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APOLLO 10 EVENT INDEX TO A/G TRANSCRIPT 



Event Tape/Ifege 

Liftoff 17/1 

Translunar Injection (TLX) 27/t 

CSM/S-IVB Separation, Ltt Extraction 29/1 

TV #t 30/1 

TV #2 39/1 

vim Wt 

TV #4 Wl 

Midcourse Correction Maneuver 98/ 1 

TT#5 100/1 

Half-way to moon 104/1 

TV #6 202/1 

Enter Lunar Sphere of Influence 220/1 

TV #7 262/1 

LOS, Spacecraft goes behind moon 273/1 

Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) #1 274/1 

First Aquisition of Signal (AOS) 276/1 

Lunar Orbit Insertion #2 (Circularization) 294/1 

TV; #6 296/1 

RCS Staging Burn 373/1 

TPI (Terminal Phase Initiation) Bum 382/1 

IM/CSii Separation 391/1 

Ascent Propulsion System (APS) Burn 393/1 

Traneearth Injection (TEL) Burn 468/1 

TV #9 474/1 

TV #10 479/1 

TV: #11 496/1 

Splashdown 649/1 



APOLLO 10 

TABLE 3-1.- SEQUENCE OF EVENTS 



3-3 



0 



Event 


hr 


Time, 
:min :soc 


Range zero — l6*U9:00 G.m.t. , May 18 1969 










Lift-off 


00 


:00 


•00 


6 


Maximum dynamic pressure 




:01 


22 


6 


ou oar^ engine cu 0 




:02 


kl 


6 


S— II engine ignition \ command.) 




:02 


h3 


1 


Launch escape tower jettison 




:03 


17 


8 


S-II engine cutoff 


00 


:09 


12 


6 


S— IVB engine ignition ( command ) 


00 


:09 


13 


6 


S— IVB engine cutoff 




•11 


1)3 


8 


Parking orbit insertion 




11 


53 


8 


S-IVB ignition (translunar injection) 




33 


28 




Trsns lunar injection (S— IVB cutoff* + X0 S£c) 




39 


21 




Command and service module separation 


03 


:02 


k2 




First docking 


03 


:1T 


:37 




Spacecraft ejection 




:56 


:26 




Spacecraft separation maneuver 


oU 


39 


10 




First midcourse correction 


Eo 


32 


57 




Lunar orbit insertion 


75 


55 


5k 






80 


25 


08 




Undocking 


98 


11 


57 




Command and service module separation maneuver 


yo 


^7 


17 




Descent orbit insertion 


99 


k6 


02 




Phasing orbit insertion 




58 


26 




Lunar module staging 


102 


k5 


17 




Ascent insertion maneuver 


102 


55 


02 


v. 


Coelliptic sequence initiation 


103 


U5 


55 




Constant differential height maneuver 


101* 


h3 


53 




Terminal phase initiation 


105 


22 


56 





APOLLO 10 

TABLE 3-1.- SEQUENCE OF EVENTS - Concluded 



Event 



Second docking 
Ascent stage jettison 
Final separation maneuver 

Ascent engine firing to propellant depletion 

Transearth injection 

Second midcourse correction 

Command module/service module separation 

Entry interface (koo 000 feet altitude) 

Enter communications blackout 

Exit communications "blackout 

Drogue deployment 

Main .parachute deployment 

Landing 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST: 10:22, T-126 



1/1 



KING This is Apollo Saturn Launch Control, 

one hour, 26 minutes and counting - we are proceeding with 
the Apollo 10 countdown at this time. The closeout crew at 
the 220 foot level have now essentially completed their 
work and they are about to secure the White Room, the arm 
that attaches to the spacecraft hatch itself. They begin to 
break up the White Room in preparations for the departure, 
and also preparations a little later for retracting the complete 
swing arm, swing arm number 9, to a standby position. We are 
a good bit ahead in the countdown as far as these preparations 
are concerned, probably in the area of some 20 minutes ago or 
so. We anticipate that the closeout crew will be ready to 
depart in about 10 minutes from this time. Spacecraft test 
conducter made another check with Houston Flight, just on a 
contingency basis, at this time in the countdown to check the 
flight since we are on the same launch time as planned - the 
flight azimuth of 72 degrees is already aboard the spacecraft 
computer and no changes are required. This is. strictly for 
contingency purposes in case we - the window changed or we 
were launching a little later than the planned lift off time. 
All still going well at this time; 1 hour, 24 minutes, 42 
seconds and counting. This is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, 10:32 am 



2/1 



PAO This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control T-l hours, 
16 minutes and counting. We are GO on the countdown for 
the Apollo 10 Lunar Mission at this time. Astronaut Tom 
Stafford, the spacecraft commander,, is in the spacecraft 
going through some checks with the spacecraft test conductor 
of the stabilization and control system of this spacecraft, 
at this time. All the propellents are aboard the 3 stage 
Saturn V launch vehicle, and all looks well at this time. 
We are GO at T-l hour, 15 minutes, 30 seconds and counting. 
This is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1042a, T-106 3/1 



PAO This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Con- 

trol at T - I hour 6 minutes and counting. Still aiming 
at our alanued lift-off at 12:49 pin Eastern daylight time. 
All aspects of the countdown, both with the Saturn 7 launch 
vehicle, the Apollo spacecraft , and the lunar module, all 
are GO at this time. The close-oat crew, which has been 
up to the 320- foot level at the end of the swing arms, awing 
arm number 9, working with the Apollo 1G crew in the space- 
craft, now is departing the area, Once the crew has left, 
this will permit us to go into preparations to move the 
swing arm away from the spacecraft hatch. We move the swing 
arm 12 degrees from the ha:ch in a parked position, where 
it remains until the T - 5 minute mark in the count, when 
it comes all the way back to its full-back position of about 
60 feet. The purpose of course, :.s in the event of an emer- 
gency, we could bring that swing aria on back in a hurry and 
the astronauts would egress . 'hey ■ ave * high-speed eleva- 
tor that's locked at the 3 2 0- 'uo'c i-ive.. standing by, in case 
of such an emergency, This elevator is operated by Jack 
Lousma, the capsule communicator, the astronaut capsule 
communicator here in the firing room. We are still GO at 
1 hour 4 minutes 42 seconds and counting. This is Launch 
Cont rol . 



7,ND OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, 10:48 am 4/1 

pA0 This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control, we 

are coming up on 60 minutes and counting. Mark, T-60 minutes 
and counting, T-60 minutes, we are proceeding at this time. 
?; 363 foo? Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle is GO as are the 
tracking elements, weather, all conditions ready for a launch 

8 P.». Eastern Daylight time. At this point in the 

countdown'we are beginning some final telemetry checks and 
we are bringing up the various radio frequencies concerned 
vtth the launch vehicle. These include 2 key tracking beacons 
located in the instrument unit which give us back tracking 
information during the powered phase of "1^. ^J" 
well with the Apollo 10 astronauts. Tom Stafford, John Young, 
lid Gene Cernan aboard the spacecraft at the 320 foot level. 
T.his is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1052 AM, T-56 5/1 



PAO This Is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control 

at 56 minutes and counting. 56, and we're proceeding satis- 
factorily. Weather conditions still GO for a launch attempt 
at this time. All still well with the crew in the spacecraft. 
We're going through some telemetry checks with the launch 
vehicle. We've also taken a look at that RP 1 fuel in the 
first stage that's been in there for a little while. We've 
checked its status and the status is reported back as good. 
We're proceeding, 55 minutes 33 seconds and counting. We'll 
be prepared within a matter of minutes to bring the swing 
arm back from the spacecraft at the 320 foot level. This is 
the top swing arm, Apollo access arm, identified as swing 
arm number 9. It will be retracted initially to a parked posi- 
tion some 12 degrees from the spacecraft. This is about 
5 feet. It will remain in that position until a 5 minute 
mark in the count when it will be brought to its complete 
fallback position some 60 feet from the spacecraft. Coming 
up on 55 minutes, this is Launch Control. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 4/18/69, CST: 10:57 T-50:52 



6/1 



KING This is Apollo Saturn Launch Control 

T-50 minutes, 52 seconds and counting. All still going well 
with the countdown at this time. Here in the firing room the 
launch team gearing up for two key tests at this time. One, 
a check of the range safety command destruct system aboard 
the Saturn V launch vehicle. The other, some attitude command 
checks to assure that the engines will swivel in response to 
commands from the guidance system during flight. The astro- 
nauts in the spacecraft still busy with some of their final 
preparations at this time, and all is proceeding satisfactorily. 
T minus 50 minutes, 18 seconds and counting; this is Launch 
Cont rol . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1102a, T-46 7/1 



PAO This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Con- 

trol at '6 minutes and counting; T-46 minutes and counting. 
Ail is still proceeding very satisfactorily for the count- 
down of the Saturn V Apollo space vehicle. The swing arm 
number 9 now has been retracted to the 12-degree position. 
This is a position some 5 feet away from the spacecraft. 
Once this was accomplished, we then proceeded to arm the 
pyrotechnics, the busses for the pyrotechnics aboard the 
spacecraft, particularly the launch escape tower. From 
here on down during the count, if an emergency was so crit- 
ical that it would be necessary, the astronauts could ac- 
tivate that escape tower now that the swing arm has been 
moved away from it- The range safety command checks are 
still continuing at this time. All is going well. Still 
aiming for that planned lift-off time of 12:49 pm Eastern 
daylight time. This is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST: 11:07, T-41 8/1 

KING This is Apollo Saturn Launch Control, 

T-41 minutes and counting. T-41; all going well. Little 
Lieter from the spacecraft now; the astronauts are still busy 

hey are not sending back as many reports as they had u 
to abouJ 10 minutes ago. The countdown still proceeding very 
satisfactorily at this time. Coming up in about 5 minutes will 
be a key test of the Launch vehicle Apollo transfer where we 
will switch from external power to the flight batteries aboard 
the 3 stages; an instrument unit of the Saturn V to "sure 
chemselvef that they will operate properly when called on during 
the flight. Over the final portion of the countdown, that 
swing arm number 9 will come back to its fully retracted posi- 
tion at 5 minutes in the count, will go on an automatic se- 
quencer at 3 minutes and 6 seconds in the count Jown; fro. that 
point on down, all activities during these final mom *^ s °f 
the countdown will be automatic, run by the ground base "aster 
computer here in the control center. If anything does go wrong, 
the computer will automatically shut down and stop the count; 
would go into a HOLD in those conditions. Once the automatic 
sequence does occur, we will begin to pressurize the various 
tanks in the 3 stages of the Saturn V. We'll go to transfer 
to internal power with the launch vehicle at the 50 second 
mark, the 5 engines in the first stage wil 1 i gni te at 8. 9 
seconds; we'll have all engines running at 2 seconds in the 
count and should get liftoff at zero. Still aiming towards 
a final liftoff - 12:59; correction, 12:49 PM, Eastern Daylight 
Time, this is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1112 AM, T-36 9/1 



PAO This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control 

at T minus 36 minutes and counting. T minus 36. All still 
going well with the command module, service module, lunar 
module, for the flight as well as the three stages of the 
Saturn V launch vehicle. We are GO for the mission at this 
time. The following are some of the highlights that have 
occurred since last evening. We went into a built-in hold 
at 4 PM Eastern Daylight Time yesterday afternoon. Follow- 
ing the start of the built-in hold we did move the 9.8 mil- 
lion pound service structure from the pad. The service 
structure was moved to its fallback position which is some 
17,000 feet away from pad B. Astronauts Donn Eisele and 
Joe Engle boarded the Apollo 10 spacecraft last evening to 
go through some switch list checks to assure that all would 
be ready for the countdown when it was picked up today. We 
picked up our countdown at T minus 9 hours and counting at 
2:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time this morning. We were a little 
late starting our propellant loading because of some minor 
problems at the launch pad concerned with ground support 
equipment. However, we then did proceed into our propellant 
load and loaded a little more than three quarters of a mil- 
lion gallons of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aboard the 
vehicle. We were then ready by the time we resumed our 
countdown at 3 hours and 30 minutes to have a full propellant 
supply aboard. The Apollo 10 astronauts Tom Stafford, John 
Young and Gene Cernan were awakened this morning with Stafford 
and Young being awakened at 7:34 AM. Their teammate Gene 
Cernan got up a little earlier. He was awakened at 6:50 AM. 
They had breakfast with some 10 of their colleagues, donned 
their suits, and then came to the pad. They were declared 
physically fit during their brief examination by Dr. John 
Teegen and Dr. Alan Harter before coming to the launch pad. 
The breakfast menu included the normal astronaut fare of 
steak and eggs, coffee, orange juice. The crew came aboard 
the spacecraft with the commander first at 10:06 AM. He was 
followed by the lunar module pilot, Gene Cernan, who sits in 
the right-hand seat, at 10:11 AM; and finally John Young, 
the man in the middle seat, the command module pilot, at 
10:16. Since the crew has come aboard we've really been 
ahead in the countdown. Since that time all has gone well. 
We f re proceeding at this time. We have just satisfactorily 
completed our power transfer with the launch vehicle. Tom 
Stafford aboard the spacecraft giving some readouts back to 
Test Conductor Skip Chauvin at this time. All aspects of 
the mission including weather GO as we approach the 33 min- 
ute mark in the count. Now 33 minutes, 10 seconds and count- 
ing, this is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, 11:17 am 



10/1 



p A 0 This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control 

T-30 minutes 40 seconds and counting. We are proceeding 
at this time and aiming for a planned liftoff 49 minutes 
after the hour. Coming up shortly the Apollo 10 lunar module 
will go on internal power. This is on power of 2 batteries in 
the ascent stage and 4 batteries in the descent stage. Most 
of the preparation work in the lunar module bad been taken 
care of before we got into the final count, but it will go 
internal shortly. For a status report on operations at the 
Mission Control Center we will now switch to Houston. 

PA0 This is Mission Control Houston, the prime 

team of flight controllers headed by Glenn Lunney is on station 
prepared to support this mission. The manned space flight net- 
work reports it is green, ready to support the mission. One 
minor problem with the telemetry computer at Carnarvon, but 
it will not hold the mission up, there is a backup computer 
there. Recovery forces report all on station. Among those 
in the viewing room here in the Control Center are Senator 
and Mrs. Barry Goldwater. We have 3 astronauts at the 
CAPCOM console, Charlie Duke, Bruce McCandless , and the backup 
spacecraft commander for Apollo 10 Gordon Cooper. Taped to 
the CAPCOM console are 2 dolls, one Charlie Brown, one Snoopy, 
replete with spacesuit. This is Mission Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST: 11:22 A, T-26 



U/l 



KING This Is Apollo Saturn Launch Control, 

T-26 minutes and counting; all aspects of the countdown for 
the Apollo 10 lunar mission are GO at this time. At this 
point in the count, the astronauts in the spacecraft have com- 
pleted the pressurization of the reaction control system for 
the Service Module. These are those 4 thrusters, those 4 
quad thrusters, around the service module, 100 pound thrust 
each, which they use for maneuvers once the astronauts have 
seperated from the launch vehicle and are on their way to the 
moon. In addition to this, Astronaut Tom Stafford is getting 
a new setting for his altimeter in the spacecraft; he uses 
this to change different abort modes during the powered phase 
of flight. The new settings given to him from Houston Flight 
by the Spacecraft Test Conducter here. Vice President Agnew 
has arrived at the control center; he has been here for some 
25 minutes at this time, and he is viewing the operations from 
a room adjacent to firing room 3, from where the overall count- 
down is being handled. We are 24 minutes, 53 seconds and 
counting; this is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1127a, T-21 12/1 



PAO This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Con- 

trol at 21 minutes and counting. All still going well, aim- 
ing for our planned lift-off at 49 minutes past the hour. 
We are making some final checks of the second stage of the 
Saturn V launch vehicle, at this time starting a chill-down 
sequence in which we introduce cold helium into the engine 
chamber, the five engines in the second stage. To condition 
it for later, during the powered flight, when that extremely 
cold hydrogen and oxygen meet in the engine chamber. We 
condition them for these extremely low temperatures over 
the final portions of the countdown itself. As a matter 
of interest, the target of the Apollo astronauts, the moon, 
at launch time will be a distance of 218,528 miles, 218,528 
nautical miles. We are coming up on T - 20 minutes and 
counting, all aspects of the mission GO. This is Launch 
Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, 11:32 am 13/1 

p A0 This i6 Apollo/Saturn Launch Control 

T-16 minutes and counting, T-16, we are proceeding satisfactorily. 
Astronaut Tom Stafford in the Apollo 10 spacecraft had completed 
some final checks of the spacecraft stabilization and control 
system. Coming up in the next minute will be a series of busy 
checks on the part of the astronauts aboard the spacecraft. 
They will update the spacecraft computer with some central 
timing feeds from Houston. The spacecraft will go on full 
internal power. Of course, the fuel cells for power for the 
spacecraft have been upped, but an external source has been 
sharing the load. This external source will be removed and 
will be on full fuel cell power at the 15 minute mark. The 
astronauts also will switch their emergency detection system 
equipment to the automatic mode for abort purposes during the 
flight. The rotational hand controllers both for Tom Stafford 
and John Young will be armed. 15 minutes and counting, 
this is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1137a,T-ll 14/1 

A0 xhis ia Apollo/Saturn Launch Con- 

trol, T - U minutes and counting, T - 11. All aspects are 
«till eoing well at this time. The astronauts aboard the 

c ha completed some special communication checks 

on what «e call the astro-comm circuit. It's a special cir- 
cuit wJich has the Launch Operations Manager, the Spacecraft 
Jest Conductor, and Astronaut Jack Lousma who has the call 
sign Stoney, the capsule communicator here in the firing 
room This is special communications which can be used 
particularly for'abort contingencies. Th —are the only 
people on the circuit and they have performed their final 
communications checks. In about 5 minutes w e wil 1 go cm 
the circuit and keep it up at that time. Mission Control 
Center"" Houston also coming in shortly with some communi- 
cations checks . All aspects going well, we are Proceeding, 
all aspects of the mission GO, coming up on the 10-minute 
mark in the count. This is Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



AP OLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1142 AM, 1-6:43 15/1 

This is Apollo/Saturn Launch Control 
at T minus 6 minutes, 43 seconds and counting Spacecraft 

He received GO; . fro. ^'^J^*' : 8 aboard the Apollo 10 
strong ones from the three astro satisfactorily 
rt 8 thirt t i«e/ h »e"rh :rft«l 1 GO/»o"o 1 ChecUs y r o» Launch 

ii^v ^\-\^iT^ir^ tSfco. p i.» 

Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GST: 11:44A, T-04:30 16/1 

KING This is Apollo Saturn Launch Control, 

T-4 minutes 30 seconds and counting The Apollo access 
swing arm number 9 now fully retracted to its fall ba ^ 
tion some 60 feet away from the spacecraft. At liftoff we 
ins ill have some 5 swing arms still attached; they will 
loll back automatically at first motion, some 3 J^*"^ 
after the vehicle takes off. Astronaut Tom Stafford 
B aB lp hL Checks with the Spacecraft Conducter the 

MissJon" Director George Hage and the Launch Rector ceo 
IVIX ^asHd theYmLutl marf In^oce^^s? .factory 
SI ISV tSis is Launch Con t jol We hav j; .t passed tj. 
l^r.l ^oma:ic V :e h q uen:e e i 8 fl n r ow S in, and the remainder of the 
o„7,ni- will be handled by the Master Computer here in the firing 

l a various events click off leading up to the ignition 
of the 5 engines in the first stage of the Saturn V at the - 
with liftoff at the zero mark in the count. The actual lgni- 
? n f'thosen engines will come at 8.9 seconds in th.^rnt. 

"•"I 1 ^rtni:e, a and e ov e r e the rUn ne^ 8 fe a w seconds!' those 

** i'.t till oe speedily checked to assure that we have proper 

• : . ; 3S.TJS SgTrajs* sr.£- - 

launch vehicle atop 7 and a half million pounds of thrust. 
We are now coming up toward the 2 minute mark in the count; 

/ u^g' ^^^^^^ 

zia i b s a p ck ct that in t^r W a a t e to r "h d a ;k ^:s°s:. h Sx 

h Th e now at T-l minute, 45 seconds and hunting. 

We'll go on internal power with the launch vehicle at the 50 

.inH Lrk - at 17 seconds in the count, the guidance system 
second mark at 17 se reference release. We already 

Tve tne proper f li '.ht' alimuth in, now 90 seconds 
Now 90 and counting. The astronauts have turned off their 
ground communication at this time ho«,er the, are on VHP, 
and of course the S band circuits, as well as the 8 P e ^ ai 
astronaut communication circuit. One minute, 12 seconds and 
counting. The vehicle tanks beginning to pressurize at this 
HE, our status -ard indicates the fi rs J -J... t.^.^ 

L 0 :ordr:n U d iZ c e ou;ti W n e g ; r :e C °are n ?0 for a mission to the moon at 
this time - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1147am T-l 17/1 



PAO - the tanks are now pressurized. 

We are coming up on the 60-second mark. Sixty seconds and 
counting, we are GO for a mission to the moon at this time. 
The second stage now pressurizing and we are coming up on 
Apollo transfer. Fifty seconds and counting, we have now 
switched to internal power satisfactorily on the batteries 
of the first stage, all three stages of the Saturn V vehicle. 
Forty seconds and counting, Tom Stafford making a final check 
of his computer. The vehicle, all stages pressurized at this 
time. We are waiting for the swing arms to come back. One 
should be coming back at this time, the second one at 17 sec- 
onds. Tom Stafford reports they are GO. We are coming up 
on the 20-second mark. T - 20 seconds and counting, guidance 
internal. 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, we have ignition se- 
quence start, engines ON, 5, 4, 3, 2, all engines running, 
launch commit, lift-off. We have lift-off 49 minutes past 
the hour. Stafford reports the clock has started. The tower 
is clear. 

PAO Tom Stafford acknowledges the roll 

and pitch program to put Apollo 10 on the proper course. 
SC Okay, pitch is tracking, looking 

good. 



CAPCOM Roger. 
SC Roll complete, ELS manual. 

Roger, roll. 

And Houston mark, one bravo. 
Roger, one bravo. 

One bravo is a kind of abort mode 
ltitude, function of altitude. 

I'm going to load low bit in here. 
Roger. 

Plus 55 seconds. 
Cabin is relieving. 
Copy . 

Cabin pressure is relieving. 
3.3 nautical miles high. 
What a ride, what a ride. 
Rog. 

That's Gene Cernan reporting, "what 



CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
SC 
PAO 

dealing with 
SC 

CAPCOM 
PAO 
SC 

CAPCOM 
PAO 

Downrange 1 mile, 
SC 

CAPCOM 
PAO 
a ride." 

SC 

CAPCOM 
you're looking good 
SC 

beautiful . 
PAO 

uh , 12 miles high. 
SC 

CAPCOM 



And roger, going to 3.2 
Roger. You're through to max 



3 and a quarter g's. She's looking 
One minute 44 seconds downrange, 7 - 



Here s 
Roger, 



4 and 1/2 g' 
copy , Tom. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 114^a, T-*? 17/2 



CAPCOM And mark for one Charlie. You are 
looking great. 

SC Roger, one Charlie and it feels 
great. 

CAFCOM You are GO for staging, 10. 

SC Roger, 10 is GO. 

SC Inboard check alignment. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC We are . . . 

PAO Inboard engines are aft. 

SC 

CAPCOM Roger, copy, Tom. EDS off, 10. 

PAO Charlie Duke asking the crew to 
turn off their emergency detection system. 

SC Second staging ... 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PAO Good ignition on the second stage. 

CAPCOM (Garble) on the S2. It's looking 
good. Confirm EDS off. 

SC EDS is off (garble). 

CAPCOM Rog. 

PAO Flight Dynamics reports trajectory 



GO at 3 minutes 9 seconds. Downrange 81 miles, 46 miles 
high. Second plane separation, that is the skirt around 
the engines on the second stage. And the launch escape 
tower has jettisoned. 

SC Man, that staging was quite a se- 
quence. 

CAPCOM Rog, sounded like it. 

SC And we have guidance initiation. 

CAPCOM We confirm that, 10. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM Yes, 10 is looking beautiful. Every- 
thing is going steady. 

SC Roger. 

PAO That's Charlie Duke talking to Tom 
Stafford. 

CAPCOM - not bad. 

SC Just like old times. It's beautiful 
out there. 

CAPCOM You guys sound ecstatic. 

SC Man, this is the greatest, Charlie. 

SC Charlie, babe, it fantastic, babe, 
really . 

PAO That's Gene Cernan with fantastic. 

CAPCOM You are GO. Trajectory and guidance 
look good. 

SC Roger. We were right on the line 
on board. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, C8T 114fa, T-« 17/3 

PA0 171 Biles downrange, 67 miles high, 

at 4 minutes 15 seconds. Still GO. 

PA0 Glynn Luaaey taking a status check. 

Everyone says GO. Four minutes 50 seconds, 230 miles down- 
ranee, 67 miles high. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. In 5 minutes you are 

all GO. All your systems are looking 

sc Roger, 5 minutes and 10 is GO. 

CAPCOM Roger, you are right on the track. 

SC Roger, Charlie. 

PA0 He have an estimate of inboard en- 

gine cut-off on the second stage at 8 minutes 15 seconds, 
Aboard engine cut-off. 9 minute. 1 1 second « , Five minutes 
30 seconds, 299 miles downrange, 83 miles high. All Con 
trollers reporting GO. 350 miles downrange, 87 miles high 

OOW * sc elevators coming on, pitch 1. 

CAPCOM That's go. 

SC l * 
CAPCOM That's go. 

sc Fitc» 2. 

CAPCOM That's go. 

SC *«» 2 * 

CAPCOM Yon got them all, Tom. 

SC Looks good. 

PA0 Guidance says it's looking real 

good. It's 6 minutes 23 seconds. 

CAPCOM - I think Snoopy is still there 

with you. You are looking good. We copy the gimbal motors 
on and your trim looks good. *.,#„i 

S C Sensors tracking them Just beautiful. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, mark. S-IVB to orbit 

capability. g-ivB to orbit capability. 

PA0 Apollo 10 now has the capability 

to get into orbit on the S-IVB should the second stage mal- 
function. u 

CAPCOM On 7 minutes, you are all GO. He 

have nominal level sense arm 8 + 15, SII cut-off 9 + U. 

sc ... sense arm and 9 + 11 tor SII. 

CAPCOM Rgoer. 

PA0 Seven minutes 14 seconds. Downrange 

now 5 38 miles and 94-1/2 nautical miles high. Coming up 
on inboard engine cut-off. 

SC ... is good. 

CAPCQM Hog, looking good here. 

SC fifclearma moot 

CAPCOM Hpgmr on the inboard* , Tom. Wa 

confirm it. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST I Ufa, T + 17/4 

CAPCOM How T s the ride? 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Eight minutes. How s 

the r *jJ e? Rog ^ fantastic, Charlie, fantastic. 

CAPCOM Rog. ^ 

CAPCOM (broken tape) enable sense arm. 

SC Enable sense arm. 

PA0 we are right down the ground track 
at 8 minutes 30 seconds. 755 miles downrange, 9 8 miles high. 
Velocity is 21,499 feet per second. Flight Director is tak- 
ing a status for staging now. 

sc - everything looks good. 

CAP COM Roger, Apollo 10, you are GO for 

8tagi CAPC0M Mark mode IV, Apollo 10, mode IV. 

sc Rog, mode IV. Staging. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Separation. 

CAP COM Roger. 

sc Appears we got good ignition. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PA0 Thrust is good and guidance has 
initiated on the S-IVB stage, the third stage. 

sc Charlie, lots of stuff out the win- 
dow in staging. We catching up and passing it now. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

sc Okay. Guidance looks right on the 

'**' CAPCOM 6 Rog, we confirm that. Looking great 

here. You are looking beautiful. 
SC Roger. 

p A0 1,037 miles downrange and 102 miles 

high and the velocity is 23,400 feet per second. 
SC - looks good. 

CAPCOM Pine. 

PA0 Predicted cut-off for the Saturn 

S-IVB stage 11 minutes 47 seconds. 

CAPCOM S-IVB cut-off 11 + 47. 

SC U + 

PA0 Downrange 1,200 miles now at 10 

minutes 44 seconds, 102-1/2 miles high, the velocity at 
24,280 feet per second. 

SC - looks good. 

CAP COM Roger, 10. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, at 1110, you are look- 

ing 8<>od. Roger, Charlie, the guidance is 

beautiful. 

CAPCOM Rog. 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COKMIMTART, 3/16/69. CST 1147.. T-l 
Predicted cut-off now 11 -mutes 



17/5 



PAO 
45 seconds. 

SC 

CAP COM 
SC 

CAP COM 
SC 
101.1. 

CAP COM 

SC 

B dot, and 102.6 
CAP COM 

SC 
SC 

at our evaporator 



8BC0. 

Roger, SBCO. 
Six. 

Roger. Stand by, 10. 

Okay, Hone ten, we .hew a 102.6 by 

ftoser, we copy that. 

Z* our TI was 255565 - one-tenth 



Roger, we copy. 

^"SarUe, have the. take a look 
,«r we a« reading a high outlet temperature 



EMD OP TAPS 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST : 12:02P, 1400 GET 18/1 

cc 10, Houston. Your SIVB is straight; 

we'd like for you to - on your evaporator, we'd like for you 
to close the primary back pressure valve, and activate the 
secondary loop. underst and. Close the primary 

back pressure valve and activate the secondary loop. 

C C Roger; just for a little while. 

We'll give you anumber. We'll have Vanguard LOS at 15 -3 2 | 
and a minute gap, and we'll see you over the Canaries at 16 .29 

sc Roger; and we have closed the isolation 

valve on CM RCS ring one two is still open. 

CC Roger. 

cc 10; Houston. Your Saturn is in great 

shape; you're configured for orbit; we are all GO. 

sc Roger; just looks beautiful. 

cc And 10, Houston. We confirm your orbit. 

The IU vector has you in a 103 by 100. 

SC Roger. 

sc 10; Houston. We want you to keep the 

primary back pressure valve closed for about 15 minutes. And 
then we'll deacti - stand by. 

SC Roger. 

sc 10; Houston. At GET of 30 we d like 

you to put the primary back pressure valve back in AUTO and de 
activate the secondary loop. 

sc Roger, understand. You want - at JU - 

you want to deactivate the secondary loop and go back to AUTO 
on the primary boiler. 

cc Affirm Gene. 

PA0 We've had LOS at the Vanguard - there 

will be about a minute gap between the Vanguard and the Cana 
Island station. Showing a liftoff time of 12 : 49 : 00 ; ™ Easterr 
Daylight Time. This is Apollo Control; we should be picking t 
Canaries anytime now; we'll continue to stand by. We do have 
AOS - acquisition of signal - at Canaries now. 

cc Apollo 10, Houston - standing by through 

the Canaries. 

sc Roger; 10 reads you loud and clear. 

We're just looking through the insertion check list. 

cc Roger, copy. And 10, Houston; would 

you like for me to review this ring 2 heater check? 

sc Why don't you do that; (garble) 

Cc Okay, Tom, we'd like for you to - we 

have a 7 step procedure here and I'll read it up to you. On 
panel 8, CM heaters 2 main B closed, CM RCS logic ON, CM RCS 
heaters ON, we want you to heat ring 2 for 15 minutes And you 
can select position C5 on the systems test and monitor the OX 
line 10. 

SC All sub first. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST: 1202p, 1400 GET 18/2 

CC Correct - 10, your first step would 

be to close the RCS propellant isolation valve on ring 2. 

SC We'll be able to do that right now, 

Charlie. 

CC Okay, then you can - then we'd like 

for you to - if you are going to close the prop valve right 
now, we'd like for you to turn the heaters on too. 

SC Okay, turned the heaters on right now. 

CC Okay, affirm. And then after - uh , 

10 Houston? 

SC All clear Charlie. We're going through 

the procedure; the heater is ON. 
CC Roger. 

SC Okay, and we'll turn them off after 

15 minutes and you say we can monitor one on C5 ? 

CC You can monitor the oxidizer line temp 

on C5 - it'll probably be all scale high, but if you see any 
change, we would appreciate you telling us. 

SC> Roger. Okay, we got that Charlie. 

CC 10, after 15 minutes, we'd like for 

you to turn the heater off, RCS logic off, and open both 
heater circuit breakers. 

SC Roger; will do, Houston. 

SC Charlie, it's just fantastic to be 

back up here again** Fantastic; really. 

CC Man, you (laughter) you guys really 

sound great up there. 

SC Yeah Charlie, after 3 years, it seems 

a long time, but here comes the Coast of Africa again and it looks 
beautiful. 

CC I'll bet. Wish we were there with you. 

SC (garble) That makes us all feel great. 

CC Roger; next time we are gonna put a 

cot onboard and one of us is going along. 
SC Roger. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan and Tom Stafford 

conversing with Charlie through - both very happy to be back 
In orbit. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. The P52 is - 

your option - it really looked great during the launch phase; 
we have an azimuth correction of minus .11. 

SC Roger. Minus .11, thank you. 

CC 10, Houston. If you've taken your 

helmets off, we'd remind you to open the suit circuit return 
valve . 

SC Roger; we're gonna do that now. 

CC Okay. Apollo 10, Houston; you've got 

about 1 minute to Canaries LOS; Tananarive at - correction - 37, 
SC Roger; Tananarive at 37; thank you. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 24:00, CST 12:12pm 19/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 2k minutes into 

the mission. Canary Island has loss of signal. Tananarive 
w;ll. acqurie Apollo 10 at 37 minutes. Apollo 10 is ir a good 
orbit. Controllers here in the Control Center report all 
systems functioning well. The procedure that you heard passed 
up tc th? crew over the Canaries was to release some oxidizer 
in svst-m & of the command module RC5. During a test on the 
pad wher. the isolation valves were open it **as discovered that 
a burst disc had opened also and had allowed some liquid 
hydrogen to flow into the lines. The valve was then closed, 
the crew is now going through a procedure ?o which they will 
open an engine v.;lve and allow this liquid hydrogen to ^nt 
through the engine. This was the talkiest crew on liftoff 
in the memory of anyone here in the Control Center. We have 
a tape of that powered portion of flight ?nd we will play 
that for you now. 

REPEAT OF LIFTOFF SEQUENCE 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 35 minutes just 

,bout within acquisition at Tananarive. We have a report now 
from the flight surgeon on the heart rates on tae crew during 
launch. Tom Stafford, 123; Gene Cernan 120; John Young 125. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1226 PM, GET 3800 20/1 



PAO Launch. Tom Stafford, 123; Gene 

Cernan, 120; John Young, 125. And the Guidance Officer has 
just reported that all of the guidance systems look very 
good on Apollo 10. Tananarive will be acquiring Apollo 10 
any second now. We'll stand by for any conversation through 
that station. 

CAPC0M Apollo 10, this is Houston through 

Tananarive. How do you read? Over. 

PAO That* 8 Astronaut Bruce McCandless 

putting in a call. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston through 

Tananarive. How do you read? Over. 

COMTECH Tananarive, Houston COMTECH Net 1. 

TAN Houston COMTECH, Tananarive. 

COMTECH Roger, can you confirm that CAPCOM 

is uplinking through your site? 

TAN That's affirm. You are uplinking. 

COMTECH Have you heard any downlink from 

the spacecraft? 

TAN Negative, no downlink. 

COMTECH Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston through 

Tananarive. Radio check, over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston transmit- 

ting in the lbind Confirm simplex alpha, over. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We have 

experienced considerable voice communication difficulties at 
Tananarive in past missions, apparently we're having the same 
problem on this mission. We'll continue to stand by. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Apollo 10, this is Houston 

through Tananarive, over. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10 transferring into 

BRAVO. We're reading you loud and clear. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Now we're reading you 

loud and clear. Dp. 

SC We're been reading you all the time 

BRAVO Houston. John and Gene have completed the P52 and the 
purging on the spaceship (garble) is minus 12 plus 34 and 
minus 76. Looks like the platform is real good. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. Understand 

platform is good. 

SC We will turn the command module RCS 

B heater off at 32. That will give us 15 minutes on it. 

CAPCOM Roger, we confirm, we confirm that, 

and your (garble) valves off - RCS propellant valves off? 

SC That's affirmative, George. 

CAPCOM Okay. 



APOLLO 10 MI8SI0M COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1226 PM, GET 3800 20/2 

sc Houston, Apollo 10. The (garble) 

on the first heater la off scale high which we "P^ted on 
theaters and we're going to turn the heaters off at 43. 

CAPCOM Say again, Apollo 10. You're fading 

in « n ^out. ^ 0 ^v, eomBa nd module RCS heaters 

off at 43. i n 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy off at 43. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We expected that on 

the heater. We'll have LOS here at Tananarive in 30 seconds, 
u-iii B a« vou over Carnarvon at 52. 

We 11 see you ove ^ und erstand 52. Our radiators 

appear to be working all right, our glycol evap outlet tem- 
perature is down around 58. The steam temperature is off 
scale low, off scale low. -4 ..i- 
CAPCOM Roger, steam pressure off scale 

l0W * sc That's affirm, and the evaporator 

outlet temperature is 58 degrees with the radiators apparently 

W ° rki clpC0M Roger, we copy, Gene. And Apollo 

10. Houston. If you read! we'd like you to close the primary 
back pressure valve Mji-j/JJ-^ Control t 43 -i-tes 
*-«n« 10 is out of range at Tananarive. The purge of that 
oxiai^r line on tL command module RCS system has been com- 
Vtlrli This system is in good shape. Gene Cernan reported 
III radiators on III spacecraft are working well. Carnarvon 
will acjuire Apollo lo'at 52 minutes. This is Mission Control 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69. GET 5200, CST 12*0 21/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 52 minutes 

into the mission of Apollo 10. Carnarvon has acquired 
Apollo 10. He will stand by for transmission. 

CAPC0M Hello Apollo 10, Houston through Carnarvon 

standing by. Houston, this is Apollo 10. We 

are going through our EC8 checklist and everything looks good. 
CAPCOM Roger, Tom, sounds real great. 

sc Thank you. Me could read you all the way 

through Tananarive, Houston, but evidentially you "uldn't 
read us at all with COMM until here at the last. We got 
the heater off exactly at 15 minutes, the propellent valve 
was shut, the logic was off and the breakers open. 
CAPCOM Roger, we copied, Tom. 

3C Houston, Apollo 10, did you get our 

torquing angles on the IMU realine? 



CAP COM 



Roger, Tom, you were pretty weak. What 



I coped was minus 0.12 plus 0.34 and minus 0.76. 



SC 

CAPCOM 
torqued those? 



Roger, and everything looks real good. 
Roger, can you give us the time that yo 



SC Stand by. 

SC 



It was 41 minutes even, Charlie, that's 
what Ipaid special attention to that. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you very much , John, 

41 minutes special attention. 

sc Hello Houston, this is 10. 

CAP COM Co ahead. 

gc Okay, guess you got my word on tne on 

scale load on the steam pressure on the primary 1°<>P- 

CAPCOM Roger, we've been discussing it, Gene, 

and stand by and we'll have some words for you. 

gc I just rechecked a secondary loop and it 

all looks good on it. Through all our monitor checks and 
redundant component checks looks like we've got a good 
Charlie Brown here. 

CAP COM Roger 

CAPCOM 
the primary evap 

CAPCOM 



Apollo 10, Houston, with some words on 



Go ahead Charlie. 

Roger, we'd like you to put the back 
pressure valve back to ADT0 - correction, MANUAL, and we 
wondered if you went to AUTO on the H20 valve during launch. 

SC That's affirm, 1 sure did. I went to 

AUTO on the steam pressure valve and the water valve. 

CAPCOM Okay, we want the steam pressure back 

to MANUAL and we're going to think about it a little bit 
more and we might reservice a little later on. 

ac Okay, fine, looks like our radiator is 

beginning to carry the load. I'm looking at about 51 degrees 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 5200, CST 1240 21/ 



SC on the evap up at temp. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Gene, everybody 

thinks I might have given you the wrong word. What - and to 
clarify it we want the back pressure valve closed. Over. 

g C Okay, in other words you want steam 

pressure auto switched to MANUAL and you want me to go to 
increase, is that correct? 

CAPCOM Affirmative. 

sc Okay, well, I'm in MANUAL now and I'll 

go to increase. 

sc Houston, this is 10. Do you want me to 

leave the water flow in AUTO after I do this? 

CAPCOM Stand by . 

CAP COM 10, Houston, you can leave the water ✓alve 

in AUTO. 

SC Roger, understand. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston on the S-band 

through Honeysuckle. How do you read? Over. 

sc Roger, Houston, Apollo 10 reading you 

loud and clear. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom, same old. The S-band is reaLl 

great today. 

Sc Roger. I've never seen the Comm better. 

It's great, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1250p, GET 102 22/1 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We will have 

LOS at Honeysuckle at 1+06. We will see you over Guaymas 
at 1 + 28. 

SC Apollo 10, roger. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 1 hour 

5 minutes into the mission. The station at Honeysuckle Creek 
in Australia has loss of signal. Flight Director Glynn 
Lunney is taking checks with the controller here in the Mis- 
sion Control Center. Everybody gives him a GO. The service 
propulsion system looks good, the reaction control systems 
on both the service module and the command module look very 
good. The environmental communications officer is pleased with 
his system. There is one minor problem in with the E-comm. 
You heard Charlie Duke and Gene Cernan discussing the 
steam pressure and evaporators during this Australian 
pass. There is a belief that the primary evaporator 
may have dried out. These evaporators, there is a primary 
and a secondary, they are used for cooling purposes when the 
radiators are not on the line. They cool by evaporating our 
boiling water. They are sometimes referred to as water boilers. 
We may reservice the water boilers and again we may not. 
E-comm wants to take a look at it over the States and see 
whether it needs to be reserviced. The radiators are working 
very well and there's the secondary evaporator. It is in 
good shape. We really have no need for the primary evaporator. 
So E-comm will con-tinue to take a look at that, but it is 
not really a problem. The station at Guayman, Mexico, will 
be next to acquire Apollo 10 at 1 hour 28 minutes. This is 
Mission Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 13:30, GET 14! 7.3/ 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 1 hour 

40 minutes. Apollo 10 has just passed over the east coast 
of the United States. During - we are still n contact at 
Grand Bahama. The crew has extended the faking probe John 
Young reported he could hear it go out and Charlie Duke h-s 
passed up the TLI information and also some pads for several 
aJort times right after TLI. We have the tape of this pas* 
over the United States, starting at Guaymas . We will play 

tHat CAPCOM 1 nOV " Hello, Apollo 10, Houston through 
Guaymas, standing by. 

3 sc Roger, Houston, read you loud and 

clear. , c , 

CAPCOM R°g» y°" re 5 by. 

sc Okay, we are ready to extend the 

docking probe when you are. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

sc We've got to get a go on that tem- 

Perat ^ C rM aSUremellt i0, Houston. We are ready for you 
to extend the docking probe and you will have to stand by 
on the temp until we get high bit rate. 
SC Roger. 

sc Okay, we will count down. 5» l * > 

2, 1, extend. 

CAPCOM Rog, copy. 

sc Probe extend doing great. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc we could feel it klunk. 

CAPCOM Fog. 

sc we could hear it go out I bet 

it's all the way out. 

CAPCOM Roger. You say you heard it go 

out? 

CAPCOM Okay. Hey, we will have that P27 

for you over Bermuda at about 1 -r AO and we ve got a xLi 
plus 90 pad, if you are ready to copy, 10. 

SC Stand by . j „ u i 4 

sc Roger. TLI + 90. Go ahead, Charlie 

CAPCOM Roger. TLI + 90 SPS/G^ 63556 

- 148 + 135003554487 - 05484 - four balls 1 + 66232180239 
001, apogee is NA, perigee is + 00175, 66458, burn time 
73766199242087167. . 

sc Hello, Houston, this is 1U . 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

sc Houston, we lost S-band for a second 

there I got everything to HAN A, go after that. 

CAPCOM Okay, Gene. HP + 001755645 8737 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1330p, GET 141 2 3/2 



delta VC 66199 242087167, boresight star is Achernan and it s 
left 008 down 27 - 2605 - 0 250011229 3399 30 1255 35. Okay, 
your set stars are Deneb and Vega at 067283337, no ullage. 
Your P37 for TLI + 4 is 006306373, the longitude is - 165, 
GET 400K is 002211. Ready for your readback. 

SC Okay, Charlie, here it comes. SPS 

G&N 63556 - 148 + 135003554487 - 05484 - four balls 1 + 
66232 , you with me? 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SC 180239001, third apogee is NA, peri- 

eee is + 001756645 873766199 24208716 7, boresight star is 
Shawla, left 008, down 27 - 2605 - 0250011229 3399 301255 35 
Still there? 

CAPCOM Keep going. 

SC Okay, Deneb and Vega, 06728337, no 

ullage, TLI + 4, 006306373 - 16502221 and you are just a 
little bit fast on those reads, Charlie. I was barely able 
to keep with you. 

CAPCOM Roger, Gene. Sorry about that. 

That was a good readback and we got the TLI pad if you are 
ready to copy. 

SC Stand by one. 

SC Okay, I'm ready. 

CAPCOM Okay. Top A63, 22425179116, three 

balls, burn time 54 3104 376 3560 335 815 1040, TLI + 10 minute 
abort pitch angle is 267. Standing by for your readback. 

sc Okay, TLI is 22 42 5179116000, burn 

time is 54310437635603, roll is 358151040 and TLI + 10 minutes 
pitch is 267 degrees. 

CAPCOM Rog. The burn looks - is going to 

look real nominal. The sep angles - everything is real nom- 
inal and your backup S-IVB key cards are okay. Pitch and 
yaw, everything looks good. 

SC That's great, Charlie. We ought 

to be coming up on a dump here pretty soon. 

CAPCOM Rog. You ought to be right over. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. On the TLI, we've 

got a string of nines on the probability for guided cut-off. 

SC Can't beat that. 

CAPCOM Sure can't. 

Sc You're doing good work so far, Charlie. 

CAPCOM So are you guys. You guys sounded 

ecstatic on that boost. 

SC Babe, you ain't seen nothing until 

you've seen that S-IC stage. 

CAPCOM Laughter. Would you care to elab- 

orate? 

SC I will later. 

CAPCOM Okay. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1330p, GET 141 23/3 
sc It's real smooth between the start 

and the end of this burn. 

^ ?C0M ^S" r ;» doubt the -hole structure 

"* 'c^CoS" """"y", y »» M.- of felt Ilk. you were 
youreelf —J^ r °;,^ 8 *"** t ru«u»rP0GP .. 

1,111 lllloV" ak ° Ut oLy""hrl 8 .ay., don't f or S et 
now, It's 8 days. 

sc Laughter, okay. 

rAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We got our 

load af Bermude. We are ready to go if you will give us 

&CCeV l' c In accept and we are through, go. 

cIpcSm Hefio Apollo 10, Houston. We got 

the loaVin okay, you can go back to block, the computer 

is y° u £ 8. Through that block. 

CAPCOM Houston, Apollo 10. We are ready 
for our latest orbit cell. 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're showing you in 
a 107 by 104. 

S C Ro ge r . 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We 

reservice it after TLI. ^ j . ^ ^ ^ on 

it, it started off the low peg and now has drifted off to 

a reading of about .24. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Roger. The spacecraft temp is 

starting to cool down. We feel real good in here. 

TAPCOM Rog, good, Tom. 10, Houston. We 

will Save you through he Canaries until 1+55, expect for 
aoout a 30-aecond break at about 1 + 43, when we go from 
Vanguard to the Canaries. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM A short break at about 1+49, ex- 

cuse me. 

SC Roger. 

CAP COM 10, Houston. How the view up there: 

Your windows all look good? 

sc Windows are all clear. Gene has 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1330, GET 141 23/ 

a white streak across his external one. Just a white streak 
on the right window. 

CAPCOM Rog. He copy. How wide is it? Is 

it significant at all? 

SC Ho, Charlie, it looks like someone 

took a little thin paint brush and just stabbed across fron 
top to bottom on the right hand window. 

CAPCOM Rog. And 10, Houston. High bit 

rate, that probe - 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 1:52:00 GST 1340 24/1 
CAPCOM And 10, Houston with the high bit rate 

that probe test hanging right in there at 85. 
SC Thank you- 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston through the 

CanarJaa! standing by. We are GO for the power on at any 



tin 



SC 



Okay, Charlie, I'll get it right now. 



CAPCOM E; T i oglc to batteries, pull on the breakere 

and logic 1 and logic 2 are coming off. 

C^COM Sr5;«iS! would you verify that the 

6 ar^breakere are closed. ^ ^ ^ (garbled) 

CAPCOM Ed" J. Houston, your pyro system looks 

good. We're GO. prepare TLI 

CAP COM Right, Tom, and we'd like you go to up 

telemetry command reset at Canaries LOS. 

SC Say again. 

CAPCOM Roger, at Canaries LOS you can go up 

telemetry command to reset. 

SC Thank you. 

Houston, Apollo 10, we're donning our 

helmets and gloves now. 

£aPC0M JoT^ouston, everybody in the room is 

h.m» m 2« be. You are looking great. We'll have LOS 

.5 1 pi— 56, we'll see you over Tananarive at 

2 plus 09. 

«r Alright, roger. 

H Q This is Apollo Control. The Canary Island 

statiofhas loss of signal. We're 37 »™ /^seconds away 
j ro . the translunar injection bu rn of t». thirst ..^f^. 
Ifse'colde At llltTdl 'the'engine will burn for a duration 

°h \*e cabin is comfortable. We've got a window report. 
Tom Stafford reporting the windows clear, one thin white 
. streak on Gene Cernan's window which is no Problem. 2nu«J! 
station to acquire will be Carnarvon. At 2 hours 25 minutes, 
this is Mission Control Houston. 



END OF TAPS 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 2:09:00 CST 1358 25/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 2 hours 9 minutes 

into the mission. Tananarive has acquired Apollo 10. We 11 

8taBd CAPC0M Hello Apollo 10, Houston through Tananarive 

standing by. We've got nothing for you. 

gc Okay, Houston, we're (garbled) and we re 

flU 8 CAPC0M TLl ' Roger. We'll try to come up through 
ARIA af aSout 2 plus 1?, Tom. They say "^f^* 8 
look good from ARIA 3. The other aircraft it s sort of 
marginal, but we'll probably try. 

SC ARIA at 2 plus 14. 

pto C ° H ARIA^tands for Apollo Range Instrumented 

Aircraft. There are 2 of these flying tracking stations between 
fan"n""ve and Carnarvon so that we will have the capability 
of continuous communication from now through TLI. 



PAO 



are 22 minutes away from translunar 



injection. . „ TrtC 

CAPCOM Hello 10, Houston, coming up on LOS 

at Tananarive. We'll give you a call through ARIA 3 in a 

Roger, we're all squared away for the 



minute or so. 
SC 

burn, Houston. 

CAPCOM Right, To 



CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Apollo 10, Houston 

through ARIA 3. How do you read? 
SC (garbled) 

Roger, you are there, 10, but unreadable. 



CAPCOM 

SC (garbled) 
PAO 



This is Apollo Control at 2 hours 20 minutes. 



Even though the voice communications through ARIA 3 are 




live in .. _ 

the 2 ARIAs between Tananarive and Carnarvon. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 2 hours 22 minutes. 

The total velocity that Apollo 10 will be footing f or in this 
third staae burn for translunar injection is 35 594.8 f e « 
per second? The GET time of ignition 2 hours 33 minutes 25 secon 
GET time of engine cutoff, 2 hours 39 minutes 9 seconds. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston through ARIA-5. 

Do you read? 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1413, GET 22400 26/1 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston through 

Carnarvon. Over. Carnarvon> The tioe 

base 6 started right on time, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, the S-IVB is looking great, 

Tom. It's pressurizing okay. 

sc And I can see the pressure building 

up and I'm at 5305, 4, 5, Mark. 5305 on your mark. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're about 3 seconds ahead 

° f y °g C Houston, Apollo 10. Fuel tank pressure 

1b up to 30. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy. 

p*0 Those tank pressures are in reference 

to the S-IVB. Time base 6 is a program in the ins trurnen t unit 
of the S-IVB which programs it for the t ransl «»*r inj 

pA0 Telemetry shows Apollo 10 s present 

velocity 25,570 feet per second. «*i oa 
pA J Present altitude 105 nautical miles. 

Three minutes to translunar injection and Flight Director 

Glynn Lunney - Three minutes, counting off. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. You're GO forTLI. S-IVB 

is looking as planned. ^ ^ ^ , ^ ^ ^ ^ eight 

ball working on number 2 and powered up P47. 
TAPCOM Okay . 

g£ Go. 13040 turns. 2VC servo power 

° n * gc S-II sep light on. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Space go. 

CAP COM Very well. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST : 1421, 23200GET 



27/1 



SC Max turn rate; you want 10 degrees? 

SC Exceed 10 degrees, very well. 

PAO Booster engineer says the Saturn is GO. 

SC Right on time. 

CC Roger; copy. 

sc Fuel lead in the Starboard. Getting 
acce leration? 

CC Roger. 

SC Right on. 

CC Roger. 

SC We've done it. 

CC Roger. 

SC We're on the way. 

CC Roger; we confirm. 

CC 10; Houston. Your S1VB looks good. 

SC Roger. 

CC And Guidance looks good. 

SC Roger. 

SC It's right. 

PAO 26 400 per second velocity now. 

C C Hello Apollo 10, Houston, in 1 minute, 

you're looking great. 

Sc Roger; 1 minute, everything looks good 

onboard. 

Sc It's starting to pick up the yaw just 
as programmed. 

CC Roger. 

PA0 Velocity 27 500 feet per second. 

Cc 10-2 minutes. You're looking great. 

SC Roger. 

Sc What a way to watch a sun rise. 

CC Roger. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan. 

PAO 29 000 feet per second. 

SC 3/4 of a G. 

CC Roger, copy Tom. 

PAO Tom Stafford reporting 3/4 of one G. 

cc Apollo 10, Houston; coming up 3 minutes; 
trajectory looks great. 

Sc 3 minutes - everything looks good Charlie. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. We've got a pre- 
dicted cutoff 2 plus 39 plus 10. 

SC 2 plus 39 plus 10. 
Wow, right into the sun here. 

CC Roger. 

PAo 31 000 feet per second velocity. 
Present altitude 123 miles. 

CC The SIVB is looking great. 

SC Roger, Houston, 10 here, looks good 
onboard. 

Sc We're getting a (garble) sequence. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1432, GET 23200 

We're getting small YAW. 
Understand. A small YAW 



27/2 



8C 

CC 

isolation ....? 
SC 
CC 

have you. Go, 10. 
cc 

cutoff of telemetry 
SC 
CC 

off. 

SC 
CC 
SC 

VC is minus .6 
CC 

That's beautiful. 
SC 



Had frequency vibrations. 

Ah, so. It's 5 minutes. We still 

10, Houston, in the blind, at 
Are you to accept? 
SECO. 

Roger, SECO. We confirm the cut- 

8 dot 422.1 of telemetry. 
Roger, copy. 

10, would you believe, my DELTA 
Roger. Minus .6 on the DELTA VC. 



Great spacecraft, Charlie. 
And, Charlie, we've got an 02 flow high light in the middle 
of the burn here which we can't account for. 
CC Stand by, John. 

cc Apollo 10, Houston, in the blind. 

Have LOS at Redstone 2plus 41. See you over Hawaii. 2 plus 
44 . 

gg Roger .... shoot that thing. I 

went to auto 2 on the suit circuit water accumulator. That' 
all that I can think of. It was right at 10 
minutes when it happened. 

cc Roger. We think that cabin 

pressure rigs kicked in for the 02 flow, John. 

SC It just went off and the flow 

started to drop now, Charlie. 

cc Okay, fine. You are beginning 

to fade out. I think we are beginning to lose you through 
the Redstone area in about 30 seconds. Hawaii 2 plus 44. 

cc And 10, in the blind. Everything 

we have is nominal. You are on your way. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. 2 hours 

and 41 minutes into the mission. Apollo 10 on the way to 
the moon. We have lost signal for about 3 or 4 minutes. 
We will pick up at Hawaii at 2 hours 44 minutes. This 
is Mission Control in Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 2:44:00 GET 1433 28/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control 2 hours 44 minutes. 

Charlie Dukes just put in a call to the spacecraft. We're 
showing present altitude 608 nautical miles. The velocity 
starting to drop off already, 33 602 feet per second. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston through Hawaii. 

How do you read? Over. 

sc Roger, Houston, Apollo 10, would you 

believe the world is starting to fade away? 

CAPCOM Roger, we believe it, Tom, you are all 

Go here. FIDO confirms it was a perfect insertion. We would 
like you to confrim you are on omni DELTA, and we're all GO. 

SC Roger. 

sc We're on omni DELTA, Charlie, and there 

isn't any question about it from here. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

sc I don't mean the DELTA, I mean the world. 

CAPCOM We got you, we understand. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we expect the S-IVB to start 

to the sep attitude at 2 plus 54 plus 10, right on time, 
and your sep attitude is looking good. 

sc Roger, Okay. John's in the left seat 

now and I'm in the center seat. We've already changed. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. Did you get a chance to get 

that radiation survey meter out? 

sc Yes, I did, Charlie, and I read zero on 

every scale. 

CAPCOM Okay. And what was the GET on that, Gene? 

About 245? 

SC About 243. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we'll have you AOS now un: 1 

you get to LOS at the moon. 

sc Sounds like Chris has pretty good cove; ge. 

CAPCOM Yes sir. He's sitting back there smiling. 

Sc You ought to see us. 

CAPCO m Chris says there ain't no backing out now. 

SC That's for sure. 

sc You can play our favorite song, Charlie, 

the one about Fly me Someplace or Somewhere. 

CAP COM Roger. That's up to you. We've got 

3 Marshall guys down here smiling from ear to ear, too. 

PA0 The Marshall guys Charlie Duke refers to 

are the booster systems engineers on the console and what they 
refer to is the trench. 

PA0 Velocity is 32 603 feet per second, altitude 

857 nautical miles. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, we would like you to 

do a avert 66 to get the state vector in the right position, 
and if you've got time comment on the ordeal tracking there 
for that backup TLI. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 2:44, CST 1433 28/2 
sc Okay, the initial track was just right 

on what the nominal was and the ordeal was looking just what 
it should be. 

^ C0M lei"' rates during that long S-IVB bum 

Ton Stafford 116, John Young 97, Gene Cernan 104. 

SC Sav ' Charlie, looks like we might have 

a little closed circuit TV up here. 

CAPCOM How's it looking, Gene? 

*C M i don't know, I can't really tell too 



■^•cUSoS' l6aSt " ^Ly^ne^Goid Stone's all configured, 
we'll^e standing by. lt .. beautiful closed^ circuit . 



CAP COM 
SC 





Hey, great, Gene. We can't wait 
I've got my own little show of these 



2 auvs up here. It's beautiful, it really is. 

CAPCOM Well great. I hope it's that good 

,in«n here We're sitting on pins and needles waiting for 
it Bey!' if you've got ! second Tom we'd like for you to 
recap the S-IVB oscillations and give the guys one up on 
starting work on it. ^ ^ ^ ^ through eyen lnto 

earth orbit boost the IV-B had just a slight little - _ 
llL both lateral and longitudnal vibrations to it 
It felt like it was running rough at 

Titan, and then after 3 minutes superinposed upon the low 

fluency vibrations came a real high frequency vibration, 

I'd say L the ball park of 20 cps, something 

and of course we were sweating it all the way but it 

down right on time, but there was a definite shift to a high 

rrequencV super imposed upon the low frequency at about 

3 "CAPCOM 1 " 0 'Toger, did it give you a feeling like 



it 2.2 Mach in a - 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1443, GET 254 29/ 



CAPCOM - roger. Is it a - giwe you a 

feeling like it - 2.2 Mach in the 104, something like that, 
just a little rumble? 

sc Yes, kind of, but not as much. We 

are starting the maneuver now and we will tell you later. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

S-IVB is maneuvering to separation 



57 direct 02 coming off. 
Roger. 

Alitude is 1598 miles, velocity 

We show ourselves at the attitude, 

We confirm, 10, you are go for sep. 
Roger. We are going to check the 



PAO 
attitude. 

CAPCOM Roger 
PAO 

30,077 feet per second 
SC 

over. 

CAPCOM 
SC 

th meters here now. 

CAPCOM Again, you are go for power arm 

and go for sep. 

p A0 That's John Young. He will do 

the docking to the LM. 

PA0 He is now in the left seat flying 

the command/service module. A minute and a half from sep- 
aration. The command and service modules will separate 
from the S-IVB at about - 

sc Houston, this is Apollo 10. Could 

you confirm the firings, over? 

CAPCOM Say again. 

gQ Could you confirm the thruster 

firings, over? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 10, Houston. We con- 
firm »JtX the rotational input, we did not confirm the 

translational - as far as we are concerned, you are go. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM 10 » we did see + and ~ x on the 
translational. 

SC Rog. 

sc 10, Houston and now 2 2 looks 

good to us . 

SC We are zips . 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PA0 Apollo 10 is pitching around now 

the Guidance Control officers says, pitching around and 
thsn will come back in and dock with the Lunar Module. 
Altitude now 3 thousand 580 nautical miles, velocity 
is down to 25 thousand 401. 

gc That world is just incredible. 

There goes a panel Charlie. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1443, GET 254 29/2 



CAPCOM 
SC 

but there goes a panel. 
CAPCOM 

CAP COM 
SC 

It to you, I really do. 
SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

up here right now. 
CAPCOM 
PAO 

house the Lunar Module. 



Roger. How do you read me King. 

Loud and clear. We don't have the S-IVB up 

Roger. 

That world is incredible. 
Really moving? 

Holy moly, I sure hope we can show 

Okay, I got the S-IVB. 
Roger. 

And there goes another panel. 
Rog. All retrograde, we hope. 
I don't know what (garble) it is 

Yeah. 

Those are the SLA panels that 
They've been jettisoned. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1454, GET 30500 30/1 



PAO Those are the SLA panels that house 

the lunar module. They've been jettisoned. 

SC Charlie, I've got the world on 

closed circuit here, so we're going to try and get high 
gain. 

CAPCOM Roger, standing by. 

SC Okay babe, there's high gain. The 

TV is on. I should be coming down to you and I'll have to 
adjust it as we come along into the S-IVB. 

CAPCOM Hey, it's beautiful Gene. We got 

the black and white now with a little time delay on the 
color. Hey, we got the S-IVB coming into the top. The Sun's 
really shinning on it. 

SC Okay, I'll try to adjust It for 

you . 

CAPCOM Hey, we got the color now. 

PAO You're on the air babe. Oh, that's 

beautiful . 

SC Have you got the color? 

CAPCOM Yes sir. It's looking great. 

SC I'm sorry it's tilted a little bit. 

That's the best I can do with the brackets. 

CAPCOM No sweat, we got it right in the 

center of the screen Gene. It looks like the Sun's really 
bright on it. 

SC Tremendously so. 

CAPCOM The Sun's got the S-IVB, the LM 

sort of blotted out It's so bright. Hey, your zooming in 
looks really good, Gene. 

SC Charlie, I've got it closed down 

all the way. Does that help any? 

CAPCOM Rog, the - in the center of the LM 

now, we still got a couple of real bright spots but it's 
looking real good in the color. We can see the prob, correction, 
the drogue. Gene, it's really looking good. It's the silver 
panels that are reflecting back real brightly. 

SC There awful ... that's right now too. 

CAPCOM Rog, the resolution is fantastic. 

You're driftiftg off just to the right a little bit. 10, 
Houston, you can't believe the picture we're getting. The 
resolution is really fantastic. 

SC I'll tell you, this monitor makes 

it great. How's the color, Charlie? 

CAPCOM Say again. 

SC How's the color? 

CAPCOM It's really beautiful, Gene. You've 

got it framed just perfectly. 

SC Hey, I think the color would be 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1454, GET 30500 30/ 



SC beautiful once we can show you the 

Earth. 

CAFCOM Rog. Old Snoopy sure looks good. 

SC Yep, he sure do. Old Charlie Brown 

is a mass of cord and wire floating around here though. 
CAPCOM I can imagine. 

SC Houston, Charlie Brown. I've settled 

down now on the zoom and the closing range you see is the 
closing range we've got. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Gene, if it looks 

like to you, we have a bright spot. It may be on your 
vidicon, coming in on your vidicon tube on the black and 
white. It's right above the drogue. 

SC Now we've got it in real life. The 

camera is fully in the shade. That's just a reflection 
coming right off the - right off of Snoopy. 

CAPCOM Rog. 10, we're afraid you might 

be burning a hole into your vidicon tube. Move it off to 
the - a little bit off her, Snoop. I think those panels are 
so bright, we might be getting problems with the vidicon 
tube. 

SC All right. I can just cover it up 

for a while if you like. 

CAPCOM Stand by. 10, Houston. We'd like 

the LM - Snoopy back again if you could give it to us. 

SC I'd be glad to. 

CAPCOM Hey, that's looking great now 

except for a couple of fingers there or something. 

SC Good resolution, that's what they 

were . 

CAPCOM You got your big hands in the way. 

Hey, I don't know what you did but the - it's really beautiful 
now. Really great. 

SC We're just a little closer. 

CAPCOM Yea. Hey, the color is great, Gene. 

SC How's that for the front porch. 

CAPCOM Oh boy, that's beautiful. 

SC Hell, I got to watch it on TV too. 

I've got - can't see out the window. 

CAPCOM Hey, what's that guy doing on the 

front porch. 

SC That's a green man, Gordo. John 

estimates 50 feet close. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Well, all I can say it's really 

happening and what hasn't happened you haven't seen yet. 

CAPCOM Roger. Really great, ready to leave 

here . 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1454, GET 30500 30 



PAO That was Gordon Cooper. He and 

Charlie Duke are both on the CAP COM console. And that orange 
platform is the front porch. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOM COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 3:15, CST 1504 31/1 

sc Charlie, we can't be more than about 

5 or 10 feet away. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CapcOM 10, it's looking real stable, we show 
you closed in tightly. 

' sc Be docked in a second, I hope. 

CAPCOM 1q8 » Houston, you're looking good. We 

can figure your marking on your rendezvous window. Looks like 

you just docked. Rogfi ^ tfe , re ^ captures> we havea . t 

fired yet. 

CAPCOM Gene, we can read the numbers on the LH 

docking window. ~~~ rnt . 9 eY »-v» 

v. ""sf^" ^ S° a P snap and we're there. Got l grays. 



CAPCOM Roger 
SC 
SC 



You saw us docking, Charlie. 
We didn't get any master alarm. Everything 

l0 ° k8 c!?cSM Rog". Didn't look like there was hardly 

anv after-dock post-docking of oscillations. 

v = » 



|£ Okay barrells coming off. 

CAPC0M loTthat's a great picture of the quads. 

I'll try and take you on a quick tour. 



CAPCOM 

we're - I may have to hold you up for a little bit here. 

sc o ka y» J° hn ' 8 8° ln 8 dowtt to the LEB and 
I'm aoing to the left seat now. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. We're standing by. 

C^cSm Apollo 10, Houston, we'd like for you 

to safe the logic. ^ ^ ^ Qf ^ reaction control 

system quads you saw there at the last. We » je coming back 
up here now with another picture. Altitude 6469 nautical 
■lies velocity 2 1,280 feet per second. 

SC Charlie, you're going to have to look at 

the same picture for a while until we get this (garbled) 
check ^complete. we understand you are busy. 

Qr Okay, I marked it. 

Houston, this is 10. We are in the process 
of attempting to pressurize the tunnel. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 3:25, CST 1515 32/1 

„ r Hello, Houston. This is 10. We're 

going to go ahead and spare the TV here for about 10 minutes 



going lu gu o»'»- 

till we get a little bit squared away. 

CA PC0M Rog» understand. 

_ r We'll be back witn yuu •- • 

CAPCOM Roger. Can you give me a call when 



Uftr^un — = — 

you got time to copy an evasive pass? 
7 % r Okay, I will. 

\\ Q This is Apollo Control. Gene Cernon 

Pirates he's going to have the camera off for about 
To minutes whilt they do some work. We'll continue to 
stay up in case we get ^/-^"'r^cond , I hope. 

CAPCOM Rog^. 10, Houston. You're looking 

good. We can figure your markings in a rendezvous radar. 
Tr looks like you just docked. , 
SC Roger. We had a capture. We haven t 

^"MpCOM ■o^r ^ene, tte_can read the numbe rs 

on^he_LM^do^^ snap and we're there and got two 



grays. 

CAP COM Roger 



SC 
SC 



iU „ start em docking, Charlie. 
We didn't get any master alarm. Every- 



tbing look. snug. ^ like fchere wa8 any _ 

hardly any after dock - post docking evaporation. 

l r y Okay, firing is coming off. 

CAPCOM Roger. Gene, that's a great picture of 

the q g* d ' I'n try and take you on a quick tour. 

We're - I may have to hold you up for a little bit here. 
W sc Okay, John's going down to the LEB , and 

I'm going to the left seat now. 

CAP COM Roger, com. We're standing by. 

CAPCOM AP°Ho 10, Houston. We'd like you 

safe for logic. Charlie, you're going to have to look at 

the same picture for a while until we get this ... check 

C ° mPl riprOM Roger. We understand you're busy. 

^ PC0M okay, I'm watching. Houston, this is 10. 

We're in the process of attempting the pressurize the tunnel. 

SC Hello, Houston. We're going to go ahead 

and suspend the TV here for about 10 minutes till we get a 
little bit squared away. 

CAPCOM R °g» understand. 

sc We'll be back with you shortly. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 3:25. CST 1515 32/2 

CAPCOM R°eer, Gene. Give me a call when you 

got time to copy an evasive pass. 

% s: T rii:;s ™ **** 

over * prm4 Roger. You're ready to copy. We have 

CAPCOM fpc/rMi 63556 plus 091 minus 

o^roor^oJSo^Nrjrpiurr^Jirpius , ,1- 

00190. c How do you copy? ^ ^ yQu It , fl juBt ... , 

SOt 8 clpC0M° n Okay. Want me to slow down? 

CAPC0M Yeah, just go to where you are. 

SC 061255358, apogee and perigee are 

, /A , ssss.,*.,.. ». « ? - h ^:\u.r^ r^s-,-. 



Ro Jer. 061255358. Did you copy? 

CAP COM 



CAPCOM ^^j;;;;^. "do you read? 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/28/69, CST 15:26, GET 32 700 33/1 

cc Apollo 10, Houston. Do you read? 

SC Houston, this is 10. 

cc Roger, 10. We read you now. We 

had a handover to Golds tone and lost you for awhile. How 
do you read me? j 

S C Okay. I ve got you on OMNI and 

I'll copy the rest of the pad on OMNI until I get high gain back 
aaain. I Rot roll of 061, pitch of 255 and give me your YAW. 

CC Roger, YAW. 358. 

S C Okay. Purpose is evasive. 

FPFG and APS 63556 plus 091 minus 021 004 390900 981 
and plus 00051, plus all balls, plus 00190, rule 061 
255358, DELTA VT is 00197, burn time is 003 and DELTA 

VC is ooisa. 

cc Roger. Good read back, Gene. 

Cc Roger good readback, Gene. 

Cc Apollo 10, Houston, the S4B's 

here are getting ready to do a auxiliary hydraulic pump 
cycling which you may feel and we will have a nonpropulsive 
event in a few minutes, also. 

sc Okay. Roger. I would reckon 

that possibly 10, latches 10, 3 and 4 are roughly going to 
be one shot in progress from the position of the But G. 
But they all are automatically made. 

Cc Roger. We copy, John. 

sc It's just like downtown up here. 

Cc Okay. You have seen it before. 

sc Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

How do you read me high gain? 

CC Roger. 5 by . 

sc Okay. We're just getting the 

hatch area squared away at this time. 

Cc Roger. Get the umbilicals 

connected? , _ , 

SC Yes. We just now completed 

that. 

CC Roger. 

sc Okay, Houston, we're reading 

2 volts on systems step meter 4D and it just bounced back 
to four tenths of a volt so I guess the heaters are 
cycling or something on the LM. 

CC Roger. 

cc Hello 10, Houston, Telecom sees 

the LM current that looks nominal. 

SC Okay, thank you. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 15:26, GET 32700 33/2 

gc Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

cc Go ahead, Tom. 

Okay. When we pressurized the 
TM i-fca Mvlar all blew out of the tunnel hatch there 
Ed we h^i Jot a spacecraft that has beaucoup of insulation 
11 tthltl. It looks like it didn't leave a big enough 
Hole! Jul; like the sa.e way when the LM forward tunnel 
insulation used to blow out. evarv 

cc Roger. Copy. You lost every 

bit of the mylar in the back side of the hatch? 

8C Hot everv bit ' but a whole 

bUnCh S 2 f Oh, just a little of it, Charlie. 

cc Okay. 

But, of course, they do away 
with it on 107 and SUBS. ^ ^ ^ ^ of plece8 

floating around? 

SC A few - 

CC okav * 

sc Just a little snow. 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COHMEHTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1543, GET 354 34/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 3 hours, 

54 minutes. We have 2 to 3 minutes of tape at this con- 
ference at the Cape. We'll play that for you now. 
gc . Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAP COM 0° ahead, Tom. 

Okay. When we pressurized the LM 
the mylar all blew out of the tunnel hatch there and we've 
got ^spacecraft that has beaucoup insulation in ere ad 
it here look's like they didn't leave a big enough hole. 
Uke the same way when the LM forward tunnel insulation 

bl ° W CAPCOM Koger. Copy. You lost every bit 

of the mylar on the back side of the hatch. 
or ine Not every bit but a whole bunch. 

Ho, just a little bit of it Charlie 



SC 
SC 



g^ 00 " But Y of course they do away with it 

OD l °CAlwM 8Ub8 * Okay. You've got lots of pieces 
floating around? 

SC A few> 

CAPCOM Okay 



sc Just a little snow. 

CAPC0M Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We still 

show the EDS power on and the EDS breakers closed. Would you 
turn the power off and open the breakers if you ve got a 

second? c . 

sc Okay, power coming off. 

g C Hello Houston, this is 10. We've 

got the logic on and we're standing by for your go for 

P ° Wer CAPC0M Roger, stand by. You have our 

ao for power on, 10. 

B sc Okay. Power's coming up and on. 

^ PC ° M Houston. The S-IVB is still 

venting not propulsive ly . 

PAO We have TV coming up again right 

now. The Command Module Service Module and the LM have 
lust separated from the S-IVB. 

J sc Houston we have cryo pressure 

light 02 tank 1 and 2 are reading about 800. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM 10» we d llke to hawe you t 

the fans off. 

gc They are off. 



APOLLO 10 HIS BIOS COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1543, GET 35* 34/2 



gp Houston, we're maneuvering around 
rigbt now at the quarter S-IVB area according to the ac- 
cepted attitude. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

gp Houston, that was fans in auto 
or off on the 02. 

CAPCOM OH Gene, on. 

SP There on. ON. 

CAP COM Rog. 

gp Okay, Houston, can see the IVB 

n ° W " CAPCOM Roger. Out of which window, Tom. 

gc John's looking out the hatch 
window . 

CAPCOM Rog. 

gc Houston, it's the S-IVB in the t* 
right now. 

CAPCOM Roger. We got it right over the 
suad - thrusters there Gene. 

gC That's it. I'll see if I can briag 
it iato you. 

CAPCOM Right. Thanks. 

CAPCOM 10, that TV is really fantastic. 

BC It looks like the dome there of the 
IVB' s geld. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

gC It looks like we have good sepa- 
ration systems and no problems. 

CAPCOM Roger. It looks about the size 

of a quarter to us here, Tom. What do you estimate your 
range? 

BC I'd say at least 300 feet now, 

CAPCOM Rog. 

gC Are you getting anything Charlie? 

CAPCOM Rog. Gene. That zoom was real 

good. We have the 8-IVB, the sun's real bright on it. 

9C How's the focus? 

CAPCOM Looks real good. That LM antanna 

is showing up real bright. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead 10. 

3C Roger, I wish you'd tell Dr. Von Braun, 
Lee Jamee, Kurt Davis and Rocco Petrone thanks a lot for 

all the people who worked on the great ride. 

CAPCOM Rog. We're going out to the net- 
works now. I think they probably heard it, but we'll pass it on 

though . , , 

gC You tell the people who worked 
on that Machine, we sure appreciated it. 

CAPCOM Rog. It looked beautiful from 

Q * re * 

CAPCOM Bid you move the camera, Gene? 

8C Say again. 

CAPCOM Bid you move the camera? 

gC It's up the hatch window. John's 
got it now. 



APOLLO lO'MSZM CQHHBOTaHY, 37l8/«9, C8T 1343, CBT 334 34 

CAT COM Okay . , 

Xc In fact you can saa tha IVB'e at- 

titude tarnetere firing thare. w , _ . hat 

CAP COM haven't lean abla to tick that 

ua yat» ITO'a really good. 

8C Yeah. 

BHD OF TAPS 



APOLLO 10, HIS8IOH COMUPtAM. 3/1B/**. C»T 15,53 35/1 

CAPCOM *■« I**' 8 "ally good, 

gj S*« estimate now that we're a good 

300 to 400 feet away. 

cwcoh ,i..ly ..Li ~r- »•'" 

starting to see one side ef It. 

cipCOK iJflO, Houston. ... can see your 

thrusts firing up there ^^^S-Xt., ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

here 'cA?coS U8t ^ ftb ° ttt Mahler! a " 7 u're looking o.t the wrong 
tflnd °gc i' a sure going to like Snoopy, because 

thafs^all I'm going to "J;^ fren M eartQ now 13 , 53 1 .ilea, 
velocity 16,063 feet per aecend.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

|c Okay, Houston, this is COR. I've get 

the IVB out of ay window here*. ' _ . , _ 

CAPCOM Roger, To*. It's looking greet. It'e 

a pretty hot bright network. We'd like you to keep the 
camera^oving around so -^J^C.. you see all the 

Partl cipCOM rOUnd H.gative, to.. All we got is the im. 

and it's a real bright blob. 

er Yeah, okay. Looke like - 

^ pc0M is your ALC switch on inside or exterior/ 

interior? ^ interior. You want to go esterior? 

CAPCOM "7 
sc That better? 

CAP COM On the black and white it is. Stand by 

on the color. We got that delay. Hay yah. that' .a lot 
better It took all that waeb out, out. Looke 

SC Charlie, we're looking for the earth 

right now. We'd like to ahow it to, but we can't find it. 

CAPCOM Roger. It'e down there aoaewhere. That 

a smart comment. Ask the navigator. He should know, 
a smart com. ^ houaekeeper right now. 

H Okay, Houston. How this ia Apollo 10. 

We want to get ahead and get so as other things done. He re 
going to go ahead and turn off the TT for a while. 

™ C °* X!rie C A£ilo Control at 4 houre, 10 

minutes" Tom Stafford indicatea thafa all of the television 
for a while. We're eure he'll give ue enough notice when 
^wants to come back up with it. We're 28 minutes away from 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 4:04, CST 15:53 35/2 
pA0 the nominal evasive maneuver time, how- 

ever, both the ground and the spacecraft are GO for this 
maneuver and at crew option they could perform it early. 
This will be a 19.7 feet per second bum with the service 
propulsion system, the big engine in the service -odule, 
retrograde burn. It will put the SIVB out ahead of the 
Apollo 10 spacecraft, the dock configuration. Then shortly 
after the burn the remaining propellants in the SIVB will 
be vented through the engine, be a propulsive vent. 

sc Then, we're still moving away from the 

SIVB, but that rascal is foresighted right at us. 
CAPCOM Roger, Tom. 

pA0 There will be enough energy in this 

propulsive vent to put the SIVB on a trajectory that will 
go around the trailing edge of the moon and then into solar 
orbit. This is the sling shot maneuver. Distance from 
earth now 14 449 miles, Apollo 10 's velocity now 15 635 feet 

S ]PAO nd * This is Apollo Control at 4 hours, 14 

minutes. We still have about 3 minutes worth of tape left 
that accumulated during the news conference at the Kennedy 
Space Center. We'll turn that tape over to the transcript 
typist, and we'll continue to stay up alive through this 
evasive maneuver. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 16:03, GET 4:14:00 36/1 



PAO Apollo 10 is now 15,023 miles 

away from the earth. The velocity is 15,364 feet per 
second. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston, we would like you 

to verify that the suit circuit return value is open. 
SC Thank you Charlie we got it. 

CC Roger. 

SC Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead, 10. 

SC Okay, estimate now that we are 

out a good 1000, 800 to a 10CK) feet before BN. Have moved out 
laterally, oh, maybe 400 feet. 

CC Roger. 

SC It looks like out of the bird 

direction we will be in will put us in the right direction, 
if we keep moving lateral 

CC Roger. Copy. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10, we are 

in burn attitude. 

CC Roger. We copy. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like 

for you to turn Off the 02 CRYO fan. 

SC 02 CRYO fan, CHARGE. 

SC Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

We are back on OMNI. We were getting a bad squeal on 
our S-band. 

CC Roger. Copy. 

SC Is that okay, or do you want 

to look at this one on high gain. 

CC Stand by. It looks good on 

OMNI. You can stay where we are. 

SC Okay, Houston. Apollo 10 

coming up to 5 minutes. We are going to start our 
gimbal drive check. 

CC Roger. Copy. 

SC Pitch 1 coming on. YAW 1 on. 

CC Roger. 

SC Pitch 2 coming on. 

CC Roger. 

SC YAW 2 coming on. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 4:34, CST 16:23 37/1 



p A 0 This is Apollo Control. Tom Stafford 

running some glmbal checks on the SBS engine prior to this 
evasive maneuver. We're about 3 minutes, 5 7 seconds away 
from that maneuver which will occur at 4 hours, 39 minutes, 
9 seconds. Duration of the burn 2.8 seconds, delta V 19 . 7 
feet per second. Apollo 10 is 17 529 nautical miles away 
from the earth, its velocity 14 368 feet per second. The 
weight of the combined vehicles 94 271 pounds. 

3C Okay, Houston. Coming up on 2 minutes. 

Delta V thrust A normal. 

CAPCOH Roger. 

SC Mark 1 minute to the burn. 

CAP COM Rog. 

SC 30 seconds . 

CAP COM Rog. 

SC 20 seconds. Bum. 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC SBS shows 90 BF5. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Engines off. 

CAPCOM Looks like a good burn to us. 

SC Okay, we have - you see the residuals plus 

1 2 tenths and 5 tenths. 

CAPCOM We copy. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. That born looked real good 

to us. I think the SDS is GO . 

SC Roger. And we're leaving IVB way behind. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

Sc ^ Houston, Apollo 10. All the pulse burned, 

... are cleaned up. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. We copy. Stand by. 

SC Roger. Could you give us a - before we 

pick up the BCT at 12 hours, could you give us an angle so 
we can look at the earth out of one of the windows? 

CAPCOM Rog. We're going to have an update on 

that flight plan maneuver for you. Stand by. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're about 95 percent 

sure that we're going to skip midcourse number 1. Give us 
some time to look at the data, and we'll get back and confirm 
that with you definitely. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM And 10, Houston. When you dock your 

suits, we'd like each one of you to read - give us a reading 
on your suit radiation dosimeters, please. 

SC Rog. 

SC Houston, this is 10. You want to go 

ahead and start charging battery 5? 
CAPCOM Stand by. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, Gene. Go ahead. 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMBHTARY, 5/18/69, GET 4:34, CST 16:23 37/2 



CAP COM 

CAP COM 
in the LBB, we'd 

SC 

CAPCOM 

CAP COM 

SC 

CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 



You can start the battery charge. 
Okay . 

Apollo 10, Houston. With somebody down 
like a readout of the LM CM delta ?. 

Roger. John ... will get it for you. 
Rog. 

Roger, We're reading 8 tenths right now. 
Roger, copy. 8 tenths. 
Make that 8500. 
Okay . 

_ Apollo 10, Houston. In about 3 minutes 

we're~going to have a short L0X dump on the saturn. 

SC Okay, we can't see it. It's Just loeg 

gone from us . 
CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 

sc , - 

and 101.2 percent fuel. My unbalance went from - on that 
short burn - from a minus 15 to a minus 200. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy. 

CAPCOM 10, we'll have that attitude for you 

for the right-hand hatch window for the earth in a couple of 
seconds. 

Okay. 

Tes, Charlie. 

Is that okay, or do you want the hatch 



This is 10. 



Okay. 

Hello Houston. 
Go ahead. 

Okay, I'm reading 100.5 percent oxidize 



SC 
SC 

CAP COM 
window? 
SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

mount then. 
CAPCOM 
SC 

look - the last time 
medicine ball. 
CAPCOM 

CAPCOM 



Right hand's alright. 
Okay . 

With the right hand, 



we could use the 



Okay. 

The last time I saw it it started to 
saw it it started to look like a 



Rog. 
Okay . 

^ Apollo 10, Houston. We have an update 

for your~P23 attitudes and stars if you care to copy at this 

time. 

SC Okay. Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger, Gene. At 5 hours this attitude 

for the P23 as listed in the flight plan is incorrect. We'd 
like you to have a roll of 180 pitch of 167, a yaw of zero. 

SC 180, 167, 000 at 5 hours for P23. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, and we've got an 

update to your stars also on page 3-9 if you're ready to 
copy . 

SC Yeah, go ahead. 



APOLLO 10 MSSIOH COMMENTARY , 5-18-69, GET 4:34, CST 16:23 37/3 

CAP COM You ready? 

8C AH set. 

CAPCOM Okay, roger. Set 1 is now ... number J7, 

and it's near side. Set 2 is a peacock nuiber 42, and it's 
near horizon. Set 3 is also peacock 42 near horison. 

BHD OF TAPS 



1$ 1 1 , i 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 3/18/69, CST 16i38, GET 44900 38/1 

CC +■ 8at 3 1b also Peacock, 42 near 

horizon, and the last 2 sets 4 and 5 on Antaree far 
horizon. 

3C Did you say Peacock set 3 was 

far horizon? 

CC Megative, near horizon for sets 2 and 

3 on Peacock. 

SC Okay. 

CC Okay. The reason for the update, 

we forgot we had Snoop out there. 
CC Okay. 

CC Hello, Charlie Brown. This is 

Houston. We've got that attitude for the Earth out the 
right-hand window. It's a row of 277 pitch 187 YAW 15. 

cc apollo 10, Bona ton. 

CC Hello 10, Houston. Over. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 

just passed the 20,000 mile mark. Mow, 20,007 miles from 
Earth, velocity is 13,508 feet per second, weight 94,096 
and one-half pounds. 

CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Do 

you read me? Apollo 10, Houston, in the blind. 

CC Hello, Charlie Brown, Houston. 

Over. 

CC Hello Charlie Brown, Houston. 

0 ve r . 

CC Hello Apollo 10 Houston, over. 

CC Hello Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Do you read? Over. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We are 

receiving data from Apollo 10. 

CC Charlie Brown. This is Houston 

Over. 

PAO Having some difficulty with the 

voice communications. The communication officer says it 
looks like Apollo 10 may be trying to lock on with the 
high gain antenna now* 

SC Hello, Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead, Tom. We are reading you now. 

CC 10, Houston. We are 

reading you intermittent. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1649, GET 500 39 



SC Hello, Houston. Houstou, bow you 

read? 

CAP COM Roger. 55 zing, how many . 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Bow do you 

read? 

CAP COM Reading a 5 by how many. 

CAPCOH Apollo 10, Apollo 10, this iss 

Houston. Bow do you read? Over. 

SC Stand Houston, do you read? 

SC Hello Houston, Houston. This is 

10. How do you read? 

capcom Rog. Read me a 5 by zing her aaay . 

SC Reading you alright now. I've 

been having a lot of trouble with the omni's and the high 
gain borrows. We get about 3/4 signal strength and zha 
noise gets so bad and apparently your not hearing. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. We've baan 

having the sane thing. We think your going from our oumi 
a little bit too fast and not giving us a chance to get 
locked up real good. I guess we're on the oranies no*; -f, d 
we're hearing you 5 by. 

ffC Okay. I'm on omni C right ssg,j 

We've got the earth here and we'd like to be able to go 
high gain and show it to you, you configure. 

CAPCOM Stand by. We * re . configured art- 

work say to go. You can go high gain. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Five 

hours, 4 minutes Apollo 10 is going to try to bring us 
another live color TV show, showing the earth. We'll 
stand by for this transmission. Apollo 10 's distance 
from the earth now 21 119 nautical miles, velocity 13 t ) -, 
feet per second. 

SC Charlie, if you see this, it a 

going to be out of this world, literally. 

CAP COM Rog. Stand by Gene. 

SC Okay. We can see exactly all of 

CAPCOM Your cutting out Tom. 

SC Are you giving me a signal nc&S 

I'm looking right at the good old U S of A there. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're looking for 

the TV. How does the high gain signal strength look Ko 
you? 

SC It's loud and clear. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



APOLLO 10 HI8SI0R COMMENTARY, 5718/69, C8T 1649, GET 500 39/2 



SC Still nothing Charlie? 

PAO Picture coming up shortly. 

SC I figure we should be over the 
United States, Mexico 

SC Bey, it's really beautiful Tom. 

It's coming in great. 

8C You ought to see it up here, Charlie, 

gC We've get the whole globe, there. 

8C Yes, you're looking right at the 

United States there. 

SC Rog. 

SC See the Rocky Mountains sticking 

out. Baja, California. Can't tell whether you have any 
fog in LA or not but Alaska is pretty much fogged in. 

CAP COM Rog. 

SC It's really a beautiful picture. 

SC We'll Just let it go here for a 

couple of minutes* 

CAPCOM Okay, thanks. Do you know on your 

monitor, which way is the North Pole to you? We've got it 
up at the northeast corner! 

SC That's right Charlie. The north- 

east corner is the North Pole. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

SC Yeu can see clouds cover the 

northern part of Alaska and it comes down in part over the 
northeast part of Canada and I can see out into the New 
England area, we've got a low pressure area out of there. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC The. color is fantastic. It really 

is, 

SC Okay, and it looks like the 

Rocky Mountains are rich color to me. The rest of U* S., 
Baja, California, that really stands out like all brownish 
and the oceans are blue but there are so many clouds out 
to the northeast of the United States, you can't believe 
it. Covers the Par East over to Europe as far as you can 

BOB. 

CAP COM Rog. We feel that we've got a 

brownish spot that's pretty hard to pick up juBt exactly 
what we're looking at but we do see the brown and the 
clouds out over the ocean about the center of the globe. 




APOLLO 10 MI86IOK Oll^i.VU/Hrllt'rtMi *»> 3 



8C *aW«*ey. 1M V*e»» «e*t la the 

Rocky Mountains down area** lew Mamie* «» !«• Colorado. 
CAPCOM Bagas. 

ac Tfc le raes l utioa Is fantastic . The 

LM you can count tb a rlvdTS »» it M * »at tU flitW»»d"T^a 

- —Way, wall Z sea elear a bit a* a 

certain part of the earth here, I'll ttf te alia la oa the 
Rocky Mountains and California. 

CAPCOM lag. Stand by To«. 

sc Bow's that Charlie, hatter? 

CAPCOM Me* re looking at it on the black 

and white here, it looke great. Stand hy hare it comse in 
on the color now. * ^ « 

sc That is really fantastic. We can 

pick out Baja and the smog over LA and we see Mexico and 
we so off to the east, in our picture, and eewe into the 
Rockies area. The Baja, California and tha Oulf, they 
really stand out beautifully. 

SC Okay we'll nave it around. 

CAPCOM looks like gat aoaa clouds 

down over Sew Orleans and down that way* ' 

8C Teah. Okay Charlie, that's full eooa. 

CAPCOM Okay, this is gat to he tha great- 

est sight ever. ■ ' ' . - 

sc Tow ought ta soa it up hare, 

CAPCOM Hoy Tom, hay. It la really fantastic. 

Could you get Baja, in a little hit, we're ahawing this «eal 
to the Pacific now. Okay, we've got tha Baja now on the right 
hand side of our screen and it's right in the canter aow. - 
We can see Mexico and the clouds up over the Rockies. It s 
really a fantastic sight. Alaoat saa tha freawaye la LA. 

SC Bight. I'a going to move down 

you can take a look down by tha Oulf of Mexico aow. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc Charlie, it's aa hard to describe. 

You can go right up pass Aiaaka and you can see the polar 
cats. It's incredible. ^ 

CAPCOM We saa it all here, Cane. The 

colors are really beautiful. 

SC That's great. And the blackest 

black that you'd ever could conceive la the setting for 
all this. 

CAPCOM Bag. 



BHD OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 17:00, GIST 51100 40/1 



SC that you ever could conceive. 

There's a study for all thie . 

CC Roger. 

SC which the people of Hew York have 

a little bit of cloud cover there. It goes all the way 
down, back down by the Cape. 

CC Eoger. You guys are really 

giving us a great show. This is fantastic. 

SC We just want to thank all the 

people who helped get us up here, Charlie. 

CC Roger. I know. 

SC That includes the tax payers, also. 

SC Charlie, you know, you blink your 

eyes and you look out there and you know it r s three 
dimensional, but it is just sitting out there in the 
middle of nowhere and it's unbelievable. 

CC He copy, Gene. Me are getting 

a real idea now, for the first time of what you are 
really seeing out there. The colors on the oceans are 
just as blue as they can be and real white clouds all over 
and the land is a real deep brown - almost a reddish brown. 

SC And the North Pole - the Anartic 

area is solid white and snow-covered. 

CC Right. 

SC It's brown in the Rocky Mountains 

and orange down in New Mexico and becomes a little more 
of a purplish orange 

CC Roger. We see all — - 

I took you off there, Tom. We see all that and it is 
looking good. 

SC You can actually pick out what 

I think is the San Waukee Valley, just on the west side 
of the hills. 

CC Roger. 

SC I am going to open the zoom and 

bring it back the other way. 

CC Roger, 10, would you check your 

TV servo power. We show it on. 

SC Sorry, I must have knocked it 

on there when I was wrestling around here. 

CC Roger. 

CC Boy, we are looking at a black 

background now. 

SC There, you have the whole Earth. 

CC Roger. It is really beautiful. 

Tom, we can even pick up the little tip of the northern 
part of South America down below Baja. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69 



27:00 CST, 51100 GET 40/2 



gc yes, it's coming in now. 

cc It's really blue, you guys . 

sc He are looking right at you. 

Looks like a few clouds right now in Houston. 

cc It's sort of a constant overcast 

here in Amoca, but we have never been. 

sc You are right on the edge of 

what might be some clouds, but certainly to the northeast 
of that area, you're clobbered. 

CC Roger. 

sc Okay John is going ahead through 

P52 here. 

CC Roger. 

sc I think I can see all the way 

up into the New Poundland area now up along the eastern 
coast that is not covered. , nn u a r „ 

cc Roger. You know, it looks to 

us that it is just completely clouded up over that way. 

sc You might say we have moved up 

the last couple of hours. 

CC Well, I'll say. We got you at 

about 26,000 miles here - or a little bit more. 

sc Okay, I am going to put the zoom 

on 55 which will give you the exact resolution we have. 

CC Roger. 

S C And just for the record, it looks 

to me like a pretty nice place to live. 

cc Roger. And we see you at P52. 

sc Okay, 55 on the zoom and that is 

about exactly the same thing we are seeing now. 

cc Well, that is really fantastic. 

cc 10, can you see the Hawaiian 

Islands? Negative. Too much cloud coverage. 

CC Okay . 

sc Houston, this is 10. Do those 
gyro torquing angles look okay to you? 

CC Stand by. 

cc Roger, they look okay to us, John. 

sc Okay. You can't verify these 

stars with the LM on right now. 

cc Roger. Are these your P23 

stars? m , 

sc Negative. These are P52 

stars . 

CC 0 ka ? • 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 27:00, GBT 51100 40/3 

cc 10, Houston. How do the stars look 

in this attitude? K -». ^ff^ultv 

sc In the telescope, I have difficulty 

telling the stars from the particlea right now. 

cc Ri gh t . 

sc There are eo«e that look like 

stars hut I have not been able to stop long enough to 
reallyee if they are or^ot. ^ ^ 

are okay? 

sc Affirm, 

cc Okay . 

gQ The Earth is juat starting now 
to take on a - a little bit of the terminator is 
coning across and we are losing the roundness on the 
bottom side. 

CC Roger. 

sc . i s hould be on the eastern side. 

cc Roger. We are seeing that now - 

CO,Bin | c il1 ' I hope the colors are as good 

down there as they are up here. t TVm t- 4«, 

cc Absolutely fantastic. That is 

the only way I can describe it. It's really b eaut i f ul . 

SC Houston, I have a question. Does 

that picture fill up your whole screen? I want to correlate 
it with the monitor. „„„„ 

cc negative. We got quite a wayB 

to go before we fill up our screen, Tom. It looks about 
the size of a basketball or so. It's pretty bard 
you are zooming in now and we are just about to fill up 
the whole picture. 

sc * Okay. The monitor has a little 

different aspect, we show 

cc All right. Okay. 

cc Apollo 10, Houston. We are ready 

for the P27 update, if you can give us PD and accept. 

sc Okay, we want to get busy here. 

We are going to kill the TV for awhile. 

CC Roger. Thanks a lot for a good 

show, 10, it was beautiful. Right about now, from top to bottom, 
we have the whole Earth, and we still have some on the 

8lde * cc Roger. It looks beautiful from 

here . 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, C8T 27:00, GET 91100 AO/4 



PAO 

CC 

SC 



The distance is 22,781 miles. 
Somebody is crying in his beer. 
No, I think he is happy, too. 
I am kidding. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MIBSIOM COMKMt ASS , 5/i8/€S>, C«T 1706, OBT 51900 41/ 



CAPCOM Relle A? ell a 10 s Houston. He'd like 

for you to put the S-band squelch switch off and whan you're 
changing on these to pause JO ascends in each position ao 
ire can get a good lockup. 

gC g-band squelch is off. 

CAPCOM * »»8' . _ _ 

PA0 This ia Apollo Control at 5 hours, 

21 timus. To« Stafford has indicted thay are going to 
close up shop for a little while ee far as comaunicatione 
are concerned. Apollo 10 is 23,059 miles away from the 
Earth. Ite velocity 12,64* feet par second. He'll come 
back up if there is any mora ais to ground. This is Mission 
Control , Houston. 



BHD OF TAP I 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1545, GET 35600 42/1 

SC Houston, we still show the BD8 

power on and the EDS breakers closed. Would you turn the 
power off and open the breakers if you've got a second. 

CAPCOM Okay, power coming off. 

SC Hello Houston, this is 10. We've 

got the logic on and we're standing by for your go on power R. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. You have our go 

for power on, 10. 

sc Okay, powers have come up and on. 

CAPCOM Rog. 10, Houston. The S-IVB is 

still venting nonpropulsively . 

SC Rog. We're going to separate in 

just a minute. 

CAP COM 10, we'd like you to stand by until 

that vents over in about 2 minutes. 

SC Okay, we're standing by for your 

go for set. 

CAPCOM Rog, Too. 10, Houston. The vents 

over, we're go for sep. 

SC Roger, understand and we are go for 

sep. Houston, I'll turn the TV on on this one. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Okay, I'm going to count down to sep. 

CAPCOM Roger, standing by. 

SC Three, two, one, go. Snoopy*s 

coming out of the dog house. 

CAPCOM Roger, and we got the TV. 

SC Houston, we had a CYRO pressure 

light 02 tank 1 and 2 are about 800. 

CAPCOM Roger. 10, we'd like you to turn 

th e f an s off. 

SC They're off. Houston, we're maneuvering 

around right now to acquire the S-IVB. Going in a sep 
attitude . 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, that was fans in auto or 

off on the 02. 

CAPCOM On Gene, on. 

SC They're on, on. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Okay, Houston. We can see the IVB 

CAPCOM Roger. Out of which window, Tom. 

SC John's looking at it out of the 
hatch window. 

CAPCOM Rog- 



now . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1527, GET 53800 43/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 5 hours, 

38 minutes into the Mission. Apollo 10 is 25,033 miles 
from the Earth. Velocity 12.157 feet per second. Glynn 
Lunney and the black team of flight controllers getting ready 
to hand over to flight director Milton Windier and the gold 
team at this time. I beg your pardon, that is the maroon team. 
Milton Windier and the maroon team. There have been a few 
brief conversations on air to ground. We'll play those 
for you now. 

g C Houston, this is 10. How are you 

reading our OMNI? , „ 

CAPCOM !0» tnis ls Houston and we re reading 

you loud and clear. We had a little noise there a minute or 
so ago. It sounded like the S-band was getting weak. 

sc Okay, we're in now and I believe 

we're on the OMNI D right now. 

CAPCOM Roger, OMNI delta. Apollo 10, 

this is Houston, over. 

sc Go ahead, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPC0 M Roger, we're through with the up- 

link. You can have the computer back and up telemetry to 
block and on your primary evaporator we'd like you to 
secure the H20 flow. It is H20 flows off. We recommend 
not trying to service the system until L0I, over. 

sc Roger. Hello Houston, this is 

Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston, over. ^ 

sc Okay, just for information, I don t 

know how far away, it's far away, but we can tell that there is 
still a SLA panel out there just spinning around slowly and 
reflecting sunlight. . 

CAPCOM Roger, do you have anymore information 

on apparent size, range, or anything like this on it. 

sc oh, it's the size of Venus but it s 

obviously a star panel because you can see it rotating 
slowly and reflecting light. 

CAP COM Rog, this is Houston. Roger, out. 

Apollo 10, this is Houston, over. 

gc We're maneuvering auto maneuver to 

an attitude to start delta V-23. 

CAPCOM This is Houston, copy. 

sc Looks like our RCS fuel budgets in 

real good shape. 

CAPCOM Roger, we concur on the RCS ruei 

budget. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMBHT ARY , 5/U/69, CST 1752, GET 603 44/1 



This is Apollo Control at 6 hours, 
10. A* the present 
cond 
from 



3 minutes into the flight of Apollo 10. A* the pres 
time! our spacecraft velocity 1. 11, 602 feet per Be 
snTare now'at an altitude of 27,546 "J^"*- 1 ^ 
earth. Here at Mission Control, Plant Director Milt 

and his team of flight controllers t h -" "^J" 
from Glynn Lunney we have a change of shift press briefing 
scheduled in the auditorium of building 1 in about 5 
minutes from now. We've had some brief conversation with 
the crew since the previous announcement. The crew is 
advised that the midcourse correction nominally scheduled 
to take place at 11 hours, 33 minutes will be postponed 
until the second opportunity which will be about 26 hours 
30 hours, Ground Elapsed Time. The reason for postponing 




play back the conversations we've had with the crew and 
then stand by for any further communication. 

sc Houston, this is Apollo 10. Have 

you already loaded that variation measure for us? 
CAPCOM Stand by . 

CAPCO m Apollo 10, Houston. Stand by. 

S c " you've had the right hook-in 

numbers in there, I just don't know if the option is right. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Roger 

we loaded that in your racer board. Should be good. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Did 

you copy? 



SC 



Yes sir. Thank you Bruce. 



CAPCOM Roger up. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

sc Roger. Go ahead. 

CAPCOM R°g« 10. There will be no mid- 

course correction number 1. We're going to do away «™tll 
the nominal time of midcourse correction number 2 to start 
with the midcourees and instead of just passing you the 
POI plus 11 pad at this time, we liked to pass you the 
TLI plus 11 the plus 25 and the plus 35 hour pad. The 
last one will be allowed under the assumption that we 
don't have a midcourse correction, until then, we 11 up- 
date it after midcourse correction number 2. For your 
information, the delta V of midcourse correction 2 at 
26 hours and 33 minutes will be about 48.9 feet per 
second which is only about 2 feet per second larger than 
we'd require for a midcourse correction number 1 for the 
nominal time, over. i 

sc Roger. It sounds like a real 

treat idea. Sounds good. t 

CAPCOM Okay, if you're ready to copy, I ve 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69. CST 1751, GET 603 44/2 

CAP COM I've got 3P 37 pass to pass. 

SC Okay, stand by. 

SC Looks like the S-IVB did a good 

job for ua and also what we calculated on that separation 

burn. Put ua right down the money. 

CAPCOM Yes, indeed. 

SC Okay, Bruce go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. P 37 block data for PLI 

plus 11 hours 01330 5201 minus 16504637 over. 

SC Co ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. TLI plus 25 hours 027305795 
minus 16507028. 

CAPCOM Roger. TLI PLUS 35 hour pass. 

037305037 minus 16509435 read back over. 

gc TLI plus 11 is 013305201 minus 

16504637. Plus 25 is 027305795 and minus 1657028. And 35 
is 037305037 minus 1650 minus - correction 9435. 

CAPCOM Roger, Apollo 10. Read back is 

correct and for your information you are now in free return 
trajectory. Your entry angle is very steep currently about 
65 degrees, in the event of lost comm you could correct 
this with P37 over. 

sc Okay, understand. Thank you. 

SC 65 degrees. 

CAPCOM Yeah, like nearly vertical. 

sc Hello Houston. This is Apollo 

10 over. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Apollo 10. 

sc Okay. Should I go ahead and turn 

my H2 purge line heater off, I may have forgotten it. I f ve 
still got it on now. 

CAPCOM Stand by . 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Roger, 

go ahead and turn off your H2 purge line heater and under 
our revised schedule of passing pads up we're not currently 
planning to send you any PADS at GET of 12 hours, over. 

SC Okay, fine. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 M1SSI0H COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET 6; 38, CST 18:27 45/1 

p A0 This is Apollo Control at 6 hours, 38 

minutes into the flight. At the present time, our altitude 
is 31 300 nautical miles. During the press conference, Tom 
Stafford requested that the ground pass up attitudes for an 
unscheduled television pass. The crew hopes to get additional 
television coverage of the earth as the earth continues to 
receive. We've passed up those attitudes and are standing 
hy for television transmissions from the crew. We've also 
got about 4 minutes of tape conversation. We 11 begin 
playing that back for you now, and if the television trane-^ 
■ission begins from the spacecraft we'll interupt with that. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, thiB is Houston. Over. 

sc Go ahead, Houston, 10. 

CAPCO m Roger. We'd like you to do an optics 

calibration at the end of this P23. Over. 

sc Reg. What star do you suggest? I can t 

see any of them out here much. 

CAPCOM Roger. Btafte by. 

sc And that was the end of it near ae I can 

figure . 

CAPGOM Okay. 

CAPC0M Apollo 10, this is loustoa. We're 

recommending that you use star 33 AmSftreoue for the optics 
cal. Over. , A . _ 

sc 1 thought you'd say that. 

CAPCOM We 7«» •** that oae " 10 » 18 

it your intention aftar you finish with this to return to 
TV? Ovc r • 

gc Yeah, we'll give you another look as 

soon as we finish this. 

sc Yeah, could yon give us an attitude - 

sort of a PTC attitude that would on able us to - to see the 
earth? I'd sure - we'd sure appreciate it. 

CAPCOM Roger. We're working on the attitude 

now. I don't believe that the TV and the PTC are compatible. 

sc Mo right. Boh. Give us an attitude so 

we can make an auto maneuver show oa the TV after we finish here. 

CAPCOM Roger. We'll have it in a minute or bo. 

sc We can hold the camera out the side hatch 

and it's compatible with the PTC, don't you think? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this Is Houston. Over. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. Oa the TV we're working towards 

using the camera out the right-hand window, although the 
hatch window would be compatible with PTC, we can't keep 
the high gain antenna lock all the time during PTC, and did you 
power down the B mags? We show both of them off. Over. 

SC Megative. I've got both B megs on. 



APOLLO 10- MISSON COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET 6:38, CST 18:27 45/2 



CAPCOM Roger. We'll have to look at that. 

We're going to hand over from Goldstone to Hawaii at 6 hours, 
30 minutes GET. The TV will still be through Goldstone. 
And have you had your VHF on since TLI? Over. 

SC That's affirm. We're called to turn it 

off in 7 hours. 

CAPCOM Roger. We haven't been copying it. 

SC Yeah. We've been in VHF simplex since 

about Tananarive. 

CAPCOM Rog, understand. Simplex alpha. 

SC Confirm. 

SC Houston, This is Apollo 10. We could 

really do great star landmark on Baja, California. Boy, it's 
wide open. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. 

SC Point conception is clear as a bell. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

SC Go, over. 

CAPCOM Roger. For TV coverage put the earth 

in the right-hand window, we recommend you roll to 263 degrees 
and hold your present pitch and yaw. Over. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM And in the previous conversation I asked 

you about the B mag status. We had erroneous TM indications 
down here. It looks like you're in good shape. 

SC Roger. Los Angeles looks clear today 

except for a little smog in the way. 

SC Houston, what was that roll angle again? 

CAPCOM Roger. Roll 263 degrees. Over. 

SC 263. Right. 

SC Hello, Houston. Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

SC Roger. Just wanted to check one thing 

on the SPS burn. I show 90 psi on my thrust chamber pressure 
indicator. I just wondered how that correlated with telemetry 
and what do you think of the engine. 

CAPCOM Roger. Stand by. I'll check that out. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. It's going 

to take us about 5 minutes to dig out the data for correlation 
on chamber pressure and SPS status. When you called that 
down previously right after the evasive maneuver I didn't 
hear any groans down here. People seemed to think it was 
fairly good and - 

SC No - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. Go ahead. 

SC Okay - 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. We were looking from 

about 100 to 105 psi. We know if it's a single bank ... it would 
be a little 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET 6:38, CST 18:27 45/3 



SC less, but we're looking ... Looking for 

100, but we know a gage error could be most of that. 

CAPCOM Roger. We'll get you a good correlation 

from the data. And, if you'll successfully complete the 
optics calibration. Over. 

SC Takes a long time to get to Antares , 

Bruce. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

p A0 This Is Apollo Control. We're continuing 

to stand by. We estimate that it may be several minutes 
before the crew has completed activities and is in a position 
for television transmission. We don't have an accurate time 
estimate on how long that will be, but we'll continue to 
stand by. At the present time the spacecraft velocity is 
continuing to drop off 10 739 feet per second, and our altitude 
is 32 135 nautical miles from earth. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1837, GET 64800 46/1 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston, over. 

SC Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, further analysis shows that 

that roll 263 degree angle they gave you is not compatable 
with high gain antenna. You're going to have to put the 
camera out the left hand window and we're working on a new 
attitude for you for that and would you verify that your 
attitude set switch is in the GDC position, over. 

Sc I told you GDC position once. No 

Bruce, it's in IMU. 

CAPCOM Roger, would you go to GDC please. 

Sc Okay. Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

The best guess is that that trunnion in calibration is 89995. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Understand 

8995 for the trunnion. 

sc Roger. Now what number do you want 

us to load into noun 87? Four balls 5. 

CAPCOM Stand by. 10, this is Houston. There 

no need to load a number in. Just hit proceed and go from 
where you are. 10, Houston. You copy. 

SC Roger, that's what we did, Bruce 

and, of course, we're all done so that will be good for the 
next time we disturbe a horizon. 

CAP COM Roger, out. 

Sc We loaded a zero when we first 

started this thing which probably accounts for some of the 
update. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Do you have a 

new attitude you want us to go to. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. Apollo 10, this 

is Houston. Your TV attitude is roll 023 degrees, pitch 
181 and yaw 041. This gives you high gain antenna angles 
of pitch plus 28 degrees, yaw 307, over. 

SC Roger. ^ Roll 02300, pitch is 181, 

yaw is 041, pitch is plus 28, and yaw is minus 07. 

CAPCOM Negative, read back again please. 

sc Roger. Roll iT 023 degrees, pitch 181, 

yaw 041. The high gain antenna's pitch plus 28, yaw 307. 

CAPCOM 10, read back correct, out. 

sc Houston, Apollo 10. We're starting 

maneuver to that attitude. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-18-69, GET 6:59:30 CST 18:48:30 47/1 

CAPC0 M Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

sc Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPC0M Roger. On telemetry, we showed 95 psi 

for SPS chamber pressure during the burn, and that is about 
right for a one-bank operation. All the data that we ve 
go? down here looks nominal. The SPS is looking very good. 

0ver * Okay- Real fine. We showed 90. I knew 

there could be some instrument errors, I just wanted to correlate. 
cl?C0M Roger. 95 is the numbers that we've 

g0t - sc Okay, roger. We're going to the TV 

"""SScSm"* Roger. 10, if you'd be interested, there 

i. a possibility of a -"J^"^ ^Tclu'l^s titute another 

tlme cIpCOM W3nt Apollo 10, this is Houston. On your 

hiRh gain for the TV pass, we suggest that you go from wide 
let width to medium due to your increasing distance from the 

eaTth SC ° Vet ' ^ay* And I suddenly have it over here. 

fAPCOM Roger. 

We'll give high gain a try now. 
p AQ This is Apollo Control at 7 hours, 6 

hy ' sc Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. We have high 

8aitl cIpCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Roger, up. 

CAP COM in fact> 1 nQW gee the 

Hawaiian Islands. The subsolar point is right over the 
Ha „aiian c lslands. You ca^e., £™ yQU on TV yet . 

S C 0k *y ' 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1858, GET 70945 48/1 



SC How does that look, Houston? 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. That's not coming 

through yet. 

SC Okay, we got it here. It looks 

real good on the monitor. 

CAPCOM You're filling up about 80% of the 

screen vertically. 

SC Okay, again it's kind of an awkward 

position to hold it but again you can hardly see Baja, 
California, Mexico real well. 

CAPCOM Yes indeed. If you could roll the 

camera right or left 90 degrees and then zoom a little more, 
we could fill up nearly the whole screen. 

SC How's that, Bruce? 

CAPCOM There you go, 10. That's good. 

Right, and we've got the North Pole on the right of our 
screen down here and the Atlantic Ocean was the terminator 
at the bottom of the screen. 

Sc Rog, that's correct. Looks like 

a beautiful sight. And either you have clouds over the 
Sierra Nevadas or their snow caps at this time, I can't tell 
which from here. You can still see the San Joaquin Valley. 

CAPCOM Roger. 10, Houston. We're - 

SC Houston, we're going to zoom in on 

it a little bit and also we're deactivating the VHF at this 
time . 

CAPCOM Roger, copy deactivating the VHF 

and zooming in. Okay, hold it about there. 

Sc You can see that subsolar point 

very well in this picture. 

CAPCOM Yes indeed. We can see the very 

bright spot on the surface of the water that is the subsolar 
point . 

SC Does it look gold? 

CAPCOM Negative. It looks silver, about 

the same color as the clouds here only obviously brighter. 

Sc You can see night time coming over 

on the Eastern part of the United States, too. 

CAPCOM Roger, and while you're doing this 

we'd like to uplink you PTC REFSMMAT, go to PU and accept. 

SC PU accepted. 

CAPCOM Roger. 10, this is Houston. Can 

you describe for us the area that the northern clouds seem 
to be obscuring. 

Sc Yea. They start up in the northwest 

territories of Canada and actually ring out to Alaska and 
from there they go down just about to the Canadian, United States 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1858, GET 70945 48/2 

sc border and go on east. But the whole 

northwest pacific, across northern Canada and over to Greenland 
is all obscured with just a solid white mass of clouds as 
you can see in the - up near the North Pole. 

CAPCOM Roger, we can see the California 

coastline and Baja, California down in the lower right hand 
corner of our screen. 

sc I've zoomed down a little bit. Now 

you can really noticed those clouds that cover about the 
northern, looks about the northern third or quarter of the 
Earth there. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Up in the vicinity of 

Alaska, we see a swirl. Does that look like a storm system or 
low pressure area, to you? 

sc Yea, you've got a swirl out there 

right on the - off the coast of Alaska. How are the colors 
coming through down there, Bruce? 

CAPCOM Oh, the colors are coming through 

beautifully. The oceans are a beautiful blue-green. We can 
see the land masses in a brown to redish-b rown. The vicinity 
of the North Pole, the clouds and ice caps seems to be 
saturating a little but on the whole it's all coming through 

nicely. j t 

sc Okay, good and the area right east 

of the Sierra Nevadas now I guess around the Rockies, as 
night time starts to spread over the United States, is 
becoming more of a purplish-red. You can see Texas, Oklahoma 
and that area becoming more of a purplish-red and the rest 
of it is still a bright red. A bright red to brown. 

CAPCOM That's right. We can see the 

terminator quite clearly moving up from lower right hand 
corner of our screen. 

sc Roger. It's really amazing the 

cloud cover we have here and the swirls that you can see 

thr ° U CAPC0M Apollo 10, this is Houston. We have 

a computer problem here that delayed our REFSMAT uplink. 
We're ready to go now though. 

sc „ Okay, we are in PU. PU and accept. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. You all 

planning any interior shots this pass? 

sc We can turn on the flood lights 

for just a minute here. 

CAPCOM Okay. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1906, GET 718 49/1 



SC Okay, we are going to go around and 
shoot an interior now. 

CC Roger. 

SC As soon as we get all arranged 

around here, we'll show you a quick inside shot. 

CC Roger. 

SC Rog. We're at locked. 

qq Roger. Okay, you're coming through 

on our black and white monitor now very well. We'll see 

the color in a minute. ... 

sc Okay, John is just sitting up side rtowe 

here in the LEB . 

cc Yeah, we see Smiling John down tnere? 

Sc He's just turning around down here. 

CC In living color. 

Cc Tom you came through really great. 
The colors are fantastic. 

cc We're looking into the LEB now 
and looking at John Young on our right. You need the 
focus a little when you get in closer. 

SC How does that look? 

sc Beautiful. Coming through nicely. 

SC Okay, 

CAPCOM Looks just like you, John. 

SC Wait just a minute. 

CAPCOM Are you in the interior position 
in the camera? 

Sc Over here is Gino . 

Cc Roger. We're looking at Gino 

right now. Understand you all haven't got your suits off yet. 

sc John has his suit off and all stowed. 

Gene and I don't. 

Cc Okay, we got a good look at the 
DISCS a few seconds ago as you panned past it. 

SC Okay. 

CC Okay we see your pack on the screen 

right out can you zoom in on that a little. 

Cc That's coming through loud and 

clear now . . Tln 

sc That's the best I can do. I 11 

try to focus it closer. 

CC Roger. 

CC That's the one on the front cover 

of your flight plan, I believe. We can read the writing 
on the program. 

SC That's confirmed. 

Cc It's really coming through 
beautifully down here. 

Cc Okay, we see your name plate, 

there Stafford. < 

g C That's how to tell who it is. 

Cc That's how I can tell who it is. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69 CST 1906, GET 718 49/2 



sc All right. 

gc You can see the sun coming in over 

my shoulder and on top, it's really tremendous. .... 

my cc Yes, indeed. Certainly is bright 

there g S For your information, all these 

are at F22. 

CC Roger. 

gc In fact, that's what we shot 

the earth at F22. 

cc Roger. 

g C Looks like you got some suntan 

yesterday, Tom. x ^ to ^ healthy 

there^harlie. ^ ^ back over h£re tQ 

my left window to show you earth again. 
CC Roger. 

Okay 10, we're getting the earth 
now We've got the terminator to our left and it looks 
lik ; the south pole on th^top^ th.^crj.n. ^ ^ ^ 

going to have a communication handover at about 7 Jjours 
11 Jnutes GET or about 4 hours from now and the black and 
white is really looking good. The color is showing a 
little bit of saturation on the white and now could you 
tell us the position of your ALC switch oyer. 

sc Stand by. It's in outside 

CC Roger, 

sc It's in outside 

cc Apollo 10 this is Houston. We 

showing the orientation reverse from which you had a few 
minutes ago, convenient for you to turn the world upside 
down or rightside up yet? 

c C Yeah, we could do it. 

S C Houston. I'm just wondering if 

this target that I'm tracking out here in the sextant might 
be the S-IVB by any chance? 

cc Sorry could you give us some 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET7:28, CST19:16 50/1 



SC Houston, I was just wondering if this 

target I'm tracking out here in the sextant might be the 
SIVB by chance. 

CAPCOM Can you give me some angles on it. Maybe 

we can do something with that? 

SC Roger. You're looking at them. 

CAPCOM 6517 and 80857. 

SC How's that, Bruce, are we right side up? 

CAP COM It's looking good, Tom. 

SC You can see the terminator really starting 

to move across the United States now. 

CAPCOM Yes indeed. Would you say the terminator 

is about over the Rocky Mountains now? 

SC No. Now it's starting to get darker. 

You can see the shadows from the Rocky Mountains out on the 
plains in Eastern Colorado and New Mexico, but it's darker 
more over to the Louisiana and east part of Texas. 

PAO This picture is coming to us from an 

altitude of about 36 300 nautical miles. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

SC Go. 

CAPCOM Roger. On the •perimeter of the earth cn 

our monitors we're showing a few little bulges that look 
like they're in the scanning equipment - the horizontal scan on the 
monitor that stays fixed in a position on the monitor is 
the image moves up and down. Do you have these on your 
monitor? 

SC Houston, 10. We lost you during that 

switch over for a minute. I think we got you again. 

CAPCOM Roger. Reading you loud and clear now. 

SC Okay. What was it you said about bulges? 

CAPCOM Okay. On our monitor down here, both 

black and while and color, we're showing a little bulge that 
looks like it's in the horizontal sweep system, and we were 
wondering whether this indentation in the surface of the 
earth as it appears on your monitor was present or whether 
it's in our equipment. 

SC We see it on our monitor too. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Okay, Houston. This is Apollo 10. We re 

going to have to terminate the TV now and stand by to get some 
other gear squared away. 

CAPCOM 10, this is Houston. Understand that - 

would you be interested in showing a water dump? We're having 
some problems with the waste water transducer. We're interested 
in dumping down to zero to verify the transducer. Over. 

SC S tand by . 

SC Houston, here we go for a waste water 

dump . 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET7:28, CST19:16 50/2 

CAPC0M Stand by. We'd like to count you down 

on the dumping and monitor at our TM as well as on board Over, 
on tne^a P o Roger. I thought you only wanted to do 

i-hese things before a maneuver. 

CAPCOM Yeah. Well, we've got midcourse correct 

number 1 which we canceled. Stand by. 



SC Okay . 

CAPC0M 10, this is Houston. Roger. We were 

going to go ahead and do this at about 10 or 11 hours anyway 
to verify the transducer. 

SC Okay . 

sc How soon do you want to start the waste 

"""cSSi H ° UBt ° n ' It'" b. read, In abet 2 or 3 

Tom. 

SC Okay. 

sc Houston, 10. Are you getting some 

black spots on your clouds? ftBtt< -. 

CAPCOM 10» this is Houston. Roger, we re gett; 

what looks like glare coming off of a window or perhaps glare 
off the lenses - sort of a thin mask over the view of the 
earth . 

c r Yeah, 

SC Okay, well I tell you what. We're goin fe 

to go ahead and turn it off now. 

CAPCOM Roger, out. 

pA0 That TV transmission lasted a total of 

about 24 minutes giving us some excellent views of the earth 
. . . j „ . r „u „ „„ a „ ar *r a ft. We'll continue to 



about 24 minutes giving ut. ------ - 

and of the interior of the spacecraft. We'll continue to 
monitor the air-to-ground conversation. 

CAPC0 M Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

sc Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. Why don't you go ahead and run 

vour P52 through the PTC REFSMAT now and we'll get the waste 
water dump when you're through with that. We 11 have a 
flight plan update for you here shortly. With an eye towards 
clearing the way to commence your sleep period or rest period 
earlv if you so desire, and if you'd be working on any 
auestions you may have or problems for us that we can work 
while tilings are'quite here, we'll be standing by to receive 

them. Over. 

SC Roger, Houston. 

sc Okay, Houston. We're realigning right 

now to the PTC REFSMAT and we're going to gyro torque. 
CAPC0 M This is Houston. Roger out. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY 3/18/69. CST 19:27, 01T 73155 51/1 

pA0 This ie Apollo Control at 7 hours, 

Al .inutes, and at the present ti.e tha spacecraft is at 
an altitude of 37,321 nautical «ilas and the velocity has 
now dropped down below 10,000 feet per second and is 
currently reading 9,935 feat per second. During the 
previous transmission, you heard the «ew advised that 
because of the fact that they won't be doing the .id-course 
correction at the ti.e acheduled originally at 11 hours, 
33, it will be possible, if they desire, for the* to 
begin their rest period a little early. We will cont n«« 
to stand by for any further conversation, bring the circuit 
up in the event we hear fro. the crew further. This is 
Apollo Control at 7 hours 42 .inutes into the flight of 
Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 1954, GET 8:05:00 52/1 
This Is Apollo Control at 8 hours, 
5 minutes. We have had a couple of brief conversations 
with the Apollo 10 crew since our last report. We will 
play back the tape and bring you up to date and then stand 
bv for any live conversation with the crew. 
sc Hello Houston, 10. 



cc Apollo 10, this Is Houston. Over, 

Okay, I have been looking at about 
maybe 39.2 volts on this battery for about the last 20 



mayoe .t voits una.*, - » --- 

minutes, do you want me to keep going to 

cc That's on Battery A? 

sc That's affirm. 

cc That's affirmative. Keep charging 

until you get to 39.5. 

SC A11 right. 

cc 10, this Is Houston. I have the 

waste water dump procedure here. 

SC Stand by . . 

g Okay, you can go ahead with the procs-v 

cc Roger. We would like you, when 

you start to dump until the quantity indication stops 
decreasing and then continue dumping for 5 minutes or 
until you get a go from us to discontinue dumping. We 
would also like to get a mark from you when *ou .tart 
to dump. Your onboard readout will probably stop 
decreasing prior to a zero indication due to the itvstru- 
»enLtion 8 calibration and we will be ready to start this 
whenever you are through with P52 and whenever it is 
convenient with you. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ do & 

water dump until the quantity stops and then for 5 minutes 
or until you give us the go. Right? 

cc That's correct. 

sc Okay, we are ready to go ahead 

with the waste water dump at anytime here. 

cc Roger. Proceed with the waste 

Water sC UmP " Houston, mark we are dumping. 

We started 15 seconds ago.^ ^ ^ & 

slow ^crease on ITM data.^^ ^ ^ la Rou8ton . lt . B our 
intention to secure the TV lines down here unless you desire 
otherwise, over. ^ -n 

finished here for today. We got other things we have to 
take care of. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1954, GET 8:05:00 52/2 
CC Roger. Out. 

g£ Houston, Apollo 10. Did most of 

the color look pretty Soo^^your.nitor.^uce.^^ 

Tom. It really did, ^ ^ ^ ^ 

g C Snoopy has been awful quiet out 

.here How is he looking to you? 

there. now s ^ ^ 1Q ^ thls ±a Hou8ttm . 

The only parameter we can see from the LM is the ™"«*J 
through the translunar bus tie. We have no reason to believe 
that Snoopy is anything but nominal though. Over. 

SC Roger. Been monitoring the current 

here. Looks good. 

cc Roger. Likewise. 

sc A normal, relaxed configuration. 



LM, CM DELTA P gage is now down to five tenths, for 

Roger. Your CM DELTA V down t< 
I guess that goes hand in hand 



some reason. 
CC 

five-tenths of a PSI. 
SC 

with our cabin pressure 
SC 
CC 
CC 
SC 
CC 

20,5 percent. 

sc Good. 



Houston, Apollo 10. 
10, this is Houston. Go ahead. 
10, this is HOuston. Go ahead. 
What does your waste water show? 
Okay, Tom, we are showing about 



SC 
CC 



10, this is Houston. 
Go ahead. 

uu Tom, could you give us a hack 

on what your waste water is indicating up there, please? 
sc Waste water is indicating now 

20 P e jcent. Roger) j understand. 20 percent. 

sc Okay. It's about what you said. 

Rlght S C Well, it shows about 18 percent. 

cc Roger, Tom. We are showing about 

5 percent less than you down here. 

SC Okay. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 1954, GET 8:05:00 52/3 
sc Do you want to give us a hack 

when you want us to stop it? 

£ c Roger. We will give you a hack. 

SC All right. 

pA0 During that aeries of conversations, 

vou heard Tom Stafford advise that he had no further plans 
for television today. Here in the Control Center, we have 
had a change of capsule communicators. Astronaut Joe 
Engle has relieved CAPCOM Bruce McCandless . A short 
while ago, the spacecraft just crossed the 40,000 apical 
miles marker. Current altitude reading is 40, 156 nautical 
miles and the speed is 9,556 feet per second. This is 
Apollo Control at 8 hours, 11 minutes into the flight of 
Apollo 10. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2024, GET 08:35:00 5 3/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 8 hours, 

35 minutes. The current altitude now is 41,067 feet and 
our velocity is 9,447 feet per second. We're presently 
in conversation with the spacecraft. We also have some 
accumulated tape. We'll pick up the tape and then continue 
to follow whatever live conversation develops. 

CAPC0M 10, this is Houston. Could you 

give us a hack when your waste water quantity stops decreasing? 

SC Okay, I'll keep watching here Joe 

We're indicating about 5 percent. 

CAPC0M Roger, we're showing just about 

zero and that's just about the same difference we've been 
running all along. 

SC Roger. Houston, Apollo 10. The 

waste water quantity has stopped decreasing, showing about 

4 to 5 percent as close as I can read the gage. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. Thank you very much. 

SC Do you want us to terminate the 

CAPCOM No, we want to hold for about 

5 minutes here, Tom. We'll give you a call when to turn it 



dump 

5 mi 
off. 



SC Roger. 
CAP COM Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. You can terminate that 

waste water dump now if you want to. 

SC Okay, turn it off. 

CAPCOM Roger and 10 we've got an update 

for your eraseable memory table here, a few new numbers 
for you and we've also got a flight plan update when you're 
ready to copy. 

SC Okay, we're kind of busy right now, 

Joe, taking suits off and scrambling around in here. 

CAPCOM That will be fine. Just give us a 

call when you've got some time. However, we would like to 
get into that PTC as soon as it is convenient for you, Tom. 

SC Okay, John's already aligned to the 

REFS /MAT. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger 10, go ahead. 

SC Okay Joe, go ahead with any updates 

you've got here. 

CAPCOM Okay, fine Tom. I guess the first 

thing is this eraseable memory table. I've got 3 new numbers 
for you on that for 03, 4, and 5 in column B. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2024, GET 08:35:00 53/2 



SC Okay, go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, for row 3, 03 the number is 

00012, row 04 the number is 13256, and for row 05 the number 
is 33266 and that's all for that one. 

SC Roger, for row 03, 0012, row 04, 13256, 

row 05 is 33266. 

CAPCOM Roger, that's affirm on row 3 that was 

3 balls 12. 

SC Roger, 3 balls 12. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. I got some flight plan 

update items here if you're ready to note them down now. 
SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay. First off we're going to 

delete all the midcourse 1 burn data. We'd like for you 
to set up the PTC as soon as it's convenient for you and 
we'd like the FDA I scale at select at 5015. We'd like to 
monitor that dead band a little closer. And we'd like for 
you to go ahead and perform the battery vent and if you 
could we'd like to have manifold pressure before and after 
the battery vent. 

SC Roger, for stand by. 

CAPCOM And again on your schedule fuel 

cell 02 purge and also canister A change and finally 
terminate the cabin purge. 

SC Roger, what time do you want the 

cabin purge terminated? 

CAPCOM Stand by, I'll find out. Okay Torn, 

we'll go ahead with that cabin purge on your check list the 
way it is on your schedule right now in your flight plan. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM 10, coming back at you on that 

cabin purge, you can do that whenever it is convenient for 
you. Whenever it looks good. Whenever you have the time ther,. 

SC Okay. One thing we've noticed here 

Joe is that the 02 flow eye light keeps coming on and we're 
running pretty high. I guess we can expect this until we 
close the vent, right? 

CAPCOM Roger, that's affirmative, Tom. 

SC All right. 

CAPCOM 10, this is Houston again. Tom, 

we'd like for you to continue that battery charge also as 
long as we can. We'll terminate that just prior to your 
sleep period. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM and I guess just 2 more items Is 

all. We're going to delete the P37 pad. TLI plus 44 and 
TLI plus 53 and that will be updated post sleep, after your 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, C8T 2024, GET 08»33:00 33/? 



CAPCOM sleep. And you can preform your 

praaleep checklist and start your rest period whenever you 
want to. 

SC Okay. It takes quite a while to 

get everything reconfigured around here. 

CAPCOM Roger, understand. 

SC Yea, we're just getting around to 

eating now, too. 

CAPCOM Okay, very good. Have you had any 

problem servicing those bags out of that food preparation 
spout, Tom? Did the water keep coming out at all after you 
pull the bag off? 

SC Haven't got to it yet. 

CAPCOM Okay, fine. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Battery vant 

completed, manifold read 1.55 on the 4A test meter before, 
and 0.60 afterwards. 

CAPCOM Okay, thank you Tom, very much, 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger 10, go ahead. 

SC Yea, can we hold on about another 

30, or 40 minutes, before going to the PTC rest, while we 
get this food squared away? 

CAPCOM Roger, your convenience, Tom. 

SC Okay. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 20:54, GET 9:05 34/1 

pA0 This ia Apollo Control at 9 hours, 5 min- 

utes into the flight of Apollo 10. The spacecraft is currently 
at an altitude of 44,838 nautical miles and the speed is about 
9 000 feet per second. It's been relatively quiet both here 
in mission control and from the spacecraft since our previou. 
report. This period of time is set aside for the crew to 
have their evening meal, following that they'll have some 
housekeeping activities aboard the spacecraft Siting set 
for a rest period. The crew has been advised that they can 
begin their rest period somewhat early because of the deletion 
of the first midcourse correction. That midcourse correction 
has been postponed until the second opportunity at about 
16 hours, 30 minutes ground elapsed time. We do have a 
brief amount of tape. We'll play that for you now. 

sc Hello, Houston 10. We're never going 

to eet up to 39 1/2 volts I'm still looking at about 39.2 in that 
battery A charger, but I'll leave it on if you want me to. 

CAPCOM Okay, Gene. This is Houston. Rog. We d 

like to leave it on just as long as we can, and try to gat 
it on up there to 39.5 or so, and we'll take it off before 
you go to sleep though, we'll remind you. 

SC Okay, Joe. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2119, GET 931 55/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 9 hours, 

31 minutes. At this time, the flight of Apollo 10 continues 
to run very smoothly. The spacecraft is now 47,034 nautical 
miles from earth and the Command Service Module and the LM 
combined had a total weight of 94,027 pounds. It's con- 
tinued to be rather quiet, both here in Mission Control 
and conversation with the spacecraft. We do have about 
a minute to a minute and a half of tape we'll play back 



for you now. 

CC 
CC 
CC 

Do you read me? 

MCC 
Net 1. 

GOLDSTONE 

MCC 

GOLDSTONE 
MCC 

CAPCOMs transmissions 
CC 

Houston. 
SC 
CC 



Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

Apollo 10, Houston. 

Hello Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

Goldstone, Houston. Contact 

Go. Goldstone. 

How do you read? 

I hear you loud and clear. 

Roger, Stand by monitor for 

Apollo 10, Apollo 10, this is 



Go ahead Joe. 

Roger, Gino we'd like to feed up a nav 
update period if you could give us , we could do that while your 
eating. Your still eating? Is that affirmed? 

SC Yeah, we're eating and we're 

finishing getting out of suits and cleaning up you've got 
pu and here comes accept. 

CC Okay. Thank you very, very 

much . 

MCC Goldstone, Houston contact 

conference. Voice Control Houston contact 
conference. 

MCC Goldstone, Houston contact 

conference voice check. 
GOLDSTONE 
MCC 

GOLDSTONE 
MCC 



I'll go ahead and start 
CC 



Contact 

Voice check. How do you read? 
I hear you loud and clear. 
Roger. Thank you. 
George, turn your computer and 
ly oz purge 

Set the clock. We are through. 
I didn't want to bother you because you are still eating 
there. 

SC No problem. 1*11 start on 

fuel cell 3 on the oz 

CC Okay. Stand by to monitor. 

PAO It appears we'll have no further 

conversation with the crew at this time. As you heard 
Gene Cernan mention they're finishing their evening 
meal at the present time and the flight plan shows that 
they will be doing a routine oxygen purge of their fuel 
cell. This will be to remove any impurities which may 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2119, GET 9:31:0055/2 

PAO -have collected In the fuel cell 

during the course of the mission and they will also, within 
the next 30 minutes or so be changing one of the lithium 
hydroxide cannisters which remove carbon monoxide from the 
spacecraft atmosphere. As we mentioned early, the first 
opportunity for midcourse correction, scheduled for 11 
hours, 33 minutes into the mission has been postponed. 
Earlier in the day, the Flight dynamics Officer reported 
that the midcourse correction, if done in 11 hours and 
33 minutes would require a velocity change about 48 or 
correction about 47.3 feet per second. By delaying this 
midcourse until 26 hours 30 minutes at which time the 
second opportunity would come up, the correction delta 
velocity would only be about 1 and 1/2 feet per second 
greater or about 48.9 feet per second. And it was felt 
that by waiting this additional time would gain additional 
tracking information approve the knowledge of where the 
spacecraft was and perhaps reduce the possibility of 
needing further midcourse corrections on route to the moon. 
At 9 hours, 37 minutes, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET10:02, CST21:52 56/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control - 10 hours, 2 

utes Into the flight of Apollo 10, and currently, the space- 
craft is traveling at a speed of 8 507 feet per second, and 
it's about 49 650 nautical miles from earth. Since our 
previous report, we've had about 1 or 2 minutes of conversa- 
tion with the spacecraft. After finishing their evening 
meal, Gene Cernan had a brief conversation with flight 
controllers here in mission control concerning this morning's 
liftoff. We'll play back that tape for you now. 



SC 

02 purge is done 

CAP COM 

SC 
there? 

CAP COM 
down here, Gene. 

SC 

CAP COM 
SC 

is a real ride. 



Hello, Houston, 10. The fuel cell purge i 
Okay, thank you Gene. 

Okay, Joe. How are things going down 



Well, things are just looking real well 
Looks like you're doing a real good job. 
How'd the liftoff look to you? 
Beautiful . 

Oh, I'll tell you, man. That's one C 
There's no question when your light off 
and lift off the ground and then you go through MAX Q and 
after that it's smooth as silk. Till you come near staging 
and than all Hell breaks lose. 

CAPCOM Boy you guys sure made one heck of a 

racket getting out of there. 



SC 

of the east wind. 

CAPCOM 
in the right direction, 
there . 

SC 



Is that right. That's probably cause 

Yeah. That wind was drifting and blowing 
It really rattled the cages around 

I would have liked to have seen the 



expression on Tracy's face on that one. 

CAPCOM I'll bet that was priceless. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM The T&D looked real good on the TV it .'.oo 1 : 

just like it does in the simulator. 

SC I'm glad we're able to show it. It workad 

out pretty good from here. John did a real outstanding job 
of turning his vehicle around and plugging in. 

CAPCOM Yeah. It looked real good. In fact I 

thought there for a while you were just running a taped replay 
from the simulator. 

SC That's all it is, babe. They've just 

got a better visual for it. 

CAPCOM That's right. You've got a good model 

up there to work with. 

capcom Goldstone, Houston. Contact voice check 

net conference. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-18-69, GET10:02, CST21:53 56/2 
CAPCOM Goldstone. Read you loud and clear 

H ° W "cAPCOM Roger. Loud and clear. Thank you. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 10:31, CST2220 57/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 10 hours, 

32 minutes. Apollo 10 now 51,847 nautical miles from earth 
and traveling at a speed of about 8300 feet per second. A 
short while ago we heard from John Young aboard the space- 
craft. He advised that the crew has now started the passive 
thermal control which is a slow rotation rate of the space- 
craft to maintain proper thermal, equilibrium. At that 
rotational rate it completes 1 revolution about every hour. 
We'll play back the tape conversation that we've had with 
the crew and then stand by for any live communication. 

SC 1°> over. 

S C Houston, Apollo 10, over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston here. Go ahead. 

sc Okay. I think we're set up in the PTC 

REFS /MAT with a 20 degree dip and round about 2 75 degrees or thereabout. 
CAPCOM Okay, thank you, John. 

S C Can you ask a guy to take a look at that, 

and see if it got - got all in there. It's not always clear 
that some of these orbital numbers getting get down in that thing. 

CAPCOM Yeah, we'll check it out, John. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Houston. Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. All that - all that REFS /MAT 

stuff looks good. What we'd like to do is take over the 
antennas. Next time you go to either BRAVO or DELTA if you d 
give us a call, we'll take over then. 

SC Okay, I'll give you a call. 

CAPCOM Fine, thank you John. 

Sc Okay, Joe. I'll give you the OMNIS at 

this time. Stand by until I get you one. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you. 

SC Hello, Houston. This is 10. 

CAPCOM 10, go ahead. 

sc Okay, I'm on OMNI and A, but that s not 

what you want. I can't get a good lock on - on B right now. 

CAPCOM Okay. That's alright, Gene, When you 

get to B let us know. 

SC Okay. 
CAPCOM 



Either - 10, this is Houston again - 



either BRAVO or DELTA let us know and we'll try it - we'll 
get it from this end. 

SC Alright. 

CAPCOM Have you changed out that canister in 

the ECS yet? 

sc The canister has just been changed. 

CAPCOM Okay. Thank you Tom. 

sc Houston, I can fly on D right now only 

1 switch in D and the other in B if you'd like. 

CAPCOM Okay, be fine, Jim. Good idea. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 10:31, CST2220 57/2 

sc Rous ton, 10. I'm in DELTA right now. 

CAPCOM £°g. Understand, Gene. On DELTA. 

sc Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAP COM Roger. 10, Go ahead. 

sc Tell your friendly man on the left side 

there of you Joe that at CDR has taken aspirin burn, CMP 2, LMP 2, 
and the LMP also has one lomotil in the log. 

CAPCOM Roger Got it. Thank you. 

SC = 

CAPCOM Apollo 1G S Houston. When you get a 

chance, the man on the left would like to have DDR readouts 
for all three of you. 

SC What? 

CAPCOM TRD, I'm sorry. Dosimeter readouts. 

sc Man, I think they're all stowed in the 

suits . 

CAPCOM Okay. 

Sc Houston s Apollo 10. 

CAP COM Hoger, 10, go ahead. 

sc Okay, Joe, One thing we'd like to do - 

we're thinking about going to sack out now. Is to go ahead 
and shut the waste vent there, and so we'll - we won t have 
any 02 high flow lights. And also, what time do you want 
to terminate the battery charge? 

CAPCOM Okay. Tom. this is Houston. You can go 

ahead and terminate that battery charge anytime now. We 
have a few other things we re going to pass up to you, and 
let me make sure I get them all lined up here, and I 11 give 
them all to you at once.. 

sc Okay, battery charge coming off, and last 

relay bust circuit breaker (garble) 

CAPCOM Okay, roger* we copy. 

sc 0kay :; that fixes you up. 

sc And we want to go ahead and shut that 

bat down, so we won't 02 the power level (garble) 

CAPCOM Good. That's a good idea, Tom. 

SC Rous ten, Apollo 10. 

CAP COM 10 » this is Houston. Go ahead. 

sc Okay, Joe, You got an update to the flight 

plan or anything? , 

CAP COM We don't have one right now, Tom, we ve 

got some other little things we're going to pass up to you here In just 

3 min g£ e ' Okay, we're all clear to sack out shortly. 

CAPC0 M Good. We'll have it to you here In about 
2 or 3 minutes . 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

S C Okay, Joe, ready to copy. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 10:31, CST 2220 57/3 

CAPC0M Okay, we've got about six or seven things 

here, Tom. First off, we notice that RHC number 2 power 
switch is still on and we 1 d like to have that off. 
gg Okay, you want that oft? 

CAPC0 M That's affirmative 



sc It's off. 

CAFCOM Okay, the » -- - -- 

you if you want to get a hold of us during the night anytime, 

- - * • a _ J — A kanlr nn . 



it s on. 

Okay, the second thing we'd like to advise 



the best mode is down voice backup 

sc Down voice backup. 

rAPPOM That's affirmative. 

c£pcS2 Okay, the next item, Tom; we'd like to 
have the LM CSM Delta P pressure, if you can get that for us 
please. 

SC Stand by. 

^ PC0M SeUl have that for you in a little bit, 

8 ° ^^COM Okay. We're going to be watching this 

waate water H20 buildup during the night and we'll keep moni- 
toring till. And we'd'like to take over the OMNI switching 
and to do that we'd like to have you go to high gain, the 
high gain omni switch to omni, if you would. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10, COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, CST 2230 GET 10*41:10 58/1 



cc ...and we would like to take over 

the OMNI switching and to do that we would like to have you 
go to high gain - the high gain OMNI switch to OMNI, if you 

W ° Uld SC Okay, High gain OMNI coming up. 

qq Roger. And we would to confirm 

that S-band antenna is in OMNI and bravo. 

sc Omni and bravo. 

cc Okay, very good. I guesa the 

only thing is we would like to have your comments on 

how that TPC is going. How it looks from up there. 

sc Okay. I believe I've got 

sc Looks very slow, Joe. Very slow, 

sc WE've got all the window shades 
up and we are slowly rotating here and you can tell the 

spacecraft has started to cool down right away. 

CC No kidding. 

sc It feels real good in here. 

cc That's real interesting. 

Sc Pardon me? 

cc I said that is real interesting to 
hear that it is cooling down that way. 

SC Yep. 

sc Gene is sacked out. He is underneath 

the right couch. 

CC Who is sacked out? 

SC LMP. 

CC Roger, okay, 

cc Are there any questions that have 

come up up there that you would like to have us work on 
tonight while you are resting? 

sc No, the only thing, it was just 

because we probably haven't seen it in the simulator and 
forgot it in the debriefings is that 02 flow, like I'm readiag 
.8 on the 02 flow right now. We've got thtt vent shut. Is that 
supposed to be the normal flow? Should be lots less than that, 
shouldn't it? 

cc Roger, Tom. ACOM says it will 

take that a little while to come down to lower value. 

SC Okay. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/ 18/69, CST 2230, GET 10:41:10 58/2 

sc Okay, Houston, as far as we can 

see up here, all the systems just look real fine. How about 
down there, Jim? 

cc Okay, it looks pretty good. Let 

me clarify one foot setting here with flight Tom. Give me 
about half a minute here, and I'll be right with you. 

SC Alright. 

cc Okay, the LM CS - LM CF Delta-P 

gauge is reading 0.6. 

6 6 cc I understand. 0.6. Thank you much. 

cc Okay, Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

SC Go, Joe. 

qq Okay, Tom, I guess about one more 

thing, or two more things. One of them is we did want to 
verify these antenna switches. I may have confused you 
some on that. On the S-band antenna we want one in OMNI 
and one in Bravo. Is that - is that where you had them? 

sc That's where we have them. 

CC Okay, very good. 

sc One's in OMNI and one's in Bravo. 

CC Roger. 

cc Okay Tom, the other thing I guess 

we need is the onboard readout for the battery. That's for 
the flight plan there. I'll get that out. 

sc Okay. Roger, we 11 go ahead and 

get them for you. 

C C Okay, thank you. 

sc I'll call them down. 

sc Okay, Houston. Apollo 10 ready to 

call in the readings to you. 

Cc Roger, ready to copy, Tom. 

sc Okay, Joe. pyro battery C is 36 

OMNI. This is BAT C is 36.8. Pyro battery A is 37.1. 
Pyro BAT B is 37.1, RCS A is 93.0, B is 93.0, C is 99.0 



Okay, roger. We got all those, 



and D is 94.0. 

CC 

Thank SC° U " Roger. And it looks like we should 

be running well ahead of our RCS budget, here. 

Cc Okay, that's good. 

Cc Okay - Okay, Tom, I guess the 

part in shot here, flight says all the consumables look 
real good. Everything's looking real good for tonight. 

SC Okay . , 

cc Okay, I guess that'll do it. You 11 

have a good sleep, and we'll see you in the morning. 

sc Yes, it sounds like shortly we 11 

soon be about 55,000 miles out, huh? 

CC Yes, that's right. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2230, GET 10:41:10 58/3 



SC Sounds like a long way from home, 

Joe. 

CC You guys covered a lot of ground 

today . 

SC Yeah. I'll tell you, when that 

Saturn starts moving out, you can tell it's going to cover 
a lot of ground. 

CC (Laughter) 

SC I would have sure like to seen that 

from the ground, too, Joe, I bet that was - when that big 
bear lifted off. 

CC Boy, that was a beautiful sight. 

SC Could you see us all the way 

through staging? 

CC Yeah, it - there was a little 

cloud there. You disappeared for a while then you broke 
out into the open again, and there were - there were two 
decks that you went through, but you could - you could 
track it a long, long way out. 

SC Roger. 

CC That wind was blowing just about 

the direction you were talking about. It really rattled the 
cages over there at the VAB. 

SC I could imagine. 

CC I tell you, it rattled a few cages 

in the TLI , too, around here. 

SC That TLI frequency was a little 

bit too much. We thought sure it was coming unglued. It 
wasn't anything bad or anything, but just those oscillation 
shields, not POGO's but just vibrations. 

CC I'll be darned. 

SC Very great, very Interesting. 

SC Not quite as bad as the 104 when 

you throttle chop out in mock 2 and (garbled) 

CC 10, this is Houston again. 

SC Go ahead. 

CC Tom, did that water taste - could 

you taste any chlorine at all in that water when you first 
started using it? 

SC You bet your sweet bippy we did. 

CC Has it - has it gotten any better? 

SC Yes, it's gotten lots better. But 

there was chlorine in it to start with. 

CC Okay. 

SC That is a good theory, Joe, 

it just don't work. But it's mighty good, though, it taste 
like mighty good water right now. 

SC Hello Houston; 10 here. 

CC Go ahead, Tom. 



„ 6 »ia/M CST 2230, GET 10:41:10 
APOLLO 10 COMMBUTAiY, 5/18/69, CST 

when we serviced that watei, 

stuff tonight? stand by. The nan on the left is 

talking. 

END OF TAPE 



58/4 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, CST 2243, GET 10:54:10 59/1 



SC Hey Joe, you're right about that 

drogue, it worked. 

CAP COM It's got to work one more time, John. 

SC I know it. 

CAP COM Then 1*11 be around to collect. 

SC Right. 

CAPCOM On this chlorination , it looks like 

as per flight plan, we'd probably better go ahead and 
chlorinate. 

SC Has the . . . been coordinated? 

CAPCOM Yea, I'm afraid it has, and if you 

chlorinate tonight, you get rid of a lot of that taste by the 
time that you use it in the morning. I'd advise you to drink 
all your water before you chlorinate though, and then give 
it the Bhot , and by morning, it won't be quite so bad. 

SC Okay, but I thought they said if we 

got off on time we could probably go 2 days without it. Is 
the Cape talking to Houston these days? 

CAPCOM I don't know. I'll find out. 

SC Okay . 

PAO This is Apollo Control. It appears 

that we'll have no further conversation with the crew at 
this time. They either are, or will shortly be in their 
rest period. Tom Stafford advised about 15 minutes ago, 
that Gene Sernon, had begun a rest period, under the right 
hand couch, and reported at that time, that he and John 
Young were also beginning their sleep period shortly. Apollo 
10 is now 54 thousand 4 hundred 87 nautical miles from 
earth, traveling at a speed of 8 thousand feet per second. 
We just had a call from the spacecraft. 

SC The latest consensus on that 

chlorination. 

CAPCOM Oh I'm sorry. I thought we d 

passed that on. I'm afraid we've got to do that Tom, As 
per agreement with the doctors. 

SC Alright. Hey how about checking - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SC Yea, there was supposed to be some 

agreement that if the water was serviced right, and we 
lifted off on time, we wouldn't have to do it for a day 
or two. . , , 

CAPCOM Yea, I know. We've already wrestled 

that one out, and we lost on that. 

SC Okay . 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 11:05:40, CST 2254, 60/1 
BLANK TAPE. - Dead Air 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/18/69, GET 11:25, CST 231* 61/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 11 hours 25 min- 

utes. We've just been advised by Ton Stafford that he and 
John Young are now beginning their rest period. Stafford also 
advised that he had chlorinated the onboard water supply. 
We'll play that tape back for you now. 

sc Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger. Go ahead, Tom. 

sc Okay, we've put in the chlorine and just 

shot the buffer to it now do you want the potable tank 
inlet valve open? It's been Isolated all this time, do you 

Vailt CAPCOM 11 * Negative. You want to leave that closed, 

Tom, until tomorrow. 

sc So you want to have some really good 

chlorinated water, then, huh? n .. 

CAPC0M I'm afraid so, we've been wrestling that 

one out, but it looks like we've got to put it in again. 

SC All right. 

CAPCOM I know what you mean. 

sc Okay, but you just want to leave it 

closed, right? 

CAPCOM Right, John. 

sc Okay. 

sc Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, go ahead. 

sc Okay, I'm about to finish that ambial 

thing and we're going to sac out. And I've got the duty for 

tonight and the sleeping bag up into left seat so if anything 
comes up give me a call. 

CAPC 0M Okay, Tom, we sure will. Have a good 

ni8ht CAPC 0 M eP " We got a lot of eyes looking down here. 

SC Okay . 

CAPC0M i guess in discussing this chlorinatior 

thing, Tom, if we get through this first one why that • s the 
worst one, and we get on the schedule then, the 24-hour sched- 
ule where you give it the chlorine in the evening and it has 
time to dissipate by morning, by the time you wake up. 
time to oi p quegtion j want to know? 

is we've got a brand new load of water and it was completely 
isolated plain when we put it onboard the spacecraft and why 
do we have to give It another shot? 

CAPCOM Well, it turns out that I guess they feel 

that the chlorine becomes pretty inactive as far as k^ 11 ^ 
bacteria in about a 24-hour period, and when we chlorinated 
it this morning, if we were to wait to get on this schedule 
where you chlorinate it in the evening which is really the 
best time, because you drink the water and then you chlorinate 
and it has time to dissipate during the sleep cycle, then by 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/18/69, GET 11:25, CST 2314, 61/2 



CAP COM morning it isn't quite so bad and in order 

to get on that cycle, we had to do it tonight. 
SC Okay. 

PAO It appears that Stafford and Young will 

be beginning their sleep period at about 11 hours 30 ■inutes 
ground elapsed tine and that's about an hour and a half ahead 
of the original flight plan schedule and Stafford reported 
about 35 or 40 ainutea ago that Gene Ceman had already begun 
his rest period under the right-hand couch. Young and Ceman 
resting in the sleep stations under the right and left hand 
couches with Ceman under the right hand couch and Young under 
the left hand couch and Tom Stafford as you heard will have the 
duty tonight and will be sleeping in the sleeping bag on the 
left hand couch. At 11 hours 29 minutes into the flight, 
Apollo 8 is now 56 372 nautical miles from Earth and traveling 
at a speed of 7908 feet per second. This is Mission Control, 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/ 19/69, CST GET 12:17:00 62/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 12 hours 

17 minutes. We've had no conversation with the spacecraft 
since our last report. Tom Stafford reported at 11 hours 
30 minutes, ground elapse time, about 47 minutes "fcsp , t ha ' 
he and John Young would join Gene Cernan in beginning their 
rest periods. A short while ago, flight director Milton 
Windier, went around the control center and reviewed the 
status of the spacecraft with all flight controllers. That 
status is very good at this point. At the present time Apollo 
10 is nearing the 60 thousand mile mark, on route to the 
moon. Presently 59 thousand 963 nautical miles from earth, 
and traveling at a speed of 7,627 feet per second. At 
12 hours 18 minutes into the flight, this is Apollo control. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , S/19/«9. C.I 0049, GET 13:00:00, 63/1 
This la Apollo Control at 13 hours 

t.t. t„° e fiisht of apoiio io. ^"i-ii;,:*',:*^:: - 

a call from Gene Cernan aboard the spacecraft. 

play ».. k that cvr-.ti.-J..^.™ io _ over _ 

If™ ^i'lUSrSrJf"" can tall - 

, ptp refs PTC T and N system Is 

anything about the way this PTC refs Pio i thr * ster 

propellant consumption we re going 

° f ^CaIcoM Okay, let me take a check and see 

« that's normal to be firing tha-ften. ^ 

We get on the edge of the dead band just almost all the 

time. , 

CAPC0M R °S» oka y* 

"PCOM Apollo 10 Houston. 

c r Go ahead, Joe. 

1,t,™« Okav, for no longer than was in 

X oelrae aeaaVan"-^!/ oVo^'earee /eao bano but 

, • v«„'rp savins that actually it's going 

"t^rins"^; J 0 ;.!; is 1 .;... r « « 

-°" ld CA?C0r " 80l ° 8 ""ell h i B thInr t He ioe. ., 

out , ur'attltude ... Is that you won't ,.t .... Mr i»t 

a while. Is the firing bothersome as far as the .leap goes, 

" wak dpcoM u up - 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST 0049, GET 13:00:00 63/2 

CAPC0M i don't know that 30 degrees would 

be that much better. You're still going to get some firing, 
it would probably be a little bit longer between "^8- 

sc Yea Joe, the thing is kind of 

amazing what was pointed out on 9 and seems like a real 
flexible structure when it fires in pulse. The whole thing 
shakes and it goes through about 3 cycles when it s fired. 
I mean the structure vibrates for about 3 cycles. 
1 g C Also the roil is up now to 3 tenths 

of a degree per second just about and there is some yaw 
in there and some pitch. , 

CAPCO m This is Houston. Roger go ahead 

Tom. 

SC Go a« ead . 

CAP COM Tom, looking at it, Tom we don t really 

see any way to get away from it. We could go to 30 degree 
dead band but you'd still get the thrustor firing, that 
aeane they'd siill be waking up. As far as fuel consumption 
JTconcerned, it doesn't look, from the dat * f £ " e l^ust 
monitering it no longer than we have, it looks 1"" It ■ J«t 
what they figured. The fuel consumption isn't going to be 
too big a factor, but I can understand the thrustor firing 
is waking you up, and I'm not real sure how to get away 
from it! 8 I guess we're going to have to scratch our heads 
a while on that. The only advantage to zeroing out these 
attitudes, is that it'll be a while before it fires again, 
hut it eventually will start firing. ? 

SC Yea I was just wondering how much fuel It 

going to take us to go zero them out and get all set up again. 
S CAPCOM Rog, I think fuel-wise you're just 

as well off to leave it like it is. We just thought that 
we might be able to get away with having ... giving you a little 
tLe before they started firing again to get back to sleep. 

SC Okay, we're just going to leave it 

cIpCOh' 01 Ml " U ' ° k SLy. well I <Wt thl.k th. f» el 

that you'd use zeroing out the 

attitudes, Tom, would be anything to worry about. It will 
give you a little time to get back to sleep before it starts 
firing again. So I guess, that's kind of your option depending 
upon Lw 8 bothersom ±t is. If you want to give that a try 
well you could. ^ ^ we glva ±£ % try> 

and see how she goes. 

pap com Okay . 

as you heard in that conversation 
Stafford and Sernon remarked that the thrus tor . 

t0 be keeping them awake. Stafford remarked as to how 
e tSu or whu they fire, seem to cause the entire system 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST 0049, GET 13:00:00, 6 

pA0 to oscillate about 3 cycles. The 

resolution to the problem was not too clear, and apparently 
there is not a great deal that can be done about it. Capcom, 
Joe Angle, said that we would continue to scratch our heads 
about it here on the ground and see if something could be 
done to minimize the amount the thrustors fire to maintain 
the passive thermal control attitude, but that at this 
point it didn't seem that there would be a great J"***" 
could be done about it. At 13 hours 8 minutes into the flight, 
Apollo 10 is at an altitude of 63 thousand 5hundred 27 
nautical miles from earth, traveling at a speed of 7 thou..»« 
3 hundred 67 feet per second. This is Mission Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, 1328 GET, 0116 CDT 64/1 
pA0 Thie is Apollo Control at 13 hours 

28 minutes. Our spacecraft now at an altitude of "."J " 
64 938 nautical miles, traveling at a speed of 7,271 feet 
per second. We've had one Mditional brief conversation 
with the crew concerning thruster firing. We'll play that 
back for you now. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

C C Okay, Tom, we'll keep trying to 

work out a way to keep those things from firing so often, 
that's - thaAind of P caught me by surprise, but I can see 
where that would wake you up alright. Does that - did it 
give you pretty much of a jar or is it noise that wakes 
you u |" Well, it's a dull thud Joe, and the whole 

stack vibrates in dance of about 3 cycles. Kind of a boom- rum- 
rum- rum- rum, you know, for about 3 cycles. 
CC Yes • 

sc We're real loud but - 

cc Okay, we copy, Tom, and we 11 keep 

working that problem trying to figure something out here, 
a little more satisfactory. 

SC Yes, I think it's the vibration 

forming the noise. It's not - it's just a real light thud. ^ 
w£eTthe jet fires but the whole stack goes to a real ^ing 
vibration for about 3 cycles. They get in some real minor cycles 
which you can feel and this is what keeps you^awake. 

' Yeah, okay, I understand, I guess 

the only - only alternate that we've got right now is that 
we could go to that wider deadband, but you'd still get the 
firings, at just a little bigger air holes is all. 

SC Yes » « e ' i:L 9tav and see how tbia 

works out. I got all the lights turned back and I'm going 
back to sleep. ^ 8ee 

you later. 

SC Alright. 

pA0 Here in Mission Control, at the 

present time, we are going through a change of J* 1 *'; *J^ r8 
Frank and his team of - his orange team of flight controllers 
loSng on to replace flight director, Milton Wendler and the 
Maroon team. The capsule communicator on the upcoming shift 
"111 be Astronaut Jack Lousma. At 13 hours 30 minutes into 
the flight of Apollo 10, this is Mission Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST 0144, GET 13:55:00 65/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. 13 hours 

55 minutes ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently is 
outbound for the moon at a distance of 66,823 nautical miles 
from earth. And traveling at a velocity of 7, 145 feet per 
second. The orange team of flight controllers headed up by 
flight director, Pete Frank, has taken over here in Mission 
Control, and it is estimated that the maroon team flight 
director, Milton Wendler will be at a press conference in 
the main auditorium, building 1 at MSC for a change of shift 
press briefing, within the next 5 or 10 minutes. He's now 
putting on his jacket and is leaving the mission operations 
control room. Crew apparently is asleep now. We've had no 
recent communications in the last half hour or more, or at 
least since the orange team came on. And at 13 hours 

56 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CBT 15:01;00 t CST 2:50, 66/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 15 hours 

1 ainute ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 still coasting 
outward toward the moon and it is continuing to decelerate. 
The velocity has dropped now to 6867 feet per second. And 
the spacecraft now is some 71 240 nautical miles away from 
Earth. The Orange Team flight surgeon, Ken Beers, reported 
recently that the crewmen apparently are sleeping well at 
the present time. And all is going quiet here in 
Control. The flight director is getting briefed from his 
various console positions on the present status of all the 
systems: the guidance system, and so on. And at 15 hours 

02 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 

END OF TAPE 



4 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 0350, GET 1601 67/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. 16 hours 

1 minute ground elapsed time. Apollo 10, according to the 
space digitals display here in the control center is now 
some 75,104 nautical miles away from earth. And traveling 
at a velocity ever decreasing of 6,640 feet per second. 
Apollo 10 - Apollo 10 presently is being tracked through the 
antenna at the Honeysuckle Creek, Australia tracking station. 
With handover to Madrid antenna at half past the hour, some 
28 minutes from now. Crew's still asleep, at some 4 hours 
remaining in the sleep period. The only additions to the 
preflight flight plan has been a new set of stars for the 
program 23. This is lunar navigation, which is star and 
earth horizon sightings. At 25 hours, a new group of stars 
is being generated and will be read up to the crew after 
they wake up. And water dump at 23 hours 30 minutes, other 
than that, the previously published flight plan is still in 
effect. And at 16 hours 2 minutes ground elapsed time, 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/16/69, CDT 0450, GET 17:01 68/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. 17 hours 

1 minute ground elapse time. Apollo 10 at the present time 
is 78 thousand 855 nautical miles away from the earth 
continuing to decelerate in velocity. Now shown 
" lBHt , of fi thousand 435 feet per second. The latest 
Tettlitl on the track or trajectory of the S4B third ■«;• 

the locks blow down, or the sling shot maneuver after 
Si'S^Jd'tLi «tr.ct.d from the S4B, shows that t e stage 

: pP io^ateIy th 7 9 e ^'^"2 -e^ ^* f 

£ «. to approximately 11 hours, when they went to 

ileen earlier than scheduled. Wake up time is still with 
^^emission flight plan. And at 17 hours 2 minutes 
ground elapse time, this is Apollo Control. 

BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY ,5/19/69, GET 18:03: 30 , CDT 0652, 69/1 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control 18 hours 03 minutes 

ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently now some one-third 
the distance out to the moon, is now showing on the display 
here a distance from Earth of 82 659 nautical miles traveling 
at a velocity of 6240 feet per second. During the sleep watch 
here in Mission Control, the Orange Team, about an hour ago, 
had played back for it the onboard television from earlier 
in the day. When most of the flight controllers that are on 
duty now were home sleeping, the events of the day earlier - 
the liftoff and all the TV passes took place and most of them 
consequently missed it. Things are rather quiet here in the 
Control Center. The crew still asleep. All systems in the 
spacecraft are functioning extremely well. And at 18 hours 
04 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 0649, GET 1901 70/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 19 hours 

1 minute ground elapsed time. Space digitals showing positions 
in velocity for Apollo 10, now show velocity at 6,077 feet 
per second! Altitude above earth at 85,999 nautical miles. 
And we have here a weather forecast from a spaceflight 
meteorology group, of the weather bureau, ESSA, which said 
this mornfng 8 that weather conditions in the planned landing 
areas are expected to be satisfactory for the next three 
days. Ocean areas of concern should have partly c loudy 
winds, 14 knots, seas 4 to 8 feet, temperatures 70 to 76 degre.e . 
The Atlantic area should have widely scattered showers each 
day. The outlook for the end-of -mission area, that is at 
15 degrees 7 minutes south latitude by 165 wes t longitude , 
is satisfactory. Crew is still asleep at this time "J^ 1 ** 
to be awakened at 21:30 ground elapsed time, which is about 
two and a half hours from now. And the control cm « 8 
still rather quiet, everyone boning up on the flight plan 
activities and preparing for a handover in some 2 hours to 
the black team of flight controllers as they 
At 19 hours 2 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo 
Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 20:01, CST 0750 71/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 20 hours 1 minute 

ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently is some 89 499 nautical 
miles away from earth, continuing to slow down in its 2 and 
a half day trip to the moon. Velocity is now 5914 feet per 
second and here in Mission Control we are still monitoring 
the rather easy rest period of the crew, the first sleep 
period for the mission. We've got about another hour and a 
half in the rest period after which the crew will have their 
status report, get a consumables update from the Control 
Center here, also flight plan update for the coming day's 
activities, purge the fuel cell oxygen, and they will be given 
a new set of stars for the Program 23 exercise, that is the 
star and earth horizon lunar navigation at 25 hours. It seems 
the original set of stars has some interference because of 
the field of view restricted by the lunar module out the 
window while in a docked configuration. Incidentally, the 
combined weight of the 2 spacecrafts, the LM and the command 
service module now stands at 94 027 pounds. We are now tracking 
through the Madrid antenna and will continue to track for 
another 5 hours, handing over to Goldstone at that time. 
All going well in the mission of Apollo 10, and at 20 hours 
3 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



iiND OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 0850, GET 2100 72/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control, 21 hours, 

1 minute Ground Elapsed Time, as Apollo 10 nears the 100,000 
mile mark in its trip from earth out to the moon. The distance 
now stands at 92,836 nautical miles, continuing to decelerate. 
Now showing velocity in feet per second of 5,765. The crew 
has still not called back to the Control Center here, although 
the Flight Surgeon reports that Stafford and Cernan apparently 
are awake and John Young is still in a rather deep sleep. 
Members of the Black Team of Flight Controllers are beginning 
to drift into the Control Room here to take over from the 
Orange Team. The handover time will be half past the hour. 
We'll monitor the air-ground continuously and pick it up 
when the conversation does resume and the crew does wake up 
and begin their day's work, get their breakfast, and so forth. 
And at 21 hours, 2 minutes Ground Elapsed Time this is Apollo 
Control . 



END OF TAPE 



1P0LL0 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST:0920, 2132 GET 



73/1 



KING This is Apollo Control; let's join 

the conversation in progress with Apollo 10. 

SC Hey we've got a morning weather 

report for you; you may be interested in it. 

CC Okay, go ahead. 

SC Roger; it's a European/ Af rican 

weather report. Portugal is clear. Spain - western Spain 
is clear, eastern Spain along the Med is under clouds. Italy - 
Italy is clear south of about Rome. Sicily - Sardinia and 
Corsica are under partly cloudy to cloudy skies. Greece is 
clear. Greece clear. Turkey is under very scattered clouds. 
Bulgaria is clear with partially scattered clouds, but the 
rest of Europe is mostly under the clouds. There's a large 
part of the Soviet Union north of the Black Sea that's in the 
clear, but the rest of it appears to be under clouds too. 
Arabia appears to be clear. Israel clear. Jordan clear. 
Libya and Egypt are clear except for a cloud strip along the 
center of the country that runs from Saudi Arabia across 
the Sinai Peninsula. Africa is clear in the desert to the 
north and cloudy farther south. It's clear pretty much to 
the south except for the Cape where South Africa appears to 
be under the clouds. That's your morning weather report from 
about 100 000 miles . 

CC Roger. Thank you Apollo 10; the 

,nly thing missing was the music. 

CC It looks like you're starting out 

the day real good there; we've go - go ahead. 

SC That's a special effects we are not 

carrying today. 

CC Looks like ole Charlie Brown is 

motoring right along in good shape there; your consumables 
are ahead on everything, and Snoopy is hanging in there real 
well too. Your midcourse correction will be on time and will 
only be 49 feet per second. And we have a flight plan update 
when you are ready to copy. 

SC Okay, stand by. We want to get a 

couple of pictures of Europe; we're getting in position right 
now . 

PAO This is Apollo Control now, waiting 

for conversation to resume; that global weather report was 
by John Young. Apparently at 100 000 miles out, he has a 
pretty good view of what the cloud cover and the weather 
situation is all over the visible face of the earth. We'll 
stand by monitoring this circuit for resumption of conversation. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 0920, 21:32 GET 73/2 



PAO This is Apollo Control; while we 

are waiting for the crew to get things sorted out so they 
can continue the flight plan updates and beginning the day's 
activity, Flight Director Glenn Lunney is briefing his team 
as they come aboard, and on all the things that have to be 
done today. Here comes the crew. 

CC Go ahead Tom. Good morning. 

CC How do you read me Tom? 

SC Roger; loud and clear - like I told 

Jack earlier; we had a real great night's sleep - all 3 of us 
feel tremendous this morning and it looks like we're running 
ahead on all consumables. 

CC Roger. Good show. The only thing 

we really have for you when you can get squared away is a 
flight plan update - and we need some RCS totals I think on 
the consumables - that's about the only thing. 

SC Okay - you ready to copy? 

CC Roger; go. 

SC I'll give you - okay. On ring A: 

91 percent. On ring B: 94 percent. Ring C: 96 percent. 
Ring D: 92 percent. 

CC Roger; we copy all that. 

PAO This is Apollo Control; Tom Stafford 

reported the percentage of propellants remaining in the various 
quads instead of rings, he said rings, although he probably 
meant QUADS on the Service Module. A,B,C,D - 91, 94, 96 and 

92 percent, respectively on those 4 quads. We'll continue 
to monitor for further conversation - the various slips of 
paper being passed around here with all the flight plan up- 
dates - and Capcom is getting ready to jump in; let's listen. 

SC - your update. 

CC Roger. On the flight plan Gene? 

SC Yes, that's affirm. 

CC Okay, at crew convenience, we'd like 

you to get your personal dosimeters and put them on your 
person; it's no big deal on that, so if you don't feel like 
unstowing the suits, it looks like they are still on the 
suits, so it's your convenience on that. And at no later 
than 23 plus 30, we need a waste water dump. And for John's 
P23 - go ahead. 

SC Okay, I was going to say John wants 

to get a P52 in here before the midcourse, before that dump. 

CC Roger; that's why we scheduled it 

no later than 23:30 Tom; we thought that would be convenient 
time to get it in - the P52 about an hour later. 

SC Okay, Charlie; go ahead. 

CC Okay - and at 25 plus 10 the P23 

sightings again, we forgot that Snoop was out there, so we 
have an update for your attitudes and for the stars for 
set 3 and 4. The attitude - we'd like a roll of 078, pitch 



., — . APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 0920, 21:32 GET 73/3 

CC A pitch of 010 and a yaw of 000. 

Okay, for seta 3 and 4 - 

SC Okay, what about the stars? 

CC Okay, I'm giving you those now. Sets 

3 and 4 for - for substitute nunki -N-U-N-K-I, 37 
and far side. 

SC Charlie, you cut off set the stars 

again; all I got was roll, pitch and yaw. 

CC Okay, for sets 3 and 4 - Nunki instead 

of Antares, and we want the far side on Nunki. 

SC Okay, is 1, 2 and 5 the Base? 

CC That's affirmative. 

SC Okay - I got 20 - let's see - for 

P23, roll 078, pitch 010, and yaw all zeroes, and sets 3 and 4 
changed to Nunki far star. 

CC That's affirmative. And at 27 hours 

after the midcourse, we'll have an update for you on your P37 
pads for 35 and 44 and 53 hours. 

SC Alright. 

CC And that's all we got this morning 

on the flight plan. 

sc Okey doke; I think I got it all Charlie. 

We'll get that waste water dump in prior to 23:30 and we'll 
make a valiant effort on the dosimeterB. 

CC Roger, we copy. And as soon as you 

lettle down to breakfast, we'll, if you like, we got a news 
summary here we'll be glad to read up to you. 

Sc Okay, guess you can go ahead and read 

it right now if you'd like. 

CC Roger. Stand by. Let me get this 

squared away here with Flight and we'll be with you in a minute. 

SC Okay, we'll just wait for you to 

continue on here; go ahead with the planned 02 purge at 22 
hours, is that correct? 

CC Stand by. That's correct, Gene. 

SC Okay. 

CC Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like 

you to give us a little idea of how the thruster activity dis- 
turbed you during the night and whether we could go ahead and 
continue on tonight with the same plan. 

SC Yep Charlie. Roger. What happens 

is if you've ever flown a B-47 or even a C-133, it seems 
like a loose dynamic structure after the thruster fires; 
the noise doesn't bother you at all; it's just the dull 
thud, but then you have an oscillation to 3 or 4 cycles 
after with just a little minor oscillation that damps 
out. There's no problem; just keep on going; we slept good. 

CC Okay, fine Tom. 

SC Charlie, it gives me the feeling like 

.._ just a little minor pulse waves that big engine bell back there 
round just enough to vibrate until it damps out. 

Cc Okay, fine. Well we'll continue on 

then. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 928a, GET 2140 74/ 



sc 


- just a little minor pulse waves 


that big engine bell 


back there around just enough to vibrati 


until it damps out. 




CAPCOM 


Okay, fine. Well, we will continue 


on, then. Surgeon, 


as I came on this morning, said that 


it looks like you all were sleeping like a log. Bow was 


your position on the 


couch there, Gene? Real comfortable? 


SC 


Yes, pretty good. 


CAPCOM 


Okay, fine. Well, we will continue 


on, then. 




SC 




CAPCOM 


Say again. 


SC 


Okay, for your friendly man on the 


left, my dosimeter reads 26021. 


CAP COM 


Roger. 


SC 


Okay, Charlie, mine is 15030. 


CAPCOM 


Copy. 


SC 


And mine is 05027. 


CAPCOM 


Rog, John, 05027. 


SC 


I believe that's right, Charlie. 


CAPCOM 


Ri gh t . 


SC 


These are very small numbers. 


CAPCOM 


Roger. It's pretty early. 


END OF TAPE 





APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, GET 21:45 CDT 0933 75/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 21 hours 51 minutes 

into the mission. We will continue to stand by live. CAPCOM 
Charlie Duke does plan to read up a news summary to the 
crew. Apollo 10 is now 95 629 miles from the earth, velocity 
5 648 feet per second, and we're showing a weight of 94 027 
pounds . 

CAP COM 10, Houston, we're ready with a summary 

of news and sports as compiled by your friendly third floor 
astonisher Jack Riley and his office. Are you ready? 

sc Man, we is just about ready for anything. 

CAPCOM Roger. This is a news team of McCandless 

and Duke then. Newspapers, television and radio are concentrating 
on the flight of Apollo 10. The Houston Post banner read Apollo 10 
out of this world" and for the first time in memory the entire 
front page of the Post is all space news. The news wires are 
commenting on the quality and quantity of the TV transmissions 
yesterday. 

CAPCOM Senator Barry Goldwater paid surprise 

visits to the Stafford and Young homes yesterday. He said 
he came to Houston because he had been to the Cape before and 
each time the launch had been postponed. Other than the 
Apollo 10 mission, the world has been relatively quiet. 

CAP COM In other news highlights, Leonard 

Bernstein left his position as conductor of the New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra. 

CAPCOM Govenor Rockefeller is in Latin America 

this week on a presidential assignment. 

CAPC0M And a Siamese cat in Vancouver, Washington 

is mothering 3 baby skunks who are orphans. 

CAP COM A Chicago art collecter paid $12,000 

for a 120 year old paper weight. 

CAPCOM And U.S. Air Force planes are seeding 

clouds in the Phillipine Islands to combat drouth conditions. 

CAPCOM In the sports news, the Astros beat the 

Cubs for the second time in 2 days. The Sunday afternoon 
battle at the Astrodome ended with the Astros on top 6 to 5 
before a crowd of over 13 000. In other games it was 
Los Angeles Dodgers 6 Pittsburg 5; St. Louis 6 San Diego 5; 
Atlanta 8 Montreal 3; Philadelphia 9 San Francisco 8. 

CAP COM And in the American League it was 

Baltimore 5 K.C. zero; Detroit 8 Minnesota 2; Washington 
won 2 games with Chicago both by 3 to 2; New York beat 
California twice, 3 to 1 and 1 to 0; and Seattle beat Boston 
9 to 6 . 

CAPCOM The trials at the Indianapolis speedway 

were washed out yesterday. 

CAPCOM And Majectic Prince who won the Preakness 

on Saturday may not run In the Belmont Stakes June 7. The 
horse's owner reports the horse is tired and has lost weight. 
Too bad. Majectic Prince is in the first horse since 1948 
that has a chance to win the triple crown. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 21:45, CDT 0933 75/2 



CAPCOM And here is your horoscope readings for 

today, Apollo 10. Tom Stafford: You should concentrate on 
finishing things that you have already started. Today's 
pace will be moderate. Use this time to take inventory. 

CAPCOM And Geno your horoscpe reads: Give 

careful thought to your working and driving habits. Do something 
nice for your friends. 

CAPCOM John Young: You will have a slow day 

today. This will give you time to concentrate on the work 
ahead. You will enjoy your surroundings and companions. 

CAPCOM And the weather in Houston is beautiful 

this morning. The sky is clear and temperatures will rise 
to the low to mid 80 ' s . Last night a clear thin crescent 
of the moon was visible. And this finishes the first annual 
McCandless/Duke radio cast. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, Good morning Charlie. 

CAPCOM Good morning, Bruce. 

SC You guys are too much down there. That's 

fantastic. 

SC Boy, you out do me. I quit. You can give 

the weather next time, too. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC That was tremendous. 

SC You're going to put someone out of business 

down there if you don't watch out. 

CAPCOM Maybe you guys. 

SC Hey, we'll keep fanning the peacock up 

here and you guys keep talking. 

CAPCOM Okay, fine. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 0944, GET 2156 76/1 

SC Hey, we'll keep fanning the peacock 

up here and you guys keep talking. 

CAP COM Okay, fine. 

SC Hello, Houston. Apollo 10. 

CAP COM Go, 10. 

SC Okay, we just want to get this on 

the record. When we woke up this morning and took a drink 
out of the water gun everything was Just great and everybody 
had a good drink, and then I took a drink and it is absolutely 
horrible . 

CAPCOM Roger, that's kind of what we fig- 

ured. 

SC tea, it started out earlier this 

morning it was good and then I got a horrible slug of chlorine 
and my mouth is still burning. No problem. And so did John. 

CAPCOM Okay, I guess you were getting a 

good - 

SC Just thought I'd get it on the record. 

CAPCOM Rog, Tom. I guess you were getting 

it out - the good stuff was in the lines there out of the 
tank, perhaps, or something. And once you got the tank water 
it was bad. We kind of figured. 

SC Yes. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10. Houston, 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Hey, rog. Gene, last night when 

you chlorinated the water did you - we'd like to know if you 
left the potable tank inlet valve open for 10 minutes after 
you chlorinated. 

SC We discussed that with - we discussed 

that with the ground and they said no. 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll - I don't quite under- 

stand the problem. We'll, from this end, we'll square it 
away and get back with you. On this waste water dump, we'd 
like you to give us the word exactly when you plan to do it. 
We have telescopes Just about all over the world going to 
photograph this thing and we'd like to give them as much 
notice as possible, over. 

SC Okay . 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 944a, GET 2156 30 7 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 22 hours 

4 minutes. There is a discussion going on in the Control 
Center here now concerning procedures that may be able to elii 
inate this strong chlorine taste that Tom Stafford was talk- 
ing about. The E-comm officer is working the problem. Charli 
Duke will probably be passing up some suggestions on clear- 
ing that problem up. We are showing now Apollo 10 96,235 
miles from earth at a velocity of 5,624 feet per second. We 
will continue to stand by live for any transmissions. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 949a, GET 220130 78/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 22 hours 

8 minutes. Charlie Duke is going to put a call to the crew 
here very shortly. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Before you use 

any of your water to mix any of your food, would you hold 
off? We're trying to get this resolved, over. 

sc Okay, Charlie, we thought the chlorine 

would taste better in fruit juice than it does by itself. 
We've already pressed on. 

CAPCOM Okay. It's probably going to be 

pretty horrible. Stand by one, we will have some word for 
you. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. Last night when you 

chlorinated and we told you not to open the potable tank inlet, 
it turned out we didn't get any of that chlorine mixed 
and now that stuff is in the line and when you draw off from the 
gun, it' 8 not mixed at all with - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 0954, GET 2206 79/ 

CAPCOM *es, WB can tel1 vou llke lt# 

sc Yes, we all (garble). 

CAPC0M How did you sleep last night? 

CAPC0 M Apollo 10, Houston. 

cp Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. Tom, last night when you 

chlorinated and we told you not to open 

inlet, it turned out we didn't get any of ^ at u chlorln * 
mixed and now that stuff is in the lines and when you draw 
off from the gun it's not mixed at all with any of the water. 
So we recommend that you open the potable inlet now «d 

take a bag and draw off about a bag full of water and then 
get rid of it, over. charlie> Vm golng t0 go 

ahead and give you an 02 purge now. 

^ PC ° M O^ayl' Charlie, that's why I asked 

the question last night. ^ ^ ^ 

CAPCOM Well, I didn't get a briefing on it, 

John, but it looks like we Just gave you the wrong word over 

* Yes, that's why both of us were as* 

ing quite a few questions. If we had a complete isolat ed 
service water tank why would we want to slug a slug of chlo- 
rine into it when no new water had come in? 

CAPC0M That's a good question. 

CAPCOM 10. Houston. On your orange Juice 

this morning, we recommend that you probably not drink - you 
not drink that and you consider getting rid of it. It s 
possibly almost pure chlorine in the Juice. 
cr Okay. 

pTo This is Apollo Control at 22 hours, 

16 minutes. We'll take this release line down now and come 
back up when there is further conversation. They're calling 

now ' 10 

CAPC0M Okay, the LM* s (garble) is up 



SC 

to nine tenths today. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy, John. 



SC 



CAPCOM 



It's point 09 . 



SC 



Point 9. 



CAPCOM Point 9, got you. 



END OF TAPE 



"—APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1026a, GET 2237 80/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 22 hours 

37 minutes. Apollo 10, 98,084 miles from earth, velocity 
5,547 feet per second. We have a conversation in progress. 
We will tune in. 

sc Houston, Apollo 10. How much no- 

tice for that water dump, over. 

CAPCOM Roger. Just as much as possible, 

10, and that's all I can tell you. We would like an hour 
or so, I guess. Looks like we got - why don't we go ahead 
and plan It for 2230, 2330 as planned, John. We will put 
the word out. 

S C ^° 8 • 

CAPC0M We will put the word out for 2330. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Astronomers 

at a number of observatories throughout the world will attempt 
to watch this waste water dump scheduled for 23 hours 30 
minutes into the mission. The midcourse correction is 
scheduled for an elapsed time of 26 hours 32 minutes 56 sec- 
onds. It will be done with the service propulsion system, 
49 feet per second delta V. Duration of the engine firing, 
6.7 seconds. With this maneuver, we will be doing part of 
the correction to place Apollo 10 over the proper g«und 
track at the moon. We want the same ground track that the 
Apollo 11 spacecraft will follow. We will attain part of 
«t with this maneuver, and then the remaining part with the 

unar orbit insertion number 1 burn. This is Mission Control 
Houston . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 0954, GET 2206 81/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 22 hours, 

59 minutes. Apollo 10 is 99,263 miles from earth. Velocity 
is 5,500 feet per second. We had some brief air-ground con- 
versation just a few moments ago. We'll play that for you. 

CAPC0M Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We'd 

like you to close the potable tank inlet valve now. 

SC Okay, I'll do it. 

SC Houston, this is 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Go 

ahead. , , 

SC On this cycle the cryo fans, how 

long do you want us to leave them on? 

CAPCOM Stand by. Apollo 10, this is 

Houston. On the cryo fans, 2 minutes for each tank. Same 
for H2 and 02, over. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Roger, out. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 23 hours, 

4 minutes. The Flight Surgeon, Dr. Willard Hawkins, advises 
that the radiation exposure to the crew to date is the equiv- 
alent of about three chest X-rays. This includes that re- 
ceived during passage through the Van Allen radiation belt, 
the area of highest radiation. We're having conversation 
now. 

SC Houston, this is 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

sc Listen, you guys were so good to 

us with the news this morning that we thought we'd bring 
you a little disc jockey work from up here if you re prepared. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc This is Tom and John on the guitar 

and the three of us singing. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

sc Here it comes; we're ready. 

(Recording of Up, Up and Away played here.) 

S C Sure hope you enjoyed the last one, 

CAPCOM Hey, that was really beautiful. 

Somebody's voice is changing though or you stowed somebody 
away up there. 

sc I thought that song was sort of 

apropos . 

CAPCOM It really was beautiful; it was 

really great, you guys. Y'all been practicing a lot. 

sc We had trouble stowing the base 

drum aboard but other than that it came out pretty well. 

CAPCOM Rog, we got you. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 0954, GET 2206 81/2 

Sc Delta 5 pal makes your voice a little 
higher, Charlie. 

CAP COM Oh, oh, that's right. I forgot. 

Are we having an encore or are you saving your next rendition 
for later on? 

SC No, that's enough for one day. 

CAPCOM Yes - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMMTARY, 5/19/69. CDT 1038a, GET 2309 82/1 

gc - no, that'i enough for one day. 

CAPCOM I believe it (laughter) . 

sc Got a few more, Charlie* but we 

will aave them for a while. 

CAPCOM log. 

PA0 That's another apace first for Tom 

Stafford, although it probably won't rank as high in the 
technical annual* ae the flret apace randesvoue he and Welly 
Schirra performed. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISBIOH COMMENT ART , 5/19/69, GET 23:20, CDT 1109 83/1 

PA0 This la Apollo Control at 23 hours 

20 minutes. Apollo 10 is 100 378 miles from the earth traveling 
at a velocity of 5 A56 feet per second. We are in conversation 
with the crew concerning the water. 

CAPCOM Hello 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. We were wondering when you drew 

off your water to purge the lines at what point you took it 
off. We think you ought to do both the drinking water supply 
and the food preparation unit. Over 



SC 



It's too late now, Charlie, we've already 



g0nS Dilou Roger. Could you tell us where you drained 



CAPCOM Roger 
it off, Tom? 

sc Yes, in my grape juice. 



CAPCOM Okay 



SC 



It came off the food servicing thing. 



CAPCOM Did 



SC 



to us. Don't sweat it, Charlie, okay? 
CAPCOM Roger. 



By the time you had already got the word 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/19/69, GET 23:28 CDT 11:17 84/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 23 hours 

28 minutes into the mission. Apollo 10 is 100 808 nautical 
miles from earth, velocity 5 439 feet per second. We have 
given Apollo 10 a GO for the waste water dump at 22 hours 
30 minutes, and here is that conversation. 



SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
At 23:30. 
SC 
SC 

the water dump. 
CAPCOM 
SC 

Charlie. 

CAPCOM 
SC 
SC 



Houston, ApollO 10, over. 
Go ahead, John. 

Got a GO for the dump at 23:30. 
S tand by . 

10, Houston, you are GO for the dump. 



Rog- 
Okay . 



Thanks . 

Houston, Apollo 



10, we've started 



so it doesn't mess up the tracking? 
trying to do? 



Roger, copy, Tom. 

And it's really filling the sky out 
Roger. 

Boy, it really is. 

Hey, Charlie, is this to fix the problem 



Is that what you're 



CAPC0M That's affirmative, John. We would have 

had the dump before - we wanted to dump as close as possible to 
our midcourse, before raidcourse, and if this one goes as 
planned we won't do another one until L0I and we d be over 
the limit. 

Unders tand . 
10, Houston - 

Houston, Apollo 10 for comparative - 



SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

Go ahead, Charlie 
CAPCOM 
SC 



I'm sorry I cut you out, Tom, go ahead. 
I was just going to say for comparative 



sighting if we try to look at this stuff with the telescope 

there is oh, a fact of 10 or 20 times the number of particles 

we have from our other dumps, but the particles are all about 

maybe l/10th the size, 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

CAPCOM 10, E COMM just corrected me. It looks 

like we will have to do the dump once a day. We scheduled it at 

this time as close to midcourse as possible and yet still 

allow you we hope to clear it away so you can do the P52. 

sc Yes, there are a lot of stars out there 

right now. 

CAPCOM Yes, I'll bet. 

CAPCOM 10, I overlooked the consumables update 

we owed you at 23 hours. If you would like to copy that we 
have it for you any time. 

SC Okay, go ahead. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, GET 23:28, CDT 1117 84/2 

CAPCO m Okay, at 22:30 GET your RCS totals were 

92 percent across the board. We had an H2 total of 48. pounds, 
and an 02 total of 565 pound*. 

sc Okay, Charlie, that's at 22:30? 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10, over. 

CAP COM Go ahead. 

sc Okay, I*ve got something out here now 

tracking that - wonder if that could be the S-IVB. It keeps - 
seems to rotate and glimmer. It's not a particle. 

CAPCOM Roger, Stand by, Tom, I'll see - correction, 

John, I'll see if I can get you some word on that. 

SC It's a long ways off. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

sc It doesn't even fill the center of the 

reticle. It goes about half the width of the reticle. 
CAPCOM Roger. ' 

sc The width of the line in the center of 

the reticle. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy. 

sc Shaft is 94-7 and trunnion is 38-7 right 

now . , ■ . . 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy 10, we're copying down 

your attitude and your shaft and trunnion and it will take 
us a while to run it out. The FIDOS are busy with the midcourse 

right now. ' . J j 

S C Okay, sure, that's something you can do 

post flight if you want to. 

CAPCOM Roger, your water dump is okay. You can 

turn it off. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1125, GET 2336 85/1 

CAPCOM Rog, and your water dump is okay. 

You can turn it off. 

SC Hog- 

sc We're in pressure release 2 now. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 

dumped about 18 pounds of water from 26 pounds down to 8 
pounds of waste water. 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control at 23 hours, 

41 minutes. We're showing Apollo 10 *s distance from the 
earth now at 101,466 nautical miles. Velocity 5,414 feet 
per second. John Young reported he is tracking something 
in the optics that rotates and glimmers, and it's a long way 
off. He believes it may be the S-IVB, the third stage of 
their booster. Flight Controllers here will attempt to verify 
that a little bit later. They're busy now on the midcourse 
correction and following that work they will take a look at 
where the S-IVB is and attempt to verify for John whether 
that is indeed what he is seeing. 

gc Houston, this is 10. We're going 

to run through the main regulator checks if you want to watch 

CAPCOM Roger, we're standing by. 

p A 0 This is a test of the redundant 

components of the environmental control system being per- 
formed now. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We d likt v 

to repeat the second reg check here. We noticed a funny en 
the manifold pressure. 

Okay, well, I let it - I pushed . 

Would that account for it? 
Stand by, I think so. 

1 didn't hold it in the full time, 

2 seconds and then I let up on it 



SC 

in and then I let It out 
CAPCOM 



1 pushed it in for about 
and then I pushed in on it again. 

CAPCOM Roger, the E COMM's would feel w 

if you'd just do it one more time for us, John. 

SC 10» Houston. "«---'- -> ~ 



Check looks okay 



us . 



SC 



Charlie. 

CAPCOM 

SC 
works . 

CAPCOM 



Okay. I'm sure glad about that 
Say again. 

I said I'm sure glad that thiii? 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/X9/69, GET 23:50, CDT 1139 86/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 23 hours 51 

minutes. Apollo 10's distance is now 102 017 miles, velocity 
5 392 feet per second. Spacecraft weight 93 872 pounds. 
This is Mission Control Houston, 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 1142, 235300 GET 87/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 23 hours, 

53 minutes and we are in conversation with the crew. 

SC Hello Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

CC Go ahead Charlie Brown. 

SC We finished the ECS redundant compo- 

nent checks, and everything looks good from here. 

CC Roger; we copied it all Gene; looks 

GO to us , too. 

SC Okey doke . Sure appreciated the 

little news bulletin - plan another one tomorrow, will you? 

CC Roger, we'll have our morning report, 

when we first come on for you. 

SC Yeah Charlie, we just can't tell you 

how great that sounded this morning; that was just tremendous. 

CC I'm glad you enjoyed it. 

SC Especially that horoscope - we wouldn't 

want these guys to do anything wrong. 

CC No sir. You gotta watch 'em John. 

We appreciated your little rendition from 90 000 or so out 
too. 

SC Got that through the sextant. Boy, 

you could see everything. We could see - you could see the 
Nile Delta just like you were down there; you could see the 
whole island of Crete, you could see Italy, you could see 
the whole - you could see the whole coast of Europe, all the 
way around except its all in the clouds. 

CC Roger. Must be a fantastic sight, 

SC A little later if we can show it to 

you - it's just beautiful. 

CC Roger. 

CC How does the sextant bring out the 

landmarks John; do you think you'll have any trouble tracking 
from way out there? 

SC I don't think you'd have a bit of 

trouble. I think it'd be a piece of cake; those places that 
are open that we always planned to use for landmarks like that 
Coast and land down off of Arabia down there; it's just as 
clear as a bell right now; yesterday Baja California was wide 
open too. 

CC Roger. We could see that real 

clearly on the TV. It would really be a piece of cake to 
track - to do any star landmark work. 

CC Roger. 

CC If you have any trouble looking at 

the stars before the dump - could you see all the stars you 
wanted to see John? 

SC Didn't see any stars with the LM 

on there Charlie except in auto optics. 

CC That's what I meant. 

SC Some - (break in tape) Sometimes 

you can see stars; there's about a 10 or 20 degree angle when 
you are directly opposite the sun where you can see stars. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 1142, 235300 GET 87/2 



CC Roger. 

SC But you can't see them - you can't 

tell what stars they are - so it wouldn't be any good for 
P51, however, I did recognize what I believed to be Mars off 
the earth and Jupiter, because of its 4 moons, so you could 
use those for P51. 

CC Roger. 

CC How are the particles - do you still 

have the particles around now? Are they all gone? 

SC I can see a few out the left side 

window - but within about 5 to 10 minutes, most of them have 
diss lpated. 

CC Roger. 

SC The dump particles are so fine; they 

don't see to be as big as the other one that came from the 
waste system dump that we make - and they are not as persistant 
apparently too. 

CC Roger, we copy. 

SC Well, I can tell you from here that 

Cuba has got some thunder bumpers over today. 
CC Roger. 

SC John, through the sextant, can you 

really get an idea of the 3-dimensional affect to the clouds? 

SC No, it just aorta looks like a picture. 

CC Roger. 

SC To me anyway . 

SC I don't know how far along the coast 

I could see before the earth went out of the optics, but it 
looked like the Gulf Coast was open today too. Maybe 1 was 
looking at the wrong place here; that's real hard to see right 
now . 

CC Roger. When we came in this morning, 

it was clear as a bell outside; I don't know what it's done 
the last couple of hours though. Just got the word - it's 
still clear outside. 

SC It looked clear down that way. Except 

for the smog. 

CC Yeah. 

PAO That's John Young discussing the 

weather with Charlie Duke. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1152a, GET 2403 88/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 24 hours 

5 minutes. Distance is 102,742 - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

sc Hello, Houston. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

I've been looking at the earth with 
the binocular and it's quite a sight, but right to the left 
of it in my field of view is this rotating object John saw a little 
while ago and I'm looking at it through the binocular and 
sometimes it appears to be the S-IVB or else it s the SLA 
panel, but it's definetely got three dimensions and it s 
rotating at quite a fair speed. I can sometimes pick up the 
nozzle on it, which makes me believe it might be the S-IVB. 

CAPCOM Roger. Say again the position 

with respect to the earth, Gene. 

Wlt gc P Well, I've got the earth on the 

right side of my right hand window and it's perpendicular 
to the terminator of the earth. 

CAPC0M Okay. On the lit side or the dark 

side of the terminator? «.« r ml- 

sc Well, it's perpendicular, the termi- 

nator got both sides, doesn't it? I'd say, it's from North 
to South Pole, it's toward the east. tn 

CAPCOM Okay, that's what I was trying to 

dig out. I probably said it wrong though. We got the back 
rooms working on where the S-IVB should be We should have 
you some worl here in an hour or so probably. How big does 
this thing look to you in the binocular, Gene? 

sc Well, I can see it rotating and it s 

bright all the time and I get bright glare glints off 
It'f rotating and it's definitely got three dimens ions . I ve 
seen something in the last day that I thought was the SLA 
panel along with it, so this may be what it is. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAP COM Hello 10, Houston. We're going to 

switch ground stations. You may get some noise for a couple 

of seconds. 

sc Houston, this is 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

sc Okay, and then down quite a ways, 

maybe 30 degrees from the first one, I've got a second ro- 
tating object that's moving in the center up there and of 
course, it's much, much further away and all I can tell Is 
that it's rotating and that it's glistening. 

^ PC0M Se?! r Houston, maybe we got that program 

alarm by accidently hitting the mark button, but I don't 
thlnk CAPC0M d ' You don't think you accidently hit 

it, John? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1152a, GET 2403 88 



SC 

CAPCOM 
happened. 
SC 



No. 

Roger. 



We thought that's what had 

Tell me this. Called up VERB 5 
then and we've got to reset the TTC? 
Stand by. 

10, Houston. That's negative. You 



NOUN 9 just 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
do not disturb the TTC. 

PAO Gene Cernan is oberving those ob- 

jects through a minocular, that's half of a binocular. 

Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 
Go ahead, 10. 
10, Houston. Go ahead. 
Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 
Go ahead. 

Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We are 
Go ahead, Tom. 

10, Houston. Do you read? 
Yes, now how do you read, Charlie? 
5 by, Tom, you were coming 5 by all 



SC 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 



CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
reading you 5 by 
CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
the time. 
SC 



Oh, okay. I just wanted to give 
you a star visibility data point. Just a second ago, when 
the sun was in the right side window, number 5 window, I 
can see on the Southern Cross, Acrux and alpha beta Centauri 
out my left window and that's the first time we ve been able 
to see it. 

CAPCOM Rog, good show. 

sc And ve couldn't - John couldn t 

see many other stars, just the real big ones, you know, like 
alpha beta Centauri and Acrux. Now as the sun moves on 
around, they've disappeared, but that's the first glimpse 
of any stars I've gotten. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SC R°g- 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 24:20, CDT 1209 89/1 



PA0 This Is Apollo Control at 24 hours 29 

minutes. The Guidance Officer reports that Apollo 10 is 
realigning the inertial »easurement unit, getting set up 
for the second group of cislunar navigation sightings, John 
Young using the onboard optics will do some cislunar navigation 
tasks by measuring the angles between various stars and the 
earth horizon. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69. CDT 1221, GET 1432 90/1 

sc Houston, Apollo 10. We* re auto- 

maneuvering around for the P23 navigation. 

CAPCOM Rog, we copy, Tom. And, John, the 

^ Atr ^ un ° ur 949 W ere really hop- 




and then back to its pos 
the calibration, over. _ m A , no T was 

sc That's what I was doing. I was 

moving it off and bringing it back on. 

rivrnM Roger, that e fine. 

^ PC0M HoJ far off, how far off do they 

Watlt CAPCOM I didn't get that number. Stand by. 

John. til GUIDO's say any movement will be fine a degree or 
so and then back is all we need, 

gc Okay, I was moving it in both direc 

tiOD8 CA??0M Okay, fine. Good show. 

gc About a degree - 

CAPCOM Hello, 10. Houston. In this maneu- 

ver to your P23 attitude, if you have to switch antennas 
it'll take a command reset. 

SC Okay. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 24:48, CDT 1237 91/1 



PAO ThiB is Apollo Control at 24 hours 48 

minutes. We are in conversation with the crew again. 

CAPCOM Hello 10, Houston. We'd like you to try 

to get the high gain locked on for the P23 so we can have 
the high bit rate. 

SC Okay, we'll give it a try, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, I'll give you a VERB 64 as soon 

as ve finish this auto maneuver. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, We've got the - some angles 

for you on the high gain, Minus 52 on the pitch and 270 yaw. 
SC Okay, fine. 

SC Hello, Houston, 10, that should be high 

gain. 

CAPCOM Roger, we got it. Thanks much. 

SC Okay, and that's medium band width. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 24:55, CST 1244 92/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 24 hours 55 

minutes. Charlie Duke is in conversation with John Young. 
John reports having a problem calibrating the optics because 
the light scattering in the telescope prevents him from 
seeing the stars. Here's that conversation. 

SC Houston, I hate to admit this, but there 

aren't any stars that I can find right now to calibrate these 
optics on. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

SC It's got to do with the position of the 

earth and how much light we're getting through there and 
everything . 

CAPCOM I - say again, John, you were cut out. 

SC It's got to do with the way the sunshine 

is shining off the earth, how much light is getting scattered 
back into the telescope, and how much is coming in off the 
LM. It's really blanking out all the stars. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, if you don't think 

it will get better in 5 minutes or so and you still can't 
see anything we'll just skip it and try again later when 
the geometry gets better. 

SC Okay. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 24 hour* 

minutes. Apollo 10 's distance now from earth 105 372 nautical 
miles, velocity 5 267 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1259, GET 2510 93/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 25 hours, 

10 minutes. We're in conversation with the crew. 

SC houston, this is 10. What do you 

want me to use for a trunnion angle, what we got yesterday, 
or put in zeros? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 10, Houston. Leave the 

bias as it was yesterday. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Did you copy on the 

trunnion? You can leave it the same as yesterday. 

SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

one must be a mistake. 

CAPCOM 
good mistake. 

SC 

here in the left seat 
CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 



Rog, that's what I did. 
Rog. 

That 649 four balls plus four balls 
Roger, we copy you. That's a pretty 



Yes, that's what I'm saying. Up 
it's the best mistake I've seen, Charlie. 
Rog. 

How about that, Charlie? 
That's really beautiful. 
SC It's unbelievable, as a matter of 

fact. They must have zeros (garble) on your matrix. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 25 hours, 

12 minutes. Flight Dynamics Officer Phil Shaffer reports 
that Apollo 10 will be half way to the moon in terms of 
mileage at an elapsed time of 27 hours, 31 minutes, 34 sec- 
onds. The mileage at that time will be 112,991 miles. And 
according to the flight plan, the Apollo 10 crew will be 
having lunch at the midpoint. 

SC Here we are again. 

CAPCOM You guys are really sharp. 

SC Yes, John's doing a great job. He's 

having trouble seeing that from all the sun reflecting around 
him. 

CAPCOM Yes, we were imagining he was. Excuse 

me, did I cut you out? Go ahead, John. 

SC When the star gets down beneath the - 

on the earth, you can't see it in the background. You just 
have to pull it out of the earth and imagine which way you 
have to pull that handle to bring it out above the horizon 
so you can see It. 

CAP COM Rog. Well, whatever you're doing 

is right. Looks good. 

SC I don't know whether it's right or 

not . 

CAPCOM Eisele's sitting here and he says 

you set the W matrix to zero. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1259, GET 2510 9 



SC Good Idea. 

FAO This is Apollo Control at 25 hours, 

18 minutes. Showing present distance 106,423 nautical miles 
Velocity 5,228 feet per second. 

SC Houston, did you get the first one 

on Nunki? 

CAPCOM Roger, sure did. 

SC Here's number 2. 

CAPCOM Rog. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 25:28, CDT 1317 94/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 25 hours 28 

minutes and we're in conversation with the crew concerning 
the star/earth horizon navigation sightings. 



SC Okay 
set on star 37. We'll do set 
your direction 

CAPCOM 
calib rat ion . 

SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 
SC 

to get that kind of stuff 
one of them, Charlie? 

CAPCOM 

CAPCOM 

a GO. 

CAPCOM 
of time on that so far. 



Houston that finishes the first 
3 and 4 on the same star as 



SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

Stand by. 
SC 



Roger, it's primarily for an altitude 
Okay . 

10, we're C & F. 
Roger. Looks good from here. 
Okay, how much time do you really need 

Can you give me a GO when you see each 

Stand by, 1 think I can. 

10, when we get the data we'll give you 
And John, you've been giving us plenty 
Okay . 

You can go. 

Roger, that completes - okay right there. 



There's another one to go. 
SC We can make another one if you want to 

Just a horizon cal. 

Roger, John, 



if it 

CAPCOM 
Nunki . 

CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
SC 



we can need one more mark on 



You can go. 
10, you can go ahead. 
You can go. 
10 you can go. 

Okay, Houston, that completes the total 
f 5 sets there and we're ready for your P27 update for the 
midcourse . 

Roge r , s t and by . 
Okay . 

Hello 10, Houston, 
load for you, state vector, 



CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
accept we have 
a PIPA bias update. 

SC 

got it. 

CAPCOM 
we have a pad for you 

SC 



if you go to POO and 
target load, and 



Okay, going aim 6 set to POO and you've 
Roger, Tom, and if you're ready to copy 



Stand by . 

Okay, Charlie, fire it. 

CAPCOM Roger, as you know it's a midcourse 2 

SPS/G&N. 63153 plus 090 minus 021 026 325610 minus 00398 plus 

00109 minus 00258 099 184 359. Apogee and perigee are NA 

00487 004 - correction 007 00440. Sextant star is 45 2050 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 25:28. CDT 1317 94/2 

TAPCOM 292. The rest of the pad 1b NA. 

SC Okay, Charlie, for MCC2 SPS/G&N 63153 

plus 090 minus 021 026325610 minus 00398 plus 00109 minus 
00258 099184359. Apogee and perigee are NA. Burn time, or 
DELTA-VT rather is 00487. burn time is 007, and 00440 sextant 
star is 45 2050 and 292. 

CAPC0 M Roger, that was a good readback, Geno. 

Your set stars are Deneb and Vega 148 013 and 018 no ullage. 

sc Roger, give me pitch and yaw again, please. 

CAPC0M Roger, 013 and 018 and you're going to 

be in the burn attitude you're going to be looking at the 
sun. The sun is 4 degrees off from the X-axis and we think 
with this roll angle that the LM will block it out completely, 

thOUg SC Oakie Doak. I've got Deneb and Vega at 

148 013 and 018 no ullage and roger on the sun. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

sc Okay, Houston, 10, I have one other 

question. 

CAPCOM G° ahead 10. 

sc Okay, Charlie, you know in the flight 

plan we penciled in and said that if we did this correction we'd 
?rim plus X to 2/10 of a foot per second if the residuals 
were less than 2 feet per second. You still want that to go? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

sc Okay, thank you. 

CAPCOM 10? e we've got your state vector and the 

target load in and we're doing the PIPA bias now. 
SC Roger. 

CAPC0M Hello Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Your high gain angles for in the burn attitude will be yaw 
180 pitch at minus 55. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 1332, 254300GET 95/1 

PAO This Is Apollo Control at 25 hours, 

44 minutes. This midcourse burn - 

Cc 10, Houston; we got the load in now; 

the computer is yours. 

SC Roger, going to block. 

SC - go ahead. 

Cc What Tom. I cut you out there. Did 

you copy the high gain antenna angles for the burn attitude? 

SC Roger, Charlie, we sure did. And 

I'm going to go ahead to the B30 and B40 so so we can do 
the star sextant check and then we'll swap seats for the 
burn . 

CC Roger. 

cc Hello 10; Houston. Hey, when you 

guys get to burn attitude, if you'll take the sextant to 
a shaft of 161.5 and a trunnion of 032-1, you should see the 
SIVB; over. 

sc Okay, that was a shaft of 161.5 and 

032 . 1 on trunnion. 

CC Affirm. 

sc How far away do you suppose it is? 

cc We didn't get that number; hold on 

Gene. It'll take us a minute or two. 

p A 0 At 25 hours, 46 minutes distance 

is 107 845 nautical miles; velocity 5176 feet per second. 
Weight 93 872 pounds. This midcourse burn planned for 26 
hours, 32 minutes, 56 seconds. 

cc 10 Houston. The final say that the 

SIVB should be 1680 miles away - that's nautical. 

SC 1680 - roger. Long way. 

CC Sure is. 

S c Okay, we're starting the AUTO 

maneuver to the burn attitude. 
CC Roger. 

PA0 This midcourse will be a duration 

of 7 seconds; a change in the velocity of 48.7 feet per 
second; we'll be posigrade and out of plane to the right. 
Toward the sun - first part of the maneuvers that will bring 
Apollo 10 into the proper Inclination to cross the lunar 
equator on the same ground track that Apollo 11 will follow. 

S C Hello Houston; Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead 10. 

Sc Okay, Charlie, since we used tank A 

on the first seperation maneuver, we assume you want us to 
start this on bank B - then you want us to open both banks 
after 3 seconds' Over. 

CC S tand by . 

SC Okay. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST : 1 332 , 25:43 GET 95/2 



CC 10, this is Houston. We'd like you 

to start on bank Bravo and put bank Alpha in at 3 seconds. 

SC Okay - Roger. Just wanted to reconfirm. 

CC That's affirmative Tom - and we'd 

like you to discontinue charging battery B at 26 hours. 

SC Okay, at 26 hours. 

end of tape 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1347a. GET 2558 96/1 



SC 

CAP COM 
SC 

of the moon. 

CAPCOM 
the re , It's 



Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 
Go, 10. 

And we've finally got a good view 
waxy crescent 



also 
moon 



Hey, rog, that's - 
not very much but glad you see it. 

Yes, we can see the sunlight and 
we can see - actuallv can see the other part of the 
in the earthshine. 

Good. 

Ni ct to know where we're going. 
Rog. Can you pick out any landmarks? 
No, not fron this distance. We've 
reflected light coming off of the LM, Charlie. 
Roge r . 

But it does look bigger, Charlie. 
Yes, I bet it does . 
Looks bigger than it did. 
Okay, I keep cutting you guys out. 



CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 



a lot of 
CAPCOM 

SC 

CAP COM 

SC 

CAPCOM 



I'n 



sorry . 
SC 



It's amazing to see how much of it 



side of it is 
full moon from 



you can see In earthshine. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC And the whole back 

lit by earthshine. Looks like it's a full, 
earthshine . 

sc Yes, and the earth gets smaller. 

It's sure nice to be able to see where you are going. 

CAPCOM Yes, I guess it is pretty comfort 

ing. Well, we've got you pretty close, 
we will have a perigee of about 58 miles. 

sc But in relative ratio 

gotten that much bigger as the earth has gotten that much 
s ma 1 le r . 

Roger . 

At 26 hours 4 minutes. 
108,727 nautical miles; velocity is 



After this midcourse, 



it hasn 



CAPCOM 
PAO 
distance iB 
per s econd . 

CAP COM 



Apollo 10 
5.U4 feet 



Hello Apollo 10, Houston. Is the 
sun bothering you at this attitude? 

g c Not yet. We're just about 

the roll maneuver in about 20 more degrees and I can 



finish 
s ee 



that it is. I think you did a good job of blocking it out. 
The sun Is to the left. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Looks like we re going to be able 

to see stars because the LM is shielding us from the sun. 

CAP COM Bog, good. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1347, GET 2558 96/2 



p A 0 Tom Stafford reported the crew got 

its first good view cf th* moon at an elapsed time of 25 hours 
58 minutes. The display which shows distance was not being 
generated at that time, but the distance at that time was ap- 
proximately 108,600 nautical miles. Gene Cernan reported the 
cnoon locks bigge r from that distance- 

S r Hello, Houston, 10. 

CAPC0M Go ahead, 10 . 

SC Okay, I can see the stars real good 

the side window, I've got Sirius out my side window, but 
eve:t out through the rendezvous window I can look up there and 
I've got Orion and Rigel there. 

CAPCOM Rog. Boy, old Snoop really, when 

the sun is on the side, he must really block It all out, 

5C Yes, and I've got the moon right up 

It's a beautiful sight. 

Rog. We envy you. 

Hello, Charlie Brown, Houston. We 
discontinue battery B charge now. 
Rog, Charlie, thank you 



above the x-axis . 

r.APCOM 

. APCOM 
would like you to 



SC 

that trunnion for the 
CAPCOM 

SC 
SC 

good and I've moved t 
Is ft 8 eat . 

CAPCOM 

SC 



Charlie Brown. On 
1 or 3.21? 



The star check went 
John's Gloved to the 



Hel lo , Hcus ton , 
S-IVB, was that 32 
It was 32 . 1 , 10 
Okay . 

Ok ay , Houston^ 
5 the center seat 

Rog- 

- was just about a half of a degree 



off 



CAPCOM 
PAO 



Roger, 10, we copied. 
This is Apollo Control at 26 hours 
19 minutes. Apollo 10's distance from the earth is now 109,468 
nautical miles; velocity is 5,118 feet per second. Spacecraft 
weight is 9 3, 872 pounds. We are 13 minutes 26 seconds away 
from the mldcourse correction. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/59, CDT 1^08, GET 2619 97/1 

gQ Coming up on 10 minutes. Mark, 

10 minutes to the burn, and we're in burn attitude all 
squared away, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We d 

like to get a time hack quick here. We're counting down to 
the burn and we show 11 minutes, 25 seconds, mark. 

SC Okay, our event timer may have 

goofed up on us a little bit. 

CAPCOM Roger, we showed you load the proper 

take time of 26:32:56:10. 

Sc Yes, that's what we - we set our 

event timer at 47 minutes (garble) counting down. 

CA PC0M Roger, I'd like to give you a hack 

at 1045. , . J 

SC Okay, the event timer jumped 2 min- 

utes on us someway. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc we were all right on the seconds. 

CAP COM Coming up on 1030, To<o. I'll give 

you a mark. Mark 10 30 . 

SC Charlie, would you Rive us another 

hack in 10 minutes so we can set our timer? 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Passing 1005. 

Stand by for a mark at 10 minutes. Mark 10 minutes. 
SC We ' re synched, 

CAPCOM Rog. 

PA0 This Is Apollo Control at 26 hours, 

30 minutes. Distance is now 110,000 miles. Velocity 5,099 
feet per second. We're 2 minutes, 36 seconds from the mid- 
course maneuver. 

sc Okay, Houston, coming up on 2 minutes, 

going to normal on bank B. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 519/69, CST; U19, 26 2 r i GET 98/1 



p A0 - 30 seconds. Engine on; it looks 

good. 

SC Burn is complete. 

CC Roge r , copy . 

SC And I'm going to proceed to 0 16. 

CC Roger Tom. Bum looks good to us. 

sc Okay, there's plus X, minus 9/10 
and I'm going to ullage it back to 2/10. 

CC Roger. 

SC There's 2/10. 

CC Roger. 

sc Residuals minus 2/10, zero and plus 

3/10. 

CC Beautiful. 

SC Proceed. 

CC Roger. 



In? 



CC 10, Houston; it looked really good to 

one question. Could you guys feel the second bank coming 

sc I didn't feel it as a matter of fact. 

CC Roger. 
t sc I was busy turning it on, I really 

didn't check the chamber pressure too well. 
It looked like it jumped a little. 

CC Roger. 

sc About 4 pBi. Our Delta VC on that 

was minus 4. 4. 

CC Copied. 

sc Charlie, the fuel remaining is 99.4 

oxidizer is 98,0 and the pugs meter bounced around quite a 
bit and ended up at 400 decrease. 

CC Roger, copied Gene. 

PAO And at 26 hours, 36 minutes, we are 

showing distance of 110 324 nautical miles - velocity 5105, 
feet per second, and weight 93 419 pounds. And that midcourse 
correction was very successful - it'll give us a 58 nautical 
mile perigee. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead Apollo 10 . 

SC Okay - why don't we try to kill two 

birds with one stone - and l^t's go ahead to the P TC attitude 
and also we can get high gain to the earth and get a picture 
of the earth with the TV as it comes up. 

cc Roger; will do. We'll have the set 

angles for you in just a minute. 

SC Roger. 

CC And Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like 

to move the pad updates down to about 27:45 so it's not to 
interfere with the TV. 

SC Okav 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: U19, 26:30 GET 98/2 



PAO And the indications from Tom Stafford 

are that he is going to turn the TV on earlier than scheduled 
the schedule called for it at an elapsed time of 27 hours, 15 
minutes - but his remark seems to Indicate that he will turn 
it on prior to that time. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 26:40, CDT 1429 99/1 



Houston. 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. If you - when you go to the 

PTC if you point it north we can give you a set of angles 
that will give you earth through one window and the moon through 
anot he r » 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We have some 

PTC angles for you and then some high gain angles and also 
we'd like for you to reinitiate battery B charge. Over. 

St Okay , s tand by . 

SC Go ahead with those angles. 

CAPCOM Roger, John. Roll 307, pitch 090, yaw 

000. That places the mocn in window 5 and the earth in 
window i. High gain antenna pitch 00 5, yaw 265. 

SC Thanks much, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston we get this ... pressure light 

on oxygen tank 1, which we heard we might get and wonder if 
we hadn't ought to - it went back out - if we shouldn't 



maybe cycle the fans, 
itself automatically. 
CAPCOM 



I guess they Just cut in the heaters 



St and by . 

sc Looks like the heaters Just came on 

automatically and are kicking it back up themselves. 
CAPCOM ' Roger, stand by. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10. Houston, we'd like to hold o 

on the cycle in the fans and wait until our next scheduled 
time and see what happens. 

sc Okay, Charlie, the light Just went back 

the heater may have come on and kicked 



out. 1 theorize that 
it back within limits,, 

CAP COM 

SC 

CAPCOM 



Roger, we concur. 

And the caution and warning looks ... 
Roger, we concur. 

Houston, Apollo 10, we're maneuvering 
Into the new attitude now. 

CAPCOM This is Houston, Roger out. 

S C And Houston, Apollo 10, how soon will 

vou have the results of the ntidcourse we made? 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Superficia 

the burn looked pretty good, but it will rake about an hour 
for us to reduce the high speed data. Over. And to get 
tracking. 

SC Roger. Thank you. 



END OF TAPE 



A POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY f 3/19/6*. C1>T U 39 . «T 2650 100/1 

c C Roger, thank you. 

PAO This is Apollo Control «t 26 hou s, 

^^^^^•^ 

13..1S .pound.. thatl> be .« 

TV. It's just too thin and too dim. 

..tt.'J. ... «h. .«t£. .•...«;•;« ■> « lndo " ** a 

" loo ^cir th * -iJ. c . D .:"o ' sir:....* *«. -«« t 

1, the TV «h«e«r ... .... I b.v. .. "!><■«. to 

your PTC attitude mode though. 
sc Stand by . 



SC 



Okay, Bruce, go ahead with that new 



'"^^PCOM Stand by one, Tom. Roger, Apollo 10. 

than we'd anticipated, so V ^° ffl p a J craft settled down and 
cedure which we hope w ill g et the JP 8 "'" follow, the 

n ore smoothly into the ; ou B r " cne C ^ y l8 1 except that you 

^el" U "5° n de g re 8 :s GO de f ad D a 9 nd, a/d then I hav ; ; some thruster 
configurations for you. Are you ready to copy? 
SC Roger, go ahead. 

rAProM Roger. After you get through the 

»" - " ?•.::..;. ah.:: u , M5. , s:«i" kl -"i.". 
.r.:;. si 1 ?:?: '-IS - ~. ». ::nth ."»-» 

desired roll rate which we .ho. .. ' " ; „'„ c „l 

: 0 .":i J .rtl"d.'pl I t:h r "'d ,„ r.t. e..».nd of 30 degree. d..d- 
b.»d. Over. i>ld ifMr you „„ th , so . 

« >•>• «»»; s •«»: * n 8 : r. l u.i: t i , .: 1 m.s t ;i«i 

ir^irr^:'::; « » lo 

pitch and yaw. Was that what you said there, Bruce? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT U39. GET 2650 100/2 



CAPCOM Roger, that's what I said 

CAPCOM 10. Houston. Say again. 

SC Could you - why don't you explain 

what we're doing here? 

CAPCOM Okay, we're trying to get you set 

up in a stable position and all damped o«t and then initiate 
ve y ca-- fully and sl-w^y PTC and then open up deadband. We 
hope this will cut down on tt- thruster firing and keep you 
from bomiing off the side of the yaw deadband with more 
fhrnster firings and consequent noise and vibrations than 
vou had la; t night. 

SC I got you. 

CAPCOM And - go ahead, 10. 

SC Okay, J-hn's copying that down and 

we've got the tube 1 -eked on to yours. 

SC Okay, but really what we're trying 

co do here is Just get the thing real stable before we start 
and then we're going to a 30 dtgree deadband just like before, 
right ? 

CAPCOM That's right. 

SC Okay. 

CAP COM And down there on steps E and F 

you can go Into manual attitude roll accel command in order 
to initiate your roll rate If you like. 

SC Okay, you've got the TV coming at 

you now . 

CAP COM Oh, r*ger, we don't show it on the 

color yet. Let me check it out on the black and white monitor 
here. 

PAO We'll have a picture very shortly. 

CAPCOM I don't show it on the color yet. 

Let roe check it out on the black and white monitor here. 
Okay, we're seeing the earth on the black and white. It's 
filling up about one third of the screen vertically. Look- 
ing good. Okay, you're on the color now and looking beauti- 
ful. Okay, we've got the North Pole over to the upper right 
hand corner - the right hand edge of our screen. Do you 
have a commentary from up there, 10? 

SC Yea, okay. It looks like the North 

Pole and most of Russia is covered with clouds. The United 
States is pretty much wide <^pen. In fact, the Solar Subpoint 
is right over the Gulf of Mexico now. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Could you give us a 

narrow beam on the high gain antenna? 

SC Okay, Houston. I've got the full 

zoom on it so you can see we're quite a bit further away 
today than we were yesterday. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY » 5/19/69. CDT 1439, GET 2650 100/3 
CAPCOM Yes indeed. 

SC Rog, what you see there. What you 

see there is a little bigger than we actually see it since 
I have the full zoom on it. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 1451, GET 2702 101/1 



SC - what you see there Is a little 

bigger than we actually see it, since I had the full zoom 
on it. If you look to the south, you can see all of South 
America there, and west of the Andes is clear. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC And in the tropical rainforest over 

Venezula and Brazil and Columbia, you can see the clouds 
that hang over there all the time. I noticed how clear it 
is west of the Andes. 

CAPCOM Roger, we can see that on the 

left of our screen. The landmasses don't 9eem to stand out 
quite as clearly today as they did yesterday. 

SC That's correct. A lot of it is 

the cloud cover and also you can see night time moving over 
Europe now. You've got a real weird cloud formation coming 
around down - just a minute. Let me get a refocus . 

SC It's a real peculiar looking cloud 

swirl. It comes off of what looks like Labrador and goes 
all the way across the ocean into Europe. 

SC I'm having a little harder time 

holding it today because of the narrow beam that we have 
with the zoom lens. We're out at maximum zoom now. 

CAPCOM Roger, it's coming very nicely 

here. Would you confirm you are In the exterior on ALC. 

SC Right, we're exterior on ALC. 

CAPCOM Thank you. 

SC I'll open it up to about a 55-mir, 

and show you exactly how it appears to us. 
CAPCOM Roger, we're - 

SC Sure are a lot of clouds down 

there . 

CAPCOM We are standing by for your zoom 

out to show us the relative size as it appears to you. 

SC Okay, right. Right there is about 

how the earth appears to us now. We've made a few miles 
since yesterday. 

CAPCOM Yes, indeed. Roger, we show you 

about 115,000 nautical miles out here in our plots. Looks 
like about halfway. 

SC Yes. How are the colors coming 

into today, Bruce? 

CAPCOM Oh, the colors are coming beauti- 

fully, Tom. I'm amazed at the fidelity. The sea seems to 
reproduce the same color from day to day, so it looks like 
you guys have a pretty stable piece of equipment. 

SC Okay, again you can see Baja, 

California, coming in there just real clear and the Rocky 
Mountains, particularly starting into Mexico going up 
through Colorado and Wyoming are coming in. 



APQLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1451, GET 2702 



CAPCOM Roger, I'm having a little difficulty 

picking out the land masses down here today. 

SC That's because of cloud cover then. 

It looks like broken clouds over the southeastern part of 
the United States. Northeast has a little bit more. Looks 
like Canada is all flocked over today and over that big 
cap that goes up over the North Pole and over to Russia 
is just followed overcast. 

CAP COM Rog. We can pick up part of 

South America. Must be the Andies, just west of the 
terminator down in the southern portion of the globe. 

SC Bruce. You should see all of 

North and South America from where you are. 

SC We're going to zoom it in again 

here. Show you a little bit closer. That's maximum 
zoom right now on Che camera. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC It's a beautiful sight. We're 

sitting here and it's almost like Science Fiction looking 
back at us, Bruce. 

CAPCOM Right. We can pick out the continents 

more clear ly . 

SC I'm voting for the world being 

round if there's dissenters. 

CAPCOM We'll record your vote on that 

1 8 s ue . 

SC You know yesterday we said the 

San Joaquin Valley was very evident. It sits on a bowl. 
Even thought we're looking at it obliquely, you can still 
pick it out in the western United States. Just like a 
big ball carved out of the coastal and the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains . 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, Houston. The SPS data 

has been looked at on both the midcourse 2 and the evasive 
maneuver and all the data is good. We'd like to get you 
to cycle the ALC switch once so we can observe the effect 
on the picture down here. 

SC Okay. Let me go back to our 

monitor. Okay, here we are. 

CAPCOM Roger. You just hold it steady 

and then cycle it a few seconds interior and back to 
exterior first. 

SC It's in interior now. 

CAPCOM Oh we can really see you working 

out down there . 

SC Coming back to us again. 

CAPCOM Beautiful. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, GDI 1451, GET 2702 101/3 

sc And Tom's cutting on the F stop 

now a^ittle bit. what p 8top are you 

U8lng J c Did you stop it down 1 or 2 stops 

more. It seems like the definition is clearer. 

sc There's F22 right there. 

cc Okay; Hold it there. 

rr 10, this is Houston. When you 

stop it down we get a second or so of excellent '•"-"ton 
and no saturation and then it tends to saturate again up 
in the North Polar region as though the ALC weren t quite 
picking up -- 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST : 1459 , 2 710 GET 102/1 
sc - plus 4 region - as though the ALC 

weren't quite picking up the insensity of the highlight, 
weren t q s ^ not fae able tQ 

the moon because, through the TV, because we got the sun, right 
up beside the right hand window. 

cr Roger, understand. 

gj: W e ? ll bring you on inside the space- 

craft if you like. ^ thatj wQuld yo 

open the lens up about 2 stops slowly and then stop it down 
f-i rlv raoidlv for us? 

sc okay. the y are comin 8 °p en now - 

(garb cc ) Roger; go ahead and bring the camera 

inside now if you like. . the 

or I can see what you mean about the 

the place. 

CC Roge r . 

sc Okay, we're gonna take you inside. 

Thafs^probably been^aid ^.^^ up yQur tran8 . 
.i..ion from inside now.^ ^ ^ Qur patch; 

how is it coming through in color? 

cc Not so good really; it looks H** 

you got some rather intense lighting from the back and the 
side - if you could get the lighting more directly on the 
patch it would be better. „ m1na 1n 

v sc Yeah, that's the sun coming in. 

We gotSohn coming through nicely on the tube. What was 
the 3 fingers for? 

sc The ... of the day . 

cc Oh, that's beautiful. 

sc We were gonna put some more things 

in hut we lust ran out of time. 

in, but we J (ioud laughter) Rogeris i 3 this also 

your emblem? 

sc This is another emblem. 

sc Do you see any resemblance between 

the card and the guy holding the card? 

cc Now that you mention it. 

sc Does he carry the briefcase. 
Good grief Charlie Brown% Now you're gonna bring on that 
vizzer here. 

cc Okay, we got Snoopy now. f 

cc Boy he's been quiet for 2 days; he s 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST: 1459, 27:10 GET 102/2 

SC gonna get a chance to do a little 

woofing here in the next couple days. 

CC Roger. We notice the resemblance 

there too. 

SC Thanks a lot . I didn't know Tom 

had a big nose like that. Take you over to Gene-o's aide 
of the spacecraft. 

CC Roger; picking up Gene now; you've 

got rather strong back lighting from the window. 

CC That's the spirit. You all enjoying 

the window shades there? 

SC There; is that any better? 

CC It is indeed. 

SC We didn't get a chance to shave this 

morning before this show; I hope that doesn't bother anybody. 

CC No, it doesn't bother us. The 

definition is real good; we can Just about read your wrist 
watch there Gene. 

C C Roger; looks like it says about 1600. 

16:05? 

SC 1605 Cape time. 

CC Roger, we copy. 

SC Houston. 

CC Roger. We synchronized our 

watches here. 

SC Beautiful. Beautiful. Looks 

like we have a good piece of gear here. 

CC Yes, it does. 

SC give you a wizzer, give you 

a wizzer of TP over here. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, GET 27:18, CDT 150 7 103/1 



sc one of our problems is trying to figure 

out which way is up and which way is down. 

sc And it's beautiful one time you have your 

choice. If you don't like things right side up you can go up- 
side down. 

CAPCOM Roger, down here, okay, we ve got one 

of you in each direction. 

sc it's really a ball up here living in 

0-g, believe me. 

SC it's the only way to fly. 

sc Once you get going the cost for individual 

passenger mile becomes rather reasonable. 
CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SC I notice, boy, it sure picks up the sun s 

reflection and density no matter where you go. That little 
reflection is coming out of my window behind me. 

CAPCOM " 
using now? 

sc We're on about 28 I believe here, wait 

a minute. Yes, about 22 to 28. 

CAPCOM Your center, roger out. 

SC No good color? 

CAPCOM Yes, it is. 

Sc You might notice the dynamics here. 

Sc I just do whatever he says. 

CAPCOM Say, Tom, the flight engineer wants you 

to be sure you log all your exercises. 
SC I got you. 

sc Like I said earlier, this isn t fanning 

the peacock, but it's the best we've got 



That's all right. What F stop are you all 



CAPCOM 



Boy, with dynamics like that you guys ought 



to be pretty good at this PTC mode. 

Sc I mean to tell you. 

Sc Right, that's why we got about 10 hours 
sleep last night. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc That's perfect zero gravity there. Boy, 
I'll tell you there's nothing like It. 

CAPCOM 10, this is Houston is there (garbled) Are 

there any sort of air currents there affecting anything you can 

feel? t w 

sc Just a ... a little movement. Watch the 

sun out here, Roy. 

CAP COM That's in effect - we discovered a long 

time ago. If you watch it long enough, it'll go out. 

sc it's really hard to stabilize some so - 

so they won't move. 

CAPCOM Roger. I remember that from Gemini 10. 

SC We discovered a ... effect up here, but 

we can't find which way is up. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY : 5-19-69, GET 27:18, CST 1507 103/2 

CAPCOM Gene, could you move the camera around 

slightly. I've got a very bright spot coming in the window, 
I just want to make that you don't burn the target with the 
F2F28 F-stop. _ , „ 

sc Yeah I'll try here, Bruce, to get it 

away from some of that if I can. 

CAP COM OhTit's really looking good now. Beautiful 

color here. 

sc n ow W e got three objects going. 

CAPCOM This is a real testimonial to prove you 

were there, in case there were any doubters. 

sc if you want to know what kind of men go 

to the moon, there's a good looking one right there. Could you 
believe it? 

SC Sone people still don t. 

sc That -s all right if you'll just send us 

S ° me CAP COM Oh, vou want music. Well we'll give you 

some music at the conclusion here. 

sc Okav, we'll take you back outside now. 

CAP COM Roger. 

sc While Tom's showing you that, we ve got 
another little rendition we'd like to put your way. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're standing by. 

sc Here it comes. This - this is just so 

that you guys don't get too excited about the TV and forget 

what your job is down there. 

CAPCOM We're ready for what we re about to 
rec ie ve . 

sc We don't mean it ah. 

sc just wanted to send some thrust back to 

y ° U " CAP COM Roger. Thank vou for your thoughts, and 

with this view of the earth it looks like the United States - 
the land mass of the US is showing up better now than it 
was a few minutes ago. 

- c Right. Bruce. I can really see them. 

Looks like the New England states are kind of clobbered in 
there, 

CAPCOM Right, 

sc But the main part of it's coming in real 

good. And again you can see the great American desert, 
the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevadas there. 

CAPCOM Oh it's just beautiful on the - the transients 

before It saturates there. 

sc Okav, I'll try to give you another one. 

CAPCOM All those little glimpses are good, but 

you've got to be fast to catch them. 

sc is if - I'm trying to hold it as steady as 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-19-69, GET 27:18, CST 15:07 103/3 
sc I can. Is it looking okay? 

CAPCOM Yes, you're doing a good job on holding it. 

sc This is Apollo 10. On the monitor, it 

appears that I have a couple of little bumps and ragged 
edges. Is that coming through on the black and white? 

CAPCOM Yes, it is. It's coming through on the 

black and white and of course in the - the color that we've 
got here, it looks like it's in the horizontal sweep. 

Sc Yeah. I noticed it when we first turned 

it on it didn't have that until it really started to saturate. 

CAPCOM All right. We saw those little bumps yester- 

day also. 

S C it was at the end of the transmission 

ye s terdav . 

CAPCOM Right. 

sc Okay, we'll go ahead and terminate the 

TV pass here. I just wanted to play a little music for you 
so we have something up here when it gets lonely during the 
PTC mode. 

CAPCOM Roger, Apollo 10. We enjoyed the TV and 

the music. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CST 13:17, GEI 27:28:00 104/1 



CC Roger. Apollo 10. we enjoyed 

the TV and the music 

SC We'll be talking to you tomorrow. Adios. 

CC Roger. 1 hope you will be talking to us 

before tomorrow. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 27 

hours, 30 minutes. Apollo 10's distance is 112,952 
nautical miles, velocity is 5,014 feet per second. That 
TV transmission lasted about 27 minutes. 

CC Apollo 10. This is Houston. 

MARK you are half-way. Over. 

SC Roger, thank you. 

SC Based on present trajectory 

analysis, it looks like no more mid-course corrections 
will be needed prior tc LOI . Over. 

SC That sounds beautiful. 

CC You are right on the money. 

SC It's cheaper to keep going than 

turning back, eh? I tell you it looks beautiful 
going away and it is going to look even better coming 
back. 

CC Roger. 

SC What kind of perigee are you 

endorsing these days there, Houston? 

CC About 60 miles pe r i cyn th i an . 

Did you see the S-1VB from your burn attitude? 

SC No, we could not see it. We 

might have been off in roll. I did not want to fool with 
that too much. 

CC Roger. 

SC I did not see it, but we are on 

the star, all right. 

CC Roger. We were just curious 

to know if you had seen it. 

SC Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Co ahead, 10. 

SC Roger. Just want you to give 

our regards to Chris and all of the people In CC and 
tracking networks. Looks like all the computers are 
working down to the last bit. Giving us that 60 miles 
perigee is pretty fantastic. 

CC Heard you, Tom. We will pass 

that on. 

SC We'd better watch it for the next 

couple of days just to make sure, don't you reckon? 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, C6T 1517, GET 27:28:00 104/2 



CC I don't reckon that we will 

desert the MOCR here. 1 think there are a few people 
planning on sticking around, at least until you get into 
orbit. 

SC Okay. That's really burning it 

right down to the old slot, though man. That is really 
great if it does it. 

SC You can tell Phil Shaffer to 

keep smiling. I can see him from here. 

CC Who am I suppose to tell, Tom? 

SC Phil Shaffer. 

CC Apollo 10, this is Houston. Prior 

to mid-course correction 2, we set your X-strlp of bias 
to zero and as a result of this, you have to update your 
erasable memory table and the contingency book. I have 
one line update for you. 

SC Okay. We are getting it out now. 

Go ahead, Bruce. 

CC Roger. The E memory table, 

column A, line 3. All balls. Over. 

SC Okay. Got all balls, column A. 

line 3. 

CC Okay, and when you are ready to 

copy, I have your P37 block data for TLI abort, 35, 44 and 
53 hours. 

SC Stand by here. 

SC Okay, Bruce, go ahead. 

CC Roger. 

CC Roger, 10. I am ready to go ahead. 

SC Go ahead, fire. 

CC TLI plus 35 hours 037305071 minus 

16509435 over. 

SC Why don't you read them all, Bruce, 

then I'll give them back to you. 

CC Roger. TLI plus 44046306695 minus 

16509414 TLI plus 53 055305499 minus 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , ' l'*/69» ''■ D'" i 52 7, GET 27:38 105/1 



CC -5499 - • n-.-s 16 5 118 1' over, 

SC Okay, T R p I u?> 3 5 Is U 3 730 50 71 

minus 16509435 Plus 44 is 04630*695 minus 165094 14 
Plus 53 Is 05530599 minus 1 6 > 1 1 8 3 "J - 

C C Roger Can read back correct out. 

SC Okay Bruce we've done the maneuver 

to the place where we disable all the jets we're going to 
wait here 20 minutes. If. "hat right? 

CC That's affirmative Roger. All the 

jets in quad Charlie and delta. 

CC Okay- Ycu know we've got the AC jets 

off right now. You know that* don't you 1 

CC S t and by . 

CC Rogsr 10. What we're attempting 

to do is get you down t a single thruster firing at 
a time for attitude ... correction. Smallest couple we can gat. 

SC Roger- 

p A 0 At 27 h..rs, 41 minutes distance 

is 113, 513 nautical miles. Velocity 4,995 feet per second. 

Sc Hey, Bruce is the theory behind PBC 

once initiated it nevn fires another jet. Isn't that the 



theo ry ? 

CC 1 think coat's the theory. Stand 

by , I'll conf i rm it . 

SC I'm just pulling your leg, 

CC They say that's the theory. I see 

a lot of fingers crossed. 

SC Yeah, chat's why I brought it up. 

CC Roger. 

SC Man if it works, it will be the 

greatest thing since 

CC You cut out half the sentence. 

SC Yeah, there was a delay in the transmission 

there. The speed of light. That's peanut butter. 

CC Roger. Copy, Greatest thing 



since peanut butter. 



END OF TAPE 



AFOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 1535, GET 2746 106/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 27 hours, 

50 minutes. The Apollo 10 crew is now reestablishing passive 
thermal control of PTC. That had been originally established 
yesterday to control the thermal environment of the space- 
craft. Yesterday the roll rate in the passive thermal 
control was 1 degree per second which meant that the space- 
craft would rotate one full revolution per hour. It's 
being reestablished at 3 degrees per second or 3 revolutions 
per hour. The procedure has also been modified in an 
attempt to cut down in the thruster firings- There's been 
considerable amount of conversation between John Young and 
CAPCOM, Bruce McCandless about this procedure. The Flight 
Dynamics Officer, Phil Shaffer, as you heard expects the 
pe r i cynthion , this trajectory at the Moon to be right at 
60 nautical miles without any further midcourse corrections. 
We will continue to track the spacecraft and see if further 
tracking confirms this- The one midcourse correction we've 
done so far was - the burn was right on time, 26 hours, 32 
minutes, 56 seconds. The preburn target was for 48.7 feet 
per second, velocity. We actually achieved 48.9 feet per 
second. Apollo 10 is now 113 - 114,032 miles from Earth. 
Velocity continuing to drop, 4,978 feet per second now. 
We will take the loop down and come back up If there's 
further conversation. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-19-69, GET 2?:55. CST 15:44 107/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 27 hours, 55 min- 

utes. We have a correction on the las: commentary. The roll 
rate established yesterday for passive thermal control was 
one tenth of a degree per second, not one degree, and the 
roll rate being established now is 3 tenths of a second. 
3 tenths of a degree per second, not 3 degrees per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION C i^ViN I » sY , 5- 19-69. < FT 2 • : 5* , ' DT k>.-8 108/1 



PAC k * t Apcli, Cv'itTil at 2' h ,r -, '.9 »it»- 

u?es, and w*'r*> bac* tn L-nver^aCion wlt'i tt-.t crew. 

CAPCOM He! lo, Ap J I c 10 , Hi: us to-. . 1 1 b*ve 

a ground hand^ve r a- 2 s * h~>rs even < EI , 

SC g . *hu are you handing us t , 'harlie* 

CAPCOM " a>- iga;n. tfe ' re ban din* u ■•yet * o 

Madrid, 

SC Jtca> Ih.^'a a nice pia->. Wiil you 

start speaking Sparish t ■ us r.cw, Charlie? 

CAPCOM T den'f believe I could do that K <w 

about buer.es dias"' Is '.bar eov d enough? 

SC Ah, =i sir.-", Mny bun , graci a& ■ 

CAP COM Bupios no rr<?. 

SC I" ; c d ergils" i v g^oa enough for me, 

CAPOM Kog, 

S C Buti-s nr i'hfs . 

CAPCvf I g-.* 3 h^-J enccgh time sp** tng English. 

<=r Thar 's all -tght, Charlie Y > u juU keep 

talking grits, I understand it 

SC Charlie, r.ot to s -und corny r trite, but 

it really is lik» ar-ther world out ''.ere, 

CAPCOM Say again, Gene. 

SC I said at the expense of talking corny 

and trite, it's really another world out here. 
CAPCOM Rog- 

SC I like to say roger 

SC Houston, 10. We - we're starting a roll 

rate now. You want me to initiate amnis, take care of the 
high gain? 

CAPCOM Stand by . 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We'd like you to select omni 

BRAVO. 

SC Houston, this is 10. How do you read on 

BRAVO ? 

CAPCOM Roger. You're coming through about 4 by with 

a lot ot background static. Gene. 

SC Okay, how now? 

CAPCOM That's fine. 

SC Okay, Houston. We've got the dead band 

set up. You want us to go back to the CMC and all up. 
CAP COM Stand by. 

SC Don't look to me like it's going to last 

very long there, Charlie. 

CAP COM Roger, John. When you did that verb 46 

inner a couple of seconds ago it collapsed the dead band back 
to 5 tenths of a degree in adapt. You'll have to reinitialize 
again, 

SC Okay 

SC I ' ir showing a - I'm showing a 5 degree - 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-19-69, C DI 15 ; 48, GET 2 7:59 108/2 



shewing a 5 degree deadhand. 
CAPCOM Roger, We wanted a - we want you to do 

us a 40 - a 30 degree d^adband. 

SC Stand by one. We'll get you squared 

away . 

CAPCOM Gene, okay. 

SC Okay, there's your 30 degree deadband, 

which la what we had unless the numbers didn't get in there. 
CAP COM Roger. Stand by. 

SC Houston, what - what I want to find out 

is, do ytu want us to go back to CMC In AUTO on the pitch 
and yaw channels from excel command. Do you want us to 
rate command giving it back to ADAPT. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. We want you to go 

to CMC and pitch and yaw manual attitude and rate command. 

SC Okay f And that's where we are. 

CAPCOM Roger, 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69. CDT 1557, GET 2808 109/1 

PAo This is Apollo Control at 28 hours, 

13 minutes. Apollo 10's distance from the Earth is now 
115,010 nautical miles. Velocity 4,945 feet per second. 

This air ground loop is very noisy. We've had no 

conversation for some time. We'll take it down and come 
back up if there is conversation. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY t 5/19/69, CDT 1609, GET 28:20:00 



APO This is Apolli> Control at 28 hours, 

20 minutes we're back in touch with the crew of Apollo 10. 

SC Go ahead there, Houston. 

CC Roger. We'd like to proceed with 

the PTC auto react check at 28 hours. Follow the pro- 
cedure as in the flight plan except for one change and that's 
one addition I should say and that's tape recorder to 4. 

SC Understand. Proceed with the 

auto react check at 28 hours with one addition. Tape recorder 
to 4 , 

CC Affirmed. 

SC Want to go ahead and do that now, 

Charlie, is that correct? 

CC That's affirm, Gene. 

SC Apollo 10, Houston. Your high gain 

antenna angles of 90 minus *0 are good for the roll left. 

SC Roger. Hey Charlies, we're up 

there eating a new meal a little late as usual and what'll 
you know. We had a chicken salad sandwich. 

CC Hey, how does it taste? 

SC Would you believe, like a chicken 

salad sandwich. 

SC Hey, great. 

SC Sounds like a real gourmet special 

the re . 

CC We'll record that comment. 

SC That's real important. 

CC Rog. We'll record that comment 

good chicken salad sandwich. 

SC You noticed he didn't say good 

corned beef sandwich. 

SC I got that. 

CC We'll ask about that next. 

SC No need to ask. 

CC You guys, how's the water tasting now. 

Have you've got up enough nerve now to try any more of it. 

SC Yeah. It's real good Charlie. No 

problem at all. 

CC Rog. Tom. 

SC The taste is Okay Charlie. There's 

an awful lot of air bubbles in it would you. You know. 
CC Rog. 

SC Which is hard to understand since 

we took all the clothes off. 

CC We'll have the E Coram guys scratch 

their heads on that and see if they can come up for the 
reasons for that. 

SC We had this same problem in Gemini. 

It's just hard to keep air out of water, I guess. 

CC Okay. 

SC Houston. It looks like we just 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1609, GET 28:20:00 110/2 

FAO This Is Apollo Control at 28 hours, 

24 minutes. Distance now 115,544 miles velocity 4,928 feet 
per second. This line's very noisy. We'll take it down and 
come back up again if there is further conversation. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5' 19/69. CST 16 L9, GET 28: 30:00 111/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 28 

hours, 30 minutes. CAPCOM Charlie Duke is talking to 
Gene Cernan. 



sc 


Hello, 


, Houston. Houston, how 


do you read? 






CC 


Roge r , 


You are coming in fine, 


Gene . 






CC 


Hello, 


, Apollo 10, Houston. Dc 


you read? 






SC 


Hel lo , 


, Houston, are you reading? 


CC 


Roger, 


, we are reading you. 5 by 


SC 


Yes • 


This is OMNI D. Haven't 



been able to do anything with this react mode. My 
signal strength goes from about one-quarter to two-thirds 
back and forth. Apparently you haven't been reading it 
all. 

CC We have had nothing but static. 

Stand by one Let me see what EC0M SAYS. 

CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Those 

number? we gave you were too late, when you went to high 
gain they were too late- We'll recompute some angles 
for you and get them off to you. Over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. Those 

numbers in the flight plan for the roll left are good 
and about five minutes, if you'll try in about five minutes 
you'll know, it should work. 

SC Okay, Charlie. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1630, GET 28:41 ! 

PAO ThiB Is Apollo Control at 28 hours, 

41 minutes and we're In conversation with the crew. 

CAFCOM Do you have nap 1 on the 535 at 

this time? 

SC Charlie, I'm going to high gain 

now . 

CAPCOM Roger. I'm reading 5 by through 

the high gain, Gene. 

SC 10, react when I went to react in 

high gain, I'm reading about minus 30 on my indicator - 
pitch indicator and 270 on yaw. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

SC I'm in a react mode now. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy on the high gain, 10. 

We'd like you to set your thumb wheels to the roll left 
indications 90 and a minus 40 and to configure your panel as 
shown in the Flight Plan with the addition of the tapes 
quarter to four. 

SC That's the way we are right now. 

CAPCOM Rog, good. 10, Houston. We're all 

configured and we think we'll be breaking lock here in a 
little while and then the next time around we should react 
and we'll see how that comes out. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 28 hours, 

47 minutes. Apollo 10»s distance from the Earth now is 
116,663 nautical miles. Velocity 4,891 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 1619, GET 28:54 113/ 

pA0 This It Apollo Control at 28 

hour., 54 minutee and we are back in communication. 

CC Hello. Apollo 10, Houeton. Over. 

sc Go ahead, Houston. 

C c Roger. Reeding you, 5 by. 

CC Say it again. Gene. 

sc Go ahead, Charlie. 

CC Roger. Reading you 5 by. Looka 

like we locked up again on the react. 

sc i gueae ao, but ve never really 

seemed to loee lock for any great length of time for it 
to ?o beck to thoa. react angle.. It ha. been w.vjring 
down between two- third, and aero .ignal .trength, but 
never .eem to lo.e lock long enough for the react mode 
to put it back at the engle. . 

CC Roger. Stand by. 

CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Do 

vou have u. on the high gain? 

7 "c That', affirm. High gain react 

mode . 

CC Roger. 

sc Looking right at you with the 

eyeball, Charlie, too. Right over Houeton. 
CC Roger. 

SC Come out and .mile and 1 will 

take your picture. , . fhl . 

qq They won't let me out of thi. 

con.tant overce.t here. 

sc How long do you want to atay. 

Do you want to try thia react mode continually *J»^ 
How it looka like we are picking up good atrong .trength 
at tho.e angle.. 

CC Stand by. 

cc 10, Houeton. It looka like you 

switched to nerrow beem it look. good. We'd like to try 
it one more time. 

CC Okay. 

sc Boy, we've got the world', 

brightest aun.hlne up here. 

sc Roger. In which window? 

CC It depend, on where you are 

at the PTC mode. 

CC - Roger 

sc : I can aee why they have all that 

thermal ineulation on the lunar module. They need it. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 2643, GET 28:54 113/2 



CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CC Roger. 1 want to talk to John 

a little bit. I think we misled you on this PTC 
setup, John, last tine. We would like to reinitiate this 
thing after this reacq test. And I would just like to 
run through this procedure again. On the 194 of the G&C 
checklist is good down through step 4. Then, we would 
like you to disable all the jets on quads c and d. 
Then wait 20 minutes again, then the manual attitude to 
PITCH and YAW to excel command. Then, make sure you enable 
all the jets and then initiate the desired roll rate 
with the procedures listed in the checklist. When you 
get the roll attained, then manual attitude roll to excel 
command and increase the dead band to the desired value 
on Page 19 3 and then manual attitude PITCH and YAW rate 
command. Over. 

SC Roger. I figured you were going 

to say that, Charlie. 

CC I don't get it. Excuse me. 

Little slow now. 

SC No, that's all right. I understand 

what you are saying. 

CC Roger. 

CC It looked like to us that to get 

the roll rate started we didn't have all the Jets and 
the thing coupled in on us and started - we got a PITCH 
and YAW out of it, also, instead of just pure roll. 

SC Well, I would be right surprised 

to see if you can get a pure roll rate out of these things 
on account of the roll thrusters, they just ain't there. 

CC Roger. Well the G&C guys say 

that with the damp doing it with the two jets, it ought 
to give us as close to a couple as we can get and they 
will admit that we get some PITCH and YAW, but we shouldn't 
get too much and then it should damp out for us. 

SC Okay. What damps It out? 

CC Roger. As I understand it, when 

you go back to PITCH and YAW rate command in the last step 
of the procedure, then we ought to damp those rates out. 

SC But don't you make the dead bands 

big and everything. 

CC Okay. Everybody is shaking - 

G&C is shaking his head no, that when you make the dead 
band big then you won't get any damping out until you hit 
the edge of the dead band, then it will bring you back in. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1619, GET 18:54 113/3 



CC I guess you just have to accept 

those FITCH and YAW a when you start up the roll rate, if 
you do get it. 

SC Okay . 

CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. On 

this next reacq test,' we would like you to check - monitor 
your PITCH and YAW gimbals on the S-band and see how close 
it comes to the gimbal and if it is listed on your card - 
your checklist. 

SC Okay . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69. CDT 16:51, GET 29:02 114/1 



SC Charlie, let me run this by again and 

Bee if we got it straight now. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Okay, we're going through the attitude 

at tight deadband. Now we're going to enter 5018, and we're 
going to disable C&D quads and wait 20 minutes, then we're 
going to enable all the jets that go to pitch and yaw rate 
command, and we're going to initiate a 3 tenths of a degree 
roll rate and excell command. All this time we are still a 
tight deadband, and then we're going to go to Y deadband. Is 
that correct? 

CAPCOM That's negative, John. You - you wait 

20 minutes - all that time to wait 20 minutes is too good. 
Then you go to manual attitude pitch and yaw to excell command. 
You enable all the jets, and then you let the dap start - stop - 
start the roll rate by doing the verb 21 901 inner and the 
verb 24 inner, and on the last enter, the thing ought to take 
off and roll, and when the roll is attained the manual attitude 
roll goes to excell command. Then you increase the deadband 
to the desired value and the manual attitude pitch and yaw to 
the right command. Over. 

SC It looks to me like we ought to use gas. 

CAPCOM Stand by. I know - 

SC I'll try. 

CAPCOM I cut you out. Go ahead. 

PAO At 29 hours, 9 minutes Apollo 10's distance 

from the earth is 117 661 nautical miles, velocity 4 858 feet 
per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1701, GET 29:12 115 



SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM 5 shot 10, go ahead. 

SC Okay, we can read you now. He want 

to go over this step by step again because we think there is 
still one step that's out of sequence. We want to go through 
it after its finished the reacq mode here. Just go through 
the whole thing step by step and then we'll give it a go, 
okay . 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. 

SC Okay, Charlie. I've go a couple 

of points for you on that glmbal limit. 
CAPCOM Okay, shoot. 

SC Okay, you can plot them if you want. 

Pitch plus 60 and yaw 220. Pitch plus 60 and yaw 240 plus 
260 and 2 70 and then pitch minus 10 and yaw 90. Pitch 
zero and yaw 120 and pitch zero and yaw 130. That gives 
you an idea of the ones I was able to plot how close we come 
to it. 

CAPCOM Rog, thank you much, 10. We copy 

them all. 

SC Okay, let me know how long you want 

us to stay in high gain. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. Hello Apollo 10, 

Houston. We're ready to discuss the PTC setup if you guys 
are still go ahead. 

SC Go, go, go. 

CAPCOM 10, you want me to start out with 

the procedure as we have it or do you want to ask questions? 

SC Why don't you run through it just 

one time and then let me write it all down and then I'll 
ask questions, okay. 

CAPCOM Rog. Okay, on the set up your 

procedure on page - the G&N checklist 194 is good down to 
the - through step 4 on 5018 when the maneuver is complete 
to the PTC attitude. Then we'd like you to disable all jets 
on quads Charlie and Delta, wait 20 minutes then manual 
attitude pitch and yaw excel command. Then enable all 
jets. Then initiate the desired roll rate via the verb 24, 
noun 01 and the verb 24 inner. When role is obtained manual 
attitude roll to excel command. Then increase your deadband 
to the desired value and manual attitude, pitch and yaw to 
rate command. Over. 

SC Okay, you went too fast on the last 

part there, Charlie. Okay, again you wanted to initiate the 
initial roll rate with verb 24, right? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. You know you 

set into the damp the 3 tenths via the verb 24, noun 01 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 17:01, GET 2912 



CAFCOM and then the verb 24 and on the 

last inner on that sequence you get the - the dap will start 
the roll rate. 

SC Okay. We set the declnal (garbled) 

disabled C and D jets, we wait 20 minutes, manual attitude, 
pitch and yaw execll command. Then we enable all jets to 
initiate the desired roll rate but we can't use the dap 
if the pitch and yaw are in excell command. 

CAPCOM Roger, but - stand by. We got roll - 

we have roll in rate command and we want you to initiate 
the roll rate in using the dap. See if you have pitch and 
yaw - 

SC Okay. 
CAPCOM Okay. 

SC Yea, well, my question is what keeps 

the roll from coming into pitch and yaw if you've got it in 
excell command? 

CAPCOM Stand by . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY „ '> 1 9 » * , < I >Z 1 709, ET J9:20 116/1 



^ne go and see how 



works 



CC Aprllo 10, *,hi- Is Houston. We'll 

admit that some rate will <o to cou;le into p J- ch and yaw with 
pitch and yaw In the excel command when the low rate Is 
Initiated. But we feel that this is a rrocedure chat will 
minimize that coupling over. 

SC Well, I'll tell you harlle. I 

really don't see a bit of difference between this and what 
he did when we set it up manually. We'd he d?ing the 
same things and you see where we're right new. 

CC Rcger. 

SC We'll try it 

SC We ' 1 ; gi ve i 

out and follow us right through it. Ok a -. . 

CC Roger. 

SC Okay one question Charlie. Do 

you want to gu to the attitude and tuh: de^d band, is that 
not currect? 

CC That s affirmative. On the VERB 

48 we select ,.5 degree dead band. 

SC Okay. 

CC 10, Houston. We' rf du-nping your 

tape. We'd like, when we finish the durop - we'd like for you 
to go to OMNI bravo and als<: >ne flight plan update, at 
2855 delete the closing of the 02 vac jon mainly A and B 
b reake rs . 

Here we've got it Charlie. 
Roger. 

When are you g^ing tc be done with 



SC 
CC 
SC 

the dump? 
CC 

Gene . 



Stand by. Ecomm say in a minute 



SC Okay. 

CC Hello Apollc 10, Houston. We have 

the dump completed select 0MN1 hravo, please. 

SC Okay. Co on OMNI bravo. 

SC Hey Charlie. When we get the de- 

sired roll rate then go manual attitude in roll to excel 
command, what's the third step in there? 

CC Rog. That's affirmative. Manual 

attitude roll to excel command then you ran increase your 
dead band to the desired value and then put the manual 
attitude pitch and yaw to rate command. Over- 

SC Okay. 

SC Okay- The attitude we have C&D jets die- 

ah led. 

CC Roger. 

SC We started the clock to wait the 

20 minutes. 

CC Roger. Copy. Our last time out 

to the 20 m,inutes we had rates down to less than a 
thousandth degree. 

SC Yeah but Charlie, here's the thing. 

We'll go ahead and do this but what happened was that when 
Tom initiated a 3 10th degree per second roll rate with 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69 CDT 1709, GET 29:20 116 



SC - pitch and yaw, In axcel command, 

and it coupled, I don't see how, we're right up against a 

dead band in about 20 minutes or however long it was. 

CC Roger. Did you enable all the 

jets at that time when you started that roll rate? Over. 

SC Nope, okay, l'» not sure. We'll go right 

down through the procedure. 

CC Roger, 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-19-69, CDT 17:19, GET 29:30 117/1 
DEAD AIR 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 1744, GET 29:55 118/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 29 hours, 

55 minutes. Apollo 10 now at a distance of 119,805 nautical 
miles from Earth and velocity continuing to decrease very 
slowly. Present speed is 4,790 feet per second. We've 
completed a change of shift here in Mission Control. Flight 
Director Milton Windier has come on to replace Glynn Lunney. 
Our Capsule Communicator will continue to be Charlie Duke. 
Milton Windier has gone around the room, reviewed the 
status of the Mission to this point with all of his Flight 
Controllers, finds everything in good condition. We've 
had some conversation with the spacecraft since our last 
report relating to the test to set up a 3 tenths of a 
second rate in roll for passive thermal control. This is 
one of two modes being tested on this mission for passive 
thermal control. Up until now the spacecraft has been 
rotating very slowly at the rate of about 1 revolution 
per hour. That rate will be speeded up to about 3 rev- 
olutions per hour. We'll pick up the taped conversation 
that we have and stand by for any live communications with 
the spacecraft. 

SC Okay, Houston. Apollo 10. We're 

going to go ahead and load the DSKY . As you can see and 
will not hit the enter until 20 minutes has elapsed. 

CAPC0M Roger 10, we copy. 10, Houston. 

Before you hit the final enter, we'd like you to hold 
off right where we are until we can get some verification 
on what this will do to us by just standing here. 

SC Okay. Okay, we're down to the 

last step and we'll hold off. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Stand by, Tom. 

SC Rog, Charlie. Okay Charlie, when 

we get to 20 minutes you mean you don't want us to keep on 
going. Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Rog, go ahead, 10. 

SC When we get to 20 minutes you do 

not wish us to proceed with the test? 

CAPCOM Negative, 10. That wasn't my 

intention. We're discussing with the G&C now. When you 
did the verb 24, noun 01 enter it set up a rate of some sort 
that I'm trying to get explained to me right now and I'll be 
back with you In just a moment. At the end of the 20 min- 
utes you can proceed on. If you stand by I'll have an 
explanation for you, over. 

SC I don't see much rates here. 

CAPCOM Roger, we - they're very small, 10. 

We saw something on the downlink. It's damping out now. 
When you get to 20 minutes, you can proceed. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1744, GET 29:55 118/2 



sc Roger- Okay, coming up on 20 min- 

utes. Going to put the manual attitude, pitch, and yaw to 
excel command. Mark 20 minutes- Manual attitude, pitch 
and yaw to excel command and all jets are coming on and 
able . 

Roger. 

Okay, are you ready for us to rehit thi 



CAP COM 
SC 



final enter to set up the roll rate? 



CAPCOM 
SC 

Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM 
SC 

going to couple 
started on this 

CAPCOM 
cussion down here 
so. Hold on. 



S tand by . 
Okay, we're standing by. 



Hous ton , 



Go ahead, 10. 

Okay, if that roll jet fires it s 
into the other axis before we even get 
thing. 

Roger, we're having a little dis- 
We'll be back with you in 5 seconds or 



CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

CAPCOM 
SC 

to wide now, 
CAPCOM 
SC 



30 degrees, 
attitude, pitch, 



10 and I think 
see what happens. 



Okay. And it just fired. 
Roger, you can enter. 
It's entered and there it goes. 
Roger. 

Okay, roll's going to excel command. 
Roger. 

And we're going to put the deadband 
af f i rmative? 

That's affirmative, 
Okay down. Manual 
and yaw now going to rate command. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, 

we're finally in configuration. 

sc Okay, we'll find out (garbled; 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston. After 

your comments on manual attitude, pitch and yaw to rate 
command you faded out, Tom. Say again what you had. 

sc Okay, that was the last step on 

the total sequence. And honestly, the only difference 
between this one and the last one was that this time the 
dap did it and last time we did it. Roll rate. 

CAP COM Roger, if - one point here. We 

couldn't, since we didn't have the high bit rate we couldn t 
tell but if you had not - did not enable all the jets, then 
when you started the roll manually in excel command, then 
it would only fire one jet and that would couple due to the 
CG problems with the LM on board it would couple into pitch 
and yaw. And we feel that that's what's happened but we 
weren't able to verify that due to the telemetry. 



APOLLO 10 MISSIO« COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1744, GET 29:55 118 



SC Okay, well I think it's a good 

theory but that - that Isn't what happened because we had 
the sane procedure for the last one except with the exception 
that we replaced the dap with the stick and throttle guy. 

CAP COM Soger, we - stand by. He'll see 

if we oan cone up with an answer but I doubt it, John. There's 
a lot of disagreement here on this. 

SC Okay, wall that's very Interesting. 

We'll watch it. 

CAP COM Rot. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahaed Apollo 10. 

SC Okay, at 30 hours, we have a LM CM 

delta P for you aa per flight pi en. It is now reeding 1.0S pel 

CAPCOM Roger, copy, Ton. 

SC loger. This thing Is really tight 

over there. 

CAP COM Rog, we agree. 10, this is Houston. 

There is 'no need to reinitiate the CM purge now. 
SC Roger. 

PA0 Thia is Apollo Control* During that 

last transmission you heard the crew remark that the delta P - 
the difference in preesure between the Connand Module and 
the Lunar Module now reads 1.05 pounds per square inch. Vhat 
that means is that the Lunar Module, which following Earth 
Orbit Insertion, had a cabin pressure equal to that of the 
Command Module but has not been repressurised, in the mean 
time has lost a very email amount of its cabin atmosphsre. 
Thie in turn is en indication of a very tight cabin. At 
the preaent time, Apollo 10 is at a distance of 120,271 
nautical miles from Earth and traveling at a speed of 4,775 
feet per second. The change of shift Press Conference is 
scheduled to begin shortly and during the Press Conference 
we will record any further conversation with the spacecraft 
and play that back following the Press Conference. This is 
Apollo Control at 30 hours, 5 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



- APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 18 4, GET 31:05 119/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 31 hours, 

5 minutes, Apollo 10 is at a distance of 123,026 nautical 
mil«s from Earth. Current velocity is «,690 feet per sec- 
ond. During the Press Conference we accumulated several 
minutes of tape conversation with the crew. Included in 
that conversation was a report on the passive thermal 
control rotation mode that the spacecraft l.as been put into 
and an assement that at first appearances it seemed to be 
working quite well- We'll play back the tape for you and 
then stand by for any further conversation. 

CAPCOM Hellc Apclio 10, Houston. 

SC 10. over. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll have a station handover 

in about 3 minutes and 45 se-onds. We're going back to 
Goldf-ti-ne it locks like 

SC Roger. 

CAPC0M 10, Houston , ■:, o ahead. 

sc Roger, just wanted to -heck with 

you on the (garbled), One thing we're doing here with 
all this spare time we're getting out our Lunar Operation 
(a~ds and Charts and gcing through the whole thing. Just 
having a skull session and we'll be doing this tor about 
the next 2 days. Just renewing the stuff. Just like going 
Through a simulation. 

CAPC0M Roger, Apollc 10. We copy. 

sc i«v might have a few questions coming down. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll be standing by with 

all the guys, Tom and we finally located our backup set 
and we'll be doing the same thing. 

SC Okav, real Mne, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Any nher requests you guys got. 

L-rks like the Earth is - PTC beginning to work. We see 
it going off in pirch and y*w but it is not coupling and 
going to one - spirling out t > *e edge of the deadband. If 
it's going back and furth between pitch and yaw well within 
the deadband. 

5C Yea, looks like It's going to work. 

CAPCOM -ell, we hope so after all that - 

we apologize to you gu^s for not being straight on the 
procedure. 

SC Well, I sti' 1 don t know why the 

other one wouldn't have worked either. 

CAP COM w e can*' answer it either, John, 

really. It's just one ,f thes" black magic ones, I guess. 
We've had a shift change do«n here. Too bad you guys have 
to work 24 hours a day up there. We got the maroon team 
it is that's on now. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1854, GET 31:05 119/2 



sc Okay, Charlie. Take it easy. 

Rog. 

We'll see you tomorrow. 



CAPCOM Rog 
SC 



SL " c iJ - " J 

CAPCOM We'll see you tomorrow. 

sc Okay, one thing about working 24 

hours a day, we've got a beautiful view up here. 

CAPCOM Yea, it's well worth it, Tom. We re 

real ^ viou8 ' Yeaj one thlng of interest to note. 

You know the total clouds we described to you on TV. 
CAPCOM Yea. 

sc From our angle now, it looks like 

the whole Northern quarter of the whole globe Is completely 
socked in there and again the United States is wh a a lly 
stands out, part of Mexico. We can see the Gulf Coast from 
here real well. Right through the hatch window. 

CAPCOM Rog, everybody who just came in 

from outside said it's still clear so that's a good descrip- 

tiOI1 *SC We'll see you tomorrow, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Rog, good night. Apollo 10, this 

is Houston, over. 

sc Hey, Bruce. We just want you to 

eye over night on the SPS oxidizer all its pressure. I ye 
seen it oh after yesterday's burn drop maybe about 5 pel 
and af^r today's burn it appears like it's slowly dropping. 
It may be a temperature effect, but I'd like you to keep 
an eye on It over night. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll keep a watch on it. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston, over. 

sc Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, this oxidizer tank ullage 

pressure decrease was also noticed on 8. We saw some of it 
last night. The explaination is that the oxidizer is ab- 
sorbing the helium ?hat is present in the tank causing the 
pressure to decrease. When it becomes saturated with 
iTAul then things will remain static In this respect for 
the rest of the mission, over. 

SC Fantastic there, Bruce. Okay, I'm 

just glad to hear those kind of answers because I've been 
looking here at it too for a couple of days. 

CAPCOM Roger, we will keep an eye on it 

though for you. Httle 
sc Okay, that makes me feel a little 

blt W CAPC0M Apollo 10, this is Houston. We've 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1854, GET 31:05 119/3 

CAPCOM been having some difficulties with 

the data storage equipment under ground command here so 
we've started the tape, we'd like to record a few minutes 
worth of random data and then try dumping it back down to 
verify our system here. 

SC Okay, I have the gray up here so 

I guess it's on okay, Bruce. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PAO All continues to be quiet from the 

spacecraft. At this time the crew is scheduled to be having 
their evening meal. As you've heard we've had a change of 
Capsule Communicators here in Mission Control. Astronaut 
Bruce McCandlees has relieved astronaut Charlie Duke as the 
spacecraft communicator. At 31 hours, 14 minutes into the 
flight of Apollo 10, this is Mission Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 30 MISSION COMMENTARY 8 5/19/69, GDT l*25 s GET 31:37 120/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 31 feours, 

37 minuteio Our spacecraft now at a distance oic 124 5 441 
n#c.tical miles f^osn Earth and the velocity is 4 3 6«7 feet 
per secoad. CAPCOM Bruce McCandless has just put in a call 
£o tfee crew and we'ra is ecmv^rs&tion with the spacecraft 
at this t±me„ We'll pick that up for ycu at the beginning. 

CAPCOM Apolla IQ t , this ia Houston, over. 

SC Go ahead Houston. 

CAFGQM •?..;:•.> «, - iC 9 *.f you're through with 

your meal we ve got some c-:.?-'.6«?ion for John rsgarding 
the 23 settings s ova 1 ?, 

SC Ok. ay, go ?bea£. 

CAP COM 0k?y the aoiss in £he data if* about 

8 to i2 arc seconds wnicin- Is considered to ba very good. The 
nominal noise on the s®xt©nt with ssro errors is 10 arc lec- 
onds so it looks like you're doiag fchiags perfectly on the 
sighting. With respect the del?& H> we got two different 
values. The one fros; yesterday implied us lag a reference 
at 33 to 34 kilometers. The setting from today implied 
delta H of 13 to 14 kilometers. We suspect that the back- 
ground light during todays settings was higher than yesterday. 
This would probably cause difficulty ia sensing the upper 
threshold at the same places yesterday. You intend to 
pick out a brighter and perhaps lower horizon locator. The 
problem is not serious. It shouldn't cause any concern but 
we'd like some comments from you specifically if you can 
compare the lighting background for today's settings with the 
background that you had yesterday and can you determine where 
this light, as it was brighter, came from, over. 

SC Well» there was a distinct horizon 

yesterday and I was marking on the upper most, I really 
don't know where, it looked like the - actually there was 
a pretty definite, defined limit that I was seeing there 
yesterday. And today I didn't see that- It just looked 
like there was no - 

CAPCOM Rogers you also made a comment 

about losing a star in the horizon. Can you elaborate on 
that? 

3C You know sometimes the auto tracking, 

tracks both the star and the - it puts the optics down on 
the Earth. The mark or. the horizon, you bring it up to 
the horizon and mark on it. Well c when it doesn't - puts 
it down on the Earth, it was so bright today that I couldn't 
see any of the stars. Everytlme it would be too bright to 
gee the stars, so I don't really know how you would do under 
those kind of conditions. It would be difficult to do - 
star landmark I believe. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 19 25, GET 31:37 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Thank you. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this la Houston, go ahead, 

over. 

SC Roger, Bruce could you make a check 

and see if it was tested on the ground prior to flight for 
this little hand held centrifuge to separate air from 
water? Yes we have a strange phemenon, the bubbles go to 
the bottom of the bag. 

CAPCOM Roger, it may take us a few minutes 

to track down the party responsible for the testing on this 
but we'll check it out. 

sc I wish you would. It's utterly 

phemonenal. What happens is that we start off with a bag 
full of water and bubbles. Little bitty bubbles and we end 
up with a bag full of water and great big bubbles. But 
there is no way to separate the bubbles from the water, that 
I can see. 

CAPCOM Did you try spinning It the other 

way , 

SC Laughing. Dutifully, yes we have. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll look Into it. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 1935, GBT 31:47 121/ 



cc Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

SC Go ahead* 

CC Roger, 10. At thie time, we'd 

like you to eelect H2 tank 2 heetere to off. 

Sc We're doing thia in order to avoid 

giving you a naster caution warning light during thia aleep 
period, if at all poasible. Over. 

gC H2 tank 2 heater ia off, 

CC Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 19:54, GET 32:05 122/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 32 hours, 5 

minutes. Capsule communicator, Bruce McCandless , has just 
put in a call to the crew and we're in a conversation with 
them now. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Over. 

SC Go ahead, Houston. 

CAP COM Roger, 10. To facilitate our DSE dump, 

we'd like to try high gain antenna acquisition once without 
disturbing the PDC - PTC. If we can't do it, we'll wait 
until tomorrow. Your procedure for high gain antenna 
pointing to verb 64 in the checklist starts out with a 
verb 37 enter. Do not do the verb 37 enter. Just start 
right out with the verb 64 enter so that we don't disturb 
the PTC. Over. 

SC Rog. You want us to put the verb 64 to 

DSRY. Is that right? 

CAPCOM Roger. And acquire with high gain antenna. 

SC Okay, in the theory they probably don't 

disturb the PTC. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, do you have high gain now? 

CAPCOM Negative 10, not yet. 

SC Houston, we have it now. 

CAPCOM Roger. We confirm high gain antenna 

acquisition, and I got a few other notes for you prior to 
your sleep period. Are you ready to copy? 

SC Wait one. 

SC Go ahead, Bruce. 

CAPCOM Roger. We'll be using omni antennas 

tonight during PTC, and this will be omni BRAVO. We'd like 
to request that in setting up your com modes for this 
evening you insure that the S-band normal mode voice switch 
is off, and use down voice backup if you need to contact us 
during the night. There will be a waste water dump after 
GET of 45 hours tomorrow. We'll give you an exact time 
tomorrow. We show rotational hand controler number 2 
direct power to be on. We'd like it turned off. The general 
consumable analysis for this point in the mission is that 
you're in good shape. If you need any specific numbers, 
well we can supply tham. Your PTC mode looks good so far, 
in fact the angular excursions in pitch and yaw which is 
built up to about 7 or 8 degrees a half an hour or ao ago 
it aeemed to adapt down and decrease on the order of 
4 1/2 or 5 degrees at the present time. We'd like you to 
report after you finish chlorinating the potable water connect a 
and we'd remind you to leave the portable tank inlet valve 
open. Over. 

SC Okay. I think we got the chlorination 

information, and we'll let you know. And if we use onmis ~ I 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-19-69, CDT 19:54, GET 32:05 122/2 

sc imagine it'll be DELTA end BRAVO like ve 

normally have been doing. And you want the S-band normal 
voice - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/19/69. CDT 2004. CET 32:15 123/1 

sc —I Imagine it will be a 

DELTA delta and bravo like we normally been doing and you 
want the S-band normal voice mode of voice .witch off and 
you want the down voice back up. 

CC Roger. 

sc And we will be waiting for a 

water dump after 45 hours tomorrow. 

CC Roger, that', affirmative. Over. 

ac Okay. When you are through with 

the dump, you can let me know and I will set up the OMMIa . 

CC Roger. We will give you a call. 

sc Houaton, thia ia 10. 

cc Go ahead 10. Over. 

S C Bruce are you going to want to 

knock off the battery charge before sleep time tonight? 

cc That's affirmative. 

SC Okay. 

cc Apollo 10, this is Houston. Wa 

have a st.t. vector to uplink for you. if you give «- 
on our up telemetry. Do not. I say. do not enter Verb 37. 

0v * r " sc tou want accept, huh? Okay, here 

comes accept. Proceed. 

CC Roger. You are in accept now. 

sc can you guys send a vector with 

that thing running like that? „ oiKvi 

cc 10, this is Houston. Negative. 

You need to hit proceed for us. 

You need to p ^ Thank por your 

information your trajectory is looking good. We'll have 
a lunar flybj pad for you here shortly. Your go for 
flyby in the event of lost Comm. Over. 

sc Sounds good. Thank you. 

CC You are welcome. 

cc Apollo 10, this is Houaton. We 

are through with the uplink. You can "?«i« 
up telemetry and we'd like to continue b " 
as long as it's convenient prior to your turning in for 
the evening. Over. 

SC Okay. Roger. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-19-69, CDT 20:16, GET 32:27 124/1 



SG Houston, 10. Look* like we're about to 

break lock. You want me to go OMNI? 

CAP COM Rog. You can go back to omnl at this 

tine. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This Is Apollo Control. We appear to 

have a fair amount of noise on the communications circuit 
at this time. The crew should be shortly getting the space- 
craft ready for their sleep period. They will be, among 
other things, chlorinating their drinking water supply, 
setting up the communications system for their sleeping 
period, and changing out one of the lithium hydroxise canisters 
that removes carbon dioxide from the spacecraft atmosphere. 
The sleep period, a 9 hour rest period, is scheduled to 
begin at 35 hours ground elapsed time, or about another 
hour and a half from now. At the present time the space- 
craft is 126 784 nautical miles from earth traveling at a 
speed of 4 576 feet - feet per second. This is Apollo 
Control at 32 hours, 30 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/ - :6? . £DT 2056, GET 33:07 125/1 



PAO T his is Apollo Control at 33 

hours, 7 ainoies Into the flight of Apollo 10. At the 
present time the spacecraft is I28 s 4«*5 nautical miles 
from earth a*d the velocity Is 4,528 feet per second. 
The Apollo K is continuing preparations for their 
sleep period which is due to begin about an hour from 
now, about 34 hours ground elapsed time. They are some- 
what ahead of the flight plan in preparations for the 
sleep period and could possibly begin a little before 
that time. Since our last report we have about 3 or 4 
minutes of taped conversation with the crew which we will 
play back for you now. 

CC Apollo 10, this is Houston., WE 

would like you to confirm if you selected OMNI, OMNI 
antenna bravo on board and we'll take over the switching 
between bravo and delta from down here. Over. 

CC Roger. We are reading you 

weak with noise in the background. Over. 

SC Okay. In order to get you, I 

had to go to OMNI delta and it looks like we may be 
losing you. I'll go ahead to OMNI bravo and you can 
do the switching. 

CC Roger. Thank you. 

CC 10, Houston. Radio check. Over 

SC Roger. Reading you loud and 

clear OMNI bravo. How do you read? 

CC Roger. We are reading you fine. 

SC Okay. We are in down voice 

backup . 

CC Okay. A little clarification 

on that. We meant that when you secured for the 
evening, if you should need to contact us at that time, 
you would select downvoice backup, not that you should 
stay In downvoice backup all night. 

SC Okay. We will just do it to 

voice again and if we need you at night time, we'll go 
to downvoice backup. 

CC Roger. 

SC We're In normal voice. How do 

you read? 

CC Roger. That is much clearer and 

no noise in the background. 
SC Okay. 

CC Apollo 10. This is Houston- I 

have your flyby pad, P30 maneuver, when you are ready 
to copy. 

SC Stand by one. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY * 5/19/69. CDT 2056, GET 33,07 125/2 
cr Go ahead. Houston. 

CC Roger. Apollo 10. this is Houston. 

' i . "^oi^-s;..."" 

Vega 36. Deneb 43. roll REFSMMAT docked 

G.N 9^353 093 .ln« 021070442027 plu. 02256 »!•* 

So327 05263 roU 1. 102351 «d 017 now 44 HA. Ax. 

you «ith «l So f<r corr#ct . 

?S 0573611705685 402221334 bor.altht 

.05G 1. 1662338. f ^ , ood 

SC »««■ l> 36/d.n.b 43 148013018 

.lr..d, l..*ed m «...bl. -^.J*";,., wh . t ... Xo.d.dt 

?r Roger. 24 kiloMt.r. w.. lo.d.d. 

ia probably the more reliable one. 

SC Roger. , 

S C Houston. I got the onboard 

r " d °£*' Roger. Go ahead. 

,p okay. the CRYO fans have been 

i. 36 8 pyro battery i. alpha and bravo, both 37.0. RCS 
.Iphal. 87* bravo 88. Charlie 92 delta 86 over. 

SC That's correct. 

cc Roger. Out. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 2056. GET 33:07 125/ 



PAO During that conversation, the 

craw has paaaed up the information they would need in 
the event there was a loss of communications between 
now and the time . they would be approaching the moon. 
With this information they would be able to do a flyby 
of the moon at an altitude of about 886 nautical miles. 
The information alao included the figures they would 
need for a maneuver to be performed at about 70 hours 
into the mission to do that flyby maneuver. At 33 hours, 
17 minutes, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MI8SI0II C0MMEHTA1T . 5/19/69, CD! 2130, GET 33:41 126/ 

PA0 Thia is Apollo Control at 33 hour*, 

*1 .inut.o into th. flight of Apollo 10. Th. •F"""'« 

rtSi i.ti» nit« «d ..'11 H-7 th.t b.ek tot ,« 

clrCOM A.ollo 10, thia la ■•«««• 

y „„ «« .«..« »»;»; i o ;;i;.. „..„ Ju . t 

out th. caniatara at this tim«. 

S5 ?C0M K*;r». with you i» a -inuto. Okay, 

w.r. going to «nd - t.fin.t. th. b.tt.ry ch.rg* at thia 
tm and w.'U purg. tho fuol coll*. 

;j:; r i.«t... *,.». «. 

CAP COM log.r, 10. . , 

ac Okay, with r.ap.ct to any thing out 

of th. kit. Th. CD1 h.dl lo.otil, CMP 1 lo.otil. LMP I 
1n _ at ii + n A th. LMP al.o had 2 aapirin. tm . 

CAPCOM lo M r, undor.tand. On. lo.otil .aoh 

and 2 aapirin for th. LMP. 

8C That' a corract. 

CAPCOM Do yo«» h * T€ the P« r " on * 1 do*A Mt » r 

r " di J» ,? stand by. Okay, you can add on. 

" "ilpCOM* 11 * U ^nofratand, CMP i. pl«. I fro. th. 

lMt That', right. Okay. CD*. 

•hat th. total wa. on th. U.Jo»., Min. nov r.ad. 26029. 

Sr r th. 2 JMp 29 i. 15031. I b.li.T. 

that CAJcoM tt "' Eog.r, and for your information, 

th. lift C J?,nific.nt dJglt th.r. i.'.ctu.lly 1/100, ov.r. 

Tou'r. not moving much. 

SC kog.r. 

CAPCOM Did yo» tn « chlorin. in oday. 

gc W.'r. going to do that later on, 

v. havan't gon. to b.d y.t. 

°f C0M Ki";irUi», i.n . P .n i thi. k t. 

that - 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69. CDT 2130, GET 33i41 126/ 



PAO Here in Mission Control at the 

present time Flight Director Milton Wendler is polling the 
Flight Controllers to determine If they have any further 
information to be passed up to the crew before the crew 
begins their sleep period. We'll continue to stand by. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this Is Houston, over. 

SC Go ahead, Houston. Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. He have nothing else 

for you at the present time. If you have no further trans- 
lations for us we'll bid you a good night and remind you 
to put the S-band normal mode voice switch off. 

SC Roger, the S-band normal mode 

switch to off (garbled) we can shut down here. 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC And after that we're going to co-operate 

with you on down voice backup. We're going to chlorinate the 
water a little bit and then sack out. 

CAPCOM Roger, and if you need us give us 

a call on voice backup. 

SC Okay Bruce, sure will. 

CAPCOM Good night. 

PAO We appear to have lost log from the 

spececraft signal momentarily accounting for the noise on 
the circuit. During that one portion where the noise also 
came In on top of Tom Stafford we could make out Tom reporting 
that he did plan to begin the sleep period shortly and that 
he advised that the crew would chlorinate the drinking water 
supply before going to sleep and then would begin their sleep 
period. That rest periods scheduled to begin at about 34 
hours, ground elaspe time or about 10 minutes from now. At 
33 hours, 51 minutes into the flight of Apollo 10, this is 
Mission Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY, 5/19/69, CDT 22:23, GET 34:34 127/1 



PAO This is Mission Control at 34 hours, 34 

alnutes into the flight of Apollo 10. We've heard nothing 
froa the crtw since capcom Bruce McCandless bid them good 
night about 45 minute* ago. They're scheduled to be in a 

9 hour sleep period, and we anticipate that they are either 
are or will be resting shortly. At the present tine, Apollo 

10 is 132 225 nautical miles from earth, and the veliclty 
is 4 419 feet per second. This is Apollo Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/19/69, CDT 3100 GET 35:31 128/1 

PA q This is Mission Control, now 

35 hours 32 minutes into the flight of Apollo 10. We ve 
had no further conversations with the crew since our last 
report. I anticipate that they are sleeping at this time. 
The spacecraft is currently 134,651 nautical miles from 
earth and the speed is 4,352 feet per second. Out here in 
Mission Control the activity has also quieted down as would 
be expected, flight controllers primarily observing the 
status of spacecraft systems and all of those seem to be 
functioning normally .t this time. One of the "-Pi*?- 
we have available to us shows the time at which the space 
craft will be crossing into the lunar sphere of influence. 
This is a somewhat arbitrary time but it is the point when 

here in Mission Control we will switch over from earth 

reference velocity and distance information to lunar reference. 
That time is currently listed as 6 1 hours 50 minutes 49 sec- 
onds ground elapsed time. At that point the spacecraft will 
be under this dominant influence of the moon rather than 
earth and the gradual decline we've been seeing in the 
velocity will reverse itself. The spacecraft will then 
begin to accelerate toward the moon and under the dominant 
influence of the moon's gravity. At 35 hours 33 minutes 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0023, GET 36:33 129/1 

- A0 T hia is Apollo Control. 36 hours 

34 minute, into the flight of Apollo 10 .And the spacecraft 
now 137,243 nautical miles from earth. The velocity is 
! 282 feet per second. All continues relatively 
in mission control. All of our telemetry inf ormat ion from 
the spacecraft indicates that all systems are functioning 
iormallv and we also are informed by the flight director 
rt™ " 7 h« Jo! been about 6 hours since the last thruster 
firing. As you recall, we set up with the crew a new 
procedure for maintaining passive thermal control to 
minimize the thruster firing which interfered with their 
sleep last night. Apparently the modified passive thermal 
control mode is working out very well. By way °J J**"*?" 1 
information on the spacecraft status right now the weight 
i. 93,353 pounds. We'll continue to monitor and report 
to you any significant changes in status of Apollo 10. As 
11 said, everything continues to progress very well at this 
tJ-e This is Apollo Control at 36 hours 35 minutes into 
the flight of Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0123, GET 37:34:00 130/1 



PAO This is Apollo control at 37 hours 

34 minutes. The Apollo 10 spacecraft is now 139 thoueai d, 
7 hundred 16 nautical miles from earth, and the velocit- 
continuing its very slow decrease, down now to 4 thousand 215 
feet per second. Here in mission control we are preparing 
to hand over shifts. Flight director Milton Wendler wi 1 
be relieved by flight director Pete Frank and his orangi 
team of flight controllers. We do not anticipate a chai ge 
of shift briefing. Flight director Wendler summarized 
activities for us on this shift reports that continuous 
tracking since the midcourse correction performed at 26 hours 
33 minutes, shows the trajectory to be very close to the 
nominal. He said we expect no further midcourse corrections ~- 
on route to the moon based on current tracking, and a new 
passive thermal control mode now with a higher revolution 
rate, some 3 revolutions per hour, compared with the 1 revolution 
per hour thermal control used last night appears to be working 
well to minimize the thruster firings that disturbed the 
crews sleep last night. Wendler noted that we haven't observed 
any thruster firing since setting up this passive thermal 
control mode more than 7 hours ago. He also noted that 
we maintained good data flow from the spacecraft, which shows 
that all systems are functioning normally. This is Apollo 
Control at 37 hours 36 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 39:01, CDT 0250, 131 



PAO This Is Apollo Control 39 hours 01 minute 

ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 still enroute to the moon is 
now at a distance from Earth of 143 201 nautical miles. Con- 
tinuing to decelerate now showing 4123 feet per second in 
velocity. Cabin pressure aboard Apollo 10 is 4. - now at 
4.9 pounds per square inch; temperature 75 degrees. A partial 
pressure of carbon dioxide in the cabin is now showing 1.2 
millimeters of mercury. The only bio instrument at ion coming 
down on telemetry from the spacecraft is on the command module 
pilot and his heart rate is in the high 50's - around 57; it 
fluctuates somewhat from time to time and a respiration rate 
of 8. Apollo 10 is being tracked at the present time through 
the Honeysuckle antenna. The handover to the Madrid antenna 
will take place at 41 hours ground elapsed time, which will 
be about 2 hours from now. Some 3 hours 57 minutes remaining 
in the sleep period. And at 39 hours 02 minutes ground elapsed 
time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0350, GET 4001 132/1 



FAO This is Apollo Control, 40 hours 

and 1 minute ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently is 
145,602 nautical away from earth, upbound toward the moon, 
continuing to decelerate. Velocity reading is now 
4063 feet per second. The so-called moon sphere of in- 
fluence, where the speed begins to Increase again will not 
take place until tomorrow at about 61 hours 50 minutes 
ground elapsed time. The Apollo 10 system status sheet that's 
put out by the spacecraft analysis people, and the one for 
the time of 39 hours ground elapsed time, is quite brief. 
It cover* a single page and most of the entries under the 
various systems say all systems performance - normal. In 
the cryogenic quantities of hydrogen and oxygen for the 
fuel cell, the tank 1 cryogenic hydrogen shows 79.7 percent 
remaining, tank 2, 81.4 percent remaining, oxygen tank 1, 
82.4, tank 2, 82.7. In the batteries some 105.2 amp hours 
are remaining in batteries A, B, and C. That's a total 
figure. All temperatures are normal in the modified passive 
thermal control mode in which the spacecraft is being 
spun up a little faster than it was last night, now rolling 
up 3 revolutions per hour instead of 1 revolution per hour. 
And this faster rate apparently requires no additional 
attitude control by the digital auto pilot to keep the 
spacecraft oriented to proper direction where the sun angle 
is 90 degrees to the longitudinal axis of the spacecraft. 
And over from the Honeysuckle antenna to the Madrid antenna 
Is about an hour away. Two hours 56 minutes remaining in 
the sleep period. And at 40 hours 4 minutes ground elapsed 
time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0450, GET 41:01 133/1 



p A0 This is Apollo Control. 41 hours 

1 minute ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently is 
147 951 miles outbound from earth. And just approaching 
4,000 feet per second, 4,004 feet per second, in velocity. 
Continuing to deccelerate. In the manned space flight 
tracking network, we've just handed over to the Madrid 
antenna, Madrid, Spain, after having tracked for several 
hours with the big 85-foot antenna at Honeysuckle creek in 
Australia. The crew has less than 2 hours remaining in the 
sleep period - the present sleep period. We have 1 hour 
and 58 minutes remaining till wakeup time. All going well 
aboard the spacecraft; all systems still functioning normally 
crew still asleep, no word from them in the past several 
hours since the sleep period began; and at 41 hours 2 minutes 
ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 0550, GET 42:01 134/1 

PAn This is Apollo Control, 42 hours 

1 min'ufe ground elapsed time.' Apollo 10 is now 150 000 .lies - 
150 257 nautical miles away from earth upbound toward the 
Hon, traveling now at a velocity of 3948 feet per second. 
™e crew is still asleep with less than an hour remaining 
nf the sleep period. A bit whimsy here in one 
of lie AspLys in the Mission Control Center its actually 
a projection of pages of the flight plan on a large ten by 
ten"ac£ground TV projector. They've borrowed Snoopy a 
dog house and show him asleep in the usual manner on his 
back on top of the dog house, and down toward the bottom 
of the page where it says "in sleep period" he's ^ illo 8 
out of JhS top of the dog house Jumping down to the ground. 
And other news about the next mission, Apollo ii» cne 
tollo 1 stack roll out to launch complex 39A at Kennedy 
Space Center has been delayed somewhat to install a pro- 
tective cover, a raincoat sort of a device over the space- 

tcJ. 'its been some delay in getting ^ ^ tailed 
properly and its estimated the roll out will begin at 
9:SS Central Daylight Time. And at 42 houus 2 minutes 
ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 0652, GET 43:03 135/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. 43 hours 

3 minutes ground elapse time in the mission of Apollo 10. 
Distance from earth 152 thousand 609 miles. Velocity now 
3 thousand 891 feet per second. We've passed the time of 
the end of the sleep period, however we've heard nothing from 
the crew and it's not planned to give them a call until 
44 hours unless they're first heard from here in mission 
control. At 44 hours the consumables update and flight 
plan update are scheduled as well as cycling the fans in 
the cryogenic storage tanks for oxygen and hydrogen, and 
a few other items to take care of. Realignment of the 
lnertial measurement unit, and a change of the lithium 
hydroxide canister for removal of carbon dioxide from the 
cabin atmosphere. A discussion Is going on here in the 
control center as to whether midcourse correction number 
3 will really be necessary or not. The current track 
predicts pericynthion arrival on the back side of the moon 
at 61 nautical miles. Serious consideration is being given 
to not doing midcourse correction number 3. We'll continue 
to moniter the air ground circuit and come up with the 
conversation when it does commence. And at 43 hours 5 
minutes ground elapse time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0659, GET 4310 135A/1 



SC Houston, Apollo 10 transmitting on 

regular S-band omni voice. How do you read? Over. 

CAPCOM Reveille, reveille, all hands muster 

on the flight deck for calisthenics. How do you read? 

SC Loud and cl«»r. We had a little 

trouble routing up all hands this morning. 

CAPCOM Well, w* decided to let you sleep 

in a little bit, and if you want to get up at your leisure 
that's fine with us . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST : 0223, 43:34 GET 136/1 



PA 0 This la Apollo Control, 43 hours, 34 

minutes; let's join the conversation in progress with Apollo 10. 

gC - round up all hands this morning. 

Cc Well, we could kin da let you sleep 

in a little bit, and if you want to get up at your leisure, 
that's fine with us* 

SC Yeah, sort* looks like we've got a 

hard day of EGC. That thing didn't fire thrusters once last 
night; my hats off to you; that's great. 

Cc You were right; we were gonna mention 

that to you - and it looks like a good way to go; that's a 
good solution. 

SC Economical too. 

Cc Apollo 10, Houston. John, are you 

the only one who is up yet? 
SC (static) 
CC Roger. 

PAO This is Apollo Control; while we re 

waiting for the noise to be taken off the air-to-ground circuit, 
apparently its a data noise and a matter of shifting antennas. 
We've had word from the Cape that the Apollo 11 roll-out has 
been delayed to 11:30 AM Central Daylight Time; we'll continue 
to monitor the air-to-ground from Apollo 10, and leave the 
circuit open. This is Apollo Control, while we are waiting 
for the air-to-ground conversation to continue, the distance 
from earth is now displayed as 153 929 nautical miles, velocity 
now 3860 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APf-U.C- 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, W2"/f9 T f.DT 7 2ft. GFT "339 137/1 



CAPCOM Ap^lLt. 10, Houst;-". When ' - u get 

«?t:led down and get breakf ist ther», we've g.*t s>me informa- 
tion just co pass a^-ng when you've got time to listen. 

SC Pofser. I better jo down t > the end 

compartment and h-ld reveille 

CAPCOM Say again, please. 

SC I sAld I've got to go back to the 

aft compartment and h r l d a little reveille. 

SC Hp! lo, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAP COM C'Gd morning, Apollo 10, this Is 

Houston. How do you read' 

SC Loud and ciear. Hey, this is really 

a great p 1 a - to sleep on the wav to the mon, I'll tell you. 

CAP COM Well, we let you sleep In ^ lirtle 

hit Have a good rest? 

SC Yes, about 9 hours solid 

SC Gerd morning, Jack, how are you.' 

CAP COM r *oed morning, groat shape Wndrr- 

stand vou are a littlp sl->w on reveille this Turning. 

SC Yes, if we had known y.u were down 

there, we probably would have heard the bugle. 

CAPCOM I expected to hear your feet *cl- 

lectlvely hit the deck before I finished reveille. 

SC Pretty hard to find out which way 

the deck :* up here. 

SC How does the spacecraft look to you? 

CAPCOM The spacecraft is in real good shape 

The CSM and LM systems are both in very good hciith and your 
consumables *re considerably ahead of y<>nr flight plan. Dur- 
ing the night - during the night ult'i this PIC mode since 
Initialization yesterday at ab~ut 30 hours, rhere were no 
jet f i riigs - 

SC Roger, we couid tell that last night. 

It doubles our analysis that we haven't fired one chruster 
since we started. Locks like we have a real winner here. Jack. 

CAPCOM Rog, that was a good solution. And 

also, vou are riding right down the plot. Your third mi d- 
course correction would be T/lOths yf a foot per second and 
sr we are recommending deletion of that and your present 
perllune prediction without mldcourse 3 is 61.8 nautical 
miles at ?6 hours. 

SC Roger, sounds great. 

CAPCOM And in addition, your data on both 

command module RC? rings remains the *ame; vcur leak rate 
on ring nurHer 1 is the same as vesterday. And when you have 
time ts listen, wp've got a little bit of new* down here. 

SC "Jhy not go ahe^d while we are fix- 

ing breakfast, might as well listen to the news. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY » 5/20/69, CDT 728, GET 4339 

CAPCOM Okay, you are right in the headlines. 

Among the biggest news events of yesterday were the three 
astronauts of Apollo 10. Millions of people throughout th 
world - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69 , GET 4 3 : 4 4 , CDT 0733 138/1 



CAPCOM Millions of people throughout th« world 

saw some or all of what one wire service writer called 
the "Mini Show". Tom Stafford was called the star and John 
Young the supporting player because he appeared upside down 
throughout the show. Gene Cernan was listed as camera man. 
A now unemployed philosopher has pointed out that due to your 
efforts color television has reached new heights. Coleman 
Hawkins, Jazz saxophonist, died at the age of 64. He was one 
of the innovaters of Beep-Bop during the late 1940's. President 
Nixon is reportedly in favor of keeping a 10 percent surtax 
past it's deadline of June 30, 1969. His spokesman, speaking 
to a House of Representatives committee, proposed that the 
10 percent surtax be extended to the end of this year and 
then lowered to 5 percent. President Nixon also announced 
that he will meet with South Vietnamese President Thieu within 
the next 2 weeks, probably at Midway Island or some other 
Pacific Ocean location. In the sports world there were no 
major league baseball games played yesterday. Gardner 
Dickinson won the National Invitational Golf Tournament at 
Ft. Worth on Sunday with a 2 under par 278. The PGA moves 
to Atlanta this week for the Atlanta Classic. One closing 
note of special interest to the Apollo 10 crew is this story:. 
Chief William Red Fox of Philadelphia, who remembers his Uncle 
Crazy Horse fighting at the Little Big Horn, would like man 
to leave the moon alone because it's ruining the rainfall. 
The 99 year old Ocala Sioux chief summed up his reaction 
to the Apollo 10 moon shot in this manner: "It doesn't 
seem to rain much since man started messing around with the 
moon." And we are tracking you guys up there now at 154 221 miles* 
and you have slowed down to 3 853 feet per second. 

SC Hey, Jack, pass the word. I don't think 

I'll get back in time for the Classic in Atlanta. 

CAPCOM Roger, there will be another time. 

S C Also Jack, will you pass the word on to 

the Indian chief that I grew up in the Dust Bowl of Oklahoma, 
but I still don't think flying to the moon has anything to 
do with the rainfall. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll pass the word, Tom. 

sc It's always nice to run across someone 

who is not a proponent of the atomic theory of weather pro- 
duction. 

sc We haven't had a chance to look out much 

here and give you a weather report yet. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're standing by, and how is that 

moon looking? Is it getting bigger? 

SC I'm sort of afraid to look. 

sc we still have all the window covers on 

since we just woke up. 

CAPCOM Roger, relax and have your breakfast and 

let us know when you are ready to press on with the plan for 
the day. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 43:44. CDT 0733 138/ 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. While the crew 

is eating breakfast the various updates to the flight Pi™ 
are beini passed to the spacecraft communication Jack Lou.m. 
J.!. in Mission Control. Look, like a """I*"™ 1 ; 
according to the flight plan, and especially if it is 
decided to delete the midcour.e correction number 3. Jack 
lolsL mentioned to the crew that the needed correction was 
something like 7/10 of a foot per second in DELTA-V, or 
velocity change, and that the predicted pericynthion on 
arrival at the moon at 76 hours, that's the pericynthion of 
Volzll would be on the side opposite the earth, would be 
^ome^ing like 61 nautical which is 1 mile off the desired 
pericynthion. We'll come - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CDT 0738, GET 4349 139/1 
pA0 ... desired pericynthion. We'll 

come back up when the conversation " 
sc Looking right over Suez Canal, 

Saudi Arabia, the Mediterranean, Africa, back into the parts 

of Europe, 

CAPCOM Houston, roger. 

SC Jack, right now I'm looking at all 

of Africa which is almost totally clear with the exception 
of a* few clouds on the western side. I can see across the 
Straits of Gibraltar. Some cloud cover just on the eastern 

Sna"in Generally, it looks like I can see Zanzibar. Gener- 
ally it looks like that whole portion of Africa and eastward - 
northeastward - is pretty clear today . 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you, Gene, for the 

weather report. ^ ^ & magniflcent sight , Jack. 

Beautiful. „„ Gene Cernan giving a global 

weather report, what's visible from the spacecraft. 
inla line from the center of the earth out through the sur- 
face to where the spacecraft is, its present position is 
Saudi Iraiia approximately 20 - 27 degrees north by 
50 degrees east. We ? ll continue to monitor in case there 
is rufther conversation but i^. «-lik«ly Jb.r. -Ill 
^^^^^ ^ 3 0» ue 8 

with a crew status report, consumables update, flight plan 
wI * . C " . 8tate vector fed up to them from the ground 
U and a e o'th a r e o°ugh a V refinement of theinertial measurement unt 
for the day's activities, after having been in the rotisserie, 
or passive thermal control mode, all night, in which under 

utes Ground Elapsed Time this is Apollo Control. 
END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST: 0743, 43:54 GET 140/1 



PAO - further conversations; let's come 

back up on the loop. 

PAO This is Apollo Control; while we 

are waiting for conversation to resume with the crew of Apollo 
10, we'll pick up the days activities on the flight plan. 
Canister change, lithium hydroxide canisters which remove the 
carbon dioxide from the cabin atmosphere scheduled at about 
46 hours; fuel cell oxygen and hydrogen purge at about the 
same time, noon meal at 47 hours, environmental control system 
redundant component check at 48 hours, 25 minutes. At 52 
hours, state vector update from the ground, also maneuver 
pad and target load for raidcourse correction number 3, should 
it actually be carried out. And just prior to the time for 
the midcourse correction, another alinement of the inertial 
measurement unit. The midcourse correction, if it is done, 
will come at 53:45 ground elapsed time. TV pass scheduled 
at 54 hours, running 15 minutes; this is through the Goldstone 
station in California - distance at the time of this pass will 
be 176 000 nautical miles from the earth and 39 000 nautical 
miles out from the moon. In about 56 hours, 30 minutes, the 
crew starts powering down, and what's called the pre-sleep 
check list, stowing all the gear, chlorinating all the water, 
cycling the fans in the cryogenic storage tanks in the service 
module, crew status report going into the sleep of communications, 
another canister change, and at 58 hours, ground elapsed time, 
they would begin a 10 hour rest period. We'll leave the 
circuit open for any further conversation. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/20/69, CDT 748. GET 4359 141/1 



PAO - ve will leave the circuit open 

for any further conversation between bites of the crew's 
breakfast. 

PAO Considerable amount of line noise 

on the air-to-ground circuit, probably indicating a need to 
shift omni antennas. Except for a brief period of realign- 
ing the lnertial measurement unit, most of the day will be 
spent in the passive thermal control mode. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. The pre- 

dicted closest approach to the moon for the third stage of 
the Saturn V, which injected the Apollo 10 spacecraft into 
translunar coaat will come tomorrow, Wednesday, at about 642 
central daylight time, at a distance of 1,779 nautical miles, 
sweep on by the moon, go into solar orbit. The line noise 
has decreased somewhat on the air to ground. We will con- 
tinue to monitor here as the crew has their morning meal. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. We're ready to 

copy the consumables update when they are available. 

SC Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Here 

we go with the consumables update. At GET 44 + - 

SC Jack. 

CAPCOM Say again, please. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. How do you 

read? 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. The consumables update. 

Consumables update at GET of 44* hours, RCS total 86 percent, 
alpha 87 percent, bravo 85 percent, Charlie 86 percent, del- 
ta 86 percent, H2 total 42.7 pounds. 02 total 526 pounds. 
We'd like today, in order to balance the RCS up to use AC 
roll instead of BD roll, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST:<&«^3. Wrl* GET 142/1 



CC - roll; over. 

SC Roger on the consumables, and we'll 

switch over to IC roll Instead of BD roll. 

Cc Houston; roger. And this is 4 percent 

above the flight plan RCS. 

SC Roger. Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead 10. 

S C Roger, Jack. Wish you'd pass on to 

Chris and Johnny Mayer that we think that this attitude for 
the PTC is really great because you can see the moon for just - 
and also the earth - for just about a half of each rev; it s 
really tremendous. 

CC Roger, Tom. t 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Stafford s 

reference there to the PTC really being great, meaning Passive 
Thermal Control Mode, that is that it was modified. He wanted 
to pass the word on that is was really great to Chris - meaning 
Christopher Kraft, who's Director of Flight Operations here at 
Manned Spacecraft Center and to Johnny Mayer, who heads up the 
Mission Planning and Analysis Division, the mathematicians and 
trajectory planners who come up with all the numbers associated 
with planning the missions. We'll continue to monitor the air- 
to-ground loop for any further conversation from Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GET 44:09, CDT 0800 143/1 
DEAD AIR 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 80S, GET 4M4 144M 



PAO This is Apollo Control. Down at 

the Spacecraft Communicator's console, the Flight Activities 
Officer is conferring with the Spacecraft Communicator Jack 
iouama on the flight plan update, giving him all the necessary 
information to read up to the crew when they are ready to 
take the update- Standing by for resumption of air-to-ground 
ronounicat ion. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0810, GET 4419 145/1 



PA0 This is Apollo Control continuing 

to monitor the air-to-ground for resumption of conversation. 
The spacecraft communicator Jack Lousma, within the next 
several minutes, likely will start reading up the flight 
plan activities, updates on the day's flight plan activities, 
to the crew, sorting out the last details of the few minor 
changes. Here in the Control Room, before Lousma begins the 
flight plan update reading, the circuit is still open on air- 
to-ground to Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0813, GET 4424 146/ 
This tape is blank 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GET 44:29 CDT 0818 147/1 



SC Houston, thla is Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

SC Okay, Jack. One thing we'd like for you 

to pass on to the Project Office Is a bit about the only type of 
thing we want to pass on in real time as of this day on the 
system and again that's due to the water. There was lots 
of air in it for the initial servicing and it's continued 
just to get a ... a little bit, and the little hand held 
centrifuge all it does Is slip the big bubbles to the bottom. 
I guess there is something about physics we don't understand, 
but we you will pass that word on to them and get them working 
on it and save some time, save about 7 or 8 days before debrief- 
ing. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll get the word to them, Tom, 

and also we have a flight plan update when you've had some 
breakfast. 

SC Okay, It will be about another 15 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT 0823, GET 4434 148 

PAO This i. Apollo Control. Apparently 

the crow Is .till In the «id.t of e.tlng breekfe.t, not quite 

d,™ to t.ke the flight pl.n upd.t. fro. Control 
Center here. At 44 hour.. 35 minute, thl. i. Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT 0835, GET 4446 149 

Thi. 1. Apollo Control. Lefe join 
the conv.r.ation in p-grea^ itj^."^ , t thi . 

tiM 'sf com Era r«.rr.;t on . t r . 

&COM EogT. Und.r.t.nd you hav. cryo 

pr... light. I. th *J.;" r i^ ng lt . Xt Juat went out 

" ii I cyclii - tumid the fans on and 

C T ?tl r.«5y Jo copy that flight plan update, 
now if • out. I m "J^. the flight plan up- 

CAPCOM Roger, here a tne r * ; harg . on b at- 

is ^is.^&s? - • - - > 

readings firat. . 

<r 0M 5£:"- J : o c k : ,, s« ..... mo». 
°r oM ;ssr« u. cmp. 

cap com s«y *E» i »* 

5030 on the CMP. 
CAPC0M undaratand 5030. 

ass srsrsssi. *.«•. - »• 

'"" CLtTo"' 15033. *»•> • »»•« - »" 

r..t.d l«t night. ,!..,!„, „ ht. »•<*•««. 

a... «. .i..,i., - •«•"* 1 • 1 " plni 10 th 

" Ji.rS.UrU. LM? pr.b.bl, .« 

.bout « to « hour, of pr.tty too* .IMP • 

to .t.rt ch.r.i.. 1. *"^r«"«. 

^ C ° M SU. M t' chT,. b.tt.r, * 

right now. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC And the charge ia on. 

CAPCOM Roger, charge on. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0835, GET 4446 U9/2 

SC Houston, is that all the flight plan 

update ? 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. That is affirm- 

ative. That's the end of the flight plan update for now and 
we're about ready to go on the state vector update and would 
like to have the computer, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0840, GET 4451 150/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. While we're 

waiting for the antennas to get sorted out for this state 
vector update, the space digitals display shows the altitude 
now, or distance from earth, at 156,728 nautical miles. Ve- 
locity continuing to decelerate, 3794 feet per second. We 
will continue to monitor air-ground to Apollo 10 as the con- 
versation resumes. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We're ready to 

uplink your state vector now if you'll go to ACCEPT on your 
TLM, over. 

SC We're ACCEPT in POO. 

CAPCOM Roger, and I have a couple more 

items on the flight plan update when you're ready to copy. 

SC Go ahead. Jack. 

CAPCOM Okay, we had, on our sextant cali- 

brations, during P23, some differences in DELTA H from yes- 
terday and the day before and we need to check the trunnion 
bias to see if it's drifting. In order to do this we'd like 
you to, either before or after your P52 which is coming up, 
to do the steps of P23 which refer to the sextant calibration. 
And you can use any star, and I have the steps for performing 
this without going through the whole P23 if you need them. 
In addition, we've noticed that you have an imbalance in our 
cryo tanks; namely, that tank number 1 is lower than number 2, 
and we'd like to reverse this imbalance by reversing the heater 
configuration. However, we'd like to do this on our mark so 
that we can get the heaters in the proper point in the cycle. 
And so when the time comes up what we'd like you to do is turn 
off the heaters in tank number 1 and turn the heaters in tank 
number 2 to AUTO on our mark, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0845, GET 4456 151/1 



CAPCOM - on our mark, over. 

SC Okay, standing by for your mark. 

CAPCOM Roger. It will be a while before 

the time comes up. 

SC Okay, let us know, and we will do 

it. 

CAPCOM Roger. It's likely to be as much 

as a half hour. And do" you copy the information regarding 
the trunnion bias check? 

SC Roger, we will do steps in P23 that 

refer to the sextant calibration, either before or after P52. 

SC And we don't need any data on how 

to do that. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. The uplink to 

state vector is complete, you can go to accept. Correction, 
you can go to block. 

SC We are in block. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST: 0850, 45:01 GET 152/1 
ALL DEAD AIR - 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GET 45:06, CDT 0855 153/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control and the circuit 

is still open to Apollo 10. However, the line noise is 
rather strong now as they break lock and rotating around in 
the passive thermal control mode with the omni antennas. In 
spite of the noise we will continue to monitor the air/ground 
circuit and leave it live. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0800, GET 4511 154/1 



PAO This Is Apollo Control. The crew 

of Apollo 10 apparently is still in the midst of the realine- 
ment of the inertial measurement unit. Meanwhile the space- 
craft is now 157,476 nautical miles away from earth. Velocity 
is now 3777 feet per second. The trajectory as tracked now 
shows that the perlcynthion at arrival of the moon will be 
some 61 nautical miles, and this is one reason that the mid- 
course correction number 3 stands a good chance of not being 
done at all. Members of the Black Team of Flight Controllers 
are in the process of taking over from the Orange Team here 
in Mission Control. At each console there Is a miniature 
briefing session going on as each man tells his relief about 
what has been happening during the night, the status of the 
systems, and any other thing that the man needs to know to 
do his job during the day. We'll continue to monitor the 
air-to-ground circuit to assume that the crew will call the 
Control Center here when they are through with their task of 
alining the platform to continue any discussion, possibly 
more global weather reports. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0907, GET 4518 1 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Go ahead. 

SC Roger. I don't know if the GUIDO 

i8 watching us or not on the high bit rate or whatever but 
wnat Vm doing here 1. taking advantage of the PTC to check 
thia celestial - to check the planet option. I've already 
got Jupiter and you can recognize it because of its moons. 
And now I'm looking for Mars. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Thank you. 

Sc Tom has the earth at his window, and 

that's the reason for the program .... and got Mars vector 
in there and it's open by Tom's window. 

CAPCOM Houston, roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. GET 45:24, CDT 0913 156/1 

DEAD AIR 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0918, GET 4529 157/ 

PA0 The Atlantic area should have widely 

scattered showers for the next two days. The outlook for the 

f the mission are. is satisfactory. End of the mission 
area is 15 degrees, 7 minutes south latitude by 165 degrees 
west longitude, in the southwest Pacific some 345 nautical 
ml les duf east of Pago Pago, Tutuila. in American Samoa. 
Continuing to monitor air-ground with Apollo 10. Circuit is 
still live. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GET 45:32, CDT 0921 158/1 



SC Okay, Houston, we've Just checked Saturn 

and it's definitely recognizable because of the ring's course 
and it's pretty close to the sun for a data point I think, 
but it's easily visible. 

CAPCOM Roger 10, we copy. 

SC Houston, this is 10, We can't do that 

optics calibration without stopping out PTC. Over. 
CAP COM Roger, stand by. 

SC I guess everybody knew that, didn t they? 

We did the realign while we still had PTC and it seemed to 
work okay. 

CAPCOM Stand by one, please. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, we thought we were 

going to come out of PTC to do the P52. There is no need 
at this time to do the second calibration. We can do that 
when you come out of PTC for the television later on in 
the flight plan. Over. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

SC Okay, Jack, just for a minute to look 

ahead in the flight plan, are we still planning the fuel cell 
H2 purge after 46 hours? 

CAPCOM Houston. That's affirmative. 

SC Okay, we'll go ahead and get the H2 purge 

line heaters on as called in the flight plan. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, and did you copy my last 

about the second calibration? Over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0926, GET 4537 159/1 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Roger. Did you copy our last about 



the 



SC Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, this Is Houston. Did 

you copy our last about doing the sextant calibration when 
we come out of PTC for the television as opposed to doing it 
now? Over. 

sc Negative, we didn't. I was just 

fixing to get Arcturus and do it on Arcturus. Looks like that 
would be a good one. 

CAPCOM Roger. We had - 

sc That's fine with us. There's no 

sense in - we'd kill two birds with one stone that way. 

CAPCOM Roger. We prefer not to interfere 

with the PTC. This is not - the sextant calibration is not 
time critical; however, we thought that you would come out 
of PTC to do the P52, so let's hold off on the sextant cali- 
bration until the TV pass, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 0931, GET 4542 160/1 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Over. 

SC Good morning there. 

CAPCOM Good morning, you guys. Your 

friendly Black Team's coming back on duty for the daylight 
hours and we got one thing for you. When you did call up 
the P52, John, you collapsed your deadband. We d like you 
to widen It again out to the 30 degrees, over. When you 
get through the 52. 

sc Okay, what we did was - yes, well, 

we just left the pitch and yaw in accel command and with 
this thing about coupling, it doesn't, you know, it doesn t 
make any difference, Charlie. But we're going to establish 
that deadband back when we get done. 

CAPCOM Roger, 

SC Hello, Houston, this is 10. As a 

result of that P52, sort of on the fly so to speak, the auto 
optics is not positioning the stars right in the center of 
the reticle. They're off - they're within the lines but 
they're not in the center like they usually are, so I d like 
to do another realine where we stop for TV or whatever, and 
we can get that optics calibration at the same time . 

CAPCOM Roger, John. I'm pretty sure we 11 

concur. Stand by. Yes, 10 - 

sc I don't - I think it's good - It s 

within the R and M lines on the sextant which is really 
pretty good. In fact, it's putting all the planet options 
inside the sextant field of view with no problem at all. 
We checked three options, Jupiter, Mars and Saturn, and it 
put them all right in there. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. We can concur if 

you want to do the P52 - another one - down after the TV 
when we do the sextant cal. You can do It if you want to, 

OVer * sc Okay, and I think this looks okay. 

I just want to verify from the torquing angle. 

CAPCOM Roger. Can you give us your torquing 

angles and your star angle differences there? 

SC Okay, Charlie. We used star 36 and 

44. The star angle difference was four balls one. The 
torquing angles X was plus 0043 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 0936, GET 4547 161/1 

sc + 00431 Y - 00366 Z - 00063. 

CAPCOM Rog, thank you much, 10. We had 

data dropout during the time. We couldn't copy it, thank 



y ou . 
Tom? 



SC Roger. 

CAPCOM Was that about 4544, thereabouts, 



SC Okay, it was 450630. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC What it was Charlie, was I did the 

first P52 using the start, then checked the planet options 
without actually using those alignments. 

CAPCOM Okay, 10, I copied. 

sc So the actual realign was kind of 

early this morning. 

CAPCOM Rog, before we came in. Thank you. 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control at 45 hours 

49 minutes. The Black Team of Flight Controllers led by 
Flight Director Glynn Lunney has gone on duty in the Mission 
Operations Control Room. The CapCom is Charlie Duke. Apollo 
10's distance from earth 158,780 nautical miles; velocity 
3,747 feet per second. We will continue to stay up live. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We're 

ready to configure the cryo H2 heaters, if you're standing 
by . 

SC Okay, Charlie, all set. 

CAPCOM Roger. On my mark, it's - stand 

by. Roger, 10, on my mark it's tank 1 heaters off, tank 2 
heaters auto. Stand by, mark. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST: 0941, 45:52 GET 162/1 



SC - stand by; mark. 

CC Hello Apollo 10; Houston; over. 

SC Go ahead Charlie. 

CC Roger. I think we lost you with the 
antenna switch there Geno; did you copy the nark on the heater 
switch? 

SC Mo - I'm sure we did lose you. Go 
ahead. 

CC Roger. On my mark - H2, tank 1 heaters 

to OFF, and tank 2 heaters to AUTO. Stand by. Mark. 

SC Okay. 

SC Hey you got it. H2 tank 1 is OFF, 

and H2 tank 2 is AUTO. 

CC Roger. And the E conns say that during 



the day here you probably can expect some master alarms from 
this configuration, due to the heaters, but it should set us 
up for the night so we won't - they won't wake you up tonight 
with the same things. We'll go back to normal - 
SC Okay, that's great. 

CC And we'll go back to normal configura- 

tion for pre-sleep. 

SC Roger. Houston - we reinitialized 

these dead bands quite a ways from our 90 degree point, and 
we probably ought to reinitialize them when we get back around 
90 degrees; do you concur? 

CC Stand by. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69 » GET 45 :57 , CDT 0946 163/1 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10. Houston. On rees tab lishing 

the dead band when you went to ACCEL command you really 
didn't hurt a thing. When you selected the VERB 37 you 



co 
ban 
90 



llapsed it, but we notice that you've increased your dead 

nd and it's still established plus or minus 30 degrees around 

degrees on the pitch, so we're still in good shape. Over. 
sc Roger, Charlie, sounds real good. Thank 



you. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENT AMY . 3/20/69. CDT 0951. GET 4602 164/1 

This t«p« i« blank 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GET 46:07, CDT 0956 165/1 



SC Hello Houston, this Is 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead 10. 

SC Okay, I'm ready to purge the H2 any tine 
you are ready. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

CAPCOM We're ready 10, go ahead. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST : 1001 , 46: 12 GET 166/1 



SC Houston, the H2 purge is complete. 

The line heater is OFF. 

CC Roger; copy. Hey, Geno , did you guys 

have any trouble with the canister changes? 

SC No, we're about to make one right 

now; 1 don't think we've had any trouble; stand by. 

CC Roger - the only reason I asked was 

I remember during the C squared, F squared, we had some sticky 
ones and was wondering how it was going. 

SC Thus far, Charlie none have stuck. 

CC Roger. 

PAO This Is Apollo Control at 46 hours, 23 

minutes. Apollo 10 has just passed the 160 000 mile mark. 
Current distance 160 014 nautical miles; velocity 3719 feet 
per second. Flight Director Jerry Griffin will take over a 
large part of the duties today from Glynn Lunney; they are 
both at the Flight Director's Console, but Jerry will handle 
a large part of the duties, freeing Glynn for activities in 
preparation for lunar orbit insertion day tomorrow and the 
subsequent lunar orbit activities including rendezvous. 
We'll continue to stand by live, for any transmissions from 
Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1013, GET 4624 
167/1 



SC Hello, Houston, this is 10. 

CAP COM Go, 10. 

SC Roger, I'm making a report on that 

optics tracking that we did this morning during RE FS MM AT. 
On the - while we're still in PTC RE FS MM AT realine, the 
optics tracking is about 10 to 20 times smoother and easier 
than it is in the simulator. It's Just beautiful. The 
optics track-ing is absolutely no problem on medium speed 
in putting that star right in the middle of the reticle 
and marking on It. Just, just fantastic. 

CAPCOM Rog, John, we copy. In medium speed 

it's really easy to track the star and put it right in 
the center. How's the visibility - 

Sc This auto optics has just been worth 

getting it. Well, there's still no way to recognize stars 
from P51's that I can see other than - probably you could 
do it If you put the whole lunar module and point it directly 
at the sun. In other words, if you went to gimbal lock 
or something like that, then you could point the, if you 
didn't have any other recourse, you could point the whole 
lunar module right at the sun and 1 think that would shield 
you enough so that you could recognize stars as constellations. 
But other than that, I haven't seen a single star or constel- 
lation through the telescope that I can recognize myself. 

CAPCOM Roger. Thank you for that report. 

We'll pass it on. 

gC Well, there's nothing we can do 

about that, I'll tell you that. But it's sure confident to 
see those things like constellations, you know. 

CAPCOM Yes, I know what you mean here if 

you dump that platform. This optics tracking Is good news 
though, if we can make that thing a lot easier. 

Sc Well, it would save you quite a bit 

of fuel cause to reinitialize that REFSMMAT, reinitialize 
that PTC, is probably going to cost you a little. 

CAPCOM Rog. You don't think the three 

tenths of a degree has - didn't give you any trouble, did it, 
when you first got started there? Is it a little learning 

CUrVe sC We're looking at about 2500, maybe 

a little less right now. No, there's no problem at all with 

It. 

CAPCOM Great. 

SC And the auto optics will track the 
•tar too. 

CAPCOM Right. This thing has really - I 
don't know whether you guys can tell it or not, but if you - 



tfOLU, 10 M...0. CO»U.T«T. S/10/M. Cff 1013, « »M4 

of .oautua wctot 1. i«J »«" 'J . il ttl . bit ... 
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n: , ..::. b 'i.dTt , l .:;."u k : ,, :. ? s «• »• »* " u4 

.. 10., « «•« 'J^*, „„., kB „ .ho thought of 

11 ' "clrcoi"" """...""it ««f « • 10 

«" It'. l.t.t..tini to .ot. th.t «v«n 

!r£:r h ?ri: , i^tr^:r.:: t ru?A:"f U i?:^- > . l i 2 »'it. 

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sc (garble) . 

capcoM 10. you't. fading out «o we 11 

..itchi. 0 .? n:tT . irrf^s:^:!: 1 :..^ 

Ju .t . utti. ........ W i «-'* *— *" " 



BIS OF TAFE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST: 1033, 46:44 GET 168/1 



PAO This Is Apollo - 

SC - that w« vers concerned about doesn't 

seem to be a problem is that the LM on except for a ... 
except for reducing the brightness that prevents you fro* 
seeing stars and recognising them as constellations. That's 
actual occlusion of the ... telescope and sextant; doesn't 
appear to be near the problem it was thought to be when 
we started. 

CC Roger - goed show. Des it look like 

what the pictures that you had been shown John? 

SC Yes, it actually looks even less than 

that and its a good deal less than the things we had - worse 
case fixed up in the simulator to practice with. 

CC Roger. You've put your artistic 

talent to work when nothing to do the next couple of hours, 
how about sketching us up a little view so we can maybe update 
the CMS when we get back down and maybe they can put a little 
cut out in there and get their picture to be real life. 
When you guys - we switched antennas on you, and Tom, we lost 
most of your conversation about the thrusters. If you'd like 
to repeat that, we're standing by. 

SC I guess John ... Charlie, that even 

though we haven't fired a thruster for I'd say 12 to 15 hours, 
now, this stack has a motion all of its own - and on occasion, 
you'll hear a little shudder in it, a little noise, and they 
are getting very sensitive ... to every little motion. And 
it is amazing that the whole stack hasn't little motions 
and noises in it. 

CC Roger - we co - 

SC ... glycol pumps to the suit - sounds like 

might be some tank slosh or something of that nature but its 
really amazing how we can pick up these little things; 
occasionally the whole thing would just give a little shudder. 

CC Roger. I was talking to the 9 crew 

this morning about it - and they said they had the same 
sensations when the LM was out front - at anytime they came 
up with any little movement, that the whole thing Just seemed 
to shudder. We're - it's really amazing to sit here and watch 
how your coupling up in pitch and yaw and the CTC - the thing 
is that it never gets out of more than 20 degrees off from 
our initial attitude, then couples back in, and goes the 
other way. We think we are in pretty good shape. 

SC Yeah - sounds like you came up with 

a real great solution here to save fuel and everything. 
Also like I passed on to Jack this morning - this attitude 
is fantastic because we can see the earth for about half of 
each one of our revs here. 

CC Hey, well, really great. Is the 

ole earth getting a little smaller out there? 

SC Ah, you can tell we're a long ways 

from home now Charlie. 

CC Roger; I bet. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CST : 1033, 46:44 GET 168/2 



CC It was the Span people that case up 

with - 

SC As a matter of fact - 

CC I was going to say it was the Stan 

people that came up with the PTC procedure, so once we got 
it straightened out on how to read It up to you, things seemed 
to be working real great; we are all real pleased with it. 

SC Teah, it feels good in here, and looks 

good as far as the attitude for the outside reference - we're 
getting a lots of pictures of the earth - and also the main 
thing, we're saving fuel. 

CC Roger. Are your sequence cameras 

and the Hasselblad working okay? 

SC Working slick as a whistle. 

CC Beautiful. 

SC Hey Charlie, I was wondering - we got 

a little time to kill here - again each day we've been going 
over our lunar activities, Just doing homework up here, about 
oh, a couple hours each day, so we'll be way ahead of the game 
when we get there, at least try to be, but one thing you people 
have never seen is Africa, and we got high-gain lock, we can 
call verb 64 and we'll show you a picture of what Africa looks 
like and you can - or I assume we are working through Madrid 
now - 

CC Stand by - that's affirmative; we're 

coming through Madrid. Would you like to just put it on when 
you come around with high-gain and not stop the PTC? 

SC Yeah - we don't want to stop the 

PTC - we want to save every ounce of fuel we can; we can show 
you just a few minutes of it; since we've got some time to 
kill here - in high gain - out the hatch window and the side 
window . 

CC Stand by 10 - lets see if we get 

the networks configured right, okay? 

SC Alrighty. Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead 10. 

SC Okay, just to reiterate, the only 

2 anomalies we've seen on the whole spacecraft, and by-and- 
large, the spacecraft is just performing beautifully, are these 
2 items. I called one of them down to Jack and you heard about 
the other one, but just to summarize them - one was when the 
Mylar insulation, you, know, kind of blew out of the tunnel 
hatch when John pressurised the LM, then the second one is all 
the air in the water - now that was the initial servicing 
of the water at the Cape. As soon as we got into orbit, 
the stuff had lots of air in it. That's continued to bug 
us just a little bit, but those 2 are about the only - 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1040, GET 4651 169 



SC - bugged us juat a little bit but those 

two sre about the only - the major things to start working 
on before we splash down. 

CAP COM Rog, we'll pass it on, Tom and we're 

going to start on that. 108 has get a hydrogen separator 
In It, hopefully, It's going to work. I don't know what we 
cen do about It for 107, but we will pass this on and see 
whet they can come up with. The TV stuff - we don't - 

SC Hey, Charlie - 

CAPCOM I was going to say, the TV stuff, we 

heven't got any lines called up end eny tine schedule for 
the satellite right now, but Medrld Is continuing to record 
the etuff and than can play It back later, over. 

SC Okay, we will give them just a short, 

about 5 to 10 minute one and then you can take a look at It 
later. 

CAPCOM Roger, if you will stand by, we will have 

you seme high gain angles for you. 

SC Okay. I don't think you've ever seen 

Africa and Saudi Arabia and that part of the world yet, have 
you? 

CAPCOM negative. Is It real clear down there 

at this time? 

SC Yes, Africa Is great. It looks like 

velvet. All of Europe, Soviet Union, all down through the 
Balkans are socked in in thet giant cloud cover you saw yes- 
terday; but, Saudi Arabia, India, and all of South Africa is 
completely open and the inner-Tropical convergence zone is 
really beautiful. Ton can really see the total line down 
there, so we will just give you a quick picture of it. 

CAPCOM Rog, fine. We will let you know when 

Madrid Is configured and we will have you some angles in a 
moment. Leter on, when we've got some time, we have got e 
few things we would like to discuss with you on the LOI, part 
of the LOI on your cue cards and some mission rulee , over. 



SC Okay. 
SC That's a good idea, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Rog, end we will be up with that - 

SC Want to aek you if - 

CAPCOM Go aheed, John. 

SC Okay. I was just about to ask you, in 

view of the chember pressures a little lower than nominal if 
we didn't want to hedge a little on that chamber pressure 
that we talked about the other day. I don't know. 

CAPCOM Well - 

SC Meybe our gage reading is just low, 

CAPCOM Rog, I kind of think Its right. On our 



second cues, after the manual repress attempt for propellent 
press less than 160, we don't believe that if you see that 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 1040, GET 4651 169 



first cue. propellant press less than 160 that the PC is going 
to actually ually get that low. You know, as we've seen 
in sims, it really didn't go that low. Vector soft point 
on the second cue and also in the mode 1 and 2 regions, 
second from the bottom down there with the SP8 Injector 
valve closed after commanded on. With the one bank, you 
know we saw PC of about 95 on the evasive maneuver and 
with one bank actually closed, that PC down to less than 
80 is really not a good indication. What we're recommending 
Is that if you have, as an example, bank B is closed or 
appears closed on your panel, then you close bank A. If 
you are still burning then you've had an instru-mentation 
failure obviously and turn bank A back on and keep burning. 
If It aiiuts down, then you should abort anyway. 

SC Okay. I think we've got that. We will 

talk about it a little more. 

CAPCOM Okay. I just wanted to let you start 

thinking - 

SC 

CAPCOM Keep talking, Tom, go ahead. 

SC Okay. What we would like to know is, I 

think you can dig it up, what did you indicate on telemetry 
for the thrust chamber pressure when we had both banks on 
yesterday during that midcourse. 

CAPCOM Stand by. I saw 95, but let's see what 

the strip chart says. Hang on. The engine was perfectly 
normal on, Tom, at 100 psl. 

SC Okay, real good. Looks like we have 

about a about gage reading of about 5 psi in here. 

CAPCOM Roger. I just wanted you all to start 

thinking about these - the cue card and we will get all 
squared away down here and let you - and when we get some 
time, we will discuss. 1*11 let you stand by for the angles 
and network configuration. 

SC Okay. 

SC Charlie, would you - you got through that 

conversation before I could get the cue card out. 

CAPCOM I figured that's what was happening about 

halfway through. Since I have such a one-track mind down 
here, I just kept talking. Stand by, I think we've got 
some angles for you. 

SC You sure do get excited, Charlie. 

SC That's okay, we just love to hear you 

keep talking. 

CAPCOM Okay. Bey, we've got some angles for 

you if you will go yaw 270, pitch 45 you should be able to 
pick this up right now. 

SC Okay, Charlie, how are you reading in 

high gain? 

CAPCOM I'm reading you 5 by, Gene. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 10*0, GET 4651 169 



SC Okay, I have to wait a couple of minutes 

for the world to come around. 
CAP COM Roger. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, this is Houston. Madrid ia 

standing by. You can turn on the tube any time. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, you are barely readable. 

We request - if you read me, we request you go narrow beam. 

SC Charlie, we are narrow beam. How do 

you read? 

CAPCOM Rog. Reading you 5 by now, Gene. Tom's 

conversation was unreadable, however. 

SC Okay, well, we've been narrow beam ever 

since we locked up. 

CAPCOM Roger. Tom's beautiful now. 

PAO This ia Apollo Control. We will not 

receive this television transmission live. It will be re- 
corded at the Madrid tracking station. As soon aa we have 
an estimate on when we will be able to replay this transmia- 
ve will notify you. The satellite is not available to us at 
the present time for live transmission. 

CAPCOM - we request that you give us a mark when 

you turn the TV on so Madrid will get the word. 

SC TV is on in the interior now until we 

can get the world to come around. 

CAPCOM Roger, 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Madrid is getting your SM ' 

carry up. 

SC You say tbey are receiving? 

CAPCOM Roger. It's weak now, but they are pick- 

ing up your interior shots. 
SC Okay. 

PAO Madrid reports a fairly good signal now. 

Apollo 10's distance 161,363 nautical miles; velocity 3,689 
feet per second. 

SC Okay, Charlie, we got the world now out 

of Tom's window and it looks pretty small in our monitor 
right now. We will try zooming it. 

CAP COM Roger. Madrid is copying. 

SC Okay, it's going out of sight there. We 

will shoot a little bit of interior and it ought to ccme in 
sight in my window here in a minute or two. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 HISSIOH COMMENT A IT, 5/20/69, GET 47:02, COT 1051 170/1 



SC my window here In a alnuta or 2. 

CAP COM Roger 

SC Interior viae we arc giving then a 

look at the a tar chart which haa got aoaa eolora for both 
tha aua and tha soon and aoaa of tha planets, Saturn, Jupltar, 
Vanua , Mara . 

CAP COM logor. 

CAPCOM How about putting that pretty patch 

up thara again. 

SC Okay, wa*ll do that. 

SC Thia ia our atar chart and how wa 

idantlfy tha atara and tha planata that we're looking at right 
now . 

SC Thia ia what wa uaa for our atar 

navigation. Tha aarth ia ovar hara. 
CAPCOM Houaton. 
SC Go ahaad. 

CAPCOM togar. Our algnal atanda about - 

SC Go ahaad Houaton, thia la 10, 

CAPCOM togar, Geno. Our algnal atrangth 

la down about 10 db . Wa'd like you to go high gain to aadlua 
width and than back to narrow. Ovar. 

SC Okay, it's aadlua now and I'll go 

back to narrow. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC How 'a that? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

SC Okay, tha blua ball hare, tha big 

one, la tha aarth aa It progreaaea through tha haavana hara 
whlla wa'ra on thia trip. Tha aoon it In yellow and it alao 
prograaaaa through the haavana. I aight bring out tha faaoua 
Apollo 10 ayabol patch. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'd like to - wish wa ware 

aaaing thia now but Madrid la going to record it for ua 
and weMl see it later on. That waa a beautiful aatronoalcal 
daacrlption of tha atar chart there, Gene. 

SC I thought you could follow it a little 

bit cloaar there, Charlie, if I told you about that. 

CAPCOM Roger. Takaa aa a little whlla to 

catch on to those thinga. 

SC Where better can you give an aatro- 

noalcal daacrlption than in the aatronoalcal heavens, huh? 

SC I think that' a where we are. This 

PTC wrlat band really helps you with tha orientation of tha 
stars, even if you can't see thea you can have feel for where 
they ought to be, which ia, I think, going to help ua out. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we're atill having a 

problaa locking up so wa'd like to have you go to wide beaa 
for 30 seconds and back to narrow. Ovar. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 47:02, CDT 1051 170/2 



SC Okay, we're in wide bean. 

CAFCOM Roger, we'll probably lose the TV 

for a little while and we'd like for you to keep going the 
next time around and maybe we can get a better picture. Madrid 
is having a little trouble. 

SC Charlie, you wouldn't believe this, 

but right now outside my window I've got something, I don't 
know how far. It might be the S-IVB. It's just spinning 
around and reflected sunlight out there. 

CAPCOM Roger, if we can get our expert 

FIDOs going and compute and see how far the S-IVB should be 
right now from you. 

SC I can see it with the naked eye and 

then I put the binocular on it and I can see it spinning around 
and I wouldn't bet my life on it being the S-IVB, but it 
sure has got to be something like it. 

CAPCOM Roger, we hope so. We'd like for you 

to go back narrow beam width now, 10. 

SC Roger, we're back in there, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, and we're getting a great 

signal strength now so we should be in good shape if you can 
give us one more pass on the tube we should get a good picture 
at Madrid. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan reporting that 

sighting. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, Madrid is reporting 

a much better picture now, so we fixed it up. 

SC Okay, the earth ought to be coming 

through my window here in a minute, Charlie. Stand by. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're standing by. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, E Co mm says it looked 

like we locked up on our side lobe there the first time when 
we acquired with the high gain. Request that you stay in the 
wide beam width - for about 30 seconds, or a little bit longer 
before you select narorw. Over. 

SC Okay, we're all right now, though, 

huh? 

CAPCOM Roger, we're in good shape now. 

That was just for future reference. 

SC For all the folks at home that should 

be a pretty good picture of the Btars and stripes. 

CAPCOM Roger, wish we were seeing it. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we are expecting a high 

gain loss in about 1 minute. Over. 

SC Okay, and here comes the earth. 

Let me get it for you first. 

SC Okay, now we've got it, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. We've got about a minute. 

SC That's a good picture of the earth 

right now. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 47:02, CDT 1051 170/3 
CAPCOM Roger, Madrid'* got It. 

SC Okay, Charlie, that's maximum zoom. You 

should be seeing all of Africa, matter of fact, you should be 
looking down right at Madrid. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're beginning to lose the high 

g*in - 

SC Garbled 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20. 69. CST: 1101, 47:12 GET 171/1 



SC ... Madrid. 

CC Roger - we're beginning to lose the 

high gain 10; we're going to OMNI. 

SC Okay; that's a shame, cause it sure 

is pretty. 

CC 10, Houston, if you'll go to manual 

on the high-gain and we'll switch to OMNI. 
SC You're there. 

CC Roger; we have them. 

SC Boy, she's in a perfect spot now Charlie; 

that was a shame. 

CC 10; Houston. Due to our lock on, 



side-low problem about a quarter or half of that pass was a 
little weak; at Madrid, if you'd like to, Madrid is still 
configured and the next time you come around, they'd like some 
more TV; over. 

SC Okay, we got plenty of time here, and 

we're just going through reading about the lunar acitivitles. 
How soon before we can get high-gain lock on? 
CC Stand by . 

CC It'll be approximately 10 minutes 10. 

SC Okay, we'll note that and let us know 

as soon as we have high-gain lock; we should be able to get 
it out the hatch window and my side window. 

CC Roger, and we'll come up with some 

more angles for you in just a minute. 

SC Okay. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. If you've got 

your L0I abort card out - we can talk about it. 

SC Okay, we got it out Charlie. 

CC Okay - second line down after Manual 

Repress Attempt, your first cue - propellant press less than 
160 and you got the second cue listed as PC less than 80; 
that's a soft number, and we don't think on the basis on Sims 
and systems data that you'll see a PC down that low, with the 
propellant pressed down at 160, and I'd drop down below that 
before we get down to 80. So - just think about it - its 
a soft number and we can discuss this later on, whether we 
want to scratch that or not. The only other comment on the 
card was down at, next to the bottom, was mode 1 and 2 only. 
On the SPS injector valve CLOSE - after commanding on. 
Your second cue again is PC less than 80, if you'll recall, 
the evasive burn, we were getting a PC of about 95 or there- 
abouts. So - that's really soft on that one. We suggest that 
we eliminate that cue and that we replace it with a statement 
that says, "Close the bank that indicates OPEN, and if you 
are still burning, its apparent instrumentation failure." 
If the engine shuts down, you are in an abort mode anyway, 
and you should continue with the LOI 1, mode 1 abort, at the 
proper time using one thing; over. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CST: 1101, 42:12 GET 171/2 



SC Okay, let me write that down and 

we'll go over It here. Charlie, I'm just looking through 
our rendezvous procedures here, and I just wondered if those 
guys had any second thoughts about some of those procedures. 
You know we can change them now but in a couple of days we 
won't be able to. 

CC Roger; stand by. 

SC Charlie, I'm Just kidding, about 

the changes. 

CC Okay - we really did go through then. 

We did the backup set last night, and from cover to cover, 
and everybody's happy as a clam with all the procedures now, 
finally. We even are satisfied with your market schedule. 
Say again, Tom. 

SC I told turtle not to have any more 

data priority - 

CC He's locked out of the MOCR right 

now; we refuse to let him in. Back to the LOY abort card, 
my first statement, after manual repress attempt with propellent 
less than 160, we think we should substitute as a second cue, 
instead of the PC less than 80, there, that if you can confirm 
a drop in PC, then that's enough to indicate a true propellent 
pressure drop - and it would be enough to shut down on. Over, 
10 - Houston, would you select OMNI Charlie for us? 10, 
Bouston, have you got any thoughts on the updates for your 
LOI abord card? Or do you want to think about it some? 

SC Let us think about it for a minute 

harlie - based upon that PC which we saw, with single bank, 
I guess maybe that ... 

CC Roger. 
We'll be standing by anytime - we'll have you some high-gain 
angles in a moment early for your next pass around 

SC Okay. 

SC Hey Charlie - I bet the Fido has an 

LOI pad for us, doesn't he? Right now? 

CC Say again 10, I cut you out. 

SC I said I was betting that Fido has 

LOI one pad for us right now. 

CC He's working on it; we got some; Fido 

aayu he's got your SIVB about 39 70 miles away. 

SC Well that must be it then, that I saw, 

cause it's really reflecting and tumbling out there. 

CC Roger. 

SC If you can see that far, but there's 

something out there. Is there anyway you could give us a vector 
to it - we could put it in the auto optics and let it go look 
for it. 

CC Stand by. We've got a yaw of 270 and 

a pitch of plus 30 for the highgain at 24. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1111, GET 4722 172/1 



CAP COM plus 30 for the high gain at 24, 

for th« lockon, over. 

SC Okay, we'll be with you. 

PAO This la Apollo Control at 47 hours, 

23 minutes. The Manned Space Flight Network expects to be 
able to feed that television signal from Madrid to Houston 
In approximately 12 hours. There Is a 12 hour reservation 
time for INTELSAT 3, the communications satellite through 
which the signal will have to be fed. The MS FN - 

SC We should be locked on narrow now 

on high beam - high gain. 

CAPCOM Roger, and our signal strength looks 

great, 10. 

SC Okay, you should be having something 

here pretty quick. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

PAO Madrid is receiving TV again now. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Madrid has a good TV 

picture. 

SC Okay. 

PAO The picture is being received in 

black and white in Madrid. It will be converted to color 
here in Houston. The Manned Space Flight Network says it 
will attempt to get the signal back here as soon as possible, 
but they estimate it will be approximately 12 hours. 

CAP COM 10, Houston. The picture is still 

looking great at Madrid. 

SC Charlie, the Suez Canal appears now 

to be going into darkness. We're looking at most all of 
Africa, the Mediterranean Sea; Spain, Portugal are in view. 
So the folks down in that part of the area ought to be get- 
ting a good picture of themselves right now. 

CAPCOM Rog. I think they can broadcast 

that stuff out - 

SC (garble) 

CAPCOM I was just going to say, you know, 

I think they can broadcast that stuff out in black and white 
live. For the color It has to come over here and be converted 
and then be transmitted back into color for the people over 
in that area, but they're probably seeing it in black and 
white . 

SC It's a beautiful sight. All of Africa 

is brown again, of course, and the waters are very, very blue. 
CAPCOM Can you differentiate between the - 

SC (garble) 
CAPCOM Go ahead, I'm sorry. 

SC Charlie, picture just went off beyond 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, S/ZQfM, CDT 1111. GET 4722 172/2 

a quarter of our window now so it looks like that's about it 
for right now. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC And what did you want me to differ- 

entiate between? 

CAPCOM I was just going to ask you, looking 

at Africa - 

SC What was your question now? 

CAPCOM Looking at Africa, could you tell 

the difference between the Congo and the tropical forests 
in the, in the, say, the Mountains around Morocco and all 
the Atlas Mountains, and up around the Mediterranean, or is 
it all sort of the same brownish color? 

SC No, once you get to the tropical 

rain forests it changes colors. You can definitely see the 
Sahara and the Atlas Mountains, and when you go south of the 
rain forests it's not as green as you would expect, but it 
gets a less red and more of a, really a purplish-green tinge 
there, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

Sc You don't see the great - the bright 

green rain forest. You think you might, but it's the shade, 
it's the contrast that you notice. 

CAPCOM Roger. Yesterday when we were look- 

ing at South America live here we could see above the timber 
line In the Andes Mountains just very distinctly, a brownish 
color, and in the Amazon Basin and in the jungles around it, 
it was sort of a deep bluish, darker than the ocean by a con- 
siderable factor, but it was more of a bluish tinge down here. 

SC It's a purplish-bluish tinge and we 

can see - again, a lot of it has to do with the amount of 
haze and cloud cover on it. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Charlie, it sounds to me like you're 

seeing it pretty much as we are. 

CAPCOM It was really spectacular color, 10. 

We're really - everybody is really pleased and happy with the 
quality. All the networks and all are just ecstatic over it. 
As we are here in the room. You guys have really been putting 
on a great show for us and we appreciate it. 

SC Yes, well it's not a show. We just 

want to show you what we can see from out here. Not many 
people get a chance to get this far and it really is a pretty 
exciting view. 

SC And we also just wanted to thank all 

the people who helped make it possible for us to get here too, 
Charlie. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1111, GET 4722 172/3 



CAPCOM Right, we're passing it on, Tom, 

to the networks. This afternoon when we got the scheduled 
TV we'd like you to do the water bag trick, the food separators 
up in the - let's see how that will look. We might be able to 
pick up something on the live TV, over. 

SC We'll show you a new law of physics 

how the bubbles go to the bottom. 

CAPCOM Okay, that's what we'd like. 

SC Roger. 

SC Forgot to tell you, Charlie, I got 

your picture walking to work this morning. 

CAPCOM Oh, great. Walking to work? 

SC Yes, how come you were late? Charlie, 

it looks like Spain is mostly open today. I'm looking at it 
through the sextant. It really looks - it's beautiful. 

CAPCOM Rog, can you differentiate the - 

SC There's Barcelona. 

CAPCOM Excuse me, I was just going to ask 

you if you could differentiate the cities. Tell us about 
what you can see. 

SC Well, all you can make out is it 

looks just like a map, a small map, and well, you can see, 
for example, the Pyrenees, and you can see there may be cloud 
cover down along the coast there, down on the Mediterranean 
coast. You can see, almost see, I think, Gibraltar. 

CAPCOM Fine. 

SC And the Lisbon area over by Portugal 

seems to be clear. In France, Marseilles Is open. It looks 
like there's a little cloud cover north of France. England 
is under the clouds. 

CAPCOM Can you pick out any of the islands 

off of Greece, or say Sardinia, or down around Italy, Capri 
or Sicily? Can you see those islands? 

SC It's pretty close to the terminator 

right now and it's a little smoggier today than it was yes- 
terday. Yesterday Crete was very clear. I could see Cyprus 
and the Nile Delta is very clear right now. You can see the 
Nile; the Nile Valley really stands out, and - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 1121, GET 4732 173/1 



sc Right now, you can see the Nile, the 

Nile Valley really stands out. And of course, the Sahara 
Desert is very clear, you can see the geological features of 
the desert. It looks like Lake Chad down there in the middle 
of the - middle of Africa. 

CAPCOM Rog. Start talking about geology and 

ve will have Jack Schmidt in the room in just a minute. 

Sc I thought he was already there. 

CAPCOM No, he's doing something over in the 

office today. t , . _ 

PA0 That's John Young giving the description 

of the earth. J . 

sc That certainly is an interesting weather 

pattern going across there. I can see right now in Bresil, 
it stands out very clearly on the horizon. And Brazil is 
covered with those little thunderstorms that build in a 
tropical area. It just seems like each tree has its own 
separate thunderstorms down that way. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc Boy. it's really a fantastic, just fan- 

tastic view. We can see right across the top of the world 
right now and it sort of looks like, I don't know «*»ctly 
how we are oriented right now, but it sort of looks like the 
North Pole is open today, but it isn't very much open. The 
whole northern part of the world is under the worst cloud 
bank I've ever seen. 

CAPCOM Rog. That thing has been there constantly 

almost since, it seems like, since you guys started the pic- 
tures back. Can you still see that strange looking storm 
system up over the Bering - I guess It was just south of 
the Bering Strait out over Alaska. Is that thing Btill there7 
It was a funny looking swirl. 

sc The terminator runs down through Africa 

right now, Charlie, so we're starting to look at only about 
3/4 of the world. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc So that part of the world hasn t come 

around to us yet. 

CAPCOM Rog. . 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're estimating high gain 

loss at 37. We would like you to - at high gain loss, to 
return to omni bravo, and then we will handle the omnia from 
there, over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Bruce has got a little 

message he cut out of the paper and I'd like to read it up 
to Tom If you are ready. 

SC Stand by. Let us switch omnia, be there 

in a second, Charlie. 



APOIXO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1121, GET 4732 173/2 
CAP COM Rog. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 47 hours 37 

minutes. The TV can only be transmitted with the high gain 
antenna and there is a period In each of the "volution, that 
Apollo 10 make, for passive thermal control and antenna lose. 
lock with the ground antennas. It is at this period that 
Jhev switch to the omni antennas for voice communication, 
D «;MlliiIlo« is not possible. Apollo 10's distance now 
162.659 nautical miles; velocity 3,660 feet per second. We 
should be back in communication very shortly here. We will 
continue to stand by. „ „_ ? 

sc Hello, Houston, are you reading us7 

* CAPCOM Rog, reading you 5 by now. 

SC Okay, I went to omni bravo there end 

left it there for about 2 minutes. I'm in delta right now, 
and wnen wt lose aignal strength. I'll give it : back to you, 
I'll Just go to o«ni in bravo and let you do the switching. 

CAPCOM roger. 

sc Okay, you can read that message up, it 

y ° U W c£cOM lke * Rog. It's from Weatherford, Oklahoma, 

H.teline. It says two young Oklahomans had high hopes Sun- 
day wnen thej "led to send%reeting. to Apollo 10 Commander 
T^omw". Stafford, an Oklahoma native. The two youngsters, 
aDoutlO year, old! were seen fro- a busy int Jo"* 
by passing motorists. They were sitting on a bills 
4 miles east of Staf-ford's hometown of Weatherford. holding 
aloft a printed sign with two small U.S. flag, attached 
to it. The eign ..id, "Hello, Tom." Did you see it? 

SC No, we were trying to, but couldn t 

quite make It there, Charlie. Tell them thank, a lot for the effort. 
We appreciate it. 

CAPCOM Rog, rog. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOB COMMENTARY 5/20/69. GET 47:42, CDT 11:31 174/1 



CAPCOM 10, Houston, if you'll select bravo 

on the dunis we've got the D commend In and we'll take over. 
SC Okay, you've got it. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/20/69, GET 47:52, CDT 1141 175/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 47 hours 

53 minutes into the mission. Apollo 10 's distance from the 
earth is now 163 198 nautical miles, velocity 3 649 feet per 
second. We'll continue to stand by live for any transmissions. 

SC Hey, Houston, this is 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead 10. 

SC Hey, Charlie, do you suppose a guy 

can really see 3000 miles with the naked eye in space? Stuff 
like the S-IVB? 

CAPCOM Yes, every body is nodding their 

heads "yes" here. We think so. You ought to be able to see 
4000 miles or so. That's a pretty big target out there and 
we think you ought to be able to see it. 

SC Okay, well, I can definitely see it. 

We've been seeing it for a couple of days I guess and went 
to my binoculars and it looks more and more like, you know, 
it might really be the S-IVB. 

CAPCOM Roger, FIDO said it's about 4000 miles. 

I guess that thing's about the - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT 1151. GET 4802 176/ 

CAPCOM - it's about 4,000 miles. I guess the 

thing is about the same plane that you all are. FIDO says 
you will have an update on your range - 

SC Yes, we see it. 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

sc We see it fairly regularly, if we look 

for it as we rotate through this PTC. 

CAPCOM FIDO will have an update on the range in 

about an hour ro so for you. 

p^ 0 That is Gene Cernan in conversation with 

Charlie Duke. 

Sc Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston, over. 

sc Okay, we are going to go ahead and get 

the ECS redundant check out of the way at this time and then 
we are going to have our own little skull session about the 
lunar operations for about 3 hours or so. We won t be talk- 
ing to you after this for a couple of hours unless we have 
some questions about the lunar operations. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. We're working on the 

S-IVB location vector for you. Do you want us to send that 
up when we get it? 

SC v e*i 8° ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay. Copy redundant component check. 

sc Okay, Houston, if you are watching, we 

are going to do the main regulator checks here. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Can you 

hold off on the component check for a minute or so until we 
get the high gain acquisition? 

SC Okay. 

gc Roger, we already started on it. 

CAPCOM We're showing yaw about 270, pitch +30 

on the high gain antenna. 

S C Ah so . 

CAPCOM You should have acquisition right now. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMEBTABY s 5/20/69, ! ,EX 48;i2» CUT 120X 177/1 



SC Ho'jstoc, 10 c bow do you read" 

CAP COM Rogers loud and clear and ready 

to proceed with the redundant component check- 
SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10 0 this la Houston. We copy 

the secondary evaporator operating now. We'd like for you 
to let It run for 3 to 5 minutes this time if you would. Over. 

SC That's affirm. 

CAPCOM Roger up. 

SC Hey a Bruce, how are things back there 

on the home front? 

CAPCOM Oh, they are pretty good. Everybody 

is watching you all via TV and the newspapers and things are 
going alocg nicely here. 

SC What about the home-home fronts? 

CAPCOM Roger, the 2 Barbaras were ever here 

at Mission Control to watch TV yesterday, They seem to be 
going along pretty well. 

SC Okay, thank you, 

PAO The 2 Barbaras are Mr?. Barbara 

Cernan and Mrs, Barbara Young. 

SC Houston, 10, if you are satisfied 

with the secondary loop I'll go ahead and deactivate it. 

CAPCOM Roger, it looks good here, you can 

go ahead and deactivate, and we'll do a little checking on 
the home front situation for you and check back In a little 
while. 

SC Okay, fine, a~4 the loop looks like 

it's operating pretty good here, 

CAPCOM Roger, we concur, 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 48 hours 

22 minutes with the conclusion of that environmental control 
system component check the Apollo 10 crew has Indicated they 
are going to spend the next couple of hours doing some home- 
work for their lunar orbit activities. This Is study time 
they've been doing every day si^ce liftoff, and they've 
indicated they will not b e a in all probability,, doing much 
communicating during She next couple of hours. We will take 
the line down now *nd come back up if there is communications, 
At the present time Apollo 10 3 s distance from the earth Is 
164 248 nautical miles, velocity 3^-26 feet per second. We 
will take this lofp down now after having been up li^e con- 
stantly fcr 3 hcurs and 27 minutes. We'll com back up if 
there are any coaaur.1 cations . This is Mission Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1216, GET 4827 178 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 48 hours, 

27 minutes. Charlie Duke is talking to the crew. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Stand 

by for the news from the homefront, over. 

CAPCOM Hey, 10, we just talked to - 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, we just talked to Barbara 

Young and she's the only one that's at home. The other two 
are at least not home. Maybe out to lunch or something or 
out spending all your money. But Barbara Young is the only 
ona at home and she says everything is all right, John, and 
she said she and Barbara Cernan almost fell out of the chair 
yesterday with your little demonstration of dynamics in zero 
g and thought it was real funny. But everything else is 
peachy keen at home, and we'll try to raise the other two 
gals later on today. 

SC Thank you. 

CAPCOM You're welcome. 

SC Tell mine to quit spending all the 

money, okay? 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll do that, Tom. 

SC I can see nothing's changed at my 

house . 

CAPCOM Rog. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Would 

you give us orani Bravo and manual on the high gain antenna, 
over . 

SC Socking it to you; here it comes. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY. 5/20/69, CST: 1231, 4B:42 GET 179/1 

p A 0 This i» Apollo Control at 48 hours, 

42 minutes and we ara in communication with the Apollo 10 
crew . 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Over. 

CC Roger, Gane ; Juat talked to Barbara 

and she said aha was home and that I didn't let the phone 
ring long enough, so she's mad at me. She said she received 
your letter yesterday and she ruined her makeup efter reading 
it, and that everything was really fine; she appreciated it 
very much, and that Tracy is fine, back in school, and they 
were really enjoying your TV shows. Over. 

SC Thank you. 

CC Roger. Tom, we'll keep trying with 

Faye. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1249, GET 4900 180/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 49 hour* 

into the mission. Madrid is handing over acquisition of 
Apollo 10 to the Goldstone station at thie time. Apollo 10 
ia 165,543 nautical miles from earth. Its velocity: 3,597 
feet per second. The only conversation we've had with Apol- 
lo 10 is to notify them of the acquisition handover. Here s 
the tape on that. 

SC Roger, Charlie. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CST: 1258, 49:09 GET 181/1 

FA0 This is Apollo Control at 49 hours, 

9 minutes. The video tape of the television transmission re- 
corded in Madrid will be flown to Houston. We will not use 
the satellite for transmission. Transport time is estimated 
at approximately 30 hours, so this video tape will be available 
In iolltln someiime tomorrow evening. This is Mission Control 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOM COMMENTARY. 5/20/69. CDT 1316. GET 4927 182/1 

PA0 Thi« i» Apollo Control at 49 hour* 

27 .inutea. There he. been no further converaation with 
the crew. Apollo 10 le now 166.435 nautical »ilea fro. 
eerth and iti velocity i* 3,579 feet per eecond. 



END 07 TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, GDI 1320, GET 4931 183/ 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 49 hours, 

31 minutes and Gene Cernan is giving us a call. 

SC Hello, Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, go. 

SC Charlie, I'm looking at the earth 

now through the monocular and I can see the west coast of 
Africa; I can see Spain and Gibraltar very, very well. I 
can see just about 90 percent of South America, up through 
central America. I can see the whole Gulf Coast all the way 
to California, and on this side now, Cuba is very visibly 
clear. All of Florida is clear and the whole Gulf Coast is 
clear. I can look up the East Coast maybe to about the 
Carolines, and then it appears to get a little bit cloudy. 
And it appears that the Great Lakes, I think I can make out 
Lake Michigan and probably Lake Superior. And then there 
are some clouds up in the northwestern central United States. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SC There's some, okay, coming out of 

the North Pole down into the Central Atlantic, there are 
some very weird picturesque cloud formations. Swirls, not 
definite low areas, but big large swirls. 

CAPCOM Rog, we copy. 

SC This is about the best view I think 

I've had - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SC It appears to be about the best view 

that I've been able to have of the whole Atlantic and South 
and North America from where I am and It ought to be getting 
a little bit better as we go along. 

CAPCOM Sounds pretty spectacular, 10. Can 

you distinguish the Bahamas region. In most of the photos 
it looked like it is definitely a greenish rather than a blue 
area. Can you pick out any of the islands or just, is Cuba 
the smallest - the largest - you can define? 

SC Charlie, she's out of my view right 

now. As soon as she comes in in the right-hand window I'll 
take another look at it, but I think probably you can - now 
there are some clouds down in there as you just go off of 
Miami and off the Keys. There are some scattered cloud cov- 
erage down in the Caribbean which may make it difficult to 
pick some of those islands out. 

CAPCOM Roger, just giving you an eye test, 

SC Okay, it appears that the whole Gulf 

Coast all the way across Mexico through Arizona, from Florida 
to California, you know, up J2 and J86 is clear as a bell. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

CAPCOM Rog, copy. It was beautiful when 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY s 5/20/69, CDT 1320, GET 4931 183/2 



we came to work this morning outside. I don't know what it's 
looking like now though. Hold on. 

SC You don't even have to go out. I'll 

tell you. 

CAPCOM Okay, everybody - the front row 

standing here says It looks beautiful outside. 

SC We'll have it coming around here in 

the other window in just a few minutes. 

CAPCOM Roger. 10, can you comment on any 

other - 

SC (garble) you guys like it down here - 

CAPCOM Say again, Gene, I cut you out. 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CAPCOM I was going to ask you, can you com- 

ment on any of the - you made a distinct comment on the Nile 
Delta and the Nile Valley, can you pick out any others as they 
come into view, say the Mississippi. Is it as clear and is 
it as distinguishable as the Nile and the desert, or would 
you have a difficult time, over. 

SC We'll take a look at It as she comes 

through the window over here. 

CAPCOM Rog. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/20/69, GET 49:38. CDT 1327 184/1 



SC Hello Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

SC Hey, Charlie, (garbled) 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, go ahead. We switched antennas 

on you, 10, and you were cut out, Tom, right when you began 
your conversation. Go ahead. 

SC Okay. We're working through the Goldstone 

now, right 1 

CAPCOM 10, you're breaking up. Can you stand by 

about a minute until we get a better signal? 
SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, how do you read now? 

SC Roger, read you loud and clear. How me? 

CAPCOM You're about 3 to 4 by, 10. Go ahead, 

I think we can read you now. 

SC Yes, okay, Charlie. If you have a good 



contact with Goldstone we might Just show you we've got some 
tine to kill and we just might show you a quick 2 or 3 minutes 
of the earth on TV you might never see on our normal trans- 
mission because we're way past here. We can get Africa, 
part of Europe North and South America and it's pretty 
good if we can go high gain into Goldstone we could probably 
get it in about 10 minutes for you. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by, we're at Goldstone 

Active now, we'll see if we can configure the network 
and give you some angles. Stand by. 

SC Okay, Charlie, while you're doing that, 

your answer is I can see the Mississippi Delta very well as 
outlined against the Gulf of Mexico. Compared to the surround- 
ing areas it's a grayish area. You can't really see the rivar 
basin or anything that might be a delta except the contour 
of the land. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy 10. 

SC Okay, and your inlets from Florida all 

the way down towards Trinidad, there's a lot of broken cloud 
coverage but I can yet pick out islands other than Cuba down 
in that area all the way down through Trinidad, possibly 
islands in the areas of San Lucia and Martinique and down in 
that area. 

CAPCOM Roger. You really got some eagle eyes 

up there. We'll be with you in a moment with some angles. 

SC Well, I'm cheating. I'm using a mono- 

cular. 

SC I'll tell you one thing, Charlie. The 

map makers are pretty good. 

CAPCOM Roger. They'll appreciate that. 

SC I can definitely see up in the Great 

Lakes region now. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 49:38, CDT 1327 184/2 



CAP COM Roger. 

sc Lake Superior and Lake Michigan are very 

clear. I can pick out one of the eastern lakes and then there 
is a big, long thin cloud bank that runs from northeast to south- 
west, probably starts around the middle of Misouri and then 
goes on up into the northeastern part of the United States 
that covers a couple of the other lakes. 

CAPCOM Rog. Say, we're getting a better weather 

report than the 6:00 news. 

SC Okay, we've got the tube all set up. 

When you give ue the angles we can give you a quick 2 or 3 
minutes of it and still continue with the PTC. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, the Golds tone is configured. 

Stand by, the E Conm's will have some angles for you in a 
second. ^ 

Sc You ought to get an outstanding picture 

of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, the United States is almost 
80 percent clear and you'll get South America and on the right 
hand side near the terminator you ought to be looking at 
Spain and the west coast of Africa. 

CAPCOM Roger, we're configured now, your anglea 

are pitch 270, correction pitch 30, yaw 270, and it's a plus on 
the pitch and those angles are good for 3 minutes from now, 

at 51 S c That was 030 on the pitch plus and 270 

on the yaw, right? 

CAPCOM Right, if you try it now you can probably 

get it. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT : 1337, 49i48 GET 



185/1 



CC - you can probably get it. Stand 

by - the E-comms are shaking their heads "no" on that - try 
51, 10. 

SC That's 51, okay. 

Tell the* I'm gonna leave then in a little bit to see if ve 
can do a little better than that. 

CC 10, we don't have the lines in froa 

Goldetone, it should be recorded at Golds tone, and we'll 
play it in as soon as we get the lines up for the live TV 
coming up at 54 hours. 

SC Okay, Charlie, very good. 

CC Since we don't see it down here, 

if you guys will give ua a running commentary we'd appreciate 
it. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control; we will play 

this video tape immediately following the live television pass 
this afternoon. 

CC If you've come up with any questions 

out of your 2 hour skull session on the lunar orbit work, if 
you'd like to pass them on, we'll get the experts working on 
them; over. 

SC Okay. Houston, can you tell when 

we've got good high-gain lock? 
CC Stand by. 

SC Doesn't appear here that we've got 

a solid lock. 

CC Roger; ve made an error in the 

calculations 10, and we estimating now at 53 before a good 
solid lock on on the main loade. 

SC Okay. Okay, there's solid lock on 

narrow beam wind. 

CC Roger 10; we're reading you 5 by; 

stand by and see if we confirm. Roger; we got a good lock. 

CC - ought to be getting a good 

picture . 

CC We got a good lock up - Goldstone 

is configured; ready to go. 

SC Okay, you ought to be looking at it 

now . 

CC Roger. 

SC Houston, how do you read on? 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10; how do 

you read on vox? 

CC I read you 5 by on vox, 10. 

SC Okay, I'll kinda narrate this 

Charlie; I'm kinda at an odd angle to hold it out the window. 
Again, you can see the West Coast of Africa, the Sahara 
Desert there all in orange, you can see the Atlantic Ocean 
with swirls of clouds over to the Eastern Part of Brazil; 
you can see the very weird cloud patterns that Gene described 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1337, 49;48 SET 185/2 



SC - out over the Northeastern part of 

the United States; again, it looks like the North Pole, in that 
whole area around Canada is completely socked in. 

CC Roger. 

SC The - again, the one thing that is 

really so amazing as you look at the earth is the amount of 
cloud cover that we have down there. Over the tropical rain 
forest of South America, there's Just numerous small cumulus 
clouds . 

CC Roger; can you describe the color as 

contrasted to say, the Andes or of the American Desert. 

SC Roger, the color of the torpical rain 

forest there is more of a greenish brown - greenish brown 
versus a brown-orange on the tropical - on the American Desert 
and the Sahara Desert. 

CC Roger, can you pick out the Amazons? 

SC (garble) 

CC Roger, can you pick out the Amazon 

River? 

SC No - there's, I can't pick out the 

Amazon I am looking at it with my naked eye where Gene 
had the 28 power monocular. I do have the zoom on here, 
so you'll seeing it a little bit bigger than we are on 
the standard vision, so the earth as you see it there is 
bigger. And you can see the terminator, or night time, 
has moved over most of Africa at this time, and is starting 
to move over to Europe. It'll soon be night time in Spain, 
and therefore also it is getting daylight over in Hawaii 
there. The cloud patterns are utterly fantastic if you 
look out at them. 

CC Roger 10, we copy. How about up around 

the clouds that I asked you about earlier up around the 
Bering Strait; is it daylight over there yet? 

SC They are just starting to come into 

view and when we have our programmed TV pass, that's through 
Goldstone, we should be able to take a look at that cloud 
funnel situation. It was a beautiful swirl yesterday. 

CC Roger. 

SC But it's also amazing how some of 

the clouds are pure white and the other ones will look more 
of a brownish white - kind of a dirty white. Again, if you 
look, you could see, by Mauretania, going over to Brazil, 
the intertropical convergence zone that's always pictured 
on our weather map, is just a straight line right around 
the earth. It's really beautiful with occasional outdroppings 
of cumulus clouds. 

CC Roger. Where are the brownish clouds 

located - over the deserts or just where Tom? 

SC Right now the brownish clouds are over 

the tropical rain forest in the Atlantic Ocean. 

CC Roger. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT : 1337, 49:48 GET 185 



SC - Tropical Rain Foreat in Brazil. 

CC Roger; copy. 

SC We're about to loae you out our window. 

CC We'll atand by; Goldstone and Madrid 

were both recording the TV; get good signals both places. 
We'll stand by till you cove out through the hatch window. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1347, GET 4958 186/ 



S C As we say adios, we disappear be- 

hind our hatch window now. We will see you later. 
CAPCOM Roger. 
SC Cut it. 

sc That vox worked okay, I guess. 

CAPCOM Hey, 10, that vox was perfect. None 

of the words were clipped or anything. It was like talking 
to you in the same room, 10. It was really great. 

S C Okay, that's the first time I guess 

we've really used vox and it seemed to be okay at this end. 

CAPCOM Roger. You are not clipped at all. 

We are real pleased with it here, 10. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We will have you on 

the high gain for about another 8 minutes, over. 

sc ... coverage on the earth at all. 

You are completely out of view. John will be able to pick 
you up in the optics. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10, over. 

CAPCOM Rog, go ahead, John. 

sc Roger. In about another hour and 

a half you ought to be right underneath us. Boy, it ought 
to be the most remarkable picture of the United States ever 
made. The whole North American Continent is just standing 
out. It's really - and there is not too much clouds for a 
change. It's open. 

CAPCOM Great. 

SC - see you down from - Florida - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

Sc You can see Puerto Rico, Haiti, 

Jamica, Cuba, Florida, the Bahamas are under cloud cover 
right now, but in general the whole United States, except 
for the New England states, and a path cutting through the 
middle of the United States, wide open. You can see the 
Great Lakes very well. 

CAPCOM Good show. We will be looking for- 

ward to your TV show live here in a couple of hours and we 
should be, as you say, about right underneath you, and ought 
to get a good view. Thanks a lot. 

sc Roger, Mexico and the Yucatan penin- 

sula, even south of Central America into Panama. i can see 
parts of Venezuela, Columbia, and of course, most of Brazil 
is wide open. Chile seems to be open along the coast down 
there. Peru and Bolivia are probably under scattered clouds 
today . 

CAPCOM Rog. You guys are giving us great 

weather reports, 

SC You sure can see a lot. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1347, GET 4958 186/2 



CAPCOM Yes, like maybe all of it. 

PAO That's John Young giving that de- 

scription. 

SC Charlie, I've got it out my window 

now and, like John said, it's ao remarkably clear. Lake 
Superior and Lake Michigan stand out very plainly. There's 
Just a patch t a little patch of clouds, on the Chicago- 
Milwaukee area, or else there is snow on the ground. I really 
think it's probably clouds, but you can almost pick out the 
States by the contour of the sea and the ocean and the lakes. 
And 1 can actually see the Mississippi, not see the river, 
but you can sort of see the Mississippi valley as it goes 
up the - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY » 5/20/69, GET 50:08 CDT 1357 187/1 



Sc see the river but you can sort of aee 

the Mississippi Valley as it goes on up north from the delta. 

CAPCOM Is this through the binocular or by the 

naked eye, Gene? 

SC This Is through the binocular, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. Sounds like a spectacular sight. 

Wish we had had a stowaway up there with you. 

SC Hey, you know, you almost did until thay 

wrote it in the OCP to get Joe Engle out of here. 

CAPCOM Yes. 

SC It's also very Interesting to watch 

the continents come out over the horizon as the world turns 
more towards it the U.S. continent turns more toward it. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SC And I agree now with John. You can see 

practically that whole island chain all the way down to 
Trinidad. 

CAPCOM We copy. 

SC It's hard to believe we is really here. 

CAPCOM Hey, you guys are a long way away. We've 

got you at about 170 000 miles, little bit more than that 
right now. 

SC 170, okay. 

CAPCOM Roger, you're still below, if the drawing 

is right there, you are still below the earth/moon plane, and 
be coming up at about 195 000 you'll be crossing through the 
plane and going a little above. 

CAPCOM Hey, we're trying to get some angles - 

Go ahead John. ( 

SC We're not much below it, right? We re 

pretty close. 

CAPCOM Roger, real close. 

SC You can watch the earth through the optics, 

plus or minus 57 degrees in the sextant, or you can pick It 
up and try to follow it for over 100 degrees. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we'd like you to select 

omni bravo and manual on the high gain. Over. 

SC Roger. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MS«I01I COMMENTARY, 5/20/69 , CDT 1405, GET 5016 188/1 



PAO This ia Apollo Control at 50 hours, 

24 minutes. Apollo 10 la 168,353 nautical miles from earth, 
traveling at a velocity of 3,538 feet per second. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 50 hours, 

26 minutes. As an indication of how well this passive 
thermal control mode is working, Apollo 10 has not had a 
thruster firing since an elapsed time of 29 hours, 53 min- 
utes . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1417, GET 5028 
189/1 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston, over. 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Rog, John. Looking here ahead in 

the flight plan and we would like to give you your P27 
update at 5205 or thereabouts, and hopefully we won't have to 
kill the PTC for you to do this realignment, you did such a good 
job this morning we think we can continue on in the PTC and 
let you do the realigning and we can get an update to you 
also in the PTC mode. And we are suggesting, since this 
thing is going so great that we just keep it going and put 
TV - that we could do TV also during PTC since it seems to 
be working fine and we will have about, at the present roll 
rate, we probably have about 10 to 15 minutes television 
with the high gain, so we can get the whole live TV and 
it will be partially exterior and partially interior and if 
that's agreeable with you guys, that's the way we would like 
to play it. 

SC Okay, Charlie, but I - remember 

we were going to do a trunnion cal here one of these days, 
and I guess today isn't the day. 

CAPCOM Well - 

SC We can't do that unless you stop 

the PTC, over. 

CAPCOM Stand by. We will see if that's 

worth stopping for. Hold on. 

CAPCOM Gene, while we are waiting for 

the answer from the experts on the trunnion cal, we would 
like you to turn to the back of your flight plan to the 
mission rules summary and would like to talk about a few 
updates that we feel are justified at this time, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/20/69, CDT 1425, GET 5036 190/1 



Sc Okay, we're turning to it, Charlie. 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC Okay, we've got the flight plan out 

for this one; we re looking at it- 

CAPCOM Roger s it's on the back page, Tom, 

on the LM stuff primarily. Looks like the command module's 
side is in good shape. But on the LM side, if you'll notice 
under the column Do Direct Return Abort For Loss Of we have 
an X beside the primary loop. We'd like to change that to 
both loops, that we'd have to lose both loops before we did 
a direct return, over. 

SC Okay. In other words, you said it 

can go secondary loop because you figure the PGNCS would last 
for a period of time. 

CAPCOM Roger, if we went on the secondary 

we would do the PDI abort sequence but it's such a short time 
frame from between the DCI and the direct return that we don t 
think that we should go that route just for losing a primary 
loop and we feel it'd be satisfactory coming back on a secondary 
loop with a PDI abort, over. 

SC Okay, that sounds good to us since 

we've seen from the alti - the G 4 N system has worked in the 
altitude chamber without the cooler, we'll go along with that 
for sure. 

CAPCOM Roger, these are suggestions, of course, 

and let y'all have time to concentrate over them and then you 
can come back with us i f you ~ to us , if you disagree. And 
at the bottom of the page under the Do Not Perform Rendezvous 
For Loss Of, the next to the last line, we list RCS systems, 
and we had just an X - we say that we would not perform the 
rendezvous for loss of either RCS, A or B, over. 

sc I think we agree with that completely, 

either one . 

CAPCOM Roger, well, that's just slight clari- 

fication. And also, moving over under the same heading, RCS 
systems for the PDI abort sequence, we recommend that we do 
not go to that sequence for loss of one system. In other words, 
if we lose one RCS system we continue with the nominal plan, 
over. 

SC I think we ought to talk that one over. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Let us think about it for a little 

while, okay? 

SC I'm a little bit lost, Charlie, You 

say do not perform rendezvous for loss of either RCS system 
and then you say do PDI abort sequence for loss of either one, 
you continue the rendezvous, or what? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT U25, GET 5036 190/2 

CAFCOM After you're committed to the ren- 

dezvous is our feeling. In other words, once you've done 
DOI, that after you've committed to the rendezvous, then you 
would not change that sequence for loss of an RCS system. 
That we would continue on nominally. And that's a tradeoff 
though. If you need time to figure in all that stuff, when 
you look at it, we Just think we're better off with a nominal 
time line once we're committed, over. 

sc Yes, we certainly like the nominal 

time line but the main thing is - depends on what you say the 
mean time to failure for that other system. If we lose atti- 
tude control we could be in trouble. t 

CAPCOM Roger, we agree, 10. We'll go - it s 

2 hours we're talking about, of course, and we'll go either 
way you guys want to go. This is strictly a recommendation. 

SC Okay, let us think about it for a 

little while, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Hey, Charlie, this failure is obvi- 

ously between DOI and phasing because once you've done phasing 
you're committed to the nominal anyway. 

CAPCOM Yes, that's affirmative, 10. We d 

like - we look at also that, really, we feel, really, that 
what you're talking about is just 2 hours of stationkeeping 
because once you're passed phasing and you're down to one sys- 
tem, then you're on the RCS for most of the burns anyway. I 
shouldn't say 2 more hours of stationkeeping, it should say 
2 more hours of attitude control. 

Sc Yes. I guess one reason - one ques- 

tion we have in mind, you know, is what caused you to lose 
that one ring; what was the circumstance that caused you to 
lose it and what are the chances that 2 hours is going to make 
a difference, you know. In whether you do a PDI abort or whe- 
ther you do the nominal. 

CAP COM Roger, we - 

SC (garble) 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Tom, I cut you off, excuse 

13 ' sc Yes, I think you're building up the 

.ime sequence. If it occurred earlier after DOI we might go 

into PDI abort. If it occurred real late (garble). 

CAPCOM 10, you're fading out. Unreadable 
now. We'll switch antennas on you. We should be back in a 
moment . 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're back; do you read 

me ? 

SC Okay - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 50:45, CDT 1434 191/1 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we are back. Do you read me? 

sc Okay, how do you read now, Charlie? 

CAPCOM You're 5 by, Tom. Look, we aren't just 
suggesting this. We feel like if a more of a real-time 
aituation here and about what kind of failure we've had and 
how much time we've got and w. play it real time. There are 
certainly aituationa where you'd want to come back w it h « " 
doing a PDI abort aequence, ao it waa juat aomething for you 
to think about and I think it 'a more of a real-time aituation 
than a hard faat rule anyway. Over. 

sc Yea, that ' a juat exactly what we were coming 

around to. If a awfully hard to write that rule down on paper 
and to aay like if it happened early you can aee what h «PP en » 
when you might do the PDI abort, but after - later on would it 
be time rushed to do the PDI abort in other combining circum- 
stances you would probably go ahead with the nominal. 

CAPCOM Roger, we agree. 

Sc Let's make us leave it up to real time. 

CAPCOM Roger, we agree 100 percent. We're with 

you. 

SC All right. fine. 

CAPCOM And 10, it looks more and more like the 

trunnion cal is becoming less and less of a priority here, 
and we're recommending tentatively now that we continue PTC 
on through that and get this later on, but we re checking with 
a few more experts on the problem. Over. 

sc Okay. That's your decision. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll let you know, John. 

sc Charlie, would you paaa on the word to 

:iristopher C. that we're saving all this fuel so we can get 
Tim some good landmark tracking. 

CAPCOM Roger, we sure will, and Tom, I talked to 

Faye on the telephone j us t a minute ago, and all is real fine 
at home and they've really been ejoying your TV shows and all 
3 of the gals think they are married to a bunch of hama after 
yesterday's show, and they've really enjoyed it a lot and 
everything looks real fine. 

SC Okay, thank you. 

Sc How can you be a ham when you re Juat 

trying to show that the world's round? 

CAPCOM It's the interior shots that they were 

refering to, I'm sure. 

SC Oh, were those live7 

CAPCOM Roger. 

sc Hey, Charlie, I want to talk you a minute 

about the data since you were in charge of it. We've got 
some pretty Interesting flight plan notes that were penciled 
- and taped in at the last minute. We're wondering if you want 
to see some of those down there? 



APOLLO LO MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, GET 50:45, CDT 1434 191/2 

tapcom Roger, it's up to you guys whatever you 

think Most of this goes 'out live, so if you want to show it, 
it will be fine. ^ ^ ^ 8uch & flM J ob on 

the data we thought we'd like, ycu know, to express our 
thattk CAPC0M Roger, I take really not much credit for 

that . 

SC 

Gordo aaa Ed. 

CAP COM 
frow ear to ear 

SC 

CAP COM 
SC 

CAP COM 
Sc 



You might have to clear that with 



Ro8 er. Ed's sitting here right now grinning 
One would think you guys were looking through - 
... grinning about another - 
We didn't think you guys were - 
He won't grin long, I'll bet. 
Roger. 

Now we're trying to spare him. 
all the way through the flight plan to the end, 
cIpCOM Roger. I ' tr b1 to see vou 

all that data. 
SC 

Charlie. 

CAP COM 
PAO 

on the backup crew, 

the backup commander. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston, we're GO without 

cal and we'd like to stay in PTC. Over. 

SC Okay, sounds good to us. I don t thlnic 

we've had a thruster fire in a long time. 

jf 0 C0M ™: r i. c °° t " 1 " 50 hours " 

* *1„ i„ n ii 0 10 is 169 456 nautical miles from earth, 

«°. velocity of 3514 «... per .econd. Sp.cecr.f. 
weight is 93 267 pounds. 



He's gone 

plan CO me cuu» 

glad to see you are reviewing 
We're trying to do our homework up here, 

Ed 8 is'Ed Mitchell, the Lunar Module Pilot 
and Gordo, of course, is Gordon Cooper, 

a trunnion 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT U43, GET 50S4 192/1 



SC Houston, were you trying to call 10? 

CAFCOM Negative. 

SC You know, for information, I 

guess it caught me a little bit unexpected, but even with 
the S-band squelch on, you know we can hear this very fine, 
not annoying at all, but very fine, soft crackling in the 
background, but not typical loud S-band that drives you out 
of your mind. 

CAPCOM Roger. Stand by. 

CAPCOM Roger, we got this - when we - 

SC Looks pretty much — 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Gene. 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CAPCOM I was going to say, on this end, 

when you break lock, it really is grim. We've got to get 
synched up on this delay here. 

SC Yes, I know. When we cut each other 

out, I can hear my voice coming back to me that I said a 
second or two ago. But, we don't - when we break lock or 
we're changing antennas or one thing or another, with that 
•quelch on, we can tell it, but it is very acceptable. Even 
right now, I've got a very low crackling in the background. 
Normally, on a good lock on, I don't. 

CAPCOM Rog, I can hear that too down here 

in the MOCR, when we break lock, it really is loud down here. 
Of course, we don't have our equipment turned on and when 
we start getting a bad signal, it really is deafening almost. 

SC It's the only reason I mentioned 

it was I'm surprised I hear anything at all with that 
squelch on, but I do. And it's really very good, because 
it's acceptable and yet detectable. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT : 1457, 51:08 GET 193/1 

SC Houston; Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead 10. 

SC Okay, Charlie, looks like we finally 

drifted out of deadband and fired a couple of thrustera. 
CC Roger; we see you at 30 on the pitch 

in here . . . , 

SC Okay, Charlie, doea it look like we 

should go back and start all over again or Just continue on 
as is? 

CC G&C aays it looka good just the way 

it is, so we just oughta continue in, and it looks like we're 
coming back into the deadband now, 10, so lets Just leave it 
like it is and watch it for awhile. 

SC Okay - it looka like; I guess we've 

run about 20 hours on thruster fire; and it's pretty good. 

CC Roger; we concur. It was great. 

PAO This is Apollo Control; that thruster 

firing was at 51 hours, 10 minutes. The last thruster firing 
prior to that was at 29 hours, 53 minutes. At 51 hours, 12 
minutes, Apollo 10 ' s distance from the earth is 170 089 milea 
its velocity is 3501 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69 CDT 1507, GET 5118 194/1 

sc Hello, Houston. Apollo 10. 

CC Roger. Go ahead 10. 

sc Roger. We seen to be waltsing off here 

agalnat that yaw. u ... 

" cc Roger. Copy. Stand by. We'll 

look at it. We might want you to etart up again. Stand 

by * sc Houeton, Apollo 10. I don't know if 

whether you can read our telenentry but we've had about 
a ateady stream of firing for the last 4 minutes. 

C C Roger, 10. We're not copying your — 

you're in low bit right. We're not copying your boost* r 
firings. We noticed you're in the edge of the dead band, 
we're diacueeing thia. Stand by. 

SC Okay. 

sc Okay, Houston, Apollo 10. We re 

continuing to fire about once every 4 or 5 seconds. 

CC Roger 10. We copy. Stand by juat 

one more minute. 

SC Okay. 

SC There we go again. 

cc 10, Houston, we're recommending 

you go to min impulse and try to pulse it eway from the 
edge of the dead band and then back to RATE command and 
then let's watch, it. We had a debate whether we should 
stop PTC for a couple of hours or not. We ra checking 
with the thermal people. Stand by. 

CC Hello 10, Houston. 

SC Go. 

cc Roger. You can discontinue 




b * Ck ' sc ° V * r * Roger. Pitch 90, yaw 0 and roll 

307. 

CC That'a affirmed. 

cc 10, Houston. In this attitude, we'll 

have a high-gain antenna in a pitch of 023, yaw 265. 

SC 023 and 265, right. 

cc Affirmed. We're going to try and 

oome up with some sters for you. For P52 and maybe a 
sextant correction a trunnion count too. We'll 1st you 
know on that. 

SC Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMBKTAKY. 5/20/69, CD! 1521. CET Sl*M ItS/l 

cr Okay. Houston. Apollo 10, we 

h.». nanauver to ROLL 307 PITCH 90 and YAW aero and 
holding In that attitude. 

CC Roger. . . 

sc Bona ton. do yon »»nt ue to June 

turn the thrwat.r. •"^J^ ^ ^ al . C n.eio, 
that right no.. 10. ^ ^ ^ ^ 
wide deadband. If «• turn the* off now. we'll J"* 
•11 over tho piece I f ueea . , 

cc Roger. It'e your choice. Wo d 

Ilka you to .tay naar thia attitude end no don't think 
Jou are goJng to a.o too nuch lo wide deadband. ao Jnnt kaap 
then on and we'll *>• in good ehape. 

SC Soger. 

cc John, It looka Ilka you got • 

pratty good atnt for tha trunnion cnl. * •» 
and rechecking It for you and you can probebly do ynut 
til In thia attitude aleo and we'll haw eone .car for 
you in Juat a ninut..^ ^ yo 

view of tha earth out of one of yonr windowa? That In 
why we cane to thia attitude. 

7 gc T #> . There ie a beautiful view 

out of the left aide window. 
CC Roger. 

sc Couldn't aak for any batter. 

We're going to change our aeata around hero. 
rr Roger* Ton. 

Cc And we're coning up about 9 ninutee 

away fron waete water dump. We are ready any tine you 
guya are. 

SC Charlie? 

CC i° •*»•••• 10 • _ A . 

sc Now it ia all right. Thia bag ie 

on th^wrong end. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

of phyolca . ^ ^ |f %9 ^ u # 

little bit. y-tr# atMdl||t by . 

sc Okay. John la all aet to start 

on the P52. Do you want the waste wnter duuped flj«« 

on t*e r^. y ^ ^ ^ ^ youf „ 

We're thinking about doing tha P52 flr.t. I jWt think 
there ie a big aweat on the water dunp. but if you will 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT 1521, GET 51:32 195/2 
cc stand by 2 seconds. Go ahead 

you can do your P52. 

SC Okay • 

cc 10, Houston. W« should be able 

to get the high gain now with a PITCH of 023 and a 

YAW °sc 265 ' PITCH 023 and YAW 265. 

CC Roger. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 51 

hours, 44 minute. . Apollo 10 's distance fro- the earth 
is 171,171 nautical miles, velocity is 3,479 feet per 
second. We'll continue to stay up live for any voice 
transmission. Houston. We recommend for 

your "union eel that we use star No. 31 A"""^ 0 ^ 
requries just a little bit of maneuvering. It looks like 
the best. Over. 

cc Andt'it looks like - I think that 

we passed on to you earlier today that we are skipping 
^d-cTu^e 3 and'we probably will ski j -J-;"«";/;„ Xt ' 
in the order of 3.6 feet per second right « ' 
leaning towards skipping that one also. Without the 
mid-courses, we have a perigee of 60.7 nautical and at 
LOI 1 we can achieve a 60 by 170. With LOI 2 we can get 
.60 circular. So. it looks we are leaning toward, 
skipping mid-course 4 also. 

SC Okay. That sounds real good. 

cc Roger. It looks like pretty 

good shooting from here. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CUT 15:36, GET 5147 196 



CAPCOM 10, we copy your torquing Angles and your 

star angle difference. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Do you want us to 

go ahead with the calibration test at this time? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. We recommend star 

Arcturus 31. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This ie Apollo Control at 52 hours, 1 min- 

ute. The flight surgeon reports that the heart rates for 
each of the crewmen has been averaging in the lower 60 's 
throughout the day. 

SC This is Apollo 10. Have you copied 

verb 086987 there with us? 

CAPCOM Roger. We - stand by. We copy it. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CUT 1553, GET 5204 197/1 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We're satisfied thst 

the trunnion calibration is looking good to us. You naedn t 
do any more. „ 

PAO This is Apollo Control. 

sc I believe that 89992 is probably 

the best number. These are right on the edge of the sextant. 
It's about to disappear out of it. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. It's looking 

good to us. You can discontinue that. We have a loaded 
site for you. tou give us to and accept and we'll send you 
a state vector. Roger , n n load - unload the 89992. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

p A0 At 52 hours, 5 minutes, Apollo 10 s 

distance is 171,898 nautical miles. Velocity 3,464 feet per 

second. Houston, Apollo 10. When do you 

want our water dump? 

CAPCOM 10, we're through with your update. 

Tou can go back to block and we are debating now the dump. 
We got to get all the cameras configured. They want to try 
to photograph this again. We're looking probably at 5215 
so we'll have an exact figure in just a minute. 

sc Okay. Houston, this is 10. 

CAPCOM Go, 10. 

Sc The reason for the delay in between 

the start of P52 and initiating it was, when I went to look 
at the sextant the eye piece floated off and though we spent 
about 2 minutes scrambling around in here and it went over 
behind Gene's sleeping bag if you can believe that and what 
I've got here, I don't know. It couldn't have been off more 
than about 3 minutes. 

CAPCOM Rog, you can sleep with it in your 

pocket tonight. , 

SC Yea, we're taping It on but that s 

the kind of thing I would think that ought to be sort of 
held in place by something better than tape. 

CAPCOM Roger, we agree. 

SC I think that happened to Dave on 

9 too. 

CAP COM Rog. 

PAO That's John Young with that report. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. You can proceed with 

the dump at 5215, over. 

SC Roger, 5215. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We'd like to give you 

a GET time hack. We're coming up on 5213 and it will be on 
my mark 5213. 10, Houston. Mark 5213. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CDT 1553. GET 52:04 197/ 
sc Roger, we are synced. Rog, did you 

allow for the speed of light there, Charlie? 

CAPCOM Yes sir. I got it one second early 

so you should have had it. 
SC Okay < 

CAPCOM Me and the retro can really count - 

sc (garbled) You've taken lots of 

lessons from (garbled) there huh. 

CAPCOM Rog^ ^ clQck go±ng 

and it looks synced here. 
CAPCOM Rog. 

pxo Apollo 10 is far enough out now 

that there's a one second delay in transmissions between 
SI Control Center and the Spacecraft and vice versa. 

CAPCOM Here comes the water dump. 

sc Houston, we're dumping. 

CAPCOM Roger, copied. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Has any of the 

telescopes been able to see the water dump yet? 

CAPCOM We haven't got word back on that 

«t 10 It will probably be a while before they get their 
Tl.ies and thing, 'developed. I think they • re taking Picture. 
! Ivervthina *nd it takes them a while to get all that in- 

r a!kand so far we haven't heard whe ther t ey .v. 

be" able to see it or not. We'll keep trying to find out 
that word for you and let you know. 

SC All right. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, COT 1607, GET 52j2X 198/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 52 hours 

21 minutes Red Rover, who was most recently associated with 
Spider and Gumdrop is in the Control Center now monitoring 
the activities of Charlie Brown and Snoopy. Red Rover 
is also known as Rusty Schweickart , the Lunar Module Pilot 



on Apollo 9. Apollo 10 is 172,421 nautical miles from 
earth traveling at a velocity of 3,453 feet per second. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Did you 

transfer the VSM state vector to the LM slot or do you 
want us to? 

CC That's affirmative. We sure did. 

SC Okay I didn't catch it till last. 

CC Roger. 

CC 10, Houston* Tou can dump your 
dump now* 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. The 



quantity of waste water dumped was 9 and 1/2 pounds. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1521, GET 51:32 199/1 



CC Apollo 10, Houston. John, we 

noticed after your trunnion bias check when you entered 
the 89992, we saw a flashing 59 come up instead of a 92 
and we don't think that number got in. It's not any big 
deal but whatever the number is is okay, but we don't 
think it went in what you were trying to load. 

SC See that, Charlie, and (garble) 

CC Roger. We see your register. It 

looked like to us that instead of the proceed you did a 
Verb 32. We saw the 59 down here when you entered that 
number, John. Stand by on this display. 

SC I just called up 687, isn't the 

second register 89? Whatever it was supposed to be? 

CC Stand by. That is what it is 

supposed to be. I am not sure - hold on a minute, let me 
talk to the guy in the sky. 

SC please don't tell me it is not 

in there. 

CC 10, that location 87 is time 

shared and those numbers that we are looking at are 
results of marked data. The 89992 we don't care wheather 
it is in or not. The point was that - to incorporate that, 
when you entered it, it appeared to us that a Verb 32 
was done instead of a PPRO to incorporate. We saw a 
59 display instead of a 0692. 

SC Rodger. Okay. 

CC That's really all we were 

trying to say, John. 

SC Okay. Yes. I know that. That 

is why I loaded it in there. 

CC All right. 

SC The next time we do one, if I 

don't get a chance to do a trunnion cal, I'll load that 
n umb e r . 

CC Okay. Fine. That's great. 



END OF TAPE 



U Ot,C 10 MISSION COMMENT AW ,/*0/«f OPT 1«» « »•♦> »<" 1 

57 »i»ut... *P° U ° " tlloclU of 3,429 fe« per .econd. 

Vi Aoollo 10, Houston. Co. 

CC okay John wa. "king .arlier 

8C ! ««r Altska. I understand you 

aDO ut that -to" center k J nto lt . . 

;r;i\t« irtrjo?!:^ on ™ P .... 

rr Okay. 

c n^w'a it KOing Donut 

S C C C 5" Prlttj good, John. How ar. you 

g.ttlng along up th «*^ at< Thi , ± . jtt .t as great as you 

.. ld it«. Kind Qf ne . t> 1>tl . t lt . 

t:s r. rr^^xror^rr-th a. y OU ... «. 

" Should be a pretty good view. 

SC All right. Thank you. 

ll Q Tite CA?C0M now i. Donn fcW . 

The back-up Co-mand Module pilot. 

SC 5£p. We're about to pa., over. 



SC „ - 

Y.a. 

CC Go * head 



SC Hou.ton, thi. i. 10. Over. 

Rog.r? ad ie.t.rd.y. I «*ed to giv. 
M » . ^_ witei bag fro 



CC Th.t John loung «»d Ch.tU. 

Dut . P t i°..c k on *. clp'oorcon-oU. Don. .1..L i. 
" th.^o.-ol. too. ^ oiio io _ BoMtoii> 

80 »o«r" d ibout thi. »». »»• 

«:-vfn rr.r > ^^ t smi:"o„.. , 

1£ tb". «b.t v.T. ooL.. M.,b. th.f. «h, it . 



working. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/20/69 CDT 1624 GET 52:45 200/2 

cc Okay. Here we go. It says Step 1. 

Fill the bag to approximately 1/2 full of water uaing 
the water dispenser. 

SC Did that- 

CC Okay . 

SC Did that. 

cc I copied. You did that. 2nd 

step. Squeeze the bag (laugh) Stand by. 

SC H Yeah, I was afraid it was going to start 

about that smart. 

sc It's a pretty complicated mechanism 

we've got here. 

cc Okay, 2nd step. Squeeze the bag 

at the valve end to force the water into the opposite end 
of the bag. This will shorten the time pass of collecting 
gas during the spinning operation. Okay. 3rd step. 
Using the handle, spin the bag until separation is 
accomplished. This operation is to cause the gas to be 
collected in the valve end of the bag and the water at 
the opposite end. No. 4. If pick off or fold acro.s 
center seam can maintain the separation of gas and water. 
Okay, then you open the pro valve and bleed the gas off 
and then close the valve and they say that ought to do it. 

° V * r * sc Quite a theory there. We'll give 

you a real term evaluation right now, Charlie. 
7 cc Okay. We can't wait for the TV. 

That's all with the only help we've got for the whole 
thing. Over. valt for the TV, Charlie. 

sc Charlie, you'll love it babe. You 11 

1<>Ve CC* Defies the laws of physics, huh? 

SC The minute - 

CC Co ahead. 

sc The minute till the earth bubble 

goes to the bottom and then sucks the water out around the 
bubble. 

CC Roger. We copied. Laugh. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan. 

SC Charlie. It works. 

CC I don't know about you guys. 

Hey, did you guys try to see if they were plain fruit juice 
bags or to separate it out. How - did you every try that? 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 1704. GET 53:15 201 

CAPCOM Hey, did you guys try Just using «• ■ 

of the plain fruit juice bags to separate it out. Bow - did 
you ever try that? ^ ^ ^ ^ wltfc 

the air. The bubbles condense from a thousand bubbles into 

wrong end spin the other end. Would you believe that 

At is heavier than water. That's my theory. 

CAPCOM Roger, maybe we've discovered soae- 

thitt8 s h c ere * That's all relative. 

CAPCOM 10. it may be that the surface tension 

on the inside of that bag is enough to keep the water fro. 
flowina through that constriction very well, 
flowing tnro g ^ ^ ^ gf ^ centrifu g e 

turns, the big bubble is right in the bottom, quite a ways 
away from the constriction. 

CAPCOM *° S :;;. t con4 en.« .11 the bubbl.. 

bUt "I/cOH " "° ".V"™*. Ilk. th. .»1« S h.»dl.'. 

on the wrong end of the bag, huh. 

on tn « c wr n » The awlng handle is on the right end, 

but the valve is on the wrong end. 

CAPCOM Well, which ever. 

It's a very interesting thing to 
study these bubbles in this water. 

CAPCOM R°g- 

S C Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM 0° ahead, 10. 

sc Okay, I mentioned this morning, earlier 

when we were looking at the Earth, Just to give you a preview 
Toll will describe it because it's on his window when we get 
there but the Eastern seaboard from about Carolines on up 
just on the seaboard is going to be covered with cloud* and 
then into the Atlantic. I mentioned a cloud bank - go ahead. 

CAPCOM Go ahead. We're hearing you. 

SC Okay, Charlie. And 1 mentioned this 

morning there was a long cloud bank from the Nor 5 he "I* r * 
parV of the United States into Missouri. It looks like now 
tSIt that cloud bank goes from central Indiana up across Lake 
Erie north northeastward into Canada. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

sc Michigan, Lake Superior and the mid- 

west are very clear except for that cloud and there s some 



VOW 10 M IS5I 0» C0W»M«. 5/20/69. CBT 1704. «T S3.» 201/2 
.X..*. -hlch «. , 

...ward into -and f"^^"^.^ 8 ^ and froS th.r. th. 
•l.o.t to Sr.enl.nd it look. 11" n « ,,„„„ lnt0 th , 

, 0 your description ^^-"^^'""k'you- U ... that bi, 
.»irl of cloud. To- «.. talking about up ala.k. -ay 
" PC0M Sh.rU.fyou to. about th. 

bro „ . ybr ith .ubtle hint. U lik. 

:rsu:ii™« , s"r*o'.: t ."« ..... 

»0 de.re.' w.st so that', probably «h.f. giving u. th. 
cloud^^tt.rn up ""^J^ i„. Th8t .. going to b« 
very easy to see. 

^ PC ° M S: 7 ;.".^:"- Joa^ln V.ll.y - 

sa „ /oUn V.1UV look. ilk. .o..on« took ; «.0.» y »' 
seems to be the one thing tn t m *d J fc uke 

:^i:/r.s r^p"^.*^..^^^.'"*. ... .* ... 

coast. 

CAPC0M Roger. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/20/69, CDT 1716. GET 53.27 202/1 

cc 10, through the monocular or 

through the .extent, were you eble to distinguish the 
reTture. .round e.y the Sen 

sc Let take a look, Charlie. 

PAfi That ie Gene Cernan giving the 

description.. There are lot. of beaches down there. I 
.ure ought to be able to distinguish so»e. 

CC Okay • 

e C Charlie, it is sort of semi — 

zkt. ir^ts^r^i S n s 

that I can call San Francisco Bay from here. 

* CC Roger. Probably some is « 

.<mtt£ haav out on the coast there, up along the California 
^n y no"h of Joaquin Valley and I can't really see anything 

vesVco.st of California. It seems like they come just 
short of the coast line. 

CC Roger, we copy. 

sc Charlie, if I hold this monocular 

low enough. I can distinguish features down there on the 
coast linV, up around the San Franci.co area. 

cc Okay. Roger, Gene. Copy. 

sc And I tell you, if we had an 

apple to drop, it would fall right on Houston from where 
11 are. Right smack underneath us - right in the center of 
the Roger> M# are iooking forward to 

this TV transmission here. 

sc okay. I wanted to ask you about 

Charlie. Were they planning to go live with us on 
hour oudw. turn it on earlier, what do you want? 

the nour, or ^ 8eelng if colditone 

configured it for live. Stand by. Goldstone is ready. W. 
are talking to PAO right now. 

PA0 We are standing by for a TV feed 

n0W ' cc Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. The 

networks and Goldstone is all configured. You cen turn on 

the Apollo 10 is approaching 175.000 

miles as it prepares for this television transmission, W. 
Irl showing 174*754 n.utic.l miles, vtlocity 3.406 feet per 
tlcond? S5-1X stand by for the TV which should be coming up 
shortly . 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY 5/20/69, CDT 1716, GET 53:27 202/2 

sc Hello, Houston. This is Apollo 10. 

Y ou ought to be receiving ; «thiM ^ ^ ^ 

Vc' Okay. We are just ifrting. 

SC KQg l Tt wlll it be exterior .hots, 

J1 » ? sc Negative. We'll Just start interior 

right away and then take^you outside. 

II Anf^hen we'll bring you back 

inside? But we will .tart inside, take you out.ide and 
bring you in.ide for the water bag. 

rc Roger. 

gC Let me know when you are 

receiving it. ^ The networks 

4nd .2 «. configured^; ^UV.^SH^" 
. plctur., Ch.rll.. Sore EEC0M> 

c " e Let u. know when you get color. 

lr Okay, we are seeing your patch 

no. in black and white. Be Just a few more seconds. 

PAO Color c ° mln « now. 

We just got the color, 10, on 

.l.pl. llttl. P»tch we^see. ^ ^ Ap<)Uo w# 



CC inTwe'd like to a.y hello from 



SC 
CC 

the s'of us, if we m.y.^ ^ ^ ^ me tQ b . 

a straight man on that question and ask it? 
SC Try one. 



CC Okay. 



END OF TAPE 



APOILO 10 COMMENTARY 5/20/69, COT 1726, CRT 53:37 203/1 
CC Okay. 

SC Negetive. Itand by one. Cot • 

little technical difficulties here. 

CC We ere etill getting the color, 

10. 

gC Inedible 

CC Okey. Co eheed. 

SC lere'e hello the 3 of ue from on 

Apollo 10, here'e Tom Stafford. 

cc He'e e beeutlful To* Stafford 

there. He'e In living color. 

SC John Young. 

cc We've got John. He'e e little 

derk down there now, with the lighte not on him, but 
we cen tell it'e John with hie chin etrep looee. 

SC And youre truly, Gene Cernen. 

CC Roger, we got you Gene. The 

eun ie up pretty bright. The eun ie pretty bright ceding 
beck out - now you ere coming in better. We eee you 
clipping down in the LRB. 

SC Okey. Thet'e the three of ue . 

Here'e the other two on Apollo 10, the friendly Cherlie 
■rown end our ever loving companion Snoopy. 

CC Roger. We got it coming in now. 

Okey. Color ie on Cherlie Brown end Snoopy e little 
derk. If you could get a little bit more light on them, 
it would be fine, but we cen recognise the cherectere. 
They look pretty heppy up there. 

SC How'e that? 

CC Thet'e fine. It looke e little 

derk on the color. Could you atop it open a little bit 
more - welt e minute. Okay, that ie fine now. There you 
go. The red and the background on the cerde ere coming 
in fine. We are weehing out e little bit on the white - 
Cherlie Brown's coat and Snoop's face. 

SC Okay, you know that there ere 

5 of ue up here. We'd like to take you outeide and ehow 
you what the 5 of ue are looking at. 

CC Roger. 

CC- Okay. We got the figuree and 

the color end it looke like a half-earth to us now. It'e 
e beautiful blue and we aee the tremendous cloud coverege 
thet you were talking about throughout the day, 10. 

SC Okay, Charlie, you are looking 

et the world right eide up es we know it. The Gulf of 
Mexico goes down and to the right of the picture toward 
the terminator, North Americe is in the lower right hend 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY 5/20/69, CDT 1726, GET 53:37 203/ 



SC corner of the picture on the 

terminator. You can look up right smack In the center 
of the whole picture. If you can make out Mexico, it's 
Houston, right on the Gulf and North America goes up 
to about the 11 o'clock position on your picture. 

CC Roger. We copy. We aee primarily 

Juat the blues of the ocean and the whites of the clouds. 
The cloud patterns are pretty evident. Agree quite 
closely with the weather map I have. It is pretty 
difficult to pick out the land masses though. I must 
admit. We see one brownish area which appears to be In 
the American Desert, about the center of the globe right 
mow. 

SC Yes, Charlie, that's Mexico 

and the southwestern United States right there and 
Baja, California, is on the left of that and the right 
hand edge happens to be the Gulf of Mexico* if you can 
follow it at all, you will follow it right to Houston 
and then New Orleans. 

CC Roger. 

SC It's awfully hard to ascertain 

the difference — Okay, Charlie, it's hard to ascertain 
between the water down there in the Gulf and the land 
mass, because the whole eastern coast of the United 
States looks a greenish brown -- 

CC Roger. That helps us out here 

to locate ourselves, at least for me, 10, and I think 
I see what you are talking about now. We have one 
section of clouds that looks like it is almost a 
circular area - a clear area and then clouds appear to 
come out of South and Central America - swing out into 
the Pacific and in the center of that it looks like the 
clear area which I am saying is the southern part of 
the United States from Mexico along the Gulf Coast. Is 
that correct? 

SC That's it, Charlie. The Gulf 

of Mexico is right smack in the center up and down of 
the world. If you follow the terminator down and went 
half-way and then went about half-way from there toward 
the rounder part of the earth, you will find the Gulf of 
Mexico on that brown area you are looking at, between 
Mexico and the southeastern United States, that's Houston 
right smack in the center of that clear area. 

CC Roger. It appears — 

SC That clear area goes from 

Central America right on up into the states. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1726, GET 53:37 203/3 



CC Roger, we copy. It appears that 

the land unci are washing out just about as much as the 
clouds. Can you open It up a couple of stops and then 
stop it down fast so we can get a second or two of sharper 
definition? 

SC Okay. Let us know when It is a 

little better. 

CC Okay, it was a little — there 

you go, if you can hold that, but I think — that's good 
right there. It is a lot better, 10. 

SC Okay. 

CC Charlie, we are full soon on you 

and it's even hard for us to make out things with the 
naked eye unless we know where they are. So, I imagine 
it is going to be difficult for you. 

CC Roger. 

SC Okay, Charlie, the total globe 

that yeu see there is bigger than what we actually see, 
since we have the soon lens on and it is probably about 
one and one-quarter times as we see it. 

CC Copy, 10. As I said earlier, 

we are primarily getting the globe on a black background and 
we see the whites of the clouds and the blues of the sea 
with an occasional glimpse of what I make out as land 
masses in the brownish. But, it is really difficult for 
an untrained eye to pick out the exact land masses. We 
are sitting here with the in-pad book. We got it to show 
the various sizes and with this diagram it is a big help. 

SC What you are saying, Charlie, 

Is that we are too far away to give you a good picture. 

CC Soy, you sure are a long way 

away . 

CC I think what it is, 10, Is the 

land masses and the clouds tend to wash out and it is a 
little hard to discern the difference, but looks like we 
can pick out the shapes of Yucatan, Florida and Cuba and 
the Gulf of Mexico. 

SC Charlie, let me ask. Do you see 

the area you said was a clear area and do you think you 
could pick up Mexico there? 

CC Roger. 

SC Okay, if you follow up, but you 

might think it is the Gulf of Mexico there and then go 
straight north, you see a little V in the clouds and there's 
one going off to the right and a little thin sliver going 



APOLLO 10, COMMENTARY . 5/20/69. CK 1726. «T 33t37 203 

sc goee from Indian* on to the 

northaaet part of the country and than that biggar blob 
that tori* P ?£a left-hand .Ida of tha V i. ovar the 
north central Unitad Stata. and than th * 
" wf . af th , v la Laka Superior and Laka Michigan, 
cant.r of tha V jogar . That la a good da.cription. 

10. It cla.r. it up for a* anyway. I can aaa what you 

tr( talking about now* 

SC And than way up on tha upper 

left-hand, «aybe about 10 o'clock on the globe, you will 

la. a fuSny cloud patt.rn that aort of look. like a ... 

aarpant of .o«. aort with hi. baak pointing 

IND OF TAP! 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOM COMMENTARY, 5/20/6*. CDT 17:36. GET 53:47 204/1 
sc You'll see a funny could pattern that 

aort of looka like a a«a aarp.nt of iom J" t __ t 

po.k polntim to th. right. That', that cloud pattern that 

Tom wee referring to up in the Alaeka area. 

CAPCo" *oier. That', nearly apparent to ue. 

When you atop it down, we can aae that pattern. Some of 

th! Mil. though, if. w.ah.d out due to the tre.endou. 

cloud s Cov.r... in thenar... ^ ^ ought to fc# 

IO ° d *CAPC0M Okay. It Ju.t cave in on the bleck and 

white. We'll aee it in Juet a aecond. Okay, now we .ee 
what you're talking about. Look, like an inverted view 

* lB0, Ji How you ought to be - all right, now you 

ought to be able to aee that - that V area I wa. talking 

* b0ttt CAp e cS; r t0 °* *o,.r. If. cowing i- a lot better. Gene, 

sc Okay. If you got a pretty good view of 

the out.ide, we'll teke you back in.id. for one le.t quick 

" lBUt CAPC0M Thank, a lot. 10. for that view.. If a 

real good. We'll be .tending by for th. water J«l trick. 

H Okay. We'll take you back in.ide here. 

sc I'll take care of it. 

sc Queatlon for today - who i. that? 

CAPCOM It look, like John Young with four set. 

of eye. in it. No. two .et. of eye.. 

SC There you go. 

CAPCOM Let', call it four eye.. 

sc Look, like a World War I aviator. 

«c That', what happen, when you look 

through th. t.le.cope to ..e th. .un. Okay, it m.y sound like 
we've been loafing for the pe.t couple of daya . but we 
heven't. We've been real bu.y. and every epare minute we 
get we atudy our flight plan. So you .ee th.t pretty jof*. 
Ifr. going to be going into orbit, and we have a completely 
different a.t of operation, to go into th.t .how. our P}** , 
profile ell around the moon for the fir.t revolution. Tomorrow ■ 
. big dey, and we're very much looking for it. Even though 
we're about 180 000 mile, away from the earth, you n.ver get 
away from studying. 

CAPCOM That's a great picture. 10. We can see 

the - the varioua spacecraft attitudes with the dark aide of 
the moon and the bright side. And we see the LM end the 
Command Module linked together and going into a LOI 1 burn 
attitude. If a real clear. You can almoat read the writing 
on the pages. _ . _ . 

SC loger. Don't adjust your aet. It e in 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CDT 17:36, GET 53:47 204/2 



SC black and white. 

CAP COM Roger. 

CAPCOM He can read on the - 

SC If you want to know where we're going - 



we'll show you a little bit of a chart of where we're going 
day after tomorrow, we ought to be seeing this in living 
moon color. Right now it's in the beet black and white we've 
got. This is the area around landing site 2. 

CAPCOM Roger. Could you open it up a little 

bit, 10. We think maybe if you get a little bit wider F stop 
it'll help us out. Your pictures are a little bit dark. 

CAPCOM That's a lot better, 10. 

SC I can't see the F stop yet. 

CAPCOM Okay, 10. When Gene moved back, . it helped 

out a lot. If you'll just pull the chart back, that's 
good now. We can - it's coming in a lot better. Gene, 
could you - 

SC The morel of the story is, John - the 

moral of the story is, John just said, you know you can study 
all your life and never finish studying and here we are almost 
a quarter of a million miles away, and we're still studying. 
Like Tom said, he's got two girls taking final exams this 
week, and this is his way of saying, "Get to work." 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC He's not the only guy who'd better be 

studying. 

CAPCOM Okay, I'm sure they're listening. Would - 

Gene, how about pointing to a landing site 2 on the map for 
the folks. 

SC Okay. Landing site 2, I'll show you 

here in just a second. We'll be coming up from the bottom 
and I'll stop my finger up on the landing site 2. 

SC That's the area we hope to bring back some 

good pictures of in a couple of days. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC ... we'll eventually - that's the area 

where we'll eventually be actually landing on the surface of 
the moon. This area is probably Just about visible from - 
in the lighted - with the terminator moon lighted I meen from 
the earth at this time. Just about. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy. 

SC That's one advantage we have. If you 

don't like to turn your pages, you can always turn youself 
instead. 

CAPCOM Commander, you're in real form today. 

SC We figure that, you know, there's always 

a way of making a picture run down hill and maybe even know- 
ledge will make it run that way. 

SC Well, I guess thet's the message to the 

kiddies in the country. If they can't get your homework 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69 , CDT 17:36, GET 53:47 204/3 

sc right Bide up, go upside down. They 

might be able to absorb more that way. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

sc Looks like John's trying to hog a 

picture there. Gene. Why don't you - there you go, you 
pushed him out of the. You got - you got center stage now. 

SC What a ham. 

CAPCOM Tou want to see me push, watch what 

happens . 

Sc That's called one finger power. 

CAP COM Rog. 

sc Okay, this is Apollo 10 signing off. 

We'll give you one more picture of the earth here, that s 
all today. Oh, hold it. We want to show you the bag too. 

CAPCOM Rog. We'd appreciate that. 

sc The bag is full of - half full of bubbly 

Wat " r sc And for those of you who are unfamiliar, 

there's the valve where the air and then the water comes out, 
and here's the handle, and notice they're both on the same 
side. Are you ready? 

CAPCOM Go ahead. It's pretty difficult - get 

some more light on it, 10. It's pretty difficult to see the 
bubbles from that position. 

sc I'll show you the bubbles after I stop. 

SC Okay, we're still open. 

sc Thousands of minute little bubbles. Tou wouldn' 

pick them up. You can barely see them with the naked eye, 
but they're there. 

CAPCOM 10, try spinning a little bit harder, 

and maybe that'll put the bubbles to the top. 

sc Man, I spinned it so hard a little while 

ago, I was going in the other direction. 

CAPCOM Rog. Gene, hold it up next to the LBB 

DSKY. We couldn't see any bubble there. If you got one 
together. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CDT 1746, GET 53:57 205 

CAPCOM Hey, that'* a good - you're really 

spinning it now. 

SC Okay, how'a that for a bubble now? 

CAPCOM Okay, wa got it- Okay, we aae 

that bubble. Really a big one. 

sc And it's in tha bottom. Charlie, 

about tha only thing wa get by apinning them la making the 
little bubblaa into a big one and it ataya in the bottom. 

CAPCOM Roger, la there any water left in 

the top of the bag, 10? 

sc No, there's no water in the top of 

the bag. All the water's out. We have tried it with aemi- 
filled bags, with full bags, with helf full bags. What we 
really have been able to do, I think, is to get the bubble 
concentrated and then suck the water out from around it. 

CAPCOM Roger. Have you tried it filling 

up - filling the bag both top and the bottom of the bag and 
then spinning it? 

SC Yea, we tried that too. 

CAP COM Well it doean't look like it works 

then does it? 

Sc Charlie, you can aee the bubble 

real good can't you? 

CAPCOM Roger, we have it Tom. It s quite 

■evident here to us. We'll have the experts look at this 
and maybe they can come up with something for later on thia 
evening for you. 

SC Hey, Charlie. It is true though 

that water goes to the bottom of the bag. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC That phenomenon we have proved. 

Well when the air gets down there we can stop spinning the 
big bubbles at the bottom. 

CAPCOM Rog, we copy . 

SC Okay, this is Apollo 10. We 11 

take you outside for one last look at the Earth and sign off. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you very much. Okay, 

10, we just got the exterior view and we got the Earth in 
the center of the screen and it's a little bit different 
orientation this time, we see the North Pole up in the 
northeast about the 2 o'clock position on our screen now. 

SC And he'll rotate the camera over 

a little bit. He was just tilting it for ease of handling 
here. He's rotated it back now, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC And from the 5 of us on Apollo 10, 

Tom Stafford, John Young, Eugene Cernan, Charlie Brown and 
Snoopy, we hope you've enjoyed it today. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY . 5/20/69, CDT 1746. GET 53.57 205/2 

CAPCOM Thank you much, 10. We appreciated 
the show. It vii very nice. We'll see you tomorrow. 

sc Okay, and tomorrow we ahould he 
around the Moon. 

CAPCOM Rog. 10, Houaton. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. On thia water hag, the 



only thing we can suggest i. fill the bag up completely f ull 
and then apin and then if you got - need more water fill « 
up again and then apin and try until it' a completely full 
and then maybe alowly kneading that bubble up to the top 
and if that doeen't work then our only auggestlon is going 
to the fruit Juice bag and. or fruit bag and f iUlng i t up 
and then apinning it until you get a big bubble and then 
kneading it up to the top where the food part is and evacuatim 

iC th sc W * y * Roger, we've tried moat of that but 

we'll preaa on here. And again we're all thinking here, if 
that's the only problem we've got on this mission we re going 
to be in great shape. 

CAPCOM Rog, we concur. 

S C Yea, I mean. You can tell what 

kind of shape we're in when we can talk about thinga like 
that. 

CAPCOM Rog. Hey - 

SC When the ahips - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 10. It appeara just - 

sc You sure like to talk a lot, Charlie. 

CAP COM I'm sorry. This time delay, I think s 

giving us some problem. If you Just keep talking and when 
Jou hear me you're still downlinking and I'm .till receiving 
you so if I interrupt you I'll just stop talking if you 
start or when I'm talking, over. 

sc Okay, real good, Charlie. We 11 

try to be more observant on that and again you might give 
us a time when you want us to start the VTC mode again and 
also I Just want to check, is the color still looking pretty 
good on the TV? 

CAPCOM Rog, we thought it waa real good 

here, 10. The Earth - the interior - hold on. Back with 
vou 10. The interior shots in some of the darker portions 
of the spacecraft looked a little dull. However, when you re 
in the flood lights everything was real fine. The exterior 
was very good we thought. The whites and the blues and the 
Earth looked fine. We think the colors are real good. Every- 
body's real pleaaed with the operation of the camera, over. 

Sc Okay, real good and the main thing 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CDT 1746, GET 53:57 205/3 

SC too, I'm hoping that from the reso- 

lution that we have end on the device that when we get around 
the noon tomorrow we ehould ehow you some real good terrain 
features with the reeolution we have on the instrument, over. 

CAPCOM Rog, we're looking forward to that. 

We think we'll be in pretty good shape and we'll come up 
with a PTC time for you momentarily. 

SC Charlie, were the pictures that we 

shot over the Straights of Gibraltar and the ones where we 
picked up South and North America over the whole Atlantic 
extremely drab. Did they get played back to you? 

CAPCOM We haven't seen them yet. The ones 

from Madrid will take 30 hours for us to get those. The 
Goldstone we're going to play back shortly, 10. 

SC Okay, I guess we're at about the 

distance where the resolution on the camera doesn't give 
you a chance to look at the Earth too closely. So I guess 
we'll probably wait till we get on back to get any good 
Earth pictures. 

CAPCOM Roger, the colors are still brilliant 

but the resolution is fairly marginal now. You really have 
to have a map in front of you to pick out what you re describ- 
ing. Hello Apollo 10, Houston. You can initiate PTC at 
your convenience with the same procedure as you'd like - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MZS8IOH COMMENT ART t 5-20-69, CDT 17:56. GET 54:07 206/1 



CAP COM At your convenience with the same procedure 

es utilised lest night. Over. 

SC Okay. We're going to go eheed now end 

etert to pick it up. 

CAP COM Hey - 

PAO This is Apollo Control et 54 hours, 8 min- 

utes. Thet TV transmission thet was recorded et Goldetone 
severel hours ego, will be transmitted to Houston end releesed 
et 6:00 pn centrel deylight time about 2 minutes from now. 
Duration is 4 minutes, 47 seconds. While we ere feeding thet 
pleyback of the television, we will record any live audio 
transmissions from the spacecraft end pley those beck after 
the television transmission. 

SC I think we're one mission too soon for 

thet one. 

CAPCOM Rog. 
The audio portion of the video replay has alreedy been typed 
on transcript tepea MG185 end MG186. 

PAO This is Apollo Control et 54 hours, 16 

minutes. Apollo 10 is 176 221 miles from earth. Its velocity 
is 3 377 feet per second. We're getting reedy for a change 
of shift here in the control center. Shifts will change et 
6:30 centrel deylight time. We're estimetlng the chenge 
of shift newe briefing for 7:00 pi. We heve about 40 seconds 
worth of tepe accumulated during the feed of the television 
from Goldstone. We'll play that for you now. 

SC Houston, this is Apollo 10. Is that 

procedure still good for today. When we disable the C&D 
jets, do we disable the C&D - the C roll jets also? 

CAPCOM Stand by. That's affirmative, 10. We 

went you to disable ell jets on quads C and D. 

SC Roger. They're disabled. 

CAPCOM Copy. 

SC Okey, the clock is sterted, then efter 

20 minutes, we'll go ahead (gerble) the station. 
CAPCOM Rog. 



END OF TAPE 



10 MIS8IOI. COMMEWAM S/10/H CM IM7 «T 541S 207/1 
DEAD AIR 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/20/69 CDT 1822 GET 54:33 208/1 

SC This is Apollo 10. Now we're 

20 minutes after having started the PTC entry exercise. 

CC Roger 10. What do you want? 

CC Roger. We'd like you to disable 

BD roll. 

CC 10. We'd like you to disable 
BD roll and have AC roll on. Okay, we're in good shape. 
E xc us e me . 

SC It's affirm. 

SC This is Apollo 10. We have set 

up the PTC roll rate. 

CC Say again that 10. 

SC Roger. We have set up the PTC 

roll and it looks good. 

CC Roger 10. We're observing your 

roll rate and we'll be looking at it and be with you 
sho rtly . 

SC Roger, and Houston. How do you want me 

to handle the antennas. Do you want me to OMNI bravo this 
time or do you want me to wait? 

CC Stand by. We'll have some word 

on that. We would like you to discontinue battery A charging 
now . 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 54 hours, 

44 minutes. The shifts are changing in the Control Center 
now. Apollo 10 is 177,149 nautical miles from the earth. 
Traveling of a velocity of 3,359 feet per second. We're 
estimating the Change of Shift News Conference for 
7:00 PM, Central Daylight Time. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10, COMMENTARY , 5/20/69. CDT 1826. GET 54.47 209/1 

sc Hello, Houston, 

cc Roger 10, Houston 



gc Hello, Houston. This is 10. 

cc Roger 10, Houston. Co shead. 

H Look, like we're going to be lo.ing high gain 



track^.re in a afflr>|> „. m . for y0tt to go OMHI. 

BRAVO end high gein antenna to manual please. 

SC Okay, Guieeppe, will do. M ... 

CC Okey, 10, thie ie Houston. We 11 

be taking over control of the antenna now. end "it" 
advises it looks like your PTC, you've got it set up as 
load or better than it was last night when you went 18 
hour, without another thru.t.r find.^ ^ ^ ^ 

l C k0 This is Apollo Control at 54 hours 

58 minute, into the flight of Apollo 10. Plight r.c or 

177,500 nautical -ilea from earth and a 10 
3 352 feet per second. At the present tim. the Apollo 10 
crew i.Jnvolv.d in setting up the pae.iv. thermal control 
loie that Ihey will maintain throughout their sleep period 
ZAt night tie mode used was to rotate the spacecraft at 

"t 3 revolutions per hour. We found this very 

I.Ji.fectory. Experienced none of the thru.t.r firing 
during the p.s.ive control mode that int.rf.rred with the 
crew's sleep the previous night 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-20-69, CDT 18:51, GET 55:02 210/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 55 hours, 4 min- 

utes. We anticipate the change of shift press conference 
will be beginning shortly in building 1, We will continue 
to tape and conversation with the spacecraft and play it 
back following the change of shift briefing. At this time 
Apollo 10 Is 177,795 nautical Biles froa earth, and the 
velocity is 3,347 feet per second. This is Apollo Control, 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



AF0U.0 10 KISSIOM COMMMTAJLY. 5/20/69 CDT 19*4 GIT 55:5* 2X1/1 

px0 This i. Apollo Control mt 55 hours, 

56 .inut.. into th« flight of Apollo 10. Th. •p.c.er.ft 
now of 179.455 nautical 11.. fro. ..rth and th. 

•pood i. 3.314 foot p.r ..con.. During tho ch.ng. of 
ihift pro.: c.nf.r.nco. wo had ono briof conYor..tio. with 
tho crow «nd John Young adwi..d th.t h. cm now ... ..th 
tho o.rth .nd tho moon fro. tho window, of tho .paco craft 
and ho roport.d th.t tho .oon lookod to bo .bout tho •»*• 

a. th. a.rth .t thi. ti«. but th.t .11 th.y could ... 
Jao j"t • .livor of lightod portion. W.'ll play b.ck 
that conw.r..tion for you now. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC 10 Hon. ton. go .ho.d. it . - 

• c togor. you can now ... th. o.rth .nd th. 

.oon in tho both window.. Tho .oon i. in tho right " 
tho -oon is in tho loft window and tho oarth wa. in th. 
right window. And you can ... th. .oon ju.t mm th. aun 
• sts oocludod bohind tho right window. Thoro • . 
p.riod of ti«. thoro. lo.. th.n a .inut. you on 
■oon. It*. . pr.otic.lly, • n.w noon. If. only « .li*.r 
fro. whoro wo «ro. 

CC Rogor. Copy. 

cc I bot th.t'. a pr.tty good .ight 

fro. thoro too. right John? 

gc Right now tho noon look. .. big 

a. th. ..rth. Do., th.t «•«■ .bout right to you .11? 

CC Th.t look, right .bout right 

fro. tho o.rth-«oon tran.it gr.ft wc'vo got. Thoy .hould 
look .bout tho .... to you. Can you .e. th.. pulling it 

.bout th. .... ? 

8C Ho. Wo f.ol tho .oon pulling 

lust . llttl. bit h.rd.r right now Joo. 

CC Okay. Something's wrong. 

You ..y wa'ro not in tho lunar aph.r. 



y.t? 

too 



SC 



CC Hot qulto. 

gc You forgot wo can pull fro. horo 

CC Okay . 

Cc You guy. .r. r..lly throwing down 
out thoro. You don't w.nt to throw it out now. 

sc Mo. Wo'ro just baroly chugging 
along horo. 

SC What*, a stav B to this ono Joo? 

CC l'« «ot raally .ur.. I'll ch.ck 
th.t out. . 

Cc Pu.h your no., ov.r wh.n you ho.r 

it verbal. 

SC 

v.rb.l. _ „ 

CC Apollo 10. Hou.ton 



All right. Wo'ro gotting clooo to that 



AIOLLO 10 MXMIOH COlWMTAtT, 5/20/.9 COT 1144 C1T 55i56 2U/2 

ac «• itiood, Houoton. Apollo 10. 

J c tog, Joba. wo'd liko to o*itch your 

hydrogon ouit dow« * littlo bit and to to oloop coofig- 
urotloa. Tonk 1 to outo o*d tank 2 off. 

SC tonk 1 koator to Auto, tank 2 off. 

CC That'o for a foot. 



HO OF TAII 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, CPT 2021, GET 56:32 212/1 

PA0 Thi« ia Apollo Control at 56 hour** 

33 ninutee. Apollo 10 now 180,635 nautical »il«a fro» 
Earth and tha Spacecraft veloctty 1. 3.292 fat par aecond. 
The craw will ahortly be preparing to begin their 
cycle and that will be a 10 hour rett period. We 11 aleo 
be paaaing up ao»e final re«arka to tha apacecraft prior 
to the beginning of that aleep period ahor tly . We U 
atand by here for CAPCOM to put in a call to the craw. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-20-69, CDT 20:38, CET 56:49 213/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 56 hours, 49 minutes. 

We're in conversation with the spacecraft at the present time. 
Receiving a pre-sleep status report from the crew, and we 11 
pick that up for you at the beginning. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Hello, Houston. 

CAP COM Go, Apollo 10. 

sc Roger. I got some onboard readouts for 

you. 

CAPCOM Roger. Ready to copy. 

sc okay. As we're taking it's 56 hours, 

BATT C is 36.8, PYRO BATT A is 37.0, PTRO BAT B is 37.0. 
RCS ALPHA is 86, BRAVO 86, Charlie 91, and DELTA 87. The 
radiation dosimeter readouts are commander 26032, the CMP is 
05032. the LMP is 15035. _ 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, I read back. Battery C 

is 36.8. Pyro A is 37, pyro B is 37. RCS A 86. BRAVO 86, 
Charlie 91, DELTA 87. RDU commander 26032, CMP 05032, the 
LMP l |°, 35 ' You got it> Edt and we're in the process 

of cycling the H2 and 02 bands right now, and I think the 
private conversation handles the crew status report this 

t1 "** CAPCOM Roger. Roger. I've got a couple of 

things for you. We'll use the same comm setup we had last 
night. On your omnia B an S band normal voice mode off. 
If you need to call us, do it on down voice backup, and 
this configuration ought to give us about 50 percent high 
bit rate. The decision has tentatively been made to skip 
midcourse 4. You can sleep in until 71 hours if you so 
desire. We'll give you a buz* if there's any change on 
that. Your consumables right now look real great, Gene. 
We've got single tank capabilities at 200 hours at 50 amp 
consumption. Your batts are all above the red line and at 
this point, we can go even if your batt charger f«l"; 
And query, did you pass on the other conversation in the 
exercise info? We'd kind of like to know if you use the 
exerciser and how you like them. 

sc Okay. Right now we've done a lot oi 

Isometrics up here today, and we have spent most of our time 
•tudying today. We've done slot of isometrics and haven t 
gotten to the exerciser. We plan to use it after we get 
through that big exercise with the suits that day. 

CAPCOM You think you'll be strong enough after 

th * t? CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, I guess that's all we 

have at the moment. You're free to start turning in and get 
15 hours of sack tims in if you want it. *i- 

sc Say that again about the single tank. I m 

not sure I fully understood you. 

CAPCOM We cut each other out, Apollo 10. Try 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-20-69, CDT 20:38, GET 56:49 213/2 



CAPCOM it again. 

SC Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Apollo 10. 

SC Hello, Houston, This is Apollo 10. Over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Reading you 

loud and clear. Go ahead. 

GOLDSTONE Apollo 10, stand by. Goldstone having 
communication problems with Houston. 



SC 
MCC 

GOLDSTONE 
MCC 

GOLDSTONE 
MCC 

keys . 

GOLDSTONE 
MCC 

CAPCOM 
read now? 
SC 

now . 

CAPCOM 
of the site 
SC 



Contact voice check. 



Roger. 

Goldstone, Houston. 
Golds tone , 

Roger, how do you read? 
Loud and clear. 

Roger. Stand by. I'll send you 3 short 



Rog. G's are GO. 
Roger. Thank you. 
Apollo 10, this Is Houston 



Okay . 



How do you 
We're reading you loud and clear 



Roger. Apollo 10. We lost our link out 
Where were we when you lost me? 

We were talking, ED. I don't know how 
much you got about the exerciser. We haven't really had a 
chance to take it out and use. We've been doing isometrics 
against the seat, the struts and so forth. 
CAPCOM Go ahead, Apollo 10. 

SC Hello, Houston. This is Apollo 10. Over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Reading you 

loud and clear. Go ahead. 

GOLDSTONE Apollo 10. Stand by. Goldstone having 

some communication problems with Houston. 

SC Roger. 

SC - 71 hours, and some sort of a plan. 

And preferably I'd like to get the realigned change in 
our REFSMMAT in as soon as we wake up so if we have any 
problems with it we can resuffle them and keep going. 

CAPCOM Roger. John, we'll get to work on that. 

There's - there don't seem to be too many things to shuffle 
here. I personally doubt if you'll be able to sleep 15 hours 
anyhow. 

SC It's an admirable goal. 

CAPCOM completely agree 

SC What we plan to do is stay up a little bit later 

tonight. 

CAPCOM Say again, Tom. You were cut out on the 

last one. 

SC Roger. What we had planned to do is 



APOLLO 10 KI8SIO- COTTAR*. 5-20-69. CM 20:38. GET 36U» 213/3 

pl.«».« to .t.y «p • !" . J.J. „ot foigot the chl.tiMtio. 

"'"ciJcS" 11 "" Vg« oVit.. I 8 o.ttt.d. Ap.ll. 

\i IK i*Sii . S U t. k . .bout 3 f..t tf 



sc 

CAP COM 



we've decided not 10 at "~ ~ . 

I think we should be .ble *• * hat ' 
That doesn't seem unreasonable at an. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/20/69. CDT 2048. GET 56:59 214/i 

GAPCOM Apollo 10. Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Joe. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tow. Just to clarify »•*•» 

I think Ed wa. talking to you about your trajectory » 
referenced the midcour.e bum correction on -t^.^""!* 
hurn in vour fly by. Thet was the LOI minue 5 burn that he 
taTtalkinl about. If you make it there if. a 3 foot per 

"cot* ejection and if you wait until fly by it will be 
. 13 foot per nconi.^^ ^ , what „. ttnde r.tood 



SC 



th "*CAl?C0M OV "' Okay. fine. I thought he said 
midcourse LOI, I wanted to clarify that. 

Ic Boy, that's a fantastic target 

until retro. That* a greet. 

CAPCOM We'll agree there. 

gc yea Joe, tell Glynn Lunney and Bill 

Schaffer and Just all those good people who got the - total 
lltloxl .id guidance operating, w. can t thank them enough. 
That targeting i. Ju.t utterly fente.tic 

CaJSm Roger, that. They .ay it', their 

Pl **"iT* Okay, tell them I'm going to 

•eve «y ptaise until I see 60 miles above the Moon. 
CAPCOM Roger, that. 

J!* During that last conversation with 

the crew you heard them advised that we do not expect they 
wUl".Vto do the midcour.e correction. a" 1 *""* 
course correction, for the trajectory a. very close to the 
no.inal Al.o the crew w.« .dvi.ed that they will be able 
to a"lp a. lltl « 71 hour, ground elap.e time tomorrow 
beceuee of the deletion of the midcour.e correction 
.cS.Sul.d to occur at about that time. Dr. Ch arle. Berry 
Cni be arriving at the New. Center fortly for a 
on thie evenings privete conversation with the crew, we 
ixplct tSIt to begin shortly after 9 p.m. We'll continue 
It this time to stand by for any further conversetion with 

crew Wtlly continue to pr.p.re for their sleep period 
tonight , 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIO* COJOaHT AIT 3/20/69 CDT 2038 Gil 3709 215/i 
DEAD AIR 



APOILO 10 1IIISIOH COMilHTAOT 5/20/69 CDT 2123 GET 37*34 216/1 

PA0 This la Apollo Control mt 57 hours » 

35 minutss into ths flight of Apollo 10. We've hed no 
further conversstion with ths crew sines ws last reported. 
Although we do heve s summary of ths private conversation 
b.tw.eS Mission Control snd th. crew of Apollo JJ rsjusstsd 
by Dr. Charles Bsrry. Ths sstronsuts were questionsd shout 
thsir general condition snd gave Dr. Bsrry a brief 
personel rsport. gpacscraft Commander Stafford summarised 
by saying ths gsnsral condition of ths craw is excellent. 
eI added I fell grsat. H. all f.sl Just great". They 
were asksd why they had each taken a lomotil tablet. _ 
Stafford replied thet ell three had been troubled with 
stomech gee e. . result of ges in the water end had taken 
the lomotil teblet in an effort to relieve this condition. 
Stsfford edded that the lomotil eeemed to help and was 
•dvissd by Dr. Bsrry thst this wee satisfactory. Dr. Bsrry 
suggsstsd that the crew increass its consumption of wstsr 
Stsfford rsplied thet he wes ewere that water consumption 
III Veil bscauss of the gas in th. w.ter but thst th. crew 
mlmbsrs w.rs trying to drink mors fruit juicss end eat more 
•f the wet food pecks. Stsfford edded thet he would try 
to lncreeee the weter intake. A general discussion of the 
condition of the spacecraft and the crew followed. Stafford 
ssld that hs and the crew hed been epending time reviewing 
upcoming activities. Is notsd that midcoura. maneuver Mo. 4 
would n't be made, and requested thet the crew's sleep period 
be extended. He was told by Flight Control, this would bs 
done. And that concludes ths summery of the private con- 
vention! At ths pr.ssnt time, Apollo 10 is 182,658 ueu- 
Ilcal ill., fto. e.rth. A velocity continuing to <••"•» 
slowly down now to 3,255 feet per second. At 5 7 bours, 37 
ilSutss into the flight, this is Mission Control, Houston, 



IHD OF TAPI 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/20/69, COT 2225, GBT 58:36 217/1 



PAO Tills is Apollo Control at 58 hours* 

36 alnutes . Apollo 14 now 184,520 nautical alias fro* 
aarth, travailing at a,a>p*ed of 3,221 faat par aacond. 
Out hara In Mia a ion Control, Flight Dlrtctor Milton Wlndlar 
la ravlawiag tha flight plan activities achadulaa for 
thla ahlft tomorrow whan Apollo 10 will ba In lunar orbit. 
Wa've had no furthar convaraatlon with tha craw alnca thay 
antarad thara alaap parlod and that bagan about an hour 
and a half ago. And va'ra continuing to follow systems 
atatua on tha apacacraft at thla time. All systems 
continuing to function normally. At 38 hours, 37 Minutes, 
this is Apollo Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPS 



UOU* .0 «•»•> C0».E»T*«. 5/20/6,. CDT 23». « 5,:50 2,./ 
51 .lnut... Apollo 10 »°* »» » « ,„cect.ft if 3.181 

h .d no conv.r.ation. with the ere ^ m 

r..t period at about 58 hour. Jf*"™ 9 .dvi.ed that they 
to beginning their re. t cycle the crew w 

would be eble to alaep a. late •■J 1 "J t £ th . y elect to 
g^. the. roughly X3 to U hour, of re. * » ^^..4 Storing 
«.. it ell. Here in "^w^Jr reviewed the flight 

,y.t.«. and flight *J«JJ« Controller, here for tomorrow', 
plan with the tea- of *2"°"" t 61 hour. 50 .inuta. 

ictivitie. in lunar orbit. J 0 ^ 8 ^^* .t which ti- 
50 .econd. w. cro.. the J;^; of accelerating toward 

the .pacecr.ft wil 1 f Jj^en" of the «oon«. gravity, 

the moon under the *?« ln . an '*°J ^.re in «i..ion control 
Up until that «4-»tb. dl«plJJ« velocity that 

All continue to «^ c f * r J^J^. r injection. That velocity 
ve have aeen ever .ince "* n ** u "; an J d then aft er the 

indicated that «««» nd ? r "-.and module pilot John 

top of the center JJ^^j; 11 ,^" «*« the co.»ander'. 
Young .leeping J 1 " J 0 " J« oe cernen .leeping in the 

:;sv.st*ir-*s*s: SSE .... x t 59 hour. 

5 3 "inute. thi. i. Apollo Control. 
END OF TAPI 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY • 5/21/69. CM 0047. GET 60:58 219/1 
0 Thi , la Apollo Control at 60 hour. 

' ^ tu « hi. *.« rL.ln» rt.ht .ro.nd 7Z d..»... thl. 

59 alnutat. thl« 1» Apollo Control. 
EHD OF TAPE 



W OLLO 10 COMMENTARY. 5/21/69. CDT 0139. GET *1:50 220/! 

This is Apollo Control at £L_ko_uil — _ 

<n *«tL*_*nd W e're itre in P Mi.sion Control, standing by 

3,119 £««t per second. *^J,J 0W our velocity et that 

updating, end ve expect that we 11 snow r4 . pe ct to 

tUe. of 3,795 JJ^JJYuiSS. toon will be 33.800 so.. 

th \rt? ^Ie. It tL present ti-. the spacecraft is .till 
nautical Biles. At tne P cont rol rotation of about 

..inteining it. P*"*" 'r^ iuia.nce officer tell. u. that 
3 revolutions per hour. The JJ™ n J tl the .p.c.craft 
we've had no thruster "'^8 GO ntinue to 

up in thi. -ode And all spacecraft a ay.te«S diBpi ^ 8 

function normally. And we ve j showing our 

over in Mission Contro * " 795 .8 feet per second. 

velocity with respect to m °°"' ica i* mlle8 fro „ th e »oon. 

.nd we .how that we're "^"^^ necessarily bare 

That di.pley changeover, * h ^ e ?° e8 ^ u rred at 61 hours 

any relevance to the event "^^^Y tne calculations 

56 minute, into the f 1 ' f A / ° c « at 61 hour. 

that we had, the event itself was *° ° c * 8 into the 



EHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 WSSIOM C01WMTA1T. J/21/*». «I «I:37 CDI Ol« Ml/l 
... thi. i« Apollo Control «t «2 hoor» 

t?£ ft APS". C.Itr.l .t%2 ho.r. 5. -Lot... 
BHD OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5 / 2 1 /69 , GET 63=43,C D T 0332, 222/1 
_ AA This is Apollo Control at 63 hours 

moon and the velocity couu » Mission Control we are 

up to 3819 feet per ""»" • ""* h J* "m ght director, 
presently going through a ^ a »£- F „ t „u„. co.ing 

Pete Frank, and his team of 0 "" 8e th " M «„ on ° Teain . The CAPCOM 
on to "Place MlUon «lnd er a „ he Mar oon^T 

'ne fAX^ll"*. «« began their ^e'P^-iod That 
started at rough I*.* crew" ac t u.l •» keeping ."ord- 

i. i , :." b n ? - r «.. t i ,, :.t: h :».« . lr:; :; 

. i j ► j „o Th ev 've now been sleeping iu* . 

ground elapsed time. Tney ye ™° h t period, 

I hours 45 — -t« ; J ;', '. 1 ;! e l:.i« t »t ) «* tlj. 

correction fw"cn Id been scheduled to occu, 

period If they desired up to H b»» •• »ur » 

I.... crossed th. ; lunar spear of nf he « ln 

r.utpri%lle: ro L Lrth and about 33 820 nautical 

second to the current velocity of 3820 feet P« f r on 

^.Vnautlcai SI^S 2T?oi h nautrc;i h .ile.."*t «3 hour. 
46 minutes, this is Apollo Control. 



£HD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 65:16, CDT 0505 223/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control, 65 hours mnt , Attml 

16 minxes ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 is now 26,111 nautical 
■lie. away from the moon, traveling at a velocity of 
fsll f«t per second relative to the moon. The crew i. not 
-^hldulad to wake up for another 6 hours perhaps, at least 
t £ey Save the option of sleeping that long since the -^course 
correction, burn number 4 has been deleted from the flight 
pld. in as much as the trajectory is a o •"ut.t.th.t It 
will reach the desired pericynthion of 61 nautical -il" 
without having to do these midcourse correct ion. . Here in 

pSsse^ The Flight Surgeon, Dr. Ken Beets, is particularly 
!"erested in washing the demonstration of '^"''"J^,, 
«r „i..tic oicnic jugs as they're nick named, that the crew 
h.e P ab a oard 'in iLcl ?hey take the fuel cell 

.nd attempt to spin it up in a centrifuge fashion. The bag 

ias a handle on it where by the crewman can spin «d 

„! to separate the suspended hydrogen gas fro. *ithi n the watar 

so they can bleed the gas off from one end of thte bag and 

I-wI Jure water without the hydrogen in it. However, the 

TV "ass did sJow Alt the bubbles do not come out of suspension. 

they"tay down at the bottom of the bag, no S^* 1 * 

it's spun up by the crewman. Its very quiet here in the 

Control Center! The Flight Director, Pete Frank, has been 

discussing with the various console positions the up coming 

dav's activities, the system status, the reports out of tha 

^LecrafJ analysis room are getting increasing y •sorter 

*?T s . fr i„ in the various systems are almost a continual 

Une'of dittos" 'all system norma!. And at 65 hour. 18 minute. 

ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 0550, GET 66:01 224/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. 66 hours 

and 1 minute ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 presently 
is 24,404 nautical miles away from the moon, traveling at 
a velocity of 3,863 feet per second. Remaining sleep time, 
something like 5 hours. If they do use the option of sleeping 
until approximately 11 o'clock central time. And since the 
midcourse correction burn number 4 has been deleted, they 
likely will use this time for rest. Meanwhile, in a related 
subject to Apollo 10, more than 175 astronomers the world 
over will be focusing their telescopes on the lunar surface 
while the Apollo 10 crew spends the next two days orbiting 
the moon. The project is called Lunar International Observers 
Network. Acronym is LION, and the purpose of the project 
is to determine whether ground observations and lunar vents can 
be confirmed by the Apollo 10 crew. LION is coordinated 
program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
with the Smithsonian Institute Center for the study of 
short lived phenomena in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Participating 
astronomers are located in 34 different countries. Lunar 
event sitings will be related through the Smithsonian Center 
to the science support room here at The Manned Spacecraft Center, 
where scientists will evaluate the report. If the sitings 
warrant further investigation, the information will be 
forwarded to Mission Control Center. The Science Support 
Room has already received several reports of activities in 
the region of the crater, Arlstarchus. These reports came 
from participating LION astronomers in California, New Mexico, 
and Spain. At 66 hours 3 minutes ground elapsed time, this 
is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



AMUO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY, 5/21/69. CDT 0650. OEI 62,01 225 
»»„ Thio 1» Apollo control. 67 hour* 

£ou»d el.p.« time, this i. Apollo Control. 



end of tape 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 0750, GET 6801 226/ 

PA0 This is Apollo Control, 68 hours, 

1 minute Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 10 now some 19.810 
nautical miles away from the moon, traveling at a velocity 
of 3.924 feet per second. Some 4 hours remaining in the 
crew rest period assuming they use the additional 2 hours 
option since the deletion of midcourse correction number^. 
Flight Director Pete Frank is reviewing the upcoming day s 
activities with the console positions here in the Mission 
Operations Control Room, and from the back rooms where the 
opaque televisors are, actually, they're television cameras 
looking down on a layout table where various displays can 
be drawn in graphs and trend charts, this sort of thing, a 
cartoon has been put on one of the channels which has Apol- 
lo 10 command and service module docked with a doghouse with 
the beagle Snoopy complete with a space helmet riding cm top 
of it. The caption is, "Happiness is a successful Apollo 10 
moon mission." At 68 hours, 2 minutes Ground Elapsed Time 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CEI 69:06. CBI 0855 227/1 

Thl. 1. Apollo Control 69 hour. 6 mlnut.. 
•round «l.p.«d tl««. Apollo 10'. pr...nt po.itlon 1. 

"."i,:*: ViZo'Wv* r//.«s si 1 :*'.:; u 

r.^nln, n til ."oduHd «.t period. .1th .n .ddltlou.l 
".. "o.'.u" -nuib""!""! b°. ,Lt S -..«.. Prior to th.t 

tiltllllfc 

«L veiterday Consequently, the track or the spacecraft 
e no! followed ihe exact preplanned track or 

, .Jnut.: ground .l.p»d tl... thl. 1. Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT: 0945, 68:56 GET 228/1 

pxo This is Apollo Control, 69 hours, 56 

■lnutes ground elapsed time. We're getting ready to -eke 
a wake up call to the crew, which will be In the for. of 
music, 1 understand. We are now 15 324 miles away from the 
moon, traveling at a velocity of 4017 feet per second. 
There goes the music. 

( On A Clear Day played here) 

SC (whistling) Reveille, reveille, 
up all hands, heave out, trice up, clean sweep down, fore 

*° d *CC* Apollo 10, Houston. Sounds like 

we're resdy for a Navy drill on the Flight Direct. 
SC Its good music. 

cc How it'd come through this time John? 

sc ite loud and clear. Its beautiful. 

Sounds like we've got stereo. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CD! 0950, GET 7001 229/1 
Pin Thi« is Apollo Control. While w« 

„. ... » ••u.i5.-«:i™i , :u.~s: 

c.tloni to lmprov. here, .nd the ™*;" lock «.,„,«- 

ifc t £'.~. John >.c k ;i«, h ,;/* 4 :;r«d , ru U.« 

: b o« t c';% 1 h" g :-"s.^rc:^i. u t in i "o Si?.: J». - » .»-« 

.ilea, apocynthion of 169 .2 nmutl cai «i . x mll „ 

_ ^-ground co..unic.tion. that come fro. Apollo 10. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENT ART , 5/21/69. CDT 0955. GIT 7006 230/1 

sc Houiton, thl> i« 10. The world 

do.en't look very much littler than it did 

CAPCOM 10, roger. I bet you the moon look* 

a little bigger though. 

sc Hello, Houeton, Apollo 10. How do 

you reed? Hello. Houeton. Apollo 10. How do you reed? 

CAPCOM Apollo 10. Houeton. Go ahead, over. 

SC Hello. Houeton. Apollo 10. How do 

TOU 'cAP^OM Apollo 10. Houeton. Loud end cle.r. 

Bow me? Over. 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 70:11, CDT 1000 231/1 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, Apollo 10, Houston. Over. 

COMM TECH I'm keying. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, how do you read? 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. How do you read? 

Over. 

SC • Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. How do you 

read? Over. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, Houston. How do you read? 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. How do you 

read? 

COMM TECH Madrid COMM TECH, Houston COMM TECH, 
GOSS conference, net 1. Goddard voice. Houston COMM TECH 
Net 1. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Over. 

COMM TECH Goddard voice, Houston COMM TECH. 

GODDARD V. Goddard voice. 

COMM TECH Roger, I can not raise Madrid. 

GODDARD V. Do you want Madrid to come up on here? 

COMM TECH Yes, sir. 

GODDARD V. Roger. 

COMM TECH Madrid COMM TECH, Houston COMM TECH, 
net 1. 

MADRID C, T. Apollo 10, This is Madrid COMM TECH. 

SC Roger, Madrid COMM TECH. We can read 
you loud and clear. How us? 

MADRID C.T. Loud and clear. Houston is having a 
problem contacting you. 

SC Roger. 

SC Madrid COMM TECH, Apollo 10. Is Houston 
reading us at all? 

MADRID C.T. Negative, not at this time. 

CAPCOM COMM TECH. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, how do you read? 

Over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, we are reading you loud and 
clear. How do you read us? Over. 

SC Loud and clear. 

CAP COM Roger, you are coming through good now. 
Have you got all those lazy bones up there? 

SC Yeap, they're all up. Everybody's up 
and everyb ody . feels great, Jack. 

CAPCOM Good, glad to hear it. You ought to with 
that kind of sleep. You missed the music, though. 

SC - What's new this day? 

CAPCOM We're standing by for news. We'll get 
it to you. 

SC Okay, we wanted to go ahead and get 
to the consumables update and go through a couple of things 
here before we get Into it. 

CAPCOM Okay, we've got a consumables update for 
you and flight plan update when you're ready. 

SC Okay, I'm ready to copy. Go ahead. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CDT 1005, GET 7016 232/1 



CAPCOM - we've got ■ consumables update for 

you and a flight plan update when you are ready. 

BC Okay, I'a ready to copy. Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Here's your consumables update which 

Is current GET of 70 hours, your RCS total 85 percent. Quad 
A 85 percent, Quad B 85 percent, Quad C 84 percent, Quad D 
is 86 percent. Your H2 total is 40 pounds; your 02 total is 
484 pounds t your RCS is 7 percent of the flight plan. We 
have a considerable list of flight plan updating to do. Are 
you ready to copy the flight plan update? 

SC Okay, stand by. We got the con- 

sumables update and we are ready to copy on the flight plan. 

CAPCOM All right. The flight plan update 

follows - 

SC Where are you going to start? 

CAPCOM We're going to start at the - 70 

hours . 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Okay. We deleted all mldcourse cor- 

rection 4 activities and starting about this time, when you 
are ready, we would like to begin the fuel cell 02 purge. 
We would like it at 7030 to get the postsleep checklist. At 
7045 we will do the P27 update and pass along our new pads. 
At 7050 do the canister change. That leaves our TV updata 
on schedule and 7115 you can begin the P52. And this would 
then put us back on our nominal time line with ECS redundant 
component check at 71 + 55. I'd like to point now, however, 
that - 

SC Okay, do you want to - 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SC You want to commence that 02 purge 

at this time, sleep checklist at 7030, about 7045 P27 up- 
date, at 71 hours canister change, about 7115 at P52, and 
the TV pass is the same as scheduled. 

CAPCOM Affirmative. Also, we would like 

you to know that LOI is now about 11 minutes later than our 
pref light planning, because we didn't burn midcourae correc- 
tion 1 and made our translunar trajectory adjuatment at mid- 
course 2 instead, so this puts us 11 minutes behind on LOI 
and 11 minutes behind throughout all of our lunar orbit ac- 
tivities. 

CAPCOM I have some additions to make. 

SC Roger, that means we will be burning 

LOI at - 

CAPCOM Roger, you will be burning LOI at 

approximately 11 minutes late; all other activities will be 
retarded by 11 minutes and we will come up with a more ac- 
curate pad in a moment. I'd like you to make some additions 
to your flight plan. At 7315 verify on panel 382 that your 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/21/69, CDT 1005. GET 7016 232/ 

»ri«ary evaporator control ia in auto and along with that, 
^"vic. Xe primary evaporator. And then al : 7330 on 
Schedule, you can activate the priwry ^apor.tor. Then. 
Apollo 10. we would like you to Ju.p over to 84 ™£ 20 

iJnute. and -ke a change there. Change the battery A charge 
to battery B charge; that is. B not A. 

sc Roger, Houeton. At o**u we »ui 

Initiate battery B charge inatead of A - 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/21/69, CDT 1010. GET 2021 233/ 

Qr _ 20 we'll Initiate battery B charge 

in.te.d of A end at 7315 we'll re.ervice the pri.ary evap and 
till activ.t. the avap at 7330 on .ch.dule. 

r.;: n : f ^" at ii v :o. x.» x 

70 ^ T IkHIh ° f * Houaton. roger. we copy. At 7313 

It in AUTO; it ia in AUTO. 

CAPC0M Roger, thank you. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT : 1015. 70>26 GET 134/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. Apparently 

ths crew Is In the midst of preparing breakfast. Spacecraft 
Communicator Jack Lousma likely will read up the morning news 
report to the crew the next time conversation resumes. Apollo 
10 is now 14 020 nautical alias away froa the moon, gradually 
accellaratlng in the lunar gravitational field. Now at * 054. » 
feet per second. Spacecraft weight now 93 261 sounds. Con- 
tinuing to aonltor coaaunl cat Ions between Apollo 10 and Mission 
Control Center. If a line were projected fro* the center of 
the earth out through the eurface to the apacecraft, It would 
be over North central Africa. Meabers of the day shift are 
the Black Teaa of Plight Controllers, beginning to now drift 
into the Control Center here for the hand over due in about 
an hour and 10 alnutes . 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. Ve have the 

aornlng newspaper if you've got tiae to listen now. 

SC Co ahead. We'd like to. 

CC Roger. During the night, you entered 

the lunar sphere of Influence, at 6 1 l 5 1 to be exact. And you 
are now 13 957 alias froa the aoon at 4056 feet per aecond. 
Technically there is no change in the CSM ayateas status, or 
your LM heater currents, and you arc ahead of your flight plan 
on all consumables. And now the newspaper. The Flight of 
Apollo 10 has besn temporarily knocked out of the lead story 
position in the Houston Post. William Porater has resigned 
his position as Administrator of the Harria County Hospital. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1020, GET 7031 235/1 



CAPCOM William Forster has resigned hie 

position as Administrator of the Harris County Hospital, 
but never fear, as the Apollo 10 nears the moon news services 
around the world have followed the flight. It's been estimated 
that over a billion people have seen at least some of the 
television pictures from the Apollo 10. Whether you want to 
be or not, you're famous. But In spite of this enthusiasm, 
thst now unemployed local philosopher to whom we referred 
yesterday, says now he thinks color television is on Its way 
out, way out. In other news highlights, Governor Nelson 
Rockefeller continues his South American tour. His reception 
in Peru was not too friendly. President Nixon will meet with 
South Vietnamese Thieu on the island of Midway on June 8. 
Leaders of the Presbyterian Church meeting in San Antonio 
have called for the Nixon administration to restore diplomatic 
relations with Cuba. Texas International Airlines has won 
the privilege of sending the first plane into the new Houston 
International Airport on June 8. 99 VIP*s will be aboard the 
flight that will depart from Hobby Airport and land at 1 min- 
ute after midnight. A 2 day open house featuring air shows 
will be held on May 31 and June 1. The Soviet Union launched 
an unmanned spacecraft into orbit yesterday. It has been des- 
ignated Coamos 282. An old buddy of ours, world traveler 
Frank Boraan, has arrived in Prague, Czechoslovakia, for the 
12th plenary session of COSPAR. Although the Czech press did 
not mention Frank's arrival, there were several hundred people 
on hand to greet him. Frank waved back and said, "Hey, Hey." 
Frank doesn't speak Czech too well, you know. In sports news, 
it was Houston over Montreal 5 to nothing, and Cincinnati 
over Philadelphia 4 to nothing. In the American League, Detroit 
defeated Chicago 7 to 6, New York over Oakland 2 to 1, Washing- 
ton beat Seattle 6 to 5, Cleveland over Kansas City 4 to 1, 
and Minnesota downed Baltimore 3 to 2 in 13 innings. In today's 
big sports story, the former scourge of the Big Ten, the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, will resume intercollegiate football. Thla 
fall, the Maroons, once coached by the famous Alonzo Stagg, will 
play such big midweetern football giants as Wheaton College, 
Lake Forest College, North Central Illinoia, and Valparaiso at 
Indiana. That's the University of Chicago, a town up north, 
you know. In golf, today is pro-am day at the Atlanta Classics. 
That's today'a newspaper. 

SC You're a good newsman, Jack. That's 

fine stuff. 

CAPCOM That came from the Public Affairs 

Office here. 

SC What was the name of that town up 

north? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CDT 1020, GET 7031 2 

CAPCOM Let*. .... C.h.i. Chicago. Chicago, 

sc Oh. ye.. I looking at it yet- 

t.rd.y. I ■«* th.. out th.r. practicing. Speaking of Chi- 

""'ciito?' 'i'don^h... th.. li.t.d. C.n.. Do 

th.y play ball? ^ ^ you , r . r-all 

had Say li.t.n. I*v. got .o«. rand raadinga for you. How 
ablut th*. JoUaniar 26034. the CMP i. 03034. and th. LMP i. 



ISO 36. 



rAPCOM Oh, you tri.d to catch a. th.r., 

didn'^ou? Th. CDR li 26034. th. CMP i. 05034. and th. LMP 

"J? 6 * I knew being in the M.rine. you'd 

b. on your to... Li.ten. we Ju.t cycl.d th. fan.. P«g.4 
th. fuel die, we'll change the cani.ter here in about 20 
uilull. «d w.*'r. grabbing a bite of chow right now. 

CAPCOM Houaton. rog.r, we copy. 

SC "it*» y° ur background 1 b.t 

it r.ally hurt, you to ... u. .l.«P. do..n't it? 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1025, GET 7036 236/1 

CAPCOM - well, we were Just about to ask 

you how you slept. I know John, he probably slept on hie 
back, his aide, or his stomach, but how about the rest of you? 

SC The CDR slept great. 

CAPCOM Roger, CDR. We know that. 

sc I slept with those other three guys 

under couch down there. Those three guys with the big suits. 

CAPCOM Okay, they probably dido t keep you 

* W * ke sC And believe it or not, I slept pretty 

well. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you. 

sc I slept pretty well, Jack, I got 

about 6 or 8 hours of pretty good sleep. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Apparently 

in rotating around in passive thermal mode, we've had break 
lock again with the antennas. 

sc Houston, Apollo 10, over. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Apollo 10. 

sc Roger. We decided maybe we can get 

around that delay problem by trying to remember to stay over 
after conversation. It hadn't worked too well so far. over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Let s 

get back to that in a couple of minutes. We're getting a 
lot of background noise. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Spacecraft 

Communicator Jack Lousma is waiting for the background noise 
to fade out before they resume conversation. Transmissions 
are barely audible through the background noise. As the 
spacecraft rotates around where the antennas are in a better 
position, the noise will drop off. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY . 5/21/69. GET 70:41. CDT 1030 237/1 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houiton. Say .g.in your l«.t 

tr.n.-i..ion. Jack , w . thoufht .. yb . «. could 

•nd of .v.ry conv.r..tion. Ov.r. 

CAPCOM log.r, w. copy. ov.r. 

ac »og.r. *nd v. h.v. b..n op.r.ting with 

th. S-o.nd .qu.lch.d i! Abl. for th. l..t 2 d.y. «d r.qu..t 
to know if that'. b..n both.ring you dowh th.r. or if th.t 

•""capcSm 0, "* tlo t.«:"i~* ™. : ? v-r - t A 

£tJco5 Apollo 10. Hou.ton. Th. S-b.nd .qu.lch 

.witch CA po C .?tio» do..n^ "ff..i « in «y w.y. At thi. ti- 

«»d illo lik. you on your H2 cryro h..t.r. go to Oft on 

"A t'.nd^oVuTO on 'tank 2 .nd w. - « "^^J^ ' ry 

v.lv. po.ition on 3»2 th.t th. - p.n.l 332 th.t 

11* tin wt.r control i. in AUTO .. o PP o..d to th. .witch 

on th^p.n.1. that v . lv . ti in AUTO .nd it'. b..n 

in AUTO .inc. liftoff. Ov.r. 

CAP COM Eog.r. 0v«r. 



$C 



Th.t'. "log.r out", J.ck. Ov.r. 
Hou»ton. thi. i. Apollo 10. Ov.r. 



ac Hou.ton. thi. i. Apoxxw *v. 

CAP G0M Apollo 10. Hou.ton. .t.nd by on., *!•«•• 



END Of TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CDT : 1035, 70«46 GET 23t/l 



cc Apollo 10, Houston. Go ahead; over. 

SC Roger. I wee Just wondering what 

the - are we gonna knock off the PGC to do the reallne to 
the new REFSMMAT ; I guess we are. I would like to get an 
attitude to go to which will avoid that desire to get glabal 
angles - use glabal lock, program alar* if possible. 

CC Roger i stand by. 

SC The second thing is does this change 

in our flight time et the soon affect its lunar umbra before 
we get to the moon? Over. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. You'll bs 

entering lunar penumbra 10 minutes later, that will be at 
approximately 72:50, and sunrise will be 10 minutes later, 
at about 74:50; over. 

SC Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENT AIT , 5/21/69. COT 1040» GET 7051 239/1 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We're cosing 

up with a P52 realignment attitude and in the aeentiae, we're 
■tending by with the 27 update coaputer and several - when 
you are ready. 

8C loger, and we will go to accept on 

the coaputer. And if you can etand by on the pad for a couple 
of minutee, we will be with you. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, roger, copy. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Tour uplink Is 

coming et you now. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69* CDT : 1046, 70:57 GET 240/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control. The crw 

Is .till In the midst of breakfast at this time; after they 
have washed the breakfast dishes, we'll have resumption of 
communications from Mission Control here, with planning the 
days activities, and there will be uplink the new state vector, 
and all the other numbers that have to stream into the space- 
craft computer for our attitudes and so on for the lunar orbit 
insertion burn. We've got some 4 hours and 48 minutes until 
the spacecraft passes behind the moon and out of sight from 
the antennas here on earth. Their distance now from the moon 
is 12 822 nautical miles; velocity continuing to accelerate, 
4 095 feet per second. To recap the plans for the lunar orbit 
insertion burn, ignition time 75 hours, 55 minutes, 53.71 
seconds, ground elapsed time. The velocity change which will 
be in retrograde, 2913.9 feet per second; spacecraft weight 
at the time of the burn 62 554 pounds, will produce a lunar 
orbit with a pericynthion of 59.5 nautical miles and apocynthion 
on the side toward the earth of 169.2 nautical miles. Bum 
time of this maneuver will be 5 minutes, 54 seconds. 

C C 10, Houston. The attitudes which 

you want for your lunar landing site 2 REFSMAT, P52 IMU re- 
aline; stop your roll at 330 degrees and then pitch down 
to 30 degrees; over. 

SC Roger; stop the roll at 330; pitch 

down to 30. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. GET 71=03. CDI 1052 2*1/1 
gou.to., Apollo 10. Sn.t M« *■ J« «" 

c.n ,o to block. 0«r. 

K Bo«;o" Apollo 10 o. to" 

^r.^£^lo 3 r..^:i^u/^^^res^rao ) ,^r^^r• 1 ;.^: l 

angle of 30 degrees? Over. 

you weft to pitch down is 30 degrees. Over. 
SC Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/21/69, CDT 1057. GET 7108 242 

sc Hello, Houston, this is 10 . I'» 

'•^CA?^ 7 7 ° Ur 10. Maneuver p.d follow.. 

Thi. if * ?C + 2 pad? SPS G4N , NOUN 47 i. NA. 077. corr.c- 
Ii« JSoi 47 in N A? NOUN 48 is also NA, 077552900 + 43184 - 
till* - 139 lo! rod i. blank, pitch is 312. all the rest in 

HA * °sc r " Okay, it's PC + 2, is that correct? 

CAPCOM Affirmative. 

Sc SPS CM. NOUN 47 is NA. 48 is NA, 

NOUN 3$ i. 077552900 + 43184 - 03459 -13910, roll i. blank, 
ana pitch is 312, and everything else is NA. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, that is affirmative. 

Another maneuver pad follows, over. 



END 0? TAPE 



i. e«-.«. »•>/«. CM! 1102 ' 7< " 13 GEI A th " 3/l 

u.n.uver pad follows; over. 

Maneuver y*- ^ ahead. _ sPS 

?»v» ! S "--"S.rais' 

acq A7A 11 42 00 plus 311 J* minus 

a*---" -^-ij.-rsr.s'jrs-jrsr 

kivw:;.:";;. >•"■»"- »" '•" " " ' 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1107. GET 7118 244/ 

CAPCOM - roll le NA, pitch 027, and the 

rest is NA, over. sps g j,u f 

„„„„ na. x ..fo.omoo ♦ «0,7 - .»>. ♦ 



ro11 '"»:«"'. f«—"« " d *• Mrt 

y „„r « «Utud., when y.u .r. r..dy to copy, ov.r. 
CAPCOM SSI -."''or ... . 

your inertial - 

CAP COM Apoil."o; Hou.ton. (So .h..d. ov.r. 

CAPCOM to copy> „ v . r . 

»».*>■!•• •» j;^»*^ , *; 0 :: .ttit.d.. ,oi», 

to Chan,. «h«n «• *• • p52 r " lign !„ 

bu t th. in.rti.l r.f.r.nc. .y.t.. .ill ..itch it. llt.U 
vhatchacallite . 1Q 

"« co » .« s i4:Tsi '.huh; *«» 

that was just passed up is the attic Howevetf when you 

•..su-^.ll.ir"'.!." s- «• h - ilf " 

,.».« «H« «•* •2;.n*J:*. (g«bl.). 

CAP COM ApSllo 10. Rou.ton. I didn't copy 

C xf.t°«.n..i..ion. »1 

«!C It's no hurry. 

i.„ii n to Houston. Tom, I » " ot 

„.di» c f ?z. out x..*ui«.. w J*: cuxd y 0 » „.« . 

„!., th.r.. H«— * „.„ .,„.„„ „.y. J«k. 

g o"th. .-«•«'«•; :i^s.:r-«: "»»v«n 

to h.ndl. it. And I v. got 'J"""" „ e w „ « Utt l. .go. 
m, snoopy. He". 8 ^.J'h.pp.n out 

th.«. c you ta ... •• B :t».*::v; 0 2i2-. f »-.«".. 

since yesterday. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 71:23, CDT 1112 245/1 

r— SC Houston, Houston, this is 10, we are 

commencing the redundant component check. We will check the 
main regulators here in a second. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we copy. 

SC coming at you, Houston. 

CAPCOM Say again, 10. 

SC Well, if you didn't get it, that was a 

main regulator being checked there. 

CAPCOM Roger, understand, main regulator check. 

The reason for the increase in LM weight la that we pumped 
a few pounds of oxygen in there and this was not included in 
the pad update yesterday. Over. 

SC How about that. 

SC Have you got any? 

SC No. 

Sc Boy, Houston, you all think of everything. 

I never would have considered that. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1117, 71:28 GET 246/1 

sc Houston; Apollo 10, how do you read 

"* n °cC J * Ck? reading you loud and clear now 

T °"' sc Okay. I didn't have the .ikes up 

cloee enough I guess , so that was the -.in trouble; oyer. 

CC Roger, you're real good now Tom. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GDI 1122, GET 7153 247/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. We have 

several minutes of dead air here in which there is no con- 
versation taking place with the crew of Apollo 10. Now 
some 11,390 nautical miles away from the moon, traveling at 
a velocity of 4,153 feet per second. Some 4 hours, 12 min- 
utes remaining until loss of signal with the spacecraft 
when it goes behind the western rim of the moon, as viewed 
from earth. The Black Team of Flight Controllers is now 
being briefed by their predecessors here in Mission Control 
Center with handover due in about 5 minutes . In Ground 
Elapsed Time the loss of signal at some 4 hours and 12 min- 
utes from now will be at 75 hours, 48 minutes, 24 seconds 
out of Goldstone. Out of Madrid some 10 seconds later, 
75:48:34. We'll continue to monitor air-to-ground for re- 
sumption of conversation. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1127. GET 7138 248/1 
sc Houston, this iB Apollo 10. Good 

sr. ^v;: tsrjst s^-.s:.ssst= 1 s 

^"circOM 111 " 8in "o W g :rr 8 oo5 llll: 10. and your friendly 
black tea. i. no. on duty^ere in .^JOCl. 

shift" W. could hear a lot of noi.e in the background there 

CApVm" Pa " 10 T 8 .. U ! we-r.'trying to get up to 
.p.ed here. Did ^guy .^-P ^llt^ ^ 

CAPCOM Okay. I'll get it from Jack then. 

SC I thought you guy. go through a formal 

change of the command ceremony down there every morning. 
tapcom Say again. Over. 

ci The ECS redundant component check 

d ' 9Wn CAP^M The CAPCOM po.ition is ^finitely 

fully manned. I'll tell you that. We have about 5 of us 

.ttting ar0Und ' x gue .. only * Marine could sound 

a.i chipper as Jack does in the morning. 
CAPCOM Roger. 



£WD OF TAPE 



A POLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDI 1132. GET 71*3 2*9/1 

"""aJSX .ffir«ti«. W. h.« th.«. 

Over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MI 8 3 OB COMMENT AIT , 5/21/69. GET 71:48, CDT 1137 250/1 

DEAD All 
BHD OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GDI 1142, GET 7153 251/1 
gc Hello, Houston. Houston, this is 

10 How do read in high gain? 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Reading you about 

4 by in the high gain.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ nar . 

a CAPG0M PreSent 10. You're Ju.t a little 

scratchy . 

sc oka y- 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GET 71:58, CDT 1147 252/1 



CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston. Over. 

SC Go ahead, Houaton, this is 10. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We have a problem with the 

Goldsone. We won't acquire the 210 foot dish until 71:49, 
that scans we'll have to get the color down through the 85 
foot dish at Goldstone at 72:14. Now, we're not sure just - 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT : 1152 , 72 :03 GET 253/1 



CC - at the Goldstone at 72:14, now 

we're not sure just exactly how good the color quality will 
be through the 85, so we can work it your choice on the thing; 
we can go as scheduled at 72:20 and see what the quality of 
the color is, and if it's bad, and it won't impact your time 
line, we suggest that we then delay until 72:50 and when we 
pick up the 2 10, and try another show. Also that give us - at 
this time you are in the lunar umbra and your friendly geoligist 
here says that there should be a spectacular shot looking right 
through the moon into the solar corona. Over. 

SC Houston, this is 10. We're kicking 

around shooting the TV at the solar carona; I don't know; do 
you think the thing would handle it - seems like it would damage 
it from the light standpoint. 

CC Stand by. Everybody is shaking their 

head back here - the experts - as long as the sun is completely 
down, or completely set, it should be all right; we'll be looking 
at Just a shafting from around the moon; we think it'll be 
all right; you could probably take a peek out your window and 
if it looks all right to you, then you could turn the camera 
over that way. 

SC We don't see the sun. We don't see it. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 72 hours, 6 

minutes. We are standing by waiting for some word on what 
will be attempted for this next TV transmission at the regularly 
scheduled time, as you heard Charlie Duke pass up to the crew. 
Goldstone will not be able to acquire with the 210 foot 
antenna; the 85 fooc antenna will be available but we're doubt- 

the quality of color TV we can receive through this antenna. 
The 210 dish will acquire at 72 hours, 49 minutes. The 
regularly scheduled TV pass is at 72 hours, 20 minutes. 
We are now at 72 hours, 7 minutes. We may try to come up at 
the regular time, feed through the 85 foot dish, see what 
the quality is; if it is bad, hold off until about 72:50. 
We'll continue to stand by for a resolution of this. 

CC Roger 10; we barely read you, Tom. 

We are looking at your display; 29 for a periloon of 2906. 
You are very scratchy 10 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMIXTAIY, 5/21/69, COT 1157, GET 720S 254/ 1 



CAP COM Rogar, 10. Wa'ra Juat baraly raad- 

lc| you, Tom. Ha trt leoking at your display, 29 for part- 
luaa of 2906. Tou art vary acratahy, 10, at laaat Tom la. 
Alaost uaraadabla. 



SC 

ovar. 

CAP COM 

SC 

SC 

aa now? Over. 
CAP COM 
SC 



Haaatoa, thla la 10. Radio chaek, 

Rogar, you ara 5 by, John, ovar. 
logar. 

Rogar, Charlla. How do you raad 

Rogar, Toa. Tou ara 5 by, ovar. 
Okay, raal flna. 



IXD OF TAPI 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1208, GET 7219 255/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 72 hours, 

19 minutes. We are going to attempt to get a TV feed through 
the 85-foot dish at Goldstone. The crew indicates that they 
have the camera turned on. We're standing by now. 

CAPCOM We're in the process of handing over 

to Goldstone. Goldstone as yet has not received your signal 
and we'll let you know, over. 

SC Okay, we've got a beautiful picture 

on our monitor this morning. 

CAPCOM Good show, 10, over. 

PAO A few minutes ago at 72 hours, 

13 minutes, Tom Stafford asked for his distance from the 
earth to the moon and the velocities. These are the figures 
we passed up to him at 72 hours, 13 minutes. Apollo 10 is 
208,950 nautical miles from the earth, velocity 3,013 feet 
per second relative to the earth, distance from the moon 
9,813 nautical miles, velocity relative to the moon 4,234 
feet per second. We're continuing to stand by to see whether 
we'll be successful in getting this TV feed through the 
85-foot dish. 

SC Give us a hack when you're getting 

a picture, would you please? 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we'll do that. Stand 

by, I'll give you some word on the Goldstone acquisition. 

SC Okay, if they don't have it before 

too long we'll go ahead and terminate it. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. If you'll stand by for 

2 seconds we'll give you an estimate of acquisition time. 
We're supposed to have it at 7214. So far they haven't got 
a signal through the 85. 

SC Houston, while you're waiting for 

Goldstone, we'll just keep a lock on here. We'd still like 
to have you check with GUIDO while we have a 290.6 parallel 
in there on our verb 82. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by, 10. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. The big peri- 

cynthion number is due to the conic integration in the verb 
82. At these distances the GUIDO' s are not disturbed. They 
say that's a normal reaction to that integration. There is 
a way you can get a better number if you'd like us to pass 
it up to you, we'll give it to you, over. 

SC We can take P21 to about the middle 

of the LOI burn, that ought to tell us, huh? 

CAPCOM That's the way we were going to 

suggest, 10. Over. 

SC Okay. Okay, we figured it was 

strictly due to the conic, but we just wanted to give it a 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1208, GET 7219 255/2 

recheck. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We suggest 

your GET for the P21 if you're going to run it is 76:00:14, 
over. 

SC Roger. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69. CDT 1213, GET 7224 256/1 



SC Roger, thank you. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Do we have any- 

thing through Madrid at this time? The Goldatone isn't 
locked on, over. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We have a Madrid ac- 

quisition and they are getting a picture recorded on tape; 
■o Goldatone lockup is estimated in another 10 minutes, so 
it's dealer's choice on whether to terminate or not. 

BC Okay, we will knock it off now. Let 

us know when you have acquisition. We will give it to you 
for just a short bit in about 10 minutes. Tell us when. 
We don't want to just keep holding the camera here. We have 
a few other things to do. We will give it to them in 10 
minutes for a short while, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We suggest you hold off 

until we get acquisition and we will give you the word on 
acquisition at Goldatone, over. 

SC All right. 

p A 0 This is Apollo Control at 72 hours 

25 minutes. As you heard, we will wait 10 minutes for Gold- 
stone acquisition and the crew will try for a short TV trans- 
mission at that time. 

SC - you can read our DSKY , we now 

show 61.8 mile perilune. It looks pretty good. 

CAPCOM Rog, we copy. 

SC Just like you guys said. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM 10, you will have to say again, Tom. 

You are barely readable at this time, over. 

SC Roger (garble) 

CAPCOM I can understand you want the dis- 

tance to the moon and distance to the earth, over. 

SC That's affirmative. Distance from 

the earth; distance to the moon; and our present velocity. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Tom, you are 5 by now. 

You're breaking up. A couple of your transmissions have been 
barely readable and this last one was 5 by, over. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. Your present 

distance from the earth is 208,950 miles; distance from the 
■oon is 9,813 with a velocity relative to the earth of 3,013 
feet per second, over. 

SC Roger, I have it copied down, thanks 

a lot. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We're standing 

by for your decision on the TV, over. 

SC Okay, we will give you the - an ex- 

ternal shot at 20 minutes. 

CAPCOM Roger, standing by for the TV. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1213, GET 7224 2S6A/1 

SC Hello, Houston. The tube is on 

right now. 

CAPGOM Roger, 10. Stand by; we don't have 

a picture yet, over. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 72:29, CDT 1218 257/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 72 hours 32 

minutes. Goldstone has acquired Apollo 10. We'll stand by 
until we have a good strong signal and then we'll pass that 
word up to the crew for another attempt at television. 

PAO Apollo 10's distance from the moon is 

9028 nautical miles. It's velocity in reference to the moon 
4283 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1223, GET 7234 258/1 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Goldstone 

has * good acquisition. We're GO for TV, over. 

g J Okay, Charlie, we'll get you going 

right now. 

CAPCOM Rog* 

gc Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. Our 

•onitor shows a good picture of the earth. How are you 

d ° lng C APC0M io, we haven't got our signal yet. 

Stand by. 

p A0 Picture coining up now. 

CAP COM Okay, Apollo 10, Houston. We re 

setting it in black and white now. Stand by for the color. 
!."• lot the color now. Apollo 10. We have the earth and 
the center - correction - it seems to have a bluish tinge to 
Hi background. We see a very bright blue, pale blue I should 
..y\ in ?h. center of the earth right near the terminator. 
Could you describe that for us, over? 

s £ Right, you can see the South Atlantic 

Ocean thera and the orange spot to the right is the »o*th 
African Continent. You can see basically the Sahara 
and ibovt that the Mediterranean Sea. The rest of the 
I. pretty -uch encased in clouds. The solid cloud cover that . 
covered the North Pole and most of Europe is still with u. 
tolay. At this time as we look at the earth we are 210,000 
miles away. We've only got about 9,000 miles to go to the 
moon aid we're traveling approximately 2500 mile, an hour 
Native to the earth. Also, in about 15 minutes we U 
enter the shadow of the moon and make our major burn to enter 
lunar orbit in approximately 3 hours. And also in about 15 
minutes we will enter the shadow of the moon and make our 
»*1or burn to enter lunar orbit in approximately 3 hours. 
Now at this distance the earth looks slightly smaller than a 
tennis ball to us and a little bit larger than a golf ball, 
and I hope it shows up the same way on your screen. 
CAPCOM 10, it's a - 

sc And again South Africa - go ahead, 

Cil * rl CAPC0M Roger, I was just going to add that 

w . can see the northern part of Africa. We had a bluish tint 
to it at first but now it's coming in to a sort of orangiah 
brown and we can see the South Atlantic and the cloud cover 
very well. The colors are very good, over. 

7 sc Roger, again the Sahara Desert, the 

Atlas Mountains, Morocco, Libya we can see from here. It is 
In orangi - brownish orange. The night time, the terminator - 

END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 72:39, CDT 1228 259/1 



SC A brownish orange, the night time, the 

terminator he* cut across the Sue* Canal and most of Egypt 
and is now covering most of South Africa. I can see Spain. 
It is a greenish brown and is completely contrasted with respect 
to North Africa. However, you may have difficulty seeing it 
on your set due to resolution at this distance. Again, you 
can see Brazil, but it is covered mostly with clouds at this 
time. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we haven't - we can see - 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead. Go ahead 10. 

SC Roger. This - Roger. At this time 

Apollo 10 ia going through the preparation for the lunar 
orbit insertion burn and the next - after we lose contact 
with the earth the next time that we come around we will - 
to have contact with the earth we'll be at approximately a 
60 mile by 170 orbit around the moon. Right now we can not 
see the moon even though it is rapidly accellerating it 
towards us - towards it by it's mass. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom, we copied. A very good 

description. We have difficulty seeing any land mass in our 
picture except for North Africa, and we can see the terminator 
cutting across Africa. Europe, the land masses of Europe, 
are just sort of fade into a bluish color. It looks like an 
ocean to us. Over. 

SC Right. Really, the only major land mass 

we can see is exactly what you can see on your set there, 
and that is the North African continent. Most of Europe is 
covered either by high clouds or some scattered low clouds 
and it's very difficult for us to see it, too. We'll give 
you a quick ahot on the interior now, and then we'll terminate 
this pass. We'll go inside now. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you very much for the view. 

We'll be atanding by for the inside. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston. You are coming 

in on the black and white monitor now. 

CAPCOM 10, we have the color now. The reaolution 

on the 85 is I think better than moat expected here. The sun 
is pretty bright in the background coming in through the - I 
guess that's the hatch window. No, side window I guess it is. 
The patch is visible but it's pretty dark due to the background 
being so bright. 

CAPCOM 10, do you read? Over. 

SC Go ahead, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, thought we had lost voice there 

for a moment. You're coming in 5 by now. We've got your 
arm patch now that's very dim at this setting. We had Gene's 
smiling face there for a minute along with your patch. The 
flag ia coming in a little bit better now. However, it's atill 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 72:39, CDT 1228 259/ 

CAFCOM pretty dark due to the bright background. 

That's a lot better there, 10. Over. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69. CDT 1233, GET 7244 260/1 



CAPCON - that's a lot better there* 10, 

over. 

CAP COM There. We have a good view now. 

How we can see Gene again. 

CAPCOM We see you waving, G«ne . Barbara 

is in the viewing room. She a ays hi. 

SC A little difficult to get the proper 

lighting up here, Charlie. Spots flood it out and we've got 
to deflect the light. 

CAPCOM Aoger, we see you trying hard on the 

thing. It looks like the ALC is averaging out and the beck- 
ground looks real good, the spacecraft back along the hatch. 
Tom's hand covering his window is real clear, his face is 
dark though. Over. 

SC That's those whiskers there, Charlie* 

CAPCOM I see. Thank you very much, John, 

that wasn't quite - 

SC That's known as a 72-hour shadow, 

Charlie. 



BHD OF TAPE 



„,LLO 10 MXSSIOH COHME S TARY, 5/21/69. C« 123*. GET ,329 261/1 
CAPCOM - yo.'r. co.i»g »«1 gre.t, ov.r. 

<r 0M th. natch ;i-:«^ 4 ;^;r,.i.i.. 

on th. out. id.. m«yb« . ""^'."ll"'. „? t of . ....t on th. 
Th. right-h.nd -indo. ta« i„t . g.n.r.l 

:X\lT t ^l'"l^l d.xinit. p.rtlcl.. 

l..h«d «».. It. H>irt n<jt yery g00i , t th i. C , MI . 

ln '"JaPCOM *o»«. 10. «« »«*« °° coapl-lnt. 

- "cAP^ 800d Kig ght Xh d0 ."-. h "V J o h n.. 

^Jn*. minting right no« .t th. 
to g.t ho... And "o;''" 1 ^!, 1 ;. th * b e.t working p.rt 

. f th. c .h 0l . ;,:«£*• b " ut ,,0, " 

th.t yo „ h .« -^/j:! 1 .- ;« th. .«t.nt 
- - c js;- rt * , - h "i. , a- u e .r-i.... - 

■•• it: * Ynu kn ow. once you lose the thing in 

h ere ana y ou have to^o^r it f.? about 2 0 minute., you 
find a way not to ... *; 

but it sur. v.. . .cra-ble going for it. I H t. 

CAPCOM »o E «r. « copy^ notlce the 

ing the lunar penumbra at this time. uo y 
.»n .etting at .11? C ^?J' -M th# , un right now. Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1234, GET 7329 26 

sc We're not in the right attitude to 

i \' c In this attitude, to look «t the 

earth and everything, v. can't get a picture of the sun that 
w « can aee. If there i- any eolar corona, we will give it 
a quick ehot . „,., 

CAPCOM Roger. Jack ie estimating you will 

have about 30 aeconda only, over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. It appears that 

the sun's reflection on Snoopy here ie getting a little bit 
dimmer, eo we very well could be where you .ay we ere. I 

h ° P * CAPCOM* Your friendly FIDOe will bet on it. 

SC - »o«« navigating now. 

sc Tee, I gueea we are too, aren t we7 

CAPCOM Rog. 

sc i never doubted them anyway. I 

just - like I said yesterday, I'll wait until I see that 
60 nautical miles. .„„ a<*- 

CAPCO m 10, Houston. Does it look any dif- 

f.r.nt c up.id. down there? ^ ^ ^ ^ of ^ ^ 

tion they were b.for..^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

ronmeut, if you don't like it, just turn upside down. 
CAPCOM Roger, 10. 

SC Okey. Charlie, we will terminate 

this pass with one quick look outside to see how the 210- 
foot dish looks at the earth from outside, okay? 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we are standing by, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1240, GET 7251 262 

sc Does it look any different upside 

down, Charlie? , . 

CAPCOM The stars are 180 out of the posi- 

tion they were before. 

gc That's one thing about this environ- 

ment. If you don't like it just turn upside down. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. 

sc Okay, Charlie, we'll terminate this 

pass with one quick look outside and see how the 210-foot 
dish looks at the earth from outside, okay? 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we're standing by, over. 

sc Charlie, it's definitely getting a 

little darker outside. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, that's good news, over. 

sc Looks like we're right on trajectory 

then. Okay, here's another look at the earth through the 
210-foot dish at Goldstone, and I hope the colors are coming 
through a little better. Again, the west coast o orth 
Africa is still a bright orange and the central part of North 
Africa is starting to turn purple as nighttime approaches 
over the western part of Libya and the eastern part of Tuni- 
sia. Again, it's awful hard to see Spain because Spain is 
a greenish-brown this morning. You have the Mediterranean 
and the Atlantic covered with some clouds. So it s awful 
hard to see any part of Spain. But again, the earth to us 
this morning look, a little bit smaller than • "I^I.S"* 000 
as we're 210,000 miles from the earth and now less than 9,000 
miles to go to the moon. This is Apollo 10 signing off. We 
■ee you later today. 

CAPCOM Thank you much for a good show, 10. 

Appreciate it. The 210-foot dish is giving us a very good 
resolution and the colors are a lot sharper, over. 

gc Charlie, I can Just see a little 

bit of reflected sunlight now out on the left thrusters. I 
believe it's probably from the earth over on the left side. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We think it might be 

earthshine. We have an update to your LOI 1 burn card. over, 
gc Stand by a second. 

CAPCOM Roger, no hurry on this. 

PA0 That was Gene Cernan describing 

Apollo 10 's entry into the lunar umbra, the nighttime of the 
moon. The early part of that TV transmission was through 
the 85-foot antenna. We then acquired the 210-foot antenna 
and had a better picture. And Mrs. Gene Cernan watched this 
television show from the viewing room here in the Control 
Center. „ , . _ 

PAO At 72 hours, 5 7 minutes Apollo 10 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1240, GET 7231 262/ 



Is 7,987 nautical miles from th« moon. It'a velocity, 4,360 
fact par second. That's with a lunar reference. 

SC Hello, Houston. Houston, this Is 

Apollo 10. How do you read? 

CAPCOM Reading you 5 by, 10. Go ahead, 

over. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We j ua t had 

a handover to Goldatone. Do you read now, over. 

SC Oh, yes, I thought that was us. 

We're back up high gain narrow beam, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Network has just advised 

that we won't hand over till 7305, over. 

SC You will not hand over till 7305, 

okay. And what is that update you have for ua? 

CAPCOM Roger, it's two of them. One for 

your LOI burn card. We have some updates to your angles. 
And we have a map update rev number 1, over. 

SC Okay, give me the rev 1 first, 

Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, LOS 1b 0754825, 0755252, 

0762258, over. 

SC Okay, I've got map update rev 1 

0754825, 0755252, and 0762258. 

CAPCOM Rog, that was a good read back, over. 

SC Okay, and go ahead with your update 

on the preliminary LOI. 

CAPCOM Roger, it's on your burn card that 

you have - that it's an update to the roll, pitch and yaw 
angles. Roll is now 179 degrees, pitch 68 - that's 068, 
yaw is 011, over. 

SC Okay, Charlie, that must be for the 

abort card, right? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, 10, over. 

SC Roger, roger. 

SC Okay, Charlie, I got roll 179, 

pitch Is 068 and yaw is 011 on the LOI 15-minute abort card. 
CAPCOM That's affirmative, over. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Those times 

that were passed up on the lunar revolution number 1 map up- 
date, the first time was the loss of signal time. That's 
75 houra, 48 minutes, 25 seconds. The second time is, which 
Apollo 10 will pass 150 degrees west, was 75:52:52. And the 
third time was the acquiaition of signal time, 76:22:58. 
We're 2 hours, 49 minutes, 46 seconds away from the lunar 
orbit Insertion burn according to the preliminary maneuver 
pad passed up to the crew a short time ago. This time will 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1240, GET 7251 262/3 



be updated again prior to that burn. We expect to update 
the LOI pad about 74 hours and 10 minutes, and that ignition 
time may change a little bit. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 73:06, CDT 1255 263/1 

DEAD AIR 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1315, GET 7326 264/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 73 hours 

26 minutes. Apollo 10 Is 6,863 nautical miles from the moon; 
velocity 4,464 feet per second. We are in conversation with 
Apollo 10 now. 

SC - the LM Is bright as day, courtesy 

earthshine . 

CAPCOM Roger, understand you are getting a 

lot of earthshine up there, 10, over. 
SC Rog. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. It 

looks like you're drifting into the limit on the high gain 
antenna. You will be handling the omnia on board; looks like 
you are coming up on omni delta for max signal strength, over. 

SC Roger. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. As you can see, 

we're - made just a couple of pulses, but we're slowly drift- 
ing over to our L0I 1 attitude. 

CAPCOM This is Houston. Roger, out. 

SC Hello, Houston. This is 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10, over. 

SC Okay, reservicing is started and I 

am at the point where I've got the waterflow on. I'll keep 
it on for 2 minutes . 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We show 2 min- 

utes on the water. It looks like you got some water into 
the evaporator. We suggest you turn it off, over. 

SC All right, understand you don't 

want me to activate it at this time. I just went to auto 
on the steam pressure and waterflow. 

CAPCOM Rog, that's the correct procedure. 

Over. 

SC Okay, that's where we are right now 

and I'm reading about 0.23 on my steam pressure. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, over. 

SC And down below, about 44 degrees. 

About 44 degrees on the glycol evap out temp. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PAO Gene Cernan is reservcing the pri- 

mary evaporator. That's the one that dried out in earth or- 
bit on launch day. 

COMTECH Goldstone, Houston Co mm Tech, net 1. 

G0LDSTONE Goldstone. 

COMTECH Roger. I am receiving an echo. 

GOLDSTONE Negative, I'm not receiving an echo. 

COMTECH I am. When I transmit, I am getting 

an echo. Meet me on net 2. 
GOLDSTONE Roger. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1325, GET 7326 264/2 

CAPCOM Hello, Houston - correction, hello 

Apollo 10. Houston. We have y.ur final LOI 1 pad ready to 
go and your P27 update. If you are ready to go with this, 
tfe ar^tco, over. , , , , _ f or the P2 7 update , 

I'll go into CMC accept now. 

CAP COM Roger. 

sc You are in accept, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, out- 

sc Okay, Charlie, I'm ready for the 

final LOI 1 and make it a good one- 

CAPCOM Roger, 10- This is LOI 1- SPS G&N 

62554 + 095 - 0 17075555331, NO UN 81 Is - 29 138 - 05612 - 
0229 correction 0299 7 35 52 30 342, apogee is 01692 + 0059529824 
55429752, sextant star is 162146394, the rest of the pad is 
ma Okay, your set stars are the same; your roll align is 
241240 and 013. no ullage. The LM weight is the same. over. 

SC Stand by one. 

sc Houston, this is 10 with the read- 

back. 

TAPCOM Go ahead- 

SC uu 1 is SPS G&N 52554 + 095 - 017 

075555331 - 29138 - 05612 - 0 2 99 7 355 2 30 3420169 2 + 0059529824 
55429752162146394, rest of pad is NA. We've got Vega, 36 
Deneb 43, roll is 241, pitch is 240, yaw is 013, no ullage, 
and the LM wieght is 30 72 7. 

CAPCOM That was a good readback, 10. Gene, 

how was my readup? Was it too slow, too fast, or - comments, 



over. 



SC 



No, very good, Charlie, just right. 



CAPCOM Roger, out. 

sc Houston, Apollo 10- The uplink is 

coming through in good shape and I wish you would pass on to 
Jack Ichmidt this message. The message is "wou d you be- 
lieve the minimum stop on the 250-mm lens is 5.6. We do 

not have an F4 on the 250-mm. M 0 v * r - 

CAPCOM Roger. 10. We will pass that on to 

him. And if no LOI 1 bum, you can expect AOS at 0761221. 
sc Okay, without an LOI burn, AOS will 

be 0761221. 

CAPCOM Affirmative, out. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10. Houston. We have 



your torquing load and state vector in. The computer is 
yours, over. 

S C Okay, thank you. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 73 hours 

38 minutes and we have just completed passing up the final 

lunar orbit insertion barn pad. It calls for an l*« itio « 

time of 75 hours 55 minutes 53 seconds. A delta V of 2,982.4 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1315, GET 7326 264/3 

feet per second; duration of the burn 5 minutes 54 seconds. 
That burn is targeted for an apocynthion of 169.2 nautical 
miles, with a pericynthion of 59.5 nautical miles. Charlie 
Duke also passed up to Gene Cernan the acquisition time given 
no LOI burn. If the LOI burn does not take place, we will 
acquire Apollo 10 at 76 hours 12 minutes 21 seconds. We had 
earlier passed up an acquisition time for a good LOI burn at 
75 hours 48 minutes 25 seconds. 

PAO And the Environmental Control Officer 

William Burton has reported to Flight Director Jerry Griffin 
that he saw the evaporator take a drink and he feels warmer. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT : 1330, 73:41 GET 265/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control, with a 

correction. That last time I gave you is the LOS time, 
75:48:25. Acquisition time with a good LOI burn is 76:22:58. 
Wa'll continue to stay up live here, for any conversation. 
In the meantime, let me recap those times. 

CC Houston; do you have any questions 

for the standard setting for the 250 millimeter lense in lunar 
orbit; over. 

SC No - it looks like we're going to 

have to use an F 56 and 1/25 since the 250 millimeter lense 
doesn't have an F4 on it. 

CC Roger, Tom. I was just talking to 

Jack here and he says we would like to use an F5 . 6 at one 
two fifteth except near the terminator, and then go down to 
one, one twenty fifth; over. 

SC Okay, we'll do that. 

CC Roger. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 

will go behind the moon and we will lose signal at 75 hours, 
48 minutes, 25 seconds. If Apollo 10 does not do the LOI 
bum, we will reacquire the spacecraft at 76 hours, 12 minutes, 
21 seconds. If the LOI burn is a good one, we will reacquire 
Apollo 10 at 76 hours, 22 minutes, 58 seconds. We now hava 
clocks counting down in the Control Center to LOS and to 
ignition. We are showing 2 hours, 3 minutes, 10 seconds to 
loss of signal, 2 hours, 10 minutes, 35 seconds to ignition. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 73:51, CDT 1340 266/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 73 hours 56 

minutes. Apollo 10 Is 5463 nautical miles from the moon, 
velocity 4640 feet per second. Flight Dynamics Officer 
Phil Shaffer reports that at the time of lunar orbit Insertion 
Apollo 10 will be 98.4 nautical miles from the moon and 
2 15 847 nautical miles from the earth. 

C0MM TECH Goddard Voice, Houston COMM TECH. GOSS 

conference. 

GODDARD V Goddard Voice. 

COMM TECH Roger, read you loud and clear. How me? 

GODDARD V. Roger, you are 5er also. 

COMM TECH Thank you. 

GODDARD V. You are welcome. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CDT 1351, GET 7402 267/1 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We'd 

like to give you a heck on your Mission time, over. 
sc Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. On my mark it will be 

74 hours, 14 minute, even. Stand by, mark J*' l *r 

sc Roger, Houston, Apollo 10. We re 

synced right on with you. 

CAPCOM Charlie Duke gave Tom Stafford that 

„.rk 2 second, early because Apollo 10 is at a distance now 
" which there is a 2 second delay in c^™ 1 "^ 0 ™ ' e 

PA n This is Apollo Control. There are 

five astronauts at the CAPCOM console at the present time. 
IV.tVo regular CAPCOM. for this shift, Charlie Duke and 
Bruce Mc£andle.s, and in addition, Gordon Cooper, Commander 
! e b«Iu c»« for Apollo 10. Ed Mitchell, the backup 

LrM Pit, and br. Jack Sch.itt, the scientist astro- 

n." who a geologist and who ha. worked with this crew on 
lunar geology. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1406, GET 7417 268/1 



SC Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10, 

SC Roger. Been reading our DSKY ? 

CAPCOM Roger, sure have. That shows the 

star angle difference and the P52 and also the torqulng 
angles, over. 

SC Roger. Looks real good. We've 

also done our sextant star check and we're right on. We've 
pulsed around here to the maneuver attitude, and we're just 
standing by. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, we show you in attitude. 

And 10, Houston. We have an hour and 26 minutes to LOS, 
over. 

SC Roger, 1 + 26 to LOS. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. Do you have 

any updates as to when we will have sunrise on this pass? 
CAPCOM Stand by. 

CAPCOM Hello, 10, Houston. We show sun- 

rise at 74 hours and 50 minutes and 11 seconds, over. 
SC Roger, 745011. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT : 1433, 74:44 GET 269/1 



PAO This Is Apollo Control at 74 hours 

and 44 minutes and Charlie Duke is talking to Gene Cernan. 
SC Hello Houston; Apollo 10. 

CC Go ahead 10; over. 

SC I cycled the cryo fans at about 71 

hours; should we go chead and cycle them again before this 
burn ? 

CC Stand by . 

CC Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like 

you to stir up the cryos again when you normally do it in the 
preburn checklist; over. 

SC Okay, fine. And Houston, in looking 

at the earth right now, looking at the south Atlantic off the 
coast of South America, in about the center of the globe, 
is a very bright, very, very bright reflective light you can 
see it with the naked eye and then again see it with the 
monocular; its a very brilliant spot, just a spot, intense 
light from the earth. 

CC Roger; in the South Atlantic, 10? 

Ove r . 

SC Yeah, I think it looks to me like 

its right smack in the middle of the subsolar point. Just 
a continuous white, bright, brilliant light - just a pin- 
point . 

CC 10 - Houston - we'll check it out 

with the guys in the back and see if they think that's the 
subsolar point or Just a reflection - angle of incidence 
type thing; over. 

SC I'm sure its Just a reflection but 

its the first time I've ever seen anything like that. 

CC Roger; we'll see if we can come up 

with some ideas - 

SC As a matter of fact its - 

Okay, the brilliance of the light is just now fading and it 
definitely is in the middle of the subsolar point and its 
- the reflection is totally gone at this time. 

CC Roger; copy. 

SC But when it was there, it was bright 

and brilliant. 

CC Copied; over. 

CC Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We have 

2 comm switches for you, so we'll switch you in lunar orbit 
comm configuration. These are S band auxiliary to down- 
voice backup and tape recorder forward to forward. Over. 

SC Roger Charlie. Do you want those 

now? 



APOLLO 10 COMMENT AM. 5/21/69. CDT : 1433. 74:44 GET 269/2 

That's affirmative, 10, over. 
Okay - tape recorder to forward; 



rr That's affirmative, 10, over. 

*c Okay - tape recorder to forwai . 

and l"l go down voice backup - does that also mean you want 



the voice switch to OFF? 

cc That's negative, 10; over. 

ZZ Okey doke. We are now in down voice 

backup; tape recorder is forward and that's the only two 
Chan8 "' That's affirmative 10. And we've 

pulled the room and you are GO for LOI ; over. 

PAO ^" k is°Apollo Control at 74 hours, 

5 minutes, 2 3'seconds from the LOI burn. 

, r Here comes the sunshine. 

r r We copy 10; at 74:50 thereabouts. 

That 'a riaht. It's nice to have a 

CC Roger; we copy 10. 

II How do they compare with the CMS? 

cp The stars are better. 

p A0 That was John Young reporting sunrise. 

cr Preset point. 141,* 
We'll take one next time around Gordo. I'll bet it look, like 

Vulture's Row down there today, doesn t it. 

cc Yep. You can t stir em witn a 
stick down here. & ^ in ^ flight 

plan and we certainly appreciate the insert that you put 
in there. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. ^ e _ 9 ^ 1 J^* V « n 

autiful vi 

hatch window. 



or Houston, At>ui*" **. . - 

* beautiful view of the earth right out through the cen er 

cc Roger, 10; we copy; that s a pretty 

8 °° d sc 6 ' I>°n't let 'em fool you Charlie; it 

iooks^like a dime to-. ^ ^ comment there 

at th J c la8t ' pred 8ay8 when it gets to look the 

size of a squash ball, let him know. 

S?n ThTbackup Command Module Pilot Donn 

Eisele^as Joined the'rest of'the backup crew here in the Control 
Room. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT : 1433, 74:44 GET 269/3 

PAO Apollo 10 Is 3 012 miles from the 

moon, velocity 5201 feet per second. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 74:54, CDT 1443 270/1 

rc Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like 

you to select OMNI ullage so we'd get a couple of minute, 
of high bit rate. Oj...^ ^ ±- lQ> Yqu Qught tQ 

h * Ve 2S5o? arllt 10. We're reading you 5 by. Out. 

sf Houston. Apollo 10. We'll start through 

the P 30 p and P40 series^ . pitching. 

cr Okay, Charlie. 

" 0 This is Apollo Control at 75 hours 14 

away from the lunar orbit insertion burn. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1504, GET 7515 271/1 

This tape Is blank. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1518, GET 75:29 272/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 75 

hours, 29 minute*. Apollo 10 Is 1134 nautical miles from 
the moon. Lunar reference to velocity 6,345 feet per 
second. Tom Stafford has just informed us that he is 
going into some of the computer programs preparatory to 
the LOI burn. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. We'll start 

through the P30P40 series now. Over. 

CC Roger, 10. Standing by. 

SC Okay. And we know what that is. 

That is due to the conic intergration. 

CC Roger. 

PAO The command module computer is 

now in program 40, the service propulsion system thrusting 
program, as the Apollo 10 crew gets prepared for the 
lunar orbit insertion No. 1 burn which will take place • 
22 minutes, 20 seconds from now. They will be behind the 
moon at that time behind the contact with the earth. Loss 
of signal 14 minutes, 39 seconds from now. Apollo 10 is 
reported to be maneuvering to burn attitude at this time. 
The LOI maneuver will b« « retrograde burn with the 
spacecraft pitched up 22 degrees. There will also be some 
out of plane component in this burn to take care of the 
rest of the maneuver needed to place Apollo 10 on the 
proper inclination across the lunar equator. The first part 
of this maneuver was done during mldcourse burn, be completed 
during the LOI burn, 

SC We can read our DSKY, we've 

trimmed and we're In a trim attitude and as far as our check 
list we are minus 6 minutes, waiting. 

CC Roger. We copy, 10. We have you 

holding at minus 6 minutes. 

CC 10, Houston, one reminder. On 

the high bit rate, it's 30 seconds. Over. For the burn. 

SC Roger. Understand. Go to high 

bit rate. We've got that on our checklist, we'll make 
sure we'll go there 30 seconds prior to the burn. 

CC Roger. 

PAO Following a good LOI burn Apollo 10 

will be on the exact ground track that Apollo 11 will have. 

SC Houston, we've got a bunch of 

clocks running in here, but just in case, give us a sync 
hack in 10 minutes, will you? 

CC Roger. We'll give you a hack 

in 10 minutes. Over. 

PAO Apollo 10 is now 9 minutes away 

from loss of signal. It's distance from the moon is 681 
nautical miles, velocity 6,916 feet per second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1528 GET 7539 273/1 



SC Houston, Apollo 10. Just tried 

looking out as far as we could out the top hatch window, 
still can't tee the moon but we'll take your word it's 
there. Over. 

CC Roger. 10. That's a guarantee- 

its there. Over. 

SC Okay . 

PAO That was a trusting Tom Stafford. 

SC It's there plus 60 miles. 

CC I'll guarantee you on that. 

CC Our Trench guys - guarantee 60 by 

170 on your, if you can burn on the P40 number. 

SC Man the beers on me. If it's 60 

by 170. 

CC We'll take that. 

SC And if it ain't, we don't have to 

worry about it. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan. 

PAO And we're coming up on 3 minutes 

to loss of signal. Mark 3 minutes. 

SC Apollo 10, Houston. On my mark It will 

be 10 minutes to ignition. Over. 

SC 10 Roger. 

CC Apollo 10, stand by for mark 

10 minutes. Mark 10 minutes ignition. 
SC We're synched. 

CC Roger. 

PAO And again he gave you that mark 

2 seconds early to allow for the lag time in communica- 
tions . 

SC Apollo 10, Houston. 2 minutes 

to LOS everybody here says got to be. 

SC Okay and then we'll see you on 

the other side in orbit. 

CC Roger. 76,22,55. 

SC We'll be calling you. 

PAO There's LOS right on the numbers. 

And as Apollo 10 and its crew goes behind the moon they're 
7 minutes 16 seconds away from the lunar orbit insertion 
burn. That burn scheduled for 75 hours, 55 minutes, 53 
seconds. Total Delta-V of 2,982.4 feet per second. Burn 
time of 5.54 minutes 5 minutes, 54 seconds. 

PAO This Is Apollo Control. As 

Apollo 10 went behind the moon we were showing a distance 
of 256 nautical miles from the moon, velocity of 7,770 
feet per second and a spacecraft weight of 93,281 pounds. 
They were in a good lunar orbital insertion burn. We 
should reacquire Apollo 10 in 20 minutes, 52 seconds as 
an elapsed time of 76 hours 22 minutes 58 seconds. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1528 GET 7539 273/2 



PAO Mark 3 minutes to LOI bum. We 

won't know how this maneuver has gone until we acquire 
Apollo 10, as it comes around the front of the moon. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1543, GET 7554 274/1 



POA One minute to LOI. 5 seconds. 

Ignition in Apollo 10 should be burning now. And at that 
time of ignition Apollo 10 was 98.4 nautical miles from the 
Moon, 215,847 nautical miles from Earth. We have 2 clocks 
counting in the control room now. The top clock reading AOSCM, 
It reads 25 minutes, 8 seconds. That's the acquisition of 
signal time with a good LOI burn. The bottom clock reads 
14 minutes, 24 seconds and that is the acquislton time If 
Apollo 10 did not perform the burn. Flight Director, Chria 
Kraft describes the attitude in this Control Center now as 
anticipatory. It's very quiet in this Control Room right 
now. A few conversations going but not very many. Most 
controllers sitting at their consols very quietly. The 
entire Apollo 10 backup crew is here in the Control Center, 
Gordon Cooper, Don Eisele, and Ed Mitchell, 2 CAPCOMS , Charlie 
Duke and Bruce McCandless . Jack Schmitt is still here. Deke 
Slayton, the Director of Flight Crew Operations is here talk- 
ing at the moment with Dr. Robert Gilruth the Director of MSC. 
George Low the Apollo Spacecraft Program Manager is here 
with Chris Kraft, the Director of Flight Operations. Lt. General 
Samuel Phillips the Apollo Program Director is seated next 
to them. On the other side of General Phillips is George 
Hage , the Mission Director. We understand that Dr. Kurt 
Debus, the Director of the Kennedy Space Center and Dr. 
von Braun, the Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center 
are in the viewing room. We'll try to get a list of some 
of the other people in the viewing room. And this is 
Apollo Control. Among other distinguished visitors in the 
viewing room are Dr. George Mueller, the Associate Administrator 
for Manned Space Flight NASA, Mr. Lou Evans, the President 
of Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, the prime con- 
tractor for the Lunar Module, and the Vice President for 
Space of that company, Joe Gavin. The manufacturer of the 
Command Module, Charlie Brown, is represented by William 
Bergen, President of the Space Division of North American 
Rockwell. And Rusty Schweickart who was the Lunar Module 
Pilot on the Apollo 9 mission is in the viewing room. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69. CDT 1518, GET 76:09 275/1 

PA0 and the lunar map has replaced 

the world map on the big board in front of the control room. 
We are a minute 23 seconds away from the time we ahould 
acquire Apollo 10 if the lunar orbit insertion burn was 
not performed. We are 11 minutes 45 seconds away from 
acquisition of signal with a good lunar orbit insertion 
burn. 

PA0 and we've past the time for 

AOS if we didn't have a burn and there is no data. As 
Chris Kraft just said, "SILENCE" ; and he counted down the 
last five seconds of that time out loud. 

PA 0 We are 6 minutes away from the 

time we should be hearing from Apollo 10. 

PA 0 3 minutes, 56 seconds away. We 

are waiting. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 16:08, GET 76:19 276/1 

PA0 We 1 re waiting. 

PA0 Mark 2 minutes. 

p A 0 One minute. 
PAO 
listening. 
PAO 



une miuuLc. 

Everyone here is watching displays and 
30 seconds. 



PAO 10. 
PAO We have AOS. 

pao We are getting data. We don't have any 

voice communication yet, but at the time we got data indicate, 
that was a very good burn. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Over. 

SC Roger, Houston. Apollo 10 can tell the 

unr ld that we have arrived. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. If. good to hear from you. 

gj Boy, you wouldn't believe this thing. 

PA0 That was John Young. 

sc The guidance was absolutely fantastic, 

and we'll give you the - the burns right now. 

sc This engine is just beautiful. 

S C Charlie, my hat's off to the guys in the 

trench. I love 'h«. ^ thmt m , n that run8 MS FN . 

CAPCOM I don't know whether 1 can do that or not, 

but I'll say thank you.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

burns? 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SC Yeah. Say thank you big. You ready to 

copy the post burn report? 

^ PC ° M otay^tSe'bum was on time. The burn tim. 

was 5 plus 56. Our real pitch and yaw and angles S^fnce 
was all good. Our residuals were 0 minus .2 and 0. DELT A VC 
read 7.0 - that's minus 7.0. The fuel remaining is 37.7 per- 
cent. Oxidizer is 39 - 



END OF TAPE 



10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1615 GET 7626 277/1 



sc -fuel remaining is 37.7 percent, 

oxidizer is 39.5 percent. The unbalance I liked to talk 
about the present unbalance is 500 increase. We re xn 
a 169 1 by a 59-6. The chamber pressure increased 
smoothly throughout the burn from 98 to 103 with no 
apparent discernible jump at 2nd ball valve initiation. I 
take that back Charlie. It bounced up to 98 and then 
slowly from 98 to 103 with all 4 ball valves on. The un- 
balance-are you still with me? 

cc Roger. Go ahead. Standing by. 

° Ver " sc Okay. I watched the unbalance 

go from where we left it at 200 decrease from the short 
burns. I didn't touch it until after everything settled 
down after we were in a burn for 30 minutes. At that 
time the unbalance was 300 to 350 decrease. I put the 
oxidizer flow valve in a decrease position. I brought it 
up to zero. I closed it and then it started on up. After 
it had about 150 increase it put it to increase and it held, 
it barely held it, and it creeped up from like 250 to the 
present point at 500. I actually neutralized the flow 
valve at about 20 seconds before the burn ended and when 
I put it to normal, valve increase went from about 400 to 

500 ' cc Roger. We copied 10. It looks 

like you really having a rise. It was a great burn. 

sc And the oxidizer, the oxidizer fuel 

remaining agree very accurately with the onboard graph I 
have of the unit pressure which is about 1 750 right now. 

cc Rog- We c °py 10 - 

sc And the first view I had of the 

moon was reflected in the overhead window of the LM. How 
does that grab you? 

CC That's great. 

p A0 That's Gene Cernan with the post 

burn report. 

sc Hello Houston. You'd have to see 

this planet to believe it. 

C C Roger 10. We've got the FIDO looking 

at your radar. Residuals are very small. Give us a chance 
to track a while and we'll confirm. Over. 

SC Okay Charlie. You don't think 

its go. I think it's confirmed as far as I'm concerned. 

cc Rog. We're committed 10. It 

looks that good. 

PA0 That's John Young that's convinced 

there . 

CC How's the view 10? 

SC We have our student geologists here 

overlooking the surface and they'll report in a minute. 



APOLLO 10 MIS8IOM COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1615 GET 7626 277/2 



CC Roger. Standing by. Over. 

SC Okay. We ' r« j us t passing from 

the highland* over into the MAM area and you can pass on 
to Jack we caught a couple ef real pretty volcanos, there's 
no doubt about it and we got a couple of good high resolution 

SC -photes and it still looks kind 

of brownish gray to us here, over. 

CC Roger, we cepy . Here eut. 

SC There were places back there wher 

this and that. There was one volcano, whatever it was, 
it was all white on the outside but definitely black on top 
of it. 

CC Roger. 

SC Charlie. It might sound corny but 

the view is really out of this world. 

CC Roger, (laughter) Ve had a couple 

of comments (laughter) from the back row that I won't 
repeat . 

PAO Those first words we have received 

were from Ton Stafford and John Toung commented and then 
Gene Cernan gave the post burn report. That was also 
Tom with reporting two volcanos and then John Young came 
back in with the description of what looked like a volcano 
black around the top. 

CC Hello Apolle 10. Houston. We 

have a map update for Rev 2 if yeur ready to copy. Over. 

SC Stand by. 

SC Okay Charlie. Go ahead. 

CC For LOS 774759, 775827, 783119. 

we've got a sun rise time of 775140 and a sunset of 791333. 
Better put your rate back over. 

SC Okay Rev 2 is 774759, 775827, and 

783119. Sunrise is 775140 and sunset Is 791333. 

CC Roger. 

CC 10, Houston. According to our maps 

we have you coming up on the sep of waves and to your left 
Langrenus. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 76 hours, 

34 minutes and as you've heard Gene Cernan reported that 
burn was right on time. Duration was 5 minutes, 56 seconds. 
And the murmur of almost unbelieve ran through this Control 
Center when they read out those residuals. Zero minus 
two-tenths and zero. The onboard reading of the orbit 
lunar orbit for Apollo 10 was 169*1 nautical miles at the 
burn 59.6 nautical miles percynthion. We were shooting for 
60 by 170. 

SC See the Sea ef Crises up here. 

That's the first real thing seems to 

recognize it. Boy its really stands out. 

CC Roger. We copy. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1615 GET 7626 277/3 

PAO That was John Young reporting he 

could see the Sea of Crises - stands out very well. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. One thing 

about the orbital light up here in the track. It's con- 
siderably slower than around the earth. 

CC Roger. We copied 10. Over. 

SC Also looking out at the horizon, 

some of the mountains we can see down here that's going 
to be a real pic tomorrow down at 50,000 feet. Over. 

CC We copy that. 

PAO That was torn Stafford. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69. CDT 1625, GEI 76:36 278/1 



SC over. 

CC We copy that. 

PAO That was Tom Stafford. 

CC 10, we're expecting an appropriate 

comment tomorrow. 

SC We'll use the right words. This 

will be our fox, Charlie. 

CC Roger. 

PAO And the people in the trench that 

the crew showered the praise on are the Flight Dynamics 
Officers whose consoles are on the front row in the control 
center. That area is referred to as the trench. 

PAO And Fido wants to get some tracking 

before he commits himself on the orbital parameters, but 
he expects them to be right on nominal. Very, very close. 

SC We've got Langrenua now out here 

off the — it depends on which way you roll, but off to the 
one side here. Very beautiful sharp peak right in the center. 

CC Copy, 10. 

SC Yes, and it appears our water 

boiler is working, too. 

CC Roger, we confirm that. We picked 

it up a moment ago. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston, we are working 

on a time for you to cross to site 1 and did you attempt 
to call a second ago. Over. 

SC Negative. I don't think so, Charlie. 

Over . 

CC Roger. 

PAO We are showing spacecraft weight 

now at 69,493 pounds. Apollo 10 losing a lot of weight 
in that long LOI burn. The weight at LOS was 93,281 
pounds . 

CC Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. We 

have a time crossing a latitude for -- correction, longitude 
for site 1, 764900. Over. 

SC Go. Roger. 

SC Roger, Charlie, and I think we are 

coming over the taruntius twins now. Looks like we've got 
them real clear. 

CC Roger. WE copy, 10. What is your 

early estimate of landmark tracking ability. Jack do a good 
job for you? You've got a lot of good landmarks? 

SC Starting to look just like 

Nasa Road 1 out there now. 

CC Sounds really great. Over. 

SC Roger. Just wait until this 

afternoon. At the speed we are traveling, that TV camera 
with the zoom should really give you a fantastic picture. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1623, GET 76:36 278/2 



CC Wa ' r« standing by. 

PAO Masa Road 1 Is the road in front 

of the Manned Spacecraft Center* 

SC Hey Charlie, you will be glad to 

know we are walking right up our LM chart, right up our 
track in the Apollo ridge right new. We've just seen 
the four Tareatlus, Papa Kilo, Hotel and Ceorge, we've seen 
Big Tarentlus. We're leaking at Messier and Messier A and 
Secchl K ought to be oeaing up — and that's Sacohi. 

CC Roger. We copy, 10. We are 

following along with you. 

PAO That was Gene Cerman calling out 

those landmarks along the ground track. 

SC We're 11 right now, cost to 

think of it. 

CC Roger, we copy. 

SC Houston. Secchl Is very well 

defined as we cone to the Apolle ridge. The rill perpen- 
dicular to the ridge and parallel te the ridge is very 
well defined in this area. The chicken track area Is 
very easy to see from this altitude. 

CC We copy, 10. 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1635, GET 7646 279/1 



CAPCOM 10, Houston. If you near 

site 1, if you get a chance could you comment on the volcanic 
cones on the highlands south of track, over.. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. We're 

right over Serenitatis at this time at least through my 
hatch window, over. 

CAP COM Roger, Tom. We copy. We're 

plotting you right along, over. 

SC And I've got the terminator 

out my window coming up. It sure makes the landscape look 
a little different. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. Could you comment 

on the shadows as you come up to the terminator and your 
ability to detect land marks in that area, over. 

SC I think it's going to be real 

good. Just like the 8 guys said, you can see down into these 
shadows . 

CAPCOM Roger, good show, John. 

SC Like, I'm looking at - down 

at one crater and their's a crater that's underneath the 
shadow but I'm not having any trouble at all seeing it from 
here . 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Okay, we've reached 208 inertial 

and we'll just hold this attitude around since this is the 
same attitude as per Flight Plan. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SC There is no doubt about it. 

This Mare area out here is darker than the other. It looks 
like it's turning nearly black where before looking out 
there looks like a light shade of grayish-brown and I bet 
that TV camera will show it to you pretty good, over. 

CAP COM Roger, we're standing by for 

the TV and stop in orb rate at 208 inertial, over. 

SC Charlie, I got Theophilus 

right on the terminator here and you can see well down into 
it. It's got a very pronounced central peak which is not 
nearly as high as the rim and its got a little rim crater 
just on the inside which is very easily distinguishable. 
And in just preceeding it at 30 east and about 11 south, the 
small crater preceeding it in contrast has no central peak 
that's visible. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We've located you 

on a map. Go ahead, Tom. 

SC Yea, well I'm right over 

Maskelyne and Maskelyne B now to be leading right into land- 
ing site 2. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1635, GET 7646 279/2 



CAPCOM Roger, we've - keeping a check 

on all your systems. Everything looks great to us. You've 
got a great spacecraft. 

SC And Sidewinder Rill and Diamond- 

back Rill stand out just tremendous here. We're just about 
to cross the terminator. 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC Boy, that's really something 

there. I don't see why the fish aren't dumped down that 
creek. And Torricelli is off to the right on foreward 
window very easily distinguishable at this Sun angle. Those 
Rills are something else again. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. We'll have you 

coming up on site 2 at 7653. You might be too dark at that 
point but that's the time, over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. At 208 here 

inertial attitude we're going just about straight down. 
Most of the terrain right down below my window is starting 
to disappear and night time is getting black here but the 
one thing that really stands out was those features that 
we picked out and I guess all the homework has paid off 
because like I said, it's just like NASA Road 1 leading up 
to it, over. 

CAPCOM Sounds really great. We've 

got our friendly geologist back here grinning and looks 
like we're going to be go for all the land mark tracking 
and everything then. 

SC Okay, and I've Just picked 

up Moltke down below. I can just see a little bit of a 
white rim and the rest is black. Landing site 1, pardon 
me, landing site 2 is completely in the black but I can 
see half of the rim of Moltke and that's about it. We're 
now passing into darkness. 

CAPCOM We copy, over. 

SC Jack although this is, Charlie, 

although we're going into this backward it's still amazingly 
easy to pick up these land marks as we're going into the 
landing site. Especially the one that we've worked on a lot 
more heavily. 

CAPCOM Roger, understand, 10. Do 

you have your are you - 

SC We should be looking down. 

We're looking down right now as Tom said, right over site 2. 
It's in darkness and we've got a lot of reflected Sun off 
the LM but right over in the Survayer 5 area also but it's 
also In darkness at the present tine. Also you can - the 
feature we called US 1 stands out real wall. It disappears 
in the darkness right by Moltke and the area over to the 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1635, GET 7646 



SC right, there's no doubt there's 

been some volcanism in there and that's what we term the 
Oklahoma hills, over. 

CAPCOM We copy, 10. We thought you 

had your descent strip chart out. We're breaking our'e out 
now . 

SC I knew he'd name something 

"Oklahoma Hills." You notice he got that out on the first 
REV too. Charlie, Theophilue is still visible out my side 
window. It's still vieible, Thaophilus is still visible 
out my side window and it's right on the terminator and it's 
beautiful the way the shadows are falling in it. If you 
would believe this, the only thing that is lit in Theophilus 
is the back rim and the central peak in the center of it. 
The central peak looks like it's going to last just about 
as long in sunlight as the far rim. 

CAPCOM 10, roger. We copy. 10, 

Houston. We'd like you to elaborate a little bit on your - 
the Rills that you commented on about 5 minutes ago. The 
Diamondback and the Sidewinder, over. 



END OF TAPE 



V 

APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 16:45, GET 76:56 280/1 



CAP COM 10, Houston. We'd like you to elaborate 

a little bit on your - the rills that you commented on about 
5 minutes ago - Diamond Back and Sidewinder. Over. 

SC Okay. I'll tell you, from my experience 

around the earth, you can tell Jack it looks like Canyon Diablo 
out there in New Mexico. They're definitely dropped down with 
sharp walls. It doesn't look like there is any build-up 
along the aides. It's just straight down like a crommet. At 
least from this angle up here - for at least 60 miles, it 
looks like they're straight down. It kind of looks something 
like Canyon Diablo, and we'll give you better description 
tomorrow at 50 000. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy - 

SC Oh, also. U.S. 1 - U.S. 1 looks like it's 

got pretty vertical edges, but again this is from 60 miles. 
We'll give you a better description tomorrow. Over, 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. In the rills, can 

you see - do you think you can see the bottom of the thing? 
Do you see any boulders or anything down there? It's probably 
pretty difficult from that altitude, but can you comment on 
that? 

SC Charlie, no. 60 miles is too far up. It's 

mostly dark down there at the sun angle. Later on we see some 
around on the other side, but tomorrow we'll give you a 
better description. 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC To tell you the truth, I didn't look that 

close, but It's - the shadow - the shadow that goes down in 
there - it - all you can tell was the rim. You couldn't see 
the bottom of it. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Gene-Oj says that the ones he looked at 

are rounded off at the bottom. 
CAPCOM Rog. 

SC Houston, 10. You might tell Jack that he 

forgot to tell us to practice studying these landmarks standing 
on our head. 

CAPCOM Roger. We - he heard the comment, and 

he'll take care of that for the next flight. We got a - we'll 
have no update for you on your block data for the TEI's, and we 
confirm your abor - your orbit is 60.6 by 170.1 on 8 minute 
tracking. Over. 

SC Rog. 60.6 by 170.1. That agrees pretty 

clos e . 

SC I guess we owe you, don't we? 

CAP COM Not me, the Fido. 

SC Houston, 10. You want me to leave my 

high bit rate switch in HIGH? 
CAPCOM Stand by. 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY, 



CAPCOM 
switch to gi 

CAP COM 

CAP COM 



-21-69, CDT 16:45, GET 76:56 280/2 
i like your bit rate 



10, Houston, 
to LOW . Over. 

Okay. Sorry, 
That's okay. 
Houston, 10. 
Go ahead , 10 . 

Okay. I guess x. «« -.~ « 

on - on the FUG switch as to whether or not you »e 

kr.:v-:^ 2i-.n^r:::i£-. e ..... 

8 0t - — - Standby. We'll get you so.e words on 



I didn't catch that earlier. 



Over. 

I'm looking for some worda 



CAP COM 
that . 

SC 

I'm referring to. 

CAPCOM 
minute. Over. 

SC 

stand about it 



It' 



Roger. We 



the oxidizer flow valves is what 
11 get you some worda in a 



Okay, Charlie. The thing 1 dl ?° ' ' u °l* r " 

It was over 300 decrease ^°»f e ^ ^ and I dosed it, 
just before zero, and I tried to le > the increase 

3 a„d then she started go ^V^uSV..",* W< »y own and in 

position at 150, and then i whole time . I did see it go 
fact, I was losing ground the who t perce nt regime down 

trough the cross-over poin th J^^ u ^ e all P ove r - all over 
to about 51 or so, and she did tlucZU * afterwards . And I 
che place, and ^en seU e d.n .a^af.rw^^^ throughout 
left the oxidizer flow vaive 

that whole part of that b«rn. taRe Qur 

CAP COM f 0 Se a ^ ly r e S ape. We'll give you some 

G and C guys awhile to analyze ta 
word after - on our y ou. 

SC »°y'- Charlie. I never saw nothing like 

!hat . bC „e - when we came - when v-a.e atoun n the back _ 

iiu^:^ «: * ^Yw^fnf^ 

rj"r s h1der„f Sao^and^te Ifd browns in there, and 

near as I can tell there's some brown in that thing. 

CAPCOM ?°J; e l0 ar e a«Tin~ds of shades of gray, 

of course. h b k side that the 

CAPCOM ^ger v-op, °» ™* fae more browna and 

colors are different, that it a pe« to 

hlacks Is that correct o than the MA ^ d±£ t from 

the MARE . One thing^tttt /really .tjnd. out that wa .» < t ^P jess ed 

on me before we got here is that - is a very g 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 16:45, GET 76:56 280/3 

sc difference between - between the - as 

far as elevation is concerned - between the MARE and the 
surrounding terrain - the surrounding highlands Boy this 
is reallv a rugged planet. And I saw a big basin on the 
be side, and 8 we'll have to get around there and look at it 

a8aiT1 CAPC0M It ought to be coming up^in B^inute. 

SC 



XL OUgU L t V u ^ <_ j- e - r - 

Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. We ve got 



c r Hello, Houston, x V . ' ~ ° 

beautiful view of the earth here, and the margin of the n.oon 



enough to pick that up too. 
CAP COM Char - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 16:55, GET 77:06 281/1 



SC TV camera might have enough to pick 

that up too. 

SC Charlie, the craters - the center of some 

of the lighter craters glow as if they're lit by radioactive - 
they just glow in this very low dim light. 

CAP COM Roger. 8 tend by one, 

CAPCOM Hallo, Apoll* 10, Houston. In about 10 

minutes as you cross 45 west, look directly north and see if 
you can see the crater Aristocrus. It's near the horizon - 
the northern horizon. There have been some reports last 
night and the night before of some transient events in that 
crater. Some glowing, and they ware hoping that you might 
be able to give them soma word on that. Over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. We've got it located, and 

that's in the Ocean of Storms about 40 - maybe 47 west and 
about 23 north. Huh? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. It's going to be 

pretty close to the northern horlson, so you might be able 
to see it. Over. 

SC Okay, fine. 

SC Hello, Houston, Apollo 10. Houston, Apollo 10. 

I've got ... on my moon - my earth lias. It's quite a sight 
here. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1705, GET 77:16 282/1 

PA0 Apollo 10 is approaching 40 degrees 

west, now, getting near landing site No. 5 which will be 
north of the ground track and the landing area for 
Surveyor 1 is south of the ground track of Apollo 10. 
10 should pass just a little bit north of Surveyor 1 
before too long. 

sc Houston, this is 10. Over. 

CC Go ahead. 

sc Roger. Okay. We're set up in 

this sleep configuration right now, as far as the roll, 
PITCH and YAW goes and we've got it in Y deadband. 
cc Roger. WE copy that. Over. 

sc — in 10 degree deadband plus or 

minus 10 degrees. That's all we are allowed in this 
sleep configuration, isn't it? 

cc That's affirmative, 10. That is 

what we want. You've got the proper entry. Over. 
S C Hello, Houston, 10. 

CC Roger. Go ahead. 

sc We were not able to see any 

particular activity in the area of aristarchus. lt ' s 
amazing though how well you can once you find the landmark 
navigate in earth shine across the surface of the moon. 
It seems to be very well lit from our altitude here. 

cc Roger, 10. We are hoping we can 

get some TV past the terminators. The TV experts are 
looking at it and we think that we might be able to get 
some. We will let you know next time around. Over. 

sc Well, we can't. The moon past 

the terminators is totally dark as long as we are in 
sunlight, but the minute we go out of sunlight, in the 
darkness outselves, the moon then glows right at us. 
C C 10, we copy. 

SC Houston, this is 10. 

cc Go ahead, 10. Over. 

g C I C an — the LM thrusters stick 

out like a sore thumb in earth shine, too, but they don't 
k*ep us from seeing any of the stars. Up here at night 
it is real well lit up. 

Cc Roger. Understand. In your 

P52 you can recognize everything and no problem that was 
not blocked by the LM. 

sc That's right and thus far, believe 

it or not, we haven't run into anything where the LM 
blocked us from a star. There was one case, but so far 
we have been lucky . 



rr Roger. ^nvvjtM. j--- 

Good thing this is all Field Grade. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1705, GET 77:16 282/2 

qc Houston, Apollo 10. In earth 

Mnp vou can se e way down in the craters. You can see the 
hadow I in the craters fro, the earth shine but the .ore 
you become adapted to it, it's phenominal the amount of 
details you can see. Over. 

CC Roge r , 10 • 

sc it's really what you call Field 

Grade Nighttime Flight, Charlie. 

cc 8 Roger. CAVU, eh? We got you 

SC 

c r Roger. , , 

sc i t ' s what John and I call Commander 6 

Moon in the Navy. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ guys here 

in the CAPCOM con.olj. ^ ^ i ^ figure 

out we're passing now out of the Ocean of Storms into so- 
more rugged country which is very evident on the surface, 
more rugg Rog er t Gene, we are plotting you 

right along. That's a good call. 

8 sc Boy, that engine worked like a 

champ, Charlie. 

CC Roger. 

sc What did you think of those 

reSid CC 1S? Man, that's really great. We 

couldn't believe it when you called them down to us I 
"Know you guys are as happy as clams up there with that 
performance! We are, too, down here. One other thing 
we noticed your sleep attitude here YAW d out about 20 
degrees. We called for a YAW of zero and were wondeung 
what we have. Over. 



because something k e7 V V t orq~ uin g us'over ^at way, but i. 
that going to bother you, or do you want it back to zero. 

cc Stand by . Over. 

sc We'll take it back there. 

sc Roger, Houston. It looks like this 

water boiler keeps torquing us off, because we haven t 
noticed that any pilot is holding inertial anywhere before 
tod particularly on this one little patch we wouldn't expect 

the YAW to get to but it looks like the water boiler 

is torquing us. Over. 

CC Copy, 10. 



Well, we got a YAW of 20 degrees 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1705, GET 77:16 282/3 

sc Either that or there is a big 

MASCOK up north or that g± „ t s Gargo 

up there. We'd like you to take it back to zero YAH and 
let's start over again. Over. 

lc Boy? r this moon is lit up like a 

Christmas tree on the dark side. I don't see the lights, 
but it is well illuminated from the earth. 

PA0 That's John Young. 

That's very descriptive, John. 

gj; i < m a little behind these other guys, 

they ^ ke — ApollQ 10> Houston. John say 

again all about the Christmas tree. Over. 

B gc i said I don't mean lit with 

liahts but it sure is brightly illuminated compared 
wl ?h earth. I am a little behind these other two guys. 
They make me mind the^SKY. ^ yQu get your 

8h are of viewing ti-^also^ ^ ?Q degree8 

west. Should be in the area of the crater Grimaldi. 

sc Houston, just to tell you 

something interesting. It looks like we are coding no 
the termination of earth shine here and we are parting 
to get long shadows on the hills as we go into the earth 
terminator. ^ friendly geologlst says that 

is right. Coming up on us here. 

tr Would you believe you can even 

see down in the craters in the earth shine shadows. Or 
is that going a little too far? 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY. 5/21/69, CDT 1719, GET 77:30 283/1 



sc - see down in their craters and 

the earthside shadows? Or is that going a little too far? 

CAPCOM That's going pretty far there. 

SC Hello Houston, this is 10 . 

CAP COM Go ahead. 

SC Okay* it appears - I can 

recognize at about 30 south and about 80 vest, that big, 
wide gorge, very rounded St the bottom that's bordered 
on one side by the rough mountains and on the other side 
by the corded mountains < 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. 

SC And I can see, I can see 

Schluter with a central peak very, very easily. 

CAPCOM Roger, understand. You got 

Schluter. 

SC Okay. 

POA Schulter is a crater at 85 degrees 

west. 

CAPCOM Hello Apollo 10, Houston. We 

got 86% on the waste water. We need a waste water dump 
whenever you get to it and as soon as you can get to it, over. 

SC We can do it right now. And 

I'm coming into the sleep attitude at this tine. What do 
you want to dump it to, Charlie? 

CAPCOM Roger, down to 25%, over. 

SC Okay. Houston, 10. We got 

indications on the gage here that we're dumping slowly. 

CAPCOM 10, roger. Stand by. 

PAO The Flight Dynamics Officer, 

Phil Schaffer, says further tracking shows the orbit as 
170.6 by 59.7 nautical miles. We ' re still 10 minutes, 45 
seconds away from loss of signal on this first revolution 
of the Moon. Showing velocity of 5,115 feet per second. 

CAP COM Hello 10, Houston. We're 

coming up on 9 minutes to LOS . We'll be standing by for 
your report on the high gain antenna on LOS and AOS pitch 
and yaw position as AOS of 783121, over. 

SC Roger. Boy, this planet is 

really something, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. ■ Elaborate John. 

We heard that twice now. 

SC That's about the only way I 

know how to put it. It's got a lot more character than it 
looks like from sitting down there on the ground. When you 
get up close to it stands out. It's got its own - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 17:29, GET 77:40 284/1 



SC ... and when you get up close it It, it 

stands out. It's got its own features that are certainly 
clearly recognizable and much different than you - than you 
see around the earth. That's for sure. 

CAPCOM Rog, Tom. Wish we were there to look 

at it with you. 

SC Charlie, there's - 

CAP COM Go ahead. 

SC Charlie, there's a - there's a three 

lighting conditions very evident. One is sunlight, earth 
shine, and now we're in pitch darkness although you can still 
see the lunar horizon against the black sky. It's the black 
moon that you can't really see anything on, but there Is 
a definate dis tinguishment of our horizon against the black 
sky when the stars are coming up. And - and both terminators 
are very interesting. Terminator produced by sunlight and 
terminator produced by earth shine are very similar, although 
the earth shine terminator being of a lower light level has 
a very giost like shadowy apperance where the sunlight terminators 
are very definate - definate shart image - #harp shadow image. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. On this - your comment about 

the - in darkness you can see the moon horizon, is that just 
star ... or can you actually see features on the horizon? 
Over. 

SC Charlie, if - if I had"- j-f I had a pencil 

I could draw you a - right across my window, I could draw you 
a horizon. There seems to be a - every since we went into 
total darkness on the surface out of earth shine, there seems 
to be a continued glow from - from behind the horizon which 
lights it up continually, and - but you can't distinguish 
sharp features, but the general terain you can see. 

CAP COM Roger. 

CAPCOM Is that like air glow or the air glow ? 

SC S ay again , ... 

CAPCOM Is that glow similar to the air glow 

lighter here on earth - in earth orbit? 
SC No , not at all . 

CAPCOM Oh, that's good. 

SC Hey, I've been - going off and flying the 

spacecraft, I've just turned around and looked out, and it - 
stars - you can see it's a bright horizon, but it looks like 
it might be the milky way, but the sky is definately lighter, 
and it goes down and clips off. You cannot make some of the 
rough terrain features out about it. It might be that we 
could be right close to the Milky Way out there, but it looks 
like about the same intensity of the Milky Way as you see it 
at night around the earth. It does get lighter over in one 
section, and we'll give you a copy on that later. 

CAPCOM Okay. Go ahead. 



APOLLO LO MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-21-69, CDT 17:29, GET 77:40 284/2 



There's a good sharp horizon there, huh? 
Yeah, I think you could make a cant shot 



SC What's going on out there is - there's 

no air glow at all, it's just a sharp definition between the 
moon surface and this parabolic glow that's out 

CAPCOM 

SC 

SC 

off a horizon like that. 

sc You can tell it has to be well lighted. 

CAPCOM You might make a cant shot, but I'm not. 

SC I didn't even think you knew what that 

me ant . 

CAP COM Oh, I know all the words. 

CAP COM LM launch might be just like a cant shot. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Coming up on three. You 

can terminate your water dump, and you're looking good as yea 
go over the hill. 

SC Roger, Houston. 

PAO And we've lost the signal as Apollo 10 

turns the corner and goes behind the moon. The crew giving 
us a rather graphic description of their first revolution 
around the moon. Shortly after an acquisition of signal on 
this first REV, you heard Tom Stafford calling out some names 
of features that here to fore have not been attached to the 
moon. These are unofficial identifications of features that 
Che crew has come up with. Names such as U.S. 1, the Oklahoma 
hills, Diamond Back Rill, Sidewinder Rill. Then they have 
a number of others. All of these features are primarily 
along on either side of the ground track in the area leading 
down to landing sites 2 - in the approach path of landing 
site 2. We will acquire Apollo 10 on the second revolution 
at an elapsed time of 78 hours, 31 minutes, 19 seconds, some 
41 minutes from now. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENT ART 5/21/69 

PAO -31 minutes from 

Mission Control Houston at 77 hours, 

END OP TAPE 



CDT 1739 GET 7750 285/1 

now. This is 
50 minutes. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1818, GET 7829 286/1 

PAO This 1b Apollo Control at 

78 hours, 29 minutes. We're about 2 minutes away from 
acquisition of Apollo 10 on its second Lunar Revolution. 
Shortly after acquiring with spacecraft, the ground will 
give the crew a go, no go for the LOI 2 burn. This is the 
maneuver designed to circularize the orbit to as near to 
60 nautical miles as possible. This maneuver will take 
place behind the Moon as did the Lunar Orbit Insertion 
number 1 burn. It will come at approximately 80 hours, 
22 minutes. We'll get the precise time when they pasa up 
the update. It'll be a much shorter duration burn but 
again „ith the Service Propulsion System. We're leas than 
a minute now from acquisition time. We'll stand by live 
for first transmission from Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1820 GET 78:31 287/1 



cc Hello Apollo 10. This is Houston 

s tandlng by . 

sc Looked like the RE ACQ mode worked 

pretty well there and then we acquired and read you loud 
and clear. 

cc Roger 10. We had you. Go through 

that again about the RE ACQ . Over. 

sc (Garble) and yaw angle into REACQ narrow 

deadband in this attitude picks you up loud and strong here. 

Cc Roger. Where did the antenna 

go at pitch and yaw at LOS. Over. 

sc Charlie, I'm not sure I can answer that 

one specific question. 

SC 10, Houston. Do you think the antenna 

went to the angle that you had dialed in, or fairly close to 
it. Over. 

sc That's affirmed. It went to those angles 

at LOS . j j j 

sc I went to REACQ and fired LOS and it did 

go to those angles and that's where they stayed and you could 

tell by the way they act. 

CC Roger. Stand by . 

p A0 We're waiting for high bit rate 

telemetry so we can command state vector and some target pads. 

sc Houston, we have a total in our high bit 

rate command in. We'd like you to select high bit rate over. 

CC Hello 10, Houston. Over. 

sc Go ahead. I'll give it to you, Charlie. 

Cc Okay. We've got it. We've got a look for 

you and if you'd give us the computer and accept we'll send you 
up a maneuver pad a correction, a target mode and a state 
vector. Over. 

SC Okay, here approve and accept. 

cc Roger, and we have a L0R2 pad, a TEI 5 pad 

and map update for you if you're ready to copy. 

SC Stand by 1 sec Charlie. 

SC Charlie give me the map update first, would 

you please? 

Cc Roger. It's Rev 3 and we have LOS time of 

795622 800641 AOS 804045. Time of sunrise 800013 and a sunset 
of 811430. Over. 

sc Okay, map update Rev 3 795622 800641 and 

04045 sun rises at 800013 and sets at 811430. 

CC That's affirmed. 

CC 10, we are having trouble ... 

SC Charles, are you ready for a ... 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 1820 GET 78:31 287/2 



CC 10 Houston. We'd like you to go up tele- 

metry command reset to command reset and back to normal. We're 
having trouble getting our commands in. Over. 

SC Okay, command reset back to normal. 

CC Roger and if you're ready to copy I have 

your LOR 2 pad. Over. 

SC Just one sec Charlie. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. Now we'd like 

to up the telemetry reset to off and then back to normal. 
Over. 

SC Okay. Off and then normal and 

then I'm ready to copy. 

CC Roger, 10 here comes the LOR 2 pad. SFS 
G&N 38650 plus 183 minus 074 080 250738 981 is minus 01390 plus 
all balls minus all balls 000209000 and now 44 is 00601 plus 
00601 01390 014 013 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1820, GET 78:41 



cc plus 006010 130901401325 

Sextant star 162205232, rest of the pad is N A , your set 
stars are Vega and Deneb , 241240013, 2 jets at 17 seconds 
on the ullage. Over. „ 0 ^ Crt 

sc Roger. LOI, QSP, G&N 38650 

plu8 183 minus 074 080250738 minus 01390 plus all balls 
minus all balls, ROLL 000, PITCH is 209, YAW is 000. 
00601 plus 6601, 01390, 0141325, Sextant star is 162205232 
Vega and Deneb 241240013, 2 jets at 17 seconds. 

cc Roger. That DELTA VC was 

01324. Over. 

sc Roger that's what I ve 

got written down, 01325. 

cc Roger. Stand by for the TEI pad. 

Over . 

SC Okay . 

cc Hello, 10, Houston. We have 

your primary evap dried out, we'd like you to close the 
back pressure valve. Over. 

SC Okay. Closing it. 

CC 20, Houston. It appears we 

are having a little problem with our ground uplinking 
capability. We'll keep you posted. I have a TEI 5 pad 
if you are ready to copy. Over. 

SC Okay, Charlie. Wait a minute. 

My finger is still on a button here, I'll be right with you. 

sc Go ahead, Charlie, with the TEI 

pad . 

CC 10, Houston. Stand by for 

about a minute. We are going to bring down our 
uplink and you won't hear us for about a minute.^ We 
are going to try to reconfigure ground site. We've got 
problems with our uplink. Over. 

SC Okay. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. The 

time for the lunar orbit insertion No. 2 burn, 80 hours, 
25 minutes, 7 seconds, DELTA V 139 feet per second. 
Duration of the burn will be 14 seconds. For you first 
time, we will be using ullage prior to this burn using 
two of the RCS thrusters, burning those for 17 seconds 
prior to the service propulsion system ignition to 
settle the propellants in the tank. This is necessary 
after that long LOI No. 1 burn, we have a long ullage 
volume in the tank. Not near as many, as much propellants 
as before and we will use ullage to settle those pro- 
pellants before igniting the SPS. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1820, GET 78:41 288/2 

pA0 And if this burn goes as planned, 

we will circular — ^ Hou3tonj ready with the 

TEI 5 pad if you are ready to copy. 0v "- 

%r Okay, Charlie, go ahead. 

J; Roger. TEI5, SPS, G&N minus 

.ith noun 48 is B inu2 06 1 plus 047086191000 plus 364 30 .!»». 
014,2 plus 00546, PITCH „.l. £ I.^OH ^ _ ^ ^ 
had .^.H" .ith o„ r upUn k at Goldston, .._ The, , «. 

configuring now and we'll be with you 
° Ver 'p A O If this next burn goes as 

planned, we will have circularized the orbit at 60.1 
nautical miles. ^ ^ have gQt them over 

the oxydizer flow increase valve to normal and go 
primary. Over. ^ ^ ^ ^ gtay normal ±n 

primary through that whole burn, is that correct? 

r C That's affirmative. We feel 

f . t I"., la so 8 hort that that is the best position and 

for TEI we 11 have a story for you on how we want you 
to operate the plugs. Also for TV, if we try the dark 

n reco Jnd 8 an ALC to inside and an F-stop of 2.2. 

Over . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1840, GET 78:51 289/1 



CAPCOM - also for TV if we try the 

dark side TV recommend a ALC to inside and and F-atop of 
2.2, over. 

SC Okay, we got that Charlie and 

I want you to understand that I did go back to normal about 
20 seconds before the LOI 1 burn ended so that's where I am 
and after I did that I went - my increase unbalance moved 
up probably about a hundred pounds. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Charlie, just for reference 

as to exactly where we are, we're looking right down on 
the top of Messier and Messier A and we'll be - we've got 
Taruntius to one side and we're just right in the middle 
of the Sea of Fertility coming right off the track into the 
landing site. 

CAPCOM Rog, thank you. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We've 

played back the data from behind the Moon during the LOI 1 
time . 

SC You can really see some boulders 

in the bottom of Messier A now. Yea, you can see some 
tremendous boulders down there. 

CAPCOM We copy, 10. We finally got 

Goldstone configured. We're coming up with the load now, 
ove r . 

SC Okay, we are seeing them and 

accepting them. We can see the load coming. 
CAPCOM Rog. 

SC You guys been taking some good 

pictures for us? 

SC Right, and for correlation, 

I've been on the same sites. I've been shooting one black 
and white of the special or I've been shooting one black 
and white and one of the special color on the same reference. 

CAP COM Roger, that's very good, 10, out. 

SC Roger, we think we've got a 

few colors here for you at least you're certain of the ones 
that are real black going into whites and then some browns. 

CAPCOM Rog> we heard your tape on 

the back side during the LOI 1 and seemed like there was a 
disagreement between brownish and bluish there. 

SC The blue was just a little 

remark . 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. If you've got 

a moment to comment on your tape playback from LOI 1 after 
the burn was completed, we heard a comment about "Hey, look 
at that bubble". Could you elaborate on that, over. 



M OLLO 10 MISS ION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69. CM 1840, GET 78:51 289/2 

sc Charlie, I guess It was a 

buW> l. C .f water of "-"hi... «i.ht - .1 S 
u9 f£ ter bun.. I trl.d » t.k. • a Mulsh cryatal . 

don't know if we got it or n where th e LM thrusters 

residual^! the SPS burn^ How large was it, 

Could^ou estimate that^^ ^ ^ ^ ln 

dlS "lr° M O^Vuston"'^* ,i« 

look around there, ^ ^ ma 

CAPCOM Rog, how does the terrain look 

ar „„„d c th.t area? ^ ^ lt , a £ull 

o£ ho «- oM o £ e„ U rsr 8 ::-got rvs.'i.sntr. „«. 

on our map, of course, we gu>- 

real smooth. Charlle> through the binocular 

you can see littie shinny , trash crat era tha^ yo ^ can ^ ...^ 

"i th qu ^: "/few e or;hel h down%here that you can't see,, to 

PlCk CAPCOM na Kog,Te-copy. 10, Houston. 

i i J. m I . can go back to block, over. 
We got the loads in. Vou can g ^ ^ ^ , ^ 

passing right over Mask.Iyne now and ,ohn is shooting back 
at site 1. 

CAPCOM Ro g - his rate> we , re gQing tQ 

™ °cipcoM a11 our '"M*; .Tu5S:.°:- r «::"t;a *„. 

th. geologist back there. ^ personally d 

at how accurate the .aps are at picking out these land .arks 

'CAPCOM' 10, Houston. You can put your 

PCM switch back to low bit rate, over. 
SC Okay. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 1850, GET 79:01 290/1 



SC Houston, Apollo 10. We can now 

see quite a bit more of Moltke as the moon revolves and 
the landing site 2 is rough, it is just barely starting 
to come in. It is still too early to tell much about it. 
Over . 

CC Roger. We copy, 10. 

CC 10, can you see on the CSM lunar 

orbit map the spot marked 112 near site 2? It looks like 
a bright, whiteish crater? Over. 

CC Oh, that's Moltke. Excuse me. 

Sorry about that, 10. 

SC Moltke is very, very easy to see. 

We've seen it both times around. Not only are the rills, 
but the low ridges are very distinguishable approaching 
the landing sites. The sun angle is such that we cannot see 
into the bottom of Diamondback or inside one of their 
rills . 

CC Very good. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. The 

Flight Surgeon is taking a look at the heart rate data now 
from the playback during the L0 I 1 burn. The ignition 
time of that burn was 75:55:53. At 75:55:50 Tom Stafford's 
heart rate was 120. At 75:56:10 was 123, at 75:56:30, it 
was back to 120. At 75:56:30, 40, it was down to 95. 
For the Command Module Pilot, John Young at those same 
times it was 94, 98, 83 and 86. And for Lunar Module 
Pilot Gene Cernan it was 91, 85, 74 and 70. 

PAO Apollo 10 now near the landing 

site 3 area. This is also the area where Surveyor 6 
lan de d. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 19:00, GET 79:11 291/1 



SC 



Houston, Apollo 10. We see the solar 



corona, and it's really beautiful 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. We copy. 

cc What - okay time is it and how long we can 

8 ee it now. We can still see it. The sun went down exactly 
at about 45, and we can still see edges of U. It a 
mostly a long shaft of light, and we can still see it. It s 
still there. 

TAP COM Ro ge r , 10 . 

SC Houston, Apollo 10- It's - the corona 

is still out there. You can see it quite bigger. 
CAPCOM Very good, 10. 

sc And you can see stars and then about - 

I can see some at about 20 degrees of the corona. It s still 

there CAPC0M lie - ^'Ror^n^he TV pass, do you thin* we 
"^Vc 1 ^ Shouldn't be any problem in this attitude. 

If we're in this attitude upside down going away, and we 11 
to from interior to the out there. You should see it as a 
long straight, and right now it's finally started to ade out , 
Charlie. It took a period of nearly 2 minutes that we could 

866 1 CAPC0M 10, how long does the shafting look as 

it comes across. Does it get shorter as you go away or just 
sort of fade out? Over.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ shaftlng , 9 
getting shorter and shorter. There's just a little bit left 
there, and it'll be gone in a few seconds. 
CAP COM Roger. 

sc It spread over an area - a very small 

area of the horizon just right in the vicinity where the sun 
sets. It doesn't go any further either left or right. 

CAP COM Rog. , 

sc Still - still see traces of it. It s 

greately diminished now, but you can still see traces of it. 
Okay, we'll get on with that P52. 

CAPCOM Be good, 10. ffnrA 

PA0 Most of that description was by Tom Stafford 

with Gene Cernan coming in right there at the - along toward 

thg 1 p A Q* We have about 36 minutes left before loss 

of signal on this revolution number 2. 

p A0 This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 is now 

realigning their inertial measurement unit and shortly should 
be Maneuvering into the attitude for the lunar orbit insertion 
number 2 burn. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-21-69, CDT 19:11. GET 79:22 292/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 is - 

has just passed the 45 degree west longitude line . 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. we'd like to leave 

your bfck pressure va'lve closed for another REV or " looking 
at it, we'll probably go to sleep tonight with it closed. 

° Ver 'p A0 This is Apollo Control. We've lost lock 

on the high gain antenna that was the cause of all that noise. 
It ^appenfd when the spacecraft started maneuvering to the 
burn attitude. We're apparentely on the omni s now. 

Q Apollo 10 is 22 minutes away from loss 

of signal on the second revolution coming up on the 60 degree 
west longitude line in the Ocean of Storms area. 

CAP COM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. If you read 

we'd like you to select omni Charlie. Over. 

CAP CO M Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. Over. 

CAPCOM Hello, Apollo 10, Houston. If you aren t 

already in - on omni Charlie, we'd like you to select omnx 
Charlie. Over. thig ig 10 . Do you read? 

CAPCOM Rog. Gene, reading you about 3-5. Over. 

SC Hello, Houston, Houston, this is 10. How 

d ° y °CAp r C0M ? 10, we're reading you about 3-5. How me? 

Over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1927, GET 79:38 293/1 



CAPCOM Hello 10, Houston, Over. 

Hello 10, Houston. Over. 

SC Roger, Houston. Now I'm read- 

ing you loud and clear. We lost you on high gain. I've 
been waiting to pick you up on omni. We're maneuvering 
out of the burn altitude. 

CAP COM Roger, we're getting low bit 

rate, 10. I don't know whether you copied my last trans- 
mission before we broke lock. We're going to leave the 
back pressure valve closed and watch it for another rev and 
probably for the sleep configuration we'll have it off, over. 

SC Yeah, we got that, Charlie. 

Thank you. Houston, this is 10. Can you recommend an 
omni for the burn? 

CAPCOM Stand by . 

SC For the burn attitude before 

LOS . 

CAP COM Roger, 10. We copy. Your 

best omni is Charlie, over. 

SC Okay, that's where I am now 

so I'll stay there. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Houston, this is 10. On the 

last pass on the back side, we're pretty sure we identified 
through the optics going backwards, CPl and CP 2 . 

CAPCOM Rog, 10. It really sounds 

great, over. 10, did you call it up or did you just 
manually track, over? 

SC Just manually tracked. If 

we'd have called it up that would have shot our wide deadband 
out of the sky . 

CAPCOM Rog. 

PA0 That was John Young reporting 

they could see the selected land marks on the back side of 
the Moon. Flight Director Jerry Griffin is taking a status 
check h ere . 

SC You wouldn't hurt the wide 

deadband. Would you check on that for us. 

CAP COM Rog, stand by, 10. 10, Houston. 

You can call up any program, it'll collapse the deadband 
back down , ove r . 

SC That's what I was afraid of. 

Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. Over. 

SC Okay, I'm looking ahead in 

the Flight Plan to 81 hours when we really start getting 
busy there. One thing we're going to want to do is we want 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 1927, GET 79:38 293/2 

gc - to delay the canister change 

and also that fuel cell 02 purge until afterwards. The C02 
content is real low and delaying it an hour or two isn t 
going to hurt a thing. And we want to get through that 
busy time without any interruptions so we're recommending 
delaying there at 8120 the canister change and the fuel 
cell 02 at 8140 until after we get through most of this 
activity, over. 

CAPCOM We concur will all that, 10. 

SC Roger. 

p A0 We have 10 minutes of acquisition 

time left in this pass and we're 39 minutes away from the 
LOI 2 burn. This will be another retrograde burn with the 
spacecraft pitched up 10 degrees. 

SC Houston, Apollo 10. We ve 

already completed the program 30. Do you want us to go 
into 40 before we lose you at LOS? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'd like to see a 

P 40 , 10 . Over . 

SC Coming up. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 19:38, GET 79:49 294/1 



PAO P40 is the service propulsion system 

testing program in the command module computer. 

SC Are you all getting the high bit rate now? 

CAPCOM That's negative. We got your low bit rate. 

We're seeing at program 40. 

SC Rog. In other words you can read all that 

stuff, you need high bit rate up with you. Huh? 

CAP COM 10, we can command the low bit rate even, 

but it takes a little bit longer. We got some parameters on 
our low bit rate, but all your DISKY's stopped so that we can 
see low bit rate. Over. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Coming up on a 5 

minute LOS. You're looking good. Go on over the hill. We'll 
see you AOS 80:40:47. Over. 

SC Roger. 80:40:47. 

CAPCOM And 10, one more update for you after 

your maneuver, after LOI 2 as we come around the horn the 
high gain antenna for the COM will be a pitch of a minus 55. 
Over . 

SC ... pitch of 55. What about the yaw? 

CAP COM It's still good. 

SC Okay. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 79 hours, 55 minutes. 

We're still showing 40 seconds to loss of signal, but the noise 
has stopped. It appeared we have broken a lock there. We've 
got about 30 seconds left till the loss of signal. 

PAO And we do have loss of signal now. We're 

28 minutes, 30 seconds away from lunar orbit insertion number 2 
burn. The maneuver by which we will circularize Apollo 10's 
orbit. We've targeted for a circular orbit of 60.1 nautical 
miles. We're presently showing Apollo 10 in a lunar orbit 
of 170.7 by 60.1 nautical miles. A review briefly, this 
upcoming burn, it will be service propulsion system, retrograde 
with the spacecraft pitched up 10 degrees. Ignition time is 
80 hours, 25 minutes, 7 seconds while Apollo 10 is behind 
the moon and out of contact with the earth, we will have to 
await acquisition of signal and a post burn report from the 
crew to find out how it went. A DELTA-V of 139 feet per 
second, duration of the burn 14 seconds. We will next 
acquire Apollo 10 at 80 hours, 40 minutes 47 seconds. 42 minutes 
and 37 seconds from now. This is mission control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 2014 GET 80:25 295/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control and we should be 

burning now for the LOI 2 burn. This was a short burn - 
U seconds in duration. We'll know when we acquire the 
spacecraft in about 15 minutes how this burn went The 
first thing we'll get is a burn report. And *}"° B 
the moment of acquisition we were changing shifts in the 
Control Center. The maroon team with Flight Directo 
Milton Windier will take over right after the acquisition 
of signal. And a short time after we have acquired, we 
should have our first TV show of the lunar ^ rfa "; As 
you've heard Tom Stafford talking, he hopes to be able to 
brine a pretty good show with the color TV. Our best 
estimate right now on the change of shift news conference 
time is 9:3? PM Central Daylight Time. We'll try to keep 
Jou updated on that time with the best estimate at present 



is 9:30. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 2028, GET 80:39 296/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 

80 hours, 39 minutes. We're expecting to reacquire Apollo 10 
now, in about 1 minute, 50 seconds at which time we expect 
to get a report from the crew immediately on the LOI 2 
maneuver that was performed on the back side of the Moon. 
Here in Mission Control we've completed the change of shift. 
Flight Director Milton Windier has relieved Flight Director 
Jerry Griffin. Our Capsule Communicator on this shift 
will be astronaut Joe Engle. Ten seconds now until AOS. 
We have conformation of AOS now. We'll stand by for the 
Capsule Communicator to put in a call to the crew. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston standing 

by. Apollo 10, Houston standing by. 

SC Roger, read you loud and 

clear. 

CAPCOM Hey, good show, Gene-o. How 

about a burn report there. 

SC Okay, Joe. We got a good 

burn. The burn was on time. It was 14 seconds. Roll, 
pitch and yaw were nominal. Our residuals were plus .5 
minus .3 minus .4 delta VC was minus 5.6. Fuel remaining 
34.9. Oxidizer 37.1. We now are reading a 600 unbalance 
to the increase. Chamber pressure was steady at 103 and 
we show it to be in a 61.2 by 60 nautical mile orbit. 

CAPCOM Roger, very good, Gene. Thank 

you. Copy all that and we're standing by for your TV when- 
ever you want to go. 

SC Okay, we're about ready on it 

now . 

CAP COM Roger. Apollo 10, this is 

Houston. We'd like for you to do your verb 66 now. 
SC Okay. 

PAO We're standing by now for 

television transmissions from the lunar surface. That burn 
report passed back to the ground by Gene Cernan indicated 
that we got very close to the planned burn. The onboard 
reading was 61.2 by 60 and after some tracking on the 
ground we'll have some Mission Control Center figures to 
go along with those from the crew. 

SC Charlie, we've got some TV 

coming down to you now. We'll try and tell you exactly 
where you are in a minute but Tom's looking out the hatch 
window. We're upside down and going backwards at the moment 
so we'll have give it the chance to locate you. 

CAPCOM Okay, Gene-o, fine. We're 

getting the picture now and it looks real good. 

sc Tom's going to try and have 

you looking right at a very bright young raid crater, very 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 2028, GET 80:39 296/2 



SC distinguishable and very bright. 

CAPCOM Okay 10, this is Houston. 

That's a real good picture and we see the crater you're 
talking about. That's an awfully good TV picture. 

SC Okay, we'll be coming up 

on the left aide of your picture on Neper here if Tom 
can scan over to get it. 

CAPCOM Okay, we verify. 

PAO The spacecraft now over 

Smyth's Sea. 

SC We should be coming right over 

the Smyth's Sea right at the present time. 

CAPCOM Roger, that's affirmative and 

the was Fl you were showing us there just a minute ago, Gene-0. 

SC Roger, okay. I've got this 

at full zoom. Do you like it at full zoom or do you want 
it back down a little bit? On our monitor it looks like 
we've got some pretty good resolution here. 

CAPCOM You got fantastic resolution, 

Tom. You might back off the zoom just a little bit there 
and give us a little bigger picture, get a little better 
orient. That's good right there, Tom. Apollo 10, this ia 
Houston. We'd like for you to cycle that ALC just so we 
can get a comparison of the picture. Stay there for about 
5 seconds and then go back to your present position. 

SC Okay, we're on inside right 

now and we'll give you a mark when we go to outside. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Okay. Mark it. We're on 

outside now. Joe, can you see we just passed over a rille 
down there. The rille should be in the upper left hand 
corner of your screen. 

CAPCOM Yea, we've got ahead of it, Tom. 

And the outside position on that ALC seems to give us better 
resolution down here than the inside. Hows that compare 
with your - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 2038, GET 80:49 



297/1 



cc The position on that ALC seems 

to give us better resolution here than the inside. How 
does that compare with your monitor? 

sc Same way, Charlie. Outside gives 

us much better. And at this time we are passing over a 
big crater now and can see it with the rear mirror. 

CC Roger. Got. 

Sc And it's got a couple of small 

ones on the inside. Okay. Those little small beacon 
areas are pure white. The rest of the crater is a 
brownish gray with several little spirals of white. How 
does it show up down there? 

C C It still looks exactly the same, 

Tom and that's perfect. 

SC Okay. I've got a real bright 

crater. I'm going to zoom in on the top of it. 
It's pure white and it looks like there may be pieces of 
bolder around on it. I am going to zoom on it. 

cc Okay. We think that may be 

Schubert, Tom. That's great. That detail is just great, 
Tom. 

PA0 We estimate this crater is about 

AO miles in diameter. 

SC Again, for your edification, we 

are upside down going forward to keep the flood off the 
windows and also to conserve fuel. But the rate you see 
there on the monitor, at least what I can see, is exactly 
our orbital rate here. John is maintaining that 315 orb 
rate upside down. 

CC Okay, we copy that. Thank you. 
And, Tom, could you see all the little 

SC Go ahead, Joe. 

CC You know we would like to confirm 

that you are in infinity on your focus. 

SC That's affirm. We are on 

infinity. 

SC As you can see in this area, the 

whole area is marked by these small new craters. They 
are pure white where they stand out and then they fade 
into a grayish - light gray brown into a darker brownish 
gray, as you get to the older areas. 

CC Roger. That is just the way 

it looks 

g q — get into some Maria area. 

I want to tell you you are getting into some marls area, 
I guesB you noticed the bottom of this one, that depression 
here is more brownish, more of a deep brown now. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT 2038, GET 80:49 297/2 



CC Roger. It's looking here exactly 

as you are describing it, Tom. That's just tremendous. 

SC Joe, we should be looking down 

right now on the Foaming Sea and to the left of us is the 
Gruithuisen Basin and we will be coming over the Sea of 
Fertility and the landing site area very shortly. 

CC Roger. 

SC It is amazing the number of new small 

craters are all out right on your screen as a brilliant 
white with a gray pattern usually going through each one. 

CC Roger. They are showing up real 

good, just like that down here on the screen, Tom. 

CC 10, This is Houston. We'd like, 

when you are coming along some of this area here, we'd like 
for you to go all the way from one end to the other on the 
zoom. Give us a mark when you back it all the way off and 
hold it there for about 5 seconds, 5 to 10 seconds and all 
the way back to zoom again. 

SC Okay. Going full off on the zoom 

at this time, coming back on the zoom. 

SC Okay. We'll take you on the right 

side and Gene will show you the crater Langrenus. 

CC You were reading our minds. We 

were just going to tell you to take us over there, if you 
coul d . 

SC We're starting to get it in there. 

PAO Jim Lovell described the terraces 

of this crater on Apollo 8. 

CC Okay, Tom, we are getting that 

picture very good and that is tremendous color you got. 

SC Joe, I don't know if you can see 

Langrenus with its central peaks, but it is an enormous 
crate r . 

CC Roger. It looks pretty impressive 

from the picture we're getting, Gene. 

PAO Langrenus, the crater in the center 

of the screen, is about 90 miles in diameter. 

CC Okay, 10, this is Houston. Whatever 

you did there, if you were playing around with your lighting, 
you gave us a real good picture then. 

SC You're looking right at the central 

peak of Langrenus right now. 

CC We're getting tremendous detail 

Gene. Are you cycling the aperture at all, during this 
time ? 



APOLLO 10, COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 2038, GET 80:49 297/3 



SC Yes, that is what I was doing 

and when I opened it up and then stop it down, my monitor 
just goes very clear for you. 

CC Same here. When you stop it down 

a little bit, we get an awful lot of detail. That's Just 
great. We are getting a real good picture of that 
central peak now. 

CC I wonder if you could zoom in on 

that central peak with that aperture shut down a little 
bit. Oh, you got it. I'm sorry. 

PAO The walls of Langrenus are about 

two miles high and that central peak is about 7,000 feet 
above the floor of the crater. 

SC ' — over here, I'm losing out of 
my window. 

CC Roger. And just for your 

information, your onboard vector looks great. We're 
satisfied with it. 

SC John is going to show you 

Mare Crisium over there on his side. 

CC Okay, we're standing by. 

SC You can see the horizon in the 

distance there. 

CC That is just absolutely beautiful. 

SC On your left on John's side you 

are looking at the Sea of Crises and on the right window 
the Sea of Fertility and we're coming very shortly up upon 
Apollo Ridge out our hatch window. 

SC We're right over we started 

looking straight down over the Mare version of the hills. 
We'll show you the Taruntius twins and Secchi A and B 
and right down Nasa 1 for us. 

CC Tom, the resolution, the detail 

that we're getting is Just unbelieveable . This is just 
great. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/2 1/69 CDT 2048 GET 8059 298/1 



SC We ain't getting bad detail light 

up here. 

CC Roger back. 

SC The low flat ridges really do 

stand out here in the MARIA area. 

SC We're coming right up on Taruntiua 

Papa, Kild, Hotel, and Golf here leading into a landing site 
area. 

CC Roger. We're picking them up now. 

SC It appears, looking with the 

binoculars down into a crater like Taruntiua Golf that 
the shadows which appear rather than to be peaked, they appear 
to be slight and small boulders of some sort. 

CC Okay. Are they down in the 

center of the crater, Gene? 

SC Yeah. They all seem to be down 

in the flat portion of the crater. 

SC Hey tell Jack to look at these 

little old ridges we have here. They all look like oh, 
they could be 4 to 500 feet elevated and run in various 
patterns. There standing up pretty good in our monitor 
now . 

CC Roger. We see them real good Tom. 

CC Okay. It appears you're showing us 

front of Delta now Tom. 

SC And eastern on Messier A it appears 

I would have to say, there's boulders on the slope leading 
toward the same direction we're moving. 

CC Rog. 

SC These are thrown out on the rim 

and Secchi Kilo is another one which appears to have 
boulders and you can contrast them very easily from the 
little pinpoint craters around the edge. They just stand 
out differently and if there to be boulders that are out 
on the rim, out on the edges of the rim. 

CC Rog. Which window are you looking 

out of now Gene? 

SC Tom has got it out the hatch window. 

CC Okay. Just for your info, we're 

seeing the RTV on the side of the window and its pretty 
much in focus as is the line of service. 

SC I should have Gutenberg coming 

up the other way. Gene's got it out the other window. 
He's looking to the south. 

SC Joe, I think, if I'm not mistaken 

that might be Gutenberg right there and I'm showing you 
the central peak which is very clear on my monitor here. 

CC Rog. That's where all the pencils 

are pointing down here, Gino. 

SC Okay, Joe Jack, we're passing 

over the Apollo ridge right now looking down. 

CC Well listen you guys. That color 

is really spectacular. That really brings it home. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/21/69 CDT 2048 GET 8059 298/2 



SC Okay. Its about kind of a, It's 

still half between gray and brown right now Joe. 

SC Jack. Your looking at some of 

those depressions that go right through some of the craters 
now and they're very flat and where they're shallow we 
can see right to the bottom of them. 

CC Rog. 

PAO The spacecraft should be just 

about opposite landing site 1 at this time. 
SC Roger. 

SC Here you'll be looking just about 

right in the area Bl right now. 

CC Roger. We're picking it up. Gene. 

We've got it in the upper left hand portion of our screen 
now . 

SC And I don't know what- Okay, I 

don't know whether Tom can scan the Sasserides. But 
Sasserides should be just to the right of that in the hills. 

CC Roger. We copy and we had a 

real interesting little dome about 5 or 6 small craters 
in it that was awfully interesting to look at. 

SC Yeah around this area you can tell 

the strictly lots of volcanic activity and cones in there. 

SC That is Sasserides should be oblique to 

you. 

PAO Sasserides is a relatively new 

lunar crater and great scientific interest. 

SC Here it comes. Here's the crater 

Maske lyne . 

CC Roger. We copied. 

SC You can see the shadow in it. 

CC Roger. It stands out, Tom. 

SC It's in there like it might be 

a Boulder. There is Maskelyne. 

SC Okay. We're going to try to show 

you some of these rills. Diamondback Rilles and sidewinder 
rilles that are going across here at a very distinctive, 
there. There are very shadowed in area and the bottom 
sees full, however some of the areas that go perpendicular 
to the eunline is deep enough to be in shadow. 

CC Okay. We copied all that 

SC (Garble) Maskelyne B. 

SC And here's our little our little 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GET 80:59, CDT 20:48 298/3 



SC nick names, the rilles Diamondback 

and Sidewinder. 

CC 10, this ia Houston, those rlllte 

and all those details are really coining out great, and that 
color doesn't hurt a thing. 

SC Okay we're coining into the terminator, 

Rous t on . 

SC Okay, Tom's going to try an get 

you Moltke and then of course right adjacent is site number 2, 
and we're coming into the terminator. We're not sure how 
much of it you can see but you should be looking right at 
the area right now. 

SC Okay, at the bottom of your screen 

is Moltice and right about there is landing site 2. It's still 
awful dim because the sun is trying to shaft it, but the landing 
site 2 is right to the left the crater you see. That's where 
we'll be going down tomorrow to photograph. 

CC Roger that, Tom, and we're still 

getting a real good picture on that. There's a lot of good 
detail, although the color is starting to fade out a little. 

SC Yeah. Well let me see If I can get 

something started across the terminator if I can Just keep 
the sunlight off the window, you can - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 2058, GET 81:09 299/1 



SC - start across the terminator if I can 

just keep the floodlight off the window, you can see it. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. Can you go to inside on ALP 

and to 2.2 on your camera now. 

SC Jack, the area now is being uncovered by 

light in the landing site 2 area looks a little bit rugged. 

CAPCOM Copy that. Rugged. 

SC Okay, the rill you see beside Moltice is 

what we have termed as highway U.S. 1. 

CAPCOM Roger. We're getting that loud and clear, 

Tom. That shows up real good. 

SC The sun is coming right on the window. 

We're hitting the terminator, so it's kind of rough. I'm 
going to have to knock it off here, because I don't want to 
hurt the tube, and when the sun goes down, we'll shoot 
back there, and maybe we can give you a little picture of 
the Corona. 

CAPCOM Okay. Mighty fine, Tom. That was just 

fantastic. 

SC Okay. Gene is going to try to shoot It 

outside for a minute there. 
CAPCOM Righto. 

CAPCOM 10, this is Houston. Before you terminate 

the TV, before you secure it, we'd like to have a color chart 
shot so we can calibrate things. 

SC Okay , s tand by . 

CAP COM You - no hurry on that at all. Just 

before you secure it. 

SC Okay. Okay, Joe. Looks like that's going 

to be all we can show. I wanted to show you Theophilis looking 
across the terminator, it's got two very distinct central peaks.' 
It's a huge crater, the peaks are still in, the back side rim 
is still in, but I don't think I've been able to show It to you 
from what I can see on my monitor. 

CAPCOM Okay, we picked it up down here, 10. 

SC Well, it didn't come in too good on my 

monitor. I was hoping to get it to you before we got too 
far away from it, but we'll show you a color chart here in 
a minute. 

CAPCOM Okay, mighty fine. 

PAO Among the interested observers here at 

mission control is astronaut Jack Schmitt, who is also a 
geologist and worked with the crew prior to this mission on 
lunar feature identification. 

SC Stand by 1 second, Joe. We gotta cover 

up a window slightly here. 

SC Houston, we'll knock it off right after 

this because we've gott? repress the LM and get on with the 
LM activities . 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-21-69, CDT 2058, GET 81:09 299/2 



CAPCOM Roger- That Tom. We'll pick up the 

color chart now. Give us about 5 or 10 seconds of that. 

SC Tell you what, Joe, I'll just hold this. 

CAP COM Okay, that's good enough right there, Gene. 

Thank you very much. 

SC Okay, I guess we'll go off the air for 

t oday . 

CAPCOM That should be a good enough show for 

today there. 

SC That's enough, (inaudible) 

CAP COM Really great. The colors were great too. 

CAPCOM Okay, what I'm recommending this, 10, but 

your TEI 5 pad is GO in case you do need to use it. 

SC Yeah, we'd like to stick around for awhile. 

CAPCOM Roger, there. 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Joe. 

CAP COM Okay, Geno, before you start activating, 

we'd like to get a LM CM DELTA-P readout from you, and while 
you're up there, would you look for - see if you can find 
any mylar hanging around in the cabin dump valve there? 

SC Okay, we fully expect to find it in the 

LM cabin dump valve. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

PAO The total duration on that television 

transmission from the moon was 29 minutes, 9 seconds. At 
this time we estimate that the change of shift briefing will 
occur at about 9:15 central daylight time. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Houston, Apollo 10. 

CAPCOM Okay, hey listen, while you're activating 

there if you've got somebody that can copy down some updates, 
I've got a map update and a couple of landmark tracking updates, 
10. And let me know when you're ready to copy. 

SC Go ahead, Joe. 

CAPCOM Okay, 10, I'll give you your map update 

pad first. It's for REV 4. LOS will be 815301 820448 823911. 
Sunrise will be at 820041, sunset 831308. 

CAPCOM And 10, this is Houston. I'll go ahead 

with these landmark updates and you can read back the whole 
thing at once if you want to. 

SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, this is your landmark tracking update. 

Fl, 823845 824347 000326000, north 071220. That concludes Fl. 
Coming up now with BRAVO 1, 825547 830050 000274000, north - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 2108, GET 8119 300/1 



CAPCOM - 000 North 304825. That 

concludes and standing by for the read back. 



SC 

CAP COM 
SC 

real quick. Rev 
with me? 

CAPCOM 

SC 

326 and 3 balls, North 071220. 



Stand by one second. 
Roger, that. 

Okay, Joe. Here they come 
is 815301820448823911820041831308. 

Roger, that's correct. 
Fl is 823845824347 3balls 



Roger, that. Go ahead. 
825547830050 3 balls 274 3 balls 

Read backs, correct, Gene. Thank 



CAP COM 
SC 

North 304825. 

CAPCOM 
you. 

PA0 We have some preliminary 

figures from our Flight Dynamics Officer on that L0I 2 
maneuver. We were shooting for an orbit 60.06 by 60.06 
nautical miles and our preliminary tracking shows that we 
obtained an orbit of 59.7 by 60.2 which, of course, is very 
close to the preplanned. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 2210, GET 82:20 301/1 



PA 0 This is Apollo Control at 

82 hours, 21 minutes. During the Change of Shift Briefing 
Apollo 10 completed the third revolution. We collected 
about 4 minutes of conversation with the crew on tape. We re 
now about 17 minutes, 40 seconds from acquisition of signal 
again at the beginning of the fourth revolution. Shortly 
before loss of signal, Gene Cernan reported that he had 
removed the hatch, the drogue, and probe and was preparing 
to go into the tunnel and into the Lunar Module. Cernan 
also reported that some mylar insulation on the outside, 
actually on the Lunar Module side of the Command Module 
hatch had apparently broken and some silicone insulation 
contained underneath was sifting out making somewhat of 
a mess in the LM tunnel. Just as we had loss of signal, 
Tom Stafford reported that he would assist Cernan in cleaning 
up the mess. We'll play back the tape of that conversation 
for you now. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, Geno. We're kind of 

monitoring your gimbal angles here. It looks like you 
might be drifting close to lock and I'm going to keep an 
eye on it. 

SC Okay, thank you, Joe. And 

for your information, we got the hatch out and we're working 
on the probe right now. The pressures are equal. What we 
did, Joe, was to make an auto maneuver to come around here 
for* the 326 degree pitch for land mark tracking and we re 
all working with the tunnel and just oc cass ionally monitor 
it. I think we'll be okay. 

CAPCOM Okay, thank you, Tom. And 

let's see there's just one other item. We want to make 
sure that you are noting to take a hack when you transfer 
to LM power so you can pass that on to us. And we'll also 
want the roll calibration angle but that's already in the 
checklist there. 

SC Yeah. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

SC Hello Houston, this is the 

LMP. I'll be going off the air, Joe. I'll be talking to 
you from inside Snoopy later. 

CAPCOM Okay, Geno. 

sc Okay, Houston. What Geno s 

doing now is, he's up in the tunnel cleaning the mylar out 
of the valve up there. Or insulation it is. It looks 
like cotton, is what it looks like. It tastes like 
f iberglas . 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 2210, GET 82:20 301/2 



SC The probe came out pretty easy. 

It didn't seem to fold as much as it normally does but it 
is a lot easier in zero G than it is in 1 G. I guarantee 
you that. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy that. It's 

working all right isn't it John. 

SC Yeah. It is right this minute. 

Hey Houston, this is Apollo 10. 

CAP COM Go ahead, John. 

SC Roll cal is plus .1. It's 

not quite zero but it's close. 

CAP COM Roger, copy. Plus .1. 

SC Geno says change it to minus 

.1. 

CAPCOM Okay, minus .1. 

SC You can tell how close it is. 

He can't make up his mind whether it's plus or minus. 

CAPCOM That must be pretty close. 

SC That's thanks to you, Joe. 

You really got an eyeball for calibrating that thing. 

CAPCOM Roger, that. Okay, 10 this 

is Houston. We're showing about a minute 50 from LOS and 
just to verify we're calibrated we're figuring on AOS 
at 823852 John. 

SC Roger. And Geno is just now 

moseying into the LM followed by showers of insulation. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SC Hey, we're going to have a 

heck of a cleaning job here. They had insulation all in 
the seal, all in the valve and it is really a heck of a 
mess up here. 



CAPCOM 


Okay, we copy, John. 




SC 


It will be just about 




impossible to get 


that LM - 




CAPCOM 


10, this is Houston. 




SC 


Go ahead. 




CAPCOM 


Roger, 10. I want - have 


you 


got the umbilical 


hooked up to your suits now 


SC 


I'm still on my umbilical 


here 



I'm up in the tunnel trying to help Gene get this crap 
cleaned up. 

CAP COM Yeah, okay Tom. You might 

want to watch real close if you do unhook the umbilicals to 
try and keep letting that mylar get in the intake or the 
inlet side of those things. It'll get into the suits. 

PA0 That concludes the tape play- 

back of the conversations we had with the crew before LOS. 
We're now 12 minutes, 15 seconds from acquisition of signal 
at the beginning of the fourth revolution and we'll come 
back up as we approach the AOS time and stand by for con- 
versation with the crew. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 22:26, GET 82:38 302/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 82 hours, 38 

minutes, and we are about 1 minute now from acquisition of 
signal as Apollo 10 moves into the fourth revolution around 
the moon. By this time, we would expect that Gene Cernan 
would be In the lunar module beginning some general house- 
keeping chores and figuring circuit breakers and switch 
panels for a communications test which will follow later on 
REV 4. Also, on this revolution, we'll be doing some land- 
mark tracking. The crew will be taking sites on two land- 
marks primarily as a practice exercise in the use of the 
spacecraft's optical system. We're now about 4 seconds from 
acquisition of signal. We'll stand by for a call to the 
crew . 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. We're standing 

by. How do you read? 

CAP COM Hello, Snoopy, Houston. We're standing 

by. 

PAO We have data from the spacecraft but 

still no voice communication. 

PAO We would expect at this time the crew 

is involved in taking landmark sightings on a landmark designated 
F 1 which is in the middle of Smyth's Sea. This Is a crater 
about 5000 feet in diameter. 



CAPCOM 
PAO 

CAPCOM 
you read? 

CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 

read? 

CAP COM 
Houston . 
SC 

CAP COM 
real weak, Tom. 



Standing by. 

And we've just put In a call to the crew. 
Hello, Snoopy, this is Houston. How do 

Apollo 10, Houston. How do you read? 
10, this Is Houston. 



Apol lo 
Hello, Snoopy 



How do you 
This is Apollo - this is 



Apol lo 
Apo 11 o 



10 - 
10, 



this is Houston. Reading you 



Okay, we're right in the middle of our 
landmark tracking and Geno is reading you loud and clear. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. Understand you're reading us 

loud and clear, and is Gene in Snoopy yet? 

SC Yeah. He's in Snoopy. ... (garbled) 

CAP COM Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston. We're 

picking you up now, Geno, and we can go ahead with this 
voice check now, and if you'll give me a long count in each 
of your three modes, we'll see how it works out, and if you 
would identify which mode you're in. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 22:36, GET 82:48 303/1 



CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CHARLIE 10, we're reading you loud and clear. 

CAP COM Okay, Charlie Brown, I understand you're 

reading us loud and clear. You're breaking up pretty badly, 
and you're just about unreadable. 1 wonder if you could 
give us an idea. Is Snoopy ready to try the checks from his 
end yet? 

CHARLIE 
SNOOPY 

me ? 

CAPCOM 



(Garbled) 
Houston, Houston, 



and how do read Housto 



Okay , Snoopy . 



how do you read 
We caught that one, Geno , 



SNOOPY 
problem is that 
command module 



Reading you loud and clear, the only 
command module hose is out here. My 
Everything is squared away, everything 
is going smooth (garbled) over. 

CAPCOM Okay. You're pretty tough to make out 

in this mode, Gene, so we'll go ahead and catch the long counts 
though If you want to give us a long count in each of your 
three modes, go ahead and identify which mode you're in, 

SNOOPY Houston, Houston. I'm CSM Comm, Charlie 

Brown COM. I can read you when I go to Snoopy COM, but you cannot 
read me . 

CAP COM Okay, Snoopy. We copy. You're on 

PSM COM and you can read us when you're on Snoopy 's COM, but 
we're not picking you up at all. Okay, stand by just a minute, 
Gene, and in the meantime, how's the snow situation up there? 

SNOOPY It's pretty lousy. Everything else in 

the LM is go. I'll give you all the readings when I get back in the 
CSM ... I can read you loud and clear on the Snoopy COM, but 
you're not getting me at all. 



CAPCOM 
SNOOPY 
to make sun 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 

want 



got 



Okay, we understand, Geno. Stand by here. 
You might have me verify some switches 
them all, I think I did. 
Okay, that sounds like a good idea. 
Okay, Snoopy. This is Houston. You 
us to go through your switch list to confirm these? 
SNOOPY Houston, unless you got a better idea, 

we might just as well. 

CAPCOM Okay. Okay Snoopy. Your audio LMP , the 

one S band PR to transmit receive. VHF A transmit receive. 
VHF B to receive. 

Go. 

S-band PM primary to primary. Down 
ff, reset off low. VHF A transmitter to 
receiver on and S-band antenna forward. 
Yeah, I got all those. 
Okay, that should hack it, Gene. 
Okay, can you think of any circuit breakers 



SNOOPY 

CAP COM 
voice backup PPM 
voice. VHF B 

SNOOPY 

CAPCOM 

SNOOPY 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-21-69, CDT 2236, GET 82:48, 303/2 



SNOOPY 
every where and I 



that might be out. I've double checked 
can't see anything that's out on any and 
I'll have a quick double check and I'll switch back to Snoopy 
COM. 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, we're looking at circuit 

breakers now. 

SNOOPY 
pass , if we can. 

CHARLIE 

SNOOPY 

CAP COM 

CAPCOM 



it 1 s 
here , 



Sure like to complete this , on this front side 

(Garble) 
(Garble) 

Roger that, Snoop. 

Snoopy, we're getting real good data 



just our con that we're having a little problem with 



SNOOPY 

SNOOPY 
you read? 

CAPCOM 
garbled, but go ahead. 



Okay, (garble) 
Hous ton , this is 



(garble) Snoopy, how do 
Okay, Gene, you're still coming in a little 



CAPCOM 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 



CHARLIE 
all right now. 



Go ahead, Gene. 



Snoopy, this is Houston. 
How ' re we doing, Joe? 

We're trying to figure out if maybe another 
antenna for this would work better, Gene. In the meantime, 
we suggest that you turn those - you have the guys in Charlie 
Brown turn their suit compressors off so we don't set this 
stuff up into the suit loops. 

CHARLIE Charlie (Garble) 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. Say it 

again, if you would, Tom. 

Got some strings over the (garble) we're 
Got good signal (garble) forward (garble). 
Go ahead and switch over and give it a try again? 

CAP COM Roger. Let's give it another try. 

CHARLIE Okay, I'll give it another try. 



END OF TAPE 



AP0LL 0 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CD! 22.6, GET 8258 304/1 

CB Hello Houston, this is Charlie 

Be speaking. Snoopy been calling you and calling you, 

d ° yO CAPC0M hlm? Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

We sure can not. That's a negative receive on Snoopy, Charlie 
Brown. Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 
CB Garbled. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie B "*». This is , tQ 

Houston and Snoopy also is here reading «* * p 
and do is go over to the CDR side and a And 
there and see if we can get any voice time Snoopy. 

to backup and let's try it. 

T think we're getting you real faint. 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, Houston, this 

18 S "c: P p y cOM hOU d ° '"Skay'sLopy. this is Houston 

You' re booming In loud and clear now. How do you read -t 

CAP COM Okay, I'll take one on that 

one. «y down voice b.c . Jl > «« " <^° E t P t «lU but apparently 

„ „ „_ liiro it was down voiced. i puj.xc« 

^^^r"'""5di : :T : £S: : r ; : :: : ;M:fr- 

. .sv;;;. ■•• - ■■ 
,.,.,1™,.,. .». ..«•■ »■■" »•'• »• "•' " 

CAP COM Roger, go. 

SNOOPY Okay on that ICS. on that 5 ^ 3 2 , } how do you 

ICSPTT long count follows, 1 2 3 4 5 , ana 

re8d TapCOM you're loud and clear. push to talk 

Gen °*SN00p a Y ead Koler, that was ICS PT T how do 

you read e ? ICS PTT 12 , J 5, e 5 r! 3 rL l. 

SNOO?? Okay, reading the ICS PTT now. 

12 345.54321. 

CAPCOM Loud and c lear ' P re88 on ' 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/59, CDT 2246, GET 82:58, 304/2 



SNOOPY Okay this is PTT. How do you 

read me, 12 345,5 432 1. 

CAPCOM Loud and clear, press on. 

SNOOPY Now I'm in vox, how do you 

read me in vox, 12--5, 5432 1. 

CAPCOM Okay, give me a long count in 

You know I think maybe the signal dropped out in one 
of them there. 

SNOOPY Okay, a long count in bocks, 

1234 5, 5432 1, 1234 5,5432 1. 

CAPCOM Okay, that looks good Geneo. 

Lets press on to figures on the voice PM step 1 activation 
14. 

SNOOPY Okydoke, and by the way, you 

do have me on a hot mike ICS PTP in this configuration, 
just to confirm it. 

CAP COM Roger, that. 

SNOOPY Okay, step 1, I go to voice, 

Okay I'm going to voice and bioraed right. 

CAPCOM Okay, and stand by until we 

get set up here. 1*11 give you a call. 

CAP COM Okay, Goldstone, this is 

Capcom. Goldstone, Capcom. 

GOLDSTONE This is Goldstone. 

CAPCOM Roger, configure for LM mode 

6.07.00, low bit rate, and give me a call when you got it. 

GOLDSTONE Roger, Roger, we start in 

test 2 sequence 1. 

CAP COM Contact Goldstone, we are there. 

GOLDSTONE Thankyou. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston, on 

the voice PM, how do you read? 

SNOOPY How do you read me? 

CAPCOM Okay, the first part of your 

transmission didn't come through Snoopy, but give me a long 
count on this is you would. 

SNOOPY Okay, now I'm still in the same 

configuration, and going to voice switch to voice, and biomed 
to right at this time. On my mark. Mark it. 

CAPCOM Roger, go ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, this is Snoopy, with a 

long count, 123455432 1, how do you read? 

CAPCOM Okay Geno we're reading you 

loud and clear. How about 2 more long counts so we can verify 
the TM bit here. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'll give you a long count 

this time. 123456789 10, 10 98765432 1, 123 
456789 10 , 10 987654329 1, I'm just getting tired 
of talking that's all, go ahead. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 2246, GET 82:58, 304/3 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy sounds good. Stand 

by lust a second. 

SNOOPY Roger that. You're cut out, you 11 

say a 8ai"^ Ggno we i re g0 with that 
let's press on with step 3 activation of 14. 

SNOOPY Okay step 3 and range 

is going to ... . 

CAPCOM Roger that, stand by, I 11 

tell you when to configure. 

CAPCOM Okay Goldstone, this is Capcora. 
END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GET 83:08, CDT 2256 305/1 



GOLDSTONE Stand by, I'll tell you when to configure. 

CC Okay, Goldstone, this is CAPCOM. 

CC Goldstone. 

GOLDSTONE Goldstone, CAPCOM the figures are 



CC We're there. 

CC Okay Snoopy, this is Houston in the 

blind. We anticipate no voice at all in this mode of course, 
but we'll stand by and see if we can pick up some data. 

CC Okay Snoopy, this is Houston in "the 

blind. We're still monitoring data and standing by in this , 
configuration and I'll let you know when we'll press on. 

CC Okay Snoopy, this ia Houston, we've 

got our data, we can proceed on with step 5 now. 

CC And Snoopy, this is Houston, if you're in 

step 5, how about a voice check. 

CC Okay Snoopy, this is Houston, we've 

got no voice from you. How about going to down voice backup. 

SNOOPY How do you read me Houston ... one. 

CC Roger, stand by Snoopy. 

CC Goldstone, this is CAPCOM. Goldstone, 

ready for configure LM mode 6.04.00 high bit rate and verify. 

GOLDSTONE Roger, we're there. 

CC Roger that. 

SNOOPY You finished it. Are you in an attitude 

that I can get? Is that where we're supposed to be, okay. 

CC Okay Snoopy, this is Houston, we're 

reading you now Geno. 

SNOOPY (Garbled). Okay Joe, do you read me now. 

CC Roger, reading you now Geno. 

SNOOPY I supposed you're worried because 

I suppose I'm in hot mike in this configuration. 

CC Roger, that's affirm. 

CC And Charlie Brown if you can - 

SNOOPY If you're ready to press on I'm ready 

to go on. 

CC Okay, we're going to Btand by until 

we verify Charlie Brown here that he's in his landmark tracking 
or sleep attitude. 

SNOOPY He is, I just got word from him. 

CC Very good. Okay let's press on with 

steerable voice PM. 

SNOOPY Okay, steerable voice PM. Here goes that 

antenna, so stand by. 

CC Okay. Goldstone, CAPCOM. Goldstone, 

CAPCOM, come up please. 

GOLDSTONE GOLDSTONE . 

CC Roger, the configure LM mode, 6.02.00. 

Give a roger. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/21/69, GET 83:08, CDT 2256 305/2 

GOLDSTONE That's af firaative , va ara configured. 

cc Okay, Gelds torn a I'm standing by for 

a lock on announcement. Charlie Brawn, this la Houaton. While 
we're waiting here we'd like far yen te turn H2 tank 1 
heatera to AUTO and H2 tank 2 heatere to OFF, please. 

cc Snoopy, tkla la louaton standing 

by . 

SNOOPY Roger lewaton, da you read. 

cc ■•y get you loud and clear Geno. 

we should be ready to press on now and give me a long count 
in each of your three nodes again. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2306, GET 83:18 306/1 



CAPCOM Houston, standing by. 

SNOOPY Roger Houston, do you read? 

CAPCOM Hey, got you loud and clear, 

Geno. We should be ready to press on now, and give me a 
long count in each of your three modes again. 

CB Houston, Charlie Brown 

SNOOPY Not yet Joe, wait until I get 

this thing locked up on auto. I'm only on sluge. John 
my mistake, he's got about another 10 seconds to maneuver. 

CAP COM Okay, Houston we copy. 

SNOOPY What's LOS time, Joe? 

CAPCOM We've got about 33 more minutes 

Snoopy . 

SNOOPY Okay, we'll make it. 

CAPCOM Roger that, and Charlie Brown 

we'd like to have your H2 tank 1 heaters to auto, H2 tank 
2 heaters off. Do you copy? 

CB Roger, that's what we did, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, thank you much. 

SNOOPY How soon? 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston, I've got you 

locked up on Auto, how do you read? 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston, I'm 

reading you loud and clear. Geno, a long count in each mode 
and identify which mode you're in please. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm in PTT and instead 

of a long count I'm reading a signal stregnth of 4.2 locked 
up in s-band auto, and I guess, I'm not sure but it might 
lock up anywhere from about 3 2 to 3 6 . This time I was at 
38 and ended up locking up solid here at 42 and I'm going IC 
at PTT. 

CAP COM Roger, you're loud and clear. 

SNOOPY Okay, how do you read me now? 

I'll give you a long count and I'm going to unkey it to 
see whether I've got a hot mike, and then I'll pick it up 
again. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 , 1 2 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 , how 
do you read me? 

CAPCOM Okay, you're loud and clear 

Geno go ahead with vox. 

SNOOPY Okay I'm in vox, and what 

I really want to know is I unkeyed about half way through 
the ICS PTT mode to see whether I had a hot mike, I assume 
I did not is that correct. 

CAPCOM That's verified. 

SNOOPY Okay, and I'm in vox, and 

you're reading me loud and clear, I guess. 

CAP COM That's affirmative Snoopy. We're 

reading you loud and clear, and stand by 1, we'll see if 
we're ready to go on here with the data. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, CDT 2306, GET 83:18 306/2 



SNOOPY Okay, standing by and I tell 

you when that S-band antenna moves around you'd think that 
the whole house was coming down on you. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Charlie 

Brown, we'd like to update your state vector, if you'd give 
us, accept please. 

CB We got it , over. 

CAP COM Roger, thank you. 

CB What happened? Did that last thing get 

transferred from the land mark track, over. 
SNOOPY So far so good. 

CAPCOM Roger, that's affirmative. And 

Snoopy we can proceed on to the FM mode now. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm going FM and I'll 

give you a call if I don't hear back from you in 30 seconds, 
I'll switch back to PM. 

CAP COM Negative, stand by in the FM 

Geno , let me give you a call. You should be able to read me 
and if we don't catch you, if we can't read you I'll give you 
another mode to go to. 

SNOOPY Okay, fine Joe, I'm in FM 

right now. 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll be with you in 

just a minute. 

MCC Goldstone, this is Capcom. 

G0LDST0NE Goldstone. 

MCC Roger, Goldstone let's configure 

LM for 6.00.09 high bit rate. 

GOLDSTONE Capcom, we are configured. 



MCC 
CAPCOM 



Thank you much . 
Okay Snoopy, this is Houston, 



I'm ready to listen to you now. How about some good numbers. 



Hello Houston, do you 



SNOOPY 
read me FM? 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston, 

Rog, I'm reading you on FM now. 

SNOOPY Okay, you're coming through 

loud and clear. 



CAPCOM 
you're not i 

SNOOPY 
voice back up. 

CAP COM 

CAPCOM 



Okay, let's double check, Geno, 
the down voice back up are you? 

That's affirm, I am in down 
Let me go to voice. 
Roger, that. 

Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston. 
We're standing by for a call on FM mode. Would you try 
one more time please. 

CB Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

Do you read Snoopy? 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, negative, we're 

not reading him although we're still trying to acquire some 
data in this mode. Tom, in the meantime you can have your 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CDT 2 306, GET 83:18, 306/3 

CAPCOM computer back. 

CB Okay we're in .... 

CAP COM Roger that, Tom. 

CB Houston, Charlie Brown is set 

up for the LM relay test. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

We're not quite ready for that yet. We'll be with you in 
jus!; a minute on that. We've got to try this PM mode yet, 
John . 

END OF TAPE 



" ■ 1 • 

APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 83:28 CDT 23 16 307/1 

CC Snoopy, this is Houston. I'm still 

on SM mode, how do you read? 

SNOOPY I'm reading you loud and clear, do 

you read me . 

CC Roger, sure am. You're not down 

voice backup are you? 

SNOOPY Negative. I'm in voice in P ... in FM. 

CC Oh, you're clear as a bell. How about 

a little short count there to confirm all the disbelievers 
here Jim. 

SNOOPY I'll give you a short count, 12 3 

4 5 5 4 3 2 1. You're coming in loud and clear, Joe, as clear 
as any other way I've heard you. 

CC Roger, this is as clear as we've had. 

Are you in push-to-talk mode? 

SNOOPY That's affirm, push-to- talk . I'll 

give you a short count now on ICSPTT. This is ICSPTT, 1 2 
3455 4 32 1. How do you read now. 

CC Boy, you're loud and clear. How 

about one quick one on GOSS and we'll press on. 

SNOOPY Okay I got you on GOSS, 12 3 4 5 

5 4 3 2 1, how do you read? 

CC Very good and stand by 1 and I think 

we'll press on here. Okay Snoopy this is Houston, that's 
loud and clear. Let's press on with the PM mode and then to 
backup voice test step 1. 

SNOOPY Okay I'm in PM mode and I can hear 

Chris back there talking in the background so it must be 
pretty good. 

CC Roger we're copying now. Stand by. 

Okay Goldstone this is CAPCOM. 

SNOOPY Well, maybe he's got the strongest 

S-band I've ever heard. 

CC Goldstone. 

SNOOPY That's pretty good. 

CC Okay let's configure for LM mode 

8.04.00. 

GOLDSTONE We're configured. 

CC Roger. 

SNOOPY How we coming down there, Joseph? 

CC We're trying to lock up, Snoopy. 

We'll give you a call here when we get it. 

CC Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston. We're 

not able to lock up down here. I wonder if you'd confirm 
if you've gone through that step 1 backup voice test. 

SNOOPY (Garbled). 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, Houston. This is 

Snoopy are you reading? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 83:28 CDT 2316 307/2 



Roger, reading you. Go ahead. 
... try and take some .... 
Hello Houston, Charlie Brown. 
Go ahead, Charlie Brown, Houston. 
Look, I don't know how it sounds to 
but, but it sounds like things are kind 
of loose on this total COMM situation. Over. 

CC Roger, Tom. We're not able to get 

a lock up right now. We'd like to verify that step 1 on that 
stack up board - correction - step 1 on the backup voice 
test has been accomplished. 

CHARLIE BROWN Say again. 

CC Roger, we'd like to confirm that 

1 on the back up voice test has been done. 
CHARLIE BROWN Is that where we are. 
That affirm. 

Hello Houston, Houston are you 
the backup voice test, over. 
Snoopy, this is Houston. Roger 
Gene, we got you now and stand by and we'll get - 

CC Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Charlie Brown Go ahead Houston, this is Charlie 
Brown. 

CC Roger Charlie, I think we've got 

you in the relay mode. I wonder if we could have you come 
out of that relay mode for now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'll go ahead and turn off 
the VHF. Okay you think we're still in it now? 

CC Stand by and I'll see. Okay Snoopy, 

this is Houston. Let's try it again now. 

SNOOPY Okay Houston, this is Snoopy, how 

do you read me now, 123455432 1. 

CC Okay, I'm reading you loud and clear, 

Snoopy, but I think we're still in the relay mode. 

SNOOPY Well, I'm now in about 27 volts, 

27 too now, so let's keep going if we can. Let's get Charlie 
Brown out of the relay mode then. 



CC 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
you down there Joe 



step 



CC 

SNOOPY 
reading. Snoopy on 
CC 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 83:38, CDT 2327, 308/1 



SNOOPY Well, I'm down to about 27 volts 27 2 

now, so let's keep going if we can. Let's get Charlie Brown 
out of the relay mode then. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston could you 

verify that you're not in relay mode, please? Could you 
verify that you're not in relay mode, please? 

CHARLIE We're not in relay mode please. 

CAP COM Okay, thanks. 

SNOOPY Okay, thank you. 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston. Let's 

proceed on with step 3. 

SNOOPY 
step 3. 

SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 
CAP COM 
GOLDS TONE 
CAPCOM 
GOLDSTONE 
GOLDSTONE 
mode 6 . 

CAP COM 
CAPCOM 



Okay, Houston, Rog. Proceed on with 
Roger, step 3. 

Okay, Goldstone, this is Capcom. 
Goldstone, Capcom. Come up please. 
Capcom, Goldstone. Go ahead. 
Go LM mode 6.02.00 and verify it. 
Wil co . 

Capcom, Goldstone. We confirm uplink 
Roge r . Thanks . 

Okay, Snoopy and Charlie Brown, this is 
Houston. Let's press on to the LM relay pitch and verify 
when you're ready to go. 

SNOOPY This is Snoopy. I'm ready to go, if 

you're reading me. 

Roger. Reading you Snoopy 



How about 

Charlie Brown, this is Houston. How do 

Hello Charlie Brown. This is Houston, 

Snoopy this is Houston. Still reading 

Yeah, I'm reading you, Joe. 
Okay, Gene. 



CAPCOM 
you, Charlie Brown 

CAPCOM 
you read? 

CAP COM 
how do you read? 

CAPCOM 
me okay Gene? 
SNOOPY 
CAP COM 

CHARLIE Houston, this is Charlie Brown. We're 

reading you about 4 by 4. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Brown. That's fine. How 

about giving me a short count, Tom. 

CHARLIE Roger. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom, I'm reading you loud and clear - 

stand by one please. 

CHARLIE Hey, hang on. That doesn't count. 

CAPCOM Okay. Snoopy and Charlie Brown. that 

ought to terminate these things. Let's go back to our basic 
comm mode now and verify it please. 

SNOOPY Hey, Houston, I never - I never got to the 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/21/69, GET 83:38, CDT 2327, 308/2 



SNOOPY 

your call. 

CAP COM 

that, Gene, 

to basic comm 1 
SNOOPY 

it again. 

CAPCOM 

that right now 

comm mo de . 

SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
CAPCOM 
GOLDSTONE 
CAPCOM 



LM relay set. I've just been waiting for 



Roge r that . 
and we'll pick that 



We 're going 
jp later. We 



t e rmina t e 
ant to go back 



You were cut off by Charlie Brown. Say 

Okay, we verify we're not going to check 
Gene. So we want to go back to the basic 

Okay, stand by a minute. 
Roger that. 

Goldstone, this is CAPCOM. 
Capcom, Goldstone. Go ahead. 
Okay, let's go back to basic c 



That 



will be LM 6.02.00 and command module 6.02.00. 



GOLDSTONE 
CAPCOM 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 
you five by . 

GOLDS TON E 
Snoopy 
CAPCOM 
CAP COM 



Roger, I copy. LM 6.02.00. 

Roger and command module (garble) 

Okay, Joe, how do you read me? 

Okay, Snoopy. This is Houston; reading 



CAPCOM, Goldstone, we confirm. 
Okay, I'm reading you loud and clear. 
Roge r that . 

We've got about 8 minutes until LOS, Gene. 
I'm going to have some stuff to send up to you here in just 
a minu t e . 

SNOOPY Okay. I'll give you all the LM data when 

I get back home. I'm in the command module up there or down 
there wherever the case may be. The voltages and all 
that other jazz. 

CAPCOM Okay, that will be fine. How does the 

glycol temp look? 

SNOOPY 
since I got 
at all. 

CAP COM 

SNOOPY 

S-band antenna, 



The glycol temp has been sitting on zero 
in here. I haven't been able to get it to read 

Okay, we copy. 

I don't know who makes the berries for 
but I sure am glad they're not in my 



that 
car . 

CAPCOM 

CAPCOM 

SNOOPY 

CAPCOM 
check, Gene, 
max position, 
min pos it ion ? 

SNOOPY 

off to max and then back to min. 



We copy . 

Hello Snoopy. This is Houston. 
Go ahead Houston. This is Snoop. 
Rog. A couple of things we need to 
We're showing your AG deadband switch in the 
Would you verify it min and cycle it to the 

Okay, Ed. It is in min and I'll cycle 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, GET 83:38, CDT 2327, 308/3 



CAPCOM Roger. 

SNOOPY It's in max now and I 11 bring it back 

to min again. 

SNOOPY Okay, it's back in min. 

CAP COM Okay. The ascent oxidizer is reading 

17 psi high on the ground. We'd like for you to read that 
out for us, and in order to do so, on panel 16 row 1 display 
engine override circuit breaker in and your prop temp monitor 
to asset and give us a reading, please. 

SNOOPY Which ascent pressure was that? Helium 

pressure or REG pressure? 

CAP COM Oxidizer pressure, please. ^ 

SNOOPY Okay, oxidizer pressure looks like it s 

about 180 psi. 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, if you will put that cir- 

cuit breaker again please. 

SNOOPY Okay, Ed, it's out. By the way everything 

in the LM was just as we launched with it. After I thoroughly 
checked the configuration. 

CAPCOM Roger, Roger Snoopy. Stand by one please. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. We're through 

with you for today. The com relay tests will go by the board 
for the moment. You can proceed with the rest of your house- 
keeping and close out. 

SNOOPY Okay, that's fine. Everything is looking 

good in here. I didn't mean to be so impatient, I just wanted 
to get this thing over before we lost you and I also didn t 
want to use too much power on this bird. Contents I guess 
are always that way, but they sounded pretty good from this end 
if you're all satisfied on the primary mode. 

CAPCOM Roger. What we heard was good, what we 

didn't hear was obviously - obvious that we didn't hear it. 

SNOOPY Okay, fine. I'll be closing out the LM 

and finishing housekeeping and see you next door. 
CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/21/69, CET 2337, GET 83:49 309/1 



CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CAPCOM Hello. Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. 

CAP COM Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston, transmitting 

in the blind, we show an 02 flow highlight. We'd like you 
to select your BD roll in the DAP, and on the - the hatch, 
we could - we tested out the flight tape and we'd like you to 
use the flight tape to tape over the mylar. The tape will 
stick to the mylar and the hatch rim, but will not stick to 
the RTV or the fiber glass, so you'll have to bridge the gap, 
and just tape it over to - over the mylar. For a cleanup, 
we could get you use a - the first choice that you use a wet 
tarycloth and go out to the RTV and fiber glass with that. 
The other suggestion, that if that doesn't work next time 
around, we'll suggest for cleaning up. Over. 

CAP COM Snoopy, Houston. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We have 

loss of signal, now. During that pass, the activity that 
we were most involved with, was the lunar module communications 
test, checking out all the various COMM modes, communications 
modes on the lunar module, both voice and telemetry, and also 
the antenna options that are available. At the same time, John 
Young was involved in taking those landmark sitings. We 
didn't hear any conversation from John relative to that. 
We now have 45 minutes until acquisition of signal again at 
the beginning of the fifth revolution. At the present time, 
Apollo 10 is traveling at a speed of 5,346 feet per second. 
And we show a weight in orbit of the combined LM, command and 
service module, of 68,351 pounds. This compares with something 
in acsess of 93,000 pounds prior to doing the L0I 1 and LOI 2 
burns. The difference in weight is - represents the propellants 
consumed by the SPS engine. At 83 hours 53 minutes, this is 
Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 0025, GET 84:36, 310/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 

84 hours 36 minutes. We're just about 1 minute now from 
acquisition of signal from reacquiring Apollo 10, as the 
spacecraft comes back around on the front side of the moon, 
for its 5th revolution. We expect that when we do hear from 
the spacecraft next, Gene Cernan will be back in the command 
module, and the crew will be involved in getting the 
spacecraft set up for their sleep period, and also making 
what ever arrangements in advance they can for the very busy 
day that they'll have tomorrow, with the LM rendezvous actlvitys. 
We'll stand by now for reacquiring the spacecraft and for 
a call to be put through to the crew by capcom, Joe Angle. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston, 

we're standing by. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, Houston. 

MCC Honeysuckle, contact Houston, 



HONEYSUCKLE Houston contact Honeysuckle. 

Read you very weak, very weak. 

^CC Roger stand by. Voice control 

Houston, contact. Voice control Houston, conference. 

G0DDARD VOICE 

MCC Roger, Honeysuckle reports 

they're reading you very weak, How do you read me? 

GO DDARD VOICE I hear you loud and clear on 
the back up, but you're not coming on the normal gos 1. 

MCC Roger. 

MCC Transfer to over head gos. 

GODDARD VOICE Houston, how do you read. 

SC Hello Houston, Houston, this 

is Apollo 10 calling from the Moon, do you read. 

MCC Honeysuckle, Houston. Comtact 

converence, how do you read. 

SC Hello Houston, Houston, this 

is Apollo 10, how do you read. 

CAP COM Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

Reading you loud and clear now, John .... 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, Apollo 10 

Houston, how do you read now? 

SC Hey down there Houston. Do 

you read Apollo 10 from the moon? 

CAP COM Apollo 10, Apollo 10, from the 

moon. This is Houston. We're reading you loud and clear, 
John. How are you doing now? 

SC This ain't John. This is the 

fellow that came back from Snoopy back in Charlie Brown. 

CAPCOM Hey, okay there fellow. How 

about the snow situation, have you got any in the command 
module , Gene ? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0025, GET 84:36, 310/2 

sc Would you believe we've been 

living in what you might call snow for three days, and we 
found out where the rest of it is. It's in our good friend 
Snoopy. But however, I think if we look at the cabin dump 
valves and a hatch real good, which we've done once, and we 
look at them again tomorrow, when we close it we will be 
alright, okay? 

CAPCOM Okay, that sounds pretty good. 

Evidently it isn't bothering you too much as far as inhaling 
it, or getting it in your nostrils and your mouth. Is that 
affirmative? 

sc Yea, I didn't have to worry 

about inhailing it. I are my way through. 

CAPCOM Okay 

sc , your nose ... a little 

bit That should be a space first, snow on the moon. Hey 
I've got lots of things for you to copy if you ve got a 
pencil. 

CAPCOM I've got a pencil. You go 

ahead. Geno , before you start going I wonder if we could 
have and accept. 

sc The LM went off at 82 29 20. 

GSM power to LM came back on at 84 +3200. CSM onboard 

readout B AT C 37 volts pyro bat A 37 pyro bat B 37 RCS A 

81, bravo 87 Charlie 84 and delta 84. We have cycled the 
H2, 02 fans and we still have H2 fan number 1 in Auto. I have 
innitiated battery B charge at the present time, and now I 
have some very interesting news from Snoopy if you 11 stand 
by 1 . 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll stand by . We 

would like for you to P0 and accept, we've got an update 
state vector for you. 

sc Okay, I'll go to po and accept. 

Stand by. Okay Houston you have Po and accept. 

CAPCOM Roger, that. 

sc And I have some news from 

Snoopy. He's a pretty good fellow, by the way. 

CAP COM good to hear that. 

sc Okay, I think you've got the ^ 

rocal angle of -.1, that's pretty close to zero. That's 
just off of zero and that's as close as I can read it. 

CAP COM Okay, that's -1 and -.1. 

SC -o.i 

CAPCOM roger that. 

sc My docking pilot has a good 

eye ball. The normal RAD level in the, in Snoopy is point 
001 rev per hour. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy. 

sc Snoopy was found to be sleeping 

during the whole 3 days of our translunar journey and 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22 /69, CDT 0025, GET 84 l 36 , 310/3 

SC was exactly the way we put 

him to sleep when we left the pad. There were no switches, 
or breakers or anything misplaced. 

CAPCOM Okay we copy that. 

SC Okay, when I looked at the 

EPS system, I found out that battery 1 had 35 volts, bettery 
2,3, and 4 also had 35 volts. Battery 5 and battery 6 had 
37 volts. Commanders bus had 29.2 volts when I powered 
up and systems engineers was reading 29.0 and those were 
all on low taps. 



CAPCOM Okay, we copy. 

Sc Okay, my AC Bus voltage was on a 

high side of the green for inverter number 2. 
CAPCOM Okay. 

sc Okay, when I deactivated the 



Comm and shut down APS, battery 1 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GET 84:46 CDT 0035 311/1 



SNOOPY - and shut down EPS , battery 1, 2, 

3, and 4 at 37.8 volts. I don't know that's possible, unless 
I misread It. And the Commander's BUZZ and the LM's BUZZ 
are at 27.2. 

CC Okay, We understand 

SNOOPY That's not possible Is it? 

CC Roger, everybody's shaking their 

heads yes Ed. 

SNOOPY The name's Gene, Joe. 

CC Okay Bill. 

SNOOPY Okay, the OPS - the OPS Is both 

at 5800 pounds on and it check out okay. The LM house- 
keeping is done. I think it's in good shape, if you want 
to know the truth, after my initial ... and down voice back- 
up switch I think the COMM came out pretty good. It's part 
of the fact that the S-band antenna shaked the LM around when 
it moved. It really held MOC at about 4.2 on the meter. 
I'm not sure exactly whether it will lock out automatically 
below 3.6 but it'll probably be worth the try tomorrow. 

CC Okay. We verify on that Gene. We've 

got some good words for you on the COMM too, it - particularly 
on the OMNI we're a lot more satisfied than anybody 'd 
expect. We got a lot - real good voice COMM with you on 
OMNI. In fact you're coming down on normal voice, loud and 
clear, we're not going to have to go on backup on that mode. 

SNOOPY Oh, that's very good. That means 

that - oh, that's very good. Hey, there's one other thing, 
Joe, I noticed that before you asked me then I went ahead 
and proceeded and I never did get an indication on the glycol 
temperature. It was down at off scale low the whole time. 

CC Okay, we copy that. 

SNOOPY And I think the same guy how supplied 

the berries for the S-band antenna supplied them for the 
glycol pump. 

CC Okay I'll check into that. 

SNOOPY But other than that I'm real happy. 

There's no disorientation when you go down there. As a matter 
of fact, it's a lot more comfortable down there or up there, 
I don't know which, but it's a lot more comfortable over 
there than it is in here as far as being able to know what's 
up and what's down. 

CC Okay, understand. 

SNOOPY You get some reports from Snoopy 

today, I hope we - go ahead Joe. 

CC Okay I was just going to tell you, 

go ahead and go the block on - you can have that computer 
back now. 

SNOOPY Okay, we're in block and that's 

our report from Snoopy today, I'm personally very happy 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 84:46 CDT 0035 311/2 



with the fellow and I hope we can give you as good a report 
tomorrow . 

CC You bet your life. Let see, we've 

got a couple other items here on the command module. We'd 
like for you to zero the optics and, let me see, we'd like 
to have the LM command module delta theoried out if you could. 
Yeah, this is before ... 

SC ... 

SC ... was 1 . 9 . 

CC 1 • 9 , thank y ou . 

SC 1.9 prior to egress but prior to 

pressurization when we pressurized it it was zero. 

CC Roger, understand John, thanks. 

SC Okay, we on the vent right now. We're 

going to keep this thing pumped up so tomorrow it won't be 
agonizingly slow, 

CC Okay. 

SC You got anything else for us right 

at the moment Joe. If not we're going to hustle around here 
and get prepared for tomorrow and eat something and those 
other things. But while those other two guys are down there 
I'll always be willing to do anything I can. 

CC Okay Charlie Brown - Apollo 10. 

Stand by for a minute, we've got a couple of three items we're 
di s c us s ing now . 

SC Okay Ed. 

CC Okay, Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead Houston. 

CC Roger Tom. We've got a few items 

we'd like for you to check here. First off, we'd like to 
verify the position of the H2 tank heaters number 1 to 
AUTO and number 2 to OFF. We'd like to verify that with you. 

SC Okay we've got number 1 H2 tank 

heater in AUTO and number 2 in now OFF. 

CC Okay and we'd like direct - 

SC 

CC Okay thank you, and direct power 

off for another two hand controllers, please. 
SC Okay, that's done. 

CC And just prior to LOS under this last 

pass we were showing an 02 flow high indication. Did you hear 
that in the cockpit and if so do you have any good words on 
that . 

SC Yes. 02 flow high is caused because 

the inflow valve gets all clogged with insulation, also the 
intake to the hoses. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0045, GET 84:56 312/1 



CHARLIE Also the intake to these hoses. 

CHARLIE You know we've been cleaning all these 

exhaust hoses and the intake to the inflow valve off a couple 
of three times a day. 

CAPCOM Okay, I understand. 

CHARLIE But doing LM ingress - doing LM 

ingress the flow of mylar overcame the flow of cleaning off the 
hoses . 

CAPCOM Okay, I understand. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. I've got a 

maneuver pad I'll send up to you whenever you're ready to copy. 

SC Okay, Joe. One more second. 

SC Okay, Houston. I'm ready. 

CAPCOM Okydok, 10, this is for TEI 10, 

SPS G&N. Your time is 096, 02, 4054, plus 29966, minus 
01794, plus 01605, roll is NA, pitch 054, all else is NA and 
I'll stand by for your readback. 

sc Okay, Joe. TEI 10, SPS G&N, starting 

with now 33, 096, 02, 4054, plus 29966, minus 01794, plus 
01605, roll is NA and pitch 054, and the rest is NA. 

CAPCOM Okay, on your now 33, your seconds 

is 40.54. 

S C I'm sorry. That's what I've got 

written down. 096, 02, 4054. 

CAPCOM Roger that. 

CAPCOM Okay, Geno, now we got some words 

for you on this PUGS, it looks like you've got an engine that 
burns fuel rich, and what we're recommending is on the next 
burn, for you just to go to FULL INCREASE, and leave it in 
FULL'lNCREASE for the entire burn. You've got no fuel depletion 
problem, so just leave it in FULL INCREASE. 

SC Okay, fine, I'm hoping that next 

burn with the SPS is a big one. 

CAPCOM Yeah (laughter). And 10, this is 

Houston. We've got some discussion words for you on this 
stuff that's floating around in the cockpit. 
It looks like the first thing when you get that hatch open 
next time, will be to try and take some of that tape and tape 
over any holes that you can see. Does it look like - What 
looks like damage the mylar, does it look like it was torn, 
or somebody punched a hole in it, or just what? 

SC It looked like high velocity oxygen 

ripped it apart. It's - the - the insulation from underneath 
the - the, I guess aluminum covering, is what's come out in 
crumbs and snowflakes and that's what around. We've taped 
it up best we can, so that no more comes out and it's there, 
babe, and I just think we can live with it, that's all, as 
long as we watch the dump valve and the hatch. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0045, GET 84:56 312/2 



CAPCOM Rog, okay. Well, listen, if it's 

floating around a good bit, Gene, there are several ideas 
that you've probably already thought of to clean it up. We've 
found that the stuff adhears pretty well to anything that's 
saturated with water. Take either a Kleenex or those towels 
that you've got, soak them up with water on the fruit border 
of the water gun would be better even, and you can - you can 
kind of mop the stuff up with that, if you can catch it and 
then trap it, and one other thing that you might think about 
doing is placing one of your towels - one of your tarycloth 
towels over the cabin inlet fan, of the inlet to the cabin fan, 
and turning the cabin fans on and this will act as a filter 
and should trap most of it. 

SC Okay, Joe. Thank you. I think our 

major problem in the command module is solved. We've got 
most all of that over the last three days. It's the LM where 
most of it is right now. I understand you're still saying 
the same thing on the cabin fans and the LM, huh? 

CAPCOM It'll be a little harder to get 

to the inlet, or intake on that fan in the LM, Gene . You can 
try it if you think it's worth it. 

SC No, I don't really, Joe. I think 

the big problem is solve it for the next flight. I think we 
can handle it as long as we keep that hatch clean. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

SC It can't hurt us - It can't hurt us 

no more to breathe it anymore. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

SC One other little item. I forgot 

about Snoopy. 

CAP COM Okay, go. 

SC I didn't - I didn't get a chance to 

drink much of the water, but I took about 8 or 10 big, good, 
gulps, and I got about 4 good gulps of air. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy. 

CAPCOM Okay, 10. Houston again. In order 

to - to reduce primary loop temperature during your sleep 
period, we'd like to power down, oh, we got three attitudes 
we'd like for you to power down. On panel 7, we'd like the 
SPS electronics power switch to ECA. And on panel 100, we'd 
like G&N power optics off, and up there on panel 2, we'd like - 

SC Wait, wait a minute. 

CAPCOM Okay, okay. 

SC Okay, now it was on panel 7 you 

wanted what, Joe? 

CAPCOM Roger, SCS electronics power switch 

to ECA. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 0066, GET 85;06, 313/1 



SC Okay now that was on panel 

7, you wanted what Joe? 

CAPCOM Roger, SCS, electronics power 

switch to ECA. 

SC Okay, SCS electronics power 

to ECA? 

CAP COM Roger, that's affirmative. 

SC Joe, come back with that one 

in about 5 minutes we'll talk to you about it. There's 
some discussion about it up here. 

CAP COM Okay, how about the portable 

water heater to off. That's on panel 2. 

SC We'll do that for you. Okay 

portable water heater, that's off. 

CAP COM Okay, G&N power optics off on 

panel 100. 

SC Okay that's off on panel 100. 

G&N power optics. 

CAPCOM Okay. 10, Houston here, one 

more thing we'd like to have the H2 fans 1 and 2 both off 
please . 

SC Okay there off, Joe and I did 

cycle them just a little while ago by the way. 

CAP COM Okay, thank you. 

SC How's the comm set up, Joe. 

We acquired you on REAC and looks like we're doing real 
fine right now. REAC in medium beam list is that okay. 

CAPCOM Roger, you're coming in real 

good, Gene. 

SC Is that okay for sleep then. 

CAPCOM Stand by we'll get a good 

read out on it. Apollo 10, Houston here. We've got 2 more 
items right now. First of all we'd like to verify you're 
going to make a canister change here before you go to bed, 
and we'd like to have an 0 2 purge. 

SC Okay, I'll verify, we will make 

the change and will give you the 0 2 purge right now. ... 

CAP COM Roger. 

SC You know speaking of comm 

Joe I'm amazed this is a quarter million miles away. Maybe 
half a million miles coming and going and it's really outstanding. 

CAPCOM Yea, we sure agree with that 

Gene. We were really amazed at how clear you were coming in 
on voice on those ominies. 

SC I'll tell you one thing it's 

a lot better than the simulator. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

SC Maybe we ought to have a 

relay station on the moon so that the CMS can work with 
the LMS . 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0055, GET 85:06, 313/2 



CAPCOM Yea, agree there. Okay 10, 

thie is Houston. Gene we'd like for you to set up your 
antenna here in narrow beam and REAC which will be your 
sleep configuration. We can watch it until LOS and make 
sure it's going to work out. 

gc Okay we acquired you in reac 

medium beam here this last time, and I just switched to 
narrow so I assume it's going to work because we picked you 
up this last time on it. 

CAPCOM Roger, that. 

S C Now you watch Snoopy well tonight, 

and make him sleep good and we'll take him out for a walk 
and let him stretch his legs in the morning. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0105, GET 85:16 314/1 

CHARLIE Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie, go ahead. 

CHARLIE Okay, we're going to let battery 

recharge all night, is that correct? 

CAP COM That's affirmative. 

CHARLIE Okydok. 

CAPCOM And Charlie Brown, we'd like for 

you to disable B and C and use B and D rolls and DAP, please 

CHARLIE You want us to use, say - say again 

once more. 

CAPCOM Okay. Disable Bravo and Charlie, 

and use Bravo and Delta. Roll and DAP. 

CHARLIE Disable - disable Bravo and Charlie, 

then use Bravo and Delta roll in the DAP. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

CHARLIE Okay. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

CHARLIE Go ahead, Houston; 10. 

CAP COM Hey, okay, Tom. We'd like, first 

of all, I'd like for you to terminate purge on fuel cell 2 
and start fuel cell 1 purge, If you would. 

CHARLIE I'm sorry, Joe. 

CAPCOM No sweat. 

CHARLIE We're still trying to scramble around 

up here. 

CAPCOM Okay, listen, when you get time, 

I guess we'll get, crew status we'd like to get from you 
are PRD readings and medication and all that sort of thing, 
and the chlorinations all that. Whenever you get a chance, 
or whenever you want to call that down press on and that 11 
about it for tonight, then. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 85:26 CDT 0115 315/1 



CHARLIE BROWN Hello Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

CC Hi Charlie Brown, Houston, go ahead. 

CHARLIE BROWN OK. Reading ... 26036 the 
chimp is 05036 and the LM is 15038. 

CC Okay, we copied all that. 

CHARLIE BROWN The Cernan had nothing, and the 
chimpy had nothing and the limp had 2 aspirins about 30 minutes 
ago. 

CC Okay . 

SC Joe, I took those two because my 

athlethes feet were bothering me. 

CC Okay, we copy that. 

SC And I'm sure much to your joy I might 

go off the air for a while and turn it over to my partners 
in crime. 

CC Okay, the man on the left says that 

sounds like the proper medication on that, one for each foot. 

SC Oh, only one foot was bothering me, 

I didn't know I'd only have to take one. I'll see you later. 

CC Okay. Let's see, I guess, are you 

still purging fuel cell one there Gene, we can't monitor that 
down here. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go Houston. 

CC Roger Tom, is John still up? 

SC Oh yeah, we're still scribbling around 

here trying to get the place squared away. 

CC Okay, you might check and see if 

wants to talk over landmark tracking tonight or if he wants 
to wait until morning to go over some of that. 

SC Apollo, Houston, say again about 

landmark tracking. 

CC Rog. John, the guys in the back room 

have come up with some critique on the marking if you're 
interested in discussing it. 

SC Sure, go ahead. 

CC Okay, talk about Fl first. The marking 

on that was just great, the timing between mark was just what 
they were looking for. One comment here, they observed your 
pitch rate at about 2/10ths of a degree per second and they 
know how it appeared to you that its their opinion that it 
increased it just a little better to give you maximum marking 
time. But the marks on F 1 were really great. On Bl, 
you probably, you obviously noted the problem. It appeared 
that you started marking about a minute and a half early. Your 
spacing was good, and I guess you noticed then if you weren't 
sure, didn't have it below you then you took quite a while 
between the fourth and fifth mark and your pitch rate on that 
one was about .15 degrees per second and it was a little bit 
too low to get the maximum marking time. The last mark was 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GET 85:26 CDT 0115 315/2 



pretty near the turning limit as you probably observed. Have 
you got any comments on the Bl, the marks were still good 
except for there but they're not quite as good as on Fl . 
It was pretty good OJT for the first crack at it. 

SC That Fl is a great big crater. So 

what I did was I turned the little crater on the edge of it. 
I couldn't even - the whole - the Fl that I was tracking was • 
my whole optics was clean down inside of it. 

CC Schmitt back here says that's great. 

The way to do it. 

SC And that Bl is no small crater either. 

CC Comment on the one and a half minute 

early mark, John. Did we pass you up the time that was wrong 
or did you start a little early or what. 

SC I just started marking whenever I 

saw it. I can see that that's what you ought to do. You see 
the thing comes out from behind the lunar module and it's 
acquisition is - you really got to hurry on it. So I wasn't 
really paying attention to the clock. When I'm flying it 
by myself I want to get the first mark at least as soon as 
I can. I get a feel for this thing and I think it will work 
out alright. 

CC Okey Doke,- no problem. That was 

what we were wondering if you had really started on the 
TP time or if you started early or perhaps we passed you up 
a piece of time that was a little early. And I guess that's 
about all the comments we got here, John. 

SC I think it went okay. 

CC Rog, we concur that it was a good 

mark . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0125, GET 85 ; 36 316/1 

CAPCOM today, and got a big day 

tomorrow so let's go to sleep, get ready for it. 

sc yea we concure that. We re getting 

a little bushed up here and we're just about to turn in and 
fix breakfast. 

CAPCOM DEKE wants you to hurry up and 

eat. He says he's getting hungry. 

sc Okay. Hey DEKE don't forget 

to skip lunch today. You didn't have time for It. 

CAP COM Okay he's one up on you. He 

only gets 1 meal tomorrow then I guess. 

' | c That's right. Keep him honest. 

DEAD AIR 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0135, GET 85:46 317/1 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, Joe. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. We got about a minute 

and a half, a minute 45 till LOS. There's a couple of things 
we'd like to confirm. First of all, we'd like to make sure 
you're in AUTO RCS , if you disable Bravo and Charlie quads, 
and that you set up Bravo and Delta roll in the DAP, and 
also we'd like to confirm with Gene that they did close out 
the cabin after transferring power. We want to make sure 
that he - that he got the circuit breakers status for the 
checklist. We just - we just want a confirm on that. 

SC (garbled) Everything is squared 

away there. We're still trying to eat, get a little things 
squared here, that's why we haven't got to the DAP, yet. 
We'll get it. 

CAPCOM Okay, mighty fine, Tom. We re just 

about a minute from LOS. We just want to confirm those things. 

SC Okay. 

CAP COM And I guess we'll be losing COMM 

with you pretty shortly, you about ready to turn it in for 
the night? 

SC Yeah. I think we made have one quick 

contact with you before we sack out. We want to make sure 
we get called on time because it's going to be a busy day. 

CAPCOM Roger, sure is. You saying you 

may contact us again coming around the other side? 

SC Right, we may do that. 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll be waiting. 

SC We'll call you. 

CAPCOM Roger that. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We've had 

loss of signal now. We'll reacquire the spacecraft again in 
45 minutes 39 seconds. And as you heard, Tom Stafford advised 
that the crew possibly would be up at that time, but we'll 
wait to hear from them in the event that they have been able 
to take care of the activities that they need to get squared 
away before they begin their sleep period. And in that case, 
we would not want to awaken them. At 85 hours 51 minutes, 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 002A, GET 86:34, 318/1 



PAO This is Apollo control 86 hours 

35 minutes- We're about 50 seconds now from acquiring 
Apollo 10 as the spacecraft comes back on the front side 
of the moon for its 6 revolution. Before losing signal, 
going behind the moon, Tom Stafford advised that he and the 
crew maybe asleep as they come around on the front side and 
we reacquire this pass. He said if the crew was still up and 
about they would give us a call. So we'll be standing by 
and if we don't receive a call from the spacecraft, we don't 
intend to put one in from here. We're now 10 seconds, we're 
coming up on 10 seconds from acquisition of signal. In 
the event that we don't hear from the crew of course, we 
will be getting another look at all of the spacecraft systems 
we haven't seen them for some 46 minutes. And we have conformation 
of acquisition of signal. 

SC Houston to Apollo 10, over. 

CAPC0M Roger 10, this is Houston, 

go ahead. 

SC Roger, could you take a look 

at the Dap and see if that's what you want? 

CAPCOM Okay, we sure will. 

SC It sounds like it's really using 

alot of fuel out there. I don't know, maybe we haven't got the right 
thing set up here. 

CAPCOM Okay, John we'll take a look 

at it . 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, on these RCS jets we'd 

like to confirm. I think maybe the problem may be in 
which ones we've got on and off and what we'd like to do 
is to turn off or disable C2 which is minus roll and B2 which 
is minus roll. That's Charlie 2 and Bravo 2 and bravo 4 which 
is minus yaw. 

SC Okay, but now wait a minute 

we had to turn off the B4 and B3 because ... did the high 
gain, because ... did the high gain antenna. 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, this is Houston, 

Roger, this configuration will take care of that, although 
I gave you 1 wrong thruster here. Let me go over the one 
we'd like disabled or turned off again. That'll be Charlie 
3 instead of Charlie 2, so it's Charlie 3 which is + pitch, 
bravo 4 which is minus yaw and bravo 2 which is minus roll. 
Those 3 we want disabled, and I have 2 of them to turn 
on as soon as you get those. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 GET 86:44 CDT 0234 319/1 

CC - one disabled and I have two of 

them to turn on as soon as you get those. 

SC Okay, I got those turned off. 

CC Okay, and then I'd like for you 

to turn on alpha 1 and alpha 2, alpha 1 plus roll and 
alpha 2 minus roll. 

SC Okay. 

CC Okay, that configuration ought to 

do it, Tom. How the sleep going, are you the only one 
awake or have you got everybody awake and running around 
in there? 

SC I put everybody to sleep. But, 

now wait a minute, C4 and B3 are also off, you know that? 

CC Okay, roger that's right. We're 

turning off the entire B and C, Bravo and Charlie, 

SC Okay, so this configuration that 

we've got on the (garble) RCS switch, which is now compatable 
with the DAP is that correct? 

CC Okay, that's confirmed. It is 

compatable . 

SC Okay. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. 

SC Go ahead. 

CC Yeah, John, we realize this con- 

figuration is different than the one you've been used to 
seeing in the PTC but this is the normal orbital lunar 
configuration and G&C has checked it over and they're sure 
that this the way we want to be set up. 

SC Okay. We just heard a lot of 

noise out there and I figured I'd better wait up 
and check with you guys to make sure we're doing the 
right thing. 

CC Okay, we sure appreciate it. Why 

don't you go ahead and get some sleep now, you've got a 
big day. 

CC 10, this is Houston. G&C says 

you can probably expect more finds now that we're in 
lunar orbit because we're holding an attitude to keep the 
antenna position right. You may expect a lot more finds 
than we had when we were PTC. 

SC Roger, understand that. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We don't 

expect any further ccon vers at ion with the crew on the pass, 
In the event that we do hear anything, we'll come back up 
and play it back for you. At the present time Apollo 10 
is about 48 minutes from loss of signal, at the point at 
which it will be going behind the moon on this the sixth 
revolution. And we're 87 hours 22 seconds now into the 
mission. This is Apollo Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0335, GET 87:47 320/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 87 hours 

47 minutes. We're about 1 minute 20 seconds now from LOS 
and it appears that all 3 crewmen are asleep at this time. 
We have about 5 and a half hours of sleep period left. At 
present time the space craft is in an orbit 61 nautical miles 
by 59 nautical miles and our velocity is about 5 thousand 3 hundred 
43 feet per second, or about 1 mile per second. We are now 
30 seconds from loss of signal as the spacecraft approaches 
the end of its sixth revolution. And after having observed 
all spacecraft systems on both the LM and the CSM flight 
controllers here in mission control have concluded that 
everything is continuing to function normally. And we are 
now showing loss of signal. We'll reacquire Apollo 10 in 
46 minutes at which time we'll get another look at all the 
spacecraft systems continuing to moniter the performance of 
both snoopy and Charlie Brown. At 87 hours 49 minutes this 
is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 88:32, CDT 0421, 321/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 88 hours 32 minutes 

now into the flight of Apollo 10. We're 1 minute 50 seconds 
from reacquiring Apollo 10 as the spacecraft comes around 
the front of the moon on its seventh revolution. We don't 
anticipate any communication with the crew. It appears that 
they are all asleep. At least that was the indication we 
had prior to losing signal from the spacecraft on the previous 
revolution. We will stand by for acquisition of signal and 
we'll listen briefly and in case we should get any call from 
the spacecraft. We're now 30 seconds from reacquiring 
Apollo 10 and here in Mission Control we're also in the midst 
of a change of shift. Flight director, Pete Frank and his 
Orange Team of flight controllers coming on to replace the 
Maroon Team headed by flight director, Milton Windier. And 
we're still standing by for confirmation from the network 
controller that we do have acquisition of data from the space- 
craft. And we've been advised by the network controller that 
we do have data from the spacecraft at this time. This is 
Apollo Control. It's now 5 minutes 10 seconds into the front- 
side pass on this, the seventh revolution around the moon. 
We'll have loss of signal in 1 hour 7 minutes, approximately 
from now. And we'll continue to monitor spacecraft systems 
and stand by should the crew awake and decide to put in a 
call to the control center here. We have about 4-1/2 hours 
left in the present rest cycle. And all indications at this 
time are that the crew are all sleeping. A change of shift 
press briefing is scheduled. We expect that will occur in 
about 20 minutes at about 10 minutes to five central daylight 
time. At 88 hours 41 minutes, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0 5 36, GET 89:47 322/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control. 89 hours 

47 minutes ground elapsed time. Apollo 10 spacecraft has 
just gone over the hill. The end - toward the end of the 
seventh lunar revolution. We have some 44 minutes 15 seconds 
until acquisition of signal again. Apollo 10 crew is still 
asleep. Lunar orbit measurements are 61.5 nautical mile 
apogee, 58.7 nautical mile perigee. As you were - those are 
apocynthion and pericynthion respectively to get into lunar 
terminology rather than earth terminology. And it shows 
the next revolution acquisition of signal at 92 hours 32 minutes 
25 seconds. The orange team of flight controllers have settled 
in for tonight's activities. Coming up on manning of the 
lunar module. Preparations for today's rendezvous sequence, 
and at 89 hours 49 minutes ground elapsed time, this is 
Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0621, GET 90:32, 323/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 90 hours 

32 minutes ground elapse time. We've j u6 t had acquisition 
of signal as Apollo 10 came over the hill beginning the 
8th revolution around the moon. The crew has a little less 
than 2 hours remaining in the sleep period before beginning 
a very busy day. Powering up, manning the Lunar module and 
doing the complete rendezvous sequence, which will include 
a sweep down within 8 nautical miles of the lunar surface 
quite near Apollo landing site number 2. We have an hour 
and 11 minutes remaining in this revolution before loss 
of signal. If the crew should waken and begin talking to 
the ground we'll come up again with the circuit, and at 
90 hours 33 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 7:33 AM, GET 9144 324/1 



PA 0 This is Apollo Control, 91 hours, 

44 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We've just had loss of signal 
from Apollo 10 as it went over the hill on the 8th revolution, 
lunar revolution. The spacecraft systems are functioning ex- 
tremely well. In fact, ony of the shortest hourly reports on 
record has just come into the Control Center from the space- 
craft analysis staff support room, about a half a page long. 
And most of the entries say systems performance normal. No 
change in status, and so on. As the spacecraft went over the 
hill, Commander - Apollo 10 Commander Tom Stafford had a 
heart rate of about 53, respiration rate 8; the Command Mod- 
ule Pilot John Young had a heart rate of 57, respiration 11; 
cabin pressure holding at 4.9 pounds per square inch; cabin 
temperature 77 degrees Fahrenheit; orbital weight now calcu- 
lated at 68,144 pounds. Apollo 10 is in a 58.4 by 61.7 nau- 
tical mile lunar orbit. One hour and 25 minutes until alarm, 
wakeup alarm time. We'll have acquisition of signal again at 
92 hours, 30 minutes through Madrid, which is just less than 
an hour from now. At 9 1 hours, 46 minutes Ground Elapsed Time 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT: 0819, 92:30 GET 325/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control, 92 hours, 30 

minutes ground elapsed time. We've just had acquisition of 
signal from Apollo 10 as it came around from the back side 
of the moon on the 9th revolution. The nominal awake time 
is some 40 minutes away, however, if it appears the crew is 
awake at the present time, we'll begin the day's activities. 
The flight surgeon will sample the incoming biomedical data 
to try to determine whether they indeed are awake, from heart 
rate, respiration and so on, he can tell pretty well what a 
man's status is. No call from the crew yet. After the crew 
has awakened, their first job of course will be to have 
breakfast, report their crew status on sleep to the ground 
here in Mission Control Center, get a flight plan update on 
the day's activities, and prepare to repressurize the lunar 
module and the lunar module pilot will be the first man 
across into the LM through the tunnel, at about 94 hours, 30 
minutes ground elapsed time, followed some 10 minutes later 
with the commander going over; Tom Stafford. Heart rates and 
respiration rates are up slightly above what they were at 
LOS on the - or loss of signal - at the 8th revolution. 
Still waiting word from the surgeon as to whether the men 
are awake or not. Surgeon reported to the Flight Director 
Pete Frank here, that it appears that the crew is still in 
light sleep; Flight Director said, "We'll leave them alone 
for awhile." Next loss of signal as the spacecraft goes 
around the back side of the moon again on this revolution 
will be some 1 hours, 8 minutes from now. Still no conversa- 
tion with the spacecraft; we'll come back up when the 
communications do start for the day's activities, and at 
92 hours, 35 minutes, ground elapsed time, this is Apollo 
Control . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 0840, GET 9250 326/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 92 hours 51 

minutes ground elapsed time. We are anticipating a wake-up 
call to the crew of Apollo 10, which will be in the form of 
music again, apparently. Standing by for music to go up to 
the crew; pleasant way to start the day. 

Rendition of "The Best Is Yet to Come." 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. Reveille, 

reveille. 

SC Roger, understand reveille. I didn t 

think that sounded like the Marine Corps hymn there, the 
music that was coming up. It did sound pretty good. 

CAP COM Roger, 10, we copy. Go ahead and 

have your breakfast and we are ready to go when you are. 

SC We're a bit ahead of schedule. We've 

already had breakfast and gone through the redundant component 
check . 

CAPCOM Roger. We have a consumables update 

and flight plan update when you are ready. 
SC Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger. Your consumables u-pdate 

valid at 93 hours; your RCS total was 77 percent; Quad A 75 
percent; Quad B 81 percent; Quad C 77 percent; D 81 percent; - 

SC Go ahead, Houston, with the consum- 

able and flight plan update, Jack. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston, how do you read? 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Apollo 10, Houston, over. 

SC We read you loud - we read you loud 

and clear, Jack. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Apollo 10, Houston. Your 

consumables update follows. Valid at 93 hours; RCS total 77 
percent; Quad A 75 percent; Quad B 81 percent; Quad charlie 
77 percent; Quad delta 81 percent; that's 8 percent ahead of 
your flight plan. Your H2 total 32.5 pounds; 02 total 435 
pounds , over. 

SC Rog, we got it. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. I have a flight plan up- 

date when you are ready. 

SC Okay, go ahead with it, over. 

CAPCOM Okay. At the end of your postsleep 

checklist, add these items. At 93 + 45 terminate battery B 
charge. At 9350, dump waste water to 36 percent, I repeat, 
to 36 percent. All lunar activities are about 12 minutes 
later than the flight plan. I have your nominal burn times, 
if you want them. 

SC No, we will get that later, Jack, 

thank you. 

CAPCOM Houston, roger. 

SC Okay, that was terminate battery B 

charge on waking up and dump the waste water to 36 percent. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0840, GET 9250 326/2 



CAPCOM Roger, 10, that's affirmative. 

SC la that all the update? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, that's the end of the up- 

date. 

SC Okay, thank you. 

SC Good morning, Smiling Jack. 

CAPCOM Good morning. You boys have been 

up a while , I see . 

SC Yes, we tried to sneak up on it by 

just about a half hour or so. 

SC Or more. 

CAP COM Roger, 10, I know you're busy. If 

you have some time to listen sometime when you are interested, 
I have the local newspaper again. 

SC Go ahead, we would like to listen 

to it. 

CAPCOM Okay. One kind of interesting thing 

was John's horoscope this morning, says "everybody you know 
has something helpful to offer. Listen carefully while you 
make the rounds quickly. Put in a busy day and assemble your 
results in the evening." Now here goes the news. Spring- 
field, Massachusetts; it seems that Springfield Technical 
College has told President Edmund T. Garvey they were taking 
over the Administration Building. Garvey was nonplussed. 
The students, about 40 in number, marched into the building 
Wednesday night armed with mops, brooms, scrub brushes and 
staged a "clean-in." They said they would clean all night. 
A student spokesman said the clean-in at the 1200-member 
campus was to support the administrative policies of the 
2-year school. Sari, Morrocco; on Friday, Thor Heyerdahl 
will get out from here to cross the Atlantic in a papyrus 
boat. The man who must keep his papyrus boat together with 
rope and string bought his third wife this year, and is now 
complaining about the price. She cost about 60 dollars in 
Egypt, much more than the going rate in Chad, where Abu 
Debrine learned how to make papyrus boats and hitched onto 
Heyerdahl* s expedition. If he succeeds in reaching Mexico 
in his boat, modeled after a 4700-year old Egytian craft, 
Heyerdahl will consider he has strengthened the argument 
that the great early civilization of the Americas - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 93:00 CDT 0850 327/1 



CAPCOM If he succeeds in reaching Mexico in his 

boat, modeled after a 4700 year old Egyptian craft, Heyerdahl 
will consider he has strengthened the argument that the great 
early civilization of the Americas learned from the pharaohs. 
Debrine is packing pictures of wives A and B , smiling side 
by side, into his kit for the reed boat trip. A photo of 
wife C, who has less seniority but is more expensive, gets 
a less prominent place. Good grief, Charlie Brown. Paris, 
Allied negotiators headed into the Vietnam talks today with 
what sources close to the meeting said were optimism that 
discussions and proposals by President Nixon and the Viet 
Cong could bring progress. U.S. delegation sources said 
Henry Cabot Lodge, Chief U.S. Negotiator, would comment on 
the Viet Cong's 10 point peace plan Washington said included 
some points meriting further study. The chief North Vietnamese 
negociator indicated he and his Viet Cong counterpart were 
still studying the Nixon 8 point proposal. Washington: Warren 
E. Burger, an Appeals Court judge with a reputation for being 
strong on law and order, was picked Wednesday by President 
Nixon to be Chief Justice of the United States. Burger, 
61, a member of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington 
since he appointment by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 
1956, is known as a strict constructionist, the type of judge 
Nixon promised to elevate to the court during his campaign 
last fall. Plymouth England: Solo around the world sailor 
Nigel Tetley was pulled from the Atlantic by a tanker crew 
today when his boat sank 14 days from home. Tetley 's wife, 
on hearing the news, said, "It is a home that is gone. All 
my pots and pans have gone to the bottom of the sea." Tetley 
was competing in a global race sponsored by a London newspaper. 
Moscow: Moscow TV showed the Apollo 10 astronauts in a 
1 minute broadcast. It said it was live from the American 
space capsule. And do you remember that unemployed local 
philosopher? He now says that while he believes in the future 
of color television, he thinks that because of your flight 
it will go round and round in people's minds for a while yet. 
Here is a sports story: Houston 3, Montreal 2, and Houston has 
just climbed out of the cellar. New York 5, Atlanta 0; 
Chicago at Los Angeles, a night game; just heard from the 
back room that Los Angeles beat Chicago. Over. 
SC Boo. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 is almost 

directly over landing site 3 near the lunar equator and 
longitude 0 on the visible face of the moon. The crew - 

CAP COM Houston, we've got a couple of items here 

we'd like your help on. We have a temperature rise in the 
helium tank in quad alpha, so what we'd like you to do after 
LOS we'd like you to roll 180 degrees and then come back to 
the normal attitude at AOS for S-band acquisition. In addition, 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 93:00, CDT 0850 327/2 



CAPCOM we'd like your crew status report and 

we'd like you to include some information on the cabin 
environment during the night to see if there is any change 
in it since the evaporators were not on the line. Over. 

SC Yes, it was fine. It's its normally 

chilly self. .We didn't need to turn off all that stuff. 

CAPCOM Understand, roger. 

SC Okay, could we have an update on when 

you expect LOS? Over. 

CAP COM Okay, 10, LOS is going to be at 93:42, 

and AOS will be at 94:29. Over. 

SC Roger, 93:42 and 94:29. 

SC Okay, Jack, on that roll do you want a 

roll to 180 degrees, or a roll of DELTA angle of 180 degrees? 

CAPCOM 10, we want you to roll a DELTA angle 

of 180 degrees. 

SC Okay, that's what I figured, just trying 

to clarify it, though. 

CAPCOM Roger, 10. 

SC Jack, the ECS redundant component check 

is complete and it looks good from here. 
CAPCOM Roger, 10, we copy. 

SC Jack, crew status report, we all had 

about 6 pretty good hours sleep. We've eated breakfast - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 0900, GET 9310 328/1 



SC Jack, crew status report. We all 

had about 6 pretty good hours of sleep. We've eaten break- 
fast this morning, and the readings on the dosimeters are, 
in order, 26037, 05307, 15039. 

CAPCOM Okay, Gene, we copy 6 hours sleep 

and 26037, 05307, 15039. Thank you. 

SC The cryo fans have been cycled, 

redundant component check is complete. I'm about ready to 
purge the H2 here in about 5 minutes and then we'll get the 
battery and the water dump here before too long. I might 
take the batteries off the line, that charge off the line, 
maybe 10 - 15 minutes early, if it's compatible with our 
suiting up and everything. 

CAP COM Roger, we copy, and the battery 

action is all right by us. 

SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like you 

to cycle the heaters on the hydrogen cryo tanks, number 1 OFF 
and number 2 AUTO. Over. 

SC 1 OFF and 2 AUTO, Jack. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you. 

SC And I'm ready to purge the fuel cells. 

I'll start with fuel cell 3, oxygen then hydrogen. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. We're standing by. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Apparently 

the crew is busy at the present time doing some housekeeping 
chores, washing the breakfast dishes, and so on. The wakeup 
call which turned out not to be a wakeup at all because the 
crew had already been awake and had had breakfast, was play- 
ing up to the crew Tony Bennett's record of "The Best Is Yet 
To Come." The crew reported they all had 6 hours of good 
solid sleep. They gave their radiation dosimeter readings 
on all three crewmen, and from the ground they were given 
flight plan updates of a few changes in the flight plan, 
moving a few operations around slightly. We're still 23 min- 
utes away from loss of signal on this the 9th revolution 
around the moon. We'll continue to monitor the air-to-ground 
and leave the circuit live until we do have loss of signal. 
Ground Elapsed Time is now 93 hours, 19 minutes. Acquisition 
of signal, the next revolution, 10th revolution, will be at 
94 hours, 28 minutes, 50 seconds. The crew has not as yet 
been passed up the new times for the maneuver sequence, all 
the maneuvers that have to go into the rendezvous such as the 
descent orbit insertion, the phasing, coelliptic sequence, 
constant delta height, etc. These likely will be read up to 
them during the next revolution. Apollo Control standing by 
on air-ground for resumption of communications with Apollo 10. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 0910, 93:20 GET 329/1 



PAQ - by on air to ground for resumption 

of communications with Apollo 10. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston. I have a map- 

up date for rev 10 if you want it. 

SC Hold it just a minute Jack. 

SC Hello Houston, this is 10; are you 

reading us? 

CC That's affirm. Loud and clear. 

SC Okay, fine. Houston, the fuel cell 

purge is complete; the H2 purge line heater is OFF and I'd 
like to go ahead and terminate battery B charging at this time. 

CC Roger, we copy. Stand by 1 on the 

batt. Apollo 10, Houston; you are clear to terminate battery 
charge . 

SC Okay, thank you Jack. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT: 0920, 93:30 GET 330/1 

cc Apollo 10, Houston. We'd like you 

to verify that all the fans are OFF in the cryo tanks; over. 

sc Negative Jack; I had them cycling; 

thank you, I'll turn them off at this time. 

CC Houston; roger. 

Sc I got too many meters running I guess 

right now. 

CC Take your time, but hurry. 

gC Jack, give me another hack on when 

LOS is, would you, and AOS? 

CC All right; LOS is at 93:42; AOS is at 

94:29, and I have your map up dates for 10 and 11 when you're 
ready . 

SC Okay, Jack, go ahead. 

CC Okay, map update; rev 10. 093 42 40 

093 54 35 094 28 50; sunrise 093 52 22, sunset 095 04 46, 
rev 11, 095 41 06, 095 52 52 096 27 16, sunrise 095 50 58, 
sunset 097 03 22; over. 

SC Okay, Jack, I got all those and good; 

I don't need to read them back. 

CC Houston; roger. 

SC I think we're in pretty good shape 

except for the waste water dump which we've got yet to go 
right now. 

CC Roger, we copy. And you're dumping 

to 36 percent. 

SC Okay, we'll dump to 36. Houston, 

we're starting the waste water dump now. 

CC Roger 10; we copy. 

CC Apollo 10, Houston; we want to remind 

you to actuate your GDC optics power, and potable water; over. 

SC Okay, optics power coming on right 

now and potable water GDC ON. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT 09 30, GET 9340 331/1 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control, 1 minute 

to loss of signal as Apollo 10 goes around behind the moon 
in the 9th revolution. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We're going to 

lose you around the corner. We'll pick you up in about 46 
minutes . 



SC Okay, to give you a status, we ve 

wo guys, one suited, John's getting suited. I'm 



on my 



got two guys, one 

way to the LM here as soon as we complete the waste water 
dump . 

CAP COM Roger. 

p^O This is Apollo Control. We have 

had loss of signal with Apollo 10. The crewmen who will go 
aboard the LM, the Commander and the Lunar Module Pilot, are 
now preparing to repressurize the LM, go in through the tunnel, 
power up all the LM systems, complete the checkout, and pre- 
pare for the day's activities which will be about an 8-hour 
sequence of several maneuvers in lunar orbit to simulate 
everything but an actually landing, the lunar landing mission 
that will be carried out on Apollo 11. Some 44 minutes to 
acquisition of Apollo 10 on the next revolution. That will 
be at 94 hours, 28 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. And at 93 
hours, 44 minutes Ground Elapsed Time this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 1018, 94:29 GET 332/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control, 94 hours, 29 

minutes ground elapsed time. We should have acquisition of 
signal now in the 10th revolution as Apollo 10 comes around 
from behind the moon. We should, for the first time, begin 
hearing the call signs, "Snoopy" for the lunar module and 

h6re Go ahead Apollo 10, Houston. 

Roger, Tom and Gene are in the LM 

Roger; we copy. 
CHARLIE brown We've gotten through the steps; we 
changed the canisters; we've got the LM power on, LM power 
cables are disconnected and stowed; I and Tom are in our 
PGA's, and you got the roll cal from last night. 

cc That's affirmative; we have that. 

cc Apollo 10, this is Houston. We'd 

like to have the CMC for an uplink. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger; wait a second. I read you 
guys loud and clear. You have POO and accept Houston. 
CC Houston; roger. 

sc We just got a VHF BEAT check and its 

says you can't believe 



CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
checking things out 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 



so much better than the simulator, 
it, and I agree. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
on S band. 
CC 

Snoopy yet. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
reading you 
CC 



Roger 10; thank you. 

Houston, Snoopy is giving you a call 



we're not reading 

They are 



Okay, Charlie, 



Are you reading them Gene? 
there , Hous t on . 

Snoopy, this is Houston. We are not 
reading you. Hello Snoopy, this is Hous - 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Snoopy is calling you and he 
reads you apparently. 

Cc Okay, Snoopy, understand you are 

reading us; we are not reading you yet; you might try down 



voice back up 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

do you read; over. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
you hear him? 



He is using down voice back up. 
Hello Snoopy, this is Houston. How 

He wants to know how you read Geno ; 

Charlie, this is Houston. 



We are not 

reading Snoopy. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
How do you read; over. 

cc Hello there, Snoopy. This is Houston, 

Reading you now, but quite a bit of noise in the background. 



Roger. He's changing antennas now. 
Houston, Houston; this is Snoopy. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 1018, 94:29 GET 332/2 

SNOOPY Okay, how do you read me now Jack? 

Cc Okay, Snoop; I don't hear the noise 

now but you're way down in the mud. 

SNOOPY Okay, 1*11 try and talk louder. But 

the noise was cause I was on ... down voice back up again; 
I have a high freq in here; I'll bring you up to date - you 
might get your activation and checkout list and wait 1 second - 
I'll tell you where we are. 

CC Okay, Snoopy - we've got the - we ve 

got - 

SNOOPY (garble) 

CC Snoopy, this is Houston; we've got 

the checklist out; be advised you are still down in the mud. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm yelling as loud as I can. 

We are on page 29. On page 29. I just finished the LGT filter 
- the spacecraft is all GO; I found nothing wrong with it; Tom 
is in here suited. He's up through page 29. I'm ready to do 
the S band T/R power amplifier check, and then I will do the 
steerable check and I will go out and get suited while Tom 
continues; are you with me? 

CC That's affirmative Snoopy; we are 

reading you. 

SNOOPY Okay - I'm presently on high voltage te«t 

and I'm ready to go S band transmitter receiver secondary 
and power amplifier secondary; are you ready? 

CC Stand by 1. Snoopy; this is Houston; 

go ahead. 

SNOOPY I got your helmet here. Okay, go ahead 

and I'll wait 60 seconds. John, do I have your helmet? 
Hello, Houston, Houston. This is Snoopy. Hpw do you read on 
secondary? 

CC Snoopy, this is Houston; we have a lot 

of noise in the background; hearing you very weakly. 

SNOOPY Okay, I hear you loud and clear, I'll go 

back to primary at this time. 

CC Roger; hear you're going back to 

primary . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1028, GET 9439 333/1 



CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 
Snoopy is ready to do the steerable S-Band antenna check, 
over. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown, over. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. Request 

you try turning your ranging switch off, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN They want you to try turning your 
ranging switch off, Gene. 

SNOOPY (garble) 

CAPCOM Okay, 10, we're still hearing you 

very weakly, and a lot of background noise, over. 
SNOOPY (garble) 

CAP COM Hello, Snoopy, this is Houston. Go 

ahead with the steerable check, over. 
SNOOPY (garble) 
CHARLIE BROWN Yes, just about. 

CAPCOM Charlie, this is Houston. We're 

still reading Snoopy very weakly with a lot of background 
noise so you may have to relay some. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Snoopy, we're at the attitude. 

SNOOPY Okay, and I should have good high 

gain lock. Hello, Houston, this is Snoopy. How do you read 
on high gain? 

CAPCOM Oh, that's much much better now, 

Snoop . 

SNOOPY Okay, I don't know if that's any 

sign. That was a piece of cake. I hope it works that way. 

CAPCOM You're coming in loud and clear now, 

Snoopy . 

SNOOPY Okay, Jack, things are going, so far, 

real well up in here. I'm about ready to go off the loop 
here, go back and get suited up, and we'd like to stay ahead 
of the game if we can. All my voltages look real good. Just 
to bring you up to date, I'm reading 30.2 on the Commander's 
bus and 30.2 on the Systems Engineer's bus. Inverter number 
2 is in the high side of the green. Battery number 6 is read- 
ing 37 and battery number 5 is reading 37. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, Gene. 

SNOOPY And our glycol temperatures started 

out at about 70 or 75 and came down very slowly, and is now 
within the green band. I guess it's about 50 - 48 degrees 
right now. Our steam pressure looks good, within the nominal 
limits. And our ambient pressure looks good, and our ascent 
helium pressures look good also. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoopy, we copy. 

SNOOPY Okay, Jack, the next time I see you 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 1028, GET 9439 333/2 



I'll be dressed for the occasion. 

CAPCOM Roger, we'll be looking forward to 

It and we'd also like to keep ahead a little bit. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm going back to suit up. 

CAPCOM Roger, Gene. And Charlie Brown, 

we have a landing site 2 track pad when you're ready. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, landing site 2 track pad, go. 

CAPCOM Roger, 096:47:24, 096:52:24, 000 

270 000 north 11 19 21 - what's this? - and your site is 130. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, 096:47:24, 096:52:24, roll 0, 
pitch 270, yaw 0, north 11 miles. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoopy, and we've got a 1921 

and 130. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes, bet you. 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown. Snoopy would 

like to do VHF A Simplex check now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, going VHF A Simplex. 
SNOOPY Roger, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. How do you 

read? 

SNOOPY Roger, Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. 

I'm reading you loud and clear. How me? Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. How do you 
read? Over. 

SNOOPY Roger, John, you're really blasting 

me out. I'm reading you loud and clear. How do you read ma, 
John? 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. Do you read? 
SNOOPY Roger, I'm reading you loud and 

clear, John. 

CAPCOM Charlie, this is Houston. Snoopy is 

reading you, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog, I know it. I read him loud and 
clear on Bravo. 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. How 

do you read on Simplex A? 

CHARLIE BROWN Tom, I can hear you but just barely. 
I've got the squelch turned all the way off. 

SNOOPY Okay, you're coming through loud and 

clear. I'll tell you what, I'll increase the squelch here a 
little bit. How do you read now, John? 

CHARLIE BROWN I can hear you talking in the back- 
ground, but I don't understand anything you're saying. Let 
me switch antennas. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown, over. 

SNOOPY Roger, John. You're coming through 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1028, GET 9439 333/3 



and loud and clear. 

CHARLIE. BROWN I don't hear you, Tom. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, can we go back to VHP B? 

SNOOPY Let's go back to B Simplex. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1038, GET 9449 334/1 



SNOOPY - clear. 

CHARLIE BROWN I don't hear you, Tom. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Then can we go back to VHF-B? 
SNOOPY Let's go back B. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hello, Houston, this is Charlie 
Brown. Do you have any suggestions? 

CAPCOM Stand by one, Charlie. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, Snoopy. How do you 

read on VHF-B? Can you read me on VHF-B? 

CHARLIE BROWN I read you loud and clear, Tom. 
Let's stay here. 
Okay . 

Can we try duplex B, over. 
S tand by . 

Go ahead on duplex B. 
Snoopy, Charlie Brown. How do you 



SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
read? Over. 

SNOOPY 
loud and clear. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
there a while , 

CAPCOM 
wants to do a 
ing him. 

CHARLIE 
B simplex, Tom. 

SNOOPY 
clear on B simplex, 

CHARLIE BROWN 
work this problen 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 

finished with your computer. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. You 

want* to give me a time hack on VERB 16065? Or your mission 
time. It doesn't matter. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Snoopy, time hack follows: 
945317181920. 

SNOOPY Okay, we're in good shape here. Un- 

til we get an update, it looks good. Let's go and give me 
VERB 0590 11706, see if that's changed and give me the num- 

ber8 ' CHARLIE 'BROWN Roger. VERB 05901 three balls 12 
1325633266. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie, thank you. 



Roger, loud and clear, John, really 

I can't hear you on duplex B, Tom. 
Okay, let's go to B simplex and stay 
John. 

Charlie, this is Houston. Snoopy 
B simplex. He's reading you, you're not read- 
Roger, I read you loud and clear on 

Roger, I'm reading you loud and 
too, John. Let's just stay here. 
Houston, Charlie Brown. Can you 
please? 

We're working on it, Charlie. 
Charlie, this is Houston. We're 
You can go to block. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1038, GET 4949 334/2 
SNOOPY Hello, Houston, this is Snoopy, 

over. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Snoop, Houston standing 

by - 

SNOOPY Okay, if you have high gain lock, 

I'm ready for my E memory dump on page 33. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. Put your 

updata link to data and we are ready for the E memory dump, 
over. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

SNOOPY Updata link to data and E memory 

dump coming at you, mark. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop, we copy. 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead, Gene, this is John. 

SNOOPY Okay, how are we doing? I'm ready 

to do that docked alignment if you are. How are you doing 
there? 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'm about ready. 

SNOOPY Okay, John. When you get all squared 

away, we go in the minimum deadband attitude hold, hold the 
rascal tight and then on your mark, you can give me VERB 06 dump 
why don't you just hold it until I get my alignment squared 
away . 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'm going to SCS and then 
deadband. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we're in mid-deadband. 

SNOOPY Okay, if you're in deadband attitude 

hold and you're all settled down there, give me VERB 06 
NOUN 20, we'll have at it, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog. VERB 06 NOUN 20 is 13807 20094 
00055. 

SNOOPY Okay, reading them back, number 1 

13807, number 2 20094, number 3 00055, over. 
CHARLIE BROWN That is correct. 

SNOOPY Okay, hold it there and we will be 

at it. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 9*:59, CPT 1048 335/1 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. We have 

your dap update pad when you're ready. 

release it, the minimum dead band we re ail 
align and squared away. AUTO. 
CHARLIE BROWN Okay, go back t ™C in A UTO. 

SNOOPY .o^U'SlrJ'Jt "ward and c.U the .found 

S Tife riign? 0 Let* ^noTU j-ll give you the .nter 
on verb 06 noun 20. Are you ready? 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, go ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, 3, 2, 1, mark it. 

CHARLIE BROWN You got it. 

sees. .«». 2?: r.iU£.:°.r.: x »■ . 

1,te Swi' °° e ' i»« * e "» 1 * of ° k * 7 ' 

"-'M; bToSh 4 i^;. 2 ;i-.»«}"i-„i"?*j.' 1 - 0004, • 



SNOOPY 



OKay, pj.u«* x.,»~- r ,000 

„ uur . Ok.y. »a. the fir.t on. 138? 

CHARGE BROW* Hi ght , ^plu* 2 J 38. ^ ^ 

CHARLIE BROWN Right. 



InoOPY Hello Houston, this is Snoopy. 

TAPrOM Go ahead, Snoopy. _ ■ i 

«« »« »»* "* JOh, ' ' 

VeIb "cAPCoT Th.f. .ffir-ti™. «• copi.d 13.01 

2 s S°^ Y PlU " """okay, and her. ar. .y .1—1 -.1- 

»- Ji?^ 1 " 8 0,M ^r.^--.T s ;r,- pl " 16070 

plua 020« ,1- 30 — .'correct'enf^rc ..ill 

< f T awn ^^•s.ss-^v- 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I «.t 3 bails » 13256 »d 33266. 

Tom * * j .u..". a-sractlv what I monitored. If 

S " 0 °IId „v DSKY I ve got i t 3 hall. 1M3256 33266. 0«r. 

you can read my D&ki i ve 

CHARLIE BROWN Instant sock set. 

<f 00 c s; Ks"--st:«i-" Thi, i. snoop,. !•. .oi.. 

to lu „ wa, ahead and get »y rate gyro check out of th. w.y. 

CAPCOM «.««. " 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , GET 94:-59 s CDT 1048 335/2 



CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston 

We re goirjg to ha?a ts do a P52 and Chen rspeat step 7 on 
youT activation 35- 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, you've got to heve & F52 first, 

huh? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

SNOOPY Hey, C.B. 

SNOCPY Hello Houston This is Snoopy, 

1 8 tr standing up here in the hatch. Do you want us to do 
a P52 right now or do you want us to start working on the 
hatch to get th«t out of the way? Over. 

CAPCGM Snoopy, we want you to get the P52 

in before us go LOS , which is going to be in 33 minutes 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, Houston, this is the 

LMP b&ck in Snoopy. 

CAPCOM Roger, we read you loud and clear s 

Geno . 

SNOOPY Okay, Jack, I'm getting on my hoses 

b ere and I'll be with you in a second. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1058, GET 9509 336/1 



CAPCOM Charlie, this is Houston. Let s 

take an option 1 on that. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. 

SNOOPY - except the LM. 

p^O We have 29 minutes left in this 

rev before loss of signal. We're a little more than halfway 
across the visible face of the moon in the 10th revolution. 

SNOOPY Snoopy, I'm going to go ahead with 

the ascent battery activiation and checkout at this time, 
over . 

CAP COM Roger, we copy, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Houston, the voltage on ascent bat- 

teries alone looks like. it's about 30 volts apiece. 
CAPCOM Roger, we copy, Snoop. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, you got those gyro torquing 
angles , over . 

CAPCOM We're copying them down. Stand by. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie, we've got them. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie and Snoopy, we've got 

some switches for you to check on the VHF-B comm situation. 

CHARLIE Roger, go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, for Charlie Brown, this is 

VHF AMA simplex basic check. Your VHF-AMA switch in simplex, 
VHF-AMB in off, VHF-AM receive only in off, VHF ranging off. 
And for Snoopy, VHF transmitter A to voice, VHF receiver A 
to on, and on the commander's audio side the VHF- A trans- 
mit receive to TR. 

SNOOPY Okay, for Snoopy, that was VHF-A 

transmit voice receiver on and what was the last one? 

CAPCOM VHF receiver A to on, and on the 

commander's audio side, the VHF-A TR to TR and check all cir- 
cuit breakers in. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. That was the setup I had 
there. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you, John. 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. How 

do you read me on VHF-A simplex? 

CHARLIE BROWN I read you same as before, Tom, which 
is unreadable. 

SNOOPY John, do you read me any better? 

CHARLIE BROWN Negative. 

CHARLIE BROWN I can hear you through the tunnel. 

SNOOPY Okay, but you don't hear me any 

better, okay. 

CAPCOM Snoopy and Charlie Brown, this is 

Houston. We're ready for you to do step 7 on your coarse 
align procedure. 

SNOOPY Okay, John, how do you read now? 

CHARLIE BROWN (Garble) Snoopy. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1058, GET 9509 336/2 



B? 



CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we're going to have to go 

to - go ahead, Tom, 

SNOOPY Okay, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Are you on duplex B, Tom? 

SNOOPY VERB 06 NOUN - 

CHARLIE BROWN - simplex A? 

SNOOPY - and I'll count you down, okay? 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, Tom, are you on simplex A or 



SNOOPY John, let's don't fool with them. 

We'll go on to B and get this stuff out of the way. 

CAPCOM Charlie, this is Houston. They want 

you to go to simplex B. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, how do you read now? 
SNOOPY John, I'm reading you loud and 

clear. How do you read me, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN I don't read you. 

SNOOPY John, do you read me on simplex B. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes, loud and clear. 

SNOOPY Okay, John, we've got it now. Let's 

go ahead with VERB 06 NOUN 20 and tell me when you are ready 
and I will count you down, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, go. 

SNOOPY Okay, 3, 2, 1, mark. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, +13552 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GDT 1108 s GET 9519 337/1 



SNOOPY Over. 
CHARLIE BROWN Okay, go. 
SNOOPY Okay, 3, 2 C 1, Mark. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay 9 plus 135 52, plus 193 71, 
plus 00 132. 

SNOOPY Okay, I've got all those. Plus 13552, 

plus 19371, plus 00132 t over. 
CHARLIE BROWN Right. 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston, this is Snoopy. 

Ready to copy my angles? Over. 

CAP COM Go ahead, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Okay, my angles are 0620, plus 012. Par- 

don me, my first register plus 16354, plus 01299, plus 35901, 
and I assume that you copy John? Oh, pardon, that's 35906 
on the last register. 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, we copy John and then 

on yours we got plus 16354, plus 01299, plus 35906. 

SNOOPY That's correct, thank you. 

SNOOPY And Houston, this is Snoopy. The 

ascent batteries look good; the backup and normal feed is 
good; and my ED voltage is 37 on A and 37 on B. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 37 on ED c s. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, Snoopy. Our next 

step here is we got to have the hatch closed so 1*11 stand 
by to help you with the probe and drogue when you're ready, 
Babe. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy. How about 

giving me the next LOS and the next AOS time, please? 

CAPCOM Okay, Snoopy, your next LOS will be 

at 95:40, and your next AOS will be at 96:27, and I have some 
LM gyro torque angles for you. 

SNOOPY Stand by half a second. Okay, go 

ahead with the LM gyro torque angle. 

CAPCOM Okay, LM gyro torque X, minus 00730; 

Y, minus 00700; Z, plus 00570. 

SNOOPY Okay, I got X, minus 00730; Y, minus 

00700, and Z is plus 00570. Is that correct? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. You've got them 

right. There's one more thing we can try on our VHF situation. 
We may have the corona built up on our VHF A transmitter, so 
VHF A transmitter switch OFF for several seconds and then back 
to voice, over. 

SNOOPY 1 don't think that will work, Jack. 

When we Just tried it again it had been in the OFF position. 
I put it to voice. We'll give it a try here in a minute though. 



A^'LLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5 22/69, CDT 1108, GIT 9519 337/2 



CAP COM Rog*r. 

SNOOPY I was suiting up while nftis CCMM 

probl-o started. Is It a VHP A Simplex mode. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, fnabie to 

transmit Snoopy to Charlie Brown on VHP *» 

SNOOPY Okay, that sort of i»*s>vs the rang- 

ing capability, doesn't it? 

CAPCOM That's affirm, 

SNOOPY Houston, this ts Snoop?. «hile 

they're closing off th* probe, and drogue. aa«i hatch, I'll 
copy some of those updates, burn update times, if you got 
them. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by one, flesse. Okay, 

Snoopy, we have these bum times They're nominal burn 
times; they'll change m little bit either way- Separation 
is at 98:47:16, DOT 099:46:0 - 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MIS3IOR COMMENTARY, i/Zi/t': GEI 9i;2S, CBT 1118 338/1 

CAPCOM s little bit either way. Separation 

is 984716. DO I 0*94602. Phasing 10058 

SNOOPY Wait a miaute, Jack, wait a minute. 

Wait a minute. Wait a minute, I can only copy them down 

one at a time I want to copy them right in the book. Now 
no on with DOI. 

CAPCOM Roger, 0994602. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, go on with phasing, 

CAP COM Okay, phasing is at 1005825. 

SNOOPY Okay, insertion, 

CAPCOM Insertion is at 1025437, 

CAPCOM And Charlie Erown, this is Houston. 

SNOOPY (garbled) that's all we need right 

DOW ' CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. Your 

roll jets to disable, please, 

CHARLIE BROWN All roll jets - wait - wait a minute, 
we'll - okay, we'll disable the roll jets. Did we maneuver 
to the landmark tracking attitude with just the probe holder? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN We haven't released the capture 
latches yet. Jack. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by, 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 



Over 



CAPCOM Go ahead, Charlie, 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. What's the answer to that 



0nS CAPCOM Okay, the answer to it is that 

as soon as the tunnel is vented you can use your roll jets. 
Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, why don't we just maneuver 
to the attitude first, then, and then free load the drogue, 
then release the latches, 

CAPCOM Charlie, this is Houston. Stand by 

one on rolling to the landmark track attitude. We'd like 
to update the LGC clock. Over. 

CAPCOM And we'll give you a GO when you 

can maneuver to the attitude. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Roger, I'll go in there 
and release the latches then. 

CAPCOM Snoopy Houston. We'd like you to 

put your update link switch to data, please. 

SNOOPY Okay, it is in data. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, Gene, you guys want to put 
your helmets and gloves on and release these latches? 

SNOOPY Yes, I'll give you a call when we 

get them on, John, before you release them. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie Brown, we've got helmets 

and gloves on. You can open the latches. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 95:29, CBT 1118 338/2 



Charlie Brown, this is Snoop, do 

Roger 6 just a second. 

Okay, and we're closing our hatch 

Okay, and I'll disable the roll jets 



SNOOPY 
you read? 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
at this time. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
here . 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Charlie Brown, this is 

Houston. Our uplink is complete and you have a GO for a 
maneuver to the landmark tracking attitude, and we have to 
have the OPS source pressure. Over. 

SNOOPY Stand by one. 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston, this is Snoop. I 

am at 5800 on both OPS's this morning when I came in. 
CAPCOM Roger, Snoop, we copy, 5800. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 1 128, 95:39 GET 339/1 



SNOOPY - 5800 on both OPS's this morning when 

I came In. 

CC Roger Snoopy; we copied. 5800 

Snoopy, this is Houston; we are 1 minute from LOS; I recommend 
you lock your high gain antenna; over. 

SNOOPY Roger; thank you. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. We've had 

loss of signal as the Apollo 10 spacecraft went behind the 
moon in this 10th revolution. We've got about 45 minutes, 15 
seconds until acquisition of signal again. We've got about 
14 minute 8 of color video tape to play back from the May 21st 
TV feed from the spacecraft to the Madrid tracking station, 
which was video taped there and the tape flown to this 
country for a play back, and it was not relayed in real time. 
We'll roll this tape now. 

SC Interior wise, we're giving them 

a look at the star chart which has got some colors of both 
the earth, the sun, the moon and some of the planets - Saturn, 
Jupiter, Venus, Mars. 

CC Roger. 

CC How about putting that pretty patch 

back up there again? 

SC Okay, we'll do that. Tell them this 

is our star chart and how we identify the stars and the planets 
we are looking at right now. This is what we use for star 
navigation; the earth is over here - go ahead. 

CC Roger - our signal's down about - 

SC Go ahead Houston; this is 10. 

CC Roger Geno. Our signal is down about 

10 DP, we'd like you to go high-gain to medium width and then 
back to narrow; over. 

SC Okay, it's medium and I'll go back 

to narrow. 

CC Roger. 

SC How's that? 

CC Stand by. 

SC Okay - the blue ball here, the big 

one is the earth as it progresses through the - through the 
heavens here while we're on this trip- The moon is in yellow, 
and it also progresses through the heavens. Might bring out 
that famous .Apollo 10 simple patch. 

CC Roger; we'd like to - wish we were 

seeing this now but Madrid is going to record it for us, and then 
we'll see it later on; that was a beautiful astronomical des- 
cription of the star chart there, Gene. 

SC I thought you could follow it a little 

closer there Charlie if I told you about that. 

CC Roger. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT : 1128, 95:39 GET 



339/2 



CC Takes me a little while to catch on 

to those things. 

SC Where better can you give an astro- 

nomical description than in an astronomical heaven, huh? 

CC (Laughter.) 

SC I think that's where we are. This 

PTC REFSMAT really helps you with your orientation of the stars, 
even if you can't see it, you can kinda feel from where they 
oughta be, which I think is gonna help us out. 

CC Roger, 10; we are still having a 

problem; we'd like you to go to wide beam for 30 seconds and 
then back to narrow. Over. 

SC Okay - we're in wide beam. 

CC Roger; we'll probably lose the TV 

for a little whilej we'd like you to keep going, the next time 
around, and maybe we can get a better picture; Madrid is having 
a little bit of trouble. 

SC Charlie, you wouldn't believe this, 

but right now outside my window, I've got something, I don't 
know how far, I assume it might be the SIVB, just spinning 
around and reflecting sunlight out there. 

CC Roger - if we can get our expert Fido's 

going and see how far the SIVB should be right now from you. 

SC I can see it with the naked eye and 

I put the monocular on it and I can see it spinning around and 
I wouldn't bet my life on it being the SIVB, but it sure has 
gotta be something like it. 

CC Roger; we hope so. We'd like you to 

go back to narrow beam width now, 10. 

SC Roger; we're back in there now Charlie. 

CC Okay, and we're getting great signals 

from you now so we should be in great shape if you can give 
us one more pass on the tube, we should get a good picture at 
Madrid. 

PAO That was Gene Cernan reporting that 

sighting. 

CC 10; Houston. Madrid is reporting a 

much better picture now, so we fixed it up. 
SC Okay - the - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSLON COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1138, GET 9549 340/1 



CAPCOM JO, Houston. Madrid is reporting a 

much better picture now, so we fixed it up. 

S C Okay, the earth ought to be coming 

through my window here in a minute, Charlie, if you will 
stand by. 

CAPCOM Roger s we're standing by. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. E-comms are saying 

that it looked like we locked up on a side load there with - 
the first time we acquired with the high gain. Request that 
you stay in the wide beam width for about 30 seconds or a 
little bit longer before you select narrow, over. 

SC Okay, we're all right now, though. 

CAPCOM Rog, we're in good shape now. That 

was Just for future reference. 

S C For all the folks at home, that 

should be a pretty good picture of the Stars and Stripes. 

CAPCOM Roger. Wish we were seeing it. 

SC Okay, now we've got it, Charlie. 

CAPCOM Roger. We've got about - still 

about a minute. 

Sc That's a good picture of the moon* 

CAPCOM Rogt Madrid has got it. 

SC Okay, Charlie, ... I can see all of 

Africa and as a natter of fact, I'm look right down at Madrid. 

CAPCOM Roger- we're beginning - 

PAO Madrid is receiving TV. 

CAPCOM 10, Houston. Madrid has a good TV 

picture. 

SC Okay. 

PAO The picture is being received in 

black and vhite in Madrid. It will be converted to color 
here in Houston. The Manned Space Flight Network says it 
will attempt to get the signal back here as soon as possible. 
But they estimate it will be approximately 12 hours. 

CAPCCM 10 s Houston. The picture is still 

looking great at Madrid. 

tC Charlie, the Suez Canal appears now 

to be going into darkness. We're looking at most all of 
Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, Spain, Portugal are in view, 
so tb« folks down in that area ought to be getting a good 
picture of themselves right now. 

CAPCOM Rog, 

CAPCOM I think they can broadcast that 

• tuff out - I was jsiet gslng to say, I think they can broad- 
cast that stuff out in black and white live. For the color, 
it has to come over here and be converted and transmitted 
back in the color for the people in that area, but they are 
probably seeing It in black and white. 

SCWell, it's a beautiful sight. All 



— POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GDI 1138, GET 9549 340/2 
of Africa is brownish, of course, and the waters are very, 

CAPCOM Can you differentiate between the - 

sc . go ahead, I'm sorry. 

SNOOPY Charlie, the picture just went out 

beyond the corner of our window now, so It looks like that s 
about it for right now. 

SS"i.t did want « to differ- 

enti "clpC0M W " n? I -« J«t going to ask you. Looking 

" "sxOOPY What was your question now? 

riprOM Okay. Looking at Africa, could you 

,.11 "e^frerence between the Congo and the tropical forest 
and the mountain, around Morocc^an^ell^he ^ 

Sbl ;s.r 4 s. t ^h^- 4 n^ h . h :.i«"."5:." 0 "« ,, :st 1 «w/ 

Hen earUer with ?he color TV passes. Ran ahout U minutes. 

To 1 a k ^ -5:.^°3 K^i - ^slwa, 
"ot , "mon of signal on the 11th revolution »!« 

time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69, GET 96:27, CDT 1216 341/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 96 hours 

27 minutes ground elapsed time. We should have acquisition 
now with Apollo 10 coming on the front side of the moon in 
revolution 11. During this rev the crew of Apollo 10 will 
be preparing for undocking the lunar module from the - 
there goes a call now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown. Over. 
CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown, read you - 

CHARLIE BROWN I checked the vent valve and - 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger, I say again, we can not get 
the tunnel to vent. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, understands tunnel will not 

vent . 

CHARLIE BROWN That's correct. We've checked the 
in pull valve, I've checked the in flow valve, I've checked 
the vent valve and Tom and Gene have checked their auto valve 
and their hatch seal around the hatch and they feel some 
pressure inside their (garbled) and it doesn't appear to be 
leading into the tunnel, so I don't know what the problem 
Is. Possibly some of that insulation has gotten lodged in 
the vent line maybe. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN This is Charlie Brown. Do you read? 

Over? 

CAPCOM Roger, we read you 5 by, about 3 

by, Charlie Brown. We copied that the tunnel will not vent 
so we are working on the problem now. Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN (garbled) 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy, how do you 

read? 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston, we read 

you about 2 by. 

SNOOPY Okay, the whole thing (garbled) 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston, you are unreadable. 

We copied a few words about the (garbled) that the tunnel 
will not vent. Otherwise, that Is all we can copy. Over. 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, how do you read 

Snoopy now? 

CAPCOM You're about 2 by still, Gene. 

SNOOPY Okay. If we have to we would like 

to go ahead and try and vent the tunnel through the LM. We 
will depressurize the LM on our way inside (garbled) 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. 

SNOOPY Garbled. 

CAPCOM Hello Snoopy and Charlie Brown. 

We recommend you skip the landmark tracking and jump to a 
high gain antenna attitude. Over. We'll have you some 
angles momentarily. 

CAPCOM Hello Charlie Brown, Houston. If 

you maneuver to a 000 roll, 014 pitch, and yaw 000 and get 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GET 96:27, CDT 1216 341/2 



CAP COM 
the flight plan. 



in the flight plan at 97 hours. Over. 



into high gain your angles are good 
Snoop, your angles are good as listed 



SNOOPY 
CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
CAP COM 



understand. 



Snoopy, Roger, 
(garbled) 

He said if you maneuver (garbled) 
Roger, Snoop, your angles are 
193 yaw 64 degrees on the high gain antenna when Snoopy 
orrection, when Charlie Brown gets the attitude. 



SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 

want Charlie Brown to maneuver to. 
In the angles. 

CAP COM 
to maneuver to 000 



My flight plan (garbled) 
Houston, repeat up to me where you 
He can 1 t read you . 



we want Charlie Brown 
yaw 000. It's listed 



Roger, Snoopy, 
roll, pitch 014, 
in the flight plan at 96 hours and 40 minutes. Over. Skip 
the landmark tracking. 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 



(garbled) 

Say, I asked you what angles (garbled) 
Charlie Brown, Snoopy let us know 



CAP COM 
when you get there. 

SNOOPY Oakie doak. This way we can get 

high gain so we can get our state vector update and continue 
on. We can't do much without that state vector. 

CAPC0M Roger, Snoop, we copied about - we 

see Charlie Brown maneuvering to high gain attitude. Stand 
by on the tunnel vent, over, we're coming up with a procedure 
for you. 

SNOOPY Okay, great, thank you. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Tom, LM time is going to be about 
360, right at 606 36 30 and roughly 40 above 400, right? 

SNOOPY Yep. Hey, how come you're feeding on 

the VOX through feed loop? Are you VOX? 

CHARLIE BROWN No, we got a hot S-band mike when 
we're in ICSPPT and down voice backup. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

SNOOPY I just left it there right now. 

CHARLIE BROWN All right, (garbled) full power 
when we can. 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 



(garbled) yes . 
Okay . 

Okay, babe. 
( garb le d) 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1226, GET 9637 
342/1 



CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. 

SNOOPY Go ahead, Houston, this is Snoopy. 

CAPCOM Rog, Snoopy, you are coming about 3 

by now, Tom. When we get high gain lock up, we would like 
voice with the ranging off, over. 

SNOOPY ... back up ranging off. 

CAPCOM Roger, and in downvoice backup 

master, if you turn the ranging off, we'll probably improve 
the voice quality some, over. 

SNOOPY Okay ," Charlie , I've got the rang- 

ing off. 

CAPCOM Rog. You're a little bit better. 

Charlie Brown, I understand you are calling. Go ahead, over. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston, this is Snoopy. 

How do you read? Over. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Snoop, over. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie. Look, as far as we 

can see, it still appears to us like all of this mylar float- 
ing around in the spacecrafta has probably got down into 
that vent line. The only solution we can see about it is 
we vent the tunnel and take it out through the LM and take 
us down. With Charlie Brown no good, it will stuff that mylar 
right back into his valve - tunnel valve, which is no good, 
how, We'll have a rough riding command module but if we 
did do something we could live with the LM for a while. That' 
about all we can see. But as far as we understand about _ 
the probe, it's probably not a good idea to release the probe 
until we're pressurized, over. ( 

CAPCOM Roger, 10, correction roger, Snoop. We re 

aware of that. We will probably come up with that solution. 
The only thing about releasing the probe without doing a 
hatch integrity check, we are a little concerned about that. 
If you will stand by a couple of minutes, we will come up 
with a procedure for you for venting the tun-nel, over. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown. How do 
you read? 

CAPCOM You are coming about 3 by, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, and I think we're all clear 

now . 

CAP COM Okay, you're coming about 4 by. 

You're picking up all the time. 

SNOOPY Houston, how is Snoopy on high 

gain? 

CAPCOM Snoopy, you are 5 by . Stand by. 

SNOOPY How is Snoopy on high gain? 

CAPCOM You're 5 by, Snoop. Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Snoopy, do you want to do 
another LM drift check now? 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1227, GET 9637 342/ 



SNOOPY Rog; We will do it while they are 

•till figuring what their recommendations are. John, on my 
■ark, let's do a VERB 06 NOUN 20. We will try to keep ahead 
of it while we can. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, go ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, counting down on VERB 06 NOUN 

20, 3, 2, 1, mark. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, + two balls, 167 + 01380 + 
three balls 94. 

SNOOPY Roger. 0016 70138000094, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Got then. 

SNOOPY Rog. 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston. My reading 0620 + 3 

0186 + 19360 + 35913, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copied. Snoop, Houston. 

We'd like to uplink - send a load for you, if you will give 
us POO in data and we will have some word on the tunnel pro- 
cedure momentarily, over. 

SNOOPY Roger, we're in POO and data. You've 

got it. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown. I 
never did get that DAP load. You got one for me? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. We've got it here for you, 

Charlie Brown, if you are ready to copy, CS - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1236, GET 9647 343/1 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Qver 
I never did get that DAP load. You got one for me? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, we got it here for you 

CharUe Brown, if you're ready to copy. CSM weigh, . 3 6 
gimbal trim, pitch minus .73, yaw plus .82, LM weight , Jin/. 

^"'CHARLIE BROWN Roger, CSM weight, 36688; minus 73, 
plus 82; LM weight, 31117. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN How do you want DAP set up today 
" ^CArCOM^ 586 qUa S 8 tInd by. Use a BD roll. Charlie 
Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN Say again, over. 
CAP COM Roger, use BD roll. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, use BD. 

SNOOPY Houston, Snoop. Are you done? 

CAPCOM That's negative, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Never mind, I can see you're not. 

Have you got our DAP load on page 45? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. Coming up to 

fSM veirtit, 36688; LM weight, 31117, over. 
y ° U "SNOOPY 8 Rog. LM is 31117; CSM is 36688, 

and understand the 501 and the 547 are still good. 

CAPCOM Affirmative. Stand by. we 11 be 

right with you, Snoop, on the procedures. 

%NOOPY Okay, as soon as we get our log - 

Okay we're going to proceed as soon as we get the computer 
back to updating the AGS and going through the gimbal check 
until we hear from you. 

CAPCOM Roger, we concur. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We got just one 

n ore load to go and then we'll have it for you. over. 
SNOOPY Okey doke. 

SNOOPY Hello. Charlie Brown, Snoop. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead, over. 

SNOOPY On that VHF A, was your squelch 

all the way off? 

CHARLIE BROWN That's affirmative. 
SNOOPY Okay • 

CHARLIE BROWN I had to squelch up and down 
you guys were transmitting. I couldn't do any good either 
way . 

SNOOPY Okay. 

riPCOM Hello. Snoop, Houston. We are 

througi »lth th. load. ' T^. co.put.r 1. your.. Ch.rli. Br... 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1236, GET 964 7 34 



and Snoop, if you're rea^y to copy, we have a procedure for 
you for your tunnel vent over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, Go ahead. 

SNOOPY Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop. On activation 38, 

we want you to do, to vent the tunnel using the normal regu- 
lator check with the following exceptions. Are you ready 
to copy? Over. 

SNOOPY Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Okay, we assume you've gone through 

the regulator checks so we're goiitg,tn shorten this procedure 
In step 2, step 2 on activation 3-8, line 2, verify overhead 
cabin dump valve, we want that open. Cabin repress to close. 
Activation page 39, step 3, the forward cabin dump valve open 
then auto at three and a half psi. How that will give us a 
one and a half DELTA P in the tunnel, and at this time the 
CMP should be monitoring the LM/CM DELTA P. Now, all we're 
concerned about is the hatch Integrity check for the command 
module using this procedure. We don't have to take the tun- 
nel all the way down. Now we will have to eliminate any RCS 
hot fire, the yaw thruster firing, and we'll get that out of 
the way after undocking. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, I think we got it, Charlie. 

On page 38, step 2, verify overhead cabin dump valve to open 
instead of auto; cabin repress to close on step 3; opened 
at auto at 3.5; and we will restrict the yaw firing thruster 
as you're concerned about the command module hatch integrity 
check, and for us to assume that when he releases the probe, 
that the 3 and a half psi will not hurt the probe, over. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. We've run that 

through the experts, Tom, and it will not hurt the probe or 
the drogue. In repressurizing, don't forget to put the over- 
head dump valve, overhead dump valve, back to auto when you 
repress, over. 

SNOOPY Oh yeah, we know all about that, 

Charlie. 

CAPCOM Okay, oh you just pressurize the 

tunnel back up again - 

SNOOPY -^kay, we're ready to go through it - 

we're ready to go. Right, we're ready to go ahead through 
it right now when John's ready. 

CAPCOM Roger, now, we'd like you to sta - 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay., let me get up here in the tun- 
nel there, Tom. 

CAPCOM Okay, troops. Now we'd like you to 

stay at about 3 and a half for a couple of minutes so we can 
get a hatch Integrity check in the command module, over. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1236, GET 9647 343/3 
SNOOPY Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay c go ahead, Tom. What position 
do you want me to be on the tunnel? Do you want me on CM 
DELTA V? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, go ahead, Tom. Are you all 
doing the checks, you guys? 

SNOOPY Stand by; keep in touch. 

SNOOPY We're starting it off right now, 

John. I'll give you a hack when we're going down. 

CHARLIE BROWN Thank you. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. It would give us 

a warm feeling if you could talk us through this. 

SNOOPY Okay, cabin gas return egress. How 

do you read me VOX, Houston? 

CAPCOM Reading you 5 by, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Cabin gas return - wait a minute, 

wait a minute - Start here, Babe, or back here? Okay, 
Houston, I'm starting on 9605, step number 2. Is that cor- 
rect? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. Before you get 

started we want both press rigs A and B to egress, over. 
SNOOPY Both press rigs A and B to egress. 

SNOOPY I've got them egress. Let's go. 

SNOOPY Roger, they're egress. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLC 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 3 ODT : 1246, 96:57 GET 



344/1 



CC over - 

SNOOP* Both press regs A and B to egress. 

I don i need that; let's go. Roger; they're egress. Cabin 
gas return egress. » . . overhead cabin dump valve OPEN. 
OPEN? 

CS That's affirmative. 

SNOOP i Okay - cabin repress CLOSED. 

CEARLIE BROWN Go. 

SNOOPY Got it closed? 

CHARLIE BROWN Affirmative. 

SNOOPY Press reg B egress. B Bravo. Okay? 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay - forward cabin dump valve and 
in AUXC at 3.5 - why don't you get that Tom and I "11 tell you 
when. 

SNOOPY Okay - I'm reading a minus a half PSI 

on my CM La pressure gage right now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, where is the suit gas diverter 
valve on this? 

CC Suit gas diverter valve should be 

in EGRESS. 

CHARLIE BROWN Should be right. That's what we 
figured; okay. Just to verify - we got pressure reg A at 
egress and pressure reg B at egrets, is that correct? 

CC Affirmative. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we're gonna start dumping the cabin 
down to 35. 

CC Rog - 

SNOOPY Do it slowly babe. Okay, there's 5. 

SNOOPY Okay, I have a half a PSI. 

CHARLIE BROWN 4-5 4-2 
SNOOPY I have 1 PSI- 

CHARLIE BROWN 4-0 3-8 ... hold it 3- 5 stop 
it Tom. Okay» we're down to 3 . . 4-2. 

SNOOPY We have 1 and a half PSI. 

CC Roger, Snoop, we copy. 3 and a half 

PSI, and we copy Charlie Brown, 1 and a half PSI. Let's hold 
for a couple minutes to get an integrity check Charlie Brown; 
watch your cabin pressure, over t 

CHARLIE BROWN I ; m watching her. 

SNOOPY This is like spring In Chicago in 

here; there's snow all over tae place. 
CC Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey Tom, I'm goiug ahead with the AGS 
bit while I can. Okay, whats you guys' pressure there? 

CC Hey Snoopy, you're holding at 3 and a 

half. 

SNOOPY Okay. I think it's starting to build up 

We can let the tunnel pressure go. Yeah, it started to go 
up before. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, mine's cows to 1 now. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT : 1246, 96 :5 7 GET 



344/2 



SNOOPY Houston, did you read Snoopy, our 

pressure went from 3 and a half up to 4 , and then Tom just 
closed the overhead dump valve. 

CC Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay - mine's holding at 1 right now. 
That's because they built theirs up I guess. 

CC Alright Charlie Brown and Snoop; we 

are satisfied with the hatch integrity check and the CSM. Now, 
before - Snoopy - before you re pres s urize , go to cabin gas 
return to CABIN. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger; cabin gas return to CABIN. 

CC Okay, you can start repress urizing 

now and we'd like to get you a - when you get back into 
configuration we'd like a hatch integrity check for you 
too . Over . 

SNOOPY Boy our cabin gas return to AUTO is what 

you want , isn 'tit? 

CC That's affirmative. 

SNOOPY Okay, and we are ready to repress I 

guess, at this point. 

CC Roger. Go. 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston, we are up to 5. 

CC Roger. 

SNOOPY Okay, do you have a procedure for us 

on the integrity check? 

CC Say again Snoop. 

SNOOPY Are you gonna pass us up a procedure 

for a hatch integrity check? 

CC Negative; just get in configuration 

and if you hold pressure, that's good enough for us. 

SNOOPY Well we're okay. 

CC Okay, fine, you can press on. Over. 

CC Snoopy, Charlie Brown, only thing is 

reminder press rigs A and B back to CABIN; over. 

SNOOPY Roger; we'll get them Charlie. 

CC Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we're maneuvered back to the 
attitude this time. Tom - we're gonna be a little more rigorous 
now . 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston. Two things 

for you. We'd like another read out on your LM CM Delta P, 
and also disable all roll jets over until we can get undocked. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. All roll jets coming OFF 
and LM CSM Delta P is .9. 

CC Roger. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoop. I gave the 

AGS an update and an alinement and then when I checked verb 
83, my local/vertical angle goes off by about 20 degrees so 
I am going through the procedure again. 

CC Roger, and we have a K vector 

update for you; over. 



APOLLO 10 COMM1HTA1T • 3/22/69. CDT: 1246, 96:57 CIT 3*4/3 

BMOOPT Okay, fir* it. 

CC Roger - 090 00 03 00. 

SVOOPY 090 00 03 00? 

CC Affirmative. 

CC S«»«P7 " Charlie - this is Roue ten* 

We'd Ilk* to - we g»t * little pros Ism with jour gyro platfora 
ae it Appears an* X gyro tsrs.ui.nt angls is a llttls largs; 
we'd lika you 1 ta rspsat the drift chsck; ever. 

SM0PT Okay, you waat to rspsat tha drift 

chsck; rogar; give us a aaeoad hsrs. 

CC Roger, that' a oa paga 43. 

glOOPT Vhaa I load in tha K vactor, I Just 

laad it ia vara - in 90. dsm't I. luhf 

CC Chsrlis Brawn, Houston. Wa*d Ilka 

aaa asrs readovt af tha LM CM Delta P; over. 



IMS OP TAP I 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GET 97:07, CDT 1256 345/1 



CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston, we'd like 

one ioie readout of the LM/CM DELTA-P. Over. 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger. And 48. 
CAPCOM Roger. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston, we copied you 

entered the K factor wrong. We need 90 hours and 3 seconds, 
not 30 seconds . Over. 

' SNOOPY Okay. 90 hours and 3 seconds, my 

■lstake. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown and Snoop, ve have 

30 minutes to LOS. If we don't get the RCS hot fire in 
we're still GO for undocking. You can do that on the back 
side. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger, what's the latest time for 

undocking now, Charlie? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN Too, you go ahead and get that 
through , 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston, undocking time 

is 98:22. You've got an hour and 4 minutes. Over. 
SNOOPY Roger, 98:22:00. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, Snoop, we're ready 

to do another one of those flip checks. Let me know when 
you have Verb 06 Noun 20. I'll give you a mark when to enter. 
Over. ' 

CHARLIE BROWN Go, over. 

SNOOPY Roger 3, 2, 1, mark. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, plus 00393 plus 01300 plus 

0428. 

SNOOPY Roger, copied you. 00393 0130Q, 

and it's 0428, we need one more number. 
CHARLIE BROWN 00428. 
SNOOPY Okay, got it 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston, let me read you 

an angle that we got and see If they confirm. You ready to 
copy? 

SNOOPY Go. 

CAPCOM Roger. For the CSM it's plus 00393 

plus 01300 plus 00428. For the LM plus 29959 plus 19285 
plus 35578. Over. 

SNOOPY Houston (garbled) 

CAPCOm Snoop, Houston, somebody cut in on 

us here on the loop. Did you copy those angles? 

SNOOPY Roger, I copied them and they look 

correct. We're going to go ahead and go through the BAP 
throttle set here. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Say, Tom, circuit breaker (garbled) 
control (garbled) power closed. 

SNOOPY Flow control, auto. 



APOLLO 10 HISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GET 97:07, CDT X256 345/2 



CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Houston, Charlie Brown hare. 
CAFCOM Go ahead. 

CHARLIE BROWN Looks like guidance control PGNCS. 

SNOOPY Roger, what about not rolling to 

this 180 degree roll until we get undocked. Will that be 
all right? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN I don't know how I'm going to roll 
with the roll jets disabled. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, John. Stand by. 

We're running this one around the room, and I've got a SEP 
pad if you're not busy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go to it, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, SEP , it's RCS G&N and it's 

NA down to Noun 33, and we've got 098471600 NA down to the 
pitch angle 014 degrees. Over. 

CHARLIE BROwN Roger, 098471600, 14 degrees pitch. 

CAP COM Good readback, Charlie Brown. 

PAO This is Apollo Control. The 

change of shift news conference has been delayed. We do 
not have an estimate at this time. 

SNOOPY PGCA coming up to 40 percent. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SNOOPY (garbled) now max throttle, 

(garbled) 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

SNOOPY Good. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, and Charlie Brown, 

we noticed when you went through your dap load you did not 
update your gimbal trims and they are quite a bit off. Ove 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'll fix them. 

SNOOPY This is Snoopy. How's that for 

a K factor time? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 

SNOOPY Okay, if it's a good K factor time 

it's going in. 

CAPCOM Okay, the K factor is good. 

SNOOPY Okay, Tom, you got engine arm off, 

(garbled) power open, Auto control auto, the VHP - 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston, if you can 

give us a POO in accept we've got the load for you. 

SNOOPY I'm down to page 47. I did every- 

thing up here, Tom. 

CHARLIE BROWN You have it. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SNOOPY Yes, I got all the RCS pressure 

SNOOPY (garbled) 

SNOOPY arm's on, helium pressure 

RCS fire. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69 . GET 97:07, CDT 1256 345/3 
SNOOPY Goodbye, baby. 

SNOOPt Hey, there's helium pressure kick 

out slightly. 

CHARLIE BROWN Where did it go? 

SNOOPY Hey, we're going st pressurisstion 

(garbled). 

SNOOPY Okay, recycle. Let me recycle theae 

valvea. Half of the damn things (garbled) 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, Snoop, you know you* re trans- 
mitting. „ 

SNOOPY I know it. Oksy, verify Masler Arm 

off and RCS Rsgo A and B warning lights are off. 

END OP TAPE 



— APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1306, GET 9717 



346/1 



CHARLIE BROWN Hey, Snoop, do you know you're trans- 
Bitting? 

SNOOPY I know it. 

SNOOPY Okay, verify master arm off and RCS 

regs A and B warning lights are off. 

SNOOPY Verify the pressures and temperatures 

in the RCS and they are all go. And Houston, this is Snoopy. 
Our helium pressure on both RCS rings is 3900 psi. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SNOOPY ATP, let me - stab control attitude, 

direct control closed on your side. 

SNOOPY I can control PGNS , that's all, 

deadband max translation four jets. Control PGNCS attitude 
hold. Attitude control three pulse jet commander disable, 
PA is enable. 

SNOOPY Hey, Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. 

- call for you to be in a mid-deadband attitude hold. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, give me a second. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, in low, you got it. 

SNOOPY Okay, we are going to start your 

RCS checks. We will give you a hack when we go hot fire. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. Remember I don't have any 
roll jets. 

SNOOPY Roger and we will not yaw. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, you can have your 

computer back. We're through with your load and we are with 
you, Snoop, on the hot fire. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie. 

SNOOPY Okay, these are all cold fire. ... 

roll right. 

SNOOPY Okay, try rolling right again. 

SNOOPY Houston, are you reading these num- 

bers? 

CAPCOM Roger, we read them. 

SNOOPY - pitch down. Yaw right, 

SNOOPY Yaw left. 

SNOOPY Okay, John, you can go to wide dead 

band attitude hold. Houston, what do you make out of that? 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CAPCOM Stand by. I think we're okay. Stand 

by. 

SNOOPY Houston, we will stand by for your 

go until we proceed further. 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. And Charlie Brown, 

we show you in the DAP min deadband, over. 

CHARLIE BROWN That's right. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, you can go to wide 

deadband for us now, attitude hold. 
CHARLIE BROWN ... undocking 

SNOOPY Rog. We haven't begun the day yet. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1306, GET 9717 346/2 

CAPCOM Snoopy, we're go with those numbers 

in the cold fire, go ahead with the min impulse, step 5. 

SNOOPY Okay, real good. We'll go ahead. 

That's the first time we've seen numbers that have gone to 

the full range. I with them, the whole analysis 

t but, okay, we'll go ahead. 

SNOOPY ... AGS . 

SNOOPY AGS attitude hold. 

SNOOPY The attitude control, 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, your commander's ... been 
enab led . , 

CAP COM Charlie Brown, Houston. We would 

like you in wide deadband, over. 

SNOOPY - hot fire. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, let us know when 

you get in wide, because some - hot fire. 
CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we're in wide. 

SNOOPY Okay, we are now proceeding and ^ 

we will let you know when we hot fire here. E-comm, we don t 
want any is that right? 

SNOOPY Okay, roll right and, John, you 11 get 

a pulse of hot fire. 

CHARLIE BROWN - roll, pitch up, roll, pitch down. 

SNOOPY Okay, thrusters seemed nice and 

crisp. They were real good. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, you want to yaw right and left 
without going to the hard spot? 

SNOOPY No. - 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, attitude control three pulse. 
Okay, get your four GDA breakers in and I'll get mine in. 
All in? 

SNOOPY Okay. We open (garble) all the 

lights are off, all the flags are off. This is the hot fire 
in the AGS. (garble) Okay. 

SNOOPY Up, down, right left, and then fore and 

aft. Charlie, you ready for a hot fire? 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, up, out, right, up, over, 

aft. I guess they all fired, babe. 

SNOOPY They all fired, Houston, but we 

didn't get it on the DSKY because they made a real short 
pulse. 

SNOOPY You wouldn't get them anyway. This 

is AGS, babe, we weren't - 

SNOOPY Yes , right. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop, we copy. Charlie 

Brown, we would like to go BMAG at one rate 2 so we can 
get some attitude hold, over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COMMENTARY , 5/22/69. COT 1316, GIT 9727 34771 



SNOOPY John, we're going to hot fire again. 

You reedy? 

CHARLIE BROWN Go eheed. 

SNOOPY Okey, Roue ton, you probably reed 

the DSKY (gerble) but I mede these short puleee; I didn t 
vent to wests eny fuel here. I'll just stey along with the 
condition we heve In the tunnel, so, they fired end they 
fired reel crisp so I think we're In good shepss, 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy, Snoop. Stand by 

for our go. 

SNOOPY Okey, Cherlle Brown, Snoop. Verify 

thet RCS thruster B3 off end your reder transponder off. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, the reder trsneponder s on 
either end B3's off. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

CAPCOM And, Snoop, Cherlle Brown, you re 

so for undocking. We hed one indicetion thet the, on your 
hot fire thet jet B3 down, we hed e TCP stuck oi, but if you 
don't heer eny thing wm're go. 

SNOOPY Sounde good here. 

CAPCOM Okey. 

SNOOPY We're proceeding with the rendesvoue 

reder sslf test. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. Got somt word for 

you on your torquing engles, your pletform, ovar. If you cen 
listen. 

SNOOPY Go eheed, we're listening, 

CAPCOM Roger, Geno . It looks like we've 

tot e constent biee In the, in yew in your platform. On our 
two drift checks we get e bias of, e torquing engle of mlnue 
03.540 end it eppeere to be a constent bins beceuee it e been 
the seme between the two different drift checks. We're go 
with thet constent biee. We'd like Charlie Brown to look 
through the, his rendezvous window end see if we heve e con- 
stent slippage, meybe, in the, in our docking ettitude end 
you cen tell thet by looking at the docking target, over. 
CHARLIE BROWN Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN And, Cherlle, give ie a heck when 
we get close to LOS so thet I cen get out the high geln, 
will you? 

CAP COM Okay, we got 8 minutes. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okey, I'll »tey with you if you pick 
me up et ebout 2 or 3 minutes. I'll go off. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes, it is rolled off. Vehicle is 
yewed to the, rolled to my left ebout, I'd sey 2 degreee or 

"°* CAPCOM Okey, fine, we get e 3 degree biee 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/S9, CUT 1316, GST 9727 347/2 



so that's it. Be alvised that jour drifting off in yasr a 
Charlie Brown. You might want to watch your attitude 0 
CHARLIE BROWN Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. 
SNOOPY Go ahead, John, 

CHARLIE BROWS Roger, the EVA preparation is com- 
plete. 

SNOOPY Okay, good show. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brewn s Houston. We're con- 

cerned about this yaw bias in the LM and apparent slippage 
of the docking range „ We'd like you to disable and keep 
disabled all soil jets until after isndocking, over. And un- 
docking attitude, we will not maneuver to the undocking atti- 
tude. Just hold what we've got e over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, okay, fine. 

CAPCOM And Snoop, we got 3 minutes , 50 sec- 

onds to LOS, over. 

SNOOPY Roger, 3:50 to LOS. 

CAPCOM And we°ll see both Snoop and Charlie 

Brown at 98:25. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Browa and Snoop, 3 

■inutes going over the hill. You're go for undocking, and 
we'll see you around the other side. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 1326, 97s 37 GET 348/1 



CC Snoop - correction, Charlie Brown, 

Houston „ try it on docking if it is apparent that the LM 
interface has slipped around to about 6 degrees £ do not undock s 
and lets come around again and look at it. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

FLIGHT DIRECTOR Charlie, let them know its 3 and a half 

now . 

CC Roger; your yaw bias right now ■-• the 

slippage is 3 and a half degrees right now, so about double 
what you've got, and if It goes that fer } do not undock; over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN That's rog - stop maneuver. Roger. 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 97 hours, 39 

minutes. We have loss signal as Apollo 10 goss behind the moon. 
Due to reacquire Apollo 10 at 98 hours, 25 minutes. 42 seconds. 
During the early part of this 11th revolutions just after 
AOS, the crewmen were attempting hatch integrity tests on both 
Charlie Brown and Snoopy - found they were unable to vsnt the 
tunnel due to a problem in a vent valve in the top of Charlie 
Brown. We passed up procedure which in affect, was to reduce 
the pressure in Snoopy to 3 and a half pounds per square inch. 
Through the forward hatch, through Snoopy 's forward hatch. 
Bleeding off the pressure through that hatch. This in turn 
pulled the pressure down in the tunnel giving a Delta P or 
differential in pressure between the two of one and a half 
pounds per square inch; in this way we were able to check and 
verify the hatch integrity for Charlie Brown. Tom Stafford and 
Gene Cernan then repressurized Snoopy and verified the hatch 
integrity for that spacecraft. The K factor, about which you 
heard considerable conversation is timing information for the 
abort guidance system, the secondary guidance system in the 
lunar module. We passed up an undocking time of 98 hours, 22 
minutes that's just a couple of minutes prior to acquisition of 
signal on the next revolution, the 12th revolution. We passed 
up a separation time of 98 hours, 4 7 minutes, 16 seconds. The 
separation maneuver will be performed by Charlie Brown at 2 and 
a half feet per second; radially down, with the RCS thrusters, 
puts the vehicle in the mini footballs starting the separation 
for the rendezvous. You heard Gene Cernan calling out the 
check list for Tom Stafford during the reaction control system 
checkout , both cold and hot firings and pressurization of 
that system. And Tom's report that the thrusters are nice 
and crisp and he thinks they are in good shape. We've given 
Charlie Brown and Snoopy a GO for undocking. Along toward 
the end of this pass, you may have heard John Young report 
that EVA preparations were completed; there's no extra 
vehicular activity planned of course on this mission but 
these preparations are done for contingency EVA's. Which 
would be the only method Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan 
would have to get back to the command module in case it was 
impossible to dock the 2 vehicles. And just before we lost 
signal, we Informed the crew that there was a bias of about 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 132S, 97:37 GET 348/2 



PAO 3 and a half degrees in the docking 

interface. We asked thea to keep a look at it, and if 
this interface slipped to 6 degrees, to not undock, to stay 
docked until they case back in acquisition. This is Mission 
Control, Houston, at 97 hours, 44 minutes; we will pass on 
the information about the start of change of shift news 
conference as soon as it is available. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 97:59, CDT 1348 349/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 97 hours 

59 minutes. We're 26 minutes away from acquisition of 
Apollo 10 at which time we will begin the very busy rendezvous 
sequence, starting with undocking and separation. Because 
of the busy schedule to come and because the flight director 
on the preceeding shift would like to stay in the control 
center for some time during the early portion of the rendezvous 
procedure, the decision has been made to cancel the change 
of shift new conference that had been scheduled for approxi- 
mately 1:00 or 1:30. There will not be a change of shift 
news conference at this time. This is Mission Control 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/68, GET 98:24, CDT 1413 350/1 



p A 0 This is Apollo Control at 98 hours 

24 minutes, we're about 1 minute away from acquisition of 
Apollo 10 on its 12th revolution of the moon. We'll find 
out at acquisition how this undocking went. We'll stand by 
here live to pick up the first communication. 

PAO Madrid has acquisition now. We'll 

wait for a good lock up to see whether he comes into acquisi- 
tion with the television camera on or not. 

SNOOPY Hey, we got him right away, Tom. 

CAPCOM Hello, Snoop, how you doing? 

SNOOPY This is Snoop on high gain. How 

are you reading us? 

CAPCOM 5 by, how me? 

SNOOPY Reading you loud and clear. We're 

about 30 or 40 feet away from him, been station keeping for 
about 5 or 10 minutes here. 

CAPCOM Roger, coald you give us POO in 

data? We've got a load for you, and are you ready to copy 
some pads? 

SNOOPY I sure am, I'm going to give you 

POO in data. And I'm ready to copy. 

CAP COM Roger, as you know it's DOI ' s 

first pad, and we've got 3 pads for you starting with DOI. 
I'll read through all and then you can read me back, okay? 
Okay, it's DOI 099460089 minus 00699 plus all balls minus 
00138 DELTA- VR 00713 027 3 balls 275 minus 00698 plus all 
balls minus 00144 C0AS star is Scorpi Delta minus 023 minus 
146 CSI time 103:45:34. TPI time 105:21:01, with an N equal 
to 1. Phasing pad is next if you're ready to copy. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger, I'm ready to copy. Go ahead 

with phasing. 

CAPCOM Roger. 100582520 plus 0 - 

SNOOPY Charlie? 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, John said he's not reading 

you. While I'm copying this he said he's got a picture of 
the LM if you want to look at it on TV. 

CAPCOM We have it, Geno , we're ready to 

continue with the noun 81 if you're ready. 

SNOOPY I'm ready to copy, go ahead. 

CAPCOM Plus 02666 plus all balls minus 

00594 01769 040 3 balls 255. Noun 86 is plus 01675 plus 
all balls minus 00568. COAS star is Libra alpha, that's 
Libra alpha, plus 004 minus 119. Your 100 degree E time 

SNOOPY AOT breaker in, Tom? 

CAPCOM Your 100 degree E time is 33:31. 

Your phasing DELTA is minus 5 seconds, 05 seconds. Site 2 
time is 10:30. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, I got everything except 

DELTA-VX on Noun 81. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, GIT 98:24, CDT 1413 350/2 

CAPCOM toger, DKLTA-VX on Noun 81 is 

plus 01666, and I've got * PDI abort pad if you 11 Just 
stand by, over. 

SNOOPY I'» waiting for you. 

CAPCOM Roger, lat me try to raise Charlie 

Brown. Charlie Brown, Houston, over. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston, over. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy reading 

you loud and cleer. 

CAPCOM Roger, he's copying the pad then, 

we're not reeding him at all, Snoop, and I'm ready with a 
PDI abort pad if you're ready to copy. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, PDI abort. go ahead. 

CAPCOM 100434550 plus 009 31 plus all balls 

olus 3 bells 1.1 00931, Burn time is 022, 3 balls, 283 
plus 00931 plus 00000 plus 3 balls 22. NA on the rest of 
the pad. Thrust profile is 15 seconds at 10 percent and 
in manually throttled to full thrust until completion. 
CSI time 101:44:25. TPI time 103:22:25 with an N equal to 1, 
end I'm standing by for your readback. And Snoopy, you ve 
tot the computer beck. We're through with the load. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie, hit it. Roger, 

thank you, hear the commence: DOI is 099460089 minus 
00699 plus all balls minus 00138 



END OF TAPE 



?OLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1413, GET 9834 351/1 

SK00 p Y Rog. thank you. Here they com at 

▼oo. DOI is 099:46j00:89 minus 00699 plus all balls minus 
00138 00713027 three ball. 275. Noun 86 is minus 00698 plus 
all b.lls minus 00144. Verb 5 Delta minus 023 and minus 146. 

CAP COM Go. 

8M00Py Phasing is 100582520. Are you with 

M? 

CAP COM Go. 

SH00PY Okay, I'll back up and give you 

C8I time and TPI time for DOI. CSI is 103:45 :34; TPI ij 
105-21-01 with an unequal 1. Phasing, phasing is 100:58.2520 
III* OllU plus .11 bills minus 00594 01769 040 000255 plus 
01*75 plus all balls minus 00568. Libra Alpha is the •tar. 
i". pin- 004 and minus 119. And 100 degrees east is 33 plu. 
11. Phuing Delta is minus 5 seconds. Site 2 is 10 plus 30. 
Are you with me? 

STOOPT Say, PDI abort is 100:43:4550 pl». 

00*31 plus all balls plus 00011 00931 022 000283 plus 00931 
plu. .11 balls plus 00022. The star is NA 15 " ec ° nd « ... 
it 10 percent then manual to full thrust. PSI is 101:44:25, 
TPI i. 103:22:25 with an unequal 1. 

CAPCOM Good readback, Snoop. Over. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoop. Charlie 

jrowfi 9 . trying to call you. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop. We don't read him. 

Ch.rlie Brown, verify your S-Band switch is in TR, over. 

SjOOPY John, is your S-Band switch in TR, 

.ad I'll give you anything you need? Just ask, 8° ahead. 

SNOOPY Okay, the time of D0I s Charlie 

MTV**, i. 099:46:0089 minus 00699 plus all jero. « d 
00138 That's noun 81 for DOI. Okay, phasing is 100 : 5»i«20 . 
I # «n 81 i. plus 01666 plus all balls and minus 00594. And 
verify your TR switch is in S-Band TR, John. 
CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. 

SNOOPY Okay . 

CAP COM Snoopy, Houston. I'm breaking in. 

It', a ground problem with the CSM. We're losing - we got 
the downlink to Goldstone so we're not getting it here in 

th " M SN00PY Okay. I'll tell you, this comm ha. 

got to be fixed within the next couple of hours, Charlie, 
.o tell them to get with it. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SH0 0PY Everything else is going good here. 

SNOOPY Houston, this i. Snoopy. Is that 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1413, GET 9834 351/2 

69.2 bv 5 7.5 good? „ . 

CAPCOM Stand by. Snoop. Houston. We re 

mot with you on the 69.2, say again. 

SNOOPY l'« reading verb 82 out of the DSKY 

•9.9 - 62.9 by 57.5. 

CAPCOM Stand by, we'll have it for you. 

Stoep, Hou.ton. FIDO's checking, stand by. Snoop, Houston. 
Tkat's a «o on the apogee and perigee. „.-„„ M \ 

SNOOPY (garble - simultaneous with CAPCOM). 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. ^ ? ^ ^ ^ 

•• Mr ;5oSpY bUrn * Looks like we're pretty steady out 
here on the stationkeeping, John, once we got squared away 
•« our attitude. 

SMOOPY Okay . 

CAPC0M Snoop, Houston, we got a beautiful 
picture out there - 

SNOOPY Give me a mark at o. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, I will, a mark at 6 minutes. 

CAP COM Charlie Brown, we finally got you, 

OV " * SNOOPY Okay, we're counting down. 

CHARLIE BROWN That wasn't 6 minutes. 

SNOOPY What was it, Jose? 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I've got 5 seconds to 6 min- 

utes. 

MArTEe BROWN Okay", 6 minutes and counting down to SEP. 

SNOOPY Got you, Babe. f 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. We re 

readlns yo u 5 by now, over. . 

CHARL1 E BROWN Roger, I've got 5 minutes and 45 

secomds to SEP, 44, 43, 42. 

CAPCOM We're right with you. ^ 

SMOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy. With that 
drift you saw how do you expect our platform to be, how close 
to sood alineaent? . 

CAPCOM R°g, we expect very small torquing 

mb ales in all axes, over. 

SNOOPY That's good to hear, thank you. 

Wall, I hope we can get back on the nominal after th " 
lobulation kind of goofed us up, Charlie. But everything s 
looking good here. . _ 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. Could you - one question 

on the tracking light. Have you tried it? ^ _ , 

SNOOPY Stand by. John, there's the track- 

ing light for you. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69. CDT 1413. GET 9834 351/3 

CHARLIE BROWN Yea, please turn it off. 

SNOOPY It works. 

CAPCOM Great, thank you. We saw it. 

SNOOPY John, why don't you toss on your 

tracking light for a minute. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, that's mine. It may be 

underneath the vehicle, I don't think you can see it. 

SNOOPY Yea. I saw one reflection here. 

We're okay. 



BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, COT 1423, GET 9844 352/1 
SNOOPY Okay, Charlie, it looks like about 

230 coming up set, babe. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog, I agree. 

SNOOPY Houston, you can tell FIDO and Sup 

port Division that these Hasselblad film packs have failed 
about three or four times on us. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop, we copy. 

SN00P v We're still getting some pictures 

though. It made the camera (garble) in the magazine. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

pA0 This separation maneuver will - 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Houston, coming up on 2 min- 

utes to sep. How about a sync mark? 

CAP COM Roger, we copied 1 minute. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog. You're right. 

CAPCOM Big Brother is watching. 

CHARLIE BROWN Keep up the good work, boys. You 

will never know how big this thing gets when there ain t 
nobody In here but one guy. ., 

SNOOPY You will never know how small it 

looks when you are as far as we are. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, separation. . 

SNOOPY Okay, configure thrust for us in 

there, John, and we're moving away. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. You are 5.3 on the DSKY and 

5.0 on the EMS and 0 on the MS- . uc 

SNOOPY I'd be inclined to believe the MS 

tOday CAPC0M We copy, Charlie Brown. 

SNOOPY Okay, Hose, say adios and we will 

see you back in about 6 hours. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CAPC0M Snoop and Charlie Brown, we see you 

separating on the big tube. 

SNOOPY See you, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog. 

SNOOPY Have a good time while we re gone, 

bab6, SNOOPY Rog* don't get lonesome out there, 

J ° hn ' SNOOPY And don't accept any TEI updates. 

CHARLIE BROWN Don't you worry. Until you get 

back. I ain't copying any more pads. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown, over. 

CAP COM Go ahead, Charlie Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. While we were waiting to 

come over the hill, we checked out VHP and we're right now 
on VHF AMA and receive only B data. „. . ( 

CAPCOM Beautiful, sounds good. xnanits a 

lot. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1423, GET 9844 352/2 

CHARLIE BORWN And don't ask me to tell you what 

-he dickens the trouble was. 

SNOOPY Houston, one other interesting lit- 

tle fact. I could never get ay AGS local vertical angle and 
VERB 83 to agree until after we undocked. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay there, Snoopy babe, let b 

check out this duplex ranging, okay? 

SNOOPY Okay, I'll go to duplex ranging on 

your mark, and we will be quiet and wait for your call. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Go into duplex ranging, on 

ay aark. Mark. 

CHARLIE BROWN You guys shut up, because I can 

hear you. You have to maintain silence about the ship on 
that vox mode. I'm going to arrange a reset right now. 

CHARLIE BROWN How about that. 800, 700, 420 feet, 

540 feet - 

SNOOPY Okay, babe, - Roger, I hear you. 

SNOOPY I don't hear any background noise, 

Just you. 

SNOOPY Hey, John, if you get a chance, 

you can turn on the radar transponder and we will correlate 
the VHF ranging with it. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, my transponder is on. Trans- 

ponder is on, its CAP switch is in operate. 

SNOOPY I should be getting a radar signal 

here and I sure don't. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston. How soon will you 

ave our new uplink on the CSM state vector, out? 

CAPCOM Stand by, we will have it in a 

moment. , ^ 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. We are ready with 

the load, POO in data, over. 

SNOOPY POO in data, you've got it. 

SNOOPY John, are you getting signal strength 

on your transponder there. I've got you locked. Of course 
I don't get any radar new signal strength. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. Am I below you or above 

T ° U SNOOPY You're right at me. Okay. Pitch 
up maybe a little bit. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY Pitch up a little more now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Say when. 

SNOOPY Okay. I am looking foreslghted 

on your transponder. I don't get any ATC strength. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay Tom. I checked it out this 
morning and AGC was good. 



BHD OP TAPE 



\POLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT : 1443, 98:54 GET 353/1 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm looking right at - I'm 

bore sited on your transponder. I don't get any AGC strength. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Tom, I checked it out this morning 

and AGC was good. 

CHARLIE BROWN I got 3.6 volts on disc 6 systems test 

1A - disc test D I got 2.1 volts on test, and on C I got 4/lUtns 
volt, and I guess that was unlocked. 

SNOOPY Houston, do you have us on telemetry; 

I can't get any AGC signal here, really about a thousand feet 

aWSy "cC Roger, Snoopy; we've been copying your 

problems; we are working it down here, and we've got your load 
in; the computer is yours again. Stand by on the radar. 

SNOOPY Houston, we had a real good radar selt 

teat; everything worked on getting transmitting power to 3.2, 
we get the shaft error, the trunnion error, the AGC, I ve got 
the needle boresited and centered, but we get no AGC. 

cc Roger; we copy. Your pings needles 

are moving? ~u 
SNOOPY Yep. I can slew up and down, high 

rate and low rate; everything; I've got him boresited there. 
CC Roger; stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, I'll run through the self test 

again if you think that'll help any from this end. 

SNOOPY Go down and look at it again - you 

might give it another try John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. 

SN00PY So this was a NO/GO for DOI . I ve got 

you boresited right there, the needles are centered at nothing. 
My AC rendezvous radar ... breaker is in, and my ... radar is 

ia * cc Break, break Snoop - this is - correction, 

Charlie Brown, this Is Houston. We need you in a transponder 
position on tSe systems test before you gat the proper readout; 
over. For the self test of the rendezvous - 

CHARLIE BROWN I'm in that transponder position. 

CC Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'm reading - S8 Is reading zero 

right now. 

CC Roger - we - 

CHARLIE BROWN And B is reading zero. And its also 

reading zero but it was working a few minutes ago. On the origxnal 
self test. 

CC Roger; stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, this thing is reading zero. Let 

me check the circuit breaker. 

CC Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, the rendezvous transponder flight 

BUS circuit breaker is in. 

CC Roger; how about trying to recycle the 

power switch Charlie Brown? 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT : 1443, 98:54 GET 353/2 



CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
b uddy . 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
to do with It. 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 



Hey that did it you guys; it's ON. 
Ohh , and I got signal strength ole 

What do you know about that. 
I've got 3.2 AGC - 

You got so much AGC, I don't know what 



John, I could kiss you. 
It was Charlie's idea to cycle the 
switch; that would have never occured to me. 
CC It was Ed's idea - 

SNOOPY O'k you both sound pretty good - 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, we're ready 

to go with your load if you'll give us POO and ACCEPT Charlie 
B rown . 

You have it . 

What you guys got for range? 
Roger. We've got 2500 feet, 
one raw data here, John, and 
It's 



CHARLIE BROWN 
CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
We've going to get yo 

my optical boresite is absolutely fantastic 
right with the needle. 

CHARLIE BROWN It's got .37 miles. This is 

going to be very interesting, it keeps jumping. 

CHARLIE BROWN Point 4 miles. 

SNOOPY Okay. That looks real good on 

my tape here. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown, the reason 

I believed the MS over the VMC was I had three-tenths of 
a foot per second of ... bias before I ever started the 
maneuver. Over. 

CC Roger. We copy. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, John, we're out here in 

earth shine, how about turning on your flashing light, 
okay? Beautiful, you've got a nice one. It looks like 
the old Gemini Agena, which is bigger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. You are supposed to start 

on P52. I saw your tracking light there briefly, but I 
haven't seen it since. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, C&C is 

yours . 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
now, it's on? 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 



Roger. Thank you. 

John, you see the tracking light 

Could you guys see it flashing. 
No. No. 
I see it. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 1443 s GET 98:54 353/3 



SNOOPY Okay. 

SNOOPY Okay, John, I'm ready when you 
are to go to VHFA simplex and data. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. On your mark. Simplex 
and data. Okay, simplex data. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown, how do 
you read? 

SNOOPY Read you loud and clear, John. 

SNOOPY All right, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN And you are saying? 

SNOOPY All right. We're going to 

terminate our data check to go on P-52. 

END OF TAPE 



9 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 99:04, CDT 1453 354/1 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, Snoop, you can go ahead 

and kill the tube any time you want to and put the cover 
over it. 

CHARLIE BROWN Say again, over. 

SNOOPY Roger, you can go ahead and kill 

the TV and put the cover over the tube. 

CHARLIE BROWN I've done all of that already. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Tom, hold your tracking light down. 

Are you able to do a P52 with that light on? 

SNOOPY I think so, John. I'm going to 

^CHARLIE BROWN That's beautiful. Can you see mine? 

SNOOPY Ob, yes, John, you're absolutely 

sensational. Good maneuver. Yeah, it's flashing about 
every second. It's just beautiful. Okay, we're going to 
auto maneuver (garbled). 

SNOOPY I 8 ot vou itl tne sextant, John. 

In my telescope. Right now, you're passing through it. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY Boy, I'll tell you. That's black 

out there, isn't it? 

CHARLIE BROWN No other color to describe that. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We've reached the 

limits on the high gain. Go to omnia. Over. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Pass to 

Snoop that he has reached the tracking limits on the high 
gain and please go to omnis . Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. Hey - hey, Geno , go to 

omnis. Your high gain has reached its limits. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Pass to 

Snoop, that we - 

CHARLIE BROWN I tell you I got a beautiful sight. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Pass to 

Snoop that we'd like - 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead there - uh - 

CAPCOM Okay, I'm talking. Pass the - pass 

the - on to Snoop that we'd like the AFT antenna. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. They want the AFT antenna 

there, Snoop babe. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, I can see it myself. Hey, 

did you hear they want the AFT antenna? 

SNOOPY Rog. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 99 hours, 

14 minutes. We still have 23 minutes left in this pad 
before we lose signal. Just prior to the loss of signal, 
Snoopy will be given a GO /NO-GO for the descent orbit insertion 
which will take place behind the moon. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 1503 GET 9914 355/1 



PAO -which will take place behind the moon. 

PAO Both vehicles are now in small 

equal period orbits. The separation maneuver was performed 
by the Command and Service Module, Charlie Brown. It sent 
Charlie Brown down in ahead of Snoopy. However, on the 
relative motion plot, and from Charlie Brown's point of 
view, Snoopy was going above and behind him. Maximum 
distance in this orbit would be about differential heights 
would be close to 5 miles and not quite 2 nautical miles 
distance separating them. 

CC Hello Charlie Brown, Houston. A 

couple reminders. We'd like delta V CG to go to CSM and the 
or Rate 2, your choice. 
Thank you kindly . 
Roger. Roger. Out. 
The descent orbit Insertion will 
revolution after the separation 
maneuver. Time for the descent orbit insertion 99 hour, 
46 minutes . 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston. This is Charlie Brown. 

What times LOS over? 

CC Roger. Charlie Brown. Coming up LOS 

to you 16 minutes and 30 seconds mark and we'll see you AOS at 
124. 

Charlie Brown? 

Could you give me the LOS in GET? 
Roger. LOS GET is 99 37 32 over. 
Roger. Thank you. 
And Charlie Brown, Houston. We 
little high and if you get a 



mags to either rate 
CHARLIE BROWN 



PAO 

performed one half 



CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

noticed the read out temp 

little stuffy in there we recommend you activate the 
secondary evaporator and the secondary pump. And then when 
you cool down, you can just turn off the evap and leave 
the pump running. Your choice. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN The cabin temperature is 74 and the 

suit temperature is 51. Can't beat that. 

Sounds like up town, over. 
It's some place. Let me tell you. 
And Charlie Brown if you have some 
we still don't have any data and if they 



CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

good word from Snoop 

pass on to you about the P52 we'd be interested. Over. 

Hey Snoopy. How's your P52 going? 
P52 is the platform realinement 
Gene Cernan is doing that while 
Tom Stafford is running systems checks on other systems. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston. You can go 

back to block on your up telemetry switch- 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. I wouldn't want anybody to 

zip me in any bad data on the back side. 
CC Rog. 



CHARLIE BROWN 
PAO 

the Lunar Module. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 1503 GET 9914 355/2 



CC Did you talk to snoop there, 

Charlie Brown? Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah. Hey Snoopy, this is Charlie 

Brown over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Is Geno keying his mike all the 

time? Sometimes I hear him and sometimes I don't. Maybe 
that feed through valve isn't as bad as they thought. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 99:24, CDT 15:13 356/1 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Snoop's calling you. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. We don't 

read Snoop. We haven't locked up on his data yet. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Did you hear that, Houston? 

CAPCOM That's negative, Charlie Brown. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN - margin and descent fuel - You 

been monitoring his descent stage fuel pressure, and gage 
windows here are doing a P52 burn. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown. We have no 

data at all. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Snoopy, this is Charlie Brown. 

Houston doesn't have any data from you today - right now. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Tell Snoop 

to do a burn 64 to get us to high gain, and we got another 
transducer that we can verify that pressure. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown right 

now (garbled). (Garbled). 

SNOOPY Charlie? 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes sir. 

CAP COM Snoopy? 

SNOOPY Yes sir. Charlie - 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy is calling, and he says that 

you have a high gain. 

CAPCOM Roger. We got the - 

CHARLIE BROWN Right now with it. 

CAPCOM Roger, we got the data, Snoopy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston - 

CAPCOM We got the data, Snoopy, and the 

descent pressure looks fine. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, I see (garbled) descent 1 and 

descent 2 both out. 

CAPCOM Roger, understand. Descent pressure - 

CHARLIE BROWN Did you say 1 and 2 both out? 

CAPCOM Copy. 

SNOOPY Okay, and you are giving me a go 

on descent pressure. Is that correct? 

CAPCOM That's correct. 

CHARLIE BROWN They said both descent pressures 

look good there, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Okay, I can read them, John. That s 

what I wanted to hear from them. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. Could you - 

SNOOPY I don't - I don't know exactly 

what kind of - 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. Could you give us 

your P52 results? Over- 

SNOOPY Roger. Stand by. 

SNOOPY Okay, the stars were 33 and 25. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 99:24, CDT 15:13 356/2 



SNOOPY Star angle difference was 4 balls 

9.. Gyro torquing angles are minus 668 minus 195 minus 055. 
Over. 

CAPCQM Roger. We copy, Snoopy. Out. 

SNOOPY Roger. And initial acquisition of 

the star (inaudible) realign look pretty good. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy. When's 

AOS or LOS rather occur? 

CAP COM Roger. We're coining up on LOS for 

you at 99:37, correction 99;38. We'll see you AOS at 100:26. 
Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, Tom. What was your biggest 

gyro torquing angle? Over. 

SNOOPY I got em, Charlie. 

SNOOPY Roger. Biggest gyro torquing angle 

was register 1 minus 668. 

CHARLIE BROWN Is that .66? 

SNOOPY It was 2 balls 668. 2 balls 195, 

and 3 balls 55. All minus. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. We got some word 

on your Haselblad problem on the magazine problem, we'd 
like you to reset the magazine flag so that the red just 
disappears and no further. If this doesn't work consistently, 
then change magazines. Over. 

SNOOPY That is why we already know that 

technique we changed magazines. 
Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Out. 

CAPCOM Hello, Snoop, and Charlie Brown, 

this is Houston. 

SNOOPY Houston, are you satisfied with the - 

CAPCOM You're - Snoop in Houston you are 

GO for a DOI. Recommend you check on CB 16 display engine 
override breaker. It might recover your descent monitoring 
capability. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

SNOOPY No, there's no breakers out there 

to hurt that, Charlie. I'm going, as long as you're satisfied, 
I'm going omni this time. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. You've got 4 minutes. 

SNOOPY Okay, I did - when I went down P52 

and when I slamed the S-BAND into the stops, I did pop 
my S-BAND antenna breaker under com on channel 16. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1523, GET 9934 357/1 



CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We show 2 minutes 

to LOS for you. Do you have anything? Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy 's just been wondering if 

you're reading him. I guess you are. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston- No sweat. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. Do you read. 

Over. 

SNOOPY Fine. 

CHARLIE BROWN We need to keep at least one set 

of communications open at all times, somehow. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. 45 seconds 

to LOS. You're still go for DOI. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. What is my P20 doing? Can 

anybody tell me? 

CAPCOM Stand by . 

CHARLIE BROWN Well, it can't seem to make up its 

mind. 

SNOOPY Garbled. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. It's 

integrating a state vector, P20. 

CHARLIE BROWN The one we just finished? 

CAPCOM Right. 

SNOOPY John, read through it. I don't 

know, I thought I got it. You'd better go through it again, 
over. I'm not on vox. (Garbled) 

PAO This is Apollo Control at 99 hours, 

38 minutes, and we have loss of signal on both vehicles. 
Charlie Brown going aroung the corner 25 seconds before 
Snoopy. This separation maneuver has put the Command Module, 
Charlie Brown, ahead of Snoopy. Acquisition times for 
Charlie Brown 100 hours 24 minutes. For Snoopy 100 hours, 
26 minutes. To recap the situation during this 12th revo- 
lution while we were in contact with Charlie Brown and Snoopy, 
as we acquired the vehicle had undocked and were 30 to 40 feet 
away in station keeping. We passed up a number of maneuver 
pads, times, and delta V' s for the maneuvers that will take 
place in the rendezvous sequence and I'll recap those times 
at a short time. Tom Stafford reported some trouble with 
the hasenbald film pack. Apparently film jamming. We did 
pass up later in the pass a procedure to try to correct 
this situation. Advised him that if it did not correct 
it to change magazines. The separation maneuver was performed 
on time and the controllers here on the ground said that it 
was at the proper delta V, 2.5. We copied the orbital 
parameters just prior to separation as 62.5 by 57.5 nautical 
miles. The Lunar Module, Snoopy, would have stayed in that 
essentially that same orbit. The separation maneuver for 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GDI 152.3, GET 9934 357/2 



PAO Charlie Brown was targeted for an 

orbit of 62.1 by 57.9 nautical miles, essentially the same 
orbit because 2 and 1/2 feet per second would not change 
that very much. We had a television pass during the sep- 
aration and as the vehicles separated you heard Gene Cernan 
caution John Young not to accept any TEI updates while they 
were gone. TEI, of course, is Trans Earth Injection and 
Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan want to find John Young there 
when they get back and complete this rendezvous. We then 
appear to have a rendezvous radar problem which eventually 
was traced to the transponder in the Command Module. Some 
concern at the time that we would not be able to perform 
DOI and we would not have been able to give Snoopy a go 
for DOI if the transponder had not become operable. We need 
the rendezvous radar for the rendezvous sequence. John 
Young recycled a power switch and got power back into the 
transponder and the system is working fine. Snoopy cannot 
monitor the propellant tank pressures for the descent pro- 
pulsion system on board. However, we can look at them from 
the ground. We checked them prior to giving Snoopy a go 
for DOI and those pressures are very good and we're not 
concerned about them. So Snoopy will be performing the 
descent orbit insertion burn at 99 hours, 46 minutes at 
delta V of 71.3 feet per second. The duration of the burn 
59 seconds. This will be performed by the descent propulsion 
system at 10% throttle for the first 15 seconds and then 
throttling to 40% for the remainder of the burn. The 
orbit targeted as a result of the DOI for Snoopy 61.2 by 8.4 
nautical miles and as a result of this maneuver Snoopy will 
start coming down to swoop over the lunar landscape at this 
low point. Pericynthion, the 8.4 miles coming 15 degrees 
prior to reaching landing site 2. Times on the remainder 
of maneuvers in the rendezvous sequence phasing 100 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2533, GET 99:44 358/1 

p A0 --rendezvous sequence phasing 

100 hours, 58 minutes 25 seconds. Again, a descent propulsion 
system burned, duration 1 minute, 12 seconds, DELTA V 
176.8 feet per second. We are targeting for an orbit for 
Snoopy at 189.8 by 11.7 nautical miles. The time for 
staging at which time Snoopy will jettison the descent 
stage, 102 hours 45 minutes. Ten minutes later at 102 hours, 
55 minutes, and 1 second, the insertion maneuver will be 
performed. Duration of that maneuver is 10 seconds, 
DELTA V 220.9 feet per second. This will be performed 
with the ascent propulsion system. We targeting for an 
orbit 45.9 by 10.7 nautical miles. The concentric sequence 
initiation maneuver, CSI, at 103 hours, 45 minutes 33 
seconds. Duration of the bum 51 seconds, DELTA V 44.9 
feet per second. This will be performed with the lunar 
module reaction control system. Targeting for 47.7 by 
41.9 nautical miles. The constant DELTA heights, CDH 
maneuver, at 104 hours, 43 minutes, 31 seconds. Duration 
58 seconds, DELTA V of 2 feet per second. Again, with the 
RCS system of the lunar module, targeting for 47.8 by 42.1 
nautical miles. Terminal phase iniation TPI at 105 hours, 
21 minutes, 1 second, duration 38 seconds with the lunar 
module reaction control system DELTA V 24.7 feet per 
second. Resulting orbit 58.7 by 47.5 nautical miles. 
The terminal phase breaking to begin at 106 hours, 3 minutes, 
5 7 seconds. Again an RCS maneuver in which the lunar module 
will null its velocity and start station keeping with 
Charlie Brown. This is Mission Control, Houston, at 99 
hours, 48 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



NPOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 99:55, CDT 15:44 359/1 



p A0 This is Apollo Control at 99 hours, 

55 minutes. We have a correction on the duration of the 
maneuvers that I just read to you. The durations that I 
gave you are not correct. I was reading from the wrong 
list. Here are the proper burn durations for those 
maneuvers. Descent orbit insertion 27 seconds, phasing 
40 seconds, insertion 15 seconds, CSI 28 seconds, CDH 2 
seconds, and TPI 15 seconds. The - starting with the CSI 
maneuver, Snoopy will use onboard calculations to figure 
these maneuvers and compare them with the ground provided 
pad, but it's preferable that they burn the onboard solu- 
tions. This is Mission Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1612, GET 100:23 360/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control at 100 hours, 

23 minutes. We are just 1 minute away from acquisition of 
Charlie Brown, 2 minutes, 23 seconds away from acquiring 
Snoopy . 

Houston, Charlie Brown. Over. 
Roger. Reading you 5 by, Charlie 



CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 
B rown . 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

Brown. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

reading you 5 by. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

Over . 

CHARLIE BROWN 



Houston, Charlie Brown. Over. 
Roger, Reading you 5 by, Charlie 



Hous ton , 
Hous ton , 



Charlie Brown. 
Charlie Brown. 



Houston, Houston, Charlie Brown. 



Houston, Houston, Charlie Brown. 



How do you read our high gain? Over. 



CHARLIE BROWN 
but I just don't re 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
Snoopy was go for DPI. 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
in when he gets to you 
65 feet per second on my 



all locked up on them, Tom, 



I'd 
them. 

Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 
Roger. Read you loud and clear. 



Roger. Sounds great. We copy. 
— nominal burn. He'll fill you 
but in 6 miles he was still in 
6 miles from me he was doing 
65 feet per second. In 3.8 miles he was doing 73 feet 
per second. I think that confirms this burn. They are 
down there among the rocks rambling about the boulders 
... right now . 

CC Roger, Charlie Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN They just saw earth rise. They 

say they are looking up at the horizon now. 



CC 
SNOOPY 
CC 

SNOOPY 
us , Charlie . 
CC 

way up the freeway. 
Over . 

SNOOPY 
Okay. Our burn was 
minus .3 and minus . 



Roger. 

Hello, Houston, this is Snoopy. 

Roger, Snoopy, go ahead. 

We is going. We is down among 

Roger. I hear you weaving your 
Can you give me a postburn report? 

Yes- As soon as I get my breath. 
>n time. Our residual was minus .1, 
i. And that was the residual for the 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDI 1612, GET 100:23 



SNOOPY DP S burn. We did not use the — 

we did not null anything out. We are at 61.2 by 9.2 and 
the AGS has us at an 8.6. 

cc Roger, Snoopy. We copy all the 

residuals and it looks like we are all go. Your DPS is 
looking good and it's go. Over. 

SNOOPY Oh, Charlie, we just saw an earth 

rise and it's just got to be magnificent. 

CC Roger. We copy. 

SNOOPY You can also tell Jack Shmitt that 

there are enough boulders around here to fill up Galveston 
Bay, too. 

CC He's copying, Tom. 

CHARLIE BROWN The only trouble is we're stripping 

lots of film for him, the spacecraft is looking good and 
there are no problems, Charlie, except it would be nice 
to be around here more often. 

cc Roger, we copy. All your 

systems are looking good to us. Did you get your DPS 
pressure back? Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN That's a negative, but the DPS 

burn was smoothed out very well when we throttled up. 

cc Roger. We got a good - good 

pressures here and the DPS is go for phasing. 

cc Snoop, Houston, there will be no 

update on the phasing pad. Everything is looking really 

S °° d * SNOOPY Okay. Good. We'll be picking up 

our landing radar test and taking pictures here and it is 

a fantastic sight. They do have different shades of browns 

and grays here. It's like the vulcan . . . vulcanism , there 

is also a pure white near the edge and the bottom is black 

and we see some large boulders that are black to blackish gray. 

Cc Roger, Snoopy, we copy. 

p A0 Snoopy is over the Smyth's Sea 

area now . 

cc Charlie Brown, Houston, can you 

see them down there among the boulders? Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN I saw them about 14 miles, but 

then I turned this thing over to CMC to let it do an auto 
maneuver and lost them. 

CC Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN I was tracking them just manually. 

I don't see them anymore. I'm going to update it with a 
little radar, a little range, and see if that brings it in. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2623, GET 100 ;23 360/3 
CC Roger, Charlie Brown, we copy. 

Out. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy. It looks 

like this leading radar is doing real good. 

CC Roger, Snoopy, we Roger* Over. 

SNOOPY It looks to oe we ought to have a 

lock on here even early. 

BHD OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/6^CDT 1*622 GET 1^^361/1 



Rog. Snoop. Over. 

Houston. I've got the ascent batteries 



We see that. Thank Snoop, 
so many things to do in such 
Snoopy coming up on 70 degrees east 



Roge r . 
Snoopy 
There ' 



Over. 



Snoop, Houston. Your ascent batteries 



SNOOPY And straight up ahead you can see the 

Gulf from the highlands over to the Maria area. It's a beautiful 
sight. Just like your crossing over to a black and gray sea. 

SNOOPY ... radar looks like it's locked on 

solid. 

CC 

SNOOPY 
connected at this time. 
CC 
PAO 

SNOOPY 
short time. 
PAO 

longitude now . 
CC 

look good. Out . 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 

close all you have to do is put 
there . 
CC 

that way. 

SNOOPY 

SNOOPY 
edge of the . . . 

CC 

be at Serenitatis very soon. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay Houston, 

the optics new. They're fantastic. 

CC Hey great show, Charlie Brown. 

SNOOPY We can tell that this area is definitely 

lower than that highland area just as the whole general area. 



Roge r . 
Also Joe , 
yoi 



it looks like we're getting so 
r tail wheel down and we're 



Yeah Snoop, Air Force guys don't talk 
(Garble) 

Okay, we're coming right over to the 
really smoothed out here compared to ... 
Roger. If we have you, you should 



I've got them in 



CC 

on second surface watch. 
CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

really hauling the maii. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
doesn't look like we're 
very nice pleasant pace. 

CC 

SNOOPY 
CC 

SNOOPY 

on Serenitatis Sea and I 
right there on his side, 
minute. Seemed to come 



Okay. Snoop. Can you come up 

Can you comment on that. Over. 
Oh. Are they down there among them. 
R ger. Bet it looks like their 

Yup. They're doing it. 
Suprisingly enough Charlie, it really 
moving too fast down here. It's a 

Rog 

(Garb ie) 
Copy. Out. 

See.is like we're coming up on my side 
believe Tom's got his direction ... 
Just come out of the horizon just a 
ovtr the horizon to be much closer to 



down here. There up thwve- 



60 miles, (garble) 



POLLO 10 COMMENTARY 5/22/69, CDT 1622, GET 100:33 



361/2 



CC Snoop, you're dropping out. Your 

voice faded out. We're standing by. 

PAO Pericynthian time 100 hours, 

43 minutes, 20 seconds. 

Snoopy Hello, Roger, Snoopy. If you 

read us Houston, we think your terminals are not tracking 
us too closely. Can you pick us up on the signal strength? 
Over. 

SNOOPY Houston. (Garble) 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Houston said something 

about the thing on the signal strength or something. 

SNOOPY Tell me again what you want me 

to do there, Houston. 

CC Roger, Snoop. We're getting 

data dropout and it sounds like.. 

SNOOPY We're passing Apollo Ridge. 

CC Roger. We copy on Apollo Ridge. 

SNOOPY (Garble) 

PAO Apollo Ridge at 42 degree east 

longitude . 

CC Hello, Snoop, Houston. Do you 

read? Can you try to tweak up the high gain signal 
strength weak. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Loud and clear there, Gino. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston. If you 

read, have Snoopy tweak up the high gain. We're not 
reading him at all. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Houston wants you to 

tweak up the high gain. They are not reading you. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, Charlie Brown. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston. Snoopy said they can't 

hold you on the high gain. 

CC Roger. Stand by. 

CC Snoop, we read you. Standing by. 

CHARLIE BROWN They are reading you, Houston, but.. 

CHARLIE BROWN They are reading you and Snoopy 

standing by. 

SNOOPY Okay, we are leaving Sidewinder, 

Tom, give me that a minute. I've got Censorius A (garble) 
here. Hey, I tell you we are low, we are close, Babe. This 
is it and it really looks pretty smooth down there 
surprising enough. Censorius A has huge boulders all 
around the rim of it falling on the inside and outside. 
Okay, I've got Maskelyne out here on my right side. We are 
coming up on Boot Hill and it is very easy to distinguish 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY 5/22/69, CDT 1622, GET 100:33 361/3 



SNOOPY Maskelyne and I see the craters 

that are going to lead us right into the landing site. We've 
got Duke Island on the left just past Boot Hill and we are 
coming up — I've got Wash Basin just off my right arm -- 
very easily distinguishable, Tom, ought to have Sidewinder 
Rill coming up on the left. Give me that, Gene. Here it 
comes. What time did we pitch over 11:40? Yeah. Okay, I've 
got Diamondback, Diamondback Rill is very easy to see. These 
rills look like they may be as much as a couple of hundred 
feet deep and very smooth. The surface actually looks 
very smooth, like a very wet clay, but smooth with the 
exception of the bigger craters. Let me get a picture 
of those rills, Diamondback. Sidewinder Rill is rugged 
on the edges and smooth on the bottom. The edges are 
definately rounded and it doesn't look like the sides 
are upturned. Okay, I've got Moltke up here on the left 
and we are coming into the site. The best description 
I can give you of these rills is of a dry — a dry desert 
out in New Mexico or Arizona. Okay, here we are coming 
up on the site. 

MCC ITCC Controllers and Computer 

Sups. Let's evaluate the displays. Make sure that you 
don't have any displays up that you don't require. 

SNOOPY Okay, I've got Moltke on the 

left and Maskelyne A... 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1636, GET. 10047 362/1 



(garbled) 

CAP COM 
checkout monitor go? 

SNOOPY 

(garbled) 

CAP COM 
voice back up, over, 

CHARLIE BROWN 
down voice back up 
down voice back up 

CAP COM 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CAPCOM 
out with Snoopy . 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 



Dynamics computer suit, can you let your 

Okay, we just went off ... 

Snoop, Houston. Request down 

Snoopy, Houston wants you to go to 
over. That's where he is. He's in 
Okay . 

Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 
Go ahead, over. 

Roger, we had a complete data drop 



I read you loud and clear. 

Okay, roger. Pass them on we got 

9 minutes till the burn get in the attitude and they're go 
for phasing, over, 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Snoopy, Houston says you're 

go for phasing. Got about 8 and 1/2 minutes now, want to 
get you in the attitude. Snoop, Charlie Brown. Do you 
read? 

SNOOPY You know this God damned filter has 

failed on me. My hasselbad just failed. Oh, I tell you man, 
that's something. Okay. Oh, look at that. If I don't have 



Snoop, Houston. We're reading 
We're counting 8 minutes to the burn 

I just got a VHF (garbled). Confirm, 



any more - 

CAPCOM 
you about 3 by now. 
over. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
over . 

SNOOPY Roger, we're going to phasing attitude. 

CAPCOM Roger, and you're go for the burn. 

SNOOPY Yea, you can't imagine the position 

we can see these things pitched way down like this. It 
looks like we're not very far above them. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, babe. You might try and get 

your helmets and gloves on. I went through P30 and we're 
all set there again. 

SNOOPY What is your attitude, babe. Boy, it's 

getting dark. Okay, I though we were pointing up in the 
air. Let's hurry up and get this burn completed. We have 
been down among them, babe. You've got to start doing that 
earlier. 

CHARLIE BROWN Charlie, you reading me? 

SNOOPY I'm reading you, do you read me? 

CHARLIE BROWN Yea. 

CAPCOM Okay you guys, give it to them. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, we can go into 40. Houston, 

Charlie Brown. They're going to a P40 now. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1636, GET 10047 362/2 



Roger, we copy them, Charlie Brown. 



CAP COM 
That you much. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog. 

SNOOPY Minus 12710 (garbled) minus 58.0. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. 

SNOOPY Yea, we're doing auto maneuver. 

Verb 70. Okay verb 70 now call verb 78 in there, babe. Okay. 
A minutes. The AGS good for a take over. The AGS is good 
for a take over. Okay, let me open and close this breaker. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

able. 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
closed. I'm sorry 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 



Okay. (garbled) end your gimbal in 

Ending gimbal in able. 
Throttle man. 
Throttle going to man. 
Throttle control to auto. 
Throttle contol is auto. 
Manual throttle commander. 
Go. 

Balance couple on. 
Go. 

Descent engine overide command off. 
Go. 

Have your push buttons all reset. 
Yep. 

Garbled, all reset. Garbled. 
Garbled. 

Okay, ECS inverter number 2, closed. 
That's over there. 
No it isn't. Inverter number 1 
You got it. 
Yep. 

Okay, descent engine override coming 

closed. AELG's coming closed. Abort stage coming close. Okay, 
Tom, if Delta T to go is less than 5 we RCS it in 03 minutes. 
If Delta T to go is greater than 25 we GOT stage in (garble). 
SNOOPY Yep. 
CHARLIE BROWN (Garble) 
SNOOPY Right. 

CHARLIE BROWN Now if we have to go to APS I ve 

got the staging procedure 9 right here. If they have to 
it in ... we'll phase it and burn it in AGS and go. 

• " . we'll burn It in AGS. 

Garbled. 

Have you got your landing radar on? 
Garbled. 

You ought to pull that breaker. 



b urn _ . - - - - r- 

we're burning out that 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 



If 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1636, GET 10047 362/3 



SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 

CHARLIE BROWN 
per second. Okay, 130 
can meet us . 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
loud and clear. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
engine RP set? 



No, it stays on ... Garbled. 

Right. 

(Garbled) 

Okay, 146 to go. ... of 176 feet 
Go. Tom. we're going on by so you 

John, how do you read? 

Loud and clear. f 

We are being cut out but I assume it s 

Okay, Tom. Coming up on 35 seconds 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1637, GET 100:57 363/1 



SNOOPY Loud and clear. Okay, Tom, 

coming up on 35 seconds, engine on descent, deadband in 
and AGS band okay, auto on AGS, AGS attitude looking good, 
Okay, the AGS is looking good, there is your AGS attitude 
in good shape. Okay and I'll ....the burn. The whole 
burn time is 40 seconds. I'm ready. Back to 99, proceed, 
ullage. Okay, we're burning, John. We're burned. 

CC Snoopy, so we copy. 

SNOOPY It's the gimbal light. Forget it 

Babe. We've got an engine gimbal light, but everything is 
good. Still burning. 149 to go. Okay, throttle it up. 
127 to go. 

CC How the attitude? 

SNOOPY 107 to go. 86 to go. 40 to go, 

40 to go. Shut down. Okay, the count is 1.5 feet per 
second. Let me know and I'll goto AGS attitude hold. 

AGS attitude hold That's good. Let it go, 

right there. That's good. That's got it, Babe. Plus 
.2, minus .5 and minus .9. The burn is good, John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. I understand. The burn 

is good. And Snoopy, we copy, your residuals. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger. 

SNOOPY You did real good then. The bum 

was steady, we had a descent .... light on twice, we had 

the engine gimbal light on, the master and all those 

good things and then we just pressed right on. Over. 

CC Roger. We copy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Verb 82, enter. 

SNOOPY Okay Okay. Houston, we 

are in a 19 .8 by 11.8. 

CC Roger. We copy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Tom, verify your engine 

... , stop quantity off, Okay, Babe, You've got news. 
I want to take my helmet and gloves off. 

CC I've got it, Snoopy, Houston. 

We missed the Verb 79. 

SNOOPY Roger. Just went in. 

CC Okay, we got it. Thanks, Tom. 

CC Hey, Snoopy, Houston, the Comm 

is really great and we got all our data now and during 
the good point though, boy you were way down in the mud, 
but everything is copasete now. Over 

SNOOPY Charlie, I fought with the S-band 

antenna to get it for you, but it's the best I could do 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 1637, GET 100:57 363/2 



SNOOPY I got the strongest strength 

OMNI when we were down there and after we passed I gave S 
Band another try and we came in good, because I thought you d 
want to see the burn. 

qq We appreciate it and thanks much, 

Snoopy, and it looked great. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy, and I 

thought you'd like to know that we have taken so many 
pictures and both cameras have failed on us. 

CC Roger, we copy. 

CHARLIE BROWN — the hack needles - give you a 

hack on where it is. On 180 and PITCH down 90. I know 
that. Okay, Tom, clean up your breaker panel, PCNGS landing 
radar open, air control decker power open, ALD open, 
inverter No. 1 open, and my descent engine override is coming 
open, my AELD is coming open, my .... stage is coming up and 
I am going to disconnect the battery. Stand by. 

SNOOPY Pretty good bird, you know it? 

Hey how about RCS? What have we got quantity wise? 

CHARLIE BROWN 9 2 and 82 

SNOOPY Fine, that's no problem, Babe. Piece 

of cake. Waiting to get to that attitude and we'll pick up 
P... 120 upside down. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, we've got 

a backup insertion pad if you are ready to copy. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, go ahead. 

CC Roger, Charlie Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead. 

CC Roger, Charlie Brown, backup 

insertions. SPS , G&N , NA down to 933, 933 is 102580100 
plus 01700 plus all balls minus 00 710180 26200 2 NA down 
to DELTA VC and DELTA VC is 01718. Rest of the pad is NA. 
Your ullage is 4 jets, 10 seconds. Got a CSI time, a 103 
4400, TPI time 1053300 with an N equal to 1. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. SPS, G&N, nonapplicable 

down to times burn 902580100 plus 01700 plus all balls 
minus 0 710 180162002 DELTA VC 0701718, 4 jets, 10 seconds, 
CSI, all three 4400, TPI 2053300, N equals 1. 

CC Good readback, Charlie Brown. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, confirm 

DELTA VC and 981 minus 00710. 

CHARLIE BROWN Minus 2 balls, 710. 

CC Okay. Fine. You have been breaking 

up a little bit, John, we missed one of those zeros. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDI 1627, GET 100:57 363, 

SNOOPY Hey, there, are you pitched up? 

CHARLIE BROWN That's affirm. I'll get there. 

Aa I pitched up? I've been tracking attitude right now. 

SNOOPY Hey John, you may have to go down 

and reset that rendezvous radar transponder. Over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1657, GET 101:07 364/1 



CAPCOM Hold it John we're getting it. 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, Snoopy. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Snoopy. Over. 

SNOOPY Did you take a look at 0649 'a what 

ire got there? 

CAPCOM Roger, we're looking at it. Stand 

by ' 

SNOOPY The first one was a small number, 

.4 and zero. 

CAPCOM Roger, copy. .4 and zero on the 

first, it looks big numbers now. Snoop, Houston. While 
we're looking at this, would you - are you ready to copy 
on insertion pad? Over. 

SNOOPY That's affirm. I am and I'd also 

like to give - you give me an update on ALS and sunrise. 

CAPCOM Roger. Stand by. Your insertion 

pad TIG starting with TIG 102550140 minus 01832 plus all balls 
minus 01235. Delta VR is 02209015 minus - correction Roll 
is 180233 minus 01818 plus all balls minus 01255 rest of 
the pad is NA. Standing by for your read back, over. 

SNOOPY Okay. You got any word on that 

noun 49. We're loosing some tracking time we'd like to try 
out . 

CAPCOM Roger, stand by. We want you to 

reject that mark with the big numbers and stand by on the 
others. Snoop, Houston, We have LOS time for you of 1 zero - 
1 zero 137. Sunrise time of 1 zero 14 zero, over. 

SNOOPY Okay, 1 got it. 

CAPCOM And how's the P20 doing now? Is 

it taking good marks? 

SNOOPY Yea, it looks like it is. We just 

got our second mark and, wait a minute. Yea, it looks good. 
It' 3 tenths of a foot per second. And I'll read the pad 
back if you'd like. Houston, are you ready for the pad? 

CAPCOM Rog, go. 

SNOOPY Okay. Insertion is 102550140 minus 

01832 plus all balls minus 01235. 022090151802 33 minus 
01818 plus all balls minus 01255 and that's it. 

CAPCOM Roger, that was a good read back. 

Snoop, Houston. We're satisfied with the way the rendezvous 
radar is updating the state vector in P20 now, over. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie. Thank you. Houston, 

Apollo 10. The zeox is track and now looks real good and 
real solid. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop. It looks good to us. 

Your range is coming right in there. 
SNOOPY Roger. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1657, GE1 101:07 364/2 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'm tracking you guys optically. 

It's really working good. 

SNOOPY Have you got our flashing light, John? 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, it's beautiful. 

SNOOPY Houston. Just for information 
everytime we loose track with the S-band antenna it happened 

to bang into stops. It pops the S-band antenna circuit breaker 
on 16. It's done that about 3 times. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

SNOOPY But it seems to recover all right. 

CAPCOM Roger. Snoop, Houston. That's 
a normal - 

SNOOPY Hey, I'm going on the antennas at 

this time. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy on the OMNI s and 

that's normal indication for the steerable when it goes 

under a stops it will pop that breaker. 

SNOOPY Okay, let's go to purge 401 noun 

72 inner (garbled). 



END OF TAPE 



Okay, I guess you maneuvered because 
Okay • 

The ... on this thing is really bad. 



LLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 101:17, CDT 17:07 365/1 

CHARLIE (garbled) this is Charlie. 

SNOOPY (Garbled) . „ T «. , 

SNOOPY That's unbelievable isn t it.' it s 
like a thing out there on a string where you can touch it. 

Where the hell are we going? 

CHARLIE You're there, you re there. 

SNOOPY Man are we there. This one happened 
bo good, it's just pathetic. 

CHARLIE Okay, ready? 

SNOOPY Yeah, that's good. Don t even trim 

1Z ' CHARLIE We're going to go to PGNCS , volts. 

SNOOPY Yep. 

CHARLIE That's good. PGNCS and volts. 

SNOOPY Did you guys turn off your tracking 
light? 

CHARLIE No. No we maneuvered. 

SNOOPY 
I don't see you. 

CAP COM Okay 

SNOOPY 
It won't stand it. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We read you about 
y. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger, Houston. This is Snoopy. 
We're starting a mark on ... now for our P52. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. We copy in the P52. 

Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Standby, Tom. 

SNOOPY Go, Roger. 

SNOOPY Okay, ... 

SNOOPY Batteries went dead. 

CHARLIE BROWN Now he's what? 

SNOOPY Haselblad batteries dead. 

SNOOPY One of the film packs jammed. 

SNOOPY Now he's moved in. 

SNOOPY Go to mark 1, what? 

SNOOPY Mark 1. 

SNOOPY Mark Y, Gene? 

SNOOPY Mark Y. 

SNOOPY Mark Y, Gene? 

SNOOPY Mark Y. 

SNOOPY Boy, no wonder John's going blind. 

SNOOPY That in 1? 

SNOOPY It's in 1. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. To improve the 
com, we'd like you to go to S-BAND of voice and S-BAND 
ranging off. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger. S-BAND voice off and S-BAND 
iging off. Over. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 101:17, CDT 17:07 365/2 



CAPCOM 
you lose the high 

CHARLIE 

SNOOPY 

SNOOPY 
How are you readin 

CAPCOM 
A little bit bette 

SNOOPY 
loud and clear now 

CAPCOM 
That's all Snoop, 
torquing angles. 

SNOOPY 
maneuver on the . . 
on the very center 
first aligning was 

CAP COM 

SNOOPY 

CAPCOM 



And Charlie Brown, Houston. When 
gain, then go to omni DELTA. Over. 
Roger. Omni DELTA. 
Charlie, this is Snoop. 
Hello, Houston. This is Snoopy. 

g now? 

Roger, Tom. You're about 3 by 5 now. 
r now. Over. 

Roger, Charlie, I'm reading you 
Over. 

Roger. We - we have low bit rate. 
When you get through P52, we'd like your 

Roger. And on the first auto 
, Houston, ... it put the article right 
of the star there, so it looks like our 
beautiful. 

Roger, Snoop. We copy. Over. 
And we're now marking on Antares. 
Rog, Snoop. Out. 



END OF TAPE 



— APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT 1717, GET 101:27 



366/1 



SNOOPY 
Are you calling? 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

Read me about 3 by. 
CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

again. Unreadable. 
CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
difference is 4 balls 2. 
CC 

tbe triangle difference. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
3 balls 66. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CC 



Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. 
Static. 

Charlie Brown, Houston, Go ahead. 
Over . 

Static 

Charlie Brown, Houston, Read me 



Static. 

Roger. We see you at P20. Over. 
Static. Houston, the star angle 

Houston, are you reading? 
Roger. Go ahead. 4 balls 2 on 

How about the torque angles? 
Okay. ...00169plus 00050 plus 



Roger, we copy, Snoopy. Out. 
S tatic. 

Charlie Brown, Houston, we are 
satisfied with your P20. Your APS looking good to us. 
Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN John, you are fairly readable. 

Stand by. We might have an antenna problem. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, we are 

ooking up your tailpipe there and ....pretty bad. Do 
ou copy, Charlie Brown. We are looking up your tailpipes, 
the C0MM is pretty bad. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown, ...static. 

CC Snoopy, go ahead. 

CC Charlie Brown, Houston, we'll have 

LOS at 10136. We'll see you over the hill at 10222 and 
Snoop LOS for you 101 correction 10137 AOS 10225. Over. 

SHO0PY This is Snoopy. Roger. We got 

that. 

CC Roger. And Charlie Brown and Snoopy 

as you are going over the hill, all the systems are go. 
We also go here on the ground. And it's looking great. 
Over. 

SNOOPY Thank you, Charlie. Snoopy is go 

here. Our P52 is complete, we are going to pick up P20 
again. 

CC Copy. 

SNOOPY Hey, Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. 

I guess we are about 150 miles from you. 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY And our P52 is complete. We 

coining over the star tracking on you. 



" APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , CDT 1717, GET 101:27 366/2 



CHARLIE BROWN Static. 

CC Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Did you get your AOS LOS times? Over. 
CHARLIE BROWN Static. 

PAO And we have lost the signal on 
Charlie Brown. About 40 seconds away from losing the 
signal with Snoopy. And Snoopy has gone behind the moon 
now on the 13th lunar revolution. We acquired Charlie 
Brown first, he reported that Snoopy had reported the 
DOI burn and that he felt it was a good one. And then 
when Snoopy came within range, Tom Stafford and Gene 
Cernan confirmed that the descent orbit insertion burn 
had been on time and they were reading an onboard orbit 
of 61.2 by 9.2 nautical miles. They were down among the 
boulders, obviously very impressed at what they were 
seeing. Communications were bad . 



END OF TAPE 



?OLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1717, GET 101:37 367/1 



PAO - what they were seeing. Communications 

were bad a large part of this pass as we lost lock on the 
high gain antenna. Then shortly before the phasing burn 
you could hear Gene Cernan calling out the checklist for 
the burn to Tom Stafford. They were on what is called vox 
voice operated circuits talking to each other on board. We 
had a good phasing burn. This maneuver coming slightly more 
than 10 minutes after Snoopy had passed over landing site 2. 
He reported that both cameras aboard Snoopy had failed during 
this low pass. This phasing maneuver will put Snoopy behind 
and below Charlie Brown. The Descent Orbit Insertion had 
placed Snoopy out ahead. Now they've burned into an orbit 
with an appacynthion of 190 nautical miles and a pericynthion 
of 11.8 nautical miles. So Snoopy will start dropping behind 
and will go behind and below Charlie Brown. To reach the 
position where it will have the same lighting and the same 
position as the Lunar Module on Apollo 11 will have after 
liftoff from the lunar surface. This phasing maneuver was 
done at 10% throttle for the first 26 seconds and then 
full throttle. You heard Gene Cernan call off the numbers 
of the Delta V as it burned down. Acquisition for Charlie 
Brown will be at 102 hours, 22 minutes, 22 seconds and for 
Snoopy 102 hours, 25 minutes, 37 seconds. Not quite 45 min- 
tes from now. The next maneuver to be performed will be 
taging which will come near 102 hours, 45 minutes. We have 
tape of a briefing by Pete Frank, Flight Director on the 
shift preceeding this shift and there has been a request 
that we play that on the release line. We'll do that now. 

"Press Conference Transcribed Separately." 



END OF TAPE 



^Apollo 10 mission commentary, 5-22-69, get 102:21, cdt issio 368/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 102 hours, 

21 minutes. We're about a minute away from acquisition of 
Charlie Brown. About 4 minutes away from acquisition of 
Snoopy! Snoopy will be making another low pass over the 
lunar surface this time on the order of 11 nautical miles, 
and "ill perform staging, jettisoning the descent stage, 
and then 10 minutes after descent stage the insertion 
maneuver. This maneuver is ^signed to retrograde maneuver, 
and it's designed to bring down the high ... that we 
achieve with the phasing maneuver. This ... was necessary 
to put the lunar module behind Charlie Brown ."d now we 
want to bring that down from about 190 miles to 145 miles 
out it in an orbit, the same orbit that's planned for the 
lunar landing insertion orbit. And with that maneuver 
Snoopy will start catching up with Charlie Brown. 
PAPPOM Houston, over. 

CHARLIE Roger. I'm looking at 316.45 miles 

on the - on the radar right now. , . ,., 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy. We'd like you to 

go to POO in ACCEPT. 

CHARLIE This thing is working. 

CAPCOM Roger. We'd like you to go in 

POO and ACCEPT . We have a state vector for you and a change 
on your back up insertion pad if you're ready to copy. Over. 

CHARLIE Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Okay. DELTA- V X and then 981. 

CHARLIE Go ahead. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. DELTA-VX and 981 changes 

t0 ^CHArS 0 " ° Ver ' Koger. Belta VX plus 0 12 70 . 
CAPCOM Roger. That's negative. 

CHARLIE Yeah, I just barely read you there 

Sn °° P CAPC0M Charlie Brown, that was a bad 

readback on the DELTA-V. 

CHARLIE Say again. Over. 

CHARLIE Say again, there, Charlie. 

CAPC0 M R°g, John * lx - s P lus 0172 °- 0ver * 

CHARLIE R°g- 01720. 

CAPCOM That's affirm. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown. This is Houston. 

I cut you out at the beginning of the pass- Say again what 
you were going to say. Over. . _ 

CHARLIE Nothing important. I m about to 

lose - I just lost range and went to 320.50 miles, and I m 
no longer in voice contact with Snoopy. I think we re just 
flat out of range. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy. _ 

CHARLIE I can hear him very faintly in the 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 102:21, CDT 18:10 368/2 



CHARLIE background. 

CAPCOM Roger. Charlie Brown, this is 

Houston. It's your computer. We're through with the load. 
Over. 

CHARLIE Roger. Thank you. 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. 

CHARLIE I'm just about to lose you there. 

CHARLIE Hello, John. Do you read us? 

CHARLIE Just barely, you guys. Did you 

stage? 

CHARLIE Houston - 

SNOOPY Houston, this is - 

CHARLIE Go ahead, . . . 

SNOOPY Hello, Charlie Brown, Snoopy. Do 

you read? 

CHARLIE Roger. Read you loud and clear 

now. Weak but clear. I read you guys. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston. How do you read 

Snoopy? 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoopy. Reading you 5 by. 

Over. 

SNOOPY Roger. Will you ask Charlie Brown 

if he's still in track attitude. I can't get any lock on 
at this distance out here. Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. He had you, he broke lock 

at 445 miles on the VHF. Stand by. We'll ask him on his 
attitude . 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Are you 

still in tracking attitude - 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown are you - 

CHARLIE I'm in attitude 180 which is where 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CHARLIE Supposed to be right now. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown. We copy- 

Snoop, Houston. He's in attitude as called for out in the 
flight plan. 180 pitch. We got your ascent looks good, 
the ascent battery looks good. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger. We've just pressurized the 

ascent tanks and they look good. 

CAPCOM And roger. If you'll give us your 

computer, we need POO and data. We have a state vector 
for you. 

SNOOPY You've got it. 

CAPCOM Copy, Snoop. Out. 

CAPCOM Hello, Charlie Brown. This is 

Houston. 

CHARLIE Is there some attitude? 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 



~VLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69, GET 102:21, CDT 18:10 368/3 
r ap COM We show you loaded TIG incorrectly. 

In P30? TIG is 102550140. Over. Correction, correction - 
fH APT T E It raa y be 102 ~ 

CapcOM Charlie Brown, that was my fault. 

TIG time is 102580100. Over. 

CHARLIE Roger. 0100. 



£f 0 C ° M Tnat's thfignition ti.e if f Charlie 



Brown^has to perform the mane uver^cas ^Snoo^c an • ^ 
rlpCOM Looks real fine, Charlie Brown. 

^PCOM Snoop, Houston. We got the load 

cSoOpT PUter ' S yOUrS Ro g er: r Hou S ton. Thank you very much. 
* I .ornn this is Snoopy. We've got about 14 minutes 
foVag^? B, ri loll g S io go ahead and maneuver to staging 

att±t clpC0M Roger, Snoop. We copy. Can you 

cogent on your cameras. We might be able to help you out 

° n ^SNOOPY^"* ^ger. On the Hasselblad it looks 

like both batteries have gone dead. Over. 

CAPCOM Copy. Both batteries dead on the 

isselblad. How about to sequence? 

SNOOPY Okay, on the sequence, I ve got 

9 «h-M na cks that you have to practically jam, ... or step 

n' «.t th« to -ke electrical "n'.ct -o the c«er. 

will run. I've got one of them to run and I 11 try to get 
°CAlcOM ne " " We copy. Thank you much. We'll 

W ° rk SNO^" y ° U ' '"''it's just hard to do that when 
you're coming across a landing site, you expect it to work. 

TAPCOM Rog, Gene. We copy. 

SNOOPY And Snoopy's going to maneuvering 

at this time. 

CAPCOM Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1821, GET 10232 369/1 



PAO We're 11 minutes away from staging 

and 21 minutes away from ignition for the insertion burn. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, you guys must be about 450 miles 

out would you. 

SNOOPY On the line and all the descents 

off. Charlie Brown, Snoopy. Over. You ready. 2 tenths 
to vertibelt full egress. Hem and repress valve closed. 
Okay, I'm ready - golly - Okay, descent 02 closed. A ascent 
02 number 1 open. Okay, Rags A and B to egress. Okay, 
water tank select asset. Okay, 1*11 check the asset batteries. 
Oh, I'm on a dead phase, Tom. TR dead phased. Okay, on your 
side AP bus A decca gimbal open. Height display thrust 
open. Propulsion descent helium reg vent open. Heater landing 
radar open. Staff control decca power open. Tings landing 
radar open. Okay, let's take another look at those APS 
temperatures and pressures. I guess they look all right to 

me * CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. The APS looks good 
to us, over. 

SNOOPY Okay. Roger, Houston. We're about 

4 minutes and 23 minutes from staging. Take Tom and let's 

get out of here. The clocks set. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston, over. 

SNOOPY Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy 8 minutes to staging. 

° Ver *SK00PY Roger, 8 minutes mark now 759, 58. 

That's affirm. We're with you. That was my mistake. It's 
4 minutes to our 14 minute check. We're 8 minutes to staging, 
750. 

* CAPCOM Copy, out. 

SNOOPY Just like to think ahead. Okay, 

Tom. Staging attitude should be - 

CHARLIE BROWN This is Charlie Brown. You'll have 

to keep me posted on what Snoopy's doing. I can't read them 
anymore . 

SNOOPY - about 250 upside down. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown. Snoop's 

going through his staging checklist. He's got 7 minutes to 
go before staging. 

SNOOPY Yes, I can read you Houston, that 

mother may give us a kick. Okay, Tom. If you get a chance 
reset my orb rate ball will you coming down. AGS agrees 
with the PGNS on that one. 39, I'm way off now. I'm about 
290. There's 2 70 coming up on 240, a little more. That s 
good. Right there, stop it. It's 1534, Tom. At 14 minutes 
you get the master arm on and we'll leave 



\POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1821, GET 10232 369/2 

SNOPPY it on remember right on through 

the insertion burn. And I'll set the DPS. Matter of fact, 
if you stay in AGS I e ll go ahead and set it now. Okay. In 
AGS, I'll set the DPS. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We have you go 

for staging, over. 

SNOOPY Over. Roger, do you have an update 

on the LM weight? 

CAP COM Roger, Snoop. Your LM weight is 

8290 over. 

SNOOPY Roger, got 8290. Thank you. 

Hey Tom, that's good enough for CSM weight. So, that's it 
babe. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. We got it 

showing the high gain now. Snoop's 3 minutes from staging, 
over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY Okay, babe. Let's run through it, 

right up to staging. We've gone through - you want to double 
check these? Yep. Hem against the vertibelt full egress. 
Hem and repress close. Descent 02 closed. Ascent number 
102 open. Pressure AGS both egress. Power tank ascent, ascent 
water open. I opened that and descent water's closed. I 
closed that. I checked the voltages, we're dead phase, 
fe're on ascent batteries and the voltage looks good here. 
You got your breakers pulled on that side. Yep. At 14 min- 
utes put your master arm on. Extra inflation 2 jets. Time 

control AGS. And you're in attitude hold so for 

staging - actually be up there if you want. I think that 
would be better for staging otherwise you're going to bang 
those thrusters all over the place. Then I should be looking 
at 270 upside down and you looking at 295 upside down. I'm 
coming right in. Okay, and at the DAP is set I'll call up 
PA7 at 11 minutes . 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1831, GET 102:42 370/1 



i SNOOPY Let's take another look at the 

damp, Tom. 12002. Let's go. Okay. Call 47 In 1 minute. 
Okay, Tom. I'll thrust APS, 2 feet per second. I'll stop, 
1*11 start thrusting forward and you stage fire. Got your 
master on mark? 

CHARLIE BROWN My attitude looks good. I'm coming 

up on 2 70 upside down. 

SNOOPY And yours is looking good. 

SNOOPY There it is. That way and then 

that way, right? Because we're going to be awful light. 
Stay out of there, Babe. Noticed that last attitude. 
That's the time you want to go. The damp was set for a 
light vehicle. We'll do it this way. Okay, you ready? 
Okay? Son of a bitch. Okay, let's make this burn on the 
AGS, Babe. Make this burn on the AGS. 

PA0 We see staging. 

SNOOPY Got a good staging. Let's make 

it on the AGS. Got in the gimbal lock? She didn't go., 
eh? That stage. That poos up, Babe. Okay, our angles — 
You didn't lock, eh? Something is wrong with that gyro — 
Okay. ROLL is 180 and PITCH is 233. 233. Better put my 
ball on inertia just to check that out. Verify it, too. 
I can't reach it. But if I could put mine, you could 
verify it on the AGS. 

cc Snoopy, Houston, we show you 

close to gimbal lock. 

SNOOPY Yes. Something went wild during 

that phasing and we are all set. We didn't lock it. We 
are going ahead to auto maneuver. 

CC Roger. 

SNOOPY Babe, I don't know. Let s put 

my AGS in inertlal to verify that we are at the right 
attitude, Babe. Okay, just do it in inertial. Okay, in 
case we have to go to it, that's what we want. Let s get 
that AGS. Wait a minute got to get this damn thing. 

SNOOPY Charlie, how is the staging? 

SNOOPY ••• wait until that thing blanks. 

cc Charlie Brown, Houston, they're 

staging. Had a wild gyration, but they got it under 
control. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY Are the AGS in inertial, Tom? 

Okay, that's good. Had a lot of time. 7 minutes. 
I don't know what the hell that was, Babe. 

cc Snoopy, Houston, you are looking 

okay for the insertion burn. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 1821, GET 102:42 370/2 



SNOOPY wait a second, I just got. 

SNOOPY Roger, Charlie, that was something 

we've never seen before. It was real good. We went to AGS 
and 

SNOOPY The computer is yours, Tom. I 

already went through P30, go on to P40 . 

SNOOPY Let me tell you what happened real 

quick as we come around to this insertion burn. Now, the 
attitude deadband started thrusting up and the thing just 
took off on us . 

CC Roger. We copy. 

SNOOPY And I could see it was coming up, 

I got ahold of it and tried to avoid gimbal lock and I guess 
I did. Looks like we got a good insertion out of it anyway. 
I mean, a good staging out of it and we are all set to go for 
insertion here. 

SNOOPY Okay, Tom, call off 686. 

SNOOPY Okay, the computers is yours. 

We're going backwards. Just the way we want to go. I'll 
tell you. There was a moment there, Tom, but let's worry 
about it after we make this burn. I want to make sure 
is AGS is up for it. Okay. 

SNOOPY Houston, stand by for a mark, 5 

minutes to the burn. Mark, 5 minutes to the burn. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie, we're with you. 

I think we have got all our marbles. 

SNOOPY Gee, it sure coming down to that 

ground, I'll tell you. I don't know, but I hope we never 
find it again. I'll tell you, that was wild, Babe. And 
it wasn't the DAP because you were in AGS. That was AGS. 
Yes, why deadband? That's where we are going to stage. 
Okay, Babe, I've got good AGS and everything is looking 
good. I've the attitude set so if we have to switch, 
we'll be all right. Okay, 40 7 on our monitor till the 
burn. We are 4 minutes. Okay. 4 minutes. Boy that is 
hard to do with helmet and gloves on. Give me a monitor 
and add that pressure 1 and 2. Let's take another look 
at it. That's looking good. Just stop pushbuttons, all 
reset and then an onboard stage reset. Buttons reset? 
AGS translation, I mean AGS translation 4 jets. Okay, Tom- 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, I'm not reading them, 

so if they don't make it, you've got to tell me, eh? 

Cc Roger, they are counting down. 

Looking good, Charlie Brown. 

SNOOPY Okay, Tom, if we don't miss at 

170 feet, if we've got more than 170 feet per second to 
go, we are in RCS , RCS maximum of 55 seconds. 



^POLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1821, GET 102 :42 370/3 

SN00PY greater than 170 where RCS is 

back to our pad DELTA V, which is going to be P40 there. 
lit is looking good. And our pad DELTA V is 220.9, so 
if we bum lesVthan 170 feet per second i f we don t get 
up to 170 feet per second go ....burn it back about 220 
Let's Bet in at 130 feet per second region. Okay, put 
push your inverter No. 1 closed circuit breaker at 1 minute 
your stab control or AALB closed. Well, I'll tell you, we 
are down among them again on backwards, you know that? 
Look at that rill. That's got to be probably 
Diamondback right there. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 1841 GET 10252 371/1 



CHARLIE BROWN 
right there. It's awful close to see that 

CHARLIE BROWN 
minutes. I'm closed 

CHARLIE BROWN 
final trim. 



That's got to be probably Diamondback 
close to se 

Okay, Babe. Coming up about two 
Okay, 2 minutes, Babe. Give it 



CC 



Okay . 
Okay . 



Here it is. 

My AELD is coming close 



No. 



Okay . 
Okay . 



And verify your burning 



At 35 seconds, we want 



And PNGCS to AUTO. 
Went right into the attitude 

Coming up on 112. 
I got 99. I'll cut you down. 
Burn time is 15 seconds, so it's 



Babe , 



50 seconds 



CHARLIE BROWN 

Tom. 

SNOOPY 
1 breakers closed. 
CHARLIE BROWN 
the engine arm to ON. 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
and Engine arm yet to go. 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 
going to go in a hurry. 

SNOOPY 220 feet per sec. 220.9. 

48. Baby, let's make this one. 

CC There's 35 seconds. 

SNOOPY After arm into ON ascent AC control 

at AUTO dead band mirror we're stuck for this attitude on 
a burn and cut down at 500. Okay Baby. 9 8 7 6 5 99 
3 2 1 burn. Burn. Okay. 160 to go. 

Cc Roger. You are burning. 

CHARLIE BROWN 134 to go. 

CC You're burning, you're burning. 

CHARLIE BROWN 100 to go. 78 to go. 50 to go. 

20 to go. Stand by, Tom. Okay, I'll null them out. Oh 
beautiful. Beautiful. Beautiful. 

Cc Charlie Brown. Houston. You got 

the burn off. We're in good shape. 

SNOOPY 
to (inaudible) 

Point 3 



CHARLIE BROWN 
me feel better. 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 
CC 

It looks great. 

SNOOPY 
burn looked real good 
SNOOPY 



Outstanding. My c< 
point 1. 



ngratulations 
Baby that made 



Call VERB 82 when you have a chance. 
AGS says we made a good burn. 
Snoop. Can we copy the residuals. 

We've got it. Oh Roger. The 



I Tell you we're down here where 
we can touch the top of some of the hills though. 

CC Houston. Under cases like this 

it sounds like to me you can relay through him because 
every time you talk to me I hear him talking in the background. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 1841 GET 10252 371/2 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston. This is Snoopy. 

Shows us in 46.7 by 11.0, over. 

cc Roger, we copy- 46.7 by 11.0. 

SNOOPY Okay, turn engine arm OFF AELD 

breaker open and master arm OFF and inverter No. 1 open. Okay, 
and the RCS just for the record from 80 and 78. Boy, I tell 
you I thought we were wobbling all over the skies. Suprised 
those residuals ended up where they did. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. Yaw 180 and pitch down 90. 

cc Hello, Charlie Brown. Houston. 

Can you hear them talking when I keep keyed down here. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes, a lot better. I thought 

all of a sudden - that was great. 

Cc Okay. When they start talking 

I'll key down here and relay to you. Over. Until you get 
them again. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, that will be kind of you. 

CC Rog. 

cc Charlie Brown Houston. We recom- 

mend for your next maneuver you should load your DAP with 
a half a degree per second. We see point 2 now. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Roger. I'm going to do that. 

CC Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston. Is he in a 283 by 15.3. 

Over. . , , i 

cc Negative. We ve got him at 46.7 

by 11.0. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. I must have loaded this 

number backwards. This P76 number backwards. 

cc Roger. We'll send you a TM vector 

in just a moment. Charlie Brown we've got your LM vector 
coming. Stand by . 

CHARLIE BROWN All righty. 

CHARLIE BROWN We're in POO and ACCEPT right now. 

cc Roger. Copy Charlie Brown. Stand 

by . Be a while . 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. I can do the realign in the 

Charlie Brown, Houston. Stand by 



meantime then. 

30 seconds. We'll have the load to you. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. I'll wait. 

CHARLIE BROWN Oh Houston. That's outstanding. 

Wished we had done that when we were full with the GSFC. 

CC Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



.POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69 , GET 103:02 , CDT 18:51 372/1 



CHARLIE 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
the computer back. 
CAPCOM 



Are you done with it? 
S tand by . 

Roger. Charlie Brown, you can take 
're done with the load. 

Charlie Brown, Houston. 



We're 



through with the computer. It's yours 



CHARLIE 
CAP COM 
CHARLIE 
SNOOPY 



we're doing a P52 the rest of it. 



Thank you much . 
You're welcome. 
That's more like it. 
Houston, we're going to OMNl's 



CAP COM 
AFT omnis. Over. 

CAPCOM 
read. Over. 
CHARLIE 
CHARLIE 
Okay, he's on AFT omnis 

CAPCOM 
you read him now 
CHARLIE 
CAPCOM 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 



Roger, we copy. 
Snoop , Hous t on . 



We want AFT omnis, 
AFT omnis if you 



They want you on AFT omnis, Snoopy. 
Houston wants you on AFT omnis. 
Ho us t on . 

Roger. We copy, Charlie Brown. Can 
Charlie Brown? 

Yes, I am. Thank you. 
Snoop, Houston. Over. 
Go ahead, Houston. This is Snoopy. 
Roger. We think we can help you 



syche out your problem there at staging. It looks like the 
mode control switch was in AUTO instead of AFT hold. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay, we'll try to recollect it. I 

thought we went right through the checklist as prescribed, but 
if you've got telemetry, it'll sure help us. 

Roger. 

Houston. Results of the ... alignment. 



CAP COM 
SNOOPY 
Do you read? 

SNOOPY 
angles are 0 
(garbled) . 

CAPCOM 
CHARLIE 
acquire you on VHF again 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 



Okay, plus 4 balls 4, gyro torquing 
plus 00311 plus 00121 and plus 00081 and the 



Roger. 
Snoopy 



We copy . 

we're going to acquire 



Okay , we'll be ... 

Snoop, Houston. We noticed on your 
checklistTthat minus 14 minutes prior to - prior to insertion, 
we have an omission on the mode control switch. It doesn t 
call out its position, and we think that's where we ran 

astray. Over. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. Over. 

SNOOPY Go ahead, Houston. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. Would you like some 

further amplification on the staging problem. We think the 
air came at minus 14 minutes where we failed to call out the 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 103:02, CET 18:51 372/2 

CAPCOM AGS mode control switch into AFT 

hold. Over. 

SNOOPY Okay. Ready. 

CHARLIE Okay, I'm coming around now, you 

guys. I'm probably not pointing at you right this second. 

SNOOPY Yeah, we wondered what happened. 

We were locked in the quad and the radar slowly played it 

out. Now it's trying to come in, John, as you pitch up. 

CHARLIE Okay. 

SNOOPY Keep going. Those springs are 

building. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69, GET 103:12, CDT 19:01 373/1 



CHARLIE 

SNOOPY 
now, John, at 320. 

CHARLIE 
giving you a 

SNOOPY 
see these . . 
ones . 

CAP COM 
a CSI update for you 
SNOOPY 
CAPCOM 



(garbled) 

Okay, we've got 



a solid lock on it 



Would you believe this thing is 
range in half steps. 

And again on our first mark, we 
We'll reject them and pick up on our second 

Snoop, Houston. We have 



Roger. 



I don't think 
981 is plus 0453 plus 000. 



Hello , 
Ove r . 

Go ahead with your update. 
UJW „ VJa Roger. It's P32 CSI 103455460 

10521010o"plus 0453 plus 000106 plus 453 plus 000 plus 005. 
Standing by for your readback. Over. 

SNOOPY Give me 981 again. 

I got enough numbers. 
CAPCOM 

° Ver *SNOOPY Stand by, Charlie. I'll give you 

a read back in just a second. This is in CSI and ... with 
you. Is that correct? 

SNOOPY Okay, John, I got CSI TIG is 1034554. 

105210100 

CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston, 

on your readback after the noun 11. Over. 

SNOOPY Stand by and I'll read it back. Let 

me get things going here, Charlie. 



s affirmative. 
John, I got CSI TIG is 

You broke out 



CAPCOM 
SNOOPY 
it back in a 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
CAPCOM 
CHARLIE 
CAPCOM 



Roger. 
I got enough to do, 



and I'll read 



minute . 



Over . 
Over . 



On 



think 



Roger. 

Charlie Brown, Houston. 
Charlie Brown, Houston. 
Go ahead, Houston. 
Roger, Charlie Brown, 
what h^P^ened on your P76 where you got those funny numbers 
that you failed to do the final enter on the noun 84. Just 
a reminder to always do the final enter on the noun 84 and also 
when you get a chance we'd like you to cycle the tunnel 
vent valve to LM press for 10 seconds to try to blow out 
that RTV or whatever's clogging it. Over. 

CHARLIE Rog. I tried that this morning. 

CAPCOM Roger. 

CHARLIE It didn t pass. 

CAPCOM Roger. Did you try it after undocking. 

Over. , 

CHARLIE Yes, I'll try it. I haven t got 

a chance right this minute. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 103:12, CDT 19:01 373/2 



SNOOPY Hello, Houston. Hello Houston, 

this is Snoopy. Our updates are looking real good now. From 
the respect of DELTA-R and DELTA-V it looks like we're coming 
right up the part to expect a range in range rate. - 



CAP COM 
SNOOPY 
PAO 

SNOOPY 



Roger. We copy, Snoop 
Roger . 

We're showing a range of 182 



Over . 
Over . 



miles 



Hello, Houston. I guess you can 



read our DISKY on this first recycle after 5 marks. 
CAPCOM Roger. We copy. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston. That last alignment 

was based upon 4 sets of marks rather than 5 because of our 
time to get locked on just at 30 minutes backup range rates, 
so we only took 4, 4 sets of marks on each star instead of 

5 * CAPCOM Roger. Copy. That's okay, Snoop. 

Press on and Charlie Brown - 

SNOOPY Roger. 

SNOOPY No turning back now. 

CAPCOM R°g- We copy. Charlie Brown, Snoop 

did you copy the noun 11 noun 37 info? Over. 



END OF TAPE 



OLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69, GET 103:22, CDT 19:11 374/1 

CAPCOM - noun 11 noun 37 info. Over. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We'd like you 

to confirm your noun 81 noun 86 info on the CSI pad. Noun 11 
and noun 37 were in there correctly. We're satisfied with those. 

0Ver *SNOOPY I' m sorry, Charlie. Noun 81-1 

still think I got a left out digit, but I know what you're 
talking about. Noun 81 is plus 045.3 and plus all balls. 
Is that correct? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

SNOOPY And the next number is 106 and 

then noun 86 is plus 453 plus all balls and plus 0005. 

CAPCOM That's - roger. It's 2 balls 5 on - 

on the DELTA- VZ . Over. 

SNOOPY If I was wrong, John, what do you 

see? What's that? Okay, John. I can't - I just don't 
believe that. I've been tracking the radar here. We re 
going right on the center line of the ball. Let's wait till 
after CSI and look at it . 

SNOOPY Okay, on high ball was right in 

the center. We'll still have plenty of time, John, after 

John, give me your CSMY data again. 
Okay, got plus 6.4 
CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. We'll have LOS 

at 10336 and AOS at 10425. Over. 

SN0OPY Roger. 10336 10425. Thank you. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 

PA 0 Showing range now, 165 miles as 

Snoopy closes on Charlie Brown. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. If you get a 

chance, pass to Charlie Brown, we've lost his PM in voice 
and we'll see him AOS at 10424. Over. 

SNOOPY This is Snoopy. Roger. Charlie 

Brown, this is Snoop. You'll have acquisition at 10424. 
Over. Roger, you'll be picking up Houston at 10424. And 
I ought to - and I ought to play 4.1 and we're tracking in 
J of-hor direction, and we're tracking right up this 
.-enter line here. But we'll just ignore the first data 
play correction. Over. 

CAPCOM Yeah. 



CSI . 

SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 



END OF TAPE 



POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1921, GET 10332 375/1 



SNOOPY Houston, I'm putting you omni. 

CAPCOM Roger, Gene. Sno^, Houston. If 

you go over the hill, you're looking god. We're all go 

here. , . . • 

SNOOPY Roger, that, with everything looking 

good, we're going to ignore the out of plane correction at CSI, 
be advised, over. f 
CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. Say again, we didn t 

C ° Py *SNO0PY Roger with everything looking good 

we're going to ignore the out of plane correction at CSI, over. 

CAP COM Roger. Understand you are not 

doing the CSI - the out of plane, over. 

SNOOPY Afirm, okay, John. I understand 4649. 

Okay, that's all right. We know which way we're going to 
burn. We'll reverse this to out of plane. Okay, 15.4 .... 
It's coming up right now. Plus 4543. Okay, so we'll burn our 
45.3. That's exactly what Houston gave us. We'll see. 

CAPCOM Hey Snoop, CAP COM. We understand 

you're burning the 45.3. Your fido's grinning. 

SNOOPY It looks just great. Okay, Tom. 

That clocked it up. 10 minutes on your range rate burn. 
In range, both. We'll see how the backup's come up. Okay, 
ark it. It was 103 feet per second. Okay, 103. 

PA 0 This is Apollo Control at 103 hours, 

36 minutes and we've had loss of signal. As you heard the 
crew talking there right before LOS the on board solution 
for the concentric sequence initiation burn agrees exactly 
with the ground solution that we passed up to them, 45.3 
feet per second. This bum coming at 103 hours, 45 minutes, 
54 seconds while Snoopy is behind the Moon. This CSI burn 
is designed to make the LM's orbit such that the terminal 
phase initiation will come at the proper time and under the 
proper conditions after the constant delta height burn. 
We're actually programming this CSI burn to effect a maneuver 
2 maneuvers away. The TPI. We want to be at midpoint of 
darkness at the proper time to do the TPI burn. As we 
acquired Charlie Brown on this revolution, number 14, he 
was reading 316 miles from Snoopy. He lost range and com- 
munications about 320 miles. For some time we relayed in- 
formation back and forth. For a period he could hear Snoopy 
if the CAPCOM here, Charlie Duke keyed while talking with 
Snoopy, Charlie Brown could also hear the conversation. 
We got a good staging with some gyrations on the part of 
the ascent stage at that point. However, apparently a lot 
of roll and we think we have that figured out now. But the 
staging itself was good and the crew proceeded on to do the 
insertion burn. A very good burn. You heard Gene Cernan 



-POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 1921, GET 10332 375/2 

pA0 again calling off the burn check- 

list to Tom Stafford and the crew comments during the burn 
itself Crew read on board after that burn 46.7 by 11 
nautical miles. As soon as the Flight Dynamics Officer has 
taken a look at all the data that he collected during this 
pass during which we were in communication we will pass on 
the grounds reading on that orbit. We'll next acquire 
Charlie Brown at 104 hours, 20 minutes, 29 seconds and 
Snoopy at 104 hours, 24 minutes, 48 seconds. This xs 
Mission Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 104:18, CDT 20:07 376/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 104 hours, 

18 minutes. We're not quite 2 minutes away from acquisition 
of the Command Module. We'll try to give you a - an explana- 
tion of what happened during the staging sequence. The 
backup guidance system, the AGS or Abort Guidance System 
mode control switch was in AUTO because trie - tne radar 
had been used to track the Command Module, and they were 
using the AUTO mode for reaction control system added to 
control. Now at - the - this mode control switch should 
have been placed in attitude hold for staging but it was 
not because that step had been omitted fro, the check is • 
So the control system maneuvered the Lunar Module to lock 
on to the Command Module as the computer directed, but 
that was not the proper attitude for staging, and the crew 
were not sure whether they went to pulse mode or to manual, 
straight manual control, but they went to one of those two 
modes to get out of that situation, and the staging went 
well We're about 30 seconds away from acquisition now. 

pA0 The altitude at staging was 33.4 

nautical miles. 

pA0 Gene Cernan was the only crewman 

in the LM being monitored by the flight surgeon and his 
heart rate during that staging sequence ranged from 105 to 

129 * CHARLIE Tou guys got 2 1 minutes counting 

hem out. I was doing okay until the last hundred miles 
or so, and I had to put it in tight dead band, because 
when you start talking about things like flame changes, I 
want to be able to go back and look at the ball. I think 
we're in BAT right now. 

Charlie Brown, Houston. We re 



Houston. How did 



CAP COM 

standing by. Over. 

CHARLIE Roger. 

CAPC0M Charlie Brown, 

^CHARLIE (garbled) Boy this track in the 
LM against the background of the Moon or (garbled) something 

down there is really fantastic 



CAPC0M 
SNOOPY 
CHARLIE 
CAPCOM 
you four by. 
SNOOPY 



We copy, Charlie Brown. 
This is Snoopy. How do you read me? 
(garb led) 

Hey, Snoop, Houston. We're reading 
(garbled) and we had a beautiful 



snuuri - - 

earth rise as you came up from behind the horizon 



Roger. Need your 98 - Snoop, 
" " " Ove r . 



CAPCOM Roger. Need your 98 - Snoop, Houston, 

need your 981 numbers and your residuals. 

SNOOPY Roger. Stand by. 

SNOOPY Okay, for CSI the 981 numbers were 



-POLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69, GET 104:18, CDT 20:07 376/2 

SN00PY 454300 Residuals were 0, minus 

^P^OM Roger, Snoop. We copy 454300. 

Residuals 0 minus .40. Thank you much. 

SNOOPY Now we're going to start with the 

high gain. 

SNOOPY (Garbled) We copy that. 

CapcOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Did Snoop 

d ° " cip'cOM^ 11867 ^"'Charlie Brown, Snoop. Correction, 
Charl SN00PY (garbled) it's the flame change time, 

a , J the flame change time which was 10415, I had minus 1.1 
and a ner; a d plus Th 8 ey had one in the opposite direction, so 
we decided not to do it there. 

PAPCOM Roger. We copy. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston. This is Snoopy 

00 "iAPC^r' d ° y ° U Ro e g ? d? We got you on high gain, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Okay, this high gain stuff is a 

beat the cake. I don't know what you were all so worried 

ab ° Ut CAPC0M W^h we could say the same about 

°s^SoPY Yeah, all I did was look at you 

coming over the horizon, and I pointed my high gain up and down 
my ZX's like I hoped I could, and man, there you were, and 

8116 l CAPC0M° n ' ^ger. We got you, and we got you 

counting down, and we see you 16:45. 

^Nnnpv Okay, seems like every time we 

initialize or call a P20 for the first time, the first 
mark we have to reject because it's got horrendous 5-digit 
numbers in it. 

CAPCOM Roger. We copy. 

pao Showing range 97 miles. 

™ opv It looks like TPI, my last recycle, 

TPI moved away from us 2 minutes and 20 seconds. I - going 
to go and try calculating our flame change and compare it 
with yours, but it looks like we're in good shape. I got a 

DeIta cIpC0M 14 " 9 ' Roger, Snoop. We copy. Houston. 

p?0 ° That DELTA-H is the differential 

in altitude between the Command Module and the Lun " Mod "^ 
and Gene Cernan reads it as 14.9 nautical miles. We d like to 
be right around 15 nautical miles, so that's very good. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 104:28 



CDT 20:17 377/1 



PAO 
SNOOPY 

on with you all the way. 

SNOOPY 
us now, Charlie Brown. 
SNOOPY 



In this next maneuver the CDH - 
Charlie Brown, Snoop. We're locked 

Right together. 
Roger. You're right in plane wxth 



snoof i Hello, Houston. This is Snoopy. 

One thing that looks real good to us is the rendezvous 
radar temperature has kept fairly cool, in act the way It i 
«L »i- 80 is about as hot as it's gotten all day. Over. 
' ?APCOM Roger. We copy, Tom. Thank you 

""^'SNOOPY Charlie Brown, this is Snoop. Our 

P lane S chan Y 8 e is NG, so we're not going.to burn ours We 11 
wait for yours. If it sounds good, "^^look at it. 



CDH time is 104435271. 
Roger. We copy. 
CDH 194435271. 
That's it, Charlie Brown. 
Okay, what I'm showing is minus 4.2. 
John, (inaudible) 

I don't either, John. We're going 



(garbled) 
Yeah. 

Ours was in the opposite directxon 
■ not burn it. You're 



SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
CHARLIE 
SNOOPY 
CHARLIE 
SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
to ignore it here. 
SNOOPY 
CHARLIE 

SNOOPY - , 

even with the sign changed, but let 

riaht down to belly band, Babe, 
rignt down / ^ ^ ^ i(> minutes away from the 

CDH maneuver burn that will make the di "erenti.l .1 ti tud e 
constant. Be a very small maneuver on the order of 2 to 
2 1/2 feet per second. The ground solution is 2.3 feet 
per second. The crew is now getting solution from their 

CO,BPU S N SoPY Okay, minus 5 81 and a minus 5 tenths, 

0 and minus 2.9, 3 plus 3. 

CAPCOM Snoop, Houston. We see your 

solution. It looks supreme. Over. _ - 

Roger. They both look great. 

Yeah . 



SNOOPY 
CHARLIE 



This is the nicest CDR .... This 
is the nicest CDR solution we ever got. 

SNOOPY That's right, John. Looks like 

our CSI solution the total targety was just fanta9t±c ' 

PA0 The control officer reports that 

all of the LM consumables are in goo d shape . We're showing 
a range now of 87 miles between the LM and the CSM. 
puA tjt te ... AGS , huh? 

SNOOPY Yeah, we're going to AGS. I want 

to make sure our attitude holds. We do all those before 



y — -APOLLO 10, MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69 , GET 104:28, CDT 20:1 7 377/2 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 

CAPCOM Hello, Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 

SNOOPY Houston, go ahead. Charlie Brown's 

reading you. 

CAPCOM R°g» Snoop. I'm not reading him 

at all. Notice - we noticed he bypassed his roll maneuver 
at about 104:33. We recommend he manually roll 180 before 
he does his P20 AUTO maneuver over, out to the burn. 
SNOOPY He got that. 

Okay, we barely heard him. Thank 



John, we're 343, 342, counting down 



CAPCOM 

you . 

SNOOPY 
to the burn. 

SNOOPY That's 2 minutes, John. 

SNOOPY (garbled) How's that? Are you 
maneuvering now? Okay, we just lost lock understand. 

SNOOPY Do what? 

SNOOPY John, we're within 35 seconds. 

SNOOPY 10 seconds. We're in AGS, mid 
deadband attitude hold. 4, 3, 2, 1 burning. 

SNOOPY Burn was good. 

CAPCOM Roger, Snoop. We copy 



SNOOPY Did you copy the residuals? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. We got it all. 



ver. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69 , CDT 2033, GET 104:44 378/1 



SNOOPY Had you copied the residuals? 

CC That's affirmative. We got it all. 

Over. 

SNOOPY All fight. Okay, go back up, Joe, and 

we'll be all set to track. 

SNOOPY Here we have a solid lock on, John. 

SNOOPY Okay, Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. 

I've had you in reflected thermal for about 90 miles odd 
and it was just very clean. It was just about the same 
as around the earth when we used to see the Agena. I've 
got you as a little yellow dot out there and I've been 
tracking you since about 90 miles. Over. 

SNOOPY And I've got only one eye power. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey, John, after lining this 

platform with the ALT, I can see why your eyes — why you 
are saying what you are saying. I'll tell you. 

SNOOPY Houston, this is Snoopy. We are 

right over by Moltke and the landing site again. See the 
view of it now from 45 miles and again — it's just 
extrapolated from below. It looks like we got about 
25 to 30 percent clear area. Over. 

CC Roger, we copy, Snoop. Over. 

SNOOPY Roger, we are coming up through 

the craters Sophia and Ritter and we can see US 1 here 
on the side from US 1 again, rounded but the whole thing 
is dropped down just like reported before. 

CC Roger, we copy, Snoop, 

SNOOPY Houston, do you have a good 

gouge on a setting for internal film to use outside? 

CC Stand by. Roger. Use 2F stop 

hard, Snoop, on that film and, Tom, if you've got a chance 
to talk a minute, could you describe Landing Site 2 from 
8 miles. We did not have you in communications at that 
t ime . 

SNOOPY Okay, Houston, go ahead. You 

were cut out. Say you want me to describe the Landing Site 
2 again? 

CC Roger. We can get it later, Snoop, 

it's a little busy now. We'll get it later. We were out of 
communications with you at that time, but we will get it 
later. Over. 

SNOOPY Yes. Okay. The approach end 

looks lots smoother than some of the Orbiter photos show. 
It's still estimate 25 to 30 percent semi-clear area for 
if the LM has enough upper tide, at least of what we can 
see at 50,000 feet, it should not be a problem. However if you 
come down in the wrong area and you don't have the hover 
time you are going to have to shove off. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 2033, GET 101:44 378/2 



CC We copy. 

SNOOPY Okay, we've got solid lock on 

now and we're working on P34. 

PAO Range is 71 miles. We're showing 

constant delta altitude of 14.94 miles between the two 
vehicles . 

CC Snoopy, Houston, we don't read 

Charlie Brown. Will you relay that if he is in his 180 
ROLL to try to high gain for us. 

SNOOPY Roger. Charlie Brown, this is 

strictly a relay, if you have done, completed your 180 
degree roll, will you try your high gain for 
Houston? Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown, I am 

on high gain. 

CC Roger* Charlie Brown. We read 

you. How are you doing? 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown. High 

gain antenna. 

CC Roger, Charlie Brown, Houston. 

We are reading you 5 by. 

CC Hello, Snoop, Houston. If you 

use any different F stops on the film, we'd like for you to 
mark it so we can process it right. Over. 

SNOOPY That ought to be a ball. 

CC Right. 

SNOOPY I'll try Charlie. I'll do my 

best. 

CC Okay, Gene-0 , I was just 

asked. Don't worry about it. Sorry. 

SNOOPY Don't be sorry. Hey, you guys 

are floating on the world out there sideways. 

CC Okay. 

SNOOPY As the earth came up, on this 

earth d«y, I toess J OVL would call it, the north pole was 
to the right and the south pole was to the left and it 
looks like — see a lot of clouds over the Pacific Ocean. 
We were kind of busy and didn't take much time to notice, but 
it was a beautiful sight. Over. 

CC Roger. We're here and still 

spinning. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

SNOOPY Charlie, I don't know how the big 

man must be seeing it, but if his view is any better than 
ours, it has got to be fantastic. 

CC Copy. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 2033, GET 101:44 378/3 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown. I'd like 

to eet a sunset time. Over. 

to get^a su Roger, Charlie Brown. Stand by. 

CHARLIE BROWN Oh, never mind. It happens so 

fast around here, I ought to be instantaneously aware of 

lt: * cc Charlie Brown, Houston. We've 

got a time for you for sunset. 104 and 58. Over. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2044, GET 104:54 379/1 

CAPCOM - zero 4 and 58, over. 

SNOOPY 10458, over. 

CAP COM Affirm. 

SNOOPY Roger. ,„„.., „ a 

CHARLIE BROWN I show you at 64.89 miles. How do 

you agree with that, Snoop? 64.7. 

SNOOPY Roger. You're right on the money. 

We show you about 64.6 now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY We're correlated right down there. 

That VHF is working beautiful. Just like the radar. That's 
mighty good gear. Sure seems to be. Hey Houston, Snoopy. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Okay, for the record we have been 

operating with Charlie Brown the whole time while he's been 
on VHF ranging 9VF PTP and our hot mike apparently does not 
bother John at all and we've had such good luck S-band with 
you folks down there that we've had hot mike very short period 

° f ^CAPCOM We copy all that. Thanks a bunch. 

SNOOPY That S-band antenna makes noise 

but it sure does track. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Rog, I see you. Very good. 

SNOOPY Okay Houston, this is Snoopy. We re 

at 60 nautical miles closing and hard dock outlook looks real 
fine I'm sure you're reading it down there. Everything 
looks real good from here and I still don't have his flashing 
light from this distance of 60 miles, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, Tom. We copy. We got you 

plotting right down the line on your charts, over. 

SNOOPY Well roger. Thank you, Charlie. 

It's looking good here. f 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, they re on. I 11 turn on 

these running lights and EVA lights too, Tom. Maybe you 
can - help see them when you get closer. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

PA0 Hard dot is the range rate. We 

show that as 120 feet per second and closing. 

CHARLIE BROWN Snoopy, you got a lighter EPI time. 

SNOOPY Roger. Hello Houston, this is 

Snoopy. The AGS comes out with the TPI at an angle of 26.51. 
Of 24.4 to initiate and 55.9 to total and that time is just 
about the same time I'm looking at right now of 105:23:20. 

CAPCOM We copy, Snoop. Thank you much. 

SNOOPY John, our new TPI time is 105:23:06:01 

105 :23:06 :01. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2044, GET 104:54 379/2 



CHARLIE BROWN Roger, I got it. 

SNOOPY That's only moved up towards us 

about 12 seconds. Okay, John. Coming up on 52 say .3 miles 
or so. I still don't have you in eight. No problem, we're 
locked on solid. 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 2056 GET 105.06 380/1 



CHARLIE BROWN 

over? 

SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 
SNOOPY 

push final comm until 12 
is what I just gave you. 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
lating. It really takes 
SNOOPY 



Did you get your final PPI time 

Stand by. 
Go ahead. 

John. No. We're not going to 
minutes but the latest one we got 



this 



Okay. That will be fine. 
Is that conversion with you. 
AH. That thing is still calcu- 
a while . 

Charlie Brown. we suddenly feel 
last weak cycle through 6 feet per second out of place. 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Wait a second. 

SNOOPY Hello Houston. Do you have some- 

that can read our eraserable, check our radar angle biases. 



bo dy 
Over. 

CC Roger. Stand by. 

SNOOPY My ITPI time, this later, is 

1052316,79, How is that for good correlation? 

CC Snoopy, Houston. Your radar 

Over. 

Okay. Real fine Charlie. Thank 



bias is in the NOISE. 

SNOOPY 
You very much. 



Roger. 

C C And Charlie Brown, Houston. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead. Over. 

CC Roger. If you get a chance, we d 

like you to bring your logics up so you can dock anytime. 
And we can give you a go for the arm and also if you get a 
chance to cycle through the tunnel vent valve on the LM 
press . 

CHARLIE BROWN No. Negative. Not yet. 

SNOOPY Okay. You want the 6 logic 

breakers are coming on and the spiral A&B batteries breakers 
are going In. 

CC Charlie Brown to Houston. You re 

GO for power arm at your convenience. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Thank you. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, Snoop. When you 

get your solution we're interested in the out of plane part so 
call it down to us would you? 



CHARLIE BROWN 
CHARLIE BROWN 
4 and one half and plus 
CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
1052256 19 . 
CC 

CHARLIE BROWN 



Yes sir. 

My NOUN is 81 minus 21.8 plus 
10.4. 

Plus 4 and one half. 
Yeah. For a change. 
Roger. 

Houston our ITPI time is 



Roger. Copy. 
Why don't you give 



and an AOS while you've got it. While we have 



an LOS time 
a chance. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/22/69 CDT 2056 GET 10506 380/2 
cc Roger, Snoop. LOS is 10532. 

AOS 10619. Over. 

SN00PY I got them. Thank you. 

cc Rog. and Charlie Brown your LOS 

is about the same. Your LOS is about the same Charlie 
Brown and AOS also. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. I missed those. 

CC Okay, LOS - 

SN0O PY 10532 and 10619. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, I'll get them for you later. 

SN00PY Okay Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. 

I'm finally starting to see your flashing light, very faintly 
at 42 miles, very faintly. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, 41.7 isn t it. 

SNOOPY Yeah . 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy. We re 

burning your out of plane here my noun 81 for you that we re 
going to burn. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go. 

SN00PY Plus 21.7, minus 4.5 and minus 9.6. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SN0OPY Okay Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy, 

we're pitching down to put our X axis towards you for the 
auto maneuver from DPI. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

PAO Range is 39 miles. 

SN00P Y Okay we're at burn attitude, Charlie 

Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, almost me too. 

SNOOPY How about that. 

pA0 This will be another reaction control 

system burn but the propellant will be fed from the ascent 
mode - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2109, GET 10519 381/1 



our charts agree 



pA0 - reaction control system burn but 

the propellant will be fed from the ascent propulsion 
system tanks through the innerconnect . 

SNOOPY 2 minutes to the burn. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

SNOOPY And Charlie Brown, 

very closely so we're go. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, my numbers agree with your 

numbers. Then I guess we're all in agreement then let s go. 

Roger. 

Mark, one minute to the burn. 
Roger. 

35 seconds, DSKY blank. 
How many seconds, John? 
5, 4, 3, 2, 1, burning. 
We're burning. 
Go to it. 
We copy. 

We got 15 to go. 
Ri ght. 

Burns complete. 
Roger, good show. 

Snoop, Houston. We see you trimming. 

Okay, zero 1 and 1 tenth. 
We copy, Snoop. 

And Snoopy 's pitching back up to 
this is Snoop. You can't believe how 



119 to the burn. 


SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


CAPCOM 




SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


SNOOPY 




CHARLIE 


BROWN 


CAPCOM 




Goo d show . 




SNOOPY 




CAPCOM 




SNOOPY 





acquire. Houston, 
noisy those thrusters are. 

CAPCOM 

SNOOPY 
rain tub with about 2 

CHARLIE BROWN 

SNOOPY 
radar target here 

PAO 



Roger, 10. We can't even imagine. 
It sounds like being inside a big 
inch hale beating all over you. 
Hey, babe. Here's where ... - 
Okay, I'm pitching up to give you 
Garbled. 

And Snoopy's now on an intercept 
tralectory to Charlie Brown. And he burned his own solution 
which agreed very closely within a few tenths with the ground 
solution. He burned delta V of 24.1 feet per second at 
105 hours, 22 minutes, 56 seconds. 

SN00PY Okay Houston, this is Snoopy. We 

have solid lock and first update appear real good. 

CAP COM Roger, Snoop. We copy. We got 

4 minutes 50 mark to LOS for you, over. 
SNOOPY Roger. 
PA.0 Range 26 miles . 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2109, GET 10519 381/2 



PAO 

SNOOPY 
off the high gain. 
CAP COM 

mind. 

SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
God damned, that one 



Range rate 125 per second. 
Houston, Snoop. I'm taking you 

Okay, Roger. You're reading my 

GARBLED 

I can hear (garbled) 
Garbled - VHF, I think. Garbled, 
looked like it was coming inside. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 105:29, CDT 21:18 382/1 



SNOOPY (garbled) 

CHARLIE Say again. (garbled) flashing it 

off. 

SNOOPY Charlie went (garbled) 

CHARLIE Yeah. 

CHARLIE Okay, how are you doing? 

SNOOPY Perfect, it's right on them. 

CHARLIE Right on them? 

SNOOPY Yeah. 

PAO And this is Apollo Control at 105 

hours, 32 minutes. Both Charlie Brown and Snoopy have gone 
behind the moon, and we have loss of signal. When we next 
see them, they should be station keeping. Getting ready 
to dock. We're showing the command module, command service 
module, Charlie Brown, in a 63 37 nautical mile orbit, and 
Snoopy is on an intercept trajectory. Snoopy performed 2 
good burns during the time we had acquisition, the constant 
delta height maneuver at which time we had a constant delta 
height following that maneuver 14.94 nautical miles, and 
then the terminal phase itself completed just a short time 
ago. The - there are two midcourse corrections programmed 
if needed. The nominal DELTA-V is zero in both of those, 
and Charlie Duke just remarked that just before Snoopy went 
around the corner he heard Tom Stafford say they were just 
taken a mark, and they were right on. So they may or may 
not do either of those midcourses. And then the terminal 
phase is f inaliz ation . The breaking maneuvers will be 
performed behind the moon, and at acquisition time, they 
should be station keeping within a few feet of each other. 
Acquisition for the Charlie Brown, 106 hours 18 minutes, 
39 seconds, for Snoopy 106 hours, 18 minutes, 55 seconds. 
This is Mission Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 106:18, CDT 22:07 383/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control at 106 hours, 

18 minutes into the mission. We're about a minute away 
from acquisition of Charlie Brown. Snoopy acquisition to 
come 15, 16 seconds after that of Charlie Brown. The two 
spacecraft should be station keeping as we acquire them. 
On the sixteenth revolution here, we have the capability 
on both this revolution number 16 and on revolution number 
17 to receive television. Television is scheduled for the 
17 revolution during the ascent propulsion system burn 
depletion. However, the capability does exist to receive 
it and It's possible we might have an unscheduled transmission. 
We're not sure. We should have AOS now on Charlie Brown 
any second. 

SNOOPY Okay, you ready to dock? 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. How do 

you read me? 

SNOOPY Looks like it's good. 

SNOOPY Hey, Joe. We're about ready to 

dock. Stand by. 

CAPCOM Very good. 

Don't call us. We'll call you. 



SNOOPY 

CAPCOM Roger, out. 

SNOOPY 



Okay, John. You're in to about 



5 feet. Looking beautiful. 

CHARLIE How far? 

CHARLIE 20. 
SNOOPY I captured? 

CHARLIE Yes, you are on. 

SNOOPY I got capture, John. Fire when 

you're ready. 

CHARLIE Everything looks good here, Tom. 

Okay, here Oh, we look good. 
Yell when there's a rock in the 



SNOOPY 
CHARLIE 
cabin, babe. 

SNOOPY All right, babe. I can see you 



Oh, we got that one, all. 

We got them, John. We heard them 



moving over. 

SNOOPY 

SNOOPY 
in there. 

SNOOPY Yep. Hello Houston, Snoopy and 

Charlie Brown are hugging each other. 

CAPCOM Roger. We heard them down here. 

SNOOPY Okay, let's stay - let's stay in 

our helmets, babe, until we get this thing squared away. 

SN0PPY Okay, John. That was beautiful. 

Just beautiful, babe. Okay now John. Let me ask you one 
thing Do you want me to pressurize that LM tunnel (garbled) 
so you can blow that mylar out again? Okay, do you want 
us to pressurize the tunnel? Okay. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5-22-69, GET 106:18, CDT 22:0 7 383/2 



SNOOPY And we is back home. Almost. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE Okay, I'll get started, and you can 

turn the (garbled) the hatch. 

SNOOPY Houston, were you calling? 

CAPCOM Negative, Gene. We're standing 

by until you got some time. -w* 

SNOOPY Okay, Joe. It's nominal that the 

rendezvous was the best one we've ever had. Right up the 
pad all the way. We'll talk about it later. I'm going 
start going through the tail end of the acquisition check 
list for the APS burn, and I'm pretty sure that Tom and John 
will start on the tunnel. 

CAP COM Roger. Snoopy, this is Houston. 

One thing we would like for you to do is go to secondary 
on the C02 canister. We'd like to monitor that one while 
you're getting cleaned up there. 

SNOPPY You're right, Jose. It s been a 

long day. 

SNOPPY Say again, Joe. 

CAP COM Roger, Gene. We'd like for you 

to go to secondary on C02 canister. We want to monitor 
that canister while you're getting cleaned up and back in 
the Command Module. 

SNOOPY Yeah. 

SNOOPY Hang on Joe. I can t - wait a 

minUt SN00PY Okay, Houston. Now say again you 

laSt " CAPCOM Roger. Go secondary on C02 canister. 

SNOOPY Okay, we're secondary on C02 canister 

n ° W ' CAPCOM Roger. Thank you. 

SNOOPY Okay, John. How do you want to 

work the tunnel? Do you want to pressurize it or do you ? 
want me to? Okay, we got plenty of pressure. Okay, that s 
better. Okay, go ahead. You pressurize it. 

SNOOPY Hello, Houston, this is Snoopy. 

One thing, Charlie Brown is getting ready to pressurize 
the tunnel, and we want to make sure we're in the right 
attitude and everything for the next maneuver .... but the 
next thing that he needs to know are the angles. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll get them for you, Snoopy. 

Okay, Charlie Brown, Snoopy, this is Houston. Your CSM 
gimbal angles are roll 300 pitch 071 and yaw 000. We re 
standing by for your readback. 

SNOOPY Okay, I got those for Charlie Brown. 

Roll 300 pitch 071 and yaw 000. 

CAPCOM Roger, that. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5-22-69, GET 106:18, CDT 22:07 383/3 

SN00PY We have an update on a LM weight. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

No. Snoopy, this is Houston. 

SNOOPY Go ahead, do you have an update 

on the LM weight? 

CAPCOM l' ve 8 ot that through, Geno , but 

we want you to load in adapt 10011 for system A. 

SNOOPY You want 10 - sav a * ain what yOU 



want 



CAPCO m Okay, I want 10011. That'll be 

system A. That's in for your adapt, and also your LM weight 
for burn is 7 - 07544. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 2217, GET 106:28 384/1 



SNOOPY Roger. LM weight is 7544. That's 

what I thought. I didn't enter that. 

SNOOPY Hey, Joe, give me that once more 

and I'll get it straight. 

CC Okay, Gino. Your LM weight 

is 7544 and in your DAP we want 10011. This is instead of 
11011. Very good. we copy, Gene. 



Tom, is your stop button reset 
going to wait on a couple of these 
verify that tunnel is clear. 

Snoopy, this is Houston. 
Charlie Brown, Snoop, let me 



SNOOPY 
auto over there, 
things while I 

CC 

SNOOPY 
know go ahead. 

CC Roger, Snoopy, whenever you are 
ready, we can uplink your LM state vector to you. 

SNOOPY Okay, we're ready right now. As 
soon as I get into POO again. 

CC Okay. Thank you. 

SNOOPY Charlie Brown, this is Snoopy 
again. Let me know how the tunnel is coming, 

CHARLIE BROWN Let me get my gloves off, Babe. 

SNOOPY Good show. Tunnel all tunnel 

all pressurized and everything looks good. Okay. 

SNOOPY Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN (Garbled) Do you remember? 
asked X for these? 

SNOOPY Look Joe, we haven't moved at all. 
Okay, and Gene got the angles for that auto maneuver. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yes, most all of it is. 

SNOOPY Ours is the bag that I brought my 
helmet over in, 

CAPC0M Snoopy, this is Houston. The computer 
is yours when you want it. Now we've got the load in. 



SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
mode right now? 
SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
SNOOPY 
CAPC0M 

Gene, whenever you're ready to copy and give 
you' re ready . 



Okay, roger, thank you. 
And are you fellows in the transfer 

Jus t ab out . 

Okay, I've got some pads for you 

Have not opened the hatch yet. 
Okay, I've got some pads for you, 
call when 



SNOOPY 
ready . 

CAP COM 
tool kit is. 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CHARLIE BROWN 



your 



hatch . 



CAPCOM 



Okay Joe, I'll call you when I'm 

Roger that, and you're aware of where 
that affirm? 
Yes, affirm. 

Okay, do you have a LM Delta-V there? 
Okay Joe, we're going to open the 

Roger Tom. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOM COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 22:27, GET 106:38, 385/1 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston, we have 

3 additional items that we want brought back. We want both 
the cameras brought back and would you believe, we also 
want the primary canister brought back, the primary 
lithium hydroxide canister brought back from the LM, oyer. 

SNOOPY Where do you plan for us to stow 

that 'c««r ? Roger, we kindof anticipated that, 

and we're thinking about that right now. Make that the 
last item you transfer back, Tom. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. We'd 

like to go to a forward omni on the high gain antenna 
we're just about against the stop nov, 

SNOOPY ; omi. 

CAP COM Okay, thank you alot, Geno . 

SNOOPY Hello Houston, go ahead and give 

me the update, would you please. 

rAprOM Roger that Geno. Coming to you 

with Aps depletion burn. Okay for noun 33 108 50 3100 +45576 
+1 balls -06231 46000 40 7 3 balls 251 +45981 -5 balls +01339 
and all else is NA, I'm standing by for your read back. 

SNOOPY Okay, Joe aps burn depletion is 

108 503100 +45576 +all balls -06231 46000 407, by the way, 
who's going to be in here to watch the burn time. Roll is 
all zero, pitch is 251 986 +45981 is - all balls and +01339 
and the coamps are is NA. 

CAPCOM Roger that, I've got 1 more change 

for you Gene, in your check list under activation 69, just 
prior to step 5 we want you to load in 404 +all zeros. 

SNOOPY Will do. 

SNOOPY Charlie does the dap and everything 

look good to you right now? I won't go through that again. 
CAPCOM Snoopy, this is Houston. Were 

y ° U C SN00PY ? Yea, does the dap look good to you 

right now. I won't go through that again right at the 
moment. I'm starting over and running through this real 
quick. . 

CAPCOM Roger, that s good. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 2242, GET 106:53 386/1 



SNOOPY 
CAP COM 
this LIOH canister 



Roger, that's good. 
And Snoopy, this is Houston. On 
this L iuh canister, looks like under the left-hand couch in 
the sleeping bag is going to be the best place to stow that. 
And we really would like to have it come back. We got rise in 
C02 in the LM and we'd like to take a look at that can. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'll try and get it out. 

You don't want a new one in, do you? 

CAPCOM Negative that. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. We ve 

completed our shift change in Mission Control. Flight Director, 
Milton Wendler has relieved flight director Glynn Lunney . 
We anticipate the change of shift briefing will begin in 
about 15 minutes at about 11 pra Central Daylight Time. 

This is Charlie Brown, Houston. 
What do you want, John. I'm up 



abou 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 
to my earballs, here. 
CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 

CHARLIE BROWN 
SNOOPY 



Hey, (garbled). 
What John? 
(Garlbed) 

I don't know, babe. 



wait a 



min 



ite . 



PAO 

SNOOPY 
calling me? 
CAP COM 

by. 



(Garbled) 
Now who's 



Negative, 
(Garbled) 



calling? Houston, are you 
Snoopy. We're just standing 
Hey John, are you in 

(Garbled) 



SNOOPY 
burn attitude? 

CHARLIE BROWN 
Houston, Charlie B: 

CAPCOM 
Go ahead. 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CAPCOM 

CHARLIE BROWN 
CAPCOM 

That's affirmative on tight deadband. 

CHARLIE BROWN Negative though? 

CAPC0M That's affirmative for Charlie Brown. 

Tight deadband on your bum. 

CHARLIE BROWN (Garbled) tight deadband (garbled) 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

John, you're cutting out pretty bad. If you could 



(Garbled) burn attitude. 
Over . 

Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

(Garbled) in burn attitude. Over. 
Stand by. I'll find out. 
(Garbled) 

Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 



I 1 



understand we"wil l/want y"ou"in°tight r deadband and if there's 
anything else, would you relay it through Snoopy? 
CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 107:03 CDT 2252 387/1 



CHARLIE BROWN Hey Joe, I'm down to the point 

where I've configured the S-band, so if I've missed anything, 
you got high bit rate let me know. The only thing I haven't 
done is turn the voice off to you. 

CC Okay Snoopy, one thing that we'll 

want now is the settings on your control knob there for 
your high gain for pitch and yaw. 

SNOOPY Okay, I'm looking at about 182 and 

about minus . . . 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Charlie Brown, how do you 

read? 

CC Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

go ahead. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. While we're waiting for 

this thing to separate from it, (Garble) deadband or is 5 degrees 
okay . 

CC Negative, Charlie Brown. We want 

no daps deadband and we want you to configure your DAP 
for your checklist. Over. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CC And Snoopy, this is Houston, we 

copied 182, what was the yaw setting on that control knob? 

SNOOPY Yaw setting is minus 5 and I'm 

going through the DI SKY slow, so if you see something, tell 
me . 

CC Okay, we'll monitor, thank you. 

SNOOPY You mean the checklist in the 

flight plan there, Joe? 

CC That's affirm. 

SNOOPY Man, with those numbers in there, 

I'm not so - I'm glad I'm getting out. 

CC (Laughter) Roger. 

SNOOPY And just for the record, Joe, 

y ou ' re a f ink . 

CC Copy - fink. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay Joe, the checklist I got 

shows for the active docking, you have 6112. 

CC That's affirmative John. 

CHARLIE BROWN Why deadband. 

CC Okay, stand by, I'll check that 

out , John. 

CHARLIE BROWN And this morning they told me 

that AC roll - they wanted to use it, and this afternoon, 
okay . 

SNOOPY This thing caused me to check 

your timer John but we're well over an hour away, so forget 
about it. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, GET 107:03 CDT 2252 38 
SN00PY Houston, on step 4 on activation 

where I proceed, do I have to do anything with that 



69 

4 bal ^ 2? That's a negative, Snoopy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay now what'd you want me to 

put there for the LM weight there, Joe. char i ie 
v cc Okay, I m getting that, warxie 

BrOWn - Okay Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN I just want to express a heart- 

felt thanks. Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

For your LM weight we want to set in 07544 and John, we re 
«aHsfied with your 61112 setup. 

SIrwE BROWH Okay, samples stay the same cause 

we're going to get rid of that thing. 

rc That's affirm. 

SNOOPY Joe, 267 out of the AGS reads 

4600 " Roger, copy 4600, that looks good, 

and Snoopy it looks like you ' re going to have to slew fro. 
MAX signal again, and we'll need those knobs - control 
knobs settings after you do it. 

SNOOPY Alright. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

CHARLIE bkuw« Go ahead charlie Brown> Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, I just wanted to say I sure 

do thank everybody that worked on the probe and made it 
work the way it did. ^ thatj John> 

CHARLIE BROWN Sure is a - sure worked good. 

cc That's what we'd like to hear. 

CHARLIE BROWN Can't tell you how P lease * * **; 

cc Now will you autograph a picture 

f o r me ? , , 

CHARLIE BROWN Of the probe, yeah. 

SN00PY Joe, you're a fink, I told you. 

CHARLIE BROWN The fink sure has sent a man out 

to do a boy's job though. 

cc Roger that. 

c« 00 pv Hey Joe there's slew for a MAX 

signal I brought it up a little bit but all I did was 
move the numbers and they're reading the same thing, 182 
and minus 5. ^ ^ m and minus 

5. And, as you're coming through the tunnel you might take 
a look at the docking angle there and see how close it is. 

SN00PY Make that 182 and minus 10. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69 , GET 107:03 CDT 2252 31 

cc Roger, 182 and minus 10. 

cc Charlie Brown, Houston. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead, over. 

cc Roger John, we got our tail between 

our legs here. We'll need for you to load in your DAP 61102, 
and you get an atta boy for that. 

CHARLIE BROWN Alrighty. 

cc And Snoopy, once he gets that set up, 

in the narrow deadband, I'm afraid we're going to have to ask 
you to slew from MAX signal again. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 23:02, GET 107:13, 388/1 



CAPCOM Snoopy, Houston. 

SNOOPY Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Snoopy, we were monitering your 

activation 69, the last 2 steps, we'd like for you to 
verify that you've put 616 through zeros and 411 to +1. 
Snoopy, this is Houston. What we copied down here on the 
last step was a 611 instead of 411. 

SNOOPY Yea I put 411, I'll check it for you. 

CAPCOM Okay, thank you Gene-0 . 

SNOOPY There you go. Okay. 

CAP COM Okay, Snoopy we got it. Thank you 

very much, and we'll need no ascent feed on this, Snoop. 

SNOOPY Okydoke. I only forgot the PG 

instrument chart 1 time when I went to update, how's that? 

CAPCOM That's better than the average bear. 

Snoopy, Houston. 
Go ahead, Joe. 

Okay, Gene-0, referring back to activation 
'd like pressure A and B to egress, please. 

Thank you sir. That one happened 



You bet you. Copy that, thank you 



CAPCOM 

SNOOPY 

CAPCOM 
64 on step 2 

SNOOPY 
in a big fast run. 

CAPCOM 
very much Gene-0. 

CAP COM And Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

I've got a maneuver pad for you, John, when you're ready 
to copy . 

CB Have a what sir? 

CAPCOM I have a maneuver pad, PEI 22. 

CB Rog, wait one. 

CAPCOM Roger, let me know when you're 



ready . 

CB 

CAPCOM 
CB 

tweek those things and it's 

CAP COM 
LOS time is 107:31 

CB 

a TEI pad, huh? 
CAPCOM 



What's your LOS time, Joe? 
Say again please. 

Joe, that's about as high as I c 

182 and -5. 
Okay I copy, 182 and -5 and our 
we've got about 13 minutes yet. 



Okay, now you're going to give me 



John . 



If you're ready to copy, 
Go to it- 

Roger that. SPS V&N coming up. Okay 
-060 +079 119 41 2885 +29472 +00558 
-00165 NA 071 all else is NA and stand by for the read 
back Charlie. 

Okay what is the zero sep 1, the 



yoi 



CAP COM 
're now 47 



1 0 0. 



SNOOPY 
pitch angle. 

CAPCOM 
read it back, 



That's pitch angle, and before you 
Snoopy, I'd like for you to check on this activation 



69, 616 to all balls and 411 to +1, those are the last 2 steps. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/22/69, CDT 23:02, GET 107:13, 388/2 
SNOOPY Say again. 

CAPC 0M Okay, Snoopy, this is Houston, do 

vou copy? , , . . 

SNOOPY !ea I copy, but I didn't hear what 

you said. 

CAPCOM Okay, we need for you to go 

616 to all zeros. This is still in activation 69 this is the 
last 2 steps, 616 to all zeros and 411 to +1. 

SNOOPY Dave, I just read it out and it 

is all zeros. 

CAPCOM Okay, thank you much. 

SNOOPY I'll do lt: again. 

CAP COM Okay, we'll appreciate it if you 11 

give it 1 more try. , 

SNOOPY That's what I'm doing. I m reading 

in address 500 158.2, it bounces around 142.2 134.3. 

CAPCOM Okay, those sound good Snoopy. And 

Snoopy, Charlie Brown this is Houston, we've got about 10 
more minutes until LOS and Charlie Brown when you re ready 
to read back, I'm standing by for your read back on that 
maneuver pad. ^ ^ _ Q60 +(m 

119 41 2885 +294 7 2 plus 2 balls 558 -2 ball 165 pitch 

CAPCOM Read back is correct, John. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 23:12, GET 107:23, 389/1 



CAPCOM Hello Snoopy, this is Houston. 

Hello Snoopy, Houston. 

SNOOPY Go ahead. 

CAPCOM Rog, Snoopy, we keep loosing signal, 

this high gain antenna. What I'd like for you to do Geno , 
just before you leave the LM, I'd like for you to slough 
a max signal again and give us those settings 1 more time. 
We keep droping a signal out and rather than going back 
and trying to slough it just before you get ready to leave, 
slough it up again to max signal if you would. 

SNOOPY When are you going to have the 

debriefing on this one, Joe? 

CAP COM Glen said in a couple of days. How 

soon can you guys be ready? 

SNOOPY That's the first That's 

the first nominal run we ever had. You should see those 
NEP's they have up here. 

eg Hey, Houston have you been 

watching this package A temperature? We never have got 
it to go down much all day. 

CAPCOM We'll be with you on that, just 

a minute there Charlie Brown. 

eg Okay, I guess we've gone this long. 

We can go another week or so. Snoopy wants to know if he 
should go into V42 , over. 

CAPCOM Say again, Charlie Brown, I missed 

part of that. 

CB Snoopy would like to know if he 

should go into V42, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, stand by, I'll find out- 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Negative Snoopy leave it in 2. 

SNOOPY Okay just let me verrify my guidance 

control switches for you, okay. 

CAPCOM Roger, go. 

SNOOPY Okay guidance control is ping 

AGS S-band is max, attitude control is mode control on roll pitch 
and yaw and mode control switches both pings and ags are 
in auto. Is that correct. 

CAPCOM That's correct, Snoopy, you got 

them all right. 

SNOOPY And you wanted the dsky left in 

poo . 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. Leave her in 

poo. 

SNOOPY And the up data link switch is 

on . 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy, and did you copy, 

we want you to slough that S-band for max signal one more 
time and give us a reading just before you leave. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/22/69, CDT 23:12, GET 107:23, 389/2 



SNOOPY Okay, I've got one more sigma 

stowed here and then I'll do it. How much time have I got 
you yet? 

CAPCOM Okay, we've got about 2 minutes and 

30 seconds till LOS. 

SNOOPY Let me do it now and I'll take the 

canister on my way out. Let me slough this thing. 

CAPCOM That sounds great Geno. 

SNOOPY Hey, Joe, would you believe I've 

got all the circuit breakers pulled, and I can't tell. I 
don't know where max signal stregnth is anymore, let me see. 

CAPCOM Okay, that's good right there, Geno. 

The way you've got it. Snoopy, Houston telcom says you 
got her right there, that's a good shot in the blind. 

SNOOPY Okay, same numbers I gave you before 

I'm going off the air. 

CAPCOM Roger that see you back in 

Charlie Brown. Good show Geno. 

PAo And we've had loss of signal. We'll 

reacquire Apollo 10 in about 46 minutes as the spacecraft 
comes back around the, onto the front side of the moon, on 
its 17 revolution, and during that revolution we'll have the 
aps burn to depletion and we also have television scheduled, 
which we hope will give us good coverage of that LM ascent 
stage maneuver. The change of shift briefing, we now 
estimate will be in about 10 minutes. The participants 
will be leaving shortly. At 107 hours 31 minutes this is 
Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT 0005, GET 108:16 390/1 



PAo This is Apollo Control at 108 hours 

16 minutes into the flight of Apollo 10. We are now about 
50 seconds from reacquiring the spacecraft, now in its 
seventeenth revolution of the moon. We expect when next we 
hear from the crew that Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan will be 
back in the LM, rather back in the command module. We'll 
shortly after acquisition, be scheduled to separate the LM followed 
by the unmanned ascent stage burn to depletion, and we hope 
to have television coverage of that event. Coming up on 
15 seconds now to acquisiton of signal. We'll be standing 
by for that . 

PA0 LM telcom reports that we have 

good signal strength on the high gain antenna. 

CHARLIE BROWN This is Charlie Brown. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

We read you loud and clear. How are things going? 

CHARLIE BROWN Well, we're all back in the command 

module, the tunnel's all locked up, and we're in attitude, and 
standing by to sep here when you give us the word. 

CAPCOM Okay, we're looking good for sep 

here, now, Tom. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay Joe, now again that tunnel won t 

fit, so what we've done is pumped our cabin pressure up about 
4PST above and (garbled) and we're holding real good. 

CAPCOM Roger, I understand, Tom. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, now, what attitude do you wish 

us to go to when we - after we separate. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay. Charlie Brown, stand by just 

1. I'll get you that . 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. We 11 

get you some gimbal angles for that attitude after SEP. In 
the meantime, we'd like for you to on your cryo H2 heaters,. 
On tank 1, go to AUTO; and on tank 2, go to OFF, please. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger, now do we have a go for pyro alarm, 

here? 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

We're standing by for logic. We'll give you a go on the pyro 
alarm here in just a minute. 

CHARLIE BROWN I got the logic off. You want me to 

turn it on? 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown. Go ahead and 

turn it on. 

CHARLIE BROWN I tell you (garbled) 

Okay . 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Brown. This is Houston. 

We got your switches on now. 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. 

CAP COM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

Your gimbal angles for attitude after SEP are roll 180, pitch 
252, and yaw, 3 balls. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 2405, GET 108:16 390/2 

CHARLIE BROWN Roger. Roll 180, pitch 252, and 
yaw is all balls. 

CAPCOM That's affirm. 

CHARLIE BROWN And when do you want us to separate 

Joe? , . 

CAPCOM Okay, we want - we can go ahead and 

separate now, Charlie Brown. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, Houston. We'll give you a 

countdown. We're all set to go for SEP. Right? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, Charlie Brown. 
We're standing by for your count. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay. Give you a 5 count. 4, i , i, 

lf ^CHARLIE BROWN Cabin pressure's holding. Snoop went 
(garbled) . 

END OF TAPE 



was 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY 5/23/69, CDT 24:15, GET 108:25, 391/1 
rVL Houston, Charlie Brown, over. 

papcom Roger, Charlie Brown, go. 

£f C ° M Man when he leaves, he leaves 

cIpCOM okay don't back into that dude 

n ow John when you get turned around. Are you keepxng xt 

in sl g ht? Yea> oUay . Joe, he took off so fast 

he's gone he went right into'the sun. 

C c f C ° M W^don'tTave any idea where he went. 

i-u^out-f 

here, we'll be okay. 

VapCOM <> ka y» standby. 

^ PC0M Hello, Houston, Charlie Brown. 

PAPrnM Roger, Charlie Brown, go ahead. 

Si PC0M Okay, look let's take a quick look 

:r £\r£rir.; ,nr.:\;:':s£:i a 

off Uke /scalded rock straight up, okay. 

"* C0 » Ki\V«i. « this attitude ? o 

Sf C ° M Soft's up above us so»e place. I 

don't^where. Kow hy°Charne B^wn. We're 

running this thing t""-^^^-.. do „-t want to see 
Snoopy^ce back Here -itW £££ J"";,. t0 make 

an t—dl.t. decision ^out^^ Qf 

^ pcoM Charlie Bro»n, this is Snoopy. 

Charlie Brown this is H""*""^ hopc thls l8 Ho uston. We're 
80 ing C ;tO c try to pick ^ ^ ^ S""' 

there did you Tom? ^ x ^ thlnk 

UD ~, ±U4„ -i o BmiRton aeain. Tom, 



CB „„„ okav this is Houston again. Tom, 

what „f want you to do is^ n - ~ ^ 

ourn^i initerd t o t £ U - d x"and ,> thi: d S h U Lrd ^ve^ sep ration 

£!£ ?A?^S: - - ."^y^ren-e hravo 
3 and Charlie 4 jets. 3 charlie 4> ok 

^:orrooi%"rL\re?fiLrtifriiL"rd%"o-e^r e rin^o:n 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 24:15, GET 108:25, 391 

CB and out in front of him so if we 

go down in thrust +X will take us down even further out in front 
over. Does your fido agree with that? 

CAPCOM I think they do Tom, they are kind of 

scratching their heads right now. Roger on that and the 
reason that Snoopy took off, we're showing that he vented 
out all the pressure out of the cabin. We think it vented 
out through the tunnel and that probably gave him some delta-v. 

CB We had the hatch valve in auto, set 

right and everything. Everything was squared away, for Snoop. 

CAPCOM rog, we may have some problem with 

some of that stuff sticking in valve - 

CB Well I would believe that. It was 

like a snow storm when Snoop started off. You wouldn't 
believe it. 

CAPCOM I bet that's right. 

SNOOPY And it was right into the sun babe, 

right into the sun. How soon do you want to do this bum? 

CAPCOM We want to sit tight here for a little 

while. We got about another 20 minutes before we want to burn. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. We 

are firming up all of these things on attitudes and burns 
for you, we want to make sure we've got everything right before 
we torch off Snoopy, 

CB Yea, I think we f ll be in good shape 

thrusting down, but that initial call out looks like we 
were trying to make another high site on him ... use minus x. 

CB It's really impossible to hit him in the 

anyWS C A p C0M Charlie Brown this is Houston. 

CB *es sir. 

CAPCOM Roger, Charlie Brown while these troops 

out are getting all their numbers all confirmed here let 
me pass up some other data to you. We've got a new sleep 
attitude we want for you to go to. This is to cool quad A, 
and the attitude is roll 090 pitch 210 yaw 000. In that 
attitude we'd like to high gain antanna. Pitch to -5 

t CB 231 " Okay, just leave attitude at 0090 

pitch 210 yaw 3 balls and high gain pitch - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, GET 108:36 CDT 2425 



CB Okay this sleep attitude is 0090 

pitch 210, yaw 3 balls and high gain pitch minus 5 and 
yaw 2 31. 

CC Roger, that's right Geno . In 

addition tonight we'd like a waste water dump, and we'd 
like it at your convenience, that can be anytime, down to 
25 percent again. 

SC Okay Joe, almost everything, in- 

cluding going to bed is going to be at our convenience 
before we get out of our suits and things . 

CC Okay. And, did you happen to 

notice the docking angle when you came back through the 
tunnel, and also did you get that big old canister back 
onboard. 

SC Yeah, Joe, we got the canister 

onboard and John greased it again, the roll angle was 
plus 1 tenth. 

CC Okay, plus 1 tenth, that's pretty 

darn good. 
SC 
CC 
SC 



You don't believe that do you, J 

I believe that John. 

It's the guy, it's the guy that 



aligned it that made it that way. 

CC I don't believe that John. 

SC It's got a sliding scale in the 

tunnel, we put it anywhere - it's got a sliding scale in 
the tunnel, we put it anywhere we want to. 

CC That I believe. 

CC And Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

in your configuration in your sleep configuration we want 
you to disable C and D quads with the auto RCS select, 
in the DAP we want you the fail C and D and select AC roll, 
and DAP . 

CC And Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

We want you to go ahead and initiate your plus X 2-foot 
per second in X now. 

S C Ro g . 

SC Okay, I'll get that quad stuff 

back here after we do this Joe. 



CC 
SC 
CC 
CC 
SC 



That will be fine. 
Hello Houston - 

Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 
Charlie Brown. 

Hang on just a minute. Go ahead 
Okay, we want you to enable all 



quads, that will be five ones In your DAP. 



SC 

Read our DSKY, 



Okay 
X is 2.1, Y is 



we got 2.1 on plus X here. 
.1 and Z is minus .1. Over. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, GET 108:36 CDT 24:25 392/2 

cc Okay Tom, we copy and verify on the - 

sc And 1.9 on EMS 

CC !- 9 » roger. 

sc And 1.9 on EMS 

cc Charlie Brown, this is Houston, we 

show you separating and we'll keep you posted on countdown 

on the ignition. In the meantime I've got a map update to 

send to you and also some data for you photography when you re 

ready^o C ° Py " , Roger . Look, we're kind of bushed 

right now and we don't need anymore photography before ... 
over . 

CC Okay. 

sc Yeah, it's going to take us a couple 

of hours to get out of our suits and get all the spacecraft 
squared away and all the stowage squared away and we ve had 
a long day, so we want - we got a lot of landmark tracking 
to do tomorrow, so we'd just like to call it quits. Over. 

sc Yeah, we're still set up to do the 

continued CEVA, we've got the couches stowed and / ve ^ th ^f; 

cc Roger, we concur on that. One item 

I want to sent up to you though, in case you start to charge 
batteries in the morning before we get in contact with you, 
we're going to start charging A instead of B, but we'll give 
you a call first thing; and when you wake up. 
J gc I'll wait to talk to you in the 

morning before I do that, uh? 

C C That will be fine, Jim. 

sc I wish they'd have - 

sc And if anytime tonight if one or the 

other of those quads starts to heat up and we need to change 
the attitude, for crying out loud, call us and tell us. 

cc Okay, we sure will, John. 

sc Houston, this is Charlie Brown here. 

What's the analysis on that quad A, are we near the fracture 
mechanics limits. It looks like it may be starting to cool 
off a little bit on the gage and come down maybe to about 
390 degrees. Could you give us a quick synopsis. 

c £ We sure will. Just a minute Tom, 

I'll get it. 

S C Okay . 

sc Hey Houston, this is Charlie Brown. 

cc Go ahead, Charlie Brown. 

sc I'm glad they don't put that days one 
on top of each other, I'll tell you that. 

£ c Boy, you guys had a real one today, 

but you sure did good work. 

y gC That's not a bad day's work for A and 

a quarter, is it? And those machines have been doing the work 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69 , GET 103: 36 CDT 24:25 392/3 

they really were slick. Yeah, and we also had a lot of good 
help from you down on the ground and we sure appreciate it. 
I thought the total system and everything (garbled) system 
turned out real well and we stood some rough spots and some 
COMMs and a few other things but by and large the whole 
system filled it off. And it made us real happy, but needless 
to say we're a little bit tired tonight. Over. 

qq Well, we can sure understand that 

Tom, and we're concurring everything you say. 

sc Hey Joe, how about a super FIDO and 

a super GUIDO up here for that CSI burn. 

CC Roger that. 

pA0 This is Mission Control - 

sc This thing is really a slicky, boy. 

It knows right where it's going all the time. ... all those 
solutions were just - shoot, you could just flip a coin and 
have picked any of them. 

£ A0 This Is Apollo Control. Weire assuming, 

based on Tom Stafford's remark that the crew is quite tired, 
that we will not be getting the TV transmission that had been 
scheduled during the APS burn to depletion. 

cc 29 temperature - package temperature 

on the ground here Tom, did you say you were reading 390? 

sc Not the package temperature, the 

helium tank temperature. 

cc Okay copy - helium tank. 

cc Okay Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

We've had ullage on the engines. 

sc Where is it? 

sc Okay, we got ignition on Snoopy, 

Charlie Brown. t 
sc Hey, I may see it out there, I'm 

not sure but I think I do. I do. 
CC Ver y good. 

sc I'll see if I can tell you when he 

burns out. That's a long burn though isn't it, 4 minutes. 
cc Yeah, can you tell which way he s 

8 ° in8 SC Yeah. Dave, it's just fire to me, 

I think he's going up, but see I'm not right side up either 
but - He's going, Joe. As long as I can see the fire, 1 
guess he's going the other way. 

qq Roger. From down here he looks 

like he's doing real good Geno. 

sc Hey Joe, would he be burning away 

from us, sort of like maybe his attitude is local horizontal 
or close to It? 

cc Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

that's affirmative. He should be going in that direction. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, GET 108:36 CDT 24:25 392/4 

sc Yeah, and I got him out my right 

hand window here, he's getting smaller and he's still on fire. 
How much more burn time has he got. 

cc Stand by and I'll find out. 

sc Hey, he just went out. He just went 

out ' cc Okay, we got him still burning, Gene. 

sc Maybe it's because the sun went down. 

cc Yeah, ma be. We got him still burning 

Geno, and about 40 seconds burn time yet. 

sc Okay, maybe I - that looked like 

him, maybe it wasn't. 

* cc Deke thinks, he thinks you may have 
turned around and probably burning back at you now. 

sc I couldn't hear it. 

sc I fixed those switches so he couldn t 

do that. I'm glad to see that he's burning, that I didn't 
screw up or something in there. 

CC Roger. 

sc John - John remembered now what I 

forgot in there - what I left in there, my helmet or something. 

* cc The way he took off it doesn t look 
like you left very much in there at all. 

g C Man, we had PLSSs and probes and 

droques and all sorts of things on there. How far will you 
be able to track him? 

cc Probably for several hours. 

sc Did he really go into the sun? 

cc Well, he's going in that general 

direction. «.».„«. 

sc God, I feel sort of bad about that 

because he's a pretty nice guy, he treated us pretty well 
today^ Roger, that's affirm. 

sc That's what I talk about using up 

a piece of hardware though ain't it. 

CC Roger that. 

PA0 This is Apollo Control. We show 

that we achieved a velocity of about 3700 feet per second 
from that bum. The nominal burn time would have been around 
3 minutes 34 seconds and we'll have some refinements to that 
later In order to conclude the change of shift press conference 
that was in progress when this pass began, we will take the 
circuit down and record any subsequent communications with 
the spacecraft and play those back to you following the com- 
pletion of the change of shift press conference. This is 
Apollo Control at 108 hours 58 minutes. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0100, GET 109:11 393/1 



PA.0 This is Apollo Control at 109 hours 

and 11 minutes. We still have about 18 minutes prior to 
loss of signal with Apollo 10, and we're in communication 
with the spacecraft at the present time. We also have 
about 2 minutes of tape recorded conversation that was 
collected during the completion of the change of shift 
briefing. We'll pick up with the tape, and then continue 
to follow live conversation. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

Snoopy did a real good job burning and we're still tracking 
him real good. Getting good data from him, and we're 
going to let you go ahead and start doing you pre sleep 
check list and I'll try to keep the calls to a minimum until 
just prior to LOS . 

CB Roger, Joe, should we go to sleep 

attitude now? Is that okay, with you? 



CAP COM 
find out now. 
CAPCOM 



Stand by Charlie Brown, I'm trying 



Charlie Brown, roger Houston. You 
can go ahead and go into your sleep attitude any time you 
want to now. 

CB Roger. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. 

CB Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM R°g» that was a beautiful job today. 

If you do half that well tomorrow, we'll let you come home. 

CB We can do better than that tomorrow. 

CAPCOM Okay. 

CB Thank you Duke, we'll probably be 

ready by then too. 

CAP COM Yea, get a good nights sleep, you 

can use it. 

CB Actually like Tom said, there is 

a lot of people who did a good, and I'll tell you these 
vehicles, so far, that little Snoopy was a real winner. 

CAPCOM We concure. 

sc And big Charlie Brown is no slouch either. 

CAP COM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. I 

hate to bother you but if you'll give us a computer we'd 
like to update your state vector. 

gQ Roger. You want them in the 

middle of this maneuver or can you wait till we finish or 
not . 

CAPCOM We can wait till you finish, John. 

I didn't notice you were maneuvering there. 

SC Okay, I don't think - - Houston, 

Apollo 10, you have the computer. ... Apollo 10 ready. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, did you get it, roger. 

sc I got it twice. That's an interesting 

point about the communications ... sometimes I was hearing myself 
speak and also Gene and Tom speak twice. I don't under stand all that. 



APOLLO 10 MXSSIOH COMMENTARY, 5.23/69. CD! 0100, GET 109=11. 393/2 



CAPC0M I'm not so sure either John unless 



we were 



«, fl vbe we were getting some relay modes in there today and 
r y thin£! Tea that coL guya are nodding their head. y«, 
eetting some relay modes where probably you were coning 
down to the ground and getting set back to yourself. 

rAPCOM 2«t * e 8 ive yoU 1 instance > tha ^, 1 

mike down nere d What would --en is yo^would 
to^y/b^you^ bac k u, -it. about 

.3 second delay, and it probably sounded like a 
pretty good echo. l understand tha t. That's 

a g ooa capability to have, to be able to ground relay like 

that ' APr(1H And Charlie Brown, this is Houston, 

CAfUurt . little intermitten times when 

I guess when you hav * ^* S * ^ that probably was the result 

were keyed just for a few seconds . »« * c "^ 1£ for a short 
thing, you'd relay ^J^f Houston , we're 

^rr^hliJh^the^computfr^o 1 ;: ^ *o back to block. 
It's all yours for the night. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ thg 

tape recorded conversation. We'll continue to stand by 
I I o« w further live communication with Apollo 10. we 

s:.r« » .«..*. ».*•» 8oes 

hehind the »oon on thie thej^evolution.^ 

=f coM s.r-iiiv."-?".; this ^ 

confiscation one «- ^"TJ,"^: l*.™ XWe 

got it right before I pass it up to you John. 
6 cr Okay . 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

c r Go ahead. , 

CAPCOM Okay» John ' ° n y ° Ur daP ! lf /^ 

make R2 read 11100 then you'll have the dap in the right 

configuration. outstanding. 

CAP COM And also, Charlie Brown, on your 

r^ h ^t::;"e^rLr/o i -a£srjI;r r J;S^ n -«•' 

no problem on that over temperature, on that quad. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT 0 100, GET 109:11, 393/3 



SC Okay. 

CAPCOM Charlie Brown, this is Houston. 

SC Go ahead, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, I just wanted to hit you with 

a couple of things before you go around the corner. First 
off, it looks like you've got a real good tight cabin there, 
in case there is any doubt in your mind of the stuff being in 
the seal. What we're looking at right now, and kind of thinking 
about, and going to let you think about on this pass and then 
pick you up, if you're still awake when we come around AOS 
next time, we're thinking about giving you 4 more hours 
of sleep time tonight. Right now we're already down to 6 to 
7 hours of sleep and we figured out with the long day today, 
it might be good to, if you want it to have a longer sleep 
period tonight, and what we do is eat Into the rest period 
on down the line there. We've got about 2 revs there you 
know where we can eat into without any problem. 

SC Yea, I think after today, tomorrow, 

just can't be hard. I'll tell you these pressure suits even 
in zero gravity are something else. 

CAPCOM What was that in zero gravity you 

said, John? 

SC I said these pressure suits are 

something else, even in zero gravity. 

CAPCOM Roger, I can imagine that. Well 

listen, you won't be asleep before you come AOS next time 
will you? j 

SC I probably won't sleep at all tonight. 

CAPCOM Well what I'm getting at is you can 

talk it over and see if you'd like to do that or if you 
want to now, we can go ahead and start building the flight 
plan around that, but if you want to do that, we can work on 
revising the flight plan while you're asleep tonight then. 

SC Okay, let me talk it over with my 

compatriots here. 

CAPCOM That'll be fine. No rush, we've 

got about 3 minutes and 45 seconds until AOS, until LOS , 
and we can catch you coming around the corner next time if 
you want. 

S C Ro g • 

CAP COM Okay, Charlie Brown, this is Houston 

we show about a minute and a half until LOS, and we'll expect 
to hear from you coming around on the other side, however 
we'll wait for a call from you. 

SC Alright thank you. 

CAPCOM Okay, Charlie Brown, we're just 

about to loose you, we'll see you at 1 10 15, that's about 
46 minutes from now. 

PAO And we have loss of signal. We'll 



APOLLO 10 MISSIOH COHMEHTAKT . 5/23/69, CDT 0100. GET 109:11 393/ 

be reacquiring Apollo 10 again In 
46 Haute. « that tl- the spacecraft .111 be It . its 18 

s«SS.n.SS st.^m ass- 

•! minutes 31 eeconda and that gave us a delta-v, a change 
orbit it has gone into until we've ha« a chance to get so.. 

to rnase up j.<j* ».i,«f u p> would make up the 

^:. 1 i t i:e t curing";e.rp.rio fl8 d lat S er "on "nine mission. At 
Sr..." 31 iSnutea this i. Anollo Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 110:14 CDT 0203 394/1 



p A 0 This is Apollo control at 110 hours 

15 minutes into the flight of Apollo 10. We're less than 
a minute now until acquiring the spacecraft now in its 18th 
revolution of the moon. The crew is scheduled to be in their 
sleep period at this time. However before we had loss of 
signal on the previous revolution we gave Tom Stafford the 
option of adding 4 hours to the sleep period to make up for 
the time that has been lost due to the additional activities, 
and getting a little bit of a late start - actually finishing 
up late with some of the activities relating to the LM 
rendezvous and APS burn to depletion. And Stafford advised 
that he would talk it over with his fellow crewmen and let 
us know when we had acquisition of signal on this revolution. 
So we anticipate that the crew will still be up and will 
probably be beginning their sleep period on this revolution. 
We should have acquisition of signal by now. We will stand 
by for CAPC0M, Joe Angles, to put in a call to the crew. 

SC Houston, Houston, this is Apollo 10, 

over. „ 

cc Hey Apollo 10, this is Houston. How 

are you guys doing? 

sc I bet you thought we were sleeping. 

We were just getting dressed for the occasion. 

CC Okay. 

SC I got some dope for you. 

qq You go ahead with the dope. 

S C Okay Joe, at GET 110:15, battery 

C read 37 volts, pyro BAT A, 37, pyro BAT B, 37; RCS ring 
A says 60 percent, B is 78, Charlie is 72, and Delta is 67. 
The canister change has been made. The fans have been cycled, 
and - 

sc Joe, are you still there? 

cc Roger, Charlie Brown. We're standing 

by. We got all your readouts so far, all the way down to 
the fans cycled, have you anything more? 

sc Yeah, we got a dosimeter reading, third is 

26038, the chimp is 05308 and ... 15040 and on the Cern that was 
26039. 

cc Okay we got all that, Gene. 

Sc And the crew status is at tired, 

and happy, and hungry, and thirsty, and horny and all those 
other things . 

Cc Roger, we copy everything and we ve 

got solutions and pills for everything but item 4. 

SC Your in trouble when I get back 

anyway . 

Cc But we just didn't want you to forget 

what the good things are like back on earth, Gene. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 110:14 CDT 0203 394/2 



SC How can I? I keep looking at this 

flight plan. 

CC Hey Roger. 

SC We dumped the waste water and we 

dropped it down to 28 - we dropped it down to 22 percent, Joe. 
But I guess that's alright, uh? 

CC Roger, that's okay^^ 

SC Now what else can we do for you. 

CC Well let's see, Gene. You can give 

us a pill report and I guess you haven't had time to take 
any today and also let us know if you've made the water taste 
bad for tomorrow. And also you can zero the command module 
optics aid I can't think of anything else right now. 

SC You want us to zero the command 

module optics, we will chlorinate the water last thing, and 
we didn't take any pills yet. 

CC Okay, we kind of figured that. And, 

let me ask you about - let me ask you about this proposed 
change for the flight plan for tomorrow, in other words, adding 
a couple of hours on to your sleep tonight. Would - did you 
guys get a chance to talk that over, do you want to do that? 

SC I'll tell you. Okay Joe, what time 

would that - how many hours would that get us up from - like, 
what's our proposed get up time now. Over. 

CC Okay, Tom, your proposed get up time 

is, let's see, it looks like 117:30 about, and we'd add 2 hours 
on to that. Okay, I just got the word, we can make that 3 to 
4 hours if we wanted to. 

SC How about standing by for one Joe. 

CC Okay Tom, we sure will. In other 

words right now you're looking at about 7 hours from now for 
wake up time, which, I don't know how soon you're ready to 
go to sleep but that would give you something like six and 
a half hours of sleep, I'm guessing. And we could add 4 hours 
on to that, 3 to 4 hours which would give you 9 to 10 hours 
of sleep. That incidently is not going to - 

SC Okay . . . 

CC Roger, that incidently will not 

compromise anything that we've got planned. We just - we got 
some pad time on down in the flight plan as you know. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 110:24, CDT 0213, 39 



sc All right that was the rest period 

in the middle of the day, there. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

sc Hey, Joe, this is Charlie Brown. 

We think we'll take you up on that sleep in for at least 
2 hours tomorrow, which will give us about 9 hours. I think 
we need it. 

CAPCOM Roger. We sure copied on that Tom, 

and we'll go ahead and - I'll tell you what we'll do, we'll 
go ahead and plan - work a flight plan around giving you an 
extra 4 hours, and if you want to crank up earlier, we'll 
see what we can do about that - cranking early in the morning 
then, because I think you could probably use that rest too. 
You guys had a whale of a day today. 

Sc Yeah, that was quite a day. You 

don't do that every day. And why don't we play it like that, 
so give us what your proposed wake-up time is and just like 
this morning we got up a little early. Give us the hours 
for proposed wake-up time and we may beat that. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay. Stand by just a second Tom. 

I'll get it for you here. 

CAP COM Charlie Brown this is Houston, Tom 

you sound like you could use a fountain of vigor about now. 

sc Yeah, would you believe about two 

CAPCOM I don't know what you would do with 
them after you got them though. 

SC Just throw them up, Joe. 

CAPCOM I'll do that. 

sc Can you uplink something like that 

Joe? 

sc Yeah, could you uplink something 
like that? 

CAPCOM We did our best in our flight plans 

and tool kits and stuff like that. 

SC Yeah, we noticed that on the LRL 

there. Say, just wanted to ask you a question, too. How 
did the TV look, you know, we haven't had time to even think 
about it? Over. 

CAPCOM Say again. How's the TV look, you 

Say? sc Roger. How did the TV look during 

that station - official station keeping? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. That was outstanding today. 

That was really good. Really had a lot of good detail and 
man that color, Tom, well I don't know what to use for a word, 
but you'll have to wait until you get back. That really has 
gone over. 

Sc Okay, but you can really up pick 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 110:24, CBT 0213, 395/2 



SC the silver and the black and the 

flag and all that on the LM, then? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger. Let's see I don't know if 

we picked up the LM, but we sure got - Yeah, the ascent stage 
was really great. We could pick up the colors on it all right. 
The Mylar showed up real good. 

SC Hey, Joe, where do you suppose 

Snoopy is by now? 

CAP COM Stand by. I'll give you a readout 

on that, Gene. He's still sailing along, I think, let me 
check. Yeah, we're still tracking him. Let me get some 
words on how far out he is. 

CAPCOM Gene, just for your info, we show 

about 9.7 foot a second separation and we think that we're 
just from that cabin venting on Snoopy after you separated. 

SC Yeah, well, you know he - up there's 

where our hatch has this insulation has been bothering us, 
inching us, you know, and stored in both cabins, and when 
Snoopy took off that insulation just exploded all over the 
whole place just like a snowstorm around the moon. And out 
of the midst of the snowstorm, came Snoopy taking off. 

CAPCOM (laughter) 

SC Houston, 10. Did you say that 

Snoopy 's cabin pressure went down to zero? Over. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, Tom. It went 

all the way down. Down to zero in 10 seconds, Tom. 

SC Hey, Joe, I went back in a second 

time to make sure that dump valve was in AUTO, so it - Some- 
thing must have happened to it. It was in AUTO. 

CAPCOM Yeah, I copy. It's probably that 

forward hatch you got in the command module with you. That 
may have had something to do with it. 

SC Yeah (laughter) sure. 

SC Hello, Houston. Apollo 10. Well 

I guess Snoop performed real well with respect to the propul- 
sion objective that we had for it, didn't it, when you let 
it off? Over. 

CAPCOM Roger that. He sure did, Tom. 

SC Yeah, real good. We got one heck 

of a lot of ... today, that's for sure. 

CAPCOM Boy, Roger that. 

SC Joe, If you want a lap simulation 

ride, let your kids get a big, a big metal bowl on your head 
and beat on it with spoons. 

CAPCOM (laughter) okay. 

SC Joe, I guess I've flown well over 

a hundred different types of aircraft and that made my third 
spacecraft, but of all of them I've never heard anything as 
noisy as Snoopy. It was too much. Between the fans, and 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 110:24, CDT 0213, 395/3 

SC the bumps and those thrusters firing 

(Garble) it was really a kick. Over. 

CAPCOM I'll bet it was. 

CAPCOM You've just never been inside a 

dog when it was barking and kicking and scratching fleas 
all at the sane time. 

SC No, that's right. 

SC It's doing everything but wagging its 

tail a little bit on the ascent burn. 
CAPCOM Yeah, Rog. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0223, GET 110:34 396/1 



CHARLIE BROWN This dog even wags his tail a little 

on the ascent burn. 

CAP COM Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN And he chased his tail on staging. 

CAP COM Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN You think that guy in the well had 

a time. 

CAPCOM Rog. 

CHARLIE BROWN Houston, Apollo 10. We have one 

other question. Just where did you propose that we stow 
that canister we brought back from the LM. Over. 

CAPCOM Okay, Tom. The most logical place 

right now looks like it'll be in the sleep bag underneath 
your couch, however, what we're going to do tomorrow is run 
an exercise over there in the - in the mockup and figure where 
the set place is with all the other gear you got on board. 
We'll come up with several ideas and let you pick the one you 
like best. 

CHARLIE BROWN You know, I can see what happens if 

that couch happens to stroke a little bit with that middle 
canister underneath it. Over. 

CAPCOM Yeah. Well, I think it - if you keep 

it rolled up pretty close to your head there, up near the 
ordeal box, there, why the couch strokes down and toward the 
bottom, doesn't it? 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, (garbled) That may be okay. 

CHARLIE BROWN And Houston, Apollo 10. We're coming 

right back over landing site 1 in all the places. (Garbled) you 
starting to look like we did before. NASA road 1 we could sure 
pick out every little crater now. Over. 

CAPCOM I'll bet you can. I'll bet it's 

looking pretty familiar by now, too, isn't it? 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, we're coming right up on landing 

site 1 here. You can look straight ahead and there's 
masculine, masculine B, leading up to 13129 and I have 
Holkey over on the left, and out there in the plains, the 
Oklahoma Hills on the left and the landing site. 

CAPCOM Jack - Jack Mitt's still here tonight. 

He says you guys were overtrained, reading off names like that. 
Hey, listen, Snoopy is about 6,000 miles above you and still 
going, and we're still getting data on him. 

CHARLIE BROWN Well good. That sounds great. Sounds 

like you got some power left in those batteries. All we're 
really glad to see you get all the data on that ascent burn. 
Over. 

CAPCOM Okay Tom, (garbled) now. I think I - 

CHARLIE BROWN They going to (garbled) 

CAPCOM Go ahead. I'll wait. 

CHARLIE BROWN Go ahead, Joe. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0223, GET 110:34 396/2 



CAPCOM Okay Tom, on your wake up in the 

morning, well on Snoopy first, they say we're expecting them 
power on those batteries to last till about 120 hours, so we 
got about another 10 hours worth of tracking it looks like. 
And on your wakeup in the morning, what it looks like now, 
the best plan is to wake you up just before LOS on rev 23, 
which would be at right at about 121 hours. And we'll give 
you a little data right away, enough to get you through the 
next rev and that'll give you the back side to get woke up and 
dressed, and break out some chow and stuff. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, so we're looking at about 

121 hours. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. And we'll call 

you just as - just as late as we can and still get what data 
we need to up to you before LOS. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, real good. Thank you. We're 

right now passing over - we're exactly over masculine and 
here's masculine B up ahead, and we've got the Sidewinder Rille 
over on the right, we've got - here's Diamondback on the right, 
Sidewinder's on the left, and this whole chain of craters leading 
up to site 2. And again, if you didn't hear me. (Garlbed) 
that it doesn't look near as rough and as rugged out here 
in the mare areas as it does in the other parts. It's pretty 
well chained up. 

CAPCOM Boy, you'll really sound good, Too. 

Jack Schmitt is standing here and he says that he's setting 
up some briefings when you guys get back. This time you're 
going to be briefing him. 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay, and I think we can sure tell 

the difference between old and new craters and the way it 
desites (garbled) it was very obvious. Those pictures came 
out, we'll show him some boulders and tell him that San Saritas A 
has some (garbled) great big, both white and black huge holders 
on both the inside and the rim and quite a - well most of them 
are on the outside of the rim, but it's perfectly rugged 
country and stay away from San Saritas a there. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy that. 

CHARLIE BROWN Hey Joe, when this surface down here, 

ceases to be interesting then it's time to bring us home. 

CAPCOM Okay. We'll send up a replacement, 

Gino . 

CHARLIE BROWN Well, right now it's still pretty 

interesting. 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll leave you up there a 

while, yet. 

CHARLIE BROWN We just went over Molkey . We got 

(garbled) river, right underneath us. 
CAPCOM Roger that. 

CHARLIE BROWN You might tell Jack that US 1 when 

you get down close comparing it to a runway from about 
50,000 feet. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0223, GET 110:34 396/3 

CHARLIE BROWN Most be close to a thousand feet 

across . 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

CHARLIE BROWN Yeah, I'd say it's - 

CHARLIE BROWN Okay Houston, if Jack Schmitt's 

still there, we're passing over the crater. We got it named 
after him, it's right past ritter and sabine and right here 
you can see some tremendous boulders down on the opposite aide 
rim, there. There's great big white ones. I'd say they're, oh, 
To see it from this altitude here they got long shadows on them, 
at least about a hundred feet or more in diameter, and down 
near the bottom, you can see where the sides are slumping in, 
it's more like the tailingsoff of mines And the sides are 
white and gray. You can see fractured structure in there, too. 
We got some pictures of it. Over. 

CAP COM Very good. We copy all that, Tom. 

Thank you. 

CHARLIE BROWN And right now, we're still just looking 

at US1 as it disappears over into the terminator. 

CAPCOM Roger. Tom, speaking of the cameras, 

do you have any - any of those camera problems you want us to 
try and work on tonight. It sounded like you had some problems 
other than film packs. Is there anything we can help you 
out with, trying to figure out tonight? 

CHARLIE BROWN Joe, those were pref light problems. 

And the main thing, the backs we can see, weren't fitted to 
the camera and run through and the batteries oa them, my 
Hasselblad went dead, just as I got to the site. I hope 
I got some pictures of it. I got all the approaches into it. 
Over. 

CAPCOM Very good. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0233, GET 110:44 397/1 



SC For pref light problems, and the 

main thing, the backs, we could see weren't fitted to the 
camera and run through, and my batteries on my hassleblad 
went dead just as we got to the sight, I hope I got some 
pictures of it. I got all the approaches into it, over. 

CAPCOM Very good, understand Tom. 

SC And tell Jack tomorrow we're going 

to get him a picture of this, the USl suddenly jumps 
aide ways up here, and maybe that's the strike football 
he's been looking for but it suddenly jumped sideways 
and you can see it or else maybe just another one has 
gone into it. 

CAPCOM Okay 

SC It fades out. It's been elevated 

in certain areas here. 

CAPCOM Rog, we copy, that's good to hear, 

and on the cameras, Tom if you run into a problem tomorrow, 
or you want both hassleblads available, Jack says you can 
put one battery in each camera and it should operate okay. 

SC Yea, okay, we'll give that a try 

tomorrow. We'll be all ready to go after them and what we're 
doing now is we're passing the terminator. We're going to go 
ahead and sack out it's been a long day and we're just watching, 
still love to watch the moon scape go by and observing here as 
we go on to the terminator, and we'll be talking to you tomorrow 
morning, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, mighty fine, Tom. That 

sounds good and we'll talk to you some more about data and 
stuff in the morning. On your LCL recovery check list 
before you back pack that stuff all the way, tomorrow we'll 
just go through them and you can just call down the item 
numbers and let me know where you have them stowed so we 
can work out your CG. Over. 

SC Okay will do. 

CAPCOM And I guess that's about it. We 

want you to know you guys did one whale of a job today. You 
really did us all proud. The big troups on the back row 
walked out of here shaking their heads and grinning from 
ear to ear, they could have eaten a banana sideways and 
never touched it. 

SC Well great that makes us real 

happy. It was a heck of a work load. One thing I wanted 
to check on. It looked like on board, Joe the landing 
radar did a great job on locking on, a pretty good altitude 
preforming all the way through, have you got any word on that 
yet, over. 

CAPCOM Roger, that agrees with what we were 

looking at down here Tom, It looked like it performed just 
real well. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0233, GET 110:44 397/2 



sc Okay now one reason I wasn't able 

to hold that light on exactly 10 degrees, it was off a few 
tenths, and even up to 1 degree, the rate needles on the 
attitude error indicator weren't calibrated so I had a zero 
pitch rate. Actually it ended up at the end with that 
calibrator just before docking was 3 tenths of a degree off. 
And I was trying to just eyeball that and eyeball the 
Dsky but I think we got what we wanted was in the local 
horizonal reference there, over. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copied all that. 

gc Also, just a couple of more copies. 

It was a real ride, that ascent engine was, I guess we had 
the longest burn on it to date, and it takes you on quite 
a little pitch and yaw excursion there as you take off. 
I mean it continues on you know the way with a non-gimballing 
engine, but yet it burned out beautifully on residuals but 
you're really hicupping back and forth on that babe, it was quite 
a ride for 15 seconds. Over. 

CAPCOM Rog, I'll bet, and I bet it got 

pretty sporty there towards, you had a pretty light vehicle 
there didn't you? 

sc Oh yea, just one pings, you 

go back and it really takes off. Also the vehicle's so light 
that you notice all the structure shaking when you fired pulse. 
And it sounded just like you'd awakened inside of a rain water tub 
with somebody beating on it with a bongo drum. 
CAPCOM Is that right. 

g C Yea, it's quite a machine. 

CAP COM Tom, this is Houston, we've been 

talking with the Doctor and it sounds like there's only 
one way that we can get you unwound and to sleep tonight. 
We're not sure how to get that up to you. 

gc Yea understand. Understand , Joe . 

Well we'll sack out shortly, but after a day like that we just 
want to talk about a few things there and relax. 

CAPCOM Yea, we sure understand. 

Houston (Garble) little switching 



SC 

around over here. 

CAPCOM 
by Geno. 

SC 



Roger we're still reading you 5 
Okay, I'll be listening for you 



tonight. 

CAPCOM Gene very good, and we 11 try 



not to bother you 
SC 

CAPCOM 



Don't feel bad if you have to. 
Barb called over just a few minutes 
ago, sheVtayed up right till the end listening, and she 
was happy as could be. 

SC Appreciate that. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0243, GET 110:54 398 

CAPCOM We've been keeping in pretty close 

touch with all the gals. In fact for all 3 of you guys 
those gala are running to read the flight plans and the check 
lists, and they keep asking us when you're going to do this 
and why you didn't do that, and they come up with some 
pretty embarrassing questions sometimes. 

sc Yea, and we've got enough of those 

people, we don't need anymore. 

CAP COM You've got 3 of them waiting when 

you get back. , , 

gc Yea I guess we'll take it in stride - 

CAPCOM Rog. 

p^O This is Apollo Control. We have 

about 1 minute 15 seconds now before we loose contact with 
Apollo 10 as it goes around behind the moon on this the 18 
revolution. Flight director Milton Wendler has gone around 
the room and checked the status of the spacecraft with all 
of his flight controllers before we loose contact. Everything 
appears to be in good order at this time. The flight 
surgeon advises that the crew appears to be either asleep 
or going to sleep at this time, and we don't expect that 
we'll hear anymore from them for the rest of the sleep period. 
They do have the option to extend this sleep period through 
121 hours ground elapse time if they so desire. Tom Stafford, 
said that they may be up and about somewhat before that, if 
they're not up by that time, the ground would awake them. 
And we should have loss of signal just about now. And our 
ecom advises that we do have LOS. We'll be prepared to 
come up again when we reacquire contact with the spacecraft, 
although I don't expect we'll have anything more than 
telemetry information at that time, which will be about 
46 minutes or so from now. At 111 hours 28 minutes, this 
is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 112:14 CDT 0403 399/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control, 112 hours 

14 minutes. We have acquisition of signal from Apollo 10 
now. We've been advised that we do have telemetry data 
from this spacecraft and we don't expect any voice communi- 
cations from the crew on this revolution. We're now in 
the 19th revolution of the moon. And we expect that all 
three crewmen are sleeping at this time. We only have 
biomedical data at the present time on Gene Cernan, and 
that information shows that he is sleeping soundly and has 
been since 111 hours ground elapsed time. Following the 
rendezvous and separation maneuver from the lunar module, 
our displays here in Mission Control show that the Apollo 10 
spacecraft is now in an orbit with an apogee of 65.4 nautical 
miles and a perigee of 56.2 nautical miles. Our velocity 
at the present time is reading 5369 feet per second. And 
at this time the spacecraft is at an altitude of 56.3 nautical 
miles. We'll continue to stand by for the early part of 
this pass while we get an initial look at the spacecraft 
systems, and then take the circuit down unless there is 
some conversation with the crew. Apollo 10 is now approaching 
the Sea of Fertility on its 19th revolution and telemetry 
data from the spacecraft shows us that the cabin pressure 
is maintaining a constant 4.9 pounds per square inch, which 
is normal. And the cabin temperature at this time is 77 degrees. 
Here in Mission Control our flight controllers are involved 
in updating the flight plan to reflect the additional 2 to 
4 hours of sleep that we expect the crew will be using 
tonight. And the flight plan will be modified to take this 
into account in effect moving activities down approximately 
4 hours toward the rest period that is scheduled just prior 
to transearth injection. And, with the assumption that the 
- this brief rest period, which is scheduled almost - more 
as a short nap prior to TEI , would be shortened to give us 
some additional sleep time tonight following yesterday's 
very busy scheduled activities. At 112 hours 26 minutes, 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 113:30 CDT 0519 400/ 



PA0 This is Apollo Control at 113 hours 

30 minutes. We had loss of signal from the spacecraft 
about 5 or 10 minutes ago. We'll be reacquiring in about 
41 minutes. The Plight Dynamics Officer reports that the 
lunar module ascent stage is now 15,161 nautical miles from 
the moon. The vehicle has escaped the earth-moon system 
and is in a solar orbit. We are still getting telemetry 
information from the vehicle and the estimate is that the 
electrical lifetime of the stage will extend through 
120 hours ground elapsed time. At 113 hours 32 minutes, 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0603, GET 114:13 401/1 

PA0 This is Apollo Control at 114 hours 

12 minutes. Apollo 10 now on its 20th revolution of the moon. 
We have acquisition of signal, and our receiving data from 
the spacecraft at this time. The crew has been asleep now 
for about 3 hours. The sleep period has been extended to 
121 hours ground elapsed time, due to the fact that the crew 
was a little longer than anticipated in beginning the sleep 
period. The spacecraft cabin temperature has been running 
about 75, 77 degrees, and cabin pressure holding at 4.9 pounds 
per square inch. The lunar module ascent stage is now about 
17.580 miles from the moon, and it's traveling at a speed of 
about 5,476 feet per second. We should continue to get telemetry 
information from the LM for about 6 more hours. Estimate that 
the battery lifetime of the vehicle will extend at least until 
120 hours ground elapsed time. In about 30 more minutes, we 11 
be having shift handover here in Mission Control. Some of the 
orange team of flight controllers are now coming on duty and 
they will be getting briefed from the previous team during the 
next 30 minutes with handover to come. At 6:30 Central 
Daylight Time. At 114 hours 15 minutes, this is Apollo 
Control, Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



APO'.LO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69 , CDT 0714, GET 115:25 , 402/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control 115 hours 25 

minutes ground elapse time. 5 nours 34 minutes remaining in 
the Apollo 10 crew sleep period. The orange team of flight 
controllers has settled in for the day here in mission 
control. The ascent stage of Snoopy is out in excess of 
20 thousar-d miles away from the moon, going into solar 
orbit. The spacecraft, as we had loss of signal around 
the back side of the moon, a few moments ago, on the command 
module was all functioning quite well. The crew apparently 
sleeping well, and at 115 hours 26 minutes ground elapse 
time, this is Apollo Control. 

END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0759, GET 11610 403/1 

This is Apollo Control at 116 hours 
in minutes jsround elapsed time. Apollo 10 has just come 
10 mln ^ e * ff 0 ™" P 21st revolution around the moon. Orange 
tZI Slit Erector Pete FrLk is having lengthy discussions 

Tl^of ^console positions here an J "'tin. -Jt the 
various status of the - various systems status. We have « 
hours 48 minutes remaining of the crew ««t period which 
has been extended about two revolutions so that the crew 
rll rttt after a rather busy day yesterday in their rendez- 

same as if they had been done on the preflignt sche « u ^ e ; 
J^s'rather quiet here in the Control Center, very little 
noise other than on the communication loops. At 116 hours 
12 minutes ground elapsed time, this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 116:33, CDT 0822 404/1 



PAO - calling back to earth. Let's listen 

in. 

PAO It's reported on the ground here that 

the crew is conducting a fuel cell purge and a charge of 
battery A. They made one brief call to earth which 
was responded to by - 

SC align, and I'm purging the fuel cells 

at this time. I've gone to mode 2 and 3 and I'm on 2A now. 

CAP COM Roger, we copy. 

Sc How are things in Houston this morning? 

CAPCOM Everything's great. Everybody's 

raving about your performance yesterday and very happy. No 
doubt you guys are equally well pleased. 

SC SC It's been a good day, Jack. Pretty 

challenging and pretty satisfying really, when we look back 
at it. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, this is Houston. You got 

up kind of early this morning. We were going to let you sleep 
in for quite a while yet. We've got a little information that 
will be of interest to you. Your consumables are away ahead 
of schedule as usual. We have you in a 65.9 by 55.6 orbit. 
Your spacecraft looks real good. You might be interested to 
know that the LM ascent stage is 23 000 miles from the moon 
heading straight up at 5400 feet per second, and haven't quite 
been able to tell yet whether it's going into orbit around 
the sun or it's going to head straight at the sun. 

SC - - isn't he? 23 000 miles away? 

CAPCOM Yes, Old Snoop is really moving out. 

SC I hope I didn't leave my watch aboard 

there . 

SC You can still track him, can you? 

CAPCOM We're still tracking him. 

SC You can't? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative, we're still 

tracking him and checking the LTC and so forth. 

CAPCOM As a matter of fact, we just a new 

memory dump off of him. 

SC You got a memory dump? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. Old Snoopy doesn't 

give up. 

SC Holy smoley. 

CAPCOM And 10, this is Houston, I've got a 

congratulatory message here. It says, "Congratulations on 
doing what I've been trying to do for a long time." Signed 
The Red Baron. 

SC Beautiful. 

SC Houston, I've got a status report 

for you. 

CAPCOM Roger, go ahead. 

SC We're all feeling good, and we're about 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , Slll/bV, GET 116:33, CDT 0822 404/2 



SC ready to (garbled) . We got in about 

5 to 6 hours pretty fair sleep. ... is 26040; the temps is 
05309 and 15041. Cycling the (garbled). 

CAPC0M Apollo 10, Houston, you're coming 

in very broken. We're going to have to repeat the report. 
Wait one until we check out the network. Over. 

SC How do you read me now, Jack? 

CAPCOM You're cutting out. Let's attempt 

to fix it up with the network and then we'll give you a call 
in a minute. 

SC Roger. 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, this is Houston. 

We're ready to try it again. Go ahead with your crew status 
please . 

SC Okay, we got 5 or 6 pretty good hours 

of sleep last night. Tom's fixing chow, John's taking targets 
of opportunity and our rad readings are as follows in order: 
26040 05309 and 15041. The purge is complete and the fans 
have been cycled. 

CAPCOM Okay, Geno , we copy your 5 to 6 hours, 

26040 05309 and 15041, and we'd like you to operate in BD 
roll today. Over. 

SC You'd like us to operate - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT 0832, GET 11643 405/ 

CAPCOM Okay, Gene, we copy. 5 to 6 hours, 

260400503915041, and we'd like you to operate in BD roll 
today, over. 

sc You'd like us to operate in BD 

roll today. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. When you're 

ready I have some updates, and we have the morning newspaper. 

S C Jack, stand by on that for a minute. 

We'll all get on a head - 

SC Hey, Jack. 

CAPCOM Go ahead. 

sc Okay, doing a little troubleshooting 

on our 70-mm Hasselblad. It turned out that the batteries 
are good, but the lens, you cannot take the lens off, and 
what I really anticipate probably is that little docking pin 
on the lens is jammed. We never did have it off so it wasn't 
a case of putting it on wrong, but it appears to be jammed 
and I can't get the lens off at all. Do you have an idea 
that might help us troubleshoot this one? 

CAPCOM Okay - 

sc Do you want me to break out my tool 

kit, Jack, and take that thing apart? 

CAPCOM Stand by. 10, Houston. We'll get 

an answer to you on which camera procedure to use. We're 
working on that now. 

Sc Hey, Jack, I think that's what it 

is though since I can't take the lens off and the batteries 
are all good, it appears that it may be jammed. 

CAPCOM Roger, thank you. 

sc Okay, Jack, tell the camera experts 

to forget it. I got it psyched out. I had to spin that gear 
wheel around until I got the flat side up and now it appears 
to work, but it was apparently some sort of self jamming 
capability. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy. Neatly devised. 

SC Hold off. We're letting it work for 

one minute and let me see what happens. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0842, GET 11653 



SC 

CAP COM 
SC 



Hey, Jack. 
Go ahead. 

Okay, here's the story on the cam- 



CAPCOM 
SC 

era. Need some help, 
CAP COM 
SC 

gear on the back, gear 



Say again, please. 

Okay, I've got a story on the cam- 
guess, all right? 
Roger, go ahead. 

- listen for a second. Okay, the 
on the back when you take the maga- 
zine off, this is on the camera base itself, it's got teeth 
on it except for one area where there is a flat spot. If 
you turn the gear over, push the gear over so that the flat 
spot is face up, I can do two things. I can snap the pic- 
ture and/or take the lens off. But as soon as I snap one 
picture, the gear does not rotate and I cannot take the 
lens off. The lens does not lock and the camera will not 
cycle any more after that. Now this occurs both with and 



without a backup. 

CAP COM 
get to work on it 

SC 

SC 



Okay, Gene, we copy that. We will 



Okay, thank you, Jack. 
Remember, Jack, the right kind of 
picture and we might find out how all this started. 

SC Houston, this is 10. One little 

bit of further information on that camera base is the fact 
that when I do get it cocked for that one shot it'll take, 
that gear does not rotate so as to turn the film pack over. 
It doesn't even rotate without a film pack in it. 

CAPCOM Okay, we copy that the gear won't 

rotate with or without a film pack in it after taking a 
picture, is that affirmative? 

SC Yes. I can send it through one 

cycle myself and it's all recocked and I have to do that 
with a pencil to work that gear around and it's recocked, 
then it works fine for one more shot, then that's it. 

CAPCOM Roger, we copy that the gear cycles 

has to be cycled manually as opposed to turning automatic- 
ally after taking a picture. 

SC I'll play with it a little while 

longer and see if there's something screwed up in this 
lens . 

CAPCOM Roger, we have people working on 

it. 

SC One final little bit more of in- 

formation. When I did - recocked that gear, took the lens 
off it and recocked the gear, I get a one-shot affair and 
it appears that the mechanism that's jamming is not in the 
lens and it's obviously not in the pack, but it's somewhere 
in the body of the camera. 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 0842, GET 11653 406/ 



CAPCOM Roger, we copy. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Could you give 

us an Inventory of which cameras you have working and which 
ones you're having problems with at this time, over. 

SC Okay, we've got one 70-mm camera with 

all three lens, LM lenses, two CSM lenses, and I guess we've 
got two sequence cameras working. 

CAPCOM Roger, one 70-mm and two sequence 

cameras . 



END OP TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT : 0852, 117:03 GET 407/1 

PAO This is Apollo Control during the 

break in communications here; the crew is apparently getting 
ready for breakfast - we'll come back and review the activities 
since they woke up. They woke up almost on the preflight time 
line, however, it had been planned that they would sleep in 
another 2 revolutions, or approximately 4 hours later than 
the normal time. A lengthy discussion took place between 
Spacecraft Communicator Jack Lousma and LM Pilot Eugene Cernan 
on how to trouble shoot the jammed still camera aboard the 
spacecraft, the one that was taken aboard the LM for the low 
altitude lunar photography. Both - or all 3 crewmen got 5 to 
6 hours good sleep; the dosimeter readings on all 3 men were 
read down to the ground. The ground reported that the LM, the 
lunar module ascent stage, was some 23 000 miles outbound toward 
the sun, traveling at a rate of 5400 feet per second. And 
possibly before loss of signal some 14 minutes from now, as the 
spacecraft passes behind the moon, the morning news will be 
read up to the crew. We'll continue to monitor air-to-ground 
through loss of signal on this the 21st revolution around the 
moon, for any further conversation between Apollo 10 and the 
Mission Control. 

cc Apollo 10, Houston. We'll be going 

LOS in about 10 minutes; and I still have rev 22 update and 
an oblique photography update for you. 

SC Okay, Jack, I'll copy it. Go ahead 

Jack, I'm ready to copy it. 

CC Okay, the map update pass rev 22 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, GET 117:13, CDT 0902 408/1 

gc Go ahead, Jack. I'm ready to copy 

±Z ' rAPTOM Okay, the map update pad rev 22: 

1172253 U93246 1180903. Sunrise 1173600, Sunset 1184826. 
Ill" for your readback and go ahead on your photography 

updat |* Okay, 22 LOS 1172253. 150 is 

119 - Sunset. Houston, did you get that? 

rAPCOM Okay, 10, this is Houston. No, 

you were cut off part way through the readback. Start at 
150 Please. U93246 1180903 1173600 1184826. 

Capcom Okay, that's affirmative. You ready 

t0 godhead with LS2 phot ography ^pad^ ^ ^ 

JOhD jJSoi" 1 ' '""""'Okay. LS2 pad: F is 1 18 28 52 
PI is C fl C 83315, with your TCA at 2 minutes F28 is 118 34 15 
wit h your TCA at 1 ^^at'll down but 

Vm not sure what you all said. I'm looking for the pad that 

8 ° CAP COM Okay, it entitled "Oblique Photography" 

and F8 is Camera on, PI is start a half a *fgree- 
anQ ° Yes, but what page is that - don t 

we have a update here somewhere? Can you give me the page 

iC ' S ?APCOM Apollo 10, Houston - 

5* Jack, we don't have the same - 

Roger 

Jack, tan . , 

PAPCOM Roger, on the flight plan page 3-71 

we have an update for oblique photography. However, that 
format has been changed and a new format I have given it to 

yOU * gc Well, we can't change it. 

Capcom 10 » Ho^ton, we'll give it back 

in th^old format for y-u.^^ x ^ ^ We 

^^CaScOM 3 "^ Roger, we'll get it back in the old 

format and - ^ ^ wQrds ^ Jack> 

CAPCOM Okay, we'll get it back in the old 

format and check with the appropriate people and meanwhxle 
I have a correction on your map update pad. You 11 be 
crossing 150 west at 117:33:36. ^ ^ & 
bit better. Listen, while you're getting it in that old 
format tell me what you told me because we're going to lose 



cr jatis-, wc — 

Roger, on the flight plan - 
sc Jack, can you tell them like it^ls^- 



CAPCOM 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, GET 117:13, CDT 0902 408/2 

sc LOS and maybe we could do something 

with it here. 

CAPCOM Roger. We want the camera on FA at 

118:28:52 and we want you to start your half degree per second 
pitch rate at 118:33:15 and we want you to go F28 at 
118:34:15 and then you can stop your pitch at 118:35:15. 

sc Okay, we'll turn the camera on at 

FA at 118:28:52. we start a half a degree per second pitch 
rate at 118:33:15, we go to F2.8 at 118:34:15 and then we 
stop our pitch at 118:35:15. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. 

Sc Hey, I knew you guys just couldn t 

wait until we got airborne and then you changed all the 
formats. How about that. 

sc That's what we get for missing that 

data priority meeting you had after liftoff. 

CAPCOM Okay, Apollo 10, Houston. Before 

you go out of sight here some more information on your update 
for LLS2. Your roll should be 180, your pitch 339, and your 
yaw 000, and the PCA numbers we were giving you were time of 
closest approach so that PI would be 2 minutes before closest 
approach and you go to F28 1 minute before closest approach 
and then P2, of course, is time of closest approach. Over. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 09 12, GET 11723 409/1 

pA0 This is Apollo Control. Apparently 

we have had loss of signal from Apollo 10 as it went over the 
hill on the 21st revolution. Toward the end of that pass the 
spacecraft communicator Jack Lousma passed up to the crew 
some pointing angles and times for some stereo strip photog- 
raphy of landing site 2. The strips will be forward looking 
as they approach the landing site. The camera will be started 
when their landing site is first on the lunar horizon, and 
then the spacecraft will be pitched down to keep the landing 
site within the camera view until the camera is vertical to 
landing site 2. Most of today's activities will be photo- 
graphic tasks, lunar landmark tracking tasks. In the photog- 
raphy task will be included stereo strips from terminator to 
terminator. In other words, the shadow of the moon where the 
sunlight leaves off, where the sunlight begins all the way to 
where we have lunar twilight or what is called penumbra. We 
have 44 minutes, 14 seconds until next acquisition on the 
22nd rev, and at 117 hours, 24 minutes Ground Elapsed Txme 
this is Apollo Control. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/23/69 , CDT : 0957, 118:08 GET 410/1 



PAO This is Apollo Control, 118 hours, 08 

minutes ground elapsed time. Less than a minute away now from 
acquisition of signal as Apollo 10 comes around to the front 
side of the moon on lunar revolution number 22. During this 
pass the crew is scheduled to do the stereo strip photography 
across landing site number 2, at which Apollo 11 likely will 
land. Also as the communications commense in this rev, the 
crew will be a consumable update, standing by for communications 
to resume. A few minor changes in the flight plan will be 
read up to the crew however it appears now that they woke up 
and called Houston about on the normal flight plan time, and the 
flight plan is now back on the time line. We likely will have 
colored television beamed to the Madrid station where it will 
be recorded during this pass, and perhaps a subsequent pass, 
and it would be released in the United States on a delayed 
basis as soon as the video tape could be flown here. However, 
it would go out in real time to the European television stations. 
Standing by for the fist call. We've got 1 hours and 11 minutes 
until loss of signal on this 22nd rev. It'll be 119:21 when 
the Apollo 10 goes over the hill. Also during the updating 
from the ground to the crew of Apollo 10 will be whats called 
a TEI 23 pad, which would simply mean numbers for transearth 
injection burn, should it become necessary at the end of the 
next revolution, number 23 - this is strictly sort of a back- 
up bit of information. 

CC - over. 

SC Hello Houston, Apollo 10. 

CC Roger Apollo 10, read you loud and 

clear. OMNI. 

SC Roger, Jack. We're all set up and 

we're getting ready to take obliques of the landing site 2. 
Over. 

CC Roger Tom; when you've got time, we've 

got lots of information for you here. 

SC Roger - just to reconfirm - for the 

obliques on landing site 2, you want the 80m lense in interva- 
lometer; over. 

CC Stand by; we'll get an answer. 

SC Okay. 

CC Okay, Apollo 10, Houston. We confirm 

we want the 80m lense in intervalometer on obliques for site 2; 
over. Apollo 10, Houston, did you copy? We want the 80m lense 
with the intervalometer. 

SC Houston; we're down to one sequence 

camera cause we don't have a power cable for the - camera we brought 
back from the LM. 

CC Roger, we copy John. 

SC Jack, did you read us? 

CC That's affirmative; we copied. Gene, 

one sequence camera and one power cable ought to do the job. 



APOLLO 10 COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT : 0957, 118:08 GET 410/2 



SC Jack, we just want to confirm; we use 

a black and white on this oblique photography - do you want 
F8 or F4 at 250, and then down to 28? 

CC Apollo 10, Houston, use F4 for the 

black and white film. 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY, 5/23/69, CDT 1007, GET 11818 All/1 



CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. Your camera 

settings we read up at 1250 is go to F4 and you will get 
better pictures later on if at 11834 you go down to F28, 
over, 

SC Houston, Apollo 10, over. 

CAPCOM Go ahead, 10. 

SC Roger. Is Jack Schmitt around any- 

where today? 

CAPCOM Yes, he's hear today. Did you copy 

our last about the F stops and the speeds and so forth? 
SC Roger, F4 , right? 

PAO This is Apollo Control. Apollo 10 

crew at this time is apparently quite busy, getting lined up 
for the stereo strip photography of landing site 2. It has 
been rather quiet here as they approach that position. They 
are now at about 50 degrees east longitude, coming up on 
landing site 2 in the next several minutes. They should be 
directly over the site at 118 hours 35 minutes, which is 
about 10 minutes from now. We will continue to monitor the 
air-to-ground circuit as conversation does come from Apollo 
10. Getting the camera set up with the proper setting on the 
exposure, proper film magazine, using an inte rvalomet er , 
which is a device that automatically triggers the camera at 
a given spacing of pictures while they tilt the spacecraft 
down to keep the landing site centered in the viewfinder. 
Continuing to monitor air to ground here for resumption of 
conversation. 

CAPCOM Apollo 10, Houston. We have the 

final change, change 12 on the camera setting. On the 80-mm 
camera - 

SC Roger. Go on change 12, 

CAP COM On the 80-mm camera, should be set 

at l/250th and at 2852, it should be set at F8 when you turn 

them on. At 3415 - 

SC That's 250th at F8. 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. Then at 3415, 

you will get better pictures if you will stop to F28 and stop 
on the time read up to you. Then, one other item of infor- 
mation, actually we would like you to perform this. We would 
like you to put both H2 cryo tank heaters to auto. Over. 

SC Okay, both H2 are on auto now. Okay, 

so we will have F8 at l/25th at 1182852, 1/2 degree per sec- 
ond at 183350, and then we will go to F2 . 8 at l/25th at 18 
3415. 

CAPCOM That's all correct, Tom, expept for 

the time. It would be l/250th, one over 250, over. 

SC Oh, it's 1 over 250. Okay, we go 

to F28 at 12 - 



END OF TAPE 



APOLLO 10 MISSION COMMENTARY , 5/23/69, CDT 1017, GET 11828 412/1 



CAPCOM - time. It should be l/250th, 1 

over 250, over. 

SC Oh, It's 1 over 250. Okay, we go 

to F28 at l/250th? 

CAPCOM That's affirmative. All of your