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NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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Teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, the Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have developed a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions? a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in...
Topics: What -- Space Shuttle Orbiter, What -- Earth, What -- Saturn, What -- Moon, Where -- Washington,...
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=2938
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Moon, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Where -- United States...
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1468
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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A cutaway illustration of Saturn 1 launch vehicle mission. The Saturn I, first of the Saturn launch vehicles' family, is a two-stage vehicle with a low-earth-orbit payload capability of approximately 25,000 pounds. The research and development program was plarned in two phases or blocks; one for first stage development (Block I) and the second for first and second stage development (Block II). The S-I (first) stage consisted of a cluster of nine propellant tanks and eight H-1 engines built by...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Earth, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1523
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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This image is a close-up view of the test firing of a J-2 engine. The J-2, developed by Rocketdyne under the direction of Marshall Space Flight Center, was propelled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. A single J-2 was utilized in the S-IVB stage (the second stage for the Saturn IB and third stage for the Saturn V) and in a cluster of five for the second stage (S-II) of the Saturn V. Initially rated at 200,000 pounds of thrust, the engine was later uprated in the Saturn V program to 230,000...
Topics: What -- Saturn, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1799
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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This cutaway illustration shows the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage with detailed callouts of the components. The S-IC Stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.
Topic: What -- Saturn
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1075
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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Saturn 1 Launch summary of research and development flights and operational flights. NASA's initial development plan for the Saturn program had called for the Saturn I to serve as a stepping stone to the development of larger Saturn vehicles ultimately known as the Saturn IB and Saturn V. The Saturn I launch vehicle proved the feasibility of the clustered engines and provided significant new payload lifting capabilities.
Topic: What -- Saturn
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=995
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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H-1 engine major components with callouts (chart 1). The H-1 engine was used in a cluster of eight on the the first stage of Saturn I (S-I stage) and Saturn IB (S-IB stage). The engines were arranged in a double pattern: four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern and each outer engine was gimbaled. Each H-1 engine had a thrust of 188,000 pounds for a combined thrust of...
Topic: What -- Saturn
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=997
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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This undated cutaway drawing illustrates the Saturn IB launch vehicle with its two booster stages, the S-IB and S-IVB. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.
Topics: What -- Saturn, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1028
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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A pioneer of America's space program, Dr. von Braun stands by the five F-1 engines of the Saturn V launch vehicle. This Saturn V vehicle is an actual test vehicle which has been displayed at the U.S. Space Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Designed and developed by Rocketdyne under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, a cluster of five F-1 engines was mounted on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage. The engines measured 19-feet tall by 12.5-feet at the nozzle exit and burned 15...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Moon, Where -- Alabama, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=2330
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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This image is an artist's conception of the Pegasus, meteoroid detection satellite, in orbit with meteoroid detector extended. The satellite, a payload for Saturn I SA-8, SA-9, and SA-10 missions, was used to obtain data on frequency and penetration of the potentially hazardous micrometeoroids in low Earth orbits and to relay the information back to Earth.
Topics: What -- Pegasus, What -- Saturn, What -- Earth
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1526
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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This undated chart provides a description of the Saturn IB and Saturn V's Instrument Unit (IU) and its major components. Designed by NASA at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Instrument Unit, sandwiched between the S-IVB stage and the Apollo spacecraft, served as the Saturn's "nerve center" providing guidance and control, command and sequence of vehicle functions, telemetry, and environmental control.
Topics: What -- Saturn, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1027
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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The business end of a Second Stage (S-II) slowly emerges from the shipping container as workers prepare to transport the Saturn V component to the testing facility at MSFC. The Second Stage (S-II) underwent vibration and engine firing tests. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.
Topics: What -- Saturn, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=2198
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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During the Apollo era Marshall Space Flight Center's engineers developed the Magnetomotive Hammer to remove distortions from Saturn V bulkhead gore segments. Using an intense magnetic field, the Hammer removed manufacturing distortions from rejected segments which otherwise would have been discarded at a cost of $30,000 each. Various automobile, ship and aircraft manufacturers adoped the technology for commercial use.
Topics: What -- Saturn, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=644
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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Originally devised to observe Saturn stage separation during Apollo flights, Marshall Space Flight Center's Miniature Television Camera, measuring only 4 x 3 x 1 1/2 inches, quickly made its way to the commercial telecommunications market.
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- TV Camera, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=646
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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H-1 Engine major components with callouts (chart 1): The H-1 engine was used in a cluster of eight on the the first stage of Saturn I (S-I stage) and Saturn IB (S-IB stage). The engines were arranged in a double pattern: four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern and each outer engine was gimbaled. Each H-1 engine had a thrust of 188,000 pounds for a combined thrust of...
Topic: What -- Saturn
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=996
NASA Images
by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
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A cutaway illustration of Saturn I launch vehicle characteristics: The Saturn I, first of the Saturn launch vehicles' family, is a two-stage vehicle with a low-earth-orbit payload capability of approximately 25,000 pounds. The research and development program was plarned in two phases or blocks; one for first stage development (Block I) and the second for first and second stage development (Block II). The S-I (first) stage consisted of a cluster of nine propellant tanks and eight H-1 engines...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Earth, Where -- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
Source: http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1522