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MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 6:00 a.m. Tape 1, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are now T-275 minutes and 
counting on this morning's Gemini 8 launch. Our countdown is on 
time, we are still aiming toward a 10:00 a.m. lift off for the 
Atlas Agena at Launch Complex 14 and the planned Gemini 8 launching 
some 101 minutes thereafter. Our countdown has proceeded satisfactorily 
this morning, we have had no holds up to this time. Because of 
several problems as a result of the mid-count we were a little 
late in starting our propellant loading of the Gemini Launch 
Vehicle but this was done in rapid time and the loading was completed 
and resulted in no effect on the countdown itself. One problem that 
we still have with us is the communications problem that Gemini 
8 spacecraft. We have discovered that in the inter-communications 
circuits. Between the two astronauts in the spacecraft, the 
astronauts can hear each other even though they do not push the 
so-called "Push To Talk Button." This is in the voice control 
circuit within the spacecraft. We do not know the cause of this 
problem, but we have determined to proceed with the situation as 
it is. That is, if one of the astronauts talks either to the block 
house or to the ground once they are in orbit the other astronaut 

can hear the conversation. The second astronaut should not hear 
the conversation unless a "Pust To Talk Button" is pressed by the 
first astronaut. As a result, both astronauts can hear what the 
other is saying even though they are not talking to each other. 
This is not considered to be a severe problem; the question was 



Tape 1, Page 2 



why it happened in order to determine as some extensive checks 
of the spacecraft would have to be made. After lengthy discussions 
and studies of the natter the determination has been made to proceed 
with this cosMDunications, this minor communications difficulty. He 
are now T-272 minutes and counting. This is Gemini Launch Control^ 
' END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 6:20 a.m. 



Tape 2, Page 1 



ACCOUNT OH ASTRCKAUTS AHD FUEL LOADIVG \ ! .... 1 Vi^ • • 2 

This is Gemini launch control at the Cap*. We are T»25$ 5 minutes and counting 
this morning on this Gemini 8 mission. The pilots for the mission Kiel Armstrong 
and David Scott were awakened as planned in the crew fuarters at the lennedy 
Spacecraft Center Operations Building at 7 a.m. Eastern Standard time. The 
pilots are now up and they will be making preparations for their final physical 
and breakfast at the Crew Quarters, before departing to the ready room later in 
the countdown. AH systems looking good at the present time. Some twenty minutes 
ago we started loading the fuel aboard the Agena spacecraft at launch complex 
Ik. A little later in the count we will add the oxidizer to the Agena also 
with our still aiming toward a 10 a.m. Eastern Standard time lift-off with 
the Atlas Agena vehicle to be followed some 101 minutes later by the Gemini 8 
launch - complex 19 . All systems looking good - Iowj-25* minutes and counting. 
This is Gemini Launch Control. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 6:30 a.m. Tape 3, Page 1 

J "i ■ 0 .'XiC'TiCI?* t SIMULTANEOUS COUNTDOWN <CF BOTH VEHICLES ' ' o, • 

This is Gemini launch control, and our T-2U5 minutes in counting on this mornings 
Gemini 8 mission. All systems looking good in the countdown at present. Some 5 minutes 
from now the Gemini launch Vehicle will jointthe final phase of the countdown, the 
Gemini launch vehicle comes into the count, and the G-2i<-0 minute mark , and this 
will at that point complete simultaneous countdown with some 9 different functions 
all participating at the same time in a simultaneous count. We have completed loading 
the fuel afeeard the spacecraft and in a matter of some 5 or 10 seconds will be ready 
to roll the tower' back at launch complex lU to proceed with our further tests at the 
pad with the Atlas Agena launch vehicle. All systems working good, our reports on 
weather both in the launch area and around the tracking network all look exceptable. 
T-2kk minutes in counting this is Gemini Launch control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 6'M a.m. Tape k Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We're now at T-230 minutes and counting on 

the Gemini 8 mission. All systems looking good. The report on the prime 

pilots for the mission Astronauts Neil Armstrong and David Scott — they 

were awakened as planned at 7 a.m. EST some 22 minutes later they took their 

physicals, taking some 15 minutes in each case, for Astronauts Scott and 

Armstrong. They were declared physically fit by their doctors, Dr. Fred 

Kelly and Dr. Norman Pencott. The physicals were followed by breakfast. 

The breakfast consisted of the following menu: filet mignon, eggs, toast 

with butter and jelly, coffee and milk. The guests at the breakfast with 

Astronauts Armstrong and Scott were four of their astronaut colleagues, 

They were Dr. Kurt Michel, one of the scientist astronauts; Astronaut 

Walter Cunningham, who is Stoney, the blockhouse communicator for the Gemini 8 

mission; Astronauts Roger Chaffee and Alan B. Shepard, who is Chief of the 

Astronaut Office at the Manned Spacecraft Center. All systems still looking 

good at the present time. To cover our communications problem once again 

perhaps in a little more depth, it was discovered during the. mid-count last 

evening that we had a communications problem. The problem is concerned with 

ther intercom in Gemini 8 spacecraft, that is the intercommunication between 

the two astronauts. In the spacecraft itself, the astronauts have a so*called 

push-to-talk switch. This is within their voice communications circuit. Now 

there are modes within the voice communications circuit. The three modes are: 

(l) push-to-talk, (2) continuous, this means anything either astronaut would say 

would be heard by the other, and (3) vox record, this is when they record internally 

in the spacecraft. The problem is concerned with the following: In the first mode 



it k 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 6:1+5 a.m. Tape U, Page 2 

the push-to-talk mode, it was discovered that if an astronaut was talking in 
that mode the second astronaut, the other pilot, could hear the conversation 
of the first astronaut. In other words, the button should be pushed so that 
the second astronaut could hear it. This was not the case, the second astronaut 
was hearing it without the button being pushed , In other wordB, it was con- 
tinually in a continuous mode. After studies of this situation, both here and 
with checks with the McDonnell piant in St. Louis, it was determined that flespite 
the fact that this dccurred, it will have no effect on the mission, either on the 
checkout during the countdown or on any of the operations in orbit of the Gemini 8 
spacecraft. It simply means that when the astronaut does not push the button, 
the seeond astronaut can hear the first astronaut talking. There is not even any 
problem with any interference in the situation whatsoever. One other thing that 
the project officials took a close look at was could this minor problem sort of 
be a forebear of perhaps other problems to follow. And a checkout of the system 
has indicated that thiB is not the case. This does not indicate any other problems 
in the system. So, we basically, at this point, have a very minor problem in the 
communications, which we feel we can continue the countdown and successfully complete 
the mission without any difficulty. It's strictly a minor problem simply in the 
intercommunications. We're now at 1-226 minutes and counting. This is Gemini 
Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:01 a.m. TAPE 5 PAGE 1 

lis is Gemini launch control. We are at T-21k minutes and counting. T-21k 

on this morning's Gemini 8 mission. We are still aiming for a Atlas/ Agena 

lift-off at about 10 a.m. Eastern Standard time followed by a Gemini 8 lift-off 

some 101 minutes later. All systems are Go at the present time. We hare a 

minor communications problem in the spacecraft. It's basically that when either of the 

astronauts., talk over the intercommunications system the other astronaut can hear his 

partner talking. It is nothing considered to be a major problem. We've looked into 

the overall situation. We feel that there will be no problem what soever. either 

during the countdown or during the actual Gemini 8 mission to include, of course 

the extravehicular activity. This problem is not expected to effect any part of 

the mission whatsoever. The flying pilots for the mission, Astronauts Neil Armstrong 

and David Scott were awakened at 7 a.m. They have taken their physical and have 

set down to breakfast with four astronaut guests. The breakfast menu consisted of 

one of 

ilet mignon, eggs, toast and coffee. Their guests were Dr. Curt Michel^ . /the new 
scientist atronauts, astronaut Walter Cunningham, the blockhouse comunicator for 
this morning's flight, Roger Chaffee and the Chief of the Astronaut Office Allen 
Shepard . . At launch complex Ik the tower is being rolled back as we continue through 
the count. They have already loaded the fuel aboard the Agena Spacecraft and after 
we get the gantry back into place at launch complex Ik we will proceed with loading 
the nitric acid oxidizer into the Agena. All systems looking good at the present 
time. This is Gemini launch control. 
ENDbOISTAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:11 a.m. 



Tape 6, Page 1 



This is Gemini launch control, we are at T-204 minutes and counting on the 
Gemini 8 mission. All systems looking good. The gantry rembval at launch complex 
Ik , pulling the tower back during the lunar phases of the Atlas Agena Count are 
just about completed . That is about a 30 minute operation removing the tower and 
leaving the Atlas Agena alone on the launch pad. When the gantry is completely 
removed and some 10 minutes from now we will start loading the nitric acid oxidizer 
aboard the Agena spacecraft. The fuel for the Agena was loaded aboard a matter of 
30 minutes ago . As far as the Atlas launch vehicle is concerned, itself its fuel 
the rocket propellant 1 or kerosene type fuel that is used in the Atlas booster was 
loaded aboard yesterday. Later in the count after the T-lkO minute: mark we will 
load the liquid oxygen aboard the Atlas. This will complete our fuel and propellant 
loading of the complete Atlas vehicle. The astronauts are continuing their break- 

st at the space Center's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building. They were both 
pronounced physically fit by their two doctors who gave them the 15' or 20 minute 
physical this morning. Doctors were Dr. Fred Kelly, and Dr. Norman Pencott. 
Dr. Kelly reported following the physical the astronauts were in excellent shape. 
He described them as bright-eyed and in good spirit. All systems looking good, 
now T-202 minutes and 30 seconds in counting. This is Gemini launch control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSICH COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 7:21 a.m. TAPE 7 PAGE 1 

This is Gemini launch control, now T-19^ minutes on this morning's Gemini 8 

mission. The countdown proceeds to go smoothly at this tine. There was a 

report that just several minutes ago, some U minutes ago to be exact, or 17 

minutes after the hour, the flying pilots for the mission, astronauts Veil 

Armstrong and David Scott, departed their crew quarters at Kennedy Space Center's 

Manned Spacecraft Operations Building and are now on their way to the ready room 

at launch complex 16 nearby the launch pad where the Gemini 8 spacecraft is 

sitting, at of course launch complex 19* They will put on their suits in the 

for the call 

ready room at pad 16 and get ready/ to go to the pad at about T-125 minutes, or 
some 60 or 70 minutes from this time. All systems are looking good. The 
weather men also give a good report. In the Cape Kennedy area we hare some 
scattered clouds, winds from the Morthwest at about 12 knots, and we expect 
a temperature later this morning within the times of the two launches of about 
78 or 73 degress. Scattered clouds, but the area appears to be quite clear at 
the present time. In the rest of the tracking network the weather is also 
acceptable, acceptable around the world as a matter of fact. In the mid- Pacific 
landing zone the weather is partly cloudy winds southeast and 15 knots with a 
sea condition of k feet. Western Pacific partly cloudy alto winds north at 10 
knots sea to 3 or k feet. East Atlantic with partly cloudy conditions winds 
from the northeast at 15 knots and with a sea of k feet. Western Atlantic 
the landing zone, the weather conditions there are partly cloudy with winds of 
5 to 1^ knot 8 and with a sea condition of k feet. All weather conditions 
looking well, and with all the conditions of the countdown looking good at the 
present time. At launch complex Ik, several minutes from now we will be ready 
to load the oxidizer of nitric acid aboard the Agena spacecraft to complete the 

loading of the Agena. The survice structure is now back at the complex lk. We 
have completed our checks at pad 19 as far as the backup pilots are concerned. 
Astronauts Pete Conrad and Richard Gordon have been in the spacecraft for several 
hours. They checked out that communications problem while they were in the space- 
craft and they feel, as well as the project officials that there will not be 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l&/&>> 7:21 a.m. 

u*fficulty either In the countdown or In the actual flight Itself. We under- 
stand, also that Pete Conrad has reported the condition to both Neil Armstrong 
and Darid Scott. We are now at T-191 minutes and 10 seconds. This is Gemini 
launch control. 

END OF TATE 



i >SION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:31 a.m. Tape 8, Page 1 

This is Gemini launch control . We are now at T-l8^ minutes and counting 
on this morning's Gemini 8 mission. All systems; still looking good as the count- 
down proceeds at the present time . We are just a little less than an hour and a 
/Atlas 

half away from the Agena lift-off scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Eastern standard tine. 

At launch complex lU, we have the gantry service tower removed and we are continuing 

to load the nitric acid oxidizer aboard the Agena spacecraft. The agena is powered 

by hypergolic propellants, that iB, a fuel and a oxidizer that ignite when they come 

in/ 

in contact with each other. That is a type of hydrozine as the fuel and the/hibited 
red fuming nitric acid as the oxidizer. We wanted to have the tower back before 
loading that oxidizer aboard. At the moment, launch complex 16 where the prime 
pilots, astronauts Armstrong, and Dave Scott arrived a short while ago... they are 
now going through a mission briefing . The backup pilots are there. Astronauts 
K„e Conrad and Richard Gordon and they are briefing the prime pilots of the status 
of the mission at this time and they are telling them we are in good shape at this 
phase in the countdown. All systems looking good. It is T-182 minutes and UO seconds. 
This is Gemini Launch Contol. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:hl a.m. Tape 9 Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control where at T-17^ minutes and counting. T-ljk 

on the Gemini 8 mission. All systems looking good. At this time at complex 16 

in the ready room, prime pilots Neil Armstrong and David Scott continue to get 

their briefing on the status of the mission. Some 8 minutes from this time 

they will be doning their space suits in final preparations before going to launch 

complex 19 to board their spacecraft. At. launch complex Ik we are completing- the 

loading of the acid oxidizer aboard the Agena spacecraft. We had to put some 

10,000 pounds of the oxidizer aboard the Agena. This is fed into a pressurized 

system and we have reports that the loading is going well. We have some 5 or 10 

minutes to go and verification of the acid loadingat ih. Back at launch complex 

/spacecraft 

19 the White Room where the Gemini 8' is located has now been evacuated in preparations 
for the Gemini launch vehicle pressurization. That is, pressurizing the fuel tanks..- 
Those stages of the Gemini, the fuel and oxidizer tanks. We have to evacuate the 

rea for about a 10 or 15 minute period while a pressurization occurs. This is due 
some 15 minutes from now. About 1 hour and 17 minutes from theplanned Atlas Agena 
Liftoff at 10:00 A.M. Eastern standard time. To cover some of the highlights of the 
count from last evening and today - we completed our mid-count at about 9:00 plm. 
Eastern standard time last night. We had three difficulties to contend with as a 
result of the mid-count. Two of them appeared to be problems last evening but turned 
out to be minor and correctable. The first was concerned with the activation of the 
fuel cells on the Gemini 8 spacecraft - we had questioned last evening whether they 
activated correctly . It turned out that the problem was strictly ground support- 
equipment problem- had plugged and gave the wrong reading. The fuel cells were 
activated well. All is going well with the fuel cells . The second is a heater 
circuit concerned with conditioning the spacecraft propellants -orbit attitude and 
maneuvering system propellants in the Gemini 8 spacecraft. We had a short circuit 
was discovered that a wire had actually been cut by one of the shingles off the 
spacecraft. This wire was fixed and the heater circuit condition is exceptable. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 2/16/66, 7:1+1 a.m. Tape 9 page 2 

The one problem that is remaining, but we do not consider it to be a major one, 
is the intercommunications within the spacecraft itself between the two astronauts. 
It is expected to have no affect on the countdown or on the complete mission including 
the extravehicular activity. Generally, that is our status at the present time. 
All looks good at T-171 minutes and counting:. This is Gemini Launch Control. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:50 a.m. TAPE 10 BAB 1 

"Ma is Gemini launch control now at T-16U minutes and counting. T-16U on the 
Gemini 8 mission. Countdown continues to proceed excellently, the complete 
simultaneous countdown actually 9 countdowns in one simultaneous operation. All 
proceeding excellently at the -present time. At the ready room at launch complex 
16 Astronauts Seil Armstrong and David Scott are now donning their space suits. 
They were supposed to do it right at the T.-I65 minute mark in the count. At 
launch complex 19 we are starting to bring the Gemini launch vehicle to flight 
pressures, that is pressurizing the fuel and oxidizer tanks in both stages to 
bring them up to flight pressure. We have completed loading the propellants 
aboard the Agena spacecraft at launch complex Ik and are getting varifications 
of the effects of the fuel loading and the propellant loading of the oxidizer 
loading at this time. The next highlight at launch complex Ik will be some twenty 
minutes from this time when we start loading the liquid oxygen aboard the Adas 

>st stage. All conditions looking good now at T-162 minutes and V5 seconds. 
This is Gemini launch control. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSIOT CONMEmKT, 3/16/66, 8:01 a,*m. TAPE 11 PAGE 1 

in 

Good morning, this Gemini control, Houston. At -153 Hinutes/the spacecraft 

are 

countdown ve/-- 58 minutes away from the Agena launch. Here in Houston we'we 

ready to support the mission. John Hodge, the Flight Director, has taken his 

position at the Center Console, and let's hare a look at the world range. 

At Merrit Island the radar has been acting up this morning, it's touch and go 
be ready 

whether it will/ support the mission. It is not critical, to the mission support. 
Simiarly some difficulties have been encountered with the radar at Jtetriek, just 

south of the Cape. Over at Carnarvon, Australia radar has given the ground crew 

are 

trouble there, but they indicate now they/ confident they will be able to support the 

are 

mission. Similarly at Carnarvon they/ having some trouble with their teletype link 
back here to Houston. Canton Island station is reporting that their acqulstion A 
beacon is not functioning and will probably not be functioning at the start of 
the mission. Other than that the weather around the world from all reports has 
lever been better for a manned spaceflight. Gene Kranx said in his experience j 

which goes back to the first manned Mercury Redstone launch, he's never seen better 

would 

weather around the world. The one exception to that remark -/as be in Houston here 

where a heavy blanket of ground fog is completely swabbing at least this part of 

the City this morning, but expected to bum off later In the morning. 

Among the representatives viewing this flight from Houston are, Mr. Maurieio Obregon, 

who is President of the Federation Aeronautique International, an organization which 

maintains world flight records and certifies them. Also here is Mr. UL Sweeney of 

Washington, D.C. who is President of the National Aeronautics Association. 

This is Gemini Control, Houston, we'll now switch for an update at Cape Kennedy. 



aL. k k 



MISSIOH COMMENTARY, 3/17/66, 8:01 a.m. TAPE 11 PACT! 2 

This is Giminl launch control - - We are go at T-151 minutes and 37 seconds in the 
simultaneous countdown with the launch vehicles at launch complex Ik and 19* At 
pad 19 where we hare the Gemini launch vehicle and spacecraft we have completed 
our pressurization of the propellant tanks in both stages and the backup pilots 
in the mission, Astronauts Pete Conrad and Richard Gordon have returned to the Gemini 
8 spacecraft to make some final checks in preparation for the arrival of the 
flying pilots Armstrong and Scott, some twenty minutes from this time. At launch 
complex lit control of the clock - - this is the countdown clock - a critical item 
since we have nine different countdowns coming into one simultaneous count. The 
control of the clock is now with the Chief Test Conductor at complex 1^. This 
appeared some 30 minutes ago and the Test Conductor at Ik will maintain control of 
this clock through the T-90 minute mark in the count, that is until after the Atlas/ 
Agena liftoff. Any holds that will be declared anywhere, either at Cape Kennedy 
>r Mission Control Center at Houston, or a hold for any reason in the World Wide 
Tracking Network, the hold would be made by the Test Conductor at Ik. Also at lk 
we are making some preparations for one of the final highlights in the Atlas/Agena 
count, and that is the loading of the liquid oxygen aboard the Atlas vehicle. This 
Is due some 5 minutes from this time. All is looking well, coming up on T-150 
minutes. This is Gemini launch control. 
EKD OF TAPS 



IISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 8:11 a.m. Tape 12 Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control and now at H-lkk minutes and counting. T-lkk 
and counting — some 49 minutes away from the planned Atlas Agena lift-off. All 
sytems still looking good and our simultaneous countdown at the present time. 
At launch complex Ik where we have the Atlas Agena going through its final checkout 
We are ijust finishing our preliminary checks prior to loading the liquid oxygen 
aboard the Atlas vehicle. We will load some l8,U00 gallons of liquid oxygen aboard 
in a process that will take 20 minutes. After we complete our loading of this 
liquid oxygen which has to be maintained at a temperature of 297 degrees below 

1 

zero. It will continue to boil on through the remainder of the count. That 1b 
because of its extremely low temperature. We will continue to tope it off, feeding 
in more liquid oxygen and as the count continues down until we close the vents 
some 2 minutes 10 seconds before the lift-off. We will be picking up the liquid 
oxygen loading shortly. At canplex 19 the backup pilots, Pete Conrad and Richard 
Gordon continue their checks in the spacecraft, awaiting the arrival of the prime 
pilots some 17 minutes from this time. We had one addition to the breakfast list 
which was reported earlier. Astronaut Donald K. Slayton who is Assitant Director 
for Flight Crew Operations has also joined the prime pilot Neil Armstrong, and 
pilot David Scott at the breakfast at the Kennedy Space Center, Operations Building, 
this morning. Now at T-lh2 minutes and 16 seconds and counting. This is Gemini 
Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 8:21 a.m. 



Tape 13 j Page 1 



This is Gemini Launch Control. Now at T-13^ minutes and counting on the 

are 

Gemini 8 launch. All systems looking good. We/some 39 minutes away from the 
Atlas Agena lift-off. If all goes well that will be at 10:00 a.m. Eastern 
standard time. If we have a nominal performance of the Agena we will expect 
A Gemini 8 lift-off some 101 minutes after the Atlas Agena lift-off. That is, 
the Atlas Agena ignition and lift-off comes at the T-95 mark in the count. We 
will proceed down the remainder of the Gemini countdown. We will have a plan 
to hold at the T-3 minute mark. If the performance is completely nominal that full 
time would last some 5 minutes and V7 seconds. Of course,' it will be aidjuEted 
during the whole period to the exact time to fit into the Agena parameters for the 
Agena that time in orbit. That would give -us a complete time of some 101 minutes 
between the Atlas Agena and Gemini 8 lift-off. At this time in the countdown in 
the launch complex Ik we are starting to load the liquid oxygen aboard the 
Atlas. This is the final phase of the important , unimportant propellant loading 
of both the Agena spacecraft and the Atlas at Pad Ik. At Launch complex 19 > 
the backup pilots Pete Conrad, And Richard Gordon continue their final checks in 
The Gemini 8 Spacecraft .awaiting the arrival of the prime pilots, Neil Armstrong 
and David Scott who are expected to depart from the Ready room. As far as the 
countdown is concerned it is some 7 minutes from this time. Now in T-132 minutes, 
and 17 seconds in counting. This is Gemini Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 8:31 a.m. Tape lU , Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are now T- 12k minutes and counting. 
Some 29 minutes away from the Atlas Agena lift-off. At this point in the 
countdown it appears that Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott are just 
about ready or have left the ready room at Launch complex 16 to proceed to 
launch complex 19 and their Gemini 8 spacecraft. They are due to be inserted 
into the spacecraft at the T-15 minute mark. And the hatches will be closed 
some 15 minutes later or T-100 in the countdown .and that is 5 minutes before the 
planned Atlas Agena lift-off. At launch complex lk at this time we are going 
through some final command destruct tests. That is a key test between the range 
! 3 and the Atlas launch vehicle to make final checks on the destruct system. 
That system would be designated in flight in the event we would get a bad trajectory 
The cheeks are going through now. We are completing our liquid oxygen, and astronaut 
Neil Armstrong and David Scott are now on their way to launch complex 19- All 
systems looking good at the present time. When the astronauts are in their space- 
craft they will be able to observe the Atlas Agena lift-off by looking through the 
windows of the Gemini 8 spacecraft at a television monitor mounted right above the 

hatches, .of course, outside the spacecraft. All systems looking good at the present 

T-2k seconds and counting, 
time. This is Gemini Launch Control. 



END OF TAPE 



WSSIQ1I COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 8:35 TAPE 15 PAGE 1 

This is Gemini launch control, now some T-120 minutes and counting, 25 minutes from 
the Atlas/Agena liftoff. Astronauts Bell Armstrong and David Scott have boarded 
the elevator at launch complex 19 and hare now stopped in the white room. They 
will be boarding the spacecraft in four minutes from this time or at the T-115 
minute mark in the countdown. It looks like they are going to lean against the wall 
and now their sitting down, they will proceed to get a briefing from the pad crftw 
in the white room and, of course, the backup pilots, Pete Conrad and Richard Gordon, 
who have spent some three hours in their Gemini 8 spacecraft this morning and will 
give them a complete briefing on the status of the mission. The status of the over- 
all mission is very good at the present time. We still have that communications 
problem that was discussed earlier with the intercom for the pilots in the spacecraft, 
.'t is considered to be a minor problem that will have no effect on the countdown or 
the actual Gemini 8 mission, including the EVA, the Extravehicular Activity, 
Astronauts Armstrong and Bcott now seated, getting a briefing from the technicians 
and the backup pilots in the white room. They will board the spacecraft at T-115 
some three minutes or four minutes from this period. All systems looking good. 
We will now switch you to the Mission Control Center in Houston. 

And this is Gemini Control in Houston. During the Atlas/Agena liftoff this morning 
here is some of the critical events that we will be watching for, and hopefully be 
in a position to verify for you. First, the liftoff is an indication of a 2 inch 
motion switch that is actuated when the booster lifts 2 inches from the pad. The 

booster engine cutoff will occur at 2 minutes and 11 seconds into the flight. The 

k minutes 

booster engines themselves drop off immediately 2 minutes 11 seconds. At/ 3*+. 9 
seconds we should have sustainer engine cutoff, of course in the Atlas all three 
engines the two outboard booster engines and the inboard sustainer engines continue 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66 8:35 a.m. TAPE 15 PAGE 2 

to light off on the pad and they continue to burn throughout. At 5 minutes and 

- - and even into the flight we have veneer engine cutoff, these are the small 

engines at the base of the bird, which control the steering of the Atlas. And 

about three seconds later, 5 minutes 3 seconds, we have the separation of the Agena 

from the Atlas. Observing on our monitors here as the two pilots enter the spacecraft. 

They will observe the Agena liftoff from a monitor above their windows, the hatches 

will probably be closed at that time. Continuing at 5 minutes and 53 seconds or 

about 50 seconds after separation we will hare ignition of the secondary propulsion 

system on the Agena. These are 16 pound thrusts, the 16 pound thrusts part of the 

secondary propulsion systems to provide ullage or to insure that fuel is in the 

thrust chamber area. At 6 minutes and 11 seconds into the flight we should have 
propulsion 

primary/ thrust from that Agena, that big engine on the Agena. It was at that point 
ir + .he October 25 attempt when everything went to worms. At 6 minutes and 13 seconds 
into the Atlas/Agena mission we will have the 16 pound thrusters will shut down, at 
6 minutes and 21 seconds the nose shroud, shrouding the target docking adapter will 
be jettisoned. At 9 minutes and 16 seconds into the flight the primary propulsion 
system on the Agena is to cut off and hopefully we will be in a suitable orbit. 
This is Gemini Control, Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, S:kl a.m. Tape l6, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control at T-llU minutes and counting. T-HU,asdme 
19 minutes away from the Atlas/Agena liftoff. Prime pilots for the mission, 
Astronauts Neil Armstrong and David Scott were over the hatch and into the 
Gemini 8 spacecraft at 38 minutes past the hour. They are now hooking up 
one of the first checks will be some blood pressure checks with the pilots, 
and of course, communications checks, once they get settled in their Gemini 8 
spacecraft. The hatch will be closed at about the T-100 minute and as reported 
earlier „ both pilots will hive an opportunityto observe the Atlas/Agena liftoff. 
Meanwhile at Launch Complex Ik, we are reaching the terminal phases of our 
countdown. - The major checks going on. We have completed the range distruet, 
that is the distruet system within the launch vehicle and are going through 
a series of final telemetry checks of both the Agena spacecraft and the AJlas 
launch vehiile. These checks are between the Air Force Eastern Test Range and 
Launch Complex lh to make sure that we are getting good quality telemetry readings, 
good signals from both the Agena and the Atlas. All conditions looking good, now 
some 17 minutes and kk seconds away from the Atlas/Agena liftoff. This is Gemini 
Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, S:ho a.m. Tape 17, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are at T-109 minutes in counting. T-109 

T 

some lk minutes away from the A las Agena lift-off. All systems still showing well 
in the simultaneous countdown. Astronauts Neil Armstron and Dave Scott checking 
out their communications in the Gemini 8 spacecraft and making their checks with 
the block house. And also in the block house the capsule communicator Astronaut 
Walter Cunningham, who is designated Stoney in the countdown. Meanwhile at launch 
complex lU we are reaching the final phases of the count. We are now some 13 
minutes away from lift-off. Over the final phase of the Atlas Agena count we 
have some highlights and they go as follows: The Agena spacecraft goes on 
internal power at the 8 minute mark. Back at complex 19 we close the hatches at 
5 minutes, at T-3 minutes and 30 seconds the Atlas vehicle telemetry goes on internal 
power that is within the vehicle itself. It has been controlled from the block house 
until that time. We have a final verification of all systems in the launch vehicle 
at 2 minutes and 30 seconds. The boom, the umbilical line that connects between the 
tower and the Agena spacecraft is checked to insure that it will come out at lift- 
off. We secure our liquid oxygen tanking, that is we close the vents in 10 minutes 
and 10 seconds. The Atlas goes on internal power, that is the batteries within the 
vehicle itself. One minute and UO seconds before lift-off. At one minute and ho sea 
before lift-off and at 1 minute and 3° seconds we turn the water on at the launch pud 
This is some 30,000 gallons per minute in to cool the pad during the iginitior 
and lift-off. Between actual final phases we go on an automatic sequence with the 
Atlas at the 18 second mark in the countdown. An ignition button is pushed at that 
point. There will be a brief hold that lasts 20 seconds between 19 and 18 seconds 
during the final phases of the count. The count will then be resumed and we will 
go down automatically to ignition at about the k second mark. That will be 9? 
minutes and h seconds in the overall simultaneous countdown. The Vernia engines 



MISSION BRIEFING, 3/16/66, 8:1+6 a.m. Tape 17, Page 2 

ignitd first, those two snail engines on the side of the vehicle. When they reach 
the proper pressur e get the full ignition and buildup of thrust of the two boosters 
and the sustainer engine, those three engines at the base of the launch vehicle 
which build up a total of 395,000 pounds of thrust. We will get lift-off some 
3 to k seconds after the start of ignition or at just about the T-95 minute mark 
in the count. Sowcli minutes and 10 seconds away from the Atlas Agena Launch. 
This is Gemini Control. 
END OF TAPE. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 8:51 a.m. Tape 18, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are now at T-10U minutes and counting. 
Nine minutes away from the Gemini — correction, from the Atlas/Agena liftoff. 
All systems looking good. Coming up in about 50 seconds, the Agena spacecraft 
will go on internal power, one of the final series of highlights over the last 
10 minutes of the countdown. As far as the launch vehicle testiaonductor is 
concerned in the blockhouse at Launch Complex lk, he will be watching a special 
monitor that has a series of lights on it. There are some 20 lights in all. 
They are go from the color yellow to green as the various events referred to 
moments ago in our previous announcement occur. That is, all these final events 
as we go on our aequencer — these lights will flahs from yellow to green. When 
we get down to the 18 second mark thatlaast green light to come on will be the 
ignition signal. We will then click on down automatically to the four second 
mark when we expect ignition. All systems looking good, we now have confirma- 
tion that the Agena is on internal. This is Gemini launch Control T-102 minutes 
and 50 seconds and oounting. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION BRIEFING, 3/l6/66, 8:56 a.m. 



Tape 19 y Page 1 



This is Gemini Launch Control. On T-U minutes and counting on the Atlas Agena 
launch. All situations looking good. At complexes ih and 19. At Pad 19 we are in 
the final process of preparing the astronauts in the Gemini 8 spacecraft. The hatches 
are expected to be closed shortly. At launch complex lk, we have just completed some 
final guidance tests. We are now at T-3 minutes and 33 seconds and counting. 
All systems still looking good. This is Gemini Launch Control. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 8:58 a.m. Tape 20, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control at T-2 minutes and 
counting on the Atlas Agena launch and at Launch 
Complex 19 they are just closing the hatches on 
the Gemini 8 spacecraft with Astronauts Neil 
Armstrong and David Scott aboard. They have now 
closed the liquid oxygen vent on the Atlas launch 
vehicle as we reach down into the final phases of 
the count. Coming up at the IkO mark will he the 
launch vehicle going on to the internal power of 
its own batteries, of course its been on external 
power controlled by the blockhouse power up to this 
time. Now one minuter and 26 seconds and counting. 
All systems still looking good; our final status 
check going on at Launch Complex lU at the present 
time. All appears still to be go. T-l minute and 
15 seconds. At Launch Complex 19 the crewmen are 
still working to secure the hatches on the spacecraft. 
Now one minute and 5 seconds and counting. T-60 
seconds and counting on the Atlas Agena at Launch 
Complex lU. Our final check still looking good at 
this point. We have now armed the range safety 
destruct system in the Atlas vehicle. To repeat, 
when we get down to the final seconds of the count 
we will have a momentary hold, at about the T-l8 
second mark as we go on an automatic sequence from 
that time. Now one minute and 35 seconds and 
counting. We will get the ignition of the Atlas 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 8:58 a.m. Tape 20, Page 2 

vehicle at about four seconds and expected liftoff 
at 0, or the 95 minute mark in the simultaneous 
count. Now T-20 seconds and counting. T-l8 holding 
momentarily, now resuming the count. T-15 5 T-ll, 
10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, k, 3, we have ignition ... 

HANEY IN HOUSTON And we've got a liftoff. It looked like right on 

the hour. Fifteen seconds into the flight. Our 
network controller advises that liftoff was three 
seconds after the hour, three seconds after the 
hour. Agena says he looks good and he's go. The 
Atlas beginning its program. Coming up on 60 seconds, 
the area of maximum pressure; mark, 60 seconds. 
Flight Dynamics advises we look good. Booster engine 
cutoff is planned for two minutes 11 seconds into 
the flight; we are now at one minute, 35 seconds into 
the flight. Both the Flight Dynamics Officer and 
the Agena advise they look good and they are go. 
The Canary Station is being advised of all the parameters 
to date; it's a very healthy report. Mark, BECO. 
BECO did occur on the programmed time at two minutes, 
11 seconds. The Atlas now about 50 miles away from 
the Cape, altitude about kO miles. Our next major 
event comes at four minutes and 37 seconds into the 
flight when a sequence timer is to be tripped. 
We are 100 miles downrange and almost 60 miles 
in altitude at the three minute mark into the flight. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/ 16/66, 8:58 a.m. Tape 20, Page 3 

ANEY Three minutes and 20 seconds, and the flight 

dynamics plot looks very good; earlier in the first 
minute or two it was somewhat low, a percentage point 
or two, but now it's following the program value 
very carefully. We are 175 miles downrange, 80 miles 
high, and both Agena and Flight Dynamics advises the 
Flight Director that they are go. Four minutes into 
the flight, four minutes; and a very smooth ride to 
this point. Four minutes 20 seconds into the flight, 
we are 275 miles downrange, our altitude 100 miles. 
Mark SECO, the Agena advises. That would be at four 
minutes kO seconds. The sustainer has shut down. 
And the Agena Controller advises we have SECO, cor " 
the vernier engines, steering engines, also have 
shut down. As yet he has not confirmed separation. 
Now Agena Controller confirms that we do have 
separation, that confirmation came at 5 minutes and 
35 seconds into the flight. At 5:53> 5 minutes, 53 
seconds we should have SPS l6 pounds thrusters lighting 
off, and about 20 seconds later, the primary propulsion 
system. Coming up on 6 minutes, 6 minutes into the 
flight; and we do have SPS start. Six minutes, 10 

seconds. And we have primary propulsion system has 

ignited, and it is operating. And Agena says it 
looks good. It was at that point on the primary 
propulsion system cuts in on the Agena that we lost 
the bird on October 25th. We are now six hundred and 
50 miles downrange, we are 120 miles in altitude 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 8:58 a.m. Tape 20, Page k 

HANEY and we are aiming here for l6l mile orbit; Agena 

confirms the shroud has separated, the shroud which 
encloses the target docking adapter into which Neil 
Armstrong and David Scott will dock with this bird. 
Seven minutes, 25 seconds into the flight, and every- 
thing has happened, if not right on time, very close 
to the time, close enough to be acceptable all the 
way. Next major event to come up at 9 minutes and 
16 seconds at which time the primary propulsion 
system is to shut down. Our trajectory plot now 
shows as nearing the 160 mile altitude and the bird 
would be programming over nicely, ready to assume 
its orbital flight position. All stations report 
the reception as good, clean telemetry this morning. 
We are 900 miles downrange. 

END OF TAPE 



A. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 9:0§ a.m. Tape 21, Page 1 

ANEY The Agena velocity chart here shows up in the 

Control Center as a green line and it is an overlay- 
over the programmed path and velocity readings this 
morning, just an exact match. Fits over the white 
programmed line. Agena said they had a momentary 
loss of data but it all came right back in. Coming 
up on nine minutes into the flight, mark, nine 
minutes . Nine minutes , 20 seconds into the flight 
and we are standing by for some word on the pri- 
mary propulsion system cutoff, we've not yet 
received it. Agena now confirms we have had cutoff. 
He said the telemetry was somewhat intermittent 
at the cutoff, but he is able to confirm cutoff, 
that confirmation came at nine minutes, UO seconds 
into the flight. Cutoff should have occurred at 
approximately nine minutes and 16 Beconds. Ten 
minutes into the flight and Flight Dynamics says 
we look very close to nominal, and he'll have the 
information off the computer very shortly. Our 
pl4t here would indicate we are very, very close 
to a l6l nautical mile circular orbit which is 
precisely what we were asking for. While we are 
checking for that information, let'sonow switch 
to the Cape and find out what's going on at Pad 19- 

king continuing during this good performance 

of this Atlas Agena in powered flight, we are 
now at T-8U minutes and 15 seconds and counting. 
The astronauts have been busy at Launch Complex 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/l6/66, 9:08 a.m. Tape 21, Page 2 

KING 19 in the spacecraft, surrounded by the vhite 

. ' . room at Launch Complex .19 • Neil Armstrong came 

back with some remarks of "very good, very good," 
■ as he received the highlights' of the Atlas Agena 
■performance. When he did hear that the Agena had 
- /ignited and was performing well he came through with 

. a very strong and very happy "very good" remark. 

' We have completed purging the Gemini 8 spacecraft 
V. ^ .with oxygen, the spacecraft will be purged completely 

with oxygen and the astronauts now have .been advised 
, that they can open their visors. They have complete 
\ ". ' 100$ oxygen in the spacecraft at the present time. 

; Coming up in just several minutes will, be a lengthy 
series of switch-list checks performed by both the . 
. Command Pilot Neil Armstrong and the Pilot David' 

Scott. They will check every individual switch in" 
' the spacecraft, in front of each of their consoles, 
and insure that its in the correct position, and 
verify this, to the spacecraft test conductor who 
is located in the blockhouse at 19. Our countdown 
is continuing to go well; all systems looking good, 
both with the Gemini launch vehicle and the spacecraft. 
Shortly we also will be making preparations to get 
* the technicians back to the elevator and down from 

the White Room to clear the area. We will be ready 
' - to lower the erector at about T-60 minute mark in 

the count. All going well here at Pad 19 at T- 
'82 minutes and. 32 seconds and counting. We now 

return you to the Mission Control Center in Houston. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 9:08 a.m. Tape 21, Page 3 

HANEY And this is Gemini Control, Houston. During the 

last lew minutes we have checked the computers, 
Flight Dynamics advises the Agena is in orbit. 
It's orbit is as follows: 162 nautical miles 
by 156 nautical miles, I repeat., lo2 apogee, 
156 miles perigee. This is as close to... as close 
as we could hope for with an unmanned vehicle. 
It's cause for a lot of smiles here in the Control 
Center and one of the Controllers is passing around 
cigars which are labeled "It's an Orbit". This 
is Gemini Control, Houston. 

END CF TAPE 



-SSIOH COMQEBTARY, 3/l6/66 , 9:22 a.m. TAPE 22 PA(2! 1 

This is Gemini launch control coming up on T-7 4 * minutes and counting, nark T-7k 

minutes and counting on Gemini 8 mission. The astronauts in the spacecraft, 

Hell Armstrong and David Bcott are going through their complete switch check list, 

that is checking all the switches on their consoles to insure their being in the 

proper position. They are working this switch list check with the Spacecraft 

Test Conductor in the block house. During thepower phase of the Atlas/Agena launch 

both astronauts are kept abreast of the flight performance all the way through. 

The spacecraft Conductor did then advise astronaut Armstrong > had the following 

quote. He told Sell "It looks like we have a lire one up there for you." 

Armstrong's reply was "good show". Our countdown continues, all systems looking 
are 

good., The in/ in the process now of making final clearance from the white room, that 
the particular height that surrounds the Gemini spacecraft. The technicians are 
busy at work in the white room at this point clearing out their various final 
checking material that was used in the final phases leading up to hatch closure. 
The technicians are expected to leave shortly, we will be aiming to lowering the 
erector at about the 55 minute mark in the count. Ve will have a hold in this 
countdown at the T-3 minute mark. Later in the count the mission control center 
in Houston, Flight Director John Hodge, will advise the Test Conductor at launch 
complex 19 of the length of the hold. He will do this by announcing to the Test 
Conductor the time we want to launch the Gemini launch vehicle. It will be about 
101 minutes from the Atlas/Agena liftoff which occured Just about on the hour. We 
are now at T-72 minutes and 7 seconds with all going well and we will switch you now 

to Mission Control Center In Houston. 



MISSIOH COME1TABT, 3/l6/66, 9:22 a.m. 



TAPE 22 PAGE 2 



And this Gemini control, Houston, we are 23 minutes into the flight of this Agena 
and the Agena has been acquired by the Canary Station. The report from Canary 
was all systems working precisely as asked, very satisfied with the operation of the 
Agena, reported good stability on the orbit and all and all a rery happy report from 
the Canary Station. Meanwhile, an additional analysis has been done on the 
trajectory data and our orbit is eren better than earlier reported. We now show an 
orbit of 162 nautical miles by 1159 nautical miles. This is just about as close 
to circular as we can hope for. At 23 minutes and 50 seconds into the flight, 
this is Gemini control, Houston. 



HD CP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 9:31 a.m. Tape 23, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are now at T-6U minutes and 3 seconds in 
counting, on the Gemini 8 mission. All going well during the final phase of the 
count of the Gemini 8 spacecraft. A short while ago the pilots, Neal Armstrong 
and David Scott were informed about what appears to be an excellent Agena orbit. 
They were given the numbers and Astronaut Armstrong remarked, "Beautiful, We will 
take that one." This was followed up by a remark from David Scott where he added, 
"Roger, that's just what the Doctbr ordered." They were both very enthusiastic 
in their remarks. Now T-63 minutes and 25 seconds in counting at launch complex 
19 we have cleared the white room of the technicians who made the final checks on 
th e spacecraft have departed and gone down the elevator. We are going through some 
preparations leading up to the erector lowering which is scheduled for the 55 mark 
in the count. Also, coming up within a few minutes will be the opening of the 
pre-valves in the first stage oxidizer system. The reason we open this one pre- 
valve early is to permit some oxidizer to bleed down into a stand pipe. That a'is 
the so called "ppgo stand pipe" that permits us to alleviate some possible pressure 
pulses that could occur in the propellants in the first stage. T(iis prevents some 
possible isolations that could occur in flight. The so called pogo test will take 
place between the 60 and 55 minute mark in the count. We bleed some oxidizer into 
this stand pipe in order to give it a cushion as far as the propellant isolation 
is concerned. All looking well, now T-62 minutes and 15 seconds in counting. This 
is Gemini Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSICB COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 9:**0 a.m. TAPE 2k PAGE 1 

This is Gemini launch control now coming up on T-5U Minutes and counting - T-5 1 * 
all going veil at launch complex 19 taxing these final phases of the Gemini 
checkout. The Agena spacecraft is now coming into the Indian Ocean, and in the 
Gemini 8 spacecraft to top the pad at launch complex 19 all is going well with 
astronauts Ifeil Armstrong and David Scott. We are going through some final 
preparations now leading up to the erector lowering. This is the service structure 
that surrounds the launch vehicle and spacecraft. We had a report moments ago from 
the block house that they expect to start this erector lowering in a matter of 
minutes. When the erector is lowered, we use a wench system to do it, that is a 
cable that is attached to the erector Itself, and a 150 horsepower motor is used to 
ease the erector first away from the launch vehicle and spacecraft, and then it 
jently lowers it down to its horizontal position. We will then, of course, continue 
on with the countdown. We are now at T-52 minutes and 56 seconds with all going 
well. This is Gemini launch control. 
BHD OF TAPE 



SL 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66 Tape 25, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control now at T-51 minutes and 35 seconds and counting. 
The erector at Launch Complex 19 is now coming down. The spacecraft is free. It 
will be about a 10 minute operation to bring the erector down to its horizontal 
position. We have reports from the spacecraft and from the blockhouse that all 
is going well at the present time. We now switch you to the Mission Control 
Center in Houston. 

This is Gemini Control Houston. Another refinement of the data based on 
Canary data now shows an exact circular orbit of l6l nautical miles on the 
Agena, which is precisely what we were aiming for this morning. The Agena 
right now is east of the Tananarieve station and Tananarieve should be reading 
out its TM which was reading quite ^ell when it passed over the Canary station. 
Our tentative planning here shows that we want to launch the Gemini at precisely 
hi minutes after the hour. Forty one minutes 00 seconds. And it appears that 
we will be aiming for a launch azimuth of 99 • 9 degrees. This is Gemini Control 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/l6/66, 9:52 a.m. Tape 26, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. Now at T-hk minutes and 5 seconds and counting 

All going well at Launch Complex 19 . And at the Mission Control Center in Houston. 

The erector is now down and we are proceding with our countdown. Coming up shortly 

will be a series of reports by Astronaut Scott on the status of the spacecraft. 

It will include reports on the Environmental Control System, Pressurization, and 

orbit attitude and 

the status of the propellants in the/maneuvering system. That's the propellant 
system for the spacecraft. We have just completed some important tests between 
the blockhouse and the spacecraft. This is a capability of the launch vehicle 
test conductor to recommend an abort early during the flight. Of course, the 
astronauts themselves would conduct an abort during these early phase of the flight 
The launch vehicle test conductor does have a capability of recommending, however, 
and the system was just checked here a few moments ago. Now in the Mission Control 
Center here at Cape Kennedy both backup pilots have arrived and they are monitoring 
the countdown from the location at this time. That is Astronauts Pete Conrad and 
Richard Gordon. They have joined Deke Slayton, who is assistant Director of the 
Manned Spacecraft Center . for -flight crew operations at the Astronauts monitoring 
controls here in the Control Center. All looking good at the present time,T-42 
seconds 55 seconds in counting-. This is Gemini Launch Control. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSIOH CCMflEHTARY, 3/16/66, 10:01 a.m. TAP! 27 FAOI 1 

This it Gemini launch control now T-3^ minutes and 3 seconds and counting on 
the Gemini 8 mission with all systems looking good. AT this point in the count- 
down we are going through a so called program sequence test at launch complex 19 • 
involved is that busy Mark 3 radio crxnahd guidance system which first supported 
the Atlas/Agena launch and now late, actually, probably 20 or 30 minutes ago 
returned its work to launch complex 19 to complete the final guidance checks there. 
During this particular sequence test we check out the flight control system of the 
launch vehicle which is the primary system and also the secondary program sequence 
of the flight control which are concerned with the spacecraft computer. The 
astronauts will be monitoring this test and reporting on Its results as far as the 
spacecraft is concerned. The crew is busy in the block house checking its data on 
how its going with the launch vehicle itself. Also going on in the spacecraft are 
some voice communications checks over VBF and very high frequency channels between 
the astronauts and the block house. All systems looking good now at T-32 minutes 
and 50 seconds and counting. We will have a hold at the T-3 minute mark in order 
to coordinate liftoff of the Gemini 8 with the passing Agena.' We will insert some 
10^0 miles ,= that a 1050 nautical miles, behind the Agena with the Gemini 8 spacecraft 
if all goes well. The hold is expected to last about 5 minutes and kj seconds. 
However, the Flight Director will give direct confirmation on this later in the 
count when he advises launch complex 19 of the exact launch time. He will actually 
confirm it at the 18 minute mark in the countdown. This is Gemini launch control. 
EHD OF TAPS 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:06 a.m. Tape 28, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. Now at T-29 minutes. Mark T-29 minutes and 
counting. All systems still going well at launch complex 19- We are still in 
the midst of our flight controlled test between the block house, the Mark III 
radio command guidance system, and the Gemini launch vehicle and spacecraft. It 
appears to be going well at the present timeas all systems look well at this 
phase of the count. Now I will switch you to the Mission Control Cjenter in'* 
Houston. 

This is Gemini Control in Houston. We are 1 hour and 6 minutes intb the flight 

of the Agena. Sll continues to work quite satisfactory. The Agena is now East of 

acquisition 

the Australian continent. As it came into the approximate 1, 000 mile/zone of the 

■narvon station. The station seemed to have a little trouble logging up on the 
C-band and the S-band radars which gave us a mild start. Apparently a ground prob- 
lem that has been cleared up and they acquired a very valid and solid signal from 
both beacons. They continued to track the Agena through and were quite happy with 
the performance of the Agena system. Meanwhile, amessage has gone out to all stations 
on the range describing in some detail the communications problem which has been fol- 
lowed very carefully since early in the day. Again, to touch on it this seems to 
be a situation where the pilot on their intercom, when they are in the intercom 
position, are actually transmitting. The situation where we are getting to much 
communication. They all note some degradation in the signal strength. It is c - l 
entirely possible that this situation will clear itself up. Once in orbit we have 

experienced it before. Very rough communications in the first orbit as we did in 
the Gemini 6 flight , but by the second orbit they were well cleared up and continued 

• 2k hours. At 1 hour and 8 minutes in the flight of the Agena, this is Gemini 
Control . in Houston . 
END OF TAPE. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, lOill a.m. Tape 29, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. Nov T-24 minutes and 3 seconds and counting. 
All systems still looking good at the pad. We are coming on the so-called OAMS 
static that here in the next several minutes. This is a test of the thrusters 
in the adapter section. of lthe Gemini spacecraft. These thrusters are part of 
the arbit attitude and maneuvering system which gives us our propulsion when we 
are in orbit. There areaa total of 16 engines or 16 thrusters in the so-called 
OAMS system. Eight of these engines have a thrust of 25 pounds, two of them 
have 85 pounds of thrust and 6 of the engines have 100 pounds of thrtlst. During 
this test of thrusters coming up here shortly, we will test the 25 pound thrust 
engines that ring the base of the adapter section to the spacecraft. We will 
test them to check the yaw, the pitch, primarily and to insure that they are 
all working satisfactorily. This also permits us to condition the propellant 
system in the spacecraft. We will get some puffs from the thrusters coming up 
shortly. All systems looking good. T-22 minutesaand 51 seconds and counting. 
This is Gemini Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMKHTAHr, 3/l6/66, 10: 16 a.m. TAPE 30 PAGE 1 

This is Gemini launch control coming up on T-19 minutes and counting. Our static 
test of the thruster system for the propulsion for the fl—lnl 8 spacecraft is 
going on at the present time and the tests are going well. This is being Monitored, 
both by the astronauts in the spacecraft and the block house at pad 19* The 
astronauts are confirming what the block house data shows, that the thrusters are 
performing rery veil. We appear to hare just about completed a rery excellent test 
on the spacecraft propulsion system. We will be leading into some final tests of 
the ~Gea&*i 8 launch rehicle. Coming up in just about 25 seconds from this time will 
be the Flight Director, John Hodge in Houston, adrising the crew at launch complex 19 
the exact time that we want to launch the flemtnl spacecraft. This will be coming 
— » shortly and we will pass it on to you at the time, low coming up on T-l8 
minutes and counting this is ffcmlnf launch control. 
HD OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:19 a.m. 



Tape 31, Page 1 



This is Gemini launch control at the Cape coming up T-l6 minutes and counting. 
All going well. Moments ago the Flight Director advised. the Cape that we want to 
have a launch at kO minutes 59 seconds past the hour. Let me reiterate we want 
T-0 or ignition at that time. Ignition of the Gemini launch vehicle at kO minutes 
and 59 seconds past the hour. The nominal close of a brief window hereafter would 
come at ^minutes q seC0 nds after the hour. To repeat, i ignition of the/Sauncnvehicle 



at hO minutes and 59 seconds after the hour. Nominal close <sfer our window: U5 minutes 
and 8 seconds after the hour. We will be launching on a azimuth of 99*9 degrees. 
The pad at the present time, the cooling the block house are going through a series 
of range safety tests with the Air Force Test Range. AH going well now at T-15 minutes 
r 7 counting. This is Gemini Launch Control. 
END OF Tape 




MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 10626 a.m. Tape 32, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We're now at T-9 minutes and 3 seconds 
and counting, with all going well at Launch Complex 19. The Agena spacecraft 
which has been inserted into a successful orbit is now crossing the Pacific 
approaching California, about mid-way between Hawaii and. California at this 
time. In the meantime, we are going through the final phases of the count- 
down at Launch Complex 19. We will go into a planned built-in hold at T-3 
minute mark in the countdown. We will resume this hold in time to make an 
ignition of the Gemini launch vehicle at UO minutes and 59 seconds after the 
hour. The hold time will be some 5 minutes and 45 seconds. When we pick up 
at the T-3 minute mark, aiming for the kO minute and 59 seconds ignition after 
the hour, the radio command guidance will put the final flight parameters into 
the vehicle for the flight, this will be for the flight azimuth. It will 
put in the proper roll program at that time. We are now at T-8 minutes and 
counting. This is Gemini Launch Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSIOII COMfflHTARY, 3/16/66, 10:31 a.m. TAPE 33 PACE 1 

This is Gemini launch Control coming up on T~k minutes and counting with all 
systems looking good at launch complex 19 . Our checkout is proceeding rery well, 
and what has been a rery excellent countdown has been one of most complicated count- 
downs that has been conducted at Cape Kennedy in riew of the fact that some 9 
different activities were brought in simultaneously during the dual operation of 
launching the Atlas/Agena at 'the 9? minute mark and coming up on the Gemini 8 
liftoff. We will go into a hold some 30 seconds from this time at the T-3 minute 
mark. This hold is expected to last 5 minutes and 5k seconds. We will then 
resume our countdown at T-3 minutes leading to an ignition of the Gemini launch 
vehicle at ho minutes and 59 seconds after the hour. This is the exact time we want 
In order to coincide our insertion into orbit of the Gemini 8 with the Agena 
which will be swinging around shortly on its first orbit of the earth. We are now 
at T-3 minutes and holding. T-3 minutes and holding. This hold is expected to 
last 5 minutes and 5k seconds. This is Gemini launch control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/ 16/66, 10:38 a.m. Tape 3h, Page 1 

This is Gemini Launch Control. We are still at 
T-3 minutes, we have just resumed the count. T-3 
minutes and counting on the Gemini 8 mission. We 
have completed our planned hold and are now proceeding 
down to the final minutes leading up to an ignition 
of a Gemini launch vehicle at kO minutes and 59 
seconds past the hour. The Mark 3 radio command 
guidance system now has fed the final flight parameters 
into the launch vehicle and spacecraft. It will be 
launched on a azimuth of 99 • 9 degrees. Now two 
minutes and 30 seconds and counting. During this 
phase of the countdown and over the final five minutes 
just about all sequences monitored in the blockhouse 
worked automatically as far as the launch vehicle 
is concerned; we are an automatic sequence and we 
are checking the various events as the click off 
during these final phases. Now at T-2 minutes and 
eight seconds and counting. This is Gemini Launch 
Control . 

This is Gemini Launch Control, now at T-l 
minute, U7 seconds and counting. We do have a 
clearance for a launch. The stage one fuel pre-valves 
have been opened, this permits the fuel to feed down 

just above the thrust chamber of the launch vehicle. 
Now coming up on T-90 seconds, mark T-90 seconds 
and counting. All systems looking good during this 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 10:38 a.m. Tape 3U, Page 2 

final phase of the count. We will get ignition of 
the Gemini Launch Vehicle at 0 in this final phase 
of the countdown. Zero ignition, the two engines 
will build up some U30 thousand pounds of thrust 
just prior to liftoff. Once the vehicle builds up 
77$ of this thrust we get a go for liftoff. This 
will occur some four seconds after ignition. Now 
T-l minute and counting as we go through out final 
checks. T-50 seconds and counting, if all goes well 
the Gemini 8 will be inserted into orbit some 1,015 
nautical miles behind the Agena. T-UO seconds and 
counting, T-UO. In the blockhouse the crew is reporting 
as they monitor the various activities over the final 
phase. Now T-30 seconds and counting. T-20 seconds 
and counting. Fifteen, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, k, 3, 2, 
1, 0, we have ignition... 
HANEY IN HOUSTON And we have a liftoff at three seconds, three seconds. 

Neil Armstrong reports the clock has started. Roll 
program is in, Armstrong says. Twenty seconds into 
the flight, and Armstrong says the pitch program is 
in, 30 seconds into the flight. All clocks are in 
sync on the ground and in the spacecraft. Forty-five 
seconds into the flight. Flight Dynamics says he 
looks good at the mark 50 second mark. And Dave 

Scott gives us his first report, the cabin pressure 
at 5«7» Everything looks good, the distance now from 
the Cape about four miles, altitude 2h miles. One 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 10:38 a.m. Tape 3k, Page 3 

HANEY minute and 30 seconds into the flight. The Flight 

Director has just been advised that thrust looks 
good. Mark one minute plus kO seconds and the crew 
has advised that they look good. That digital command 
system update has been received in the spacecraft and 
Scott has depressed a little button on the right side 
which indicates to the ground that it was received. 
Flight Dynamics says we are go for staging, we are 
two minutes, 10 seconds into the flight. The Ground 
gives Gemini 8 a go for staging. Two minutes and 32 
seconds into the flight, the spacecraft now about 52 
miles downrange and Armstrong says we have staging 
and second stage has ignited. Armstrong said they 
noted the staging and saw a little fireball behind 
them. Guidance looks good, we are now at 50 miles 
altitude. We are about 100 miles downrange. The 
Surgeon reports he's well satisfied with the values 
he's reading on both crewmen. Flight Dynamics says 
we are right down the middle, all the data agrees. 
The plots are on exact Overlay of the planned values . 
Three minutes and 50 seconds into the flight, and 
communications have been reasonably good, as sharp 
or sharper than we can recall on any past launch. 
Four minutes into the flight. Flight Director has 
advised his controllers to stand by for a status 
checks. He'sr checking each one of them now. He's 
gotten a go from all positions here in the Control 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 10:38 a.m. Tape Page k 

Center, Jim Lovell, our Cap Com, has just advised 

Armstrong that he is go from the ground. Downrange 

distance now about 280 miles, altitude 80 miles, 

and again Flight says we are right down the middle 

on our traces here. Five minutes into the flight. 

Mark .8 have achieved 8C^t of the velocity desired. 

We are now 85 miles highaarid Lovell assures Armstrong 

again that he looks very good here on the ground. 

We have second stage cutoff, approximately 5 minutes, 

1+0 seconds. Five minutes 50 seconds, in about 10 seconds 

the crew should initiate their thrusters, Flight 

Dynamics confirms again he is go and Lovell is 

passing this up to the crew. Six minutes, 5 seconds 

into the flight, and Armstrong advises they have 

completed their burn, they are free of the second 

stage. Six minutes, UO seconds into the flight and 

as yet we've heard no numbers on the orbit, but we 

believe it will be very close to the planned value 



END OF TAPE 



» I 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, ' 10: U8 a.m. Tape 35, Page 1 

As yet we have heard no numbers onbthe orbit;, but we believe it will be 

very close to the planned value. The Guidance Officer advises there was 

xero out-of -plane burn. .absolutely no out-of -plane deviation. Flight Dynamics 

advises they should have some numbers for us on the orbit shortly but he advises 

the Flight Director that it looks nominal, which would make it a ll*6. We will 

stand by and get further confirmation on that. This is Gemini Control, Houston. 

y30 seconds , 
8 minutesand the spacecraft is now out of the Bermuda acquisition zone. We may 

*j 

have further contact by Antiqua. The Flight Dynamics Officer adirises based on 

the early data, the low speed data which will be refined our initial orbit is 85 

analyzed 

by 155 . This will be rerun and e /_ d andfurther data will be cranked into it 
and I am sure there will be refinements. But at 9 minutes in the flight, it appears 
to have an acceptable orbit for the Gemini 8 spacecraft. Meanwhile we have racked 
up the conversation through the lift-off phase. The conversation begins at T-l 
minute and while we are refining the data on the orbit we will play that tape right 



now. 

HOU . . .M-l cc coming up on 130 launch vehicles 

transferred to internal power. 
S/C Roger 
HOU Standby to (garbled) 

HOUS Stage II pre valve s coming open. 5 seconds. 

T-20 seconds mark. 10 9 8 7 6 5 ^ 3 2 1 
IGNITION, LIFT-OFF 

S/C Roger 

HOU Roger . . .Gemini 

S/C garbled 

HOU Roger ,Roll 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:U8 a.m. Tape 35, Page 2 



HOU) Good llftpff 8. 

S/c roll ones' in, we have a pitch program 

HOU Roger, Pitch program 

Mark. 50 seconds. You are looking good 8. 

S/c garbled, cabin pressure is 5.70 

HOU ...at the cabin 

Mark 1 + kO. You're locking good, 8. 

S/C Thank you, DCS is in. 

HOU Roger, DCS. 

S/C Stage 2 tanks look good. 

HOU Gemini 8 you are go from the ground for staging. 

S/C DCS is in. 

HOU Roger, DCS 

S/C Roger, we have staging. .ignition 

HOU Roger, staging. 

S/C ...we saw the falling fireball here. 

HOU I understand you have guidance. 

S/C Rog, we have guidance 

Zero pitch, and 1 degree yaw right coming in 

HOU Roger, your guidance looks good on the ground 

B/C .... pitch... yaw about a quarter of a degree 

HOU Roger, your plots are looking very nominal here on 

the ground, 8. 

S/c The second stage was real good, mission. 

HOU Gemini 8, you are go from the ground. 

S/c Roger, it's looking good up here. 

HOU Mark point 8, Gemini 8. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:48 a.m. 



Tape 35, Page 3 



S/C We are going to. .. (garbled) 

are 

HOUS "^on/looking very good here on the ground. 

S/C . 1 garbled 
HDU Roger 
S/c garbled 



MISSICH CCMSRaRY, 3/16/66, 11:03 a.m. TAPE 36 PAGE 1 

This is Gemini control, Houston, they are 21 minutes 52 seconds into the flight. 
Jim Lovell, Aircraft Com. has Just been in touch with the Gemini 8 spacecraft 
via the Ascension station. We hare a refinement on that initial orbit -which ve 
gave, ire are presently show based on Antigua data, an orbit of 87 by ikj miles, 
and this, of course, is very cosfTorting. We were trying for an orbit of 87 by 1I46. 
We would expect perhaps further refinements on this when we reach the Carnarvon 
station and I believe we will except as reasonably final the Carnarvon data. But 
right now our orbit for the Gemini 8 spacecraft is showing 87 by ikf nautical 
miles. In their conversation via emees^lom Armstrong came back with a "all systems 
O.K." report from the Gemini 8 spacecraft. Apparently the temperature in the frog 

egg experiment, we can't tell which one, the frog eggs are inside of both hatches. 

are 

t ji one of the compartments, perhaps both, ttfeey/- noting a slightly elevated temperature 

and, therefore, plan to activate the frog egg experiments somewhat earlier than 

planned in the flight plan. At present they plan an activation of 1*0 minutes into 

the flight. Meanwhile we have some data from the Agena orbit, and Just a few of them 

to show you how close to the nominal the Agena achieved in its successful flight 

this morning. We showed an altitude at orbital Insertion, actual altitude of 161.3 

miles versus a planned altitude of l6l .nautical miles. At cutoff our feet per second 

actual on the Agena was 25, 365.9 versus a planned cutoff of 25,369 feet per second. 

Thats 3.1 feet per second off the planned mark. For the Agena we are presently 

showing a 160.6 actual, nautical miles versus the planned of l6l. We have the very 
tape 

brief /conversation recorded from the Ascension tracking station. We are prepared 

to play it for you now. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 11) 03 a.m. Tape 36, Page 2 

HOU Gemini 8, Gemini 8, Houston Cap Com, over. 

S/C This is Gemini 8. 

HOU Roger, your orbit has been changed to 871U7. 

Your go for a nominal M equals U, there will be 
.plane 

a slight/change. We'll give you that information 
later and we understand the frog egg temperature 

is a little hotter than normal and we want to 

remind you to activate the right unit number one 

handle at time U.O. 

S/C Time U.O, also systems look okay in the spacecraft. 

HOU' Roger. All systems okay and standing by for UHF 

No. 2 check. 

S/C Okey. Houston, Bhis is Gemini 8 on UHF No. 2, 

how do you read me? 

reading 

HOU Roger, Gemini 8, this is Houston/you slightly, 

garbled, but allowed, how are we? 

S/C Can you read me if I speak slower 

HOU This is Houston, Roger 

S/C We are going back No. 1. 

HOU You are going No. 1. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:12 a.m. 



TAPE 37, PAGE 1 



This is Gemini Control, Houston. Over Carnarvon, some U5 minutes ago, the Gemini 8 
space craft was given a go for 16-1, a flight of at least 2^ hours. The ground 
station read out all the values, checked through the systems, did a lot of work 
with Dave Scott calling out values from the spacecraft . Both parties, the spacecraft 
and the ground, very satisfied with what they read. The doctors indorsed the — 
both pilots, said they were in excellent shape as they went of the Carnarvon area. 
Their first manuever, which will be a slight heighth adjustment is to come at one 
hour and 3k minutes anflo37 seconds into the flight. It will be a negative delta V . 
or adjustment downward of the heighth. Of some three feet... a delta V of three 
feet. Carnarvon data also confirmed the Antigua data and we are presently calling 
our Gemini 8 orbit a ikj by 87 mile — nautical mile — orbit. We have now the tape 
conversation from Carnarvon and will play it. 



Houston Capcom 

s/o 

Capcom 

S/C 

Capcom 

S/C 

Capcom 

S/C 

Capcom 

HOUSTON FLIGHT 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 



Gemini 8, Gemini 8, Houston Capcom. 

Hello, Houston Capcom, now we are reading you well. 

Roger, this is my first call. Don't forget your radiator 

flow at zero 35 • 

Okay. Radiator flow. 

Roger, and around zero zero four zero, the sea reentry 

command, C-adapter continuous and the 8-3 experiment. 

I didn't quite get that one. Say again, please. 

Roger, at four zero, C -Reentry command, C-adaptor continuous 

and the frog egg experiment. 

Roger, we got that. 

Roger and we are just standing by. 

Carnarvon, Houston Flight. 

Houston Flight, Carnarvon capcom. 

Roger, do you have any questions. 

Negative. We see the unbalance in the fuel celss. Everything 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 10:12 a.m. 



Tape 37, PAGE 2 



Carnarvon 


else is kQngteg away. 


Hou Flight 


Roger . 


Carnarvon 


I'd like to check my GET clock. 


Hou Flight 


Go ahead. 


Carnarvon 


Okay. Thirty -eight, thirty-five, on my mark. Mark. 


Hou Flight 


That's good. 


Carnarvon 


And PR 69, 33, 1+0 on my mark. 


Hou Flight 


Okay stand by. Go. 


Carnarvon 


69, 33, 35. Mark. 


Hou Flight 


That's good. 


Carnarvon 


Okay. Thank you. 


TANANARIEVE 


Tananarieve has LOS. 



This is GeminiCOontrol Houston. That firstt portion of that tape was mis- 
identified. It was actually remoted through the Tananarieve station. It was Jim 
Love 11 talking from Houston primarily with Neil Armstrong. We now have the 
Carnarvon tape and we'll play it for you now. 



Barnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 



Hou Flight 



Carnarvon has Agena telemetry solid. 

Okay, Carnarvon. 

And, we show the Agena as go. 

Roger . Fl 1 . n -.t CTr-rvon . 
E&ighfeaflarnarvon . 
Go ahead. 

I just got a MI, it says main LOS and AOS until 

end of EVA or until further notice. Is this Gemini or 
Agena? 

That's Gemini, we'll send a correction 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 

Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 

Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 

Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 

Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 

Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 

Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Carnarvon 

s/c 

Carnarvon 



s/c 



3/16/66, 10*12 a.m. Tape 37, Page 3 

The Agena looks real good. 
Roger . 

Have valid S-band track Agena Carnarvon. 

Roger. How's that S-band temperature there Carnarvon? 

Say again flight. 

How's that S-band temperature? 

Stand by one. Hotel 063> S-band temperature is 137 degrees. 
137, that's very good. It's going down a bit. 
Correction on that parameter number — it's hotel 

0l+9> roger. 

Flight, Carnarvon. We've lost one FRW 2 high power 

command transmitter. We still have one good. 

Roger. Carnarvon, Houston Flight. 

Flight, Carnarvon, Cap Com. 

We havenft got your Charlie on Agena yet. 

We transmitted that. Will transmit again. 

Roger . 

Carnarvon has Gemini telemetry solid. 
Roger.. 

Dropping out. 

Gemini 8, Carnarvon Cap Com. 
Hi there, Carnarvon, go ahead. 
How are yall doing? 
IFust fine. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 105.12 a.m. 
Carnarvon 



Tape 37, Page 1+ 



axe 



S/C 

Carnarvon 



S/C 

Carnarvon 
S/C 

Carnarvon 
S/C 

Carnarvon 
Hou Flight 
Carnarvon 
Hou flight 
Carnarvon 



S/C 



Okay, we/showing you real good here on the ground, we're 
giving you a go on your radiator. Put your evaporator 
to normal. 

Evaporator is normal. 

Okay. Now about your quantity read switch to ACSO 2 
position and leave it there until I tell you to move 
it. 

Roger 

Okay, I'm showing you on prelaunch are you doing some 
computations or can you go on to catch up? 
Ready, I'll check it first. 

Okay, let's go to catch up. Okay, got you in catch up. 

Now your battery and your fuel cell. Go ahead. 

1A - 950.0, 2A'- U.8, 2B - 5.2, main buss is 2h.5. 

Okay, I copy that. 

We got that Carnarvon. 

I am going to give a go for 16.1. 

Very good, go ahead. 

Okay, you're go for 16-1. How about that? 

We're going to need your computer run again now. How 

about setting up 52 minutes and counting up I'll give 

you a time hack at that time. 

Okay. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 10:12 a.m. 



Tape 37, Page 5 



Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 

Carnarvon 
S/C 

Carnarvon 

s/c 

Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 

Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 

Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 

S/C 

Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 
S/C 



I can't read you, Flight. 
Stand by . 

We're getting a Gemini dropout. 

Roger. Will you check activation of Experiment S-3 
at k 0 minutes . 

Ok. Did you start S-3 at k 0 minutes? 
It was k 0 .... 
k 0 what? 

k 0 and ten seconds 
Ok. 

Carnarvon, did you get that quadriplex signal strength. 
Roger. Quadriplexer is -65. 
Roger . 

We are getting very poor Gemini telemetry, Flight, 

we are dropped out at the present time. 

Roger 

C-Band track at Gemini Carnarvon, have telemetry back 

in. 

Roger 

Ok, we've cut our computer summaries you can go to 

Pre launch anytime you want. 

Couple of pulses in yaw. 

OK. Your Agena looks real fine 

Roger . 

Say again. 

You couldn't have done anymore for us than you have. 
You've got everything going. 



k k 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 10:12 a.m. 



Tape 37, Page 6 



Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 

Hou Fit 

Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 

Carnarvon 
Hou Fit 
Carnarvon 

s/c 



That's what we are here for, isn't it? 
Carnarvon, Flight. 
Flight, Carnarvon 

You might check and see if they have an antenna selectc 
adapter . 

LOS on the Agena, say again Flight. 

You might check to see that they've got antenna select 
to adapter. 

Roger. Flight our radar confirms the adapter "beacon. 
Roger . 

Now what did you say about storms? 

I said there were storms just ahead of us... we can 

see them on 



END OF TAPE 



1SI0N COMMEHTARY, 3/16/66 11:58 a.i. TAPE 38 PAGE 1 

S/C There is scae clouds Just ahead of the chamber - - - 
HOU Well, we could use some rain. 

S/C 

HOU About like the la it tine you were here. Let me know when you going orer 

to the pre launch. How did you - - - 
S/C Barbie - - O.K. we hare the address if you're ready to copy it down. 

HOU . Go ahead - 

S/C 80 was - - - at 004, 8l was 00001, 82 was -000— 

HOU Ok, I got it allrlght. Got your prelaunch now. Ok - - - - I don't 

have anything for you, I'll stand by now and let you count. 

Cfirnaivon in flight. 
CARNAVON Inflight Carnarvon 

H I didn't get those ratings. Would you read the* out to mm please. They 

were pretty low. 
CAR OK. 80 -0004, 81-0001, 

HOU I though that was four zeros. 

CAR I'll check it if you want. et ne have your Cor 8l again . 

HOU Cor 8l was 00001. 

HOU Ok, I was right, Thank you. 

CAR Cor 81 -00001, We have - garble - - 82 is 000k. 
HOUSTON Roger 

CAR Everything looked fine. The Agena looked good going over the hill. / ; 

are 

They/ in good shape and everything is Go. 
HOUSTON Roger - Thank you Carnarvon. 
CAR You got an extra amount of summaries also. 

HC This is Gemini control, Houston, We'd like to review sons of the maneuvers 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 11:58 a.m. TAPE 38 PAGE 2 

cooing up. These values may change, but probably only slightly. Presently the 
spacecraft Is over Hawaii. They are in conrersatlon now, but first we will cover 
this maneuver information. At 1 hour 3^ minutes and 37 seconds Into the flight 
they are to perform a slight height change. This will cone south of Hew Orleans 
several hundred miles out over the Gulf, on this pass on and below the U.S. The 
The Delta V is now to be a -2.9 or retrograve maneuver. This will leave the space- 
craft with an estimated 722 pounds of usable fuel onboard. At 2 hours and 18 minutes 
and 25 seconds into the flight the spacecraft is to perform a phasing maneuver 
which will require a delta V or a delta velocity of 51.2 feet per second. At 
2 hours and ^5 minutes 31 seconds into the flight the spacecraft will perform a 

lane change or maneuver calculated to get rid of a very slight wedge angle in 
the two orbits. This angle is presently estimated at .05 degrees. The spacecraft 
will be oriented with the blunt end north and will burn toward the south. It will 
burn 25.7 feet per second and this will leave the spacecraft with some 643 pounds 
of fuel remaining. We will be along 3 hours and hi minutes and 36 seconds into 
the flight, the spacecraft will perform its coelliptlc burn, or circularization 
bum. This is one of the larger burns 59*2 feet per second and it will leave the 
spacecraft with 583 pounds. At 5 hours and k minutes into the flight the space- 
craft will initiate its terminal phase maneuver and at 5 hours and 36 minutes into 
the flight they will perform a maneuver which will require a U3.6 feet per second. 
This will be the terminal phase final, flow, as ve have been talking, we have been 
hearing in our other ear that Wallie Schirra and Prank Borman who are returning 
from their far eastern tour, we believe their in Hawaii and we understand they 



MISSION C&MSNTAEY, 3/16/66, 11:58 a.m. TAFE 38 PAGE 3 

are trying to contact the spacecraft. They haven't put out a call for several 
minutes but Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott are aware that their being paged and 
the Schirra advised that their call sign is Gemini 76. At 1 hour and 20 minutes 
into the flight this is Gemini control, Houston. 
HID OF IAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 12:0U p.m. 



Tape 39 > Page 1 



This is Gemini Control, Houston. We've just been handed the final computer 
runouts on the initial orbit for the Gemini 8 spacecraft. It goes like this - these 



are conditions/second stage cutoff plus 20 seconds. In other words, that time 

when the spacecraft would have parted from the second stage. The insertion velocity 

at SECO plus 20 seconds was - the actual was 25,737 feet per second. This against 

a planned value of 25,730 feet per second. The perigee presently shows 86.2 

actual, 86.2 nautical miles, as against the planned value of 86.8 nautical miles. 

The apogee, actual, 1U6.2 versus a planned apogee of 1U6.0. We have conversation 

between the ground and the spacecraft from Hawaii and here it is. 

HAWAII Hawaii, have the Agena T/M solid. 

HOUSTON Roger, Hawaii. 

HAWAII Hawaii. Is the Agena go? 

'USTON Roger, Hawaii. 

FLIGHT Hawaii, Houston Flight. 

HAWAII Hawaii. Go ahead. 

FLIGHT Can' we have~a J .contingehci^ "A", Agena, please? 

HAWAII Roger. Copy contingency "A". 

FLIGHT How do things 16ok? 

HAWAII Agena looks very good. 

FLIGHT Go. Ok. Does that - - Hawaii, Houston 



at 



Flight. 



HAWAII 



Hawaii. Go ahead. 



FLIGHT 



Can we have that S-band temperature, please? 



Hotel, k9. 



HAWAII 



Roger. HO U9 is lU2 degrees. 



.IGHT 



Roger . 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 12:OU p.m. 

T "VWAII 
FLIGHT 

HAWAII 



FLIGHT 
SCHIRRA 
HAWAII 
SCHIRRA 

HAWAII 

S/C 

HAWAII 
S/C 

HAWAII 
S/C 

HAWAII 
S/C 

HAWAII 



S/C 



Tape 39 > Page 2 
Hawaii. This is Gemini T/M. 
Roger, Hawaii. Go. Hawaii, this is" Flight. 
We would like an Agena LOS main. 
Roger. Agena LOS main and be advised that 
Wally Schirra, Gemini 76, is attempting to 
contact Gemini 8. Over. He's inbound in 
an aircraft to Honolulu. 
Ok. How about that? 
Hello, Gemini 8. Gemini 76, over. 
Gemini 8, Hawaii Cap Com. 
Gemini 8, this is Gemini 76 en route 
Honolulu. Do you read? 

Gemini 8, Hawaii. We have a maneuver load 
for you. Are you ready? Over. 
We're all set. 

Roger, transmitting maneuver load. 

Rog. Got DCS light and reset. 

Roger and are you ready to copy the update? 

Over . 

Stand by, Hawaii. 
Roger. 

Now we have you in sight down there. It 

looks like a nice day. 

Beautiful weather here . 

Ok. Go with the updata, Hawaii. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 



3/16/66, 



12:6k p.m. 



Tape 39 > Page 3 



HAWAII 



S/C 



HAWAII 



s/c 

SCHXRRA 
S/C 

HAWAII 

S/C 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 



Roger. GETV - 1 3*+ 37- Delta V 2.9. 
Burn time, 0 plus 05 . Yaw, zero; pitch 
zero. Address 25,9 00 29. Address 26, 
all zeros. Address 27, all zeros. Thrusters 
forward, maneuver retrograde. Did you 
copy? 

Roger, Hawaii. Got it. GET burn - 01 3^ 37- 
Delta V, 2.9. Duration, 0 plus 05. Yaw, 
zero; pitch zero. Address 25, 9 00 29, 
address 26, all zeros, 27, all zeros. 
Both confirmed. Thrust er forward, man- 
euver retro. 

That's correct. And also be advised that 

Wally Schirra's been attempting to contact 

you. His call sign is Gemini 76. He's 

inbound to Honolulu. 

Oh. Very well. We're standing by. 

Hiya, Dave. How do you read? 

Is he trying to contact us on UHP or HF? 

He was on UHF. I haven't heard him for a 

couple of minutes. 

Ok. 

Hawaii here, has Agena LOS. 
Roger, Hawaii. 

Gemini 8, Hawaii. We have nothing further 
for you. Standing by. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 12:0U p.m. 



Tape 39) Page 



S/c Ok. All's doing well up here. 

HAWAII Roger . 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 12:10 p.m. 



Tape kO, Page 1 



This is Gemini Control, Houston. A little additional information on the 
inclination of these two vehicles - the Agena achieved a 28.86 degree orbit - 
that is the degree that it is running north and south of the equator. The 
planned value for the Agena was 28.87 degrees - off by .01 degrees. Meanwhile 
the Gemini 8 achieved a 28-91 degree inclination - the planned value there was 
28.86. So on our one plane change maneuver we will burn off that .05 degree 
difference in order to make the two inclinations match. The Guaymas station 
acquired Gemini 8 only a minute or so ago. Let's tune in on that conversation 
live . 



GUAYMAS 

FLIGHT 
GUAYMAS 

FLIGHT 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 



Flight, Guaymas. We have both birds 
go. Gemini 8's still in mode one. 
Roger. 

He's barely readable on my UHF here, 

Flight . 

Ok. 

Hawaii , Houston Blight . 
Hawaii, go ahead. 

Did the crew confirm that they got that 
maneuver update ok? 
Rog . A f f irmat i ve . 
Roger. 

He's got the catchup now, Flight. 
Ok. 



This is Gemini Control, Houston, here. In just four minutes the spacecraft will 
perform their first maneuver and as we've been talking the Texas station assumed 
control. Let's go back live. 



JL k L 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 12:10 p.m. 

.'LIGHT 

GUAYMAS 

HOUSTON 

S/C 

This is Gemini Control, Houston, 
burn. Mark one minute. 

s/c 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

s/c 
Vc 

HOUSTON 

FLIGHT 

S/C 

HOUSTON 
HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON [ 

s/c 

HOUSTON 



Tape kO, Page 2 

Guaymas, Flight. We have it now. 
Roger . 

Gemini 8, this is Houston Cap Com. 
We're standing by for your burn. 
Roger. About three minutes to go. 
We're about one minute away from the 

Going right over the coastline now and — 
Roger, Dave. Stand by for a 30-seeond 
mark to burn. 
Ok. : 

Mark - 30 seconds to burn. 
Ok. 

. . burn . 

Roger. Burning, Flight. 
Roger . 

Burn in, mark. 

Roger, we're standing by for your burn is 
off. 

Gemini 8, will you place your T/M switch 

to real time-delayed time? 

Ok. 

Gemini 8, this is Houston requesting tape 
playback switch to continuous. 

Stand by, Houston. 
Roger, will do. 



MISSION COMMENTARY j 3/16/66, 12:10 p.m. 
HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 
END OF TAPE 



Tape UO, Page 3 

Gemini 8, this is Houston. You don't have 
to answer. We'd like to have your computer 
in prelaunch when you can. 

. . .is almost a foot per second. Computer's 
in prelaunch and we're putting tape playback 
to continuous. 

Roger, thank you. Understood you were taking 

out the residuals. How did it go? 

Yeah, we took out the residuals but they-flaem 

to be building up on us with time. 

Rog. That's part of your accelerometer 

M*B.t . 

Yeah, I think that's right. Are you going 
to update that bias? 

Whenever you're ready we're going to send 
you an accelerometer update. 
Ok. I think we're probably - stand by a 
minute . 

Roger. We're standing by. 

Ok, go ahead and send the new bias for us. 

Roger, coming up. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 12:20 p.m. TAPE kl PACE 1 

S/C We haven't got a light yet 

HOU Standby, it's coning 8. 
S/C Got a light, reset. 

HOU Roger, the light. 

tip 

S/C This is Gemini 8, we got your/date 

HOU Gemini 8 this is Houston, the accelerator bias update was good. 
S/C Roger, thank you. 

S/C Roger, understand phase adjust at 0218261+9.3 1+07 yaw 0 pitch 0 

25001+9/ R "3, 26 and 27 Jtmw all zeros, aft thrustera — 
HOU Roger, Dave, O.K. And, Gemini 8 would you - - - blank - — Gemini 

8 this is Houston, you will probably expect an update of that phase 

adjust maneuver ever /Ascension, over. 
S/C Okey, understand. 

This is Gemini Control Houston. That will conclude the conversation 
for this pass as the spacecraft moves we've had LOS from the Antigua station. 
We expect further contact several minutes from now when they are in the tone 
of the Ascension Island station. At one hour and 1*6 minutes into the flight 
of Gemini 8, this is the Control Center in Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSICW CCMMEHTARY, 3/16/66, 1:51 p.m. 



Tape k2, Page 1 



This is Gemini Control Houston at 2 hours, 9 minutes into the flight of 
Gemini 8. The crew by now has probably completed their first meal in space. 
They were reported having their lunch at approximately an hour and 50 minutes 
into the flight. Meanwhile, the surgeons console here has passed on some in- 
formation about heart rates at various points in the flight to date. During 
the launch phase, Neil Armstrong showed a high heart rate of lk6 and the low 
during the powered phase of flight was 120. Hell's normal heart rate runs 
between 65 to 70. David 8cott, meanwhile, reached a high during the launch 
phase of 128, his low was 91. And Scott normally runs about 55 beats per 
minute. During the burn — during the first burn — south of Hew Orleans Hell's 
heart reached a peak rate of 105.; AtOIosS of signal at Antigua, his heart rate 
was 80. Dave Scott, during that burn, showed a heart rate of 75 and at loss of 
signal at Antigua his heart rate was 60. We have some tape conversation from 
the Ascension station .between Gemini 8 and Jim Lovell, here in Houston. We're 
ready to play that conversation for you now. 

AS CEHS ION Roger, I have an update to your phase adjustment 



maneuver if you're ready to copy. 



S/C 



ASCENSION 



Are you ready 8? 



S/C 



Be ready in a second. 



ASCENSION 



Roger, we're standing by. 



S/C 



Ready now. 



ASCENSION 



Roger, your GET burn 02 18 25. Delta V - 50.6. 



Delta P - 1 + 08. Yaw - 0. Pitch - 0. Core - 25-00 5 06 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 1:51 P-«n. Ta P e k %> **** 2 

ASCENSION Cores 26 and 27 - all zeros. Thrusters aft - 

maneuver posigrade. 

S/c All on Gemini 8 GET 02 18 25. Delta V - 50/6, 

one ♦ 08. 0 yaw. 0 pitch. 25 00 5 06. 26 and 
27 all zeros. Aft thrusters posigrade. 

ASCENSION Roger, that is correct. I hope you are enjoying 

your eating. 

S/C Pine, not bad at all. 

ASCENSION Ascension LOS. 

This is Gemini Control Houston as the spacecraft went over the Tananarive's 

area the ground and the spacecraft simply tagged up, there was no additional 

discussion. We're about five minutes away from our next maneuver of phasing 

adjust, which is prograaanied for two hours, 18 minutes, 25 seconds into the flight. 

You heard Jim Lovell update Neil Armstrong on the precise values of wanting this 

burn. We can confirm that the earlier burn was done apparently, there was some 

accelerometer bias in Borne of the guidance components which left some residual 

numbers in their incremental velocity indicators and these had to be burned off 

that 

but this was done in the — we were satisfied 1 / the initial maneuver was carried 
off successfully. This is Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



k k. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 1:20 p.m. Tape U3, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston, at two hours, UO 
minutes into the flight of Gemini 8. Presently 
our charts show the spacecraft 375 nautical miles 
away from its Agena target vehicle and the mission 
progressing very nicely. The crew completed their 
second maneuver between Tananarive and Canarvon 
at the appointed time on this last pass across the 
Indian Ocean. We have a tape of the conversation 
confirming that maneuver with Sarnarvon and we'll 
play it for you now. 



S/C Hello, Carnarvon, Gemini 8. 

CVN How are you doing? 

S/C Ok. We've completed our burn on time, our residuals 

known, the fuel is PQR 3, 88$. 

CVN Ok. Your OAMS stop was 80%? 

S/C 88 

CVN 88, ok, I copy that. Did you activate S3 at 2+10? 

S/C Stand by. 

CVN Say Again. 

S/C No, we missed it. Ah, hang on here. 

CVN They missed their S3 flight. 

Hou Fit Roger, stand by. Go ahead with it now, Carnarvon. 

CVN Say again, flight, 

Hou Fit Go ahead with it now. 

CVN Ok, go ahead and activate your S3 at this time. 

S/C S3 complete at 225. 

CVN Ok. 

S/C Carnarvon, Ihave C-band track. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 1:20 p.m. Tape U3, Page 2 



CVN Ok, I have a pre-change update, let me know 

when you are ready to copy. 
S/C Stand by. Ok, go ahead. 

CVN OK. GETB 02H550, Delta V 26.2, burn time 0+35, 

yaw 90 right, pitch 0, cores? 25 and 26 are zeros. 
Core 2790262, thrusters aft, maneuver south, over. 

S/C Roger, we understand. GET burn 021+550, Delta V 

26.2, 0+35, yaw 90 right, pitch 0, 25 and 26 all 
zeros, 2790262, aft thrusters maneuver south. 

CVN Very good, you're looking real fine; your Agena's 

looking real good, too. 

S/C Thank you. 

CVN Ok. You're looking real good, we'll hang on loose 

here and keep quiet . 
S/C Rog, understand. 

S/C Yeah, we'll see your tomorrow. 

CVN Oh, very well. They just went over to prelaunch 

Flight . 

Hou Fit Carnarvon, Houston, Flight. 

CVN Flight, Carnarvon. 

Hou Fit Can we have another Gemini main please? 

CVN Roger. He's now at prelaunch and looks real good. 

Hou Fit Roger. Carnarvon, flight. 

CVN Flight Carnarvon. 

Hou Fit How's his TR? 

CVN TR is right where it was before, lacking about 

3/8th of a second. 
Hou Fit Very good. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 1:20 p.m. Tape 1+3, Page 3 



CVN The signal strength on the quadriplexer and dioplexer 

seems to be dropping down, its not holding up right 
past the spacecraft now. 

Hou Fit Ok. 

CVN We have Agena LOS at Carnarvon. 

Hou Fit Roger. Any problems? 

CVN No, everything's real fine all the way with both 

vehicles . 
Hou Fit OK. 

CVN Carnarvon has Gemini telemetry LOS. Coming back 

in again. LOS all systems at Carnarvon. 
HANEY This is Gemini Control Houston. That concludes 



the Carnarvon discussion. We had hoped the 
spacecraft would be within the Hawaii sphere 
of acquisition for this upcoming burn, which 
is to take place one minute from now, at two 
hours, 1+5 minutes and 1+7 seconds. A burn requiring 
26.2 Delta V, 26.2 feet per second, at the conclusion 
of this burn the fuel remaining on board is estimated 
at 61+3 pounds which should be more than adequate for 
the terminal phase maneuvers which use so much fuel 
during a rendezvous mission. This is Gemini Control 
Houston . 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 1:50 p.m. 



Tape kh, Page 1 



This is Gemini Control, Houston, at 3 hours, 9 minutes into the flight -of 
Gemini 8. The plane change burn was completed on time at 2 hours and 4 5 minutes 
into the flight. Just prior to Hawaii acquisition. The crew confirmed that over 
Hawaii. We've also completed another burn - a tweak burn - which came approx- 
imately 3 hours , 3 minutes into the flight , while they were over the west coast 
of Mexico, about k minutes ago. This had been an unplanned thing but it was to 
smooth out certain parameters here as the two vehicles close on each other. A 
very small burn, only two feet per second, quite similar to the one performed 
in their first rev as they crossed the Gulf of Mexico. The crew has been advised - 
as soon as they acquire the Agena, which should occur momentarily, radar acquisi- 
tion - they have been instructed to send a command to the Agena which would have 
the effect of turning on the acquisition lights on the Agena. It's been determined 
here to go ahead and let the crew send this command. The command can also be sent 
from the ground, but the decision is to let the crew send this command. We have 
audio tape now from the Hawaii station and then we will bridge into the conver- 
sation as they cross Mexico and presently swing down over the island chain into 
South America. Here's the tape. 

HAWAII Gemini 8, Hawaii, 

s/c Go ahead, Hawaii. 

HAWAII Roger, we have you go and I have an Agena 



acquisition update when you're ready to 



copy.. 



s/c 



Rog, go ahead. Then I'd like to have you 



take a look at our cabin pressure. We're 



presently reading 5-1. 



HAWAII 



Stand by. Roger, we have a ground reading 



of 5.25. 



s/c 



Ok . We ' 11 keep an eye on it . 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 1:50 p.m. 



Tape kk, Page 2 



FLIGHT 

s/c 

HAWAII 



s/c 



HAWAII 

s/c 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 



That's ok, Hawaii. That's a good number. 

Let's go ahead with the acquisition, 
of 

Roger, GET/acquisition - 3 plus 07- GET 
of 2U8, 3 plus 15. GET rendezvous, 3 plus 
15. Azimuth zero degrees, elevation 7 
degrees. GET sunrise at TPF, 05 37 00, plus 
or minus one minute. Do you copy? 
Roger, understand. GET of acquisition is 
03 07; GET of 2^8, 03 15; GET of rendezvous 
03 15. Azimuth zero degrees, elevation 
7 degrees, GET of sunrise, 05 37 00, plus 
or minus one , for TPF . And do you have 
the update for addressed' 2k , 53, and 5U? 
Negative. Stand by. 
Ok. 

Flight, do you hear? 
Roger . 

Hawaii Cap Cora, Flight. 
Go ahead. 

Ok. 2k, 53, and 5^ are nominal. 
Understand - 23, 2k, are all nominal. 
2k, 53? and <yk- 
Roger . 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 1:50 p.m. 



Tape kk, Page 3 



HAWAII 

FLIGHT 
HAWAII 

FLIGHT 
HAWAII 

S/C 

HAWAII 

S/C 



HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 

S/C 



Hawaii copied, 2k, 53, and 5U are all 
nominal . 

Ask him how the burn went there, Hawaii. 
Roger. Do you want me to update 2k, 53 > 
and 5^ all nominal? Over. 
That's right. 
Gemini 8, Hawaii. 
Go ahead. 

Addresses 2k, 53, and 5*+ all nominal. And 

we'd like to know how your burn went. 

Ok. Understand all nominal on the addresses 

and the burn was on time and the residuals 

nulled . 

Roger, copy. 

How are those Agena SPC's coming along, Hawaii? 
They all clocked out on time, Flight. 
Hawaii, Houston Flight. 
Hawaii, go ahead. 

Can we have a quantity read, there, please, 

on the propellant. 

Quantity read on OAMS propellant? 

That's right. 

Gemini 8, Hawaii. 

Go ahead. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 1:50 p.m. 
HAWAII 

s/c 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 

FLIGHT 
HAWAIT 
FLIGHT 
GUAYMAS 

s/c 

GUAYMAS 

HOUSTON 
GUAYMAS 
HOUSTON 
GUAYMAS , 

s/c 

GAUYMAS 

FLIGHT 

GUAYMAS 



Tape kk , Page k 
Could we get a reading on your OAMS 
propellant remaining , please . 
85 percent. 
Copied 85, thank you. 
Roger, I got that. 
Did you copy, Flight? 
Yep. 

Flight, Hawaii has Agena LOS. All functions 
clocked out on time, and it was go* 
Roger. 

Hawaii has Gemini LOS. 
Roger . 

Gemini, Guaymas Cap Com. 

This is Gemini here. 

Roger, Gemini. We have you go on the 

ground . 

Guaymas Cap Com. 
Go ahead. 

Stand by. We're going to remote through Cal. 
Say again, Gemini 8. 
Everything looks good here. 

Ok. We'd like for you to send your aq lights 
on - spacecraft command 251. 
Break, break. Guaymas, go remote air-to- 
ground . 

Guaymas, remote. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 1:50 p.m. 



Tape kk, Page 5 



HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 



S/C . 

HOUSTON 

S/C 

HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 



s/c 

HOUSTON 

S/C 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

s/c 



Gemini 8, Houston Cap Com. 
Go ahead. 

Roger, we want to give you another burn 

here very shortly - stand by to copy. 

GET V, 03 03 Ul, Delta V, 2 feet, posigrade. 

That'll be 000 - I'm now reading you 02 3k. 

Ok, Houston. We didn't get that. All we 
burn. 

got was the GBT/l3Ur.N. Say again please. 
Roger, the Delta V is two feet per second - 
2 plus 0. 

Two feet per second. 

Roger, and it's posigrade. 

. . . posigrade? Is that correct? 

That's correct. 000. 

Ok. 

Counting 25 seconds to burn. I'll count 
you down. 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, ^> 3> 2, 1, burn 
it. 

We got it. 

Off burn. Gemini 8, this is Houston. Let 
me know what the results were, will you? 
Stand by. 

Hello, Texas. I think we got it in and got 
the residuals . 

This is Houston. Say again, 8. 

Rog. The burn was on time and we got the 



residuals . 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 1:50 p.m. 



Tape kk, Page 6 



JUSTON 



S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 



HOUSTON 



S/C 



HOUSTON 



s/c 



Roger. Sorry for that hurried-up thing 
but we had some malfunctions here that we 
had to get you a burn in a hurry and so I 
just thought I'd count it down for you. 
Ok. Thank you. 

Gemini 8, this is Houston. How is your 
platform alinement coming along? 
Stand by. Houston, we're not in aline- 
ment right now. Did you want us for some 
reason to aline? 

Negative. Roger. We were curious how your 
alinement was going since we got an extra 
2 feet per second which our tracking indi- 
cated had to be put in and came at a late 
time, that's all. 

Ok. We werennbt i alined prior to the burn 
because we didn't think we were going to 
have to have the burn and we believe we still 
have some bias errors in the accelerometers . 
Roger. Understand and also be informed that 
the Agena is now configured TDA north and 
we were just curious how your alinement has 
been going. Does it look like you've been 
getting good alinement? 

That's correct. We have been getting good 
alinement . 



_iND OF TAPE 



it k. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, l+/ l6 / 66 > 
HOUSTON 

S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

S/C 

HOUSTON 



2:00 p.m. Tape U5, Page 1 

Roger 8 and if you'll switch your TM switch 

to.oreal time and delaye time for us. 

Roger, real time/delay time. 

Houston this 8, advise we don't have a lock on 

yet, so I guess we'll have to wait until we get 

a lock before we send 270. 

Rog, understand, you don't have a lock on yet 

and you are going to wait befire you send 270. 

Actually, it's 251 we're going to send. 

Houston, Gemini 8. 

Go ahead 8, this is Houston. 

Rog, can you confirm a fuel cell purge at this 

time. 

Roger, will do, we're standing by. 

Gemini 8, this is Houston. If you go to prelaunch, 

we'll check your' accelerometer. bias . 

Roger, going to prelaunch and you did say you wanted 

a fuel cell purge at this time. Is that correct? 

That's right. We're going to watch it. 

Okay, we're getting intermittent lock ons on the 

radar. 

8, this is Houston. Put your tape play back 
switch to continuous. 
Rog, go continuous. 

Gemini 8, this is Houston, we're having Delta P 
lights which was not mnusual with 7, but not 8. 



MISSIOH COMMENTARY, V 16 / 66 * 

HOUSTOH 
8/C 

HOUSTOH 
B/C 

HOUSTOH 
S/C 

AHTIBUA 

HOUSTOH 
S/C 

HOUSTOH 
S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTOH 
HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTOH 



2:00 p.m. Tape 1*5, Page 2 

Do you have your crossover on? 

That's affirm and wehhave no Delta P. 

Av gee, I 'a kind of disappointed. 

We've got a winner up here. 

Gemini 8, this is Houston, your aBaal m m t mtmr 

bias is right on, looks very good. 

Okay, thank you. 

Antigua AOS. 

Gemini 8, Houston. 

Go ahead. 

/ 

Roger, would you place your TM switch to* real 

o ryour tape play 
time/ in Aoe^aand./ back switch to command. 

Roger, real time in acq and "splay back to command. 

And would you place your cryogenic gaging switch 

to ICS02. 

Rog, ICS 02. Be advised we did get a Delta P 

light. H 2 purge on section 2. 

Rog, with the Delta P. And now -/would you place 

yi)ur cryogenic switch to fuel cell 02? 

Gemini 8, this is Houston, put your cryogenic 

g*g*wg switch to fuel cell H2. 

Roger. Houston, Gemini 8, fuel cell purge 

complete, the crossover is off. 

Understand, roger, fuel cell purge is complete. 

And cryogenic gage switch to off please. 



MISSI01J COMMENTARY, U/ l6 / 66 » 
S/C 

HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

S/C 

HOUSTON 



s/c 

ANTIGUA 
END OF TAPE 



2:00 p.m. Tape 1*5, Page 3 

Roger. 

Gemini 8, Houston Cap Com, over. 
Qo ahead. 

I have your coelleptic maneuver update, if you're 
ready to copy. 
Okay, go ahead. 

GIT -..»a*n. > 03 k7 3k. Delta V - 61.6. Delta P - 
01 ♦ 22. Yaw - 0. Pitch - 23 degrees down. 
Core 25-00 567. Core 26-00 2^0. Core 27 - 
all zeros . Thrusters aft - posigrade down. Do 
you read? 

Understand GST burn {garbled) ...+22. Yaw - 

0. Pitch - 23 degrees down. Core 25 

LOS Antigua. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 2:20 p.m. 



Tape U6, page 1 



This is Gemini Control Houston at 3 hours, 39 minutes into the flight of 
Gemini 8. We are about 9 minutes away from our next burn and major 
maneuver which will bjjve the effect of circularizing this Gemini 8 orbit 
at roughly 1^7 nautical miles. This is to occur at 3 hours, U7 minutes, 
35 seconds into the mission. Rather large burn, a Delta V at 61.2 feet 
per second. After the burn the spacecraft should read something like 5^6 
pounds of fuel remaining on board, Presently the spacecraft is 170 miles 
behind_the_Agena. When we last heard from Gemini 8, they were having 
intermittent radar lock. It looked like it was locking up fairly well 
toward the end of the pass over the Rose Knot Victor parked of f the east 
coast of South America. Meanwhile the backup crew members for the Gemini 8 
mission, Pete Conrad and Dick Gordon have reached the Control Room here in 
Houston after a one hour and 50 minute flight from the Cape. Coming with 
them were Donald Slayton and Astronaut Walter Cunningham also. They came here 
directly from Ellington Field next to the Manned Spacecraft Center and are 
conferring with Jim Lovell on the flight progress to date. We have the tape 
conservation via the Rose Knot Victor station and here it is. 
RKV Capi Com Gemini 8, RKV Capt'Com 

S/C Go ahead 

get 

RKV Roger. We did not/confirmation on that maneuver update. 

Would you read... 

Houston Standby RKV, standby RKV, we have another one coming 

through. 
KKV - Roger 

S/C OK. NSR 03 1 +73 1 + 61.6 01 plus (garbled), yaw 0, pitch 

3 degrees down, 2500 567 26 00 2k0 (T 0000, thruster . 
aft, posigrade down. 

RKV Roger. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 2:20 p.m. 



Tape k6, page 2 



Houston RKV, Houston flight. 

RKV Roger, flight. 

Houston Standby to take another burn. 

RKV Roger, go. 

Houston GETB 03 U7 35, Delta V 61.2, burn time 01 plus 22, yaw 0, 

pitch 21 degrees down, core 25 00 57 0<, core 26 00 22 k, 
core 27 bflll zeros, aft thrusters, posigrade down. 
Read it back. 

RKV Gemini 8, RKV Cap Com. We have an update. 

Houston Read that back to me first. 

RKV OK. Standby one please. 

Houston Roger 

RKV Time is 3 plus hi 35, Delta V 61.2, Delta T 1 plus 22, 



yaw 0, pitch 21 degrees down, 25 00 57 0, E6.-00 22 k, 27 
all zeros, thrusters aft, posigrade down. Roger. Gemini 8, 
time on that is 03 k7 35, Delta V 61.2, Delta T 1 plus 22, 
yaw 0 degrees, pitch 21 degrees down, core 25 00 57 0, core 
26 00 22 k, core 27 all zeros, thrusters aft, maneuver posi«i 
grade down. Do you copy? 
S/C Roger. 03 ^7 35, 6l.2, 01 plus 22, yaw 0, pitch 21 degrees 

down, 25 00 57 0, 26 00 22 k, 27 all zeros, aft thrusters, 

posigrade down. 
RKV Roger, is affirmative. 

Houston RKV, Houston flight. 

RKV OK, flight. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 2:20 p.m. 



Tape k6, page 3 



Houston 



RKV 



Houston 
RKV 

Houston 
RKV 

S/C 
RKV 

Houston 
RKV 

Houston 
RKV 

Houston 
RKV 

Houston 
RKV 

s/c 

RKV 



Ask him if he has managed to get that Acq light on yet. 
That is Agena Acq lights on. He was going to send that 
command 251. 

Roger! We have no indication of it here. We do have 

phase 10ck and I think we should get him totake that 

lock off and try to get that flush load in. We have been 

unable to get flush load in. 

You mean coder on y..neiicoder on? 

Yes. Tell him to turn the ien coder off. 

OK, Go ahead and do that. 

Gemini 8, RKV Cap Com. Will you turn your encoder off. 
We would like to update the Agena with a flush load. 
Encoder is off, RKV, and we have negative lock on. 
Roger, understand. 
RKV, can we have a Gemini main? 

Up Gemini. Did you copy, Flight. He had been unable to 
get lock on. 
Say again 

He had been unable to get radar lock on. 
OK. Did you get the flush load in. 

We^aBeuiJransmitting right now. Thats affirmative. We have 
a map. . • 

OK. Why don't you get those Acq lights on from the ground. 
Tell him you are going to do that. 

Roger. Gemini 8, RKV Cap Com. We are going to send the Acq 
lights on from the ground here. 
Go ahead. 

Roger. We have it verified by map. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 2:20 p.m Tape U6, page k 



RKV Roger. You may turn your encoder back on. 

S/C Affirmative. 

RKV Roger. Go ahead, flight. 

Houston It is ok. We read that. Very good, RKV. 

RKV Thank you. We will have a LOS. We are having a break up 

right now on Agena. 
Houston Roger . 

RKV OK. We are getting an indication occasionally of ji_ radar 

lock. 

Houston Roger 

RKV We have radar indication again .We have had our first LOS 

of Gemini and Agena. We expect maybe somemore here shortly. 
Houston RKV, Houston 

RKV RKV 

Houston Did you get indications of power output on the transponder? 

RKV Station is LOS 



This is Gemini Control Houston. About two minutes ago, Neal Armstrong called 
in over Tannanarive and he was able to confirm at that time that radar lock 
ha d been established . A solid radar l ock was, had been linked up and he gave 
us,. .about two minutes ago. He said the range was 158 nautic al miles. This is 
an all important element of a rendezvous mission - - the establishment of that 

radar link. The pilots say that if they had to lose any of the several things 

involved in a rendezvous mission, that is the platform, the computer or the 
radar, they would much prefer the least. The one they would rather have over 
anything else is the radar. At 3 hours, k7 minutes into the mission we do 
have this brief conversation via Tannanarive. We will play the tape for you now 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 2:20 p.m. 



Tape kG, page 5 



Tannanarive This is Tannanarive remote. 

Houston Gemini 8, Houston Cap Com. 

S/C This is Gemini 8. Go ahead. 

Houston Do you have solid radar lock on with the Agena? Over. 

S/C Houston, Gemini 8 reads you loud and clear. 

Houston Roger. Do you have solid radar lock on with the Agena? Over. 

S/C That is affirmative. We have solid radar lock. Just a 

second and I will give you our current range. 
Houston Roger. Thank you, sounds good. 

, S/C We are indicating a 158 miles range and elevation of about 

k degrees. 

Houston Roger, sounds good and I am seeing about 3 minutes and 9 

seconds until your burn. 
S/C Roger. 



Gemini Control Houston here. We are 3 hours k& minutes, 51 seconds into the 
flight which would indicate we should be just about completing the circularization 
burn. We will stand by, we should have confirmation on that from the Tannanarive 
station. Signal loss not due if or another two minutes I would say. Our big 
rendezvous display chart here in the Control Center is etching a circular ring 
for the spacecraft, matching it up with the circular Agena orbit. Jim Lovell 
is putting in a call now, lets listen. 
END . OF ."-TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/l6/66 



2:31 p.m. 



Tape hi, Page 1 



Okay, our (Garbled) Residuals are hone-i 



Hou 



Roger, lefthand burn complete, residuals are honeo. Did not 



get the rest . 



This is Gemini Control Houston. You heard Neil Armstrong confirm that he had 
completed his circularization burn. He had no residuals left, apparently a 
clean manuever. And now we are advised that Tannarive has had LOS, loss of signal. 
Our next maneuver coming up at 5 hours and 13 minutes , 35 seconds into the mission — 
and appreciate that this is an update over the time given earlier — we now show for 
the terminal phase initiation maneuver five hours, 13 minutes and 35 seconds. This 
is Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66 2:52 p.m. 



Tape 1+8, Page 1 



Gemini Control Houston here, four hours, 10 minutes into the flight. Gemini 8 
now in contact with the Coastal Sentry Quebec, some five, 700 miles south of 
Japan and the conversation is going something like this. 



s/c 

CSQ 
S/C 

esq 

s/c 

CSQ 



HOU FLIGHT 
CSQ 

S/C 

esq 

HOU FLIGHT 

esq 

HOU FLIGHT 
CSQ 



CSQ, Gemini 8. 
Go ahead. 

Got a data point, ready to copy. 
Qo ah««d. 

8.10, V.8, 126.6^, 156, 290.8, Soh, looks like we're 
about fire minutes late 
Roger, copy. 

Houston flight, CSq, we hare initiated the Agena load, 
we hare memory compare, we are getting a memory read 
out at this time. 
Roger. 

Gemini 8, CSQ, you can turn your recorder back on at 
this time. 

Okay, going back on. 
Flight, esq. 
Qo ahead. 

Roger, we are showing an Indication that the tape recorder 

is off at this time. We are checking it. 

Tape recorder if off? 

Tape recorder is off? On Gemini? 

That's affirmative. 



L. ^ k. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 2:52 p.m. Tape k8, Page 2 



HOU FLIGHT CSq, Flight. 

CSQ Go ahead, flight. 

HOU FLIGHT Will you get a ECM count on that ACS control gas 

pressure and temperature? 

S/C C8Q, Gemini 6, data point ready. 

CSQ Roger. Go ahead. 

S/C Jwiber 12 - 6.0, 1*21.59, **51, 273^, 570. 

CSQ CStay, I copy. 



Gemini Control here, while the conversation continues, we show — we 
read the spacecraft and the Agena now separated by approximately 100 nautical 
miles. That will be at k hours and 12 minutes into the flight. Let's go back 
to the conversation. 



HOU FLIGHT CSQ, Houston. 

CSQ Go ahead Houston. 

HOU FLIGHT Can we hare a contingency Charlie on the Agena please? 

CSQ Roger. G;i ..- 

S/C CSQ here' 8 a data point now, ready? 

CSQ Go ahead. 

S/C 5.6, 119.05, 152, 273.*, 56U. 

CSQ Roger, that's data point 13. 

S/C That is correct. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66 , 3:20 p.m. 



Tape U9, Page 1 



This is Gemini Control, Houston, at h hours 39 minutes into the flight of 
Gemini 8. Since Hawaii we've heard Dave Scott calling out some of these values, 
the plots on his angle of his target, the Agena target, the range, the range rates, 
and other values . A series of numbers which he does not break and probably will 
not be understandable without the proper chart. But this is how the conversation 
has gone since Hawaii. 



HAWAII Gemini 8, Hawaii Cap Com. 

S/C Go ahead, Hawaii. 

HAWAII We'd like you to turn the encoder off. 

We're going to reconfigure the beacons 
from here to tape dump. 

S/C Ok, encoder coming off. 

HAWAII And would you place your T/M switch to 

real time-delayed time, please? 

S/C Real - time.- delayed time. 

HAWAII Flight, Hawaii has both vehicles go. 

FLIGHT Roger, Hawaii. 

HAWAII Roger, go ahead, ready to copy. 

S/C Point no. 20, 7.k, 101.07, 155» 216-9, ^52 

HAWAII Roger, copy. 

HAWAII Gemini 8, Hawaii. We'd like to get an 

OAMS propellant readout when you have a 
minute . 

S/C 75 percent. 

HAWAII Roger, 75- 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 3:20 p.m. 

FLIGHT 

tuitfAII 

FLIGHT 

HAWAII 

FLIGHT 

HAWAII 

FLIGHT 
B/BAII ' 
FLIGHT 

S/CV' T T 

S/U" TI 
HAWAII 

S/C 

HAWAII 

s/c 

HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 



FLIGHT 
HAWAII 

FLIGHT 



Tape U9, Page 2 

Hawaii, Flight. 

Hawaii, go ahead. 

How about the dump? 

Roger, the dump's in progress now. 

Ok. I didn't hear you ask for that. 

We commanded the tape recorder. It was in 

command position. 

Spacecraft? 

. . . espy. 

Ok. 

No. 21, 7.0, 98.50, 15U, 207. k, h3h. Hawaii 
copy? 

Hawaii, Gemini 8 with another point. 
Ready to copy. 

No 22, l.k, 95-93, 159. 201.9, tel 
Roger, copy. And you can place your T/M 
switch back to real time hack after this. 
Real time hack in. 
Now, Flight, Hawaii. 
Go ahead, Hawaii. 

Roger, we completed the Gemini tape dump. 
And we got a five -minute dump on the Agena 
but we weren't able to position the tape. 
Stand By. That's ok, Hawaii. 

Roger. And are you copying these data points? 
Roger. Yeah, we're getting them. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 3:20 p.m. 



Tape k9, Page 3 



I 



/LIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
PLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 

HAWAII 
rLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 

HAWAII 



FLIGHT 
HAWAII 
FLIGHT 
HAWAII 



FLIGHT 
HAWAII 



Hawaii, Flight. 
Hawaii , go ahead . 

Have you got the beacons reconfigured? 

That's affirmative. 

How about those PCM counts? 

Stand by. 

Ok. 

Flight, Hawaii. 
Go. 

What PCM counts would you like? 

That's BCS gas pressure and temperature, 

D059, D070. 

Copy. 

Hawaii , Houston Flight. 
Hawaii, go ahead. 

What was the problem with getting the tap* 
reconfigured? 

We Just didn't get the change of state, Flight, 
do we left it on. We did get a five-minute 
dump. 

Ok. Understand. 
Flight, Hawaii. 
Go, Hawaii. 

Roger , we had LOS before we were able to 
get those PCM counts and we did get the 
recorder positioned on the Agena. 
Roger . 

We must have missed the request for those 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 3:20 p.m. 



Tape U9, Page k 



PCM counts. 

FLIGHT That's my fault. I asked you for that in 

addition. Not to worry - we'll get it from 
Guaymas . 
Roger . 

Guaymas , Flight . 
Go ahead, Flight. 

Do you have your special - your MI? 
That's affirmative. 
Ok. It's all yours. 
Roger. Flight, Guaymas. 
Go ahead. 

Guaymas, Gemini 8. Want a data point. 
Go ahead. 

No. 27, 8A, 83.26, 11+9, 166.9, 3^9. 
Guaymas copied. 

Both birds still looking good Flight. 
Roger . 

Those PCM counts are still the same, 
Flight . 



FLIGHT Roger , Guaymas . 

S/C Gemini 8 with a point. Ready to copy? 

GUAYMAS Copy. 

S/C No. 28, 9.1, 80.75, 151, 157.8, 332. 

GUAYMAS Guaymas copied. 

GUAYMAS Flight, Guaymas. That S-band transponder's 

risen about 3 degrees since acquisition - 
it's at 108 degrees now. 



HAWAII 

FLIGHT 

GUAYMAS 

FLIGHT 

GUAYHIAS 

FLIGHT 

GUAYMAS 

FLIGHT 
S/C 

SjteYMAS 

GurtYMAS 
S/C 

GUAYMAS 
GUAYMAS 
FLIGHT 
GUAYMAS 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 3:20 p.m. 



Tape 49, Page 5 



.LIGHT 
GUAYMAS 

s/c 

GUAYMAS 

s/c 

GUAYMAS 
HOUSTON 

S/C 

HOUSTON 



s/c 



nuUSTON 



s/c 



HOUSTON 

s/c 

FLIGHT 

s/c 

GUAYMAS 



one zero eight? 
Roger. 

Guaymas, Gemini 8 with a point. 
Go ahead. 

No. 29, 8.9, 78.27, 152, 150.5, 318. 

Guaymas copied. 

This is Houston Cap Com. 

Say again. 

This is Houston. We have it and we also 
have your ground TPI backup when you're 
ready to copy. 

Stand iby. Ok, we've got a visual on the 
Agena at 76 miles. 

Roger," understand visual on Agena at 
76 miles . 

At least we have some object in sight, or 
something that looks like it would be the 
Agena. 

Understand a visual Agena, or Sirius, 76 
miles . 

Yeah, could be a planet. 
Guaymas, Flight. Guaymas, Flight. 
Guaymas , Gemini 8 , go ahead with the TPI . 
Roger. GETV, 05 13 13; ETNSR, 01 25 38; 
Delta V, 32. 6j forward, 32.0; up, 1.7; left, 
5.7; R sub D, 32-5; Delta R sub D, 131; 
azimuth, 27. k; elevation, zero. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, 3:20 p.m. 



Tape U9, Page 6 



S/C 

HOUSTON 

s/c 

HOUSTON 
S/C 



HOUSTON 
S/C 

HOUSTON 

HOUSTON 

FLIGHT 

RKV 

FLIGHT 



RKV 

FLIGHT 
RKV 

FLIGHT 
RKV 



Rog, Guaymas. Real smooth. Stand by. I'll 
get it back to you. 
Guaymas , Gemini 8 . 

This is Houston Cap Com. Go ahead, 8. 
Ok, TPI coming back at you. You ready? 
All set to go. 

05 13 13, 01 25 38, 32.6, 32.0 forward, 1.7 
up, 5-7 left, 32.5, 131, 27. h on the elevation, 
and zero on the azimuth. How's that? 
Other way around, Dave. Azimuth is 27- ^ 
and zero on the elevation. 
Yeah, that's what I thought you said. Ok. 
Otherwise it sounds good. We'll check that, 
Dave. That doesn't sound right. 
Roger, Dave. That is 27. k on the elevation. 
RKV, Houston Flight. 
Houston Flight, RKV Cap Com. 
Roger , on that terminal phase backup solu- 
tion, we should have reversed the elevation 
and the azimuth. Just check with him, will 
you? Elevation is 27. h up, azimuth zero. 
Would you read the el please, again? 
Roger. Elevation 27. U up. 
Roger, I copy 27-*+ degrees up. 

Azimuth, zero. 
Affirmative. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 3:20 p.m. 



Tape U9, Page 7 



This is Gemini Control, Houston, k hours k& minutes into the flight. In the 
course of that conversation jmcrhMaSiNeil Armstrong sajr that he had acquired visually 
the Agena. He gave the range as 76 miles and he had that acquisition at k hours 
1+0 minutes into the flight. This is Gemini Control, Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 3^9 p.n. Tape 50, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. We're five hours, eight minutes into the 
flight. And in about 2 to 3 minutes, we estimate the pilots will begin their 
terminal phase initiation. Themmagic number here is not so much time as the 
angle. When they achieve an angle from their target vehicle of 27 *k degrees, 
they will begin their terminal phase initiation and some 32 to 33 minutes 
should be very much in the proximity of the target vehicle. We have some 
tape from the recently concluded pass over the Rose Knot Victor parked off 
the southeast coast of South America and here's how that conversation went. 



RKV Roger, we'd like to confirm on this TPI that you 

did copy correctly with the at 27. k up 

and azimuth at 0 degrees. 

S/C All right, we understand that. 

RKV Roger, we also show on the ground that the L band 6632* 

is not locked. 
HOU FLIGHT Hot on is the terminology. 

S/C Under stand, is that correct. 

BjtV Roger, that's what we're showing on the ground. How 

are you reading (garbled).....' 

S/C Roger, understand 

RKV L band coder is on flight. It's just the coder lock 

light that shows it's not on. 
HOU FLIGHT Forget it . 

S/C RKV got a data point, you ready? 

RKV Roger. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/l6/66, 3^9 P«»- ^P** 50» **** 2 



S/C No kl - 1*.9> 138, 58.7» l 1 ^. 

RKV Roger. 

S/C Also, be adrlsed that your TPI and TPS may be approximately 

9 minutes late. 

HOU FLIGHT RKV Houston Flight. 

1UOC. Go ahead flight. 

HOU FLIGHT Forget the rest of it. 

REV Rog. Flight, we're showing that the L band is on, how- 



erer, we're showing that the L band coder is not locked 

and I think there May be bomb kind of instrumentation 

} 

problem with this, because he says he's getting gotfd* 
data points and eTerything. 



HOU FLIGHT We're fcalking about encoder on which prevents us from 

sending commands. 

RKV Oh, encoder, yes, that's off. 

HOU FLIGHT Okay. 

REV Sorry, I misunderstood. 

HOU FLIGHT Great. 

S/C REV, REV, Gemini 8, with a data point. 

REV Roger, go ahead. 

S/C k2 - 15.5, k 7.7*, 137, ^5-2. 

REV Roger, would you confirm that your encoder is on? 

S/C It's on now. 

RKV Roger, thank you. 

Flight, REV, B band case temp - hotel 0l+9 is sitting 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 

HOU FLIGHT 
RKV 

HOU FLIGHT 
S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 
RKV 

HOU FLIGHT 
RKV 

HOU FLIGHT 
RKV 

HOU FLIGHT 
RKV 

HOU FLIGHT 
EHD OF TAPE 



3/16/66, 3:^9 p.m. Tape 50, Page 3 

at 118 degrees. 
Okay, that's fine. 

By the way, ire had visual sighting 

Very good. 

»u»ber k3 7-2, *5-5, 138, 3^-3, 102. 

(garbled) .... 

RKV, Flight. 

Go ahead flight. 

Agena contingency dock, please? 

Roger, Delta. 

Tes, ve have some old Air Force types here. 

Okay. Say, sorry about that mix up on the encoder. 

That's okay. 

Flight, both vehicles are looking very good at LOB 

here. 

Roger. 



it k. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/16/66, U:00 p.m. Tape 51, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston at five hours, 19 minutes into the flight. 
We can assume, although we have not heard from the spacecraft since the Rose 
Knot Victor that their terminal phase initiate maneuver is completed. Jim 
Lovell is attempting to reach them now. They are over in the Tananarive area 
off the east coast of South Africa. This would place them some 25 to 26 miles 
below and behind the Agena as they begin to sweep gently up to l6l miles, orbital 
altitude of the Agena. This is Gemini Control standing by. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, U:05 p.m. Tape 52, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston at five hours, 2k minutes into the flight, 
some 11 minutes after the terminal phase initiate burn and according to our 
plots the spacecraft should be about 17 miles below and beneath the Agena. We've 
had no further word via the Tananarive station. We are standing by here on the 
premise that they will call us when they have some new information for us. This 
is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OFTAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, U:10 p.m. Tape 53, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. Still no further word. We have talked 
with Jim Lovell, the Spacecraft Communicator at this point. He says he is 
hesitant to contact the crew because this is one of the most difficult parts 
of the flight. Both crewmen are quite busy, Dave doing his mathematical exercises 
in the final approach, and Neil controlling the thrusters. They are now east 
of the Tananarive station. We expect to hear from them again in about 15 minutes. 
Make that 10 minutes when the Coastal Sentry Quebec acquires off the east coast 
of China and during the course of that pass they should go into their terminal 
phase final. We have been advised that some of these events like the final 
approach and certain of the docking, lets make that read the final approach, 
will take place in daylight, in other words, several minutes, perhaps five 
minutes pass the sunrise line out there this morning. At five hours, 30 minutes 
into the mission, this is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, k:V? p.m. Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston at 5 hours, 3k minutes into the flight 

of Gemini 8. The Agena currently showing 7 hours, and 15 minutes of flight. 

Still no word from our crew members . All eyes here in the control center 

for 

glued to our "big displays^and every ear listening p> the first word. John 
Hodge now in contact with the flight controller on the CSQ, he has advised 
him we have no special instructions for the ship. Of course, we would like 
to hear as soon as possible what their status is as soon as CSQ acquires. 
That acquisition should come about 5 minutes from now. This is Gemini 
Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, ^:20 p.m. Tape 55, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston, 5 hours, 39 minutes into the flight. Flight 
Director John Hodge has advised the Coastal Sentry Quebec controller that he 
would like the range and range rate read out at approximately 30 second intervals 
when the CSQ acquires the two vehicles, which they Bhould within a very few 
seconds. About five minutes from now, then, the Gemini 8 spacecraft will go 
into its terminal phase final maneuver, which is programmed for 5 hours, 1*5 

minutes, 37 seconds into the flight. This calls for a yljowf fi : of 39.8 feet 

will 

per second. And leave onboard some V58 pounds of fuel, according to our 

estimates here, which are based on telemetry. 

Momentarily, we should have acquisition by the CSQ. Dick Gordon who 

backed up Dave Scott in the Gemini 8 preparations as the pilot crew member, 

has 

has taken a station right on top of the Flight Director's console. He/occupied 
it for about the past two hours, keeping a very close .plot, with the values that 
Dave Scott called out earlier. 
(Pause) 

The Coastal Sentry Quebec controller advises they JLshow a range of about 
38,000 feet. They did acquire telemetry solid about 60 seconds ago. 
(Pause) 

The Coastal Sentry Quebec controller Just advised the Gemini 8 spacecraft 
that they had nothing for them. They were standing by. This brought an acknowledge 
ment from Hell Armstrong. And he said that they'd be back to them later. 
(Pause) 

The Coastal Sentry Quebec advises the range is now about Ik, 000 /feet. And 
as soon as several people in this Control Center heard that reading their thumbs 
went up indicating that things were going along very well. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 4:20 p.m. Tape 55, Page 2 

Another range reading, about 12,000 — 12,100 feet. 

(Pause) 

All these values are coming from the ground station there at the Coastal 
Sentry Quebec. Five minutes and hk minutes. Range now quoted at 10,800 feet. 
(Pause) 

We're coming up on the terminal phase final maneuver. John Hodge has Just 
quered CSQ for another range reading. 
(Pause) 

CSQ advises the range is now about 7500 feet. 
(Pause) 

Range now 6800 feet. We have an exceptionally clear signal, voice signal 
from the CSQ today. 

Range now 6100 feet. 
(Pause) 

A new range reading at 5700 feet. The big question now is whether the distance 
will be closed while we're still within the Coastal Sentry Quebec range of acquisition. 
I would estimate we've probably got another two) minutes. The next station, of course 
would be Hawaii. That station to acquire at 5 hours 58 minutes into the flight. 
Some 10 minutes from now. 
(Pause) 

And now we have another reading on range of 4900 feet. And expect to loose 
signal any second. The pilots have not had any voice conversation with CSQ fluriihg 
this pass but that is understandable, since they are both very busy fellows at this 
terminal phase. CSQ now advises they have lost signal with the spacecraft. Their 
last range reading at loss of signal was 2100 feet. 2100 feet from the Agena. All 
systems aboard both the Agena and the spacecraft performing very nicely. We should 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, k:20 p.m. Tape 55, Page 3 

reacquire the spacecraft in perhaps 8 minutes from Hawaii and will be back 
to you at that time. This is Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



ft 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, k:kO p.m. 



Tape 56, page 1 



This is Gemini Control Houston 



and there is the word we have been 



waiting for. I paused because just as I opened the announcement, Hawaii 
called them. Neal Armstrong came back that we are station keeping, we are 
about 150 feet apart. 150 feet apart in their presently, perhaps 1000 west 
of Hawaii. A minute or two ago, Jim Lovell attempted to raise the spacecraft 
through the Range Tracker, a ship parked 1500 west of Hawaii. We could 
barely, hear Neal acknowleding the call and could not read his voice. It is 
quite clear now and all he has said in response to the Hawaii Capsule Comm- 
unicator's question* "How is it going?". "We are 150 feet apart and station 
keeping." They should advise any minute about their docking plans as to when 
we can expect that to oqcur. . 
PAUSE 

Neal Armstrong has given us a little update and he says the Agena looks fine. 
The antennas are all in the proper position. He described the TDA as looking 
fine, it is apparently no worse for the wear from 7 hours and k2 minutes in 
flight, and they are apparently maneuvering their spacecraft around in order to 
get some of the readings off .the status display panel located just above the TDA. 
They are being given at this time, some yaw maneuver times, some other values. 
Lets tune in on it and follow the conversation live. 
S/C Roger, understand. Yaw maneuver 071000. 

Hawaii Also, while you are at up plus 96 degree heading, the Agena 



will go to flight control mode 7 for 30 seconds. 



S/C 



Understand} 96 degrees up C 7 for 30. 



Hawaii 



The SPC load we are transmitting contains Agena clock reset. 



We are very anxious for it to be executed even if it cuts 



short your platform parallelism. Over. 



S/C 



Say that last one again, please. 



Hawai i 



Roger. The SPC load we are transmitting contains a clock 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, k:kO p.m. 



Tape 56, page 2 



reset for the Agena. Vfe are anxious for it to be executed 
even if this means cutting the platform parallelism test 
short . 

Roger. Understand. SPC has the priority over the platform 
parallelism, in essence, is that right? 
That is right. 

Flight, we are having difficulty getting a compare and 
necessity C load. 

OK, letnus know when you have got it. How about the tape 
dump? 

Tape dump is doing fine. 
Roger 

Also their C band beacons have been reconfigured. 
ThereS is Gemini Control Houston here. During the lull in the conversation... 
here we go again. Lets go back to the spacecraft. 

Go ahead. 

Roger. We are unable to get some of the initial commands 
into the yaw maneuver necessity C load. It is still showing 
Os. 

Standby. You have about enough time to retransmit. Do you 
want to do that? 

Roger. Hawaii is retransmitting, flight. 
OK. If after this one you don't get it in, send inhibit 
and we will do it again over RKV. 
Hawaii Copy. 



S/C 

Hawaii 
Hawaii 

Houston Flight 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 



Houston Flight 
Hawaii 



Houston 

Hawaii 
Houston 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, k:kO p.m. 



Tape 56, page 3 



Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 



S/C 



Hawaii, flight. 

Flight, we are transmitting SPC disable. 

Roger. Hawaii, flight, is that a memory readout or a memory 
compare? 

We have tried for both, flight. The memory readout shows 
zeros in quite a few of the commands. 
Roger. Hawaii, flight. 
Go ahead. 

Will you ask the crew when they first saw the acquisition 
lights. as they came in. 

When they first saw acquisition lights. Roger. 
Right 

Gemini 8, Hawaii. We would like to know when you first saw 

the acquisition lights as you approached. 

We will have to go back in the data and dig that out. 

Roger. 

We think it was miles but we will have to check out the 
tape . 

Roger. Copy and we are ready to copy the readouts if you 
have them. The readings in the status display panel. 
Roger. Looks like we are about 80 feet out still and we have 
a main red otff , main green on, armed off, secondary high on, 
secondary low on, attitude on, rigid off, power on and can't 
quite see the dock yet. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, k:kO p.m. 



Tape 56, page k 



Hawaii 



Roger. Copy. 



S/C 



Pretty bright up here. 



Hawaii 



Flight, did, you copy? 



Houston 



Roger, I got red off and green on and then I lost it. Do 



you want to come again. Thats ok, we have got them all. 



Hawaii 



Roger, understand. Then he said that they can't give us the 



readings from the status display panel. They are using a 



sexton to get the information they have. 



Houston 



OK 



Hawaii 



We have LOS at Hawaii. 



Houston 



Roger 



This is Gemini Control Houston. That will wrap up the conversation in Hawaii. 
The flight plan from here calls for the actual docking to take place over the 
Rose Knot Victor parked down off the east coast of South America. The Rose Knot 
Victor is to acquire the spacecraft at 6 hours 32 minutes into the flight. We 
presently show 6 hours 8 minutes into the flight. All in all the pilots are 
acting extremely "Ho-hum" about the whole thing. They were being urged here to 
say a bit more about their situation and if anything, I think they stranded more 
relaxed over Hawaii in reporting these events than they have sounded inranjr 
point during the flight. We have now the complete tape d>f the pass. There may 
be some interest in listening to the initial contact. We will play the entire 
tape through for you at this time. \ 
END OF TAPE \ \ 




MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 1 



Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 

S/C 

, Hawaii 
S/C 

Houston 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Ba-waii 

S/C 

Hawaii 



How does it look? 

All right. We have both vehicles go Flight, 
Roger. Ask him how he's doing? 
Gemini 8, this is Hawaii. 
Go ahead. 

Roger. How are you doing? 
Station keeping at about 150 feet. 
Roger. Have you transmitted UHF to stable. 
That is correct. 

Roger. He have an SPC load to transmit. 

Would you enable it, please. 

Sure will. 

Hawaii, Flight. 

Flight, Hawaii. Go ahead. 

We'd like to get an onboard GAMS propel la nt 

remaining, too. 

Stand by. Gemini 8, Hawaii. 

Go ahead. 

Roger. Would you turn up your encoder, 
please? 

OK. Doing a little BAO work up here. 
Gene, it looks in fine shape. PBA is out 
and rigidized. The lifters sticking out as 



MISSION 



Houston 
HAWAII 
Houston 
Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 



COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 2 
expected on the PBA. The diapole is up. 
The engine looks good and he's turned the 
acq lights off. 
Roger. Copy. 

Did you copy all that, Flight? 
Roger . 

Gemini 8, we'd like an OAMS propellant 
reading . 

We have 55 percent. 
Copy, 59. 
That's 55. 

55. And we're standing by to copy the 

status display panel readings. 

OK. We'll have to get over on that side 

of it. Gemini, Hawaii. 

Go ahead. 

We have a yaw maneuver time for you if you're 
ready to copy. 
OK. Go ahead. 

Had a yaw maneuver at 07 10 00. That's 
GET. 

Roger. Understand yaw maneuver 07 10 00. 
Also, you're at a +9 degree heading. The 
Agena will go to a flight control mode 7 for 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 3 

30 seconds. 

S/C Understand 96 degrees FC 7 for 30. 

Hawaii And the SPC load we're transmitting contains 

Agena clocX reset. We're very anxious for 
it to be executed even if it cuts short 
your platform parallelism, over. 

S/C Say that last one again, please. 

Hawaii Roger. The SPC load we're transmitting 

contains a clock reset for the Agena. 



S/C 

Hawaii 



S/C 



Hawaii 
Houston 

S/C 

Hawaii 

Houston 

Hawaii 



Rog. 

We're anxious for it to be executed even if 
this means cutting the platform parallelism 
test short. 

Roger. Understand SPC has priority over the 
platform parallelism, in essence, is that 
right? 

Affirmative. 
That's right. 
OK. 

Flight, we're having some difficulty getting 
a compare on this SPC load. 

OK. Let us fcnow when you've got it. How 

about the tape dump? 
Tape dump is going fine. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 4 



Houston 
Hawaii 

Houston 
Hawaii 



Houston 



Hawaii 
Houston 

Hawaii 
Houb ton 
Hawaii 
Houston 

Hawaii 



Roger. 

Also, the C-band beacon has been reconfigured. 
Flight, Hawaii. 
Go ahead. 

Roger. We're unable to get some of the 
initial commands in for the L maneuver 
in this SPC load. It's still showing 
zeros . 

Stand by. You have about enough time to 
retransmit it. You want to do that? 
Hawaii? 

Roger, Hawaii is retransmitting, Flight. 
OK. If after this one you don't get it in, 
send inhibit and we'll do it again over RKV. 
Copy. 

Hawaii, Flight. 

Flight, we're transmitting SPC. Disable. 
Roger. Hawaii, Flight. Is that a memory 
readout or a memory compare? 
We've tried for both, Flight. The memory 
readout showed zeros in quite a few of the 

commands . 



Houston 



Roger. 



fe. i 



MISSION 
Houston 
Hawaii 
Houston 

Hawaii 
Houston 
Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 

S/C 

Hawaii 
S/C 

Hawaii 



S/C 



COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 5 
Hawaii, Flight. 
Hawaii, go ahead. 

Will you ask the crew when they first saw the 
acquisition lights as they came in? 
When they first saw acquisition lights, Roger. 
Roger . 

Gemini 8, Hawaii. 
Go ahead. 

We'd like to know when you first saw the 
acquisition lights as you approached. 
We'll have to go back in the data and dig 
that out. 
Roger . 

We think it was 45 miles but we'll have to 
check on the tape . 

Roger. Copy and I'm ready the copy the 
readouts if you have them now. The readings 
from the status display panel if you have 
them. 

Roger. Looks like we're about 80 feet out 
still and we have main red off, main green 
on, armed off, secondary high on, secondary 
low on, attitude on, rate is off, power on, 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4:50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 6 

and can't quite see to dock yet. 
Hawaii Roger. Copy. Roger, understand. 

S/C Pretty bright up here. 

Hawaii Flight, did you copy? 

Houston Roger. I got red off and green on and 

then I lost it. 
Hawaii You want to come again? 

Houston That's OK we've got them all. 

Hawaii Roger, understand. And he said he can't 

give us the readings from the status display 

panel. They're using a section to get the 

information they have. 
Houston OK. 

Hawaii And we have LOS in Hawaii. 

This is Gemini Control in Houston. We have replayed the 
conversation following our rendezvous, and to recap one thing 
and another, the two vehicles have matched velocity, that is, 
Gemini 8 has matched the Agena velocity of 25,365.9 feet per 
second, or in miles -per -hour 17,294.9. They are running at a 
60 to 80 feet apart as they move across the eastern Pacific. 
Also, based on early TM values, our controllers estimate that 
the spacecraft used only 180 pounds of fuel in that terminal 
phase, final maneuver, and this would match very closely with 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 4$50 p.m. Tape 57, Page 7 
the fuel usfige demonstrated by Gemini 6 in its rendezvous with 
Gemini 7. It's all touch of irony today as this rendezvous 
took place just vest of Hawaii. The two pilots, the command 
pilots for Gemini 6 and Gemini 7, Wally Schirra and Frank Borman, 
were in an airplane and they are headed also for the island of 
Hawaii. They should land there later this afternoon after a 
Far Eastern tour. Again, we should acquire the Rose Knot Victor 
should acquire at 6 hours 32 minutes into the flight. We're 
presently showing 6 hours 16 minutes into the flight, and the 
physical docking is to take place over the Rose Knot Victor. 
This is Gemini Control Houston. 

BSD OF TAPE 



MISSICW COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 5:13 pm. Tape 58, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston at 6 hours, 32 minutes into the flight. 
Flight Director Hodge has Just talked with the controller on the Rose Knot 
Victor, they have agreed on tMir procedures there. We're standing by wait- 
ing for some word. There goes a call up to Gemini 8. 

We heard Gemini 8 acknowledge the call. Hodge asked the Rose Knot if 
they were docked. We are Advised they are not docked as yet. And the Rose 
Knot has Just told Gemini 8 to go ahead and dock. 

The desired velocity for this docking maneuver is about 1 foot per second, 
that is driving in toward the Agena, the docking adapter. The pilots want at 
least \ foot per second to insure that all the latches are engaged and the 
proper link-up is achieved. But they don't want too much more than 1 foot per 
second for fear that some damage might be done in the coupling. 

Rose Knot Vittor shows — Rose Knot Victor shows — and now the word is 
they have docked , They have achieved the dock. They must have only been a 
few feet away. The Rose Knot Victor controller is congratulating them. Neil 
Armstrong's only comment was "It was a real smoothie.? They apparently were 
only a foot or two away from the Agena when they put in the call. 

Armstrong says that the Agena was very stable during the docking maneuver. 
They are physically docked now and he says they are having no disturbances at 
all. in .their flight path. The actual docking maneuver brought a small chorus 
of cheers from here, a lot of thumbs up signal in this control center. The 
Rose Knot Victor controller talking with them. He is advising the pilots that 
they'd like to update a command load to the Agena. Additional commands for the 
Agena being readied to be sent up from the Rose Knot Victor, not very much 
additional conversation coming from the two. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/16/66:, 5:17 p.m. Tape 59, Page 1 

HANEY • • • .Neil Armstrong is making triply sure that the 

proper command is sent from the Rose Knot Victor. 
He apparently wants to take no chances which is quite 
understandable in his present configuration. (Pause) 
Now the SPC load, or the Stored Program Control load, 
this is a controller aboard the Agena has received 
its proper command and both the spacecraft and the 
ground are happy with that . We have the taped con- 
versation from the start of this pass available for 
you and we'll play that for you now. 

RKV Gemini 8, RKV. 

S/C ...about two feet out... 

RKV Roger, stand by for a couple of minutes here. 

HOU Is he docked? 

RKV Negative, he's not docked yet. 

Ok, Gemini 8, we have TM solid. You are looking good 
here on the ground, go ahead and dock. Flight we're 
going to hold off on this SPC thing until he does get 
docked . 

HOU Ok, go ahead with your memory compare. 

RKV Roger . 

HOU Let us know what he does. 

RKV Ok, we have a rigid light.... it is not rigid now. 

HOU Say again. 

RKV Ok Gemini 8, it looks good here from the ground, 

we're showing column rigid, everything looks good 
for the docking. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 5:17 p.m. Tape 59, Page 2 

S/c Ok, we're going to cycle our stop on switch now. 

RKV Roger . 

S/c Flight we are docked. And he's really a smoothie. 

RKV Oh Roger!! And congratulations, this is real good. 

S/C You couldn't have the thrill down there we have up 

here. Just for your information, the Agena was very 

stable, and at the present time we are having no 

noticeable oscillations at all. 
RKV Roger, copy. Agena very stable and no noticeable 

oscillations. 
S/C Rog 

Hou Fit RKV, Flight. What is the control mode in the Agena? 

RKV Stand by, Flight. 

Hou Fit Roger 

RKV We are in control mode 6 flight. 

Hou Fit Roger 

RKV Ok, we are showing zeros in those cores and we are 

going to have him turn encoder off then also the 
UHF enable. 

Hou Fit Ok, you want to send it again? 

RKV Gemini 8, RKV. We'd like to update that SPC load, 

it did not all get in correctly, could you give us 
UHF enable and the encoder off, please. 

S/c I think we'd rather... can we send it in on the 

encoder ourselves? 
Hou Fit Can't do that. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/16/66, 5:17 p.m. Tape 59 , Page 3 



S/C You just want a load and SPC again, is that right? 

RKV . Rogj we did not get all the SPC load in correctly 

over Hawaii and we want to finish the SPC load from 
here. And you cannot do that from where you are. Do 
you copy, Gemini 8? 

S/C Yeah, we copy, we are just discussing it a little bit. 

RKV Ok. 

S/C Ok, we are going to go along with you on that and 

want you to make double sure you get the right 
numbers . 

RKV Roger, wilco, we sure will. 

Hou Fit RKV, flight, you can tell him SPC's are disabled. 

RKV OK 

Hou Fit Make him feel a little warmer. 

RKV And be advised Gemini 8 that the SPC's at the 

present time are disabled so regardless of this 

load does it will still be ok. 
S/C We'd like for you to make double sure. 

RKV Roger. Could you give us the encoder off please? 

S/C It's off. 

RKV Roger, thank you. We are sending the SPC load. 

S/C How 'bout setting that emergency timer reset, should 

we open it up . 
RKV That's right. 

S/C Ok. 

RKV Ok, Gemini 8, the SPC's are in. We have reset the 

emergency timer, and you may have control back again. 
S/C Thank you very much. 

RKV Roger . 

t P" - 

_ *~ -to* *~ dh. W A* Jk ^ t- - 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 5:17 p.m. Tape 59, Page h 

RKV Oh wait a minute, we didn't sent that SPC enable, 

do we want to send that Flight, or not? 
Hou Fit Right 
RKV What ? 

Hou Fit Confirm the load 

RKV Ok. Flight we got a negative on the memory 

compare . 

Hou Fit Negative? 

RKV That affirmative, a negative on the memory compare, 

we're getting the print out now. 
Hou Fit Take a readout on that, RKV 

RKV Rog, that's what we are doing. 

Hou Fit Let ' s know which rows have got zero in 

RKV Wilco 
Hou Fit RKV, Houston 

RKV Houston, RKV 

Hou Fit Did you send VM word? 

RKV That ' s negative . Gemini 8 , we would also like to 

send the VM word, would you turn the encoder off 
please? 

S/C Ok, encoder off. 

RKV Roger, transmitting VM word now. Ok, you can turn 

the encoder back on. Flight we got no compare on 
the VM. 

Hou Fit No compare on the VM? 

RKV That's affirm. 

Hou Fit Ok , that ' s ok , we can get them to put that in them- 

selves . 

RKV Ok 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 5:17 p.m. Tape 59, Page 5 

RKV You want me to read it up to him? 

Hou Fit He has it onboard, standby. Go ahead and read it 

up to him. No you are not going to have enough time 

now. We'll pick it up over CSQ. 
RKV Ok, flight. I don't know what the heck went wrong 

with that thing. 
Hou Fit Say again. 

RKV Say I don't know what the heck went wrong with that 

VM load. 

RKV Gemini 8, RKV, we are about to have LOS!* you are 

looking real good from the ground, congratulations 
on rendezvous and docking. Flight we've had LOS 
and we did not get a tape dump. 

Hou Fit Roger. 

This is Gemini Control Houston here, at 6 hours 
kk minutes into the flight. According to the best 
estimates that we have the actual docking took place 
at 6 hours, 3k minutes into the flight. We can verify 
this later through telemetry but that is the estimate 
of the Flight Director. The pilots still have about 
two hours work ahead of them before they will power 
down for the night and suspend their activities after 
this most busy and successful day. The events will 
include some maneuvering with the Agena, several 

yaw maneuvers, they'll use the SPS propulsion system 
and observe it very carefully. Every event is to 
be photographed in as much detail as they can. This 
is Gemini Control Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSIOT COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 5:50 p.m. Tape 60, Page 1 

There seems to be seme difficulty with this line. This is Gemini Control 
Houston, excuse the mechanical delay. The Gemini 8 crev should he about 
beginning a yaw maneuver with the Agena. They will use the Agena thrusters 
yawing at about as much as l8o degrees at the rate of about a degree and a 
half per second. They then will check the Agena gyros and perform additional 
yaw maneuvers before going into a series of bending mode tests, which will 
call for an Agena yaw thrusters as well as spacecraft thrusters. And also, 
during this period as we approach the Coastal Sentry Quebec, they are to 
perform a fuel cell purge and a little later, they will again exercise the 
secondary propulsion system when they're back over the Rose Knot Victor. 
We have some tape conversation for you from the Tananarleve station. In 
this conversation, there are questions about the receipt of some commands 
that went up to the Agena. According to the Flight Director, the commands 
were transmitted from the Hawaii station, earlier, and again from the Rose 
Knot Victor. We got a valid indication that they have been received, then as 
the spacecraft computer looked at the commands and there seemed to be disagreement 
on exactly what commands were in. We suspect right now, that the programming may 
be a bit off in the computer for this particular case, want to underscore it there, 
there appears to be no problem with the computer, they certainly worked very well 
coming into the rendezvous. But in this particular area of the program, there 
may have been improper loading some disagreement with the actual commands that 
went up for the Agena system. Here now is the Tananarleve conversation. 
HOU CAP COM Gemini 8, Gemini 8, Houston Cap Com, over. 

S/C This is Gemini 8. 

HOUSTON FLIGHT Hawaii, this is Houston Flight. 

HOUSTON FLIGHT Roger, 8, reading you loud and clear, I have some informa- 

tion for you, ready to copy? 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 

S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 
S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 



S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 
S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 

s/c 

HOU FLIGHT 
B/C 

HOU FLIGHT 

S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 
S/C 



3/16/66, 5:50 p.m. Tape 60, Page 2 

Stand "by. What kind of information is it? 
Well, first of all, it's about the yaw maneuver, I have 
some dope for you which we would like for you to follow. 
You mean the SPC 1 s yaw maneuver . 

Roger, we believe we have the load in and we'd like 
to have you enable the SPC's and let the Agena start 
coming through. If you run into trobie* and the attitude 
control system of the Agena goes wild, just send in 
command 1+00 to turn it off and take control of the 
spacecraft. Do you copy that? 
Rog, we understand. 

Roger, okay, stand by. I have another update for you. 
Stand by. I got to get the right book. Go ahead. 
Roger, node 07, Ok, 46, Rev 5 67.5 east, 1552 right 
asoension. 

Roger, node 07, 04, 46, Rev 5 67.5 east, 15 + 52 at 
ascension. 

Roger, that's correct and would you verify that the L 
band radar is on please? 

Rog, we sent an off command, do you want us to do it 
again. 

No, this is the spacecraft L band radar. 

Roger, the from the transponder is off. 

Roger, thank you and would you put the ECS02 heater 
off? 

Okay, going off. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 5:50 p.m. 



Tape 60, Page 3 



HOU FLIGHT 



S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 

S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 

S/C 

HOU FLIGHT 

S/C 

HOU FLIGHT' 
S/C 

TANANAEIEVE 
END OF TAPE 



Roger, and EECOM down here thinks that the fuel cell 
02 and H2 heater circuit breaker had opened up during 
the Pacific pass and we would like to know if Dave 
found that circuit breaker open: and did he reset it 
after Hawaii? 

That's affirmative, he did find it Open and he did 

reset it after Hawaii. 

Roger, big brother is watching. 

Say again. 

propellant 

Could you give us an CAMS pr-ipail; quantity readout please? 

CAMS propellant. 

51^ right now. 

Roger, 5l£. Thank you. 

We've yawed around to 180 now for the parallelism and 
it's gone quite well. 

Roger, understand, you've yawed to 180 for the parallelism 

check. 

Right. 

Tananarive: has LOS. 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 6:12 p.m. Tape 6l, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. We've encountered some trouble in the 
flight. Neil Armstrong has backed off from the Agena. He reported this 
trouble occurred at approximately 7 hours into the flight. We were advised 
of it some 5 to 6 minutes ago over the Coastal Sentry Quebec. The present 
situation is, he's using the rate one of his RCS rings to maintain attitude 
and we are watching the situation very carefully. This is Gemini Control 
Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/16/66, 6:lU p.m. Tape 62, page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston again. Apparently the last transmission 
was not received by all stations, so we repeat. Trouble has developed in the 
flight of Gemini 8, while docked with the Agena the configuration apparently 
got in a maneuver which Neil Armstrong did not like. He elected to undock 
and back off from the Agena. It is also our understanding that his maneuvering 
system, his onboard maneuvering system, that is his big thrusters on the adapter 
are inoperative. He is using one of two rings in his reentry control system to 
maintain his attitude during flight. It is possible that the flight may be 
terminated early. This trouble developed, according to Armstrong, at 7 hours 
into the flight. It was passed on to us some 10 minutes ago while the spacecraft 
was over the Coastal Sentry Quebec. We presently read 7 hours, 3^ minutes into 
the flight and we are standing by. This is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



I 

MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 6:kk p.m. Tape 63, Page 1 

This 1b Gemini Control Houston. We are 8 hours and 3 minutes into the 
flight of Gemini 8. And in view of the trouble encountered at 7 hours into 
the flight as reported earlier, the Flight Director has determined to terminate 
the flight in the 7-3 area. We plan to bring the flight down on the 7th orbit 
in the 3rd, what we call the 3rd zone, which is approximately 500 miles east 
of Okinawa, it's in the far west Pacific. Our situation out there is as follows - 
a destroyer named the Mason is about 160 miles away at this time, it is proceeding 
towards the point, and it should take that destroyer probably 5 to 6 hours to 
reach the point, which should come very close to the... well it may be a little 
delayed, get there after the landing itself. The first estimate I have on the 
retrofire time is 10 hours and four minutes into the mission, in other words 
two hours from now. Landing should take place some 25 to 26 minutes later. 
In addition to the Mason , a C-5k has been dispatched from Tachikawa Air Force 
Base in Japan, its proceeding to the point. Another C-5^ is proceeding to the 
point from Okinawa. The, another location here on the landing point is quoted 
to me as 630 nautical miles south of Yokosuka, Japan. The weather conditions out 
there are partly cloudy, visibility ten miles, and the landing will be made in 
full daylight, its 12:30 p.m. out in the 7-3 area. Again to recap our situation 
as best we understand it at this point, at 7 hours into the mission, Neil Armstrong 
noted some maneuvers, the spacecraft -Agena combination getting into some rates 
that he did not like. He elected to back off from the Agena, undock, which he 
did. We do not know whether the problem developed in the Agena or in the space 
craft. We do know that the maneuver thrusters on the aft end of the Gemini 8 
spacecraft bepame inoperative in yaw. He did report later he had his pitch 

thrusters and he also reported he had used one of his reentry control system 
rings to bring the spacecraft under complete control. That pretty well sums 
up our situation here, we'll pass along additional information as it develops. 
This is Gemini Control at 8 hours, 6 rrinutes into the flight. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT ' t 3/16/66, 7:01 p.m. Tape 6U, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. At this time the flight control team 
are reviewing retrofire parameters to bring the spacecraft in the 7-3 area. 
We have been further advised' that an HU16 amphibian type aircraft is being 
dispatched to the scene, again located about 500 miles east and slightly- 
south of Okinawa. In additional discussions with Gemini 8 over the Rose 
Knot Victor, it was a fairly short pass, Neil did advise that the thruster 
number 8 apparently failed in an open position. We don't know that that was 
the complete extent of the difficulty, but he did verify that that thruster 
failed. We don't know whether it failed while he was still docked to the Agena 
or after he had undocked and backed off from the Agena, but that's of no 
consequence at this, point. He does have the spacecraft in a very stable 
attitude, using his RCS system. The Agena is described as ahead and below 
him, which apparently is a favorable condition for the kind of landing 
maneuver we want to attempt, of retrocommand is 10 hours and k minutes into 
the mission and to correct an earlier statement it is approximately 32 minutes 
later that the spacecraft should touch down in the West Pacific. This is 
Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 7:17 p.m. Tape 65, Pagel 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. Eight hours, 36 minutes into the flight 

of Gemini 8. We've had no further voice contact with the spacecraft since 

it left the Rose Knot area some 10 to 15 minutes ago, and we do not expect 

any further conversation until the spacecraft is over the Coastal Sentry 

Quebec which should occur at 8 hours and 52 minutes into the flight. At last 

reports the Agena was in a stable attitude, I repeat the Agena was in a stable 

attitude and tracking placed it about 5 miles ahead and below, earlier Neil 

Armstrong had said about a mile below the Gemini 8 spacecraft. We are also 

advised by the R covery Forces that the plan is to take the crew to Nana 
e 

in Okinawa and they will be billeted there for all the post flight checks. 
Again the retrbfire time is to be 10 hours, k minutes into the flight. The 
splash taking place 32 minutes after retrofire, that to occur in area 7-3 
in area 500 miles east of Okinawa. The weather out there inthat area is 
outstanding, waves only 3 feet, visibility 10 miles and they will come down 
in a daylight situation. Local time will be approximate 12:30. Two airplanes 
are on their way there, a destroyer is on its way there, in addition: a third 
airplane, an amphibian capable of landing on the water if necessary is also 
being sent there from Naha. This is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 7:33 p.m. Tape 66, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. Additional recovery information has been 
forwarded to us. We now estimate it will be about three hours after spacecraft 
landing that the destroyer Mason will be on the scene. While the spacecraft land 
one C-5k should have already been on the scene for some 20 minutes. It will be 
overhead, it is equipped to pick up electronic signals as the spacecraft reenters 
and in general we will get most of our information from that airplane , most likely 
That will be patched back through Japan and across the Pacific. A second C-5k 
should be there some 20 to 25 minutes after landing, along with that amphibian 
aircraft we mentioned earlier. The retrofire itself which is programmed to take 
place at 8:U6 CST, ten hours and k minutes of elapsed time into the mission will 
take place over south central Africa according to present estimates. Meanwhile 
here in thebontrol Center, Capsule Communicator Jim Lovell and backup crew 
members Pete Conrad and Dick Gordon, are going over the reentry checklist which 
will be checked out very carefully with the crew. I want to emphasize that there 
may be considerable communications difficulties in that landing area. We are 
counting heavily on that relay into Japan, but at best they will be marginal. 
So post landing information may be a little slow in coming, but we will do our 
best. At 8 hours and 53 minutes into the mission, this is Gemini Control Houston 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, B/16/66, I'M p.m. Tape 67, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. We're 9 hours, S minutes into the flight 
and we just concluded the pass from Gemini 8 over the Coastal Sentry Quebec. 
This was the point, where about two hours ago, we first — got our first reports 
of trouble. The trouble itself apparently started at 7 hours into the mission. 
Neil was over the CSQ about 20 to 25 minutes later, at which time he advised us 
of it. We would like to play for you now the tape conversation over the CSQ, 
which is primarily passing up the retro fire times, all the values they'll need 
onboard to do a controlled reentry. Here's that tape. 



S/c We have a GMT in solid, transmitted ACQ lights on. 

CSQ Roger. 

HOU FLIGHT During your pass, if you have time you can ask 

the crew — advise the crew that you have turned 
the ACQ lights on and we'd like them to see if they 
can pick up the Agena. 

CSQ We're still trying to get a position to determine if 

we have any recontact problems on retro. 

H0U FLIGHT Roger 

CSQ Gemini 8, CSQ Cap Com, com check, how do you read? 

S/c Read you loud and clear. How us? 

CSQ Read you loud and clear, we have a new TR and a lift 

for you. 

S/C Okay, the TR we've got is counting up. 

CSQ Say again. 

S/c The TR we've got is counting up. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7'.kk p.m. Tape 67, Page 2 



CSQ The TR you've got is counting up? 

Well, the one we've got is counting down, do don't 
sweat it. 

: Verifyi ii that module k is loaded. 

S/C It is leaded, verify UA and UB. 

CSQ Okay, is your pre-retro check list complete? 

S/C We're just finishing up restowage. 

CSQ Okay, what about the left secondary 02, verify that 



it is open. 
Open. 

Okay, I'm about to transmit the T 1 to you. 
Okay, go ahead. 

Roger, verified on the ground. Transmitting a load. 
CSQ Cap Com, we want to go ahead and have you trans- 
mit the TR. Have you transmitted the TR? 



CSQ Affirmative. 

HOU CAP COM Is it counting down properly? 

CSQ Roger. 

HOU CfiP COM Okay. 

CSQ Okay, I have someMDriEMDIU quantities for you. 

First of all, let's do the bandf-a message. 

S/C Stand by a second. 

CSQ Okay. 



S/C 
CSQ 
S/C 
CSQ 

HOU CBE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 
CSQ 

S/C 

CSQ 



S/C 
CSQ 
S/C 

CSQ 
S/C 
CSQ 

s/c 

HOU 
CSQ 
S/C 



7:UU p.m. Tape 67, Page 3 

GRay, area 7-3 GET on C , 10 OU k-7 , RET UOOK, 
G 2 +02, RET RB 28 + 15, tank light 50, tank 
right, 60, do you copy? 

Roger, understand 7-3 GET on C, 10 Ok hi, RET 
UoOk, G2 +02, RET RB 28+15, tank left 50, 
right 60. 

Core 

I have some MDIU for you. All right ,/03 33 > 6^9, Core 
Ok 6k 090, Core 65 01 05 9, Core 66 65 k6 0, Core 07 
3U 72 6, Core 08 1+ 0 8 66$ Core 09 31 7 U 5, Core 10 
0 2 5 10, Core 11 13 6 00, Do you copy? 
Roger, is that 65 Core or 05? 
65 

Okay, Jim, 03 33 6^9; Ok 6k 690; Core 65 01 05 9> 

66. 69 U60 ;3k 72 6} 08 k 08 66; 09 31 7 k5', 

10 0 2 5 10; 11 13 6 00. 

Okay, one correction. That's 66. 65 k 60. 
Roger, 65^60. 
That's affirmative . 
Now about 66 90- 

CSQ you can tell him, hhis TR's in and counting 
properly. 

Would you verify your TR 2 56 circuit breaker is 

closed? 

It's open. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 7:kh p.m. Tape 67, Page k 

CSQ Okay, would you close it? 

S/C Okay, coming closed. 

CSQ Okay, we'd like to know what attitude control 

mode do you prefer during retrofire? 

S/c We don't have any choice. We'll try the Acme 

if that works, we'll go to rate command on the RCS. 

CSQ Okay. 

S/c We'Ve just completed our restowage. Oiir restowage 

is complete at this time, it will be for all practical 
purposes the same as launch configuration. 

CSQ Okay, we want you to set your remote timer to 

15 ( j' 15 minute a.tJiA 

S/C Okay, now what was that retrofire time again please? 

CSQ GET OC 10 OU 46. 

S/C Okay. 

CSQ About an hour from now. 

I can give you RKV acquisition power if you like. 
S/C Yes j go ahead please. 

CSQ Okay, 09 kk 37- 

S/C Rog, how about GET time hack? 

CSQ Okay, I'll give you a GET time hack. At 09 01 00. 

S/C Roger. Let me give you mark at U5 you'll then 

have LOS. Mark. 
CSQ Okay. Flight, CSQ 

We've lost all parameters and flight contact with the 

crew. 



MISSION COMMENTARY , 3/l6/66 , 

CSQ CAP COM 
HOU FLIGHT 
CSQ CAP COM 

HOU FLIGHT 

CSQ 

END OF TAPE 



7:hh p.m. Tape 67, Page 5 

Houston Flight, CSQ Cap Com. 
Go ahead CSQ. 

Roger, I can barely read you, we passed up 
everything except the mission instructions an 
regard to the IVI's and - RPAand the black out. 
Roger, we'll pick that up at Hawaii. How do your 
systems look? 

Okay, we verify 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 8:03 P.m. Tape 68, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston, nine hours, 22 minutes into the flight 
of Gemini 8, and in the last few minutes we did hear briefly from the spacecraft 
as it passed through the Hawaii area of contact. The crew was passed up additional 
retro information and toward the end of the very brief period we were in contact 
Neil Armstrong was running through some control mode checks in the spacecraft and 
he reported one of. the happier pieces of news we have heard in some time, that is, 
that he now has yaw control back on his orbital attitude maneuvering system. This 
was the system that he reported earlier was inoperative after backing off the 
Agena. He did report, however, just a minute or two ago, I timed it at 9 hours 
and 17 minutes into the mission that he did have CAMS control again. This will 
be of help to him in lining up his platform and preparing for his retrofire 
maneuver which is to take place at 20 degrees longitude and approximately 0 
degrees latitude over Africa. VTe will attempt to monitor it via the Kano, 
Nigeria station although we have no great hopes of picking up the signal, thats 
slightly outside the ring of acquisition for Kano. Again, the weather out in 
the recovery zone continues good, our maps here show there will be at least six 
hours of daylight after splash, which is helpful, wave heights as we reported 
earlier are only three feet, and all in all we look pretty good. We'll be coming 
up probably in a few minutes after the Rose Knot Victor talks to them, which 
acquisition should take place at 9 hours and hk minutes into the mission, some 
20 minutes from now. This is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 8:33 p.m. Tape 69, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. We have been in touch with the spacecraft 

over the past few minutes, a detailed briefing other than the numbers which 

they received earlier on the retro positions and their retro commands passed 

along. We acquired at 9 hours and kk minutes into the flight. Actually the 

TM acquisition, the voice conversation picked up a couple of minutes later. 

The crew sounds quite relaxed coming into this retrofire maneuver. Among other 

things they were advised to drink some water before their retrofire maneuver. 

It was also suggested they drink some water after retrofire on their way down 

to the landing point. The surgeon also has suggested that each of them take 

a tablet of merazine, this is a tablet to avoid motion sickness. The reason 

being while the wave ofeight in the landing area is only three feet, its 

choppy, and they suspect it might cause them to be a little seasick once down 

on the water. The crew has confirmed they have completed their pre-retro 

a 

checklist and they/ further medical suggestion was that if they do elect to 
leave the spacecraft, the suggestion is to take the medical kit along just 
in case. Meanwhile the C-5 1 + whose call sign has been passed along to them 
is nearing the area, the impact, the landing area. It has on board three 
pararescue men who will leap into the water once they have the spacecraft 
in sight. They will have with them a flotation collar which they will afix 
about the spacecraft. At nine hours 53 minutes into the flight, this is 
Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT , 3/16/66, 8:k7 p.m. Tape 70, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. The pilots were counted down in the 
blind via the Kano Station, and Neil Armstrong, while he said nothing 
leading up to the point of retrofire, came back with a very reassuring, 
"We have all four retros,.all four have fired". A cheer went up here in 
the Control Center, and I'm sure everyone can understand why. The contact from 
here is through the Kano, Nigeria station. Armstrong, after the maneuver, 
went on to relate that everything was in a stable condition and seemed to 
be proceeding satisfactorily. We want to emphasize again that there is 
practically no communication expected now for some time. We are going to 
try to reach them via the Coastal Sentry Quebec on HF after they emerge • 
from blackout, but that signal at best will be marginal. Probably our 
first authoritative information will come via one of those C-5 1 *- aircraft 
maneuvering in the area of east of Okinawa. This is Gemini Control Houston. 
To recap again, we have fired all four retros. They fired successfully 
and the tape of that very brief conversation which lasted less than 30 
seconds is now being replayed to insure that everything was proper, and 
after hearing it a second time, we are quite satisfied everything was 
quite proper. This is Gemini Control Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 9:01 p.m. Ta*a 71, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston, 10 hours, 20 minutes into the flight. We've 

had of course, no contact with the spacecraft since retrofire. However, we 

assume that splash will occur about 22 minutes from now. Something just under 

22 minutes from now. The computer is driving our display showing the descent of 

the spacecraft , based on the retro values we were given by Neil Armstrong by 

the Cano sifcetand it presently shows an altitude of approximately 100 miles. 

We want to emphasize again that communications are going to be marginal, at 

best, in this area, we hope perhaps to get some UHF regular radio contact in the 

area by the Coastal Sentry Quebec . We are certain that the C5^ planes in the 

area as well as the HU 16 will make every effort to contact their bases in Naha 

or in Yokusuka. And for the moment like everyone else, we're standing by and 

waiting out this last 20 minutes. This is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 9:21 p.m. Tape 72, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston , ISDOiihcrazs , 1*0 minutes into the flight. As yet, 
we have received no confirmation of visual contact from the area. However, all 
ears are cocked for such a message. We estimate that the spacecraft should be 
on main chute at this time based on the nominal values, based on retrofire 
maneuver. And, we as I said earlier, estimate splashdown will be 23 minutes 
after the hour. Meanwhile we've been advised that there fere two aircraft in the 
area now, both the amphibious plane which has swimmers aboard. We also have a 
C 5h in the area, that has been on station for some time now. The Coastal Sentry- 
Quebec which is some 12 or 1300 miles to the southwest ttas made several attempts 
to raise the spacecraft by UHF and HF. Let's stand by for any additional informa- 
tion. 

Attention — Naha Rescue 1 now says they have the spacecraft in sight. It's 
three* miles dead ahead of them, there's no information whether they have it on 
the water or still on main chutes, but they do verify they have it in sight. 
I say again, Naha Rescue 1, which is a C5U has the spacecraft in sight. It is 
overhead. The destroyer Mason right now is approximately 90 miles from that 
point. We'll come back when we have additional information. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66, 9:28 PM Tape 73, Page 1 

This is Gemini control Houston. We have Just had a report relayed to us 
via Hawaii from the aircraft that their position is 25 degrees 2 minutes north 
136 degrees 00 minutes east and they advise that they were deploying their 
pararescue men, there are two pararescue men aboard who have a flotation collar. 
They affirmed again that the spacecraft is in a stable, upright, good floating 
attitude. The pararescue men undoubtedly will be the first to talk to the 
pilots. We have had no reports of any radio contact with the airplane. 

This is Gemini Control, Houston. 



END OP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66 Tape lk, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston, 10 hours 53 minutes after lift off of 
Gemini VIII. No additional reports from the area, we are standing by. We 
know the swimmers are in the water and we are assuming this dropout communications 
was caused by the C-5U dipping down in order to let the pair of rescue men 
leap into the water. As soon as they get back to altitude, we should have 
more information from them relayed through Okinawa and on back through 
Hawaii to the states. Meanwhile, the flight controllers are taking a careful 
look at the agena and making some plans for it over the next day or two. Some 
maneuvers will more than likely be attempted. The on board fuel situation of 
the agena is being looked at and slowly but surely, it looks like the agena 
will remain in business for a time and while we don't have the detailed flight 
plan at this point, it should be available within a few hours. This is 
Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 9; 57 PM Tape 75 Page 1 

This is Gemini Control, Houston. Our situation is this, one of the aircraft 
in the area, we have two in the area, C-5U, from which one pararescue man has 
leaped and a second is preparing to leap in the water. This aircraft did re- 
establish contact briefly with the Mason, a destroyer which is moving on the 
scene. It is now estimated about 75 miles from the point and the C-5^ will 
deploy a second pararescue man momentarily and they will begin to afix the 
flotation collar. This represents all the information we have at this time. 
We will come back to you with further developments. 
This is Gemini Control Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/l6/66, 10:05 p.m. Tape 76, Page 1 

This is Gemini Control Houston. We now have information to confirm that both 
pair of rescue men are in the water, both jumpers. Their names are, Airforce 
Staff Sargeant L. Huyett of Manchester, Pennsylvania, and Airman First Class E. N. Neal 
of Charleston, West Virginia. The aircraft is under the command of Capt. Leslie G. Snyder 
of Statan Island, New York. In addition to that, the Search I aircraft, an amphibian, 
is in the area observing the action. It is under the command of Capt. Crayton Frost 
of Massa, Arizona. This is Gemini Control Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



i_ k. i. 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/16/66 10:17 PM Tape 77 Page 1 

This Is Gemini Control, Houston, 11 hours 36 minutes into the flight. 
We have Just been advised from the ship that the flotation collar is securely 
around the spacecraft at this time. There are also three swimmers in the 
water in the area of the spacecraft and they report everything going very 
nicely. We still have no report on crew status, we should have something 
momentarily. I say again the big flotation collar, which is an aid to 
navigation for spacecraft floating on the waves, is securely about Gemini 8, 
they are floating in an upright position and there are three swimmers in 
the water, we do not know the identity of the third. 

This is Gemini Control, Houston. 



£ND OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/16/66, 10:27 p.m. Tape 78, Page 1 

Gemini Control Houston here. We've just had a report relayed through Hawaii 
that the swimmers in the water have been in voice contact with the crew. The 
crew reports all aboard is fine. I say again, the crew reports their condition 
is O.K. The plan from the air is to bring the Mason, which is now approximately 
50 miles away, along side to pick up the spacecraft and the crew members. This 
could change . but that is the plan right now. Some 50 miles away, the Mason making 
approximately 30 knots. This is Gemini Control Houston. 
. END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 5/17/66, 12:32 a.m. Tape 80, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. We have Just received word that 
both astronauts are onboard the destroyer USS Mason. They were both onboard 
at 12:30 CST. The plan now is to go on to Haha where they will off-load off 
the destroyer. We had a report a few minutes earlier that they astronauts 
were standing up in the spacecraft with their sunglasses on, smiling and 
waving. We'll have further announcements later on. This is Gemini Control. 

END OF TAPE 



a. i> L. ~ <L 



MISSION COMMENTARY 3/16/66, 12:50 AM Tape 8l Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. We now have word that Gemini 8 
spacecraft is on deck of the destroyer, Mason. It was lifted on board at 
12:38 AM, Central Standard Time. The astrounauts were lifted on board, 
rather climbed on board, 8 minutes earlier. A Jacob's ladder, which is a 
rope ladder, was thrown over the side and the two astronauts climbed up 
the latter to the deck of the destroyer. The Mason is now steaming toward 
Nana, in Okinawa. The Agena spacecraft is now oyer the South Pacific, 
it's 15 hours and 51 minutes in its flight. The Flight Controller reports 
the Agena is looking good. Plans for the remainder of the night are to 
take memory readouts from the Agena at stations around the network. The 
flight plan is now being updated, and the plan now is to pick up the Agena 
burns earlier than previously planned. No burns will be scheduled earlier 
than 8:00 AM in the morning, Central Standard Time. The Agena is now in 
its 10th rev, at 15 hours and 51 minutes into its flight. 
This is Mission Control, Houston 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 8:50 a.m. Tape 82, Page 1 

This is Agena Control at Houston. About 25 minutes ago, a small burn 
was performed by the primary propulsion system engine on the Agena. The burn 
time was approximately 2.2 seconds In duration. The ground elapsed time 
when the burn took place was 23 hours and 2k minutes into the Agena mission. 
This burn put the Agena into a l6o by 218 nautical mile orbit. It has been 
determined by the flight controllers that a minimum of fire hours space 
trill be placed between each burn. This last burn took place over Caraarron 
at approximately 8:2^:58. This is Agena Control in Houston. 

END 07 TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 9:15 a.m. Tape 83, Page 1 

This is Houston Mission Control. We have word here that a medical 
officer onboard the USS Mason, a Lieutenant Paul Pukuda, vho was assigned 
to the Mason for this mission, just completed an examination of the 
astronauts. Both were in excellent condition. The blood pressure tests 
were completed and blood samples taken. Just a few minutes ago at about 
six minutes after midnight their time, which was 9:06 our time, and the 
astronauts were reported as resting and Hungry" and having what they called 
a light lunch of steak and eggs. The Mason is now reported at, an hour 
ago, was reported at 25 degrees, k2 minutes north, 131 degrees, 1*5 minutes 
east, with a steering course of 272 at 30 knots and they were riding well 
on smooth seas. The Agena is now orer the Atlantic Ocean on its l6th rer. 
A few minutes ago we had a burn of 10U delta v which placed the spacecraft 
in a l60 by 218 nautical mile orbit. Prior to this bum it was in a l60 
by l6l nautical mile orbit. The burn was conducted over Carnarvon in 
the fifteenth rev. The next burn is scheduled to take place some four 
hour 8 from now. And this burn will take place over Hawaii, and this will 
be a circularization maneuver. It will also be a 10k feet-per-second bum. 
Some dispersions are expected in this bum, and will be trimmed up later on 
with the secondary propulsion system. Out of plane and in plane burns will 
be conducted until fuel depletion, and this will probably throw some 
dispersions into the orbit. However, these will be taken out later with the 
SPS, secondary propulsion system. This orbit is good for 210 days, or about 
seven months. It will be when we get into the circularization maneuver, 

get the Agena into the circularization mode. Right nov we are 2^ hOUTS and 
19 minutes into the Agena mission. This is Mission Control Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 9^3 a.m. Tape 8k, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. Astronaut Wally Schirra, who was 
on a personal appearance tour In the Pacific, is presently in Hawaii, and 
he along with Dr. Dvanj§4 Catterson will fly from Hawaii to Okinawa to meet 
the Gemini 8 crew. Schirra and Dr. Catterson expect to arrive in Okinawa 
shortly after the USS Mason docks there. They will pick up the Gemini 8 
crew and return to Cape Kennedy. It's normally about a 20-hour trip from 
Okinawa to the Cape. At the Cape, the Gemini 8 crew will have a normal 
nine-day debriefing. This is Mission Control in Houston. 

END OP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 11:05 a.m. Tap* 85, Page 1 

This la Gemini Control Houston. A press conference will be held 
today at 12:30 CST at the Houston Neva Center. In the course of this 
press conference, we vill play all of the tapes starting Just before the 
difficulty developed in the flight last night. We'll «tart with the 
Tananarive pass and carry all the tape recording* we have right through 
to retrofire. From the Mason we received a report about 50 minutes ago at 
16:11 zulu time. It is now 17:06 zulu. That both astronauts have had a 
hearty meal of steak and eggs and are now sleeping. The Mason's position 
at 16:00 zulu was 25 degrees, 39 minutes north} 131 degrees, 22 minutes 
east. It's proceeding on a course of 272 degrees at 30 knots. The Mason 
estimates it will arrive at Nana at 23:00 zulu time today. Meanwhile, 
a party headed by Capt. Wally Schirra has departed Eickam Field in Hawaii 
in an Air Force 707* Capt. Schirra, along with Dr. Duane Catterson and 
other NASA people, will land also are estimating Nana at 23:00 zulu today. 
This is Gemini Control Houston. 

2ND OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 2:50 p.m. Tape 86, Page 1 

This is Mission Control Houston. Scheduled burn in the new Agena 
flight plan was made at 28 hours and kh minutes into the flight of the 
Gemini. This was a little over an hour ago in the l8th rev. The purpose 
of this maneuver was to circularize the orbit. The burn was a PPS burn, 
a primary propulsion system burn and it took place at l:Uh p.m. CST oyer 
the Hawaii station. The burn was at apogee and resulted in a 219*9 
by 219.7 nautical mile orbit. The maneuver was aimed at a 220 circular 
burn. This new orbit is considered excellent. The SPS thruster fired 
to the burn for ullage of the fuel. The primary propulsion system 
was initiated for a two- second duration burn of 10k feet-per- second. 
Hawaii reported that the burn events looked good all the way. The 
burn was made with the TEA, target docking adapter of the Agena . forward 
in a tight control mode. After the burn was completed, the Agena was 
returned to a loose control mode to conserve fuel. In this mode, less 
than 5/100 of a pound of fuel is used each hour for attitude control. 
The Agena is now in a zero roll, zero pitch, zero yaw attitude. Later 
today the scheduled plane change burn will take place. This is now 
set for 6:17 p.m. CST, and will be over the tracking ship CSQ. The 
Agena will be TEA north with a burn of l600 feet-per- second out of 
plane. The burn is expected to move the Agena about one point five 
degrees out of plane to the north. The Agena is now in the 19th rev. 
coming up on the Pacific at 29 hours and 52 minutes. This is Mission 
Control Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/17/66, 5:26 p.m. 



Tape 87, Page 1 



...the command for the primary propulsion burn which Is scheduled 
to take place about 6:17 CST was loaded into the Agena over the Coastal 
Sentry and the 21st rev, and the proper loading of the command wa6 confirmed 
over Hawaii. In addition to the load command, a VM cutoff was loaded. This 
is the velocity meter that measures the velocity to be gained and then cuts 
off the primary propulsion system burn at the proper moment. The inclination 
of the Agena spacecraft after the circularization in the l8th rev at l:kk p.m. 
today was 28.88 degrees, this was a change of 2/lOths of one degree in the 
inclination of 28.86 prior to the burn. The scheduled 1600 foot per second 
out of plane burn will cause the inclination to go to 30.37 degrees, or 
make the orbital path curve fatter. This will make the Agena go farther 
north and farther south of the Equator. The present orbit is good for 
seven months or about 210 days. The onboard power is described by the 
flight controllers as being fat. They started with 2580 amp hours of power 
on board and they still have in excess of 2200 amp hours of power left. 
The scheduled PPS, or Primary Propulsion System burn is scheduled to take 
place in the 22nd rev over the CSQ. We are now 32 hours and 28 minutes 
into the Agena mission. This is Mission Control Houston. 
END OP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66 5:38 p.m. 



Tape 88, Page 1 



This is Mission Control in Houston. We just got word that the U. S. S. 
Mason with astronauts Armstrong and Scott is now entering the Nana Harbor 
in Okinawa. Both astronauts are rested and they just completed a hearty- 
breakfast a little while ago and were taken on a tour of the Destroyer 
Mason. We just received this message just a few minutes ago. The Agena 
spacecraft now has started its 22nd rev and is 32 hours and 38 minutes 
into the mission as the Agena crosses the south Atlantic. This is 
Mission Control in Houston. 



END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 6:20 p.m. Tape 89, Page 1 

This is Mission Control Houston. The primary propulsion system 
burn that wa6 scheduled to take place at 17 minutes after the hour 
of 6 has been postponed by the Agena flight controllers here in 
Mission Control. In checking the data in the stored program command 
mode in the Agena memory, they diacorered a slight error, and this is 
being corrected now. Plans are to make the burn in the next revolution. 
This burn is a plane change burn of 1600 feet-per- second with the 
target docking adapter pointing north» This burn is out of plane 
and it's to see how accurately a plane change can be made and to 
determine how much in plane velocity results from an out of plane 
burn. As I said, they are now correcting the error that was discovered 
In the Agena memory that they had fed into it earlier, and the plans 
are now to make this burn in the next revolution. This is Mission 
Control in Houston. 

END OP TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 6:23 P.m. Tape 90, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. We Just ggt word a few minutes 
ago that the USS Mason is now at the dock in Nana, Okinawa with the 
Gemini 8 crew, astronauts Armstrong and Scott. This was about 30 
minutes ago when the Mason docked in Okinawa, Naha, Okinawa. They 
were getting the gang-plank in place, and astronaut Schirra was 
standing by on the dock to greet the Gemini 8 crew as they came off 
the ship. We have a little more information on the primary propulsion 
burn that was erased by the CSQ on this last pass. That was in the 
22nd rev. It wasn't originally scheduled to take place here, but 
they discovered an error in the stored program command load in the 
Agena memory. That is being corrected now, and the plans are presently 
to make the burn on the next rev., over the CSQ. This will be at 
approximately 8:00 CST. This is Mission Control Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 6:UO p.m. Tape 91, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. We have Just been advised 
that the Change of Shift Press Briefing has been moved up and is 
scheduled now for 7:00 p.m. instead of the 7:30 time that was 
scheduled earlier. Mr. Hodge and some of his people will be going 
over to the News Center in Building 6 in Nassau Bay across from the 
Manned Spacecraft Center in just a few minutes. We also have another 
little bit of information from the USS Mason in Nana, Okinawa harbor. 
Astronaut Schirra boarded the USS Mason about 10 minutes ago and 
went onboard to greet the Gemini 8 crew. The Agena is now over the 
mid-Pacific in its 22nd revolution around the earth at 33 hours and 
kl minutes into its flight. This is Mission Control in Houston. 

END OF TAPE 



k k 



MISSION COMMENTARY TRANSCRIPT, 3/17/66, 7:50 p.m. Tape 92, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. The primary propulsion system 
burn on the Agena has been delayed and at the present time the earliest 
time that the PPS burn would be scheduled by Flight Director Eugene 
Kranz is around 2 a.m. tomorrow morning. This 1600 foot per second burn 
is a burn of about 20 seconds in duration and is planned to be burned 
north out of plane, that is with the IDA pointing north, Target Docking 
Adapter pointing north, and this is to see how accurately a plane change 
can be made with an Agena and determine how much in-plane Telocity would 
result from an out-of -plane of this type. As I said this burn, this 
PPS burn has been postponed, or delayed, and would possibly be made 
around 2 a.m. tomorrow morning by the Flight Controllers who will be 
on duty here all night. In any event they will be here monitoring the 
systems of the Agena, certain that the temperatures remain normal, 

within the systems. They will be monitoring the guidance for consumables 
in the attitude control system that remain, primary propulsion system, 
and the secondary propulsion systems fuels. At the present time, the 
Agena is over China in the 22nd revolution around the earth and some 
3U hours and 51 minutes into the flight. The Flight Director wanted to 
make certain that St. Patrick's Day didn't pass unnoticed in the Mission 
Control Center and when he came in this evening he had on a green bowler. 
I don't believe he's Irish, with a name like Kranz, but nevertheless 
St. Patrick's Day did not pass unnoticed here in MCC. This will be the 
final announcement from the Control Center tonight and any newsmen re- 
quiring information on this burn that may be performed later tonight 
may obtain said information by calling the NASA News Center in Houston. 
This is Mission Control. 
END OF TAPE 



MISSION COMMENTARY, 3/18/66, 8:10 a.m. Tape 93, Page 1 

This is Mission Control in Houston. During the night, the flight controllers 
conducted some exercises with the Agena spacecraft. Two "burns were performed, a 
plane change burn of l600 feet per second and a minimum impulse of 96 feet per 
second. The plane change burn was performed at 1:57 a.m. CST this morning. For 
some reason the yaw angle was off slightly. This caused a posigrade in plane 
velocity component. Flight controllers think this is possibly caused by the 
center of gravity not being defined as well as it should have been. When the 
primary propulsion system engine started the gyros sensed the Agena primary pro- 
pulsion system was not burning through the center of gravity so the engines glm- 
balled to make the correction so that the burn would go through the center of 
gravity. This introduced a dispersion into the guidance and the result that the 
out- of -plane burn added energy to the orbit and j raised the apogee to 336.1 
nautical miles, with the perigee remaining at 220 nautical miles. Actually what 
happened, the spacecraft was not pointing at the right angle and this caused the 
dispersion. However, the inclination angle that they were aiming at came out 
nearly as predicted?: The dispersion effects of the apogee only, causing it to go 
up. The inclination angle changed by about 1.7 degrees. Now the minimum impulse 
burn which was performed a little while ago at 6:^3 a.m. was a 96 feet per second 
burn. This was a retro burn with the TDA, target docking adapter, pointing west, 
or the Agena spacecraft was flying backward. The burn was performed over the Eastern 
Test Range and at perigee, this has a tendency to lower the apogee, this brought the 
spacecraft into a lower perigee. The perigee is now 278.6 by 219.9 nautical miles. 
The spacecraft is now coming up on the West Coast of North America in the 29th 
revolution around the earth, 47 hours and 12 minutes into the flight of the Agena. 
This is Mission Control in Houston. 
END OF TAPE 



L ~ Ml