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May 25, 2010 NACA
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eye 266

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In 1954, the fifth and final of the NACA's Colliers was awarded to Richard Travis Whitcomb of Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the development of the Whitcomb area rule—a ''powerful, simple, and useful method of reducing greatly the sharp increase in wing drag heretofore associated with transonic flight, and which constituted a major factor requiring great reserves of power to attain supersonic speeds.'' Here Whitcomb is shown in the 8-foot High-Speed Tunnel in April 1955...
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1954.html
NASA Images
May 25, 2010 NACA
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In 1951, the Collier Trophy was awarded again to John Stack and associates at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the development and use of the slotted-throat wind tunnel. Stack, head of Compressibility Research Division, was a hard-charging man whose attitude toward unproven technology was usually, ''Let's try the damn thing and see if we can make it work.'' Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1951.html
NASA Images
May 25, 2010 NACA
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eye 202

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In 1947, the Collier Trophy was awarded to John Stack of Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for research to determine the physical laws affecting supersonic flight. Lawrence D. Bell and Chuck Yeager also shared in this trophy for their work on supersonic flight. This image is of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Who -- Chuck Yeager
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1947.html
NASA Images
May 25, 2010 NACA
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In 1946, the Collier Trophy was awarded to Lewis A. Rodert of Ames Aeronautical Laboratory for the development of an efficient wing deicing system. This Consolidated B-24 Liberator (pictured) was modified by the NACA for studies on the effects of inflight icing on all aerosurfaces such as the wings, tail, engine cowling, nose, props and antenna. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1946.html
NASA Images
May 25, 2010 NACA
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In 1929, President Herbert Hoover presented the Collier Trophy to Joseph Ames, chairman of the NACA, for the development of low-drag cowling for radial air-cooled aircraft engines. The Collier has been awarded annually since 1911 by the National Aeronautic Association ''for the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles.'' Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/collier_1929.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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This analog computing machine—a very early version of the modern computer—was located in the Fuel Systems Building at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland now the John H. Glenn Research Center. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Where -- Glenn Research Center GRC
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery10.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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The NACA's seal. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery9.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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Many of Langley Laboratory's early experiments focused on ways to reduce aircraft drag. One method was to place a cowling or covering over the engine cylinder heads, much like the hood over the engine of a car. By the end of September 1928, wind tunnel tests of cowling #10 showed a dramatic reduction in drag. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery8.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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Among the famous visitors to NACA facilities: Fred E. Weick, head of the Propeller Research Tunnel section from 1925-1929, in the rear cockpit; aviator Charles Lindbergh, in front cockpit; and Tom Hamilton, aviator and eventual aircraft/airport manufacturer, standing. Image Credit: NACA
Topic: Where -- Hamilton
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery7.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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A semispan airplane model and flow-direction vane mounted on the wing of a P-51D airplane for transonic tests by wing-flow method. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery6.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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Amelia Earhart front row, center on the steps of Langley Research Building in 1928 before a tour. Legend has it that, during the tour, part of her raccoon fur coat was sucked into a high speed wind tunnel. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery5.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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The historical evolution of airfoil sections from 1908-1944. The last two shapes are low-drag sections designed to have laminar, uninterrupted flow over 60 to 70 percent of chord on both the upper and lower surfaces. The NACA airfoils subsequently influenced the design of every modern aircraft wing. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery4.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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Twin jet exhausts are inclined toward the ground to simulate takeoff conditions for certain engine installations and to identify options for decreasing takeoff distances. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery3.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NACA
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Kitty Joyner, an electrical engineer for the NACA, at work in 1952. Image Credit: NACA
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery2.html
NASA Images
May 17, 2010 NASA
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In this photo taken on March 15, 1929, a quartet of NACA staff conduct tests on airfoils in the Variable Density Tunnel, which, in 1985, was declared a National Historic Landmark. l to r Eastman Jacobs, Shorty Defoe, Malvern Powell, and Harold Turner.
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/naca2010_gallery.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Dr. Robert H. Goddard's rocket is in the tower, ready for the July 17, 1929, test at Auburn, Massachusetts. This was the fourth flight of a liquid-propellant rocket. Rocks were piled on pipes directly under the nozzle, on a frame suspended from the two 3/8 inch pipe guides to keep the latter as straight as possible by the tension produced in this way. The noise from this particular rocket launch attracted the attention of the entire community. When the public grew concerned over the potential...
Topics: Rocket Launches, Where -- Massachusetts
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000138.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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On December 17, 1903, at 10:30 am at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, this airplane arose for a few seconds to make the first powered, heavier-than-air controlled flight in history. The first flight lasted 12 seconds and flew a distance of 120 feet. Orville Wright piloted the historic flight while his brother, Wilbur, observed. The brothers took three other flights that day, each flight lasting longer than the other with the final flight going a distance of 852 feet in 59 seconds. This flight was...
Topics: Unique Aircraft, Early Aerospace-Pioneers, Where -- North Carolina
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000128.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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NASA was formed in 1958 from the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA. The members of the Main Committee of NACA which met in Washington, D.C. on April 18, 1929 include from left to right: John F. Victory, Secretary Dr. William F.Durand Dr. Orville Wright Dr. George K. Burgess Brig. Gen. William E. Gillmore Maj. Gen. James E. Fechet Dr. Joesph S. Ames, Chairman Rear Adm. David W. Taylor, USN (Ret.), Vice Chairman Capt. Emory S. Land Rear Adm. William A. Moffet Dr. Samual W....
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NASA Management, Where -- Washington
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001703.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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On the barrel to the left is Edward R. Ray Sharp, a future engineer in charge of the NACA's Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio.
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NACA-LaRC, Where -- Ohio
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001396.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Left to right: Eastman Jacobs, Shorty Defoe, Malvern Powell, and Harold Turner. In this photo taken on March 15, 1929, a quartet of NACA staff conduct tests on airfoils in the Variable Density Tunnel. (In 1985, the Variable Density Tunnel was declared a National Historic Landmark.) Eastman Jacobs is sitting (far left) at the control panel'.
Topics: NACA-LaRC, Wind Tunnels-Exterior
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001242.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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The first aircraft purchased by the NACA was this Fairchild FC-2W2. Marked as "NACA 26," this aircraft was the first to be flown in a NACA paint scheme. The colors applied to this Fairchild were blue fuselage, silver wings and tail. The wing had a yellow stripe down the middle, from tip to tip. A red, white and blue shield was added to the rudder. It was used by NACA in an effort to correlate wind tunnel and flight aerodynamic characteristics.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001395.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Lockheed Vega Air Express. Frank M. Hawks broke the transcontinental speed record in this plane. It was the first production aircraft with the NACA cowling, 1929.
Topics: NACA-LaRC, What -- VEGA
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001390.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Metal workers welding pipe pause for the camera in this 1929 view.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001381.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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The Langley flight crew installs an experimental low-drag cowling on the Fokker trimotor, 1929. Such cowlings increased fuel efficiency and overall performance.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001393.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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eye 1,232

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Group photo on steps of Langley Research Building in 1928. front row, left to right: E.A. Meyers, Elton Miller, Amelia Earhart, Henry Reid, and Lt. Col. Jacob W.S. Wuest. Back row, left to right: Carlton Kemper, Raymond Sharp, Thomas Carroll, (unknown person behind A.E.), and Fred Weick. During her tour of Langley in November 1928, Amelia Earhart had part of her raccoon fur coat sucked into the 11 Inch High Speed Tunnel. To her left are Henry Reid and Co. Jacob Wuest, Langley base commander.
Topics: Women, VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001389.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The NACA cowling as applied to a Curtiss AT-5A at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, October 1928.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001724.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA Broskie
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The youthful engineer-in-charge Henry J.E. Reid sits at his desk, April 1928.
Topics: NACA-LaRC, NASA-Center-Directors, Who -- Henry J.E. Reid
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001386.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Drag can present a major problem for aircraft and many of Langley's early research was focused upon reducing aircraft drag. One method was to place a cowling or covering over the engine cylinder heads, much like the hood over the engine of a car. By the end of September 1928, tests of cowling #10 in the PRT showed a dramatic reduction in drag.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001387.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Langley metal workers fabricated NACA cowlings for early test installations. Cowlings reduced drag and increased aircraft performance.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001394.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Curtiss Hawk with NACA Cowling in 1928.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001388.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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At work in the metal shop making engine cowlings. The cowlings smoothed airflow over the engine and reduced drag. This increased speed and fuel efficiency.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001392.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Originally the Wright Apache had a propeller spinner over the hub and a metal jacket covering the crankcase and inner portions of its engine cylinders. An LMAL test pilot prepares to fly the Apache to high altitude.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001382.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Fred E. Weick head of the Propeller Research Tunnel section, 1925-1929, in rear cockpit. Charles Lindbergh in front. Tom Hamilton is standing.
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NACA-LaRC, Where -- Hamilton
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001302.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The H. Weston Lumber Co., founded in 1848, was said to be the largest in the United States. The huge sawmill was the hub of activity and employment in the community of Logtown, one of five communities that existed where Stennis Space Center is now located. The lumber company finally closed in 1928. In October 1961, the federal government announced its decision to locate a national rocket test facility in Hancock County, Mississippi. The towns of Logtown, Gainesville, Westonia, Napoleon, and...
Topics: Historical-Stennis, Where -- United States of America, Where -- Stennis Space Center (SSC), Where...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-000541.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Langley administrative office in 1927. Note the blueprints on the table at right lower corner, and rubber stamp tree on the man's desk in left foreground.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001385.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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A Langley researcher ponders the future, in mid-1927, of the Sperry M-1 Messenger, the first full-scale airplane tested in the Propeller Research Tunnel. Standing in the exit cone is Elton W. Miller, Max M. Munk's successor as chief of aerodynamics.
Topics: NACA-LaRC, Wind Tunnels-Interior, Aeronautical Research, What -- MESSENGER
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001383.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Modified Model T Ford with Huck starter, shown starting a Vought VE-7.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001384.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Max M. Munk, chief of aerodynamics, in his office at Langley, 1926.
Topic: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001301.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Dr. Robert H. Goddard and a liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of...
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, Rocket Launches, Where -- Massachusetts
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000132.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The NACA's and LMAL's first civilian test pilot, Thomas Carroll.
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001379.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Clad in a fur lined leather flying suit with oxygen facepiece, NACA test pilot Paul King prepares to take to the air in a Vought VE-7.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001380.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Hangar construction at Langley in 1922.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001378.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Workmen in the patternmakers' shop manufacture a wing skeleton for a Thomas-Morse MB-3 airplane for pressure distribution studies in flight, June 1922.
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001376.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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John F. Victory (1892-1974) was the NACA's first employee and the only executive secretary it ever had.
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001303.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Active aircraft biplane, NACA 29-38131, with model wing suspended during flight.
Topic: Unique Aircraft
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001374.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Langley Laboratory's first wind tunnel, a replica of a ten year old British design, became operational in June 1920.
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001375.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in session at Washington to discuss plans to place America foremost in the development of avaition. A report was heard from Dr. Ames, chairman of the executive committee, on research work to develop the new heavy oil fuel injection aircraft engine which does away with carburetor and spark plugs, and will lesson the fire hazard. Dr. S.W. Stratton, secretary of the committee and director of the Bureau of Standards, is shown seated at the extreme...
Topics: VIPs-People at NASA-NACA, NASA Management, What -- Columbia, Where -- Washington
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001705.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Test section and balance for Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT) #1. The 5 foot diameter circular test section and control room of NACA Tunnel No. 1. A Curtiss "Jenny" model can be seen mounted in the test section. Both a real JN4H and a highly accurate model were put through identical tests. The NACA engineers used this data to make the necessary corrections to the wind tunnel.
Topics: NACA-LaRC, Wind Tunnels-Interior
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001723.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Goggles at the ready, this Langley test pilot and engineer conducted research business high above the ground. In the early years the flight research team was usually made up of a test pilot (Thomas Carroll, front cockpit) and an engineer (John W. Gus Crowley, Jr.).
Topic: NACA-LaRC
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001377.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Robert H. Goddard with vacuum tube apparatus he built in 1916 to research rocket efficiency. Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard is commonly referred to as the father of American rocketry. The same year he built the apparatus, Goddard wrote a study requesting funding from the Smithsonian Institution so that he could continue his rocket research, which he had begun in 1907 while still a student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. A brilliant physicist, with a unique genius for invention, Goddard may...
Topic: Rocket Propulsion
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001338.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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Dr. Joseph Sweetman Ames at his desk at the NACA headquarters. Dr. Ames was a founding member of NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), appointed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1915. Ames took on NACA's most challenging assignments but mostly represented physics. He chaired the Foreign Service Committee of the newly-founded National Research Council, oversaw the NACA's patent cross-licensing plan that allowed manufacturers to share technologies. Ames expected the NACA to encourage...
Topics: NASA Management, NACA-ARC, Where -- Ames Research Center (ARC), Where -- California
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001639.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NACA
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The first meeting of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA.) in the Office of The Secretary Of War April 23, 1915. Brig. Gen. George P. Scriven was elected as the temporary Chairman of the NACA and Dr. Charles D. Walcott (not pictured), Secretary of the Smithsonian, was elected Chairman of the NACA Executive Committee. After the Wright Brothers historic first flight in 1903, the United States began to fall behind in aeronautical research. With the beginning of World War I the...
Topics: NASA Management, NACA-ARC, What -- Columbia, Where -- United States of America, Where -- New York,...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2000-001571.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The Wright Flyer demonstrations at Fort Myer, Virginia on September 3, 1908. In January 1907 the Wright Brothers submitted a bid to the U.S. War Department to design a plane for $25,000. This bid came as a response to a War Department request issued a month earlier for a "Heavier-than-air Flying Machine." While Wilbur Wright went off to Paris to promote the Wright Flyer, Orville Wright stayed in Dayton, Ohio to design a plane for the Army Signal Corps. By August Orville's plane was...
Topics: Unique Aircraft, Early Aerospace-Pioneers, Where -- Virginia, Where -- Paris, Where -- Ohio
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000124.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Submitted in 1903, the Wright brothers finally received this patent in 1906 for their airplane that they tested in North Carolina. Their application included detailed descriptions of their aeronautical innovations. With the receipt of their patent, the Wrights had control over their design- they could grant or deny permission to use their design and were entitled to a royalty. Nevertheless, the Wrights started a large legal suit against Glenn Curtiss after he designed a plane that had many of...
Topics: Miscellaneous-1, Aerospace-Pioneers, Where -- North Carolina
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00067.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Jerrie Cobb poses next to a Mercury spaceship capsule. Although she never flew in space, Cobb, along with twenty-four other women, underwent physical tests similar to those taken by the Mercury astronauts with the belief that she might become an astronaut trainee. All the women who participated in the program, known as First Lady Astronaut Trainees, were skilled pilots. Dr. Randy Lovelace, a NASA scientist who had conducted the official Mercury program physicals, administered the tests at his...
Topics: Women, Mercury-Program, What -- Mercury
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2004-00026.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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NASA Project Manager Fred Ahmay holds a Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) container in which C. elegans nemotodes (round worms) were found. The container was part of a middeck experiment that was among Columbia's debris recovered in East Texas. The worms were found alive after flying on Columbia's last mission, STS-107. The experiment was designed to verify a new synthetic nutrient solution for an International Space Station "model" specimen planned to be used extensively for...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- STS-107, What -- International Space Station (ISS), What -- Columbia,...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00085.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 Renee Bouchard
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Ronald D. Dittemore (right), a 26-year NASA veteran, announces his intention to step aside as the Space Shuttle Program Manager at the Johnson Space Center in Houston to pursue other opportunities. Also pictured at the Washington, DC announcement is Michael Kostelnik, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs. Dittemore, who has served as the Shuttle Program Manager for more than four years, will remain in his current position until the...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- International Space Station (ISS), What --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00087.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Members of a US Forest Service search team walk a grid during a Columbia recovery search near the Hemphill, Texas site. The group is accompanied by a space program worker able to identify potential hazards of Shuttle parts. Workers from every NASA Center and numerous federal, state, and local agencies searched for Columbia's debris in the recovery effort. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where -- Texas
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00082.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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One of the Space Shuttle Columbia's Main Engine powerheads found on the grounds of Fort Polk, Louisiana. The 800-pound unit was one of the easternmost-recovered pieces of debris from Columbia. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00076.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. "Hal" Gehman Jr., Chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (left), and Board member Dr. John Logsdon, director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, listen to experts' testimonies on STS-107 For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where -- Washington
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00083.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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A view of the Astronaut Memorial Space Mirror at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The memorial is a national tribute to the 17 American astronauts who gave their lives in the quest to explore space. The memorial has received added attention since the loss of the Columbia crew on February 1, 2003, when they perished in an explosion as they were returning to Earth from mission STS-107. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- Earth, What -- STS-107, What -- Challenger, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00078.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The Columbia Accident Investigation Board gathers for a second day for its third public hearing, held in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The CAIB was set up to examine STS-107 and analyze exploratory tests. Navy Admiral Harold W. "Hal" Gehman Jr. was designated as the Chairman of the Board. From left to right in this photo sit Board Members Steven B. Wallace, Scott Hubbard, Dr. John Logsdon, Rear Admiral Stephen Turcotte, Hal Gehman, General Duane Deal, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, and Maj. General...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, Who -- Sally Ride, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where -- Florida, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00079.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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A close-up camera view shows Space Shuttle Columbia as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-107. Launch occurred on schedule at 10:39 EST. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Rocket Launches, Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00080.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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This image shows the grid on the floor of the RLV Hangar as workers in the field bring in pieces of Columbia's debris. The Columbia Reconstruction Project Team is attempting to reconstruct the bottom of the orbiter as part of the investigation into the accident that caused the destruction of Columbia and the loss of its crew as it returned to Earth on mission STS-107. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- Earth, What -- STS-107
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00081.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr., Chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, addresses the press at the Shuttle Landing Facility before departing Kennedy Space Center. Gehman and the other members of the Board visited sites at KSC to become familiar with Shuttle processing procedures. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on February 1, 2003 during reentry. For more...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00084.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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View of the debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia in the hangar at Barksdale Air Force Base in Shreveport, Louisiana. The debris was collected and cataloged prior to shipment to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00075.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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View of the Recessional at a special memorial ceremony honoring the Space Shuttle Columbia crew at the Washington National Cathedral. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00077.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe addresses the Johnson Space Center employees with encouraging words in the Teague auditorium following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia crew on February 1, 2003. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, Who -- Administrator Sean O'Keefe, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00090.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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President George W. Bush, before the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts, stated, "Each of these astronauts had the daring and discipline required of their calling. Each of them knew that great endeavors are inseparable from great risks. And each of them accepted those risks willingly, even joyfully, in the cause of discovery." For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [...
Topics: Presidents, Columbia STS-107, What -- Columbia, What -- Discovery, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00091.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a massive collection of flowers, balloons, flags, signs, and other arrangements were placed at the Johnson Space Center sign at the Center's main entrance. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107, Where --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00089.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Through a cloud-washed blue sky above Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles toward space on mission STS-107. Following the countdown, liftoff occurred on-time at 10:39 EST. Experiments in the SPACEHAB module ranged from material sciences to life sciences. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Rocket Launches, Columbia STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Columbia, What -- STS-107
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00074.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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The STS-107 crewmembers pose for an informal crew portrait near a T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center. From the left are astronauts Rick D. Husband, mission Commander; William C. McCool, pilot; David M. Brown, Laurel B. Clark, both mission Specialists; payload specialist Ilan Ramon; Michael P. Anderson and Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [...
Topics: Columbia STS-107, Who -- Rick D. Husband, Who -- William C. McCool, Who -- David M. Brown, Who --...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00086.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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When scientists need longer exposure times in high altitudes, they use scientific balloons like the one pictured here. Made of a super-thin polyethylene, the balloons are filled with inert helium and can be launched from almost anywhere, staying aloft for as long as 24 hours, 26 miles above the surface. Goddard Space Flight Center assumed the management of these research tools from the National Science Foundation in 1982 and now launches about 35 balloons a year. Publication information: Please...
Topic: Where -- Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000119.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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Goddard's Launch Phase Simulator or High-Capacity Centrifuge simulates vibration, G-forces and changing pressures that a spacecraft would encounter during launch and landing. To perform a test, which typically lasts one day, technicians place spacecraft components and even entire satellites in either the simulator's cylindrical test chamber (at the far left in this photo) or on its test platform at the other end (it was not installed when this photo was taken). Powered by two 1,250- horsepower...
Topics: Simulators, Aeronautical Research, Where -- Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2002-000113.html
NASA Images
Dec 8, 2009 NASA
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This is the official crew photo from Mission STS-107 on the Space Shuttle Columbia. From left to right are Mission Specialist David Brown, Commander Rick Husband, Mission Specialist Laurel Clark, Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Mission Specialist Michael Anderson, Pilot William McCool, and Israeli Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation [ http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GRINColumbiaGenExpl.html ]
Topics: Columbia STS-107, Who -- Kalpana Chawla, Who -- Ilan Ramon, What -- STS-107, What -- Space Shuttle...
Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00070.html