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WEATHER FORECAST 

Victoria and Vicinity— Moderate to fresh 
south and west wmdg; partly cloudy and 
moderately warm. \ - ; 

Vancouver and Vicinity-Light to moderate 
wind*; partly cloudy, a\d moderately 





(EST ABM. Ml EI) 1*58) 



COLONIST Tl LEPHO> I S 




AdvcrtMn 
Busine&s 
Circulation 
Job Printing 
Editorial Roor 
Social • Ediror 



.7... -\-'-.,. F. my.rr 4H4 

ice E 4)H 



Otrdon 1812 

,_V O ardon 6241- 

..3 Empirv 41U 



E in pi re 3311 



NO. 191 — SEVENTY-EIGHTH YEAK 



VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SUNDAY, JULY, 26, 1936 



FORTY PAGES 



MAY TRY FOR RECORD X" 

Steaming Towards New York at Over 30 Knots for the 24 Hours— Page 19 



HORSE SHOWS PLANNED 

Agricultural Association Arranging for Displays at the Fair Here — Page 5 



TURTLES FOR SOUP 

Study to Preparation of Amphibians Now Living at Vancouver— Page 2 



Chef 
Giving 



KENNY BLACK WINS 
$5,000 GOLF MEET 



BY THREE STROKES 



Yoiinji V ancouver Amateur Shoots Nine-linlcr-Par 
63 for Einal Eighteen to Ffaisn With 275 for 

Seventy-Two fifolM I>i*tanc« Kelson ami 

Thomson Tied for Runner-l p Berth 



Canada's Magnificent Memorial at Vimy 



By EVERETT GRAEME 
Cin»dl»n Prm Buff Writer 

SHAUGHNESSY HEIGHTS GOLF CLUB, VANCOU- 
VER, July 25 CP). — A poker-faced young amateur, Ken 
Black, exploded all over the course where his father, as pro. 
gave him his first golf lesson, to blast par as it never was blasted 
before in a major tournament in British Columbia, and capture 
the $5,000 Jubilee golf championship with a par-crumbling 63 
over the last eighteen of the seventy-two-hole route. 
Black i total of 275 (or the tour 



lent was thirteen atroke* under 
par. Hi* dizxy round of birdies and 
pars gave young Ken a new course 
record scarcely twenly-iour hour* 
after Lawson Little, former ama- 
teur king, had cracked the former 
mark with a 64 In yesterday's 
•lghteen-hole round. 

Black faltered only once during 
hla spectacular performance. He 
took a five on the seventh hole. 

GAVE PAR LACINO 

He put his second Into the trap 
td the left of the green, exploded 
out well and two-putted for a five. 
But with the exception of that hole, 
the twenty- four-year-old Shaugh- 
nessy Club star ripped par to pieces 
as he took the lightning-fast course 
In his stride. 

Only once did Ken relax his poker 
face. That was when he walked up 
to the eighteenth green after lay- 
ing his second pin high and fifteen 
feet from the cup. His father. Dave. 
Bhaughneasy pro. was golf marshal. 
As Ken topped the rise leading up 
to the green and started toward the 
hole, his father, with a grin split- 
ting his shrewd Scotch face, grabbed 
13. Column 7 



INVESTIGATING 
BETTJNG RING 

Attorney-General Starts In- 
quiry Into International 
Gambling Activities 



VANCOUVER. July 25 CP -Under 
instructions of Attorney Oencral 
Gordon 81oan authorities arc in- 
vestigating the possibility that a 
large International betting ring is 
operating In Vancouve r . 

Detective E. Hichens, of the city 
police, at the direction of the At- 
torney -Oenera I, conducted raids 
yesterday in which a large quantity 
of documents and lists wore seized. 
A number of persons have bom or- 
dered to appear before police offi- 
cials for examination. 

iii bi huh i n 



time ago, police stale De- 
tection* Hichens received Information 
that a betting ring that promised 
profits of flOO per cent was operating 
in the city. Investors. It was said, 
placed money with local agents and 
the money waa forwarded to Mont- 
real to be wagered on various race 
tracks of Canada and the United 
States. Some of the Investors were 
aaid to have received large divi- 
dend*. All investors were said to 
hart been bound to secrecy, with 
the result that police investigation 
was made difficult. 

Federal post office Inspectors In 
the United States are co-operating 
with local officials In the investiga- 
tion 

The present ' Invest Itrat ion is 
being carried out under the Securi- 
ties Fraud Prevention Act. 

List* were seized Friday in the 
form of directories of race track 
followers and fanciers In Van 



VETERANS TO 
HOED RITES 

Drumhead Memorial Serv- 
ice Here Today Coincides 
With That at Vimy 



Muffled peals on the belli of 
Christ Church Cathedral will sum- 
mons the citizens of Victoria to 
attend the Drumhead Memorial 
Service being held In the Mayors" 
Grove. Beacon Hill Park, today, co- 
Incident with the unveiling and 
dedication of the Canadian War 
Memorial at Vimy Ridge by His 
Majesty the King. This service Is 
under the auspices of the Victoria 
and District Council. Canadian 
Legion, B ESL. 

VETERANS PARADING 

All veterans will fall In on Hum- 
boldt Street under the command of 
Lieut. -General Sir Percy Lake. 
K.C.B., K C.M.G., at 2:15, and will 
march off promptly at 2:30 and 
take up their position, on the square 
prior to the arrival of detachments 
from H.MS. Apollo, the Royal 
Canadian Navy, Military. District 
No. 11, and non-permanent forces. 
Nursing Sisters and Women's Aux- 
iliaries will report to the officer In 
charge of the markers at the Grove 
and be placed In the positions allo- 
Mt*J# for them. 

The service will be conducted bv 
the Right Rev. H E. Sexton. D.D , 
Bishop of Columbia, assisted by 
the Rev. E F. Church. Accompani- 
ments will be played by the Cana- 
dian Legion Band, and the order 
of service Is as follows 

ORDER OF SERVICE 

"O Canada"; Scottish Isment. 
"Flowers of the Forest, " Piper A 
Pollock; reading of Scriptural 
lesson. Wisdom Hi. 1-9: hwmn. O 
Valiant Hearts"; address by Bishop 
8cxton; Last Post; two minutes' 
silence; Reveille; hvmn. "Abide 
With Me"; the Blessing; "La Mar- 
seillaise" and National Anthem. 

The congregation 1* requested to 
Join in singing the hymns. 





OF WHOLESALE BUTCHERY 



None Injured When 
Front of Tram Is 
Torn Off by Truck 

\ ,'ANCOUVER. July 25 <*.— 
V The front end oLa street 
car today was torn off, leav- 
ing the motorman standing on 
an ppen observation platform, 
when the car was struck by a 
truck on a downtown street. 
Neither the truck driver nor 
the street car motorman were 
injured. 



\ 
* 

-a 



MINISTERS 
COME HERE 

Three Additional Members 
Of Federal Cabinet to 
Visit B.C. 



An Impressive View of Canada's Magnificent Memorial at Vimy Ridge. Which Will Be Unveiled by King 
Edward today. Erected to Perpetuate Canada's War ^ Dead, the Memorial Has Taken Eleven Years to 

an War ^ 



RELIEF STEADY 

Thousands Have Gone Back 
To Work at Basic Indus- 
tries Since 1933 



Complete. Thousands of 



Veteram Are 



ial Has Taken 

tha Dedication 





Ceremonies. 



Vast Bands of Pilgrims 
Closing In on Vimy for 
Unveiling of Memorial 



Mechanic Throun 
Into Atlantic tin 
Plane Doilaca Bird 



HEAT WAVE TOOK 
BIO DEATH TOLL 



WASHINGTON. July 25 w -Re- 
ports that Intense heat had carried 
a 65 per cent Increase in the num- 
ber of deaths in principal entrs co- 
incided today with estimates that 
drought damage to crops would be 
less than previously forecast. 

Deaths In eighty-six large cities 
during the week ended July 18. the 
census bureau said, totaled 12 183 
compared with 7.4.19 ip the corre- 
sponding week a year ago. Official* 
attributed the increase to high 
temperatures. 



PAGE DIRECTORY 



J 



Comics r&«r 21 

f'ulherUnn on Bridge Page 4 

Editorials Pagt 4 

Finance Pa«r 20 

Jane Dixon 
MMnlghl and Perry 



MALAHAT TO HAVE 
FIRST A in POST 



First of Series of Stations to 
Opened Next 

Evening 



\EW YORK. July 
A naval reserve 
mechanic was throw 
death in the Atlant 
today when the pi 
plane in which the 
was riding attempted 
a bird. The Jerkm 
plane, It was explain 
Samuel H. Oladston 
seat out of the 
height of about 1.0(1 



25 '/T>. - 
aviation 
1 to his 
I Ocean 
3t of a 
1 lechanic 
to dodge 
of the 
d, tossed 
and his 
at a 



srllp a 
Km feet. 



On Tuesday evening a first aid 
station will be opened on the Mal- 
shat Highway at the Shawntgan 
l ake cut-off. 

This station, which is being pro- 
vided by the Joint enterprise of St. 
John Ambulance Association and the 
Canadian Red Cross Society, is the 
first of some twelve or fifteen which 
are to be Installed In different parts 
of the province, the undertaking 
being sponsored bv the Provincial 
Police. 

Officials taking part In the open- 
ing of the station on the Malahst 
on Tuesday are G. H. Stevens man- 
ager of the Royal Bank of Canada 
here and vice-president of St. John 
Ambulance Association: Colonel J. 
H McMullln. Commissioner of Pro- 
vincial Police; H W. Edwardson. 



Roosevelt 
Returns to 
U.S. Waters 



ABOARD SCHOONER LIBERTY 
WITH ROOSEVELT'S FLOTILLA. 

Julv 25 ^.-President Roosevelt Wf * tnpr Rnd «nlftlng winds aided 
nosed his sixty-five-foot schooner | ' lrc "Raters battling flsmes along 
Sewanna bark to American shores 



tonight, after eleven days of sail- 
ing hrs-ftttte vacation craft, .in all 
k ind s of weather, llu associate* re- 
ported him "fit as a fiddle" for the 
trying days of campaigning for re- 
flection, no* far away. 

His two-week cruLse is scheduled 
to end at Campbello Isle, NB , lite 
Monday night or early Tuesday. 
Eight days of the voy 
In Nova Scotia waters 



Nrarlv 6,000 Canadian* \ isit Serine of War Mem* 
orirs on V a> lo Attend < cremoniee Marking 
Dedication of Monument — Wreathe* Are 
Laid in Three French Cities 



LILLE. France. July 25 <P —Pilgrims to the shrine ot Can- 
ada's war dead tonight boarded trains that will take them 
to Arras, next stop in their journey to the granite monu- 
ment that overlooks the ridge at Vimy. where Canada's soldiers 
fought a heroic defence in the Great War. 

Clot>e to 6.000 of the pilgrims, the 
welcoming cheers of their French 
hosts rmglng In their ears, left this 
industrial centre after resting from 
their long sea voyage from Mont- 
real. The returning veterans, their 
wives and their children, and the 
mothers of soldier-sons who gave 
their lives in the Oreat War. landed 
at Le" Havre from three liners 
which crossed the Atlantic accom- 
panied by the HMCS. Saguenay, 
first Canadian destroyer to visit 
France. 

TO FORM Gl ARI> OF HONOR 

Also converging upon the ridge 
were seamen from the destroyer 
who will form a guard of honor at 
the Vimv Memorial when it 1* un- 
veiled bv the King tomorrow. 

While most of the pilgrim* made 
their way to Arras, others, arriving 



(Srxcial lo The Colonial). 

OTTAWA. July 25 — A trio of Do- 
minion Cabinet Ministers plan to 
visit British Columbia shortly on 
official business, in addition to Fish- 
eries Minister Mirhaud. already on 
the Pacific Coast. Mr. Michaud's 
return, it was officially announced 
tonight, would be awaited before 
further representations are made to 
Washington on the Sockeye Salmon 
Treaty. Canada hns bi^n opposing 
the condition stipulated by the 
American Sejjate, In approving the 
pact, that no regulations should be 
put Into effect by the proposed 
preservation commission until in- 
vestigations had been carried on for 
eight years. 

Labor Minister Rogers will leave 
Ottawa about August 8 or 0 to con- 
fer with the four Western Premiers 
on relief matters. He had not defi- 
nitely decided whether he would 
travel direct to Victoria to discuss 
the subject with Premier Pattullo or 

stop off en route to confer with the I peak of regustration 
three Prairie Premiers. 

TO VISIT MINKS 
To Inspect National Parks and 
visit several of the coal, gold and 
t silver mining areas of British 
J Columbia, Hon. Thomas Crerar, 
I Minister of Mines and Natural Re- 
sources, will depart the end Of 
August or early in September. 

Transport Minister Howe proposes 
to look over further the proposed 
trans-Canada air route to be started 
in 1938, surveying the portion from 

Winnipeg to the Coast. His trip, I tries of the provin< r are back to 
either late in August or September. 1 about then- 192« levels of employ- 



Foreigners F\acnated From Spain Repeal Full 
Horrors of Revolution — Dead Utter Streets of 
Malaga — Fifty Priests Shot Down in Public 
Square- — ContUs'l Wife Is Murdered 

._ - » 

Government Claims Further 
Successes Against Rebel* 

GIBRALTAR. July 25 (/P).— Refugees, arriving here to- 
night aboard the British destroyer Brazen, bi ought re- 
ports that 2.500 bodies were lying in the streets of 
Malaga, Southern Spanish city, northeast of here. 

One stated fifty Catholic priests had been placed together 
in a public square and shot down by a machine gun. 

The Brazen brought 150 persons, including British and 
United States nationals, from Malaga and returned to that city 
for more, while the British destroyer Boreas carried 100 fleeing 
from Huelva. 

Foreigners at Malaga were not injured, the refugees asserted, 
but the city was ' unrecognizable." They said clubs and homes 
of Monarchists and Fascists were destroyed and more than 200 
buildings were burned. 

Armed youths, the fugitives de- 
clared, were roaming the street* and 
frequent killings occured. 

The Boreas' passengers suid tha 
city of Tarlfa was under a heavy 
bombardment as they passed by. 

Three loyal Spanish cruisers and 
rebel-held forts at Ceuta. Morocco 
traded shell for shell today in the 
Straits of Gibraltar, but fog frus- 
trated the combatants. . 




KILLED BV lU)\ s 

SAINT JEAN DE LUZ. Fiance. 
July 25 (A*).— The slaying of the 
Norwegian Consul's wife and her 
nurse in San Sebastian, Spain, by 
boys barely big enough to hold 
rifles was reported tonight by refu- 
gee* reaching here from that cltv. 
Continued on Page 3, Column 3 



IS 




Provincial and municipal, relief 
lists showed 16.073 fewer persons in 
receipt of assistance in June this 
year, than in the corresponding 
! month in 1933. British Columbia re- 
lief officials disclosed yesterday. Be- 
tween May and June 2,158 Individ- 
uals were dropped from the lists, 
while Federal camps for single men 
closed. 

Assisted families were reported at 
17,544, some 3 000 less than at the 
Single men in 
British Columbia urban and rural 
an as numbered 13.427, as compared I 

with 27,417 in June. 1933. when 1.344 St. Paul Clllt) Owner Found 

others were in Federal camps. 

While no segregation was avail- 
able to indicate what proportion of 
those leaving relief lists in the last 
three years had gone bark to em- 
ployment, increased staffs reported 
in lumber, mining and other In- 
dustries Indicated several thousand 
additional men now employed. 
With few exceptions, basic Indus- 



OF CONSPIRACY 



FOREST FIRES 
EESS SERIOUS 

Marooned Men at Kootenay 
Pass Still Unreported— 
Winds Aid Fighters 

OALOARY. July 25 <*.— Cooler 



will include an inspection of the 
harbor situation at Vancouver. 

With all of the three Ministers ad- 
ministering several departments, ad- 
ditional to their own in the absrnc/ 
of six colleagues on official bus; 
ness in Furope. their departure plarts 
have been held up somewhat. 

TURKEY BUYS LINER 
FOR OTTOMAN NA< 



merit, and are expanding steadily. 



BREMEN, Germany, July 25 
Turkey has purchased the No 
Oerman Lloyd liner Trier, to be In- 
corporated in the Ottoman Navy 
The Trier is a twelve-year-old ship tpn yesterday. 

of 9.415 tons. The purchase price 

is stated to have been about $340,000. TORONTO WOMAN DROM NED 



Chicago Reporti 
Rabie* Outbreak 

CHICAOO, Julv 2fi r — There 
was a "gas purge" In Dogland to- 
day a* a result of a rabies scare. 

Two hundred canine* were killed 
In a few minutes in the Chicago 
dog pound s carbon monoxide death 
chamber The mass "liquidation" 
was ordered after three person* 
died of rabies «nd sevenfv-one bit - 



1 \l MI'I 111 Ml \T IN s\\ I III N 

8TOCKHOLM. July 25 <? -Un- 



TORONTO. July 25 O -Dorothy 
Lalng. twenty-seven. Toronto, was 



IN Ml \l< O I N|)S 

MEXICO CITY Julv 25 (#), — A 



and TraTel 
Social Note* 
Snorl 
The* I res 
is 



honorary secretary- treasurer of st trn _ dav < ; . 1k , of 2(m rlrrfrlraI 

John Ambulance Association and work—a In the heart of Mexico 

Hugh M Birch- Jones, commissioner onded todav with resumption of 

of the Canadian Red Cross. service. 

Birthday Will Be Just 
Another Day to G.B.S. 

MALVERN, Kngiand. July 25 i/PV write Ibsen, yon -tmow. in the end 
—George Bernard Shaw, who In his forgot how to write. He spent hi* 

mornings trying to learn how again, 
like a child " 

Still waggish, still straight, de- 
spite hi* eight decades of ceaseless 
energy. Shaw did his best to indi- 
cate thst an eightieth birthday an- 
niversary wa* nr.' Surprise 'n him 
whatsoever 

^Tomorrow will be lust another 
day." be declared I cannot n re- 
tend my eightieth bnthdav will be 
different from any other d»y.' 



"Back to Methuselah ' spoke Inv idi 
ously of extreme age. chuckled to- 
day over the fact he will be eighty 
vears ol d tomorrowr 

'.'Plan?" he repeated "Man at 
eighty hair a past but no future. I 
cannot contemplate anything " 

And then he belted hi* own 
word* — "*-- 



the Alberta-British Columbia 
boundary southwest of here today. 
Hundreds of men and equipment 
rushed into the menaced districts 
and the weather change prospects 
looked bright for early control. 

No word had come from the nrty 
men marooned at the summit of 
Kootenay Pass, near Blairmore. nor 
was there any word from rescue 
pting to break through 
to them Little fe*r was held for 
their safety, however, as -the -en- 
circling flros were' widely separated 
though cutting the party off from 
its base camp. 

The situation remained seriou* 
in the Highwood River with flames 
racing down. the valley shore* en- 
dangering ranch property and camp. 
Settlers were ready to move if 
necessary and additional fire 
lighters were *ent Into the district 
from Calgary and High River, which 
Is fifty-five miles east of the danger 
zone 

Several Quak es . 
FeU in Settttlc 



from Antwerp, planned to stay here 
tonight and proceed to Vimy to- 



morrow. 

During the day many of the 
pilgrims took side trip* In the 
country surrounding the city, re- 
visiting towns and village* which 

Continued on Page 1. Cotnmn 5 



PEAK IS CLIMBED 
FOR FIRST TIME 



Mount Monarrh. U.TOfl Feel High. 

by Henry S. Hall and 
Hans Furher 



employment in Sweden now is the I drowned and three other pcrvms 
lowest in Ave years, with only 34.500 ; were saved today when a cabln-t\p» 
out of work at the end of May. a 1 auxiliary boat overturned In Lake 
decrease of about, 25 per cent from Ontario off Leut v Avenue in the 
April. least end of the city. 

Seven Thousand 
Students Ready 
For High School 

Stewart C, Kurncll. Oak Hay, ^ in- One of Ten 
Governof^General'fl Medalu for l)i-trirt Lead* 
en hip — Mar\ J. Handling, North Van* 
rouwr, Topt Pro vine* — Inland li-i-* 



Guilty on Kidnapping 
Charge 

ST. PAUL. July 25 (A*).— A Federa. 
court jury-tonight convicted John 
P. 1 Pack) Pelfer, night club owner, 
on a charge of conspiracy in the 
$100 000 kidnapping of William 
Hamm. Jr , St. Paul brewer. 

The jury, composed of eleven men 
and one woman, reached Its verdict 
nearly twenty-five hours after it 
received the case at fl 33 p rn Fi <' 
The Jury agreed at 7.10 pin, after 
ten hours and ten minutes of actual 
deliberations. 

SENTENCE DEFERRED 

Federal Judge M M Jo\re de- 
ferred l*entence until next Wednes- 
day arid the defendant was released 
on the; same bond of $100,000 under 
which) he had been at liberty. 

PeifJer, named a* the "flngerman" 
In thi abduct ir>n. liad been Indicted 
a* one of seven conspirator*. He 
was the only one who stood trial, 
after four had pleaded guilty. 

They are Alvin Karpis. one-time 
America* "public enemy number 
one , CharW <Big Fltz» Fitzgerald. 
Los Angeles, who pretended to shake 
hands with Hamm as he «elzed~liim 
on June 15, 1933; Edmund C. Bar- 
tholmey, in whose home the brewer 
was lmpriMined for four dayi at 
BcnsenviUe, 111 , and Byron Bol'"n, 
reputed machine - gunner for tha 
Barker-Karpl* mob 

SERVING TERMS 

Two others, Arthur <Doci Barker 
and Elmer Farmer, are »erving 
terms in Alcatraz Prison for th« 
1200,000 kidnapping of Edmund G. 
Bremer, St Paul banker, and were 
not brotight to trial. Barker a 
under life Imprisonment, while 
Farmer, former Bensenvllle, III., 
tavern keeper, Is serving a twenty- 
year term. 



SEATTLE MAN IS 
BURNED TO DEATH 



Firemen Find Bodr hi Fire Whi* h 
Spread Through Cafe and Hotel 
to 



AS a result of promotion! and examinations. 7.259 British 
Columbia students will leave elementary schools for high 
and superior schools in September, it was announced yes- 
Monarch 11 700 feet of rock, mow | terday by the British Columbia Department of Education. The 



Page ?l 

Page is 

Page 24 

Page 19 

Page n 

IS, 14. || 

Page M 

7 a* long a* I can 



I dares*-. T «h*ll go on writing 



SEATTLE. July 25 iff) 
slight earthquake shock*, of a few j 
second*' duration, awakened resi- 
dent* of all part* of Seattle at 
12 45 a m today No damage waa 
reported. 

Newspaper offices were besieged 
e*U» from resident* who re- 
feeung at least four 



, temblor*. 



and Ice that towers among brother results show 6.252 pupils recommended for promotion into high 

'school without examination, and 1.007 others who passed the 
entrance examinations successfully. Approximately 1.900 
students took the examinations, including 123 who were com- 
peting for awards. 

Mary Janet Handing, a fourteen- 
year-old student at the Queen Mary 
School, North Vancouver, lead* the 
province with 543 marks, out of a 
possible 800 Miss Handling and nine 
others will each receive the Oover- 
inoT-Oenerals medal*, for standing, 



to *eventy-flve rrriles north of the 
notorious unsealed cliffs of Mount 
Waddlngton. has been climbed for 
the first time. 

In Vancouver, en route to an- 
other Alpine adventure on a *econd 
"new" mountain in the Waddlngton 
area, aie Henry I Hall, of Boston, 
•nd Haas Furher gyide the men 
who built their curn on Mount 
Monarch thl* week on their at- 



f empis 



first in their respective school dis- 
tricts, a* follows 

District 1— Stuart Oland B irnell. 
Monterey Avenue School. Oak Bay. 
523 mark* 

D. strict 1 Robert Wood Duncan 
Conaollds'ed School. 520 mark* 

00 Page 9. Column 4 



SEATTLE July VI tfi*i — A man 
burned to death In a fire whir 1 
started In a cafe and spread to a 
hotel above early todmy; 

The dead man. w,hose body fire- 
men found In the cafe, waa tenta- 
tively identified as Pat Murphv. 
Seattle. 

Cause of the Are waa undeter- 
mined About fifteen patron* in the 
cafe, and the owner, George Priru - 
vera, hurried out a* the fire 
Prlnavera said he 
had escaped 
Quest* In the hotel rushed to th" 

1 street In their sleeping clothe - 
Firemen re*eue*j one man 

J by smoke in the 



I 







THE DAILY COLON! 



rn 



RIA, B.C., Sl\T> AY, JULY 26, fag 



West Indian Turtles 
At Vancouver Will 
Become Jubilee Soup 

Chef Instructed to Prepare Amphibians, Now 
Housed in Tank, for Banquet to Lord Mayor 
Without Breaking Their Shell* 



Crowd Wi 
Siberian 




Oinidun Txtm Staff Writer 

VANCOUVER, July 25 Chef Cornelius Muysenberg 

made a cursory study of West Indian turtles today and 
bemoaned the li\t that Canadians were not gourmets. 
The four turtles, a present to Vancouver's civic dignitaries 
from His Majesty's Commissioner A. W. Cardinall of the Cay- 
man Islands, flipped about weakly in wooden tanks at the back 
of Chef Muysenberg's vast kitchen in a Vancouver hotel. 
It la Muysenberg » job to trans- | that the aholl has to be cut in four 



form the 
into coup 



1 
ft 



300 -pound amphibians 
lot the Lord Mayor of 
and other distinguished 
visitors who will be banqueted by 
the city's Golden Jubilee commit- 
tee next month. 

OLD HAND AT GAME 
He isn't really worried about th 
Job. because he used .to » coo 
turtles in his native Holland before 
he came to Canada twenty years 
•go. .»nd he hasn't forgotten the 
art although the only time he 
serves turtle to his present clientele 
la when he takes it from tin cans 
and makes It into salads. Even 
then, very few people ask for turtle. 

The only thing that makes the 
present Job difficult Is that the 
Jubilee committee wants the four- 
foot tortoise shells kept intact. 
Butchering a turtle generally means 



or five pieces In order to separate 
the meaj. However, Chef Muysen- 
berg is going "to boil down the 
turtle, shell and ail. and keep the 
precious shield for the committee. 
He doesn't know what they want it 
for. 

ONE GOES LONG WAY 
Only a little of the meat is u>< d 
for the soup and one turtle will 
make enough for 500 people. Muy- 
senberg can make stew out of the 
meat and fan make a nice patt«' 
with**he fifteen-pound liver. 

"We haven't the clientele for 
turtle steaks here, " Muysenberg re- 
gretted. "But 1 make a nice turtle 
ragout with lots of mushrooms and 
olive and plenty of sherry." 

The only part of the amphibian 
used for soup is the Jelly substance 
adhering to the under part of the 
shell. The rest of the meat is used 
for ragout and some is diced up 



for ragout and some is 

New Travel Coats r ST™ 



In imported tweeds. Luxurious 
collars of wolf, raccoon and lapin. 
Price $35.00 to ?59.50 




728 YATES STREET 



Quality Electric 

WASHER 



BALLBEARING MECHANISM 

TERMS' •CO 0 PEH MONTH 
w No Interest 

Beatty Washer Store 

1609 Douglas St G7511 



TASTE LIKE CHICKEN 

Muysenberg didn't know what 
kind of turtles they were except 
that they came from Jamaica. 

They're just ordinary turtles," he 
said, "and most people would think 
they were eating chicken or ve*l If 
they tasted the meat." 

He hasn't deckled yet what he's 
going to do with the fin and belly 
leather. Sometimes its used for 
women's shoes and cigarette cases, 
but he doesn't think anyone in this 
country could prepare it. 

In the meantime the turtles are 
being fed lettuce which would re- 
tall about twenty cents a leaf in 
the glided dining -room above, and 
don't seem to like It much. They 
prefer seagulls' eggs, but nobody 
knows where to get them in Van- 
couver. 





Would Pay 
For Relief 
With Silver 



VANCOUVER. July 35 ■ -Alder- 
man W. W. Smith, chairman of the 
Vancouver relief department, today 
was investigating the possibility of 
making relief payments In silver in- 
stead of by cheques He has pro- 
posed discussing the scheme with 
Hon. O. S. Pearson. British Colum- 
bia Minister of Mine, 

Payment of relief with silver 
would save the city approximately 
$1,000 in 8tamp* and bank service 
charges on 20.000 cheques each 
month, the alderman said, as well 
as stimulate the mining industry. 




reel 



Nearly 1.000 persons watched 

William Harkness. the Canadian 
Houdini, make his sensational Si- 
berian chain escape outside The 

Dally Colonist office on Broad 
Street yesterday afternoon. 

Joseph Wheeler wa« shackled first 
to show the chains were solid. Mr 
Wheeler and Carl Strable securely 
manacled Mr. Harkness about the 
% lists, forearm*, ankles and neck 
with thirty pounds of chain and 
Iron manacles. He was lifted into 
a light truck by Mr Strable and 
Constable Harry Mercer. One 
minute and twenty seconds later, 
the magician emerged carrying the 
chains with padlocks still fastened. 

Mr. Harkness was a arded the 
Houdini Trophy, emblematic of the 
highest technique in escape acts, 
during the recent Pacific Coast 
Magicians' Association convention 
at Seattle. Mr. Strable is a fellow 
magician and secretary of wizards 
of the West. 

DAMAGING FIRE 
AT 

Large Part of Business Sec- 
tion Swept by Flames- 
Eight Buildings Lost 

CRANBROOK. Julv 25 W — Dam- 
age, tentatively estimated at $30,000. 
today was caused by a nre which 
wiped out a large part of Cran- 
brook s business section Cause of 

towns history, was unknown. 

When first sighted, the fire had a 
strong hold on the York Rooms and 
quickly spread to Dezall's Garage 
and the Italia Hotel, adjoining 
buildings. ~ 

The fire department and a volun- 
teer crew fought the blaze for nearly 
two hours before bringing It under 
control. 

Kootenay Motors. Davey's Bakery, 
the residence of John Stefanuk, the 
Tea Kettle Inn and an annex to the 
Cranbrook Hotel were also destroyed. 

Most of the buildings were re- 
ported covered by insurance. 

GRANVILLE IS 
PURSE WINNER 

CHICAOO. July 25 (^.—Gallant 
Fox, now nine years old and 
munching oats down in Kentucky, 
sent another of his sons out to win 
the $35000 Arlington Classic today. 

Granville, son of the famous 
champion of 1930. rolled along into 
the three-year-old championship of 
the American turf before 30 000 
cheering spectators at Arlington 
Park by defeating Mr. Bone* by two 
and one-half lengths. Hollyrood was 
| third, a half length back of Mr 
Bones and four lengths ahead of 
Count Morse, which finished fourth. 

MANITOBA WILL 
VOTE TOMORROW 



Liberal -Progressive* and Conserva- 
tive* Onlv Have sufficient C.indi- 
to Klect Mouse Majority 



Former British Columbia 
Attorney-General Passes 
Away at Kamloops 

< i 
KAMLOOPS, July 26 «*.-F. J. 
Fulton. K.C., seventy-four, British 
Columbia Attorney-General In 1P05 
and city solicitor for Kamloops since 
1910, died here today. He was a 
resident of Kamloops for forty-seven 
years. 

He was three times member of the 
Provincial Legislature, 1900 to 1909. 
resigning In the latter year when he 
disagreed with Sir Richard McBrlde 
over Canadian Northern Pacific 
Railway guarantees. 

In 1917 Mr. Fulton was elected to 
the House of Commons as Unionist 
candidate for Cariboo. 

A keen sportsman. Mr. Fulton 
enjoyed hunting, fishing and golfing. 
He was one of the founders of the 
Kamloops Golf Club. He played 
yearly In the Pacific Northwest 
Seniors' tournament at Victoria. 
WAS BORN IN ENGLAND 

Born in Bedllngton, England. Mr 
Fulton came to Canada in 1887 and 
to Kamloops two years later. 

In 1810 he married Winnifred M. 
Davie, daughter of the late Hon. 
Alexander E. B. Davie, of Victoria, 
who survives him. along with four 
sons, Alex and Davie, at home; 
John, in the Royal Air Force and 
stationed at Cairo, Egypt, and Fred 
J . In London. England. Mr. Fulton 
; is also survived by two brothers, A. 
G„ in Vancouver, and James H., at 
i Kendall, England, and a sister. Miss 



DEATH TAKES 

F. S. FULTON I Believe It or 7*ot 



Funeral services will be held Mon- 
day afternoon at St Paul's Cathe- 
dral. Rt. Rev. O. A. Wells, Bishop of 
Cariboo, officiating. 



GIVING CONCERT 
AT BEACON HILL 



POWELiTs 



i ■ 



There Isn't a City in the 
World Where Dowell's 
Cannot Send Your Fur- 
niture and Guarantee 
It Will Be Properly 
Unpacked at Its 
Destination 



ASK US ABOUT THIS 
WORLD-WIDE SERVICE 

The explanation is simple. Dowell's is the largest 
and oldest repository firm in Victoria, and as such 

I k,,,|» a tunwlA wi/Hp rnnnpr tinn with firms of simi- 

nas ounr a worio wiuts mhmwot wmm »■ »n»>> 

lar repute. Dowell's come to your home in Victoria 

and* take complete charge of packing, crating, 

shipping . . . everything. Your effects art 

delivered at your new home in first-class order by 

a firm in which you can place complete confidence. 

For particulars and cost estimate on all household 

moving 

PHONE G7191 



Offices Jnd Safety Storage Wirehoul* 

1119 WHARF STREET 



of 16th Canadian 
Ml-* Merle North 
ishing Programme 



Scottish 



Bv kind permission of Lieut. -Col. 
R. H. Kingham. the 16th Canadian 
Scottish Band, assisted by Miss Merle 
North, will give the following pro- 
gramme in Beacon Hill Park at 3:30 
o'clock this afternoon, after the me- 
morial service by the C a n a d ian Le- 
gion. Lieut. James M. Miller will 
eend ue > t * ■ — 

. Opening march. "Vimy Ridge" 
• dedicated to the C.E.F.); military 
fantasy. ' King and Country"; waltz. 
"Ecstacy"; songs by MLss Merle 
i North, "Somewhere a Voice Is Call- 
' inR" and Beautiful Dreams"; popu- 
i lar selection. "Desert Sons": cornet 
| solo, by Bandsman Jnme.s Mnssop. 
"Roses of Picardy"; overture, ' Mas- 
aniello"; march. "With Sword and 
Lance': popular selection. 'War- 
blers' Serenade"; vocal solos, Miss 
Merle North, "When You Come 
Home" and "Perfect Day"; grand 
•election, "Huguenots"; final march. 
Freedom's Banner." 



POLICE UNCOVER 
EXTORTION PLOT 



Eleven Prominent Fverett Citliens 
Threatened Inleaa $1,000 Paid 
Man AnrsttMl 



HE EE IS REAL NEWS TO* THOSE WHO HI'FFT.B FROM 

DEAFNESS AND HEAD NOISES 

MUM W.rn M the r ar-Nort hin* Worn In the tar-It's O.I ftf Ml«ht-Fre« T**l 



EVERETT. Julv 25 </P> —Depart- 
ment of Justice agents, working 
with Everett police, today an- 
nounced they had uncovered an ex- 
tortion plot in which the Uvea and 
homes of at least eleven prominent 
Everett citizens were threatened. 

Agents said the eleven persons 
each received a letter which threat- 
ened UJ blow up thctr homes, injure 
them physically and "expose" them 
unless $1,000 was paid. 

Police arrested Earl Christensen. 
alias Carl ChrLstensen. twenty- 
| eight-year-old blond, curly-headed 
Everett paper mill worker, in con- 
nection with the extortion. 



A new type of harring <Bone Conduction)— the first 
showing In Canada -Its wonderful to thin* you run now 
hear throufh the bone- no unsightly earpiece on the ear 
Teat our New Maaaaae for Head Noiaea 
We hate opened the door lo new hearing by means of 
newest Invention the rejuvenation of the auditory 
by natural use. a method deacrliicd by emlnrnt 
A boon to mankind, combining all the Deaf have 
ever wanted or hoped for You fortet your Deafness 
remove strain and Hear all the world of sound, ronver- 
iatlon. music, radio, talkies, ete. Equally beneficial to 
youni or old Chosen for use by many professional men 
Recommended by leadlnt aurlsta 

slvowlna In Victoria the smallest Hearing Aid in the 
also a HS« model, button type, which fits In th* 
itAw w.ihnut hraribsnrt IQquirn no attention The 



system 
men 



■sm 

world 



use of thla small aid will offset the greater part of your 
difficulty By actual test you will know what can he 
done You merely have to test It to know what thla 
will mean to you Fully g leranUed for ten years' service 
Thirty five different models We invite you to call for a 

FREE PRIVATE TEST 

I m.c.i In ( bane) 



Jl I.T ?» TO H I T XI 



H yr. in % M Till » P M 
Inquire si Dt<k f..r H T Dak. DOMINION HOTFI. 
VII 1MRI » 
Nl W IOW I KK I s 

lJbeml Allowance lor Your ' Pr»sn,t ImtlumWl 



PANTHER TERRORIZES 
POPULACE OF TOKIO 



TOKIO. July 25 If).— After ter- 
rorizing some of the most congested 
wards of Toklo. an escaped black 



panther was recaptured today. 

The savage animil, whirh had 
forced its way through the bars of 
its cage in a zoo. wait finally located 
in a street manhole It was forced 



out by smoke into 
with no casualties. 



another cage 



A T marriage your wife 
*■ gave up her financial 
independent e. The in- 
creasing demands of I he 
home and the passing of time m.ikr it impossible for her 
to resume business or professional life. 



WINNIPEG.. July 25 Tt. — Voters 
in Manitoba will trek to the polls 
Monday to elect fifty-two members 
to the provinces flfty-flve-member 
Legislature. 

The Liberal -Progressives and the 
Conservatives arc the only two par- 
ties with sufficient candidates in the 
field to elect a majority in the Leg- 
islature The Liberal - Progre.vMve.s 
have nominated forty-seven candi- 
dates and the Conservatives have 
named thirty-seven 
, Headed by S. J. Farmer, of Win- 
nipeg, the Co- opera! ive Common- 
wealth Federation has named nine- 
teen candidates, and the Manitoba 
Social Credit League, promising 
basic dividends for all, has named 
twentv candidates. Seven others of 
various affiliations have been nomi- 
nated 



It is p$m responsibility, not only to provide for die home 
during life, but to ensure its maintenance in the event of 
your death. Life insurance is the SI RE way. 

7567 



THF 




Manufacturers Life 

Insurance Company 

TORONTO, CANADA 



HorvLeaders 
Finished in 
$5,000 Meet 



Unveiled by His Majesty at Vimy Today 



Branch Office: Pemberton Building. Victoria 



BATCH ELORS 



PURE FOOD STORES 

SELF SEtVICE-rOPULA«-PICK b PACK-JAMES BAY GROCERY 




PEARL NAPTHA SOAP 

ROGERS' SYRUP 

S-Uv tin . —■— 



* I 



~>srs 



,5- Ib. tip .13** 



HORSESHOE SALMON. pe r Hn „ l«< 



EMPRESS ORANGE MARMALADE 

4-IS. ti« for , — ■ '7 

KELLOGGS CORN FLAKES. 




VANCOUVER. July M 01. -Win- 
ners in today's 15.000 Oolden Jubi- 
lee golf championship, with their 
scores an<L pri zes, we re 

Kenny Black. Vancouver, ama- 
teur. 275. 

Byron Nelson. Rirtcnvnod. N.J. 
pro. 278. Sfl""> 

Jimmy Thomson. Shawnee on- 
Delaware, pro. 278, $375. 

Maedonnld Smith. Nashville,. 
Tenn . pro. 279; $500. 

Tonv M.incro,~a«!ensboro. N.C., 
pro, 279; 1500. 

Terle Johnson. Detatur. Ills . pro. 
280; 1350 

Freddy Wood. Vancouver, pro. 
281; $300. 

E Zimmerman Portland, pro 283: 
$2.i0. 

R Ouldahl St Louis, pro. 283; 
$250. 

Da\e Black. Vancouver pro. 285; 
$165 

D Longworth Oakland pre. 285, 
$185 

W Ctoggln. San Francisco, pro 
285; $165 

Orvllle White. Chicago pro 
$83. 

R Mundny San' a Rrvw. pro 286; 
$8:1 

M Christian. Yaklmi. pro. 28« 
$83 ■ — 

E. J Harrison. Little Rock. Ark 
pro. 286; $83 

Horton Smith Chicago, pro, 12t^ 
t$2 




General Electric 

WASHERS 

See the New Beautiful General 
Electric Waaher 
ONLY *S.OO DOWN 

JAMESON 

ELECTRIC. LTD. 
1121 Douglas Sl B 1171 



See the New 

"Aeroflame" 

rh» taa-barnlng *a w « • t 4 nil that 
h.. il« awn w.t»r Jackal <.»l ••• 
r rang*. 




LIP-READING 



rn»au lawom t>r 
DAT Tr:al Lasso,,, rr.a 

I I. H TYl 

Mullrr- Ws. a r»a^" • C^rttflcaV 
rh»na C MM ««S1 D»«glaa i» 

Phona 12 1»-IJ *» and f 101 10 



tmatit 
MIGllT 



CLEAN TEETH 

Are essential to good looki and 
good health Lyptodent Tooth 
Paste ii a scientifically pre- 
pared dentnfice. It cleans and 
polishes the teeth and promotes 
Mouth Health. Satisfaction or 
money refunded by all Vancou- 
ver Drug Co Stores Large 
tube 23c, Family size 39c. 



Th*« annua] outdoor show to be 
staged bv the Vlrtorla Ottjf K*nne| 
Club will be held on Saturday. 
August 15. at "Drumadoon " Cadbuco 
Bay. by kind permission of Mr. aTRT" 
Mrs Fred Robertson The Judge* will 
be T P WrConnell and E Wood- 
house. 



FREE TO 
HAY FEVER 
SUFFERERS 

r f tr— aamolw supplr of STpt 

r »l»' f'ir Har r»y»r Stiinm« 



For * . {/— a amolo supplr of Cphatona lha 

r»r- »H»" fir Hair P»r»r ■MMMf Asthmi 
snrt Ro«» r«T»r which ha* prov*4 Its amwr»~ 
Irur »rf;rae» to cvoat* of s'iff#r»rs through- 
out MM »';rld. arnd 1*/ rrn'a-Uo tvrrr tot* 
Of parking and rns.l.r* 
Rtttt • * Oe IM ■ 
Ca il B'r»»l Toror to 



■ lfarol<i F* 
f»7 Mi. !• Me 



The unveiling of the Vimy Memorial by Hi* Majesty King Edward VI IT. 
Western Front, call* to mind the an«iou« day* when fnt>«t of the world 
when the paper* were scanned for name* of dear one* who were offering 



4 



Ben Coltnn* San Fr«nrtxerv pro neverthele**/ by tale* of h*roi«m devotion and »elf-M«.riftce una 
■ :M 183 J Vimy again.t a background of 



to honor the memory of 11,000 Canadian* reported "mi*sing 
wa« plunged into the maelstrom of war Agoniring day* they were, 
their bodie* a* a barrier to the advance of the enemy, but days relieved, 
in hittory. Thi* layout *how< the impo»in« Canadinn Memorial at 



RELIEF IN 10 SECONDS 

T-'f.r arapir arts, running at th* no**. 
h**l*l**M and th* abominable «b*«*lM 
ar< rtli*T«d la • f*» aavondi afar takin* 
. «p.h*»orj«. sr.d in minu 1 ** th# attack 
♦—"" l* o»»r Sold br druegtat on • MONCY- 
. H k r 'Y. katts it || Tl sar bottt* 

on the 



FPHAZONE 

L It Ads Quickly- 



Pepper and Red Hot 





ons Used by Crew 
To Prevent Seizure 



l niiMial Story of Sailing VmmI Moneta in I8»» 
Is Connected Wild Old Hastings Mill r ounu. ,1 
By Captain Edward Stamp in 1865 



By OEOROE BONA VI A 



AN unusual story is connected with the Hastings Mill built 
by Captain Edward Stamp on the Mainland in 1865. It 
was around the pioneer structure that the city of Vancou- 
ver had its beginning. The tale hinges about the sailing vessel 
Moneta, which caught fire while loading lumber there on May 
26. 1868, and had to be scuttled before the flames were quelled 
Without warning, part of the 



Monela's cabin suddenly burst Into 
flames. A number of workmen sup- 
posed to be handling buckets of 
Wuter entered the cabin and 
broached several bottle* of Captain 
Turpin's liquor. In the confusion 
they stole everything movable and 
damaged the expensive nttuigs. 
Steam was hastily raised aboard 
Captain Stamp's tug Isabel, and the 
burning vessel was towed to a beach 
near the mill. There she was scut- 
tled by mlllworkers with axes and 
augers. 

Not until Juae 9 was the Moneta 
surveyed by Captain Raymur, J. W. 
Trahey and Captain Mitchell. They 
reported her seriously damaged In 
commenting upon the mishap. The 
BnHeh Colonist made the following 
remark* about Captain 8tamp's 
mill: 

"A large number of vessels are at 
present lying at the mill. There are 
three loading and four waiting to 
load, and the aeven will carry 50,000 
feet of lumber each Four of the 




and three for foreign ports. There 
Is a strong possibility that before 
long British Columbia will mainly 
supply the California market with 
lumber, for its great superiority se- 
cures it a ready demand at 2 cents 
a foot mora than lumber imported 
from elsewhere." 

TEMPORARY REPAIRS 

Much to the disgust of shipbuild- 
ers, it was rumored on June 20 the 
Moneta was to be repaired at San 
Francisco. Two marine surveyors 
thought the ship should be tem- 
porarily patched In Burrard Inlet 
for the voyage south, but Captain 
Turpln. her master, was dubious. 
Three days later he changed his 
mind He reasoned that if he could 
»ct the vessel to San Francisco she 
would be immediately condemned 
by underwriters and her owners 
would receive a substantial sum. so 
work commenced 

A difficulty arose on June 28 in 
regard to salvage claims, snd Cap- 
tain Stnmp appealed to the Admir- 
alty Court. The Isabel put to sea 
with the sheriff aboard, ready to 
Intercept the Moneta as she passed 
through the Strait of Juan de Fuca 
on her wav south. 

After a fruitless search, the tug 
put Into Victoria, where a man 
named Elliott, vtee-majshal of the 
Admiralty Court, was taken aboard. 
At 4 o'clock on the afternoon of 
June SO the Moneta was sighted In 
the Oulf of Oeorgla. near Portier 
Pass 

As the tug drew alongside the 
sailing vessel. Elliott shouted that 
he had a warrant to arrest the 
Moneta. 

' Come on. boys. Defend the ship 
Allow no man to come on board." 
Captain Turpln bellowed He waved 
a sword in the air and eommnnded 
the crew: -Knock any man down 
who attempts to come aboard." 

Arming themselves with hand- 



spikes, harpoons, swords and clubs^ 
the crew echoed: "Down with the | 
damned pirates and rascals." The 
ships cook passed around packets 
of black pepper which were tossed 
at the Isabel s crew. — 

Several men on the MoneU 
dashed to the galley and heated iron 
bars until they were cherry red. 
Elliott and an assistant named Mc- I 
Millan were both injured by these [ 
terrible weapons. Elliott received 

a chut wound. — 

Suffering acutely. Elllou climbed ' 
back over the ships rail with the 
warrant in his hand. He was fol- 
lowed by McMillan. Stephens, Cox 
and Deputy-Marshal Austin, Elliott 
received a thrust from a red hot 
kitchen fork through his left hand. 
The wan ant was snatched from his 
right hand and thrown overboard 
in fragments. 

Finally the Isabels crew drew 
their revolvers, and Captain Turpin 
tried to make his men realize fur- 
ther resistance was futile Susannah, 
the captain's wife's negro maid, 
swung a pair of blacksmith's tongs 




V. W. Ahiers Wins Annual 
Competition of Victor.a 
Horticultural Society 

[OTHER WINNERS OF 

PRIZES ANNOUNCED 



Shown above is the tiny copper cylinder found under the roots of a 
stump on Nigei Island, recently, by W. M. Halliday and B. A. McKelvie, 
who are convinced it was one of the trinkets placed there in 1786 by 
Captain James Strange, upon the occasion of his taking possession of 
the surrounding country for Great Britain. 



on Elliott's shins. Bellowing 
with pain, he was sorely tempted to 
pull the trigger of his revolver. 

Order was restored at once The 
Moneta's sails were furled and a 
rope passed to the Isabel. The sail- 
ing ship was towed to Esquimau 
without further mishap. 

CREW ARRESTED 
Admiral Hastings sent an officer 
and two marines aboard to arrest 
Captain Turpin, his crew and Cap- 
tain Pamphlet, the pilot. They were 
brought to Victoria on July 1 and 
released later on their own recog- 
nizance. 

Two days later a letter appeared 
in The British Colonist signed "Fair 
Play." The writer claimed the vice- 
marshal first threatened the Mone- 
ta's crew with cocked revolvers, a 
boat hook caused Elliotts wound 
when he accidentally ran against it. 
no swords or firearms were used by 
the Monetas men, and the warrant 
was not torn up and thrown over- 
board. "Fair Play" claimed. 

Captain Turpin replied on July 4: 
I beg to state that the letter signed 
'Fair Play' appeared without my 
knowledge, also that the statements 
contained therein are Incorrect. I 
take this opportunity of testifying 
to the gentlemanly conduct of the 
vice-marshal and the great forbear- 
ance of his men. No one can regret 
more than I do the unfortunate 
I lrcumstances of two men being 
wounded." 

Mr Justice Needham. Captain 
Dawklns. of H.MS. Zealous, and 
Captain Price, of H.M S. Scout, lis- 
tened to Captain Stamp's evidence 
in salvage action for $5,000 on Julv 
18 Stamp had been offered $2,500 
to settle out of -ccrort. but believed 
he was entitled to more. 

The- last heard of the Moneta was 
on July 22, when Mr. Justice Need- 
ham awarded Captain Stamp $3 500 
to be distributed among those who 
prevented the vessel from becoming 
a total losa 



SCIENTIST WAS 
ON B.C. COAST 



the Havana woman related. "As 
the couple reached the sidewalk a 
deadly lusuaae rang out. boui me 
nurse and the patient fell dead 
The Consul's wife was expecting a 
baby within the month." 

RECORDS BURNED 
Senora Franny Castello, of Boga- 
la. Colombia, said the city was 
filled with convicts released from 
Pasajes Pi son and others who came 
from Bilbao. 

"These convicts came for only one 
purpose," she said. "They stormed 
LONDON. July 25 <0\— Sir Henry the Palace of Justice in San Sebas- 
Wellcome. eighty-three, f a m o u s a»d made a bonfire of Provin- 

today following an operation. 



Sir Henry Wellcome Wrote 
Book About Pioneer 
Indian Missionary 



Sir Henrys scientific a<h;c.e- AMERICANS MI»M\<; 

ments ranged from the e-stablsh- WASHINOTON, July 25 (*), -The 
ment of physiological laboratories to State Department tonight made 
pioneering the field of archeological ' urgent inquiries of ius agents in 
survey through the use of airplanes. Spain in an attempt to locate Mrs. 

He won the Royal Humane So- I Monica Owen, of Cambridge. Mass.. 
clety Life Saving Medal in 1885. and and a party of New England col- 



as late as 1927 founded the Lady 
(Stanley Maternity Hospital in 
Uganda, Central Africa. 

NOTABLE CAREER 

He conducted a number of arch- 
aeological and ethnological explora- 
tions in the Upper Nile regions of 
i the Sudan and after the Oreat War. 
.s.r Henry held honorary member- 
ships in many scientific bodies. He 
was a freeman of the Ancient Wor- 
shipful Society of Apothecaries' of 
the City of London. 

Elr Henry Wellcome was well 
known in Britush Columbia, having 



lege girls. They had not been 
heard from since a few days before 
Spain's revolution began. 

Mrs Owen and her charges have 
been louring Spain for some time. 

The State Department acted at 
the request of Robert D. Owen, of 
Boston, who was so concerned over 
his failure to hear from Mrs. Owen, 
a relatve, that he announced he was 
sailing for France to endeavor to 
locate her. 



V. W. AhierV garden at 3228 Sea- 
Ion Road, was last night judged to 
be the best in the contest conducted 
annually by the Victoria Horticul- 
tural Society. E. W. White, of the 
Department of Agriculture, and 
George Robinson. Elk Lake, the 
judges, made the announcement. 

Entered in the class "A" competi- 
tion for gardens having an area of 
over 7,200 square feet, Mr. Ahiers' 
garden was awarded 348 points. The 
second garden in this section was 
Judged to be that ol C. Richards. 
414 Simcoe Street, with 327 points, 
while A. H. Nunn. 3125 Somerset 
Street, received 313 points for the 
third place. 

For his victory Mr Ahiers will re- 
ceive, the society's trophy. 

WINS "B" ILAss 

In class "B" for gardens under 
7,200 square feel, G. Davis, 2439 
Dunlevy Street, was awarded first 



Sarsiat, 3317 Tennyson Street, sec- 
ond place, with 274 points. Class 
"C," for gardens in which occasion- 
al paid help is employed, was won 
by F. F. Rawlins, 169 Beach Drive, 
with 298 points. A. S. Derman, 
501 Obed Avenue, and A. E. Powell. 
225 Maddock Street, were second 
and third In this class, respectively, 
with 292 and 290 points. 

These gardens are open for in- 
spection to the interested public, It 
was announced. 

Flowers, fruit and vegetables 
from these gardens will be on dls- | 
play at the thirteenth annual shoa 
of the society at the Willows on 
Friday and Saturday. A prize UK 
for the show can be obtained from 
the secretary, F. E. Boulter, at Em- 
pire 8490. 




Dresses 



At Half Price 

and Less! 



STYLES SUITABLE FOR FORMAL 
AND INFORMAL OCCASIONS 



Bring This List With You 
for Reference 



DES 



1 ONLY, YELLOW ORGANDIE 



1 ONLY, PRINTED ORGANZA 



1 ONLY, COCOA PLAIN CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, PINK CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, SAND CHIFFON 



SEEKS AID FOR 



1 ONLY, MAUVE NET OVER TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, YELLOW ORGANZA 



1 ONLY, BROWN PRINTED SILK 



1 AMI 



OVERCHECK ORGANZA 



ADVANCE HALTED 

• By the Associated Pirn) 

Spams Liberal Government, 





1 ONLY, PRINTED CHIFFON 



Aid. Andrew McGavin Wants 
Change Made in Motor 
Vehicle Act 



1 ONLY, PRINTED CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, PRINTED TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, BROWN PRINTED CHIFFON 



spent some time on this coast a few claiming It had halted a Fascist ad- 
years ago. He became very inter- | vvance from th? north sixty miles 
ested in the work of William Dun- f rom Madrid and that rebels were 
can. the pioneer missionary of the ' bottled up in important southern 
North, and wrote a book describing cities, asserted early Sunday it was 
his labor among the Metlakaila j in control of the nine-day-old re- 
Indians. bellion. 



r 



MAIL ORDERS . . . 

Wh«n out of town, * note to ut will bfinfl your mcdicint by rtfurn mill 
Wt par rh. po.fjg. 0B p„, c „pt,on, to jny iddr.f. .n Br.t„h Columb.. 



AT 

roaT 



M c G!ll 6 Otfmo 



rnoNE 

O » H I I s 

i i •• 



REFUGEES RECOUNT 
TALES OE BUTCHERY 



Continued from Page 1 

Youths of fourteen and sixteen, 
enlisted In the Popular Front mili- 
tia, roamed the streets in defiance 
of their superiors and fired indis- 
criminately on suspected Fascists, 
the refugees said 

Dona Carmen Adams, of Havana, 
recounted the shooting of the Nor- 



Colonel Luis de Villaneuva. com- 



A resolution, far-reaching In its 
effects, if it is acted upon, will be 
Introduced by Alderman Andrew 
McGavin at a meeting of the City 
Council on Monday evening. It deals 
with a period of twelve hours' grace 
to be allowed a motor vehicle driver 
in which to produce his driver's I 
license. Following is the resolution 
in part: 

"Be it resolved that Victoria City | 



1 ONLY, COCOA NET OVER TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, BLUE CHIFFON (Plain) 



1 ONLY, GREEN NET OVER TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, BLACK AND WHITE CHIFFON 



mander of ah insurgent column at I Council submit to the Union of 
Vera, in the northeast. Count* r i British Columbia Municipalities con- 
the Government's declarations with vention for consideration a resOIu- ' 



1 ONLY, PINK NET OVER TAFFETA 



the assertion that the revoltcis had 
blocked the exits from Madrid. He 
.said the capital would be forced 
to capitulate within a week because 
of food and water shortage. 

There were 161 United States re- 
fugees at their embassy in Madrid, 
awaiting evacuation British and 
other foreigners were evacuated by 
British .ships. 

lov iusi < i mil 

The Spainlsh Government an- 
nounced the surrender of A bacete, 



rai s< riptio.n dinihi. 



wegian woman She was wounded 
first in the arm. Dona Carmen | rebel centre in the southeast, after 
said, when she peered through a , a steady Government drive and con- 
curtain from her apartment li.nued bombing ot Fascist positions 
"8he was helped down to an It MM revolters at Cadiz, Seville 



ambulance bv a nurse in uniform. 




Have You a 



Standard Charge 
Account ? 



// \<>t. Your Application /.« W el c o m e d by 

(hit Department of intmnts. Main Of fire 



It 



\ Charge .\co>utit makes for safer, more btssinesalikc ihopping . 
.when vou have one. to carry loose ca>h or take time ?o TcrtTfj 
at the en.l of each month yoti receive an itemized statement showing m complrte <|r- 
tail all the purchase* you have made. 



is tin necessary. 



You save both time and money by paying 
by cheque, either at month-efid 
monthly, as desired. 



or 



Your Charge Account builds a credit 
record that is 'priceless . . . identifying 
you as of unquestioned prestige. 



Start now to c mm -the f>reMtce ,,f. » I'Uai ^e Wvxml »J tin MaudajJ 
store wliose ere, lit rco^N arc a verital.le "Who* Who m B.C.- 




NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR THIS SERVICE 



STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

FURNITURE SPECIALISTS 



737 YATES ST. 



and Cordoba were surrounded and 
claimed those Important southern 
cities would fall into loyal hands 
within a few days. 

The French Government, au- 
thoritative sources in Parts reported, 
refused to send planes, arms and 
ammunition to help the Spanish 
Popular Front Government— similar 
.n political complexion to that of 
taMMt, The Frrnch administra- 
tion was sympathetic toward the 
1 i. grit against Spanish Fascists, It 
was said, but declined to lnterlere 
in the situation. French Rightists 
had charged the Paris Oovernment 
was helping Madrid. 

FRENCH 1 ERRAIN 
The mayor of Irun, Spam, re- 
ported to French authorities at Hen- 
1 daye that the rebels had been firing 
artl; 



lion calling for enactment at the 
next session of the Provincial Legis- 
lature. of legislation amendmg Sub- 
section 1 of Section 18 of the Motor 
Vehicle Act. requiring that every 
licensee shall have a driver's license 
in his possession at all times while 
driving nr oprrinng a mnu>r veht< Ir- 
on any hlgrway. anil shall at all 
times produce said icense for in- 
spection on, demand of any police 
officer or cor stable, lo provide that 
as an alternative every licensee 
when asked by a police officer or 
constable fdr his drivers licence 
shall be allowed twelve hours In 
which to produce his licence after 
such demand, at a police office 
designated by such officer or con- 
• table " 

Mr McOavin believes the present 
art inflicting a fine upon any per- 
son who cannot produce his driver's | 
licence upon demand is extremely | 
unjust. He declared last evening he | 
was fully prepared to champion the 
cause of a period of twelve hours' , 
grace. 

BANDS OF PILGRIMS 
CLOSING IN ON VIMY 



1 ONLY, PRINTED CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, NAVY PRINTED CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, CORAL NET OVER TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, YELLOW CHIFFON (With Coat) 



1 ONLjr, PRINTED BLUE CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, PRINTED GREEN CHIFFON 



1 ONLff, CORNFLOWER BLUE CHIFFON 



I 



1 ONLY, PRINTED BROWN CHIFFON 



1 ONLY, YELLOW NET (With Capd 



With 



1 ONLY, BLACK NET APPLIQUE TRIM 



1 ONLY, BROWN NET OVER TAFFETA 



1 ONLY, BROWN NET OVER PINK SILK 



1 ONLY, BROWN PRINTED SILK 



a projecting 
\)\ of French land- on the Fr»»oo- 

Ppanish bord°r. He said he intended 
t<5 send loyal fighters across this 
French area get at the evolters 
■p — rtu in.'.rmed of this develop- 
ment. 



Cordoba in the southwest was un- 
der heavy fire from Leftist planes 
while dynamite-armed miners oc- 
cupied El Carplo. in Toledo Province 
and shattered rebel strongholds 

In the Jagged mountain 
j north of Madrid loyal troops neld 
control of the gateways to the Ca- 
pital while revolutionaries paused on 
j the northern slope* awaiting new 
.movements. 

| Rebel leaders* acknowledged tlteir 
columns were at least sixty miles 
from Madrid, but declhvd to dis- 
pose projected offensives. 



1 ONLY, PRINTED BROWN CHIFFON 



16 



18 



16 



16 



20 



16 



16 



16 



18 



14 



16 



14 



18 



16 



38 



18 



20 



16 



18 



42 



20 



40 



14 



38 



18 



16 



14 



16 



38 



18 



40 



40 



Regular 
Price 



12.75 



19.50 



25.00 



27.50 



29.50 



35.00 



27.50 



23.50 



32.50 



32.50 



Price 
Sale 



500 



7.95 



7.95 



9.9S 



9.95 



9.95 



9.95 



9.95 



12.95 



12.95 



32.50 



27.50 



27.50 



32.50 



32.50 



32.50 



23.50 



39.50 



23.50 



29.50 



39.50 



37.50 
39.50 



26.5 




32.50 



39.50 



42.50 



39.50 



39.50 



47.50 



49.50 



12.95 



12.95 



12.95 



12.95 



12.95 



14.95 



1 1.95 



14.95 



14.9y 



14.95 



19.50 



19.50 



19.50 



19.50 



23.50 



2:5.50 



23.50 



2:5.50 



23.50 



23.50 



29.50 



29.50 



Continued from Page 1 

thev marched through^ in uniforms 
of the Allies in 1915 and after. 
DEPOSIT WRKATIlS 
"In Arr|s. Brig -Gen Alex Ross, 
president of the Canadian Legion,) 
and other members of the Legion's [ 
official party, deposited wreaths on 
memorials to Franc*'* wartime dead 
in that city. Lorette and Mont St 
El .1 

Meanwhile, the King, who will j 
unveil the granite shafts tomor- 
row, was on his yacht" somewhere f 
on the English Channel neartng | 
' the French Coast Three destroyers 
were accompanying the Admiralty- 
boat, from which the Kin*, will 
proceed to Vimv tomorro* 





niN i in« . i isiir r> i. Mm hi\(. 

VIM^ RIDOE. France. July 25 
0 — Distinguished representatives 
of public, military and cultural fife 
In several countries will be present 
wh n Canada's memorial r lo fear- 
war dead is dedicated by King Ed- 
ward VIII Among those at the 
ceremony will be the following 

Great Britain Lady Bvrur Lady 
Currie. widows of two commanders I 
PEIPING Julv 25 0>. — Whether' of the Canadian Corps In France 



Orders Study, of 
Chinese ( lassies 



Alfred Duff Cooper. Secretary for 
War; Lleuf-Oen. Sir Henry. Bur- 
stall. Canadian Divisional Com- 
mander. Field Marshal 8lr CyTil 
DevereU. Chief of the General 
Staff; Major-Gen. Sir Frederick 
Maurice; MaJ -Oen. O. J Farmar 
one-time Quartermaster-Oeneral of 
the Canadian Corps; MaJ -0»n, Sir 
Fabian Ware, vice-chairman of the 
Imperial War Graves Commission, 
Brig -Oen. 8ir Alexander Horr- 
Ruthveh Oovernor-Gen^ral of Aus- 
tralia. Unaccompanied were Mal- 
colm MarDonald. Sir Flrozkhan 
Noon. High Commissioner from 
India; Lord Mattlstone. Sir William 
Di k. President of the Royal So- 
■' . of Sculptor*. S'r Edwin Lut- 
p«H A R A . and Brig -Oen N W 
Webb* V • — 

Canadians with their aive, in- 
cluded Hon Ernest Lapointe. Min- 
ister of Justice; Hon C O Power. 
Minister of Penjuon r Hon. Vincent 



they like it or not municipal em- 
ployees here wtfl study the Chines* 
classics as part of their daily office 
routine, says Mayor Chin Teh -Chun 
He ha.- Ven eading •' idi periods 
himse'.f and sa\* rhst onlv by a re- 
turn to ancient teachings can poll- 



Lady Jellleoe widow of the Orand 
Fleets wartime commander. Lady 
Home, widow of Lord Home, com- 
mander of the First Army, to which 
the Canadian Corps was attached. 
Ladv A st or Ladv Drummond Lady 
Bova-ren and Lady Dash wood * 

by their wives were 



I _ 



Massey, Hutfe Commissioner Hon 
Philippe Roy,. Minister to France. 
Dr. L J. Lemieux. former Quebec 
Agent -General; and W C. McAdam. 
secretarv in charge of the British 
Columbia A f e n c y - Oeneral In 
London. 

Others were Hon. J O Oardiner. 
tflniater of Agriculture, Hon A W 
Roebuck. Ontario Attorney - Oen- 
eral; Lt -Col O P Vanler of the 
High t ommlMionera* office jean 
Demr of the Capadlan Legation ; 



Commissioner, and Becales Wilson. 

France " JU1#» TTeannehey, Presi- 
dent of the Senate; Edouard Her- 
rlott. President of the Chamber of 
Deputies. Edouard Daladier, De- 
fence Minister; Yvon Delbos, Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs; Paul 
Bastld. chairman of the foreign 
affairs committee of the Chamber 
of Deputies; Joseph Riviere. Min- 
ister of Pensions, Robert Jardilller. 
Charge of the Postofflce Depart- 
jnaivt; Marshal Philippe Petaln; 
Marshal Henri Qouraud. Oaneral 
Edouard Nollet. Orand Chancellor 
of the Legion of Honor, Gabriel 
Hanotaux, historian; and Brig - 
Oen Raymond Brutrfnel. who com- 
manded the Canadian Ma' h.ne nun 
Corps during the war 

United Qtates Jess* S»rs'iss 
Ambassador.. _to__France. General 
John J_ Pershing, wartime head of 
the United States Army. 
, Military AitACies of the Umted 
T StBtwj, ■ponjifl; PnrtQg'at. Japan and 
Italy, were present 



VISIT YOUR 
NEIGHBORHOOD 
PIGGLY WIGGLY 

YOU WILL BE AMAZED 
AT THE DAILY 
BARGAINS 

PIGGLY WIGGLY 

'C..4I... IMM 



Cricket Scqre$ 

In (Hd Country 

LONDON. July 3» f»— Little ac- 
tion was seen in English county 
cricket games today due to rain all 
over the country. 

24 runs for no wick 




Derbyshire. 154 for six; va Not- 
tlnghamshire, at Ilkeston 

Surrey, VA for six 'Squires 76i; 
vs Kent, at The Oval 

Northamptonshire. 110 for three; 
v» Essex, at Ilford. 

Gloucestershire 236. 
shire. 55 runs for no wlrkeu, at 
Leice-bCcr. „ , r - * 

Hampshire. 10* 'Mercer six for 
4a. Clay four for Mr, Glamorgan, 
175; at Bournemouth. 

Yorkshire. 1«7 <Tat« five for 23) t 
Sussex. 133 for six; at Bradford 

No play was possible at Taunton 
between Middlesex and Somerset. 

NAOYKOEROEB, Hungary. July 
25 O — For yean Oedeon Papp, 
seventy-three, and hla wife Maria, 
rayed that they die to* 
A minut* after the hus- 
dted in a hosoUai »h« wlf« 




THE DAttTV CMI.QNIST, VICTORIA, B:C.; SfNDAV. ,H I.V 2<\ 1W 




The Daily Colonist 



Printing and Pub 
Limited Liability 

J. L Talt. Managing-Director 

Subscription Rales by Carrier and by Mall In Districts 
Contiguous to Victoria. Served by Colonist 
City Carriers: 

Yearly - •»£ 

Monthly* - 100 

AU subscription rate* payable In vivamce. Mail sub- 
scriber* are- requested to make all remittances direct 

to The Daily Colonist. 
Subscribers In • derlng change of address should be 
partlcuxai *o give both old and ..e addreaa 
Subscription Rate.s oy Mall: 
To Canada. Oreat Britain, the United State* and 
Mexico except districts as above: 

* par 'y — — — 

Kalf-Yearly - - 3.0 

' ua-terly 1 ' 

Sunday. July 26, 193G 



ON MAKING THE BEST OF LIFE 

Those who have charge of the upbringing and 
instruction of youth usually urge upon them the 
Importance of having definite aims, or a definite 
aim. in life. In reaching a decision as to his 
future career the practical-minded youth, follow- 
ing his own natural bent and Inspired perhaps 
by an ideal of service, may wish to enter upon a 
trade or profession in which he can become con- 
spicuously useful; or he may be of an aesthetic 
turn, preferring beauty to mere utility, and may 
devote himself to fine art in the belief he can 
best serve the day and generation by Increasing 
the sum of human pleasure. Again he may be of 
the contemplative type with no great bent in 
either of the other directions, but with a strong 
desire to know the meaning of life, to ask ques- 
tions and endeavor to find a rational answer, 
even if only a partial and incomplete one, to some 
of the riddles of existence. 

These three alms are not mutually exclusive. 
The practical man may have a touch of the ar- 
tistic temperament and the reflective habit of 
mind is compatible with aesthetic culture and 
practical utility alike. In varying degrees the 
useful, the beautiful and the true enter into the 
calculations of everyone, and without disparaging 
either the useful or the beautiful. It may be worth 
while to consider the satisfactions which attend 
the quest for truth, the search for reality, the at- 
tempt to understand something of the mpaning 
of life. 

It is to the credit of the honest searcher for 
truth if he endeavors to rid himself of as many , 
assumptions as possible. Is it not legitimate. ' 
however, to begin with the assumption that the 
world In which we live has no meaning 0 If we are 
asked to believe that life has no meaning what- 
ever, and if we accept thaf dictum, then, of course, 
there Is nothing further to be said. Our search 
for truth comes at once to a hopeless end. Per- 
haps It was an effort of reason; perhaps it was 
his artistic temperament ; perhaps it was hopeless 
despair, that led Macbeth to say: 

Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player 
That struts and frets hu> hour upon the stage 
And then Is he ard no more; it is a tale 
Told bv an idiot. lull of sound and fury, 
.Signifying nothing— 
but In any event it was an assumption. 

A second assumption, or postulate, which the 
serrcher after truth is entitled to is that human 
beinrts arc, at least in a measure, equipped for the 
ti.sk of discovering the meaning of things. This 
claim Is put forward In no arrogant spirit. It 
asserts only that some reliance ran be placed 
upon our reasoning powers. In opposition to this, 
the sceptic is apt to say that even if life and expe- 
rience have any meaning, our faculties are of such 
a weak and limited character that they are quite 
unequal to the difficult problem , of discerning 
the true smiuUcame of wh.it wc see, hear, and 
touch. If the sceptic is right, then clearly it Is a 
waste of time to pursue our search for truth any 
farther. 

Tt>4hag« two postulates or assumptions, that 

life has a meaning and that we are capable ot dis- 
covering something of that meaning, a third may 
bt added to the effect that it Is proper and nat- 
ural for a rational being to try to discover what 
the meaning really Is. Tin question presently 
arises as to whether it will ad 1 to man s happiness 
to pursue such a quest. Whj not accept without 
question the fruits of science/ and enjoy the gifts 
that industry and fin© art /an confer upon us? 
What, after all. besides exercising our curiosity, 
is there in philosophy? On I answer is^that the 
chief difference between ; dvanccd and back- 
ward races Is not In their onpaclty to utilize the 
fruits of science or to enjotf the achievements of 
art. but in their attitudrf towards the unseen 
world. The future of the human race depends 
far more upon the philosophy which it constructs 
and upon which It acts than upon the further 
conquest of 1U physical environment. 

FROM Till. BOOK OF EVE ~ 



the slimming erase, and her waist looked like the 

stem of a flower. Therese Cabarrus., one of the 
women of the Thermidor, used to bathe In straw- 
berry juice and milk. 

Jit is only a matter of forty years, however, 
since science came with its full force to. the aid 
of beauticians; even surgery has been introduced 
by the specialists. The originator of face-lifting 
was Marshal Richelieu in the days of Louis XV. 
It is recalled in the Revue of Paris that every 
morning his hair-dresscr drew up the skin of his 
scalp, tied It in a top-knot with string, and hid 
this temporary repair Job under a powde red wig. 
This trick no doubt gave the cue to the plastic 
surgeon of today. Now noses too prominent are 
reduced. Recalcitrant and unkissable mouths arc 
altered; sagging throats are smoothed out; depth 
is added to the eyes; the whole, face is given a 
changed contour. The made-overs are infused 
with the hope of retaining outwardly, for a time, 
the suggestion of youth by forcible elimination 
t)f the caresses of age. The Book of Eve tells the 
story of woman's efforts to stay the wrinkles in 
life's pilgrimage. 

ISLAND HIGHWAY 



The Observation Car 



BT I lit EDITORIAL 81 Ar* 



A Brilliant Guess 

"I shouldn 't wonder if that comet 
that s moving about so fa^t in the 
sky is an Inspector of the Universe 
appointed by President Roosevelt, 
ruminated -HV- B. Turpin. well- 
known Amen an resident of this 
city, in the course of an overheard 
friend who 



Nu ... si W njiloi Wul u« .4xi.u «» 
cepi uut in* proixr etanalure and addrea* 
ol the writer run rule admit* of do ea- 
No letter thould exceed 400 word* 



TRI RO I AIllfcDKAL 

, Sir,— In your issue of July 23 there 
was an account of a new' cathedral 
to be built at Guildford in England, 
and it is said to be 'only the sec- 
ond Anglican cathedral to be built 
from its foundations since the Ref- 
ormation ... the other cathe- 



OOOTtj at.on with j dral built completely- since the 



Presidents fondness lor appoint- 
ing inspectors for this, that, and 
t other!" — J E M B. 

• • • 



Is It a Gentle Hint? 



In no department of Provincial administration 
has so much money been wa.strd as in road- 
buildlng. It is the prolific source of extrava- 
gance. In the latest programme It is proposed to 
waste more money on projects of so-called im- 
p ovements, all of which are not necessary. There 
is the instance of the Cowlchan Bay cut-off, 
which would eliminate the waterfront roadway 
and mean a definite detriment to the value of 
property there. It is small wonder that the people 
of the district are complaining. If that part of 
the Island Highway Is unsafe, the Provincial 
Government Is to blame. It has done little enough 
to remedy conditions, possibly wtth the view of 
providing the new cut-off which is now proposed. 

The project of the Government at this part of 
the Island Highway would involve an unwar- 
ranted and wanton expense. It would carry the 
road inland, instead of, as at present, along 
Cowiclian Bay with its .s.vmo ..utlo.-k What is 
proposed Is to break faith with the landowners 
facing Cowlchan Bay. At a quarter of the cost 
of the cut-off that Is being planned the foreshore 
road could be put into an excellent state of re- 
pair, and the residents and the traveling public 
would be satisfied. There Is no demand for a 
change. The time-savin^ln distance by a realign- 
ment of the highway would be negligible. This 
Island. In the matter of its highways, has suf- 
fered from a good deal of neglect. The present 
state of the roads testify to this, for all too little 
work of maintenance is being done. Whatever 
expenditure there is at the present time should 
be put Into maintenance of the roadways as they 
are, not into projects, such as the Cowlchan Bay 
cut-off. That cut-off would be a breach of faith 
and as unnecessary as it would be extravagant. 

"MY (.AUDI V 



1 wish to point out that on May 
2D. 1880, the foundation stones of 
Truro Cathedral were laid by King 
Edward VII, then Prince of Wales; 
the central tower was built as a me- 
morial to Queen Victoria and con- 
In a r*Ugi*l BtB»l store there is secrated on January 22, 1904 
an interest,!,* model of the Mala- Hence Truro is the first cathe- 
hat Drive showing how the road dral completely llnished since the 
winds and twists up ihe mountain- Reformation. Liverpool will be the 
side. Joe, of the advertising de- second, when finished, and Gulld- 
partment.' lnlormed us the high- lord the third— not the second, 
way appeared quite rough, after In all fairness to the Cornish 
gating at the exhibit for nve min- cathedral this should not be for- 
utcs. He wanted to know if it gotten. 
* was a gentle hint to the Provin- 1 EDWARD W. HAMMOND. 

ci.il Government. . . . One night RR t. saanichton, B.C.. July 24. 
this week a car washer kno\wi W9 
-Boots" got out his equipment to 
manicure several dusty automo- 
biles. When he turned on the 
.spray brush to wash wheels with, 
only a thin tnckle of water ap- 
peared. 'Boots'' worked 10 min- 
utes on the hose, but found noth- 
ing wrong. After an hour's sleep 
in theback of a bus he set to work 
again and found a large cockroach 
lodgul inside the spray- . . . A • 
polic; ■man lrn-nd vow 
camping agaitl m 



I I I i I i; I ( LIGHT RATI I 

8ir,— We note with interest thai 
the BC. Electric is about to make 
a reduction in our rates for elec- 
tricity in certain directions Why not 
make a proper gesture, and do away 
with the infamous practice of 
charging a basic rate on the house 
internal area, something which can 

have no bearing on the supply of 
ws never to go ^ othcr poaslbly an ln . 

an open 0i * cr ease in the consumption which is 
PU «w' , L ' V IS? 1 ?? Jri ' l i l ■ benefit to the supplier. Also give 
miles up the coast ne Vancouver Island the rates that are 

blankets on the beach and settled all/M1I „ H ln Vanrnilvpr ritw met- d 
down for a real sleep. A few 
hours later he dreamed he was 
pormrnnT his bent wtthorrt shoes, 
hat or coat .in a rainstorm He 



A peaceful quietude, a whispering bre. M 
Whose coming scarce is felt. Among the trees 
A waking call from some small drowsy bird 
Trills through the silence, while full-toned is heard 
The voice ol cooing doves. How sweet, how fair. 
This living freshness breathing everywhere. 
Silver the light where once the shadows lay. 
Such is my garden, at the break of day . 

Morn s hour glass runs . . . day's fretting nol.-es 
die. 

While swallows crying dart across the .sky. 
The sun's last rays fade from yon distant hill. 
8o Nature sleeps, and oncV nv>re all u> still. 
Flowers grow more radiant in the waning light. 
Incense is wafted to the goddess Night. 
A wondrous peace falls with the setting sun. 
Such is my garden when the dav is done. 

- E. M'Mlllan. 



TO AN OI D FRIEND 



awoke with a yell to find the water 
lapping his feet. . . . Next day 
his boat drifted off with the tide, 
and bcln? unable to swim he was 
forced to watch it from the shore. 
Six hours later, when he had al- 
most given up hope of seeing the 
eraft again, it drifted back on the 
beach with the incoming tide. . . . 
"Fender" and "Spider." two taxi 
drivers, were arguing heatedly in 
a Yates Street taxi office that it 
was impossible to change from 
hi h to second gear, without 
noise, in a large automobile sta- 
tions outside While they were 
on the point of blows. "Oscar," a 
enr washer, stepped outside and 
.showed them It could be done. It 
was a treat to watch their expres- 
sions. ... If a portly newshawk 
covered a rifle contest, would he 
automatically be a "big shot."— 
G B. 

• • • 

Dot and Dash! 

Hank the Philosopher, says: 
"Speakin' o' this here Telegraph- 
ers' Centenary. I'll bet a lot o' 
them fellers , dash<edi' off on th' 

'dot.' — W.I.F'. 



allowed in Vancouver City instead 
of penalizing those that reside here. 

f| n r f TP r>rrT ^ > * 

1076 Joan Crescent, Victoria. B.C., 
July 25, 1936. 

THfc HEWER 

Sir. I noticed an Item ln your 
esteemed paper, the other day, 
which showed a picture of, and 
called attention to the cairn that 
has been erected at Brockton Point, 
Vancouver Harbor, in commemora- 
tion of the old Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany steamer. Beaver, the first 
steamer to ply the waters of the 
Pacific Ocean. 

I was particularly interested in 
that item from the lact that I was 
employed on the old craft tor two 
years as one of her engineers. 

In 1867 the Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany sold the old steamer and It 
was bought by a company consist- 
ing of Capt. J. D. Warren and Mr. 
Ben Madigan. The latter was the 
chief engineer of the boat, and I 



divided in a sharp conflict between 
the "left" and the •Ughf" with vic- 
tory to the radical element, result- 
ing in the election of Dr. Telford to 
the office of provincial president 
with an extreme radical slate, and 
the defeat of the more moderate 
Connell supporters and the con- 
sequent curtailment ln the powers 
of leadership vested lh the reverend 
and honorable Leader of the Op- 
position, who suffered the humilia- 
tion of a vote of confidence, which 
was virtually an impeachment. 

Following the convention, the 
party has gone to desperate limits 
in endeavoring Ho cloak the issue 
so far as the public Is concerned, 
and mend the damage done. An 
example of this desperate attempt 
to heal wounds and keep the party 
Intact can be found in The Com- 
monwealth, dated July 7 last. 

It would be interesting to know 
.what Rev. Mr. Connell thinks of 
the following. "The bourgeois 
patois of 'left' and 'right' may be 
given, a rest, as it should. Every- 
one who speaks becomes left or 
right without knowing it. till some- 
body throws a brick at him called 
'left' or 'right.' They solemnly agree 
to go for 'first things first'; to be 
•realists.' and.' as Lefeaux puts it in 
his forthright manner, not a pack 
of Idealistic and anarchistic dream- J 
ers.' Then somebody- yells: 'Yah! 
You're a rightist and lashes up a 
vote of no confidence'." 

I think if Marx were alive he 
would say: "Damn you! Don't use 
my name to split the CCF. Robert 
Connell and I are the best of 
friends and he knows as much 
about my stuff as any of you Your 
'no confidence' votes are lashed up 
by disruptive egomaniacs You will 
have to move if you move at all — 
under a capitalist reuime. You \* 1T1 
have to take first things first. 
Connell knows this and knows what 
he is doing Oive him a decent 
chance and don't tofment him with 
your shallow distrust and tiresome 
yappings about right M\d left He 
Is driving to get through— by the 
first open door. Once get power 
and 'the arsenals' will be yours and 
the police your servants and Mac- 
Brien can be kept in Ontario" 

It is Interesting, to say the least, 
how the CC F. expects by getting 
Provincial power to capture the 
"arsenals" and "keep M.icBrien ln 
Ontario" Before the next Provin- 
cial election the people of British 
Columbia are entitled to know just 
where the CC.F and its leader 
stand, not only on the question of 
first things first, but its ultimate 
and specific object. According to 
the quotation from The Common- 
wealth, there is no difference in 
object between the "right" and 
"left." but with the help of Con- 
nell, they hope to get "through— by 
the first open door" — then Ood 
help Connell and British Columbia 
ROBERT D HARVEY 



CHILD! 

tot Box er Glrle. 
„, .nh .un keck* 



ILDREN'S WASH SUITS 



a u • 



THE WAREHOUSE" 

[NT ST. MM DOIGLAS ST. 



69c 



mo oovn 



Qualicum Beach School 

QUALICUM BEACH, V I , BC 

A private boarding and day school tor boys Headmaster, R. I. 
Knight, M A. For prospectus, write to A. D. Muskert, 
Qualicum Beach, B C. 



defray the expense of piping water 
all the way from Sidney; then to 
build septic tanks; then to put sani- 
tation facilities into the new build- 
ing i for the Government architect 
had omitted these in his palatial 
plans ». Then to provide transpor- 
tation, for the old school site Is not 
central but lies on the far border 
of the North Saanich district. 

So now this amalgamated district 
P committed to borrow upwards of 
$9.TJ0fl over and above the monies 
in hand and promised, and it Is 
presumed that a mill rate of 5 can- 
not take care of the loans. Had the 
money been voted to provide— ln the 
real interests of the children— the 
best teachers ln the world, and a 
healthy site for a reasonable build- 
ing, this borrowing orgy might have 
been more excusable. But the wel- 
fare of the children was not con- 
sidered at all. 

If there is a Provincial sanitary 
Inspector it is to be hoped* 'hat he 
will take out an injunction to pre- 
vent building on thLs site, and so 
save the health of a hundred and 
seventy children and those who 
crme after from being jeopardized 
In the cause of political intrigue. 

tn the Deep Cove district land Is 
assessed much higher than in the 



Roasted Mallard 

Ducklings 

85c Each 

DALE'S 



Cranlei*>h Mouse School 

FOR IOYS 
A Private Elementary and High School 
C V MILTOrt. A.CP. 

r.ithnr. ii. . h t mplre SIM 



chier engineer oi tne ooai. ana s rn_fDE.n.i u nanvai 

was the second. A general freight- Central Building. Victoria 

ing and towing business was the* B.C. July 24. 1936. 



My friend, my bonny friend, when wc are old. 

And hand in hand go tottennp down the hill. 
Mav we be rich in love's reftm » gold 

May loves gold coin br current with us still. 
May what we are be all wo might have been. 

And Mia f porrnMnl perfect, O mv friend 
And may there *tlll be mnnv AhcnM to glean 
' Th our love's acre, comrade, to the end - 
And may we find, when ended is the page, 

Death but a tavern on our pilgrimage 

— John Masefir'.d. 



There is no talent so pernicious as eloquence lo those 
aho have it under command —Addison. 



He who is firm ln will molds the world to himself — 
Goethe. 



The Weather 




The Book of Eve in which is writ the changing 
fashions of womanhood is H old as its MJM 
implies, for successive ages frame its added 
chapters, all having something or other to do 
with the adornment of the sex In seeking the 
cause for the present excessive use of cosmetics*, 
history records that such an artificial vogue 
coincides with the end of a war Extraneous aids 
to beauty are as old . as the annals of time. 
Poppeia's dally bath of the foaming milk of she- 
asses, her night mask, her painted cheeks and 
immobile eyebrows were the precursors of the 
adventitious adornments of Hollywood stars, those 
adornments that are being, copied by the sex all 
over the world. 

Ninon de Lenclos. a noted beauty of her time, 
believed that beauty was a short-term letter of 
Introduction, and this theme is chosen by Andre 
RtvoUet lu an article in the Revue of Pari* He 
tells how Catherine de Medici brought rejuve- 
nating philtres, astringent creams and magic 
powders in her bridal trousseau from Italy. In 
those times the astrologers were consulted and 
their Incantations sought. Then pigeons were 
stabbed and withered faces bathed In their blood. 
The maids of honor of Catherine de Valois pow-. 
dered their hair with violet dtist: they had their 
eyebrows plucked and their chins sprayed Trlth 
mercury. Maxle de Medici sprinkled herself with 
musk. That was the period when frangipane 
gloves and rare scented soaps appeared Thin, 
.is now, hours were spent in adornments with 
paint and pastes. 

This is an age Qf high color lh the cosmetic 
sense. It was so, too, in the time of La Pompa- 
dour, whose arsenal of rouges MHtbMd her for 
twenty years, outwardly at least, to wage war 
against premature wrinkles. There is nothing new 
in the eyebrow fashions of the preterit time 
Eugenie de Montijo. or the Second I mprrr period, 
had specially eloncatcd eyebrow., penciled to 
contrast with her lorger-me>not 



Meteorological Office, Victoria. B C , at 7 00 p.m., 
July 25 1936 

SYNOPSTR OP* WKATHER CONDITIONS 

Pressure Is rising over this Province, and showers 
have occurred on Vancouver Island and In the Carl* 
boo District. Fine, moderately warm weather con- 
tinues from the Lower Mainland eastward to Oka- 
nagan and Kootenay. — 

Fine, warm weather continue* in the Prairie Prov- 
inces 

PRECIPITATION AND TKMPF.R.*TURKS - 

■ Precipitation for twelve hours to 5 oo pm j tempt m- 
tures for twenty-four hours i 

Mix 
i 'i 

73 
74 
HO 



Victoria ..- - 

Nanalmo 

Vancouver -- 

Kamloops ...... 

Prince Oeorge 

■an Point — 

Prince Rupert 

Atlln . 

Dawson ----- 

Seattle 

Portland 

£an Francisco 

Spokane 

LM Anceles ^ 

Pent trton 

Vernon - 

Grand Forks 

Nelson - 

I.sslo 

Cranbrook i. 

Calgary 

Edmonton ...... 

I I t't Current 

Prince Albert - 

Q U ' App e t M .i . T. 

Winnipeg r 

Moose Jaw 

SATURDAY 

Maximum 

Minimum - 

Average • 

Mmlmum on the grass 

Weather, clear; sunshine July 24 



Rain Mln 
53 
50 
52 
46 
46 
50 
50 



Golf's Greatest Show 

"Evergreen Oolf Trail, the greatest 
show in the history of Victoria 
golfdom. goes on tomorrow, ram or 
shine, at the Oak Bay links, with 
one of the finest casts ever assem- 
bled on one location taking part 
in it. The leading man. of course, 
will be none other than Tony 
Manero. the little Italian who 
bia/eerm the front at Baltusrol to 
win the'TTnhed States open cham- 
pionship. Others pedaiming will 
Qcflt \Kunr-s, Canadian open 
tltleholder; Bryun Nel'on. Metro- 
uolita n open wlnivr; Hortorr 
Smith, Augusta Masters' cham- 
pion; Ralph Guldahl. Western 
open UtlMt; Jimmy Thomson, 
ranked as the world's longest 
driver, L- 11 Eatofi, diminutive 
pro. who dropped a "dodo'' In the 
United States open and the vet- 
eran S<ot. Mar-dons Id Smith, one 
of the most consist >nt winners ln 
golf 'a recoid books, That's not all, 
there's plenty of niorc fine shot- 
maker.-. ;n the field! who will make 
you wonder If you ran play the 
game after seeing them In action. 
There's a fellow named Lawson 
Little, who stroked his way 
through two successive British and 
United states amateur champion- 
ships, before joining the monied 
ranks. Little got "hot'' on Friday 
in Vancouver and blasted par to 
' . ! ame" with Just 29 strokes for 
nine holes, eight under the re- 
quired number for the distance. 
So (twin uu-i. lliA- .-UioA- at Oak 
Ray It will be on for three days, 
and if the weather is perfect. Old 
Man Par better hide away in the 
deepest bunker until Thursday — 
J D. 



kind of work she was engaged in. 
and for the next twenty years she 
j traveled pretty much all over the 
I Gulf of Oeorgia. and the Straits of 
Juan de Fuca, from Comox to Cape 
Flattery. Mr. Henry Saunders, the 
Johnson Street grocer, acted as 
agent for the steamer. 
The old boat at this time had a 



SCHOOL AMALGAMATION 

Sir.— Now that election talk is in 
the air it is important that the el- 
ectorate should know something of 
the workings of the school amalga- 
mation scheme, one ol the pet pro- 
jects of the Hon. Dr. Weir. Minister 



Sidney and North 8aanich districts. 
Many of the residents of Deep Cove 
are farmers with two. three and four 
hundred acres, and their taxes mul- 
tiplied by six will be difficult to 
meet at all. which Is the more un- 
just considering there are only 
twenty-one children of school age 
in this district. 

It will be seen by the foregoing 
that In thLs Province the spend- 
thrift who wants to buy something he 
cannot affort Is not only permitted 
to extract money from hLs thrifty 
neighbor's pocket but Is aided In «o 
doing by the Government. This is 
done in the name of higher educa- 
tion, and is an example of the 
school consolidation or amalgama- 
tion scheme as encouraged by the 
Department of Education ln the 
present Liberal Oovcrnnvnt. 

In the States they have one sim- 
ple word for It— racketeering; and 
the United States Oovernment is 
doing its best to stamp it out. 

H. GLYNN-WARD 
Treanna." 8tdney. BC. July 24. 
1936 



STOCKERS 
ECURITY 
TOR ACE 17? 

VICTORIA'S FINEST 
FURNITURE • • 
• WAREHOUSE 

MOVING • PACKING 

• PHONE 0 8181 • 



of Education. The lollowing is a 
different appearance to what she pracUca j example of it. as carrl?d 
had when she came around the j cut ln lhe lnree . sc hool districts of 
Horn ln 1835. All of her cabins I Sldn ,. y Nortn saanich 'and Deep 

Cove, on Va couver Island 

Deep Cove has had able trustees 
for many years. They managed the 
as sound as ever, and she wduld poke &cri ool to the satisfaction of ih>- 
her nose up on to mud banks and | parentJ , a nd put by a nest egg ln the 
rocky ledges, while loading or un- ban)t as wpll al . 0I , tnr reasonable 

■ . l.l. » n . nr ..,ln,. nVu-kllt ... A mm ... . ■ m . . • 



and upper jrork had been removed 
and her machinery quite altered 
The wood of her hull was, ho .< m I 



loading, without worrying about 
scratching her paint. 

I spent two very pleasant and 
profitable years on the old vessel, 
and learn«d everything possible 
about that kind of engine and that 
kind of work. I progrr.wd so well 
that I was offered a Job a.s chitjf 
engineer on The Lady of the Lake, 
running on Deaie Lake, Casslar 
and in^two years more I was ownnr 
of the vessel So ttatttfi move ori! 

Well. Mr Editor. I thank you fj>r 
vour Hem the other dRV. It rolled 
back the curtains of my memory, 
recalllnu these circumstances, which 
happened so long ago, that they 
are quite in danger of bring for- 
gotten altogether. 

JOHN FULLERTON. 
1945 Ash 8treet, Victoria. BC 
July 24. 1936. 



.16 
T02 



or 



50 
* 

54 
52 
54 
66 
46 
47 
48 
16 
K 
43 
46 
46 
62 
62 
62 
56 
64 



66 
58 
74 
74 
78 
60 
80 
82 



82 
80 



90 
74 
70 
88 

74 

88 
86 
86 



TitU'% at Victoria 



Tline of Udej iPmcTo »Und»rd Uu), 
»t Victoria. B C . tor the month ol June. 

T n -» H t rime H't Tim* H'ttTltne H • 

n» - h ii as it m rt ii ii n h u_ri 

7 20" i.a i si Too at 

7 jo i ai I iji ar a.i 



69 
.53 
61 



1 

a 

0 

II 

a 

s 

14 

ia 
ia 

17 
II 

<a 

21 



13 hrs . 6 mm 
5 00 P M. WK.ATIII R KKPORJS 

Victoria -Barometer 30 11 j wind. SW . 12 mites; fair 



Vancouver Barometer, 
clear 



30 08: wind. SW . 6 mill 
1 NW.- 4 'miles 

fair. 

- Prince Oeorge -Barometer. 29 98. wind. SW . 22 
miles; cloudy. 

Prince Rupert - Barometer. 30 14. wind. S. 4 miles; 
tair 



si OR 

i o o7 a j a ii o a] . I 

I o o a i 9 jo 041*4? i » 2D sa ».1 

.112* nn 10 o* ot ii u ••<<••>» i a 

1 7 It « 1 10 «s i 2 i a oa 7 7 23 ia a 8 

~T 1 oT TT'll JJ I IJ IT ~ 

I 0 ;j 4 2 4 17 7 0 12 cm 2 It 19 40 a 1 

I I 33 S3 I iff I 7 12 30 I I 30 SO 12 

| 2 42 4 3 a 17 ,S a 12 12 4 9 .0 19 II 

13 4* 14 i an 43 a a 

I 4 SO .2 * 1 12 12 a 2 I 

' " ' i" 1 ' . .•:•! so » s 

I « ft t II v .i „ — 422.34 il 

| 7 73 • 71 | i« 33 3 3 

j a 03 os 17 3* a 3 it si a o 

I 0 10 • 2 n 43 0 I K 47 I 1 30 41 7.1 

| Ci \" » 7. 9 32 1 0 I* 03 7 I 31 41 7 2 

' i 43 i3 9 57 i a ia ia 7 a 22 as a 7 

I a tS 7 7 10 33 3 3 11 33 7 a 23 33 1 3 
t"3 20 t(HI»» a I I3S* T • 
34 3 7 



I I.M IRK ITV 

Sir. — In r< ferenee to the pro- 
po."f<t reduction on electricity by 
the British Columbia Electric Com- 
panv. I think very few hcauseholders 
would benefit even if the company 
offered the electricity free after 
the customer used the minimum 
allowance amount at 6 cents per 
kilowatt hour. 

Will someone Interested check up 
a street or block of ordinary resi- 
dences and see how manv <lf any) 
weTT sble to take advantage of the 
old 3-cent rate 

It would be more acirptable If 
the people were given t> reduction 
on v K it th*v actually requlre<! 
9fbf not help the ordinary house- 
holder in this way and not try to 
induce her to use more electricity 
than she needs at 6 cents tn order 
to get some more at 2 cents? 

J. O. STIMSON 

2002 Lome- Terr 
July 25. 1936 



mill rate of 1.9. which included the 
payment of pupils sent to high 
school. 81dney ancT North Saanich. 
on 'tie other hand, had ideas t *> 
big for their boots and wfrc unable 
to carry on their school under a mill 
rate of B.7 and 6 4 respect ivi ly . 

The high school at North Saanich 
burnt'' down. With "T.he~msurance i 
n.onev and the $6,000 promised by 
the Oovernment for a new school, 
the ideas of the trustees In the two 
latter di-strict . grew more and more 
magnificent; nothing would^ suit 
them but a $20 000 bulldlim. for 
which a Government architect drew 
plans. Also, in thts circumstance 
a few saw an opportunity to lower 
their own tax rat at the expense 
of their neighbors at Deep Cove. 

To this end private meetings 
were held at Sidney at which it was 
decided to "amalgamate" Deep 
Cove, and aw the instigators were 
good Liberals they were sure of 
Government backing. There ■ a 
clause ln this Consolidation Act 
which allows the Department of 
Education to consolidate school dis- 
trMtl at its own dLscretlon irn pSX - 
the of the desires of the voters 
therein. 

The ik* «• ..,u •. public nv"'nr; Oi 
all three districts was held, so ad- 
vert Led that many of the Deep 
Cove residents knew nothing about 
It until afterwards. However. 



RIBI.fc/S IHVINK INSPIRATION 

Sif'.'— There has been donated 
quite recenty to the Provinelal Ref- 
erence, the Provincial Traveling and 
the Municipal 'Carnegie 1 Libraries 
in Victoria, each one copy of the 
Oreek and one of the English New 
Testaments, edited by Mr Ivan 
Pann. PO. Box 101 Aldeishot. On- 
tario, bringing to light a marvelous 
numeric .design underlying the 
whole of the Bible from OcnesLs to 
Revelation. 

Mr Panin. an octogenarian. Is a 
Russian Nihilist converted to Clm t 
In his youth, and since then devoted 
to His Word a a scholar aid 
mathematician He discovered over 
forty years ago that there is inter- 
woven in the Bible a mo*t compli- 
cated numeric design of 3 s. 7's, li s, 
etc. and their multiples, which it 
would have taken several hundreds 
nf years for each one of the thirty 
three writer* of the Bible to 



in the origuial Hebrew and Oreek 

manuscripts Is numbered and occu- 
pies its own special place ln the 
order of total number of letters ln 
the Bible, the slightest variations f 
orthography being all Ood -ordained, 
whereas of the smallest sectarian 
man-made alteration hopelessly de- 
stroys the continuity of thi'^numerlc 
design as found ln that wonderful 
Bible composed of sixty-six mo 
more and no lessi books written Ly 
thirty-three men over a period of 
1,600 years. 

This numeric design is not found 
in any other Hebrew or Oreek 
literature, nor In any of the lang- 
uages under the sun. thus proving 
the Bible to be unique. Mr Panin s 
books are highly commended by 
leading scholars and srirntists and 
he has never been successfully gain- 
said by hti critics. God, In these 
last days, is speaking with no un- 
certain sound through the diiov- 
eries made by the ' pi« k and spade 
of the nrehneolo^Lsts and through 
the numeric Bible, giving the scep- 
tics no other alternative between 
dHlbera'ely statlntr in the faep of 
all the facts to the contrary. On the 
one hand that 2 and 2 make J or 
that black Ls white, which is 
absurd, and on the oth»T hand Ihe 
acknowledgment that Ood I* nod 
and that He ln the author of the 
Bible QFO! 

The discovery of the numerlfc 
design ln the Bible will convince or 
confound the agno'He who h«< been 
asking for *c!*nt Ifle facta and 
mathematically correct proofs about 
I God. and His Word and here they 
are! 

The pertinent question, after all 
these given proofs, is "And ow 
what think ye of Chrl It 




1 . . . . fT 

Into his own particular books or . Whom do men now Mf that I the 
; pr-' les 



While his discovery M for the 
Christian an added, although not 
needed, proof of, the Divine- oruin 
of the Bible. It [comp1et"ly under- 
mines all Bible qrittei-m and brings 
modi rnlMB, evolution, and atlm m 
toppling to the ground wherever 
honest -thinking men will face the 
undeniable facts. 
Mr. Panin proves that every letter 



Son of man am 1 " These heart - 
searching questions brought now to 
the heart of < very individual should 
be. with all these fai-U available 
"Thou are the Chriit. the Word 
of God made flesh, the Son of the 
living nod' ' L $ EEKMAN 

40 Wellington Avenue Victoria B C , 
July 24. 1938. 

Additional letter* «n Page Ii 



CULBfcR I SON on CONTR ACT 

Rv Eh Culbertson 



H'orld't Champion Player and Crealesl Card Analyst 



five to eleven against the scheme 
It was summarily decided 'on the 
combined - voles* of the other two 
districts 1 that amalgamation should 
take pla . 1 >' the r>ep rove mill 
rate should be raised from 1 9 to 5. 
or over, and the other two districts' 
rates lowered accordingly. Also 
that the $20,000 school should be 
built to house the 170 children. 

Then it came to light that ins NQ 
school site was thoroughly insani- 
tary, lying low, surrounded by barn- 
yards and impos-slble to drain .satis- 
factorily: that the 'water from the 
well thereon had been pronounced 
definitely unfit for human use by 
the Provincial bacterologlst and the 
-lhe Encyclopedia -Britajmtca dU- 1 local health officer V 
closes the fact that Karl Marx in' At The last public meeting the 




SH BBORNNKSS DOESN'T PAY 'and led a diamond up to dummy. 
Just as most brilliant plava ran -be Ea*t captured the king with his ace 
!)laf ed in a definite ratawy I ^j^^^^,^ 
Vienna coup, double squeeae e,im | DerrariT rjuexen ana w ^ won nnn 

pi^tTit frot* bt^ oo ta Totsd for t y, m muu i. pter. etc. so the -buiis" at Jl^ff SiftiSl 

the bridge table run according to » l«ng <"*™>™l \ "J* 
-pe. One of these types occurs "*hcd or within a trick of ertab 

r 11. u ....... . 1 .. him In lln fan 

the defence of 



AND MARXISM 

81r, — The CCF ha* gone on 

record as not being opposed to 
the doctrine of Karl Marx Refer- 
ence to, an article on Socialism in 



his manifesto of 1847 gave Social- 
ism an international character and 
took no pains to distinguish it from 
7 a, . Communism, It is apparent tha,t at .far into the small hour. voMnar for 

417 a3iii3 saiao«7-» tn€ CCF conVenlloh, the . par; , loan*, and yet more loans. First to 

137 S 3 5 3*> * " 11 47 4 7 19 .10 3 0 



i io 47 a oa a 3 it 23 a 2 ;» 52 13 

3 40 4 7 I 30 10 1 2 

I 4 3» 3 T 30 30 I 3 

| » 21 3 II i !20 57 a * 

A I OS 3_}J, ...I -1-1 33 II 

sat itT....:... unrii 

i 7 jo i v | 33 13 a a 



Voter* had contracted borrowing- 
fever from examples set by all Ca- 
nadian Governments and they sat 



frequently ln the defence of no 
rump contracts A defender dog- 
gedly plugs away at establishing a 
suit even though It would do him no 
good to establish It. since, as '. it 
brldglsm goes, "he couldn't get |-to 
hi* own hand with a Jimmy " Such 
a play as West mad- today, for in- 
stance, 

BWtfcj (MttMA 
Both sides vulnerable 

NORTH 

* I 

n> q f 

♦ K W 1 11 B 8 I 
A A J 9 2 



r^tevan Point Barometer. 30 14 ; wind SW 4 miles: 

fair, 

Tatooih- Bammeter 30 19 wind. W . 4 mile . clear. | 
Port land -Barometer. 3000: ttrrt NW 11 MMMI 1 
clear. 

Seattle Barometer 30 06 « md N 1« MlMai deal 
8an miwisco— Saiomelci. *>. wind, W., 18 nulo. 
fair. 



TTi» time g«e<1 le P»c!8e utendnri tot J 
the 130th Meridian «e«t ft m eoaTitea | 
from 0 to 21 noun from mirtnleht to eald- 
nlatit T ,e ffeuret for nelibt eeree to 
rtntmtul«h hlth w»ter from low e/eter 
wnere Dlintt orur in the t«W*. the. ntfe 
rleee e>r fe.Ua •»nunito«el* dux i tie two eue 
receive tide! period! without turnlne 

rhe he «ht le in feet end tentM of a 
foot. <r 



jrod from the e- ere.ee lerel ef 



of t 
the 



ami ih§ depth of weter on the ttll 
e t»usrr.ell dr>do<-K add 14 I feet to 
lettnt Of Man »ei#» e« ei»o»e eieen 
To tin* t' • d»r* of weter on 'he will 
ol the Sonehew« dr»doe*. add M fewt le) 
» lite bwa«M t u...» waiat ae eeore (l>ea 



FIFTY YEARS AGO TODNY 



^ - ■ " - iv .--* 

iwrom TTie Dell? Bntlah Colonlet of Jnlr 34. Itaeli 

» ■ . «■ 

PVom the North -The l.ttle »team»r Al»»ian. Captain le>TfT which r.ae 
>unnin« on the »tlete#n Rl»*r rtur.ni the Summer mon-h*. irrived rer* 
terd»T »eTen d»r« from fMrt Wran*»l The Inverne«« cannerr had turned out 
11 000 raw of aalmon. and the Metlaeahtlev-taone r» trad mwd* a f>»U pa** 
of 1000 raaee With regard to TTie election eonf - -houeh the r«ult of ihe 
eounl had hot h f en made anown It wa. aeaaealle concede* that Ur Demp«"f 
for that dtfleloa of th» Caaaiar poll:n« 



Thunder end Uehtnlna- At 1 a'elowk yaeterder enornme a wr fic clan of 
thunder, awoke the ele-plnl eltlaene of VKtorie II »a. .^om->an.ed fcr amid 
na«h ot hehtnine ae., Tt j n eav* peaia and" *!»ld Hilhei • , ceeded wwt m 
half an hour the .form ' ad pe.acd ovr and people tank aea n to 



end T 

four I h 



with 



adtleaw hare fceen received here Italia* Ihal IM 
eharterael k*> wtttw • of teae from *hanahai 

io Vanrou<»r Fa Aoi»rwen and Canadian cittea. makint h» 
ih teee *t thla 




North 
♦ 

I NT 



Y. a • 
Pa»* 
Pa** 



The bidding 
South West 
la P.- 
•2 NT Pa** 

Pas* Pass 

•Souths two no trump bid 
distinct it retch 

Weat opened his fourth highest 
heart and dummy a nine could have 
held, h i' decUrwr *a» al a glance 
that the bulk of his trick* Ivad to 
come from the diamond suit There- ' Ifafl 
fore be overtook with the tea »pot . paxiner s second highest. 



lishment. stared him In the face, 
and further fjcsplt*- the far I ilaat he 
would have no qul k en'ry for his 
heart suit after forrlng out declar- 
er's ace, West stubbornly continued 
with hearts Declarer won, and 
after ronce^Jing the Jack of di- 
monds to Ea-'t. laid down the hand 
FrTTiIn* If lets wtrhnTrt erm at- 
tempting a club finesse for the 

queen • "T~ _ . 

After West took the iUik or 
heart* elementary reasoning would 
ha\e demanded a shift of lea/la. 
The diamond ault menace . MM 
pressing it was vital to try a suit 
tl.at irught pro4*iM> at. least two 
ir.'ks. anfl produce them quickly. 
Dummv a club holding mwte that 
shift look unpropltioua The ot> 
remalnlmr chan«* was In apane*. 
That the declarer had started with 
a spade bid should have cut abso- 
lutely no Ire; If the defenders 
1 couldn't gel two spade tricks they 
'o i dr. t get two from anywhere 
Obviously, a upade ahlft would 
-i have defeated the contract handily. 
TOIMt S l)i I >1 ION' 

Question— Defending against a no 
trumrr <ot.:i^ i mv p**Um o,,Pr»e>d 
a king of a suit In which dummy 
; then showed the ft | 4 and f held 
' th» $ 7 J. What card should I have 
played' 

An»wer-n rterprTide. on th* real of 
dummy s hand and tha rest of 
your* You might have wanted 
partner to shift, for all I can- tell, 
n-i' generalh speaking t he g)ng 
against no Wimp calla Tof 





Big Shipments of Perch- 
erons Coming From Oregon 
And Alberta 

ALL ENTRIES WILL 

CLOSE ON AUGUST 22 



As a special feature, the British 
Columbia Agricultural Association 
will present three horse shows at its 
seventy-fifth annual Provincial Ex- 
hibition to be held at the Willows 
during the week of September .12 
to 19, It was announced yesterday by 
W H. Mearns. secretary. 

Assuring the exhibition of some 
thrilling heavy-horse team driving 
events at the horse shows are some 
important outside entries In the 
heavy horse class. It was announced. 

A carload of Percherons, believed 
to be among the best In Western 
Canada, are coming from Alberta, 
while a shipment of Percherons 
from Oregon is also being sent here 
by a United States exhibitor, It was 
said. Many other six-horse, four- 
horse and two-horse team* are being 
aent from various parti of British 
Columbia and Pacific Coast States 
will close August 22. 
JUDGING HORSES 
Ail horses competing must turn 
out for parade whenever required 
official* stated. All entries must be 



THE DAILY COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C.. SU NDAY, JULY 26, IM*. 



Soldiers Search Arabs 




Members of the Seaforth Highlanders, sent to Palestine to quell the 
unrest between Jews and Arabs, conducted an intensive campaign in 
search of hidden arms, following several ambushes in which Jews and 
British soldiers were killed. Above we see some Arabs beinjj searched 

by British Tommies. ' 



may be obtained in the annual prize 
list booklet of the British Columbia 
Agricultural Association. 



NANA1M0 PASSES 



September 12, at 10 ajn. Judging 
of the horses will begin at 10 a m 
Monday, September 14. All animals 
must be recorded In the Canadian 
National Livestock Records, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Ottawa, except 
when exhibited from United States, 
when entries may be recorded In 
the American Livestock Records. 

L L. Beatty. of Mission City. NANAIMO, July 25 -Seized with 
prominent horseman, will Judge the a sudden illness at 8 30 o'clock this 



News Received 
Of 



l W. JONES TO 
ADDRESS GYROS 

Clubmen- to Hear Former 
Minister of Finance at 
Luncheon Tomorrow 



CLUB CALENDAR 
MONDAY — Oyro Club, luncheon 
meeting. Empress Hotel. 12:15 p.m. 
TUESDAY— TCiwanis Club, luncheon 
meeting, Empress Hotel. 12 15 p.m. 
THURSDAY- R )t arv Club, lunch- 
eon meeting, Empress Hotel, 1:10 
p m 

J. W. Jones, former Minister of 
Finance for British' Columbia, will 
speak to the Gyro Club at luncheon 
tomorrow on "What the Ea*t Think.-, 
of the West." Mr Jones has made a 
study of this problem and hLs ad- 
dre.«s should prove Interesting. 

"Germany Today"" is the subject to 
be discussed by CharN s Archibald, a 
young Victorian, who has recently 
returned from a long tour of the 
Continent, and particularly Ger- 
many, when he afldrui-u, the K;?. 
warns Club on Tuesday. He will di.s- 
cuss the German Empire under 'the 
Nazi regime. Mrs. Agnes Kelsey, 
Winnipeg, soloist with the Vancou- 
ver Jubilee Symphony Orchestra, 
will be guest vocalist. 

R. V. Stuart. Vancouver, manager 
of the British Columbia Loggers' 
Association, and formerly with the 
British Columbia Forestry Depart- 
ment, will address the Rotary Club 
at luncheon on Thursday on ' The 
Future Supply of Raw Materials for 
Our Forest- Product. s." Mr. Stuart 
was; scheduled to deliver this address 

eance' 1 



Mrs. J L. Latrcmouillc. of K am- 
received the sad news ofTRe 



loops, 
death 
Franck 
Tucson 
States 



of her brother. George 
who passed away July 4 at 
Arizona, in the United 
Veterans Hospital. Mr. 



W. L. 



M. (iliholm, Member of 
r f amily, Succumb*, to 
Sudden Illness 



heavy horse section of the exhibl 
tlon. It was stated. 

Full list of the rules governing the 
Judging and the three horse shows 



A Man's Wrist 
Watch 

Unbreakable, Watertight, Anf.mag- 
ncfric, Self ' NrV md mtj 

F. W. FRANCIS 

Jeweler 1210 Douglas St. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




morning while he was driving a 
truck along Commercial Street, Wil- 
liam Lionel McGregor Glaholm, 
aged forty-one. well-known native 
son and member of one of Na- 
naimo's best pioneer families, died 
before medical help could be sum- 
moned. Mr Glaholm had been In 
ill health for .some time. 

He is survived by his mother, Mrs 
Kate Olaholm, Chapel Street, who. 
as Miss Kate McGregor, was Na- 
nalmo's first May queen. He was 
also a son of the late Captain John 
Glaholm. He is survived by many 
relatives In British Columbia, 
amoiiK them being a cousin, Hon 
Oordon Sloan. Attorney-Oeneral of 
British Columbia, and Mr J. Ward 
Bell, of Vancouver, who is also a 
cousin, and his aunts. Mrs. T. Gla- 
holm. first white child born In Na- 
naimo. and Mrs. A McOregor, of 
Nanaimo. 



Franck served in the C E.F. and was 
wounded and gassed In 1917. 

Besides a loving wife, Zada 
Franck. RN , Mr. Franck Is sur- 
vived by his father. Paul Franck. 
Saanich; four brothers and four 
sisters. 

Funeral service was conducted at 
Tucson. Arizona, the American 
Legion being In charge. The last 
wLvh of Mr. Franck was to have 
the Canadian flatf draped over his 
casket. 

NOTED MILITARY 
FIGURE PASSES 

I.ate Lieut. -Colonel Napper Well 
Known on Pacific Coast — Proml- 
in Western Cricket 



DOWN TOWN 

On Geary Se. mat »ho»e Powell CI km 
to the print ipal Score* and TWMm 
MODERATE MATES 

•rt 

Be. 

KJCCKUt-ENl MEALS 

Breakfast 25. »5 SO - Luncheon »0 
tSun M) Dinner M (Sun 85) 



iih..„i Bath $150 With Sat* $0 
iinnina I Beginning at» 



H HI Speak on 

Health Insurance 



A Joint meeting of Oddfellows will 
be held on Monday night. In the 
hall of Victoria Lodge No' 1 when 
Brother H. Anscomb. M P P.. will 



Sand io« f oldar fl«ei coetpieto 

- poflitt oH nlirtll 



:"' M 

aflc 



discuss "Health Insurance" 
ecu fraternal societies. 



as it 



A 6MinjfcOir»iri.lW-.««i 



G4044 



G 4 M 



ALL FIR 

MILLWOOD 

$5.00 For 2 Cord$ No. 1 
Fir Millwood 

Heavy Slabs j §3.50 
Inside Fir Blocks / SI.OO 

SAWDUST M.:»0 Unit 
2 Unit Uors 

Col wood Wood Co. 

C D SHAW-BIUCE LOW 
728' l Fort Street 



ADD GLASSES TO 
MUSIC FESTIVAL 



Direclors Working on 193T Svllahus 
—Still Other CtMMl to Be 
Included 



The directors of the rfua1fl1 fV.,- 
tival have been hard at work on the 
1937 syllabus, and have added the 
following classes: 

Class for Male Choirs — Service 
clubs; not less than twelve voices. 

Class for Small Vocal Ensembles - 
Not more than twenty voices; un- 
conducted; under sixteen years. 

Class lor Pianoforte Trio— Under 
fourteen years. 

Class for Painoforte Accompani- 
ment — Junior, under sixteen years. 
Competitors will be required to ac- 
company a soloLst (vocal or instru- 
mental) provided by the committee. 
Test piece to be chosen by the adju- 




Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaners 

NEW METHOD LAUNDRIES, 



LTD. 



X/m| Orders Promptly Attended To 



l>hor« c B/64 



"BUILD IC PAYROLLS" 



Taking 
Us 

Down 



Pacify 

JV*aoR*Tt» 



"W« have |hI Heard of Pacific 
Milk end my we do like it," write* 
Mrt L C.' J. "We jre new comet 
to British Columbia We have 
been Here three monthi, but were 
here two monthi before We heard 
or thu milk " And we thought we 
were to well known that all you 
had to do wat to come to Canada 
from anywhere and right away you 
would hear of Pacific Milk 



PACIFIC MILK 

Irradiated ot Course 



Obituary 

CROSHM AN — Funeral services for 
Mrs. Ellen Croasman. who passed 
away on Friday morning at the 
family residence. 454 Griffiths 
Street, will take place on Monday 
afternoon at McCall Bros.' Funeral 
Home at 2:30 o'clock Adjutant L. 
Ede will officiate, after which Inter- 
ment will be made in Colwood 
Burial Park. 

LABEHGE — Vesterday morning 
there passed a way at St. Josephs 
Hospital. George Laberge. aged 
thirty-six years, p irn in CJuebec and 
a resident ol Sooke tor the past 
fifteen years. He is survived by his 
widow and one daughter. Louise, at 
the family residence; two brothers. 
Lionel and Charles, in Sooke, and a 
sister. Mrs. J. Borbeaw. in ^uebee: 
The funeral will take place on 
Tuesday, the cortege leaving the 
Sands .Mortuary, Ltd, at 8 40 
o'clock, and ten minuti*s later Mass 
will be celebrated in St Andrew's 
Cathedral. 

Thomson -The funeral Ol Kg 
Blanche Edith Thomson took plate 
yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 
Canon A. de L. Nunns officiating 
Many Irlends were in attendance 
and floral tributes were numerous 
Interment was made in the family 
plot in l oss Bay Ometcry. Hymns 
sung were "Abide With Me and 

s.i.c in the Arms of Jesus '' The 
following were pallbearers. Thomas 
Stevenson, Charles siefdal. William 
Lowe, Ralph Bagley. Peter Tur- 
goose and Harold McCaw. 



With the death of Lieut -Colonel 
Henry George Napper, M.C , officer 
commanding Second iRes » Bat- 
talion the Manitoba Rangers, in the 
Jubilee Hospital here on Thursday, 
there pa.<»-ed away a figure well 
known on the Pacific Coast for his 
military activities. Colonel Napper 
had also close association with 
cricket in Western Canada. 

On the outbreak of war he went 
overseas with the 13th Canadian 
Mounted Rifles and. on that unit's 
disbandment in England, served in 
France with the 54th 'Kootenay 
Battalion, with whom he wis pro- 
moted to rank of captain, and was 
awarded the MHitary Cross lor con- 
spicuous gallantry in action on the 
Somme. He was Invalided and. on 
his discharge from hospital In Eng- 
land, was sent to Seaford as ncl Pl- 
iant of the casualty clearing de- 
poi, subsequently bc'liV.? promoted to 
rank of major, commanding rcm- 
mcnt.l depots at that point then 
transferred as officer commanding 
regimental depots at Whitley. 
in Mil 1 1 I \ WORK 
On his return to Canada Colonel 
Napper took an active interest in 
non-permanent militia work. Join- 
ing the Manitoba Rangers in 1926 
He was promoted to the rank of 
lieutenant -colonel commanding that I 
unit, with headquarters at Brandon. ' 
Mm. which appointment he held 
until his transfer from Brandon in 
1931. then being transferred to 
command the Second <Res> Bat- 
talion. Manitoba Rangers, whn h 
rank he" held "until his demise. 

Colonel Napiier was with the 
Canadian Pacitlc Railway in \.ui- 
ous capacities from 1908 until nil 
appointment as general car fore- 
man at Fort William terminal m 
1931. which appointment he held 
until his retirement on May 30, 19 w 

M in known < km hi rta 

On his arrival in Canada he was 
closely associated with the Wotem 
Canada Cricket Association, being 
president of that organization in 
1814. He played for Alberta and 
Manitoba in lie Western Canada 
provincial tournaments, a number 
of which we're held In Vancouver. 

The . -mains are now resting -at 
Hay wards Funeral Parlors, from 
wiU be made in 



Of Willy* Can 



heard publicly. i i i 

iSetv Models In 

eleven and under sixteen, accom- 
panied by boy or girl over eleven 
and WUitf sixteen. 

Class for Vocal Solo- -Girl over 
twelve and under sixteen years, ac- 
companied by bov or girl over twelve, 
and under sixteen. 

Class for Elocution — Ensemble 
speaking of verse; intermediate; 
group limited to twelve 

Further announcement of other 
classes added will be made shortly, 
the directors say. 



A widower was to !*• married for 
the third time, and his bride had 
been married oner before The 
groom-elect wrote across the bottom 
of the invitation to a friend Be 



Master's Motor Company Limited 
now the sole dealers In Victoria and 
divtrict for the Willy's "77". have 
Just received a carload of the new 
model of this popular automobile, 
which are now on display in their 
showrooms. 809 Yates Street. The 
designers of the Willys "77'' have 
incorporated many of the modi-h 
characteristics found only in cars 
of the high price field, and have 
combined the smart appearance 
with exceptionally strong constric- 



a recorded gas consumption of a-> 
high as thirty-five miles to the gal- 
lon being registered in many cases 
The rtUlafinrtoni of the Willys have 
been scientifically arrived at, based 
on the average motorist's needs, 
cc»n4r-rving every inch of s|>are while 
giving the maximum of motoring 
comfort and safety. 



ANTI-VIVISECTION 

MATTERS' DISCUSSED 

The local Anti-Vivlsectlnn Socl- ty 
has recently held a three week.-/ 

shop campaign on Douglas Street, 



. ecent meeting for the customary 
observance of World Day for Ani- 
mals in October. There will be no 
board meeting in August 

EAGLES PICNIC AT 

BEAVER LAKE TODAY 

Buses will leave Eagles' Hall. 
1319 Government Street this morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock for the "picnic 
which Victoria Aerie No 12 Is 
holding at Beaver I-ake. A 
Kood sports programme has been 
arranged by Or H. Clarke A I'vnn 
I if s charge of refreshments; C. H. 



i"K<> rtiHM MANca c a w aoau i 

III. ION It t » I 
M SI H \ I . NOTIC a 

Th» Vnrmbi-rs of Pro Patria Branch, 
Canadian Legion, and the Woinrn a Aualti- 
ary are rrquealrd to allrnd tl\r funrial of 
our ln'» DteBradai Colonel II O Napper. al 
the H»» warns H 0 Punrral Cliaprl, on 
Monday. July 37. at J IS P M 

O. A MUa 
Secretary. 



tion wlueh gives the "t- 
df motoring safety and 



e ^ t marg i n - and i t U en Umatnd lha' . u l i.OOSi Lester, 



durability. 



sure-to com TTils is no amateur .Economy of operation Is one of the 
performance' '• j salient fcaturcs-tVmnd in the Willys. 



(Xii^ans showed their interest In tW* and V. 
window display during this jx riod ports 



A. E Chilton, C 0_i$f.g™ 
Cnin are looking after the 
All members, their families 



The society discussed plans at a , and visiTing brothers are invited to accept that price ' 



attend Hot water, milk, 
sugar will >je provided. 



A partner who censors the sales- 
metis out-gom^' letters, quotes from 
this one batt<«d out last week I 
can offer you these bonds at 90 If 
I <!<» not hear from you I shall con- 
clude tlvat you do not wish tn-pau — 

more than 88. so In order to saTf 

both fOUf time and mine. I will 




( ONCEET \T (iOKf.l. P \KK 



Band, under the leader-hip of 
Bandm.iotrr E Bent, will givp .a 
concert tlm afternoon at 3 o'clock 
In the Gorge Park. The programme 
will consist of sacred music, fea- 
turing selections and old-time 
hymns. J 





i \ 



Eycr\hody is say'i 

o 



ng Smiles nith Snapshots — f**j your Share 



,NE KODAK — one man to 
press the button — one girl 
m sTTTite. fin often romance hegini 
this vsav. 

W lien the prints are ready — 
I here s ihat smile ag.iin. Hard to 
forgd it, when it's timed right at 
\<>ii. "()nl\ a snapshot'' — hut how 
nuny are worn next to the heart. 

Take Nour Kodak in hand this 
week end. Keep what it sees. Things 
liven up when the snapshooting 
starts. Everyone^ Trlittlc gayer* 



And you bring hack the punic — 
the trip — the swimming party — in 
a form you can't forget 

He prepared, take MMDshoCS, The 
snapshots you'll want tomorrow 

you must take today. Kodaks as low 
as $V Brownitl from SI. 25 ... at 
your dealer s. 

• • • 

In Canada "Kodak" is the r< «>is(t. ad 
trade mark and sole proju rt\ <»f 

Canadian Kodak ( <>., Limited, Tofooi 



Royal Oak Bu-tal Park on Monday. 
July 27. at 2:15 o'clor k: Sen Ices wil 
be conducted by Rev. Canon A de 
The. Esquimau^ Salvation Arniv r ^ Nunn - < of ^ l Mar >' s Anglican 




Church o.\k nav 

Srts Krrorf/ for 

Tiger Shooting 

ALLAHABAD. India, July 25 Q 
-Sir Gutab Singh. Maharajah ot 
Rewa. one of India s richest princes, 
has shot hl.vfive hundred and first 
tiger, thus fulfilling % vow ne made 
seventeen years ago when in his 
teens. He celebrated the feat, 
claimed a world record, with a party 
on the grand 'scale in his Jungle 
palace. 



Sfc» 



of Iron Fireman. >o* art 
*r>nl» I<imh« m..n, . hui mn.ma 
he»tin« .omfort "equal in the 

Keai t.p, „, autrtmati. 
Mat in«allanonvan«i.» vou 

J. A. MacKAY 



The local doctor, strolling along j 
the village street, saw one of the 
old Inhabitants seated -on a chair 

in the doorway of his cottage. 
Well. Thomas. ho» are voir 

lnrrrrrmf ttw dor tor .' ' 1 •**"*■ ' f 

Thomas- Well t rte br;;er than, 
I was, sir. b it I haln i <o « ell a' I 
« m before I was a* bad as I be 
i uo». ' - ■ » ■ — ■ i 



<r !od 



NO WONDCT sA sP<?HOTS mAe the hean grrmr f,wl>r 
— »hefi the) lan pve yow a eni.le like this ... to keep. 



CRACK SNAPSHOT COMBINATION 
Jiffy Kodak V. P. — Kodak VERICHROME Film 

ll I CUIt 1 i < • ' r to m t K'>"d %n-t[)shr»ts — with 
Jilh Koda1< V P . for instance, loaded with Kodak 
Film "V P." ,tands for "vest rMnket" 

able little camera really firs. Simple 

to'kh two burtoni and ytju've ma,rje a picture sire 
1», x 2« 2 inches. $y 

Vi ith Kodak VcruhromeTiTrn you can take pic- 
ture m the shade or on cloudv da>V Any camera IS 
a btttir camera, loaded *ith Verithrome. 




THE DAILY COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., "SI X DAY, JULY 26, 1936 



KIRKHAM'S 



612 FORT ST. 






en furlonss. 




Outing Headquarters 

Ttnti, all sizes; Down or Wool Sleeping Bag-*; 
Air Sport-a-Beds; Child's Life Jackets 
Camp Cots and Chair* Repaired 

F. Jeune & Bro., Ltd. 

570 JOHNSON STREET G 4632 



AT 





si 

Kabejltete 

old* arid up 
Dan 

rna* TO 

Duck 
Peace 

Bwepen 

Paocratic . . 
Ancient Roma 
Drastic Ro«« 

AImj eiwi&Je: 

Dutch Boy 

Nlaht Plash 

Time Enouvtl , 

Sweep Quick 

•Apprentice allowance. 

tOentleman rider 

Weather clear; track fait 



. . . firr 

three-jear- 



• • a « S) eeeeeeeeee 1 

e e • e • 

•a • • • eeeeaeee.ae 



• >0 . • . 1 • • • * o e e a a 



Tag Day Result — Yesterday * tag 
day takings In aid of St. John 
Ambulance Association 
to $238.1/- 



■ a * • • a • 



Manages to Hold Strong Bid 
Of Help Yourself to Take 
Handicap Race 



GenuineCreolin Disinfectant 

4 I u. Bottles, 25# S-Os. Bottles. 40# 16-Os. Bottles, T64* 

IZAL DISINFECTANT 

t Oz -16 Or— 32 Oz.—'A Gallon-Gallon 

SPRAY PUMPg OP ALL SIZES 

SCOTT & PEDEN. LTD. 

Cor Stor. and Cormorant Street Phont G7I81 



You Owe Yourself Protection Through 

Fire INSURANCE Automobile 

ELSIE B. RICHARDS 

Suite 7, Metropolitan Building, Opposit 
PHONE EMPIRE 7722 



BALL SQUADS 
TO CONTINUE 
PLAY-DOWNS 



Repairs to Furnace- The Esqui- 
mau School Board has approved 
contracts lor repairs to the furnace 
at the Municipal High School and 
not the Lampoon Street School, as 
was previously reported. i% 
nounced yesterday. 



HASTINGS PARK. VANCOU- 
VER, July 25 if . — Nearly 10,000 race 
fans today saw Orangery, star of 
the Oreencroft Stable, capture the 
Agasslz Handicap, feature event of 
the opening day at Hastings Park. 

Orangery led from the starting 

gun to the wire, but was tiring 1 Brunsdon's Boys and Silent 

badly at the finish and was seri- 
ously threatened by Don Ran s Help 
Yourself. Chlca forced the pace 
early In the race and managed to 
hold show position. The winner 
paid $825. $4 65 and $3.20 on a $2 One game up in the play-downs 



TANK GAS WATER HEATERS NOW 
50c DOWN, $1 MONTH! 

A low pure haw pr'.ca ftnd •conomlral opfratlnr coata 
tlon. Call at our Douglas Street itora for complete 




13th ANNUAL SUMMER 
SHOW 

Victoria Horticultural Society 

AT THE WILLOWS 
FRIDAY, JULY 31 AND SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 
Official Opening, Friday, 3 P.M., by His Hon. the Lieut -Governor 



mutuel ticket. 

Marcus Docile, held behind the 
pace setters In the sixth race until 
rounding the back stretch the sec- 
ond time, moved up rapidly at the 
finish and won handily over Puako 
and Wracla, who finished in that 
order. 

High money of the day, $42 50, 
$12.50 and $590, was paid on Joe 
Sam. who captured the seventh 
race, run over the Ascot course, of 
one mile and one-eighth. Lord 
Whlttler was second and Platurica 
third 

The dally double, from Tokens In 
the second to Easter Style in the 
third, was worth $2fi B0. while the 

one-two bet on Marcus Docile and 
Puako in the sixth returned $29 75. 



Glows Meet Tuesday in 
Third Game 



WOOD! WOOD! 



Already split, also hear* ilabarood 
mixed #lth Inside block, comma from 
Duncan, euttlnc tla and bis timbera. 
Ail atova lanttha. Never 10 water 
Dry enouih to put In basement floes 
twtea aa far aa mlllwood. 
Macular 14 00. Now 



S3.25 



Hillcrest & Mayo Bros. 

Timber Co. 



49th Summer 

SUIT 
SALE 



1,000 Genuine British 
Suitings 
Regular $40 Suits 



TENNIS MEET 
ENDS TODAY 



Finals in Esquimalt Net 
Championships Carded at 
Hillcrest Courts 



$ 



NOW 



1 




CORRECTLY $TYLED 

UP TO DATE 
PERFECTLY FITTED 

CHARLIE HOPE 

"Piontsr Merchant Tailor" 

1434 Government St. 

(CND Or PANDORA AV.MH 



Pnrkvr in Victory 



BROOKLINB, Mass . July 25 DE 
— Prankle Parker, youthful Spring 
Lake. N.J., tennis star, added his 

name today to the illustrious list of 
stars who have won the annual 
Longwood Bowl, by defeating sev- 
enteen-year-old Bobby Rlggs. of I^os 
Angeles. In the final of the forty - 
fourth tournament. 
The scores were 6-2. 3-8. 8-3. 7-5. 



Fine for Kidney 
Weakness 

STOP RESTLESS NIOHTS 



Keep your kidneys fraa tXpm waste 
matter, prtaona and acid, and put health- 
•etlTltr Into kldneya and bladder and 
rN'U lira a healthier, happlar and lonser 

sir*. 

On* moat sfflrlant and harmless war 
an do this la to sot from your druaslst a 
40 -cent bos of Oold Medal Haarlem Oil 
i-« « ..e. and take them as directed — the 
•win reealte wlU onrprleo rou. 

Besides disturbed sleep, some symptoms 
•f kidney Sroubio arc backache, moist 
swims, let cramps and puffy eras, tf ynu 
want real results. b« stirs to set OOLD 
atflUL -- lha orislnal snd sanuina — a 
(rand kidney tMmVMce. end - diureMe— 

Olvs 



I. i 



Ins Mae . 

Qui 'i Aw>! d >> 

sernnil Rif — Clmmins. 
ami tif. the ftirlolnts 

Captuj * 

i Hi ms) ...... 

f»rl>o . 

.tubal . . L 

nik Pine .J. 



r. i 

Bl 



h.rd Ki" 



T. Blltl 
Lrvhitrn 



Esquimalt tennis champions for 
another season will be crowned to- 
day at the Hillcrest Club courts, 
when the finals of the ninth an- 
nual invitation championships are 
played. 

Play will commence at 10 o'clock 
with the consolation mules, and 
one hour later the semi-final of the 
men's doubles will be p layed with 
Temple and Margison opposing 
Brown and Wilkinson. 

Afternoon play will commence i 
with the men's s i ng le s fi na l at 1 
o'clock. J. Fraser and Eric Con will 
meet for the crown and a keen Also j 
battle is antlniMiMl 

Yesterday, Cox d'ltai.d A Wright 
8-1, 6-3. and J. Fraser < limit] U d C 
^ arglson with scores of 6-3, 6-4. 

■SSVLTI 
Other resulu follow: 

Women's lloulilrs 

Mrs. Erickson and - Miss Bovcc 
won from Miss Northam and Mi 
Lockley. 6-1. 6-0. 

Mrs. Bayles and Mats Hi bden 
won from Mrs. Butler and Mi 
Thomas. 6-2. 6-4. 

Mixed Double* 

Mrs Butler and Butler won from 
Miss Baillies and Holclrldgc. | | 
1-6. 6-2 

Mrs. Erickson and Wii. !, 
from Miss Boyce and Dir.- . ti-a 
6-1. 6-4 

HM*I l)<>uhlea 

Wood and Knight WOK from 
Jackson and Brown-C.u e, 6-4, 4-ti, 
14-12. 

Brown and Wilkinson won from 
MrLeod and Nixon. 6-4. »>-( 

Wood and Knight won lrnni But- 
ler and Davey, 4-8, 6-2, 6-3. 
todw s i>r \w 

Consolation Singles 

10 00 n RtitMTtl \s. Mfl-eor! 
Camsu.sa vs. W. Wood. 

11:00 — Miss Parkinson 
Owen. 

loo — mm 

Nlss Newman 

9chwarz. Mi- 
Borrow'man. 
2:00— N. Fraser 
3:00— W. Erickson 
4 00 — ' Buzz ". Evans 
Fraser vs. Flack. 

5:00 — Clack vs. winner of Cam 
susa vs. Wood: Mis borklej vs -■■>■■ 
winner of Miss Newm.in vs MLs 
Borrow man. winner of M,. . Park 
Ineon vs. Miss Owen ys wliui r of i « . . , 
Miss Madlll vs. Mis* Beh" U 

6:00— — Semi-final men's singles, Scotland 
semi-finals worm i 

( hanirionship (tenia 

11 00 — Seml-hnal mrn.> double*: 
Temple atid Margtson v« Brown 
and Wilkinson. 

1:00— Final men's singles ,j 
ser vs. K. Cox. 

3 :00--Ftnal women 
Erickson and Mm It i 
Bayles vv Miss Hebden. 

4.00— Final mixed doublet 



Flr.t Rare — Clalminc. purse t<00. three- 
year-olds and up, ilk snd one-half fur- 
lnnr«- 

Umpire tHeltOSO MS 90 17 90 S4 10 

Red iJidy 'Bporrll 4 40 2 9S 

Adelaide N (L««swell> S 40 

Time. I 2S Al«> ran Mlsa Onden. T-ady 
Torchllla. Judso Austin. Charxan. Altlvo 

Second Race — Clalmln*. purse $400. 
three- veer-olds and up. flv* ftirlnnss: 

Tokens <Dubola) |S 40 13 10 $2 70 

■Tosella 'Barnrttt 4 05 3 10 

Happy Msdne (LaSSVfB) 4.S0 

Time. 102 1-5 Also ran Ethel Btsr, 
Oalener. Manx JeMer. Tusculotta, I'm 
Alone 

Third Raee — Clalmlns, purse t400, for 
three-year-olds and up, five furlonts: 

Faster Star 'Helton) $9 2.5 14.11 l«M 

I'layliiK On 'Atkinson) 170 3 00 

Miss Base 'KnUhtl 110 

Time. 1 01 2-5 Also ran Lily May. Nuve 
Aita. Black Desert. rral«ro, Tommy Band 

Dally double paid $28 »0. 

t'nurth Race — Halmnls. purse $400. 
thr."--vear-olds and up, bred in Weatern 
Canada, five furlonss 

VernsLoan (Chrl»tenson> $7 30 $ 4 70 $3 35 

Phoebe Joe tBporrll 13 05 I 95 

Evelyn Mav 'Helton) 3 10 

Time, i 03 2-5 Also rsn Bunny May, 
Bomrrldse Ladf Aurel:u«, Quits Contrsry, 
Oolden Mesh. 

Fifth Race — The Aitassl* Handicap, pursa 
<600. three-year-olds and up, seven fur- 
Innas 

Orangery (LasswelD $8 25 t 4 R5 $3 20 

Help Yourself (Whltacrei ... 14 90 5 70 

Chira <8porrl) 4 10 

Time. 1 28 Also ran Lady Oold. Bold 
Courtier. Son of Day. Bcotla • F1a«, Royal 
Flint. 

tilth Race — rlalmlns, purse $400. three- 
year-olds and up. mile and one-slxteenlh 
Marcus Docile 'Barnett) . .$9 10 $4 30 $3 40 

Puako (Knlaht" 4 10 

Wracis iChnstensont * 3 so 

Time. I 48 Also ran Hominy Imp, Paris 
Leave. Evidently. 
One-two bet paid $29 75 
Seventh Rae«^— < lalniina. purse $400. for 
three-year-olds and up, Ascot course, mile 
and one-el»hth: 

Joe Sam 'Kniihti ..... $42 50 $12 50 $5 90 
l^>rd Whltner fDtJtWIS) . t 10 III 

Platurica 'Lassaelli 3 40 

Time. I >'> |-| aits) ran Anacsprl, 

Sihrr Hoi.d. Afridl 



o\ i itMt.ii r i Ml rifs 

Race — ClalmlrtS, thri e-vear-olds 



Elrat Race — CMlmins 
and up. br"<l In Western Csnsda 
one-lmir furlonvs 

Maine B 

THIy Eh >er ...TTT...., 

Prln.es Betry 

Brown Jus 7T. 



nix and 



103 
118 
10'» 
l"J 
104 
I0R 
J 03 
111 



118 

118 

MUJ 

107 

thr^e-yesr-olds 



for the Lower Vancouver Island "A" 
section softball championship, the 
defending champions. Brunsdon's 
Boys, will battle the Silent Glows 
on Tuesday and Thursday evefiinRs 
this week as the three-out-of-flve- 
game series for the title continues. 

In the Initial fixture the clubs 
played to a 7-7 tie after eleven In- 
nings of good ball, and in the second 
game Brunsdon's Boys came through 
with • 7-4 triumph 

Esquimau Meat Market and Col- 
bert's Grocery, "C' and "D" section 
tltleholders, respectively, will open 
the lnter-seetional play-offs tomor- 
row evening when they clash at Bul- 
len Park. The second game will be 
pl ayed Wednesday evening at Vic- 
toria West Park. Should a third fix- 
ture be necessary to decide the win- 
ners, it will be played Friday at Bul- 
len Park. 

League officials yesterday an- 
nounced that four umpires will be 
used for the "A" section play-downs. 
ThLs i.s the first time in the history 
of softball In Victoria that arbiters 
have been used at each base. 

The schedule for the week follows: 

LOWER ISLAND PLAY-OIES 
"A" Section 

Tuesday— Brunsdon's Boys vs Si- 
lent Glows. Royal Athletic Park; Mc- 
Clure. O'Connor. Waller and Smith. 

Thursday — Silent Glows vs Bruns- 
don's Boys. Royal Athletic Park; 
Pick. Waller. Smith and O'Connor. 
"B" Section 

Monday— Esquimalt Meat Market 
vs. Colbert's Grocery, Bullen Park; 
MeClure and Munn. 

Wednesday— Colbert's Grocery vs. 
Esquimalt Meat Market. Victoria 
West Park; O'Connor and Munn. 

flf a third game is necessary It 
will be played Friday at Bullen 
Park.> 

WOMEN'S LEAOrE 

Monday— Saanichton vs. NSSC, 
Saanichton; to be appointed 

Wednesday— Saanichton vs. Car- 
dinals, Saanichton; to be appointed. 

Thursday— Live Wires vs Saanich- 
ton, Queens and Quadra, Price and 
Carr. 

1*1 1)1 N KM)( KOI T (TP 

Victoria Longshoremen vs. Bell 
Barber. Memorial Park; Williams 

and Gent. 

POODLE DOG KNOCKOl'T CLP 

Monday — Painter's Bruins vs. 
Navy. Victoria West Park; Fraser 
and Waller. 

Thursday — Victoria longshoremen 
vs. Saanichton. Victoria West Park; 
Munn and Holncss. 

< sl.VIIU KMX KOI T ( I P 

Friday Toco Cleaners vs Tigers. 
Victoria West Park; McCltir* and 
Smith. 



n f i r I 



111 

US 

111 

III 

113 

III 

•IIS 
•101 

I 1 



104 

105 
104 
104 
109 
111 
111 
108 



Announccmc 



nts ! 



inii.th Rare 



N 



vs. Miss 



rSN >f fi^nr. 



* 118 

Ill 

10S 

104 

r-fflalmlnc maiden three- 
bred In Wesjern Canada. 

furtostssi 

;-. " no 

110 



Superfluous Hair on the face Is 

ftdmlttedly the most hideous fem- 
inine blemish Women ver\ rarelv 
sp^ak of this disfigurement, but 
secretly and anxiously try everv 
promised cure thev see advert iscd. 
OtUjf to find to their sorrow that 
the growth to but aggravated by 
their use Electrolysis alone is the 
safe and permanent cure, and this 
1* one advertisement which h ab- 
solutely true' Women who earn- 
estly desire to find the truth will 
reroute :t Miss Hanman, 503 
Baywmrd Building. Phone O 7642 



118 



Madlll 
s. Miss Bo 
Newman 

. N Fl. 



vs. Ml* 



M. 



B.-tclu .KUd 
rtunnyfler 
Comni'iicer 
M I i»rr 

Also elieibl 
Weno 

Eunv i i e . 

Eirminsn 
r« 'i.rrall 



Ju\erile 
lone* - - 



.1 T | "e 

inir.ln 



vAillll'T ot 



g ^ttt.'; ::::::::::::;::^ 

last Kins 

Slalh Rare — Clslmlnt. three 
and up. mile snd one-sisteenth 



7 ll« 

Hsndicsp. 



1 14 

101 

IOC 



Quality. Senlre and Reliability— 

his linked us to our Taluts j custom- 
ers for manr yeaw. We still con- 
tinue to improve as time goes on— 
^ changing our methods and styles to 
Jj^ meet modern conditions. Try., us 
m w:Lh your next printing order snd 
be Isttltefttd The ColonLst. 1211 
HI Bn>itd*S;r' , ' , t — Prinfin? Lithognph- 
ing. Bookbinding. Eiigravmi:. 



".. Hot goods 

10 . 
110 
■ar-olds 



\ ,ii .ilinn *I safftsgt a' prlOtt fOU 
can afford to pay. Ladies Hanger 
0 ■ initialled >. $!r»S up Mc- 

Martm's carry a full line of leather 
Two stores. 716 YMm, 811 
Government 



r 



I- : a - 
M; 



Dsrei-a 
Bitter Bark 
Primroie Day 

■.e ( rllth Rai 

and up, mile 
Miova tl.Ms 



108 
108 

• 

108 
108 
|0H 
108 
108 

10« 

108 
I OB 

101 

ir-.ni. three-yesr ,>lds 
and SSte-siSteei I , 



lanrnt* are 

expensive 



It 

W i - r *■ • ■ 



h Talk 
S 



Eirlh Brothers' Perm, 

quality type but not 
Permanent.* also, wiVhou' any wires 
or plertricltv or machine Phone 
E 2.544 615 Enr* S'reet 

FtlHtsj a Lonr-Eelt Need: Colonic 
lirigaMon. internal bathing E. M. 
Leonard RN po>» -graduate, Mavo 
Bros. S06 Campbell Bldg E 2721 

( hleken Dinners. Devonshire 
• >m teas a special- v Tlie Chalet, 
Deep Cove 



Erickson and 
ler and Butler 



Mr. 

Me* Rut. 



V S t T . . 

V. i ■ .o.e 
ft ll, Mj,li..i" ' 
tot tie « Lad 
Man.mr • M •• 



Rilldre 




TWher-How m.nv e>n,n,,> are ^t/ aV . ' 
there? 

Johnny— Four: earth, fire water 
and brandv 
Teacher -Bi \i-ri- I 
Johnnv— Yes, teacher father say* 
when he has brandy net 'in Mi 



Hurdl»« purse 
o Is ant! iip" m:le a - 1 one-stx'eenth 
E»e'' i Home , is ■ 



•: 

• 10J 

...... 10$ 

IM 

four-year- 



summer. ( nU.iges for Rent .with 

free use of shower and tennis court 

The Chflle*, Deep. 



The Kins « Daaghters' Garden 

Party Aueust 13. at the home of 
aflat Afnew Rockland Avenue. 



149 

St For a Delishtful Hohdav try The 

; Chalet. Deep Co\e , 's-. 

1 47 t | . 

M3 



Firs Destroys School — Fire de- 
stroyed a new Doukhobor school 
under construction at Glade. B.C., 
late on Friday evening, according to 
word received by the Provincial 
Government yesterday. The build- 
ing, being put up by the Doukhobor- 
colony, was under the surveillance 
of a night watchman at the time. 
No details were kamed here. 

Iimte Local Old Boys— The Bruce 
Old Boys of Vancouver are holding 
their annual picnic In Stanley Park 
on Wednesday. July 29, and an In- 
vitation has been extended to all 
former residents of the county 
mentioned, resident In Victoria, to 
Join in the event. The place of the 
picnic to announced to be at the 
covered tables back of the pavilion. 

Contracts Pending — Road con- 
tracts affecting the Malahat, Jordan 
River and Lower Mainland points 
will be awarded by the Provincial 
Government on the return of Hon. 
F. M. MacPherson from Vancouver, 
this week, it was said yesterday at 
the Department of Public Works. 
The Minister of Works is expected 
back on Monday. 




Latest 1936 All-Wave 

BSSkas. " saaa -JBtUUHWWULU' ~ *~ ' 

Radio 



We are not permitted by the 
manufacturers to mention 
the name of this radio which 
has been so sensationally re- 
duced — but you can see them 
in our store! One of the 
latest 1936 all-wave models 
in a superb cabinet. At this 
price it is the greatest radio 
value this store has ever of- 
fered. Get one while you 
can. 



Reduced to 
Sell at 




FLETCHER BROS. 

(VICTORIA) LTD.. 1110 DOUGLAS STREET 



Reward Posted — Concerned with 
intermittent outbreaks of Are and 
attempted bombing incidents in the 
Doukhobor areas of the province, 
the Provincial Government has re- 
newed an offer of a reward of 
$2,000 for Information leading to 
the arrest and conviction of the 
perpetrators, Attorney - Oeneral 



at Wadham's, 
Beaver. 

Recommend Tender — Alderman 
Andrew McGavln. chairman of the 
City Council water board, yesterday 
announced hto committee would 
recommend to the council that the 
tender of D. P. Garrison for Sooke 
Lake watershed timber be accepted. 
During a meeting at the City Hall, 
members of the board felt selective 
logging of the watershed property 
was a move in the right direction for 
forest preservation, as opposed to 
destructive high-lead logging. If the 
council accepts Mr. Garrison's ten- 
der, logging to expected to commence 
immediately. 




Oak Bay Building -In the Munic- 
ipality of Oak Bay during the week 
a permit was taken out for the 
erection of a $3,800 house at 1244 
Beach Drive, for K. B. and F E. 
Davenport. It will contain six 
rooms. Another permit was issued 
for the construction of a four- 
roomed house for Clarice Heale at 
2035 Newton Street. It to estimated 
to cost $1,200. 



Reorganization Meeting — Brian 
Hoole, Saanich Conservative Asso- 
ciation official, last night extended 
an open Invitation to Ward One 
"Saanich) residents to attend the 
reorganization meerlng of the ward 
Conservative association on Wed- 
nesday at 8 pm. in St. Luke s Hall, 
Cedar Hill Road. "Come and help 
fight Socialism." was the Invitation 
extended. 



TOURNEY ENDS 

Mainland Netters "Annex 
Five Tennis Crowns at 
Kelowna Meet 



Joint Offlcw — No decision was 
reached on the plan to amalgamate 
the offices of city building inspec- 
tor and school board buildings and 
grounds superintendent during a 
meeting In the City Hall yesterday 
morning. Members of the council 
present were Aldermen Walter 
Luney. T. W Hawkins and Edward 
Williams. The school board was 
represented by Trustees W. C. 
Moresby. K C , Percy E. Oeorge and 

John Wallace. Another conference ' crown. The scores were 3 8. 1-8, 



KELOWNA, July 25 tT.-Flve 
championships headed for tike Coast 
tonight in the pockets of Vancouver 
players following the finals at the 

Provincial Inferior championship 
tourney here today. 

Miss Eleanor Young, of Vancou- 
ver, who won the women's singles 
crown Thursday, had a hand in two 
other final victories today. 

Paired with Miss Britton. also of 
Vancouver, they won the ladies' 
doubles final, beating out Mrs. 
Matthewson and Jocelyn Pease, of 
Kelowna. C-2, 3-6, 6-3. 

Partnered with Ed Forst In the 
mixed doubles, Miss Young helped 
dispose of McDonnell, of Trail, and 
Miss Brydcs, of Vancouver. 8-3. 6-1. 

Pearson, of Vancouver, took a 
gruelling match from O. Verley. of 
Vancouver, after losing the first two 
sets, to take the men's singles 



Appointment, 9 to 6 
Prions, Off.cs, E25U 
After 6, Phona G 3971 



Harold S. Timberlake 



OPTOMETRIST 



647 YATES STREFT, 




FOR PERSONAL SERVICE 

CALL 

Gray Line Cabs 

25c G4151 25c 



24-Hour Service 




Instant Service 



clever 



6-3, 6-2. 6-0. 

Ed Forst and Verley. of Vancou- 
ver, ousted the only American 
threat In the tournament. Langlle 
and Nordstrom, of Seattle, in the 
men's doubles final with a 8-3, 6-3, 
6-2 victory. 



will be held In the mar future 

Delegates Returning— Hon o M 

Sloan, K.C.. returned to hto office 
yesterday morning from Vancouver, 
where he had attended the meeting 
of the Provincial Liberal Associa- 
tion's executive. Other members of 
the Cabinet are expected back to- 
day, having remained behind for a 
closing session of the executive yes- 
terday. Premier Pattullo is sched- 
uled to attend a^Vimv Memorial 
service at Beacon Hill Park, at 3 
p.m. today, to which His Honor the 
Lieutenant-Governor has been In- 
vited. 

Fishing Resumes- -Three cannery 
plants were reported open at Rivers 
Inlet yesterday, as salmon boats 
made the most of a good run of 
ftoh. About 150 boats were operat- 
ing, according to provincial advices 
MCsUl while, dissentient fishermen 
.sent a delegation to Interview Hon 
.1 B, Miehaud. Federal Minister of 
Fi Ivrles. who arrived at Rivers , 

IlUet dtninfl the day on board the brask » matman yesterday evening 
hvdroRraphic survey vessel W. J. j at the Ttlllcum evmns-slum and won 
Stewart, tanneries were operating the main event [of the weekly show 



JOE SAV0L01 
BEATS FRALEY 

Outwits Nebraskan to Gain 
Winning Fall in Fourth 
Round of Mat Bout 



wrestling. 

flavoldi. after many unsuccessful 
attempts, dropped Fraley in the sec- 
ond round with a flying tackle, after 
coming off the ropes with hght- 
nlnc speed. It was a clever piece of 
wrestling and the fans gave the 
dark-featured Italian quite a hand 

Fraley, one of the finest exponents 
of the flying step-over toehold to 
ever show in these parts, squared the 
match in the next round with this 
v«ry hold 8avoldl tossed Fraley 
around with three flylns: mares, but 
the speed with which the Nebraskan 
applied the hold surprised the fans ' 
and Mr Savoldl. and he soon tapped 
the mat. 

W INNING FAI L 

Savoldl limped to his comer, and 
commenced to massage his power- 
ful leg. His face showed slims of 
pain, 'and everybody thought the 
Italian was suffering with a cramp 
Fraley apparently thought likewise. 
Instead of going In after the bell 
rang, he haft stood there and looked 




WOOD AND COAL 
SAWDUST 

J. E. Painter & Sons 

most o ss4i 

«T CORMOSUMT ST. VlfTORM 



tlon. With the gra^e of a panther 
leaping at Its prey, the foxv Sa- 
voldl Jumped at Fraley. landed a 
well-directed drop kick and dropped 
Foxv "Jumping" Joe Savoldl. 205- thr Nrbrasknn *• Usl canvas. He 
pound Michigan wrestler, outwitted was on top of his opponent In a sec- 
Pat Fraley. cleter 220-pound Ne- ° nd and )he next second, the ref 

eree. tapblnirf the Italian on the 
back, awarded him a fall 

Gaining fajl'.s In the second and 
fourth roun. 



First United Church 



Qaailre street an* Ita 
Key 



moral RnaS 



W 



Minister 
O. Wilson, 14 A 



D O 



R*» 



Aaalatant Minister 
Edward W Morton. B 4 



SfNDAT SIRVKT.S 
RKV EDWARD W MORTOM Will Con 
durt Both Morning and Kvenlnt 
Services. II and 7 10 o'clock 

SI MM* SCHOOL 
I 4S AM Intermediates and Seniors 
II AM - Primaries and Juniors 



Pat Meehan, Edmonton, scored an 
odd -fall victory over Pat Maloney, 
Boston, In the seml-windup. Ma- 
-orr Thtx' was Savoron cue Tor ■»T- t ,on * T .'*» u«ual. opened up with hit 



the first on s foul, 



- 



The King Reviews Royal Air Force 



rough tactics and soon had ths fans 
up in arms With the match stand- 
ing OaM fall apiece, the Canadian 
gained the winning fall in the last 
round with a snoee-ssion of drop 
kicks, the fans howling, their ap- 
proval Meehan welghcdOlS pounds, 
five more than Maloney. 

Al Oarnot pinned Bill Steen In 
the third round of the preliminary 
lor a one-fall verdict. They wrestled 
at 138 pounds. 

Johnny Pears refere*d. 




WRIGLEY SWIMS 
SET THIS WEEK 



naif Mile Provincial Champion- 
ships Will Be Ml at ncmen 



2 
I* 



4uu.ru Cw.s,* 



...................... 



Paislev t" leanrrs and Byers. 

rail and del^er. G3724, 



Making a 300-MuV Aerial Tour of England's Atr Stations. King Edward VIM, Who Is Commander-m 
Chief of the Royal Air Force, it Shown (Saluting) as He Inspected a Fleet of England's Mightiest Bomb 
4 ... at MiJdenhall Aerodrorna, The King's Brother, the Duk« of York; I. Second From Right in 

• e^ 

,' e» t — - 



Next Saturday afternoon th» an- 
nual Wrigley British Columbia half- 
mile Awlmmln* championships will 
be run off at Bowen Island under 
the direction of the Union Steam- 
ship Company. The meet is sanc- 
tioned by the British Columbia sec- . 
tlon of the Canadian Ama'eir 
Swimming Association. 

Two trophlea put up by the Wrig- 
ley Chewing Gum Company will nsr 
St stake one for th* boys and an- 
other for the girls A new trophy 
has been presented to the Keirrwns 
An istlc Club and W for the women • 
haif-mile Okanagan championship 
title and will be competed for an- 
nually at the KVIowna Regatta, 
which will be held this year on Au- 
gust S and 6 

Gold, silver and br'mse medato 
will go to the first, atv^md and third 
swtmrnen. and the winner will hold 
the trophy 

Recently the Wri47>y Brltl/h Co- 
lumbia one-mile events were held 
st Kitsllsno Beach, with Bobby 
Mathewson. of Victoris, snd 
O Hars. of Vancouver being the 
eesaful winners 

Don't Endure Slipping 

FALSE TEETH 

TV) roar false teetb dr->» ST si:p «rr>«ei 
*"mi talk. sat. lsuth aa* en ease') Don't se 
an noyed a r.d err.bsrr sated a minute looser 
•"ASTETTH a r«» r>os>^— •»> re- -»> nr, 
your oletee. holds teeth firra O'ees • • 
feel n« of aec^r -t and eomforu Ne 
.'imi ry to oes, ■»■ . • „, r,e t 

Re,,.!'""™ -' « - — -ft,,,., 



I 




THE DAILY COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1936 



— 



— : — 



Social Activities and Notes of Personal Interest 

— — . . . 

Reception Is Given for IA Beautiful Summer Bride Summer Dance Attracts 



Blind Residents of City 

Hi< Honor the I jfiilfnant-Governor and Mrs. K. W. 
Hamber Entertain at Tea at Government House 
- — Mu§ical Programme Greatly Enjoyed 



His Honor the Lieutenant -Gov- 
ernor and Mrs. Eric W Hamber 
entertained a number of blind real- 
dents of Victoria and other guest* 
at tea at Government House yester- 
day afternoon. The guest* were re- 
ceived In the drawing-room by His 
Honor and Mrs. Hamber. who were 
attended by Captain W. Hobart 
Molson and Mr* Hew Paterson, 
honorary aides. Mr. A. M. D. Fair- 
bairn, secretary, announced the vis- 
itor* aa they arrived. 

TEA IN HAI.I.ROOM 

Tea waa served in the ballroom at 
small tables which, with the long 
buffet table, were adorned with 
lovely Summer flowers. A three- 
piece orchestra was in attendance 
and played during tea. 
An Informal musical programme 
Included songa which were 
most charmingly sung by Mr*. W. 
P Remington, of Pendleton, Ore., 
and Mr. Harry J. Davis, who was 
accompanied at the piano by Mrs. 
Remington; selection* by Mr. Er- 
nest Fullerton, piano-accordionist, 
end oommunlty singlnc In which 
the guest* Joined heartily. 

inn utuiu gueais, earn 01 wnom 
was accompanied by an eacort, In- 
cluded W. Allison. Mrs. A. E. Ash- 
ton. Mra A. Bailey, J. Barker. A J. 
Bancroft, A. Chamberlain, G. Coch- 



H. Crocker. Mrs. M. I>unn, Mrs. R. 
Durrant. S. Parrington. W. H. Pos- 
ter, J. Kempton. Mra. E. Lang. Mrs 
M. Loudoun. Miss F Lowe, Mrs. E. 
Madden. D. Metcalfe. Mrs. J. E. 
Painter, E. Penney, Mr*. M. Poet. 
Mr*. A. River*, Mr*. Scott. Mis* O. 



LANsra 

■ (ITU 



BaiTlsll 



"Correct Apparel 
For Women" 



Mod 



V _V> UMIT 



* 



Seebach, Mrs. J. Smith. E. Speck, 
Captain Ian St. Clair, K. Sta'pleton, 
Miss D. Stark, P. C. Tembletl, Mia* 
A. Thome, A. Tillesen, J. Tracey, 
E. J Turner, A. Varney, Mr*. E. 
Watling. Major W. H. Watts, A. 
Whiter, H. Woodfleld. W. J. Wright. 

Other guest* Invited to meet them 
Included: Premier T. D. and Mrs. 
Pattullo, Hon G. M. Weir and Mrs. 
Weir, Mayor D. Leemlng and Mrs. 
Leeming, Mrs. and Mis* Alexander, 
Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Angus, Mr*. J. 
W. Benning, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 
Boyd, Mrs. Fltzherbert Bullen, Mr. 
and Mrs. R. P. Butchart. Mis* 
Crease, Mr. Davis, Mr. O. W. Dea- 
vtlle, Mr. and Mrs. S. J Evans, Miss 
C. Frame, Mis* E. Grubb, Mr. and 
Mr*. B. S. Hetsterman, Mis* N. 
Hensley. Mrs. and Mtsa Jones, Col. 
and Mrs. T. M. Knox. Mr. and Mrs. 

G. McTavlsh. Captain and Mrs. W. 

H. Molson, Mr. Lome Ogllvie, Miss 
Ogllvle, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. D. Pem- 
b-rton, Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Rlckard, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Robinson. Miss 
M. W Rowan. Mr. and Mrs. A. R. 
Sherwood. Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Spencer, Captain and Mrs. Thorpe- 
Doubble. Rev. J K. Unsworth, D.D., 
Mr. and Mrs. P. Walker, Mr. and 
Mra. F. E. Winslow, Miss Agnew, 
Mrs. H. G. Bolt, Brigadier and Mrs. 
J. Sutherland Brown. Mra. L. A. 
Genge, "Mr. D. McMillan. Mr. E. W. 



W. CraiK. W. S. Crichton, A. McMullen. Mrs. A. B. Morkill, Mr. 



and Mrs. Hew Paterson, the Very 
Rev. Dean Qualnton and Mrs. 
Qualnton, Mr*. W. Curtis Sampson, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. White, Bishop 
and Mrs. W. P. Remington and Mr. 
and Mrs. H. J. Davis 



Weddings 



rutrhtr Bulldln* 



LIMITED 

Douflat St 



Joseph 
Rose 

Optometrist 

1013 Government St 
Phone EGO 14 



B 



LOW PRICES 

ON 



AND ALL 

CANNING SUPPLIES 



Mm»»I ftTORM. LTD . 



i 



Fort M, 



I \YDKN — BROWN 

The wedding took place in St. 
Mirk s Church last evening at 8 
o'clock, between Dorl* Louise, eld- 
est daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. G 
Brown. Victoria, and Mr. Evert 
.Sigurd Hayden. formerly of Fin- 
land. Rev. O. L. Jull officiating. 
The bride was given away by her 
father, and wore a grey silk suit and 
hat, and a corsage bouquet of pink 
rose* and swansonia. A few friends 
were welcomed by the bride and 
groom after the ceremony. In their 
new home. 1042 Pandora Avenue, 
who were greeted on arrival by Mr 
Brown 




CANNON — TTrVkR 
A marriage was solemnized In 
Port Angeles on Thursday. July 23, 
between Margaret V. <Mollie> 
Turner, only daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis Turner. 1905 Duchess 
Street, to Mr. Fred C. Cannon, son 
of Mrs. M. Cannon and the late Mr. 
Cannon. 1122 Queens Avenue. After 
a short honeymoon Mr. and Mrs. 
Cannon will reside in Victoria. 

DODD1 m m»i i i I 
The marriage took place at Wind- 
sor Parish Church. England, on July 
22 of Eleanor Frances, daughter of 
Rev. W. F. Madel<«y and of the late 
Mr*. Madeleyrof Vancouver, to Mr 
Oeorge Dodds, eldest son of Mr. and 
Mr*. Walter Dodds. of Windsor. 
After spending the Summer in Enjt- 
land. tRe"DTide and groom will leave 
for the Orient, where they will make 
their home. The bride has many 
friends In Victoria, and waa a mem- 
ber of the staff of the Public Library 
here for several year*. 



Hammered Brass or Copper Curbs 



Made) to measure Average pnea 
Set our California Incinerator 
Also our Garden Seats at 



*0.."»0 and $7.50 
$5.00 
*V».00 and Sfl.OO 



The Red + Cross Workshop 



584-fl Johnson Street 



Phone K 3513 



mi 



The Beaches 
Are Calling 

Si/ a i t*i> II t* 
• • • kJiP . if tr tw tf 



LET US DELIVER YOUR 
CAMPING EQUIPMENT 
TO ANY POINT ON 
VANCOUVER ISLAND 



• •rrlr. I ft a 
VleUrla. 



Phone G 8188 

ISLAND FREIGHT SERVICE 

LIMITED 

514 CORMORANT STREET 




Large Crowd to Empress 



There was a large crowd at the 
supper danoe at the Empress Hotel 
last evening, many out-of-town 
guests being among those dancing. 
The orchestra, under the direction 
of Mr. W. F. Tickle, played as 
special number*. "A Star Fell Out 
of Heaven." 'The House That Jack 
Built for JUL Taint No Use," 
and out of respect for the unveiling 
of the Canadian War Memorial at 
Vimy today, "Rose of Picardy" wa* 
played a* the home waits. 

Among those present were Mr 
and Mrs. B. Schwengers. Mr. and 
Mr*. Robert Krements iMontclair. 
N.J.). Mrs. S. Whltaker (Balti- 
more, .\M i. Miss Kathleen Hall, 
Mr. and Mrs. Pat Slnnott, Mr. A. 
Millar, Mr. Goldwyn Terry, Mr. R. 
Apple ton, Miss Reby Edmond. Mr. 
George Beverldge, Miss Eleanor 
Helsterman. Mr. H. Robinson. Major 
Vincent McKenna, Miss Margaret 
Adam. Mr. and Mr*. Robert Webb, 
Mr. J. Munro, Miss Prances Biggin, 
Mis* Vera Sharland. Mis* Calla 
Goldsmith, Mr. Arthur Ftaser, Mr. 
Pat Parr, Mrs. Phyllis McLough- 
lin. Mr. W. Sheret. Miss Helen 
Condon (Seattle). Mr. and Mrs. W. 
O. Crawford. Mr. and Mr*. C. E. 
Blaney. Mr. and Mrs. K. Tatlow, 
Mr. and Mra. Gordon Godwin. 

Mr. William Meams, Miss Betty 
Bechtel. Miss Oladwyn Beasley, Mr. 
Harry Mearns, Mr. Sandy Hunter, 
Mr. John Featherston. Miss Betty 
Potter. Miss Elizabeth Macdonald. 
Mis* Maureen Orute, Miss Cath- 
erine Ma ed o n a ht. Mtss Ptrrftts 
Hodgson. Mr. Nixon, Mr. Eric Wood, 
Mr. D. Baker. Mr.' t,. McMartin. 
Miss Elinor Muirhead. Mr. Irving 
Strickland. Miss Zeta Clark. Mr. L. 
Patrick. Mr and Mrs R L. Rldout, 
Miss Daphne Holmes. Miss May 
Lambert. 



Mr. J. WUliams. Mr. R. Doull. 
Miss Aileen Cullum. Mr. Desmond 
Burdon-Murphy, Mis* Nan. Eve, 
Miss Ruth Pangman. Miss Hel«a 
Cody - Johnson. Miss Patricia Mc- 
Connan, Mr. Donald McMillan. Mr. 
Aubrey Walls. Mr. D. Lawson, Mr. 
D. Tye, Mr. Brian Burdon-Murphy. 
Dr. Alex. Gunning. Col. and Mrs. 
H. C. Cooper, Mr. C. Miller. Miss 
J. Lloyd-Young. Mr. Rawson, Mr. 
J. E. Semmes, Jr.. Miss Adlne Oland, 
Miss asther Ford, Mr. Jack Eraser. 
Miss Gloria Wilson. Mr. Waring 
Kennedy. Mia* Betty Bapty. Mr 
Hubert Sceats. Mr. Richard Muir- 
head. Miss Sheila Sangster. Miss 
Betty Slater. Mis* Audrey Bar- 
nett. Mis* Patricia Cattroll. Mr. 
Stanley Williams, Mr. Douglas 
Robertson. Miss Rene Williams, 
Mis* Helen Stewart, Mr. Lawrence 
Mallek. Mis* M. Washford. Mr. A. 
Foubister. Mr. J. O. Ritchie. Mr. J. 
MacDonald, Dr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Foote. Mr. C F. McNaughton, Mr 
T. Porteoua, Mr. O. H. Flinn. Mr 
F. Barlow, Mr. O. F. Burton. Mr. J 
Strang, Mr. W. Hudson. Mr. Q. 
Warnock, Mr. O. Vandenhrack, Mr 
A. M. Kirk. Mr. and Mrs. J. A. 
Walford. Mr. W. H. Hutchinson, 
Mr. J. Huber. Mr. W. A. Knox. Mr 
and Mrs. Russell HenshaU "Van- 
couver). Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Clcerl. 
Miss Isabelle McMillan <Kam- 
loopsi, Miss Peg^y Stanley. Mr 
and Mrs. F. O. McCurdy. Dr. and 
Mr*. Douglas Oraham. Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Sehwen e er a . Dr and Mr 



Leonard Tepoorten I Vancouver*. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Tackcr Cook ( Van- 
couver) , Mis* Betty Broley. Miss 
Margaret Howroyd. Miss Owen 
Wright. Mr. W. Murdoch. Mr. R- 
Murdocrt. Mr Esmond Home and 
Miss K. Grogan. 



ocraph by Savannah 

A pretty bride of last week wa* Mrs. Wilfred Arthur Johnston, 
formerly Mis* Laureta Week*, only daughter of Mr. and Mra Garfield 
Week*, of Duncan, whose marriage took place at the Metropolitan 

United Church. 



Luscious Fruhs Should Be Canned for Winter 



Br J1S8IK MARIS Df BOTH 

You do not have to be a cooking 
expert to fashion luscious fruit 
spreads. Jelly is somewhat tem- 
peramental, if made by the old rules, 
for fruit* vary In sugar, acid and 
pectin content from season to sea- 
son, and according to the degree of 
ripeness. But why take any risk 
with it, when commercial pectin 
made from fruit may be employed? 
It standardizes Jelly-making, re- 
moves the chance of failure and 
stretches the fruit Juice. 

Scientific experiments have proved 
that a better product is made when 
not too large a quantity of Jelly or 
preserves is cooked at one time. A 
good rule to follow is to make no leas 
than four and no more than ten 
glasses In the same kettle. It Is 
much easier and wiser to divide the 
labor among many days Instead of 
trying to crowd it into three or four 
Intensive campaigns during the 
Summer. 

Some useful recipes which will 
add variety to the store cupboard 
are as follows: 

STRAWIIKKKV JKI.I.V 

Five qta very ripe strawberries. 4 
cups juipe. 7 1-2 cups <3 1-* lbs ) 
sugar, 1 cup fruit pectin. Method: 
Crush strawberries. Place in » Jelly 
bag to drip. This will take between 
two and three hours to get the four 
cups of Juloe. Then mix sugar and 
juice m a large saucepan. Bring to 
a quick boil and at once add the 
fruit pectin, stirring constantly 
Then bring to a full rolling boll and 
boil hard one-half minute. Remove 



Vila-Ray J 

/j A < 




from fire, skim, pour Into sterilized 
glasses and paramn at once. 

CRUSH I) STRAWBERRY JAM 

i Made From the Pulp Left After 
Jelly Is Made) 
Seven cups sugar <3 lbs.), 4 cups 
prepared fruit <2 lbs t, 1-2 cup fruit 
pectin. Method: Measure sugar and 
fruit, as prepared above. Into a 
large kettle and mix well and bring 
to a full rolling boil over fast heat. 
Stir constantly during and before 
boiling. Boil hard one minute. Re- 
move from fire and stir in fruit 
pectin Then stir and skim by turns 
for Just five minutes to cool slightly 
and to prevent floating fruit. Pour 
quickly into sterilized glasses, par- 
affin the hot Jdm. 

mni < unserve 

One cup fre.sh rhubarb. 1 cup 
fresh strawberries, 1 cup diced pine- 
apple (fresh or canned). 2 cups 
•.ugar. Method: 8tew the rhubarb 
until soft. Add pineapple, straw- 
berries and sugar. Cook until thick. 
Pour into sterilized Jars, paraffin 
and seal. 

( IKR \\T JEEEY 

One peck currants. 1 pint water, 
sugar. Method: Cook currants in 
water for twenty minuted. (No need 
to remove steins). Pour through a 
Jelly bag Let drip, /but do not 
squeeze. Measure juicej add one cup 
sugar to one cup Juice/ Cook until 
Jelly sheets from the spoori. 

CAN N t I) PIN I M i l I MINT 

mi v 

(To Serve With Lamb) 
Two cups '1 lb) syrup from 
canned pineapple, 1 1-2 lbs. sugar, 1 
cup mint leaves, green coloring. 1-2 
cup fruit pectin. Method Drain 
syrup from pineapple. Wash mint 
leaves, do not remove from stems. 
Place leaves in large saucepan and 
press with potato masher. Meas- 
ure sugar and pineapple syrup into 
.saucepan and mix with mint. Bring 
to a boil, adding coloring to give 
!e red shade. Use coloring which 
fruit acids will not fade. Aa soon as 
the m ixture boils add fruit* pectin, 
stirring constantly* 



TODAY'S RECIPE 



BUTTERSCOTCH Sauce- 
Try this on ice cream or 
cake: One and one-fourth 
cups brown sugar, two- 
thirds cup corn syrup, four 
tablespoons butter, three- 
fourths cup thin cream. Put 
brown sugar, syrup and butter 
into a saucepan. Heat slowly 
to boiling, stirring carefully 
until the sugar Is dissolved. 
Boll to 230 degrees Fahr. Add 
cream slowly", stirring it in. 
Heat and serve. This sauce 
may be kept for some time; 
It must always be stirred Just 
before serving. 



FASHION NOTE 



50< Ilovoskin Oil 
wilh any »l 
Vita-liny 
piir<*hi.*f» 

Vita-Ray Vitamin Cream is 
the amaxing »cientific cream 
which makes the skin look 
younger in 28 days! It carries 
Vitamin D direct to the cap- 
illaries— the only source of 
akin nouriahmeot. 

If your skin is exceptional^ 
\j dry — exceptionally lined 
— use Vits-Ray Doveskin Oil 
with Vita-Rsy Cream. You 
double the effectiveness of 
each. They wotk together to 
smooth away lines — to re- 
duce enlarged pores — snd to 
combat "crepey" throst. Take 
advantage of the special offer 
this week — without fail. 

MacFarlane Drug Co. 

Corner Douglas and Johnson 



a full rolling boll and boil hard for 
one-half minute Remove from fire, 
remove mnr leave* and stems, skim, 
and pour quickly. To remove all 
traces or mint leaves hot Jelly must 
be poured through a fine meve be- 
fore it is poured into glasses. Par- 




affin hot Jelly at once. M 
five elght-ounoe glasses. 

SPICED (iRAPE BUTTER 

Four lbs. ripe grapes, 1 teaspoon 
mixed spices. 2 lbs. suKar, 1-4 cup 
cider vinegar. Method: Cru.^h 
grapes, cook until seeds separate 
from the pulp. Rub through fine 
colander. To pulp, add sugar, mixed 
spices and vinegar. Cook thirty 
minutes until somewhat thickened 
Seal In sterilized Jars. 

C. K V V S < i R A P F. CONSERVE 

Use grapes which have not begun 
to turn npe. Use crisp, green grapes, 
any variety. If they have started to 
ripen, the conserve will not be tart 
enough. Halve and seed whatever 
quantity is available. Add three- 
quarters of a pound of sugar to each 
pound of grapes, bring slowly to a 
boil until the ju.ces start to flow, 
then simmer for thirty minutes, 
stirring occasionally to prevent 
sticking. Pour while hot Into steril- 
ized glasses. Seal. The liquid part 
should Jelly when it cools and the 
grape halves a til partially retain 
their shapes. 



New dress** have trick* up their 
sleeves, *o look at the sleeve* when 
you buy a new gown. Blouse sleeves 
are also tricky. They are broad, with 
rather high shoulders, the broad 
effect achieved by means of Inverted 
tucks at the shoulder or neckline, 
resulting in a casual draping effect 
from shoulder to elbow. 

Whlmslest of the style whimsies 
is the transformation of one-time 
household cottons into swanky 
clothes. Evening gowns of bed- 
spread pique, sheeting and sailcloth 
with uphllstery fabric trim; quilted 
coats for beach, lounging and eve- 
ning wear ; sports clothes of mattress 
ticking; culotte overalls of army 
shirting, and denim fishing outfits. 

In Paris are seen capes of net. 
Immense net capes are thrown over 
evening gowns. They trail on the 
ground and give their wearer the 
grand air. Indeed? 




PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 



a Prompt and Dep«ndabl« Prtvrrlptlnn KtrvW Approved of 
bt Tsar FhT'lrlan. 

Wheal Chalra — Slrkroan Vapplloa — rmtrhra 



rrnmpt MolerrTrta nHWtrr «• All Parla af Iba CIU Oah 
Rat. Saanlcb and Eaaalmall. 

OWL DRUG CO.. LTD. 



("amp hall 
Bulldina 



Phona 

a tin 



W H Bl »SI> 




Qualiciiin Beach 

Captain Richard Opie. of the 
United States army, and Mrs. Ople 
motored up last week from Van- 
couver Barrack*. Washington, to 
spend a few days with Oaptain 
Ople's sister. Mrs. A. M. Hughes, 
"Rodann*." Chester Road 

a • a 

Mr Harold Willi*, of Victoria, 
hiked Up-Island, arriving at.Qual- 
icum Beach on Thursday evening, 
and will spend a short holiday here. 



JACKET DRESSES 

IN PRINTED SHEERS. SPECIAL 



$10.95 



A. K. LOVE, LTD. 'street' 



EITTEE — LOVB 

The engagement Is announced of 
Jessie Lilian, younger daughter of 
Mrs. Lova, 1325 Franklin Terrace, 
and of the late Mr Robert Love, to 
Mr. Horace Neill Little, only son of 
Mrs. Ian 8t. Clair and of the late 
Mr. Clifford Little. The wedding 



will take place quietly at St. 
Michael and All Angels. Royal Oak, 
in the latter part of August, m 



ROWSE— WANNA.MAKER 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Wannamaker, 
3251 Dublin 8treet. announce the 
engagement of their only daughter, 
Dorl* Edna, to Mr. Spencer Rowse, 
only son of Mr. and Mn H. Rowse. 
Broughton Street The marriage 
will take place ahortly. 



City Temple 

The Ladies' Auxiliary of the City 
Temple will hold it* annual garden 
party on Wednesday. July 29. at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. R. Snider. 
1152 Camrohe Crescent. The fol- 
lowing programme has 1 been ar- 
ranged: Dancing by pupiLs of Mi.ss 
Florence Clough Dancing Academy; 
accordion solo. Miss Save Smith, of 
the MoUie Milton School; elocution. 
Mr*. Chappie; readings, Mt^s Enid 
Cole, and .selections by Mr. Savory's 
Harmonica Band. There will also 
be other form* of entertainment, 
.•*urh an housle-housle. coeoanut 
.shies, clock golf, snd other things. 
Afternoon" tea will be served on the 
lswn. Reading of teacups will be 
part of the entertainment. Supper 
will be served from 6 to 7 o'clock, 
Then bring -wrf»nd the tombolas will be drawn for 
during the evening. • 
• • a 



Pro Patria W.A. 

All members of the Women s Aux- 
iliary to Pro Patria Branch' Cana- 
dian Legion, are requested to meet 
at the Mayors' Orove. Beacon Hill 
Park, today, at 2 45 pm„ to attend 
the Vimy Memorial service. 

a . a • 



To make clover leaf rolls, when 
your dough is light, break off .a, 
piece equal to amount used for one 
ordinary roll. Divide it Into three 
equal parts, shape each part Into 
a small ball. Plar* the three balls 
In a muffin tin brush over with 
melted butter and let rise When 
doubled ^in bulk, bake fifteen min- 
utes in a hot oven i400 degrees T.). 



Ail oversea* nursing sisters are re- 
quested to meet at the Nurses' Home, 
St. Josephs Hospital, today at J 30 



p m to attend thp drumhead Mfftasj 
in BeaCOft TIU1 Park. Medals are to 
be worn. 

a a a 

>t. John « W \ 

A garden party under the aus- 
pices of St. John* W A. seniors a... 
be held at the home of Mrs J. H 
Gillespie. "Wlndyhs:igh ' Fairfield 
Road, on % Wednesday from 3 to 
5 30 pm. 




Father — "Oit yer Jacket 
young raon, an' come wl' 
""Jock— Yer no goln* to 
art ye. father? 

Father— "I am that; didna I tell 
ye this momuV that I d settle wl 
ye for yer bad behavior?" 

Jock— "Ay. but I thought it was 
onlv a joke like whin ve teJt the 
grocer ye d settle srt' 



FOSTER'S 




$ 



10 



•ill hold any cost of 
your Mlfcrion xt free 
storage until F*ll Take 
advantage of our 
plan of payment. 



Fur Store 




NOW. 1 



W.th fur co»ts soaring you don't have to be J mathematician to 

prices. Lapin. seal, caracul . . . here they are, marked down to 
a level you will never see again . . . tvtry one carrying tht itamp 
of fin* workmanship, smart style and made from choicest pelts. 




Caracul Pa* CoaM and Swag 
gert In black, brown, grey 

$39.50 



There's Quality in Every Coat at Foster's 




A E Alexandor, Prop 



Phone E 2514 



753 Yates Street 




yW ,n ^ m - 



rr 



8 



THE RAILY COLO 



NIST. VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1936 




•- --- ■ — V— 

Social Activities and Notes of Personal Interest fj 



f 



% ^^^^^ i 

Metropolitan Church Is She's Two Years Old Today 
Scene of Quiet Wedding 



A pretty wedding was solemnized 



In Metropolitan United Church yes- 
terday afternoon at 2 30 o'clock. 
Rev. E. P. Church officiating, when 
Jean Elizabeth, youngest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Hurst, 1055 
Princess Avenue, became the bride 
of Mr. Thomas Hastings Carson, 
eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. 
Carson, of Toronto. Those present 
•included relatives and a few in- 
timate friends. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
the bride was a dainty figure as 
she walked up the aisle to the 
strains of The Bridal Chorus," 
played by Mr. Edward Parsons, ac- 
companied at the organ by her 
sister, Miss Doreen Hurst. She wore 
a simple floor-length kown of white 
satin, with a yoke and sleeves of 
lsvce, and a veil of embroidered net, 
confined to her head with a wreath 
of orange blossoms, and carried an 
arm bouquet of Johanjja Hill roses 
and white sweet peas. 

The bridesmaid was gowned in 
pule green net, wore a smart white 
hat. and carried a bouquet of 
Columbia roses and pink snap- 
dragons. Mr. Victor Holman was 
best man. 

As the register was being signed. 
Mr. A. Palmer sarin "I Love You 
Truly." 

HGVnOM HELD 
A reception 



afternoon boat for Seattle, en route 
to Portland, the bride traveling in 
a smart navy blue outfit, with 
matching accessories, md on their 
return they will make their home in 
Esquimau. Mrs. Constantine, of 
Seattle, was a guest at the wed- 
ding 



At the Hotels 



service at the home of the bride's 
parents. In a floral setting of pink 



DOMINION 

Captain C. A. Learmouth. Miss E 
Whaley and Miss O. Leech. Mr. P. 
C. Prltchard, Vancouver; Miss A. 
Holloway. MLss E. MiUap and Miss 
E. Anderson. Chlpman; Mr. J. K. 
Pinlason, Ottawa: Misses M. and J. 
McKay, Aberdeen; Mr and Mrs. F. 
Snyder, Port Angeles; Mr and Mrs. 
E. E. Heagle, Calgary , Mr. and Mrs. 
S Evans, Vancouver; Misses T. Ste- 
phans, Mr. Westergard. Seattle; Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Lewis, San Francisco; 
Mr. W. J. Lewis, Port Townsend; 
Mr. E. L. Cason, Portland; Mr. and 
Mrs. O. W. Sargent, Florence; Mr. 
A. Sundenall and E. Starner. Seat- 
tle; Mr. and Mrs B. Billings, Fresno; 
Mr. D. B. McKillop. Victoria; Mr. L 
Tansky, Vancouver; Miss E. Stib- 
bins. Palm Beach; Mr. and Mrs W. 
J Woodruff. Mr. and Mrs. H. J. 
Hayea. 8eattle; Miss M. Russell. Los 
Angeles; Mrs C. Quinney, Orefoft; 
Mrs. W W Koskela, Mrs. L. Bona- 
fous, Reno; Mr. and Mrs. S. Fraser. 



and white, duriimt which, bride and t San F:.t;. j>lq: Mis* E. Warater. 



groom stood beneath an arch dec- 
orated with white streamers, glad- 
ioli and gypsophUa. from which was 
suspended a large white bell. 

Mrs. Hurst wore a dress of flower- 
ed silk and a white hat. and Mrs. 
Carson, who Is visiting in Victoria 
for the wedding, was .n a pale blue 
chiffon gown, trimmed with match- 
ing fur, and wore a pale blue toque. 
Corsage bouquets of Ophelia roses 
and swansonia completed their en- 
sembles. 

Pink and white sweet peas In 
crystal and silver vases, and tall 
pink tapers In silver holders, 
adorned the refreshment table, 
which was centred with a handsome 
two-tiered cake. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carson left on the 



Brooklyn; Miss M. Smith and party. 
Reno; Miss L. Mendenhall and Miss 
C. Shevllng. Seattle; Mrs. Murry 
and Mrs. Tweedy, Alberni; Mrs. F. 
Chlttlck. Seattle; Mrs Harding and 
party. Mrs'. J. J. Ollmon, Mrs. J. 
Ball and son, Mrs W. W. Huestis. 
Vancouver; Miss J. McMillan, Kam- 
loops; Mr. and Mrs K. H Orr. Ed- 
monton; Miss A. Thompson, Mrs 
Reid, Kelowna; MLss F. Schultz. 
Miss S. Hobson. Oregon; Mr. and 
Mrs. Bourdan. Vancouver; Miss O. 
L. ailllson. Mr. and Mrs Flinn, 
Lethbrldge; Mr and Mrs Hahn, 
Arizona. 




gate, Hythe] Dover and Canterbury, 
will return to her home this after- 
noon. On he r way home she visited 
at Toronto and Winnipeg. 

• • • • 
Leaves for Qualicum 

After spending the past week in 
Vancouver Mrs. J. J. Moore, 821 
Princess Avenue returned to her 
home at the end of last week and 
has now left to spend this week 
with her daughter, Mrs. Fred 
Rockett, at Qualicum Beach. 

• • • 
Returns From Duncan 

Mrs. M. E. Mainguy. of La Jolla, 
California, who has been visiting in 
Duncan for several weeks, has re- 
turned to Victoria and is staying 
with her son-in-law and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Barber-Starkey, 
Goldsmith Street. 

• .* • 
Here for Summer 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald McKay, of 
Hastings, Nebraska, have taken up 
residence at the Dunelm Apart - 
] ments for the Summer. Mrs. Mc- 
i Kay is a cousin of the Misses Rus- 
j sell, 27 Boyd Street, and has been 
a frequent visitor here. 

• • • 

Leave for Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovett K Fraser, of 
Lakeport, California, and Miss-Ethel 
Shaul, of Berkeley, left for home 
yesterday, after spending the past 
few days in Victoria as guests of 
Mrs. J. K Fraser and Mrs. J. M. 
Murdoch, Cook Street. j~ 

Back From Holiday 

Mrs. W. J Morrow. Mrs. W. W 
Laing and Mrs. M. Elliott have re- 
turned to their respective home* In i 
the city after a delightful holiday ! 
spent at KliLsa Lodge, Sproat Lake, ! 
and Forbes' Landing. 




aitk 



you wart to pay 



COATS, DRESSES AND SUITS 

at Spectacular Reductions 



W INDKK.MEKK 

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Kanters, 



Summer Coats 

to Clear at $9.89 

No matter whit they cost. w* 
■Imply h«v* to »*ll every one befnre 
the Pull co*.t» »rrlv* You cm 
h»v* your rholr* in »ny color •nd 
wr.it, for only H9.M9 

The Plume Shop 




Her mirrored reflection making her appear a,™., iw.n, TaUe „ olitUv < ot u g e 

Shirley Joan Elliott poses for her portrait. She is the daughter of j 
Mr. and Mrs. Syd Elliott. Irving Koad. and granddaughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Dunn. Central Park Apartments and of Mrs. M. A. Elliott, 
Irving Road. Shirley is two years old today. 



Social and Personal 



CACTI S IN LONDON 



LONDON <•). — Cactus growing Is 
on the Increase in London, as Indi- 
cated at a recent exhibition It is 
a convenient form of gardening for 
people who live in flats. 



Kanters, Reno, Nev.; Miss Jenness 
L. Hudson. Miss E. N. Baber. Miss 
L. Regan, Reno. Nev.; Miss Ruth 
Neelands, Forest. Ont.; Miss May 
Neelands, Sarnla. Ont.; Mr. N. A. 
Craddock, Saskatoon; Mr. and Mrs. 
H. F. Scudamore, We.st Saanich; Mr. 
and Mrs. R. E. Strassburger, Seattle; 
Miss Mary C. Neely, Miss Jessie 
Kennedy, MLss Pat Kennedy, Winni- 
peg; Mrs. J. W. O'Brien, Cleveland. 
Ohio; Muss M. Gannan, Bloomfield. 
N.J.; Mr. B. Weed, Sanalito. Cal ; 
Mr. A. C. Olney, Kentfield. Cal.; 
Miss A. McLachlan. Calgary; Muss 
M. McLennan. Vancouver. Mr. and 
Mrs. G. R. Dempsay, Miss E Hagen, 
Mr.s M Blomlle, Mrs. Francis Evans. 
Mrs Frederick S. Brlnton and two Tra n osU .„ 
daughters, Seattle. 



Mim i ll.ux ens Shower 

A miscellaneous shower was held 
recently at the home of Mrs. A. G. 
Wagg. 1809 Chambers Street, when 
she and Mrs. C. Holman entertained 
in honor of Mrs. Howard Holman, 
formerly Olive Piatt. The gifts 
were concealed In a sriver and white 
tub and were presented by Elaine 
and Lois Masslck. Lois Massick 
also presented the bride with a 
bouquet of rose gladioli. The table 
was decorated In silver and while 
with streamers hanging from the 
chandelier, and was centred with a 
basket of carnations and a minia- 
ture bride and groom. Oames were 
played. The invited guests were 
Mesdames P. Piatt. S. Holman, W. 
Ayton, E. J. Monk. L. Wagg. Cun- 
Itff, McMillan. D. Duncan. J. Smart, 
Sr.; J. Smart. Jr : H. Church, G. 
Ma.s.sick. Cosh. V Marsh. F. Brown. 
Misses E. Florence. L. Harrison. M 
Wagg. M. Burnett, J. Smart, C. 
Best and J Drysdale. 



Beach Drive. About the end of 
August she will be joined by her 
husband, and, after he has had a 
short holiday here, will return to 
the East with him. 

i * • 



and Mrs. G. P. Wor.sley. who 
have been staying at the Small 
Charming Hotel, are leaving next 
Wednesday for Qualicum, where 
they have taken a cottage for a 
month. 

. . • 
Here From Vancouver 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ross, of Van- 
couver, have come over to Victoria 
to spend two weeks' holiday here 
with Mrs. Ross' parents. Mr. and 
Mrs. P A. Crump, of Beach Drive. 

• • .,• 
\t SAltspring Island 

Miss Winnlfred Brown, of Rocky 

Point, is at present visiting her 



To Be M.iriicd Here 

The marriage of Muriel Amy grandmother. Mrs. M. McFadden, of ( I 
(Pat», second daughter of Mrs. SaltS p rln g island. She will be on 
Maud Hall and the late Mr. James 
Hall, of 2555 Prior Street, to Mr. 
Frank Howland. youngest son of 
Mrs. E. Howland. 1128 Orant' Street, 
will take place on Monday evening, 
August 31. 



These are the better type of gar- 
ments it pays to buy . . . giving 
you infinitely more satisfaction be- 
cause of their superior styling, work- 
manship and materials. We're com- 
pelled to sacrifice them because our 
policy docs not permit us to carry 
over fashions from one season to 
another. Be sure to come in and see 
for yourself how marvellously you 
can save in this big July Sale. 



New 
Tweed Coats 
for Fall 



Just Arrived! 




Here for Wedding 

Mrs. A. Constantine, of Seattle, 
who came to Victoria to attend the 
wedding of Miss Jean Hurst to Mr 
Thomas H. Carson, which took place 
yesterday afternoon at the Metro- 
politan Church, Ls the guest of her 
aunt,' Mrs. R. W. Hurst, of Bay 
Street, during her stay here. 




Vlrt.rl* 



T* M*k* ftaen far New ShlsmroU 
IV* Off** On* 

Hupmobile "8" Sedan 

Brand New — Bli B><1iirtlnn In Trie* 
« ' nn Vnur ('•*■ C»r 

MASTERS MOTOR CO , LTD 



SOS f ATIS NT 



rilONK K M4I 




Empire 7155 

DRY CLEANING. DYEING 



BSVI BUY 

Mr and Mrs. Wilson and son, 
Gean H. Wilson, San Diego ; Mr. 
and Mrs. A. T. Lowe. L. Llsevick. 
Zaporonick. Pearl Saskiw. Mrs. 
Chapakki. Mr Chapalski, Hilda El- 
liott. Vancouver; Bill Lewis. Vic- 
toria; Ralf Nagley, 
Connard, Vancouver; 



Here From Winnipeg 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Collard and their 

daughter are guests of Mr and Mrs. 

Miss Bee Peacock was the guest Sa 2093 Crescrnt Road 

of honor at a tea given recently by . • . 

Mrs. P Taylor. 2239 Dalhousle Expected Today * 

Street. The tea table was centred Mrs Bernard Lefevre. who for the 

with a rose bowl of red carnations, p as t six months has been visiting 

in front of which stood a miniature irlends in London, and also at Mar- 
bride and groom. Following the 



the lslantt for the next two weeks. 

• • • 
Sailed Yesterday 

MLss Dorothea Sheret. of 217 Gov- 
ernment Street, sailed last evening : 
aboard the Ss. Empress of Japan on | 
a holiday trip to the Hawaiian 
Islands. 

• • • 
Gone to Shawnigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Baker and 
fnmily. of Monterey Avenue, have i 
taken Miss Alma Russell's cottage, 
"Mlnni-Wa-Wa," Shawnigan Lake. | 
for the rest of the Summer. 

• • • 
Holiday on Mainland 

Mrs. Woulfe Hicks and Muss Fran- 
ces Fraser have gone to Vancouver 
to spend a holiday as the guests of 
MLss Eraser's cousin, Miss Jane 
Doyle 

• • • 
Visitor From Chicago 

Mr W E Hill. of. Gordon Head 
Ls enjoying a vLsit from his sister, 




121? DOI «.i \^ 
STKKKT 



LIMITED 
lo Wear and Fl 



tea. Miss Peacock was presented 
with a chromium-plated waffle iron 
Seattle; Leo ! by little Miss Lorna Davia__Those 
Mm. E. O. I invited were Mesdames George Wil- 



Slmmons, Doris Simmons. Edmon- 1 hamsnn. M. Nlcol, E. Lacey. L. E. 
ton; Mr. and Mrs. W. T. McDonald. Leonard, t. McCallum, D. Taylor. 
Mrs. Cranstrom. Misses Mayhood p. Harris. J. Naysmith. J. Eastwood, 
and C*lct, Vancouver; Mr. arid Mrs W Martlndale. S. Davis and E. Har- 
John 8cheercr, Seattle; Mrs. C. M. rts; Ml!ws E. Telford. L. Thompson. 



SELBY'S 

Arch-Preserver 
Shoes 

See the Smart New 
Styles 

CATHCART'S 

1208 Douglas Street 



Lumer. Marjorie Lumer, W. Vancou- 
ver; Mrs E Shephard. Mrs. L. 
Adams, Saskatoon; Mr. and Mrs 
Floyd Werner and family. Great 
Falls. Mont.; Mrs. and MLss Elsie 
Morton, Vancouver; M/s. D. Wtt" 
UMBWSJs, Victoria; T. Halyhurst, Van- 
couver; Mrs. Van Day, Chicago, 111.; 
Mr. and Mrs. Burqutsi, Paul Bur- 
quLst. Vancouver; Mnj. H. 8miley. 
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. R. L. 
■MM Wapoto, Wash ; Mis* E M 
Adams. Saskatoon. Sask. 



Little Stories for Bedtime 

The Merry Little Breezes Do Good Deeds 

Fly THORNTON VV. BURGESS 



MCDONALD'S 

*W Men*. ST m V»TfH «.T 

R «ltl l. I'll 

••wr MIA ro« UM" 

MONnAT »\n TVKSDA1 I »s|| (mi 

« \nnx stk ui s 
svowri-AKK r*sTRV flora in.. 

9*t Mrk !."»«• 

KOM\S Ml M H.-k„. I-...M. , m.I 

I Kh*«. I*r** pkt J<»< 
OOVTCB, s»i...h. i lb. (in 
MM M I i \s \DI W VKLVEKTA «nit 

oi.n rN<i|.i«H ctKRsi ' ih »si. 
ri rr»R rir.i orate, ;\ ihv fm- 

■H-TTrR. Fr»«h « ,,,m-r.. ;t Ih. 7i»„ 

<R»llrf Orrlft. QMN «rrr»lrri> 
n»I.IVF.RY — W» DrlKrr «nv»h*r* la 
ih* (Ma »r s.harb. 



OLSNBMIKL 

Mr and Mrs. M A Baldwin, Miss 
Kathedne Collins. San Francisco; 
Mr and Mrs. Dounlas Shirley and 
children, Santa Paula, Calif ; Miss 
Clar"a Sonka. Lemon Orove. Calif ; 
Miss Alice Sucdin. Mr. and Mrs E 
N. Curtis and dauRhter. San Dieito. 
Calif.; Miss M. A. Sexton, Sacra- 
mento, Calif.; Misses Mary Jo Kim- 
ball, Evelyn Walton. Fresno. Calif.; 
Musses J and L. Wismer, Miss Min- 
nie DyffeLs, Hillsboro. Ore : Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward G. Hltt. Puyallup. 
Wash; Mr. and Mrs. A. PawUger, 
Nevv York; Mlsa J. Turton. England 



Dl VONSHimi not HI 

Mrs E. Blunt and daiiKlitcrs, 
Daphne and Grace. Santa Barbara. 
Mrs D Seurlel, Vancouver, M -s 
Phyllis M. Kent. Massett. QCI; 
Mrs. L. J. M Holland, St Peters- 
burn. Fla ; Mrt. H W FlanburRh. 
Seattle; Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Hooval. 
Long Beach; Mrs Dalrymple Tay- 
lor. Maple Bay; Mrs J. H- Row- 
lands and family, Calgary. Captain 
and Mrs Bridge. Nanaimo; Mr. and 
Mrs L F Kn.vak. Los Angeles, Mrs 
John IngltA. Vancouver. 



R. Foster, Sharleen Martlndale. 
Lorna Davis and A. Taylor. 

• • • 

Thratrr Party 

The members of tlie Que - Alex 
GUIs' Club held a delightful tin SiM 
l party on Friday evening, followed 
I by supper. The tables were artis- 
tically arranged with blooms In thel 
club colors of blue and gold. The| 
members present were: Mrs. Wil- 
liams. Mrs. Harri.s. fcffl Ycimaiis 
and Mioses A. Reid, L. L.urd, M 
Laud, K Buni'-LI. T. Gne:/, C. 
Schmelz. V. Kerslake. M M ml*, H. 
Jacques. H. Atack, J. McAllister. S, 
McAllister and M Muir The MXl 
meeting will be held at the home 
of Mrs. M. Williams. Second M 
on August 28 

• • • 
Make Presentation 

fttlsa Helen' Bolt entertained the. 
members of her sewing club and 
other friends recently at her home, 
M Michigan Street. After refrcstu 
ments were served from a daintily 
appointed table, a surprise pp . r.- 
tatlon was made to the bpttesi, 
whose marriage will take place the 



"Jum to do some little kindness— 
Tliat is all we ask; 
Just to be of Isome small service . 
U our dally! task ' 

Everv mornirtg when Old Mother 
West Wind cohies down from the 
Purple Hills ahd shakes her clul- 
dren. the Merrjy Little Brec/es, out 
or her big barf to play all day on 
the Green Meadows while she 
spends the dav doing her share In 
the work of the Great World, they 
sing that little song while they 
dM I the very merriest kind of a 
dance Then off they race to see 
What they can find to do for others 
They never expect to do» a great 
deed Thcv are quite content t« do 
little deeds, for Old Mother West 
Wind taught them a long time a^o 
that, life is made up mostly of little 
deeds. 




Mrs. Margaret Woodrome, of Chi- 
cago. Illinois. 

• • • 

\,sitins Here 

Miss Kathleen Hughes. M.A., of 
Moose Jaw High School staff, is 
visiting Miss Isobel Barnes, 2089 
Granite Street. 

Is in Hospital 

As the result""of a painful acci- 
dent suffered a few days ago, Mrs 
T. A. Richard ls a patient in 8t. 
Joseph s Hospital. 

• • • 
To Live in Knit land 

Mrs Oliver Hunt and her win. 
Peter, will leave today for Montreal 
en route to England, where they 
Intend lo make their home. 

• * • 
1<> l ive in Duncan 

Mrs. Eva Walker. 732 Yat/-s Street, 
is leaving to take up residen-e in 
Duncan. 



solation, Miss CuthberLson and Mr 
J. Nicholson. Refreshments were 
served at the close of the game, the 
hostesses for the evening being Mrs 
J Reid. Mrs. A. D. Grieve. Mrs. H. 
LangrLsh and Mrs. B. Lock. 



"Jones Is the finest salesman I 
know. Yesterday he sold Mrs Blank 
two do/en stair-carpet rods " 

"That doesn't sound very clever 
to me." 

Ah. but you dont know Mrs. 
Blank She lives in a bungalow'* 



He Threw I p His Head and unified 



been a great ri^al to do. They had 
blown away a cloud of flies which 
had been bothering Bossy the Cow. 
Tin y had warned Peter Rabbit that 
Reddv Fox *a.s trying to steal up 
behind him. They had carried the 
scent of Old Man Covot* to Johnny 
latter end of August The guests i chuck just ln time for Jolyany to 



known anything but kiiulnes-, it was 
terrible He kept hoping and hoping 
, that Jne would be able to get away. 
Tins particular dav there hadn t ^ ^ h>vc tcrnb i e naws ol 

Black PUMO land on him at the very 



were Mrs.. Hugh La m e nt . - Mrs H~ 

( , Savllle.' and Misses Eileen Mc- 
pherson. Oladvs Townsend. Mabel 
Oilllland. Evelyn Smith. Eleanor 



dive into his house Then they 
hadn't found much of anvthing to 



last minute. 

The Merry Little Breezes felt ter- 
riblv. Thcv blew angrily in Black 
Pussy's face, but of cdurse Black 
Pussy didn't mind this at all. Tin v 
trfed to find dust to blow in her face 
so she couldn't see. and thus -give 
Mite a chance to hide, but there was 
no dust in the Lone Little Path 



Wimk iNSTircnrrs 



ROt M OAR 

The fortnightly card party of the 
Royal Oak Women's Institute was 
held on Thursday evening, when 
prizes were won by the following 
First lady, Mrs W.. Heal; first, gen- 
tleman. Mr J. G. Nicholson; second 
lady, Mrs H Langrlsh; second gen- 
tleman, Mr. D. Anderson, and con- 



UNDINE 

THI NIW 
PERMANENT 
W A V I 



It ii a grind welcome our customers have given UNDIN1. No 
wonder. L'NDINE is not just *n improvement in permanent 
waving. It s an entirely new principle . . . with no wirts, no tU$ 
Irnii), no harmful ehemnah. I'NDINE if cool, comfortable snd 
QUK K-only one to two snd s half minutes of scmil hestm^ time. 
You II msrvel. too. st its simplicity ... snd you II lore the soft, 
durable wave it sffords you. Phone now for s new snd thrilling 
UNDINE permanent. 

THE "BOB" SHOP 




View Stf««t 



G7BJ1 



Mr ll.llon ht» IRSJH » p«.l «r»S*»t» rnvt.r In H-H - I* 
v ih . I n»1lr.» m.'hln* 



I YOUR PRINTING 



do but to plav anrl hive a |Md time (|iry ^ {or , nRl poor ^ 



ecnrrallv. Tliat is what thev were 



Cudllp. Grace Copas. Eleanor Grnpp. rtoini{ whpn thf . v i„-,ppened to race 
Kathleen Nesbitt and Dto( hy dnwn tno ^ Lit :Ie" Path just as 
Mountain. Black Pussy sprang on little Mi'e. 

. • * • ' the runawav babv of Dannv Meadow 



MORE VICTORIES 
FOR Nu LIFE 

AT THR nr\C*M DOO SHOW 

1. Be»t t5n« ln Snow t. Emht Br.t 
of Brtedi. I, M*n» nr«t,»ii<l Second 
Award* want to lh« do*t rrom kennel. 
u*ina Nn un 



R*r Sal* »• Towr Dr*t«l.t P 
irtwifnt «t<w* 




RECLUSE DISCOVERED 
STARVING TO DEATH 
AT PORT ANGELES 



Tea for \isitors 

Miss Gwendoline Harpo 1020 
Bank Street, entertained at the tea 
hour yesterday in honor of a num- 
ber of visiting music teachers The 
guests of honor Included Mrs. Agnes 
Kel.sev. Miss Minnie Boyd. MUM 



Mouse. The Merry Little Bree/es 
eUdB't know who he was. You see, 
•.hey didn't know that Dannv 
Meadow Mouse had any babies In 
fact, they didn t. even know that 
Dnnnv and Nanr.v had a home to- 
gerTieT In the mttrrtle' of the nlle of 



Lyla Brown and Miss Fergussen. all , 0 ]{j corn stalks on the >dge of 



PORT ANGELES. July 25 (^> — 
An elderly recluse, found starving to 
death ln hLs home here while he 
possessed 110.000 ln cash, and sav- 
ings, was reported recovering at a 
jhoapital today. Officials did not re- 
veal the man's hlme 

Neighbors, falling to see him about 
the house, notified county health 
officers, »ho were authorized lo 
break Into the premises 
Dr J L Mcradden. acting 



of Winnipeg; MLss McKav ' Find- 
later >. and MisaKnowlden (Reglnai. 
Mtss Harper was assisted by her 
i;i<»ther and Mrs Mannn Ma<-f»<»\- 
ern. who poured tea. Other guests 

profession in Victoria 

Saskal. hewan Visitors 

Mr and Mrs J Olazebrooke, who 
attended the Shrine convention In 
Seattle, last week, are visiting MYs 
H. A. Olles. at Boleskine Road, be- 
fore returning to t.heir home *t» 
Biggar, 8ask . via Prince Rupert 
Mr. J.jpia/ebrooke served for four 
vears as Councillor and for two 
Biggar 



Farmer Brow n ■ corn field, which 
shows how well Dannv had kept his 
secret. 

But though the 'Merrv Little 



helpless little Meadow Mou.se? Just 
then one of-~*hem spied something 
not Jar away. It was a dog, a little 
blsrk and white dog. He was a 
stranger "on the Green Meadows. 
Right away the Merrv Little Breezes 
wondered if he liked to chase cats, 
as some dogs do. It w as worth find- 
ing out. anyway. If it had been 
Bow-er the Hound they wouldn't 
have bothered,. hecau*e they know 
that Bowser and Black Pussy are 
very good friends. But with this 
| stranger dog it might be different 
Right away some of them hurried 
down to where he was and they car- 
, ncd with them a little of the .scent 



Is an Important Factor in 
Your Business 



WE PRODUCE A QUALITY OF WORK THAT WILL ADD 
CREDIT TO YOUR FIRM WHETHER IT IS 



Breezes didn t know who llfle M,:e Q{ g;,,^ p u », v He threw up his 
was, til. \ d;d Know'tliat he was in nf>ad and 5m f»ed Then he softly 

tiptoed up to the Lone Little Path 
in the * direction from which that 
let little Mite RmeU of C!U came B i ack pwsjf was 



terrible tr 
wanted lo 
Black Pussy would 



and right away 1 they 
>methhig to help him 



STATIONERY 
OFFICE BLANKS or 
MATTER FOR MAILING 



IK mill *<«»|0 mm v,.».v 

ed lo vr * r * as mavor in Bis 
. . . 
| Toronto Visitor* 

health Mrs W. Lngan.-of> 
her 
I mo 



'a'ric'.a. 



Toronto. « ith 
Ls visHing her 



think that she had let hint go She Ju , t aboiJt ^ spring ^ uttle Miie 
wou'.d even turn her head away. on ^ mn:r wnf>n th( . re wa s a sharp 
LitUt Mite would start to run. and beiar.d her She forgot all 

then, just as he would reach the about Uu n . Mite„ ftb« whirled about 
edw of the tall grass, down would ^ {ace ^ dog. hertail several times 
rome her paws on him making htm M blg M usual Sne splt an d growled 
squeak with Oain and fright. But and shnwrfi a ;i nr r claws 
alw»yi she took care not- 1» hurt|-. Run! . Run md hide!" whispered 
him so that he couldn t nm It was , hp MrrTV Ll .. ; , n, w , f , , n li r t W- 
great f in for Black Pvtssy At least : MltP Anrt np m(i 

<he acted as if she thought so But 

to Uttle Mite, prwjrmrne Mite, who Next Story— Third Adventure of 



officer, .said under-nourlshment sp 

parently caused the man s collapse. | mother-in-law, Mrs John A Logan, j never before ifi all his short life had Uttle Mite." 



,-.l 



THE COLONIST BIsTSJr" 1 

Printing • Lithographing * Bookbinding • Engraving 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH^ 



ii 1 i • 




» , 




THE DAIlV COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, IU.Y 26, \936 

- ' 



N 



// 



OW . . . Open for Your Inspection . . . 

"The Bay's" 

HOME OF TODAY" 



170 BEACH DRIVE 

"The Bay" has completely furnished the above modern home, located at 170 Beach 
Drive 'corner Beach Drive and Victoria Avenue), and invites your inspection. 

Open Daily From 3 to 5 and 7 to 9:30 in the Evenings, Except Sunday. 

MONDAY, JULY 27, TO SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 

(Take Blue Line Shoal Bay Bus) 

'The Bay's" Home of Today" was furnished for the purpose of demonstrating to 
Victoria people how charming and practical a modern home can be. 

A home that any family would be proud to own Designed not ostentatiously, but 
tastefully and comfortably. Decorated with an eye to the modern needs and luxuries 
of the average size family. 

BE SURE TO VISIT THIS HOME— IT IS A TRIUMPH 
OF BEAUTY AND GOOD TASTE 

ADMISSION FREE 
(Children Admitted Only When Accompanied by Parents or Guardians). 

This Home Was Built by E S. Cross, Contractor, in Association With 
J. S. Heal, Builders of Homes With Originality. 



Seven Thousand 
Students Ready 
For High School 



Swimming and Meals 



Hrtlth Bnr\e ot tha C»n«di»n Mi-<llc«i 
Auoclttlon «nd Ufe Iniuranca 
In C»nad». 



busy breaking down the lood into |( he third complication -the lack of 



Why do we always nay "Don t 
awim after meaU." Small boy* — 
and girls, too— who take to water 
like a fly does to su*ar are thor- 
oughly convinced that whoever 
coined that warning should be re- 
garded as Public Enemy No. 1 of all 
oncoming generation*. 

After all. however, a view that has 
persisted for tmrtttredt and probably 
thousands of years must have some 
logic behind it. And it has. too- 
sound physiological reasons. 

For some three hours after a meal 



other chemical rompounds better 
suited for absorption into the blood 
stream and then for storage in the 
hver, muscles and elsewhere. 

The blood flow u to i consider- 
able extent diverted to the gastro- 
intc>t:nal tract for this purpose. 
That is why we feel drowsy after a 
heavy meal. 

Now 6WlmmtnK Is a strenuous 
exercise. It sends blood surging to 
the muscles. The water is com- 
paratively, cool. too. so that blood 
rushes to the skin to warm the body 
surface. 

That means the blood would be 
called upon to fare two rmergeney 
calls— or really three. And none 
would be adequately dealt with. 

The digestion would suffer and 



our stomach and upper Intestine are , the swimmer would feel chflly But 






JOIN the Hudson s Bay 

Company Employees Picnic 

Wednesday, July 29, at 2 P.M. 

The Beaver Club 'Hudson's Bay Employees' will leave the 
C P R whart on the Princess Elixabeth, to sail for Port 
Angeles, where they will hold their ANNUAL PICNIC 

They extend a cordial invitation to all their friends and 
customers to join them. 

• h_ i — — i. 

THE PROGRAMME 

A tint iportt pfOo.ramm« hat b««n arranged and* will tikt placa it fh« 
Port Ang*l«* High School ground* upon arn.jl 

A special four will h# ma<J« to fht Olympic Hot Spring*, ticket* 60c rtfurn 
t.m« will h* »llow»d for bathing'. 

Part ot fha US Na»y »»W be lt Port Angclt* and jrrirtgtmtnr* ha»t b«an 
miHf for intptction tonrv 

Lunch »tll b« »fr»td »t tht Elk* Club from 5 to 6 p m if I ch«rg« of 30c 

A limited numb«r of ticktt* jr« available ft SI 25 r»turn ch«M'«n from 
5 to 12 vtar», K j It tm *"d "»jv b« procurtd at "Tho lay" 
OHk». M»i»a«m# Floor 



'LEASE MAKE HESERVATIONS EARLY 



blood to the muscles might have a 
much more serious consequence, for 
the danger of cramps would be in- 
creased. And cramps In deep water, 
particularly when the shore is com- 
paratively deserted at or after meal- 
tune, may be disastrous. 

The wiser plan Is to wait at least 
iin hour alter meaLs. By that time 
digestion wul be well under way. al- 
though still far from completed. If 
the meal has been a heavy one. a 
two-hour wait is much to be pre- 
ferred. 

By the same reasoning, on*- should 
not eat heavily immediately after 
coming In from a swim which has 
been either strenuous or in cold 
water. That may bring on cramps, 
too— but. in a different plao?. i 

If in a long race, or If exhausted! 
on coming out, the food -hould 
confined to readily absorbed stig 
articles which give maxlmiim energ 
yield with the least digestive efTon 
Hyrupy fruit Juices, grape jUice. con 
syrup and' honey are to »e rerom 
mended. 



Questions concerning health, ad- 
dressed to the Canadian Medical 
Association, 184 College Street. To- 
ronto, will be answered personally 
by letter. 



How It Started 



By JEAN NEWTON 



I 



but. rum 

"Blue funk" i s an interesting 
mixed mct.iplvM- with whow mean- 
ing we are all familiar, but whose 
origin is obscure 

As ail ol us have observed, the 
word 'blue'' is regularly used ftg- 
unrn u rr ' t ir H E *, 1 WW 'a u e iso n af- 
fected by discomfort, anxiety or de- 
pre.Wd spirits— a practice which has 
a physiological basis in the fact that 
afteT the body is struck a blow, or 
when a person suffers from cold or 
alarm, the skin becomes livid, 
leaden -colored or bluelsh. 

.'Punk'' is possibly from the 
Flemish "fonk" connoting", among 
other things, smoke, tear and nn-n 
Blue f unk, " therefore, ts a legiti- 
mate affinity ol words, which to- 
gether make a natural idiom. 



Continued from Pace 1 

District 3 — Frederick Reginald 
Hole, Walter Moberly School. Van- 
couver. 484 marks 

District 4— Mary Janet Handling. 
Queen Mary School, North Vancou- 
ver, 543 marks. 

District 5— Hugh Hawking Trertse. 
Pitt Meadows School. 524 marks. 

District 6— Irene Frances Smith, 
Balmoral School. 493 marks. 

District 7— Ada Elizabeth Littler, 
Blakeburn School, 529 marks. 

District 8— Henry Douglas Oray, 
Trail School, 499 marks. 

District 9— Kenneth Donald Hes- 
ter, Creston School. 525 marks. 

District 10 — Albert Norman Black- 
hall. Borden Street School, Prince 
Rupert, 511 marks. 

The names only of candidates 
promoted by recommendation or 
passed upon examinations in June, 
as they affect pupils from Vancou- 
ver or Gulf Island points, were an- 
nounced by schools, as follows: 
VICTORIA CENTRE 

Boys' Central— Angus M. Ken- 
ning. 367; Raymond L. Campbell. 
360; Alfred R. Corner. 360. Pro- 
moted on recommendation: Donald 
E C. Anderson. Holland K. Bate, 
Thomas J Beesley, Roy F. Clements, 
John 8. Earle., David P. Evans. E. 
Lome Fuller, William A. Oale. E 
Raymond Gandy, John Oardiner, 
Alexander T. Holder. Donald L. 
Holstein-Rathlou, Eric J. Holyoak. 
Maurice A. Hundleby. David W. 
Lawrence, Norman L. Lucas, Donald 
J. Mackay, Lawrence P. Mann, 
Maurice G. Newberry, Oeorge Noda, 
Trevor Parfitt, Austin W. Paten- 
aude. Percy C. Pike. Darrel E. Pop- 
ham. Hugh D. Ramsay, John D. 
Sutton. Roy E. Taylor. Jamea W. 
Uren, Howard P. Wakelin, Wallace 
R. Williams, George P. Williamson. 

Sir James Douglas — Cecllle Pagett. 
386; A. James Plckford, 372; Rupert 
S. Bennett. 365; Florence M. Byatt. 
360; Thomas D. Carney, 360; Aleck 
V. D. Humphries, 360; Donald K. 
Smyth, 360. Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Odette- G. Alavoine, 
John H. Alexander. Betty M. Ander- 
son. Dorothy J. Anderson, Elnyth 
M. Anderson, Norman O. Anderson, 
John F. Armstrong. Ruth E. Bal- 
com. Irene M. Banks. Enid M. 
Browne. Richard B. Campbell, Wil- 
liam D. Clarke, Daryl L. Coates, 
Norman E. Coates. Frances M. 
Crockford. Jack H. Crookston. Ken- 
neth M Crookston. Jack A. Cum- 
mlng. Marlon O. Dey, Donald C. 
Diamond. Deirdre J. Diespecker, 
Betty L Doodson, Joan M. Duncan. 
Arthur Elworthy. Oeoffrey B. Fair- 
weather. Dorothy M. Fuller, Dan 
Oahan. Laura A. Oardom, Sheila C. 
Oraves. Robert O. Oreen, William 

A. Hamilton. Ethel M. Hole. Oerald 

B. Home. Eric L. Hughes. William 
A. Kissinger, Doris E. Lancaster. 
James R. Malone. Dorm K Menries, 
Barbara Moresby. Richard L. Mti- 
trle. Douglas Mackenzie. Dorothy 
M. Mcllwaine. Richard R Pooley. 
Barbara Purser. Tom O. Ravfuse. 
Eleanor J Rodger, Lome B Ross. 
Kathleen L Shute, Jack B Smith. 
Megan L. Thomas, Kenneth A 
Wills 

(mis' Central-Marion D Jones. 

408; Evelyn M Dopp. 386; Margaret 

J. Atkinson, 375; Norma Holdrtdge, 

360: Oloria K Horsford. 360: Mll- 

'tetine C. Hudlin. 360 Promoted on 

recommendation- Pearlc M. Alex- 
ander. Ruby E. E. Alexander, Daisy 

Chong. Jane Clague, Lilian M. 

Curtis. Mildred Dickinson. Frances 

Y. Doble. I. LouLse Eaton, Jean L. 

Fletcher. Ruth E Gardiner. Mar- 
garet Grlfun. Eleanor D Hourston, 

Veronica A. Hut ton, Merle C. John- 
ston. Julia R. Kent-Jones. Diana L 

Ker. Irene Lane, Bernice 8. Lerik. 

Grace Livingstone Doris P. Mann, 
I Gwendoline E. Martin. Mary C. 

Morton. Rita T. Nevard. P. Marv 
I Noakes. Kathleen If, Rav. Kathleen 

M. Rose. W. Faith Sinclair. V. 

Patricia Smlrl. Svlvj,. I> Stansbv. 

Nellie F. Thompson. Mary Tso. Er- 
mine L. Webber. 
George Jav — Eleanor E. Marr,-493' 

Hen Mar. 488; Charles H Oroth, 

412: E Manning Po'.wrs, 410; Eliza- 
beth J. Skinner. 408. James F. 

Thomas. 408. Ella A. Wiltshire. 38«; 

Herbert D. Tt.vlalr. 384; Doris E. 

Chan. 377; Roger Brayshaw. 372; 

Peter V. Henderson. 364; Darvl F 

Wille. 364; Allison R Shrewsbury. 

362; Emma D Chan. 300; Florence 

M. FoubLster. 3(50; Elizabeth Oroth. 

360; Edward Harrison. 360. Pro- 

omoted on recommendation: June 

P. Btckerrllke. M. Hilda Chalk. Ida 
^Ss Chan. Eva Coppock. Kenneth 

Dicks Robert M Donaldson. Ed 

ward W Drysdale. Mary Farr. 

Oeorge R Harvey. Oordon W 

Better, Roslna A. Kerr. Oeorge H. 

Le Bus. Duncan Lee. Hubert Lee, 

ley Leonard. Mary E Leung. Paul 

Leung. Alice N Linton. Norman O. 

Little, Audrev Lowe. Lily Lowe, Vic- 
toria Lyle, Dale A. Miller. Jean M. 

Miller Roy Miller. Eva Mtrrter F.<M Melville V. Painter. Beryl Saunders. 



The old shepherd's daughter was 
going to marry a town dweller. 

Wi.-hlng to make her father look 
smart when he gave her away at 
the Altar she got him to agree to 
wear a hat. 

The shepherd went to an outfit- 
ter and asked for-* hat. 

• What size, please ?" asked the 

know. 

' We ll try aix-and-a-half first," 
suggested the shopman. 

"Six-and-a-half be hanged." said 
the old chap, 'I wear a fifteen col- 
lar and I know me head be bigger 
than me neck." 



M. 8toba. Kathleen M. Stone. Paul 
C E. Wheadon. Walter Wilson. — ■ 
North Ward— Promotd on re- 
commendation: Gladys M. Argyle, 
Oeorgina A. Bailey. Ruth E. Boyd. 
Norman 8 Carter, Herbert Chan. 
Ilene L. Cousins. Ralph Dayton, 
Kithleen Dobbie. Marjorie B. J*. 
Earl, Philip Eng. Elizabeth L. 
Oreenhalgh, Andrew Greskiw. 
Eleanor J. Hampton. Vincent Henry. 
Thomas T Holta. William J. D. 
Hoskyn. Gordon L. Humber, Violet 
Joe. John E. J. Kenny. Constance 
T. Kitamura, Fumiko Kondo. Ed- 
ward Leavitt, Eva Lee. John H. Lee. 
M. Irene Lindley, John I. Logle, 
Dora M. H. Lowe, Ray Mah. Victor 
P Merriman. David D. Miller, Beat- 
rice H. Murray, Gladys McAnerln. 
Joan R. McDonald. Mary V. Mc- 
Donald. Ardlth T. Nakashima. 
David Pye. Flora H. Quan. Oeorge 
F Rawllngs.. Douglas 8am. Robert 
F. Saunders, Tsutomu 8himlzu. 
Frances A. E. Smith. Beatrice Tang, 
Jack Tang. Shrley E. Taylor. E. 
Hazel Thome. Beryl Vincent. Roy W. 
Vincent, Arthur O. Winter. Reg- 
inald Winter. Ethel Wong, Peter 
Wong, Mavis Y. Yuasa. 

Oaklands — E. Harllng Glover, 
360; Arthur E. Rhodes. 360. Pro- 
moted on recommendation: Phyllis 
A. Adams, Harold Anderson. Wln- 
rufred R. Anderton, Dorothy I. 
Barnes. Hilda M. Barnes. Frederick 
Hearpark, Edward Boothby. Bernice 
M. Butterls, Robert Caufleld. O. 
Margaret Day. Marguerite C. De 
Glrlamo. Kathleen A. Fowler, Muriel 
M. Gibson. Florence E. Orant, 
Walter H. Hamilton, Gladys N. Har- 
rison. Phyllis M Hick. W. George 
lLuwood N oreen M Keailev FVox- 
ence A. Kennedy. Arthur L. Kinney, 
Frances C. Knight, Joseph W. Lott, 
A. Dorothy McCoy, Gladys M. Mc- 
Mlllen, Elizabeth McNair. A Rupert 
C. Maysmith. Allan E. Merriman, 
William H. Mlchelln. Gilbert Lax- 
ton Milnes. Annie Newlands, John 
H Packford. Muriel E. Purdy. Betty 
R. Ritchie. James E Scott. William 
Smith. Clifford J. Stephenson. 
George H Stock. Charles F. Thomas. 
Duncan K Turner. Kathleen Van 
Mannan. Mabel E. Vlggers. Robert 
S Wallace. Margaret A. Ward. LU- 
lnn Waters. Gerald E. Wilson. 
Noreen F. Youngs. 

Quadra— Archie Y. Gillies. 406; 
Gloria A. F Parke. 360. Promoted 
on recommendation: A. Clement 
Aitken. f.erald C. Ashcroft. Phyllis 
Battle. Mary A. Callan. Edward B. 
Davis, J. Raymond C. Dawson, Dick 
J. Donaghy, D. James Dutot. Oeorge 
L. H. Folsy, Rupert B. Praser. Frank, 
H. Oale. Douglas A. Oeorge, Nor- 
man D. Heasllp. G. William Heater. 
Ellen Hogen. Clifford R. A. Howell. 
Hilda G Jacques. Betty M D Kir- 
•jy. Robert A Lansdell. David H. 
McAlpine, Walter Mertton. Robert 
Murray, Wendy M. Perkins. E. Mona 
Qu.ivle. M Clifford Rolfe. Harold O 
Severs, Laura Severs. Margaret H. 
Smith. George A. Walton, Doris A. 
Wells. June O Wells. K. Florence 
Woodruff. 

South Park— George A. Baxter, 
507; Evelyn O. Shcldrick. 435; Ron- 
ald V. R McDowell, 419; Leslie J. 
Kelly. 384; Donald L Hae. 381; Es- 
ther Arlow. 380; Gilbert W. Bur- 
rowes. 373; James R. Blyth. 372: 
Alfred Adamson. 300: Marcia Be irh. 
360; Stanley L. Clarke. 360; S David 
Preston. 360; Doris H. Rutherford. 
360; T. Josephine Wardell, 360. Pro- 
moted on recommendation: Robert 
C Aklns. William Allan. Edith M. 
Barr. Margaret U. Beattf^. Douglas 
Bevan-Pritchard. L. Peter Bourne. 
John Bradshaw. H. Rny Brldger. 
Agnes W. Chesworth. Llla E. Crow- 
ther. Valorle W Curtis, William A. 
Dakers. Jovce R. Dawes. Jean I. 
Dilwnrth. Lorraine E. Doull. Eva W. 
Eastwood. John Favor;. Helen R. 
Fei :u.<»on. Betty Harrtfv Hairv J 
Harvey. Mavis Henry, Robert Heriry, 
Dorothy L Hudson, ojladys Jon. s. 
Donald S Jupp. DavlrJ Ketehflson. 
Margaret Laughlln. Je|an E. Man- 
hHrd. C Winston Maynard. Keith ■ 
Moores. Mary M Mountain, C Oor- 
don Mnedonald. Jessie J McDowell, 
Roderick P McOraw. Elizabeth M_ 
MeLau*an. Frederick D MePher.son, 
Mary B. Newman. Walter R. Reld, 
E Elsie Ro.ss, Graeme W Scott, 
Margaret L Sedgley, SUnley R. Sel- 
liek. Olwvn F Smlrke, Elizabeth 
Southern, MaLsie Speck, Desmond A 
Spelman. Helen P. Wilson. Phyllis 
J. Wi^on. 

Victoria West - Ida L Lalonde. 
485. Grace Paterson. 475; Gordon F. 
Smith, 368 Promo'ed on recom- 
mendation Mergerite Ash. Eileen 
Bennett, Edmund Brown. Jack C. 
Bugslag. Muriel L Burrows. Ernest 
4 Cottle. Bernice Flude. Charles A. 
Goodwin. Marjory H Hill. G. Li la 
UTIlier, Thomas Jenkins. James E. 
Kearney:- Jean A Knowles. Lily 
Lea.sk. Donald F MacLachlan, 
Richard Marsh. Boyd H Moore. O, 



mendatlon: Ormond B. Alexander, 
Marjorie B. Bartram, Jean M. Beck- 
wlth, Godfrey H. Bird. Jack C. Bor- 
rowman. George L. Brodie, Joseph 

H. Buck. Paul B. Buckley. Jooelyn 
B. Cave. Thomas Clark. Arthur J 
Davey, John Depew, Ema L. .Pltz- 
slmmons, Josephine E. Flack. Thisbe 
E. Fletcher, Grace M. Fraser, Her- 
bert Fulthorp, Daphne J. GUI. Roger 
P. Harris. Susan L. Herchmer. Rich- 
ard D. Higgins. David A. Holden. 
Donald C. Holden, Docia P. Jones. 
Margaret C. Jukes. Yvonne 8. Jukes. 
Ian W. MacKenzle. Sheila M Mc- 
Cabe, Arthur R. Mauger. Edward 
Meredith, Ivy V. Miles, David J. 
Miller, James I. Murray, Anthony L. 
Oldfleld, George C. Parsons, John E 
Pearson, Iris O. Pembridge. T. Au- 
drey Ruffe 11, Kathleen 8. Scott. 
Vera K. Smith. Jack W. Squire. Ar- 
thur 8trang. Mack P. Sutton, Muriel 

I. Uhthoff, Thelma J. Wait, W. Oer- 
ald Watson, G. Patricia; Williams, 
John Wool cock. 

Willows— Isabella R. Marr, 485; 
Mary I. Enoch, 414; Atholl D. Suth- 
erland-Brown, .413. Promoted on 
recommendation: Thomas Albion, 
J. Lindsay Alexander, J Adrian 
Barltrop, Kenneth C. Beattie, Jef- 
frey D. Cragg, Florence O. Crom- 
well. Rene C. Davles. Diana Daw. 
Vernon B. Oilson, Leonard Godfrey. 
Percy F. Greenway. Sylvia M. Grist 
Margaret W Harris, Albert C. O. 
Holmes, Derek C R. Home. Room 
8 Jervis-Read, Gertrude Johnson. 
William E. Jones, Harold D. Ker- 
mode, Olivia A. Kraehling. Margaret* 
I. Leiper. Oeorge Lovttt. Donald M 
McKechnle, Donald 8. McLeod 
Sheila M. McLeod. Kenneth R. Mac- 
Nelll, James M. Miller, H Murray 
Mlnckler, R. Mae Mulr, Agnea 8 
Robertson, John E. Robinson. Nor- 
man A. Robinson. Francis^ J 
Scroggs. Cherie M. Snelllng. Donald 
W Smith, Daphne P. Thomas, Olive 
J. Turner, Margaret J. Vey. Dorothy 
M 




A sports writer tells that the 
anchor " of .i fwg-of-war team is 
rail) a man of stamina and 
rietermlna' ion H> certainly har.gs 
; 5 i on to the exuL - 



ESQUIMALT CENTRR 

Bsquimalt— Robert B. Stephen* 



garet M Young. 4M; Betty B. 
Locke, 360; Wlnnlfred J Smith, 360; 
Laura G. Stewart. 380. Promoted 
on recommendation: Barbara An- 
derson, Cedric Archer. Leslie H 
Bennetts, Muriel E. Bourne, Ronald 
8 Carter. Marjorie E. Clare, Gladys 
M. Clements, James Codvllle, Edgar 
A. Cookman, Oordon Cooper. Thom- 
as B. Derry, Oeorge Dunlop, Ivy E. 
Dunnett. Roy H. Edgar. Dave O. 
Frankham. Beverly Gilbert, William 
T. Glass. Kathleen F. Howe. Jean V. 
Klnch. Arthur F. Kltely. J. Margaret 
N. McBeath. Donald B. Mclntyre. 
Junior A. Mulcshy. Thelma R. My- 
ers. Howard E Naylor. Ina H. New- 
man, Frederick C. Pellow, Adrian 
Phillips, Rob R. Ricketts. William A. 
Robinson, Lawrence Rosslter, Joan 
M. Scoble. Harold A. Simmons, 
Emily E. Spencer, William Stephen- 
son. Robert J. Stewart. Arthur J. 
Tarns. Doris E. Tarns. Desmond T. j 
Tierney. Belton F Turner, Barbara 
E. Waldron. Joan M. WIllcox. James 
A Williams. Joan P. Williams. 

Col wood— Yvonne K. 8t. James. 
502; David D. McLean. 490 
FALKLAND < I M I KK 

Falkland— Marion E. Smith. 472; 
Rhea M. Phillips, 401. Promoted on 
recommendation Corinne J. Cur- 
rti, Bertram J Ferguson, Jack F. W 
Hambrook. 

- \ INK II CE NTRE 

Cedar Hill— Samuel A. Levis. 391; 
Frank E. Harding. 382; May I. Hud- 
son, 380; William A R. MeCoubrey. 
374; Robert F Carson. 380; Leila 
Harlo* k. 360 F»ronioted on recom- 
mendation: Gordon C. Browning. 
Dorothy J. Day. Philip Ellis. Doris 
M. Exton. Deryck B. Oranlm. Alec 
G. Jones. Eileen H. Levis, William 
E Lloyd. Kenneth J. McPhall. 
Sandy McPherson. William D. 
Morry. Joyce O. Ostler, Dorjfen B. 
Plimley. Oeorge Ross. Robert W. 
Ross. Frances A. L Rowellj David 
Y. Simpson. Kenneth C. Tipper. 
Lillian Williams. 

Clo\erdale-Lorralne A. Saul. 459 



Promoted on 




endatlon 
Ash more 
R Bell. ! 

est W 
pbell. M. ! 
Dodds 



R till Morton. Herbert G -Psr»nt«r, j 1)n 



v^ard Mlnnls. Lawrence R. Munroe, 
John T. McLeod, TrLs Newell, Vin- 
cent Patterson. Josephine Pi'rri 
Douglas H. Porteous. William C 
Renfrew. Lloyd A Sinclair. Johanna. 
Smith. Ellen L. M Pvmes. Harold 
W. Thompson. Robert Thorburn 
Richard VlvlAn Freda Webb, Allen 
Wilson. Mary Wll.wn. W. J Ken- 
neth Wilson. TV-sniP Wnng. Mikiko 
Yaniamoto. 

Margaret Jenkins — William D 
Plumb. 383; William L Lunev. 373; 
Albert E. Rowe, 363. William G 
Wright. 360. Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Dorothy O Adams. 
Douglas W\ Adch.son. Russell C. 
Bales, Roy O Bannlsler. I^esley Col- 
Uson. Dorothy E. Corbett. Chester 
H. Cotter. William Dunaway. Kath- 
A. Ellfsoh. 'MargueYite Elltott. 
Elizabeth N. Enoch. James F.: 
Muriel J Forrester Elizabeth M 
Francis. Nell A. Hansen. Jean E 
Harwood. Jessie C Hepburn, O. 
Edwf n Illbb erson David M Hobbs. 
Stanley T Hoffman. Wrlliam D 
Jewell. Edmond D Jorre de :*t 
Jorre Marl i. A I • •-. • • !?•»•«•: • y 
Li;ribr.-K>k M' '. vllle A Lumbev. John 
Mackintosh. Muriel Malcolm. Gor- 
don W. Marshall. Winifred M 
Moorhouse. Ada V Mutch. Dor-en 
M McKean. Jovcr* McLean Ma iriee 
E ODonoghue I.eorrore F Poo!- 1 
Doreen M Robson Joan R Robson 
H<rold A Sa»rr'.;cM Ronald O 



Jsttterneld. Fred W. stoba, Patncie J BurneU, iZk 



Roy 8ewell. Valentine H Sloan, 
Sheila, N. Smith. Alice E 8U>ne. Do- 
reen V. Toms, Joan M. Toms, I Lor- 
raine Wllley. Vernal Wllley. Iris L 
Williams. Edward Witter.— 

8t Anns Academy— O Macrlna 
Bootlte. 483. Myra I Batchelor. 
478; Mona O. Walsh- 469; Isobel M 
Cowley-Brown. 457; Elaine P Bas- 
anta 45« Marie p Crossley. 430 W 
Irene Richmond. 436. Mildred K 
Hardiman. 430; Dorothy M Davis, 
429; Laura V. Webb. 422; Claire A. 
McWade. 416: Patricia S Byrom. 
411: Irene M Quacliot'l. 409; Ella 
C> Hood. 403; Veronica T Cloeri. 
399; E. Antoinette Sparrow 398. 
Denlse E. Bethune, 391; Sheila A. 
Keams, 391; Loma M Burton. 388; 
Irene L. OoguJllon. 387; PloretU O. 
Lazznrln. 387; E Annie Kelly. 384; 
JCgcphlne P O'Connel!. 375; Mar- 
garet P Harris, 371, Mmrte E. Long- 
pre. 371. P Mur'.el Arm.s'rong. 368; 
Alice M KeUy, 380; Audrey* Y. 
Mudge 360 

S- Loul« .Couepe - Albert H. 
Woodb'iry 434. J >*< ph P Webb. 
425; Harold S. Lundie. 413; Elphege 
W M Mart;n 390'. John P. Hemley. 
377; F. John flantly. 380; Walter C 
Covnden 360; Nicholas C. Lennox. 
360. w Henry Roberts 380 
OAK BAY ( INTRI 
Monterey Aeenue — Stuart 0 



f'reorge Adams. James 
Oordon T. Bell. James 
Joseph F Blakemore. 
Bleathman. Alma B. C 
Jean M. Clark. Theresa 
John F Drake. MargareJt A. Dyer. 
Patrick J Flanagan. Murjlel K Oill. 
E James Oraham, Dwlght N Green 
W. R Roy Oreen. Lome W Owilf 
Crordon HaVward. Phyllis F Hender- 
son. Leslie W Hick. Nora L. Hunt 
S'anl^v K Hunt. John A. Irwin. 
Florence M. Jasper. Stuart Kitrh- 
Ing. Edna O. Lake. Frank E Lane. 
Jill t Little. John E. Main, Thoma.' 
Main. Roy A. Marshall. Patricia A 
Mllllgan. Audrey F Mills. Phylhs B 
Mills. Betty Mulrhead. Mona M 
MrMlehael. William O. McMlchael. 
Donald P MeMuldroch. Phvllls M. 
Ockwell. Frederick- H. Partridge. D 
Muriel Pendray. Clifford O PeppeB. 
Mary Ralph. John V. Routley. 
Charles O. Sawyer." Harry E Simp- 
son. Laura O Trace. Glen D. Under- 
wood. Garfield E Warren. Barbara 
J Willerton. M Alison Woodward. 

Craipflower -Ruth L. Cameron. 
363 Prom6t"d on recommendatlon^t 
H iv A A mm s ttne , John F Bafev. ' 

Y Durant. Audrey M O. 
noodman. George R MacFnrlane, 
Roger J Mann. T Lois Moonev. | 
Ronald W_ Nellson. Dorothy L. j 
Rohert.son: Helen E Rrv<« Robert | 
H Scott. 

■Gordon Hepd — Marcus O C 
Grant 360 Promoted on recom- 
mendation Edwtn r Andei 
Jovce A Bel! Margaret A Best. 
Kenneth E B'lrkin^haw. Man- T 
Carman O Janef Dohbs Jean M 
Grant Dorothy P Humeston Mar- 
garet A Llfton Maud Renouf 

Mount Newton — Promoted on 
recommendation Dor^' : A P.-ond- 
foot. R Anne B irr. Maurice ?J; 
Butler. D Mary Cruse J Elizabeth 
Hearle. fillbert L MttgSvtt; Gordon* 
R Sluggeff Mae P Whl'e. Barbara 
cher 377: Kathleen M A MneMI, 
8 Wilson , 

MeKenzl* Avenue— Lillian Plet- 
360 Promoted on recommendation 
Jean M Armstrong. Oeorge . E Bat- 
ting, Kathleen P Campbell Mar 
Jnrie D. Chalmers. I Joyoe Pennell. 
Thelma H A . CHbbe. Burton A 
Graingrr Eileen M Jamea, Oordon 
A. Lawrence Bettv P Powell, 
Oeorge Richardson. Donald A Scott. 
Orace L. Sinclair. Lawrence C. 
Webb 

Prospect Lake— James Wlllougfc- 
bv. 487 Promoted on recommenda- 
tion Harold J Armltage Alec Gor- 
don George R Morx-kton Alfred 
B Qua vie Mare-nrrt h. 
Elizabeth A Sharpe. 



i 




_ 



9 



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try a pair of these restful 
shoes Make use of our 
X ray service Dr. Locke's 
shoes for ladies are priced 

1 o;° « 1 1 00 

"Bay" Fashion Floor 



r^oHSTAHVtV 




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SIGNIFIES 

• Outstanding 

• Electric 

• Refrigerator 

• Value 

Compare the new A M C 
with other leading makes 
and convince yourself that 
there IS a saving The 
A M C.^is covered^ by a five- 
year guarantee and is eco 
nomical to operate. 

As low as $5 cash and $4 50 
monthly, including small 
carrying charge. 

144.50 

"lay" Third Floor 



Royal OtOt-Jesaie L. 



V)2 



Lenlle D Draper. Annie P Fafer- 
berf. John C Kodevwi, Le»He w 



Strawbery Vale — Promoted { 
reoommendatmn J Predertr Murk- 
ley. PhyllU M rmm, Ian B Hoy, 
Jnyr a s ' <v.<:i»- L Rorlman/ 



Matthew^ C Fred Mom. Noreen Hugh N Smyth PrancU M laafTe. 
Rankin Herber' A flmlth. Jame* A TUUcum Doris Birch. 34|i Alan 
Smith Pri'lJ': v if!, Eric SfXhera. j Cle«« ItW Cecil C<*i*m*, 3M. 
Marfaret E Vamey. | ( ontlni»e<l w Pa t «> tz. i\*thf*. 1 



— ~M 




Social Activities and Notes of Personal Inte 




AM CLUB TO 
SING (IN BOAT 



England, and will make an 
tended 'visit with their son. 
Harold Monks, of the Imperial Oil 
Company in Torino. 



Kildonan after a short visit to Port | 
Alberni and Vancouver. 

•• j^"**^* • * - ■ . ■ 

Mr. E. Armstrong has returned to 



5 Both Men and Women Are 
Dressed in Cool Silk 



Annual Open- Air Concert of ^Eff&ZSSEVi 



Famous Choir Set for 
Wednesday 



Through the kindness of the Show 
Boat authorities, the Arion Male 
Voice Choir, the oldest organization 
of its kind in the Dominion of Can- 
ada, and established here In the 
year 1892, are holding their annual 
open-air concert on the evening of 
Wednesday, July 29, on the Show 
Boat. and. as is usual on such oc- 
casions, the entire proceeds from 
seating and collections will be 
handed over to the Victorian Order 
of Nurses. 

The members of the choir have 
been carefully rehearsing a pro- 
gramme of numb»rs, winch, it is safe 
to say. will give pleasure to the 
throngs who gather on the water- 
front these delightful summer eve- 
nings. 

Mrs Beatrice Floyd, soprano, and 
Mr. Moaapp. cornettlst. will be the 
assisting artists, and the choir will 
be led by W. C. Fyvc, honorary con- 
ductor; P. H. Hughes, honorary as- 
sistant conductor, and Mr. Herbert 
Kent, honorary conductor emeritus, 
the latter having been a member of 
the Arion Club since Hi Inception 
In Victoria. 



days at Clayoquot and Torino. 

• •' • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Bigmore, of Es- 
tevan, are holidaying in Port Al- 
berni and Vancouver, but WlQ re- 
turn to the We.st Coast about the 
end of the month 

• • • 

Mrs. n. Todcr. of Port Alberni, 
has been spending a vacation on 
the West Coast, visiting points as 
far up as Clayoquot. but will return 
to her home next week. 

jr ' • • 

Mrs. E. RoSeborough, of Port Al- 
berni, arrived in Tollno on Friday, 
and will remain for a few days 
before leaving for Port Alberni. 



Girl Guide Notes 



West Coast 

Dr. O. M. Plneo was a passenger 
aboard the Princess Maquinna,- re- 
turning to Port Alberni after visit- 
ing points as far north as Port 
Alice. 

• • • 

Mrs. Duncan Orant and her 
daughters, Ruth and Isabel, of 
Toflno, are visiting in Kyuquot and 
are the gue.sls of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Godson. Miss Ruth Grant will re- 
main for several weeks before re- 
turning to Torino. 

• • • 

Mrs. W. P. Forsythe and lit He 
ion. David, of Kennedy Lake, have 
been spending several weeks visit- 
ing In Clayoquot, where Mr. For- 
sythe ha* recently joined them. 

Mr. R Oale has recently left for 
Victoria, after spending the pa.st 
three months on the Weal Coast. 

• • • 

Mrs N. Garrard, of Port Alberni. 
ia spending a vacation In Tollno 
with her two sons, and is the guest 
of Mr. F. C. Garrard. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. O. G. Godson and 
their ltttl • son. who have resided at 
Toquart for the past six years, have 
left to take up their residence at 
Bamflcld. Mr and Mrs. W. L BU* 
Her. of Coal Harbor, will arrive in 
Toquart shortly, where Mr. Hlllier I 
will take charge of the Government 
telegraph office. 

» • • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Oibson. who 
have been spending a few days at 1 
Nootka. have left for Victoria en 
route to their home In California. 

• • • 

Captain C. C. Blnns has returned 
to Herbert Arm after spending a 
few days at Clayoquot and other 
West Coaat points. 



FIRST COMfMTZ 

The First Colquitz Company of 
Girl Ouides returned on Friday from 
Margaret s Bay. Gordon Head, where 
they spent a week in camp. The 
tune was profitably hpent in routine 
work and learning new guide work, 
and in the evenings the girls en- 
Joyed a sing-song around the camp- 
fire. Qn Thursday evening a mas- 
querade was held, which proved 
very i n t e resting, and prizes were 
awarded to Betty Austin, Pamela 
Mudie and Rosemary Steward, rep- 
resenting "Kutem and Clllem Hos- 
pital"; Blanche Parker, Sonla Ctin- 
nlngham and ' Grace Hodgson as 

Three Blind Mice," and Dorothy 
Austin. "Friar Tuck"; Mary Anstie, 
"Robin Hood," and Grace Sinclair, 

Maid Marion " Sunday being vis- 
itors' day, a number of the parents 
visited the camp and were enter- 
tained at afternoon tea, which was 
.served by the girls. Those in charge 
were Miss D. 8tocken, captain, as 
commandant; Mrs R. Fields, quar- 
termaster; Mrs. Hetherington, as- 
sistant quartermaster, and Mrs. 
Steward, nurse. Those present at 
camp were: Betty Austin. Phyllis 
Sheffield. Maureen Evans. Dorothy 
Austin. Molly Raper. Grace Sinclair, 
Pamela Mudle. Soma Cunningham. 
Mary Anstie. Orace Hodgson. Tannls 
Martin, Margaret Burow, Jessie Lah- 
mrr. May Fairclough. Rosemary 
Steward. Kathleen Steward. Blanche 
Parker and Kenneth Fields. The 
company wishes to thank Mlss 
Staveley for the use of the camp 
site - . Mr. Oeorge Austin for the use 
of his truck and car; also Sirs 
Raper. Mrs. Anstie and Mr J 
Grimes, who kindly provided trans- 
portation. 




Your Health and Your Weight 

■ — - 

THE BASAL METABOLISM TEST IN OVERWEIGHT 
By J AS W BAKTON, M D 



An overweight individual i thirty- ever, that give overweights the Idea 
live pounds overweight) fanhlully ' that instead of cutting down on 
followed the reducing diet outlined food and increasing exercise, all 
by her physician— cutting down on they have to do to reduce weight 
liquids, starches and fats— and tried is to use some "short-cut" such as 
to take a little more exercise. The thyroid extract. Thyroid extract 
first week there was a loss of five gfl] no t reduce weight In those 
pounds, the second week a loss of | whuse basal metabolism rate Is 



three, and the third a loss of two 
the fourth and fifth a loss of one 
pound each week, while the sixth, 



within normal limits, that m, no 
higher than plus 10 nor lower than 
minus 10. The Lahey Clinic. Boston. 



seventh and eighth showed no loss years ago rep orted some cases 

whatever despite the reduced diet where the m of lh yrold extract to 



have a chance of making a good | 
deal of money. Your choice of a 
husband evidently is going to turn 
out to be a very wise one. 

The child born on July 26. ap- 
parently, when it emerges from 
adolescence into youth, is going to 
find a way already paved for it on 
the highway to success. 

If a man. and July 26 is your 
j natal day, you may "be too easy 
going for our own good. Your great 
amount of optimism, unless safe- 
guarded against, might tempt you 
to participate hi some highly specu- 
lative venture. As an educator, 
physical instructor, missionary, In- 
ventor, writer, actor, composer, ag- 
riculturalist, or broker, wealth may 
come to you. ■ 



SPECIAL! 

For 3 Days Only 

Ladies' or Gentlemen's Bracelet 
Watches, six new styles to 
choose from. 




and exercise. 

While this loss of weight— twelve 
pounds— would have been satisfac- 
tory in some cases it was not 
enough to make the desired dif- 
ference in appearance, muc*h to the 
patient's disappointment. 

As she was anxious to try some of 
the gland extracts or the reducing 
drug, dinitrophenol. her physician 
ordered a basal metabolism test. In 
this test the patient goes to the 
physician's office or to the hos- 
pital before breakfast, having eaten 
no food during the previous twelve 
to fourteen hours. 

This means that as no digestion 
is going on. there will be no in- 
creased rate at which the body 
processes are working in order to 
digest the food. 

The patient lies down at complete 
ease with "nothing" on her mind 
After half an hour of rest the pa- 
tient breathes naturally Into the 
apparatus and the total quantity 
of oxygen used and amount of 
carbon dioxide given off are meas- 
ured arid compared with what Is 
considered "normal" for the size of 
her body. It has been found that 
when an Individual breathes pure ^ u pm 
oxygen the amount of oxygen taken 
up by the blood is the same as 
when ordinary air is breathed into 
the lungs. In this particular case 
it was found that the basal 
metabolism rate was minua_ IS, 
whereas the normal rate is con- 



weight In those with" a 
metabolism raJe 



reduce 
normal 

brought on symptoms of goitre. 

In at least nine out of ten cases 
of overweight it will be found that 
this basal metabolism rate, or rate 
at wlhch the body processes work 
is within normal limits. Therefore, 
thyroid "extract will not only be 
useless in reducing weight but may 
actually cause harm. 

However, where cutting down on 
food and Increasing exercise has 
not brought satisfactory results In 
reducing weight, it would be good 
sens» to have this basal metabolism 
test made. 



Regular 

$19.50 

$1 00 Down — 50c Week 



11 



MONDAY. Jl'LY 27 
•I.KI 

If July 27 is your birthday, the 
Vst hours for you on this date ate that are fully guaranteed 

from 8 15 to 10 15 a.m. from 1:15 

| to 3:15 pju, and from 6:15 to 8:15 

1 pm. The danger periods are from 

1 8 : 15 to 8:15 a.m.. fr om 4:15 to 6:15 

:p.m. and "from 8 .15 to 10:15 p.m. " 
Do not spoil this,Jay by mulling 

lover some iancied slight or injury. 
Be ready to accept friendly ad- 
vances, particularly if they are made 
by someone with whom you have 



Each one new, smart looking, 
with 15 - jeweled movements 
lly guaranteed. Ac 
curate and reliable. 

sea thi m is <>i a vu.vnow 

Joseph Rose, Ltd. 

jiwttiR-s-oPTn ivss 
1013 GOVERNMENT STREET 



IT'! 



P*Y THI a< 



What Today Means 



-LEO" 



best hours for you on this date are 
from 10 a m. until noon, from 2 to 4 
pm and from 7 to 0 p.m. The 
danger periods are from » to W 
am., from 5 to 7 pm. .and from 9 



had a misunderstanding. It may be 
poor business judgment to quibble 
over pennies in any deal involving 
dollars. This Is a good day to. "do 
unto others, as you would have them 
do^unto you. " A sense of overcon- 
fldence Is apt to cause a mistake, 
so be vigilant. A sluggish business 
market can be stimulated by a good 
dose of sales enthusiasm, but high 
pressure methods are likely to cause 
a bad reaction. Optimistic ardor 
may Inspire confidence, where of- 
fensive arguments are apt to result 
In distrust. Married and engaged 
couples, and those who are in love 
had best spend money conserva- 



I 



Sailors From 



The Army and Navy Veteranf 
plaved hosts to the ship's company 
of the H M S. Apollo last evening in 
uvely this day if they wish to escape I their clubrooms. Wharf Street. The 



VETERANS UNITS 
ATTEND 




Fnter- 
Vlmy IMIrrimage 



That Body of 

lours 

(By Jamea W Barton, HDi 



Printed Silk Chiffon Ensemble Dress and Full-Length Coat With Blacky i 
Velvet Kevers; Escort Wean a Double- Breasted Suit of Pure Silk 
Suiting With Silk Grosgrain Evening Oxfords. 

Br LifrarrH we said, cool comfortable looking 

HAT'S THE matter with men? clothes for men are so much more 

They actually are doing some- of a rarity Women always look 

thing about their clothing for hot cool and chic. 

weather. They always have had a Ham ever, the blonde being es- 

good deal "to Bay about women's corte^ by the handsome cavalier is 

| foolishness In the matter of dress, wearing a printed silk chiifon en- 

,but why any human who considers semble dress and full-length prin- 

himself Intelligent— and most men C ess coat with black velvet revers. 

do. I believe- should wear heavy The print is black and wine on a 

I woolen trousers, ditto coats over cream ground It is worn with a 



Be careful in your eagerness to 
be of .service to someone, that you 
do not undertake to do more than 
you really can. There is danger 
on this date in all forms of hastily 
made promises. Many an unsuc- 
cessful undertaking has caused the 
sidered to be as high as plus 10. or , OM of confldence , wpU worth hav . 

as low as minus 10. Now minus 18 ln(? activities on this dav 
is not considered far from normal, may ha ve some important bearing 
as minus 30 and plus 40 are not un- 0 n engagements being made for 
common. tne coming week. Be very cautious 
However, as minus 18 showed that vour sense of humor does not 
that the body processes were work- give offence, this day, as people 
ing more "slowly" than normal, the are apt to be extremely sensitive 
physician decided to use extract of wit. Indulged in at someone else's 
thyroid gland, beginning with small expense. Is seldom appreciated. Be 
doses. At the end of the first week modest in your statements, for brag- 
there was a loss of three pounds, at gadoclo wlil perhaps be the principal 
the end of the second week a loss medium through which dislike la 
of two pounds, and at the end of Ukelv to originate. Married and en- 



the charge of being extravagant. 

If a woman and July 27 ia your 
birthday, the Indications are that 
considerable wealth will come in- 
to your possession. It might pay 
you to think more of your bless- 
ings and to find less fault with 
the world in general. You have a 
tremendous amount of determina- 
tion, possibly ao much that you 
are never satisfied, unless you 
have things done Just your way. 



freedom of the club was extended 
to all sailors from the British ship, 
who enjoyed the courtesies of the 
billiard tables, the dance in the ball- 
room, and the entertaining smoker 
in the rotunda with Curley's Har- 
monious Harvesters an the feature 
attraction Harry Roehon was in 
charge of the entertaining- 
programme. 

At the Britannia Branch. Cana- 
dian Legion, a well -at tended smoker 



third week a loss of one* pound 
The dose was Increased and the 
following week showed a loss of 
two pounds, the next week two 
pounds, the next one pound, the 
next one pound, and the next no 
loss whatever. 
The thyroid extract was then 



gaged couples, as well as those who 
have already, or are about to declare 
their love, must refrain from being 
In any way dictatorial on this oc- 
casion if they would avoid arousing 
anger. 

If a woman, and July 26 Is your 
Dlrthday. you ought to be unusu 



Extremely generous, broad-minded. I | n commemoration of the Vlmv Pil- 
and perhaps very entertaining, you | grimage was held last night also, 
perhaps have many friends. You ' Many members and friends of the 
I should have a good head for bual- lin it enjoyed the first-class concert 
ness. You are capable of inspiring presented bv the veterans, which 
a great love. Although you are very i waa headlined by the Britannia 
sentimental, there is a chance of Branch Band, and featured msm of 
your impressing some people as victoria's mnM. popular and talented 
being rather indifferent. As a amn teur entertainers The master of 
teacher, artist, writer, actress or ceremonies for the evening was 



Mr. and Mrs. W. Orant. who have 
made th< ' home at Bamflcld for 
the past two years, have left to 
apend the Summer months on the 
East Coast of the Island. Mr Grant 
has been associated with the 
United Church Marine Mission for 
some time. 

• • • 

Mr Percy Wills spent a few days 
at Ahousat before leaving for 
Nootka Mr. Wills expects to visit 
Isolated points In Kyuquot and 
Quatslno Sounds before returning 
to Victoria via the East Coast 
the Island. 

• • • 

Miss Pearl Elkingtoii was a pas- 
senger aboard the Prill I* Ml Ma- 
quinna, returning from Victoria and 
Vancouver to Join her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. A. Elklngion. In Toflno. 



Thompson recently 
for Victoria, where 
the Summer vaca- 



Mls* Muriel 
left Clayoquot 
she will si>end 
tlon. 

• ♦ • 

Mr Frank Orange, of Clayoquot 
Sound, has left for Ceepeeece, where 
he will remain for the remainder of 
the Summer. 



IRV|N(. ON SMALL ANIMALS 

m roooi i i i i n Bl 

IK MAN BUM.- 

As it Is the food we eat that builds 
tlie body and repairs worn out-tis- 
ane. It is only natural that nearly 
everybody is interested in food from 
the health standpoint That certain 
foods appeal to some and not to 
others, that bulky food such as cab- 
bage requires fourteen pounds to 
equal in food or fuel value one 
pound of meat, that fruits prevent 
constipation, that starch loods sup- 
ply energy Is now known to the 
of majority of people. 

Most of us do not want to have 
to live according to any special dirt, 
even If it is prescribed hy a qUsUl< 
fled food expert Further, the fact 
that a certain diet appears to keep 
guinea pigs or white mire m good 
health doesn't appeal to us as being 
any reason that this particular diet 
would be Just as effective if eaten 
by human beings. 

However, as It is by means of liv- 
ing certain diets and other sub- 
stances with small animals that 
much of the advancement in pre- 
venting certain ailments and curing 



their shirts, and sometimes even 
vests, when the mercury hits the 
90's. passes the comprehension of 
a mere-female of the species. 

Men have flirted around with 
Palm Beach suits, white flannels, 
duck trousers and all the rest, but 
now they really are getting down to 
business and have even gone to the 
length of wearing cooler evening 
clothes. Will wonders never cease 1 



square brimmed sailor from Lilly 
Dache. 

Something new for Autumn is a 
silk satin with a leathery feel. It 
is shown for early Fall drerses and, 
in heavier versions, for cocktail and 
dinner suits. There are clred 
satins which also have this leathery 
appearance, and sometimes the 
finishes almost like varnish. 

Lacquered finishes, usually re- 



Here Is a voting man who looks 
as cool, comfortable and smart as Uncled to satins, are now spread- 
ing to other fabrics. There is a 
very new look to snk taffetas with a 
ore finish, which gives an effect of 
stovepipe lustre We seem to be 
getting our dress fabrics and i our 
kitchen equipment a bit mixedJbut 
the results are excellent Sometimes 
ihe lacquered effect Is interrul 
flue to novelty in the weave ol 
silk, making them new and| 
teresting 



stopped but the patient continued al)y qv ,i C k at memorizing. A keen 
on the decreased diet and by being Par should enable you to learn 
strong enough to increase the foreign languages without dlffi- 
amount of exercise was .ible to cu i ty . You have probably a very 
keep her weight at this point. She ; retentive memory, which la per- 
had lost twelve plus fourteen. ! haps going to prove one of your 
twentv-slx pounds altogether. Bv , greatest assets Unless you curb 
following carefully her physician's your generous Impulses, they may 
Instructions she had rid herself of i rn d you into personal sacrifices 
at least three-quarters of her ex- that possibly are uncalled for. and 
cess weight. are likely to work a hardship. 

Now the above ts encouraging, but | Avoid, shouldering other people s 
results such as these are not usually responsibilities, if you wish to 
obtained In cases where the basal escape a lot of worry. As a play- 
metabolism rate Is so near to wrtght. Journalist. photograoher, 
normal. specialty shop owner. lecturer. 

It Is results such as these how- musician, or business woman, you 



business woman you are likely to 
attain a position of prominence. 
Marriage may change your dispo- 
sition in many ways, for the better 
It Is probable that your married 
life will be a fulfillment of your 
fondest expectations. 

The child born on July 27 gen- 
erally, when It reaches its teens, 
i attains leadership among Its asso- 
! elates through either the field of 
sports or literary attainments. This 
I youngster is likely to be very 
, successful in life 

If a man and July 27 Is your 
i natal day. the acquisitive spirit per- 
f haps makes vou ambitions to have 
vast possessions. Ambition ani- 
mates most of your actions As a 
geologist. mining engineer, jour- 
nalist, musician, educator, lawver. 
doctor or promoter your accom- 
plishments n^Tpay you exceedingly 



Percy Payne. 

COLLAPSES AND DIES 
IN VANCOUVER OFFICE 

VANCOUVER. July 25 r> -R A 
D Todd, assistant superintendent of 
city sewers, collapsed In his office 
at the cltv yards today and died 
almost instantly. 

Todd was connected with the cltv 
deportments since amalgamation, 
and was formerly with the works 
department of Point Orey. 



»ll. 



"I left a quart of whisky In my 
bunk this morning and forgot It 
when I left the train." the passenger 
complained to the conductor. 

^Ynu did?" exclaimed the railroad 
man "Then you are the fellow to 
go bail out the porter. I wondered 
where he got It." 



the girl he is escorting He Is wear- 
ing a double- breasted suit of pure 
silk suiting launched by London] 
tailors, and wears silk grosgjaii 
evening oxfords. 

UOMKN < OOI ( H1C 



Mr 

rived 



and 

from 



others has been accomplished, it is 
Mrs. Monks have ar- I only common sense to learn about 
Victoria en route from j the effects of common everyday food 




Wej should have described tin 
young woman's costume first, bu| 
we fouldn't resist the tcmptaM< 
to talk about the man because, as 

substances regularly eaten by man 
when eaten by these small animals 

In The Journal of Hygiene, Lon- 
don, we are told tfiat "Drs. J. B. 
Orr. W. Thomson and R C. Oarry 
maintained a large colony of white 
rats on a "diet in general use by 
human beings Half of the rnts 
were fed on this ordinary or avcr- 
aee human, diet, or this diet with- a 
small increase in milk, the other 
half were fed on this same diet to 
which more milk and some green 
I nod wre sdo><1 

"Four generations of rats of the 
same stock were reared on th. se 
two diets. . k 

"The rats on the human diet with 
arki.tional milk and green food were 
healtfiyTn all respects so "far as 
can be judged by rats on a stock 
diej. On the other hand, in spite 
of living U0.d«r the same circum- 
stances and bring members of the 
same stock or families, the animals 
without additional milk and green 
food showed: «J a markedly in- 
creased death rate due to increased 
sensitiveness or susceptibility to an 
infection to which all the rats were 
exposed. ib> a definitely slower 

rate of growth: <_cj less iron or 

haemoglobin in the bloodr- «d> ■ 
poorer general physical condition, as 
Judged by behavior and condition of 
their coats." 

These doctors state that these 
results apply to some extent to 
human beings And this is *l*o in 
line with the opinion of Professor 
McCollum. John Hopkins University, 
who tells lis that if to the ordinary 




n. i\s ii\<.(.i ST 

POLITICAL sit 

CHICAOO. July 25 >.V —For the 
notification of Colonel Frank Knox. 
Republican vice - presidential nomi- 
nee. Chaune.»v McCormlck. chair- 
man of arrangements, today an- 
nounced plana to stage "the biggest 
political show Chicago has seen in 
years." 

Colonel Knox will make his for- 
mal speech of acceptance next 
Thursday night, officially taking his 
place beside his running mate. 6ov- 
rrnor Alf M Landon. of Kansas. 

A bov with a very large mouth 
was shopping for a mouth organ. 
'Critically he tried even- harmonica 
in the shop but couldn't find one 
j to suit him. 

Finally exaspera'ed. the clerk led 
him to a grand piano. "Hera." he 
suggested try running your mouth 
over these keys!". 



Witt - Kitty 

B» MTNA WrtCOX PUTNAM 



TOO CAM USI comet ic« all you wish— ir you remove 
thoroughly . with Lux "fcnlet Soap! Its ACTIVE lather guards 
: the dangerous pore choking that causes Co«mrt ic SVin. 
Um it before you put on fresh make-up— ALWAYS 
yrm go to bedf You 11 find it keeps skin lortlyt 



- « **** 



product and raw fruit or vegetable 
dally, there Is no need to worry 
about our daily diet 



watering-cart of a certain 
Irish town used to be deeorsted with 

patent medicine advertisement*. An 
Innocent Irishman from the rural 
district*, looking at one. remarked. 
Faith, it s no wonder the town ts 
healthv when they~wiler' the streets 
[with Flaherty* sarsapartll*!" 




A party ss wet a* a rainy week- 
I end will do a lot for dampened 
[spirit*. 



THE WHOLE FAMILY RELIES UPON 



Mv rmcF mm 

ihrouth « 
rvilonmt W'«nt 
Art 





and 

hrouati a • 
'nlnnitl Want 



ihrsusn 



Coloni<l 

sat ai 



Barrr. tr.t 
ouppt. wai 

last 

-A Colomat 
Want Art 
found him 




Colonist Want Ads are a family 
standby. It does not matter whether 
you are looking for real estate or a 
pair of roller skates, Colonist classi- 
fied columns wilt point the way to 
savings, putting you in touch with 
the person you wish to reach, carry- 
ing your message to the greatest 
number. Get the Want Ad habit 
They bring results 



a»»II hi* 

th-ou».'i 
1 Colonial 
Ada. 



Want 



Phono 

E4U4 




Tm titr.t 
pla 

aommar A 
Colonial Want 
' mm 

»h»ra. 



THE DAILY COLONIST 



CLASSIFIED AD DEPARTMENT 

Office Open 8 A.M. to 10 P.M. 





THE DAILY CO LONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, Jl'LV 26; 1° 




11 



VICTORIA 



ANGELA HOTEL, 



WI Bardett 



entlielr new manaeement 
with bath, tin* 1» i 

Seellent service. 

4. W. HABVKT 



Completely 



renovated and redecorated 
with bath. Oom'ortable. 

ratea. 



3le roomi with b 
first-cleee e^slne 



Pbon» 



Lake-of-the-Seven-Hills at Sooke 



CURIOS 

ARCTIC STUDIO 



SOUVENIRS 



JOB* D. O. MeTAVISB 

and Eskimo Carvlnfi. BatkeU. Moccaalna. 
Braceteti. Alaskan Black Diamond Jewelrr, Etc 
Opposite lb* Empress Hotel. «l I 416 Humboldt It. Vlcl.rla. B.C. 



TO EVKBYTHINO IN TOWN" 



BEVERLEY HOTEL APARTMENTS 

7tl TATEA STBBET. OFF DOI GI.AS 

Vlaltlna Victoria. Cut Your Expenses in Half by Securing One of Our Ueht 

Housekeeping Rooms or a Cotv Bedroom, at Reasonable Ratea 
Via Atarlee Rlnaty Larrc Rooms Transient or Permanent 

one otr:;« 'AS. a (.him i mi 



Camfort and Cenvenlence at the 



CECIL HOTEL 

O If WILSON. Manaeer 
It 00 a Day 



rl «trrel 



r, bin 



DOMINION HOTEL 



VICTORIA, IC 
Hospitable Service . . Eicellenf Cuitine 
Central Loci t ion— Modenfe Hatee— Free Bui 
WM. J. CLARK. Msmger 




] EAST SOOKE 
LOVELY SPOT 

First - Rate Accommodation 
Found on Landlocked 
Waters of Harbor 



FORBIDDEN PLATEAU 



Thia Lovely Spot 



ly Spot U Reached by a Woodland Trail 
the Many Hiking Trip, Which May Be T 



Woodland Trail From Sooke, and Forms an Objective for 

at Headquarters. 



of 



BRENTWOOD BAY 



FISHING PARTIES 

Try Your luck With ERNIE 'LUDEYl LEE 
Apply it LITTLE WILLIE'S, BRENTWOOD Phone Keying 43 F 

No Pifh, No Pay Launch "Surprise" 



CORDOVA BAY 



McMORRAN'S PAVILION 



RIGHT ON 
THE REACH 



Modern thicco camp and cortiget loir», tithing booths, ten, ke 

lau. 
irrice. 

cet every Saturday night, •« piece evchettra; admimon 25c 



DEEP COVE 



MANY ATTRACTIONS 
FOUND IN SAANICH 
AS VACATION LAND 

— ■ 

Glorious Scenery, Sport and Quiet K«m May Br 

- Had by the Visitor to Saanich rVniiiHiila — 

Trip Is Comfortable Afternoon'. 
Drive From City and Return 



SOOKE HARBOR 
PROVES POPULAR 



Many Make the Settlement Their 
Objective for an 

Automobile Drive 



FORBIDDEN PLATEAU ci°« T r' AU 

WHISK YOU »tt RLU KNOW AND At PINE FLOWERS 

Comfortable cablni. aprim bedi. furniehed complete Make reeerveuoo early 
For a real rest i<riii« >our Is. nine fv4 lot a »eet <M two. *ac*.'Ualn twlee 
4 weak— euldee'- moderate rataa 



Kor full 



tenon apply to 



MORGAN FUI I CO.. VICTORIA— « ORPIEI D HOTOsM. COI R1TNAY 



The district of 
twenty mile* from 
^riore popular as a 



THE CHALET, DEEP COVE 

Comfortable accommodation In hotel or roar furnished eottaees Bhoaer bitbs 
Bemi furnished cottaaea adlarent Rlehl on the seafront on tha famous 
Baanlfh flshlne watera rrea tennli BoaU for hire Oolf course - 
Ratal moat reasonable Chicken dlnnara and KnsllJh Devonshire 
• apeelaitr. Phone Sidney IIP 



EAST SOOKE 



GLENAIRLEY FARM 



EAST SOOKE. 
V I B C 



Perfect for a restful holiday by tha sea. Oood accommodation; boats, bathlne. 
tennis. Indoor badminton, danclne. etc. Oood home cookine. plenty of Jersey 
eream. frjilt and veeetablee Only one hours drive from Victoria Teas, 
lunches, supper Inclusive ratea. lit per walk SerteMe horses. Me per Hour 
Phone or write Major Cavenagh. Cast Sooke 



OF A 4° I DT 180 AC " ES 0F 

O 111 1 I\ 1 VACATIONLAN0 



Warm Bathlne. Boatlne. Hlklne Boardlne Accommodation Homekeep ne 
(-misses Raasonabla Rates Plenty nl ( ream. K«ss. Fruit WTfTT Vr«etab+e»- 
- V I, BC -For Reservations. 1. « Herian. 



COWICHAN BAY 



Buena Vista Hotel 



COWICHAN IAY. 
VI, RC 



A fully modern comfortable hotel, looklne out over tha water Delicious oookine. 
lunches, teas and dinners. Cowichan Bay Is noted for tha fl-tiins. and a sliver 
challenee cup li offered by the manaeemenl to the euest taklne the heavleat 
lalmon Oolf and tennia nearby. Write or phone t7 B i. Duncaa. 




ICHAN BAY INN 

Old Country inn built on the jwirer't edge at Cowichin Riy 
M of tnttqutt. ^tnimont beds. Eatceptionjllf good coolung 



STEWART'S AUTO MARINE 



Headquarter! for fueling. 



COWICHAN 
RAY 

Roirt and launches »oc hire Tackle for 

m II, 



Teacher— "Now, Robert, what sre 
you doing? Learning something?" 

Robert— "No, air, I'm listening to 
you " 



DUNCAN 



THE GREENHAVEN ,r AN 

Modern in every way Luncheon and fountain service. Where 
courtesy, quality 




NANAIMO 



STEVENSON. 



Hotel Malaspina, Nanaimo K£t& 

For os-ernleM. ee Just • rneai. plan to itop at thli Impresalyely eood hotel 
Wonderfully attrecOye meela— e treat to all who appreciate tha choicest food 
eipertly prepared by white ehefe The pnree are eitremaly moderate 





PLAZA CAFE 

Plixe patroni ere served speedily by e corp* of happy, courteous girls 
Fountain Service in Connection "We Never 



PARKSVILLE 



ISLAND HALL HOTEL ,IGHT 0N TH! " ACH 



AT PARKSVILLE. V I 



. 27 

opening onto the sandy beech where bithing it 
tine. Freth farm products Modente ntet 




THREE separate attractions to the tourist and holiday 
seeker are held by this beautiful Island, which lies bask- 
, inp; all Summer in the luxuriance of one of the most tem- 
perate climates in the world. The lure of the deep, unbroken 
woods, with the tang of the invigorating mountain air to spur 
trips of adventure and exploration; the warm, sparkling water 
of the myriad beaches, coves and lakes, where boating, bathing, mandlng 
fishing and loafing are always in order, and the quiet restful- 
ness of rural surroundings, where the wind is ever scented by 
the hundred-and-one odors of flowers and fields, and no sound 
comes to break the silence save the bleat of a sheep or the 
distant rumble of a train, winding through farm and meadow. 
CLOSK TO VICTORIA I accommodation, whether ho be In 

search of lunch, tea. supper or a 
Of the last two glorious settiiiKs comforUble , loppln(? place for an 
the Saanich Peninsula holds full vMcd hoUda £ 
measure and running over. Only a 
few miles from Victoria on a broad, 
surfaced road, the traveler plunpes 
into the heart df a rich farnvtng 
try that skirts a shore, broken 
up into countless secluded bays, 
each a perfect haven tn itself. Pol- 
lowing the road from the city it is 
but s few miles out that the Junc- 
tion of the East and West Saanich 
Roads LiT reached at Royal Oak 
The East Road leads ofT to the 
right, running past Elk Lake to 
Sidney, landing place for Oulf 
Inland and Mainland ferries Ahc.id 
is the West Road, leading past Mr 
Butchart 'a g.ircli ns. Brentwood and 
Deep Cove to link up with the Ea.st 
Roaifl at the head of the peninsula 

■n n rata msta 

The Saanich Peninsula slopes 
dow n to either shore from the 
shot lders of Mount Newton and 
Lett I Saanich Mountain, from the 
suminit of which hill is laid out a 
glorous panorama. To the east 
lies the Oulf of Georgia, beyond 
a sweeping vists of trim fields, 
outlined in ereen hedges and neat 
fendes with farmhouses half hidden 
In Hump of spreading trees In 
the! middle distance the boats 
plough their way. bound to Van- 
roUver and other ports or outward 
bound to distant points. East, West. 
South and North Away in the 
distance, over the tops of the dark 
psjBO islands, the blue mountains 
of the Olympics raLse a dazzling 
barrier of snowpeaks against the 
far horizon. 

To the west ths eye Ls carried 
over Finlayson Arm. which winds 
rjeTwT^^tTIe nTHs, more like a 
gigantic river than an arm of the 
sea. On these waters hundreds of 
pleasure boats, launches, yachts and 
rovtboats move to and fro on the 
famous Brendwood flshtng ground*. 
Perhaps the Brentwood fenv or an 
ancient tramp steamer, titanic In 
romparlson with the smaller craft 
leisurely slides through the water 
toward Bamberton Cement Works 
on the further shore Sheer from 
the water's edge rises the Malahat 
Mountain with the freen Sooke 
Hills beyond* To the south lies the 
snow capped range of the Olympics 
sweeping down to the sea at the 
western extremity of the chain. 
PI \( I ^ <>l IN I KREST 

"The Saanich Peninsula ; bounds 

Sr^pmarId 1 ^rTrtior? d No*VtaltoJ th » clt * w " 



Sooke. barely 
Victoria, grows 
as a Summer resort 
every year. The scenic beauty, the 
tang of the fresh sea sir. the swim- 
ming, boating, fishing and hiking 
which are to be found form an 
irresistible lure to both residents of 
Victoria and to vLsitors alike. To 
those who are in search of an after- 
noons excursion from the city, 
Sooke is easily reached and plenty 
of accommodation for teas and 
lunches is to be found. 

Prominent among the places ca- 
tering to the visitor's needs B The 
BlufT. Here was at one time a sub- 
stantial country home, set in the 
heart of private- grounds and com- 
a magnificent view across 
the Straits to the distant mountains. 
Real English meals are served, and 
for those wishing to make a pro- 
longed stay there are many attrac- 
tions. Bathing, fishing and tennis 
are to be had at a resort that lies 
on the edge of unbroken forest, yet 
offer* all the comforts of city life. 



Ea.st Sooke. forming an Ideal 
destinaUon for a pleasant after- 
noon's drive from Victoria or the 
objective for a more protracted 
stay. Is reached by a choice of two 
routes, both holding appeal through 
scenic charm. One Is the Gillespie 
Road. Joining the main Sooke high- 
way, not far from Saseenos The 
other is via Rocky Point and along 
the shoreline, with a view of the 
open sea beside the road 

Pit Tl RESQl'E BEAl'TY 

Once at East Sooke the visitor 
Ands picturesque beauty combined 
with all facilities for a perfect holi- 
day. Olenalrley Farm, right on the 
shores of the Sooke Haibor. Is a 
genuine farm to the substantial 
residence of which ha.* been added 
cottages and tent accommodation to 
meet the needs of the visitor Home- 
grown produce. Jersey milk and 
cream and fresh fruit and vege r 
tables add to the delicious home 
cooking. To gain an appetite that 
will do Justice to the fare there Is a 
wide choice of recreations. Tennis, 
swimming, boating, flshinF. bad- 
minton in a covered badminton 
court, which is used also for danc- 
ing, is combined with Just lazing on 
the fine beach or riding along the 
many trails. 

WAOOtT 

A little further along the road 
• Seagirt" holds the charm of seclu- 
sion combined with warm bathing, 
boating, hiking and fishing One 
hundred and eighty acres in extent, 
Seagirt has a mile of private water- 
front with sheltered bays and gently 
sloping beaches. Either boarding 
I accommodation or housekeeping 
cottages are available here, and It Is 
but a short rowing distance across 
the harbor to the picturesque 
village of Sooke. 



Sit THE BEATHEB IN BI.OOM AND 



SNOW" 



MARIWOOD LAKE CAMP 

Is now open This camp is situated In Uia midst of tha most beautiful pert of tha 
Plateau It splendidly eeuu-i-ed to i.ioUrie for the comfort of tha euaata. and U 
operated In conjunction with McKeum Lake Camp and the Forbidden Plateau 
Lodse Addtesa all Inquiries to 

The F.reiadea Plateaa l-edae. Ms!.. Bos il. raerleoay. IC. rtaene tMM. 



COMOX 



"THE ELK/ COMOX BAY, B.G 

An English Country Inn with a charm all Ita own. prosidlne simple Old World 
hosmuhty, amldjt wonderful, mountain scenery. Jersey .eraaae. el*- Iroea anr 
farms, pleasure and sport ealore. et moderate rataa. 

MR* TBVNIS BirtlNO BOATING BATHINO FTSBINO 

III M.QI \BTKBS OF BINU SALMON CLUB IDEAL HABBOB FO* YACHTS 



CAMERON LAKE 



Cameron Lake Chalet ?o N ^!.h: ghway 

Seend an Ideal holiday on Camemn Lake, eon feet above aaa levai. amid the 
smell of the pines and the mountain air Ftah. boat, bathe, hike or laaa. 
fortabla hotel St.le-SS.U per dayi SUM to 

(irORGE W. WOOLLTT. Mastae«r. 



Al BERN I 



KEMPE'S TEA ROOMS 

Alberni, B.C. 

Teas, Ice Cream, Lunches, Confectionery, Light Groceries 
Rest Rooms In the Centre of the Town 



PORT ALBERNI 



SOM ASS HOTEL ;° C " T AL, " NI 

Good Accommodation All the Year Round 



BIG TROUT CAUGHT 

IN CROTEAU LAKE 



Customer (having rough shave— 
I say. barber, have you got another 
razor? 

Barber— Yes. why? 
Customer— I want to defend my 
self. 



Word has been received of a mag- 
nificent catch made on the Forbid- 
den Plateau which must be the envy 
of every fisherman who reads. Lloyd 
Morgan, a guide attached to Cro- 
teau s Camp, took a thlrty-one-lnch 
trout from Croteau s Lake last week 
The fish was taken on a fly and 
gave a liard battle before he was 
brought to the net. Fish are taking 
well in the many lakes on the For- 
bidden Plateau, and the clear, cold 
waters make them extremely lively, 
ready to figl.U to the last for their 
freedom and giving the fisherman a 
good chance to test his skill. 



CLAYOQUQT 



CLAY0QU0T HOTEL 



CLAYOQUOT. 
• C 



Located on a beautiful sand beach on quiet waters Bathlne. boat. nr. flshlne 
The Sunset Trail winds throueh the yvercreens to another beach for surl 
bathme end a -n>ep cave Rates IS no per day. or 117 30 per weak 



SPROAT LAKE 



KLITSA LODGE Sproat Lake 



In tha heart of the Iiland mountain dlitrlrt. 140 mllei front Victoria An Ideally 
situated Hummer lodee. practically surrounded by tha waters of Sproat Lake 
Besides tha Lodee. there are furnished bunsaiowi i hot end cold water In all 
roomi and bathi> Klertrlc neht Fxcellent flshlne Motor boati. canoes and 
leree pleasure launch Oood bathlne and hlklne. IS a day up. Inclusive Baaer 
vatioiis. Mrs Josephine E Wark. Bproal Lake. VI. BO. Phone SIX 



SALTSPRING ISLAND 



Noted West Coast Summer Resort 



Saltspring Island Golf Course 

Ouest accommodation at the club house Central to sit BalUprlne Meals, teas, 
etc. 12 00 per day 11730 weekly. Inclusive Oreen fees, 30e per day 12 00 weekly 
Sportlne nine-hole course T>nnts ' Camp In connection en the aea 




VESUVIUS LODGE •*«•*!•» 



"Vesuvia Rsv" 
home roos 
12 30 per day 



South Sea of 
• irm bsihins 



Pacific 
flshlne 



Modern lodie. farina sea 
-tenme— coif IU00 >o lis oo 



r 



In 



SAVARY ISLAND 



SAVARY ISLAND 



LOVEI 1KB THS.N 
HsWsll 



New. all-inclusive holiday ra*s as low as 175 73 a week. UbelstellBI return fare 
from Vanaou er Spend yout iolldayi on an Isle of Komaine. where sandy beaches 
stretch for miles Oolf. tehnli baton I, f. shine, inline, and a hundred ether 
pleasures WHF.RK MoSseLTtOfl ART. UNKNOWN Come to the Royal Bavarjy Betel. 
Savary Island Ulustsated folder on request 

BOVAI. SAVARY HOTTI. IMHA*. POINT. SAVABT ISLAND. 1.0. 



SAN JUAN ISLAND 



Clayoquot, Where Hundreds of Visitors Spend a Delightful Holiday. With the Choice of Inland Watera 
Fiehing and Bathing or, a Short Diatance Away, the Mighty Rollers of the Open Pacific aa They Pound 

the Sands of Long Beach. 



Norwegians in 
Marinr Pageant 



MAY AID IN PASSING 
TRUCKS ON HIGHWAYS 



A pageant commemorating the 
discovery of America bv Lief Knrc- 
son and hts Vikings was the con- 
tribution of the Norwegian com- 
munity in Vancouver lo that city's tnrwigh a microphone 



MONTREAL. July 25 <* Perhaps 
this gadget will aid motorists to pass 
trucks more easily on the- -highway: 
a sound -absorbing device at the 
rear of the«truck to carry the sound 
of an approaching car to the driver 

Province of 



Affluent Fn ling 
Is Short Lived 



K W AN LAMAH 



Nesr rridev Harh«r. Waihltielan Plrst I Up 
Oat af- Kidney an International Ferry 

On hlstone San ftJBB Island Visit sitae of both British and American eamps 
•■b" up.ed d irine the Boundary Dispute Accommodations la modern hotel end 
eebini located slor e a shri'err-d ihori* line BkrelhMit meals Abundant* ^ fresh 
veaetables, fruit, m Ik and creVm. Tennis flshlne. hlklne. picnics, campflree. 
hones. PR T.t roahoati Weekly rates tli.M and Il7.es». 

Address Roan lasiih Prldar Haihnr. Washlnrten. USA. 



LUMMI ISLAND 



QUALICUM 




golden jubiles. 

A repllr* of an old Viking ship, 
with a crew of twenty-seven men. 
entered the First Narrows at 3 
o'clock, with a narrator telling of 
the landing of the first Viking ship 
on the Atlantic Coast, nearly 1,000 
years ago. The ship sailed around 
to Brockton Point, where they 
landed and were met by a band of 
Indians A song. "V inland, the 
Fair," from "Asgcrda." the ballad 
upera by Marion Isabel Angus, of 



Quebec Safety League is going to 
suggest this device to truck owners 

A gentleman Is a man who uses 
the bu'ter knife *h«r he hro,,*: , 



WINSTON -S\LEM. NC. July 25 
TH*I.— William E Merchant knows 
how it feels to be a muTToriaire for 
a day. 

Merchant reomed . a dividend 



cheek from a company tn which he 
owns a small block of stock. It was 
made —out for 1 1. 000 J U JO. and 
properly .-.miied by all necessary '<'.- 
nets!*. Tt «.hou!d have been for" 
114 . SO He returned the check. 



"THE WILLOWS" 

TAFT'S LUMMI ISLAND IESOHT 
Write for Lfftfif u't . f 0 Bock, VVjih 



ALTA LAKE 



QUALICUM 



QUALICUM BEACH 



THE MECCA Of ALL 
GOOD TOLHISTS 



For information regirdmo, boutet. cottigei or land, wntt 
ED THWAITES. Qwal.cum leach Pkonei 282 and S. 



RAINBOW LODGE , l c TA 



The thin, brar ne mountain s'r. 1 500 ft 

yesr lound. coast dweUer .Readied Irou. 
P'll Ra;Uar Round tr . it Plihine in Tee 
mr.unieineerlne and hortehark rtdlrie Csbtn or 
tletarta. ar 



level. Is a poeitlve tonic for the 
SS tjneon BUemshtp Co and 
•wlmmtne tennis, danclne. 
Apple 
Rt 



SOL DUC HOT SPRINGS 



to the Island should miss a visit to 
the Dominion Astrophyslcal Ob- 
servatory, equipped with the second 
Unrest telescope in the world; a 
sight of the famous Butchart s 
gardens. privately - o wn ed. - yet 
to the public through 
the courtesy of Mr and Mrs R P. 
Butchart Brentwood, famous as the 
headquarters of the Aaanlch Inlet 
r wstjaf groun ds. Is with easy 
reeVri of a good «olf cos irse. while 
tennis is svsUable here at Deep 
Cove and on the East Road Elk 
|JLake is well known as a bird eanr- 
. and a pUs-surr :r rt 
Throu?: oat the peninsula the 
r is certain of 



the song sung as the Vikings sighted 
the new land. Music by Monrad 
Malmin. leader of the Vancouver 
Norwegian Male Chorus, was writ- 
ten especially for the occasion, and 
the part of the skald was taken 
by John Chrlstenaen. young Nor- 
wegian soloist, assisted by the 
Norwealan Chorus 

An all-Norwegian programme fol- 
lowed, under the direction of Mon- 
rad Malmin, when selections from 
Oiieg and Norwegian folk songs 
Vancouver and New Westminster 
•NoTWresTtan Cluba and addreaaea by 
tflfllt O O. MeOeer. H Rlndahl 
tnd Rev August Petersen were also 
gr.en. 



SHERWOOD CAMP 



LITTLE QUALICUM 
tlVEl 



On river. aee> end tuehwee. lust ecroee the Drtdee Pur-, ihel eottaeee. 
and eold showers warm bathlne. sea and^ fres i ^ » a er 



hot 



flshlne for eut-throat trout at mouth 
IC. B. B 



PO 



and qui board foe 

a a 



hire 
B.C. 



SOL DUC HOT SPRINGS 

In the heart of the Olympics— en -ottaees — danclne. Unnle. rtdaaa. hlklne. 
nine, mineral buhs-eicellent lace and stream fishine Bajevf swim mine 
Northweit • lariest outdoor hot m.neral tank Purtbee informatloa enu 

I C. MARTIN Sal Daa Hat tarlnaa. Part AoeelM. Suk 



HARRISON HOT SPRINGS 

P£an a l/aoo/u 



ROYSTON BEACH 



Royston Beach Auto Camp 



Ts*m forts >>le eebtns. furnished or unfurmsned Bhi»»rs 
eamtet en ' CTt» see*" etesrsrtc lieb» aw*w«vi>re. Ml -f 
miles north of Nanaimo. k* milee seruth •( Cempbeli BiTer 

B. Sfarain. Prae. 



and ur>.»«-de'e 
- - -e *i 



El 



HII. IN.. li»N< IM„ SSIMMIM. 

Mil I 1INNI1 




mm. 



I >»NI S--INIMI f«e mm „„.,....l 

asssl «»»l.at.if.. . r>r»-r .»»,,, t ...r feo-s • 

Itally « PH. « N B. reate.. V.»^..t — Ps. I«« 

\ |s«4sss stalk*. M II a en. mn4 I It a> aa. Welt, law 



Ham. s 



12 



j— 
_i 



THE DAILY COLONIST. VICTORIA. B.C., SIN'OAY. IMA 26. 19.>6 



SEVEN THOIjMNO ' 
PASS ENTRANCE 



recommendation 
Ij»tira A 



Promoted on 
Frank E. Baker 

Mary P Burns. Harry NT" Clarke. 
Marion C. Coulbear. Mary Craig- 
dnllte. Sonia J. Cunningham. Pearl 
M. Downtiworth. William 8 Duncan. 
Gwendolyn M Fouracre. Phyllis J 
Fox. James H. Oorst. Jean A 
Hamilton. Oeorge H Harper. 
Howard H. Henn. Wellealey W Is* 
bister, 8adle F. Jamirson. Jack K 
J( fTery, Betty I. Jones, Helen M. 
Kent.' Frederick Kllburger. David 
Li.ster. Kathleen Marling. Archibald 
8. Muir. Nancy A. Munkley. Filth 
M. Nellson. Henry J 
Kathleen Peat, Elsie C. Ralph. Law- 
rence A. Restall. Bertram Simms, 
Frances E. Simons Adelaide P. 
Simpson. Jar k E. Southern. 



mendation Joyce A Neil. Flora H 
Ross, John C. Wray. 

Van An da — Promoted on recom- 
mendation Thomas P Raftery. 
HKM HIN CENTRE 
Brechin— S. Bernice Ovington, 371. 
Promoted on recommendation: Vio- 
let M. Evans, James S Gold. Wlllred 
H. Gregory. Lucy E Newberry. Edith 



Bowen, | L 8 <. Minii Toru Uyeyama. L. Mae 

ZelUy. 

( VMI'IU I I. RIVER ( KNTRE 

Bloedel— Harry Adachi, 382; Marj- 
orie J. W. Wood. 382 
Campbell Falls— Ray Case, 360 
Herlot Bay— Gilbert A Krook. 416; 
John O. OhwaW, 416, Albert J. 
Clandcmng. J88 
Oy.ster Bay— Ruth P. Palmer. 480 

< KHAR. NORTH CENTRE 

Cedar. Ea.st— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Samuel Greenway, 
Nowotnlak. j oan m Roberts. Arthur E D Sun- 
nus. 

Cedar. North— Promoted on rec * 
ommendation: Florence D. Arml- 
.shaw. Norman C. Saunders. Alice M. 



T7 



Rhode, Kathleen A Oli- 



Tolm.e— Constance Reld. 474. Ed- Shaw, Robert I. B. Thomas 



ward Rand. 424; David Sutherland. 
409; Catherine M. Pebernat. 389; 
Peter Gorst. 381; Thomas Motters- 
head. 360. Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Ruth J Burdge. John 
A Camr-ron. Nancy M. Chater, 
Evangeline D/ile. Hazel F. Demp- 
sey, Eileen A. Ells. Helen B. Honey- 
church. Alice M Hornby, D. Evelyn 
Humphrey, .Miriam Litster. Doreen 
J. Mackcreth David Miller, Irene 4. 
G. Orr. Christopher O Pratt. Eliza- 
beth Rou.say. Marion I Rousay, 
Catherine A. Weeks. 

Model Phyllis A. Harwood. 394; 
David A. Wilson. 360 Promoted 
on recommendation Miriam C. 
Rver, Pamela Griffin. Neanie 
Brown. Dorothv E Pre.scott. John C. 
Campbell. John P. Archibald. 

I \ WM'M, NORTH CENTRE 

Deep Cove -Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Agnes J. McKechnle. 

Saanlch. North — Promoted on 
recommendation- Rolfe W Brock, 
Phyllis E. Deveson. Elsie M. Gum- 
mer Muriel P. Hall. Kathleen L. 
Hammond. Olen W Harrison, 



CHEMAINl S CENTRE 

Chemainus— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: John S. Aitken, John 
A. Cathey, B Rosaline Crucil, Mar- 
garet "M Eberts, J Gordon French, 
Yoshiteru D Hlgashi, Isamu Inouye, 
Michlo R. Inouye, MLsao C. Izuml, 
Theodore L. Jansch, Lura L. Kauf- 
man, Kazuko Kawabe, Leslie A. 
Knight. Mataharu C. Otsu, George 
J. Pedersen, Mary K Plnson, E. 
f Margaret Scott, Dale R. Stephens, 
' Irene V. Underwood, Eileen V. Work, 
Gladys V. Work, Norman J. Work, 
Kazuo C. Yoshida, Kumeo J. Yo- 
shida. 

Crolton— Promoted on recommen- 
dation: G. Stanley Dyke. Harry 
Slmmonds, Kazuko Takarabe 

Westholme — Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Jean L. Hay, Robert D. 
Howard. A1I1 



Douglas M. Lawson. Charles Sans- 
bury. 

Sidney— Oerald F Godfrey. 465 
Promoted on recommendation: 
Oordnn A Brethour. Frances L. 
Carlson. Elma M. cjnrmirhael. Ed-' 
ward F. Carter, Briiee E. Deildal, 
Oordon M. France. Ronald M. 
France. Audrey Le Vack. Margaret 
R. Morrey. Bobby D. Mounce. Ed- 
ward L Skinner. Benjamin P. J. 
Wells. Chlva Yanal. 

Al.ltERNT CENTRE 

Albernl -William N. Hunt. 459; 
Bernloe O. Cowley, 445; Fred A. 
Schwartz. 362; Laurance J Hanna, 
360; M. Elizabeth Milas, 360. Pro- 
moted on recommendation: Mavis 
E. Adams, Ijiura E. Alnsworth, 
Edith E. Bowes, Marjorie S. Eaton, 
Elise H Forrest. Carson M Free- 
land. Joan E. D. Hunt. Lois E. 
James. Lilly B Jacobsen. Edward 
C Miller. Elsie W Parker. Doris O 
8tnck. 

Beaver Creek Helen L Therens. 
403; Marguerite E Johnston. 366. 

Great Central— Jnmes Kitamura. 
376; Ma-sa Yoshikunl. 362. 

Albernl Indian Residential— 
Philip Tom. 420. 

BL1 BBI it Ml kk 

Blubber Bay - Promoted on recom- 



line 
ver. 

Langiord Promoted on recom- 
mendation, Rodney W. L. Bayles, 
Ada Car low, Claud W R. Heggle. 
Claude H. Hlncks. William C. Ord, 
Audrey M. Prior. Patricia M Rib- 
bans. Kitty 8taverman. Alice E. D. 
Taylor, Phyllis M. Wilkinson. 

Metchoaln — Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Violet C. Bell, Ruth 
Beckingham. William J. Martin, 
Terence C. McCreight. 

COMOX CENTRE 

Comox— Jean D Outline. 491; K. 
Rita Whelan. 488; John C. Hawkins. 
360; George Longland, 360: Pro- 
moted on recommendation: -Flor- 
ence E- Bennett. Mary E. Cox. Ralph 
Cox, Margaret W. Cearley, J. Ken- 
neth Falrbum, Rita C. Gray, Geor- 
glna F. Laban, Nellie O. Pratt, Ron- 
ald W. Pratt, Norman H. Russell. 
Quentin M. Russell. 

COl RTENAY CENTRE 

Courte nay— James H. Boffy, 360. 
Promoted on recommendation: C. 
Mary Aitken. Ruby I. Bowen, Mar- 
guerite Burnett. ELsie F. Carter, 
Janett N.*»Day, Gloria L. Edwards. 
Vincent H Everett, Jean E. Fraser, 
Roy C. Orieves, E. Eleanor Hames. 
Peter O. Hughes. G. John Hurford. 
Marjorie V. Kerton. Ian Maclntyre, 
J. Noel McPhee, Eleanor M. Mac- 
Quillan, Murray MacQuillan, Gordon 
S. Roberts, Anthony C. Selfe, K. 
Hale Stewart. Joan M Straith, June 
H. Tribe. Oliver Tarling, Norman M. 
Wood. 

COWICHAN LAKE CENTRE 

Cowlchan Lake— Promoted 011 rec- 
ommendation Dennis C. Bailey, 
Verna V. Barker, Ernest L. Boulet 



ted on 



lette, 360 Promoted on recommen 
dation: Harry A. Mclntyre. 
HA RE WOOD CENTRE 

Chase River— Promoted on rec- 
ommendation: Ethel L. Weeks. 

Harewood— Marjorie 8mith, 399; 
Josephine Bortlgnon. 360 Promoted 
on recommendation: Grainge M. 
Bradwell. George Bramhall. Joy 
Buck, Sadie Cook. Dorothy M Dor- 
man, Frances P. Foster, William C. 
Harris. Paul Macham. Donald Nell, 
Dora Simpson. Frank 8mith. Ar- 
thur J Spencer, W. Grant H. Spen- 
cer, Muriel Stobbart. Beryl 8tod- 
dart. Kenneth Wright. 

Nanaimo Bay -Promoted on rec- 
ommendation: A. Margaret Devlin, 
A Anne Green. William Ostle. 

Nanauno Indian— Harvey Matlce. 
371. 

St. Ann's— Margaret J T. Dcdln- 
sky. 460; Dorothy A. McVicker. 452; 
Veronica McLaughlin. 400; Mary 
Savoie, 388; Mary Letchford, 364. 
JAMES ISLAND CENTKK 

James Island— -Promoted on rec- 
ommendation: Wallace Bond. David 
Ooldle. C. Orace Jennlson, William 
H. Kldd, Wlnnlfred Wat-son. 
KAPOOR CENTRE 

Kapoor— Promoted on recommen- 
dation; Thomas V. Bowers. Kozo 
L Saito. 

LADYSMITII CENTRE 

Ladysmith— Promoted on recom- 
mendation— Frances A. Andrulonis, 
Albert Battie. Raymond Battle, 
Clifford Brown. Orace W. Cowie. 
Helen E. Currie, Norman P. De 
Lucia. Mary J. E. De Wilde. Vera E. 
De Wilde. Audrey F. Dick. Gladys I. 



Harvey Carnell. Nell Eckert. Malcolm j Dou - Thelma A. Emblem. William 



COBBLE HILL CENTRE 

Bamberton— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Dorothy E Baldock. 
Edna M Fielder. Dennis B. Perrlus. 
Leslie H. Wilson. 

Bench— Promoted on recommen- 
dation: Joe Roland Hughes. 

Cobble Hill— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Joyce E. Cummins. 
Joan E. C. Maslin, John A. Maslin. 
Ronald C Raine. 

Malahat Station— Promoted on 
recommendation: John W. Olofson. 

Mill Bay— Promoted on recommen- 
dation: John V. La Fortune, Mysle 
O. Perry. Oeorge B. Wilkinson. 

Shawnigan Lake— Promoted on 
recommendation: Trevor M. Ander- 
son, David W. Bell, Thoma.s J. Brew- 
er. Evelyn M. Ed'DeLs. Anita Marie 
Luckovlch, Rita M. Weber. 

Sliawnigan Lake. West — Promoted 
on recommendation: John A Allen 
< OLWOOD CENTRE 

Albert Head— Promoted on recom- 
mendation Jean A. Marco tie, Roy 
O. McMinn. Wishart 8 Welch. Frank 
D. Spencer. 

Col wood — Promoted on recommen- 
dation: Kenneth F. Bavle.s. David 
C. Deeprose, Geoffrey A Deeprose. 
T. Bruce Milburn. 

Happy -Valley— Promoted on rec- 
ommendation: John D Blenkin- 

sopp, Alexander Caton, Eric W. Clay. I ard H. Bazett. Marshall Bel 



G. Gillespie. Norman H. Gravelle, 
James Hatter, Lillian A. John-son. 
Irene A. McLean, Edla Olsen. 

Nixon Creek.- Promoted on recom- 
mendation: William A Baleman, 
Margaret V Magnon. Rose L. Mag- 
non, Elmer F. Rylander. 

Yount— Promoted on recommen- 
dation: Margaret Campbell. George 
R. M. Fiddler, Verla O. Ness, Winni- 
fred M. Rubins. Howard E. Southin. 
CUMBERLAND CENTRE 
Cumberland— Dorothy I. Brown. 
388; Heromi Saito. 375; Gwendoline 
C. Rutherford, 363. Promoted on 
recommendation William Arm- 
strong. Doris Brown, Milford H Dev- 
lin. James R. Dick, Helen I. Eadie. 
Rees W. Evans. Dorothy V. Hutton, 
Richard M James. Yasiihiro Kaga, 
Tetsuo Kawagauchl, Harry Ken- 
mare. Barbara R. McNiel. Bessie P. 
K. Mah. John Martin. Hideo Matsu- 
kura. Arthur Mortimer. Sueyoshi 
Ogakl, Chlzura Okuda, Chrissie Rob- 
ertson, Helen O.' Robertson. Maryko 
Saito, Masato Sora. Shigekl Sora. 
Rhinya Tateyama. Myrtle E Vahle, 
J. Wyntour Vaughan, Yoshimie 
Yaguichi. Toshiko Yano. 
Bevan— Beverley E Gibson. 365 
Minto— Teruo Harada. 446; Kan-' 
eko Tahara. 387; James Small, 374. 
I>l NCAN CLM KE 
Duncan — Robert Wood. 520; 
Thomas Aitken. 502; E Elizabeth 
Woods. 451; Elizabeth M Lemon. 444 
Promoted on recommendation: Rich- 
Minnie 



Kenneth O. Duncan. Marjorie E. 
Hutchinson. Oeorge S. Hutchison. 
Eileen Jones. Phyllis H. Lock, Ade- 




wniRrvrR roi r.o 
"iiuhir 1 mi 00 



Be Beautiful 

PERMANENTS 

.new on. MUIIM 

KHillT MONTHS - GI'ARANTEI 
PnONB A Bo I T Ol'S NEW LOW I'Kh I S 

\Iolcr llairdrcssing School 

ui»« notOLAs it room M m o m o 1011 



ALTERING ISLAND 

FERRY* 






.A. 



EXCURSION 
• CRUISE 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29 

Enjoy • delightful dn»e by Motor Coach along the Saanich 
Peniniula to Swarti Bay, where the ferry Cy Peck, m boarded 
for a rtfrething crime through tha beautiful Gulf lilandt 
The Cy Peck will call at the following Gulf Itlandt en route Pas- 
tengeri may ditembark at any of theie rejorfi — reioining the ihip 
on the return |ourney— or continue with the cruiie to the la»t port 
of call. 



BEAVER POINT 
PORT WASHINGTON 
GALIANO ISLAND 
MAYNE ISLAND 

Optional Stop 

Lunch may be obtained at any of the ifop». or picnic facilitict 
may be 



PORTS 

OF 
CALL 



7 hours stop 

6' 2 hours stop 

' 4' 2 hours sfop 

4 hours stop 



Can will not be carried on tha ftrry. but 
Swarti Bay. 



RETURN 
FARES 



B«wi • f t Coach l.lnri n»rrrt ti • » m 
E»rrr lf»»»t *mrli Hmt •! 10 • m 



Bu< and 



Ferry 

Children 



'1 



•^5 



Ferry Only. T5<f ; Children. H»t 



DAILY SAILINGS 



0AILY EXCIPT WEDNESDAY 
Lr Fulford Harbor . 8 15 a.m.. 10 JO am 4 00 pm 6 45 pm 
L» Swartt Bay — 9 30 am. II 30 am. 5 00 pm ; 45 p m 

WEDNESDAY ONLY 

L«a*e Fulford Harbor. 8 IS am; Lea«a Swarft lay. 1H0 pm [neth M I uUun 

EXC1 K>lo\ E) |W s vn K I > \ ^ 
To Mid From SALT SPRING ISLAND 

Leave Fulford Harbor 1 15 pm 6 45 pm 

Leave Swarti Bay , 2 00 pm 7 45 p m 

ALL CARS (Including Dnv.,1 $1 HO lftMIB 



Bonsall. Dora W Boyd, Rosanne 
Bradshaw, O. Herbert BuckJiam, 
Fannie M. Buckmaster, Cecil Clark. 
Murray T Crelghton, Ruth Dickson. 
Edward Thomas Dolhenty, Walter 
Driver, Russell L Els, Fre<la Ellis. 
Ruth M. Esscry. Robert B. Evans, 
Stella Ford. Lynn P Praser, Vera L. 
Gibson. William T. Olandfleld. A. 
Harold OreR.son, Annie M. Gnfnn, 
Gertrude Hailing. Dorothy T. Ham- 
ersley, Leonard J. Hopton, Marie D. 
Irvine. Charles R. G. Johnston, Irene 
Jordan. Lloyd B. Leemlng. G. Ray- 
mond E Manzer, Mary Maxwell. Mil- 
dred A. McCoH, Charles A. Peterson, 
Miriam E. Pipe, John Porter, Nor- 
man J. Prest, Elaine E Purdy, 
Daphine E. Purvey, Raymond G. 
Purvey, Douala* M. RedtrraVe. Wit- 
Ham K. Reilly, Robert 3 Robinson. 
Robert J Sanderson. Olive C. Sel- 
lars, Patricia Sherman. John P. 
Smith. Gordon R Spears. Henry C. 
Sweatman. Harold Tarrls, Tokio 
Tatebe, Wlnnlfred I. Van Dvke, 
I Prank 8 Wijkin. Eileen E Willis. 
Margaret Woods. 

Cowichan— Promote on recom- 
mendation ' Cherry A Hooper. 
Clarence J. Ross, John E Ward- 
roper 

Olenora— Emily G Greenway. 360; 
B. Molly Doldge. 360 Promoted on 
recommendation: Alma M. Rogers. 

Koksllah— Promoted on recom- 
mendation Ralph T. Corfield. Oor- 
don J. Evans. Ivy O. Ford. Oordon 
R. French. Albert T. Oiles. Mary M. 
Palmer. M Audrev Vye. 

Mavo— Promoted on recommenda- 
tion Viola H K Chambers 

Mount Prevost- Promoted on rec- 
ommendation: E. Mary Pollock, 
James S. Pollock. Verna, L. Eber- 
hard. V. Viola Portelanrr 

Rahtlam — Promoted on recommen- 
dation E Leona Rtiief 

St. Ann s -Loon U. Dirswar, 
Jotm ,T. Rev. 44? 

F WW L'INTll 

Bowvr V. June Fielding. 413 

Deep Bay-Ravmond Rtock.uid. 
430. Constance A. Domav. Fioi- 
enro Ferguson. 360 

Faiuiv B«v — Melrin H C Cut ran 
402. Promoted on recommendation 
John C Robertson 

Union Bay— Alice M Muschamp. 
372: M. Ethel Shllhto 372 Promot- j 
ed on recommendation Pauline j 
Home. Oeorge E. McKay. 

(. ABKIOI.A. NORTH ( KM RE 
Gabrlola. North — Promoted on 
recommendation John Cox. Glen- 



L. GrouheJ. A. Marie Oullhamoulle! 
Ruth G. Higgins. Frank Jameson. 
Doreen M. Joyce, Earl P. Kent, 
Alexander Kllpatrlck. Mary Lap- 
sansky. Pearl M. Lively. George B 
McLeod. Douglas c. McPhee. Sylvie 
M Maun'is. John Murray. Doris I. 
Noye. Jean M. Porter. F. Robert 
Porter. Antoinette Pozzi. Bet.sy D. , 
Quavle. Mwrvaret P Hepytn. Domrbu | 
A Thicke. John W. Thomas Douglas 
J. Thomson. Lily E. Twentyman. 
Edith M. T. Yori. Louis J. Yori. 

Diamond Crossing— Promoted on 
recommendntlon: Francis A. May- 
ovskv. MarRaret C. McKinlry 

HALOOI M ISLAND CSNTM 

Malcolm Island— Terttu T. T. Aro. 
462; Edsel A. Kaarlo. 455; J. Oordon 
Campbell, 360 Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Dorothy M. Anderson. 
Peter J. Campbell. Doris L Hilton. 
Thelma J. Kordahl. 

M ITNI ISLAM) CENTRE 

Mayne Island— Ptomoted on rec- 
ommendation Takeshi Kadonaca, 
Gordon G. Odberg. Phyllis Odberg. 
Gordon S. Robson. 

OYSTER. NORTH CKNTEI 

Oyster. North— Promoted on rec- 
ommendation Frank F Burrill. 
Evelyri S Cairav K Isobel Maln- 
warlnK. Tommy B Michael 

Waterloo— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Lily Graham, Made- 
line Manca. 

PARKSVH I E C| m , {K 

French Creek— promoted on rec- 
ommendation: Henry Bailey. Edith 
M Briplashaw. Norman D Foster, 
Kathleen 8 Gault. Norman W. Nel- 
son. Helen Strome. 

Montrose— Promoted on recom- 
mendation: Clara M Clarke, 
Charles E. Dawson. Sybil E Hav 
Lois M. Streeter. 

Parksville— Jack Tranrteld. 300 
Promoted on recommendation: 
Margaret J. Abernethy. Olive T. 
Clarkson. George F. W. Cole. Dor- 
othy E Douglas, MarRaret R. Ford. 
Stanley E. C'.ill. Irene M Harrison, 
Edna M. McDermid. Barbara Petr.- 
RTew. Dorothy M. Skinner 

Red Oap— Promoted on recom- 
mendation Tamiko Sarayama 
PI \DI It Isi \M) ( | N | , (| 

Pender I' land — Promoted on rec- 
ommenrhrtron ', Elmer M Bower- 
man. Rov A Brackett. JoarJ L. Brad- 
ley. Edward Corbett. William D 
Corbett. Eric J Orinimoif. Thomas 
W. Muir. Marie A. Norman. Mar- 
garet H. SticlnRs. Esther' A. Teece 

Pender Hand. South4-Promoted 
on recommendation: 8y >11 Conery. 
Norman D. W. Georgesor 

Saturna Island - Prrlmotrd on 
recommendation John P Cas.-el- 
man. Arthur O. Ralph. 

port ai.be r \ i cwmmt 

Port Alberni— Dorothv I. Oreen. 
467; Tadao Takrshlta, 386; J Stan- 
ley 8inclalr. 384; Lucy 8. Welch. 
371; Sum! Ota. 361 Promoted on 

recommendation: Stanley J. Bett. 
Dorothv Boy Ian. John H Braven- I 
der. Lillian E. Brown. Evrlyn L. 
Bunui.,U)uise c. Christie. Evel>-n M. 
Clarke. Martin Clausen. Kenneth A. 
Crowshaw Leonard A 'dimming. : 
• loan \v. Dowding. Anthony C R | 
EmbXon, .John W Frasor. William 
C. Garrard. Alrxmidcr N. Ollfillatn, 
Shril,) P. HockiuK. Phillip Jiolme*.! 
Voshie Ik^da Keith Joyce. Jran 
Kowaichuk. Irene MUloriey" 'WarfTf 
dington McGarrieh. Ian J Mc- 
Gr^Ror. Howard A McLean Mary '< 
A M.-Mii;a_n. Edward J . Nj£h__LU-4 

C, o: "l to'roi hv Powell, Vii- 
let E Rcade. Goorce R Saunders 
Oertrude E M Tucker. Hazel >. • 
Wallace. Carl W. -Walker Kathrvn 
M. Weaver — 



PORT IMRDV CI N'T R E 

fOUT Hardy— Promoted -on^ero:,.- 
| mendation- JuTla De Witte. Tulla 
LA. Lyon. QY»rrine o Woods. 

QI MM CM RE ICS 
* Hi!her— EhrabeTh M Oordon. 421, 
Mary C. Galloway. 414 Promoted <>r 
recom men'rfST^r^ElJallntLXL- F 



FASSENGERS 



Fares 



Automobilat Imcluding driver) . 



Trucki <inrludinq driver I 
Motorcycle* 'including drrvtri 

For F»rth#r Information and Motor Coach 
Fhone E 1177 I 1171 



UaJ Return 

mm r*5c to SI 50 

25c 

$125 to $2 00 



icr. 

QualK urn Br^ch - Promoted on 
recommendation Elizabeth J. Bal- 
lazel R a Miller. Patrjria Y 



CULF ISLANDS FERRY CO. 

UMITE0 




' ( ■ XN'.I > » I M RE 

^aWEC?r~ Momt- i> ern 9t e a: e n — rec 

ommendation Muriel A. Stev.art 

Burvovne Bay - Promoted on rec- 
ommendation Margaret MV Cairns 
Divide Promoted on recommen- 
dation. June Bennett Natalie A 
Jame.skl. Lorraine WftKeTJfi 
Oanges Harbor— Promoted on rec- 
| ommendation: Arthur V. Drake. 
Kenneth J Eaton. Brian N. Inglis. 
Kazuko Mikado. Idlth E Mr.. 
Mackie Nakamura, Harry A. Rob- 
erts. Maureen JL Jevmour Ralph ^ p.. v .'er. Dorothv fT Warren Tor- 
Seymour. Arthur C. Stacey. Herbert ; >| v Wold 
O. Tweedhope 



D Sanders. 

Quallcuin, Luue— fvM>e; m c 
*hrr. 360 Promoted on recom- 
mendation Vera E. Thurlborn 
Helen Welch. 

QCATSINO C ENTRE 

Qua Utoo— Promoted on recom - 
i mendation Birdie M Perrie. EUle 



Suggestions 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii|i 

Now! A Sheerer, Clearer Stocking = 

That Wears 
Longer I g 

"Mir-o-kal I 
Twist 



ummer 



u 



»» • = 



Hand- 
Em broidered 

Huagarian 
Blouses 



f> 



V 



BY KAVSI-.R 



ifrht at. = 

91.00 = 



40 



See the ultra-sl 
two-thread weij 
per pair 

Or the sheer thrce- 
thread weiplit at, per 
pair $1.15 

Shown in the popular 
coppertones, also heige 
and grey shades. Sizes 

*• • to toft. 

— Hosirrr. Main ilajfjM 



= Long-Sleeved Styles at 



$5.95 



Lovely embroideriti in brilliant eolotinffl are the mak- 
ing of the^e <heer voile "peasant" B16UKI, CilrJtCl of 
white or champaKne. Sizes 34 and 36 Oniy. 



Cottons forSummer | 

When It Comes to Frocks i 
FoTHome! 



SHEER FRILLED 
BLOUSES 



Are Also Lovely for Summer, 
n d ^) nly 



$3.98 



Swish tlievf drcs>es through the suds — you'll find their = 
colorings ^ fresfi and lovely as ever. <ioo<| qualitv = 
prints and plain-color materials in "fhirtmaker" or = 
more dressy styles to suit both misses 
and women. I'rice _ 



$1.95 1 



Nothing more feminine, more dainty, than the<e blouses 
of fine triple sheer with dainty frilly fronts and finished 

with (aggotting and pin tucking*, Lpng-tlecvcd stvles. 

White or eggshell. Sizes 34 to 44. 



Artist 
Smocks 



('•'«"! quality print* and 
plain broadcloths are fea- 
tured in the^e attractive 
sinockv Verv smart styles 
with bias binding, abo 
plain numbers. 

Bach 

— Whlirwear. l»t Floor 



hi 



$1.95 ■ 



0 



Hammock 
Couches 



Pi iced to Clear 

Votir opportunity to 
get a real tine quality 
couch at a low price. 



Art 
Needlework 



In Several Interesting 
Features 

\ Selection ol Needlepoint 

Pieces suitable foe picturet ( 

fire»ide licncheN. frmtsto. lis, 
chair bac|ll and seat«, fire 
Screens and wall pancb. 

4iHete*twri » h sigtrsr HPricei 



2 Only. HAMMOCK COTCUKS. compb te with stand and ran..pv. Coil lprill| 
seat, upholstered back; canopy finished with wind screen back; curiam covering 
of floral troyto* awning. (TOO JTA 

Regular, each, .v : 00, foi l^aCw>OU 



= I'Ol 



LARGE GARDEN UMBRELLA— 

C-tn[>lrte with table. Umbrella has 

tight-foot spread, adjustable two>piecc 

stick and covered with floral trovtex 

awning, Table enamelled white or 
green. Regular $2'>.75. 



$22.50 



\ ERANDA CHESTER !•' I E L I) <>r 

GLIDER COUCH with coil- spring seat, 
three cushions and three-cushion back. 
Covered with fancy flor: 
green, black" and orange. 
Regular $37.50 for 

— Drapery. Jnd floor 



$29.75 



range from 

to 



7.»r 

930.00 



- FINE 
LINENS 



Book-Erjds with stencil 

canvas for needlepoint, 
rleav) veneer wood frame. 
Including wools for work* 
Ing, ^ 'i implete, pair $1 .01* 

Work Stan ds with frames 
and black >atin -tamped 

with lining and embroidery 

threads. Complete for, 
each J*1.JM» 

—Art N»#dl»»ork, tat Floor 



f 



In Our Kodak 
Department 

Developing and printing 
work is of • the" highest 
order. Here: you are fs^~ 
Mtrrd OT lh* very best frn- 

ish and your snapshots will 

not fade. — 
- Lower M«!n floor 



— Including Many 
= Mand-Kmbroidered Pieces 
EE All Exceptional Values 

= w iiiTK cutwi »rk wi) idi i;r 

EE L W E IX N'CHEl >\ SETS Exoii* 

— sitely embroidered. Cloth 72 \ ll»x 
=E inches and* twelve napkins. Priced tit 
= PS6.M 

EE WHITE CITWORK \M) HAND- 

EE i:.Mi:K< dDEREp TE \ SETS— Cloth 36 k 

== ^6 inches and four napkins A set S.'J.fJ.'* 

= OYSTER LINEN DINNER SETS— 

= Hand embroidered, hand hemstitched. 

=^ Cb.th 72 x pis inches and twelve ii. qp 

== k '"> f a>10.50 

~~ HAN13- EM BROIDERED MADEIRA 
TKA Cl.( mis-Size 36 x 36 j... hi 

Each ion 

fltlSH LINEN J&A.\fASK SETS— 
Cloth 72 \ 72 inches and f» napkins 

910.00 

Cloth 72 x m tscnes an<l k napkin! 

l loth 72 \ litX ini'hr-. and U\VV~\ nap 

f 17.50 



/ 



rv 



.* - ■ 



kina tor 



BRIDGE, AND TEA SETS of oyster 
linen with colored embroider) ami ap- 
pliques. Cloth .*f> x 36 inches and four 
ins, A set %'.\.\ T»0 
LINEN DAM \ SK LUNCHEON 
SETS with hemsttfehed edges' 
< loth 45 x 45 .inches and four napkifll 

93.50 

Clotti 54 x P inches and four napkmv. 
N ' SM..V) 
i loth 60 x ko in« he. md six napkins. 

95.75 

I'll. LOW CASES — All hand embroid 
crrd. A \ftv fme selection Priced 
from 91.00 ■ 92.27. 



■ '15 frN'I.V. II \M ) ROI1 \ERV. I > ;.: VDEIRt s 1 1 E I T 



$4.95 



ShTTS— Regular value, ■ ac t. p9. 93 r*or HALP PRICE 
\ set Includes one sheet, '*) x 108 inches; one pjjir pj (patcrting piltow^slM. 

-Un»nt. Main roor 



DAVID 



ENCEP 

TED 



Isabella Point— Promo: ed of rec- 
ommendation A Kathleen Laev. 

Veviivlu*— Promoted on rei'om- 
mendation' Ruth I Ooodrlch " 

Vesuvius North — Promoted on 
reeommrndatton Kenneth Byron. 
Wll'.lam A. Sampoon. 

Formbv Hou.s^ A Elizabeth 
Scorme*. 3S7; Richard P Baker. 373 
(.11 rORf) |S| \ND < r \TRr 

Ollford 



Lavio- 



s " W \RH I PPIR ( » mri 

Ssyward. Upper-William P R 
Buckley, 3P3 

SOOKF ( I \ THl 

Otter Point— Promoted on revons* 
mendarton W.Kenneth Drxft. W. 
A.fred Shambrook. 

Shirley - Promoted on recom- 
mendation T. Richard Arden. D 
Clifford Banner. P Edwin Banner. 
E Arthur Clark 



Sooke Promoted on reeommen 
. dAUon; MurM E. Oetile, IV-Bmr 
- -Stnlth. Wilfred J. Strong 

Sooke EX<;t— Promoted on rerom 
mr-ndation A Walter Bro»n 

Sooke, WofTh— Prorr.ofr,rf 6n r*>«-^.^' 434 
ommendation Me. bourne A. Dun- 
can. ,. 

SQI JRRfcJ. COVI C'ENTR t 

Squirrel Cove M Jean Jardine 
r *)4: Madge B M -on. 4R3 Pro- 



TOI INO < fVTRF 



wn 1 iNt.iov r ETfTM 



rri'.t'^l on rr-e^mmrndafion Irm» 



m< 

Clnvoquof-Peter Karate OS. Departure Bay - Promoted on T. Arman, William R. Colweii 
O t o fgc tin o tu. 4 M: - i-k T" — 

Torino— Tama Yoshida. 
I:. Ravi(i« 



IfaSsMefrTdatlon 

low^ ■ 

Lari'zvilie— BeJDlvy 



ftOfcVI N i \ N'TRE 

M fiuljran - Bernice R. 

360 



Tv>lum- Arthur O. 
Mary Pornt!. 399; Donovan J 
moted on recommenda'.on Eisie ^ Bedford. 310 Promo-ed on rerom- 
E. Nlehols. H Marsery Nichols | mehri.i • ion Rohm C Bisa Murte] 
WhaMown-Morna P Humph- J Bl*kely. asu* rarwMlpi Fr#d 

. . , | Cr o c k-» « , Iain A MavDonald Wtl- 

TIH RI.OVS Cf.NTRE I Ham Mar Donald. James H Murhell. mCBBat le ei 

Blind ChanneT-Thelm* Gilbert. ! Robert r Mltehell. Helen Na:rn. O.jeulette. PranSSS 0 Hflaon. Ernest 
442 1 Stanley V Parkin. Molly Pt»<fcy. J Joseph T, 

Stuart IsiaTd Irene Riias. 3M .Marion Wiltaon. Eileen Woodruff '»»■«* Von 

n '^Li 1 ^^ 4 ** I'CU'ELFT CITNTRF WWLUHQWH MM r,r ( 1 sir) 

hurston Bay— M«ae M Johnson f, .e>. Promo-ed ^ r ^ orn . g££ 

Moruhltav 



Neerln. 

Promoted on recommendation H 
Doaglii Thick. 

Mountain— Eva Klrkpatrtek. 3«3 
Promo-cd on recommendation : 
Lome H A.cxar.£lr:r. DoioUiy L. 
HorUi. Ar'hur Lulla?. 

Northneld— Promoted on recom- 
mendation C Wilfred MeOarrttle. , 
MarmeT X: Tloaa 
^>llln<tron Promoted on re,com- » 
MTlire Prsns Esther 



Praneia A Pel- Wellington. South - Promoted on 
, re<y>mmendatk.n Don* M Cald- 

ir. 1 



well. Mary' E. Caldwei!', Minnie 
Cartwrimt, Alma V Oreen. Waiter 
T. Maa.«.anen. Oraoe WllUama. 




Schooltx» s Arurwer- 
uae of ras is for people 



The 
to sU 



Chief 



PLANT LICE 



Thomas. Leo- 



• ••*r»>) or »t» •fitl »»f with n»». »pnn- 
im then anta utmun it , *iah M 

"h»m from Mr* ~ ' 



W»-M«rsiier1te j rxek. 
1 482. MArgaret Bowater. 371. 



'.'.is 14 tnewt p*f. Mo atr » r»ur eher- 
nr.ed pl«iiti I Ma .a.r tir rar.not ln!-ire 
•>•» rtt'i aellMW follaea m blnsaoena ta 
M.n4. airirr I ana, •> aa al all Drae. 



-Mer farsv ttl m 
r*«*e*sj * • ear •«« a at4 





(KSTABLlSHEn \K*> 




NO. 191 — SEVENTY-EIGHTH YEAB 



VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SUNDAY, JULY, 26, 1936 



KENNY BLACK TOPS FIELD IN $5,000 OPEN GOLF 

\ • 11 1 1 ■ — ■ 

Royals Swamp Cal gary Footballers^ in Second Game of Dominion Series 

"sensational round = 
of 63 gives young 
amateur the title 



New Westminster 
Blanks Prairie XI 
12-0 in Vancouver 



Canadian Track Stars Pose for Deck Picture 



Royal City Squad Hand* Alberta R<'|>r«Miilali\ r«. 
Worst Defeat in History to Reach Dominion 
Cup Final — Coulter Nets Six Coals — Half- 
Time Seore 8-0 Ccmmell Ccts Four 



VANCOUVER, July 25 «7>._New 
Westminster Royals, British Colum- 
bia soccer champions, ran through 
a disorganized Calgary Callles 
eleven today for a 12-0 victory, the 



ing another pass from McKay, Just 
before time. 
Ilne-ups: 

New Westminster Royals — Stronge, 
Anderson. MrKlbbin, MacPherson, 
defeat an Alberta tram has | Harvey. W. Wheeler. Plndler, Mc- 
suffered In this province, and j Kay. Coulter, Oemmell, Watchorn. 

tha Albertans t ram th e | B p a i * . Onr : 

Calgary Callles — Barefoot. Mc- 
Kay. Wolfsberg. Gibb, P. Smith. 
Ogllvie. Freeman, Brown, Matthews, 
Law. West. 



PRIVATE ROBINS 
HEADS MARKSMEN 



Srnrm 99 Oat of 103 at Heals 
Range— Private C.lendenning Is 
One Point Behind 



Dominion soccer secies 

The Royal* won the first game 
of tha beat - of - three series here 
Thursday night, 2-1. 

Royals will now meet an Eastern 
Division champion yet to be named. 

Callles were outplayed from the 
opening whistle, and as Royals 
scored goal after goal, they became 
more disorganized than ever. Royals 
•cored twice In the first two min- 
utes of play. 

Half-time found the Britush Co- 
lumbians riding an 8-0 lead and 
four more goals found their way 
past Barefoot. In the Calgary net. 
In the second half. 

COULTER SCORE* six 

The veteran Casey Coulter proved 
the star of Royals' scoring craze, 
accounting for no leas than six 
goals, while Oeminell had a total of 
four with two assists. 

The ball was carried swittly to 
Callles' end of the field at the 
whtstle. Oemmrll rushed in as 
Barefoot tHrew out Watchorn s shot 
and scored before a minute had 
passed. He got another a minute 
later, taking a neat pass from Mc- 
Kav to beat Barefoot the second 
time. 

A few mUiutes later Coulter took 
another pass from McKay for the 
third Royal tally and then Oemmell 
scored, heading in Flndler's corner 
kick. 

In the meantime. Callles. ^- ; ^'t o » ".^''".^1; 
though realizing they were hope- (Opr. W. 0*m» II"!!,!"!! 
lessly outclassed, never gave up and 
made game attempts to keep the 
play away from their goal. But 
their effort* were unavailing as the 
atrong Royals eleven swept down 
the field time after time and kept 
Barefoot busy. 

About midway through the half 
the Westminster splurge started 
again Flndler banged the sphere 
In on a pass from Oemmell and 
then Oemmell took his turn, scor- 
ing on a pass from Harvey 



Put'ing on 99 out of a passible 
105. Private C. Robins, brilliant 
young army marksman from Work 
Point Barracks, was high scorer at 
the weekly shoot held yesterday aft- 
ernoon at HeaLs Range 

Private Oeorge Olendenning, also 
from the local Oarnson. finished In 
.second place with 97. one point be- 
hind the leader. 
The scores: 




Finlshef Seventy-Two-Hole Distance With Spark- 
ling Nine-Under-Par Card for Total of 275, 
Three 



Stroke! in Front of Field — Nelson 
\nd Thornton Share Top Money Prize 



Continued from Page 1 of 69 and 68. blew up in the morning 

him around the shoulder and patted 1 "Rhteon today and netted a 79 He 
him oji the back. Ken grinned In : recovered on the afternoon journey 

lor a 70. but his lapse definitely put 
him out of the running for the 



response. 

Black s card— 
Par put - ft 



leanVrslup Whn». how e v e r . e quu M * 

into the final six of the fifteen 



In 



442 444 , r )43 -34 
354 444 434 — 35—72 money winners and collected $83. 



343 334 324-29—63 

Ken's da/zling display of golfing 
shots was another climax to the 
third straight day of par smashing 



in nun mom v 

Bob Munday, Santa Rosa. Cal. 
came through with a laM-routui 6l>. 
after rounds of 71-74-72. Only two 



playing for Coin*, a Lancashire club. othora m , n(1 pm( . money brQk , )kar 



f.arrlaan— 

Pte C Robin* 

Pt» O (llendennlnc . 

Spr r. C Corry 

Onr C Raamuaaen . . . 

Spr. y a. Brown 

Mh (out Brit arte— 
Ifaj. F. Richardson .. 
C»pt B J Oarlfdcn . . 
Mlaa Owen Spencer . . . 
Mr. P. R Harm-mi 
Uia l J E Hutrhlncs 
Bmdr I 8 Brown 



loo sen sno t 

.34 34 31 00 

, 33 34 11 0S 

, II Jl It 01 

i 30 33 3* 01 

33 30 3* SO 
300 SOO SOfl T 

34 32 31 07 
II 13 31 0i 



These seven young ladies and their chaperone. plus well over a hundred others, were about the happiest folk in the Dominion as the Duchess 
of Bedford sailed from Montreal for Havre, France, en route to Germany, with them aboard. The pretty young ladies shown on deck are 
members of Canada's Olympic track and field team, and are. from left to right: Aileen Meagher, Halifax; Margaret Bell Vancouver; Dot 
Brookshaw and Jeanette Dolson, Toronto; Betty Taylor. Hamilton; Roxy Atkins and Hilda Cameron, Toronto; Mrs. W. E Stirling Halifax 

president of the W.A.A.F., and chaperone of the team. 



L -Bmdr SaMiat 24 30 JS S3 

Onr A K. Dunnett ...|.... 28 20 JJ 13 

Idth C anadian <irotli«h— I i 

30 32 32 04 I Capl W F Japlcv .31 31 33 US 

12 12 11 02 8«t. A. K. aSbC 29 10 33 M 

32 31 21 91 Bd<m. F nryirlale M ' II 02 

25 34 31 00 Bdvn I Culroas 27 31 33 01 

2< 13 M 00 PU A W. Evan* 27 31 31 «0 

20 II 20 M Brit -CHn Dunbar 30 31 27 SA 

20 31 31 S3 Sat C CuntU 30 32 26 Rl 



A lady who had bought a pair of 
Bilk stockings for thirty oents at a 
bargain sale took them back next 
day and complained that one of 
them had a ladder in It. 'Well," said 
the manager, "what did you •expect 
for thirty cents, a marble staircase?" 



Coulter got his third goal a few 
minutes later. It waa the best goal 
of the game as the veteran Royal 
took the ball from the half-way 
mark and ran throrgh three Cal- 
gary defenders to score from 
twenty yards out wtih a terrific 
drlv* that had Barefoot beaten all 
the way. 

Oemmell made It 8-0 for Royals 
Just before half-time, carrying the 
ball through himself. 

After the Interval Royals eased 
tha par* for a while but still held 
the upper hand over their Calgary 
opponent* and had little trouble In 
keeping the Albertans clear of their 
goal. 

BOTALI a\v\y a<;\in 

Westminster a t a r t e d anot her 
march a few minutes later, how- 
ever, aa Oemmell took a pass from 
Watchorn for the ninth Royal 
tally. 

Prom then on the game centred 
around Coulter and that veteran 
mada every opportunity count as he 
banged In three goals In the space 
of a few minutes 

Pint he scored on a pass trom 
Oemmell. then on a pass from Mc- 
Kav. He got his sixth goal of the 
heating Barefoot after tak- 



John Uurio Lift* 
Trnni* ( rou n nt 
Tacoma Court* 



1 



" ACOM A. July 25 l/P. — 
John Murio, veteran of the 
Pacific Coast, tennis strife, re- 
gained the Pacific Northwest, 
mens singles championship 
today as he defeated' Dick 
Bennett, Berkeley youngster, 
In the final at the Tacoma 
Lawn Tennis Club In straight 
seta. 10-8. 6-1. 7-5 

Dr. Esther Bartoah. Los An- 
geles, won the women's singles, 
•coring over Virginia Wol*ln- 
den, San Pranclaco Junior. 6-4. 
9-7. 

Bennett teamed with Paul 
Newton, of Berkeley, to win 
the mens double*, scoring 
over the Lo« Angeles duo of 
Robin Hippenstell and Vern 
Hughes. 6-3. 6-4. 8-10. 6-3. 

Dr. BartAsh and Vern 
Hughe*, of Los Angeles won 
the mixed doubles defeating 
Mrs Oolda Meyer Oroas arid 
Dick Hyde Berkeley. 6-2. 8-6 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT 



By Ripl<"> 




A" 6Ers<fi20°- 0 
"B BtTS«Sl5 0 - 0 

TrO SPLIT THE BETS 
BETWEEN TrffAV 

EACH agkeemng TO 

TAKE HALF OF The. 
OTHERS BET 

But 'B'l OSES Hl5 *t5*«86T 

HOH MUCH MOW Y 

wust'a'payto B 

? 



An? 

# 17." 



IhasE Boles of sa*f«ancsco\ 
Successfully held up 

27 STAGE COACHES - 

- without Pulling a trig^r. 

HEWASCAUGHTThc28«tT1ME 
AND SPENT 4 YEARS W JAIL 

After his release, the we ils rargo co 
paid h»m </25 a f*atm not to hold 

UP ANY AAORE ow TMfiR STAGES 





GOlDfiSH TURNfn WHiTt 
FROM FRIGHT/ 



a Pickle 

CONTAINING 
ANOTHER PICKLE 
Found bv 
m V SINJGMTTR 
CMtLAS 




Hammond Bats Out 
Century as Second 
Test Match Starts 

douemtenhire's Ureal Cricketef Carrief Bai for 

118 Kim** a«* Filmland Faeei India — Mollirr 
( omilrv lias Fir-I Innings Lead 



turned in by the contingent of divot 
stars from all parts of the continent. 
Including United States open cham- 
pion. Tony Manero; Oene Kunes. 
Canadian open titleholder; LItt'e. 
Horton Smith and a dozen others. 
BIO GAIXKRY ATTEM>* 

A gallery of more than 3.000 
crowded around the eighteenth 
green as young Black, Jimmy Thom- 
son and Willie Ooggln. American 
stars from Shawnee-on-Deluware 
and San Francisco, stroked down 
their final putts. 

Scarcely less .sen.sationaJ was 
Thomson's sparkling 65, seven under. 
A disastrous seven on the twelfth 
hole of his morning round, ruined 
the burly Thomson's chancea of 
topping the pros for lirst-place 
money of $1,200 HI* early 74 and 
his 65 added to previous sub-par 
rounds of 69. 70 held to 278. It gave 
him a tie with Byron Nelson, young 
pro from Rldgewood. N J., for second 
place in the field and top-rating in 
the pros. They'll split first and sec- 
ond-place money by a ruling of the 
tourney olllclals. Trie ruling holds 
for the remainder of the first fif- 
teen pros in the prize money. 

A play-off would have been held 
tomorrow for Nelaon and Thomson, 
but the 83.000 meet in Victoria 



today. Nell Christian, of Yakima, 
had a 71 over the last eighteen, 
while E J Harrison, of Little Rock. 
Arkansas, posted two 70's. 

Christian had a 73 after two 
earlier 71a. 

Harrison, after a par 72 Thursday 
took 74 yesterday 

Horton Smith. Chicago pro. and 
one-time Joplln ghost, had four con- 
sistent rounds of 70. 71, 73 and 72, 
while Ben Coltrln. twenty-eight- 
year-old San Francisco sharpshooter, 
after dotting a 66 Into his score yes- 
terday opened today with a 74 the 
same aa his Initial round, and fin- 
ished with an even 72 

HOW THEY SCORED 

•rnrM follow: 

Krn Blark. Vancouver 70 70-72 *.1 3.4 
Jimmy Thomnon. Hha«r- 

n«>-on-I>»lawar« . •••70-74-SS- 171 

Marl)ona!d Smith. Nanh- 

trlll*. Tmn »»-72 70 SS- 370 

Tony Manure. Ori>en«horo. 

NC Ti-«7-71-6» 271 

Tfrla Johmton. rwatur, 

111 70-73-70. «« ?«/ 

I Zlmmrrman, Portland W-70-M-7&- 2S1 
R Ouldahl. Bt liOiili . SS- 70-73 -T2- 2S1 
W. Ooatln. San FTanrUeo 70-71-77-72-2SS 
Don Sutherland. Vanrou- 

»T "H-A0.7t.74_ 

A Bell. San Mat.o. Cal 73-IWI 77-73 ?S0 
C. t>o<»r. Rorh»«t»r. 14 Y 74-74-80-72 2S0 
b UtUti Ch|ri»«o ,. 78 04-72 7.S 2H0 

C Shrppard. Loa Antrim 73-0»-74^ 200 
Al Zimmrrman. Portland 71 T!-74-70 M 
Z Eaton. Oklahoma .... 72-74 70-7* 



i P Kinrh. Sarramrnto .. 71 74-71-72 TBI 

tarting next Monday made this | h B a.«t.r Uno ji-.rh . 77-72-74-71-201 
rnpracticable aa the players were o.na Kun.a. Norrumwn 



b Robins 



Manchester. Eng. July 25 .— A , Meherhomji. not out 
vigorous onslaught by England's | Mahommed Nlssar. c Hardstaff, 
batsmen in the first day's play of 
the second test "match with ' India; f • Prrrr 
put the Mother Country In a good 
position to obtain a big first-innings 
lead when play is resumed Monday 



. 0 



:<.--.. 



13 
I 



After India 
for 203 runs, 



had been dismissed I 
today, the English 
players compiled 173 for two wlcketa. 
Wnlter Hamftiond. Oloucestershlre's 
dependable all - rounder, smashing 
out 118 not out. Hammond had been 
kept out of the first test through 
lllnesa, but his play showed him to 
be aa clever as ever. He gave a 
display of powerful driving and his 
century included 16 fours. 

While many matches throughout 
the flountry were curtailed on ac- 1 
count of ram, a crowd of 8.000 here 
saw a full" day s cricket that lacked j 
thrills until Hammond went after 
the Indian attack. 

VUU 1 > now 1 > wei l. 
Hedley Verity. Yorkshire spin 
'bowler, had the visiting players In 
difficulties throughout their innings, 
taking four wickets for 41 runa. 8. 
Waxlr All waa the onlv man to bat 
confidently and. putting up ft | 
masterly defence, he remained-,.. j_t 
the wlcketa nearly three hours to 









203 


BOWLINf 


I ANALYflfl 






O M 


R 


W 


O. O Allen 


... 14 3 


39 


2 




..15 2 


30 


0 


W. Hammond 


.. 9 1 


34 


0 


R W V Robins 


... 9 1 


34 


2 


H Verity 


... 17 1 


41 


4 


T. Worthlngton .... 4 0 


16 


1 



Not€d ProfY^ional 

To IMa\ Honda* 



score 42 runs 



Y. S Ramaswami 



- Lou,*v,ll.,Ky 

KXPLANATION KOR YESTERDAY'S RIPLEY CARTOON 
The Tear Down. Boild-l p Champion — Several vear> ago. a typewriter company conducted a national con- 
test among Ita salesmen to promote the idea of tearing a machine apart when demonstrating It Tha winner 
was E B Peterson, of Pocatello. Idaho, wflo established « record of two minutes fifty-three seconds for the 
standard tear-down and rebuild Job— removal of carriage, rack space lever supporting bar. front centring 
scale, and all the forty-two levers and type bar segment* in the msrtrine-replacernent of all parts, and the 
writing of one line. The contest was conducted in the com pan vs factory. 



adopted brighter tactics for 40. 

V. Merchant, reirarded as the best 
batsman on the touring eleven, 
made 33. and Amar Singh, now 
playing for Colne. a*La.opashlre club, 

got 37 

Matters did not look particularly 
bright for England When H. 6 
Olmblett. young Somerset profea- 
slonal. lost his wicket with only 
twelve runs on the board, but Ham 
mond and A E FagK Kent, carried 
the score to 146 before the latter 

1 was dismissed T Worthlngton 
played with Hammond -until the 
close of play. He was Included in 
the English team when Maurice 

' Leyland. of Yorkshire, met with an 
Injury while plaving for his country 
sgainst Nottinghamshire earlier in 
the week. 

THE SCORE CARD 

India 




I .scheduled to leave for the Island at 
1 midnight tonight. 

kMrra, MANI.RO TIED 

MaeOonald Smith, dour S< ot of 
Nashville, Tenn , and veteran of a 
hundred golfing campaigns, and 
Tony Manero, of Greensboro, N C„ 
United Stales open champion, tied 
with 278'h and will split third and 
fourth -place money. 

Smith breezed home in a smart 
68 m the inal eighteen He had 
pimiou.s roiiuts of 69. 72 and 70 
Manero, like Smith never o\er par 
i over the fc ur eighteen-hole rounds, 
slid in wit 1 another par-smacking 
mark to ell nax his final day. 69 He 
tacked it t » a 72, 67 and 71 in the 
1 earlier rou ids. 

Both Si nth and Manero. nine 
under par Tor the tournament, were 
just under In the morning with 70 
and 71, respectively. In the after- 
noon they started clicking and sliced 
par steadily. 

Terle Johnson ,* Decatur. Ill , pro, 
boomed around in another routing 
afternoon round for a 68 and a 
total 280 to hold down sixth place 
alone He was six under par for the 
day after a 70 In the morning and 
had cards of 70 and 72 for Thurs- 
day and Friday Freddy Wood, 
voung pro from Vanrouver Munic- 
ipaJ Links who led the field until the 
final eighteen holes, grabbed sev- 
enth place as he slipped from par 
to take a 74 and a total 281 
01 1 DAML w 1 11 i p 
Emory Zimmerman, Portland pro 
and one-time favorite of Pacifir 
Northwest amateur golf circles, also 

Slipped on his ,•;.■),', (TS U, take 

a 75 after posting a 69 in the morn- 
He had a 69 on the opening 
and followed with another 

sub-par 70 yesterday His total of 
n a tie with Ralph 



P» t»-77 75 70 201 

W Purwr. toattlr 71-74-78-70 201 

T loniworth Portland . 70 -71 74 -70 ?01 

P Coleman, t.oa Anrftf" 70 71 7* 71 203 
Stan Leonard. Vancouver 7O-7S-70-73- 204 

Harrr Winder. Vanro iver 73-71-7S 7 4 20S 
H Nampaon. B'irllnaam*. 

Cat 74-72-74-70 200 

B I,ovln*\ CharloM»<vlll». 

Va 71-7S- 71-70 200 

I, Dodaon. Sprint r> Id. 

Mo 74-74-77-71 700 

M Demaaaer. Mod"lo 

Cal 71 72 SO 7S 100 

J Hinaa. Oardan City. 

L I 71 70 00.72 mi 

J niikar. Vancouver 7S 74-70-7» lot 

J Brtrv. Vanrmivrr:. ..T.-74-n-71» 74 702' 
I, Johnson. Vancouver no cardl 



Siaf> chn^s 



him 



/ . j iQultUW, St. Louis, one of the - 

I par-busters, who also failed to hit 
his stride today He took a morning 
Tt and a final 72 to add to his (W 
and 70. 

Dave. Black, fathrr of the young 
amateur star who romped home to 
top the f|,i,j held a -hme-wav tie 
with L>we V Longworth. of Oakland 
and "Wee" Willie Ooggln 
Francisro. at 285 Black's two round, 
of 73 and 74 todav were far from 
Tyne form he showed yesterday when 
he carded a M „ u f|r „ t rwm 
an even 72 



\ ITIOIfAl it lOI • 

W. L P> ' 

Chicago 56 32 636 

St Louis 54 36 600 

New York 48 42 533 

Pittsburgh 47 42 528 

Cincinnati 44 43 506 

Borton 43 48 473 

Philadelphia 34 V5 3H2 

Brooklyn ... .... 31 58 348 

AMIR H W U sf. I | 

• w L Pet 

N« York 60 32 652 

Cleveland 52 41 559 

Bo- : on 51 43 ,4.1 

Chicago 48 42 533 

Detroit 49 43 533 

Wa.shington 48 44 M9 

Philadelphia .j 30 61 330 

8t Louis 29 61 322 

coast LCAOI 1 

* W L Pr 

SeH'tle 89 51 a75 

Oakland 65 55 542 

Portland 61 55 — .52* 

M»*fc.oni 62 :h :,i7 

Loj A nge esa ti . m — 61 498 

San D.ego « 59 61 i | 

San Franc, sco 58 fin 47'i 

455 



Sacrarr,»>nto 46 H 

INTER \ 4TION || I I lOtJI 

W L Prt 

Rorhe/;t^r 64 36 640 

nuSUlo 40 *41 594 

...i, *7 4» -M» 

Baltimore 55 47 |§| 

Montreal m 48 51 485 

of San I Toronto 49 M 471 

Albany 36 62 367 

Syracuse 32 67 323 



raeph QULDAHL 

\OTED St. Louis professional 
golfer. "%ho finished weH up 
gfUpngst the leaders In the Vancou- 
ver tS.000 op^n tournamcr,' ves'er- 



.JSSll P " V ^ lh * mo «t^nsUtent 
|0 . Of the meft He r Rr ded a 70 on 



for Ten Shilling*— The family home tt the famous Benitv family of England, situated near 
En ni.se orthy Wexford, was sold recently for a mere ten shillings— about 82 50— because the maintenance costs 
of the house In comparison with its real value were too heavy to attract buyer* The house was sold to an 
unemployed laborer who demolished It to salvage bricks, roofing slate and miscellaneous woodwork. 

all queries to Cartoonist Rlp:cy. c . 0 Kulg Feature*. New. York City. N.Y 



Mustag All. run out II 

V. Merchant, c Hammond, b ' 

Verity- : -- - ---- » 

Amar Singh, c Duckworth, b 

Worthlngton 27 day. and who will tee off in the 'he opening day. added a 71 renter 

C. K. Nayudu. lbw b Allen 16 I3 OO0 meet tomorrow at the Oak Bay »nd wound up with a pair of 

U S Ramaswami b Verity 40 link*. Ouldahl ended the Mainland 77 '' today 

Jehanglr Khan, c Duckworth, b tourney with a seventy -two- hole Six TJniUd Mat** dlmtrr* split 

Allen . r.:-^r; card of 283 eight strokes behlnl the f he six purse* f r0 m ^n*h place to 

C. 8 Nayudu b Verity 10 winner He is a smooth steadv fifteenth 

Mshsraj Vuflanagram. b Robins 6 golfer, and aiU be «tafcra*d closed 4 Orvllle White e>f Chicago who 

S Waxtr AH. e W,orthjngton, b at the local course during the three- v-t^rday ffnlshed a stroke back 

Verity 43; 



Island l anders 
If ill Stage Show 



Longworth also fell off from his 
par and «ub-par form In the final 
round posting a 73 alongside « 72 

and two 70*. { 

Officials of the Vancouver Island 
Dog PanCler*' Association decided 
at their last executive meeting to 
stage another show. I t will be held 
on August 20 in the Vancouver 
Island Coach Lines Building with 
the afternoon being set aside for a 
children a pet show and the eve- 
ning s regular, parlor show Further ' 
particul-trs win be announced later 
It was also derided -o hold a point 
dav battle of birdies and para, j the pace-setting Wood after round* j show on September 20. 



1 



~" 



\ 



14 



— 



THE D 



AILY COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY. II LY 2b, 19: 

1 \ — 



\ 




\ 



BIG FIELD ENTERED IN $3,000 OPEN TOURNAMENT 

Cubs Widen Lead Ov er Cardinals to Th ree Full Games— Yanks T riumph 

More Than Eighty 
Golfers Will Tee 
Off at Local Club 



Strengthen Hold 
On Top Position 
By Easy Victory 

Chicago Pounds Three Philly Pitchers for Nine- 
teen Hits and a 17-1 Triumph — St. Loui* Leeee 

To Bee*, 3-2 Yankees I lute Sox 

— Tim e Chicago Players Banished 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 

PHILADELPHIA, July 26 (*•).— 
The Chicago Cub* increased their 
National League lead to three 



New York Yankee* boosted then- 
American League lead to eight and 
a half game* today by taking the 

opejier of their "crucial" series 



games today, beating the Phillies, j with the White Sox. 5 to 3, in a 
17 to 4. while Boston defeated the 
St. Loula Cardinals. 

The Cubs pounded three Phtllie 
pitchers for nineteen hits. Inter- 
mingled with four errors and three 
bases on balls, while Curt Davis 
held his former teammates to six 
hits. 

Three of the Phils' scores came 
in the ninth on Bashores single 
and consecutive home runs by 
Chuck Klein, hi* seventeenth of 
the season, and Dolph Camilh. 

Davis pitched five hitless Inn- 
ings before Pinky Whitney batted 
for Oomez in the sixth and singled. 

It was Whitney's" first appear- 
ance since his Injury in the all-star 
game at Boston. He again singled 
in the eighth. R. H. E. 

Chicago 004 342 040—17 19 1 
Philadelphia 000 000 103— 4 6 4 

Batteries — Davis and Hartnett; 
Walter. Johnson. E. Moore and At- 



Bees Set Bark Cards 

BOSTON. July 25 (TP). — The 
Boston Bees defeated the St. Louis 
Cardinals. 3-2. today In the first 
game of thi ir current series. 

Boston made all three runs in the 
first Inning when Tony Cuockiello 
lifted a home run Into the left 
field bleachers, scoring Thompson 
and rene Moore. 

Johnny Mlze gained the Cards' 
runs when he drove a home run 
into the right field pavilion In the 
sixth inning after Pepper Martin 
walked R. H. E 

St Louis 000 002 000— 3 7 0 
Boston ... 300 000 000— 3 7 0 

Batteries — Win ford and Davis; 
Macfayden and Lopez. 

Pirates Down Dodger* 

BROOKLYN. July 25 (^.—Snap- 
ping out of a tie with a five-run 
attack In the sixth and seventh 
innings, the Pittsburgh Pirates to- 
day won their third victory In four 
starts by downing the Dodgers. 7 
to 4. 

Bill Swift's seven-hit pitching 
held the Brooklyn* in check In all 
but the second, fifth and seventh 
innings, as his mates finished 
strong to retain third place in the 
National League. 

Floyd Young's homer with a mate 
on base in the second lnnuig. gaye 
the Pirates an early start. 

— R H' E 
Pittsburgh 020 003 200- 7 10 
Brooklyn . 010 010 200 4 7 

Batteries — Swift and P.idden; 
Clark. Butcher. Baker and' Phelps 
Giants Rally to Win 

NEW YORK. July 25 (HI, — The 
Olnnt.s, helpless for eight Innings 
before Wild Bill Hallahan'a pitch- 
ing. pushed over three runs m the 
last <tt the ninth today to nose out 
the Cincinnati Reds. 5 to 4, and 
hold onto fourth place in the Na- ] 
t tonal League. R. H E 

Cincinnati. 100 000 111- 4 10 1 
New York - 000 020 003 - 5 10 o 1 



battle that saw three members of 
the Sox cast chased off the field. 

The Sox banished from the dia- 
mond by Umpire Bill Johnston 
were Manager Jimmy Dykes, 
Catcher Luke Sewell, and Coach 
Mervyn Shea, who disagreed with 
the way the arbiter was calling 
balls and strikes In the sixth inning. 
Dykes and Sewell were chased first, 
and a few minutes later 8hea was 
run off when he renewed the argu- 
ment. 

Ar-tt result, the crowd of 15.000 
booed the umpires so loudly that 
a cordon of police escorted them 
from the field at the end of the 
game. R. H. E. 

New York . 100 002 020— 5 9 2 
Chicago ... 002 000 010— 3 7 2 
Batteries — Ruff ing and Dickey; 
Lyons and 8ewell. 

Senators Trounce Browns 

ST LOUIS. July 25 <>P). — Jimmy 
Deshong extended his winning 
streak over the Browns to five 
straight today by letting them 
down with six hits while his mates 
pounded Jack Knott for seventeen 
hits and a 9 to 1 victory. 

The win pulled the Senators up 
to within a game of the fifth-place 
White 8ox. who lost to New York. 

R. H. E. 

Washington 010 130 130— 9 17 0 
St. Louis 000 100 000— 1 8 2 
Batteries— Deshong and Bolton; 
Knott. Vanat'a. Kimberlin and 
Olullani. Hemsley. 

Sox Root Tigers 
DETROIT. July 25 </P). — The 
Boston Red Sox. with two big bar- 
rages of base hits, mowed down the 
world champion Detroit Tigers to- 
day In the second game of their 
series. 18 to 3. 

Boston collected twenty hits off 
four Detroit pitchers, and scored all 
Its runs in the second and fifth 
Innings. Detroit got nine hits off 
Lefty Grove, but was able to score 
In only the third and fourth inn- 
ings. R. H. E. 
Boston ... 060 0120 000—18 20 1 
Detroit ... 001 200 000— 3 9 4 
Batteries— Orove and R. Ferrell; 
Bridges. Phillips. Sullivan. Kimsey 
and Ha v worth. 

Heavy- Hitting Affair 

CLEVELAND. July 25 t/P). — The 
Philadelphia Athletics out-clouted 
jTThe Indians today to defeat the 
0 tribe, 15 to 12, dropping Cleveland a 
full came in the American League 
pennant race, as New York trounced 
Chicago. 5 to 3. 

Frank Hayes. Philadelphia catch- 
er, broke a two-all tie in the ninth 
inning when he connected with the 
bases loaded, for his fourth double 
of the contest. His three team- 
mates scored. R. H. E. 
Philadelphia 101 361 003—15 19 2 
Cleveland . 031 121 310—12 18 2 
Batteries - Dovle. Kelley and 
Hayes; Blaeholder. Hudlln, Lee 



Where Germany Will House 5,000 Athletes 




Batteries— Hallahan. Brennan nnd 
IiOmbardl, Campbell; Smith. Oum- 
bert and Marwuso. 

AMERICAN LBAOUI 

CHICAOO. July 25 i/Pl. — The 



EVERY TENNIS 
RACKET 

In Our Stort Jf Sal* Pricai 
Vjluti to $22 00 Now »1 1.7ft 
Orhtn it Lew ai 



Uhle. Brown and Sullivan. 



COAST LEAGUE 

8AN FRANCISCO. July 25 f/W. 
Jack Salveson. ace Loa Ang/le* 



Germany's specially constructed Olympic Village, said to be the most 
parts of the world during progress of the Olympic Games. No money 
and convenient in this all-inclusive settlement in the woods at Doberitx, 
from the carefully planned site are given, with an air view of the village, 
on the right. Lower inset is a close-up of one of the neat, white tree- 
tingent, will be housed. In the circle is shown view of the regatta course 
the rowing and sculling events. The Olympic village will 



— Central Press Canadian Photograph 

sumptuous ever built, will house in comfort 5.000 athletes from all 
or effort has been spared to make the athletes' surroundings pleasant 

near Berlin, only fifteen minutes from the huge Reich Stadium. Scenes 
showing the entrance (left foreground) and the administration offices 

shaded cottages where many of the athletes, including Canada's con- 
st Gruneau as seen from the grandstand, where spectators can view 

become an army post after the games, according to reports. 



Smart Contingent of American Professional* In- 
cluded in Draw \\ hen Field Starts Off Tomor- 
row at Oak Bay (lours*' Ken Black Is En- 
tered — Starting Timet Are Announced 



WIN OWN GAME 

8EATTLE, July 25 i/PV — The 
league • leading Seattle Indians 
cinched their nine-game series with 
the Sacramento Senators with a 
4-to-3 decision here tonight. 

Lou Koupal nllowcd the Senators 
only six hits and won his own game 
by driving across the winning run 
in the seventh inning, after the 
visitors had taken the lead with a 
three-run splurge In their half of 
the same frame. 

R. H E. 

Sacramento _ 000 003 OW 3 6 1 
Seattle . 100 001 Ma— 4 8 1 



LONGACRES RACING 



Results follow: 

First Rare — F1\r and one-half furlruns. 
purse 1400. for all mo. foaled In Wn»h- 
initon. aprnal wlihli: 

Port Chenoe < Summer*) 
Smokn Oirl <Deprang> 
Jay L (Josephsom . . 
Time. 1 07 1-8 A!«o 



Rerret Trynt 'Meirlttl . 
Jessie Cloud (Deprangl 

Time. 1 
flr<\ Bon C 
Wur»n, Va 



4 30 



. 15 10 IS SO H 50 

.. ... 4 20 140 

. I 10 

ran: Violate 0 . 



Batten***— Andrews 
Koupal and Spindel. 



and Head; 



inn hk in tssoci \ ikin 

Columbus 3 Kansas City 2 

St. Paul - Louisville, postponed, 
ram. 



Irish Marl*. Golden Steeple, Play Money. 
IT nty Money, Sliver Toes. 

Srrond Rare — Pi\e furl >n»s. pur%e 1400. 
claiming, for tiro-vear-olds 
Proud Ooldie <8<-iiultz> . 15 40 $3 SO 12 SO 

Flko Boy ijosephson) 5 10 3 r>0 

Maud Hogan <3ena> 4 .10 

Tim*. 101 Also ran Radnor. Crystal 
Stiellc, Fair Mortgaie. Tr. inner Wurd. Final 
Play. 

Third Hire — Six furlongs. pur«e MOO. 
claiming, for three-year-oM* and up 

I .fie "Summers) 17 10 t 5 20 14 20 

Hose Crv.tsl <CalInway> . . . 13 80 SAO 
Royal chef -***nderM 170 

Time. 1 13 Also rm Worthrrn, fllad 
Star, Lady Edith, tiold' Return, Lady 
Louella. Wasatch B . S>ra«on 



l\ I i ItV \ I ION \ I I | \( . I r 

Toronto 9. Newark 0 
Montreal 2. Baltimore 9 1 12 In- 
nings'. 



Fourth Race — Six furlosigs. 



put I 

id up 

J iff MO 
4 40 



1400 



MONTREAL. July 25 PL lobby 
Alston, top-flight professional from 
Ottawa, won the Quebec open golf 
championship today with a thirty- 
stx-hole total of 144. made ,up of 
two seventy-two rounds [Cm Far- 
ley. Montreal, formerly of Thronto, 
was second with 145. 



PEDEN BROS. 

BtcTele*. Sporting flood* and T«»i 

1410 DOUGLAS SHEET 



Men's Suits 

Sports Backs 

In Many Sryl«$. Extra Values. 
*20.00, f22.50, $25.00 

& Smith, Ltd. 

614 YATES STRrET 



-- - r ■ ■ - » 



DOIT OPERATE 

ENLARGED 
PROSTATE 

Or Say Urinary III. ml Not 
CONSULT pi 
••ok aa Loss of Manhood and 
Othar Cli of Man." with treatment 
far Enlarged Froatata WITHOUT 
OPERATION Diagnosis Form Tar 
trmnnlals and adrlee In plain anra- 
topa. Alaa book an Skin and Blood 

Ol Ptae by mall Our Bpe- 

alaltt— Traatmanl by mall without 
pergonal Interytaw 

ENGLISH HERBAL 
DISPENSARY LTD. 

lift* nana 8« Vaaroavar. B < 



pitcher, with a string of twelve con- 
secutlva Victories to his credit, was 
saved from a poaslble defeat here 
today when he was relieved by Berry 
as the Angels took the field for the 
last half of the ninth, with the score 
tied at 7-7. The Seals nicked Berrv 
for the winning run in their half, 
to win 8 to 7. 

Ted Norbert made the winning run 
when he scored on singles by Ross 
and Barath. 

R H. E. 

| Los Angeles . 101 004 001-7 15 2 
San Francisco 230 010 Oil-* II 1 
Batteries -Salveson and BotUnni; 
! Ballou. Stutz and Moi./n 

MISSIONS GO UNDER 

SAN DIEOO. July 25 i,lv— Com- 
bining four hits and three errors for 
four runs in the opening inning, the 
San Diego Par) res spanked the Mis- 
sion Reds. | to 2 here today and 
Jumped Into s three-to-two series 
lead. 

Howard Craghead. right-hander, 
recently obtained In a trade with 
Seattle, limited the Reds to five hits. 

Frank Lamanski was replaced by 
Lloyd Johnson after the four-run 
up-rtstng. and held the San Dlegans 
In check until he was retired for a 
pinch hitter In the eighth. W Beck 
assuming the burden. 

R H E 

Missions .... 000001 100- 2 5 4 
San Diego 400 000 01 x— 5 9 1 
Batteries— Lamanski. JohnsoivW. 
Beck and Outen; Craghead arxi De- 
sautels. 

OAKS TRIUMPH 

PORTLAND July 28 '(/TV — Jack 
La roe r a whiffed eleven Portland 
Beavers tonight and kept his eight 
hit* well scattered to give the Oak- 
land Oaks s 5-to-2 victory— their 
third win out of the week s eight 
games. 

R. H E 

Oakland 00010030A-5 u o 

Portlsnd ... 010 100 000— 2 I 1 
Batteries- Lacocca and Hersh- 
b^rger Radomts. Trench and 
Brucker , / 



rlaimtnt. for threc-sear-olrf 
Enabo (Summers' . . ,12 20 
Wooden Soldier 'lender*) 
St Mica (Denranz > 

Time., t 13 I-S Al*> ran 
Llolele. Moonrvbrnok. Wii.uint 
Crv«l«l Pier. Rtoann Cnlnr R II 

Firat daih double 'Proud 
Ruftep pairt f 17 40 

riflh Race — S \ fariOnSI. eui e 
SlStmiBC. for three-year-olds and up 
Rapid Morlttata 

• Joseph wn • 
Can F.le 'Summeril 
Teeme R <Adamo 

Time. I II AI«o 
Maeantlr. Ouchl To 
Boon Time, Prinreas Va 

Slith Rare — flu furlonia. purse 1400. 
ctaimina. for three-year-olds and up 
tWlne Rank <«.jmme,.. 14 30 II 70 13 40 



Is 10 

3 30 

4 no 
Donald. 

Woman. 

Ooldte to 
MOO. 



. . lit M tl.l! 14 90 

4 10 3 30 

8 80 

ran EWtreaa Wells. 
Fdaar Rot. Requiem, 



1 10 

4 SO 

Also ran Drink water. Mor- 
ip. Bylona. La Salle, Brilliant 
na. Ovrrahota. • 
Second dally double > Rapid Mortgage to 
Deline Bank) paid S320 O0 

seventh Race — One mile, purse 1700. Th* 
Pot -Intelligencer Graded Handicap, for 
three-year-olds and up 

Two Tricks <Oray> 14 30 (3 80 13 20 

Blue Boot lAdamil J 10 2 70 

W:l<lland fSrhulizi 2 50 

Time, t 38 A'so ran McCarthy. Clilana. 
Sir Oawaine, Bon Amour 

Flihlh Rare — MUi and one-eighth, 

claiming, for four-year-olds and up 
Ncnhgalls iDeprann 113 70 15 80 13 30 

Dr Spoon • Slelaff > 3 40 2 80 

Pn itenips i Wllbour) 3 80 

T.me, 1 512-8 Also rair Weeping 
WSlata, Kl'ty C. Too nu^y. T' t- .i.ii, .Ilarc 
Devil, Clofhtop and Daudet 

n\ i Rjrtoan km rail - 

first Rare — Six furlongs, purse 1400. 
Wsa'nntLon breds. for three-year-olds and 

up. SPMlSl m-ciirhts 

Mad r.na»m . 1 108 

Miaa woiada 107 

f.:nd Sjn'a 1 0R 

I S I Pri'icr BoW 118 

filirt Rrar 100 

E^ery Effon 117 

I »> Pi. 'ou Bow 105 

Fort rhotnas . . 108 

Duoer 100 

• A ' Pa; ton nitrr. 

terond tt tf ■ 3|» furtonal, purse 
• Mt, (or ihrre yr >r-o;rls and up 

Varuv ., 

t.nst Edition . . 

I,o- r Apple 

Adder 

Manlv 

Bink Shot 

Chub 

Bright Knot 

FoVgi 

Red Cuno* 

Leila U 

Nvdia 



Third Race— One mile, purse 1400. claim 
Ing. for three-year-olds and up. 

Tlmbus 



Plain Clnthea 

Plenty Oold . 
Mary so ...... 

' Laader 

Sedreg ...... 

Ardeleno 

Bla.-k Shirt . 
Booter Chief 
Flnr-.egan ... 
Chattrrly .... 
Shortane .... 



>.....•■••■ 



110 
115 
105 
110 
115 
104 
108 
115 
108 
115 
115 
110 



Fourth Race — Five furlongs, pursa IMR) 
the Nursery Purge, for two-yaar-olds 

Skv Rhonda 



eaaaa.aa* 



MOO. 



SCOTT'S SC^APBOO.sl 



Rv R I Scott 



| id 8wei t Mystery . 

'At Bon Red , 

HlKh M.irnn 

' A » Sharp Oirl 

•C> Tom a . . .'. 

' B ' Bgwtcl 

Panlpat . . , $ 

Tarpwood 

( Bt Hf.'iriicirouth . . . 

lAiWUhelm ent r » 

<B> Durham entry. 

<C> Clrlftin entry 

Fifth Race — Mile and Me-slxtas 
purse MOtf; clilming, foi louryrar 
and up 

Br mfleld - 

I T.orsodl 

Lanty Boy 

• Tnro Blu» 

K'-^ „., 

Dundreary M 

Capl I.,, in 

Cratta Run 

Pompohone 

Bo:i Moon 

torn a r 

suta a, re— One m.le. pursa 1500. 
lard Handicap, graded, for thrc- vcar 

id up 

peek la 

iedo I 

[Mica Rock 

Colli ts>aaeaaaeaaaaaaaaa*aa_aaaa 

Translucent ..... 
A i Campus Queen 

Listo 

' A i Mt tie Ina . 
Archduke 
Broadway Roxla 
I A > Beejlry entr: 





WARRIORS Or- 
KEMVeV C AFfZlCA) 
A DORK ftfEM- 
<>tLVE4 WlTlH 
EVER.Y<HiN<; EKCEPf 
CLOfHES , *V 
OP "THEIR BODV 
D ECO RATIO 
1^ IM \<A<<\OH 

PAlMiED 
OM^HEIR 

LE<5* 



^AVIMO MORIZXO 
OP CM\C\CtO BUILT UP 

A #500,000 Business 
By SWAPPING 



• t •aaaaaaaasaaaa a « 
eaeaaeeaaaaaeeae as 



105 
101 
104 
104 

in 
mi 

101 
104 
118 
101 



olds 

108 

108 
115 
101 
10H 
toa 
115 

111 
no 

108 
ill 

Bal- 
olds 

107 
110 
108 
102 
107 
1 .1 
100 
108 

lot 

105 



>»e\enth Rare — OM mile. II 000 added 
Lleutenant-Oovern <r s Handicap, for three- 
year-olds and up 



I ■ 

U.S. 'SrTXMP* wi<h iMiTl/VLS SfAMPEO 

-rviPoucH <hcm- PEProRevrtD BY business 

CONCERN? TO PREVENT <HEFr o^ 




n H esiIm a<ep -That 1me 

CtROW CAUSES -*sK ANNU-U 
DAM ACE. OF <3.J.?- 
A. CEH-T A DAV 
-"PER CROW/ 




I adv Peen?le 

Hrrokel Conard 

■ *. I Klfftl Im<*o 

A I. I. lie O u y 

Itoarten ,. 

Mohar . ' 

' A ' Bee/let en' rr 

rishlh Rare — One mile, purse 
rlalm'ng. for ihree-rmr-oMa and up 

DarrTe Be . . .' . 7.T 

Remle *. 

Sup Tfinll 

Crystal Image 

C!at • op Chief . . ; , 

Bevhill 

wo»',-i 4 Bin 

Pltia nt ,.t, 

Si Life 

W.ld Hour Ill 

Vovage '110 

J j i {Vmonf Ill 

Ntnth Rare iBRSSUtStR to he u-rd .1 
necessary SMI furlongs. purs* 1400. 
clnlrjnins. for three-year.olda, and u» - 



102 
103 
I0J 

118 
113 
105 
106 I 



t« 

nos 

115 
•I Id 

115 
1 1 | 
• 105 
115 



Led by a classy field of top-notch 
American professionals, noted • for 
their par-busting activities on the 
Mainland last week, the second act 
of the "Evergreen Oolf Trail" win 
be ushered in tomorrow at the well- 
groomed Oak Bay course, when 
more than eighty expert dlvoters 
start off in quest of a major slice 
of the $3,000 melon. This pur.se, the 
richest in the history of local golf, 
will be divided up Wednesday, when 
the seventy-two-hole classic draws 
to a close after a three-day on- 
slaught against par. 

A young Vancouver amateur. 
Kenny Black, who electrified a gal- 
lery of some 3,000 spectators yes- 
t-erday «vV Vh« S h a v i ghn e ssy Club 
links wall a dazzling round of 63. 
nine u dcr perfect figures, to win 
the $5,000 event, is entered. He will 
be gunning for his second straight 
triumph before heading East to 
compete in the Wlllingdon Cup 
matches, held as a curtain-raiser to 
the Canadian amateur champion- 
ship at Winnipeg. Black s game will 
be plosely watched here.. 
RANKING PLAYERS FNTKKED 

Shotmakers, who have blazed suc- 
cessful trails since big money crept 
into the game, will be playing at the 
sea-bordering links for the first 
time. Topping the list are such 
well-known players as Gene Kunes, 
Canadian open titleholder, Ralph 
Guldahl. Western open champion; 
Horton Smith. Augusta Masters' 
tournament winner; Bryon Nelson. 
Metropolitan open tltlist; Jimmy 
Thomson, rated as the longest 
driver in golf. Macdonald SmiUi, 
the vet ran Scot of Carnoustie, and 
many others of fame. Zell Eaton, 
the little pro who holed his tee shot 
in the recent United States open 
meet, will attract plenty of atten- 
tion from the gallery. 

A chap by the name of Lawson 
Little, former ruler of the amateur 
fairways both in Great Britain and 
the United States, will be booming 
his mighty tec shots over the local 
cotirr • I search of the main share 
ol the purse. Little Is the boy who 
blasted his way over the outgoing 
nine at Shaughne.vsy the other day 
in 29. Just eight strokes below par, 
to finish with a card of 64 lor a 
tit w record, which was erased yes- 
1 terday by Ken Black. 

MONDAY*! DRAW 

12 00- Ted Colgate. Jack Bagjey. 
H. O. English. Victoria. 

12:08 — K. H. 8tevens. Sandy Mar- 
ling. Fllmer Morgan, Victoria' 

12 :16- C. E. Brown. Harold Llne- 
hanT,Tfte Painter. Victoria. 

12 24— W. Nary, Lois Angeles; O. 
Behneittr, Ogden, Utah; Freddy 
Painter, victoria 

U 12 H Clarke. Oakland. Cal ; 
C. H i o "1. I . Tacoma. Wash ; Brlre 
Evans. Vl< torla. 

12 40 Horton Smith, Chicago. 
Phil Taylor. Victoria; L Dodson 
Cleveland. Ohio. 

12 48-jJ Bredemers, San Antonio 
J Mcdormick. Los Angeles/ F 
Nixon, Vancouver. 

12 66 A. Millea. New York; 8teve 
bVTDJoUkmi, Powell Rrver. J. Hunt- 
er. Mill I Barbara. 

1 04-M. De. Masaey. Modesto 
Cal ; J.I Oeerston,' 8alt Lake City, 
W JelllfTe. Hollywood. 

1 12— |B. Loving. Virginia; K 
Tucker. Seattle; P Burns. Victoria 

1 20— J. Thompson. Shawnee, 
Del ; J Bulla, Chicago; R Ouldahl 
St. Louis. 

1 58--H Bislfr Long Beach 
Cal : C S sheppirti. Loa Angelea; 

Ken lawson victoria 

1 36-J. Daw'M>n. Chkago; Joe 
PryBS Vtetttfei R Mundsy. Santa 
Rosa. Cal , 

1 44 foJeman. Los Angelea. 



N Smith, California; H Brynjolf- 
son, Victoria 

1:52— Byron Nelson. Ridgewood. 
N J ; D Long worth, Oakland. Cal ; 

D. Black. Vancouver. 

2:00— Bill, Mehlhorn, Loulsvllla, 
Ky ; Ted Longworth. Portland. Ore i 
R. Morrison. Victoria. 

2^08-OrviUe White, Chlcagoj 

Dune Sutherland. Vancouver; H. 
Sampson, BurUnghame. Cal. 

2:16— C. Doser, Rochester, N.Y.; B. 
Coltnn, Los Angeles; Ken Black, 
Vancouver. 

2 24— W. Ooggin, San Francisco; 

E. Zimmerman, Portland. Ore.; Ben 
Colk, Vancouver. — 

2 32 — Ray Mangrum. Los Angeles; 
Stan Leonard, Vancouver, O Rich- 
ards. Tacoma. 

2:40— J Hlnes. Oarden City, L I : 

F. Mlnch. Sacramento, Cal.; Don 
Sutherland. Vancouver. 

2:48 — J. Robinson. Los Angeles; P. 
Drum. San Francisco; 8. Powell, 
Vancouver. 

2 56- Zell Eaton. Oklahoma; Nell 
Christian, Yakima; Wlllard Wills. 
Victoria. 

3.04 -Macdonald 8mlth. Nsshvllla. 
Tenn , Q. Johnson, Chicago; F. 
Woods, Vancouver. 

3:12— Lawson Little. Chicago; I J. 
Harrison, Arkansas; Alan Taylor. 
Victoria. 

3 20— A. Roux, Whittler, Cal ; V. 
Torfln. Tacoma. F. Clunk. Victoria. 

3:28— G. Kunes. Morrlstown, N.J.; 
A Bell, San Mateo. Cal ; H. Winder, 
Vancouver. 

3:36— W. W Squire. Victoria; 
A B. Crumt>. Victoria; F. W. 
Oosagrif. Salt Lake City. 

Lumbermen \\ ill 
Hoi a 1 Golf Meet 
On the Mainland 

Lumbermen from all parte of the. 
Pioviikc will meet si titt Point 
Orey Oolf and Country Club. Van- 
cotner. to take part in the annual 
tournament of the lumbermen snd 
allied industries. 

Any person engaged in Umber, 
logging, lumber or shingle businrs.s. 
or their trade as oclntlon.s. lumber 
trade Journals, forestry schools nnd 
allied interest that furnish supplies, 
equipment, or transportation to the 
I lumber Industry is eligible to par- 
ticipate In this tournament, but only 
lumbermen, loggers and. shlr\gle> 
manufacturers can win major 
prizes. 

There will be eighteen events and 
severn I prl/e.s for each event, also 
a dinner and entertainment. Last 
year over 100 took part in this tour- 
nament. 

Those Interemt^d should com- 
municate with Charles Dietrich. 
1642 Pandora Street. Vancouver, 
telephone Highland 327. for further 
partirulara. < 



GOLF FACTS 

NOT THEORIES 



By ALEX MORRISON 



Dmle Polly 

Suitor 

Alrslide 



Beau Remount 

f):x;r Binder . 

Anna ^**h- 

The Trainer *. . 

Doraldlna 

Uur Pronto .. 

Changing Wirt . _.. 

•Apprentice allowarrra 
Weather rlear trark fast 



• * * • a • • • a * s • • 

• ■ a • * a a ..ass. 



•101 

111 
104 
»1 
Ill 
|0« 

ft 

•10* 
104 

•HI 

106 



AW 

Raa 



BIG SIX STANDINGS 



. By Tha Aaaociatad Pt-m 

The «undlng« < three leading hit- 
ters in each leagua. : 

O AB R H Pr t 

7» MS 14 io« rtt 

■4 111 «4 1M 17. 

.44 JOO jt) 7| 

m tat <t hi is* 
4i 114 *i in r.g 
u »i si m is' 

Home Run Leaders— Gehrig. Yan- 
28. Foxx. Red Sox. 27. Troaky. 
Indians. 35; Ott. Olants. It] Dirkey. 
Yankee*. H. Klein, Phillies. 17; 
hmm, Indians 17 

League Tofais Am»-nean League. 
m. National League. 382. Total. 



■Whita So« 
Wh.U Bra 
Bulllran. Indians 
Madwirk. fsr linalt 
P Wan*r. P:ra'.aa 
Dam » ree, Cuba 



Kaye l>tm Pilots 

ttnal ttt lit lory *• 

In Gold Cup Htei 

BOLTON LANDINO. NY. 
July 25 A*| —Kaye Don, 
visitliit; BntiRh autorm>bll«» 
and Ape>,edbon*. pilot, became 
today die first outsider to 
drive a jwinnlhg boat in the 
thirty - three - venr - old Oold 
Cup regatta. AmTicaa pre- 
mier motor-boat elaxxle 

The «tocky Briton piloted 
th* e>vpn-year-old ImpAhl, 
Detroit Yacht Club entry, 
over the ninety miles In 1 hour 
and 5812 minutes, at an av- 
erage speod of 45 734 miles an 
hour 

Alone In the ft>ld aider the 
other eight entries withdrew. 
Don made no attempt to «et 
any recorda and rlrtuallv 
coasted to victory as he pleased 
to return the cup to Detroit 
after a lapse of threa yearn 
Impshl Is owned bv Horace 
C. Dodge wtvw Delphlne IV 
In 1932. 




ft > / T«aiN»Nf> V 

| | SHOWS IN 



A middle-ayed pro working near 
New York city askavl me to h'lp 
him straighten out hla long shots 
and^ If posslbl* ndd some length to 
them I watched his old swing and 
didn't see one straight ball 

Most of the trouble came when 
he allowed his hands to separate at 
DM end of his back.' wing. To pre- 
vent this I suggested that Inter- 
locking grip and keeping the chin 
in place until well tft*r Impact. H* 
took the grip and kept hla chin 
bark. hi'Mng every ball straight 
and at least twenty-five yards 
'onger. 

In spite of the fact that he had 
gained the much desired Improve- 
ment, h'- taVfi up the grip af'T 
about an hour's trail If made me 
think of how he would acold a pupil 
for not giving hla lnstructlorta a 
fair trial. 

For yAr* he had been putting 
up with faults snd because they 
wr re not completely eliminated In 
a matter of minutes he gave up. 
Maf.v a plsver has done the same 
thing Oolf isn't learned In a day. 



W. & J. WILSON 



£48 



Jaagae W 
»fen • 

fit r.m rsxstrs t srarr r 




- 



. . — V • — J 

THE DAILY COLONIST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1936 



\ 



15 



GREAT BRITAIN CAPTURES DAVIS CUP MATCHES 



A ustin and Perry- 
Score Victories 
Over Australians 



Former Defeatl Jark Crawford Vfc'ilh Comparative 
Eaae in Four SHk, and IVrry Takis DecWon 
From i)u\sl — Double* Malch SH Tomor- 
row — Crowd of 16,000 Attendi 







WIMBLEDON, Eng , July 25 O).— 
Oreat Britain's three-year suprem- 
acy In Davis Cup tennis competition 
appeared today 
to be assured for 
another year. 
With the first 
two singles 
matches of the 
challenge round 
series with Aus- 
tralia won, the 
British team had 
only to capture 
one match out 
of the three re- 
maining. Fred 
Perry did the ex- 
pected today as 
h • conquered 
the Australian 
champion, Adrl- 
ln four sets, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5, 
Henry W. "Bunny* 1 Au- 




► H > 1 1 II I lit 



an Quist, 
8-J. But 
«t In. the slender, stylist No. 2 player 
of the home forces, had previously 
shown the way by a convincing vic- 
tory over Jack Crawford, 4-6, 6-3, 
6-1. 6-1. 

The Aussles had counted on Craw- 
ford to beat Austin to give them a 
chance of capturing the series, with 
that match lost, their task appeared 
Insurmountable. 

FACE HARD TASK 

They will have to win the doubles 
engagement Monday and then both 
singles matches Tuesday to pull out 
their first Davis Cup tennis title 
1919. 



Quist and Crawford probably will 
team up for the doubles encountar 
against the British "regulars,'' 
Charles Tuckey and George Patrick 
Hughes. In the last two singles 
Quist will play Austin, while Craw- 
lord faces Perry. 

Today's matches were played in a 
high wind with showers interrupting 
progress several times A -crowd of 
10,000 was in the stands. 

Austin and Crawford met In the 
first encounter. The British "No. 2" 
played lw* customary stylish game 
He displayed some fine backhand 
shots and a series of accurate cros.v- 
court placements that kept his tiring 
adversary on the run. He out-gen 
eralled Crawford in all but the first 
set and swept through him with 
amazing ease In the last two sets 
m the final one. Crawford look only 
three points, apart from those in the 
single game whtch he won on 
service. 

PERRY SETTLES DOWN 

Perry played erratically against 
| Quist. The Australian champion 
played a canny game and for a time 
appeared to have the upper hand. 
He lost the first set. taking only one 
game, then won the second 6-4 and 
led 5-1 In the third, but at that 
point Perry settled down and showed 
his real form, taking six games in 
a row and capturing the next and 
deciding set with the loss of only 
two games. 




Provincial Tennis 
Tourney Will Open 
Tomorrow Morning 

Forty-Fifth Annual Briti-h Columbia Champion- 
ships to Get Under Way at Victoria Lawn Tennii 
Courts — Strong California Contingent Is 
Coming — Keen Compeition Expected 



— Central Pren Canadian Photograph 



Martha Genenger. of Berlin. Who Holds the German Record in the 200-Metre Breast Stroke Swimming 
Class, and Who Will Contest This Event at the Olympic Games, Is Shown in a Practice Session. Ger- 

"ome Through the Efforts of Frauhen Genenger. 



Lethaby's Eleven and 



Albions Win Fixtures 

(rain Triumph! Over II. M.S. Apollo and Couiehan 
In Cricket Matches — Five Ca and Victoria I'lay 
To Draw — Let Gibbone Maket ltt> Runti 



Moore, not out 13 

r*tn« 7 



With more than forty leading Cal- 
llornia netters here to open play, 
the forty-fifth annual British Co- 
lumbia tennis championships will 
get under way tomorrow morning 
on the well-kept courts of the Vic- 
toria Lawn Tennis Club, Fort Street. 

Pacific Northwest sectional singles 
and doubles will be played as an 
added attraction for the meet which 
will be In progress dally. Finals in 
the P.N W. sectionals will be played 
Wednesday afternoon, and in the 
i Brittsh Columbifc titl<* *?vt*nu> on 
Saturday. 

Johnny Murio, dusky San Fran- 
cisco- Hawnan netter and recently- 
crowned Washington State cham- 
pion, is making the trip to Victoria 
again this year, and will be one of 
the strong favorites to life the title 
won last year_.y»' Eugene Smith, 
smooth-stroking young Berkeley, 



Total I eight wickets) 

Sellars did not bat. 



....115 



California, racquet wlelder 

LARGEST CONTINGENT 



Dakeyne. b Jones 

Blackwell. c Jone.s, b Jordan 
Hinds, c Peers, b Jordan .... 




Local cricketers, captained by Hu- 
bert Lethaby. yesterday gained a 
158 to 52 first innings .victory over 
H.M.S. A|x>llo in a friendly all-day Newton, not out 
match played at Macdonald Park Slaney, b Jordan 

The visitors followed on and In a Pearce. c Darcus, b Peers 2 

second innings at bat scored 161 Locke, b Peers 2 



Blasei Way to Fine 

Golf V ictory 



Footballers From H.M.S. 
Apollo and R.C.N. Battle 
To 1-1 Score 

Bailor football elevens from the 
visiting British cruiser H.MS. 
Apollo and the Royal Canadian Navy 
played to a 1-1 draw yesterday eve- 
ning at the Royal Athletic Park In 
the annual fixture for possession of 
UM handsome Naval Veterans' 
Trophy. 

At the suggestion of Alderman 
James Adam the match Will be re- 
played when the British ship returns 
here late next month. 

The fixture produced some good 
football, particularly from the left 
wing of the visitors, while the work 
of Dick Caldwell In the net for the 
Royal Canadian Navy was out.st.and- 
lng. Caldwell, out of the game for 
nearly two seasons because of In- 
juries, staged his comeback In grand 
stjWe by making a number of bnl- 
llint saves. 

/Keenly contested all of the way. 
tiie match provided Ihe most excite- 
ment after the R.C.N, equalized late 
in the final canto. The outcome wits 
• fair representation of the play 
and the verdict wan received In 
splendid spirit by the respective club 
captains. 

OPiviM. TALLY 

The opening marker of the match 
and the only score In the initial 
half, came twenty-five minutes 
after the kick-off. Acford. brilliant 
inside left of the visitors, sagged the 
hemp when he accepted a pass from 
Brown, on the wing, and scored with 
a beautiful shot from outside the 
penalty area. Caldwell never had 
a chance with the shot. 

RCN. had a number of excellent 
scoring chances during this stanza, 
but Lockyer. twenty-one-year-old 
netmlnder of the visitors, turned 
everything aside In fine style. 

Tommy Watt, 'bustling local cen- 
tre forward, knotted the score late 
in the final stanza when he took 
"be Costa's pass on the run and put 
the ball In the corner of the net. 
Lockver made a great effort to save 
trie shot, the ball Just touching the 
tips ol his fingers as It continued 
Its- way Into the net. 

In the remaining time at their 
disposal both clubs tried hard for 
the winning marker, and when the 
final whistle sounded they were still 
fighting for victory. 

A McKlnnon refereed and the 
teams were: 

H MA Apollo — Lockyer; Davies. 
Powell (captain). QutlllAm. Staynes, 




Five C's— O. 

Austin 6 

Bossom 12 

Goward 11 

Moore 4 

Victoria- O 

J. Payne 15 

Attwell 5 

Quainton 9 

G Payne. 7 

Nixon 2 



fOWK H W 

F. A. Considine. b Freeman 4 



From different parts of .the sunny 
South, from Phoenix. Arizona; Van- 
W. R I ouver and other Pacific Coast cities, 

0 24" and Up-lsland points, ranking ntt- 

1 38 ( ters will be on hand to battle for 

2 34 ' the provincial titles. California has 

3 19 1 the largest contingent with more 
W R than forty players coming for the 

4 56 big tourney. Six of Vancouver's 
1 11 leading netters are making the trip 

1 19 across the Gulf, while Seattle is 

2 16 : sending many of its leading players. 
0 6 Added to the impressive list of vis- 
itors will be a large number of Vic- 
toria's top-ianking players. 

Play will commence at 10 o'clock 



Miss L. Kitchen vs Miss B Mar- 
shall. Mrs. R. V Hocking vs Miss 
G Cullen; Mrs H. N Lay vs Mrs. 
G. M Gross. 

3 30 pm . — Miss D Marler vs. Mrs. 
J. C. I. Edwards; M. Woodson vs. S. 
P Birley; Miss A Morgan vs. Mrs. 
H Wright; Mrs M Laird vs Miss 
M Hudlow; E Amark vs Dr. 
Hudlow. 

4 15 p.m — R. V. Hocking vs. L. 
Nordstrom; J. Del Amo vs. E. 
Cooke; H Langhe vs J. R Kinney; 
J Hawes vs Mel Drange; O Ver- 
ier vs. F Kovacs; J D. D Camp- 
bell vs. L. Nelson; H. Armstrong vs 
C Milne. 

5 p.m.— G. Browne-Cave vs. V. 
Hughes; K. Cole vs. J. C. 1. Ed- 
wards; B Nelden vs W. E Corfield; 
R Harman vs. X>r H. A. Holt; E. 
Haley vs. J. J. Moreno; Mrs. F. Del 
Amo vs. Miss M Phlllpsen; Dr. E 
Bartosh vs. Miss O. McCall. 

5 45 p.m.— Alloo or McBride vs 
Hall or Burdon-Murphy; Rennie or 
Weesner vs. Imhoff or McCltmont; 
Harman or Holt vs. Newton or 
Erhman: Brand or Hlppenstlel m 
Woodson or Birley; Miss Kltchln 
or Miss Marshall vs. Mrs. Hocking 
or Miss Cullen; Oordon vs. Amark 
or Hudlow; Mrs. Laird or Miss Had- 
low vs. Mrs. Birley or Miss Green; 
Mrs. Lay or Mrs Gross vs 
Marler or Mrs. Edwards. 



runs. 

Playing at Beacon Hill Park, Five 
C's and Victoria played to a draw. 
The churchmen batted first and put 
on 117 runs, and in the time at 
their di.spo.sal Victoria scored 115 
runs, for the fall cf eight wickets. 

The batting of A J Parens and Lo-ke . 
|G. C. Grant, veteran bat men, who Slaney . 
scored forty-six and forty-five Ye- Pearce 
spectlvely, was the. feature of the Newton 



Extras 14 Saunders, b Freeman 0 | tomorrow morning with matches in 



Total 161 

Bowling Analysis 

Lethaby'.s XI 
Fir.,; Innings— O. W 



11 

16 2 
fi 

I 



Dunlop. b Smith 16 

Fox. b N Pife . 8 

j Leggatt. c Russell, b Smith 13 

I Baise. b Gibbons 1 7 

joreen, b Oibbons 0 

tt St J. Considine. not out 6 

21 A E. Oreen. c Swan, b Oibbons . 0 

49 Wilkinson, c Freeman, b Hoggarth 0 

31 Icretghton. b Hogjarth . 

20 I Extras 



Charlton 2 

Wallace 7 



0 
1 



H.M.S Apollo 
| First Innings— O. W 

Jordan 12 2 

I Jon-vs 8 2 

j Moffatt 6 3 

Norton 2.5 I 

i Second Innings— O. W 

Jordan 9 4 

1 
1 
1 
3 



reus 

Peers 



... 65 



match at Macdonald Park. 

Paymaster - Commander Wallace 
was the only member of H M S. 
Apollo's side to make anything Ilk" 
a score. He put on twenty-two runs 
before being caught by Peers from 
Moffatt s bowling. 

M \KK GOOD START 

Five C's batted first at Beacon 
Hill and made a good start Quain- 
ton and Jack Pavne put on fortv- , j one s 4 
four runs for the fir.,t wicket. Then » orton 0 
wickets fell rapidly and six we-e ; DarriLS « 
down for sixty-six runs. Yoxall. 
with a wri! -played thirty-eight, and 
Attwell. with ten. helped the score 
along, the final total being 117, 

Victoria lost two wickets cheaply. -Sainton, b Bossom 
then Meredith and Klnch took the 
score to sixty-two for three wickets. 
From this point the Victoria bats- 
men tried hard to make the runs. Comley. c Austin, b Bossom 0 

Kinch punLshed all the loose balls Oakrs. b Moore 5 

and Vic Moore made thirteen runs Yoxall. b Moore 38 

in quick time, and when stumps Nixon, c Edwards, b Ooward 3 

were drawn Victoria had 115 r u ns I AttwtU. r Goward. b Moore 10 

for eight wickets and onlv needed Pf>tch - c K ™ ch - b Moore 2 

three run.s to win the match. Kerslake. not out a. 3 

Bossom bowled well for Victoria. ! 
getting five wickets for thirty-eight 



Total 62 

ai j-.ions 

Pritchard e Dunlop. b Wilkinson 16 



the Pacific Northwest sectionals 
carded. Ross "Bud" Hocking and 
Lieut -Commander J. C. I. Edwards 
will carry Victoria's colors into the 
sectional singles, while Don Camp- 
bell and Reg Cortield will play in 
the doubles. 
0 j Mrs. Margaret Laird. Glendale. 
n California, and Ray Casey, veteran 
7 San Francisco netter, and British 
Columbia mixed doubles rhMH|a%1Wi, 
will be on hand to defend the laurels 
they won last year. 
Club ofllclals have been working 



Recreation Centre 

Acti\ itir* 



SEE THIS NEW 

GIBSON 



REFRIGERATOR 

$ A C A-50 



159 




Provides Efficient Refrigeration 
Jt Low Cost 

KENT'S 

641 Yjtei St. Phon. E 6013 



T 



Weaver c and b Neville 30 

WEN Bell c and b Maclndoe 14 

L Bell, not out 27 

• 



Total i three wickets* 168 

Bowling- Henderson, one for 49. 
Neville, one for 26, Maclndoe. one 
for 37. 



15 Oibbons. c Considine. b Fox 

|| i Swan, b Fox 

5 Barriay c Considine. b Green 



86 

3 
1 

r N Pite. b Often 0 

37 Pitkethle . . b Grern 0 

20 Russell, not out 9 

29 Freeman, run out I 

29 D Pite. b Green 2 

32 Ho?garth. run out 0 

Extras 



J. Payne] c and b Goward 
O. Pavne, c and b Bossom 
Griffin, b Bossom . ~\ 



. 20 
. 23 
. 7 







KENNY H \( K 

'PWENTY-FOUR- YEAR-OLD son 
i of Dave Black, professional at 
the Shaughnessy Heights Club, who 
won the $5,000 open golf tourna- 
ment on. his home course with a 
brilliant sevenly-two-hole card of 
275. thirteen strokes below par Ken 
11 ni tied with one of the greatest 
tournament rounds ever posted in 
British Columbia, finishing the final 
eighteen holes In 63. nine under per- 
fect figures, for a new course record 
He toured the outgoing "nine in 34 
and then sprinkled birdie after 
birdie over the back stretch for a 
29. Black beat out Bvron Nelson 
and Jimmy Thompson, noted United 
States professionals. »ho tied with 
278 s. 



runs, and Moore had the* excellent 
analysis of three for nineteen runs 
Jack Payne bowled fifteen overs for Kinch. not lout 
the Five C's. getting four wickets Collett c yoxall 
for fifty-six runs; and OMrgt Payne 
took two wlcket.s for sixte-n runs. 
ILBIONI win 
Playing/ at Cowichan the Albions 
defeated the home side. 136 to 62. 
The horne eleven opened- weakly 
against ihe Albions' batting 



Total .... . - 117 

viCToai \ 

41 

b Attwell /3 

lbw. b J Payne ... [6 
c J. Payne, b G Pavne 24 
Edwards, t O. Payne, b J Payne / J 
Goward. p O Payne . 



Appleton 
Meredith 



16 Smith, c Leggatt. b Baiss 0 hard for the past two weeks com- 

pleting details for the tournament, 
and yesterday F A. Jackson, popu 
lar club secretary, reported every- 
thing in readiness for the opening 
tomorrow 

C. Hugo Rayment. one of Canada's 
bt vt-known tennis and badminton 
officials, is tournament manager, 
and Dr. E Wellesley Boak Is the of- 
ficial referee. 

Forty-seven matches are scheduled 
for the opening day s play, and some 
!good matches should be witnessed 
R THE DRAW 

18 j The draw follows: 
23 1 10 a.m -P N W. sectional singles 
and doubles. 

11 a no — E. Alloo vs A McBride; 
O Amonette vs R Hyde; D Imhoff 
vs. J. MrCllmont: R. Christmas vs 
R. Colwell. 

12 a.m. — R Pellctreau vs T O. 
IT I Ry*l|; H. Drummond vs J Porter- 
20 firld; Mrs S P Blrlev vs Miss C 
U (;reen; Miss J Campbell vs MLss O. 

C'chrane 

2 pm— .7 Hall vs D Burdon- 
Murphy; A Ronnie vs C C. Wles- 
C YrOlruid VI M Carlock: P 
■ ton vs fl Erhman; A. C Brand 
Hippenstlel. 



Total 

Boulinr \nilvsn 

Cowichan — O 

.. . 4 Freeman 9 

N. Pite 5 

Smith 5 

Gibbons 3 



W 

2 
1 
2 

3 



Ho-garth 1.7 2 

Albions— O W 

Baiss 4 1 

Fox 6 4 

Leggatt 3 

Wilkinson 2 

Oreen 4 



2 
0 
1 

4 



6 

2 

5 

R 

27 
3f. 



An arrangement between the 
Victoria Parks Board, under the 
chairmanship of Alderman James 
Adam and the Recreational and 
Physical Education Centre of the 
Provincial Government was com- 
pleted recently whereby the Rec- 
reation Centre will und'ertake to 
provide supervisors for the chil- 
dren s playgrounds of Beacon Hill 
Park and Central Park ever^' after- 
noon, beginning tomorrow until 
August 22. 

The leaders appointed for the 
pi i si nt are MUs Frances Borde 
Miss Doreen Dale-Johnson and Eric 
Moves, who are fully qualified to 
carry out a programme Including 
names, .singing, dancing, story tell- 
ing and swimming It Is hoped that 
wiekly contests can be arranged 
with helpful and interesting 
features 

At each park "stunt nights" will 
be held so that the children an 
demonstrate what they have learned 
under the supervision of the leaders 
and at the completion of the course 
or season there wil be a final 
round-up" at one of the parks In 
which all the children will par- 
ticipate. 

It Is hoped that every success will 
attend this new venture of the 
Parks Board and will result In many 
smiling voung faces at Central and 
Beacon Hill Paries. 




BEATS LENEY 




LONDON. July 25 0 -The world 
record for the on^-mile walk es- 
tablished by the Canadian. George n 'f 

Hiding. In 1910 was bettered today 
bl- T Bernard", of' Latvia. 



6 21 i 2 4- 



Brmard covered one mile in 6 21 I 2 45 p m J Kenmrver \s o 



W 



..11 

Tomalln. c Comlev b J Payne ..I 4] clipping 4 4-5 seconds off the mark Rotirke; | Armstrong vs J Murlo; 

Rossnm. b Quainton 0 the Torontonlan set twenty-six years R Per.n«»tt vs C S Collison: MK< 

b u 't I Austin, b J. Payne 3 I ago of 6 25 4-5. P McDonald vs Mrs O W Ronrke. 




Robinson; Smith. Bryant. Froct, Ac- 
ford and Brown. M 

Royal Canadian Navy— Caldwell. 
Dovey, Hlbbert; Hutton. RoMM 
< captain'. Cocker!!!; Sweet. Brown. 
T. Watt. W. De Cc*.ta and Walker 

Members of the two clubs were the 
dinner guests of the city at an in- 
formal banquet at the Dominion 
Hotel following the match. Alder- 
man James Adam presided at the 
function 



WEST BROMWICH. England OJ, 
— An eight -year-old boy placed on 
probation for theft of two bicycles 
•*as said to have hired out Mir atotefl 
cycles to older boys at two cents a 
ride. 



Dunlop helped th" score along at 
little with sixteen runs. Leggatt. 
who contributed thirteen runs, was 
the only other member of the Cow- 
ichan eleven to rench double fig- 
ures. The tall end of the wicket fell 
cheaply and the side was out for 
the small total of .sixtv-f*o r ins 

The feature of the Albions Innings 
was the .splendid bitting of Les Gib- 
bons, who srornd enough runs to de- 
feat Cowichan single-handed, whep 
he put on oishty-six runs, Pritrhard 
3cored sixteen runs, but the remain- 
der Of the side was exceptionally 
weak at bat 

The scores — 

Lira tai i at 

Lethaby ."run out . S ... 2 

Darcus. b Newton 46 

Twite, c WAllace. b Newton 11 

j Moffatt. ruft out 13 

Grant, not out 45 

Dunlop. lbw, b Locke 1 

Jone.s. run out ." 20 

Peers, c Hinds, b Slaney 2 

| Norton, c Rotherham. b Wallace 2 
I Austin, b Slaney ... 2 

Jordan c Wallace, b Slaney 3 

Extra* .....rftw. VI 



Young Veteran 



By Jack Sords 




// smoothness appeals** 

CIGARETTES 

•-are irresistible. 



Total 

II. M I *AFOU o 
First Innings 

Richardson, _b Jordan ... 
Rotherham, b Jones 



1,8 






MIL 

drift. 



k < 



Ft 

Off rs olt i* 3r* 

im rue m>aw*5 



• 1 



OU7lFieLPe«? OF- . 
"Tab *ieW Vock. <&iAsrrs, a fe/v»- 

s/6A0 M AaJ AT TM6 Ae>6 OP 27 



0 

6. 



CharltAn. c Twite, b Jones 2i 

Wallace, c Peers, b Moffatt 22i 

Dakeyne. c Twite, b Jor4*n 5[ 

Blackwell. c Twite, b Moffatt 0 

Hinds, b Norton j «•< j 

Newton, c and b Norton 

Slaney. c Jordan, b Moffatt 1 

Pearce. b Norton 0 

Locke, not out 1 

Extras 5 

Tots! .....52 

Second Inning* 

I Rifhard.soii b Darcus ...... 1 

Rot e ; .•, h, Norton .... 47 

( Charlton, c jmb b Jordan 0 

| Wallace, b Peers 1 




1/0 A'S Pt<WT A*PTARAr« AT 

rue purr* ft* Trie 6*ws vec 
FAHAieo et'T hs Ffnrw»e>f*e. 

SeAJO»J OATM A BATT'OO " 
Of 309 



XI 

HITS FREELY 

Touring Cricketers Hammer 
Eton College Bowlers 
Almost at Will 



ETON Buckinghamshire England 
July 25 <V -Hammering the offer- 
rngs of Eton College bowlers prac- 
tically at will. Hon R C Matthews' 
Canadian cricket team hit up 169 
runs for loss of only three wwkets 
todav before the game was aban- 
doned owing to ram It was a one- 
day match. 

Ken Ross Montreal batsman, led 
the onslaught with a 78 not out 
score, while James L Weaver. Ed- 
monton rang up 30 runs before be- 
ing caught. 

L Bell. Toronto Crloket Club, was 
next in line for batting honors with 
27 not out. 

The representative Dominion team 
has yet to lose a contest on English 
soil, having beaten Hampstead. Har- 
row Wanderers. Free Formers and 
an M C C outfit that boasted many 
well-known cricketers "fn its line-up 
They have drawn with Richmond 
and Rugbv Bchool. 

The score card 

< ANADI Ws 

Rom. not out »....«■..■■»■■» 

P .v-aaram. c Clark, b Henderson 14 



Victorian Scores Straight- 
Set Victory — Mrs. Hocking 
Wins Easily 

DUNCAN. July 25 -Ross Hocking, 
of Victoria, was winner of t he men a 
singles in the 'annual open tourna- 
ment of the South Cowichan Ten- 
nis Club, which finished here today, 
when he won from Eric Leney In- 
three straight sets. Mrs Ross Hoek- 
.ng was women's singles winner, 
scoring an easv win over Jean 
"Campbell, with the loss of only two 
games, one in each set. The best 
match of the day was the mens 
doubles, In which Gordon and 
Brand, after losing the first two 
sets to Corfield and Phillips, staged 
a great comeback to take the next 
three sets, winning 4-6. 3-6. 8-6. 
8-6. 6-3. 

Mr and Mrs Hocking scored an- 
other straight-set victory when they 
took the mixed doubles from W K. 
Corfield and Jean Campbell. 6-2. 
6-2 Mrs Hocking partnered with 
Jean Campbell to win the women's 
| doubles from Mrs S P Birley and 
' Mrs Tomalln. 6-2, 6-4 

Men's Single* 
Hor king beat Leney, 6-1 6-3. 6-1. 
Women * Single* 

Mrs R Hocking beat Jean Camp- 
bell, 6-1, 6-1. 

Men * Doubles 

Championship of Vancouver Island 
i Ootdon and Brand beat Corfield 
and Phillips. 4-6. 3-6. 8-6. 8-6. 6-3. 
Women * Double* 

Mrs Hocking and Jean Campbell 
brat Mrs Birley and Mrs Tomalln. 
6-2 6-4. 

Mlied D*ihle« 

Championship of Vancouver Jsland 
Mr ai.d Mrs Hocking b»>at W E. 

Corfield and Miss Jean Campbell. 

6-2, 6-2 

Consolation* 

Mena Brand 'Victoria >, beat R. 
Christmas. 6-3. 6-4 — - 

Women * Miss D Burner beat 
Miss B Garrard 6-1 6-4 

Mm* Handicap Doubles 

ChrUtma* and Appleby < 30i 
be»t Knott and Bennett (—11), 2-6. 
6-3. 6-2. 

Women * llandlrap Double* 

Misses D. Stanler and Plnhorn 
scratch* beat Mrs. .Tomalln and 
Miss B Oarrard <-15» 6-3, 6-3 
Mlsed Handicap Double* 

D Ro>rU and Mrs C J Waldy 
•m-h' h> bept I Fox nnd Miss B 
Oarrard «scralch>, 6-4, 6-4. 




oiinC 

Am V><n 



Con 



arc} or bv the Government of British Columbia. 



This advertrftment is not published or displayed by the Liquor 



16 



\ 



THE DAILY COT.OXTST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY 26. 1936 





/ % M 



1 , 



Plays and Players 



In Brilliant Production 



A ppealing Drama Now 
On Screen at Capitol 



Kay Francis In "The White An- 
gel" Is now at the Capitol Theatre. 
It la an appealing production of the 
aame high standard and by the same 
produce™ ax "Louis Pasteur," and 
deals with tlie story of the heroic 
war nurse, Florence Nightingale. 

It Is a trlumpn for the producers 
and for Miss Francis, who was never 
more lovable nor sincere, as in the 
role of Florence Nightingale. 

MLss Nightingale was the daugh- 
ter of a wealthy, prominent English 
family, who gave up ease and riches 
to aid humanity. Yearning to do 
something worth-while she decided 



to devote her life to the hospitals of 
London after learning of the terrible 
conditions that existed in some of 
them. 

Leading surgeons opposed her, but 
her wonderful work soon attracted 
attention. 8he was sent by the War 
Ministry to the battlefront during 
the Crimean War. At a front-line 
hospital she found terrible condi- 
tions and neglect of wounded sol- 
diers. . 

A special added attraction on the 
Capitol stage will be Clement May, 
world-famous Dlclcensian character 
artist In person. He will Unperson- 



MONim, Tl KShAY, WKDNKSI) A Y 

Out of fh« roaring Eightiei, ^» 
with Buffalo bill't Wild Weirf U>fU\lrCihjOl 




0AK1EY 



FOSTER^ 
DOUGLAS 



Clydo 




-\ VKH IV 



GRETA NISSEN in 

"HONORS EASY 

■ * = Special Attraction ===== 

ON OUR STAGE! 

DAILY AT 9 P.M. ONLY 

"The Canadian 
Houdini" 

Bill Harkness 

Thirty Minutes of Magic and 
Illusion by the Man Who 
, Captured 

Tin* Coveted llou<lini 
Trophy 

Awarded at the Magicians' 
Convention in Seattle 

Sre thr Sensational Eoeape From a Riveted 

and Sealed l ank \\ bile Handcuffed and 
Heavily Bound Willi Chain* 




MOVDAT 

Trr*n»T 

DVTSDAT 



PLAZA 

rHINIBI 



BIGGEST SHOW 
OF THE YEAR! 

%7, 000, 000 Worth 

Of Fun and Beauty! 

SAMUEL 
GOLDWYN 




ETHEL MERMAN 
SALLY EILERS 

PARK YAK ARKUS and th. 
Gor B «owt GOIDWYN GIRLS 

**l*a,,d lnr« UNITID Atf/STi 



e picked her up 
threw him down! 



Ik 



EDMUND LOWE 
ANN SOTHfRN 

Qitrcfrd by AVf, Kmnton A 
A COLUMBIA 



IO 



mu/iCe\L 



cuPvLevy 



AH)/\llUf\ TWLCnTCOflnUT 



8 



p.m. 



AMUSEMENTS 



in 



On thr 

Atlas— Barbara Stanwyck 
"Annie Oakley. ' 

Capitol— The White Angel." 
starring Kay Francis. 

Columbia — Jack Holt in 
"Storm Over the Andes." 

Dominion — "And Sudden 
Death," starring Randolph 
Scott. 

Plaxa— JJddle Cantor in "Strike 

Me Plnk. M 
Oak Bay — "Captain Blood." 

with Errol Flynn. 



ate the Charles Dickens" characters 
—Uriah Heap. William Mlcawber 
and Scrooge. 

Mr. May is famous for his life- 
like makeup, which will be done in 
full view of the audience. 

BRIGHT HIT ON 
BILL AT PLAZA 



Eddie Cantor's "Strike Me Pink' 
With Parkyakarkus and Other* 




Olivia de Haviland and Errol Flynn in a Scene From "Captain Blood," 
Showing at the Oak Bay Theatre Tomorrow. 

Theme of New Picture 
Condemns Fast Driving 



Eddie Cantor in "Strike Me Pink." 
the pop-eyed comedians sixth an- 
nual musical extravaganza for Sam- wn o drives her auto with the accel- 



uel Ooldwyn, begins a three-day 
run at the Plaza Theatre tomorrow. 
Thus lavish mlLUon-and-a-haU 

dollar production, featuring Ethel 
Merman, Sally Eller.s. Parkyakarkus 
and William Frawley and a glorious 
new array of Ooldwyn girls, casts 
Eddie as a timid little college tailor 
whose secret passion for a glamor- 
ous night club singer, in the person 
of Miss Merman, moves him to take 
a correspondence cour.se in personal 
magnetism, entitled "Man or Mouse, 
What Are You?" 

Then he Inherits the management 
of a huge amusement park and be- 
comes involved with a gang ot slot 
machine racketeers who have put 
every previous manager on the spot. 

"Strike Me Pink ' was based on 
Clarence Budington Kellands Sat- 
urday Evening Post story and novel. 
• Dreamland." The adaptation and 
screen play are by Frank Butler. 
Walter DeLeon and Francis Martin. 
Norman TuuroK directed. Harold 
Arlen and Lew Brown are respon- 
sible for the snappy song hits, which 
include "The Lady Dances." "First 
You Have Me High, Then You Have 



Closer to reality than most dra- 
matic films of the past, because it 
deals with an agent of death com- 
mon in every-day life, "And Sudden 

Death," which opened at. the Do- 
minion Theatre on Friday is a skill- 
lul blend ol romance and thrills. 
The story tells of a young woman 



crator against the floorboards, a 
member of a set of young cocktail- 
sip ping, fast -driving moderns who 
laugh at "caution- signs. 

When the girl. Frances Drake, is 
unimpressed by her fourth citation 
for speeding, Randolph Scott, police 
lieutenant, undertakes to change her 



point of view. He succeeds, but not 
before he has fallen in love with her. 

Scott and Miss Drake are drawn 
closer daily until an incident tears 
them apart with dramatic sudden- 
ness. The girl's brother, played by 
Tom Brown, smashes his auto uito 
a school bus, killing a child, while 
Frances Is seated beside him. She 
assumes blame for the accident be- 
cause of his condition and is charged 
with mnil«ughUr. 

Scott's testimony is important in 
bringing about the girl's conviction 
and imprisonment. She Is freed only 
after a second smashup brings her 
brother's death. 



JAPAN AWAY 
FOR ORIENT 

Empress Liner Sailed, for 
Manila Via Way Ports 
Last Evening 



With over 450 passengers aboard. 

the Canadian Pacific liner Ss. Em- 
press of Japan, Captain L. D. Doug- 
las. R.N.R., sailed from Rlthet Piers \ 
at 5:30 o'clock last evening. The big 
liner arrived from Vancouver shortly 
before 4 o'clock to embark travelers 
and take on mails and cargo. Some 
200 passengers joined the Japan 
here, the majority of them being for I ] 
Honolulu. 

Among the prominent travelers 
going out on the Japan were: W. 
Freeland Kendrick, former mayor 
of Philadelphia and recent delegate 
to the Shrine Convention at Seattle; 
Mrs. Dorothy Paul Wade, assistant 
secretary of the Leonard Wood Me- 
morial. New York; P. E. Van Hossan. 
vice-president of the Vapor Car 
Heating Company. Chicago; Mrs. 
Edward A. Steele, socially prominent 
In Philadelphia; D. M. Biggar, man- 
ager of the Chase National Bank. 
Hongkong, and Dr. F. O. Knowles, 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia. 

Others included in the liner's list 
were: Col. and Mrs. Lsaac Newell, 
Peiping; Oeorge C. Rice, Buffalo 
real e.state man; Mrs. Theodore A 
Hunt and Miss Patricia Hunt, of 
Winnipeg, on a round-the-world 
tour; Muss E. Coltart. secretary- 
treasurer of the Ocean Shipping 
Company, Vancouver; C. A. Ogburn 
and Huang-l-Tsuang. officials of the 
Brown <fe Williamson Tobacco Com- 
pany, Shanghai; Oeorge Paley, Im- 
porter of Chicago, and A. H. Heath. 
St. Louis, proceeding on a tour of 
the world. 

Traveling to Honolulu with the 
Canadian Pacific and Canadian- 




SHOWING MONDAY 04LY 



Danger and Romance in an 
80 Mile-an Hour Entertain- 
ment Thrill ! 




"AND 
SUDDEN DEATH" 



Paramount 



Phone E 0914 



10" 
15' 
25' 



12 1 



15 



5 On 



AT nmt. litt i ,vi. 7 » %«. Huh 
RANDOLPH SCOTT • FRANCES DRAKE 



AISO . . . AT |lt& * ll 
Radio". No 1 Star of 



* i«. s..i» 



"PALM SPRINGS" 

WiH FRANCES LANGFORD • S)R GUY STANDING 



HERE TUESDAY . . . 
EDWARD EVERETT NORTON 

In Hit liggtst Comedy Hit 

"NOBODY'S FOOL" 



GLENDA FARRELL 



-With- 



CESAR ROMERO 

ALSO 

"DRACULA'S DAUGHTER' 

OTTO KRUGER • GLORIA HOLDEN • MARGUERITE CHURCHILL 



»»» 



EfflsS 9 sm$M. 




ATLAS PRESENTS 
"ANNIE OAKLEY" 



Il.it !>.u a Stanwyck Pnrtravs Role of 
C.lrl Shot In Brilliant 
Drama 



Scene in Capitol Film 



Me Low." "The Calabash Pipe 
Shake It Off." 



and 



THRILLING FILM 
IS AT COLUMBIA 



Jack Holt Play* leading Role 

• Storm Over the Andes"— 
Cast 



In 




Trfriling. action-packed and ro- 
mantic drama Is in store for you! 

Thr management of the Columbia 
Theatre takes great pleasure in an- 
nouncing that Jack Holts first Uni- 
versal starring production Is a thrill- 
ing South American aviationThd 
war drama. Storm Over the Andes, 
and that it will be shown at this 
theatre for three days, starting to- 
morrow. 

Holt, as a daring Amen, an aviator 
of fortune who throws his lot with 
the air forces of a South American 
country In the throes of a war. ha.-, 
an excellent supporting cast, includ- 
ing Antonio Moreno, screen favorite 
for twenty years; beaut if id Mona 
Barrle; comic Oene Loekhnrt. Juan- 
Ita Oarflas. Orant Withers, Barry 
Norton, Oeorge Lewi* and many 
other* 

Besides colorful fiestas, plenty of 
love Interest and exciting Hying, 
there are many actual war scenes. 



The old West, that of the days of 
General Custer and Buffalo Bill, 
is brought vividly to the motion pic- 
ture scr-en in "Annie •akley," Bar- 
bara Stanwyck's new starring ve- 
hicle, which opens tomorrow at the 
Atlas Theatre. 

Annie Oakley, as many people still 
living today will remember, was a 
simple country girl from Ohio, who 
In the late eighties, toured the 
world with the Buffalo Bill Wild 
Wmt Show. The tour made her an 
mtt niational character, and placed 
her among the women whose names 
will always live In American tradi- 
tion, for Annie Oakley was the 
greatest rille shot, man or woman, 
the world has known. 

The strangely thrilling story of 
her life Is plcturlzed in "Annie Oak- 
ley ' by R.K.O. Radio. Plucked by 
fate from a backwoods obscurity, she 
became the frund of the famous 
and the toast oi European royalty. 

The glorious years of Annie Oak- 
lev ■ life were lived against a blood- 
tingling background faithfully de- 
lineated in the picture. Hl.storlc and 
romantic characters such as Buffalo 
Bill and Sitting Bull are relived 
Event* signified in Annie's life 
are re-enacted. The plot of_the story 
concerns her romance with a rival 
mark. man. 

ERROL FLYNN IS 
STAR OF PICTURE 




SNOWING MONDAY AND TUESDAY ONLY .^YMS 




The Story of ^^^^ MM 

Immortal Florence Ntghtingale! 

Kay Francis 

"THI 

WHITE ANGEL 

««"> IAN HUNTER 



Donald Wood* • Nig». true* • Donald 
Crup • Henry O Nt.li • •illy Mauch 




PLL« ON TNI CTflCE 



Dlrrrl from Paladiura Thralrr. londnn 



hralrr, 

CLEMENT MAY 

Kajnoui l)l< krimian A< tor 

In characterisations and Imirrinnilioni 'in qui. a 
fktniri mad* In fall »!»» af aadlrncrt fmtn 



7 

tea 

m 



mtktt Moma la 
mOKaTTf movim 

DA V" 



I At I », I I*. • II. » 




• 



rs 



Starts WEDNESDAY. July 29 ■ 

SHOWING I DAYS ONLY! m 

ON OUR STAGE ■ 

50 CRAZY PEOPLE • 35 GORGEOUS GIRLS ■ 

A Hilanoui Muiicil M.rrhquik. Direct From th« ■ 

Roxy Thfjtrt. Ntw York Wi 




cxtEn A jOHfKdn : 



KUKOO KL0WNS -OF K0MEDY IN PERSON 
» SHOWS IIG BROADWAY SUCCESS 

DAILY • "ANYTHING HAPPENS" 



Kay Francis. Who la Now Appearing 
Theatre in "The White Ansel." Htr 



on the Screen of the Capitol 
Latest Film Production. 



• ON THE »i HI I s #> 

I \l C.H *«. TOf THRILL 




With 

ln»n Don LtTy, Glcnda 
Farrtll, Norman Fottar 



"ANYTHING HAPPENS" 
TO PLAY AT CAPITOL 



Pl:i\s Hole of "Captain Mood" 
s.ilt.itlni Presentation at Oak 
May Theatre 



in 



"ESKIMO" WILL BE 

AT COLUMBIA SOON 



Pink snow MMMl the eyes of 
sMdHMM in the Arctic when Col. W. 
S. Van Dyke started filming of tin- 
snow IkIoo .scenes In • Eskimo." to 
be shown Thur.sday at the Columbia 
Theatre. Red paint, sprayed from 
an air machine, turned the snow 
and the hemispherical huts built 
on it. a beautiful rase-colored 
hue overnight, to the astonishment, 
and In some c.ise.s alarm, of the na- 
tive cast. 

. It was rfonr because sunlifht on 
the cry.-Uillized snow r.iiLsed ' hala- 
tion" or strong reflections, danger- 
ous to photography. The pink tint 
made the work of the cameraman 
in thr odd light of the Northern 
wastelands simpler. 



Daring and debonair Peter Blood, 
immortalized by the novel of RaphJ 
ael asbatinl. It brought to life in the! 
mammoth production which comes 
to ihe Oak Hay Theatre, Monday, 
TiHMiav and Wednesday. 

Tall, broad-shouldered Errol Flynn 
makes the Ideal pirate chM. and 
dainty eighteen -yrar-old Olivia del 
Haviland enacta the part of the 
seventeenth century beauty , who' 
first buys Captain Blood as a slave- 
and then loves him. It Ls a tre- 
mendous picture with more than 
forty principal*., aeveral thousand 
extras, wind-jamming pirai^ cruis- 
ers and frigates, etc. 

"A bottle of gin was sr-nt to me 

Cook Old thev say anything 0 n my birthday with an unsigned 

about the rooking? ; car d ' writes a correspondent "I 

New Mnld - So. but I noticed them don't know what to make of It." 

praying before they started rating. | How about cocktails 1 



Victoria theatre patrons have a 
real treat.in store for them. Start- 
ing Wednesday the Capitol Theatre 
will present one of thr finest stage 
shows to ever play In this city. This 
attraction Ls "Anything Ha;>pchs," 
and haa for its stars those famous 
stage, screen and radio personalities, 
Olsrn and MMsJM. 

The Capitol Theatre management 
U indeed fortunate to book this fine 
attraction. "Anything Happens" and 
Its two stars has already played to 
capacity audiences at the new 
Orpheum Theatre In Vancouver, and 
the Metropolitan Theatre in Seattle 
and only a sudden change in book- 
ing made the Victoria engagement 
possible. 

The revue U laid in twenty-one 
scenes and has eleven outst.indlng 

song hits. OL en and Johnson are 
assisted by a company of fifty, which 
Includes a group of the famous Gae 
Foster Olrls, who come dlrret from 
the Roxy Theatre in New York. 



PRO ART 
TRIO 

VICTORIA HIGH SCHOOL 



Thursday 

July 30 

S JO PM 

Undtr fht Spomorihip of fh« Prorna- 
cul Summer School* 

MARGUERITE DEVLIN, Puno 
HANS ZSCHIEDRICH, V.ol.n 
EUGENE MAHRER, 'Cello 



S'udfnft 
G*»t*»l 



it* 



Tt«k»t« AM Sal' al Willia Piano. 
Marinn»»r» tj»'»r riMf' «r 
i c<7 u i H tri Sv-hrv>l StudanU. 



Stars in Dominion Film 



Australasian lines excursion and re- 
turning August 7 on the Niagara 
were: Miss B. Beal. Miss Z. Met- 
calfe, MLss E. Metcalfe, Miss Dor- 
othy Shcrct. Miss Delmar Gibson. 
R Bethell and J. Kitter. of Victoria.. 
Mr. and Mrs. E P. Janes, Master W. 
jP. Janes, Duncan; Mlvs Miriam 
Snow, Miss Bertha Crawford, j Miss 
, Delia Long, MLss Lillian Bellos, MLss 
Margaret Kr-rncr, Miss M. Kre nrter, 
MLss R. Moore and Miss Haze Mc- 
Murtrey. Seattle; MLss E. Fi ihrer, 
! Miss Marion Walker, Miss Rc berta 
Marry, Miss Corlnne Powers, Miss 
I Vera Dickey, Miss Marie Clckey, 
| Miss Mlna English, MLss Vlolef Vel- 
|ter and Miss E Collms, Portland. 
KROM MAIN'I, W'f) 
Prom Vancouver were: Miss M H 
Ramsay. Miss C. Loveday. Miss M 
K'.rkpatrlck, MLss D. Ralne. A O. 
Osborne, O. Nicholls, Muss M. Le 
Messurler, MLss M Brown. Miss I 
Erlen Peden, Miss E. Langworthy, 
Miss Ena Betterton, MLvs Alice Bet- 
terton. Miss O. Kelloway, MLss O. ' 
York. MLss E Campbell, Mis* M 
McLean. Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker, i 
MM E B. Hoyland. M.vs Kay Smith ' 
Miss T Beatty, Miss Mary Clark 
and Miss M. Beblngton. Other Brit- 
ish Columbia passengers were Miss 
K. Davies. Miss V. Mclntyre, MLss J 
Ooodwln and Miss B Moore, of 
Cloverdalr. and MLss F. Latimer. 
Pen tic ton. 



1 



CADITC 



OAK BAY 



MON TUES 
AND WED 




9,000 Cubic Feet 
of Conditioned 
Air Per 
H l n u te 



U.lt 1)1. nr. 

•Ml 

S.mphonr 

'f ar* iMaa • 



THKF MI.HT1T 

wsTivPKn 

rtrnlni 



al 7 mi • 
•n* %\T 
Mallnrx 




HILL BILLIES TO 
GIVE PROGRAMME 



COLUMBIA 

- TUESDAV . Wl 
prtttnts A UNI 



Boat 

ir- 




Lieutenant Randolph Scott Insists That a Plat Tire 
Made H« and Frances D«a*» IwMe tar the Par; 
the Feature. Attraction Now M ths 



Not R' 



mine*. 

in "And Sudden Death," r nfertainmrnt will 
™ ■ - ' " mark for " 



Tomorrow night the Show 
en'rrtauiment will be given by C 
leys Musical Harve^'rrs. supported 
by the sixth amateur talent contest 
This aggregation of mountain mu- 
Islctans Iim so far topped all at- 
tendance records at the popular 
Show Boat. 

Tomorrow night, according to 
Show Boat Captain Eallck. the Hi 
Billy aggregation will present 
|nov^l and sensational Interlude en- 
titled "Alberts Pilgrimage Prom 
Sayward to Victoria -which Is 

Horse Opera de Lu*w? — ; 

As the novelty of this special 
event woyJd W ruined by pre-show 
expianftiions, it must be sufficient— 
according to "Curley "-toaay that It 
breaks new and sensational ground 
in community entertainment 

Among the amateur aspirant)! for 
Victoria amateur honors tomorrow 
nlfht are fwo juvenile* from Lady-! 
smith, who will offer an exhibition! 
riarvrr based on the Spring Song ' 

The management of the Show 
Boat states that tomorrow night's 
set a new h 




fnjoy tn« smiting sdvfn 
twrct oi Csptsm El'.oH in a 
thsitrt thtt if Ik* Istt word in com 
•off D»tp r#itful »ti»i jnd *n *t 
mosphtr* jlwayt cltsn tnd *r#«li, 
batauw 9000 Cubic f»tf •* 

tiontd a* p«r bMmm « in 

Circulation Ljtttt hod phonst 
*bl< fhos« htrd Or ktjnng to tnjoy 
t»«ry dttail or tk« p«r»orm«nc« 



15c 



DAY 

VCISAl PICTURE 



5 Oi 



IPX 7 




laNra naos i.iimi hotii or txrcmt m 
"A NIGHT AT THE RITZ'* 



• fATHClA ELLIS • 



ESKIMO" 



THK BIGGEST PICTURE EVER MADE ? 





itartt Tk.radty 

COLUMBIA , 



V 



\ 



■ 



Erasmus Viewed (fs 
Premier Journalist 
Of Mediaeval Times 

Quartf*r-0'iit«'narv of Death Recalls Facile ami 
<:I*'v«t Pen of GreAl Scholar. \N bofte <»rrrk 

New Testament Wii Source of TIkmmb pi 
king JanH'H" and Other Ver»IOBi 

REV OR. J K UN8WORTH 

|~^OUR hundred years ago this month one of the great jour- 
H/nalists of all history died. Before newspapers began to 
*-( be published, Erasmus held a place similar to that of to- 
day's editorial writers and columnists. What the editors and 
columnists, for example, of the two local papers are to their re- 
spective constituencies, the scholar of Rotterdam was to all 
Europe. Taking a larger view and speaking in a general way, 
John H. Finley, of The New York Times, and the late G. K. 
Chesterton, were in the direct line of succession to the sixteenth 



THB DAILY ftpLOXIs X VICTORIA 

~ ' 



B.C., SUNDAY, [ULY 26. 1916 



— 



Northern Drama\ Coming 





ACTIVE 0,-mu, 
IN BUILDING 

Saanich Has Many New 
Homes Planned for Erec- 
tion This Summer 



I FILM TEACHKS 



Thrilling Nqrth 



Columbia Theatre, Thursday. 



In the municipality of Saanich 
permits taken out •during the past 
week indicate a very active cam- 
pattm in home building in that dl»- j 
Met For the most part the homes 
for which preparations are being 
made arc of. a modest type." being I 
const rucU'd for owners who are , 
anxious to have their own \ laces in 
which to live. ' , 

There were nin# permits taken 
;rn Epic Coming to the <)Ut f or brand ne 



I mated to cost $1,500. is to be erected 
lon,Wyndeatt Avenue for O. Eade 

A four-roomed residence will 
I built on Rutledge Street for K W 
Hallier. It Is estimated to t^; PRPIT f > FO 

On Lo.att Avenue. John T Noble UllLlI I LLll 

will erect » five roomed house to 

cost $1,400. 

A. T Trace will construct on 
I Tattersall Drive a four-roomed 
home, estimated to cost II.SOO. 

A four-roomed home wil be 
erected by W. Daley on Ob.d 
Avenue, estimated to cost $1,000 

On Ralph Street, A. E Oibbs 
will build a $1 000 home. 

A four-roomed houte is planned 
for G- Vh ©wnibiH'v. to be e..-.u,i 
lit a i cost of $1,200, on Reynolds 
Street. 




"Are We Civilized?" to Be 
Shown at First Baptist 
Church 

Of t imely interest and. according i 
to the advance notices, "preaching I 
a powerful and dramatic message 
of brotherly tove. peace and inter- 



put through a message 
tolerance und good win". 

History Is reviewed down | 
and the\ present is surveyed 
light of the current world 
with t|* new threats of war. 

film deliver*, a 

crushing blow amun.M the forces of 
greed and conquest " one critic 
comments, adding thai "at the satna 
j time the picture Is brilliant enter* 
tainment, sc reened in a background 
1 of splendour and magnificence, with 
la poicnant love story running 
1 through the actum to a climatic 
! Uni>h " Personally directed by 
E»lvun Carewe, head of the new 
movement lor production and riia- 
tnbutton of instructional film en- 
tertainment, the picture took more 
than a year to make It has been 




century humanist 

It was a stirring age and one that 
gave a splendid chance for a Jour- 
nalist. The life of ErAsmus covered 
what were perhaps the most intense 
decades of those two great and 
thrilling centuries, the fifteenth and 
sixteenth. Born at Rotterdam \A 
1469, and dying at Basle July 12, 
1536, his sixty-seven years touched 
tins lives of many of the worlds 
greatest of that time— Lorenzo the 
Magnificent. Christopher Columbia, 
Leonardo da ViniL Michaelangelo, 
Raphael, Titian, Martin Luther, Sir 
Thomas 'now Saint Thomas) Moie. 
It was the period of the Renais- 
sance and tiie Reformation. Eras- 
mus was born only a few years alter 
the printing -press began to scatter 



over Europe the stored-up knowl- them have been used by famous 
edge of the manuscript*. 

Against the skyline of that new 



age, winch was a veritable spring 
turn- of humanity, stands the figure 
of the greatest scholar of his time. 
Other men may have been greater 
and more potent personalities, and 
their names will linger longer In the 
popular mind. His was not the 
dynamic loroe of Luther nor the ar- 
tfctsfl genius of da Vinci. He was a 
scholarly writer. 

Dr. Preserved Smith calls him the 
"broadest scholar and the most pol- 
ished wit of his generation." As 
scholar, stylist, thoughtful writer 
on religion and education, he has 
had few equals. Another has said 
that he "compassed almost all 
human knowledge and brought it 
to bear on religious truth." A high 
appreciation Is given by Charles 
Reade in the closing paragraph of 
his great novel, "The Cloister and 
the Health," of which so many 
scenes arc Uken from the writings 
of the humanist. "He was not only." 
sa>s Rcade. "the first scholar and 
divine of his epoch, he was also the 
heaven-born dramatist of his gen- 
eration." 

TIIF.RE WAS LOI S 09 < OPY 

Plenty of Journalistic material, 
then, was there for the taking. 
There was lots or "copy" available 
And there was a man big and clever 
enough to seize It and broadcast it 
to the world. It was the pre-news- 
paper age. and that vehicle for the 
modern commentator oh affairs was 
not yet at hand. But Erasmus was 
a most prolific letter writer, and by- 
means of frequent publication of 
these letters (which were, indeed, 
composed with an eve to the printing 
press », and by equally frequent pub- 



1 - 



hcation of essays which he called 
•Colloquies," he kept up a running 
comment on the course of public af- 

i»m._ . . ■ 

The epistles are a feast, according 
to a writer in The New York Times, 
at which one will meet all the | 

famous men of his age. In them 
one can follow contemporary his- 
tory, and. particularly every change 
in the opinions of their writers. The 
contributor mentioned may be 
quoted: "Prom the literary stand- 
point, the •Colloquies' are the 
writer's masterpiece Each one of 
them tells an engaging story, so 
vivid, so true to life, so perfectly 
drawn m plot and character, and so I 
exquisitely expressed, that many of 



authors, as Rabelais, Ben Jonson. 
Margaret of Navarre, Saidou, Sir 



Walter Scott and Charles Reade. 

"Each colloquy, in addition to 
being a. short story, was a tract for 
the times. Again, it has been re- 
cently pointed out that almost every 
one of them was evoked by some 
particular emergency or event that 
needed to be interpreted and com- 
mented on for the benefit of the 
public." Erasmus may be fairly put 
on the blackboard as the premier 
Journalist of the printing press era. 

C.AVK miT NEW II >l \MKNT 

Much clo«er comes the great 
scholar to us of today, when it is re- 
called that it was Erasmus who 
gave the modern world the first New 
Testament In the original Oreek 
text and thus prepared the way for 
countless versioas in the Oreek and 
the vernacular. So close is Eras- 
mus to today that the Bible that 
will be read in church this morning 
and thiss evening rests upon the 
Oreek New Testament of Erasmus. 
For William Tindalc translated his 
Oreek text into English, and from 
Tlndale s version came that of King 
James* "Authorized Version. Eras- 
mas, the scholar, was the spiritual 
grandparent of the versions of Mof- 
f: t, Weymouth and the rest. The 
line runs like this: Erasmus, Tin- 
dale. Cranmer. King James" trans- 
lators, modern revisionists. 

One of the great hopes whifh had 
stimulated Erasmus in undertaking 
the gigantic task of preparing a 
Oreek text from the few and im- 
perfect manuscripts then available 
was the wish that all men. so far as 
they were able to rend, should ha.e 
the opportunity of becoming 
acquainted with the New Testament 



for themselves. In a much-quoted 
passage from the Introduction to 
the New Testament itself he says: 1 
"I long for the husbandmen toMng 
parts «f them to himself as he fol- 
lows the plough, for the weaver to 
hum them to the accompaniment of 
his shuttle, for the traveler to. be- 
guile the tedium of Journeying with 
them " 

BIBLE FOR ALL PF.OPLI ti 

His earnest desire that the Word 
of Ood should be brought to bear 
on the minds and hearts and homes 
of all peoples was expressed in tht 
first edition of 1516: "I vehemently 
dissent from those who would not 
have private persons read the Holy- 
Scriptures nor have them trtin.v- 
lated into the vulgar tongues, as 
though Cluist taught such difficult 
doctrines that they can only be 
understood by a few theologians, or 
the safety of C hr lstl on religion in 
ignorance of It. 

—"I should like all women to read 
the Oospel and the Epistles of Paul. 
Would that they mmn trarftlafrfl 



Mother Whv don't you wear that 
beautiful underwear you got for 
Christmas'^ 

Daughter — Oh. I'm saving that 
for a windy day. 



eluding a Summer cottage on Clov- 
erdale Road for Mrs. H Hill, cost- 
ing $500. The other homes are as 
follows: 

J. H Walton for a nve-rooined 
iiouse. estimated cost $3,000. to ,Jje 

-voted on Bean Avenue. 

other five-roomed W. estl- 




In an Atlanta school a prize was 
offered- lor a story of. the Jew est 
words in rhyme. A colored boy- 
won It: 

A mule in the barnyard, Uuv and 

slick. . 
A boy with a pin on the end" of * 

stick 

Slips In behind him as still as a 
mouse — \ 



_ 



national *ood will." the new talking 
; motion picture. "Are We Cmlr -d?" praised by leadmg educators, states- 
Ls to be shown at the First Baptist rn.cn and religious leaders. 
C: eh tomorrow and Tuesday eve- 
nings at 8:15 o'clock, with intro- 
ductory comments and musical 
numbers by Rev. D A. iJimbert 
f Starring William Farnum and 
Anita Louise, and supported by an 
all-Mar cast and more than 25.000 



player* — this spectacular film 
Crepe on the door of the little boy's I attempts to remove the veil frqm 
house. I present-day world events, and "Ho 



Village Policeman — "Now. 
what's vortr name?" 
Culprit— "William Jones" 
Po'.i.-eman — "I want your rtghl 
lutne.'*" ~ • * 

Culprit- 'Oh. well, then, William 
Shakespeare.** 

Policeman — "Ah.- that* better! 
You can t put me off with any of 
that Jones stuff * 



When \ott decide to build a home consult 
'a reputable architect. It it »ise economy. 



The Daily Cross -Word Puzzle 




ACROSS 

1. Courage. 

« Possessing flavor. 

11 To testify. 

12 Places of combat 

14. DHL 

15. Jcttlea. 
17. Pronowf* 
18 To free. 
10. Inlet*. 

:o a pi 

21. Babylonian fod. 

22. Wanders. , 

23. Jason's ship. 
24 Railway car. 
26 Foreign 

27. Prevariratr.s 
28 To chew. 
28 Whirls. 
31 Annoys. 
34 Crafts. 
35. Oovernor. 

38. Pronoun. 

37 Cravat. 

38 Listed. 

39. To chop. 

40. Type measure 

41. More uncouth. 
43. To mislay. 

43 Indian herb 
45 Uncloned. 
47. Is fond. 
18 wise mei). . 

now n 

1. Porgiveablt. 
3. Imitated. 

3. Portion 

4. Concerning. 
8. Takes swst 

8 Transactions. 
T. War god. 



DOWN 

8 Dance step. 

9. Nook. 
10 Harm. 
II. Defies. 
13. 8urgical thread 
Ifi Beyond. 
19 Contends. 
20. Lifts wi'h lever. 

22. Guiding lines 

23. To change 

2S. Selected group. 

26 Wai ill 

28. Spanish dances. 

29 Cloys. 

30. Made ready 

IT. Draft animal 

H2 Essays' 

33. 8tltehed 

35. Ls borne. 

38. Vapor 

3^ To put edge on 

41 Rodent 

42 Support. 
44." Thus. - 
46. Father (coll.). 




into all languages, so that not onlv 
Scotch and Irir-h. but Turks and 
Saracens might be able to read and 
know them." Such a spirit en- 
titles Erasmus to a place on. the 
honor roll of the British and For 
eign Bible Society. 

Much of the scholar's <-Won was 
fulfilled In the near iuture. His 
Oreek Testament was the fountain 
and source "from which flowed the 
new translations, which like rivers 
irrigated the dry lands of the 
mediaeval church and made them 
blossom into a more enlight'-ncd 
and lovely form of religion ." .Tin- 
dale gave an English New Tf tfr- 
ment to his native land and 
Francis de An/.inas published a 
translation in Spanish. Luthers 
German New Testament was based 
upon Erasmus In the twenty Jfl ttt 
before his death in 1536 sixty-seven 
versions and reprints of the Greek 
Testament appeared. It was printed 
by seven publishers in Basle alone 
A best seller, indeed. 

A CENTRE Of 00*1 UCI 

Many aspects of tiie great schol- 
ar's character and phases of his 
work must remain untouched. His 
relationship to the Reformation and, 
his breach with Luther, his criticism 
of the church and his desire to re- 
form it are topics upon which many 
folios have been written. Like many 
another of that tumultuous day. he 
was the centre of conflicting opin- 
ions. Two closing paragraphs deal 
with other questions. 

Ernsmus was a pacifist, states Dr 
Preserved Smith. Among the main 
tracts in favor of an international 
■UN which he produced, the most 
finished proposes a World Court 
and a League of Nations as prac- 
tical measures to prevent war 

On June 6, 1A36. he knew himu lf 
to be dying, though the end did not 
come till the midnight of Julv 11-12 
His last words were: "O mother of 
Ood, remember me Jesus Christ. 
Son of Ood. have mercy upon me 
I will sing of the merr y and Judg- 
ment of the Lord " These were re- 
peated over and over again in the 






I-atin language, of w 
great ja ma lt< r. untt 



breath «fhe dyint: mfn said in the 
low German «rf 
"Deatj God." and ex] 



lich he was so 
with his last 



lis childhood, 
ired. 



PROVIDES GOOD 
C0NCF.RT SFMS 



M. Oee. of Winnipeg. 
What lie Is Doing to 
Music Lovers 



T>M» 
Help 



Among the arrivals at the Em pre M 
Hotel yesterday afternoon was Fred 
M. Gee, of Winnipeg, who. for some 
years past, has provided Wlnnlnetr 
with a very attractive series of Win- 
ter-, concert.; He in on his way to 
San Francisco and will spend only 
a verv short time here. 

Mr Oee Is a musician of note 
himself, who appearrd in artist 
roles in his younger days, but who 
of late has TTlRfie it a practice, to- 
ptaMtfl the. resid e ut&.ol tliCL-Maiu- 
toba capital, together with a few 
other of the larger crMes of the 
Prairies, "with the opportunity of 
hearing, each Winter, some o\ the 
best available talent 

For the coming Winter. a>-pro- 
gramme of about ten big attractions 
l hooked for the Auditorium, which 
,<;rafs about 3-.W1 person* Mr. Oee 
points out that there is a regular 
list of some 3.000 subscribers who 
take the season's chain without a 
break Among the eomlr. ic- 
tlon's this Wln^r are Lawrence Tib* 
bet and the Minneapolis Svmpluony 
Orchestra. Mr. Gee is able to ar- 
range for the taklne of about half 
of these attractions to Edmonton 
and Calgary, and in addition a I HI 
I are made possible for appearing ir 

i Rr-gina »nd Mrt&toQn i 

A tempera nee lecturer fl a r . h e d 
on the'screen a picture of a drop 
of water magnified so that all the 
organLsms in it could be seen swim- 
ming around. "Not. * said the lec- 
turer. "I am going to show you 
the effects of alcohoT. See what 
happens when I add a drop of 
that " Immediately all activity 
stopped, and an old Trishworrufh In 
the hack of the hall turned to a 
friend anJ said Look a; that' 
Shure. Ill never drink wit-r again 
without some whLsky in ttt" 



"DUILDING a home ... your own home, is a thrilling 
experience, the very thought of materializing your 

own ideas of design, layout and construction is an indescribable pleas- 
ure . . . equalled only by the sheer joy of crossing the threshold as the 

door doses and you step into the completeness of it all. 

Home owning is also a business. The difference between the first and the last 
cost depends almost entirely upon the quality of materials and workmanship. 
The first cost is known . . . the last cost is too often a gamble. 

What price depreciation .'.Consider it now before you build, insist on materials 
that cut the cost of depreciation and minimize the last cost to you. 

Take Red Cedar for instance. There are at least fifteen places in home construc- 
tion where Red Cedar can be used to advantage. Of major importance are the 
roof and side-walls. A roof of British Columbia "Edge-Grain" Red Cedar 
Shingles is not only time-defying; it provides a measure of insulation that js 
amply demonstrated in frigid weather py lowered heating costs and cool com- 
fort d-uring hot spells. I 

Red Cedar Side-walls complete a .perfect extdrior, with protection from all 
WCithcf conditions. ! 

Consider also the sheer beauty of this ijative. Everlasting wood ... the natural- 
like symmetry of shingle or shake and the attractive shadow line of deep and 
thick butted Red Cedar Siding. 

By all means consider the last cost ... remember British Columbia "Fdge 
Grain" Red Cedar Shingles and Red Cedar Siding minimize exterior deprecia 
tion costs. 



The Dominion 
Housmc id... 

Enables a prmfxctire home owner to 
build a home for an initial cath layout 
of twenty per cent, of the total a it 
with the balance repayable at five per 
cent, over a period of twenty years. The 
Act enables him to build a $5,000 home 
with SI. 000 capital. The balance of 
$4,000 can be repaid at the rate of 
$26.11 per month for interest and prin- 
cipal. This is very much less than he 
would pay as rent for the tame type 
of house. * 

The term of the loan is for ten years 
with the option to the borrower of 
renewing for a further ten years, sub. 
ject to revaluation of the property and 
on terms mutually agreeable. 

For complete details and' information 
as to the procedure for making appli- 
cation for a Dominion Housing Act 
Loan, enquire of vnur Insurance Agent 
or local real estate agent. 



home, frattirinfl- 
of British Columbia 



roof 



TFm attractive 
and side walls 
"Edge grain" Red Cedar Shingle* and 
Red Cedar Siding, was planned by 

MrCARTF.H NXlRNT. Archjtectt, 

Vancouver. British Columbia 

I 

:; 

u 





1ATED FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES 



OF BRITISH 



IMBIA 



_ - V-. 



I 



• 



THE DAILY COLONIS^, VICTOR!^ B.C.. SUNDAY, JULY J6, 1936 



LEGION BAND TO 
PLAY THURSDAY 



of Knvrlimt Miuio Will 
by Ml* Conway's 



Beautiful 




my Commemorates Canada's Heroism 



5 



Follower* of the Show Boat are 

Indeed fortunate this week In hav- 
ing with them the prize band of the 
Canadian Legion at lta Thursday 
evening concert. 

The band will present a pro- 
gramme of beautiful music, and as 
the outstanding attraction of the 
evening, Miss Sheila Conway, tha 
band * soprano solout, will be heard 
In a group of si>eclally -chosen num- 
bers Thl* performance mark* the 
first Show Boat band concert of 
the season. 

The programme will include: (1) 
March. "British Legion," T. Big- 
wood. <2» aelectlon, Old Favorites"; 
<3> waits, "Gold and Sliver"; (4) 
songs. Mlsa Sheila Conway. ia> "The 
Sunshine of Your Smile." with band 
accompanying; <b> Homing" (Del 
Riegoi. piano ac<x»mpanist, Miss 
Grace White; (5) symphonic ar- 
rangement. "Home on the Range"; 
<6) potpouri, "More Musical Memor- 
le»"; <7> songs. Miss Sheila Conway, 
ia> "The Song of Songs." with band 
accompanying, (b) "The Kiss" 



(Alditi). piano accompanist. Mis* 
Grace White; (8) waits. "Mighty 
Lak' a Roue; <9) selection, "Com- 
munity Land"; (10) "Old Timer*' 
Walm." 



Military Activities 

17TH FORTRESS COY. ROYAL 

< WAOIAN ENGINEERS (N.P.) 

Order* for week ending July 28. 
1936. by Captain J. H. Mcintosh. 

Parades — The Company will pa- 
rade at Company Headquarters at 
20.00 hour*. Tuesday, July 28. 1938. 
"-Musketry Training — Heats Rifle 
Range has been alkrted to the Com- 
posite Units a* follows: Instruction. 
Wednesday afternoon, July 29; Sat- 
urday afternoon, August 1. Clas- 
sification, Wednesday afternoon, 
August 5; Saturday afternoon. Au- 
gust 8. All ranks must attend one 
parade for instruction and one for 
classification. Transportation ar- 
rangements, etc., will be Issued on 
Tuesday parade, July 28. 

Annual Camp — District Engineers' 
annual camp will be held from Au- 
gust 3 to August 9, inclusive, at Rodd 
Hill All ranks attending this camp 
must be present on parade on Tues- 
day. July 28. 

J H McINTOSH. Capt. 
OC. 17th Fortress Coy., 
RCE. iNPi 




l*t RN flfith C.E.F i I W \DI \N 
SCOTTISH REGIMENT 

Battalion orders by Lieut -Col. J. 
R. Klngham, Officer Commanding 
Part I 

Vlmy Memorial Drumhead Serv- 
ice- -In order to comply with an 
invitation expended to the unit by 
the Canadian Legion. BE.SL., 
through the DOC. M D. 11. to at- 
tend the drumhead service In the 
Mayors' Grove. Beacon Hill Park, 
on Sunday. July 28. 1936. the bat- 
talion will parade at the Crystal 
Garden at 14:15 hours (2:15 pm.l 
as a composite detachment, under 
the command of the following offi- 
cers, on this date: Major Stuart 
Robertson. OC. Detachmrnt; Lieut 
fi. J McDonald. Second Lieut. K. S. 
Crabtree. 

Dress Full dress service dress, 
with web belts, diced hose and white 

spats Medals and decorations will 

be worn. The pipe band will be in 
attendance. 

Royal School of Infantrv 'Part ID 
Course— Candidates selected to at- 
tend this course at Work Point 
Barracks, commencing Monday, July 
27. 1936, will report to the com- 
mandant of the school on that day 
at 8 15 hours (1:11 atp>. Dress 
service dress. 

Nodee 

The officer conimandfiig will hold 
a meeting In the O C t of lice, the 
Armories, on Monday, July 27. tfM 
at 20 30 hours. The fallowing offi- 
cers will attend: Coiipany com- 
manders, the acting ilgnnl officer 
and the quartermasteif. Dress will 
be blue undress - 




Ietters»*v£ditor 

No leiMr to t** editor will M lw 
uewt ovw Um prop« »un»tur» 
iddrMs of th« wriur Thl* rul* a 



oX no Mcepuon. No 
ta 




'"-.-Sgr-V^ - 



8 



*• t*'- ' :«&*** • * * ' 



m * 



» i 



■ -»i -. iff i «*jfeii|i»» ciu . 





mm 4 ■ i 




- Centr»l Pro»« C«n»(liin Photo»r»ph 

Pointing Majestically and Reverently Toward the He.ivens, This Magnificent Memorial to the Heroism of Canadians in the Great V/Lr Will Be Unveiled Today by King Edward. More Than 6.000 Canadian Vet- 
erans, Pilgrims to the Shrine at Vimy. Will Witness the Impressive Sight as the Draped Hag Drops From the Gleaming White Pil ars. The Memorial Is Situated at the Crest of Vimy Ridge, Where the Canadian 
Army Won Undying Fame When, on Kaster Monday Morning, in 1917, After a Barrage Which for Days Had Battered Eriemy Trenches, They Charged the Heights, Took Them and Held On. 



nl 

On Command -The! following of- 
ficers. W.O., N.C.O "s and man. 
having been appnned Tor the In- 
fantry 'Part D) Course at. Work 
Point Barracks, commencing on 
Monday. July 27, IWTft; sre placed 
on command as from that d«t«' 
Second Lieut E A Stewart. "HQ'; 
Second Lieut. K. S. Crabtree. "A . 
Second Lieut A M Field, "C". 
1204. CSM R F Ouyton. "D"; 
ISfil. A -Sergt F A I^rkin. "C '; 
1S93. L-Cpl. R. S. Marshall. '•»"; 
1680. Pte R. S. Dronfield "B '; (for 
ref re.cher>. 

Erratum— Battalion orders No 2(5 

Baled 25-6-36. Part II. sub-head 144. 

In so far as It concerns No 1723, 
Pte M.J0. McPhail. Ls amended to 
read "Re-enHstment" in lieu of 
"at testation.'; and the reglmenUl 
number is amended to read "No 
388" in lieu of "No 1723 - 

, W. H. PARKER. Lieut. 
. Adjt. 1st 

Regiment 





















Vincent Starrett 






\ 



-A- CO.. 11TH MACHINE CI N 
BN., r.M.O.C. 

Dutiee— Orderly offleer-for w.ck 
ending August i. 1936. 2nd Lieut 
W. O. B. Flndlay; next for duty. 
Ueut. H. Buss; orderly sergeant. 
L. Sergt. W. Conway; next for duty. 
L. Sergt. A. F. Oarnot. 

Parades — The company will par ads. 
strong a* possible. Tuesday. July 
28, 1936, at 20 00 hours. Dress, 
mufti. Preliminary practice for an- 
nual rifle classification at Heals 
Range. Wednesday. July ». 1936, 
and Saturday, August 1. 1936 Dress, 
drill order. Details regarding as- 
sembling for shooting will be no- 
tified during the Tuesdav evening 
parade. , 

Training— Preparation for shoot- 
ing at. Heal s R.*ng» on Wednesday 
and Saturds- July 39 and August 
I. 1936 W O B. F1NDLAY. 

- - ?nd Ltwif 
For Major commanding "A" Co. 

llth MO. Bn, C-MO.a 



CHAPTER XVI 
No. I'm sorry. Mr. Fentress." 
7.i Ida said. "I don't know who tele- 
phoned Janice. I didn't hear a 
word she sold. The telephone Is In 
hut. bedroom. She went ln*lde and 
closed the door."" 

"You should have llste/ied. Zelda." 
said Blackwood, with a grin. "Never 
let any little matter of propriety 
stop you in an Investigation. I am, 
myself, quite shsmeless." 

-I tried." Zelda said, serlou.lv 
"I thought I heard her say 'this 
afternoon.' Just that and I cant 
be sure I really did hear any words 
at all " 

-This afternoon.— repeated 
Blackwood. "Too bad you didnt 
hear the rest of it- *lnce you'd br^n 
trying all afternoon to reach her " 

Fentress S|K>ke decisively "The 
question, now. Riley, is what's to be 
done 1 There 1 * another dead wom- 
an, apparently, at 1140 Lake Shore 
Drlvt. Unless somebody heard the 
shot and Investigates, she wont be 
found until that maid comes to- 
morrow" 

"Oh, the poller will have in btr 
told.'' said Blackwood. "The sooner 
the better. I suppose. It's Zeldas 
Job. She'll probablT be arrested 
But mavbe von can get her out on 
bond " He glanced sf 7ields Tens- 
ing, who had gone pa> "Have you 
got your story straight? Tha same 
on* sxarlly that you tnld Just wow? 
Okay. If f * ff** i 

As they were Wving the reg- 
Uurant Rllev spotted a telephone 
booth near the r*<.hir- < rage »nd 
turned hark tn get rhsng*. ' 1 11 
{ break the news to Dallas," he added 



■Mil iiucally. and vanished into the 
booth. 

Zelda Lansing seized the lawyer"* 
arm. Will they really arrest me, 
Mr. Fentress?" she demanded 
fiercely. 

They niay." admitted Fentn I 
"They won t call it arrest, of course 
They'd hardly dare to place a 
charge against you" on ^he evidence 
In hand— but they'll do their best to 
hold you ." He looked at her with 
serious eves "I'm a lawyer. ydG 
know. I ll do the best I ran for you. 
If necessary, I'll defend you. But 
tell me this at once. Did you have 
anything to do with thla?" 

"Nothing. I swear It " * 

"And you krtow- nothing about It? 
Remember. tNre are several stis- 
plclous circumstances In your pre- 
dicament. Your visit to • Hindu, 
for Instance, and that sort of thing. 
Have \ou the faintest Idea where 
Percy Jones is to be found?" 

"I swear I haven't. If I had. I'd 
tell you I went to Janice hoping 
she might tell me something ' 

"All right." said Fentress. "Ill 
see what I can do" 

Blackwood emerged from the 
booth with nersplrs'lon on his brow. 
They gathered that he had listened 
to some Dallas elocution. He was 
Jaunty enough, however. 

' We're to bring her to the scene of 
the crime." he said. "Dalle* U on 
his way." - * 

"What doe* Mr Dalla* think 
asked Zelda Lansing almost timidly. 
— But there was no answer to h»r 
I que«t|on until thev were seated in a 

taxlcsh Then Blackwood spoke. 
| "I'm afraid he think* It quit* pos- 



| slbls that you murdered Janice 

yourself, Zelda." he said regretfully. 
"You see. if Percy did kill Rita-— 
which I don't for a minute admit— 
and Janice happened to know 
: about it. and you happened to know 
that Janice knew, and Janice hap- 
urned to be in a mess her.M If, and 
happened possibly to be thinking , 
about talking -w. ll. you see. the i u ' )on the P"™^ 
sort of mind that Dallas has!" 

"But you believe me. at last, don't 
you 1 " 

At last, darling— at last — I think 



Fentress hsd seen Colbiaih and' "Has anybody got a key?' a.ked 
Anne Gray together at the theatre Blackwood. "I unagine the ap.irt- 
that evening. , BWHt is locked" 

They descended to' the pavement j It was a contingency lor which 
before 1140 Lake Shore Drive and "no one had provided. The doorman 
viewed the familiar building with v..ure lie had no duplicate. Dallas 
distaste. To Blackwood it .seemed cursed and then apologized to Zelda 
that he was spendm.,' more time lean ing In the end it was Black- 



life being a 
brief adventure^ — than the attrat- 
tions of the confounded place called 
for. However, there was another 
murder now. It made a differ* n< 8 



wood who iuggested a remedy. 
Thereafter they' stood outside the 
silent apartment while a hulking 
sergeant passed out onto the fire 
escape and entered the back bed- 



I dq^ Provisionally, anvway. I made looklng for> h( . wr , n dered. And what 
the error or telling Dallas that I did. ' WM u .j, ht hhr nad ROUKht? Z(Mda 
In point of fact, and I'm just afraid nad M | d ^ JanJce was murd . 
it won t help your case a Irtle bit. J bv , nmtml but It was quite cer- 

"Then listen to me. Riley -and tain that Zelda would hav* lied if 
iqu too, Mr. Fentrrss! I've changed the murderer had been actually 
my mind about Janice. The redhead 
killed Rita Wingfleld. and she killed 
Janice too. I can't prove It; I Just 
feel IV — m my veins And heaven 
only know* what she's done with 
Percy. I'm Just afraid there's going 
to be another murder!" 

"N^w don't worry about that," 
said Blackwood easily. "Leave every- 
thing to u*. By the way. you re 
quite positive that you n*ver heard 
of thl* Anne Gray before 1 " 

"Positive!" 

"Do you happen to know a man 
named Rollle Colbeth?" 

Miss Lansing stared 

"Roll!* Colbath! What has he to 
do with this?" 

"Do you know him?" 

-A little. Near'y everybody does. 
I think." 

"Who Is he» What does he do?' 



Had Janice 1 found what sh* was room window. He was absent for 

✓ \cra. minuii .. then they heard 
him swear, inside, as he stumbled 
upon the body and retreated to v lind 
the light switch. Dallas bawled 
orders througHRthe d<XM\ 
It opened, and with shocking sud- 
Percy. Her story was very plausible. I denness they were looking down at 
however She was really a very Janice Hume, blocking their en- 
decent little scout — although once trance to the apartment. She lay 



again ne wonaerea wnat *ne or anv 

other woman could see to like in 
Percy Jones. 

A large car, furiously driven, was 
turning In from the street Its 



where she had fallen, a look of hor- 
ror and surprise upon her face. 

Dallas stepped over her and knelt 
for a moment beside the body Then 
he rose "Come in," he invited 



Landing. Dallas; you met her Sat- 
urday night. I think. ' As for Fent- 
resa-" He swung an arm in airy 
.introduction. 

Th» chief of detectivea was in fair 
humdr considering the circum- 
stance*: "Hello. Mr Fentress," he 
said, shaking the lawyer's hand "So 
"1 don't know I dont think I Blackwood's dragged you into this, 
do. He's Just— oh. Jual one of those has he?" He bent hi* brow* over 



wheel* grated against the curb and grimly, "and be careful not to touch 

Dallas sprang out of It. followed by her as you pass ' He closed the door 

half a doren huskies. behind them and for a moment 

Blackwood nodded affably. stood In silent contemplation of the 

"Brought your gang with you, did premise* His eye* at length came 

you?" he grinned. Thi* 1* Miss back to Ze.da Lansing "Well listen 



men. I -guess' You meet him every 
place. He has plenty of money. He 
drink* a lot^or seem* to-but he's 
aiwavs 



•« a gen 

this 1 " 
i to 



the »hrlnking girl and continued. 
"I'm very" glad to *ee vou. Miss 
lanslng-xery glad Indeed Shall 
we go up 1 " 

has he gm to d^ «t*h The uniform 1 "! diVirrrUn was hov- 



to your story first. Misa. Lansing " 
he added Ther* was * menacing 
smile upon hi* lip*. 

She wrenched her eye* awa7 from 
the silent flgtare on the flo-.r 

"I had been trying to reach her 
all afternoon." said Zelda Lan mg 
It was *fter Mr Blackwood—" 

Ml. Blackwood courteously ta- 
ternipt/d ■ if .-r, M ;: M riw re" h» 

bowed. "I won't" remain for the re 
cltal I'v* heard the_*tory. after 
all— and as It happen*. I have % 

reMew to do tonight I merely 

iiv-* se« the bodv And Fen<- 



of rot! Gentleman, good night. I'll 
call you tn the morning. Lulu. 

He left, tiiom staring in astonish- 
ment at. his abrupt departure. 
Outside the door of the ai>art- 

. m«nt, win n the voices had resumed. 

I he turned an eye upon the door- 
knob and shrugged his shoulders 
He had small use for fingerprints, 
in any case-* they wire too scien- 
tific ■ but it was probable there were 
none The murderess had not 
touched the doorknob. She had 
simply.-atood ouUside the door and 

] rung the bell until the victim, her- 
-< .!. had open« d it. 
"Very clever! " said Mr. BU*k 

I wood. But in any event the finger- 
print* could be left to Dalla*. 
He shrugged again and strode di- 

I rectly to the fir* escape. Then, 
softly, as he had before, he slipped 
down to the eighth floor landing 
and Jockeyed fnr ■ view of the 
Wingfleld bedroom. The room was 
quite d»rk; but the window, he 
could see. waw wtiehtly nrrsed, exactly 
as it had been when he saw It last. 

Swinging outward Into space, he 
pried at it with his toe With an 

1 effort he raised the window several 
inches, and eventually got It up as 
far as It would go The swing across 
was famthr slekenlng, but he made 
It without difficulty. Half In and 
haff out of the window, he sat for 
a moment and listened for sounds 
Of pursuiL^hen put his head Inside 
'To Be Oon»lnu»d . 



SCANDINAVIAN LANGUAGE 

Sir,— May I ask you to let me 
inform some of the people here in 
Victoria that the Scandinavian 
language was nof derived from 
Latin or Oreek or Hebrew. 

The Scandinavian language was 
derived from the old German 
language and has nothing to do 
with Latin or Oreek or Hebrew. 

HAROLD HESKIN. 
617 Yates Street. Victoria, B C. July 

24. 1936. 

MAKM \\ sn< I \i InM \\n 

MtUOIOM 

Sir.— In view of the fact that at 
the recent C.C.F. convention it 
was put on record that the CC F. 
was not opposed to^M.uxian Social- 
ism, it may be of interest to many 
of your readers to know airthor- 
ltively the attitude of Marxian 
Socialism towards religion. 

In Soviet Russia all th* ruling 
class are Marxian Socialist*.' I 
therefore quote the most fair and 
well-uiXoiiutui book I have yet read 
on Russia. "Soviet Russia," by W. 
H. Chamberlln. Mr. Chamberlin 
was special correspondent to The 
Christian science Monitor from 1919 
to 1930, the eleven most important 
years in Russia's political growth, 
lie wrote this book after he had 
returned to America and had de- 
cided not to return to Russia, *o 
was able to write the truth, even 
though unfavorable to the Russian 
Government. ~ wflhout fear of re- 
prisals from the Rusian secret 
police. 

Hi* portrayal of conditions In 
that most carefully censored coun- 
try, must be a far truer one. there- 
fore, than that given by those who 
havss only visited there for a few 
months or those who have to re- 
turn there. I will quot* one of hi* 
>tatenwnts i ■ 

"Lunacharsky. Commissar for 
Education, issued the following In 

1929: — * ' 

"Theatre*, concerts, moving pic- 
tures, radio, visit* to museum*, 
richly illustrated scientific and 
especially antl - religious lecturer*, 
well -arranged periodical and non- 
pcrlodical children's literature— all 
this must be set in motion, de- 
veloped, completed. Or created, for 
the great objective of most quickly 
transforming the growing genera- 
tion Uito an absolutely athelstlo 
one. The believing teacher In the 
Soviet school 1* an awkward con- 
tradiction, and department* of 
popular education are bound to uso 
every opportunity to replace such 
teachers with new ones, or antl- 
rellglous sentiment*." 

He also states that not more 
than three children together may 
be taught religion, either by the 
parents or voluntary teachers, 
thereby making Sunday schools Im- 
possible— yet lh Canada we allow 
Communist Sunday schools. 

Then he *tates. contrary to th* 
popular Impression, that alter 1928. 
the Russian Government relaxed its 
persecution of the old Orthodox 
Church; but stiffened lis persecu- 
tion of any Protestant churche* 
which exist In Rus. ia. Tills be- 
cause the anti -religious teaching In 
the schools was succeeding in wean- 
ing the younger generation from 
the Orthodox Church, but was not 
so successful In keeping them from 
embracing the teaching of tlmse 
Protestant churches which teach 
the Gospel of Christ. 

Instances of this persecution, he 
cites, are the refusal to publish an 
order for 25.000 Bibles given by 
the BaptLsts. the most active Prot- 
estant denomination tn Russia," 
the sending to prison of young 
Baptists who refused to Join the 
army; the law imposed that Bap- 
tists could only hold services and 
meetings in buildings which they 
own. This stopped most of their 
meetings, as they own very few 
buildings, and cannot afford to buy 
any more, being very poor. 

The persecution against the 
Orthodox Church has practically 
ceased now, I believe, not because 
the Russian ruling class are any 
kindlier disposed towards religion 
than they used to be. but because 
the harshr measures adopted 
against it during the past cig'htccn 
years have been so successful that 
now Us hold on the people I* 
negligible — even the worst of 
tyrants are magnanimous to an ut- 
terly defeated eie my. Also to be 
able to say that they are not now 
persecuting religion Is a great help 
to their world propaganda,' for the 
chief aim of every Marxian Social- 
ist is world physical, therefore, 
bloody, revoluMon. Even now «u«h 
1* going on In Spain. Do we want 
this to happen In Canada, too? The 
surest way to avoid this will be the 
adoption of Social Credit by the 
Dominion Oovernment. 

A. S AVERJLL. 
303 Pcmberton Building, 
BC, July 24. 1938 




By Ml. v 



ME 'NT DE OLE '(WAN 
COT HELT UP COMIN' 
HOrAE FuV\ PRW-rtEETlN' 
US' NIgHT-BuT ALL 
U5 LOS' WuZ OUR 0REF' 
AN' NO TlM£,A-TALL?» 



sa.d Ri 



.•ting gbout in perplexfy. HI* dia- 'res* is quite capable of looking •fter 
Black-. mav at tight of the polios was Ms* Lansing Good c:gh Zelda 
tm and lobwloua |ChJc jp. jou 



W man at Lambeth- "I am 
-.peaking the tru'h. I am a mem - 
her of the ChuiTh or England, re- 

'.' r- at Wille*den "My hushand 
abuse* me terribly. . and my baby, 
aged two. repeat* the language 

aflaf him 

N<-.rh tendon i-.-e "He is 

* married n.sn wrh fwo children 
There *i nothing else 1 can say in 
i hi* favor- 




V 




THE DAILY COLONIST,\yiCTOPIA, B.C., SUN D A Y.JULY 26, 1936 



— 



— 



— 




Mto.\WV///AWVVWAWY//'*W\V/// /\\\W//// 



MARINE, RAIL a*cO AIR 




I LINFR HERE 

MORNING 

Empress of Asia Arriving 
Tomorrow From Ports 
Of Far East 



th# Philippines by 
way of China and Japan port*, the 
Canadian Pacific liner 8«. Empress 
of Asia. Captain A. V. R. Lovegrove, 
R N R . will arrive alongside Rlthet 
Piers at 7 o'clock tomorrow morn- 
ing-, according to advlcea received 
from the ship by James Macfarlane, 
local representatiye of Canadian 
Pacific 8teamaliips The big liner 
has passengers, mails and cargo for 
this port Completing here, the Asia 
will continue to Vancouver. 

DUE MONDAY 
From Japan ports, the Nippon 
Yusen ryabha Ms. Hikawa Maru is 
due at William Head Monday eve- 
ning, according to. Harry Douglas, 
local agent of the line. For Canada 
the Hlknwa has one first-class pas- 
senger, six tourist passengers and 
thirty-three In the third class 
United States passengers Include 
twenty-four tourist and twenty-five 
. class. For Canada, local 
and overland, the ship lias 1.500 tons 



V ancouvpr-Bmmd 
Excursion Loaves 
He re on Tuesday 



ON Tuesday next. July 28, 
B C. Coast 8ervtce of Ca- 
nadian Pacific Steamships is 

sponsoring an a 11 -day excur- 
sion to Vancouver. The Ss. 
Princess Victoria will take the 
excursionists to the Mainland 
city leaving the Belleville 
Street docks here at 8:30 am. 
and the Vancouver dock at 6 
pm for the return trip. 



of general cargo, Including 750 bales 
or silk. 

HKRE TUESDAY 

Coming in from the United King- 
dom by way of Panama, California 
and Washington ports, the Furness 
Line Ms. Pacific Exporter is due 
here Tueiiday, according to advices 
received by King Brothers, local 
agents. The combined freight and 
passenger liner has passengers and 
| freight for Victoria. 

QUEEN CHARLOTTES 

Ss 
om 



LEARN TO FLY 

Offsrs complete nylni lnitruction at 
moderate r»te« For Information, apply 
T H. Firmer. Seaplane Float. Ksqul- 
Feltnn. Oil?;.}. AUe 
•I reasonable rater 



BARGAIN PARI 

BANFF 



VICTORIA 

mmAY,J17LY31 



Cowl on iMimfi ui»a* 
„«t.,. k i.i Tb<ir«l.T, )™*T »0. or 




1 or 



< H1LORKN. HAJJ- KAHI 

ood m d «» roa«hoa a*ls». 

No honaa* I •»« l 

• —1,1.. I.. I weekvnd ■■ 
^«h« Ro.kiea. 

Sury at the 
Bang Sprmtt M*4 

TUJLHT OfVIGH 
1102 0— S X a aat — *»♦»»••« litrdmB 4177 

ri TV a* CMRro Garden Wli 



4g*mm I'" I Ill-flu lilMOltlpl 



Aboard the 

ice 

Vancouver last night for the Queen 
Charlotte Islands were a number of 
Victorians, including Mrs. E. Mar- 
dell, Miss M. A. Cameron. Miss S. 
Hlscocks. Mr. and Mrs. J. O'Brien. 
Miss E. Hams. Miss P. Hams. Mr. 
and Mrs. E. S. Hcnshall. Miss E. 
Howell, Miss N. Jones. Miss M. 
Rathbone. Mrs. L. A. Rathbone. Mr. 
and Mrs. B. Orossman, A. P. Van- 
rup. W S Duncan and O. Dybhavn. 
OUTINGS TODAY 

Vancouver Island Coach Lines 
outings listed for today include an 
excursion" to Qtialicum Beach, leav- 
ing the local depot at 9:15 a.m.; a 
"Mystery Trip," leaving the depot 
at 10:30 a m ; excursions to Maple | 
Bay. Jordan River, Sooke Harbor. 
Shawlnlgan Lake and Ooldstream 
Park, all departing from Coach 
Lines Depot at 10 a.m. 

LAND AND WAT! It 

The combined land and water ex- 
cursion of Vancouver Island Coach 
Lines and Oulf Island Ferry Com- 
pany for next Wednesday include 
a coach drive to Swartz Bay, where 
the Ms. Cy Peck will be boarded 
for a cruise through the Oulf Is- 
lands, calling at Beaver Point, Port 
Washington. Galiano Island and 
Mayne Island. 

FINDING PROFITABLE 
MARKET IN MONTANA 



SEA CADETS 
HOLD SPORTS 

I ■ 

Rainbow Corps Stages An- 
nual Events at Rodd 
Hill Camp 



Rainbow Sea Cadet Corps yester- 
day opened their Rodd Hill camp 
to the public and the young sailor- 
men staged a grand programme of 
sport* eventa for a large crowd of 
parent* and friends. There were 
ten events in all and each one was 
carried out without a lutch. Ideal 
weather conditions prevailed during 
the afternoon. 

Many ot the par en is reviewed the 
neat lines of tents, in which the 
boys had lived during their stay 
in camp, and many expressions of 
praise were heard. The sun- bronzed 
youngsters, too, looked as If they had 
enjoyed the fortnight under canvas. 
fHd Nh< HONS 

The sports* were divided into two 
sections, land and water. The for- 
mer Included an obstacle race, a 
tug-ol-war, a gun wheel race, fleet 
manoeuvres, and an exhibition of 
field gun drill. In the water events 
there was a whalers' crew race, a 
cutters' cr ew race, a lifeboat ttm\ 
a "babies" whaler race, and a race 
between the ship's company and the 
officers. 

Afternoon tea was served, the pro- 
ceeds of which will be turned over 
to the Navy League. 



Plans to Make Home Here 




mm 



Y 




LETHBRIDOE, Alta, July 25 (#). 
-Farmers of Southern Alberta, des- 
pite the export duty of 42 cents a 
bushel, are finding a profitable mar- 
ket for wheat across the border In 
Montana. 

Scraping bins clear, Warner dis- 
trict farmers have been trucking 
wheat to Sweet Orass. Montana, 
where the price for No. 1 gram Is 
$1.39 a bushel. The same wheat is 
quoted at Warner at 73 cents a 
bushel. The profit la 24 cents a 



One-Day Trip to 

Vancouver 

Tuesday, July 28 



Ss. Princess Victoria leaves Victoria at 8:30 
A.M., arriving Vancouver ipout 1:15 P.M. 
Returning steamship leaved Vancouver at 
6 P.M. Lunch on board, 50c; dinner, 75c; 
continuous coffee saloon service; musical 
entertainment, dancing Staterooms are 
available at special low rates. Avoid dis- 
appointment-buy your tickets early. 



RETURN FARE 

$ 



2 



CHILDREN 

$1 




CTRIFIED^ 



COOLED aQ, 
PERBLY APPOINTED 




RILLING 

: • 



LYMPIAN 



For the fullest enjoyment, ride the famous roller-bearing 
Olympian:, a completer ancje of accommodation! adapted 

to your budget — standard sleeping cart, tourist sleepers and 
Luxury coachee. Delightful meals in dinitfg car as low as 50e; 
bay service at your seat ~ ffowr w Trip from V/ctor<e 

—sandwiches lOtf, pie t_ 1omMt Sum4u4 

1 (V, coffee 5r— in tourist cwi... si—,,.,. 

ST FAUX S4S0O »«7.eO 172 00 

MINNEAPOLIS 4*00 S7 SO 
i . 4S0O 
. . SO 78 



oars and coaches. 



AIR COOLED 



. !■ | art Ik* right tanparatnra 
ragardUas ot (Ha WMraar Cool 
alaaa wtlkoal draefhr*. 
•not or aimiart. And roa travel 
im tka oil* read Ikal oparataa 
owai ilaowa m..a|. T, ik«! < 
earth ooset 4n CMrsqe 
Mllwaesa* Road ajf)Mf .11 tka 
any, and that 
hi • ■ — riMnq 



PentSM 

». ire 



sioux crrr . 

OMAHA . . . 
PIS-MOI 
CHICAGO 



tins • ... . st 

O . . . . . 87! 



37 ©O 
SO M 
S2 IS 
BJ M 



72 00 
72 00 
74 73 

77 ee 
seoo 



Corraafyoa.'lingH low fajrev to Datrnit, W«aktB<jtoa» 
Haw Tark. Bootaa and etkar tasSare Cttlaa. 
Spar* la alaaptng car* vvtts 



Vlctorio Offlca 
•01 Go*s»rmmaal it 
Phosa Oordaa 7041 
Erie MarahalL AfMl 

* <"••» far Trtnr-Attntie ■>•»«- • k r I lm»$ 

T" ' 



^Milwaukee road 



• A Mill CA 8 LOIOIII I LIC IB If I ID R AIUO AD • 



In the first event ol the water 
contests, the Port Watch took an 
early lead over the Starboard Watch 
to win the whalers' race by a good 
ten lengths. The- event was run 
over a triangular three-mile course. 
The exciting cutters' race, held over 
the same distance, saw the Port 
Watch take a half-boat lead about 
midway in the race and only after 
a terrific stroke had been maintained 
was the crew able to defeat the 
Starboard Watch by a scant length. 
The crews circled the guide buoys 
in 5:52 1-2 and 6 mins.. respectively. 

One of the features of the after- 
noon was the •'hnbles' " whaler race. 
In which two teams composed of the 
youngest cadets In the corps took 
part. The average age of the boys 
who raced In the three-quarter-mile 
event was given at eleven and one- 
half years. Thp crew in charge of 
Coxwain Bobby Harrison defeated 
that of Coxwain Jack Robinson by 
about a two-boat lead, although the 
crews finished only four seconds 
apart. The time of the winning 
crew was given at 7 mlns . 5 sees. 
THOSE IN CMWI 

The "babies" crews were made up 
of the following: Winning boat. 
Cox Bobby Harrison. J. P. Downs, 
Bob Coleman, Peter MaiKenzle 
Don Filcwood and Len Fitchett; 
second boat, Jack Robln.son. cox; 
Ln Howe, Lindsay Slieppard. Hu- 
bert Brown. David Holmes and Stan 
Hawks. 

The officers crew, composed of 
Lieut. -Commander P. W Tribe. 
Lieutenant C. M. Henry. Chief Mate 
J Green. Captain Walter Brown. 
fiub-Lleutenant A Hardy and W O 
Peter Plddir.gton. defeated the ship's 
company rrew by about a length 
The ship's crew wss composed of 
CPO A Wilson. Cadet A. Brook - 
man. Cadet E Fisher. Ldg. Seaman 
A Howell, PO E. Clarke and P.O. 
Allan Hardy, coxwain. The time of 
the rare was«:14. This was an ex- 
tremely close race, with the officers 
forging to the front only after a 
hard fight. 

Mra Sidney Wood. . president of 
the Women's Auxiliary to the Navy 
League, presented the prizes 
THE OFFICIALS 

Officials of the sports were Dr 
Thomas Miller. Commander C. H. R. 
Sllngsby and Paymaster - Captain 
Johnstone. Judges: Sub-Lieutenant 
A Hardy, starter: Chief instructor 
J. Oreen. announcer; Captain W. 
Brown, timekeeper; C A. Clark, veo- 
man of signals, and Lieutenant C. 
M Henry, recorder. 

Complete result* of the races 
follow: 

Whaler Race.-l. Port Watch- 1 
Sfarbrtard Watch. 

Cutter Racc-1, Port Watch; 3 
Starboard Watch 

Whaler Race — I, Officers' Crew; 
2. Ship's Company. 

Babies' Whaler Race l, Cre w of 
Coxwain Harrison: 2 Crew of Cox- 
wain Robinson. 

Lifeboat Race — I. Starboard 
W*t*k»*v 2, Pert Weteii. 

Obstacle Rare - 1 Cade) Brook - 
man: 2. PO. Clarke; 3. CPO 
Archie Wllsnn. 

SUB Wheel Rare— 1. CPO Archie 
Wilson; 2. Cadet J Drake 

Bread Price* to 

RUe on Mainland 

VANCOUVER. July 25 0> -Owing 
to barter rh;«nufarturing costs bread 
Ptires will jump from one-hayf to 
1 cent a loaf \ n Vancouver on Mon- 
day. Frederick J-^Klklrvs. managing 
•ecretary of the Master Bakers' As- 
sociation, annouwed today. 

"A year * go Hour wa* around 14 
per barrel." Elkiru said. "Todav It 
is $5 80. In addition, «ji other in- 
gredient costa have font up 25 per 
cent. This, coupled with introduc- 
tion of minimum wages and hourj of 
work regulations ha* Imposed a bur- 
den that bakers ran bo longer 
carry.'" 

ALLOY IN 1 ■ 1 liV»M 

MILAN. Italy, July 25 f.- An al- 
luminum alley is being u.«ed here 
br a large arms fa n t> mak- 

ing; of nwrivtrl! Onlv the barrel of 
lb* weapon rcaiauu steel. 



W. F. STUTTERHEIM 
Mining inspector of Borneo, who arrived in Victoria on the American 
Mail Line Ss. President Jefferson, on Thursday. Mr. Stutterheim is 
from Celebes and is en route to his home in Holland on vacation. He 
has been in Borneo for ten years past and discovered valuable mineral 
deposits. He Is planning to retire in another year and settle in Victoria, 
making this city his headquarters for the study of British Columbia 

minei and mining. 



Ocean and Coastwise Movements 



Weather Report 



E8TEVAN — Clear; northwert. light; 

30 14 St; Miiooth 

UENNARD ISLAND — Cl»«r; northwest, 
lie hi 10 18. lifht am-all 

PACHENA Clear, northwest, freoh. 
SO 12 SI; smooth 

CARMANAH Clear; west, lltht; 10 IS; 
smooth 

CAPE BEAI.B Clear; northwest. Hint. 
10 12 



W ireless Report 



(E»tev»n I PU. Unless Otherwise' Stated) 
HIKAWA MARU Bound Vancouver. Ml 

miles from Vancouver at 4 p in 

PACIFIC C'OMMFHCK Bound Port 

Alice, due 5 a.m. this mornint 

NOOTKA — IWt Nootka for Barcl»» 

Bound 

ALBFRTOItTK Bound Vancouver! 123 
miles from Vancouver. 

Gulf Island Mail 



10 



t.l 



Wednea- 
rridas. 



OANcrs QAI4AMO, M\T\r. rr snn 

l-UVD. PORT WASHINOTON 
SALTSPRINO 1*1 (Ml 
Malls cloea Sundar. Wednasdar. ftldaf 

11:13 p.m.; Tuodar. 10 a m 

Malls due Monday. 1 » KM 
Wednesday. Friday. 7.11 am. 

m lVrR POINT 

Mails rloaa Tuesday 
day. Friday. 11:13 P m 

Mails dua Sunday. 
MS in. 

SATURN* 

Malls closa Sunday. Wednesday. 11:13 
p m 

Malls du* Moniay. 7 13 pm.i Friday. 
7 13 am. 

south prvnr.a 

Malls elosa Sunday. Weflr.es/tsy, 
p m 

Malls due Monday. 7 13 p 
fill a m 

Ml SORAVB 
Mails close Tuesday. 1C a 
11 15 pm ' 
Mails due Sunday. Wednesda*. till 

NORTH CAI.IANO 
Malls elose Sunday. II . 1ft p 



11:13 
Friday. 



Ft' 1*r 



Shipping Calendar 

TO ARRIVr 

CORRIENTES t nlted R.nsdom. July 20 
H F ALEXANDER -California. July 21. 
PRESIDENT JEFFERBON - Philippines. 

China and Japan. July 22 

FMMA ALEXANDER— California. July 21 
DRECHTDYK - Holland and United 

Kinsdom. July 23 

EMPRESS OF ASIA- Philippines. China 

and Japan. July 27 

II F ALEXANDER -California. July 2« 
PACIFIC EXPORTER -United Kingdom. 

July 23 

UIKfWA MARO (Vancourer) -Japan. 
July 21 

RI III ALEXANDER— California. July 10 
TO DEP4RT 

H F ALEXANDER — Cal:fornla. July tl 
KM PR ESS OF JAPAN -Hawaii. Japan. 
China and Philippines. July 23 
EMMA ALEXANDER— California. July 2S 
H. F ALEXANDER — California. July 21 



cess Joan will leave Nanatmo dally except 
Sunday for ' Vancouver at 8 a.m.. 3:30 
pm and 1 p m .: Ss Prlnresa Elaine. 
Ss Pnnreaa Elizabeth or Ss. Princess Joan 
will leave Nanalmo on Sunday only for 
Vancouver at B a m.. I 30 p m and 7pm; 
Ss. Princess Elaine. Sa. Princess inirabeth 
r 8a Princess Joan will arrive Nanalmo 
dall- except Sunday from Vancouver at 
13.. nocn. 1:13 p m. and I pm: Sa Prin- 
cess Elaine, 8s. Priucess Elizabeth or Ss 
Princess Joan will arrive Nanalmo on 
Sunday only from Vancouver at 13 15 
pm, 3 45 Mat »nd 13 midnlcht. 

VICI OKLA- WttTl COAS-i Sa Frlnceas 
Maiiulnna will leave Victoria for West 
Coast of Vancouvei Island ports on the 
first, eleventh and twenty-fUst of each 
month at II p m. 

VANCOUVER-NORTHEHN BRITISH OO 
L'JMBIA— Sa Princess Adelaide will leave 
Vancouver every Wedneaday for Prince 
Rupert and way ports at 1 p m : Sa Prince 
Rupert or Sa Prince Oeorxe will leave 
Vancouver 'or Stewart and way porta 
every Monday at • t> m I Si Cardena will 
leave Vancouver "very Tueeday at • p m 
for Prince Rupert and way porta; Sa 
Catala will leave Vancouver every Friday 
at ft p m for Stewart and wa> porta. 

VANCOUVER - QUEEN CHARLOTTE 
ISLANDS— Si Prince Charles will leave 
Vancouver every alternate Saturday tor 
Queen Charlotta Island points and Prince 
Rupert at 5 p.m. 

BWARTZ BAY-FULFOKD HARBOR — Ma 
u7 Peck will leave Mwarta Bay dally, accept 
Wednesday, at J 30 a m.. 11 30 a.m.. ft:00 
r> m and 7 44 p m . Wednesday only. Ma 
Cy Peck will leave SwarU Bay at 7:00 p m. 
Ma Cy Peck* will leave Fulford Harbor 
daily, except Wednesday, at ft 1ft a.m.. 
trj'50 a.m . 4 00 p ra. and ft 4 j p.m.: Wed- 
nesday only. Ms. Cy Peck wUl laavt Ful- 
ford Harbor at 1.15 a ra. 

BRENT WOOD- MILL BAT — My. Cascade, 
startinc from Brentwood at ft am., will 
leave there trery hour after dally and 
Includlm ft n.m. Mv Caacade. startlni 
from Mill Bay at ft 30 a m... will leave 
there every hour after dally and Includ- 
:n« 6 30 p m. 

ORIA - OULF ISLAFDfl - Princess 
Mar* I leaves Victoria every ruaaday for 
James Island. Itera Lslar.d. Port Wash ins 
inn, '!»'.•« Harbor, Mayne Islahd. Oallano 
!>'sn^ and Vancouver a' 10 30 am 

VICTORIA -PORT ANQELE8 — Sa Iro- 
<tuola or Da Olympic will leavU Victoria 
1» :y at ft 15 am. 11 10 am and 1:30 
P m. tor Port Anxeles 

SIDNEY- AN AT'f i RTF" !4 Ss Q.jllcene will 
leava Sidney dally for AnacorUs at 10:18 
ab fend « 45 pm Ss Qullcene will arrive 
at Sidney dally from Anacortea at ft 33 
a.m. and 6 30 p m 

8TDNEY-STEVESTON- VANCOUVER — Mv 
Motor Prlneeas will leave Sidney at ft 45 
a m and 4pm daily except Bunday for 
Steveston; Mv Motor Princess will arrive 
Sidney dally from Steveston at 3 30 p m , 
and dally except Sunday at 10 p m Mv 
Motor Frlnceas will leave Sidney. Sunday 
only, at 4 p m for Vancouver 



West Coast Mails 



Malls closa 10 p m.. i»W HSU and 31rt 
each month for Ahousau BamflelcL Cee- 
peerea. ClayoquoU Clo-ooae. Ecoolst Estavan 
Point. Kakawla. KUdonan. If uquot 
Nootka. Port amerm. ^Ftrrt Renfrew 
Serhart. Toflno and DclueW Due ItU 
pm. nth. l«tb and 38th each month, 
except Eeoela. / 

Mails close 10 p m . 31st each month and 
8 43 am. }7nd eaeb month for Centre 
Island. Due I '3 p m.. 38th each month. 

Malls dee 8 43 a m . 2nd. 12th and 22ad 
each month, except Bonders, far Clayo- 
Estevsn Point. Eakawta, Kyuqaot 
and Toflno. 

Mails close ft 43 am. 8th. 18th and 38th 
each month, except Sundaya, for Clo-ooae 
Port Renfrew. Bamtleld and Kildonan. 

Ma is close ft 43 am. P iraSaM and 
Sa'uedava, for Bamfleld. tc e Klidonaa. 
San Mateo. Se-hart and t'cuelet. Dm 
S 10 a m . Tqeadaya and Saturdaya. 

Ms is elose 11. It p nr. . Mondays, and i 
p m . rrl( t» T ^ '« H"iber^^Pnrt A^tca and 

daya. 

Malls eloaa 10 P m . 1st each month, and 
ft 43 a m . 2nd each month, for Cachalot 
Dua lit! pm.. 8t& each month. 



Coasting Craft 

nrTORIA - VANCOUVER - Be Princess 
Kathleen or Sa. Princess Marsuerlta wUl 
leave .Vlrkx la da.ly at 1 4e p m.. for Van- 
couver. Sa Princess Kathleen or Sa Frln- 
ceas Martuartt*. «vtn arrive Veetort* Sally 
at 140 p m. from Vaneouvwr. Sa Prlnreaa 
Eliabeth or Sa Frlnceas Joan wiU leave 
Victor a dally at 13 m.dntiht for Vancwi- 
ver; Be Princess Elisabeth or Sa. Fr.neeae' 
Joaa will arrive Victoria dally a* 7 am. 
from Vancouver 

VICTORIA -SSATTLS—Sa. Prtncaae Kath- 
K4S or Sa Pr.n,esa Martuer.te will leave 
v-ctnria dally at ft r> m. for Saaf'.e Sv 
Frinceaa Kathleen eir H» — Pi lULWes Msr- 
su»r:t» will erriva Victrr a daily st 13 50 
prn. from Sea-'ie ■-« Iroquois w:'.l leave 
• s 4e v st ft It am. for BestMe. 
3s tr acj w oli win arnv. Vi'torta dally frerex 



1 Se st • ,e at 8 23 a I 

RAKArMO-VANCW- l 



- Sa Frmcaaa 



British Mails 



S3 EMPRE88 OF BRITAIN Malls close 

1pm. July 37 

88. NORMANDIE 'via New York' Mails 
elose 4 ,p m , July 30 

88 DUC-HEW* OP RICHMOND Malls 
close 1pm. Auttist 2). 

88 EURO PA via New York* — Malls 
close 4 p m . Aueust 3. 

Msll intended for transmission vta New 
York mutt be so marked When sent by 
air over United States lines, mall may 
ba posted thre« days later than the dates 
indicated / 

JAM tl( 4 

Ms. is close I pm. July Sl-Auaust 1. 



Yukoifand Atlin 



Mails 



-VIA VANCOUVER— Malls elosa 1 pm. 
July It. II. 15. 18. 30. 33. 31. 37; A'ltust 
1. I. 8. 10. and 11 13 pm. July 38 Malls 
of July 13. 30. 37. Auxust t and 10. letters 

only 

VIA SEATTLE — Mall* eloae 4 30 pm 
Auauet 3 atVS iS 



Queen Charlotte 
Mails 



VIA VANCOUVER— Malls elosa I p m 
June 37. July 11. 33. Auaust 8, 33. Sap- 
ten 



pm. Juna IT. July L 1ft, 3*. 
II. September ft. 13 



1 



Transpacihc Mails 

teas 

CHINA AND JAPAN 

•EMPRESS OF JA' AN Malls elose 4 

pm. Jul? 11. Dua at Yokohama. Auauet 
8; aTharahaL AucuM 11 Honsfcooa, Au- 

SBSI Ifc . x 1 

•Carries mall for Bonolulo. 

ACSTRAMA AND NEW EE ALAND 

MAKtTRA 'Via San rranciaooi -Mslls 
•loea 11 11 pm. July IS Dua at 
ton. Autmat tr. Sydney, 



Honolulu Mails 



VIA SAN FRArtCIeVrj- Mails e|oee 11 Is 

pm. Jkjf 21. 28. 2T and 28. and Aueust 
4 and I 

SS EMPRESS OF t*4M ADA — Msite rjoea 
4pm. July 31. 
as NTAOAJU - Mauia alosw « a at . 



WIND LIGHT 



FOR RACING 

Boykin and Bandicoot Win 
In Star and Dinghy 
Yacht Classes 



SUr bonts and dinghies sailed off 
Royal Victoria Yacht Club yesterday 
afternoon ln the sixth of a aeries 
of races for the Longstreth and Dev- 
onion challenge trophies. Because 
of a light variable southerly breeze, 
vessels made only one circuit of s 
course from the club to Jlmmie 
Chickens Island. Flower Island, 
Csdboro Bay buoy and back to the 

dub. _ 

In the star race. Boykin, sailed by 
R. P. Blandy, crossed the starting 
line first. She was followed by T. 
Halkett ln Ripples and W. Packford 
In Aqulla. Ripples worked out s 
ead until she met a soft patch off 
Humber Point, when .she was passed 
by Boykin and Aquila. Boykin 
lengthened her lead over Aquila at 
Cattle Point and held it to the fin- 
ish. Stars' finishing times were: 
Boykin, 4:15:14; Aquila. 4:15:38; 
Ripplea. 4:20:57. Present alandings 
of stars in the series are Ripples, 
71 per cent; Boykin and Mintaka, 
b6 per cent; Aquila, 52 per cent. 

Dinghies crossed the starting line 
in the following order: Bandicoot. 
O. Heal; Kismet, H. Gann; Onaway, 
P. Hinck6; Falcon, P. Horsfteld; 
Tern. Q. Campbell; Penguin. Ned 
Ashe. MureUei. Mrm Peggy Ootby 
Icy Bee did not start. Tern 



ander sailed last night for San 
Francisco, Wilmington j and San 
Diego she took out s csprcity list. 
The liner arrived from Seattle at ] 
11 o clock, and sailed for the South 
shortly after midnight. 

Booked st tlje local office for la.st 
nights sailing of the Emma were 
Mr. and Mrs. Morton Seidel, Arnold 
Seidel. Mr. and Mrs J W Madden. 
Mrs. F. H. Sager. Miss L Pearl Am- 
ett, F. F. Pease. Miss Berths Tait 
and T. B. McLay. 

Comuig m from Vancouver on the 
afternoon boat to join the south- 
going ship were 8. W. Miller, H, M. 
Salkeld. E. Marsland, Fred M. Gee, 
F. O. .C. Rsmage, Mrs. J. McCleod, 
Miss K. McCleod, Mrs. C. Goodman. 
Miss Diana Goodman. Miss Ger- 
trude Parken. Miss Dorothea Park- 
en. Mr. and Mrs. Oeorge Larsen, 
Miss Beaver. Miss A. Parkam. Miss 
King. Miss Henderson, R. K. Smith, 
Miss E. R. Cayley, Mrs. M. A. Hogan. 
Hendry Leggatt. Miss B. Campbell, 
Mrs, M. C. Jones. Mrs. J. K. Armsly, 
Miss M. D. Hyman, C. Cryer and 
P. W. Stapleton. 



dropped out when the reduced'area 
of canvas she carried failed to give 
her any speed. Murellet ran Into 
several soft spots and was not 
counted in the finishing time. 

Finishes were as follows: Kismet, 
4:31:45; Penguin. 4:36:55; Bandi- 
coot, 4:37:37; Onaway. 4 38 39; Fal- 
con, 4 40:31. 

Ben B. Temple was starter and 
Fred Harman timekeeper 



EMMA ALEXANDER 
IS BOUND SOUTH 



Unrr Left Vlrtorla for San Fran- 
riarn. WilmmiMon and San 
Dieico Early Today 



Pacific Steamship Line* coasting 
ships are now getting all the busi- 
ness they can handle between Wash- 
ington, British Columbia and Cali- 
fornia. To assure passage, an in- 
tending traveler has to book well In 
advance. When the Ss. Emma Alex- 



QUEEN MARY 
DOING WELL 



Fish Packer Hit \ 
RoekOfCIsland 
Shore on Friday 

Bound along the West Cosst o! 
Vancouver Island, the fish-packer 
Marauder, of Vancouver, crashed on 
a rock about five miles west of Jor- 
dan River Friday afternoon. Shft) 
wss beached nearby ln a leaVy 
condition. 

The Marauder had been at ths 
plant of th* Victoris Machinery 
Depot for repairs and ».u after a 
load of fish when she hit. 

Yesterday morning tugs of ths 
Island Tug A: Barge Company pro- 
ceeded to the scene. The flsh- 
pneker will be patched and towed 
to Victoris. 

The Marauder Is owned by tht 
Pachens Fishing Company She Is 
110 feet long and 15 feet wide. 

"He called me s liar. and. big as 
he is. I knocked him flat." 

"With your fist?" 
*:No, with my car " 



Cunard-White Star Liner 
Will Likely Make New 
Atlantic Record , 



NEW YORK. July 25 (^ -Trav- 
eling st an average speed of J044 

knots for s twenty-four-hour run. 
RMS Queen Mary raced toward 
New York today with indications 
she would be able to break the west- 
ward trans- Atlantic record of the 
French liner Normandle. 

Sir Eqgar Britten, commanding 
the Queen Mary, advised the Cun- 
ard -White Star office here that the 
linrr was expected to reach quaran- 
tine by midnight Sunday. 

If the liner makes quarantine by 
that time, shipping men said, her 
crossing from Cherbourg Breakwater 
to Ambrose Lightship would be four 
days, -eight hours and fourteen 
minutes. The Normandie's record, 
established In May last year, la four 
days, eleven hours ana forty-two 
minutes. 

The average speed of 30 40 knots 
was established on the twenty-four- 
hour run ending at noon today, 
ship's time, during which the Queen 
Mary covered 760 miles. The total 
distance covered since the liner left 
Cherbourg Breakwater Wednesday 
night was 1 975 miles, at an average 
s|ieed of 29 80 knots. 

The Normandie's, average speed 
for the total distance of 3.192 miles 



4 -day 





M "PRINCE ROBERT" 

TO GARDNER CANAL 
anri MMJGLAI < M 

August 21 to 25 



*30« end up 

from Vancouver 



Onm mi 

Orrrieafra />..<> * P r>r* 

rare Inrladee nrals ana Kerih 

Fwr hjrormatiaa. Call ae 
Write 

( HII F F4BIS. n r V 




on ner 



in was 29 *4 knots 



Come On In . . . 



THE WATER'S FINE 

And Every Resort on Vancouver Island Is Ready to Welcome 

and Entertain You 




t i ■ v ' 



V 



Make your reservations now for the following 
excursions— spend rhe day in the open at your 
favorite 




EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 

4 Round Trips to 

nanaimo r N r 

Coachtt Le*»* Victor j Depot 9 15 jm, 1 30 pm, 
4 30 pm, 7 30 pm 

"COACH LINES" 

EXCURSIONS 

SUNDAY, JULY 26 

Qualicum Beach 

Lv Dapor. 

$2.50 



Five ho4ir« at Ml wonderful b««c* Lv Depot, 
9 IS am Lv Quelicum, 6pm 
RETURN FARE 



Maple Bay 

One of the most beautiful spots on the Island Lv. 
Da-pot. 10 am Lv M.pl, l. r . 5 pm f aj £C 
RETURN FARE ^kjW 1 *mw^sw 



Mystery Trip 



an unknown dtttm«tiotl 
hotel Lv Dtpot, 

$i.oa 



Through glorious ic«n«ry to 
lathing, boating, picnicking, 
10 30 j m L» . ? ftt 5 p m. 
RETURN FARE 



SH\W MGAN 
LAKE 



• SOOKE 

immoK 



Vu the Cut OM Roast 
L» Dapot. '0 8 m 

uJ^Tj^l 75c 



To Waiffea Spit 
Lv Dtpot. 10 t m. 
L» Sook*. 6 pm 7K»> 
Return F8re ■ »«• 



• goi.dstkixm 

PARK 

Good f icait. Grottnrjt 
Lv Dopot. 10 » m 
Lv Goldttre»m, 6 30 E(\fi 
pm Return Fare 3UC 



JORDAN RIVER 



Spond th« djv 8t thu popular rtsort o« the opsin Pacific Rkntc grounds, lunch and taa m»» Ho 
obtained Swimming in the ocean surf tr -1 f\f% 

Lr Dtpot. 10 am Lv Jordan R.v.r, 5 pm RETURN FARE ) I .UU 



SI MMKR EXi I RSIO.N srilKIM LES TO 



• lORDOV \ R.\Y 

2r>r One Way, 10* Return 



I ttf l ^ I \KF 

ir.r Each Way 



r\nBORO BAY 

10** Each W«y 




! 1177 



CM LINKS LTD 

l — .•S»av> -r- 

DEPOT 8R0UGHT0N STREET AT BROAD 



E117S 



) 




^ 




20 



THI- DAILY COLOXTST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY ftS, [036 j 

! . i j : — '> j ^ 

FINANCE - COMMERCE - MARKETS 



Security Prices 
Close Higher at 
New York Mart 



NEW YORK. July 28 <>P). — 
8tocks moved forward In a quiet 
but persistent rally today with 
market attention centred princ- 
ipally on the motors, steels and 
specialties. 

Chrysler, buoyed by the record 
earnings report of the company and 
the unexpectedly generous dividend 
voted by directors, took the lead 
early. Qcneral Motors was not slow 
to follow and the steels soon 
climbed aboard. 

The Associated Press average of 
AO stocks held a net gain of .4 of a 
point at 87 9, another top since the 
Summer of 1931. Transfer totaled 
611.840. 

The action late yeterday of the 
Chrysler board in declaring a dis- 
bursement of $4 a share compared 
with $1.50 paid on June 30, aroused 
discussion In Wall Street over the 
possibility of other companies fol- 
lowing suit. It was argued that 
leading corporations with large 
profits will either have to divide 
them among shareholders or be 
penalized under the new tax law. 

Outstanding share performers in- 
eluded Chrysler, up 3 1-2 at 121 5-8. 
a peak since 1929; General Motors, 
up 2 at 71 3-8; U.S. Steel, up 1 1-8 



US. Smeltinf 

U 8 Sle.l 

Vanadium . . .. 

Warner Bro» . 

Wesrin*. Air Brake 
Weidttr Eltrtrlc . 
Wf stern Union . . . . 

Wh'ite Motor .' 

Woolworth 

Zenith Radio 



79 


79 


«i 0 64 « 


«i 6 


21-4 21 -3 


21 3 


11 10 1 


10 7 


42 


42 


138 4 114 


1J8 4 


US- 2 89 


89 


ml i 23 5 


24-1 


■ 2 53 1 




32 4 






at 85 



X 



4 3-a ai 



138 1 

Down fractions to around 2 were 
J I. Ca.M- at 166. and Anaconda at 

changed. 

Moderate trading Interest Ift a 
group of pivotal carrier and utility 
Hens kept the bond market fairly 
well balanced, despite profit-taking 
in some sections. 

Foreign dollar .bonds likewise 
held to a narrow -ange Rome 
« 1-2's were unchanged and Uru- 
guay 6"s were a shade higher. 

<H A Humber, Lid > 
<AII Fraction* In Eighth*! 

Hiirh low 



CLIMB HIGHER 

Ten Issues Touch New Highs 
With Junior Stocks Con- 
tinuing to Lead 



TORONTO, July 25 <0>.-With 
base metal* in the van, mining 
stocks advanced smartly on the 
Toronto exchange's shortened Sa- 
turday market About ten new 
highs were made. 

Sherrltt-Gordon and Walte Amu- 
let added 1Q and 12 and closed near 
their peaks at" 1 .85 and 1.80. Pend 
Ornlle, Noranda, Mandy. Ventures 
and Hudson Bay were higher. 

Tobtim. Sylvantte. Pickle RU 
Hard Rock and O'Brien reached 
new peaks and held near the top. 

Siscoe continued its record-mak- 
ing hitting 4.35 for a gain of 15. 
Teck-Hughe*. Little Long Lac and 
Mclntyre were up and Hollinger 
and Wright-Harsreave.s off slightly. 



FOREJCN EXCHANCE 

..NEW YORK. Jul* 23 (API -Quo- 
tations in cent*. 
Prance — Demand, iSl'i. cables. 

Mm. 

Ita.v -Demand. 7 89 cables. 7 89 

Demand. 

Belgium 16 87V 

Germany -f ree, 40 27. registered, 
33 70: travel 

Holland— 68 M 
Norway— 36 34. ' - 
Sweden -35,90 . 
Denmark 22 43. 
Finland 3 22 • . 
Bwitaerland 32 72 
Sp.i n 13 "l 
Portugal- 4 37. 
Greece— .94 
Poland -18 90 
Czechoslovakia — 4, lis. 
Jugoslavia 2 11. 
Austria 18 88 
Hungary 19 90. 
Rumania — .76. 
Argentina 33 50 
■raall 8 72' . 

Tokio 39 31 
Shanghai 30 18». 
Hi.;*.:.' 31 7j 
Mtklco City— 27 16 

mmUMO KX(HAN(,r 

NEW YORK. July 25 lAPi Quota 
lions in dollars Demand. 5 02 3-16: 
cables. 5 02 3-18. sixty - day bills, 
6 013-16. 



PHICES MIXED 
AT VANCOUVER 

Mines and Oils Move Nar- 
rowly Without Developing 
Definite Trends 



WHEAT GAINS 
FRACTIONALLY 

Futures Advance in Dull 
Trading — Export Business 
Absorbs Light Offerings 



VANCOUVER. July 25 (P.— Looses 
and gains of a few cents were about 
evenly, divided on the short Satur- 
I day session of the Vancouver Stock 
I Exchange as 147,256 shares changed 
j hands. 

Bralorne Gold was up 5 cents at 
760, Premier added 3 at 2.55 and 
Big Missouri gained one point at 60. 
Gold Mountain firmed 1 at 14 In 
fair trading and Pilot was fraction- 
ally higher at 7 1-4. Cariboo Gold 
Quartz was off 2 at 1.75, Vldette a 
similar amount at 1 12 and Reno 
eased 1 at 1.23. Mmto was strong, 
but closed down 1 at 61 and Gold 
Belt lost 4 1-2 at 26 1-2 although 
selling at 30. Remaining gold prices 
were unchanged to mixed. 

Ranchmen's led the oil gains 
closing up 3 at 41. Freehold at 
9 3-4, Dalhousie at 66 1-2 and Mar 
Jon at 18 1-2 firmed fractions. Cal- 
gary & Edmonton dropped 3 at 1.51. 
while Home at 1 03 and Highwood 
Sarcre at 26 1-2 were unchanged. 

Base metals were firm. Pend 



Selected Stocks at 
Eastern Exchanges 
Show Small Gains 

gppjqpjpij9jMi|p^8MMk»^^wwk«M^ i i ■ ^m»m0f^m^mmm^mi0mtmm^m~^^^^mmmm ^ m ■ y 



A. 


E AMES & 

LIMITED 


CO. 


\i w York 

MOM RI AL 

SOI .(15 Brlmonl House 


Established l«M 
INWMMrM -M 1 KI1U1 
3 VM (II 1IH 
TORON 1 0 
VICTORIA 


• 


LOMM.S r M.I \M) 
Telephenea * 4171 i 6 



IMM -IK1VI Ml llns 

<B rd tt Tailing. Ltd I 



MONTREAL, July 25 <r — The to 25 and Shawinigan 
stock markei shook olf a profit- , Corporauon improved 
taking attack today and edged into 
iiactionally higher ground 

Light selling at mid-session Bc p 

meant little to buyers of rails equip- n c Power 

menu and Canadian Car preferred f" 1 ;^'"* I ,^ r d odut ' t ' , \\'\ 

advanced 1-2 to 84-4, highest in rancda Camoni 

two veprs Canada Cir .': . our.tlrv 

two >car» 'cstada mi. 

GallLS of_l-4 to 1-2 Were po.f'tt Canada Ui 



and Power 



New Conversion Loan for 

BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE CO. BONDS 

Pull Particulars Upon Application " 

BURNS & WAINWRIGHT, LTD. 



for Bell Tfllphone at 147. Brazilian S«a^mMUrV " 

at 12 3-4. Montreal Power at 30 3-4 Distiller - j e»'Tama 

and Sha*inigan at 19 3-4. ***** Br rti:r 

MetaLs, NK-kei. sm-:i. r, and H»i- Ha.. t ., waikcr ..::::::*.:: 

linger remained stationary. I l^nmu.mJi Pe-roieum ' ! 

> ' Imperial Tobarco 

TOKONIO LXCHWIiE 1 1n 

TORONTO. July 25 (P .— Steel inl.rn't'oni! util't'm • b • 

issues came to the fore in .today's L- thf \ v: ' ' Ms 

abbrr • - .ed session. _ MeColl vi ' "tenac! pfd. 

Canadian Car 'issues were quite JJ^j -«.v„ 

active and both made and lield . ii. r.. > 



top prices of 9 and 20 1-4 rcSpec- P °*f r corporai-on 

tlVCly. ffMtM 

Brazilian Traction and C P R banks 
were 1-2 higher and Ford "A." fa- {£2 ?,' r c^om^rce V. . . 

ternational Nickel and Smelters i Doo'THiaft Ben* " 

""changed. • g-J^J 
Imperial softened slightlv. Can- Bans of Nova acona .... 

Roy.il Bank ol Canuda 



B:d 
30 
*\ 

T: 

6'. 
I'l 
3J 

a 

IS i 

S7 

21 

40 

19'. 

32's 

31 

N 

I3 : s 

sr. 

8 i 
1 li 
24 «. 
1« . 
102 
18' j 
si . 
88 
U\ 
6* 
18'.- 



A'Ved 

32 
i i 

ill , 
B'« 
8'j 
f% 

32', 

13 



BONDS AND STOCKS^ 

DIRECT W IKE EAST 

BUCKLE & MUNRO, LTD. 

1118 GOVERNMENT STREET TEL. G 8107 8 



14 



Recent Developments at the Alberni Property of 

Havilah Gold Mines 

Ltd. (N. P. L.) 



MIMMI HKTION 

• Bird * Tailing. Lid I 
Bid 



Air nMudlon , 

Alllrd Oli-ltllralg 

Allis Clislmera 

Amfr ran , 

Amcr r»lane-p 
Amfr pv»r Pn«'er .. 
An'rr LtWtfRMtlVa ... 
Amer Radiator 
Amer. Ro'l n* Mills . 
Arner Rm^llrr 
Awrr Tr] * T"\ ... 
Amer Tnh.irro 

An»r ITatorwerka i'l! 
Ansrondn fonprr ... 
Ali lu-nn Ttniltvgjr . . . 
AH int:o Pr-finlnc . . . 
Auhiirn 

I tO, I n!n,iv 
Bi't'lwln t/ic >rroltve. . 

B'ndlg Aviation 

Rfh Hlerl 

Burden 

Bn-' Wuriipr .... 

n ■ ■ s [' 

rpp 

Case i .1 I i 

Csteri'iUni' Trae .... 

C A I O R.illway 

Otiryalg-r 

rolumhlB Has 
Comr-K". .1 Mwnl 
rooimoowealth Ar On 

rnn»o!-ini 

Ton O.s 

Tout r»n 

rinf Oil 

rurtlss Wruht 

rwr* * ro 

Mill '.is Am r ■ rt ... 
nnpnnt 
. r y in .i.i — If m lsa m i .. 
Wee Au'o T He 
Flee Pnwer * t ,ir . 
Palrhan*-s M^r-c 

>"re»p. >t Tp-h 

Oeneral PnoU 

denefn! rieririr 

O-neral Mo'ors . 
Ooodvesr 
CJr'ai N.irlliern 

r > il «i i ii f -- 
Phrvtalrr • 
Home B<i'ind 
Hud'ori Motor* .... 
IP'uronhll* M'.tors ... 
Tnfl Nlrkel 
inll Td 

fll rentr.il 

Kennerott rnpprr ... 
Kr«-«-re 

i A> M Tn'mrrs 101 I 

t innrt Oarbctitf v i 



79 7« s 
2IM 209 4 

ii i 4i 

134 . 

2<t 7 
8 

27 3 
21 3 
?7-« 
81 4 
170 
101 I 
28 
T> 1 
84 2 

3N 

11 3 
3 S 
30 
S« 4 
27 J 
31 1 
71 8 
M 8 

n 
|ta 

78 

88 % 
III . 

a i 

18 I 
3 8 
33 

41 8 

77 
33 
8 8 
T> 8 
"-' !S 
188 4 

-m — 



:8 8 

27 2 
27 4 
27 I 
8 1 ! 7 



2-i 4 
18 7 
84 

28 8 
34 

21-1 

"I K 

f.N 8 
28 7 

79 4 
S3 7 
12 7 

181 
7S 8 
** 4 

170 I 
21 4 



41 t 

h 8 

8 S 
74 

71 4 
18*. 4 



Hose 

79 
210 4 

48 
134 8 

28 8 
8 

27 3 
21 7 
27 4 
88 
170 8 
101 2 
28 
39 

84 2 
8 

38 

21 3 
3 '. 

29 7 
N8 4 
T7 
31 1 
79 8 
M 3 
13 

188 

ii 

88 S 

121 N 

22 2 
13 1 

1 8 
33 

41 8 

33 

8 3 
78 2 
72 3 
IC£ 4 
178 



Acm« 

Aiax . . P. 

Biiamar 

Bankneld 

Rise Metals 

Dear Exploration ... 

Heattie 

Big Missouri 

Bob jo 

Mrnlnrne 

B K X 

Iliifra to Ankerlt* ... 
C At K Corporation 
Canadian Malartlc . 

Cttriboo V 

i i. tie Trethaway .. 
Cen'ral Manitoba .. 
Central Patricia . . . 
Cliemtral Research . 

Chibougamau 

f'on't Copper ....... 

Dome 

Kalronhrldge 

Kldorado 

tied a Lake . , , 

(Jraiiadn 

Oreene 8tabell 

(iunnar . 

Mardrork . .' 

Mnlllnger 

Home Oil 

Howey 

Hudson Bar 

Jackson Manion .... 

Kirklaml l ake 

Ijikeshore 

Little long Lac .... 

Marassa 

Maple Ueal . . : 

Mrlntvre 

M<tCei!/.« Red Lake 

M< Lend Cock shutt . . 

MeVittle Graham .. 
' MrVVatters 
I Mining Corpora' ion 

Morris Klrkland 

International Nickel 

Noranda • 

n Brien 

Parktull 

Paymaster 

Pend Orelll* ... 

Petrlin flold T ...... . 



.10' 
33 
.78 
.73 

80 
1 49 

..,8 

M% 
1 50 

12', 
8 M 
I 50 
I 33 
I 77 
1 33 

4» 
4 ON 
I 13 
1 83 

33 2 . 

88 

1 18 
29 

SI. 
1 10 
3 57 
15 12'i 13 37', 
I 01 I OS 
91 92 
38 50 27 00 
83': 84 
82 85 
S9 f0 39 12 . 



A-kfd 

.11 
85 
77 
31 
.19 
62 
1 53 
81 
28 

7 CO 

ia 

8 70 

I 57 
I 33 
1 80 
1 34 
46 
4 70 
1 19 
1 88 
3 50 
54 00 
■ 80 
89 
1 17 
.32 
51 '» 
1 13 
3 58 



41 3 

17 

51 4 

-»7 | 

to 

41 

71 3 



Msck Truck .... 

Matheaewi Aiknii . . 

M.on Honeywell 
Montgomery Ward 

■N»M Blieirt 

Nail nair- 
Natl DMtillenes 
Natl Pn*-r A t.tte 
New Ymk Cen'ril 
North 8in-r ro 
Northern Pscifie '. 
Ohio Oil 

Pacific (las A- riee 
Packard 

Penn V i H»ar .... 




Plrkle Crow 

Pmneer 

rxeinier 

Reiu Aulhier 

Reno 

Han Antnnin 

rtherritt (inrdon .. 

23 7 I (1*0881 

19 3 I Ht Anthony 

Htadacona ....... 

4-i | Sudbury Baain .... 

Sullu an . ...... 

1R 7 ! ftrh anite 

Terk Hughes 
Thnmpson Cadillae 

Toburn 

Venture* 

Wavsule 

Wright- H«r«rea\ei 



51 
35 1 
32 7 
8" 4 
43 4 
18 7 
71 • 
• 77 
28 7 
13 

40 4 

34 7 

9J 1 
11 8 
41 

11 5 
37 



Pontile s 0*« » 4<I 2 

Phllltos Pete 

Pullman ' 

Pure Oil 

Radio' 

Republic Iron * Steel 

Rev noid s Totmeco 

8ta|c« .\ St. ites 

Schesiley ,,,, 

?ee . rs Rnehiick • 

Shell Union 



lis . 

r*i 



Hi-il' i rn I' . 
Sou'herti Ral 
Sperrv rorpti 
Stand..' I 11 
Standard 0« 
Standard Ol 
Standard Oil 
Stewart \5 irner 
Si tVnt nte 
.Stvdobaker 
Texas reri-n 
Te^s^ (lull 
Tlmken 

Trans s.,.,e. ran 
Union r irt A* 
Dnion i'.«r ri< 

I'nl'ed 8;rllna 
United Corrn 
t ii ted Oas 8r 

tt S In rl 5! . 
V S Tllfl.lie- 

VM Ruhher pfd 



Imp 



44 8 

31 I 

19 7 

12 t 

2' 7 

35 4 

10 * 

tt 7 

81 4 

19 8 
14 3 
40 1 

11 I 

20 8 
48 

* 

tt 1 

swM t 
T9S 

I * 

II 7 
40> 

33 2 

88 4 
M-9 
96 

136 3 

27 * 

6 2 

17 2 

.3.1 6 

70 J 

71 1 



80 
43 1 
16 6 

37 7 

16 4 
40 

34 7 

1\ 3 

11 1 
16. 7 

41 } 
.0 4 
II 4 

.21. 3 

70 3 
• I 4 

80 



I. 6 
7 7 
14 6 
81 I 
19 I 

11 6 
11 7 



0. 4 

2r 3 
8 

\lj 2 
29 6 



51 7 
35 3 
32 7 
*• 1 
45 1 

16 7 

17 7 
JT 

>«: 5 
II 

40 1 

31 5 
78 1 
II 1 
41 

II I 
37 



... 9 33 
. . . 4 80 

24'j 
. .. 41 7i 
. . . 2 08 
... 3 90 

21 

... 147 
. . . 1 40 
37 

.. . 51 00 
. . . 92 00 
. . . 4 50 
23 

. . . I 02 
91 

. . . 1 30 
.. . 7 13 
. . . 8 35 

2 U 

. . . 3 85 

Ho 
. .. 1 80 
. . . 4 10 
39 

. . . • 37 
... 4 70 
... 174 
. .. 3 f. 
. . . I 30 
73 

. . . 1 6.3 
. . . 2 40 

10'y 
... 123 



6 30 
4 90 

-'4 % 
42 23 

2 10 

3 95 
23 

I 48 

1 44 
60 
31 25 
6.' 1 1 , 

4 60 
24 

1 04 
91 

1 33 

7 20 
* iO 

2 32 

3 90 

1 26 

2 32 
1 81 

4 15 
30 
39 

1.11 
1 75 

3 40 
I 33 

78 

1 67 

2 42 
11 

6 33 



WINNIPEG, July 25 IT —Wheat 
futures prices advanced 3-8 to 1-4 
cent in a dull .session as trading for 
Uve- W4*k cieeved out wi His Winni- 
peg Gram Exchange 

July finished at 93 1-2. October 

92 7-8 to 93 and December 92 1-4 to 

93 3-8 cents a bushel. 

Export bu.sine.s- estimated a 
SQO.000 bushels absorbed the lifhl 
offerings without difficulty. 

The market appeared to be al- 
most entirely influenced by the ac- 
tion of Chicago. Chicago values 
closed 1-8 lower to 1-4 higher. Min- 
neapolis showod minor losses at 
bottom levels. 

Liverpool finished strong, clo.sm | 
11-4 to l-2d higher, after rallying 
fiom an indifferent opening. 

33 IN NIPS I. <.K\IN 



Cloxe 
92 H 
93'. 
93 

39' , 
b42 

Ml % 

as* 

b57 
a 37 

*46 

52', 
"49 . 
I a*h Grain 

Wheat— 1 Hard. 95 1 Northern. 94'.. 
2 Northern. 92'. 3 Northern. Hi No 4. 
84 7 4: No 5. 7.1\. No 6. 78 s, Feed. 61 V 
Track. 92 Amber Durums. No 1. t6'»: 
No 2. 90 \ No 3. 88\ , No 4. 85 \. Trie*. 
98'. AHW. No- li 82V No 2. B%i 
Nr.. 3. 77V Oarnet Wheat. No 1. 88',. 
No 3. 17 

Oats 2 rw. 43' 3 CW. 39',; B*. 
I Peed. 19 I Feed. J7',. No 2. 33',. 
No 3. 32'.; Track. 41'. 

Barley 2 Row. 58-. 8 ROW. 66". 
SCW. 52'.. 4 CW. 47 , . 5 C W . 47% 
6 C W . 44 N Track. 50 . 

Rye- 1 r W . 57 V 2 r W , 57 I 1 C W . 
54'. Ree, ed. No 2. 30'.. 4 CW. H 
Track. 56S 

riax I NWC. t«8'. 3 C W.. 162'.. 
1 C W . Ill Hi 4 C W . 142'. Track. IfiaS 



Oreille gained 2 at 85 and B.C. ; adil Northern Power firmfd a point BaTi' oT'foron.o Hi 

Nickel addrd 1-2 at 33 1-2 O^!co:ida 



*-nd Noble Five were uncbang'Xl a' 
9 1-2 and 2 1-2 respectively. 



4.300 at 27 





ill A 


H'umh 


er. Ltd > 


Wheat 


PC. 


Open 


High 




Dec 


92 


91% 


92% 


91% 


July 


33'. 


93' | 


93 N 


92 \ 


oet 


92". 


93 


93% 


92% 


Oats- - 










Dm 


39'. 


40 


40% 


39% 


July 


42 \ 


b41 


43 


bl2 


Or- 


41', 


41', 


41% 


41 '. 


Ryt — 










!•■ . ... 


.57'. 


b>8 


S9't 


31% 


Julv 


58% 








Oct 


37 S 


37 . 


58% 


57% 


Barley- 








Dec 


46'. 


46 j 


48% 


41% 


July 


Nl 


b5l 




S2 ' a. 


Oct. n. 


49'. 


b19 


49 . 


49% 



50 st ! SO 
3.300 at 19 



2,000 



Wheat 

Dec 

TlllT 



< MCiMM «.R 3IN 
<H A Humb-r. t.td > 

PC -Open High Ixiw Close 

10f'. 104'. 181 N. 103> — W4Sr 

'103 103'. 103% " 102 ' 103% 

101% 104'. 104% 102% 103 



t 

Dec « 
July 
Sept 
Oals 

Dec . 

fjgj 

flrpt 

!( ve 

Do* 
Julv . 
Sent. 



*fi . 
90% 
87 i 

37% 
39 
36 . 



80' . 
10 . 
S6 . 

37'. 

16% 

72'. 
73% 
72 % 



81 ' 
91 1 
6* 



36% 
71% 

73% 



79% 
69% 
86 I 

36% 

J.1% 

7.2 

72% 



81% 
91 

81% 

17 

B* 

72% 
b74 

72% 



l*4ind QuotatSonfl 



• Burns At Walnaruh 
Ml N|( |f\l 

. 

Municipality of Bsquimdt 

.3 . 1963 
Cltv of Vsncouxer 3 . IUK0 
Oreatef Vanrouer Water 

DUtrtct 4%'^. 1N7 

Citr or Edmonton 4' < : . lie) 
Cite of Kdmon'.m 1% . 1941 
C:ty of Mnnfreal .3'. . 1913. 
City of Quebec 5 . . 1953 . 
Toronto Harbor 4',""-. 1953 

raoNiNt i3i 



Canadian Bonds 



I.Ktrd Oils 

Amalgamated ' 000 at 12 . 500 at 13 
l.onn at 13 'B-60i 
A P Con :'0 at 14. 
Har«a! 1 00O at f>8 
Home 300 at 1 03 

( urh Oils 

Ajj ttntt 1 0.10 at 06 

Cn'mont ,00 • n . 100 a' 14 

i r Hold 4 000 at 00' , , 3,0 0 0 at ,C |% . 
4 000 at 10 

Hick wood looo at 26' 
2.000 tt 27' .. . 4 900 at, 28 

Mercury 100 at 11%. 

Okalta 20O at 20 

Ranchmen*- 200 st 44 

Rovallte- 3 at 29 ,0 

Listed Mines 

Bi* Mlvsour! ',00 at 60. 500 at 61 
Rralortie 4 at 7 50. 100 at 7 65. 30 at 
7 70 

B R X 1.000 at 14. 
Cariboo. 323 at I 77 
Dentonla 700 at 18 
■ t 19% 'B-80> 

Oo!d B !t» 7.R00 at 30 
Island Mountain 100 at 1 54 
Inter C Ac C 100 at 20 
Root Welle 300 at 63 1 00 at 65 
Mak Slecir 300 at 04 
MlntO MM at til 2 400 at 82 . 2 000 at 
62' 3 800 st 63 
Pioneer 220 at 8 ',0 

Premier 15 at 2 30. 70 st 2 55. 1 500 at 
7 56 

Reno 300 at 1 24 . 1.400 It I 75 
•s.illv tct, „| 

Balm Ml 7 000 ,.t 0*' | 1 000 st 08%. 
Sheep Creek 1.000 at .72. 
Vldette- 390 »t I 14 

Curb Mines 
B C Nickel 1 800 at 34. 
rnn re«v V,0 at 1 4 
Pawn l.ono a' 60 

Federal 2.000 at 08 1 000 at 06'. 300 
at 06'. 

Oeorge Con 2.550 at 10 
Oold Mountain- 6 '.no a' IIH; 5 noo at 
14 500 nt 14% 8 .00 at 14%. 
Orandvlew I 000 a' 03 
Orsr.ge 6.000 at 02 

Orull Wlhk^ne 450 at 10 1.100 at 10% 
Hedley Amal 1.000 tt .16% 
Hume 1 000 at 03', 
Kootcnav Flo 5 000 at 00%. 
Meridian 500 at 06 

Nlmln 5 500 at 16. 1 "00 at 16%: 2 000 
at 16 

Noble Five 7.0O0 at 02' 
Pend Oreille 10 at 90 100 at 83 800 
*t 95 100 at 97 

Pilo' 7 300 st 07' 5C0 at 07%. 
Oue-nelle Q 1.000 ai 09'. 
Reh?nce- 3.500 st 06 . 200 at 06%. 
Relief Arl ',00 at 31. 200 
Rufiis Arc -^700 at 01. 



DnlUal Knap. re — M00) at 14%. 
Viking 2.000 at 02'. 
Wesko- 200 *t 21 1 

Industrials 

Breweries Kighl* -IN at 1 M 



r, .;*' 
*l 7.73 



.0 



Liverpool R 7 heat 



FOREIGN CURRENCIES 
COMPILED ON BASIS 
OF CANADIAN DOLLAR 



Arc proving up a scries of high grade veins up to 800 
feet in length. This is an outstanding speculation 

AT 10c PER SHARE 



J. A Burchett 



308 Un.on Bldg. 



D C Gordon 



i ivi :■[•< >oi. ,t . i •, .CP' i .ui..- ■ 
per-bushel when quotations, c I f. Liver- 
pool, in Canadian lunds. at current Mcr- 
1 1 n eschanse r»te of 15 01, as supplied 



by flronmhall 



Today Y day 
No. 1 Manitoba Northern. 

Vancouver. July 108% ,110% 
No. 2 Manl'nba Northern. 

Atlantic lOldv July 107% 108% 

No 2 Manitoba Northern. 

Vancouver 'Mewl, July 107% 108''. 
Hungarian 'Old-Newt. July- 
August 95% 97'. 

Australian. Auiust 106 , 106% 

Corporation Bontii 

'Burns Ac Wainwrtght. Ltd ' 

i t ri K i RUTCH 

Bid Asked 

Br Power V . I860 ... 109 25 IC7 75 

BC Telephone 5 ft, I960 .... 108 25 109 75 

B C. Electric 6 .pfd 109 75 III 2.3 

B C. Telephone t"r . pfd. . 108 75 110 125 

Beauhart-ols. Power I . 1973 38 00 39 50 

Calgary Power 5 . 1960 98 25 99 75 

Can Pac Railway 5'.. 1954. 107 75 108 50 

Can North Power 5". . 1953 103 50 105 ro 

Oatineau Pnw ' A" i . 1941 94 75 96 25 

International H»dro Ift, 1944 54 25 55 75 

Western Power 5 . 1949 . 106 00 107 2.5 

INIM MTIItl S 

Burns Bundle* 3".. 1939 79 23 80 35 

Canada Steamships tft, 1941 35 00 36 50 

ranada Cement 3' ft, 1947 105 75 107 23 

Oeneral Steel Wares 6 . 1952 101 75 104 7:. 

Federal Oram *~ . 1949 . 99 00 101 00 

MrColl-Frontenne 6 -. 1949 . 104 50 106 7 5 

Simpson » Ltd H . 1949 .105 25 106 50 



MONTREAL. July 25 British 
and lorciKn exchange closed steady: 1 

AiLstralia. pound. 4 0095; France, 
franc. .0662; Groat Britain, pound. 
5 0212; Germany, reichsmark. 4029; 
Holland, florin. .6805; Italy, lire. 
.0792; Japan, yen .29116. 

New Zealand, pound. 4 0499; South' 
Africa, pound. 4 99C.8; Spain, peseta 
1371; United States, dollar, par. 

Foreign Bonda 

(Burns At Wslnwrlght, Ltd • 



British Columbia Telephone Company 

We Offer Our Services in Effecting the Eschjngc to the New Bondl 

BIRD & TALLING, LTD. 

1006 BROAD STREET C E BROWN, Mgr G74H 





B:d 


Asked 


Australia 5". . 1957 


. 106 75 


1C7 25 


Belgium 6 .. 1955 


. 106 3ft 


106 75 


Bogdta 8' , 1945 


. 15 25 


15 75 


D-imark 3'-'.. 193S .... 


. 101 50 


102 00 


French 7' . , 1941 . . 


. 162 25 


162 75 


Oermon Oov't 7". . 1949 


32 75 


33 25 


Itrtly 7- . 1951 


84 .'1 


85 00 


J»P»n •«%», 1954 


. 96 75 


19 i 


Minaa Ocrae* tHft, 1959 


17 50 


18 on 


Norway 6 1944 


. 108 IN 


106 625 


Queensland 6 . 1947 . . 


. 1 1 1 25 


III 75 


Rome 6 . 1952 


79 25 


79 78 



r 'mc: i <; jwwi „ virw 

Industrial and Mining Stocks Higher Again This Week 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR RAPE INVESTMENTS SHOULD NOT BE OVERLOOKED 
WHY ACCEPT LOW INTERESTS ON D93*OSIT8 ' 
OUR DAILY FINANCIAL BROADCAST OVER CFCT AT 9 10 AM 



Hugh 3llan 



J. W. JONES, LIMITED 



J. W. Jonea 



Above prices in New York 

Silver Marki&i 

LONDON. July 25 (It*) -Bar silver 
steady, 1-16 higher at 19 11-16d. 
AT ttlW VOHK 

NEW YORK. July 25 ,,p - Bar 
silver nominal, no quotations. 



Toronto Stocks Command Attention 

Our office it open Krr«re « \ M ||MM| rati or trlrphAtir for <■ u .»i * mlnlnc 

m t»» biifini and Brlllnf ordrrt. 

A. A. MEHAREY & CO. 

«. I FORT slKMI HIHMH KK05I) > l|*7 



BAR GOLD AT LONDON 



MONTREAL, July 25 0 -Bar Rold 
in London down 2 cent.s at $34 84 in 
Canadian funds; 138s 10 l-2d in 
British fund*, The fixed »35 Wa.-h- 
ln«Lon price was unchanged with the 
Uniwd States dollar par. 



r ST O RIEDiSPO TS'7"""V^ 

f 



FROM SEA TO SEA 



B> W/ >. Banks, B.A. 



• Biirni * Walnwrlght. Ltd f 



Bid 



Askecl Hum of Can 



88 <0 



4* I Prov of B C 4 



4t 6 

.0 7 
19 6 
If 1 

71 7 
U 4 
30 ', 
14 6 



rr<>* i.r n c 4', 

Prov of Hi' 3 

Prov of B C 5' ,' 

Prtn i>l 1.0 6 



19.37 

. IM 

1933 . ... 
r. I94> 

i*rr. . • 



pmv df Manllooa 4 

I'rnv of Manilntia 4' ■ 

Prov of Manitoba s 1 ; 

Prov of Ontario 4'. . 



V937 

19.31 



100 13 
103 30 
108 00 

3.1 7 • 
*6 no 
93 73 
93 33 
•)« -'. 
97 33 
96 7.'i 



84 no 

86.0 

■ 

! on .30 I ' 

70 33 ' 
»4 no 

102 2.3 
106 30 I 
TTTWT - "* 



f\ 4 f Pioi. Jit OuLsrJA «'- - 
!« 6 Pr,n ol uuebe"c 4'. 



. iv.6 inn ?.'. 

1166 107 00 
r .I4MA.U4AO 



87 2, 

MM I " 

93 2.3 

93 3.3 

-97 73 IT N R 

94 73 

99 :.'i I " 
102 3 .3 
|M "o 
117 (Ui 



14 4 
40 I 

'6« 
?0 6 

1 1 I 



Prn\ of U'jehee 

Prov of fnsk . 4' 

Prov of ?ask , 4' 

r i of Sssk U 

Pr ov o r Btsk . "V 

Pro' nf fls'k . 6' 



Above oiiK'stmna aubiei t U> ronf imstion 



9 
3* 6 

64 I 
13 3 
1 6 

116 

»9 7 1 VANCOUVER • .Inly 2.3 (CP< 
,'2 . rwTieal rash prices 



IH18 109 SO III '8 

' "3*7 Ml 7; 1 18 

1934 79 73 79 3\ 

. It31 88 73 tl 2 

19311 »■> 7.3 88 ? 

. |3',J ' "87 7 - »0J 

19".2 92 73 »4 7 




1937 
1917 

|| N 

1840 
1941 
'HI 
1944 
1943 
1946 
!'»49 
1932 

: ) ,n 

19'«7 
193* 
19MI 
193.3 
1966 
1931 
19.36 
I9S7 
1933 
I 

! »..'> 

1970 

nuj 

1933 
1M4 
no 



.3 ' 
.3 % 
4 

.3 *J 
S % 
4 
4 
4 

I 1 

4 

4 

4V 

4 

4 

3 ' 

T. 

4 

4' . 
4' ■ 
4'. 

3 ' 
3 



Bid 
106 23 

102 373 
inn 73 

I in 3r 

114 625 
113 623 
113 675 
109 7S 
113 873 

103 73 
101 73 
112 M 
112 12.3 

112 23 
111 173 
100 »7S 

int id 

1 1 3 37.3 

lis 7S 

113 7. 
117 625 
117 73 
119 30 
lit 7'i 
7T7 7 3 ' 

inn 671 

ri 1 1 

ion 7S 



A«ked 

in7 125 
103 25 
101 623 

1 1 1 375 

113 75 . 
116 50 ' 

114 73 

1 in 625 
114 7'. 
jnr 1 j;. 
ins 623 

112 sn 

112 75 
ill 10 
III I 
in; 73 
III 171 
1 16 373 
1 16 625 
114 7, 
1 18 7 'i 
118 75 
120 33 
120 75 
JM A 
101 671 

in: 875 



Vatn o i', er 



66 4 



K*- .14Ul!> 

I N,,Y 



No 



8 I 
13* 

• * 3 1 so i_N6r' he 

'l 2 No 4 Worlrx 

17 1 No 5 Wheat 

t*-* -9fe. * Wt-eef 



: 1 .'e r n " 



Strsleht Tonah 
91'. 8a., 

97^ W. 

8fS I7S 
87 . '*-. 
'14'. 81 «• 



\ ■ ■ 
KVC 

n 

Ctt le 

Elf* 

Ford 



in 

71 i 



, Feel 



Track 91 



63 

39' 



Ni ^ York < mli 

• II 6 II imber, Lt<" • 
R d 

• • • • »• t * • ^ 

44', 

I 's 

-ri-rrrrT — trr 

4 . 

14\ 

19 

........ 26'! 

67 S 



4 Amn Crmmld 
A mn ^torr 
Oas 

ated fls % 



Mfl 1 

n<-''d 
v 



A >k -d 
36 



I 

4 T 
73 
20 





Bright Spots in News of 
Industry for Past Week 

Br The Canadian Pre , |lrnmc increased to 1,433 765 tons. 26 

Montreal— fl. S. Kresiie Comp.iny. per c< nt more tHan 1935. 



Ltd.. will erect a new $285,000 store 
here. 

Ottawa — Canadian business fail- 
ures in April were 100 compared with 
107 last April, and defaulted liabili- 
ties decrea-sed 17 per cent 

Sarnla. Ont. -Neal Bakin? Com- 
pany, Ltd will erect a $10,000 addi- 
tion to their plant. « — 



Wetland. Ont. — June ship canal | here. 



Kentville. N.S. - Building of a 
$100 000 hospital planned. 

Vancouver — Water-borne Imports 
;ind export* 25 per cent higher In 
first six months of 1936, a total of 
3 840.750 tons. 

j Peterborough. Ont - Tax payments 
to date amount to $288.«00, an In- 
crease of 5 per cent over last year. 

Kirkland Lake. Ont. — A $50 000 
iraraire-apartment building planned 



bulldlr 



out 
News 

and 
Notices 



< own 11 w cAMtm 

Bv kind j*. rniL^sion nf F C Mo- 
the Cowlchan district Scout and Cul 
camps are being held on his prop- 
erty at Croftrn from July 20 to 31 



HKST CATIIF.DR \l. TROOP 

Plans for the garden party of First 
Cathedral Troop to bc held on Au- 
gust I at the home of Miss K Ag- 
new were completed at a met ting 



Rover Scouts oome Into elrftp each 
evening after their day's wort. The 
nurriber sleeping under canvas 
ranges frtim .sixty-one to sevt nty. 
Tji<t cwnp chief Is DUtrlc, Oom- 
Arthur 



The camp Ls delightfully situatAl j mifilioncr Arthur BLschlagjr, as- 
ln fields whMh command a wonrjerf- *Wd "y bistrlct .Scouter E M. Dop- 
ful vLsta of sea and snow-cappiJd ' plni-Hetajt-nstal, Srouters O.J»hilhp- 
mountnlns. , long stretch of sarid (> * h M. ft. K. Cairns and pranson, 
affords exceHent bathing facllitle*. A 8;r 
and the Scoots are thoroughly en- Smith. 



Joying their three bathing parades 
earh day Instructional classes are 



*m m « 

tpfi't A. Lincoln, A. Mdhnea, C. 
H. Langlols and Rovior Mat* 
J Morford. The Cubs of the Cow- 
lchan district parka will sucoeed 
the Scouts on Monday, July 27. 



held ea<-h morning and recreations 
UKta* boating, bathing, fishing. 
sott'iaM, boxing and rampfire con- 
of the troop committee. The party rer ts 

will be held from 3 to 6 pm. Tea Scout troops In camp are Duncan. 

win be served and the, r w.ll be tea- Quamlrhan. South Cowlchan and his property for reduction of th* 
cup reading dannng by Rangers. Cobble HU1, Fairbrldge and Saht- , national debt He was an iron and 

'«teet manufacturer. 



HUDDERSFIKr.D. England 91 — 
Albert Henry Wilson whose estate 
was $195 000 has Wt the residue of 



and other features 



-*g> 



I 

u 



4 



Bonds Called for Payment 



'Supplier! br Bird Ar Tilllnt. Ltd • 



The folloi n* I* a ll«l of Issues whl, h hiv< be-n 
erttretr In order of date of pamient 



o, 



V V . 

Osle ol 
Psvm«tit 
Ana I. 1039 

r 1m 1 1*" 

Ai< 1. 193.1 

Art* — r.- r»36 

Aut 1. 193* 



Humble ON , 
loll P*e ..... 
rmnerial oil 
Newr 

H oneer . 
Btsr. lard OH Kl 
Amn A Ian t 'in\ 
United O •* . 
t'n' erl r «-t A- 
\ Niagara Hud .- n 
n stillenei. Rn<tta 
Half 0.1 
at*o* 




"1 



ier 



16 

l»"s 
13* 

s 



8-, 

1 ' ' 



Cor 4 



American Beet Sugar Co Con\ Deb 6 s. 1940 
Boaton ( on* O** Co « s, 1»47 
Californis oregrm Pwr m and Wer r 
California Oirxnn Pwr I" and R»f B" 8 s 
Crane Co 3* Notes. 1940 
■Mtarn Wis. tier Co 1st L:rn a. id Ref \ 
Eastern Wis Elrr Co 1st H * , v 1846 
PalrtankS' Morae * Co 3 s. 104 j 
Furopean iTtee Corp I>eb 6 • l«afs 
Crenaral Amer Tank Car Fq 19 4 | to 1941 
Mlnneaota Transfer Rv 1st l a, 1946 
Rierra A Ban Pranriaro Pwr Is' 3 s. 1949 
Wayna Pump Oo. Cnnv i't 1934 
W1» Power and Main Co r. P and t» 

and 1961 

Wia Power A Ugly Co H * » 1932 
Wta»4»tib Berr. lit »nd Bef "C 3 ». 1*s* 
Wla Pub Serv 1st and Ref B < • IM4 
Wla Pub Sere 1st aun R'f 3 fa 1993 

IB Paso Nslitral Qaj I'mi.. Si. », tUS l .'i »j.g 

Wt Page* stai .11 at « * »» I s4 S ' ■ r, Ifl !j , , , . . , . ■ 

Tfornia Water rerMce 1«| A j s. 1«U .r — TTTT 

ral Oas ui A I a. 19*9 MM . a it 17. ;»!« [ 21c and 20c 



24' 
4 

1r 
— s* 



U IMS 
I. 1938 
I . ■ 19.-8 
I liVT6 

1 T97TS 
I 1936 
1 1936 



3» 
6 

II 
i I 



RUINED WALLS OF FOHT ERIE. ONT. 

' HKN Sir I'i. " Br"ck raptured tlun to>ir tunes in two years 
trolt in 1812 he 'took a.s » B»rtnsh abandoned it afrer the 
He armed Hrlg Adam^. of Fort George, at the opp-. • | 
.died tons, which was now the river, in 1813. But dtirln 
1 the Detroit This little last days of the year both 
;>!sh.p figured al.*> m the opening of Were swept clear of the foe 
. ' hpatlliUM on the Niagara frontier, 
v I .. • -r ut J - •■ Elliot^ oi tl*e U-S 
1 » •• i/»d her, with a smaller ves- 
i ( Ailed the Caledonia, as th> > kaj 
>:T F.ri F.ri- F. :. >•• s night atta< k 
*K I miL£ * eramplet*» Mirrrrlae and his m m 
[ai •<•:>:. 'imbered Hie small crews. 
J> further encimbere d by the nufl ar 



*7's 
36 

90 

8' 
I9's 
1 '• 
S's 



M«)iitr« ;i! Prortuipr 



MOSTRXAL July 25 <r -Prices 
were nomina.lv tttwM Mt an in- 
active *e>v:m of Canadian Com- 
ni'dl;\ Ex.-ln:igr product 8cr!lnn. 
Buttei— Spot. Quebec. Z\ i Qc. 
Wi'*' - Spot 0:1:3110 \* large 
"''A" medium, 24c. 1 B 



to his disastrous attempt at Queens- 
ton, r 

f Ml E: ic dared trom 1764 Across 
from Buflilo. II proved to be one ol 
the chief centres of the almost en- 
large ItatWOM warfare upon the- Niagara 
|lron:ier. changing 




earl 
Eru 



g 

bank-s 

. and 

1814 saw the Bnti>h in Fort 
fuain. 

Howe*er, the fort was too H'lHtly 
held ^9 resist the strong American 
arftiy which again invaded Canadian 
soil in that year. The enemy great lv 
strengthened the defensive works 
anrl jr^lslerl & dc U;ravined- siege by 
American pn."^>ners on board Oeneraf Drummond. which was one 
Bill the Now York rrrtliUa regarded of the most costly operations of the 
the achievement as a great victory entire war to the Pritish and Cana- 
P lilMliBd with 'he -harw of Hull's dian troops But the tide of for- 
surrender. it spurred on the enemy tune was to turn again, and the 



Americans blew up the fort beftrre 
abandoning it In November. Today 
Fort Erie town, a termini of the 
Peace Bridge, receives dally a pe»ce. 
ful invasion of friendly American/ I 
in sharp contrast with the hostile J 



if 



\ — — 

Till: DAILY COLONIST. VICTORIA, B.C., Sr\PAV. TI'LV 26, 



21 



THE TUTTS 



By Crawford Younti 



DAD 




oje of -The. happiest* moments in marr.\ei> 

LIFE WAi WHEM MOM WAS MAKING- AMENDS F0» 
BUP-Ntv^ HIM WITH a MUSTAfep PtASTr-fe. . 




• «->•' MM '!■."->. 



7 »' 



APPLE MARY 




WELL-ER-I ACCIDENTLY 
KNOCKED EM INTO 

THAT SPICE SIRUP, 



1 



SAY, WHAT 
HAPPENED TO 
MY BAKED 
APPLES? 



AND THEV SOAKED 
MOST OF IT UP 



7 r 




v 

GEE WHISKERS, 
GRAN MA. THEV RE 
BETTER'N ANY I 
EVER TASTED 



SURE THING, MARY 
NEVER ATE 
NOTHIN' SO 
GOOD. 



IM GONNA 
TELL BESSIE 1 
TO TRV ONE. I 




B y Martha Orr | 



^| ' WELL PUT THEM IN THE 

RRFR.IGE.R. ATOR. , AND BILL 
CAN TELL US IF THE 
CUSTOMERS 
LIKE THEM rr BOY.IF THEV 
TONIGHT. >-\DONT,ILL EAT 

EM ALL / 





TODDY 



Hat citing a Scheme 



By George Marcoux 



GLlTYA j WIL LIAMS 






5M «*» 



MM****** KICK 








Pu'k . TMtM i p, wtipf « » rtMMY m 

TMKUSTIM6 EACH IMTO IMt MNK tt <*OPTM 

PUT »S Hi cU-MtRS TWOOWTWHOOR, 

n Of ftNP rVTS MONfV 



TMM TUtPC WAS HITS MltS Of 

out mori rtMNv with roar, 

WHIM Ml TOOK THIM SCATTtRINt TM?H 
OUT Of RANK 



MANCHESTER England O). — White HeatheY Pund on his birthday 
Kiiik Edward MBl a cheque for H» Th» fund provides holidays for poor 
to The Manchester Evening News" | cKildren. 



Jane Dixon Says: 



DKSPITK THr KXTENT OK THF. NK.W DEAL FOR WO M K.N. IT 
rfmmvv m PRIV1LEOI OF MEN to be THE M7M! K%fl 

IN THE LOVE Qt'EST — SI XT I EN WANTS TO KNOW 

how to r\T( ii warn M \N 

Today's lelter U printed In the hope some of you eou nfltn gl who 
rome to me with your 'heart'' problems will realize how utterly ridiculous 
your sentimental 'moolngs'' about love sound. 

The other persons absurdities always are a great deal funnier than 
our own. 

We can see them more clearly. 

We Can Jud«e them more impartially. 

Viewed at Ion* range, what to us seems a burning necessity be- 
romM folly to the other person 

Here's the letter, and If the youmtUns who wrote It were a cat I'd 
be convinced shed been playing with catnip 



POPEYE 

! POPtSE. \ VJC 
(ifArLLkON DO\ 
1 THAT rfc*W--l 



By Secar 



V/OU OVER A 
DOLLBRS ON 
WANT TO 
SHfXRE. \T UOITH VOO 



NO,THfSHKS_O0S G\U€ 
SOMEOF IT TO B 
ORPHlrAKS' 






v Nrtd IHATE VOL) .TOO'! 
YOU LIED TO ME ! GET 
OUT OF MW SvCjHT! 
I KEVCR UUfNNT TO 
SEE YOU AGA.UA*. 



C VA WT WfNrAT 
THE OEEP, EVA? 

U)f\tAT WrM-' 




r OKr\T \ TAKE VA1H 
fiHO KEEP V\VM GOT 
OF Mt 




^oon t wokry. >iEEP \ 
»BEL\E\)E6 Its VA — Y€R 
MlrAE NOW-HMM-I OONT 
TH\NKVA UMO-VIA. BE1 
^THERE UJftS SOME 
^ ^ '^\ MISTAKE 




NAPOLEON AND Ui^CLE ELBY 



By Clifford McBride 



THAT LAST AUTO CAMP 
TURNED OS DOWN BECAUSE. 
VOU'RE A DO& . THAT 'J 
HARDLY" YOUR 'AUCT . BUT 
U/E'M BE PREPARBO PCX? 
THE NEXT ONE . 





Mim Dixon: Could >oa help me? I mint have help from 



"I'm tUteen. have blue eve« and hrown hair, and am in m» 
In Mt h achool. 

"MIm DIaon. until thla year 1 have never eared a 
hoys, hut now I suppose I'm head over heelV In love. 

IT STARTED AT A DAM * 
"About a month ago I went to a danee In anoiher town with a 
eerUIn boy. There, much to my surprise, was a boy from my town, 
a bov I had known In %t hool a year before. The boy who took me to 
th« danee and 1 got Into a quarrel, so I broke my date with him He 
tried to boas me around, tell me who I should danee with, that I 
mustn't go outside, etc, 

"After I was an«ry with him— we'll eall him A— I met the other 
hoy-well eall him B He rut In/ was sociable, and I was worried 
about how I was goln« to C et home. 

"When H Inquired If I had a dale I (old him no.' He atkeri me 
other questions, about how I rame to the danre. etc., hut I didn't 
answer. He requested the intermission dale. I gave It to him. and he 
s<ked to take me home. I accepted, gladly. 

"It was during the intermission that I learned to care *o much 
for him. Absolutely he Is the most heavenly person I have ever sern. 
It is like N-Ing In hea\en when voii're with him. 

he MEM i v iMlXI - 
"1 know he likes me because I have reason to know Not long 
ago when 1 had a dale he tried his best to gel me to go with him. hut 
f couldn't. Since, when he sees. me. he speiks and gives that Vome 
hither" smile of his. then passes on 

"Now that you've heard my story here is mv question: How ran 
I catch him?' 

"I'm crary about him. but for two weeks he has Just spoken to me 
and gone on his way. I've tried to forget him. hut I tlnd mvself loll- 
ing around, thinking of him always. 

"1 see him almost every day. but all I gel is the smile. 

"Please help me to raleh him and 1 shall be ever so thankful lo 
you. I'll take your advice, but please remember I must catch him as 
I cannot live without him 

at your earliest opportunity — We." 

SHE'S PRORVniT srxRFn niM \WM 

Answer 1 m not a maker of fish hooka, my dear ' 'We " I'm Ju».t a 
relations columnist, a happily married woman who^ajlowed the 
man she loves to catch her. 

I wouldn't know nhout mnn traps Lx <-aus«< I feel Ihey are unsound, 
and so they have never Interested me except as exhibits of the folly of 
women who go fishing. 

If you have been as extravagant In your pursuit of the young man 
a* you are to your letter to me. I am not surprised that he smilea and 

You've probably scared rUm o ff, _ 

' Despite the extent of the New Deal for women it remains the 
privilege of men to be the pursuers in the love quest. 

The neat lime you meet the young man stop and greet him Treat 
aa you would any other friend \nu like and admire 
Be*fVTendiv. not gogale-eved 

At sixteen you are experiencing the firs' of vour heart throbs, not 



POP 



Election Recipe 



By I Millar Watt 




IF YOU WANT TO BE 
ELECTED . Rff^lEMflea 
MY RECIPE FOR 
RHU&AR3 TART 





•PUT IN ALL THE 
SUGAR YOU DARE 
AND 

THEN DOUBLE IT/ 




7 27 <0o»Tr 1«H. IM*. »r ThM 



TILLIF THE TOILER 



i Thirty-Day Ri thin son Crusoe 



By Westover 




OMLV TWO MC*?E IWVS AMD 
M/vC OGTVMZT.S RIP My^Tma/ 
DEVIL'S ISLAND - YOU 




THE <5UV THAT FRAMEO 
MAC BV ee-TTtMe HIM 
% 500 HE COOLOWT oTAy 
A MOMTH Oi THE iSLAAlD 

VAiiTH NOTHtkJe But a 

POCKET VCNIFE AM>A 




TILHE'S VOOI*fc»EO 

Because shh's never. 
BEEW separated prom 

MAC Foil A MONTH 





VsiOO OO- OO -THEY 
SAY THIS IS L AMD IS 

Peopled e>v ghosts 

• MM c 



121 



mac Must stay ota 

THB I S LAMD OlE MOMTH 

VMiTH MOTHlMfS BoT 
A BATH1MS-SUIT A/tO 
A POCKET- KMlFE CXi 
FORFEIT $ SOO 




MRS . TOMES IV. BLT-.V 
"SEVAllMC? A POCKET IM 
MAC'S &ATHiMe5-'SUlT SO 
MB VaiOMT LOGb HiS 
kNlFE 



1)1 .\I E [)U r AN 



MICKEY 
AND WBSLEY 
*AW DIXIE 
"IN WILL, 
HUGWEIL '£ 
ARMS? 

■ NOT 

KNOWING 
WAT THE # 
ACTOR kAS 
ONLY COACH- 
ING DIXIE IN 

THEATRE 
TECHNIQUE 
WESLEY fVQNS 
TO MICKEY. - 
HE HAS ASKED 
HER TO GO TO 
TUE DANCE 
WITH HIM I 



r 



^O, TMA-T^ WMV TW€YVE Bt£N 
BO COOL TO ME LATELV- 7 
— PR06ABLV MATE TO TELL 
ME MOW TMEY EEEL ABOUT 



V-rt EACW OTHER/ Jks 





By I P MnEvoy and | H Striebel 



-AND 

SO 
EVEZYdOOY 
BUT 
DIXIE 
MS 
GONE 
TO 
THE 
PANCC 
AT 

THE * 

ST00DWOCK 
GOLF 
CLUB- 



1-21 




!v\ll.Y\oi,ONiST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1938 



Business and Professional Directory, Want Ads 



RATER FOR CLASSIFIED OR WANT 
ADVERTISEMENTS 

On* »nd ant-half mi H m ■ sretd »*»*) 

tnsertlon, nln* cent* » word a week, with 
a minimum of Uo word*, caah with order. 
No adverttaemenl occ*pt*d tor lui than 
twenty-five cidU. 

Death and r<jrier*l Notice.,. 1 1 ',0. fill 
Insertion: II 00 for each additional Inser- 
tion Marriages, Card* of Thankg and In 
Memorlam Notice*, tl 50 per lruertion 



Birth Nolle**. II 00 per tnaertlon. 



Buslnes* or Professional Carda of two 
line* or undtr, II 14 per month. Addi- 
tional apace at II 35 per Una per month. 

Adv*rti»er* wbo daalra may have repllea 
addressed to a box at Tht ColonUt and 
forwarded to their prlvat* address. A 
chart* of ten cent* 1* mad* for malllnc 
r*plie«. In thl* cat* add threa word* 

CBos Colonlit") to th* count for th* 

number of word*. ■ 

Out-of-town render* of' our advertise- 
ment* aak advertisers to clva address a* 
wwll aa phona number*, a* It I* not Aiwa /■ 
t« aommunlcat* throuth th* 



LOWER AND PERN SHOPPE B 2651 
Douglas Pern* a specialty 
<-ow prica for spray*, deeljna 



POSY SHOP. Artistic Ploral Tributes 
Ml Port Street 
Phona O 6421 - Nliht Phone O 4683 



i WOODWARD * SONS LTD 

-Eatabluhed 1882— 
Designs - Bouquet* — Plowera 
Anywhere Any Tim* 

: 0 4614 Night: O I 



Any claim for rebate on account of 
error* or omission* must b* made within 
thirty day* Iron th* data of the aame. 
otherwiee the claim will not be allowed. 

The Colonist will not be reaporulbl* for 
more than on* Incorrect ln»*rtlon of auy 
advertiiement ordered for more than one 
U*ue ^ 

The Colonial acrrlce la available everr 
day from I a m. to 10 p m . exctptlnt 
Sunday. Jut* call ■ metre 4114. 

~To Insure Insertion. Clas»lfled Ad* »hould 
reach Th* Colonlit befor* 10 p.m. on th* 
day prevlou* to publication. 



01a*alfled Ad* for The Sunday ColonUt 
will be accepted up to 10 p m on Satur- 
days 



CLASSIFICATIONS 



PLORAL ART SHOP 
Dyson A Clark 
DUilnctive PuneraJ Design* 
639 Port Street 



E48U 



MONUMENTAL WOKKS 



TEW ART MONUMENTAL WORKS. LTD 
O Tax* No 4 car to work*. 1401 Mai 
Street Phone O 1412. 



lu 



COMING EVENTS 



A 



BIO OLD - TIME AND MODERN 
dance, Tueaday, July 21. Irvine * Or- 
chestra. 9 till 1. Lady and gentleman* 
wrist watch, to b* given away. Tourists 
welcome Crystal Qarden. 16c 

A BIO DANCE EVERY WEDNESDAY. 
A O P Hall. 1 10-12 30 Stewart • 4- 
piec* old-timer*. 26c. Refreshments Tom- 



/ CONSERVATIVE WARD ONE. 8AAN- 
4 J lch — An orgenliatlon meeting will b* 
held on Wednesday. July 29, at St. Luke * 
Hall. Cedar Hill Crossroad, at 8 p m 
Com* and help fight against Socialism " 



CRYSTAL QARDEN DANCE, EVERY 
Saturday strain. 9 to 12 Admlaalon lie 

HILLCREST TENNIS CLUB -FLANNEL 
dance, Palala d* Danse, Dallas Road. 
Wednesday. July 2». 1936 Reg Wood* 
4-plece orchtttra. Ttcketa 60c. Refresh- 
ments 

M 

day nliht. 26c 



Aereate for Rent 
Acreage for Hal* 
Acreage Wanted 
Auto* for Hire . 

Autocnoollta 

Birtha 

Bicycle* and Motorcycle* 
Bo* is and Launch** 



• •••a. •■••■*. ...... 

• ••••..■••■...■*»•* 
••••a ..*••*..... 



I»AI!U)I( DOC 
B ] I August 16, at "Drumadoon. " cadboro | available 
•2 1 Bay. auspices Victoria City Kennel Club references 
•4 , Phone Mrl. B Davidson, secretary. O 4878. 
44 | for further information 

IIAKTNER WHIST. - MONDAY, 8*10. 1210 



CMOKRAN'S, THE SEASIDE DANCtNO 
Pavilion. Cordova Bay. every Satur- 
Baxter's 6-plece orchestra 

SHOW. SATURDAY. 




\'OUNO WOMAN DESIRES*' POSITION. 
1 trained nurse, housework Phone E 8441 



lEI'SONAL 

i CLAIRVOYANT CARD READINO BY 
* » Mme Moblus. the gifted psychic. ) 
palmist and life reader, will pleas* and i 
help you Mme Moblus placet her many 
year* of experience, ability and spiritual 
tlft* at your service Investigate- and be , 
convinced Try a. clairvoyant card read- 1 
Int today Price moderate Balmoral | 
Hotel. 1109 Douglas Street (opposite 
Krr.-ae s Store 1 . Suite 14. 

A N OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE MORA 
n th»n 150 .001 On* only. 1916 all cubic 
foot model. Kelvlnator (never used), haa 
all latest Improvements; only 1226 Guar- 
anteed Term* If desired 

MURPHY ELECTRIC CO. LTD 
751 Y.tes Street O 1711 



! L DOUBLE SERVICE 
IN WANT 
ADS 



A VOID THE UNCERTAINTY — SEE IHt 
•'* tested proof befor* having your next 
permanent. Ben Waude Uairdreasing 
Phona E 4021 709 Port Street 

4 REAL TREAT WHEN YOU DINE AT 
»- the Mayfalr Cafe Open Sundays 
1011 Broad Street, at Port 

ANY KIND OP KNITTING," DONE BY 
expert knitters Suit* mad* to tlze. 
IHV Box 8512. Colonist. 



You cm telephone your answeri 45 
*ell 4S ycur classified exjvertiss- 
merr» to The Colonist Readers arc 
cften nterested n Want Advc'tiss- 
mer ti tha' do nof carry tht names 
or add'esses of advertisers, but a 
Colcn.st bo* number for the accom- 
modation of those readers who fine 
if inconvenient to write an answer 
and to serve the advert 'sc* better 

We Will Take Replies 
to Box Numbers CXer 
the Telephone 

The Colonist service s ava lab'e 
from 8am to 10 p m , excepting 
Sundays Phone Empire 4114 



■ < tea ■ nut,: - 



PATENT ATTORNEYS 



J GRAY. REGISTERED PA 
attorney O 4712 616 Pembrofc* 

RNEST [s^ARVER, fjTffi^ 



A 
E 

Roistered Canada and U 8 
Patenta and Trade Marks in All Countrlee 
7B3 w Pender Vancouver Phone Sey 1351 

l~> MISCELLANEOUS 



t Continued i 



yJAWS. ALL 
k' gummed etc 
Oladslcne Avenu* 



KINDS. 
Phon* W 



1587 



31 



MONEY TO LOAN 

'Continued' 



KEFORE BREAKFAST! OHADE "A" I 
Jersey milk, cr.y or Esqutmslt, TO qts . 
1100. Pree samples. Empress Dairy £ 4371, 

—CONSTIPATION— 
TJASIC Cause of All Complaint* 

Intern»l Bathing — Colonic Irrigations! 
Also for Rheumatic Conditions, etc . com- I 

blned with steam- baths, massage 
Superintendent. Edith M Leonard. R N . 

• Post Graduate. Mayo Bros. ' 
504-7 Campbell Building E 2721 



UT1J HAVE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS 
for first mortgage 1500, 1750. 11.000. 
11.500. 12.000 and 12.250 Building loans a 
specialty Quick cleclnona Brown Bro* . 
314-5 Pemberton Bid* 



Ar* Conv*y*d by th* Style and Quality of 
Your Letterhead 

I Neat and Attractive Lettering In This AU- 
Important Detail Is a* Esertuial a* 
Good Dressing in a Personal 
Interview 

W* Tak. Prid* In Our Work 

THE COLONIST 
1211 Broad Street Phon* G 5241 

Printing - Uthoer»phing 
Bookbinding - Engravina 



SAWDUST BURNER FOR YOUR KIT- 
chen rani* Saf*. clean, simple to 

use and oy far the most economical fuel 
you can use Styles from 117 50 Hatl » 
Stove Works. Ltd 1321 Government St 

ysMALL 4-HOLE RANGE WITH WATER- 
f5 front and warming closet til 60 
Carter s Stove Store. 822 Port St E 1511. 

U'ESTINGHOUSE CABINET ELECTRIC 
rang* with automatic oven control; 
ftr»t-cla»a condition, cheap O 1711. or 
apply 751 Yalta St 

• l-BURNER SMALL FUEL OIL STOVE. 
*S suitable camping, little used. 16 Gaso- 
line 2-burner stove. 15 Mr* Duke. Patricia 
Bay. Phone 47X, Sidney. 
w 



'Continued i 



U 'ANTED SECOND HAND OIL Bl'RN- 
er tor njt Box 8824. Colonist 

W'A.Ni. I URNITI'RE. TOOLS AND 
' * m*n * clolhuic lor caah G 4911 



« FOL LTKV AND LIVES rot K 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

TO RENT 

(Continued) 



nOUSEKBEPING SLEEPING ROOMS— 
MuJ. rn. 11 60. 1100 • week. Yalt) 

Room*. 111 Jonnson Street 



N 

e 

E 148s 



ICE QUIET 



ROOM, NEAR PARK. 
417 Va 



Ml 



Mis 



«* POIT.TRT AND SI PPI II S 

I tjjT HELEN S AITS . 424 COURTNEY ST. 

'pWENT Y WYANDOTTE. 20 R I R. PL L- * Double and single housekeeping rooms. 

Douglai'-St*^?. 'Vn'on. E^isf, ^ '^UpWO-ROOM SUITE. AND ONE ROOM 

— : ^rf^* with kltchei'.ett* 802 Cook o n:». 

SI-ANTED LIVE POIT1KY Pl'I'I'lW , , „.,. »^ 

>> and pet*. Pelland. Queen* *,id Dous- T WO HOI btrKEEFINO ROOMS 12 64 

la*. O 0088 ; * merk on* room II 1 120 Vancouver St, 

Q ROOMS AND KITCHICNriTE ALSO 



■ convenience. |115 Prin- 



HRINO YOUR ABUSED HAIR BACK TO 
health. PARKER -HER BEX hair scalp 
treatments 818 Sayward Bldg E 772 S 



>•<<•••> 



46 

1 

. 40K 

. 87 



Building Met*rl*4 10A 

B us tns is Directory seeeea********* ^ 

Business Opportunlllee • 11 

Partis of Thanka saeeeeeeeeeeee* 4 

Church Notice* •••«••••••.... 4 

Clot hi n*. Purs, Shoe*. xTto 46B 

Cooling Event* »a»*ee*eee ************* 
Danclne >«##<»»**>************ ******** ^ 

Death* aae»******eee*ee<** ****** _2 

Dress it * < ^. «•.««*••••• 

Educational ■•••eeee*eeee***e***eeeee* 
Farm* for Rent ••••••t*****e******eee* 

Farm* tor Sale ....................... 

Farm* Wanted •..•*••••*....».»• 

Flat* and Apartment* to Rent 

Flat* and 
For Sal 
Purnltur* 
Fuel .... 
Funeral Dlrectorg 



E Government Prize* Two 14. two 12. 
two II, and »pecl»ls * 

sJATURDAY NiaHT _ AT 9 GCLOCK 
O Get your dance ahoea out of hock. 
Com* to the Arctic, out the Bey 
Where Old Man Rhythm* holding (way. 

V.1ATURDAY DANCES. FROM J T O 12. 
£7 at th* Army and Navy Club. 10t>i 
Wharf Street. 



13 



•••••••••••a** 



■■••*••• 



78 
J 

2 J 



23 

aj 
44 
47 
41 
44 

• •••••••• 4i0 

••••••••• 40 D 

40C 

••a... «•.•*•. 4 

Furnished House* for Rent 45A 

Furnished Room* for Rent 49A 

FurnKhed Rooms Wanted 5UA 

Hairdressers and Beauty Specialists .. 21 A 

Halls to Rent 18 

Hotel* Mate***** 48 

Housekeeping Rooms to Rent 41 

Housekeeping Room* Wanted 

Houses for Bai* 
In Memorlam . . 
Lost and Found 

Machinery •■•.•••••••••••»..... 44 

Market Speci*l* «•.»•«•.•.«.. 35 

Marriages ...•,•*..,.••«••••......... 1 

Miscellaneous II 

Money to Loan tl 

Monumental Works 4 

Muslo 44 

Musical Instrument* 40E 

Nursery Stock. Plants. Ele 40H 

Nursing and Convalescent Home* 20 

Personal 21 

Prof***:onal Directory 14 

Property for Sale 

Property Wanted 

Poultry and Livestock 

Radio 40P 

Room and Board 47 

Room and Board Wanted 44 

Situation* Wanted— Femala ls 1 hsti 

Situation* W»nted-M*l* 17 ^ 

Stove*. Range*. Furn*c*g 401. .gus 

Bummer Resort* 81 

Teacher* Wanted 15 

74 
74 
18 
65B 
H4J 
14 
12 
« 

12 

74 



a ; 



H0 
«1 

42 



DAIRYMAN. OOOD MILKER. EARLY 

ser. Phon* Albion 1BG. 

NVA8SER TO GET ORDERS FOR 
roduct. Phon* a 1677. 

rsxPERIENCED BUILDER WANTS 
a-4 strong active man. mlllng to learn 
Some rash needed State amount wagea 
and percenlate of profit*. Box 8528, 

Colonist. 

I^XPE.tlENCED RADIO AND APPLIANCE 
I J salesman wanted ' no others need ap- 
ply I for well-established house. State ate. 
experience, reference* and if car ow/ier 

Box 8513. ColonUt. 



/ COMPETENT JOURNALIST. EDITORIAL, 
staff experience. Canada. England, 
rork Alberta or B C highest 
Redmond. Cadboro Bay 



i MOUTUAC1E APPLICATION IN ANY 
• » amount appreciated. Lowest rates: 
building loans a specialty Straight loan 
or repayments to suit. Quick decisions 
P. R Brown & Sons. Ltd. 1112 Broad 
Street Phon* G 7171 • 

ANY REQUEST l-OR A MORTGAGE Ap- 
preciated See H C Holme* Pemoer- 
ton At Son. Ltd 825 Port Street O 8124 



1* TO RENT— MISCELLANEOUS 

_ _' • 

/ SAKAVAN TRAILER. TWO -^WHtEL, 
V> light, deeps two T Wace. Cobble Hill 

MEAT MARKfcT LOCATION AVAILABLE, 
twenty years' continuous occupancy 
Rental 128 00 Apply The Royal . rus: 
Company Phones E4128 or E9012 

rpo HENT A BAKEHOUSE. WITH BRICK 



4tC CATTLE Z 

I.-'OR SALi; SEVERAL YOUNO COWS. C " 
t STOUNDING BARGAIN— EXCELLENT I L freslr yf due-t* freshen For mlor- .) DEI.IliHTFUL UNFl'UNISMFD ROOMS. 
-» i :ano. bench and music cabinet. mu»t ; mation. phon* E 1810 | — or C1)uple | U M montn p nollf 

L-SOR SALE - FRESH IIEIH K ALSO « 1577 
4- youiw Pigs. Phone Belmont J9U 

fEJtSEY COW, FRESH E.N FU IN JUNE. 
'I only 



Box 



sacrifice. 1-aMna town immediately 

8554. Colonist. 

a WN1NUS AND LAWN HAMMOCKS 
• » Factory prices 720 FUtard E 0631 

n-H ENGLISH PAINTS AND MURE SCO 
Hickman Tye Hardware Co Lid O 8117 

/ SLASSICAL MUSIC "TORONTO CON- 
" aervatoryl, college kyooks. cap and 
rown, 4 piece Endlsh pottery and sterling 
■ilver tea aet. tome sterling silver and 
silver-plate flat pieces, fur collar, some 
unall articles 140 Michigan 81 

/ SLAM SHELLS MAKE BEST ROADS. 
^ paths, garag* floors. e ru „hed cannery 
shells. 15 00 ton Saaoku Canning Co 

Ltd . Sidney 

ELECTRIC 

Taylor As 



only I4j 387 Oarbally Hoad 

I ERSEY COW. HIGH TESTING. FOUR 
'> gallons Phone Belmont 27L 



4?B 



HORSI s 



I^OR 8/ 

■4 horse 



YATES - HOUSEKEEPING ANf 
bedroom* Reasonable E 3019 

NEAR CRYSTAL 



920 
7 » 1 



Ml 



I M I 4MMII II 



.) HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS. GROUND 
SIX-YEAR-OLD SADDLE "" Moor, one at front, light and weter. 

110 00 month 452 Chester Street 



SALE 

sound and gulet, good looker, 
or will trade for hay or straw Phone after 
5 10. E 2411 

SWADDLE HORSE FOR SALE McUKlDE. 
No * 



i-:e 



1 Bam. Willows 
.... v I » 



1 CLEARANCE SALE. USED 
" »?shers. bargains for cash 



Co . 728'v Fort 

SAMPERS 8UPPLIES 



pom 

< goat 



SALE 



OID YOU KNOW I'll A *> YOO CAN BOR- 
row 11.00 to 11.000 00 on your dia- 



monds. J*welrr or »nythlna of value at 
PACIFIC JEWELRY At LOAN CO 
Licensed Pawnbrokers 
1214 Broadjopp ColonUti Phon* O 272* 

I^CZEMa7 ITCH. PSORIASLS. LEO UL- 
cer* Try Geo Le* s Chinese Remedy 
831 Cormorant. Depart, and Drug Store* 



*- sugar and «yrup. 
ery. 1404 Douglas 3t 



Lilly* Cr.nfectlon- 
Phone 1S511 



T-IOR SALE. CHEAP GENTLEMAN S 
» *ln*le ticket to Calgary Phon* E 6973 



MONEY TO LOAN-J500. It 000. 11500 8 pm 

I nd »2.000. improved property only. <£w 

Hen -onable rsle of interi'st 11 O Dalby 39 
4c Co . Ltd , 834 View, opp Spencer's. 

\ 4 ONEY AVAILABLE FOR OAK BAV 
.'1 mortgages at lowest rate* Helstar- 
min. Forman At Company 

q^HE SALE OR PURCHASE OP AUTO- 
i mobiles financed on monthly payment*. 
Island Pinanc**. Ltd . 1112 Broad SL 



/ SAMPERS' 8UPPLIES. COTS. TABLE8. 
*- sro'ind sheets, bras. etc. F Jeun* ag 
Bro . Ltd . 570 Johnson 8t O 4832 

/ SALL US FOR PREE E3TIMA TES ON 
- repairs to all makea of electrlo wash- 

* oven to hold 250 loaves Equipment 1 No obl igat i on Phone O 75 11 

if required. Phone 0 4015. O 2242 «fter 



young, 
3287 Alder Street 



i'.f 



PURE-BRED 8AANEN 
he*\y milker Apply* 

DOOM 



»j ELMS AND APARTMENTS 
TO RENT 

\T MOUNT EDWARDS. 1001 VANCO0- 
rompletely furnished suite*. 



monthly 



WANTED TO Hi s r— 
MISCELLANEOi > 



32 



WANTED TO BORROW 



Co . «t Fort St 



A 

e nwi 



33 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



I N T E R NATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE 
1 Schools (Canadian!, Ltd, John Wood, 
agent. 707 Yates Street. Alr-condltloning 
Diesel, largest company In the world. 

T INK UP REGULAR INCOME FOR WIN- 
ter Phone O 4934. evenings 

f\VH EMPLOYMENT 8YBTEM IS NA- 
" " tion-wlde and free to men «ho qual- 
ify under th* Hemphill Training Mvstem 
Writ* tod«y for Diesel news. W McAllister. 
4n Yate* Street or phon* E 4041. I 2253 



SINGLE MAN FOR OENERAL FARM 
P work 120 per month and board Box 



SALESMEN FOR WELL-ESTABLISHED 



s 

onlst 



4^ y ANTED - TWO 



TWO 

women for special salea work New. 
selling line Olve phone number Box 



MCLEAN'S BAKERY. TWO STORES. 
1104 Douglaa St and 105 1 Pando ra A v* 

KEFINED. CHEERFUL PERSON OIVE8 
companionship afternoons, indoor or 
outings. 1100 nor.ing exner ence E 2875 

U'ATER DIVINKR. MEMBER CANADIAN 
Association of Dowsers, usint English 
method Everv Inratlon guaranteed to b* 
j on crown of spring D. All»n Downey. 
1 Deep Cove. Sidney, B C. 

U'E BUT STAMPS. OLD LETTERS AND 
envelopes Small lot* or collection*. 
What have vou* Balmoral Hotel. Suite 18. 

VOfR OWN CHARACTER AND AHILI- 
« ties written for you by name vibra- 
tion See what vnur name vibrates Tall 
afternoon*, or write. Viol*. 1341 Vlnint 
Street 



YOUR WFDDING INVITATTONS AND 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Printed In th* Newest Styleg 

WE ARE SPECIALISTS 

In AH Types of flutlonerr for Us* Befor* 
»nd After the Wedding 

• See Dg 

THI COLONIST 



IMBOSSED STATIONERY 

f)RIVATE STATIONERY EMBOSSED IN 
» any d**ign or color The Colonlit 
Commercl*! Printing Dept O arden 5241. 



rLooi si rf At in a 

FLOOR 



CO . 
O 7314 



707 



\7 L HARDWOOD 
* Johnson, reduced prices 

WESTERN FLOOR. 454 OOROI ROAD 
Old or new floors ebui., 



|>LACE SUITABLE FOR A SMALL BUSI- 
-4 ne:>* wanted Must be real snap Pull 
particular* must be sent to Mrs E. Mel- 
ton. 1522 Comox Street. Vancouver. B C 



40 FOR SALE— MIS 


» I 1 ANEOL'S 


40A BUILDING MX 


rr Kl \l 8 



(ir.NERAI, 1 I \MIN(. 



/ 1 ENERAL Teamlnr. Ploughing. Ezravat- 
VI i n g Fleldhouse. Craigflower P.O E 9601 



IM OMR TAX 



a A I.E S M f N AND At. I N IS 



To Exchange- Real Estate 

To Rent — Miscellaneous 
Unfurnished House* to Rent 
Unfurnished Rooms Wanted 

Wanted— Female Help 

Wanted— Mai* Help ... 
Wanted — MisreKsneou* 

Wanted to Borrow 

Wanted to Buy— House* 



•■■••••••••••a 

4 4)4) * ■ • 4)| 



Wanted to Rent— Houses. Unfurnished 67B 
Wanted to Rent— Mlscellaneoua 39 

Will irad* 11 

Wood u 

I 1)1 

RAPPER -On July 11. I93S. at the Jubilee 
Hospital. Lt -Col Henry George Napper. 
MC. of 424 Victoria Avenue, aged sixty- 
five vears and born in Chichester, flussex. 

- gng lariat — • ■ ■ — — ■ 

The remains are reposing at Hayward's 
MC. Funeral Company's Chapel, trom 



w 



ANTED SALESMAN CALLINO UPON 
hardware and **ra*es. to sell fast- 
selling product on commission State ex- 
perience and line* carried, to Box 8456, 

Colonist. 



1211 Broad Street 



Phon* O 5241 



Printing — Lithogr»phint 
Bookblndlne - I 



VT'RITK for book How to Recover Brlt- 
»» Ish Tax " Dtesperker. 311 Pemberton 



is, t ium K 



IRE AUTO INSURA! 
Frsser At Co. Ltd. 



SEE LEE 
isd Street 



LAWN HOH f RH 



AJ WORTH. 838 JOHNSON STREET 
, K7041. Try our new i*wn mower 
grinder An easy running Job assured 
Sharpen, adjust, collect and deliver. II 00 

I.M.VE8 BROS LAWN MOWER SHOP 
mower. |1 Pree del' y 1423 Broad. E 0682 
LITHOGRAPHING 



4 QUICK SALE OF OOOD USED LUM- 
* *• bet. aUsad, 2x4 an4 2*4, 1 x4 4 1 A. 
rlv* door*, furnace and wall register*, at 
1844 Fell Street Cheap, while It lasts 

p AN AD LAN W*»UrnWood workeri. Sashea. 
KJ door* and general mlllwork G 4013 

THE MOORE- WH1TTINGTON LUMBER 
COMPANY. LIMITED 
Established 1891 
T AROE 8TOCK3. RIGHT PRICES Lum- 
*J ber. mlllwork. gyproc m**onlt*. 
shingles. *tc 

You ar* cordially Invited to visit our 
MODEL KITCHEN at Bridge and Hillsid* 

OUR BUSINESS IS BUILT UP BY 
SAT ISFIED CUSTOMERS 

I UMBER SPECIALS - SUITABLE FOR 
s^ Summer rimps home repairs, altera- 
tions Garden seats, builders hardware, 
paint Bhawnigan Lumber Yds 2000 Gov t 

YEW DOOR8, 2 FEET UY 6 FEET. 1124 
^ each, one or four-panel, delivered at 
Victoria: also English shingle stain. II 00 
per gallon WUliama. 45 Cordova Street 
W . Vancouver 



SIDNEY SPEEDY SERVICE 

U1 HAVE LUMBER In stock at attrac- 
tive prlcea suitable for building — 
chicken houses, wood sheds, bsrn* and 
garage* 

Call In 



DO NOT TRl AT YOUR 
PRINTING 
AS JU8T ANOTHER EXPENSE 

KVERY plec* of printed matter 
that Uaves your office carriea 
a message Emphasise that mes- 
•ag* by th* us* of qutlity printing. 

THE COLONIST 

1211 Bro*d 8tr*et Phone O 5241 

^•e 

Printing— Uthogr«phlng 
liriokhlndlnk-Eaaravlna 



I4ELOIAN GRIFFON PUPPIES. Ql'ICK 
I» salt Reasonable, healthy. 114 
Berkley O 1468 ' 

l/KIR SALE 3 BLACK COCKER SPAN- 
T lei pup*. 5 months. 1 Red. 8 months, 
good hunting do< *n Black and White. 2 
months. 1 Scottie Phone E2413 alter 5 10 

r,-MNE SELECTION WIRES. SCO ITIE8 
cockers Prices right Nitlnat Ktnnel*. 
th* Candy Bar. East Saanich Road. Royal 
Oak 



I^ULL LINE SHIRLEY S FAMOU8 ENO- 
*- Hah dog and rat remedies Bole aients. 
Pet Shop. 1411 Douglas 81 O 5731 

PARLOR DOG SHOW. SATURDAY. 
August 14. at "Drumadoon." Cadboro 
Bay. auspices Victoria City Kennel Club. 
Phone Mrs. B Davidson, aecretary, a 4978. 
for further Information. 

l)UP««B-PB»r*ft*1> FOX TERRIERS. 
1 Colllea Also Airedale .log. one year 
old. Other dogs Reasonable. Pelland. 
Queens and Douglas O 0088 
I^MPIRE TYPEWRITER. SPLENDID MA- — 

chine, standard keyboard. IIS Bog I I > EO ISTER ED SMOOTH FOX TERRIER. 



also unfurnished; 
E 4922 or O 41=1 

\IISA. 520 COOK - BEST MODERATE 
priced two-room furnished and unfur- 
nished suites in Victoria: nice location! 
close to town, fully modern E 0981 

\VAILABLE JTJNI 1— MODERN, FRIO- 
I dal re. 2 bedrooma. ovrrlooklnf park, 
facing south Norgrov* Apta. P*rk Boule- 
vard at rook 

A TTRACTIVE DOUBLB~ SUITE, NICELY 

«» lurnishe.l private bath Th* Nor- 
mandie " E 6284 

A furnl»hed. 'af" "a^Mou™ Doua'ua. 
E 4622 



8825. Colonist 



for 149 00 E 4556 



I.-'ASY VACUUM CUP WASHER. SACRI- 
I ^ ftre 

L^tiR SALE — 18-IN TABLE LOOM. COM- 
I plete also parts of large loom. etc. i 4»B 
Phone E1S82 »fter 5 pm 



IV best blood lines Phone E 7497 

WANTED — PAIR COCKER SPANIFIJs 
S'nte color, price and age Box 4541. 
Colonlit. 



\ PARTM EN TS — FURNISHED 2 
room*, from 112 50 to 114 00. 1441 
Pandora Phon* owner. B 3444 

ATTRACTIVE THREE ROOMS AND 
* * b«th, newly decorated gas r*n*», closgt 
to sea and park. 115 O 1181. or 144 Cook. 

SUITE 3 DELIGHTFUL 
henette: very moderate 
real. Leov o* mstve 14J9 V\n»n* 0 77*0. 



V TTRACTIVE 
room* tnd k 
■•at LeOv < 

\T MAYF 
rent ve 



FAIR, UNFURI 
ry reaaonable 



R 4 ft BIT'S 



.-«OH 



3AIX TENT. 10 X 

2143. 



11, PHONE 



O 2515 



and Get Our Figure on It 

8IDNEY LUMBER 

2114 Government Street 



IITHOORAPHINO - LITHOORAPHINO. 
J engraving and embossing Nothing too 
large and nothing too small. Your station- 
ery la your advanr* agent Th* Colonlit 
Printing At Publishing Co. Ltd 



14 



4 N OPENINO FOR FOUR GIRLS AS 
■* » students in oldest established h»ir- 



dressing school In Victoria Practical 
training under expert supervision I^arn 
a profession that will bring good return*. 
Vinori* Halrdresalng School, Woolworth 
Bid*. Low fee. easy terms 

PKRMANENTS 
Haircuts. Flnarr Waves. Marcels You 11 
be pleased with our students' work 

I eyVPABLE COOK -OENERACr SLEI I' IN. 
' lond of children Reference. Box 8."i43. 

Colonist 



•l \ HAIRDRESSERS AND 
BEAL'l i SFECIALI>^ 



4 TTRACTIVE PERM . reasonable Indfvld- 
»a ual attention. Bobette Salon G 4853. 

I I AIR DRESS UNO IN YOUR HOME Ex" 
*4 perienced operator Emp.r* 7503 

I DEAL Beauty Bhoppe. 1004 Hillside, cor- 
*- ner Quadra: no el»c permanents a 1614 

KNOW THE COMFORT OF A REALLY 
beautiful prrmanrnl that only experts 
and new machines can alee 

CHATTON BEAUTY SALON 
104 Woolworth Bid* F. 3641 

Not connected with school in sain* building 

UR VAPOR SYSTEM IS IHE MOST 



PLBLIO STEN'OGRAPID R 

T^THEL SEYMOUR. 2 0 7 CAMPBELL 
4-< Building. Don.'laa Street Phon* 
O arden 2. 26 Authors' manuscript*, law 
and eeneril Strictly ronf uui.tlal 

WINDOW GLASS 

\I T INDOW O L A 8 S REPLACED AT 
shortest notice Auto glass replaced 

Shile you wan Mdlor Br s . Ltd 
roughlon 8treet. Phone O 5021 



819 



0 



J 1 r NrRAL 



modern and efficient method of per* no 'hort length* Never in water 



mother with three children, three miles 
from Sidney, on bus line wsies fifteen 
ral service, will take place on ' d"»»f» » month Applv Box 8498. ColonlsT 
Monday, July 37, at 2 I> pm. and Inter- 



ment will be made in the Roval ouk Burial 
Park. 

LABEROK *On Saturday morning. July 35. 
share pasted away at 8t Joseph s Hos- 
pital. Oeorge Laberie. aged thirty -six 
years, born in Quebec and a resident ol 
Book* for the past fifteen years H ere 
survive his widow and one dnu,:r, 1 
Louise, at the family re at dW net two 
brothers. Lionel and Chailes, in ajgtskt, 
and a sister. Mrs J Borlieau, In Quebec 
The funeral will lake plae* on fu< day, 
July 28, the curtege leaut.a tht c iml - 
Morttiary, Lid . at t 40 o'clock, and ten 



Is 



[ AtnDRESSINO 



ENROLL NOW FOR PALL 

GRADUATION 



Indlv.duai Instruction - 1 
Call or Write 



ssy Terms 



MOI.FR HAIRDRES8INO SCHOOL 
Room 208 110* Douglas Street 



ESFOMSIBLX 
two weeks 



...nu.ea -later M.ss, will be celebrated W ,„,; , )l(v 

■t Andrew a cathedra l lithl houstwbrk, > »r • 1 

CHO.HHMW St trXfam.iy r« • 11 ""* r ° lonl,t 



Griffiths; Strfet. 
day rn*Vi 



sttee 

rmiiL 



Victoria West, on Ptl 
en Crnssman, ns-d 
ventv vtilne M'ais. belovi d wife of Wil- 
liam CrOMmOn The late Mrs CfOI - 
man Whs h, rn I 1 Devunahlie, Endand. 
and had l"'»ii 1 resident Of Ull 
for the past eighteen years She is 
mourned by. bes'ies btt husbaivl. even 
sons, Thomas- Tuffnell. of Altadena, 
Calif : two son* In England, a sou in 
Chicago, a son in New Zealand, and 
two sons in Victoria, and one daughter. 
Mts Alice FM "iids. of- Victoria, also a 
sister in to* Angeles, Calif 
The funeral will take place on Monday 
afternoon liotn M.tnll Br., I 
Home nt 2 in o'clock Adjutant L Ed* 
Writ crnmirt the service.- aftrr which in 
terment will be made in Colwood Burial 
Park 



Vni NO WOMAN FOR 
Bummer apartments on 
he able to cook, 
»i> children, sleep 



manent waving Using no machine and 
don* without electricity You feel no heal 
or weight Cut* tuna in half, quicker than 
» marcel Lasts longer than any other 
perm, and the Mleea ar* reasonsoit for 
Usla beautiful soft oil wart Push up or 
tight curl* Tne demand for this system 
s great, so plei.se make your appointment 
I.ar-'r.uue Beauty Salon. Fletcher Building. 
1110 Douglas Street O 7441 

ONLY FULLY -QUALIFIED ASSISTANTS 
trained in the true Tyrrell tradition 
of unvarying excellence attend you at 
MAISON TYRRELL S. the hairdm ■- 
in-' IM lallatt in David Spencer a 
Phone E 4141 

4 f ICTORIA BEAUTY PARIXJH8 
' F. 8)15 for * good permanent All «g- 
perienced opt 



WOOD AND COAL 



1X8 V-JOINT. 115 00. DOORS, FROM 
4. II 50 each, cedar fence posts. 15c and 
board*. 113 00. flooring and V-Jo>nt 
short lengths. 115 00 and up ' Every- 
thing for building at lowest price* " Jt. 
A. Oreen Lumber Co. G 7614 

40O rtUMTI'RE 

/ s H ESTER FIELD SETS (TEN OF THEM — 
KJ never been used>. *ny style or cover, 
■ t H. nne, storage Co . Wharf Bt Caah 
or terms. Amazing prices 

f AST CALL FOR HOUSEHOLD EF- 
feru. including kitchen aet. radio, 
caipet. small oak desk. Hoover cleaner and 
sundries. Any reasonable offer Phone 
E 3494 

SPLENDID CHESTERFIELD SUITE. RUO 

...J. 0 n '» ,rl '' a " »•* new. Reasonable 
E 49^9 No dealers 

rj^HR EE- PIECE C'HFSTER FIELD SUfTt 
. "Pholstered in good-wearn a tapestry. 
157 50 Holland Bros. 713 Fort Street 
K o • : 1 



t BIO SALE-DRY INSIOE BLOCKS 
- a n ued with bark slabwood Irom Dun- 
can All fir. no cedar or hemlock. 13 . n.. 

no 

knots, no pitch Beats cordwoo.l Ready 
fw oascmrn: Re. |4 35 now 13 25 cd.. 
2 cas 16 25 Two week* only OK Fuel 
in O 



\BARCJ 
, Other 




JJ 



tl)L( A I ION \l 




nUSIVESS, RADIO AND PR 
courses of study Day 
classes Sprott-Shaw School 



A 



J OR tOO - rJOUB* WfNIXjVVS 
cleaned outside 4c each O 5021 

I NKED WORK. ANYTHING IN CAR* 
• pentering building, repairs shingling, 
st pr.res you can afford to pay E 6776 

\l AN WANTS ROOM AND IVi \RD IN A 

»»I ataatj Itotn* la Victoria m exchange 
for »or» for a couple ol months Write 

II .s , ..a c. ..:„• 1 



( 



sOAfHIN( i 



FKFSr II 



Ppone E 2301 



IPARATORY 
tnd evening 
E 7184 

A Nil Of.HMAN 
rris moderate 



I.AN- 
or 



4 SOACHING. StrPPLEMFN TALS. 
' guinea and bnokkcepun o 
Box 8502, Colonist 

I/XPERT COACHING IN FRENCH. OF.R- 
I ' man, Italian 



Phone Mdrn 
1120 Ma, 

t'NIOR MAT.RIC 
rxperirnced teac' er 



Vlvenot, 



AND 

dry inside block mixed with 
slabs from Duncan. Hillcre.t and Mayo 
mills, cutting ties and big timber Stov* 
length, ready to burn, got* twice as far 
as millwood. reg 14. now |3 2S .' cds 14 
Sole agent HiJIcr-st and Mayo Bros O lull 

4 NOTHER BIO SALE DRY INHIDE 
4a blocks m.xed with b»r* slcbwood. 
from L'p-Island mill. <1 11 cd . 3 cds . 19 60 
Has never been in water ''->n ild R Hop- 
kin* Wood At Coal Co. E 7914 

A BARGAIN wioKi -Ml FIE WLAjH 
» » nnx"d inside bloiks. guaranteed 12- 



\\ "ANTED IMMEDIATELY. FOR CLIENT 

»' *ny qu»ntlty of real good furniture 
!or spot c«sh QUALITY befor* PRICE 



ny qu»ntlty of real good furniture. 
AI.ITY befi 
First Consideration 

Phone O 4424 " " " ' 
Wll.lnws PU1WMAN CO 
T05 Johnson Btreet 
FTsCStor* Up From Dou*l*s Street 



L'OR HIRE— HOSPITAL BEDS. WHEEL 
4V chair*, table*, ttc 3514 Douglas E 374] 

/ J ENERAL ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR. 

" Monitor top. one year old. Large ra- 
pacity Wa* 1330 A bargain at 1335 
Kent *. 441 Yatea St 

/ J ENUINE CROWN DERBY BET. REA- 
"4 sonable. nice wedding present, also 
diamond rings Box 84S7, colonist 

/ s UARANTEED USED 8EWINO ~ MA- 
chines from 110 00 Smgtr Sewing 

M»chin*^Co. 724_Y»tes Street. 

/ JOOD USED WASHING MACHINES, 
119 50 up Jameson Electric Ltd E 1171 

/ J ENUINE JERSEY MILK. 10 QTS IL 
" Early delivery O 5044 or Albion 44P 

I IQUOR kegs. Barrels, churns, washma- 
4^ chines repaired. Wilkinson, cor Oorg* 
and Wash 

/ SWN YOUR OWN TYPEWRITER PORT- 
4 » able*. 145 00 and up Term* »r- 
ranged Remington. Rand. Ltd . 921 Oor- 
don Street O 4011 

rlRTABuT SONORA - PHONOORAPH. 
With records, like new. 17 50 Empire 
t raw write?, good condition. 17 00 Lady* 
rldin* habit and boots. Th* Exchange. 860 
Yates Btret E 5736 

I9HOTO FINISHING, AMATEUR DEVEL- 
4- oping and pontine, all site*. 16c. ex- 
pert camera .-epalra 

ART CENTRE 

T4J Fort Btrtet 

I RECONDITIONED VACUUM~CI.FA.NERS 
IV from 17 60 electric rantt. 125. spot 
*«•. arc welder. 195 electrlo Irons. 
0 7431 Malnwarlnt. 733 Fort Phone 

KECONDITIONED EIOINS. WALTHAMS. 
Westflelds. previously taken In trade, 
at less than half prk-t JOSEPH ROSE. 
LTD . 1011 Government Street 9 

RINO. ~ll 
Any r*«- 
Box 8523. Col- 



.) LARGE DOES AND NINE YOUNG It AB- 
— bits for sale 12 50 E 9503 



1 \ 



A 1 



MIM III \SK)I S 



BOUT THREE ACRES OF OATS, 
heavy crop. 180 Santster. Mount 
Douglaa Crnerroad. near Blenklnsop Road 

/ s ANARIES - OUARANTPED SINOPRS. 
" 12 50 each also lovebirds, bantams. 
Plgeorts. tame rats, guinea nigs Ref.on- 
able Petland. Queens and Douglas O f068 

LVJR BALE \ TON WELL-CURED HAY. 
* 15 00 Ftrst-rlasg for goats Box 8434. 
Colonist 

I I AY. AROt'T IH TONS IN BARN. TO- 
-4 1 gether n'>h (04*1 pssture feed. 1110 
Box 8'24. ColonUt. 



APARTMENT. UNFURNISHED, 
rooms, bath. Inland. O 7916. 

A TTRACTIVE 8UITE.1— Savoy ManalonC 
£V Fur., serviced, unfur ; central O) 

A TTRexCTIVE SUITE. Ft'RNISHED 
. » unfurnished 140 linden Ay*. 

A LVIN- MODERN. HEATED FUR APT4L 
'» Das: two block* town 1009 Johnson. 

"Next Door to Erarythlna In Town* 
BEVERLEY HOTEL APARTMENTS 
724 Yale* StreL off fjjouglaa 
I >RAIItIE EXCURSIONISTS. ATTENTION! 
4 —Bedrooms, houtakeplna room* and 
suite* by day. week or month. Oas. light, 
water, beat, etc . free. 

JAS A GRIFFITH. Prop O 0374 



KLWIL 



AITS 

furnish* 



TWO 



AM) TI1REE- 

(1 0220. 



u 

n RIGHT HOME-LIKE SUITES. TOURIST 
accommodation 446 Prince**. G 0160. 



47 



BOOM AND HOARD 



\MOST COMFORTABLE ROAKD-RKHI- 
dence. permenenla or transients 
Home rook.n*. 1 baths 040 Fairfield 
Roed._ E4592 

AT BEATON HALL LUXURIOU8~AO- 
commodatlon cuisine unroualltd Tabl* 
tuett* accepted Mr* Roundlnt E 1481 

AT 410 DALLAS ROAD-BOARD AND 
• a residence, a, so afternoon tea* and 

dinner* served 

AT 1441 ELPORD 
^ V room with hoard 

4 PRIVATE HOMe7 WITH GOOD 
t% board: Fairfield di strict E 0498 

AT ffUNNT BRAE — Comfortable rooms 
and horn* cooking 851 Burden Ave 

nftARD-RESIDENCE — HOME PRIVI- 
leges Good tabl* Reasonshi* 1007 



ELL APTB 

nfurnislu 



1017 COOK — 1 ROOMS, 
d. heated, bath. O 1462 



B 
( ? 

V> One single, on* very attractu* 
Reasonable Q 4052 



/ SOMKORI ABLE »TRN1SHKD THREE- 
" ' room suite*. 111. 116. Tranatents' 



SOM FOR I Mill. 

J room st 
commodate 1 501 Montreal 

1 .UCHEBB AITS — UNIQUE 4-ROOM 
I " suite no stenv very convenient, 
tlate rent E 8940 



IT — FURNISHED 
garat* O 3440 



I/HJR UNFt:HNlSHED APARTMENTS AP- 
r ply at Th* Royal Trust Co. 1203 Out- 
eminent St E4I26 We hav* a good se- 
lection of 1 and 4-room suite* In th* city 
and o*k Bay pric** rangina from 124 
to 140 per month 

I^URNISHED FOUR - ROOM MODERN 
I suite, bathroom, waterfront ait*. Ten 
Mil* Point. Cadboro Bay. uae of lara* ear- 
dens and tawns O 4137. after 1pm 

lst'HNIBHED FLAT. QUADRA APAR t 
I menta. 116. Empire Realt* Co. inna 
Broad 



VJACRIPICI I8K DINNER 
** diamonds, largest *» carat 
sorable price accepted 

otii't 



yJAI Y tjf USES ELECTRIC WMHERA 
k ^ HI snd up Taylor Ac Co. 731's 
Fort Street — 

V^EE OUR WAIXPAPERS BEFORE BUY- 
»~ >ng our pric** art rltht Harte-An- 



Colllnson E 1234 

g <OM PORTABLE HOME. OOOD BOARD. 

* offered bv Udy --lose to bus rout*. 

• 4 00 per week Bog 8632. Colonist 

/ 40M FORT ABLE BOARD - I'rWIDENCE f 
" J near sea. Oak Bay E Tjss ; 

( 



HARROGATE APARTMENTS. 1204 
Beech Driv*. Oak Bay. fully fur- 



SOMFXIRTABLK ROOM-BOARD NEAR 
car rlty reasonable 505 Gov't St 

r^AIRFirLD WII L GIVE ROOM AND 
board to boy 1 heap Apply Box 1577. 



in . never in salt water 1 cd 
15 40 Agent for Kapoor M l: 



It tl 2 cd* . 
Ltd . E 9111 



A I FIR SCREENED SAWDUST. I j Op } 
unit*. 15 0<) lor 2 cord* No I fir ojill- 



Bl PPL1 M FN TALS 
O 6502 



< \IU» OF IIIWKs 



To the Sl.ters »nd nurses of st Joseph's ! 

Hospital who so kindle and lootigly nllr^ed 
and rsred (or my wife during her Isst I 

Mines, and to the many friends who have 1 \"oi No MAN : , good FDUCAIIoN 
written and otherwise expressed their «sm- 
pathv. I herehi tender mv sincere and 
grateful thanks — Geo P Emerson 



1IARKIKD MAN CAPABLE 4 ROUND 
*'' l'> '• rv *, r sr., re. l.a'idv with tools. 

can operator, or truck O 5214 ATRlcm^TION supps . MATH* AND 

MOCK WORK. EXCAVATING DITi'H -'I ehemstry R Bianco. B A . E 4740 
U a t,m ° U,flt stump* j s^j ATR1CULATTON M 

Koo.MS KALK}MINaTD 11 it papfr- 1 ' t»u«bt 
_ hanttng. painting, O M7I I » f 



O 4496- 



ATKS for SUP- 

O 108? 



wood, insld* fir. 14 00 
Colwood Wood Co. G 4044 

4 SPECIAL— DRYLAND MILLWOOD^ I 
' a cord All fir slab, never in 
12 50 rord. hone dry, lion F. 6532 

A SPECIAL SALE fOUIOD 
kindling 43 75 cd Four week* 
Oenearl* Wood Co E3I42 

A BPFCIAL SALE DRY CEDAR WOOD! 
• 1 II 31 < d on.y I 3182 

nIO SNAP FROM SOOKE DRYLAND— 
MHlwotKj. never been n water mixed 
with insid* block, everv stick guaranteed 
Douglas nr. easy to split. I] 85 cord, over 
three cords 12 75 split wood. »2 85 rord. 
bone dry blo -ics. it 60 Famous Putt Com* 
psny Phone day or night. E 2924 

pE.Tr HEAD SAWDUST FROM MALA- 
■ > hit Tit Mil:*. 1126 per 9 Ml J E 



Colonist 

|/MtONT BED-SITTING ROOM REAS7TN 

4 abla 

/SORIKIN HEAD AT 
4 1 g ies's Albion 37 Y 

yJOL IIMIY BI'tMJY. CHEAP FOR CASH ! I ADY OFFFRfl NICELY FURNIBHFD 
G *»64 I 4 bad or bed «itt ,n*-room good board. 

<HINC»L4T*i XXX,\X S.TAR 
k^ ir,.es Dslnel Box Co O 
Ml -|( 41 DsfRl MFSfS j eprNT 4X6X3. NEARLY NEW. 

41 IHFNTIC ANTIQUE. FAMILY SEVEN ' 

•» S' neratiott*. Arolinn harp « eg () i J i..,.te. 



Il'ALNUT SECRETAIRE AND II. >, iK • 

»* rase. 144 i tenor hanjo 'like nev. 1. 119 



E 3325 



drews p«m 



Ul View Bt O 47IS 



wir.d-played music 1 Heard. 
ho>-yah. Cadboro B.iv 



'egfjui . 

Camp Kla- 



4 s RLE BR AT I D CONN B FLAT CORNET. 

* ri'sriv new co t » I2r.. E 7688 

l^OR SALE TENOR BANJO l ilt #1 NT 

4 ' 11 er| one month Offer>' G 6637 



IlIANO AC 

4 120 bas 



RDtON, NEW. IN CASE. 
I lAVtl treble 203A 



bark alabs 13 60 Woolworth Bulldlnt. call 13 to 8, 
1 1 

IjMALL OROAN, SUITABI.F HOR " 

sion hall or homt. txrelltoi tone: 
• 37 50 a:4> ant Tie naby trj»iu p, .1,0, 
in rovewocji The Exchange. 000 Yateg 
Street E .)726 



\' ACUUM 
dsy 01 



,eet 



CLEANER FOR 
weeg We drliv. 
Phon* Empire 1723 



RENT IT 



board 428 Vancouver St rT 7J44 
BEACH PAYING 



reasonable 1030 Johnson Street O 7456 

I4RIVAIE ROME PERMANENT OR 
transient Low fates, wholesom* food 
Near beach. park Walking 
Oerete P 0?98 



distance ' 



THE GROVE 966 BANK 
with or without me»ls 



E MM 



STREET ' 
Oak Bay 



AN ATTRACTIVE 
LABEL 

ON YOUR^OOODS 

U'ILL arrest tht stten'.on of the 
bnvint public We exerute any 
design or combination of colors 

Se» our Bam idea 



I IK 



booms ro ill vr 



IINOLE ROOM, 
pplv <» 4447 



' I ".si : . 
1 sale 
Irom 160 



4 BMAII. Bt'ITE r)R 
- * beautiful location 

IHE CECIL HfjTEL 
I4RIOHT OUTSIDE R'jIjMS. REASON 
I » ahie rate* 1173 Blansfiard 

/ ILOfli JAMES BAY tliliru .69 1 1 in- 

' atltO co-y roOmi gltdhenette E 4785 

E RFCONDITIONED PIANOB ON Mi Phon* O Mil ' V™"1»H™*j(,tl. IKjV.WAT f f. 114 AT 

le this week All mskes. prlrtt 1 



THE COUJNIST- 



lit 



It »M«III l> 



nlshed. exclusive E 9551 

I OWER DUPIJtX. F1V4? ROOMS. VH- 
*i furnished, two hardwood floor*. Pair- 
I., adulu only E 6487 

\ I ANOR MANSICJNS— VACANCY ELKO- . 
.»! trie equipment Beeutiful view* and 

locality 0 6I24 

\'EW, MODERN FOUR- ROOM Bt'ITE^ 
Unfurnlabed. Ridbsu Apt* 417 64V 

0 2810 

ONE. TWO AND THREE-ROOM APART* 
merit* All morlerii roiivenieiues pri- 
vate entrances, furnished or urifurnl'sli <l; 

■orroundiiigs. have to b* seen to 
t>e appreciated, within walkina distance to 
n »n It 1 '. i'ti reasonable 5a Menxlea 
St Phone OMM between II and 7. 

t SRC HARD HOUSE APAHIMENTB 611 
' ' Michigan Bt Close to boat* and park. 

rl-an. < on. for' able suites, lots of hot water, 
gas and leieprVerif Phon* E 5710 

4 |M VAC ANCY. 'PARK MANSIONS" 
' ' Ml N P*rk. large, fully furnished, 
.private bath: moderate rental E 4073. 

1 * NFI.'HNISIf El 
\ ^'otJf ■ . fe i.,e 



f F.D 
ed 

4«n Onn e Road 



A'.D FURN1BH* 

lat. 114 up. rede, orated. 



rNFl'RNIBHED 
heat, rlean. 



I RO 'M 

modern 



APT . H W. 
I III Y.te*. 



P«int*r A Sons 417 Cormr 



O 3/.4I 



I IM HAL DIKK TORS 



THOMSON FUNFRAL HOME 

Established 12U 

ttm Quadra Bt Nest First rnt'ed Church 
Baautrrul Draw.ng-Room Chspei 
Ladv Assistant 
* Finer Service. Nowhere a 

Fairer Price 

O 3411 Day er W ight 

DUttBctivt , Fiin.raj Servte* in Our Ntw 
Mortuary at Mnderatt Cost 
Experienced Lady Attendant 
SANDS MORTUARY LTD 

Phone. 17411. O 1510 1801 Q„ d r. St 



1 -hint 

'xp rienr.- including busim-.s. oranite 
sales, ,'ore work, requires employment for olenairley. East Booke 
Butoti'er month*, in or ojir of town Will- 
ing to ta. klr anv sound proposition Box 
4i4fl Colonist 



MF.ftHFR 'MA. C AM BR IIX..F. 
Aeardemtc Certificate . expert 
FTe-eh, Ijstln, History 2051 
Street E7.88 During July, 



trOt NG MAN DESIRES JANITORS PO- 
I sltion 84MfTtneM interior decorator 
plumbing 



RATWARDS BC FUNFRAL CO. LTD 
Eatsbltshed 1447 
T>4 Brouehton Str^eL Victoria B O 

■ mptre 1614 . O arden 7f79 

Oardtn 7481 |mpirc sou 

MrCALL BROS. 
Tht Floral Funeral Horn*" 
Office and Ch*p*l Cor Johnaoo and 

Vancouver 8treeu 

Phone O arden 3011 



of 



IT* fMIMIRs 4 VI 



or 

carpentry 



KOYAl tJUSINF.-lS COLLEOE. 1008 OOV^ 
-rnmeee* Phone G 6014 t W S*«er 

SUPPLEMENTAL FX AMB~ TUTORING 

►~ Tor Dcpanxent of Education supple-, 
mental' examinations bv .successful ||R 1 1 special 
teacher Rittes t.'ncte r ,.a Phon* E 4344 
or call at 1612 Rl. hmonri Avenue 



4 SORDWOOD SAWN. ONE CORD 75C: i 
4. cords II 30 Phone E 6402 

4 SAMEBON .1 DRY KINDLING." II *4 CD 
Semi-dry edglpca. 12 50 cd E 4136 

hRY SLAB II 7» 1 CDS , |7 00. DRY- 
land, lino cd inside 4 00 cd neavy 
s'ao. 1115 cd rrillwood. 12 50 cd . I eda. 
14 71 Guaranteed all Douglas Br Dt*- 
rributors Selkirk Lumber Co s Wood O »114 




r. Mia 



Fletcher Br, 

RADIO 

MfJDEL RADIO, 
sale. 120 Like 



>rint:n* -Lithographing 
Bookbinding- Engravlnt 



|«|Q|i RADIO* FOR HIitF. BY WEEK OR 



Stor*. 1121 Oov't St O 4722 

•"ft sic rn r « *Nii M'.o.kt vci.ra 

Koy s sUCTCLE. 4UZI 
1114 Pandora Avenue 

/ ' YCLE AS A MEANS CJP 

4-/ -no finer way to emoy your not ... 
or to get to ape] fronr eork New maehints 
from 129 75 to |s,o Bold o* rnnvtnient 
tern.s Robinson a 1220 Broad St opp 



NICE TONE. , :s .. .... 1 , 

V ,.- V\'Af'H IHH SPACE. FOR BAROAINS 
»» r«'!vi beautiful radio cabinets. II 15 
es.n. one electric radio. 112 60. cell 
• 14 75 pair Oeldllassea. 
bottles. 29c radio tubes. 
49r tl jl watches tor 15c, lartt telescopes. 
1175 Glllese* rarors. with *lx blideg. 49c. 
;ong oiocl* padlocks. I4c. taillithts. 15c. 
33-70 IIH60 ' , P" :t «o"es to su.i any »l*hl. 13 71 Aaron- 

P 1966 '" n ' <* u '.Ha U '"4 

I Jol.nson St 

RELAX A7 li 



*' walkint distance Rea.onahle rent, 
board if desired Oarage' 41.1 Mo<a Bt 

r'IRNISnED ROOMS OR SUITES TO 
re: t from 13 60 weeg:, „p New Una 
:*nd H otel Ijli Oovernm-nt O 6440 



TWrPDHMUIR MANSIONS 
4 'ICTORIA S newett apartment building. 
4 rorrer of Heywood Avcr.u* *nd P»rk 
Boulevard, opposit* Beacon Hill Park A 
distinctive building with large. *«nny and 
well-tlsnfied suites A private entrance 
fr . n the street to each suite On* or two 
•orris, all electrical kitehenettea. Indl- 
vldusfl refrigerators, hardwood floora. fire- 
place's Available August 1. furnished at 
unfurnished Your Inspection Is cordially 
Invited Apply 0 M Porre.t. phona I 46 4 4. 
or E4I24. or at the bulldlnt 



HOTEL DOt'GI AS 
IS OFFER INO FETRFMFI Y I OW BATES 
I for transient and permanent eu*»ts 

Inspection invited 

V'lCE LARGE ROOM. SUIT ABIE TOUR, i : ~ 

I or 01 next peotde. close i,, i„« n \\'A'.' 
.►>.' E 11*4 4 4 



41'E.TTHOIJdE HOTEL I4J7 GOV'T, 
vv N'wly deenra'ed apartmenta, fur» 
otahegL unfurnished, greatly reduced rate*. 

» M ATH AND 4.PARTM ENTI 

v\ \s 11 b 



( ■ 



4 * 



/I CM BICYCLES. Ill 50 TO 127 60 BI 
4 • o-irs repaired W* al«o our ola bi- 
cycle* »rd p*rtv A»rori«ons Cut-RaU 
Store 13:6 Gov t St O 4722 



\\'i:or-S AND HAMMERS. BAWB AND 

• * p?m 1-. s,w mandre 



df'.ls Prices reasort- 
V Met»ls. Ltd. 1832 
B C 



BOOMS \\ Willi 
I M' 8M«HI n 



'n fd 



P' e. n e n 8175 



BMAIJ. FURNISHED APART- 
r week, yesponsibl* people. 



HOI M s IO M N I 



■ : s 



navisHrii 



4 4* A. .LP 4 1'f.R BALE NOW ON LOWEST 
»» price, on window riasa in city Dry 
' • re : ,,« , , if ..er;*w umber, etc . 

UU off J J Rosa A Sons - 711 pandora 



>k <>b sums 



A 

lor 



)M PAPFRFD WITH 8UNWORTHY 
per from 16 Won t fade I 4545 
iple* Paii.'.ng at low rate* 



I7C 0ARPFNTFR4 AND CONTRACTDRA 



J!l 



LOST 4.M) IOI ND 



D 

m* 



Y MILLWOOD. 12-IN 
• 1. I ed . 12 00. TTd* 
t. 88M 



4-DAY FPt- 
14 00 Mov- 



V 



4 LTFRATTONS. HnUSFRAISINO CON, 
'» reta work, repairs O Regan O 7647 

n ;:s8 



j >! 1IJJINO 

II 



Al l (.RATIONS 



Roof Rk- 
yettl 4 9"t* 



1," '■:> LEATHER HANDBAG 

4 may have same by Identifying 



I^IRBT OROWTH CORDWOOD ANY 
l*ngth. from our own timber limb*. 
OWNER 1 bark. knot*, etc 



OR BALE HARLKY TWIN. A I SHAPE. 



Ply Wheeler, r o Th* D»:ly Coloni 
OBT 



sr 



J Albion E 7663 



I 

cont 
chai 
par t 



1EPAIRED. EX- 
h antes E 4270 



st /~1 UARANTEED ALL DOUOLAt fill 12 60 

.i»r»«~»~i / or<1 * rnTliy 14,0 Bone-dry 1, js 
WHITE Pt RBE. PFnitAPS AT > cord 'ns'd. block. 14 00 rh.rk slabs 13 50 
S'reet Gener»l Warehouse, cord dfvltr.d 13 35 eord Bhawnigan 
led posts! note, small Douglas Ce E 1914 Agar,'* Selkirk Lura 
rter may keepi and com- rw*4) Co 

4V4M4WM* vahie P,e.„ OT-tBLkHv SI^ B -.T~ROI> 

■J> I . I • I rers Wood Co S nh* wt O 2214 



I^OR BALE firPT. 8 BK YCI.p. IN r.X 
4 relien* ronditlcr. Price |24 Pi. on* 
C1 7340 

KIDING HHfF lin WHIPCORD WITH 
le»ther facinrs. Le athey helmet, site | » 
l*cket with sheepVfTn lining and collar 



• I RECONDITIONED frr BOX FB VF 

- di no v.,e Mch 1" 0 1 reconditioned 
let bos l*rte slge metal. 114 50 1 re- 
rge sue. metel Mike 
IIt.M 1 Ransette new. 129 50 
e operktes from .'21 volt* Third 
d hi s Bav C'omp 



I ADY NEEDS TWO RTCS CONNECT IRQ 

I 4 r -,- . , o- ■ i.rieei ROTHMI. Col ' \ «VP ti'KiMrn B' NOAI/1W. CT/TBB 

oni*t . i |^V..m ri 1003 

_ " II 4H . MOW. FIVE ROOMS. WITHIN 

, l» Rye mibutes wtlk of OMf Hall 

I O 1017 

. - > 

I 



fthis ranai 
I .r _Hu 



K D *oru-, 



t« spotlight 



F MM 



F 7814 



i't> pm MBiNf, i\n nniiM, 

\ "ICTORIA PLUMBlWo CO REPAIRS 
* sTtd contracts, reasonable pricea Q 1S53. 



SIM ITIONI VV \ N'T ED— 
HM M l- 



S J CURRY A SON 
Funtral Director* 

and Brouthton Stretu 
Phont 0 4513 



rvREPSMAKINO. ALTERATIONS. SLIP 
L'oevers js* p» t nour r t t far* 4 0738 

J/X PERIENCED BOOKKEEPr.R DEBtREB 

*-» doctors dentis'. or small set* of 
n.OUm ftt^W ""—'--shed BO, 

r^XPUlIFNCED NURSE BY DAY OR 
■* week reasonable rates G 7691 

till Douglas Street 



1O8T. Wl 
^ hithw»y 



EDNESDAY, JULY 13. ON 



^NAP. 160 00. WO Tltn-laW MoT.jR- 
" e.T CBI Ju«t overhtul'd. also sidecar 
G 1*93 ^ 



mo. an Fkstmsn Kodak 

mobile Club 



between Victoria and Nanai 
Return to Auto- 



Phone O IUi 
We relet rapn Flower* 
CUT FU1WEKS AND DEStONB 



A NY FLOR AI DESIGNS at lewaal ^nce* 

.4 Pwllerl Bros i3i> no.i*ia» st n -ill 

|» N'B ■!< 101:1* SL'rVJERIES 414 

l» vi> % iy»i m s.tit set u «d lesveai 

>n rt a 



Oftees W* row no. 



a susi ANI 4 FLORAI \> 041 VAT 
4-. U MlE tlMMIJn dea.gtu a mm 



11 O 15J1 
IB 81 



J ADY. MIIVDIF 4GFD DI SIRES POBI 

8^ tlon. orrnmion housekeeper »o elderl' 



l»dr or *»rt'emari 
kit household dune. Bos »SP« 

1 IOHT HOtSFU.ORK OR 

U rh 'H t* 1 >e 9 4-, , le 

d-n Avenue 



Iderly 
underiake 

Colonist. 

CARE OF 

Court. Lln- 



MOBITION AS HOLSEKU.PER OR DO 

a liiV rajMiYT* ,,n<, cookln, • d,lly 



4 



T OST. AT BEAVER LAKE MAN . -4 ULt I 

*4 swtmmln* tr.ii. ks Please phone 
E M71 _ 

J OST — PAIR TORTOISMHELL SPEC- 
4^ t*cl»s in brown ra<e, near Rank of 
Commerre- Reward Phone ■ 7134 

I OST POCKET KODAK IN BLACK 
leather case, near fotin'aln in Beamn 
Hill Pa rk. Ju ly 21 t J436 

LOST — JULY 21. l-rr YACHTS 
din*hv blu* flsi on stern, near Chat- 
.JMjfll-.D^n* O 4701 

I OST NEAR CADBORO BAY. BUND s Y 
*4 pa:r men's blsck oxfords Box 4497. 
Colonlpt . 

l - OST - RING "GREATLY VALUED AS 
li keep,a»e J 1 1 j I Oeneroug reward 
Pl^ne Elsso 

>IOVF4 TO LOAN 

\PTW MODERATT 4 MOUNTS TO 
loan on f.rst innrMates on Oak Bay 
••< lenewa at I per sent Write 



>OD — 
r In 



— WOOD — AIJ. KINDS — 
All Best Fir -Ousrs? '.»d N 
Salt Wattr 
SPFCIAL SALE ONE WEEK ONLY 
I Cord. II 71 1 Cord*. 17 71 
In<:le Blocks. Slove Length. 14 00 Cord 
fr Cords 111 50 

Agents for YOUBOU TIMBER CO 
X 274J 3414 Ooualas 



W 1 



.4 PKOFT SSION \l DIRK T 



OR Y 



nisTtxT 



EW ART GEE. DOS.. 402 SAYWARD 
B.dg 1207 Doutlas St Ft O tit 18.422 



AN INVITATION' 
h»v* at present the sAffoaJ showlnc 

' blcycTet in ,r Poor e.er pre.ented 

in Yi.torta We eayrdlally invito you >o 

drop in and see the latest in bicycle design 
and mecnaniirn or the leading English an* 
Can»di»n-ir.sde m»rhlne* 

HARRIS BICYCLE" STORE 

"18 Fort Street opp Pisg|» Wn«ly 



WINCHESTER SPECIAL WITH 

thirty-two rounds of ammunition 
What offers' E 4048 1225 Johnson St 

1 ' : I" I'F JFi'^FY Mil K 

de.'pered m time for breakfast 

Riverside Da ry. phone 0 1622 



MOI SIKIU'ISC. ROOMS 
TO RENT 

•r.R AUfM PT -- FvyrTR ROOM' rTT7JCC<y 
•BFKFrP 4 «nh garage Fully fur- 
peek 070 niaheei ineledlno nnen *nd *ilvey 1014 

Hal'.i .ire IKesd 

J f Ot.-SEKFFPI-i'i Pfe-)MB PARTLY 



/ «OM PORT ABIE' t.fCIHT HC 

' tne room* overlooking 
Heywood Avenue 



f irnlshed 
irr.s.d* Rn«d 



AkpD 



Ofetn. 120 



Phon, o 4729 
EWT.Y DFCORVIFD r.'.v ANfi TWO 



I 



•4J *4F k *»4»fy flf 



11)11 



V'EV 

*>s rK>'o* for 
O'mng *'enmrr.oda' 1 
t] M *no up lh* Clifton Itbiaa 
Broad 



r -elly 
' lll»'4 



.lij l< 



re.' or. 120 



I s\ 
E 04S0 



Willi VHP 



V.VH 

Bundty 



2-CYI INDER 
netrest off-r 



BIXE 171 OR 
419 Gorgt Rosd. 



II 4V \MID- MIS< El, I. AM Ol s 

A R PI'm T A TION PtiR PAYING IIIOB 

» est pr.res for rata, bottle*, toon 



stoves, furnltura. 0T 
to dispose of W* 



rt»M«orr 

\ TTRACTIVE BED - BITTINO ROOM* 
with kitchenette, studio Toun»e» *v'ery 
lulet and coxfortabl* From 111 jyionth 
Also b, d*» or weeg ||V4 Rockland Av». 



WEI Jr- FL RNTSHED BRIO HI RO/^M 
PirrfieTn. **Yr MTV 14Vf PMIMtAl | 



■ RJ . I r 'HNIBHED BUNGALOW, 
4 rooms, near Cherry Pi beach Good 
w»'ef . ippl, « menti s or lon«er Tw»»d 

Croft Cotible Hi: 1 

L"V)R auoubt pleasant^-rnibhfd 

1 *sr sea and ear Moderate 

(Tl ll x slWiB ij l s ll - • - - ~ 

1,'OR A' ritiBT CHARMINCII Y-FUR- 
I ., ,h..- ro tate 1 bedrooms 1CI Betrh 
Irrive Phone F 9510 



1,'OH AUGUST A I It A '"I IV FLY FT.'R- 
1 r.ished t,unvs:.w r*ntr*lly located. 



Phone G 6075 
AND 



I' : Y AM) At OUST - FUIJ.T 
•I nlshed *ttr*'tl** aevenree-rm 



PT'R- 

'.O-.-e 

irden, 
W II 



ieL 



«Tovra' *vn r angt* 



\ NUMBER OP lAROE-SIZED KITCHEN 
rant**, in txeeptionally good eondl- 



"on. now in stock 
10M Douglas Street 



McDowei A Uftl 
t 4118 




O0TIOPATHIC PH YAK IA N 8 



hR VERNON „• 
free) and licensed 



Buudin* 



44*-T-1 
Phont E mpirt 7471 



RFOTV 

iont 



S»sM>l»B M4««M R 



R Lowtntsoro tret< 

lameness, mints ner>e. 



rheum*' -m. 

4 opt 8. 14*1 



OR 



r 

Cf>lrvr 



SALE SECOND-HAND MOFFAT 
-trie rente ln teevi rondi' "1 four- 
en »nd sirm nt iv»n Box 6567 



l,K»R OOOD. NEW AND USED RANGKn 
•r ''ir-s-es snd . ""sei -•*>«•,• 
•"■ m G joat 

|>AriFic n'RNey*>av- on birnfr 

I ■ «*r • ne» Wrll .-.I r ,,e.p Q 33 Tl 



T ADY 8 BICYC LE WHf.i l. BRAKE 
good eondl'ion fewsor.sb:* for cash 

■ Mil 

l»4NGRS WANTED A LIBERAL AL- 

Mt • anct for ye ir bid r*na» on ti.*H .'"1*. 
p ,--h*.e 1 « pew s. e-ia-i e, g" 'erpyl** ' mryr*i 
lis'! . Itsis Wo-k, Ltd 1121 Oove-r-ert lfU 

et'reel 

w 



I 'OlIFJkl AELI PTTRBISIIED UNptJR 
ai-iee- r.^m* t'Httt b *nd • eater 
•00m strvtoe t"/--.ne-u t)0*» ntee 
')»<on«b'r* Masise ill Port St 0*111 

/ SOSY FOUR AND TWO-ROOM "bUTTEA 
-'useteepir, room*, eedrvvms RITZ 
710 Port * 'e.. a 7140 



Harvard Bulldlnt. Victoria 

m r f 



imrr»c.«t» possession Rent from 115 00 t. 
160 00 per mntVh MACNICOl. % CO 
LTD itoo Blansfiard Blret Phone E 0072 



r |V) REUABI^ TENANT I 

* O.Udren - Five-room artl* 



niF.'s 



Box as 



OF ;*tj EBOCIRR 

»• once and montr. 



tt»wr.niBH Miosis, Bteam Bstna. Colonle 
** irrigation 604 Campbell B.di 



I 373L 



KANGE r.ASIi.st.A, 8|uL M . 
1 fr.r*nl ran.aa BC Hardware. 



o. Ill L44 .. rS ,.,. „ 

r*!»*» cord, '.on Bog 



MMK. At "IT ABLE 
Must 4» in firrt- 
4514, 



rt'RNlBHED HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 
Sola in m 44 gee up roio hi 

4 s BO"ND Fioon B*T 
"4 9 
MO 420 

riVAFKERPf.-O 



aeps' iiua. 

f.olonif 



s.e)«e;, n 



IT 

h'.-- e. 



tround*, Box 446A. 



r e-.ei t , 

■lag r no* 



n NO ROOM 
no dlslsnre 



4.4 Tl I Ft.RNISHm ' P',r,«yh 

* * kMrxr pi*no. OOywtt reluibla pert,, 
adulfs 1)8 P»rm»nen» N»*r C"overd*:e 

• - o 4«,» 



.11 



rwrr'. mo'.M .res' ,.s. ro Ml sop ISA FAIRFIELD for 

able littTlRockiand Astnu*. |'» Autu.t. 134 



I 



I 




• 

i 26, 1936 




THE DAILY 



1ST, VICTORIA, B.C., SUNDAY. Jll.V 







23 



_ 



A Mart tor Busy Readers — Property tor Sale or Trade 



BOUSES TO RENT 

t Continued) 



I*NFI'R WISHED 



1 <UU\ HAULTAIN ST. 4 ROOM* OAR- 
1 t/l'sF sge |14: J4J0 Central Ave . 4 

room*. 115. 2'.M Cedar Hill id . 4 rooms. 
MrMe, 111. 2074 Ooldsmlth St.. • room*. 
112 40. 7M 8t Patrick 8t . i room*. tar- 
Ma. furnae* with aawduit burner. 127 50. 
000 Foul Bay Rd . 7 room*, etureo. two 
bathrooma. 145. — 

PEMBERTON & BOW/ LTD 
(25 Port Street Phone O 1114 



2945 
418 
823 

232 
(22 

1145 

•14 
<5t 
1S54 

•ts 
111 



KEYS AT OFFICE 
Further Particular* Will Ba 
Oladly OlTto 

R LACK WOOD AVE - Nice hlih part 
of Hillside. 8 rooms 125 00 per month 
UUADRA 8T —Corner of Summit: • 
rooms 127 50 per month 
UUEBEc BT — lames Bay. clot* in: I 
rooma. 125 00 per month. 
F.HULTMALT ROAD — Nice l-roomed 
bungalow, with laraa garden, for 
120 00 per month 

SUPERIOR ST -Jimii Bay; I rooma. 
in ftrat-claaa ahape. 120 00 per month 
ADMIRALS ROAD— Eaqulmalt; 5 |Ood- 
sixa rooma; bungalow. 120 00 per 

month 

FAITHFUL ST — Modern l-roomed 
aeml-bungalow, with two bathrooms 
and hot-water beating. 140 00 par 

month 

METCHOSIN BT — Near Pemberton 
Wooda. 5-room bunialow. furnace. 
11100 per month 

HEAD ST. — Near Esuulmalt Hlfh 
School: 5- room bungalow, for 115 00 
par month 

8T ANN 8TKEET — Oak Bay. nlca 
dlatrlct. near bua and aea: • room* 
122 50 per month. 

HEYWOOD AVE -Pacini park. close 
In; • room*, furnace, double taragt: 
130 00 per month. 

ST-Co*y l-roomed ruitlc 
for 111 50 per month. 



TO OUT-OF-TOWN 
SUBSCRIBERS 



Out of ic*»n tubltt then *yno *«♦> 
to enswet »ctveMiiemer«t» n wtiich 
only ihe telephone- rxjrnbc of th« 
advertiser « fl'ver, may rrviil then 
•epi«i to The Cotori5t and The 
Colorist wiU convTXjnicjte «uch m 
pl«t to the 



AUTOMOBILES 



Car Load of 
WILLYS If 



$7!>r> 



Thl Sedan VI •'«-» Delivered 
Your Car In Trade 

MASTERS MOTOR CO . LTD. 
Sola Dealer* for Victoria 
109 Yata* Street Phone E 3541 



75 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

<Oon.lnued> 



F 



BOUSES FOR SALE 
(Continued i 



s 1 



AND SERVICE STATION. ON 



KWW'" CHANDLER 
J s7—0 like new. i.ioo 



61 



SUMMER RESORTS 



I 



PRIVATE HOME. 



WH 



s 



B O. LAND * 



•22 



Street 



Phona a 4115 



1741 SIXTH ST 4 RMB . MODERN 115 00 
1465 HAMLEY ST., 4 room*, modern. 15 00 
2579 PRIOR ST., I -rooms, modern... 17 50 
144 HOWE ST.. 7 rooms, modern . . 20 00 
111 VIEW ST, 6 room*, modern .. . 22 00 
1419 CAMOSUN ST . 5 room*, modern 22 jO 
.HIS FIRNWOOD KD . 7 room*. uiotl- 

1150 

ST., I rooma. modern 2100 
AVE , 7 room*, 
nawly decorated, excellent con- 
dition 15 00 

HEATH DRIVE. 5 rm» . modern 30 00 
JEN AVE. I room*, modern 20 00 



plain cookim lnexpen*iv* Tourl*t* 
or permanent Oarage E 5053 »«• Bank 
street Oak Bay car 

SHAWNIOAN — WANTED. PURNIBHED 
cotlace or hou»e, boat. east aide ol 
lake, August • to 22 Box 8613. Colonial 

SHAWNIOAN — THREE AND FOUR- 
roomed furnished cottale* for rent 
Westendale. 1191 Yale* _ 

fm RBtT — FURNISHED COTTAOE AT 
1 Prospect Lake: electric lliht. running 
water and boat Phona O 1101 

rpHREE - ROOMED FURNISHED COT- 
1 tsge. Cordova Bay O 4711 

WANTED MODERN FURNISHED COT- 
t*gc, for Auiiki. at Bhawnigen Lake 
All particular* to Boa MT7 . Coloniat 



ROYAL SEDAN. 
1930 Ford Se- 
dan, de luxe modal. Oli 1929 Light Ford 
Delivery. 1129 1119 Ford Coupe. «ith 
rumble aeat. till 1111 2' -3-ton White, 
hydraulic brakes, vacuum booster, ready 
for the road, 1700 1921 2-ton Federal, 
duala. 1100. Many others Part* for 
truck* and cara at low price* 
CLARKE'S OARAGE 
•11 View S' 



J TORE 

main highway, in rapidlr-developlng 
community. Exceptional opportunity for 
man with unemployed children to eatab- 
Ush them In separate businesses A joint 
tenantship of properly will develop a 
spirit of co-operation and yat permit of 
prlvita initiative Suitable tor service sta- 
tion, confectionery, irocery. cobbler, tea- 
room or barbecue, and auto camp, nursery 
or poultry farm. Particular* Box 1823. 
^ Coloniat 

1 t< M ALL OAFE DOINO NIC! 



JAMESON MOTORS' REDUCED 
MIDSUMMER PRICKS 

1929 Bulck Small "8 * Da Luxe Sedan. " 

In flr*t-cla*« condition, for 1395 
1921 Dodge Sedan, perfect condition 

with vary lood tire* 1295 

1927 N«»h Small • ' Sedan Reduced 

to m 1145 

1934 Orarfam "•" Sedan. Like new . 1145 I 



- f 
for c 

rjpHi 



for sale as going conce 
for clear-title property Bo 



1483. 



and 

112^0 



SUITE 
I. pari 
house Included 



APARTMENTS. 



No agents 



close in Sacrifice 

Box 8620. Coloniat. 



A REAL SACRIFICE 

BEAUTIFUL NINE-ROOM COUNTRY 
HOME 

/ iV*,R ACRE OF LAND AND FRUIT 
' ' tree*, near aplendld beach and Inside 

four-mile circle. Thl* home has hot-water 
heating, lovely hardwood floor*. two 
splendid open fireplaces, extremely nice 
kitchen with tiled alnk, two very nice up- 
to-date bathroom*, a lane sleeping porch 
with splendid view Will sell for 18 500. 
on terms Coat over $12,000 about three 

. I year* aeo Apply 1154 Windsor Road, or 

BUSINESS ! PhQP I O 1 130. 

OOROE BARGAIN 

OWNER will aell modern five-room bun- 
ialow. fully furntihed. with all con- 
venience*, cement baaement and Karate. 



trade 

>nltl 

ALL 



i Continued) 

i .)] ACRES. ABOUT HALF CLEARED. 
1 — 'J lood residence with bath. b»*e- 
BMH, lie . nearly new outbuildlma. aix 
mllea out A bargain at ll.SOO for • nice 
country home City Brokerage. 1000 Blan- 
shard St 

» ACRES OOOD FRUIT AND VEGETABLE 
land, small houee and bulldlne*. cloac 
Terma Owner, Box 1471. Coloniat 



.n 



85 



FARMS FOR SALE 



t\'E SPECIALIZE IN 8F.LLI.NO BUSI 
el neaae* Largest dealera in city L U 
Conrers At Co 1025 Douglas Street 



$600 

from Vi 
timber 



to Co 

-OOOD STAND OP CORDWOOD 
About 1.500 cords Fourteen mile* 
•toria Road* built rlihl Into 
Ciood building*, tools. Borne wood 



I linn Turnover 
Good stock. 



OROCERY 
y busn 
about 



AND 



y '.out'"?Soo w"" 



CONFEC- 

nth" 



JAMESON MOTOR8. UMITED 
Broughton Street. City 



L. V ' CONYER8 A CO. 
4025 Douglas Street 



SATURDAY SPECIALS 



:ib 



three large lots In garden, with fruit trees 
Near school and bu*. Low d>| " i Uk 
taxes. Full price Tl'""' 

LEE. FRASER CO. LTD 
1222 Broad Street E 4721 



Qi/.rRONT FARM. FIFTY-FOUR ACRES 
k J Modern eight -room house, two bath- 
room*, basement, central heating, orchard, 
two cottages barn and other outbuildlma 
Excellent fishing and shooting Price. 
112.500 J H Whlttome * Co. Limited. 
Duncan. B C 



(\AK BAY — ATTRACTIVE NEW BUNOA- 
*J low. corner Newport and Orchard 
offer 



Inspect and make 
O 1287 



to owner 



80 



HMMI sT()R»s 



XIR 



HOTELS 



FAIRFIELD HOTEL — Centrally located. 
Douglaa-Cormorant Plaaaant. -> rll - 

; ,r. : -:..-d rooms. 110 month up. O 0222 



MA( BIMRY 



DURANT SEDAN 
| ESSEX SEDAN 
DODGE SEDAN 
DE SOTO SEDAN ... 

BUICK SEDAN 

DODOE SEDAN 

REVERCOMB 
925 Yates Street 



MACHINERY R 
era Marina I 



Reg'd boiler weld 
York* 815 Pembroke 







MOTORS 



1250 
1285 

.139'. 

1450 
. 1550 

1750 



O 8421 



G5 



AUTOMOBILES 



2114 CENTRAL AVE. I rooms, mod- 



15 00 

45 00 



1114 WOODSTOCK AVE. I 
fully modern, hardwood 

P. II BROWN at SONS. LTD. 

1111 Broad Street Phona O 7171 



HAULTAIN BT, Baanlch. 7 rooma .. 115 00 
MEDINA ST. lower duplex, 5 room* 117 50 
VICTORIA AVE, Oak Bay. I rooma. f 10 00 
P AIRFIELD, new duplex. I room* ...11100 

OLIVER BT . 7 rooma. available Bap- 

140 00 



(LIVER ST 

tamber 1 

A A. 
624 Fort Strt*i"t 



EY * CO 



E 1187 



HOUSES — APARTMENTS 

AVERY LARGE SELECTION. PUR. 
nlehed arid unfurnlahed. Up-to-date 
rente! aervlc* 

HEISTERMAN. FORMAN * CO 
101 View Street. Phona E 4111 



H UNO ALOW. 1 ROOMS. 1151 
til Strood. 11111. 



Wi 



OOOD OPEN 
ell convenience*. 122 50. 
G 82j8 



hEBIRABLE BUNOALOW 
location. 
8H8 Madison 

i;OR RENT BY OWNER— OOOD B1X- 
I room house, vicinity Oak Bay Hiah 
School Box 8482. Coloniat 



•BA FOB 8ALB 

A UTC^TOPB. UPHOLSTERY WORK ALL 
'1 work guaranteed Low prices Em- 
preaa Oaraia E 7833. 

A UTO EMOINES IN OOOD CONDITION. 
i\ To clear: Blk-ton Packard. 145. Hud- 
son H -per "I." rabored. 115; Twln-slx 
Packard, 140. Intarnatlonal two-ton. 136 
Wa have spare part* for the following 
late model cars In stoc* 1914-10 Bulcks. 
Cadillac. Chevrolet. Chrysler. Dodge. Es*ex. 
Model "A' Ford. Hudson HupmobileC 
Jewett. Pevee, PeevUe*. Ree. itu dakiajie g . 
Wlllys-Knuht. also a large assortment of 
truck parti. S H ttrea. all suae, batterlea, 
generators, starter* A few good 32 I I 
tlrea and tube* Praeldant I" aadan. new 
battery, tlrea. 1450 

PACIFIC AUTO WRECKING CO . LTD 
937 View St. Phone E 7511 



OOOD TRANSPORTATION 
WILLYS- KNIGHT SEDAN Thl* J^-)-)" 



DODGE SEDAN. 1921 model Wi 7", 

Reduced to T?I • 

CHEVROLET TRUCK. 12x8 • 1 

duals. 192t model PI 1 •» 

CECIL E\'E MOTORS. LTD. 
Yatea at Quadra Streets 
Pontlac Car* O M C Trucks 



r s s ■ - inal buy ^ 



| ( 'OR SALE STORE BUSINESS. 

grocery, candy, tobacco, etc , In- 
cluding stock, counters, all fixture*, 
complete: living quarters. I rooms 
Rent 122 50. 



THE GRIFFITH CO 
811 View Street 



lb EXCHANGE- -REAL ESTATE 



1 (l')l' NASH SEDAN. 1935 PONTIAC 
Lt/OU Coach, 1934 Dodge Convertible I 
Coupe. 1914 Chevrolet Sedan. 1912 Naah 



i TTRACTIVE BOOKS PROPERTY 
* » Good fishing, shooting, etc. Ideal 
Summer home»ite Trade for small Saan- 
I Ich property, preferably with cottage 
MACNICOL At CO . LTD E 0822 



SHARM1NGLY TREED DOUBLE LOT. 
J Cadboro Bay. offered for other, or 
Sedan 1931 Hupmoblle Sedan. 1938 Nash I acreage, off main road. Sproet Lake. 
Coach. 1925 Dodge Sedan. 1926 Chevrolet 1 Comox. Okanagan or Edmonton district* 
Coach 1 like d or British Austin, or 

On Display at Our TTsed Car Lot } TTiI. .i • 
Fort Street Below Blamhard 
BURTON A: WILLIAMS MOTORS. LTD 
NAHH-LaFA YETTE AgenU 
1001 BLAN8HARD ST 



Bus 21, Courtenay 
NEW 



LL SIZES Ul 
i lowaat price* 



TIRES IN STOCK. 
Bed'l Service Station 

2S-TON. 7-SPEED 



hUMP TRUCK, 
worm drive lood condition Phone 



after 4. E 8880 



M O . 



I^NGLISH SPORTS ROADSTER 
1^ perfect condition, smart appearance 
30 mile* per gallon Box 1471. Colonist 



I.1REE 1RL4X TO 1 1CBT YOUR OAS 
r MUaeca - Tlllotson Carburatori live 
reaulla Try one on your car Pays for 
itself with tha gas It save* Reasonably 

priced for all car*. CHET DOWMAN 
724 JOHNSON STREET 



,10R SALE— PACKARD SEDAN. IN EX- 

owned. 
car or cabin 
Phona OSU0 



'700 Will accept small 
launch aa part payment 



|.VH:R ROOMS. 18 00 MONTH. WITH 
I water Apply Brrtwhlatle. 100 Burn- 
aide Road, corner Harriet. 



OUSB ON HAULTAIN BUB ROUTB— 



H 

M 

a^TBABXT NEW 



Two lots, caraia E 1414 

U-NOALOV 
decorated ln«lde and out K 0447 



JDERN S-ROOM BUNGALOW. NEWLY 



dett 



cloaa to business district. 1014 Bur- 



S UNSET AVENUE. 5 ROOMS. 120. MAY 
Street. • rooms. 110. Shelbourne St . 
I rooma. 110: Wilkinson Road, 5 room*, 
acre of land. 112 50. Oreenwood. 1405 
Douglaa Street 

SIX-ROOM STUCCO HOUSE. GORGE 
dlatrlct Cloaa school, bus and street 
car. Three bedrooms, fireplace*, fur- 
nace. iarag« All In splendid condition 
Phone G73»4. mornlnia [ 

SIX -ROOMED HOUSE IN (XX)D CON - 
dltlon. near High School: furnace. I 
garage, garden: 1*15 Five rooma, Sa-mlle 
circle, tea: 111 711 King'g Road 



I EXPERT^ REPAIRS ON YOUR CAR 

let specialist B ^r.0^ b Jorn., C Vr^ 
snd Pandora 

f I CENSED 1928 CHEVROLET SEDAN. 
I J excellent condition, price, 1235 cash. 

Phone 1 1101, 

r OOOINO TRAILER FOR SALE. WITH 
I J due tire*, reasonable E 4914 

MOTOR CARAVAN — COACH - BUILT 
body, fully furnished, at a aacrifica 
price Would consider launch In trade 
Henderion. R M D Duncan. 



() 

only 
new 
cash 



WNFR OOINO OLD COUNTRY— ONLY 



■.000 miles 
wood boxes 
O 7141 



Hydraulic hoist, two 
Terma Cheap for 



'1VRAILER FOR SALE. IN OOOD COI4- 

1 eutiea 



Avenue 



price 110 Apply 1115 



11MLLYS "7T BALES. SERVICE. VI — 
»> Mutual Auto Sale*. Ml Johnson 



HOUSE 



FUIX SIZED 



920 



OIX ROOMED 

^ basement, furnace, aarsvt one block 
car. two block! school. 1111 Delta Street 

NO 11 HAMPTON ROAD FOUR 
roomi and upstair* floored, edie- 
gram polished floors, all walls painted, 
built-in cupboerda In kitchen, full sixed 
rement basement, garage, lood lot, vacant 
last of July Isaac Montgomery, owner. 
1941 Bee Street. Phone t. 8829 for ap- 
pointment 

J -ROOMED MODERN BUNOALOW. PUB- 
< * naea. high end dry. off Maanlch Road, 
cleat In: rant 112 00 Apply 423 Sayward 
Butldlnn Phone F. 7411 

«HELBOURNB~TIIRrF BED- 
rnom*. good fanlen. «ir«i» 
spotlessly rlesn. 120 00 Phone Colquitt 
IIY 

n ROOMED HOUSE. SUITABLE FOR 



3106 ; 



party requiring . 



$285 
1350 



•21 Durant Four-Cyllndar Sedan. 
In real good condition 

Ill* Hudson Sedan, roomy, com- 
fortable, and in A 1 ahapa 

1911 Ford • , 4" Tudor A real good *( [" 
car at a low prlcg 

1111 Dodge Sedan A ear that It up to 
d»te in performance and ap- sflj 1 1 "T" 

pearanre. and a real buy at V" I • • • 

— TRUCK SPECIAL - 
Ford Model A' Light Delivery. »1 
in fine thape ready for aervica fl IM 

Agent* for All Chry»l*r Producte 

BEOO MOTOR COMPANY. LTD 
185 Yatea Street O 1144 



T. 9415 



VICTORIA B C 



CLEARING FIVE CHEAP CARS 
Bulck. Dodte. Oakland. Star. Wlllya-Knlghl 
From 125 00 to 175 00 
Br, ii the Cash and Drive Away 
MUTUAL AUTO BALES 
•31 Johnson Street Phona O 5841 

FORD ENOINE. - COMPLETELY 
overhauled and Installed, 115. 
and old engine: 1928 Star engine. 125. 

Chevrolet enmne. complete, |10. Cameron 
Bros. 1340 Craufiower 

EX TOl'RINO. 1»28. EXCFL- 
lent condition, mileage under 
42.000 Owner legvina for England Phone 
■ 0544. weekdays, > to 8 

1 ^1*^1 PLYMOUTH 4 SPORTS ( 
-I •*•-«/ 4 good tires, new rings and com- 
pletely overhauled. 1300 cash Box 8391. 

Colonist. 



I!H'7 



$100 f 



sH ARMING NEW BUNOALOW ON 
* beautltul acreage, low taxes, aplendld 
district take smaller place 
Owner. E 1291 



l.-VJR EXCHANGE — IMPROVED PROP- 
I .erty with house, in good location. 
Bhawnigan Lake, for tmall house in city 

Sen Ht3. Oolegtlet. 

HAVE 2 's ACRES, 5-ROOM HOUSE. ALL 
conveniences and large greenhouses. 



ST CHARLES STREET HOME 

SITUATED In % acre of beautiful lawns I 
and garden Well-constructed house : 
contain* four bedrooma. bright sitting- 
room, den and dining-room Separate i 
chinaman's quartera 47 "villi 

Per immediate sal* 4P • aWW 

MARA. BATE to CO . LTD 

K. Phona E7124 



STUCCO BUNOALOW. PLEASINO ASPECT 
yJITUATED ON SALSBURY WAY. NORTH 
►y Quadra District Contains four 
rooms, good plumbing, fine basement with 
garage and furnace Fxcellent garden, 
varloui kinds of large and amall fruits, 
xtra large lot $L>()()() 

JOHN OREENWOOD 
Bank of Toronto Building 
1405 Douglas Street 



StMWM.-l- 
•"".MHr „ 



C>*' • )" FULL PRICE FOR THE NEAT- 
VvasMj est l-roomed bungalow we have 

had for aome time Uvlng-room. open 
tlreplace: 1 bedroom and kitchen City 
water and electric light. Lot 50 x 120. all 
laid out In flowers, vegetable* and fruit 
tree* Taxea only 19 90 About two miles 
from city 

ROOMED HOUSE. PACING 
water, in very good condition 
Price tncludtt tha, furniture in the rouse 
a very fin* organ, many very tood car- 
pet*, lino*, picture* and all klnda of other 
(•JEIUture : r.or: e was sold a few sear- 
ego for 18 000. and would make a good 
rooming house 

OOlMI 8-ROOMED BUNOALOW. LIV- 
ing-room. dlnlng-ronm. 3 bed- 
rooms. 1 piece bathroom, large glaased-in 
sun porch, kitchen and pantry; full cement 
baaement with hot water heating, laundry 
•ub*. leparate garage Large lot. 88 x 148. 
laid out In garden Located In the .tames 
Bey district close to the water This is 
one of the best buys wt have had for some 
I time 

clear mie. exchangrmodVrn" houa*. Sean- ] ««>7(W| 5 ACRES FACINO ESQUI- 
Ich preferred Colqultx I9W fsVIW mult Lagoon with 300 ftet of 

waterfront 2-roomed cottage and barn 



UP-ISLAND FARMS 
ACRES. 15 cleared In pasture: 
ern 7-roomed residence with pretty 
outlook, barn, fine chicken plant for 2.000 
bird* Price 13.500 1 
J~vUNCAN- 55 acrea. 15 cultivated, large 
MJ barn, water tank, chicken house*, 
fruit tree*, small ahack A very pretty 
property and a lovely letting for house 
Price 11.590 

ACRES, 4 rooms, barn and chicken 
house* Only 1 1.250 

JOSEPH C BRIDGMAN 
804 Brouthton Street Established 1151 

Albert Burdon. Real Batata Dept 

-ACRE FARM FOR SALE OOOD 



15 



16V 2 



bathroom, power available 11.250. half 
cash J E Gallant. Maple Ave . Weat 
Sooke. VI 

Mt'NIriFALITT OF SAANICH 
NOTICE BE FIBER 
Vol K"E la hereby given that permits 
are required before open fires may 



be lighted 



A A RANKIN 

Chief of Police. Baanlch. 



4 FIVE-BOOM 
n| HI RBts MTMOALOW— THREE 
ACRES OF NATl'RAL P sKH 

Situated leas than four mllea from Vic- 
toria on paved road where taxea are 
very low and In one of the very nicest 
district* 

This home, which ha* Ju*t been com- 
pleted a abort time ago. ia stucco and 
very artistic in design built among 
nice tree* It ha* hardwood floor*, 
baiement, furnace and aplendld open 
fireplace It ia beautifully furnished 
'the furniture, which ia like new. cost 
over 11.500' The whole thing can now 
be bought for 14 500 Will accept part 



ARTHUR E HAYNES. LTD 



FORT KTREET 
Fire ana Auto 




VEW 5-ROOM BUNOALOW. OOROE. TO 
exchange for Oak Bar or Ten Mile 
Point property Box 1057. colonist. 



77 LISTINGS CANCELLED 



WILLYS- KNIGHT SEDAN — 1 
I i'«,<~ f, c t condition Tlrea ilka new 
Licence. Muat aell Only 1225. cash or 
tarms Box 845(. Colonist 

CHEVROLET SEDAN. IN OOOD 
ahape. four wheel brakes. 1213 

O 2249 



EAL ESTATE AGENTS — TAKE NO- 
• mv property known as 3448 
Bethune Ave It off the market. Dated 
July 25. 1938 H B Marshall. 



S'.ri 



f?A 



HESr CASH VALUES FOR USED CARS 
—Cor Gorge end Oovetnment O 8332 



CASH PRICE FOR YOUR CAR A I 
Empress Garage Tradea 



11(11 I OK SM K 



t SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE. TWO THREE- 
• » piece bathrooms Suitable for duplex. 
II •' .s iter heating, full cement basement, 
uarage. Ideally altuated In quiet neigh- 
borhood, within l's-mile circle. Nice 
I groundg with shade trees Inspect and 
mske v 0 ur offer to owner, E 5653 Will 
onaider trsde for suitable buntalow 

FULLY MODERN FIVE-ROOM HUN- 
galow Urge Itrlng-room with largg 
fireplace, nice bathroom, two bedrooms, 
kitchen, full-tlae basement Lot 50x191 
Convenient to car and bus Will aecrlfica 
Phone owner. E 4917 or E 8330 



SELLING TOCR CAR» 

TP SO WE CAN OBTAIN FOR TOO 
1 THB HIGHEST CASH MARKET 
PRICE 

WE HAVE BUYERS WAITTNO 
JONES BROS SERVICE STATION 



Phone E 4021 



Yates al Uuadrs St 



\f ALUABLK AUTOGRAPHED BOOKS 
and first editions al part pavment on 
caravan or car Box 1581, Colonist. 



9 \V ANTro 

I 2 GOOD USED CARS 

Will Par Caab 

CLARKE AUTO SALES 
Oppoelte Hudaon * Bay 



- j -» SELKIRK AVE. WATER FRONT 
• 1 I 1 hedronms. 



Phone owner. 



den. 
E 0221 



1 22 \ 



Q-Ro< 
O 113 



t near 

1I1L J 

:OirT.T4 
sleeping porch 

k 



OXFORD STREET. SCV1 
rooma. oak floora. 117 10 T. 1M13 

-ROOMED BUNOAN>W. 1445 HILISIDE 
Ave Phona O 4t84 

ROOM HOI 'SB. 11J» MASOM fTTREET. 
30. Including water Phone E 9815 



OLDBMOB1LB SEDAN 
NASH COUPE 
AUBURN CONVERTIB 



I13S 



TIBtJb COtJPB 



Many Others 



r Pi n 



THOS PLIM IE Y 



W 1NTED 1 <) N 1 -HOI M 8 



O OR 4 ROOMED HOUSE. PURNBJIBD 
•» or unfurnished, modern, amall rent. 
Bot Hit, Coloniat. 



87 A 



rrRMsiiETt 



UVANTKD FOR SCHOOL YEAR. PART- 
Iv-furnlshed mcnlern house of at leait 
1 bedroom*. 1 bathromni and maid s room. 
In loratlon equally close by to both Si 
Michael s and Norfolk Mouse rVh->oJ« Mod- 
erate rental Must have an open view 
high and dry. Box 1557. Colonist 



fit 



MM IK KLSOItrs 



/ J RANDVIEW LODGE. MAYNE ISLAND 
™ * Table board from our farm, golf, 
tennis, fishing, bathing, dancing Single 
114. double 111 30 weekly E Naylor 

QetAOUIT, E SOOKE Bathing, boating. 
1-^ fishing Good accommodation Ph 8R 

CIS COTTAGES AND « AVIPSITVS 

RENTWCKU) ni'NGAIiOWS - NEXT 



Dtstrlbutori 
10 Yatea Street 



"LTD 



Quality Trjansportatlon 

O 7181 



BOA IS AMI LAUNCHES 

A REAL OOOD 18-PT FI8HBOAT. 1 
years old, with IS-h p Yale engine 
See Mr Willi*. Enttrprlse Wharf. 

Spruce 
G 1422 



KOAT LUMBER. Best Quality 
oars. II -.0 pr Dalxlel Box Co 



l^VINRUDS OUTBOARD MOTOR. PER- 
I ^ feet condition Apply 2125 Belmont 



A 



I» ai'oai: 
* extra 



-.1. IUMIII V 

s:;j(H) 



NEW 

large five-room bungalow, latest 
featurea. situated on beautiful acreage, 
fenced, nice approach driveway Splendid 
district Low taxes Consider smaller place 

part payment Owner leaving, aacrifica 
lovely furniture Owner. E 12»1 

/Thome that you will be proud" of 

rLOSE TO OAK BAY AVENUE -Four 
vdrooms. reception hall. sitting - 
room dining-room and kitchen, oak floors, 
inlaid linoleum In kitchen, bathroom, etc. 
Panelled (iiiiiiig-iooni and halls, furnace 
heated, garage, etc Will 

sell for i 

For Appointment to View. Phona E2211 

T.X)R SALE— FTVK-ROOMED COTTAOE. 
iv recently built, with garden, soma fruit 
'reef tood water supply Ne»r arhool. 
PO and churches Price 11.150 

Real Estate and Insurance Aeent 
C WALLICH— Cowlchan Station PO 

r3R BALE - 7-ROOMED HOUSE. ONE 
hloek from sea and park, school, car. 
twelve minutes from business district, 
lane lot Makt Ideal duplex Box 1128. 

Colonltt 

8-ROOMFD BUNOALOW. S 
acres small orchard, good water sup- 
ply, near Cherry Point 12.000 rash, terms 
srrented Tweedcroft. Cobble Hill 

HOUSES BUILT ON INSTALLMENT 
plan D H Bala. Contractor. Fort 



A \ en ue 



l^Oil SALE — DIBSK I iSi.lNE I NEW ), 
I electric starting Seen in operation. 
Dirk 8c Walker a. 310 Johnson Street 

QOOO CLINKER-BUILT ll-FT ItOW- 



boat 
dale Road 



117 
R R 



Oeorge Poison. Maxtin- 
1. Royal Oak 



BUICK COUPE Four Star De luxe equi 
ment Juat like ntw 
A treat buy 

STUDERAKER SEDAN- Four Slar De luie 
equipment Free wheeling 
A bargain 

PACKARD SEDAN — Four Star 
Uonally tood 1111 model A 
treat anap in a larte car. 

PLYMOUTH SfcDAN Four Star 
little four-door at the 
right prieg 

DAVIS-DRAKE MOTORS. LTD 
It u k and Otdsmobile Car* O M C. Truck* 

Victoria Dtincsn 
Port Bt at Quadia Gov t and Kenneth 



1AUNCH HULL FOR SALK LENGTH 19 
•i feet, beam S feet, oak frame, cedar 
planking, copper fastened Juat caulked 
and painted Shaft, propeller, intake valve, 
steering wheel and stuffing bog included 
Reasonable See or write Bob Whlskln, 
Sooke Harbor House. Sooke. B C. 

EW HULL, FORTY FEET. WITH MA- 
engina. etc. Make good work or 
oleasure boat Not yat launched Snap 

at 1550 Box 8193. Cosonlat. . 

N EW NEPTUNB OUTBOARD*, PKf - 
Excellent for trolling. 185 Muncla 
I air -cooled Inboard engine*, l's hp. 141. 

t on* clutch. »■; >0 e 



N EW H 
rine 



*<;:>(> 

An exrep- 

A snappy 

132.5 



Buchart t Oardens Furnished, mod- 
ern, the betv E B Andrea. Tod tnlet P O 
phone 48Q 

nRENTWOOD - OOOD, WEIJ..-FUR- 
nished cottage. 115. another. 117 so 

b mm 

1|RENTWOOO. FUR NT SHED COTTAOE. 
I» August. I IS 00 month O 4144 

4 tOTTAGES FOR RENT. AUGUST AND 
" September, by week or month, on fine 
beach in Deep Cose some furnished or 
unfurnished If desired shower and free 
use of tennis court Phone Sidney 82E 

| lOUNTHY. NEAR SEA. 2- KoOMED FUR- 
' nished cottsse low rent. 14 miles out 
Sot s.809. Colonist 

| SOTTAGE ON LOVELY 200 ACRE SEA 
" front farm', five rooma. W Hart. 
East s....«^ V I 

* lORIXlVA BAY. COMFORIAHIJt DOT- 
1 » tage. dry and healthful. 15 00 week. 
114 00 month E 3218. E 8125 

t SOTTAGE ON IOVELY 100-ACRE 8EA- 
' J front farm; flva rooma W Hart. 
Sooke. VI. 



rem) irrrs and ihi-n you ll have 

NO EXCUSE 'FDR 'DRIVING AN ol.D 

/ CAR ANT ICTNGElt 

1134 PURD V I DB LUXE 

FORDOR 

1(14 FORD V I 

— -t»UPE 
1932 EHSr X 



0 



Olrllng. 1005 Gov t 
NE ONLY. FOL- BOAT— THIS BOAT !• 



in special bag Will hold two peraon* W* 
inelt* your inspection 190. term* mar ba 
arranged Third Floor. Hud»on ( Bay 
Company 



KOWBOATS 
Hrtgtt Strtttnn motorboatl, 118 week 
Staeey a B'vat House. Ooldstream Bay. on 
Island Htahaav 

s 



2} MALL ONE-CYLINDER FOUR -CYCLE 
marine motor for sale o 2«7tj 

TWENTY -SIX FOOT UI'Nfll. MARINE 
ennne. for sale Stacry • Boathouse. 
Ooldstream 



I I 

I ' 



and Stadarona 

designed, built Alteraetona. re- 
Fstlmates M P Paine. O70;,8 

IDEAL HOME FOR PROFESSIONAL MAN 
i Standing in large tarden, lawn and 
shrubs Hardwood floors, larte granite 
fireplace Beautiful sunroom, rosy den 
rj-gs/ell-eppolnted kitchen, superior plumbing, 
four charming bedrooms Baaement and 
good furnace A moat attractive home, 
cloaa* to beach, with acenlr view Muat bt 
seen to ba appreciated Price 14.000 Ex- 
clusively by J Greenwood. Bank of Toronto 
Building, 1405 Dotnlaa Street. 



All cleared and fenced 150 fruit trees and 
berries Thl* Is a beautiful piece of prop- 
erty and very cheap at the above pne% 

■ E HEATH 
125 Yatei Street T. 4041 



SHAWNIOAN LAKE SUMMER HOME 

with two ecret near end of West Arm 
Large living-room with fireplace bedroom, 
three-placa bathroom and well-equipped 
kitchen Oueat houae accommodating three. 
Servant'i quarter* at rear of two-car gar- 
Me. Running water from concrete tank 
filled by taaollna engine and pump Boat- 
house contalna 18-foot launch, complete 
with outboard motor, also new 14-foot 
clinker-built rowboet Purchaser would 
need only bedding, linen and cutlery, as 
everything else 1* included with tha prop- 
erty ^_ 
Onlr • ahort drive from itorea, train and 
Forest Inn. The place would be especially 
appreciated by the children and tha older 
folk Best snot for tuning or hunting. 
THE ROYAL TRUST COMPANY 
Real Estate Department 
1202 Government St 
E412I or E1110 



41 *>| U | — OAK BAY FOUR - ROOMED | 
fiP-I'lsF"/ buntalow Living-room, open I 
fireplace, two bedrooms, bathroom and ! 
kitchen Nice lot with several tood fruit 
trees Close to car and school Taxes 
only 130 Let u* show you this propertr I 

I 

FAIRFIELD NOT FAR PROM 
water Six -roomed buntalow. 

Uvlng-room. dining-room, three bedrooms 
and kitchen All In flrtt-cltst condition 
Full cement basement with furnace and 
lsundry tub* Separate tarage A real 
good buy 

E B HPATH 
825 Ystes Street E 4041 



CHOICE BUSINESS PROPOSI- 
TION TO EXCHANGE 

FOR VII i " It IA OR Dl Nt AN 
PROPERTY 

Owing to srrioii* illnes*. owner of good 
paying country store muat rttlrt, ao 
will sell at a sacrifice or exchange for 
dwelling Property consists of bulldlnt 
containing four large living-rooms, 
store and warehouse, gaa pump, all 
stock and fixtures THIS IS A GOL- 
DEN OFPORT1 MTV KIR SOMEONE 



OAK BAY 



$1500 



-Term* Very attractive 
four-room bunialow in 
perfect condition. All newly decortted 
inside and out. lant llvtng-room. I re- 
place, polished floor*, two bedroom*,, 
larta kitchen, bathroom, separate toi- 
let, laundry-room, aeparate laragt. 
wood«hed A very romfortabla 
and tood garden. Ttxe* 111 



ACREAGE 



$1050 



Term* Two tcret all 

cultivated, fruit, ttc . and 
comfortable four-room buntalow In 
splendid condition Chicken house, 
barn. etc. Close to achool and bua A 
good buy 

W. J. Gillilind & Co. 



1703 BROtD ST 



tardea 6711 



$2150 



•J71!) 



FIRNWOOD ROAD HIGHEST 
point In city, nit ely-boulevardcd 
street. well-kept properties adjoining 
Hou-e In perfect condition Inside and out 
limine breakfait and Uvlng-room*. hall, 
four bedrooms, fine b»*ement furnace, 
washtub* Garage Nice garden Owner 
ha* recently come Into pos«e*»ion and of- 
fer* for quick ss> at 12.750 

JOSEPH C BRIDGMAN 
804 Broughton S'reet Established 1151 

Albert Burden^ Real Estate Dept 



FOR RENT OR SALE 

2054 Oak Bay Avenue. Oak Bay 
-ROOM BUNOALOW. WITH 1 BED- 
•) ronirii open fireplace: wash tub*, gar- 
ate 2 lot*, nicely situated amonttt oak , 
shade trees Look this property over and 
mske us an offer W* will aell on very 1 
easy terms or rent moderately to reliable 
tenant 

SWINER TON * CO . LIMITED 
820 Broughton Street 



• ROOM ( 

•> J in 1150. terma Empire Realty 
Co . i 08 Broad 

»-nCpMED COTTAOE. NO OAR AGE. ON 



i hem. 
L dote 



• ROOMED FAMILY HOME. 

to Parliament Buildings, with 



magnificent wooden tennis court 
onlr 14.500 See owner, 215 Oovtrn 



Street 

TDEALLY - SITUATED NEW WATER- 
I front home with X\ acre* land for sale 
Good beach and lovelr outlook: 10 mllet 
north of Victoria All city convantencea 
Rutt. cobble Hill. B C 

IDEAL PRIVATE BEACH SEASIDE 8UM- 
1 mer cottage, furnished, on Baanlch 



West Coatt Bar tain _ Box 8A48. Coloimt. 

NORTH QUADRA 

PBT COMPLETED, cholc* location Thle 
very attractive 8-roomed atucco dwell- 
ing, with ill modern equipment hardwood 
floora in the reception-room, dining-room 
and hall: bullt-ln feature^, open fireplace 
special *!nk. cemen' baaement furnace, 
tarage Property 70 « 150 Low taxe*. Im- 
mediate possession Price only •OOKgl 
i terms to arrange) •>>.». M I 

CLOSE TO HIGH SCHOOL 



\\-W. HAVE (.<>.>[) DFM4ND FOR SMALL T.MVE ROOMED furnished house Only 
?! boats What have *ou for tele' I U25 caah or 1875 'on terma Ta 



tt. What have fou 
Enterprise Whivrf toot of Fort 



> cj smberlaln St Phone O 1870 



(l 



SM k i>";is - A OOOD SEVEN -ROOMED 
•D I aeml-l 




buntalow 1422 Fernwood. 



tO BL'Y — HOLMES 

/ <ASH FOR CHEAP BUNOALOW 
* house, low taxes, large garden 



trict op 
8447. Cc 



Fullest partlrulara 



OR 

dis- 

Bng 



$100 



AS CASH PAYMENT, balance 



( loae in 



area. 
Total 



BU I— bungalow 
newly decorated 
price. 1750 

CASH, balance a* rentala 
paymrnta of t20 per month. 
Including Interest at 8 I Situated on 
nice street. Oak Bay Low taxes Pour 
nice large rooms, nicelv treed lot 
Total purchase price 11.350 

CASH as down payment for 
an almoat new four-room 
bunttlow. Oort* district Total price. 
1900 The owner la leaving town and 
la wlll'ng to lose some money See 
these before you buy 

A FIRST -CLASS ROOMING 
house buslnesa. bringing In 
1100 per month Low rental and 
ood tenants Almost new furniture 

George Randall 



$150 



$200 



$750 



Mux Deutlas 



I. 7 II 



I ' 



III 51' 
8808 



Monal 
on 1st 

COTTAOE, IN JAMES BAY BOX 



VIEW ROYA! 



Owners leaving for England will sacri- 
fice their beautiful new stucco h 
f.ve room i. oak floors, tour-piece 
room, tiled sink, cement basement, 
nace and garage. - .a ted on 
acres, fenced good garden and 
trees Taxea approximately 1*7 00 
Our reduced price now also Includes 
furniture, which alone recently cost 
over tl.500 Owner might »i«e a ams 
city home aa part pevmen 
appointment only. 
Total price 



ree 
ade 



| OT. WITH BRAOI OR SMALL HOUSE. 
*■* condition no oojed to reliable party 
on rental term* Phone G 1171. 

U 'ANTED TO RENT OR LEASE WITH 
option to purchase, houae not less 
than ten room*, close in. vieinlir of Christ 
Churrh Cathedral preferred Box 1811, 

Colonist 

•» OR 4-ROOMED BUNOALOW. PARTLY 
»» furnished about t»00. barttin for naif 



$4500 

wr trrritn/r in oib bat 

FBOPTRTIH 

H. W. Miller & Co. 

711 FOBT ■TBEET O win 



rash 

onist 



State particulars 



Col- 



Ml 



i'KOI'F.R.TY FOR SALE 



$8145 
xr,r,u 



U'HFN 
for your N 
McQuadt s t^d 

U'AN TED-24 TO 10-FT CABIN LAC *>' II 
in etrhafTi* for Summer cottage. Cor- 



BTTTLDrNO A 
pplles 

1. 14 Wharf St, 



BOAT WEE IS 

Ship Chandler* 
E 1141 



Taxes onlr 

Title clear ) 

.IS.MES BAY SNAP 

SIX ROOMFD BUNGALOW, well p'anned. 
f illy mor 1 till hsse £>> 1 1 I y | 

men I tsrate only « ' " " " 

Well Worth 11.500 Termi to Arrange 

OAK BAY BARGAIN 



A 



in 



S' 



' ADR A H FIGHTS. 
70 x 208 Box Mil 



OAK T" 

Coloniat 



as 



/ «H<>ICE I-OT IB UPLANDS in 
' trontate. til Improvemente paid 

B MM 

| kXUGMTFUL ' LOCATION. ONE 
I ' one-half scrts equsl* ten rltr lots', 
three-mile circle, ag j'he-n expoaure main 
paved hlthwav. natural park wVh nat ira| 
trees and flowers In seaaon. mostly g-iod 
nd. city weteuuui light, low tax** Per 
] immediate tele I2»l. easjr terma 
1 MeCnnnell. Pemb»r'on Building 




These c«rs Are All in New Car Condition ,t tr ~o 20*4 



NATIONAL MOTOR COMPANY. LTD 
II* Yates St - Open Evenings - a 1177 
1121 Ford Truck, long wheelbaee 11*5 



■ HI »l \ HN 



oi'i-oRnviriK-s 



rABIN TO RENT- GORGE ROAD W EST 
Phona E 7177 

<sADBORO BAY. Purn Cot i age*, house- 
' keeping reetne board E »7»s. O 0114 

J ^nt7> OOYE~ BALANCE "oF JULY. US. 

, ;.t r ^';^"B•.y , : 5 August 

beache* Spar'.iiag. at Deep Core 

1<X)R BtNT-LAROB CAMP ON CAD 
J boeo Bay Beach IIS for Anrnst 
Ptieeie r. MTI. 

7lLPNAIRI.ET FARM Gt-EST Hi 

raatful holldar by the sea Home 



tennis court boats* ete 



rooking, Otir own Jerset cows indoor bad 
irtinlon. asphalt tenni* "iin »"«'■ --c 

rate* 111 weekly. It SO * d»« 8* 
orate onlv extra Special monlhij rate*. 
Writ* M* or ( a ( enagh. B. Book*. VI, « 
• hogje Book* IU 



1(11 Al BURN SEDAN, like 

new 

t»2» CHEVROLET COUPE 8 

this ona 

1*20 OAKLAND 

SEP AN ---,..••■.•••..< 
l»M ESSEX . .- 

SEDAN 

Several Others 



*i;im, 
1300 

H50 



KARBKR MOP OOINO CONCEBN. TO 
reel, Mount Douglaa Apartmenta 



Phone E 48JJ 



E7«m 



rffr STORE. OARAOB AND OAS 
I Fou- living rooms city water 
and electric light 1'y ettea cleared, pro- 
igetlrt land Taxes IT Thl* builnes* is 
* live one tt is situkted on th# mam 
hlghwar It presenl»-<s- aptend.d oppor- 
tunity to »n -nte*e*i»ing »r.d energetic 
couple Price 12. M8 Tqulpment and stock 
at invoice Alfred Carmkhael to Co. Ltd. 
1210 Broad Street Reel Estate. 



lot Earlv ptvssession Thl* requires quirk 
action Choir* location 

TO CLOSE AN ESTATE 
TAMES RAY. eloat to Beacon Hill Park 
•I This estate must be cloaed Make your 
offer 8ifl Niagara Street «ix - roomed 
nicely planned residence, hot-air fern get), 
tall am basement. Pull details at office 

OOROE DISTRICT 
tJuat Off Main RaghWkTl 
•1 VOO to 



NORTH QUADRA STREET 

POUR - ROOMED COTTAOE WITH 
three-elect bathroom Nice tarden 
.avn in frA • Bis sfps at J 1 • I ~i I 
door Price, on term*.. vl'h"' 

SAANICH REALTY OFFICE 
1M» On*dr* Street Phone f Ootli 



1% First Mortgages 1% 

We have On hand for Immediate dis- 
posal. several first morttate* ranting 
from 1500 to 11.000. on new dwelling! 
in 0*k Bay Full particular* gladly 
given on requeat — 



Es< 



Nice fhur-roorred bungalow 
Sesnirh Highway, on I '» acres of land 
Oood gard»n. chicken boueee. aplendld 

.. e r suppit tpnnn 

give yon possession Pr I sSfcVUU 

Davis Realty 

SI OO Pbtne r -• < 



711 * A fe 4 



R 



OARAt .E 



THREE STAR RED TAO USED CARS 
1»2» CHEVROIJTT SEDAN 
1»14 Do IX IE SEDAN 
1111 HI PMOBII.E SEDAN 
1»3t PI VMi )UTH SEDAN 
1»11 PONTIAC SEDAN 
t»15 MAPLE l^AF 3 TON TBl'f'K 
Man* Others 
Slashing Reductions on All Cars 

THE M()TOR HOUSE iVtCTORfA' LTD 
Yates Street . ft 1 H7-E 1711 

ESSEX — IN ~A 1 SHAPE LOW 



mi 



1 SONEVCTIONERY STORE FOR S ALB, 
^ living quarters Box 1551. Colonist 



I srj»IRE CONTACT PERSON To PI- 
I' nance e*tablishm*nt. manui* *unng 
busin'ss. te lepplant imported product 
Pre«ei t turnover approgimstel*; quarter 
nnllion annually Poaaibilii lea bein* •* 
evident, correspondent % reply will be aer i- 
tlnifed for extreme honetty of ptiy 
No rnmrint protnoterg wgyiTts Pet-- s • 
IS 000 to 110 000 required Bog (507 
Colonia t. ^ 

^MAIJ. CAFE DOtVO NICE BUSINESS 
*3 for ss'e as isms cence 
red* for eleer title property 



CE in excellent eon- 
y 1001 175 . Baan.ch 
v»ry reasonable terms 



'LOSE-IN SAANICH U 



i EAR ATM 
or exchange 



HI 



PHOPFRT> WANTFT) 



mun.Mpautr 
Low tax** 

CI/18E TO THE GOVERNMINT HOU8B 
*-) CHOICB RESIDBNTI AL LOTS, onlr 
aw 1500 each , 

H O DAIJlV * CO , LTD 
814 View Street Opposite Bpenrerg 

4-NOOM SUNOAI/^W 7 PIECE BATH- 
x room. l»5-i lioo cash, balanee aa rent 
Call *43 T*tfersall Drive 



GOOD StTI.DINO LOTS 
No agents Builder * term* 
C orrj*Trae-*^~ 

t \ ' ANTED ON CAOBORO BAT BEACH 
el i sr*e wsterfront site to build eei 
Will pa» eaah Bog »S«2. colonist 

commercial' 

pases 100 feet or more waterfrontage 
at Cadboro Ber Sox 1570 Coloniat. 



UniJ- BT'Y 
Oak Bav 

Box 88.11 



U* ANTED FOR 
i 



TEN ACRES, SAANICH ARM 
About 1,000 Ftet of Wjtcr- 
frontagc. Price 



$400 



0« tha tunny tide of Finlgyton Arm, 
firinq tositHwetr Deep water tor 
inchorgog If low M* frtih witgr 
on property Tgxtt J4 SO | f*$t 

Gillespie, Hart & Co., Ltd 

«l I Part Ktreet Pkene '. 1111 



II? 



At Rt \(,r FOR HM.K 



or will «»i . | CASH BUYS 1-ROOMED HOUSE 
Boa 1411 sr 1 *" 1 " gtyc nice localltr. 
yk. far. 1-1 Darwin. ~ 



I >ORT AOE 
I » r-s 

pit 

1 



WATsTRPROrTT. 1H 

acres, cosv eottaee. s rooms modern 
plumbing II 7 so Owner, isii Douglas 

ACRES. 4 ROC MS AND BATH BARNS. 

etc All m rrfc* 
account ef IB 
Bsrt »14l. 



SASEENOS — SOOKE 

1 SI Acre*, fou*- roomed eotr bungalow 
Pin* garden and amall (rail planta- 
tion Good rogda d* and camp market 
for all produre Love'v view of Use eeev 
Cloae to sheltered COTt IP the Inner 

$2650 




S3S00 



COLES, HOWELL 
& CO, LTD. 

NORTH QUADRA STREET 

A DKY ATTRAt TIVI Minn BIN 
GALOW. and almost an acre of beau- 
tiful garden, eilre construction cement 
walla to floor JoUti: hot water heating, 
aeparate garage, stande high and dry 

Sow 1 ".; $3150 

NEAR WILLOWS BEACH 

SEMI-BUNG ALOW. S BOOMn MHV 
AND 1 I P. practically new Hardwood 
floora and every refinement of a hl*h- 
claa* residence. Including garage for 
two cara. Circumstanoea enable us to 
offer thl* deiirebl* home away below 
coat of bulldlnt — 11.200 cath, and Oi 
balanct cm remain on 
mortgage Price 

FAIRFIELD 

SACRIFICING 5 ROOM BUNGALOW 

New roof, cement ba»ement. hot air 
furnace, electric atova and heater 
Linoleum and fixture* In- |4 PAS 
eluded in bargain price of •» I WVU 

tor offer.) 

SEAFRONT ESTATE 

A CHARMINt. nt Nti.AI.OW. practically 
new, 4 bedrooms, large reception - 
rooma and sunroom. ete I full baae- 
ment. furnace, and electric light Best 
of plumbing fixturea and unlimited 
water by gravity. 1 000- foot aeafront- 
age en all-year-round protected har- 
bor: about 25 mllea from Victoria: one 
ecra in well-kept tarden and lawns, 
tha balance aecluded park land, with 
magnificent specimen trees. 14 acres 

; 0 *:,-: r " $15,000 

Or might consider toma exchange 

SAANICH INLET SEAFRONT 

WI SPI ( I VI l/E IV Kt MUI Ml Al 

SEAFRONT and adjoining properties, 
and invite your Inquiry and inspection 
of several of tpeclal merit one and a 
half to twenty acrea Values to suit ell 



COLES, HOWELL 
& CO. LTD. 



is Ml w - rn» t T 



o tor 



ESTABLISHED lBtt 

GLIMPSE OF THE SEA 
THROUGH THE OAKS 

<H\KMIN(. OtK BAY RESIDENCE — 

Stucco. seml-buntalow. two bed- 
rooms down, bathroom and washroom, 
on* bedroom up. with apace for two 
mora and a bathroom. Beautiful liv- 
ing-room of geurrou* dimension* with 
wide window* wltb view* of Oak Bay 
A good-alaed dining-room Ho-, water 
heating, oak floora. a big lot lovely 
gardan. oak Ueee. aome young 

$7000 

REAL CALIFORNIA TYPE 
STUCCO BUNGALOW 

A MOST ATTRACTIVE PI-ACE — You 

wtli fall for it on sight Situated in 
city, near Gonsalee Hill and Foul Bay 
Beach, vtry pretty outlook Built by 
a Canadian for his own use Thia 
man gamed some very useful knowl 
edge, while workiug in California, in 
making a buntalow real's attractive In 
the artistic a* well ea the utility 
sense This he has demonstrated in 
I his unisu* bungalow. Contains flva 
rooms, with space lor more in attic 
Further particulars upon 
request Tht price It only 



$4200 



ACREAGE 



M VMl HK.HD lY— Oil! >lde of CM 

wood I tacts, two acres and up. from 
eV-iOO an acre up 
AliMIBAIJt ROAD — Near Naval Hos- 
pilal City water: reaaonable taxes 
Tract, of .o acre, at JgQQ 

l tnnoRO BAT BOAD - Beyond golf 
link* Lovely view* of Cadboro Ber 

Nicelr 
Price 

The B.C. Land & Investment 



~ $2200 



Agency, Ltd. 



I.OVI KNMI S r - IKI I T <l lllf. 




A SI VI I IM I. OAS BAY 
FUNt.ALOW. TIDOR DI'glGN 

Five room buntalow, very attrac- 
tive Interior, comprltlng large liv- 
ing-room with tiled fireplace, book- 
eaae. large leaded tlass windows, 
nice dining-room. 'compart kitchen 
with tiled sink, cooler and usual 
convenience* two nice bedrooms 
and tt tee pie. a bathroom between, 
completely shut oft from remainder 
of the house Attractive electric 
light fixturea. walla painted In 
pleasing color* throughout All 
woodwork irr three-coat enamel 
Basement with hot air furnace, 
leada connect with all room* lurg* 



lot under cultivation 



$3300 



SO ACBEi SKAFRON I 

100 Yards on the beach. • arraa 
have been cultivated. 25 fenced 
Cleared building lite, facing aoulh. 
ha* magnificent views of mosm 
taint For Imme 

diste disposal <•? I I *JII cash 



$1750 .. 

Pemberton & Son 

Ltd. 

625 Fort St. Phone G 81 24 



Saltspring Island 

R* At TIK I RISIIitNTTAL FARM 



EXTENSIVE SI. AFRONT AOE 

Overlooking Sansaas Narrowa and 
Oppealte Cewlrhaa Bar 

Contain* 400 acre*, ell wire fenced 
about 10 acre* undgr cultivation and 
dnldtd into fields by eroaa fencea 
Orchard 

Modern residence of eleven roomi. with 
tlx good slsed bedrooma and Large 
shady veranda Uaed at present ea 
a Summer guett house It It Ideal for 

piped to houae 

Other bulldinti Include Barn, cow- 
ahed with concrete floor three chicken 
houeee. pit stle*. granary. cerp*nter*a 
ahtip and implement ahed 
Two horses, two rows, and aundry 
farm Implenienla included In price 
Oood hunting la afforded on the 
properly, deer, groute and quail being 
Plentiful In aeason The'nearhy water* 
of Cowlchan Bay ar* noted for (almost 
and grilae fl»hlng Price 

$11*000 

Sw inert on & Co., Limited 

e'tt Rrenthten street 
Seal Estate. Fire and Automobile 
Insurance. Notary Publlo 



Overlooking the 
Gorge Waters 

A new stucco bungalow lust com- 
pleted On hlth tround. comprlt- 
lng five eon\cnirntly arranged 
rooms hall, latge llvlng-rootn with 
fireplace hardwood floora. dining- 
room, two bedrooma. very well-ap- 
pointed kitchen, with til* draining 
boards recessed bsth and ahower 
Concrete baaement. furnace anl 

$2950 

Christopher & Swayne Ltd 

Broad and View St. O 4l?l 41 !-. 



TO CLOSE ESTATE 
OFFERS WANTED 

Furrifld* being well built, good loci 
lion, ttven roomt, bitiment, furntct, 
gjrjqt, No 469 Mot! Slrtet 

Close in ind estv walking dittjnci 
from town. |uit painted ind dicor 
•ted. now in tint - elm condition, 
ltvtn roomi, bjsemenf furnice, gtc , 
good location , No 1144 Oicir Sfrett 

No^2565 Prior Strgef. between Kings 
Roed and liy. good in room houia, 
fhrge bedroomt, blttmgnt, furnaco. 

Low otveri will be conttdtrgd on all 
tht above property T( 



Heisterman, Forman & Co 



608 V„w Sfrggf 



I 4161 



Secluded 
Country Home 



Artistic stucco buntalow of four room*, 
with lsrte rireplare In sitting room, 
two nir* bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen 
and sma. sunroom A rustic tarden 
with beautiful trees and lots of priv- 
ary Cloae Rv with good Ira 
tlon. l<et ua ahow you 
thl* Only 



P. R BROWN & SONS, LTD. 



$2250 



lilt BROAD ST. 



rilovt r 



7171 



PeimeTA District Six room California 
eeml-bonaalow. tood condition Uvlng- 
room with fireplace, dining-room, kit- 
chen, three bedroomt. bath and toilet 
separate Pull rement basement, fur, 
nace, 10- foot corner lot. II.1M. ttM 
rash and assume anorltage 

G M. WALTON ft SON 

tea Fembertow Sldg t ettt 



MOONKISE AMI MOONSF.T 



Tim* of mooorlsa and moon set rparlflo 
standard lima), at Victoria. BO. for tha 
month of July. lHfc 

S*U 



YACHTSMEN 

Saft. tecurg. rear-round anrhorac* la 
hard to find, but here la a property of 
11 scree, with axtenalr* sea fron'aga. 
considered the safest haven for tmall 
craft in Saanlrh The land, quit* close 
to the main highway la well wooded 
and I* protected from every ttormy 
wind that blow* Tha house and 
ground! having been neglected for some 
years need re' onditlonlng. but it Ig • 
lovely piece of properly with gre»; 

, . $5250 
Her & Stephenson, Limited 

1*05 Government St Phone O »1t"7 

Money to I»an 



A GOOD BUY 



in 



A OOOD FAAfHT IflsfF 

Comprising alt rooms and bath- 
room, alao entrance hall, pantry.' 
full cement Deterrent, ftrtplate let 
llnng-room. OTt" flooret linoleum, 
blind*, electric nature* flood fence*, 
a nice garden Clear ti'l* Low 
taxet High location In the best 
part of Victoria West Owner going 
to Alaska Poll price 

nM T • | :,00 TFPMS 
One Th.rd Ctsh. Balance rent 
For Inspection ' •>* Rev far* Of 
U M BOSrVEAR to CO LTD 

O anil 




f ASH TA1.RS — f'otr four-room bunta 
low lest ft««t"ie "«t two bwdro»>mg. 
bathroom. high loawtlon Swerlflce 
for 05«M 

TMF IDf \L ho Mr — Five- room bunga- 
low w.ti every modern convenient 
Two good iratg well tto'tad with fr-jita 
end vegetable* poultry houses, etc 
One of 'he ftrtwet slewt in Vioor s 
Tsses |74 'a3 Consider par' trade 

r- for quick tela P8SSO 
arvFv AfBrs Cultieated Meal 
horpe»lt» In lovelr Oordon Head dl«- 
tri't Sell tear te i nit or consider 
trad* 

ROBT MArilf OL * CO I TD 
IMS Rlen.hare II. ■ at aire 



Tim* ef tunriaa 
etandMd timet, at 
month of Julr. 1»M 



WATFSIROVTAOE 174 OAR BAT 

Client wlahea to etrhant* ten beantt- 
ful Itrtt wt'erfront lot*, with prtxete 
beach, altuatad in Oak Bar value 
14 .400 for ho ua * 'with feur bwdroogggi 
in hi*o-<laas reeldentlal dlitrlet, V*n- 
WD1 par d.ff.r*ne* in ceeh 

h • T» »T>4J tn of f t>r | 

WTAI a CO . LTD |W 



lists 

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MM Ceettrei Are- Oa* Bar— t MM 

W. E. TAPLEY 

SallaW «r>4 CMtraeAwv 
Seeelre Retaedeline- Wee Rewidenee* 



A bluAiiinf bride 4m t* red lh« 
mrn'i department of s bis ttort. 

I wsnt s hlrihdsr rsrssent for 
my hiiAbtuvl but I tton't know whet 
to buy.' 1 

•Why not s nkre ellk muffler for 
p"ening wee r 7 " 

Oh. rleer no! My hti 
tot*e out ei, nicht " 

"Well, vosi mlgt.t i*i .t lor 
He will therL" 



3L 



TIIK DAILY COLONIST, VICTORIA. Ti C , SI XDAV. II I .Y 26. 1936 



sum show 

WES » 

Annual Event of Victoria 
Horticultural Society to 
Be This Week 



Trio Will Play Here Next Thursday 



— 



Judges for the annual Summer 
show of the Victoria Horticultural 
Society, to be held Friday and Sat- 
urday at the Willow* Exhibition 
Orounds. were announced last night 
by officials of the society. 

The show will be held in the Main 



Building of the fair grounds. It was 
said. 

The artistic displays will be 
Judged by Mrs. Biggerstaff Wilson 
and Mrs. Jack Rlthet. The general 
floral exhibits will be judged by 
Oeorge Robinson, veteran official of 
Elk Lake, while E. W. White, of the 
Provincial Department of Agricul- 
ture, will Judge the vegetables. 

There will be thirteen separate 
sections of flowers, fnilt and vege- 
tables on display at the Summer 
show, officials said. In the display 
section of the show three competi- 
tions, Including the annual district 
display contest, have been arranged 
flowers will have a 
it place on the display 
shelves, while large-sized fruit and 
vegetables, the cream of the Island 
crop, will also be on display. 

Programmes of entertainment for 
the two days of the show are being 
arranged. 



NO EMPLOYMENT ON 
ALBERTA FARMS FOR 
OUTSIDE UNEMPLOYED 




Lewis 



Trio. 
Qraham. 



Instrumental, 
baritone 



The Pro Arte Trio, Which Will Be Heard at the Victoria High School in a Special Musical Concert < 
Ihursday. July 30. Members of the Trio Are: Hana Zschiedrich, Marguerite Devl ln and Eugene Mahrer 



on 



CALOARY. July 25 0 -"Stay out 
of Alberta" was the warning Issued 
today to British Columbia and 
Saskatchewan unemployed who may 
have had Ideas of 



for harvest work. 

Drought has cut down crop pros- 
pects and no work will be available 
for outside help said officials of the 
Government employment service In 
Issuing the warning here today. 

More than 1,000 single Jobless men 
already are in the city seeking har- 
vest work, and hundreds of them are 
being cared for by the Alberta Re- 
lief Commission. 




Small Boy: Father, what's a com- 
mittee? 

Father: A committee Is a body 
that keeps mlnutea and wastes 
hours. 



AUCTION SALE 

Monday at 1 :30 P.M. 

Fred Smith & Co. 

Auctioneer* and Valuators 

• — ■ - 

Antique and Modern 

FURNITURE 

Silver, Rr;!** and Copper 

Including: 2 Electric Vacuums. 
Model Pacific Liner Uook two years 
to build, worth $250), Marshall- 
Wells Electric Washer, Refrigerator. 
Console Model Radio. Rejuvenator. 
English Buggy, set of 7 Colonial 
Chairs and Dining Table. Walnut 
Corner Whatnot, Singer Hand Ma- 
chine. Boy s Bicycle. Shetland Spin- 
ning Wheel (150 years old». Walnut 
Balance Rocker. Papier Mache 
Tray, Console Oramophone, 2 Brass 
Fenders. 2 Colonial Walnut Tables, 
pair almost new Walnut Beds 
(complete*. Lloyd Loom. Sunroom 
8ulte. Dlvanette, Wilton and Ax- 
mlnster Carpets, Linoleum and 
Linoleum Squares. Breakfast Suite, 
Standard and Table Lamps, Ranges. 
Heaters, and the usual assortment 
of MLsrellsneous Effects. 

Ooods received or sent for up to 
11 A M . Monday. 



A 

Aurtioneer* 
Phone C. 4f»13 — R«i r MM 

on Antique* and Works 
of Art 



Maynard & Sons 



Auctioneer* 



Instructed, we will vll at our Sales- 
room. 7.11 -731 Johnwn Street, on 

WEDNESDAY, 1 iSO 

English Mahogany 
Furniture, Twin 
Bed, Carpets, Etc. 

This furniture, .removed from 8t. 
Charles Street, Includes such pieces 
as: Very fine Mahogany Chest of 
Drawers. Mahogany Bookcase. 
Mahogany Dressing Table. Ma- I 
hoganv Frame, Cheval Dressing 
M I - r o r. MalKMuuy Mattel- Tap : 
WashMand and Commodes, nice 
Mahogany and Walnut Cane-Sent 
Bedroom Chairs. Burmese - Carved 
Stand with Brass Tray. Oak Drop- 
leaf Tables. Fireside Seats and 
Footstool*. Occasion*! T.Wes, Brass 
Jardinieres, Fenders, Irons and 
Spark Ouards. very good English 
Care ts and Stair Carpets. Oriental 
Squares and Rugs, lante Mirror, 
splendid pair of English Mahog.mv 
Twin Beds, with Box Spring and 
Hair Mattresses, Walnut Bedroom 
Suite. White- Enamel Bedroom 
Furniture and other pieces of which 
particulars will appear later. Elec- 
tric Range. WE Front Ranr>s 
large assortment of Oarden Tool*, 
about eight lengths of Oarden Hose 
all White-Enamel Ice Refrigerator 
etc. On view all day Monday and 
Tuesday. 

Morning Sale at M M 

will Include about Fifty March- 
hatch Barred Rock Pullets and 
other Poultry. Vegetables. Two- 
Wheel Trailer Caravan, etc 



>MVN%Rn A M>\> 



TODAY 

8 30 p m — Dick 

mer Victoria newspaperman, 
take listeners to Denmark during 
the weekly -Port* of Call" broad- 
cast. A dramatization of the his- 
tory of the country will also be pre- 
sented by a cast of radio actors. 
CJOR. 

8 30 am.— The piano and organ 
which Franz Liszt used as a boy 
are to be played as a feature of a 
broadcast from Budapest over the 
Columbia chain. Part of the pro- 
gramme will originate in the Mon- 
astery of St. Francl*. where Liszt 
spent his boyhood. Other Liszt 
works will be presented by the 
Royal Opera Orchestra. The pro- 
gramme marks the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the composer's death 
KOL. KVI. 

10 a m. -Kathleen Norris will ap- 
pear in a dramatic role on the 

Magic Key" programme when she 
plays a role from her own work, 
The Life of Queen Victoria," dur- 
ing a short dramatized broadcast. 
Lennie Hayton* dance orchestra, 
the NBC. Symphony Orchestra. 
John B. Kennedy, riews commenta- 
tor, and Bill Robinson, famed negro 
tap dancer, will also be heard KJR. 

11 am — Dr. Howard Han&on will 
direct the second broadcast of the 
Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra. 
The programme will Include Mo- 
zart's ••Impressario" and Chabriers 
■ Espana ." KOMO. 

11 am. — 'Fetes." by Debussy; 
Sibelius' "The Swan of Tuoncla"; 
three Rumanian dances by Bartok. 
and Dohnanyt's "Suite for Orches- 
tra" will be offered by Paul Leniay 
when he directs the Columbia Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the regular Sun- 
day morning "Everybody s Music" 
broadcast. KOL, KVI. 

11:15 a m — Carleton Smith, music 
commentator, will speak to this 
continent from Bayreuth. Germany. 
In a special N BC. blue network 
programme. KJR (tentatlvet. 

4 30 p.m.— Schubert's "M a r c h e 
MUltaire", Beethoven s "Eg m out 
Overture". "Choral No. 147" and 
Come. Sweet Death," both by 
Bach, and Handel s "Coronation 
Anthem" will be presented by thr 
Ooldman Band during a half-hour 
NBC. blue network programm 
KJR. 

4 30 p.m. — 8aul Caston, assistant 
conductor and first trumpeter of 
the Philadelphia Orchestra, will be 
guest conductor of the Robin Hood 
Dell orchestra, broadcasting from 
Robin Hood Dell. Falrmount Park. 
Philadelphia, for two hours over the 
Columbia chain Caston will direct 
the orchestra Ih "Symphony in D 
Minor"; Tschaikovsky s "Nutcracker 
Suite"; "Valse Trlste." by Sibelius; 
Rimsky- Korsakoff's "Flight ol the 
Bumblebee"; Bachs Air for the O 
8tring." and the novelty, "Musical 
Snuff Box." by Liadoff KOL. KVI. 
KSL. » 

5 pm —"Christmas Morning" will 
be the monologue to be offered by 
Cornell* Otis Skinner during her 
fifteen-minute NJ3C. blue chain 
programme KJR. 

6 pm — Ernest La Prade and A A 
Harding will be guest" conductor's 
during the third concert of the an- 
nual serte* from National Music 
Camp. Interlochen, Mich Popular 
symphonic and standard composi- 
tions will be broadcast KOMO. 

7:30 pm — Don Voorhees will be 
guest of Tim and Irene at the 
''Wfcky" home, during this halt- 
hour of conn •<lv and music. KOMO 
MOMlW 
3 30 pm - July Starr, new Colum- 
bia singing star, will appear In her 
second programme with thr Chari- 
oteers, male quarfe'te f->r "Colum- 
bia KOL. KVI. 

5 pm — Joan Crawford and Fran- 
chot Tone will present a radio ver- 
sion of Chained" on the Columbia 
Radio Theatre" programme KOL. 
KVI 

5 30 pm— Dr Edwin Franko 
Ooldman will begin his seventh 
week of broadcasting this season 
with his famous Ooldman Band for 
the NBC. blue network audience 
KJR 

6^0 pm -Walter Logan. Cleve- 
land N B C. musical director, will di- 
rect the Oreat Lakes Symphony Or- 
chestra from the Oreat lakes Ex- 
position In a half-hour NBC. red 
network presentation. KOMO 

7 15 pm -Reasons for the pres- 
ent critical position of the English 
Cabinet *nd the poastble conse- 
quence* will be discussed b v P m- 
fessor Hugh McDowell Clokle. of he 
political science at 



1 Stanford University, over the N BC. 
. blue chain. KJR. 
will ! 7:30 p m.-"By the Waters of the 
Minnetonka." by Lieurance; Pop- 
per's "Gavotte"; "One Fine Day." 
from Puccini's "Madame Butterfly"; 
Bruno's "Sing. Smile. Slumber" and 
Strauss' ' Blue Danube." will be sung 
by Margaret Speaks during her pro- 
gramme with William Daly's Or- 
chestra. KOMO. 
9 p.m.— The Colonist news. CFCT. 



11 30 r> m — «*n*tor Plshface and Profe»»or 

Fig«»bottle. comedy, v»rl*ty 
J 00 p.pj H M Canadian Orenadier 
Guards Band, director. Captain J J 
Oaimer 

J 30 i) m -Dandle* of Yesterday, malt 
quartette 

J 45 p m.- London Letter, talk by Allstalr 

Cooke. Erie land 
3 00 p m - Reflections, Instrumental 

3 44 p m Last Year s Htta, director. Jack 

Meakin 

4 00 r;n H Leopold Spftalnr* Orche.- 



Sunday's Programme 

CrCT. Victoria. Br H.4SO keys) 

11 00 am — Christ Church Cathedral 
4 00 p m -Sunday Afternoon Concert 

• 00 p m — Pentecostal Assembly 

• 30 p m -Oospel Sun.'hine "Hour. 
7 00 p m —Miniature Concert. 

7 30 p m — Christ Church Cathedral. 

8 43 p m Evening Reveries 

t R( V. Vancouver. B.C. (1.100 keys) 
3 13 a m -e 4f a m See C R C Network 
2 00 pm flee CRC Network, escept: 
8 00 p ni - Home Hour of Music. 

KNX. Hollywood (MM keys) 

• IS p m - The Jones Boys. 

8 30 p m - Rev C E. Puller 
7 30 p m — Towsjsend Plan, talk 

7 43 pm — Concert Music 

8 no p m - Presbyterian Church 

• 00 p rn - News Plashes 

8 II p m - Larry Lee s Orchestra 
8 30 pm -The Crockett Family. 

10 is p m - Hal Oraysnn s Orchestra. 
10.30 pm —Larry Lee'e Orchestra 

11 00 p m - Jay Whidden * Orchestra. 

C.B.C. NrTWOR* 

» IS a m to | 45 a m -His Majesty the 
Km* Unveils the Canadian War 
Memorial at Vlmy Rldie. 

» 00 pm Band of HM Orenadier 
Ouards. director. J 4. Oatner. Mont- 
real. 

? 30 . ■ Dr H L Stewart Review* the 
News. Hullfa* 

I4Spm Present in* Wilfred Charett*. 
pianist. Ottawa. 

J 00 p ni Crinolines, mixed quartette, di- 
rector. Ernest Dainty. Toronto 

3 30 urn— La Vllle Malson. Montreal. 

« 00 p m . — Blatlnerphone rrcordin* of 
ceremonie* Unveillnt Canadian War 
Memorial at Vimy Ridce. 

4 10 p m Jasper Park I rune Muslcale. 

director. O R Murknwsg) 

5 00 p m Feast of Ste Anne from Shrine 

of Ste Anne de Beaupre. Quebec 

5 30 p m - Rocky Mountain Melody Time. 

, M,.rt Kennev s Western Gentlemen 
Banff 

a no b.bj) BfttfJt 'BC. Network! 

6 HO ■ >ii Mirmr of Melodv. director. 

(leoffrev W*ri<1:ngton. soloist,. To- 
ronto 'BC, 6 I5i 

• 30 p m Chasing Shadows. Dm* S'ew- 

art, Dorothy Norton, pianists. Cal- 
«ary. 

• 4S p m Canadian Pres* 

Weather. Toronto 

7 00 n m Time Bltnat. Ottawa 
7 00 Pm - Atlantic Nocturne. Allan Reld. 

or««n. i#on Bolk'vot/ky. vlolijn. j' 
Prank Willis, readings. Halifax 
7 30 p m Blue Pacific MoontKht. direc- 
tor. Percy Harvey, with Jean de Rl- 



7 30 p 

h no p 



5 00 p rn Cornelia OtU Skinner, 
lot ues 

6 IS p in Paul Whiteman* Musical Va- 
rieties, Ramona, Roy Bariy. Durelle 
Alexander, Bob Lawrence. Km*'* 
Men, Norman Ruvelle. guest artial. 

8 00 p m — Twilight Hour. muMc, poetry. 
• 30 i> m - Dreams of Lon* Aio. Ethel 

Parks Richardson, son* dramatisa- 
tion. 

7 00 p ■ Twin City Poursom*. male 
quartette 

7 10pm News Flashes 
7 IS p m -Palace Hotel Ensemble. Instru- 
mental 

p m - Leon Navarro s Orchestra 
> m — Jlmmie Lunceford * Orchestra 
3 30 p m — Carl Ravaiza* Orchestra. 

9 00 p m - Pledier Henderson's Orchestra 
» 30 p m -Readers - Ould*. J H Jackson 

10 00 p m — Tom Brown's Orchestra 

10 30 P m - fllerlin* Youngg Orchestra. 

11 00 p m - Charles Runyan. or«anl»t. 

C B S DON LEE Nr.TWORK 

KVI-KPRC KOIN-K8L-KOL 
3 00 a m -Salt Lak* City Tabernacle 

or«an and choir. Utah iKVII. 
3 30 a m Romany Trail <KOLi 
3 45 am - -CBS-BBC News Exrhan**. 

Avlmer Andre Vulllet. Pari* iKOLi 
• 00 am- Church of the Air.. 
9 30 a m Russell Dorr, baritone, orches- 
tra (KVIi. 
» 45 a m.— Eddie Dunstedter Entertains. 
If) 00 a m - Kleiner Quartette, Instrumen- 
tal 

10 10 a m — St Louis Blue* 

11 M a m —Evert body's Music, director. 

Howard Barlow tKOLv 

12 00 noon Sunday Serenade 

12 30 p m Songs of Russia, director. 

Vladimir Helfeti 
1 00 pm.-Ann Leaf's Musical* 

1 30 p m - Alma Bheas«reen and Virginia 

Johnson, piano duo 

2 00 p m Ma and Pa. *ketch 

3 30 p m —Press-Radio New* 
2 35 p m -The Chlcatoans. 

2 45 p m Ted Malone * Between the 

Bookends 

3 00 p m Clyde Lucas' Oallfornla Don* 

3 10 pm— Annal* of the Ace*. 

4 00 p m - America Dance*, director, Lud 

Gluskln ' KOL). 
4 30 p m Robin Hood Dell Symphony 

Orchestra, director. Saul Ca.iten, 

Philadelphia 
3 30 p m — Community Sin* 
" 00- p m — Dick Stabile * Orlhe.str*. 

7 30 p m - Bob Crosby'* Orchestra 

8 00 p m - Johnny Johnson'* Orchestra 
8 30 p m - Beta Schaefer's Orche.str* 

3 00 pm— Milton Ch»rles. onanist 
I 15 pm —Carl Schreiber's Orchestra 
» 30 p m — Joaeph Chernavsky * Orchestra 
10 00 p m - nils Klmbel s Orchestra 

10 30 p m —Jan Garber a Orchestra 

11 00 p m — O»rlord Carter. or*»nl*t. 



2 00 p in W.unan a Masailn* of In* Air 

3 00 p m. — Otto Thurn's Orcheatra. 
3 19 p m — Back Seat Driver 

3 45 pm -Pictorial. Rush , Hu.ho*. 

4 00 p m — Sai-o-Tune*. director. Mirkes 
Olllette ' 

4 10 p m -Strinctin*. 
Ford 

5 00 p m — Vuitln* with Captain Dobbs 
5 30 p m.— Blue Prelude, piano*, contralto 
« 00 p m — Contented Prcmramme. Lullaby 

Laidy. orchestra, director. Moigan L 
Eastman. Dr Roy Dafo*. 
7 00 p m -Amos n" Andy. 
7 IS p m — Lum and Abner comedy 

7 30 p m -M irtaret Speak*. W Daly .s 
Orchestr*. 

8 00 p in Fibber MrOee and Molly 
comedy 

• 10 p m.— Richard Himber * Champion*. 

9 00 p m — Hawthorne House, drama 

* 30 p m — Keith Beecher * Orchestra. 
10 00 p pj —News 'fU lies. Sam Hate* 
10 || p m -Marshall s Mavericks 

10 30 p m — Henry Knin'e Orchestr* 

11 00 p m.-E4di* Duchln'. Orchestra. 
11 30 p m — Reverie*. in»trumentalrst*. 

N B.C.-KGO BLl'E NETWORK 
KOO KJR KEX KECA-KOA 

8 00 am Hour of Mcmorte*. US Navy 
Band. 

9 00 a til Joan and the Escort, quartette 
9 30 a m - The New World, speaker. 

10 45 a m. — N B C. Music amid 
llOOam.-The Manhattan, orchestra 

11 30 a m -Western Farm and Home Hour, 
talk*. Wilbur Hall *erl»l. Josef Hor- 
nik's Orchestra 

12 30 p m — Oaylord 
12 45 p m —Ross 

1 00 pm Titers Talk It Over. Emily Post 
AnnoliffTrd. author*; Alma Kltchell 
contralto. M C. 

1 45 p m. — Johnstone Ensemble 

2 00 p.m - V 3 Army Band, director. Cap- 
tain T F Darcy. 

2 27> p m.— Musical MomniU. 
2 3S - p m — Gale Page. ton**. 

2 45 p.m.— Three Sc*mps. vocal trio 

3 00 p m -William Hoffman s Orchestra 
3 15 p m — Tor» Rus-ell. soncs 

3 30 p m —John Herrlck. baritone 

4 00 p rn Jean Dickenson, coloratura »o- 
prano. 

* 30 M» Crosscut* from the Lo« o' the 

5 00 p„. -Beaux Arts Trio, tnstrumental 
5 30 p m —Ooldman B ind Concert 
8 45 p m — Jolly Coburn * Orchestra 
7 00 p m — N«no Rodriso « Orchestra 
7 IS pm — Stanford University Pro- 
gramme, speaker. 

7 30 p m — Al Donohue s Orcheitr* 

8 00 p m — Shandor. violinist 
8 08 pm -Henry Bus*e* Orchestra. 
aiSpm -Frank Wattnab*. sketch 
8 30 p m -Irving Aaronson * Orchestr* 

8 45 pm -Armand Oirard, barlton*. 

9 00 P m — Ruasian Rhap»ody. Rallna Za- 

rova 

9 30 p ni -Yesterday * Mu»ic. Robert Ste- 
ven*, tenor 
10 00 p m -Ran Wild* * Orche»tr» 

10 30 p m —Jlmmv drier'* Orchestra 

11 OQ. p m. Paul Carson, organist 

C BS. DON LEE NETWORK 
KVI-KFHC-KOIN-KSL-KOL 
m — Poetic Siring* <KVJ). 
— T r u^M ti iijiupi p n. ■ 
-Gold Med»l Hour - Betty and 






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Bob. dr»m« Modern Cinderella. 
*ama. Latest Thing. News. Beity 
Crocker. recipes. Hymn* of All 
Churchr* 

10 00 I m Hcd Malone* Between the 

Bookends. 



Charioteer* and 



Bays 
Judy 



10 15 am Happy Hollow. dr«matlc sketch 

10 30 am Manhattan Matin**, variety 

11 1$ am -Milton Charles, organist <KVD 

1 1 4S a m — Hoosier Hop. 

12 00 noon- Department of Education 

Series iKOLi. 
12 30 p m — Chicago Variety 
I 15 p m — Bob Crosby s Orchestra <KOL) 

1 45 p m — Wilderness Road, drama 
J 00 pm -Oeorge Hall s Orchestra. 

2 U pm— Dr Polygolde* <KOL). 
7 30 p m -News Plashes 

3 oo p m — Feminine Fancies 

3 15pm Loretta Lee and E ton 
•KOL». 

3 30 P in The 

Starr. 

4 00 p m - Horse* Heidt a Brigadier* 

4 30 pm— Song* at Eventide <KVll 

5 00 pin -Radio Theatre, director. Cec-1 

De Milie 

eoopm - Wayne Kin« s Orchestra. 
« 30 p m — March of Tim* 
3 45 p m. — Jack Shannon, tenor 'KV'H 
TOO pm— Clyde Lucas and orchestra 
I 15 p m - Renfrew of th* Mounted 
serial. 

7 30 p m One 

and Pat. 

3 00 p m - Vincent Lope* and orchestra 
3 30 p m — Hawaii Call* 

8 00 p m — Eddie House, singing organist 
» 15 p m — Carl Schreiber * Orchestra 

8 45 p m —Nocturne with Frahklln Mc 

Cormack iK8L>. 
10 no p m — Oaylord Carter, onanist. 

10 30 p m - Jan Oarber's Orchestra 

11 00 pm — Hrnny Goodman's Orchestra 
11 30 p.m. -Oaylord Carter, organist 



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3 SO p m - Light classical musie YV2RC. 
51 I *, 91 meg 

M WlltlD 

4 00 nm-Muslral prosyramm* from Lon- 
don EAQ. 30 5 m . B 87 me* 

UNMUVaVN. nuiiirlssds 

4 00 p m - Special transmission for Cen 
tral and South America PCJ. 31 2 
m , 9 53 me* 

Monday's Programme 

IX1NDON 

3 55 p m - Reginald King and his orches- 
tra OSP. 13 3 m . 15 31 me*. GST. 
Ill n, 13 14 me*. OSD. 25 5 m . 
1173 me* 

• 58 p m Moccasin Telegraph " A 
thrilling atory of the Arctic, told by 
Merge Zolo OSD. 25 5 m . 11 75 met . 
OSC. 313 m . 8 58 met. 
PARIS 

II 30 am Theatucal Broadcast, by the 
actors of th* Pari* Odeon Theatre. 
TPAS. 23 2 m . 11 88 meg 
MOSCOW 

I 00 pm A Broadcast for Workers on 
the Canal and River Transport Sys- 
tem RNE. 25 m . 13 me* 
BFRI IN 

3 00 p m -Some Cheerful Choruses The 
German Olior»l <Jnion. DJD. 25 4 
m . 11 77 me*. 

• 15 r> m - Concert of light music DJD. 
25 4 m . 11 77 me* 
ROM 3". 

3 00 p m - New* bulletin In English Spe- 

cial programme arranged by th* 
Federation of Business and Proles- 
aional Women Abruxzeal soma 
2RO Mall Bag 2RO. 31 1 m . 
8 63 meg v 

MADRID 

4 00 pm— Newa and Bullfight Review 

EAQ. 30 3 m . 8 87 meg 




FOR SAFETY 

Expert Appointed to Take 
Charge of Logging Acci- 
dent Prevention 



ady 



la saXety 

industry. 



M o n da v ' * Programm e 



Nevs, and 



manoery. violinist. Vancouver 
8 00 p.m I.i se. Lau«h and Love, orches- 
tr*. »n|olst*. director. Count Pr»vda. 
Winnipeg 

8 30 p m Drifiwood. Allan Caron. organ- 
ist. Winnipeg 
| oo p m — In the Old Chateau, strln* 

ouartetie. Winnipeg mot CRCV) 
10 00 p m New*, Vancouver iBC Net- 
work). 

M R ( KTO RFD VrTVVORK 

KHQ KOW KFT KPO-KOMO 
8 CO a m Malnr Bowes' Capitol ramllv. 
Waldo Mayo, conductor, Nicholas 
0**U*tfltlnOi Helen Alexander. Roy 
Campbell s Royalist*, Joey Naah. 

8 30 a m —University of Chicago Round 
Tabl* T.Iks 

9 no a m -Harold Nagel'a Orchestra. 
9 10 a m - Joan and the Escort*, singer* 

10 00 a m - Belle Oeste de Muslque. direc- 
tor. Ben Sllverberg. Michael Rusyn. 
baritone 

10 30 a m Peter Absolute, drama 

11 oo a m —Chautauqua Symphony Orches- 
tra, director. Howard Hansen 

12 00 noon- The Widow s Sons, drama. 
12 30 p m - Wnrrfs and Music Ruth Lvon. 

soprano Charles Sear*, tenor. Har- 
vey Hay*, narrator Larry L*r»on. 
onanist 

1 00 p m Suoday Special, dram* by 
C*rlton ■ Morse. Hare! Warner, 
contralto actors, violin, organ 

2 00 n m -Catholic Hour. Medlavellst*- 

. Choir. 

J 30 p m Echoes from the Orchestra Pit. 
director. Charle* H»rt. Annette Hast- 
inc*. soprano 

3 oo p m — K-7 Secret Bervlc* Spy Story 

3 30 p m -Jose Ramlre* and Argentine* 

4 00 |. m — Ma>' r Bowes' Amateur Hour. 

5 00 p m - Manhattan Merry-Go-Round. 
Rachel Carlav. Rodney McLennan. 
Men About Town. Andr Sanella s 
Orchestra 

S 30 p m Album of r*mtllar Music. 
Prank M ■«:.;. Luci M-.iuoe *.rden 
and Arden. Bertrand Hlrsch. bus- 
lave Haenschen'a Orchestra 
I no p :n - National Muale Camp Pro- 
gramme, music 
1 00 p m — Morln Sisters and Ranch sBoy*. 

Don McNeil, M 0, 

™ 34) p in — Tim and Irene, comedy team. 
Don Wilson. M C l Morton Bowe. 
tenor. Don Voorhee*' Orchestra 
I 00 ma.- Henry Bus.se s Orchestra, 
8 13 p m Winums R!st»r». vocal trio 
• KPOi 

■ 30 p m One Mar. s Family. Carlton 
Morse drama 

• 00 p m ■ John Nrabltt * Passing Parade 
8 13 P m —Sinn* Time, director. Louts 

, Ford 

8 30 p m Mark Fisher * Vlstal del Lego 

Orchestra. 
10 00 p rn Nisi Flashes. Sam Bay** 

10 15 pm Brld»* to Dre»ml»nd. Fan) 
Carson, onanist; 

11 00 p m - Beam Art* T 
II 30 p m -Jack Me. sin 

NBC Kf.O Rl I t 

*Wl *>-«WjCTX-KECA-KOA 
8 0» *fn-. Bsppv Jack, songs 

• IS * m The B*n«ers. vocal, instru- 
mental 

• Mam Rsdto City Ml**** Hall Sym- 
phony director. Maurlr*. Baron, 
gueat a rllat* 

in 00 *JT1 The Magic Kry of R C A . *<i**t 

artists' John B Kennedy, orchestra, 
d rector Frank Black 

n no * m - Gilbert Reides. raconteur Yrni 



rrrT. 

7 45am- 

8 no a m - 
8 30 »m.- 
8 45 a m - 
3 oo * m - 
8 15 a.m.- 
! io i m - 



Flss|,e» — 



/ 



Victoria. BC. 1 1.1.5* keys) 
f! se »nd Rhine 
Timely Topic*. 
Musical Chronometer 
I#t s Go Plnre, 
Morning Miodi | 
March Tine 
Hush Allan * Fwianru 
9 40 a m —Golden M'lodie* 
in no a m - Road to Hsppines* 
10 15 ■ m —Health Kellevgrsms 

10 30 am -Art Farey at the Plafco 

11 00 a m - Health Spot Shoemskjr 
II 15am- »!crar> Book 

11 30 a m - Conrrrt Mm ir Box 

12 II pm —World Book Man • Wfhe n Otd 

Columbus Diicoser Amerlci } 

11 20 p m - Msrine Moods 

12 30 p m -World Flashe 
1? 45 p m -M»nhatt*n Serened* 

100pm— Dallv Monitor 'excerpts from 

The Christian Science Monitor! 
8 00 p m - Radio Birthday 
* 30 p m — 1812 Overture 
8 45 p m —Time On' for Harmony 
7 no p m - Music Lovers' Corner. 
7 15 pm-Ray Noble Directing 

7 .10 p m — Organ Serenade 

8 00 p m — Time to Dance 
8 30 p m — Rer.deevmis 
8 00 p m - Colonist Radio Reporter 

CRIV. Vanraever. BC (1100 kca) 

4 30 p m - Recordln** 

5 00 p m —See c R C Netaork. eavrpt: 
» 30 p m — Dr Lvle Telford, addrrss 

KNX. Rnllvwon* I MM krv.l 
7 00 p m -Elmer Ooes to Hollywood 
7 15 p m - Drury I*ne and orchestra. 
7 30 p m —The Newlvwed*. comedy. 

7 45 P m —King Cowboy, annes 

8 no p m —Officer of the Day 
8 15pm -Minllc 

8 45 p m -Tnwnsend Plan 

9 oo p m — News Flashes 
8 II pm— Ruhinotf and violin 

• 30 p m —The Crockett Family, 
10 15 p m — Hil Gravsnn s Orchestra 
10 30 p m —Marshall Grant, organ 
1100 p m — "-1P Fnatrrll"! Orchettra 
12 00 m n — Trans-Pacific News 

r R r VFTW08K 
8 00 p m — Fanfare Orchestra dl-ectof. 

Bruce Holder, inlolit*. St John 
8 30 p m -Tribute |o a Seine, director. 

Perry Faith. dram* by Rupert 

Hughes. Toronto 

• 00 ,. m - With Banner* Flvln*. director. 

Gtj'seppe Agostml Imperial Grena- 
dier*, male quartette. Montreal 

• 30pm Wilderness Adven'ur**, talk, 

amplres Canadian Forestry Associa- 
tion. Montreal 

• 43 p m Canadian Pre** New* and 

Weal! r- _ Toronto 
7 no p m — T me Rlwnal. Ott'swa 
7 oo v m — Jaseha Oalpertn's Orchestra. 

Iwike I otiise 

7 30 p m t.ulliby lagoon, director Saml 

Hersen^ioren. Toronto > B C 7 4S' 

8 OO p m - Youn»bloosls of Beaver Bend. 

dramatic serial, Winnlpe* 

• 30 p m - Lakehearl Melody, organ, vocal 

•recital. Fort William 
8 43 p m Book Rexiew. James Stuar > - 

Wcci Prlnr* Albert 
8 00 p m - Old Time Frolic. Saskatoon 
8 30 p m —Knights of Oladness. director 

.T.shn B^-»-n*ft. Fdmor'^Ti rrtcv 
lOOOpm News. Vancouver -BC Bet 

work> 

10 II p m .ack Wllllarfon'. 
Vancouver .B C Network' 



All Paelfl* Standard Time 



Sunday's Programme 

LONDON 

3 40 p m H:s Male- - the King unveils 
the Cansdian War Memorial at Vlmy 
Ridge in the presence of the Presi- 
dent of the French Republlr OSP. 
18 8 m. IS 31 meg. OSP. 19 8 m. 
II 14 me* , OSD. 23 5 m . 11 73 meg 
MOM OW 

1 00 p m Review of the week listeners' 

nuestlons and aajewers. news bulle- 
tin* RNE. 23 m . 12 me* 
FARM 

2 4.5 p m - Concert slaved from Radio- 

Parl* TPA4. 23 8 m . 11 72 meg 
Bl Rl IN 

3 00 p m A Snndav evening * pro- 

gramme DJD. 25 4 ni , 1177 meg 
5 30 p ii Germ in M*rche*. DJD. 




Krrlyn W hi tell 
A l I nity Church 

EvHyn WnitHl apoaks twice more 
at the Unity Church of Fellowship. 
Doiifflas Hotel, before leaving for 
Duncan. Her address today at 3 
p m will be on "The Greatest Thing 
in the World." given by special re- 
quest of those who have heard her 
on this subject before She will also 
speak on Thursday at 8 p.m. Her 
place will be taken during her 
absence by Rev. Lela Coombs, 
healer and teacher from Tacoma. 
and later the Centre will have a 
canr.w of lectures 
Walker. 




NUll D. JfVRIN* 

Pressing ahead IU campaign to 
increase the «afefv of workers in the 
woods of British Columbia the 
British Columbia Loggers' Assoc!*- 
tlon has appointed Will D Jenkins, 
internationally - known expert, to 
take complete charge of accident 



ughoul Its 

industry. 

As Mr. Jenkuu all 
director of the mi 
under the Brliuh Columbia Lumber 
and Shingle Manufacturers' Asao-. 
elation, he will virtually have carta 
blanche over the entire umber In- 
dustry of the province in accident 
prevention efforts. 

BEST AVAILABLE 

"The Jogging industry la deter- 
mined to increase the safely of lut 
workers by every po&slble means." 
K. B. Brown, clialrman of the board 
of the loggers' association, declared 
"We feel that In Mr. Jenkins we 
shall have the best man available 
in western America to direct thi» 
work. Our safety campaign already 
ha* aecured valuable results and 
these should be greatly increased 
under Mr. Jenkins. In this work, 
of course, the Industry has both a 
humanitarian and a direct financial 
interest." 

Mr. Jenkins will work with the 
safety committee set up by the De- 
partment of Labor, the Workmen* 
Compensation Board *nd the log- 
gers' association. 

minis n r UATtUIMB 

Hon. O 8. Pearson, Minister of 
Labor, welcoming Mr. Jenkins' ap- 
pointment, expressed keen satisfac- 
tion with the progress of the safety 
drive to date. Through educational 
work and other measures, he said, 
accident* had been substantially re- 
duced In bucking and falling opera- 
tions, which have always been the 
most dangerous In the woods. 

The safety committee, with Mr. 
Jenkins present, will meet shortly 
to review all logging serldent* In the 
first half of this year antl. plan 
■safety work for the future. 



WINS ( I.MERA ( ONTKST 

Jolin Bong proved to be the 
winner of the Y M C A. Camera 
Clubs monthly competition, held 
on Friday. The aubject wa* "A 
Rose ' A new member, Donald 
Molr, was introduced 




Don't Worry 

VER 

MOVING 



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11 H a m Clois'er Bells, instrumental en 
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11 so am B»nno Bahmoff s.olnlst 

12 OO nooji Simla < Vespers, music direc 
lor. cnarie* " 



NRr KPO If D, NTT WO BR 

KHQ- KG W- KPT -KPO-KOMO 

8 30 * m on* Marttar* ITif a,. . 
8 45 s t Merry Madcaps. Cloulier* Or 
chestr* 

8 15 a m — Clint Noble * OtTtre»ira 
8 30 a m — SMmmer Pmmenade, songs 
in no a m -Rlalhra Pared* 
II «* am - Pepper Young i P» ml ], s»»tch 
II IS am M* Perkins, drama. V.rglnia 
Psvn* 

II 30 am Vie *nd Bade. ho*itenold 
comedy 

. II IS ■ si -The n vetlls. dremaur 

13 8C noon — Woman • Badlo Bettew 
I 113pm — Anieln V;t»J* s Band 

1 30 p m -Jtirr Sear* Orcheetr*. 1 




Mutt ■ 



C5T 189 



*m htm tmw 




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packing and 

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OUR UNIFORMED MEN ARE TRAINED 
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MOVING. PACKING. 
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HEANEY'S 



Established 1890- 
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Phone G 1194 





1 ti^PLt !> r>Y TOh.o 




^ I Step Into My Castle 



jti_ 




By Frank Leon Smith 
w 




■ ■MM ■■■■■■ '~ 



. .it . *. HI ■ - ■ 



BARTHOLOMEW Hall was a mile from 
it* entrance gate*, a mile of beautiful 
winding road under great oaks, maples, 
beeches Eventually Blbby Norton reached 
the vast pile of the main building with its 
lofty battlement* and ivy-covered walls, and 
since the drive wound round it he kept on 
going, making a complete circuit. Hooray! 
No girl*! 

He shut off the motor of his bicycle and 
contemplated the high arched entrance, the 
mullioned windows, the crenelated towers. 

Perfect! Gorgeous! He hopped off and 
ran up the wide shallow granite step*. Sud " 
denly the great strap-hinged door was opened. 

Three fat red-faced men In knickerbockers 
marched past him without seeing him. They 
earned golf bags alung to their shoulders. 
Then came a small man with reedy legs, ac- 
cented by the bulk of his plus-fours. He had 
a red moustache and hair that had been red. 
and like the others, he bore golf clubs— but 
he came out backward and pulled the heavy 
door shut. 

Blbby cleared hi* throat. "Excuse me, U 
this Bartholomew Hall?" 

The man stared at Blbby. ' It la" 

•Are you the dean? But wait a minute-i* 
this a girls' school?'" 

••No! This is a private residence.'' 

•Great! Could I aee you Just a minute? 
I represent the — " 

The little man glared at Blbby and at 
Bibby* dusty old motor bicycle and sidecar, 
with Its big bag of bows slanting upward like 
an anti-aircraft gun. "Oet out of here! I 
have no time for you!" 

There waa nothing for Blbby to do but 
clamber aboard his bicycle and start the 
motor The little man waited until Bibby 
had turned to go back down the drive, then 
he sulked off after the other men. 

Bibbys engine sputtered, falteredy IMM, 
and he had to nurse It back to its full-throated 

"^Why. Ivanhoe. How nice! Or was It 
Ivnnhoe who had bows and arrows!" 

He throttled down and turned to find a girl 
standing alongside, gazing at the bows and 
arrows m the sidecar. A very fine-looking 
redheaded girl in faded blue linen pyjamas 
with loam on the knees 

• How do you do? Oh. excuse me. but do 

you live here?" 

Uh-huh " , k . , - . 

• Could I speak to you about something? I 
mean-I guess we d better move' around the 
house a little becauae a man— I guesa It was 
your father-he just sent me away " 

The girl laughed and beckoned him around 
the corner of the house He idled 
after her and stopped where she waited in tne 
shade Then he reached into the sidecar and 
pulled out a book with a blue cover. "See this 

^lle took the book The title was 'Turpin 
II She glanced up at him and « m ' 1<,d 

He grinned back. "Excuse me. I m Biooy 
Norton." 

• Margaret Bartley." 

She sat on the grass and invited him to Join . 
her He dropped down beside her. He said. 
•Your house looks like a castle." 

SHE made a face "You don't have to rub 
It in We've been kidded for years be- 
cause my grandfather had an attack : of an- 

cc.strv and didn't get over it until thla-thls 
fortress was finished." 

Well. I was down In Florida, teaching 

archery'" . ,,. 

Oh. vou are a professional archer? 

• H *a» » hobby I had to do son 
when architecture plajed out " 

"Oraclou*— an architect, too?" 
•They said I could be, n the unlverslty- 
that was Nebraska-but when 1 got to Florida 
,hcv aaid. 'Why. there's sn architect here 
already!' 80 anyway. I came on up here to 
New York, and the only man I knew was with 
s motion picture company." 

Have you been in pictures, too'" 

• Well I've designed sets and one thing and 
another In Hollywood and I've worked as an 
extra in Florida. So I asked ft* man how 
,0 go about getting . job teaching .rrherv 
a, a bov.s Hr gave me a ist of 

£choola II turfed oat to » ■ « * * ,rl * 
M honls His idea of a joke " 

• How mean'" 

■Oh no. U ao happened that some of the 
Let** had buildings Ilk* ^ 
dav up and down the Hudson Vallev, I -saw 
J lot more castle. 80 I wen, back tot* 
U,„ man and ■ his office I met Harry Mack 
Edward* He s a big picture director 
Go on This is very interesting , 
Mr Edwards haa just come back from Lon- 
don. His company owns the picture rights to 
tll a< book. Turpin W *• • modem ' fete C- 
tive story with a mysterious charac ur *no 
wears a Dick Turpin costume for a Mr*** 
„nd takes the law into his own hand> When 
?Wn talking about the* glrU schools and 
LST award's got exciu-d 
1 sold him the Idea to make 
here and finish his picture in Hollywood-ana 
do vou know what. Miss Bartley?" 

She shook her hcid . 

•Tve trot to have a job. so I asked Mr M- 
wardsT 'What do you want to have a Dick 
Turpin character for? If ft* character rights 
, M of wrongs and does things for the poor 
why not pick on the right man?' I explained 
how much more graceful the bow and arrow 
are. than Turpin'* horse pistol, and some of 
the things an archer can do. and he aaid. 
•You find me a good convincing castle in a 
nice natural setting and lH play ball »o 
4 cruised around today, but the girls' schools 
don't want the excitement of a picture com- 
pany men I aaw this place at a distance 
and when I was told it was Bartholomew Ha.l 
1 took it for granted It waa another school 
Anvway. it was my last chance— and 



Blbby said Impulsively, "8ee here. Mr Ed- 
wards, you want me to double for Alan Brant- 
mgham. I want the Job. All right. How la 
It if we have Benda masks made for Al and 
for me? You can make a big dramatic pomt 
of it when Al unmasks and the identity of 
the mystery man is revealed And with the 
mask on, I can be around and Bartley can aee 
me. but he won t know fne." 

"You re juat full of ideas, aren't you?" said 
Edwards. "What are you going to sell me 
next?" 




Tht if««! jrm of rht jrmor w« lifted, the revolver 
tiploded loudly, then— "Gang!"— »n arrow jhot by 
Bibby Norton p.arccd th« armor slmoit to the leather. 



Edwards could 



you've done Is try to unload suggestions and 
ideas on me. All I want from you is some 
bow and arrow work— and now , how do I know 
you can even shoot?" 

Blbby nocked an arrow, held It In place 
while he foraged In some box lunches "I 
never claimed to be any William Tell.'' he 
said He tossed an orange Into the air, then 
drawing the arrow to Its head, he sent it 
through the orange as ft finished its arc and 
started downward. Tve never tried it with 
an apple. I've always practised on oranges ." 

The next day when the "all clear" signal 
was flashed-by Rita, meaning that her father 
had left for the city— Blbby Norton was called 
upon to do hi* stuff. He shot into the tire 
of a car speeding down the Bartley drive and 
the car overturned The microphones caught 
the twang of his bowstring at various parts of 
the estate. The cameras caught him shooting 
from behind trees, from the branches of trees 
and from the tops of stone walls. 

Edwards had his negative developed and 
printed. He was pleased with his results. He 
had a aeasion with the New York office, which 
was delighted at the chance to throw a little 
mud in Hollywood's eye. and it waa agreed 
that he might aa well do all the work he could 
at the Bartley estate; so. acting on Bibby* 
suggestion, he hired a couple of Broadway ac- 
tors for villains, and shot the garden party 
sequence, with Rita's house guests as atmos- 
pheric extras. 

Rita and her friends responded enthusiasti- 
cally, but Rita waa disappointed when she 
found that Blbby was not in the acenes. She 
couldn't understand the man. He hadn't ap- 
peared for lunch that first day, and when she 
had taken him to task for It aa he leaned on 
his bow. masked In his coatume. she saw a 
leplica of him at a distance, and the replica 
waved his hand and 
steps, so she knew It was to 
she was talking. 

She didn't like Mr Brantlngham. masked or 
unmasked He waa smug, assured and thought 
the Hollywood label was in Itself a claim to 
fame ■ The fourth day. encountering him In 
a cedar thicket, ahe sought to avoid him. but 
he flung off his mask, put his arms around 
her and kissed her-and this Robin 
turned out to be Blbby 



which would be invisible to the cameras and 
which had moved arm and pistol trigger. 

"Cut!" roared Edwards "Flni! End of the 
opera! Everybody step on it now! Oet this 
place cleaned up! Be careful not to break 
anything and see that you do ■ neat Jo"j!" 
Fred Bartley turned to find Rita staring at 
•Why, father!" 




Hood 



She thrust the pictures 



"Oh. golly!" 
the*e!" 

"He's going to. 
Into his handa. 

"What's the name of your company?" 

"Ensign Pictures." 

Her llpa parted In a slow smile. "Ensign 
Pictures? How funny!" 

Bibby went to the sidecar, fished in the big 
canvas bag and produced a beautiful slim bow 
of lemonwood He came back to her. braced 
the bow against his leg, strung It and handed 
it to her. "Thla la the last one I made and it 
has about the right pull for you." 

•But I couldn't take It!" 

He raised his right arm In comic threat. 
"Hey!" then they laughed. She lifted the bow 
and awkwardly tried to nock an arrow. "Here, 
let me show you. Miss Bartley." 

Mr. Fred Bartley. on the green In four, 
mopped hi* brow and glanced toward the 
house. Silhouetted on the terrace was a bat- 
tered old motorcycle and sidecar, and a few 
feet away stood the. stranger he had ordered 
off the premUes. The stranger had his arm 
around his daughter as they held a pose sug- 
ge*tlve of a movement of the tango as done by 
professionals 

Mr Fred Bartley hurried acroas the green- 
sward He waa quite near before he discov- 
ered that what the young man was doing waa 
steadying and directing his daughter from 
behind a* she drew an arrow to its head. 8he 
let go; the arrow sped toward a bush they had 
selected a* a mark, and as she turned, pleased, 
to look at Blbby, there stood her father.. 

"Rita! What Is the meaning of tht*?" 

•Father! This Is Mr Norton! He wants 

to-" t 

Fred Bartley managed to pinch up a fold of 
Bibby s sleeve and march him to 4h* motor- 
cycle HI you ever come back here 1 11 have 

you arrested!" 

Blbby kept saying. ' But Mr. Ba tley— but 
Mr Bartley— let me explain—" 

Must I send for the state troop rs?" said 
Mi Mai tley. and Blbbv glanced wild y at Rita 
Bartlev. stepped on the Manor ..nd rdde away." 

• Father. If you d just calm dow 1 for one 
minute!" 

• I don't want what hes selling! I will not 
have peddlers around!" 

' Listen to roc; he's no pcdd'.< r 
ask permission for his company to 
tng picture* h*rc! ' , _ . 

W-h-a-t? Movies'' Here? Over my dead 
bodv' And you makmg friend* with him!" 



came to 
mov- 



niij"»»' — ' 

•OUT father haa chaaed me away 
' Now. unaccountably, ahe fetched the kind of 
blush that only a redhead can deliver, and ahe 
said not looking at Blbby. "You mean if you 
mm „et per mission to take pictures at one of 
these so-called castles you can get a Job a* 

Well. I'd only be the double for the leading 
man. Alan Br .wit Ingham " 

•Well whats holding you bark' 

He stsml at her "You mean you think we 
could work here?" .. 

• 1 don't thlnk-I know you could I 

ME reached out and gave her a clip on the 
arm then was horribly embarrassed 
Oh gosh*, excuse me' I got kind of wtld- 
- l)U U ' been so ' 1 mean- 

-Oh shut up " ahe said, laughing Excuse 
mr one minute and she went Into the nous 

When she came back ahe had Ifc huge 
pin lb showing Bartholomew Hall from 

various angles. 



He stalked hack to the third hole. 

WHEN Harry Mack FJriward* saw the 
photographs he exclaimed. "Perfect! 
This castle will establish my locale beautifully! 
If the studio want* to roar because I'm picking 
up a crew In New York and bringing Al 
Brantlngham and Anne Hay thorn here by 
plane— let em roar" 
An office girl came In 
. a call for you." 

He picked up the receiver. 
Hello. Blbby? I mean- M* -Norton? Tins 
U Rita Bartley t thought you might like to 
know that my father. Mr. Frederick Bartley. 
la a vice-president of Oorham Trust Oorham 
Trust ha* underwritten just oodles of stocks 
and bond* for Ensign Picture* If my father 
savs your company can t take scenes here, tell 
him he's standing In the way of one of his own 
enterprises" \ 

• Ooah. Miss Rita-that* great' 

Oh— and Mr. Norton, my left forearm Is 
all black and blue where the bowstring hits It 
when I shoot." 

• Darn It. whv dldn t I think to give vou a 
guard for your arm! I'll make one Ml aend 

it to you." 

• Bring It with you. Good -bye! 

He hung up and stared at the telephone. 
Then ho remembered the r st^of the m*«*agc 
and told Edward* 

• If you know the Bartley rflrl »o well. wh> 

didn't you say aor „ 

• Oh I don t know her exactly I mean— 
■dwarda wave him a look and . M»i«ned *° 

an office diplomat the taak of telephone* to 
Mr Bartley Preaently the diplomat reported: 
Oke but what a hard shell Had to listen 
to a yard and a half of insult* He claims 
Ensign I* the most extravagant *M*flM out- 
fit. In existence But he says if he can he!p 
is to economize, hes got to do hi* duty. He 
makes one condition. He aaya that under no 
circumstances is the voung man with the bows 
and arrows, who called there this morning to 
set lm on the premises" And the diplomat 



"Myself'-a* your assistant. I could relieve 
you of a lot of detail. Let me see the working 
script again, will you?"' 

Edwards slapped a script on the desk for 
Blbby. "Don't you gum things so Bartley 
throw* ua off hi* ranch!" 

MR. Fred Bartley reeled on the stone step* 
of his castle. A considerable cavalcade 
was In hi* drive— cars with actors, cameramen, , 
sound men. prop men. carpenters, electrician*: 
truck* with cameras and reflectors. 

Harry Mack Edwards advanced from the 
first car. introduced himself and made a cheery 
little speech. Bartley wanted to know how 
long It would take. Only a few days, Edwards 
thought. 

Bartley walked back Into the house, got 
ready to leave for the city, and called for Rita. 
She waan't there. 8he was down at the gate- 
keepers lodge, breathing a bit rapidly as Bibby 
Norton strapped a leather guard on her left 
arm. 

They heard a horn sound for a curve in the 
drive. •Oraciou*— that'* Father* car!" she 
said and hurried out. A* BarUey s car came 
up. Bibby walked calmly up the drive. 

Bartley stared at him. Blbby wore hi* black 
wig. a papier-mache mask and a toll cap with 
a feather. The car slopped alongside Rita and 
her horse. ' Who's that?" Bartley demanded. 
"Juat one of the actors." 

It they don't drive cars over the 
lawn*. Sorry I ever let em come here." 
"Yea, Father." 

Orumplly he kissed her and drove a»av. 
Rita walked around a curve. Joined Bibbv. 
• What on earth have you got on your face?" 

Hi* muffled voice answered. Mask— de- 
signed from a composite of all the best Robin 
Hood drawings He took It off and grinned 
at her. "Oueas your father dldn t know me. 
Alan Brantlngham 1* going to wear the same 
kind of mask." 

How will I tell you and Mr. Brantlngham 
apart?" she blushed. 

Til be the bowlegged one His knees knock 
a little. I gueas I'll have to say good-bye. Mr. 
Edwards will be looking for me " 

"Juat a minute. I've invited a lot of friend* 
to be here while you are taking the picture*. 
They'll get here In time for lunch— and I 
want you to eome." 

Blbby shook hla head "Id love to— but 
look. Miss Bartley. I'm only a sort of extra 
man In thla show, and it wouldn't look well 
to Mr. Edward* and Mlas Hay thorn, the star 
—and Alan Brantlngham " 

She flared. ...'jpo you mean you're afraid of 
their opinion? You could come if you really 
wanted to' " 

He stored at her. his wig and cap in one 
hand the mask in the other. Then he threw 



And 
before. I 



When she got around to it she thrust him 
away with the palms of her hands. 

•You're a public enemy. Will you have din- 
ner with me tonight?" 

"No. No. with many thank*, but— no. 
for the same reason I told you 
mustn't mix with the gentry " 

' You don't seem to have any hesitancy at 
-at kissing the gentry around corners and in 
bushea." 

• Oh. but that I* different, vastly different. 
He klsaed her again. 

She made no protest She Just looked at 
him 8he said. "Bibby, I don't know that I 
like that. I don't understand you. You re- 
fuse to lunch with me. and yet-well. I may be 
wrong, and It might have been Mr. Brantlng- 
ham. tot yesterday I think I saw you looking in 

the windowa." 

Bibby blushed. "I-I admit I looked into 
your castle, and VU tell you why " 

•Don't bother. Just so you wont find it 
necessary to klaa me every time we meet— I m 
going to Europe with my father!" 

•What!" 

Father sail* tonight for a conference in 
London. I am going too." 

He grasped her arm. looked into her eyes. 

■•Rita— aw. Rita, don't go-that is. unless you 
have to. Ml promlse-I won t kiss you any 
more, if you don't go." 

"Then— If I don't go— that ll a psomlae? 

' Yes' I mean— no!" He embraced her 
heartily. "1 ani * ttty weak character, and If 
-you want to know the truth Mivs Margaret 
Bartley. there I* something about you thats 
like a forest fire where all the trees and shrub* 
are made' of dynamite. I'm not sate anywhere 
near you-and please don 1 go to Europe!" 

All right. I won't-lf you'll have dinner 
with me." 

• But let me explain— when I was looking in 
your windows I was admiring the great hall— 
and let me tell you why." 

He told her, and she said she tliought it 
was the most exciting Idea she had ever heard 
of— and wasn't it wonderful, the way he was 
always thinking of hi* boas' interests? 

Blbby got redder than she had ever aeen 
him. and aaid. Oh. 1 don t know a* If* hi* 
Interests I'm thinking about. Then, a* she 
asked him again about dinner, he managed to 
think he heard Edward* calling him. 



kissed her fiercely; and once 
derly. a* he put her arm* around hi* neck and 
returned all three klaaes 

■ I wanted to do that the first day we met," 
he said quietly. 

"80 did I " 

Blbbv retrieved mask wig and cap. 
away a few step*, turned and called, ' Just so 
there won t be any mistakes around here— 1 11 
be the bowlegged one!" and he went off bow- 
ing his lec* exaggeratedly. 

He lcuaw d Edward*, who was having a cam- 
era set up on top of a truck Edwards was 
In raptures over the castle and grounds Have 
to hand It to you. Norton. • You re some 
picker' " 

••Yair." said Bibby. blushing iui a ccou ntably. 
•But look. Bos*, here's a BBnch M . Pir- 
ley'a got a lot of eoclety girl friends coming 
for a visit. They'd dreas up voue -picture like 
a million in the garden party scene* where 
the two villains defy Miss Haythom.'' 

My heavy villyun* are in Hollywood " _ 
___ » — t ■ ■ 

ft A W, you could send 
f\ >m from Broadway 
you were going to 

I m 



WHEN he found Edwards, he said. Look. 
Mr Edwards, have you seen the Inside 
of the castle? I know you will think me a 
hick for suggesting taking Interiors In a real 
houae. but you could light It. honestly— and 
that great hall haa everything— armor, flags. 

tapestries, old oak tables " 

Edwarda was furious He wa* In this thing 
now much deeper than he had planned He 
had introduced characters, troopers, villain*. 
Incidental people, and he had to finish with 
them here, or take them to Hollywood, or 
chance It that he could double them out there 
He sputtered and Blbby went on, Mr Bart- 
around her finA iey u going to Durope for eighteen days. You 
e more, very ten- can knock off those Interiors here as well a* 




Her father glared through the maze of Joists 
and cables He pointed to Blbby. "That man I 
He is responsible for all this! Ill wire Ensign! 
Hi sue! IU have them all fired!" 

FRED Bartley stalked up the stair* and Into 
hla private library. Rita followed and 
closed the door. She said. "Did you at any 
Ume say they couldnt work In the houae?" 

"What? You know very well I didn't, be- 
cause I never thought they'd dare auggest 
such a thing." 

' I stood right beside you the day you talked 
to that man in the New York office and gave 
them your permission to come here. You said 
if you could help them to economize, that it 
was your duty to co-operate " 

"Ye*. And I also said that bow and-arrow 
fellow couldn t come back here " 

"Hah! 80 you did. And you picked on the 
smartest one of the lot— the one who has made 
it possible for them to break their records for 
speed and economy. You'll be proud when you 
see how little thla picture has cost— and how 
good It la." 

Obstinate at times. Mr. Bartley waa never 
too stubborn to listen to reason— business rea- 
son He asked. "Since when have you taken 
an interest in such things?" 

"I gave them permission to work In the 
house, and you must not think of having Mr 
Norton fired. I've given thla a lot of thought 
and I'm going to tell you what I think you 



for em. or cast 
And look— where 



why not use state trooper*?'' 

••Say— that's not bad' Naturally, 
here, the more scenes I can grab off. the 
better " 

Blbby pulled a bow .'rpm a truck, strung It, 
and reached for hi* quiver of arrows He said 
• I even think jou could do your airplane scene* 



should do. In the interests of your stockhold- 
ers—and If you like the idea— you ran claim 
it as your own." 

She kissed her rather, pulled up a little 
stool, sat in front of him and said, with a 
grav ity that tickled him, "Listen. Fred " 

Preaently a servant came to Bibby and said 
,he wa* wanted In the amall library. When 
Blbby came In. Rita slipped out. 

Bartley slumped comfortably u , an armchMi! 
gave him a long look. Then he grinned. "Sit 
down. Norton. I've been hearing things about 
you. Supposing you tell me about yourself. — 
and I'll see if it all checks up " 

Rita had time to change to her prettiest 
dress and the property men had time to get 
the great hall and foyer restored to rights be- 
fore that Interview was over— an interview to 
which Harry Mack Edward* had baen invited. 

Then Bibby came racing downstairs in the 
soft shoes of Robin Hood. In the hall he 
found a tall redheaded girl In white organdie, 
and without preliminaries he embraced her. 
Then he led her to a deep window embrasure 
and they sat down. 

"I'm to go to Hollywood with Mr. Edwards 
Your father said— to quote him— that 1 seemed 
to be just the practical kind of fellow 
Trust had been looking for to co-ope: ate with 
their exeoutlves and auditors at the studio In 
the Interests of economy, efficiency and what 
not. But how tn the world did he know I'd 
been anchltect and that I'd had picture ex- 
perience?" 

She blushed. "Well, you told me. didn't 
you? And you wouldn't want me to keep 
secrets from my own father, would you? And 
' had to tell him you were so Interested tn 
your work you Just made them stay here and 
take all those scenes." 

He got red. ' No such lofty motive I wanted 
to keep them here as U 
so I could be near you. " 

"Oh, Blbby!" 

"Oh. Rita!" 



't.R head on his shoulder, she said softly. 
"Then If— If that's all you need to make 



H' 

good pictures, even when you go to 
you'll keep on making good picture*, because 
—well, darn you. Blbby Norton! Art you go- 
ing to make me ask you to take me with you 
—or can you make some of the advance* your- 
self?" 

He could, It seemed, make all the necessary 
advance*. And by and by *he aald. "You'll 
have dinner here?" 

"Yea." he aald. and. grinning, added. "Your 
father asked me to ." 

Edwarda, coming into the hall a moment 
later, looked over at the window embrasure, 
then tiptoed out. thinking. "Now why couldn't 
I get feeling like that into It when I was shoot- 
ing my love scene* with Anne Haythorn and 
JU Bra nt Ingham'" 

(.CopyrKht. the a*ll STndlrit*. in I 



New Tests for Infancy 

To Determine Progress 



(Copyrltht. lilt 



TIE M 
IQ a 
la tka 



by Tht North Amtnc.n 
AiUanct, Inc ) 



F!«a'-f' rv1 m him "Look here Nor- 
ton. I took you mcht unseen Thev told me at 
the office you were ao archer, but so far all 



not 

That scene where the villain hides In the 
anil o. armor and gets shot by Robin Hood— 
we could do that *w«U. You could rehearse 
your people nights and *hoot daya. and look 
at the tune and money youd aave." 

Mr. Bartley finished in London sooner than 
he had expected, ao he took an earlier boat 
and got back on the sixteenth day. It wa* late 
afternoon when he reached his estate 

Mr Bartley's eye* popped, but when he 
came In sight of the castle he stiffened, then 
dropped limply In his seat Oenerator trucks 
drawn up. sound trucks, electric sable* all over 
the drive and running in through door* and 
windows. 

He sought to da*h into the house As well try 
to dash Into a collapsed coal mine. Furniture 
•hoved Into hall*, against walla; light* great 
and small everywhere on the floor and on 
scaffolding, and the whole place crowded with 
people and with the sound and camera eoupi 



men I 

was focused on a stand of armor — and oddly 
enough. Ihere was a big revolver In the |M 
clasp of the armor 

Presently the armor stirred, then someone 
—it was Alan Brantlngham. in Robin Hood 
dress, called Into a microphone. Come out 
before I call three! One— two— three!" 

At three,.the steel arrn of the .armor waa 
lifted, the revolver exploded loudly, then— 
••Crang!"— an arrow, shot by Blbbv, Norton, 
aao in Robin Hood garb, but without a mask, 
since he was not In, the . acme pierced I he 
armor almost to the feather The armored 
figure fell forward, trailing some black thread* 



w I* taking It* place beside the 
among children psychologist* It 
U the "motor quotient"— the ratio of 
the number of *pecifled motion* a child can 
make to the number which can be made by 
the average child of the same age. 

In the same way the well-known IQ 1* 
the ratio between the number of specified 
questions one can answer correctly and the 
average performance for a child of the same 
age 

In some subtle way the M Q and the IQ 
are related to each other The MQ might 
be considered the I Q of the earliest month* 
of life. It ha* all been worked out at the 
Institute of Child Welfare of the Unlver*lty of 
California, according to a monograph report 
Juat Issued through, the Child Development 
Committee) of the National Research Council 
here. 

The First Two Monfmj 

•r-'OLLOWlNG are the best items for the! 
JT fim'two month* of the baby* life If' 
the infant can meet them In order. Its ra'e 
of development is normal 

8lx day*— Lay the child in a prone position 
and note whether It make* alternating crawl- 
ing movements with its leg*. If &o. credit one 

point- 
Fifteen -days— Pick the child up with the 
hand* around it* body under the arms, fingers 
extended upwards along the back of its neck 
to support its head Hold It against you with 
the head at your should* r in an upnuht 
poaltlon. Credit one point If It can be felt to 
make a postural adjuatment to the changed 
position. Credit one more point If the child 
lift* It* head free from the shoulder inter- 
mittently. 

Elghtem day*— Place the child in a prone 
position and note whether It frees it* face 
by l&rning IU head to one side or lifting it 
free from the surface Credit one point for 
either movement. 

Twenty-one days— Place a red ring in the 
child a hand and credit one point if It retain* 
definite hold 

Fifty days- When the child is Umg on Ml 
back, unrestricted by clothing and 
parently contented mood, credit 
If it make* vertical arm thruat* 
play. 

Fifty-five day*— Place child in same poaltlon 
a* before and credit If It kick* it* legs In play. 

Flfty-*even days— Pick child up and credit 
one point if it holda it* head erect for two 
or more seconds when support 1* removed 
from back 

Thus the normal child at two month* should 
•core eight point* The entire teat consist* 
of *eventy-flve point*, normally attained in 
abouv fifty months. The last requirement 1* 
to walk down sUlra without any auppbrt from 
the hand*, and standing on each foot alter- 
nately without atanding with both feet on 
any one step 

KAcntjl jod Motor Link 

THIS la not precisely an Intelligence test, 
but It Is about the only measure of 
•peed of development which can be uaed with 
the infant before It Is able to talk In these 
earliest month*, there 1* a good deal of ac- 
cumulated evidence that mental and motor 
development go on together 

•There appears at first glance** aayt Nancy 
Bayley. of the University of California, who 
make* the rrpart a regular *«e<juence In 
whirh matu-a'ion in mc'or abih'ie.s occurs 
la the individual. Thi* sequence, however. 



resemble* the mental development aequen. I, 
In that It 1* due to a general rapid growth 
In ability, with any one child deviating only 
•lightly from hi* own average level on the 
difficulty *cale. With Increase In age and 
deceleration of the rate of maturation, the 
deviation* from the average performance ln- 
and the sequence of development be 
orderly. 

"The developmental aequen c« seem* to de- 
pend on rapid Increment* In the entire level 
of ability. The correlatlona with inteJllgerv e 
are hlghe*t at the agea when creeping and 
walking first occur Walking correlate* higher 
than pre-walklng with both mental and 
motor acores. There Is a definite positive cor- 
relation between the age of walking and the 
age of talking, another Instance of the ten- 
dency of all behavior to conform to a general 
maturation trend in early life. Both walking 
and talking are product* of a general stage 
of maturity in motor and mental functions, 
which 1* reached by the child about the begin- 
ning of the second year. The correlation* 
between different type* of performance de- 
crease a* the children grow older/' 



in an ap- 
one point 



in random 



Gain and Loss 

LIFE is made up of gain and loss; and 
often the gain comes only through the 
loss Even when one attains to the possession 
of that which is best, achievement is saddened 
bv the thought that it has been won by the 
sacrifice of many things which would have 
been «4»od in themselves, but which could not 
be held with the one supreme good Each new 
tonqueat in human life Is like the dawning of a 
new day. As the sky reddens and brightens, 
the stars fade out. Yet when the sun has 
risen high ove r the horizon, and has flooded 
the heavens with hla light, who mourns for the 
departed glory of the star*? It ought to be *> 
also in the other *p here As the light of life 
emerges In'o <"1e*!vr shintTUF. the minor hghts 
are lost tn the glory not by any merely arbi- 
trary law, but because in the new splendor 
they have no power of shining and he r. 
surely ungrateful who ^ mourn* that the former 
things in which he delighted have sunk into 
insignificance before the greater blessing . 

Let the 



which' afe now lavished upon him 
cold beauty of the »tars fade out. if we have 
Instead the warm shining of the sun Let the 
silent solemnity of the night pass by. un- 
mourned for, since ours are the life and move- 
ment of the sunlit day. 



Admiration 



a hoapital. and saw the other day 
—A little white-haired lady— she had been 
there since last May— She had outlived her 
friends, and all her relatives were dead — and 
there she lay. alone and helpless In heT small 
white bed . . . And yet her face was radi- 
ant — ahe had an Inward Joy— That no adver- 
■Ity or pain or hardship could destroy— If ever 
*ptrU mere Imprisoned In a human frame— I 
saw it in her eye*— that light for which there 
U no name . . And ao, when I look round 
and aee IT* things aome people bear— ana aee 
the fortitude with which they faoe their pain 
and care— I think the very angel* must look 
down sometimes and say— "These "human 
beings aren't so bad— Some fall and go astray 

- But some grow «trong*r *ith their trials as 
on and on they plod What can we teach them 

- thev re aTre*dv half way 





\ 



ay. in.v 26. 1936 



r 

z 
r 

L 



MIllllllllllllllllHimillllllllllll 







X 



— 



iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiitiiuiuu MmmMimm n iiUltiili ii Mlii m i n iliii m 



Field Flowers of July 



Ulllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllll 



lllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIMtlllMIIIIIM t 





WITH the. disappearance of the great - 
Ice-cap that formerly covered Vancou- 
ver Island to a height of some 4,000 
feet, as recorded on the mountain range*, the 
land began again to rise after Its long sub- 
mergence. Reefs became Islands, Lslands be- 
came rocky hills, the sea -bottom between, with 
Us shell remains, became dry land, and a new 
chapter of life began with the return north- 
wards of the vegetation that had fled before 
the cold and Ice. Evidences of marine occupa- 
tion are plentiful about Victoria, not only those 
of sea-shells, but topographical ones in the 
form of high terraces cut by cliffs on the sea- 
ward side, as from Clover Point to Beacon Hill 
Park and along Dallas Road, and of lower ( 
stretches of level or very gently sloping land 
scarcely above the sea along the shore. North 
of the Pemberton Woods and extending from 
Shoal Bay to Oak Bay. behind Anderson Hill 
and Inland to the valley between Mount Tol- 
mle and Oak Hill Is such a tract, marked 
throughout by marine shells near the surface. 

One block of this area lies between Quaml- 
chan 8treet and the Pemberton Woods, a piece 
of low-lying land drained by ditches, and a 
noted place in Spring for such buttercups as 
the water-plantain spearwort and the straight- 
beaked ranuculus. By midsummer, however, 
these are gone, and the open fields are begin- 
ning to show the ripening of grasses In tints 
of golden ochre and bronze, emphasized by the 
outliers of broom that mark the steady en- 
croachment of that shrub on the drier parts. 
Drainage has indeed much affected the plant 

, ■ « i i i j i jaa ..,,!* § , , , I Via nr tirlnal 

life, making It more alrncuit ior me original 
species to hold their own. and at the same time 
encouraging the presence of newcomers who 
c o uld net have established themselves at an 

earlier time and under wetter conditions. This 
disappearance of native species and arrival of 
strangers Is one of the results of man's Inter- 
ference with Nature. In seeking to control 
Nature he disturbs the balance she has set up 
with great pains, and In so doing he may find 
himself defeated by the effects of his en- 
deavors. This Is particularly true when his 
control is sought on a large scale and for ex- 
ploltary purposes. In earlier times, before the 
machine age. man co-operated with Nature 
and thus controlled her without making an 
enemy of her. 

In Unfenced Fields 

A RAMBLE through these unfenced flelds 
in mid-July Is thus not without scien- 
tific Interest. There are ditches still moist 
from recent rains, others dry; there are 
mounds of sandy clay dug from them, now 
almost wholly concealed by vegetation. A 
dense forest of broom stretches up towards 
Foul Bay Road, source of the outliers spoken 
of above. An old fence separates the flelds 
from the woods, where the ow) berry or bird- 
cherry and the snowberry make a thicket and 
from which young aspen poplars have been 
seeded There Is here In the air the honeyed 
scent of cottonwood trees In the ditch the 
water dropwort or water-parsley. Oenanthe 
sarmentosa. raises 1U roundish umbels of tiny 
white flowers whose anthers impart to them a 
pinkish tinge The large smooth green com- 
pound leaves have a ground-pattern of threes, 
upon which is superimposed a pinnate arrange- 
ment of the broad, toothed and partially lobed 
leaflets. Near by grows the glandular willow- 
herb. Epllobium adenocaulon. a small-flowered 
relative of the flreweed. distinguished by the 
disproportion between lis small pink flowers 
and its long seed-pods Among the grass on 
the bank is the slender clnqueloil or five-fin- 
gers. Potentllla gracillis. remarkable for its 
long-stemmed basal leaves with seven, or occa- 
sionally Ave. palmatcly arranged leaflets with 
deeply cut edges, dark green above, pale, and 
thickly covered with matted white hairs below 
It is Interesting to note how the calyx, after 
the withering of the yellow flowers, turns its 
sepals inwards to form a close receptacle for 
the maturing fruit, while the little bractlpts be- 
tween the sepals remain turned outwards 

Along the side of a narrow path is one of our 
little-noticed members of the pea family. 
Hosackia Americana or Spanish clover Its 
tiny flowers are borne singly and resemble 
Tilnute sweet pea blossoms There are sev- 
eral species of Hosackia at our end of the Is- 
land, the prettiest being Hosackia gracilis, with 
purple and vellow flowers found about Oak 
Rav and William Head Some botanists put 
the Hosacklas with the Lotus genus, one spe- 




DEATH AND DEVASTATION FOLLOW IN WAKE OF UNPRECEDENTED HEAT WAVE 

Literally millions of dollars in rJamaq*. »cort* of iivtl lost, jnd untold humjn and jnimjl suffering hjt b«cn brought about by the unprecedented hejf v/av« that swept 
through the United States Thousands of acres of once fertile land has been laid bare by the withcnnq rays of the merciless sun In the Dakotas, the United State* 
Government is removing stricken farmers from their homesteads and placing them elsewhere Below, right, a couple taking a last look at their home Upper left, a 
sizeable river once ran here Now it is |ust a dry ditch Lower left, a grim symbol of drought — a skeleton lying on the hard baked toil of South Dakota In circle, one 
of the tew states untouched by drought is Kansas, though states on all sides are suffering Picture shows bumper crop being carted in for threshing In upper right, 

cattle look longingly at what was once the lake that gave them water. Now it's iust a dried up hole 



H 



cies of which. Lotus corniculatus. the birds- 
foot trefoil, Is a well-known British wild 
flower, sweet-scented, with bright yellow 
flowers. 

Sneezeweed in Flower 

ELENIUM aulummilf, or sneezeweed, Is 
t coming into flower. Its hemispheri- 
cal heads of inconspicuous yellow disk-flowers 
surrounded by large yellow three-toothed ray- 
flowers turned downwards as a rule The 
leaves nre greylsh-gieen and smoothly velvety 
in t<»xtur»T— with reunions glands and notable 
lor trie very peculiar manner In which their 
edges are continued down the stem as long 
narrow wings. The dry leaves and flowers 
produce violent sneezing, hence the popular 
name. The plant, common in places wet ear- 
lier in Uie season, belongs to a group peculiar 
to the Pacific Coast of America from here to 
Mexico and Chili. Our six-cles is cultivated in 
gardens In Europe. The Brlti-.li .sneezewort Is 
Achillea ptarnjica. related to our common yar- 
row. In Africa they liave" a tree popularly 
called .sneeze wood, because the dusrt of the 
wood produce* sneezing. 

Pav-ing northward below the long mound of 
soil now quite overgrown with ft variety of 
plants, among those in flower is to be seen the 



goldenrod, Solidago lepida, literally the charm- 
ing goldenrod. The goldenrods are predomi- 
nantly American Hooker assigns only one 
species to Europe and Asia, so that it is worth 
noting that long before the discovery of any 
transatlantic species, the virtues of the gol- 
denrod. or what were supposed to be such, had 
been discovered in Europe The botanical 
name Solidago appears to be a relic of medi- 
aeval Latin derived from the phrase: "Solido 
vulnera" or "in solidum ago vulnera" — I -make 
wounds whole. It had a reputation among the 
early hcrbaJisls tor all wounds, wil inn or 
out, and it was imported from abroad at con- 
siderable expert.se. Oerard says of It: "It Is 
extolled above all the herbes for the stopping 
of blood, and hath in times past been had In 
greater estimation and regard than in these 
dales: for within my remembrance I have 
known the dne herbe, which came from be- 
yond the seas, sold in Buckle rsburie, in Lon- 
don, for half-a-crowne an ouriice But since it 
was found in Hampstead Vvjoods, even as It 
acre at our towne's end, no man will give 
half-a-crowne for an hundredweight of it. 
which plainly setteth forth/our (nconstaticie 
and sudden mutabilttie, esteeming no longer of 
anything, how previous soevelr it be. the whilst 
it Is not strange and rare " The virtues of the 



European goldenrod are astringent and tonic 
properties. The sweet goldenrod of the Ameri- 
can Atlantic coast contains in glandular dots 
on its leaves "an aromatic and stimulating 
oil of an anlsate odor and pale greenish-yellow 
color: it is also carminative and diaphoretic, 
and its infusion is used to relieve spasmodic 
pains and nausea, its dried flowers and leaves 
have been employed as a beverage under the 
name of Blue-Mountain Tea." I am afraid 
»ith us the goldenrod has fallen on evil days 
medicinally, for it is one of the plants to whose 
is attributed"" Whether that 
be so or not. the bees are great lovers of it. and 
its golden panicles are a notice to us that the 
flowering season is drawing to a clo,e and that 
Autumn, 

"Season of . . . mellow fruit fulness, 
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun." 

is approaching not many weeks hence. 

The Fireweed 

WE have already seen the small glandular 
willow-herb Here is its larger and more 
beautiful relative, the flreweed in our popular 
speech, but in Britain the rose-bay. flowering 
willow or French willow botanically. Epilo- 
bium augustifohum. the narrow-leaved epilobe, 



or willow-herb. While with us XI Is decidedly 
a plant of open spaces, especially where Are haa 
recently cleared the land of Its ordinary vege- 
tation: In Britain it is a woodland plant. One 
authority says that "in the woods about Wring- 
ton in Somersetshire whole acres of ground are 
covered with It " Hooker say» it is a plant of 
"moist banks and moist open woods." Oerard 
well describes it Is a goodly and stately plant 
. . . growing to a height of slxe foote. gar- 
nished with brave Aowers of great beautie, con- 
sisting of fower leaves apiece, of an Orient pur- 
ple color " Its beautiful coloring of the land- 
scape is one of its chief features. At midsum- 
mer I have often looked across the straits from 
Shirley and Jordan River to admire the sunlit 
slopes of the Olympic foothills, rosy pmk with 
Areweed. resembling the heathery hills of Ar- 
ran from the Ayrshire coast. In the Indi- 
vidual plant not only are the Aowers charming 
In color and In their position, poised on the tip 
of the slender seed-vessel, but the latter, when 
ripe and opening, is a very pretty object, with 
its seed-tufts of pure white silk. This sub- 
stance is said to have been used as a fabric 
material. 

Much has been made of the fact that the 
Areweed springs up so suddenly and mysteri- 
ously on burnt-ofl and newly cleared lands. 
There is really nothing mysterious about it. 
Each seed of the flreweed. as I have saidjibove, 
Is endowed by Nature with a tuft of fine silky 
hairs, so that it resembles an elongated shut- 
tlecock but with a more delicate and adaptable 
air-floating apparatus than the latter's ring of 
stiff feathers. An ordinary plant of flreweed 
of no great size will produce on a single stem 
a hundred seed capsules, and each capsule con- 
tains at least a hundred seeds, probably many 
more 



Thus one 

air at least ten thousand seeds at a very con- 
servative estimate It is easy to see that a 
comparatively small area of flreweed will pro- 
duce many millions of seeds. These are car- 
ried by air-currents far and wide, and conse- 
quently the most isolated spots suitably pre- 
pared by man's purpose or by accident become 
tenanted by the travelers. When you consider 
how the ashes of Alaskan Katmai's volcanic 
explosion twenty years or more ago were car- 
ried as far south as Victoria, you will see how 
the silk- borne seeds of the flreweed may travel 
far from their home. 

Healing Plants 

THE sneezewort is not the only plant we 
meet with on our stroll that Is reputed to 
possess the power of healing wounds. In among 
the grass rise the blue-purple heads of the self- 
heal, Prunella vulgaris, a member of the mint 
family, though without aromatic scent. The 
individual flowers, which compose the Inflor- 
escence, are well worth attention and are espe- 
cially beautiful under a magnifying glass. The 
corolla Is two- lipped, the upper lip bending 
over the lower one. which has a broad middle 
lobe fringed along the edge Within the curved 
upper lip are the stamens and pistil The 
stamens are peculiar in having their filaments 
or stems divided near the summit Into an up- 
per and lower tooth, the latter one bearing the 
anther, the other being sterile. 

Self-heal Is remarkably widely dispersed. 
Hooker found it at Monay. in Tibet, at an ele- 
vation of 15.000 feet. In Europe if was long 
ago greatly prized for the treatment of cuts, 
and some of its other folk-names emphasize 
this, such as carpenter s-herb, sicklewort. and 
hook weed. Its lack of aroma removes the ex- 
plantatlon often given for the herbal claims of 
most of the members of the mint family, but 
it possesses a certain astrtngeney which was 
probably of use In staying bleeding It would 
be pretty in a garden were it not for its 
spreading roots which make It exceedingly 
troublesome to control. 

Down among the grasses the eye catches a 
glimpse of bright rose pink. It is not a com- 
mon color with us, at least among the lowlier 
herbs No skill is required to recognize the 
possessor as a pink and it is only one of a 
number that are scattered about in this par- 
ticular corner They are ripmparatlvely new 
arrivals, and In spite of the competitive con- 
ditions they have to meet tney are more than 
holding their own. They are not natives of 
our country, but have, com* to us across the 
sea from Europe by way of our gardens So 
iong ago as 1921 they were /reported as garden 
escapes about Victoria; indeed even before 
that, for Henry s "Flora" reports them in 1915 



Two species are thus named, Dianthus armerta. 
the Deptford pmk. and Dianthus deltoldes, the 
maiden pink. It is the latter which we rind in 
our area of meadow, a pretty little plant, six 
inches to a foot high, with quite small leaves 
opposite each other, and with the flowers 
placed singly at the summit of the short flow- 
ering stems. There is a ring of darker rose 
color about the centre of the corolla, and the 
edges of the petals are toothed or notched It 
is scentless. 

A Pink ^trinn»r 
r inn Ji ' .n'vji ' 

ANOTHER pink stranger grow* close at 
hand, this time a relation of the gentians 
Its flowers grow in upright clusters, its stems 
and opposite leaves of a pale green Its name 
Is the common centaury or. botanically. Ery- 
threa centaurium It. too. has a reputation for 
healing wounds, and its name "centaury" is 
said to be due to Us having performed such a 
service to one of the Centaurs. Its chief tame 
as a "simple" is. however, in the treatment of 
jaundice, ague, fever and indigestion, and as 
a tonic The pmk of the flower is set oft by 
the yellow of the stamens and pistil at the 
summit of the tube, the lobes lying out salver- 
like The flowers open only in bright sunshine 
and close early in the afternoon. 

In continuance of my stroll I go along Fou) 
Bay Road There the vegetatim by the road- 
side is pretty well past flowering, but an ex- 
ception Is an orchid. Habenarla elegans. the 
elegant rein-orchid. The lower leaves of the 



rein-orchid mostly die oft about the tune of 
flowering, leavmg the bract-like stem ones 
only. The flowers of the various species are 
grouped together in long slender Inflorescences, 
more or less compact. Owing to the prcv.i. .-..^ 
green of the stems, bracts, ovaries and spurn, 
as well as the green markings that usually 
occur on the upper sepals and petal, these 
orchids are very Inconspicuous a short distance 
away. Closer at hand, they are less so, of 
course, and this is especially true when, as in 
this instance, the flowers are actually pure 
while except for the green stripes referred to 
They have a sweet, honey-like scent. 

Wealth of Roses 

THERE are other plants that strike one 
with either flower or seed these Summer 
days in coming and going through the fields 
and their surroundings There is. for example, 
the extraordinary wealth of roses of the species 
known botanically as Rosa pLsocarpa, literally 
the pea- fruited rose; I don't know why. be- 
cause the fruit has no resemblance to a pea. 
since it u marked by a slender neck, or at 
least narrows distinctly at one end The 
flowers are in clusters aa a rule, and in this 
respect differ from the larger Nootka rose, 
which is generally single, or at most two*,or 
three together. The pea- flowered rose Is gen- 
erally noticeably smaller, but it seems to me 
I never before saw its flowers either so numer- 
ous or so small as they are this Summer The 
bushes about Quamlrhan Street are literally 
covered with them, and they are little largei 
If at all than those of the wood rose. Rosa 
gymnocarpa. the naked-fruited rose, from 
which, however, they are easily distinguished 
by their perfume as well as by live size of their 
leaves, the wood-roae being practically scent- 
less and with quite small leaves. 

One notices, too, the great seed vessel clus- 
ters of the cow-parsnip. Their size gives a 
good opportunity of seeing the main details of 
the structure of a capsule of an umbelliferous 
plant, though the particulars difter from genus 
to genus The row -parsnip capsule is btoadei 
at top than bottom, being shaped something 
like an elongated heart, only at the concave 
angle there rise from a small base two little 
points, remnants of the two styles Two outer 
ribs form a broadish rim around the capsule's 
edge, and from the base of the styles four 
curving lines of dark brown extend half the 
length of the capsule, and between each pair 
a slender rib goes to the base. When the cap- 
sules are ripe a touch will rausc them to spilt 
to their flattened faces The resulting 
carpels are still, however, atdLched 



P 

above to the top of 
of fine jstiff but springy threads 



the flower stem bv 



Each 



pair 
arpel 



roniaina a single seed, whose position is 
marked! by the four brown curving lines 
outside and two others on the inner 
«>arh carpel, the* lines being the oil dicta of 
the living ovary. 



n the 

an of 



• About l]our Dog 



By r. H WILTON GOODSELL 



ARTICLE NO VI ■ - 

A New Dog Arrives 

THERE are many who do not appreciate 
or realize what an important bearing 
the circumstances under which a dog 
enters a new home may have upon his future, 
and incidentally upon their own. Understand- 
ing, patience and firmness are the Chief req- 
uisites in successfully dealing with a dog. and 
never perhaps are they so absolutely necessary 
^ rmrtng the frm few days' or a dog in new 
surroundings and among strangers. Some of 
mv readers may raise their "eyebrows when I 
sav that first impressions gained by a dog in 
a new home may have a vital rflect upon its 
while future, but it is true. 

Give a new dog the opportunity to acquire 
the idea that it can be "boss" and intractabil- 
ity, wilfulness and bad manners and habits 
will result and sooner or later react badly for 
both master and dog As I have stressed be- 
fore, children and dogs are surprisingly alike. 
I^t a child or a dog once gain the Impression 
that they can have their own sweet way and 
they will develop into what others, not blinded 
bv affection, will unsympathetkally refer to as 
pests. And when this happen*, the poor child 
or equally unfortunate dog usually reapa a 
condemnation that rightfully belongs else- 
where Tills is only another proof that chil- 
dren and dogs do not always get a square deal. 

In a New Home 

'■yo help the dog entering a new home and 
1 his master. I offer some advice, which I 
hope may prove to advantage to both A dog 
comes Into his new home either by way of a 
trtp in a crate via express, or personally con- 
ducted by the seller or purchaser. The last 
mentioned method should always be chosen If 
possible as It Is much less or ft, ilraln upon" 
the dog s nervous system, and hence It will 
arrive at Its new abode In a much more nor- 
mal state, both mentallv and physically Of 
Course dogs can become used to making jour- 
neys, no matt-r how tong. in 



They can accustom themselves to almost any- 
thing Many show dog* travel thousands of 
miles yearly In this manner and seem to enjoy 
the excitement of it. 

But the dog coming to a new domicile is 
usually a youngster thai has probably never 
undertone such an experience before, nor even 
been away from the place where he was born 
or from those who had hitherto, had charge of 
him. He Is destined to an existence as a pet 
or companion and f here fore unless nul'e un- 
avoidable, why subject him to an experience 
that might cause him to reach his destination 
scared Mifl or even sick' So if distance and 
other factors permit, go fetch your new dog 
yourself and personally bring it into its new 
home, or have the seller bring it to you. In 
e.thrr case, acquaint yourself fully In advance 
with the animal's history. How it has_been 
raised, fed and cared for. whether or not it 
has b»en recently wormed, and If so when 
and with what medicine. 

Precautions to Take 

ASCERTAIN if it is accustomed to the in- 
ferior of a house and Its many rontenls. 
that in therr" utter strangeness may prove as 
terrifying to a young dog aa the mythical 
"bogey -man" to a young child. Ask whether 
the dog has been broken to collar and lead 
and if it has been house-broken; whether it 
has had the opt>ortunity to see and come In 
contact w)th different people and dogs In 
short, flnd out everything you ran that will in 
any wav h< I ; ■ vou and vour dog to gnt com 
fortably .settled in vour new association. 

Never accept a dog that does not In every 
ray appear perfectlv sound and healthy. Test 
its hearing its eyesight and examine It close- 
ly for any Indication of skin irritation or 
disease If you have any doubts on any of 
these physical matters no reputable breeder 
or dealer should object to your having a 
veterinarian make an examination I ha\e 
heard of so manv who have been persuaded to 
eccep. * puppy that they thought was not not 
quite At by such remarks as; ' Oh' That little 



skin Irritation is nothing. Just a bit of digestive 
upset. It will be all right lh a day or two." 

That "little skin irritation" sometimes has 
a way of being diagnosed later by a vet- 
erinarian as mange or a bad case of eczema. 
In acquiring a dog by purchase there is no 
reason for overlooking the admonition of old 
Roman law. "caveat emptor " Far better to 
play safdf than be sorry. Whenever anyone 
obtains a dog from me, I always have the 
animal examined by my veterinarian at my 
expense and have him issue a certificate of 
health and soundness. This is done the day 



Journey, and given It a tidbit or two if driving 
does not seem to upset it. 

Now at your door, before opening the car or 
attempting to alight, put on the collar, if 
the animal is not already wearing it. making 
sure that it is so adjusted and fastened that nnm Patterson 

the dOg. CaiUlOt UUll U ls U. axl through It. grasp ,Copw„M IIM. bv RM North Amer.cn N*».p.p,r 



• • Cosmopolite * * 



the dog is to leave my premises and the certif- 
icate is handed' the purchaser" or mailed 
him with th<*<Jog's registration papers, bill of 
sale. etc. 8uch a procedure acts for the 
brneflt of purchaser and seller alike, and 
prevents any arguments later about the dogs 
physical condition when it left my hand! 

Most breeders fail to do this, but there Is no 
reason why they should object to the pur- 
chaser doing it at his expense, and I advise 
it. And one thing more, never take a dog, 
from an establishment that is not scrupulous- 
ly iie(*R or m w"hifh all other dogs do not 
look healthy, well-cared for and content 

Necessary Preparations 

NOW suppose you have driven to get your 
dog and you have al last reached your 
horn* door Before you set out you should - 
h.ive provided yourself with a collar of the 
sue and weight suitable for a dog of the 
breed you are getting and also a strone but 
not over-heavy leash. Incidentally I believe 
that the Hunter, less noticeable a collar Is the 
better, provided it is sufficiently atrong for the 
dog that Is no wear it You will- also have 
done well to have put in your pocket a few 
tidbits. For this purpose nothing is better 
than small pieces of liver, cooked and thor- 
oughly dried so that they are quite hard. Most 
dogs relish this as much as Ales do molasses 

Naturally you wl n have taken precautions 
oy raising the car windows, so that the dog 
could not get wit during the trip and so per- 
haps be lost, and if you have any regard for 
your car. you will have taken along an old 
sheet or rug. and a towel or two. for some 
times dogs are rarsirk. especially if not used 
to such a mode of traveling If the exigencies 
of driving are permitted, you., will have Jon* 
well to have talked to the dog during the 



the lead securely and step out. urging the dog 
to follow you. If it has not been taught to 
follow on a lead or to wear a collar, grasp 
the animal firmly— for doga can wriggle out 
of a hold very quickly— and carry it to the 
house and Inside. If It is used to the collar 
and lead, it Way "get duToTlts ow n accord and 
follow you. d"p*ndcnt upon whether you have 
made any headway during the trip towards 
winning Its conAdence. and also whether it has 
r been frightened o^.upisct by the drive. ..»,...„ 

Use Common Sense 

BE very p atient , use common sense, and do 
not forget that the human voice in low. 
soft tones has a steadying and reassuring ef- 
fect upon all animals, and that anger, lm- 
patience, or loud, harsh tones have exactly the 
opposite result* Don t blame the dog and dub 
it stupid or obstinate if it does not walk up... 
— to~TOuT door as though It had been doing It 
for years 

Should It do this without fuss or bother, 
you m ay be sure of one or two things, possibly 
of btrth of th'rfi Either you have made some 
progress In •*::.!..!.» M r dog s confidence or 
vour new dog has a lot of common sense and 
poise possibly both Now having brought the 
dog to the door of Its new home. I must defer 
iry suggestions on treatment of It when once 
Inside until next week. 

s 'Continued Next We*ki 
iC«r>rrtiht. IMS the B»ll Syndir«l». Inc ) 

JAPANESE women—and— merr— are being 
urged to adorn ttreir Angers with platinum 
lings in peace time, so that there shall be a 
large reserve supply of this precious metal. 

The nnes. which are adorned with emblems of 
national sentiment such as the rising sun and 
ehfrrjr blossoms, are being sold under the dl- 
n UM of the Japan Platinum Popularisation 
Society.* ■■ -- , : - — ♦ -j 

It Is estimated that If 10 per cent of Japan's 
seventy millions Invest in a ring each there 
will be a reserve of 130 tons of metal on which, 
the military authorities can draw in cat* of 

need. 



Ailiar.r*. Inr i 

IJARIS -M Le Danois, head of the Scien- 
tific Office of the Fisheries Department, is 
looking to the deep-sea experiments of France a 
floating laboratory, the President Theodore 
Tlssler, for assistance in the development of a 
remarkable theory he has evolvad on the life 
of the salmon. 

It has been found both In America and Eu- 
rope that salmon preparing to spawn habitu- 
aliy re-enter- the rivers from which they origi- 
nally descended u> the open sea Earlier 
explanations of this phenomenon credited sal- 
mon with a remarkable sense of geographyTbut 
M Le Danois asked himself whether these fish 
were really as clever as this. 

With the help of scientific colleagues at 
home and abroad, he collected information 
about the localities where salmon were occa- 
sionally caught It lea and noted these place, 
on the maps of the Continental Shelf Marine 
research of recent years tends to confirm the 
theory that our present rivers when tlvy reach 
the sea. follow, their old courses along the now 
submerged land which. In prehistoric times, 
joined the British Isles with the Continent 

M Le Danots is convinced, by data received 
from various sources, thst salmon, when they 
reach the sea. continue their Journey 
these submarine rivers; thus European 
still live In a world where the Thames, the 
H umber, the Tweed, the Aomme, the 
other rivers continue to flow into the 
st point* now sunk in the North 8ea. 

These submerged prolongation* of our 
ent livers, say* M Le Danois, flow along thetr 
original beds at greater depths than the sea 
around them and their water remains salt He 
says the salmon collect at prehistoric estuaries 
end. when they return from the sea between 
October and March, simply work their way up 
the submarine rivers to spawn in inland fresh 
wstera Incidentally, a fact that confirms the 
theory is that salmon are not known ever to 
he*e been found beyond the margin of the 



Bay of Biscay and around the A/ores rarriej. 
scientists on board working for M. Le Danois 
department, which is attached to the Ministry 
of Marine They have been taking sounding' 
and examining the ocean bed at depths of 
more than a thousand fathoms 

University Celebratei 

HEIDELBERO University, celebrating the 
550th anniversary of its foundation Uiis 
year, is the third oldest German university in 
Europe, coming after Prague ' 1348> and Vienna 
'1365i, and the oldest on German soil It was 
founded in 1386 by the Oreat. Elector, Ruprecht 

lent life. 

In it* first sixty years the average number 
of annual matriculations was The num- 

ber of student* visiting Heide,b*-rg now I* about 
2.000 Heidelberg, founded by permission of 
Pope Urban VI, was Luther* stronghold in 
1518. and after acknowledging the Reformation 
in 154«. was the centre of s struggle between 
Luthensm and Calvinism Tilly destroyed 
Heidelberg in the Thirty Years' War. and after 
the attack* of Louts XIV in 1«80 and I6OT. the 
university came under the power of Rome At 
the opening of the nineteenth century, how- 
ffWt, H*-.d';bcrg once again took 1U place as a 
leading centre of humanistic teaching Men 
of science who made Germany world famous 
were produced by the university during the last 
otnturjp, „ . , , t .... , * - — - — -*» 

The Nazis have Insisted that all teaching at 
the university must now be based on the creed 
of blood and race One of the new Heidel- 
berg building*, opened in 1931. has had a 
bronze figure of Pallas Athene, inscribed "The 
Living Spirit.'' replaced by a German eaglt, 
inscribed The Oerman Spirit " 




Theodore TVawier. at present in 

la the 



Airport to Have Railway 
♦Hat Berlin Templehof Airport is to hftve 
Ms own electric railway. This it part of 
the wide extension scheme oow being put 
into operation Hangars to accommodate one 
hundred and twenty machines sre to be built 
and th electric railway service will run 
I he ground* to transport passengers and 



r 

I 



A Midsummer Day-Dream 



— 



Br FRANCIS IBM CAN A V AN 

"Mary made a little cake. 
6ti*? nirwl#* it for tit*r brotii^r h K<ik** . 
It was hi* birthday, he wan eight . . 



M 

• And 
brlakly. 



\ 



OLLY'S stubby pencil pauaed In 1U 
progress, and her voice also pauaed In 
Its slow reading . . . 
•o, what happened?" asked Betty 
Betty dearly loved action and a 



"Nothing happened." said Molly firmly. 
• except that they ate the cake." And then be- 
cause she could think of no more certain way 
to end It aU. wrote It just like that: "And so 
they ate the cake." 

The children were waiting In the hammock 
until mother should call them to help her 
make Billy's birthday cake. They had col- 
lected all the things needed for a specially 
nice cake, sugar, butter, eggs, milk, flour, bak- 
ing powder and vanilla extract, and had set 
them out upon the kitchen table. They had 
buttered the layer tins, and Betty had taken 
the cork from the vanilla bottle and sniffed 
1U fragrance, and the queer delightful little 
shiver ran down her back as It awaya did; 
and then just as their mother had come Into 
the kitchen, the telephone rang and she had 
to go. When she came back in a moment, she 



told the children that she must do quite a bit 
of telephoning, so It would be better for them 
to wait out of doors in the hammock until she 
was free again to begin the cake. 

Then It was Molly had been moved to write 
her verse, and she and Betty repeated the 
lines again and again in a lulling monotony 
aa the hammock swung lazily back and forth, 
making them very sleepy as the morning 
grew warmer. 

"Mary made a little cake. 
She made It for her brother's sake, 
It was his birthday, he wa* eight. 
And so they ate the cake." 

Midsummer Day. and day dreams at 



It 

this season are not uncommon. 

•What la the use of falling asleep like this 
when there's so much to do? " thought Molly, 
and then she sat up and said aloud: 



Wordsworth 

(Written on a blank leaf of his memoirs) 

Dew friends, who read the world aright. 
And In It* common forma discern 

A beauty and a harmony 
The many never learn. 

Kindred In soul of him who found 

In simple flower and leaf and 
The impulse of the sweetest lays 



Accept this record of a life 

Aa sweet and pure, as calm and good. 
As a long day of blandest June 

In green field and In wood. 



How welcome to our ears, long pained 
By strife of sect or party noise. 

The brook like murmur of his song 
Of Nature's simple Joys. 

The violet by the massy stone, 
The primrose by the rivers brim. 

And chance sown daffodil have found 
Immortal life through him. 

The sunrise on his breezy lake. 

The rosy tints his sunset brought. 
World seen, are gladdening all the vales 

And mountain peak* of thought. 

Art builds on sand, the works of pride 
And human passion change and fall. 

But that which share* the life of Ood 
With him survtveth all. 

-John Oreenleaf Whlttier. 



Is This True? 



AVERY sad little article was found in The 
Children s Newspaper of July 4. It con- 
cerns all children who read English. If It were 
left to thfin the mortgage on the farm of 
Eugene Fields widow would soon be lifted. 

Where Is the little boy or girl who does not 
love the verses, pretty, funny, or sad. that 
Eugene Field made for the children? If It la 
true, something should be done about It at 



Eugene Field, who Uvea still In all our 
nurseries with Little Boy Blue and "Wynken. 
Blynken. and Nod." passed on some yeara 
Mm c to his Land of Long Ago"; but he comes 
back to our minds In rather a sad way. 

HU widow has lived on. though many had 
forgotten she was still alive, and misfortune 
ha* come to her. Her husband's genius and 
world-wide popularity won for him a com- 
fortable fortune, which he left to her. but It 
was swept away in the depression of seven 
years ago. and the old lady has had little be- 
yond her farm in Wisconsin to live on. 

She has clung to It. though her children 
and grandchildren tried to persuade her to 
live with them In a more comfortable home 
when she fell 111. She could not bear to do so, 
though money had been borrowed on her 
(arm and she could not repay It. 

8he Is now very 111. and asks American 



people to pay off the mortgage to enable her 
to pass the rest of her days In the home her 
husband made for her. 



Vimy Ridge 

'-pWENTY years ago the Canadian soldiers. 
1 commanded by Oeneral Byng. took Vlmy 
Ridge. Today a statue Is being dedicated to 
their memory, and to that of all others who 
fell in the Great War. 

Many thousands of Canadians are taking 
part in the ceremony In which sorrow, pride 
and gratitude are mingled. Not only those 
who fell on the fleld. but many, many since 
who have gone to Join their old comrades will 
he remembered. Among these are the beloved 
idem— Lord Byng and Sir Arthur 



Young people should read the atorv of that 
day as It la told In speech and poem and hls- 
tnr\ It was for the children that the great 
vaeriAc* was made. May you all prove worthy 
ft it 



"Come on, Betty. I'm sure mother must 
have called us." and they slipped out of the 
hammock and ran mto the house. Mother was 
In the kitchen adding the eggs to her cake 
mixture. The little helpers hurried to give her 
the other ingredients In order, and felt very 
Important when told to bring the Icing sugar, 
too. But Just as the vanilla was poured In, the 
telephone rang again, and off went mother. 

"Let us atlr the cake. Molly." said Betty, 
"until mother comes back." So Molly stirred 
and stirred until her round little cheeks were 
pink with the exertion of It. Then Betty took 
her turn. Her arms were shorter than Molly's, 
and she tired more easily, so Molly went at It 
again. 

"Now let's stir the other way round." sug- 
gested Betty as Molly showed sign* of slowing 
down. Then a strange thing happened, or 
was It really a strange thing? They had been 
stirring from left to right Tor a long" time and 
had stirred everything mto the cake, so when 
they began stirring from right to left they 
were stirring everything out of the cake. Of 
course It was all very simple and natural, but 
they were rather amazed to see things reap- 
pearin First came the vanilla extract, and 
Betty was too surprised to even sniff It; then 
came two cups of flour and- four teaspoon* of 
baking powder, a cup of milk, three egg*, some 
butter and sugar. It was heavy stirring and 
somehow it seemed all wrong, but Molly kept 
on and on. Then the door opened and mother 
came In. 

"What are you doing?" she asked, frowning. 
■Meddlesome Matties, unmaking all my cake. 
I shall send you both upstairs at once," and 
mother opened the baking powder tin and 
gave the children each a heaping teaspoonful, 
which they took bllnklngly Into their sur- 
prised little mouths. 

Up, up. up. like big balloon* they arose, feel- 
ing strangely light and giddy, and away in 
the distance they heard mother's voice calling: 

"Molly. Betty, come, we're going to make the 
cake." The voice came nearer and nearer and 
louder, and then. "Wake up. wake up. sleepy 
heads!" and there was mother beside the 
hammock smiling a* the two sleepy children 
opened their bewildered eyes. 



Glass Razor Blades 

tN these day* all sort* of things are being 
JL made of gla**. U has been spun into the 
flneat thread* and woven Into dainty frock*. 
It ha* been made so strong that It 1* almost 
or quite unbreakable. Stranger still it can 
be bent and then tied In knots. "A* brittle as 
glass" Is no longer true of many products of 
the modern glass factory, and yet as the fol- 
lowmg paragraph shows one of the strangest 
use* of glass date* from very ancient tunes: 

Double-ctjged blades are used in many mod- 
ern safety razors, and it comes a* a surprise to 
know that razor blades with two cutting edges 
were In use 6,000 years ago. 

This fact came to light when excavations at 
Tepe Oawra In Iraq were being made by an 
expedition from the Museum of the University 
of Pennsylvania. The razor blades V9i .iade 
of obsidian.-* natura 1 Totcarrte jrhrss. -Curiously 
enough "this substance cannot be found at Tepe 
Oawra. and It is thought that the people of 
that town carried on a trade with Armenia, 
where the blades evidently came from. 

The Wonderful Ant 



EVER since, and perhaps before the time 
of Solomon, the ant has been watched 
and studied. The observers have been very 
patient and found out strange things about 
the marvelous little creature. In South Afrlra 
the white ant la looked upon as a pest. A 
chance discovery shows It may prove a guide 
to ^e human seeker after water. 

A naturalist, who had long been wondering 
how the ants could exist without water, was 
watchmg a well being sunk on a Transvaal 
farm He saw a tiny shaft running down into 
the earth near the larger one they were sink- 
ing. It reached a depth of sixty-five feet 
Here there was water. Up and down, day and 
night, the ants moved, each carrying a drop 
of water to Its nest. It took each ant half an 
hour to descend and return. There appeared 
to be day and night shifts, the Insects working 
faster In the cool night. 

■tlllllllllimillllllll imillllldllimi MMMNM MMMMW 



Police. Dog Befriends Fawn 

*•••»• •« mm ............. • 




Fishing on the Mack en lie River, eighteen mitei tut of Port Arthur, on th« Tram-Canada Highway, George 
Clavet, of Port Arthur, cimi scroti a baby deer, several days old, floundering in the water, half starved. Ha 
took it to the home of Nick Miooch at Mackenzie, and the deer, three weeks old when the above picture was 
is now a pet, with Prince, the husky dog, paying as much attention to "Tiny" as docs his master, Nick, 
shown giving the fawn her morning meal, milk from a nipple and bottle. 



Solomon John Goes for Apples 



Br LUCRET1A P HALE 

SOLOMON John agreed to ride to Farmer 
Jones' for a basket of apples and he de- 
cided to go on horseback. The horse 
was brought round to the door. Now he had 
not ridden for a great while; and though the 
little boys were there with him. he had great 
trouble getting on the horse. 

He tried a great many times, but always 
found himself facing the wrong way. looking 
at the horse's tall. They turned the horse s 
head, first up the street, then down the street; 
it made no difference; he always made some 
mistake, and found himself sitting the wrong 
way. 

Well, he said at last. "I don't know as I care. 
If the horse has his head in the right direc- 
tion that is the main thing. Sometimes I ride 
this way In the cars because I like It better. 
I can turn my head easily enough to see where 
I am going." So off he went and the little 
boys said he looked like a circus rider, and 
they were much pleased 

He rode along the village, under the elms, 
very quietly. Pretty soon he came to a bridge, 
where the n.ad went, across a little stream. 
There was a road at the side, leading down to 
the stream, because sometimes wagoners wa- 
tered their horses there. Solomon John s horse 
turned off, too, to drink the water. 

"Very well." said Solomon John, "I don't 
blame him for wanting to wet his feet and to 
take a drink this hot day." 

When they reached the middle of the stream, 
the hor*e bent over hi* head. 

How far his neck comes into his back! "! ex- 
claimed Solomon John, and at that very mo- 
ment he round he had slid down over hi* 
horse* head, and was sitting on a stone, look- 
ing into the horse's face. There were two- 
frogs, one on each side of him. sitting Jujrt as 
he was. which pleased Solomon John, so he 
began to laugh instead of to cry. 

But the frogs Jumped into the water. 

"It 1* time for me to go on." .said Solomon 
John. So he gave a jump, as he had seen the 
frogs do, and this time he came all right on 
the horses back facing the way he was going. 

"It Is a little pleasanter." said he. The horse 
wanted to nibble a little of the grass by the 
side of the way, but 8olomon John remem- 
bered what a long neck he had. and would not 
let him atop. 

At la*t he reached Farmer 
him his basket of apples 



Next he was to go on to a cider mill, up a 
little lane by Farmer Jones' house, to get a 
Jug of cider. But as the horse turned Into the 
lane, he began to walk very slowly— so slowly 
that Solomon John thought he would not get 
there before night. He whistled and shouted, 
and thrust his knees into the horse, but still 
he would not go. . 

"Perhaps the apples are too heavy for him." 
said he So he began by throwing one of the 
apples out of the basket. It hit the fence by 
the side of the road, and that started up the 
horse, and he went on merrily. 

"That was the trouble." said Solomon John, 
"that apple was too heavy for him." 

But very soon the horse began to go slower 
and slower. 

So Solomon John thought he would try an- 
other apple. This hit a large rock and 
bounded back under the horses feet, and sent 
him off at a great pace But very soon he 
fell again mto a slow walk. 

Solomon John had to try another apple. 
This time it fell Into a pool of water and made 
a great splash, and set the horse out again 
for a little while. He soon returned to a slow 
walk -so slow that Solomon John thought It 
would be tomorrow morning before he got to 
the elder mill. "It Is rather a waste of apples." 
thought he. "but I ran pick them up as I come 
back, because the horse will be going home ai 
a quick pace." 

8o he fluni out another apple that fel 
among a partir of duriks, and they began t 
make such a quacking and a waddling that 1, 



frightened 

So the only 
the horse go 
on one side, ikow 
frightened a 




It's Dinner Time for the Robins 



mt t in mini I 



>MMinmMimiMm«M«itititi • 



iiin£ 




itof k quick trot. 
>mon John could mak£ 
lingmg his apples, no* 
ohe other. One time He 
ow. thatt ran along by the side 
of the road, (while the horse racrd with her. 
Another time he started up a brood of turkey* 
that gobbled and strutted enough to startle 
twenty horses In another place he came near 
rutting a boy. who gave such a scream that It 
sent the horse off at a furious rate. 

And Solomon John got quite excited him- 
self, and he did not stop till he had thrown 
away all his apples and had reached the cor- 
ner of the cider mill. 

"Very well." said he, 1 if the horse is so lazy, 
he won't mind my stopping to pick up the 
apples on my way home. And I am not *ure 
but I shall"' prefer walking to riding the beast." 

The man came out to meet him from the 
cider mill and reached him the Jug. He was 
just going to lake. it. -wb«4»~.he~-fcuiTred" the 
horse s head round, and, delighted at . the idea 
of going home, the horse set off at a full run 
without waiting for the Jug Solomon John 
clung to the reins and his knees held fast to 
the horae. He called out "whoa! whoa!" but 

jjd the horse would not atop. . —- ^^r- 

He went galloping on past the boy, who 
I stopped and flung an apple at him; past the 
turkeys who gobbled at lum; by the cow that 
turned and ran back in a race till her breath 
gave out; by the ducks that came and quacked 
at him: by an old donkey that brayed over the 
wall at him. by some hen* that ran into the 
road under the horse s feet; by a great rooster 
that .stood on a fence and crowed at htm; by 
Farmer Jones, who looked out to see what had 
become of him; down the village (ftufi, an d 
he never atopped till he had reached the door 
of the house. 

Out rome MTrBnd Mrs Peterkin 
non. Elizabeth Eliza and the three boyi. 
Solomon John got off hi* horse all out of 
■ath i 

Where l« the Juf of elder?" 



* Sir Joseph Banks • 



PERHAPS that 1* what Sir Joseph Bank* 
would like best to be called, but. a* you 
will aee, he was more than that. This 
remarkable man was born nearly two hundred 
years ago in 1743 and lived till 1830. 

His home wa* in Lincolnshire, and. unlike 
many great men of which you have read, he 
waa very rich. Hi* father wa* a landowner 
and his mother an heiress. Yet Master Joseph, 
like any of you, loved to play out of doors. He 
was very fond of flower*, as most children 
are When he was sent to school, he did not 
see why he could not learn about them Instead 
of learning Latin and Oreek. a* even little 
fellows did In those days But boys had to do 
a* they were told So the declension* and 
conjugation* were learned and the classics 
translated. But that did not keep the- lad 
from using his eyes and wits in the fields, the 
hedgerows and garden. He made friends with 
the old women who gathered and sold herbs. 
He discovered an old Illustrated book on 
botany and that helped. After he left Eton 
Banks went to Oxford The rich mans son 
was able to persuade the authorities there to 
provide Instruction in botany. 



The transit of Venus wa* seen In June. 175t. 
New Zealand was visited and the coast ex- 
plored. Australia was claimed for Oreat 
Britain. Botany Bay was named by Bank* 
because of the number and beauty of its 
plant*. At New Oulnea. Java, the Cape of 
Good Hope and other places Banks 
new and useful plants, some of which 
afterwards cultivated In the West Indie*. 



Out in the World 

//■HEN. at twenty. Banks left Oxford, he 
went on a cruise to Labrador and New- 
foundland. Then he began to make the col- 
lection of specimens which was to contain 
plants from many parts of the world. The 
seeds from some of these plants were sown In 
English gardens. Victoria has this year had 
visits from astronomers from many parts of 
the world. Steamship and airplane, not to 
speak of railway and motor car, have made 
travel easy. 

In 178* there was going to be a transit of 
Venu* visible In the Sandwich Islands, and the 
Oovernment of Britain had been persuaded 
by scientific men to *end out an expedition to 
Taliltl to observe It. There was In England a 
Yorkshire captain. Jame* Cook, who had 
made a name for himself as a splendid seaman 
and a wise and good man. He was put in 
charge of the expedition. In the little ship 
Endeavour of 170 ton* were the sailor*, as- 
tronomers and the botanl*t. Joseph Banks. 
Cook was to discover unclaimed land, the as- 
tronomers to observe the stars, and Bank* to 
find new plant*. 



A Generous Rival 

IN Australia the great French explorer. La 
Pereuse. met the Endeavour. He had 
come to take possession of the continent for 
the French King. Finding the English flag 
flying, he sailed away never to be seen again 
Banks never rested till three years afterward 
It was discovered that he had been wrecked 
on a coral island. # Many other times Banks 
returned to the French valuable document* 
and specimens taken from French scientists 
during the wars between France and Oreat 
Britain. He befriended French prisoner*. In 
this and other ways he showed that science 
does not know national boundaries 

Other Explorations 

BANKS did not go with Captain Cook on 
the voyage which brought him to the 
West Coast of North America, although he 
helped support that great venture. 



He sought and found plants In Iceland 
In the Hebrides. Beside* plants and InaecU, 
he brought from Iceland example* of the won- 
derful literature of that northern land. He 
was able, too, to assist the people when they 
were in trouble. This great naturalist waa 
not satisfied with finding plants only. He ex- 
plored the island of Staffa with It* wonderful 
pillars and Flngal's Cave. 

Sir Joseph Bank* was a very generous man 
He helped many with money and hi* splendid 
library wa* open to all .students He a*al*ted 
travelers and naturalists with his Influence, 
his advice and his money. He was president 
of the Royal Society and founded the Royal 
Geographical Society. It was owing to his 
Influence that Australia's first settlement wa* 
made and he helped to begin the civilisation 
of a part of Africa. He left hi* library and hi* 
rich collection of «peclmena to the BrltUh 
Museum. He gave liberally of himself and of 
his possessions for the good of other*. Of *uch 
men the BrltUh Empire may be proud. 



Success 



YOUNO people, having laid aside their 
books, have time to think about the 
future. Who among these big boy* and girls 
does not hope and plan for success In the life 
that lie* before them? Here 1* a passage that 
may help them. It Is taken from an old 
magazine: 

We all admire, and some of us envy, the 
successful man. We long to tread in his foot- 
step*, and. if we did but know it. It Is the 
easiest thing In the world provided we are 
prepared to pay the price, provided we are not 
afraid of work He will succeed who takes 
"Difficulties attract. me"- bismoU©. 



Poems of the 
Great War 



The poems on thie week'e ptie have been taken 

from ' In the Otr of Battle.' ' Poemi of thr Oreet 
Wer." ieUcim bv Carrie Ellen Holman, of Bum 



Where we so often make the mistake is that 
we look for results before we have built up 
their natural structure before we have earned 
our success; and If Luck comes our way, we 
are often even more tempted to grab at the 
plums In the quickest and easiest way pos- 
sible. In nine cases out of ten what is the 
fate <f the gambler and the Infant prodigy? 
When the former dies. I* hi* will generally 
proved for a million pounds' When the lat- 
ter grows up. do we often hear hi* namr upon 
the lips of the public' Luck seems so allur- 
ing. ItuJ yet how often her recipient*, or. 
rathet. I would call them victims live to me 
the <|ay. Just because she has taken) from 
them/ their greatest possession*, that lit, the 
power to strive. 

No. Success i* not the fruit, of Luck/ rather 
she 1* the child of sheer hard luck Lurk 
alone spell* disaster, but couple her with work 
and she then turns into -Opportunity, which 
is Indeed a great factor In the composition of 
that magic thing. Success. 




a*ked Mrs 



"It 1* at the cider mill. " said Solomon John. 
"At the mill!" exclaimed Mrs. Peterkin 
"Yes. ' said Solomon John, the little boys 
had better walk out for It; they will enjoy It; 
and they had better take a basket; for on the 
way they will find plenty of apple* scattered 
along on either side of the lane, and hens and 
duck*, and turkey* and a donkey." 

The little boys looked at e«eh other and 
went: but they,j» topped first and put on their 
tjoot* -The Junior Clas- 



The Little Gentleman 



I knew him for a gentleman 

By signs that never fall; 

His coat wa* rough and rather worn. 

HLs rheek* were thin and pale; 

A lad who had hi* way to make 

With little time for play. 

I knew him for a gentleman 

By certain sign* today. 

He met his mother In the street. 

Off came his little rap. 

My door was shut, he waited there 

Until I heard hi* rap 

He took the bundle from my hand. 

And when I dropped the pen 

He sprang to pick It up for me. 

This gentleman of ten. . 

He does not push or crowd along. 

nis \oice is gem i\ piumeo. 

He does not fling hi* books about 

A* if he were bewitched. 

He stand* aside to let you pass. 

He alwavs shuts the door. 

He runs on errand* willingly 

To forge, or mill, or store 

He thinks* of you before himself, 
He serve* you if he ran, 
For in whatever company 
The manners make the 
At ten or forty tla the 
Hi* manners tell the tale, 
And I discern the gentleman 
By Wgn* that never fall 



O. W . mA 

unwjra 

0 Canada the blood of all thy sons 

Cries out today from fair and glorlou* deeds; 

And spirit legions of Immortal 
Who died to 
needs 

Pledge thee, anew by their white honor roll. 

To loftier issue* born of sacrifice : 
Bidding thee keep unatained. that nobler soul. 

Which they have ransomed with *o great 

a price. 

—A Beatrice Hlckson. 
The Df ad 

Blow out. yon bugles, over the rich dead! 
There s none of these so lonely and poor of old. 
But. dying has made u* rarer gifts than gold 
These laid the world a* ay, poured out the red 
Sweet wine of youth; gave up the year* to be 
Of work and age. and that hope serene, 
That men call age, and those who would have 
been 

Their sons, thev gave, their Immortality. 

Blow, bugle.s blow! Tliey brought ua for our 
dearth. 

Holiness, lacked so long, and love and pain. 
Honor ha* come back a* a king to earth. 
And paid hi* subjects with a royal wage, 
And nobleness walks In our ways again. 
And we have come into our heritage. 

—Rupert Brooke. 

The Lad Out There 

Oh. power of love, If still you lean 

Above a world, so black with hate, 

Where yet— It has ever been— 

The loving heart Is desolate. 

Look down upon the lad I love 

"My brave lad tramping through the mire.) 

1 cannot light hi* welcoming fire. 
Light thou the stars for him above I 
-Vqw night* are dark and morning* dim, 
Let htm in his long watf hing know 
That I. too, count the minutes slow, 
.And light the lamp of love for him 
The sight of death, the sleep forlorn. 
The old homesickness vast and dumb— 
Amid these things so bravely borne, 

I-et my long thought* above htm come, 

I see htm In the weary file 

So young he is, so dear to me, 

Wi'h ever ready sympathy. 

And wistful eve* and <iiee r fu! smile. 

However far he travels on 

Thought follows, like the *tllow-wren 

That file* the stormy seas again — 

To land* where h#>i del'ebr. l* gone 
Whatever he may be or do 
While absent far bevond my call. 
Bring htm, ths long dav > march being through, 
Safe home to me some evenfall- 
^-r —May 



T 



fMi unmeet phstn von fint prue m 'he Netwnel Am atewr American W.ldMe Photo Contest conducted by 
the American Wildlife Initifate It »ho*» i mother - - feeding her »o*ng the - holding their mouth* 
*>de open and ■tjMrej tor then dinner The p*tere was taken b» W.lUm M ( i»ell. of New York titv. 



In the vear 147H John Scolvu* l« said to hav« 
reached Labrador in search of a northwest 
passage Some historian* my trn* explorer 
was a Dane, while others contend he wa* » 
Pole. 



Let Us Be Thankful 

' 

OUR King* life ha* been saved* In the 
danger he has borne himself a* a brave 
'.man He was loved before Now he is admired 
We cannot even imagine what might have 
happened a this time If the h#>ad of the 
i BrvuAh Empire had fallen and we shall not 
trv Let ua be thankful ia the Oreat > Ruler 
of the »orld who ha* preserved a life so 
precious 



Where Are You All? 

THE streets * r e very quiet these morning* 
Wn do not hear the chatter of little folk 
on their way to school or the «houU of boy* 
at play. 

Won t some of you write and tell u* where 
von are' The editor would like to flu the 
page with stories and pictures of the place* 
• hern vou are spending your holiday* Some 
of you perhaps think that hnme r i* the Bast 
place of ill Others have had adventure* 
A fe* hjrn gone far t»av Let u* share youi 
fun or vour 



\ 



THE DAILY COLONIST. VICTORl \, B.C., SUNDAY, R I.Y 26, 1936 




Suburb m Countru 




New Zealand, the Land 



IMIItMHIlt Milllll MIMMtllMIIIII 



Of Evergreen Pastures 



! Frames as Background for Tall Flowers 

.IMIIHIIIMIII mtlMHIHmiUHItMmMmaMaMISIMM^^ mmnlllMtMU Wt M' <'•»"• 



..MM 



■MMi 



Br ■. O MscCAXLUM 

vHERE appears to be no crop suit- 
i for temperate climate which 
cannot be grown weil In some part 
or other of the Islands, and the profusion of 
the growth of most crops, the evergreen nature 
of the pastures, and the luxuriance of the 
trees, Justify the description so often applied 
that 'New Zealand Is one of the gardens of 
the world.' 

"The profusion of growth so usual in the 
country Is by no means wholly due to the 
advantageous natural conditions which exist, 
but Is in great part aided by the skill of the 
agriculturists and the efficient Agricultural 
Department whtoh directs Its rural activities. 
The various primary rural products now pro- 
duced in large quantities are of very high 
quality, and the portion exported overseas is 
of the best, Is well prepared to suit the tastes 
of the consumers, and Is adequately advertised 
in the worlds markets." 

Such la the conclusion reached by W. J. 
Spafford. Deputy Director of Agriculture for 
the State of South Australia, after a recent 
visit to New Zealand. The visit was made In 
the course of a tour of countries of the south- 
ern hemisphere, the object of which was to 
pay particular attention to the production 
marketing of crops that compete with those 
of Australia on the world markets Because 
Canada produces many agricultural products 
which compete with those of the southern 
hemisphere in export trade, Mr. Spafford s 
observations are of more than ordinary in- 
terest, and the following article Is baj>ed upon 
his report. 

Mejf Is Chief Export 

NEW ZEALAND has an area of 104,015 
square miles. Her exports are largely 
the product* of her farms, chief of which are 
frozen meat, principally mutton and lamb, 
to the extent of about 240.000 tons each year; 
butter, of which product 140,000 tons are sent 
to world markets, cheese and wool. Export* 
of cheese amount to 99.000 tons and wool 
144,000 tons. 

It is the pastures of New Zealand that make 
tms astounding exportable surplus possible. 
They are probably the beat in the world. 
Rainfall varies from 13 to 200 inches an- 
nually, but In much of the country the pre- 
cipitation is between thirty and fifty inches. 
Still more important than the amount of 
rainfall Is Its distribution during the seasons. 
Mr. Spafford says: 

"In most places this rain is so evenly dis- 
tributed that about equal amounts are re- 
ceived in each month of the year. Another 
favorable feature of the New Zealand climate 
is that, despite the high rainfall received over 
modt districts, it Is neither a cloudy nor a 
loggy country, but receives plenty of sunshine, 
and in this direction also favors the develop- 
ment and health of livestock. Although some 
of the mountains are snow-capped and fre- 
quent falls occur In the ranges, it is very 
seldom that snow reaches the lower lands, 
and the climate Is so equable that it Is un- 
necessary to house livestock at any time of 
the year." 

With the pastures luxuriant and evergreen, 
extensive reserves of hay and ensilage are un- 
necessary and only small amounts are pro- 
duced to safeguard against grass shortage In 
the event of unusually severe winter conditions. 

Productivity of Firms 
a N idea of the productivity of pastures can 
J\ be obtained from the carrying capacity 
of typical farms. On one of 369 acres at Pakow- 
hal. on the Hawkes Bay plains, 2300 ewes 
were carried in 1933. They were lambed down, 
fattened and 111 per cent of lambs were sold. 
In addition, 6.000 sheep and 100 head of cattle 
were fattened and sold Besides all this graz- 
ing nlnety-aeven acres were left for seed and 
twenty-six bushels of double-dressed rye grass 
seed and 120 bushels of double-dress s-hite 
clover seed were harvested per acre Th« only 
cropping done by this farmer is the growing 
of a few acres of mangels each year J from 
which yields of 80 to 100 tons per arfe are 
secured. The only fertilizer consists ft five 
hundredweight* of bone and blood meal per 
acre with the crop of mangels 

Another farm of 100 acres near Palrjierston 
North carries 900 breeding ewes and (fattens 
120 per cent of lambs without the purchase 
of foodstuffs. The farm Is divided into seven- 
acre fields and the flock is kept in only 
one day at a time. One seven -acre field on 
this farm is kept for hay. 

Still another farm of sixty acres at Hender- 
son, near Auckland, carries fortv-flve Jersey*, 
and the only foodstuff purchased 1* for the 
calve*. In addition 600 pigs are kept and 2 000 
are marketed each year Oreen feed l* grown 
for the pigs and a certain amount of hay 
and ensilage for the cows The pastures *re 
kept in full growth by an annual torSdressing 
of 6O0 pounds of superphosphate and one-half 
ton of lime per acre. 

New Zealand farmers pav close attention 
to pasture management Thnr objective. Is to 
keep down I he coarser plants and to encourage 
the growth of finer one*. This Is done by 
tegular and frequent grazing and never allow- 
5 growth to become rank Soil fertility U 
maintained by liberal applications of commer- 
cial fertilizers, principally those contributing 
phosphates and there are extremely few mho 
attempt to "get by" without using plant food 
of some sort A* a whole. New Zealandcrs 
may be said to be "fert Hirer conscious.' for. 
almost regardless of the natural fertility of 
the soil*, the question is what and how much 
fertilizer shall be used rather than whether 
or not to use artificial plant foods 

Seed Carefully Selected 

ANOTHER important factor contributing 
to good pastures i* the seed used In 
thi* direction the New Zealanders are quite 
advanced, for close attention is paid to grass 
and clover mixtures, to rates ol seeding and 
to strain* of seed used. A great deal of atten- 
tion is paid to standardization and improve- 
ment ol grass and clover strains, with peren- 
nial, rye and white clover being the 
basic seeds used in moat pasture mixtures 

For the production of mutton and lamb. 
Southdown rams are used on Romney Varah 
ewea Conditions make the fine wool breeds 
mhlch predominate m Australia, unsuited to 
New Zealand, with the result that wool pro- 
duction I* secondary to meat Carcaase* of 
• he Sotithdown-Romney Marsh Cross are aon- 
c.erfiillv uniform Due to the care taken by 
the buyer*, who go direct to the farm* to make 



their purchases of lambs for the export mar- 
ket, sheep for slaughter are- In a high standard 
of condition. Ax there are thousands of car- 
casses lrt the freezing works, the grade of 
lots for shipments la uniform in size, weight 
and degree of finish. Incidentally lambs for 
slaughter remain with their mothers until the 
day they are shipped off to the freezing works. 
The Meat Purchasers Board, established in 



MANY flower gardens are lack- 
ing a frame or background, 

although there are many types of 
backgrounds to utilize. No mat- 
ter how beautiful a flower garden 
Is in Itself, It can be even more 
effective If certain flower* are 
"framed" against a proper back- 
ground. A hemlock edge, a stone 
or brick wall, a closely bound 
fence of saplings, or where there 
ls room, a green wall of shrub- 
bery are proper "frames" for 



1922, controls all exports of meat. This board flowers. Means of "framing" 
regulates grades, and sets buying and selling ' flowers are illustrated in the above 



conditions as well as promoting export trade. 
Two member* are appointed by the Govern- 
ment, five are elected by producers of meat 
for export and one member represents stock 
and station agents. A small levy ls assessed 
against each carcass, which produces a total 
of about $175,000 for the board each year. Of 
the total collected, 75 per cent ls earmarked 
for advertising purposes. The advertising of 
New Zealand meat In purchasing countries ls 
one of the outstanding features of the activ- 
ities of the board, and has been carried on 
so efficiently that it i* the envy of all other 
exporting countries. 

Jerseys Predominate 

-px AIRYINO has developed with great rapid- 
JL-/ lty in the Southern Cross Dominion. 
Jersey* outnumber all other breed* and pre- 
dominate throughout the country The latest 
figurea place the row population at 1.933.000 
with an annual butterfat production of 
427,000,000 pounds. In 1901. the average pro- 
duction was 127 pound* of butterfat per cow. 
By 1911, the figure had advanced to 140 and 
by 1921 the average was 174. Another ten 
years raised the average to 199, while the 
average for 1934 was 220 8 pounds. Improve- 
ment of pastures, herd testing and discrim- 
inate breeding and culling, together with the 
importation of high-class breeding stock, have 
been responsible for the steady Increase in 
average production. Close attention is beuig 
paid to all these phases, and official* believe 
the end to Improvement has been far from 
reached. The average for the country is still 
far behind the average for cows In testing 
aasociatloas, the 287,000 cows on test in 1933-34 
having an average production of 262 44 pounds 
of butterfat. 

The Tamworth breed predominates In the 
swine Industry of New Zealand Under exist- 
ing conditions it does not appear as though 
New Zealand will become an important pro- 
ducer of grain, and if this remain* so the 
Dominion will always be handicapped in con- 
nection with the production of bacon pigs. 
Although there ls a very plentiful supply of 
dairy by-products for pigs in the growing 
stage, the necessity of purchasing gram for 
finishing, then to have to ship to markets 
on the other side of the world does not appear 
to be an attractive economic proposition. 

Much the same condition* handicap the 
poultry industry, ahd while the Dominion does 
not produce a surplus of wheat and other 
grains suitable for large numbers of hens It 
does not appear at all probable that New 
Zealand will become an exporter of eggs. 

Research in Wheat 

ALTHOUOH only a relatively small quan- 
quantity of wheat Ls grown, a good deal 
of research is being undertaken with the 
The principal aim of the wheat re- 
search workers is the development of heavy- 
yielding wheats producing graln'of good qual- 
ity, and officers are confident that a new 
cross-bred wheat being distributed Ls very 
close to the desired type. Latest figures show 
New Zealand's wheat crop at 242 036 tons, 
of which 8.042 tons was exported Oats and 
pea* are the other principal grain crop*. 

Mr. Spafford * impressions on New Zealand s 
pastures are 

"Much of the success attained with pasture* 
in New Zealand is due to intelligent manage- 
ment. It is generally recognized that correct 
balance can be maintained only bv regularly 
and frequently grazing the pasture* fairly 
hard, and again 'getting the livestock onto 
them before the growth becomes coarse and 
thick. 

Rotational grazing Ls practised to prevent 
touting the pastures and to reduce the risk 
of eating out the better quality fodder-plant*, 
rather than seeking more protelnous forage 

'The stirring of the surface of pastures 
does not appear to be popular, but the drop- 
pings of animal* are spread frequently with 
light harrows or something of the kind. 

' Oreat care I* taken by most grazier* to 
remove bad weeds from pasture* 

"Top dressing pasture* with superphosphate 



photographs; left, the new Eng- 
lish and Dutch delphiniums, 
which are among the most beau- 
tiful of hardy plant* In cultiva- 
tion; and right, climbing roses on 
a high lattice make a charming 
background against which other 
tall-growing 
framed. 




Ltft, New Engl.*h and Dutch D«lphiniumi; R.ght. Chmb.ng Roitt on H.gh Litt.ct M Background for Grow.ng Flowtr, 



is general, except in the very best districts. 
In some places lime i* applied every second 
year or so. 

"The 8eed Certification Scheme In operation 
in New Zealand 1* having a marked effect on 
the improvement of pastures." 



Use of Plant Food and 
Late Season Growth 



Dominance of Hardy Plants 
Ended by Strange Revolt 



O' 



k NE of the things which the garden novice 
takes longest to learn ls to work ahead 
of the season Palling in this, he often at- 
tempts, too late, to make up for the oversight 
The feedmg of plants which bloom in late 
Summer and Autumn is a case Ui point. Roses, 
fruit tree*, hedge plant* and many other .shrubs 
which continue to make growth until late in 
the Summer are In the same category 

All plants of this general type are best fed 
generously now. Supplying plant food late in 
the season stimulates overactive growth, re- 
sulting in "soft " wood which docs not have a 
chance to mature properly and. therefore, is 
particularly subject to Winter injury. It is 
especially dangerous to apply plant foods rich 
In available nitrogen late in the season to any- 
thing except annuals, or to vegetables which 
will not be carried through the Winter. 

Even in making applications of plant food 
at the present time or during the next few 
weeks to roaes. shrubs and fruit trees, it is ad- 
visable to make sure, If a mixture is being 
used, that it contain* a high percentage) of 
potash. Unbleached wood ashes, which tire 
particularly good for ro*es and fruit trees! or 
either sulphate or muriate of potash. Can be 
applied alone or with a complete fertilizer. «hus 
assuring an abundance of potash. 

During a prolonged period ol dry weattier it 
l« well to give r>ne or two thorough watering* 
after the fertilizer has been distributed to 
make sure that it work* well down into the 
.soil within reach of the feeding roots. 

Spade up a seed bed in a shadv corner of 
the yard to plant late perennial seed*. They 
are more easily cared for in the open ground 
than In boxes at this drying season of the year. 
Pulverize the soil fine Wet It down thor- 
oughly and plant the seed a* soon as It dries 
past the mud stage. 



T 



tfttj IMIMMMmilMMMllMIMIMI """"""" MMII * MIMIttN IIIHIHtll rl 



. .i..... ......... 



Fine Wheat Crop Near Regina 



1 



(*m i t ■ mi it i HIM* 



................MM | It. ......... |(l 



r 




It * not «ll drouth in S*tk|.rS... rs* AltHo«gk tkt ei"eme " > « ,k a"d inut"»ts» 

*»'" *» *t rb« f'OC I ro*f«rntd lirmir i o* tk# rt«»- jl !'#• tff <4»<xg »tl 

m IN yt»t%. m Urn plieta ot i crop -i«*r lUgmj ftit.Ut 



rtgiont are 



By THOMAS R HENRY 
fCopyrttht. 1B3«. by The North American Newspaper 
Alliance. Inc ) 

t HE upbuilding of arLstocracles and their 
overthrow by revolution* seem* to be 
a dominant law of Ufe. 
IU application to the vegetable world is 
found in extensive experiments Just reported 
by Dr. Frederick A Clements, of the Division 
of Plant Biology, of the Carnegie Institution 
of Washington. 

His experiments and observations throw 
light on perplexing problems, among them the 
origin of species. There are, Dr. Clements 
finds, "plant communities'' adapted to locali- 
ties which continually are changing as condi- 
tions change progressing to fitter and fitter 
types, and then reverting to the prunitive 
through cataclysms. 
"Etch successive community," says Dr. 
— Elements, from lowly moss or lichen to the 
final forest, owe* its acquisition of territory 
and It* golden age to the conquest of the 
original inhabitants, and will in turn be dis- 
possessed by more powerful invaders. The 
outcome of each period of competition 1* the 
dominance of the best-equipped community, 
until the Incoming prairie or forest put* an 
er.d to the waxes of invasion and conquest, 
owing to the fact that each represent* the 
highest type of population possible m the 
particular climate. Tills by no means indi- 
cates that competition ls absent in these com- 
munities, but merely that the ruling class can- 
not be overthrown without a revolution. 

Dominant Grasses Win 

< ' A N accurate census ol the prairie re\eals 
l\ a tendency for the brilliant flowers to 
be replaced by the dominant grasses, a fate 
that even overtakes the pea* and clovers in 
*plte of Xheir service as nitrogen fixer* lor the 
entire community." 

Dr. Clements' studies, he report* to the 
Carnegie Institution, show clearly that »uch 
factors as a limited supply of water or light will 
produce striking differences between Indi- 
viduals, not Infrequently of the magnitude 
»een in varieties and apecie*. Thi* come* 
about in a. single generation, a* a result of 
direct adaptation, but a* yet there is no 
adequate proof that these new feature* can 
be fixed, and hence transmitted to succeeduig 
gine ration*. 

Furthermore " »ays Dr Clements, rio ex- 
perimental evidence ha* been obtained that 
the minute fluctuating variations emphasized 
by Darwin are accumulated year by year until 
they constitute a new species, and It now ap- 
pears improbable that thi* ls^he case, in 
plant* at least. Even In the prali le. where the 
atature and form of the grasses and herb* are 
the outcome of thousands of years of com- 
petition, it has proved possible to modify the.se 
greatly in a single year by removing indi- 
viduals to the point where the supply Is in ex- 
cess of the demand These experiments aLso 
have served to confirm the view that the suc- 
cession of land populations, such as l* ex- 
hibited in a bum, a sand dune, the delta of a 
river or an old lava How. is largely or wholly 
a consequence of competition 

One of the most striking experiment* re- 
port dealt with the so-called buffalo grass" 
which once covered the prairies, and wa* 
much in the public eye at the time of the re- 
cent duat storms. It played an Important part 
in tieing down the top soil During the past 
„ feneratloft_it_Ji«a beta practically exter- 
minated. , 

The general opinion ha* been that thi* 
gra** disappeared in the wake of the vaniah- 
ing bison, presumably because of some vague 
bond of sympathy between the two. Another 
belief held that the tall graaa trailed westward 
after the pioneers and occupw 
prepared for it by the buffalo 

How Tall Grass Vanished 

13^ 



natural monarch of the prairies and tliat the 
coming of the bLson constituted a sort of 
grass revolution which enabled it to be over- 
thrown by the plebian buffalo grass. 

Say* Dr. Clements: "Much field study has 
been given to this problem In Nebraska and 
Kansas before an opportunity offered to test 
the merits of tan and short grasses in actual 
competition. Within .sight of the graceful 
obelisk of Nebraska's capitol was found a 
stretch of nearly pure buffalo grass, lagging 
half a century behind its departed namesake. 
Dotted through it were vestiges of tall grasses, 
apparently hopelessly discouraged by their 
diminutive antagonists. The area was fenced 
to demonstrate the part taken by~grazlng In 
thus effect, and was charted annually lor three 
year* to trace the course of competition. . 

"During the first season the tall grass re- 
covered rapidly, and produced seed for the 
first time It increased its -lead each year 
until it everywhere dominated the buffalo 
grass and had actually replaced it over much 
of the territory. In the- weedy spots, a single 
year of protection restored the natural ad- 
vantage of the grass to such an extent that 
the weeds disappeared as If by magic In the 
second Summer. This experiment supplied 
the final link of evidence necessary to explain 
the changes in grass land communities during 
the period of settlement 

"When the bison roamed the plains by the 
million*, they damaged the tall grasses more 
than their short competitors, giving the latter 
a derided advantage in the struggle and 
rendering them correspondingly dominant. A* 
the buffalo were killed off or driven westward, 
the handicap to the tall grasses, was removed 
In little more than a decade and these quick- 
ly assumed the rank allotted them by the 
character of the climate. 

"Similar experiment* to redress the balance 
between the two kinds of grasses have been 
made throughout the West, always with the 
consequence of restoring the ability of the 
taller specie* to compete successfully with the 
shorter* The converse process Ls taking place 
In the tall gra** prairie* of the Mls*ourl Valley, 
where confining cattle in pastures ha* had the 
effect of transmuting the blue-stem com- 
munities into a buffalo-gra** sod." 
- * — a, 

Sowing Garden Seeds in 
Midsummer Weather 



w 



•-ontrary-that the tall 



wa* the 



HILE there i* comparatively- little plant- 
ing to be done during midsummer, some 
vegetables, late flowering annuals and peren- 
nials mav be planted at thLs Ijune With moat 
species of plants prevailing warm tempera- 
ture* result In quirk and strong germination 
Partial or complete failure in getting a goo# 
stand of seedling*, however, often results from 
the drying"but -nT "the soli surface Just as the 
c eed i* sprouting Under *urh condillons the 
tiny germinating rootlet* may be shriveled 
and destroyed in a few hours. 

To prevent such loss two simple practice* 
are employed The first is to make sure that 
the soil «urface about, the se^d* 1* thoroughly 
pressed down ahd flfm The, objer- of thla la 
to keep moisture, from the soil below, rising 
constantly to the surface to replace that lost 
by evaporation. The second l* to use a light 
cover or mulching of some sort to provide 
shade and conserve aurface moisture until the 
seed has germinated. Salt hay. straw, excei- 
Hor or strips of burlap, kept moistened with a 
hose, are used for this purpose Any such 
covering mun be removed Immediately when 
the seedlings are well up. as otherwise they 

No cracked eggs however good the quality 
mav be are allowed In the Canadian 
grade* A snd B Cracked eggs fall into 
C. but are required to 
egg* of that 



Garden Week 
by Week 

Br NORMAN W F RANT. F R U.S. 

THE lncresslng interest In dwarf shrubs 
and oonifers for the rock garden has 
created an incentive among nursery- 
men to import or grow these most useful and 
ornamental decorations. 

Heretofore It has been a habit for the 
majority to plant either shrubs or conifers 
when small and eventually be compelled to 
dig them out when their welcome ha* become 
worn out. Of more recent years the rock 
gardener has been sble to obtain shrubs and 
conifers that they know will only attain a 
certain height although they may go on 
spreading indefinitely. It therefore i* essen- 
tial that they be afforded room in which to 
spread 

Junipers, that is. the prostrate or creeping 
forms, are essentially rock garden plants. 
They are evergreen, always are ornamental, 
and now that there are so many varieties 
to be had one does not have to adhere to the 
green colored forms only. Varying a* they 
do from light green, dark green, blue shades, 
to gold*, reds, and variegated forma,, it affords 
us unlimited choice. 

There are no more beautiful nor useful 
junipers than our own protrate native forms. 
Juniper communis or Mountain Juniper ls a 
very rough prickly Juniper, it* color is much 
of a pea green, only growing a foot or so in 
height, but spreading endlessly. Its habit of 
hugging the contour of Vive ground and trail- 
ing down the face of rocks makes It a most 
useful shrub. 

Before we learned that this Juniper grew 
abundantly In certain area* In our Province, 
then quite plentiful In place* on our Island, 
we went to the trouble and rxpense of Im- 
porting our stock Bringing coals to Newcastle 
we were informed, and so we were. 

V 

Dainty and Graceful 



JUNIPER hor uniit ahs or procumbens is an- 
other native, more dainty and graceful. 
The color varies from a light pea green 
to brown shades This Juniper is very plenti- 
ful up in the Kootcnay country. The diffi- 
culty always is In finding seedlings or very 
young plant* of these Junipers, a* undoubtedly 
they are not easy movers A large plant In- 
variably has miles of roots running far out 
among the rocks and It 1* almost Impossible 
to dig one up without causing serious damage 
to the root*. 

It is from these two plants thst many dif- 
ferent form* or varieties have originated. 
Juniper communis ha* given us at least three 
excellent varieties, J. com. depressa pluniosa 
perhaps being the* choice of first place, and 
J horlzontalis Dougla.sU comes a very close 
second. Both theae Junipers have a charming 
habit of changing color during the winter to 
shades of red or red-vtolet. There sre gold 
forms of both J. horlzontalis and J. communis 
but the.se varieties are very much slower grow- 
ing and do require more care 

We will not dwell on the usefulness or beauty 
of all the other Junipers but suffice to say that 
no gardener can err in using these shrub* 
to Improve a rockery. 

Next In usefulness, and plants that sfford 
plenty of scope for besuUfying the rock gar- 
den, we think are chamaecyparla. Chamae- 
cyparis swallows several of the more ancient 
families of coniferous evergreens Thi* makes 
It easier for the amsteur m picking or choos- 
ing plants from the catalogue. 

Fascinating Plants 

THE wee small members of this lsrge fam- 
ily are the golf or tennis ball form* 
There are perhaps six or eight a-ell-known 
lorm*. not all out here. We can vouch for 
the following: C. obtusa caeapltosa. C. obtusa 
Junlperoides. C obtusa Junlperoldej, com ajcta 
and C. obtusa tetragon* minims the last being 
the smallest and slowest grower. All are fss- 
cinatlng plants, most suitable for the Jap 
tsble garden but would be lost in the lfrge 
lock garden A group planted In a *ultable 
and ronsplcuou* spot In the rockery would 
always attract notice snd this would b» the 
most suitable manner In which to use them 
Of course. It Is a rase of *ihe smaller snd 
dwarfer growing plant of this nature which 
always entails a high price. One i* compelled 
to hesitate before going in for groups of these 
dslntle* 

Thnr are so many plant* In this family 
useful for the rock garden that it 1* difficult 
to limit ourselves to any plant* in particular. 
Several favorite* of our* mav be of Interest 
to our readers which we will discuss. C. 
Fletrherl comes to mind first This a very 
dainty festhery dwarf cypress, blue In oolor, 
grows to three or four feet, quite pyramidal 
in habit and most attractive From a blue 
to a very dark blue green is our next choice. 
C. mlmlma glAucs Of very different habit, 
this conifer forms flat decumbent solid leafed 
branches, closely overlspplng. In some form* 
very flat or spreading and In others growing 
more or less cone shsped 

A vsrletv of this fsmlly, the nsme of which 
we do not vouch for gors under C. nestolde* 
nans A habit not found In any other conifer, 
it grows Just like a biro" s nest sll the branches 
flattening themselves one on top of the other 
We have known these, plant* between ten and' 
fifteen years old and their maximum height 
is lea* than eighteen inches and their width 
about three feet We shall never forget the 
first time of seeing this plant so that our 
resders may wen know that It I* "worth while * 
The history of the above Is that it grew a* a 
fr»ak Lswson cypress and of course it ha* 
risen propsgatM extensively. The color is 
darker than the Lswson snd much more dense 
foliage 

Have Beautiful Foliage 

THERE sre several more of the obtusa type 
which are most excellent members of the 
chamaecyparu family, auch as C. obtusa fill- 
coid»>s, which ls a dwarf form of the Hlnoke 
cypres*, the two obtusa gracilis form*, one with 
dark mos* green foliage and the other a 
golden form, also obtusa nana graclUC, a very 

One with graceful fernlike foliage the 
branches weeping, makes a fine addition as 
s rock garden conifer . _ 

Of the piMfera type there are at least half 
a doien really good aubjeru. C pislfera fill f era 
nana la a dwarf form' of the flawsra cypre** 
and there are golden and variegated forms 
imont these slan Ther» i» siirh * dist-.n'-- 
Mort smong the rhamaecvpane. in fsrt there 

any way. 




TT 



— 



THE rf.MI.V OH.OMST. VICTi'KIA, B.C., SI NHAV. JULY 2(\ V 



X 



\ 



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mini 







iimiiimmiimimmiiimiii 







mum imimiimmimimmiii mimmmi 




Return to Battlefields 




i imiimmmimmimmimmii i miiiiiiiiiii i n miimmimimmmii mmimimmimimimminim mmmiimiimmiimmiiimiiiiiiimi iiiiiiimmMimimm iimimmmmmi n imiiiii 11 mm immmimi n imimm 



By CAPTAIN W W MURRAY, MC 

RRAS, Prance— A peacetime host of 
0.000 Canadians converged oh this city 
and on Albert, twenty-two miles to the 
The pilgrimage of war veterans, their 
wives and children, widows, mothers and 
fathers of men who, nineteen years ago, died 
to defend the thing* in which they believed, 
crossed the Atlantic prompted by a single pur- 



T 



Pilgnmi Congregate 

'ODAY they renew their homage to the 
memory of young Canadians who. endur- 
ing hardship and suffering great agony, passed 
on. Following tours of adjacent battlefields 
by motor-coach, they proceeded to LrUe, re- 
turning for the unveiling at 2 30 p.m. of Can- 
ada's National Memorial on Vlmy Ridge 

Saturday morning a second section of the 
pilgrims reached Le Havre and were conveyed 
to Lille, from which point they visited place* 
of interest near Ypres and St. Eloi. 

Performed on behalf of Canada, the first 
public act of King Edward VIII since the full 
court mourning period expired will be to un- 
veil the Vlmy Ridge Memorial President 
Albert Lebrun of France will also be present. 

Brig -Gen. Alex Ross, Dominion President of 
the Canadian Legion, and the official Legion 
party, proceeded from Arras to Valenciennes, 
forty-five miles away, to attend the ceremony 
of inaugurating the street named after Sergt. 
Hugh Cairn*, V.C. 

Hundreds of those here to witness today's 
ceremony took part In the historic battle of 
April 9. 1917, To them the story is old; but 
to many others Vimy was only a name. Now 
that they were on the ground they listened 
avidly as the survivors of Vimy relived their 



"Fight for the R.dge" 

♦HE Canadians came to Vlmy from the 
Somme In October. 1916 Within a few 
months vague rumors indicated a Spring of- 
fensive, and these were confirmed when all the 
harbingers of attack began to flock from the 
villages of Artols. 

Behind the Canadian Corps front replicas of 
Vimy Ridge were marked out with tapes, over 
which battalion* practiced for weeks 

The preliminary bombardment which swept 
the enemy's earthworks and wire obstructions 
started late in March. 

The date for the offensive was set for Easter 
Monday. April 9. 

On Easter Sunday, following brief church 
parades, the attacking battalions swung out of 
their billets and trudged to the preliminary as- 
sembly areas. There they were Issued with 
battle equipment— shovels, sandbags, bombs 
and flares. 

The final "Jumptng-off" positions had al- 
ready been reconnoitercd, and at nightfall the 
assaulting troops were directed thither. For 
hours the men lay silently and patiently under 
a drizzling rain. 




ridge the whole Plain of Douai lay at the feet 
of the triumphant Canadian 1 ;. 



GLORIOUS VICTORY OF VIMY TO BE COMMEMORATED WHEN KING EDWARD UNVEILS MEMORIAL 
In the illustrations jbo»« ire shown, jt the top, j «itw of a section of trenches at Vimy and. below, a grim scene that will flash back into the minds of Canadian veterans 
On the right are shown two of the carved figures that adorn the memorial, the largest fa France or Belgium, which is being un.e.led today by His Ma,esty. 



At 5 30 a m a thundering crash heralded the 
barrage. Countless brilliant flashes lit up the 
country, flickering and dancing across the sky. 
as hundreds of guns belched out the barrage.. 
The infuntry leaped from their positions, and 
the great assault began. 

From the German trenches rockets and flares 
were shot high in the air in frantic appeal to 
the artillery. Throbbing mine explosions shook 
the earth, their huge tongues of flame mingling 
with the flashes of shrapnel and high-explo- 
sive. Above the din rose the crackling of ma- 
chine-gun and rifle Are. 

The Canadian infantry ploughed through the 



Some Interesting Facts 
About Canada's Tribute 



CANADIAN Memorial on Vimy Ridge, de- 
signed by Walter S Allward. architect, 
of Toronto, and in course of construc- 
tion for twelve years. 

Work performed under direction of the 
Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission, 
of which Major-tlencral S. C. Mewburn. Ham- 

lltbhrTTchalrma H. - — 

Unveiling at 3 12 pm. July 26, by King 
Edward VIII. 

Pilgrimage of approximately 6.000 Canadian 
war veterans and others to Vlmy Ridge organ- 
ized by the Canadian Legion of the British 
Empire Service League, and directed by the 
National Vlmy Pilgrimage Committee com- 
posed of representatives of national veterans' 
rRanlzatlons. 

Canadian official representatives: Hon. 
Ernest Lapolnte. Minister of Justice, Hon. Inn 
A Mackenzie. Minister of National t>efence,j 
Hon. C. O. Power. Minister of Pensions. 

Ouests of Canada Right Hon. Sir Rober^ 
and Lady Borden; Right Hon. 8tr George 



r 



Lady Perley; Sir Eugene Fiset. Wartime Dep- 
uty Minister of National Defence; Lady Byng. 
widow of the victor of Vimy; and Lady Currle. 
widow of Sir Arthur. 

Arrangements made by Hon Philippe Roy, 
Canadian 'MTfllstcr in Parts, and st.iff of the 
Canadian Legation. 

Representative of France— President' Albert 
Lebrun 

Guard of Honor— Bluejackets from H M C S. 

8aguenay. ~~ 

Civilian Ouard of Honor -One hundred 
Canadian war veterans from the Pilgrimage 
party. 

Brass band from the Royal Canadian Horse 
Artillery. 

Pi|>e band selected from various Highland 
regiments of Canadian militia 

Bugle band from Canadian Permanent Fori e. 

Drummers from 48th Highlanders of To- 
ronto. 

Chaplaltt* — One Anglican, one United 
Church of Canada and one Roman Catholic. 



chaos of No Mans Land and swept into the 
enemy trenches Here was the one storied 
occasion, never to be repeated, when all four 
Canadian divisions fought in line From right 
to left, the 1st 'Curriei. the 2nd iBurstall". the 
3rd <Lipsett> and the 4th I Watson » swung into 
attack— the whole might of Canada, com- 
manded by General Sir Julian Byng, plunging 
across Vimy Ridge. Sandwiched between the 
3rd and 4th Divisions, to take care of a gap 
which later operations would create, was the 
13th Brigade of the 5th I Imperial > Division 

The 1st. 2nd and 3rd Divisions made short 
work of resistance; but the 4th Division, on 



cattle the recuperative power Is lost Without 
any human interference, the Forest Service 
expert says, the vegetation fluctuations of the 
area are as definite and specific as the tree 
ring fluctuations 

For any definite year there Is no means of 
prediction The present drought area may 
have drenching rains tomorrow, however im- 
probable, since droughts tend to be pro- 
gressive. The less moisture there is in the soil 
and streams the less water there Is to make 
rain The one thing certain is that there will 
be periods within every decade of less than 
average rainfall, thai there will be periods 
within every half century when drought will 
become extreme, and that over periods of cen- 
turies there will be killing droughts. 



the extreme left, encountered a difficult situa- 
tion. The Pimple, a high mound honeycombed 
, with subterranean tunnels, was a deadly trap. 

Meanwhile the early morning rain had 
turned into snow flurries. 

At the first objectives the Canadians halted 
and dug in The attack went on. With ma- 
chine-like precision the vast wave swept over, 
taking up the advance where the others left 
off The infantry were now out of range of 
their field-gun barrage. The light artillery 
had already limbered up. and the guns were 
being galloped forward. From the crest of the 



Across the Plain 

THE vista was one of peaceful-looking vil- 
lages surrounded by gxeen woods, of pros- 
perous towns— Douai. Henin-Lietard, Cor- 
behem, from whose chimney stacks poured 
clouds of smoke— on the far horizon, of rail- 
ways over which trains were traveling Along 
the roads and across the open fields the Ger- 
mans were retreating. 

Small cavalry patrols pushed intrepidly 
through the troops forming an outpost line and 
made a wary reconnaisance in the direction of 
Wlllerval and Arleux* Tanks which essayed 
the crossing of the ridge became ditched before 
they debouched from Thelus. 

The Pimple continued to be the scene of bit- 
ter fighting; but darkness fell with that posi- 
tion still held by the Germans. 

The victory, however, was almost complete 
It was clear the Pimple would yield only to an 
assault preceded by a heavy bombardment, 
and for two days the matter rested But at 
5 a.m. on April 12 the 4th Division again at-_ 
tacked. This time they made no doubt of suc- 
cess. The operation was completely succe.vs- 
Xul. and the whole of Vimy Ridge was now in 
possession of the Canadians. 

On the Somme 

N spite of crowded hours, many Canadian 
pilgrims found time to visit the Somme 
Battlefields, the portal to which is the re- 
stored town of Albert. The Canadians were 
well acquainted with the crumbling nuns of 
but today they .saw a town from which 
of the scars of war have been erased. 
The Mecca of the Canadian pilgrims In this 
neighborhood was Courcelette. Old soldiers, 
remembering "the Jagged rubble-heap of La 
Boiselle." three miles up the Bapaume Road, 
saw again in their minds eye the mine crater, 
again ghastly with protruding limbs of dead 
men, the shell -pitted road to Contalmaison. 
and the pock-marked flank of Pozteres Ridge 
On the crest of this eminence the Canadians 
relieved the Australians on the last day of 
August. 1916. Arriving from Ypres Salient, 
where for many months they had accustomed 
themselves to being overlooked by the enemy 
on the ridges above, they accepted with mani- 
fest pleasure a situation which enabled them 
to se« the enemy's back country, to look down 
on the valley of the Ancre River, and count 
their own shells bursting in Grandcourt and 
Miraumont. 



I 



The First Attack 

k N September 9. 1916. came their first at- 
tack on the Somme. the capture in day- 
light, without preliminary bombardment, of 
the last remaining portion of Pozleres Ridge 



held by the enemy. This paved the way for 
the Battle of Courcelette six days later. 
JThe sunken roads of Courcelette today were 
no longer poisonous with the stench of fly- 
blown corpses, nor were there shell holes on 
whose waterlogged surface floated a green 
scum. The little cardboard signposts which 
the Canadians called Maple Leaf Road'' have 
long since disappeared from ihe route that 
used to lead pas the Sugar Refinery, across 
' Candy Trench and into the village. 

But one could still establish time and place- 
even if with some difficulty for the feats of 
incredible bravery around the Fabeck Grabon. 
Mouquet Farm. Thiepval, Hessien, Kenora and 
Reglna Trenches. 

The national memorial at Courcelette is a 
simple slab, standing in its own park anud 
beautiful surroundings, encouraging forgelful- 
ness of the horrors of the Somme and stimulat- 
ing only a memory or great-hearted, cheerful 
and intrepid Canadian youths who offered all 
• they possessed for an ideal. 

Germany's Black Day 

THE Amiens battlefields were not neglected, 
for at Le Quesnel, sixteen miles southeasl 
of Amiens on the Roye Road, stands the most 
southerly of the Canadian memorials, in design 
and general lay-out not greatly different from 
those at Courcelette. Dury, Bourion and Pass- 
chendaele. The pilgrims retold tlie incidents 
of August 8. lilt, In the misty dawn on "The 
Eighth of the Eighth ' the Canadians attacked. 
In their stride they captured Demuin. Auber- 
oourt and Marcekave. Wiencourt. Capeux and 
Ignaucourt fell before them. Before midday 
the victorious Canadians were m possession of 
Calx and Beaucourt. near the northern and 
southern eatwmty of their advance They 
had penetrated more than seven miles, and 
next day they pushed forward an almost equal 
distance. Before the Amiens fighting slowed 
up, they had established themselves close to 
the outskirts of Roye. , 

"The Hanging Virgin" 

STORIES of these spacious days were told 
and retold today as the pilgrims radiated 
from Albert to dwell for a brief space in the 
valley of their receding youth. They remem- 
bered the "Hanging Virgin" and it* legend In 
the war days German shells had wrecked havoc 
on the famous church, toppling from Its steeple 
the Virgin, holding aloft the Christ -child. The 
figures did not fall, but leaned out over the 
street at a direct right angle. 

Fertile minds, on all fours with those who 
had seen the "Angels of Mons." concocted the 
legend that "when the Hanging Virgin falls 
the war will end." Coincidence operated to 
the fulfillment of the "prophecy." 

In 1918 Albert fell into German hands, but 
in the ensuing British offensive a shell from a 
British battery hit the church steeple, and sent 
the figures crashing to the ground. Within 
three months the war was ended. 



How Canadians Went 

Into the Famous Battle 



THE storming of Vlmy Ridge on April 9. 
1917. had a great deal more to it than 
the assault of troops under a screen of 
artillery fire The staff work was as perfect 
as human Intelligence could make it. E\ery 
emergency was provided for. 

Here^are some particulars for Infantry bat- 
talions on that point: 



I, 



Manoeuvres Arc Secret 

JAPAN S naval manoeuvres this year will 
take place In complete secrecy. In an- 
nouncing the manoeuvres, in which 150 
warships will take part the Japanese navy 
made no mention of the location or gave the 
slightest indication of the nature of the prob- 
lem which the manoeuvres may be designed to 
solve. 

All that It stated Is that the manoeuvres 
will be held on seas In the neighborhood of 
Japan for about three months from the early 
part of August until the latter part of Octo- 
ber- 



Three Drought Cycles 
Exist in Western 
United States 



»Y THOMAS R HENRY 

tCor»rl«hl, MM br Thr North Amfrlc.in N**»p«i>rr 
Allienr*. KM ' 

FOR three thousand years the western 
United States has been squeezed In the 
coils of two or three interlocking and un- 
predictable drought cycles. 

There is a short period cycle running from 
three to seven year*, a longer one running 
from thirty' to fifty years and a still longer 
one running from 100 to 150 years. 

Sometimes all three rycles reach their peaks 
together- and this may be what Is happening 
now as the northern Intermountaln area 
faces what may be, some experts fear, the 
worst drought In its history. 



One must plan for less than average rain- 
fall in this region lor three or four years out 
of every ten. warns R. S. Campbell, senior 
forest ecologist of the Forest Service. If this 
were all. there woitd be no particular reason 
to worry, since the Great Plains and inter- 
mountaln vegetation has a remarkable adap- 
tability to such conditions Within a single 
year it can recover almost completely from 
the effects of such a drought 

The trouble comes with the progressive fall 
of the average of precipitation for wet and 
dry years combined over longer periods Forest 
Service compilations show a decided down- 
ward trend for the entire lntermountain region 
since about 1908. In California there has 
been a downward trend in the average of 
more than eight inches in the eighty-six. 
years since 1850 This does not mean that 
each succeeding year has been drver than the 
past year During the period there havr been 
very wet vears and vrrv drv years But all 
the time the cumulative average has been I all - 
tng The succeeding droughts have tended to 



T 



To Be Big Building 

HE German Relchsbank is to be the larg- 
est building in Berlin. 
When two extension buildings are completed 
within the next two years, the banking offices 
will enclose 680 000 cubic yards— 260 000 cubic 
yards larcer than the palatial new Air Minis- 
try of 2 500 rooms. 

The new Relchsbank will also surpass the 
Ri ichstng in size and "wTH be more than twice 
as large as the Kaiser s vast palace In Berlin. 
This palace occupies 320.000 cubic yards. 



During the past fifty years, records just 
«otm*W*d by the Range Research Division of br more and more severe and the succeeding 
the US Forest Service show, there have been periods of rainfall le.v and less able to re- 



Among Canadian Heroes 

H I RTY- FIVE of the slxtv-onc Canadian 
1 Corps winners of the Victoria Cross were 
not born in Canada Sixteen were born In 
England, ten in Scotland. fl\e In Ireland, four 
in the United States; one each In Russia and 
Denmark 



The attack was taken in four stages, and 
each projected advance was indicated on maps 
by lines of various colors. The first objective 
was the Black Line'; the second, the Red 
Line . the third, the ' Blue Line." and the 
fourth, the Brown Line." 

The assaulting troops were divided into 
* waves ' A wave consisted of two lines of men, 
extended to a distance of four or five yards 
from each other. The first line of the wave 
was normally from twenty to twenty -five yards 
in advance of the second line. 

At Vimy Ridge the first, line comprised rifle- 
men and bombers; the second line grenadiers 
and Lewis gunners. This distribution was not, 
however, arbitrary. 

The distance between waves was from fifty 
to 100 yards. 

' Moppers up" were troops who. following 
the second wave, dealt with dug-outs in which 
the enemy might still be lurking, thus permit- 
ting the assaulting waves to continue their 
advance. 

Each wave had a definite objective allotted 
to it. 

Every article troops were permitted to carry 
In the attack was specified In orders," which 
had to be rigidly adhered to. 

In the haversack men 

Iron 



Cations 

ONE spare oil tin 'for the rlfllo. 
Iron rations - therr <on.M*fed of n imatt 
package containing one tin of bully beef., iwa^ 
hard tack" bLscults, a small bag of sugar and 

one of tea, — , 

■ I " " — ■■■■ " 1 ■ ' 

One field dressing, comprising an absorbent 
pad .vrapped up In sterilized bandage, and a 
smill bottle of iodine 

Two Mills No. 5 bombs ' 

Each rifleman carried 170 rounds of ammu- 



nition; two airplane flares, to be lit from the 
ground at the various objectives to indicate 
their position to the airmen; two sandbags; 
extra rations for tweruy-four hours > bully beef 
and "hard-tack' > ; one filled water bottle. ~ 

A total of thirty two heavy wire cutters were 
Issued to each battalion. 

Picks and shovels were .carried by most of 
the personnel. 

Twelve "SOS." flare signals were carried by 
each company. 

Two "battle flags" were carried by each 
platoon They were not to be stuck in the 
grounJ, but were to be waved over the head 
to Indicate to artillery observers the position 
of the advance troops. 

Battalion escorts for prisoners of war were 
not to exceed 10 per cent of the number of 
prisoners. This duty was usually performed 
by slightly wounded men returning to the first 
aid posts. 

Officers and men were strictly forbidden to 
carry any letters, papers, orders or sketches 
which, in the event of their capture, might be 
of use to the enemy. 



Events in History 

Execution of Lord W illiam 
Russell 



ON July 21. 1683. Lord William Russell 
' met the death of a martyr, when he 
was beheaded tor alleged complicity 
in the Rye House Plot. 

He was born on September 29 1639, and 
was the third son of the first puke of Bed- 
ford. AfUjE-aompleiiiig his education at Cam- 
bridge University he traveled on the European 
continent, for aome. time.. and returned to Eng- 
land in 1659. On the Restoration of the Mon- 
archy in the following year he was elected 
a member of the Hou.v of Commons for the 
v family borough of Tavistock, but he played no 
important part in public affairs until the 



don. but It failed owing to the royal pouty 
starting on its journey earlier than had been 
expected. Russell was but one of the many 
prominent men arrested and placed in the 
Tower of London, but It Is certain that neither 
he. nor several of the others, had the slightest 
knowledge of the conspiracy. 

On July 19. 1683. Russell was placed on 
trial at the Old Bailey on the charge of high 
treason, and. although the evidence offered 
against him was both contradictory and un- 
satisfactory, and although not a single charge 
in the indictment was proved, a packed Jury 
accepted the evldenoe of the suborned and 
perjured witnesses who testified against him, 
and pronounced htm guilt v He defended him- 
self in a spirited -and dignified speech, and 
was ably assisted throughout the trial by hi* 
devoted wife, whom he had marred fourteen 
years earlier 

Sentence of Death 

HE was sentenced to death, and his ex- 
ecution was fixed to take place In Lin- 
coln s Inn Fields a couple of days later. 
Strenuous, but futile, attempts were made to 
save his life, but the King, who was deter- 
mined to avenge Russell's activities In con- 
nection with the Popular Party. Ignored the 
many petitions presented by the most prom- 
inent men of the day. while Russell himself 
refused to avail himself of the means of 
escape which certain friends suggested to him. 

On the night of July 20 he had a parting 
interview with his wife, and then slept peace- 
fully until the morning He was attended on 
the scaffold by Bishop Burnet; and John 
Evelyn, In his diary, records the execution in 
the following words: "July 21 Lord Russell 
was beheaded In Lincoln s Inn Fields, the ex- 
ecutioner giving him three butcherly strokes. 
The speech he made, and the paper which 
he save to the Sheriff declaring his Innocence, 
the nobleness of the family, the piety and 
worthiness of the unhappy gentlemen wrought 
much pity, and occasioned varioua discourses 
on the plot "— Copyrighted 



six notable drought periods — 1888 to 1890 1R08 
to 1904. 1910. 1917. 1919. 1924. and 1928 to 
1934 mclusire These have been Interspersed 
with years of relatively plentiful rain. 

The record ran be carried back as far as 
1310 B.C. by means of tree ring examinations — 
a method, which, during the past four or five 
years, has been brought to such perfection 
that in certain areas the precise vear. when 
a ring was formed In certain areas ran be 
determined , Trees add a new ring of wood 
year and the width of each ring cor- 
to the precipitation available that 
year. 

Study Tree Rings 

TREE ring studies m- Arizona, as reported 
by the Forest Service, show dry years 
recurring In fourteen and twenty -one year 
cycles, with major droughts every 150 years 
and minor droughts at forty or fifty year 
intervals. Periods of poor growth In the 
Pacific Northwest between 1630 and 1930 re- 
curred at intervals of from three to fourteen 
vears There are no records for the region 
now especially arfected. bvt there la everv 
reason to believe that it 
Dioturt. 



ruperate the losses 

When Trouble Comes 

•HERE are year droughts, decade drouk*ht> 
and century droughts A dry year in a 
wet decade doesn t mean much But when 
a land experiences a drought within a drought 
the cumulative effects are disastrous. That is 
what seems to be rTappentng now. althoutrrr 
there ts no way of determining the present 
position within the longest drought cycle. 

The plants of the range country have an 
lr.hfrcnt drought wisdom, the Forest Service 
report explains. Their physiologioa+-meehan-, % 
Ism has been perfected by evolution to make 
the most use of available water Some of the 
range grasses require less than 400 pounds of, 
wat er to manufacture one pound of forage 
material In .contrast to this, the water re- 
quirement of alfalfa is 800 poufids Intensive 
grazing, however. Is a new experience for these 
plants, arHl.ttow-WPTalng rvolutlon has not had 
time to adapt them to it Fluctuations in 
growth and abundance are enormous. 

The ranire countr could stand extreme fluc- 
tuations of vegetation courage under natural 

6y sheep and 



Tl IF. PILGRIMS WSW KR 



th*_Le'd o' doa'h 



"i7meV»GW has headed the wounds of b'ffc 
And war -scarred 1 .- me» er^e-t^ce ~o,o r 
-^rrrwhe/e heroes sleep - . ^, *-, 

0 silent men' who 'rom thy silence stjlLvve hear 

The chant of cowwt^ess, thousands, 'o whom toda> wc bow 

—our greying heads, . — . 

. Bring we the torch vqu go.-: *o us 'o '->.e rw • 
See' we hold it high and SLtriye r 0 keep it bright " ' 
— ere we pass* on, ■ 

So rest thee, comrades know \ ? that we who sta^d and witch 
TIH nr go down each day and pra, for peace , < • 
nil oot forger. 

— P A G. July, 1936 

m». ■ . . ~ . — .» — ■ 

I - 



formation of the Popular, or Country, Party 
several years later. 

This party, which had been formed for 
th* purpose of oppofinif the policy of the Cabal 
ministry «nd the French and Catholic plots 
of Charleg II speedily gained so great an 
influence throughout the country that the 
King. In order to curb the activities of the 
partv, prorogued Parliament, but when the 
Houses reassembled after a brief interim the 
partv was stronger than ever and forced the 
King to discontinue the Dutch War His 
alliance wPh France was thus dissolved and 
the troops with which the King had hop'd 
t© mak* himself^bsolute w<re disbanded; 
wh'lle the Cabal ministry was broken up By 
this time Russell f had become one of the 
leaders of the pa^ty.: and he plaved a prom- 
inent part in the |mpeachmen* of Lord Dan6v. 
the King s favorite, and also In (he move- 
ment to exelude the Duke of York from the 
succession to the throne 



THE Rye Jlouse Plot of 1683. which derived 
its name from the meeting-place of the 
conspirators a farm house near Ware in Hert- 
fordshire had for it* object the assassination 
of -he Kin* snd the Duke of York while on 
their way from the Newmarket race* to Lon- 



Thc Cost of Vimy 

A TOTAL of 97 184 officers and men form- 
ing the four divisions of the Canadian 
Corps, took part In the atormlng of Vlmy 
Ridgr on April 9 1917. 

Attached to th* corps was the 5th 'Impe- 
rial' Division of which the 13th Infantry 
Brigade attsckro" viitb the Canadian troops 
near the centre of the line 

During the preliminary bombardment a 
total of 553 000 shells, weighing 13 000 ton*, 
was expended. ■ * % 

On the day of the attack 883 f>id heavy 
and siege guns flrtd 211 000 shells. 

Canadian casualties for the second week of 
April. 1*1 7. numbered 11 797 officers and oth*r 
ranks killed, wounded and missing 

Canadian captures Included more than 4 000 
prisoners, flffv-four light and heavy guns 
trench mortars-und 124 machine guns. 

Oerman losses on the Canadian front were 
not recorded but one division lost 3,133 all 
ranks during the operation, and another 3 473. 

The Canadian frontage was 7 000 yards. 

Caspian Sea Vanishing 

Caspian Sea la threatened with extinc- 
tion because of Irrigation works which 
drain the rivers that form Its wat«r aupplv. 
Professor B Apollov prominent Soviet geolo- 
p declares Professor Apollov say* that since 
1926 tha'aea has lost 7 435 square mile* area 
while in 1925 the water level Tell twenty-four 
inches and In March of this year the level 
1 9 inch** lower than In IKS. 



I 



THE DAILY COLONIST. VICTORIA. B.C. SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1936 



- 



MilHMHIHIU.IIIIII.IIIM 





IIIIMIIIIIIII 





By J. Fdward Norcross 



lltllll mini 



MANCHESTER -In blazing sunshine, 
with blue skies overhead— for sum- 
mer ha* come to the North at last- 
the Lancashire "wake*" have begun and thou- 
sand* of mill-workera are trekking to the sea- 
coast. Blackpool, of courae. being the favorite 
reaort. 

Lancashire takes its holiday on the stag- 
gered" system A group of towns stop work 
for a week; then another group. for another 
week and so on. Just now Bolton and six 
other manufacturing centre* are leading off, 
almost the whole population deserting them 
en masse. For eight days all industrial 
operations will be closed down and most com- 
mercial undertaking* also The shopping 
streets seem to be afflicted by a *ucoesslon of 



"THE MEANS TEST— RESULTS OF TARIFFS— SAFETY AND SPEED— WAR SPINSTERS'"' - 

r . .. > ' • ... 



lllllimilllllllllllll I till minimum? 



i 



It 1* estimated that the people of the Bolton 
group will spend $1,750,000 before they come 
home again. $250,000 more than last year, 
making it the best week since the boom days 
of 1021, a welcome sign that the depression 
in the cotton industry 1* beginning to pass. 

Nevertheless. In view of the low wages paid, 
it i* astonishing that so many people should 
have the money in hand for a holiday that 
will average a co*t of from $50 to $100 a 
family. It 1* done by mean* of savings club*. 
Every industrial establishment ha* its holiday 
fund and no sooner will thl* year* holiday 
be over than the fund* for next year will 
be opened and savings will accumulate week 
after 



EVEN the unemployed, if they have man- 
aged to get a little money together, may 
join in the general exodus. Holidays on the 
dole are possible and permissible — so much so 
that special regulation* have been put in force 
governing them. The man who Is drawing 
unemployment benefit, however, must not 



leave the country— he must not go even to 
the I*le of Man, the Channel Island*, or the 
Irish Free State. This i* in order that he 
may be recalled quickly If employment offers. 

Neverthele*s, the regulation* have been 
framed with a view to encouraging unem- 
ployed men to take .holiday* at the normal 
period*, a humane and far-sighted provision 
which help* to keen men fit and hopeful 
despite their enforced idleness. 

A* a matter of fact, the British system of 
unemployment relief i* probably the most 
humane In the world and thl* when all that 
can Just I v be aald against the much -criticized 
Means Test Is taken into consideration 

The M«jni Teif 

THE Mean* Test Is operated by the Public 
Assistance Board. Thl* body was brought 
Into existence two years ago when the Gov- 
ernment took over the main part of the bur- 
den of caring for the ablr-bodled unemployed 
who had exliausted their covenanted benefit* 
under the Unemployment Insurance Act. thus 
relieving the local rate*. 

The first duty of thl* board wa* to prepare 
regulations. It did not institute the Means 
Te*t— that had been done long before and 
by the Labor Oovemment— but it brought in 
a series of uniform rule* to be applied all 
over the country. 

These considered a family, living together, 
as a single unit and took into consideration 
the earnings of the children of the applicant 
The latter were allowed n certain proportion 
<>f their wages as spending money, and the 
cost of their board was deducted from the 
balance What was left was considered to be 
the Income of the applicant and the amount 
was deducted from the relief allowance This 
meant, of course, that so long a* they lived 
at home young people were compelled to the 
extent of their ability to support their parents. 

The regulations came into effect at the be- 
ginning of the year and provoked such an 
uproar all over the country that they were 
withdrawn at once and a "standstill order" 
was promulgated. In a number of rases the 
Public Assistance Board had alreadv m< rented 
the allowances of applicants and these in- 
creased allowances and any unchanged allow- 
ances were allowed to continue. Applicant* 




Government Officials Leave on 
Vimy Pilgrimage 

Canada's official rtprtsenfatives to the 
»«.t - m% b, H» »A*te*t« tU K«9 of tk. 
Canadian war memorial at Vimy R.dgt 
art: At top art shown three Cab.ntt 
ministers in tht official party. On tht 
left it tht Hon lin Macktnxit, Minister 
of National Dtftnct; in Hit ctntrt, tht 
Hon. C. G. Power, Minister of Pennons, 
and Hon. Ernttt Lapointt, Minister of 
JuatiCfc At right it Sir Eugene Frstt, 
Surgeon General and Deputy Minister of 
National Defence during the Great War. 
Below, left, Sir Robert Bordtn, Canadian 
Premier when Canada entered the war 
Right, Lady Curne, widow of General Sir 

Arthur Curne, Commander in Chief of 

the Canadian forces in France, ii »ten | I 
htr son, Garntr Curne. T I 

- Ontr»l FTtM Canadian Photo | 



whose allowances had been reduced, 
were put back on the old scale. 



tT WAS understood at the time that new 
x regulations would be forthcoming at an 
early date They have been promised re- 
peatedly from time to time but have not yet 
appeared. It Is stated that the Unemploy- 
ment Assistance Board ha* had great diffi- 
culty in framing them. That task, however, 
has now been completed but It has taken 
no less than four meeting* of the Cabinet 
to ratify them. 

The Cabinet, in fact. Is between the devil 
and the deep sea. 

Result of Tariff 

POLITICAL troubles and economic diffi- 
culties on the Continent, together with 
the British protective tariffs, are causing for- 
eign manufacturers to set up plants in this 
country. 

While these are welcomed as helping to 
solve the unemployment problem they do not 
always prove an unmixed blessing. . 

The owner* are not accustomed to British 
trades unionism and sometimes show a dis- 
position »o ride roughshod over organized 

"Tabor This sort of thing has brought about 
a strike In a tire works in the Midlands em- 
ploying thousands of men and women. The 
company, a foreign one. absolutely refuses to 
have anything to do with collective bargain- 
ing and brushes aside the demand* of the 
employees in an autocratic manner such a* 
British workers no longer brook nowadays. 

, The ,-fnke has been going nn for weeks and 



trades unionists the country over are watching 
it with interest, for on the outcome depends 
whether foreigners are to break down the 
protection they enjoy a* the outcome of 
struggles extending over more than half a 
century. 

Incidentally, it may be remembered that 
the strikes in France and Belgium have em- 
phasized the superior position of British 
workers, 'not only as regards pay and working 
conditions, but also from the standpoint of 
organization. 

Workers here have learned to their aston- 
ishment that even with the advances likely 
conceded the wages of large number* of 
French people and Belgians are less than 
the allowances to men In Great Britain who 
are on the dole, while their organizations 
are lamentably weak or non-existent. 

Foreign flrm.s cannot set up plants without 
thi consent of the Government and a move- 
ment is now on foot to *ecure that *uch con- 
sent shall not be given unless the applicant* 
undertake to recognize British trades union 
customs 

The question is to be raised In the House 
of Commons before It adjourns for the Autumn 



Safety and Speed ' 

NOTWITHSTANDING all the effort* of 
the Minister of Transport. Mr Hore- 
Beiisha notwithstanding the relmposiuon of 
the speed limit, the creation of -safety" cross- 
ings marked by studs and Belisha beacons, 
the testing of new driver* applying for li- 



cences, and the persistent "road safetv ' propa- 
ganda, the total number of road casualties 
for the first twenty-five weeks of the present 
year is in excess of that for the correspond- 
ing period of 1935. The figures are. respec- 
tively. 98.041 and 95.581. 

The week ending June 20 has become known 
a* the ' black week." the numbers. 134 killed 
and 5.301 injured, being the highest for nearly 
twelve months. 

Possibly the sudden spell of hot weather, 
which brought out t large additional volume 
of traffic, contributed to the Increase We 
shall know more about that when an Investi- 
gation Into the causes of road accidents, now 
being undertaken by the Ministry of Trans- 
port, is completed 

Meanwhile, two facts, not without some 
little comfort, may be mentioned. Owing to 
the larger number* of cars on the roads the 
casualties would be gTeatly In excess of those 
of two years ago. instead of being fewer, were 
it not for the measures taken to make the 
highways of the country safer. 

Secondly, pedestrians seem to be acquiring 
' traffic consciousness"; during the twenty- 
five weeks alreadv cited the number of pedes- 
trians killed and injured was 984 lower than 
that for the first half of 1935 

A regulation for the compulsory testing of 
brakes and steering-gear on all cars Is likely 
to be Mr Hore-Bellsha's next "move. 



They think it can be done in a little south- 
country village, Porteaham, near Weymouth. 
The only difficulty la lack of electricity to 
operate the mouse. The "grid." the great 
national *y*tem of electric supply. Is coming 
to Porte*ham. however, and it ia expected 
that the track, now in preparation, will be 
opened in August. 

Cat - training Is going on. meanwhile, 
throughout the village and the surrounding 
country, providing a new interest in life for 
farm-laborers and others Not all cats can be 
Interested in artificial mice but of the 150 
cat* known to be in training it Is .believed 
about one-third will take kindly to the new 
sport. 

Preliminary test* show that a cat can travel 
at about half the speed of a greyhound. The 
course 1* to be 220 yards, long and four cats 
will race at once. The entrance fee for each 
eat will be 60 cents and the British equivalent 
of a parl-mutuel will be installed. 

Tragedy of War 

TWO thousand women met at Ktngsway 
London, on a recent Sunday. They were 
the sweethearts of men who had died in the 
Great War and who had been robbed of the 

They were mostly working women After 
their meeting they marched In procession to 
Hyde Park, carrying banners with them and 
singing "The Song of the Spinster " 

Under the Health Insurance Scheme which 
Mr. Lloyd Oeorge brought Into operation In 
pre-war. days men and women of sixty -five 
who are registered are entitled to a pension 
of $2.50 a week, regardleas of what other means 
they may posses*. If a married man dies 
before he is sixty-five his widow Is entitled 
to a similar pension even though she be only 
a young woman. 

It Is this that the women engaged in the 
spinsters' campaign regard as grossly unfair 
to themselves. They point out that had they 
been married to their soldier lovers, if only 
for a day. they would now be drawing pen- 
sions. What they ask is that they should 
have pensions at fifty-five*, instead of sixty- 
five, pointing out that when they reach their 
fifties women, whatever their occupation find 
it much more difficult to obtain employment 
than men of the same age 

The movement was begun about fourteen 
months ago and has now 35.000 members in 
forty branches The appeal Is made on be- 
half of approximately 250.000 unmarried 
women workers 



IP DOGS can be taught to race after e>r- 
trlc hares, why not cats after electric 
mice? 



THE spinsters who are agitating for pen- 
sion* at fifty-five on the ground that 
the Oreat War deprived them of the men 
they might, have married and. mferentlally. 
of the widows' pensions they would have had 
had their husbands died, are only some of 
those who have cause to regret the "lost 
generation." 

Addressing the boys of Leys School. Cam- 
bridge—the Eton of the Nonconformists, as 
Stonyhurst College is the Eton of the Cath- 
olics — Mr Baldwin said: 

"You will never know what we are suffer- 
ing from today— the losses of the generations 
of the war I was forty-seven when the war 
began and I saw that slaughter of our men 
"The men of forty and forty-five who ought 
now to be coming forward and taking charge 
of everything in this country are not there, 
and. therefore, we have to. perhaps, more 
than our share, and many of us who would 
be glad to hand over, have to listen with 
what patience we can to those who say 'You 
poor old men. who want* you? " 

Mr Baldwin prefaced thl* by saying that 
when he left public life he hoped his epitaph 
might be written in a slight paraphrase of 
.some well-known words of Tennyson's "He 
made no speeches, no. nor listened to them " 
The reference was to a line in "The Idvlls 
of the King ' Who spake no slander, no, 
nor listen d to it " 

It wa* a ' bit of peculiar bilge ' he went 
on. when old gentlemen told schoolboys that 



This UJeek^ Best Books 



4 



Br MARION ISABEL ANOUS 

"fUorm Along" (Blackle). by Captain J Ft. 
Murphy. The sea was the natural choice of John 
Richard Murphy when it came to choosing a 
career, for he was born with the sound of the 
sea below his home and spent his life roam- 
ing around the wharves and waterfront of 
Cork. In those days quite a large seaport . . ." 
His first ship, the Dumfriesshire, was a sailing 
vessel bound for Sydney, and the captain and 
mate were a tough pair, warranted to knock 
the nonsense out of both able-bodied seam en 
and young apprentices However, his experl- 
rnee* around the wharves Mood Murphv m 
good stead, for during the first "blow he 
amazed the old hands by climbing out on the 
weafrtc"f-arm when orders came to reef the 
main-topsail. . 

Since then for nearly fifty years he has fol- 
lowed the sea. going from sail to steam, and 
from ocean-going vessels to coast work HI* 
anecdotes, told with typical Irish humor, cover 
both amusing and trainc experiences that oc- 
( urred in ports all over the world His rl*e 
wa* steady but not spectacular, and the dan- 
gers he encountered are brushed aside lightly 
as all part of a day's work These ranged 
from difficult trips around the Horn, voyag" 
on unseaworthy vessel*, to troop-carrying dur- 
ing the hazardou* war days, and work lor the 
Irish Free State after the War Sometimes 
his superiors were regular good fellows, some- 
times he shipped with brutish, tyrannical cap- 
tains and mates 

He makes no mention of adventures, am- 
orous or marital, that are supposed to be part 
of a sailor's life ashore, and one gathers he 
never married, giving all his love to the sea 
His style is easy and informal, and flavored 
by the salt tang of nautical terms peculiar 
to the sailorman Much of hi* life has been 
spent on the Irish Channel run. and the fol- 
lowing anecdote 1* typical of the Irish. The 
indifference of the Irish to the fighting in the 
cirr of Dublin never failed to Impress him. 
and of the time when the principal law Of- 
fice* were being shelled, he records the follow- 
ing: "TJiere was quite a large crowd of sight- 
seers well in advance of the guns, all of them 
thoroughly enjoying the show. Up came a 
sergeant of the Free 8tate Army and addreas- 
inn the crowd, said quite polltelv. -Would vrr 
plase move back a bit. cos we want* to blow 
that corner of the building away. The crowd 



politely moved back, and the shelling went 

on . . ." 

Life as Captain Murphy has known it has 
been hard especially after his Irish Free State 
experiences, when the bottom dropped out of 
shipping, but he has always enjoyed every min- 
ute of living as. perhaps, only an Irishman 
ran 



"The Wild IrUh Girl" -Chapman A: Hall), 
by Dr. Lionel Stevenson. The title of one of 
her most popular books is aptly revived by Dr. 
Lionel Stevenson as tlie title of hi* biography 
of Lady Morgan, famous m the brimming of 
the last century as one of the foremost woman 
writer* of her lime. Priop to Lady Morgan 
there had_ been women writer*, but most of^ 
them were ladles of questionable vtrtue, such 
as Aphra Behn, or ladies of unimpeachable 
•tanding, such as Ml** Burney, who were more 
. Interested in the literary than the financial 
side of writing. 

Lady Morgan flourished simultaneously with 
Maria Edgeware. but such is the irony of ife 
that Lady Morgan, who was the more popular 
of the two, is now practically forgotten, while 
Mis* Edgeware I* now regarded *s a classicist. 
U is Dr. Stevenson s contention, however, that 
Lady Morgan was Uve first woman in Great 
Biitam to make writing reputable and profi- 
table. 

Lady Morgan, wlvo was born Sydney Owen- 
son, entered this world in a manner worthy of 
her later life She was born in mid-channel 
between Ireland and England In the stormy 
weather, and certainly her tempestuous career 
closely paralleled the conditions of her birth. 

Lady Morgan began life with "everything 
against her She was the daughter of an 
improvident Irish actor, which wa* synonymous 
with "social outcast." and her childhood wa* 
a difficult one. Dr. Stevenson traces her life 
through the Bohemian days In Ireland where, 
from birth, she lived m the theatrical world. 
Later, her father managed to scrape together 
enough money to give her a boarding achool 
education, and with increasing knowledge. 
8ydney was gripped by an overpowering am- 
bition to be someone of importance. She had 
not the gift of beauty, for she was so tiny 
that she was conspicuous and. in addition, 
suffered f rem pHvslcal deformities In spite 
ot these handicaps, she was a fascinating 
nerabn. for she was witty snd brilliant, pos- 



sessed the bower of mimicry, could play the 
harp to advantage and was an excellent enter- 
tainer; in fbct. a woman who would stand out 
from mediocrity. 

She started writing very young, poetry first 
attracting her She preceded Moore in putting 
lyrics to Irish traditional airs, which she 
learned from her fsther. who knew the Erse. 

Sydney's character reflects the diverse strains 
In her From her father she inherited the 
gift of showmanship, and from her mother, a 
puritanical Methodist, the good sense that ani- 
mated all her actions At an early age she 
announced her determination of marrying to 
better heraelf socially and financially, and in 
an age where chastity was not of extreme im- 
portance, she managed to keep wooers inter- 
ested while retaining her virtue. 

She became companion to the Marchioness 
of Abercorn. and while in thi* position, added 
another fascinating chapter to her life. Dr 
Morgan, resident physician and Cambridge 
graduate, wa* a shy man, but brilliant scholar. 
He fell deeply in love with 8ydney. and pro- 
posed marriage The Lord-Lieutenant of Ire- 
land, the. Duke of Richmond, wa* persuaded 
to knight Dr, Morgan for no reason at all, 
and the marriage look place. It was an Ideally 
happy marriage, lasting over thirty years until 
death separated them, and during that time 
they were seldom apart Her husbands in- 
fluence wa* most beneficial and her work 
became more brilliant through his encourage- 
ment. She became a famous hostess, first in 
Dublin and later In London, where her aalon* 
attracted the celebrities of the day to her lav- 
ish entertainments 

Lady Morgan was the forerunner of the 
modern newspaperwoman Dr. Stevenson shows 
the gradual development of her literary powers 
. from shortly after the Battle of Waterloo, 
when she was among the first Britishers to 
enter France" She dabbled in European af- 
fair* and wTote a controversial book about 
France, followed later by a similar book about 
Italy. At all time*, she wa* a great influence 
in Irish politics a* well as being an influence 
upon her literary con tempor ansa, — • 

Dr. 8teveson has used authentic dialogue 
wherever possible, hi* sources being existing 
diaries and documents. He has succeeded ad- 
mirably In bringing out the element* of con- 
flict In her life, and has employed a method 
of the treatment of hi* subject which 1* not 
loo pedantic. 

Dr. Stevenson received his public and high 
school education in and near Duncan, later 
attending the UntyeTMty of British Columbia 
and Toronto University. He took his doc- 

I 9 



torate at the. University of California, and re- 
cently received his Bachelor of Literature from 
Oxford, where he wrote this biography. He t* 
at present teaching at Tenipe. Arizona, but 
find* time to write an occasional volume His 
works, to date, are: "The Pool of Stars" and 
* Rose of the Sea," which are chapbooks of 
poetry, and two prose works. "Appraisals of 
Canadian Literature" and ' Darwin Among the 
Poets." 



•'Two Worlds" > Covii l-Frida, George Mc- 
heod» by Lester Cohen. •-: ; . uport the v a 
came upon a strange day . . . 36« days sail- 
ing this way . . , and upon this double day 
the sense that we had set out to see the World, 
and had seen two worlds— the. world of Com- 
munism and the world of Capitalism— and the 
more we thought it over, and the more we 
talked to people, the more we felt that the 
old lines were down, nations, peoples, philos- 
ophies and religions— all these were being 
geared one way or another— It was as a man 
thlnketh that made the difference— and some 
men thought to profit by the sweat of an- 
other s brow, and some men thought to pro- 
duce whst was necessary and daitribule it 
among those who produced -and in all the 
woild we met no one but what he felt one way 
or >he other— and wc came to feel that all of 
us, in this time., were people of the two worlds. " . 

So eonchrdes the author of this thoughtful 
and unusual book. It is not a travel book, 
yet a blographv nor a social treatise, 
something of all three. Lester Cohen, a writer, 
and his wife Eden, set out on a strange quest 
How nrrie i knew, and how much 
there was to find out. and now that I could do 
It, I was going to set forth— bound for the 
beauty and the wonder of one world, and a 
better understanding of our troubled, chaotic 
time . . ." 

They left New York on the French liner, lie 
rie France, and as thev went they observed the 
conditions of both working and leisured classe* 
In Europe and Asia Thev talked to the man 
In the street— that is. the average citizen; 
they talked with the workers- busmen farm- 
ers, coolies and so on they tallied with the 
intelligentsia writers,, artist* and visionaries; 
they talked to society men and women, bank- 
er*, military man. in fact, to anyone and 
everyone they encountered. They studied the 
conditions, socially and economically in this 
cross-section of the world: they pondered upon 
the exploitation of vice a* It afferted the 
economic status and morality of the various 
-ountrtea and the further afield thev went 
' and the more they delved into condition*, the 
sadder they became. Z 



schooldays were the happiest time of tlieir 
lives. It would be difficult to cram more 
iallacie* into so *hori a sememe, he said. 
His ovwi lile had been pio«re.ssively happier 
and far more Uiteresting as time had gone on. 

"Nobody knows exactly where we are going 
or exactly what the now world— and the word 
new does not necessarily mean better— may 
be but we know there are changes in the 
air and I have every' confidence myself that 
we shall find a way," he concluded. 

Ships on Pacific 

THE OBSERVER. Mr. J. L Garvin s famous 
Sunday newspaper, comments caustically 
on the delay In furnishing the support needed 
to the British lines on the Pacific. It says: 
"There was some plain speaking in the House 
of Lords on the drowsy deliberation with which 
the Empire's shippuig problems are, to all 
appearance, being handled. 

"Both in the Pacific and In the Baltic our 
trade ls having the life squeezed out of it 
by the preferential policy of foreign govern- 
ments. _ 



The Intolerable nature of the situation i* 
admitted, and what ha* been done in the 
way of remedy Is precisely nothing at all 

"The latest announcement is that the case 
of the Pacific lines, which are within Bight 
of extinction, has been remitted to a com- 
mittee. 

J It must be a severe ordeal to keep a straight 
face in making such an intimation " 

The committee referred to is the Imperial 
Shipping Committee, which, as The Time* re- 
marks, has prepared a large number of ad- 
mirable reports on a gnat variety of shippmg 
subjects sine* it was appointed aixteen years 
ago 



"If this had been done six month* ago." 
The Time* says, "the whole mstter could 
have been disposed of long before mid- 
summer.' 

It is significant that Sir Edward Beatty 
ha* arrived In London Just in time to confer 
with the Australian ministers. Dr Earle Page 
and Mr R O Menzies, before they sail lor 



ALMOST at the moment when It wa* an- 
nounced that step* were to be taken 
in the matter of the Pacific line* a melan- 
choly storv was being told at the first statu- 
tory meeting of the creditors of the bankrupt . 
Royal Mall Steam Packet Company, which 
once flaunted It* house-flag proudly on all 
the Seven Seas 

The Senior Official Receiver. Mr ETA. 
Phillip*, who presided, told how. shortly after 
he became a director, thirty years ago. Lord 
Kylsant, the former chairman of the com- 
pany, had begun the series of mergers that 
had ultimately brought disaster on It 

It was Lord Kylsants policy. Mr Phillips 
said, to purchase controlling or large interests 
in other shipping companies. 

"Lord Kylsant's autocratic control appears 
to have carried all the projects which were 
put up by him." he continued. "His co- 
director.s seemed to be complacently content 
for it to be so." 

In 1926 the company had purchased the 
whole of the Issued capital of the Oceanic 
Steam Navigation Company for $35,000,000 
When the period of acute and lon„' continued 
depression arose the company had proved In- 
capable of surmounting the difficulties with 
which the group for which it had become 
responsible was faced. 

The liabilities aguregated approximately 
$73,500,000. the asset* were estimated to pro- 
duce $5,100,000 



The creditors were advised that they 
not expect more than five cents on the dollar 
and should be pleased if they got more 

It wUI be recalled that Lord Kylsant was 
prosecuted in connection with the c<»m|>e.ii\ > 
affair* Replying to an angry shareholder 
the Official Receiver said "I think it highly 
improbable that there could be anv prosecu- 
tion of anyone else .1 ran hardly Imagine 
that the Director of Public Pnverutioti* would 
reopen a matter which ls four or five years 
old with a view to finding another victim " 



Their tour of llnvestlgatlrin started bv 
questioning the sailors on their boat and 
ended as they sailed from Yokohama At the 
outset of the trip they encountered difficulties 
at the British Foreign Office, for the British 
apparently do not welrrwne visitors to Pales- 
tine, at any rate, visitors who would be likely 
to ask embarrassing questions. However that 
was smoothed out. and they were free tO study 
the inroad* of Farlsm in England They 
listened to a debate In Parliament about Sir 
Oswald Mosley's activities, and part of the 
debate i* given verbatim. 

Russia, for many reasons, receives more In- 
dividual attention than any other country At 
first glance k seemed a* If Russia was an 
■ ideal country,— the penal colony at LubertJse. 
- the theatre many things impressed the 
Conens However, as they delved deeper— saw 
a man begging for a crust, these and many 
thing* threw a different light on Ruaslan life. 
Cohen went to visit hi* coualn. a Jew who 
had been wealthy before the Revolution and 
received an Insight Into Jewish life in Russta 
He vuited the Kiev monastery, varlou* 
museum*, heard Andre Malraux apeak, aaw.. 
the peasant* at work orl collective farm*, and 
met a counter-revolutionary at Odessa He 
*vl*ited the great Dnleprostroi dam and the 
Palace of the Tartar Khans at Bakchiaaral. 

He glven^an amusing account of hi* difficul- 
ties in repossessing hi* trunk st Istanbul and 
the various formalities -in this case the 
money he paid out— required From Turkey 
he went on to Athen*. thence to Jerusalem 
and Egypt Port Said and Colombo drew htm 
next and the apathetic condltlona of the 
Ceylonese whom he call* "almp-walkers. 
draws forth pitying comment* And then to 
India The difference be ween the conditions 
In the native state of Mytore and the British 
state* U shown In raaaid contrast. _ 

Singapore and the Orient followed He 
draw* an analogy between the fiikh police of 
the Far East and the slave driver* of the Old 
South. He depict* labor condition* in China 
where men take the place of 
scribe* the unsettled political 
He telL of Chinese festival* and hi* experi- 
ence* at an eaecutlon. 

In Japan he wa* followed by a spy — a schol- 
arly man— who kept tab of his every move- 
ment. He throws interesting aldelight* on the 
relation In both China and Japan between 
economic conditions and prostitution 

One reading will not a.rfrW for this book 
One can read it again and agaui. in fact, one 
should to appreciate thoroughly the condition* 
snd peoples he describe* The stwle u mav * 
be gathered from the above excerpt* is un- 




usually vivid ahd the staccato tempo 
suited for vft political and economic panorama 
presented. 



Mv f.real. (Wide, Beautiful W-.rld Mac- 
millan I by Juanlta Harrison. Summer being 
here, travel arid travel talk l* In the air So 
"My Oreat. Wide. Beautiful World" la very 
appropriate readu-g The book Is the story 
of a colored woman who had traveled arouiwi 
the world during the last ten year*, and who 
ha* visited twenty-two countries m the couise 
of her journeying* A* she went she took 
notes of her impressions and the daughter of 
a former emplover edited them, leaving the 
spelling and grammar Just as they had been 
An excerpt will show Miss Harrison's naively 
philosophical style ' . . . I had a thrilling 
day at Monte Carlo The laws are different 
from Nice. In Nice I went several times to 
played a few franr in the Casino, and on the 
floor girls in their evening cloths dancing fh 
the arms of hansnn Frenchmen The French 
are great love makers Being man-proof. I get 
a big kick out of them I even wieeked into 
the gaming room without paying an entrance 
fee But at Monte C I found it harder I 
wanted to try the table where they plaved 
with eleven cards One of the guard* tryed 
to tell me But he looked so big *nd hamaom 
I dldn t remember a word he *aid Bo I loaf 
twenty franc It wa* worth It" 

In fact, most things to Miss Harrison are 
worth It.' and that sums up her travel 
philosophy. Sh' writes with a frankness and 
lack of restraint whlrh l* Intriguing. Of 
Naples she says. T made my horse galop a* 
of en as I coQld. but suffered for 1$ three 
days . ■" > 

The authors capacity for enjovment Is un- 
limited and every MtW; however trivial, 
contributes to that capacity. In Syria she 
records " . A fine young msn have Just 
spreaded his beautiful red rug on the grown 
and took off his shoes and are prsylng wttta 
hi* face toward the setting sun. He Is on his 
nee* bowing His face down to the rug !t 
la beautiful to see and will live in 



Wl'h thl« Ideal philosophy It is no wondeT 
Mis* Harrison enjoyed her travels and la able 
to pass on that enjoyi 
m'nt of her readers. 



Tie up the tomato vines as they grow, 
ing them to one or at m«t two or three main 
»Uik\ according 'r> the stake or trellis vou are 
using If thev e rt on' of hand H Is hard work 
to tie up the vines without breaking them 



I 




/ 



- 



the n\n.v colonist. VICTORIA, B.C., S UN D AY, in.v 26, iw 




^Jllllfllllllf IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIItlMIIMllllllMtllllllMIt IIIIIIMMIIIII lllll Illl 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



..... 



5 V~ 

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIHIIII Ill I.......I.........I.......................I.............I........I IKII III 




Qreat Britain and the Dominions Overseas 



Big Portions Are 
Eaten at Banquet 
Despite the Heat 

SuppcMMNjv Strengtfa of Forefather* Nothing Com- 
pared lo High Living of Moderns at Tow0T of 

London Dinner "Bragget" I* Served 

— Trooping of Colon Described 




,! 



Trans-Atlantic Planes Nearing Completion 



By Ot.ANVILLE CAHBW 



Uvrk Makrs $11.1 

Error, Hut Hone$t 
Man lift urns Money 

ADELAIDE iBUPi. — The 
paying out clerk at the 
totalis* t-or of Morphetvllle. 
near Adelaide, paid out |tlf 
too mjich to a lucky better. 
Three days after the man re- 
turned the money. The race- 
course management was so 
appreciative of the mans 
honesty that they broadcast 
round the course the aston- 
ishing news, which was 
greeted with a* much ap- 
plause as is given to a winner 
of the big race, the King s 
Cup. 



quoted them in his speech. So Han 
sard, being an accurate recorder, 
had to print them. Here they ai" 

"Let us be realists and fate the facts. 
For peace, at any price, is more than 
pacts. 

The house is broke; the burglar 

keeps the cruet 
Whv not be wise, and say he didn't 



It mav b» awkward lo condone 
crime. 

But not il a was lawful all the time 
If humble pic be what the nations 
wish. 

Let them have plenty, let them lick 
the dish. 

Singing 1 lie meek Italian left his 



To drive tne Abv.vsinian brute from 
. Rome ' 

Maybe that mustard on the moun- 
tain tops ' 

Was looked by Englishmen di.sgui.sei! 
as Wops?" 

MHtncr stokv 

There are some queer jobs in the 
world. One of them is that of pro- 
viding the King with shrimps That 
Is the business of a certain Pur- 
veyor of Shrimps to H M by Royal 
Warrant" in Lancashire, ba hM to 



every week 

He— the only ghrtaper In the 
world to hold a Royal Warrant— is In 
ptTMH anything but a shrimp He 
is a 6-ft. 3-tn. ex-heavyweight cham- 
pion of the Coldstream Guards. 

From soldiering to shrimping 
seems an odd change of vocation. 



LONDON (BUP) — Those people who are always praisers 
6f times past and who love to contrast the supposed 
strength of our forefathers with our puny weak-stomached 
selves had a itirprise the other day. We showed them what 
we can do in the matter of high living in high temperature. 
The scene was the Tower of London. The thermometer stood 
around the eighties. The banqueting table was loaded with 
viands. This is the sort of thing 
.which the bill of fare offered. Item, 
a giant boar's head from the Black 
Forest of Germany. Item, a haunch 
of venison from the Kuig's Forest of 
Windsor. Item, a young swan from 
the King * Swanneries, and all sorts 
of mediaeval dishes and "trimmings." 
each of which bulked larger than 
most modern meal*. And the set- 
ling was all in keeping. The waiters 
wore the serving -man s dreas of 300 
years ago. The ale-conners iale- 
tastersi came back from the ancient 
day* to do their old-time duty of 
seeing that the ale and the other 
drinks were up to standard. Once 
upon a time these fellows had a hard 
job. They had to taste every fresh 
brew in the City of London and fix 
it* price. Their office dates back to 
the Conqueror. For 500 years at 
least the City itself appointed them 
■ 

And now for the main drink of 
that torrid evening. It was "Brag- 
get." And not many people, nowa- 
days know what that is. Still fewer 
know how to concoct it. That ;.• .:. : 
the case, the help of the Senior Bea- 
dle of the ancient Devonshire sea- 
port town of Barnstaple was invoked, 
because he brews it to this day. He 
did his work clad in the costume ot 
hi* class in the early sixteen hun- 
dreds a black coat which *as 
adorned by large silver buttons and 
much silver braid, a long waistcoat 
of vermilion red. black silk knee 
breeches and white stockings And 
this is how he made Bragget. 

tnt km m 

He poured a Huge kettlcful of boil- 
ing strong ale into a great disn con- 
taining honey, pepper, nutmeg, cin- 
namon and some other spices. These 
he mixed together and then poured 
Uicm uao a boiler holding a barrel- 
lul ol cold strong ale This he mixed 
again for some time. Then the 
Senior Ale Conner played his part. 
Wearing his official gold-braided 
purple gown and three-cornered hat. 
he went through the age-old ritual 
And he found the Bragget good. 

There was only one fly In the 
ointment The gentlemen who weie 
taring so sumptuously were none 
other than H M. General Commis- 
sioners of Taxes of the Tower of 
London Division. Until the Brag- 
get got in it* benevolent work one 
guest at least had an uneasy feeling 
such as a heretic might have had 
who iound himself dining with the 
Grand Inquisitor and tU* colleagues. 

rmoornra turn < ouwa 

That Tower of London dinner was 
an indoor scene ot color. Let us 
turn now to another scene— an out- 
side scene of color -Trooping tin- 
Color on the King s birthday in the 
great open space which lies between 
St. James Park ind Whitehall 
known to us as tin Horse Guards 
Parade. 

Picture the ancient grey buildings 
of Whitehall, the rid of the nfwtr 
portion of the Adm rally, the .stone 
ol the Foreign OtTli I making tlhrec 
sides of the quadra igle, the Jreen 
Of St. James' i'aile and the White 
stone of the Guard's War Memorial 
nearly completing the other. Only 
on? corner left open the road curv- 
ing round the Mall, the wide tree- 
lined processional road leading to 
Buckingham Palace Thousands of 
people at the windows, more thou-* 
sands in the stands and standing be- 
hind the thin red line of sentries 
Tlien the amval ol the Grenadiers, 
the Coldstreams, the Irish Guards 
Scarlet and gold and steel glittering 
in bright sunshine The Royal 
Horse Guards, silver cuirasses, scar- 
let plumes on silver helmets, roal 
black horses Troops now all in for- 
mation, bands playing. A silence, a 
hurst of cheering from the Mall, and 
then just visible through the trees, 
the King, escorted but ndmg alone. 
j>n a bay horse, as Colonel- in-ChxU 
of the Grenadier Guard*. A salute 
and a smile to Queen Mary and the 
:«o little princesses in thu Whitehall 
balcony Tlien the intricate ani 
marvellously accurate ceremonial of 
the Trooping of the C olor the King » 
Color of the F1M, Battalion ol the 
Grenadier Guards. There can be 
nothing like t his ceremony an v where 1 
else in the world 

At last the Royal procession mov- 
ing off. Guards, foreign attaches in 
resplendent uniform* of all nations. 
And one figure among :hem all — 
riding alone. 

"HANSARD S" VKKM. j 

Probably for the first tune in its | 
history that uninspired and matter- 
of-fact publication of The doings and 
sayings of Parliament known as 
"Hansard ha* printed some verse. 

It was all because of sanctions It 
•tern* that someone has suggested, 
that the only way to really get us all 
back Into an amiable frame of mind 
and soothe Italy * wounded feel- 
ings" i* to reverse the Leagues ver- 
dict that Italy was the aggressor 1n 1 
the Ethiopian business. A sort ol 
general as you were for the Ethio- 
pian*. So a certain M P wrote some 
few lines of verse in satirical vein 




London Press Urges 
Saving of British 
Shipping on Pacific 

Dail> Mail, Daily Herald and Dft.l) Telegraph Sax 
Preaervaiioii of Service* Muni Be Maintained 
— Stress Important* of "All Red Koul< 



LONDON (BUP).— All sections of the London Piess are 
busy impressing upon the British public the urgent need 
to save the British -shipping services across the Pgeif 
In The Daily Mail. The Daily , Herald and The Daily Tele- 
graph the danger to the Empire of the loss of these services is 
being pointed out. A lead is set by Percy Cater, writing in 
The Daily Mail, when he says: 

' Will Britain give a lead to the 
Empire to keep the flap, flying in the 
Pacific shipping trade f 
"British shipping circles are wor- 



The first of the great new Imperial Airways flying boats which will be used night and day on the Empire routes and in forthcoming trans- 
Atlantic flights, recently made its first appearance at the Short factory in" Rochester. England, where twenty-eight giant craft are being 
built. The ships will carry twenty-six passengers, baggage and mail at a cruising speed of 150 miles per hour. The ships are reported to 
ba^a»la»t word in modern aero-dynamical efficiency. The photo shows the new flying boat on the slipway. 



Bride Avenges Her 

Husband's Murder 
~7 In Indian Village 

Brutal Slaying of Bridegroom Prompt! Young 
Punjabi (iirl to Kill Two of His Mtaeken 
— Prevent! Own Death 



LAHORE (BUP) —Locked in a hut with the body of her 
murdered husband, a young Punjabi bride not only frus- 
trated the murderers who had also planned her death, but 
managed to kill two of them. The tragedy occurred near the 
village of Nandipur. in the Gurjranwala district. 

BTOr TO ki - 1 
She and her husband were relurn- 
j lag home after their wedding cere- 
Imony when they stopped by the 



Over-Rea listic Efforts of Actor 
Tragedy for Orchestra 

BOMBAY i BUP ». -Four people were injured when an Indian 
amateur ac.or became so carried away by his part as a knight 
of old that he struck out in earnest with his sword. The actor, who 
was playing at the Lucknow Theatre, had unfortunately been pro- 
vided with a sword rather more substantial than most theatrical 
weapons. 

The villain, with whom he was fighting a duel, discovered to his 
dismay that there was no make-believe about the fight on his oppo- 
nent's part, and made a rapid exit. wlul P the knight errant cheated 
of his prey, pursued his qu-st among the orchestra Four musicians 
were sent to the hospital to have their wounds treated. 



GUxnt Max art Is 
I ted to Rrimn c 
Mrtal From I \ < s 



SYDNEY. Australia- \ BL'P i . 
— A giant magnet, special- 
ly made In London. Joas^bcen 
installed in Sydney Hospital 
for removing steel fragments 
and magnetizable metals from 
eyes. . 

JThe machine, which has a 
power of more than 500 volt.-. Earle 
draws out the metal from the 



is placed inside a magnetized 
circle. 



ried at the prospect that American 

n ■ 



' RABBIT HAS 
NO RESPECT 



SAYS NATIVES 
ARE STARVING 



Invades King's Estate and 
Plays Havoc With His 
Lovely Garden 



LONDON ( BUP i — One of the 
Aorst .sufferers from rabbit inva- 
sions is the King at his Windsor | locked herself in 
Forest residence. Fort Belvedere, 
where he has become a keen gar- 
dener and planned many of the 



fl "r,u''/„ Missionary in Africa Blames 

find some water. I 

A group of men gathered round a i 
well told htm he could get a ouckel 
out of a nearby hut. but when he 
went there he was followed by the 
men and killed. Alarmed by her 
bridegroom's long absence, the girl 
went to Investigate and was told by 
the men at the well that her hus- 
band was In the hut. 

As soon as she saw her dead hus- 



Mealie Quota Act for 
Dangerous Hardship 

CAPETOWN .BUP' -Natives in 
the Transkel region of Cape Prov- 
ince are facing starvation bccau.se 
they are unable to buy their staple 
food — "mealies," or maize — under 
approximately $562 per bag. and at 
the same time maize is being ex- 
band lying in a pool oi. blood, she ported under Oovernment subsidy 
slammed the door of the hut and at seventy-five cents per bag. 

This is one of the allegations 



beds himself, often helping in the 
a consignment to the King vvorK wlfh hls own handv 

His gardens are now among the 

lovehest_m the country, but rabbits 
from the surrounding forest and 
park have wrought havoc notwith- 
standing the cflorls of the. al 



■OKI HOI K 

The assasMtLs started to bore a 
hole through the wall of the hut. 
But the girl had lound a scythe in- 
side 

When one of them made, a hole 
large-enough to put hi- hand through 
she alaslie-d at him with the scythvf 
killing him instantlv'. A second ot 



keepers, who annually slay thou- , lne men aLso ,ri<,d lo « et 1,1 *>\d 



sands as a matter of routine. 



killed When farm hands ri 



;d 



MM EFFORT TO 
MATE LION, TIGER 



tiiji 



LONDON < BUP) - An experiment 
in artificial fvoluhon is to be under - 
taken at the I«ondon 7,oo where an 
empt. will be made to breed a 
er-llon nt a "tigon " 
The animals concerned are a 
young lioness, born last June at 
London Zoo 
Only one tiger-lion hvbrid has 

been shown previously at the Zoo 

It was bred bv the Jam Sahib of As adversity t us to think 
Navvanager in Ml It lived at the j propcrlv of our Itftf, it is most 
Zoo for about ten years. beneficial to us - Johnson. 




Taking a iMf out of the book of ,nr scene sOon afterward.s they found 
the D'ike and Duchess of York his tn ' K' rl standing guard over the 
neighbors at Roval .Lodge. Windsor. bodv nf nor bridegroom, but at the 
the King has decided to have his P° ,nt of collapse. 

Ml acres wired and palisaded. This | | ■ 

barrier will be about three miles 
long, and it will be made of Uak 
palings three feet high, covered 
with fine mesh wire netting and 
with •n additional six inches of 
netting and paling buried in j the 
ground Thus it is hoped to pre- 
vent rabbits burrowing through/ 

These measures are costlv-(-the 
materials, irrespective of labor, ex- 
ceeding $;S00 a mile. 

ADVKBftll v 



made by Rev. Lincoln M Larrlng 
ton. of Ludeke. Pondoland. who has 
been engaged in mission work In 
the 
vears 

town to rouse interest In the pUfht 
of the natives. 

\n< \n» in Bl \ 

* When I left home " he said, 
mealies wire $.'-. fij ,i inc. and they 
were unobtainable In "many places 
One of the causes \s the Mealie 



to 



Natives thought they would be able 
to get mealies at $3 25 a bag. but 
where are they? Does the $paeU« 
lator still hold them all? 

"The native knows that the Gov- 
ernment exports mealies at seventy- 
five cents per bag. and he wants to 
know why thsy are not sent to the 
native areas Why cannot the Gov- 
ernment subsidize farmers in this 
way. so that he would not mind 
i heap mealies for competitors in 
other countries if he could off load 
his mealies in the native territory?" 

Mr. Larrln-jton declares that the 
hut tax is operating unfairly and is 
making habitual criminals of the 
natives. The natives could not get 
cash for any surplus products, be- 
cause among th-msehes the barfr 
system prevailed, and the Govern- 
ment would not lake cattle or meal- 
ies in payment for taxes. After being 
Ncnt to tail as a tax defaulter, the 
native still owed the money on his 
release. 



WARNING FLASHED 
BY GHOST LIGHTS 



Robot "Kve" and "Brain" ( ontrol 
Mr. danism al Brighton Munic- 
ipal Airport 



subsidised competition will speedily 
oust British Hum from vitally Im- 
portant Imperial' routes between 
Canada, the United States, New 
Zealand and Australia, unless sub- 
sidy aid is applied " 

r\< IFIC PSOBI ni 

The Pacific problem created bv 
the US subsidy to her lines and 
telling of London talks m which Dr. 

Page and ol hei I lomlnion rep- 
resentatives take part, he adds: 
' Nntlffl hJl been given oi Vive 



LONDON iBUP». — Two ghost 
lights on the top of Lancing Col- 
lege Chapel, high up on the Sussex 
Downs, glow their red message of 
warning to pilot* of alrcralt flying 
to and from the new Brighton 
Municipal Airport. 

The lights are controlled bv a 
robot "eve" and "brain" contained 
in a sma'll box fixed on the spire of 
the. chapel In it is a selenium 
cell a chemical compound which 
reacts to light Just as does the 
human eye. 

When dusk reaches a certain In- 
tensity, from whatever cause, the 
eye flashes its message to the auto- 
matic switch which operates the red 
warning light at each end of the 
building 

These lights are the first In * 
magic circle of traffic lights e.f the 
sky which will encircle the airport 
and guard and direct air traffic. 

' » < ll I HI 1 v - 1 1 ' ' i I n i M N 111 WW f W MAY FLY PLANE 

kw for . n M Orkers irettlJUl T n nTiurnnmirnr 

Wage. IncreLd TO STRATOSPHERE 

LONDON iBUPi.~_ Half the LONDON 'BUP) —An officer of 
workers of Britain have recivrd lnP K A F is hortlv to be pitted by 
jncreases in wane rates during the t '"' Alr Ministry for the first at- 
;>i,t oichteen month.s. Not tBWt |>*—t to reach the stratosphere in 
the post-war boom vears ud to 19"0 an airplane. 
Quota Act be. nu,e when there were nnvr J^,^ mm ^ » a secret new h.gh-.lt.tude air- 

so wide a Murp. plane is now being completed in a 

The Ministrv of Labor s monthly < lo.scd hangar ol the Bristol Aero- j 
bulletin shows that the first ttfi I PMM Company at Fllton Bristol, 
months of 19.16 have brousht more The flight is to be made this year | 
money to manual workers than anv Th * P llot s Iving suits liave al- f 
comparable period for twelve vears 'cariv been ordered Fi\e or six , 



withdrawal from Nfmrobrr next of 
the Union Steamship Company* 
San Francisco line, and It is feared 
that unless help ts forthcoming this 
Canadian - Australasian line will 
have to close It* Pacific service. 

"In this case the 'All Red Route' 
would be cut for the flr.st time, with 
unfortunate consequence* to British 
prestige The regular and rapid 
Pacific services from Australia and 
New Zealand would be left in for- 
elRn hands producinsr an undesir- 
able situation in the e\ent of any 
emergency " 

Dealing with the same problem 
The Daily Herald tells of the Lon- 
don talks and adds 

NOTHING DOM 

"But nothing has hee M done Mr 
R O. Menzies leaves for home .soon, 
and should no agreement be 
n ;i< h' d by then all hope of one will 
disappear. There may be conflict* 
Inu views on how best to deal with 
this problem, but the facts remain 
that, for Imperial reasons. It is held 
desirable to n t.un the e sections of 
the "All-Red " routes, that the ship- 
owners are helpless and that the 
British Oovernment does nothing 
. . . Dominion OoVMMMUl* have 
expressed themselves favorably to- 
wards the Idea of financial help " > 

At the same time this Socialist ' 
newspaper runs a leading article 
emphasizing the necessity for main- 
taining the Pacific line.s and advo- 
cating a subsidy, though undesir- 
able, if the American authorities 
will no; come to an a«reement 

Another brief article stressing the 
importance of this question also ap- 
f pears in The Dally Telegraph under 
i the signature of the paper's famous 
i naval, correspondent, Hector By- 
water. 



IS THREATENED 

English Residents of Tan- 
ganyika. Kenya and 
Uganda Highly Anxious 



Protesting the Tithe Bill 




NAIROBI 'BUP' — The British 
peoples of Tanganyika. Kenva and 
Uganda are fraught with an\i<tv 
over the possible return or'Tan- 
ganyika to Germany 

Thev not only see the All -Red ' 
route to the Cape is threatened, but 
the dream of a great Centra! 
African Dominion destroyed by the 
transfer of the terntnn 

MK\\( I Is |HN 

Such transfer would compel Im- 
perial Airways to travel *toout a 
thousand miles across foreign ter- 
ritory, wliilr aerodromes situated in 
North and South Tanganyika would 
menace two area- of British influ- 
ence verv important to the future 
of Africa 

As it is thouKht probable —that 
Germanv would re-estabtsh Its pre- 
war pollrv of training the natives 
to- be soldiers the return, of- Tan- 
gamika .o (iermanv would impose 
on the voung British territories to 
the north and south a • erv heavy 
burden in <leffne*»' exjwt^diture. 

Native chiefs and tribal heads- 
men, who have not forgot ten the 
unfortunate history of their coun- 
try under Oerman ruie. will oppose 
the transfer whlrh <voulrt mean 'h« 
complete destruction 'of the moat I 
imj>ortant experiment which has j 
been carried out in the history of I 
the African comment, that of 
nitr»t policy ' 

Natne policy In Tangamlka was 
settled by Lord Lugard on the prin=_. 
elple of indirect, rule. By this was 
meant the gradual transfer of 
responsibility for tribal affairs from 
the Centra Oovernment to the 
chiefs and headsmen. 



Rood crops, traders were afraid 
buy 

"Formerly, the trader bought 
mealies from the iiaii\e< and ,-torcd 
thrm. sejling them bark in times of 
srarcitv j Now he has to buy ex- 
port certificates and has not the 
mnnev m lock up in that wav The 
natives generally have no place to 
store mealies 

REACH KVnnWMKRP. 

"No jilacp todav Is really beyond 
the reiJch ot officials" added Mr 
I arnngton ' The Transket Native 
Council reaches all over the coun- 
try The trouble is that the men 
are awav at work and the women 
and children left behind are In 
dancer of starvation. . 

"The Oo'ernment the natives 
were told, was going to - bii} 600 ooo 
batrs of mealies and sell them at 



So far in 193fi. increases worth 
nearlv $100.000 000 a vear to the 
country 1 spendlne power have been 
grnnted This is how Britain's 
wage movement has varied during 
the past Mx \-ars 1911 ruts of 
510*250 000 1932 cuts of $64 500 - 
000; 1931 cuts of $16950 000; 1934 
Increases of $24.025 000: 1935 in- 
creases of $4R 750 00O 1936 'first 
four monthsi. increases of $71,- 
240 000 

The annonn.ement from the Min- 
istry of_ Labor also announced that 
further wage restorations bringing 
the total} to nearly $155 000 000 



for th^ supply of 



firms tendered 
special suits. 

Nobodv knnwf- how a heavier- 
than-air machlnf will fly in the air- 
lew heiKhts lying about 50 000 het 
It is posMble ejen that lhe engine 
may burst The pilot may come 
down fainting 

If his ox\gen supply falls suddenly 
he will die alone in his cockpit un- 
>s* he can spin down fast enough 
into heavier air 

The world MOON the Air Minis- 
try has to beat In its altitude effort 
is 47.386 feet tet up in 1'iT14 h'\ -he ' ***h~ and. if nr 
Italian Air Force pilot RCfMVtO 1 -streets at 



DUST CART TO 
CLEAN OUT OAS 



PORTSMOUTH 'Bt'P- Refuse, 
coilertmg vehicles that will be able 
to decontaminate house* after air 
raids were demonstrated to dele- 
gates attending the annual confer- 
ence nf the Institute of Public 
Cleansing l»ere 

For tune months Portsmouth s 
transport and cleansing superin- 
tendent Mr S Allehurrh. has been 
secretly experimenting with a "ref- 
use compactor " 

Tills is a modern type of vehn le 
which compresses refuse loaded 
into It 

It Ls fitted with a hoac and pumps 
capabl- of sending a let of water 
sixty feet Into the air. Rpravs ran 
arv decontaml- 



$2 75 a bag and give the tnuler have been made during the past six Donati He flew a British-englned 



IWflnty-flve cents per bag protlt weeks 



'Italian machine 



Are Solving Problem in Transportation 



i 



PR \YiR 

(— To pray together in whatever 
In the above picture farm workers in picturetque costume are seen about " ,K "' or rit,,,,; ls mo*4 ender 
to join a two mile procession of farmer, and laborer* from every part of brotherhood of hope and s\mp*tJtf i 



lI*L? lr ™l*T~! k' P \ I L* a .' t "- 1B I England, in London, protecting the Tithe Bill. *Mch 

too httvy * u* burden lor the farmer* to cany 

W— - 



iht 



tbey .ay. Will be rati contract in this Uf«.-J Th , i d „ in fht Abov( p K , ur> A 
| Madam oe Stael - j Member* of the School of Military 




Mr Allchurch rjaims that another 
us» nf the vehicle would be to put 
out fires Radio could he fitted. 

If all Portsmouihs thirty refuse 
Vehicles were similarly equipped, 
the. eould Hean*e the 130 mile* of 
the city's streets after an air raid 
within an hour. 



tly I* to Get the Tank 
"ring. 



Across 'he Rivrr Without a Bridi;? and 
Seem to Be Doing WelL 



01 HFST WOMAN 
LIVES IN Wi 



•JOH AJCNF.RRf ""ITO Bt*P> -Re 
lleved to be the world . qMm| «om- 
»n Anna Lou i n Orion i woman. 
!• t II active a' the age of 131 

wt ^-* -<4»r«rvmati wa* 

filling in sher census forrn^ owing to 
her MfTHlneM he eould not believe 

n * r »*r — Hex — bantlum certificate 
was produced and this showed 
that ahe had hee n christened at 
Pteteraburg in 1910 when her age > 
Wia~|rtven as |f»s 

1 was born on the v«al R|ve r m 
the Cape says Anna, "and spent 
most of tm life near Klmberley^ 
not the one t|,e V built after the di- 
amonds were found 

Nothing hM ever happened <o •, 
me I aaw no wars I lived very 
happily ke'-ptr.g house for mv.htt$-r 
band and sometimes doing wort 

for White people 

"Mv husband died a long time 
ago. and I have' been blind »o long. — 
In fart it is v> long that f . do not 
know mu<h abo'it the*e train* 

rwerfnr rn— | », rV Lell me about 

1 r»m very tired now I 
get r-od. and I am too old to marry 
"gajn * Uf husband died before 
Kim'eTi^y was colonized by