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JSC2004-E-27943 (21-25 June 2004) --- With an instructor leading the way, several of NASA?s 2004 class of astronaut candidates get their turn in the water once more during water survival training at Pensacola Naval Air Station.
Source: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/behindthescenes/training/html/jsc2004e27943.html
NASA Audio Collection
by john.l.stoll@nasa.gov
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05-12-22_Space-to-Grounds.zip
Topic: Expedition 67 ACR Collection
NASA Audio Collection
by john.l.stoll@nasa.gov
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05-26-22_Space-to-Grounds.zip
Topic: Expedition 67 ACR Collection
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/MSSS
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This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. The lower half of the scene slopes down toward the lower left. In this image, the north polar residual cap surface (white) is seen to grade downhill into exposures of layered terrain. The layers are the dark, bumpy bands in the lower 2/3 of the picture. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image covers an area only 750 meters (820 yards) wide by 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) long at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6...
Topics: What -- Polar, What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, Where -- California,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02371
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/MSSS
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On Mars, Northern Hemisphere Summer (and Southern Hemisphere Winter) began on December 16, 2000. In this December holiday season, many children across the U.S. and elsewhere are perhaps anticipating an annual visit from a generous and jolly red-suited soul from the Earth's North Pole. As the December holidays were approaching, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) was busy acquiring new views of the region around the martian north pole. The three best views obtained this...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Polar
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02899
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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12 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a mid-summer view of layered terrain in the south polar region of Mars. The general hypothesis that has been around since the Mariner missions to Mars in the late 1960s and early 1970s is that the layered material in the polar regions is composed of some combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. Alternatively, the layers might be ancient sedimentary rock, perhaps protected from erosion by millennia of...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Polar, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02914
NASA Images
by NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team
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These MISR images from May 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 7447) include portions of southern Wyoming, central Colorado, and western Nebraska. The top view is from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. The bottom image is a stereo "anaglyph" generated using data from the nadir and 46-degree-forward cameras. Viewing the anaglyph with red/blue glasses (red filter over your left eye) gives a 3-D effect. To facilitate stereo viewing, the images have been oriented with north at the left....
Topics: What -- MISR, What -- Terra, What -- STEREO B, What -- STEREO, What -- Earth, Where -- Wyoming,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03406
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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12 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a banded surface in Argyre Planitia, the second largest impact basin in the martian southern hemisphere. The bands are the erosional expression of layered, perhaps sedimentary, rock. <i>Location near</i>: 55.8S, 45.4W <i>Image width</i>: width: ~3 km (~1.9 mi) <i>Illumination from</i>: upper left...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03631
NASA Images
by NASA/Ames Research Center
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Stardust Capsule Return as seen from NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory with a mission to explore the conditions during reentry from the light emitted by the fireball caused when the capsule streaked through the sky. The aircraft was located near the end of the trajectory, just outside of UTTR. The participating researchers are from NASA Ames, the SETI Institute, the University of Alaska, Utah State University, Lockheed Martin, U.S. Air Force Academy, the University of Kobe (Japan), and Stuttgart...
Topics: What -- Stardust Capsule, Where -- Alaska, Where -- Utah, Where -- Japan, Where -- Germany
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03668
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD
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Quick Time Movie for PIA02117 Journey to a Comet This movie shows Deep Impact's approach to comet Tempel 1. It is made up of images taken by the spacecraft's medium-resolution camera from May 1 to July 2, 3:50 Universal Time. The spacecraft detected three outbursts during this time period, on June 14, June 22 and July 2. The outbursts appear as flickers or bursts of light. The movie ends during the middle of the final outburst.
Topics: What -- Deep Impact, What -- Medium Resolution camera
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02117
NASA Images
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Landsat 1 (originally named the Earth Resources Technology Satellite, or ERTS) was the first of what was to become a series of satellites designed to map and monitor the Earth's land surfaces. This view of Los Angeles and vicinity is a scene acquired by a single pass of Landsat 1 on 25 June 1974. The image is derived from visible and reflected infrared light and is displayed with the visible green, the visible red, and an infrared channel coded as blue, green, and red, respectively. Healthy...
Topics: What -- Landsat 1, What -- Earth, What -- Landsat, Where -- Los Angeles, Where -- San Jos?
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02988
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
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Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope. Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet. This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on...
Topics: What -- Io, What -- Jupiter, What -- Cassini, What -- Galileo, What -- Moon, Where -- Jet...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02860
NASA Images
by NASA
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Stratus clouds are common in the Arctic during the summer months, and are important modulators of the arctic climate. This image pair from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was acquired on August 23, 2000, and shows a region of stratified clouds situated near the boundary of the permanent polar ice pack to the north of the Chukchi and East Siberian Seas. At top is a natural-color view captured by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. At bottom, a stereo anaglyph enables...
Topics: What -- MISR, What -- Polar, What -- STEREO A, What -- Terra, What -- STEREO, What -- Sun, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03748
NASA Images
by NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team
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The Amery Ice Shelf is an important dynamic system responsible for draining about 16% of the grounded East Antarctic ice sheet through only 2% of its coastline. Most of the mass input to the system occurs from the Lambert and several other glaciers. Mass loss from the system occurs through basal melting and iceberg calving. These images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray the ice shelf front on October 6, 2001 (top) and September 29, 2002 (bottom), and illustrate...
Topics: What -- MISR, What -- Earth, What -- Terra, What -- Polar, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03729
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/MSSS
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Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbits around the red planet 12 times a day. Each orbit goes from pole to pole. Over the course of a single day, the wide angle cameras of the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system take 24 pictures--12 red and 12 blue--that are assembled to create a daily global map. Such global views are used to monitor the martian weather and observe changes in the patterns of frost and dust distribution on the surface. These two pictures are examples of what Mars looks like in late...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Polar
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03755
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/MSSS
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Full size (780 KBytes) This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows a field of dark sand dunes on the floor of Kaiser Crater in southeastern Noachis Terra. The steepest slopes on each dune, the slip faces, point toward the east, indicating that the strongest winds that blow across the floor of Kaiser move sand in this direction. Wind features of three different scales are visible in this image: the largest (the dunes) are moving across a hard surface...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Crater, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03751
NASA Images
by NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team
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Large smoke plumes were produced by the Blackjack complex fire in southeastern Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp on May 8, 2002. Smoke from the fires, (which contributed to hazy skies across much of north Florida) is apparent in this image pair from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer. The fires started in late April, and had grown to consume about 95,000 acres of swampland and longleaf pine forest by May 20. Fire is a natural part of the swamp ecosystem, however, and a number of key plant and...
Topics: What -- STEREO A, What -- STEREO, What -- Terra, Where -- Florida, Where -- Georgia
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03709
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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Large areas of this Cassini synthetic aperture radar image of Titan are covered by long, dark ridges. They resemble the "cat scratches" seen in other places on Titan, but here they are longer and straighter. Spaced about 1 to 2 kilometers (0.6 to 1 miles) apart, they curve slightly around teardrop-shaped bright terrain, giving the impression of a Japanese garden of sand raked around boulders. The bright material appears to be high-standing rough material that the ridges bend around....
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Titan, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03567
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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16 August 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 269 during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 269 occurs in mid-August 2005. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Sun
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04149
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-379, 2 June 2003 This color-enhanced composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images shows dust-raising events--small dust "storms" and a few very large dust devils--in the Syria/Claritas region around 2 p.m. (1400) local time on May 21, 2003. The region is southwest of the Labyrinthus Noctis, near 14S, 108W. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left; winds were blowing from the west/southwest when the picture was taken....
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04552
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-498, 29 September 2003 Today, 29 September 2003, is the first day of southern summer, and the first day of northern winter on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in Syria Planum near 12.9S, 102.7W. The volcano and surrounding terrain have been thickly mantled by dust; this dust has subsequently been eroded so that it appears textured rather than smooth. The thin, light streaks that crisscross the image are the...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, Where -- Syria
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04768
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-509, 10 October 2003 This April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in a crater north of Syrtis Major near 27.1N, 297.2W. The steepest slopes on each dune face toward the bottom/lower left of the image, indicating that the dominant winds that influenced their formation came from the north (the top of the image). Layers are exposed in a butte at the lower right corner of the picture; this butte is a remnant of layered...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Crater
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04791
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-350, 4 May 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Becquerel Crater of western Arabia Terra. These materials were deposited in the crater some time in the distant past, and later eroded to their present form. They probably consist of fine-grained sediments; they could have been deposited directly from dust and/or volcanic ash settling out of the martian atmosphere, or silt and sand settling to the...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Crater, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04501
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-428, 21 July 2003 This June 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polygonal pattern developed in seasonal carbon dioxide frost in the martian southern hemisphere. The frost accumulated during the recent southern winter; it is now spring, and the carbon dioxide frost is subliming away. This image is located near 80.4S, 200.2W; it is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across.
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04655
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003 This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04637
NASA Images
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<a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/archive/PIA04298.mpeg"/> Animation This movie shows the daytime temperature of the surface of Mars as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. These temperatures clearly show the growth and retreat of the martian northern and southern polar ice caps. The caps grow in winter and are composed of carbon dioxide ice with temperatures as low as minus 125 degrees Celsius (minus...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), What...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04298
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-340, 24 April 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows rocky, dust-mantled buttes in a terrain similar to the Monument Valley of Utah/Arizona, located southwest of the Cerberus region. Boulders the size of large houses have tumbled down into the valleys between the buttes. The picture covers an area about 1.5 km (just under 1 mi) wide near 3.3N, 212.4W. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, Where -- The Valley
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04477
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rear hazard identification camera shows the rover's hind view of the lander platform, its nest for the past 12 sols, or martian days. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the airbag-cushioned lander, facing northwest. Note the tracks left in the martian soil by the rovers' wheels, all six of which have rolled off the lander. This is the first time the rover has touched martian soil.
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Hazard-identification Camera, What -- Spirit
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05082
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL Ocean Surface Topography Team
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The latest remote sensing data from NASA's Jason satellite show that the equatorial Pacific sea surface levels are higher, indicating warmer sea surface temperatures in the central and west Pacific Ocean. This pattern has the appearance of La Nia rather than El Nio. This contrasts with the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and U.S. West Coast where lower-than-normal sea surface levels and cool ocean temperatures continue (indicated by blue and purple areas). The image above is a global map of sea...
Topics: What -- Jason Satellite, What -- Altimeter, What -- Earth, What -- TOPEX/Poseidon, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05071
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft passes above a portion of the planet that is rotating into the sunlight in this artist's concept illustration. The spacecraft has been orbiting Mars since October 24, 2001. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Odyssey mission for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The...
Topics: What -- Mars, What -- Spectrometer, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Where -- Washington,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04818
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-541, 11 November 2003 In some regions of Mars, dust devils create streaks by disrupting or removing thin coatings of fine, bright dust from the surface. This summertime view of terrain in southern Noachis Terra, acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), provides an example. Streak patterns such as these are commonly created during the spring and summer in the southern hemisphere; in autumn and winter they are often erased--perhaps by...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Terra, What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04864
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Details observed in Saturn's south polar region demonstrate that this area is far from featureless. Lighter colored clouds dot the entire region, which is dominated by a central, sharply-defined circular feature. Movie sequences in which these features are captured and followed will allow wind speeds in the polar region to be measured. This image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft's narrow angle camera on May 20, 2004, from a distance of 22 million kilometers (13.7 million miles) from Saturn...
Topics: What -- Polar, What -- Cassini, What -- Saturn, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05414
NASA Images
by JPL/NASA/Cornell
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This image shows the tracks and trench marks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The rover can be seen to the lower left of the lander. The trench is visible to the upper left of the rover, which has traveled a total of 35.3 meters (116 feet) since leaving the lander on sol 7 (January 31, 2004). On sol 23 (February 16, 2004), the rover used one of its wheels to dig a trench measuring approximately 10 centimeters (4 inches) deep, 50 centimeters (20 inches)...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What -- Mars, What -- Polar, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05301
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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This dramatic view of Saturn's rings draped by the shadow of Saturn, shows brightness variations that correspond to differences in the concentration of the ring particles as they orbit the planet. The planet's western limb is visible in the upper right corner. Three of Saturn's moons can be seen here: Bright Enceladus (499 kilometers, or 310 miles across) is visible near lower right; Epimetheus (116 kilometers, or 72 miles across) appears at center left; and interior to the F ring, near the top...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Visible Light, What -- Enceladus, What -- Cassini, What -- Sun, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05417
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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12 February 2004 The somewhat concentric bands in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image may be an expression of eroded layered material. The crater in which these occur is found at middle southern latitude near the west rim of the giant Hellas impact basin. The picture is located near 36.6S, 321.2W. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left; the image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Crater
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05294
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This illustration shows the locations of the various magnets on the Mars Exploration Rover, which are: its front side, or chest; its back, near the color calibration target; and on its rock abrasion tool. Scientists will use these tools to collect dust for detailed studies. The origins of martian dust are a mystery, although it is believed to come from at least one of three sources: volcanic ash, pulverized rocks or mineral precipitates from liqiud water. By studying the dust with the rover's...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Rock Abrasion Tool
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05511
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This 3-D cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004. The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3...
Topics: What -- Navigation Camera (NC), What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05783
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Cornell
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This false-color image shows visible mineral changes between the materials that make up the rim of the impact crater known as "Endurance." The image was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity using all 13 color filters. The cyan blue color denotes basalts, whereas the dark green color denotes a mixture of iron oxide and basaltic materials. Reds and yellows indicate dusty material containing sulfates. Scientists are very interested in exploring the...
Topics: What -- Crater, What -- Panoramic Camera, What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06013
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
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16 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two large and many small mesas composed of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar cap of Mars. MGS has observed the south polar cap through three whole summers, and MOC images have shown that the scarps on these mesas retreat an average of 3 meters--some retreat faster, some a bit slower--per martian summer. The south polar cap is the most rapidly-changing landscape on Mars. These mesas are located near...
Topics: What -- Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter (MGS), What -- Surveyor, What -- Mars, What -- Polar
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05946
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Cornell
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This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows one octant of a larger panoramic image which has not yet been fully processed. The full panorama, dubbed "Lion King" was obtained on sols 58 and 60 of the mission as the rover was perched at the lip of Eagle Crater, majestically looking down into its former home. It is the largest panorama yet obtained by either rover. The octant, which faces directly into the crater, shows features as small as a few...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Panoramic Camera, What -- Crater
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05672
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The Cassini spacecraft has sighted tiny Pan, a body only 20 kilometers (12 miles) across. Pan is responsible for parting the Encke Gap in Saturn's outer A ring. The 22 narrow angle camera images making up this movie and taken in visible light were part of a sequence designed specifically to search for Pan and for small moonlets near Saturn's F ring. The Encke Gap is a relatively narrow gap, approximately 270 kilometers (168 miles) wide. Pan was discovered in 1990 in images returned by the...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Visible Light, What -- Voyager, What -- Atlas, What -- Saturn, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06084
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Saturn puts on a mesmerizing display in this image from August 7, 2004. Turbulent swirls and eddies are visible throughout the southern hemisphere. In particular, the boundary of the dark southern polar region displays a prominent oval-shaped storm near the lower right. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow angle camera at a distance of 8.4 million kilometers (5.2 million miles) from Saturn, through a filter sensitive to infrared light. The image scale is 50 kilometers (31...
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Polar, What -- Cassini, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06474
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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This false-color Cassini mosaic of Saturn's moon Enceladus captures in a single view, much of the frigid moon's diverse geology. Cratered terrain dominates most of the scene. The relatively dense accumulation of impact craters implies that this terrain is among the oldest on the moon's surface. Near the bottom of the picture is a crater 20 kilometers wide (12-mile) with a prominent dome-shaped structure in its center. The entire area is transected by a complex web of fractures and faults; some...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Moon, What -- Enceladus, What -- Crater, What -- Voyager, What -- Miranda,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06207
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS
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Piercing the ubiquitous layer of smog enshrouding Titan, these images from the Cassini visual and infrared mapping spectrometer reveals an exotic surface covered with a variety of materials in the southern hemisphere. Using near-infrared colors -- some three times deeper in the red visible to the human eye -- these images reveal the surface with unusual clarity. The color image shows a false-color combination of the three previous images. The yellow areas correspond to the hydrocarbon-rich...
Topics: What -- Titan, What -- Cassini, What -- Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06407
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Images taken during Cassini's second close approach to Titan in December 2004 have captured detailed views of the moon's intermittent clouds. The clouds seen here are at about 38 degrees south latitude on Titan. The clouds across the middle of the frame extend about 250 kilometers (155 miles). The image scale is about .6 kilometers (.4 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion...
Topics: What -- Titan, What -- Cassini, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06157
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/APL
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The magnetospheric imaging instrument onboard Cassini recently discovered a new radiation belt just above Saturn's cloud tops, up to the inner edge of the D-ring. Before this discovery, it was not anticipated that such a trapped ion population could be sustained inside the rings. This new radiation belt extends around the planet. It was detected by the emission of fast neutral atoms created as its energetic ions interact with gas clouds in the same region. Saturn's radiation belts have numerous...
Topics: What -- Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI), What -- Cassini, What -- Discovery, What -- FAST,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06421
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows a rover test drive up a manmade slope. The slope simulates one that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity will face on Mars if it is sent commands to explore rock outcrop that lies farther into "Endurance Crater." Using sand, dirt and rocks, scientists and engineers at JPL constructed the overall platform of the slope at a 25-degree angle, with a 40-degree step in the middle. The test rover successfully descended and climbed...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What -- Mars, What -- Crater, Where --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06316
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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A global detached haze layer and discrete cloud-like features high above Titan's northern terminator (day-night transition) are visible in this close-up image acquired on October 24, 2004, as the Cassini spacecraft neared its first close encounter with Titan. This image is a colorized version of an ultraviolet image released on October 25, 2004 (<a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06120">PIA06120</a>). The haze has been given colors that...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Titan, What -- Sun, What -- Polar, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06123
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Wave-like patterns in Saturn's rings and a nearly half-full Mimas are caught together in this image from Cassini. Mimas is 398 kilometers (247 miles) across. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow angle camera on Nov. 19, 2004, at a distance of approximately 4.8 million kilometers (3 million miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 29 kilometers (18 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the...
Topics: What -- Mimas, What -- Cassini, What -- Visible Light, What -- Saturn, What -- Huygens Probe, Where...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06556
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The great eye of Saturn's moon Mimas, a 130-kilometer-wide (80-mile) impact crater called Herschel, stares out from the battered moon. Several individual ringlets within the F ring are resolved here, and the small moon Atlas is also seen faintly outside the main rings. Mimas is 397 kilometers (247 miles across); the view shows principally the moon's anti-Saturn hemisphere. Atlas is 32 kilometers (20 miles) across. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Mimas, What -- Crater, What -- Atlas, What -- Saturn, What -- Visible Light,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06654
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills."" The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Spirit, What -- Mars, What -- Navigation Camera (NC),...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06715
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL
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This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of " Endurance Crater."The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through...
Topics: What -- Navigation Camera (NC), What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06866
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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This Cassini image shows the night side of Saturn's moon Dione, dimly lit by "Saturnshine": that is, reflected light from the planet lying off to the left in Cassini's field of view when this image was taken. Dione is 1,118 kilometers (695 miles) across. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 18, 2005, at a distance of approximately 1.3 million kilometers (808,000 miles) from Dione and at a Sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase,...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Moon, What -- Dione, What -- Sun, What -- Huygens Probe, What -- Saturn,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06626
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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This dramatic image shows Saturn's craggy moon Pandora skimming along the F ring's outer edge. Pandora orbits about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) exterior to the ring, but in this view is projected onto the ring. The moderately high-resolution of the image reveals the moonlet's odd shape. Pandora is 84 kilometers (52 miles) across. The image was acquired from less than a degree below the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 29,...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Visible Light, What -- Cassini, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07647
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The large Tirawa impact basin on Saturn's moon Rhea is visible at the two o'clock position in this Cassini image. Rhea is 1,528 kilometers (949 miles) across. This view shows principally the trailing hemisphere on Rhea, and is centered on the moon's equator. North is up and tilted 25 degrees to the left. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 13, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centered at 338 nanometers. The image was...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Rhea, What -- Cassini, What -- Sun, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06641
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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This view, like <a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08303">PIA08303</a>, shows Prometheus with a streamer it has created in the inner edge of the F ring. Prometheus comes close to the inner edge of the ring once per orbit, perturbing the ring particles there. In 2009, the moon's orbit is expected to carry it repeatedly into the F ring core, an event that ring scientists are eagerly awaiting. Prometheus is 102 kilometers (63 miles) across....
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Cassini, What -- Sun, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08311
NASA Images
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NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recently stopped to analyze an exposure of rock near "Beagle Crater," on a target nicknamed "Baltra." Nearly 100 sols, or Martian days, had passed since Opportunity had last analyzed one of the now-familiar rock exposures seen on the Plains of Meridiani. The rover ground a 3-millimeter-deep (0.12-inch-deep) hole in the rock using the rock abrasion tool on sol 893 (July 29, 2006) while stationed about 25 meters (82 feet) from the...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What -- Rock Abrasion Tool, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08701
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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<a href="http://ciclops.org">http://ciclops.org</a>. Fine topographic detail and color variations are revealed in this 11-image, false color mosaic taken during Cassini's second close flyby of Saturn's moon Enceladus, on March 9, 2005. This mosaic, a high-resolution cropped section of the full-disk mosaic available in <a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08354">PIA08354</a>), shows the center of the...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Enceladus, What -- Saturn, What -- Polar, What -- Cassini, What -- Sun, What...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08355
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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In their orbital ballet, Janus and Epimetheus swap positions every four years -- one moon moving closer to Saturn, the other moving farther away. The two recently changed positions (the swap occurring on January 21, 2006), and Janus will remain the innermost of the pair until 2010, when they will switch positions again. Although the moons appear to be close in the image, they are not. Janus (181 kilometers, or 113 miles across at right) is about 40,000 kilometers (25,000 miles) farther away...
Topics: What -- Moon, What -- Saturn, What -- Cassini, What -- Visible Light, What -- Huygens Probe, Where...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08170
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The A and F rings are alive with moving structures in this Cassini spacecraft view. Graceful drapes of ring material created by Prometheus are seen sliding by at left, while clumpy ringlets slip through the Encke Gap. Prometheus (102 kilometers, or 63 miles across) is all but invisible to the right of the lowest streamer seen here. This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 12 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Visible Light, What -- Saturn, What -- Sun, What -- Huygens Probe, Where...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08308
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The unlit side of the rings glows with scattered sunlight as two moons circle giant Saturn. The light reaching Cassini in this view has traveled many paths before being captured. At left, Mimas (397 kilometers, or 247 miles across) presents its dark side. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across), on the far side of the rings, is lit by "Saturnshine," or reflected sunlight coming from the planet. Saturn, in turn, is faintly lit in the south by light reflecting off the rings....
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Cassini, What -- Mimas, What -- Enceladus, What -- Visible Light, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08220
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The dark shadows that drape Saturn's northern latitudes are split by three familiar bright gaps. From bottom to top, sunlight passes through the broad Cassini Division (4,800 kilometers, or 2,980 miles wide), the Encke gap (325 kilometers, or 200 miles wide) and (barely visible) the Keeler gap (42 kilometers, or 26 miles wide). It is unlikely that the shadows cast by Saturn's rings have much of an effect on the large-scale movements of the atmosphere. The dynamic clouds of this gas giant are...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Saturn, What -- Huygens Probe, What -- Sun, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08190
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The F ring dissolves into a fuzzy stream of particles -- rather different from its usual appearance of a narrow, bright core flanked by dimmer ringlets. Also notable here is the bright clump of material that flanks the ring's core. This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 58 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 10, 2007 at a distance of approximately 1.7 million kilometers (1.1 million...
Topics: What -- Visible Light, What -- Cassini, What -- Saturn, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08908
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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As part of its investigation of "Victoria Crater," NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined a section of the scalloped rim called "Bottomless Bay" (or "Bahia sin Fondo"). This view shows the northeastern side of Bottomless Bay as seen from the southwest. The exposures combined into this mosaic were taken by the rover's panoramic camera through a 750-nanometer filter during the 1,019th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's Mars-surface mission (Dec. 5,...
Topics: What -- Crater, What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What -- Panoramic...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09084
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/JHUAPL
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This image of the Terra Sirenum region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0918 UTC (4:18 a.m. EST) on Nov. 25, 2006, near 38.9 degrees south latitude, 195.9 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. At this time, Mars' southern hemisphere was experiencing mid-winter. During Martian southern winter, the southern polar cap is covered...
Topics: What -- Terra, What -- Mars, What -- Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09101
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this vista of "Victoria Crater" from the viewpoint of "Cape Verde," one of the promontories that are part of the scalloped rim of the crater. Opportunity drove onto Cape Verde shortly after arriving at the rim of Victoria in September 2006. The view combines hundreds of exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam). The camera began taking the component images during Opportunity's 970th Martian day, or sol, on...
Topics: What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What -- Opportunity, What -- Crater, What -- Panoramic...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09104
NASA Images
by NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
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This is New Horizons' best image of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon, taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles). The longitude of the disk center is 38 degrees West and the image scale is 17 kilometers (11 miles) per pixel. Dark patches of ancient terrain are broken up by swaths of brighter, younger material, and the entire icy surface is peppered by more recent...
Topics: What -- New Horizons, What -- Ganymede, What -- Moon, What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09245
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/U.S. Geological Survey
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This frame from the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows spherules up to about 5 millimeters (one-fifth of an inch) in diameter. The camera took this image during the 924th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's Mars-surface mission (Aug. 30, 2006), when the rover was about 200 meters (650 feet) north of 'Victoria Crater.' Opportunity discovered spherules like these, nicknamed "blueberries," at its landing site in "Eagle Crater," and...
Topics: What -- Microscopic Imager, What -- Imager, What -- Mars Exploration Rover (MER), What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09077
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The night side of Rhea shines softly in reflected light from Saturn. A similar effect, called Earthshine, can often be seen dimly illuminating the dark side Earth's moon. Background stars make short, dim trails across the black sky. The sunlit terrain on Rhea is so much brighter than the part lit by Saturn that the former is completely overexposed in this view, which took more than 30 seconds to acquire. This view looks toward the leading hemisphere on Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles...
Topics: What -- Rhea, What -- Saturn, What -- Moon, What -- Visible Light, What -- Cassini, What -- Sun,...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08986
NASA Images
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Mt. Etna, a volcano on the island of Sicily, erupted on October 26, 2002. Preliminary analysis of data taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 28 shows the instrument can provide an excellent means to study the evolution and structure of the sulfur dioxide plume emitted from volcanoes. These data also demonstrate that AIRS can be used to obtain the total mass of sulfur dioxide injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic event, information that may...
Topics: What -- Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, What -- AIRS, What -- Aqua, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09937
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
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This image from HiRISE image <a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10001 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_003583_1425">PSP_003583_1425</a> shows gully channels in a crater in the southern highlands of Mars, taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The gullies emanating from the rocky cliffs near the crater's rim (upper left) show meandering and braided patterns typical of...
Topics: What -- High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), What -- Crater, What -- Mars
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10001
NASA Images
by VLT/ESO/NASA/JPL/Paris Observatory
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These thermal images show a "hot" south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere. The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO). Scientists say Neptune's south pole is...
Topics: What -- Neptune, What -- Very Large Telescope, What -- European Organization for Astronomical...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09927
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University
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The image of Tropical Cyclone Gonu in the upper panel was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on June 5, 2007, at approximately 20:20 UTC. NASA's CloudSat satellite, carrying the cloud profiling radar, flies in formation with Aqua, and passes over the same location approximately one minute later. The line from A to B on the upper panel represents the ground track of the CloudSat satellite and corresponds to the cloud profiling...
Topics: What -- Aqua, What -- CloudSat, What -- Cloud Profiling Radar
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09601
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The Cassini spacecraft spies four large impact basins on the southern hemisphere of icy Tethys. Tethys (1,071 kilometers, or 665 miles across), like the other airless worlds of the Solar System, wears the record of countless impacts experienced over the eons. Lit terrain seen here is on the leading hemisphere of Tethys. North is up and rotated 15 degrees to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 21, 2007. The view was obtained at a...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Tethys, What -- Visible Light, What -- Sun, What -- Huygens Probe, Where...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09723
NASA Images
by NASA
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A chevron-shaped pattern and bright vortices stand out in the turbulent Saturnian atmosphere. Such features are hallmarks of the boundary between alternating east-west flowing cloud bands. The view looks toward an area about 9 degrees south of the planet's equator. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on July 28, 2007 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 889 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Saturn, What -- Huygens Probe, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09722