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Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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Mysterious chalkings have been reported throughout NASA Langley Research Center. The puzzling messages appeared overnight and urge employees to take bizarre actions, such as smile, dance through crosswalks and skip to work. Safety officials tested the chalk and have confirmed that it presents no problem to employees. Langley spokesperson Marny Skora says management encourages employees to take risks, noting that as one chalking indicates, "Every noble work is at first impossible."...
Topic: Where -- Langley Research Center (LaRC)
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/researchernews/chalkings-teachers.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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As project Mercury began in the late 1950s, Langley was thrust full force into the national spotlight with the arrival in Hampton of the original seven astronauts. Under the tutelage of the Space Task Group, (from left front row) Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Scott Carpenter, Donald "Deke" Slayton, Gordon Cooper, (back row) Alan Shepard, Walter Schirra and John Glenn were trained at Langley to operate the space machines that would thrust them beyond the protective environment of...
Topics: Who -- Scott Carpenter, Who -- Gordon Cooper, Who -- Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Who -- John H. Glenn,...
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/R oad2Apollo-04.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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The challenge: fly humans a quarter of a million miles, make a pinpoint landing on a strange planet, blast off and return home safely after an eight-day voyage through space. This photograph of Lunar Excursion Module pilot Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface was taken by Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong. Credit: NASA
Topics: Who -- Buzz Aldrin, Who -- Neil A. Armstrong, What -- Apollo 11, Apollo 11
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/Road2Apollo-01.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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Even before the Space Task Group was formally organized, Langley had begun to develop the concept of the "Little Joe" test vehicle that became the workhorse of the nation's initial humans-in-space program -- Mercury. Little Joe, a solid fuel rocket, carried instrumented payloads to various altitudes and allowed engineers to check the operation of the Mercury capsule escape rocket and recovery systems. Here Langley technicians construct the Little Joe capsules in-house in Langley's...
Topic: What -- Mercury
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/Roa d2Apollo-06.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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The Scout program began in 1957 to build an inexpensive sounding rocket to carry small research payloads to high altitudes. Scout would eventually assist the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs by testing reentry materials, evaluating methods of protecting spacecraft from micrometeoroids, and examining ways of overcoming radio blackouts as a space capsule reentered the atmosphere. The first Scout launched at Wallops Island July 1, 1960. Credit: NASA
Topics: What -- Mercury, What -- Gemini
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/Road2Apollo-02a.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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After Mercury came Gemini, the project that would put to the test the maneuvers that would be required if Apollo was to be successful. Gemini astronauts would have to practice the rendezvous and docking techniques necessary to link two spacecraft. Langley researchers built the Rendezvous Docking Simulator giving astronauts a routine opportunity to pilot dynamically-controlled scale-model vehicles in an environment that closely paralleled that of space. Credit: NASA
Topics: What -- Mercury, What -- Gemini, What -- Opportunity
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/road2apollo-08.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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Almost 40 years have passed since July 20, 1969, when the lunar module "Eagle" carrying Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin gingerly made its way down to the Sea of Tranquility, landing humans on the moon for the first time. "From launch to splashdown, there was no aspect of the Apollo mission that scientists, engineers and technicians at NASA's Langley Research Center had not helped to develop in one way or another," said historian James R. Hansen, author of...
Topics: Who -- Neil A. Armstrong, Who -- Buzz Aldrin, What -- Apollo 11, What -- Moon, Where -- Langley...
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/Road2Apollo-00.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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Project Fire explored the intense heat of atmospheric reentry and its effects on would-be spacecraft materials. Although the ultimate tests involved Atlas rockets carrying recoverable reentry packages, the flight tests from Cape Canaveral were preceded by a series of important wind-tunnel tests at Langley. Here technicians ready materials for a high-temperature wind tunnel test. Credit: NASA
Topic: What -- Atlas
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/road2apollo-03.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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The most successful of the pre-Apollo probes, Lunar Orbiter photographically mapped the equatorial regions of the moon. These maps, compiled at Langley, provided the detailed topographical information needed to pinpoint the best landing sites on the moon, including the exact spot in the Sea of Tranquility chosen for Apollo 11. Credit: NASA
Topics: What -- Apollo 11, What -- Lunar Orbiter, What -- Moon
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/Road2Apollo-09.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
by NASA
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A full-scale model of the Mercury capsule was tested in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Full-Scale Wind Tunnel. Managed at Langley Research Center, the objectives of the Mercury program were quite specific -- to orbit a crewed spacecraft around the Earth, to investigate the ability of humans to function in space and to recover both human and spacecraft safely. Project Mercury accomplished the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Credit: NASA
Topics: Who -- John H. Glenn, What -- Mercury, What -- Earth, Where -- Langley Research Center (LaRC)
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/road2apollo-05.html
Langley Research Center Media Archive
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In the opinion of many space historians, Langley's most important contribution to the Apollo program was its development of Lunar Orbit Rendezvous (LOR). Here, John Houbolt explains the critical weight-saving advantage of the LOR concept. The basic premise was to fire an assembly of three spacecraft into Earth orbit on top of a single powerful rocket. Without this successful mission concept, the United States may still have landed humans on the moon, but it probably would not have happened by...
Topics: What -- Earth, What -- Moon, Where -- United States of America
Source: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/home/roadtoapollo-07.html