Skip to main content

Full text of "The Daily Colonist (1980-02-17)"

See other formats



INSIDE i 


SPORTS 

irvic Vikettes took Calgary Din- 
nies into overtime but wound up on 
the losing end of a 71-67 score, 
their first loss of the basketball 
season. A 33-game UVic win streak 
was snapped in the bargain. Page 
16 

Eric Heiden of the U.S. created a 
stir at Lake Placid, N.Y., Satur¬ 
day, by nailing down his second 
gold medal in speedskatjng—this 
time for5,000 metres. Page 17 

Canada's national team was un¬ 
able to hold off the Finns Saturday 
night and suffered their first loss 
at the Olympic hockey tourna¬ 
ment. Finland won 4-3, despite a 
late push by the Canadians. Page 
17 




Prrmpwf) 




Holden's blades flash 
In 5,000-melre race 



THE ISLAND 

Monday ends a tedious wait for 
Alert Bay Indians. That’s the day 
when a long-promised inquiry into 
health services in the community 
plagued with medical problems 
finally opens. Page 44 


WORLD 

Opera in the park, a solar eclipse 
and the constant din of fireworks 
on a bright Saturday enlivened 
China’s celebration of the Lunar 
New Year. Page 45 

THE CAPITAL 

Hallmark Society’s prestigious 

Louis Award will go to a group 
that devoted itself to preserving 
Craigdarroch Castle. Page 23 


OPINION 

An election that no one wanted? 

With four out of five candidates 
competing in Victoria riding being 
currently unemployed, city hall 
reporter Hubert Beyer, begs to 
differ. He believes claims that 
“those out of a job don’t, want to 
work” are nothing but a myth. 
Page 5 


ENTERTAINMENT 

It is an experiment on a grand 

scale. Pacific Opera, a young com¬ 
pany doing community produc¬ 
tions, has hired some stars and 
is tackling La Boheme. The costs 
are high but the risk is no more 
than normal say Pacific's princi¬ 
pals. Page 31 


CANADA 

Quebec Premier Rene Levesque 
says he’s more and more confi¬ 
dent of a victory in the so¬ 
vereignty-association referendum 
which he expects is “15 or 16 
weeks away.” Page 36 

LIVING 

Higher silver prices means more 
expensive photography, from In- 
stamatic snapshots to finely de¬ 
tailed medical X-rays. Page 21 

IN THE ISLANDER 

W.A.C. Bennett was a master in 

the art of the twin-bladed axiom 
and well-turned truism . . . Vic¬ 
torians are searching for their 
roots as interest in pedigrees 
mushrooms. 


INDEX 


Background 

5 

Backstage 

31 

Books 

43 

Bridge 

45 

Business 

8-12 

Checkmate 

22 

Classified 

46-57 

Comics 

27 

Crossword 

44 

Editorials 

4 

Entertainment 

31-36 

Living 

20-24 

Medical 

24 

Names in News 

3 

Off the Record 

33 

Outdoors • 

20 

Reporters Notebook 

15 

Sound Around 

34 

Sports 16-19, 25, 26 

Stamp Packet 

23 

Travel 

37-41 

Home edition 

Telephone: 383-4III 
Classified 386-2121 



i 23jc ^uttban (Colonist 


I ancouver Island's leading newspaper since 18->8 


Some rain, 
high 5 

Weather details 
on Page 2 


No. 57 — 122nd Year Victoria, British Columbia, February 17, 1980 


** 


20c Dailv, 30c Sunday 


Conflicting polls raise Tory hopes 



Last hurrahs: Clark waves to Quebec supporters, Broadbent bites a B.C. 'hero,' and Trudeau joins applauders in London, On I. 


Thousands fleeing 
floods in Arizona 


- Associated Press 

Thousands of residents of 
l’hoenix, Ariz., fled their 
homes Saturday while surg¬ 
ing waters washed out roads 
and bridges and floated 
away cars in Arizona, Cali¬ 
fornia and Utah. 

Authorities ordered the 
evacuation of 11.000 people 
along the normally dry river 
beds running through Phoe¬ 
nix, an area of 1.5 million 
people. 

Two persons drowned in 
Arizona and a woman died 
on a rain-slickdd-California 


highway during two days of 
flash floods. 

Eight of the 10 bridges 
spanning the Salt River in its 
32-kilomctre run through 
Phoenix were closed and 
none of the surface crossings 
were passable. 

With one half of the city 
virtually shut off from the 
other half, about 650 Nation¬ 
al Guardsmen patrolled eva¬ 
cuated neighborhoods. 

Gqyernor Bruce Babbitt 
ordered a state of emer¬ 
gency Friday night as au¬ 
thorities kept an eye on the 
Stewart Mountain Dam 


Olympic jams 
chill spectators 


LAKE PLACID, N.Y. 
(UPI) — Governor Hugh 
Carey Saturday declared “a 
limited state of emergency” 
to aid up to 6,000 spectators 
stranded in driving snow and 
numbing wind-chill tem¬ 
peratures of -23 degrees Cel¬ 
sius at the Winter Olympics. 

State police also instituted 
a virtual “ban on sight¬ 
seers" in the Olympic area, 
stopping cars up to 30 miles 
away unless drivers had 
tickets to the Games or could 
prove they were residents. 
Only a limited number of 
private cars are allowed into 
Lake Placid during the 
Games. 

Police and the Red Cross 
stepped in to help the specta¬ 
tors who were in a peripheral 
parking area in Keene Val¬ 
ley awaiting buses to get to 
the sites of competitions 27 
kilometres away. 

“Between 4,000 and 6,000 
people had to wait an hour 
and a half and wehad to send 
down the Red Cross and the 
Salvation Army to make 
sure nobody got frostbite,” a 
state police officer said. 

The police also comman¬ 
deered 17 extra buses in the 
emergency move to pick up 


many of the shivering peo¬ 
ple. 

One dispatcher was heard 
to warn his drivers in radio 
taxis, which carry Olympic 
personnel only, to lock their 
doors in the area and not stop 
“or you’ll be ripped apart." 


which holds -back the Sa- 
guaro Lake about 32 kilo¬ 
metres cast of Phoenix. 

After a helicopter flight 
Saturday with state legisla¬ 
tors over the metropolitan 
area. Babbitt told reporters 
that "damage thus far is 
relatively limited ” 

Meanwhile, a series of Pa¬ 
cific storms soaked southern 
California for a fourth day 
Saturday after swamping 
roadways, dumping mud 
and rocks into hillside 
homes, and washing away 
automobiles. 

Winds unofficially clocked 
at about 65 kmh tore through 
the Napa Valley in northern 
California on Saturday, 
knocking down power lines 
and toppling trees. 

A building under construc¬ 
tion in Napa collapsed. Pa¬ 
cific Gas and Electric 
spokesman Tony Lcdwell 
said about 1,200 customers in 
Novato lost power when 
trees fell onto power lines. 

The National Weather Ser¬ 
vice said another storm 
headed toward the area 
could add another 7.6 centi¬ 
metres to the 15 cm which 
had fallen by Friday night. 


B.C. ‘safest’ 
nuclear 
war haven 

Canadian Press 

In the event of a nuclear attack. B.C. is the 
safest place to be in Canada, says the B.C. director 
of Emergency Planning Canada 

Fred Cooper said B.C. is far from major United 
States population centres and nuclear fallout is un¬ 
likely to float north because of normal wind direc¬ 
tion. 

"We average 15 to 20 calls a day . . . from 
people worried about a nuclear attack,” he said in 
an interview." 

"The public perceives a threat. The Iranian 
situation started it and then the Afghanistan inva¬ 
sion made it worse. Now people are worried about 
the situation possibly destabilizing in Pakistan or 
Yugoslavia. 

“I had a man with long experience in the U.S. 
nuclear industry in my office the other day,” Cooper 

said. 

“He spent his whole life in the industry and 
consciously evaluated where he should live to avoid 
the effects of a nuclear attack. And so he decided to 
move to just near Victoria." 

Cooper said many other Americans.have moved 
to B.C. for the same reason. 

He said planning for a nuclear emergency 
should include a fallout shelter, a 14-day supply of 
food and water and a battery radio to listen 
for instructions. 

Cooper cautioned against building costly nu¬ 
clear blast shelters because if an attack is near 
enough, such a shelter would be of little help. 


Blunder 

killed 

Afghan 

chief? 

Colonist wire services 

Former Afghanistan 
President Hafizullah Amin 
was destined to become the 
No. 2 man in the Soviet in¬ 
stalled government of Ba 
brak Karmal and actually 
was killed by mistake in a 
Russian military blunder, 
the London Observ er report¬ 
ed in its edition today. 

A story by the newspaper’s 
"special correspondent in 
Moscow” blamed the mis¬ 
take on Soviet Lt.-Gen. Vik¬ 
tor Semenovich Paputin, 
who originally was reported 
killed in fighting at the Af¬ 
ghan capital of Kabul. 

In reality, the newspaper 
said, Paputin was recalled In 
Moscow. But he neyer made 
it alive. 

"According to the new ac¬ 
count,” The Observer said, 
“Paputin got as far as 
Sheremyetevo Airport, 
where he committed suicide. 
Western reports that he was 
killed in Kabul are said to be 
quite wrong." 

Page 2—Soviet 


Jury urges rescue shape-up 

Ocean tragedy prompts call 
for more boats , better links 


VANCOUVER (CP) — An in¬ 
quest jury investigating the cap¬ 
sizing of the freighter Lee Wang 
Zin wants the federal and provin¬ 
cial governments to improve the 
co-ordination of disaster response 
services. 

Thirty Taiwanese crew mem¬ 
bers died when the ore carrier 
overturned Christmas Day after 
apparently striking Celestial Reef 
off the northern tip of the Queen 
Charlotte Islands. Only two bodies 
were recovered. 

The jury decided Saturday that 
the freighter probably struck the 
reef, opened its portside and 
rolled over within a few minutes. 

The jury said the federal gov¬ 
ernment should station search and 
rescue vessels capable of with¬ 
standing the severe weather con¬ 


ditions off B.C.'s north coast near 
Prince Rupert. 

It also said that all search and 
rescue centres should have call 
signs of vessels arriving and de¬ 
parting B.C. ports. 

A coast guard report released at 
the inquest said it took nearly an 
hour to identify a vague distress 
call as coming from the Taiwan 
ese freighter which radioed its 
call sign but did not provide infor¬ 
mation on its name or position. 

Coroner Hal Murphy said he 
was satisfied with the jury’s.find- 
ings fo accidental death. 


Earlier, Murphy criticized Ca¬ 
nadian marine authorities while 
giving instructions to the jury. 

Murphy said Saturday that 
throughout the inquest lie had 
been struck by a persistant theme 
—- the casual way Canadian offi¬ 
cials dealt with the Lee Wang Zin 
while the freighter was in Cana¬ 
dian waters. 

Murphy criticized Prince Ru¬ 
pert port warden Fred Bullen for 
not inspecting the vessel prior fo 
issuing a certificate to sail after 
55,000 tons of iron ore pellets 


CTV gives Grits 
slimmer margin 

TORONTO (CP) — Conservative strategists 
seized upon conflicting poll results Saturday to insist 
that Monday’s election won’t be a runaway win lor the ‘ 
Liberals. 

The party says its own polls are more in line with 
a CTV poll that says the 

-y$k- 

THE WINTER 
CAMPAIGN 


were loaded aboard the freighter. 

The coroner also said the assis¬ 
tance the B.C. marine pilot gave 
the ship's master in plotting an 
outward course left much to be de¬ 
sired and that the delay in coast 
guard rescue services was unac¬ 
ceptable. 

A coast guard report indicated it 
took almost an hour to identify a 
distress call as coming from the 
Lee Wang Zin. The freighter ra¬ 
dioed its call sign but did not 
provide its name or position. 

A pilotage official had said a 
pilot boat from Prince Rupert 
could have reached the freighter 
about 1% hours after the distress 
call. 

A coast guard helicopter was 
first to arrive at the ship, four 
hours after it radioed for help. 


difference between the 
two parties is less than 
the huge gap shown in the 
latest Gallup poll. 

Conservatives say the Lib¬ 
erals are slipping in key 
B.C., Toronto and other On¬ 
tario ridings while they and 
the NDP are gaining. 

The Gallup, officially re¬ 
leased Saturday, gave the 
Liberals a 20-percentage- 
point lead over the Conser¬ 
vatives in popular support 
and a 10-point lead. Most 
observers say that margin 
on election day would put the 
Liberals back in power with 
a majority. 

But a CTV poll released 
later in the day gave the 
Liberals a 10-point lead na 
tionally and only a one-point 
margin in Ontario with its 
crucial 95 seats. However a 
w hopping 40 per cent of those 
surveyed by the CTV said 
they were still undecided, 
compared to 11 per cent 
in the Gallup. 

Both polls distribute unde¬ 
cided voters in the same pro¬ 
portion as those who have 
made up their minds. The 
Gallup, done Tuesday and 
Wednesday, was based on 
interviews with 2,055 voters. 
The CTV poll involved 1.920 
interviews between Wednes¬ 
day and Friday. 

The Tories, who have 
questioned the validity of 
the Gallup throughout the 
campaign, attacked its re¬ 
sults again in a statement 
released from the party’s 
Toronto headquarters. They 
also released results of their 
private polls, usually 
closely-guarded secrets. 

And in another highly-un- 
usual move, Bill Neville. 
Clark's chief of staff, 
briefed reporters on the 
party’s polls during a bus 
ride to the airport in Mon¬ 
treal. 

He said the Conservatives 
took those steps because 
they feel Gallup has a “bad 
poll" and it could have a 
negative effect on Tory 
party workers who wouldn't 
work hard enough to get 
voters to the polls Monday. 

The Gallup has shown the 
Liberals to be way ahead 
since the campaign started. 
Prime Minister Clark has re¬ 
fused generally to comment 
on polls but in the last week 
has insisted he will win a 
majority government, de¬ 
spite what the polls say. 

The Gallup has been within 
two percentage points of the 
winning party’s popular vote 
in all but two of the last 12 
federal elections. 

But in 1957, after the last 
Gallup gave the Liberals a 
14-point lead in popular sup¬ 
port, John Diefenbakcr’s 
Conservatives won a minor¬ 
ity government by finishing 
only two points behind the 

Page 2—Polls 


• If it isn’t a Liberal 
sweep, B.C. could de¬ 
cide outcome. Page 13 

• Leaders have their 
final say. Page 59 



Helen Denton 

... daily column 

Another 
Chesnut 
in the 
garden 

After M.V. Chesnut’s 
death Dec. 29 many Colo¬ 
nist readers wrote in say- 
ing how much they 
missed his gardening col¬ 
umn. 

Starting today on Page 
27. Chesnut’s daughter 
Helen and her husband 
Patrick Denton will col¬ 
laborate on a daily gar¬ 
dening column for the 
Colonist under the name 
of Helen Chesnut. 

Both active hobby gar¬ 
deners, Helen and Pat¬ 
rick reside in Qualicum 
Beach with their two 
children. 

Helen was for many 
years a high school teach¬ 
er and spent four years 
overseas teaching in Eu¬ 
rope. Patrick is a news¬ 
paperman with extensive 
experience in radio and 
print media. He originat¬ 
ed The Backyard Gar¬ 
dener column now syndi¬ 
cated in 2,000 newspapers 
across North America. 

The Dentons intend to 
carry on the high stan¬ 
dard of informative writ¬ 
ing on gardening enjoyed 
by readers of the late 
M.V. Chesnut. 



























2 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


OFF PAGE ONE/WEATHER 


Andy Capp 



X DON'T SEE THE 
POINT- I'M 
TWICE AS GOOD 

r as vou are 



r \ 

HUH.'-THAT'S' 
ONDY BECAUSE 
YOU HATE -< 
LOSIN' MORE 1 
THAN I DO 1J 


EH-/ 

\ ^ 




Polls conflict lifts Tories 


Soviet * suicide ’ after blunder 


Paputin was 53 when he 
died and was a candidate 
member of the Communist 
party Central Committee 
since 1971. 

The Observer said it 
formed its "new account” of 
activities in Kabul last De¬ 
cember by talking to “in¬ 
formed Russian sources in 
Moscow.” 

After Soviet troops moved 
into Afghanistan at Amin’s 
request, Moscow intended to 
hold new elections “at which 
Babrak Karma! would be 
elected to the leading po¬ 
sition and Amin would be 
demoted to No. 2 or No. 
3,” The Observersaid. 
i “Amin was to remain a 
visible part of the govern¬ 
ment, so (as to) supply fur¬ 
ther legitimization under 
Karmal’s firm control. 


From I'agr I 


(But,) the plan went wrong. 

“When Soviet troops 
began to arrive in Kabul 
at 7 p.m. on Dec. 27 they 
took the radio station, the 
old presidential palace and 
other government buildings. 
One column went to Amin's 
palace and surrounded it. 

"Then, for some reason, 
fighting broke out at the pal¬ 
ace atid Amin was killed," 
the newspaper said. “Al¬ 
though it is not clear how 
Amin died, the new account 
insists that there was no 
'revolutionary tribunal' and 
that he does not seem to have 
died at Soviet hands. 


“The Soviet authorities 
were embarrassed by 
Amin’s untimely 
death . . . (and) the security 
failure which led to Amin’s 
death was blamed on Papu¬ 
tin, who was recalled to Mos¬ 
cow." 

Meanwhile, an Afghan dip¬ 
lomat in Islamabad, Paki¬ 
stan, said Saturday there “is 
absolutely no truth to the 
speculation regarding the re¬ 
moval” of Babrak Karmal 
as president of Afghanis¬ 
tan. 

Unconfirmed reports that 
Karmal had been ousted by 
the Soviet-backed forces 
that installed him in office in 
December began circulating 
last week in Kabul. They 
said Karmal was succeeded 
by Asadulla Sarwari, vice- 
president and deputy pre- 


Hostages release off 
for two more weeks 


United Press International 
Iranian Foreign Minister 
Sadegh Ghotbzadeh said Sat¬ 
urday he did not expect the 
50 American hostages in 
Tehran to be released within 
the next two weeks. * 
Though delicate negotia¬ 
tions were inching forward, 
Ghotbzadeh said the formal 
appointment of a UN com¬ 
mission to look into Iran’s 
grievances—expected Sun¬ 
day—was only the “first 
step” toward resolving the 
crisis. 

In an interview on French 
television that concluded a 
whirlwind series of appear¬ 
ances in Paris, Ghotbzadeh 
said two weeks would be “too 
soon" to expect the hos¬ 
tages to be freed. 

Saturday was the 105th day 
of their captivity. Ghotbza¬ 
deh, who came to Paris to 
meet with French officials, 
said the commission’s ap¬ 
pointment did not necessar¬ 
ily mean Iran would agree to 


free the hostages or that the 
militants actually holding 
the Americans would con¬ 
sent to their release even if 
Iranian authorities did. 

“Nothing is definite yet,” 
Ghotbzadeh told a Paris 
news conference. "The for¬ 
mation of a commission is a 
first step. Things will stay as 
they are until the commis¬ 
sion finishes its work." 

At the United Nations, Sec¬ 
retary-General Kurt Wald¬ 
heim’s office said a five- 
member commission being 
appointed at Iran's request 
was nearly set and that the 
names of its members prob¬ 
ably would be announced of¬ 
ficially on Sunday, after 
which they could leave for 
Tehran. 

Formation of a commis¬ 
sion to investigate the de¬ 
posed shah’s alleged crimes 
was one of the conditions set 
by Iran for the release of the 
hostages, now ending their 


British train derails, 
16 taken to hospital 


LONDON (AP) — An ex¬ 
press train en route to Man- 
chester from London 
derailed Saturday night as it 
picked up speed and five 
cars tumbled across one of 
Britain's busiest rail lines, 
authorities reported. 

Police said no one was 
killed in the accident at Bu- 
shey, 24 kilometres north¬ 
west of London, but eight 
persons had to be freed from 
the wreckage, 16 were taken 
to hospitals and 40 others 
were given first aid for 


shock, cuts and bruises. 
They said the train was car¬ 
rying 170 passengers and 
crew members. 

A spokesman for the state- 
run British Rail network 
said several coaches struck 
an overhead bridgelike 
structure for supporting 
track signals and brought 
down electric cables that 
temporarily stopped all 
trains between Euston ter 
minus outside London and 
northern England. 


The weather 


Feb. 17,1980 

Cloudy with periods of 
rain. Winds moderate east¬ 
erly. Saturday’s precipita¬ 
tion: 2.6 mm. Sunshine 18 
minutes. Recorded high and 
low at Victoria airport 5 and 
0. Today’s forecast high and 
low 5 and 2. Today’s sunrise 
7:19, sunset 5:37. Moonrise 
8:10 a m., moonset 7:44 p.m. 
Monday outlook: periods of 
rain. 


East coast of Vancouver 
Island—Cloudy with periods 
of rain. Winds moderate 
northerly. Saturday’s pre¬ 
cipitation: 3.2mm. Recorded 
high and low at Nanaimo 3 
and 0. Forecast high and low 
5 and 2. Monday outlook: 
periods of rain. 

West coast of Vancouver 
Island—Cloudy with periods 
of rain. Winds moderate 
northeasterly. Forecast high 


fresh to strong northeast¬ 
erly. Forecast high and low 3 
and —4. Monday outlook: 
mostly cloudy with a few 
'flurries. 

Extended outlook, Tues¬ 
day through Thursday — 
Periods of rain. Highs 5 to 8. 
Lows 2 to 4. 


St. John’s 

Halifax 

Fredericton 

Charlottetown 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Thunder Bay 

North Bay 

Kenora 

Winnipeg 

Churchill 

The Pas 

Brandon 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Prince Albert 


READINGS 

Max. 

- 3 - 

- 2 - 
— 6 - 

— 5 - 
-8 - 
-5 - 

— 4 - 
—10 - 
-10 - 
-14 - 


Dawson City 

Whitehorse 

Fort Nelson 

Fort St. John 

Yellowknife 

Inuvik 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Portland 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

Phoenix 

Las Vegas 

New York 

Miami 


0.6 

1.0 

3.0 


—12 

— 9 
-12 
—11 

• —13 

— 9 


Min. Prec. 

-8 - 
- 8 1.0 
—13 
-13 
—13 
—11 
-10 
-23 

—16 — 
-24 0.4 

-14 -22 
-24 — 

—17 — 

-23 - 

Zfr z 


-21 —33 
—15 -30 
—11 -26 
—11 —23 
-14 —23 
— 9 —13 
8 0 
I —9 
8 2 
16 
16 

18 11 
11 7 

4 — 1 
27 16 


1.3 

03 


12 14.4 

14 27.2 


mier Asadulla Sarwari, con¬ 
sidered to be more of a Mos¬ 
cow hardliner than Karmal. 

Karmal is not known to 
have been outside the heavi¬ 
ly guarded People’s Palace 
for more than a week and the 
reports apparently were 
caused by his absence from 
public view. Diplomats liv¬ 
ing nearby also reported 
they had heard bursts of 
automatic weapons fire in¬ 
side the building. 

But the diplomat, a 
spokesman for the Afghan 
embassy in Islamabad who 
asked not to be identified, 
said: “Had there been any 
change, we would have been 
informed of it.” 


15th week of captivity in 
the occupied U.S. embassy. 

Another demand, in the 
words of Iranian President 
Abolhassan Bani-Sadr, was 
for the United States to 
“condemn its own past" in 
Iran and guarantee that it 
will not block Tehran's at¬ 
tempt to extradite the shah 
from Panama to face trial 
“for his crimes and trea¬ 
cheries.” 

Apparently responding to 
the second demand, Presi¬ 
dent Carter said in an inter¬ 
view released Saturday that 
he regreted “misunder¬ 
standings” with Iran but he 
offered no apologies for 
American actions, including 
support of the shah. 

"We obviously regret any 
misunderstandings that 
have existed in the past or 
will exist in the future be¬ 
tween ourselves and Iran or 
any other country," Carter 
told a group of magazine edi¬ 
tors who interviewed him 
on Friday. 

“(But) i don’t think it is 
good at this sensitive mo¬ 
ment to resurrect an analy¬ 
sis of the last 35 years of 
Iran’s history. 

“I will not do anything 
to violate the principles of 
our country. I will not do 
anything to violate our obli¬ 
gations to Iran,” Carter 
added. 

Ghotbzadeh said Iran 
must approve—and the Unit¬ 
ed States must accept—the 
commission’s findings be¬ 
fore Iran would consider 
freeing the hostages. He also 
admitted that the militants 
who seized the hostages to 
demand the shah’s extradi¬ 
tion might not want to settle 
for something less. 


_ 24 

North Battleford —13 —24 — 

“* 43 — 

•19 — 

•18 - 

18 0.8 

•21 - 

•11 1.4 

5 2.8 


Swift Current 

Medicine Hat 

Lethbridge 

Caloarv 

Edmonton 

Cranbrook 

Castlegar 

Penticton 

Revelstoke 


-10 

— 5 
-10 
-13 
-13 

- 6 
- 2 

0 

— 4 


ITime HtiTIme Wt 
|M MFt.lHM Ft. 

Time HtiTIme Ht 
H MFt.lHM Ft. 

17 

0310 

8.010840 

5.8 

1350 

9.512125 

2.2 

18 

01511 

8.310930 

5.3 

1450 

9.012155 

2.9 

19 

0415 

8.711030 

4.9 

1550 

8.4|2235 

3.8 

20 

0500 

9.011130 

4.6 

1710 

7.712305 

4.7 

21 

0535 

9.311240 

4.3 

1820 

7.117340 

5.6 

22 

0625 

9.411350 

4.1 

2005 

6.712355 

6.3 

23 

0/06 

9.411505 

3.8 

2130 

6.81 



TIDES AT FULFORD HARBOUR 


Monday outlook: periods of 

Vancouver 
Prince Rupert 

5 0 

4 — 9 
— 3 —10 

2.4 


ITime HtiTIme Ht 
IH MFt.lHM Ft. 

Time HtiTIme Ht 
H M Ft.lH M Ft. 

, North coast of the Main¬ 

land — Mostly cloudy with a 
few snow flurries. Winds 

Port Hardy 
Toflno 

Comox 

Prince George 
Williams Lake 

4—1 

7 3 

1 - 1 

— 9 —18 

— 8 -14 

3.2 

4.1 

2.2 

0.4 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

0645 11.011240 6.3 
0020 3.410715 11.1 
0100 4.610750 11.2 
0155 5.910830 11.1 
0255 7 1j091Q11.0 
0400 8.210950 10.6 

1700 10.1 
1810 9.8 
1330 5.6 
1425 4.9 
1525 4.3 
1625 3.9 

2340 2.3 

1915 9.4 
2040 9.1 
2200 8.9 
2350 9.1 


0—6 

1.4 

23 

1730 3.6 



Liberals in popular support. 

National campaign chair- 
man Paul Curley said in the 
Toronto statement that “the 
trends noted in our most re¬ 
cent tracking data run oppo¬ 
site to findings published 
by Gallup.” 

Curley said the party’s 
pollsters, Decfma Research 
Ltd. of Toronto, have con¬ 
ducted daily polling in B.C., 
Toronto and the rest of On¬ 
tario. Those are considered 
key areas because Quebec is 
conceded to the Liberals and 
most Prairie seats will go to 
the Tories. 

“In the 12 sub-geographic 
areas we investigate, our 
data reveal a marked de¬ 
terioration of Liberal sup¬ 
port in every area but one , 
over the last two weeks,” he 
said. 

“The data also reveal a 
significant increase of P.C. 
support in nine areas, an 
increase of NDP support in 
five of the areas and an in¬ 
crease in the undecided rate 
in three of the areas includ¬ 
ing southwest Ontario and 
the east end of Toronto.” 

He said the party’s last 
national survey between 
Jan. 29 and Feb. 2 gen¬ 
erally agreed with other 


From l*ag<> I 


published polls, but party 
polls since then have shown 
the Liberals have lost seven 
points in Toronto, six in the 
rest of Ontario and seven in 
B.C. 

Neville told reporters that 
party polls show the Liberals 
one point ahead in Toronto 
but have the Conservatives 
two points ahead in the rest 
of Ontario and eight points 
ahead of the NDP and 20 


ahead of the Liberals in B.C. 

He said Decima, headed 
by Tory polling guru Allan 
Gregg, talks to 250 voters a 
day and that the figures he 
gave were based on samples 
of about 2,500 people. 

In the statement, Gregg 
elaborated on certain as¬ 
pects of polling which, if 
misunderstood, result in 
misinterpretation. He pre¬ 
dicted that if certain factors 
work as they have in the 
past, "the results are going 
to be an awful lot more 


competitive than any super¬ 
ficial analysis of the polls 
would indicate.” 

With undecideds distribut¬ 
ed, the CTV poll gave the 
Liberals 43 per cent of popu¬ 
lar support, the Conserva¬ 
tives 33 and the New Demo- 
crats 22. Without 
undecideds, the Liberals got 
26.1, the Tories 20 and the 
NDP 13. 

• The Gallup, including un¬ 
decided voters, gave the Lib¬ 
erals 48, the Conservatives 
28 and the NDP 23. 


TIDES FOR MONTH OF 
FEBRUARY 
TIDES AT VICTORIA 

(Tides listed are 
Pacific standard Time! 

Time HtlTIme HtITIme HtiTIme HI 

IH MFt.lH M Ft.lH MFt. l HM FI. 

17 0420 8.010920 6.411455 8.812155 2.1 

18 0450 8.311015 5.711545 8.212235 2.8 

19 0525 8.511125 5.II164S 7.612320 3.0 

20 0555 8.7|1215 4.511800 6.9| 

21 0000 4.9|»40 8.811325 4.012000 6.5 

22 0050 5.910705 8.811445 3.612330 6.9 

23 0140 6.710800 0.711400 3.21 

TIDES AT SOOKE 




Grassies ring and 
jewelleiy repair event. 

SALE EXTENDED 
...UPTO 50% OFF. 

Response has been so fantastic to this event that we are 
extending the sale with savings of up to 50%. 

THIS OFFER GOOD THROUGH ALL OF OUR GRASSIES STORES! 

RING SIZING 

Men's & Ladies. 

Smaller: 

(10K, 14K, 18K) 

Now $87.95 


Regular price: 
$12.00- $15.00 

Now $9.50 

Larger: (10K, 14K) 
Regular price: ' 
$22.00-$26.50 

Now $15.95 

Larger: (18K) 
Regular price: 

■v $39.60-$47.40 

Now $24.95 


HALF SHANKS 

Men's & Ladies 10K 
Regular price: 

$110-$150 


Men's & Ladies 14K 
Regular price: 
$154-$210 

Now $121.95 

Ladies only Platinum 
Regular price: $220.00 

Now $165.00 


DIAMOND 

RE-TIPPING 

Regularly priced to 
$25.00 per claw 

Our price 
per claw 

$8.50 

regardless of number 

Chargex 
Master Charge 
American Express 
and Grassie's Credit 
Account Welcome 



Since 1886 \ 


MAYFAIR SHOPPING CENTRE, 385-2744 1209 OOUCIAS ST., 385-1911 

• 566 SEYMOUR • 4517 W 1016 • PACIFIC CtNTRt • PARK ROYAL • BRtNTWOOD • 
LANDSDOWNE # GUILDFORD • COQUITLAM CTR • COTTONWOOD CTR • NANAIMO • 
PORT HARDY • KAMLOOPS • VERNON • KELOWNA • RLVELSTOKE • PARKSVllLl • 


(GF/1X 1070 ) 

ELECTION 

SaECTION 

Expert analysis. Instant results. 



Hon. Rate Mair 
Barb McLintock 


Victoria Times 


Ian Jessop 

C-FAX News Team 

Terry Spence 


C-FAX News Director 

C-FAX Federal Election Results live from 
8 p.m., Monday night — 

Tune to 1070 Right at 8 p.m. for Election 
Results from Eastern Canada as many of 
the M.P.’s will already have been 
elected. 

The largest News Team in Victoria will 
keep you informed as to the Local Results, 
and our Network Reporter Team will keep 
you informed on Provincial Results . . •. 
LISTEN! 


Presented By: 

The Victoria Real Estate Board 
Blaney’s Travel Service Ltd. 

The Arrangers 


■ Terry Spence 

(C-F/IX1070) 

The Victoria Airforce. 




i 














































































WORLD 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 3 







770 Vernon Avenue, Victoria.* British Columbia 
VHX 2W7 - ((>04) itih-224 1 


NOTICE OF 
MEETINGS 


AND SELECTION OF ITEMS 

FOR THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 18, 1980 
TUESDAY, February 19, 1980, 7:30 p.m. 

Northridge Elementary School,' 
4190 Carey Road. 

COUNCIL MEETING 

There Will Be A Break To Recognize 
, Heritage Day At 9:00 p.m. 

- ’Not* special location 

Forturther details please contact the 
Office of the Municipal Clerk 


'ANTIQUE 
AUCTION 

|Tues., Feb. 19| 
7 P.M. 


For Details 
See Our 
Display Ad 
At the End of 
Classifieds 


AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS' 
926 Foil SI. 386-3308 


District of Saanich 


. . 1 

The Corporation 

of the 


388-7021 


WIN! 

A 

STEAK DINNER 
FOR TWO 

WRITE A 
BETTER 
CAPTION 
CONTEST! 

"Are you sure this is what the boss meant when he said, 

Round up all the mustangs?” 

MY CAPTION:_ 


ADDRESS:. 


PHONE:. 


FILL IN AND 
DEPOSIT AT 


den I 


rora 


1060 YATES AT COOK 
384-1144 

CALL COLLECT, VICTORIA 


Henry, 

finally 

Twenty years after they 
met at a party in Paris, 
Maria Cristina Vettore Aus¬ 
tin Ford is being sued for 
divorce by Henry Ford II, 
retired chief executive offi¬ 
cer of Ford Motor Co. The di¬ 
vorce trial is to open Tues¬ 
day in Detroits’ Wayne 
County Circuit Court. The 
divorce was initiated by 
Ford on Jan. 23, 1978, after 
his wife's December, 1977, 
separation suit. Ford, now 
62, and his wife, now 49, were 
married in 1965. Two days 
before Christmas 10 years 
later, he moved out of their 
Grosse Pointe, Mich., hopie. 

A persuasive bakery shop 
manager in Birmingham, 
Ala., persuaded a would-be 
robber to take her personal 
cheque instead of the store's 
money Aletha Crowe told 
police she then cashed it 
from the cash register. 
When police arrived, she 
handed over the cheque, 
payable to Bruce Pearson 
Police are still looking for 
him. 


Maria Ford 
call it quits 


No-light cigarette vapor 
may help stop smoking 


By PATRICIA McCORMACK 

NEW YORK (UPI) — A new experi¬ 
mental cigarette that never needs lighting 
andfills the lungs with nicotine vapor when 
inhaled is helping people to stop smoking, a 
doctors’ publication reports. 

The article in Medical World News also 
reported that a nicotine-spiked gum, a 
prescription item in Canada, will be avail¬ 
able the same way in England in April. The 
gum, “Nicorette,” an over-the-counter 
item in Switzerland, is not avilabie in the 
United States. 

Flavored with spice to mask some of the 
nicotine taste, the gum goes for about the 
same as a pack of cigarettes. 

Details of the cigarette that nevers need 
lighting was discussed by Dr. Norman 
Jacobson, a San Antonio internist, in a 
telephone interview. 


Jacobson said he and his brothel* 
Avram, a pathologist, have been involved 
in field-testing early models of the non¬ 
combustible cigarette for two years on a 
small scale. 

He said a patent has been applied for 
the cigarette, and “we feel it will be 
approved soon." 

“This does not represent a safe ciga¬ 
rette,” he said, "because we know nothing 
of the side effects of nicotine alone.” 

Jacobson said persons trying the fake 
cigarette have found it “very simple, very 
effective and satisfying.” 

Medical World News said each ciga¬ 
rette delivers about half the nicotine of a 
puff from a conventional one. Jacobson 
was reluctant to reveal details of the ciga¬ 
rette's makeup but he said one fake ciga¬ 
rette can be used all day. 


Different slopes 
for different folks! 

Jackson Hole, Aspen, 

Sundance, Vail, Sun Valley, 
Timberline, Squaw, Crystal, 
Snowbird and more and more 
and MORE! 

From Tahoe to Taos 
from Washington to Wyoming, 
our western U.S. has it all 
—the snow, the space 
the superfun—world-class 
skiing within easy reach 
and very affordable. 


_night. "I am immensely 
happy to be free,” he said. "I 
wiil restart working in a few 
months and at last will be 
able to play for my public 
again.” Estrella was arrest¬ 
ed in December, 1977, and 
charged with sheltering sev¬ 
eral friends accused of being 
members of an Argentine 
guerrilla group. 


7 killed 
in snow 
air crash 

BILLERICA,'Mass. (UPI) 
— A British-owned, cargo 
plane caught fire in a driving 
snowstorm Saturday, nar¬ 
rowly missed several homes, 
then crashed and exploded in 
a wooded area about 20 miles 
north of Boston. Seven peo¬ 
ple were killed. 

Eyewitnesses said the 
plane, a Red Coat Air Cargo 
four-engine turbo-prop, was 
“a fireball" as it plunged to 
earth. The crash rattled win¬ 
dows of nearby homes, 
torched snow-covered trees 
and scattered wreckage over 
an area 30 yards wide and 400 
yards long. 

The only survivor was 
identified as Richard Creer, 
a British citizen who lives in 
the United States. He was in 
critical condition at St. 
John’s Hospital^ in Lowell, 
Mass., with head injuries 
and severe burns. 

One victim was not found 
until 7:50 p.m., more than 
five hours after the crash. 
Authorities said he was 
wedged beneath the fuselage 
wreckage. 


How to choose 
what's best for you? 

At INFOROAD U.S.A. you 
can get brochures and maps 
to help you plan your - 
U.S. skiing holiday and 
match a mountain to 
your mood, 

a. resort to your resources, 
a slope to your style. 

Just phone InfoRoad U.S.A. 
or drop a line. 

We'll send you 
the low down 
on all our high spots. 

INFOROAD USA 

Phone toll-free 


or write: 

InfoRoad, 1199 West Hastings Street 
Vancouver, B.C., V*E 2Y4 


Miss Piggy looks a bit 
strange by dog standards, 
but puppy love can be blind. 

When a litter of pigs was 
born on the Broken Arrow, 
Okla., farm of Freddy and 
Sandra Herd a few days ago, 
Miss Piggy was the runt. 
Merf, a motherly Dasehund 
whose pups had just been 
weaned, got interested. The 
piglet is fed from a rubber 
glove and will be returned to 
the brood before long. 


hello girl 

Neil Simon’s daughter, Ellen, sits beside her husband, 
John Leland of Los Angeles, during mass-marriage 
ceremony at Swami Muktananda’s winter headquar¬ 
ters on Miami Beach when Muktananda married 11 
couples. Actress Marsha Mason, Ellen’s step-mother, 
was among those present. 


1 

w 

Ford 

.. .separation suit 


Argentine pianist Miguel 
Angel Estrella, imprisoned 
for more than two years in 
Uruguay on charges of sub¬ 
versive activity, arrived in 
exile in Paris Saturday 


Sidney Super Foods 

Prices effective Feb. 17-19 

Store Hours: Daily 8:30 to 6:00 
Thurs., Fri. 8:30 to 9:00, Sun. 10-5:30 
in Sidney's "Downtown"—Across from Sidney Hotel 

Seen Serving fhe Peninsula for 15 years 


CANADA GRADE "A" BEEF 

RIB 

STEAKS 

*2 

139 

FROZEN HEAVY 

PORK SIDE 
SPARE RIBS 

J9* 

SCHNEIDER 

OLD FASHIONED 
BONELESS HAM 

.2 

199 

SWIFT EMPIRE 

SIDE 

BACON . i.ib.pkg. 

2*1 

149 

OLYMPIC BRAND 

BOLOGNA 

. IS-oz. l 

109 

OLYMPIC 

CHICKEN 

LOAF . 


129 

ROASTING 

CHICKEN 

88* 

ROYALE 

TOILET TISSUE 

4-ply 4 roll pack . 

99* 

PEEK FREAN 

4 

|19 

DIGESTIVE BISCUITS 

14-oz. pk. 

1 

SQUIRREL 


[29 

PEANUT BUTTER i 

1-5kg. % 

ALPHA * 

CREAMED HONEY 1 

2-lb. tub . 

188 

CALIFORNIA 

LETTUCE 

each . 

39* 


Prisoners freed 
in El Salvador 


SAN SALVADOR, El Sal¬ 
vador (UPI) — Authorities 
Saturday bowed to the de¬ 
mands of leftists holding the 
Spanish Embassy arid re¬ 
leased 17 jailed militants, 
but the leftists vowed to con¬ 
tinue the occupation until six 
others are freed. 

A spokesman for the leftist 
Feb. 28 Popular Leagues, 
speaking by telephone from 
the embassy, said militants 
would occupy the mission 


where they hold two Spanish 
diplomats hostage until their 
six other “comrades” were 
released. 

“We defined our position 
last Tuesday — that we 
would leave the embassy in 
return for release of the 23, 
but not all have been re¬ 
leased," he said. 

The latest development in 
the 13-day-old embassy take¬ 
over apparently ended hopes 
for an early end to the or¬ 
deal. 


Np progress was reported 
in the release of about 455 
other hostages held by vari¬ 
ous left wing groups in the 
strife-torn Central Ameri¬ 
can nation of 4.8 million peo¬ 
ple. 

Some 30 Leagues mem¬ 
bers seized the embassy 
Feb. 4 to protest a raid by 
troops to free 13 hostages 
held by leftists at the San 
Salvador Christian Demo¬ 
cratic Party headquarters. 
The Leagues claimed five 
leftists were killed in that 
raid, but Red Cross officials 
reported four dead. 

The various hostage crises 
confronted the ruling civil¬ 
ian-military junta with one 
of the stiffest challenges 
since right-wing President 
Carlos Humberto Romero 
was ousted in a bloodless 
coup Oct. 15. 

Members of the leftist 
Popular Revolutionary Bloc, 
some carrying fire bombs, 
Friday invaded the Foreign 
Trade Institute and are hold¬ 
ing 60 hostages. 


Attack on Gaza Strip 
kills three , hurts 10 

GAZA CITY (AP) — A grenade attack and bomb in the 
Israeli-occupied Gaza Strip killed three persons and wound¬ 
ed 10, Israel’s military command reported. It imposed a 
curfew on Gaza City. 

It was the second time in less than three weeks that Arab 
guerrillas attacked Israelis. 

Shortly before noon, a terrorist tossed a hand grenade 
into an Israeli military pickup truck in downtown Gaza, 
killing two civilian passengers, including a 21-year-old 
Israeli woman, and wounding pn Israeli soldier Four Arab 
passersby were wounded and one died in hospital. 


A 


m 
































































/ 



£Ik Juntos Colonist 


1858 


Published every morning except Monday bv 
The Colonist Publishers at 2621 Douglas 
Street, Victoria, B.C., V8W 2N4, a division of 
F P. Newspapers Ltd. Second class mall 
registration number 0516. All undelivered 
copies or any notices respecting chanoes of 
address are to be sent to the above address 
Member Audit Bureauof Circulation 

RICHARD BOWER 
PUBLISHER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 


1980 


DON VIPOND 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 


FRED BARNES 
MANAGING EDITOR 


COMMENT/ BACKGROUND 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 


r 


This trip 
is necessary 

The struggle for power which ends Mon¬ 
day seems to have generated more frustra¬ 
tion, irritation and outright hostility among 
Canadians than any recent political contest. 

Who is satisfied with the way this cam¬ 
paign went? What we are left with on the eve 
of the election are many voters firmly com¬ 
mitted to one political view or another — some 
voters confused and undecided and some who 
couldn’t care less and probably won’t vote. 

That may not be soul satisfying, but it is 
inevitable. The raucous, insulting, sometimes 
misleading, frequently simplistic, usually 
one-sided, occasionally informative style of 
our political campaigning is still preferable to 
the single-party ballot or no choice at all. 
Those are the other options. 

Part of our frustration comes from the 
nature of the issues. The simple truth is that 
no one — no one— can be certain of the best 
way to tackle mammoth questions like energy 
development, government intervention, fi¬ 
nancial management and national unity. We 
still long for neat answers to complex ques¬ 
tions. There are none. 

In the campaign acrimony it is easy to 
lose sight of the basic exercise Canadians 
undertake to-morrow. Democracy, that cum¬ 
bersome, much-maligned process which 
leaves the choice of government to all of us, is 
creaking into action onge more. The process 
began in December when a majority of the 
representatives we sent to Parliament decid¬ 
ed it was time. A government was defeated. It 
is up to us to choose another. We may consider 
it an expensive, tedious, annoying election. 
But it is not an unnecessary election. 


Something else 

Monday is special. No, no, not for that 
reason. Tomorrow, the third Monday in Feb¬ 
ruary, is National Heritage Day. 

“Heritage Day isn’t yet a holday,” says 
Pierre Berton, “but it’s an important day and 
we ought to remember, as we trot off to cast 
our vote, that this country has a past, that the 
living reminders of that past are all around 
us, that once lost they can never be regained, 
and that this richness of heritage can, in the 
future pay big dividends, economically as 
well as aesthetically.” 

Mr. Berton is the elequent chairman of 
the board of the Heritage Canada Founda¬ 
tion. 

“We’re in the continuity business,” he 
says. “We believe that if you lose all physical 
reminders of the past, you have a rootless 
country. You also have terribly dull cities.” 

Mr. Berton says the pragmatic argument 
for a community sense of heritage is that the 
most successful cities, from a living as well as 
from an economic (tourist) point of view, are 
those that are redolent of other times — New 
Orleans, Quebec City, San Francisco, Rome, 
Paris, London, Amsterdam. 

Has Victoria earned some small place 
on that list? Here’s a simple experiment. 
Consider the places you find most attractive 
around town, the places you take visitors 
when you’re showing off your community. 
How many owe some of their distinction to 
history? 


SCOOPS 


by Doug Snejrd 


poycomw the Moscow ouwks 

WILL CAUSE SEVERS FINANCIAL 
HARDSHIPS FOR THE AlULflft 

t 




PO Poll KNOW HOW MUCH 
A qoiP MEDAL IS WORTH 
IN WLLION? 



Points to ponder before polling day 


OTTAWA — At least four cogent 
reasons would dictate to a reasonable, 
serious Canadian voter some hard- 
headed, unemotional caution before he 
easts a vote on Monday and each of 
them suggests that he should make a 
careful decision, refuse easy ways out 
and go to the polls. 

* These reasons seem to me to be: 

Ci The nation faces not many but a 
few very serious problems and there is 
a choice to be made whether they can 
be dealt with through easy, painless 
ways or whether future health de¬ 
mands a tougher approach, a willing¬ 
ness to bite the bullet now for the 
sake of a less difficult and more as¬ 
sured future: 

□ One of the leading parties, the 
Liberals, has been exceptionally 
vague about the approaches it will 
.adopt if, as the front runner, it secures 
power again as the result of Monday's 
voting; 

□ A view that the Liberal party is 
one of the great Canadian political 
institutions, has contributed much in 
the. past to the national welfare but 
which, after long years in office, very 
badly needs a period during which it 
can revitalize itself and produce the 
political approaches that the difficult 
1980s and unknown 1990s will need; 

□ Another view, that our govern- 
CCtmental affairs would be greatly im¬ 
proved if we could bring ourselves 
to the weaning point from the Liberals 
and accept thc\alternative that fairly 
frequent — say every eight to 12 years 


W.A. Wilson 

FP News Service 


— rotation of power would be healthy 
for the community. 

To take these viewpoints in turn, 
the few but serious problems of the 
nation are very well known and no 
voter can honestly pretend that he is 
unaware of them, whether he pays 
further attention or not. The great 
problems are these: 

OA state of national financing that 
adds automatically to the cost of gov¬ 
ernment without any new services, 
that severely restricts the freedom of 
choice of any finance minister and 
that seriously contributes to interna¬ 
tional doubts about the fiscal health of 
this nation; 

OA failure over several years to 
pay our way in the world, despite our 
great resources, to a degree that 
leaves the Canadian currency vulner¬ 
able in ways that both threaten the 
general economy and can very, very 
easily have a seriously adverse effect 
on the cost of living; 

OA crude oil supply problem that, 
as matters now stand, will grow more 
and more costly and which has not 
been tackled with sufficient resolu¬ 
tion, at any point since OPEC quadru¬ 
pled crude prices in 1973-74, to ease 
materially the problems Vie now face 
through the first two-thirds of the 



Holland Avenue pastorale 


Jack Ralph 


A visionary’s blueprint 
for fighting pollution menace 


Hardly a day goes by with¬ 
out a new story about toxic 
exposures, radiation leak¬ 
age, poisoned land and poi¬ 
soned people. Like thou¬ 
sands of sleeping monsters, 
toxic-waste dumping 
grounds are now awakening 
to horrify entire communi¬ 
ties throughout the country. 

In the Los Angeles area, 
the problem has taken a dis¬ 
turbing twist. Whereas the 
source of soil- and water- 
contaminants is usually 
easily traced, health offi¬ 
cials are apparently mysti¬ 
fied about the source of 
trichloroethylene (TCE), a 
suspected cancer-causing 
chemical that has been de¬ 
tected in San Gabriel Valley 
area water supplies. 

Our alarm over these re¬ 
ports is added to by a sense 
of frustration and perhaps 
even guilt as we begin to 
realize that toxic-waste con¬ 
tamination could have been 
avoided. 

For decades our toxic- 
waste disposal practices 
have been so primitive and 
so careless that they defy 
belief. Tons of poorly pack¬ 
aged toxic, even lethal, com¬ 
pounds have been trucked to 
disposal sites, dumped, and 
then buried in the naive be¬ 
lief that for chemicals — as 
with human beings — burial 
and death are synonymous. 

What these foolish prac¬ 
tices have led to is the crea¬ 
tion of thousands of under 
ground, uncontrolled 
chemical factories, produc¬ 
ing unimagined and unin¬ 
tended reactions of the most 
insidious nature. Instead of 
lying harmless, in a matter 
of months or years toxic 
agents reach into the sur¬ 
rounding soil and the under¬ 
ground and above-ground 
water supply and then pol¬ 
lute the air, too. 

When nearby communities 
find their drinking water and 
their soil poisoned and their 
animals ill or dying, justifi¬ 
able despair, even panic, 
emerges. In time, hapless 


Larry Agran 

Los Angeles Times 


citizens learn a new chemi¬ 
cal vocabulary: phenols, 
dioxin, benzene, chloroform, 
carbon ^tetrachloride. And, 
of course, they learn of the 
effects upon themselves and 
their children: damage to the 
liver and pancreas, central 
nervous system disorders, 
diminished intelligence, ge¬ 
netic damage, stillbirths, 
miscarriages and increased 
incidence of cancer. 

Belatedly, there is the 
recognition that our toxic- 
waste disposal policies have 
been a monument to idiocy. 
And, belatedly, there is the 
realization that there must 
be a plan — probably a na¬ 
tional plan — to protect the 
public’s health. But what 
kind of plan? So far, atten¬ 
tion has focused on ways of 
policing thousands of dump 
sites and millions of indust¬ 
rial establishments — per¬ 
haps a hopelessly difficult 
regulatory challenge. 

Now meet Dr. Pietro Ca- 
purro, an environmental pa¬ 
thologist with profound ex¬ 
perience and with a good 
idea to boot. Writing in the 
highly respected journal. 
Clinical Toxicology, he 
states: 

"It does not make sense to 
scatter industrial plants at 
random, each producing 
around itself a zone where it 
is unhealthy to live. Rather. I 
propose that industrial 
plants be concentrated in 
groups . . . Equipment for 
detoxification should be pro¬ 
vided to serve all the plants 
in the group more economic¬ 
ally than if each plant were 
required to provide its own, 
or to transport its toxic prod¬ 
ucts to some remote dump¬ 
ing ground. Surrounding 
each group of industrial 
plants, I would have a buffer 
zone of water or forested 
area. Beyond the buffer 
zones would come farms, 


1980s — there was much that could 
have been done that was left undone; 

There are many reasons why the 
. present state of national financing is 
unsatisfactory but one of the most 
pressing is simply the rapidly increas¬ 
ing cost to the taxpayer of running 
such large deficits year after year. 
Paying more and more interest each 
year is never rewarding unless the 
borrowed money is being used to fi¬ 
nance productive enterprises that off¬ 
set the cost and this clearly is not our 
situation. Even though much of the 
deficit is financed simply by printing 
more money — the process is that the 
Bank of Canada buys government 
bonds and issues new money in return 
— there is, year by year, a very large 
balance that is genuinely financed 
with taxpayers’ money used to pay the 
interest. 

The value of the dollar is important 
because, somewhat below that of the 
U.S., it gives Canadian exporters a 
useful edge at the price of increasing 
the cost of living. There is an obvious 
trade-off — how much to do we want 
the price of food to rise to give indust¬ 
rialists a competitive advantage? The 
fact that we do not, despite our inher¬ 
ent wealth, pay our way in the world, 
makes the dollar very vulnerable. 


There are practical things to be done 
about tiffs problem but no party — not 
the Liberals, Tories nor New Demo¬ 
crats — has truly addressed itself to 
the problems. 

Our imports of crude oil, and the 
price wc pay for it, will rise steadily 
during the next few years and so will 
the nation’s vulnerability to erratic 
supplies. Since the alarming OPEC 
action seven years ago, there has 
been an increase in exploration, 
helped by tax concessions introduced 
by the Liberal government, but there 
has been only one real approach — 
syncrude — to developing unconven¬ 
tional oil sources where there could 
well have been several. The record is 
not good because more could have 
been done to leave us less vulnerable 
than we will be. Parties should be 
judged by the determination, practi¬ 
cality and preeisenbss of the state¬ 
ments wc have been offered during the 
last two months. 

Finally, the proposition that we. in 
a democratic system, would be well- 
advised to rotate power between par¬ 
ties. The problem of revitalizing politi¬ 
cal parties is part of it. The advan¬ 
tages of having an alternative 
available when we become dissatisfied 
with those who have held power seems 
obvious and is another part of it. But 
more is involved than that. Long con¬ 
trol of .power does things to men and 
the course of wisdom is to sec that it 
does not do them or us too much 
harm. 


Boycott: UK athletes unable 
to see the moral problem 



commercial centres and 
residential areas. Workers 
would be moved in and out of 
the industrial area by public 
transportation.” 

The ramblings of a vision¬ 
ary? Or, rather, might it be 
the general outline of a long- 
range national plan for in¬ 
dustrial reorganization? 

Capurro writes not as a 
remote theorist, but as a 
practising pathologist who 
single-handedly documented 
an extraordinary case of an 
industrial plant responsible 
for the toxic pollution of a 
small Maryland community 
called Little Elk Valley. Uti¬ 
lizing a gas chromatograph 
and a mass spectromewr, he 
traced the dumping of ben¬ 
zene, carbon tetrachloride, 
trichloroethylene and other 
toxic and cancer-causing 
chemicals from the plant it¬ 
self to the local air and water 
and soil. 

Then, relying upon nuclear 
medicine and other sophisti¬ 
cated diagnostic techniques, 
Capurro confirmed the exis¬ 
tence of high levels of these 
same agents in the biological 
systems and organs of ex¬ 
posed residents who were 
* suffering from depression, 
memory' loss, fatigue and di¬ 
minished intelligence. Fin¬ 
ally, among those exposed 
over a period of more than 
five years, he noted a dra¬ 
matic increase in cancers of 
the pancreas and the lym¬ 
phatic system. 

“Naturally,” he writes, 
“we cannot achieve such an 
arrangement at once. For 
example, it will require 
states to yield some of their 
jealously guarded so¬ 
vereignty. However, if we 
agree that the plan is logical 
. . . then the sooner we recog¬ 
nize the goal and begin work¬ 
ing toward it, the better be¬ 
come the survival prospects 
of our grandchildren and 
their grandchildren.” 

Larry Agran, an attorney and a mem¬ 
ber of the Irvine, Calif., city council, I* 
the author of The Cancer Connection, 
a book about national environmental 
cancer policies. 


LONDON — The response 
of British athletes and the 
British 
Olympic 
Committee 
to the sug¬ 
gestion that 
they should 
not go to 
Moscow has 
been, as 
most com¬ 
mentators in 
Britain 
seem to 
agree, deplorable. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher immediately 
joined President Carter in 
his call fora boycott, and she 
was generally supported by 
Parliament and the press. 
Ex-Prime Minister Edward 
Heath dissented, arguing 
that it was a futile gesture 
which would not get the Rus¬ 
sians out of Afghanistan. But 
he appears less preoccupied 
with sport (although he is 
himself a distinguished in¬ 
ternational yachtsman) than 
with undying resentment at 
the way Mrs. Thatcher oust¬ 
ed him from the leadership 
of the Conservative Party. 
He loses no opportunity to 
dissociate himself from her. 

The athletes, on the other 
hand, and the sporting es¬ 
tablishment took a simpler 
line. They wanted to exhibit 
their prowess in Moscow. 
Those who were interviewed 
on television or in the news¬ 
papers tended to blame “the 
politicians” indiscriminate¬ 
ly for threatening to ruin the 
Games and make “youth” 
suffer. 

“Keep politics out of 
sport,” they said again and 
again. When it was suggest¬ 
ed to them, and especially to 
members of the Olympic 
Committee, that they had al¬ 
ready accepted a blatantly 
political condition by agree¬ 
ing to the exclusion of South 
Africa, they fell back on the 
argument that not to exclude 
South Africa would also 
threaten the Games, be¬ 
cause some other countries 
might then withdraw. 

That the Games should go 
on was, they made quite 
clear, the only thing they 
really cared about. 

They must know, of 
course, if they allow them¬ 
selves to think about it, that 
the modern Olympic Games, 
with national teams, nation¬ 
al anthems, national flags 
and government subsidies, 
are intensely political. In¬ 
deed, several of them cut the 
ground from beneath their 
own argument by saying that 
they wanted the chance “to 
represent their country’’ in 
Moscow. 

The Russians, in a little 
book just published by the 
Soviet Communist party for 
the guidance of party activ¬ 
ists, have been explicit. The 
choice of Moscow as the 
site of the 1980 Olympic 
Games, it says, represents 
an “ideological victory for 
socialism over decadent 
capitalism” and is "convinc¬ 
ing evidence of the correct¬ 
ness of the foreign policy 
course of our party. ’’ 

The anxiety of the athletes 
that their years of training 
should not be wasted is per¬ 
fectly natural. What’s lam¬ 
entable is that they should be 


Anthony Lejeune 

too self-absorbed to recogr 
nize any moral problem at 
all. 

In a sense, they — and Ted 
Heath — are quite right in 
dismissing the particular 
issues of Afghanistan and 
the exiling of Sakharov as 
irrelevant. The moral dilem¬ 
ma was created by the 
choice of Moscow as a venue 
for the Games. 

The nub of the argument 
against participating is that 
one ought not to attend a 
party in the house of some¬ 


body who is abusing and 
menacing and wrongfully 
imprisoning and even killing 
one's friends and neighbors 
To go is to condone, person 
ally, what one’s host is doing 
That’s not politics: it’s a nor 
mal principle of behavior. 

A foreign correspondent 
writing to the London Time s. 
recalled a conversation with 
Hitler’s close associate, At 
bert Speer, who told him how 
pleased the Fuhrer has been 
by the Olympic Games in 
Berlin. According to Speer, 
Hitler kept saying exultant¬ 
ly: “They all came! They all 
came!” 


c 


Today in History 


1 


The last local resistance to 
Louis Riel’s Metis govern¬ 
ment of Manitoba ended 110 
years ago today — in 1870 — 
when Maj. Charles Boulton 
and his force of 47 men were 
captured. 

At the time, the Hudson's 
Bay Company's sovereignty 
had expired and negotiations 
for union with Canada were 
not complete. 

1621 — Miles Standish was 
put in charge of the Pil¬ 
grims’ militia at Plymouth, 
Mass. 


1908 — The king and crown 
prince of Portugal were as¬ 
sassinated. 

1933 — The League of Na¬ 
tions condemned the Japa¬ 
nese occupation of Man¬ 
churia. 

1954 — Britain announced 
that food rationing instituted 
during the Second World 
War was to end. 

1965 — Prime Minister 
Pearson announced that old- 
age pensions would be made 
payable at age 65 instead of 
70. 


c 


Erma Bombeck 



Women have known for years that they are the 
financial giants of their country. 

They regulate the economy, control the purchasing 
power, and establish guidelines for spending. 

You want to know how we 
know it? Because someone told 
us. 

If I seem underwhelmed about 
the distinction, it’s because I just 
broke my own record for cashing 
the smallest check ever record¬ 
ed in the Guinness Book of Rec¬ 
ords . . . seven cents. This mar¬ 
vel occurred at one of those self- 
service gas stations. In trying to 
force a leaded nozzle into an 
unleaded gas tank, I inadver¬ 
tently spilled a little gasoline on my shoe. 

Realizing my error, I quickly changed to the unleaded 
nozzle and got exactly what 1 had cash for . . . $6.32. 
Wheh I went to pay the girl behind the glass she said, 
“You owe seven cents on pump No. 34.” 

I said, “1 didn’t put that gas in my car.” 

She looked up tiredly and asked, “What did you do 
witji it?” 

"I poured it on my foot." 

"Why would you do that?” 

"I meant to pour the unleaded." 

"On your foot?" 

“In the car.” 

“That’ll be seven cents." 

I whipped out my charge card. 

“You want to charge seven cents?" 

“Of course not,” I snapped. "I also want to get a 
windshield wiper, a whoopie cushion for the front seat, 
and a traffic light dog that lights up for my rear view 
window when I hit the brakes.” 

“We only sell gas. Besides, we don’t take credit cards. 
That'll be seven cents cash.” 

"I have tons of money at home,” I said. 

She looked at me and I realized I was not exactly 
dressed for success. “Then I’ll write you a checque,” I 
said. 

Seconds later, I ripped it out of the chequebook, gave 
it to her (with two I.D.s) and she said, “Aren’t you going 
to record it?" 

My checks burned with humiliation as I jotted it down 
and said, “Did you know that women control 85 per cent 
of the nation’s wealth and that if we ever quit buying, 
this nation wpqld come to its knees by noon?” 

She snapped her gum. “It must be lonely at the 
top.” — 

<c) Field Enterprises, I Ac. 



























&unbug Colonist 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Page 5/February 17, 1980 


Steelhead ban 

decision 
nets disgust 


I haw M in the following 
letter to B.C. Environment 
Minister Stephen Rogers:. 

I have been an ardent and 
fairly successful steelhead 
fisherman for some lit) years. 
During this time I have be 
coming very knowledgeable 
of certain rivers and 
streams on Vancouver Is¬ 
land The decision to make 
all rivers on Vanconvtsr ls- 
land catch and release only 
for wild steelhead from Feb. 
7 to March :tl was met by me 
with much sadness and dis- 
gust. 

Certainly, the steelhead 
runs have declined over the 
years. Poor logging and 
mining practices, illegal net¬ 
ting in rivers, highway con¬ 
struction, urban develop¬ 
ment, pollution, etc. have all 
taken their toll while govern¬ 
ments at all levels sat back 
and did very little to correct 
these things. The bona fide 
steelhead anglers really 
haven't done much to cause 
the decline of the runs. 

Hook and release fishing in 
my estimation is a barbaric 
practice that compares with 
fox hunting, hull lighting, 
bear baiting and cock fight¬ 
ing. We all know that it is 
illegal to molest, club or 
stone fish in a river or 
stream. Catch and release to 
my mind should fit right into 
this regulation. To play a 
fish for 15 to lit) minutes or 
more and then release it ex¬ 
hausted and in many cases 
bleeding internally, and ex 
ternally makes no sense at 
all. If the steelhead rivers on 


Vancouver Island are in as 
bad a shape as you say. then 
close them completely until 
such time that they can, 
again, support a fishery. 

Also, the catch and release 
applied generally to all 
streams on Vancouver Is¬ 
land is ridiculous. 1 under¬ 
stand that biologists swam 
some of the rivers and found 
few steelhead in a lol of 
rivers yet, as many rivers do 
not have good runs until late 
February and March. 

With the latest restrictions 
on winter sldMhead and the 
already implemented ones 
on summer steelhead on 
Vancouver Island west coast 
rivers, the $:t steelhead 
punch card becomes a farce. 
No fish can be kept to punch 
on the card, except hatchery 
fish which can easily be ac¬ 
counted for at the hatchery 
complexes. Incidentally, 
will you be returning a por 
tion of the $3 fee to the 
thousands of anglers who 
purchased cards in good 
faith in 1979-80? How will the 
Vancouver Island hatchery 
complexes handle the hordes 
of anglers who will go there 
now in hopes of catching a 
steelhead to take home? 

In closing, I ask you in the 
name of thousands of Mr. 
Average Joe steclheaders on 
Vancouver Island to please 
reconsider what you have 
done and try anything but 
catch and release only. 

JIM AKSKEV, 
2819 Adelaide Ave., 
Victoria. 


Build a tuniiel 
for all reasons 


I have asked B.C. Hydro's 
gas division to permit con¬ 
version of my oil furnace, to 
heating my home with gas. 
"No-way." they say, until a 
pipeline is built underwater 
from the mainland to this 
Island. 

It is all of 12 years since 
the B.C. government an¬ 
nounced in the press that a 
contract was being given to 
one of three companies bid¬ 
ding to build an underwater 
gas pipeline. The plans were 
drawn, bids were made, so 
why no gas? 

In my home I have gas 
used for the hot water tank, 
and cooking. The pipes are 
right up to my furnace. So 
why can I not have gas heat¬ 
ing for my home? My broth 
er has it in Los Angeles— 
our B.C. gas. 

Get on with it, Mr. Bill 



■‘Your work, (harlesworth. has improved enormously. And now that you’ve cut down on smoking, all 
that remains is for you to get the boozing licked." 


Bennett, let's have some 
gas. 

I have written to the pre¬ 
mier, and also the minister 
of energy, urging that really 
serious-consideration be 
given to "Sam Bawlf’s tun¬ 
nel.” 

We need train service—by- 
tunnel with the mainland; we 
need a new hydro cable: we 
need natural gas. So what 
belter or cheaper way than 
to put all these together in a 
tunnel? In the long run it will 
be cheaper than three sepa¬ 
rate projects. The federal 
government promised us 
train service at the time of 
Confederation. 

Now then, taxpayers, all of 
you write letters, and let's 
have gas to heat homes, and 
a tunnel to secure our trans¬ 
portation to the mainland 
RALl’H DENT, 
1212 Oscar St., 
Victoria. 


Civic Scene 


by Hubert Beyer 



Throughout this election campaign I've heard peo¬ 
ple refer to tomorrow's contest as the election nobody 
wanted, except the politicians. 

A useless and expensive exercise, foisted on the 
helpless taxpayer, they say. 

I beg to differ. Not only has the campaign provided 
a welcome diversion from the huntdrum of winter, 
especially since the Rhinos were in the race in these 
here parts, but it also laid to rest a myth which has had 
Canadians bamboozled for years. 

And that's the rtiyth that most of those out of a job 
don't want to work. 

You've heard these statements. They usually emin- 
ale from those who bask in the security of a steads 
job 

But any such assertions must crumble in the face of 
the Victoria election campaign in which four of the five 
candidates are unemployed. We haven’t been able to 
find out yet what the fifth one does for a living, but 
we re reasonably sure he does exist . . . 

ALAN MCKINNON, the Tory incumbent, is a re¬ 
tired teacher. So he's not unemployed, but he certainly 
doesn't have a job. 

Robin Bleneoe, the New Democratic I’arty candi¬ 
date, is an unemployed social worker. He's putting in 
long hours as an alderman in Victoria, but I ask you: Is 
that a job? 

Liberal hopeful Bruce Corbett is unemployed. In his 
last stint he was a dishwasher at a hospital. 

Dorothy Ratzlaff, the Marxist-Leninist candidate 
who's got a hard time keeping from falling off the left 
side of her platform, is an unemployed key punch 
operator. 

The only one who's gainfully employed, so we re 
told, is Kirk Higgins, the Rhino man. Unfortunately, he 
hasn’t shown his face long enough for anyone to ask him 
what he does for a living. 

How can anyone say people don’t want to work w hen 
four people put of work are moving heaven and earth to 
get a job in Ottawa tomorrow? 

AND TO ACHIEVE THEIR GOAL, they have en¬ 
listed the help of thousands of friends. Now that's what I 
call determination. 

Unfortunately, only one of them will succeed which 
won't affect the unemployment statistics too dramati¬ 
cally, but that’s only the beginning. 

Since there’s nothing wrong with political patron¬ 
age. according to the ancient laws of all parties, 
whoever wins can put in a good word for his less 
fortunate fellow contenders. " 

Bleneoe might be be able to give art appreciation 


courses for retired civil servants with special emphasis 
on Emily Carr. 

Corbett could be given a job as dishwasher in a 
federal institution. His last one was with a provincial 
hospital. 

Ratzlaff may find fulfilment of all her dreams as 
secretary to Victoria Chamber of Commerce president 
Cedric Steele. She could make the rich pay for 
her lunch. 

And McKinnon could leach aspiring politicians to 
back the right candidate for party leadership. He’s been 
giving a lot of thought to that topic lately. 

SO DON’T LET THOSE politicians tell you the 
election was needless. They don't know what they're 
talking about. 

As I said, apart from the pure entertainment value 
we’je getting for our election dollar, we learned some 
serious lessons, at least here in Victoria. 

From now on, whenever someone says that most of_> 
the unemployed are lazy bums who dpn't want to find 
work, you'll know better. 

Because you happen to be living in a riding where 
four people without gainful employment have show n an 
admirable drive to change their lives, you can tell the 
rumor-mongers that things arc- different in Victoria. 

We take our unemployment seriously. We don't 
leave a stone unturned, not a vote unswayed, to find 
jobs. 

And as a final thought: Willi all the practice we re - 
getting at electing our federal representatives, maybe 
one of these years, we'll get it right. 


Board quips 
hit as sexist , 
in bad taste 


In a recent article in your 
paper the proceedings of a 
meeting of the Capital Re¬ 
gional District Board were 
reported—the matter that 
concerns us is the issue of 
appointing a woman to the 
newly proposed Economic- 
Development Commission. 

Apparently at the meeting 
one member of the board 
made remarks ("quip 
pingly" or not) that can only 
be described as racist, sexist 
and certainly in bad taste. 

Another member of the 
board protested against ap¬ 
pointing "token” women— 
trivializing what we thought 
was a serious matter. 

The issue itself arose from 
a letter sent to board mem¬ 
bers from the Women’s Em¬ 
ployment Committee, a co¬ 
alition of groups, indivvjhals 
and community workers who 
are collaborating out of a 
concern for the high rate of 
unemployment amongst 
women, low wages and lack 
of job security. The commit¬ 
tee's objective is to improve 
the dismal situation of wo¬ 
men who are in the labor 
force and of those w ishing to 
enter or re-enter it. Thus we 
are concerned that the prob¬ 
lems women face with re¬ 
spect to employment are . 
erased. 

We pointed out to the board 
that while we are pleased 
that the district is undertak 
ing efforts to promote eco¬ 
nomic development general 
ly within the region, we are 
at the same time concerned 
that the commission will not 
have adequate representa¬ 
tion and knowledge of the 
particular problems women 
face in the economy. We also 
pointed out that we hoped 
that women's very special 
needs would not merely be 
assumed to disappear only 
with increased economic ac¬ 
tivity, or that it would not be 
assumed that women will 
continue to be satisfied only 
with traditional work roles. 


«We suggested, therefore, 
the appointment of at least 
one well-qualified woman to 
the commission to act as 
botli an advocate and re¬ 
source person on hchalf of 
women in the region, much 
ill the manner that other ap¬ 
pointments were to be repre¬ 
sentative of other eompo 
nents in the local economy— 
namely, industry, construc¬ 
tion, fisheries, forest prod 
nets, small and large busi 
ness. etc. We also suggested 
that the commission should 
at all times consider the im 
pact of its efforts on women 
and how better to promote a 
more positive work environ¬ 
ment and opportunity for 
women. 

We protest that the issues 
we raised Were not seriously 
considered. They are serious 
concerns. We hope that in 
future the board will be more- 
positive and work concretely 
towards ensuring satisfac¬ 
tory economic development 
for all citizens in the region. 
Let us hope that what hap¬ 
pened thistime is not repeat¬ 
ed. It is of no benefit to 
anyone. 

DIANA BUTLER, 
on behalf of the Women's 
Employment Committee, 

" 2119 Granite St., 

Victoria. 


The Colonist welcomes let¬ 
ters from readers. Please 
keep them short and to the 
point. Letters may be edited. 
To be considered for public a 
tion. a letter must be signed 
and the writer must include 
address and phone number 
where he or she can be 
reached during the day. 
Name and address of writers 
will be published with let¬ 
ters. 


Much sympathy for child snatchers 


A number of recent news 
reports and magazine arti¬ 
cles have played up the 
"problem” of child-snatch¬ 
ing by non custodial par¬ 
ents. 

There is another side to 
this story which has not yet 
been told in the media. 

The “problem" is really a 
symptom of a much greater 
problem—the inability of the 
Canadian judicial system to 
deal with problems jif access 
and custody in a just, com¬ 


passionate and understand¬ 
ing way. 

The judicial system is very 
unsympathetic to non-custo- 
dial parents who wish to con- 
tine to be parents to their 
children. Further, the sys¬ 
tem operates so as to encour¬ 
age custodial parents to use 
their control over the chil¬ 
dren as a weapon against the 
other parent and former 
spouse. 

The result is a lot of very 
frustrated parents who know 


they will never be allowed to 
see their children as often 
as they should, if at all. What 
non custodial parents go 
through is much worse than 
if their children had been 
kidnapped. 

The few who decide to 
snatch their children repre¬ 
sent the tip of the iceberg. 
There are many, many more 
who would be- fully justified 
in doing the same thing. 

Until the much greater 


problem of ensuring access 
for non-cdstodial parents 
has been resolved, the 
"problem" of child-snatch 
ing by parents w ill continuc 
and probably gel worse. As a 
non custodial parent who 
last year saw his son for just 
21 days I have a great deal of 
sympathy for those parents 
who do snatch their chil¬ 
dren. 

ARTHUR R. POWELL. 

30 Rendek ( res . 

Regina. Sask. 


Dateline: Feb. 6, 1978, Victoria. 

Source: Monday Magazine. 

Topic: A roll-on roll-off ferry to service north- 
central B.C. coast regions. 

"This province's northern coastal communi¬ 
ties, which have not had a regular sea link to the 
outside world since privately-owned freight and 
barge services packed it in, may be getting some- 
good news this year." 

The article, written by Derry McDonell, went on 
to describe the proposed "good news" as an espe¬ 
cially-designed coastal vessel 207 feel in length with 
a deck loading capacity for cars and freight trucks 
and with room for 52 passengers. 

Estimated over-all cost $3.5 million, 
r 

Dateline: Thursday, March 13-14, 1978, Vic¬ 
toria. 

Source: All B.C. Lower Mainland—Vancouver 
Island daily newspapers. 

Topic: A roll-on roll-off ferry to service north- 
central B.C. coast regions. 

"The B.C. Ferry Corporation will Order a $3.5 
million ferry to serve the Queen Charjolte Islands 
from Prince Rupert, Recreation and Conservation 
Minister Sam Bawlf said today. 

"The 210-foot vessel will carry 50 passengers 
and 23 cars on a round-trip of less than 24-hours 
when in operation by the summer of 1979." 

The same story records the fact that the hew 
ferry will be part of “a $12 million program to 
improve services to the mid and north coastal areas 
of the province." Implementation of the program 
was scheduled to tie in with the opening of the new 
north Island highway. 

Dateline: August 1, 1978, Victoria. 

Source: All daily newspapers. 

Topic: Central-north coast ferry service. 

"The provincial government has encountered 
anothdr difficulty in its efforts to get a proper ferry 
service to the Queen Charlotte Islands . . . No one 
wants to build the required vessel.” 

As it turned out, Burrard Drydock and Vancou 


ver Shipyards had submitted proposals but neither 
met the requirements laid down by the Ferry 
Corporation. Bids were called again. There was no 
response. 

The problem was that the government had 
decided $3.7 million was the tops. The people who 
build ships came in with a low of $6.1 million of 
which the provincial government, or the ferry 
corporation, would have been responsible for $4.8 
million. 

In 1978 a project close to a million dollars over 
budget was regarded as a great sin. 

Time went by Sam Bawlf. like the vessel he was 
touting, couldn’t pull a winning bid and so went the 
way of all defeated politicians—and their dreams. 


Dateline: Jan. 4. 1980, Victoria. 

Source: All coastal newspapers. 

Topic: North-central coast ferry service. 

"The provincial government has asked naval 
architects to come up with a design for a roll-on 
roll-off ferry to serve the central and north coast of 
B.C." 

The vessel, the stories tell us, should be a shade- 
shy of 200 feet but capable of handling cars, freight 
and passengers. Around 20 cars and maybe 100 
passengers would be ideal. 

Once the best design is selected, the tender call 
will go out. 

(If you have the feeling you've read that before, 
see item one but don’t go away). 


Talk Politics 


with Jim Hume 


Dateline: Anytime between February 1978 and 
February 1980, Victoria. 

Source: Any newspaper within listening dis¬ 
tance of Don Lockstead (NDP-Mackenzie) and 
all-time ferry critic. 

Topic(s): A north-central coast, adequate ferry- 

service. 

Lockstead never quit asking for the service, the 
government never tired of waffling and telling him 
everything was under study. 

When in 1978 ended he was still asking! When 
1979 ended he was still asking. He's a stubborn man 
and if you’re a gambler, bet that his first question in 
the new session of the Legislature will be on the 
north-central ferry service. 



Dateline: Feb. 4, 1980, Victoria. 

Source: NDP caucus press release. 

Topic: North-central B.C. coast ferry service. 

"NDP transportation critic Don Lockstead said 
he has learned that ferry service from Port Hardy to 
Prince Rupert will be suspended this spring from 
March 31 to June 1.” 

Lockstead is fudging a bit there because the 
B.C. Ferry Corp. is hopeful the Queen of Surrey will 
be on the Hardy-Rupert run by mid-May. But it’s not 
really much of a “fudge." 

His beloved north-central coast will not only 
NOT have its special commuter ferry on this spring, 
it won’t have a ferry service at all, other than tugs 
and barges, which are not the ideal way to travel the 
scenic coast route. 

"This is another example," said Lockstead 
Feb. 4, "of the inability of this government to plan 
and manage even the most basic services to the 
people of this province." 


Dateline: Feb. 12. 1980. 

Source: A government press release from 
Transportation and Highways Minister Alcx- 
Fraser. 

Topic: (No guessing now) north-central coast 
ferry service. 


There a slight twist to this one: “Tenders w ill be 
called Feb. 13 and opened March 5 for a contract to 
prepari the site for the new Prince Rupert-Skidc 
gate ferry service to the Queen Charlottes sche¬ 
duled to begin in October." 

Note the dates, note the p re uni so. They arc going 
lo build the docks even if they haven't yet started to 
build the ship. 

But there’s another promise oil that. “Details on 
a vessel to be allocated to the Prince Rupert-Quecn 
Charlotte run will be available in the near fu¬ 
ture.” 

Did he say "to be allocated?” Yes. lie did. 

He didn't say “to be built?" No, he didn't 

It was Sam Bawlf who said it would be- built fora 
cost of $3.5 million, but that was back in 1978. 

It was Bawlf who said it would be in operation in 
the summer of 1979. 

And it was the ship builders who said it couldn't 
be done, not for $3.5 million, anyway. 

The latest word is that for a slightly smaller 
vessel than the one called for by Bawlf the govern 
nienl. if and when it calls bids, will be prepared logo 
as high as $4.7 million. 

Wasn’t that the approximate price of Sam 
Bawlf's ferry which should have been in service for 
the past year? Yes, it was, $4.8 million as a matter of 
fact. 

Have prices for shipbuilding come down since 
1978? No, they have not. 

Dateline: Feb. 17, 1980. 

Source: The writer of this column. 

Topic: North-central ferry service. One man s, 
opinion: Alex Fraser more than deserves his title as 
King of the Cariboo where he is crowned at each 
election, but he'll have a tough lime making ad 
miral. 

The Marguerite, the Surrey, the Rupert and now 
the missing ferry. 

Mr. Minister, do you know the difference be 
tween the boat deck and the bilges? 

I thought not. 































































6 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 
MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION & HIGHWAYS 


PUBLIC NOTICE 


Gillespie Road, at Shawyer Bridge, will be closed 
for bridge maintenance between 8:00 a.m. and 
4.00 p.m., Monday, February 18th, 1980, to 
Friday, February 22nd, 1980, inclusive. 

Detour via Happy Valley Road and Rocky Point 
Road. 


G. W. Harper, 

District Highways Manager, 
Saanich District Office, 
Ministry of Transportation 
and Highways 


WORLD 


‘Oly’ boss on lewd count 


OLYMPIA, Wash. (UPI)-” 
— Leopold Schmidt abruptly 
resigned as president and 
chief executive officer of 
Olympia Brewing Co,, the 
seventh-largest U.S. brew¬ 
ery, following his arrest for 
lewd conduct in a public res¬ 
troom, a company spokes¬ 
man said Saturday. 

Schmidt, 39, was one of 
three men arrested Thurs¬ 
day night during investiga¬ 
tion of homosexual activity 
at a lakefront park res¬ 
troom. 

The others were state Rep. 
Eric Rohrbach, a Republi¬ 
can,' and Joseph Dean Gre¬ 
gorius, director of the divi¬ 
sion of alcohol and substance 
abuse for the state depart¬ 


ment of social and health 
services. 

A brewing company 
spokesman announced Sat¬ 
urday that Schmidt resigned 
his $132,000-a-year job Fri¬ 
day “for medical reasons” 
and that “he is placing him¬ 
self under the care of a 
doctor for treatment.” 

Police chief John Wumer 
said two or three more ar¬ 
rests were expected within 
the next week. 

Schmidt is the great- 
grandson of the company's 
founder. He became presi¬ 
dent of the firm in 1974 and 
was named chief executive 
officer in 1977. 

Rohrbach, 28, executive 
chairman of the House insur¬ 
ance committee, has not 


been available for comment 
since he and the others were 
released on personal recog¬ 
nizance following misde¬ 
meanor charges of lewd con¬ 
duct. 

Rohrbach was engaged to 
be married next month. 

Glen Miller, an assistant 
secretary of the social and 
health services department. 


said Gregorius had indicated 
he wanted to resign bis posi¬ 
tion for a less visible job 
in the department. 

Undercover officer Jim 
Flint entered the restroom 
and “was solicited himself,” 
Wurner said. “The acts were 
taking place right in front of 
him. That's when he made 
the arrests.” 


r 


Roofing? 


Seamless Aluminum Gutters 


1 


So luxurious! And so inexpensive! 

Rich sculptured and plush Saxony carpet 
at the price you w ant to pay! 

Armstrong 

There are so many 
things to consider 
when choosing 
carpet. Traffic, 
color, natural fibre 
or man-made, 
textured or plain. 

We'll be glad to 
advise you on the 
right sort for the 
area you want to 
cover. 


Cbme in and see this superb collection 
colorful Armstrong carpet! 



Phone 598-4441 
after six: 
eaU 598-7024 
for an estimate 


r c 


Capitol City 

?a*pet 



INTERMEDIATE FORTRAN 

This course will teach advanced features of Fortran IV 
including the use of subprograms and direct access 
I/O. Principles of good program design will be emphasized 
and practiced in several programming projects. In addition, 
basic file handling will be introduced, including an introduc¬ 
tion to IBM 370 Job Control Language and use of utility 
programs. 

A basic knowledge of Fortran IV language, including 
some actual programming experience will be assumed. In 
order to complete programming projects, assigned students 
will be expected to spend some time outside of class to 
complete them. A limited amount of computer time will be 
available to each candidate. 

Class limited to 20 registrants. 

WEDNESDAYS, commencing February 20, 1980; 7:30- 
9:30 p.m.; 9 sessions; Clearihue Building, Room D130. Fee 
$110. 

TEXTS. The Elements ot Programming Style.’ 

Kernighan & Plauger, McGraw-Hill. 

RECOMMENDED READING LBM 370 
Job Control Language. Gary Brown. 
INSTRUCTOR: Ms. Laura Proctor 

p.o. box 1700 
victoria, b.c. v8w 2y2 
(604) 477-6911, local 4802 


university extension « university of victoria 



NOTICE TO ALL VICTORIA AREA 
REGISTERED CHARITABLE 
GROUPS AND AGENCIES 


The British Columbia Government Employees' 
Community Services Fund will be accepting 
applications from eligible non-profit groups and 
agencies, who offer assistance and services to 
the Southern Vancouver Island community, for 
inclusion in’the 1980 canvass of government 
employees. 

For further information, please write 
B.C.G.E.C.S.F., Box 83, Parliament Buildinqe 
Victoria, B.C. 

Applications must be received by March 15 
1980. 




Gofutcd City /loojuu^ 


Guaranteed custom work—tree estimates. 
1920 OAK BAY AVE. 598-4441 


GUTTERS • INSULATION • DOWNSPOUTS • 


‘WE DO A COMPLETE JOB” 


Ourfi®pllM 

We can provide you with: 

• Renewal Decals 
0 New Coverage 
0 New License Plates 

FEBRUARY OFFICE HOURS 

Weekdays 8:30-5:00 p.m. 
Saturdays 9:30-2:00 p.m. 


TM BOORMAN INVESTMENT CO. LTD. 



612 FORT ST. 


386-7521 

217 



LOOKWHAT THE PERMANENT RSP OFFERS YOU: 

RETIREMENT RETIREMENT NO RSP COSTS' 

TERM DEPOSIT SAVINGS DEPOSIT PREFERRED 

□ One to five year term deposits □ Savings deposit features RSP LOAN RATES 

□ Guaranteed interest rates □ Daily interest Come in and see us today. 



the Permanent 

Canada Permanent Trust Company 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation ** 

Members-Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 
•Fixed Income and Equities sections each have annual administration fees of 3/4 of one percent 


1125 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA 
386-1361 


1551 CEDAR HILL CROSS RD., VICTORIA 
477-7216 


HOT FOOD 

RECESSION 
PROOF BUSINESS 

ULTRA-MODERN 
EQUIPMENT TO DISPENSE 

Nationally Advertised 
Hot Food Minute Meals 
$700.00 a Week Full Time 
COMPANY furnished professionally se¬ 
lected locations, finest heated dispensing 
equipment for hot foods and wholesale supplies. 
COMPANY can't furnish financing. 
APPLICANT must furnish character refer¬ 
ences and a desire to operate their own 
business. 

APPLICANT must have adequate working 
capital. 

CALL MR. PAUL MACDONALD 

( 604 ) 687-0511 

Call 9-9 

SHERATON LANDMARK HOTEL 


WHEN WE PREPARE 
YOURTAXESWERACK 
UP WHAT WE DO. 

IfyourH&R Block- 
prepared tax return 
is questioned, we 
step in to represent 
you to the district 
. taxation office, all 
year round, at no 
extra cost. 

We know all the 
tax laws, and we double-check your return 
before you sign it. 

We II take your place, because nothing can 
take the place of good solid service 

This year be sure. 

H*R BLOCK 

THE INCOME TAX SPECIALISTS 



2000 DOUBLAS ST. 

(2 block. North ol bio Boy) 

388-6813 


100-C BURNSIDE WEST 

(Burned* and Wascana) 

384-4222 


OPEN 9 AM to 9 P.M. WEEKDAYS. SAT 9 AM. to 5 PM 

■■■ " APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE —■ 


AND OUR NEW LOCATION! 

COLWOOD/ LANGFORD 722 COLDSTREAM AVE. 

(Naxt to Westbrook Contra) 474-1413 

USOit OPEN 9 AM. to P.M. WEEKDAYS. SAT. 9 A.M. to 5 PAI. 


Sears EATONS 


595-9111 3864222 385-1311 382-7141 

DURING REGULAR HOURS 

OTHER AREA OFFICES: 

SIDNEY, DUNCAN, NANAIMO, PORT ALBERNI. 

COURTENAY. CAMPBELL RIVER. PORT McNEIL , 



Everything for your pet • Open seven days a week 



SPECIALS 

NOW PURR-R-R-RING! 


HUSKY KING SIZE 

DOG FOOD 

Case 24/25V2-OZ. 
(Also available 
by the can) 


TUFFY’S 

DOG FOOD 

Chunk or 
Hi Protein Meal 
Bag 8 kg 
(17.6 lbs.) 



KAL KAN 

CAT FOOD 

Case 24/6-oz. cans 
(Also available 
by the can) 



KEN-L-RATION 

BURGERS 


(Beef Flavour) 

Pkg. 2 kg (4.4 lbs.) 



• FROZEN MEAT 

• RABBIT 

• MILK BONE 

PELLETS 

• RAWHIDE 

• CAGES 

CHEWS 

• FISH FOOD 

• PET LIBRARY 

• ACCESSORIES 

• VITAMINS and 

• DRY and CANNED 

SUPPLEMENTS 

DOG and CAT 

• BIRD SEED 

FOOD 

k 

* 


PURINA 

CAT 

CHOW 


Bag 10 kg 
(22 lbs.) 






CLIP and SAVE 


VALUABLE COUPON 




-| 00 

OFF 


Any 20 kg bag 

WAYNE 

DOG 

FOOD 


Jill 


J^AS\\WS\\\\S\%S\VA\\V\\VW\\'A\VW.SSV.••.•.•awwavvwkJ 


PET FOOD MART 

4918 EAST BURNSIDE • NEXT TO POP SHOPPE 
385-6411 

Mon. through Sat. 9:00-6:00 
• Fri. late night until 9:00 • Sunday 11:00-5:00 







































































































CAPITAL REGION 


Bookstore marks year five 

^ ■vovr.v 

'v ' r* ! n 

J* • I , » $ 


It began as a small book¬ 
store in Oak Bay,‘giving 
more than taking. 

Now at-at 641 Johnson 
Street in Victoria, Everywo- 
mans Books celebrated its 
fifth anniversary Saturday. 

The non-profit store is still 
small, but it continues to 
grow beyond the traditiqpal 
definition of a “book store.” 

The store is managed by a 
volunteer collective of about 
15 women of various back¬ 
grounds and ages that range 
from early 20s to 71. Volun¬ 
teers who arc not in the 
collective also help out in 
the store.. 

COLLECTIVE members 
interviewed Saturday at the 
anniversary celebration at¬ 
tributed the store's success 
to the “spirit” among 
women in the collective. 

Ann Hillyer, one df the 
founding members, said 
none of the members or vol¬ 
unteer workers got paid. 
Kent and operating expenses 
were covered by the sale of 
books. 

Almost one entire wall is 
covered with a bulletin 
board of notices and an¬ 
nouncements that reflect 
what's going on for women in 
Victoria. 

THE STORE'S shelves are 
stocked with books from 
feminist.writers and small 
publishing houses that pro¬ 
duce non-sexist, role-free lit¬ 
erature. There are also 
racks of magazines, pam¬ 
phlets and back issues. 

Hillyer said the store was 
both a clearinghouse of in¬ 
formation and a referral 
centre for women’s re¬ 
sources in Victoria. 

It's also a comfortable 
place to visit, chat or 
browse. 

In its five years of exis¬ 
tence, one of the most sig¬ 
nificant changes was its 
move to downtown Victoria. 

HILLYER SAID. “We 
were happy to be able to 
make the move from Oak 
Bay to downtown. It made us 
more accessible to a wider 
number of people. 

' The success of the collec¬ 
tive as an operating struc¬ 
ture has also been a hearten¬ 
ing experience for every 
body. We put in a lot but 
we get a lot back.” 

Hillyer said women from 
the store had visited schools 
on request and set up book 
displays at conferences. 

As Victoria has grown and 
matured, so has the store. 

COLLECTIVE member 
Connie McCann said the 
move downtown was a logi¬ 
cal one and made the store 
more visible. Its stock of 
books had practically dou¬ 
bled. 

“We’ve reached out to 
more women. Travelling 
women in the summer hook 
up to us, as do new-women in 
town and single mothers and 
women of all ages," she 
said. 


Arson still 
hottest 
of crimes 


EDMONTON (CP) — Po¬ 
lice, fire departments and 
insurance companies pre¬ 
dict the 1980s will be the 
decade of the torch as arson 
rates climb. 

In North America, arson 
is the hottest crime going, 
says Richard Cooper, Ed¬ 
monton head of the Insur¬ 
ance Bureau of Canada. 

“It’s a very large concern 
to us in the insurance indus¬ 
try simply because of the 
level it is at, and if some¬ 
thing isn’t done it will in¬ 
crease,” Cooper said. 

Cooper said Alberta’s 
arson rate increased 300 per 
cent between 1975 and 1978, 
compared with a 25-per-cent 
increase in Ontario during 
the same period.” 

Behind arson’s upsurge is 
"the erosion of social values 
in the last 10 years,” Cooper 
said. 

Statistics show 50 per cent 
of arson fires are caused by 
vandals. 

Thrills, boredom and re¬ 
venge motivate the ll-to-30- 
year-olds to commit an esti¬ 
mated 70 per cent of arson 
offences, he said. 

Police arson detectives in¬ 
vestigated 25 suspected 
arsons in January. Seven 
more this month—including 
a 91-million blaze at Beth 
Shalom synagogue Wednes¬ 
day—have boosted Edmon¬ 
ton’s arson loss to more than 
half 1978’s $5.5-million fig¬ 
ure. 



—Colonist photo by Atex Barta 

Connie McCann, Linda Tree Proe and Annie Weeks chat amid books 


HURRY! SALE ENDS TUESDAY, FEB. 19th 

ALL PHONE ENQUIRIES RECEIVED UP TO 9 P.M. TUESDAY WILL QUALIFY FOR THIS SPECIAL OFFER 

homeowhers 

DID YOU KNOW 

YOU CAN CHANGE TO 
WEATHERGARD THERMAL WINDOWS 


r\ 

t— 

i 

i 




iff 



air 


• In most cases without 
cosmetic change 

• Available in %” and ’/i’ 
space 

• No fuss or no mess to 
clean up 

• Average home completed 
in 4 hours 

• Insulating windows save up 
to 50% of window heat 
loss 

• Weathergard windows are 
guaranteed, 1 year labour, 
5 years on materials and 
10 years on sealed thermal 
units 

• B.C. Hydro Financing 
Available 

• Expertly installed by our 
own installers 


FLOAT 
GLASS 
DISTORTION 
FREE 

1 


WITHOUT 
REMOVAL 
OF METAL or 
WOOD FRAMES 


to 

year i 

guarantee 

V- 




SEALED' 
DEAD AIR\ 
V SPACE 


ALUMINUM SPACER 
. FILLED WITH 
DESICANT BEADS 

“AIRTIGHT SEAL 


SAVE 40 % 

ON WEATHERGARD THERMAL CONVERSION WINDOWS 


f 230-lb7^ 

STORMLOCK 

SI NGLES 1 


IS 




ROOFING 


FOR WALLS 
AND ATTICS 


& 


/- 


therm-'SITic 

~ J HI O’A \ iVm I At :0\ 


INSULATION 


5” CONTINUOUS 
ALUMINUM 
GUTTER 


u 


WE VE GOT IT 
CAST LOCKING . 
1 GUTTER CORNER 


GUTTERS 


PhonemrfoT an in-the-home estimate at no obligation 052 4411 

Weathergard 

Shop 


Branches in Victoria C5 2-4411 
Duncan 746-9648 
Nanaimo 7B3S811 
Port AJberal 784-3416 


* Division of Somaso 
Building Bervloss 

2146 Keating X Rd. 


THE COLONIST, Sun., Feb ruary 17, 1980 

FIRST AID 
TRAINING 

R0SWYN INDUSTRIAL FIRST AID 
TRAINING SCHOOLS INC. 

2713 Quadra St., Victoria 

Fully qualified, experienced instructors. 

Examination and certification by the Worker's Compensation 
Board of British Columbia 
Two-Week, Monday-to-Friday Courses 
Commencing, March 10 and March 31 
Applications now being accepted 
for evening courses starting March 4, 1980 

Register Now 

TELEPHONE 384-5022 Anytime 


See our new shipment of named well budded 

CAMELIAS .. .... FROM 

DAPHNE Winter blooming. each 19" 

WITCH HAZEL. eaC h 14" 


OPEH 9-5 
WEEKDAYS 
9-5 SUNDAY 

Com* in and 
discuss your 
garden problems 



LISTEN TO GOOD ADVICE 
FROM HARRY HURN 

ms SAT. and SUN. 841-11:26 a.m„ 1:45-3:36 p.m. on C-FAX 




SUPER 

FOOD 


l WEST 
BURNSIDE! 


Pr sea Effacthra Fab. 17, IS, IS 


Ample Parking • Every Day Savings 


an 10% OFF 

f* WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20, 

MINIMUM $5 ORDER. 
CARTON CIGARETTES AND 
I TOBACCO NOT INCLUDED T 


CANADA GR. A BEEF 
GRAIN FED 

TOP ROUND A ,„ 

STEAK, 059 

RUMP ROAST. a. 4 

SHELLBONE 

ROAST and 069 

BARON OF BEEF a. 


ROGER'S 

PANCAKE 
SYRUP HO ml 


PUREX 


BATHROOM 

TISSUE .. 4-roll pkg. 


119 


OLYMPIC A 

BACON 0 

ENDS 5 * bo* £ 


19 


CHEER Jfc 

DETERGENT 3 

8 Htro. V 


19 


OLYMPIC SLICED ^ aaaa JAVEX Ji* 

BOLOGNA BLEACH 1 I! 

1 lb.. I 128 oi.. ■ 


MARGARINE I 69 

3-lb. pack. I 


3-lb. pack 

BLACK DIAMOND 

CHEESE 
SLICES 

WESTON Family Size 

STONED WHEAT 
THIN BISCUITS 21 1 

WESTON 

WAGON 

WHEELS 12-oz. box 


It 


FLEECY A - - 

FABRIC 009 

SOFTENER4 

KITTY TREAT 

CAT 

FOOD 12 m. i 

WASA RY-KING 

SWEDISH \ 

CRISPBREAD 250 c 

TEXAS Size 56's 

PINK or WHITE 
GRAPEFRUIT 


t 

it 


it 


BLUE RIBBON 

TEA 

BAGS .100 bags 


LFUCE 39 


it 
















































































8 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


Week’s Vancouver trading 


Distributed by The Canadian Press 
Week ending Friday. Feb. 15, 1*10 

Quotations in cents unless marked $ Odd lot sales 
marked z. Netchartgebfromiastweefc'scloseofseme 
lot type 


Pacific Res 501500 73 
Pa Acheron 199650 70 


Stock 

Aaron Mng 

Abelia Res 

Action 

Adanec 

Agassiz 

Ateta 

Aitex 


Avino 

Azure 

Banner 


Bell Molvb 
Bel moral 
Benpel 
Benson 
Betina 


Sales High Low Close Ch'gt High Low 
Resource and Development 


Bison 


Blue sky 
Brace 


Buccaneer 
Cdr Res 


Canalta 

Carotin 

Casino 

Castle 

Celico Res 

Chariest 

Charter 

Charriot 

Cheyenne 

Chromex 

Cima Res 


6000 

500 

450 

450 

57300 

175 

160 

175 

70283 

250 

209 

720 

noo 

$7 

5* 

5'* 

115520 

165 

150 

150 

18600 

125 

110 

no 

11500 

160 

150 

150 

80930 

485 

420 

425 

67292 

380 

300 

380 

311380 

335 

235 

320 

190100 

83 

74 

75 

106825 

450 

370 

385 

82100 

45 

39 

41 

23265 

780 

700 

710 

45955 

300 

270 

280 

4353 

840 

770 

770 

130825 

385 

290 

335 

109000 

380 

305 

340 

158740 

160 

145 

145 

704365 

420 

370 

375 

306178 

128 

100 

105 

180058 

250 

195 

215 

500 

75 

75 

75 

31736 

$27* 25 

25% 

18000 

58 

55 

55 

103100 

67 

55 

56 

48300 

125 

no 

112 

32425 

480 

425 

430 

7623 

110 

100 

100 

30550 

170 

140 

150 

13400 

.no 

300 

300 

17800 

139 

120 

120 


103123 $10% 9% 


-15 290 190 
7'* 5% 
-10 175 135 
-20 165 110 
-10 180 150 


♦ 80 335 155 

88 55 

—45 450 150 

-4 51 37% 

780 600 
-5 300 235 
- 10900 610 

♦ 45 385 165 

—rl5 5* 175 
-no 175 80 

-25 420 280 
-10 128 70 

♦ 16 250 130 

♦ 5 85 67 

♦ % 27V, 17V, 

-5 65 50 

-7 80 26 

-13 134 85 

-35 5 400 

♦ 5 110 31 

-20 175 100 
-20 395 250 
-15 160 110 

9* - V, 10'* 7* 


Pan Arctic 
Pthfndr 
Pegasus 
Perry Rvr 
Pnebell 
Piper Pete 
Plains P 
Pondry 
Prairie ene 
Princess 
Prism Res 
>v* exp 
OCNExpl 
Queens tk 
Oulntaine 
Quinstar 
Rainier 
Ramm vntr 
Reako Exp 
Redtor Mn 
Regency 
Reeves 
Rex silver 
Rhodes Res 
Rimrck 
Rio Plata 
Risbv T 
Riviera Ind 
Robert Mns 
Rosmac 
Sabina 
Sachem Ex 
Sgble 
St ellas exp 30460 
S Jacinto 136000 
Saxton Ind 
Scot gold 


56300 390 
86200 60 
34870 $9 
6000 125 
3500 50 
26175 $9 
14555 179 
52425 90 
17210 510 
116700 65 
40150 600 
48183 150 
39300 150 
16350 760 
60600 500 
79300 245 
32700 285 
17050 150 
245800 95 
89000 170 
21000 74 
17200 40 
8220 180 
99233 250 
69000 65 
179275 210 
31700 100 
39600 34 

32700 70 
30440 110 
25020" 150 
62575 130 
17501 82 
. 60 


43 48 -2 73 20 

52 59 -1 88 32 

345 345 -15 410 255 

46 50 —7 60 41 

8V4 8 % —l 9V, 7 

95 100 -20 130 55 

45 46 el 50 28 

7% Vh —, % 9* 


Bancorp 
Berkley 
Blue Diamd 
Bmc Oil 
Bonneville 
Brazos 
Bronson 


20500 69 
4300 62 


69 56 

62 50 


170 128 140 *15 170 92 


37000 125 100 125 

18100 45 38 38 

8100 105 95 100 

47 * 40 


12V, 

46 72 

125 / 90 


164 175 


Seatorth 

Seadrift 


69898 

85 

76 

77 

-8 105 

58 

Seatu Ex 

33050 195 

160 

190 

♦ 30 195 

ISO 

Selkirk 

20440 

Mb 

12'* 

13 

16 


Seneca 

19700 

47S 

375 

395 

-35 480 

260 

Sheba I 

49050 

45 

40 

40 

46 

27 

Shelter O 

192762 

Ml 

130 

136 

-2 150 

52 

Shld Dev 

i 95200 

2.35 

172 

180 

—35 235 

150 

Silverado 

50523 

925 

820 

850 

- 25925 

630 

S Chief 

47200 

500 

435 

450 

- 50650 

420 

S Christl 

39917 

56 

47% 

48 

-1'* 67 

40 

S Sprlno 

11681 

516 

450 

450 

- 25615 

450 

S Stndrri 

5400 

$17% 14% 

14' 

» 17'* 9% 

Silver Tusk 

215200 

25 

97 

103 

♦ 2 128 

70 

Slocan 

11350 

$?6 

22'* 

23 

-2% 28V; 

i 17% 

Sovrgn Mtl 

46900 

89 

75 

80 

-9 95 

66 

Stall Lak 

3700 

612 

575 

575 

- 2561? 

455 

Sfampd 

14480 

760 

225 

260 

♦ 15 260 

185 

Stand Skat 

80400 

68 

56 

56 

-12 80 

30 

Suneva Res 

1000 

73 

73 

73 

♦ 6 73 

40 

Sunexco 

81780 385 

300 325 

—60 390 

140 

Suzie Mng 


28262 400 365 380 —10 440 360 


Citfec Mini 104375 60 
Clavmore 56100 67 


43200 50 40 

4S125 230 180 195 —19 2>5 
50 -10 62 


Cobre 


Colonial 
Comaplcx 
Comet Ind 
Comnwlth 


60 -2 70 

98650 140 125 138 ♦B 149 


25 

140 

28 


Colbv Mns 327288 390 300 320 —25 390 145 

r 36920 475 420 420 —30 480 420 

1241 550 550 540 - 10600 490 

“ 65 75 -2 85 35 


9000 

37226 


395 300 
55 42 


Conam Res 27320 350 300 300 
Conbeau 14513 50 4 7 48 —2 _ 

Con Bound 802o6 160 125 130 —10 170 95 

Con Cinoia 61190 1950 1600 1625 —1871950 85 

Con Five Str 20454 300 285 285 —10 325 270 

I Con Sir Butt 25075 50 40 


45 -5 


30 


Con Sir Rdg 19300 160 125 125 —25 160 105 

Con Trn Col 23650 110 75 75 —30 155 75 

Coot Svr 49370 840 675 700 —125900 545 

Cpr Giant 82400 275 220 260 ♦ 10 340 125 

122900 75 65 65 —5 80 42 

200607 600 537 575 — 25637 370 

.. 220 130 


Cpr Lake 
Coralta 
Corporate 

cosmos __ — _ 

Covnex Dev 16525 100 165 170 


26900 201 190 190 

26574 65 58 


70 40 

-10 200 165 


Cream 402700 141 106 124 +15 141 72 

Cree Lake 872701 590 510 520 — 5590 365 


Cube Res 

Dankoe 

Darkhawk 


Dteodame 
Dora Ex 
Dual Res 
Dunganon 


Enex 
Enterpris 
Equity Svr 
Forum Res 
Futurity 
Galaxy City 
Galveston 
Gen Engy 
Geodome 
Giant Ex 
Giant Reef 
Glamis Gld 
Global 


51300 

too 

90 

90 

—15 130 

43727 

555 

490 

510 

— 20625 

16200 

95 

80 

86 

—9 no 

57100 

937 

800 

875 

- 251025 

33128 

64 

58 

58 

—4 73 

18600 

80 

70 

70 

120 

106900 

525 

485 

525 

♦ 5575 

29150 

250 

205 

210 

-20 250 

63050 

IV-. 

155 

169 

-16 215 

52600 

175 

160 

170 

♦ 10 200 

59500 

75 

60 

60 

-10 78 

33218 

470 

425 

450 

♦ 25 5% 

252600 1 

149 

105 

134 

♦ 34 149 

45200 

39 

34 

34 

41 

700 

33 

33 

33 

40 

58620 

150 

117 

125 

—5 150 

62128 

210 

180 

195 

225 

15130 

$40 

37 

37 

—1 44 V* 

28815 

190 

140 

150 

—40 200 

95300 

60 

so 

50 

-10 66 

' 37400 

50 

42 

42 

-3 52 

79650 

450 

385 

400 

450 

78950 

160 

131 

150 

♦ 5 160 

22450 

300 

260 

300 

♦ 10 350 


66600 52 40 __ 

3100 225 215 225 —5 230 155 


54867 330 280 280 -5 425 


Goldbelt 33275 350 280 330 ♦ 50 350 139 

Gldn Gate 100600 280 220 220 —55 300 75 

Gowganda 70700 88 76 76 —7 100 S5 

Gt Nor Pete 73300 89 69 72 —17 99 59 

GrtPac -- — ..- - 


Green wod 
Grounds tr 
Grove E x 
Hallmark 


27200 370 315 335 —35 370 225 

41150 425 365 375 —40 430 210 

15560 150 125 125 —15 175 101 

50650 315 275 275 —30 325 250 

. “ 61 

SO 


98700 130 110 111 


Hecate Gld 582440 150 80 114 + 38 150 _ 

Hereon Res 88805 540 460 460 — 45540 355 

Hiland Crw 43591 185 155 170 —10 185 135 


High wood 
Host vent 
Ice Station 


179300 175 150 160 

35700 175 155 165 

- 150 135 145 


imprl Met 27763 69 60 


Initial 
intercep 
Inti Balfour 


62 ♦ 1 

20900 72 6 7 67 —4 _ _ 

5500 150 140 ISO ♦S 160 140 

8500 400 360 375 —25 425 290 


175 101 
-10 215 75 

-S 165 135 
80 45 

80 


111 Brnmac 73200 66 - 55 55 —11 7? 


Itl Shasta 


20380 165 151 165 ♦ 10 178 150 


Inti Stanrd 241537 238 135 190 +55 238 S8 

Intrnetwk 12167 37 25 25 —1 37 16 

Invex Res 150750 260 225 225 —15 290 210 
Iona Silver 37160 440 375 390 -30 6V, 375 

Jet Star 129800 325 770 280 +10 325 170 

JOV Ind Ltd 47800 40 30 40 * 5 44 15 

Jubilee Ex 22078 85 70 75 —5 95 50 

Kamad “ "" - 

Kandahar 


133590 240 210 215 -10 265 110 
93096 273! 205 225 +10 273 170 


Karin Lake 59700 121 115 115 —10 132 


Keith Cpr 
Kelly 


108900 70 63 65 —1 76 


Kent Engy 25300 


20500 225 190 195 —10 225 185 


70 77 - 3 93 57 


48240 205 170 175 —25 205 14S 

Knobv Lak 55785 340 250 270 -55 340 124 

la Teko res 79399 115 104 105 —2 130 50 

Laco Res 114250 144 115 115 -15 155 79 

Lar Petr 96250 200 180 18? -17 220 ISO 

Liberty 239930 400 360 400 + 10 475 300 

Lincoln — .- —— - 


202838 575 410 550 +145575 281 

Lion Mines 36575 375 300 300 —60 395 200 


Logtung 
Lorcan 
1 ornex 
M cp Res 


M M Prcpn 23900 75 


7300 350 310 310 -35 420 240 

87000 300 270 285 300 160 

50 SO -2 55 35V, 

70 70 + 5 75 55 


6840 $52 
16400 75 


62 


MdnExpl 12200 205 . 185 191 -19 230 180 


Magnum 

Makaoo 

Manchstr 

Marbaco 


73 

58 


13400 85 
67500 70 

5250 65 „ „ 

2800 140 125 125 

Marge Entr 138480 45 

Mark V 

Mvrck _ _ _ 

May Ralph 223918 260 205 221 

Mconl Peel )II00 50 47 


73 
60 
62 -3 


3500 140 130 130 
6500 645 600 600 


.... 47 

Meston Lke 12050 270 250 250 


103420 125 100 105 + 5 165 85 


Mid Mtn _ 

Mid North 20500 70 
Mi—Lo H B 3100 56 .. 

Mokomd 58100 675 612 637 


90 

70 45 

75 60 

27 180 80 

44 +1? 45 19 

-10 160 100 
25645 500 

■24 260 149 

-2 60 27 

10 275 185 


Mont Grnd 
Mosq Crk 
Mt Sickr 
Mt Wash 
Mtn Stats 
Mtneer M 
Mundee 
Musto Ex 


N Privtr 


40100 S9 


♦.IS 70 
-4 75 30 

— 25675 410 

9V, 7% 


537 

410 

480 

- 15537 

415 

1 65 

54 

54 

-10 80 

50 

1 37 

31 

34 

-1 45 

22 

$13% 

i 11% 

12'* 

—1 13% 

10 

60 

52 

52 

-8 65 

38 

i 160 

115 

135 

-25 201 

90 

i 235 

202 

709 

—6 245 

180 

195 

145 

155 

-21 195 

93 

200 

190 

700 

200 

183 

' 175 

ISO 

160 

175 

140 

i 210 

m 

195 

-5 210 

140 

i 295 

251 

260 

-5 300 

210 

160 

125 

140 

—25 185 

115 

700 

615 

680 

♦ 30700 

380 

i no 

99 

105 

♦s no 

85 

380 

335 

340 

-30 465 

335 

245 

195 

195 

-30 245 

100 

i 49 

44 

45 

-1 49 

33 

i 190 

175 

175 

-10 200 

155 

$17 

16 

16% ♦ 17% 

14% 

320 

290 

320 

♦ 25 335 

770 

81 

75 

75 

90 

67 


NA Rare 4000 35 
N Hart res 166700 58 


29 29 

4? 


NS Res 

120400 

500 

450 

480 

♦ 15500 

NW vent 

24900 

160 

135 

135 

—5 170 

NRD Mrjg 

205590 

435 

355 

405 

♦ 35 435 

Nu Energy 

73660 

1150 

1000 

1000 

-1001150 

Nuspar 

59000 

56 

47 

SO 

—8 70* 

O'Lori 

82700 

60 

53 

55 

♦ 1 75 

Omni Res 

17600 

270 

250 

260 

310 

Osec A 

20800 

190 

182 

189 

220 

Fa Casslar 

16000 

185 

172 

175 

—5 185 

Pac Coast 

93500 

125 

85 

100 

♦ 10 125 

P Cypress 

127500 ■ 

125 

360 

400 

—10 5% 

Pacific Fm 

28320 

120 

100 

120 

♦ 2 130 


Sydney Dev 
Svn Trac 


20523 875 
46874 700 
144600 280 
60097 105 
13300 140 
20000 90 
30100 95 
29200 66 
150366 300 
19150 115 
36170 295 
53300 400 
82485 55 
68750 60 
451090 279 
47200 105 
66100 50 

23200 170 
171800 155 
23900 $9 
14096 110 
267414 104 
110000 185 
69450 185 
6660 66 
1500 | 


Table Mtn 117526 113 


Tx Resce 
Tachma res 
Taseko 
Taurus R 
Tay Rvr 
Tmgami 


48250 
40020 
72115 90 
48600 460 
17500 42 
103200 $12% 


47 

535 

135 

120 

700 

435 

199 

255 

125 

65 

147 

65 

32 

121 

210 

50 

111 

85 

23 

60 

95 

120 

90 

71 
50 

39 
755 
670 
220 

85 

125 

80 

73 

55 

205 

95 

251 

370 

43 

$4 

187 

90 

37 

140 

no 

7* 

105 

7? 

150 

145 

65 

47 

80 

36 

40 

72 
375 

40 

10 


Terra Mng 204862 1037 930 
Thor Expl 88400 290 260 
Thundrwd 192890 124 ill 
Tnta Hill Ms 57500 250 190 

Tinta Slv 73500 410 375 
Tourngn 132450 300 250 
47191 775 500 
10000 53 50 

72800 275 250 
12800 300 275 

9000 400 


Transcolt 
Tcon Res 
Trio Res 
Tri Power 
Tri Star 
TRV 


390 

18055 531% 29 


5S0 

85300 40 35 

25200 45 35 

79020 56 50 

14350 $11% 9% 
101900 195 150 

4000 45 40 

112380 $10’* 8V, 


550 

137 

130 

700 

435 

235 

270 

145 

90 

147 

70 

35 

121 

225 

55 

170 

95 

25 

61 

105 

125 

90 

81 

50 

39 
800 
670 
230 

92 

130 

90 

80 

55 

220 

95 

260 

380 

45 

67 

194 

90 

40 
145 

ns 

105 

80 

176 

180 

66 

60 

80 

43 

41 
79 

375 

41 . 
10 % 
1000 
280 
118 
200 
400 
250 
525 
53 
760 
290 
395 
29 
800 
37 
40 
52 


♦5 »90 
—5 no 

♦ 25550 
-13 76 

- 75675 
-8 150 
-20 190 

795 

- 65525 

♦ 40 245 
-20 310 
-5 165 

♦ 19 95 
-18 180 

85 

-5 43 

—44 300 
-30 255 
-2 65 

—35 230 
-1 105 
-8 40 

-2 76 

-5 110 


150 


Burlington 185300 94 


70 -17 94 50 


Cal Dvnmc 38200 211 175 200 +10 211 93 

Cakx Ltrte 17150 110 100 100 137 80 

35100 70 65 70 + 2 78 53 


Camretco 101500 45 
Cam 
Can; 


228975 160 114 115 —35 160 100 

36280 77 69 69 -3 80 60 

caravan 2500 58 55 55 58 40 

Cardero res 253C0 79 60 60 —19 100 37 

Carmac 18500 38 32 32 -8 43 25 

Carpntr Lk 74400 220 170 195 —50 425 150 

Cascadla 491500 60 45 58 +13 60 33 


Catalina 

Cathedral 

Cherokee 


8000 340 330 340 + 5 355 200 


157000 80 70 75 + 4 80 


-20 150 

70 

Cusac ind 

35135 

590 

-5 130 

55 

Cyclone 

250820 

124 

♦ 16 82 

65 

Dallas Ex 

4500 

65 

-A 65 

35 

Datumone 

10700 

170 

-3 48 

30'* 

Datatech 

20500 

22 

— 75950 

700 

Decker 

3000 

260 

— 5710 

490 

Delta Ref 

5977 

155 

—45 310 

132 

Denar Mns 

12000 

75 

—15 125 

65 

Denver Svr 

25350 

215 

—10 180 

100 

Diana 

93000 

65 

no 

65 

Donegal re 

15500 

175 

—15 110 

65 

Dorado Res 

52833 

65 

-6 66 

24 

Dble Eagle 

14000 

70 

—40 300 

145 

Dune Mrl 

14S00 

43 

—10 117 

62 

Eaglet 

25050 

195 

—35 305 

200 

Eaton 

n0934 

155 

-15 430 

285 

Edina 

42500 

45 

-8 57 

24 

El Coco 

32780 

725 

♦ 1 81 

35 

Eldorado 

48650 

160 

-7 227 

134 

Electra Res 

30500 

96 

—15 120 

72 

El Paso 

147432 

132 

-7 60 

28 

Erl Res 

39499 

70 

—15 195 

60 

Excalibur 

24600 

185 

♦ 20 155 

95 

Farrah Res 

45200 

525 

♦ % 9 

5% 

Fleetwood 

13499 

330 

115 

100 

Fortune Isl 

10000 

39 

♦ 9 104 

57 

Futura 

9600 

160 


+21 195 

♦ 25 225 

80 

♦ 19 240 

—20 113 
-7 56 

♦ 1 


no 

140 
58 
40 

65 
23 

49'* 30 
90 45 

-75 460 225 

44 34 

-1% 12 V, 6 Vi 

♦ 551150 670 

♦ 10 290 180 

—3 150 74 

—40 250 

♦ 10 495 
-20 300 
-225825 

59 

-20 280 
—10 350 


Granger 112700 51 44 


Grenoble 160340 235 160 161 


20th Centry. 209570 800 
Tyee 
UCambrg 
Unltd Frtn 
U Heame 
Un maefie 
U Rayore 
U Westld 

Val Co . _ 

vat Pt L 36200 140 
Vntor Res 54833 200 
Verooex R 150775 165 
Vester Ex 71350 125 
Wlcome 42650 215 
West Adera 3125 55 
W Ring H 22675 375 
Wstn Warn 8800 104 
Westfort 19630 $9 
Wsgth Pete 92705 450 

Westtev 38575 340 

Westmnt 34511 $9 
Wharf 30133 490 

Windmill 29400 120 
Wodsrt 500 55 

Ykn Rev 56400 125 
Yukon Gold 22450 162 
Zenith 39600 150 

Zenore 90100 90 

Zone pet 48800 180 
Wirrann 
Aleta w b 30300 25 

A Fkrt w 4600 100 
Argo gold w 29900 115 
Brace w 29500 49 
Brato Cap w 77800 14 
Canalta w 46900 45 
Charriot w 187800 120 
Cobre w 13900 44 
Colbv Mn wt 85100 105 
Delta w 13200 30 
Hi wood w 255000 32 

invex Res w 79150 99 
Karin Lk w 15000 30 

Knoby Lk w 15000 86 
LdCO w 32000 40 

Magnum W 27500 16 
Moico w 15000 85 
Mutual w 81400 100 
Nw coast wt 49500 59 

Nth Sth Wt 48300 30 

Osec wt 35100 19 
Pgs Exp wt 14000 187 
Quinstar w 95500 56 
Sllvrad w 38600 30 
Suneva w 123700 24 
Trcolt w 2200 250 
venx wts a 31700 20 
Zone w 33900 20 
Total sales, resdv 
80 Advances. 234 Declines, 

INDUSTRIALS 

Ambasadr 1 .. 

Ardiem A 
Austin Inv 
Auto Mar El 
Bm Rlty u 
Balco 

Bcric 523090 790 750 


48 
298 
200 
430 
37 
250 
260 
5 390 
—2% 39% 23 
+ 240800 305 

»~4 49 22 

—8 50 26 

♦ 2 56 26 


Kenver Res 31831 45 


11 

11% 

7 

Kerry Mng 

24000 

30 

25 

25 

160 

-20 195 

120 

Kleena Kin 

5500 

47 

47 

47 

45 

♦ 3 52 

34 

Lakewood 

39000 

61 

so 

60 

9'* 

— % 11% 

4’* 

Lansco pet 

11000 

9? 

80 

80 

26% ♦)% 271* 

17% 

Light 

23500 

255 

165 

245 

126 

-14 150 

125 

Loredl Res 

115500 

61 

55 

55 

160 

—35 200 

120 

Luaarn Mtl 

393700 

95 

70 

80 

163 

♦ 3 170 

69 

Lustre Gold 

20200 

no 

100 

105 

115 

-5 135 

99 

Mckenze 

102300 

126 

95 

105 

200 

-25 235 

145 

Maggie 

Malabar 

47500 

S3 

44 

48 

53 

♦3 55 

50 

10500 

56 

50 

56 

355 

♦ 50 375 

240 

Mara Mnrls 

3250 

285 

770 

270 

100 

116 

85 

March Res 

31600 

180 

145 


8»* 

— V* 9% 

7% 

Marco 

1000 

60 

60 

60 


410 —40 450 
335 +10 400 

8 '* - '* 10 
425 —55 5% 

115 —1 120 
55 57 

105 -10 125 
ISO 162 

188 

. —H ‘ 

170 


Morn Star 23100 87 


106916 141 110 139 +14 170 


Nca Min 
Nept Res 
New Congs 119200 80 65 


79 


-10 

90 

50 

Nithex Ex 

70000 

45 

40 

40 

—5 

55 

-8 

225 

121 

Nomad 

488835 

450 

325 

395 

-5 

500 

f Ms 


Nor Quest 

42300 380 

355 

360 

-20 470 

—3 

30 

IS 

North ener 

126022 

155 

135 

145 

-5 

175 

-15 100 

37 

Nrth Lights 

115266 

80 

65 

65 

—11 

104 

♦ 5 

115 

60 

Nth Horzon 

4500 

180 

170 

170 

-10 210 

-2 

64 

16 

Nugoid 

48900 

170 

149 

149 

-11 210 

♦2 

16 

.5 

Oliver Res 

171300 

10b 

89 

97 

♦4 

no 

♦ 1 

45 

17 

Or HI Cpper 

35500 

60 

50 

50 

—9 

100 

-29 125 

17 

Orine 

U2500 

43 

33 

34 

—8 

47 


37 37 —7 48 

* 71 -9 105 

15 20 -9 56 

25 26 —I 32 

70 80 114 

15 25 -5 35 

60 60 —25 86 

33 33 +1 47 

12'* 12'*—2'* 16 

70 70 -5 65 

60 60 —20 100 

35 36 —II 60 

12 25 -5 32 

17 19 +4 30 

35 135 —45 190 

45 56 +16 56 

22 25'* -3'* 32 

24 


Ptvlco Res 152270 115 90 95 
PhoOilcan 38000 80 75 75 


Pico Res 
Pilgrim 
Pizza Patio 
Ponev Expl 106800 85 


Rainbow 26400 87 71 

Rampart 57600 135 


100 

115 

115 

115 115 

no 

Roanoke 

4500 

40 

35 

35 

—9 

45 

4000 

24 

20 

24 ♦? 26 

20 

Ronrico 

39400 

295 

270 

285 

♦ 10 310 

4500 

60 

50 

60 -5 70 

50 

Ruskin Dev 

36250 

NO 

90 

90 

-10 150 

400 

$6% 

6% 

6% — % 7 

6% 

Sahqua 

13600 

88 

80 

81 

—4 

no 

1300 

$9* 

9'* 

9'* 9'* 

9% 

Samson 

9625 

130 

120 

128 

—2 

150 

2800 

$7% 

7 

7 - % 9% 

5% 

San Antonio 

89750 

110 

90 

90 

-is no 


Be Sugar 
Buckinhm 
Cda Dev 
Cda Dev p b 
Cdn Javelin 
Cantor p a 
Canlan inv 
Computrx 
Crown Zel a 
Doman 
Gt Nat Land 
Gregory 
Grouse 
Hal Roach 
Kaiser 
Keg Rest 
M B 
Madtll 
Nor oest 
NW Sorts 
Potter A 
Potter B 
Proflex 
Renn Ihd 
Sartoga 
Seaboard 
Taro Ind 
Thi Dim Ind 
Web Knap 
Wscorp 


San Rafael 78320 36 31 


103 

115 

115 

115 

115 75 

Sanllogi ind 

13500 

45 

2500 

$11% 

11% 

11% 

11%. 11% 

Santa Sar 

162336 

910 

900 $135 

135 

135 

135 135 

Sask Wain 

3200 

no 

15206 

165 

150 

160 

190 100 

Sc her Engy 

98200 

305 

3500 

$6 

6 

6 

6 5'* 

Seahawk 

16000 

90 

325 

$7% 

7 

7% 

7'* 7 

Senator 

11600 

49 

13700 

25 

TO 

25 

♦ 5 25 20 

Symour 

9500 

150 

200 

$24'* 

24% 

24% 

26% 24'* 

Shima 

45000 

no 

7100 

S10' a 

10 

10V$ 

10% 10 

Sibola 

139400 

85 

2700 

130 

115 

125 

♦ 10 131 115 

Sienna Dev 

50700 

100 


3100 $5% 5% 5% ♦ % 5% 5 Vi 
13700 80 75 78 85 70 

3507 280 270 270 375 210 

1500 $39 38 38 + 2 39 33'* 

7300 190 180 180 206 175 

10100 $30% 28', 30% 30% 28'* 

700 $25 25 25 25 22 

‘ 229 215 -15 240 175 

30S 375 +25 375 300 

130 130 -10 155 130 

180 185 225 180 

25 25 43'* 10 

160 170 +1 175 150 

7 7% -1 9 7 


13425 230 
360 375 
721? 140 
62 185 
88000 29 
8700 170 
2550 $8 
450 $11 
152600 410 
563 30 

3500 260 
100 $23 


Synrgy 
Tagus 
Tally Res 
Tamarind 
Tandem 


Tor me* 


Warrants _. 

Nor ges wt 200 70 < 

Total sales* industrials; 

10 Advances, 7 Declines, 

VANCOUVER - 


11 

♦ l 11 

10 

Totem ind 

17000 

50 

40 

45 

400 

-10 430 

380 

Tracer Res 

41950 

220 

170 

200 

30 

30 

30 

Tran Pac 

74100 

165 

120 

145 

260 

260 

175 

Trident Res 

84700 

3uG 

245 

245 

23 

23 

23 

Tungores 

14000 

73 

62 

62 

“ignis 


Tnk mng 

26600 

130 

95 

100 

70 

70 

55 

Uke resor 

58800 

162 

90 

135 


AT 

894,753 

Untd Gunn 

13200 

66 

60 

66 

es. 

21 Unchanged 

Uni vex 

31000 

50 

40 

48 


Ni Cal Dev 75793 $17 
Norco 34000 320 

Norex Res 111400 81 

Nortek En 87925 $6% 6% 6% ♦ % 7 5% 

Northair 241860 585 530 545 ♦ 20595 450 


Acacia Min 

40600 

85 

60 

83 

♦ 23 

85 

4? 

Adoia 

64000 

60 

40 

43 

-12 

68 

30 

Aegean 

39300 

105 

100 

100 


125 

70 

Alcum Mng 

21300 

120 

96 

101 

—4 

150 

96 

Alina Inti 

28750 

75 

70 

75 

♦5 

80 

50 

All Star Res 42900 

67 

60 

65 

♦ 5 

67 

54 

Allwest Ind 

35150 

315 

235 

245 

—55 

94 

230 

Alto Ex 

14100 

135 

no. 

130 

♦ 25 135 

55 

Amark Ex 

67820 365 

295 

295 

-55 395 

250 

Amca Ind 

87200 

290 

240 

245 

-31 360 

52 

Amigo Svr 

6000 

48 

45 

48 

♦ 8 

50 

29 

A more 

23871 

150 

no 

120 

—20 170 

36 

Antrim Res 

4400 

90 

90 

90 

—2 

105 

90 

Arbor Res 

22000 

60 

55 

60 

♦ 5 

70 

50 

Aries Res 

25100 

160 

150 

150 

♦ 20 175 

70 

Arizako Mn 

12620 

38 

J7 

37 

♦ 2 

40 

23 

Ark Energy 

7700 

175 

‘fio 

140 

-20 175 

100 

Armor Res 

17800 

180 

170 

170 


180 

150 

Arrowhd 

24625 

45 

4 £ 

40 

—5 

45 

22 

Artilery 

40800 

99 

85 

♦ 9 

99 

43 

Ashcroft Rs 

64330 

385 

275 

3)0 

-60 415 

250 

Ashnoia 

31000 

80 

72 

80 

♦ 7 

90 

71 

Astra Res 

2000 

64 

60 

60 


70 

30 

Aurus Mng 

37600 

31 

28 

28 


34 

19 

Avalanche 

3400 

68 

55 

65 

-5 

70 

55 

a vance Inti 

7400 

80 

75 

79 

—6 

93 

60 

Aver ok 

84700 

275 

225 

230 


275 

93 

Banbury 

20700 

136 

125 

130 

—6 

160 

93 

Banqwest 

3000 

<2 

40 

40 

-5 

55 

35 

Bardmc 

900 

425 

400 

425 

♦ 25 425 

350 

Beach Gold 

77866 

68 

56 

56 

-11 

80 

51 

Beaver Gld 

10300 

175 

150 

160 

—15 175 

120 

Belmont 

117600 

180 

140 

150 

-20 185 

60 


Valdez Res 45800 40 


Clavtron 51000 170 145 145 —15 180 115 

Clear mine 37100 225 190 195 —20 240 140 

Cleaver Lk 121700 30 27 30 + 2 30 14 

Coast Int 136606 140 120 124 —11 155 30 

Cold Lk Res 16522 160 135 140 —10 160 -100 
Con Reactr 64300 65 51 54 —1 65 31'* 

Cont Mnrl S6188 300 215 220 +10 26 160 

Cornwall 161250 410 355 370 410 170 

Crescent 36695 230 200 220 + 20 325 191 


460 475 -115650 330 

100 102 -13 125 38 


22 13 

275 95 


65 40 

70 50 

48 20 

195 130 

i 185 100 

48 30 

750 395 
) 175 82 

105 63 

132 70 


18 

220 140 


Gallahad 600 115 115 85 —15 115 

Gasllte • 4000 250 205 250 —40 300 zos 
Gavex Gold 97556 46 36'* 36V, -3** 49 34 

Gillian Min 163600 225 175 175 —5 225 84 

Gld Angel 53050 320 260 270 —40 330 105 

Gldn Shmrc 85800 95 85 85 —3 110 53 


5 51 25 


Gt Central 11500 66 55 66 + 6 78 _ 

Gt World 200950 290 185 215 +15 290 50 


235 160 


Hat Creek 9500 130 100 100 —25 150 52 

Hedlev Pac 9500 8! 29 80 81 50 

Hernlsphr 19600 220 »5 205* +5 220 90 

Hesca Res 37330 430 370 380 —45 620 330 

Hillside 16500 63 57 58 —5 70 35 

Himac Res 31400 145 130 138 —7 172 122 

Hoko 10100 .130 110 120 —2 180 53 

Interlake 374500 80 65 68 —2 90 30 

Itl Geogrpc 3560 125 125 125 165 99 

Itl Wellngtn 3600 86 84 85 +13 95 70 

Island Mng 21980 132 125 130 + 5 140 75 

Jalna Res 76400 145 130 135 + 5 147 95 

Jewel Res 1500 65 65 65 75 55 

Julia 39778 65 55 58 -2 80 36 

Justen Res 7800 150 131 140 150 120 

Kennedy 12500 110 95 100 —5 110 70 


-20 105 55 
♦ 75 255 68 


Marquis Dv 29000 105 99 100 —2 120 

Mecca Mr Is 76000 50 49 

Meridian 70410 100 75 . 

Molvmlte 85100 120 100 120 +10 120 55 


45 
80 
60 29 

no so 


83770 600 500 580 +10 625 225 


200 140 140 140 —10 210 140 


Panther Mn 20000 85 65 80 —5 90 47 

Prgn Res 16500 TOO 160 170 —20 225 126 

Pawnee 011 31200 14S 120 121 —14 160 85 

Pemb Star 1000 65 63 65 —5 74 38 


7300 235 225 235 +10 265 215 

54780 53 45 


Penn Egv 
Pntagn 

Petrox Pet 28000 99 90 90 —5 120 60 


130 

80 


12225 130 115 125 + 5 150 89 

172800 200 140 150 - 200 140 

200 38 38 38 


55 38 

_ „ .. .. 11 85 53 

61000 89 78 78 —9 9S 45 


Poseidon 

Ouinto Mng 98381 170 150 152 —13 180 83 


-16 95 
135 


61600 80 65 67 —3 100 35 


163 

-61 300 105 

Redfern 

11500 

100 

90 

100 

110 

75 

20 

—4 30 10 

Redid Res 

34800 

180 

160 

160 

—6 180 

80 

18 

20 15 ' 

Reef res 

59520 

550 

440 

470 

-65 550 

180 


24,220,934 

Regis 

89000 

36 

30 

36 

-7 38 

20 

es. 

35 Unchanged 

Rlchrock 

23000 

40 

35 

35 

-10 45 

29 


200 $41'* 41% 41'* ♦!'* 4lV, 35'* Sands Mis 1350 385 350 375 —25 42S 310 


9500 150 125 125 —7 150 80 


Silver Acor 12100 150 120 120 —20 152 101 

Slver Cloud 33200 70 60 60 —10 80 46 

Slver Prmc 55450 340 305 330 + 5 340 155 

Spectrum 81000 65 52 60 + 4 65 30 

Stateside 15800 145 120 120 -15 150 85 

Sunrise Co 30200 48 41 43 —S 58 25 

S s IceCrem <000 ?8 26 26 —4 32 20 


122200 205 180 185 -15 740 170 

98600 72 57 57 -10 80 50 

125000 66 50 64 66 50 

60000 67 50 50 —II 72 26 

Thndrblt 52100 125 115 115 —I 130 90 


4600 280 260 270 -10 320 260 


95 

Sft 


48 -7 70 20 


62913 195 165 165 -10 235 140 

Velvet Expl 21000 87 80 80 —4 87 56 

Viscount 29500 170 150 150 —5 175 72 

Warrior 37600 4)0 370 375 —25 430 310 

West J Pete 30500 210 180 205 + 30 226 170 

West Trend 270390 320 260 280 + 5 320 200 

Westwd en 113490 600 455 495 —85 610 150 

Wildcat 31250 135 120 130 —5 175 80 

Wilwood 21000 155 130 144 —11 170 100 


Windarra 

7100 

75 

70 

70 

-5 88 

56 

Wrld cment 

T59720 

174 . 71 

170 

-50 299 

50 

Yamto 

104300 

375 

300 

315 

♦ 15 375 

1)2 

Zodiac 

18500 

160 

145 

150 

-10 200 

100 

Wirrinlt 

and 

Rights 


River mtn r 

54900 

26 

22 

22 

—3 26 

22 

Banbury w 

22000 

25 

21 

25 

35 

9 

Cornwall w 

I6J900 

90 

63 

66 

90 

** 63 

Eaglet w c 

4100 

70 

56 

56 

—9 70 

33 

Himac w 

15000 

17 

15 

15 

-1 35 

15 

MSR w 

51600 

12 

10 

11 

—1 15 

10 

Nor quest w 

4500 

280 


270 

-15 350 

105 

Nugoid w 

26700 

m 

55 

70 

♦ 15 100 

30 

Reef w 

17600 

215 

187 

187 

-14 215 

41 

Santa Sar w 

14500 

375 

335 

370 

♦ 85 375 

105 

Svr Acorn w 

12100 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

Thdblt Wt 

17)00 

10 

6 

6 

-6 20 

5 

Tms pac wt 

23300 

50 

30 

40 

♦ 18 50 

25 

Tungco w 

31000 

12 

10 

12 

25 

8 

VAD w 

77100 

35 

25 

15 

♦ 6 40 

20 

Wesfn w 46100 215 

Total sales, curbs 

150 

160 

-60 235 35 

13.448.998 

66 Advances. 

142 Declines, 

39 unchanged 

TOTAL VOLUME THIS WEEK 


38.564.685 


Chinese 

labor 

growing 


WASHINGTON (AP) — China has made 
significant progress toward full employ¬ 
ment for more than 400 million persons in 
its labor force, largely in agriculture, 
the World Bank said this week. 

The success -ot China in providing em¬ 
ployment for a work force that grew by 
roughly 150 million people between 1957 
and 1975 was attributed primarily to agri¬ 
culture, which absorbed tvfo-thirds of 
those new workers. 


In a report published by the World Bank 
Thomas Rawski, associate professor of 
economics at University of Toronto, said 
the substantial increase in demand for 
farm labor stemmed from collectivization 
of farming and the rapid growth in man¬ 
ufactured farm supplies. 

In recent years, he says, communes have 
mobilized labor for^projects in water 
conservation, land improvement, road- 
building and irrigation. 


FAST VOLVO SERVICE 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


Import Car 
Specialists 

3319 DOUGLAS Across from ICBC 384-1161 


SILVER COINS WANTED 

Canada 1967 and prior 
U.S. 1964 and prior 
G.B. 1946 and prior 
Olympic Silver Coins 

(no nickels needed) 

JOHN & GLENDA CHERAMY 
384-7622 



FRANCHISES AVAILABLE 

FOR REFINED EATING ESTABLISHMENTS 

Founders of a well-known Vancouver restaurant, 
featuring fine fare in a warm-like atmosphere, with 
proven sales of over $1 million annually have a 
number of franchise opportunities in selected 
areas of Greater Vancouver and Victoria. An in¬ 
vestment of $50,000 plus architect s fees gives 
qualified parties and established name noted for 
hospitality, proven quality menus and recipes, staff 
training, construction and operational supervision, 
volume purchasing, etc. 

Interested groups or individuals should phone 
(604) 687-4929 during business hours or write to: 
Vincent R. Fourt, 200 Guinness Tower, 1055 West 
Hastings St., Vancouver, B.C. V6E 2E9 for detailed 
Information about the franchises and locations for 
these exclusively-styled restaurants. 


Hares sub/eef to 
change without 
notice 

$500 minimum 


Guaranteed Investment Certificates 

5-YEAR INTEREST COMPOUNDED ANNUALLY 


EATON/^ay frust 

EATON'S Victoria 382-7141 
BAY Victoria 385-1311 

Momtof Canada Dapoalt Insurance Corporation 


& Crown Trust & 

COMPANY 


INVESTIGATE OUR 
SELF-ADMINISTERED 
RRSP FEE SCHEDULE 


Our fee for acting as trustee and custodian is 
calculated as a percentage of the market value 
of the fund at the end of each'year in accordance 
with the following: 

.75 of 1% on the first $50,000; 

.50 of 1% on the excess over $50,000. 


r 


---'N 

ANNUITIES 



CANADA LIFE 

^ ASSURANCE CO. 


Why not contact me NOW to see if 
you have income which qualifies for 
tax reiiel through the purchase of an 
income averaging annuity. The 
deadline for the purchase is Feb. 
29th. 1980. for the 1979 tax year. 


KEVIN M. D. MCLAUGHLIN 

ASSOCIATE ESTATE SERVICE DIVISION 
680-1070 DOUGLAS ST. But. 385-1484 

VICTORIA. B.C. V8W 2C4 Ret 477-7150 


SAVE ENERGY! 1 

with Low Cost Storm Windows 


Cut window heat loss in half 
with TEMP- RITE® storm 
windows and save on heating 
costs! Acrylic or vinyl windows 
are easily installed, cost 50% 
less than conventional ones. 



flrk Solar Products 

QUADRA STREET 
^ VICTORIA. B C S8* 7M] 




Interest on 
2-Year Certificates 
Interest Paid 
Semi-annually or Paid 
MONTHLY on amounts 
of $10,000 or more. 


Guaranteed Investment Certificates 

Crown a Trust 

Eighty-three years of Personal Service 

1306 Douglas St. Victoria, B.C. 383-3711 
Member of Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 
John D. Jameson, Manager 

Mail today for more information 

Name_ 

Address_ 

_Postal Code_ 

CROWN TRUST COMPANY 

1306 Douglas St. 

Victoria, B.C. V8W2E8 


s Crown Trust & 

COMPANY 


We offer the best 
chequing account 
ANYWHERE 


• FREE Unlimited Chequing 

• FREE Personalized Cheques 

• FREE Monthly Statements 

• FREE Transfers from Savings 

• INTEREST on your money 
Complete Deposit by Mail Service 


Minimum annual fee -$100 
No charge for security transactions. 

Crown s Trust 

1306 Douglas St Victoria 0 C V8W 2E8 (604,. 303 3711 


CHEQUE IT OUT! 

CROWN TRUST 

1306 Douglas Street Victoria, B C V8W 2E8 Telephone 383-3711 
Eighty-three years of personal service 
Member Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Your RRSP Can 
Beat Inflation... 

What it takes 


is a Plan! 


You can invest — in an RRSP for example, not just 
to generate tax savings (all RRSPs save taxes). . 
but to make your money grow 


INDUSTRIAL GROWTH FUND 

No. 1 over 11 yrs. up 570.9% (includes divi¬ 
dends). ' 


OUR COMPANY HAS OVER 
25 RRSPs TO CHOOSE FROM 

For more information without 
obligation, phone or write to ... 


CANADIAN GAS and ENERGY ' 

' (Specialty fund) No. 1 over 5 yrs. up 342.7%. 

GOLD TRUST 

(Specialty fund) Qualifies as a RRSP diversified 
in Canadian-owned mining companies. 1 yr. up 
110 %. 


NAME_ 

ADDRESS. 


GREAT PACIFIC MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. 

906 HILLSIDE AVENUE, 
VICTORIA, B.C., V8T 1Z8. 
PHONE 383-4178. 








































































BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 9 



Give the little lady a hand 


Torch-wielding worker is unmoved 
by hundreds of pleading fingers dur¬ 
ing reconditioning and glove cleaning 
operation. Between 200,000 amd 300,- 
000 industrial gloves are recycled each 
week by glove division of Work Wear 


Corporation of Canada Ltd. at firm’s 
Toronto plant. Gloves come from such 
industries as automotive, steel, glass, 
electical appliances, which can save 
about 50 per cent of their work glove 
costs by having them reconditioned. 


REGISTERED RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLANS 


12 


% 


for a 5-year term 

$500 MINIMUM DEPOSIT 

NORFOLK TRUST 

777 FORT STREET 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Phone 388-5153 

Member Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 


. 12 %% 

2, 3, 4 years 11 3 /«% 

PI 

florfolk Tru/t 

(Serving Canadians 
Since 1916) 


AT 

MAYFAIR INSURANCE AGENCIES LIMITED 

OPEN SIX DAYS A WEEK FOR 
YOUR CONVENIENCE 



Mayfair 


SHOPPING CENTRE 


PHONE 

386-6343 


RRSP 

Registered 
Retirement _ 

Savings Plan _ 

13 


Now — you can 
make a change 
for the better. 

Ask us how we can 
help ybu transfer your 
present RRSP to earn First 
City's most aggressive rate. 
No lees. Phone today. 


FmsiCilKlHusi 


A Canadian First 


724 Fort St /Victoria, B C./V8W 1H2 
Phone (604) 383-4141 


Prospecting boom 
throughout B.C. 


By GARRY KAIRBAIRN 

VANCOUVER (CP) — 
Everything from old-style 
gold pans to electronic 
equipment that eavesdrops 
on U.S. naval signals is being 
thrown into British Colum¬ 
bia’s prospecting boom. 

Lured by rising metal 
prices, swarms of small¬ 
time prospectors are comb¬ 
ing the mountains nf British 
Columbia, searching for a 
range of minerals from gold 
to molybdenum. 

In. Vancouver, interior de¬ 
signer attends night classes 
in how to pan for gold, while 
in the rugged interior a one¬ 
time Winnipeg school teach¬ 
er scampers along moun¬ 
tainsides on a similar quest. 

Meanwhile, other men use 
$1,400 instruments that pick 
up very low-frequency radio 
signals sent out by U.S. Navy 
stations to enable strategic 
missile submarines to calcu¬ 
late their positions precise¬ 
ly- 

By watching for electro¬ 
magnetic variatons in the 
signals as they pass through 
rock masses, the hunters can 
get valuable clues to mineral 
locations — or perhaps find 
only a rock fault. 

Sometimes they get more 
than they expected — one 
group in recent months 
found unusual interruptions 
in the signals. Discreet in¬ 
quiry determined that one 
U.S. station was varying the 
signal, which penetrates 
well to deep-running subma¬ 
rines, to send a morse code 
message during the Iranian 
crisis. 

Exploration teams work- 


GILLAIN 

Treatment for 

ALCOHOLISM 

with Dignity... 

Phone 

( 604 ) 656-5525 

RO Box 2369. Sidney 
British Columbia. 
V8L3Y3 


ANNUAL RATE 
OF RETURN 

41 % 

CANADIAN GAS AND EN¬ 
ERGY FUND is committed to 
the pursuit of capital gains. 
It strives for superior results 
by investing exclusively in 
Canada s dynamic oil. gas 
and energy stocks. 

Over the past year, the price 
per share increased 82%. 
Over the past 5 years the 
price increased 419.4%, 
this generated an annual 
rate of return of 41%. 

It qualifies for R.R.S.P. and 
R.H.O.S.P. For a prospec¬ 
tus and more details call the 
mutual fund specialist. 

CLIFF LATHAM 

Midland Dtharty Ltd. 

734 Broughton St 
Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 
388-6411 

Canadian gas and 

energy 

2-1 lund limited + 


Member ol Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

1 ■ " 





DEAN SAWYER 


Dean Sawyer has been 
elected president of the 
Sales and Marketing Execu¬ 
tives of Victoria. The owner- 
manager of Sawyer Sewing 
Centres Ltd. was Installed in 
office during the SME's 
January meeting. Other ex¬ 
ecutive members are: John 
Wrobel of Cubbons Building 
Supply. Andrew Lynch of 
Monday Publications. Ken 
Mickelberry of Old Country 
Rentals. Norma Fitzsim¬ 
mons of Island Florist. Her¬ 
man Hamhuis of Goodwill 
Bottling. Linda Hildebrand 
of Drake Personnel. Don 
McCormack of Hygrade 
Radio and past president 
Bill Johner of Royal Trust. 

■*. » 


ing for targe companies have 
access to even more sophis¬ 
ticated equipment, including 
some designed to read natu¬ 
ral radio frequencies gen¬ 
erated by the earth. 

But despite all the elec¬ 
tronic gadgetry and expen¬ 
sive aerial surverys, one 
major-corporation execu¬ 
tive said, there are still vast 
opportunities for the lone 
prospector who picks up 
rocks and brings them in for 
chemical and other analysis. 

“The basic tool in British 
Columbia is still your chem¬ 
istry coupled wth geology,’’ 
said Don Cross, western di¬ 
visional manager for Noran- 
da Mines Ltd. 

“B.C. is still wide open for 
prospecting." 

In an interview, Cross said 


30 per cent of Noranda’s 
work is on prospects brought 
to it by individuals and ju¬ 
nior exploration ventures. In 
some cases, he said, the 
property has been inherited 
from a grandparent and has 
remained undeveloped for 
two generations waiting for 
higher prices. 

The role of small indepen¬ 
dents,%e predicted, will in¬ 
crease as high metal prices 
attract exploration and 
make small mining opera¬ 
tions economic: 

"Your’re going, to see a 
myriad of small mines. It’ll 
be like the '30s or earlier.” 

The record or near-record 
exploration expenditures of 
1979, he said, will be eclipsed 
by 1980 as activity increases 
25 to 50 per cent. 


Bank denying sale 
forced by Grenada 

TORONTO (UPC) — The Canadian Imperial Bank of 
Commerce will sell its branch on the Caribbean is¬ 
land of Grenada to the government-owned bank, but 
denied Friday the move was forced on it by the revolu¬ 
tionary government. 

"There’s been nothing forced on the bank," CIBC 
spokesman Everett McCrimmon said. “It’s not a forced 
sale.’’ 

The Commerce issued a brief news release saying its 
St. George’s branch would be sold to the National Com¬ 
mercial Bank of Grenada Ltd. 

"The sale, which wijl be concluded on Feb. 29, repre¬ 
sents the culmination of discussions between the Com¬ 
merce, the National Commercial Bank of Grenada Ltd. and 
the Peoples Revolutionary Government of Grenada," said 
the release. 

McCrimmon refused to discuss the factors that led to 
the decision. “I think that's everything we can say. un¬ 
fortunately,” he said referring to the news release. "I 
think you'll have to put your own interpretation on it.” 

The branch, which employed 20 Grenadians, was estab¬ 
lished in 1963. McCrimmon said that other private banks 
continue to do business in Grenada. 

The People's Revolutionary Government led by 35- 
year-old lawyer Maurice Bishop took control of the island 
last year. 


Moly price doubles 

VANCOUVER (CP) — While the glamor of gold con¬ 
tinues to dominate "public attention, British Columbia's 
metals boom is solidly based on more prosaic substances 
such as copper, lead and tongue-twisting molybdenum. 

The value of metals production jumped 62 per cent 
last year — to $1.33 billion in 1979 from $820 million in 
1978, government estimates show. 

Gold and silver production each rose in value by about 
80 per cent for totals of $86 million each, but were be¬ 
hind copper at $653 million and molybdenum at $322 
million. Lead totalled $93 million. 

The increases came almost wholly from higher world 
prices. Molydenum production declined in quantity while 
almost doubling in value from 1978’s $168 million. 

A hard, silvery-white metal used in alloys with steel to 
make high-speed tools* moly was not mined in British 
Columbia 20 years ago, but the province now is the world’* 
second largest molybdenum producer. 

With the general metals surge, provincial officials esti¬ 
mate, more than $l billion could be spent on mine 
development and expansion in the first few years of this 
decade. 

In addition to metals, the B.C. mining industry last 
year produced $85 million in industrial minerals, $164 
million in structural materials like gravel and $524 mil¬ 
lion in coal. 

The 11.8 million tonnes of coal, up from 9.5 million 
tonnes and $382 million in 1978, is almost 15 times the 
levels of the 1960s. Production is expected to rise fur¬ 
ther, to 30 million tonnes in the 1990s and 60 million 
tonnes by 2000. 

More than $1 billion in coal developments being planned 
— involving Japanese, Romanian, German, Dutch and 
Italian investors — are to dot the B.C. side of the 1,000-by- 
40-kilometre coal belt on the Alberta-B.C. border. 

Once salable only to Japan’s steel mills, the B.C. 
metallurgic coal has since found additional markets in 
South Korea. Taiwan, Brazil. Mexico, the United States, 
Denmark, Belgium and Romania. Ontario markets for the 
B.C. coal are also expected to grow. 


FOR ANNUITIES 

MEET THE WOMAN 
FROM SUN LIFE 

CALL 

RHONA HUME 

ASSISTANT SALES MGR 
814—1175 DOUGLAS—382-3145 




TED PHILLIPS 


TOP 

SALESMAN 

Arthur Block. President of 
Block Bros, and Bill Wonna- 
cott, Manager of the Sidney 
office, wish to congratulate 
MR. TED PHILLIPS tor being 
Top Salesman for the month 
of January. If you are consid¬ 
ering selling or buying real 
state give TED PHILUPS a 
call. 

656-5337 


BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD. 
656-5584 


TERM DEPOSITS 


($5,000 MINIMUM) 

SAMPLE RATES* 


100 - 

180 DAYS 


2 

YEARS 


3 

YEARS 

OR: OUR BEST 
DAILY INTEREST 
SAVINGS RATE: 

(Subject to $5,000 
minimum monthly balance) 


m 


13 

1 2 m 

102 % 

12 


%% 


Your money is guaranteed without limit by the 
Provincial Share and Deposit Guarantee Fund 
* Annual rales subject to confirmation 


VICTORIA 

PUBLIC 

SAVINGS 

Credit Union 


v> 


547 Michigan Street, 382-5105 
710 Broughton Street, 385-1437 
1601 Blanshard Street, 388-5554 



The Cash Plan 

YORKSHIRE TRUST has a better way. 

One, and only one Registered Retirement Savings 
Plan is inflation adjusted. The CASH PLAN from 
Yorkshire Trust. 

At Yorkshire, your interest is compounded semi¬ 
annually, then adjusted for inflation, based on the 
average monthly change in the Consumer Price Index. 

So, besides saving for your retirement, reducing your 
taxes, and paying you a high rate of interest, 

Yorkshire goes one better Interest adjusted to 
inflation! There are no fees and no minimums to 
* start your R.S.P., and transfers from other 
companies will be handled at no charge. 


•Rate subject to change. 


W YORKSHIRE 

TRUST COMPANY 


In your best interest! 


Vancouver, B.C. 

900 West Pender Street.685-3711 

590 West Pender Street.685-3711 

2996 Granville Street.738-7128 

130 East Pender Street.687-7797 

6447 Fraser Street.324-6377 


New Westminster, B.C. 

538 6th Street.625-1.616 

White Rock, B.C. 

1424 Johnston Roa<K.531-8311 

Victoria, B.C. 

737 Fort Street.384-0514 













































































✓ 


10 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


BUSINESS 



WELL’S 


MOVING & STORAGE LTD. 


630 ESQUIMALT 

384-7191 



$3 billion going 
to RRSP funds 

Late rush unavoidable headache 


NELS UNICUME 

• LONG INSTANCE 

• LOCAL MOVING 



"The people’s choice — since 1921" 

-_• OVERSEAS 

* S™?!?i ER ZED SHIPPING MEMBER 

STORAGE SPECIALISTS ALLIED VAN LINES 


VICTORIA < 
PUBLIC 
SAVINGS 



No Fees. 

Rate reviewed 
Quarterly.. 
Term deposits 
available. 






AUTO INSURANCE 

WE OFFER 

• DELUXE COVERAGE 

TO MEET TODAY’S NEEDS 

• SUPERIOR CLAIMS SERVICE 

WITH THE PERSONAL TOUCH 


@ 


■ For the PEST COVERAGE 
and the FASTEST SERVICE, see us!’’ 

Cumberbirch Insurance 


Agencies Ltd. 


1314 Quadra St. (between Johnson and Yates) 1-25 388-4221 


ITbore. d Campbell 
Designer-Builders Co. Ltd. 



ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF THEIR 
NEW OFFICES AT 

1115 LANGLEY STREET 

THIS MOVE WILL BETTER SERVE OUR CLIENTS 
IN THE AREAS OF: 

• Planning and architectural programming 

• Design 

• Solar energy consultation 

• Construction management 

• Restorations and renovations 

• New construction 


Doug Campbell B. Arch. 
Tom Moore B. Arch. 



ALLAN TOLSMA AGENCIES LTD. 


MOVED 


to 


2535 GOVERNMENT ST. 

(Now across from RUSS HAY BICYCLES) 
Right behind former location 

NOW IS THE TIME TO 
RENEW YOUR INSURANCE 


Ample Parking 
Open 9-5:30 Daily 
Monday to Saturday 

385-6313 


OPEN 9-9 Mon.-Fri. 
Sat. 9-5:30 
Feb. 18-29 




(® 0 y?& n ® i 


MONTREAL (CP) — Close to $3 billion 
— enough to build five Olympic stadiums 
like the one here — will be socked away by 
the end of the month by taxpayers pursu¬ 
ing the elusive income-tax refund. 

That’s how much 1.6 million Canadians 
are expected to put into registered retire¬ 
ment savings plans (RRSPs) — the little 
man’s biggest tax shelter. 

Much of the money will change hands 
just before Feb. 29, the deadline for 
making contributions deductible from 1979 
income. 

THE LAST-MINUTE RUSH is a strain 
on the banks and trust companies, the most 
aggressive sellers of RRSP plans. But they 
cannot afford to sit on the sidelines; there’s 
too much money involved. 

About $2.4 billion was poured into RRSPs 
in the 1977 tax year, and another $2.6 billion 
in 1978, says Revenue Canada. That’s al¬ 
most double the amount taxpayers put into 
the Canada and Quebec pension plans. 

Since 1976, taxpayers haye put more into 
registered retirement savings plans than 
private pension plans. 

Ottawa introduced the RRSP in 1957 to 
give self-employed people a chance to 
build a retirement fund. By 1971, contribu¬ 
tions amounted to only $320 million. 

THE BIG SURGE for RSSPs followed 
Edgar Benson's tax reforms in 1972 which 
raised the maximum allowable contribu¬ 
tions and made the RRSP a tax break for 
almost anybody with something to invest¬ 
ment. 

Although instant tax deductions may be 
the main reason why many consumers 
invest in a plan, the RRSP is intended to 
allow us to build up a substantia) re¬ 
tirement nest egg. 

Interest or capital gains earned on con¬ 
tributions to an RRSP aren’t taxed so long 
as the plan is operational. 

Sometime between age 60 and 71, the 
RRSP owner must use the proceeds of his 
or her plan to buy either an annuity from p 
life insurance company or a so-called 
registered retirement income fund. The 
retirement income provided by these plans 
is taxable. 

IF AN OWNER CANCELS a plan to get 
at his savings, the proceeds are taxed 
during the year when the plan is terminat¬ 
ed. If that happens to be a year of low- 
earnings — for instance, if the owner is 
unemployed — the proceeds are taxed at a 
low rate. 

Competition among financial institutions 
has given consumers a huge number of 
options to choose from, enough, in fact, to 



CLOCtf 

REPAIRS 

L. 0. FRANK 

JEWELLER and 
WATCHMAKER 
4-720 Yates St. 
385-3021 


JEWELLERY 
APPRAISALS 

WE BUY OLD GOLD 

G. W. Frank Gem Labs Ltd. 

720 YATES 38W3841 

»_L»_„ 


On Vancouver 
Island there is a 
new number for 
quality annual 
report printing: 

656-0171 


Manning-Re 



P.O. Box 2608 
Sidney, B.C. V8L 40 


ANNUAL RATE 
OF RETURN 

35% 

GROWTH EQUITY FUND 
has achieved a price in¬ 
crease of 339% over the 
past five years — an 
average annual rate of 
return of 35%. 

It qualifies for RRSP. 
RHOSP and Pension 
Fund investment. 

For more details and a 
prospectus, call the mu¬ 
tual fund specialist. 

CUFF LATHAM 

Midland Doherty Ltd. 

734 Broughton St. 
Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 

388-6411 

growth 

equity fund ltd. 


! 6 > 


confuse anybody looking for a "best” 
plan. 

As with any investment, there are RRSP 
options for every taste. They range from 
the safe, rock-of-Gibraltar package with 
limited growth potential to riskier pack¬ 
ages which promise larger gain. There is 
also plenty of middle ground. 

Then there are a maze of fees to consider 

— opening fees, administrative fees, 
trustee fees and termination fees. They 
vary from plan to plan. 

SAFE RRSPs are the so-called guaran¬ 
teed plans that banks and trust companies 

— and a bear stock market in the mid-1970s 

— made popular. 

These can be simple cash deposit plans 
that cam interest at a level linked to pre¬ 
vailing savings-account interest rates. Or 
they can be term deposits or guaranteed 
investment certificates offering a fixed 
rate of interest over a fixed period. 

Safety, in the form of a guaranteed plan, 
is clearly the Canadian way in RRSPs. 

A recent survey by Montreal-based Pir- 
beck Investment Management Ltd. counts 
$2.9 billion in 35 guaranteed funds eligible 
for RRSP investment. By contrast, the 65 
stock funds which could the basis for the 
riskier, equity-based RRSPs had assets of 
$1.33 billion. 

BUT THIS YEAR, promoters of mutual 
funds which invest mainly in the stock 
market are hoping to get a larger share of 
the RRSP market. 

Since their value is determined by the 
ups and downs of the market, these equity- 
based RRSPs are riskier than the guaran¬ 
teed plans. But after two years of a 
bouyant stock market, the return front, 
these equity-based RRSPs has been much 
greater than those of the guaranteed plans, 
an important consideration for the in¬ 
vestor worried about inflation. 

RRSP funds based on bonds or mort¬ 
gages rank somewhere between the 
guaranteed funds and the equity funds in 
terms of risk. 

However, recent sky-high interest rates 
have tended to depress the bond market 
and push down demand for mortgages, 
which is bad news for people whose RRSPs 
are based on these investments. 

INVESTORS WHO BELIEVE they can 
do better than the banks and trust com¬ 
panies can run their own retirement plans, 
but have to register the plan with a trust 
company. 

And life insurance companies, the big 
RRSP sellers from 1957 until the banks and 
trust companies moved in after Benson’s 
reforms, sell various annuities as RRSPs. 


*100,000 NET INCOME 

On approximately 700,000 gross sales. Well es¬ 
tablished automotive retail centre in a prime loca¬ 
tion. Excellent experienced staff in place. Purchas¬ 
er to receive long lease and option to purchase site 
property. Ideal for experienced business manager. 
Price $300,000, plus inventory. 

Conlidentlal enquiries to: 


Onluhc. 

TH mI Zifl 

WESTERN HOMES LTD. 
V1037 Ctovfdf M6-M94 ^ 


ALLAN TRELFORD 

386-3494 

(24 hours) 


Auto Insurance 


Autoplan lime approaches, and we are ready 
Our expert staff at Broad Street is waiting to assist you, 
quickly and painlessly. 

We do it all, from personal autos to commercial fleets 
Let us work for you — today. 



HARBORD COMPANY 


1220 BROAD ST. 
388-5533 

8:00-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 
<*00-4:00 Feb. 16-21 


MEDICAL OFFICE 


1105 Pandora Ave. — 550 and 471 square feet. 
Partitioned office space in Medical Arts Building. 
Immediate possession. 

DOWNTOWN OFFICES 

Various sizes, reasonable rents. Modern, air con¬ 
ditioned building opposite city parkade 


RETAIL SPACE 


Downtown mall. 544 square feet, small shop on 
pedestrian walk-through, good traffic 


mPL 

MORGUARD PROPERTIES LTD. 

620-880 Douglas 383-4168 


BEST IS 
BETTER 


GUARANTEED 
SAVINGS RRSP 

. 55 % 

YIELD* 


12 


*12% calculated daily and 
compounded quarterly yields 12.55 o 

Any Registered Retirement Savings 
Plan is a good way to defer taxes and 
earn interest. 


Hut not all RRSP* 


alike. 


If you aren't getting all these 

advantages, transfer your RRSP to 

Westcoast Savings. 

• 12% interest, calculated daily. 

• Interest paid and compounded 
quarterly. 

• Official receipts issued weekly in 
January and February. 

• Quarterly sJfiHjynents. 

• Flexibility — add to it at any time. 

• No fees of any kind. 

• Interest adjusted to competitive 
long term rates every Jan. 1 and 
July 1. 

• It's easy to transfer to Westcoast 
Savings and we pay interest from 
the day we receive your plan. 


GUARANTEED 
FIXED TERM RRSP 


up to 

12 


. 25 % 


I year term 

2, 3, 4 and 5 year term 


12.25“ 

11“ 



• No fees or charges ol any kind 

• Withdrawable at predetermined 
rates. 

• Interest paid and comf4n£nd 
annually. 

• Official receipts issued weekly in 
January and February * 

• Quarterly statements. 

• A term investment that gives a 
high guaranteed interest rate from 
I to 5 years. 

• It's easy to transfer to Westcoast 
Savings and we pay interest trom 
the day we receive your plan. 

Come and see us. Get the BEST* Plan. 

Its better than money in the bank. 



* Begin Earning & Save Taxes 


tii 


WESTCOAST SAVINGS CREDIT UNION 

Better than money in the bank. 


Oak Bay 

20t>7 Cadboro Bay 
595-1432 

I squimalt 

1234 Esquimalt 
388-7171 


Col wood 

1°13 Sooke 
478-5534 

Oak Bay Village 

2255 Oak Bav Avc*. 
595-4342 


Downtown 

1111 Government 

388-7535 

James Bay 

239 Men/ies 
386-0355 


Sooke 

6689 Sooke 
642-5233 

Hillside 

770 Hillside lat Blanshard) 
388-7545 


All deposits are fully guaranteed without limit by the Provincial Credit Union Share 
and Deposit Guarantee fund. 


— w 


























































































WANTED 

MODERN MOTEL IN VICTORIA AREA 

50-70 Unit*. All Inquiries handled discreetly. 

PLEASE CALL GLEN ROBERTSON 

382-8101 or res. 592-9776 

National Trust Co. (3440-A Douglas St) 


BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST. Sun., February 17, 1980 11 


BOND WEEK: Inflation fuels more investor worry 


ROYAL OAK INDUSTRIAL PARK 


wm 

i 


■ 


3.15 ACRES — PRIME LIGHT 
INDUSTRIAL LAND 

If you are looking for thfe 
ideal site to relocate or expand 
to, this opportunity to join 
several well established national 
companies should not be missed. 
Strategically located on prime 
arterial routes to serve 
Greater Victoria .^nd Up Island. B 

RICHARD HOLMES BRIAN SPARK ■ 

ijlmiUtion, Jbttlg| 

1000 Government St. 384-8124 I 

mumi 

ANNUITIES 

Lifetime! 

Income 
Averaging! 

Commutable! 

For maximum return, your annuity must be tailored to 
your personal circumstances. 

FOR SPECIALIST CONFIDENTIAL ADVICE AND 
BROKERAGE SERVICE: Cqll or write 

” SAM MATHERS or ERNEST BELAND 

Associates, the Estate Service Division 

CANADA LIFE ASSURANCE CO. 

1070 DOUGLAS 1-5 385-1484 

REGISTERED RETIREMENT 

SAVINGS PLANS 

TAX SAVINGS AND RETIREMENT 
INCOME IN ONE PACKAGE 
Four plans to choose from: 

1. Flexible Retirement Savings Plan 

• Interest calculated on the daily balance 

• No lock-in 

2. Fixed Term Retirement Savings Plan 

• Term — one to five years 
9 No fees 

3. Sell-Administered Retirement Savings Plan 

• Mixed investments available 

• All government returns and statements 
prepared tor you 

4. Dominion Compound Fund — R.R.S.P. 

9 Equity based 

• 1979 growth 24.7% 

Branches in British Columbia located in 
Vancouver, New Westminster and Victoria 
Come in and talk to one of our friendly start about 
your Retirement Savings Plan, before February 
29th. 

Victoria Branch 
1113 Blanshard Street 
Phone 386-3534 


TORONTO (CP) — Prices 
declined in active trading on 
the Canadian bond market 
this week depressed by bad 
news of inflation in an atmo¬ 
sphere of general uncer¬ 
tainty. 

The short end of the mar¬ 
ket dropped a half-point. 
Mid-, long-term, provincial 
and corporate issues fell 
three points. 

Dealers said professionals 
continued to dominate trad- 
ing with accounts hanging in 
the sidelines as participants 
continued to avoid long-term 
borrowing. 

An analyst said between 
$500-million and $750-mil!ion 
of new debt financing is 
being quietly arranged in a 
sudden rush of private deals 
with Canadian financial in¬ 
stitutions. The activity was 
caused by the collapse of 
prices in publicly traded 
bonds and continued chaotic 


PRESTIGE 

SUPERB LADIES’ 
WEAR SHOP 

Excellent Downtown 
location — exceptional 
Growth and Net. 

*600,000 

Details to qualified Principals 
and courtesy to Agents. 

EXCLUSIVE 

HERB McDANNOLD 
382-9191 384-6768 

the Permanent 

702 Fort St. ! I4 


conditions in debt markets, 
which make it difficult bor¬ 
rowers to float new offer¬ 
ings. 

One such financing was 
made by Union Gas Ltd. 
which has raised 160-million 
through the sale of 20-year 
debentures to eight buyers. 
The company paid 13.37 per 
cent for the' money. 

Also, the Federal Business 
Development Bank has 
raised 165-million through 

Dividends 

Aluminum Co. of Canada Ltd., four 
per cent pfd., 25 cents; $2 pfd,, 50 
cents; both payable June 1, record 
May 12; four per cent ptd., 57 cents, 
May 31, record May 12. 

Canada Cement Lafarpe Ltd., 20 
cents, Feb. 29, record Feb. 20; V'j per 
cent pfd., 32.5cents, March 20, record 
Feb. 20. 

Crown Life Insurance Co., 60 cents, 
an increaseof 15 cents, April 1, record 
March 14. 


WANTED 

RECREATION 

BUSINESS 

For serious main¬ 
land purchaser. 

Patrick Supeene 

REALSPAN 
PROPERTIES LTD. 

UM4S4 (14 In.) 
47142*4 


the sale of five-year notes 
paying interest at 13.12 per 
cent. 

On Friday the U.S. Fed¬ 
eral Reserve Board in¬ 
creased its bink discount 
rate — the rate it charges on 
loans to its member com¬ 
mercial banks — to 13 per 
cent from 12 per cent, a 
move likely to send interest 
crease reflected the Re¬ 
serve's concern over eco- 


rates higher in Canadian and 
U.S. economy. The sharp in- 
nomic developments, 
including the large increase 
in the price of imported oil. 

Day-to-day money was 
available at 9% per cent. 
Three-month treasury bills 
traded at an average of 16.60 
per cent, up from 13.51 per 
cent last week and six-month 
bills at 13.76 per cent up from 
13.70 percent. 


OPEN HOUSE 

FRI., SAT., SUN. 2-4 P.M. 

#304 and #402 - 906 SOUTHGATE ST. 

Ideally situated next to Beacon Hill Park. Two 
deluxe condominiums, teaturing fireplace in spa¬ 
cious living room, ensuite plumbing and self-con¬ 
tained laundry area. Five top quality appliances 
included. Covered parking Only 14-unit building. 
Exclusively listed at $69,000 and $90,000. 

' In attendance 

BERNEIDA TAYLOR 382-9485 

““H SHIRLEY MOLLBERG 478-5327 

ri ROYAL TRUST 

._7 477-0191 and 3848001 ms 


COIN LAUNDROMAT^ 


CORDOVA BAY SEAVIEW 

OPEN SUN. 2-4 

4884 LOCHSIDE DRIVE 

Come and view this, 
luxurious 4-BR home 
and you will not be dis¬ 
appointed. Designed 
for the greatest use of 
light and space this 
quality home offers 
over 3,000 sq. ft. on 3 
levels. The BONUS is 
the PANORAMIC SEA- 
VIEW. MLS. 

FRED LERCH 479-0428 

THE PERMANENT 

3647 Shelbourne 477-0141 n 6 



‘ Vz ACRE — $64,900 

Older home with recent addition gives space for the 
growing family. 4 bedrooms, family kitchen, den or 
conversation area with fireplace. Views over city to 
Olympics. Close to elementary school and lots of room 
for gardens and play area. View exclusively with: 
479-1667 DOUG RELF 479-5761 

J. H. Whittome & Co. Ltd. 

Royal Oak Branch 


FAIRFIELD PLAZA IS 

EXPANDING NOW 




Canada Trust Realtor Cl 


WANTED RETAIL STORES 


Golden opportunity to get 
into established location 


750 SQ. FT. STORES 
AVAILABLE NOW!! 



Join Thrifty Food Store, TD Bank 
and other first class retailers. 

Many kinds of retail stores wanted. 

For plans and details, call owner COLLECT at 

685-8292 (Vancouver) 


THE 
BACKROOM 
GALLERY 

, Art Gallery and 
r Residence 
2070 Oak Bay Ave. 


This prestigious Oak Bay Gallery with 2100 sq. ft. on three 
levels is available for purchase. Gallery, framing and 
restoration facilities together with owner's suite represent 
a unique and exciting business opportunity. Please call, 
all enquiries through listing salesman. $135,000. 

D. C. BUTTERFIELD 

Northern Pacific Realty ltd. 479-1687 (24 hrs.) 



, / 

LORNE DOYLE 

Mr. James MacGregor, Manager of CANADA 
TRUST, is pleased to congratulate LORNE 
DOYLE on achieving top sales award for the 
month of January. 

For friendly, courteous service call 

595-1047 LORNE DOYLE 595-5131 


I! 


North WestTrust 


MATTICK'S FARM 

An Exciting Business Opportunity 

Rental Space available in a farmers' market at an established 
location in Cordova Bay. Ideal for fruit and vegetable outlet, garden centre, 
amusement rides for children, health food store, arts and crafts exhibits, 
bakery, tea house, etc., etc. Excellent traffic volume, access and parking. Ex¬ 
isting ^^ctures and expansion areas available. 

Contact Kathy Jawl — 658-5696 


UPLANDS WATERFRONT 

% acre of waterfront in one of Canada's most 
beautiful areas A spacious 5-bedroom home 
and a 16 x32' heated pool. What more could 
you ask for? Elegant living room with marble 
fireplace, separate dining room and large family 
kitchen with built-in cooking centre, dishwasher 
and garburator. Off the spacious hallway are 4 
bedrooms and a 5-piece bath; the master has its 
own 4-piece ensuite plus a walk-in closet. 
Downstairs is a rec. room with a rock fireplace 
wall and a large wet bar. A 5th bedroom with 
3-piece bath, the utility area, large office, plus a 
games room. The view over Cadboro Bay and 
the Yacht Club and out to the Strait is very lovely 
and ever changing 

Listed at $295,000. Exclusive listing with: 

386-7521 TOVE BARLOW 477-9859 
595-1535 JOHN JENKINS 388-5464 Pgr. 582 
BOORMAN INVESTMENT CO. LTD. 

612 Fort St. 2-17 


A UNIQUE COUNTRY ESTATE 



This very special west coast style residence located within five miles (8.05 km) 
of Victoria is set in a secluded 5-acre (2.02 ha) property overlooking meadow, 
pond and stream. Offering about 3800 sq. ft. (353.02 sq. m) which is planned 
for a family. 

OFFERED AT $425,000 by PETER NASH 598-3321 
JACK MEARS OAK BAY REALTY LTD. , 



Glen 


fom 


Lionel Walter 


Recognizes 
LIONEL WALTER 

as Vehicle 
Salesperson 
for the month of 
January 


Mafinend 

GtenOal t^ 

rora 

1060 YATES AT COOK, VICTORIA 


Lionel says: 

••• n 


Always 
Ask for 
Lionel” 

384-1144 




$1,000,000.00 VIEW! 

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4 
5002 GEORGIA PARK TERRACE 




This new exclusive listing has incredible views of ocean, 
mountains and the Gulf Islands. Set in a quiet residential 
cul-de-sac, the quality of construction must be seen to be 
fully appreciated. Massive entry hall provides easy access 
to the large LR with its feature FP (Travertine Marble 
Hearth), separate DR. large kitchen with eating area, and 
easy access to the large sundeck! Main floor also has 
large den. 2 pee, powder room, large master BR with 4 pee. 
ensuite. Downstair&tis fully finished with large farmily room 
with FP for entertaining and sliding doors through to the 
second sundeck and private garden. 3 more bedrooms with 
numerous buitt-ins, attractive 4 pee. bathroom, hobby shop, 
laundry room and plant room. OVER 3000 sq. ft. FINISHED! 
Call today for private viewing with exclusive agent. $153,- 
000 . 

385-7744 DALE BRIOGS 592-3978 

GARDNER REALTY (1979) LTD. »» 



JJJanftfienii fcBtatea 

A beautifully treed retreat located on the northern tip ot 'he 
Saanich Peninsula in the Municipality ot North Saani'h 
When completed LANDSEND FSTATFS will consist ut si*ty 
t ACRE LOTS, each backing onto a commonly av ned fo 
ACRE WILDERNESS PARK 

Services to include Paved Roads. Municip I Wntei CvElem 
and Hydro Service 

$35,500-$36,500 


RICK HAWKES 
721-5161 


DOUGLAS HAWKES LTD. 

384 7128 


I. 



















































































































12 THE C OLONIST. Sun., February 17. 1980 

VICE VERSA 
TRANSLATIONS 
598-7474 

jur unique specialty: translation ol 
documents, tapes, brochures, etc. 
from English to French ... or vice 
versa. Mailing address: 

H. Migeoo, 1754 Lalie St., 
Victoria, B.C., V8R SW4. M6 




BUSINESS 


EKTACHROME 

FILM PROCESSING 
DUPLICATE SLIDES r 


24 HOUR SERVICE 



city photo 


1227 Government 385-5633 
CAMERAS • PROJECTORS • DARKROOM • RENTALS 


"Everything 
you'll ever need 
—photooraphically 
that Is" 


MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING 
SERVICES DIRECTOR 


The Municipality of North Saanich on lower Vancouver 
Island requires a Director of Engineering Services immedi¬ 
ately. 

Duties will also include those of Subdivision Approving 
Officer or Assistant Approving Officer, and liaison with 
counterparts in other government agencies. 

Experience in the Municipal field essential. This is a position 
for a suitably qualified technician but Professional Engi¬ 
neers or similarly qualified persons are also invited to 
apply. 

Duties involve responsibility for the co-ordination of all 
outside works and services which include a small water 
distribution system, sewage collection system. Capital 
Works programs and all Municipally owned buildings and 
lands. 

Salary negotiable in the $20,000 to $25,000 per annum 
range commensurate with qualifications and experience. 
Usual Municipal fringe benefits included. 

Apply in writing before March 3rd to: 

Graeme & Murray Consultants Ltd., 
1137 Yates Street. 

Victoria. B.C. V8V 3N1 


APPRAISERS 


As members of the field appraisal team, experienced career-oriented 
appraisers are required by the B.C. Assessment Authority for the 
following offices: Coquitlam. Nanaimo. Courtenay. Vancouver and 
Terrace. 

These generalist appraisers will normally be assigned a geographic 
area and be responsible for carrying out and defending a variety of 
appraisals, including but not limited to: 

— residential 

— light commercial and industrial appraisals 

— specialized appraisals such as farm appraisals 

— related assignments in meeting organizational objectives 

The successful applicants will have a minimum of 2'h years directly 
related experience plus the successful completion of the first two years 
of the U.B.C. Diploma course or the successful completion of courses 
in the 100 series of the A.I.C. program. These positions require field 
work and travel necessitating a clear and valid B.C. driver's licence. 
These positions offer excellent working conditions; a fully competitive 
benefit package; a salary from $19,475.52 per year (1979 Pate); 
relocation assistance is provided, if applicable NOTE: Lesser qualified 
applicants may be appointed at an entry level appraisal position with a 
corresponding salary from a minimum of $14,164.20 per year (1979 
Rate). Applicants are requested to specify locations) and in this 
regard applicants are advised that their applications will alsor be 
retained on record for a three-month period in the event of future 
vacancies in various regions of the Province. 

Quote Competition No. 00-2-8. Application forms may be obtained 
from the various assessment offices located throughout the prov¬ 
ince. Please forward completed application forms to: 


Director of Personnel 
B.C. Assessment Authority 
1537 Hillside Avenue 
Victoria, B.C. 

VST 4V2 


MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES 

CHILD ABUSE WORKER 

C iftti U w KM 23-01 $20,S1S42MSt 

Based in COQUITLAM, will work as part of a child abut# team 
providing consultation and education to Ministry social 
workers in the Lower Mainland. Duties include crisis inter¬ 
vention, family assessments and counselling In conjunction 
with other professionals. The position requires 24-hour 
on-call services on a rotating basis. Participation in training 
Ministry staff, as well at other professionals, schools, 
agencies and lay groups is an integral function. Participation 
in the development of community resources; on-going re¬ 
search and evaluation of literature and the media; and liaison 
with hospitals to provide reports as required. 

Qualifications — Graduation from a university of recognized 
standing with an MSW; a BA preferably in social sciences, 
more preferably with post-graduate trainino In social work; or 
for persona without degrees seven years experience aa a 
social worker, or in a directly related held; preferably 
experience in child welfare, families, ass es sm ents, multi-dis¬ 
ciplinary settings, leadership roles. Use of personal car, on 
expenses, may be required. ^ 

MINISTRY OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY AND 
GOVERNMENT SERVICES 

CHIEF, MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SECTION 

C w M tt ti on MiXm-ll J2a.S7H24.223 

In VICTORIA to be responsible to the Director, Government 
Printing Bureau, for formulating Bureau policies and develop¬ 
ing operational plans, operating and management informa¬ 
tion systems and procedures; co-ordinating the provision of 
administrative services, staff training, and directing the 
provision of safety and security programs required by the 
Bureau. 

t 

Qualifications — Post-secondary degree or diploma in an 
administration or systems development discipline or equiva¬ 
lent combination of education and experience; considerable 
related experience, preferably in manufacturing or printing 
industry. 

Return applications by 
February 27, 1980. 






^ ce o^fco< 



Positions 
are open to both 
^ men and women. 

Canadian citizens are given 
preference Obtain applications 
from, and return to address below. 


. 544 Michigan Street, Victoria, B.C., V8V1S3 


How safe are your secrets? 

Electronic pirates thrive 


TORONTO (CP) — All 
those tax intricacies you tell 
the government about your 
personal and business af¬ 
fairs may be finding their 
way out of Ottawa and into 
the ears of eager listeners, 
says a University of Western 
Ontario computer sciences 
professor. 

Speaking this past week at 
a data communications con¬ 
ference, John Carroll said 
details of tax returns are 
among masses of govern¬ 
ment information that travel 
in uncoded form over easily- 
tapped communications 
channels. 

But Carroll says the public 
sector isn’t the only one suf¬ 
fering from the bugging bug. 
Electronic pirates also glean 
sensitive information trans¬ 
mitted between government 
departments and police com¬ 
munications. 

V>For under $1,000 I could 
build a satellite ground sta¬ 
tion and intercept well-log¬ 
ging data from the Beaufort 


Sea on its way to Houston, 
Tex.,” he said. 

Carroll said a federal 
policy is urgently needed 
that would require telecom¬ 
munications companies to 
guard the secrecy of commu¬ 
nications, but at the same 
time give the government 
authority to monitor certain 
kinds of communications in 
the public interest. 

Techniques to safeguard 
transmissions are readily 
available, he said. Some U.S. 
banks have already adopted 
“encryption” or coding 
methods based on semi-con¬ 
ductor chips worth only $60; 
a single communications 
channel can be protected for 
about $8,000. 

“With economic and reli¬ 
able encryption equipment 
available, there is no reason 
for the government to jeop¬ 
ardize the privacy of Cana¬ 
dian citizens — not to men¬ 
tion cavalierly disregarding 
its own security memoran¬ 
da.” 


INSERVICE CO-ORDINATOR 

Required immediately by an expanding acute 
care hospital on the mainland. Successful 
candidate will be an R.N. with a B.Sc.N. and 2 
years general nursing experience or equiva¬ 
lent. Post-graduate course in Adult Education 
a definite asset. Salary/benefits per RNABC 
Agreement, head nurse level. Apply in writing 
to Don-A. Smith, Director of Employee Rela¬ 
tions, Surrey Memorial Hospital, 13750-96th 
Avenue, Surrey, B.C., V8V 1Z2. 


MILLWRIGHTS 

are required for our Harmac Division. Applicants must 
possess a B.C. or Interprovincial Trades Qualification 
Certificate. Preference will be given to those with several 
years of sawmill and heavy industrial maintenance 
experience. 

These are permanent positions offering a wide variety of 
trade experience. Hourly rate of pay is $11.75 and a 
comprehensive benefit package and generous relocation 
assistance is available to the successful candidates. 

Harmac is an integrated pulp and lumber complex 
located 8 miles south of Nanaimo on Southern Vancou- 
ver Island. 

Please submit applications, complete with qualifications 
and work experience to 

Industrial Relations Department 
Harmac Division 


AA 


MacMillan Bloedel 


Nanaimo, B.C. 
V9R 5M5 


PACIFIC COACH LINES LTD. 

SAFETY OFFICER 

VICTORIA, B.C. 

A NEW Safety Department is being established within 
the company as a result of a recent amalgamation of 
two Provincially-owned inter-city coach companies. 
The successful incumbent will be responsible for 
formulation and implementation of new and progres¬ 
sive safety, accident prevention and training programs, 
policies and procedures. This challenging position is in 
Victoria. There are 3 major work locations on Vancou¬ 
ver Island as well as Vancouver. The Company has 
approx. 130 highway motor coaches with approx 450 
employees. 

An individual with experience in the safety field within 
the motor vehicle and transportation industry would be 
most desirable. 

The Company offers a comprehensive benefit pack¬ 
age. 

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and 
experience. 

Detailed resume may be forwarded to: 

R. D. ELLIS 

Industrial Relations Manager 
PACIFIC COACH LINES LTD. 

#500-700 Douglas St. 

VICTORIA. B.C. V8W 2B5 


However, he said, such de¬ 
vices should not be allowed 
to shield private communi¬ 
cations from government in¬ 
spection. “The govern¬ 
ment’s ability to read 
telecommunications traffic 
is widely used and consider¬ 
ed to be a normal exercise of 
national sovereignty.” 

The U.S. government man¬ 
ages to monitor and control 
telecommunications, said 
Carroll, but does so in an 
informal way through close 
alliances with the individ¬ 
uals who run the industry. In 
the absence of such bonds 
between the the government 
and leaders of the Canadian 
communications industry, 
he said, the public interest 
must be asserted through 


I 


WE DRAW 
THE LINE 

where you want It. 

Ruled forms redrawn 
accurately or photoco- 
pied exactly, from your Qg 
sample. Speedy print¬ 
ing service,, too. 

IDEALETTER 

SERVICES LTD 

2524 Government St. 362-9296 
(near Bey St. intersection) 


government policy. 

The growing shift toward 
electronic transfers of funds 
among financial institutions 
makes the need for a nation¬ 
al policy all the more press¬ 
ing, he said. 

"Every day $1 trillion 
changes hands world wide 
by computer-based wire 
funds transfers," said Car- 
roll. “Perhaps $150 billion of 
that impacts on Canadian 
interests.” 

Government policy would 
have to decide how Canadian 
institutions should fit into 
this world-wide network and 
provide for the integrity of 
the system. 

HOTEL-MOTEL 

RESTAURANT-BAR 

MANAGEMENT 

Enroll NOW In our HOME-STUDY 
Hospitality Program without giving up 
your present occupation. 

Clip and mail this ad for full informa¬ 
tion or phone (416)481-2214 (24 
hours). 

Dept HM 1 4 

CANADIAN SCHOOL OF TRAVEL 
2221 Yonge St.. Toronto. M4S 2B1 

Name__ 

Address_ 

City_ 

Prov._PC._ 

Phone _ 


Attention 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST 

The Vancouver Island Branch ot the British Columbia Association ot 
Occupational Therapists wishes to make you aware of the chronic 
shortage of Occupational Therapists in Victoria. 

At present there are a variety ot positions available In Physical 
Medicine. Psychiatry. Pediatrics and Goriatrtcs. Locums, relief, full 
and part-time positions exist. 

For further Information contact: 

Susan lies. President 
366-2464, sxtenslon 288, 9:00 to 4:00 
Occupational Therapists must be eligible lor registration with the 
Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. 


MECHANICS 

DIESEL BUS OR TRUCK EXPERIENCE 

Pacific Coach Lines Ltd. has several mechanical 
positions available as a result of a recent amalgama¬ 
tion of two companies. 

Applicants should have from 2 to 5 years journeyman 
experience with a good working knowledge of gen¬ 
eral mechanics including diesel engines, clutches, air 
brake systems, steering, etc. 

Please submit written resume of qualifications and 
experience. 

Quality workmanship with good work habits required 
to maintain a high mechanical and safety standard of 
our fleet of 130 highway motor coaches. 

Starting rate $11.19 per hour plus a comprehensive 
benefit package. 

PACIFIC COACH LINES LTD. 

Personnel Office 
150 Dunsmuir St. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

V6B 1W9 


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST 

Applications are invited tor a new. PART-TIME OC¬ 
CUPATIONAL THERAPIST position within the Long 
Term Care Unit of the Royal Jubilee Hospital. Excel¬ 
lent opportunity to work within an interdisciplinary 
team atmosphere. 

Must be eligible for membership with C.A.O.T. As per 
current Health Sciences Association, monthly salary 
range, based on full-time service, 
$1.489.50 to $1,787.50. 

Applications accepted to March 3, 1980. Apply to: 

Personnel Department, 

ROYAL JUBILEE HOSPITAL, 

1900 Fort Street, 

Victoria, B.C. V8R 1J8 


MINISTRY OF HEALTH 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Competition 80:440-01 $28.584-$40,008 

The Ministry requires a competent administrator to 
carry out an approximate two year task ot managing 
Skeenaview Lodge in Terrace. This involves manag¬ 
ing the day to day services, while also continuing the 
phasing out of Its operations due to obsolescence, 
etc. The Lodge is a psycho-geriatric institution with 
■‘’approximately 120 beds and 110 statf. 
Qualifications — The successful applicant will have 
educational and experience qualifications indicating 
competence in hospital administration. 


Return applications by 
February 27, 1980. 


.eO^fco^ 



Positions 
are open to,both 
men and women 
Canadian citizens are given 
preference. Please send resume 
quoting competition number to 

Michigap Street. Victoria. B.C.. V8V 1S3 


MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 

ENGINEERING AIDES & ASSISTANTS 

Competition 80:449-01 

The Geotechnical A Materials Engineering Branch has 
vacancies on laboratory and field crews at regional 
facilities in Prince George and Terrace (please state 
preference of location). Will be engaged in soil, aggregate 
and geophysical surveys, geological mapping, field in¬ 
strumentation, geotechnical data analysis, report writing, 
pavement evaluation and design, concrete mix design, 
construction materials quality evaluation and inspection, 
drafting and related duties. 

Qualifications — Applications are invited from persons 
having formal post secondary training such as technical 
college diploma or university training, in civil or geologi¬ 
cal engineering, geophysics and physics, physical geo¬ 
graphy, chemistry, mathematics and practical experience 
relevant to the tasks to be performed. The positions 
require considerable travel away from Headquarters (on 
expenses). 

Salary—engineering Assistant $1,442-$1,689 (present) 
$1,557-$1,824 (Aug. 1/80) 
Engineering Aide $1,369-$1,596 (present) 
$1,479-$1,724 (Aug. 1/80) 


Return applications by February 27, 1980 




Positions 
are open to both 
(nen and women 
Canadian citizens are given 
preference Please send resume 
quoting competition number to. 


544 Michigan Street. Victoria. B.C.. V8V 1S3 


LOOKING FOR A FUTURE? 

WENDY'S 

OFFERS YOU A CAREER 

I Wendy's Restaurants of Canada Inc. is part of the fastest 
I growing hamburger chain. Between June 1978 and De- 
I cember 1979 we have grown from 8 Wendy's to 50 
I restaurants nationwide. This expansion will continue — 

1 by the end of 1980 we project to have 80 units open 
I This growth and expansion offers you the opportunity to 
I make your mark with a fast growing company. 

| If you are: 

a people person 

able to train and motivate others 
career oriented and anxious to succeed 
I —looking for a challenge 

1 We offer: 

I —an advanced training program 
| —the opportunity to become a Restaurant Manager 
-good salaries, benefits and personal guidance that will 
contribute to your continuing growth and satisfaction 
| —development that can provide endless opportunities | 
based on your abilities. 


YOU CAN GROW WITH WENDY'S 
Immediate openings now available in Duncan as well as | 
in other parts of British Columbia. 

Interviews will be conducted in Victoria. 

Please apply to: 

Recruiting Manager 
^Wendy's Restaurants 
f Canada Inc. 
k 200 — 909 Beach Ave. 
k Vancouver, B.C. 
k.V6Z 1E3 
L 6Q4-669-3424 


kTIm terser Pag«i. 

K ' ~ /a 


B 



UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA 

requires a 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION > 
COORDINATOR 

in 

COMPUTER SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS 

DUTIES: Under the direction of the Director of. 
Cooperative Education, to provide administrative 
support to the Cooperative Education Programme in 
each department such as job placement for students, job 
development, work term visits and liaison with employ¬ 
ers, colleges and high schools on Co-op matters. 
QUALIFICATIONS: A degree in Computer Science, 
Mathematics with emphasis in Computer Science, or 
Electrical Engineering. Additional courses at the 
graduate level, related work experience, and some 
administrative experience an asset. An ability to establish 
effective working relationships with students and Co-op 
employers and with representatives of colleges and high 
schools is essential. 

SALARY: Commensurate with qualifications and 
experience. 

APPLICATIONS: In writing, including resume of 
education and experience and the names of three referees: 

Director of Personnel Services, University of Victoria, 
P.O. Box 1700, Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2. 

CLOSING DATE: February 29, 1980 

All replies will be held in confidence. 

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA 



Committee on Crown 
Corporations 

Financial Professional 

Progress is a continuous feature oflife! One of our clients' 
professional stall'is returning to a private sector position of great 
responsibility. Consequently an opportunity lias become available 
with the small, elite research group of the Committee. The 
Committee’s responsibilities are varied but centre on its duty to 
represent the interest of the public as shareholder in Crown 
Corporations. The Committee’s effectiveness is enhanced by the 
work of its professional staff. Jhis work includes financial and 
economic analysis, strategic evaluation, and long-term planning. 

Wo are seeking an individual who has exercised responsibility in 
the decision-making process in business. Candidates’ backgrounds 
should indicate the ability to perform intricate and sophisticated 
analyses of large scale enterprises. Personal qualifications may 
include cither a graduate degree in Business Administration or 
Economics, or a professional accounting designation. 

Candidates are invited to forward details of their qualifications, 
employment history, and salary progression to: Richard Rittenberg. 


P 

I Peat, T 


t, Marwick and Partners 

2000-Orie Bentail Centre, 

Vancouver, B.C. 

V7X IM6 

Member: Canadian Association of Management Consultants 


































































































































B.C. 


By JIM HOME 

Colonist reporter 

The betting is that it will 
all be over by the time B.C.’s 
polls close Monday night. 

But only if one of the major 
parties can make a clean 
sweep in Quebec and On¬ 
tario, home provinces for 170 
of the 282 parliamentary 
seats up for the grabs across 
the country. 

The Liberals have a 
stronghold in Quebec now 
and are banking their hopes 
on pulling into the Grit camp 
the heavily populated piece 
of real estate stretching 
from Ottawa to Toronto and 
beyond to Windsor. It forms 
the "high ground" captured 
in May last year by the Con¬ 
servatives. 

If it swings back to the; 
Liberals, the vote count in 
Alberta and B.C. will be aca¬ 
demic. If it stays Tory, then 
and only then will B.C. pro¬ 
vide a cliff-hanger for the 
rest of the country, with each 
of its 28 seats of vital concern 
to the three major parties. 

Alberta offers 21 seats to 
would-be members of Par¬ 
liament. At dissolution, all 
were solidly in the hands of 
the Tories. 

Only the bravest of fore¬ 
casters are calling for any 
change in any of those 21 
ridings. 

When the cross-country 
results reached the Alberta- 
B.C. border last spring, the 
party standings were NDP 
J8, Liberals 113, Conserva¬ 
tives 114. v 

The rest of Canada 
watched as B.C. weighed 
the balance in favor of a 
Conservative minority gov¬ 
ernment, sending 19 Tories 
to Ottawa, eight members 
from the NDP and one lone 
Liberal, Art Phillips, Van¬ 
couver Centre. 

He was the only member 
of Trudeau’s government to 
survive west of Winnipeg, 
and he did it with the slim 
margin of 95 votes over his 
nearest rival, Pat Carney, 
Conservative. 

There were two surprises 
last May when the B.C. vote 
was counted. The first lay in 
the solidity of the Tory 
sweep, the second in the sur¬ 
prising federal strength of 
the NDP as it picked up eight 
seats, its highest-ever fed¬ 
eral representation in B.C. 

The question facing the 
forecasters tomorrow is: 
Can both the Tories and the 
NDP hold what they won so 
handily almost a year ago? 

In Burnaby, Svend Robin¬ 
son (NDP) won the seat by 
1,485 votes, not enough to 
warrant complacency this 
timt\ with Doreen Lawson 
<L) and Hugh Mawby (PC) 
breathing down his neck. A 
shift is possible. 

In Capilano. Ron Hunting- 
ton (PC) scored a clear-cut 
win a year ago. leading his 
nearest rival by 15,557 votes. 
It should be enough to keep 
the seat in the Tory camp 
despite Huntington’s loss of 
credibility in several areas 
dealing with federal finan- 
' eial aid for B.C. projects. His 
chief rivals are Andy 
Krawczyk (NDP) and Gerry 
Salberg. 

Cariboo-Chilcotin saw 
Lome Greenaway (PC) take 
the seat with a majority of 
4,494. Again, it should be 
enough to hold off Larry 
Ozero (L) and Harry Olaus- 
sen (NDP). But the gambler 
should approach cautiously, 
remembering that for many 
years Cariboo-Chilcoton was 
a Liberal seat. 

Comox-Powell River, won 
by Raymond Skelly (NDP) 
with a majority of 4,519 
votes, should hold, although 
AI Lazerte (PC) and Shirley 
McLaughlin (L) have fought 
hard. If there is a shift, it 
should go Liberal, but the 
gambler should ask for odds. 

Cowichan-Malahat-the Is¬ 
lands is held by Don Taylor 
(PC) but only by a slim 1,554 
votes. His chief rival is Jim 
Manly (NDP), with Liberal 
Leo Gervais already touted 
as a poor third. It’s any¬ 
body’s guess which way the 
coincomes down. 

Ksqulmalt-Saanich, solid¬ 
ly held by Don Munro (PC) 
with a 13,929 majority last 
May, should hold despite the 
Trident controversy. Gerry 
Kristiansen (L) has pushed 
Munro hard and so has Bob 
Cameron (NDP). If there is 
a-swing, it should go Liberal 
but a elose-to-ll.OOO-vote 
shift is hard to believe. 

It’s the same story in 
Fraser Valley East, where 
Alex Patterson racked up a 
15,237-vote majority for the 
PCs last year and is expect¬ 
ed to swamp Harry Fontaine 
(NDP) and Jack Suderman 
(L) again. 

Fraser Valley West will 
probably stay with Robert 
Wenman (PC), who led his 
nearest rival by 11,570 votes 


may 

last year and is expected to 
repeat over Joe Leclair 
(NDP) and Ben Nowak (L). 

Don Cameroi) (PC) won 
Kamloops-Shuswap by 6,649 
last year, and is expected to 
hold off Mack Bryson (L) 
and Nelson Riis (NDP). 

Kootenay East-Revel- 
stoke, won by Stan Graham 
(PC) with a 1,797-vote ma¬ 
jority last year, holds a 
question mark. Joe Conroy 
(L) or Sid Parker (NDP) 
could provide the upset. 

The same doubt hangs 
over Kootenay West, al¬ 
though it gave Bob Brisco 
(PC) a 2,142-vote majority 
last time. Heavy unemploy¬ 
ment in the region and little 
interest shown by Ottawa in 
its economic problems could 
see the seat swing to Peter 
Kendall (L) or, more likely, 
to Lyle Kristiansen (NDP). 

Mlstdon-Port Moody, held 
by Mark Rose (NDP) with 
2,361 more votes than his 
nearest competitor -last 
year, is another question 
mark. Rose has lost a little of 


CAMPAIGN 


TOE COLONIST,.Sun„ February 17, 1980 1 3 

- . - 4 ii.. 


set Monday’s pace at 


THE WINTER ' 
CAMPAIGN 


his popularity and faces 
tough competition from Bill 
Otway (PC) and Tom Sprags 
(L). The NDP will likely 
hang on. 

Nanaimo-Albernl, held by 
Ted Miller (NDP) with a 
4,826-vote majority last 
year, should stay left of 
centre. Miller's main threats 
come from Cecile McKinnon 
(L) and Scott Van Alstine 
(PC). It is known as a swing 
seat, but the NDP is regard¬ 
ed as well ahead this time. 

New Westmlnster-C’oquit- 
lam, held by Pauline Jewett 
(NDP) by 3,943 votes, should 
remain left of centre J despite 
hard fights by Ted Eakins 
(PC) and Carl Miller(L). 

North Vancouver-Bur- 
naby, won by Chuck Cook 
(PC) with a 2,168-vote ma¬ 
jority last year, could fall to 
the Liberals. Cook's tough¬ 
est rival Is Gordon Gibson, 
former provincial leader of 
the Liberal party and a vet¬ 
eran campaigner. The odds 
makers give him a good 
chance of making it to Ot¬ 
tawa this time. Jack Wood¬ 


ward (NDP) is rated a poor 
third. 

Okanagan North has a new 
Conservative candidate, 
Vince Dantzer, but he inher¬ 
its a vote which saw the 
Tories slaughter their 
nearest rival last May by 
13,169 votes. Otto Hack (L) 
and John Powell (NDP) are 
not likely to change things. 

Okanagan-Simtlkameen, 
won a year ago by Fred King 
(PC) with a majority of 9,- 
293, is also unlikely to change 
despite the strong efforts of 
Don Moses (L) and Darwin 
Sigurgeirson (NDP). ' 

Prince George-Bulkley 
Valley, l)eld by Lome 
McCuish (PC) with a 4,779- 
vote lead over his nearest 
rival, should stay Tory. His 
opponents are Monica Mar¬ 
guerite Becott (L) and Ar¬ 
chie Patrick (NDP). 

Prince George-Peace 

River has Frank Obcrle 


(PC) seeking re-election. He 
won by 10,810 votes last time 
out and has been winning by 
those majorities for years. 
No serious threat is seen 
from Jim McIntyre (L) or 
Bob Simpson (NDP). 

Richmond-South Delta is 

also right-wing country. The 
seat was won by Tom Siddon 
(PC) with a 16,738-vote ma¬ 
jority last year, and the odds 
are that the best efforts of 
• Mercia Stickney (NDP) and 
Glen Macrae (L) will not be 
enough to shake that lead. 

In Skeena, it’s a different 
story. Jim Fulton (NDP) 
won the seat last year, but 
only by 615 votes. His hold is 
slim. If there Is a shift it will 
probably be to the Liberals’ 
Jack Talstra, with the 
Tories’ Allan SheppaiJ 
third. 

Surrey-White Rock-North 
Delta brings the voters back 
to Tory country, where 


Benno Friesen (PC) is ex¬ 
pected to hold on to his 12,- 
017-vote margin from last 
year. There are six candi¬ 
dates in the election, but not 
even Carol Langford (NDP) 
or Rent Masi (L) is regarded 
as a serious threat. 

Vancouver Centre should 
provide the best fight of the 
day. Art Phillips (L) wrested 
the seat from Pat Carney 
(PC) last May, but only by a 
slim 95 votes. The odds 
makers arc forecasting a 
similar finish Monday night, 
with Phillips barely hanging 
on. 

In Vancouver East, Mar 
garet Anne Mitchell (NDP) 
won the seat last year with a 
1,175-vote majority. She is by 
no means safe this year, with 
Art Lee (L) running hard 
and touted as leading in pre¬ 
election polls. David Kilbey 
(PC) is llstpd as a poor third. 

It’s a different story in 
Vancouver Kingsway, 
where Ian Waddell (NDP) 
won the seat hy 4,425 votes 
last time and is expected to 
hold off Simma Holt (L) and 


the polls 

Drew Taylor (PC), his chief votes last year and has not 


rivals. It is not regarded as a 
safe NDP seat, and both Holt 
and Taylor ran hard cam¬ 
paigns. If there is a switch it 
would sec the seat go back to 
Holt and the Liberals, but 
again the gambler should 
ask for odds. 

Vancouver Quadra, with 
eight candidates in the race, 
was won last year by Bill 
Clarke (PC) by 7,049. Peter 
Pearse (L) could change 
that if there is a Liberal 
swing across the province, 
but he is the only one on the 
list who poses a threat. 

Vancouver South's John 
Fraser (PC) with a 12,095- 
vote majority last time out, 
should hold on without diffi¬ 
culty. Patrick Graham (L) 
and Judy McManus (NDP) 
are his most serious rivals, 
but neither is rated as having 
a chance of defeating the 
Tory. 

In Victoria, Allan McKin¬ 
non (PC) is expected to re¬ 
peat his 1979 performance 
with another heavy major¬ 
ity. McKinnon won by 12,714 


lost in popularity. Robin 
Blencoe (NDP) has run a 
tough campaign against 
heavy odds. Bruce Corbett 
(L) isn’t given even a remote 
chance of catching the lead¬ 
ers. 

It all adds up to a forecast 
of little change in B.C. unless 
there is a Liberal sweep, in 
which case all bets should be 
called off. 

Give the Liberals three 
seats, maximum, with ques 
tion marks aainst Lee in 
Vancouver East and Phillips 
in Vancouver Centre. That 
leaves Gibson in North Van¬ 
couver as the lone hero—if 
he can pull it off. 

If the Liberals can win 
three, they will hold one 
(Phillips) and take one seat 
from the NDP (Vancouver 
East) and one from the 
Tories (North Vancouver- 
Burnaby). 

That would leave the new 
standings at the end of the 
day at Liberals three, NDP 
seven and the Conservatives 
18. 



EATON'S 


: ™ rW 





Lower Main Floor 


Fashion Wear Clearance 


WOMEN'S 


Special Group of Women's fashion clothing 
from our Main Fashion Depts. in Vancouver 
Area and Victoria stores. Find a good 
selection of sportswear, dresses and more. 
Shop early for best selection. 


WOMEN'S 

SHOES 


Here's a really good chance to save on these 
popular styles of Women's dress shoes, 
clearing from Eaton's Mainland stores main 
shoe departments. You'll find a great 
selection. Each pair offered at the one low 
price! Shop early while selection is at its 
best. Sizes 5-10. 




PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 


PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 


WOMEN'S BOOT CLEARANCE 


Fashion leather boots clearing from Eaton's Vancouver 
area and Victoria main shoe departments. Assortment 
of -styles in sizes 5 to 10. Colors mostly blacks and 
browns — Shop Early! 


PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 


J 






























EATON'S 


r-y/ 



/ 





20% Off 


selected custom dra 


and slipcover 


irapery 

fabrics. 


Give yxr whdcws 
brand new outlook 
Whatever their si ze and shape 

have them covered 
with style and savings 
‘ new at Eaton's. 



Window dressing takes on a whole new 
meaning during Eaton's drapery and slip¬ 
cover fabric sale. You're sure to find the 
fabrics just right for your particular re¬ 
quirements. Our selection includes 
sheers.- velvets, antique satins, cottons, 
acrylics, tergals and polyester/cotton 
blends in prints and solids.'Just ask our 
experienced sales staff for a no-obligation 
estimate. 


20% off suedeline linings 

Suedeline, an acrylic backed lining, is an exceptional 
value now for these reasons: 

• it is an insulating thermal barrier 

0 it reduces heating costs, so you save on fuel 
bills 

r 

0 it helps keep rooms cooler in summer 

0 it's an easy care blend of cotton/polyester and 
can be washed by hand 

0 it's water repellent and water stain resistant. 


Eaton's In-Home Service 

Take advantage of our no-cost, no-obligation in-home 
service. 

An expert will come to your home by appointment 
and give 

you an on-the-spot estimate. 

Call early to avoid delay. 


Draperies, Second Floor, 
Home Furnishings Bldg. 


Store Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 7 




































































































































































































































































Craigdarrocl i 
might have met 
fate of other 
Dunsmuir 

residences 


Acclaim for heritage heroes 




Craigdarroch defenders 
receive major award 


The Hallmark So¬ 
ciety's prestigious Louis 
Award will go to a group 
of people who spent 21 
years devoting them¬ 
selves to preserving 
Craigdarroch Castle, 
Victoria’s major land¬ 
mark. 

The Spciety for the 
Preservation and Main¬ 
tenance of Craigdarroch 
Castle will receive the 
award at 8 tonight in 
the castle for "truly out¬ 
standing contributions to 
heritage preservation," 
said Stuart Stark, Hall¬ 
mark Society president. 

The people who devot¬ 
ed themselves to preser¬ 
ving the castle started 
with a budget of $50 al¬ 
though the building cost 
10,000 times that much 
to construct. Stark said. 

"Today it’s hard to be¬ 
lieve the castle could 
have ever been a threa¬ 
tened building, but threa¬ 
tened it was, if not with 
imminent demolition 
than at least by disinter¬ 
est and neglect,” he 
said. 

“Had it not been for the 
castle society, Craigdar¬ 
roch may well have met 
the fate of other Duns¬ 
muir residences—Ashno- 
la. Mount Adelaide. Fair- 
view." 

Awards of merit at the 
sixth annual awards 
ceremony will go to Con¬ 


stance and Fasten Isher- 
wood for restoring a 
building at 1192 Fort 
Street; Camberley Ren¬ 
ovations, Sharie Hayes 
and John Hayes for “sy- 
pathetic adaptation" of a 
building at 1765 Rockland 
Avenue; Les and Shirley 
Beach for restoring a 
house at 215 Wilson 
Street; Dick and Anne 
Zecr for continuing 
preservation of a Mef- 
chosin farmhouse at 3670 
Happy Valley Road, and 
William Gidden and John 
Gidden for a "sympa¬ 
thetic addition" to 605 
Courtney Street. 

Stark said the first an¬ 
nual Peter Cotton Memo¬ 
rial Awards, established 
by the Heritage Building 
Foundation of the Hall¬ 
mark Society in memory 
of Victoria architect 
Peter Cotton, were given 
for written or visual pre¬ 
sentations on the theme, 
"Looking for History in 
Houses." 

Two winners were cho¬ 
sen from more than 50 
Greater Victoria en¬ 
trants in Grades 5 to 7. 

Awards will be pre¬ 
sented tonight at the cas¬ 
tle by Lieutenant-Gover¬ 
nor Henry Bell-Irving 
and went to: 

Cecile Hambleton. 
Grade 6, St. Patrick’s 
School, for the most out¬ 
standing visual presents 


tion—tracing the history 
of The Priory at 729 Pem¬ 
berton. 

Christa Zimakas, 
Grade 7, Norfolk House 
School, best written pre¬ 
sentation—a study of im¬ 
portant heritage build 
ings in Victoria. 


Work at IS92-built 
house at 1192 Fort 
“happily combines 
meticulous atten¬ 
tion to restoring the 
fabric of the build¬ 
ing with whimsical 
personal touches.” 


“Sympathetic 
adaptation ” 
at 1765 
Rockland 
(left) 


- *■=> • 


trior renovation at 215 Wilson 


At end of trail , hand-pumping and prayers 


There will be.last-minute 
hand pumping and a "little 
praying" today as area can 
didates hit the end of the 
campaign trail and settle in 
lor Monday's federal elec¬ 
tion. 


Unlike politicians, the 
weatherman makes no 
promises. But he thinks Van¬ 
couver Island voters will be 
free of the threat of snow 


at 9 a m. until they close at 8 

p.m.S 

The forecast calls for a 
milder but cloudy day, with 
periods of rain, as part of a 
moderating trend. 

There are 3-15.582 eligible 
voters in the five Vancouver 
Island ridings, up from 326,- 
292 in the federal election 
that occurred only nine 
months ago. 

Across the nation, well 
over 15 million people have 
the right to decide Monday 
whether the short-lived Con¬ 
servative government of Joe 
Clark should get another 
chance. If the national polls 
are right, they will return the 
reins of government to 
Pierre Trudeau and his Lib¬ 
erals. Much may depend on 
whether Ed Broadbent's 
NDP makes a long-awaited 
breakthrough this time, or 
stays close to the 27 seats it 
held when the government 
toppled in December. 

At that time the minority 
Conservative government 
had 136 seats, the Liberals 
111 and Social Credits. 

The Tories held three of 
the five Island seats with De¬ 
fence Minister Allan McKin¬ 
non in Victoria, Donald 
Munro in Esquimalt-Saanich 
and Don Taylor in Cowichan- 
Malahat-The Islands. The 
NDP’s Ted Miller in Nanai- 
mo-AIbcmi and Ray Skelly 
in Comox-Powell River had 
a strong grip on the other 
two. The May 22 election was 


a bad day for the Liberals in 
all five ridings. 

Most political observers 
feel four of the ridings will 
remain in the same hands 
when the votes are counted 
Monday. The single question 
mark hangs over Cowiehan- 
Malahat-The Islands where 
Taylor is involved in a tight 
race with the NDP’s Jim 
Manly, who missed by a fair¬ 
ly narrow margin of less 
than 1,600 votes last time. 

The toe-to-toe battles of 
the all-candidate meetings 
are out of the way. but most 
of the candidates will be de¬ 
voting their time to main- 
streeting, door-knocking or 
phone canvasses today. For 
most, today will be fairly 
low-keyed with a little more 
mainstreeting, the odd cof¬ 
fee party and at least one 
special dinner. 

Some, like Taylor and his 
wife, will stop for a regular 
church service. 

“We'll be doing a little 
praying," said Mrs. Taylor. 

Taylor's main opponent 
can be counted on to do the 
same. Until lie resigned in 
January, Manly was the 
minister at the First United 
Church in Ladysmith. 

In most cases, candidates 
will be celebrating (or 
drowning their sorrows) 
Monday night in their cam¬ 
paign headquarters. 

Among the exceptions are 
Taylor, who will be heading 
for the Village Green Inn at 


Duncan after the results are 
known. Manly, who will be at 
the IWA half in Duncan and 
NDP hopeful Robin Blencoe 
in Victoria, who will go with 
his supporters to the James 
Bay Community Hall. 

McKinnon's large plural¬ 
ity in Victoria is being chal¬ 
lenged by first-time candi¬ 
dates Blencoe, Liberal 
Bruce Corbett and Parti Rhi¬ 
noceros jokester Kirk Hig¬ 
gins. Marxist-Leninist 
Dorothy Ratzlaff. with little 
hope of gathering many 
votes, is in the race a second 
time. 


Property at Minnie Moun¬ 
tain in Saanich's Cadboro 
Bay area which has been at 
the centre of a lengthy court 
battle has changed hands, 
the Cofonisthas learned. 

Announcement of the 
ownership change will be 
made at a Monday morning 
news conference at-Saanich 
municipal hall. 

Broadmead Farms Ltd. 
has sold the 72-acre site to 
former Broadmead general 
manager Gordon Rolston. 

Asked for confirmation of 
the sale, Broadmead vice- 
president Merv Mawson 
would only say there was a 


In Esquimalt-Saanich, 
where the shutdown of the 
Trident Aircraft operation 
has become one of the main 
issues, the NDP’s Robert 
Cameron and Independent 
Philip Ney are taking a se¬ 
cond run at Munro’s healthy 
majority. Another good-na¬ 
tured Rhino, Robert Mad- 
docks, is also horning in this 
time. 

While it's strictly a two- 
man show in Cowichan-Ma- 
lahat-The Islands, Taylor 
and Manly are being chased 
by Liberal Leo Gervais, 
Communist Ernie Knott and 


possibility the land had 
changed hands, and “a full 
statement will be issued at 
Monday’s press confer¬ 
ence." 

Municipal hall sources 
confirmed that ownership of 
the land had changed, and 
“new wrinkles to Broad 
mead’s plan for the site will 
be unveiled Monday.” 

Broadmead plans a multi- 
million-dollar housing de¬ 
velopment on the site. 

The 10-year, phased, 210- 
unit mixed housing project 
would see single-family ho¬ 
mes offered for sale early 
next year. 


Rhino Louis (Cowbird) Le- 
sosky. 

Miller’s challengers in 
Nanaimo-Alberni are Con¬ 
servative Scott Van Alstine, 
Liberal Cecile McKinnon. 
Communist Gary Swann, 
Marxist-Leninist Allan Be- 
zanson and Rhino Frank 
Coffee. 

Up against Skelly in 
Comox-Powell Riv.er are 
Conservative Al Lazertc, 
Liberal Shirley McLoughlin 
and Communist Sy Peder¬ 
son. 

Whatever happens in the 
way of campaigning today 


Townhouses and four four- 
storey buildings housing 71 
condominium units are in 
eluded in subsequent phases 
of the project. 

The 77 single-family 
homes would be built on 32 
acres, 62 townshouses would 
occupy nine acres, and the 
apartment buildings would 
bobuiltinaquarry. 

The Cadboro Bay Resi¬ 
dents Association, which has 
been fighting a costly court 
battle to halt the project, 
failed in a bid last month to 
have the Supreme Court of 
Canada hear an appeal 
against a recent B.C. Court 
of appeal decision. 


from the time the polls open 



Minnie land changes 


has to have the personal 
touch, since the ban on prim 
and electronic advertising 
took effect al midnight. If 
the candidates are to reach 
the mass of voters now . 
whatever they do will have to 
be newsworthy. 

One last piece of advice 
from returning officers: if 
you’re on the voters’ list, 
you’ll have received a card. 
Take it with you to your 
designated polling division 
If you've lost the card, call 
your returning office and 
find out where you're sup¬ 
posed to vote. 


hands 


The ratepayer group was 
seeking leave to appeal a 
ruling which overturned a 
B.C. Supreme Court decision 
that had blocked a land-use 
bylaw for the property. 

However, the association, 
according to its president 
Richard Boss, is still exa 
mining other legal avenues 
to stop the development. 

Cadboro Bay area resi¬ 
dents have voiced over¬ 
whelming opposition to the 
project on grounds that it 
would destroy what has been 
traditionally a single-family 
residential area. 


No-vacancy sign at Vic General was quite timely 


A sign of the times appeared briefly last week when a 
.large "no vacancy" sign was hung from the top floor of 
Victoria General Hospital. 

Hospital officials say they don’t know who was respon¬ 
sible for the sign, which was removed shortly after it ap¬ 
peared, but concede that it was appropriate. The hospital has 
been forced by the lack of beds to cancel many elective 
operations over the last few weeks, and many patients 
have spent hours in the emergency room awaiting an 
empty bed in a regular hospital ward. 

HE WAS STILL rather angry when he called the Colonist 
newsroom. 

"My name is Horace Godfrey and I live at 33 Dock 
Street,” he said. 

"I have an article which I w ant you to print," he said, and 
began dictating. 

“On the second of February, two ladies with a large 
dog on a long leash, walked along my sidewalk when the 
dog decided he had to go. 


Reporters' 

notebook 



“One of my favorite plants, called heather, was 
in full bloom. The dog circled a large shrub, then backed 
up, squatted, and excreted a large packet in the middle of 
my plant. 

“I rushed out of the door, shouting at the animal which 
took off in haste. Neighbors, who saw the incident, said I 
should have taken a potshot at the dog. 

"The two ladies came from Pilot Street.” 

End of dictation. 

"You got that? Thank you very much." 

You're welcome, sir. 

. - , 


WHEN Canadian Press bureau chief Charles La Vertu 
staffed the legislative press gallery for the Thomson Com¬ 
pany, one of the newspapers he served was The Kamloops 
Sentinel. 

Recently in that fair Interior city, Arthur La Vertu, 
a musical cousin of Charles's, took the top award and 
a $ 1,000 prize in a music festival. 

Guess-how the Sentinel recorded the event? Charles 
it was, the guy who has trouble with typewriter keys. 
Cousin Arthur hung on to the thousand. 


WHEN IT COMES to cashing in, it doesn't take the 
Americans very long. 

A&M Records has come out with a one-minute, 28-second 
disc titled Thank You Canada (Love Shelley), which is about 
the recent harboring of six Americans by Canadian embassy 
staff members in Iran. 

Eight-year-old Shelley Looney is a left-winger with 
an otherwise-all-boys hockey team in Trenton, 25 miles 
from Detroit. She voices the written sentiments of her 


next-door neighbor. Johnny Williams, who is with radio 
station CKLW in Windsor. 

THE NEW WAVE of rock music sweeping the world 
has brought with it a new look for young men, a ran¬ 
dom survey of Victoria discotheques shows. 

In place of long hair and beard, the dedicated new- 
waver wears his hair short back and sides, and if he 
sports any facial hair at all, it’s a severely-trimmed 
moustache. 

The new-wave look is actually a military look, and in 
these dark days it may be a symptom of the renewed 
militarism being spouted by international leaders. 

ALTHOUGH they already had their victory party Friday 
night, Victoria's two area Parti Rhinoceros candidates, Kirk 
Higgins of Victoria and Robert Maddocks in Esquimalt 
Saanich will be celebrating again Monday. 

The Century Inn has turned over its facilities to Rhino 
supporters to watch the federal election results come in on 
television. Oddly enough, the room they'll be in is called the 
Forty Thieves.' 









































WASHINGTON GOALKEEPER Wayne Stephen¬ 
son appears to have taken eyes off puck during 
Saturday night action in Vancouver but he made 


save on the shot fired by Stan Smyl. The Capitals 
scored two unanswered second-period goals on 
their way to a 3-3 decision. 


Success deserts Canucks 
on return to home rink 


Vancouver Canucks have 
played some excellent hock- 
-ey games in 1980 but unfor¬ 
tunately for Vancouver fans 
none of them have been at 
pacific Coliseum. 

*; The unpredictable Can¬ 
ucks camt off a tremendous¬ 
ly successful road trip and 
■three days rest Saturday 
Sight only to lose 5-3 to the 
lowly Washington Capitals in 
a National Hockey League 
game played before a crowd 
of 13,163 at the Coliseum. 

* In other games: the 
■Frenchmen were flying in 
'’.Montreal as the Canadiens 
pounded Pittsburgh Pen¬ 
guins 8-1; Toronto Maple 


• Complete summaries — Page 18 


Leafs, edged visiting Hart¬ 
ford Whalers 5-3; Buffalo 
Sabres got by the Red Wings 
4-3 at Detroit; Atlanta 
Flames played to a 2-2 tie 
with the Minnesota North 
Stars at Bloomington; Bos¬ 
ton Bruins downed Colorado 
Rockies 5-3 at Denver; and 
Los Angeles Kings outseored 
visiting New York Islanders, 
3-2. 

The Canucks loss was their 
sixth in their last seven home 
games and they remain win¬ 
less at the Coliseum in 1980. 
Their last victory there was 


Dec. 29 against Quebec Nor- 
diques. 

Their only point at home in 
the new year came from a 2-2 
tie with Buffalo on January 
18. 

The big surprise was that 
the Canucks had been going 
so well while the Capitals 
were coming off an 8-2 
thumping from Edmonton 
Oilers the previous night. 

Vancouver had taken 
seven of a possible 10 points 
on a recent road trip and 
included were upsets of the 


Vikettes’ string ends 


CALGARY — With the 
Canada West women’s bas¬ 
ketball title safely tucked 
away, maybe University of 
Victoria Vikettes let down a 
little Saturday night. 

Maybe it was just a coin¬ 
cidence. 

£ But one night after clinch- 
lag first-place in the six- 
lea m league. Vikettes suf¬ 
fered their firsj setback of 
the season, bowing to Cal¬ 


gary Dinosaurs 71-67 in over¬ 
time. 

The defeat ended a 33- 
game win streak for Kathy 
Shields’ crew, which is now 
17-1 in conference. Vikettes 
play host to the best-of-three 
CWUAA playoffs starting 
Feb. 29. 

The absence of Carol Tur¬ 
ney-Loos, heart of Vikettes’ 
offence and conference¬ 
leading scorer, for most of 


UVic swimmers shine 


£ VANCOUVER — Four 
•women from University of 
^Victoria turned the three- 
day Canada West swimming 
3md diving championships 
■»tnto a showcase for their 
lialent. 

•- The UVic contingent 
Earned 128 points to nail 
down the women’s aggre¬ 
gate trophy and shattered 
several records along the 
?way. 

On Saturday they broke 
iJhree more: Judy Newman 
cracked the meet record for 
She 100-metre freestyle with 
a time of one minute, 1.03 


seconds; Janet Rushcall 
eclipsed the standard for the 
200m. butterfly with a time 
of 2:28.88; and the relay team 
of Newman, Rushcall, Cathy 
Rushcall and Alison Noble 
set a new mark of 9:37.7 in 
the 800m. freestyle. 

While she didn’t set a rec¬ 
ord, Noble won the 200m. 
backstroke with a time of 
2:29. Carey Busfield of UVic 
was second with 2:17. 

Next stop for Noble, New¬ 
man and the Rushcalls is the 
Canadian Interuniversity 
Athletic Union champion¬ 
ship meet In Laval, Que., 
starting March 5. 


Today's menu 

FIELD HOCKEY 

11 a.m. — Island Men's League Rebels I v*. Tigers II, Windsor 
Park, Rebels II vs. Pirates, Beacon Hill Park. 

1:30 p.m. — Island Men's League: Castaways vs. University of 
Victoria Vikings, Oak Bay High; Tigers I vs. Oak Bay, Windsor 
Park. 

i 

CROSS COUNTRY 

1 p.m. — Victoria Flying Y road races, Royal Roads. 

RUGBY 

1 p.m. — Island Union, third division: James Bay Athletic Associa 
tion vs. Ebb Tide, Macdonald Park; Vampires vs. Oak Bay, Victoria 
High; Duncan vs. Agrarians, Duncan. 

2:30 p.m. — Island Union, fourth division. Jutes vs. JBAA, UVic. 

SOCCER 

2:15 p.m — Island League, first division. Royals vs. UVic Vikings, 
UVic; Vic West vs. Mestons, Heywood Avenue Park; Castaways vs. 
Nanaimo, Nanaimo. 

2:15 p.m. — Island Leaue, second division: Vantreights vs. Pros 
pect Lake, Lambrick Park; Royals vs. DaVinci, Blanshard Street 
Park; Labatts vs. Vic West, Central Park; Duncan vs. Port Albemi, 
Duncan; Nanaimo vs. Oak Bay, Nanaimo. 

2:15 p.m. — island League, third division: Lakehill vs. Kickers, 
Reynolds High; Oak Bay vs. DaVinci, Henderson Park, Cordova Bay 
vs. Braves, Lochside Park; Campbell River vs. Duncan, Campbell 
River. 

2:15 p.m. — Island League, fourth division: Gorge vs. Lakehill, Oak 
Bay High; Croatia vs. Castaways, Parkland High; Duncan vs. Oak 
Bay, Duncan. 

2:15 p.m. — Island League, fifth division championship playoffs: 
Cordova Bay vs. Port Albemi, Lambrick Park; Prairie Inn vs. Vic 
Wek, Prospect Lake Park. Consolation playoffs: Castaways vs. Saltspr 
ing, Carnarvon Park; Chez Pierre vs Gordon Head, Butlen Park; Hawks 
vs. Dulkan Merchants, Vic West Park; Saanich United vs. Spa, Laos- 
downe Junior High. 

MONDAY 

HOCKEY 

I: IS p.m. — South Island Junior 'B' League: Juan de Fuca Gulls vs. 
Oak Bay Trios, Juan de Fuca Arena. 


the second half definitely 
hurt. 

The guard with the dead- 
eye shot was forced off her 
game by the Dinnies, con¬ 
necting on only five of 16 
field-goal attempts. 

And she ran into foul trou¬ 
ble, taking her fourth per¬ 
sonal with 16 minutes to 
play. Turney-Loos then sat 
down until five minutes re¬ 
mained and shortly there¬ 
after took her fifth and dis¬ 
qualifying foul. 

Vikettes, who led 32-31 at 
the half, turned in a poor 
defensive effort and, without 
Turney-Loos. were unable to 
hold off the Dinnies in over¬ 
time. 

The score was knotted at 
65-65 after regulation time, 
forcing the five-minute 
extra period. 

Dori MacPhail scored 24 
points and Lori Chizik added 
20 for Calgary, which im¬ 
proved its second-place rec¬ 
ord to 13-5. 

In the men’s game, UVic 
Vikings — who clinched the 
men’s league title Friday — 
improved their conference 
record to 16-0 with an 85-71 
victory over Calgary Dino¬ 
saurs. 

Karl Tilleman, the fresh¬ 
man who shocked Vikings 
the night before with a 40 
point output, was closely 
shadowed by another first- 
year guard Saturday night. 

Eli Pasquale, the out¬ 
standing Sudbury native, 
tied Tilleman up most of the 
night, limiting him to nine 
points. 

Billy Loos scored 22 points, 
as Vikings, who led 45-42 at 
halftime, had to compensate 
for the absence of two big 
men much of the second 
half. 

Gerald Kazanowski and 
Reni Dolcetti, in foul trou¬ 
ble, were forced to sit out. 
But Tom Narbeshuber and 
Kelly Dukeshire came up big 
off the bench. 

National teamers Steve 
Atkin and Romel Raffin led 
Calgary scorers, netting 20 
and 17 points respectively. 
Dinosaurs, though, were un¬ 
characteristically cold from 
the floor, hitting on 35 per 
cent. Vikings managed 44 
per cent of their field-goal 
attempts. 

UVic out-rebounded Cal¬ 
gary 49-37. as the slumping 
Dinosaurs watched their rec¬ 
ord level off to 8-8. 


Islanders pack punch 
as Cougars triumph \ 


Canadiens and Philadelphia 
Flyers. 

Capitals goaltender 
Wayne Stephenson, the vic¬ 
tim of the Edmonton bar¬ 
rage. came up big against 
Vancouver making 29 saves, 
including four from point- 
blank range when the Can¬ 
ucks had a two-man advan¬ 
tage for 50 seconds. 

Ryan Walter, Alan Hangs- 
leben. Pierre Bouchard, 
Paul Mulvey and Mark 
Lofthouse scored for Wash¬ 
ington while Curt Fraser 
scored twice and Rick Vaive 
counted once for Vancouver. 

The game was a chippy 
affair that culminated with a 
minor brawl a minute before 
Lofthouse’s goal. Stan Smyl 
of Vancouver and Tim Coul- 
is of the Capitals drew 
minors and misconducts 
while Harold Snepsts of Van¬ 
couver and Mulvey were as¬ 
sessed majors and miscon¬ 
ducts 

The loss at Montreal was 
nothing new for the Penguins 
who haven't won in the 
Forum since January of 
1969. 

Guy Lafleur and Pierre 
Mondou scored twice each 
for the Canadiens who held 
period leads of 3-1 and 5-1. 

Montreal defenceman 
Larry Robinson had a big 
night on defence and assist¬ 
ed on the last four goals. 

The Canadiens, who suf¬ 
fered through one of their 
worst ever slumps in Decem¬ 
ber, are now 13^4-0 in 1980. 

The Leafs victory was 
their first in three tries 
against the Whalers and it 
came just one day after an 
other shakeup by general 
manager Punch Jmlach. 

Imlach traded defence- 
man Pat Ribble to the Capi¬ 
tals for future consider 
ations and shipped 
goaltender Paul Harrison, 
defenceman Greg Hotham, 
centre Paul Gardner and 
right winger Bob Stephenson 
to the minors. 

Curt Ridley, recently ob¬ 
tained from Vancouver for 
cash, started in goal for To¬ 
ronto but suffered a hand 
injury midway through the 
game and was replaced by 
Czechoslovakian Jiri Crha. 

Ridley was taken to hospi¬ 
tal for x-rays. 


Norris Division 

G W L T F A P 
Montreal 57 32 19 6 222 181 70 

LOS Angeles 59 23 27 9 232 247 55 

Pittsburgh 57 20 26 11 183 216 51 

Detroit 56 20 27 9 189 192 49 

Hartford 55 18 25 12 199 206 48 

Adams Division 

Buffalo 58 36 15 7 229 152 79 
Boston 57 34 15 8 226 169 76 

Minnesota S4 25 18 11 217 169 61 
Toronto 56 23 29 4 209 233 50 
Quebec 55 20 27 8 163 196 48 
Patrick Division 

Philadelphia 55 38 4 13 233 160 89 
NY Islanders 56 27 21 8 192 174 62 
NY Rangers 56 25 22 9 211 200 59 
Atlanta 56 25 22 9 190 186 59 
Washington 56 16 31 9 179 214 41 
Smvthe Division 

Chicago 57 24 19 14 162 169 62 
St. Louis 57 25 23 9 183 187 59 
Edmonton 57 19 27 11 213 231 49 
Vancouver 56 18 29 9 177 199 45 
Colorado 57 14 34 9 177 223 37 
Winnipeg 59 14 36 9 156 238 37 

Today's Games 

Toronto at NY Rangers 
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia 
Montreal at Buffalo 
Atlanta at Chicago 
Quebec at Winnipeg 
St Louis at Edmonton 
NY islanders at Vancouver 

Monday Games 
NY Rangers at Hartford 
Los Angeles at Detroit 
Quebec at Minnesota 


By STAN COOPER 

It was the mid-island boys 
night to shine for Victoria 
Cougars on Saturday at Me¬ 
morial Arena. 

Three Vancouver Island 
products accounted for all 
the goals in a well-earned 4-1 
win over former coach Pat 
Ginnell and the Medicine 
Hat Tigers, one of the most 
improved teams in the West¬ 
ern Hockey League. 

Leftwinger Brad Palmer, 
having a fine sophomore 
season, scored two key 
goals, Bob Smith scored the 
3-1 marker and Greg Adams 
wrapped things up with a 
shot into an empty net with 
14 seconds to play. 

The win kept the Cougars 
within three points of first- 
place Portland Winter 
Hawks in the Western Divi¬ 
sion and Cougars still have 
three games in hand. Port¬ 
land knocked off Seattle 
Breakers 5-3 Saturday and in 
the only other game, Bran¬ 
don Wheat Kings walloped 
Lethbridge Broncos 11-3 in 
Brandon. 

Palmer, a Lake Cowichan 
resident in the off-season, 
brought the crowd of 3,035 
fans to life with a shorthand¬ 
ed goal midway through the 
second period. His high 
backhander following a Bob 
Jansch-pass caught goal¬ 
keeper Kelly Hrudey leaning 
the wrong way and brought 
theCougarsto 1-1. 

It stayed that way until 
early in the final 20 minutes 
when Palmer, Chemainus- 
resident Jansch and Grant 
Rezansoff teamed on a 
three-on-two break with 
Palmer sliding a hard shot 
along the ice to Hrudey’s left 
for his 31st goal of the sea¬ 
son, third-best total on the 
club. 

Smith, a Ladysmith prod¬ 
uct playing as an over-age in 
his second season here, was 
left alone in front and con¬ 
verted a Mark Morrison- 
pass with less than four 
minutes to play. 

That set the stage for 
Cowichan Bay’s Adams, who 
gathered in a pass from 
Robinson to Score his 48th 
goal of the season. 

Brant Keissig, a former 
Brandon regular acquired in 
an early-season trade, 
scored the Medicine Hat goal 
at 5:23 of the second period, 
whipping the puck past net- 
minder Grant Fuhr. But 
Fuhr was unbeatable from 
that point and kept the Cou- 

* * * 


MEDICINE HAT 1. VICTORIA 4 

Fir»t Period 

No scoring. 

Penalties—Robertson MH 4:15, 
Steblyk, MH 6:21, Robertson MH. 
McCarthy V 11:28, Koules MH, Dev 
thenes V mators 14:25. Davis MH 
double minor, Robertson V 15:30, 
Dawes V 17:29. Buskas MH 19:42. 
Second Period 

1. Medicine Hat, Klesslg (Kempth- 
orne. Buskas) 5:23 

2. Victoria, Palmer 30 (Jansch) 
13:40 

Penalties— Kempthorne MH 10:01, 
Smith V 12:12, Steblyk MH 14:00. 

Third Period 

3. Victoria, Palmer 31 (Rezansott. 
Jansch) 3:06 

4. Victoria, Smith 19 (Morrison, Ro 
bertson) 16:50 

5. Victoria, Adams 48 (Robinson) 
19:46 

Penalties—Adams MH 6:36, 
Buskas MH 12:48, Palmer V 12:57, 
Dawes V 17:21 

Shots on goal by 

Medicine Hat 14 12 12-38 

Victoria 111115 — 37 

Goal— Hrudev, Medicine Hat. 
Fuhr, Victoria 

Attendance— 3,035. 

SEATTLE (3) — Dan Held, Dave 
Werbeniuk, Bob Graves. PORTLAND 
(5) — Bob Geale2. Florent Robidoux, 
Tim Tookey, Dave Babych. Atten 
dance: 5,138. 

LETHBRIDGE (3) - Gord Wil¬ 
liams 2, Dave Barr BRANDON (11) 
— Darren Halasz 3, Dave McDonald 2, 
Dave Stewart 2, Mike Winther, Don 
Dietrich, Darren Gusdal, Kelly 
McCrimmon. Attendance: 2,669. 
Western Division 

G W L T F A P 
Portland 57 40 16 1 306 243 81 

Victoria 54 39 15 0 269 174 77 

Seattle 55 19 34 1 214 298 39 

New West 54 4 49 1 182 332 9 

Eastern Division 

Calgary 54 37 16 1 294 218 75 

Regina 55 37 17 1 340 231 75 

Medicine Hat 57 28 24 4 250 249 60 

Brandon 59 28 30 1 264 288 57 

Billings 55 27 27 1 257 228 55 

Lethbridge 57 26 28 3 273 260 55 

Saskatoon 52 22 27 3 245 260 47 

x-Great Falls 28 2 25 1 73 186 5 

x - Folded. 

Today's games 
New Westminster at Calgary 
Medicine Hat at Seattle 
Lethbridge at Billings 
Saskatoon at Regina 

Hockey scores 

B.C. JUNIOR 

Chilliwack 9 Merritt 3 
Penticton 9 Abbotstord 2 
Nanaimo 6 Richmond 5 
WEST INTERNATIONAL 
Elk Valiev 6 Kimberley 2 
^rail 4 Nelson 2 

Additional sport 
P. 18, 19, 25, 26 


gars on even terms until 
Palmer took over. 

Fuhr, beaten for 12 goals 
in his last start, showed no 
signs of nervousness and 
made his best stop against 
Steve Tsujiura late in the 
second period when the high- 
scoring forward broke in on 
the left side and tested the 
Cougar rookie from about 20 
feet. 


Fuhr finished with 38 
saves, including la in the 
first period, while Hrudey,.a 
husky netminder with an ex¬ 
cellent glove hand, blocked 
33 drives. 

Tigers, In the fashion of all 
Ginnell clubs, took the ma¬ 
jority of penalties but Cou¬ 
gars were unable to capital¬ 
ize on six power-play 
opportunities. Referee Rob 


Shick assessed to of 16 
minors to Medicine Hat and 
fighting majors to Dan Des- 
chcnes of the Cougars and 
Oren Koules of the Tigers 
after a first-period scrap. 

Cougars play host to Seat¬ 
tle on Tuesday night, vutit 
New Westminster Bruin$$n 
Thursday then play hos**o 
the high-scoring Regina HSls 
on Saturday. 


B.C. GIRLS CHAMPIONS skip 
Lana Lacheur, third Colleen 
World, second Janice Wilson and 
lead Maureen Okell of Oak Bay- 


Curling Club. They will represent 
the province in March in the na¬ 
tional championships in Charlotte¬ 
town. 


Oak Bay foursome 
wins B.C. girls title 


Add Lana Lacheur and her 
Oak Bay rink to Vancouver 
Island’s impressive list of 
provincial curling cham¬ 
pions this year. 

The Oak Bay foursome 
which includes Colleen 
World, Janice Wilson and 
Maureen Okell defeated 
Shelly MacFarlane of Prince 
George 7-5 Saturday in Delta 
to win the B. C. girls cham¬ 
pionship. 

It’s the first time a Vic¬ 
toria rink has won the event, 
which began in 1967, and the 
1968 champion Margo Conti 
rink from Campbell River is 
the only other Island win¬ 
ner. 

Lacheur. who finished the 
nine-rink, round-robin event 
with a 7-1 mark, will repre¬ 
sent the province in the na¬ 
tional final, March 8-15, at 
Charlottetown, P. E. I. 

The Oak Bay skip stole two 
on the 10th end fot victory 
when McFarlanc was unable 
to complete an in-turn draw 
to the four-foot with her final 
rock. Lacheur led 1-3 after 
five ends but MacFarlane 
grabbed a 5-4 lead with sin¬ 
gles on the sixth and seventh 
ends. Lacheur evened the 
score on the eighth and the 
Prince George skip elected 
to blank the ninth and retain, 
last shot. 

Patti Jennings of North 
Vancouver finished second 
at 6-2 after dropping an 8-3 
decision to Cheryl Patton of 
Cranbrook on the final draw. 
Jennings had defeated La¬ 
cheur 9-8 on Thursday morn¬ 
ing. 

MacFarlane and Patton 
finished at 5-3, Sandra 
Guenther of Vernon, Carol 
Streuby of Chilliwack and 
Janet McWilliams of Bur¬ 
naby were 3-5, and Joanne 
Christianson of Fort St. John 
and Sandra Keizer of Powell 
River were 2-6. 

Lacheur joins Island win¬ 
ners Stacey Coomber of 
Nanaimo, who begins play in 
the national iynior men’s 
championshipfToday at Sault 
Ste. Marie; Glen. Harper of 
Duncan, the provincial se¬ 
nior men’s representative in 
the nationals next month at 
St. John, N. B.; and Tim Hor- 
rigan of Victoria Curling 
Club, the B. C. representa 
five for the national men’s 
championship at the Brier 
next month in Calgary. 

Three-time national 
champion Flora Martin of 
VCC begins her quest for a 
fourth provincial senior 
women's championship this 
week at Hollybum Country 
Club in West Vancouver. The 
event begins Monday and 
continues through Friday. 


Curling 


The Island won’t be repre¬ 
sented in the Seagram Mixed 
final next month as Fred 
Duncan of Port Albemi was 
eliminated by Gary Wray of 
Smithers in the morning 
round Saturday in the pro¬ 
vincial championship at Wil¬ 
liams Lake. 

Bob McCubbin of Rich¬ 
mond won the “A” event in 
the modified double-knock¬ 
out championship and was 
playing in "B” side action 
Saturday night along with 
Tony Eberts of Kamloops, 
Gene Kraus of Abbotsford, 
Wray, Doug McCabe of 
North Vancouver and Gord 
Roland of Vernon. 

The winner moves on to 
the nationals. March 16-22, in 
St. John’s, Nfld. 

* * * 

In Vancouver. Cathy Jan¬ 
sen skipped the University of 
B. C. women’s rink to six 
consecutive wins to capture 
the Canada West University 
Athletic Association curling 
championship. 

University of Saskatche¬ 
wan and University of Vic¬ 
toria, represented by the 
Helen Anderson rink, fin¬ 
ished with 3-3 records. Uni¬ 
versity of Lethbridge was 
last at 0-6. 

Saskatchewan, skipped by 
Dave McCusher, won the 
men's championship with a 


4-0 record. Lethbridge was 
2-2 and A1 Carlson of Victoria 
wasO-t. 

In women’s games Satur 
day, UBC' stopped Victoria 
11-4. then beat Lethbridge 
8-5: and Saskatchewan 
downed Lethbridge 8-5 and 
beat Victoria 10-6. 

In n>pn’s play, Lethbridge 
took Victoria 9-2 and Saskat 
chewan edged Lothbridgo6-5 
in an extra end. 


Hosts whip 
Ex-Brits 


James Bay Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation hung a licking on 
Vancouver Ex-Brits in first 
division exhibition rugby 
play Saturday. 

Chuck Shergold led the at 
tack with three tries as 
JBAA trounced the Ex-Bnits 
44-7 at Macdonald Park. ' 

JBAA also won the second 
division match 25-7 while 
Vancouver Kat.x beat Oak 
Bay Wanderers 15-9 in a sSc 
ond division exhibition 
match at Windsor Park. 

Paul Vaeson added tjvo 
tries for JBAA. Dan Hem 
mingway. K. C. Walt $id 
Gary Johnston scored -one 
try each, Kym Clarke kitied 
a drop goal and two converts 
and Scott Avery kicked, a 
penalty goal. 

Doug Hayes scored a try 
and kicked a penally goal Cor 
the Ex-Brits. 


Debbie and Debbie 
crack meet records 

EDMONTON — Debbie Scott and Debbie Camp¬ 
bell of University of Victoria capped a highly 
successful weekend here Saturday but posting their 
second wins in two days. 

Debbie Scott shattered her own meet record in the 
1,500 metres of the Canada West University Athletic 
Association event in a time of four minutes, 23.9 
seconds. 

Her previous mark, set last year, was 4:24.4. 

And Debbie Campbell set a new record in winning 
the 800 metres event in the Edmonton Journal 
international meet, dueling Anne Mackie-Morelli of 
Richmond most of the race before finally taking the 
lead on the final bend. Britt McRoberts of Richmond 
was third. 

On Friday, Miss Campbell won the 800 metres in 
the university meet while Miss Scott easily won the 
3,000 metres. 

For her efforts. Scott was named outstanding 
female performer of the university meet, also for 
the second successive year. 

Anita Sobon of UVic clocked her personal best in 
the 1,500, turning in a time of 4:57. She ran fifth. 

The best performance by a member of UV’ic’s 
men’s team came from -Mike.Lax, who placed 
seventh in the 800-metres at 1:59.6. 































SPORTS 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 1 7 


Second gold to heart-throb Heiden 


•LAKE PLACID, N.Y. 
(UPI) - Eric Heiden, the 
nation’s newest heart throb, 
responded to the bobbysox¬ 
like screams of spectators 
Saturday and plowed 
tSrough a steady snow to win 
the men's 5,000-meter speed 
skating event for his second 
gold medal at the XIII Win¬ 
ter Olympics. 

While the snow made 
things hazardous for other 


athletes and inconvenienced 
thousands of visitors, the 21- 
year-old Heiden seemed un¬ 
perturbed by the weather 
and spun around the skating 
oval in an Olympic record 
time of 7 minutes, 02.29 sec¬ 
onds to beat two Norwe¬ 
gians, world record holder 
Kai Arne Stenshjemmet and 
Tom Erik Oxholm. 

Heiden, winner of the 
men’s 500-metre event Fri¬ 


day, was cheered wildly by 
the crowd every time he 
passed the grandstand and 
screams of “Ooooh, Eric” 
and “Go, Eric, Go” could be 
heard from many of the fe¬ 
male spectators. Other fans 
waved American flags and 
applauded enthusiastically. 

It was the third medal cap¬ 
tured by the U.S. speed skat¬ 
ers in two days. On Friday, 
Leah Poulos Mueller of 


Dousman, Wis., took the sil¬ 
ver medal in the women's 500 
metres. 

Heiden also stands an ex¬ 
cellent chance of winning 
three more gold medals in 
the 1,000, 1,500 and 10,000- 
meter events. 

“In the 1,000 and 1,500 I 
have a chance to do very 
well," Heiden said. “The 10,- 
000 metres is up in the air but 
I’m pretty confident." 



A steady snow, which 
dropped as much as four 
inches on the northern 
Adirondack region, created 
havoc for competitors in the 
two-man bobsled and in the 
women’s downhill training 
at Whiteface Mountain. 

The snow made the refri¬ 
gerated bobsled run at Mt. 
van Hoevenberg slicker than 
normal and several of the 
sleds resembled bumper 
cars at an amusement park 
as they banged repeatedly 
against the walls. 

Poor conditions didn’t 
bother the Swiss team of 
Eric Schaerer and Josef 
Benz, however. With two- 
time world champion 
Schaerer at the controls, the 
duo ended a 24-year gold 
medal drought in Olympic 
bobsled competition for the 
Swiss by winning the event 
over two East German 
sleds. 

While the U.S. missed a 
medal in the bobs, the two 
American sleds finished 
fifth and.sixth, respectively 
— the best showing by U.S. 
bobsledders since a bronze 
medal finish in the 1956 
Games at Cortina, Italy. 

In another medal event, 
Anatoli Aljabiev gave, the 
Soviet Union its third gold 
medal of the Games in nor- 
dic skiing competition by 
winning the 20-kilometer 
biathlon. Aljabiev, the victor 
here in last year’s pre-Olym¬ 
pics, used his expert marks¬ 
manship to edge East Ger¬ 
many’s Frank Ullrich by 
only 11 seconds. 

Eberhard Rosch, Ullrich’s 
teammate, won the bronze 
medal in the event which 
combines cross county ski¬ 
ing and rifle marksmanship. 


Eric Heiden of U.S., newest star at Lake Placid, skates to second Olympic medal 


Weekend viewing 
from Lake Placid 


SUNDAY 

Noon 

GD 70 metre special ski jumping 
(live); 1,000-metre speed skatino; 
men's 15-kilometre special cross 
country. 


CD 


Summary. 

Highlights. 

MONDAY 

8 a.m. 

Giant slalom. 


CD 


CD 


5 p.m. 

Downhill skiing. 


6 p.m. 

Figure skating. 


7 p.m. 

CDCD Fioure skating, speed 
skating, downhill and cross-coun¬ 
try skiing and ski jump. 

(D Women's downhill; ice danc¬ 
ing; pairs free skating 70-metre 
special ski jumping. 

8 p.m. 

CD Cross-country skiing and 
speed skating. 

11:30 p.m. 

CD Figure skating, speed skat¬ 
ing, downhill and cross-country, 
skiing and ski jump. 


4:30 p.m. 

CD Ski jumping and cross-coun¬ 
try skiing. 

7 p.m. 

CD Figure skating, the giant sla¬ 
lom, cross-country skiing, hockey 
and ski jump. 

9 p.m. 

CD U.S. vs. Romania hockey 
(live); first run of men's giant 
slalom; 70-metre combined ski 
jumping; men'scompulsories, fig¬ 
ure skating; women's 10-kilome¬ 
tre cross country ski race. 

11:30 p.m. 

CD Summary. 

11:45 p.m. 

CD Highlights. 


YOUR LAST CHANCE! 

To Buy a New 1979 

SUZUKI or KAWASAKI 

Motorcycle at Dealer Cost!! The building has 
sold!! Everything must go!! Used machines 
— make your offer! Office Equipment, etc., 
tools, accessories, shelving boxes, cash 
register, Tru-ride by the bucket, Everything's 
for Sale! Make 
Your Offer! 


See Ken Williams 
at 

TUES.-SAT. 

9-5 


FREDERICK MOTORS LTD. 

616 QUEENS AVE. • 383-0823 



79 HONDA 
CLEARANCE 


CT 70 

NOW S 739 

XL 125 

NOW $1259 

XL 250 

NOW $1699 

CB400TI 

NOW $1599 

XR 250 

NOW $1699 

CB400T2 

NOW $1799 

CX500 std. 

NOW $2699 

CB750K 

NOW $2999 

GL1000 

NOW $3999 


3 ONLY 

1977 CB 750F 
SUPER SPORTS 
Brand New S2799 

ALL AT 

MUUiKS MARINE 

913 Tata* St. DmAmUmmIMI 
m-mi 2-17 mhiii 


ca 

I- 


■ DRIVER EDUCATION • 

— New courses starting every month — 
Neri Course starts Non., Mar. 3, 1980 

ENROLL AT WATSON S 

824 JOHNSON ST. 

Or Phone 384-9824 

Ask about $50.00 ICBC Rebate. 


H 

m 

m 

z 

</> 



PETER PATES SAYS 


KATHITE H 

CREOSOTE REMOVER 

AND ALSO 

HELPS PREVENT 
CHIMNEY FIRES 


Pates Supply 


LTD 


WAREHOUSE' PRICES 


GRAND OPENING March 1st 

Narine & Power Products 
Service Centre 

OTTERING SERVICE TO 

JOHNSON 


MERCURY — EVINRUOE 
OUTBOARDS 

MERCRUISER — O.M.C. — VOLVO 
STERNDRIVES 




LMWNM0WERS 
CHAINSAWS 
PARTS 

and ACCESSORIES 


382-1211 


402A ESQUIMAU R0. 

(Corner of Mary and Esquimau Rd. across 
from E & N Railway Station) 



ATTENTION 
SAANICH RESIDENTS 

Copies of the 

SAANICH OFFICIAL 
COMMUNITY PUN. 1979 

are now available at a cost of $5.00 per copy, 
from: 

PLANNING DEPARTMENT, 
SAANICH MUNICIPAL HALL, 

770 VERNON AVENUE, 

VICTORIA, B.C., V8X 2W7 

G. V. LAURENSON, MCIP, 
Municipal Planner 


THE HEAT’S ON 
FOR WINTER SALES. 



TR7 Convertible 


If you love the idea of convertible 
sports cor excitement during the 
worm months !o come, why not get a jump on Spring ? Buy your TR7 convertible 
today and take advantage of special off-season prices. There s plenty of stock to 
choose from right now. And believe it or not, TR 7 convertibles make a great 
all season car The heaters have been designed and tested for Canadian 
Winters and TR7's fuel economy mokes sense in any weather 

Yes sir, the heat's on for TR 7 convertible Winter sales. And there’s no 
better time to bargain on the winning tradition of Triumph. , . 

Road test the TR 7, when , ^ 

conditions are not at their best. IjCHl lltQihTUlO. itl TRIUMPH 


That's a true test of performance! 

\ ' , 


PLIMLEY 




1010 Yates 
382-9121 


Canadian rally fails 
to avert narrow loss 


LAKE PLACID, N.Y. 
(CP) — Finland got a 
short-handed goal from 
Seppo Sudraniemi with 
less than four minutes 
left and then held off a 
furious Canadian rally 
which fell one goal short 
to cam a 4-3 victory Sat¬ 
urday night in hockey ac¬ 
tion at the 1980 Winter 
Olympics. 


Soviets 

Finland 

Canada 

Poland 

Holland 

Japan 


18 


Sweden 
U.S. 

Czechs 
Romania 3 1 
W Grmnv 3 1 


Red Division 
G W L T 

3 3 0 0 
3 2 10 
3 2 10 
3 12 0 
3 0 2 1 
3 0 2 1 6 

Blue Division 
3 2 0 1 15 
3 2 0 1 14 
3 2 1 0 21 
2 0 8 
2 


F A P 

41 5 6 

14 11 4 
6 4 
17 


8 30 1 
25 1 


Norway 3 0 3 0 


16 15 
5 26 


With Canada attempt¬ 
ing to reorganize at its 
own blueHne, Reijo Lep- 
panen stole the puck 
from defenceman Randy 
Gregg and passed to Su¬ 
draniemi who beat goal- 
tender Bob Dupuis from 
10 feet. 

Canada took the subse¬ 
quent faceoff into the 
Finland zone and Kevin 
Primeau finished off ^ 
three-way passing play 
14 seconds after the Fin¬ 
nish goal. 

The Canadians contin¬ 
ued to press for the re¬ 
mainder of the game and 
with Canada enjoying a 
5-4 manpower advantage 
and Dupuis on the bench, 
just failed to score on 
a goalmouth scramble 
with nine seconds left. 

Esa Peltonen, Jukka 
Koskilahti and Leppanen 


got the other Finnish 
goats, while Canada, 
which outshot Finland 33- 
26, also got goals from 
Glenn Anderson and Paul 
MacLean. 

The win moved Finland 
into a tie with Canada for 
second place in the Red 

Hew we fared 

BOBSLEDDING 

Two-man: Joev Kilburn, Ot¬ 
tawa, and Bob Wilson, Montreal, 
13th atter final runs; Brian Va- 
chon and Seroe Cantln, both Mon¬ 
treal, 20 th. 

SPEED SKATING 

Men's 5,000 metres: Craig 
Webster, Regina, 20th among 29 
entries. 

LUGE 

Women's single: Carole Keves, 
Woodstock, Ont., 18th among 23 
entries; Danielle Nadeau, Mon¬ 
treal, 22 nd. 

Men's single: Bruce Smith, 
Mississauga, Ont., ltth after 
final run; Mark Jensen, Toronto, 
17th. 

POINTS 

Unofficial standings by coun¬ 
tries based on a 10-5-4-3-2-1 scor¬ 
ing system for the first six finish¬ 
ers In the Winter Olympic 
Games. Events completed — 11. 


Soviet Union 
East Germany 
United States 
Netherlands 
Norway 
Austria 
Switzerland 0 
Finland 
Sweden 

West Germany 7 

Italy 6 

Canada 4 

Bulgaria 4 

Czechoslovakia 4 

Japan 7 

Poland 2 

France 1 

MEDALS 

Medal standings at the Winter 
Olympics. Events completed — 


61 

58 

32 

23 

21 

18 

16 

8 


11 . 

Soviet Union 
East Germany 

U.S. 

Netherlands 

Austria 

Switzerland 

Norway 

Italy 

Finland 

Canada 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

West Germany 


Gold Sil. Br 

2 


3 

0 

1 

cr» 

0 * 


Division’s preliminary 
round, both with 2-1 rec¬ 
ords and two games re- 
maining. However, 
should the teams end in a 
tic at the conclusion of 
the round, then Finland 
would advance to the 
medal round because of 
its win over Canada. 

In other games, the 
United States beat Nor¬ 
way 5-1, Czechoslovakia 
whipped Romania 7-2, 
the Soviet Union bounced 
PolandS-l, Japan lied the 
Netherlands 3-3 and Swe¬ 
den defeated West Ger¬ 
many 5-2. 

Finland opened the 
scoring at 4:03 of the first 
period with the teams 
playing five aside. Pcl- 
lonen shifted around de¬ 
fenceman Don Spring 
and carmned a shot off 
the post to Dupuis's left 

FINLAND 4, CANADA 3 
First Period 

1. Finland, Peltonen (Sudran¬ 
iemi) 4:03 -- 

2. Canada, MacLean (Berry, 
O'Malley) 14:22 

3. Finland, Leppanen (Levo) 
19:51 

Penalties — Berry Cda, Koski¬ 
lahti Fin 2:06, NIII Cda 6:04. 
Saarinen Fin 8:21, D'Alvise Cda 
10:41, G. Anderson Cda 11:02, 
Grant Cda 17:51. 

Second Period 

4. Finland, Koskilahti 17:07 

Penalty — Kurri Fin 11:52. 

Third Period 

5. Canada, G Anderson (Nill, 
Davidson) 6:47 

6. ‘Finland, Sudraniemi (Lep¬ 
panen) 16:55 

7. Canada, Primeau (Hind- 
march, Devanev) 17:09 

Penalties — Primeau Cda 
11:59, Kurri Fin 15:20, Hind 
march Cda, Lltma Fin 17:25, 
Haapalainen Fin 18:12. 

Shots on goal by 

Canada A 8 16-33 

Finland 9 11 ^—26 

Goal — Dupuis, Canada; Val- 
tonen, Finland. 




CAN YOU 
AFFORD TO 
WASTE 

ENERGY? 

$$$$$$ 


MIL 

THE 

PROFESSIONAL 



MANUFACTURERS 

FREE IN-HOME 
ESTIMATES 


“You can afford us; you can? afford not to 
find out about us!” 


w 


401 DAVID STREET, VICTORIA 


VAN ISLE 
WINDOWS 

383-7128 


fltd. 



























































































18 THE COLONIST, Sun., February n, 1980 


SPORTS 


NHL summaries 


HARTFORD 3, TORONTO 5 
Firs! Period 

1. Hartford, Roberts 6 (Detool, John¬ 
ston) 18:12 

Penalties- RenaudHar 10:22, Wil¬ 
liams Tor 12:14 Giroux Har 18:45. 

Second Period 

2. Hartford, Carroll 8 (Detool, M. 
Howe) 4:01 

3. Toronto, Slttler 23 (Mulhern) 
5:39 

4. Toronto, Salming 15 (Paiement, 
Martin) 6:27 

Penalty - Boutette Har 12:22. 

Third Period 

5. Toronto, Salming 16 (Sittler) 
♦:27. 

6. Toronto, Paiement 17 (Sittler, 
Martin) 11:14 

). Hartford, Douglas 25 (G. Howe, 
Giroux) 13:09. 

8. Toronto, Butler 7 (Salming) 19:58 
Penaltes—None. 

Shots on goal by: 

Hartford 10 10 16—36 

Toronto 12 7 13-32 

Goal — Hartford, Garrett; Ridley, 
Crha, Toronto. 

Attendance —16,485. 


Glen Meadows 
bonspiel set 

Glen Meadows starts its 
annual senior men’s curling 
bonspiel Tuesday at 9 a.m. 
First round draws: 

9 a.m. — E. Johnstone vs. A. Moore; 
Gar Taylor vs. T. MacLachlan; R. 
Yells vs. J. Smith; F. Furnell vs. B. 
‘Armstrong; I. Petch vs. C. Clark; G. 
Mortimer vs. C. Astuse 
11:15 a.m. — L. Perlette vs. M. 
Jeffries; S. Thompson vs. N. Cuttv 
bertson; R. Cole vs. A. Howell; A. 
Harris vs. E. McDormond; R. Kelly 
vs. J. Lietoel; M. MacLeod vs. V. 
Wilson. 

1:38 p.m. - W. Griffith vs. R. Ste¬ 
venson; D. Locke vs. R. Smuland; R. 
Nickelson vs. E. Jolly; L. Petlev- 
Honesvs. B. Watson. 


PITTSBURGH 1. MONTREAL 8 
First Period 

1. Montreal, Lafleur 43 (Shutt, 
Langwav) 5:39 

2. Montreal, Mondou 23 (Tremblay) 
13:01 

3. Montreal, Mondou 24 (Napier, 
Langwav) 18:50 

4. Pittsburgh, Lonsberry 10 (Stack- 
house) 19:50 

Penalties — None. 

Second Period 

5. Montreal, Larouche 36 (Shutt, 
Lafleur) 6:31 

6 Montreal, Risetorough 7 (Robin 
son) 10:26 

Penalties - Libett Pgh 0:18. 

Third Period 

7. Montreal, Lafleur 44 (Larouche, 
Robinson) 1:32 

8. Montreaal, Tremblay 8 (Robin 
son, Lambert) 7:38 

9. Montreal, Shutt 32 (Larouche, 
Robinson) 12:24 

Penalty — Tallon Pgh 14:26. 

Shots on goal by 

Pittsburgh 8 5 9 — J22 

Montreal 17 17 8 — 42 

Goal — Holland. Pittsburgh; Her¬ 
ron, Montreal. 

Attendance -17,075. 

ATLANTA 2, MINNESOTA 2 
First Period 

1. Minnesota, Payne 30 (MacAdam, 
B. Smith) 9:53 

2. Minnesota, Sargent 13 (Giles, 
McCarthy) 12:07 

3. Atlanta, Chouinard 23 (Russell) 
14:20 

4. Atlanta, Lever 23 (Marsh) 15:05 
Penalty - Shand Atl 11:51. 

Second Period 

No scoring. 

Penalties - Marsh Atl 12:16, Harts 
burg Min 16:27. 

Third Period 

No scoring. 

Penalty — Chouinard Atl 9:55. 

Shots on goal by: 

Atlanta 12 7 6-23 

Minnesota 7 14 9—30 

Goal — Bouchard, Atlanta; Ed¬ 
wards, Minnesota 
Attendance — 15,162. 


Terry on target 


Terry Crocker had the 
magic touch Saturday. 

The Spartans forward 
Hated all her teams goals as 
they-edged Rebels 3-2 at 
Mallfit Douglas Park and 
moved into fourth place in 
tiusfirst division of the Van-. 
couver Island Women’s 
FioldHockey Association. 

IQ Other games, first-place 
UVfc-Vikettes ran their un¬ 
beaten string to 12 games 
with a 2-0 last-place Sandpip¬ 
ers, at Windsor Park while 
third-place Oak Bay sur¬ 
prised Mariners 1-0 also at 
Windsor. 

Highlighting second divi¬ 
sion play was Rebels Red 
upset of Evergreens. 

Liz Libby scored only the 
Reds’ third goal of the sea¬ 
son and that was enough as 
they edged the third-place 
Evergreens 1-0 at Oak Bay 
High School. 

Sailors stayed unbeaten in 
l^games with a 3-1 win over 
Hobbits at Beacon Hill Park 


while Rebels Gold defeated 
Sanderlings 2-1 at Oak Bay.^. 

FIRST DIVISION 

P W L T F A Pts 

UVic 12 II 0 ! 42 4 23 

Mariners 13 8 3 2 25 IS 18 

Oak Bey 13 7 5 0 29 26 IS 

Rebels 14 5 9 0 22 42 10 

Spartans 13 5 7 1 22 22 II 

Cowichan I II 4 6 1 18 21 7 

Sandpipers 12 2 10 0 12 27 4 

SPARTANS (3) — Terry Crocker 3. 
REBELS (2)-NikiBrians2. 

UVIC (2) — Cvnthia McAlpine. 
ClndvBrav SANDPIPERS(0). 

OAK BAY (1) — Janet Ruest. 
MARINERS (01. 

SECOND DIVISION 

Sailors 13 9 0 4 33 7 22 

RebeisGdd 14 7 2 4 20 14 10 

Evergreens 12 5 2 5 18 9 15 

Cowichan 11 11 5 3 3 28 12 13 

Hobbits 13 2 8 3 17 30 7 

sanderlings 13 3 8 1 7 25 7 

Rebels Red 13 2 9 2 3 28 6 

REBELS RED (II — Liz Llbbv. 
EVERGREENS (0). 

SAILORS (31—CattivCavIn, Leslie 
Howe, LeslieWalker. HOBBITS (1) — 
Cattiv Robinson, 

REBELS GOLD (2) — Sherry RP 
binson. Colleen Blevins. SANDER- 
LINGS <11—Marilv Hooev. 



Hours: 

Monday to Friday 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Saturdays Feb. 16 to Mar. 1 
9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



tepUemon 


M0MWGHTQ4ST^^^MM«1U2«^^ 



JIM 

COFFEY 


As many of my friends, associates, 
and clients know. I sold the world 
famous Brand X tor many years. A 
few months ago I joined Reg Midgley 
and AMC, and what a pleasant sur¬ 
prise 1 Honestly, folks, come and com¬ 
pare the quality, the finish, and 
the price ot the AMC Concords. 
Spirits and Eagles Like me. you H be 
happy with the value and economy 
ottered with these great cars from 
AMC. You H find out why when others 
are tailing, AMC ts on the move, on 


» the move with the size and types ol cars needed m North America. And 

* V® 5 - 8MM back their cars with the best guarantee in the industry. 

■ A^ A r C . Bu . v ? *°* ec,K>n PkH 1 driving one ot the all new 

k AMC Eagle 4-Dr Wagons With its luxurious equipment and 4-wheel drive. I 

enjoyed driving tn the recent snow and icy conditions. Wtth Eagle—Go anywhere 

* anytime! Rog has authorized me to discount my demo by $500, so come on m 
trade Brand X and move up to an AMC Eagle 



Eagle Wagon 


Reg Midgley 




WASHINGTON 5, VANCOUVER 3 
First Period 

1. Washington, Walter 18 (Picard) 
10:30 

2. Vancouver, Fraser 10 (Smyl) 
11:06 

Penaltias—Vancouver bench 
(served by Lupul) 3:13, Lehtonen 
Wash 4:26, Vaive Vcr 5:14, Gradln 
Vcr 11:20. Hangsleben Wash 17:14. 

Second Period 

3. Washington, Hangsleben 7 
(Lofthouse, Edberg) 6:08 

4. Washington, Bouchard2 (Walter, 
Gartner) 9:33 

Penalties—Green Wash double 
minor, valve Vcr 9:17, Stephenson 
Wash (served bv Jarvis) 12:13 
(served bv Walter) 12:33, Coulis 
Wash, Hughes Vcr 16:32, Snepsts Vcr 
17:42,, Oddleitson Vcr 19:12. 

Third Period 

5. Washington, Mulvey 10 (Green, 
Picard) 0:37 

6. Vancouver, Fraser 11 (Smyl, 
Snepsts) 1:25 

7. Washington, Lofthouse 10 (Ed¬ 
berg) 10:08 

8. Vancouver, valve 13 18:00 

Penalties—Gartner Wash minor, 

major, Vaive Vcr malor, Kearns Vcr 
3:15, Mulvev Wash, Smyl Vcr 6:41, 
Coultis Wash, Smyl vcr minors, mis- 
corxhKts, Mulvey Wash, Snepsts Vcr 
majors, misconducts 9:04. 

Shots on goal by 

Washington 9 10 12—31 

Vancouver 7 16 9—32 

Goat—Stephenson, Washington; Han¬ 
lon, Vancouver 
Attendance—13,463. 


ISLANDERS 2, LOS ANGELES 3 
First Period 

1. Los Angeles, Simmer 40 (Dionne, 
Taylor) 2:49 

Penalties — Lane NYI 2:18, Nys 
from NYI minor, major, Wells LA 
malor 14:16, Kelly LA, Persson NYI, 
Langevin NYI 18:35. 

Second Period 

2. NY Islanders, Bossy 39 10:30 

3. NY islanders, Howatt 5 (Henning, 
Sutter) 11:37 

Penalties — Nystrom NYI, Wells 
LA majors 3:16, Gibbs LA, Bossy N Yi 
13:23. 

Third Period 

4. Los Angeles, Goring 20 (Hopkins, 
Gibbs) 0:52 

5. Los Angeles. Taylor 31 (Dionne, 
Simmer) 15:32 

Penalties — Wilson LA 6:46. Howatt 
NYI, Wilson LA 13:13, Trottler NYI 
15:24, Bourne NYI 15:32, Simmer LA 
minor, major, Smith NYI major 
15:46, Gillies NYI 18:13, Olonne LA 
19:00. 

Shots on goal by 

NY Islanders 3 6 6-15 

Los Angeles 11 11 7—29 

Goal — Smith, NY islanders; 
Keans, Los Angeles. 

Attendance —11,326. 



Third Wenzel in spotlight 


Kirk Wenzel 

... new city champion 


By REG REYNOLDS 

Wenzel isn’t a name you 
hear every day but it’s be¬ 
coming a household word in 
Victoria bowling circles. 

John Wenzel has been one 
of Victoria’s top bowlers for 
some time, his daughter 
Kelly Wenzel represented 
B.C. in the All-American Ju¬ 
nior Bowling Congress 
championships at Washing¬ 
ton, D.C. last summer and 
now son Kirk has captured 
the Victoria men’s tenpin 


Oak Bay extends streak 
with shutout over Gorge 

Oak Bay is on the move in the first division of the 
Vancouver Island Soccer League. 

Winning its third game in as many starts. Oak Bay 
scored a 2-0 decision over Gorge* at Royal Athletic 
Park. The win boosted Oak Bay Into fourth place in 
the Id-team division, one point up on Gorge and one 
behind University of Victoria Vikings. 

Oak Bay and Gorge each have four games re¬ 
maining in league play. 

Ken Garraway opened the scoring at 73 minutes, 
driving in a rebound of a Jim Hunter-shot which was 
deflected off the crossbar by goalkeeper John 
Iruretagoyena. 

Denis Mamie scored the insurance goal on a 
penalty shot four minutes later after being pulled 
down in the penalty area. 

Steve Akam earned his fifth shutout of the season 
in the Oak Bay net. 


Youth stfccer 


BUFFALO 4, DETROIT 3 
First Period 

1. Buffalo, Martin 32 (Selling, 
SchoenfeW) 4:41 

2. Buffalo, Marlin 33 (Gere, Dunn) 
5:37 

3. Detroit, Labraaten 23 (Plrus, 
Korn) 14:30 

Penalties - Long Det 0:41. Berg¬ 
man Det 5:16. 

Second Period 

4. Detroit, Woods 5 (Polonich) 0:49 

5. Buffalo, Gare 38 (Schoenteld, Van 
Boxmeer) 13:47 

6. Buffalo, Savard 3 (Perreault, 
Dudley) 14:32 

Penalties — Playfair But 7:31, Lar¬ 
son Det 16:00. 

Third Period 

7. Detroit, Korn 2 (Labraaten, 
Woods) 15:14 

Penalty — Savard But 1:47. 

Shots on goal by 

Buffalo 10 12 9-31 

Detroit 5 8 15-28 

Goal — Sauve, Buffalo; Vachon, 
Detroit. 

Attendance — 17,944. 


BOSTON 5, COLORADO 3 
First Period 

1. Boston, Miller 14 (Lalonde, Bour- 
aue) 1:01 

2. Colorado, Malinowski 2 (Pierce) 
4:19 

3. Boston, Bourque 11 (Middleton, 
Cashman) 5:38 

Penalties — Watson Col 5:03, Se- 
cord Bos 12:24. 

Second Period 

4. Colorado, Robert 23 (McDonald, 
Malinowski) 16:07 

5. Boston. Secord 17 (Ratelle, 
Smith) 17:33 

6. Boston, Park 3 (Bourque, La¬ 
londe) 19:10 

Penalty — Smith Bos 9:59. 

Third Period 

7. Colorado, DeBlois 20 (Berry) 
18:41 

8. Boston, Jonathan 20 (Bourque) 
19:18. 

Penalties — OReilly Bos malor- 
mlnor, Morrison Col malor 10:46. 

Shots on goal by . 

Boston 11 8 9—28 

Colorado 9 12 8-29 

Goal — Cheevers. Boston; Oles 
chuk, Astrom, Colorado. 

Attendance —14,130. 


Results of matches Satur¬ 
day in the Lower Island 
Youth Soccer Association: 

DIVISION 4A B.C. Cup Play town 

— Lake Hill Jadresko4 Duncan Wood¬ 
land Autobody 0. 

TIE BREAKER - Prospect Lake 
Liddell Construction 4 Lansdowne 
Eve. Opt. Tigers 2 

EXHIBITIONS — Gorge F.C. 2 
Juan de Fuca Belmont Collision 2. 

DIVISION 4B District Cup Play 
downs — B.U. Ocean Construction 
(4C) 6 Lansdowne Eve. Opt. Bomb- 
ers 0; Gorge R ova Is 0 Salt Spring 
Kicks 1; Peninsula Cougars 2 Cordova 
Bav Tigers 3. 

DIVISION 4C District Cup Play 
downs — Gordon Head A.N.A.F. Vets 
2B.U Titans4. 

DIVISION 5A B.C. Cup Play down 

— Gordon Head Coppen Jewellers l 
(winner on corner kicks) Gorge F.C. 
1. 

DIVISION 5A District Cup Play 
downs — Prospect Lake Prescription 
Optical l Juan de Fuca Acme Gut¬ 
ters 2. 

DIVISION SB District Cup Play 
downs — Cordova Bav Colts 0 Gor¬ 
don Head Machinists 3; Peninsula 
Dolphins 2 Bays United Pembertons 
1; Lansdowne Eve. Opt. Colts2 Gorge 
Buccs (SC) 0; Gorge Canadlans3 B.U. 
Comm. Travellers2. 

DIVISION 5C District Cup Play 
downs — Oak Park Motel 1 Lans¬ 
downe Eve. Opt. Mustangs 0; Gordon 
Head Acme Commercial Painting 1 
Juan de Fuca Westcan Terminal 0; 
Bays United Strikers 0 Prospect Lake 
Kiwenis4. 

DIVISION 6A B.C. Cup Play down 

— Cowichan Image 3 Cordova Bav 
United 0; Gorge F.C 0 Gordon Head 
Lum's Greenhouses 1. 

DIVISION 6A Exhibition — Bays 
United Dragons 1 Prospect Lake Is¬ 
landed. 

DIVISION 6B District Cup Play- 
downs — Hornets 0 Duncan Westcan 
Raiders 3; Coreland Development 0 
Lake Hill Cedar Hill Esso 2; Prospect 
Lake A.A. Transmission 3 Juan de 
Fuca Westcan Stevedores 2. 

DIVISION 4C/D District Cup Play 
downs — Cordova Bav Seals 1 Gorge 
Canadians 3; RCAF 7 Bays United 
Unicorns 0; Sooke Juan de Fuca Re¬ 
alty 1 Bays United Tigers 0. 

DIVISION 7A B.C. Cup Play downs 

— Gordon Head University Heights 
Esso 2 Cowichan O.K. Tire 1; Gorge 
F.C. 2t8kehlll SockeyesO. 

DIVISION 7A Exhibitions - Bays 
United Greens 2 Prospect Lake Old 
field Service 3; Newport Meats 1 
Lansdowne Eve. Opt. Hurricanes 1. 

DIVISION 7B District Cup Play 
downs — Peninsula Eagles 4 Gorge 
Royals (7C) 0; Stocker N/A 1 Cowi 
chan Knights of Columbus 0; Juan de 
Fuca Ridlev Bros.4 Gordon HeadCos- 
mosl. 


DIVISION 7C/D District Cup Play 
downs — West Coast Savings 4 Bays 
United Barbarians 1; Bays United 
Village Meats 0 Peninsula Warriors 
5. 

DIVISION 8 League Playoff - Cor 

dova Bav Bobcats l Gorge F.C 3; 
Gordon Head Princess Mary 1 Juan de 
Fuca Denny's Automotive 2; Oak Bay 
Hardware2 Lake Hill Buckle Electric 
4. 

District Cup Play off 

SECTION 1 — Bays United Wolves l 
Juan de Fuca Hampton Hustlers 0; 
Bays United Oliver Hounds 3 Sooke 
Vikings 2, Prospect Lake Grayline l 
Gordon Head Sheibourne Plaza Drugs 
0; Gordon Head Mander Trucking 8 
JuandeFucaDairyQueenO; Peninsu 
la Kickers 6 Juan de Fuca Langford 
EssoO. 

SECTION 2 — Bays United Lions 4 
Juan de Fuca Gddstream Chevron 1; 
Gorge Canadians OGordon Head Vic¬ 
toria Kinsmen 1; Peninsula Steelers6 
Gordon Head Cosmos 0, Prospect 
Lake Dura Construction 2 Prospect 
Lake Home Lumber 4. 

EXHIBITION — Lansdowne Eve. 
Opt. Blues 3 Peninsula Leopards 0, 
Gorge Buccaneers 0 Lansdowne Eve. 
Opt Whltecaps6 

DIVISION 9 NORTH — Gordon 
Head Kiwanis 0 Gorge Canadians 3, 
industrial Insulation 3 Lake Hill 
Tom's Pizza0; Cordova Bay Eagles l 
Lansdowne Eve. Opt. Boxers 0 

DIVISION 9 SOUTH — Gordon 
Head Victoria Auto. Transmission l 
Peninsula Sharks 2; Lansdowne Eve. 
Opt. Rangers 0 Peninsula Panthers 
0;Juan de Fuca Suburban Realty 0 
Lake Hill Totem Towing 0, Gordon 
Head Teamsters 0 Gorge F.C. 1, 
Gorge Royals 1 Cordova Bay Ravens 
0. 

DIVISION 9 EAST — Sooke Blue 
Jays 1 Gordon Head Hillside Gulf 0; 
Strikers 1 Lake Hill Mercury Marine 
2; Gordon Head Floral Delivery 0 
Juan de Fuca Mega Power Electric 0. 

DIVISION 9 WEST - Lake Hill 
Saanich Kiwanis 0 Lansdowne Eve. 
Opt. Rovers 1; Juan de Fuca Glen 
Valiev Electric 2 Gordon Head 
Sambo's 0; Gordon Head Menzies 
Plumbing 2 Peninsula Whitecaps 0; 
Prospect Lake Pirates 2 Gorge United 
1; Peninsula Rowdies 0 Juan de Fuca 
Tigers 0. , 

DIVISION 18 NORTH—Lansdowne 
Eve. Opt. Strikers 0 Prospect Lake 
Artie installation 0; Cordova Bav 
R amblers 0 Gorge CanadiansO; Pros¬ 
pect Lake Victoria Public Savings I 
Lansdowne Eve. Opt. Kickers 5; 
Gorge F.C. 1 Gorge United 0; Deken 
Electric 0 Lake Hill Cable 100. 

DIVISION 10 SOUTH - Prospect 
Lake Reid Excavation 1 Cordova Bav 
SpartansO; Prospect Lake Vampires 
1 Prospect Lake Thorne-Lennon 1; 
Goroe Buccaneers 2 Lansdowne Eve. 
Opt. Sounders0; Flyers 1 Lansdowne 
Eve. Opt. Waves 0. 


your. 


[UP 

yiiiity 


3 WAYS TO WRAP UP 
YOUR SAVINGS BEFORE SPRING! 

1. Install doubt* glazed wtth exclusive thermal barrier I 
tramee end minimize condensation. 

2. Convert to TherfnoGlas using existing windows and | 
door frames. 

3. Add "DURASHIELD” vinyl inside storm windows. 

Call now lor "InJhoJiome " free estimates. 

WESCRAFTl 

MANUFACTURING QUALITY 
WINDOWS FOR 25 YEARS 

2189 KEATING X ROAD I 


758-2442 (Nanaimo) 
286-0444 (Campbell River) 


338-6142 (Courtenay)l 
652 1131 (Victoria)! 

1-21T 


YAMAHA 400 SALE 

NEW 79 MODELS 


736 CLOVERPALE 

Dealer Licence 6186 


385-8756 




XS400F 


*1649 


• 6-SPEED 

• 4-CYCLE TWIN 

• ELECTRIC START 


*1899 

SAME AS 
2F WITH 

MAGS AND DISCS 


FULL 1 YR., 19000 KM WARRANTY. 

PRICE INCLUDES FREIGHT and PDI 
and RIDING INSTRUCTION 

MULLINS MARINE SALES ltd. 


925 YATES ST. 


PmW Licence 5245 


382-1928 



ile* 5»i* 
MAIbjSr. 
!l; Rdth 


scratch and handicap cham¬ 
pionships. 

Kirk, a 19-year-old busi¬ 
ness administration student 
at Camosun College, rolled a 
678, the best series of his life 
to take both titles last week¬ 
end at Mayfair Lanes. His 
handicap total of 732 was 23 
pins ahead of the nearest 
competitor. 

Kirk’s win comes in only 
his second try in the city 
tournament but he has been 
involved in Victoria bowling 
for six years. 

He was an AJBC bowler 
until two years ago and now 
bowls in three leagues, the 
Monday Men’s Scratch, the 
Tuesday Mixed All-Star 
Kingpinners and the Wed¬ 
nesday Men’s Commerical. 

Father John also bowls in 
the Scratch and Commercial 
Leagues, but on different 
teams. He and Kirk make for 
an interesting matchup as 
both sport averages in the 
180-to-184 area. 

The key to Kirk’s big se¬ 
ries was a 289 game that 
started with 10 straight 
strikes and finished with a 
10-pin tap and a miss. 

His best previous series 
was a 669 last year. 

ir ★ ★ 

Easter is still more than a 
month away but the wise 
bowlers arc getting their en¬ 
tries in now for the Colonist 
fivepin bowlspiel at Town 
and Country Lanes and the 
Mayfair tenpin bowlspiel at 
Mayfair. 

Both events arc perennial 
sellouts and this year the 
fivepin tournament is so rich 
that it’s bound to sellout 
fast. 

The fivepin spiel is offer¬ 
ing $3,600 in prize money 
which means $600 to the 
Colonist “A” event winners. 

Entry is $25 per five-man 
team. The tenpin tourna¬ 
ment offers $2,500 in prizes 
and entry is $20 per four-man 
team. 

Entries are available now 
and the fivepin spiel has al¬ 
ready accepted more than 40 
applications including about 
20 from out of town. 

Both events run April 3-6. 

SPARE BITS - Wilson’s 
Bowladrome will hold its 
Valentines Day doubles but 
not until next month. Full 
bookings and a machine 
breakdown forced Glen Wil¬ 


son to postpone the annual 
event...The Courtenay Over 
the Hill Gang of Dusty Mill¬ 
er. Bill Hill. Wayne Farrell 
and Pat Patrick showed they 
weren't so over the hill and 
collected $380 for winning 
the Mexicana Motor Hotel 
“A’’ event in the fourth an¬ 
nual Winter Carnival Bowl¬ 
spiel at Courtenay. The Ding 
Dongs of Parksville finished 
second in the fivepin event 
while Steambowlers of Lady¬ 
smith were third and Bob 
Clark Four of Port Albemi 
finished fourth. The Ding 
Dongs held a 107-pin lead 
going into the final game but 
captain Hill led the rally with 
a 300 game. The Misfits of 
Port Alberni won the A.R.V. 
Sound ’’B" event and A.R. V. 
Sound of Courtenay won the 
Glacier Lanes 
“C”Event...Riet Duyvestyn 
rolled an all-spare tenpin 
game of 179 at Mayfair last 
week...Mickey Bakalak 
showed he’s another of the 
promising juniors with 562 
(167. 203, 192) series in the 
schools league at Mayfair. 

TENPIN 
Mayfair, Victoria 

MEN: ErnieHolness617(201,205, 
211), 571; Jim Norbury 608 (209,208), 
Joe Smith 606; Al King 605 (200, 
220); Marty Wong 603 (217,225); John 
Edge 603 (224,236); Wally Ostatychuk 
603 (246); KenGrexton603 (213), 573; 
Hal Wymore 596 ( 206, 243); Jim Le- 
bold 595 ( 220); John Edge 592 (212, 

203) ; Connie McBeth 692 ( 207). 554; 
Len Scott 594 (202.214); Les White 591 
1225); Bill Prior 591 (234); Henry Loo 
590 ( 224), 560 ( 206); Art Manson 590 
(254); Rick Hedlev 589 (212, 203); 
Fred Lobbezoo 587 (249), 584 (215), 
Alex Holowachuk 586 (232), Barry 
Stowe (200, 202); Alex Pearson 582 
(222); Kirk Wenzel 581 (202,201), 556; 
Tom Musgrave 581 (220), 576 (212), 
563 (209); Rob Ross 581; Frank Miller 
578; Bernie Nikkels 576; Len Havley 
576 (243); Bill DeCaria 575; Chuck 
Bennett 574 ( 214), Colin Bedwell 574 

(206) ; Ken Pollock 573; Lee Dooev 573 
(200); Bud Marty 571 (201); Doug Bull 
571 (212), 566 ( 227); Harold Guerin 
570; Bob Ellis 569; Will Wood 568 

(207) ; Tom Hardy 568 (212); Rod 
Caddell 566 (201); Roger Parke 566 
(200), DaveAnnear563(211);,Mickev 
Bakalak 562 ( 203); Lawrie Dunn 560 
(205), John Wenzel 560 (209), 553 
(207); Orel Morneau 559 ( 220); Alex 
Holowachuk 559, Dennis Anderson 
558; Wally Vogelsang 558, Bill Sand 
erson 558; Ken Buchanan 557 (225); 
Don Brown 556 (210); Sheldon Nipp 
556 (204); Gary Colby 555 (201); Mike 
Cook 554; Don Norbury 554; Klaus 
Mescheder 554, Bob Noton 553; Bud 
Randall 553; Bill Martin 552, Ken* 
Grant 552; Bob Butts 552; Bob Scott 
551 (201). George Kelly 550 (202). 

WOMEN Vera Gibbons621 (224, 

204) ; Jean McPherson 587; Ev Don 
aldson 567 ( 205); Emmy Pleslch 562 
(200); Audrey Malkewich 559,529,520 
(222); Cathy Wallace 558 (219); 
Maureen King 538, 529; Sheryl Boyes 
536; Jane Stewart 534 ( 205); Rosa 
Morneau 534 ( 255); Coby Lobbezoo 
533 (226), 522; Sue Holness 529; Carole 
Jacobs 529; Darlene Williams 528, 


Dot Bennett 526; Jean Baslee 52t 
Lois Whidden 525 (225); Diana / 

524, 501; Elsie Haddow 521; 

Murray 516; Velma Ember lev 516; 

Holly Hansen 516, 506; Merleen Hill 
516, Bee Kelly 514 (207); Jessie Loo 
514, Sue Jubto 514, 504, VI Pottinger 
511; Avis King 509, Betty Breiten 508; 
Kathy Peace 508, Flo Michell 506, 
Marilyn Grant 505; Nona Fletcher 
504; Nora Hardy 502; Gall Murdoch 
502; Charlotte Stossel 501; Riet Ouy- 
vestvn 501; Ruth Murray 500; Wendy 
Garbett 500. 

Duncan 

MEN: Terry Walton 611, 562; 
Keith McDonald 591, Richard Skeet 
568, Ron Blake 567; Percy Tyson 558; 

Roy Wilson 555; Lyle Cartwright 5J4, 
Dennis Pears 553. 

WOMEN: Vi Pottinger 574; Ruby 
Abbott 572; Elaine Calder 554, 5$0; 
Lorraine Hlndmarch 529; Judy Cove- 
loskl 524,514; Marg Unruh 520; Caro¬ 
lyn Cleasbv 505; Audrey Cornett 502; 
Sally Yates 501. 

Lake Cowichan »**<• 

MEN: Len Smith 608 (236), Doug 
Baird 581 (243); Jim Jubinville 574; 
Heinz Neuter 562 (211,204). 

WOMEN: Amy Mavea503. 

Ladysmith 

MEN: GusOuranitsas562; Peter 
Brvski Jr. 557. 

WOMEN: MargDoward517. 

BAG Bowl, Nanaimo 

MEN: Ken Bell 667; Wayne Haf^ 
vev 603; Dennis McDonald 599. 576; 

Len Wilkinson 594; Dennis Pears 591; 

Jack Williams 586, 572; Ernie Par^ff 
584; Carl Grzech 583; Aubrey Powell 
582; Paul Carmichael 582; Mickey 
Keelev 579; Otto Furchak 579; Don 
Harsch 577; Clive Walton 577, Dennis 
Lum 565, Ken McGlenen 562; Brian 
Laing 560; Bob Boudot 560; Frank 
Etter 558; John Knud sen 556; Ken 
Brvski 556, 554; Bob Gust 554; Ray 
Morris 554; Fred Botlev 554. 

WOMEN: Bea Summers 609; 
Lorraine Hadley 583; Dyanne Hind- 
march 553, 510, 507; Dora Brebber 
527; Wendy Gallia 524; Delma Fortin 
523, Judy Johnassen 519; Lil Muir 578; 
Sandy Parker 514; Lynda Milbourn 
508; Ann Lublsotto 506, Wendy Skel 
dock 505; Marylou Wheeler 504; Nan - 
Parkin 504. * 

-: 

FIVEPINS 

Town A Country, Victoria 

MEN: Dennis Williams 909 (313, 
302); Russ Hunt 856 ( 312); Darrell 
Prezeau 850 ( 309); Jim Letoold 842 
(353); Jesse Newell 838 (345); Dave 
Meredith 838 (312); Wayne Hendry 
838; Herb Hunt 825 (322); Dave Rees 
819 ( 350); George Waugh 810 ( 306); 
Cliff Soady 807 ( 314); Fred Hickey * 
805. 

WOMEN: I lace Walker 789 (323); 
Aleta Kennedy 770 ( 391); Vera Lysne 
.766 (338); Donna Waldrin 751 (291). 

Wilson's, Esquimau 

MEN: EttoreStefani803. 

WOMEN: Nancy Ranald! 769 
(363). 

Duncan 

WOMEN: Linda Paradise778. 

Chemainus 

MEN: John Atkens876 (362); Art 
Green 861 (344); Tom Alexander 861 
(395); Leo Kossey858 ( 343),811 (350); 
JoeLedoux832; Doug Cross 827; Dave 
Lambert 821 (327); Harold McGill b05 
(37)7). 

WOMEN: Elsie McWhinnie 877 
(392); Sylvia Jackson 788 ( 323); Rene 
Hill 759 (301); Janet Woodlev 757 * 

(340). 

Ladysmith 

MEN: JashaCain808 (307). 

Brechin, Nanaimo 

MEN: Ron McLellan 856 ( 356); 
John Radelia 837 (319, 320); Dave 
Smith 822 (361). 

Fiesta, Nanaimo 

MEN: Evan Camp 843 (330). 

WOMEN: Jackie Carmichael 
761. 

Rainbow, Port Alberni 

MEN: George Van Kooten 880 
(362); Rubin Krein825. 

WOMEN: Velma Innes880 ( 362), 
Joyce Unger 865 (339); Jackie Pitman 
763; June McMurdo 761, Fran Cror 
teau 759, Bev Lloyd 758, V. Crasniuk 
752. 



WINDSHIELD SPECIAL 

$oeoo 

Save 4 b W# off deductible 

On all windshield insurance claims 

MOBILE SERVICE 384-9111 


Offer expires 
March 31/80 



C 0M PfcfN 


NATURAL HAIR IN 8 WEEKS 



Canada s leading innovator in 
hair replacement can give you 
a full head of natural hair that 
is part of you 24 hours a day 
no matter what your activity 
Regardless of the ex'tent of 
your hair loss. Paragon Plus 
can offer you undetectable, 
permanent hair OUR PROD 
UCT IS GUARANTEED 
Write for your free full color 
brochure— 


MOdGON PLUS 

1920 Scotia Tower. 
650 W. Georgia Street 
Vancouver. B.C. V6B 4N8 
Toll Free 112-600-663-9156 
Operator 151 



NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY 

CODE 


PROV./STATE 


TEL. 


VC2-17 


LAST 3 DAYS TO ENROLL 

FREE WOODWORKING SEMINAR 


You can learn how to 
build your own furniture. 
Novices are welcome! 
Save dollars compared 
to high retail prices. 


Ml It man* I tpact. 



TOOLS n SPACE 



"The Hobby 
Woodworking Shop 


Op in 10-10 Mon.-Thurs. 

10-6 Frt and Sat 

383-9600 

338 Catharina (at Esquimau Rd.) 


f 

















































































SPORTS 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 1 9 


Fairclough’s heroics 
save Liverpool again 


LONDON (Reuter)— That 
amazing young man David 
Faiftlough did it again Sat¬ 
urday. With First Division 
champions Liverpool dead¬ 
locked 0-0 at halftime in the 
Football Association Cup 
fifth round tie with Third 
Division Bury, Falrclough 
camp on a substitute and 
promptly scored both goals 
in Liverpool’s 2-0 win. 

Fairclough scored three 
goals last Saturday and 
scoped again in midweek 
when he came on as substi¬ 
tute in the l-l draw with 
Nottingham Forest, in the 
League Cup. 

Second Division Watford 
scored the shock of the day 
with a 3-0 away win over 
First Division Wolverhamp¬ 
ton Wanderers. 

Wolverhampton was hop¬ 
ing to become the first team 
to make two Wembley Cup 
final appearances in the 
same season having already 
qualified for the League Cup 
final. 

The other clubs through to 
the quarter-finals arc Tot- 

The Original Knight 

Ksolunar tables 

V^When To Fish^, 
Or Hunt 


According to the Solunar Table* cal¬ 
culated for this area, the best times 
for hunting and fishing for the next 10 
days,Mrill be as follows (times shown 
are Pacific Standard Tima). 

Minor Major Minor Major 
A.M TODAY p m - 



5:15 

— 5:50 

TOMORROW 

12:10 

6:20 

12:35 6:45 

TUESDAY 

1:05 

7:20 

1:40 7:50 

WEDNESDAY 

2:05 

8:20 

2:35 8:45 

THURSDAY 

3:05 

9:20 

3:35 9:45 

FRIDAY 

4:00 

10:15 

4:35 10:45 

SATURDAY 

5:00 

11:15 

5:30 11:40 

SUNDAY 

5:55 

— 

6:20 12:10 
MONDAY 

6:45 

12:30 

7:05 1:00 

TUESDAY 

7:30 

1:15 

7:50 1:45 

8:15 


Minor periods, shorter duration, 
light tvpe. 

Major periods, lasting US to 2 hours 
are shown In bold. 


tenham, West Ham, Ever- 
ton, and Ipswich. Blackburn 
and Aston Villa, and Bolton 
and Arsenal will need to play 
again after both games fin¬ 
ished 1-1. 

Fairclough’s heroics for 
Liverpool saved his club the 
embarrassment of a trip to 
Bury for a replay and with 
six goals in the space of eight 
days he must have high 
hopes of a prolonged first- 
team run. 

He came on for England 
international David John¬ 
son, who also suffered the 
indignity of being cautioned 
for a foul on goalkeeper John 
Forrest, and scored in the 
6-lth and 82nd minutes. 

Watford’s hero was new 
signing Malcolm Poskett 
who scored twice in the sec¬ 
ond half to put his side on the 
road to victory. Luther Blis-' 
sett scored the third. 

The game marked an un¬ 
happy first-team debut for 
Wolverhampton goalkeeper 
Mick Kearns. 

Tottenham's young mid- 
field star Glen Hoddle was in 
superb form in his side’s 3-1 
win over Second Division 
Birmingham. 

Hoddle set up the opener 
for Gerry Armstrong and 
grabbed the other two for 
himself, one from a penalty 
after Argentine World Cup 
star Osvaldo Ardiles had 
been brought downilBs he 
raced in on goal. 

Everton cruised into the 
quarter-finals with a 5-2 win 
over Second Division Wrex¬ 
ham at Goodison Park. 

A freak own goal by Aston 
Villa’s Alan Evans, in the 
dying seconds gave Third 
Division Blackburn another 
chance while Bolton and Ar¬ 
senal also drew 1-1, both 
goals coming in the first- 
half. 

Premier League Aberdeen 
went on an eight-goal spree 
against First Division Air¬ 
drie ip the Scottish Cup 
fourth round. 

Steve Archibald helped 
himself to four goals with 
Willie Miller. Gordon Stra- 
chan, Ian Scanlon and John 
McMaster scoring the 
others. 

Champions Celtic was sur¬ 
prisingly held to a 1-1 draw 


by St. Mirren in Glasgow. 
Frank - McDougall, a player 
Celtic once tried to sign, put 
Saints ahead in the 36th 
minute with Murdo MacLeod 
equalizing in the closing 
stages. 

Cup holder Rangers had to 
fight all the way for its 1-0 
win over Dundee United and 
only a superb goal from cap¬ 
tain Derek Johnstone saved 
them a visit to Dundee for a 
replay. 

FA CUP 
Fifth Round 
Blackburn 1 Aston Villa 1 
Bolton 1 Arsenal 1 
Everton 5 Wrexham 2 
Ipswich 2 Chester 1 
Liverpool 2 Bury 0 
Tottenham 3 Birmingham I 
West Ham 2 Swansea 0 
Wolverhampton 0 Watford 3 

ENGLISH LEAGUE 
Division I 
Brighton 0 West Brom 0 
Derby 2 Southampton 2 
Man City I Leeds 1 
Notts F 2 Middlesbrough 2 
Stoke 1 Man United l 

Division II 
Cardiff 0 Bristol R 1 
Chelsea 1 Cambridge i 
Luton 4 Fulham 0 
Orient 0 Shrewsbury l 
Preston 2 Sunderland 1 
Queen's PR 4 Oldham 3 
Division III 
Barnsley l Colchester 2 
Blackpool 1 Plymouth 3 
Exeter 3 Gillingham l 
Grimsby 2 Swindon 0 
Hull 1 Mill wall 0 
Mansfield 2 Reading 2 
Oxford 1 Sheffield U 1 
Sheffield W 3 Chesterfield 3 
Southnd 3 Brentford 2 
Division IV 
Aldershot 1 Walsall 1 
Bournemouth 2 Tranmere 1 
Bradford 2 Wigan 1 
Darlington 2 Torquay 0 
Doncaster 5 Scunthorpe 0 
Hartlepool l Halifax 2 
Hereford 0 Peterborugh l 
Huddersfield 5 Stockport 0 
Line coin 2 Newport l 
Nothamton 1 Crewe 0 
York 1 Portsmouth 0 
r 

SCOTTISH CUP 
* Fourth Round 
Aberdeen 8 Airdrie 0 
Celtic 1 St. Mirren 1 
Hearts 2 Stirling Albion 0 
Keith 1 Berwick 2 
Morton 5 Dunfermline 0 
Queen of S T Partick 3 
Rangers 1 Dundee U 0 

SCOTTISH LEAGUE 
Division I 
Clydebank 3 Arbroath 1 
Dumbarton 0 St. Johnstone i 
Raith 2 Hamilton l 

Division II 
Albion 4 Brechin 0 
Alloa 3 Cowdenbeath 2 
E Stirling 1 Stenhousemuir 1 
Forfar 2 Falkirk 0 
Meadowbank 0 Queen's Pk 2 
Stranraer 1 Montrose 1 

NORTHERN IRELAND 

Ards 2 Crusaders 5 
Cllftonvllle 1 Coleraine 3 
Distillery 1 Ballymena 3 
Glenavon 1 L inti eld 2 
Glentoran 1 Bangor i 
Larne 0 Porta down 2 



Alice Ritzman 
Donna Caponi Young 
Dot Germain 
Carolyn Hill 
Pat Meyers 
Silvia Bertolaccinl 
Sandra Post 
Pat Bradley 
Lori Garbacz 
Penny Pulz 
Amy Alcott 
Beth Daniel 
Bonnie Lauer 
Sandra Palmer 
Donna Horton White 
Kathy McMullen 
Jo Anne Corner 
Kathy Whitworth 
Kathy Cornelius 
Mary Dwyer 
Judy Rankin 
Cathy Sherk 


Pro basketball 

NBA 

Cleveland 123 Detroit 104 
Utah 121 New York 102 
Philadelphia 100 Chicago 92 


HOME 
OF 
urtiig 

IMPROVEMENT 


Sears 



Emergency 
Installation * 
within 24-hrs. 


’except Sundays and Holidays, 
Greater Victoria area only. 

•No extra charge for delivery. 


ing setting on the 

209" 


Power Miser ‘ 180E 

40-Imperial gallon capacity. Energy-saving 
lower thermostat's external temp, 
control. No. 731 BO. 
v. 240-V 

Cascade 40 

Features 40-Imperial gallon capacity, twin 3000 watt upper 
and lower heating elements. White. 

. 240-V No. 73570. I 

Parts and Installation extra. 

We also carry 12-gal., 22-gal., 30-gal., 60-gal. 

Sears Plumbing & Heating, 595-9111 

i Simpsons-Sears Ltd. 

3190 Shetbourne Street 



THERMO GLASS 

• Warm in Winter, Cool in Summer 


• Distortion tree glass 

• Eliminates misting and 
condensation 

• Reduces window heat 
loss by up to 50% 

• Eliminates unwanted noise 


• We convert all typOs of 
windows, no sash 
changes necessary ( 

• Custom greenhouses 

• Skylights 

• Atriums 


mm 

* FREE ESTI 


INDUSTRIES LTD. 


721-3665 


FREE ESTIMATES "Dedicated Proud Craftsmen'* 




LEASING 


1980 ZEPHYR 2-DOOR 

4-speed transmission, light group, power steering, 
radio, remote control mirror, steel-belted radial 
tires, front disc brakes, bucket seats, electric 
rear-window defroster, deluxe wheel covers, main¬ 
tenance-free battery. 

36 PayiMnta of 174.00, Full Price 6264.00 


submbb/i morons iro. 3377 oouglas Si victoria 3 * 6-6131 


FORD TRUCKS 



PACIFIC COASTAL 
AIRLINES is now 

OPERATING AS 

AIRWEST 



AIRLINES 


VANCOUVER AIRPORT—Plrni* 273-5531 

To Cassidy 

Fit. Depart 
301 0650 


The Following Schedule Is Effective Immediately. 

CASSIDY- Phone 753-1255 

To Vancouver Airport 


0800 

0920 

1050 

1215 

1345 

1600 

1710 



End 

Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 


Fit. 

302 

304 

306 

308 

310 

312 

314 

316 


asr 

Arrive 

0740 

Frequency 

Daily 

Start 
Feb. 8 

0835 

0855 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

0950 

1010 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

1130 

1150 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

1245 

1305 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

1430 

1450 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

1630 

1650 

Daily 

Feb. 8 

1740 

1800 

Daily 

Mar. 8 


End 

Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 


NORTHBOUND: VICTORIA - Phone 368-5151 - Te 

Victoria Camay Comox 

Fit. Depart Arrive Depart Arrive Depart 

510 0745 0810 0845 0925 0935 


Cassidy, Comox, Campbell River, Port Hardy 

Campbell River Port Hardy 
Arrive Depart Arrive Frequency Start End 

0955 1005 1105 Dally Feb. 8 Apr. 26 


SOUTHBOUND: PORT HARDY. Ta C ampbe ll Rhrar, Comox, Cassidy, Victoria. Comox—Phone 390-5813 

'■* Dnrt U.vrfw V-■- - Ml_ a,_ _ . . . 


Port Hardy Campbell Rlyer 
Fit. Depart Arrive Depart 

502 1400 1445 1455 


Comox 
Arrive Depart 

1520 1530 


Cassidy 
Arrive Depart 

1615 1630 


Victoria 

Arrive Frequency Start End 

1655 Dally Feb. 8 Apr. 26 


CASSIDY — To Qualkum, Port Alhonti 


Fit. 

601 

603 


Cassidy 

Depart 

0900 

1400 


Quaticum 
Arrive _ 

0925 0935 

1425 1435 


Arrive 

1000 

1500 


Start 
Start 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 8 


PORT ALBERNI — To Quaticum, Cassidy 

Port Albemi Quaticum 

Fit. Depart Arrive 

602 1015 1040 

604* 1510 1535 


1050 

1545 


Cassidy 

Arrive Frequency Start 

1115 Dally Feb. 8 

1610 Dally Feb. 8 


Cud v 
End 

Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 


End 

Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 


NOTE: For Reserva¬ 
tions and Information for 
the following locations 
please call Vancouver 
273-5531 collect: 
Campbell River, Port 
Hardy, Qualicum and 
Port Alberni. 


Barr, Halldorson close 
to Tucson Open leader 


Halldorson 

... shares third place 

Third-year 
player leads 

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. 
(AP) — Alice Ritzman, play* 
ing in 6nly her third profes¬ 
sional tournament, shot a 
one-under-par 71 Saturday to 
take a one-stroke lead into 
the final round of a $100,000 
Ladies Professional Golf As¬ 
sociation tournament. 

Ritzman was one stroke 
ahead of Donna Caponi 
Young, Dot Germain and 
rookie Carolyn Hill. Another 
stroke back at 73 were San¬ 
dra Post along with first- 
round leader Pat Bradley, 
Silvia Bertolaccini and Pat 
Meyers. 

Cathy Sherk of Port Col- 
borne, Ont., carded her sec¬ 
ond consecutive 78 for a 156 
total, 17 strokes off the lead. 


TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — 
Rex Caldwell, who was play¬ 
ing so poorly he left the tour 
for a week to work on his 
game, fired an eight-under- 
par 65 Saturday to take the 
first-round lead in the rain- 
delayed, $300,000 Tucson 
Open golf tournament. 

Caldwell, 29, gunning for 
his first tour victory, began 
Saturday’s play in the mid¬ 
dle of the fifth fairway, 
where he has hit his tee shot 
when a storm halted Fri¬ 
day’s play. He was already 
two-under-par, having ca- 
gled the par five second hole 
Friday. He went on to make 
two long birdie putts on the 
front nine, then sliced four 


Rex Caldwell 

32-33-45 

Jim Colbert 

33-33-66 

Dan Halldorson 

32-3S—47 

Rooer Maltble 

31-36—67 

Keith Fergus 

34-33-67 

Dave Barr 

34-33-47 

Ler Clements 

33-35—68 

Buodv Allln 

33-35—68 

JacK Renner 

31-37—68 

Tom Purtzer 

34-34-68 

Peter Jacobsen 

35-33—68 

Dan Pohl v. 

34 35-69 

Stan Algett ' 

34-35—69 

Allen Miller 

33-36-69 

Bobby Walzel 

35-34-69 

Tim Simpson 

* 32 37-69 

Stan Lee 

33 36-69 

Bob Eastwood 

35-34-69 

Dana Quiglev 

33 36-69 

Andy Bean 

35-35—70 

Bob Bet ley 

32 36—70 

Lindy Miller 

33-37-70 

Mike Mor lev 

36-34—70 

Howard Twittv 

33-37-70 

Barry Jaeckel 

37-33-70 

Dave Hill 

35-35-70 

Lou Graham 

33-37-70 

David Edwards 

32-38-70 

Ron Streck 

34-36-70 

Bob Smith 

35-35—70 

Tom Shaw 

34-36-70 

JimNetford 

3717-74 


more strokes off par on the 
back. 

His round over the 7,005 
yard, par 73 Tucson National 
course gave him a one- 
stroke lead on Jim Colbert, 
who had completed the 
round Friday with a 66. 

Another stroke back were 
Keith Fergus, Canadians 
Dave Barr of Kelowna and 
Dan Halldorson of Brandon, 
and Roger Maltble. Fergus 
and Barr completed the 
opening round Saturday, 
while the other two recorded 
their 67s before the after¬ 
noon rain came the previous 
day. 

Because of the rain, which 
completely washed out 
Thursday’s play and more 
than half of Friday's, the 
second round will be played 


today, with the final two 
rounds on Monday and Tues¬ 
day. 

“This is beginning to look 
like a two-week tourna¬ 
ment," said Caldwell, grin¬ 
ning. “And if it keeps raining 
in Los Angeles like it has 
been, we may even play the 
LA Open here in Tucson." 

Talking about his game, 
Caldwell said he was so dis¬ 
couraged by his play in the 
first four tournaments of 
this year that he skipped last 
week’s Hawaiian Open and 
spent the time practicing. 

A putting lesson from John 
Brodic, the former San 
Francisco 49ers quarterback 
who’s now a sportscaster, 
helped his game, said Cald¬ 


well, who had neversurvived 
the cut at Tucson in five 
previous appearances. 

"Alter Thursday'n-saWv 
out, I was practicing on (ST 
putting green and John came 
by and watched me for a 
while, told me to move my 
hands a little forward and 
square my shoulders,” Cald¬ 
well said. 

“It must have worked. 
That 20-footer I made on 
No. 7 seems like the first de¬ 
cent putt I’ve made jn a 
year." 

Andy Bean, co-favorite for 
the $54,000 Tucson Open win¬ 
ner’s prizedmh Lee Trevino, 
carded a 70 Saturday while 
Trevino finished at 73 the 
day before. 


Kaat eyes four-decade club 


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — 
Pitcher Jim Kaat is getting a chance 
to join a select group — Ted Williams. 
Mickey Vernon, Minnie Minoso and 
Early Wynn — as a four-decade major 
leaguer. And New York Yankees of 
baseball's American League think 
he’s got a good chance to make it. 

Kaat, a 41-year-old left-hander who 
began his major league career with 
the 1959 Washington Senators, is tech¬ 
nically a .free agent. His contract ex¬ 
pired last year, when the Yanks ob¬ 
tained him from Philadelphia Phil¬ 
lies. 


He talked to Yankees owner George 
Steinbrenner in the off-season and 
says he was assured that if he stayed 
in shape he would get a shot at a spot 
on the roster. Last year he was used in 
short relief. 

“I think he can still pitch and he 
would be perfect for the same role he 
played here last year, coming in to 
pitch to certain left-handed hitters,” 
said manager Dick Howser. "He’s in 
better shape now than he was 10 
years ago. I'd say he has a legitimate 
chance to make the team.” 


68- 71-139 

71- 69-140 

69- 71-140 

69- 71-140 

70- 71—141 

70- 71—141 
69 72—141 
67-74-141 
74-68—142 
7468-142 
72 70-142 

72- 70-142 

71- 71—142 
6874-142 

72- 71-143 
71-72—143 
70-73-143 
7073-143 
7073-143 
69-74—143 
7370-143 
7078—156 


IF YOU WANT TO WORK WAXING YOUR CAR! THAT’S YOUR BUSINESS 
IF YOU DON’T — THAT’S OUR BUSINESS 

NEVER WAX YOUR CAR AGAIN! 


«• 


PRESERV-A-SKUNE® GUARANTEED IN WRITING 


^fe $ 89 


95 


TIDY CAR 

ASSOCIATED DEALER 
SETTLE A DOHERTY 


Tidy car warrants each Tidy Car registered vehicle owner that 
Prasarv-A-Shina" process will protect and preserve the finish 
against damage from weather-induced cracking, flaking, * or 
deterioration, fading, or loes of gloss, for as long as the vehicle 
medium and remains registered to the Preserv-A-Shine purchaser. 

542 HILLSIDE AVE. 382-4222 

8:30-5:30 MON.-SAT. 


Fisher: the wtxxl stove that’s 
warming the Winter Olympics. 



Imagine hurtling at break¬ 
neck speed down the side of 
a mountain with nothing 
between you and disaster 
but two thin planes of wood. 
Or skiing down the 90-meter 
ski jump when suddenly 
you’re suspended in mid-air, 
and for a brief instant the 
world is a quiet place as 
you understand the glory 
of flight. 

It’s the Winter Olympics, 
with the world’s best athletes 


going all out for the gold. 
And the woodstove that’s 
keeping the Olympians warm 
is Fisher, the world’s num¬ 
ber one cold remedy. Only 
the very best make it to the 
Olympics. That’s why Fisher 
is proud to be the Official 
Woodstove of the 1980 Win¬ 
ter Olympics. Fisher knows 
the dedication to excellence 
that it takes to be number 
one. So do hundreds of thou¬ 
sands of homeowners who 


have chosen Fisher for its 
quality construction and 
reputation for value. 

See the Fisher family of 
beautiful and economical 
woodstoves. Warm up to the 
woodstoves that are warm¬ 
ing the Winter Olympics— 
Fisher Stoves. 


PATES SUPPLY 

VICTORIA 

3347 OAK ST. 388-6313 

« t~HAK<,KS 

M 




-If 



































































20 THE COLONIS'T, Sun., February 17, 1980 


OUTDOORS 


Joining crowds at Constance Banks 


I fished Constance Banks 
off Victoria Sunday with Al 
Meadows of the Pacific' 
Trailers’ Association in ^his 
commercial trailer Lyra. 
But we were rigged for legal 
sport fishing with hand gur- 
dies used as down riggers. . 

WITH US WERE Jack 
King and Brian Inglis of the 
Amalgamated Conservation 
Society and John Sanderson, 
another commercial trailer, 
who is in the process of hav¬ 
ing built a 50-foot freezer 
-equipped trailer he hopes 
will be ready for the coming 
fishing season. 

We got nine Chinook sal¬ 
mon. ranging from 14 inches 
to 22 inches, of which four or 
five would have be&n 14 to 
19-inch throwbacks under 
the proposed 20-inch mini¬ 
mum size sport size limit. 


LADIES 


we THotiGffr 
JsHOMLT) tarn... 


i m 


km 


VERN VOWLES 

SHOP FOREMAN 


21-POINT WINTER 1 
SAFETY CHECK 

INCLUDES 
S'! Change of Fillet 
V! Change ol Od 
it. Replace Plug Gasket 
St Coapiete lube 
St Check Power Steering 
Fluid level 

St Check Iras. Fluid Lewd 
S Check Ml. Fluid Lewd 
S Check hike Fluid lewd 
Si Check hikes ind Report 
S Check Ah Filter end Clean 
S Check Cooling Sptea 
S Check ID Belts 
S Check 111 Hoses 
S Check lights ud Signals 
S Check Fites 
S Check Wipers 
S Check Eihawst Splee 
S Check Ratten and Service 
S Check Wishers aid Had 
S luhe Door Hinges 
S Check Shock ihsorbers 

’191" 


WINTER 
TUNE-UP 

4-CYL >38* 

6-CYL ‘45“ 

8-CYL >49“ 

INCLUDES: 

al 

al 


PLUS TAXI 


al 


Plugs, condenser, 
fuel filter, points 
Check choke 
operation 
Set carb to specs 
Service air cleaner 
Service battery, 
adjust drive belts 
Set engine to specs 
on electronic scope 
MOST CARS »»i 


m MAJOR CREDIT 1 

■ cards accepted! 

11 let'll» 

"I 

Road 

Ready 

Service 

ills 


o 

outdoors 


alec 

N CSOJ 

merriman 




FISHING ABOARD a 

commercial trailer like the 
Lyra is an experience, rath¬ 
er than sport, but the 20 cans 
of chinook salmon wife 
Taffy did up Monday will 
taste just great. We had run 
out of canned salmon, al¬ 
though we still have a few 
tins of smoked salmon. 

Big attraction to me was 
the trip to Constance Banks, 
which I had fished only once 
before with Gordon Lamont 
and Bert Wright, in Bert’s 
boat the Limit. 

TO GET TO Constance 
Banks fjrom Victoria Harbor 
you head out past the Break¬ 
water and as soon as you 
clear 1 Brotchie Ledge you 


head your boat on a straight 
southeast course (Meadows 
simply put the boat south¬ 
east on automatic pilot) and 
you will, after about 4j£ 
miles, come to the Constance 
Banks shallow spot, a rock 
pile about eight to 10 fathoms 
deep. 

Strangely the waters in¬ 
side Constance Banks are 
deeper than the outside, 
about 50 to 60 fathoms be¬ 
tween Clover Point and Trial 
Island, but on the outside, 
towards Port Angeles the 
depth is only around 45 fath¬ 
oms. That sometimes fools 
amateur navigators seeking 
to fish the bank. 

I WATCHED the Furuno 


print-out depth sounder in 
the cockpit and was fascin¬ 
ated to see how steep and 
sudden the drop off was as 
we pulled away from Brot¬ 
chie Ledge and then about 
three-quarters of an hour 
later, as if out of nowhere, 
the graph showed a line ris¬ 
ing suddenly from 55 fath¬ 
oms to 14 fathoms. We had 
reached Constance Banks. 
Visually, on the water, we 
also knew we had reached 
the Bank because of the nu¬ 
merous sport fishing boats 
around us. 

I HAVE KEPT the depth 
sounder printout of our fish¬ 
ing trip over the bank and it 
provides a picture of the bot¬ 
tom of Constance Banks, 
which is a big valley and 
peak area, far out from 
shore and reaching almost 
all the way between Brotchie 
Ledge and Trial Island. 

Some day I probably will 
make the trip from Sooke, if 
I can find a reliable-looking 
flat calm day. It would only 
be a three-quarter-hour trip 


FABRICS 
THAT SAY'SPRING' Just 

Arrived... 

0 New exciting colours in prints 
and plains and Ultrasuedes * 
0 Silk suitings 
0 VOGUE PATTERNS 

Girls ... Plan your graduation 
gown early... 

•Lessons on sewing with Ultrasuede 
are included with the purchase. 



fli w 1 •1*1 

OlAKf.EX 

212—2445 BEACON AVE, SIDNEY figft 


EATON'S 

'Treat yourself 
to a night out' 

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 
FASHION SHOW 
FOR SPRING '80 
PLUS A DELICIOUS DINNER, 

ALL FOR JUST 8.75 

See the latest styles and fashions, 
one night only Wednesday, Feb. 27th 
at Eaton's Victoria Room 

It's an opportunity for men to get the current viewpoint on men's casual and 
dress styles for Spring '80. And for women, it's a close-up look at fashions from 
Eaton's No. 1 and Signature Shops. Bring your husband, wife, friend or lover to 
this informative fashion show and dinner banquet. It's a night out you won't 
want to miss. 

Menu 

Appetizer: Chilled tomato Juice Entree: 

Shrimp cocktail 
Lemon wedge 
Seafood sauce 


Dessert: 


Fruit parfait 
Tea or coffee 


Banquet style Prime Rib 
Au-Jus 

Ovlen roast potatoes 
Buttered fresh frozen peas 
Cauliflower Au-Gratin 
Tomato and lettuce 
garnish 

Dinner roll, butter 


8.75 per person 

TICKETS AVAILABLE 'IN PERSON' AT EATON'S 
ACCOUNTS OFFICE, THIRD FLOOR. SEE YOU THEREI 


ENSIGN 

CHRYSLER-FLYMOUTH LTD. 

SERVICE 

CENTRE 

COOK l VIEW 


386-2411 

FOR APPOINTMENTS 

Any additional parts or 
labor will be quoted 
before work is start¬ 
ed. DL. 5295 



with my 140-horsepower 
Johnson outboard. 

YOU REALLY should 
have a depth sounder on 
board to find the bank, but 
there are visual methods of 
determining your location 
over It. On a very clear day 
Meadows advises to line up 
the Up of Trial Island looking 
through the gap between Ten 
MHe Point and Chatham Is¬ 
land (don’t be confused by 
the gap between Chatham 
and Discovery.) For tho 
other line use the new pulp 
shed on Ogden Point docks 
where the grain elevator 
used to be and line it up with 
the observatory on Little 
Saanich Mountain. That 
should put you right over the 
shallow spot of Constance 
Banks. 

If you get caught in fog 
while out on Constance 
Banks and you aren't too 
sure of your navigation, go 
due north and you will find 
landfall. 

WE FISHED with 25- 
pound lead balls Sunday and 
it was a chore to bring them 
in on the hand gurdles. On 
one side of the boat we 
fished 18 fathoms with a pig 
to draw the line out and 21 
fathoms on the inside 
line .. . and the same com¬ 
bination on the other side. 

We used #37 SC103R rain- 
bow-colored, predominately 
blue, cuttlefish hootchles 
with Hot Spot Flashers and 
42 inches of leader on two 
lines and specially cut strip 
in Scotty Bait Biter Holders, 
with red Hot Spot flashers on 
the other two lines. Both 
caught fish. 


I MUST CONFESS I would 
have never used a hootchie 
of that color. It seemed more 
like something to catch the 
fishermen than the fish. But 
it worked. 

Meadows buys herring 
from a commercial fisher¬ 
man out Sidney way and cuLs 
his own strip . . . longer, 
narrower and thicker, which 
he says provides better ac¬ 
tion for the high speed he 
trolls at, twice as fast as 
sport anglers usually go. 

"We need thicker strip. If 
It is too thin it will cork¬ 
screw through the water," 
he explains. He trolls at two 
knoLs where sport anglers 
troll at about one knot. 

SPORT ANGLERS use 
revolving flashers, but most 
of them don't go fast enough 
to make them revolve, he 

says. 

Meadows explains that a 
flasher is supposed to re¬ 
volve, but a dodger is de¬ 
signed to go from side to 
side. 

He uses only flashers when 
commercial fishing, except 
when he is fishing soekeye he 
goes dead slow and lets his 
flasher work like a dodger. 
Almost exclusively he uses 
the Hot Spot flashers, except 
he will use the Okie flashers 
for coho. "You must go one- 
third faster when you are 
using Okie flashers." 

He uses 42-inch leaders for 
Chinooks, with both hoot- 
fhies and strip. 

WE FISHED the outside 
ledge of Constance Banks on 
the Port Angeles side, at the 
20 to 25 fathom mark a good 



Photo by Alec MerriS^n 

Under proposed 20-inch minimum sport catch size limit. &o 
salmon on the left, held by Jack King of South Vancouver 
Island Rangers, would be throwbacks and probable mortali¬ 
ties. The 22-incher on right, held by RCN Angler Brian Inglis 
would be a keeper. Salmon on left is a 19-inch four-pounder 
and salmon in centre a 14-inoher.Both Inglis and King ace 
past presidents of the Amalgamated Conservation Society. 


LADIES! 

ITS THE 

MARTINELLI 

“WEDGE” 


PRESENTED BY “BALLY” 

Treat your feet to the soft Italian leather and 
genuine plantation crepe soles of this great design 
from Bally. It's our last shipment, by the way. Due 
to a large price increase this design is no longer 
available in Canada. Colours now available. Black, 
Navy and Brown. (Size range 5&-10AA, 5-9B). 
Regular Price 54.95. 

sale VI4 95 

PRICE at *»4 
VILLAGE 7 SHOES. 

w CEDAR HILL MALL STORE ONLY Ml 

JEJ UpfMr Wml oil Ophtr St. by Sambo* ““ 

OPEN MOW.-SAT. 0:300. FW. lo 0 

477-3722 


deal of the time Sunday. 
“Many of the sport fisher¬ 
men stay on the shallow 
rocks on the northwest at the 
eight to 10 fathom mark and 
some of them seem to get 
bigger fish on the shallows," 
he said. 

Occasionally, if fishing is 
dead, he moves east of Trial 
Island towards Discovery 
and fishes the 30-fathom 
line, n 

MEADOWS IS a conserva¬ 
tionist and he writes a regu¬ 
lar column for Western Fish¬ 
eries. 

For Chinooks and coho he 
believes in diversified pro¬ 
duction, but fears federal 
fisheries may be inclined to 
put to much emphasis on 
hatcheries. 

He believes nature must 
be given a helping hand to 
improve production in the 
thousands of coastal 
streams that have produced 
coho and chinook salmon. 

HE EXPLAINS that 
hatchery fish seem to travel 
in schools. It is either a feast 
or a famine. When you are 
over them, you get terrific 
fishing, but when you lose 
them they are gone for good. 

But the wild fish, he ex¬ 
plains, come from many dif¬ 
ferent rivers and they come 



IMPORT CAR 
SERVICE 
VOLVO PARTS 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 DOUGLAS 
Across from ICBC 
384-1161 


LADIES! 

FALL/WINTER STOCK CLEARANCE 

SHOE SALE 

“CELEBRITY” 


Ladles! Shop early on this one. A limited 
selection remains of our fall/winter stock. It s a 
great line. Soft, supple calf skin grace a light¬ 
weight heel and cushy flexible sole. And of 
course, Celebrity shoes are "all'' leather. 
Regular Price 57.95. 


95 


SALE PRICE 


29 


/ 


“HELENA” 


Ladies! Here we have fashion on a lower 
heel. Again, our selection is limited so 
shop early for best selection. Enjoy the 
soft leather inner lining which shapes, 
itself to the contours of your individual 
size and makes walking In style'' en¬ 
joyable. Regular Price 39.95. 

0095 

SALE PRICE 


VILLAGE SHOES 

(OAK BAY STORE ONLY) 598-3031 

2238 OAK BAY AVE. 
MON.-SAT. 9:30-6, FRI. to 9 


and go all season, providing 
diversified fishing opportun¬ 
ities. 

Meadows believes th'erS 
should be more accent' 
placed on small stream im¬ 
provements like flow con¬ 
trol, habitat protection, iflrtik 
stabilization, gravel clean* 
ing. Incubation boxes and 
rearing channels. 11 

WITH SECOND groWtff 
timber now taking hold in-thi- 
watersheds “we have a Ykht' 
opportunity to bring our 
rivers back in condition to 
increase survival of natural 1 
wild fish in the rivers," he 
says. “We should be impray 
ing hundreds of creeks and 
rivers for coho and chidOok 
production.’’ 

He believes hatcheries iYC 
contrary to nature for Chin¬ 
ooks and coho, although he 
approves of combining wild 
stock enhancement with 
hatchery production of coho 
and Chinooks. 

NEW TECHNOLOGY in 
fishing, including fish find 
ers, bigger and better boats, 
and freezer capabilities, is 
placing more pressure on the 
available salmon stocks. 
Meadows acknowledges. 

Fishermen are now more 
capable of putting greater 
effort into looking for fish 
and they have a greater cap¬ 
ability to stay out on the 
fishing grounds in bad 
weather. 

BUT HOOK and line fish¬ 
ermen like trailers are not 
capable of wiping out stocks 
of fish like the big new 
seiners, he says. 

Hook and line fishermen 
catch only the fish that bile, 
but the seine nets take every 
fish in the ocean ... big or 
small, and any species that 
is in the netting area. The 
only control over the netter.s 
is the times and areas they 
are allowed to fish. 

But trailers only catch sal- 
mon when there are big 
schools around. When the 
schools thin out and the bite 
goes off, the trailers look for 
other fishing areas. So they 
really only chip away at the 
stocks. 


"A fascinating place” 

THE 

ROCKHOUND 
SHOP 

777 CLOVEROALE 388-5341 
TUES. TO SAT. 
Discover us soon.' 


AUCTION 

of 

WEST COAST 
INDIAN BASKETS / 

and 

RELATED ITEMS " 

To Be Sold 

Wed., March 17,1980 
7:00 p.m. at 
1635 W. Broadway, 
Vancouver, B.C. V6J 1W9 
Telephone: 733-1157 

Persons wishing to consign 
articles for this and subse¬ 
quent Specialty Auctions of 
Royal Doulton, Moorecroft. 
Worchester, Royal Crown 
Derty China, Oil Paintings, 
Oriental Carpets. Sterling 
Silver, etc., are requested to 
contact our Vancouver of¬ 
fice. Tel. 112-733-1157, 9 
a m.-5 p.m. weekdays. 

We hold Antique and Quality 
Furniture Auctions regular¬ 
ly. Phone today for free ap¬ 
praisal. 


LOVES AUCTIONEERS 
& APPRAISERS LTD. 

1635 W Broadway 
Vancouver. B.C. V6J 1W9 

r.ihe Advantage nt the 
M.unl.md Marketplace 





















































LIVING 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 21 


Fans behind soap opera scenes 


WINNIPEG (CP) — Some people may not care 
if Janice is poisoning Mac in Another World, or if 
Nicky of the Young and the Restless turns to a life of 
crime. 

On the other hand, there arc those who would be 
very unhappy if Donna and Chuck broke up on the 
set of All My Children, or if Roger—heaven help 
us—kidnapped Christina on The Guiding Light- 

The people wno care about these dire possibili¬ 
ties are fans of the television soap opera. 

Darlene Kanski, 19, a creative communications 
student at Red River Community College in Winni¬ 
peg has been watching General Hospital for eight 
years. 

She said she is so attached to the characters on 
the show she gets upset when one of them is 
"killed." 


“Yes, very much so," said Kanski, "especially 
characters 1 really like." 

If her favorite, Rick, died in real life, she would 
try to get to the funeral. “If he died on tne show, I'd 
wear black,” she said. 

Even the replacement of a familiar actor with a 
new one is upsetting. “I can't handle it. I just have a 
certain picture of how they’re supposed to look." 

Tony Mariani, 19, has been watching Another 
World for three years—ever since his mother got 
him hooked. “She's a junkie, you could say.” She 
cried when her long-time favorite, John Randolph, 
died. 

Tony said some people think the fact he's a 
devotee is "sort of sucky or something like that.” 
But he doesn't care. 

He’s following the story of murderous Janice 


and innocent Mac. “I couldn't stop watching now— 
it's at a high point." 

But if it happens that he does miss an episode, he 
turns on Winnipeg radio station CFRW the next 
monjing and listens to disc jockey Dick Reeves' 
five-minute rundown of what happened the after¬ 
noon before. 

Reeves got started “for a lark and the next day 
the phones started ringing. 

“It’s a service, not a feature," said Reeves. “I 
don’t want to stop it. It’s increased my audience." 

Despite this sort of popularity, sociologists and 
psychiatrists have been critical of the effects of 
soap operas since the days they first wafted into 
homes via radio waves. 


High price tag 
attached to photos 


By JOHN HOLUSI1A 
Colonist-New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The explosion in the 
price of silver—still at stratospheric fevels 
despite recent declines—is doing more 
than making it hard for the newly married 
to afford table service for eight. Higher 
silver prices mean more expensive photog¬ 
raphy, from Instamatic snapshots to finely 
detailed medical X-rays. 

Although silver is most commonly as¬ 
sociated with coins, jewelry and flatware, 
the metal’s chemical properties have also 
made it the basis for photography. A 
century ago, pictures, known as daguerre¬ 
otypes, were made on chemically treated 
sheets of solid silver. And today, silver 
halide crystals in a film base form the 
image when a picture is taken. 

PHOTOGRAPHY consumes from one- 
third to one-half of the 160 million ounces 
of silver used yearly in the United States. 
The Eastman Kodak Co. alone uses 70 
million ounces a year, 20 million recovered 
from its own operations and 50 million pur 
chased from outside sources. 

In second place is E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours £ Co., a major factor in the X-ray 
field, which uses 17 million ounces, fol¬ 
lowed by the GAF Corp. and the Minnesota 
Mining and Manufacturing Co. Polaroid’s 
instant color films require relatively little 
silver, using two million to three million 
ounces a year. 

As the price of silver soared from 
slightly above {6 an ounce a year ago to $50 
briefly last month before settling into the 
$30 to $35 range, film producers tem¬ 
porized and then tumbled over themselves 
in announcing price increases. 

KODAK, WHICH produces well over 90 
per cent of the amateur and professional 
picture film sold in the United States, 
announced a set of price increases in De¬ 
cember. Before the new prices could go 
into effect, they were cancelled and re¬ 
placed by still higher prices. Prices for 
color photographic paper, scheduled to 
increase 9 per cent in December, were 
lifted 50 percent, effective Feb. 26. 

Kodak’s instant film went up 10 per 
cent in late January, while 35-millimeter 
color film increased 20 per cent; 35-milli¬ 
meter black-and-white, 35 per cent, and 
black-and-white photographic paper, 35 
per cent. 

BLACK AND WHITE films use more 
silver than color films because silver is 


retained to form the image; various dyes 
form the color images. The faster a film, 
that is the more light sensitive, the more 
silver it requires, because It is the silver 
compounds that react to light. 

Because the radiation doses that pa¬ 
tients receive must be kept to a minimum, 
X-ray films have the highest silver con¬ 
centration of all, and the price increases 
have reflected this fact. Kodak increased 
X-ray film prices 6.2 per cent last Septem¬ 
ber and 12 per cent more in October; then it 
added 40 per cent and 38 per cent increases 
inJanuary. 

THE GAF CORP., another producer of 
X-ray films, raised its prices 107 per cent 
over the level of October 1979 in one jump 
last month. According to a GAF spokes¬ 
man, silver accounts for about $2 of the 
cost of a $3.00 11-inch by 17-inch sheet 
of X-ray film. 

And the silver in X-ray films is effec- 
tivly lost to reprocessors, since X-rays arc 
locked away in doctors’ and dentists' 
vaults for future reference. 

The price increases for other silver- 
rich industrial products have also out¬ 
stripped those for snapshop films. Kodak 
increased the price for films used in photo- 
typsetting 13.4 per cent in November and 
followed with a 75 per cent increase on Jan 
26. 

POLAROID, WHICH specializes in 
“instant" color films, raised its prices an 
average of 7 per cent on Jan. 1 and fol¬ 
lowed with a 6 per cent increase effective 
March 1. 

The impact of the price increases has 
not yet been felt at the retail level, ac¬ 
cording to trade sources, although some 
retailers have reportedly been stocking up 
in anticipation of further rises. Photo¬ 
graphic industry analysts say customers 
are relatively insensitive to price in¬ 
creases. 

But summer vacationers may be in for 
a shock when they pick up their processed 
prints. The reason, according to Paul 
Boles, vice president for processing at 
Fotomat Corp., is that major processors 
are under a Kodak price protection plan 
that will delay the 50 per cent Feb. 26 
increase until May 26. 

“MAY 26 IS THE BIG one for all of us 
except the little guys," he said. “We’ve got 
the Feb. 26 increase in place and we can 
anticipate another jump up in price in 
May. 1 would guess that by the middle of 
May all the processors will have to take 
a position for the summer, and then you’ll 
sec a big flutter." 





NORAH I.ETNES, PROP. 


DEAN HEIGHTS 
BEAUTY SALON 

Norah takes pleasure in introducing Maggie . . . 
who is now associated with Dean Heights Beauty 
Salon. Maggie will be pleased to welcome her many 
customers and friends to this new location. 

COMPLETE HAIR CARE: 

• Permanents • Manicures 

• Cuts and blow dry 

• Colour 

• Treatments 

Complete range of Fermodyl and Redkln products 
available at regular prices. 

APPOINTMENTS . 592-7633 


2877 Foul Bay Road 
Dowa the Ml) from Laasdowoe aad UVic 


<^SS 

ONE-DAY MINI COURSES 

— count o florin go lor busy people — 

On Saturday, March 8, 1980, Camosun College will be ottering more 
than 50 full-day and half-day courses at Lansdowne and Interurban 
Campuses. 

"How-to" courses on gardening, mini computers, antique collecting, the 
ins and outs of boat buying, diesel car maintenance, physical fitness, how 
to start a business, getting the most for your food dollar, to name a few. 

Call Camosun at 592-1281, local 278, for complete information on the 
MARCH MINI COURSE DAY and watch for further details. 

•M 

Limited child-care services (for children ages 3-7 years) are available tor 
a nominal fee. 

Plan a family day at Colley* — MARCH 8. 



Our full lead crystal from Europe in the famous 
Pinwheel design ranks very high in popularity with 
Birks customers everywhere. 


Here, we are offering 10 Pinwheel items—each at the 
same low price: $14.95. 

Included are a pair of candlesticks, two vases, footed 
candy dish, cream and sugar pair; nut dish, marmalade 
jar, celery tray, an ashtray and a round 3-section tray. 
$14.95 each. 

QUANTITIES LIMITED 

BIRKS 

JEWELLERS 





7 BIRKS 
SPECIAL 
EVENIi 


Somebody you'd like to frame? 

You get the picture. We have the frames in a variety of styles and sizes. 

fo, [sample: Ou ;£*“>*' 

5X7 . $6.50. $ 4 4S 

8x10 Single .* 23.50 . $ 15 67 

5x7 Oval .SK.S 0 . $ 9 67 

Panel arrangement .* 15.00 .- . *10°° 

The 3 above illustrated Frames are only a few of the many 
styles available • ... 

Hillside 

706 Yates St. Shopping Centre 

'BIRKS,^ 

I J E W E L L E.R sl 


BIRKS ANNUAL 
PICTURE FRAME SALE 

Yz OFF 


OUR 

REGULAR 

PRICE 



He 


FALL AND WINTER 

DRESSES 5* 

Daytime length and full 
length formals. Buy one 
dresa at regular price and 
gat a second dress of equal 
or lower value for 54. 


TUES., FEB. 19 to SAT., FEB. 23 
5 DAYS ONLY 

No refunds or exchanges on sale merchandise. 
Pensioners discount does not apply. 


1306 BROAD STREET m 385-0322 



Unwanted Hair? 

A No-cost consultation 
with an Expert . . . tells 
you about the only perma¬ 
nent way to get rid of it! 

Introductory Treatment 

50% Off 

Once you ve treated unwanted hair with KREE 
DERMATRON METHOD electrolysis, you've banished 
it forever from your face. arms. legs, body You’ll 
be surprised at how fast and gently it works Our 
KREE trained Electrologist will arrange a consulta¬ 
tion without charge or obligation Call us now 
382-7141 


EATON'S 



Pretty Pearly 
Love Pendants 
-only $5. each! 


Five little flights of fancy with 
"simufated pearls mounted on gold- 
colourpendants...and swinging 
romantically on delicate chains. 


Each design is different. And each 
would make a sweet treat of a 




gift idea! 
$5. each 



706 

YATES 

STREET 



B I 

JEW 


R KS 


HILLSIDE 

SHOPPING 

CENTRE 

M6 














































































#2 THE COLONIST. Sun., February 17. 1980 


TUESDAY 1.49 DAY 

FEBRUARY 19th 


2 T 

tmt FOR X 


49 


JULIENNE 

Sports Weight_ 

ODDMENTS A 149 

Variety of Weights .FOR X 


AFGHAN 
YARN. 


6 X 

FOR X 


49 


RUG LATCH 
HOOKS . 


149 


SUPER WASH 

WOOL ... 


.ball 


110 


CHESS /LIVING 


AT JUBILEE 


y **# 8 **# 

1771 FORT ST. (at Richmond) 595-8912 



When you're looking for quick relief from 
rising prices, look to Naturalizer! You'll find 
your favorite Spring styling. And remem¬ 
ber, Naturalizer is the name to look for, for 
beautiful styles that feel as good as they^\f^ 


look! 


V 


It 


“BRACELET” 

Bone. Taupe, or White 

*36 


“SERENADE” 

Bone or Navy. 

*38 


“PEEK-A-BOO" 

Bone 

*38 




"CREST” 

While or Taupe. 


*34 


“TRACEY” 

Rod or Navy 

*40 


“GYPSY” 

Bone with Taupe trim 

*43 


“TWIRL” 

Bone or Nude 


*38 


“CHARIOT” 

Tan or Navy 

*38 

“KITTEN” 

Multi. 

*40 

“BOUQUET” 

White. Brown. Bone. 
Burgundy. Black 

*40 




Tal fans hoping history 
is able to repeat itself 



DRAPERY WORLD 

PAMELA 

at Drapery World Interiors will 
help you add personal touches to.. 

your home. 

• Custom made draperies 

• Fashion and dc\.orativo cushions 

• Original paintings 

• Local pottery 

. # Macrame v 

• Bedspreads 

• Ceramics 


By RAY KERR 
Colonist chess writer 

The Candidates’ Matches 
of the world chess champion¬ 
ship playoffs approach and 
one has to wonder if Mikhail 
Tal can make history repeat 
itself after more than 20 
years. 

It was in 1959 the the Soviet 
chess magician astounded 
everyone by winning the 
candidates' portion of the 
world championship and 
went on to upset the then- 
world champion and compa¬ 
triot Misha BotVinnik. 

But Tal, plagued by ill 
health, didn't stay long as 
world champion and lost the 
return engagement to Bot- 
vinnik somgtwoyears later. 

That, of course, didn't 
make his health any better 
and for the next two decades 
or so he seldom flashed his 
old form. 

Until about three years 
ago. that is. 

For some reason his health 
started getting better at that 
time and he kept scoring one 
success after another. 

The most recent one, of 
course, was in the Riga In 
terzonal, where he won with 
such ridiculous ease one was 
immediately reminded of 
former world champion 
Bobby Fischer, when the 
American superstar was at 
his best. 

So brilliant was Tal's play 
at times that one wondered if 
anyone in the world could 
really beat that guy. 

If only it were so. 

Sadly enough most of us 
Tal fans know that brilliance 
alone doesn't win world 
championships. 

There's a small matter of 
a former Soviet superstar 
named Viktor Korchnoi, who 
is also playing in the Candi¬ 
dates’ Matches. 

Should Tal get by him— 
and 1 am not saying he wi 11— 
there's still another fairly 
powerful chess person ahead 


and that's world champion 
Anatoly Karpov, also of the 
Soviet Union. 

True enough, Tal in the 
last two years has probably 
produced more true chess 
brilliance than Karpov will 
in a lifetime. 

But when it comes to world 
championship match play, 
brilliance alone seldom 
wins. ' 

It’s mostly strong play of 
the style of Karpov and 
Korchnoi that takes One the 
farthest. 

And so we Tal fans can 
only hope that our hero can 
combine brilliant play with 
prudent defence and even¬ 
tually reach the final, where 
with a few breaks he can 
duplicate his feat of more 
than 20years ago. 

Of course, don't be daft 
and go betting your shirt on 
him now, for you might lose 
more than that. 

As for Karpov, he just 
keeps rollin’ on. 

His latest triumph was in 
the Tilburg tournament in 
the Netherlands, where he 
won undefeated while play¬ 
ing against pretty well all the 
strong players in the world 
except Korchnoi and Tal. 

A fine Karpov victory was 
against ex-Soviet superstar 
Gennady Sosonko now living 
in the Netherlands, which is 
our Game of the Week. 

Sosonko 1 think made the 
mistake of playing the Drag¬ 
on against Karpov, which is 
akin to trying to skate with 
the Montreal Canadiens. 


Checkmate 


DRAPERY WORLD 

INTERIORS 

2517 E^tovan Ave. 

(in tt>e shopping centre) 

595-3011 , 


2nd ANNUAL 

SHOW OF WATERCOLORS 

by Christine Richards 
in our shop 

Wed.. There., Fri., Sat., 
March J9, 20, 21. 22 



Ian Skulsky of Vancouver—one of B.C.’s lop juniors 


Karpov 

White 

t P Kt 
2- Kt KB3 
3 P-Q4 
I KtxP 

5 Kt-QB3 

6 B-K3 


Sosonko 

Black 

P-QBI 

P-Q3 

PxP 

KI-KB3 

P-KK13 

B-Kt2 


7 P-B3 __ 

Kt B3 

19 P-K6 

BBl 

8 Q-Q2 

00 

20 PxPch 

RxP 

9 B-QBt 

B-Q2 

21 Kt K6 

QBxKt 

10 P-KR1 

P-KRt 

22 RxB 

Q-RI 

11 0-0-0 

Kt-Kt 

23 Q-K3 

BxKt 

12 B-K13 

R B1 

24 PxB 

QxRP 

13 B-KI5 

RBI 

25 RxPvh 

K B1 

It KK-K1 

P-Ktt 

26 Q Kt 

Q-R3 

15 P-Bf 

Kt-BS 

27 R-QS 

R-KB3 

lti KBxKt 

PxB 

28 RxQR 

RxR 

17 BxKt 

BxB 

29 RxRP 

P-QI 

18 P-K5 

B-K12 

30 RxP 

Resigns 


SPERTI Sun Lamps 




If you 
can’t Go 
South... 
Go Sperti! 


The complete line of Sun Lamps 
Model PT-9. compact design, ad¬ 
justable to 3 positions for maxi¬ 
mum convenience. Also Model PT- 
164 floor model or table model as 
illustrated, both complete with 
goggles and timer. 



2 MODELS TO 
CHOOSE FROM 


The sun can do anything that a Sperti does, 
EXCEPT tan you at night, tan you indoors and turn 
itself oft. 

Call 384-7196 lor More Information 

SURGICAL SUPPLIES 

Limited 

(A division of McGill & Orme) 

1012 BROAD ST. VICTORIA 384-7196 

And in Nanaimo. No. 8—1588 Boundary Cres. Ph 754-1281 


Pussycat pacifier not safe 


OTTAWA (CP) — Parents who purchased Pussycat 
brand pacifiers for their infants should discard them 
immediately because they could suffocate them, the con¬ 
sumer affairs department has warned. 

A statement said consumer complaints received by 
the department indicate the nipples of the Danish made 
products can break off at the mouth guard after a short 
period of use and lodge in the back of an infant's throat. 


It said the importer has ceased distribution of the 
product, described as a "safety pacifier ", but some 
could still be on the market. 

“If necessary, steps will be taken by the department 
to remove any remaining product from the marketplace 
under the authority of the Hazardous Products Act." the 
statement said. * 


CASH! 
WANTED... 

Clocks, Watches, either complete 
or parts. Fair prices paid. Also old 
watch chains and fobs. 

WATCH 

MOVEMENTS 

CLOCK 

MOVEMENTS 


W * 1 


w J. CRAVEN 


®lte (ttlack Ji>hop 

Established 194 6 

1037 Fort St., Victoria, B.C. V8V 3K5 

ft Telephone 383-9251 


<V. 



Shoes tor all the family 
Exclusive Oak Bay distributor 
tor Ladies Naturalizer shoe? 


oak bay 

(Eukr&fSrrn 


SHOES 

2215 OAK BAY AVE. 

Next to Oak Bay Hardware 

AUEN £Z L r ATTER 595-1144 

Thirly-tour Years of 

Shoe Experience c ,___ u _ Iir _ 

to Serve You Store Hours 

Tues. to Sat. 

9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 



LADIES . . . 

We are now accepting Spring fash¬ 
ions. good shoes and handbags for 
re-sale on a consignment basis. 
Please remember . everything 
MUST fee in immaculate condition 
— clothing to be laundered 
or dry-cleaned and on hang¬ 
ers please. 


• Do drop around^nd 
see our fine selec¬ 
tion of New to You 
fashions supplied to 
us by our clients on 
a consignment 
basis. At the mo¬ 
ment we have a very 
nice recent con¬ 
signment" of good wool Win¬ 
ter coats ... all at inflation 
beating prices. 

REPEAT 
PERFORMANCE 

2027 Oak Bay Ave. at Foul Bay Rd. 
(located in the Oak Bay Mall) 

11-5 p.m. (Tues.-Sat.) PHONE 595-5432 

We Seif For You and To You 



Learn 
Short Cut 
Sewing 


Only at Stretch & Sew Fabrics* Center can 
you learn the Short Cut Sewing v techni¬ 
ques of the new Ann Person” - ' Method of 
sewmg It's so simple and easy you'll be * 
sewing beautiful clothes in one-half the 
time of ordinary sewing Come, learn 
short-cut sewing and in eight easy lessons 
you will make: 


Class 1 A quick T-shirt top with crew 
neck or turtleneck. 

Class 2 Marvelous pants and skirt 
that are ad|usted to fit you perfectly. 

Class 3 Versatile raglan sleeve dress 
with square neck or turtleneck 

Class 4 The once difficult bust dart 

alteration and the zipper without a seam. 

Class 5 Sweaters - cardigan, pullover 
or vest with crossed over V-necklme 

Class 6 The simply smashing tab 

front dress. 

Class 7 Classic iacket with set-in 

sleeves and a neat, straight skirt 

Class 8 A great swimsuit that custom- 
fits you, ond on adorobie cover up. 


CALL MONDAY to register tor Ann Person 
Method I classes. Starting Mon., Mar. 12. 1-3 
or 7-9 p m.; Tues , Mar. 13. 1-3 or 7-9 p.m.; 
Wed.. Mar. 14. 9:30-11:30 a.m. or 7-9 p.m. 8 
lessons $20.00. Text book $8 95. 

SHAWL COLLARED BLOUSE and 
VARIATIONS Sat.. Feb. 23. 9:30-11:30 a.m. 
$3.00 


STRETCH&SEW 

Fabrics Center 


, Sir#ItK a S#w. lot >990 


2541 ESTEVAN 


592-9622 


* 1.49 




DAY 

TUESDAY 



TUES., JAN. 22 nd 

1 PAIR PANTS or 1 SKIRT 
1 LT. WT. SUIT JACKET 
1 LT. SWEATER or 3 TIES 
YOUR CHOICE CLEANED FOR 1.49 



20 % 

DISCOUNT t 

ON ALL OTHER / 
DRYCLEANING 1 

Personal or Household 

N B We reserve the right lo surchirge 
_ garments requiring special - 
etlenlion 




mminizinG 


ctttifits 

THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING 
AT ALL 8 LOCATIONS IN VICTORIA: 


Colwood Plaza 478-3014 
Esquimau PIXza 386-8641 
Fairfield/325 Cook 384-5031 
Jubilee/1771 Fort 595-8912 
Royal Oak Plaza 479-4041 
Town & Country/3457 Saanich 388-9821 
Hillside Plaza 595-3722 
University Heights Plaza 477-8323 


A 















































































































FOR ANNUITIES 

MEET THE MAN 
FROM SUN LIFE 

m ■ •/ CALL 

«H/1ljre JOHNR. H. LEY 

wcmO!da coclu 


810 


-1175 DOUGLAS—382-3145 



Dr. B. P. SPENCER 

wishes to announce the opening of his 

MEDICAL PRACTICE 

in 

FAMILY MEDICINE 
and MATERNITY 

at 105 Burnside Rd. East 

(Burnside and Harriet) 

Office Hours: 9-4:30 Mon.-Fri. 

Phone 382-1621 


P.S. 


WE ARE BACK FROM A WONDERFUL 
HOLIDAY IN HAWAII 






S'A 


And we re ready to show you our 

NEW SPRING ARRIVALS FROM BRITAIN 

MOHAIR COATS in beautiful pastel colours of pink, 
blue, aqua, white and natural. 

LIGHTWEI6HT WOOLS in mauve. blue, yellow, coral. 
Ideal for Spring in Victoria. 

Also a new shipment of SUITS 
and SKIRTS just unpacked from 
Mary Wycherley of London. 
Exclusive to the 

Ptrradtllij 

1017 Government St. 
m; A 10% discount for our senior citizens. 



HAIR 

FASHIONS 



3960 QUADRA 

(Quadra Centre) 

479-7115 

Open Thursday Evenings 


RENEW YOUR OLD 
DOWN QUILT OR PILLOW 

We II take your old down or leather-down 
blend quilt, (or pillows), and turn them into a 
New quilt. 


TWINS — 
DOUBLE - 
QUEEN - 


$75.00 a $85.00 
$110.00 
$120.00 


Also, we rebuild your old pillows from $12.50 

We also carry-Fluffy', a natural down soap 
from Europe that cleans, deodorizes and 
restores the insulation quality of your down 

(Don t dryclean your down products) 



eufodouLn 

qJltr& pilbuur 


VICTORIA - 

1728 DOUGLAS ST 
"OPPOSITE THE BAY" 
(604) 384-0133 


COOUI1LAM 


LIVING/STAMPS 


U.K. special issues 
off to a good start 


a Canada 
Arts 

Fine Graphic Art 
Expert Framing 


1732 Oouglos 
Royal Oak j-9 


384 2042 
479-1331 


By LESLIE DREW 
Colonist staff 

Britain’s high slump de¬ 
sign standards have again 
triumphed in its first special 
set of stamps this year, the 
four depicting waterbirds 
which were issued on Jan 
16. 

Several collectors locally 
have commented on this im 
menscly attractive set—the 
lOp kingfisher, ll^p dipper, 
the 13p moorhen and 15p yel¬ 
low wagtail—each bird de¬ 
picted against swirls of 
color. The designer, wildlife 
artist Michael Warren, has 
made his first venture into 
stamp design with this Issue 
and from all appearances, it 
won't be his last. 

Several other special 
issues will be coming from 
the British post office this 
year. The next, on March 12, 
will consist of five stamps 
marking the 150th anniver¬ 
sary of the Liverpool and 
Manchester Railway when 
George Stephenson's Rocket 
steam engine launched the 
world's first regular passen¬ 
ger railway service. The 
stamps, all of 12p value, will 
show the Rocket and rolling 
stock, and joined together 


Stamp 

Packet 


they will form a complete 
train. 

The international phila¬ 
telic exhibition held in Can¬ 
ada two years ago moves to 
London this year, from May 

6 to 14, and there will be five 
stamps for this event on May 

7 showing tourist landmarks 
in and around London—the 
Albert' Memorial, Royal 
Opera House, Hampton 
Court, Kensington Palace 
and Buckingham Palace. 
The set will be unusual in 
that it will contain a value to 
cover the overseas postcard 
rate. And there will be a 
miniature sheet containing a 
single 50p stamp showing a 
montage of noted buildings 
and monuments produced in 
line-engraved monochrome. 
The stamp will be sold separ¬ 
ately from April 9 and in the 
miniature sheet following on 
May 7. 

On June 18 the British post 
office issues four stamps on 


famous people, which is the 
subject chosen by the Con¬ 
ference of European Postal 
Administrations as the 1980 
theme for Europa stamps. 
Because this year is also the 
mid-point of the 1975-1985 
United Nations Decade for 
Women, the stamps will 
show four 19th Century 
women novelists—Charlotte 
Bronte, George Eliot, Emily 
Bronte and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Gaskell, with each writer 
being shown against a back¬ 
ground scene from one of 
their novels. 

Four sport centenaries— 
those of the Welsh Rugby 
Union, Amateur Athletic As¬ 
sociation, Amateur Boxing 
Association and the first 
cricket Test match played in 
England (against Austra¬ 
lia)—will tie commemorated 
by a set on Aug. 1 featuring 
action scenes from these 
sports. 

Leaders in music will be 
portrayed m an issue Sept. 
10, four British conductors. 
Sir Henry Wood, Sir Thomas 
Beecham, Sir Malcolm Sar¬ 
gent and Sir John Barbirolli. 

Finally there will -be the 
annual Christmas issue, de 
tails of .which have yet to be 
announced. 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 23 


A SKIN CA 


la carte 

SKIN CARE STUDIO 

FACIAL TREATMENTS In a relaxing atmosphere 
PARAFFIN TREATMENTS for hands or feet 
ELECTROLYSIS OR WAXING TREATMENTS 
for removal of unwanted hair, 

ROSA GRAF and DR. RENAUD’S COSMETICS 
840-C Pembroke St. pleas* call 388-5353 


ANN LANDERS 



$1.40 day special 


5 chocolate bars for $1.49 



Mayfair Shopping 
Centre 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 


Homosexual third sex l 

o 

to control population 


SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY 

5 ivswr 

I miHaidviEMsumr 

are 


Dear Ann Landers: Al¬ 
though you take the position 
that homosexuals are not 
"normal and healthy,” will 
you consider another 
theory? I believe they are a 
third sex, created by nature 
to control the population. 
Look at the facts: 

Most animals have built-in 
controls over reproduction. 
Man cannot, and will not,- 
control his sex drive. By the 
sheer weight of numbers, 
scientists should come to the 
conclusion that homosexual¬ 
ity is more than perversion. 
Homosexuals exist in vir¬ 
tually all cultures and have 
existed throughout history. 
As you may have guessed. I 
am a homosexual. The 
homosexuals I know, both 
men and women, have many 
things in common—which 
brought me to this conclu¬ 
sion. None were seduced 
when young, and all were 
attracted to members of 
their own sex since child¬ 
hood. Those who married did 
so under pressure from their 
families, and most of them 
are now divorced. 

This may seem silly, but 
homosexuals can recognize 
each other at a glance. “It 
takes one to know one” is 
true. I believe this also is 
part of nature's plan. — 
Name Deleted By Request 

Dear. Deleted: There is a 
great deal of controversy 
among psychiatrists on 
whether or not homosexuals 
are "born” or “made." 1 
side with those who believe 
they are "made," and 1 don't 
mean seduced by perverts. 1 


believe homosexuals are 
psychologically conditioned 
very early in life. This rules 
out the third-sex theory as a 
method of population con¬ 
trol. 

You are right about instant 
recognition. I have heard 
this statement from many 
homosexuals, and I believe it 
is true. 

Dear Ann Landers: I am 
an 86-year-old Harvard 
graduate (class of 1915). now 
a retired professor of lan 
guages at the University of 
New Hampshire in Durham. 

I enjoy your column and 
think you do a good job, but I 
did not like the letter from 
the reformed shoplifter who 
said she quit stealing be¬ 
cause of something she had 
learned in your column. In a 
previous response you re¬ 
ferred to specially con 
structed price tags that trig¬ 
ger an alarm system when 
the merchandise goes 
through the door. 

Your column should be 
teaching people the glory of 
honesty and not simply how 
to stay out of jail. — J.W.H. 

Dear J.W.H.: 1 appreciate 
your high-minded position, 
sir—but human nature being 
what it is, I am happy if 1 can 
teach them anything at all. 

Dear Ann Landers: I am a 

22-year-old woman who has 
been seeing a 25-year-old 
man for nearly three years. 
We love each other a lot and 
neither one goes with anyone 
else. 

For my birthday last year 


I thought he might surprise 
me with an engagement 
ring, but instead he bought 
me a lovely dress I had ad¬ 
mired in a shop window. I am 
hoping he will buy me a ring 
this year, but so far he hasn’t 
said anything about it. I have 
a hunch money is the prob 
lem, and he is embarrassed 
to admit it. 

I have a good job and a nice 
nest egg. Should 1 offer to 
help him buy the ring? — The 

Itch To Hitch In Pendleton. 
Ore. 

Dear Itch: An engagement 
ring needn't be an expensive 
rock. Your friend could have 
bought you a modest stone 
last year for what he paid for 
the lovely dress. Don't offer 
to “help him out.” The ring 
will be much more meaning¬ 
ful if he buys what he can 
afford on his own. 


Advertising 

helps 

good things 
happen. 


& 

u 

a 

o 

o 

(A 


a 

< 

oe 

o 

o 

H 

o 


III 

a 

o 

o 

M 


a 

< 

a 

§ 



SPECIAL: 


ADD AN 11x14 DECORATOR PRINT 
TO ANY PACKAGE FOR ONLY $14.95 


- Small deposit at the time of sit¬ 
ting 

r We select the best pose 
r Satisfaction Guaranteed 

APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED BUT NOT NECESSARY 


* No Limits — order any number of 
packages — full packages only 

* $1.00 tor each axtra child in group 
photographs 



^COpC PHOTOGRAPHY 


749 DISCOVERY STREET 

388-4238 






Between Douglas 
and Blanshard 

PARK AT THE FRONT DOOR 


SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY 


SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY 


HAPPY BIRTHDAY! SASKATCHEWAN and ALBERTA 

A TRIBUTE TO OUR PIONEERS 


COLLECTORS 

ALBUM 

Hardship, despair, vision and tri¬ 
umph — our pioneers have ex¬ 
perienced them all. For three- 
quarters of a century these condi¬ 
tions have mingled to bring the 
West full circle; from her colorful 
past we enjoy the success of 
today and anticipate the future 
with hope. 

It is with this theme in mind that 
these albums have been pro¬ 
duced in honor of the courageous 
pioneers who had a dream and 
saw it fulfilled. 


0 




SaskajbH 1 


mm 


1905 


e»an 


■* 

1980 




Two years in the making. 
These stories take you 
back to the beginning of 
our Provinces. Listen 
while Stan Sparling takes 
you through tne eany days 
of the first settlers. The 
rebellion, the Depression, 
follow the pioneers as they 
tame the West. 


Saskatchewan or Alberta Story both are available on LP record, 
8-track and cassette, at $8.95 each plus tax and 50* handling. 

AT HOME OR IN THE CAR - YOU’LL ENJOY LISTENING TO OUR HERITAGE 

Send Cheque or Money Order lo HERITAGE PRODUCTIONS 


MADE IN CANADA 
100% Guaranteed 


Victoria Press, Box 628 


Our Factory Sample wig sale 
continues for one more week 



First Lady Wig special 

Our clever overseas buyer managed 
a very special purchase, and that 
means savings passed dn to you. 

Choose from various styles, in colors 
ranging from dark to light, auburns, 
greys, and frosteds. Each wig, 
regardless of length or style is priced at 
one low pride. 19 99 

Limited quantities, so hurry. 

Ear piercing special 

Our fast, safe and painless method 
takes only seconds. Have your ears 
pierced with gold plated studs, in your 
choice of hearts or stars. Reg. 19-.99. 
Save 30% 8.99 

Prices in effect till February 13. 

VV/ps. Downtown Vancouver (third). Victoria Park Royal Richmond 
LouQheed. Surrey Champlain and CoouiUam 


* 


SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY SCOPE PHOTOGRAPHY 














































































24 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 



LIVING/MEDICAL 


Men’s and 


Ladies' $400 

SLACKS L ,, 



1012 YATES 
382-3938 
384-4641 


Photograph helps diagnosis 



WHITER SALE 

LADIES SHOES 


SELBY 

ARCH PRESERVERS 
md EASY GOERS 

Reg. to $49.00 

__J95 

NOW 


36 ! 


JOSEPH DUVAL 
and HELENA 

Reg. to *37.00 

__‘95 

NOW 


|. IU .VA 

26 ! 


GOLD CROSS 

tlHl 

COBBIE CASUALS 

Reg. to *55.00 


NOW 


39 


>95 


NKCOLINI 
DRESS SANDALS 

Reg. to $66.00 

AA95 

NOW 


AIR STEP 

Reg. to $37.00 

OC95 

NOW ftU 


ALL SALES FINAL 

s#a*?L. 

1453 Douglas Street 


Dear Dr. Donohue: I just 
went through a harrowing 
experience, including a lot of 
expensive and, I think, un¬ 
necessary X-rays. I had a 
swollen eye. It was eventual¬ 
ly diagnosed as "Horner’s 
syndrome." This was finally 
determined by a doctor who 
asked to look at a photograph 
of me taken a few years 
earlier. Have you ever heard 
of this problem? No one else 
around here seems to have. 
What about the photograph? 
How did that help? — Con¬ 
fused. 

Horner’s syndrome has 
three signs—drooping of the 
upper eyelid, an abnormally 
small pupil in that eye and 
absence of sweating on that 
side of the face. 

0 . Homer’s is not an illness of 
itself. It indicates that cer¬ 
tain nerves in the upper part 
of the chest and in the lower 
neck are not functioning. An 

example of the kinds of 
things that can cause such a 
nerve problem is pressure on 
the nerves, as from a tumor 
in the lung. The X-rays were 


Your Good Health 


to determine such causes. 
They were precautionary. 

Looks can be deceiving. 
What appears to be Homer’s 
syndrome may really be a 
person’s normal facial 
structure. An old photograph 
can often be helpful in such 
cases. Yours showed that the 
eye appearance was a new, 
abnormal development, in¬ 
dicating possible pressure on 
those nerves I spoke of. 

Multiple X-rays are neces¬ 
sary because the search for 
a specific cause is laborious. 
You would not settle for one 
hurried glance to find a nee¬ 
dle in a shag carpet. 

Dear Dr. Donohue: My 

mother has glaucoma and 
the eye drops do not get the 
pressure in her eye down 
enough. Her sight is getting 
steadily worse. I have heard 
that marijuana helps glau¬ 
coma. Is this true? Would it 
be available for her? — R.M. 


Marijuana has been shown 
to actually reduce intraocu¬ 
lar (inside the eyeball) 
pressure. It has been used 
effectively in some patients 
with glaucoma. Both smok¬ 
ing the material and taking 
an oral preparation of the 
active ingredient (tetrahy¬ 
drocannabinol) have the 
same effect. Eyedrops con¬ 
taining the ingredient are 
being tested. 

Dear Dr. Donohue: You 

discussed dizziness recently, 
the kind related to ear prob¬ 
lems. You mentioned sea¬ 
sickness medicines that 
might help. I had dizzy 
periods and my doctor said it 
was because the arteries are 
unable to get enough blood to 
the brains. I was wondering 
if seasickness medicines 
would help me. — Mrs. P.R. 

Probably not, but they 
might be given a short trial. 


Bulletin Board 


PANCAKES 

St. Alban’s Anglican 
Church Women, Evening 
Group, annual pancake lun¬ 
cheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. Tuesday at 1468 Ryan 
Street. 

LUNCHEON 

Mary and Martha Guild, 
Church of Our Lord, annual 
pancake lunch Tuesday in 
Cridge Memorial Hall, Blan- 
shard at Humboldt. Serving 
from noon to 1 p.m. for those 
with a limited lunch hour and 
from 1-2 p.m. for a more 
leisurely lunch. Also stalls 
featuring homebaking, no¬ 
velties and books. 

MUSEUM 

Films Potlatch: A Strict 
Law Bids Us Dance and 
Mungo Martin Makes a Box 
at 8 p.m. Tuesday in Provin¬ 
cial Museum’s Newcombe 
Auditorium. 

Kaleidoscope Theatre 
drama About Free Lands at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday and 3 
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, in 
Newcombe. 

Events free, for informa¬ 
tion phone 387-5745. 


SPEAKER 

Education Minister Brian 
Smith will speak at 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday at Luxton Hall. 
Open discussion period will 
follow talk. Presented by 
Esquimalt-Port Renfrew So¬ 
cial Credit Constituency As¬ 
sociation, open to public. For 
information phone 474-2022 
from noon to 3 p.m. week¬ 
days. 

MEETING 

Friends of the Provincial 
Museum annual general 
meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednes¬ 
day in museum gift shop 
lounge. 

SKI WEEKEND 

Canadian Hostelling Asso¬ 
ciation, Victoria District, 
will hold inexpensive ski 
weekend from Friday eve¬ 
ning through Sunday, Feb. 
24, at Forbidden Plateau. 
Carpool and accommodation 
at Forbidden Plateau mini- 
hostel belifg arranged. There 
is a 12 -person limit so regis¬ 
ter soon. For registration 
and information contact 
Pack and Boot Shop, 10-720 
Yates Street Mall, or phone 
383-2144. 



Shop Sears 
Spring and Summer 

me for 



good 
values, 
everyday 
of the year 

Look at the selection, then look at the 
values in Sears big Spring and Summer 
Catalogue! We've got special features 
too, like carefully chosen '3-Star Extra' 
and 'Sears Best' items... our way of mak¬ 
ing sure you get your money's worth. 

With over 880 pages of great values to 
chooSe from, you’ll see why we say, Sears 
Spring and Summer Catalogue is like a 
department store at your fingertips! 

Fashions! 

Want to know what Canada's wearing 
this spring? Look in the book! 

If it's in fashion, Sears Spring and 
Summer Catalogue most likely has it! 



DiaLDial,Dial... 

CL 595-3161 

Colwood Area Shoppers: 

Ca»: 474-1234 


LEGAL HELP 

Free legal information 
centres are provided by stu¬ 
dents from University of 
Victoria Faculty of Law at 
following times and places: 
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays 
and 7-9 p.m. Thursdays at 
Vic West Community Y, 521 
Craigflower; 7-9 p.m. Thurs¬ 
days, James Bay Commu¬ 
nity School, 140 Oswego; 2-4 
p.m. Mondays and Wednes¬ 
days, UVic Student Union 
Building. 

GROUPS MEET 

Alcohol Anonymous holds 
close to 60 meetings a week 
in Greater Victoria. Meet¬ 
ings are also held in virtually 
every community on Van¬ 
couver Island. For informa¬ 
tion phone 383-7744. A 24- 
hour service is available at 
383-0415. 

VICTORIA USC 

Victoria Work Group, Uni¬ 
tarian Service Committee of 
Canada, in action from 9:45 
a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursdays at 
1947 Cook (Cook-Maplewood 
bus from town). Donations 
of new or good used clothing 
and bedding welcome, will 
be shipped to Botswana, 
Africa. Last shipment had 
net weight of 4,663 pounds. 
For information phone 478- 
4219 or 652-2025. 


LAMP SHADES 

Repaired or Made 
To Order 

THE VICTORIA 
LAMPSHADE SHOP 
OMhoWUL 383-1544 




BARGAINS 

USED FURNITURE 
and APPLIANCES 

3460 QUADRA 3S4-3152 


Ml 
FORA 
ITS JUST A HOT 
TO TME WINDOW 

SHADE mo f, 

JOANNA MILLS FABAICS 




jantzen 

CRUISE 

WEAR 

featuring 

SHIRTS 

and 

SHORTS 

A&cot 

MEN’S WEAR 

435 Simcoe SL 385-3433 
Jam** Bay Square 


Dear Dr. Donohue: My 

problem is excessive per¬ 
spiration on the palms of my 
hands. I’m 18 and became 
aware of it four years ago. 
Since then it has grown into a 
serious problem for me 
physically and psychologi¬ 
cally. I am afraid to shake 
hands with anyone. Doctors 
offer no solution. I will enor¬ 
mously appreciate any an¬ 
swer you can give. — Mr. X. 

Anyone under the stress of 
fear, excitement, or pain 
will perspire from the palms 
and under the arms. When 
the perspiration is excessive 
it is referred to as "hyperhl- 
drosis." 

If diabetes, an overactive 
thyroid gland, or menopause 
(and a few other rarer condi¬ 
tions) are not the cause, then 
there are a few agents that 
can be tried. A mixture of 
aluminum chloride hexahy 
drate in alcohol can be ap 
plied to the palms nightly 
This is irritating, so care 
should be taken. It is washed 
off in the morning. A 3 per 
cent solution of glutaralde- 
hyde is also helpful for 
some. 

Dear Dr. Donohue: You 
have warned on several oc 
casions about the dangers of 
overuse of the nasal sprays 
for people with chronically 
stuffed noses. How about 
steaming? Will that, too, 
have the rebound effect on 
the nasal membranes you 
talk about? — Mrs. T.A. 

No. And I did neglect to 
suggest steaming as a suit¬ 
able alternative to the 
sprays. 


■ , Registering Now in Victoria . . 

DALE CARNEGIE COURSE | 

Effective Speaking — Human Reiatioos — Sett-Confidence 
Memory Training — Selling Your Ideas 
Overcome Worry and Tension 

FOR INFORMATION SEND: 

NAME.,... . • v u. 

ADOftESS .*.*. _ 

PHONE: Rts.. But. . ■ 

To Victoria Press, Box 687 

Presented by T. W Thorftnnson & Assor-iat** i M *-■> B 





IF YOU ARE 

SERIOUS ABOUT HEATING 


THE STOVE SHOP 

733A Goldstream Ave. 
Victoria (Langford), B.C. 
it, 4760322 

CLOSED MONDAYS 971 



\ 

CONTINUES 

UNTIL SAT., FEB. 23 


20% OFF 


tfft&Merasf 

*■» 

. H Towfils, bath mats, 
a nd shower curtains 

THF. 

Special Selection 

40 % OFF 

Med 

Embellished towels, 
ceramics and mirrors 


Xl640 Oak Bay Avenue 

X 595-1123 

* 


A very special Birks 
offer 

for one week only 


FEB. 18th UNTIL FEB. 23rd 

HILLSIDE 

STORE 

ONLY 




A clearance of 
selected Vinyl and Leather 
Handbags with savings of 

50% OFF ALL REGULAR PRICES 

ILLUSTRATED ABOVE ARE /USE THREE Of MANY STYLES AVAILABLE 

S uantities limited 
ue boxes during this event. 

HILLSIDE SHOPPING CENTRE ONLY 


BIRKS 

JEWELLERS 




* 




































































































AT 

JAMES BAY 

230 Menzies St. 

We love lo have you with us 
on Sundays. It*ts our softest 
and most Italian day. For limit¬ 
ed time only every purchase 
over $3 per person WILL RE¬ 
CEIVE A BEAUTIFUL 14-01. 

TIFFANY GLASS 


OFFER good only Sundays while quantities last. Sit 
in only. Other coke specials available for delivery 
and pickup. 



OVER A DECADE 

OF EXCELLENCE IN ITALIAN CUISINE 





VICTORIA 



PORTRAIT 

SPECIAL 

1-5x7$ 


for 


4.98 


4 WALLETS ONE POSE 


FEB. 20-21 


In Woodward’s Victoria 
Children’s Wear Department 

•Wednesday: 10:00a.m.-1:00 p.m., 2:00- 
5:00 p.m. ‘Thursday: 10:00-1:00 p.m.,2:00- 
5:00 p.m., 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

•Groups - $1.00 extra per person 
•Families welcome 

•Guaranteed satisfaction or money refunded 
•Limit of one Special per child 
•Optional portraits available 


SPORTS 


No No wins for composer 


ARCADIA, Calif. — No No 
outlasted Terlingua and Al¬ 
ways Gallanz to win the $44,- 
950 Sierra Madrc Handicap 
by a nose Saturday before a 
rain-drenched crowd of 22,- 
389 at Santa Anita. 

No No, ridden by Bill Shoe¬ 
maker and carrying 115 
pounds, cove red 6'/s furlongs 
on a sloppy track in 1:15 3-5 
and paid $17.80, $6 and $3.20. 
The victory was worth $26,- 
950 to composer Burt Ba- 
charach. owner of the five- 
year-old Maryland-bred 
winner. 

Terlingua, the only filly in 
the field of seven, was sec¬ 
ond by a neck and returned 
$4 and $2.60. The 4-year-old 
daughter of Secretariat was 
ridden by Darrel McHargue 
and carried 117 pounds. 

Always Gallant, the 3-2 fa¬ 
vorite racing under top 
weight of 122 pounds includ¬ 
ing jockey Laffit Pincay, 
was third by five lengths and 
paid $2.40 to show. 

Saturday results and en¬ 
tries for today (see Monday 
entries on Page 26): 

FIRST RACE —Time 1:10 3/S. 
Tuft and Stuff 

(Pierce) 110.00 $3.40 $3.00 
Boots Fawcett (McCarron)2.40 2.40 
Wanderbug (Rosales) 5.20 

Scratched — Rifsttafel. 

SECOND RACE —Time 1:10 2/5. 
Mascadoll 

(Rodrigues) S7.40 $5.20 $3.20 
Quilette (Mercado) 15.00 6.80 

Miss Bacon (McCarron) 3.00 

Daily Double (7-7) paid $45.60. 

Scratched — Racing Delight. 

THIRD RACE-Time 1:18. 

High Toss 

(Plncav) $9.60 $3.80 $2.80 

Delude (McHargue) 3.00 2.60 

Masthead (McGurn) 3.00 


Scratched — valendor, Old Song, 
Pacific Mom, Abyss. 

FOURTH RACE - Time 1:45 1/S. 
Battle Call 

(McHargue) $8 80 $5.00 $4.40 

Dancvn Tim (Pierce) 5.00 3.20 
Majestic Link (Sorenson) 6.60 

FIFTH RACE-Time 1:39. 

One More Bid 

(Mena) $9.80 $4.40 $3.40 

water view (Olivares) 4.no 3 60 
Roman Rockette (Toro) 6.00 

$5 Exact a (4-8) paid $77.50. 
Scratched — Entres Nous. 

SIXTH RACE —Time 1:39. 

Home Last 

(McHargue) $7.60 $4.00 $2.80 

Quick Rapoort (Pierce) 4.40 3.00 
Bishop Again (Pincay) 2.40 

Scratched — Hail To The Queen. 

SEVENTH RACE —Time 1:23 1/5. 
incorporator 

(Baltazar) $4.40 $2.80 $2.60 

HI Chaparral (Olivares) 6.20 3.20 
Roman Oblisk (Shoemaker) 2.60 
$5. Exacta (4-)) paid $99.00. 
Scratched — Replant, B W Turn- 


EIGHTH RACE - Time 1:15 3/5. 
No No 

(Shoemaker) $17.80 $6 00 $3.20 

Terlingua (McHargue) 4.00 Z.60 
Always Gallant (Plncav) 2.40 

Scratched - Wishing Well. 

NINTH RACE — Time 1:52 1/5. 
Prodigious 

(Plncav) $6.20 $3.00 $3.00 

Kinalmeakv (Shoemaker) 5.20 3.60 
Ring O' Roses (Baltazar) 3.80 

$5. Exacta (9-1) paid $95.00. 
Scratched - Any Size Andy. Pirate 
Fleet, Brands. 

Attendance 22,389. Handle 

$3,921,200. 

Entries 

FIRST RACE - $12,000 claiming, 4 
years and up, 6Va furlongs. 

Flowing Free 


SECOND RACE — $10,000 claim¬ 
ing, 3 vear old mares and fillies, 6 
furlongs. 


Dancing Melss 
Dazzlinglv 
Top One 
Ciao Caro 
x-LaChuavinist 
x-On Cue 
Sunny Dispssh 
Space Win 
Hillache 
Jans Promise 
Faux Exlair 
Miss Cockatoo 


117 

117 

117 

117 

112 

112 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 


Tregilllck 
Yourself 
Import Wine 
Caiuns Gunner 
Kralie 

x BddSensatln 
Streekin Dekn 
Talkeetna 
Right Winner 
Black Bullet 
Slay TheDragn 
Gallant Warrir 


EASY-TO-MAKE SWEATERS 
IN HIGH FASHION! 

BOBBLY YARN 


TUMULTE 


by Pingouin 


Unique 

colour blends. 
500 g ball . 


25 




1439 Douglas St. 
384-9841 


University Heights 
Shopping Mall 
3970 Shelbaurne St. 
477-8531 2>« 



FREE GUARANTEED 
CARRY-IN SERVICE 
ESTIMATE 

• TV • STEREO 

• MICROWAVES^^dV^^ 0R 

• VIDEO QUj 



IN-HOME 
SERVICE CALL 

Ivrvwiri^l. - 

JOE CHOW ll^UKLin ^ 

JUC vnun . SALES . SERVICE • RENTALS 

27 BURNSIDE RD. (WEST) 381-5622 ffcOO to MO 

"rentals™ 

• TELEVISION • MICROWAVES • VIDEO • STEREO 
OR 

i u RENT-T0-0WN AND PURCHASE 



CJVI 

Full Election coverage 
8:00 p.m. 

MONDAY, FEB. 18th 

Continuous till all result* in. 

s 

Brought to you by: 

S & H DATSUN CENTRE 
DAVID INGRAM’S CENTA 
«I H.WHITTOME REAL ESTATE 
AND INSURANCE 

VICTORIA REAL ESTATE BOARD 


counted! 


CJVI’s Program Manager Joe Easingwood will 
anchor our coverage with special election 
commentators Provincial Finance Minister 
Hugh Curtis, Peter Bunn and John Brewin. 

Stay tuned 

and hear your vote counted first on 

W90 


THIRD RACE -$13,000 maidens 3 
year old fillies, 6Vi furlongs, 
x MissCynLvn 112 

Laura's Star 117 

Little Mo 117 

Shameen 117 

Country Tune 117 

Abridge 117 

Complete 117 

MlssCenyak 117 


FOURTH RACE —$18,000 allow¬ 
ance, 3 year old colts and geldings, 
1 1/16 miles. 

Forlaurels 117 

Native Wit 114 

Knight Of Gold 114 

Herbager Lad 114 

Fearless Bedx 114 

Egg Toss 120 


FIFTH RACE — $22,00(7allowance, 
4 year old and up, l 1/16 miles. 

Soft Market 121 

x-a-Spinlza 108 

Prince Worthy 114 

x-Greater 112 

First Tony 113 

Wlckerr 109 

Crowned Muse 113 

a-HI Ho Black 113 

Gultarron 114 

Grand Allianc 120 

Black Hood 120 

For I ion 113 

a-Coupled. 

SIXTH RACE — $14,000 maidens 3 
year old colts and geldings, 1 1/16 
mile. 

Fabulous Resn 118 

Master Surgen ns 

Dr. Love lie 

Bandelaire lie 

x Affiance. 113 

Oeil 118 

Sir Fleet lie 

Monty Role 118 


SEVENTH RACE - $30-000 claim¬ 
ing, 4 year and up, l 1/16 mile. 
Unspoken 111 

FIveStarGenrl 114 

No Saint 114 

Plelstosaur 115 

Earnest 116 

x Kulak 107 

Shackles 116 

EIGHTH RACE - $125,000 added 4 
year and up, 1V% mile. 

Relaunch 117 

Padar Ahead 117 

Beaus Eaole 121 

Double Dlscont 114 

Saboulard 116 

Peregrlnator 115 

Gristle 116 

NINTH RACE - $15,000claiming, 4 
year old and up IVb mile. 

TrongSang 116 

Trafarl l15 

x LicensedtWn 111 

Devilaglo 116 

Western Scout 115 

Boyds Trjnsprt 116 

Cross 116 

Runnin Ruler 1 16 

Noble Champn 113 

Court Ruffian 115 

x apprentice allowance. 

SELECTIONS 

1. Caiuns Gunner, Flowing Free, 
Tregilllck. 

2. Top One, Dancino Melissa; Sunny 
Disposish. 

3. Little Mo, Complete, Laura's 
Star. 

4. Knight of Gold, Fourlaurels, 
Fearless Bedeaux. 

5. Prince Worthy , First Tony, 
Grand Alliance. 

6. Dr. Love, Fabulous Reason, Mas¬ 
ter Surgeon. 

7. No Saint, Five Star General, 
Shackles. 

8. Relaunch, Beaus Eagle, Sabou¬ 
lard. 

9. Licensed To Win, Trong Sang, 
Western Scout. 

One Best: Prince Worthy. 

New sprint mark 

WARSAW (AP) — Polish 
sprinter Grazyna Rabsztyn 
set a world indoor record for 
the 60-metres sprint Satur¬ 
day when she clocked 7.84 
seconds. She broke her own 
record of 7.86 seconds. 


THE C OLONIST, Sun., Februar y 17, 1980 

RECORD 
SALESPERSON 
WANTED 

Full and Part Time Salespeople are re-1 
quired immediately. Applicants must | 
have proven experience in this field, 
with a knowledge of classical music j 
preferred. 

SEND RESUME IN CONFIDENCE 
TO VICTORIA PRESS 

BOX 735 


THE CANADIAN RED CROSS 
SOCIETY 

Victoria City and District Branch 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

The Annual General Meeting of the above-mentioned 
Branch of the Canadian Fled Cross Society will be heltf'at 
Red Cross House, 1046 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C. on 
Wednesday. February 27th, 1980, at 8 P.M. 

BUSINESS 4 

1. Reading of the Minutes of the last General Meeting. 

2. Business arising out of minutes orthe last Meeting. 

3. Presentation of Reports for the year 1979. 

4. Election of Officers for the year 1979. 

5. New Business. 

All members of the Branch in good standing at the end of the 
year 1979 are entitled to attend the Annual General Meeting 
and are requested to be present. 

Nominations for the appointment of Officers and Members of 
the Branch Executive Committee may be made by any 
member in good standing and must be submitted in writing, 
duly proposed and seconded with the consent of the 
nominee, to the Secretary not less than twenty-four (24) 
hours prior to the time set for the Meeting. 


You are invited 
to a very Special Show: 

FASHION 

OVERTURE 

An expression of Fashion 
in a New Decade 

Featuring 

The Victoria Symphony 

and 

Fashions by Woodward's 

at 

The University Center 
March 8th, 1980 

_ aa 

at 

8:00 p.m. 


Tickets $10.00 each 
Reserved seats’ 

Don't be disappointed 
Pick up your tickets now 
at: 

Uvic Box Office or 

Woodward's Advertising Office, 2nd floor 


Proceeds to The Oak Bay - Gordon Head 
Social Credit Association 





































































26 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


SPORTS 


|—England wins ferocious tilt— i Santa Anita entries for Monday 

• 1 ARCADIA Calif — Nor- x MovinMonev III TotheToo 114 Frulll 


LONDON (Reuter) — 
England tripped title holders 
Wales 9-8 in a savagely con¬ 
tested Five Nations Rugby 
Union championship match 
Saturday in which Welsh 
flank forward Paul Ringer 
was sent off -after only 14 
minutes. 

In Edinburgh, France 
slumped to its third consecu¬ 
tive defeat when Scotland hit 


back to win 22-14 at Murray- 
field. 

Fullback Dusty Hare 
kicked a penalty with two 
minutes left to clinch only 
the second win by England 
over Wales in the last 17 
years. Hare scored Eng¬ 
land's other points with two 
earlier penalties while 
Wales’ points came from 


tries by Jeff Squire and 
Elgan Rees. 

The result meant England, 
having won its three 
matches, must now at least 
share the championship. If it 
wins the last game against 
Scotland, England will take 
the title outright for the first 
time since 1963. 

From the start the match 
was contested with unbri- 




YOU THINK THIS WAY ABOUT FUNERALS? 


□ Money spent on elaborate funerals would be better spent on the living. 

(Simplicity can mean dignity) 

□ 1 don't want my body put on display. 

□ 1 want to record my wishes before my death so that my next of kin need not 
make painful decisions under stress. 

If you feel this way you are not alone. 

1 00,000 people in all walks of life now 
belong to the — 

MEMORIAL SOCIETY OF B.C. 

To: MEMORIAL SOCIETY OF B.C. 
519-620 View St. 

Victoria, B.C. V8W 1J6 

l wo are interested in ttie aims of the So¬ 
ciety. 

VP wrfht more information 
□ want to enrofi now 


Write or phone for free brochure — 

Namefs). 


“ft’s Your Funeral" 

Address. 


VICTORIA BRANCH 385-5214 

Office Hrs.: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 

City/Town. Postal Code 

Phone.Amount Enclosed 


Membership Is $10 (or each adult. 

(No charge for children under 19) 


/“^ SUNDAY ONLY—FEB. 1 

f Graham s Own 

CORNED BEEF BRISKET 

With local 

GREEN CABBAGE 

Nabob 

COFFEE . Reg. Grind, 24b. bag 1 
Limit one per customer. 

N -OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 9 to 9 

Feltham at Shelboume—477-9541 



died ferocity by both teams 
and Irish referee David Bur¬ 
nett was in danger of losing 
control. 

But he acted decisively in 
dismissing Ringer when the 
Welsh wing forward ap¬ 
peared to catch John Horton 
with his elbow after the Eng¬ 
land fly half had released the 
ball 

In Edinburgh, the Scots 
staged a splendid recovery 
by coming back from a 14-4 
deficit to end a run of 13 
games without a victory. It 
was also the first success 
against France in six years. 

France, already beaten by 
Wales and England, made an 
encouraging start and led 7 4 
at halftime. 

But Andy Irvine, who 
missed five penalties and a 
conversion for Scotland in 
the first half, made up for his 
lapses by inspiring a re¬ 
markable recovery. 

Irvine scored two tries, a 
conversion and two penal¬ 
ties. A try by John Ruther¬ 
ford and a conversion by Jim 
Renwick made up Scotland’s 
points. 

France scored through 
tries by Jerome Gallion and 
Serge Gabernet, who also 
got a penalty, while Alain 
Caussade managed a drop 
goal. 


ARCADIA, Calif. — Nor¬ 
mally dark Monday, Santa 
Anita will be open this week 
as the U. S. marks George 
Washington’s birthday. En¬ 
tries: 

FIRST RACE ->12,000 claiming 4 
year old and up, I 1/16 mile. 


Ravidus 
Tristos Truffle 
C.P. Express 
x Rivetaoe 
Princely Role 
Equa 
Arcoville 
Pee WeePaintr 
Oanari 
Fascinant 
xPosemitDnce 
Maiestc Vinrch 


116 

116 

120 

110 

111 

116 

116 

116 

116 

116 

110 

116 


x-MovinMoney 

111 

To the Top 

114 

Fruili 

A Coupled 


Worldwide On 

114 

Authorization 



a Yanuka 

114 


FIFTH RACE - $25,000 claiming 4 

A Coupled. 


NINTH RACE —$20,000 

vear and up, 6V3 furlongs. 




year and op, 1 1/16 mile. 

Keen N Bold 

121 

SEVENTH RACE - $35,000 allow 

Taste Tempter 

Trkplane 

116 

a nee 4 year and up, 1 mile. 


F leet Stone 

Fingal 

116 

Quip 

116 

El Champa qui 

Jans Last 

118 

Hot Oil 

114 

Trival 

Willie Steel 

116 

x-CaroBambin 

111 

x George Due 

Tulsea 

118 

Prenotion 

118 

Prince Caper 

Willie Be Done 

115 

x-LandasLgnn 

108 

Backdoor Man 

White Sprite 

116 

Switch Partnrs. 

117 

Rescator 

Fashion Lad 

114 

Dr a on Cmmnd 

114 


Lama 

116 



SUB RACE - $10,000 c 

x Joe Blot 

110 



year old mares, colts and i 


113 

113 


116 

115 
114 
122 
111 

116 
116 
116 


-$100,000 added, 4 furlongs. 


SECOND RACE - $15,000 Claim 
ing 4 year and up, 6 furlongs. 


SIXTH RACE 

— $22,000 allowance 

years and up, l'/j miles. 


Back Field 

118 

4 year and up, 

fillies and mares, 1 

Per egrlnalor 

114 

Amarillo Slim 

118 

mile. 


Marrooui 

116 

Maiestc Mmnt 

118 

Nllinska Street 

120 

El Fantstico 

113 

French Chatea 

118 

x Planning 

113 

As Oe Copas 

114 

Prof o Let 

118 

First Victory 

114 

Smasher 

113 

x-Ships Flag' 

113 

x Anapamy 

109 

Silver Eagle 

120 

x-Argaonaftis 

113 

a Cameo Shore 

1)4. 

Balzac 

123 

California Fig 

118 

Dance Leader 

120 

First Prayer 

120 

xapprentice allowance. 



Irish Realm 
Mr FristFrind 
Surreptitiously 
Turf N Fleet 
Runaway Hit 
x-DonGabriele 
Owl Crow 
Dance TothMsc 
Pashanant Kb 
Tellaglo 
Rebs Invite 
Sali Sands 
Classical Age 
Lima Mike 


116 

116 

116 

115 

115 

108 

118 

115 

116 
113 
117 
116 
116 
115 


LUXURY, PERFORMANCE, ECONOMY 

at an Affordable Price 


flfeD 

olds 


THI 
year 
longs. 
Resolutions 
Hail To Albert 
Dr. Monty M. 
Al Who 
Wils Shoe 
Vorlaufer 
Black Moses 
x-Hill Drive 
Tonka Canyon 


RACE — $13,000 maidens 3 
colts and geldings, 6 fur- 


118 

118 

118 

118 

118 

118 

118 

113 

118 


FOURTH RACE - $14,000 maidens 
3 year old fillies, 1 mile. 

Princess Crnsh 116 

From Kidtoln 116 

Bics Chick 116 

Bronze Time 116 

a-Scarlet Gold 116 

Debys Willing in 

a-Sweet Maid 118 

EcntncAdvntr 116 

Soft Reply 116 


FRESH AS 
A FLOWER 


IN JUST 
ONE HOUR 


GRAHAM S MARKET 


PRICES EFFECTIVE FEB. 17, 18, 19, 20 


Canada Grade "A" 

BONELESS ROASTS 

Top Round Rump 
Sirloin Tip, lb. 


2 


69 


Canada Grade "A" 

BONELESS 

TOP ROUND STEAK 

lb. 

£89 

Canada Grade "A” 

499 

BONELESS 

NEW YORK STEAK 

4 



Canada Grade •A” 

DELM0NIC0 

STEAKS 

lb. 


Lean 

GROUND 

BEEF 

lb. 


Tender lean 

STEWING 

BEEF 

lb. 




MAZDA 

626 

STANDARD FEATURES 


Reminder chime for headlights left on. Rear window defroster. Front-door 
map pockets. Electric clock. Intermittent windshield wipers. Vanity mirror 
on right-hand sunvisor. 60/40 split fold-down rear seatback. Driver's 
reclining bucket seat with adjustable lumbar support, adjustable cushion 
height and angle. Electric remote trunklid release. Two glove compart¬ 
ments (one on driver's side). Storage box with armrest in centre console. 
AM/FM stereo radio. Side-window demisters. Tinted glass. Heater duct for 
rear-seat passengers. Front airdam. Full cut-pile carpeting. Front and rear 
anti-roll bar. Power-assisted front disc brakes. Lockable fuel filler door 
185/70 SR-13 steel-belted racjial tires with 5.5 JJ wide styled steel 
wheels. Wheel trim rings. Full-length protective bodyside mouldings. 
Day/Night rear-view mirror. Illuminated lighter, ashtray, and trunk com¬ 
partment. Automatic choke. Steering-column stalk controls. Bumper 
guards, front and rear. Trip odometer. 5-speed manual overdrive transmis¬ 
sion. Power-boosted flow-through ventilation system. 

TRANSPORT CANADA RATING: 33 M.P.G. combined 
Ask About our DEMO CLEARANCE! 


Dealer Licence D02073A 


Corner of 
Blanshard 
and Johnson 
385-1451 


PEUGEOT 



THE 
FABRIC 
DOCTOR 
SAYS 


‘It’s time 

to have 

Winter 

Grime 

removed 

from 

your 

drapes” 


THREE GOOD REASONS 
FOR SENDING 
DRAPES TO US: 


We clean thoroughly but very 
gently in crystal clear solvent 
Drapes are treated to a new fabric 
finish to give them a crisp new look 
which makes them hang better! Gets 
GRIME OUT — puts new body IN — 
and saves you 20%; so get in on this 
special — CALL TODAY! 


We guarantee no shrinkage 
No loss of body 

Save 20% during the month of February 


PHONE 382-4266 NOW! 

FOR PICK-UP SERVICE 


NU-WAY CLEANERS LTD. 

1590 CEDAR HILL CROSS ROAD 
; 420 WILLIAM STREET 

“The home of the Fabric Doctor” 



No 

Prospecting 
Involved... 
just a GOLDEN 
opportunity from 
Diplomat! 


It's On! 

Now. to March 9th. 1980. 

A ‘GOLD RUSH'of gigantic 
proportions. From the* Fro 
Cambrian Shield to the Pacific 
Ocean, it's all from your nearest Diploma! 
dealer. 

But never fear. There are no pack- 
horses or back-breaking toil involved. 
No panning or sluicing or treking through 
uncharted country. Instead, this GOLD 
RUSH features the joy of getting to go in a 
Diplomat Motor Home. 


Diplomat has' always built 
high value, quality motor 
homes, but now to March 
the 9th they're offering 
a golden incentive 
with their fine vehicles. 
GOLD. One troy ounce of 
gold bullion with every 
1980 Class A or Mini Motor 
Home purchased. 

That's right. Simply Pur¬ 
chase a Diplomat motor home and 
receive an ounce of gold. 

No: this is not a contest. No 
skill testing questions or waiting 
half a year. All there is to dojs pqr 
chase a 1980 Diplomat Class A or 


Mini Motor Home, and you'll 
/ receive your ounce of gold. 
’That's it. But. don't wait; this is a 
limited offer which closes March 
9th. 1980. 

Got in on the 'GOLD RUSH’ at any 
of your conveniently located Diplomat 

dealers . . . The Diplomat Gold RusJi offer is limited 
fo Dealers and Manufacturer s inventory 
as of the promotional period 



KAT1LA CHEV OLDS LTD. 
5262 Argyle Street 
Port Alberni, B.C. 

Dealer licence number 1055B 


TRIANGLE HOMES LTD. 
Sidney, B.C. 

Dealer licence number 5096 


\ 


i 



























































































































THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 27 

Helen Chesnut’s 

Garden Notes 


F 

R 

E 

D 

B 

A 

S 

S 

E 

T 




Father's sense of timing was always 
quite wonderful. It was his habit to 
wait for some sort of sign or signal 
before making any major change in 
his life. 

And so, during this past year when 
his health began to fail, he dreaded the 
thought of giving up his lovely home. 
But most especially he was reluctant 
to give up his gardening columns. He 
was waiting for that certain signal 
that would tell him he must retire. 

My father knew how much he would 
miss the contact with his readers, as 
many home gardeners wrote him 
about their various garden problems. 

Each letter of inquiry he would an¬ 
swer in a personal way, always en¬ 
closing a small packet of gift seeds as 
a token of thanks for the reader's 
interest. He also felt that his readers' 
letters gave him an added opportu¬ 
nity to learn, as he researched an¬ 
swers to difficult questions. 

Father recognized how very much 
he would miss writing about garden¬ 
ing, a subject he loved so much. He 
felt that working in a garden was a 
most therapeutic and health-giving 
task. Tending a patch of earth, he felt, 
had a sort of cosmic wholeness to 


Art 

Buchwald 


it and blessed the gardener with peace 
and health of mind and body. 

There is a little verse that describes 
just how my father felt about garden¬ 
ing and all his gardening friends: 

The touch of the sun for pardon 

Song of the birds for mirth 

One is nearer God’s heart in a gar¬ 
den 

Than anywhere else on earth. 

Those of us who knew how strongly 
attached my father was to his garden 
writing and to you, his readers, were 
glad that he was able to continue his 
work right up to the end of his life. He 
never had to give up his cherished 
work. 

And father’s timing, perfect to the 
end, allowed him a Christmas together 
with his children and grandchildren. 
Then he retired quickly to a hospital 
room, viewed the most beautiful sun¬ 
rise he'd ever seen in his life, and died 
the following day, 

My own garden is full of my father’s 
lovely bulbs, which he would pass on to 
me each autumn, when he dug up and 
divided one or two sections of his bulb 
garden. I am hoping to set up an M. V. 


Chesnut Memorial Garden at my home 
with his bulbs and some of his favorite 
plants. 

Father’s favorite lily was “Pink En¬ 
chantment.” One summer when they 
came to visit, they placed several 
blooms on the dashboard of their car 
just to savor the delicious scent during 
the course of their journey. And just 
this November, as we were leaving 
their home after a wonderful family 
weekend together, father disappeared 
round the corner, to re-appear with a 
beautiful apricot-colored rosebud 
from a sheltered corner of their gar¬ 
den. 

My^father held strong ties with all 
his gardening friends. He must have 
answered thousands of letters from his 
readers during his years as a garden 
columnist. I feel that now he would 
like me to express the same feel¬ 
ings he voiced on his last gardening 
radio program several years ago. 

On that last program he thanked all 
his listeners for their interest and their 
letters. Then my father closed his last 
program by saying he hoped that, 
"Some day, some way, we will meet 
again.” 

— Helen Chesnut. 





WASHINGTON — Teddy 
Kennedy keeps screaming 
that President Carter should 
leave the White House and 
come up to New England to 
debate with him. I don’t 
agree. In times like these, 
the president must be in 
Warrington dealing with 
each crisis as it comes up. 

Take early last week. The 
president was in the Oval 
Office when his Security Ad¬ 
viser Brzezinski rushed in 
with a cable. 

Is it from Pakistan? 

No, said Brzezinski. It’s 
from Muhammad Ali in Tan¬ 
zania. He wants to come 
home. 

The president, who never 
panics in a crisis, said. He 
can’t do it. The cornerstone 
of our entire foreign policy 
depends on his mission. 

I know that, Mr. Presi¬ 
dent, but he says in his cable 
that the president of Tanza¬ 
nia won’t see him. 

Why not? Is it because Ali 
is no longer heavyweight 
champion of the world? 


Sydney 

Harris 


As a former member of Troop No. 
4, Beaver Patrol, Boy Scouts of 
America, with more merit badges 
than I deserved, it^vas with a sinking 
feeling last week that I saw another of 
my boyhood heroes go down the drain 
with hardly a gurgle. 

This time it was Sir Baden-Powell, 
founder of international scouting and 
hero of the famous Siege of Mafeking 
in the Boer War at the turn of this 
century. A hero he may have been to 
the British at that time, but down the 
long corridor of history his name now 
echoes hollowly. 

I have just finished a massively 
fascinating new book, The Boer War. 
by Thomas Pakenham, who has unco¬ 
vered much material hidden for more 
than 70 years. One tightly-packed 
chapter deals with the seven-month 
siege of Mafeking in 1900, which its 
commanding officer, then Col. Baden- 
Powell. defended gallantly against the 
Boers until help arrived. 


No, it's because he’s 
black. 

Isn’t the president of Tan¬ 
zania black? 

That’s just the point. The 
president of Tanzania is sore 
because we sent a black man 
to persuade him to call off 
the Olympics. He thinks 
you're patronizing him. 

But doesn't he know I 
didn't send Ali because of his 
color? I sent him because 
he’s the best diplomat I’ve 
got. 

I know it, and you know it. 
But nobody else does. Mr. 
President, what are we 
going to do’? 

What else does he say in 
his cable? 

Brzezinski read from it, 
All the black Africans here 
in Tanzania tell me their 
fight is with South Africa 
and not with Russia. How 
come you didn’t tell me that 
when you made me Special 
Ambassador to the Dark 
Continent? 

1 thought I did. Carter 


said. Why don’t we cable him 
and tell him that if he cuts his 
' mission short, the Russians 
might go ahead with their 
Olympics, and then they will 
never get out of Afghanis¬ 
tan. 

I talked to our people in 
Tanzania and they told him 
that already. He said it 
doesn’t matter because he’s 
the greatest diplomat in the 
world and he'll lose his title if 
no head of state will see 
him. 

But it’s just one country. 
I'm sure the presidents of 
Kenya and Liberia will see 
him. 

Yes, but they have already 
decided not to go to the Mos¬ 
cow Olympics. 

He doesn't know that, 
Carter said. 

I think you ought to send 
him a cable immediately. 
Mr. President. If Ali cancels 
his trip now we could not only 
lose Afghanistan, but Maine 
and New Hampshire as well. 

All right, send the follow¬ 


ing wire. ‘Dear Champ, As 
President of the United 
States and Commander-in- 
Chief, I am ordering you to 
continue your diplomatic 
mission. Your negotiations 
could mean the difference 
between a Moscow Olympics 
or no Olympics at all. Our 
only hope to avoid a confron¬ 
tation between the two 
major nuclear powers is 
your ability to persuade Ni¬ 
geria and Senegal to stay 
home this summer. All 
America awaits your deci¬ 
sion.’ 

Happily for all of us, Ali 
decided to continue his his¬ 
toric journey. 

The only reason I mention 
all this is that if President 
Carter had been slogging 
through Maine last week, as 
Teddy would have him do. he 
would never have had time 
to deal with the Ali crisis, 
which many diplomatic ob¬ 
servers are now describing 
as the turning-point in So- 
viet-American relations. 


But the man who, a decade later, 
gave us the Scout Oath and the Scout - 
Law and the Good Deed a Day, was no 
one whose attitudes or actions I would 
want to follow. He may have been 
trustworthy and loyal and clean and 
brave; he was also bigoted and callous 
and deceptive and profoundly unjust. 

Well before Mafeking, Baden- 
Powell was accused by his Colonial 
Office of murdering an African chief¬ 
tain he had taken prisoner. He admit¬ 
ted killing him, said the man deserved 
what he got, and the case fizzled out. 
He then published a book of his adven¬ 
tures in this African campaign, in 
which he referred to the “sport” of 
"niggerhunts.” 

Under his command, the white gar¬ 
rison at Mafeking seized part of the 
rations of the black garrison, who 
were given the choice of starving to 
death or running the gauntlet of the 
Boers. Baden-Powell then stealthily 


substituted part of the horses' rations 
of grains and oats for the natives, 
making them pay handsomely for the 
food commandeered from their own 
stock, while the whites were given 
credits or extra funds. 

He also believed that there was 
large-scale hoarding of grain by the 
natives, and executed by firing squad 
some starving Africans caught steal¬ 
ing food. But then it was found that the 
"hoards" had been secreted by the 
white merchants and their cronies; an 
Army Service Corps sergeant-major 
in charge of rations was found running 
his own black market. 

“It was the Africans, most of all. 
who bore the brunt of the fighting and 
saved the day,” reports the author. 
But Baden-Powell gave them no 
thanks: Of the relief fund for Mafek¬ 
ing, none went to thousands of Afri¬ 
cans whose farms had been looted, 
towns burnt, and families expelled or 
died of starvation. Some Boy Scout. 


James Bacon’s 

Hollywood 


MCU Monitor. 


HOLLYWOOD — For the 
first time in my memory, 
Milton Bcrle was on the re¬ 
ceiving end of a stag roast by 
the Friars the other night. 

The show opened with a 
tenor singing the Star Span¬ 
gled Banner, and that was 
the only clean line delivered 
all night. 

Milton is a folk hero in 
show business, not necessar¬ 
ily for his comic genius, and 
that was the X-rated theme 
of the night. 

Don Rickies. Jackie Ver¬ 
non, roastmaster Hal 
Kanter, Jesse White, Hcnny 
Youngman, Jack Lemmon, 
Walter Matthau and the rest 
of the dais were relentless 
with Milton. 

The only clean speech of 
the night was given by 
Danny Goodman, the con¬ 


cessionaire of the Dodgers. 
He had Vin Scully in stitches 
when he introduced himself 
as “a graduate of the Milton 
Berle School of Public 
Speaking.” 

You have to know Danny, 
who is right out of Damon 
Runyon, to appreciate that. 

Sometimes you lose some¬ 
thing in the translation. 
Elaine Steinbeck, widow of 
John, was in a Tokyo book¬ 
shop recently and, like ali 
authors and author’s 
spouses, she asked if they 
carried any of her husband's 
works. 

The clerk nodded enthusi¬ 
astically. "We have his most 
famous book. Angry Rai¬ 
sins ,.” 

Grapes of Wrath helped 
John win the Nobel Prize for 
literature. 


according to GUINNESS 


The highest recorded flow rate of 
any artesian well is 20,000 
gallons per minute, certified in 
1973 for a well 20 
miles northwest 
of Orlando, 

Florida, by the 
Wekiva 
River. 



•rm Nfc. C* . tat. 

W k nia UR 


V 


f 












































































































































































































28 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


PROVINCE 


Irene Windeyer 
dies in Duncan 


A well-known longtime 
resident of the Cowiehan 
Valley, Irene Noel Win¬ 
deyer, 76, died Saturday at 
her home, 5451 Miller Road, 
Dunean, after a brief illness. 

She was born in Lismore, 
Ireland, and married Cmdr. 
Guy Stanley Windeyer, RN, 
in 1928 in England. 

They came to the Cowi- 


From out of 
the West ... 



... eomes tfie POSY EXPRESS 


PETEQJAX 

goldsmith 

PRICE 
GOLD SALE 

Karat gold and sterling silver chains, 
rings, earrings, and more. Diamonds 
and genuine gems set in gold. 

40% OFF 


L 


all watches and straps 

This sale is not being repeated 
and is while quantities last. 

DON’T MISS IT! 

OPEN 9:30-5:30 TUES. to SAT. 


230 Menzies St., James Bay 


Cherchez la microscopic femme 

ie comnlex sex life of West Const is a seaweed einlist in loimoeHti th„ 


chan Valley in 1933, and 
cleared the land themselves 
for Somenos Lake Farm, a 
successful livestock and 
market garden farm. 

Somenos Lake Farm be¬ 
came the B.C. Forest Mu¬ 
seum in $974. 

A memorial service will be 
held at 11 a.m. Monday in St. 
John’s Church, Duncan. 


The complex sex life of 
dulse seaweed puzzled biolo¬ 
gists for more than a cen¬ 
tury. 

But the elusive female 
dulse has finally been locat¬ 
ed, thanks to the combined 
talents of two Canadian sci¬ 
entists, according to a report 
in Research Sews, organ of 
the National Research Coun¬ 
cil. 

Dulse, which is rare on the 


West Coast, is a seaweed 
variety considered a deli¬ 
cacy by many people. 

The discovery of the elu¬ 
sive female dulse will lead to 
more effective cultivation of 
the crop and possibly to its 
transplanting to Vancouver 
Island waters. 

The two researchers, one a 
phycologist (not a typo¬ 
graphical error, but a spe¬ 


cialist in seaweeds), the 
Other a geneticist, discover¬ 
ed that the female dulse 
plant did exist, but only in 
microscopic sizes. 

The clues lay in the chro¬ 
mosomes of the plants. By 
approaching the problem 
from both their disciplines, 
the two were able to isolate 
and identify the female plant 
and to plot dulse's reproduc¬ 
tive mechanism. 


GRAND SALE 

Before The Season Ends 

Reg. $699.00 $ 


469 


00 


CLEAROUT SALE 

forest™ Limited Stock So Shop Early 

STOVES BEFORE YOU BUY GIVE US A TRY 

THE MODERN PIONEER 

Facts about 
the Forestking. 

The Forestking is constructed of heavy 
'A ' and 5/16" hot-rolled steel plate. 
Steel plate is denser, more pliable, and 
longer lasting than the cast iron stoves 
of yesterday. The Forestking weighs 360 
lbs. (163 kg) providing an excellent 
radiant mass. 

The two step burn system recycles hot 
gases within the stove, providing more 
efficient heating. 



Forestking 

Features 


1. 5/16" steel top, V« steel sides 

2. 2 Individual cooking surfaces 

3. Firebrick lining, to prevent burnout 

4. 8" Flue provides more efficient draft 
5 Nickled door and name plates 

6. Adjustable leg balls 

7. Available in solid or glass door models 

8. Asbestos door seal 

9. Vent caps to control air intake 

10. Ash Catcher 

11. Optional Fire Screen Available. 



M >STER 


Parking at 
rear of 
building 


SWEEPER 

901 Esquimalt Rd. 386-3717 

(at Head St.) 

_ Mon, to Sat. 9:30 to 5:30 p.m. 


An asbestos seal around the door 
makes the Forestking virtually airtight. 
The Forestking holds fire up to 8-12 
hrs. and has a heating capacity of up 
to 2000 sq. ft (185 sq. meters). No 

f jratc is required, as air is drawn from 
ower front of stove to provide an 
efficient burn. The Forestking burns 
either wood or coal and will handle 
logs up to 22" in length. Adjustable leg 
balls allow easy levelling. 

Glass door model $20 extra 

FINANCING AVAILABLE 


SAVE 
20 % 

SAVE 
20 % 

SAVE 
20 % 

LAST WEEK 
TO SAVE 20% 

CALL NOW!! 


DRAPERY CLEANING 

Coil, the world's largest drapery and 
carpet cleaner, will restore your drapes 
to their original beauty. 


CARPET CLEANING 

Coit's exclusive Electro-Jet® carpet 
cleaning restores pile beauty and re¬ 
moves deep-down destructive GRIT 


UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 

Experienced Coit experts come to your 
home and clean your furniture without 
fuss or bother. * 


VICTORIA 

LANGFORD 

SIDNEY 

Bumsid* Rd* 

386-6701 

Goldstream Ave. 

478-6421 

B«acon Ave. 

656-5142 



COIT 


WORLD'S LARGEST DRAPERY 
AND CARPET CLEANERS 


i C0I1 drapery, carpet and upholstery cleaning, 


ONE SALE TILL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23RD 
WHILE QUANTITIES LAST 



Work Wear Bargains 
Engineered for Savings 
at the Bargain Store* 


a n 


♦ THE BARGAIN STORE IS: 

First quality merchandise at competively low prices 

Clearly marked factory imperfect merchandise where the mark or flaw will not 
interfere with the wearability or durability of the garment 
Desireable factory clearouts priced to give you best value 


DOESKIN SHIRTS 

Soft, thick and 
warm in 100% cot 1 
ton. Choose from 
assorted bright 
checks. Sizes 15 to 

17>/2. 

WORK JACKETS 

Easy care poly- 
ester/cotton jackets 
with zipper front. In 
spruce, olive or 
navy. Sizes S.M.L. 

XL. 

BLUE JEANS 

Heavy duty pre¬ 
washed denim jeans 
by famous makers. 
Assorted styles. Ir¬ 
regulars. Assorted 
waist sizes. 

SALE- 6.66 

SALE. . 11.88 

SALE 14.99 

WORK SHIRTS 

In hardwearing. 

WORK SHIRT OR 
PANT Buy them 

WORK SETS 

In permanent press 
poiyester/cotton. 
Olive, spruce or 
navy. Shirts 14Vi 

SALE 7.99 

Pants 30 to 44 

easy care polyester/ 
cotton blend. With 
snap button front.* 

Sizes 14'/2 to 17. 

both and make up a 
hard wearing set, in 
durable cotton. 
Green only. Shirts 
sizes 15 to 17; Pant 
sizes 32 to 40. 

SALE, 8.99 

Iac e h_. 4.99 

SALE 8.99 

DENIM COVER¬ 
ALLS Sturdy work- 
wear in blue denim 
or striped cotton 
with zipper front. 

Full cut for comfort. 

Sizes 36 to 46. 

COVERALLS 

Easy to pop on or 
off with zipper front. 

In polyester/cotton. 

Olive or spruce. 

Sizes 36 to 46. 

BIB OVERALLS 

We have 2 styles to 
choose from: zip- 
pered, striped over¬ 
alls or carpenter 
overalls. Sizes 36 to 
46. 

SALE 9.99 

SALE 17.88 

SALE 8.99 




SHOP COATS 

Protect your good 
clothing with these 
lightweight, button 
front shop coats. 
Assorted colors. 

Sizes 36 to 46. 

SALE_ 8.22 

WORK SOCKS 

Soft, warm and 
comfortable to 
wear. With reinforc¬ 
ed heel and toe. 

Grey only. One size 

11. 

SALE 1.22 

WORK BOOTS 

8” oil grain uppers 
with side patches 
and shawl tongue. 
Style 1: safety toe, 
steel plate and neo¬ 
prene soles. Style 2: 
safety toe and lug 

tSk 42.99 


Ulovdmdj bargain 





LOCATED AT: DOWNTOWN (VANCOUVER), NEW WESTMINSTER, 
GUILDFORD. LANSDOWNE, SEVENOAKS. COQUITLAM AND VICTORIA 

Personal Shopping Only • No C.O.D.’s, phone or mall orders • No deliveries 






































































»».«/»«■*•'» W*V«V 


THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF 





FOOD FLOORS 


BRINGS YOU FLAVOURS OF MEXICO 


Grade Canada No.1 

Tomatoes 

» 33 * 


Green 
Peppers 

excellent stuffed, 

15 * 


each 


Grade Canada No. 1 


Cucumbers 

white spine, 

29 * 


each 


Mexican 


Eggplant 


each 33* 


Zucchini Squash 

49* 


lb. 


Cherry Tomatoes 


ib 79* 


Acorn Squash 

AQ* 

excellent when baked.lb. *03 

Hot Peppers 

ib. 99* 


Freshly Ground 

Ground 

Beef 

medium quality, 

1 79 



Savour the flavour of zesty 
Mexican style foods at 
Woodward’s this week. 
You will find some attrac¬ 
tive buys on food that will 
add spice to your menu 
and some sun-drenched 
Mexican produce. Visit the 
special section and de¬ 
monstrations Feb.18 to 23 


Lawry’s 

Taco Trio 


205 9 pkt. 


|55 


Taco Sauce 

250 ml 89* 


Sauce Mixes 

Taco Jo«, Enchilada, Mexican Rice 
Spanish Rice 

2 ,o, 85* 


pkt. 



CHILES RELLENOS CON QUESO 




*< 


4 to 6 ounces sharp 
natural Cheddar cheese, 
shredded (1 to 
1 Vi cups) 

3 tablespoons all¬ 
purpose flour 


m 


3 fresh long green hot 
peppers or canned green 
peeled chiles 
All-purpose flour 
6 egg whites 
Dash salt 
6 egg yolks 

Cut peppers or canned chiles In half crosswise. (To prepare 
fresh peppers, place on broiler pan; broil 4 inches from heat 
just till skins blister. Cool slightly. Peel and carefully remove 
the stems and seeds.) Stuff each pepper or chile half with 
cheese; roll in flour. Beat egg whites till stiff, but not dry. Add 3 
tablespoons flour and the salt to yolks; beat till thick and 
lemon-colored; fold into whites. 

For each Chile Relleno, spoon a mound (about Vi cup) of egg 
batter into shallow hot fat (375°); spread batter into a circle. 
As batter begins to set, gently top each mound with a 
cheese-stuffed pepper. Cover with more batter. Continue 
cooking till underside is browned. Turn carefully and brown 
second side; drain on absorbent paper. Serve at once. 
Serves 6. 


Old El Paso 

Taco 

Shells 


140 g pkt. 


85 


Primo’s 


Masa Hanna 
Flour 
199 


2 kg bag 


Lawry’s 


35 g pkt. 


Taco . 

Seasoning 

mix, 

2..,69* 


• Lswrys Tostada or 

Taco Shells 


10-pack 


99* 


Old El Paso 


Tortillas 


1 l-o*. tin 


l 59 


Ortega 


whole green.* .. 4-oz. tin 

La Victoria 

Salsa Brava 


79* 


hot sauce.7-fl.-ex. jar 

Old El Paso 

Taco~Sauce 

hot or mild,.8-11.-ox. ja 


99< 


IS 


El Molino 


Refried Beans 

I 9 tin 69 ? 


454 < 


C.H.B. 


Garbanzo Beans 

75* 


14-ox. tin 


Old El Paso 


Mexe-Beans 

with chili sauce.I4-fl.-oz. tin 


85* 


Primo 

i Corn Chips 

5-os. pkt. 39* 

Old El Paso 

Old El Paso 

Nachips 

119 

9-oz. pkt. A 

El Molino Corn 

Tortillas 

frozen.6-pack 6 9 

wodiMi4s 

Taco Dinner 

009 

290 9 

El Molino 

Sopaipilla 

mix.12-oz. pkt. 99* 

• 

Lawry's 

Chili Seasoning 

mix.3 7/ 16-o*. pkt. 79* 

HAS IT ALL! 

Personal Shopping 

We reserve the right to limit quantities. 

THE BIGGEST SELECTION 

...THE HIGHEST QUALITY 


1 






























































30 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17. 1980 


WOODWARD’S GREAT ONE PRICE SALE DAY 
OFTEN COPIED - NEVER EQUALED 

For more than 80 years Woodward’s have helped hundreds of thousands of Western Canadian families make their shopping dollars 
stretch as far as possible with special sales like our famous 1.49 days. Another way in which we are trying to do our best for you. 


INFANTS' WEAR 


and colors. Size 12-24 . each 1.49 

INFANTS' PLASTIC PANTS — As¬ 
sorted colors. Sizes newborn to XL. 4 * at% 

..!.. 4 tar 1.49 

INFANTS' BOXED SLIPPERS — Blue, . 4A 
pink, white or red. Sizes S.M.L. each 1.49 


CHILDREN S WEAR 


T-SHIRTS — Assorted styles and colors. « 4A 

Sizes 2-«X.each 1.48 

BRIEFS — 100% cotton. Girls' sizes A 4 4A 

2-3X. £ tar 1.49 

BRIEFS — Assorted styles and A 4 4A 

colors. Sizes 4-AX. I tar 1.45! 

BIKINIS — Assorted colors. Sizes 2 w ] 49 

BOYS' SOCKS — White, navy, n 4 4A 
i camel or brown. Sizes . £ tar 1.49 

mm 

FANCY KNEE HI'S— ... 2 tar 149 

PANTY HOSE Regular or all A . 

sheer. £ tar 1.49 

STOCKINGS— . 2 - 1.49 

SUPPORT PANTYHOSE— .pair 1.49 

KNEE HI'S— . 2tar1.49 

UNPANTY PANTYHOSE — . 2 - 1.49 

GOLF SOCKS — Pom-pom trim ....pair U9 

SPORT SOCKS — Cushion sole .pair 149 

HAIR COMBS — Metal, assorted. . each 149 
HAIR COMBS — Metal, assorted . 2 hi 1.49* 

FRENCH COMBS— . 2 - 1.49 

HAIR COMBS — Plastic, assorted. 3 - 149 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS—Assort-q , 

ed . 4 hr 1.49 


FASHION ACCESSORIES 


GIRLS' FASHIONS 


BRIEFS — Assorted styles and * . 

colors. Sizes 8-14. 2 hr 1.49 

KNEE HI'S — White, navy, bone or « . Jn 

blue. Sizes 6-11. 2 hr 1.49 

BELTS — Assorted styles. Sizes 4-6X and . 

7-14.each 1.49 

JEWELLERY — Assorted styles each 149 


LINENS AND DOMESTICS 


PLACEMATS — Printed vinyl. 2 tar 1.49 

TEA TOWELS — Prlnted/waffld .>• - -q 

weaves.Ater I.49 

TEA TOWELS — Cotton stripe. 3-1.49 

OVEN MITTS — Puppet style each 1.49 

WASHCLOTHS — Checked t 4A 

Pkt. of 7.each 1.49 

DISH CLOTHS —Wattle weave. 4 4A 

Pkt. of 3.each 1.49 

DISH CLOTHS — Striped. \ ia 

Pkt. of 5.each 1.49 

DISH CLOTHS — Waffle weave or basket 4 4A 
weave. Pkt. of 4.each 1.49 

DISH CLOTHS — Striped. « 

Pkt. of A.each 1.43 

DUSTERS — Checked yellow 1 . A 

Pkt. of 3.each 1.49 

■ 

MULESLIPPERS— .:.. each 149 


CRAFTLAND 


BOYS' WEAR 


ACADIA 3-PLY FINGERING — 3 tar 149 

AURORA 4 PLY FINGERING - . 3 hr 149 
CRAFT YARN — 50 gram ball, A * » Q 
multi purpose. £ tar 1.49 

FOAM CHIPS — 700 gram ball. each 149 


BOYS' BRIEFS — 100% cotton, 
S.M.L. 


each 149 

BOYS' VESTS — 100% cotton .each 149 

BOYS' CREW SOCKS — Assorted colors. . 
Sizes 9-11 . 


,149 


APPLIANCE ACCESSORIES 


ALPHABET ORGANIZER FOR A 4 4A 

TRANSONIC BLANK CASSETTE 4 4A 
TAPES— .each 1.49 

TRANSONIC RECORD BRUSH — each 149 

K-TEL RECORD SELECTOR — each 149 

45 RPM RECORD RACK — each 149 
HEADPHONE EXTENSION C °RD^-^ -|^g 

VACUUM BAGS — To tit Hoover, Lewvt, < , Q 
Regina, Eureka. each, pkt. I.49 


CAMERAS 


PHOTO ALBUM — Canadian made, at- a M 
tractive cover. each 1.49 


S"x7" METAL PHOTO FRAME — each 


149 


LINGERIE 


BRIEFS —Assorted colors. Slzes.S.M.L. 1 > A 

XL.each I.43 


8"Xl0" METAL 1 4A 

PHOTO FRAME — .each 1.49 

G.E. MAGICUBES — Camera flash- 4 . A 
cubes. Pkt. of 3. each 1.49 

PLASTIC SLIDE TRAYS — 40 ca A - - A 

MALLORY DURACELL AA 0 4 4A 

UNIVERSALPHOTO ALBUM — Will ac 
cept refill pages for a variety of photo 4 . A 

PHOTO ALBUM REFILL PAGES 

— To fit universal photo album 

or any standard size 3-ring binder. c i 4ft 

Assorted styles to choose from D mp> 1.49 


MEN'S FURNISHINGS 


WOODWARD'S BRIEFS - 100% cotton, - 4A 
white and assorted colors. each 1.49 

HANDKERCHIEFS—100%cotton, 3 per - 4A 
pack . each 1.49 

CUSHION SOLE SPORT SOCKS — As- 4 4A 

sorted colors, stretch size 10 - 12 . each 1.49 

WOOL/NYLON DRESS SOCKS — As- 1 4A 

sorted colors., stretch size 10 - 12 . ... each 1.49 

ORLON/NYLON DRESS SOCKS — A*■ 4 4A 

sorted colors, stretch size 10 - 12 . ... each 1.49 

7 STAR WORK SOCKS — Assorted - 4A 
colors, size 11 only.each 1.49 

*5 SHORTS — Polyester/cotton, 4 .. 
assorted colors, S.M.L. each 149 


HOME ACCESSORIES 


ASSORTED SHADES — Various styles 4 4A 

and colors to choose from. each 1.49 

CHANDELIER BULBS — Decora- 4 4 4A 

five bulbs in 25, 40, 60 watt. 4 tar 149 

9"xl2" MIRROR— . 

each 149 

ASSORTED PICTURES— . 

2-1.49 

S"x5" PICTURE — Assorfed 
styles . 


ASSORTED PICTURES — 

framed with various subjects. 

Elegantly 4 4A 

each 1.49 


BIKINIS — Assorted colors. 
Sizes S.M.L. 


each 149 

HIPHUGGERS — Assorted colors. Sizes « 4A 
•S.M.L.each 1.49 


LADIES' SHOES 


NOTIONS 


COUNTESS SEWING BOX — Accordion 
style sturdy plastic.each 


DRAPERIES 


FOAM CUSHION FORM — Round or 4 4A 

square.each 1.49 

SHEER FABRICS — Printed or plain 4 4A 

polyester, washable, 90 cm.each 1.49 

DRAPERY LINING — White or Ivory, 4 4A 

cotton/polyester, 90 cm.each 1.49 

ASSORTED FABRICS — Plains or print- 1 4Q 
ed, various textures, 90 cm.each 1.49 


ON SALE WHILE QUANTITIES LAST 


WornkMuk 




WE RESERVE 
THE RIGHT 
TO LIMIT 
QUANTITIES 


I 


CHINA & GIFTWARE 


GLASSES — Choose hi-ball. old fa . , 0 
shioned or luice, set of 4.each 1.13 

DURALEX BOWLS — Set Of 4. each 1.49 

STEMWARE — Assorted sizes each 149 

TEAPOTS - . each 149 

DINNERWARE — Choose dinner plate, * 
cup and saucer, soup plate each 1.43 

BREAD AND BUTTER PLATE OR n * 4A 

FRUIT DISH - . £ tar 1.49 

DRIED FLOWER BOUQUETS — Uva -a mq 
grass, pampas grass .,...each I >19 

ASSORTED HOT PADS — .. 3 tar 149 

CANDLES — Choose pillar or box of 12 4 4A 

tapers. each 1.49 

WOVENWOOD 10" SALAD BOWL WITH 4 4A 

SERVERS— .set 1.49 

ONION SOUP BOWL « 4A 

WITH LID— .each I>19 

SQUARE WOVENWOOD 4 4A 

NUT SET— .each 1.49 

WOODEN MUG TREE — Holds 4 mugs. « . Q 
.each 1.43 


HOUSEWARES 


PLASTIC WARE — Choose waste basket, 
sauare dish pan, dish drainer and trav, 
utility tub, pail, tote box, laundry basket, 4 4Q 
3-piece covered bowl set.each 1.49 

CLEANING AIDS —Choose sponge 1 4A 

pack .....each I >19 

BAKER'S SECRET « 4A 

BAKEWARE— .each 1.49 

LIGHT GLOBES— . 6 tar 149 

PAD AND COVER— .each 149 

COOKING AIDS — Choose oven mitts, 
hand grip opener, 4 piece steak knife set, 

3-plece kitchen knife set, egg 4 4A 

LITTLE GOLDEN BOOKS — As- 4 4 4A 

sorted children's stories. 4 tar I>19 

JUMBO COLORING BOOKS WITH 4 4A 
CRAYONS — 3 large color books, each 1.49 
HARTZ CAT LITTER — 10-lbs. cat litter.- - A 

.each 149 

FRISBEE — Backyard or beach fun. 4 4A 

.each 1.49 


FLOOR COVERINGS 


PLASTIC RUG PROTECTOR — Clear 4 4A 
pleated. Approx. 27" wide, 3 feet. . each 1.49 
VELVET PILE SCATTER MAT — Avail¬ 
able in blue or black. Approx. 4 4A 

SAMPLE MATS — Assorted colors and 4 4A 

styles. Approx. 28"x27" .each 1J49 

DOUBLE FACE TAPE — l’A" x A - 4A 

15'per roll . 2 r* 1.49 


STATIONERY 


WOODWARD'S SCHOOL SUP 
PLIES — Choose from looseleaf fill¬ 
er paper, metric rule or plain, as¬ 
signment covers, yellow second 4 4 4A 

sheets, typing bond. . £ tar I >19 

H.B. PENCILS —Package of 12. .. 2-149 
COLORED PENCIL PACK — 18 in vinyl 4 4A 
pouch.each 1.43 

STICKPENS —Package of 9. . 2-149 

FLO MARKERS — Package of 20 fine- 4 4A 

line markers.each 1.49 

WRITING PADS — Extra large A . 4A 

BLUE LINED ENVELOPES — 0 1 4A 

Your choice of No. 8 or No. 10. £ tar 1.49 

SCOTCH TAPE — Handy dispenser 4 « 4A 

roll W'xlOlO".4 tar 1.49 

PHOTO ALBUM — Canadian made, 5 4 4A 

pages.each 1.49 

PHOTO ALBUM REFILLS — 4 A 1 JA 

pages per pack. £ tar 1.49 

LUNCHEON NAPKINS — Every- A . 4A 

day designs. £ far I >19 

BOXED STATIONERY — Assorted de 1 4A 

signs.each I >19 

PLASTIC FILE FOLDERS — Package of 4 4A 

12 .each 1 >19 

MEMO BOARD — Handy hang up memo 4 4A 

with pen.each I >19 

PLAYING CARDS — Single deck in plas- 4 4A 

tic box.each 1.49 

GIFTWRAP FOLDS — Assorted c 1 
everyday designs....3 tar I >19 

SKI TOQUE- .each 149 

ADIDAS SPORT SOCKS — White only. 4 4A 

.pair 1.49 

DART SET — Set of 3 darts.each 149 

EVEREADY ALKALINE BAT- 4 

TERIES — AA size., . 2-149 

WOODWARD'S D SIZE BAT e ... 

POCKET FLASHLIGHT —Compact, dls-. .. 
posable.each 1.49 

EVfeREADY FLASHLIGHT — For home . .. 
or car use. .. each 1.49 

TENNIS BALLS — Yellow. .. 3-149 

MINI-RUCK SACK — Compact, light- . 

weight.each 1.49 

CAMPER'S PUMP — with extension . .. 
hose.each I .49 

2-PLAYER BADMINTON SET — . each 149 

BASEBALL OR SOFTBALL — each 149 

’HOCKEY TAPE— ..each 149 

BIKE ACCESSORIES — Water bottle, 
trike horn, reflector or plastic basket. . .. 
.your choice 1.49 


DRUGS & COSMETICS 


WOODWARD'S HEALTH AND 
BEAUTY AIDS — Assorted sham 
poos and bath oils and milk baths, 

900 ml; baby shampoo, 450 ml; rub 

ber gloves and toothpaste, 100 ml; A . 4A 

mix or mat. L far I >19 

WOODWARD'S OWN — Skin Care Lo¬ 
tion, 500 ml. Mouthwash, 900 ml, Baby 
Powder, Wheatgerm, Oil Shampoo or 
Conditioner, 450 ml. Balsam Shampoo or * 4A 
Conditioner, 500 ml.each 1.49 

ARRID ROLL ON —25 ml; Freshex 0 1 4A 

Solid Room Deodorants . £ far I>19 

WILKINSON STAINLESS BLADES 

— 5's; Schick Blades, 5's; Allenbury « . iA 

ROSE MILK LOTION — Bonus size, 
Corlciden 60's; Silkience Hair Condi- « 4A 
tioner, 200 ml; ScotchGuard, 8-oz. each 1^49 

KOTEX LIGHT DAYS — 30's, Johnson & 
Johnson Baby Powder, 14-oz., Ban Roll- « 

On, 2V2-OZ.each 149 

PEAR SOAP — 3's, Sottlque Beads, 16- 
oz.; ListerIne Toothpaste (3tiibes), John- « 4A 
son & Johnson Baby Lotion, 240 ml each I >19 

PEPSODENT TOOTHPASTE — 100 
ml, Polldent Tablets, 32, Efferdent 
tablets, 32s, Efferdent Denture 
Cream, 50 ml, Vicks Multi-pack 
Cough Candies, Light and Fresh 
Hair Conditioners, 225 ml. Your A . . A 

BODY ON TAP SHAMPOO — 225 ml. The 
Only Solution, 8 oz.. The Only Shampoo, « 4A 
16 oz.each 1.49 

WINDSHIELD WASHER SOLVENT 
AND ANTIFREEZE —Good to minus * 4A 

ZIP WASH 4 WAX — Adds turtle wax as + ^ 
It washes.each 1.49 

ARMORALL — Protects rubber, vinyl « 4A 
and leather, 4 oz.each 1.49 

THUNDER OUT — Heat treated granu¬ 
lar clay for traction in winter, 4.54 Kg. « 4A 

.each 1.49 


AUTOMOTIVE 


CANDY 


SMILES 'N CHUCKLES PEPPER- * « 4A 

MINT PATTIES — 100 g .0 tar 1.49 

FOLEYS MIDNIGHT MINTS — 200^. | jq 

TOOTSIE SUPER POPS — 12 pkt. 3-149 

PAULINE JOHNSON SNOWBALLS — < 4A 

300 g.each 149 


PAINT & HARDWARE 


GARDEN GLOVES — To protect your j 4A 

hands.each 1.49 

HAND GARDEN TOOLS — Your choice. < 4A 
.each 1^9 

10" FLOWER POT — .each 1.49 

POTTING SOIL — all purpose, 4 4A 

sterilized .each 149 

HOSE NOZZLE— .each 149 

FISH FERTILIZER — Deodorized, will ^ 4A 

MOSS KILLER—Kills moss in lawns and « 4A 

on roofs, 1 Kg.each I >19 

FOAM PAINT BRUSH — Set of 3 dispos + .« 

able brushes.. t .each I >19 

CHILD SAFETY LATCH — For cabinet « 4A 

drawers and doors.each I >19 

DEFLECTORS (TWIN PACK) — Directs « JA 
air away from curtains into room. . each 1*49 
BAMBOO RAKES — To keep lawns neat * 4A 

and tidy.each I >19 

PLANT START KITS — Quality 

seeds, lust plant, water and watch ^ . 4A 

them grow.Otar 1.49 

PEATMOSS — 15 L .each 149 

VERMICULITE — 15 L .each 149 

PLANT FOOD — Keeps houseplants . 4A 

healthy and flourishing.each 1.49 

PAINT BRUSH — With nylon bristle, 

ROLLER AND TRAY SET — Makes fast t 4A 

work of household painting.each 1.49 

PLASTIC SHEETS — Protect floors 
during paint lobs, 8 'xlO'. . 4A 

Pack of 3 .each 1-49 

MASKING TAPE — Many uses for 0 t 4A 
home and workshop, %"x60 yards. L tar l«49 
EZ CORD HOLDER — Neatly holds 150' J JA 
of extension cord.each I >19 

SWEET PE Ail OR NASTURTIUMS a < iq 

— Jumbo^Ize packages.4 far 1^3 

BEGONIAS—3 tuber sand 3 peat pots per 1 mq 
package .each i.43 

SOW 'N GRO SEED BLOCKS — A - 4A 
Flowers and veaetables . £ hr 1.49 

CANADA SEED — Packages of 1A . 4A 
flowers and vegetables . IU tar 1.49 

GERANIUM GARDENS — 6 peat A . .a 

pads per package . £ tar I >*3 

POTTING SOIL — Sterilized, 17 I size 4 iA 

bag.each 1.49 


WE RESERVE THE RIGHT 
TO LIMIT QUANTITIES 
* Selling Inside the Produce Depart¬ 
ments at all stores. 


FOOD FLOOR 
GROCERY 


QUICK AS WINK CAKE OR c 4 4A 
MUFFIN MIX — 8 oz. pkt. Otar 1.49 
PEEK FREANS BISCUITS — 4 4 4A 

Assorted flavours, 150 g pkt. d tar I >19 
BUMBLE BEE CHUNK 
LIGHT BONITA TUNA — 6,5 A 4 4A 
oz. tin . £ tar 1.49 

SCOT TOWELS BIG ROLL — 2-149 

TETLEY TEA BAGS — pkt. of 72 4 4A 

.each 1.49 

POST HONEY COMB, 275 g 
pkt., SUGAR CRISP, 250 g pkt. n « 4A 
^JCflUILCh^J £ tar 1.49 

VANCOUVER FANCY FARMER 4 4A 
SAUSAGE —300 g each 1.49 

FROZEN B.C. GROWN GAME 
HENS — 20 oz. and over, grade 

UTILITY each 149 

FROZEN B.C. GROWN FRYER 
DRUMSTICKS — 1 lb., 4 oz. trav * 4A 

FLETCHERS BREAKFAST SAU « 4A * 

SAGE — 600 g trav .each 1.49 

FLETCHERS SLICED MOCK 4 4A 
CHICKEN LOAF —500 gpkg. each 1.49 
FLETCHERS BONELESS HAM 4 4A 
STEAKS — 2's or 4's, 250 g each 1.49 
WOODWARD'S SPECIAL CURE 
SIDE BACON —Sliced vacpak, 500 g 4 4A 

.each 1.49 

SNACKERY NEW SIZE FRESH 
PIZZAS — Salami or pepperoni, 575 4 4A 

g .each 1.49 

OLYMPIC BBQ FRANKS — 4 4 a 

WOODWARD'S OWN APPLE PIE 4 4A 

WOODWARD'S OWN CHOCOLATE 4 4A 

BROWNIES— .each 149 

WOODWARD'S OWN APPLE 4 4A 

SAUCE LOAF CAKE - .each 149 

WOODWARD'S OWN CREAM A 4 4A 

BUNS- . Otar 1.49 

MAX DONUTS — fancy cake donuts. 4 4A 
1 dozen .each 1.49 

GRADE CANADA FANCY 
APPLES—Red, Golden Dell -4 A 4 4A 

dous, Spartans .. 10 tar 1.49 

SUNKIST ARIZONA OR oa 4 4A 

ANGES — Medium size . 20 tar>149 

SALAD PACK — 1 lettuce, 1 white 
spine cucumber,celery, 1 radish 4 4A 

.All for 1.49 

GRADE CANADA NO. 1 TOMA 4 4A 
TOES — Imported . 48 oz basket for I>19 
CALIFORNIA PINK 14 4 4A 
GRAPEFRUIT —Sunkist ... 12 tar 149 
ALFALFA SPROUTS, 8 oz. pkg., 
and FRESH SPINACH — l(k>z. pkg. 4 4A 

.Alitor 1.49 


WOODWARD’S GREAT ONE PRICE SALE DAY - THE ORIGINAL 1.49 DAY 

Only First Quality Merchandise Sold in Woodward's Regular Departments . . . No Substandards or Factory Rejects. U sc Your Woodward's 

Personal Shopping Only . . . SORRY NO PHONE, C.O.D. OR DELIVERY SERVICE ON >1.49 MERCHANDISE. Account Card 


> 



































































































































































































































£l)e &tmfrag Colonist, 


ENTERTAINMENT 


Section Three/February 17, 1980/Page 31 



Pacific Opera enlists galaxy of stars- 

6 Experiment ’ in a grand style 


Most people think La Boheme is an opera. 

But to hear Pacific Opera's manager Cathrine Lowther 
and her board chairman George Hcffelfinger talk, it sounds 
as though Puccini’s masterpiece is some kind of theory 
to be tested. " 

Both Lowther, in a recent interview outside the opera's 
rehearsal hall at St. Jean Baptiste church hall, and 
later Heffelfingcr, referred to the production opening 
Thursday at the McPherson as an “experiment" for the 
young company. 

What’s being tested is whether the association can 
go from what were ostensibly community productions 
to at least a semi-professional status with paid lead sing¬ 
ers. And is there an audience willing to pay double the 
ticket price to offset the increased production costs? 

Already part of the answer is known. Even a week ago 
half the tickets were gone. 

"People were lapping up the $15 seats. They sold out 
first,” said Lowther, who has never had such an active 
box office so far ahead of opening night. 

Heffelfinger Is encouraged too by the early response. 

' It indicates to me that people are willing to pay the 
pjrlce this time to see what It docs for the quality,” he 
said. 

Neither Lowther nor Heffelfinger is too concerned that 
their experiment with grand opera with professional leads 
and the Victoria Symphony in the pit will break the young 


By JIM GIBSON 

Colonist reporter 


organization. It does mean, however, $40,000 against the 
usual $26,000 to $36,000 production costs. 

“There’s no more risk than normal,” insists Heffcl- 
finger, who said the additional expense has been bud¬ 
geted for through special grants, increased revenues 
and some cost-cutting. 

Milt Wright of Spectrum School represents one major 
saving for the association. As technical director, he not 
only designed the sets but his students have built them and 
form the stage crew as part of a school project. 

The move toward professionalism at this stage in the 
company’s development has a lot to do with the choice of 
La Boheme. The Puccini work seemed to be on every¬ 
one’s list of favorite operas, including symphony conduc¬ 
tor Paul Freeman’s. 

If the company was going to tackle "a name” grand 
opera as its audiences were now demanding, then it had 
to choose one that readily adapted to the McPherson’s 
comparatively small stage. Most others Just wouldn't 
have survived the limitations, says Freeman. 

If all the signs pointed to La Boheme as the choice, the 
company was faced with a major problem. There just 
wasn’t a tenor in the community who could carry the lead 


role of Rudolfo. It seemed time for the opera to make 
the jump and import professional singers. 

Heffelfinger says the change in the composition of 
the board from mostly singers to members with no 
stake in opening their mouths in song made the leap to 
semi-professionalism that much easier. 

Still, Freeman and his auditions committee had to go 
a little further than expected for their Rudolfo. The con¬ 
ductor finally found their tenor when Aaron Bergcll 
auditioned for him in New York. 

Bcrgell has sung the role in about 10 productions, start¬ 
ing with the Israeli National Opera. Vancouver’s Mar¬ 
garita Noye plays his Mimi., Seattle Odra's resident 
baritone, Donald Collins, is Marcello, and Karen Smith 
of Victoria, rounds out the lead roles as Musetta. 

Probably stage director Peter Mannering is the only 
one of the off-stage principals for whom the produc¬ 
tion isn’t an experiment along the road to a profes¬ 
sional company. As the founding artistic director of 
the Bastion Theatre, he did somewhat the same thing. 

He’s done operas before and isn’t bothered by the 
economic necessity that only allows the professionals to 
arrive for the last 10 days of rehearsals. 

“We did that In the early Bastion days too,” said Man¬ 
nering, explaining it is all done by working around the 
professional’s roles in early rehearsals and keeping the 
absent performers informed of what’s happening. 


The most disconcerting superstar there is 


By JOHN J. O’CONNOR 

Colonist—N.Y. Times Service 

NEW YORK — What is a 
Steve Martin? Pick one or 
more of the following: A 
comedy writer, a comic per¬ 
former. a recording star, a 
best-selling author, star of a 
hugely successful movie en¬ 
titled The Jerk or television 
superstar. 

Martin is, of course, all of 
these. He is, in fact, the most 
disconcerting show-business 
phenomenon of the last sev¬ 
eral years. 

Thursday on NBC-TV, 
Martin has his second televi¬ 
sion special. This one is 
called Comedy Is Not Pretty, 


■which happens to be the title 
of one of his record albums. 
His relationship with .televi¬ 
sion is not casual. He has 
evolved from an occasional 
guest star to periodic host of 
Saturday Night Live. He has 
even been interviewed, rath¬ 
er warily, by Barbara 
Walters. 

Much of the Martin act is 
visual. In repose, caught off¬ 
guard in a presumably natu¬ 
ral state, Martin could be 
mistaken for your average 
insurance salesman? He 
wears a suit and tie. His 
prematurely grey hair is 
neatly cut. He is harmlessly 
nice-looking. 

Then, without warning, he 


seems to develop a spastic 
tic. The facade of reasonab¬ 
leness dissolves into a mani¬ 
acal glare. A prop arrow 
suddenly seems to be pierc¬ 
ing his head. Mr. Average 
has suddenly been trans¬ 
formed into a wild and crazy 
guy. The secret Ingredient is 
incongruity. 

This new special begins 
with a producer (Peter 
Graves) commanding his 
idiot assistant Igor (Marty 
Allen) to fetch the show’s 
script. Igor, still resentful 
about a whipping, returns 
with the wrong material, 
something entitled Evil 
Deranged Script. The pro¬ 
ducer is puzzled but pro¬ 
ceeds with the show. 


In the first sketch, Martin 
is a cowboy, riding into town 
on a miniature pony that is 
no bigger than a great dane. 
At the local saloon, he falls in 
love with a singer wearing 
gqlden earrings. A fight 
breaks out, and Martin is 
forced to flee, this time on an 
elephant. He eventually re¬ 
turns, is shot and, in the 
death scene, receives a kiss 
from his beloved. All of this 
would be fairly standard 
stuff, naturally, except that 
all of the other roles, includ¬ 
ing that of the beloved 
wench, are played by chim¬ 
panzees. 

In other routines, Martin 
becomes a dry-cleaning pro¬ 


prietor who sounds like 
Lawrence Wclk (“Take the 
raiments and cast them upon 
the waters of the Maytag”), 
an Olympics contender who 
has perfected the "scream¬ 
ing like a maniac” dive and a 
critic of 60 Minutes who 
notes that Morley Safer is a 
Canadian and wonders “if 
we were to go to war with 
Canada, whose side would he 
fight on?” Next week: "Tom 
Snyder: Is he real, or is he 
wax?” 

As Socrates, drinking the 
hemlock that he didn’t real¬ 
ize was poisonous, Martin 
leaves the world with the 
message, “Come Mr. Tally 
man, tally me banana, day¬ 
light come and me wanna go 


A Belfry press release dated Feb. 4 made Its way 
to the Colonist last week officially announcing that 
Don Shipley was stepping down at the end of the 
season as artistic director "to pursue his career as a 
freelance director.” 

He will, so the release says, “continue a close liai¬ 
son with the theatre in the capacity of artistic advi¬ 
ser.” In the interim, the board is "undertaking an 
energetic search for a new artistic director, who will 
be appointed in time to plan the 1980-81 season.” 

Shipley's decision to leave should come as no real 
surprise. 

He did it once before with his ill-timed sabbatical 
for the 77-78 season for somewhat the same reasons. 
The Belfry and professional theatre in Victoria 
certainly needed his presence more then than they 
may now. 

Shipley has made no secret that he wanted out 
after this season.. He hinted as much during an 
interview last fall and people close to The Bel¬ 
fry openly spoke of this as being Shipley’s last 
season. Everybody knew about it,-but no one would 
officially state it on the record. (He apparently only 
formally told his board at its last meeting.) 

Some even said that Shipley stood on the sidelines 
for The Belfry’s first three productions in order that 
his board could find a possible replacement among 
the three guest directors. It is about the best 
explanation as to why Shipley has yet to direct a play 
at his own theatre this season. After ail, until this 
season Shipley’s board just hasn’t been able to 
guarantee him finances for a set roster of plays to 
direct. This season it did, and Shipley has not done 
what he does best—direct plays for The Belfry—al¬ 
though he closes the season by staging Wings with 
Sylvia Sidney. 

Shipley has been the best thing to happen to 
professional theatre in Victoria since Peter Man¬ 
nering came over from Vancouver to start the 
Bastion. Above all else, he almost fanatically 
guarded his standards while possessing the knack of 
transferring them onto the stage. In the process, he 
has shown Victoria audiences what a difference a 
decisive and energetic director makes to theatre. 


1 


jim gibson 



backstage 


And it is to his credit that The Belfry is having its 
best season to date at the box office with productions 
whose scripts and directors Shipley at least chose. If 
he was once indlspensible, the box office now says 
otherwise. 

Still, at a personal level, it is difficult to under¬ 
stand how he can walk away from the theatre he 
founded at this crucial point in its development and 
his own. There is still much more for him to do 
in Victoria otherthan act in a consultory role forThe 
Belfry. 

It’s difficult not to construe his departure as a 
turning of his back on those people whose expecta¬ 
tions, hard work and sacrifice his presence en¬ 
sured. 

It’s doubtful that either Shipley or Victoria the¬ 
atre will ever duplicate that alchemy again. 

Chit-chat ... Sylvia Hosle has been given the 
Charlottetown Festival’s first show just for kids, 
and she’s picked Marge Adelberg’s musical Three 
Bears to stage. Husband Bill Hosie goes back again 
this summer as the host narrator for the festival’s 
Feux Follets. The whole family moves to P.E.I. 
near the end of May for the summer ... A letter 
from The Lord Chamberlain's Players Society—the 
people who want to give you a Stratford-on-the-Pat 
Bay in Saanich—comes with an envelope bearing 
the slogan "Shakespeare’s Playhouse Reborn.” The 
organization is going to have something to say at a 
news conference soon . . . Glynis Brownsey or Ley- 
shon, as she goes by on stage, had one of those 
breaks that actresses supposedly dream about. Ap¬ 
parently It was closer to a nightmare for the well- 
known Victoria personality now hiding out in Van¬ 


couver. She assisted director Roger Ilodgman with 
the Vancouver Playhouse’s current mainstage pro¬ 
duction Love for Love so, when the star, ailing 
Diana D'Acquila, couldn't go on recently, Hodgman 
gave her a call. As Brownsey had done the part 
before in workshop, she was the logical choice 
considering there wasn’t an understudy. She re¬ 
ferred to it all as “very exciting” if that's what an 
actress calls going on for two performance after a 
single run through . . The Belfry was having simi¬ 
lar problems last weekend when It had to can¬ 
cel a performance of Da because Peter Brocking- 
ton, one of the minor wonders of the production, took 
ill. The weekend before, a performance was briefly 
interrupted when someone with a few delusions 
barged in off the street. How come things like that 
only happen when the theatre has a hit? ... Belfry 
board chairman Paddy Stewart and charming wife 
Judy hosted a cast party Saturday night after the 
final performance of Da. Surely Stewart is some¬ 
what of a dream come true as a board chairman. He 
not only digs into his pocket and persuades his 
friends to do the same to keep The Belfry afloat 
during some recent tough times, but he’s actually 
been doing the renovations to the theatre’s women’s 
washroom. Another board member, architect John 
Keay, did the design. 

Datebook. . . The Victoria Symphony has' gui¬ 
tarist Uona Boyd as Its soloist for- concerts this 
afternoon and Monday night at the Royal. 

Kyle's Gallery opens its Second Annual European 
Masters Exhibition this afternoon. The collection of 
drawings, watercolors and prints by important 19th 
and 20th Century continental artists will be at the 
gallery until mid-March. 

Some of Victoria's top young musicians and 
singers (Walter Prossnitz, Miranda Wong, Allen 
. Resler and Ingrid Attrot) are in concert this after¬ 
noon at Craigdarroch. It’s a benefit to aid Vietnam¬ 
ese refugees. 

The mime troupe. Theatre Beyond Words, is at 
The Belfry Tuesday through Saturday nights. They 
were here last year and were a lot of fun. 



home." Visiting the land that 
time forgot, Martin can 
scarcely hide his amuse¬ 
ment at finding hippies 
wearing love beads and talk¬ 
ing about vibes and bum¬ 
mers. 

Underneath his special-lu¬ 
nacy surface, Martin can be 
startlingly cynical—and de- 
vastatingly funny. As a 
suave gigolo, for example, 
he is delighted to discover, 
when the waiter asks red or 
white, that wines come in 
colors. He is seen cheerfully 
ordering a bottle of beige or 
perhaps tweed. It’s a nifty 
sendup of the fashionable 
wine ritual. For the most 
part, Martin's incongruities 
are terribly effective. 


Anna Wyman ... sees her role as one of the crowd 


A dance about dancers 

Idea sprung 
out of bad 
rehearsals 

Directors usually depart once a show has opened. Dance 
company choreographers do the same thing, but Anna 
Wyman is the exception. 

The sole choreographer for .the Anna Wyman Dance 
Theatre has missed only one performance in the Vancou 
ver company’s nine-year history. 

When her dancers are on stage, as they are tonight at 
the McPherson, Wyman believes her place is in the 
theatre, watching, gauging reaction, and sometimes finding 
inspiration for new works. 

It's the only place for an artistic director to be. she 
insists. How can she deal with any problems if she 
only hears about them second-hand? 

And if a dance isn’t working for an audience, then 
Wyman knows it too. She would be the first to see if 
someone walked out of her performances. Nobody has 
yet. 

“So far I have been able to present evenings that people 
won't say 'I'm bored.’ ” 

And she does it less by razzmatazz than from avoiding the 
killing I'm-going-to-make-a-life-statement school of chore¬ 
ography. Some choreographers inevitably take their depres 
sions or whatever qn stage With them. 

"I don't want to get into that because nobody is really 
interested." 

Wyman maintains that she's able to stay fresh and 
out of choreographic corners because she enjoys life ("it’s 
important for choreographers to be outgoing") with a 
passion for more things than just dance. Invariably that’s 
where she finds the germ for ideas she takes back to her 
eight-dancer company. 

But not always. She opens tonight's performance with 
1 a new for Victoria work, Surya Savilar (only two of 
five dance programs arc repeats) that grew out of a 
bad day in the rehearsal hall. 

“There is something staring you in the face—why not 
do a dance about a dancer's day when he doesn't want to 
get up in the morning and it hurts to stretch . ..?’’ 

The music came a week later when she chanced to 
hear Keith Jarrett’s The Kohn Concert. 

"I said that’s me. His moods, his whole presenta¬ 
tion was exactly what I wanted.” - 

What also keeps Wyman fresh as a choreographer are 
her dancers. As the company grows technically so must 
her choreographic challenges to them. She also relies on 
them creatively. It’s their studio improvisation of her 
concepts that takes her choreography to its final stages. 

But if there is a distinctive Wyman style, the choreog 
rapher is at a loss to articulate it. 

Choreographically, she describes herself as “painting 
in space. 

“I deal a lot with space and lines." 

Nor does the physical nature of dance escape her 
concern. 

"I deal a lot with pure movement," she said, aware 
that even that isn’t an adequate explanation. 

“All my dancers take a ballet class every day and 
they take a class from me. 

“A ballet dancer always has his feet on the ground, 
where my dancer has to be able to turn himself inside 
out.” 

Wyman’s approach to dance hasn’t gone unnoticed. 
She regularly sells out her twice-a-season Vancouver 
runs. Eastern critics lay on the praise, as did those re¬ 
cently in her hometown of Graz', Austria, when the company 
tours, but perhaps more important to her is that everytime 
they play Williams Lake the audience keeps growing.— 
J.G. 


l 


► 


4 














































32 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 




632® 


THE BUTCHART GARDENS — Open year round at 9 
a m. Admission gate now closing 4:00 p.m. 

THE BUTCHART GARDENS* RESTAURANT — 
OPEN YEAR ROUND — Serving delectable Garden 
Lunches and scrumptious High Teas beside a crack¬ 
ling hearth in the relaxed atmosphere of the historic 
Butchart residence. Now open 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

COFFEE BAR SERVICE — Available 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

SEE HOW OUR SEEDS ARE PACKAGED — Hand 
packaging of seeds in the Gift Store is fascinating to 
watch. We have many specialty items found only in our 

store. 

35 ACRES OF GARDENS — An invigorating stroll 
through these majestically beautiful gardens, a spot of 
tea by our crackling hearth and seed packaging on 
display combine for a fine outing. 


STRATHCONA HOTEL — British Columbia’s largest 
night-life centre. 919 Douglas St, 383-7137. Featuring 
“THE OLD FORGE” Nightclub with live -music of 
"THE BROTHERS FORBES AND FRIENDS.” 3 Dis¬ 
cotheques — “THE STING,” “THE CUCKOO’S 
NEST A and “IVY’S” and a unique lounge called “BIG 
BAD JOHN’S” featuring Hillbilly atmosphere. Lun¬ 
cheon served daily in “THE STING” ana lunch and 
dinner served in tne “CUCKOO’S NEST” 

“Everybody knows who’s Number Ohe!” 


CENTURY INN — ENTERTAINMENT PLUS!! 
“DECA-DANCE DISCOTHEQUE*' — Elegance of the 
’30s, the energy of the ’80s, the first Disco of the new 
decade. "OUR PUB” presents the best exotic dancing 
in town dally noon to 6 followed by Disco Dancing ’til 
midnight. Century Inn. Pandora at Government on 
Centennial Square. 383-1151. 


STEWARTS — Nightly dining par excellence — Vic¬ 
toria’s best — Louise Rose at tne piano. 388-7021. 


KOSTAS — Authentic Greek dining. Live entertain¬ 
ment nightly. 384-4196. 


GRAYLINE SIGHTSEEING TOURS — Butchart Gar 
dens —includes afternoon tea — 1:30 daily. Grand City 
Drive — daily — 11:30 and 2 p.m. 388-5248. „ 


— r . 

POWERFUL BALLET FOR TWO 


TORONTO (CP) — Song of 
a Wayfarer, Maurice Be- 
jart's powerful modem pas 
de deux for two men, be¬ 
came part of the National 
Ballet of Canada's reper¬ 
toire Thursday night with 
strong performances by 
Frank Augustyn and Tomas 
Schramek. 


The short ballet is an emo¬ 
tional tour de force for the 
two male dancers bathed in 
white light on an otherwise 
dark and empty stage. 

Both men, but especially 
Augustyn, handled the roles 
with great control and won 
the approval of the audience 
at O'Keefe Centre. 

The piece takes it inspira¬ 
tion from the despairing 
mood of a song by Gustav 
Mahler, sung Thursday by 
baritone Gary Relyea. Es¬ 
sentially an exploration of 


human relationships, the 
ballet deals with need, sup¬ 
port, conflict and reconcilia¬ 
tion. 

Program notes say the 
Sorig of a Wayfarer is about 
a young man and another 
figure, variously described 
as his double, his conscience 
or his destiny, struggling to¬ 
gether before a final recon¬ 
ciliation. 

The piece was created by 
the Belgian choreographer 
for Rudolf Nureyev and 
Paolo Bortoluzzi, 



LIVE 4B 


AT 

LANGHAM 

LANSHAM COUfiT THEATRE 

presents 

Habeas Goppas 


by Alan Bennett 
Directed by: 
Tony Nicholson 


FEB. 21 
to 

MARCH 1 


Daily except Sunday 
8:15 P.M. 

PHONE ANYTIME 
FOR RESERVATIONS 
384-2142 

Pr ater f e rf by the 
Vidor id Theatre GuMd 

AT LAMOHAM 2-16 




WINNIPEG. SOLD OUT! 

TORONTO.SOLD OUT! 

MONTREAL. SOLD OUT! 

VICTORIA.RESERVE NOW! 


THEATRE BEYOND WORDS 

“Canada’s Finest Mime Troupe” 

—Toronto Star 



Superb Family Entertainment!!! 

at 

The Belfry Theatre 

(Gladstone at Fern wood) 

FEB. 19-24, 8 P.M. 
MATINEE FEB. 24, 2 P.M. 

Tickets at all usual outlets or 
Reservations — 385-6816 


ITALIAN DINNER SPECIAL 

Chicken Cacciatore and Lasagna 

399 


Garlic Bread, 

Choice of soup or salad 

Served from 4 p.m. Sunday and Monday 


“ EX™. 

Reservations, 386-5513 

ROYAL OLYMPIC HOTEL 

642 Johnson St. 


SUNDAY 

Public 

1 00- 4:30 p.rn 

Family Swim 

5:00- 6.30 p.m. 

Public 

7:00- 8:30 p.m. 

Adults 

8:30-10:30 p.m 

MONDAY 

■ Early Bird *-■ 

7:00-8:30 a m. ■ 

I Adult 

9 00-11:30a.m. 1 

1 Noon Swim 

11:30-1:30 p.m. 1 

I Adult 

1:30-330 p.m. 1 

1 Rolling Homo Swim 4 004.00 p.m. 1 

■ Public Swim 

• 7.30-9:00 p.m. I 

I Adult Swim 

9 00-11:00p.m.. 1 

TUESDAY 

1 Early Bird 

7:00-8:30 a.m. 1 

1 H'sewives Jamboree 9:30-11:30 a.m 1 

■ Noon Swim 

11:301:30 p.m. 1 

I ParenlandTot 

1 30-3 00 p m ■ 

I Nitty 60's 

1 303:00 p.m. 1 

1 Public 

3 005:00 p.m. 1 

I Public 

7 009:00 p.m. 1 

| Adults 

9:0011:00 p.m. | 

| WEDNESDAY | 

Early Bird 

7:008:30 a.m. 

Adults 

9 0011:30 a.m. 

Noon 

11 301:30 p.m. 

Put* Adult 

1 303:00p.m. 

Rolling Home 

4:004:00p.m, 

Famllv Swim 

. 4 308.00pm. 

Adults 

8:0011:00 p.m., 

ik._ ^ 


SWIMMING 


In person famous circumnavigators 


ROBIN LEE GRAHAM 

DOVE S TEENAGE WORLD CIRCUMNAVIGATOR - February 25,1980 



SPONSORED BY MARITIME MUSEUM 
TICKETS S5.00 

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MARITIME MUSEUM. SAIL TREND OAK BAY. SUNTIME YACHT SHOP SIDNEY 


SUNDAY BRUNCH 

the finest in town 

for 5“ 

12 years . 3“ per person 

EAT ALL YOLTCAN 



i Children under 

. 4 // /‘.' •: 12 vears. 

T< 


11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 
Make Reservations Today 

Shefwood cparkjlnn 

123 Gorge Road East 386-1422 


Mozart, 

Mingus 
and 

Mannheim Steamroller! 

A record shop for serious music lovers. 

Superb sound recordings from the world’s leading 
audiophile labels, and other selected albums lor 
people whose musical tastes are beyond the main 
stream. FANFARE is the only record shop of its 
kind: stocked with fascinating music and offering 
knowledgeable service to suit. Special orders 
welcome — and understood! 

FANFARE — the unique record store. 



cfflnfflR 


IMPORT RECORDS 
1530 Pandora Ave. Victoria B.C. 

At the Oak Bay Junction 
4,0, 592-5222 

• SATURDAY TO A** 


mm 


lower level Cedar Hill Mall 

y Shelbourae and Cedar Hill X Rd._Phone 477-7744 j 



LIMITED ENGAGEMENT! 

_ Evenings at 7:05, frOS p.m. 

GOLDEN ME S1.M 


WARNING: Some frightening 
- (B.C. Director) 






OAK DAY 


After the sensational 
return to the screen of 
JAWS...what could be 
more terrifying than 


"One of the moat aNunng and Slotting him* to come out of 

Hotywood in soma tome ft is certain to shock. 

—Rone Barrel—ABC TV 

Sun. 2:55, 4:35, 7:00, 9;10 Warning: Occasional nuotty. I 

Weekdays: 7:00, 9:10 suggestive sesnaa and | 


A FINE. FRIGHTENING 
FILM WITH HUMOUR, 
HORROR 4 STYLE." 
—NBC TV 



»T (English Subtitles) • 

i 1 Some Frightening Scenes (B.C. Director) 


EVENINGS AT 7:00 rod 900 P.M. 
MATINEE SUNDAY AT 2:15 P.M. 


toWpe cinema 


382-5922 — 806 DOUGLAS 
IN NOOTKA COURT MALL 


B.C. Director. 


Gigolo 


Sunday 1:30, 3:15, 5:00. 7:05. 9:05 
Weekdays — 7:05 and 9:05 







nm. 


JOHN ANNE 


0^Heip ison the way! 


LAST TIMES TONIGHT! 

Today Only at 7K)5, 9:00 p.m 
GOLDEN AGE SI .00 




t* 


i A comedy to steal your heart .... 

j Occasional coarse language arm swearing (B.C. Orrector) 


WINNER CANNES FILM FESTIVAL 

SE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST DON'T MISS IT'! — UVtC Martlet 
ITERLY ABSORBING WISE. FUNNY AND REFRESHINGLY MATURE — Nee 

rek 

They lived, died, laughed and loved 
behind a newsreel camera. 



I I II I A 


Quadra at HtNatda 382-3370 


NIGHTLY 7 & 9 


l/XKramcr -gg-A , 

SrA -e y V3» AWARDS! 

^■■Tvramer 


Starring: 

DUSTIN HOFFMAN 
MERYL STREEP 


OfifON I 


MATS. FRI. SAT., SUN. 
1:30, 3:20, 5:10 


NIGHTLY 
7:10, 9:10 





odioN 2 


ihicawwi»._ 

t&FO& 

AVCO EWBASHV PC'L/ttb N arnia 


AN ASTRAL FILMS RELEASE 

WARNING: 

Some Frightening end Violent Scenee (B.C. Director) 


. vim erarrr MAT $. FRI * SAT - NIGHTLY 

iwm 1:35. 3:2 °- 5:15 


7:10, 9:15 


WARNING Some 
Nudity. Frequent 


• A^l' 




NIGHTLY 7:15, 9:30 


COUNTiNC| house 1 


■ROAD AT BROUGHT on i**J«4 


w 


THE the BEST — ELECTRIC 

CT rr-TOTO HORSEMAN IS THE BEST 
EliEGTRIC AMERICAN ROMANTIC 

HORSEMAN comedy 

Stank* ROBERT REDFORD 
...- JANE FONDA 


WA IM S N O: Occaatonel Violence. (B.C. Director) 

NOW IN IT S 9 TH WEEK IN VICTORIA! 

P2HSH2SISS33 


BROAD AT BROUGHTON ItWtH 


NIGHTLY 6:50, 9:15 


STEVE TheJ eRK 
MARTIN 



c '*'»•r<u>»n>n(Mi 

— PLUS — 

ACADEMY AWARD 
WINNING SHORT 
• THE ABSENT MINDED WAITER" 
STARRING STEVE MARTIN 

MATS. SAT., SUN. 1:30, 3:30, 5:25 
, NIGHTLY 7:16, 9:20 


ROY SCHEIDER 


All that work 
All that glitter. 
All that piain. 
All that love 
All that crazy 
rhythm. 

All that jazz. 


•w, vtwciH'rfMcn acouAeencArtj maw 



ROY SCHEIDER BOB FOSSE 


vtCM oust wteu rr 

JESSK2IWMGE /4NNRENKIMG LEMND84VER CUFFG09VMN &BEN VEREEN 

ootC'OeonoKXAMw. Iiwoe KOOuceox <«W1WV txaoao Muac tunwoex a ccwcuctob 

GIUSEPPE ROTUNNO ALAN HEIM PHILIP ROSENBERG TONY WALTON RALPH BURNS 

J SSSSa KENNETH UTT&WOLFGANG GbATTES 

coto« exoe- hown*moa»c«it>e*xrM 


•«®sf~iH«iiiiii!irrafiiss[& 




MO ADMITYAMCt TO 


WARNING: Soma nude and auggeative acanea; 
acenea of aurgery (B.C. Director) 


U05 BROUGHTON 


ROYAL 


NEXT 

ATTRACTION 


X 


'u/’ 


r 























































































































































ENTERTAINMENT 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 33 


Lovable bear cuddly winner on wax 


Top 20 in Victoria 


There’s big appeal this week 
with a marmalade-loving 
bear who makes a new Caed¬ 
mon record a cuddly winner. 
Also on tap is Chicago, a 
been-around-for-a-long-time 
group which is making big 
waves with new and younger 
fans, and Gotham Flasher 
which makes a downhill 
journey with a two-record 
disco package. 

Michael Bond: Paddington 
Turns Detective 

Some years ago, in the 
darkest jungles of Peru, 
there was a small adven¬ 
turous bear who set off on 
a journey which ended at 
Paddington station in Lon¬ 
don. 

Complete with a pot of 
marmalade and a label 
around his neck saying 
“please look after this 
bear", he was found by the 
Brown family who, not sur¬ 
prisingly, named him Pad¬ 
dington. 

His story was told in Eng¬ 
land with tremendous suc¬ 
cess by Michael Bond who 
has written many children's 


plays for the BBC. Padding¬ 
ton has been a favorite of 
British children for a num¬ 
ber of years and eventually 
made the big step across the 
puddle to North America. 

Books and toy bears can be 
seen everywhere and now 
Caedmon records have pro¬ 
duced a delightful Padding¬ 
ton Bear record with four 
stories. They are read by the 
author and the music is com¬ 
posed and conducted by Don 
Heckman. 

The recording follows 
Paddington’s adventures 
through an auction sale, a 
catastrophic attempt at do- 
it-yourself, detecting, and 
dining out at a very .posh 
London restaurant. The lat¬ 
ter is far the best with Pad¬ 
dington ordering a marma- 
lade sandwich—-with 
custard—for dinner, getting 
his pickled onion lost in a 
saxophone player's instru¬ 
ment, and promptly pouring 
water over an omelette 
flambe. 

A walking disaster, Pad¬ 
dington produces many 
chuckles in a first class pre- 


McPHERSON 
8 P.M. PLAYHOUSE 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17th 


Ti’SArma 



| Bo x Office op#n Sun. 1 

Tickets $4.50. $6.00, $7 50 
Available at the McPherson. 
Hillside, Hatley Park Brandywine, 
Sidney Cards n Things and 
University Centre. 

This performance is one ot a series ot Canadian 
? , Q cultural events sponsored by IBM Canada Ltd. ^ 


McPherson Playhouse Foundation and 
University of Victoria present 

ELMER ISELER CONDUCTS 



THE 

ELMER ISELER SINGERS 

Canada's Finest Choir 

"CHORAL MUSIC OF HIGHEST PERFECTION" 

UVIC CENTRE AUDITORIUM 

March 22 at 8 p.m. 

Tickets $7.50, $6.50, $5.50 
McPherson Box Office (386-fl21), Hillside Mall, 

(JVIc Centre, llatley Park Brandywine, 

Cards N’ Things (Sidney) A 



PROUDLY PRESENTS 
THESE 

TWO SPECTACULAR 
CONCERTS! 


McPherson Playhouse 


ClK DIRECT FROM IRELAND! 

Chieftains 

THE GREATEST IRISH TRADITIONAL 
GROUP IN THE WORLD 

"ACOUSTICALLY IMPECCABLE... HAUNTING" 

March 24 at 7:00 p.m. 
Tickets $8.50, $7.50, $6.50 



CANADA’S HOTTEST FOLK BAND 

“A FULFILLING MUSICAL FEAST. BEAUTIFUL" 

Mar<3i 31 at 8:00 p.m. 
Tickets $6.50, $5.50, $4.50 


Tickets for both concerts,on sale at McPherson Box 
Office (386-6121), IJVic Centre, Hillside Mall, Hatley 
Park Brandywine, Cards N’ Things (Sidney) ai. 



Off the record 


sentation.—John Hogbin 

Rating:**** 

Gotham Flasher: Gotham 
Flasher 

Gothaih Flasher is touted 
as the first album package 
released in Canada with two 
12-inch disco discs. 

Frorp there, it’s downhill 
all tfie way. 

The four sides each carry 
one lengthy numbrt’ for a 
total of 35 minutes, 33 sec¬ 
onds of ear-thumping, body¬ 
shaking disco—a ripoff since 
one record will hold the total 
time without destroying 
sound quality. 

The album has a few re¬ 
deeming moments: Side 


four, a remake of the old 
standard Try a Little Tend¬ 
erness, is built on a slinky 
bass foundation, but has 
been rendered soulless be¬ 
cause it’s lost in the disco 
mix. 

I'm Never Gonna Leave 
You (New York), the side 
one offering, is about as pas¬ 
sionate as permafrost, giv¬ 
ing a geographic rundown of 
New York’s better-known 
districts. I’d rather buy a 
tour guide. 

The f'emaining two- 
pounders also evince the de¬ 
cline of discodom—both are. 
duds—Roger White 

Rating: * 


1 

Paddington 
sets out 
to find 
the big due 


Chicago: Chicago 

Highly-instrumented big- 
band rock with an impres¬ 
sive sound is the trademark 
of this long-evolving group, 
whpse latest effort is al¬ 
ready showing signs of sup¬ 
port from a new wave of 
younger fans. 

The group, now with CBS, 
has been around for 12 years 
and has a penchant for exu¬ 
berant music, if slightly 
fatuous lyrics can be dis¬ 
counted. 

Best cuts on this "high- 
rise'' album arc Street Play¬ 
er, first off on side one, 
and Must Have Been Crazy, 
written and sung by Donnie 


(Hot Licks) Dacus, a rela¬ 
tive newcomer, which 
reaches back earlier into the 
roots of rhythm and blues 
than Chicago is normally ac¬ 
customed to. 

On side one, Peter Cetera 
shows traces of the glory of 
If You Leave Me Now, their 
biggest hit, on the some¬ 
what maudlin Loser with a 
Broken Heart. 

Chicago's individual style 
has been copied and im¬ 
proved on by others over 
the years, but for fans of the 
jazz-rock fusion movement 
they're probably still aryong 
the foremost. Not for me, 
though. I prefer my rock 
served up simply.—Paul 
Bennett 
Rating:* • !4 

Off the Record’s five-bul- 
ict rating system provides a 
ready reference to the judg- 
menton individual albums. 

Here’s how the bullets are 
awarded: 

• •••• Outstanding 

• • • • Very good 

• •• Good 

• • Fair 

• Poor 



and 


*Together For the First Time’ 

Musical’Director: Jon Washburn 

Two Double Choir Motets by J. S. Bach 
& works by Kodaly, Britten, Durufle 

ST. ANDREW’S CATHEDRAL 

(Blanshard & View) 

SATURDAY, MARCH 1st—8 P.M. 

Tickets: Adults $4.25; OAP & Students $3.00 
Available at Iveafhill Gallery — 47 Bastion Square, 
The Tudor Sweet Shoppy—2228 Oak Bay Ave., 

and at the door. ji 

For information call 477 7759 or 385-27HH. 


THE 

VICTORIA 
SYMPHONY 

PAUL FREEMAN, MUSIC DIRECTOR 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 
2:30 P.M. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 
8:00 P.M. 

ROYAL THEATRE 

PAUL FREEMAN, Conductor V 
LIONA BOYD, Guitar 
PROGRAMME: 

Symphony No. 1 in G Major, Opus II, No. 1 . Saint Georges 

Concerto for Guitar ind Siring Orchestra in D Major . Vivaldi 

Adagio for Guitar and Strings . Albinoni 

Symphony No. 7 In A Major ..Beethoven 

TICKETS: 

$4.50, $6.50, $7.50 and $9.50 at McPherson Playhouse 
Theatre, Hillside Ticket Centre, Hatley Park Brandywine 
Store, Cards 'N Things (Sidney), and at the door 1 Hour 
prior to performance. 


KALEIDOSCOPE THEATRE PRESENTS 




ALL THIS AND WARM 
FRIENDLY SERVICE TOO! 

At Schoor’s you are our 
most important guest. 

We thank you. j 


OPEN: Wsd-Fri. 

S pjn. — closing 
ftL, Sam. 

11 JO am. — dosing 





About Free Lands 

Premiere performance of a documentary 
drama portraying Eastern European 
immigration to Western Canada. 
Saturday, February 23,7: JO P.M. 

Sunday, February 24, 3:00 P.M. 
Newcombe Auditorium 

B.C. Provincial Museum 

FREE ADMISSION 


A 

Selection 
of our most’' 
popular 


West Coast 
Salmon Steak 
(Poached or Grilled) 
Tartar sauce and 
Lemon butter 

Broiled Red Brand 
Sirloin Steak 

Sauteed Mushrooms 

Curried Shrimp 
on Steamed Rice 

Pure Indian Chutney 


J 


Menu 
Items at 
a special 
price of $7.95 


Prime Rib 
of Beef 

Oven Baked 

Chicken 
Cordon Bleu 

Stuffed with Ham and 
Cheese 

ALL DINNERS INCLUDE 
Chef's Green Salad, 
Stuffed Potato, Fresh 
Vegetable, Rolls and 
Butter 


This Week 

1. The Long Run 

2. I Don’t Like Mondays 

3. Romeo's Tune 

4. Sara 

5. Yes, I’m Ready 

6. September Morn 

7. Head Games 

8. Longer 

9. Last Train to London 

10. Rock With You 

11. This Is It v 


Last Week 
Eagles (3) 
Boom town Rats (1) 
Steve Forbert (6) 
Fleetwood Mac (2) 
Terl De Sarto and K.C. (5) 
Neil Diamond (9) 
Foreigner (4) 
Dan Fogelberg (13) 
E.L.O.(12) 
Michael Jackson (7) 
Kenny Loggins (11) 


—--- nvmir 

12. Don’t Do Me Like That Tom Petty/Heartbreakers (15) 


13. Don’t Ya Hide It 

14. An American Dream 

15. Jane 

16. Crazy Thing Called Love 

17. 99 

18. Coward of the County 

19. When I Wanted You 

20. Him 

(N) — denotes new entry 


Stonebolt (8) 
Dirt Band (17) 
Jefferson Starship (10) 
(jucen (18) 
Toto (19) 
Kenny Rogers (14) 
Barry Manilow (20) 
Rupert Holmes (N) 


Canada's top LPs 


This Week 

1. The Wall 

2. The Long Run 

3. In Through the Out Door 

4. Cornerstone 

5. Fine Art of Surfacing 

6. Best of, Vol II 

7. Damn the Torpedoes 

8. Kenny 

9. Reggata de Blanc 

10. Breakfast in America 

List compiled by CBC' 


Weeks in Top 40 
Pink Floyd (8) 
Eagles (18) 
Led Zeppelin (24) 
Styx (17) 
Boomtown Rats (12) 
Abba (9) 

Petty & Heartbreakers (12) 
Kenny Rogers (10) 
Police (13) 
Supertramp (46) 

s 90 Minutes with a Bullet 


/ / trnnmrr wl i n i s 

ONhHOmRGDM 

starring 

LALLY CADEAU & ROBIN WARD 



8:00 P.M. 

MAR. 2 A 5 2:00 P.M. 

at the McPherson playhouse 

TICKI-rn; AT McPherson Playhouse* box office. Hatley Park Brandy¬ 
wine, Hillside Mall Ticket Centre, Cards n Tilings (Sidney) 

Sponsored by AIR CANADA (J) 

and Laurel I\»int In tv, 

CAO* MOULS UMtUl) 

0C BASTION THEATRE COMPANY 


JOHN LEE HOOKER 

& BAND 



WITH SPECIAL GUEST 


WEDl& thur. 

FEB. 20 & 21 

TICKETS 

$h nn Adv.inti' S7 ,K ' Door 

AVAILABLE AT 

MIC HARD'S RECORDS A HARK) s 


> BASTION SQUARE PHONI . 


DOORS OPEN AT 8 00 P M 


Province of British Columbia 

Ministry of Provincial Socrutaiy 
find Govotnmttnt Stttviu;-. 


tfZ 


I ARI FP 


Keg 

PartyTimes 


(v 3vs] 


are 

GoodTimes! 


GET YOURS NOW! 
GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE! 

Pacific Opera with 
the 

Victoria Symphony Orchestra 

presents 

LM 80HEME 

PUCCINI'S GREAT DRAMATIC OPERA 
A Timeless Story of Passion and Beauty, Life and Death 
in MW-19th Century Paris 


Featured guest soloists from 
New York, Seattle, Vancouver 
with talented local 
performers 

Four grand performances 
February 21, 22, 23, 8.-00 p.m. 
February 24, 2.-00 p.m. 
thi McPherson playhouse 

Ticket*: 

$5.50, $7.50, $10.00 
$12.50 and $15.00 

Available at: 

The McPherson, 

Hillside Ticket Centre, 

Halley Park, 

Brandywine Store, 

Cards 'N Things (Sidney) 




There are dozens of good reasons 
for Keg parties. Here’s one!!! 

For each member of your party (any size) 
the Keg is offering $1.00 Off 
Sundays through Thursdays! 


This offer Is good for the purchase of entrees only. 
Otter valid to Thursday, February 28th, 1880. 


(One coupon per group) 




CUP AND BRING TO: 

THE KEG AT THE WINERY — 479-1691 
THE KEG AT THE HARBOUR — 3B6-7789 


























































































































34 THE COLONIST, Sun,, February 17, 1980 


ENTERTAINMENT 


Van Halen sells fast but no record 



Rock group FM at UVic on March 1 





For a touch of 
difference that 
counts call 
595-4632 
for Reservations 


By KING LEE 

The “Sold Out" sign 
should be hung out in the 
next three days for the 
March 19 appearance of rock 
group Van "Halen, but the 
less-than-lwo-wcek sellout 
won't be a Victoria record. 

Box office ticket demand 
for Van Halen has been 
booming since last Saturday 
and the 6,500 tickets should 
be gone soon, even at $8 a 
crack. 

Jack Morgan, director of 
recreation for the city, says 
the quickest sellout for a 


Sounds around 


rock group is a tossup be¬ 
tween Beach Boys, Bach- 
man-Turner Overdrive, and 
April Wine. 

The Beach Boys held the 
record since 1968, but the 
Sept. 1975, appearance by 
BTO and the May, 1976, April 
Wine show at the arena 
matched that performance. 

However, the Van Halen 
show might be the first time 


scalpers could operate in 
Victoria. 

WHEN POLYGRAM first 
announced that the Boom- 
town Rats were launching a 
Canadian tour, Victoria was 
booked for performances 
April 5 and 6 at the Univer¬ 
sity Centre Auditorium. 

Now, the final itinerary 


has come out and the group, 
whose / Don’t Like Mondays 
was a No. 1 hit on singles 
charts in North America, is 
set for only one show, on 
April 6, at Memorial Arena. 

The latest sheet shows the 
Rats open their tour March 
19 in London and head for 
Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, 
Kingston, Winnipeg, Cal¬ 
gary, and Edmonton before 
their Victoria date. They fin¬ 
ish off by hopping back to the 
B.C. Mainland for a Vancou¬ 
ver appearance. 


MY APOLOGIES for 

causing any confusion re¬ 
garding groups FM and 
XTC. 

Both are scheduled for the 
University Centre Audi¬ 


torium at the University of 
Victoria, but on, different 
nights. 

FM will be there on Satur 
day, March 1, and XTC will 
be the attraction the follow¬ 
ing night, Sunday, March 2. 


BRUNCH 


1501 HAULTAIN, VICTORIA, B.C- 

tim staff o« EAST GATE RESTAURANT 

(Malaysian & Indonesian Cuisine) 

*• wishes all patrons and friends a 
very Happy New Year ahd 

KONG HEE FATT CHOY 


We also take this opportunity 
to congratulate the 

| INTERNATIONAL TEA & BISCUIT CO. 

on their forthcoming opening 
5 - on Feb. 21st. 1980 

fcacarMWOJsawrawnswuawaivgiK 


r co. t 

—J 


Don Juan: 

Moliere’s 

anti-Christ 


ESQUIMALT 


PARKS & 
RECREATION 



SAILING 
LESSONS 

Springtime is Sailtime and here is your 
opportunity to learn to sail through the 
co-operation of Recreation: Oak Bay 
and Pacific Sailpowei 
Lesson sets begin on Saturday. March 
1st. with a total of four on-the-water 
216-3 hour lessons, for S85.00. Ctasses 
involve a maximum of four partici¬ 
pants. 

Set sail from the Oak Bay Marina 
and spend your Spring learning 
to sail. 

Interested? For further informa¬ 
tion, please dial: 


/ciilpouicf 


■99S-sunrr> 


OTTAWA (CP) — After -to 
years on stage as actor and 
director, Jean Gascon is 
havinganew love affair with 
his favorite playwright, Mo- 
liere, France's greatest 
writer of comedy. 

Wearing a black turtle¬ 
neck and his eyes flashing 
behind his steel-rimmed 
glasses, tlie most distiri 
guished of Canadian-born 
men of (he theatre thinks he 
has found a new long-hidden 
secret in Molfere's play Don 
Juan. 

The womanizing Don isn't 
just driven by the devil, he is 
the anti-Christ incarnate, 
Gascon thinks. That's the 
way he intends to- present 
Ray Jewers in the title role 
when the National Arts 
Centre theatre company 
stages the play next month. 

"The play is an enigma,” 



272 GORGE ROAD WEST 


M0N.-THURS. 
9 A.M.-9 P.M. 

SUNDAY 
9 A.M.-6 P.M. 


FRI., SAT. 

8 A.M.-9 P.M. 


PRICES EFFECTIVE 
SUN., MON. 
FEB. 17, 18 


We reserve the right to limit quantities while stocks last 



CANADA 6RADE A 

RIB STEAK 

lb. 

SIRLOIN or CLUB 

fSTEAK 

GR. A lb.. 

T-BONE 

STEAK 

GR. A lb. 


SWIFTS SLICED 

SIDE BACON 

1 lb. pkg. . 


FRESH BULK 

WIENERS 


OLYMPIC BONELESS 

i DINNER HAM 


2.59 

2.89 
33)9 

1“ 

89 * 

1.89 


1.00 

MCML TISSUES S/jf 


9 LIVES 
CAT FOOD A / 

6 - 02 . tins ."I / 

SCOTTIES 


200 s box 
KRAFT with cheese 

MACARONI 

DINNER 

225 g box . 

HERSHEY S INSTANT 

CHOCOLATE 

2-lb. tin. 

WASA RYE KING 

SWEDISH 
CRISP BREAD 

200 g to 250 g pkg. 

HEINZ 

TOMATO 

SOUP 

10-fl.-oz. tins. 


3 / 


.00 
1.99 
69 - 

5/1.00 


NABOB S REG. OR FINE 


GROUND COFFEE £239 


MALING SLICED 


TOTINO FROZEN i piA BLUEBONNET A 

PIZZA 10” 1.59 margarine 1.6fi 

13-02. ■ lw W 3-lb. pkg. IHWW 

McCAIN FROZEN Ml A A 

SUPERFRIES 79 

2-lb. bag. ■ W 

RUPERT GOLDEN BATTERED A Jfc Ak 

COD 1,(9 

SUNKIST I |1|1 

ORANGESHI >UU 

US. GROWN 

EMPEROR GRAPES 59* 

IMPORTED A f|| 

CUCUMBERS 2 49 


c 


MUSHROOMS (9 

1.49 

LYNN VALLEY JfcJfc 

PEARS 2/ 99 

14-fl.-oz. tins. Am / W W 

ROBIN HOOD Ak WM A 

UNBLEACHED "3 #1 
FLOUR Il 

10 kg bag .Wl ■ W 

CLOVERLEAF FLAKED A Al 

WHITE TUNA 1,9* 

6 V, 07 tin ..... | ■ 


V.I.P. 

FABRIC 

SOFTENER 

128-0.-02. jug . 


GREEN GIANT 


NIBLET 9 97* 
CORN S’iO / 


M.J.B. 


INSTANT 

COFFEE 



he said in an interview. “No¬ 
body knows it’s real mean¬ 
ing. 1 think it was written in 
anger against the church and 
the French establishment, 
after what they had done to 
his play Tartufte." 

Molicre, who was born in 
1622, six years after the 
death of Shakespeare, wrote 
a stinging attack on hypoc¬ 
risy in the play about the 
priest, Tartuffe, who worms 
his way into a rich man’s 
home and dupes him of his 
fortune. The church had the 
playsuprcssed. 

Mollerc then turned to an 
old Spanish legend for Don 
Juan, the play he titled Lc 
Festln de Pierre. The legend 
and Moliere’s play have, 
since then, been the basis for 
numerous stage works, in¬ 
cluding George Bernard 
Shaw's Don Juan in Hell 
scene in Man and Superman 
and Mozart's opera Don Gio¬ 
vanni. 

Gascon, former artistic 
director of the Stratford 
Festival and now director of 
theatre at the National Arts 
Centre, first played the Don 
in 1954 at the Theatre du 
Nouveau Monde, which he 
helped found in Montreal. 

lie secs the Don as a man 
with surpassing powers of 
evil, exemplified in his se¬ 
ductions, “probabTy the only 
really free man in the 
world” who thinks he can do 
whatever he likes, and who 
pits himself against the 
powers of good — and is 
destroyed. 


SPORTS CENTRE 

386-3261 

SKATING SCHEDULE 

SCHOOLS 
Wed. 3:30 to 5 P.M. 
PARENTS and TOTS 
Thure. 1:20 to 2:50 P.M. 
FAMILY 

Sat. 10:30 a m. to 12 noon 
PUBLIC 

Sun. 1:45 to 3:45 P.M. 
8:15 to 10 P.M. 


ESQUIMALT POOL 

386-8734 

SWIMMING SCHEDULE 

EARLY BIRD 
Mon. to Sat. 7 to 9 A.M. 
ADULTS 

Mon.-Fri. 72 to 1 P.M. 

Sat. 12:30 to 1:30 
TuM.-Thurs. 5 P.M. to 6 P.M. 
Mon.-Wed. 9 P.M. to 10:30 P.M. 
Tu«s., Thur*., Sat. 8:30 to 10 P.M. 
Sunday 8 to 10 P.M. 
PUBLIC 

Mon., Tum., Thurs. 7 to 0:30 P.M. 
fn. 7 to 10P.M. Sat. 1:30 to 4:30 P.M. 
Sal 6:30 to 8:30 Sun. 12:30 to 3:45 


FITNESS CENTRE NOW OPEN. 

COME OUT AND TRY THE UNIVERSAL GYM 


SKATING—SWIMMING—CURLING 


$ 5 95 


CHILDREN 

$3.50 


11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Over 20 Hot and Cold Dishes to Choose from 
Including Baked Ham "carved just the way you like 

A nifty* 

RESTAURANT W 

(fcilotui 


365-2441 


MOTOR INN 
2852 DOUGLAS 
“Meet your Friends Tonight at Amity's” 


u DINING 
LOUNGE 

On the waterfront with Victoria's most 
spectacular view of the Inner Harbour 
' Member of world famous Italian cuisine'' 

GOURMET MEALS 

WITH OUR DELICIOUS 
SALAD BAR 

• STEAKS •SEAFOOD 
I • WILD GAME •PASTA 
DISHES, TRY OUR HOME¬ 
MADE LASAGNA • VEAL 
DISHES • PICCATA AL 
MARSALA • SCALLOPPINE 
ALLA PARMIGIANA 


BUFFET LUNCH I 

Twit# Fn. 11to £m| 



RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED; 3854497 


111* WiMri Street at the toot of Yates. Open Daily 
trom S.JOp.m Lunch Tuet. to Frl. il Mlol M Extra 
Parking available on the waterfront 


• Charge* 

• Master Charge 
American Express 



VALENTINE SPECIAL 

SUNDAY, 
FEBRUARY 17th 



CHILDREN S MENU 
$3.50 

UNDER 10 YEARS 


THE WHOLE FAMILY 

6 95 


EACH 

ONLY 


825 BURDETT - 


FULL COURSE DINNER INCLUDES 

Our Special Salad 
RIBS or CHICKEN 
Vegetable — Choice of Potato 
French Garlic Bread 
Sherbet — Beverage 

CHERRY BANK HOTEL 385-5380 
































































































































































|K*° S 'SVl'*> Nl 


W*V9 

»c*«* * 


and write your own 
success story. 

LET'S TALK ABOUT IT! 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17. 19K0 35 


CITY OF VICTORIA 


ADVISORY 

PLANNING 

COMMISSION 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1980—7:30 p.m. 

An INFORMATION meeting of the Advisory Planning Commission will 
be held at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 19,1980, in the Anteroom 
to the Council Chambers at City Hall. This is an informal hearing 
before the Advisory Planning Commission. It is in addition to the 
formal statutory Public Hearing which will be held at a later date, if 
Council proceeds with a rezoning proposal. 

The meeting will be open to the public and any person, having an 
interest in land within a radius of one block of the site of the 
proposed rezoning, may make representation to the Advisory 
Planning Commission at the meeting. 

The following rezoning applications are included on the Agenda: 

605 ALPHA STREET — ISLAND FORKLIFT SALES LTD. (APC 
#1925) 

Rezoning ot 605 Alpha Street from "R-1B Single Family Dwelling District" to 
"M-1 Limited Light Industrial District" to permit servicing, wholesale and 
retail sales of forklift industrial machinery. 

1234 FORT STREET — K. & J. SCHMIDT (APC #1926) 

Rezonlng of 1234 Fort Street from "R-3(2) Multiple Dwelling District to "C-1 
Limited Commercial District" to permit one of the existing ground floor suites 
to be used as a retail store. 

122 MICHIGAN STREET_ 

VANCOUVER ISLAND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (APC #1927) 

Rezoning of 122 Michigan Street from "R-2 Two Family Dwelling District" to 
"R-K Medium Density Attached Dwelling District" to permit construction of 3 
townhouses. 

Further Inquiries should be directed to the 
Department of Community Development (Tel: 
385-5711, Local 360)'between the hours of 8:30 
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 


Kemfex 

EXTERIOR TEXTURED COATING 


KENITEX . . The miracle coating that eliminates paint¬ 
ing. Decorates and weatherproofs your home. Applied over 
many surfaces. Over 5 million applications worldwide 
since 1948. 

There are no substitutes. 

GUARANTEED 15 YEARS AGAINST PEELING, 
CHIPPING AND FLAKING. 

VICTORIA... 516 WILLIAM ST. 

CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 
24-HR PHONE SERVICE NANAIMO 

384-4148 722-2677 


GRANITE 




tUedtout/ 


772 GOLDSTREAM AVE., 
LANGFORD 


in the WESTBROOK! SHOPPING CENTRE 


The Corporation of the District of Saanich 


HERITAGE 
DAY 


The third Monday in February is Heri¬ 
tage Day in Canada. Due to the Federal 
Election on February 18, the Saanich 
Municipality is recognizing Heritage Day 
on Tuesday. February 19, with a display 
of historical photographs. A recognition 
ceremony will be held at 9:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. February 19, 1980. in the 
gymnasium of the Northridge Elemen¬ 
tary School. 4190 Carey Road, during 
the Council Meeting. Interested mem¬ 
bers of the public are invited to attend. 
Coffee will be served. 

M. B. COUVELIER 
' Mayor 


CAPITAL REGION 


Certification issue 


Canadian Pres* 

VANCOUVER (CP)—The Canada 
Labor Relations Board has dismissed an 
application by (he Regional Aviation Em¬ 
ployees Association to take over certifi¬ 
cation from the Teamsters Union Local 213 
to represent employees of Airwcst Air¬ 
lines. 

But the board also said Friday that a 
separate application for revocation of the 


Teamsters’ certificate was timely and or¬ 
dered a representation vote on or about 
March 15 to determine if the workers want 
to retain the union. 

The board further ruled that if the union 
is decertified, the employees will no longer 
be covered by a collective agreement. 

The board's decision said an unfair 
labor practice complaint by the union will 
be held in abeyance pending the represen¬ 
tation vote. 


Central figure 
in dirty tricks 
to be married 


Canadian Press' 


Ellen Mackay, a central 
figure in the Social Credit 
party’s dirty tricks affair, 
was to leave Victoria Satur¬ 
day for Florida, where she 
will be married to a Miami 
businessman this spring. 

Last fall, it was disclosed 
that she had told party work¬ 
ers in September, 1978, that 
it is “quite a bit safer than 
you might think" to write 
letters to newspapers and 
sign them with a phoney 
name. 

Following Attorney-Gen¬ 
eral Allan Williams' an¬ 
nouncement Thursday that 
Mackay will not face char¬ 
ges in connection with the 
dirty tricks affair, she said 
Friday she has decided not to 
take legal action against the 
Socreds for firing her from 
the caucus research depart¬ 
ment Dec. 4. 

Mackay, 26, said she will 
convert to Judaism, the faith 
of her fiance. 

She would not give his 
name. 

She also said she will look 


Mackay 

.. .off to Florida 


for a job in Miami when she 
becomes eligible to work in 
the U.S. 


SUCCESS STORY 


PRICES EFFECTIVE FEB. 17, IS, 19 

We reserve the right to limit quantities 

FRESH LEAN Jfcdfc 

GROUND 198 

BEEF ib ■ 

FLETCHER S PORK or COUNTRY J 1A 

sausage:::; J 19 

SWIFT PREMIUM GR. A FROZEN j . n 

DUCKS -1 39 

IMPERIAL 

MARG- 189 
ARINE 3.bs I 

teT uxe 099 

BAGS ms C 

PACIFIC POWDERED 

milk ... 7 79 

GLAD OUTSIDE J.. 

GARBAGE 129 

BAGS ..10s pfcg. I 

CARNATION HASH BROWN H 

POTATOES 79* 

MR. NOODLE INSTANT 

NOODLES a «. 5 I 00 

CHRISTIE . 

BITS & BITES *»,b., 79* 

TOTINO’S CRRRISPY FROZEN 4 co 

PIZZA D«iux, or Pepperoni.a 1 

TENDER - WT 

CELERY ...19* 

GREEN .to _ , 

CABBAGE , to 25* 

SEEDLESS ^ Jn 

GRAPES . I 49 


EVERYBODY’S TALKING 

GOLD 


This 11.47 acres has nearly everything but that. If 
you desire a gentleman's estate with beautiful views 
of the sea. Mt. Baker, woods and pastures; plus an 
adorable French provincial home of approximately 
4200 finished sq. ft. built in 1977 by Wheaton 
Construction featuring 4 bedrooms. 4 bathrooms, 
sauna, living room. 26x16 dining room. 13x12 den. 
rec. room, family room opening to pool and 
patio. Garden and pasture areas are easily main¬ 
tained with underground sprinklers. The 3-stall 
barn, tack room and outbuilding are in excellent 
condition. A riding ring??? Of course. Priced below 
replacement at $369,000. Excellent financing ob¬ 
tainable 


STEPHEN SALAGA 388-6275 Pager 663 

OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD. 

381-2233 2-1 


... it will work 
for you too. 

In excess of 83,000 
circulation. 

Place your ad in our 
next issue of 














































































































43. 


36 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


CANADA 


Levesque optimistic on referendum 


QUEBEC <CP) — Dis¬ 
missing the federal elec¬ 
tion as a “minor distrac¬ 


tion,” Quebec Premier 
Rene Levesque told a 
weekend meeting of the 


JAYKO HOLIDAYS 


OFFER AN EXHILARATING 
1 7-DAY ESCORTED TOUR TO 


FIJI and the COOK ISLANDS 


From March 27 to April 12 


★ AT THE LOWEST PRICE IN 
NORTH AMERICA ★ 

Can. $1589.00 ( of double 'j 

THE HOLIDAY OF A LIFETIME 

(Deadline Booking Feb. 20th) 


6669 EAST HASTINGS, BURNABY 

299-2024 299-2114 

Senior Citizens call 388-4268 


Parti Quebecois national 
council he was more and 
more confident of a 
referendum victory. 

“We are going to win it 
and we're going lo win it 
by a big margin," he said 
Saturday. 

Polls conducted in De¬ 
cember after the PQ tem¬ 
porarily banned public 
sector strikes and lost 
four byelections to 
Claude Ryan’s resurgent 
Liberals showed the PQ 
trailing. 



CRUISE ALASKA 


Aboard “Princess Patricia" 


BUT LEVESQUE said 
party fortunes were im¬ 
proving, citing a January 
poll which indicated 60 
per cent of Quebecers 
thought the question for 
rrext spring's so¬ 
vereignty-association 
referendum was honest. 

After the byelection 
losses, Levesque blamed 
the "social climate.” 
Now, he told the 400 dele¬ 
gates and observers, the 
climate was better be¬ 
cause most of the labor 
disputes involving 275,- 
000 public-sector em¬ 
ployees had been re¬ 
solved. 

The premier predicted 
that a strike by 13,000 
school support em¬ 
ployees that closed most 
Quebec schools would 
end before the weekend 
was oyer. 


2 SPECIAL GROUP 
DEPARTURES FROM VICTORIA 

★ JUNE 24-JULY 2 

★ AUG. 27-SEPT. 4 


895 


From, Cdn. 

Board your private coach in Victoria for trans¬ 
fers to Vancouver to join ship and experience an 
8 -day cruise of a lifetime through some of fhe 
wolrd's most spectacular scenery. PORTS OF 
CALL: Ketchikan, Wrangell, Glacier Bay, Tarr 
and Hopkins Inlets, Skagway, Juneau, Tracy 
Arm, Prince Rupert, Alert Bay, Vancouver. 


EARLY BOOKING REQUIRED-PHONE 

NOW FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION 



BUDGET TRAVEL LTD. 

1066 DOUGLAS ST. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 
384-7121 



THRIFTY FOODS 


.1590 FAIRFIELD RD. 

. PLENTY OF FREE PARKING 


Pric*< tffMthra Sml Ftk. 17 , Mm. FA. It, Tim. Fak. It 


DOUBLE SMOKED 


PICNIC SHOULDERS 79 ' 

WHOLE OR SHANK PORTION . lb. ■ W 


1 “FRESH, LEAN, BONELESS” 


I STEWING BEI 

CREST 4 

29 

TOOTH PASTE 

Reg. or Mint, 150 ml 



TOMATO 

KETCHUP 



LYNN VALLEY 


PEACHES 

FREESTONE 


59 



jL AYLMER 

V TOMATO 

JUICE 48-oz. tin 


79 


jL SNO-CAP FROZEN 

V GREEN 
PEAS 2 lb bag 


IMPORTED, RIPE 


BANANAS 


While stock lasts 


IMPORTED NAVEL 


ORANGES 


1590 FAIRFIELD RD. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



Wt RESERVE 
THE RIGHT TO 
LIMIT QUANTITIES 


STORE HOURS 
MON.-FRI. 9-9, SAT. 9-6 
SUNDAY 10-6 


HE SAID that such di¬ 
verse people as a former 
Liberal candidate and a 
minister in a past Union 
Nationale government 
had joined people of “all 
stripes” who had said 
they would vote “yes” in 
the referendum. 


Speaking of his visit to 
Toronto last month, 
where he addressed the 
“English establishment" 
at a combined meeting of 
the Empire and Cana¬ 
dian Clubs, Levesque 
said that behind the "po¬ 
lite talk” of the people he 
met there was a “nega* 


tlon of Quebec’s aspira¬ 
tions.” 


Not all English-speak¬ 
ing people were hostile 
toward Quebec—“far 
from if'—but the "Eng¬ 
lish establishment''had a 
lot of influence on public 
opinion, he said. 


HE CALLED the gov¬ 
ernment's negotiating 
strategy a “relative suc¬ 
cess,” noting that only in 
the case of Hydro-Que¬ 
bec, the provincial elec¬ 
tric utility, did the gov¬ 
ernment resort to ai 
imposed settlement. 

“And we haven't heard 
any complaints.” 

With Jhe referendum 
“15 or 16 weeks away” 
party workers faced a 
crucial period of cam¬ 
paigning, he said. “We 
can’t overlook any¬ 
thing.” 

IN OTHER countries, 
people had given their 
lives or gone to prison to 
get their independence, 
he said. 

The referendum was a 
“fundamentally non-par¬ 
tisan” occasion for Que 
becers to show a “mini¬ 
mum level of national 
solidarity,” he said. “It 
doesn’t happen often.” 

Already there were en¬ 
couraging signs that Que¬ 
becers were "putting 
aside partisan interests" 
and realizing that, after 
the referendum, "we 
won't change planets.” 


You are invited to hear DOUGLAS MARTIN speak on THE 


IRANIAN CRISIS 
and the BAHAI 
COMMUNITY 




A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,1980 UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA 
CLEARIHUE BUILDING, ROOM A106 8:00 P.M. 


Mr. Martin, scholar, historian and international lecturer, is General 
Secretary for the Canadian Bahai Community and holds the distinction 
of being the only Canadian to address the 1976 World Congress of Faiths, 
Canterbury, England. ? 

His talk will offer a clear and challenging explanation of the historical 
significance of present events which continue to pose a threat to human 
rights in IRAN. 



in Eaton's 

Suncapade 
to Fiji 


Mrs. Mary Davidson 
R.R. #2 Sooke, B.C. 


Mrs Davidson's entry was drawn for thfe Grand 
Prize Feb 2nd at 4 p m on Eaton s Floor of 
Fashion. The prize is a Suncapade for two on 
Elan Flolidays 2-Island South Pacific Holiday by 
CP Air. $300 (Canadian) spending money from 
Eaton's with travel to and from Vancouver and all 
travel arrangements handled by Eaton's 
Travel. 


EATON'S 


: - 

em*bro*cate 



It means "to rub down with liniment." 


If liniment and locker rooms is where your 
head is, you'll find plenty of your kind of good 
reading in our sports pages. Who won, who 


lost... plus the human drama that makes 
sports more than a game. You can jog down 
to the newstand for your copy, but why not let 
our carriers get the exercise? Call us for 
home delivery. 


The Daily Colonist 


ntwtpaptf 

readcfthip 

project 


Thke our word. Subscribe 

Phone 383-4111 — The Daily Colonist Circulation Department 


■MlH 


MMMN 




Mmnmn 

































































TDAl/Fr 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17. 1980 37 



7 day cmifcs (mm Vancouver 
to Sitka. Skagway, d 

GUcirt Bay, and f 

Ketchikan. 

him:27. lOKOHkRMHfli 
{tol'tomtiti ?. W 


per person 
U S. funds 


BAINS 


INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL 1 710 DOUGLAS ST 
SERVICE LTD. (Opp the Bay) 




u 


$ 


HAWAII 

539b c 


H 


par parson twin 

SENIOR CITIZENS *519. 

These packages are designed with Victorians in mind. 
Some space is still available on all departures. 

EASTER DEPARTURES 
MARCH 27, 28 and 30 


FROM $579 p * ,Per *° n 


Twin 

Child Discount $85 


Brochures only at 


WESTERN CANADA TRAVEL 

729 JOHNSON ST. ■ 382-6160 

(Free Parking in Civic Parkade) 

SOOKE OFFICE 642-4422 



P LAWSON TRAVEL 


fhehdidaumakers 



Reno Las¥egais 


Costa Rica 



P LAWSON TRAVEL 

the holidaymakers 

HARBOUR SQUARE LOWER MALL 


Free Customer Underground Parking 

J£S,X5SS OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 


386-7574 



W6 combine the best of both worlds. 

We fly the only direct CP Air private jets to 
New Orleans from Vancouver. 

We connect with a luxurious 7-day Caribbean 
cruise. 

We can arrange an extended 7-night stay in 
fascinating New Orleans. 

We have it all ... mL -__ 

Vancouver 
departures 


FOR RESERVATIONS 
AND BROCHURE 
CONTACT — 

FEATHERSTONE TRAVEL 

With Three Offices to Serve You: 

C0LW00D PLAZA CEDAR HILL MALL JAMES BAY 
478-9505 . 477*0131 386-8427 

REMEMBER — it it s TRAVEL, it s FEATHERSTONE 

We Deliver Tickets. mi 


$899 

per person sharing 
twin or double 


Tripmai 

0 International 



Panoran t ■ s and chauffeured journey 

• ' Jk .■»■ 

Coach touring 
still at top 
of wanted list 


HOLIDAYS IN CANADA 1980 

MARITIME 

THIS SUMMER OR FAI L 

H V TO TORONTO I ROM V ICTORI A 
AND IOUK IIIRHUI.II: _ 

CAPE BRETON 1SI AND 
AND HIGHLAN DS_ 

LOUISBURG AND THE 

CABOT TRAIL 
QUEBEC CITY 

aN p m uch mo re 

A VARIE?? OF TOURS 

ARE AVAILABLE 



TRAVEL 
'ICES . 


TREAT YOURSELF TO A SCENIC 


EXPERIENCE 



2257 Oak Bay Avenue. Victoria. B.C. V8H IG6 Phone 505-222# 


Your cruise is our command ... 

for your next vacation try the delights'of a Panama, Mexico 
or Caribbean cruise. 

Thomas Cook 

Presents a 

CRUISE NIGHT 

6 p.m. Tuesday, February 19 — Empress Hotel Ballroom 

Princess Cruises 

Film presentation on cruising. 
Refreshments served. Space is limited. 




TORONTO—The popular¬ 
ity of the two-week or three- 
week escorted molorcoach 
tour of half a dozen or more 
European countries con¬ 
tinues to grow because, like 
love, it is a many-splendored 
thing. , 

The splendor of Westmin¬ 
ister Abbey and the changing 
of the guard at Bucking¬ 
ham Palace, of the Eiffel 
Tower. Cologne Cathedral, 
The Doges' Palace and St. 
Peter’s, of Mont Blanc and 
the Blue Grotto: These are 
the sights that thousands of 
Canadians fly over to Eu¬ 
rope every year to see and 
they can see every one of 
them on a single tour. 

An experienced traveller 
may well want to concen¬ 
trate on one region, southern 
Ireland. Burgundy, the 
Swiss lakes . . . 

And sure, in the 60's a wit 
poked fun at tours with the 
words, "If it's Tuesday it 
must be Belgium.” 

But the tour company that 
takes more Canadians to Eu¬ 
rope on these packages than 
any one else, Globus-Gate¬ 
way, reports that its best¬ 
seller is still a 14-day tour of 
seven countries—Holland, 
Germany, Austria, Italy, 
France, Monaco and Swit¬ 
zerland. And running this 
tour a close second is a 19- 
day tour of nine countries. 

According to the firm's 
Canadian Manager, Ed 
Rogers, the grand tour of 
Europe has never stopped 
outselling any other kind of 
tour. 

“It’s not only the number 
of countries but the fact that 
many of the greatest tourist 
attractions in the world can 
be seen up close on the one 
trip. No honest person can 
say he’s bored at the thought 
of riding in a gondola on 
Venice’s Grand Canal or 
cruising past the Lorelei on 
the Rhine River. 


"These are experiences 
that, transmitted from gen- 
eration to generation, will 
continue to send Canadians 
by the millions to Europe to 
see and to wonder. 1 ’ 

Globus-Gateway provides 
33 European itineraries, 
from six to 40 days, all of 
which can be joined at a 
tour's first continental city, 
though London is the start¬ 
ing point for most. Travel¬ 
lers can begin their tours 
with trans atlantic sche¬ 
duled or charter flights that 
synchronize with tour depar¬ 
ture dates. 

Substantial savings can be 
achieved by joining a tour at 
its first continental city. 

“A Rome start eliminates 
both the overnight stay in a 
London hotel and the cost of 
the London-Rome flight. It 
saves more than $100 at 
today’s prices," said 
Rogers. Tours can also begin 
in Amsterdam. Brussels, 
Paris, Madrid, Oslo, Zurich 
and Athens. . 

Prices range from below 
$47 a day for tours of Portu¬ 
gal and Spain to about $63 a 
day for lours of continental 
Europe and the United King¬ 
dom. 

The tours have a multilin¬ 
gual escort throughout. They 
include breakfast and dinner 
in all but major cities, where 
breakfast only is provided; 
full English breakfast is pro¬ 
vided in all British tours; 
accommodations in superior 
tourist or first class hotels; 
and comprehensive sight¬ 
seeing with local guide lec¬ 
turers. All baggage han¬ 
dling, taxes and tipping are 
taken care of. Most motor- 
coaches are air-condi¬ 
tioned. 

Tour brochures are avail¬ 
able from Globus-Gateway 
at Suite 104, 1801 Eglinton 
Avenue West, Toronto, Onl.. 
M6E 2H8, and from travel 
agents. 


FOR 

TRAVEL 

INSURANCE 

P. R. Brown and Son# 
Ltd. 

762 Fort St. 
385-3435 


RENO 

COACH TOURS 

Weekly Departures 
from Victoria and 
Nanaimo from Only 

139 °° 

per person 

■ ^^F ^^F double 

B.C. 

PARLOUR 
CAR TOURS 

Call Today 388-5553 mo 


HAWAII 


PACK 

NOW 


14 NIGHTS 
THIS WEDNESDAY 


*599 

tr iveleyden 

768 FORT ST. 
388-4201 ... 




Phone 388-7811 or call at 
1322 Douglas St. for your seat Reservations 




O Inutoku 

"J'4k 


. Sulim 
’AuMruUn 


faytf///'(•(/f/ /(/(’< 


Tie South 


Pacific 


Honolulu ~ 


Munfiiou 

linden 


SUM 

Fiji 


I pin 

gjtt/ .. 


ftiRo Ihrgfi 


, ■xtSiI". 

lulUIDUl fa 


(In 1st nuts 
Island 

Horn Horn 


4$ 


Auckland 

V’li’/rtl/rtm/ 


Nniah-ti^** JV- 
Mooivtt ,, 


Ramlonjjfi 


Sail to paradise this Fall. See exotic isles, 
New Zealand, Australia. 


On Sept. 25 the Pacific Princess 
will sail from San Francisco to 
Sydney, returning to Los 
Angeles. Don't miss this once- 
a-year opportunity. The itinerary 
is unmatched for variety and ex¬ 
citement. And your ship is un¬ 
matched for luxury and comfort. 
For your cruise, we'll fly you free 
to and from the ship. 

56 glorious days. 

We'll drop anchor at Tahiti. Visit 
coral-ringed Raiatea. Rarotonga. 
Palm-fringed Pago Pago. Un¬ 
spoiled Bora Bora. Moorea. Fiji, 
Apia, the Hawaiian Islands. Mag¬ 
ical places. Explore Auckland. 
Cosmopolitan Sydney. And 
more. 

A modem floating resort. 
Your ship is proudly British- 
registered. The mood? Casual 
elegance. Friendly atmosphere. 
Enjoy gracious service. Award¬ 
winning cuisine—the pride of 
our Italian dining room staff. The 
finest entertainment afloat. Air 
conditioning throughout. Spa¬ 
cious decks, sparkling pools. 


A theatre. Dancing. Bingo. Deck 
sports. There's always so much 
to do. Or relax and do nothing 
at all! 

One-way cruises. 

If you have less time, cruise one 
way, fly the other. We'll pay most 
of your airfare to and from the 
ship on a regularly-scheduled air¬ 
line. And stopovers are easily 
arranged. 

From Sydney to Los Angeles, 
Alfred Sheinwold will conduct 
bridge and backgammon 
lectures. 

Contact a travel agent soon. 


| IVlnccs* Cruises." 109 Gram ille 

_ W street. Vancouver. B.C. VtiC 1T2 Vnd 
| me a brochure I'm Interested m Siuth 1*aoi6c 
_ 'J Acapulco 1 Trunscun.il Caribbean Alaska 
PJ AP050-2-17 


































































































4 


38 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


HAWAII 
ON SALE 


DArVAPCC* Per person, double occupancy; triple 
■ ■$ 479 ; single $649. Includes airfare, 
a a transfers, lei grpeting and 14 nights 

S/l mJMM accommodation with kitchen at either 
the Kuhloiani or Coral Reef Hotel (Garden 
■ Wing). For departures April 6 . 13. 20, 27 

for two weeks only. March 9 departure is available using 
Seaside Lanai at $519 per person 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND 
RESERVATIONS, CALL 

HILL TRAVEL 

2257 OAK BAY AVE. 

595-2226 


FOUR SEASONS TRAVEL 

1214 BROAD ST. 

384-7108 


TRAVEL 



Ke/marok . .. luxurious family seat 


Smolenice ... now home of scientists 


There’s enough to send 
castle buff up the wall 


CAPITAL TOURS 

All farts quoted are on a par person basis. 
RENO TOURS 

Departures Sunday Mornings. $180 Dbl: $190 Twin. 

We have space available for one couple on our Feb. 24th 
departure Space is available on the following tours: March 
9, Mar 30. April 6 . April 27. May 11 and limited space 
available on all weekly Reno Tours until June 29 
All Capital Tours leave from Victoria and return to Victoria, 
with Amiable Escorts on Air-conditioned deluxe coaches, 
staying at the hospitable Dunes Motel. Eugene and the most 
popular Onflow Hotel in Reno As you can see. they are 
very popular tours so don't delay. 

TEXAS and THE DEEP SOUTH 

March 30th departure is sold out and we have just six seats 
left on the Fall Departure Oct. 11th If you plan taking this 
very interesting scenic and historic tour flying to San 
Antonio then bus touring through the hospitable Deep 
South, contact ua quickly. 

DISNEYLAND TOUR 

March 29 for the School Break: Sold Out. 

EASTER WEEK-END 

April 4 to April 7 $140 Dbl: *150 Twin. 

A leisurely, relaxing week-end tour to the rugged and 
beautiful Oregon Coast with time to stroll the lovely beaches 
from our Seaside Motel and enjoy a sumptuous Easter 
Dinner with a happy group 10 seats left 

NATIONAL PARKS SUN-FINDER 

April 12 to 26. $510 Dbl: $525 Twin. 

15 days of fine scenery 

A different experience, wandering the beautiful Parks and 
the great Pacific Northwest in search of the best in the 
beauty of Nature, and several interesting creations of man: 
Yellowstone. Salt Lake City, Canyons Country, Bryce. Zion 
and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, then, road 
conditions permitting, through Yosemite. through the lush 
Sacramento Valley to San Francisco, the Redwood Forests 
and the scenic beauty of the California and Oregon Coasts 
+ A very comprehensive scenic tour 

SPRING BLOSSOM TOUR 

May 10 to 13. *140 Dbl: $150 Twin. 

A Pleasant Week-End 

A delightful week-end tour to view the spring glory of the 
fruit-growing areas of our own province and Northwestern 
Washington. Kamloops, the Okanagan Valley. Grand Coulee 
Dam and the Petrified Forest enroute to Yakima, the Apple 
Capital of the World, enjoying tine views of Mount Rainier 
National Park on the way home through Seattle. 

GRAND CANYONS TOUR and YELLOWSTONE 

May 17 to 30. $490 DM: $505 Twin. 

This popular annual tour has been improved to take in 
mysteriously beautiful Yellowstone National Park and the 
fantastic Grand Tetons in addition to a very complete 
experience of the wonderful Canyon lands; Bryce. Zion, the* 
East and South Rims of the Grand Canyon We can 
accommodate 7 couples on the popular tour 

ROCKIES TOUR 

May 20 to 31. $450 Dbl: $465 Twin. 

12 Days of Splendor 

Offering the best in Scenic Beauty in the Pacific Northwest: 
North to Kamloops, through the length of the Okanagan 
Valley. East to Cranbrook then circling the lovely Glacit* 
National Park to Waterton Lakes; North through Fort Steele 
and Radium Hot Springs to Banff and Jasper; Westward to 
Prince Rupert for a return cruise along the Inside Passage to 
Port Hardy and home the Island Highway A groat tour 

PORTLAND ROSE PARADE 

June 13 to 16. Just a note to confess. I made an error on the 
dates in my brochure. We still have space available. Phone 
and reserve early, $150 Dbl: $160 Twin 


384-1432 
384-5612 


B! Capital 


Tours 


215-645 Fort ttroot Vkrtorio 
2nd Floor, Yarrow SutWinj. 


BRATISLAVA — Castle sightseeing is a good 
reason for visiting Slovakia, the eastern section of 
Czechoslovakia. Both in quantity and variety, the 
region offers just about everything a castle buff could 
ask for. 

The first Slovak castles were built at the end of 
the 12th century on the sites of the Great Moravian 
castles that were used by local people as refuges. 

The perfection of shooting weapons at the begin¬ 
ning of the 15th century forced modifications in castle 
building. It become necessary to erect large outer de¬ 
fence towers, manifold fortifications and moats 
aimed at moving the firing line of the enemy as far as 
possible from the palaces and chapels. 

Then the Hussite Wars of the 15th century and the 
Turkish onslaught of the 16th century made it neces¬ 
sary to improve defences to the point where new 
edifices could not be called castles at all, but simply 
citadels or fortresses. 

Most of the castles gradually fell into disuse or 
were destroyed in times of war or by fire. Since the 
last war, however, a program of restoration has been 
undertaken in Slovakia and many are now used as 
offices, museums, or for other purposes. But many 
still stand—neglected, gloomy and forbidding, inter¬ 
esting subject material for today’s camera-toting 
tourists. 

Four popular Slovak castles are: 

• CACHT1CE CASTLE on the northern periphery 
of the Low Carpathian Mountains. A typical royai-bor- 



Are you planning a Summer holiday in Europe 
this year? 

Ask an Arranger tor the special hotel prices, in 
connection with your Wardair Charter. 

Hotel accommodation in London starts at 11.25 
pounds, per person, per night. 

Hotel accommodation in Manchester starts at 
20.00 pounds, per person, per night. 

Hotel accommodation in Amsterdam smarts at 
DFL 82.50 per person, per night. 


Call in and see An Arrange r\ now. 

BLANEY’S TRAVEL 
SERVICE LTD. 

OHicially Licensed by the Government ol British Columbia. 


920 DOUGLAS STREET 1503 WILMOT PLACE 

382-7254 The Arrangers 598-4531 


California Fly/Cruise 


from $599 °°« 


On June 8th fly from Vancouver Cost inclusive of airfare. 


to Los Angeles where you are 
met and transferred to the 
"Cunard Princess” for your 
coastal cruise to San Francisco 


accommodation based on shar¬ 
ing inside stateroom and all 
meals on board. 

Extended stay in California can 


arriving in Vancouver June 12th. be arranged at time of booking. 


-ri l ■»"» ' » l 



_ 

; ,h ;; » » _ . . — .* •* 



NON-MEMBERS WELCOME 


382-9202 


1075 PANDORA AVE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Plenty of Free Perking 


BCAA 
— Travel Agency 

V, ' a most trusted A 
'*»»'•* name in travel 

Ma 


der castle, it became private property at the end of 
the 14th ’century. 

A grisly story goes with it. A man called Bathary 
was imprisoned there for murdering a number of 
young women in the vicinity and bathing in their 
blood, 

• SMOLENICE CASTLE on the ledge of the low 
Carpathian Mountains near Trnava. The original 
castle was built to guard the pass through the moun¬ 
tains but fell into disuse when the road no longer 
needed to be guarded. Renovation was undertaken 
after the last war and today the castle has become the 
House of the Scientific Workers of the Slovak Acade¬ 
my of Sciences. 

• STARA LUBOVNA CASTLE near the Polish 
border in eastern Slovakia. It became a seat of 
Polish vice-regals in 1412 but was returned to Hun¬ 
gary in 1772. Part of the castle embracing the chapel 
and a residential wing, both built in 1657, is today the 
town museum. 

• KE/MAROK CASTLE in the town of the same 
name in the Spis region east of the High Tatra 
Mountains. Built originally as a fortress to safeguard 
a traders’ road, it was rebuilt as a luxurious family 
seat in the 16th century. Later it was damaged by fire 
and rebuilt several times. 

More information on Slovakia’s castle and ways 
to go about seeing them may be obtained from 
CEDOK, the Czechoslovak travel bureau and hotel 
corporation, 10 East 40th Street, New York, N Y. 
10016. 


Travel 

Update 



BY the TRAVEL EDITOR 

WE HAVE ALL been invited to ‘‘Make a date 
with a mermaid in the world's oldest kingdom.” 

That's the sales pitch from Denmark as the 
cocky Danes enter what they hope will be a travel 
bonanza in the 1980s. 

Travel agents will get a new product in the sales 
push—a comprehensive catalogue of the nation’s 
travel industry entitled, wait for it, Denmark. 

There is also a film Denmark—You'll Love It 
and an incentive travel brochure entitled Denmark, 
the oldest kingdom, your newest incentive. 

For unusual holidays, the Danes offer a brochure, 
Stay in a Danish Inn. It offers some 65 inns in the 
country, priced from $16 including breakfast, per 
person, per night. That could prove ideal for stop¬ 
overs on bicycle, u-drive-tours or when riding the 
Danish rail system. 

WANT SOME SUMMER skiing not too far 

away? 

Oregon now has year-round skiing on Mt. Hood 
thanks to a recently completed chairlift at the 
Timberline Lodge. The lodge is the only United 
States ski resort able to offer year-round facili¬ 
ties. 

The new Palmer chairlift begins at the 7,000-foot 
level and stretches across the Palmer snowfield, 
taking skiers to the 8,500- foot mark! 

Summer temperatures on the mountain range 
from 28 degrees Celsius to zero so you’ll have to pack 
both winter and summer clothing. 

■T 

MIKE AND TERESA SHEPARD are into their 
third year of historical and adventure tours. 

They run Swiftsure Tours Ltd. from Victoria 
and can tantalize you with the offer of photograph¬ 
ing a 2,000 pound stellar’s sealion, tracking down 
elusive short-tailed shearwaters or horned puffins, 
spending Easter with the grey whales off Long 
Beach or sailing B.C.’s sheltered coast. They also 
offer charter and group discounts. 

SOMEONE AT AMERICAN Hawaii Cruises has 
been thinking of families. 

The firm is offering special family fares on its 
new seven-day inter-Hawaii cruises aboard the SS 
Oceanic Independence from June 7. 

You fly lo Hawaii first. For further information 
try your local travel agent or American Hawaii 
Cruises, Suite 611, one Embarcadero Centre, San 
Francisco, CA 94111. 

MORE PEOPLE THAN ever are visiting Aruba 
and they’re staying longer. 

That’s the message from the Netherland An¬ 
tilles (thought Aruba would have you grabbing for 
your atlas) which had a record-breaking 185,141 
visitors last year, up 13 per cent on 1978, and a 
staggering 76 per cent over five years earlier. 
Everyone stayed almost twice as long as five years 
ago, too. 

Aruba, by the way. offers a seven-mile stretch 
of “snowy” beaches, free port shopping and year- 
round warm temperatures. 


HAWAII 

14 NIGHTS 
THIS WEDNESDAY 

now *599 

tr iveleyden 

768 FORT ST. 
388-4201 i» 



TO BRITAIN 


CARGO 

SHIP 

CRUISES 






SOUTH SEAS 

About 45 days — 
Sail San Francisco 
75 to 100 Passengers 

SOUTH AMERICA 

About 66 days — 
Sail Vancouver 
75 to 100 Passengers 
The Cruise Specialists 


Guaranty your charlar far* by pay¬ 
ing in full within 7 days ot booking! 


Reserve your Charter flight now with 
Wardair — CP AIR — AIR CANADA 


From 


per 
person 


LONDON HOTELS 

FROM POUNDS STERLING 

■ w# Per Person Per Day 

Visit bur office tor details and immediate bookings 

WESTERN CANADA TRAVEL 

729 JOHNSON ST. (Free parking In Civic Parkade) 382-6160 

SOOKE OFFICE 642-4422 




DRURY’S 

TRAVEL 

5A Yates Mall 
388-5652 Hours 10-4 

' The Beet hr DAY TOURS 

BOW he beet for he reet 

DAY TOURS 

GABRIOLA ISLAND 

April 13 |- 

incl. smorg. lunch 1 O 

QUALICUM INN 

April 20 $4 c 

incl. smorg. lunch IO 
May/June Brochure Available 

RENO days iiT 

SANDS HOTEL/CASINO 

DISNEYLAND 

from *249 

PORTLAND ROSE 
PARADE 

June 13 


Tour* incl. Medical Insurance 
Agent* for Holliday Co. 


23-DAY 

TRANS-PANAMA CANAL 
AND CARIBBEAN CRUISE 

BOARD THE CUNARD PRINCESS 
AND DEPART SEPTEMBER 4th 
IN VANCOUVER. 


Good News. Cruise Lovers! Board the 
beautiful Cunard Princess in Vancouver 
and sail her all the way to San Juan. A 
cruise adventure of a lifetime, visiting 
those fascinating ports of call: San 
Francisco. Mazatlan. Acapulco. Cristo¬ 
bal. La Guaira, Grenada, Barbados. 
Martinique, Tortola, St. Thomas and 
San Juan; 23 days of pure delight All 
cabins are with twin beds and full facili¬ 
ties. 


INSIDE 

CABINS 


OUTSIDE 

CABINS 


*2140 

*2755 


U.S. per 

parsea 


Great Ships of British Registry since 1840. 

Visit our office for details and immediate bookings 

WESTERN CANADA TRAVEL 


729 JOHNSON ST. 


(Free parking in Civic Parkade) . 
SOOKE OFFICE 642-4422 


382-6160 
2-16 


1 







































































Why 

the Hyatt Regency 
Vancouver 

and the Bayshore Inn 
have cut winter rates 
by one-third. 

December through March are pleas¬ 
antly mild winter months in Vancouver. 
They are also our “slow" months. So, to 
encourage your visit, we're offering a splen¬ 
did Inducement: one-third off our usual 
room rates 

With all due respect to the Bayshore, 
we believe the Hyatt Regency offers even 
more of an inducement than our friends up 
the road. 

Because their special winter rate gets 
you a luxurious room with a beautiful view 
at a fine hotel out near tranquil Stanley 
Park. But our special winter rate gets you 
a luxurious room with a beautiful view at 
a fine hotel right rn the heart of exciting 
downtown Vancouver. So you’re steps—not 
taxi rides — from the city’s best shopping, 
nightlife, restaurants, galleries, theatres and 
business addresses. And, be¬ 
cause our room rates are 
priced a little lower than 
| the Bayshore’s i/ear-round, 
one-third off ours is less 
expensive than one- 
1 third off theirs. Come dis¬ 
cover Vancouver in winter. 
The only thing “off-season" 
about us is the price! 




HYATT REGENCY 
VANCOUVER 

655 Burrard Street 
Vancouver, B C. 

V6C2R7 
(604)687-6543 / 

In Canada 

1-800-361-6172 

gets you Hyatt 
world wide and toll-free. 



TRAVEL 


It’s gung hay fat choy 


CALIFORNIA—MEXICO 
ARIZONA—NEVADA 

16-Day Bus tour 

Once a month you have tho opportunity to |oln our experienced 
tour escorts on this fabulous trip visiting San Francisco. Solvang. 
Disneyland. Ensenada. Palm Springs, Phoenix. Las Vegas and 
Reno with many side tours Included aloog the way. Phone now 
tor a detailed brochure. ^ y| q 


DEPARTS FEB. 23rd 


TW./DB. EA. 



FLORIDA 

23 DAYS BY AIR AND COACH 

Here is tho trip you have promised yourself! En|oy the sun in Tampa and 
Miami, the fun in Disneyworld, the excitement in Reno and Las Vegas, the 
fascination ol Galveston and New Orleans. Visit Phoenix. El Paso. Pecos. 
San Antonie, and Panama City. Stay at luxurious hotels such as Holiday 
Inn. the St Anthony in San Antonio, the Incredible Flagship in Galveston 
It is impossible to do justice to this exceptional tour in these tew lines, so 
please ask us tor a detailed brochure. Only 2 departures, so book 
early 

MARCH 15 $1i4Q 

or APRIL 5 Tw/Dbl ea. I I ‘♦o 


DISNEYLAND 

Via San Francisco or via Saeramonto 
10-DAY HOLIDAY 

Both tours include Disneyland and 15 attractions. San Diego 
Zoo. Tijuana. Universal Studios, and $10,000 medical insur¬ 
ance. Via San Francisco includes 2 nights in San Francisco and 
a full city tour plus 3 full days In Disneyland. Via Sacramento 
gives you an extra day in Disneyland 

Departs March 29 and April 19. 

5 SHARING *249 as. 


MARITIMES 

25 DAYS BY AIR AND COACH 

Spend your Summer holiday this year exploring this beautiful 
country This is a cross-Canada tour including a week in the 
Marrttmes Please ask us for our itinerary which explains this 
fantastic odyssey in full detail. 

Departures: 

AUGUST 1st (Bus out — fly back) 

AUGUST 28th (Fly out — bus back) %•% -4 7 CT 

ONLY, ea. dbt. I I f O 


MEXICO 

IS DATS BY AIR AND COACH 

Direct flight Vancouver-Mexico City and return, plus a 
fully escorted coach tour of unique Mexico. Stay 3 nights 
in Mexico City. Acapulco. Guadalajara with overnight 
stops In many other fascinating and historic cities. 

DEPARTS APRIL 11th and 25th 


.’989 


Tw/Dbl. ea. 

1 11 Coming Soon! . . . - - 

PORTLAND ROSE PARADE — JUNE 13 
ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH 7 days COACH 

There s no lime to lose—so give our I960 brochure a peruse 1 



VICTORIA MUCH 
1394 HIUSIM 
(it Mar M Rd.) 
MON.-FRI 
9-5:30 
595-31 


I was sitting at a table in 
the Peninsula Hotel with Dr. 
H. H. Wong when a page boy 
came through thumbing the 
bicycle bell on the stick that 
holds a blackboard with the 
paged person's name on it. 
Ting-a-llng. 

Doc Wong didn’t look up. 
"Not for me,” he said. “It’s 
very bad joss to see a doctor 
at Chinese New Year.” The 
New Year’s celebration in 
Hong Kong lasts about a 
month. So Doc Wong spent 
most of his time in the lobby 
of the'Penlnsula. 

It’s a grand old hotel, now 
50 years old. The lobby 
tables are always full. Busi¬ 
ness in for their elevenses. 
Women for lunch. Afternoon 
shoppers for tea. Cocktails 
at sundown. A lot of Hong 
Kong’s business is done in 
the Peninsula lobby. 

The Peninsula page boys 
go about their business at a 
brisk walk. Four are always 
on duty to open the heavy 
plate glass doors between a 
pair of Chinese stone lions 
that guard the Peninsula. 

They wear starched white 
uniforms with gold buttons. 
Snow-white pillbox caps at a 
jaunty angle. They have the 
look of military cadets. 

Doe Wong said: “This is 
the West Point of the tourist 
business in Hong Kong. In a 
couple of years these 15- 
year-old boys will be assis¬ 
tants, moving up toward 
manager in some hotel or 
restaurant.” 

A lot of Peninsula’s man¬ 
aging staff were once page 
boys. 

GUNG HAY FAT CHOY! 
Happy New Year! It is the 
lunar year 4678. The Year of 
the Monkey. (There are 12 
animals that rule the years. 
They take turns.) 

The liveliest celebrations 
arc in cities with big China¬ 
towns: San Francisco and 
Honolulu are best next to 
Hong Kong. I shoot off a few 


AROUND the WORLD 
with STAN DELAPLANE 



Peninsula page boys ... on way to be managers 


firecrackers myself. It’s 
much more fun than our New 
Year's with only one evening 
of funny hats. 

You can have your own 
home-made New Year. Open 
a can of noodles and eat with 
chopsticks. 

At this time of year, Tsao 
Chun, the kitchen god, goes 
to heaven to report to the 
Jade Emperor. Most house¬ 
hold life goes on in the kit¬ 
chen. 

The new moon rises Feb¬ 


ruary 26. Chinese communi¬ 
ties began bursting with 
happy firecrackers the day 
before. The Golden Dragon 
is ready to parade. 

The first three days are 
important: Do not break 
dishes the first day. Do not 
sweep the floor or use nee¬ 
dles or s'cold anybody. Do not 
spank your child. (Wait a 
week and then let him have 
it.) 

Small Cold Day has passed 
but Great Cold Day is com¬ 


ing up. Button up your over¬ 
coat. 

Buy flowers for the New 
Year. Good blooms, good 
luck. 

On New Year's Eve, chil¬ 
dren go before their elders 
and bow. The elders then 
give them money in a red 
paper envelope with lucky 
sayings printed in gold. (You 
can buy these in a big city 
Chinatown.) 

The money is called 
“ngart sui chin,” and the 
child must not spend it until 
the 15th day of the moon. 

Dr. Wong went to medical 
school in Edinburgh but he 
knew ail Chinese remedies, 
too. 

“If you have a lazy child, 
put a lantern in his lazy little 
hand and in the other a bunch 
of hard-boiled eggs. Then 
you walk him around the 
streets crying, ’naai lamg, 
naai lamg.’ means ‘Laziness 
for sale.’ ” 

Doc Wong said when the 
child has eaten all the eggs, 
he will be cured of laziness. 

Make his own bed without 
being told and get straight 
"A’s” in school. 

Lu Pan’s day is coming up. 
He’s the god of carpenters. 
It’s a good day to get mar¬ 
ried. 

Officials’ day is some¬ 
where in there. Pay back 
taxes. (That’s luckier than 
good flowers.) 

Doc Wong had paid all his 
bills. That’s a requirement 
of the New Year. 

He said: "Also my patients 
have paid ME. I bet a lot of 
North American doctors 
would like a New Year like 
that.” 

Before the New Year, get 
your hair cut. Take a bath. 
Put on all clean clothing. 

At midnight, the family 
sits down together and has a 
dinner that is all vegetables. 
This beats champagne if you 
consider the next day. Happy 
New Year. 


r RENO~! 

■ FULLY ESCORTED LUXURY BUS HOLIDAY 

Join one of our super Holliday escorts for 7 days of 
V variety and fun with many valuable casino packages 
^ each day and side tours to Virginia City, Carspn City and 
k Lake Tahoe all included Accommodation at the Ro- 
K deway Inn in Eugene and the Sands in downtown Reno. 

B Fares based on twin or double occupancy. 

FIB. . $10Q MARCH $ 

1 23 IlKJta. 1,8,15,22 

k f -SPECIAL BONUS 

I MEDICAL INSURANCE 

$10,000 coverage included for all passengers 
on any ol our tours at NO EXTRA COST 

... 

I 

i 


LONDON — British 
Tourist Board Authority 
chief, Sir Henry Mark¬ 
ing, has attacked as 
“wholly misleading” a 
recent report that Lon¬ 
don was now the most 
expensive city in the 
world for visitors. 

Sir Henry said the re¬ 
port was based on only 
five international hotels 
catering for expense ac¬ 
count visitors out of a 


6 Wholly misleading 9 


total of 1,300 hotels in the 
British capital. 

“If I were to quote the 
Concorde fare across the 
North Atlantic as being 
the fare between London 
and New York, I would be 
accused of being mis¬ 
leading. 


“But that, so far as 
London's hotel prices are 
concerned, is what news¬ 
papers carrying the re¬ 
port have done." 

London, he added, still 
offered particularly good 
value for money in the 
middle and lower end of 
the market. 


“There are many thou- 
sands of hotel rooms in 
the capital where the 
visitor can stay for $40 to 
$55 a night—about a quar¬ 
ter of the price quoted in 
the news report. 

"When reprinted over- 
sea^reports such as 
these mislead potential 
visitors into thinking that 
London and Britain are 
beyond their means,” Sir 
Henry said. 


What's more v- 
depressing than losing 
your luggage? 


'jJ 



Losing it and not having MSA Baggage Protection 
to cover the loss. 

MSA can't bring your lost or stolen baggage back to you, but we can 
help make the loss just a little bit less disastrous than it might be 
otherwise. 

With MSA Baggage Protection, risks of loss or damage are covered, 
'—and while we can't replace your lost articles, all or most won’t be lost 
forever. 

Baggage Protection is only one of the MSA Travel Protection plans. 

We also provide Hospital and Medical Protection, Travel Accident 
Protection and Trip Cancellation Protection. 

Before you travel, ask your 
Travel Agent about MSA's 
Total Travel Protection Plan. 


MSA Travel Protection 
Take us with you 
when you go. 

Ask your Travel Agent. 

Administered by the Medical Services Association. 



THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 39 


FLY 


RENO! 

NON-STOP 
FROM VICTORIA 


1 HOUR AND 40 MINUTES 
BY PACIFIC WESTERN JET 

3, 4 or 7 nights 

March 9,13,16, 20, 23, 27, 30, 
April 3, 6,10,13,17, 20 


DEPARTS 

Golden Sierra 

Sondownar 

March 9. IS, 23 

$235. 

$239. 

March 30 A 

$255. 

$259. 

Aprils .*• 

$235. 

$239. 

April 13, 20 **** 

$245. 

$249. 

March 13, 20, 27 3 

$225. 

$229. 

April to. i7 j;, 

$235. 

$239. 

March 13, 20, 23 7 

$203. 

$299. 

April 3 / 

$291. 

$309. 

April 0, 10,13 Says 

$209. 

$299. 


HOTELS: MAPES, GOLD DUST DOWNTOWN, 
ONSLOW AVAILABLE AT HIGHER PRICES 

Package includes 

Pacific Western Alrflnes 737 non-stop from Pat Bay 
Airport, complimentary snack with champagne while In 
flight, casino packages and casino excursions, hotel 
transfers, while in Reno and your choice of accommoda¬ 
tion at the Golden Sierra. Sundowner, Mapes, Gold .Dust. 
Onslow. (Orr the seven night package Sierra. Sundowner 
or Mapes only). Night flight departs Thursday or Sunday 
and returns 6:00 a.m. Friday or Moriday morning. 


from Victoria or Vancouver 

SKI 

TAHOE 

Hard) 9,13, IS, 20, 23, 27, 30 
April 3, S, 10, 13, 17, 20 


3, 4 or 7 
nights 

3 nights Vancouver 
from 

*199°° 

3 nights Victoria 
from 

$229°° 


from Vancouver only 

LAS VEGAS 

•wry Thursday and Sunday 
3, 4 or 7 nights 


$ 201 °° 

3 nights Granada 


from Vancouver 


3, 4 or 7 nights 


departs 

RENO Ztisr 9 * 89 

■ ■ ■■ ■ ^ a mahtfi At Si 


oo 

3 nights at Sundowner 


departs 

every 

Friday 


Oahu 7 days 

from 

*514°° 


from Vancouver 

HAWAII 

Oahu/Maui — 14 days -Oahu/Kauai Oshu 14 days 

from horn 

*794°° *844°° *544°° 





"Our Disneyland, 
California and 
, Arizona buses are . 
fully escorted. 

Phone for"detail 
of inclusions!” 

Shelia Goff — Tour Manager 


sunrise 

Metar-caeeh keAdayi, departing from 
Victoria, Duncan, Nanaimo or Courtenay. 


RENO 

depart, trary 
Sunday — 7 days 

Golden Sierra 

*169“ 

DISNEY 

10 days 

departs June 28, 
July 19. Aug. 2, 16 
Sept 20, Dec. 20 

each for 
family oT 
five 

*259“ 

GRAND 

CANYON 

departs Apr. 26, $£9000 

Sept 20 f 17 days 

Portland, Boise, Salt Lake City, 
Bryce Canyon, Grand Canyon, 
Phoenix, Tuscon. Lake Havasu, 
Las Vegas, Reno, Eugene. 

CALIFORNIA 

SUNRISE 

departs Apr. 5, 

May 31, SspL 13, 
Dae. 19 

*599“ 

Springfield, Areata, San Francisco, Solvang, Anaheim, 
San Diago, Las Vegas, Reno. 


Unless otherwise indicated all prices are person based on twin 
| or double occupancy. 

On Vancouver Island Sunrise Holidays is the 
GENERAL SALES AGENT for 

yh/erWino 

HOLIDAY* LTDPMHMHWhJ 


PHONE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 

OR . 

382-4271 i 

SUNRISE HOLIDAYS 
LTD. 

2618 Quadra 
Victoria 

































































TRAVEL 


■w 





Imagine. Now you can fly CPAir to where summer goes for the winter. 

And at a price that’s as low as charter. 


flights weekly including 
oSuperOrange 747s 
from Vancouver to Honolulu. 


CPAir’s Hawaii begins even before you get there. 
With complimentary refreshments minutes after 
your takeoff from Vancouver. 

And again with your lunch or dinner. 

Imagine. All this, and the sun, sand and surf. And 
CPAir service too. 

, AH at an incredible price that’s as cheap as charter. 
Paradise never looked so good. 


Catch CPAir’s Charter Class Hawaii Fare 
from Vancouver to Honolulu now 
while the sun is up and the price is down. 


• Stay anywhere from the first Sunday following your departure, up 
to 30 days. 

• $50 nonrefundable deposit required within 7 days of booking. But 
not less than 14 days before departure. 

• Full payment required 14 days before departure. 

• 10% off children 2 through li accompanying you. 

• Price effective for travel between Jan. 26 • March 25 and April 2 - 26. 


Price is subject to change and does not include taxe 

Call your travel agent or CPAir at 682-1411 in 
Vancouver, 382-6111 in Victoria. 


'mi-' 


L P and (4 .ire registered trademarks of Canadian Pacific Limited. 


CPAir 

* WfeYe out to be your airline.’ 


l in 


March 21 to April 2 Double $495 ea. 

(13 days) Twin $510 ea. 


Our March 6 departure is now lull and we have 6 seats remaining on 
this fine tour A special relaxing holiday with & nights in Victoria s warm 
sister City; right downtown in our convenient motel location A variety 
ot optional sightseeing available, or spend your days by the pool in tin* 
sun Also Included is a night in the spectacular M G M GRAND HOTEL 
in Reno. 

APRIL 15 (15 days) New California Adventure SOLD OUT 

APRIL 19 (16 days) Arizona and Grand Canyon 

MAY 10 (18 days) Southern Calitorma 

MAY 18 (io days) Yosemite—Mother Lode Country 

MAY 18 (17 days) Grand Canyonlands SOLD OUT 

JUNE 9 (ii days) B.C. and Alberta Northwest 

JUNE 18 (12 days) Yellowstone—Grand Tetons 

RENO — LAKE TAHOE 

During February and March you may onioy our unique 8-OAY TOUR 
that includes oxtenslvc sightseeing options in Reno and overnight at 
Lake Tahoe, for only $205 00 ea (sharing dowblo) During April and 
May the tour price is $219.00 ea (sharing double), reflecting an 
Increase in hotel costs Stay with us at the luxurious SAHARA IN 
DOWNTOWN RENO and travel in the finest coaches available — the 
value In your holiday Is obvious. Departures Feb 23 (6 seats remain); 
March 2. 16. 22 (lull), 29. April 5 (full). 13. . May 3. 17. 2b 
For the safety. comfort and consideration ol all aboard, there Is NO 
SMOKING or DRINKING on the coaches 

COME AND SEE US! 

We re small enough to know YOU—large enough to serve YOU 
12 years in Victoria. 

DETAILED ITINERARIES AVAILABLE ON ALL TOURS 

STL #208-1012 DOUGLAS ST. 385-4732 

Hours: 9:30-12:30, 1:30-5:00 Mon. to Fri 


40 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


GOLD RUSH ON AGAIN 


Today’s booming gold 
prices have focused atten¬ 
tion on the gold rush heritage 
of Alaska and the Yukon. 

Northern residents are 
flocking to streams and 
rivers, and “north to the 
Yukon” once the rallying cry 
of gold rush stampeders has 
taken on renewed meaning 
for Alaska-bound travellers. 

The town of Skagway, at 
the northern tip of Alaska's 
southeast panhandle, owes 
its birth to the Klondike gold 
rush. An overnight boom 
town in 1898, Skagway re¬ 


tains much of the character 
and flavor of that historic 
era—boardwalk street 
fronts vintage frame build¬ 
ings, and colorful saloons. 

Accessible by cruise ship, 
ferry, or air, Skagway has 
drawn increasing numbers 
of appreciative visitors in re¬ 
cent years. 

From Skagway the White 
Pass and Yukon Railroad, 
built at the turn of the cen¬ 
tury; follows foot trails of 


Klondike goldrushers as it 
climbs over mountains and 
past lakes to Whitehorse, 
capital city of the Yukon 

Recently completed is a 
new highway that also 
crosses’ the mountains, mak¬ 
ing Whitehorse accessible by 
bus or ear f rom Skagway. 

Located near the head¬ 
waters of the Yukon River, 
Whitehorse was once the 
junction point between the 
railroad from Skagway and 


river steamers from Daw¬ 
son City. Today’s visitor tra¬ 
vels to Dawson by bus or 
air. , 

Gold rush history truly 
comes alive in this northern¬ 
most town in the Yukon, 
"hub city” of the Klondike 
region. Log cabins of both 
Jack London and Robert Ser¬ 
vice have survived the 
years, along with an old 
riverboat, the Palace Grand 
Theatre, and Canada's only 


legal gambling casino—Dia¬ 
mond Tooth Gertie’s. 

For many visitors today, 
the town's chief attraction 
was also its first—panning 
for gold. Several mining op¬ 
erations are set up to permit 
visitors to pan for their own 
“colors.” 

A trip to the gold country 
can be an exciting and re¬ 
warding experience, even if 
you don’t strike it rich. 

For further information, 
contact TravAlaska Tours 
#555 4th and Battery Build¬ 
ing, Seattle, WA 98121. 


Dajuxa, Owntr-Escorted Coach Tour* 

SPRING TOURS 1980 

NOW FILLING RAPIDLY! 


Dream comes true under sail 

SAUSALITO, Calif. — 7 \ worldwide programs y 

avp vnu pvpr Hrnamivt • \ found. 


Have you ever dreamed of 
sailing the South Seas, the 
Aegean or the Gallapagos 
archipelago? 

Images of sails sweeping 
past star-filled skies, of div¬ 
ing through crystal clear 
waters amongst vibrant 
coral heads, of sweet air fill¬ 
ing your lungs as you run 
along the surf line of a vast 
empty beach—all of these 
dreams and many more are 
realities and available. 

Travellers can sail on any 
one of more than 20 vessels 
which are currently plying 
the world’s oceans through 
Ocean Voyages of Sausalito, 
Calif. 

Mary Crowley, Ocean Voy¬ 
ages’ director, says she’s 
proud of this unique organi¬ 
zation of adventurous people 
and fine quality vessels. 

A comprehensive and di¬ 
verse range of seafaring of¬ 
ferings is available. Prices 
are reasonable on these 
carefully chosen vessels 
whether you sail on a 46-foot 
racing sloop in New Zealand 
(It days, $630 per person), a 
57-foot schooner in Hawaii 
(10 days, $590 per person), or 
bring a group of friends 
on a fast sailing 71-foot ketch 
in Central America (four 
people, $2,800 per week). 

“Our purpose is to make 
the reajity of voyaging 
available to those ever curi¬ 
ous about oceans. Sailing is 
always a valuable learning 
experience—an exploration 
of new perspectives on 
nature and on yourself,” 
Crowley explains. 

The following quote begins 
Ocean Voyages' newly pub¬ 
lished brochure: "The gods 
do not deduct from man's 
alloted span, those hours 
spent in sailing.” (An An¬ 
cient Phoenician Proverb). 

As well as adventurous 
sailings in Melanesia, Tahiti, 


Latest addition, Ta ijo, 95-foot Brigantine will sail from San Francisco 


Hawaii, the Galapagos, Ca¬ 
ribbean, Aegean, and along 
the coasts of Alaska, Califor¬ 
nia, Mexico and Maine, the 
travel firm has a network of 
vessels offering passage op¬ 
portunities such as Mexico to 
Hawaii, Hawaii to Tahiti, 
Bermuda to Gibraltar and 
many mere for those in¬ 


terested in extensive ocean 
sailing. 

Whether you wish to sail on 
Eblis, an 81-foot, gaff-rigged 
yawl, luxuriously cruising 
the Aegean (May 18-June 1, 
$1,050); Whistler, 54-foot rac¬ 
ing/cruising cutter on a 
challenging ocean passage 
-from Hawaii to the Marque¬ 


sas (March 1-21, $1,050); or 
on Sir Cloudesley Shovell, 65- 
foot schooner, which sails 
the Caribbean out of Antigua 
and explores the East Coast 
during the summer months 
ranging as far north as Nova 
Scotia, there are still spots 
for you this winter and 
spring. The firm also offers 


year 

round. 

Typical of the comments 
made by participants is the 
following received in a letter 
from Janet Fujinari of Santa 
Cruz, Calif., who sailed in 
both Galapagos and Peru ex¬ 
peditions last year: “Look¬ 
ing forward to more ’adven¬ 
tures by Ocean Voyages’! 
The last one motivated me to 
enroll in a Spanish language 
class. Your programs are 
great in themselves, but (for 
me), they are also starting 
points in the expansion of 
knowledge and understand¬ 
ing of the world around me 
and of myself. 

“Truly, they are voyages 
of discovery!” 

Ocean Voyages Institute, 
the research and education 
arm of the travel firm, also 
works with scientists such as 
Dr. Roger Payne and Dr. Ric 
Martini aboard the Varua, a 
73-foot Brigantine, in the Ha¬ 
waiian Islands (16 days, $1,- 
200), and the 144-foot Bar- 
qirentine, Regina Maris 
sailing the Caribbean for six 
weeks conducting humpback 
whale research ($2,700). 

A addition to the fleet is the 
Ta/jo, a 95-foot Brigantine, 
which will sail under the Gol¬ 
den Gate, April 18, beginning 
a unique series of participa¬ 
tory sailing, scuba diving, 
and phptographic expedi¬ 
tions. 

The first voyage will be 
San Francisco to Ensenada 
with stops at the California 
Channel Islands (April 18-28, 
$650). 

Continuing programs ex¬ 
plore the coasts and offshore 
islands of Mexico, El Salva¬ 
dor, Costa Rica and Pana¬ 
ma. 

To receive a free bro¬ 
chure, write or call: Ocean 
Voyages, 1709 Bridgeway, 
Sausalito, Calif. 94965. 


SUPER HOLIDAYS 

- PALM SPRINGS SPECIAL 


(f you appreciate superior rooms, coaches and sightseeing 
routes to enhance your holiday — phone today lor your 
descriptive Itinerary and discover why VALUE CONSCIOUS 
TRAVELLERS choose our offerings first. 

DAY TOURS 

FEB 27 Sailspring Island (Hot lunch included) •20 ea. 

(2 Furry Cruises, Malahal Views and Harbour House Hotel) 

MAR 17 St Patrick's Day (Hoi lunch included) * 1 8 ea. 

APRIL 14 Grouse Mt Skyride (Lunch & tram included) *2^ ea. 
MAY 11 Sooke Harbour House (Buffet lunch included) * 1 Q ea 
JUNE 2 Squamish-Shannon Falls (Lunch not included) •22 ea. 

SHORT TOURS 

APRIL 4 (4 days) Easter at 108 mi Ranch Resort 
APRIL 20 (7 days) Kootenays and Silver Slocan 
APRIL 21 (4 days) Okanagan Springtime 
MAY 8 (4 days) Bavarian Mai-Fest (Leavenworth) 

JUNE 10 (7 days) Kah-nee-ta and Rose Festival 
JUNE 12 (4 days) Portland Rose Festival and Parade 


Eaton's 

Travel 

presents 

Travel 

for 

Pleasure' 

with 

Brian Wells 

An informative 
six session series of 
Lectures and Films 
to assist you in 
making your trip 
a really pleasant, 
lasting experience. 

Mr Wells has had more 
than 15 years of assisting 
the travelling public, and 
has researched those 
problems and issues one 
may face when abroad 
These lectures are the re¬ 
sult of this research and 
can be of great assistance 
to anyone planning travel 
now or later. 

'Travel for 
Pleasure' 

Starts Wed., 

Feb. 20 and 
continues each 
Wednesday 
through 
March 26. 

7:00 p.m. to 
8:30 p.m. 

Topics Covered Include 

#1 Introduction to Travel 
Airlines vs. Charters 
#2 Ocean - River Cruises 
#3 Coach Tours - Camp¬ 
ing 

In America; Europe. 
UK. 

Hotels - Documenta¬ 
tion 

Customs, Immigration; 
Passports 

#5 Currency - Auto 
Rental 

#6 How to Plan a Trip 

Clothing, Health; Cul¬ 
tural aspects. 

Series of 
& Lectures 
10.00 
Register at 
Eaton's Travel 
Third Floor. 
Seating is Limited. 

EATON'S 


„ 


SKI 

BIG WHITE 

AND 

SILVERSTAR 

Air, Hotel and Lifts, 2 or 5 I 
nights accommodation. 
(Starting Decomber j 
22nd). From Only 

100 


LAS VEGAS 

From VANCOUVER 
4 nights Air & Hotel 
Commencing Feb. 21st. | 
BOOK EARLY 


WAIKIKI 

FROM VANCOUVER 
Air and Hotel 
ONE WEEK 

too 


BAHAMAS 

FROM VANCOUVER 
AIR and HOTEL 

7 NIGHTS 626°° 
12 NIGHTS 766“ 


BARBADOS ' 
SALE 

From Vancouver. With 
new reductions, you 
may receive two 
weeks air and hotel. 


749 


00 


(SAVINGS OF 220.00) 


FIJI 

From VANCOUVER 
17 days Air 8 Hotel 

00 


1291 


CENTO 


620 ADMIRALS RD. 
VICTORIA. B.C. 

* 384-4622 




“LOVE BOAT” 

• MINI CRUISES • 

Register Now For 

3 and 5-DAY 
CRUISES 

Contact 

WESTERN CANADA TRAVEL 

729 JOHNSON ST. 382-6160 

(Free Perking in Civic Parkade) 

SOOKE OFFICE 642-4422 Me , 


AM 



















































TRAVEL 


Vietnamese 
boat people 
once clung 
to it for • 
their lives 
but now it’s 
being rebuilt 
as hoter 
cocktail 
lounge 



Go east for a glimpse of real 


By JOHN PINKERMAN 

KUALA TRANGGANU, 
Malaysia — Penang may be 
more relaxing. Kuala Lum¬ 
pur may have more mosques 
and other big city attrae-' 
lions. However, the east 
coast along the South China 
Sea will give you a more 
valid look at the real Malay¬ 
sia. 

To begin with, there are 
more Malays and fewer Chi¬ 
nese in Kota Bahru, Kuan- 
tan, this city on the seashore 
—over 50 per cent as against 
the national average of 44 
per cent Malays, 36 per cent 
Chinese and 20 per cent In¬ 
dian, Indonesian and others. 
This strong Malay presence 
means the East coast is 
more ‘ different” than Hong 
Kong, Singapore and Kuala 
Lumpur, with their ever¬ 
present Chinese influence. 

Also, the lifestyles found 
along the coast will give you 
a fascinating experience in 
what Malays are really like, 
both the good and the bad. 

And. the tourist industry is 
in its infancy here, which 
means that while accommo¬ 
dations are not up to Pen¬ 
ang’s luxurious state, the 
souvenir merchants haven’t 
taken over yet and the people 
still are happy, friendly and 
a bit awed by North Ameri¬ 
can travellers. 

You had better hurry, 
though, because several re- 
sort-type seaside hotels are 
in the making, and when 
they rise into the sky on what 
are now remote and tranquil 
beaches, the tourism influ¬ 
ence will take over, the won¬ 
derful Malays, or some of 
them, will become more 
merchants than natives— 
and you won’t be able to tell 
this area from Bali, Barba 
dos or other once-pristine 
but now commercial vaca¬ 
tion spots. 

So, enjoy these outposts, 
reached by decent road or 
propeller airplanes, while 
you can. 

You likely will stay at the 
Pantai Motel, an adequate 
hostelry where the service 
matches the pace of its sur¬ 
roundings—languid. But, the 
mostly Malay service people 
make up in friendliness for 
what they lack in speed. 

If you visit from May to ‘ 
September,’ particularly in 
August, you will enjoy the 
exciting experience of tur¬ 
tle-watching. What this 
means is that you travel 30 
miles south of Kuala Treng- 
ganu, usually at night, to see 
giant leatherback turtles, 
some eight feet long, 100 
years old and weighing 2,000 
pounds, crawl up on the sand 
for their annual egg-laying. 

They will use their flippers 
(legs) to dig holes two to 
three feet deep and lay from 
50 to 200 eggs each, then 
return to the sea and perhaps 
swim thousands of miles to 
as far as Australia (one 
marked turtle has been 




Jus-Rite' 


5 MINUTE 

PASSPORT 

PHOTOS 

COLOUIUND 
* bLACK and white 


’>6 YATES ST. 
TOWN and COUNTRY 
HILLSIDE 

BEACON AYE.. SIDNEY 


Malaysian living 


sighted both here and on the 
west coast of Australia.) 

The turtles will not be dis¬ 
turbed by your camera’s 
flash bulbs, and when they 
are finished they will use 
their flippers to cover the 
eggs. The eggs normally 
take about 100 days to hatch, 
and the baby turtles work 
their way through the sand to 
the surface and follow moth¬ 
er’s path to the sea. 

One unfortunate aspect of 
the annual event td^that 
poachers sometimes km the 
mother turtles, steal the 
eggs and grab the baby tur¬ 
tles for food. However, if you 
are lucky to see the arrival of 
the giant adults, you will 


have something to remem¬ 
ber. 

A visit to the local villages 
along the coast is something 
to be remembered—views of 
a lifestyle that you may have 
read about but seldom be¬ 
fore have seen. Equally fas¬ 
cinating is your visit to the 
Trengganu open-air market, 
rain or shine. The fish will be 
only minutes or hours out of 
the water. The fruits—pa¬ 
paya, oranges, bananas and 
other products of the tropics 
—are fresh, the housewives 
come and go by tri shaw and 
the hundreds of sellers will 
be patient with you, your 
camera and your silly ques¬ 
tions. 


16th ANNUAL EASTER IN 

Hawaii! 

WITH MARGIE NAYSMITH, APRIL 4-20 

Tour includes: FuJIy escorted from Victoria, hotel 
accommodation with kitchenette in Honolulu. Re¬ 
turn air fare via CP Air. 


16 DAYS IN 
HONOLULU 


$ 


699 


00 


Call Today! 


i c Bayshore 
1 iravel 

1622 Government St. 382-71 03 

For best cabins, at low prices, book now . . . 

ALASKA s 605!„ 

7-day cruise from Vancouver every Sunday 

Ports of Call: 

Sitka, Skagway. Ketchikan and crulaing of Glacier 
Bay. 

Price: 

*U.S. funds per person, sharing outside, cabin with 
two lower beds and facilities. 

Season: 

June 22 to September 7, 1980 

We are ptaaaad to offer for the first time the Soviet 
cruise ship ODESSA, on its maidsn voyags to Alaska. 
All cabins a/c., gourmet meals, Russian antartainmsnt 
and bast of all, no tipping. Hurry, limited number of 


SSEKjfrP*- 




AIRLINE 
AIRP0RTER 
SERVICE 

TO VANCOUVER 
AND VICTORIA 
AIRPORTS 

REGULAR SCHEDULED 

DAILY SERVICE DEPARTING FROM 

COURTYARD INN 
850 BLANSHARD 

FOR INFORMATION AND 
DEPARTURE TIMES CONTACT: 

HUSTLE BUS LTD. 

388-9916 

Locally owned and operated and fully-licenced by the 
British Columbia Motor Carrier Commission. 


Another phase of your 
brief visit that you will not 
soon forget is a half-day boat 
ride up the Trengganu River. 
It costs only $5 and it gives 
you a close-up at how the 
river people live. There are 
wrecked boats lining both 
sides of the river, some the 
craft that brought Vietnam¬ 
ese boat people refugees 
here, others that were seized 
from foreign fishermen 
working Malaysian waters. 
You can make frequent stops 
ashore to mingle with the 
friendly natives and you will 
conclude that they live a 
primitive but happy life. 

Such is life in these Malay¬ 
sian boondocks. You must 


pass through Kuala Lumpur 
to get here, and while in the 
capital city, you will note the 
frequency of Moorish archi¬ 
tecture, the luxury of the 
tourist hotels—and the joy 
of a day’s trip to Fraser’s 
Hill, a 5,000-foot resort 63 
miles north of the city. Also, 
don’t miss seeing the Nation¬ 
al Monument, an imposing 
bit of sculpture that seems to 
duplicate the U.S. Marine 
Memorial built in Washing¬ 
ton to honor the heroes of Iwo 
Jima’s Second World War 
conquest. 

It honours those killed in 
the 1948-60 fight against 
communists. 

But, for a more genuine 
look at what Malaysia is 
really like, hurry through 
your Kuala Lumpur experi¬ 
ence and head for the East 
Coast. 


EASTER AT 108 MILE RESORT 

April 4 to 7 Double SI 50.00 ea. 

(4 days) Twin $155.00 ea. 

An enjoyable Easter "break” in Beautiful B.C . Springtime in the 
CARIBOO! A four-day holiday at this favourite recreation resort in the 
heart of Cariboo country. Easter dinner is included, along with escorted 
sightseeing through the rugged Fraser Canyon and into the remote 
Chilcottn. A thoroughly retaxing vacation in the right place at the right 
time o< year 

For a detailed Itinerary, please call 

B.C. TRAVEL 

385-4732 

For other tour offerings, see our ad in this section 2-16 


IV just 30 miles 
hour drive from 


CALL THE CRUISE SPECIALISTS! 
385-1533 or 385-4312 


11-115 TRAVEL SERVICE 

385-1533 578 Votes St Victoria, B C. 385-4312 


On a Beautiful Ba} 

North of Nanaimo and a two 
Victoria you will find a resort gem. All units 
overlook the ocean and are spacious and luxuri¬ 
ous, a golf course is across the road and the 
friendly Village of Qualicum minutes away. Con¬ 
tinental breakfast, a great restaurant, a lounge 
with a sweeping view and our own racquetball 
court completes the picture. We call it the 
Sand Pebbles Inn. You'll call it Magic! Two- 
day holiday package for a couple $79.50. Call us 
for a brochure or contact your Iravel agent. 
Sand Pebbles Inn, Qualicum Beach, B.C. 
(604) 752-6974. 


RED VELVET TOURS & TRAVEL LTD. 

Ste. 154 Market Square (Pandora St. entrance) 

384-5121 9j£r 

COACH TOURS 

Express tour to Reno departs every Sat. p.m. 


From $119.00 
From $139.00 
From $269.00 
From $255.00 


Rogular tour to Reno departs every Sat. a. 

Disneyland Starting March 29 
Calgary Stampede Special Juty 2 

AIR TOURS 

Reno, Vegas, Hawaii, Disneyland, Mexico 

PORTLAND ROSE FESTIVAL 

June 13, 14 and 15. 

Includes pre-parade show, parade, % 4 A 4 00 
city tour and farewell lunch From ■ 1 Quad. 

All tours feature .unlimited medical and hospital coverage at 
no axtra cost anrT'a complimentary $250. bonus package on 
Reno Tours. —- 



MARITIME 

TOURS 

Visit Canada this summer 
and fall on our first class 
Maritime tours. We have 3 
different tours this year as 
below. The prices are from 
Victoria and are based on 
present air fares, if booked 
now you are protected. Fall 
departures Sept. 1,8, 15. 


ATLANTIC CANADA 15 day$.$910.00 

INCLUDING 

NEWFOUNDLAND 21 dayi_$1140.00 

INCLUDING 

NEW ENGLAND 24 days_$1345.00 

twB weleyclen 


388-4201 


768 FORT ST. 



THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 41 


Sunday 

Features at 


SAFEWAY 


CANADA SAFEWAY LIMITED 


Stores Open 10 to 5 

Prices Effective: February 17th 

In All Your Safeway Stores in Greater Victoria, Colwood and Sidney 
Hillside & Shelbourne Store Closed Sunday 


Beef Chuck Roast 


Blade 
Bone-In 
Canada Grade 


a’1.19 


Frozen Peas. 

2*79* 


Bel-air 

Fancy 


Meat Dinners 


Manor House 
Frozen Assorted 
Varieties. 11-oz. 
(312 g) pkg. 



Paper Towels 

L99* 


Scott 
Assorted 
Colours. Pkg. of 


Coffeemate 


Carnation 
16-oz. (454 g) Jar 


S 


149 


Margarine 

r. 31^1.79 


Cheer Oxydol 

Powdered Laundry A t 11ml 
Detergent ^ M ^1^1 

2.4 kg box. Your Choice BlVV 


Spartan Apples 

69 


B.C. Grown 
Commercial 
Grade . 



Sal«s in Retail Quantittes Onty ... Wa Rtstnra tha Right to Limit Quantities 

_ ... and a little bit more 

Everything 

you want 
from a 
store 


SAFEWAY 


CANADA SAFEWAY LIMITED 


lit more 

m 















































































42 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 


/ 


CANADA 

Court 
gives 
Ralph 
the bird 

TORONTO (CP) - A cou¬ 
ple of wolf whistles and 
“How ya doing” got Rajah 
the mynah bird tossed out of 
county court Thursday. 

The 25-year-old bird was in 
court with his owner, Colin 
Kerr, who is being sued by a 
private Toronto mint for $1 
550 for not paying for 5,000 
medallions made for him 
in 1976 that had a mynah 
bird on them. 

Kerr testified that the me¬ 
dallions discolored when 
wom next to the skin. But 
Michael Whelon, who was a 
co-owner of Studio Jewellery 
Arts in 1976, testified that the 
minted medallions, were 
never meant to be wom as 
costume jewelry without 
special preparation. 

Kerr, who describes him¬ 
self as. an entertainer, is 
counter-suing for damages 
done to his career because he 
says people to whom he gave 
the medallions complained 
of them discoloring and have 
shunned him. 

Following the morning re¬ 
cess, Kerr brought to court a 
covered cage that held 
Rajah and his mate. 

Rajah let out a couple 
of squawks, but they were 
ignored. When it happened 
again, thp judge looked at 
the court clerk and the clerk 
asked Kerr to get rid of the 
bird. 

“It’s the first time he had 
been thrown out of a place in 
25 years and he's been with 
me at the Vatican, Bucking¬ 
ham Palace and the White 
House," Kerr said outside 
court. 

Malcolm Oswald, the other 
partner in the mint, testified 
that he told Kerr that the 
medallions needed a special 
plastic coating if they were 
to be wom as pendants but 
Kerr wouldn’t go for the 
extra cost. 

Kerp denies he was ever 
warned. 


Wardair 

ruling 

disputed 

VANCOUVER (CP) — The 
Canadian Air Line Flight At¬ 
tendants Association says an 
arbitrator has ruled in its 
favor in a dispute with Ward- 
air over the use of Thai 
JJight attendants on the air¬ 
line's Southeast Asian refu¬ 
gee flights. 

Cathy Bruce, CALFAA 
western business repre¬ 
sentative, said the arbitrator 
ruled that the union’s con¬ 
tract with Ward- air applies 
to the refugee flights. 

She said the binding deci¬ 
sion nfe&ns the company 
must pay the wages set out in 
the contract, even if Wardair 
continues to employ the 
Thais instead of CALFAA 
members on the flights. 

However, Tom Spalding, 
Wardair executive 
vice-president, said in an in¬ 
terview from Edmonton that 
/he airline interprets the de¬ 
cision as only the first step in 
arbitration proceedings— 
that the arbitrator has ruled 
it is within his jurisdiction to 
make a ruling on the dispute. 

Iran show 
at library 
irks staff 

OTTAWA (CP) - Staff 
members at the National Li¬ 
brary are angry at a library 
display marking the first 
anniversary of the Iranian 
revolution. 

“The whole building is 
talking about it and the gen¬ 
eral opinion is that it's some¬ 
what outrageous,” said 
Chris Seifried, a cataloguer 
In the library’s photo collec¬ 
tion. 

“The lives of our embassy 
officials have been in jeop¬ 
ardy in Iran and I don't think 
a public building should be 
used for a display of this 
inflammatory material," he 
said. 

The exhibition, organized 
by the Iranian embassy in 
Ottawa, consists of revolu¬ 
tionary and nationalistic 
posters and a photographic 
record of the revolution that 
brought the Ayatollah Ru- 
hollah' Khomeini to power a 
year ago. 



WARDAIRGLASS 

ISMORE THAN ECONOMICAL 
ITS DOWNRIGHT POSH 

"Wardair Class"to Europe and Hawaii. 


If Europe is beckoning, or Hawaii, 
we've got a lot going for youvia Vfardair. 


You get all the trimmings at very economical prices; even 
lower pnees if you book now for a spring departure and 
avoid peak season fares. 

You fly in wide-bodied jet comfort, and ’Wardair Class' is 
really something special. Great food, imported wines with 
your meals, bar service at no extra cost-these are just a 


few of the things you enjoy in flight. Yet this up-front 
service is all in the basic price of your ticket. * 

Check our wide choice in Wardair schedules and 
destinations. And remember that when travelling to the 
U K. you also have the option of flying into one 
city and returning from another. 


EUROPE 

London (Gatwick) 
Manchester 

Glasgow (Prestwick) 

PronL'fi irt 

Spring & Fall Departures 

LOW SEASON 

From 

$589 

$574 

$569 

$649 

$619 

Summer Departures 

PEAK SEASON 

From 

$759 

$744 

$739 

$824 

$789 

SAVINGS PER 
COUPLE Up To 

$340 

$340 

$340 

eocn 

rreuiwuri 

Amsterdam 

OOJu 

$340 

HAWAII 

Honolulu 

$324 

$354 

$60 


EUROPE HAWAII 


You also get our 
exclusive money-back 
guarantee. 

5 When you book your 

Wardair flight, you get our 
exclusive, money-back 
guarantee, which says in 
writing: 

“If you book a holiday with 
us and, prior to departure, 
find the identical Wardair 
product advertised for less, 
well match the lower 
advertised price.” 

Pa yment in full at time of 
booking guarantees current prices 
a gainst any fuel surchar ges 
or currency fluctuations. 

Drop in soon, and tell us your 
vacation plans. Well get you 
on a Wardair flight that’s 
more than just economical 
transportation. It’s a great 
part of your holiday. 


Low Season departures are Irom May 1-14 and September 
14-October 20. 

Peak Season departures are trom June 26-August 2. 

You must book at least 30 days in advance and stay a minimum 
of 6 days. 


Low Season departures are Irom now until June 25 and 
September 8-November 1. For flights departing March 20-23 
add $25 per person. For flights returning April 3-6. add $25 per 
person. 

Peak Season departures are from June 26-August 30. 

You must book at least 14 days in advance and you cannot 
return prior to the lirst Sunday following departure. 


Wardair A.B.C. flights require a non-refundable deposit of 10% to be 
received by Intervac within 7 days of booking Only round trip flights may 
be booked and prices quoted are per person round trip and do not include 
land arrangements. Cancellation Insurance is available for a nominal 
charge. 

Specific terms and condition# are shown in Wardair s brochure and all flights are 
subject to availability Prices may vary depending upon dates selected All prices 
subject lo fuel cost increases and/or Increases due to currency flucluations. unless 
lull payment is made at lime ol booking 





1701 Douglas St 

4th Floor 

385-8731 





VISA 


Planning to fly Vfaidair? It's hard not to think of the Bay. 






























































V 



£be ^imbag Colonist 


T 


Gandhi lovingly remembered 


In the spring of 1930 Mohandas K. Gand¬ 
hi began, to walk to the sea some 200 
miles from his home. His object: to make a 
little Salt. Ten days later, when he and his 
followers reached the sea, a little salt was 
made. And so, of course, was history: 
British India began to crumble. ^ 

“We were bewildered," Jawaharal 
Nehru recalls in this memoir. “We could 
not quite fit in a national struggle with 
common salt.’" 

But Indians weren’t allowed to make 
salt: the Salt Act forbade them and gave 
the government a monopoly on its produc¬ 
tion and sale. 

After his walk to the sea Ghandi was 
jailed without trial or sentence and Wil¬ 
liam L. Shirer, then a 27-year-old journal¬ 
ist with the Chicago Tribune, didn't meet 
him until August when Gandhi, released 
from prison, was negotiating with the vice¬ 
roy, Lord Irwin, about the possibilities of 
Indian independence. It is upon his meet¬ 
ings with Gandhi over the next few months, 
as well as his own newspaper reports, 
that this memoir is based. 

It was an exciting, dangerous and vio¬ 
lent time in India, 

Gandhi had by then evolved his concept 
of passive resistance to British author 
ity, and it was being used effectively 
throughout India to demonstrate for inde¬ 
pendence. 

"The British," Gandhi told Shirer, 
“want to put the struggle on the plane 
of machine-guns where they have the 
weapons and we do not. Our only assur¬ 
ance of beating them is putting the strug¬ 
gle on a plane where we have the weapons 
and they have not.’’. 

Satyagraha, then, was most assuredly a 


By Walter Kellythorne 


GANDHI: A Memoir, by William L. Shirer. 

Musson. $16.95. 

weapon. It required patience, belief, and, 
in a mass movement like Gandhi’s, plenty 
of bodies: thousands, in fact, for the Brit¬ 
ish and their native lackeys to club into 
unconsciousness. It was, one realized, only 
the sheer numbers of Indians who offered 
themselves that so effectively hampered 
British attempts to contain and destroy 
their struggle. 

Their attempts to do so seemed to bear 
more fruit In the political realm. 

Gandhi’s talks with Lord Irwin ap¬ 
peared to result simply in a commit 
ment to talk more in London later in 
the year; more, though eventual inde¬ 
pendence was assumed by both sides, 
Irwin succeeded in extracting from Gandhi 
an agreement that all of India's most 
important affairs — including foreign 
policy, finance and defence — would re¬ 
main under British control for the forsee- 
able future. 

Gandhi’s political followers were dis¬ 
mayed. Though he told them that "the 
goodwill and active help of Englishmen 
(was) necessary" for Indian indepen¬ 
dence, few of them wanted or believed in 
such help. A split in their ranks seemed 
inevitable, but before he left for London 
Gandhi brought them into line: he. and no 
one else, was to have sole negotiating 
authority with the British. 

His London trip was a disaster. The 
British refused to discuss in detail the 
complex aspects of the problems before 
them and Gandhi returned to India no 


further ahead than when he had left it. In 
fact, as Shirer points out, the seeds of what 
he later regarded as his greatest failure 
were already well sown. 

This was the inability of Hindu and Mos¬ 
lem Indians to reconcile their differences 
into a united front against their common 
oppressor. 

Even Gandhi, the Mahatma, “great 
soul", was unable to bring the two factions 
together, and in London he was constantly 
harrassed by Moslems who feared that 
their interests would be ignored in an India 
ruled by Hindus. Rather than face that, the 
Moslem leaders and their followers opted 
for a country of their own — Pakistan — 
whose existence has so far failed to end the 
bitter divisions between Moslem and 
Hindu. ' 

For the next 15 years of his life Gandhi 
— in or out of prison — led demonstra¬ 
tions and politicked feverishly for the 
end of British domination in India. On 
August 15, 1947, his dream was realized. 
Five months later he was killed by a Hindu 
fanatic. 

Shirer's book, then, is not only a memoir: 
it is history, too, and an autobiography 
of a young man appalled by the world 
he reports on. 

“I count the days with Gandhi as the 
most fruitful of my life," Shirer writes. 
"No other experience ... so shook me out 
of the rut of banal existence and opened 
my . . . mind and spirit ... to some con¬ 
ception of the meaning of life on this 
perplexing earth." 

Observant and loving, this memoir can 
be read with interest by anyone seek¬ 
ing that same concept of life. And thal, 
one suspects, would be nearly everyone. 


BOOKS 

Page 43/Sunday, February 17, 1980 



Mohandas K. Gandhi: Patience and a cast of thousands 


A doomed anthology 

By Julian Reid 

OTHER CANADAS: An Anthology of Science Fiction 
and Fantasy, edited by John Robert Colombo. 

McGraw-Hill Ryerson. $15.95. 


Other Canadas is an an¬ 
thology with a mission. In 
Ihe words of editor John Ro¬ 
bert Colombo, it aims to 
demonstrate "that there is a 
Canadian science fiction and 
fantasy, and that is worth 
a serious reader's serious 
attention.” 

Perhaps that mission was 
foredoomed from the start. 
After all, however you look 
at it, Canada's contribution 
to SF is disproportionately 
small, even when contrasted 
to that of. say, Australia •— 
let alone those two major 
centres of activity in the 
genre, Britain and the U.S. If 
we exclude ex-Canadians 
like Gordon R. Dickson, who 
left this country long before 
they commenced publishing, 
and immigrants like Nova 
Scotia's Spider Robinson or 
Victoria’s own Michael G. 
Coney, who were established 
SF writers long before they 


arrived, we arc left with only 
one major talent whose writ¬ 
ing (in the genre) was ac¬ 
tually nurtured here: A.E. 
van Vogt. And he moved to 
the U.S. in 1944, only' five 
years after he turned to SF 
writing. 

Of course, there is always 
our one true native daughter 
— Toronto’s Phyllis (Jiotlieb, 
who more or less by default 
has been hailed as "the cen¬ 
tral figure in Canadian SF.” 
But, good as she is, she is far 
from productive, and might 
more justly be categorized 
as the inevitable exception 
who goes to prove the rule. 

Colombo attempts to cir¬ 
cumvent this embarrassing 
lack of material by reverting 
to the old ploy of drawing 
upon practically anything 
and everything, just as long 
as its. author once cracked 
open a bottle of Canada Dry. 
As he himself puts it, he has 


considered as eligible "writ¬ 
ing in prose or poetry form 
by all of the following: Cana¬ 
dian citizens, new Cana¬ 
dians, former Canadians, 
even non-Canadians (when 
their work is set in Can¬ 
ada)." The result, needless 
to say, is a volume notably 
lacking in any discernible 
Canadian flavor, despite its 
pretensions and the genuine 
merits of some of its con¬ 
tents. 

, Set aside 100-odd pages of 
debris which could appeal 
only to the most fervently 
masochistic of literary histo 
rians — forlorn scraps of old 
novels, a pseudonymous 1X83 
pamphlet on “The Dominion 
in 1983," and two threadbare 
I9th century stories whose 
sole merit lies in their sub- 
margina! historical signifi¬ 
cance — and one is left with 
an average-sized SF anthol¬ 
ogy of more-or-less average 
quality. 

Only two stories emerge as 
really outstanding: Algernon 
Blackwood's superb exer¬ 
cise in wilderness terror. 
“The Wendigo,” and A. E. 



Colombo 


... Canadian SF scarce 

van Vogt's oft reprinted SF 
classic, “Black Destroyer.” 

All things considered, the 
chief merit of this miscon¬ 
ceived but not entirely 
worthless conglomeration is 
the way it underscores the 
very question it set out to 
scotch: Just why is there so 
little in the way of indigen¬ 
ously Canadian science fic¬ 
tion and fantasy? 







Pat 

Barclay 


Cutting down 
the Carr myth 

EMILY CARR, A Biography, by Maria Tippett. Oxford. 

$16.95. 

Perhaps Mexico was not the best place to begin 
reading a biography of Emily Carr. After Orozco, 
Rivera, and that swarm of artist-patriots who chose the 
career of Emiliano Zapata as subject matter — and 
whose works were collected in a stunning exhibition 
which good luck brought us to in Mexico City — Carr's 
Victorian prudery, her old-maid persniekety-ness, 
seemed trivial and tiresome. Even the cool silences and 
the great green rhythms of her forest paintings failed to 
evoke the customary awe. Mexico had already over¬ 
awed us. And beside its teeming life and volatile 
passions, Emily Carr’s life seemed merely ordinary, 
like our own. 

But once in Belize (which is to be our home for the 
next three months), we found the familiar Carr magic 
to be as potent as ever. Compared to the cultural 
excitement of Mexico, Belize is strictly a non-event. But 
the jungle and the sea give Belize some green rhythms 
of its own. To a chilblained Canadian, perched under 
a palm tree on a coral island some 20 miles from the 
Belizian shore, Emily Carr’s life and work have plenty 
to say. At this distance the shadow she casts over our 
cultural history seems nearly as long as that of Louis 
Riel. In fact, Carr's troubled life and lonely struggles 
seem almost archetypal to us today. Like Riel’s, her 
story is the stuff of which myths and legends are 
made. 

So it stands to reason that the time was ripe for a 
myth-debunking scholar to march in and attempt 
to cut the shadow down to size. The scholar is Maria 
Tippett, who teaches cultural history at Simon Fraser 


The young Emily Carr 


University and is co-author, with Douglas Cole, of From 
Desolation to Splendour: Changing perceptions of the 
British Columbia Landscape. 

Ms. Tippett is nothing if not conscientious; her 
research and writing consumed five years and sent her 
burrowing through archives, museums, libraries and 
galleries in three countries, while her travels in Carr’s 
footsteps took her to places as diverse as the Queen 
Charlotte Islands and Concarneau, France. Emily Carr, 
A Biography, is a thoroughly documented and handso- 




The muddled pundit 


By Walter Young 

200 DAYS: Joe Clark in Power, by Warner Tro.ver. 
Personal Library. $7.95. 


It is the thesis of Dalton Camp’s preface to this book 
that the Clark government fell because it did not 
understand the opposition, and therefore could not 
appreciate either its nature or its strength. By its 
failure to call Parliament soon enough, the government 
denied itself an opportunity to assess the position of the 
enemy. The enemy was not only Liberals and New 
Democrats, it was Ontario Tories too. 

Because they have Quebec, the Liberals are formid¬ 
able. To beat them the other party must have reliable 
support in Ontario just to get in the game. The Conser¬ 
vatives under Joe Clark had the advantage of a Conser¬ 
vative government in Queen's Park, led by the sleek and 
plausible Bill Davis. But, curiously. Clark and his 
advisers chose both to ignore this strategic factor and to 
alienate Davis as well. It was not done deliberately. It 
was done out of naive and feckless inexperience. 

There is a good deal of sensible analysis in Camp s 
preface. It is, however, only 17 pages long and 50 cents a 
page is steep, even for Daiton Camp. What Camp does 
not mention in his preface is the book that is attached to 
it. I understand that this is because Camp had not seen 
the book since he was writing the preface at the same 
time Troyer was writing the book. It is just as well for 
Troyer since, had Camp seen what was to follow, he 
might have chosen to use his preface elsewhere. 



mely illustrated work. Tippett is generous with her :£ 
acknowledgements and discreet in her complaints, S 
relegating what appear to be well-founded criticisms of £ 
Carr's literary trustee (Ira Dilworth) and his heirs to 
two unobtrusive notes following the main text. In short, 
it is impossible to fault the sincerity and industry of £ 
either the author or her publisher. My only real criti- 
cisms of this book are that while it aims at being the £ 
definitive work it skirts speculation (or quotation from 
art authorities) on the relative significance of Carr’s 
achievement, and that the super-conscientious Tippett. £ 
not content with capturing “the real" Emily Carr. £i 
warts and all, had further insisted on peeling the skin £ 
off each and every wart. £: 

This latter characteristic means that the first half £: 
of Emily Carrhas to fight an uphill battle against read¬ 
er iritation at its obsessive objectivity. Two examples •$ 
cannot convey the cumulative effect of many, but to £: 
illustrate: Tippett is harsh in her criticisms of Emily’s :£ 

insularity during her years of study in London and £: 

Paris, calling her “notsufficiently imaginative, or even til- 
interested. to seek out what little modern art there :£ 
was in London”, and, in Paris, "(cloaked) in impene- £: 
trable conventionality, . . . oblivious of the revolu- :£ 

tionary currents that existed around her." Tippett does £ 

not make the point that Carr’s provincialism in these :£ 
two centres of Western civilization worked to protect •£ 
the stubborn individualism that made her mature £: 
work both possible and great. Carr’s impulses were :£ 
instinctive, not intellectual; as Tippett herself points £ 
out, “her greatest asset as an artist was her spontane- :£ 
ity.” ^ 

But there is much to admire in this fascinating :£ 
book. Ms. Tippett has done her homework so efficiently 
that she not only supplies an enormous quantity of new :£ 
or hitherto scattered information, but is able to :£ 
place it firmly in the context of the times. She is £: 
especially good at tracing the various influences on :£ 
Carr’s development as both artist and writer, and is £: 
frank on the subject of her repressed sexual develop- 
ment and resulting “hysterical personality”. (Carr’s :£ 
father, it seems was the culprit.) 

Emily Carr, A Biography lives up to the promise of £: 
its dust-jacket, “recreating the life of Emily Carr as :£ 
she lived it, not as she told it.” Maria Tippett prefaces £: 
her book with the confession that Carr’s life “filled me :£ 
with admiration and wonder as I reconstructed it." One £ 
suspects that her "warts and all" approach to Carr’s £: 
story was a necessary act of self-defence against a :£ 
subject that persists, despite man’s most rational £: 
attempts, in looming much larger than life. 



It is not that Troyer does not offer considerable 
tribute to Camp; he quotes him extensively, writes of his 
"icy judgment," “memorable phrases." and at another 
point refers to "the acid flask in which Dalton Camp 
dips his chrome steel pen." If reading one journalist 
fawning over another is not to your taste, then there arc- 
parts of this book better left unread. 

If. as well, you are seeking some insight into the 
brief life of the Conservative government, or some- 
analysis of what has happened to our politics since last 
May. then you w ould be wise to leave the rest of the book • 
unread as well. It is more than a disappointment, it is an 
egregiously bad book. What makes it so bad is not a 
single flaw but rather a remarkable combination of 
defects. It is the sort of book about which the kindest 
reviewer could only say that it appeared to be well 
bound and that the type was clear and evenly set. 
Beyond such positive judgments it is downhill the rest of 
the way. 

★ ★ ★ 

V 

There is very little in this book that is new. What 
there is consists of trivial anecdotes that barely war 
rant telling. And distressingly often what is retold is 
either inaccurate, vague, or inconclusive. In some 
■instances it is a matter of sloppiness, in others it 
appears that Troyer jus-t doesn't know. 

He writes of Pearson being “hardly comfortable” 
in his East Block office in 1965, which is curious since 
Pearson had been,prime minister since 1963. He writes 
of Diefenbaker being buried "outside Prince Albert” 
which is certainly a utiique way of describing the" 
location of Saskatoon. 

Troyer has a fair amount to say about the disas¬ 
trous Tory pledge to move the Canadian embassy from 
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The problem is thal he seems 
unable to make up his mind about which snippet of 
gossip is the most reliable. 

On page 27 Troyer describes campaign aides Jim 
Gillies and Bill Neville as keeping Clark’s resolve “firm 
on the issue" of moving the embassy. On page 51 we 
learn that aide Lowell Murray was opposed and that it 
was Maureen McTeer who talked Clark into the deci¬ 
sion, having been put up to it by her law tutor Jeff 
Lyons, who had been pul up to it by his good friend Ron 
Atkey. On page 55 it turns out that “Clark’s campaign 
aides advised against the issue” and that Lowell Mur¬ 
ray, when asked by Clark whether the promise was a 
good idea, had merely said,"use your own judgment." 

The fact that this rather confusing information is 
spread over three chapters illustrates another problem 
with the book: it lacks any recognizable organization. 
Troyer leaps from anecdote to anecdote, filling the 
space between with trivial information usually know n in 
the trade as “boilerplate.” 

* *■ * 

At one point Troyer describes Lowell Murray as the 
"Chief architect of th destruction of the 1979 Clark 
government " We never learn how it was that one man 
engineered this event. The chapter on Murray ends in 
mid-air. In fact, throughout the remaining 150 pages 
Murray barely appears again, although the final chap¬ 
ters deal with the supposed reasons for the govern 
ment's destruction. In Troyer’s. judgment it happened 
because Clark had never known real pain and really had 
no heart. 

Those who buy this book will consider that Troyer 
compounds the felony for. in addition to the trivial 
character of most of the information, the lack of 
organization, the gaps, inaccuracies and repetitions, 
the prose is awful and the syntax worse. 

For those who know Warner Troyer as the literary 
guru of the CBC’s pretentious Sunday Morning radio 
program, this is a surprise. Troyer’s writing suffers 
from a glut of bad metaphor, an excess of pointless 
description, imperfect spelling and grammatical errors 
of the most glaring sort. He has no literary, discipline 
and writes with neither polish nor restraint. 

The book is over written; its tone is stentorian and 
pompous: Troyer writes of the commonplace as though 
it were utterly exotic. His sentiment is banal and 
mawkish and full of the shallow and trendy jargon of 
pack journalism. Ironically.Troyer dedicates the book 
to his parents, who taught him “love of laughter and 
truth, and contempt of piety and cant.” He still has a lot 
to learn. 




























44 THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17,1980 

ISLAND 


Nimpkish wait ends 

Health services inquiry will open Monday 


By BILL SMITH 

CotoMitnuorter 

It has been a tiring, frus¬ 
trating wait for the Nimp¬ 
kish Indian Band at Alert 
Bay, but on Monday the ’ 
wait will be over. 

That is the day the long- 
promised public inquiry into 
health services opens. 

For the Indians in Alert 
Bay, an isolated community 
on Cormorant Island off 
northern Vancouver Island, 
it will have a been a year 
almost to the day since they 
asked then provincial health 
minister Robert McClelland 
for a full-scale public in¬ 
quiry. 

AT THE SAME time, the 
Indian leaders asked the at¬ 
torney-general and the B.C. 
chief coroner to investigate 
the Jan.22 death of an 11- 
year-old Indian girl in St. 
George’s Hospital. 

In the interim: 

• A 16-year-old non-status 
Indian girl died in the same 
hospital. 

• Two so-called “public 
inquiries” have been con¬ 
ducted in addition to two 
probes by the B.C. College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. 

• Federal Health Minister 
David Crombie visited the 
area to meet with the band. 

• Plans for a new 16-bed 
hospital have been an¬ 
nounced. 

• The provincial health 
ministry refused to order a 
public inquiry. 

• The village was rocked 
by the uncovering of a man 
who had been impersonating 
a doctor for 10 weeks. 

But all this is now behind 
the band as they make final 
preparation for their “day in 
court.” 

Dr. Gary Goldthorpe of 
Sioux Lookout, Ont., the man 
appointed last week by 
Crombie to conduct the one- 
man inquiry, will spend the 
first few days meeting with 
Indians in communities on 
northern Vancouver Island 
and in the Alert Bay area. 

THE INQUIRY’S terms of 
reference cover the state of 
Indian health in the area, 
and how it compares with 
that of the white population, 
and future directions for 
health policy and health ser¬ 
vices for Indians. 


SIMMERING discontent 
over health care for Indians 
in Alert Bay, tinged with 
charges of racism against 
hospital staff and the com¬ 
munity’s only doc.tor, Dr. 
Jack Pickup, erupted with 
the death in January, 1979, of 
11-year-old Renee Smith. 
She died of a ruptured and 
gangrenous appendix five 
days after being admitted to 
hospital. The day before she 
was admitted, she had been 
given pain-killing pills by a 
nurse and sent home. 

A coroner’s jury later 
ruled that Pickup was negli¬ 
gent. 


high mercury readings, both 
in the hair and blood, among 
the native population. 

BUT SHE poignantly re¬ 
minds one that two young 
Indians died last year—the 
Vear of the Child. 

And she recalls the pe¬ 
tition sent to several pro¬ 
vincial government minis¬ 
tries by Alert Bay teachers 
asking for an inquiry into the 
medical care available “be¬ 
cause we have witnessed 


questionable practices con¬ 
cerning the medical care 
of our students." 

BUT THE problems beset¬ 
ting Alert Bay were prob¬ 
ably best described by Dr. 
John Coombs of Ottawa 
when he told Crombie during 
his visit to Alert Bay that 
Indian communities across 
Canada were ticking like 
time bombs because peo¬ 
ple were desperate over in¬ 
adequate health care and 
living conditions. 


THE INDIANS say Pickup 
is only part of the problem. 
They are looking at the 
whole question of Indian 
health statistics, which they 
say are pretty grim. 

After a post-inquest in¬ 
vestigation, the B.C. college, 
which licenses doctors, 
agreed that Pickup made a 
mistake, but found him com¬ 
petent in a series of tests. 

Since then, changes have 
been made at the hospital, 
adjacent to the Indian burial 
ground and its dozen looming 
totem poles. Until a federal 
health and welfare doctor 
arrived in mid-summer. 
Pickup had been the only 
doctor working there for 
more than 18 months, on call 
24 hours a day, seven days a 
week. 

THE HOSPITAL is now 
operating under surgical 
guidelines for small hospi¬ 
tals which limit the kind of 
surgery that Pickup or any 
other doctor can perform 
when there are fewer than 
three doctors. 

Other changes have been 
made based on the recom¬ 
mendations of a committee 
headed by Dr. Charles Bal- 
lam of the health ministry. 

No one welcomes the in¬ 
quiry more than former fed¬ 
eral public health nurse 
Vera Robinson, now em¬ 
ployed by the band as family 
guidance counsellor. 

She became the centre of a 
furore which has not subsid¬ 
ed with a call last April for 
an Inquiry into the high inci¬ 
dence of Indian deaths. 

She also expressed con¬ 
cern about tuberculosis and 



ACROSS 
1 Cut 

6 Tint* periods 
10 Short drive 

14 Burdened 

15 Thought: 
Prefix 

16 French 
department 

17 Change 

18 Gad aboul 

19 Dingle 

20 Sign 

22 Passed on 
24 Heath genus 

26 Meet cuts 

27 Begs 

30 Family mem¬ 
ber 

31 Aslan nation 

32 Spouse: 

2 words 

37 Sizable 

38 Traveling: 

2 words • 

40 Born 

41 Much money: 

3 words 

43 Feature 

44 Prior to 

45 — lights 

46 Erred 


51 Cheerless 

52 Talk Idly 
54 Unlawful 

58 Bluster 

59 Burt — 

61 Habituate 

62 Perfume: 
Var. 

63 Tidy 

64 Mr. Wolfe, et 
al 

65 Colloids 

66 Antelopes 

67 Ontario river 

DOWN 

1 Scoria 

2 Feeble 

3 Roman date 

4 Cores 

5 Hold out 

6 Board of — 

7 Fuss 

8 Time period 

9 Mr Maug¬ 
ham 

10 Alkali: 

2 words 

11 Appeals 

12 Cove 

13 Requisites 
21 Inlet 


UNITED Feature Syndicate 



23 French river 
25 Astonish 

27 Italian Island 

28 Fastener 

29 Garment 

33 Funny chaps 

34 Price 

35 Edward —: 
Eng. painter 

36 Bracken 

38 Plume 

39 Goading 
42 Leasers 


43 Fraternal 
order mem¬ 
ber 

46 Electric unit 

47 Gift 

48 Wedge 

49 Angry 

50 Of ships 
53 Plane 

55 Correct 

56 Press 

57 Trial 

60 Water: Fr. 




FEEL LIKE VOITRE 

n 


Seems you can't win! . . . you jack up the 
heat to keep warm and yet It still feels cold 
by those old single pane windows, so up 
goes the thermostat again!'. . . and who 
needs that at today's energy costs? Well, 
there is a way to solve the problem without 
freezing or blowing your heating budget. 


SAVE ENERGY 

WHILE YOU 

WARM UP! 

WITH GRANITE S 

DOUBLE SEALED 

INSULATING GLASS 

WINDOWS 

Converting or replacing single pane windows re¬ 
duces thru glass heat loss up to 50%. And remem¬ 
ber, only the 2-Seal Sealing System warrants a 
10-year guarantee against leakage — twice as long 
as the Industry standard of 5 years for “run of the 
mill" 1-Seal units. 

STOP HEAT LOSS 
THROUGH ROOF 
AND WALLS WITH 

Fire retardant cellulose fibre flows 
into cracks, irregular "hard to get 
at" areas and between wall studs 
providing fuel savings and increased 
comfort. 

"HONE NOW FOR A FREE ON-SITE ESTIMATE - YOU BE THE JUDGE! 



-OUTER SEAL 


As 
seen 

INNER 

SEAL W ith 
Barrie 
Clark 



CHECK OUT OUR OTHER 
MAINTENANCE FREE 
INSTALLATIONS 

SUNDECK/PATIO 
ENCLOSURES 
' SUNDECK/PATIO 
COVERS 

KENITEX EXTERIOR TEX- 
TURED COATING. 
GUARANTEED 15 YRS. 
AGAINST PEELING. 
CHIPPING AND 
FLAKING. 

SECONDARY WINDOWS 
VINYL SIDING 



ANITE 


INDUSTRIES LTD. Serving all of Vancouver Island 

24-HR. ANSWERING 516 WILLIAM ST. VICTORIA IN NANAIMO 

SERVICE 384-4148 722-2677 


CAPIIAL 


SHOP DAILY 
9 to 5:30 
Thurs., and Fit 9-9 


CONTINUES , 

Prices in effect 'til Feb. 23rd While Stock Lasts- 


READY YOUR GARDEN FOR SPRING PLAH1ING 

HEAVY Dlin MEEUUMf 


EDGER 

COMET “D" handled edger 
with fire hardened hardwood 
handle for edging lawns and 
walkways, etc. Reg. 6.M 

EARLY BIRD E 49 

SALE W 


DIGGING FORK 

Imported.“D" wood handle 
4-tyne dlggingfork for sandy 
and fine soil. Reg. 9.95. 

EARLY BIRD C99 

SALE W 


ERIE Canadian made farm 
or heavy duty garden wheel- 
> barrow. Your choice of wood 
or steel frame with square 
nose for easy dumping, and 
pneumatic rubber tire. As¬ 
sembled and ready for use. 
Reg. 79.95. 

EARLY BIRD SALE 


|99 


in 




FERTILIZER 

SPREADER 


v mui 

WMmm — v 


GARDEN SHOVEL AND RAKE 

Choose a round mouth garden shovel, 
or 14-tooth bow rake by COMET. Each 
has a Are hardened hardwood han¬ 
dle. 

EARLY BIRD SALE, each 


!99 


ERIE 25 lb. capacity 
spreader for fertiliz¬ 
ers, lawn seed, etc. 
16" spreading width, 
puncture proof rub- 
1 ber tires. Unassem¬ 
bled. 

EARLY BIRD 
SALE 


[88 


GARBAGE 

CAN 

Family sized galvan¬ 
ized metal garbage can 
with tapered body, drop 
handler,, and lid. Reg. 
19.95 

EARLY BIRD SALE 

799 

SHOPMATE 

GRINDER 

Complete motorized unit 
for the home workshop. 
Features include $” coarse 
and fine grinding wheels, 
built In work light and 
water tray, pins adjustable 
eyeshields and tool rests. 
Reg. Sd.K 

EARLY BIRD SALE 

47” 

12-V0LT 

TROUBLE LIGHT 

18-foot cord with poly 
cage, complete with 12- 
volt bulb and alligator 
clips. Ideal for boats, 
cars, trucks, etc. 

EARLY BIRD SALE 

599 

CAR 

RAMPS 

Heavy stamped steel 
platform. 5008-lb. ca¬ 
pacity per set, fitted 
with safety tire stop. 
Reg. 39.95. 

EARLY BIRD SALE 

27” 


FIRE 

EXTINGUISHER 

5 B.C. rated dry 
chemical Ore extin¬ 
guisher for boats, 
trailers, homes, etc. 
Effective on grease, 
gasoline or electrical 
fires. Complete with 
mounting bracket. 
Reg. 14.95. 

EARLY BIRD 
SALE 


IT 




MEN’S WEAR 

JEAN 

CLEARANCE 


Purchase several pair by 
these leading manufacturers. 
Assorted styles In 199% cotton 
prewasbed denim. Sizes 29-39. 

25% V * laCS 
EARLY BIRD 
SALE, pr. 


14 95 

G.W.G. 
JEANS 

Savings for the entire family 
on quality G.W.G. 199% Colton 
prewasbed denim Jeans with 2 
front scoop pockets and 2 back 
atch pockef 


patch pockets. 

MEN’S 

Boot cut, flare legs or modi¬ 
fied wide leg. Sizes 28 to 38. 
WOMEN’S 

Modified wide leg. Sizes 29 to 
48. Reg. 24.95. 

EARLY BIRD 
SALE, 

PR. 


'6- W 

19 “ 


CHILDREN'S 

4 legs la slim or regu¬ 


lar fll. Sizes 8 to 18. Reg. 
and 18.95. 

EARLY BIRD 
SALE, pr 

BELL® FLANNEL SHIRTS 

Assorted yarn dyed plaids In 
199% cotton flannel work 
shirts. Long sleeve button 
front styling in sizes S to XL. 
Reg. 18.95. 

EARLY BIRD 
SALE 


14* 


14* 


or CHARGEX 

ADDITIONAL PARKING 
IN OUR LOWER 
PARKING LOT 


KEM 

PAINT SALE 

Save now on quality KEM 
brand interior paints in a 
wide range of custom mixed 
colours. ■w— 

KEM TONE FLAT LATEX 

Reg. 17.95 gal., EARLY BIRD SALE 

KEM LOW LUSTRE LATEX 

Reg. 21.65 gal., EARLY BIRD SALE 

KEM-GLO 

Semi gloss enamel, Reg. 23.95 gal., 
EARLY BIRD SALE 

KEM VELVET ENAMEL 

Flat velvet finish, Reg. 23.35, 

EARLY BIRD SALE 

KEM-NAMEL 

Satin gloss latex enamel, Reg. 19.95 gal., 
EARLY BIRD SALE 


>^8SKfla- I Swirjfecff 1 


1 C 

m 

19J2 

18“ 

152 


1 


98 


FABRICS 

COTTON PRINTS 

Assorted florals on light and coloured 
grounds. Good assortment of colours. 

Made of 199% cottoa, 115 cm wide. 

EARLY BIRD SALE, metre 

CORDUROY 

Heavier weight medium wale corduroy with 
flannel backing. Choose from chocolate brown, 

teal or deep beige. Perfect for jackets, —_ 

blazers, light upholstery work, etc. OQ*| 
199% cotton. 99 cm wide. Reg. 5.95. Jh*'* 

EARLY BIRD SALE, metre W 

PRINTED DRESS CREPE 

A lovely fabric for blouses, dresses, etc. Choose 
from abstract and floral designs on coloured 
grounds of coral, blue, aqua, lavender, _ _ _ 
etc. Made of textured 106% polyester, tQh 
US cm wide. Reg. 7.99. 

EARLY BIRD SALE, metre W 


HOUSEWARES 


CORELLE EXPRESSIONS 
APRIL PATTERN 

We’re offering special savings on the 1 
APRIL pattern — a cluster of predomin- I 
anliy yellow flowers. This ‘Corelle Ex¬ 
pressions' dianerware has a 2-year nor¬ 
mal ase guarantee! Assortment I 
eludes: 

DINNER PLATE. Reg. 8.39. _ „ . 
EARLY BIRD SaLe 2.99 | 

EARLY*BIRD SALE 3.1 

SAUCER. Reg. 2.99. 

EARLY BIRD SALE 1.] 

SOUP/CEREAL BOWL, Beg. 

US EARLY BIRO SALE 1.! 




PLUS MORE ITEMS AT SIMILAR SAVINGS 


CAPllAL 


1900 STORE STREET 

385-9703 

IRON A METALS LTD. 



k Jhm 














































































































































































































i ' 


OXFORD 

FOODS 

271 COOK STREET 


|Price* effective SUX, FEB. 17 to TUEX, FEB. 1t| 

We reserve the right to limit quantities 


WORLD 


THE COLONIST, Sun., February 17, 1980 45 


Din ushers new year 


WESTERN FAMILY 4 

MRMRIHE 3 1 

49 

MAPLE LEAF 4 

BACON .. 1 

29 

CRISCO 

SHORTENING s 2 

149 

CARNATION ^ 

COFFEE 

MATE "w \ 

59 

AYLMER Mi 

TOMATO El 
JUICE t U< 

91 

GLOBE J 

69 

CORNED 

BEEF 'S 1 1 

McCAIN FROZEN J 

APPLE 

PIE 1 

|09 

McCOLL’S in own juice j 

PINEAPPLE r 5! 

9 * 

YORK ^ i 

TOMATOES v5! 

9* 

1 SCOTT VIVA ^ 

PAPER 

TOWELS S? 1 

|19 


PEKING (AP) — Opera in the park, a solar eclipse and 
the constant din of fireworks on a bright Saturday enlivened 
China’s celebration of the Lunar New Year and the beginning 
of the Year of the Monkey. 

In a New Year’s greeting, Chinese leaders called for 
Taiwan to join China, saying they are confident the island 


CORPWMTION OF 
THE CITY OF VICTORIA 

WATER MAIN 
FLUSHING 

The annual flushing of water mains within the 
City of Victoria and the Municipality of Esqui¬ 
mau will be programmed between February 
18th and 29th, 1980. This may cause tem¬ 
porary but harmless discolouration of water. 
Any consumer (such as a laundry) to whojn 
colour of water supplies is of vital importance 
will be notified in advance of operations in his 
vicinity if a request for such notification is 
received at the office of the undersigned, City 
•Hall, Victoria, B.C., telephone 385-5711, local 
289. 

In no case, however, can the City accept 
responsibility for any damage arising out of the 
use of discoloured water. Consumers are, 
therefore, advised ta be on the alert for tem¬ 
porary discolouration. 

J. D. Sansom, 

City Engineer and 
Water Commissioner 
City Hall, Victoria, B.C. * " 

February 14, 1980 


TBS 

/ i 


itadown ■ the quilt ? 

your friends choose. 


Quality counts at the Damadown factory in Vancouver where 
only the finest materials are used Down or dacron and 100% 
downproof cotton cambric ticking Choose easy care covers, 
accessories and drapes from one of Damadown s exclusive 
.designs, available in regular or custom made sizes Call for a 
free brochure or drop in to see the superb quality that makes 
Damadown the most popular 
continental quilt in Canada 



daniodown quilts ltd. 

Established 1967 1 

Available at 

The Victoria GENERAL STORE 

767 Fort St. ,»■ 383-6133 



Forthe program that works... 

COME IN TO 
WEIGHT LOSS CLINIC 


SOUND WEIGHT 
LOSS METHODS 

Our sound weight loss 
methods are designed to 
take weight off quickly 
and safely without 
dangerous drugs or 
shots, fad diets or 
boring exercises. 

Our unique stabili¬ 
zation and main¬ 
tenance techniques will 
teach you how to keep 
weight off forever. 

PROFESSIONAL 

STAFF 

The staff at Weight Loss 
Clinic includes professional 
consultants and experi¬ 
enced nurses who under¬ 
stand your goals and use 
all their knowledge and 
experience to help you 
achieve them in private, 
one to one consultation 
visits. 

FREE 

CONSULTATION 

Come in to Weight 
Loss Clinic and learn 
more about us or call 
and arrange an 
appointment for 
your free weight 
loss consultation 
visit. There’s no 
obligation. 

Call now! 



WEIGHT . 
LOSS 9LINIC! 

COOK MEDICAL BLDG. 1175 COOK ST., 8308 384-7177 

Visa and faster Charge welcome 8 am to 7 pm Mon.-Kri. 

« WEIGHT LOSS, INC. 1980 


and mainland would jointly celebrate the new year within a 
decade. 

“The togetherness of Taiwan and the mainland is like 
lips and teeth—let us raise our banners of patriotism and 
strive for an early resolution of the sacred business of 
national unification,” said a front-page open letter to the 
Taiwanese in the Peking People's Dally. The Nationalist 
Chinese established their government on Taiwan after being 
driven from the mainland by the Communists in 1949. 

In Taiwan’s capital of Taipei, President Cbiang Ching- 
kuo called on the people to consolidate efforts for security 
and peace. He said Taiwan entered the new year “under a 
harmonious and joyous atmosphere.” 

He added: “But our compatriots on the Chinese continent 
have been living in agony.” 

The New Year also was celebrated on Taiwan and in 
Korea and several other Asian countries. 

South Korea’s national railway provided extra trains to 
handle increased passengers as more than one-half million 
Seoul citizens left for family reunions in the provinces. 

In Peking, Communist party and government officials 
attended tea parties and a cultural performance in the Great 
Hall of the People. 

Crowds were on streets and in parks. More than 1,000 folk 
artists from eight suburban communes joined in dragon and 
lion dances and were applauded by 7,004 spectators, China’s 
Xinhua news agency reported. 

The sun had a different sort of altar in southern Yunnan 
province, where scientists set up their euipment to study th 
eclipse from atop a hili. 

© 


THE ACES® 


IRA G. CORN, JR. 


"If we rightly estimate 
what we call good and evil, 
we shall find it lies much in 
comparison." - John Locke. 

Comparison of results is 
the foundation upon which 
competitive bridge matches 
rest. What might first 
appear as a par result may 
be reduced to little when 
compared to what four 
other players might do with 
the same cards. 

When this deal was 
played in the Team Cham¬ 
pionships at St. Moritz, Rixi 
Markus of England reached 
six spades on the bidding 
shown. Two clubs was an 
artificial all-purpose forc¬ 
ing bid and, when North 
found enough to make a 
slam move. M. Markus easi¬ 
ly pushed her hand to slam. 

She was lucky. West led a 
diamond that was ruffed 
and there were no problems 
taking 12 tricks for a score 
of 1,430 points. 

Why was she lucky? East 
might have found a Lightner 
slam double asking for an 
unusual lead and barring the 
lead of a diamond. In that 
case, either a club lead or 
the lead of the heart ace by 
West could lead to the 
defeat of the slam. 

When the deal was 
replayed, declarer did not 
have as much luck in the 
bidding - East made the 
slam double and it was 
West’s turn to shine. Unfor¬ 
tunately for the defenders. 
West suffered a lapse and he 
repulsively led an unimagi¬ 
native diamond. 

To make matters worse, 
South redoubled and the 
scor^ for six spades redou- 


NORTH 

♦ 1086 5 4 

♦ J 

♦ 94 

♦ K 10887 


WEST 

♦ -- 

♦ A 8 7 6 

♦ J75J 

♦ J 6 5 4 3 


EAST 

♦ 72 

♦ 9432 

♦ AK 10 9862 

♦ --- 


SOUTH 

♦ AKQJ93 

♦ KQ105 

♦ ... 

♦ AQ2 

Vulnerable: North-South 


Dealer: South The bidding: 

South 

West 

North 

East 

24 

Pass 

24 

34 

44 

Pass 

4 NT 

54 

64 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 


Opening lead: Trey of dia¬ 
monds 


bled came to 2,020 points. 
And instead of the Markus 
team winning the match 
comfortably, they lost it by 
a small margin. 

Good results are fine. But 
it takes a comparison to 
know how good they really 
are. 


Wedding 

Imitations 



’ c 

Come in 
^ and view our 
wide selection 
of samples 

B Oiinl 
Centre 

622 Broughton 
across from Eaton s Parkade 


Bid with Corn 

South holds: 1-19-B 


♦ 108654 

♦ J 

♦04 

♦ K 1098 7 


North Eost Sooth West 
3 ♦ Dbl 1 


ANSWER: Six clubs. 
Partner s pre-empt shows 
long clubs in a poor hand. 
The opponents are a cinch 
for six or seven of either red 
suit. Jump now to take away 
their bidding space. 


euodouun 

"The Down Quilt, Pillow and 
Accessory Specialists' 


EURODOWN QUILTS LTD*. 
1728 Douglas St. 
(across from the Bay) 
Victoria. B.C.. V8W 2G7 
(604) 384-0133 


FASHIONABLE RENTALS 



Cubans seize ship 
for flight to U.S % 


KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) — 
A band of eight Cubans, re¬ 
ported armed with hand¬ 
guns, commandeered a 
small Liberian-registered 
freighter in Havana and 
forced Its crew to take them 
to United States on Satur¬ 
day, U.S. officials said. 

There was no reported vio¬ 
lence and the Cubans peace¬ 


fully surrendered their 
weapons to federal agents 
when the container ship Lis- 
sette arrived in Key West, 
the U.S. coast guard said. 

Guard spokesman Greg 
Robinson said the Cubans 
were taken to the Key West 
Coast Guard station by the 
FBI for preliminary ques¬ 
tioning. 


Engagements, Weddings 
and Anniversaries 

WWW 

Engagements 


Preston — Ducker 

Captain and Mrs. Anthony J. 
. reston, 2373 Zela Street, Vic¬ 
toria, are pleased to announce 
the forthcoming marrlaa 


Capt 
Presto 

tori a, Ui V K'VVJVU IV BIIDWIIUC 

the forthcoming marriage of 
their daughter, Bridget Patri¬ 
cia, to Mr. John Alexander 
Ducker, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
George A. Ducker of Victoria. 

The wedding will take place 
on Saturday afternoon, the 7th 
of June, 1980, at St. Paul's 
Naval and Garrison Church, 
Esquimalt Road, Archdeacon 
Greenhalgh officiating. 

Johnston — Keiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Johnston of 
Ladysmith, B.C., are pleased to 
announce the forthcoming mar¬ 
riage of their daughter, Rae- 
lene, to Wayne, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alec Keiser of Victoria, 
B.C. 

The wedding will take place 
on Saturday, March 1st, 1980, at 
St. Andrews United Church, 
Nanaimo, B.C. 

WWW 

Goddue — Laferriere 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Goddue, 
Victoria, B.C., are pleased to 
announce the forthcoming mar¬ 
riage of their youngest daugh¬ 
ter, Colleen, of Parksville, B.C., 
to Mr. Marcel Laferriere of 
North Bay, Ontario. 

The wedding will take place 
on June 14th, 1980, at 6 o'clock at 
St. Andrew's Catholic Cathe¬ 
dral, Victoria, B.C. 

WWW 

Brown — Stenberg 

Both families are pleased to 
announce the engagement of 
Carol A. Brown, of Duncan, 
B.C., only daughter of Jim and 
Emma Brown of Vernon, B.C., 
lo Terry M. Stenberg, only son 
ol Martin and Laura Stenberg of 
Maple Bay, Duncan. 


Bryce — Forrest 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Mcln- 
doe announce with pleasure the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Deborah Faith Bryce, to Alan 
Curtis, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Forrest of Victoria. 

Marriage to take place 2:00 
p m. March 29. 1980, at St. 
Aldan's United Church. 

WWW 


Jones — Horne 

Mr. and Mrs. Keray Jones 
and Capt. and Mrs. John Horne, 
all of Victoria, B.C., are pleased 
to announce the engagement of 
their children, Karen Gail and 
Ian Audlev. 

The wedding will take place 
March 1, 1980/ at 1:30 in the 
afternoon at St. John's Anglican 
Church, Victoria, B.C. 

WWW 


Macintosh — Baynton 

The engagement Is an¬ 
nounced between Mary Sheila, 
second daughter of Commander 
Macgregor F. Macintosh, 
R.C.N., and Mrs. Macintosh of 
Northwood, Middlesex, Eng¬ 
land, to Gregory Allan Chad¬ 
wick, only son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allan Leslie Baynton, of Vic¬ 
toria, British Columbia. 

The marriagefWII take place 
In Victoria on AiSril 12, 1980. 


WWW 




WWW 


Weddings 



Danvers — Whlteley 

A beautiful wedding took place Feb. 1st, 1980, at St. Martins-in- 
the-Field Church on Obed Ave. when Marilyn Jean, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Eric Whlteley of 554 Mountfield St., and Ron Geoffry Ford, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Danvers of 941 Violet Ave., were united in 
marriage by the bride's uncle, Rev. J. R. Murray. Mrs. Ruth Powell 
was organist. Bride's uncle Doug Murray rang the church bells as 
the couple left. 

The bride had chosen an elegant gown of white Tuiana 
(knit). Lovely Swiss Guipure lace in floral design enhanced the net 
yoke of the fitted bodice, edged the collar and fashioned the net and 
lace lower sleeve to Illy point cutis. The full skirt draped gracefully 
entrain, bordered with matching lace. Her 2-tier finger tip veil with 
floral applloues misted from a pretty Juliet cap of mine' floral 
lace to complete the picture of a radiant and happy bride. 

She carried a beautiful bouquet of orchids and Talisman 
roses. Her four bridesmaids looked lovely In long yellow gowns with 
lace jackets to match, carrying bouquets of daisies and daisy 
mums. The groom looked handsome In his tuxedo of off white, with 
his four groomsmen wearing brown tuxedos with yellow ruffled 
shirts. ' 

Reception was held at the Cedar Hill Recreation Centre 
where 170 guests enjoyed the evening. Their four-tier wedding cake 
was a picture of beauty, made by tne groom's mother. Good luck 
wishes for Marilyn and Ron were on the outdoor theatre sign 
Happy couple went to Hawaii for their honeymoon. They will reside 
In Victoria. 

Anniversaries 


Breitschmid — 50th 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl K. 
Breitschmid celebrated their 
50th Wedding Anniversary on 
St. Valentine's Day. They were 
married in the Anglican Church 
' ‘ * nnk, Ini— 


In Calgary, Alberta, in 1930. 

They have two daughters, 
Mrs. Lawrence W. Egginton 
(Caroline) and Mrs. Leslie Sze- 
kelv (Adeline) both of Victoria. 
Two grandsons, Garry and Rick 
Egginton, four granddaughters, 
Chervl-Lvnn and Janine Eggin 
too and Lisa and Vera Szekelv. 

Mr. Breitschmid, upon his 
discharge from the R.C.A.F. in 
1945, was for many years in the 
restaurant, catering and delica¬ 
tessen business, with member¬ 
ships In the Restaurant Assoc., 
Chamber of Commerce, Opti¬ 
mist Club, Chef de Cuisine of 
V.l. and F.O.E. 

Until his retirement in 1978, 
Mr. Breitschmid was the Chef 
at Government House serving 
Lieutenant-Governors Nichol¬ 
son and Owens, and may we add 
with the unfailing assistance of 
his wife Dorothy. 

To celebrate this occasion 
there will be Open House at the 
home of their daughter and son- 
in-law Mr. and Mrs. Szekely, 
3343 Wordsworth Ave., on the 
afternoon of February 17, 1980, 
from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. All 
friends are invited to share this 
occasion. No gifts please. 

WWW 


Harper — 50th 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Harp¬ 
er will celebrate their Diamond 
Wedding Anniversary on Febru 
ary 20, 1980. 

They will be pleased to wel¬ 
come all their friends to an open 
house tea, which will be held at 
their home, 1248 Reynolds Road 
on Wednesday, February 20, 
from 1 to 4 p.m. 

WWW 

Cave — 50th 

Albert and Beverly Cave will 
honour Albert's parents, 
George and Ruby Cave on their 
Golden Wedding Anniversary 
with an open house to be held at 
610 Baxter Avenue, February 
17th, Sunday, 2-5 p.m. Good 
wishes only please. 

WWW 



Raid lor publication of Wedding, Engagements and Anniversary notices 1 
without pictures, available on request from the Advertising Department 
(Special forms to assist you in writing copy also available) Copy tor weekend 
editions should be in the Victoria Press office no later than S p m. the Wednesday 
prior to publication date. 


s with or 
srfmen* 
weekend 




BUSINESS OFFICE OPEN 
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday lo Friday 
(Closed Saturday and Sunday) 


-J 


f. 




































































C-1 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 


386-2121 

Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Saturday 8 a m. to 5:30 p.m. 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Vancouver Island’s Largest Shopping Centre in Print 


c-i 


386-2121 

Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Saturday 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 


CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISING 

RATES 

All rates quoted are tor In¬ 
sertion In both the Dellv Cok> 
nlst and Victoria Times. 


SPECIAL PRIVATE PARTY 
WORD RATES 

10 word minimum 
lor 2 days 

15c per wo£d per day 

3 to 5 consecutive days 
12c per word per day 

6 consecutive days or more 
10c per word per day 

R eal estate, mobile home, 
rental, clubs, organizations and 
bus ness advertising does not 
quality tor these rates. 


GENERAL WORD RATES 
10 word minimum 
1 or 2davs 

19.75c per word per day 

3 to 5 consecutive days 
16.00c per word per day 

6 or more consecutive days 
13.75c per word per day 


SEMI DISPLAY 
LOCAL RATES 

Any advertisement which 
varies from 6 pt. regular clas¬ 
sified style shall be considered 
semi-display. 

u agate lines per column Inch, 
lor 2 days 

71.50c per agate line per day 

3 tp 5 consecutive days 
64.50c per agate line per day 

6 or more consecutive days 
57.25c per agate line per day 


NATIONAL AND 

OUT OF PROVINCE RATE 

Regular Classified 224 per word 
Semi Display 854 per agate line. 
14 agate lines per column Inch. 


BIRTH NOTICCS 


Up to 30 words 14.00 
Each additional word 15c 


DEATH NOTICES, 
MEMORIAL NOTICES 
AND CARDS OF THANKS 
61 50c per count line per day 

3 consecutive days 
53.25c per count line per day 


PRIVATE BOX NUMBERS 
13.50 

Private Victoria Press box num¬ 
bers are for use only in conjunc¬ 
tion with advertising published 
m the Victoria Times and The 
Daily Colonist. 


Contract rates for local busi¬ 
nesses available op request 


DUNCAN 

OFFICE 


Advertising, Circulation, Edl 
torlal and General Information, 
746-6181. 

• 109 Ingram St. V9L1N8 


TERMSOF 
PUBLICATION 

F.P. Newspapers Ltd. shall 
not be liable for non-Insertion of 
any advertisement beyond the 
amount paid for such advertise¬ 
ment, 

in the event of error occuring 
the liability of F.P. Newspapers 
Ltd. shall not exceed the charge 
for the space actually occupied 
by the Item In question. 

All claims of error in publi¬ 
cation shall be made within 12 
hours thereafter and If not made 
shall not be considered. No claim 
will be allowed for more than one 
incorrect Insertion nor for errors 
not affecting the value of adver¬ 
tisement. 

All estimates of cost are ap¬ 
proximate. Advertisers will be 
charged with space actually 
used. 

All advertising copy will be 
subject to the approval of the 
Victoria Press, who reserve the 
right in Its sole discretion to clas- 

nisfced 6 ** 0 * ^ inS€f * C0OV ,ur " 

All advertisements must com¬ 
ply with the British Columbia 
Human Rights Act. This act 
states no advertisement may 
stateor Imply a preference, limi¬ 
tation or specification on the 
basis of an applicant's race, reli¬ 
gion, colour, marital status, an¬ 
cestry, place of origin, age, or 
sex (unless the matter relates to 
the maintenance of public de¬ 
cency AND prior approval has 
been obtained through the 
Human Rights Branch). 

While every endeavor will be 
made to forward replies to box 
numbers to the advertiser as 
soon as possible, we accept no 
liability in respect of loss or 
damage alleged to arise through 
either failure or delay In 
forwarding such replies, how¬ 
ever caused, whether by negli¬ 
gence or otherw I se. 


NOTICE 

OF COPYRIGHT 

Full complete and sole copyright 
in any advertisement produced 
by F.P. Newspapers Ltd. Is vest¬ 
ed in and belongs to F.P. News¬ 
papers Ltd, provided, however, 
that copyright IN THAT PART 
AND THAT PART ONLY of any 
such advertisement consisting 
of Illustrations, borders, signa¬ 
tures or similar components 
which is, or are, supplied to Vic¬ 
toria press by the advertiser In 
the form of reproduction proofs, 
veloxs, engravings, etc., and In¬ 
corporated in said advertise¬ 
ment shall remain in and belong 
to the advertiser. 


CIRCULATION 

INFORMATION 

The Daily Colonist 383-4111 

Victoria Times 382-3131 

Wherever carrier service is 
ma 1 nta Ined, 14.50 per month. 

By mall — Vancouver island 
and Gulf Islands, 17.00 per 
month, 120.00 per 3 months, 
140.00 per 6 months, 180.00 per 
year. Rest of Canada, 18.00 per 
month, 122.50 per 3 months, 
145.00 per 6 months, 190.00 per 
year. 

Outside Canada, 120.00 per 
month, 1240 per year. 

BY MAIL 

Saturday Times Only 
Sunday Colonist Only 

Canada 60 cents per copy, 
S30.00per year. 

Outside Canada. $1.10 per 
copy, 155.00 per year. 

The Dally Colonist Second 
Class mail registration No. 0516. 

Victoria Times Second Class 
mail registration No. 0625. 

ISLAND 

REPRESENTATIVES 
Duncan, Chemainus— 

Mr. HILTON HOLT 7464181 
Nanaimo 758-9633 

LakeCowichan 749-6206 

Port Alberni— 

Mr. FredSuhr 723-8312 


CLASSIFICATION 

INDEX 

VITAL STATISTICS 

1 Births 

8 Cards of Thanks 

308 Cards of Thanks 

305 Deaths and Funerals 

312 Florists 

310 Funeral Directors 

309 InMemorlams 

313 Miscellaneous 

311 Monuments 

NOTICES 

14 Announcements 

16 Catering, Banouetsand 
Reception Rooms 

15 Coming Events and 
Meetings 

20 Lost and Found 
18 Places to Visit 

EMPLOYMENT 

28 Employment Service 

21 Help Wanted —General 

22 Office Help 

26 Part Time —Temporary 
Help 

24 Sales Persons and Agents 
30 Situations Wanted 

23 Skilled Trades 

25 Teachers 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

36 Services Directory 

PERSONAL SERVICES 

33 Bands, Musicians and 
Orchestras 

40 Business Personals 
43 Dancing 

42 Education 

41 Legal Services 
71 Music Teachers 
39 Personals 

34 Pre-RecordedMusic 
32 Trade Schools 

38 Travel 

MERCHANDISING 

83 Aircraft 

117 Antiques and Arts 
78 Bicycles 

80 Boats and Marine 
65 Building Supplies 

93 Cameras, Supplies and 
Photo Finishing 

127 Chicks, Poultry, Hatching 
Eogs, Supplies 

101 Children's Miscellaneous 
116 Coins and Stamps 
135 Farm implements 
M*uel 

97 Furniture 
105 Garaoe Sales 
120 Garden'Supplies 

99 Groceries, Meats and 
Produce 

95 Heating & Fireplaces 
130 Heavy Equipment and 

Machinery 

128 Livestock, Supplies and 

Events 

96 Ma lor Appliances 

100 Miscellaneous for Sale 
103 Miscellaneous Wanted 
109 Miscellaneous to Rent 

77 Motorcycles 
70 Musical instruments 
125 Pets and Supplies 
92 Sporting Goods 

81 Sailboats 

94 Store and Office Furniture 
and Equipment 

115 Swaps 
63 Timber 

98 TV, Stereo, Radio Sales and 
Service 

112 Wanted to Rent, 
Miscellaneous 

AUTOMOTIVE 

155 Automobile Financing and 
insurance 

164 AutoBody and Painting 

168 Campers, Trailers and 
Motor Homes 

166 Cars and Trucks Wanted 

150 Cars for Sale 

148 Lease Vehicles 

149 New Car Directory 
160 Parts, Accessories and 

Service 

151 Sports, Import Cars 
158 Tires 

154 Trucks, Buses and Vans 

156 U-Drlve and Auto Washing 

ACCOMMODATION 

185 Convalescent and Rest 
Homes 
175 Hotels 

178 Summer Homes, Cottages 
and Resorts 

181 Tourist Accommodation 

RENTAL . 

201 Apartments to Rent, 
Furnished 

200 Apartments to Rent, 
Unfurnished 

203 Apartments Wanted 

206 Duplexes to Rent 

207 Duplexes Wanted to Rent 

202 Furniture to Rent 

215 Halls. Warehouses, Stores 
and Offices to Rent 
197 Housekeeping Rooms to 

Rent 

199 Housekeeping Rooms 
wanted 

211 Houses to Rent, Furnished 
210 Houses to Rent, 

Unfurnished 

212 Houses Wanted to Rent 
205 Rental Aoencies 

190 Room and Board 

191 Room and Board Wanted 

193 Rooms to Rent 

194 Rooms Wanted 

204 Shared Ac c ommodations 

FINANCIAL 

155 Automobile Financing and 
Insurance 

233 Mortgage Loans and 
Insurance 

234 Mortoaoes for Sale 
230 Personal Loans and 

Insurance 

235 Wanted to Borrow 

REAL ESTATE 

280 Acreagefor Sale and 
Wanted 

240 Business Opportunities 

241 Business Opportunities 
Wanted 

247 Commercial or Industrial 
Properties 

258 Condominiums 
253 Country Homes and 

Properties 

270 Exchange Real Estate 

290 Farms for Sale and Wanted 
263 Garagesfor Sale. Rent, 
Wanted 

293 Gulf Island Properties 
250 Houses for Sale 

265 Houses Wanted to Buy 
295 Listings Cancelled 
268 Listings Wanted 

271 Lots for Sale 

294 Mainland and 
Out-of-Province Properties 

169 Mobile Homes and Parks 

273 Property for Sale 

274 Property Wanted 

244 Revenue Property 

245 Revenue Properties Wanted 

259 Townhouse* 

285 Up-1 stand Properties 
256 Waterfront Properties 


t 


FI LAN — Bruce and Kit are 
pleased to announce the birth 
of Kurt Timothy, weighing 9 
lbs., (4070 Gms.) or February 
8, 1980, at Victoria General 
Hospital. — special thanks to 
Or. Mark Fisher, Peevost and 
the superb nursing staff. 

HANDYSIOES - Born to John 
and Stephanie, a little sister 
for Daniel, Meredith Leigh, 6 
tos. 11 or. on February 8.1980. 
First granddaughter for Alex 
and violet Yashuk and Jack 
and Sheila Handvsldes. Spe¬ 
cial thanks to Louise, Cheryl 
and Dr, Curran. (Insured) 

LANE - Born to Thomas and 
Suzanne on February 12. 1980, 
at Victoria General Hospital, a 
Ot r i» Cheryl Ann, 4 Ibs.Tozs. A 
sister for Cara. Thanks to Dr. 
M_Greenwood and Dr. Hamil¬ 
ton and Dr. Spacey and mater- 
nlty staff. 

LIM — Jimmy and Shir 11 are 

K oyd to announce the birth of 
Nr first child, a son, Brian 
Richard Samuel, 7 lbs., 3V»ozs. 

■ Jagdis. Corwlll and maternity 
.staff at Royal Jubilee Hospl- 

MACKENZIE - Born to Ken 

Hector MacKenzIe. 

ii ABHowctMcmrs 

THE 107TH ANNUAL GEN 

J ral Meeting of the Bishop 
ridge Centre for the Family 
Society. 27 Hayward Heights, 
will be held Monday February 
25th. 1980, 7:30pm at the centre 
Refreshments will be served fol 
lowing the Business Meeting. 

ATTENTION ANIMAL 
lovers: we need good resaleable 
articles for a Spring Sale on be¬ 
half of the Good Shepherd Ani¬ 
mal Shelter. Please call Rita, 
477-5242. or Elly, 656-3822, or 
656-7603._ 

CENTRAL STUDIOOF 
SPEACHA EXPRESSION 
Speak It, spell It and tell it with 
sound and sense. Also effective 
«£d < 2 f r ect‘ve speech Phone 
388-7190,8-10am or 5-7pm 

MEETING-NEW MONTES- 
sorl pre-school and elementary 
Metropolitan United, Christian 
Education Center, February 
21st, 7:15. All welcome._ 

SPAYED OR NEUTERED 
pets don't roam from home. Ani¬ 
mal's Crusaders, 386-9832. 

RECYCLE TIN 
Save Bolivian people and us 


is 


COMINS EVENTS 
AND MEETINGS 


WEDNESDAY 
GARTH HOMER 
Achievement 
Centre 

813 Darwin 

Entrance oft Vernon Ave. 

No Game Less Than 

IS 

10th GAME 


20th GAME 


In Prizes Last Week 

Early Birds6:45pm 

No. 930 Douglas. Bus stops at 
rjar entrance on Vernon Ave. 
Extra parking In Saanich muni¬ 
cipal parklno lot one block 
away. 

OAK BAY 
HIGH 
SCHOOL 
1915-1980 
REUNION 

There will be a meeting ot 
the reunion committee In 
the High School Library 
Tuesday Feb. 19th at 7:30 
p.m. It you would (ike to 
assist in the planning tor 
this special reunion loin 
us Tuesday evening. 

OAK BAY REUNION 
1915-1980 

MAY 30,31, JUNE 1,1980 
PASS I TON I _ 

fare Soccer 


EVERY MONDAY 
ST. JOSEPH'S HALL 
745 W. BURNSIDE 
FIVE EARLYBIRD 
GAMES 7 P.M. 
Good Neighbour Games 
and Bonus Games 
NO GAME UNOER520 
Plus Min. Jackpot S100 
5 Extra Games 



EVERYSUNDAY 

Early blrdsi:30pm 
Esquimau Legion 
622 Admirals Rd. 
FREE BUS TO TOWN 

SINGLESCLUBS 
OF VICTORIA 
For up to <Ut. Information on all 

bruro^zsrd. Tldoti 477-9W0, 


IS CQMNC EVENTS 


Victoria Native 
Friendship Centre 
BINGO 

Every Tuesday 
Early Blrds6:45 
ESQUIMALT LEGION 
Everyone welcome 
Door prizes 

BASEBALL 

BINGO 

Every Tuesday 
Red Barn 
Lambrick Park 
Oft Feltham Rd 
Early Bird6:45 pm. 
Regular Games 
7:15 P.M. 

5 Extra Games 
Bonus Games 

OAK BAY 
MINOR SPORTS 


EVERY MONDAY 

Early Bird now at 6:45 pm 
Regular and extra games 

SENIOR CITIZEN HALL 
1442MONTERIEY 

UNITED NATIVE 
NATIONS BINGO 

EVERY MON. NIGHT 
ESQUIMALT LEGION 
EARLY BIRDS6:45PM. 
Free bus Into town after extra 
garni- Everyone welcome 

SWAP AND SHOP NOW OPEN, 
Jacklln Centre (Langford) In¬ 
door/outdoor swap meet Laroe 

4 X8' tables supplied. Vehicles, 
boats and equipment displayed 
tree. Hours 10-4 every Saturday 
and Sunday. Sellers phone 
478-4696. Located In Langford 
across from Belmont High 
School at 3108 Jacklln Rd. 

FLEAMARKET 

Sanscha Hall - Sidney. 

Pat Bay Hwy and Beacon Ave. 
Every Sunday commencing 
October 7, 9am-4pm. Items new 
8. used - old 8> modern, interest 
for all. Snack Bar. Admission: 
254. Reservations: 656-3082. 

MOVING OPEN HOUSE FOR 
Trl-Chem liquid Embroidery. 
Going at cost prices Also will 
send for anything In the 1980 
catdopue at 15% off during the 
Open house. 512 Cecelia Rd. off 
Jutland. 384-4218._ 

PENINSULA BABE RUTH 
GENERAL MEETING, FEB. 
20th, 7:30pm. SAANCHA HALL 

5 I 0 NfY . ANYONE 

INTERESTED PLEASE 
_ATTEND._ 

THE WIDOWS ASSOCIATION 
will meet In St. John's Church 
basement, 1611 Quedra Street, 
Sunday February 17tti at 2pm. 
Mr Thorne B.S.P will speak on 
drug safety. Phone 383-1404. 

CERAMIC FIGURINE CLASS 
starting, 2828 Rock Bay Ave. 
Dutchman Inn. 386-7557. 


II 


CATERING, BANQUETS 
art RECEPTION RMS 


GEORGE'S BAVARIAN 
BANQUET FACILITIES 
1021 Pandora 383-7121 
INTERNATIONAL CUISINE 
3 Ol NING ROOMS AVAILABLE 
SMALL OR LARGE PARTIES 
Up to 150 Seating Capacity 
ENTERTAINMENT 
AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 


CROWN'S FOOD & BAR. CA- 
terlng for all occasions at any 
location Varied menus, reason- 


21 LOST art FOUND 


LOST PART PERSIAN OR 
ange Tortoiseshell. Douglas St 
Beacon Hill Park area. Leather 
collar with flea medallion. Re¬ 
ward. Maureen 386-2286 eve- 
nlngs, 477-1838 days. 


LOST: SMALL GOLD BROOCH 
with garnets, great sentimental 
value. Reward to pin value. 
SJmgjon Sears, Bay, white Spot. 

LOST: FLOWEREO BABIES 
pillow, embroidered face, be¬ 
tween town and Into Vic West, 
my sons little friend. Please call 
388-7743._ 

FOUND: ONE MONTH AGO, 
longhaired male Siamese with 
flea collar, looking for good 
home. Burnslde/Wllklnsonaree. 
479-2063._ 

LOST: SILVER HEART 
shaped locket In parking lot. FIs- 
gard and Wharf area. Vanessa, 
387; 1931 days. 386-7567 nights 

LOST: 2 WEEKS AGO HUMP- 
beck Rd area, 1 year old Shep¬ 
herd Lab. Answers to Oggy. 
595-1604 or 381-5853._ 

LOST: MEDIUM SIZE WHITE 
shaggy dog namod "Gunther". 
1500 reward, duncan 746-5258 
weekday afternoons._ 

LOST: FEB 10TH ESQUIMALT 
and Maitland blade, neutered. 

2as.f.u.a)^ r ihyr r,,<> 

LOST: MALE, 6 MONTH OLD 
Gold and Whitt Lab/Samoyad 
cross. Answers to Smokey. 
992-6879 Reward. _ 

CHOCOLATE POINT SIA- 
mese. answers to "Rochester" 
Lost near Cowlchan District 
Hospital. 112-746-7930 Reward 

LOST-FROM FRONT OF 
Woolco orange and chrome 3 
spaed bike, reward. 4796950. 

LOST; SMALL BLACK RAB- 
of R * , * >h Street. 
479-9538.__ 

LOST: MAN'S BROWN PAD- 
ded vest, keys In pocket. Re- 
ward If found. 385-2486 _ 

LOST: LADIES WATCH SEIKO. 
Phone 387-5436 or 592-9840. 
Reward_ 

LOST ? NORCO 10-SPEED, ALL 
equipment, Information appre- 
clated, can Identify. 479-6102L 

LOST: FERNWOOD AREA, 10 
month male black and white cat. 
Black flea collar. S9S-42SS 

LOST-WHITE MALE COCKA- 
poo^Colwood school vicinity, 

LOST-ORANGE MALE TOM, 8 
months^ Brentwood Bay, re- 

LOST: PAIR OF GLASS WITH- 

ga.a?x^A, <icinify 01 

LOST APOLLO CAPRI 10- 

,t ■wimi'. - 


11 


KU MUTES 
(ENEUL 


HAIRSTYLIST 

Wim «oot# clientele for d™,- 
twm^lon. House ot Glemou,, 


necessary 
Advocacy, 


0 previous experience 
train. Citizen 


HELP MUTED 
SENEML 


British Columbia 
Forest Products Limited 

Mackenzie Division 
requires 



Immediate openings are 
availeble to applicants 
who have a valid Workers' 
Compensation Board In¬ 
dustrial First Aid Certifi¬ 
cate. Previous fire light¬ 
ing, police experience or 
armed services training 
are desirable additional 
qualifications. 

BCFP's Mackenzie divi¬ 
sion Is locarted 120 miles 
north of Prince George. 
Good educational, com¬ 
mercial and recreational 
facilities are established. 
Both summer and winter 
sporting activities are 
readily available in the 
surrounding area. Mod¬ 
ern housing is also avail¬ 
able. 

Written applications out¬ 
lining training and work 
experience should be 
(Jlrstjtedto: 

Assistant Employment 
Supervisor 

British Columbia Forest 
Products Limited 
Box 310 

Mackenzie, B.C. V0J 2C0 
Call collect to: 997-3989 

GENERAL 

SALESMANAGER 

Prefer mature person with past 
personnel management. At least 
20 years marine sales experi¬ 
ence, knowledge of all power 
boat lines. Send resume only to 
Deep Cove Marina & Yacht Sail 
Ltd, 10992 Madrona Dr, R.R. 1. 
Sidney, B.C. V8L 3R9. 


DAILY COLONIST REQUIRES 
carrier for newspaper route In 
the EAST SOOKE area There 

« re approx. 72 customers (fe¬ 
vered which earns approx. 
6200. per month. It fakes about 
1W hour delivery time as dell 
verli are made In newspaper 
receptacle by the road. For more 
Information please contact MR 
R.MACKLEY, 383-4111 local 164 
or leava a misaga. 


LICENSED PRACTICAL 
NURSES 

Casual vacancies exist for 
L.P.N.'s to work on an on call 
basis. Must be available for all 
shifts. Licensing by BCCPN re¬ 
quired and previous experience 
In acute care nurslnQ. Apply to 
the Personnel Office. Saanich 
Peninsula Hospital. 2166 Mt. 
Newton Cross Rd. Seanlchton, 


PART-TIME SUPERVISION 
required tor early morning, 
leaving the rest of the day free 
for other activities 
Duties Include assisting District 
Manager with all aspects of 
Newspaper distribution. (Sail 
and Service) would suit 
adult/senior student. Car would 
be an asset. 

Contact Mr. C. Carolan or Mr. H. 
Faerber, 383-4111 


VICTORIA HOME WANTED 
for 16 year old bov with 
behavioral difficulties Middle- 
aoed couple preferred. Bov 
should be the only or youngest 
child. Parents will be part of a 
professional team. $900 per 
month. Write or call Ellen 
Gabeimenn, Family Court, 2020 
Cameron Straet, Victoria or 
phona387-!896_ 

ACCOUNTANT REQUIRED 
for rehabilitation center. Must 
be capable of taking complete 
charge of all books of entry and 
general ledger. Will be respon 
slble for the preparation of 
monthly financial statements 
for presentation to the Board of 
Directors. Please submit full re¬ 
sume of qualifications. Reply to 
Victoria Press Box 802. 

MARINACARETAKERS 
GULF ISLANDS 

Couple or single person prefer 
rad. Must be good at Oeneral 
repairs and dock maintenance. 
Accomodation provided. Phone 
Vancouver 689 9545 evenings 
6-8pm., or write Victoria Press, 
Box 834,_ 

HEAD NURSE REQUIRED 
for an 8 bed coronary/Intensive 
care unit. Administrative train¬ 
ing and/or experience preferred 
as well as experience In coro- 
narv/lntenslve care. B.C. regis¬ 
tration (or eligibility) required. 
Apply to Director of Nursing, 
Cowlchan District HospItaT, 
Duncan B.C. V9L IE5._ 

RELOCATING TO 

W.C - 

lob In Vancouver. As one of Van¬ 
couver* leading aoencies, we 
are constantly aware of our cli¬ 
ents needs. Send resumes or call 
Diana or Mary at 683-4192. 

CAREERCENTER 
42S-8P0W. Pender St. 

MONEY-TRAVEL 
Exdtment 

Earn while you learn to be a 
driver, mechanic, supply and 
weapon tech., military police* 
man, cook, admin, dark. Visit 11 
(Victoria) Service Battalion Bay 
St. Armoury Rm 218, Tue.-Thur. 
7:30-10:00 pm, Mon-Fri. 8:00-4 
pm._ 

MOTEL CARETAKER, DUN- 
can area. Versatile person with 
oeneral maintenance and front 
desk experience needed to help 
gal operate full service motet 
Reply to Box 395, Duncan V9L 
3X5 stating experience, age, 

ass^Er- wc AM 

MAJOR FRANCHISED 
FAST FOOD RESTAURANT 
MID ISLAND 

Working Manager required 
Immediately. Experience In all 
aspects of full service licensed 
restaurant. Salary negotiable. 
Reply In confidence to Victoria 
Press Box 779. 

GREATOPPORTUNITY 
Earn S150-S250 a month for MVk 
hrs. morning delivery of Colonist 
newpaper In Oak Bay area. 
Apartment rildentlal routes 
available For more Information 
contact Mr. Carolan at Colonist 
Circulation Dept. Phone 

RE DEPENDABLE, 
le couple required tor a 
adult apartment. Prime 
-j - i. Duties include office 
and maintenance. Must be cap¬ 
able oral I minor repairs and 


HELP WANTED 

man 


THE CORPORATION 
OF THE DISTRICT 
OF NORTHCOWKHAN 

DUNCAN, B.C. V9L 3X4 

DEPUTYTREASURER 
COLLECTOR 
The successful candidate will 
assist the Treasurer-Collector In 
the day to day operations of the 
accounting and collection de- 

MSMSARUSBBK 

tlesof hlsdutli. 

Duties will Involve accounting 
supervision, assisting In budget 
and financial statement prepa¬ 
ration, staff supervision and per¬ 
forming other related duties that 
may be assigned from time to 
time. 

•Mm_ 

counting course (C.G.A., R.l.A.) 
and have attained at laast 3rd 
year standing or have equivalent 
municipal experience. Some ex¬ 
perience with data processing an 
In-house computer would be an 
asset. Should have personal Ini¬ 
tiative and be a sett-starter. 

Starting salary will be commen¬ 
surate with experience and prov¬ 
en performance. Excellent 
fringe benefits are applicable. 


Candidates should preferably be 
enrolled In a recognized ac- 


Wrltten applications stating ex¬ 
perience, work history, educa¬ 
tion and Including at least three 
references will be received bv 
the undersigned up to 4:30 p.m., 
Wednesday, February 27,1980. 

J.N Berlkoff, 
Administrator 
Tha Corporation 
- of the District of 
North Cowlchan, 

P.O. Box 278. 

Duncan, B.C. 

V9L3X4 


UNIVERSITY OF 
VICTORIA 
School of Social Work 
, requires 

PROJECT DIRECTOR 
NATIVE INDIAN 
SOCIAL WORK 
EDUCATION PROJECT 

Responsibilities: To collect data 
on the number of educational 
and social service programmes 
for training; to Inquire into the 
viability of these programmes 
and to begin the task of planning 
for naw educational pro¬ 
grammes for Indians. 


ferred. Knowledge oftSe educ4- 
tlonal and social welfare sys¬ 
tems In B.C. Skill In collecting 
and organizing data. In planning 
and report writing required 
Candidates with experience in 
similar protects preferred. 

Salary: Commensurate with 
qualifications and experience 
Thisprotect has been funded by 
the Canadian Donner Founda- 

need and developments during 
the first year. 

Apply to: Brian Wharf, Director. 
School of Social Work, Univer¬ 
sity of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, 
Victoria, B.C. V8W2Y2. 

Deadline for applications: 
March 1,1980. 


LIGHT DUTY 
CLEANER 

for the 

DEPARTMENTOF 
RECREATION 
CITY OF VICTORIA 

Rateof Pay—tS.M/hour 

This Is light duty cleaning work 
ot a varied but routine nature 
performed In and around a num¬ 
ber of civic buildings. Upon re¬ 
ceiving initial verbal Instruc 
tlon, an employee of this class 
performs the required cleaning 
duties In an assigned area and 
under the oener a (supervision of 
a supervisor. Completion of the 
eighth school grade and some 

K evlous cleaning or housekeep- 
g experience Is desirable. 
(This Is part-time wont — ap 
proxlmatelv 4 hours a day). 

Application forms can be ob¬ 
tained from the Personnel De¬ 
partment. city Hall, • 1 Centen¬ 
nial Square, and should be 
submitted not later than Noon. 
Wednesday, February 20,1980. 


John Deere 
Industrial Equipment 
Dealer 

HELP WANTED TO FILL TWO 
VACANT POSITIONS AT 
COAST TRACTOR AND 
EQUIPMENT 

Service Manager for NANAIMO 
branch to supervise 12 to 15 me¬ 
chanics Must be a qualified 
lourneyman heavy-duty me¬ 
chanic with considerable previ¬ 
ous experience as service man 
ager. Wages negotiable, 
advancement possible Apply in 

RHMSIS." ,SLAN ° HliH ‘ 

?85s V T IC T T R 0 Jt A TO B g A r N C g 

EQUIPMENT 

A working foreman Is required 
to supervise one or two other 
mechanics at brand new bulld- 
ing In central Saanich area. 
Must be a qualified lourneyman 
mechanic with previous supervi¬ 
sory experience. Union retes 
plus lead hand differential plus 
oeneflts. Apply In person to 
COAST TRACTOR AND 
EQUIPMENT. South island 
Highway Nanaimo, 754-7735. 


COMPUTER DEPT. MGR. 
westcoest Savings Is B.C.'s 3rd 
(largest credit union with 9 
Ixenches, 43.000 members and 
sssets of 1260 , 000 , 000 . we have 
en Immediate opening for a 
computer Department manager 
to coordinate operation between 
our computer center and 

vrsexperience In computer op¬ 
eration and must have strong or 
ganlzatlonarand analytical 
abilities. Financial experience 
an asset. Apply In writing to: M. 

M:^ i v^r en ' s *' 
. W6STCOAST 
LJ SAVINGS 
ww CREDIT UNION 


Princess 

Mary 

Restaurant 

Vessel 


THE PRINCESS MARY RES- 

aewsaevs 

ouet captain. Applicants must 
have a nWnlmunVof Tyears ex- 
par1«nc» In the service Industry. 
Dyne* to Include supervision of 
all banquet staff and to ensure 
maximum service. For appoint- 
mont call Rob Mann ant64487 

PERMANENT FULL TIME 
and part time positions avail¬ 
able. Excellent earnings. No ex¬ 
perience necessary, but car re- 
qulred. Call 388-7325._ 

EXPERIENCED COOK NEED- 
ad. Crest Harbourvlew inn. 
Apply In person between 
9em-2pm., 455 Belleville street. 



21 HCLF WANTED 


JOIN YOUR LOCAL 
VICTORIAMEDICAL UNIT 

berH>80? 17 ve * rs 0,(1 ^ Dec * m * 

-Train and get paid for part-time 
employment as a First Alder In a 
military tnv l ronmeot 

- Full time employment Is avail¬ 
able during the summer. 

11 (Victoria) Medical Company 
Bav Street Armoury 
815 Bay Street 
Victoria, B.C. 

Come down Tuesday or Thurs- 
dav evenings at 8:00p.m. 

WALLSTROM'S 
THE CLOG FACTORY 

Requires full time salts clerk (to 
become manager) for a new 
store to be located at Market 
Square Victoria. • 

We offer a fixed salary plus 
bonus and a shared extensive 
Insurance program after 3 
months of full time employment. 
Please send resume to: Jan 
Wellstrom Co. Ltd. *3-342 EH 
Esplanade, North Vancouver 

B. C.V7L1A4.__ 

SUPERINTENDENT 
Required Immediately by well 
established Nanai mo based Gen¬ 
eral Contractor. Must be experi¬ 
enced In commercial and Indust¬ 
rial protects, and able to llese 
with Owners/Architects and 
Subtracters. Salary negotiable. 
Must be willing to relocate If 
required and on occasion be will 
Ing to work out of town All re¬ 
plies dealt with In the strictest 
confidence. Reply to victoria 
Press Boy 823. _ 

LOCAL VICTORIA FIRM RE- 
ouires person to train under ap¬ 
prenticeship (5 yr. program) In 
buffing, plating & manufactur¬ 
ing. Previous vocational or 
metal working experience an 
asset. Reply in writing stfttlng 
age, education, etc. to Victoria 
Press Box 828. 

WANTED* 

Person for office-manager posi¬ 
tion for our accountlng/book- 
keeplng area. Must have at least 
3-4 years schooling In currant 

C. G.A techniques. Salary 

S1200 + per month, full benefits. 
Please send resume to PO Box 
7032 Postal Station P._ 

RELIEF HELP REQUIRED, 
who are able to provide paid 
weekend care In your own home 
tor a 9 year old autistic, setf-abo- 
slve boy. He Is presently In a 
special foster home. Training 
available but experience prefer¬ 
red. Please call A. Pearce, 
598-5121 Mon.-Frl. 9AM 4PM. 

REQUIRED: QUALIFIED 
OMC and E vlnrude mechanic for 
full-time employment, good 
wages and working conditions. 
Apply In writing, stating qualifi¬ 
cations and references, Parks- 
vllie Marine, P.O Box 1078. 
Parksvllle, B.C. VOR 2S0. 

EXPERIENCED MECHANIC 
for Cal Van Auto Supply and 
Repair Centre, permanent posi¬ 
tion. Should be experienced In 
performance tuning and all av 
peels of automotive service. 
Apply in person to Service Man- 


3 PERSONS WANTED 
$250-1450 WEEK 
Car necessary. Must be neat In 
appearance. No experience 
necessary. 386-8835 between 
10-5:pm. 

EXPERIENCED JANITOR- 
ess/Janitor for light duty Jani¬ 
torial, part time evenings, Mon¬ 
day to Friday. Must be bondable 
and able to work with minimum 
supervision Apply to P. O. Box 
Sir, Victoria, B.C._ 

SMALL EXCAVATING FIRM 
needs experienced operator for 
450 Case Loader Experienced 
on other machines and Class 1 or 

3 licence an asset. Permanent 
posMIon. Reply to Victoria Press 

MARRIEOCOUPLE PREFER 
red, experienced as resident 
managers for 54 unit townhouM 
protect. Nanismo. Written ap¬ 
plication with work experience, 
references, etc., to Victoria 
Press Box 822._ 

COPIER SERVICE TECHNI- 
clen required to service Canon 
copiers. Some experience neces 
sary on copiers, will train suc¬ 
cessful applicant. Apply Pacific 
Business Equipment, 1006 Hlll- 
slcfe 

Experienced Cook 

Required for restaurant on Alas¬ 
ka Highway. Phone 773-6458 or 
773-9421. Must 00 through Fort 
Nelson B.C operator_ 

Restaurant Helper 

Required for restaurant on Alas- 
k* Highway. Phone 773-6458 or 
773-9421, Must go through Fort 
Nelson B.C. operetor._ 

EXPERIENCED MANAGER 
position for 43-suite apartment 
In Duncan area available. Man 
and wife operation, must have 
good^reference. Victoria Pris, 

PERSON TO CARE FOR 3 
children between 1:45 and 
4:15pm, Monday through Fri¬ 
day, In my home. Mlllstream 
School area. 12.60 per hour. Ref- 
erences. 474-2019,_ 

MOVING TO FLORENCE 
Lake, March 1st. Require loving 
babysitter for 2 year old boy, 
prerarraolv In home, willing to 

WORKING PARENTS RE- 
quire reliable sitter at vour 
home for 9 yr. old girl, after 
school. In Gordon Head School 

?#?884 4 &v°s 339 * fter 5 30Pm - 

WANTED: ENERGETIC PER 
son to loin gardening company. 
Extensive knowledge of fertiliz¬ 
ing, pruning and spraying essen¬ 
tial. Must be a6le to quote. 
383-2103,9-5. 

day, 8-Spm. Wilkinson. Carey Rd 
area for my 2 little girls, IV* and 

4 years. Must be willing to regls- 
ter with daycare, 479-3762 

RELIABLE MOTHER, 


full time In September Unlver- 
slty/Mt. Tolmle area 477-5160. 

GRAD NURSE WANTED FOR 
small private hospital for Wed¬ 
nesday and Thundiv HI. Sat¬ 
urday and Sunday 7am-3:30. 
Phone for appointment 383-7814 

MATURE EXPERIENCED 
cook required for exclusive re¬ 
tirement home. Call Mrs. 
Scribner, 595-3534 for further In¬ 
formation._ 

MATURE. EXPERIENCED 
short order cook for coffee 
stop/dell. Apply 8am-4pm at 
The^Ejgulmalt Dell, 1153 Esqui- 

HOUSEKEEPER-NANNY RE 
qulrad for family with 2 children 
In Toronto. Experience and ref¬ 
erences essential. Phone Mon- 
day 998-7870_ 

TREEPLANTERS. EXPERI- 
enced Wast Coast. Reply with 
name and phone number to Perv 

V8R6N4 60,1 5292< Vlc1 ° rla ' B C - 

PROFESSIONAL DOG 
groomer required, must have 

or477778 exper,#oc# ' W5 ' 1243 

LICENSED AUTO MECHANIC. 
Call collect 537-S509, ask for 
Jack. On Saltsprlng Island. 

BABYSITTER REQUIRED IN 
Vic High area for shiftwork. 
385-3193._ 

RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER. 
4 hours. 3:30-7 :X “ 

Washington area. 


30pm. Burnside- 
a. 383-4645 


HELP WANTED 
GENERAL 


ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT 
tor medium size business duties 
— responsible for water billing, 
collecting and recording with the 
aid of one bllllno clerk and one 
terai office clerk; accounts 
/abla, stock records for ma- 
.. lets and supplies, bank recon¬ 
ciliations. some payroll work in 
absence of payroll dark, typing. 




etc; assisting the treasurer In his 
duties, advising customers of 
rules and regulations, etc. 

Junior matriculation required 
supplemented by courses in dou¬ 
ble entry bookkeeping and ele¬ 
mentary accountancy. 

Please reply to Victoria Press 
Box No. 799 outlining training, 
work experience and salary ex¬ 
pected 


VO 


VICTORIA 

PUDLIC 

SAVINGS 

Credit Union 


We have an Immediate opening 
for a bright and personable tel ler 
with previous experience. 

Our credit union otters excellent 
benefits, a progressslve salary 
program and a good working 
environment. 

Please mall resume to: 

Mrs. L. Toporowskl. S47 Mlchl- 
iST, Victoria, V8V 1S5. 


ganS 


REQUIRE FULLY-EXPERI- 
enced drapery seamstress. Good 
houMy^ wages. Victoria Press. 

WANTED: MATURE EXPERI- 

384-1715,385-4035 _ 

NEEDED: BEFORE SCHOOL 
end afterschool care, near David 
Cameron School. 381-5449 after 
4pm._ 

EXPERIENCED SKIPPER TO 
charter 43' troller. Must have 
references Victoria Press Box 

NEEDED MATURE RELI 
able sitter, my home, own trans¬ 
portation required, Gorge-Col 
oultz area. 384-3084. 


eXPERIENCED CELLULOSE 
InAilat on awllcator tor walls 
and attics Aoolv «36 Davonshlre 
between 9 and 5. 


FULL TIME CASHIER/CLERK 
for gift shop. Send proper re- 
some to victoria Press Box 819 


22 OFFICE HELP 


SECRETARY TOTHE 
MUNICIPAL CLERK 
CLERK'S DEPARTMENT 
PAY GRADE 9— 
11048*11226 
PER MONTH 


retarial position as Secretary to 
the Municipal Clerk. 

The ckrtles Involve taking and 
transcribing dictation, record 
keeoing, filing. Initiation of rou¬ 
tine correspondence, prepara¬ 
tion and distribution of agendas 
andmlnutes, Issuanceof requisi¬ 
tions, receiving and answering 
enquiries and attending various 
council and Committee meet¬ 
ings. 

Applicants must have the ability 
to cope with a heavy workload 
combined with perpetual and 
frequent deadlines. Due to the 
nature of the Department appii 
cants must also be extremely 
accurate in all aspects of their 
work. 

Applicants should have experi¬ 
ence as a secretary at a senior 
level, the ability to work effec¬ 
tively with the public, elected 
officials and other personnel. 
Grade 12 education supplement 
ed by secretarial courses, ex¬ 
perience In taking minutes of 
meetings and experience In 
working with by-laws. 

Further details of the position 
may be obtained from Personnel 
Services. 

Applications will be received by 
the undersigned until 4:30 p.m., 
Friday, February 22nd. 1980. All 
applications for this competition 
will be acknowledged provided 
return address Including postal 
code is shown on the application. 

Persons who have already ap¬ 
plied for this position need not 
re-submlt their application. 

Director 

Personnel Services 
.Saanich Municipal Hall 
770 Vernon Avenue 
Victoria. B.C. 

V8X2W7 


SR.BOOKKEEPER 
S0PEN 

Required immediately for well 
established downtown C. A. firm. 
Preference will be given to those 
applicants who have previous 
experience In Accountants office 
with proven record of capabili¬ 
ties in client accounting aod be 
component to monthly finSnclal 
statements, veer end state¬ 
ments, corporate and personal 
tax returns. Good appearance 
and pleasant personality and the 
ability to deal with their 
Important clients effectively 
Salary to commensurate with 
experience. 

PRIME PERSONNEL 
320-1070 Douglas St. 
_385-7012_ 

A small downtown Vlrm requires 
2 fully experienced secretaries, 
both to work for senior practi¬ 
tioners. 1 Is engaged In Interna¬ 
tional Commercial work. For 
this position executive level sec¬ 
retarial skills and aptitude are 
appropriate. The other will be 
arriving from Ontario In April 
and will practise Family Law 
exclusively. For this position, 
knowledge of court forms end 
procedures and appropriate or¬ 
ganizational ability are essen 
flat. These positions combine the 
opportunity to be Involved with 
Interesting matters with the ca¬ 
sual atmosphere ot a small of¬ 
fice. There will of necessity be 
some Involvement with all 
phases of the office routine. Ex¬ 
cellent salary with pleasant 
working conditions. Please send 
resume to Messrs. Butler 
An^us., 736 Broughton, 

CLERK—TYPIST 
Required with experience In 
purchasing department. Accu 
rate fl<wre typing and pleasant 
telephone manner a plus. Please 
call 388-5565. 

office 

overload 


MEDICAL OFFICE RECEP 
tlonlst to work 30 hours per week. 
Applicants must have previous 
medical office experience, ty¬ 
ping of at least 65 wpm and dicta 
phone experience. Send letters of 
reference with resume and sal 
ary requirements to Victoria 
Press Box 791. 


BOOKKEEPER 
Growing real estate company 
requires person with 2 years ex 
perleoce as a bookkeeper and 
who Is desirous of obtaining a 
CGA. Excellent company bene¬ 
fits. All replies kept confidential. 
Send complete resumes to Vlc- 
torla Press, Box 810,_ 

°J£ TA ; T . YP,STS required 

with minimum 2 years experi¬ 
ence for Interesting temporary 
assignments at good hourly 
wage. Please phone Office Over 
load, 388-5565 for further Inf or 
matlon._ 

PART TIME SALES HELP FOR 
JEAN STORE. MUST BE 
FLEXIBLE. FROM 12-24 
HOURS PER WEEK. 388-4251 
FOR INTERVIEW. 


22 OFFICE HELP 


for financial firm, previous fi¬ 
nancial experience beneficial, 
outgoing personality, musF be 
transferable. Apply In persen to 
733 Johnson St. See G. Devon¬ 
shire. 


EXPERIENCED MEDICAL 
Receptionist neede d tor full time 
work In group Practice. 388-6251 
weekdays. 


a SKILLED TRAKS 


WANTED BY B.C. CEMENT 

one DPW number 1 welder With 
several years shop and fleldex- 
perlence. These are permanent 
lobs. Wage rate for millwrights 
110.39per hour plus C.O.L.A. end 
DPW number I welder 110.49per 
hour plus C.O.L.A., plus shift 
differential when applicable. 
Good fringe benefits. Telephone 
for appointment. From Vlctvla 
call direct 383-9622, from tfr- 
couver call direct 681-4546X>d 
from any other point in B.C/call 
743-5511 collect. 


REGISTEREDNURSES 
GORGE RD. HOSPITAL 
ANEXTENDEDCAREUNIT 
Vacancies exist for permanent, 
full time days, 7:30am-3:30pm., 
6 on 3 off. Permanent, part-time 
days, 7:30am-3:30pm, 3 on 6 off. 
Permanent.part-time nights. 
ll:30pm-7:36am, 3 on 6 off. Ca¬ 
sual R .N.'s also required for .re¬ 
lief on call for all shifts. Quail 
fled applicants apply to: 
Personnel Department, Gorge 
Road Hospital, 63 Gorge Roed 
East, Victoria V9A l L2. 


GM DEALER 

VANCOUVER ISLAND 
REQUIRES PARTSPERSON 
If you are fully qualified we offer 
you TOP WAGES In a pleasant 
community. Phone, write, or 
visit Egil Nleuweiaar at: 

Seale & Thomson Ltd. 

Chev-Olds Dealer 
Courtenay B.C. 

Phone 334-2425. Box 3399. 


LARGE ESTABLISHED RE- 
tall company requires profes¬ 
sional sales person for its Vic¬ 
toria location. Excellent 
commission structure, 12043D>- 
000 range Medical, dental plan 
Must have previous successful 
sales experience. Forward re¬ 
sume in strictest confidence" to 
Victoria Press Box 818. 


IF YOU ARE A QUALIFIED 
Bricklayer-Stonemason andean 
estimate vour own work 

THE BLUE ARMY 
has additional work available In 
^our^trada Immediately. 


EXPERIENCED PROPANE 
oas fitter,with drivers license 
reoulred for permanent employ¬ 
ment. Apply In writing, giving 
resume of background and ex¬ 
perience to: Manager, P.O Box 
520, Parksvllle BC. VOR 2S0. 


THE BLUE ARMY 
requires a fully qualified 
renovations contractor to handle 
additional work In the Oak Day 
area Phone 385-7755__ 

INSTRUMENT PERSON RE 
pul red for legal survey firm In 
Duncan. Minimum 5 years ex¬ 
perience In Cadastral Survey¬ 
ing. Resume and references fo 
Victoria Press Box 638. 


EXPERIENCED MEAT CUT- 
ter with knowledge of freezer 
meats for local distributor. Send 
resume to Victoria Press Box 
773. All applications conflden- 
tlal._ 

EXPERIENCED LATHER 
wanted. Permanent, full time 
position, excellent pay. For fur¬ 
ther Information phone after 
6pm , 478-7870. 


WANTED SHIPWRIGHT OR 
boat carpenter for Interior boat 
finishing. Call after 6pm, Port 
Alberni, 723-8958. _ _ __ 

WANTED: QUALIFIED UP- 
holsterer, able to cut and sew. 
Full time position. Write to Vlc- 
torla Press Box 784._ 

WANTED: JOURNEYMAN 
carpenters and labourers. Must 
be experienced. After 5pm, 
477-7718._ 

EXPERIENCED TAPER 
wanted for Duncan area 
112-746-4912_- 

FRAMING CREWS WANTED 
Phone 656-7723,8 am to 4 pm 


24 


SALESPERSONS 
UD MBITS 


I 

"1 BESTSEliERS" 
REAL ESTATE 


TRAINING 

PRODUCES 

SUCCESS 

Block Bros, will train you In 
sound proven methods enabling 
you to quickly reach your de¬ 
sired level of success. Successful 
progressive salespeople 

ARE NOT BORN, THEY 
ARE TRAINED 

Call today, Interviews by ap¬ 
pointment only. (Held strictly 
confidential.) 

CALL 

"THE BESTSELLERS" 
Sidney-Colwood 478-5541 
Bill Wonnacott 
Blanshard 386-3231 

Bob Hahn 

Shelbourne 477-1841 

BobCullum 
Bernle Wilkinson 

WciflMRBSB'' 

Cooperative Life Insurance Co 
Cooperative Fire 81 Casualty Co 
Have openlno for multi line In¬ 
surance sales person for Vic 
for I a and Duncan. Sales experi¬ 
ence en asset, but not required 
These openings offer all tradi¬ 
tional staff benefits as well as a 
salary plus commission 
Apply In writing to: 

H.H. Krott 
The Co-Operators 
3618 Shelbourne St. 
Victoria, B.C, V 8 P 5JS 

SALES POSITION 
We are a young, vigorous and ex¬ 
panding company looking for a 
sales representative for the Vic¬ 
toria area. 

The person we seek will be en 
enthusiastic self starter with ini¬ 
tiative who Is able to apply our 
products as well as sell. 

An excellent opportunity for 
above avereoe Income plus op¬ 
portunity for early advance¬ 
ment. Full group benefits. 

For • confidential interview 
phone Mr. Evans at 381-5331. 


Career Sales Opportunity 

Arrowsmlth Realty Ltd. a S4Jbsi- 
dlarv of Alberni District Credit 
Union requires an experienced 
life Insurance sales person. 

This position offers a salary plus 
commission as well as the usual 
company paid benefits. Resume 
and reply to: 

Jean Earthy—Manages * 
Arrowsmlth Realty Ltd 
4853 Angus St, P.O. Box 544, 
Port Alberni, B.C. V9Y 7M9 


Classified — Victoria’s Largest Proven Market Place — Where Your Articles Sell Fastest! Cost Less to Sell 386-2121 


































































































































































































C-2 

M SALESPERSONS 
ANDAOENTS 



E.T.D. 

Licenced Realtors: Mow's vour 
E.T.D.r To be successful you 
must possess Empathy. Talent 


and Drive, if you're not develop¬ 
ing vour —— 

areas. 


vour full potential (n these 
is. perhaps It's time for a 




people and offers an atmos 
re that could be conducive to 
jr success. Talk It over with 
^Hughes, 382-9191 or Res. 


|T7Tf 


A. E. LePAGE 


JOIN US 


Business Is Increasing 
and we have need tor sev¬ 
eral licensed salespeople. 
Let's have a chat about 
how we can help you in 
1980 sales. For a confiden- 
t la I interview call 
477-7121, R. RAWNSLEY, 
MGR., A. E. LEPAGE 
WESTERN LTD. 


LICENSED REALTOR S 

-- T ^j ) , 


YOU ARE WANTED! 
“In House Listings" 
“Good Location" 
“Easy Parking" 
“Experienced co-workers" 
Better than average 
COMMISSION splits 
Weonlv want 
the VERY BESTI 
DON'T YOU? 

Then CALL NOW 
In confidence to: 

K. M. Porter Res. 656-5235 


mDUNSMUIR 

UJ 388-7868 


CASTLE PROPERTIES LTD. 
requires 2 experienced active li¬ 
censed realtors or 2 new llcen- 
cees, willing to accept guidance 
readily, to complement our dy¬ 
namic sales team. We have com¬ 
plete and most up to date maps 
and Appraisal Records Including 
Microfiche and In House Com¬ 
puter for Market value compari¬ 
son, Mortgage Ammortlzation 
Apartment and Investment 
Analysis etc. We offer a full 
range of fringe benefits Includ¬ 
ing Medical Plan with weekly 
Disability pay, paid signs, Sta¬ 
tionary etc. Excellent rommls- 
sto" split within easy reach to 
90/10. For confidential Interview 
call FREDDY STARKE at 
386-6164 or 595-1175. 


TOP NOTCH CLOSER 
ASSISTANT TO THE 
MANAGER 


Inlflatlvetooet and stay ahead In 
a new concept sales career, call 
my office at 385-7755 Monday 
throuoh Friday and make an 
appointment for an Interview 
mhthef*- 


wi 


e Manager 


TO 

BUYORSELL 
AVON 
Call 384-7345 


SALESTRAINEE 
This challenging position will 
provide a sound base of training 
and experience for progression 
Into outside industrial sales. 
Previous sales experience not 
essential. Apply In writing with 
resume to Victoria Press Box 


AGENTS LICENSE 
Realtors, thinking of starting 
vour own company? Active 
agents license available. Let's 
talk In confidence. Reply Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 801. 


A SUCCESSFUL INTERPRO- 
vlnclalmf 
and sales 

ambitious,____ 

ers for expansion purposes. Send 
>lles to Victoria Press Box 


UL mi curuv- 

clal management, marketing 
1 sales enterprise Is seeking 
bltlous, creative, self start- 




BORED OR TIRED WITH 
your old |ob? Looking for full or 
part-time work? And make as 
much money as you like. This 
may be your opportunity. For 
Interview, call 592-0730. 


MEN AND WOMEN WITH 
strong ambitions, call 479-7839 
\rs Rlr*- 


Mrs Rlgler for appointment. 


TEACHERS 


SUPERVISOR, PARENT PAR- 
tlclpatlon Preschool, Nanaimo 
1980-81 term. Apply Mary Ca¬ 
bell, 815 Short Ave., Nanaimo, 
V9R 4L7^C^imed applicants. 


licensed PCC 


28 PART-TIME* 
TEMPORARY HELP 


REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY, 
bondable janitor/houseoerson- 

, j --- •- 


minimum 3 days per week In¬ 
cluding weekends, union wage 
scale and benefits. Pleasant 
working conditions. Apply In 
writing to Victoria Press Box 770 


HAIRDRESSER NEEDED 
part time to Instruct at Interna¬ 
tional Hairdressing School. If In¬ 
terested please call Don 3864841, 


PART TIME WORK IN MEAT 
processing plant, days or nights, 
required to wear hair scarf. Also 
pari time driver wanted. Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 642. 


HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS RE 
quired for part time evening 
work. Call 388-6660 between 6-9 
pm. 


BE YOUR OWN BOSS 
Have your own business, part 
time or full time. 478-7182. 


BABYSITTER WANTED. COR- 
dova Bay area. 9 month old boy. 
Some afternoons only. 658-5862. 


occasional evenings. Preferab- 
ly James Bay person. 388-4918. 


OCCASIONAL EVENING BA- 
bysltter required. 652-1363. 


2t EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 


RESUMES 

impress any employer with a 
succinct and sensible analysis of 
vour personal background and 
work experience. Complete and 
comprehensive coverage for 
only ISO. 384-5659. 


RESUMES THAT GET JOBS. 

Professionally prepared. 
Personal, confidential service. 


--- ..OFESSI 

lv prepared. Reallstlcallyprlced 
--,.384-4428 


on an Individual basis, 
eves, until 9pm. 


H SITUATIONS WANTED 


ENGLISH COUPLE, RE- 
tlred, non-smokers, non- 
drInkers, seek position on Van¬ 
couver Island, secrulty. care¬ 
taking, private residence, 
waterfront property, etc. In ex¬ 
change for furnished accommo¬ 
dations. Excellent references. 
Vancouver, 112-689-2767. 


EXPERIENCED, MATURE, 
fyplst/receplonlst requires full 
lime employment. Knowledge of 


B.C.. 

composition andspoiling 
Victoria Press Box 816. 


nowledoeof 
and medical 


30 SITUATIONS WANTED 


TRY THE OLD CANADIAN, 
from 86 . Cleanups, cartage, 

- 1 — ^ r talk ‘ 


handyman, trees topped, felled. 
The hand of experience, the 
heart of a lamb. Lorne Elves. 


592-0129,598-2636. 


VERSA?I£E^ GRAPHIC AR- 


tlst seeks___ 

Experienced care and consider 
atton given to all types of art 
protects. Illustrations and maps 
a specialty. Call 384-0126. 


[NTJLy^ENT, WELL READ. 
— b |ob 


INTELLIGEI 
kindly lady r 
panlon and/ 
Conscltnfkx 
good referet 
Press Box 71 


panlon and/or housekeeper. 
Conscientious and reliable. Very 
-“■ rences. Reply Victoria 


CASUAL WORK: PAINTING, 
fireplaces, chimneys, repaired. 
Gutters c l eaned, lined, repaired. 
Installed. Attic Insulatl 


•spall 

„,,,v ••owitftlon. In¬ 
stalled. 388-7941, 477-9216 
Wesley. 


dental receptionist seeking posi¬ 
tion In hapov office. Capable of 
w ?l k,n i..* ,on ?;..® ood raPPorf 
with pitollc, willing to assist If 
needed. Victoria Press Box 817. 


BUSINESSMAN WITH EXTEN- 
slve Insurance end real estate 
background desires full or part 
time employment In sales relat- 
ed field. Victoria Press Box 785. 


DUTCH GARDENER. GAR- 
denlno. Pruning. Small or big 
lobs. Free estimates. 388-6529, 
479-2968. 


RETIRED BUSINESSMAN 
wants few hours weekly. Good on 
telephone, reception, selling, let¬ 
ters. 721-5182. 


homemaker and companion to a 
healthy senior gentleman. Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 790 


RESPONSIBLE WOMAN 
seeking housecleaning lobs, S5 
hours, minimum 4 hours. Good 
references. 38X1196. 


EXPERIENCED LPN RE- 
qulres full time employment as 
receptionist In Doctor's office. 


MAN WITH TRUCK WILL DO 
cleanup, hauling, chainsaw 
work. etc. Reasonable. Tony 
474-1014. 


dent, available for bookkeeping. 
Income fax or any lob. J. Laurlo, 
386-7570. 


SAVE NOW! INTERIOR 
painting done to vour satisfac¬ 
tion. Reasonable! Reliable! 
479-3250 


EXPERIENCED PAINTER 
needs work. Interior and exteri¬ 
or, small plaster repairs. 
592-7137. * 


GUTTERS, PAINTING, GAR- 


YOUNG LADY NEEDS WORK 
In lab to gain lab related experl 
ence. 382-9507 


31 YEAR OLD MAN URGENT- 
lv needs steady work. Clean drl v- 
ers licence. Phone 382-8704. 


PENSIONER WOULD LIKE 
Hjjht^work, full or part time. 


ROOFER. CEDAR, SHAKES, 

SJEwTwW*' “ *"• 


CLEANING LADY NEEDS 
work. Phone 386-1710. 


TYPING PROFESSIONALLY 
done. I B M. Selectrlc. 479-3209. 


HOUSECLEANING, S5 AN 

--- 178-3"' 


hour. Phone478-9246or478-3239. 


RENT—A—KID 
Help with odd lobs, 387-5506 


BANOS, MUSICIANS 
AHD ORCHESTRAS 


“OVERPROOF", FEATURING 
Dallas Hansen, Robert Edwards 
and Ian Taylor Is now available 
for bookings. Phone Robert, 
595-6620. 


34 PRE-RECORDED MUSIC 


PAPA BEAR 

PRODUCTIONS 



— LIVE or RECORDED MUSIC 

— CATE RING SERVICES 

— BARTENDER SERVICES 


385-2832 


SPINKY'S 

Priced to Fit Your Bu< 


rlcedtoFIt Your Budget. 
BAR SERVICE available. 


656-1652 


CANDU MUSIC 


Entertainment Services 
384-5521. 


ARION'S 

Make vour occasslon a success. 
595-4376 Days or Evenings 


STARR SOUND LTD. 
Ballroom, rock and disco 
386-1230 


"STUBBIES" CANNED 

»^5 ,z,no,nWedd,w 


CJR^ANNED MUSIC. 382-3811, 


RUDY'S MOBILE DISCO 
385-6720 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
ARD DIRECTORY 


CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, 
available for bookkeeping, write 
up work, financial statement 


-- - -.-lament 

preparation. From personal 
residence. Murray Ellis, 
385-1011. 


COMPLETE ACCOUNTING 
and bookkeeping services Also 


preparation of personal Income 
tax returns. G. Spence 721-5165. 


ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEP- 
I, fliw- -- 


Ing, financial statei 
come tax. etc. Mr. * 
479-4541 or 388-4413. 


TAX RETURNS PREPARED 
at your address. 15 up. 652-1534 
after 5 pm. 


iNiwtlWn 


ABC &JSI RIC 

VICTOR! A SHAVER CENTRE 
382-7221 

TELE-TECH APPLIANCES 
385-6783 

ONE STOP SERVICE AT 
831 YATES ST. 


REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS 
D. M. (Dooty^MacKlllop 

Island Homes Realty Ltd. 


RELIABLE MOTHER WOULD 
like to babysit any age, anytinr 


- --any age, anytime, 

nutritious meals, big yard. CoF 
wood area 478-1038. 


BUTTONS 'N BOWS DAYCARE 
Centra, 312 Ben homer Phone 


}_NE EDA^PLAY MATE.MY 


mom will babysit days. Wooi- 
co/Cerey Rd. area. 381-0851. 


WILL BABYSIT OVER NIGHT 
— “‘ikendt, my he 


and weekends, my home 
479-4206. 


WILL BABYSIT, MY HOME, 
weekdays, Gordon Head area. 
721-5084. 


WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME 
Monday-Frlday, fenced yard, In- 
f ants welcome. 474-2948. 


I WILL BABYSIT, MY HOME, 
Esquimau area. Phone 384-9578. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
AND DIRECTORY 


BUTTONS & BOWS DAYCARE 
Center, 312 Benhomer. 478-1314. 


WILL BABYSIT IN OUR 
home, 3 veers and up. 381-1255 


IKON INDUSTRIES LTD. 
drilling and blasting, logging 
roads, subdivisions, basements. 
246-4533 daytime, 245-8296 eve¬ 
nings. 


Briet Layers 


RETIRED BRICKLAYER, 
*-rlck, blocks andTf- “ 


or contract. Very reason¬ 
able 385-6340 


25 YEARS' EXPERIENCE, 
fireplaces, chimney repairs, 
house^facinus, etc. Doug, 


479-5975,721-5 




room vanities, counter tops, all 
custom bul It or ref aclng old cabl • 
nets with new modern designs 
with low price. For free estimate 
479-7245. 


CUSTOM CAB I NETS 
Refaclng-Free Estimate 
384-2323 


RENOVATING? 

Want some Ideas! Kitchens, 
bathrooms and rec rooms my 
specialty, for a tree estimate call 
Terry, 479-9573. 


RAD CONSTRUCTION. ADDI- 
tlons-lnterlor and exterior fin¬ 
ishing and renovations. Reesoo- 
' », fre 


able rates, free estimates. 
477-2181, 478-0460 between 
5-7pm. 


IF YOU ARE TIRED OF ME 
dlocure workmanship, call Ro¬ 
bert Innes, 598-2795 evenings, for 
all home renovations, additions, 
rec rooms, etc. 


JOURNEYMAN CARPENTER 
commerdal/resldental renova 
flops, framing, additions and 
finishing. For reference and tree 
advise call, Al 478-4750. 


ENGLISH CARPENTER, REN- 
atlons, JJ, ‘— 


ovations, additions, changes, 
finishing, cupboards, decorat 
Ing. Reliable and reasonable 


Phone 478-8643. 


COMPLETE HOME Con¬ 
struction services. Hour or by 
contract. Sidney and North 
Saanich. 656-3403,6560295 


CARPENTER AVAILABLE 
for renovations and additions, 
kitchens, bathrooms, rumpus 
rooms, etc. 386-9604. 


REMODELING, ADDITIONS, 
stairways, entrys, all home and 
c^mmjrclal repairs. Phone 


FINISHING CARPENTER, 
basements, sundecks, cabinets, 
siding. Free estimates. Reason¬ 
able. Terry 652-4572 


PERMA CONST. LTD. 

FREE ESTIMATES, 384-2323 


NEW CONSTRUCTION OR 
renovations, planning, drawing, 
layout and work. 656-4947. 


FULLY QUALIFIED 
carpenter requires employ¬ 
ment Phone 384-0894. 


JORGENSEN CONSTRUC- 
tlorv ^Complete design services. 


YOUNG CARPENTER WILL 
attorn, sundecks, sTd- 


do renov.__ __ . 

log. No lob too small. 652-3753. 


SMALL JOBS A SPECIALTY. 
Call_ 598-2920 


FRAMING CREW AVAIL- 
able. Call Kasa 652-3433. 


Carpet CteMfag 


VICTORIA STEAMATIC 
Carpet, upholstery, drapery 
In home cleaning 
It's automatic with Steamatlc. 
652-3470 


REGIONAL CARPET CLEAN- 
Ing, steam cleaning. Living 
room, dining room. hall. 145. 
478-8518 


PHIL'S CARPET CLEANING, 
steam cleaning carpets, chester¬ 
fields, chairs. 474-1808. 


C«T«t> ari LMmbi 


\ BEAVER 


HOME CENTRE 

1580 Hillside 595-1225 


Carpeting a new home or recar- 
petlng vour present one see the 
Homemakers. Contact Mai Con¬ 
nors, 595-1225 

You Install! 

We Install I 

12 month warranty on our Instal¬ 
lations. 


CARPETS AND LINOS LTD. 
FLOOR COVERING 
SPECIALISTS 

715 PANDORA AVE. 386-2401 


18 YEARS EXPERIENCED 
carpet layer. Cheap for cash. ln- 
aliat 1 —-- • 


K . iuM.1 . wi<w iui iii- 

tlons, repairs, restretch. 
Phone Master Power Wash 
384-6818 anytime. 


C k A .P? ETS AN D LINO IN 
stalled, reasonable rates, free 
estimates, workmanship 
guaranteed. 383-6791. 


NEED YOUR CARPET in¬ 


stalled. Call 388-7245 weeknlohts 
between 5 - 7 pm. Free estimates. 


CARPET AND LINO. WE LAY 
♦bebest and f| x the rest. 
479-0782. 


RETAINING WALLS. PATIOS, 
sidewalks and all small concrete 


lobs done. Estimates gladly 
glvan, 


WESTERN FORM 
RENTALS LTD. 


658-5122 
Nights 658-8018,474-1727 


READY-MIXED CONCRETE 
when you want It - we deliver on 
weekends. Smaller lobs a spe¬ 
cialty. Personalized, friendly 
service. Phone 478-3522 ( 24 hrs) 
or 388-5464 pager 611, Small Load 
Cement Products Ltd, 2650 Nob- 
hill Rd. 


G AND R CONCRETE FINISH¬ 
ES, all type of concrete work. No 
job too small. 383-8985 after 4. 
388-9820. 


STAN FRY CEMENT FINISH- 
Ing. All sizes of lobs, smell or 

M4Sl66 Free es ' lmates ' cal1 


FORMS, CEMENT WORK, 
steps, foundations, sidewalks, 
etc. Steve Laszlo 479-4756. 


C*MkTfc( 


CUSTOM CERAMIC TIL- 
Ing,free estimates. All work 
guaranteed. 656-5494. 




DON'T RISK A CHIMNEY 
fire, call BLACK STACK Chim¬ 
ney Sweep, member of Blue 
Army and B.B J. 10% Off met81 
chimneys. aU-Tfl 1,9am-9pm. 


BLACK MAGICK 
Chimney & Eves Cleaned 

388-4839 


38S-2813 


pointing and Flashing Graham 
Contracting. 381-1112. 


ESQUIMALT CHIMNEY 


Chan* Santo 


FATHER and son with van, 

drilvyy. He M6-9S00. 


BUSINESS SUVKES 
AND WSECTMY 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 


CTa mm , S*rric 


NO CASH NEEDED 

Attics, basements, yards. Any 


kind at lunk hauled away. Also 
buy 81 sell anything of value. 
Bob'S, 386-2451 or 47 W 789 


4 BROTHERS —ALL AREAS 
FREE ESTIMATES ANYTIME 
NO CHARGE AND UP 
Yard. Basamcnt, Garage, Etc. 
luilng and Bobcat, 479 V " 


Hauling and Bobcat. 


112 


COOKNELL'S CLEANUP SER 
vice. Big or small, we can handle 
It all. Free estimates and fast 
ervli “ 


service . 1 
478-9762. 


handle 
and fast 


ce. Cajl ian 386^891 or Ken 


REASONABLE CLEANUP. 
Yards, basements, etc. also 
*“ .freec-- 


hauling, fi 
656-5671. 


e estimates. 479-5823, 


GORDONS SERVICE 
Household repairs, cleanup, 
yards, basements, hauling, 
delivery. Evenings 478-8251 


CLEAN-UP YARDS, COM 
posts and basements, prompt 
service, reasonable rates, 
478-4943. 


CLEANUP SERVICE, OAK 
Bay-Falrfleld speciality, base¬ 
ments, yards, etc. Hauling. Free 
estimates. 598-7595 or YR 97332. 


LOOKING FOR A OEAL? OUR 
^•-ton truck takes most loads for 
only 113.50. 383-0805. 


CLEANUP MAN AND EMPTY 
truck looking for work.reason- 
able. 385-7965. 


HAULING AND CLEANUPS. 
Basement, yard, compost. Free 
estimates. Eugene's, 383-3528. 


CLEANUPS, BASEMENTS, 
attics, yards, composts, and 
lunk hauling. 658-5406. 


CLEANUP AND HAULING, 
scrap metal, basements, rea¬ 
sonable. 479-3971 


CHEAP RATES, 1 TON TRUCK. 
Yards, basements, composts, 
small moves. 592-8869. 


§s&% 

pager 1614. 


NEW HOMES CLEANED AND 
vacuumed, rubbish hauled. 
479-4067. 


WHEATON 

CONSTRUCTION LTD. 
General Contractors 
Building Consultants 
385-5702 


m FARMER 
CONSTRUCTION 
Design — Renovations 
388-5121 


TYLER CONST. LTD 


Commercial 81 Residential 
Renovations 8 . Additions 


385-3856 


T.&C. BUILDERSLTD. 
Framing 

385-5293_385-8587 


CUSTOM HOME SPECIALIST, 
call Mike anytime. 592-0322 eve¬ 
nings, 384-3323 days. 

EL- 


ELCON PROJECTS LTD. 


FOR COMPLETE RENOVA 
tlons call 474-1431. Reference 
available. 


ARCHITECTURAL. STRUC- 
tural drawings, quantity takeoff 
and estimates prepared, 19 
years experience, hourly-con¬ 
tract. 721-5047. 


ALLTYPESOF RESIDENTIAL 
and commercial design draft- 


end commercial design draft¬ 
ing. Building Inspections and 
construction management ser¬ 
vices. 652-3580 


ARCHITECTURAL STRUC- 
tural drafting services custom 
or renovations. Hourly/con- 
*— 1 —‘"led. 


tract, certified. 479-0896 


F loor Covering Specialists 

CUSTOM 

DRAPERIES 

—Bedspreads— 


PROMPT IN-HOME SERVICE 
715 PANDORA AVE. 386-2401 


DRAPES, SLIP COVERS, BED- 
spreads, camper cushions, etc. 
Reasonable Phone 38S-0846. 


Dressmaking; 


ERZSI DRESSMAKING BOU 
tlque now open, professional 
dressmaking, designing and al 
teratlons. Call 382-5712 
9:30am.-5:30pm. Mon.-Sat. 


DRESSMAKING ALTERA- 
tlons and draperies. Lots of ex¬ 
perience. 479-6655. 


INOVATIVE SEWING 
Quilts, wall har- - 


bags, canvas won 


ingings, clothing, 
ork. 385-7162. 


“SPRAYMAN" 

Specializing In all types of tex¬ 
ture ceilings and wall, satlsfac- 
tlon guaranteed. 652-360). 


BOARDING, TAPING AND 
other decorating specialities. 
Free estimate. Workmanship 
guaranteed. 385-4725. 


DRYWALL APPLICATION, 
taping, textured ceilings and 
basement framing. 382-4295 


LOWEST PRICES 
All phases. Available Immedl- 
ately. 385-2)51. 


FOR SUPURB JOB AT REA- 
sonabie rates, phone 652-5752. 


BMtriul CwrtrMtort 


LICENCED ELECTRICIAN 
will do residential, commercial, 
Industrial. Old home rewiring. 
Workmanship guaranteed. Free 
iates. Cart 388-6275 pager 


issr 1 


„ RG HELLER ELECTRIC 
Resident, commercial, small In¬ 
dustrial. Old home rewiring. 
Very reasonable rates. 478-4032, 
If no answer 385-5335. 


OLDER HOMES REWIRED— 
No down pymt. We finance at 


Construction or Service 
Electricians. Call Henry 


384-3323 (24hrs) 


alderley^lectric 

Small hookups to large wiring 
lotos. Done promptly at reason- 
able rates. 658-5373. 


SELF-EMPLOYED ELECTRI- 
'SJR- Price* that WON'T SHOCK 
YOU. All types of wiring. Free 
1 .381-6728. 


estimates.;! 


ADDITIONS, ALTERATIONS, 
dryer hookups, etc. Reasonable 
rates. Free estimates. Brian, 


DO YOU HAVE SMALL ELEC- 
trlealI wiring lobs? No one Is Irv 
terested? please call evenings, 
652-5809. 


Qualifieo electrician, 


«U«L ritu CLCl. I KILInn, 

specializing In service calls. DIs- 
count tor Senior Citizens. 


385-0698. 


SEMI RETIRED ELECTRI- 
c an needs work. Rewiring and 
•jRCfflc heat, etc. Very reeson- 
able, licensed 478-3806. 


SMALL WIRING JOBS, SER- 
prices you can at- 


HSI-NSED electrician 
wllj do new wiring, rewirlr 


win do new wiring, rewiring, he 
water tanks Installed. 479-9765. 

ELECTRICIAN. FREE ESTI- 
mates. Call Bernie 386-1094. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
AM) DIRECTORY , 


MANSELL BOBCAT SERVICE, 
md St - 


Cali 
tor leveling, 
backfilling, septic fields, post 
holes, sand, gravel or topsoil 
supplied, spread, leveled. Base¬ 
ments dug, landscaping and 
rock work. 


ROBERTSON'S EXCAVATING 
Tr»c* machine wlih back hoc. 
R«h^basements, backfilling. 


BRENTWOOD BOBCAT SER- 
ylce. Bobcats from sit 
hour653-3519or652WS7 


MILLE R'S FENCE ANDGATE. 
Chain link fence or term fences 
suoolied and/o, installed. Resi¬ 
dential.!— 


. ifisiaiteu. resi¬ 

dential, commercial or security 
Gates made to fit. Tennis atom 
« specialty. 15 years experience. 
Phone 384-4711. 


ISLAND CHAIN LINK 
Fencing In wire or wood 


F enclng In wire or wood 
Small lobs a specialty 
477-0332L 


EURGPEAN CRAFTSMAN, 
all types of fencing and repairs. 
Guaranteed work. Gordon Head, 


Fb*fa|aB4SMi« 



COMPLETE FLOOR CENTRE 
Hardwood, Carpets and Linos 
532 William St., 384-0343 
Nights: Al, 386^3078 
Mike. 652-4308 


KNIGHT'S 
FLOOR SURFACING 
Sandino—finishing, new & old 
f oors. Free estimates. Call any¬ 
time 382-1186. 


1 , , ■ ■ 1 a a 

rurvnuri KfnMSMf 


ANTIQUE RESTORATION 
and reproduction, highest qual¬ 
ity craftsmanship. Dove West. 
388-5517 


F0RNITURE refinishing, 
reasonable rates, estimates. 

382-5582. 


4 BROTHERS ALL AREAS 
FREE ESTIMATES ANYTIME 
ROTOTILLING, yard cleanups, 
lawn maintenance, new lawn 
preparations, Bobcat Service, 
Hauling. 

SPRING CLEANUPS 479-61)2 


Pay A .i- ,TY LANDSCAPING 
Ltd. Pruning, gardening, main¬ 
tenance and cleanup. New lawn 
preparation, power raking, 
—latlng, stone work. Monthly 
free 


lerlatlng, stone work. M 01 
ates. Reasonable prices, 
fstmates. 47^5114,478-4216. 


RELIABLE GARDENER FOR 
prunino and spraying, ornamen¬ 
tals, evergreens, hedges and 
fruit trees, general garden 


clean-up, power raking, aeorat- 
Ing and full maintenance. 
478-6781. 


HARVEY'S LANDSCAPING 


power raking, aerating, garden 
design. All phases. 479^7078, 


DUTCH LANDSCAPING 
Professional pruning of fruit 
trees, ornamentals, trimming 


hedges, cleanups, new lawns, 
etc. Free estimates.- 


FULLY EXPERIENCED GAR- 
dener for all phases of garden 
work, certified spraying, rose 
and fruit care, pruning, rototlll- 
Irtg. 479-150), 385-6326 


MARK TEN GARDENING AND 
landscape Improvements. Year¬ 
ly maintenance and construction 
a speciality. Free estimates. 
383-2103,595-7132 


GARDEN AND LAWN MAIN- 
tenance, planting, pruning. 
Monthly rates. Reasonable. Call 
Eric 384-9037,8-9am, 66 pm. 


CREATIVE LANDSCAPING 
Dutch horticultural background. 
477-7882. 


FRUIT TREES, ORNAMEN 
tais pruned, certified sprayer, 15 
yrs. experience. 383-8363. 


FORGENERALGARDEN AND 
lAwn^matotenance please call 


UMsarittazfct 


MAYFAIR GLASS 


384-8721 

INSURANCE CLAIMS 
HANDLED PROMPTLY 
790 SPRUCE ST. 


HARRY, THE BROKEN 
WINDOW SPECIALIST 
Residential broken glass, plate 
shelves, auto glass. 477-6534 


€vtt* Ctuafai 

ad Rtpwi 


GUTTERS, DOWN PIPES, 
drain tiles, chimneys repaired, 
fireplaces repaired, roofs de- 
mossed, repairs and replaced. 
479-8196. 


5" CONTINUOUS GUTTERS, 
special contractor rates. Old 

r^iS^.v^er ,n 


GUTTER'S INSTALLED AND 
repair*! Graham Contracting. 


NEEDHELP 

Repair and renovations, plumb¬ 
ing, carpentry, painting, roof re¬ 
pair, fencing, drywalling, etc. 25 
years experience. Low price. 
\ ree Try Nick, eve- 

nlngs 381-0296 


T.iC. HANDYMEN 
We do a pood lob. All kinds of 
yardwork and home malnte- 
• Is our speciality. Garden- 


nance Is our speciality. Garden¬ 
ing, fencing, cleanup, painting, 
cement work. Our rates will 
please you. Call 477-6871. 


FAMILY MAN EXPERI- 
enced In home repairs and gar¬ 
den maintenance. Get house and 
yard In shape for spring. Estl- 
£»«tes free, quotes firm. 
382-5179. 


JACK OF ALLTRADES 
Expert service, repairs, re¬ 
modelling. fencing, drywalling, 
roofing, etc. Call the man wtvo 
can do It. 478-8153.- 


KAN-DU. FAMILYMAN WITH 
l-ton truck, hauling, oeneral re¬ 
pairs, construction, firewood. 
Let Kan-Du work for you. 
386-2695. 


RUSSELL'S CONTRACTING 
You name It, I do It. Let me give 
au ‘ r, "'” a - 


MARK TEN COMPANY. RE- 
palrs, renovations, painting, tll- 
•ng, fencing, patios, etc. Free 
estimates. 383-2103.595-7132. 


FIXING. MENDING, GAR- 
den Ing tending. Transportation. 
>5 an hour. Paul, 383-9426. 


RELIABLE HAULING AND 

c *" 


HAULING: TOP SOIL, SAND, 
manure, wood, garbage, etc. Eu¬ 
gene 383-3528. 


LOOKING FOR A DEAL? OUR 
— truck t - ‘ • 


^•ton truck takes most loads for 
only $13.50.383-0805. 


WILL CLEAN AND HAUL, 
etc. Very reasonable. Tony, 
474-1014. 


MAN WITH TRUCK WILL 
haul anything. Call Terry, 
384-4805. 


Horn IraproMMitt 


THE BLUEARMY 


BUSINESS StinCES 
MID DIRECTORY 



Manufacturers of custom mill- 
work, vanities, cabinets, wood 
windows, frames, doors. Inclua 
Ing French doors and windows 
and pocket door frames. K.D. 
fir, hemlock finished lumber and 
mouldings, sanding and resaw¬ 
ing. Weekdays 7 j 30-5:00 
Cr. Hillside and Bridge 388-6645 


SPECIALIZING IN RENOVA- 
tlons and bathroom remodelling. 
20 years experience. Call John 
479-0695. 


LICENCED EUROPEAN 
Plumber. Work guaranteed. 
Reasonable rates. B 8 iB Mechan¬ 
ical, 652-1346 ask for Peter. 


ADDITIONS. RENOVATIONS, 
home repairs, one man- all 
trades. 478-1560. 


BUILOING INSPECTION 
from foundation to roof. 
478-1560. 


HELP KEEP OUT THE COLD 
Phone GLACIER INSULATI' 


— GLACIER INSULATION 
LTD. today. Our re-lnsulatlon 
and new construction division 
both fully guarantee materials 
and workmanship. For those In¬ 
terested In upgrading existing 
Insulation In your home we offer 
Rebates throuoh: 

-The Federal Government 
C H I P program 
-B.C. Hydro 
gram. 

hurry today - It's economical 
to Insulate now. Phone between 
9am-5pm 388-6844 


1 Financing Pro- 


ECONOMIC WAY TO IN&U- 
late your home. You purchase 
materials. I'll Install the lob. 
Will advise amount of materials 


and government grant. Free es¬ 
timates. Crawl spaces also. Call 


Bill 385-3730 


«Mt*S*viot 


„ MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS 
Commercial or residential. Sat- 
Jsf^actlon^^iMBranteed or no 


NATURAL GARDENING AND 
Landscaping can handle It all. 
No job too big or too small. From 
cleanups, lawncare and pruning 
to rock walls and any cement 


Reasonabte rates. Phone 
479-0055 after 7 pm. 


CREATIVE LANDSCAPING 
Designing and redesigning. Ar- 
Hstic layouts. Frae estimates. 
Dutch Horticultural back- 
ground. 477-788? 


PORTUGESE LANDSCAPING. 
Stone work, rock walls, fire¬ 
places, and landscaping, f-ree 
estimates. Reasonable prices. 
595-5439. 


41 BROTHERS — ALL AREAS 
FREE ESTIMATES ANYTIME 
New lawn preparation, rototlll- 
Ing, Bobcat Service. 479-6112. 


GUARD YOUR PROPERTY 
with Guardian Locksmith, 
592-4211. Complete mobile lock 
smithing service. Fast service. 
Reasonable rates. 


SMALL BLOCK BUILDINGS, 
fireplaces and brick facings, 
competitive rates. 592-1905 after 
5 pm. 


ALL TYPES OF MASONRY 
work done. Call 3886895 after 5 
pm. 

-T- 


Mtcolawws Service 


.Sawyer Sharpen Scissors 
840 Fort St._3886228 


TRANSLATIONS FROM GER- 
man to English. Call 385-2072 


DRUM CARTAGE 

The moving specialists. Pianos. 


Call 383-9861 and save us 


MOVING??? 

C&M Cartaoe. Laroe or small 
moves. Very low rates. Phone 
595-4376 days Monday-Friday, or 
656-3651, after 4 pm. 


D 81 DTRANSFER 
For fast efficient moves and 
very tow rales phone 721-3286 
anytime or 595-4376 from 9-4 
weekdays. 


LIGHT DELIVERIES AND 
smal moves, $9 minimum, 112 

385^3447 HaV ® d0,lleS Gav,on 


LOW, LOW RATES, HOUSES, 
apartments. Insured, bonded. 


A van able Immediately! 


Experienced, efficient, Insured! 
Eugene's, 383-3528. 


MBNCARTAGE 
Experienced movers, $20 per 
hour. Call 386-3652. 


P«irtanaMD*c«ritwt 


GARRETT PAINTING AND 
Paperhanglns. fast, friendly 
service, low winter rates, free 

?aw atwchar, « Gar -. 


SPECIALIZING 
In Interior painting and wall pa¬ 
pering. Guaranteed work at rea- 
rates. Free estimates. 
592-7239, 592-3641 after 5. 


MARK TEN, PAINTING AND 
decorating, $25 a room. Wall¬ 
paper hanolng a speciality. 

Fr « wo '" 


ATTENTION HOMEOWNERS 
University students offer you top 
quality Interior and exterior 
painting at bargain rates. Free 
estimates. 386-001 after 6 pm. 


DECORATOR 

Specializing In fine wall cover¬ 
ings, grass cloth, vinyls, foils, 
etc. Estimates, 474-1397. 


OLD AGE PENSIONERS PRE- 
ferred. Residential 
Yellow pi 
Painting, 


■ liijiuiigno rnc- 

I. Residential painting. 
1 pages or Garth Glover 
TO, 385-6422. 


ANY ROOM $35, TEXTURED 
!Wavlnfl 


CERTIFIED PAINTER. LOW 
Guarantee*3f?-38o?. te *' Wr,tt *" 


PAINTING AND DECORAT- 
Ino, 19 years experience. Free 
«Jlmate. Guaranteed work. 
598-8240. 


ARTS PAINTING AND DE 


EXPERIENCED PAINTER 
needs work. Interior and exterl- 
small plaster repairs. 


PAINTING, NO JOB TOO 
small. Interior and exterior. 
Contact Steve 382-6566. 


JOURNEYMAN PAINTER, 
has own equipment, will work by 
hour or contract. 478-3167. 


CANTERBURY DECORATING 
Quality painting and paper hang¬ 
ing. Free estimates. 479-3541 


LET TONY DO IT. FRIEDRICH 

piasterln- — «... 


plastering and stucco. Patching 
specialists, older home stuc¬ 
coed, pebble dash, resurfaced. 


Styro stuca>. Guaranteed clean 
quality work. 656-2064. 


STUDDERS PLASTERING 
and stucco. Repairs, additions 
and renovations. No lob to small. 
Guaranteed workmanship. 
592-1668 or 592-2111 


PLASTERING AND STUCCO- 


nlng calls welcome. 478-1118, 
Jlmy's Plastering 8 Stucco. 


BUMNESS SERVICES 
ANDDMECTORT 


COLEMAN PLASTERING 
Quality lath andatucco. 47I-W76. 


PLASTERING, STUCCO, RE- 
pairs, reasonable, 479 - 477 *. 




„ A NEWFIRM 
Renovations, new construction, 
discounts. Law and Son Plumb¬ 
ing Service Ltd. 658-81)2. After 
hours 658-8163 


R IDG ID—ROOTER 
Drain & sewer cleaning service. 
On call 24 hrs., phone384-1234 


LOW COST PLUMBING RE- 
palrs, excellent workmanship. 
Days: 383-0149; evenings and 
weekends: 386-6553 


EXPERIENCED PLUMBER, 
Free estimates for alterations 
and new installations. Reason 
able rates. Call 4796817 


REPAIRS AND RENOVA 
'•om- 20years experience. Low 
rates. 24 hour service. 652-5813. 


REASONABLE RATE PLUMB- 
er. 24 hour service. Free esti¬ 
mates, 477-5742. 


. 4 OAVIDS PLUMBING 
Hot water tanks, plumbing r 
pairs, drain cleaning. 386-8M1 


SPECIALIZING IN BATH- 

room renovBtions. Call John. 

479-0695. 


DA S PLUMBING SERVICE, 
alterations and repairs. Reason- 
able. 478-0965. 


JIM MCGREGOR REPAIRS, 
-“scount. Pho- 


OAPdL 

384-5320 


Phone 385-9239 or 


FRUIT TREE PRUNING WITH 




Quality ty ___ 

service.. Fast turn around at 


S T ypesetllng Services 
y typesetting and paste-uo 
:e. Fast tu -- --* 


competitive prices. 

812 Cormorant St._385-2076 

RririftratiM 


BURNETT REFRIGERATION. 
Fridges and freezers serviced In 
your home. 382-4134 (24 hrs) 


RMfrcariSMfac 


SHAKES. SHINGLES AND 
durold roofing and rerooflng. 
Pree estlmdtes. 656-3492, 
386-9891. 


PARKER JOHNSTON LTD. 
1855 BLANSHARD. 382-9181 
“Roofing Victoria Since 1935" 


ALLTYPESOF REPAIRS AND 

cw,r *' She *' 


ROOFING INSTALLED, ASH- 

R-actlng 1 38? l fn’2 Graham C ° n ” 


Saw Sharp*! 


^CANDir^U 

mnceceMTVK 


Shat SIM* 


SUPER SHOE SHINES $1.50. 
Wednesdays Ladles day $1.00, 
Barber Syrt, Empress Hotel. 


Sip* 


DISTINCTIVE HAND CRAFT- 
ed wood signs, custom-made for 
home or business. The Slgn- 
maker, 474-1348. 


Talan 


LEATHERWEAR ALTERA- 
tlons, repairs, remodelling, 
cleaning and dyeing. Elley's 
Leather Fashions. 738 Johnston, 
383-7834 


, .. OAK BAY TAILORS 
Tailoring, alterations, ladles 


lak Bay, 598-413) 


BRITISH CUSTOM TAILORS 
131) BLANSHARD 383-2632 


StaraWMaws 


B ! BOSSOM 

! GLASS CO LTD 


382-3031 382-0222 


TretStnic* 


OAK TREES WANTED. I WILL 
buy, cut and haul away your 
unwanted healthy oak trees. For 
restoring antique boat, not for 
ewood. Please phone Collect 


flri- . ... 

Steve Phillipsi 


9 evenings. 


EXPERIENCED CHINESE 
gardener, pruning, fruit trees, 
shrubs, spraying. 384-8621, 
479-7078. 


OANGEROUS TREE REMOV- 
al, topping and falling. Very rea¬ 
sonable rates. Free estimates. 
Fast service. 478-9346. 


TONYS TREE SERVICE, 
tree s remov ed,pruned, etc. Rea- 
sonart*Ttn-1014 


KEN'S TREE SERVICE. LOW 
rates for pensioners. 382-5310 
evenings. 


TREE WORK PRUNING, ETC. 
Phone Dave 386-8558. 


ACE UPHOLSTERY 
477-0455 

Quality workmanship. Europe- 
an craftsman. Free estimates. 


WMavOoMars 


JACK'S WINDOW CLEANING, 
residential and commercial, 
free estimates. Call 383-3481. 


HAVE YOUR WINDOWS PRO- 
fesslonallv cleaned. Reasonable 
rates. 5986203. 


TRAVEL 


PARADISE ISLE 

BOOK NOW FOR 
LOW OFF SEASON RATES 
IN SUNNY WEST MAUI 
Phone lolanl Holdings Ltd. 
3826042, 595-5141 


MAUI 

Deluxe 2 bedroom fully 
furnished condominium located 
on a safe sandy beach. Available 
March 1st on. 

OK Trucking Co Ltd 386-3414 


ONE BEDROOM CONDO IN 
Waikiki, top floor with ocean- 
view and mountalnvlew, avail¬ 
able 1st of April. $40 per day or 
weekly or monthy rate. 656-4111 
or 656-5328. 


DELUXE 2 BR„ 2 BATH CON- 
domlnlum on sunniest beach in 
Maul. Good bookings stljl avall- 
able. 477 3039, 383-9512 


MAALAEA BAY. MAUI. 
Ocean front, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath 
condo. Fully furnished. Book- 
ingsaya liable. 477-4963. 


TRAVELING TO EDMONTON 
bv car end February, person in¬ 
terested in sharing expenses call 
382-2920. 


TRUCK LEAVING FOR TRAIL, 
17th. Need someone to share ex- 
penses. 382-4247. 


WAIKIKI 1 BEDROOM CONDO, 
central location April 1st. $25 
per day. Phone 592-4668. 


TRAVEL 


CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN 
SKI TOUR 

March 2-7 5 nights 
including 
accommodation 
lift tickets 
transportation 
Oouble S225/per son 
Four-ln-a-room $200/per son 
Six-in-a-room 5175/per son 
Phone 386-8778 
for more information 
JEUNEBROS &PEETZ 
570 Johnson St 


GOING TO MAUI 
Kaanapali Beach 


PAPAKEA 
l bedroom condominiums in¬ 
cluding all facilities and allo>m- 
forts of home and then some. 
Summer prices as of May 1 , 
$37 so per day U.S. funds. Call 
479-7117 before 5 p.m. or 382-7642 
after 5 p.m. and weekends Ask 
for Percy or leave message. 


MAUI—BEACH FRONT 


DELUXE 2 BEDROOM; FULLY 
FURNISHED CONDOMINIUM 
PLENTY OF RECREATION 
ANO MILES OF SANDY 
BEACH. WEEKLY AND 
MONTHLY RATES. AVAIL¬ 
ABLE APRIL. BOOK EARLY. 
383-4124. jf 


39 PERSONALS 


Watchdog Richards Report 
*157 Many thanks to the Classi¬ 
fied Ad girls tor their Happy 
Leap Year Valentine's Day 
greeting In last Thursday's clas¬ 
sified ads. Your City's Watchdog 
wishes to also thank the follow¬ 
ing Valentines who have been of 
great assistance to yours truly 
My Mother, Mrs. Marie Codvre, 
Mrs. Joyce Nordwall (Victoria 
General Hospital dietician), 
Eleanor Walton, Mrs. P. Arm¬ 
strong, and the female em- 

^ ees of City Hall. Please con 
e to phone 383-6259 or write 
Your City's Watchdog, C. Joe 
Richards, Post Office Box 154, 
regarding Municipal matters 
Seen In passing: Pat and Arch 
Snow formerly of CBUT visiting 
Victoria General Hospital, 
Corinne Stark answering phones 
at the VGH information booth 


NOT SOMEONE'S VALEN 
tine again this year? Lonely 39 
year old male, likes outdoors, 
camping, fishing and candle life 
dinners by the fireside. Would 
like to meet female 30-37 years 
old, for lasting relationship 
Should be working, energetic, 
petite, tun loving and like to be 
pampered. Send photo and reply 
to Victoria Press Box 835. All re- 
plies answered. 


WOULDLIKETOHEARFROM 
romantic young minded, unat¬ 
tached ladies age 30-35, with own 
means. Who eniov dancing, oc 
casional dining by candlelight or 
lust sharing special moments 
with someone who really cares 
Victoria Press Box 833. 


MARRIEO COUPLE, MID 
twenties would like to meet lady 
20- 35 for mutual pleasures and 
sincere lasting relationship Re¬ 
cent photo appreciated. Direc¬ 
tion assured and expected. 
Reply to Victoria Press Box 774. 


NEWCOMERS 

Everyone welcome If interested 
in starting group for various ac¬ 
tivities such as theatre outings, 
antique hunting, discovering 
Victoria and making new friends 
contact Victoria Press Box 808 


RETIRED PROFESSIONAL 
woman, interests— homemak 
ing, gardening, bridge, travel, 
seeks sincere male companion 
please write Victoria Press Box 


REFINED WIDOW SEEKS 
gentleman friend, 60 65. In¬ 
terested in the outdoors, danc¬ 
ing, travel. Good homemaker 
Oblect marriage. Victoria Press 
Box 792. 


EDUCATED, ACTIVE OAP. 
some means, would like to know 
attractive lady around sixty for 
companionship. Detailed replies 
confidential, snap appreciated 
Victoria Press Box 812. 


REFINED WORKING LADY, 
60 , looking for sincere good-na 
tured gentleman for companion 
ship on Reno trip, each pay own 
expenses, Victoria Press Box 
824. 


ATTRACTIVE COUPLE, LATE 
30's would like to meet other 
couples or ladies to share sincere 
friendship All replies eonfiden 
tial. Victoria Press Box 809 


AFFABLE Bl MALE, 35, 
seeks same 25 to 40 for true 
friendship. Honest, considerate, 
and very discreet. Victoria 
Press Box 830. 


BUSINESSMAN IN 50'S, LIKE - 
to meet lady for occasional ro¬ 
mantic evening or cruise in Gulf 
Islands Box6423Stn C. Victoria 
V8P 5M4 


PREGNANCY AND BIRTH 
control counselling. Victoria 
Birth Control Clinic. For ap 
pointment phone 38S-33S1. 


LONELY. DISTRESSED. Dis¬ 
couraged? For assurance- 
encouragement, Dial A Prayer 


TROUBLED BY SOMEONE'S 
drinking, the Al-Anon Family 
Groups can help you. 382-0744 or 
PO Box 654, Victoria, V8W 2P3. 


WHY NOT CALL NEED BE 
tore small concerns grow Into 
emotional distress. NEEO 
3866323. 


WOULD LIKE TO MEET LADY 
that goes to church, 55 or over, 
nonsmoker, nondrinker. Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 815. 


YOUNG MALE WITH GOOD 
knowledge of massage, will 
share experience with others. 
Reply Victoria Press Box 827 


WHO CARES IF YOU ARE 
pregnant? Birthright does. 
Phone 384-1431. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 
383-0415 


40 BUSINESS 
PERSONALS 


and fed up with the discos and 
clubs and the "Plastic" people 
you've been meeting??? 

If so, take the first step to social 
happiness bv calling us. 


VICTORIA 

382-4434 or 382-5122 

VANCOUVER 

684-1593 or 684-2058 


Also in Edmonton, Calgary 
Seattle, Spokane, T acoma 


PERSONALIZED 

DATINGSERVICE 


INSTANT CASH FOR 
B.C.R.I.C. Shares! Harbour 
Square Ticket Sales, 910 Govern 
ment. 3816114. 


RESUMES THAT GET JOBS. 

Professionally prepared. 
Personal, confidential service. 
3856145. 


PYRAMID POWER 
TREATMENT 

Box 268, Union Bay, B.C., V0R 
3 B0 


ROAN SOUND PRODUCTION. 
Tape duplication, recording ser 
vlces^Weddlngs. meetings, etc. 


PSYCHIC READING 
Spiritual healing, Chakral ener 

R f changes. Leonard Thornton, 
H.d 59^5675, for appointment. 


TAROT DIVINATION BY LION 
Sun (the most publicized on Con 
tment For appointment, call 
386-0262. 


LONELY? WRITE EMILY 
Quest FriendshipBureau Conti 
dentlal. PO Box 5220. Victoria 


BEAUTIFUL INDOOR POO\_ 


and-sauna. Restricted avail abil 
Ity Queen Victoria Inn. 386-2812 


MRS. PAYN-JONES, TRANCE 
medium, questions answered. 
386-3603 




C-2 


BUSINESS 

PERSONALS 


BE ASTAR 


VGurseU In the movies. 
Watch on TV at home. Let us 
record your wedding or anv 

595-8331 for Information. CON 
c ,f P J, y JDEO. a division of Hill- 
slde Sight and Sound. 


FOR YOUR PERSONAL 
“automatic writing". Send 
stamped, self-addressed enve 

S e to LAD, P.0 Box 220, Saan 
ton, B.C VOS 1M0. First name 
only required 


« tt. u 7? an Be'** 1 ™* Consultant 
Bill Boychuk offers skills In 
therapeutic hypnosis/counset- 
ling for stress, smoking,-weight. 
Phobias, fatigue. Call 382 4092 


PETER LAX, GOLDSMITH 
230 Menzles St. will be 
closing In mid March, 1980. 
Please pick upreoalrs 
as soon as possible 


IMMEDIATE CASH 


B.C R I C. SHARES 
479-7006 for pickup and $$$ 


ASTROLOGY READINGS, 
reasonable For appointment 
.......-. 179-0836. 


call Wayne at 475 


WHY BE LONELY? DIAL A 
friend club. For Information 
phone 642-5622, confidential 


TEACUP AND CARD READ 
Ing. Fondue Pot Restaurant. 
HOP Yates 388 4468 


LOOKING FOR WORK READ 
the first ad under employment 
services. 


MESSAGE SERVICE 
Trl-City telephone messaoe $20 
month, 386-8622 


WILL DO CLAIRVOYANT 
Readings In my home. Phone 
478-0891. 


CARD READING IN DEPTH 
Seventh Year_ 652-1765 


FOOT TREATMENT. PHONE 
Monika at 478-1245. 


FOOT MASSAGE, REFLEXO- 
logy. call Marl-Lyn 595-0789. 


EDUCATION 


UKRAINIAN AOULT BEGIN 
ners language classes, held 
Thursdays, 7:30pm at The 
Ukrainian Cultural Centre, 3277 
Douglas. Further Information 
385-9150 


TUTORING—PROFESSIONAL 
help by experienced teacher 
French, math, new and old 
methods 598-2331. 


TUTORING ELEMENTARY 
grades, special cases invited. 
Between 8 " 


n 8-10pm, 478-9880. 


FRENCH 10 WEEK SESSION. 
French teaching specialist. $100 
Call evenings, 592-4849. 


SPANISH LESSONS BY NA 
live speaker, basic and conver 
sational. s5/hour. 595-1456 


DRAWING AND WATERCO 
lour tuition. Free introductorv 
lesson. Philip Wade, 383 4729. 


43 DANCING 


TRIM UP TO MUSIC 

DANCERCISE &ALL 
TYPESOF DANCING 


OANCE& 

SELF—DEVELOPMENT 
STUDIO 


755 YATES STREET 

385-3223 


Open noon 'til 9:pm 


LADIES, NEED SOME EXER 
size? Join 1 of our fun classes in 
Belly Dancing, Disco-Dancer 
else or Jazz at Dance Village, 576 
Johnston, 385-2414 


60 FUEL 


FELLED FOR 15 MONTHS 
dry Arbutus and fir. $70 up for 
J / 4 's cord. Split, stacked, etc Al¬ 
most anything negotiable 
388-9153. Home 7pm-2am for 
night delvieres. 382 5582 


DRY FIREWOOD. SPLIT, DE 
livered. $40 pickup load 
642-4988. after S, 


FIREWOOD $45 A TRUCK 
* COrd ° IUS klnd,i JP 0 


ALDER SPLIT ANO DELIVER 
ed, $60 cord. Also mixed wood 
479-3971 


BEAVER FUELS 
Green alder, $65 a cord, split and 
prompt delivery. 382-9325 


FIREWOOD, FULL CORD, 
split, prompt delivery. After 
6pm, 64? 3S43. 


ALDER WOOD, SPLIT, DE 
livered, $45 pickup load, $70 
cord 478-4815. 


ALDER, FIR, ARBUTUS. DRY. 
green, from$65. Split, delivered 
478-2371 


SPLIT ALDER OR FIR. *1 
cord delivered and stacked. $50 
642-3398 evenings. 


ALDER AND MAPLE FIRE 
wood, custom orders acceptec 
$35 a pickup lopd 652-4870. 


FIREWOOD, DRY, SPLIT, DE 
livered, $45, big pickup loac 
642 3904 


63 TIMBER 


TIMBER WANTED INCLUD 
ing alder, will contract logs with 
FMC skidder. wet or steep 
ground no problem, small or 
large lots. 112-390-2506 


FULLY EQUIPPED PROFES 
sionals want standing or telle 
timber, anv quantity for toi 
prices. 383-3065 


65 BUIUNNt SUPPLIES 


N0RSECRAFT 


V HARDWOOD 


NOW IN STOCK 
Alder, 

North America 
ALSO. Open Saturday All Dav 
531 David St. 383-4233 


JUBILEE BUILDING 
SUPPLIES Ltd. 


We've Moved 

Come See Us At 
6772 Kirkpatrick Way 
(oft Keating X Road) 

652-9141 


CONCRETE FORM 
RENTALS 


Our forms erect fast-strip fast 
Save time and material. 

Ask for a free estimate 


WESTERN FORM 
RENTALS LTD. 


658-5122 

Nights 658-8018,474-1727 


Bu,,er Brothers 

Butk»r Supplies 

a * utfCf 2046 Keating 
X-Road 
652-1121 


TRY US FOR 
Fiberglass 
Insulation 
Styrofoam SM 
Drvwall 

Masonry Supolies 
Ready mix concrete 


SLUGGETT & BROWN 
JOINERY 




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































C-3 

65 BUILDING SUPPLIES 

HOME LUMBER 

A luMkig Supplies 

470 Aider tier Rd 
385-6711 

PLYWOOD SALE 

STANDARD 

4x8—5/16 Stdflr 55.75 

4x8—HStdtir , 56.95 

4x8—'/iStdfir 59.50 

4x8—%StdfirT&G 511.45 
4x8—% Sid 513.50 

Factory D:UnS 

4x8—'A 6.95 55.50 

4x8—>A 9.5(5 55.95 

4x8—% 13.50 58.95 

4x8—% 15.50 511.95 

LUMBER SALE 

STD. and BTR FIR 


2x4-6' 

$155 

2x4—92% pet Studs 

$275 

2x4—8'—14' 

$320 

2x6—8'—14' 

$320 

2x8-8'—24' 

$320 

2x10—41'—24' 

$425 


Louvered Bifolds 

# I Select Mahogany 
c/w hardware 
Vj Louver Full Louver 
2668 538 534 

5068 574 565 

Duroid Shingles 

210 wt. No. l Asphalt self 
seal. All colours in stock, 
per bundle. 58.95 

INSULATION 

FIBREGLASS 
PRICE PER 1,000 sq.ft. 
R12-4" 5155 

R20—6" 5255 

R28—8" • 5345 

GYPROC 

Price per 1,000 Sq. Ft. 
'/!" GYPROC 5135 
%" FIRESTOP $180 
STUCCOWIRE $30 
PERMAX 56.50 

Deliveries made any¬ 
where on Vancouver Is¬ 
land and Gulf Islands. Be¬ 
fore you buy compare our 
prices. For quality, ser¬ 
vice and guaranteed sav¬ 
ings, phone: 

386-3374, Mil 


CASH AND CARRY. ROUGH 
cedar lumber In utility grade, 
standard and better. Cedar 
shakes, shingles and fencing ma¬ 
terial. Also will custom cut to 
order. All at better than competi¬ 
tive prices. Smiley Rd. Che- 
mamus. 248-9622 


SAANICH LUMBER YARDS 
Garages, Carports, Fencing, 
Garden Sheds, Greenhouses, 

C hicken Houses, Dog Kennels, 
Compost Box, Workbenches. 
M96 Admirals Road 385-2486. 


ROUGH CEDAR. ALL DIMEN- 
Sions. Hidden Valiev Saw Mill, 
7200 Sylvester Road. Open Satur- 
day and Sunday Phone 743-2830. 


BATHROOM SUITE, PINK 
bath, toilet and sink. 42" vanity. 
Excellent condition. *200. 
658-3057 _ 

CHIMNEY BUILDING MA- 
terials, 2' blocks with flu lining. 
Also 2x8, 2x10 dressed lumber, 
S4S, 6476Oldfield Rd. 652-1816. 


ITALIAN TILE AT DIRECT IM- 
Kort price, a genuine saving. 
386-2812. 


3 OLD EXTERIOR DOORS, 
solid fir with glass Insets. *75 
each 385-6307 


HARDWOOD FOR SALE, 
seven types, kiln dried. 388-6186. 


QUALITY CUSTOM CUT 
c edar fencing material. 642-5972 


18" BARN SHAKES. *50 PER 
squares. 642 5794 after 6 pm. 


18 ' CEDAR SHAKES FOR 
sale Phone477-4674. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


SOUNDVALUE! 

SOUNDCREW 

4560 P. A. Cabinets 

Constructed from W plywood, 
waterproofed, braced and Insu¬ 
lated. convered In tough vinyl 
with "Road Case" aluminum ex¬ 
trusions Loaded with JBL 2220B 
or JBLK140. 

*520 each complete 

SOUNDCREW 

H-l HORNS 

Same construction as 4560's with 
100 w driver, 1000 Hz passive 
crossover and level control. 

_ *280 complete 

SPECIAL BAND DISCOUNTS 
AND TERMS AVAILABLE AT 

McMusic 

COLWOOD 

2244 Sooke Road 478-4672 

Mon. Frl. 10-7, Sat. 9-6 


Election '80 

Conservative prices 
Liberal trade-ins 
No Down Pavment 
if good Credit 

AT 


Home 01 MAMMON D Organs 
KIMBALL Pianos and Organs 
714FORT_ 388-9632 


JUST ARRIVED!! 
RE-INVENTED! THE ALL 
NEW AEOLIAN PLAYER 
PIANO. A BEAUTIFUL IN¬ 
STRUMENT TO PLAY BY 
HAND AS WELL! COME ON IN 
8. BE THRILLED WITH THIS 
EXCITING CREATION FOR 
RECREATION UNLIMITED. 

BERNIE PORTER 
MUSIC 

"YOUR 

LEARN TO PLAY STORE" 
725 CALEDONIA 382-9542 


ONEONLY 

USED PIANO apartment size 
Immaculateconafiron. 

Rentorbuv 
S50permth. 
BALDWIN PIANO8, 
ORGAN CENTRE 
,,,, facrois from The Bav l 
1734 Douglas 381-0551 


' SUNN SUPPER SALE 

All ALPHA 50 watt ana BETA 
ICO watt amps and combo's 25% 
OFF till Feb 29, Expert Fret 
work and maior repairs. 

ThkGflfcTAR SHOP 
% SOFTSOUNDSMUSIC 
535 YATESST. 381-5814 


SUPER SALE!!! 

20% off our usual low prices on 
all new & used guitars, flutes, 
trombone* & clarinets. Sale ends 
Feb. 22/1960. Universal Trading 
Centre. 584 Johnson, 383*9512 


COWRIE ORGAN, 2 KEY- 
boards, variable Instrument ac¬ 
companiment, peddle board, 
good condition. *475.477-3081. 


70 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


ROLAND TR55 RHYTHM AR- 
ranger and GA30 gullar amp. 
Sunn PA head. Sansul PA 100. 2 
Traynor columns Garnet moni¬ 
tor. Sold separately. Priced 
Reasonable. 479 8746 

RICHARDDENZIL 
Piano Tuner-Technician 
Regulation, repairing, 
rebuilding. 

388-9295 _ 

ONE-STOP MUSIC CENTRE 
HALL-FAIRFi ELD 

728EO R rsV CCENT " E 3,5-3307 

CONNORGANS 
Kincaid Pianos 
KenPeaker 

__ 385-1455_ 

KENT ELECTRIC GUITAR, 60 
watts solid state amp, *140 or 
swap for chainsaw. 381-0273 or 
388 4629,_ 

PLAYER PIANO, “GERHARD 
Heintzman", 1908 vintage, some 
rolls. *2900. 286-6417, 427 Lutod 
Road, Campbell River. 

CON TRUMPET, NEW CONDI 
tlon. only 6 months old. Cost *880, 
asking *550. Consider trade. 
642-3936 _ 

KING ALTO SAXOPHONE, 
Model 451, *649 99 PAMUS 
MUSIC, 1108 Blanshard (at 
Fort), 386-8475. 

WE BUY PIANOS FOR CASH 
1400 BLANSHARp' a ° r °384-2434 

LESAGE UPRIGHT PIANO, 
*800 or nearest offer. After 4:30, 
388-9591_ 

BEAUTIFUL FRENCH PRO 
vlncial Willis piano, walnut, 
apartment size, *2,500.477-7094 

TWO GUASS 140-DEGREE RA 

dial horns, J ‘ .. 

ers, *1600 tI 

COLLECTORS.-GIBSON L5, 
Gibson J45 and Martin 0018. 
478-3865._ 

LARSON UPRIGHT GRANO 
piano, good condition. *900 or 
offers. 383-8123_ 

SOUND SOURCE BOX WITH 
JBL K140 bass speaker. 479-5911 
after 5. _ 

MARTIN 000-18 GUITAR. PER- 
tormer collectors Item. Fair 
market value-<750.383-4677 

SACRIFICE SALE. MUST 
sell Mann Les Paul copy. Offers. 
382-2862._ 

LOWERY OE BUT ORGAN 
with maalc oenle. Excellent con- 
dltlon, *1300, 383-5904_ 

GIBSON ARCHTOP GUITAR 
New neck and case. *425 o.b.o. 
385-0881._ 

PIANO. OUEVILLON 
cooctr ' a,ang 

40WATT FENOER4CHANNEL 
4T9 54& • CC0U5t, C Pickup. 


al horns, model HF-4000 drly- 
s. *1600 firm. 382-7357. 


KARN UPRIGHT PIANO. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. Ideal for stu¬ 
dent. Phone 598-6143. ° 

SPANISH GUITAR WITH 
case, electric guitar, both good 
condition. *45 each. 383-7061. 

FOR SALE. MARSHAL 50WATT 
!ead head with Marshal speak 
ers. Offers. 477-5167,_ 

ROLAND SH1000 KEYBOARD 
synthesizer, hardly used, *700. 
592-1045_ 

CONN ORGAN, 2 KEY 
boards, built In rhythm, foot 
pedals, 2 years old. 388-4609 

5 PIECE DRUM SET. CYM- 
balv stand, stool, excellent con¬ 
dition. Offers. 477-4961 

KINCAID PIANO. AS NEW. 
apartment size. Oak finish. 
*1495. After 5pm 384-6384 

71 MUSIC TEACHERS 

INTERESTED IN GUITAR 
lessons? Jazz, rock, classical or 

ga > -94 T 2ysf> n tfc hMu>lcS,ud10 ’ 

POPULAR PIANO, ORGAN, 
accordion and guitar lessons. 
652-2392_ 

PROFESSIONAL INSTRUC- 
tlon In guitar, piano and voice. 
Pat Hartman. 386-1710._ 

CLASSICAL AND FLAMENCO 
jevefs r '38S-6167 gUa ' IC “° n5 ' 

LEARN A SKILL THAT WILL 
last you a life time. Piano lessons 
In your home. 478-9654._ 

PIANO TEACHER WANTED 
for 2 children our home. Suzuki 
preferred, 595-0934, 

77 MOTORCYCLES 


GT80MX 

NOWS649 

YZ100 

NOW $1199 

DT100 

NOW $929 

DT175 

NOW $1349 

TY175 

NOW $1339 

MX175 

NOW $1199 

XS4002F 

NOW $1649 

XS400F 

NOW $1899 

XT500F 

NOW $2099 

SX6502F spec. 

$2599 

XS750spec. 

$3299 

XS750F 

NOW $3099 

XS1100F 

NOW $3999 


PLUS NEW 

78 YB100E at$759 
78SR500E at $1899 

1100 

MIDNITE SPECIAL 

ON DISPLAY NOW! 

ALL AT 


Dealer 5245 
382-4515 



925 Yates St. 
382-1928 


CT70 

NOW $739 

XL125 

NOW $1259 

XL250 

NOW $1699 

CB400TI 

NOW $1599 

XR250 

NOW $1699 

CB400T2 

NOW $1799 

CXSOOstd. 

NOW $2699 

CB750K 

NOW $2999 

GL1000 

NOW $3999 


PLUS 

79 CM 185 (ex safety coun¬ 
cil). Full remaining war¬ 
ranty si M9 

30NLY 

1977CB750F 
SUPER SPORTS 
Brand New $2799 



925 Yates St. 
382-1928 


Dealer 5245 
382-4515 


77 MOTORCYCLES 


SAVE-SAVE 

On A Few New 1979 

. HARLEYS 

* SPORTSTERS 

* LOW RIDERS 

* FAT BOBS 

See Us Last. . . 
Before You Buv 

VICTORIA 

HONDA 

Harley-Davidson 
2851 DOUGLAS 386-8364 

Dealer SSS4 



The Honda Customs 

CM 200's 
CM400-S 
CX 500C'S 
CB650C-S 
CB750C'S 
We've got'em 
all in stock 
See Us Last. . . 
Before You Buv 

VICTORIA 

HONDA 

2851 Douglas 386-8364 

Dealer 5854 


HARLEY 

DAVIDSON 

WIDE-GLIDE 

The Sportsman's Bike 
See I! Nowet 

BROOKLANDS 

MOTORCYCLES 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON HONDA 
937 Fort Dealer 6121 383-5926 


77 Yamaha RD400, mag*, disc 
brake*, lust tested, low mlleaoe, 
tuned up. Good condition Might 
consider vehicle as partial 
trade. *1095 or best offer 
384-4995 


3 STREET BIKES. 1972 750CC 
Kawasaki, *1200. 1972 350cc 
Kawasaki. *500. 1966 90cc 
Honda. *200. All are In good con 
ditlon, will take otters on any ot 
the above. 383-1451. 


WANTED: LIKE NEW, USED 
exhaust system to fit 4 Into 2 
Honda 750 automatic, or Honda 
750F Sell or swap pair brand 
new TT100 tires Wholesale *110. 
Nelson 112-743-2013 


1975 HONDA 750, CUSTOM 
paint, Harlev wheel, headers, 
extended forks. *1700. Suzuki 
250PE In good condition, *900 
firm. Dave 385-2718. 


MOPEDS— 18 MODELS 
ISLAND MOTORS, 385-3515 
602 Esquimau Rd. Dealer 5138 


1974 TY250 TRIALS YAM. IM 
maculate condition, extras. 
Brand new In ‘77. Offers. 
382 3895 


1979 YAMAHA YZ-100. RIDEN 
1-hour. *1000. 1977 100 Yamaha 
Enduro with 1932 kms on It. *450. 
112-749-3880. 


1978 SUZUKI 550, 4000 KM. 6 
speed, used 7 months. Excellent 
condition. 2 helmets. *2150. 
479-5807. 


75 HONDA CB360T, 6-SPEED, 
m^rwwp.r,. and tires, png 2 

6pm, 


*900 firm. 386-5486 after 


250 BULTACO MATADOR. 
MK3, fully enclosed chain New 
paint, seat, fender, etc. *600 
Doug. 479-4723 


69 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE 
650. needs general cleanup, runs 
ok, need money, must sacrifice, 
*600,658-5589 


1977 HONDA XR-75, RUNS 
well, excellent condition. Many 
extras. Must be seen *500 
478-5930. 


1978 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
Sportster, low mlleaoe. oood 
condition, *3200 or best offer. 
388-7081 


WANTED: PARTS FOR CBJ75. 
Muffler assembly, battery, side 
covers. CW cover. Call Pat 
477-1222 


1977 1200 HARLEY OAVIDSON 
engine for sale. Also custom 
frame and other parts. Call 9-9, 
479-6285. 


1977 YAMAHA XS400. LOW 
mileage, good condition, must 
sell. 477-4169. 


400 YAMAHA ENDURO. Ex¬ 
cellent shape- *1200 or best otter. 
388-7061 


1978 XS-750 YAMAHA SPE 
clal. Immaculate condition. Best 
offer Between !2-4pm 383-6187. 


YAMAHA 400 RD. 76, 15,000 
miles. Good condition. *800 
656-3290 


78 HONDA 550, 13.000 KM. 
Front end damage, *750 or 
otters. 478-3874. 


1976 HONDA XL350, NEW TIRE 
and chain, good shape. *775 
o.b.o. 477-3942. 


1977 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE, 
750cc. excellent condition. *2000 
o.b.o. 388 5846. 


1976175XL HONDA, LIKE NEW, 
only 350 km. *1200.656-6840, after 


1978 HONDA CB550K, 10,000 KM. 
*1,995. W/2 helmuts. 388 1172 be- 
fore 3 pm ask for Claude. 


77 YAMAHA 400CC ENDURO, 
joodcondltion, *900or best otter 


MINI BIKE. 2 WEEKS OLD, 
excellent condition, *375. 
479-0272. 


74 XL17S, 5.000 MILES. GOOD 
condition, with full face Shoei. 
Asking *600.385-0165. 


1976 YAMAHA 750D. *2495, 1978 
Yamaha XSl 100, *4695. Metro 
Toyota, 386-3516. Dealer6290 


1977 YAMAHA DT250D. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. Low mileage. 
*900 656-1804 


WHY GET WET? MOTORCY- 
cle accessories for sale. 382-0906 
after 3 ask tor John. 


1978 HONDA 400. 6500 KM. EX 
7f! , 32W° nd,ti0n - S,25 ° - ° fterS? 


MOVING. MUST SELL 79 YAM 


74 HONDA ELSINORE MT. 
street/trall bike, rebuilt motor, 
many extras. *750. 384-4452. 


MUST SELL 250 YAMAHA EN- 

595-2j94.400 ml,es ' ,,ke new - 


74 HONDA XL175, IMMACU- 
late condition. *750 or closest 
offer. 477-6751. 


100 YAMAHA ENDURO, 
street or trail, perfect condition. 
*350 or Otters 478-9166. 


1978 HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200, 
low miles, *S,000flrm. 656-4742. 


1973 YAMAHA 175, ASKING *550 
or best offer 595-3955. 


6 MONTH OLD MONTESSA 247. 
*1350.652-1698 after 3 


74 KAWASAKI 500. OFFERS. 
592-5227 after 5 


1977 HONDA 360, EXTRAS, *850 
or best offer. 477-8551 after 6pm. 

1971 SACHS 125 TRIALS. RUNS 
good, otters, 479-6781_ 

71 BICYCLES 


LARGEST SELECTION OF Bi¬ 
cycles and accessories. 
SAME-DAY REPAIR SERVICE 

RENO BIKES 
2519 Government St. 
384-5514 


MANS BIKE. 10 SPEED. DAE 
Tuno. nearly new. must sell. 
S150 or Best otter. MS-5177 etter 
5pm. 


BOY-S 3-SPEEO, BANANA 
condition. 592-2167. 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 

71 BICYCLES M BOATS mi MARINE 10 


ONE REO TRICYCLE *10, 
boys red 3-speed Shields bike, 
excellent condition. Best otter 

479-1563._ 

USED CHILDS BIKE. 2 
speed, up to 7 years old. 595-8545 
after 6 and weekends._ 

APOLLO MARK IV, 25" 
frame, very light, as new, *275. 
477-9942. 


2 LAOIES PEUGEOT TOP 
line bicycles, little used, *100 and 
*110. 385-4290,_ 

MEN'S CCM MISTRAL 10- 
speed, excellent condition, *90 or 
best offer . 721-5381._ 

RALEIGH 5-SPEED WITH 
light, excellent condition. *90. 
479-6666._ 

MEN'S RALEIGH 10-SPEED, 
*60.477-8468._ 

MANS 10-SPEED, 21" CHIMO 
bicycle. 477-3769._ 

LADIES OR GIRLS CCM, EX- 
cellent shape. 26xlH". 479-7586 

U BOATS mOURINI 



YACHT SALE 

3150BAYLINER 
Conquest Sunbridge 

ONEONLY —DEMO 
"GIBSON GIRL" 

—1 I'll" beam 

—twin 260 hp Volvo Penta 
stern drives 
—fresh water cooling 
—teak bow platform 
—convertible top, side cur¬ 
tains 

—slant cockpit cover 
—cruise curtain 
—electric pkge. includes: 
110V dockside, alcohol 
electric stove, hot water 
heater, refrl., electric 
heat. 

—3 batter les and switch 
—3 deck hatches, tinted 
—marine head 
—shower 

—teak transom platform 
—hravy duty anchor gear 
—anchor winch 
—compass 

—remote control spot/flood 
light 
—stereo 
—trim tabs 

—depth sounder with alarm 
—VHF radio 

—sleeps seven in three 
cabins 

—apo. 120 engine hours 
-1979 model 

$64,499 

26'GLAS-PLY 
Command Bridge 

—255 Hp Mercruiser V-3rlve 
—10'beam 

—Glas-Ply unitized 
construction 

—standard equip. Includes: 

* dual controls 

* compass 

* FWC 

* hot water 

* heavy duty battery 
and switch 

* 110V shore power 

* anchor gear 

* dinette 

* galley 

* and much more 

—Glas-PIv lifetime warran¬ 
ties. 

One only available. April deliv¬ 
ery. Approximate price *45,000 

28'GLAS-PLY 
Command Bridge 

—twlr^|255 Mercruiser 

—lU'H"beam 
—classic styling 
—unitized lay-up — hull, 
deck and cabin 
—extended cruising range 
—standard equip, similar to 
26’ plus much more Includ 
ing even mooring lines, 
bottom paint, ships bell 
—Glas-PIv lifetime warran¬ 
ties 

- if purchased during con 
structlon, possible to custo¬ 
mize 

—one only available May de¬ 
livery 

Approximate price *60,000 


Powercraft Centre Ltd. 
730HILLSIDE AVE. 

382-8291 


THUNDERBIRD 
YACHT 
'y SALES 

WtSTPOWT MARIN* 

Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 
2075 Tryon Road, Sidney, B.C. 
656-5832 

NEWBAYLINERS 

INSTOCK 

1950 EAGLE. 470 Merc 
2150 LIBERTY. 140 Volvo 
2270SKAGIT Sunbridge 
2350 MONTE RE YC/Bndge 
2550 SARATOGA Sunbridge 
2750 VICTORIA C/Brldge 
2950 ENCOUNTER Offshore 

SPECIALS 
OF THE WEEK 

69— 37' ALCAN houseboat. Twin 
170 Volvo's. Onan generator, 
all elec, galley. Complete 

'73^MerFORMeJ£ s D 
188 Merc, compass, C.B., 
sounder, downriggers, trim 
tabs and more. Absolutely im 
maculate. *11.995 

'72-28' UNIFLYTE Express 
cruiser, with twin 318 f.w.c. 
Chryslers, boathouse kept, in 
excellent condition. *29,900 

EXPERIENCED 

BOATS 

58-30' Diesel *8,799 

7a-18vv Starcraft with EZ Load 
trailer, as new S9.500 

70— 24'San Juan, new 470 *9,950 

73— 22' F iberform E xp. *V,900 

#"“2 4 !E i, ??£t 0fmEx R *11.950 

74— 24' Bell Bov C.B. *11,900 
78—20' Sangster htp. f.w.c. 

74— 24'NlsouallvC.B. *12^900 

55—28' Norcraft *12,995 

60—24' Skagit Exp. *12,995 

75— 22W Relnell *12,500 

75—22Vj* K&C, C.B. *12.500 
75—24' Reined exp. loaded 

74—25'Saratoga *14',295 

74— 2550 Saratoga Exp. SOLD 

64— 27'Chris Connie *15,900 

75— 22' Sea Ray Exp.f.w.c. 

*14,950 

76— 2550 Saratoga Exp. SOLD 

73— 26'FIberform C.B. *18,900 
TO—26'TelStarC.B. $19,900 

70— 24'Tollycraft, Exp. SOLD 

5 press *18.000 

77— 26' Reined C.B. *21,000 
77—26'C.B Reined *72.900 
77—26'Campion C.B *23,500 

65— 31'Chris Sea Skiff *23,999 
76-26' Campion C.B. twn *25,500 
72—28' Uniflyte Exp. *29,900 

76— 28' Bounty *29,900 

77— 28' Carver *32,000 

76—28' Silver ton C.B *34,900 
76—28'Executive C.B. *38,900 
T^-^Carvef'fvew^ *38,000 

75— 3050 Encounter C.B. *42,900 

76— 28'Tro an C.B. *51,900 

75—30'Tro an C.B *46,500 

65—38'Chris Trl-cabrdr. *89,900 

74— 40; Tollv tr l * 112,000 
57—43'Richardson C.B. *99,500 

71— 45' Gulf Commander* 165,000 

71—45'Grenfell *165,000 

68—61'Grenfell Yacht *269,000 

CALL 

RICH or RON 

656-5832 


.—. t ,Open7 0avsaWeek 
656-5711 6563918 

■ Evenings, 652-4386 


PACKAGE DEALS 

on new 

DOUBLE EAGLE 

Fisherman's Specials 
14'DOUBLE EAGLE 
—Deepv 
—Camper top 

— 35 Johnson Electric 
—1200 Roadrunner 

— FACTOR YLfST *5861 

PACKAGE *5250 

16' DOUBLE EAGLE 

— Deep v 
—Camper top 

— 55 HP Johnson electric 
—1200 Roadrunner 

— FACTORY LIST *6834 

PACKAGE *6150 

PacksgM include: Lite lackets. 
paddels, He lines, fenders, sea 
trials. 

Come Out And 
See Our Everyday 
BOATSHOW 
OVER60 

BOATS IN STOCK 


6c&. 


W whiflc 
marine ltd. 


SALES ANO SERVICE 
Corner Harbour and Resthaven 
6567786 SIDNEY 

WINTER HOURS 

Tues.. Sat. 8:30-5:30 
Sun., 12-5 Closed Mon. 



POWER 

21' Pocket Tug, 23' Cruiser, 24' 
Sea Rav. 25' Owens, 26' Tolly 
craft, 26' Garden Express. 27' 
Falrllner, 28' Chrlscraft, 28' 
Polaris, 28' Sea Skiff, 30' E x Gov¬ 
ernment Cruiser, 30' Grenfell, 
30' Trawler, 31' Enno's. 32' 
Grand Banks, 32' Grenfell. 32' 
Supercraft, 32' Spencer, 32' Tol- 
lycraft' 33' Bayllner, 34' ex 
RCMP, 34' Trawler, 34' Falr- 
llner, 34' Centre Bridge, 34' Tol- 
lycratt, 34' Farrell, 36' Super¬ 
craft, 36' Grand Banks, 36' 
Trawler, 37' Monk, 38' Tody- 
craft, 38' Chrlscraft, 40’ Monk, 
42' Stephens, 42' C. T. Trawler, 
43' Trawler, 44' Garden, 44' 
Monk, 48' ex Government Cruls 
er, 51' Yacht, 52' Monk 
McQueen, 55' Klngscraft, 65' ex 
Dept, of Fisheries. 

SAIL 

22' Catalina, 24' San Juan. 24' 
Gaft Sloop, 26' Reined. 26' Sloop, 
28' Motor Sailer. 30' C8.C, 33' 
Spencer, 33' Motor Sailer. 34' 
Steel Sail Boat, 35' Endurance, 
36' Ferro, 36' Trimaran, 40' ls- 
lander.41' Sloop. 

The above is an example of some 
of the vessels we are seriously 
ottering for sale “many at spe¬ 
cial winter prices." For more 
information please contact 
JOHN ALLENat 
VAN ISLE MARINACO. LTD 
Tsehum Harbour Box 2130 
656-1138_Sidney, B.C. 


15'GLASTRON 
. —50 HP Merc. elec. 
—Trailer 
—Super clean 

$3,495 

16' FIBERFORM 
—65 HP Merc. elec. 
—Road Runner 
Trailer 

—Fisherman's 

Special 

$5,495 

17' K & C 

—120h.p. I/O 
—Trailer 
—New canvas 

$5,995 

See Them Now 
In our Showroom 
AT YOUR 
1-STOP 

MARINECENTRE 

mercury 

marine 

385-1457 800Cloverdale 

JSShXHftk 

twin Perkins diesel, auto 
pilot, whaler on Davits, 

extremely clean. Offers 

to *129,500 

42'Garden *125,000 

36'Uniflyte trl cab *132,000 

34'Tolly-Trl * 87,500 

38'Tollv-Trl * 79,500 

30'Tody * 71.500 

26; Tody * 35.900 

28'Tolly * 29.500 

30'Sea Ray *51,900 

28'Tro an * 49,500 

30'Troian * * 44,500 

36'Shepherd *41,900 

28' Lynwood-Diesel * 38,900 

28' Seacamper * 19,500 

26' Sabrecratt * 13,500 

32' Peterson Dlsp * 12,900 

40' Housecrulser * 67,900 


SAIL 


»' Honter 
i' islander 
' Seawolf 


» 3,950 

* 41,900 

* 79,500 



Located on the Highway 
Just before Swartz Bav 


The Home for 
ZETA 
In Victoria 

20' BAYLINER 

2 piece camper top, V-berth. 190 
OMC l-O., C.B., sounder. EZ- 
load trailer w/brakes *9950 
26' SABRECRAFT Express 

*13,900 

25' STARCRAFT Express 

25' BELLBOY C.B JlSlSoO 
24'WINNER Express *12,500 
22'SANGSTER Sdn and 

Trader *13,900 

19* ZETA I/O Demo *13,250 
18 Vj' BELLBOY HT and 

Trailer *10,500 

18'CAMPION HT and 

Trailer *9,495 

18' HOURSTON and 

Trailer **,995 

Cad John Roland at 

PASSAGE 

MARINE 

656-2580 

(Cedar Grove Marina) 


JEUNE BROS. 
Tent & Awnings Ltd. 
BOATTOPS 
385-7751 


BOOTS u4 MARINE 


Commercial Fishermen 
Recreation Boaters 

Sell your boat fast and with com¬ 
petence. use AMS, Associated 
Marine Sales. Your boat will be 
photographically and speclfi- 
cally distributed throughout the 
ent I re growing network. 

Berths are available now to rep¬ 
resent your boat and It can be 
represented In Its present loca 
tlon. Let experience and compe¬ 
tence from years of yacht bro¬ 
kerage sell your boat. Should you 
be Interested In establishing 
your own yacht brokerage under 
AMS or If you wish to sell your 
boat fast, cad 642-4009. 


HONDA 

OUTBOARD SALE 

On Left-Over Models 
9.9 Shorts $899 

PLUS 

Still A Few 79 Merc's 
Left At Sale Prices 
At 

MULLINS 

MARINE 

925 Yates St. 382-4515 

AltNOWC_ . 

Sealanderp^ 

Landing Craft Cargo Carrier 
Work/Crew/Divers 
Speeds to 30 knots 
4models— 1 toSTons 

Versatile Environmental Prod¬ 
ucts Division ot Burrard Yar¬ 
rows Corp 60 Riverside Drive, 
North Vancouver, B.C. V7H 1T4. 
(604)929-5451. • _ 

iwsm 

NATIONAL BOAT SALES 

TRUANT 33 

2060 White Birch Rd. 
Sidney. B.C.,V8L 2R1 
(604) 656-3966 
ALSO AT 

False Creek, Vancouver 

WANTED 

37'-46' 

Tri-Cabinor All Cabin 

Not over 10 years, prefer twin 
diesel. Have older 40' well kept, 
wood planked "Hotter" de 
signed, twin oas- to trade. Cad or 
write Don Telford, 384 931 1. 
days, 477-0028, evenings, or Box 
1220, Victoria. 

MARSH MARINE 
SERVICES LTD 

MARINE CONSULTANTS 
Before you Invest - Let us test 
Reasonable Rates 
2447 Beacon Ave. Sidney BC 
V8L1X7 , Tel (604) 656-4335 

ERICKSON YACHTS 
CHEOY LEE Diesel Trawlers 
ALEX CHISHOLM 
YACHT SALES 
located at 

ANGLER'S ANCHORAGE 
MARINA 

652-3531 933 Marchant Rd. 

_Brentwood Bay 

CHRYSLER MARINE HEMI 
engine with Pargon v-drlve, 
running but needs rings, 225 
Horsepower. *500; Chrysler ma¬ 
rine Heml engine, apart but 
complete, valve orlnd done on 
heads, *350 ; 6'fiberglass dinghy, 
built-in flotation and oars, *250. 
656-7355._ 

Squire and Coombs 

20 Commercial listings. Phone 
for free bulletin. Licences "A" 
and "C" class available. Open 
8:30-4:30, Mon.-Fri. Weekends 
bv appointment 

4S Bastion Square 384-3363 


MUST SELL-MOVING 
22' SANGSTER 
188 Merc, *1700 worth of new leg. 
Aux, OB. Swim grid, dinghy, 
sounder, compass, tape deck. 
Good condition. *9500, open to 
otters. 721-5014. 


18' HOURSTON GLASSCRAFT, 
1977 hardtop, camper back 
cover, 170 HP Volvo I/O. Road 
Runner Trailer, sounder, CB, 
anchor, spotlight, compass, 
hourmeter. spare prop , down 


CLASSIC 36' MOTOR CRUIS- 
er, ideal home, couple or small 
family. Economical crulsino, 
fishing boat, excellent condition. 
Sound and sea worthy, asking 
*25,000 or best otter 479-1015 be¬ 
tween 8 30am 4:30pm, 384-0632 
anytime. 


69 


1252 Wharf St. 


McQUADE S 
MARINE SUPPLY 


388-4343 


Dole Plates, compressors, 
hydraulics for marine refrigera- 
tloninstock. 

Servicing Vancouver island 
Aurora Mechanical 
& Refrigeration Ltd 

1806 Cook St 386-4334 


MARINE ENGINES 
Diesel and gas Complete liUlal- 
latlon • rebuilding - exhaust sys¬ 
tems For pleasure, commerical 
and fish boats. Canoe Cove 
Marina Ltd. 656-5633 


Selling Your Boat? 
i require good clean trailerable 
boats, all sizes and fibreglass 
cruisers 21 '-26*. For prompt 
attention call John Roland at 
Passage Marine, 656-2580. 


^,F»SH IN STYLE 
22' cabin cruiser, yellow cedar 
on oak ribs 235 Chev motor, 
fresh water cooled, marine toi¬ 
let, two many extras to list. Ask 
fnp *2500 or first reasonable 
offer. 383-0697. 


23' CABIN BOAT, 1959 Dis¬ 
placement red cedar hull profes 
sionally built with oak frames 
and steamed ribs, 1974 130 Hp. 
Volvo Inboard, excellent sea 
boat, recent survey *4300 OBO. 
595-5183 after 5pm. 


„ FISHERMAN SPECIAL 
22 pIy 318 Chrysler Inboard. 
F.W.C. dry exhaust, rebuilt lest 
spring. Sink anchor and CB 
radio, oood condition. *4,300 with 
mooraoe In Oak Bay Marina 
Must sell 388-9602. _ 

"THREE SONS III" 39' FRE- 
dette designed displacement live 
aboard with or without C license, 
long line drum and oear, new die¬ 
sel, electronics, hydraulics, din¬ 
ghy, etc. Recent survey, top 
Shape, *68,000.935-6883. 

26' SABRECRAFT. HARDTOP 
with full canvas, 225 horsepower 
Chrysler 318, full Inboard, stand- 
up head, 3-burner propane stove, 
icebox. CB. Depth sounder. 
Phone 384-7469, after 6, week 
days._•_ 

MARCONI MARINE ELECT 
Simrad skipper sounders-Mar- 
coni SSB radios Mieco Loran C- 
JRC/JMA radars group rates 
avail. Excellent service. Sale 
rep. Jim Johnson, 1 W. Burnside 
Rd. Victoria, 386-9414._ 

1962 75 HP. JOHNSON ELEC- 
trlc, alternator, and tachometer. 
Trade for 20 or 30 hp. motor. 
Prefer Johnson. Never in salt 
water. Excellent condition. 
595 5938 after 5:30 weekdays, an- 
vtlme weekends._ 

BOAT LETTERING A SPE- 
652 2<)X7 Ph0ne Ken w « rn#r ' 

FOR SALE. 22 COLLASPIBLE 
Black cod traps with 4,000 fath- 
oms 9/16" poly. *3500.658-8482 

, SPORTS FISHERMEN 
Herrin 0, cut your own bait. 
656-3851. _ 

32'A LICENSE TROLLER DIE 

'?If. R ?. INELL bowrider 
" i'tttr'allff and »5 to Mercury. 
M500orbestotttr474-lS49. 

"ANTED.SPORT YAK III 
Y'J'I' wWte exterior. Alter Som. 
-382 2733 or 477 Map. 


M BOOTS and MARINE 


ADVftnee 
VACHTS ITD. 

17W Campion 130 Volvo * 7,495 
18'Olympic, trailer. * 5.495 
19'Glen L *6,995 

19* Campion Cdy.w/trlr. *15,750 
22'Bayllner C.B. *15.995 

22' Grew, w/traller *13,995 
22’ FIberform E xpress * 7.995 
22'Sea Ray w/trailer. *16,900 
22' Relnell. trailer *9,995 
23'Sangster Dolphin *17.600 
24'Surfer *16.900 

24'Relnell C.B, *13.900 

24'Searav, twins, trailer *22,500 
25' Bellboy C.B , like new *22.900 
25' Bayllner Offshore *14.999 
25'Bellboy Express *18,500 
25'Bayllner C.B. *15,995 

25'Bayllner Offshore Ht. *13.999 
24'Sabrecratt C.B. *17,800 
26' Fiberform C.B. *20,995 
25'Chrlscraft *11,995 

26'Campion Sdn *19,900 

26'Fiberform CB twins *20,995 
26'TelStarC.B. *22.900 

26'Fiberform C.B. *25,500 
27'cal Glass Com Br. *19,995 
27'Chris Exp. *24,900 

28'Lynwood C.B. *32,450 

28'Bayllner Bounty C B *44,900 
28' Executive C.B., twins *42,850 
28' Northstar Dsl. *11,900 

28'UnlflydeC.B. *39,995 

30' Grenfell *20,900 

30'Chris Immac. *31,900 

30'Monk Exp *17,500 

30'Bavliner EncntrC.B *42,900 
30' Troian C.B. SOLO 

31' Bayliner Conquest *67,900 
32' Grand Banks *74,950 

32'LuhrsCB *56,995 

33' Dbl Ender Dsl *12,500 

32'Falrllner C.B. *56,995 

30'Executive C.B. *69.995 
36' Chris Tri-Cab *74,000 

36' Richardson Spts. Fish *43,900 
36'Grand Banks *79,000 

40' Monk *49.500 

40' Cruise-A-Home, twns. 

Immaculate *67,900 

42'CT 42. Trawler dsl. *149,000 
45'Grenfell Spts Fish 

diesel *169,000 

46' Monk McQueen *64.950 
50' Classic Power *44,900 

52' Monk McQueen twin 

diesel *175,000 

65' Ex RCMP Crusr. dsl. *109,000 


SAIL 


18' Crown 
20'Cal 
21'San Juan 
23' Paccshlp 
23' Clipper 
24' Venture, trailer 
25' Cal 

25' Cal,6dsails 

26'Clipper 

30' Fortune m-sailer 

32' West Sail Cutter 

32' Buccaneer 

34' Coronada 

36'Cascade 

36' Sloop 

40'Atkins yawl 

44' Voyager aux ketch 


* 4.750 

* 5,295 

* 7.995 
413,900 
*11.750 
*13,900 

SOLD 

*13.495 

*13,900 

*37,500 

*86.900 

SOLD 

*43,500 

*84,900 

*119,000 

*56,000 

*169,000 


DAVE BROWNELL 
TOM ALLAN 
DON GARDINER 
BILL THOMSON 

Bosun's Marina 656-5558 
10775McDonald Park Rd., 
Sidney, B.C. 

Oak Bay Marina 598-3366 
Pedder Bay Marina 478-1771 


POWER 


47' power PILOT BOAT, much 
gear Extremely good condition 
*61,000 

34' MONK Classic, hoathouse 
kept *25,000 

25'TROJAN very clean *17,000 
22'CALGLASS. loaded *9.900 
18' DOUBLE EAGLE HT, galv 
trailer, spotless *8,995 

18' SPORTSMAN Runabout, 
very clean, w/trailer *7,300 
15'6HOURSTON Manyextrason 
trailer *5,500 

30' TROJAN Command, twin 
power . Very clean *34,500 



453 Head St. 


383-3324 


PRIVATE 

25 Sangster Marlin Command 
Bridge, 233 Mercruiser In¬ 
board/outboard, long cabin, 
standup head, propane aallev. 
Fully equipped. Offers. 652-2470 

16' SANGSTER 19Z5-75 HORSE 
power motor, full camper top, 
sleeper seats, Immaculate con¬ 
dition. New galvanized trailer 
plus many extras. *3700. 
479-2304. 


ONE SET OF NEW PLANS FOR 
Bruce-Roberts designed 25' sail¬ 
boat. Practical family cruising 
design, *225, Tavmore 4-man In¬ 
flatable raft, used only twice, 
SllQO-b.o. 383-8460, 598-2837. 


MV. LADY LI AN 54' STEEL 
freezer troller, fully equipped A 
license, seine privilege. All gear 
and more Open to otters near 
appraised value. 386-0514, 
112-248-3560 


PRICED TO SELL-45' FERRO 
cement ketch, professionally ce¬ 
mented Suzle diesel, ready to 
sail. Serious persons only. *39,- 
000. 112-748-2902. 


1974 440 CHRYSLER MARINE, 
complete, 4 barrel, electronic Ig¬ 
nition, extra water pump, extra 
carb. *1000 or offers. 5-9pm. 
479-5294. 


fairly new east hope 

gillnet dcum drive and alumi¬ 
num drum/rollers, and prooelor 
guards. *1600 or otters. 479-52V4 

16' CAMPION DEEP —V. 
camper top, walk thru wind 
shield, stern seats, 55/Evinrude 
us<d 


26' TOLLYCRAFT (1974). Ex¬ 
ceptionally clean vessel that 1$ 
well equipped with options. *31,- 
800. John Allen, Van Isle Marina, 
656-1138. 


16' STRATOCRAFT BOAT 
with 70 hp. Merc and 9.8 Merc. 
Model 1979, only 6 months old. 
Excellent condition with trailer. 
Asklng*7250. 595-4848 


24' FIBERFORM C/B, 233 
Mercruiser Engine. Loaded with 
ootions and In excellent condi¬ 
tion, with or without Caulkins 
trailer Phone 752-3629 


12' ALUMINUM CARTOPPER 
(unsinkable), 3Vj hp motor 
Both boat and motor nearly new 
Oars and spare oas tank Includ 
ed. *600 or best otter. 642-4009. 


34.6' 7-TON A LICENSE 
troller, VHF, CB. radar, auto 
pilot, 2 sounders, hydraulics. 
Good record and well main- 
talned. *90,000. 383 5908. 


QUALIFIED SKIPPER WITH 
group fished packer, freezer, Bo 
nanza Jll 2 good years wants 
troller for this season. Alan at 
381-1048. 


... READY TO GO 

12' Thornes aluminum, Road- 
runner trailer and 9.8 Merc. All 
1977 for *1600 or best offer. 
479-0548,598-7690. 


26' CHRISCRAFT. HULL IN 
good condition, needs new 
motor, *10,000 or best offer. 
386-2131 


40' HARTLEY FERRO-CE- 
ment professional lay up. v* 
complete, Meadows survey* *22,- 
000.386-1894 


PARTLY FINISHED 14' 
paper tiger Catamaran, Brun- 
zeel mahogany ply, Including 
plans. 479-9613. 


17' FIBERFORM IN- 
board/outboard, with Tandom 
trailer. *5500. 385-2536 after 
4:30pm 


15' HOURSTON GLASSCRAFT. 
completely rebuilt 40 horsepow 
er Johnson with trailer. *1500. 
384-2207, 385-1829. 


9.9 HP ESKA, USED LESS 
than 20 hr, extra prop, like new. 

frade on 15-20 hp. Phone 
658-8524, after 6. 


2 MOBILE RADIO TELE- 
phones, 6 channels plus BC sta 
tlon, 1 was a base. Excellent 
shape. 12 volt *400 642-3581 


REBUILT 335 HP CUMMINGS, 
2:1 twin disc gear, *12,000. Elec¬ 
tric anchor winch for 40' boat, 
*250. 478-6602. 


EXPERIENCED SKIPPER TO 
charter 43' troller Must have 
■’ences. Victoria Press Box 


referei 


15' SKOOKUM SEALER, 
trailer, 15HP, Evlnrude used 50 
hours. Excellent condition. 
*2200*477-7894. 


SO BOATS MARINE 


C.B. UNITS 

40 channel. Large easy to read 

M8 d S§UN V 6*&RADIO Service 
931 FORT_313-4731 

F28 TROJAN 

T win 255 Merc's on V-drive. VHF 
and slave halier, sounder, 
fridge, etc. etc. *51,900 

Cedar Grove Marine, 656-2580 

30' ALUMINUM TOWBOAT, 
built In 1978 by Rogers and Sin¬ 
clair. equipped with 200 HP Nis 
sen diesel engine, Hamilton 1031 
let drive, many extras. *45,000 or 
otters. James Loveday, 943-1971. 

19' CALGLASS HARDTOP 
boat with 165 Mercury cruiser, 
inboard/outboard, like new. 
Complete with Calkins trailer. 
$84«r Days 112-748-3838, after 
6pm, 748-1019._ 

MCKINNON MARINE RE- 
palrs & Supplies. Acme boa¬ 
tyard, 2320 Harbour Road will do 
electric, mechanical and most 
accessory Installation, phone 
656-7355 

WANTED TO LEASE 1ST 
class troller. Guaranteed re¬ 
sults. Otters to Victoria Press 
Box 807._ 

17' FIBERGLASS BOAT, 55 HP 
Johnson and 6 hp Johnson, new 
1800 lb. galvanized trailer plus 
many exfras. 652-3714._ 

WANTED: FRESH WATER 
heat exchanger for 250hp Chev 
engine In Crist-Craft boat. 
385-0271 _ 

16' FIBERGLASS CANOE, 
electric motor, paddles and life 
iackets. *350 or best offer. 
383-9846 after 5pm_ 

lB'/a' PLYWOOD CABIN CRUIS 
er, toilet, sink, etc Two 1977 20 
HP Mercs, both In excellent con- 
dltion. *2950. 388-6381._ 

19' STUERY, HARDTOP, 
camper canvas, CB galley, 
extras. 140 Merc I.O., Caulkins 
trailer, *8000.652-5534_ 

16' DOUBLE EAGLE, 70 HP 
mercury, 2000 lb EZ load trailer, 
many extras. Excellent condi- 
tlon 478-6S89_ 

HEAVY DUTY TRAILER 
used for herring skiff, *1325. 150 
fathom 100 mesh herring net. 1 
year old, otters. 478-9163._ 

FIBERGLASS REPAIRS 
No lob to large or small. Highest 
quality Reasonable Free estl- 
mates. Will travel. 652 5685 

1978 14' DOUBLE EAGLE, 55 HP 
Johnson electric, Roadrunner 
trailer, immaculate. *5200. 
721 3694._ 

MV FIVE KINGS II A 45' A 
licensed troller, 16.87 tons, steel 
construction, built by Chuck 
Mayer, fully equipped. 656-155?. 

JOHNSON 55 HORSEPOWER 
outboard with controls, electric. 
Excellent condition. 479-5530, 
748-0454._ 

CHRYSLER —SEAGULL 
Ken Praslng Equipment 
934 Goldstream_478-9313 

HARBOUR MACHINE LTD. 
PROPREPAIRS 
31 ErleSt._383-6555 

NEW VDO SUNLOG KNOT 
meter, drive unit and cable, *250 
or offers After 6pm 382-5859 

WANTED LEG AND GEAR- 
box. 1960 40 HP Johnson 
656-3775. _ 

1975 17' BAYLINER WITH 
motor and trailer, immaculate 
condition, 479-9406._ 

18’ j HOURSTON GLASCRAFT, 
120 OMC 1969. needs work, heavy 
duty trailer, *4500. 386-3087 

TANDEM HERRING SKIFF 
or flatdeck trailers, built to 
order, *1100 and up. 478-3871 

15' COBRA. TRAILER, 35 
Chrysler electric start, full can 
vas, *2200. 382-5912. 


17' BAYLINER MUTINY 
70 HP Johnson, trailer, extras, 
super clean, *6000 474 1460 

17' BOAT WITH 40HP MER 
cury with trailer, many extras. 
*2,000 or closest otter 652-3753 

C LICENSE FOR UP TO 40- 
boat. Asking *7,000. 598-6684 
after 6. 


WANTED: BOAT APPROXI- 
matelv IS'. *400 or under, trail¬ 
er? 652-4101. 


WANTED: SET OF 2 OR 3 
spool Gurdies with valves and 
motors. 656-1948 


MARINE REPAIRS 
Gas, diesel, I.O. 477-6288 days 
and evenings. 


14' HURSTON GLASS CRAFT, 
50 Hp. Merc and trailer. *900 
479-4302. 


1979 1200 LB. ROADRUNNER 
trailer, *450 firm. Phone 
479 4302. 


NORTH SEA 26, FIBERGLASS 
diesel, fully-equipped with boat 
house *38,000.477-6551 


CANOE 16' FRONTIERSMAN 
in excellent condition. Phone 
479-7232. 


16' SKI OR DRAG BOAT HULL 
and trailer, needs finishing, *550 
or offers. Doug, 479-4723 


37' GLASS COMBINATION 
Seachum, fully equipped. Excel- 
lent condition. *165,000.479-0764 


1979 21' FIBERGLASS DAY- 
crulser, needs minor finishing. 
Must sell. Only *2595.477-3953. 


FUEL DOCK NOW OPEN AT 
Deep Cove Marina. 


CSiC 25, *19,500, NO TRIFLERS. 
112-748-1848. 


FOR SALE, 7Vj HP MERCURY 
outboard motor. 383-459S. 


25'X50* SCOW FOR RENT, 
lease. 474-1397. 


17' LONE STAR ALUMINIUM, 
*950. 59S-1589 after 6pm 


1976 20HP MERC, NEWLY RE- 
built, *695 386-5463 


FITZWRIGHT SURVIVAL 
suit, new, large, *275. 479 7324 


81 SAILBOATS 


THUNDERBIRD 

YACHT 

SALES 

wtST*o«T MARINA 


Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 
2075 Tryon Road, Sidney, B C 


Racing or Cruising 

Our new Buccaneers will take 
you first around the bouvs or to 
vour favour island Anchorage In 
complete comfort 

80 BUCCANEER 22' 

LIST *13,896 

80 BUCCANEER 25' 

LIST *18.530 

80 BUCCANEER 29' 

LIST *46,336 

80 BUCCANEER 30- 
LIST *47,418 

80 BUCCANEER 305 
LIST *60.239 

Trade-ins Welcome 
USED SAILBOATS 

25'—30' Keel boat, trlr.. 

10,5001b. max *2,500 

75—21' Northwest, trlr. *7.900 
75—21'Buccaneer $9,449 

72—25' Coronado *13.950 

78—25' Bayfield SOLD 

72—28' Trimaran, 
needs mast *9.995 

71— 25'Hughes *8,500 

72— 23' Paceshlp *9,700 

78—22'Roberts *11,995 

75—24'Swiftsure *13,900 

72—30' Rawson S28,000 

75—23' Paceshlp. Like new. 

SOLD 

75—37' Folksman steel hull 

diesel $48,500 

66—60' Ketch $79,900 

42'Discovery *112,000 

CALL RON or RICH 

656-5832 


C-3 


II SAILBOATS 


SAIL 

42' Gaft Rig KETCH, Immacu^ 
late, very tiddly *55,000 

42' SPENCER deluxe condition, 
racer/cruiser $85,000 

34' CORONADO racer and cruis¬ 
er *48,000 

42' MOTORSAILER, beautiful 
llveaboard *78,000 

37' Cabin Archer design CUT¬ 
TER immaculate * 100,000 


453 Head St. 


383-3324« 


WANTED - CRUISING SAIL 
boats. V.B^L is having a bring 
vour own ISoat, Boat show In 
April. We will advertise vour 
boat, you can sell It yourself tree 
of commissions, or. If we brinO 
you an otter, for the duration of 
the show we will cut our com¬ 
mission from ten to five percent. 
For further information call or 
write to Victoria Boat Mart, 453 
Head St., V9A SSI, 383-3324. 

OFF SHORE CRUISING . 

1- 33' sloop, 1-33' Double Ender* 

2- 42' Cutters for sale. $32,000-, 

*90,000. 4 page detailed descrip¬ 
tion of each boat including in¬ 
terior and exterior photos. Send 
for catalouge of Oft Shore Cruis¬ 
ing Boats. We mail add'l listings 
for next 6 months. *5 to cover 
printing and handling to: Arctic- 
Tropic Crusing Boat Sales Ltd., 
R.R m, Duncan, B.C._ 

46' F.C. STAYSAIL KETCH, 
yard built hull, completely 
rigged and equipped for oil- 
shore Diesel engine and 2000 W 
generator, Avon dingy. 4 man 
liferaft, microwave oven, VHF. 
RDF, wlndvane, 6 bags of sai Is. j 
anchors, 2 anchors winches. ? 
compasses. Offers to *89,500. 
Phone 245 3888 

BOSUNS LOCKER 

Feb. sale, great savings 
10% discount on pur¬ 
chases on 100 ft. or over of 
any size rope. 

580 Johnson St._3BQ.1308. 

VICTORIA 
SAILING SCHOOL 

CYA certification. Charters 
3A1218 Langley St. . 383 40K1 - 

SAANICH LUMBER YARDS 
PRAM DINGHY KIT $63.00 

SABOT KIT $75 00 

KAYAK (PARTLY ASSEM 
BLED) $45 00 

1496 ADMIRALS ROAD 385-2486 ' 

SAILTREND 

Marine Supplies & Clothing 
Open 9-6. Closed Sun /Mon. 

1157 NEWPORT_592 2711 

O'DAY 27, OMC SAILDRIV6 
motor, fully outfitted for racing, 
cruising. Consider smaller boat 
trade. *25,000. Phone 248-3973 
Parksvllle._, 

GULF ISLAND 29, $14,200 
Vancouver 27, (revised version, 
extended stern) $14,200.- 
Semotiuk Design Co. 381 -1143, ‘ 
383 3324 Pager 577 _ 

SAILBOATS WANTED S 

We badly need good, used, 20' 35‘ 
sailboats for our sales dock Coo- 
tact Thunderbird Yachts Sales 
at Westport Marina, 656^5832 

24' FIBERGLASS SHARK 
Class racing, cruising sloop 
New sails inlcudmg spinnaker, 
sleeps 4, Complete with head and 
galley 658-5338 


1975 FRASER 30. 4 SAILS. NEW • 
spinnaker and gear, stove, oven, 
shipmate stove, sounder, CB. 
dinghy, anchor winch. $25,900 
652 4317, _ 

C&C 35 MKI, EXCELLENY 
condition, 1973 . 5 North sails, 
knot meter, VHF, sounder, fold 
Ing prop, Uni-fridge, fireplace y 
*55,000 112-929-3994. 


CAL 227, FULLY EQUIPPED 
for cruising or racing, immacu- - 
late condition. Atomic 4 inboard/-- 
112-274-5924 or 112-271-4177. 

CAILINN MO-1969 48' CENTRE 
cockpit keten, yellow cedar/flr, 
ocean tested. *60,000. Campbell 
River 286-1395._ 

WANTED 

Cal3-30, Newport 30, Islander 30. 
C8.C 30 or equivalent 477-3605 
evenings, 388-3646 business. 

1978 PACESHIP 26, AS NEW, 
$26,500. On Display. GYPSY 
YACHT SALES, 2270 Harbour 
Road, Sidney, 656-5591,_, 

NEW 8' SABOT SAILBOAT.' 
Never used. *250.474-1869 after 7 
pm. _ * 

WANTED: LASER OR SIMI 
lar boat, willing to pay *1100. 
598 5926_ 

26' CRUISING SLOOP. ALL 
standard equipment, 170 Genny 
offers. 2843 Wyndeatt Ave. 

C&C 35 MK II, EXCELLENT 
condition, race equipped, otter 
to *69,000 522-7649_ 

FURLING HEAD SAIL GEAR 
for large sailboat *200.652 5717 

92 SP0RTIN0 GOODS 


SPECIALTY 

|GUNS int iT es5 

NEW ARRIVALS!! 

Huger Red Label 20 gauge over 
and under. Remington 700 Var 
minter .243 and 308 Ruger M-77 
in 7x57 cal Ruger M 77 in .338 
magnum Remington 1100 12 ga 
sluggun. Remington 760 pump 
.243 cal. Winchester Mon. 70 
Police 308 cal. Marlin 99c 22 
automatic. Remington870pump 
.410 oa. Remington 870 pump 1 ? 
ga LEFT HAND! Remington 
788 in 22-250 cal Browning Re¬ 
naissance 9mm nlckle plated en¬ 
graved with case Smith & Wes 
son In 45 colt calibre. Vostok 22 
Auto Ruoer Blackhawk stain¬ 
less 357 magnum. Ruger Black 
hawk 45 colt calibre 

Vancouver Island's 
Largest stock Qf guns! 

576 Yates St, 383-2422 


50 Years Ahead 
FIRST IN VICTORIA 

GUN OIGEST 1979ONLY U SO 
Still 79 price — New Midland 
rifle w 4x scope 270,,30/06, *299. 
RIFLES — Marlin 35 cal, *169; 
Savage 300 older gun, mint, *319; 
Rem. 25/06,3x9, *399, Whitworth 
7x57, *219; Park/Hale. 7mm 
mao, *289, Win. 225,4x Redfield, 
*349; Husquavarna, 8mm. *249 
SHOTGUNS — Stevens. 3 shot, 
12G, *59, Mossbera, t2G pump, 
*134; Browning 12G, Dble, *399; 
Bock 1?G, O/U, *395. PISTOLS 
— SiW 22 kit gun. stainless, 
$?99; S8.W Mod 39, Nlckle. *349, 
Ruoer Blackhawk, 30 Ml, *269, 
S8.W, 29 8^ nlckle, *549. 

SAVE NOW 

Compound Bows at 79 Prices 
Bow Hunting For The Future 
Friday Nights 
SAVE YOU MONEY 

1307 Broad St. 385-3429 




FRANK WHITE S 
SCUBA SHOP 

832 Fisgard 3854713 


SIGN UP NOW FOR: 

Open Water Diver Course 
StartlngMarch 10 
BAMFI ELD WEEKEND 
DIVE CHARTER 
March 8th and 9th 
_ *85, All Inclusive > 

WETSUIT. EXCELLENT CON 
ditlon, fits 160-175 lbs, *180. 
Phone after 6pm. 385-8046. - 


WANTED-MANS WETSUIT IN.*, 
good condition for 5' 10" for 
190-200 lbs 642-3845. 


V 






































































































































































































































































































C-4 

92 SfWTWGSOOOS 


RECREATIONS LTD. 

We Specialize 
In Billiard Table 
Repairs and Recovering 
Billiard and Foosball Tables 
Cues—Accessor les 
517 Kelvin 384-3332 


RIMP4C DIVERS Ltd 

Make new friends and have fun 
bv loinino the next scuba diving 
course with Rlmpac Divers 
which starts March 17. Enroll at 
the shop. 9818 Fifth Street., Sid¬ 
ney. 650-6313 


SKI BOOTS, NOROICA ASTRA 
GT, 3 or 4 years old. excellent 
boots, offers. Ski suit, 2 piece 
suit, size 40, waist 34, has zipper 
at waist to make a complete l 
piece, green and blue, used very 
little.^aid $260. offers. 4774044 


LIKE NEW, LADIES FARMER 
Jane wet suit, H", nylon both 
sides. Complete. Fit approxi¬ 
mately 5*4 , 120-130 pounds. 
477-5144. 


NEW CROSS COUNTRY 
flberolass Epoke sklls, 200cm, 
Rottefella bindings, size 8 Vj 
boots, poles, asking $160. 
479-8630 


MOVING. MUST SELL COM- 
plete scuba system, tanks, regu¬ 
lator, wet suit, fins. etc. $150. 
474-2718. 

2 WET SUITS LIKE NEW, 140 
pounds, 5'8'\ $100 each. 652-2628. 
386-1474. 


15% OFF GUNS TIL MONTH'S 
end. Old Ric's Pawn Shop, 555 
Johnson St. 384-5422. 


MANS WETSUIT, FITS APP 6 '. 
185 195 lbs. $125. Phone 478-3144. 


FITZWRIGHT DRY SUIT, 
good condition, $350.652 1777 


12 GUAGE SPRINGFIELD 
pump, used once. $130. 642-5090 


93 


CAMERAS. SUPPLIES 
and PHOTO FINISHING 


bill 's 


photo 

.ruppli) 


DOWNTOWN at 
1672 Douglas 
383-7443 

SUPER DARKROOM 
SALE 

Feb. 15to 20 only. 
Savings on ALL 
darkroom supplies. 


H 

PHOTO SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 750 
Phone 244-4741 

On Trans-Canada Highway at 
Chemainus 


PHOTOCONTEST 

FEBRUARY and 
MARCH 

PRIZES1150.J100.475.M0 


island 

colour 

labs 

615 FORT 


t0> 


364-2242 


Plus 8 locations to serve you. 
SAME DAY SERVICE on all C41 
films — in by 10 a m. oul by 5 
p.m. 


REPRINT SPECIAL 
TILL MAR 1. 29* EACH 
AT ALL LOCATIONS. 


New PENTAX MB F2 50mm lens 
wilhcase, $219.95. Limitedquan- 
tity at thlsprice. 


LEITZ 200 MM F4.5 TELYT, 50 
mm F2 8 Elmar, 35 mm F3.S 
Summaron, Lelca lc with 50 mm 
F2 Summitar, Vidom finder, 
Killfit reflex housing. Evenings 
382 1971 


PAILLARD-BOLEX H16 RE- 
flex movie camera. 75mm Dali 
meyer lens and 16mm Swifar. 
Fine condition. $500. 383-8460. 
598-2837 


2%X3V 4 . 5X7, 8X10 VIEW CAM- 
eras. New Omega B 06 XL with 
lens, 2 carriers. easel, timer, etc. 
$310. 478-6435 If phoning Sunday, 
call after 5 pm. 


KITS CAMERAS 

For good used equipment 
388 6821 or 388 5226 


FOR SALE VIDEO SOUND 
camera with powerpak for Bata 
vision system, like new $325. 
385-4078 evenings. 


MINT PENTAX SPOTMATIC 
ll, 4 SMC Takumar lens. 
478 6435, If phoning Sunday, call 
<ifer 5 pm 


MINT LEICAFLEX SL, 50F-2 
Summlcron-R. $650. Lelca M-3,3 
lens, meter, etc 478-6435. if 
phoning Sunday, call after 5 pm, 


MINOLTA MOVIE CAMERA 

“ vSa ' J ‘ 


nkyo d 
i. 384-W 


VIVITAR 135MM F2.B OM 
mount. Best offer. 388-9566, 
595 5818. 


DISPLAY YOUR PHOTOS 
On standoff wall mounts 11x14 
kit $3 385-6170 


94 STORE and OFFICE 
FURNITURE and EQUIPMENT 



IF YOU RE 
SETTING UP 
OR EXPANDING 
AN OFFICE 
Check with us for used desks, 
typewriters, filing cabinets and 
all types of otficechairs, etc 
Pioneer” Used Office Furnish¬ 
ings. See our yellow and black 
sign at 4715 Trans-Canada High¬ 
way. Farmer's Plaza inear 
Whippletree Junction). 3 miles 
south of Duncan. Phone 748 4032. 
Open 10 a m. to 5 p.m. Wed. 
through Sunday 


STORE FIXTURES 

Numerous sizes used shelves, 
display stands and counters to 
clear Phone386-3211 


TAYLOR SOFT ICE-CREAM 
machine, working order, as is, 
$1800 Ballantyne pressure 
cooker deep fryer, excellent con¬ 
dition. $2000. 385-9839. 


MUTOH DRAFTING MA- 
chlne, mint condition. $350 or 
best otter. Drafting chair and 
accessories. 592-6061 


MISCELLANEOUS RE5TAU- 
* - for sale. Call 


OPEN DRUM HAND DRIVEN 
duplicator, as is, working order, 
$50,478-3671. 


LARGE ELECTRIC NATION- 
al cash register, $295 or otters. 
479-3231. 


°FFICe CALCULATOR, LIKE 
new, $100; manual typewriter 
with 20” carriage, $95 595-4596. 


PHOTOCOPIER IN WORKING 
order, Ideal for small club or 
office 383-5819 


94 STORE mi OFFICE 
FURNmWE art EQUIPMENT 

4' DISPLAY CASE. $150. 
Coca/Cola vendor. $385. Colla¬ 
tor, $300. 598-1892 


95 HEAT1N0 i FIREPUCES 

FIREPLACE GLASS 

"Custom sizes made to order" 

MAYFAIR GLASS 

FULL SERVICE GLASS SHOP 
-ST. 384-r 


790SPRUCE ST 


8721 


FIREPLACE CONVERTER 
New and different. Heat with 
forced fresh air from exterior 
variable speed fan. Special In¬ 
troductory offer, $495.479-8580 

6 YEAR OLD HONEYWELL 
oil furnace with 250 gallon tank 
with all duct work. Offers on 
$300.384-6190._ 

1972 OIL RANGE, COPPER 
range boiler and 72” diameter oil 
barrel. Phone 479-2594 or 
652 4970,_ 

BOX WOODBURNING STOVE, 
about 2'Xl' In size. Can cook on 
tOj>. Asklno $65. 642-4844, 

QUAKER OIL FURNACE, 
tank, stand, flue, lines, offers. 
474-1973. 

N MAJOR JkPFUMCtS 


FINAL CALL! 

Floor semule clear-out of all 


jmple cte_. 
brand new Gibson refrigerators, 
ranges. Speed Queen washer & 
dryers Prices slashed to sell 
out immediately. Mfg. guaran¬ 
tee 8. service included. Sorry no 
phone calls Personal shopping 
only. Sale hours everyday 10am - 
6pm, Sun. 11am • 5pm. 

F I COLWOOD LANGFORD 

urnitureland 

1610 ISLAND HIGHWAY 
(FARMERSMARKET) 


BILL'S BARGAIN BARN 
would like to announce the open¬ 
ing of our new APPLIANCE 
warehouse, located at 98 
West Burnside Rd., beside Capi¬ 
tal Market. We have a good se¬ 
lection of stoves and Fridges, 
some with left-handed doors, 
washers, dryers, dishwashers, 
freezes upright and chest. In va¬ 
riety of sizes and colours. 

30 DAY WARRANTY 
Buy. sell, trade, dicker & deliver 
384-5721 or 384-5235 


6 MONTH WARRANTY 
Technician overhauled refrig¬ 
erators, washers, dryers, 
ranges, dishwashers. Phoenix 
Appliances, 2009 Fernwood. 
Tues. Sat. 166pm Frl. til 9pm. 
Trade-ins wanted 384-0423. 


KITCHEN AID DISHWASHERS 
1980 models in stock. Plus build¬ 
ers appliances 

KENYON SALES 

386-1214 (24 hrs.) 


freeze $425, Maytag washer $500, 
Maytag dryer $400, GE self clean 
Stove$650. Viking fridge 16CU. ft 
$600 All appliances in Harvest 
Gold 386-7149. 


TAKE AWAY FOR $200: 28 
cubic foot. Zenith freezer. Good 
working condition. 30" Viking 
stove and Speed Queen washer, 
good condition, need parts. 
479 5427_ 

CASH DISCOUNT ON MAYTAG 
APPLIANCES — immediate de¬ 
livery. Butler Brothers, 1724 
Douglas St. (across from the 
Bay), 383 6911 


HARVEST GOLD 24" 
McClary range Good condition. 
$100. Whirlpool fridge, white, 
square cornered, $95.479-0137 

13 CU.FT KELVINATOR 
fridge, 6 years old, white, se- 
perafe freezing compartment, 
offers 595-7968 


BAYCREST, HARVEST GOLD. 

K >rtable dishwasher. Gibson. 

arvest Gold frost free fridge. 
595-S461._ 

MATCHING SIDE BY SIDE 
Inglis washer and dryer. Har 
vest Gold, used only 6 months, 
$500. 382-3819._ 

FINDLAY 30" ELECTRIC 
ranoe, $150. RCA Whirlpool 14 
cu. ft. fridge, $250. White. Excel- 
lent condition. 383-0758._ 

VIKINGCONVERTIBLE DISH- 
washer, harvest gold. Works 
well but needs a few screws. $115 
or best offer. 478-9397,_ 

HEAVY DUTY WESTING- 
house automatic washers, fully 
reconditioned, and guaranteed. 
$150. 385-2033,2519 Douglas. 

COLOUR FRIDGE FOR SALE, 
excellent condition, large freez- 
Ing compartment. 382-2372. 

ELECTRIC STOVE, BRENT- 
wood^excellent condition. $ 200 . 

15 CU. FT FREEZER. 1 YR. 
old Call Mr. Dick days 385-4493, 
evenings 38643523._ 

BUILT-IN DISHWASHER, 
new motor and pump last year. 
$100 or best offer. 4780 823. 

DISHWASHER, WESTING- 
house portable, white, excellent 
condition, $195.38SQ79S_ 

KENMORE 30” RANGE FOR 
sale, white, excellent working 
condition, $100 firm. 598-2849. 

23 CUBIC FT. WESTING- 
house freezer. $200 or best offer. 
386-2103.__ 

15 CU.FT. OLDER FRIOGE 
%&*§&!& WOfkino order ‘ 

FRIDGE. STOVE. WASH- 
er/dryer all work well. $450. 

HARVEST GOLD 13 CU. FT. 

382 * 280 / 24 electric stove. 

FOR SALE WESTINGHOUSE 
stove, good working order. 
Clean, stop. 384-4545._ 

WHITE MOFFAT RANGE. 30”. 
excellent condition. Phone 
592-3893 ^ _ 

EASY AUTOMATIC WASHER 
and dryer, excellent condition, 
$375 pair .595-7678._ 

HOOVER WASHER SPIN 
"- in good condition, $125. 


dryer ir 
478-0407 


MICROWAVE OVENS FOR 
rent bv Homark, 381-5622 


15CU.FT. FRIDGE. WRINGER 
washer 385-2931. 


BRAND NEW 7 CU. FT. DEEP 
freeze. Offers. 385-1728 


kitchen stove. 478-4203. 

97 FURNITURE 

DELUXE STYLE 
3 ROOM GROUPINGS 

AS LOW AS $998. 

Living room, kitchen and Bed¬ 
room. 

180 days same as cash or easy 
bank financing on approval of 
credit 

Qhglroc|gf$ 

388-6264 715 Finlayton 

Open nights 'til 9p.m. 

Sat, 'til 6, Sun. 12-5 

THE ENDISNEAR 

Our year end sale starts Sat. 
Feb. 16th at Ham. Oak 8-12 pee., 
dining suites,,magnificent 
burled 9 pee dining suite, Chip¬ 
pendale and Rennalssance revi¬ 
val parlor suites, plus many 
Items under $200; oak ward¬ 
robes, small tables, over stuffed 
chairs, sets of 4 chairs, oak cap¬ 
tains chairs, grandpa rockers, 
what not stands, etc. 30% oft 
brass. Open 7 days, most nights, 
only 15 min from town, financing 
avail. OAC. Petes Place 716 
Got dstr earn, 478-6000 


4 SEATER FRENCH PROVIN- 
clel chesterfield, metching 
chair, beige, excellent condition. 
$389.477-7862. 


97 FURNITURE 


TRADE-IN 

TIME 


425 on vour old mattress 
425 on vour box spring 
WHEN YOU 
PURCHASE A NEW 

Latex Rubber 

MATTRESSOR 
BOX SPRING 

The mattress that gives even 
support to 811 parts of the body, 
truly the most comfortable mat 
tress of all. 

MATTRESSES 

3'3” size, each piece $199 

Regular size, each piece $249 
Queen size, each piece $289 
King size mattress $399 

MATTRESS 
TOPPER PADS 

ENJOY the luxurious comfort : 
Thick Size Rubber Foam 

1 In. 39x75 $27.25 $8.55 

2 In. 39x75 $52.75 $17.25 

11n. 54x75 $37.75 $11.85 

2 In. 54x75 $72.90 $23.65 

tin. 5x0 $44.65 $14.00 

2 In. 5x0 $86.50 $28 00 

1 in King $58.50 $17.75 

2 in. Kino $112.35 $36 40 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Open Fridays 'til 9p.m. 
EASY CREDIT terms available 

Gregg Furniture 

“The quality furniture store — 
where you can see how It's 
made" 

2300 DOUGLAS 388 7365 


my * 10 

SAVE MONEY? 

Prices slashed for a limited time 
only on floor samples, one of a 
kind- discontinued lines etc - 
super buys on quality brand 
mane furniture. 20 dining room 
suites. 11 bedroom suites. 8 kit¬ 
chen sets. 14 chesterfield suites, 
30chairs 8, recllners, 28 coffee & 
end tables - also open stock 
chest of drawers, dressers,, 
desks etc. mattress & box units, 
waterbeds, bunk bed outfits & 
much much more Hurry in for 
vour best selection. Open a re¬ 
volving charge account with us If 
you need credit Onlya I2minute 
drive from downtown Victoria. 
Sale hours everyday 10am - 6pm, 
Sun Ham 5pm 

IT'S WOkTH A DRIVE TO 

COLWOOD LANGFORD 

lurnitureland 


MESS BOX 


Mfg. by Grange, deluxe 
multi-needle quilted bed¬ 
ding while they last! 39" 
twin set. Reg. 4199.95. sale 
4158.88; 54" double set. 
Reg. 4239.95. sale 4188.88; 
Queen set. Reg. 4269.95. 
sale 4218.88. Sale hours 
everyday 10am - 6pm, 
Sun. llam - 5pm. Open a 
revolving charge account 
with us if you need credit. 

F IcocwooccANcroRo 

urnitureland 

1610 Island Highway 
(Farmers Market) 

DO NOT COMPRO¬ 
MISE ON QUAL¬ 
ITY. VISIT OUR 
NEW LARGE 
SHOWROOM AT 
1633 HILLSIDE AT 
SCOTT ACROSS 
FROM THE MALL 
FOR THE FINEST 
SELECTION OF 
FURNITURE. 


f r TiUicum 

Furniture 


1613 HILLSIDE 


TRIPLE DRESSER, 3 DRAW 
er chest, 3 piece sectional, old 
oak buffet, old oak coffee table. 
38S-0614. 


4 PIECE LIVING ROOM SUITE 
from Denmark estate. Offers on 
$1800. 382-1570 after 3 pm. week 
days. 


CAPTAINS BED. STURDY, AT 

tractive, good condition, $145. 6 
chandelier, $45. Must 


ie glass cf 
I 598-0364 


LIKE NEW SINGER THREE 
cushion chesterfield and chair 
Smoked glass coffee and end 
tables. 386-1802 _ 

7 PIECE PECAN DINING 
room suite, $800. Bedroom suite, 
$100. Stereo, $75. Recliner, $40. 
478-4091._._ 

3-PIECE BEOROOM SUITE. 
$400 2—piece living room suite 
$600, otters. 656-7890 _ 

USED SOFA. CHAIR And COF- 

fee table for sale, Ideal for rum- 
pus room. 478-7754 after Spm. 

HIGHBOY, VANITY $190; 
armchair $40; teak lamp tables 
$80.383-3128._ 

CORNER SECTIONAL CHES 
terfield, ver* good condition, 
$550 592-6169._ 

ORIENTAL CARPETS, NO- 
madic kilims and wall hangings. 
596-9495._ 

DUNCAN PHYFE WALNUT 
dining table, good condition, 
$250.477-7649. 


SINGLE BED, EXCELLENT 
condition, box spring. Shepherd 
casters, $125 complete 59^2936 


CUSTOM BEDS, CAPTAINS, 
$160. mates. $140, mates bunks. 
$180. 479-7400. 


SIMMONS HIDEABED. 
brown and beige. $250 firm. 
658-5827. 


QUEEN SIZE BAUHAUS 
hide—a—bed, excellent condi- 
tlon. like new. $500.642-4590. 


UNUSAL EDWARDIAN ARM 
chair, excellent condition, $275. 
595-7186 


MOVING. DOUBLE BOX 
spring and mattress, must sell. 
388 3941,386-7157, after 5 


DINING ROOM SUITE, 
stereo, swivel chair. Best offer 
384-4263. 


ROUNDOAK TABLES 
652-4740 


HIDEABED AND RECLINING 
chair for sale, $100.383-8708. 


SET OF 4 HEAVY CARVED 
oak chairs, $450.382-5939 

GREEN SECTIONAL IN GOOD 
condition, $350.721-5012. 


BRAEMORE DOWN SOFA 
Four seater $850 595-7467 

WAGON WHEEL BUNKBEDS 
$110. Good condition. 479-6042. 


KITCHEN TABLE AND 
chairs, $50.477-8832. 


97 FURNITURE 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 19H0 


7-PIECE WALNUT FINISH 
dlnino room suite includes buffet 
and china cabinet, $550 ; 6-plece 
all wood Mediterranean bed¬ 
room suite, $950; two spotless 
single box springs and mat¬ 
tresses. $150 each, red chester¬ 
field bed, $250, white vinyl 
queen-size headboard, $vo: sin- 
ole bed. $50; manual typewriter, 
$70 All in very good condition. 
Res. 383-6777, Bus. Monday, 
Wednesday. Friday, 383-5341. 


ANTIQUES AND OLD FURNI- 
ture. Walnut dining room suite, 6 
matching chairs and buffet. 9xW 
Axmlnister carpet. Double brass 
bed Walnut china cabinet. Oc¬ 
cassional oak ano cane table and 
more. 4784)779 or 385-6690, 2824 
Sooke Lake Road near Gola- 
stream._ 

WARDROBE. WALNUT. TURN 
of Century, matching double 
bed. Walnut vanity, three wav 
stool, *■* 


mirror, cane stool, two black 
ladder back chairs, rattan seats, 
two oreen soda fountain type 
chairs. Maple spindle single bed, 
Maple double bed, rocking chair. 
writing desk 595 S461._ 

TEAK OBLONG DINING 
table and 6 chairs. Table with 
pullout extensions. Will seat 10. 
Chairs upholstered in muted or¬ 
ange brown weave. Condition 
excellent Must sell quickly $400 
or best offer. 385-2195 after 5. 

THIS ASSEMBLED KING SIZE 
waterbed. 6 drawer pedestal, 
headboard, heater, vibrator, 3 
sets sheets and mattress pad. 
Nearly new. Will refund in 7 days 
If not satisfied. $800. 112-748-5253 
or evenings 743-9840_ 

LOOSE BACK CUSHION CHES- 
terfield, excellent condition. 
$185. Antique vanity, cane 
bench, complete bedstead. $200 
Chi Id's wood vanity with bench, 3 
wa^bevelled mirror, $30. 

PINECRAFT LTD. ONTARIO 
pine furniture (with illustrated 
catalogues) on display to order 
at Leaf Hill Galleries. 47 Bastion 
Square, Victoria. Further Infor- 
matlon, 656-6207,_ 

NEW BEDROOM SUITE, 
Granoe mattress and box 
spring, Included with double 
mirrored dresser, chest of draw¬ 
ers and headboard. $650 or best 
Offer. 5954)383._~ 

SINGLE POSTER BED. % 
bed, older painted drop front 
desk, painted 6 drawer chests, 
older mahogony dresser, beauti¬ 
ful occassional chairs, pair of 
lamps, odd chairs. 479-2260 

MAHOGANY SETTEE, WASH 
stand, tov*seat. small wooden 
table, firescreen, 5 drawer ma¬ 
hogany chest. Mahogany tilt-top 
table, coffee table, painted be<f 
side table, 592-6392._ 

8 PIECE VILAS MAPLE DIN 
ing room set, $1500. 7 piece qual¬ 
ity French Provincial bedroom 
suite, $2500. Will consider offers. 
388-9468._ 

KNECKTEL MAHOGANY 
console table, 3 leaves, 2 chairs, 
ideal for small dlnino area. Ex 
celled! condition. $395 or best 
Offer. 477-7103. 


BARGAIN BASEMENT SPE- 
cials — Glass front china cabi 
nets $59 - $79 — $119 — $149 
ECHO FURNITURE, 704 View 
St. 3 8 4 - 2 2 1 4 


DOUBLE BED WITH WOODEN 
headboard and footboard, and 
new mattress, $175; oak chest of 
drawers with small mirror at¬ 
tached, $65. 479 2322. 


ONE YEAR OLD QUEEN SIZE 
waterbed, excellent condition. 
$450 or closest otter. 385-9549 
after 5pm. 


BROWN VELVET COUCH AND 
chair, deluxe chrome set, both 6 
months old. Terry, 382-3101 or 
381-0324. 


TABLE AND2CHAIRS, COUCH 
and arm chair, good condition 
Reasonable prices 366-1388 
after 4pm 


BEDROOM SUITE, ALL 
wood, double bed, high boy, van- 
Ity and stool. $475.477-91S7 

WANTED: DOUBLE DRESS- 
er with mirror, reasonable. 
381-5676._ 

GRANDFATHER CLOCK. NO 
movement. 6'6”. Quality teak 
construction $350 383-8250 

KROEHLER COLONIAL BED 
c he$ te rtle!d in good condition 
$200. 384 7920, _ 

HEADBOARD AND FRAME, 3 
drawer dresser and mirror. All 
Vilas. 592 8975 _ 

MOVING, HOUSEHOLD FUR 
nlture for sale, all reasonable 
prices Phone478-8861._ 

CONTINENTAL SINGLE BEO, 
box spring and mattress, like 
new $95. 598 347?._ 

QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, 4 
poster, naugahvde rim and heat 
er, $400or offers. 384-7373 

CORNER DINETTE SUITE, 
love seat (hide—a—bed), older 
upholstered rocker. 595-6745 

M TV. STEREO, RADIO 
SAliS mi StUVICf 

Open'til 9 Nightly! 

385-5555 

STEREOS-COLOR T.V'S 

Technics-Panasonic 

(FULL SERVICE 
WARRANTY) 

—5 vrs. parts 8. labor on most 
new sound equipment! 

—Loaner supplied during ser¬ 
vice. 

—Full credit upgrading lstyr 
—No down payment (OAC) 

—In storebank financing 
—Yes, we take trades 
CHARGEX— 
MASTERCHARGE 

Used Stereo Equipment 

PRICEDTOCLEAR 
Yamaha Speakers ea.$99. 
Technic SB 4500speakers $149. 
Challenger 15 speakers $149. 
Quad 303 power amp $?49 

JVC KDAlCcass deck $219 

Color tv Specials 

New Panasonic 20" colour TVs 
Special $599. No Down Payment. 
Low Monthly Payments(OAC) 
Colour TV trades 


Zenith 19" colour 
Panasonic 19” colour 


$169 
$199 

Open 10-9 Dally 10-6PM Sat 






For your best buys on colour 
televisions come In early & pick 
out your set Special sale event 
on RCA & Electrohome • Sorry 
we can not advertise prices in 
this ad, they are too low! Per 
sonal shopping only while they 
last. Sale hours everyday 10am • 
6pm, Sun llam-Spm. 

F ICOLWOOD-LANGFORD 

urnitureland 

1610 ISLAND HIGHWAY 
(FARMERSMARKET) 


jWaig Jfiirniturr 

Sc 3ppliaiups 


1821 COOK 

RENT COLOR TVS from SJO 

385-2435 

Car Stereo Special 

7-key stereo equalizer/booster, 
30 watts per channel, 2 VU 
meters. $119.95. Still available- 
boosters $29 95. 

B.C. SOUND & RADIO Service 
931 FORT_383-4731 


TV. STEREO, RADIO 
SALTS mi SERVICE 


Dual 714Q direct drive, fully 
automatic, quart locked turn¬ 
table. Price reduced $200 on 1 
demo only. Now $449.95. 


CAV 


388-6564 


764-A YATES (IN THE MALL) 

SONY AM/FM RECEIVER, 25 
watts per chann6l. semi-auto¬ 
matic direct-drive turntable, 
two-way speakers 10" and 2”. 
Suggested list price $799.85. Our 
package price only $650. 

Metro Electronics 
17)9Quadra 386-0512 


110. 


$ 10 . service call anywhere in 
Victoria. Call Homark. 381-5622 

NEW.STEREO COMPONENT: 
NI kko amo, 50 watts, Sony direct 
drive turntable, Cerwin Vega 
U15 speakers, 100 watts. 300 
hours on whole component. 
Guaranteed. Asking $1000. 
383-2622 between 5-6._ 

COMPLETE CITIZEN 24- 
channel 5-watt mobile/base CB, 
woodgraln cafthg 30' Coaxial 
table, impedance matcher, car 
antenna. 8' adjustable apart¬ 
ment antenna. Excellent condl- 
tlon. $140,596-1450,4:30-7pm. 

USEDT.V.'S 

For sale from $49 95. Come In 
and make an otter. 

Call HOMARK, 27 West Burn- 
slde, 381-5622,9am-9pm_ 

BASE STATION CB RADIO. 69 
channels with upper and lower 
bands, also 5/8 wave atenna. 
complete with 100' RG8/U cable. 
Bjrand^new, $275 complete. 

PAIR PRO-LINEAR STAGE 60 
speakers. Excellent condition, 
$275 or best offer. Sony reel to 
reel portable tape deck, TC-270, 
built In amp with tapes, $225 or 
best Otter 382-5077_ 

KENWOOD AMPLIFIER. 60 
watts per channel Two Cerwin 
Vega 2-wav loudspeakers, high 
energy design. Excellent condl 
tlon Asking $900 firm. 366-3626. 

SWAN WM3000 SWR POWER 
meter, D104 power mike, 6 posi¬ 
tion coax switch, RCA oscllo 
scope, variable cap. all sizes, 
roller Inductees, etc. 479-0228 

CLEARANCE SALE OF MAG- 
novox 26" colour TV's, remote & 
non remote. 

ATLAS STEREOANDTV 
763 Fort St._385-2712 

CAR STEREO SYSTEM, 
Craig cassette deck, 30 watt 
booster amp, 50 watt Concord 
ntw ' >e " w °° 

CASH DISCOUNT ON ALL 
color televisions. Your television 
sold on consignment at Butler 
Brothers, 1724 Douglas St., 
383-6911, _ 

SAVE $300 

Almost new Technic 35 watt per 
channel, direct dr I ve turntable, 2 
speakers. Includes stand. $800. 

USED COLOUR TV'S. $139. & 
up ELECTRON TV SALES & 
SERVICE, 100 Burnside Rd. W. 
383-5432 

MAGNABLANER ID, AUDIO 
research D100. audio research 
SP5. Linn Sondek. Will sell 
separately. 382-801S_ 

PAIR OF BRYSTON AMPLI- 
flers, 200 watts per side. Sound 
craftsman pre-amp/eouallzer. 
595-4375._ 

ONE PAIR SB 4500 TECHNICS 
speakers, excellent sound and 
condition. Must sell within 6 
days 59S75Q9_ 

HARMONKARDON RABCO 
ST-7 turntable with cartridge, 
excellent condition. New $900, 
sell $400or best offer. 656-4774 

WANTEb LOAN OR PUR- 

chase service manual or chema¬ 
tic Halllcrafters S-51. 592-0281 
evenings._ 

$45 BLACK AND WHITE. $150 
color Good condition with no 
risk guarantee. 383-8774 or 
382-1234 


RCA XL100 20” COLOUR TV, 
not a year old. $525 or best offer. 
388-4990 


RCA COLOR TV, 26”,VvALNUT 
cabinet, excel lent condition, $ 1 75 
or offers. 479-9286. 


STEREO, 5 MONTHS OLD. EX 
cellent condition, $1,200.384-6785 
after 6pm, 


REALISTIC 449 CB, 40 CHAN- 
net and side band, $150. 388-6275 
pager 2792. 


TELEC 1361 AUDIO MIXER. 
$125. Shure microphone, $50. 
Phone 382-0477, after 4 pm. 


ADMIRAL CONSOLE STEREO, 
god^condition, $200 or offers. 


USED PORTABLE COLOR TV 
$50. brand new A.G.S. stereo 
components $275. 382-3955 


1980 ELECTROHOME TV, 
only 4 months old. $500 firm. 
477-3296,383-3276 


FLEETWOOD CONSOLE 
stereo, excellent condition. $125. 


CROWN D C 300 POWER AMP. 
LC. 150 pre amp. DBX 119. 
384-6635. 


ELECTROHOME COLOR TV, 
26”, walnut cabinet, excellent 
condition, $250 384-5447 


TELEFUNKEN RADIO REC- 
ord player with glass case. $225. 


REMOTE CONTROL CONVER 
tor, Gerrold Star comm 1 1 . brand 
new, $130. 479-4972. 


MARCONI CONSOLE STEREO, 
turntable, good shape. Asking 
$175,384-927* 


MARANTZ 2225 RECEIVER. 2 
hd 44 spkrs. Dual trntbl. $500 
ObO. 385-1449. 


8' GENERAL ELECTRIC 
color TV, clock and snooze, $270. 
477-3136 


SANSUI RECEIVER. 70WATTS 
per side, Sansul SP3500 speak- 
crs. Dual 721 turntable 386-3319. 


ELECTROME 20” REMOTE 
control, excellent condition. $325 
or nearest offer. 479-0447 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 18" 
black and white portable TV. 
with rolling stand, $60. S95-7678 


TWO B.I.C. VENTURA FOR- 
mula I speakers, $130. 477-6135 
after Nxn. 


SANSUI AU-317 AMP. TU-217 
tuner. 383-1483, after 6pm. 


WANTED TC-S007 TOKAI C.B. 
radio. Phone 479-7466 after 6pm. 


STEREO CREDENZA, GOOD 
condition. $250 5954596 


10 YEAR OLD CABINET 
stereo, $60.477-0230. 


ERA GRACE 707. GRACE 
Verion cable. $400 479-6805. 


V.H.F SCANNER WITH 8 
crystals. 598 1435. 


GROCERIES. MEAT 
mi PRODUCE 

FRESH FISH 

sh salmon all sizes. 
I selection at lowest 


The II 

prices. Come out to the Fisher¬ 
mans Market, located at the 
Farmer's Market, 1610 Island 
Highway. Open 7 days a week. 

ALBERTAGRAINFEDBEEF 
Pork. veal. lamb, information. 
381-6621._ 

SIDE OF PORK*, HOME 
grown, grain feed, government 
Inspected. 479-6843. _ 

FROZEN LOGAN BERRIES 
to r 5 pound containers. 

Phone 652-2046. _ 

BLOCK-READY BEEF 
Box Beef (no waste). Informa¬ 
tion: 478-3374. 


99 


GROCERIES. MEAT 
and PRODUCE 


PANAMA FLATS 



Carrots, 10 lbs 99c. Also 
featuring potatoes qnd va¬ 
riety of vegetables, fruits 
and spring flowers. 

SAT AND SUN 
10am-5pm. 


FRESH CRABS FOR SALE 


IOC 


RESH 


MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 




4011QUAORA 479-5921 
Finest quality and selec¬ 
tion of kitchen tables and 
authentic Brentwood 
chairs._ 

MATTRESS $55 ROYAL 
el«ctrlc typewriter, 30 dev aver 
antee, $125. Large simulated 
walnut double pedestal office 
desk, as new $265. Oak swivel 
office chair, $85. Large old oak 
gate leg dining table with 3 extra 
leaves, $375. Queen Anne mahog 
any china display cabinet, $275. 
Old hanging corner wall cup¬ 
board, $135. 1930's solid walnut 
sideboard, $250. 

STEPTOE 8i SON 
434 Kingston. 383-1689 

ATTICA 

720MARKET ST 

WE BUY ALMOST ANYTHING 
(Doors, windows, glass, plumb¬ 
ing. furniture etc.) 

WE SELL ALMOST EVERY- 
THING (Antiques, 2nd hand fur¬ 
niture, Architectural supplies 
etc.) 

_382-4214_ 

7-PIECE WALNUT FINISH 
dining room suite includes buffet 
and china cabinet, $550, 6-piece 
all wood Mediterranean bed 
room suite. $950; two spotless 
single box springs and mat¬ 
tresses, $150 each; red chester¬ 
field bed. $250; white vinyl 
queen-size headboard- $90; sin- 
ole bed, $50; manual typewriter. 
$70. All In very good condition. 
R*$- 383-6777, Bus. Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 383-5341 



WE TAKE TRADES 
1810STQRE 385-8781 

HTON’S 

WAREHOUSE 

STORE 

749 View St. 


HERE WE ARE AGAIN 
3/16ths tempered glass, sizes 
46X68 and 34x68 and 70. $17.50 
each. Lots of Thermo units $1 
uo. Free advise on how to do It 
vour seif storm windows. Aver¬ 
age house $250 24 oz clear glass. 
754 per sq.ft., 32 oz. $1 25. 3/16. 
$1.50, V 4 ", $1.75. Bronze tint, 24 
oz , $1 3/16, $1.75. Cut to vour 
sjze^and shape Can deliver. 

ANTIQUES. COLLECTIBLES, 
used modern furniture, appli¬ 
ances. reconditioned bicycles, 
lawnmowers. stereos, tapes, 
tods, tires, china, baby Items, 
numerous miscellaneous items. 
Bills Bargeln Barn, Craigflower 
& Tllllcum, 384-5235 Tuesdav- 
Sunday._ 

2 & 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIP 
OFFER at TOOLS N* SPACE. 
We supply all woodworking tools 
and equipment You build great 
protects at tremendous savings 
Novices welcome. Spaces are 
limited. Call or visit today! 
383 9600 after 10am. 338 Cam 
erlneSt _ 

FOUR SEATER CHESTER 
field and chair, brown, needs 
upholstered, Hostess chair; 3 
rugs; trunk; Hoover scrubber 
and polisher; black and white 
TV; Ladies 3 speed bicycle, va 
cuum; carpet sweeper, 4 slice 
toaster, etc. ISO Wildwood, 
598-7816._ 

MOVING SALE. SOLID PINE 
triple dresser and deck mirror, 
humidifier, older model dish¬ 
washer, pine table and 4 chairs, 
ladles Raleigh 10-speed, round 
oak coffee fable, large office 
desk, Admiral 30" range. Solid 
walnut coffee table, and more 
Items. 479 0812. 


HOMELITE 

CHAINSAWS 

SALES — PARTS - SERVICE 
RENTALS 

GIBSON POWERCRAFT 
NOW AT 730 HILLSIDE 
382 8291 


MATCHING SOFA AND 
chair, chair and three tables, all 
for $150; covers for sofa and 
chair, $35; stool, wicker chair; 
kitchen utensils (coffee maker, 
electric fry pan and kettle, etc.) 
bathroom accessories, and mo¬ 
torcycle seat, $50 385-0840. 


ADMIRAL UPRIGHT FREEZ- 
er $250; McClary frost tree 
fridge $395, 3 pc wooden dinette 
$150; 24" deluxe Brentwood 
range, avacado $175 Mel's Bar¬ 
gains, 3460 Quadra St. 384-3152. 
Chargex and Mastercharge 
available 


STIHL Chainsaws 

SALES —PARTS —SERVICE 
RENTALS 

GIBSON POWERCRAFT 
NOW AT 730 HILLSIDE 
382-8291 


VACUUMS 

Electrolux, Compact, Filter- 
queen, Hoover and others. Re¬ 
built with warrenty. Starting 
$25. 

All Victoria Vacuums 595-2622 


POLYETHYLENE FILM — 
available In clear or black In full 

C rolls or handy tarp sizes - sult- 
for vapor barrier or protec 
coverings for woodpiles, 
cars, boats, etc. THE PLASTIC 
SHOP, 2105 Douglas St. 386-1477 


Vj-PR ICE GOLD and Silver 
jewellery sale! Watches 
40%oft! PETER LAX. 
GOLDSMITH, 230 Menzles. 
Don't miss It! 


QUEEN-SIZE BEO, TWIN 
bedroom suite, hldeebed, Colo¬ 
nial style couch and chair, color 
tv, CB home base. Electrolux 
vacuum and power head, sewing 
machine, sewing desk and gun 
case. 479-3231. 


FILTER QUEEN VACUUM 
with powerhead, B&W tv. deep¬ 
freeze. small 2 -door fridge, 
washer and dryer, couch and 
chair, hideabed. utility trailer, 
CB radio, lots of miscellaneous. 
479-2523. 


100 MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 

SIMMONS BEAUTY REST 
Back Care III 39" bed, complete 
with rug roller frame and Colo¬ 
nial maple headboard, $3/9 95. 
Simmons bed complete unit with 
extra long mattress and box 
spring, $399.95; Contemporary 
lovescat. brown button tufted 
vinyl with plaid nylon cushions, 
$239 95; French Provincial occa¬ 
sional arm chair, Fruitwood 
carved frame with coll seating, 
beige nylon tapestry. $249.95, 
newly recovered sling chair, 
pheasant pattern, $149 95; Chi 
nese carved step end table with 
drawer and plate glass, $198; 
white and gold vanity dresser 
with stool, $175; pair of white and 
oold motif tables. $35, white and 
odd older style poster bed with 
new 39” mattress and founda¬ 
tion, $150; Queen size mattress 
and box spring, $159.95, Colonial 
patchwork swivel rocker, 
$128.88; Contemporary style 
sofa and chair, $99 95; Apart 
ment size table and 2 deluxe 
chairs, $99.95; semi hi back 2 
piece chesterfield suite, $149.95; 
Ketvlnator 30” range, $69.95; 
Traditional style large 4 seater 
loose cushion style sofa and arm 
chair, good quality suite, 
$299 95; triple dresser with twin 
mirrors, $228 ; 5 drawer chest 
$118, brand new26” colour TV's, 
clearing. $569.95, deluxe model 
with easy bank financing 

Qhglrciclgg 

388-6264 715 Finlayson 

Open nights 'til 9 p.m. 

Sat '1116, Sun. 12-5 


„QPS 



■s? __ 

geneta 

1115 FORT ST. 

Over 30 Years 
Your 

AUCTIONEERS 

and 

APPRAISERS 
in Victoria 
384-6441 


CARPET 




l 

S 


Sizes 2'xl2* to 100'xl2'. Largest 
stock and best prices on Vancou¬ 
ver island We cut our roll ends 
Fuzzy Wuzzy Ruos. Craigflower 
and Skinner. Victoria West. 
382-6)42 and In Beban Plaza. 
Nanaimo, 758-9413. 


NEW AND USED 


4 pee. chesterfield suites $679 
and $1098; 2-pc. chesterfield 
suites $269 to $779; swivel rock 
ers $179 and $189, love seats $149 
and $169; wooden rocking chairs 
coffee fable sets 
$42.95; s-pc. kitchen sets $59 to 
$149; 3-pc. kitchen sets $39.95 to 
$129; complete bedroom suites 
$249 to $1128; chests of drawers 
$59 to $299; dressers $69 to $329. 
cedar chest $199; single beds 
$44 95 to $159; bunk beds com¬ 
plete $299, bedside tables $22.95 
to $95; $tudents desks $74.95 to 
$169, 9x12 rugs $59 to $199; va¬ 
cuum cleaners $34.95 to $79; fire 
screens $22 95 to $49. Use your 
Chargex or Master Charge. 

Pandora Furniture 

1050 PANOORA 383-6319 


jfflais Jfiirniturp 

Sc Appliances 


USED 


30" Moffat range $58 

Kenmore dryer $198 

Speed Queen washer $198 

Gibson 2-door fridge $198 

2-pce. chesterfleldsuite $249 

Rec liner *69 

plus much more 

1821 COOK 

385-2435 

SHOP AT 

ATTICA 

THISWEEK 

SPEAK TO BRYAN 
OR STAN ON THE 
SLY 

THEY'VE GOT A 
SUPER DEAL ON 
EVERYTHING IN 
THE STORE 

382-4214 

THE ENDISNEAR 

Our year end sale starts Sat. 
Feb. t6that llam. Oak 8-12oce„ 
dining suites, magnificent 
burled 9 pee dining suite, Chip¬ 
pendale and Rennalssance revi¬ 
val parlor suites, plus many 
Items under $200, oak ward 
robes, small tables, over stuffed 
chairs; sets of 4 chairs, oak cap¬ 
tains chairs, grandpa rockers, 
what not stands, etc. 30% oft 
brass. Open 7 days, most nights, 
only 15 min from town, financing 
avail. OAC. Petes Place 786 
Golds tream, 478-6000 

Vacuum Cleaners 

Nearly new and reconditioned 
from $25.00 guaranteed. Current 
models always available: Com 
pact, Electrolux, Filter Queen, 
Kirby, Hoover, Sears-Kenmore. 
Eureka. Lewyt, G.E. etc. Power 
nozzles adapted to any machine. 
Repairs every brand. Trades 
welcome Top of line Bullt-ins - 

Mister Sweeper, 901 Esquimau 
Road (at Head), Colwood Cor¬ 
ners Mall next to Highway Su- 
-• -7,474-1011. 


COLDCURE 

EPOXY 

Excellent for glueing, cold 
moulding, sealing, etc. It will 
even cure underwater. 


permarket. 386-3717, • 



428 E. Burnside' 
386-181)_386-7814 

WATERBEDS 


p tl2! 


ins and Accessories, 
ay or night, 478-7345. 


SHELVING 

Matthews Agencies 
922 Meares _388-4123 


LIKE NEW EQUIPMENT 40% 
off., study desk, executive's 
chair, woven oval carpet, dratt- 
Ing table, ski rack. 478-6642 


NEW EQUIPMENT 25% OFF 
Weights and dumbell equipment 
with bench press, snow chains 2 
sets. 478-6642. 


100 


MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL 

1 KNIVES 

GOLD PANS! 
Professional—Ridged 
Metal $8.95 ea. 

574 Yates_383-2422 

IN STOCK COROTLAS INSUL- 
lated greenhouse panels. UV 
stabilized, 75% clear, acrylic 
sheets,'/»", 3/16", '/ 4 ” cleat and 
translucent, 246 mil polyethyl¬ 
ene A Iso clearance on old stock, 
Va oft retail. Foam (nsullatlon, 
cushion foam, foam chips, v, 
patterned acrylic sheets, clear 
acrylic sheet cutoffs, vara thane. 
Decopour, eooxv paint andresln. 
Plastic World Division of Cus¬ 
tom Industrial Fiberglass Ltd. 
1105 Alston St. 8 30-S Mondav- 
Frlday._ 

USED COLOR TV'S, 18” 26 " 
consoles, 30 day guarantee. $100 
$299. Many to choose from. We 
also buy or trade all makes and 
models. Call 388-4031 Today Is 
land Collateral & Sales, 620 
Johnston St. at Broad._ 

NEW RUG. GOLD, RUBBER 
back, llVjxl]', price$45. Almost 


595-3184_ 

FEBRUARY SPECIALS 
Walnut Gibbard tea wagon $250, 
loveseat $175; Gurney wood & 
coal range $150. oak wardrobe 
$99.50. Mel's Bargains. 3460 
Quadra St. 384 3152. Chargex 
and Mastercharge available 


APPLIANCES 


tee. $85 and up. 
Douglas. 


^Unbelievable Gigantics 
OPENING SALE 
Hundreds of Items of used furni¬ 
ture and goods that must be 
cleared Saf and Sun. 478-3221. 

MEDITERRANEAN CRAIG 
stereo cabinet and solid wood 
dresser and chest of drawers. 
.383-1927. _ 

8' USED KITCHEN COUNTER, 
double stainless steel sink, taps. 
Two 43X21” counters. 4X8' win- 
bow 477-2833_ 

CRAFTSMAN 10" RADIAL 
arm saw, metal cabinet stand, 
$380. Cement mixer 2.7 cu. ft. 
load, motor, $170 384-0764, 

TWIN SIZE BED. SEALY BOX 
mattress, teak bed head on cast 
ers and quilted bed cover and 
blankets. 59S-7720_ 

ELECTROLUX VACUUM 
cleaner and carpet shampooer 
complete with all attachments. 
Good condition. 656-5976_ 

REASONABLY PRICED SIN- 
gle beds box spring units, like 
new Can be bought individually 
or pair . 477-9897,_ 

2 PIECE GOLD CHESTER 
field $150. Loveseat as new $175. 
Kitchen set round dropleaf table 
$95. 656-4984_ 

2 CAPTAINS BEDS WITH MAT- 
tresses and castors. Asking $100 
each or best offer. Also fridge. 
best offer 592 4457_ 

SANDWANDA EMERALD .85 
carats, purchase Inquiries PO 
Box 783, Station E. Victoria. 
V8W2L9, _ 

VACUUMS 

Eureka and Hoover. Sawyer 
Sewing Centre. 388-6228._ 

CERAMIC TILE. JAPANESE 
and Italian direct Import prices 
from 654-SS. per sq ft 386-2812 

9-^I^CE/WALNUT DINING 

s,one chcss set - 

EIGHT BAGS MANURE, SOIL, 
chips, or bark, $11 delivered 
592-7068 _ 

GRAVEL OR SAND. $18 NEW 
cement slabs, 954 delivered 
592-7068 _ 

GOLD CHAINS, 14 KARAT, A 
real bargain. 656-41 1 1 or 
656-5328.__ 

FRIDGE, CHAIR. DINETTE 
set. *8-737 Vancouver Street, 
between 4 and 6 only,_ 

VINTAGE TABLES $75 $130; 
kitchen table $30; small trunks 
$5-$20 383-3128_ 

STIHL 085 chainsaw. Ex¬ 
cellent shape, $300 firm. Ask tor 
Merydle, 479-7066_ 

OUTDOOR INCINERATOR 
barrels. Ready for use. $6.95 de- 
llvered-383-1328._ 

45-GALLON OAK WHISKEY 
barrels, good condition. $17.50 
383-1328. _ 

GOLD BRACELET, BEAUTI- 
ful handcrafted, old gold. 
386 3028 _ 

MOVING MUST SELL, STORE 
showcases and counter, 
479-7477. _ 

COMPRESSOR 

Staole guns and spring hinges. 
477 7912. _ 

FORENTA DRY CLEANING 
press, Clssell form finisher for 
sale. 479-8161. _ 

CARPETING AND UNDER 
lav, 54 sq. yds, best offer. Excel- 
lent condition. 479 8158_ 

HIDEABED, BAR STOOLS, 
utility table, books, records, 
slide trays, etc. 477-1132_ 

NEW CUSTOM MADE HAS- 
sock Avocado green leather- 
ette Cushion top. 595-1641 

SMALL SIZE SOFT PLEATED 

green tweed skirt, worn once, $40 
or best offer . 383-1939._ 

ANTIQUE OAK CARVED 
rocker, needs repairs. Color TV. 
$35 each 479-1781 


GARAGE DOOR OPENER. 
$125. Two chair-bed combine 
tlons. $100 each. 478-5219_ 

DELUXE MODEL TRIM-GYM. 
floor model tummy trimmer, $60 
or best offer tor both. 384 8401. 

SPANISH WEODING DRESS, 
size 12, full and lacev $75 Over 
$300new. After 4:30,383-7717, 

NEW 8V 4 MILWAUKEE CON- 
struction skill saw, $125. 
386-9517. __ 

ROUND OR SPLIT CEDAR 
fence posts, cut to vour speclfi 
cations. 652-4870_ 

FREE STANDING FIRE 
place, never used, $ 200 . 20 gallon 
propane tank, full, $60 474-1826 

WOMANS LINED BURGANDY 
leather coat, like new, size 10 , 
$175 479-6359._ 

NEW STARRETT 0-4" Mi¬ 
crometer and inside gauges. 
Asking $180 Doug, 479-4723 

BRASS FIRESCREEN, BUGGY 
cage with stand, $20 each. Want 
ed Little Smoker. 479-5983. 

SOLID GOLD CHAIN ANO 
pendant. Reasonable. Call 
383-8648_ 

LLOYD STEREO; ELAAN 
skis; portable record player. 
477-6402._ 

3'X6' POOL TABLE, 2 SETS 
balls, 2 cues, oood condition. $75. 
477-3081._ 

MOVING SALE. PIANO, DAN- 
Ish furniture, carpets, and much 
more. 477-9183._ 

7000' '/»" HARD COPPER 
pipe; 24 cu.ft. freezer. 388-6493. 
after 6 pm. _ 

LARGE SOLID BRASS 8 LIGHT 
chandelier made in Holland, new 
price $650 asking $500. 592-9311 

V„ LENGTH BLACK PERSIAN 
coat, size 14-16, $400 or otters. 
382-6681_ 

WARDROBES WOOD GRAIN 
finish, 2 doors and bottom drsw- 
er 6'hlgh 3'tong, 2'deep 477-9897. 

BRAND NEW BEAUTYREST* 

- - Ai 


queen size n 
$250 478-6414. 


size mattress for sale, 


BEIGE BROCADE ARM 
chair, $65. Amber coloured swag 
lamp, $30. 479-77S4. 


C-4 


too 


MISCUUNEOVS 
FM SHE 


HARRY. 477-6534 
Non glare and regular picture 
glass, wide selection of attrac¬ 
tive Venetian blinds Repairs on 
screens and screen doors 
TRY ME, I'M RE ASONABLE 

tradeswXnted 

Used microwaves. TV's or 
stereos wanted as trade-ins HO 
MARK. 27 W Burnside Rd 
381-5622 _ 

SPEEDQUEEN WASHER AND 
dryer, Kenmore washer and 
dryer, McClary frost-free 
fridge. Viking stove, apartment- 
size washer, deepfreeze. 
479 3231_ 

1930'S OPERA COAT WITH 
hood, black velvet, full length, 
worn once, size 9, $60. Wine co¬ 
loured evening dress, nicely 
styled, never worn, size 9, $45 
595 4707_ 

MOVING. WASHER. DRYER, 
dishwasher, Singer sewing ma¬ 
chine Console, bedroom suites, 
chesterfield, recliner, antiaue 
buffet hall chair, vanity, etc 
Reasonable. 381-0391. 


NEW DEALER 
MCCULLOCH 
Service-Parts 
D & R Mowers 
615 Chatham 
384-5551 


SUEDE COAT, LIGHT BROWN, 
Mink collar and gjffs, quilted 
lined, size 10-12, $200. CalMength 
brown leather coat, size 8-10, 
$100. Both excellent condition. 
477-9489. 


Have l Moosun BO 209 and l Colt 
model airplane, unbuilt. 1 TCR 
racing set, 50-60 ft of track, all 
accessories, offers. 721-3617 
after 6pm._ 

RENOVATION SALE OLD 
house. Wooden oas stoves, stair 
case and railing, modern oil fur 
nace, hot water heater, 250 gal¬ 
lon tank, lumber 1128 Ormond 
St 9 5pm._ 

14 KARAT GOLD CHARM 
bracelet and 4 pairs of 14 karat 
oold earrings, 1 with diamonds, 

2 14 karat oold necklaces, dia 
mond dinner ring, silver charm 
bracelet, etc. 595-7720. 

WOOL SALE 

6 ply Buffalo-Siwash. $3.99 
YARNS UNLIMITED 
1407 Government St 384-5012 

WOODEN BI-FOLD DOORS 
and hardware. 2 pair, I3'4"x6'. T- 

e air, 7'6"x6'. Fiberglass wooden 
ox floats. Open to offers. 
656-2810_ 

10GALLON AQUARIUM, WITH 
hood and accessories. Fiber 
glass and wood skateboard 
decks, $8 each. Also wheels and 
trucks. 477-6120._ 

2 SPEED ADJUSTABLE UP 
right vacuum for $175. 25 pound 
capacity Pansonlc microwave 
with defrost $400 382-2128 be- 
tween 3- 5pm_ 

12' FIBERGLASS SPEED 
boat mould. $375. Briags and 
Stratton gas motor, 5np. $75. 
Jabsco water pump, model 
*9990, $25.656-7518_ 

AS NEW9X12 TAPESTRY CAR 
pet, avacado and betoe, $400 4 

E family room group sette, 
ve seat, chair and stool, as 
new, $350, cost $650. 595-0502 

12X17 GREEN RUG WITH UN 
derlay, good clean condition, 
$75; treadle sewing machine in 
wooden cabinet, working order, 
$150.592 9098._ 

DEMOLITION MATERIAL 
Doors, ?x4's. 2x6's, 2x8's, 2xl0's. 
2 xl2's, lx8shipiap, large beams, 
plywood, incinerator barrels, 
misc-1081 Dunford. 474-1096 

TWO 39" SIMMONS POSTUR 
pedic mattresses, almost new. 
$75 each or best offer. Two pad 
ded 36” beige headboards, $20. 
478-4428. _ 

KITCHEN CABINETS, COM 
plete with sink, taps and arbor ite 
top from 14 year-old home Ask 
Ing $175. Help to remove. 
479-1357,_ 

INCINERATOR BARRELS. 
$7.50 delivered. Screens, covers, 
extra. Old barrels removed, 
extracharoe. Also clean barrels 
$10. Prompt delivery, 479-4067. 

VERY LIGHT CHESTER 
field and chair and 2 small 
chairs, floor to ceiling copper 
light stand; must sell this week 
end, cheap 477 4044 or 477-8386. 

APPROX. 90 YARDS ACRILAN 
carpel, two-tone green and two 
tone beige, foam underpad. $400 
403 1157 Fairfield, phone 
383-4007_ 

ROCKWELL SHAPER AND 
router with carbide heads and 
cutters, cost new $2600, sell!no 
$1450. Everything in top condl 
tlon. 384 5154,385-8872._ 

COWHIDE JACKET, SIZE 40. 
Western style, brand 
"Sprung," fan-colored, cream 
acrylic pile lining, four pockets 
total. Asking$85 381-1016. 

HOOVER SPIN DRY WASHER, 
$65. Brass finish firescreen 
42"x28”, $15. 12 volt tride char 
gcr. $7. Roof rack and box with 
cover, $14, 382 9474,_ 

645-14 SNOWTIRES ON RIMS 
for Ford. S bolt, $35 Polished 
brass firescreen, $12 50 Fisher 
Price garage and parkade; $10 

384 5176. _J. 

23 CU FT FREEZER IN EX 
cellent condition, $325. Heatila 
tor, costing $56 for $35. Chester 
field $55 or offers. B&W tv, $35. 
721-3418.__ 

10 SPEED BOYS BIKE, $75 
Patio screen door, $5. 2 golf 
carts, $10 each. One Argus slide 
protector and trays, $35. 477-7461 
after 6 pm. _ 

LARGE SPIRAL PLANT 
stand also stand for fern. Bovs 
aoes 6-10 mlsc. hockey equip¬ 
ment. Boy's size 4 skates, good 
condition, reasonable. 385-1804. 

RECORDS PLUS- VICTORIA'S 
latest new and used record store, 
many imports. 102 Maynard 
51 H °" rs 

Vi-PRICE GOLD SALE! 

Peter Lax. Goldsmith 
230 Menzles St., James Bay 

CHAINSAWS 

Alt Becker and Son Ltd. 

2981 Tllllcum_384 6414 

BABY'S BUGGY AND BABY'S 
bath change table, dog's cage. 
M 2 34 M mPef Assorted clothes. 

KENMORE PORTABLE DISH 
washer $225, 10 cu. ft. freezer 
$200, brand new kerosene heater 
575. 478-5219._ 

AS NEW LINED HARVEST 
gold dr aoes, 148x96, $225,148x84, 
$200 Two light fixtures, $10 
each 382-3734,_ 

TWO SCHOOL DESKS, ONE 
wooom, one metal, $15 each, 
cedar fence posts $1.50 each_ 
382-7430. _^ 

SIZE BOXSPRING AND 
mattress, oood condition. $ 100 . 
New Sears fireplace, all access- 
ories, black $200.652-2860. 

BAGS FOR YOUR HOOVER 
vacuum cleaner. We carry the 
complete line at Singer Sewino 
Centre. Hillside Mall, 59S-4S45 

TWO SINGLE BEDS, PADDED 
headboards; older dresser; 
nearly new wringer washer; 
chest of drawers. l446Westall. 

RARE HOWARD POCKET 
watch $250. Schick hood hair 
dryer, fable r -'**• — 

385-6486 


! model, $30. Phorte 


4X8 POOL TABLE WALNUT 
finish, excelienf condiflon. $375. 
652-1867._ 

BEETHOVEN BI-CENTEN. 
rHal collection of records, com¬ 
plete set. 386-0345 evenings. 


BC ALUMINUM, 479-7121 


DRAFTING TABLE, $100. 
After Spm, 383-9579. 


16' TWIN AXLE HEAVY DUTY 
utility trailer. Covered. 381-0291 


17 OUNCES OF SCRAP STER- 
ling silver, $600,592-0482 


MARQUETTE ENGINE ANA 
lysizer *40^175.478r3712. 
































































































































































































































































































































































































C-5 

TOO MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 

CRAFTSMAN RADI ALARM 
saw, *175. Toilet and tub *50. 
Logging boots, 8&10, *75. Motor- 
cvcle helmut *30. 595-040) 

DRAPES TO FIT WINDOW 24' 
wide bv 84" high. Woven fabric, 
orange/vellow mixture. *100 or 
best offer , 384-15Q6._ 

PORTABLE CASSETTE, 2 
crystal vases, pewter mugs, 
leather boots 11 , leather brief- 
cases 479-5485._ 

GOOD HIGHBACK BROWN 
tweed, rolled arm couch and 
chair. *150. Lawnbov lawn 
mower, 21" cut. *175.385-2639. 

TELEPHONE ANSWERING 
machine, cheque writer, office 
safe, filing cabinet/desK. exer¬ 
cise bike, cash register. 598-9849 

LAWNMOWERS. REEL TYPE. 
Yardman, 18", 2 HP, *125. Atco 
14". *95. Electric Weed Eater, 
S2S, Phone evenings, 478-1023. 

NEW SOLID RED TENNES- 
see cedar chest, handmkd*' 
beautifully carved, on roll cast- 
ers, *500 firm. 479-0134._ 

PERSIAN OR EAST INDIAN 
CARPETSWANTED 
in various sizes by private buyer 
for own home. 592-3664._ 

A4 ROLLED RIM. CLAW FOOT 
bathtubs *50 a piece. Chester¬ 
field, offers. View at 1230 Styles 
Street. See caretaker._ 

FOR SALE, BOX SPRING, 
men's size 10 ice skates, Timex 
watches, size 5 ladles skates, 
S95-8328. _ 

CAMPER/VAN ROOF RACKS, 
steel structural*; Industrial, 
electrical and plumbing flttlnos; 
and more. 841 station Avenue 

HAND-CRAFTED LOVESEAT 
and occasional chair. Olln skis. 
Marker bindings, Ralchle boots, 
size 8 and poles. 385-6252. 


DOUBLE BOX SPRING AND* 
mattress, moffat 24” range, 
desk, chest, vanity and stool. 
Kitchen table. 477-7369. _ 

10X18 GARAGE FOR SALE, TO 
be moved, trees to be cut down 
for firewood, also used red 
bricks 598-7052. 


FIVE SMALL BRITISH INDIA 
scatter mats, assorted shapes, 
new. *175 each. 383-0997. 


18" LAWNBOY GAS MOWER 
with grass catcher, oood condi¬ 
tion. S«) 592-0081 after 5. 


LARGE ARM CHAIR *50. 
upholstered rocker *30, Gerrard 
turntable. 595-3795. 


SIX SOLID FIR INTERIOR 
doors, 30"x78" 595-5461. 


WATER DISTILLER, *150. 
Phone 382-7457. 


DESK *85. MIRROR, RADIO, 
lamps 1270 May Street. 


WEDDING DRESS SIZE 12, 
cotton lace, as new, *95.598-4768. 


200' 4” DRAIN TILE, 208; 2 
sump pumps, *30. 383-0974 


PERSIAN CARPETS 4X5, 
3V,X7 Best offer. 595-7186 


6' MARBLE VANITY TOP AND 
2 mag wheels cheap. 477-H84. 


101 CHIL0RENS 
MISCELLANEOUS 

ROUND-A-BOUT 

CHILDRENS CLOTHES 
We will sell quality used chil¬ 
drens clothing. 1005 View, Tues- 
sat, 10-5 p.m. 385-6552_ 

JOLLY JUMPER. PLAYTEX 
nurser kit, plush yellow bunting 
bag, girl's clothing newborn to 
3X, excellent condition. 478-5113 
evenings._ 

CUDDLE SEAT, *2 SNUGGLI. 
*20 Swing—O—Matlc, *25. 
Older car seat, *10. Musical mo¬ 
bile, *10. Mothercare baby 
bouncer. *12.656-2164 _ 

WANTED FOR CONSIGN- 
ment Handmade children relat¬ 
ed items - dolls, toys, baby out- 
fits etc. 477-1073_ 

WANTEO: BUGGY. CHANGE 
table, playpen, crib, snuoglie, 
car seat , 382-2062 _ 

FOR SALE. CRIB, HIGH 
chair, Snugli, walker, and 
clothes. 479-5955 


103 


NISCtLUNIOUS 

WANTED 


GOLD 

SILVER 

DIAMONDS 

STERLING 

SILVERC0INS 

Come in for free 
appraisals. 

No obligations. 

UNIVERSAL 
Trading Centre 

584 JOHNSON 383-9512. 


EVERYWED7PM 
AND SAT 1:30PM 

WE BUY, SELL 8, APPRAISE 
CONSIGNMENTS WANTED 
2036OAK BAY AVENUE 

592-5111 


iSPE 

GUNS 


INT KNIVES} 
LTD. 


GUNSWANTED 
Rifles —Pistols—Shotguns 
BUY for cash 
SE LL on consignment 
TRADE for goods 

576 Yates _ 383-2422 


NEEDCASH? 

WE BUYGUNS 
OF ALLTYPES 

1307 Broad 385-3429 

Wanted for Cash 

Jewelr^of|dH kinds,, diamonds. 


Also good cameras, musical in¬ 
struments, tools and all person- 
sal goods of value. We buy, 
pawn, sell.'' 

ISLANDCOLLATERAL 
620 JOHNSON (AT BROAD) 


SCRAP GOLD AND SILVER 
Purchased for cash, also Gold 
and Silver Jewellery, pocket 
watches, medals and Military 
Items. Silverware, Brassware, 
Antique furniture. Collectors 
Corner Antiques Ltd. 829 Fort 
Street, 386-1155. 


WANTED KEY CUTTING MA- 
chine, small parts bln, oood type¬ 
writer. international Knives 

383-2422. 


103 


MISCELLANEOUS 

WANTED 


COUPLE FURNISHING 
home. Needed-1 pair of drapes, 
good wood coffee table, dining 
room table and chairs, vacuum, 
2 lamps. 1 floor lamp, l painting 
or prints, vanity with mirror, 
plant stand and fireplace access 
orles. No dealers. 479-2322. 

I AM COLLECTING ALL 
Items made from war time brass 
shell casino such as vases, book- 
ends, ashtrays, cigarette 
holders, humidors, letter open¬ 
ers, etc. Also want military 
swagger sticks, drill canes and 
badges Phone anytime 598-2327, 

CASH 

Vintage clothing, fur* and ac¬ 
cessories. 11-5. 384-4547 after 6, 
385-9878. 577 Johnson. The Bay 
Window._ 

THE SALVATION ARMY 
needs vour clothing, furniture, 
household goods. "Help us to 
help others." Family Thrift 
Stores. Victoria, Sidney, Lang¬ 
ford For Pickup— 386-3295 


WANTED-1 WOOL CARPET 
9x12, Rogers silver plated flat- 
ware for 8, odd pieces of Royal 
Albert petit-point china, 1 Dun¬ 
can phyfe and table. Please 
phone 479-5400,_ 

WANTED: VENETIAN 
blinds: 8'x4'4'\ 3'2x3*10, 3*2x4‘3, 
2’3x5'6, 3*6x1'I. 3'6x4'2, Hx3'2. 
White or Ivory only. Must be In 
good condition. Can be slightly 
wider or longer . 385-5150. 

URGENTLY REQUIRED 
Refrigerators, freezers, auto¬ 
matic washers, dryers, ranges, 
dishwashers. Phoenix 
Appliances, 384-0423. 


WASHERS, KENMORE. 
inoils, Whirlpool, Speed Queen, 
simplicity; moat makes dryers, 
ranges less than 15 yrs., working 
or not. 478-2313,478-5449. 

Beer Bottles and cans 604 doz, 
soft drink bottles, old car bat¬ 
teries, radiators, copper, brass. 
lead etc. 526 Oavld, 383-1328,8-4. 

GOLDSTREAM TRADING 

WE BUY 

478-4332._ 

DIAMONDS 8. GOLD WANTED 
Cash for your diamonds and 
rings In any condition. Universal 
Trading, 584 Johnson, 383-9512. 

WE PAY CASH FOR ALL 
square cornered fridges, stoves, 
washers, dryers, deep freezes, 
working of not. 384-5721_ 

WHEELBARROW CON5TRUC- 
tlon type, pnoevatic tire. Any 
condlfionl Paul 479-3716, 

UTILITY TRAILER OR BOAT 
trailer, washer and dryer, fridge 
and stove, deepfreeze, W-ton 
truck. 479-3231._ 

CASH FOR GOOD USED REC- 
ords and prerecorded cassette 
1 -ille, 330 Marigold. 


tapes, Disc-o-flli 
9-6,479-5413. 


CASH PAID FOR YOUR USED 
appliances, furniture, CMlecf- 
ibles or what have you, house- 
fulls to a handful 1.4784)719, 

FENDERS FOR 1956 F700 
Ford truck. Also 100 pound pro¬ 
pane tanks. 2 or 3 ton floor lack. 
642-4562._— ^ 

RIDING MOWER. PREFER- 
ably with grass catcher, also ro- 
♦otlller, good condition. Eve¬ 
nings, 6567785-_ 

DOUBLE PEDESTAL DESK 
with typewriter storage in left 
pedestal. Good condition. 
592-1551. 


P . R J V M E COLLECTOR 
wishes to buy diamonds with or 
without settings. Best prices 
paid 479-8541. 


SELL OLD BOOKS TO THE 
HAUNTEOBOOKSHOP 
_382 1427_ 

CASH FOR MILITARY 
badges — medals — bayonets. 
Colin McIntosh 479-2362._ 

WANTED: OLD TOYS, METAL 
toy banks, old tobacco tins. 

384-5284 after Spm,_ 

WANTED: CHINA PLATES 
R^S^PYussla. R.S. Germany. 

LARGE SHELVES. DESK 
chair, occasional chair, small 
table, dresser. 658-5538._ 

WANTED: WASHER SPIN 
dryer, double bed, dinette, ml sc. 
furnishings. 382-7154,_ 

WANTED-SMALL FREEZER, 
bar fridge, automatic washer. 
Working or not, 384-0423._ 

WE WILL PICKUP YOUR OLD 
appliances, scrap iron, bundled 
newspapers. 3866938._ 

FRIDGES, SQUARE COR- 
nered. working or not. 478-2313, 
478-5449. _ 

WANTED: ALUMINIUM GAR- 
den shed and travel trailer. 
_382-2062_ 

WANTED-36" BAR FOR 
older McCulloch chain saw. 
Phone 478-3983. 

WANTED: BO/CT APPROXI- 
mately IS*. *400 or under, troll- 
er? 652-4101._ 

WANTED: GOODSNOWTIRES 
G78-15 and ••'O* toboggan. 

388-4173.__ 

1950'S RECORDS, ESPECIAL- 
lv 45's Elvis Presley, Hank 
Williams, etc. 592-S7&4_ 

WANTED: SETSOF POTS AND 

B ns. used. Reasonable. Phone 

5-5131._ 

WANTED: WELSH ORESSER 
or similar, plastic plant boxes. 
478-2563. _ 

WANTED: CEMENT MIXER 
wittwt motor or wheels. Phone 

MAXWELL BATES 
Cash prices paid by collector for 
paintings by the above. 385-261S 

WANTED: GIRL'S ICE 
skates, size 3 and wooden stu- 
dents desk .652-1363._ 

WANTEDOLDLIGHT GLOBES 
with sharp glass tip. Phone 
592-4478._ 

WANTED MINTON "GOLD 
658*59?6*" ChlnM 10 * et - 

WANTED: STERLING SIL- 
ver. Scrap Sliver and Gold and 
Brie shares. 656-6834._ 

FRIDGES, SQUARE COR- 
nered, bought. 383-7213 All Temp 

3& T M MEWT MIXE,> ' 

WANTED: OLD BAKING CABI- 
net. 5954)875. 


WANTEDl *ADI< 
llr. 


of repair .Phone 479-: 


OS IN t 
79-7556. 


OLDER PIANO WANTED 
around *600 cash. 477-1933. 

ra^ D i^ iTY trai1 -- 

WANTED: USED PLANK 
flooring. 652-4722_ 

SMALL OAK CHINA CABINET. 
hall stand, desk. 595-3092. 

WANTED 1 PAIR OF GOOD 
G70X15 tire*. 479-3056. 

105 MUfiim.ES 

MOVING SALE 


tools, toys, games, carpets. 
TV's, books, bowling balls, golf 
clubs and chesterfield and much 
more. 3905 Cnerr I lee Crescent. 

MOVING SALE, HOUSEHOLD 
yrnlture, pi no pong table, 65 
Valient, Tee-Pee trailer. Pio¬ 
neer chainsaw, canopy, miscel¬ 
laneous. Sat-Sun 10-4.4370 Fleid- 
mont off Shelbourne and 
Roblnwood._ 

FAMILY GARAGE SALE. 
Lighting and fluorescent light¬ 
ing, windows with screen*, 
household Items, toys end cloth¬ 
ing. 7922 Patterson Rd. Sotur- 
day, KMpm. 652-4853._ 

MOVING SALE. BEDROOM 
sulfa, 110 apartment stove, 
desks, hldeabed, miscellaneous 
household articles. Frjdav 


through Sunday, 
478-6203. 


7 Tecfane, 


115 GAJU6C SAliS 

BASEMENT SALE >573 DEN- 
man St. side door. Sunday, Feb¬ 
ruary 17th. 10-3:30. Skate 
boards, childrens clothes, step 
tables, scope, etc._ 

BABY ITEMS ANDMISCELLA 
neous items. Friday, Saturday, 
Sunday, 10am-4pm. 1309 Bur- 
lelth Cras. 

^ U A .?v E .^M^ N 3?.Vr1 

GARAGE SALE. 1129 DERRIN- 
berg Road, 10 anrto 4 pm Sotvr- 
day and Sunday, 652-1346. 

GARAGE SALE. 495 DAVIDA 
Ave., 8-4 Saturday and Sunday. 

GARAGE SALE. 1680 SAN 
Juan off Shelbourne, Sunday. 

115 SWAPS 

1962 75 HP. JOHNSON ELEC- 
trk, alternator, and tachometer. 
Trade for 20 or 30 hp. motor. 
Prefer Johnson. Never In salt 
water. Excellent condition. 
595-5938 after 5:30 weekdays, an- 
yt l me week ends._ 

KENT ELECTRIC GUITAR. 60 
watts solid state amp, *140 or 
swao tor chainsaw. 381-0273 or 
388-4629. _ 

RELUCTANTLY SELLING Ex¬ 
cellent one of a kind 1975 Dodoe 
Special. Need older truck In 
trade. 3834)572._ 

19641 BUICK SPECIAL, RUNS, 
needs some work, will swap for 
10-speed In good shape. 386-2570. 

JX4 LANDROVER. *3,000 RE 
build. Warn hubs. Swap for best 
boat outfit or 7 6566806._ 

1972 23' FULLY EQUIPPED 
travel trailer, swap boat, cash. 
384-3329._ 

1976 DODGE RAMCHARGER 
swap cash and pickup. 652-3448 

111 C0MS STAMPS 

SALE 

The Stamp Mart Is moving from 
811 «27 A Fori Street In order 
to fMilitate our move, we are 
reducing stock All albums and 
supplies at 10% off. Shbwgard 
mounts. 25% off. Packets, 20% 
oft. Many other Items too nu¬ 
merous to mention at greatly 
reduced prices. _ 

INVESTORS SPECIAL 
Trade vour silver dollars 1967 
and before, for .999 pure Engel¬ 
hard sliver bars. 3V» silver dol 
lars for loz Dure silver. 50oz. 
and 20oz. bars available while 
supply lasts. Call 743-2994 or call 
operator ask for Duncan mobile 
J J9-3568. _ 

WE BUY AND SELL CANA 
dlan and US slver coins 

CAPITAL CITY 
COINS & STAMPS 

*100 BURNSIOE RD. W. 

_383-2634_ 

SILVER COINS WANTEO! 
Canada 1967 and prior, U S. 1964 
and prior, G.B. 1946 and prior, 
Olympic sliver coins. John & 
Glenda Cheramy, no nickels 
needed. 384-7622. _ 

49.230 OZ. FINE SILVER BAR 

-wif * — 


_ _.VER 

with assay certificate. *2,560 Ca¬ 
nadian (cash). 450 Burnside 
East. _ 

10OZ FINE SILVER INGOTS 
with assay certificates. *543 Ca¬ 
nadian (cash). 450 Burnside 
East _ 

WE BUY SILVER COINS AND 
sterling Universal Tradlno 
Centre, 383-9512 _ 

„ BUYING SILVER COINS 
Best prices paid, will pick up. 
592-1675. _ 

RETIRED JEWELLER 
needs silver or gold coins. Will 
pay premium price. 598-3684. 

BUYING SILVER COINS, BET 
ter prices than deal — — 

383 8744 


n dealers. 382-4029, 


SELLING CANADIAN SILVER 
coins, serious Inquiries only, 
385-8290. 

WANTED: SILVER COINS, 
sterling, etc. 3834311,595-7567, 

117 AIU1Q0CS i«4 ACTS 

THE END ISNEAR 

Our year end sale starts Sat. 
Feb lath at 11am. Oak 8-12 pee., 
dining suites, magnificent 
burled 9 pee dining suite. Chip¬ 
pendale and Rennalssance revi¬ 
val parlor suites, plus many 
Items under 1200 ; oak ward¬ 
robes, small tables, over stuffed 
chairs, sets of 4 chairs, oak cap¬ 
tains chairs, grandpa rockers, 
what not stands, etc. 30% off 
brass Open 7 days, most nights, 
only 15 min from town, financing 
• V *M. °AC. Petes Place 786 
Golds tr earn, 478-6000 _ 

SCRAP GOLD AND SILVER 
Purchased for cash, also Gold 
and Silver Jewellery, pocket 
watches, medals and Military 
items. Silverware, Brassware, 
Antique furniture. Collectors 
Corner Antiques Ltd. 829 Fort 
Street, 386- lisT _ 

MASTERPIECE 
Exquisite bureau cabinet, made 
in Germany, ebonlsed with 
TV. carvings. Very ornate, 
/ Inlaid, double marble top, 
entlne front, excellent con- 


ebony carvings, very 
Ivory Inlaid, double mgr_ _ 
serpentine front, excellent con¬ 
dition, *5,700. 383-1233 leave 
number. _ 

ANTIQUE OAK. MUST SELL. 
Barley twist, 6glece, dining site, 
*1000 Telephone table, *75. 
Carved hlgh&ack chair with cu¬ 
shioned seat, *100. 598 2980 or 
656-5751 Monday-Thursday after 
5pm. _ 

GRAND PIANO 

Antique 7' piano In superb Rose¬ 
wood case. C1830. Recently re¬ 
built and restored, offers on 
*6500 to view please call 4774)6)6 
eves. 

1920 OVERSTUFFED LIVING 
room suite, wing chair and otto¬ 
man In rose velvet; chesterfield 
and chair In imported tapestry 

JACOBEAM STYLE DARK 
oak oval dining room fable, six 
chairs, original leather seats, 
cane nsert backs, <$*lna cabinet 
and side board. Excellent condl- 
tlon. 595-5461. _ 

WANTED: GEORGIAN FUR 
niture, oriental rugs, sliver, 
clocks,etc. TOP PRICES PAID. 
D.Robinson. 1019 Fort, 384-642S. 

ANTIQUE RESTORATION 
and reproduction, highest qual- 
^craftsmanship. Dove West. 

WANTED: GEORGIAN SIL- 
verware, Victorian silverware, 
old sliver. Private collector. 
384 -3040. 

CASH FOR OLD OIL PAINT 
logs, antique and estate lewe- 
lery. Brandon's. 18 Centennial 
Square. 3854)623. _ 

WANTED: COCA COLA SERV 
Ing trays, change trays, toys and 
other advertising items. 478-2203 
after 6pm. _ 

OLD ENGLISH PINE MARBLE 
top wash stand. Pair brass car- 

598$849 amPS ' C0PP * r kett,e - 


PERSIANOR EAST INDIAN 
CARPETSWANTED 
In various sizes bv private buyer 
for own home. 992-3664. _ 

FINEST QUALITY IRISH 
linen double damask hand 
hemmed table cloth. 70x90; 12 
napkins. >150. Phone 595-6016. 

FIRESCREEN 3'6"X5' HIGH, 
approx. 200 years old; needle- 
point hand done mahogany 
frame and stand. 656-5002. 

FURNITURE REPAIRED. AN 
•» our specialty. Phone 




WANTEO: HIGH-QUALITY 
Canadian art. Phone 
112-228-1589, Private. 


ORIENTAL CARPETS, NO- 
madlc kilims and wall hangings. 
598-9495. _ 

400 DAY CLOCK, SILK SHADE 
ANTIQUE LEATHER BAR 


DISK % CUT 
W VMTS 0,d ' ,,,50 ° 


120 fiJUtDOl SUPPLIES 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 




SAANWOOD FARMS LTD. 
Cow manure. 652-2026 or 
652-1743. No Sunday calls please. 

PENDRAY FARMS LTD., COW 
manure, 6 yards *48, delivered. 

477-1519_ 

NO. 1 STRAIGHT OLD COW 
manure, 4 yards *38,7 yards *52, 
bags *2.25.5954)773_ 

COW MANURE, LITTLE BED- 
dlng. 777 Kangaroo. 478-1876. Let 
Phone ring. 

CHICKEN MANURE. 
_478-3612._ 

U BAG CHICKEN, 25« BAG. 
Cow, pig, S4.9S truck. 652-3501. 

FOR SALE, HORSE MANURE, 
dirt cheap. 477-9969. 

PUxriit&Rotmafei 

miCmtHht 

OON'SYRACTOR SERVIC6 

477-3913 

We rotovate, plow, cut grass and 
brush; also loading andhauling 

4 BROTHERS — ALL AREAS 
Hand Tillers, Tractors 
479-6112. 

Ted* and Supplies 

SEARS ROTO SPADER, 8 HP. 
reverse gear. New, *350. 

ROTORSPADER, 7 HP. RE- 
condltioned, *200.595-1860. 

SCREENBO TOP SOIL 
manure and sand, * 12 /' 
ery extra. Sterilized 
by bag E. Nixon * 

Nlf"*-- 


WITH 
*12/vd. Oellv 
ed potting soil 

. ... Ltd. 478-6511; 

Ights 479-1937,479-2995 


Dll- 

livered 


1. Top quality topsoil de- 
In Victoria area. 10-20 


• 1 SHREDDED BLACK LOAM, 
4 yards *48; 7 yards *72; bag* 
*2 25 each. 595-8129. 


125 PET* and SUPPLIES 

GREATER VICTORIA DOG 
Obedience Training Club phone 

477-2145. Puppies taken at all 
times during the course. 
592-7310. _ _ 

25 GALLON AQUARIUM. ALL 
accessories Including silent 
jhant pump, fluorescent hood. 


dr 


WANTED: GOOD HOME FOR 
two dogs, brother and sister, 6 
months old, half lab. half Golden 
Retriever. Very friendly. Phone 
386-5502. _ 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER/IRISH 
Setter cross, 10 months old, 
spayed female with shots to good 
479 276^ w, Ih space. *100. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER PURE 
bred, 1 year old Obedlance 
trained. Good on the gun won¬ 
derful with children No papers 
*200.642-4009. _ 

REGISTERED GOVERN- 
ment Doberman Pinscher pup- 
pies from Champion stock. 
246-4267 or 746-4332. _ 

BEFORE BUYING A PUPPY 
call Victoria City Kennel Club 
‘'Watchdog” for advice. 
477-9781, _ 

REGISTERED YORKSHIRE 
Terrier puppies, ready to go 
April 1, *300 firm. Call 248-9649 

between 6 and 8 pm 


NEEO GOOD COUNTRY 
home for well-behaved purebred 
Irish Setter, 2 years old. 
3864)970, _ 

TANSY-FEMALE GOLDEN 
lab cross Needs good country 
home. Gentle family dog. 
384 7142 nights. __ 

APRICOT TOY POODLE, 
four months old, purebred, not 
registered. Needs shots. *175. 

DON'T PUSSYFOOT AROUND! 
Now is the time to soav or neuter 
and stop littering. Animals' Cru 
saders, 3869837. _ 

HANDSOME GOOD NATURED 
Registered Male German Shetv 
herd, *150 to a loving home. 
749-6106. _ 

WANT TO PLACE 10 MONTH 
male racoon, domestic. Prefer¬ 
ably with other racoon. Messaoe 
Phone 382-8817 _ 

REGISTERED BLACK LA 
brador puppies Excellent tern- 
P^r^ment and conformation. 

BABY COCKATIELS, 12 
weeks old. Whites, pleds and 
normals Glen Lake Aviaries. 

478-6428. _ 

TAKLA SHELTIES, REG'D 
sable puppies available. 479-5939 
evenings. _ 

WANTED-YOUNG SIAMESE 
cat. must be suited to indoor apt. 
living. Please phone 386-4039. 

FOR SALE, SIBERIAN HUS- 
kev. 18 months, well-treined, 
male, 479-2428. _ 

7 MONTH OLD PUREBRED 
mi|f Germ an Shepherd, 


briicla *78 JTol oroomer * ••• 


30-GALLON TANK. ALL Ac¬ 
cessories and fish, *100 or best 
offer. 477 3660. _ 

WANTED: 20 GALLON FISH 
'US*!.#* ** supplies. 

479-4583. _ 

PUPPIES*10TOGOOO HOME. 
Lab and SoIukT cross. Colour 
mainly white. 598-3182. _ 

2 TAME CHIPMUNKS ANO 

*n-tm c,at S9S !0 ' S ‘ 

BLACK LAB PUPPIES TO 
good homes. 20 Midwood Road. 
479-7836 after 5:30pm. _ 

.. MINIATURE PINSCHERS 
^6^30?^ ^ 7 **** 

TWO YEAR OLD SPAYED 
Irish Setter. Asking *70.6566975 
after 5pm. 


Ion aquarii 
s 479-6208, 


6 WEEK SPANIEL PUPPIES 
for^saje. Male and female. 

FREE TO GOOD HOME, 3 
beautiful rabbits plus cage and 
run. 3886797, _ 

YOUNG COCKATIEL, 4 
months, hand-reared. *100 or 
best offer 6564190. 

.— FOR 
noon or 


TWO LARGE DOG CAGES 
sale. 478-9466 before no< 
after 6pm _ 

YOUNG, TAMED PARROT 
tor sale Already talking. Phone 
642-6393. 

MALE SHEPHERD/LAB 
Cross. 10 months old, free to good 
home. 3864188. 

MANY AQUARIUM PARTS 
and supplies for sale. 477-5525. 

S . M ^ L L B|R DCAGE AND 
stand. *20. 38695)7. _ 

2Vi YEAR OLD ST BERNARD 
to good home, 382-3016 _ 

BABY BUDGIES FOR SALE, 
blueandgreen. *15.4766844. 

S5 e « y mU 0 ttens ' 4 MONTHS 

REGISTERED YELLOW LA- 
Draaor lwn,l< puppy. SW-IIW. 

FREEGERBILS 

592-0986 

sanis^° coc * etiei - 

cage »° 

3 POOOLE PUPS FOR SALE, 
to reliable homes 4794)064 


IS KTSariSVPPUES 


BIRDC^E-UO. 


m 


CHICKS, POULTRY 
HATCHING ESSS 
SUPPLIES 


TAKING ORDERS FOR DAY 
old Ltilcks. R i. Red. B. Rock, 
Comet, Leohorn, end meal 


HATCHES WEEKLY FROM 
March. Hubbard. Comets. 
Harco. Barred Rock. Fancy 
chicks. Ducklings, ooslings, tur- 
keys. 479-2084.112-7465244 


6 MONTH OLD BROWN LEG- 
horn^lavlng. Call after Spm. 


. -...— —i SILKl*. 

7-8 months old Phono 3844)790 


ta 


LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES 
UW EVENTS 


BAREBACK AND STEER 

Wrestling, *200. Instructor: 
Lynn Jensen, Cardston, Alberta. 
6 times in top 10 Bareback In 
CRCA. *50 deposit required by 
March 24. For Information, 
112 468-7632, Rocking Horse 
Ranch Arena. 


MANDER 

TRUCKINGLTD. 
SAWDUST 
SHAVINGS 
CEDAR HOGFUEL 
385-3041 

After 6,477-5053,479-7629 

JOHN M$CNUTT 
TRUCKING 

SAWDUST—SHAVINGS 
HOGFUEL 
Large or Small Loads 

479-6560 


OUTSTANDING REGIS- 
tered Appaloose gelding from 
championship stock, 7 years, 
>5.2 hh. loud tri-colored leopard. 
Excellent disposition. You must 
see this one! Asking *1250. 

478-3023. 


2938 Lamont Road. Saanichton. 
Inquiries Shanks or 656 3697, 
652-1595. 652 9342. Rtfresh- 
ments, door prizes _ 

BOARD FOR ONE OR TWO 
horses Box stalls, separate pad 
docks Excellent feed and care. 
Riding ring and miles of trails. 
All this for only *95 per month. 
478-3823. 

BEAUTIFUL SHOWY DAPPLE 
prey mare. 12 2HH Suitable for 
beginners. Good lumper, pony 
class winner. No vices Can be 
seen at Sherwood Creek Farms. 
478-1156.478-1227, _ 

LESSONS IN BASIC ORES- 
sage. Hack, hunter, lumper. 
Must have your own horse. 
Please call. Sue Novecoskv 
112-743-4769_ 

AT STUD: WAR FAIR S TOMA 
hawk 16 hh Appaloose, bay with 
white blanket, fee by private 
treaty. Contact: Margaret 
Meeres 652-4765._ 

BUCKSKIN QUARTER HORSE 
mare. 9 years, schooled in per¬ 
formance, good games horse, 
excellent frail horse Obedient, 
lots of spirit, *800.478-8141. 

FOR LEASE MORGAN MARE 
fully trained, English or West 
em. Experienced rider prefer 
red, but not essential. Perfect 
manners. 477-8134,_ 

EXPERIENCED YOUNG 
rider wishes to work with horses 
in exchange for riding privileges 
<n Glen Lake area. Naomi 
478-3034,_ 

PONY. REGISTERED HACK- 
ney. for oreen or experienced 
rider. Excellent bloodlines. 
Good for breeding. 598-1515. 
Sofya._ 

KEEP THESE DATES FREE, 
April 19th and ?Oth. victoria 

uta&ai&si# Ann,, •' 

LEATHER WORK CHAPS, 
oood condition, thioh approx. 

^"stsjr 011 *••• ti0 ° f 

17" STUBBEN SIEGFRIED. 
»7" passier dressaoe saddle. 
112-743-4769_ 

BEE EQUIPMENT WANTED 
for 


RGE REGISTERED QUAR- 

GRAZING ACREAGE MET- 
chosin. Good water Pertly 
fenced. Phone 476532), 478-9770. 

FOR SALE 

Landrace boar, weaner and 
feeder pigs, bred sows 4765153. 

THOROUGHBRED MARE, 
dark bay, 15.2hh, great mover, 
OOOd disposition. 479-6843 


--- --.9-OLD 

loose Stud, Green broke. 


REGISTERED 4-YEAR-OLO 

COURBETTE RITTMEISTER 
all-purpose 17" English saddle, 
as new. 478-4681. _ 

WESTERN EAMOR SADDLE, 
excellent condition. *495. 
652 2860 _ 

1979 2 HORSE TRAILER. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. *4300 obo. 
6561432. _ 

P°LLEp HEREFORD HIGH- 
land heifer in calf, excellent ani- 
mal. Reasonable. 656-6326. 

REGISTERED QUARTER 
Horse Mare. Chestnvt. JB King 
blood line. 245-3210 after 5pm. 

2 REGISTERED ANGUS HEIF- 
ers. ? ready to breed. *750 each. 

7 YEAR OLD W ARAB MARE, 
English and western, *450, Day- 
time 479-8911, evenings 642-5849. 

1978 11* UNIVISION STOCK 
traMer. *2,500. After 5pm. 

LOVE FROM FOW 


HORSE FOR SALE, EXPERI- 
enced prefer red 383 5173, 

PONY BUGGY *800, 2 HORSE 
trailer*2200 Phone479 5131. 

GREEN OAT HAY, *3.25 BALE. 
Can deliver. 598-3684. _ 

FOR SALE. FEMALE PIG. 2 
years old 4794)364 _ 

HEREFORD HEIFER CALF. 
Phone 642-5147, _ 

GOOD GREEN HAY, FEED 
wheat for sale 652 1882 


17VV* ENGLISH SADDLE WITH 
Perth and stirrups, * I SO. 652-1346 


190 


HEAVY EQUIPMENT 
ANO MACHINERY 


STEEL 

BUILDINGS 

IMWRWttSa 

We have lust purchased these all 
steel straight wall pre-engineer- 
ed package buildings from large 
Eastern U.S. manufacturer. In¬ 
cluded In packages, colored 
walls, rain outter and down 
spouts, large overhead door 
openings, 3070 main doors with 
every bulldino. We will do com 
p£te turn-key If required, any¬ 
where In B C 

Republ Ic^Bu I Wjng System 


No. 3 8296120 Street 
Surrey, B.C. Ph. 591-8865 

1974 INTERNATIONAL HAR- 

OLD SAWMILL. *850. 
4769201 


130 


HEAVY EQUIPMENT 
AND MACHINERY 


TOMOTOR A20,20,000 POUNDS 
fork-truck, 17*6" lift. 385^757 be¬ 
tween 8: am and 4:30pm', Mon- 
day to Friday. 


w. Matdeck trailers, built to 
order.SUOOandup.478-3871. 

671 *'N" SERIES GM POWER 
m-7467037 ***" runo,ng< V>200 - 

10 YARD GRAVEL BOX AND 
hoist; 66 international truck 
Paris. 642-5966. _ 

16' COLLINS FLAT DECK IN 
near new condition. 658-8381. 

195 FARM IMPLEMENTS 



Lawn & Garden Tractors 
7 hp - 28 hp 

Diesel Farm Tractors 
22hp 275hp 
Full Line of Attachments 

J. GRIEVE MOTORS LTD. 
Vancouver Island's largest farm 
Implement dealer now selling 
Yenmar 4-whee! drive tractors. 
13 to 33 h.p. Full line of attach¬ 
ments. 

6S2-1642_SAANICHTON 

MECHANIC'S SPECIAL. IN- 
ternational Farm-All Super A 
tractor with hydraulics and 
front-end loader. Engine com¬ 
pletely rebuilt, machine needs 

s&gaftflfcF ,o com - 


WANTED: OLDER FARM 
tractor In working order, 3-pOint 
hitch, miscellaneous farm af- 
-». Will pay up to *1500. 


tachments. ’ 
6562717. 


MODEL 130 MASSEY FERGU- 
son tractor, 3. hitch, power take¬ 
off with new brush cutter. 

479-2979. 

1« LUSt VEHICLES 



WILL SHOW 
-YOU- 
HOW TO LEASE 

ANDSAVE! 
EX-LEASE 
Vans and S.W.'s 

WE HAD 17 
NOW WE HAVE 10 
TO CHOOSE FROM 

They have to go now 
78VolareS.W. 
78CaravelleS.W. 

78 Lebaron S.W.—Loaded 
3 to choose from 
n Vola reSW^ 

77 Dodoe Maxi-Van 
2 To Choose From 

78 Dodge B200 

Plus Many More 
SeeTomCino 
or Bryan Cathcart 

ENSIGN LEASE 
LTD. 
Quadra at 
Caledonia 
386-2411 

DEALER NO.5620 



Talk to us before vou 
lease a car or truck I 
382-7121 

Empress Pontiac 
Buick GMC Ltd. 

Oealw 5701 __ 

IW CMS F0H SALE 



Largest Indoor 
Showroom 
featuring 

The Finest Selection 
of Pre Owned 
Automobiles 
79 MUSTANG 
79 COUGAR 
79 CAPRI GHIA 
78 CELICAGT 
78 COROLLA 
77 CAMARO Z28 
76 CHEV Impala 
74 VENTURA 

385-4444 

24 MONTH WARRANTY 
Benk Financing Available 

854 Pandora at Quadra 

Parking In Rear Dealer 6690 

ii7i-im 


1970 THUNDERBIRO, _ 

nsihr-A 


EXCEL- 

, _ ira 

|gj 

385-3221. Dealer «6222 _ 

w 9 ?a D 4vI M UN DE R BIR D. 
302 V8, 16,000 miles, as new, 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, bucket seats, con¬ 
sole, radio and cassette player. 
*6,495 or nearest offer, 479-0383. 

80 OLDS OMEGA, 7,600 KM. V6, 
automatic, power steerino, 
power brakes. Still under fac¬ 
tory warranty, *7995. Phone 
9» r v Kangas, 3863516. Metro 
Toyota, Dealer 6290 _ 

1980 HONDA PRELUDE, 
black 5 speed with extended i 
year wairanty. Complete with 
cassette deck, custom mats and 
seat covers. Priced for quick 
sale at *7400.477-4518. 

1980 VOLKSWAGEN. 6SPEED. 
front wheel drive, stereo, sliver, 
excellent gas mileage, 1806 
mhes^* 1300 below replacement. 


79 CHEVY MONZA BLACK, IN- 
strumerrt and suspension pock- 


„ „ I960 PHOENIX LJ 
Pontiac, front wheel drive, 2 
door, bronze. 6,000kms. *7500. 
Replacement cost *8500.479-7782 

79 ^‘RMONT STATIONWA- 
ranty. 6562206 


1980 TOYOTA TERCEL. 37 
MPG's, 5 speed, am/fm radio. 


15# CMS FOR SALE 


fi 

i 

Sl/BUffB/7/7 


THE HOME OF 
LINCOLN 

MARQUIS, COUGAR, 
XR7, ZEPHYR, 
CAPRI, BOBCAT, 
FORD TRUCKS 

ALSO 

T0PQUALITY 

USEDCARS 

ANDTRUCKS 



Last of le 
1979 

DEMONSTRATORS 

STOCK 9-203 

79 MONARCH ESS, 2dr. 6 
CVl. A/T, P/S, P/B, 
radio, elec, defrost, 
tilt wheel, power win¬ 
dows, etc. 

WAS $7682.10 NOW $6610 
SAVE $1072.10 

STOCK 9-210 

79 MONARCH 2 DR. 6 CVl. 
A/T, P/S, P/B, radio, 
vinyl roof, elec de¬ 
frost, mouldings, etc. 
WAS $6475.50 NOW $5448 
SAVE $1027.50 

STOCK 9-445 

79 COUGAR XR7. Fully 
equipped including air 
conditioning, power 
moon roof, AM/FM 
stereo, 8-track, etc. 
WAS $12,871.40 

NOW $10,724 
SAVE $2,147.40 

STOCK 9-335 

79 COUGAR XR7, 2 dr. 
H/T. V8. A/T, P/S, 
P/B, AM/FM quad, 
power seats, power 
windows, air condi¬ 
tioning, speed control, 
etc. 

WAS$11,085.50 NOW $9317 
SAVE $1768.50 

STOCK 9-700 

79 GRANO MARQUIS, 4 
door, Diamond Jubi¬ 
lee Edition! V8, A/T, 
P/S, P/B, AM/FM 
Quad 8 track, power 
seats, pass recliner, 
power windows, speed 
control, tilt wheel, 
power antenna, re¬ 
mote mirrors, etc. 
WAS $13,578.80 

NOW $11,345 
SAVE $2,233.80 

79 MARQUIS Brougham, 
4 dr. V8, A/T, P/S 
P/B, AM/FM stereo, 
tilt whed, speed con¬ 
trol, power seats, 
power windows, 
power locks, etc. 

WAS $11,459.70 

- NOW $9,652 
SAVE $1,807.70 

STOCK 9430 

79 FORD F150,4X4, Rang¬ 
er. V8, A/T, P/S, P/B, 
radio, 2 tanks, gauges, 
etc. tutone brown. 
WAS$lt,517.20 

NOW $9472 
SAVE $2,045.20 
Deluxe box cover, now on 
truck, $672 Extra! . 

LARGE INVENTORY 
OF 1980 MODELS — 
BOTH CARS AND 
TRUCKS TO CHOOSE 
FROM! ALL ON DIS¬ 
PLAY! ALL CLEARLY 
FACTORY PRICE 
TAGGED! 

TRADESWELCOME! 

ON THE SPOT 
FINANCING,ON 
APPROVEOCREDIT. 
FMCCOR BANK. 

COME IN AND ASK ANY 
ONE OF OUR COUR¬ 
TEOUS SALES STAFF 
TO SHOW YOU 
AROUND. 

SUBURBAN 

MOTORS 

3377 Douglas 
386-6131 

Dealer 5528 


_BUY MY DEMO! 

1979 Silver ACCORD, 4 door, 

•VtomaNc Electric $uor00 f. 

AM/FM radio, dock, only 7.5W 
Km! Ask for WOLFGANG 
LACHMUND. at METRO 
or Res., 

383-2156. Dealer 5876._ 

MERCURY CAPRI GHIA, 1979. 
copper metallic, 10,000km, still 
under warranty, V8, power 
steering/brakes, TRX wheels, 
alr-conditloned. sunroof, AM— 
FM rodlo. most other conve- 
nlence opttons. Offers around 
>7800.479-2136._ 

DEMONSTRATOR 


151 CMSF0RUU 


PALM 



Good or Bad 

WHOCARES 
WE FINANCE 
NOCO-SIGNERS 

Let us help re-establish your 
credit. Separated, divorced, old- 
«oe pensioner, single male or 
female. You qualify. Buy and 
MV same location. Cars from 
*150 down and payments as low 
as*i0 weekly. 

CHARGEX ACCEPTED 

Instant 

"NO-RED-TAPE" 

CREDIT 

Walk In, Drive Out 

3342 Oak St., 3868385 


78 AUDI Fox, automatic 
H PI NTO hatchback. 4 speed 
78 MAZDA 929 wagon, auto 
V, 7PX& T A p, ckuP «nd camper 
V, GLC hatchback 

77 HONDA Civic H/6. sunroof 
77YQL A RE sedan 6cvl. auto 
76COURlERrruckauto. 

76 MAZDA wagon 
75 P l nto wagon auto., P.S. 

74 HONDAHBoutO.4.500miles. 
73 DODGE Swinger 
72 CELICA coupe 4 speed 
71 C0 R TiNA4 speed 
71 TOYOTA Corolla 
70 MAZDA 1500 Sdn, 4 spd.69 
FALCON automatic 

7 DAY MONEY BACK 
_ GUARANTEE 

[pacicic] 


PEUGEOT 


385-1451 Dealer 5253 
Blanshard at Johnson 

3M0NTE CARLOS' 

1973-74-75. Each one loaded and 
priced to sell! Trade* welcome 
PAINTER MOTOR. 3005 Doug- 
las, 388-6196. Dealer 5802 

'72 DUSTER 340 
Immaculate condition, low mile¬ 
age. SPECIALTY MOTORS, 
38)-5544, 385-7733 Dealer6033. 


SAVE $1226! 

On my 1980 PARISIENNE 
BROUGHAM Sedan Fully 
power equipped. Including air 
conditioning god cruisemaster! 
Less than 5000 km, and full new 
car warranty. Colour, tu-tone 
Brown and Gold, plus rich velour 
elusive with 
CHARLIE PETERSON, at Em- 
prev» Pontiac Buick GMC Ltd., 
382-7121 or res 592-0458. Dealer 
5701._ 

SAVE $1500 


Provision of company car forces 
1980 Grand Prlx. Only 


sale of my 191 


Delightful __ 

gray colour, with wine fabric 
Interior. P S.. P.B , A.T., radio, 
Monroe shocks, radials, tilt 

- Se,ls nw ,or *10,000 

Will sell for *8500 firm. Week 
ends all day. 383 4013, weekdays 
after 6 pm, 384-3327 _ 

1979 MUSTANG 2.3 LITRE, 4 
cyl . auto., radio, ps. 35,000km.. 

*4795 

1979 LTO wagon. Country 

SESMCft **''*■ '*%& 

HERTZ RENT ACAR 
Division Of Howbar Leasing 
388-4411 OPEN 7 DAYS WK 
Dealers License «&499 

MUST SELL 

79 Camaro in mint condition. 305 

1979 LE CAR. 1400 KM. TWO 
"WJfh* qfd. snow tires, am/FM 

5TO5M6 ^ n * W pr,ce - 

1979CO R D° BA , FULLY LOAD 
ed, T -bar roof, excellent condi- 
tlon, Reg477-8411 or 656 5075. 

SAVEM y*D R ED'S. 1980 OAT- 
sun 510 hatchback, automatic, 
trade considered 5924029 

1877-1871 

A BLACK BEAUTY 
W7 Tram am, auto. P s. P.B, 
P.W. > track. Only 3a (XX) mi. 1 
owner local car OtfarM al a 
vary annoetatlvt price ot »72»5 
Exclusive with BERNIE 
WACHTER, McCallum Motors 

^ler 3 11 * * !^”- '»• 

'78 LINCOLN 

Towne Coupe 2 dr fully equipped 
plus a r and stereo. 6ne owner 
Wi. automobile with only 
12,000ml. Immaculately kept 
and serviced. Priced to sell. DE 
PAPE MOTORS LTD. indoor 779 
Pendore 384-8035 Peeler 5311 

UNBELIEVABLE 

1978 Audi Fox 2 dr. auto. Show¬ 
room randltlon Only 14,000 KM. 
LfKaM owner An exclusive with 
PADRO J ARRAIS, Pacific 
M« p «- p ej*o*ot, 385-1451, res. 


382-0092 I 


78 HONDA ACCORD 2 DOOR, S 

^“MlrrTxffil 

condition. *5900. 595-7295 be 
tween 7-9 pm. _ 

IV 7 PONTIAC VENTURA 3 
door, hatchback, V6, economi¬ 
cal. immaculate, must sell be¬ 
cause of University expenses, 
sacrifice *4,000. obo. 598 3279 

LATE MODEL 7* SILVER 
5^speed, extres. asking *6500. 


77 NEW YORKER. SILVER 
with burgundy leather, 440 V8, 
power seats, sunroof, every¬ 
thing. 23,000 miles. A beautiful 
car. *6800. 479-5639 

78 CELICAGT 
Black and loaded, must sell, 
moving. 385-9068. _ 

77 MONTE CARLO, 350 AUTO- 
matlc, p.s, p.b, a.c, 48,000 miles, 

jssEBtfr 1371 ° r 

BLUE 78 HONDA CIVIC. LOW 
mileage, good condition, ask 
IJ^WOofcall attar 5om. 

78 MUSTANG II. POWER 
steering/brakes. V8 4-speed. 
AM—FM cassette, radial TA's, 
low mileage. 386-4003 attar 5pm 

1977 DODGE MONACO ROYAL. 
4 door, automatic, power steer 
!!»• »ggr 6rekes, good condi- 


tton.t 


I. 477-0039 


bUKk *£flo Latter ?rUtrlor L A,l 

1977 OOOGE ASPEN SE, 6 
cylinder, thicket seats, vinyl 
^..gl^ cond'" 0 ", 78,°°o 

78 FIREBIRD. 17,000 MILES, 
excellent condition, Cragar 
V0 automatic. SMS0. 

»^ LL >Jn 3B .!d5. C ^ 

1978 TRANS AM 8.8 LITRE, 
rtwtv lactory options. Immacu- 


1978 VW RABBIT. J DOOR. 4 
speed, approximately 20,000 
miles, excellent condition. *5750 
or best offer .6566864 


c-s 


150 CMS FOR SUE 



CHRYSLER 

PLYMOUTH 


ALLUNITS 

CHECKED 

BYCARCLINIC 

DIAGNOSTIC 

CENTRE 



79VolareS.W. $6333 

6-cvlinder. automatic, radio, 
P.S., P B , white- tan interior 
Bucketseats. Roofrack 
and much more 
Stock *4411 

79 Zephyr S.W. 

79 Fury 9-pass. S.W. 
7BVolarePrem.S,W. . 
78LebaronS.W 
76 Royal Monaco S.W. 
76CoronaMKII S.W. 

73 Monteoo S.W. 

73 AstreS.W. 

70 Estate Wagon ’ 

Plus Many More 
Used Vehicles " 

73 Furv III 
73 New Yorker 

73 Chew Nova 

74 Furv III 
74 Cougar 
74 Fiat 128 

74 Sportsman Van 
75GranTorino 
76 V.W. Dasher 

76 Newport 
77Landcruiser4x4 

77 Ford %-ton Van 
77 Dodge P.U. 4x4 
77 Mustang 

77 Cordoba 
77 Comet 
77 Boogie Van 

77 Granada 

78 Aspen 
78 Newport 
78 Cordoba 

78 Mustang 

79 Sunbird 

79 Lil Red Express 
79 Camaro Z28 
79 Dodge D100 
79 Econollne Super Van 

Plus Many More 


Friday Times 
Page 50 

Saturday Colonist 
Page 29 

GOV'T TESTED 
PLUS 2-YEAR 
WRITTEN 
WARRANTY 



Chrysler-Plymouth 

Ltd. 

DOWNTOWN 
YATESAT COOK 

Dealer licence number 
D5295 

386-2411 

Open Weekdays 
Till 9:00 

77GMCSP R, N T (ELCAMINO) 
block on block with stripino, 350 
automatic. 33,000 miles, swivel 
buckets, power windows, power 
starring, power brakes, AM/FM 
cajsjtte deck. *5800 or otters 

479-2981. 


MUST SELL 

1977 Volare S.W. Premiere E 
♦lon-Wen equipped, in excellc 
condition. Low mileage. May 
seen at 3059 Washington Ave. 


1977 HONDA CIVIC. LOW 
mileage, clean, am/fm- cos 
satte stereo, set of winter tire*, 
lust recently tuned. *4200 or best 
offer. Call Mike. 477-5913 be 


1977 GRANDE MARQUIS CO 
plete towing package, air cbn 
Honing, quadra sonic tope dei 
cruise control, 460 motor, 36-1 

SsoS s 38^^f ,,en * condl " J 


77 COUGAR 4 DOOR. AUT( 
mafic, power steering, powi 

* >r % e &,fS C AU!r'R , A^^I 

-3516, Metro Toyota. Dealt 


1978 IMPALA l. ___ 

gon, luxury and economy, Yodf 
rock, sound proofing package, 

CTt-Tjw^fter 5pm. U 1 * te ' 


11 I RA N S AM - BLACK' ON 

block, 400 4-speed, p^, p.b, p.w, 
and new tues 

24,000 miles. Excellent coodl- 

tlon. 652-1371, after 5. HW i 



























































































































































































































































































































































































C-6 

ISO CMS FOD SALE 


D 

0 

D 

G 

L 

A 



VOLKSWAGEN 

AUDI 


. Your Largest 
Volkswagen 
Audi 

Dealer On The 
Island! 


AUDI 5000S 

DIESEL 

lest Drive 
It Today! 


PREMIUM 

LUXURY 

ONEOWNER 

UNITS! 


78 LINCOLN MK V. 
Loaded! Finished in 
white with 33,000 km. 
Traded on 1980 5000S 
$18,950 

78 4'UOI 5000S, in Colibra 
Green. Fully equipped, 
and only 11,000 km. 
Traded on 1980 5000S 
$14,950 


78 AUDI 5000S, in Agate 
Brown. Only 39,000 km. 
Traded on 1980 5000S 
$13,950 


78 AUDI FOX Sedan, in 
Metallic Green. Auto¬ 
matic, with sunroof! 
Traded on 1979 5000S 
$8295 


77 COROOBA, automatic. 
Fully equipped and fin¬ 
ished in coral metallic 
with black vinyl top. 
Only 30,000 miles! 
Traded on 1980 5000S 
$8995 


PREMIUM 

USED 


SOSkvIarksdn. 

$8695 

79 Capri Ghia 

$6995 

77 Cordoba, AT 

$6995 

77AspenSE,sdn. 

$4995 

77 Skylark sdn. 

$6195 

77 Pinto Squire Van 

$4495 

76 Capri, AT 

$4995 

76 Volare Wagon 

$4295 

76 Valiant sdn. 

$3995 

76 Volare, 2 door 

$4495 

76 Corolla 

$3295 

75 Cordoba, loaded 

$5495 

75 Duster, AT 

$3695 

73 Volvo 144, AT 

$5995 

72 Cortina, AT 

$2495 

68 Cad.de Vllle 

$3495 


UPTO60 MONTH 
SCOTIA PLAN 
FINANCING 
AVAILABLE. O.A.C. 


Douglas Volkswagen 
Ltd. 

3329 Douglas Street 


388-5466 

Dealer 5100 


1977 COUGAR BROUGHAM. 4 
door, fullv loaded, with power 
steering, brakes, windows and 
seats, air-conditioned, 24,000 
miles, like new $6000. Oavs 

n&i'iU' 3 '' "”* r 6om 


WE MADE A MISTAKE. OE- 
luxe 1977 Toyota SR5 Llftback is 
too small for our family. 5 speed, 
only 26,000 miles, should be seen. 
743-4906, 387-3047. 


1977 DODGE ASPEN SPECIAL 
Edition waoon, 318, power steer 
mg, power brakes, automatic, 
only 18,000 miles. As new. $4950 
3886275 pager 865. 


78 COROLLA, 2 DOOR, AUTO- 
matlc. Esso Inspected and re¬ 
conditioned Only 40,000 miles. 
$4995 Phone Colin, 386-3516, 
Melro Toyota. Dealer 6290, 


77 TRANS AM, BROWN, AUTO- 
matic, p.s., p.b., p w . $7500 or 
willing to trade down to sports 
car 382-8740 


1978 ZEPHER MERCURY 
beipe 2 door, V8, automatic, 
p.s/p.b. $5500 firm. 595-7861 any¬ 
time 


1978 HONDA CIVIC 11,500 
miles, sporty excellent condl 
tloh. After 5:30pm. 477-0453. 


78 DATSUN 200 SX, 5 SPEED. 
FM AM, excellent condition, low 
mileage, asking $6800 478 1256 


77 FIREBIRD, 39,000. NEW 
radlals, PW, PB, PS. $72,000. 
316-1101, Bernie. 


ACL BLACK. 1977 CAMARO. 
lote mileage, excellent shape. 
Offers on $6700 478-8051 


1978 CAMARO LT, T—ROOF. 
350 automatic, tape deck, excel 
lent condition 652-3854 


150 CARS FOR SUE 



IIMiTO 


1129 pet mo. 


Used Cars! 



386-1711 


OPEN FROM 
8am.-9p.rn. 
SAT. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 


100% Bank Financing 
O.A.C. 



METRO TOYOTA LTD. 

645 FINLAYSON 
(Across from Woodwards) 
DEALER 6290 



ESD 


1977 CAMARO EXCELLENT 
Itlpn, low mlief. 


condition, low mileage. Must be 
seen 384-7506. 


78 PONTIAC LEMANS STA- 
tionwagon, excellent condition, 
low miles. 112-746-5639. 


78 GRAND LEMANS STATION 
wagon, many options, excellent 
—1776, ~- z - 


shape. 382-1776,743-4860. 


" VULMKt 51 Al IUNWAOUN. 

new condition, $5z00 or best 
Offer 385-3265. 


1977 HONDA ACCORD. GOLD 
HB. 5speed, $5200 595-6824 


77 HONDA, EXCELLENT CON- 
dltlon. $3000 firm. 384-3495. 


1975-1971 


SHOWROOM CONDITION 
76 Oldsmoblle Toronado 
Brougham, 2 door hardtop, fully 
power equipped, front wheel 
drive, mechanically excellent. 
56,000original miles, city tested, 
air conditioned, cruise control, 
tilt and telescopic wheel, 
AM/FM radio and 8-track 
stereo, power steering, power 
disc brakes, power trunk, win¬ 
dows. door locks and antenna, 
dual 6-way split 60/40 power 
seats, dual mirrors and ladies 
vanity interior mirrors, dual ex¬ 
haust. new steel belted radlals, 
like new condition In/out. Luxu 
rlous off yellow exterior color 
with padded Vj oold vinyl top and 
crushed gold velour Interior. 
Must be seen and driven. Pri¬ 
vate sale. $7500. Call owner in 
Vancouver at 876-4202 anytime. 


WS BUICK ESTATE WAGON. 
All available power options. Well 
maintained large wagon. $2650 
384 1721, 592-3121, Sports and 
Classic Cars, 640 Lower Hillside. 
Dealer 5433 


1975 NOVA, 2 DOOR, POWER 
steering, power brakes, auto¬ 
matic, sun roof. 65,000 miles. 
Blue. Excellent condition 
throughout, tested. $3300. 


1976CHEVETTE 
Excel tent shape, 22.000 miles, 
i a -,‘&£ ri £ en and a real miser. 
*3295. Days 595 2622, nights 
386-5248. 


,97 ? .?, L £ S omega, 4-DOOR, 
metallic brown, V8, auto, power 
Peering, power brakes, radio, 
o^y 34.000 miles. Extra nice car. 


). 385-4774. 


1976 LINCOLN TOWNE 
Coupe, loaded with extras. Only 
45,000 miles. Like new. $8400. 
H2-748.;3838 days, after 6p£ 


1976 TRANS AM, LOW MILES, 
honeycomb mags, 4 speed, 
AM/FM stereo. Immaculate. 
$5900 or best offer. 388-6931 be¬ 
tween 8:30-5pm, or 112-525-4264. 


1975 MONARCH, ONE LADY 
owner, automatic, 6 cylinder. 


power'steering; power brakes! 

ellent condition, $3, 


sunroof, excell 
850 384-5445. 


75 MONARCH GHIA, 
moonroof, vinyl top, air, all 
power accessories, velour in 
ter lor, AM/FM stereo, $4500. 
Offers. 656-6352 


76 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER 
Mag wheels, 4 speed. Hurry, for 
his one! $5595. Call Bob McMil¬ 
lan, 386-3516.- _ 

Dealer 6290 


Metro Toyota. 


76 VENTURA, 4 DOOR AUTO- 
matlc, power steering, power 
brakes, 36,000 miles, $5295. Call 
Ed Varga. 3860516. Metro Toyo¬ 
ta Dealer 6290. 


1976 RABBIT CUSTOM 2 DOOR, 
4 speed, 13" radlals, rear 
wiper /washer, clock, 43.000 
condition. 

$3800 478-5725. 


1976 TOYOTA CORONA SW, 
maroon, roof rack, AM FM 
radio, 40,000 miles. $4500 
478-6215 


75 CAMARO, 4 SPEED, RA 
dials, mags Stereo, sunroof, 2 
i ad la< $flpw tires, 4 winter rims, 
$5000 382 9443, Carey, after 4. 


976 CHEV MALIBU. 4 DOOR. 
35° V8. power steering/brakes, 

f 2 748 8347°"°' °°° d Cood,,,on 


'76 CAMARO RS. 350 4 SPEED, 
maos and radials. good shape, 
**900. Trades considered. 

Jo/VOVd. 




ISO CMSFORSUi 


Cornell gm 


USED CARS 

you CAN 
EXPECT A 
GREAT DEAL 
FROM CORNELL 


Call Dick Smith 

78 NOVA 

4 door, V8, auto, ps; pb, radio 
(ex-lease) 

ONLY 


$3995 


73 BUICK 

APOLLO, 6cvl. auto, PS. 

ONLY $2995 


Call Harry Vanderhoek 

77 DODGE 


MONACO 4 dr. V8, auto, fully 
loaded 


ONLY 


$3995 


79MUSTANG II 

4 cyl., auto, ps, pb, radio 

ONLY $5895 


★ * ★ It 


Call Dennis Crook 

77 FORD 

Maverick, 6 cyl. auto, ps. only 
15,000 miles. 

ONLY 


$4495 


78 FORD 3 /4-TON 

Pickuo. V8,4 spa., vJuti 8' camp. 


ONLY 


$9895 


OPEN 

MON-FRI.9-9 
SAT. 9-5 

Finlaysonand Burnside 
385-5777 Dealer 681A 


COROLLASR5 


’926 Toyota 1600. 5spd., white 
with brown interior, radial TAs. 
mags. $3195. PAINTER 
MOTOR. 3005 Douglas, 388-6196 
Dealer 5802 


ONEOWNER! 

1976 Pinto Squire station wagon. 
Automatic, power steering. 
26,000 miles. Esso inspected and 
reconditioned, city tested, $3995 
call Rov Moretti, 386-3516, Metro 
Toyota Dealer 6290 


1975 TOYOTA COROLLA 4 
speed, radio. 24,000 pampered 
miles. Totally and completely 
immaculate $3150. 384-1721, 
592-3121, Sports and Classic 
Cars, 640 Lower Hillside. Dealer 


COROLLA 1200 


1975 4 cyl, 4spd. 2dr HT, red with 
white interior, runs great. $2595 
PAINTER MOTOR, 3005 Douu 
las, 388 6196 Dealer 5802 


76BUICK REGAL 
4 Dr 47,000miles 
BRIDGE ST. MOTOR CO. LTD. 
Dealer 5161 

Bus. 388-5714 Res. 652-4244 


19760LDS VI STA CRUISER, 350 
V8, auto, full power, including 
am/fm radio, air conditioning 
and door locks, radials, 42,000 
miles. Excellent condition 
throughout. $4500.38S-4774. 


1976MONTE CARLO. IMMACU 
late, 2 door hardtop, landau roof, 
2 tone blue, 350 engine, power 
steering, power brakes, radio, 
rear defrost, radials, 30,000 
miles. $5900.652-9320. 


1975 DUSTER, SPLIT VINYL 
top, economical 6 cylinder, 
power steering, new brakes, new 
tires, good condition. $3500 or 


•••«»» good V.U8IUMIUII. M3UU or 

best offer. Call after 6pm. 
479-5735. 


1976 BUICK LESABRE, 
power steering, power brakes, 
power seats, power windows, tilt 
wheel, AM/FM radio, air condi¬ 
tioning, etc. plus complete tow- 
lr>g package. $4600. 595-7678. 


1976DATSUN HATCHBACK. 39.- 
000 miles. Exceptionally clean 
and well cared for $3150 

384-1721, 592-3121, Sports and 
Classic Cars, 640 Lower Hillside. 
Dealer 5433 


1975 BOBCAT. 2 DOOR, LOW 
mileage, good condition. Over 30 
m^J cylinder, 4 speed $2500. 


76 HONDA HATCHBACK 4 
speed, just tested, excellent con¬ 
dition, 50,000 miles, $2,795. 

385-6465 evenings. 


76 PLYMOUTH ARROW 
Hatchback, tested. Excellent 
condition. $3200 or best offer. 


1976 OLDS 98 REGENCY. ALL 
possible options you would ex¬ 
pect on last of big luxury cars. 
$7650firm. 479-5807. 


LIKE NEW 1975 MONTEGO MX 
stationwagon. Low mileage, new 
radlals. $3595 or best offer. 
382-0172. 


76 BUICK SKYHAWK, V6. 5- 
speed hatchback, chrome pack¬ 
age, new radlals, AM/FM cas- 
sette, $4000. 384-9970. 


75 GRAND FURY, POWER 
Power brakes, motor 
365, 70,000 miles, $2,400 or near 
otter. 477-8028. 


1975 DODGE CORONET 
Brougham, 40,000 miles. Asking 
*3 ,m 656-Ssi after 5:3Qom 


1976 DODGE ASPEN. RADIAL 
tires, new brakes. $2700 or 
offers. 478 4249 after 5. 


1975 FORD ELITE. 400 CU. IN. 
motor, 37,000 miles, clean condl- 
tlon, $4000 or best offer. 383-2633 


1976 VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT, 
deluxe model, full options, low 
miles. 384-4589. 


1976 CUTLASS SUPREME, Ex¬ 
cellent condition, loaded. $4700. 
598-6519. 


76 VEGA, SHOWROOM CONDI- 
tion. 5 speed and many other 
options. 384-2270. 


75 VENTURA, ESSO AND GO 
yernment tested. Immaculate 
Inside and out, $2500. 59S-09Q7. 


76 TOYOTA COROLLA, 4 
door, 14,200 miles. Near new con¬ 
dition, $3400 656-7864 


76 CAMARO, 305 V8, 29,000 
miles, beautiful condition, $5000. 
479-5639 


75 CAMARO RALLEY SPORT. 


1975 CELICA, LOW MILEAGE, 
excellent condition. 384 7506. 


1973 -1974 


VOLVO S.W. 1974 


4 spd, 4 cvl. amfm radio, roof 
rack. BCAA tested. Green exte¬ 
rior with immaculate vinyl In¬ 
terior. Excellent value at $4995 
Contact MICHAEL BRINE at 
McCallum Motors, 382-6122. res. 
598-9061 Dealer 5603 


MUST SELL 

1974 Plymouth Fury III, 2 dr 
hardtop, automatic, oower 
steering, power brakes, tape 
deck, radials, rear defroster, 
other extras. Excellent through 
out. Hurry on this. $1900. 
652-3792 


1973 CHEVROLET IMPALA, 2 
door automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, trailer hitch, ex 
cedent condition, $2500 595-0420 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 

ISO CMSFORSUi 150 CMS FOR SUE ISO CARS FOR SALE 



79 CORDOBA 

19,000 Km, balance warranty 
$6895 


79 ASPEN 

2 dr , 6 cyl, auto, bucket seats, 
console. 7700 km. $6395 


79 PINTO 

2 dr 4spd. 8,000 Km $4495 


78 FAIRMONT 

4 dr, 6cyl, auto, PS $4995 


78DATSUNSW 

510, automatic $5895 


76 DART 

6 cvl, auto PS $3495 


74 SATELLITE 

4 dr, V8, auto $2495 


74 DATSUN WGN 

Auto, only 42,000 mi. $3495 


74 PINTO 

Run : a-bout, 4 cyl. auto $2495 


70 DODGE 

Monaco, 4 dr. $1495 


3200 DOUGLAS 
ATCLOVERDALE 
382-2313 

MON. TOFRI.9TIL9 
SAT. 9 TILS. Dealer 5881 


Wanda 


CAR CENTRE 

YATES AT QUADRA 


USEDCAR 

SPECIALS! 

79 Volare *4944 

One Owner, 6 cyl, economy 


78 Mazda 929 S.W. 


4 door, radials, A. T., 
tape, radio, 30,000 Kilo 


Light Grey 


$5944 


2 Honda Accords 

77 H.B. Automatic $5744 

78 H.B. 5-speed $5944 


77 Firebird 


$5944 

Economy V6, A T ,P|.,P.B. 

Radio, accent trim 
Metallic green. 23,000 miles 


74 Vega SW 

was$1944 SPECIAL $1544 


70 Renault R-16 

was$1144 SPECIAL $944 


BANK FINANCING. 

INSURANCE. 
LICENCE PLATES 
ALL AT OUR ONE STOP 
NEWANDUSEDCAR 
CENTRE 


386-6707 

Dealer No. 5668 


BARGAIN 


74 Astra Safare Wgn.,4cyl. auto, 
wood side, roof rack. Excellent 
condition $1495. PAINTER 
MOTOR, 3005 Douglas, 388-6196. 
Dealer 5802 


BEAUTIFUL 73 THUNDER- 
blrd, all power, air conditioning, 
AM/FM stereo, 429 cubic Inch 
rebuilt engine, new transmis¬ 
sion. Tiempo radials on mags. 
$5500 598 4428 after 5pm. 


1973 CHRYSLER NEWPORT, 
utlve car,- 


executive car, company main¬ 
tained. all power options includ¬ 
ing air conditioning Call Betty 
Taylor at 388-9161 between 
8: Goar* — 


>am.-5pm. 


MAKE ME AN OFFER 
aod I won't refuse 73 Monte 
Carlo, excellent condition. 45,000 
miles, tested, 2 door hardtop. 
$3500 or best offer 385-6755 


73 MONTE CARLO. EXCEP- 
tionaliy well-maintained, re¬ 
ceipts to show Original paint, 
inspected to Dec/80. Offers. 
652-9323. 


1973 TOYOTA CORONA DE- 
luxe, 4 door sedan, automatic. 
Very good transportation Best 
offer. Mornings only, ask for 
Lenny 384-7151. 


73 ASTRA, 4 CYL. AUTO. $945. 
PALM AUTO WORLO INC , 

386-8385, 3342 Oak Street, Dealer 
5260. 


1973 SATELLITE SEBRING, 
V8, power steering/brakes, en¬ 
gine lust overhauled. In excel 

ler A ——-«--- * . . 


ent condition throughout. A 
--- 3854653 . 


super buy at $1895.3 


73 CELICA GT, AUTOMATIC, 
AM/FM radio, radlals and mag 
wheels. Spotless condition. 
$2995. View at 2304 Marlene 
Drive. 9-9pm 


1973 LEMANS PONTIAC, MA- 
roon-white interior, 30,000 miles, 
beautiful condition, power 
brakes and steering. Best offer 
over $2,500. 595-0181. 


'74 TOYOTA COROLLA SR5, 
beautiful condition, six steel- 
belted white wall Mlchellns. 
$3400 or best otter. 595-4130, eve 
nlngs. 




DART, 6 CYL, AUTO, 

-0. $1695. PALM AUTO 

WORLO INC , 386-8385. 3342Oak 
St. Dealer 5260. 


1973 CHEV BELAIR, 4 DOOR, 
automatic, power steering and 
brakes. Excellent condition, 38, 
000miles, $2495. 592-2537 


73 PLYMOUTH SATELLITE, 
slant 6 automatic, very ^ood con¬ 


dition. 64,000 miles. z 


73CHRYSLER NEWPORT 


74 TOYOTA CORONA, STA- 
J'wwaoom, excellent condition. 


BIO WAGON, 73METEORV400. 
c P ^ioJ,»^ 


1974 IMPALA 4 DOOR. HARD- 
op* -It Dower, 8 track, $3100. 

383-7807 


74 COMET, 2-DOOR 6-CYLIN- 
der, auto, p.s, 64,000 miles, test- 
ed $2200. Offers. 478-6529. 


74 FORD COMET 2 DOOR. 6 

SiilM§5 , 54 COOal,l °" Ask - 


1973 ASTRE 4 CYLINDER, 
radio, new brekee. J1095 or beet 
otter. 597-3364 


IMMACULATE 1974 PLY- 
mouth stetlonwogon. 647-5709, 
642-3060. 


74 TOYOTA CORONA 2 DOOR 

5i?2S.i rd - 124,5 or otters. 
478-8096. 


1973 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS. 
1*9* SWMTtS.^ 00 '* Condition, 82,- 


1973 TOYOTA CELICA. 4 
speed, excellent running condl - 
tlon. After 6pm. 383-9028 


73 AST RE, $500. 384-1595 AFTER 


1974 TOYOTA COROLLA 1200. 
Asking $2000, 642-3941 


1974 VOLVO 142 GRANDE 
Luxe, one owner. $4300 658 8784. 


1974 c APR!. V6, AUTOMATIC, 
21.800miles. 658-8928. 


ns> 


DATSUN 

CENTRE 


79 DATSUN 

Automatic,stationwagon. $5695 


78 ACCORD 

Hatchbackautomattc $5995 


77 TOYOTA 

Pickup,4 speed *4995 


76 VOLVO 

Stationwagon.automatic $7250 

V 


76 DATSUN 

Pickup, automatic $4695 


74 VOLVO 

Station waoon, 4 speed $4995 


72 HORNET 

Station wagotr. automatic $2295 



70CORTINA 

Automatic $995 


69 VOLKSWAGEN 

4 speed $1895 


65 PONTIAC 

Automatic $495 


1 BLOCK M 


381-5222 

AND 

KT and FOUL BAY 

592-2471 


SAUNDERS & HITCHMAN 
LTD. 

2040 Cadboro Bay Road 
- 5059 


Dealer : 


73 CELICA ST, AUTOMATIC. 
50,000 miles, $2999 ; 73 Midget. 
$2999 Phone John Park, Metro 
Econolot, 386-1711, Dealer 6290 


RARE—ECONOMY PLUS 
performance 74 GTO Hatch¬ 
back, 350 4-speed, $4995. 474-2839 
between 1 and 6 


1974 PLYMOUTH DUSTER, 
slant 6, automatic, power steer 


slant 6, automatic, power steer 
Ing, excellent condition. $2200. 

384-2932 


73 VALIANT, SLANT 6 AUTO, 
excellent condition, very low 
mileage, offers to $2600 477-4044 


1973 CADILLAC ELDORADO, 
very good condition. Very rea 
sonable 385-1361 ext. 49 morn¬ 
ings 


IMMACULATE RX7, 73 MAZDA 
SW, radio, radlals $1950. 
382 1081 mornings or after 
9:30pm. 


CONVERTIBLE 74 BUICK LE 
Sabre, every available option 
Showroom condition. Otters to 
$8500 479-0764 


73 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
MKIV, silver gray, matching 
vmvl roof, air, velour Inferior, 
all power. 385 2296. 


1974 PINTO STATION WAGON. 
Country Squire. 4 cylinder, auto¬ 
matic, bucket seats. $2250. 
598-4936 


1974 TR6, EXCELLENT CONDI- 
tlon, $5800 firm. 112-748-9814 
weekdays after 6pm. 


1973 NOVA, 4 DOOR SEDAN, 6 

cylinder automatic, 62,000 miles. 


1974 DODGE WAGON. GOOD 
condition. $1300 or offers. 
386-8424 


74 NOVA, 2 DOOR HATCH- 
back, 56,000 miles Asking $3300. 
478-4086 evenings. 


1971 -1972 


RARE 71 Z28 CAMARO 
350 LT1 330HP stock. Turbo 400 
automatic, TA's wltti American 
vectors, L 88 hood, etc. Low 
miles on car and motor. No 
trades please Serious Inquiries 
only. $6200 or best cash offer. 
479-0861 


OPPORTUNITY! 


1972 Pontiac LeMans Station 
Wagon, one-owner, lady-driven, 
49,000 miles Gold, brown in¬ 
terior. p.s, p.b. auto, 350 in. 
$3095 o.b o Phone 479-7496. 


A DEPENDABLE USED CAR 
at a very reasonable price. 71 
AMC Ambassador, 2 door hartF 
top. ^motor^alr condltlonlr 

598-6537 


Honing, 
r week- 


1972 FIAT 128, 4 DOOR, 4 
speed, 53.000 miles. Local 1 
owner. Excellent. $1550. 
384-1721, 592-3121, Sports and 
Classic Cars, 640 Lower Hillside. 
Dealer 5433 


1972 PLYMOUTH DUSTER, 318. 
Very good condition. 55.000 
miles. Radio. Rally wheels, 4 
summer and 2 winter Michelln 
radlals $2350 OBO. 598-5908 
after 6pm. 


1972 Buick, 49,000 miles, all 
power options, radlals, complete 
towing package. Excellent con 
dltlon. $2495 or best offer. Phone 
382-8979. 


SPECIAL 


72 Dodge Colt 4dr Won., auto. 
$1395. PAINTER MOTOR, 3005 
Douglas, 388-6196. Dealer 5802 


1971 CHEVELLE 2 DOOR 

hardtop with 307 V8 automatic 
and power steering. In excellent 
condition. $1,950 or best offer. 
652-5517 or 652-2704. _ 

1972 DODGE CORC*4ET, 

power steering, power brakes, 
new brakes, rebuilt transmis¬ 
sion, needs some body work. 
Offers. 479-3842. 


72 IMPALA, CLEAN, FRESH 
family sized 4 door. Body and 

mechanical —-- “ 

economy 
cla. “ 


miy * uwi Doov ana 

echanlcal parts tops. Fuel 
onomy. Good for'full size vehl- 
f. SI,795or OBO. 743-5982. 


71 VEGA SW, 4 CYL.. 4 SPD., 
$689 PALM AUTO WORLD 
INC., 386-8385, 3342 Oak Street. 
Dealer 5260. 


72 VEGA, '76 MOTOR, AUTO- 
matlc, excellent mechanical 
condition. Body good condition. 
Tasted. $1500 invested. Must sell. 
$950. takes. 384-7844. 


Datsun 510 2 door sedan, 
automatic, low mlleaoe. Excel¬ 
lent condition. $1850. Phone 
479-4966. 


1972 PINTO RUNABOUT. NEW 
radials, new head, new breaks, 
new muffler, sell complete or 
parts. 656-4606. 


MUST SELL 71 GREEN CORO- 
net custom station wagon, power 
brakes, power steering, $675. 


1971 PINTO AUTOMATIC, 
vary clean and good running con 
dltidn. $1450 or best offer. 
652 5517 or 652-2704. 


72 TOYOTA COROLLA 1600. 
excellent condition, 42.000 miles, 
tested till 1981. priced to sell el 
$1400.479-3197 


CITROEN 

1972 Citroen Safari, 7 passenger. 
Well maintained. 95,000 miles. 
$6000.383-0405,386-0911 


74,000 miles, automatic, 6 cylin¬ 
der, radio, Inspected Octo¬ 
ber /80, $1,200. 595-6210. 


1972 MAZDA R100. 2 DOOR. 4 
speed, excellent running condl 
tlon and body, $1200 firm, 
598 5978. 


LUXURY 


79 Cadillac diesel 
79 Audi 5000S 
78 Buick turbo, loaded 
77 Cutlass Supreme 
77Chevelle Malibu 
77 Buick Regal 2 dr., air 
76lmpala4dr.,air 
73 BMW Bavaria 4 spd. 
73T-Blrd 
70 Mercedes 250C 
64T-Bird, air, loaded 


SPORTS 

79 Firebird 
79 VW convert. 

78 Corvette 
76 MG Midget 
74 Toyota Celica 
73 Porsche914 
72 MG Midget 
69 Camero SS convert. 
68 Chevelle2dr. HT 
65 Mustang convert. 


TRUCKS—RVS 

79 BendixM/H,23' 

79 Jeep Wagoneer 4x4 
79 International Scout 
78 BendixM/H, 19' 
77EldoradoM/H,21' 

74 Ford PU, V* 

73 Ford PU, canopy 
71 Toyota 4x4, winch 


DOWNTOWN AT 



VOLKSWAGEN 


971 YATES at Vancouver 
385 2415 

Dealer 5180 


71 TOYOTA (>K)WN DELUXE 
n,Ydo< 


stationwagonTTdoor, automatic, 
6 cylinder, radio, good shape. 
Best offer 479-1212 


72 PLYMOUTH STATION 
wagon, power steering, power 
brakes, automatic, good condi¬ 
tion 388-5004 


72 DOOGE DART, 2 DOOR 
hardtop, 318 automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, lust 
tested, $1500. 595-0247 


1971 FORD COUNTRY SQUIRE 
Wagon, auto, p.s, p.b, some rust, 
needs brake work. $950. 388-7548, 
after 6 


71 GTO, 4 SPEED. 450 CU EN 
pine- sunroof, new clutch, excel¬ 
lent condition. Askino $4100 or 
best offer 598-2405 Ask for Gord 


72 FORD TORINO, 4 DOOR, 302. 
power steering, power brakes, 
AM/FM 8 track, very clean, 
$1,450 382-8015 


71 COUGAR AUTOMATIC, 
power^steerlng. power brakes 


1972 MERCURY MONTEGO, 2 
door hardtop, ps/pb. Good condi¬ 
tion. 479-6194. 


1972 TOYOTA CELICA. GREAT 
condition, runs well, with tape 
deck $2095 477 3000. 


1971 FORD TORINO 500, 302 
motor, very little rust. $875. 
478-6486. 


71 DODGE CHARGER. GOOD 
condition, radials, tested, $1100. 

385-7663. 


1971 PLYMOUTH CAR IN 
^oc^tjOndltlon. Reasonable. 


71 CHARGER, RALLY RIMS, 
du«l headers, 

offers.598-2756, Les 


1971 VW BEETLE, MECHANI- 
cally sound, body needs work. 
$750 or otters. 384-5973. 


1972 CHEVELLE, 4 DOOR 
automatic, 6 cylinder. $1200 


1971 TOYOTA CROWN WAGON. 

clMn 


1972 TOYOTA WAGON. EX- 


197! TOYOTA COROLLA, EX 
cellent condition, tested, U.000 
of best offer. S9S-S229. 


197? TORONADO, LOADED, 
verv^cfeen, first sleoo takes. 


72 GRAN TORINO WAGON. 351 
Clevelend. outo, P.S, P. B, 76.000 
Just tested. S1600 OBO 592-1330 


71 OATSUN 510, ORANGE. 4- 
5£eed^oreet condition, $1775. 


1972 CADILLAC. LOADED. 
Phone Jonn. after 5, ,768103 


71 VEGA. RUNNING CONDI- 
tlon. best offer. 382-5094. 


71 VENTURA 2-DOOR POST. 

30. after 5. 


&-cvllnder. 474-2480.. 


71 VEGA, 4 CYLINDER. RUNS 
well. S700 Phone 3816018 


V S2t iTI ,*£GTO. MUST SELL 
by 20th $1300 offers. 479-2724. 


fOR SALE 71 FIRENZA. $150. 
384-5709. 


1971 FORD STATIONWAGON. 
Otters. 598-1861. 


1970 art Mifer 


1968 PARISIENNE. $800 OR 
best offer. Phone478-6526. 


firm. 382-7430. 


1967 VALIANT FOR SALE. EX- 
cellent condition. $1500.384-1280. 


1969 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX. 
388-9488. 


1948 CHEV. 4 DOOR. $900. 
Phone Cobble Hill 743-3085. 


1949 MONARCH, MINT CONDI 
tlon, $3000 or best offer. 478-6580 


1966 VOLVO 122 SEDAN FOR 
parts, some new. $170.385-9972 


1970 OATSUN 510, 1600 4- 
speed, asking $900.478-4914. 


150 CARS FOR SAL£ 



MANY OF OUR 
VEHICLESHAVE A 
CROWN SEAL, 

1 YR. WARRANTY ON 
THE POWERTRAIN! 
CHECKOVERTHESE 
SELECTED UNITS — 
FOR YOUR OWN 
PEACE OF MIND! 

78 FUTURA, A/T $5895 

75 MONTE CARLO (Air) 14895 
77 VOLARE, A/T $4995 

79MALIBU Wgn. $7895 


OPEN 

Mon.-Thurs.,9-9 
Frf.-Sat ,9-6 
2867 Douglas at Topaz 
382-7)21 Dealer 5701 


POINT 

MOTORS 


Mercedes-Benz 

PORSCHE 

1979 

DATSUN 
. 210 
Four door sedan 
automatic, radio 

$4,895 


We have a good selection 
of low-mileage 1979 Dat- 
sun staff cars. There are 
wagons, hatchbacks, and 
two and four door sedans. 
These are all bargain- 
Driced and any reason¬ 
able otter wll be accepted. 
We also have a nice selec¬ 
tion of quality used cars. 


OPEN 'TIL6P.M. 
Government 
at 

Hillside 

385-6737 


Dealer 5053 


1967 THUNDERBIRD. RE 
built motor, transmission, ex 
cellent interior, many new parts 
Needs minor body work, wind 
shield, paint, and an owner who 
is willing to finish our partial 
restoration Best offer, or trade 
for van 385-0481 


1965 PLYMOUTH SAVOY, 
slant 6, 2-door post, excellent 
shape, $525.1969 Buick Le Sabre, 
2-door hardtop, some rust, motor 
oood, $500 Both cars can be seen 
at Trio Ready Mix, 773 Cordova 
Bay Rd between 8-4:30. Monday 
Friday, in evenings call 479-5526. 


1960 LINCOLN 
For the collector this Is a clean 
unit and one of the few remaining 
original Mark Vs. 

SPECIALTY MOTORS 
381 5544 385-7733 Dealer 6033 


70 RANCHERO 


motor, brakes and tonneau. 
Phone 478-0723 or 386-3SS8; 7-9 
pm. $2200o.b.o. 


67 BUICK SPECIAL 

2 dr. KT, ps. pb. 340 cld, low 
mileage. 

SPECIALTY MOTORS 
381-5544, 385-7733 Dealer 6033 


1968 CADILLAC COUP DE 
Vllle. sliver grey, black interior, 
all power, tinted glass, excellent 
condition, 78,000 miles, tested to 


off'^ur'- 5 ' 000 ° r bes ' 


1968 CHRYSLER NEWPORT. 2- 
door hardtop, automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, excel¬ 
lent running condition, new tires, 
tested, needs paint. $595 or best 
otter. 3860415. 


1956 PONTIAC 4 DOOR, STAN 
dard. Very clean. Very solid. 
Rebuild disassembled 265 V8 or 
install your own small block. 
Original paint beginning to blis- 
ter $750.477-7318 


1969 PLYMOUTH ROADRUN 
ner, 2 door hardtop, new paint, 
new tires, 383 magnum, shift kit, 
high perfomrace car. Best 
offers. 381-1135 or 388-6275 pager 
2564. 


steering, power brakes, 2 door 
hard top. V8, 70,000 original 
miles, cassette, buckets, tilt 
steering, clean. $1500 or best 
offer. 385-2869 


1964 ACADIAN WAGON. STAN- 
dard, excellent running condi¬ 
tion. New brakes, clutch and al 
tern a tor In last 20,000 miles. $600 
or nearest offer. 743-5265 or 
743-5419. 


1969 COUGAR XR7, NEW 

S aint, new exhaust, brakes. 

51W automatic, headers, Holley 
hlghrise, power steering, power 
brakes, many extras. $3250. 
384-8466. 


64 GALAXI E STATION 
wagon, power steering, power 
brakes, --- - 


"Bwmi, iwnci jinnitiw, uuwci 

braxes, 390. excellent running 
condition, good traveling or 
work wagon. $525 or offers. 
658-5589. 


1967 DODGE DART GT. 273 4 
barrel, new radials, bucket 
seats, console shift, auto, very 
clean. $1500 or best offer. 
478-1105 after 6pm. 


66 MUSTANG, NEW 302. 3- 
speed automatic, crulse-o-matic 
console, black interior, gooc 
body, new paint, good tires, new 
chrome. Must be seen, 652-1408 


1963 MERCURY METEOR. 2 
door hardtop, power steering 
and brakes, fender skirts, $895 

£S v ,i.L ,2 - 748 - 3W8 ' 6pm. 
748-1019. 


69 PLYMOUTH 318 AUTO. 
$1185. PALM AUTO WORLD 
INC . 386-8385, 3342 Oak Street 
Dealer 5260. 


1969 CHRYSLER NEWPORT 4 
door sedan, automatic, p.s/p.b. 
49,000 miles. Nice and clean, 
tested. $1070.382-9658. 


66COMETCALIENTA. POWER 
steering, power brakes, 390, 3 
speed automatic, tested. Offers. 


68 BUICK SKYLARK CUSTOM, 
2 door hardtop, power steering, 
power brakes, 74,000 miles. 
After 6pm 479-6935 


1956 CHEV, 4 DOOR, V8. COM- 
stocked, $1500. Phone 


1956 METEOR WAGON, Re¬ 
built 292, 312 heads, 2 new tires. 
Restorable $575 388-6962. 


65 SUNBEAM IMP. RUNNING 
condition Brakes need work. 
382-5606 after Spm. 


1967 CHEVY II, FOUR DOOR, 
six cylinder Excellent condl 
tlon. Tested. $1100.386-2406. 


69 PLYMOUTH FURY III, NEW 
g<Hnt^mechanically sound 


LADY'S 1969 CHRYSLER 
tested, tuned, trailer package 
$750 firm. 384-0835. 


ISO CARS FOR SUE 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 



If you are looking at Rab¬ 
bit, Honda or any ot the 
front wheel drive cars on 
the market, you owe it to 
yourself to check out the 

1980SUBARUS 

* Hatchback 

* Hardtops 

* Sedans 

* Wagons 

* 4 wheel drives 


The Small Car 
SPECIALISTS 
Offer these economy 

SPECIALS 

79 Chevette 4 dr. AT, blue 
- M.995 

79 Chevette 2 dr. AT, red 
$4,895 

79 Chevette 4 Dr. AT, dark 
blue $4,995 

79Chevette4 Dr. AT, light 
green • $4,995 

78 Honda Civic H/Bk. 4 
sod. $4,895 

78 Honda Civic H/Bk. 4 
SOd. $4,495 

78 Concord DL 6 cvl. AT 
$5,295 

76 Maverick, 6 cyl, AT 
$3995 

72 Mazda 616, 1 Owner, 
40.000 miles $U95 

72 Cortina, 1 Owner, 43,000 
miles,silver,4sod. $1,695 


MANY MORE TO 
CHOOSE FROM 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 Douglas 
(OeoositeICBC) 
Dealer 6605 384-1161 



'72 Merc Marquis $2695 
'73 Maverick Grabber 

$2795 

'74 Austin Marina $2195 
'74Pinto2dr. $2695 
'75 Chev Nova 4 dr. $4295 
'75ChevCaorice $3995 
'76 Maverick 4 dr. $4295 
'76 Pacer 2 dr. $4395 
'76 Plymouth Volare 2 dr. 

$4195 

'76 Datsun 710 4 dr. $4295 
'78 AMC Concord 2 dr 
$4995 


* GUARANTEED 
* SAFETY TESTED 


The Super Lot 


REGMIDGLEY 
MOTORS LTD. 

385-8756 

Douglas at Cloverdale 

Dealer Lie. 5186 


CLASSIC 1964 FAIRLANE 500 2 
door Coupe, 289, 4 speed, radials 
and more. Must be seen. $1,00C 
firm. No Trltlers please. 385-9753 
between 4-7pm 


1970 TOYOTA COROLLA STA 
tionwagon, 4-speed standard, 
radio New front brakes and ex 
haust. Everything works. $735 
firm 598-7782 or 474-1479. 


1969 PONTIAC LAURENTIAN, 
45.000 miles on rebuilt 350, V8 
Good body and paint, tested. 
Needs one piston ring. $550 or 
best offer by Thursday. 479^5961. 


1966 CUTLASS, 4 DOOR HARD 
top, automatic transmission, 
power steering, power brakes, 
radio, radial tires, good condi 
♦Ion. $795 or best offer. 478-5012. 


1964 OLDS F85, SILVER-GRAY 
In color, 330, runs well, new 
brakes on all four $2500. 

386-2691. 


1969 VALIANT STATIONWA 
gon reliable, slant 6, auto trans, 
new brakes, good tires. $850 obo 
478-5759 after noon. 


1966 DODGE POLARA, 2 DOOR 
hardtop. Power steering, 
brakes, windows Excellent con 
dltlon. $1100.479 3687 


1964 CHEVY BISQUANE 2 
door post In good running shape, 
reliable transportation, $700 or 
offers. 384-5873 after 4pm. 


1969 BEAUMONT 307, 2-DOOR 
hardtop deluxe, power steering, 
new radlals, perma shine, excel- 
lent condition. $2200.382-4354. 


66 PLYMOUTH SPORTS 
Satellite 318. Excellent condi 
tlon, $2850 or best otter. 656-665C 
after 5. 


1970 NOVA, 2 DOOR SEDAN. < 
cylinder, 3 speed manual trans 
mission, low mileage, $1700 or 
best offer. 477-8570 


65 MERCURY MONTCLAIR 2- 
door hardtop, oood condition, 
asking $1200 or trade for Buick 


1969 MACH I. BLACK, IM 
maculate, $7000. Serious buyers 
only. 656-1131. 8-5 Mondav-Frl 
day, Denis. 


1968 DODGE CORONET. 1 
owner, power steering, power 
brakes, automatic V8 318. radio, 
clean 656-3203 


67 CHRYSLER NEWPORT 4 
door hardtop, automatic, power 
steerIng/power brakes. Runs 
well. S600r - *-- 


0 or best offer. 382-0471 


1970 TOYOTA COROLLA, 
standard shift, 2 door, 61,000 


miles, 4 nearly new tires, clean, 
sacrifice at $1,595.592-3323. 


1969 FORD FAIRLANE STA 
tlon waoon, excellent condition, 
cltv tested. $1195 offers. 
386-1427. 


67 DODGE DART GTO, 2 DOOR 
hardtop, vinyl roof, automatic 
318, bucket seats, PS, PB, $1750. 
477-1461. 


65 fORO FALCON STATION 
wagon, 90, 


..J,000 miles, new trans 

mission, spare motor, $250. 
656-7546. 


66 FAIRLANE XL500. 2 DOOR, 
V8, factory 4 speed, fresh paint, 
striping, good condition. Asking 
$1400. 388-9571 


150 CARS FM SALE 


C-6 


k /y V 
A^ifeieani 


CHEVROLET 

OLDSMOBILE 


OMEGA 

80 OMEGO 2 door, 4 Cylin¬ 
der automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, 
radio. GM's new front 
wheel drive. Less than 11,- 
000 kilometers. Finished 
inblack $7,850 


CUTLASS 

75 CUTLASS 2 door, V8 
automatic, power steer¬ 
ing, power brakes, radio. 
A beautiful automobile, 
only 38,500 miles. Fin 
ished in blue with match 
ing cloth trim. $4,850 


MALIBU 

79 MALIBU 4 door, V6 
automatic, power steer 
ing, power brakes, radio, 
32.000 kilometers. An eco 
nomical car. Finsihed in 
green with matching vinyl 
trim. " $6,150 


FORD 


74 FORD ' 2 ton Pickup, V8 auto¬ 
matic, with canopy Finished in 
brown with natural trim. Only 
$3,250 


MOST CARS 
BCAAINSPECTED 


• MON.-FRI. 
8:30a.m. - 9p.m. 
SAT. 9-6 


Millstream Chevrolet 
OldsmobileLtd. 
1730 Island Highway 
474-1211 
Dealer Lie. D 5831 


1969 MUSTANG 351, AUTO 
matlc, vinyl roof, radio, oood 
condition. One owner $3495 
477-3781 


67 COUGAR. $2999 , 72 COLT, 
automatic, one owner. $1995 
Phone Grant, Metro Econo Lot. 
386-1711 Dealer 6290. 


1968 DATSUN "510", $1299; 71. 
240Z. Call JOHN HORA, METRO 
ECONOLOT, 386 1711 Dealer 
6290 


1966 VW STATIONWAGON, 6000 
miles on new motor Best offer 
Good condition. 592-1680 after 6 
pm. 


69 TOYOTA, GOOD TRANS 
portation without the glamour or 
expense of a Caditla 
477-9924 


, $830 


70 PONTIAC. GOOD RUNNING- 
condition, offers on $750. Can be 
viewed at 538 Hillside Ave. Mon 
dav Saturday, 8:30-4:30pm. 


68 FALCON WAGON, 6 CYLIN 
der automatic, good mechani 
callv, good on gas, $300 
112-246-9752 


69 FORD GALAXIE 2-DOOR 
hardtop, 390 engine, auto, power 
brakes, power steering. $750 or 
best offer 383 2034 


1967 FALCON, AUTO, RADIO, 
$289. PALM AUTO WORLO 
INC., 386 8385. 3342 Oak St 
Dealer 5260 


1952 PONTIAC 4-DOOR SEDAN. 
62,000 miles, good condition 
throughout, manv spare parts 
$1695 or offers. 478-5959 or 
478-1421. 


63 VALIANT 4 DOOR, 74.00C 
miles, 170 slant 6. 3-speed man 
ual, mechanically A-l, no rust, 
good rubber and tested. $900 


63 CHEV IMPALA SS, RE 
built 327, turbo 350, shift kit 
cassette deck Excellent condi 
tlon, except for some rust. $2,00C 
I-S315. 


obo 721-5 


62 CHEV II WAGON NEEDS 
new family, runs well, lovingly 
maintained, government ispect 
ed, custom 3rd seat, 2 spares, 
best otter 477-2410 


69 RIVIERA 

Fully loaded including air condi 
tionlng, recent rebuilt motor, ex 
cellent condition, otters or trade 
595-5141 


1968 PLYMOUTH STATION 
wagon, tested Excellent me 
chanical condition with a couple 
of small dings $650 or best offer 
by February 25th 656-6030 


70 CHEV IMPALA 2 DOOR 
hardtop, 350, mags, raised letter 
tires. Been family car. Gooc 
shape $1500. 1255 Pearce Cres 
477-5925 


69 PONTIAC 2 DR HT $497 
PALM AUTO WORLD INC 
386-8385, 3342 Oak Street. Dealer 
5260 


1970 DUSTER 2 OOOR HARD 
top, V8 automatic, power steer 
Ing, $1,295 479-5451. 


1965 PONTIAC 6 CYLINDER, 
oood running order. $100, Rich 
388-9333, 386-3665 evenings. 


69 BUICK SKYLARK. 2 DOOR 
hardtop, $1350 or offers 
382 3367. 


67 CUDA. REBUILT MOTOR, 
trans, brakes, exhaust. Otters 
656-7603,656-3822. 


1969 VAUXHALL 4 SPEED 
Very economical, tested, radio, 
$695 383-1927 


68 CAMARO, 327, AUTOMA1 
1/fm C 


r .v., p.b., am/fm cassette, 
trade for truck or offers. 386-t 


68 METEOR RIDEAU, NEEDS 
brakes, $250 or best offer 
385-1909 


67 MUSTANG F ASTBACK, C 
390 auto, power steeri 
598-7694 


1965 CHEVY NOVA. 4 DOOR, 
oood transportation. $450 firm 
479-0854 


65 PONTIAC LAURENTIAN, 
new brakes and fires, good run 
nlngorder, $37S 386-8190 


68 T - ELI R D, RUNS WELL, 
needs some r J 


bodywork, offers 


1969 VAUXHALL VIVA. 4 DOOR 
automatic. Inspected, new tires, 
$450. 595-7802. 


1967 SUNBEAM MINZ, 4 DOOR 
automatic, some body rust, $150 
595 7802. 


1965 DODGE. USED DAILY, 
needs work, one family owned. 
$125,595-3916 


1969 MUSTANG CONVERT 
ible, 4-speed, new brakes and 
exhaust, $1995. 598-2709. 


63 VOLKSWAGEN, CHEAP RE 
liable transportation, asking 
$500 384-4928. 


69 VOLKSWAGEN 
Beetle, good condlt 
7133. 


$1,050.656-71; 


67 FIREBIRD, 326, REBl 
high performance, oood ( 
Ask for Earl 385-0326. 


1967 THUNDERBIRD, GOOD 
condition, offers. 479-6964 


67 FORD FALCON, RUNS OK, 
$300 After 5, 598-4783. 


1966CHEVY BEAUMONT 
Offers 477-5248 


1962 PONTIAC STRATOCHIEF, 
running order. 384 1976. 






































































































































































































































































































































































C-7 

i 5 i outs rot mi 

den Oak 



Tell A Friend 
"Choose From 
Victoria's Finest 
Selection 
Ot Used Cars" 

1978 Pinto, 3 dr, AT. Sil¬ 
ver. $3950 

1978 Horizon sedan in 
Aztec Gold. AT. R $4950 

1979 Volare sedan. Very 
low mileage. $5450 

1979 FuturaACVl.AT.PS. 
19,000 miles. $5*50 

1979 Mustang V6, AT, PS, 
PB. $6250 

1979 Horizon HB, 9,000 
miles. $6450 

1978 Monte Carlo 307 V8, 

tilt, AT, PS, PB. Lovely 
condition. $6450 

1979 Camaro. Only 18,000 

miles. $6950 

1980 Fairmont sedan. 
1,200 miles. $6950 

1980 Mazda 626 sedan, 900 
miles. $7250 

1979 LTD 2 door. Loaded, 
15,000 miles, lovely sil¬ 
ver. $7450 

12 month, 12,000 mile 
power train warranty 
available at 
modest extra charge. 

WE CAN 
LEASE YOU 
A LATE MODEL 
LUXURYCAR 
CALLOUR 
USEDCAR DEPT. 

24 Month Warranty 

Available on most units 

BCAA Inspections 

GLEN OAK FORD 
YATESATCOOK 
384-1144 Dealer 6616 


v owo 



lie mr 

LARGEST MUON 
Of MINED 

IS 


79 Volvo 244 DL, At. 

78 Volvo 245 DL, At. 

78 Volvo 242 GT, 4-spd. 
WD 

77 Volvo 245 DL, At. 

76 Volvo 242 DL, 4-spd., 
O/D 

76 245 DL, At. 

*76 Volvo 242 DL, 4-spd. 

76 Volvo 245 DL, At, 

76 Volvo244 DL, At. 

74 Volvo 164 E, At. 

74 Volvo 145, Auto. 

74 Volvo 145 E, 4-spd. 

73 Volvo 142 E, 4-spd., 
O/D 


BCAATESTED 


BANK FINANCE 


382-6122 


Corner ot Y ates and Cook 
Dealer 5603 


BEAUMONT WAGON NEW 
paint, tire* and chroma rim*. 
Must be seen. 384-8815. 


57 CHEV 2 DOOR 6 WAGON, 
government tested, otters. 
477-4636, 


1969 FORD GALAXIE 500, 2 
door, hardtop, Fastback. $700or 
closest. 386-3179 


1964 DODGE POLARA. NEW 
exhaust 


1968 CHEVELLE, 2 DOOR, 
automatic, 283, headers, side 
pipes, maos, $1600. 479-6549. 


1969 OLDS DELTA 88 2 DOOR, 
hardtop, 69,000 miles, new paint, 
cltv tested. $900tlrm. 384-1465. 


1967 FORD GALAXY SEDAN, 
excellent shape. Very low mile¬ 
age $1800.4T/-9934. 


1966 BUICK, 82,000 MILES. ME- 
chanicallv perfect, $850. 

656-6840, after 6. 


67 MUSTANG, AUTO, POWER 
duals, air shocks. 




1967 300 CUSTOM FORO $600. 
Phone 385-5010. 


65 CORVAIR TURBO, $300. 63 
Corvalr Monza, $200.478-6286. 


66 PARISIENNE. GOOD EN- 
pine new exhaust, $425.479-4165 


65 MUSTAl . _ 

needs work. $1000 firm. 477 


iNG 289. 4 SPEED. 
$1000 firm. 477-0011. 


55 A50 AUSTIN, CLEAN, TEST- 
ed. low mileage, $375.478-5275. 


m UltFOtUli 


*DeVape 



One owner wTth only 46.000 
miles Beautifully kept and well 
cared for. 



100 LS 1975 4 dr. auto, ps. pb, 
economical fuel inlected engine, 
air conditioning. One owner, 
lady driven, 25,000 miles. A 
super buy—Hurry ! 



S 


77 300D Diesel, sunroof, air. 
cruise control. PW, leather, Vic¬ 
toria one owner, 15,000 miles. 
Hurry for this one! 



S 


79 450SL. 2 tops, all luxury and 
power options. Metallic paint 
and leather. 6,000 miles. Bal¬ 
ance of factory warranty. Gor¬ 
geous car! 

79 Cadillac Seville Diesel 
79 Lincoln MKV. loaded 
78 Lincoln Versailles, loaded. 

78 Lincoln Towne Coupe. 12,000 
78 Cordoba. Beautiful—As new! 
78 Camaro.6cvl,asnew! 

77 TR7,4-spd-. air 
77 Volare Won. 6 cvl . auto 
76 VW Rabbit auto, nice! 

75 Lincoln Mk IV,25,000mi. 

75 Rabbit. 20,000 mi 
75 CamaroLTi, side pipes 
71 Rolls RoyceCornicheconv. 

71 Jaguar XJ6.4dr. Nice! 

69 Rolls Royce. 4 dr . Silver 
Shadow 

Open8:30-5:30 Closed Sat. 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD. 
Indoors at 779 Pandora 
384-8035 Dealer-5311 


PLIMLEY 


JAGUAR — ROVER 
TRIUMPH 

M.G. — MINI — SAAB 

1010 YATES ST. UZ-0121 


79 FIREBIRD FORMU¬ 
LA V8, power steering 
and brakes AM/FM. 
All as new $8695 

79 MERCURY CAPRI 
R/S. auto tram., power 
steering, and brakes, 
stereo, radio $8495 

74 MERCEDES BENZ 

240D, diesel. Nice con¬ 
dition $9995 

78 CHEVY NOVA, 6 cvl, 
auto trans, power 
steering, and brakes, 
radio $5495 

77 CHRYSLER CORDO¬ 
BA, 360 V8, power 
sheering, power 
brakes, air condi¬ 
tioned, AM/FM, power 
windows $6295 

77 DODGE ASPEN 
coupe, slant6cyl„ auto 
trans, power steering, 
radio $4895 

75 AUDI FOX 
automatic, radio, very 
clean, 39,600 miles 

$3795 

73 DATSUN 610 wagon, 4 
cvl automatic, radio 

$2695 

MANY MORE 
TO CHOOSE FROM 
DEALER 5351 

Every Used Car 

CARRIESA 

METROHONDA 
WARRANTY!! 

Every Used Car 

GOESTHRUTHE 

ESSO CAR 
CLINIC!!! 


METRO 

HONDA. 


388-6921 

(NEXfTOTHEARENA) 

2151 Blanshard 

Dealt-5876 

66 CHEVY II. 283. 4 BARREL. 

s2600 

or closest offer. 479-2391 


66 FORO CUSTOM, 6 CYLIN- 


1965 ACADIAN STATIONWA- 
oon, V8, good condition Am/fm. 
in-dash cassette. 385-2869. 


1970 AUSTIN AMERICA. A-l 
condition, $1)00. 382-5837 after 
5pm. 


69 VOLKSWAGEN SQUARE- 
back for sale, excellent condi¬ 
tion. Phone 592-1752. 


fAGON : 
16,000 mi 


» BUICK WILDCAT CLAS 
, all power, exceptional good 
>592-4024 


»lc, ... 

condition. Private 


1970 CAMARO SS, 4-SPEED. 

TA's. $3500. 


ana ' 


tVM.CHBVSLE R, <—POOR. 


7M ffi.' 


64 FORD, 6 CYLINOER, 2 
door, automatic, tested, sound 
mechanical, pood buy. 477-2008. 

66 BUICK WILDCAT. ALL 
powar. original condition. 445 
motor. 478-7356_ 

63 CHEVY II, 6 CYLINDER, 4 
doo r excelient condition, $1000. 

66 CUTLASS OLDS 425. POWE R 
st ear I no, power brakes. $750. 

1964 FAIRLANE STATION 
wagon. $395 or bast of far. 

67 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE. 

tested, S147S. 382-9474._* 

68 BUICK LESABRE. PAST 
government test, $500.598-2954. 


150 CARS FOR SALE 


1969 PARISIENNE, VERY 
cjean^r ell able transportation, 


1969 VW SW. AUTO, 479-0721 
after 5pm. $1000, 


66 CHRYSLER, 383. $200 OR 
best offer 477-3203. 


69 GRAND PRIX, OFFERS. 
478-5113 evenings. 


67 VALIANT, NEW BRAKES, 
very dean. S1100.479-5106. 


v SHOO. 41 

1963 BUICKViLDCAT. NEEDS 

work. What otters? 656-5768. 


1965 VALIANT, GOOD CONDI 
tion. tested $650.658-8301 


66 CHEVY II NOVA. 382 3438, 
386-1042, after 6 pm. 


1939 DODGE SEDAN RESTOR- 
able. $1000 598-4939 before 4 pm 


65 CHRYSLER NEWPORT, 
one owner. 477-3920. 


1969 CHEVELLE. $650 OR 
Offers. 479-0507. 


69 DODGE DART CUSTOM. V8. 
3 speed auto. Otters. 595-7597. 


151 SPORT, IMPORT CUS 


A 


< 

donna 

capital city auto 


FIAT 

Strada. Just two 1979 models 
left. FROM $6595 

X19 TARGA Sports. Just two 79 
models $9,555 


BMW 

M. Selection In ! 


1980 3201. Selection in stock 5 
speed, sun roof. E.P.A. 
rated at 8.1 L/100 km (35 
MPG). Price incl. dealer 
service. FROM *14,595 

I960 5281. 5 spd, sunroof, E.P.A. 
rated at 9.8L/100km (29 
M P.G.). Price Incl. dealer 
service FROM $22,355 

1979 3201, reseda green, sun roof, 
AM/FM stereo radio, 6,000 
km, 9 mo. warranty, 1980 
repl. cost $15,375. NOW 

$13,350 

1975 5301, aut. anthracite grev 
met., stereo cassette, air 
cond., full service history. 
GOOD VALUE. CHOICE 
6F TWO. $10,795 

1975 5301, stick shift, in Sienna 
brown met., sunroof, stereo, 
full service history. Only41,- 
000 nfl. $10,995 

MISC. 

1979 SAAB EMS in light blue 
metallic. Only 8,000 klm. AS 
NEW $13,500 

1978 Pontiac Firebird in black, 
tilt wheel, stereo casette. 
spare snow tires. Only 16,000 
mi. Good Value at $6495 

1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 Con¬ 
vertible in electric blue, 
Dellorto carb, headers, only 
13.500 ml. Get ready for 
Spring $6395 

1750GOVERNMENT ST 

386-7508 Dealer 5066 


LIKE NEW 

1979 Datsun 280ZX. GL, 6 cvl, 
fuel Inlection, air conditioning. S 
spd. trans, ps, pb. pw, cruise 
control, quad stereo radio, am 
fm. power antenna, rear wiper 
and washer, rear defroster, re¬ 
mote hatch release, power mir¬ 
rors, full instruments, head light 
washer, trouble light, mag 
wheels, Perm* Shine. Call Les 
Carr, 9 to 6, 385-4444 after hours 
721 -3798. LES CARR SALES 8i 
LEASING- Dealer6690_ 

1977 CORVETTE. SHOWROOM 
condition, loaded, air, cruise 
control. AM/FM stereo, 8-track, 
luogage rack, plus extras. Near 
new G60 white letter Goodyear 
radials, 350. automatic. Rare 
combination of sliver blue exte¬ 
rior. smoke grev leather and ve¬ 
lour interior. Have bought 1980. 
Must sell. Offers on $11,900. 
479-0652. _ 

76-77 VOLVO 264 GL. TOP OF 
the line In metallic copoer, 234)00 
miles. In absolute show room 
condition. Fuel Injection, all 
electric, sunroof, air condition¬ 
ing, leather, l-track. Quartz 

MUST SELL MY 1978 SILVER 
Anniversary Edition votkswa 
gen Rabbit. Excellent condition 
One owner 26,700 miles Worth 
$5800 to me. what's it worth to 
yo u? 595-7968. _ 

H »1 CORVAIR MONZA 900 
sport coupe, new black paint and 
front air damp.plus pin striping, 
new rims and tires, new 4 speed 
and dual exhaust New carpet 
and Interior. 474-t795_ 

1966 RED MGB. 65.000 MILES. 
Immaculate, new convertible 
top, factory hardtop, tonneau, 
radials. snow tires, padded roll 
bar Must be seen. $3200 Phone 
Susan, 477-2176, after 4 pm. 

MUST-SELL MY 1978 SILVER 
Anniversary Edition Volkswa 
gen Rabbi). Excellent condition 
One owner 26.700 miles. Worth 
$5800 to me, what's It worth to 
you? 595-7968. _ 

1973 FIAT 124 SPYOER, LOW 

mileage, custom paint, mag 
wheels, radials. AM FM cas¬ 
sette, mu st sell. Make an otter on 
$4000. 592-3726 evenings._ 

240Z. 1972. MUST SELL. NEW 
silver on black paint, new clutch, 
new tires, 64,000 miles. $3800. 
P^home between 4pm-6pm. 

75 TRIUMPH TR7. 4 SPEED, 
excellent condition, 45.000 miles. 
$5495. Call Brad Horman, 
386-35)6, Metro Toyota. Dealer 
6290._ 

1966 TRIUMPH TR4A, EXCEL 
lent condition, British racing 
green, no rust. Wire wheels, 
hardtop, 69,000 miles, city test- 
ed, asking $4000,479-4669 

1974 FIAT 124 SPYDER COM 

pletely reconditioned end well 
maintained. 55,000 miles, $4000 
firm, view at 1341 Hillside. 
383-6802._ 

1972 BMW 2002. LOW MILES. 
Immaculate condition, many 
0f 

MUST SELL 1977 CORVETTE, 
will accept trade as pari pay 
ment.^ Make an offer. 384-3479 

74 VOLVO 142 GRANDLUXE, 

ras&nmtrfe: 

tween 6-7pm._ 

72 CAPRI, 2600 V6, EXCEL 
lent condition. Receipts for work 
done. Offers on $2495. 381-2183 
between 6-7pm. 


1972 VOLVO WAGON, A-l CON 
dltion, radial*, Clbie lights, trail¬ 
er hltch/wlrlng, 70-000 miles, one 
owner. $3500.652-3284._ 

67 FASTBACK MUSTANG GT 4 
speed, completely rebuilt en- 
w&jtc. Lots of extras. $4200. 
595-2015,479-5101. 


CITROEN 

1972 Citroen Safari, 7 passenger 
well maintained. 95,000 miles. 
$6000. 383-0405,386-0911 


68 VOLKSWAGEN CONVERT 
I hie, excellent condition, asking 
$3000_or bast of far. Burnaby 


1966 CHEVELLE MALIBU, 2 
door hardtop, 283 stock, mags, 
automatic, offers to $1900. 
384-5445. 


LOTUS ELAN PLUS 2. 1969. 37.- 
000miles. New paint, apod condi 

1978 CORVETTE. SILVER AN- 
nlyecsary edition, fully loaded, 
mint condition, asking $15,500. 


1974 VOLVO 142. AUTOMATIC. 

sarstftf 1m "" c, «"- 


5» TRIUMPH TR3. EXCEL 
lent condition. >4200 or best 
offer 386-3790. 


^ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 


151 SPORT, IMPORT CARS 

1977 TR7 EXCELLENT CONDI 
tlon, 17.000 miles. Offers? 
474-2643._ 

1972 KARMANN GHIA, 48,500 
mUj|^lovelv condition, $5000 

1971 SPITFIRE. 32,000 MILES, 
needs paint, $1650. Mav take 
pickup as part trade. 656-3635 

59 MGA, REBUILT ENGINE 
and transmission. Best otter on 
$3,000.382-9079._ 

1 976 AUDI 100, AM/FM 
ster eo^tapedeck, sunroof, $6000 

SLEEK LADY DRIVEN OPEL 
GT, excellent running order 
Asking $3000.479-5053_ 

74 BMW 2002 Til, ONLY 43,000 
miles, excellent condition, 
extras. 642-3152 or 383-693). 

1973 240Z, CITY TESTED, 
clean, sacrifice $2995. 3029 Earl 

Grev._ 

BEAUTIFUL 1973 XJ-6 JAG- 
uar, low mileage, immaculate 
condition, $9700 Phone devs. 
388-4*40 or evenings, 386-7205. 

1970 MERCEDES 250 4 DOOR, 
automatic, rebuilt engine, excel 
lent condition. *4995. Call 
598-1525 evenings. 

IMPORT CARS WANTED 
Call Jim Williams 384-1161 
Edward Motors. Dealer 6605 

1974 CORVETTE 

350 automatic- 385-5584, 5-7pm. 

79 HONDA PRELUDE, 15,000 
km., under warranty, extras. 
642 4840_ 

1976TR7, EXCELLENT CONDI 
ttojyxtcad to sell at $4750 firm. 

1974 VOLVO 144 AUTOMATIC 
17,200 miles near new $4900. 
656-4060 


1974 FIAT X19, GOOD CONDI- 
tion, asking $3800 or best offer 
477-5747_ 

1976 TR-7 COUPE, SUNROOF, 
mags/TA's. Must be seen. 
Offers. 477 2815 

1973 240Z. 4 SPEED- IN MINT 
condition. 598-5030 


FIAT X19, 1974, 53-000 MILES. 
Offers. 656-5648. 


TRADE 1970 GMC Vz TON FOR 
small car. 478-7051 after 4 “* 


1974 MGB, $2800. 
479-6663 


tS4 


TRUCKS, BUSES 
W0 VMS 





THE HOME OF 
LINCOLN 

MARQUIS, COUGAR, 
XR7, ZEPHYR, 
CAPRI, BOBCAT, 
FORD TRUCKS 


Tl 


Let's 

Go Min 


STOCK 0 IOOA 

79 CHEV 4X4, pickup. 

4 speed $8495 

STOCK0-140A 

79 FORD V4-lon window 
van. Captain's chairs, 
etc. $8695 

STOCK472 VA 

78 CHEV 1 ton. V8, C/W 
steel Box. Only 14,000 
Km $8695 

STOCK 9422A 

78 DODGE Maxi Van. 
Camperized $6495 

STOCKO-I47A 

78 FORD Econo Van, 6 
cvl., auto $5995 

STOCK 0 78B 

78 FORD F100 pickup. 6 
cvl., std. trans. S5495 

STOCK 9783A 

77 FORD F150, 4X4. V8, 
auto $5695 

STOCK 9I4AA 

77 FORD 3 /4. V8, auto, air 
cond. $6595 

STOCK 0-1UA 

77 FORD FI 150 Van. V8, 
auto, cassette, camp¬ 
erized $7495 

STOCK 0-I24A 

77 FORD FI50 pickup. 
V8, auto, P/S, P/B 

$4995 

STOCKM16B 

76 FORD 3/4 ton. V8, A/T, 
P/S, P/B $4595 

STOCK 0-35A 

75 FORD Va ton. A/T., V8 

$4495 

STOCK P10UA 

75 FORO Va ton. Super 
Cab, C/W camper $5795 

STOCK 0-202B 

75 FORD 3/, ton. V8, A/T, 
P/S, P/B $3595 

STOCK 9185 A 

68 VW Van, camperized, 
4 spd. $2295 

THESE, AND 
MANY MORE 
TO CHOOSE FROM! 

ALL ON DISPLAY AND 

CLEARLY 
PRICE TAGGED! 

SUBURBAN 
MOTORS 
3377 Douglas 
386-6131 

_Dealer S578_ 

72 GMC Fleets ide % ton. elect, 
hyd. tilt box. box liner, warn 
winch. Quartz lights, am/fm 8 
tf *ck, cassette etc. New engine, 
automatic differentials, brakes 
etc. etc. etc. Excellent condition, 
$6,800. Bob 478-9609 


154 


TRUCKS, BUSES 
AND VANS 


B. 


MOTORS LTD. 

78 DODGE camper van *10.500 
77 GMC % ton auto. Only 25,000 
mi $5795. 

77 FORD V 4 ton, 4 spd $4995 
76 TOYOTA PU SR, 5 spd $4295 
76 FORD 150 4x4. low miles 
$6495. 

75 DODGE Ram Charger SE 
package *4495. 

74 DATSUN PU with canopy 
$2995. 

74 DODGE van, 6 auto. $3295. 

. 73 BODGE Super cab $2595 
PLUS A GOOD SELECTION 
OF LOW PRICEDCARS. 

260) SOOKE RD. (Glen Lake) 
478-50)1_Dealer 5450 

HAVE WE 
GOT TRUCKS 

1977 Chev Shorty V8 4 sp. 

1977 Dodge lOpass Royal 
Sportsman 

1977 Oodge Maxi Van with seats 

1972 to 1973 Dodge Vans 

6 only from *2,995. 

1977 Datsun pickup 

1973 Chev Suburban trailer 
hauler. 

20NLY 

1976 Ford Cab & Chassis 
TRADES WELCOME 

Downtown Sidney 
Auto Sales 

2360 656-7259 

Beacon Ave Dealer 5078 

1964 JEEP, 2 WHEEL DRIVE. 
3 4-ton pickup. $800 or best offer. 
1976 GMC Jimmy deluxe model. 
4 wheel drive automatic, radio, 
tilt steering wheel, power steer 
Ina, power brakes, fully carpet¬ 
ed and finished In Naugahyde 
$8400. 1977 Chev Scottsdale 20. 
V 4 -ton camper special. 4 wheel 
drive automatic. 350 engine, 
power steering and brakes. Tilt 
steering, dual fuel tanks, 
canopy. S6.59S. Days 
112-748-3838, after 6pm, 746-5284 

FAST 81 ECONOMICAL 
72 Volkwaoen van, excellent 
shape, 4000 miles on large bore 
motor. Webber carbs. mechani¬ 
cal distributor, sodium exhaust 
valves. SS headers, Hurst 
shifter, tac and new shocks. Car 

K ted with skylight and folding 
d. $4000 or best offer. Call 
collect 112-743-4065 after 5:30pm 
weekdays or all da^weekends 

1968 FORD F100 
Red and silver, 1974 360, man 
trans, mags, tires, mirrors, dual 
baft., headers, dual exhaust, 
4:10 gears, extra 3:55 gears, 
overloads, T. hitch, sound sys¬ 
tem, sunroof and more. Must 
sell. $3000 O B.O. Will take 
trades. 592-4351._ 

1977 CHEV SILVERADO, 
heavy duty % ton Camper Spe¬ 
cial. Power steering, power 
brakes, automatic, 350 cu. In. 4 
barrel, dual tanks, fiberglass 
canopy. 12"xl6Vz" tires on alu- 
minum turbine rims, much 
more. Only 28.000 miles. Excel¬ 
lent condition. Asking $7800. 
383-2095 or 479-4984. 

79CHEV*-ton $5995 

77 FORD EXPLORER 4x4 $5295 
78 FORD Custom Steoslde $4995 
76GMC* 4 -ton $3995 

76GMC SIERRA CLASSIC 
Vz-ton $3495 

GEM MOTOR SALES 
480 Esaulmalt Road 
382-7195_Dealer 633 

YOU ALWAYS WANTED ONE? 
Like new Jeep C J5. Made In 1978 
Boiiht in 1979. Only 7,000 km. 
Used bv professional driver for 
fun only. Must sell. We're mov¬ 
ing valued by car dealer at over 
S7.000. Priced tor quick sale at 
$6,300. Call 721 3812 before 6 or 
598-2647 after 6_ 

1978 GMC GAUCHO VAN, PRE 
mium condition, automatic, 
power steering and brakes, 
chrome roof rock, ladder and 
grill, Thrush mufflers, nearly 
new radials. custom flares, Zie- 
bart, sunroof, etc, etc. Guaran¬ 
teed. 17.000 miles. $11,000. 
384 5825._ 

1977 DODGE 150 ADVEN¬ 
TURER PICKUP AND canopy 
V8, P/S. P/B. radio-tape, air 
condi ttoning, two tone brown and 
yellow. ESSO Tested, only 27.510 
Km. Call WHIT McGlLL. 
METRO HONDA. 388-6921 
Dealer 5876. 

1976 FORD F 150 PICKUP, 
power steerino/brakes. new 
11X15 LT tires on white spokes, 
dual exhaust, 4 speed, chrome 
box rails. Custom velvet in¬ 
terior. Some chrome, 18mpg. 360 
cu. In. V8. excellent condition, 
54,995 or best offer 478-6460. 

.976 RANGER Vz-TON, POWER 
steering, power brakes, 360. 
automatic, am/fm tape deck, 
dual tanks, sliding rear window, 
ckjal exhaust, rear step bumper, 
new tires, 2-tone. $3900, will con- 

1ifli»S&. ,r * de - Ml " Bav - 

1970 FORD VAN 

l n stock showroom condition, 59,- 
000 miles, 6 cylinder standard, 
good gas mileage, mechanically 
top shape, new shocks and ra¬ 
dials with maos, cassette stereo, 
white with black trim. $3000. 
384-51S4,385-8872. 

72 GMC 4x4 JIMMY 
Very clean truck, 350 auto. 
12x16.5 radials. tilt, tinted glass, 
full interior and chrome, tape 
deck Phone 478-0723 or 386-5558, 
7-9 pm. $4500o.b,o._ 

1974 CHEV TON 4X4 4 
speed, $5000 Invested In engine 
465 Hp 454. customized front 
end. new custom paint, many 
extras, a very fast truck driven 
daH^sSSOO. 478-1515 days, 

1977 CHEV 3/4 TON PANEL 
van, 350 automatic, ps, pb, 
white, 42,000 miles. $4395 

HERTZ RENTACAR 
Division Howtoar Leasing Ltd. 
388-4411 OPEN 7 DA YS WK 
Dealer Number 6499 

1953 AND 55 TON 4X4 M37 
Canadian Army trucks with ac¬ 
cessories, both in excellent run- 
ninacondition. bodies very good. 
$8500 for both or sold separately. 
Phone anytime Rick or Bill, 
384-4564 or 474-2507_ 

1972 FORD F250 4X4. 360 4- 
speed, free-wheeling hubs, 
tanks, l-ton rear end with duals, 
9vv all-steel fiatdeck. 78.000 
miles. Tested til Jan. '81. Good 


1979 FORD XLT F250 SUPER 
Cab, dark metallic green 2 tone 
paint. 460cu.in. air conditioning, 
tilt wheel, cruise control, camp¬ 
er special, dual tanks. Like new. 
3000 miles. Still on warranty 
Asking $11,300.1)2-749-39)5 


764x4 


Ford F ISO Va ton PU, V-8, 4 spd, 
ps.. pb., Warn hubs. $4495. 
PAINTER MOTORS, 3005 Douo- 
las, 388-6196 Dealer 5802 

1977 FORD ECONOLINE E150 
van, excellent condition, 17,000 
miles, 351 V8, power brakes, 
power steering, automatic, plus 
2 snow tires, *6500 or nearest 
offer. 479-4448._ 

MUST SELL 

1970 Ford *4 ton with 1 ton rear 
end,6cvllnder. 4speed, overload 
springs, headache rack, no rust. 
$1495 or best offer. 386-2050 any- 
time._ 

1977 GMC BEAUVILLE VAN. 
auto trans, PB, PS. Seats 8, two 
tone gold and brown Chrome 
wheels Chrome roof rack. Tint¬ 
ed rear and side windows. Im- 
maculate. $7,500.477-6066 

1979 GMC VAN, %TON LONG 
wheel bese, V8 automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, high- 
back bucket seats, panelled and 
Insulated. $7750 or best offer. 
474-1692. 

1978 FORD % TON PICKUP, V8, 
4 speed, power steering, power 
brakes, camper special, dual 

ay l a8i t fe TO,,lts<it 

78 GMC 4X4 JIMMY. 4 SPEED. 
350 4 barrel. 28,000 miles, mag 
wheels, $8/00. Phone collect 
112-344-6711 or 652-4636. 


154 


TRUCKS, BUStS 

MW VMS 


GARDEN 

CITY 


AUTO LEASE LTD. 

HOME OF THE 


78 Ford Vt PU, canopy 
78 Ford F150 Van 
78 Chev Va PU, canopy 
78 Chew Window Van 
77 GMC Va PU, canopy 
77 Ford Ranger XLT PU 
77 Dodge Van (Boogie) 

75 GMC Crew Cab 
69 Ford PU and camper 
77 Chev 4x4, V8, auto 
75 Ford PU6cvl. auto. 

TRADES WELCOME 
No Reasonable Offer Refused 
100% FINANCINGO.A.C. 

OPEN 

9:00 A.M.-8:00P.M. 

2978 DOUGLAS ST. 

382-9111 
Dealer 5721 


1959 FARGO '/a TON, $749. 
PALM AUTO WORLD INC., 
386-8385, 3342 Oak St., Dealer 
5260. 

1976 FORD 250 XLT 4X4, LOW 
mileage, pood condition, heavy 
GWD packaoe. mags and tires. 
$6500. After Spm, 474-1715 

1973 DODGE VAN, LOW MILE- 

age. 6 cylinder, stendard trans, 
$2850 or offers. 479-6321 after 
Spm_ 

1978 GMC VANDURA % TON 
van, 18,000 miles, mags, headers 
and many extras. S7500 or best. 
59^4852, after 6 992-4798. 

1974 SCOUT 4X4, 345 V8. 4. 

speed, 41,000 miles, excellent 
condition. $4500 or offers. 
748-1234, Duncan._ 

77GMC SIERRAGRANDE 
^6ton. PS/PB. auto, tilt/wheel, 
H/D cargo/window. $5600. 
743-4797._ 

MOVING MUST SELL SMALL 
school bus/camper very com¬ 
fortable. Good working order. 
All offers considered. 479-3360. 

1975 CHEV CAMPER SPECIAL 

pickup. Loaded with factory op¬ 
tions Plus! $3850. offers. 
656-6806._ 

1970 DATSUN PICKUP 4 
speed, 79,000 miles, 6 good tires, 
tested, excellent running condi - 
tion, $1500.383-9073 _ 

1976 CHEV SCOTSDALE, 350 Vz 

ton, automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, air conditioning. 
479-2979,_ 

1977 GMC SIERRA GRANDE. 
3S0 Vz ton, automatic, power 
steering ^wer brakes, dual 

76 GMC 4X4, SHORT BOX, 350. 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, roll bar, dual 
tanks, asking $6100 477-3005 

MUST SELL, 73 FORD RANG- 
er. Vz ton. 360, 4-speed, good 
body, with extras. $2500.479-3164 
or 4123 Holland Ave._ 

ASKING $8200 1977 CHERO 
kee wagon, 4 wheel drive Will 
consider trades up or down. 
598-2414 or 656-3727_ 

1970 FORD RANGER F250 
pickup ^i-ton, automatic, radio, 
p.s, p b, $1800 or trade for small 
car, 652-3829._ 

74 VAN Vj-TON, 302, EXCEL- 
lent condition, low mileage. 
Fully camperized Many extras. 
384-3893._ 

79 DODGE.VAN, 6 AUTO 
mafic, power steering, power 
brakes, excellent. 4-1331 John- 
son._ 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN VAN. 
camperized, gas heater, radials, 
good condition, $1995. or best 
offer. 652-5630._ 

MUST SELL. '76 SUPERCAB. 
AM/FM cassette, new tires, 8Vz' 
3-wav Vanguard camper. 
384-6083._ 

1-TON CHEV FLAT DECK 12,- 
000 GVW, auto, air, no-spin 22.- 
000 15' chassis mount camper, 
offers, 478-2483._ 

76CHEV V* TON, 3504 BARREL, 
power steering, power brakes, 
new canopy, excellent condition, 
$5500.652-1369_ 

54 MERCURY F100. V8. AUTO- 
matlc, dosi rear end, body and 
box in excellent condition, 
offers. 652-1369. _ 

77 CHEV CHEYANNE Vz TON 

pickup, 20,000 miles, power 
steering, power brakes, tilt 
steering, $5900 656-5473_ 

1969 F100 ’/,-TON FORD PICK¬ 
UP, 360 std., tested, power 
brakes. 385-6757 between 8 am 
and4 30pm., Monday toFriday. 


76 FORD F150. 4X4, 360 AUTO- 
matlc, winch, 11x15" tires on 
mam. Lots of new parts. Tested. 
$5000 385-6060_ 

1972 VOLKSWAGEN WEST- 
phalia, cassette tape, radials, 
excellent condition, tested, 
$4800 652-3788. 


1973 FORD % TON RANGER 
XLT, 390, automatic, headers. 
1200x16 5 tires, excellent shape. 
Must sell Offers. 595-8597 


68 FORD TRUCK, GOOO RUN- 
ning condition, $950 or best offer. 
Phone 743-S310 or 748-9771 

79 GMC SHORT BOX 4X4, 350 
automatic, with canopy. 25,000 
km. 478-3874 _ 

74 FORD 100 XLT, 40,000 
miles, like new. custom canopy. 
Extras. Best offer .656-4562 

1975 TOYOTA WITH CANOPY. 
30,000 miles, new condition, 
$3450,477-8752 _' 

70 SCOUT 4X4, V8, SUNROOF, 
roof rack, white spoke mam. 4 
speed. 652-5567_ _ 

1969 CHEVY VAN. 96,000 
miles, in running condition, new 
tires, $550.652-2527_ 

1963 FORD 6 CYLINDER WIN- 
dow van, runs well, $675. 
595-0587._ 

1968 GMC HEAVY DUTY HALF 
ton, V8, auto- good running 
order. $1300,384-1003_ 

1968 VOLKSWAGEN VAN. 
good^running condition, $1700. 

1972 DATSUN TRUCK AND 
camper, excellent condition, will 
sell separately. 595-5905_ 

1965 CHEVY Vz TON, 350 NEW 
motor. 2000 miles. $1100 or best 
offer. 3430 Seymour Avenue 

GEM 1972 DATSUN TRUCK 
Excellent shape. Also camper 
$2500. 385-6178. 


75 SUPER CAB RANGER, 
dual tanks, power steering, 
power brakes, tops. 478-0245. 

MUST SELL. 1969 DATSON 

»!X ru " 5 ' * 


65 INTERNATIONAL SCOUT 

76 GMC 4X4 Vz TON, EXCEL 
lent condition. $5500. Phone 


1970 DATSUN PICKUP, EX- 
c «llent running condition. 
479-7768. 


1977 JEEP CJ5, 22.000 MILES, 
many options Good condition. 
Best offer on $6000. 479-1303 


75 HIGH SIERRA 4X4, 49,000 
miles, excellent condition. Many 
extras. $7500. 477-6305 


78 CHEV SILVERADO WITH 
canopy. Immaculate. *7300. 


1972 GMC VAN, BUBBLE TOP. 
camperized with cabanna. $ 6000 . 

383-694). 


154 


TRUCKS, BUSES 

AND VANS 


1971 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER, 
4X4, sunroof, power steering, tilt 
steering, highback buckets. 
)2X 15 TA radials, extra rims and 
tires, spare parts, hood, fender. 
etc. All this for $4,000.479-7324. 

LATE 1977 FORD F250 % TON, 
42,000 miles, V8 4 speed. Ford 
canopy, 2 tanks. 17" split rims, 
?5 amp battery, many extras. 
Sturdy and dependable. $7000. 
382-3449_ 

1970 FORD SPORT CUSTOM 
pickup, tested, canopy, radio. 
60,000on 390engine, rebuilt auto¬ 
matic transmlssign, spare 
motor parts. *1950.656-5745 after 
6pm._ 

1974 FORD PICKUP, CANOPY, 
trailer special. V8 automatic, 
power brakes, power steering, 
mam- side pipes, AM/FM radio, 
must be seen. $3500 firm. 
479-5663__ 

77F150 4X4, SHORT STEPSIDE 
box. power steering, power 
brakes, 4 speed, AM/FM cas¬ 
sette, CB, 11x15 tires. 30,000 
miles, $6300 firm. 112-539-2724 
after 7pm. 

75 DODGE '/2-TON 

V8. auto, with canopy. Offers? 
SPECIALTY MOTORS. 

381-5544 385-7733 DEaler6033 

71 Ford % ton Van 

8 cvl. auto, $995. BRIDGE ST. 
MOTOR CO. LTD., 388-5714, 
652-4244. Dealer5)61. 

NUCLEAR FALLOUT 

Get away In this 1978 Land Cruis¬ 
er. YATES AUTO SALES. 
388-7722. Dealer 5268._ 

70 FORD VAN 302 AUTO. $1645. 
PALM AUTO WORLD INC., 
386-8385,3342 Oak Street. Dealer 
5260. 


1976 GMC VAN, 34,000 MILES, 
350, p.s., p.b., automatic vl, 
upholstered interior, cassette, 
AM/FM radio, $4500. 383-4018 
after 4:30pm._ 

79 CHEV Ki-TON PICKUP, 
only 5500 km, still on warranty. 
350 engine, tilt wheel, cruise, 
many extras. $8400 or best offer. 

1956 GMC W-TON, NEEDS 
work. $300. 1977Vz Ford ^-ton. 
custom camper special, 18,000 
miles, showroom condition, 
$7500. Rob 477-4370,_ 

65 FORD VAN IN MINT CONDI 
tion with new rebuilt 6 cylinder 
engine, new tires and complete 
new brake system, new paint 
job, $1800.477-6448,_ 

78 INTERNATIONAL SCOUT 
Traveller 4x4, V8, air, power 
brakes, steering, tilt, cruise, 
trailer towing package, im- 
meculate, $8»0. 598-7689, 

1974 VOLKSWAGEN VAN. NEW 
radial tires, snow tires, chains, 
roof rack, cargo box, accomoda¬ 
tion for sleeping and eating. 
S47S0.656-3890.__ 

1976 FORD E 150 VAN, 351, 
power steering, power brakes, 
automatic, AM/FM cassette, 
semi camperized. $5695 or best 
offer. 386-9159_ 

1973 TOYOTA PICKUP. 
Clean. Runs well. Clear-outprlce 
$1685. 384-1721, 592-3121. Soorts 
and Classic Cars. 640 Lower Hill¬ 
side. Dealer 5433 


78 FORD COURIER PICKUP, 
and canopy. Like brand new! 
Only 7,600 Km., $5995. Call Les 
Favle, 386-3516. Metro Toyota. 
Dealer 6290. 


1974 FORD F250, 38,000 MILES, 
new rubber, automatic, power 
steering, power brakes. $3295. 
Butler Bros Equipment, Keating 
X Rd Yard. 6S2-4437_ 

1978 RAMCHARGER 4 X4, 400. 
automatic, loaded, excellent 
condition. Will take older Scout 
or Landcrulser as part trade. 
479-9279. 


73 DODGE MAXI VAN. EXCEL- 
lent condition. $3000 or offers. 
388-S462, 384-6527 after 5pm 

74 FORD COURIER PLUS 
canojzy. $2450 or best offer. 


'77 BLACK 4X4 STEPSIDE 

GMC SierraGrand. automatic, 
fully-equipped. 478-2705. 

76 DATSUN AUTOMATIC P.U., 

new paint, exhaust, radials, 
$3750 595-4069._ 

69 FORD %-TON PICKUP. 79.- 
000 original miles, $1850. 
6S2-3000_ 

1970 FORD >/z TON TRUCK FOR 

sale- $900. 382-7204, between 
4:30-8pm._ 

1975 CHEVY VAN. 33,000 
miles. *2850. Phone 382-6432 
)0-5pm. 

1968 FORD % TON PICKUP, 
needs body work. Offers. 
477-5248 _ 

1971 FORD Vj TON, 3 SPEED, 

automatic. Must sell. $1300. 
642-3647 _ 

66 FARGO Vz TON TRUCK, 318,4 
speed standard transmission. 
canopy, $550 478 7422 after6pm. 

1972 FORD 500 MOVING VAN, 
new engine with 8000 miles, 
$6395.382-5837 after 5pm. 

77 FORD % TON CAMPER 
speciaL low mileage. $6500. 


1971 V 4 TON JEEP PICKUP4X4, 
new tires, breaks and engine. 
automatic. $3000.652-3687, 

1972 GMC Vz TON, CANOPY. 350 
V8, power disc brakes, good run- 
ning order. $2100.479-057’^ 

75 FORD F100 SUPERCAB, 2- 
tone paint, 55,000 miles, $4250 or 
offers. 478-1291._ 

1978 CHEVY VAN, 11,000 
miles, excellent condition, many 
extras. 652-3854 

1978 FORD TON VAN. DE- 
luxe interior. 479-9124 Monday- 
Frldav8-5. 


1971 FORD TON, 302, 4 
speed, 62,000 miles. $ 1200 . 
474-2575 after 6 pm. 


1974 DODGE WINDOW VAN, 
radials, radio, rear seat etc. Low 
mileage. $3500 477-0223 


76 MAZDA PICKUP. 1800, 
good condition, 30,000 miles. 
Offers on $3500.382-4907 


4X4 1976 LAND CRUISER, ME 
chanicallv A-l. Must sell to best 
otter. 652 3567 anytime. 


1977 DODGE ^.-TON CLUBCAB, 
360 motor, good condition, 
canopy, radials, $5795.6560321 


1965 MERCURY % TON. NON 
spin rear end. new flat deck, new 
paint, $875.478-6891. 


MUST SELL, 73 VW SAFARI 
camper, good condition. $4800 or 
nearest offer. 598-6218. 


68 FORD '/j TON, CANOPY, 
white spokes. 6 cylinder, stan- 
dard. $1,500. obo. 479-2724. 


1971 FORD %-TON, GOOD CON- 
dition, low mileage. Asking 
$2000.478-3458,642-4844. 


76 OATSUN PICKUP, CANOPY, 
excellent condition. $3995 or best 
otter. 478-6151 


1976 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER, 
46,000 miles, excellent mechani- 
cal condition, offers. 385-0633 


1969 SCOUT, 4 CYLINDER 
automatic, rlghthand drive, ex- 
cellent condition. $600.474-1058. 


77 DODGE y» TON AAAXI VAN, 
camperized, lots of extras. 
3860345 evenings 


1973 GMC Vi-TON. $1000 OR 
best offer. Needs paint. 382-9309. 


71 GMC VAN ASKING $1500. 
384-1539 after 4pm, 


1968 DODGE 200 CREW CAB. 
$1100.479-4605 after 6pm. 


CHEV STEP VAN. EXCEL- 
lent condition. $1400.385-1549. 


1972 FORD F100 4 X4, 360 4- 
speed, roll bar 598-4275 


!W9 CLUB WAGON, RUNS OK 
$700. After 5pm, 598-1610. 


1973 GMC 1500, GOOD CONDI- 
♦Ion, $2200. 383-9059. 


1969 DODGE VAN, GOOD RUN- 
nlnq order, $500.658-5834. 


385?S? GE PANEL TRUCk 


154 TRUCKS, BUSES 
ANO VANS 


1977 DODGE VAN B200 CUS 
tom % ton. AM/FM cassette, 
trailer hitch. $6000 o- nearest 
otter. 385-4388or 383-512J. 


1977 FORD ?6-TON 4X4, 400 EN- 
glne. power steering, power 
brakes, automatic. $6900 
658-5806. 


67 FORD HEAVY DUTY Vi 

ISoVw«<« 1 ^ r f, , ,'00 3 5 

best offer. 386-7288_ 

73 GMC % TON VAN, LONG 
box, V8. automatic, radio, win¬ 
dows one side, new tires, partial 
new paint. Offers. 382-6945 

MUST SELL. MOVING. 76 
Chev 4x4, extras, low miles, 
$6500, offers. 383-3375._ 

1970 FARGO, GOOD RUNNING. 
80.000, new brakes, tires, tune- 
up, covered box, $850.3834)580 

65 MERC VAN, 30,000 MILES 
on rebuilt engine, tested til Feb. 
81. saooflrm. 656-5363 after 7pm. 

1964 DODGE Vz-TON, V8, 3 
speed. $550. 478-5046 after 
4:30pm,_ 

73 TOYOTA HILUX, 4 SPEED, 
radio, oood condition Best otter 
over $2400 479-7804 9-5. 

69 CHEV '/5-TON, GOOD CON- 
dltlon, $1800.386-6)38._ 

67 DODGE PICKUP, 4 WHEEL 
drive, $2000. Phone 479-5)3) 

1969 Vi TON VAN. 56.500MILES, 
nice shape. Best otter . 381-0817 

1968 VOLKWAGEN VAN. $400 
_721 3307_ 

1970 FORD F250, 360 4 SPEED. 

$1,200 479-2426._ 

1960 VW CAMPER VAN. 
needs work to run $225.383-8501 

1964MERCURY FORD TRUCK. 
$500 Phone 385-5010_ 

1971 DODGE TRADESMAN 200 
window Van, $1,600.479-2255 

72 FORD Vz TON, $775. DOUG 
at 479-4723_ 

66 GMC Vz TON, 283, 3-SPEED. 

runs well, $400. 386-4015._ 

69 CHEV Vz-TON. 307 AUTO. 
$1300.652-3224. 

15* TIRES 


ALIGNMENT 

SPECIAL 

$ 12.88 

ADJUST — caster, cam¬ 
ber, toe-in and tire air 
pressure. 

INSPECT — tront end, 
suspension, springs, 
shock absorbers and 
steering assembly. 

Parts and Installation extra 
PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT. 

D&DTire v 

1620 BLANSHARD 
_382-7283_ 

1976 PINTO COUPE. ECON 
omy, MPG model. 2300 cc, 4 
speed, radio, HD battery, ra¬ 
dials. 26,000 miles. Call 595-1960, 
$2600._ 

750-15 TIRES AND RIMS, FIT 
Dodge or Ford 5 bolt truck rims, 
$150. or best otter Good condi- 
tion 383-3638._ 

735-14" GROUND GRIPS AND 
rims. $25. 6 hole 16" split rims 
$30.382-7430._ 

WANTED: ONE PAIR USED 
radial snow tires, size 185x14 
598-7908._ 

4 NEAR NEW SS RADIALS 

NEW 7 50-16 BF GOODRICH 
snow tires on rims, asking $200. 

478-3458,642-4844. 

110 PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
AND SERVICE 

ROLL BARS 

Custom made for any vehicle 

FROM $99.95 

INSTALLED 

Complete roll caoe kits tor circle 
track 

FROM $145 

Instock. 

In addition to custom tube bend¬ 
ing we offer a complete custom 
fabricating service for all types 
of vehicles 

Smith Racing 656-6165 

Osaka |~¥] 
Motors 

TOYOTA OATSUN HONDA 
VW RABBIT 
Behind Douglas SI. Dairy Queen 

CLUTCHES Installed from $105 
VALVE GRINDSfrom$170 
TUNE UPS from $32 .. 

Parts & Labour incl *5 
Repairing and Rebuilding 
TELEPHONE 383-3043 




BEETLE 

AUTO 

HAUS 


Volkswagen Parts 
Accessories and Repairs 

Rebuilt, exchange shorttolocks 
2821 DOUGLAS ST. 382 1815 
Across From Colony Motor inn 

1963 GMC HANDI VAN, IDEAL 
for shoo truck or econo camper 
2'x6' Illuminated sign on 10' 
stand. '58 Ford convertible, new 
nauoahldeupholestry. 4'x6' l ton 
utility trailer Rebuilt small 
Hem! with power fiite transmis 
slon 1939 BSA 250 C.l Chopped 
Model "A" coupe body 
OLDSTYLE STREET RODS 
1045 MARWOOD AVE 

478- 9246._ 

^ E r^,^w SA p L s E p 6 s’? L B DS 4 
door hardtop runs good, body 
good. $400 obo 65 Morris Mini, 
runs oood, body good, new tires, 
custom dash, many new parts, 
$400. obo. 65 Impaia body only 
*75. Plus numerous mini parts, 
doors, glass etc. Call Bob 

479- 5934 days. John 385-4085 after 

5pm._ 

67 FAIRLANE 2 DOOR HARD 
top body parts and glass; two 289 
motors in good shape; two 3 
speed automatic trans for the 
same; 75 Plymouth Fury III, 
needs nose; 3)8 engine and auto¬ 
matic trans. $29,000 km. All 
offers accepted 479-5555. 

SPRINGS 

Complete Repair Service for 
cars and trucks. LOGAN 
SPRING Si SUSPENSION LTD., 
60 Crease Ave. (Behind Budoet 
Rent-A-Truck) 384-2744,_ 

MUSTANG 65-73 QUALITY 
parts, carpets, upholstery, re¬ 
pair panels, trim, etc. Send for 
free catalogue: Canadian Mus¬ 
tang 4428 Valmonte PI. Victoria, 
V8N 5R6. Sorry, no counter 
sales. Mall order only._ 

4 L78X15 SUMMER TIRES, 
two 4 ply, two 8 ply. Smell block 
Chev. Aluminum intake mani¬ 
fold. 1968 and up Corvette big 
block headers. New 6 drawer 
Grey tool box. %■' drive Gray 
socket set. 479-6521 after 6pm 

1968 COUGAR FOR SALE FOR 
parts. 61 to 70 Olds Vista Cruiser 
statlonwaoons, very rare. 61 to 
65 Comet and Falcons for parts, 
misc. batteries and tires, used 
parts. 381-1135 or 388-6275 pager 

RADIATOR REPAIRS, FAST 
top quality repairs at Maurice s 
Auto Body, 427 Beta St., phone 
386-3381 or 384-0094 Located be 
hind the Burnside Pay and Save 
Gas Station. 

ECONO AUTO PAINTING 
from $179.95. All preparation 
plus 2 coats 478 2713 9am-5pm 


C-7 

160 PUTS, ACCESSORIES 
UD SERVICE 


NEVER WAX 

Your Car Again —Only $89 95 
TIDY CAR 382 4522 


NEW WARN WINCHES 
$660 and *630 
Dual-dri ve differentials 
47P-5H2, after 5pm 


TOP PRICES PAID 

tor scrap cars and metals, we 

pickup anywhere 

382-4493_384-8075 pgr 1614 

VICTORIA4 WHEEL DRIVE 
FREE WHEELING HUBS tor 
any make of 4-wheel drive 
597 Hillside at Rock Bay 
D-13531_386 6511 

21.5" GITANE (PROFESSION 
al) tour DV France, tiamme 
rims, super LJ parts, strong 
lloht, Zues. Must sell. Best offer 

385- 8663._ 

64 BEAUMONT FRONT END. 
Turbo 350, 2 barrel manifold, 4 
barrel manifold, 350 water 
pump, 70 Valiant transmission, 
Dodge alter nator 479-8873 

2000CC TOYOTA MOTOR WITH 
automatic transmission, 22,000 
miles, $350. Four 700x15 radial 
truck tires on split rims, $100 

386- 0217._ 

283 WITH TRANS EXCEL 
lent condition, $250 . 352 with 
trans, new water pump and al¬ 
ternator, oood condition, $225 
658-5589_ 

SOON TO DEMO, 57 GMC j 
ton step side, selling all parts 
except drive train, conte and see 
to believe. Must oo by Thursday 
night. 592 10)5._ 

SMALL BLOCK FORD TUN 
nel ram, $250. 3-speed standard 
transmission complete $150 
479-9244 


USED EQUIPMENT 50% OFF 
GMC Jimmy fender moulds 2 
sets. Streetmaster manifold 
478-6642 


USED ^DATSUN, TOYOTA. 
Pinto, Honda parts Bob and 
John's Autobody, Cobble Hill, 
743-9141. 


390 MOTOR AND TRANS, S450 
Datsun 510 for parts. 350 Chev 
motor, $400 Turbo 400' trans, 
$150,385-7811 


NEWTOVICTORIA 
RV MOBILE DOCTOR 
All RV repairs and mainte 
nance 479-2119 


TWO 77 OOOGE PICKUP 
grills, two 73 Dodge pickup 
grills, all sorts Chrysler oriils. 
479-8873 


WRECKING 1964 CHEVY IM 
pala, 350 motor. Rally wheels 
and tires, chrome parts, in ex 
cellent condition. 112-283-2696 


TWO BRAND NEWCORVETTE 
aluminum mags, still in boxes, 
new over $400. Sale $300 
658-5835, Ron 


SCRAP CARS BOUGHT AND 
hauled from anywhere. Also 
misc. used parts for sale. 
381-1135 or 388-6275 pager 2564 


TWO 61 VOLKS VANS FOR 
sale for parts. One has newly 
rebuilt engine view at 1203 or 
1213 Yukon St. 385-0331 


15' TANDEM FLATDECK 
trailer, equalizer hitch and elec¬ 
tric brake lever. Pipe rootrack 
for GM 4X4 Blazer 656-5671 


SONY GF-572 IN CAR CAS 
sette deck, AM/FM stereo, auto¬ 
matic radio. Brand new 4-7pm 
385-9753 

TWO SLOTTED DEEP DISH 
chromles, 78x15, 8" wide, fits 
70x15. excellent condition, $100 
479-2877. 

62 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE FOR 
parts Drive train excellent $150 
or best offer 478 7422 after 6pm 


FREE TOWING 
Scrap cars and trucks cash paid. 
478-9947. 478>293 


289 PARTS, SNOW TIRES, 
truck rails. Mini rims. 478-2567. 
479-5716 


WANTED: 70 MERC MONTE- 
oo 4-door body parts. Reason 
able 478-4248 


ROVER 2000 STARTER, 
shock absorbers and fenders. 
385-1318. 


VW FIBERGLASS FENDERS 
and molds, tow bar, radio, and 
miscellaneous 477-6760. 


UNLICENSED MECHANIC 
professional work at an amateur 
price Phone after 7.479-9843 


NEW BOX AND REAR BUMP 
er for '79 short wheel base Dodoe 
pickup, 478-4703. 


WANTED: 1962-1965 2’/z" GM 
small block exhaust manifold. 
478-5969 


WANTED CORVAIR TURBO 
charger. Please call after 5pm 
383-3366 —‘ 




289 HEADERS, $30 T&O'KEY 
stone mags with F-70-14 tires. 
$50 388 5352 


2 ENGINES, MUSTANGS, 289 
and 302. 9" rearend and '69 Mus 
tang parts. 388-6958. 


M20 4-SPEED COMPLETE 
for parts; Mr. Gasket vertical 
gauge shatter 478-4069 


WANTED 51 OR 52 CHEV 
Coupe for body parts (right rear 
section). 386-3)75. 


WINNEBAGO CANOPY FOR 8 
box, lined and insulated. $350 
479-9983 


FOR SALE 1951 STUDEBAKER 
Champion, parts or whole and 
rebuilt tlathead 6.384 4S45 

FORD-3 SPEED STANDARD 
transmission and 350 to 1 gears, 
$60. each. 384-2)77. 

AUTO REPAIRS DONE BY 
qualified mechanic at reason 
able rates. 479 8569 

650X13 TIRE, ALMOST NEW 
Heavy duty snow chains 
656-5002._ 

WANTED ANY INFORMA 
tion about 1936 Hillmans. Please 
phone 595-4810 

WANTED AUSTIN 1 100 
TRANSMISSION. 382 4866 EVE 
NINGS._ 

WANTED FOR CHEV 350. 
good Hollev 600 spread bore car¬ 
buretor. 479-3148 » 


FOR SALE 289VAN HEADERS 
and side pipes. 382-8736 _ 

AM FM 8 TRACK STEREO. IN 
dash mount. 477-8067 after Spm 

MARQUETTE ENGINE ANA 
Ivsizer « 40-175.478 3712. 


65-66 MUSTANG LEFT DOOR. 
$40,477-8832 


289 FOUR BARREL MANI 
fold, $50 firm. 595-2795._ 

55CHEV 4 DOOR, $200. 384 729/ 

164 AUTO BODY 
AND PAINTING 

PRISM AUTO BODY LTD 
guarantees quality craftsman 
ship, competitive rates and fast 
service See us for your free csti 
mates today at 1496 Admirals 
Rd. behind Saanich Lumber 
yard._ 

ECONO AUTO PAINTING 
from $179.95. All preparation 
plus 2 coats 478-27)3 9Am Spm 


166 


CARS AND TRUCKS 
WANTED 


Selling Your Car? 


CASH FOR GOOD, 
CLEANUSEOCARS 
THOMAS PLIMLEY LTD, 
1010 Yates St , 382 9121 


CASH 

for clean, used cars 
SAUNDERS Sales & Service 
474-221) Colwuod 




































































































































































































































































































































































































C-8 

168 CARS AND TRUCKS 
WANTED 

We Buy & Consign 


PRE-OWNED 


385 m 

LESCARR'S 
SALES & LEASING 
654 PANDORA AT QUADRA 

~ WE PAY 

the Highest Prices tor 
Your Clean Used Car 
TRY US—YOU'LL BE 
SURPRISED! 

CONTACT 
CARLSPICER 
Used car mgr. 
Empress Pontiac Buick 
GMC LTD. 

382-7121 DL01227A 


FOR CLEAN 
USEDCARS 

SEE LES STARLING 

SUBURBAN 
Motors Ltd. 

3377 Douglas 386-6131 


IMPORTS 
SPORTSCARS 
SMALL DOMESTICS 
URGENTLY NEEDED 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 Douglas 
(Opposite ICBCJ 
6605 X»4 1 


GeM 

PAYS 
High Prices 

FOR CARS & TRUCKS 
480 Esquimalt Rd. 382-7195 


WE BUY 
ALL 
MAKES 

McCallum Motors Ltd. 

Corner of Yates & Cook 
382 6122 D5603 


WANTED 

TRUCKS & VANS 
Also will take 
consignment vehicles 

GARDENCITY AUTO 
LEASE CENTRE 
382-9111_2978 Douglas 


CASH PORCLEAN CARS 
E&K MOTORS LTD 
642 Burnside E 383-6231 


70-72 BUICK SKYLARK. LOW 
mileage. mint condition, 923-41S4 
collect/ 


WANTED 70 MERC MONTE- 
go 4-door body parts. Reason¬ 
able 478-4248 


WANTED 72-76 CAPRI. GOOD 
condition, standard transmis- 
sion. low mileage. 383-0201. 


WANTED. 6CYLINDER PICK 
up. manual trans. mechanically 
sound, around *1000 386-0869 


WANTED 

74 or newer Westphalia. 479 7393 


WANTED: 1978 OR 1979 VW 
van. 592-0516. 


WANTED: 1957 OLDS 2 DOOR 
hardtop or convertible. 598-4220 


I6t CAMPERS, TRAILERS 
and MOTOR HOMES 



2524 DOUGLAS ST. 

(Across from Vic Press) 

383-3635 


BUT TIME IS 


Brand new 1979 Funcraft 
van conversion. Was 
S16.900. 

Sale Priced $13,995 

Frontier 8' camper. Was 
$4,540. 

Sale Priced $3,999 

Frontier 19' Motorhome. 
Was $22,600. 

Sale Priced $17,999 

THESE ARE JUST A 
FEW EXAMPLES OF 
THE SAVINGS IN EF¬ 
FECT NOW. 

DON'T DELAY! 

STOP MOTORS LTD. 

Dealer 6307 


FOR SALE: 1972 ARISTOCRAT 
Lo-llner, 16', oven, toilet, heater, 
fridge, awning. 477-5539, 


OKANAGAN CAMPER FOR 
Import, asking $1200. Phone 

GEM 1972 DATSUN TRUCK. 

SSSSEalSf- Al “ “™"- 


MUST SELL 1966 23' 4RIST0- 
crat trailer, Fully self contained. 
Offers on $3000.382-6827. 


8' X30" THUNDERBIRD 


1971 PROWLER TRAILER 23' 
model M, spare tire and hitch, as 
new. 112-748-0558. 


1979 SHASTA, 231V. BUNK 
beds, sleeps 6. full bath. 642-4547. 


1978 17' BOLER, AS NEW, $6500 
or best otter. 595-3746. 


HOME MADE CAMPER FOR 
■/R-ton, $500.112-749-3880. 


IV. VANGUARD CAMPER, 
fully equipped, $3875.478-1115. 


CANOPY FOR DATSUN 
short box truck. $385 385-6508 


jy CAMPER, GOOD CONDI- 
tlon. $2250 or offers. 478-3*92 


161 CAMPERS, TRAILERS 
aid MOTOR HOMES 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980 



-16 Years of RV Experience 
Ready to Serve You— 


★ VANGUARD ★ 

★ PROWLER * 

★ TRIPLEE * 

★S TARCRAF T* 

79 CLEARANCE 

8' Vanguard Frld. and turn $3995 
9’ j' vanguard toilet, Ided $5695 
9W Vanguard c/w shower $6595 
18*V Vanguard trl $7995 

20W Vanguard GM mini mh 
$20,995 

19' Prowler trl $6995 

20'Prowler trl $7495 

26'Prowler bunk $10,995 

27'Prowler bedroom $11,295 
32' Prowler 5th wheel $14,995 
Starcraft hardtop trl $2995 

CLEAN 

TRADE-INS 

'78 Vanguard 20'V mini $15,995 
'76 vanguard 20' mini $13,995 
'74 Terry 30' 5th $9500 

'78 Nomad 21-5th $8995 

'74 30' Holiday Rambler $8995 
'75 13'Scamper fr and hter $2695 
'77 Okanagan 8'fr and hter $3195 
'79 Valley Import cper $2795 

—Large Parts & 
Accessories Store 

—Repairs 
—Consignment Sale 
—Rentals 

PEDEN RV LTD. 

285OUESNEL ST. (D1950A) 
386-3464 

Behind Empress Pontiac Buick 


V HC 


TRIANGLE 
HOMES LTD 


24 YEARS 


The company with 24 years 
under the same ownership as 
sures you of honest dealings and 
reliable after-sale service 
To show our appreciation of the 
customer support that has made 
us successful. we are offering, in 
this, our anniversary month, 
until Feb. 29, i960 a special 

$100 per year 
discount! 

Off our regular prices on new 
1979 and 1980 motor homes Yes 
— that’s right — a big 

$2,400 SAVING 

For You!! 

The RV centre with the indoor 
showroom plus 6 bay coin op 
Car wash with clear ance for your 

Franchised dealer for Citation, 
Corsair, Aristocrat, Centurion, 
Southwlnd, Jamboree and Diplo¬ 
mat. 

In Sidney on the Pat Bay Hwy. 
across from Sandown Raceway 
656-1122 656-7251 

Dealer 1055B 


PEDEN R.V. LTD. 

-RENTALS- 

MOTORHOMES 

CAMPERS 

TRAILERS 

Early Booking Specials! 

Book your unit before April 1st 
and receive a special discount 
and an opportunity to receive 
your rental at no charge! 

For Details Contact Us At 

386-3464 

2855 Quesnel St. behind 
Empress Pontlac-Bulck 


All Types of RVs 
Reasonable Rates 


lie Dodge Chrysler 


382-2313 


POOLESRV 

TRAVELAND 

Dealer for: 

TERRY, TERRY TAURUS. 
TRILLIUM travel trailers, 
SLUMBER QUEEN truck 
campers 

PARTS & SERVICES 
ACCESSORIES 
PROPANE —DUMP STATION 
STORAGE 

1080 Goldstream 474-1411 

D5806 


1974 VANGUARD 20', 360 
Dodoe, power steering, power 
brakes, sleeps 6, 34,000 miles, 
$12,900or offers. 478 1963. 


1979 WILDERNESS TANDEM 
travel trailer, 20'. toilet, shower 
and bath, sleeps 6. fully 
equipped, nearly new. 478-5802 

FOR RENT, 19* WINNEBAGO 
Class A, $295. per week No mile¬ 
age charge. Evenings only 
477-9910.__ 

AS NEW. 1978 OTTO 20' MO 
torhome. complete, 9,000 km, 
$14,800. 734 Chesterlea Rd 
479-1127. 


11’/$' CAVEMAN CAMPER, 
toilet. Sleeps6.478 2323 Rod. 


WANTED: 14-16' TRAVEL 
trailer about 72 model. Must be 
clean, oood condition, and rea¬ 
sonably priced. 385-0218. 


1977 27' GOLDEN FALCON 
tandem trailer, sleeps 8. LES 
CARR'S SALES 8i LEASING, 
385-4444 Dealer 6690. 


1975 WINNEBEGO MOTOR 
home, 25', low mileaoe. Excel 
lent condition. All options Inctud- 
ed.SlS^OO 6561432. 


8' CAMPER, 3-WAY FRIDGE. 
3-burner stove, furnace. Sleeps 
S. Complete with boat loader. 
Asking$3000. 384-4700. 


1979 WILDERNESS 20' TRAIL- 
er, fully equipped. Last chance 
before It hits me trailer sales lot. 
$7000 firm. 383-9168 anytime. 

8' SECURITY CAMPER. EX 
cellent condition. Furnace, 
radio, new stove 656-1748 after 
5pm. _ 

WE WILL BUY YOUR GOOD 
used Rec vehicle Peden R.V. 
Ltd , 2855Quesnel St., 386-3464. 


RENT TRAVEL TRAILERS. 16. 
17, 18. 23 feet. Winter and sum- 
mer rates. 384-4818_ 

CLASS A MOTOR HOME FOR 
sale, many options, all offers 
considered, 479-6612._ 

9VV OKANAGAN. HAS EVERY 
"^excellent shape, $3850. 


1976 25' PACE ARROW. LOVE- 
477 7094 V UnM ' ° tferi W 3 ' 000 

1963 ESTA VILLA 15' HOLIDAY 
trailer, self—contained. $1200 or 
nearest offer 479-2979._ 

MOTORHOME FOR RENT. 

1965 PIRAMID TRAILER. Ex¬ 
cellent condition, self-contained, 
28'. S2800. 112-743-419$. 


168 CAMPUS, TRAILERS 
and MOTOR HOMES 



1978 32 HOLIDAY RAMBLER 
5th. Loaded with everything 
plus 79 GMC Sierra Grande 6 
pass, also loaded 
Was $39,950 Now $34,990 

1976 24'ITASCA, loaded 
WAS $19,950 NOW $18,950 

1974 CYGNET 16' $3,295 

'P9 TT 2 HTT $1495 

'74 SUNDOWNER HT.T. $2295 
'74 13'BOLER $2495 

'7413'SPRITE $2795 

78 DATSUN IMPORT TRUCK. 
Deluxe cab, radial tires with 
automatic and radio, 13.000 
Km $5495 

In stock, new 

CHINOOKS. LITTLE CHIEF. 
KITKAMPERS, 
LAYTON TRAILERS 
andTRAV-L-MATES 

YOUR DOWNTOWN 
R.V. PARTS DEPOT 

1703BlanshardSt. 385-5012 
Dealer 5183 



Fennell's 


TRAILER SUPPLIES 
LTD. 

PROPANE —REPAIRS 
AND 

APPLIANCE SERVICE 
Custom Building 
and 

Van Conversions 
Large Parts 
and Accessories Store 

652-3941 

Mon.-Sat.9to5 
Sun. 12to4 

6459 Patricia Bay Hwy. 




WINNEBAGO 
RUSTLER 
0 ROADWAY 
MOLIOAIME 
TRAVELAIRE 
LEI8URECRAFT 
BOLER. LIONEL. EMPRESS 
CANOPY TOPS — ACCESSORIES 

PAT BAT HWY . SIDNEY 
690-5504 DmW 5513A 

Open 9-5 Weekdays 
12-5 Sundays 

GREAT SELECTION OF 
LIONEL 

Canada's Most Popular 
TENT TRAILER 
Buy now — 

Avoid the Spring rush 
ATTENTION! 

For '/a ton and v* ton trucks we 
have the 8' ROADWAY Carnes 
ers, c/w furnace, stove, fully 
Installed. ONLY $2,495 

MANY LOW LOW PRICED 
_MOTORHOME S 

31' AIRSTREAM TRAILER, 
1970. Center twin bed, air condi¬ 
tioning, electric lack, full length 
awning, new tires, etc. Complete 
with 69 Chrysler New Yorker 
with oversized rad., large trans 
cooler, air rear shocks, all new 
tires, etc. All above ready to oo 
drive awav. $10,500 Located Salt 
Spring is. 112-537-9625 Kennedy 


PROPANE 

PARTS—SERVICE 

BOB'S 

MOBILE HOMES LTD. 

25 Crease 3863623 

DL 00414 A 


FOR RENTOR SALE 
MOTORHOMES 
WEEKLY —MONTHLY 

GARDEN CITY AUTO LEASE 
LTD. 2978 Douglas. 382-9111. 
D-5721._ 

DOGWOOD TRAILER SALES 
PARTS —PROPANE 
WESTERN WILDERNESS 
Campers 

WILDERNESS Trailers 
2630 Devllle Road 
Highway 1 at Midstream 
478-6841_D 5390 

17'GOLDEN FALCON TRAVEL 
trailer, stove, fridoe- toilet, fur 
nace, sleeps 6, winterized, slnole 
axle, easy to pull, economical, 
complete with equalizer hitch 
and bars, excellent condition. 
$3500. Inn-City Trailer Park at 
3430 Seymour, Site* 71,_ 

1977 FRONTIER. 18' MOTOR 
home, sleeps 4, 350 GMC, auto, 
power steering, power brakes, 
radio, 34,000 miles, fridge, fur¬ 
nace, stove, toilet, shower, Mi- 
chelin radials. new condition. 
$13,900. 385-4774,_ 

1977 18W SHASTA TRAILER, 

tandem, fully-equipped. 1976 
Matador station wagon. 28.000 
miles, both in new condition 
Original owner. $11,000 or 
nearest reasonable offer Will 
sell separately. 656-6701._ 

1978 DELUXE MOTORHOME. 

spotless, 25', 18.000 miles. 454 
Chevy engine. Many extras: Mi¬ 
crowave, air conditioning, 
stereo, Onan generator, cruise 
control, etc. Phone collect, 
629 3502. _ 

LIONEL TENT TRAILER 
110 model, sleeps 6, sink, 

2 burner stove. Icebox, portable 
heater, awning, carpeting, good 
condition, $2,500 obo. 386-7479 
after 4pm._ 

8'6" SECURITY CAMPER, 
furnace. stove with oven, fridoe. 
tollef, electric water pump, 
lacks included, good condition. 
Asking $2850 or best offer. 
478-8695_ 

27' WINNEBAGO CHIEFTAN, 
Immaculate condition, low mile¬ 
age, full bathroom, generator, 
aurrondlt^nin^aodother luxury 

RAVEN RV'S 
VAN CONVERSIONS 
479-3178 

BRITANNIA 
VAN CONVERSIONS 

478-2713_(Dealer 6703) 

169 MOBILE HOMES 
AND PAMS 

THINKING OF SELLING? 
Our listings are selling and we 
have purchasers waiting 1 For a 
no cost evaluation of your home 
and prompt courteous service 
call: Buy Right Homes, 474-2154, 

NEW 8. USED HOMES 
1510 Admiral at Craigflower 
Four new developments for you 
to choose from. Open daily from 
10-5. Sun. 12-5. Phone now! 
383-2912. Buy Right Homes. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER. 12X60' 
Fleetwood mobile home 2 large 
bedrooms with dining room, set¬ 
up in park 15 minutes to town. 
jJjLSOO or offers. 474-1746, Lang- 

KME 

range, fridge, garden shed, 
large carport, sunporch, patio, 2 
bathrooms. Truely a lovely 
home. 478-5219__ 

WHAT A DEAL!! COSY 2 BED 
room older deluxe furnished mo¬ 
bile home In quiet park In View 
Royal on bus line. Open to offers 
on |J0,900. Call 385-2639 or 


on $10, 
479-8712. 


1975 BRENTWOOD NEONEX 3 
bedrooms, large bathroom, will 
sell partially furnished, garden 
shed Included. Adult park/Cob- 
bleHIII. 112-743-4456 

IMMACULATE 2 BDRM 

„ 1976 ONLY $13,900! 

Beautiful 68x12. Enormous treed 
lot! 474-2154. Buyrlght. D6162 


169 


H0WLE HOMES 
AND PARKS 


VILLAGE 


* Fine retirement living 

* Own your lot 

* $500,000 rec. centre 

* Display homes on site 

* R.V. Storage 

* Phased Now Selling 

Turn West off Pat Bay on 
McTavIsh Road, (Airport turn 
off) men Right on Canora to 
Entry Gates 


Dealer 6155 


Phone 656-1414 


SEE OUR 
4 

DEVELOPMENTS 

Choose from any of our fine mo¬ 
bile home communities or tetl us 
where you want to be. Locations 
for our fine homes In Esquimau. 
Langford, Sidney, Sooke, Mill 
Bay and also Vane. area. Phase I 
and II of Oakcrest filling fast 
Choose your lot today. View 
homes In Langford (Trans Can 
Hwy) and Esquimau (Craig 
flower Rd.) 


DL6162 

Lan 

Crali 


mgford open dally till 8 
1 1 of lower Rd. dally till 5 


CASH REBATE 

Buy a new General Home before ^ 
February 29. 19*0 and receive a 
factory rebate. 

12'WIDE,$300 
14' WIDE, $400 
DOUBLE WIDE,$500 
Ask about our mobile home park 

'Triangle Homes 
Victoria Ltd 

2435 T rans C anada Hwy., 
Victoria, B.C 
Open 7 days a week 
Dealer 5088_478-1774 

GOLDSTREAM 

MOBILE HOMES LTD. 

T/Can Hy Sooke Lk Rd 

New 1980 homes on display, 
14x70 S place award winning 
bathroom, 2 BDR c/w fireplace; 
new d/wlde 2 BDR, 2 bath (1 
ensuite). Set up In adult sect, 
14x70 3 BDR. For private prop¬ 
erty set up, open for offers. 
Marsh Smith 478-8761 or 478-8774 
Res. Dealer 1280A. 

MOBILE HOME 
Views of Brentwood Bay from 
this Immaculate 2 yr old mobile 
home. 3 bedrooms, wall towall in 
living and dining roms. Nice kit¬ 
chen with bar Approx. 960sq. ft. 
Pa rental S80 per month. Price 

MARY ANN WALDMANN 
386-3231 598-0265 

BLOCK BROS REALTY LTD. 


POSSIBLY 

CANADA'S FINEST PARK 
Buy your mobile home at the 
dealer of vour choice. Scenic 
water and mountain views 
Phone 642-5486, or 642 5972. 

ADULT PARK 
SIDNEY AREA 
8 ocean view lots left. Triangle 
Homes (Victoria) Ltd.. 2435 
Trans Canada Highway, Vic¬ 
toria. B.C 

Dealer >5088,478-1774 

NEW OWNERS 

Only 5 spaces left In quiet family 
park, located In Sooke, small 
pets welcome. Sorry, no large 
dogs. Phone 642-4420. 

ADULT PARK, 1972 OLYPIAN, 
12x48, 2 bedroom, new drapes 
and carpet. Covered porch, 4 
appliances, on bus route. $13,000 
478-1006 evenings and weekends. 

TO BE MOVED 24X48 3 BED 
room Homco, Embassy. Fire¬ 
place, fridge, stove, dishwasher, 
storage room, sundeck. Asking 
$28,000 743-5688.__ 

SPACES FOR RENT, CEDAR 
Creek Mobile home park Adult 
and family sections. First month 
rent free. Shawnioan, ill Bay Rd, 
743 2449 or 743-5291 _ 

$2,000 BE LOW M A R K E T! 

24 wide on lakef ront setting close 
in! Largebrs. Must sell! $23,700! 
474-2154. Buyrlght. D6162 

OFFERSON $23,500! 

1978 deluxe 14x70beautiful water 
view! Too many options to list. 
474-2154, Buyrlght. 06162 

TO BE MOVED 

12x48 with self contained 20x20 
addition 48' of covered sundeck 
474-2154. Buyrlght. 06162 

24X40 MOOULAR HOME, 
3-bedroom. fridge and stove, 
brand new condition. $25,900. 
652 3096._ 

ONE BEDROOM 12X56, MILL 
Bay adult park, $7000 381 5653. 
No Agents. 


1S5 


CONVALESCENT 
AND REST HOMES 


UNDER NEWMANAGEMENT 
Joan Cres Manor 
Retirement Home. 

Mrs M. Baker S9S-131S 

A touch of distinction 

VACANCY IN SMALL RESTH 
ome, female and male, home 
cooked meals. 595-1513 

190 ROOM and BOARD 

OAK BAY GUEST HOUSE 
1052 NEWPORT 

Rooms available with private 
bathroom, excellent meals, 
maid service. Beautiful sur 
roundings, close to ocean, bus 
route, shopping, etc. Ideal for 
retlremenfllvlng. Apply above 
address or phone 598-3812 

GLENSHIEL HOTEL 

HOME FOR SENIOR CITI¬ 
ZENS 

EXCELLENT FOOD 
CENTRALLY LOCATED 
606 DOUGLAS_383-4164 

and breakfast, or fulMaoard. 




Inter and permanent rates 
available. Situated 1 mile from 
city center Along side Craigdar 
roch Castle. 595-5411,1037Cralg- 
rtarroch_ 

PRIVATE HOUSE, LARGE, 
sunny room with own ensuite 
bath. Retired preferred. 
385-9403._ 

ROOM AND BOARO, PRIVATE 
home Student or working Men 
382-2162. 


ROOM AND BOARD, LAUN- 
dry, etc. 384-6452. 

183 KOOKS TO KBIT 

DOMINION 

HOTEL 

Rooms from $67.50 per week. TV 
and maid service at our full f acli 
itv downtown hotel, close to all 
buses. 386413*.759 Yates St. (Oi- 
lofwellsF- 


vision o 


s Fargo), 


LOW RATES 

MAIDSERVICE 
Room by day. week or month. 
Singles from $45 per week, $140 
per month. The JAMES BAY 
INN, 270 Government St. 
384-7151. (Dlv. of Wells Fargo). 

MODERN KITCHEN UNITS, 
close to downtown, color TV, 
from $27.50 dally and from $95 
weakly. 3*34742_ 

WEEKLY SLEEPING ROOMS, 
Douglas Hotel. Special rafes. 


193 ROOMS TO RERT 

LARGE FURNISHED ROOM, 
$35/week, share kitchen, bath. 
Working quiet person Evenings, 


194 ROOMS WANTED 

FURNISHED ROOM WANTED 
by bachelor, non smoker, non 
drinker. Immediately. Fairfield 
area. Phone 477-5985 after 4 ask 
for Peter, leave message. 


197 


HOUSEKEEPING 
ROOMS TO RENT 


CLEAN HOUSEKEEPING 
rooms, everything supplied. Low 
rates. York Hotel, 711 Johnson 
Street, 385-2544._ 

BRIGHTLY FURNISHED 
room, carpet, cable, cooking fa¬ 
cilities. Balcony. Fairfield area. 
383-4082. _ 

HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS. $130 
to $180 a month All utilities in- 
dudad. 383-0686._ 

YOUNG PEOPLE TO SHARE 
house In James Bay. 383-2622 
after 5pm._ 

UNFURNISHED HOUSE 
keeping room and kitchenette, 
senior. 384-8568. 

199 HOUSEKEEPING 
ROOMS WANTED 

QUIET YOUNG LADY WANTS 
housekeeping room tor end of 
February. 386-1388 between 


200 APARTMENTS TO 
RENT UNFURNISHED 

^MjSmehunters 

WW 2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

HERE ARE SEVERALOF OUR 
MANY LISTINGS 
Bachelor, James Bay. lacuzzi & 
sauna,$171 

l BR. Cook/Hillside, brand new, 
$280/$290 

1 BR. Gorge, suit elderly, $205 
l BR. central,f/s,sauna. $245 
1 BR. West Bay $225 

1 BR Fernwood, possible care¬ 
taking position, $197 

I BR. Trailer,nicek>t,$i75 

1 BR. Burnside, quiet bldg. 
Shopping & bus close, $270 

2BR. West Bay, $280 

2 BR. Gorge, pool & sauna. $330 


2 BR Quiet well kept bldg. Suit 
Retired or Semi Retired. Close 
to bus, $273 

2 BR off Burnside. Quiet Adult 
Building. F/s, cable, w/w, S3I6 

2 BR. James Bay. Friendly bldg. 
Close to park, $272 

Mon - Frl 9-9 
Sat-Sun 10-5 
381-2113-Fee $30 

PARK WEST APTS. 

55 BAY ST. 

BACH —$155 per mth. 

1 BDRM — $200-$23S 

2 BDRM—$26O-$270 
Some suites avail. NOW 
TOVIEWCALL: 385-2572 

COPA PACIFIC APTS. 
1031BURDETT / 

l BR and Den with FP, D/W and 
SKYLIGHTS. Available March 
1st —$415 per mth. 

TO VIEW CALL: 382-5435 

PANDORA APTS. 

1022 PANDORA 

Close to town — 1 BDRM — $255. 
Bach at $220. Avail. March 1st. 
TOVIEWCALL: 386-0908 

BONNIE DOONE APTS. 
21 W. BURNSIDE 

Available March 1st. 1 BDRM 
from S2 70-$288 per mth 

TOVIEWCALL: 3822906 

rente* 

710MARKET ST 
OPEN 8-97 DAYS 
381-1234 

HERE ARE A FEWOF OUR 
MANY FINE VACANCIES 
$165 bach w/view! carpet 
drapes central! 1A12 
$200; l br bale, carpet/drapes 
laundry, fridge, stove, ht. 5A13 
$225; 2br. bring'' ‘ ‘ 


-Ihokids & pets 

cpt/drapes, fridge/stove. 7A22 
MANY OTHERSTOSEE 
CALLTODAY 


381-1234 


rente* 


REOLSPnn 

■' tmz 


PROPERTIES LTD 


848 BROUGHTON 3884454 

A REAL BARGAIN 
This lovely 2-bedroom apart¬ 
ment is a real bargain at $29,900. 
Nearly 1,000 square feet with 
large Living room, large kit¬ 
chen. This apartment Is situated 
close to: shopping, recreation 
centre and schools. A chance of a 
placeof your own without a large 
outlay of cash 

Blake Crothers 

388-6454 385-9597 

HD 


Will have two 3-bedroom town- 
houses available March 1 In an 
attractive family setting at In- 
terurban Rd. and Columbine 
Way. 

Both townhouses feature wall to 
wall carpets, stove and fridoe 
and full basements. Preference 
wlllbeolventofamflies. 

A refundable Share Purchase of 
approximately $2500 and $3000 is 
required, toward which the Pro¬ 
vincial Family First Home 
Grant of $2500 can be applied. 
Monthly payments are approxi¬ 
mately $300 to $325 and are ad 
lusted according to your income 
For more Information call 
479-4726. _ 

WINDSOR COURT 
APTS. 

258 GORGE ROADE. 

AVAILABLE FEB.29 

1 bedroom from $240. 

2 bedroom from $300. 

Resident Mors. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mundav 
385-0075 

Mature Adults. 

No Children. No Pets. 
MACARTHURPARK 
ESTATES LTD. 

1 ONE BEDROOM APART- 
menu Merch 1st.'Adult! only 
No pets. 7797Cede, Hill Rood. 

1 BACHELOR. 1 BEDROOM 
E^squjmalt area on bus line 


$2251 BR.2APPL.4A11 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

PRIVATE BEACH. 1AND2BR 
912 Selkirk Ave. 382-3502 


200 


APARTMENTS TO 
RENT UNFURNISHED 


AVAILABLE NOW 

Deluxe waterfront condomin¬ 
ium with plush W to W carpets, 
grass cloth paper, 3 first line 

X dances, and vour patio is 
n only 15' or 20' from the 
water's edge Cozv and warm 
central oil neat (5rms, 2 bath 
rooms, 2 bdrms) very spacious 
and never lived in, new & mod¬ 
ern, all quiet neighbors and no 
pets or children Please phone 
382-4312 or 382 8239 days or eves 
call 477-4662. $600 per month or 
you can buy (see our ad In clas¬ 
sification 258) NOW ONLY 12%. 
Dickie Agencies Ltd. 

630 Sea forth 


U, 


I li 


SEAVIEW RENTAL 

TOWNHOUSES 

2341 HARBOUR RD. 
SIDNEY, B.C. 

PHONE 656-0391 

OAK BAY PRIME 
WATERFRONT 

Top floor 2 BR., 2 bath condo¬ 
minium suite available immedi¬ 
ately with 1 year lease Attrac¬ 
tive prestige building near Golf 
Club. Fireplace Wrap around 
balcony. Superb water and gar 
den views. To view call Eleanor 
Sanderson 384-9610 or 479-1667. 

J. H, Whlttome 8i Co Ltd. 

OCEANF RONT 

Luxurious apartment with a spa 
clous 1400 sq ft. 2 BR 2 wash 
rooms - walk-in closet 


adioining 
off living 


room and master bdrm 
ents a spectacular view large 
kitchen with eating area land¬ 
scaped grounds - tranquil setting 
deep water moorage at near by 
marina. Adult building 
OCEAN VILLAGE -642-5254 


CHALET APTS. 

1465 Fort St. 

(Off Pemberton Rd.) 
Completely Renovated l and 2 
BRs from $250. No pets or chil¬ 
dren accepted. 

SENIORSONLY 
Call Manager at 5954)593 
Complete Property 
Management 


SIDNEY 

Bachelor $245-$275, one bedroom 
and den $360*380 One bedroom 
den and loft $400*410,2 bedroom 
$385*395, 2 bedroom and loft 
$460. Includes: wallxwall. 
drapes, hot water, cable, park 
mg Near shopping, bus. schools 
Children accepted, no pets. 
656-3060. 

NEAR JUBILEE 
HOSPITAL 

Two BR suite, HW floors, car 

K tts a must. Older orientated 
ock. $242 includes heat and co¬ 
vered parking. Available Feb. 

davldburr ltd._384-9335 

VILLAGE OAKS 

21250AK BAY AVE 
Luxurious condominium, 2 bed 
room suites, 1 v*t baths, some 
avaflableimmediatelv. some 
March 1st. Near all amenities 
$575*670. Call 595-2919._ 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1ST 
Large 2 bedroom condominium. 
Stove, fridge, washer and dryer 
included. Good block close to 
town. Adults only Pleasecall: 

ART STREIGHT 
385-7744 388-6275 PGR 882 

GARDNER REALTY 
_(1979) LTD._ 

CHARACTER HOUSE. 2 BED 
room apartment on upper floor 
Large living room, dishwasher, 
fully carpeted, laundry facili¬ 
ties, sea views, attractive gar¬ 
den. Suit quiet professionals. 
$535 per month utilities Included. 
Available immediately 

598 7449__ 

LIGHT AND AIRY I BED 
room basement apartment in 
character home, fully-carpeted, 
available immediately, would 
suit quiet student or professional 
with an interest in greenhouse 
gardening utilities, heat and 
laundry facilities Included, $325 
per month. 598-7449. 

TREELANE ESTATES 

l BR, $340 and up. Available im¬ 
mediately. 

Hobby room, sauna, whirlpool, 
underground parking available 
Adults only. No pets 388-5332 
Concord._ 

PRINCESS PEMBROOKE 
APARTMENTS 
1020 PEMBROOKE ST 
One bedroom apartments avail¬ 
able March 1st. $252 Children 
welcome. Sorry no pets Contact 
the manager or phone 382 94S4 

OCEANF RONT 


ments. Landscaped grounds, 
country setting, adults 
OCEAN VILLAGE-642-5254 

YATESST.QUIET BUILDING2 
bedrooms- nice view, $254. Park 
ing, heat, cablevlsion Middle 
Aged preferred. 384-7785, 
386-1961 _ 

NEAR COOK AND PEM 
broke Street, 2 bedroom top floor 
in triplex, wall-to-wall,Tridge 
and stove, $275 plus heat and 
light 652-4735 after 6pm_ 

FOUR CHARACTER UNITS: 
small apartment block. Cedar 
Hill Road-Hillside area. 3-1 bed¬ 
room units. 1-1' j bedroom unit. 
$220-$285. 598-3475_ 

GONZALES BAY OCEAN 
view, 2 bedroom Suitable for 
small family. No pets. $400 a 
month plus shared utilities 
Available now, 595-8707_ 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1 BACH 
elor apt. Centrally located Suit 
older person. Ph. 383-1833 
K.I.M._ 

LUXURIOUS SPACIOUS 2 
bedroom, 2 bath corner suite, 6 
appliances. $600 with lease. 
386401X386-3816._ 

CITY CENTRE 

Reduced rent for light caretak 
ing, small bachelor. Suit retired 
Person. 388-9942._ 

2-BEDROOM MODERN UNIT, 
$235 monthly. Central location. 
Parking. Adults. 112-743-4575, 
evenings._ 

AVAILABLE NOW. SPACIOUS 
2 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo in 
Spencer Castle- $610 per month. 
382-3840 or 652-1667._ 

2 BEDROOM CONDOMINIUM, 
no children or pets. Available 
March l$t. Washer and dryer. 
IV? bathroom $400.479-6655 

ESQUIMALT CONDOMINIUM, 

3 bedrooms, good location, chil 

dren OK. all appliances, $410. 
385-7156,384-8721._ 

COOK STREET 1800 SQ FT 
character apartment Sundeck 

;9 9 a ,sfc raen >42S Le “ e 

2 BR. ESQUIMALT, F/S, C/V. 
w/w. $270. Homehunters, 
381-2113. Fee _ 

1 BR. BURNSIDE. F/S, C/V, 
w/w. $270. Homehunters, 
381-2113. Fee_ 

1 BR. PLUS DEN, F/P, W/W, 
d/w. Parking. Fairfield $415. 
Homehunters.381-2113. Fee 

LOAOED!BACHELOR PAD 

JAMES BAY BEAUTY! 

$245 w/view, crpts & morel 1A14 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

TWO BEDROOMS! $250! 
Baic,crpts/drapes,4apol! 5A13 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

2t1 APARTMENTS TO 
RENT FURNISHED 


HARTNELL HOUSE 

Modern units by day. week or 
month. Close to downtown, co¬ 
lour TV. parking, linen, etc. 
383-0742. 


201 


APARTMENTSTO 
RENT FURNISHED 


WEEKLY 

DAILY 

‘ BY THE HARBOUR AND 
THE HEARTOF VICTORIA” 
Centrally located close to attrac¬ 
tions, Parliament Buildings, 
shopping Fully equipped, fur¬ 
nished apartments with maid 
service. Indoor pool, saunas, Ja¬ 
cuzzi whirl pool, games room, 
free local calls, free parking 
ROYAL SCOTT MOTOR INN 
425 Quebec St., Victoria. 
388-5463._ 

ELBOW ROOM 

Clean, comfortable, spacious l 
or 2-bedroom apartments, locat¬ 
ed in a quiet, parklike estate, 
extra-large kitchens, fully- 
equipped, cable tv, maid sec- 
vice, some fireplaces, special 
winter rates Casa Linda Motel, 
opposite Royal Colwood Golf 
Course. 364 Goldstream Avenue. 
474-2141,_ 

LUXURY LIVING 
Furnished bachelor and 1-bed¬ 
room suites. Maid service, an¬ 
swering service Indoor heated 
pool, cocktail lounge, saunas, 
coffee shop, dining room, laun 
dry, colored cable TV. No pets. 
COACHMAN INN, 229Gorge Rd 
E. Phone388-6611. 

DELUXE ACCOMMODATION 
Furnished bachelor and l-bed- 
room suites. Colored TV, dining 
room, laundry, indoor pool, 
hudropool. saunas, lounge, maid 
service, answering service. No 
pets CANTERBURY INN, 310 
Gorge Road Phooe 382 2151. 

CRAIGFLOWER MOTEL 
Now renting weekly and monthly 
deluxe bachelors and one bed¬ 
room suites on beautiful Gorge 
Waterway Maid service, laun- 
dromat, color TV, 388-7861 

1-BEDROOM, LIVING ROOM, 
dining room, kitchen, carpeted, 
tenant private yard. All found. 
No pets $225 per month 
477-9998._ 

ROYAL VICTORIAN MOTEL, 
230 Gorge Rd East. Furnished 
units from $220 to $290 per 
month. Pleasecall 385-5771, 

2 BEDROOM AND BACH Sui¬ 
te close to downtown. Linen, 
dishes, and colour tv, parking in 
elusive. 383-0742._ 

JAMES BAY 

Bachelor March l. $235 includes 
heat. No children or pets. 
38S-9772 OT 477-9448 + 

BALCONY! CARPETS! HEAT! 
Orapes.fr idge/stove. furnished! 
Central. S215 takes it! 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

ONE BEOROOM. WARM, CAR- 
port. utilities included. From 
$130 monthly 478-4212,_ 

FURNISHEO I BR., F/S, W/W, 
vour own entrance, $275. Home 
hunters, 381-2113 Fee._ 

COZY COTTAGE WITH FIRE 
place and carport. No pets. Ma 
lahat Bungalows. 478-3011 


Ui.u V u 1 I . 

lahat Bungalows, 478-31_ 

WOW! TWO BEDROOMS? 
That's right! Only $250, 7A23 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

ELEGANT! JAMESBAY! 
Furn! Pool, bale, view! 1A03 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

1 BACHELOR. 1 BEDROOM 
Esquimau area on bus line 
382-9481_ 

FURNISHED 1 BEDROOM 
basement suite, including utili¬ 
ties, $200, pear Wooico 479-5587 

202 FURNITURE 
TO RENT 


FURNITURE and 
APPLIANCES 

RENT 

WASHER and DRYERS 
COLOR or BLACK/WHITE TVs 
FURNITURE—APPLIANCES 
at PENNIES per OAY 

1821 COOK 
385-2435 

STANDARD 
FURNITURE 
Three Rooms from 
$42.00 per month 
Immediate Delivery 
382-5111 737 Yates St. 

CAM0SUN 

FURNITURE RENTAL 
Month to Month 
Piece or group 
immediate Delivery 

833 Yates_383-3655 

203 APMTMENTS 
WANTED 


Affimelw 

WW 2713 


unlens 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

E liminate Needless Phooe Calls 
We also advertise FREE for you 
and send prospective tenants 
you require. 

Give us a Try. 

We’reooen 7 days a week 

Free To Landlords 


LANDLORDS! 

FREESERVICE! 

Large Tenant Selection! 

FOR QUICK RESULTS 

DIAL 381-RENT 

rente* 


TWO RESPONSIBLE QUIET 
ladies with references seek 
? bedroom character apartment 
or house io Fairfield, Rockland 
or Oak Bay area. Rent approx. 
$300. Call 595-0688 or 382-6427. 


IDEAL TENANT, RESPONSI- 
ble working woman, non- 
smoker. no pets, seeks l bed¬ 
room suite, central location, 
James Bay-Fairfield 386-5511. 


WANTED: tD SUBLET, FUR 
nI shed one bedroom or studio 
March through June. Parlia¬ 
ment Buildings area. Respon- 
sible tenant. 387 3729. 


RESPONSIBLE WORKING 
girl seeks 1-bedroom apartment 
or basement suite for April 1st. 
Something with character Rea¬ 
sonable 3861237. 


NEW IN TOWN 

Quiet, esponsible employed fe¬ 
male with two cats requires un¬ 
furnished 1-bedroom or bachelor 
tor March 1 385-0660, Donna. 


QUIET, GOVERNMENT 
working single girl, would like to 
rent bachelor or 1 bedroom. Pre 
ter in private home. 382-5823, 
478-2700 


WANTED. 1 BEDROOM 
apartment, heat and utilities in 
eluded, in central Victoria area 
Responsible tenant. 385-2000 
7:30am-4pm weekdays. 


MIDDLE AGED HANOI- 
capped couple wish 2 bedroom 
apartment, ground level. 


WORKING GIRL WITH CAT 
requires 1 bedroom apartment 
under $200, heat included, for 
April 1st 383-7438. 


TWO RESPONSIBLE WORK- 
Ing women require 2 bedroom 
suTte or duplex. Willing to main¬ 
tain. 383-4132 or 386-3249. 


RESPONSIBLE FEMALE RE 
Quires apartment or suite by 1st 
of March. Under $200.386-1718 


204 SHARED 

ACCOMMODATIONS 


RESPONSIBLE FEMALE OR 
single parent wanted to share 
modern home near Seats. Pres¬ 
ently occupied by self employed 
(33) and single mother 
with 2 girls, (849). Come to 3239 


LOOKING FOR FEMALE TO 
share 2 bedroom main floor 
house. 8H 5.384-5453 or 592-9007. 


204 SHARED 

ACCOMMODATIONS 


ROOM MATE 
REGISTRAR 
Apt 4 houses to share In varied 
areas from $100. 

381-2122_Fee $20. 

WANTED2 RELIABLE WORK 
ing persons, preferably male to 
share 5 bedroom older home. 
Close to Gorge Road Hospital 
Call 3867745 anytime. 


LARGE 2-BEDROOM CHAR- 
acter suite, one block from Bea 
con Hill, washer and dryer, heat 
included in rent $125 plus half 
light and cable 386-9776. 


WANTED QUIET ROOM NON- 
smoking woman, no meals. 
Close Oak Bay Beach Hotel. 
381-1190. 


2-BEDROOM HOUSE TO 
share In Oak Bay. available 
March 1st. 592-4852, between 6 
and9pm. 


WORKING MAN. 24, SEEKS 
co op mixed house. 474-1751. 
479-1793 Paul. 


205 KNTM. AGENCIES 

rente* 

TENANTS 

NEEDAPLACE? 
NEED IT NOW? 
CALLTODAYI 
WE CAN HELP! 
710MARKET ST 

381-1234 

OPEN 8-9 7 DAYS 

rente* 

LANDLORDS 

NEEDATENANT? 

NEEDONENOW? 

WE HAVE THE ONE 
FOR YOU! 

CALL US NOW! 

381-1234 

rente* 


**1585* 


TIREDOF HUNTINGFOR 
ACCOMMODATION? 

We are working 7 days a week 
locating suitable vacancies that 
meet your needs 
We have many vacancies on 
hand at all times. 

DON'T WAIT! 

Call NOW or drop in any time for 
more Information. 

FEE $30._ 

310 ROBE RTS ST 
Waiting list. 384-5320 
PrlncessLoulseApts. 

205 DUPLEXES 
TOtEXT 


iff”#. 


unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

3 BR. Cordova Bay Beach, sea- 
view, f/p. Non smokers, non 
drinkers preferred. $400 

3 BR. Colwood. Close to shop¬ 
ping. Children welcome. $375 

2 BR upper duplex. Fairlleld. 
Private entrance. F/s, w/w Cat 
welcome. $300 

2 BR plus den. James Bay. w d. 
f/s. covered parking, $450 

2 BR upper duplex, Langford 
W/d, f/s, cable. Large master 
bedroom, $350 

3 BR. Esquimalt. F/p, w/w, f/b, 
$475. Children welcome 

Mon Frl 9 9 
Sat Sun to -5 
381-2113-Fee $30 

rente* 

OPEN 8-9 SAT 8. SUN 
710MARKETST 
381-1234 

Ren , b, SXS. bsmt, oerege 
fireplace. P.ibathsSmore! 1X4 

rente* 

SIDE BY SIDE DUPLEX, 4 
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, full 
basement, fridoe, stove, dish 
washer, carport, sundeck, close 
to town, damaoe deposit, ref 
erences required. Occupancy 
February 15th. 386-2707, 479 8120 
after 5pm weekdays or anytime 
weekends. _ 

BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT 
suite on the Gorge with 3 bed 
rooms and 2 full baths, suit lam- 
llv or 2 responsible couples, 
available month-to-month or 
lease beginning April 1st at $550 
per month. Large dining room 
with wet bar, 592-7246.___ 

BRAND NEW, BRENTWOOD 
Bay, 5 blocks from ocean. 4 bed 
room duplex, living room with 
fireplace, dining room, family 
room, bright kitchen, laundry 
room. IVj baths $525. For ap¬ 
pointment phone 477-2686 or 
384 4549_ 

AVAILABLE MARCH 16TH. 
Langford, 3 bedroom duplex, 
wall-to-wall carpets, fireplace, 
appliances, large fenced yard 
and garden shed. $450 per 
month. Damaoe deposit re- 
qulred. 592-5172 anytime. 

SIDNEY 

3 bedrooms, fireplace, l v? baths, 
6 months old. $450 per month No 
pets References required Mike 
656-4066 or Vic 656-4003. 


SIDNEY 10WNHOUSE, 3 BtD 
rooms, l'/j baths, W.W, stove, 
fridge, washer, dryer Private 
yard Storaoe shed Parking 
Children and cat OK. $420 April 
1st. 656-7027. _ 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY, 
side-by-side duplex, 3 years old. 
3 bedrooms. lVi baths, fridoe, 
stove, wall-to^wall and fireplace. 
West Saanich Road. $500 per 
month. 383-1621._ 

3 BEDROOM, TOP LEVEL 
up/down duplex. Lakehill area, 
appliances included. $450 per 
month Available March 1 st. ref- 
ereoces required. 477 7517 

2- BEOROOM DUPLEX. WITH 

fireplace, l’/j-baths. w/w. elec 
trie heat, full basement. Rent 
$385 477-5138._ 

WONDERFUL!3 BEDROOM 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

PET PALACE 
Kids/pets OK! 3br wonder 
w/W.tnced. fr/stove, more! 7X3 
RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 

DELUXE SXS IN COLWOOD, 3 
bedroom: fireplace, no pets 
$450.652-3249._ 

3- BD, W-W, FRIDGE, STOVE. 
Bay and Fernwood. $400. 
479 4509. 

217 DUPLEXES WANTED 
TO RUT 

MARRIED COUPLE WITH 
well behaved dog looking tor l or 
2 bedroom. Shawnigan Lake or 
Duncan area, reasonable. 
385-7694 


210 


HOUSES TO RENT 
UHFWNISNE0 


WINDSOR PARK.-OAK BAY. 3 
bdrrrn . 1)00 sa ft Adutts only, 


210 


HOUSES TO RENT 
UNFURNISHED 


C-8 


AVAILABLE IMMEDI- 
ATELY CENTRAL 
SAANICH. EXCEPTION 
AL QUALITY FOUR 
BEDROOM EXECU 
TIVE HOME, 3V) BATH¬ 
ROOMS. WATERFRONT 
PROPERTY WITH 
SPECTACULAR VIEW 
SPACIOUS, W/Wr-F/P, 
DRIVE-IN G A 
RAGE,FULL BASE 
MENT.S750. PER MO. TO 
VIEW CONTACT MON 
TREAL TRUST COM 
PANY, PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT, 
384-2111. 


UPLANDS BORDER - 
AVAILABLE IMMEDI 
ATELY. THREE BED 
ROOM HOME RECEN1- 
LY PAINTED 
THROUGHOUT. F/P, 
LANDSCAPING. 
DRAPES, DRIVE-IN GA¬ 
RAGE, FULL BASE 
MENT. $700. P.M. NO 
PETS, REFERENCES 
REQUIRED. TO VIEW 
CONTACT MONTREAL 
TRUST COMPANY, 
PROPERTY MANAGE 
MENT. 384-2111. 


P. R. BROWN & 
SONS LTD. 

TOWNHOUSE 

$700.00 — One only — Exclusive 
Executive two bedroom master 
ensuite. Sundeck and patio 
Dble. oarage. Excellent loca 
tlon. Further particulars and to 
view ph. 385-3435. 

HOUSE 

$650.00— Three bedrooms mas 
ter ensute. Two-four and one 
three pc. bathrooms. Living 
room and den. F/P — UHiity 
room. Three patios. No pets. - 
385 3435. 


rente* 


381-1234 

710MARKET ST 
OPEN 8-9 7 DAYS 

DOZENS OF VACANCIES! 
SEE SOME TODAY! 

TRY: 

This fine 3 br home with fenced 
vrd. crpts, prking. Bring kids & 
pets. Only $425 IH32 

This cottage only $325, Kids OK! 
crpt/drapes. fridge/stove 6 H 11 

rente* 


COUNTRY SETTING. 

CUSTOM DELUXE 
This one-vear-old home in 
Broadmead has everything but a 
fridge. Features 3 bedrooms. 2 
baths with lacuzzi and sauna in 
master bathroom. Living room 
and family room have fire 
places, separate dining room, 
very modern kitchen with top ot 
the line appliances Large laun 
dry room entrance to double 
garage has electronic doors 
This is a fairyland house with so 
many delightful features and a 
loy tor family living. W/W rugs 
No pets please $900 per month 
References required. Call 

david burr ltd 384 933S 


Affimeh 

WW 2713 


unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 
4 BR Beatiful view of Cordova 
Bay. Ail appl & drapes. $700 

l BR, plus den, very cozv. fenced 
“—--thed 


yard Shopping at the door. $325 

2 BR. South Oak Bay. 1 block 
from beach. F/s. f/p, garaoc. 
$360 

Mon Frl 9-9 
Sat-Sun 10 5 
381-2113-Fee $30 


PATRICIA BAY 
WATERFRONT 

$625 per month. Beautiful, 
new, 2-bedroom. 2-bath, 
family room oft large kit 
chen with stove and fridge 
Separate dining room, living a 
room. Expansive deck 
areas. Available now on I 2 
year lease. 

JACK MEARSOAK BAY 
REALTY LTD 
RENTAL DEPARTMENT 
598-3321 

EXECUTIVE 

WATERFRONT 

TOWNHOME 

Situated on Saanichton Bay. Two 
bedrooms, triple plumbing, util 
Ity room, double, self-contained 
garage All appliances and 
drapes Adults only Available 
March 1 Minimum one year 
lease. References required. $700 
per month. Mr D. Munro, Vic 
toria Realty Ltd . 3863585 or res 
477-1705. 


SOMETHING SPECIAL! SPEC 
tacular south view over Sooke 
Harbour from sunroom, master 
bedroom and deck. 3 bedrooms, 
kitchen with stove and fridge, 
hardwood floors, sunken marble 
bathtub, utility room with wash 
er and dryer, large workshop 
Well-landscaped with vegetable 
garden. 200' to waterfront on 
blind road, two blocks to village 
center and schools, references 
required. $450on lease 642-3513. 
3-7 pm. 


ROOMY CHARACTER HOME, 
newly renovated, available. 
February 15th. 1000 block South 
oate in Cook Street Fairfield 
area 2 storey, full basement, 2 
bedrooms on main floor. 1V 3 
bathrooms, kitchen, dining 
room, pantry, living room, front 
room and 2 bedrooms up. Close 
to Beacon Hill Park. Dallas wa 
terfront and shopping areas 
Small pets optional. $545 per 
month. Kasapi Construction. 
3866191. v 


OCEANF RONT 
Bungalow/townhouse, 2 bdrm. 
fireplace, laundry room with 
washer and dryer. Tranquil sur 
roundings. Landscaped grounds 
Near by marina's have deep 
water moorage, sliding glass 
doors off living room lead to 

9 arden patio 10Vj‘ from ocean 
erv private Adults 
OCEAN VILLAGE-642-5254 


OCEANF RONT 
I BR. Townhouse with 1400 sq ft 
of luxurious living space sur 
rounded by landscaped grounds 
m tranquil setting spectacular 
view from 3 sides - 6 deluxe 
appliances - 2 washrooms 2 
patios fireplace deep water 
moorage In near by marina 
Adults. 

OCEAN VILLAGE -642 5254 


SOUTH OAK BAY 

BRIGHT 2 BEDROOM HOME 
available March 1st Pets ai 
lowed but screened bv landlord 
Has fireplace, fridge and stove 
One block from sea. $500 per 
month. 592-7445. 


AVAILABLE MARCH 1ST. 3 
year old house, 2 bedrooms main 
floor, l down, fireplace, fridoe 
and stove, drapes. Close to bus. 
Meredith Cres. area. Refer 
ences. $550 per month Phone 


LUXURY 2 BEDROOM, 2 
bathroom townhouSe, James 
Bay, full appliances, flreolace. 
vaulted ceilings, available ) 
March. $575 per month Herb 
Smith. 385-6804 or 388*275 paoer 
880 


IN SAANICHTON R< 
bdrm. character home, 
wall, fireplace, veg 
close to schools, shops, i 
652-1584, _ 

4 BR..2VS BATHS, REC 
bar, panoramic vlevi 
Straits. Available Imm 
Homehunters. 381 21131 




































































































































































































































































































C-9 

210 HOUSES TO RENT 
UNFURNISHED 


a|B B 


ROWN 

ROS on 
LANSMARO 


$1000. 3611 Cadboro Bav Road, 
large, luxurious home with 
magnificent view of 10 Mile 
Point and mountains. 3 
Bdrm upstairs with fullv 
self-contained 2 Bdrm suite 
In basement. Stove and 
fridge, freezer, dishwasher, 
washer and drver, 2 tire- 
places. 2 bathrooms, wall to 


wall throughout. 3 car ga- 
landscaped garden 


rage, landscaped ga 
Perfect for family with oood 
references. 


For futher Information call: 
Brown Bros. Agencies Ltd. 
385-8771 (anytime) 


CADBORO BAY, 2 BEDROOM, 
no basement, electic heat, stove 
and fridge, newly decorated. 
Lirge fenced lot onto the park 
and beach. $425 per month. Ref¬ 
erences and security deposit. 
Call 477-3766. 


COUNTRY ESTATE 
Secluded 2 bedroom bungalow, 
immaculate, private setting of 
tall fir trees, minutes to city, 
available March 1st. Details call 
after 6pm, Dave 595-2658, 
382-0831. Del 477-4994 


FAIRFIELD 

Rent or option to buy. Excellent 
location Older home 2 bedrooms 
main, 1 In basement, $525. 
7524151 Qualicum 


2 BEDROOM HOME. FULL 
basement, fridge and range! 
Nice garden, small fruit. Cook 
and Pandora area. March 1st. 
$400 per month. 382-5324, 


4 BEDROOM. 3 BATH. 2 FIRE 
places, spacious, close to all am 
enlties, quiet. April 1st. $650. 
479-9216. 


ARDMORE AREA HOME FOR 
rent. March 15th or 31st. No pets 
or small children. $600 per 
month. 656-4073 


MALAHAT 2 BEDROOM COT- 
taoe, laroe fully fenced grounds, 
suitable for 2 adults and child, 
$375 month. Phone 382-7522 


CAN'T BE BEAT! 

3br w/workshop! 4appl, view! 
cpts throughout $450 more! 7H33 
RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


CENTRAL SAANICH 3 BED- 
room house for rent. $500 month¬ 
ly. Days phone 656-5833, nights 


CLOSE-IN! TWO BEDROOM! 
crpt/drapes, 2 appl! $425. 1H21 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


AVAILABLE IMMEDITELY 3 
bedroom large home, $500 After 
5478-9404 


3 BR!$375. KIDS/PETS OK 7H32 
RENTEX 381-1235 FEE 


212 


HOUSES WANTED 
TO RENT 


Affimehi 

2713 


i unten 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

Eliminate Needless Phone Calls 
We also advertise F RE E for you 
and send prospective tenants 
you require. 

Give us a Try. 

We're open 7 days a week 


Free To Landlords 


URGENT! RESPONSIBLE 
working women seeks 1-2 bed¬ 
room house, duplex or basement 
suite, by March 1st Have well 
mannered dog Between $250 
.v 386-0037,** 


$300 month ! 


7 after 6pm 


RESPONSIBLE WOMAN WITH 
3 children will pay up to $365 for 
7-3 bedroom house or duplex with 
yard References. Needed for 
April, Mayor June. 595-4643eve- 
nlngs or 524-4162 collect 


SPACIOUS QUIET HOUSE 
needed for two sisters. Art stu 
dent and registered nurse. Keen 
gardeners. Excellent refer¬ 
ences 598-9078. 


MARRIED COUPLE WITH 
well behaved dog looking for 1 or 
2 bedroom. Shawnioan Lake or 

S uncan area, reasonable 
5-7694. 


RETIRED. RESPONSIBLE 
older couple require house, cot- 
taoe, 30 miles radius of Victoria 
or Duncan area. 1 or more bed¬ 
rooms. 743-4215 


YOUNG MARRIED COUPLE 
looking for 2 bedroom apartment 
or house In Victoria, no kids or 

S ts. non-smokers, maximum 
)0. 656-0290. 


URGENT. WORKING COU- 
ple, starting family, requires 2-3 
bedroom house with fireplace in 
quiet area. Phone before noon, 
385 6480 $300-$400. 


YOUNG MAN. 26 WITH DOG, 
would like house In Colwood— 
Langford area. 478-7819 before 
17 noon, 


MARCH 1ST. RESPONSIBLE 
Couple seek 2 bedroom home In 
country. Garden space, garage 


2 BEDROOM HOUSE OR COT- 
taoe on Shawnlgan Lake, will do 
any repair work. References. 
642 5709, 642-3060. 


QUIET 2 BEDROOM HOUSE 


for reliable tennants with excel- 
lent references. 598-9078 


BUSINESSMAN SEEKS 1-2 
bedroom house or duplex, March 
1st $350-$400. 385-4533, pager 


FAMILY OF 5 URGENTLY RE- 
qulre a 3 bedroom, basement 

381 U S466 f ° r thC 1St ° f March 


WANTED 2 OR 3 BEDROOM 
house with unfinished basement, 
$350 384 5284 


3 STUDENTS WANTING 3 BED- 
room house or duplex up to $370. 
383 7467,595-1517 


RESPONSIBLE FAMILY 

would IIF* *-* ,l -- 

con Hill 


irUNJIBLt r^.„, w , 


WORKING MOTHER NEEDS 3 
or 4 bedroom house by March 
1st 381-0660, 3:45pm-6pm 


WANTED: 3-4 BEDROOM 
house to rent, references avail- 
able. Phone 598-1384 after 5 pm 


WORKING COUPLE AND 8 
year old require 2 bedroom 
house for March 1st. 598-1215. 


215 


NALLS, WAREHOUSES 
STONES and OFFICES 
TO RENT 


FOR LEASE 

OFFICE ANDRETAIL 
ANDMEDICAL SPACE 
Now available. Please contact 
BEV HIGHTON or M. GEAR 
ING at 477-7284. 

COMPLETE PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 


HERITAGE BUILDING 
1200 sq.ft, of deslreable office 
space In restored heritage 
house, ample parking. 

1192 Fort St_383-7157 


McKENZIE-QUADRA 


_ r _Jlng < 

Northern Pacific Realty Ltd. 
479-1687. 


OFFICE SPACE TO RENT, 
Keating X Rd and Kirkpatrick. 
$200 per month. Telephone an¬ 
swering service available. For 
further Information call, 
656-7340 


YARROW BUILDING, 800 SQ. 
ft. of open office space. Rent $445 
per mo *" * J ~ 
lanltor 


month, includes heat and 
_ tltor service. Call Mr. Ed¬ 
mond, at 383 3822 or Royal Trust 
388-4311 


STORAGE AREA FOR RENT. 

*i4r “• • - 


dra (front only), then call 
381-3131, office hours only. Mac- 
Leod 8, Associates Ltd. 


1,350 SQ. FT. AND UP WARE- 
house & office for sale or lease. 
Call 366-0897. 

E Y. Construction Ltd. 652-4461. 


215 


HALLS, WAREHOUSES 
STORES m4 OFFICES 
TO RENT 


RE 0 L 5 PPin 

XWLU k 


PROPERTIES LTD 


846 BROUGHTON 3864454 

MAYFAIR 


Quality retail and warehouse 
space available — Retail, 1,200 
sq. ft. with rear loading and 
loads of parking. Warehouse. 4, 
000 sq. ft. with drive in or loading 
dock, can oo as low as 2.000 sq. fl. 
Ideal location with easy access 
to all area's of the city. 


FORT & COOK 
MEDICAL/DENTAL 


This office space has ample par¬ 
king and Is priced below market. 
Be sure to view this 


OAK BAYAVE. 


spa . .. 

new, well located development. 
Space from 450 to 1,450 sq. ft 
Good parking. 


NORTH DOUGLAS 
RETAIL- 
WAREHOUSE 


4.500 sq. ft. on one floor with load 
ing dock, excellent location and 


plenty of space for cars and 
trucks. Starting a new business 


or need laroe quarters, then look 
at this location. 


DOWNTOWN DOUGLAS 


Excellent corner relail space 
- f ^ T(e 


CallustovlewanyfT 


LAWCOURTAREA 
NEW PRIME 
OFFICE SPACE 


Full air conditioning, covered 
parking, energy saving design. A 
full floor or part available 


ONE ONLY 


1,000 sq. ft area available In the 

iSt . 


Alpha 51 complex office-retail. 


Low, low, monthly cost 


8 B 


B 


ROWN 
ROS on 

LANSHARO 


Poopt* Helping Poopt* 


1800 Blanshard Street, Commer¬ 
cial property available March 1 
Corner influence with 2700 
square feet main floor with more 
upstairs. Lots of parking avail¬ 
able. terrific exposure. $7.50 per 
square foot. 


For further information call: 
BROWN BROS. AGENCIES 
LTD ,385-8771 (anytime) 


MEDICAL OFFICE — 1105 
Pandora Ave., 550 and 471 
square feet. Partloned office 
space In Medical Arts Building 
— Immediate possession. 


DOWNTOWN OFFICES —Vari¬ 
ous sizes, reasonable rents Mod 
ern, air conditioned building 
opposite cltv parkadc. 


RETAIL SPACE — Downtown 
mall, 544 square feet, small shop 
on pedestrian walk through, 
good traffic. 


itipl 


M0RGUARD PROPERTIES 
LIMITED 

620-880 Douglas (604)383-4168 


OFFICE SPACE 
PRIME INDUSTRIAL 
AREA 


Entire floor (aporox. 1.760 ft), 
well lit partitioned bright of¬ 
fices. Complete with storage 
area, large security valt, etc. 
Good entrance and reception 
area. Rate of $5 80 per ft in 
eludes everything, hydro, taxes, 
etc. Can lease. Good access and 
parking, close to downtown Call 
386-3414 local 55 for appolnt- 
ment, QK Trucking Co. 


PENTHOUSE 

OFFICE 

The entire top floor of brand new 
building now available for lease 
Deluxe office space In downtown 
prime location. Custom Interior 
finishing may be done to your 
specifications Outstanding de¬ 
sign features and amenities. 
This will truly be the definitive 
office In Victoria. 

DAVID GLOVER 
383-3033 


OAK BAY JUNCTION 
STADACONACENTRE 
1 Retail —733,882 or 1615 SO ft 
on Fort St. Will finish to suit 
Great exposure to 20,000 cars per 
day. 

2. Office — 1500 finished store 
front office space Boardroom 
p us 5 semi-private offices. Ad 
dltional 400 sq ft. for storaoe. 
Unique garden outlook at rear. 
Seasprav Properties Ltd. 

386-3124 R. D. LAW 


OFFICE SPACE 
HILLSIDE AVE. 
GROUND FLOOR 

All utilities Included in rent with 
anitorlal services Ample park 
ing Aporox 600 sq ft. and 125 sq. 
ft. For further Inform a ton. 
388-4434 WILFGEE 388 4434 
WESTMONT REALTY (1977) 
LTD. 


CITY CORE GOVERNMENT 
Street, old Rommano Theatre, 
ready for occupancy May 15, 
1980 Ladles deluxe lounge lower 
floor Restaurant, deluxe space, 
stage, balcony, washrooms, ex 
pertice kitchen main floor 2 bed¬ 
room deluxe suite or office. Pri¬ 
vate entrance All building air 
conditioned, new wiring, va¬ 
cuum system. Victoria Press 
Box 803 


GROUND FLOOR 
OFFICE SPACE 
1640OAK BAY 


1150 sq.ft, laroe reception area 
and 4 private offices. Carpet) 
drapes and heat Included. Mini 
mum 3 year lease. Goodwyn 
Management Ltd., 388-7923. 


OFFICE SPACE 

800 Sq. Ft. $225 mo 

600 Sq. Ft. Studio $i45mo 
Small Office 575 mo 

For Further Details 
Diease call Mr Anderson 
382-2721 or 477-4985 


PRIME FRONTAGE SPACE 
torrent In new shopping centre 
which is still expanding. Units 
available from approx. 1300 sq. 
ft. and 900 sq. ft , can be made 
Into one unit. Also office space 
available, first and second floor, 
some air conditioning, fully car¬ 
peted. Phone evenings till 11 pm, 
112-537-2394. 


WAREHOUSE 
Appr. 2100 sq. ft. (plus 300 
office sp) 426 William St., 
City Industrial District. 

H. Hegen Realty Ltd. 

595-2131 


1200 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE 
space. Douglas St. back loading 
doors, $260 per month. 384-8232. 


LOCKERS FOR STORAGE, $11 
and up. 388-4542. 


,% S %5 F H T iffi C S ^{T°4 RAGE ' 


SHARE STORE SPACE $100. 
1270 May Street. 


21S 


HALLS, WAREHOUSES 
STORES ami OFFICES 
TOREHT 


: i 

♦ft ROWN 

-SB ] 

ROS on 

* * 

yy l ANSHARD 


PaopU Helping PtopU 


830 Pembroke St 2500 square 
feet street level, office 
space, heat and air condi 
tlonlng incl. 2 washrooms, 
bright and cheerful suite 
lease available now at $6.50 
per sq.ft. 


904 Gordon St., 900 sq. ft of de 
sirable store or office space 
available Immediately, 
$750 00 per month, includes 
heat, lease available 


1006 Fort St. 3000 sq. ft. third 
floor office, fully carpeted, 
open space, all utilities in 
eluding ianitor (except 
phone). Lease now available 
at $7.50 per sq. ft. plus share 
of expenses 


For appointment to view please 
call 

Brown Bros. Agegcies Ltd. 
(anytime) 


385-8771 ( 


[O 

_SERSPRRV 

PRO«RTlfS LTD / REALTOR 


1911 QUADRA 


OFFICES: 

3960 Quadra, 1010 Sq. Ft. 

1005 Broad, 725 Sq Ft 
Shelbourne, 908 Sq. Ft. 
Stadacona Centre, 1491 Sq. Ft. 
3440 Douglas, 2600 Sq. Ft. 

1022 Pandora, 700 Sq. Ft. 


RETAIL/STOREFRONT 
2333 Government, 2500 S.F. 


Stadacona Centre, from 733 S F 
1253Esqulmalt Rd., 733S.F. 


WAREHOUSE 

626 Esqulmalt R , 1200 S.F. 

740 TyeeRd , 4200 S.F. 

Govt, and Bov, 700 S.F. with of¬ 
fice 


R D. LAW 


386-3124 


)tnv.E too/ 

tfimlUiiort, 


1000 Gov i Si 384 81?4 


OFFICE—Blanshard St. Ap¬ 
prox. 1376 sq. ft, Quality office 
space available now Good ex 
posure Attractive rates. 

WAREHOUSE - Approx. 28.000 
so ft basement storaoe space 
Excellent access and expo¬ 
sure, Ample parking. Asking 
$i 50 per sq. ft. Located Esqul¬ 
malt Rd. close In. 

RETAIL — Downtown close to 
E atons Ask t ng $860 per month 
absolute net. 

Brian Spark Richard Holmes 
384-8124 


WAREHOUSES. 4500 17,000 
sq.ft. 24' high ceilings. Loading 
docks. Level entries. In town. 
Contact Bruce Story, 382-6042 


DOWNTOWN STORAGE 
1490 sq. ft, sprlnklered, concrete 
floor, street level entrance, $500 
per month 388-9329 


ESQUIMALT RD RENTAL 
space, 1500 sq.ft. Suitable for 
offices, store, catering, etc. $4.50 
per sq.ft 652-3572. 


STUDIO FOR RENT. 1500 SQ. 
ft $250 per month. 385-5525 or 
595 4756 evenings. 


2400 SQ FT RETAIL SPACE 
for lease on Herald and Govern¬ 
ment 382-4825 


233 


MORTGAGE LOANS 
AND INSURANCE 


1st AND 2nd 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

SOOKE —GULF ISLANDS 
SHAWNIGAN —DUNCAN 
UP-ISLAND —MAINLAND 


We specialize in Land and 
Land Development Mortgages 
anywhere In B C. 


Existing Mortgages Bought 


Call Mr. Douglas Hawkes 
384-7128 (after hours 477-9544) 
DOUGLASHAWKESLTD 
990 BLANSHARD ST. 


MORTGAGES 


1st Mortgage loans handled 
- --1 efficient. 


quickly and efficient lv with flexi- 

t,l V% m B S R*S a w B N iV & «.! l T^ 5 

767 Fort St. 38HUS 


234 MORTGAGES 
FOR SALE 


1ST MORTGAGES 


Amounts available from $15,000 
and up; returning 16 Vj%i 8 %. 
Interest paid monthly. Well se¬ 
cured. For further information 
call 


RAE INVESTMENTS LTD. 
DEREK GREEN 
388-7891 


VERY WELL SECURED 1ST 
mortgages for the careful Inves¬ 
tor. 14 Vj% to 16% Interest. For 
full details call Vincent Holmes, 
Thames Investments Ltd., 
Holmes Building, 1000. Govern¬ 
ment St., 384-8124. 


—18% — 

Mortgages Available 
GLENGARRY REALTY 

479-7238 


240 BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A 
sound business proposition? 
Does the idea of operating a 
modern specialty camera store 
In a prime mall location appeal 
to you? Would you like the sup- 


■v yw: nuuiu you ine sup¬ 
port of a company that has been 
In business for 20 years with a 
sound track record of franchis¬ 
ing? Then contact: 


FRANCHISE 

DIRECTOR 


KIES Cameras 


1601 Yew St., 
Vancouver, B C. V6K 3E6 
Call Collect (604) 731-8281 
Or (604) 732-9194 (Eves) 

We heye operating stores on the 
West Coast, each one backed bv 


a comprehensive support prey 
oram covering all phases of the 
store operation. Our training 


— training 
program will prepare you to 
enter the exciting world of pho 
tography. 


$40,000 cash investment re¬ 
quired. We have locations avail¬ 
able In Comox Centre. Comox 
B.C., Champlain Mall, Vancou¬ 
ver, B.C., Semlahmoo Mall. 
White Rock, B.C., Maple Park, 
Quesnel, B.C., Fort Mall. Fort 
Sask., Alta., Mldnapore Mall, 


miunopuic mail. 

Calgary, Alta , Weyburn 
--Weyburr - • 


Square. Weyburn, Sask., Law- 
son Hots., Saskatoon, Sask., 
Sherwood Village, Regina. 
Sask., Write or call us now! 


GOLDMINE 

POTENTIAL 


Flrsf t fne offered for sale. 78 
seat fu lv licensed restaurant In 
Sooke, less than one year old and 

Kildnu,-- (/ d |, y - 


ism Mianuiir year oiaana 

NOB?r'’”---- tEl ^ TON 

USSs 


• a ■ 1 3 ■ uciun iun 
NOBLE, 366-79SS or 386 6275, 

F a 9rr789._PE TER SYKES, 

386-2955 Of 382-3216. CENTURY 
21 Mayfair Realty Lid, 


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17. 1980 


240 BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 



One of B.C.'s fastest 
growing communi¬ 
ties. New and used 
cars, 5 repair bays. 
Esso Bar. Several 
options on how to 
purchase. 

RADIO SHACK 
FRANCHISE PLUS 


Well-established business in 
boom 1 ng Port H ardv One of f I rst 
full-line associate franchises. 
Other name lines specialized ie. 
stereos, CB radios, TVs and mu¬ 
sical accessories, records and 
tapes. Located In core of com¬ 
mercial zone. Gross Vj m, net 
$55,000. Price $50,000 plus stock 
of approx. $125,000. Vendor will 
consider paper with qualified 
purchaser. 

Al Bull Office- Dick Strotol 
477-2149 477 1841 477-0450 

BLOCK BROS REALTY LTD 



PENINSULA 
Expanding grocery ouflet with 
almost highway location. Im¬ 
maculate retail section with 
ample parking. Two bedroom 
apartment for the owners with 
watervlew and basement for 
storage. $145,000. TERRY 
SMOLLETT, 386-3494 (24hr$.). 


100,000NET INCOME 


On approximately 700,000 gross 
sales. Well established automo¬ 
tive retail centre In a prime loca 
rlen 


• Litigiiiuiiiciiiauiimt loca¬ 
tion. Excellent experienced staff 
In place. Purchaser to rqrelve 
long lease and option to purchase 
site property Ideal for experl 
enced business manager Price 
300,000 plus Inventory Confiden¬ 
tial enquiries to ALLAN TREL- 
FORO 386-3494 (24hrs) 

' CENTURY 21 

Western Homes Ltd. 

1037 Clover dale Ave., 
386-3494 (24hrs.) 


VICTORIA 

DELICATESSEN NEAR 
EMPRESS HOTEL 

Owner Is leaving tor the East. 
Great business with tremendous 

nntnntl ml r __ . I___. 


potential. Good equipment — 
-*——* 1200 sq. ft. 


new bright store (120i) sq. ft ). 
Owner Is looklnp at any reason 
able offer to $60,000 Plus stock 
which can be adjusted to suit 
purchaser. 

AIBuil Office Dick Strobl 
477-2149 4 77-1841 477-0450 

Block Bros. Realty Ltd 


VICTORIAMOTEL 
Very attractive easy operation 
Ideal for husband and wife, 9 
units catering to select clientele 
in excellent condition plus sepa 
rate 3 bedroom rancher owner's 
home located on treed park like 
property Asking $269,000. For 
more details and private view¬ 
ing call: 

477 1841 Anne Howard 652-3206 
Block Bros Realty ltd. 


A NEW BUSINESS ENTER- 
ise No capital required. Llm- 


prise No capital required. Llm- 
itedcompetition in select mar 
ke^^tewly designed French 
decor Beauty Salon In a 


shopping area on Salt Spring lv 
land, available on terms to suit 
tennant. Either rental lease pur¬ 
chase or larger envoivement in 
entire shopping center Shop 
fully equipped and ready to open 
Its doors. 112-537-2394 evenings 
to 11 pm. 


MAKE MONEY 
STRIPPING 

Profitable furniture stripping 
franchise fur sale Hand done 
work guarantees first quality re¬ 
sults. Tie this In with any repairs 
or reflnlshlng furniture and you 
have a real winner. Asking 
$30,000 Phone for details. 
GERRY DAVIS 592-6961 

Royal Trust_384-8001 


GROCERY STORE 

and gas pumps In thriving area 
of Western Community. Living 


accommodation at rear. 
I50'x120' watervlew lot. Asking 
$125,000 Vendor may carry with 
good down payment. 


Rona — M2-3835, Juan de 


Fuca F 


- 642 5244 


ATTACHED 
Business Premises 

Suitable for most retail busi¬ 
nesses, almost new equipment 
for Fish and Chips takeout and 3 
Bdrm residence 
WALLY KING 388-6275 Pager 

OCEANCITYREALTYLTD. 
381-2233 


Grocery Store 
Fullv equipped 


For GROCERY 8, MEAT busi¬ 
ness. Excellent turnover and 
LARGE RETAIL area. Prlcedat 
$35,000. plus stock. Phone VIC 
TOR WONG 592-5454 or 479-6569 
anytime. Byron Price & Assoc. 
Ltd. 


DOWNTOWN BLDG. 

4800 SQ. FT. APPROX. TOTAL. 
EQUIPPED AS 75-seat coffee 
shop and bakery Corner close to 
retail wholesale outlets and 

S howing multi residential area 
ould be NIGHTTIME opera¬ 
tion. 

FRANCES BROWN 595-5131 
CanadaTrust 


FAST FOOD 

Business going concern with a 
good wholesale and retail trade 
A real money maker, asking 
price Includes land, building and 
equipment ottered at $360,000. 
MLS 44365. Further details 
please call anytime. 

477-0191 JACKMOEN 658-5448 
Royal Trust 


SECLUDED FISHING — 


Beach Resort for sale by owner 
No agents please. (Georgia 
Strait) Mid Vancouver island 


on beach. Eight Individual units 
and two-bedroom owner's home. 
Boats and launching facilities. 
Can be expanded. Price $235,000. 
Reply Victoria Press Box 782 for 
further details. 


Bak'ery—$39,900 


Excellent opportunity for some¬ 
one experienced In this line. Sta¬ 
tement on file showing progres¬ 
sive growth. Location close In. 
For equipment and lease inf or 
matlon contact. 

JOHNTODD 598-7849 

davld burr ltd._384-9335 


AUTOMECHANICS 
AND BODY SHOPS 

Own Your Own Shops or rent 
your own from $478. Further in¬ 
formation call: 

ARNOLDMARR 
388 4434 477-6233 

WESTMONT REALTY 
(1980) LTD. 


Sun Tanning Booths 
Do-It-Yourself Kits 

Not A Franchise 
803-288-0191 


VICTORIAMOTEL 


9 unit motel, easy operation. 
‘ “Itforla G«*w«l Hosblt 


Victoria General Hospital 
area. Price$210,000. Anytime 
FRANK SALE PAGER 738 


THE PERMANENT 382-9191 


240 BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


GOLDMINE ON VAN ISLE 
0, d Country Antiques, 8 miles 
south of duncan with 500' hioh 
way frontage. 3 19 acres. Sev 
eral thousand sq.ft, of inside dls- 
play area, plus outside 
compound, '/j acre useable 
Owners 3 bedroom suite, 10 
years establishment and grow¬ 
ing every day. Specializing In 
antiques and second-hand. 
Owner anxious and will consider 
offers on asking price of $ 140,000. 
(Stock may be purchased se- 
peratelv). Owner will consider 
assisting with financing. Contact 
Don Shaw today 743-5591 and 
748-3813, H.W. Dickie Ltd. Mill 
Bay Office, TC Hiahway and 
Shawnlgan, Mill Bav Rd. 


VERY PROFITABLE 60% 


FAST RETURN 
Rental Energy Business 


We are dividing uo our many 
retail store locations throughout 
B.C. Full training and company 
support for man with some me¬ 
chanical ability. 

Light Industrial equipment. 

„ NOSELLING 
Constant demand and growing 
due to energy crisis. Investment 
required $7075 to $27,185 cash, 
fully secured. Victoria Press 
Box 806 


HEALTH FOOD 
STORE 

Well established and show 
ng a excellent return. Ideal 
location with lease option to 
December, 1987. 

CERAMIC SHOP 

Downtown location specia¬ 
lizing In classroom work 
shops and retail sales Lease 
option to May 1984. Good op¬ 
eration tor energetic couple. 
All serious Inquiries on these 
listings to be directed to: 

GARY RESTELL 478-6987 
MONTREAL TRUST 386-2111 


APPROX 
60 ACRES 


Approx. 1 Million F.B.M. Tim¬ 
ber Access and Looping Per 
mits available also subdivision 
Plan for 5-acre lots (Approval in 
Principle from Regional Dist ). 
Location TOFINO, B.C. Price: 
$195,000 Min. $100,000down. For 
information: 

PETER PRIMGAARD F.R.I. 
R.l. (B.C.) 

Seapray Properties Ltd. 
477-7131 


Tractor Business 


The year has started. Municipal 
contracts are In. Business In 
eludes 3 deisel tractors, 1-2 ton 
dumptruck and sickle bars, flail 
mott mower etc. On a $50,000 
c«sh flow, a net of $ 12,000 in 
1979. All this plus a 25 yr. repu 
tatlon for $36,000. New MLS Se- 


..ILS. Se- 

r| oys purchasers only. Please 
call for details. 

PATRICK SKILLINGS 
477-7291 384-8075 (Pgr. 1204) 

D. F. H REAL ESTATE LTD. 


HAIRSTYLIST SHOP 
DUNCAN 

3-statlon, unisex hairstyling 
shop for sale In fast-growing 
area. Good lease, parking and all 
equipment, showing excellent 
return. 

For further (nformaton please 
call DIANE ADAIR at 746-5171 
Of 746-6793. 

H.W. DICKIE LIMITED. 

70Government St., 
Duncan, B.C. 

V9L 1A1 
746-5171 


BEAUTY PARLOR 

4 Stations 6 dryers — a busty 
local clientele to draw from. 
Good lease — excellent parking. 
Barbara and Shirley 381 2233. 
OCEANCITY REALTY LTD 


PERSON TO ACT AS AGENT 
and represent my business on 
South Vancouver Island, includ¬ 
ing Victoria. Small Investment 
required. For Further Informa¬ 
tion contact Al at Advance 
Slgns.112 753-7547 


3 UNITS OF $20,000 EACH RE 
qu I red to complete I n vestment of 


$140,000 In fast growing bus! 

“ ‘ ’* “ ‘ francMM 


ness This Is not a franchise and 
shows excellent net returns. For 
full details please write Victoria 
Press Box 83? 


HEALTH FOODSTORE 
Family Business in new shop¬ 
ping centre near Victoria. Gross 
over $200,000 Victoria Press 
Box 787 


THRIVING AUTO REPAIR 
business on Island Highway at 
Mill Bav. Low overhead and In¬ 
vestment. Excellent clientelle 
112-743-4341 8-5pm or 478-3973 
after 6pm. 


JANITOR BUSINESS. SIDNEY, 
Brentwood, office and floor 
cleaning. Gross $25,000 yearly, 
77 van, equipment will teach 
business. Asking $25,000. 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY. 
Owner selling profitable restau 
rant on large commercial proo- 
erty, due to conflicting Interests. 
11? 752-3146. 


FOR SALE, RETAIL PLUMB 
ing store, Fairfield Plaza, Mall 
Is expanding, good returns, stock 


included. 


384 4849 after 


WANTED PEOPLE WHO WISH 
to open there own Fish 8. Chip 
outlet on the Island under the No. 
l name in Vancouver. Full traln- 
Ing given. 6560283. 


UNIQUE 33-SEAT DOWNTOWN 
soup/sandwich coffee house for 
sale. Small staff! Courtyard 
overflow during high season! 
Victoria Press, Box 811. 


ISLANDS SCHOOL BUS Op¬ 
eration. Shows good return for 
owner operator or otherwise on 
reasonable Investment. Reply 
» Press, Box 820. 


Victoria P 


GIFT SHOP 

For sale. Excellent location. 
Good lease, inventory Must be 
purchased. 381-0231,595-2328. 


5"GUTTER MACHINE 
and truck. Factory on wheels. 
479-7121,479-3232. 


STORE FOR SALE BY 
owner. Phone 656-7428 or 
479-4185. 


GIFT SHOP FOR SALE. $12,000 
plus stock Phone 388-5430, after 
7pm 385-8598. 


HOUSE MOVING BUSINESS 
phow 


241 


BUSINESS OffOR- 
TUUmiS WANTED 


MIDDLE AGED BELGIAN 
couple with references wish to 
manage and operate concession 
for Institutions, business or In 
dustrlal. Specialty: Belgian and 
French Canadian cuisine. 
592-5765. 


WE'RE INTERESTEDIN PUR- 
chaslng an Import or Wholesale 
Business. Please send brief to 
Victoria Press Box 829. 


244 REVENUE PROPERTY 



28 suites — $650.0( 


_ _0,000 

3bachelor, 19, l bdrm, 6,2 bdrm. 
Good financing In place. For Info 
on this and others call SHANE 
BEFURT 386-6164. CASTLE 
PROPERTIES LTp. or 479-0010 
res. 


COMMERCIAL 


F, sh Market. Traffic count 
30,000 per day $140,000 

PIERRE BERUBE 
388-6275 *2764 

Block Bros. Realty Ltd. 
478-5561 


244 REVENUE PftOfERTY 


MODERN 
DUPLEX 
BRENTWOOD 


Attractive duplex, three bed¬ 
rooms, 2 bathrooms each side — 
thermo pane windows. Zone con¬ 
trolled electric heat, ideal for 
owner occupier. Asking $112,000 
with terms. To view phone: 

DON CLARK 592-6651 Res. 
NATIONAL TRUST 595-2121 
Office 


SLASHED$10,500 
NOW $99,500 
8 BDRM DUPLEX 
GROSS $11,700 

p*ch side has 3 Bdrm, LR with 
Place, plus 4th Bdrm and 2nd 


1"'. m ana zno 
Bath In completed Bsmt. Only 13 
vrs old, this Esqulmalt Duplex 
plus In law and possible 2nd In¬ 
law suite has to be a super buy. 
Over $20,000 below replacement. 
2^ n «r. r „ el , ,rln S', says, ‘Sell 
Now! Firm, Assume 

^ °90 «t 11 Vj% Call Pat Doerk- 
sen, 478-3432 or Century 21 Sut>- 
urban, 478-8316 


Rockland 
Heritage House 


Eight suites all self cont'd., six 
with f—*-- — =F -‘- 


f I replaces C omplete reno 


yatlon 1978, gross Income over 
S25.000 Assumable $110,000 first 
fnj-jjt 11% priced to sell at 


-000. Drive bv 1003-05 Van- 

couer St. Call Mike McCleery 
(Vancouver). 


Hannah and Millin 
Properties Ltd. 
112-734-5221 


9UNITS 

EASY RENTALS 

Gross $20,340. After $600 man 
agement fee and 2% vacancy 
factor, still nets nearly $15,000 
before financing. 6 of the units 
were added 14 years aoo, are 
good sized, electrically heated, 
tenants pay own heat For a very 


^cfuaL’cph^Tetestaten^t'caH 
Frank Wills, 388-7868. ‘ - 


Frank Wills, 388 7868. OH YES. 
Asking only $149,500. Easy 
Terms. Trade In your small 
block. 


DUNSMUIR 
PROPERTIES LTD. 


FAIRFIELD 

CONVERSION 


7 UNITS 
$110,000 
—Terrific Location 
—Sound attractive “Character'' 
building 

—Very good condition 
—Not all units self-contained 
—Amenities updated. 

—A truly easy care proper tv 


JOAN BAXTER 


Res 382 8037 Off. 382-8101 
National Trust Co. (Douglas) 


CRAIGDARROCH 

CASTLE 

Could be your new neighbour If 
you purchase this Imposing 
character conversion at 1070 
Joan Crescent. Asking price 
S140.000. For further details call 


DON JENKINS 
382 9198 or 388-6258 
CEDRICSTEELE 
REALTY LTD. 


4 SUITE 

APARTMENT BLOCK 
GROSS REVENUE $10,524 
ASKING PRICE : $119,500 
GOOD RENTAL LOCATION 
IDEAL STARTER FOR 
PENSION SCHEME 
RICHARD HOLMES 
BRIAN SPARK 

PEMBERTON, HOLMES LTD. 
1000 Government St. 

384-8124 


PRICE 
REDUCTION 
$82,500 


Five suite revenue property lo¬ 
cated In good rental area easy 
management for absentee 
owner. Try your offer, call Gerry 
Howse 

OCEANCITYREALTYLTD. 

381-2233 


UP & DOWN DUPLEX 
Spacious, wet I-constructed du¬ 
plex with pleasant views. Plenty 
of cupboards and storaoe space 
Good potential for further de¬ 
velopment of lower suite Sepa 
rate driveways and utilities. 
Lampson Street $66,900 
FloBlllnskv 

479-7266 477-1841 

Block Bros Realty Ltd. 


4PLEX 


Close in on Government 
2-1 BR 
7 Bachelor 
Full basement 
New Listing 

MIKE RUSSELL 388 9729Res 
NATIONAL TRUST 595-2121 
Bus. 


REVENUE 

Apartment blocks and commer¬ 
cial properties providing posi¬ 
tive cash flows and hedge 
against Inflation. Small blks. up 
’O'tes Down payments from 
$50,000. Please call 
OLE KNUDSEN 479-2764 

Royal Trust_ 384 8001 


REVENUE 

PROPERTY 


2 houses on the same lot. Live In 
one and rent out the other Phone 
KIM ENG, 386-2955 or 477-9439 
CENTURY 21 Mayfair Realty 
Ltd. 


DUPLEX 
SxS S117,000 

4 Bedrooms 2 Complete baths 
«"d on each side. Excellent 
condition 

^ ALEXOR ANITA TAIT 
,£ C JA N C,TY REALTY LTD. 
381 2233_ 477-8522 


GONZALES BAY 
SEAVIEWS 

Side-bv-side duplex on 22,000 sq. 
ft. subdivided lot. Possible town- 
house site. Open to offers. Call 
anytime. 

FRANK SALE PAGER 738 
THE PERMANENT 382-9191 


_ BY OWNER 
Attractive new 2 tenant com¬ 
mercial building within 1 mile 
Cltv Hal!. Triple net $18,100 1980, 
$20,000 1981, $21,300 1982. Clear 
’•tie, $230,000. No agents. 
477-9443. 


, „ M FAIRFIELD 
6 Self contained suites. Tudor 
tvpeott street parking, gross 
$17/708. $25,000 will handle Full 
P/lce $144,5°° S Houston 
fW’585 Smith Dobson Estates 
Ltd 384-1424 


DUPLEX 

2-1 br sultes good condition. 
C lose to T&C. Only $54,900. 
WALLY KING 381-2233 

OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD, 


APARTMENT BLKS 
AVAILABLE 

Contact Bing Richards 388-7868, 
388-5464 Pgr. 732. 

DUNSMUIR PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


SIDE BY SIDE 
Duplex 

’/? acre Blenklnsop near McKen¬ 
zie. Phone owner 477-8666. Offers 
on $119,000. 


FAIRFIELD, FURNISHED 7 
Gross revenue 
*12^426. $94,500. By owner, 
595-8008 


ESQUIMALT 4 PLEX. EASY 
care, electric heat, close to 
stores and bus. $79,500.386-3923 


UP DOWN DUPLEX, MARI- 
ooM-gpod condition, rented $650. 
$70,000or offers. 652-3898. 


245 REVENUE 

PROPERTIES WANTED 


APT. BLOCKS 

Small, med; and large. Older 
or newer. Sincere ourchasers 
immediate reply without obliga 
tlon. 

477-0191 SYLSHUMKA 5950337 
Royal Trust 


WANTED 

Bv private investor, revenue 
-*y, mbr*-— • 


$275,000 Please call 


i total pric 
477-0631/ 


247 COMMERCIAL OR 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES 


2WAREH0USES 

$149,000.00 

2 Warehouses SxS of ap¬ 
proximately 1900 sq. ft. 
each side — both have 
mezzanine floors. Ceiling 
height of 17 ft. overhead 
doors of 10x12. Each side 
has Its own heatinq sys¬ 
tem and 2-piece bath. Lo¬ 
cated aproximatelv 1 mile 
from city centre. Present 
owner wishes to lease 
back one WHS. 

For further information call 

C.E.PULLAN 477-1578 
or 

PAT SNOW 592-3931 


ISLANDHOMES REALTY 
LTD. 

386-7545 




WHITTOMTS 


’/2 ACRE 
CENTRAL 
SAANICH 


Choice l-l zoned, level property 
Will sell outright at $3.50 i 


Ross Bracken 477-0029 


1.64 Acres Colwood 

Beautiful property with updated 
2,800 sq. ft. Colonial style home, 
and modern 2,000 sq. ft. self-con 
talned WORKSHOP Zoned gen 
eral commercial this property 
offers many possibilities 
477 5306 Ruth Lukaitls 388-4271 
Ross Bracken 477-0029 


Rirk Pacific 


3.25 ACRES 

INDUSTRIAL ZONED" 
$350,000 


f 1 serviced prooerty — may 
be divided Into 3 pels of 1 ac 
Good access and exposure. 


Cal! M. Ruddy 656-4089 
Pager 792 388-6275 

Park Pacific Inv. 383-4124 


HILLSIDE AVE. 


Excellent revenue property 
showing $39,000. net per year 
basic, with the ability tor income 
improvement. Existing flnanc- 
jng of $300,000 at 10%% Two 
•ofs. h*° warehouses and office 
building — $460,000 — or pur 
chaseon^the warehouse andof- 

000 ° 


Jlng on one lot for $400, 


THE ZIEGLERS 
592-1768, or 
384-8075, Pgr. 310 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 595-3151 


491 Burnside Rd. 
Triple Net 

Modern retail/comm. bldg. 
Built 1973 Fullv leased, 3 prime 
tenants, net income $57,097. As 
sumable $375,000 first mtg at 
1U5%. Asklna $650,000 Details 
with MIKE McCLEERY, Van¬ 
couver. 


Hannah&Millin 
Properties Ltd. 
(112)734-5221 


Gold is where 
you find it 

C-1 zoned. App. 29,000 sq. 
ft. Downtown Duncan 
near T. Eaton. Ready tor 
development. A. Badham, 
Landmark Properties 
Ltd. 386-6762, Res. 
595-1556. 


WESTERN 
COMMUNITY 
TOWN CENTRE 


Westbrook shopping centre 
$9 50sq.ft. 
Goldstream. central loca 
♦•on $11.25 sq.ft, 

PIERRE BERUBE 
Pager 388-6275 #2764 

Block Bros. Realty Ltd. 
478-S561 


JAMES BAY 
2DUPLEXZONED 
PROPERTIES 

Vendor says sell these 2 (66x165) 
ft. lots with houses rented tor 
$275 and $300. New townhouses 
and commercial properties. 
Ideal location. Priced $85,000 
each. 

Erna Ellsay 

388-6275 Office 24 Hrs. 

Page 345 477 1841 

Block Bros. Realty Ltd. 


SHOPPING 

CENTRE 


Fully Teased, well located centre 
generating good Income. Vendor 
will carry substantial financing 
at a very attractive rate. For 
further details call 

_ DONJENKINS 

382-9198 or 388-6258 
CEDRICSTEELE 
REALTY LTD. 


OWNER MUST SELL 


STRATATITLE UNIT 


1,050 SQ.FT. 
MODERN, AIR—COND 
BUILDING 
QUADRA-HILLSIDE 
$57,000 

OWNER WILL HELP 
FINANCE 

592-7140 AFTER 6: PM 


Downtown Investment 
Commercial Building 
Trades Considered 

Fu " «> rlc * 

$395,000. Fully leased to yield 
absolute net before financing of 
$32,000 P.A. will consider trades 
up or down of apartments, com¬ 
mercial or residential. Call 
Peter Margetts 592-2407. 

^ MARGETTS & GOWER 
OAK BAY PROPERTIES LTD. 


VICTORIA 
M2 ZONING 

3062 Jutland., 141x159 paved lot. 
Older building 4180 sq. ft. could 
be used as warehouse plus small 
Office. Asking S2S5.000 and 
owner will look at all offers. 
Phone 

^«.«. J,MDONNELLY 
477-0191 477-8855 

Royal Trust 


LP T .2lP?.. SA l-E BY OWNER 
lie fi 


ft;* 1 *'. VIC West, 1 mile from 
City Hall. 477-5130 after 6 pm. 


J£i£iL ES F 4 AT industrial 

property cwitrat Colwood area. 
$3.60per foot. 474-1289 


247 COMMERCIAL OR 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES 


2-storey Bldg, with over 
4000 sq. ft. each floor. Of¬ 
fices, board rooms, drafl 
ing offices, would suit 
consortium of engineers. 
Zoned M-1 Industrial with 
plenty of room for exoan- 
sion. Over ’/i acre of land 
in 2 parcels. Possible part 
lease back. Asking $499,- 
000 . 

For further particulars 
contact John Barton 
386-7545 (24 hrs.). Island 
Homes Realty Ltd 


. OLDTOWN 
COMMERCIAL 

90% brand new building 
fully leased. Nets over 
$60,000 annually. Prime 
corner location. Excellent 
financing. 

0FFERS0N 

$650,000 

BARRY BOWES 
JOHN WEST 
388-6275 pgr. 756 and 
571,386-7545 

Island Homes Realty Ltd 


WATERFRONT 
3.7 ACRES 

Consisting of motel trailer park 
and lovely owner's residence 
This prooerty has dual zoning 
Also installed latest sewage dls 
Dosal system Reasonably 
priced for further information. 
477 0191 Judv Johnson (24hrs.) 
Royal Trust 


HOLDING PROPERTY 

Over 9,000 sq. ft of possible 
aoartment site with liveable 
house on property. Otters in¬ 
vited c*n the asking price of 
$73,000 Please cal DENNIS 
BERRY at 598-3321 

JACKMEARS 
OAK BAY REALTY LTD 

EXCELLENT INDUSTRIAL 
building. 40x60, high frontal 


doors. 4 offices, 400 amp wiring, 
overhead crane, pit, gas storage 
tanks and pumps, approx 16,000 
sq ft Fullv fenced. $189,000 or 
lease 870 Devonshire Rd Esqui 
malt 385-0341 days, 479 2248 
after 5pm 


M-l ZONED LOT 44X187, 
Esqulmalt District. Ask 
ing $63,000. John Barton 
Island Homes Realty Ltd. 
386-7545 (24hrs.) 


250 HOUSES FOR SALE 



Ml and 1. 
1:3114 PM 


I 


(Brentwood Bay-left off West 
Saan. Rd. on Verdrir-left on 
Hagen to Damelart) 

Four yr old home, like new 
throughout, super floor plan, 
lush w/*/ carpet. Cathedral en 
trance with 2 distinctive brick 
arches to an extra nice living 
rm Sep din. rm. delightful kit¬ 
chen and dinette, 3 bdrms., mas¬ 
ter is large with 2 pee ensultc 
Lovely family rm. with 2nd fire^ 
place Dble caroot Some view. 
Only $89,000 Phone Morris Lund 
386 7545 anytime. 


LOADSOF 
HOUSE 


This new MLS sits on a 10,000 sq 
ft lot at Turgoose Point and 
gives you sea views from the 
Hvlng area. Features are 4 bdrs 
possibly 5, 3 four piece bath 
rooms, rec room with fireplace, 
double carport. All this adds up 
to over 2200 sq. ft. finished. Of 
fered at $84,500 which Is below 
the assessed value of $88,500. 


WORKSHOP 


Situated on a rustic lane in 
Brentwood and offering a sepa 
rate garage workshop, an 18x35 
Inground swimming pool, 4 bdrs 
and rec room, laroe covered 
sundeck, extra off street park¬ 
ing, forced hot air electric fur¬ 
nace and numerous other extras. 
Built In 1974 and continually 
maintained and improved since 
then. Offered at $91,500. 


BRAND NEW' 

3 bdrm almost ready for occu¬ 
pancy, located amono other new 
homes In Brentwood. Offered at 
$74,900. 

LARRYHADD0N 


British American Realty Ltd. 
385-1431_592-7735 (Res.) 


NEWLISTINGS! 
$67,900 


A truly unique and comfortable 
family home with a large corner 
lot & lots of shrubs 4 f ruTl trees In 
the Gorge area. 3 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, 2 sunporches. super 
‘ ' ‘.quickly! 


kitchen. Act. qulcfclyf 

JOHN E. THOMSON 
479-1687 (24 hrs.) 

“CHARACTER" 

"CHARACTER" 


An unreplaceable charmer. 
Gives all vou would expect from 

S /alltv homes from yesteryear. 

earn ceilings, stained glass, 
four large bedrooms. Formal 
dining room, living room with 
fireplace, den with fireplace. It 
priced 


Is very reasonably priced be¬ 
cause It needs some lovino re¬ 
pair work done. $65,500 

JOHN MONKHOUSE 
598-0186 

DAVID BUTTERFIELD 
382-0008 

Northern Pacific 
Realty Ltd. 479-1687 


IMMACULATE 


7 year old, 3 bedroom home 
Many added features including 
18' pool, mature trees on large 
65'xl 17' lot, ensulte, beautiful old 
brick fireplace, quality carpe¬ 
ting, partially finished basement 
rim “ . 


with rutted In fireplace, bath, 
laundry, garage and workshop. 
Nice Colwood location, 3170 Wl- 
shart. $36,000 assumable at 
11%%. Asking $73,500. Owner 

-fa 


478-8602, no agents 


NORTH RIDGE 10% 


3 bedroom home (2 up, 1 down) 
on a large lot In a quiet, residen¬ 
tial neighbourhood. Very close to 
schools, transportation, and only 
15 minutes from downtown Vic¬ 
toria. Finished TV room, and 
game room downstairs. Save 
money on 10% N.H A mortgage 
Approximately $48,500 with two 
years to go. Try your offers on 
$76,900 For more information 
cSII 479-2178 after 5:30pm. 


250 HOUSES FOR SALE 


C-9 


FORT ST. 381-??. 


990 FORT ST 381 2233 

OCEAN CITY REALTY 


OPEN HOUSE 
SUN. 1:30-4:00 
1905 JEROME 
Beautiful home close to shops 
and transportation. 3 bdrms. on 
mam, LR with FP — DR. and 
large kitchen. Extra Bdm and 
Rec room down Sundeck over 
looking large garden Asking 
$72,900. 

479 5693ALBAN BOWES38 ) 2233 


MT.TOLMIE HEIGHTS 
SI 18,000 
OPEN HOUSE 
SUNDAY 2-4 
1930MAYFAIR DR. 

Oak Bav border, near unlver 
sitv 4 bedrooms, two full baths, 
Immaculate home. Gardener's 
delight 

PAT FORBES 

477 4118 381 2233 


CORDOVA BAY RIDGE 
Four or five bedrooms, lOYr.old 
4 level spilt In excellent condi 


tion Three bathrooms, family 
room with beautiful fireplace 
adjoining kitchen. Double car¬ 
port, nlcelv treed 96x130 lot. 
Separate oames room, over 2500 
square feet. Shake Roof New 
exclusive listing at $109,S00. 
- 598- 31 r 


BENGREIG 


3105 381-2233 


COUNTRY 

CHARACTER 

3 bedrooms, full basement, large 
lot, close to new hospital — Full 
price$6S,900 NewM.L.S 
381 2233 R W RHODES 479-9241 


3 BEDROOMS 

Large 10% 1st mortgage — full 
basement. 1'/}baths,flreplace— 
Full price $59,000. (M.L.SJ 
381-2233 R W RHODES 479-9241 


6MOSOLD 


3 Bedrooms, full basement, lv* 
baths, heatilator fireplace, sun 
deck, excellent views, 1st mort¬ 
gage $57,500at 11.25%. (M L S.) 
381-2233 R. W. RHODES 479 9241 


4YEARSOLD 
3 Bedrooms, full basement, 
water views. 1»/» baths, fire 
place, fullprlce $53,900 (ML. S.) 
381 2233 R. W. RHODES 479 9241 


RUSTIC COTTAGE 

Looks small but Is huge — Cor¬ 
dova Bav — Custom built 1972 — 
3 bedrooms, full basement- large 
kitchen, formal dining room, liv¬ 
ing room has sloped ceiling, 
large brick fireplace, master 
bedroom, walk in closet plus 3 
Dee. ensulte — other ? bedrooms 
are super large — For further 
details 

381-2233 R. W. RHODES 479-9241 


COUNTRY LIVING 

492.500 

1 Yr. old. 1300 sq ft. 3 br. 1% 
baths. 2 rockfaced fireplaces 
Laroe den and family room plus 
a complete self-contained ihlaw 
suite rented for $275 per mos 
Hurry on this one. 

ANITA OR ALEX TAIT 
477-8522 381-2233 


CHARACTER HOME 


4 bedrooms plus den, formal din 
ing room with bay window, 
beamed ceilings, built in 


beamed ceilings, built In hutch 
and side boards — living room 
with fireplace — full basement, 
plusdevelot 
price $79,9 
tails. 

R. W. RHODES 

479-9241 381-2233 


'eloped upper floor —Yuli 
'9,900. For complete de 


$64,900 

Still needs fixing up but good 
family home Interesting design. 
Large living room, dlnino room. 
3 bedrooms. 

PATFORBES 

477-4118 381 2233 


BEAUTIFULLY BUILT 
GORDON HEAD 
FOUR LEVEL SPLIT 
4 bedrooms, family room. 
$116,000. 

OR 

This delightful 4 year old 3 bed¬ 
room fullv developed basement 
Large lot with greenhouse. 
PATFORBES 477-4118 381-2233 


COMPLETELY 
RENOVATED 
$46,900 


WEST SAANICH 2 BRS and 
DEN, 4 PC BATH, UPDATED 

AND plumbing, 

MODERN KITCHEN, NEW 
CARPETS THROUGHOUT. 
CLOSE TO BUS AND SHOP 
PING ONCE YOU'RE INSIDE 
YOU WON'T KNOW ITS AGE! 
CALL NOW 

GARY WHITELEY 381-2233 
OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD. 


COLWOOD 
SPLIT LEVEL 
ONLY $69/900 


6 MONTHS OLD, OVER 1,400 
SQ. FT OF FINISHED AREA, 3 
BDRMS, REC ROOM. LARGE 
EATING AREA OFF KIT 
CHEN, BUILT-IN DISHWASH 
ER, HEATILATOR F.P . 
EXTRA INSULATION. THIS 
WON'T LAST, CALL NOW. 

GARY WHITELEY 381 2233 
OCEANCITY REALTY LTD. 


MUSI BE M 

REDUCED TO 1116,000 


Contemporary executive 
home located on cul-de- 
sac in Saanichton with 
fantastic sea views. May 
extras to numerous to list 
here. For Intormation 
Catl Karen Barclay 
388-6275 # 2730. 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 

381-2233 


LAKEVIEWS 


A dellohtful 1300 sq. ft. home In 

X lar Glen Lake. Approx. 20 
to town. Features lake 
views from kitchen, dining and 
living room areas, Open beams 
and wall-to-wall fireplace In liv¬ 
ing room, lots of cupboards and 
built-in dishwasher In sunny kit¬ 
chen. 3 baths, woodturner In rec 
room, workshop tor dad. It's dif¬ 
ferent Asking $77,500. Phone 
now before it's sold 

MARILYN MOORE 
381-2233 RES. 382-801S 


TEN MILE POINT 

$ 110,000 

4-br rancher on W-acre lot In a 
very quiet location Living rm., 
kitchen and dining area have 
been completely renovated with 
quality In mind—solid oak cabi 
n ? , Y?E ,bw,,Hn ««>••»*><:**, and 
skylights are some of the attrac¬ 
tive freatures. 2 full baths, tarn- 


••X 


, hobby rm.. and 
‘ this family ac- 


-- T ...Heels ri_ 

qulred for viewing this exclusive 
listing. 

- - 477-7766 


WALLY PETl 

ADELINE Nl<_ __ 

OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD 
381-2233 


ERSON .. 

(CHOL 477-8562 


OAK BAY BORDER 

By owner, $79,900. 3 bedre 
home, quality carpefl 
throughout dining room, liv 
room with fireplace, sundedt 
large master bedroom, fully 
veloped basement with laun 
room, garage and worksh 
Fruit trees, shrubs and separ 

?98^9578 Sl>e<1 N ° a0entS °**4 




































































































































































































































C-10 

250 HMKtSFWULE 


FOR SALE 


Royal Trust 


OPEN HOUSE 
#402-#304—906 
SOUTHGATE ST. 

FRI., SAT. and SUN. 

2-4 P.M. 

ideally situated next to Beacon 
Hill Park. Two deluxe condo¬ 
miniums. Featurlnofireplace In 
spacious living room, ensulte 
plumbing and self contained 
laundry area Five too Quality 
apollances Included. Covered 
parking. Only 14-unit building. 
E xcKnTvely listed at $09,000 and 

BERNe'da"^[*OR 382-4485, 
SHIRLEY MOLLBERG 428 5327 
of 477-0191,384-8001. 

SAT. ANDSUN. 1:30-4:00 
1680LANDSENDRD. 

Seavlew home on Vj acre prop- 
ertv with 4 BR family home 
Price $145,000. Come and view 
with 

CONNIE REYNOLDS 479-0007 
or HAZEL CAMPBELL 598-3594 
or 384-8Q01 

DELUXE 

UNIVERSITY PARK 

Only a few 2 bdrm condos for 
sale In this building. A special 
one on the 2 nd floor has been 
newly listed Includes stove, 
♦ridoe, good size rooms. Sauna, 
hydro pool, pool room, hospital¬ 
ity room, covered parking. 
Dandy mortgage of $34,300. 
10 Vi%. $325 per month. Price 
$43,500 

MARGARET JOHNSTON 
477-1763 or 384-8001. 

SIDNEY 
BY THE SEA 
Just half a block from sheltered 
safe mooring. An 11 year old 2 
bedroom stucco bungalow with 
full high basement Completely 
fenced yard. 20'xt* sundeck off 
dining rm. Extra I6'xi2' bed¬ 
room down. Price $59,900. 
MARGARET JOHNSTON 
477-1763 or 384-8001. 

5 PLUSACRES 
IN SUNNYSOOKE 

Calling all horseman or farmers 
looking for a little spread Here 
Is 5 acres of pood, level land, half 
fully fenced ana half left In Its 
natural wooded state. An im¬ 
maculate. 3-bdrm, full basement 
home comprised of living rm , 
dining rm., a beautiful compact 
kitchen with lots of cupboards 
and counter fops and a deluxe 
Jcnn-AIr range. Downstairs 
would be ideal for an in-law 
potential, l bdrm. currently used 
as an office 2nd extra bedroom 
and bathroom in process of de¬ 
velopment. A dandv 50'x30’ 
sturdy barn partitioned Into 
stalls all ready for the animals. 
Only $105,000. To view call 
JOHN MORRY 592-9770 MAR¬ 
GARET JOHNSTON 477*1763 or 
384 8001. 

OPPORTUNITY 

Assumable $42,500 1st mortgage 
at 10'/.% due June, 1982. This full 
basement, 2 bdrm. up and 2 down 
periced to sell at $$57.S00 is an 
excellent opportunity for some¬ 
one to get Into their own home. 
The house features a large lot — 
73.5x195', a new roof, updated 
wiring and four appliances mav 
be negotiated with sale. Don't 
hesitatecall 

KELLY CHRISTIANSEN 
385-5336 or 384-800) 

$25,000 

FULL PRICE 

Move In now! Super condomin¬ 
ium in a 4-unit block. Living 
room with fireplace