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Colonist 


No. 189 — 122nd Year 


Vancouver Island's leading newspaper since 1858 

Victoria, British Columbia, Wednesday, July 23, 1980 


Cloudy , 
high 22 

Weather Details 
on Page 2 


* ★ 


25C Daily, 30c Sunday 


It’s too good a scapegoat 

rlSfk Yifkwj Capital Region District failure 
IU lilts MlUVw but it does jobs no one else will 



.CRD 


UNLOVED 

ORPHAN 


First of five parts 

By NANCY BROWN 

Colonist staff 

The Capital Region District is 
dead. , 

Torn apart by territorial and 
personal bickerings and bogged 
down in legal suits, the board and 



Campbell 
... old right 


its committees continue to meet, 
but progress is almost non-exis¬ 
tent, and decisions are made only 
under pressure of deadlines. 

It has taken 15 years at the 
hands of local politicians for Dan 
Campbell’s daydream of co-op¬ 
eration and mutual support 
among Victoria’s seven muni¬ 
cipal councils and seven unor¬ 
ganized areas to fail. 

BIJT DETRACTORS should 
not live in hope of getting rid of 
the board. 

Municipal Affairs Minister 
William Vander Zalm, and be¬ 
fore him Hugh Curtis, have been 
promising for years to “do some¬ 
thing" about regional govern¬ 
ment, but that something is not 
going to include major surgery. 

After all, as far as the provin¬ 
cial government is concerned, 
the regional board is a great 
scapegoat. 

IF ANYTHING IS not work¬ 
ing at the provincial level—dog 
control, public transit or what¬ 
ever—it’s a simple matter to 
dump the problem through legis¬ 
lation onto the region. 

Citizen objections are then fo- 



Curtis 

.. former chairman 


cused on the regional politicians, 
and their provincial counterparts 
can stand back and applaud as 
the public takes on the region in 
the public arena and through the 
courts. 

It’s been a long and expensive 
15 years for taxpayers since Dan 
Campbell, then municipal af¬ 
fairs minister, brought in the 
legislation creating regional gov¬ 
ernments. 

FROM ITS FIRST $393,356 
budget to this year’s $26 million 
budget, the politicians have 


grumbled and fought and the 
taxpayers have complained. 

The first budget was a model 
of simplicity. 

Directors were responsible 
only for fireworks control and 
parks acquisition, and they met 
in a small office above Govern¬ 
ment Street with part-time secre¬ 
tary Tony Roberts (now Islands 
Trust secretary-treasurer) tak¬ 
ing minutes. 

The regional parks function 
was to cost $393,356, with a fur¬ 
ther $1,000 set aside for essential 
maintenance. AH other expendi¬ 
tures totalled $10,000, including 
an honorarium of $1,750 for Ro¬ 
berts. 

REMUNERATION for all 
directors was $2,250, plus an ad¬ 
ditional $200 for chairman 
Curtis. Today, you can’t get one 
director to serve for a year for 
that $2,450 total. 

A sum of $100 was earmarked 
in that budget for a sewer 
study—the first expenditure on a 
long road of bungling and politi¬ 
cal manoeuvring that has seen 
the region, financed of course by 
the taxpayer, in and out of courts 
and appeal hearings. 

In I960, regional politicians 
are charged with administration 
of a $26-million budget covering 
such diverse jurisdictions as 
Willis Point Fire Protection and 
Recreation, and community 
health services. 

Page 2—Region 


Economic union 
deadlock 
blocks accord 

• Bennett to start public push on constitution. 
Page 35 

VANCOUVER (UPC) — No consensus on renewed 
federalism is possible until a compromise is reached 
oh tfie federal government proposal,to safeguard eco¬ 
nomic union in a revised constitution, Saskatchewan 
Attorney-General Roy Romanow said Tuesday. 

“I don’t think there’s been real movement yet 
and I don’t think there can be real movement until we 
get some of the fundamental issues resolved, of which I 
think powers of the economy is one,” said Romanow, 
co-chairman of the constitutional reform talks, following 
Tuesday’s closed-door meetings. 

Federal Justice Minister Jean Chretien, the other 
co-chairman, said he was open to provincial sugges¬ 
tions to modify the economic union proposal. 

“But for me it is pretty fundamental. I’m talking 
about economic union in Canada—the freedom of move¬ 
ment of people, goods, services and capital (among 
provinces). I see nothing revolutionary about it.” 

Several provinces have expressed fears that the 
economic union proposal could affect their ability to 
legislate programs to aid their own citizens. 

4 

Pact for builders 
‘best in country’ 


Government pension 
index limit boosted 


VANCOUVER (CP) — A 
tentative two-year agree¬ 
ment was reached Tuesday 
night between the Con¬ 
struction Labor Relations 
Association and unions rep¬ 
resenting 45,000 B.C. con¬ 
struction workers. 

Settlement came follow¬ 
ing a marathon bargaining 
session under mediator 
Clark Gilmore. 

The package provides for 
a two-year wage increase 
of $3.35 an hour and geo¬ 
graphical certification on 


the contentious issue of 
union affiliations. 

Roy Gauthier of the 
Building Trades Joint 
Council said the package 
was the best in the country 
and his organization was 
satisfied. 

Association president 
Chuck McVeigh said the 
settlement was more 
money than the companies 
or the provincial economy 
could afford, but an expen 
sive settlement was the 
only solution short of a 
strike. 


The B.C. Government 
Employees’ Union and the 
government have reached 
agreement on future pen¬ 
sion plans with what 
amounts to virtually full in¬ 
dexing still in place. 

Provincial Secretary 
Evan WOffe introduced tfie 
agreement in the form of 
amended legislaton Tues¬ 
day. The legislation was 
welcomed by BCGEU head 
John Fryer as a victory of 
reason. 

The BCGEU had protest¬ 
ed earlier proposed legisla¬ 
tion and demanded a sec¬ 
ond look. The government 
agreed to the second look 
and for the past several 
weeks has been in close 
consultation with the union 
to come up with Tuesday’s 
answers. 

One of the main union 
objections was that the 
original legislation would 
have placed an eight-per¬ 
cent ceiling on indexing, 
meaning that however high 
the cost of living rose, pen¬ 
sions would rise a maxi¬ 
mum of eight per cent. 

In the amended legisla¬ 
tion presented to the Legis¬ 
lature on Tuesday no spe¬ 
cific indexing ceiling is 
.mentioned, but union offi¬ 
cials say it is so high as to 
be non-existent. Other 
sources suggest the ceiling 
agreed to is between 12 and 
15 per cent. . 

Other major changes in 
the amended legislation 
would establish a consulta¬ 
tive committee of govern¬ 
ment and union officials; 
change the distribution of 
contributions from em¬ 
ployees; and provide that in 
future when an employee 


quits and takes a refund the 
matching employer contri¬ 
bution will remain in the 
pension fund rather than be 
returned to general reven- 
euc. 

Wolfe said the changes 
.had one fundartental p jo- 
pose — "to ensure that pen¬ 
sions promised to emv 
ployees will be secure in 
the future." 

The change in the distri¬ 
bution of employee contri¬ 
butions provides that the 


seven per cent now contri¬ 
buted will be allocated 5% 
per cent to the pension fund 
itself, l'/, per cent to fi¬ 
nance indexing. 

School teachers, who 
were also challenging the 
earlier pension legislation, 
So not'appear to be includ¬ 
ed in the amendments, al¬ 
though their professional 
association has been in¬ 
formed that it, too, will be 
welcome to nominate a 
member to sit on the con¬ 
sultative committee. 


INSIDE 


Actor Sellers 
fights for life 

—Page 3 

Gnome-spotting 
isn’t simple 

—Page 7 

Soviet swimmer 
shatters barrier 

—Page 13 


Yearling sells 
for $1.7 million 

—Page 21 


Radiation data 
‘manipulated’ 

—Page 26 


Sports 


Four blasts 
blow silence 
of St. Helens 


VANCOUVER, Wash. 
(AP) — Mount St. 
Helens broke a six-week 
silence with four tower¬ 
ing ash eruptions Tues¬ 
day after a series of in¬ 
creasingly frequent 
earthquakes, the U.S. 
Geological Survey said. 

A pyroclastic flow of su¬ 
perheated gas, ash and 
rock also rolled down the 
north slope of the mountain 
reaching to Spirit Lake, the 
survey said. 

There were no immedi¬ 
ate reports of injuries. 

Residents of Cougar, 
about 24 kilometres south¬ 
west of the volcano, were 
being evacuated. 

A mushroom-shaped 
cloud of ash towered to a 
height of 14,000 metres in 
the first eruption at 5:14 
p.m., the National Weather 
Service reported. 

It said the ash was head¬ 
ing north-northeast toward 
many of the eastern Wash¬ 
ington areas blanketed by 
ash during the mountain's 
first massive eruption on 
May 18. 

A second eruption Tues¬ 
day came at about 6:25 
p.m., with a darker cloud 
and larger plume rising to 
above 15,000 metres, said 
Carl Burgeson, spokesman 
for Gifford Pinchot Nation¬ 
al Forest. 

A third plume appeared 
shortly after 7 p.m., fol¬ 
lowed by a fourth blast at 
about 7:20 p.m. 

Within an hour of the first 
eruption, observers in a 
U.S. Forest Service plane 
reported that a lava dome 
which had been slowly 
growing in the crater since 
the last eruption June 12 
appeared to have a hole 
blown through it. 

“It looks like it blew its 
core,” said Phil Cogan of 
the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency. 

A Forest Service spokes¬ 
man said 120 firefighters 
Page 2—It’s got 


Tidal theory 
left in ashes 

Tuesday’s eruption of Mount St. Helens came 11 
days after the period of maximum tidal pull in the 
area this month, blowing a hole in a theory that eruptions 
might be indirectly related to monthly tidal peaks. 

However, the seismologists’ jury is still out on the 
case. The latest series of four eruptions which started at 
5:14 p.m. might have been at a time of daily tidal peak, 
said Dr. Garry Rogers, of the Pacific Geoscience Centre 
at Pat Bay. 

Rogers believes the stronger pull of gravity from the 
sun and moon when they are aligned with earth could be 
the "straw that breaks the camel’s back” when an 
eruption is imminent. 

The Pat Bay centte’s seismographs began rec¬ 
ording renewed but moderate quake activity in the 
Mount St. Helens area at the weekend, he said, with 
several registering Richter 2.5 to 3, but the mountain 
was relatively quiet Tuesday, at least until shortly 
after 5 p.m. 

A weather office official said Vancouver Islanders 
need not worry about the possibility of ash being 
dumped in this area because the upper flow of air 
was from the southwest to the northeast. 

At 8 p.m. Tuesday, the official said, reports were 
being received of ash being visible or falling at Wen 
atchee, Yakima and Moses Lake, all north to northeast 
of the volcano. 

A number of Victorians who drove to area vantage 
points to see whether the eruption's 10-mile-high cloud of 
ash and steam was visible may or may not have been 
disappointed. 

Shortly after 7 p.m., a thin, flat grey cloud could 
be seen poking above the sea haze in the general 
direction of Seattle, which is approximately in a line 
with Mount St. Helens and Victoria. 


Run over twice 


VANCOUVER (CP)—A 
man was charged Tuesday 
with attempted murder 
after a firenfan was run, 
over twice by a car. . 

Police said the fireman 
spoke to a driver whose 
vehicle was blocking the 
driveway to a fire hall. 


The car driver rammed 
the truck, knocking off a 
door and hitting the fire¬ 
man. The driver left, then 
sped b3ck and ran over 
Fireman Ross Edward, 
who suffered a broken 
hand and foot. 

Yui Man Cheng, 38, was 
charged. 


First tyee entered 
from Nootka area 

—King Fisherman, 31 

Angry Fraser hits 
shipbuilding cuts 

—Page 32 

House passes 
pipeline bill 

r—Page 33 

Bridge 30 

Business 6-9 

Classified 41-50 

Comics 40 

Crossword 28 

Editorials 4 

Entertainment 38,39 

King Fisherman 31 

Letters 5 

Living 27-30 

Marine Calendar 32 

Medical 30 

Names in the News 52 

Provincial Court 37 


Rapids claim victim, 
second in two weeks 


NANAIMO — A popular swimming 
spot on the Nanaimo River has claimed its 
second life in two weeks. 

A 24-year-old Nanaimo man was 
drowned at the White Rapids area of the 
river Monday afternoon, nearly the same 
spot that a 19-year-old man lost his life 
July 8. 

Police had still not released the name 
of the second victim Tuesday evening, but 


said that the man was drowned after he 
lost his grip on a rope across the river and 
was swept into the rapids. 

Eric Ericson, 425 Wharton, Nanaimo, 
drowned two weeks ago when he was 
swept into the rapids, and his body was not 
recovered until several days later. 

RCMP were able to locate the body of 
Monday’s victim shortly after the in¬ 
cident. 


Air controllers using 
‘blackmail’ on pilots 


12-14,16, 21-23 


QUEBEC (UPC) — 
Many Canadian air traffic 
controllers practise a type 
of “blackmail" on pilots 
who question their actions, 
a federal inquiry into avia 


B.C . dental plan minus some teeth 


VANCOUVER (UPC) - The 
long promised B.C government 
dental care plan will exclude the 
general public, but children up 
to 14 years old. senior citizens 
and welfare recipients will bene 
fit. Health Minister Kafe Mair 
announced Wednesday 
Mair said the plan, to go into 
effect Jan I. IWH. would rover 
about 9I54M British Columbians 
and cost the government 6U5 3 
million in its first year of opera 
lion 

Coverage would be limited to 


children up to 14, people over 65 
and those who now have their 
medical plan payments paid by 
the provincial government. 

The plan will not provide 
“some measure of protection" to 
all British Columbians, as once 
promised 


including 
checkups, x-rays, cleaning, fluo 
ride fur children under It. ex¬ 
tractions. root canals, fillings 
gum and bone treatment and 
denture repairs. will he covered 


There will be no premiums and 
no deductible under the plan. 

For persons whose medical 
plan premiums are paid by the 
human resources ministry, and 
for those who receive assistance- 
with their premiums, the plan 
will pay for dental work, inrlud 
mg work by denturistv lo a max 
imumof $7t*ayrar 


For all other 
and children up U 14, the plan 
will pay 50 per uont of denial bibs 
i 6700 CM 


dren will also be eligible for a 
free checkup, including cleaning, 
scaling and fluoride treatment, 
once a year. 

Mair said dentists who chose to 
participate in the plan—it is op 
uooal—would be paid according 
to a fee schedule already nego 
Hated with the College of Den 
lal Surgeons of BC. 

Dentists will bill the plan, 
directly on behalf of the patient 
who will receive a copy of the 
claim form submitted by the 


Patients whose dentists do not 
take part in the plan will have to 
pay their dentist directly for the 
services, then submit a claim 
form to the plan for reim¬ 
bursement. 

Dr Ted Damage, president of 
the dental college, hailed the plan 
as a positive step forward in 
denial care. 

“We're especially pleased that 
the plan is aimed at helping those 
who need it must children se¬ 
nsor citizens and the di sad van 


tion safety was told Tues¬ 
day. 

“For many controllers, 
concern for aviation safety 
has been transformed into 
a sort of blackmail which 
unfortunately in many cir¬ 
cumstances, harms rather 
than aids air safety,” said 
Pierre Rivest, director of 
the Quebec ministry of 
transport's aviation de¬ 
partment and a pilot for 32 
years. 

“It's not unusual to see 
pilots, some even from Air 
Canada, fear going to cer¬ 
tain airports because 
they're worried about 
being bawied out or ridi 
ruled by the air traffic coo 
(roller." Rivest told the 
commission of inquiry on 
aviation safety 

Rivet*, who emphasised 
he was speaking in a per 
saaal capacity and wot at a 
official, said 
rcoatroUerx. who were 


theoretically at the pilot’s 
service, would get revenge 
on a pilot who complainrd 
about his instructions by 
“certain reprisals such as 
giving him useless and 
sometimes dangerous ma¬ 
noeuvres the next time he 
arrives at that airport.” 

Rivest said some pilots, 
especially the more inex 
perienccd, would go out of 
their way to avoid certain 
controllers, sometimes 
even risking overturning a 
plane on a muddy runway 
that had no air control rath 
er than submit to the ac 
(ions of certain contrpl 
ten. 

Rivest, who worked (or 
Transport Canada for 16 
years and has written (wo 
books on aviation, said the 
federal body’s philosophy 
rested on oar criterion 
Wail (or a tragic accident 
before taking any action 
towards safety 



































A — 


2 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 * ★ 


OFF PAGE ONE/WEATHER 


Andy Capp 





Names and figures for region 


The Capital Regional District board is made up 
of 18 directors from seven municipalities and seven 
electoral areas, representing a total population of about 
240,000 people living in 934 square miles around Victoria, 
stretching from Port Renf rew in the west to the outer Gulf 
Islands in the east. 

Directors, sitting as cither the regional board or the 
regional hospital board, meet at 1:30 p.m. on the second 
and fourth Wednesdays of every month in the board room 
on the third floor of the CRD building at 524 Yates. 

Municipalities 

Saanich three directors 15 votes 

Victoria three directors 13 votes 


Oak Bay 

one director 

4 votes 

Esquimau 

one director 

4 votes 

Central Saanich 

one director 

2 votes 

North Saanich 

one director 

1 vote 

Sidney 

one director 
Electoral areas 

2 votes 

Colwood 

one director 

2 votes 

Langford 

one director 

3 votes 

Metchosin 

one director 

1 vote 

Sooke 

one director 

2 votes 

View Royal 

one director 

1 vote 

Saltspring Island 

one director 

1 vote 

Outer Gulf Islands 

one director 

1 vote 


ON TOP OF THAT, taxpayers 
will be paying for hospitals 
through the same organization 
which meets as the Capital Re¬ 
gion Hospital Board—same 
directors, just a different bud¬ 
get. 

The directors have a third hat. 
There are times when they call 
themselves the Board of Health: 
again, same directors, same set¬ 
ting, but another budget. 

Don’t expect to find the direc¬ 
tors in those tiny Government 
Street offices. 


THEY HAVE graduated from 
there, through a suite of offices 
in Bastion Square, to their own 
three-storey building on lower 
Yates Street. 

Year by year, they enlarge 
and renovate throughout, and 
this year more expense is antici¬ 
pated to set aside part of the 
office space for a new transit 
department. 

But the decision-making abil¬ 
ity of directors has been in in 


Region: ailing scapegoat 

I From !*»£<• I I 


verse proportion to the responsi¬ 
bilities. 


TODAY, THE politicians in 
dulge in marathon meetings, 
study lengthy and often incom¬ 
prehensible reports, and defer 
decisions as long as possible. 

Some observers say a major 
reason for regional feuding is 
that each director is represent¬ 
ing a small enclave rather than 
the region as a whole. 

Representatives of the un¬ 
organized districts are sent to the 
board directly by local taxpay¬ 
ers, but municipal directors are 
council appointees. For all, the 
first loyalty has to be to the areas 
they represent. 


IT HAS BEEN suggested to 
the provincial government that 
amendments to regional legisla¬ 
tion should include a provision 
that at least the regional chair¬ 
man should be elected directly by 



personalities as it does with rep¬ 
resentation. 


Couvelier 

... Saanich interests 


regional taxpayers, and that 
there should be a return to the 
system whereby municipal can¬ 
didates wanting regional seats 
should run for election to the 
region as well as to council. 

But the bickering at the board 
level has as much to do with 


Chairman James Campbell 
still carries on a long-standing 
fight with Finance Minister Hugh 
Curtis, his predecessor as re¬ 
gional chairman. There are 
times when his apparent desire 
to take pot-shots at the provin¬ 
cial government takes prece¬ 
dence over regional needs. 


SAANICH MAYOR Mel Cou¬ 
velier and Salt Spring Island 
director Yvette Valcourt form a 
lonely little faction on the board, 
supporting each other usually in 
the face of opposition from the 
rest of the directors. 

And Couvelier has been 
known to complain about his fel¬ 
low directors from Saanich, Aid. 
John Mika and Howard Sturroek, 
because he cannqt rely on them 
to vote with him to give Saanich a 
block of votes. Mika and Stur- 
rock frequently prefer to consid¬ 
er regional implications as well 
as Saanich's parochial concerns.' 

Next: Parks, the single major 
success story of region. 



Where money came from 


Contributions toward the 
Capital Region District's 
$24-million 1980-81 budget: 


Victoria 
Saanich 
Oak Bay 
Esquimau 
Central Saanich 


$1,358,509 

$2,060,081 

$466,189 

$195,564 

$619,900 


North Saanich $592,342 Outer Gulf Islands $75,280 

Sidney $861,289 These direct requisitions 

Colwood $660,089 on local taxpayers do not 

Langford $294,747 include the budget for hos- 

Metchosin $154,583 pltals, transit levies, reven- 

Sooke $384,516 ues that offset many types 

View Royal $141,940 of expenditures, and pro- 

Saltspring Island $138,615 vincial grants. 


Birth defects Board members 
spur testing 


TORONTO (UPC) —Ra¬ 
diation tests started Tues¬ 
day on video display ter¬ 
minals in the classified 
advertising department of 
the Toronto Star, the 
Southern Ontario News¬ 
paper Guild said Tuesday. 

The Guild asked for the 
tests after learning that 
four Star women em¬ 
ployees had given birth be¬ 
tween October, 1979, and 
January, 1980, to baTfies 
with defects. 

Tests for levels of micro¬ 
wave emission and ionizing 
radiation were made by 
staff from the Ontario min¬ 
istry of labor's radiation 
department on about 40 ter¬ 
minals Tuesday and found 
“no trace of radiation,” 
said John Brooks, the news¬ 
paper’s director of commu¬ 
nications. 

“We’ve asked them to 
come back and continue 
testing of all 200," he said, 
adding that he was not sure 
how long the tests would 
take due to other, commit¬ 
ments of the testing staff. . 

Guild local representa¬ 
tive Linda Torney said 
birth defects in the four 
infants varied. 

Brooks said the guild, 
which has representation 
on a four-year-old commit¬ 
tee with management over 
computer terminal use at 
the newspaper, had ad¬ 


vised in June that defects 
had been discovered in four 
out of seven babies born to 
Star employees working in 
the advertising section. 

He said that though the 
newspaper had already 
conducted its own investi¬ 
gation and was "satisfied 
that there is no connection 
between the VDTs and the 
birth defects,” the govern¬ 
ment testing was being 
done “to make certain the 
equipment is meeting all 
safety requirements.” 


The current make-up of 
the Capital Regional board 
includes appointed direc¬ 
tors from municipalities 
and those representing 
electoral areas (* indicates 
an electoral area repre¬ 
sentative): 


•James Campbell, Outer 
Gulf Islands, chairman. 

•Al Beasley, View 
Royal. 

Mel Couvelier, Saanich 
mayor. 

Shirley Dowell, Oak Bay 
alderman. 

•Howard Drummond, 
Colwood. 

David Hill, Central Saan¬ 
ich mayor. 


Ken Hill, Esquimau 
mayor. 

•Ed Lubick, Langford. 

William McElroy, Vic¬ 
toria alderman. 

John Mika, Saanich al¬ 
derman. 

Harold Parrott, North 
Saanich alderman. 

•Don Rittaler, Sooke. 

Norma Sealey, Sidney 
mayor. 

Howard Sturroek, Saan¬ 
ich alderman. 

William Tindall, Victoria 
mayor. 

•Mae Tipton. Metchosin. 

•Yvette Valcourt, 
Saltspring Island. 

Robert Wright, Victoria 
alderman. 


‘It’s got a real beauty to it’ 


near the mountain were 
evacuated safely. The 
crews had been fighting 
fires started by the May 18 
eruption which had been 
smouldering beneath a 
blanket of ash. 

Burgeson said logging 
crews were also apparently 
out of the danger area. 

“As far as we have it, 
nobody is in the red zone,” 
the restricted area around 
the volcano. 

Because the volcano had 
remained quiet for several 
weeks, state officials in re¬ 
cent days had moved to 
reduce the red zone, loosen¬ 
ing the restrictions on pub 
lie access to areas around 
the mountain. 


pKrom Pag<» if 


Initial reports indicated 
a light ashfall in White 
Pass, 88 kilometres north¬ 
east of the peak, within an 
hour after the eruption. 

“It looks like the real 
thing,” said geologist Tim 
Hait of the Geological Sur¬ 
vey. “It’s got a real beauty 
to it.” 

Many of the communities 
in the path of the May 18 
ash fall appeared to be in 
the path of Tuesday's 
cloud, which flattened at 
the top and became anvil¬ 
shaped as it reached into 
the upper atmosphere. 



July 23, 1986 

Cloudy with sunny 
periods, \yinds fresh west¬ 
erly. Tuesday’s precipita 
tion: nil. Sunshine 14 hours 
30 minutes. Recorded high 
and low at Victoria airport 
29 and 15. Today's forecast 
high and low 22 and It. 
Today’s sunrise 5:37, sun 
set 9:02. Moonrise 5:24 
p.m., moonset 2:10 a.m. 
Thursday outlook: mainly 
cloudy. 

East coast of Vancouver 
Island — Cloudy with sunny 
periods. Winds moderate 
southeasterly. Tuesday's 
precipitation: nil. Record¬ 
ed high and low at Nanaimo 
29 and 15. Forecast high 
and low 23 and 14 Thursday 
outlook: mainly cloudy 

West coast of Vancouver 
Island — Mostly cloudy. 
Winds moderate north 
westerly. Forecast high 
and low al Tofmo 2D and 12 
Thursday outlook cloudy 

North coast of the Main 
land — Mostly < loud) 
periods of fog or drl/rie in 
the morning Winds author 


ate northwesterly. Fore¬ 
cast high and low 16 and 11. 
Thursday outlook: a few 
showers. 

Extended outlook, Fri¬ 
day through Sunday — 
Mainly cloudy , rather cool 
with chance of a few sprin¬ 
kles or occasional drizzle. 
Highs around 20. Lows near 
12 . 


Comox 

Prince Georoe 
Williams Lake 
Kamloops 
Dawson City 
Whitehorse 
Fort Nelson 
Peace River 
Yellowknife 
inuvlk * 
Seattle 
Spokane 
Portland 
San Francisco 


02 

0? 


0.3 

14.1 


St John's 

Haitian 

Fredericton 

Charlottetown 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Thunder Bay 

Kenara 


Churchill 
The Pas 
Brandon 


Saskatoon 
Prince Albert 
North Battletord 
Swift Current 
r Mat 



1? 

21 

24 

24 

23 

24 

23 

24 
24 
77 
21 
77 
2i 

31 

32 

30 

31 
31 

33 

3d 

31 

79 

33 

U 

15 
» 

16 
M 

n 

i/ 

to 


Price. 

i SJ 
• 30 


12 - 

TIDES FOR MONTH OF 
JULY 

TIDES AT VICTORIA 

ITKlwIlsledAfe 
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Major eruptions also oc¬ 
curred May 25 and June 

12 . 

Tuesday’s eruption came 
less than a day after seis¬ 
mographs at the University 
of Washington in Seattle 
recorded the first new vol¬ 
canic earthquakes beneath 
the peak in several weeks. 

Six tremblors were re¬ 
corded between 6 a.m. and 
11 a.m. By about 3 p.m. the 
quakes had increased in 
frequency to one about 
every five minutes. 

Scientists said there was 
no immediate indication of 
the meaning of the quakes. 

,No seismic activity was 
reported at Mount Hood, 72 
kilometres east of Port¬ 
land, Ore., which had rum¬ 
bled slightly in the last few 
weeks. 


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WORLD 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 3 



Canadian lobster Actor fighting for life 


Broken ship lies at jetty in Rotterdam’s oil harbor area 

Tanker refloated 


llOTTERDAM. Holland 
(UI’I) — A giant super¬ 
tanker carrying 157,ooo 
tons of crude oil split in two 
and sank in Rotterdam 
harbor Tuesday, forcing 
officials to close the 
world’s largest port. 

A potential disaster was 
averted, however, when 
salvage experts managed 
to refloat both halves of the 


ship without a major oil- 
spill in Rotterdam's Euro¬ 
port, 

Only about 10 tons of oil 
spilled from the 212.000-ton 
Energy Concentration, 
with the rest still.safely 
stored in its undamaged 
tanks, officials said. 

Deputy Port Director 
Christiaan van Krimpen 
said both halves of the ship. 


registered in Liberia and 
owned by the Golden Piek 
Maritime company of 
Hong Kong, sank when it 
split in half with an explo¬ 
sive sound. He said the 
tanker broke its back be¬ 
cause the center tanks 
were unloaded before the 
fore and aft tanks, putting 
too much weight on the 
ends of the 1,069-foot ves¬ 
sel. 


a threat to Scots 

LONDON (CP) — Scottish fishermen say cheap Cana¬ 
dian lobster imports might eventually destroy the entire 
Scottish fishing fleet. 

A spokesman for the Scottish fishermen’s organiza¬ 
tion which represents the fleet’s 6,000, men says Canada's 
cheap lobster has been ’’hanging like a noose above the 
heads of Scottish fishermen for some time" but the 
situation now is crucial and “the British government must 
lake immediate action." 

“If Canada's present surplus of fish continues to 
be exported to Britain and the continent, along with 
imports from Iceland, and Norway," says the organi¬ 
zation’s secretary Ian MacSwccn, "it could undermine 
the existence of the Scottish fishing fleet during the next 
decade." 

An estimated 75,000 pounds of lobster are being 
flown from Canada each month to Paris and Am¬ 
sterdam. MaeSwcen says they are selling for two 
pounds less per pound ($5.40) than Scottish lobster. 

British fishermen are particularly disturbed by the 
loss of the French market. 

"France was always our main market but now gour¬ 
mets there are opting for Canadian lobster at £1.50 
per pound (about $4 a pound) instead of paying £3.50 per 
pound for Scottish lobster,” says MacSween. 


Colonist nows services 

LONDON — British actor 
Peter Sellers, the funny 
man loved by millions, was 
fighting for his life Tues¬ 
day night after suffering 
another massive heart at¬ 
tack. 

The 54-year-old come¬ 
dian collapsed in his suite 
at the Dorchester Hotel. He 
was given mouth-to-moulh 
resuscitation and sped by 
ambulance to the Middle¬ 
sex Hospital. 

A hospital spokesman 
said that Sellers suffered a 
cardiac arrest. “He is in 
the intensive care unit and 
our doctors are fighting to 
save his life. It is too early 
for us yet to say anything 
more positive. He is grave¬ 
ly ill.” 

The actor's fourth wife, 
Lynne Frederick, was fly¬ 
ing to Sellers’ bedside from 



Sellers 

... massive attack 

California. She is 29 years 
his junior., 

Sellers suffered his first 
and massive heart attack 
in 196-1 immediately after 
his marriage to Swedish 


blonde beauty Britt Ek- 
land, his second wife. He 
was said to have “clinically 
died" eight times after 
being stricken. 

Other, less severe at¬ 
tacks followed and in 1977 
he was fitted with a heart 
pacemaker, which me¬ 
chanically regulates the 
heartbeat. 

Last May, Sellers spent 
six days in a Dublin hospi¬ 
tal after what doctors said 
was a mild heart attack. 

The battle forSellers’ life 
began in his suite at the 
Dorchester Hotel where the 
actor was awaiting a re¬ 
union with Spike Milligan 
and Harry Sccombe, with 
whom he made radio his¬ 
tory a generation ago in a 
series known as The Goon 
Show to fans. 


Italian gay sent home 
after Moscow arrest 


MILAN, Italy (AP) — An 
Italian homosexual arrest¬ 
ed when he tried to demon 
strale in Moscow's Red 
Square returned to Italy 
with his tour group Tues¬ 


day and claimed he had 
been roughed up by Soviet 
police. 

“I’m tired and hungry, 
but above all 1 need to see a 
doctor," said Enso Fran- 


Bloody conflict 
raging in Chad 


PARIS (AP) — One of the 
bloodiest conflicts in the 
world is raging in the 
north-central African 
country Chad. 

Chad's civil war pits 
rival Moslem factions in a 
struggle for national domi¬ 
nance. The conflict is com¬ 
plicated by a Christian fac¬ 
tion and alleged Libyan 
involvement, as well as a 
hands-off attitude by Afri¬ 
can states. 

Unconfirmed reports 
reaching Paris on Tuesday 
listed casualties at 3,000 
dead and 7.000 wounded 
since March 22, when civil 
strife erupted. 

Following the failure Of 
mediation attempts by sev- 


Killer Joe 

ravages 

thousands 

MANILA (AP) — Ty¬ 
phoon Joe destroyed thou¬ 
sands of homes in the 
northern Phillipines before 
crossing the South China 
Sea to thrash Hong Kong 
today, where it killed two 
people and injured 54, au¬ 
thorities said. 

Officials said the storm, 
which battered the north¬ 
ern Philippines with 160-ki- 
lometre-an-hour winds, left 
eight fishermen missing 
and wrecked about 5.000 
homes. 

Thousands of other 
homes and apartments 
were seriously damaged, 
relief officials said. 

To the north. Joe blasted 
the British colony of Hong 
Kong, knocking anchored 
ships adrift in the harbor, 
launching landslides and 
felling trees. 


BUILDING A NEW 
HOME? . . . then 
you’ll want the best. 
See page 28 lor more 
information. ,a 


oral African nations. Presi¬ 
dent Goukouni Oueddei is 
locked in a struggle to save 
his year-old government 
from a challenge by his 
former defence minister, 
Hissene Habre. 

The situation remains a 
standoff despite 17 weeks 
of vicious combat that has 
„ forced most of the capital 
N’Djamena's 180,000 citi¬ 
zens to flee into the bush or 
cross the Chari River into 
Cameroon. 


cone, a 32-year-old mem¬ 
ber of the Italian gay rights 
group FUORI 

He was seized by waiting 
plainclothes police Monday 
when he tried to chain him¬ 
self to a fence near St. 
Basil's Cathedral to protest 
Soviet laws making homo¬ 
sexuality a crime and the 
imprisonment of two Rus¬ 
sians pn charges of homo¬ 
sexuality. 

Francone showed report¬ 
ers a bruise on his right leg 
that he said he received 
during his detention. 

Italian Embassy offi¬ 
cials in Moscow said Fran¬ 
cone was questioned for 
two hours at a police sta¬ 
tion off Red Square. 
Among other things', the 
police asked whether he 
had made contact with 
Russian dissidents or West¬ 
ern news correspondents. 

Francone was delivered 
to his tour group when it 
flew back to Milan Tues¬ 
day. 


Whale 

hunt 

will 

goon 


BRIGHTON, Eng¬ 
land (AP) — While 
protesters outside 
chanted to save the 
whale, the Internation¬ 
al Whaling Commis¬ 
sion on Tuesday ap¬ 
proved continued 
hunting of the world’s 
largest creature. 

The move favors 
whaling countries such 
as Japan and the So¬ 
viet Union. The vole 
was on whether to ban 
all eommerpial whal¬ 
ing. 

Thirteen countries 
supported the ban but 
nine, including Can¬ 
ada, opposed it and two 
abstained. Eighteen 
yes votes were needed 
for passage. 


Sadat slams Jerusalem plan 


CAIRO (AP) — Presi¬ 
dent Anwar Sadat, in a na¬ 
tionally televised speech 
Tuesday, attacked Israel’s 
plan to make Jerusalem its 
capital and delivered a 
strong denunciation of the 
Soviet Union. 

Speaking from his sum¬ 
mer retreat in Alexandria, 
he said the Arab zone of 
East Jerusalem should be 
part of an autonomous 
West Bank of the Jordan 
River and plans by the Is¬ 
raeli government to change 


the status of Jerusalem 
should be considered “null 
and void." 

Israel annexed East 
Jerusalem after the 1967 
war, when it also seized the 
West Bank and Gaza strip, 
and the Israeli parliament 
now is discussing a propos¬ 
al to formally declare the 
entire city of Jerusalem as 
the capital of the Jewish 
state. 

Sadat repeated the Egyp¬ 
tian stand in the Egyptian- 
Israeli peace talks that the 
1.2 million Palestinians liv¬ 


ing in the West Bank and 
Gaza strip be given full 
autonomy. He also said ex¬ 
isting and planned Jewish 
settlements in the occupied 
territories are illegal. 

But he devoted most of 
his speech to criticism of 
the Soviet Union for Its in 
terventioh in Afghanistan 
which, like Egypt, is over- 
whelminly Moslem. 

“We will not permit any 
Soviet aggression against 
any Arab or Moslem coun¬ 


try and there will be no 
normal relations between 
Egypt and the Soviets as 
long as they are occupying 
a Moslem country," Sadat 
said. 

Egypt, preparing "for 
any eventuality,” has 
asked the United States for 
additional combat planes 
and military experts to cut 
down the training program 
for Egyptian pilots to three 
months from two years, he 
said. 


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Z \)c SJailn Colonist. 


Published every mornlno except 
I OCO Monday by Canadian Newspapers 1QQA 
AOtJO Company Limited at 2621 Doyqlas XJ/OU 
Street. Victoria, B.C . V8W 2N4. 


RICHARD BOWER 
Publisher and Editor-in-chief 


DON VIPOND 
Associate Editor 


DAVID A. BROWN 
Acting Managing Editor 


COMMENT/BACKGROUND 


■T- 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1980 


We are 
two peoples 

The political voice of British Columbia has 
become too shrill in this summer of federal- 
provincial debates, this season of haggling 
over the constitution in general and the taxing 
of resource wealth in particular. 

Our country is in the throes of an historic 
bargaining session, of trying to draft a con¬ 
tract which will equitably guide and govern all 
its distant and dissimilar parts, not just for a 
year or two but indefinitely. It is hard bargain¬ 
ing because political empires are at stake. 

Our provincial government needs remind¬ 
ing of its dual role. We are two peoples, 
residents of this^province and citizens of this 
nation. Just which government will be able tax 
resources how much is an issue within the 
more significant exercise of rewriting the 
constitution. 

To be sure, Premier Bennett wants to 
guard the traditional provincial jurisdiction 
over natural resources. Certainiy it is galling 
to find the lustful eye of Ottawa on our natural 
gas exports, to feel the grasping hands of that 
Trudeau crowd which has annually overspent 
the country for more than a decade. But so 
forcefully is the Bennett government espous¬ 
ing its particular interests, through meetings 
with the Alberta cabinet and potshots at fed¬ 
eral cabinet members, it appears to have 
forgotten its other role, its more important 
role as a partner in renewing confederation. 

A Gallup poll shows only 16 per cent of 
western Canadians think the provinces should 
have exclusive control over resources. A 
whopping 70 per cent believe control should be 
shared between federal and provincial govern¬ 
ments. 

The government of British Columbia and 
Alberta should not look for a fat referendum 
majority to someday support them on the 
resource control issue. It won’t be there. 


f 


ime 


the great healer 

There is something both humbling and 
inspiring in what scientists have found as they 
study a mass extinction of life on earth 
which occurred about 65 million years ago. 

The latest development in a continuing 
probe of this ancient mystery comes after the 
research ship Glomar Challenge r extracted a 
1,050-foot core from the ocean bed in the South 
Atlantic. Dr. John LaBrecque of Columbia 
University’s Lamont-Doherty Geological Ob¬ 
servatory and Dr. Kenneth Hsu of the Geologi¬ 
cal Institute of Zurich reported fossils in 
this sedimentary core show that whatever so 
rudely interrupted the pattern of life on earth 
did so abruptly, in geological terms. 

The core showed that surface organisms 
such as one-celled sea animals called Fora- 
minifera were thriving, with no signs of im¬ 
pending crisis, whenThey were wiped out. 

Other scientists have estimated that 
three-quarters of land and sea species were 
eliminated during this period of mass extinc¬ 
tion at the end of the Cretaceous period. 

Shortly after the mass extinction single¬ 
cell plants known as Thoracosphaera became 
the dominant life form on the surface of the 
world’s oceans. While the duration of this 
extinction process may have been consider¬ 
ably less than 100,000 years, say the scientists, 
it took several millions of years before life 
forms in the surface water diversified to 
match what was there before. 

Numbers in the millions slide off the 
consciousness. But this research should re¬ 
mind us how incidental is man in nature’s 
record book. And it offers assurance, welcome 
in the nuclear age, that no matter how we 
brutalize this world, in the course of time—a 
very long time to be sure—life will rise again. 


Exploring the case of the mystery flash 


WASHINGTON — Was there a 
secret nuclear explosion last Sept. 22 
off the coast ofSouth Africa that U.S. 
intelligence failed to record? Or did 
Washington know about it and just not 
want to tell? 

Developments here leave the ease 
of the mystery flash unresolved, and 
raise questions about U.S. foreign 
policy, the credibility of American 
surveillance, and its ability to moni 
tor violations of SALT II, when and if 
that treaty is signed. 

Last week the Pentagon leaked the 
report of the Defence Intelligence 
Agency, which concluded that the 
explosion probably was from a clan¬ 
destine nuclear test. Then the White 
House hurriedly convened a back¬ 
ground briefing revealing that its 
own specially appointed panel of 
distinguished scientists had conclud¬ 
ed that the Sept. 22 incident probably 
wasn’t caused by a nuclear explosion. 
Instead, they said, the most likely 
explanation was that it was a freak 
natural disturbance that fooled the 
United States’ Vela spy satellite— 
no easy task, because the satellite has 
correctly spotted nuclear explosions 
41 out of 41 times in the past. 

If it seems odd that the Carter 
administration is opposing the find¬ 
ings of its own Defence Intelligence 
Agency, such intra-bureaucratic 
wrangling is but one of the many 
anomalies in a story that, like a 
tantalizing unsolved mystery, lin¬ 
gers on. 

At first it seemed relatively sim¬ 
ple, if alarming, when last October 
the story was leaked to ABC-TV that 
an American satellite had detected a 
nuclear blast off the coast of South 
Africa for which no nation would 
take responsibility. Many experts 
suspected Pretoria. 

The leak forced the Carter admin- 


0N YOUR flARK 

^scn... 


Robert Manning and Stephen Talbot 

Los Angeles Times News Service 


istration to reveal what it had suc¬ 
cessfully kept under wraps for five 
weeks—that the Vela spy satellite 
had spotted a possible nuclear blast. 

Why had the incident been kept 
under wraps? 

Little by little, leak by leak, pieces 
of the puzzle began to emerge. At first 
the White House suggested that the 
satellite had malfunctioned. But later 
the administration revealed that it 
responded normally to all tests, and 
was in fine working order. 

There was another curious aspect 
to the case— there was an absence 
of any lingering radioactive debris. 
By itself, this did not mean that no nu¬ 
clear blast had occurred. There have 
been many confirmed nuclear blasts 
where no radioactivity was detected. 

Furthermore, the administration 
did not bother to search for radioac¬ 
tive fallout until three days after 
the satellite sighting—time enough 
for the wind to blow it around in the 
vast, remote and poorly monitored 
area at the bottom of the world. 

There was, however, a potentially 
corroborative sighting by the world’s 
largest radiotelescope located in Are- 
cibo, Puerto Rico. At the same time 
that the Vela satellite reported sight¬ 
ing a nuclear blast, the Arecibo 
telescope recorded an unusual ionos¬ 
pheric ripple. 

While it could have been caused by 
an earthquake or electrical storm, 
scientists at the laboratory confirm 
that there were no detected earth¬ 
quakes at that time, and that it was a 
relatively calm evening. An atmos¬ 
pheric disturbance such as that de¬ 
tected by the Arecibo telescope often 
is produced by nuclear blasts. 




Road crackdoum saves Israelis 


Dial Torgerson 


JERUSALEM — Israel, long 
known for having the deadliest traffic 
in the world, has managed in the past 
five months to cut traffic deaths 
almost in half. 

Visitors who know what traffic 
used to be like now stare amazed at 
Israeli motorists following one an¬ 
other down the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 
expressway at the 55 mile-an-hour 
limit, driving with what seems to be 
prudence and caution. 

There were those who thought that 
Israeli driving, which claimed 12,700 
lives in the last 30 years, was a symp¬ 
tom of a darker side of the Israeli 
personality. 

All experts agree that the stress of 
life in Israel—a small country, isolat¬ 
ed, almost surrounded by enemies, 
subject to frequent wars, with over¬ 
crowded cities and a mulitudinous 
bureaucracy—finds expression in the 
way Israelis drive. 

What, then, has happened? Why do 
motorists now slam to a halt to let a 


pedestrian use the crosswalk on Jeru 
salem’s Jaffa Road? There is still 
stress at work. But now the stress is 
provided by the Israeli police. 

An elaborate education program 
has accompanied the police crack¬ 
down, but Israeli drivers admit it 
is the fear of a traffic ticket that has 
changed them from maniacs to mil¬ 
quetoasts. 

Until 1979, the maximum fine for a 
moving violation was $150. Now it is 
$2,000. A driver who runs a stop sign 
no longer faces a maximum $40 
fine; a judge can now fine him 
up to $100. Two such violations can- 
mean suspension of a driver’s licence 
for two or three months. 

Minister of Transport Chaim Lan¬ 
dau launched the traffic safety cam¬ 
paign soon after he took over in 
January 1979, making road safe¬ 
ty one of the top priorities of his 
ministry. 

Los Anoeies Times News Service 


Over the next few months, the 
circumstantial evidence began topile 
up. For example, in January the CIA 
told selected members of Congress 
that, on the evening of the suspect¬ 
ed blast, the South African navy was 
conducting secret manoeuvres in this 
same area. 

Then, on Feb. 21, CBS News re¬ 
ported that it was Israel that explod¬ 
ed the bomb, with South African 
co-operation. Two years ago, the CIA 
concluded that Israel had a nuclear 
capability as early as 1974. 

In March, a BBC-TV documentary 
suggested that the blast was an Is¬ 
raeli neutron bomb tested .with South 
African co-operation. Previously, Is¬ 
rael sold to South Africa gunshlps 
equipped with missiles capable of 
launching a nuclear bomb. 

Moreover, South Africa had illicit¬ 
ly bought rocket launchers from a 
U.S. firm, Space Research Corp. of 
Vermont, whose executives were re¬ 
cently convicted and sentenced for 
violating the arms embargo imposed 
on South Africa. 

These weapons are used to launch 
tactical nuclear weapons in Europe, 
and the neutron warhead (two to 
four kilotons, the same size as the 
suspected blast) fits onto these 
weapons. And, since the neutron 
bomb is an atomic weapon whose 
radiation dissipates quickly, it would 
be more difficult to detect. 

Many of the most conservative 
experts, such as Gen. George Kee¬ 
gan, the former head of Air Force 
intelligence, stand behind the nu¬ 
clear-blast explanation. Keegan has 
said that he suspects an Israeli- 
South African joint effort. 


Another key question in this detec¬ 
tive story is: Who had what motives? 

The intelligence agencies have no 
axes to grind as far as either Israel or 
South Africa is concerned, nor would 
they have an interest in embarrass¬ 
ing the White House. They do have an 
interest in the credibility of Ameri¬ 
can surveillance, however. 

Such a technical failure might 
raise questions about SALT II verifi¬ 
cation—not to mention the chilling 
thought that, if the Sept. 22 suspected 
nuclear blast went almost undetect¬ 
ed, how many others have gone or will 
go undetected? 

For the Carter administration, 
confirmation of a secret nuclear 
blast by South Africa and-or Israel 
would have ominous repercussions. 

South Africa’s nuclear prowess is 
largely a product of 23 years of co-op¬ 
eration with the United States, which 
provided that country with nuclear 
fuel, key technology and training for 
its scientists. 

State Department officials have 
said that if such a nuclear blast were 
confirmed, it would leave an indelible 
stain on U.S. relations with the Third 
World. 

Perhaps most frightening, if Is¬ 
rael and South Africa have indeed 
secretly joined the world's exclu¬ 
sive nuclear club, it might trigger an 
atomic arms race throughout Africa 
and the Middle East. 

In the face of such circumstantial 
evidence, the White House's alterna¬ 
tive explanation—that a tiny meteor¬ 
oid either caused a glint of light to 
trigger the satellite's sensors or ac¬ 
tually collided with it—is not particu¬ 
larly convincing. 

The first possibility has a proba¬ 
bility factor of one in a billion, ac¬ 
cording to White House officials close 
to the investigation. The latter hap¬ 
pens “every 10, 20 or 30 years.” 



The land is bright 


The Globe and Mail 


.Some things have not changed in 
the 75 years since Alberta and Saskat¬ 
chewan entered Confederation as 
provinces. A clear night sky over the 
Palliser Triangle is still awesomely 
enveloping, boundless, endless and 
ageless, dripping with ripe stars that 
hang low enough to touch. A Chinook 
arch, looking east toward Calgary, 
still makes and keeps its astonishing 
promise. Prairie wool, where you 
can find it, is still the most sinfully 
silky of grasses. And an expanse of 
ripening wheat is still as full of 
movement and fascination as an 
ocean. 

But elsewhere all is change, and 
change that comes on at a gallop. 
Farm cash receipts in Saskatchc-, 
wan, $2,820 million last year, still bulk 
large in the province’s accounts (as 
on the plus side of Canada's balance 
of payments). But they now have 
$1,814.7-million worth of mineral pro¬ 
duction and $l,574.7-million in fac¬ 
tory shipments (both for the first 10 
months of last year) to help support a 
thriving and diversifying economy. 
It’s no secret that Alberta's agricul¬ 
tural production, still substantial, 
was overtaken long ago by oil output. 
What’s new is the secondary indus¬ 
try, petrochemicals, machinery and 
construction that contributed an in¬ 
creasing share to an Alberta gross 
domestic product of $28,9«7-million 
last year. 

The movement is still strongly 
upward. Saskatchewan's potash in¬ 
dustry is expanding; its huge ura¬ 
nium reserves have hardly been 
scratched. The push from the high- 
rise towers in Edmonton is toward the 
frontier of research, development, 
high technology. a 

This growth has been dramatic. 
But it has not been surprising, not at 
least to anyone familiar with the 75 
years of history these two provinces 
are celebrating this year. Saskatche¬ 
wan and Alberta began and grew as 
the far frontier of Canada’s de¬ 
velopment westward from Ontario 
and Quebec—settlement of British 
Columbia moved inward from the 
coast. And although the nature of that 
frontier has changed, they are still at 
its cutting edge. 


Furs, timber and wheat, in that 
order, are what Canada was made of. 
Each in its turn was the staple ex¬ 
port with which Canada paid its way. 
The federal capital, set in the logging 
camp of Bytown on the Rideau, is a 
monument to the age of timber. But 
as it was built the real burden of 
paying Canada’s bills was moving 
west, to be taken on and carried for 
generations by the homesteaders who 
plowed the prairies. 

It was wheat grown by immi¬ 
grants in sheepskin coats and sod 
huts that provided the foreign ex¬ 
change to pay for the late Victorian 
and early Edwardian walnut and ma¬ 
hogany that ornamented the impos¬ 
ing brick mansions on the main 
streets of eomforta’ble southern On¬ 
tario manufacturing towns. The peo¬ 
ple in the brick mansions found 
that hard to remember. The people in 
the sod huts, and their descendants, 
found it impossible to forget. Their 
political history, radical, innovative 
and militant, is the history of a 
fight for a fairer share of the power 
and wealth of the country their har¬ 
vests built. 

Their new political movements, 
the Co-operative Commonwealth 
Federation in Saskatchewan, Social 
Credit in Alberta, were as different in 
philosophy as a grain farmer from a 
cattleman. But both emphasized 
community co-operation, self-help 
arid, above all, resistance to the 
power exercised in government of¬ 
fices or corporate boardrooms half a 
continent away. 

The fight took them at times dose 
to despair, in the ordeal of dust and 
depression in the thirties. It has more 
recently, with the help of oil, potash 
and uranium, left sod-hut austerity 
behind, far behind. If once they got 
less than their share of sympathy, 
they may now be getting more than 
their share of envy. True, they now 
have a lot that is enviable. But they 
sweated for it themselves. And for 
that, after 75 years that were occa¬ 
sionally tragic, occasionally heroic 
and always creative and energetic, 
what they really deserve is congratu¬ 
lations. 




The Egyptian military 
under Major-General Mo¬ 
hammed Naguib began 
moving againsf the throne 
28 years ago today—in I»S 2 
— and forced the abdica¬ 
tion of King Farouk three 
days later. The following 
year Naguib became the 
first president and premier 
of the new republic. 


SCOOPS 


WELL. IT LOOKS LIKE WtCMUMA 
FUU WKK OF SAS AMP POOP OK M mi... 



1621 — The Virginia col- 
lony was granted the New 
World’s first written con¬ 
stitution. 

1847 — Mormons arrived 
at Great Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

1870 — The first railway 
car from the Pacific Coast 
reached New York. 


by DougSneyd 


POT HOT IN TU£ SAAIf VYEfK. 




I come from a family of pioneers. 

My mother invented guilt in 1936. 

My dad dedicated his life to trying to get nail holes 
in the wall to heal them¬ 
selves. 

And according to my chil¬ 
dren, I introduced the word 
"No" to the Western world. 

(Before that time parents 
used “We'll see ") Their 
theory is that at first I only 
used the word to get atten¬ 
tion. Then I started to enjoy 
it and today it’s such a habit I 
say "No" before they even 
ask the question. 

It's a distinction I don't deserve. I am not the first 
mother in North America to use the word “No." In 
fact, there is no doubt in my mind that when 
historians decipher cave markings of prehistoric 
cave dwellers and discover etched In a rock a 
plaintive, "Mom 1 Can I eat the leftover bear?" her 
response chiselled below will translate into, "No! 
I'm saving it for lunch!” 

The word "No" is finally gaining the respectabili 
(y among child psychologists it has so long de 
served, home of them are at last spreading the word 
that "No" means love and character building 

When I told my kids this, they said they already 
had more character than Ml Rush more 

They never und ers too d me They always thought 1 
got seme kind of a cheap thrill uni of saying. "No. 
yon can't drift down the Ohio River in a 


r 


Erma Bombeck 


dishpan," and watching them fall over furniture, 
staring at me with the contempt usually re¬ 
served fora mother who picks her children up by the 
ears. 

I don't expect anyone to ever fully appreciate that 
a mother makes more decisions in one morning than 
the Supreme Court makes in three years. 

“Can I borrow your camera to take to a beach 
party?" 

“You wanta chaperone our three-day-two-night 
prom?” 

“Can I pierce the dog's ears?" 

"Will you tell me where you hid the book that con¬ 
denses every novel ever written so I won't have to 
read this whole book tonight for my report?" 

"Can 1 wear what I’ve got on?" 

"Can’t I slay here for a week by myself?" 

“Do you want me to grow up hating you?" 

1 went shopping with my daughter the other day 
and as 1 pulled on a bathing suit I turned around and 
said. "What do you think? Should I buy it?" She 
shook her head and said, "No." 

"Why not?" I demanded * 

"Because your entire body looks like it needs 
pressing in it I'm saying no because I love you and it 
will build your character " 

Somehow. it sounded better when I said It 




V 




































u 


OPINION/LETTERS 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 5 



Gorde 

Hunter 

One man's 
opinion 


Ah yes, what is the distance from home plate to 
the rubber in centimetres? Sports such as baseball, 
football and yes, golf, will never succumb to the 
metric madness. I should qualify the golf bit in that 
Uplands and Glen Meadows use the metric dis¬ 
tances, which puts them in rather rarlfied stand 
ins—in that the golf courses of Europe do not use 
anything other than yardage. These local courses, 
then, are being made to look foolish. 

Anyway, this department has had dozens of 
calls and letters from citizens hostile to metric and 
most of them feel at a loss to do anything against the 
unwanted intrusion. No place to turn, nobody to 
carry the ball. Their spleen is vented individually 
rather than in a co-ordinated manner with others of 
their persuasion. I have an address tor them this 
morning. 

There is an operation called Operation Humbug 
headed by an engineer name of Koyce Rich from 
Vancouver. Address is, 2460-A Marine Drive, West 
Vancouver, B.C. V7V 1L1. 

This group, as you have undoubtedly guessed, is 
four square against the humbug of metric. Royce 
Rich likens metricators to a fifth column that has 
infiltrated every level of government and every 
business and professional organization. 

“THEIR METHOD,” Rich writes, “is to con¬ 
vince the top echelon that metric is either manda¬ 
tory, desirable or inevitable, none of which is true. 
The rank and file, those who are expected to use this 
foreign system with its cumbersome units, are 
seldom if ever consulted. If you belong to any 
business or professional organization you will prob¬ 
ably find someone higher up has agreed to metrie- 
ate. Thus the Metric Commission can claim that 
conversion is proceeding voluntarily." 

Obviously he is correct. He is correct in assum¬ 
ing somebody in power at this newspaper, for 
instance, or in our local radio stations, said go ahead 
chaps, use metric—use it even although three-quar¬ 
ters of our readers and/or listeners have no idea 
what we are writing or talking about. This news¬ 
paper and the radio stations, do not service their 
customers by the use of metric measurements or 
Celsius readings. They confuse them. 

"Their motivation is diverse," Rich continues. 
"Some are true believers who think this conversion 
will lead to universal harmony, solving ail the 
problems of the world. Others, with a lust for power, 
enjoy Inflicting this unpopular system on a long 
suffering public. The majority, whether govern 
ment bureaucrats or private sector metrication 
officers, are motivated by the desire to retain their 
lucrative positions. Their objective Is clear—to 
eliminate every vestige of the Imperial system of 
weights and measures from our culture." 

There is no question in my mind of the unpopu 
larity of metric, with my guess running to as high as 
70 per cent of the population. And these figures arc- 
justified by opinion polls from all parts of Canada 
and the United States. 

“WE KNOW the vast majority of Americans 
and Canadians are opposed to metrication,” Rich 
continues, “but if this majority remains silent, it 
will Inevitably be forced upon us. It is essential our 
supporters write and write—to politicians, to the 
media and to business and industry. Write to the 
management of your department and food stores. 
Tell them you don't want metric. Some of the large 
chains in Ontario have indicated they arc willing to 
fight. If you are as unhappy with metric as we are, 
you will do your utmost for this crusade." 

I give you the fundamental issues as seen by 
Operation Humbug: 

The implementation of metrication without 
consulting the people and without parliamentary 
debate makes a farce of the democratic process. 

The absolute prohibition of the use of any 
non-metric units is an infringement of our freedom 
of choice. 

The "inherent simplicity” of the metric system 
is greatly exaggerated. The metric units, particu¬ 
larly the metre, are cumbersome and inconvenient 
for general use. 

We are for Imperial measurement because it is 
part of our heritage, part of our language and 
culture and is, in fact, much more practical for 
many uses. 

Because of the pressure from citizens and 
industry, the U.S.A. General Accounting Office 
commissioned an in-depth study of the advantages 
and disadvantages of metric conversion. The re¬ 
sults were overwhelmingly in favor of the status quo 
and the U.S. federal policy has been clearly stated 
that metric conversion will not be imposed, but that 
any industry may convert if they find an advantage 
to so do. The U.S.A. is not going metric, why should 
Canada? 

Why Indeed and if you feel the same way, do- 
something about it—join Operation Humbug, write 
your letters of complaint. Do nothing and get what 
you deserve. 


Base only refuge 
while in Quebec 


\ 


While visiting my sister, 
her husband and family in 
Victoria, Gaston Godbout's 
letter, July 9, was brought 
to my attention. 

It would seem Godbout 
would have everyone be¬ 
lieve Quebecers are the 
good guys and everyone 
else are the bad guys 

I don't like the term 
French Canadians; it puts 
everyone with a French 
background in the same 
category Some of my best 
friends have a French 
background I was born 
here and don't like to be 
referred to as English 
Canadian 

I had the pleasure of 
being stationed (with my 
wife and family) in Kagot 
ville, Quebec for five 
years. Our service men 
there were attached, heat 
en and kicked mercilessly 
on a regular basis when 
ever the) went into Chirou 
llffii to sie inline and were 


Punch 



* 1980 Punch PuW* ltd 




Otsi L.A Thngg Synd 


‘I sec. What was to be a quick decision has now 
become the best of ten." 


The Colonist welcomes letters from readers. Please 
limit them to 200 words, sign them, include your 
address and a phone number where you can be reached 
during the day. Letters may be edited. Name and address 
of writers w ill be published with letters used. 


Centre 
trade off 


In regard to the proposed 
convention centre on the 
waterfront, it appears that 
the mayor and aldermen 
may have acted only for 
short-term benefits to the 
business community. 
Meanwhile, the genera¬ 
tions to come will be de¬ 
prived of what could be a 
beautiful green belt area in 
the heart of the city. 

Victoria is not just any 
city but a place renowned 
around the world for Its 
charm. It is the capital city 
of our province and, there¬ 
fore, deserves as much at¬ 
tention as has been given to 
our national capital—Ot¬ 
tawa. 

I hope that the citizens of 
Greater Victoria will make 
a point of being at today's 
public hearing at city hall. 

MISS M. B. MORLEY, 
955 Humboldt St., 
Victoria. 


Case with hidden irony 


Now that the medical 
profession seems to have 
disposed of Dr. H. F. Mac- 
Connachie (re Paul De 
Groot’s piece on July 15) 
perhaps it could turn its 
attention to some sure-fire 
way of ensuring that pa¬ 
tients, when bringing mal¬ 
practice suits against 
members of that profess¬ 
ion, can obtain the expert 
and objective medical tes¬ 
timony which seems essen¬ 
tial for any chance of suc¬ 
cess. 

I know of a woman who. 
after struggling for five 
years, has been advised to 
sep a psychiatrist. By now 
she probably needs one, a 
neat little example of cause 
and effect. 

But it is MacConnachie's 


own fault. He must know 
perfectly well that he 
should confine his sense of 
humor to the commercial- 
traveller type, which is 
messy but harmless and 
seldom bothers with irony. 

As for schizophrenia, any 
man with any spark in him 
at all is bound to have a wee 
touch of it. A successful 
clown must have it, Mark 
Twain had it. As far as 
society is concerned, the 
only issue is whether it is 
benign or not so benign. 

Hidden away some¬ 
where. between Dr. Mac¬ 
Connachie's case and the 
business of a patient's an¬ 
guished attempt to get ob 
jective expert medical tes- 


B.C.’s true identity 


Now that the repatriation 
of our constitution (The 
British North America 
Act) is much in the news, it 
seems an appropriate time 
to correct the name of the 
territory in which we arc so 
fortunate to live. It ceased 
being British Columbia in 
1872 and it’s time we ack¬ 
nowledged its true identity, 
namely, Canadian Colum¬ 
bia. 

I think I am correct in 
stating this is the last terri¬ 
tory in the whole world pre¬ 
fixed by the word British. 
The designation B.C. 


causes confusion further 
down our coast with Baja, 
California and further 
afield some people think 
British Columbia is a coun¬ 
try somewhere in South or 
Central America. 

Let no one interpret this 
letter as being anti-British. 
I was British born but am 
Canadian by choice. 

Please don’t change the 
name of your paper; it’s 
cute. Have fun. 

GEOFF MITCHELL, 
Sea Bluff Farm, 
Victoria. 


Cruelty hard to eclipse 


For sheer cruelty, Allan 
Fotheringham's article 
from Detroit on Ronald 
Reagan, would indeed be 
hard to eclipse. Many mil¬ 
lions in the United States 
think well of Reagan, and 
yet that petty-minded 
Fotherlngham, who must 
have a vanity beyond com¬ 
prehension, would seek to 
vilify Reagan, on whom 
this grout country of Can¬ 
ada may have to lean and 
also trust, especially if the 


thrown into jail without 
medical attention or even 
allowed a phone call. We 
had no recourse; at no time 
was anyone sent from Ot 
tawa to investigate 
Our base commander 
would only say to the men 
his lands were tied, and the 
only way to avoid confron 
tation was to stay on the 
base Five years is a long 
time to spend in confine 
ment; we still had to go into 
town to shop, but that's 
another horror story and 
would lake a full page to 
write about our experi¬ 
ences in Quebec. 

There Is no doubt in my 
mind those Quebecers in 
the Okanagan instigated 
those fights as I well re 
member (he hell they ra/ed 
here in Victoria m 1944 45 

John i: kilson 

Canadian Furors 
Bast Cumox * 


According to the Colo¬ 
nist, July 15, Edgar Kaiser, 
Jr. is critical that the north 
eastern coal deposits are 
going to be subsidized by 
the taxpayers. 

Industry Minister Don 
Phillips said that "Mr. Kai¬ 
ser is displaying the typical 
altitude of the American 
businessman." 

From this remark by Mr. 
Phillips may we assume 
that the owners of the 
northeast coal measures 
are not typical American 
businessmen? And, if they 
pay lower royalties—it is 
not a subsidy—even if It 
means less revenue for the 
province? 

As stated, the lower 
royalty for new gas finds is 
to encourage exploration 
Bui these coal fields in the 
northeast were found many 
years ago. so (he analogy 
escapes me 

It will not be "forever 
before a large scale steel 
complex is developed in (hi 
we»( and easily mined coal 
that ha» been left in (be 


ground would bring that de¬ 
velopment closer. 

HARLAND W. CLARK, 
10994 Madrona Dr., 
Sidney. 


Yellow Pages 


have 


timony on his behalf in a 
malpractice suit, there is 
irony all right but I can’t 
quite put my finger on it. 
Perhaps a good psycholo¬ 
gist could. 

A. W. SMITH, 
9780 West Saanich Road, 
Sidney. 


Friend’s 
care saluted 

My highest commenda¬ 
tion to I he two most cour¬ 
teous and efficient para 
medics who responded so 
swiftly to my call for an 
ambulance on June 24 at 
about It p m. 

When I got a very feeble 
phone call from my friend 
on the 16th floor that she 
was ill, I rushed up to find 
that she'd had a heart 
attack. 

I dialed “O” and the op¬ 
erator had the ambulance 
at the door, almost before 
I'd hung up the phone. The 
two young men, with an 
oxygen tank, quickly had 
my friend comfortably on 
the stretcher and in no time 
had her at emergency 
where again she was given 
instant and excellent care 
and attention by the attend¬ 
ing physicians and nurses. 

After two weeks in the 
coronary unit, with good 
care, she was able to return 
home. My sincere thanks to 
all those dedicated people 
at Victoria General Hospi¬ 
tal for their service. 

EMMA E. KLASSOFF, 
1147 Quadra St., 
Victoria. 


Capital Talk: By doug small- 


Smothered by semantics 


OTTAWA — It’s been some time now 
since we’ve turned our attention to the 
gray art of jargonese or, as it’s also 
known, semantic smother. 

As you are aware, this art (some call 
it a disease) is widespread in political 
and bureaucratic Ottawa. It is based 
(or appears to be based) on the prem¬ 
ise that proper and official communi¬ 
cation is only really proper and official 
if it is concealed. 

Thus, when Solicitor-General Bob 
Kaplan wants to say something is out of 
control, he uses the phrase "Inade¬ 
quate machinery exists for effective 
oversight." 

Thus, too, when Statistics Canada 
talks of patterns, it calls them "short¬ 
term trend cycles.” 

And thus, again, when the Canadian 
Transport Commission wants some¬ 
thing clarified Lt refers instead to “dis¬ 
sipating all appearance of confusion." 

Since we, too, are interested in dissi¬ 
pating confusion, here are some of the 
latest examples (with possible transla¬ 
tions) of linquistic legerdemain: 

“Windows of opportunity with nar¬ 
row time frames," Communications 
Minister Francis Fox. Translation: 
Chances. 

“Increasing duplication and overlap, 
declining complementarity and inter 
agancy competition to gain a mandate 
over newly perceived needs,” Agricul¬ 
ture Minister Eugene Whelan Bureau¬ 
cratic infighting. 

“Protecting the process of wealth 
generation that is an essential under¬ 
pinning of our society," Economic De¬ 
velopment Senator-Minister Bud 
Olson. Keeping the Commies out. 

"Slowly but surely, a reliable juris¬ 
prudence will evolve that will provide 
Canadian employers with specific 
guidelines to implement the concept," 
Employment Minister Lloyd Ax- 
worthy. Working the law to make work 
laws work. 

“Given clear signals from govern¬ 
ment, industry will respond in a man 
ncr that is fully consistent with our 
national energy objectives,” Energy 
Minster Marc Lalonde. Friendly per¬ 
suasion. 

“The route to improving our re¬ 


search capacity will require substan¬ 
tially higher levels of funding,” Tech¬ 
nology Minister John Roberts. 
Financial paving. 

“Potentially destabilizing ingre¬ 
dient," former Tory external affairs 
minister Flora MacDonald. Compe 
tition. 

“A relatively finite set of priorities 
in relation to concrete issues," Exter¬ 
nal Affairs Minister Mark MacGuigan. 
Decisions. 

"Selection of industrial consortia to 
become the final contenders to under¬ 
take contract design and project defi¬ 
nition for six new surface warships,” 
Defence Minister Gilles Lamontagne. 
One decision. 

“Programs instituted to respond to 
the substantial deficiencies that had 
been identified prior to their creation 
in the availability to Small and medium 
sized business of new investment 
funds," Industry Minister Herb Gray. 
Helping business help itself. 

"Constructing a more co-operative 
approach to the effective use of the 
procurement tool, ' Supply Minister J. 
J. Blais. Helping government help it¬ 
self. 

"Immediate ongoing process of re¬ 
lating mutual needs and capabilities,” 
International Trade Minister E j Lum- 
Icy. Bargaining. 

"Increased strain on Ihe collective 
bargaining process,” Labor Minister 
Gerald Regan. Heavy bargaining. 

"Affecting meaningful altitudinal 
change,” Multiculturalism Minister 
Jim Fleming. Successful bargaining. 


“Filling an information need among 
citizens which had previously gone 
unanswered," Justice Minister Jean 
Chretien. 

Perhaps It’s too much to hope for, but 
could he have been referring to efforts 
to fight the spread of jargon? 

Or will anybody ever .be able to 
overcome what Solicitor-General Bob 
Kaplan so aptly described (in a differ¬ 
ent context) as "obstacles to the crea¬ 
tive use of sentencing options?" 

Colonist Fp News Service 


Told enough, people will believe 


That Prime Minister 
Trudeau should call Britain 
a "foreign country” gives 
us a perfect insight as to 
the constitutional change 
he is in such frantic haste to 
make! This remark is simi¬ 
lar to one voiced by his 
former mouthpiece, Nor¬ 
man DePoe, after De- 
Gaulle's infamous cry of 
“Vive la Quebec Libre," 
declaring on TV: "We do 
nc(f want the president of 
Ffance or the Queen of 
England to tell us what to 
do!" 


It'seems Trudeau's 
method Of propaganda re 
scmbles strongly that of 
the German Goebbels, who 
said:' “Tell it to the people 
often enough and they will 
believe it!” It is perhaps 
quite logical for Trudeau to 
use this method, as his am¬ 
bitions and Hitler's appear 
to have so much in com¬ 
mon! 

Is it possible that Tru¬ 
deau does not know that 
Britain Is our mother coun¬ 
try, and the Queen of Eng¬ 


land is also the Queen of 
Canada? 

It is unbelievable that not 
one Liberal in the whole 
convention confronted Tru 
deau with the verity of 
his ridiculous statement! 
Which certainly bears out 
Trudeau’s own description 
of the Liberals (before he 
joined them) as "that 
spineless herd, that bunch 
of idiots:” 

MURIEL POWELL, 
Cowichan Bay. 


Soviet bellicosity is on the 
increase. 

The obese vanity of Foth- 
erlngham shows itself in so 
many ways. His journalese 
or pert (as he doubtless 
sees it) use of the English 
language Is nbt only sicken¬ 
ing, but sometimes unintel¬ 
ligible; what a far cry from 
an educated Christian 
gentleman. 

WILLIAM JENNINGS, 
1120 Beach Drive, 
Victoria. 


The light beer that 

doesn’t give 

upon taste. 


Coal boon to development 


’Specially good with almost any meal. 
Less than 99 calories per bottle 
makes Special Lite less filling. 
Refreshing, real Canadian beer taste 
makes it really food for thought. 
Next time_try the Special. 


answer 

The July'11 Colonist re¬ 
ports that Aid. McKenzie 
wants to spend $50,000 to 
find out which businesses 
and services Victoria has 
to offer, and those that are 
unavailable. 

May I suggest that he 
"let his fingers take a walk 
through the Yellow 
Pages " This will tell him. 
without spending any 
money, what is available 
And, as to what is unavail 
able, if H ain't there, it ain't 
available 

W E KOECKI.KIN 
Sunn) Shores. 



V‘‘ 

f [S/FJn 7 f 4" r y*: V ' 


■ ^ 





















































6 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


TORONTO (CP) — The 
Toronto stock market re¬ 
gistered an advance for the 
fifth consecutive session 
Tuesday as heavy buying 
continued in gold mining 
and real estate and con¬ 
struction issues. 

Neil Wickham, senior an 
alyst in charge of special 
situations with Green- 
shields Ltd. of Toronto, at¬ 
tributed the firm trend in 
the market to the boost 


Dulrtbute. by CP 
Toronto Stock Exchange—July 22 

Complete tabulation ot Tuesday 
transactions Quotations in cents un¬ 
less marked $ z—Odd lot. xd—Ex- 
dlvid3nd, xr—Ex rights, xw — Ex 
warrants Net change Is from pr3vious 
board-lot closing sale. 

Net 

Stock Sales High Low Close Cti'ge 
A and B 


Toronto trading 


given the Canadian econ¬ 
omy by the decision to pre 
build portions of the Alaska 
Highway pipeline, fore¬ 
casts by economists that 
the recession Is almost 
over and the fact that, de¬ 
spite the recession, both in¬ 
stitutions and individuals 


Issues traded 
Advances 
Declines 
Unchanged 


Tues. 

m 

263 

706 

225 


66S 

238 

207 

770 


AG.F.M 

3242 

$5* 

J* 

J* t 

Aby Gin w 

5650 

513", 

12* 

1) 4 

Ab Prc 199937 

$20", 

19* 

20": . 

Abitbi 10 

Z31 

$51* 

51* 

51* 

Acklands 

100 

$13* 

13* 

13* 

Adanac M 

300 

400 : 

190 

390 - 

Advocate 

100 

140 

140 

140 

Alton Min 

4550 

$J0 

29* 

30 4 

Agnico E 

14550 

$15* 

IS 

15* 4 

Agra Ind A 

1250 

IS* 

S 

5* 

Akaitctio 

7100 

200 

185 

700 . 

Albany 

10100 

245 : 

240 

740 

Alt Energy 

50092 

$27* 

21* 

22* 

Alla Gas A 

31484 

$34* 

33* 

33* - 

AHa G C p 

z30 

$64 

64 

64 

Alla G E p 

100 

$22* 

22* 

22* ■ 

Alta G F 

708 

$26 

25* 

26 

Alta G 9 76 

Z85 

$25* 

25 

25 

Alta G 760 

100 

$22", 

22* 

22* 

Alta G 6* 

2325 

$47* 

47 

47 - 

Alla G 6"; 

16530 

$30* 

30 

30 - 

Alta Nat 

z?0 

$21 

21 

21 

Alcan 

119821 

$37* 

36* 

37 

Algorna St 

41237 

$36 

35 

36 

Allarco Dv 

100' 

$135 

135 

135 

Am Larder 

6400 

86 

85 

86 

Am Eagle 

6700 

$6'. 

6 

6* 

Am Leduc 

2M80 

90 

90 

90 - 

Andres W t 

i 1310 

$10* 

10", 

10* 

Andres W £ 

) 310 

$10* 

10* 

10": 

Ang CT 265 

z30 

$27". 

27". 

27’. 

Ang CT 790 

100 

$30'. 

30". 

30* 

Anq D Gld 

1825 

410 

41X1 

400 

Aquitaine 

4346 

$67'. 

66'. 

66'. - 

Arous 

too 

$15* 

15* 

15* 

Args 260 p 

Z20 

$25 

25 

25 

Argus B pr 

300 

$26", 

26': 

26", 

Argus C pr 

400 

$5* 

S'. 

5* 

Asamera 

17150 

$73": 

23 

23 

Asbestos 

Zll 

$35 

35 

35 

■ Asoc Pore 

316 

385 

385 

385 

Astral 

500 

290 

790 

790 

Atco A 

12933 

$25* 

25* 

25* ■ 

Atlas Yk 

10229 

89 

85 

85 

BBC M p 

1900 

$25 

25 

25 

BC Sugar > 

k 1125 

$40* 

40* 

40* 

BP Can 

38375 

$46": 

46 

46 

Bachelor 

18450 

475 

460 

475 

Bakertalc 

10800 

130 

125 

125 

Bakertlc r 

5600 

7 

6 

6 

Banister C 

1400 

$19* 

19". 

19* 

Bank BC 

254 

$34 

J4 

34 

Bank Mtl 

46325 

$29* 

28* 

28* 

Bank N S 

31130 

$32". 

31 

32 

Bankeno 

4800 

$7* 

7 

7* 

Barbecon 

300 

$19 

19 

19 

Barex 

7500 

27 

25 

27 

Barv Ex pi 

4000 

150 

145 

150 

Baste Res 

7300 

$15". 

15 

IS* 

Baton B 

4300 

$13", 

13* 

13* 

Bay Mills 

200 

$6"i 

6* 

6* 


Cal PA 263373 SIS 1 * 18’a IS* ♦ * 

Cal P 5 p 1200 U0'i 60**7 60* i ♦ 5 

XSM»* 101'a 101' * -IV* 
100 $100* KX>* 100* ♦ * 
45 S100 100 100 -1 

1925 126**7 26 26 - * 

10 $96'4 98’4 9f'4-l>s 

72600 315 300 315 ♦ 10 

26290 $79 27* 79 ♦l 1 * 

7400 $15 14*4* 15 ♦ >4 

9905 $66 67 66 O* 

1330 $12**7 12* 12* ♦ * 

500 $13* 13*>7 13* >- * 

5200 $U'-» 14V. 14". - * 

3503 $12* 12* ITS - '/• 

114 $142* 4 14? 147 ♦ *5 

700 $33* 33 33*o ♦ V. 

C Nor West 14950 $23* 23* 73* 

CanP Ent 23675 $24 73V, 23*4 

200 $33 32* 33 

3116 $18’/. 18*4 18* 

5400 $17*/» 16V. 16V. ♦ V, 

5967 $27*/7 26Vj W* 

C Trust Tk 5650 $20* 20* 20V. ♦ Mi 

C Tung 1500 $30* 30* 30* - *4 
CCaWeSV A 4360 $10 9* 9* 

CCablesv B 1615 $9* V* 9", 

CC Man Y 100 $12* 12* 12* ♦ * 
4725 $14* 14 14* ♦ * 

100 $79 79 79 

820 $22* 72* 72* ♦ * 

Cl Bk Com 48806 $26* 25* 26 - * 

C lencour 26200 134 120 137 *14 

4150 $20* 20* 70* ♦ * 

41747 $20* 19* JO’/, - * 

1100 $44 44 44 ♦ * 

7120 $14* 14* 14", - * 

300 $25* 25* 25**7 ♦ * 

20392 $42* 42* 42'/, 

100 $8', 8* 8* 

348 $20* 20", 20* ♦ * 

700 $26' , 26V, 26", ♦ ' , 

— 29* 29* ♦ * 


Cal p »o p 

Cal P 9 80 
Cal P 9.75' 
Cal P 2.36 
Cal P 8* 
Calvert 
Camflo 
C Cblb A 
Camp RL 
Can Cem 
C Cem 6* 
CCem 2 p 
CDC 

CDC pr B 
Can Malt 


C Padtrs 
Can Perm 
CS Pete 
Can Trust 


C Forms! 
CGE 
CG Invest 


appear to have money to 
invest. 

ACTIVE STOCKS 

Stock Sates High Low Close Ctrge 

CalPow A 283373 $18* 18* 18* ♦ * 

BC Forest 773990 $15* 14* 14*- * 

Abitibi Prl 199937 $20",.19* 20* ♦ * 
Genstar 166072 $38*^6* 36'-, - * 
Bow Vallv 128997 $73* 22* 73 - V, 

N Senator 6l28oTfS - *llfl 131 ♦ ? 

St Fab ten 167870 68 58 63 -1 

Newnortt) 162000 44 39 40 

Delour Mn 139863 155 151 151 

GuHstrm 137079 $9* 9* 9* ♦ * 
Merland E 44076 $10 9* 9* 

C Nat Res 41247 $20* 19* 20* - * 

Coseka Res 35930 $71 20* 71 

Oist Tr A i2S $6* 6* 6* 

Doman l 4100 $10* 10 10 - * 

Dome Mine 5961 $116 110 116 *5 

Dome Pete 26454 $85* 84 84* - * 

DPete A p 1200 $21* 71* 21* ♦ * 

1146 121* 21* 21* 

74562 $20 19* 20 ♦ * 

8000 85 83 83 -2 

9078 $35* 35* 35* ♦ * 

110 $17* 17* 17* ♦ * 

3050 $15 14", 14* ♦ * 

16420 $25* 25* 25* ♦ * 

600 $11 Ws 10*- * 

100 $ 6 * 6 * 6 * ♦ * 

500 $10* 10* 10* ♦ * 

3000 117 no no - 4 

10965 180 170 170 

1400 $26* 26". 26". 

1500 $7* 7* 7* ♦ * 

100 $11* 11* 11* ♦ * 

700 $11* 11 II 

19256 $5* 5 5* - * 

500 $12 12 12 

300 350 335 350 * 10 

220 325 375 325 

7300 $11 10* 10* ♦ * 

2500 222 217 217 -3 

86700 7 6 6 —1 

19925 $7* 7* 7* ♦ * 


TSEX 

Minerals 

Flnanc'l 

Oil. Gas 

Industry 

Utilities 

Consum 

Merch 

Forest 

Transp't 

Pipeline 

Manage 

Comm. 

Golds 

Building 


TSE 300 INDEX 
Close Ch'ge High Low 
2179.84 ♦ 8.48 2191 58 1782.51 


2107.33 
1380.53 
4915 75 
1332 30 
1568.06 
1915.22 

1393.34 
1777.04 
7842.80 
2286 40 
2284 00 
1936.67 
4655.79 
5552 66 


♦ 79.65 2404 00 1634 87 

♦ 14.69 1380.53 1073.19 
-48 79 5155.88 3557 04 

♦ 5.11 1345.60 1121 S3 
-1.30 1598 67 1320.87 

♦ 5.96 1915 72 $476 ?! 

♦ 8 15 1395.28 1203.1? 

♦ 5.01 1919.58 1470.31 
-0.82 3193 20 7305.01 

—23.20 2343.22 1806.10 

♦ 17.17 2408 51 1861 26 
♦ 7 99 1936.67 1458.68 

♦ 194.00 4655.79 2553.68 

♦ 115 98 5552 66 3732 80 


Up 10. down 4. Volume 8.31 million 
(8 II million). Value $137.67 million 
($97.91 million). 


MARKET 

REPORT 

Closing quotations tor T ties. July 22, I9H0 


New York 


NEW YORK (AP) - 
Stock prices turned lower 
in late trading Tuesday 
after government officials 
renewed their pledges to 


CLOSING AVERAGES 
Open High Lew Clese Ch'ge 

30lnd 931 S7 940 78 972 18 977 30-I 37 

20Trns. 31S.lt 318 14 311 79 317.55 -0 88 
15Utts. 114.70 114 79 113.62 114.28 ♦0.11 
65Stks 340 54 343.60 337 15 338 89 -0 50 

Stocks volume: rtldus. 4,211.800: 
Trans 1,353.700; Utils 586.200 . 65Stks. 
6.151.700 Total volume 52.23 million. 


C Marconi 
CNat 

C Nat 8.50 
C Ocdental 
C Ocdntl p 
CP Ltd 
CPL A p 
C Reserve 
Cdn Tire 
Cdn Tire A 29194 $30 


Becker B p 100 $9", 
Bell Canad 59974 $70'. 


Bell 7 28 
Bell 180 
Bell 196 
Bell 7.05 
Beth Cop 
B tgharl O GI64X 
81 Hawk 9000 
Black Phot 
Bomac A 


- 1 
- * 


9", 

70*- '• 


100 $30* 30* 30* ♦ ' 
250 $20 70 20 

800 $24* 24* 24* 

4555 $23* 23* 23*-’ 
208 $21* 21* 71*-’ 
$9 8* 8* ♦ ’ 

55 57 

14* 15 - '• 
8 8 


57 
710 $15 
1050 $8 


CUtil 6 pr 250 $68 

CU 10* 600 $26* 26* 76* 

C Util 9.24 1300 $74* 24* 24* ♦ '• 

CWN G 4 pr 235 $8 . 8* 8* 

CWN 5* p 100 $12"* 12* 12*- * 
Candel 011 100 $34 34 34 -1 . 

Canrav 8840 310 305 310 ♦ 5 

Canron A 49825 $19 16 18* ♦ ?'. 

Cara 7700 $9* 9* 9* ♦ * 

Cara A 1200 $8* 8 8* - * 

Carl OK 3300 $9 8* 8*- * 

Carl A p 220 $22* 22* 22* 

Carma A 12170 $22 19* 21". ♦!* 

Carolln M 2900 $18* 18". 18* ♦ * 

Cassiar 1796 $13* 13* 13* 

Cassidy L 200 400 400 400 

Celanese 26930 $7* 7 7* ♦ * 

Celan 175 p 200 $17* 17* 17*- * 
Ctl Est A 500 S12V, 1?* 12* 

Chnclr 16250 $5* 5* 5* - * 

Charter Ol 100 780 780 780 -15 

Cherokee 4400 $12* 17* 12* - * 
Chib Kav 54500 39 36 37 ♦ 3 

Chiettan D 4460 $78 27* 77* ♦ * 

Chimo 400 215 215 215 

Chrysler 918 $8 7* 8 

Clbor A 1000 100 100 100 

Coin Lake 26500 67 63 65 -2 

Cmplx 3550 $6* 6 6 - * 

Commco 3995 $63", 62 62* - * 

Cominco A 750 $25 25 25 

ComCap Tr 1600 $8* 8* 8* 

Comrd O G 4400 380 375 375 
Comagas 7000 765 - 255 256 - 9 
Con Bath A 31130 $15* 15 15* ♦ . 

Con Bath B Z54 $14* 14* 14* 

Con Fardv 1000 280 780 280 -10 

C Durham 16300 780 775 777 

C Morisn 10000 475 410 . 410 -10 

Cons Pipe 100 $7* 7* 7* ♦ '. 

Cons Prof 6544 220 


DPete B p 
D Bridge 
DExptor 
Dofasco A 
Dorn Store 
D Textle 
Oomtar 
Domfar pr 
Dover pr 
Dr Me C A 
Dunde Pal 
Dunrale 
Du Pont A 
Oustbane 
Dylex Ltd 
Dytex L A 
Dynamar 
E L Fin 
Est Mlrtlc 
East Sul 
Estn Prov 
Ego Res 
Ego r 
Elhom 
Elks Stors 
Emco 
Emco w 
Enrgy Res 
EquITrust 
Exquisite 
Extndcar 
Extd A 
Flbrg Nik 
Fed ind a 
F idelity Tr 
Finning T 
F Calgary 
F City wf7 
P Ctv Tr C 
F Mar 
Foodcx p 
"ord Cnda 
F Sea A pr 
Francana 
Fraser 
Fruehaut 
G M Res 
Galtaco 
Galveston 
G Distrb A 
G Distrb w 7800 445 


300 $5 
2100 $12 
9328 295 
625 187 
871 $6 
200 260 
300 $9* 


S 5 
11* 11*- * 
780 280 -10 
187 187 
5* 5* — * 
760 260 ♦ 5 

9", 9* ♦ '. 


1000 $9* 9* 9* 

13933 $172* 116 122 +6 

700 $7* 7* 7* 

200 400 400 400 
5600 $34* 31 34 ♦ 2 

5400 295 285 285 - 5 

200 $7* 7* 7*-". 
1900 $7 7 7 - ", 

11850 235 210 235 + 20 


irwtn foy 
ivaco 
J Q Res 
Jannock 
Jannock 8 
j a not k wf 2 1200 
Jorex Ltd 51300 
Joutel 16100 
Kaiser Re 9841 
Kam Kotia 5900 
Kaps Tran 92642 
Keeprite 200 
Kelsey M 1500 
Kerr Add 
K An aeon 
Labatt A 
Lab Min 
Lacana 
Laidlaw A 
Laidlaw B 
Ldl 9* 

Laidlaw 8 
LOnt Cem 
L Shore 
Lasltr Km 
Laurasla 
Lau Fin p 
Lava Cap 
Leigh Inst 
Liberian 
LL Lac 
Loblaw Co 
Lob Co pr 
LOb Ltd Ap 225 
Lob Ltd Bp 275 
Lochiel 10300 
Lochiel A 753 
Lytton M 


- 7 


6 * 

46 


6 *- 


100 

530 $47 
270 $7* 

950 $20 19* 19* - * 

7300 $17 17 17 ♦ * 

5000 $10 10 10 

9000 $4* 6* 6* 

100 450 450 450 

200 255 255 255 

500 $10* 10* 10* ♦ * 
445 430 445 . 20 


GMC 1176 $58* 57* 57*-1* 

Gnstar 166022 $38* 36* 36*-* 
Gnstar 2 35 83125 $39 36* 37 ♦ * 

Giant Yk 4765 $25* 24 25* ♦1* 

Glbrattar 11955 $13 12* 13 ♦ ', 

Gibe R'ltv P 2600 $22 22 22 - * 

Goidale A 1000 $5* 5* 5* ♦ * 
Golduod M 13000 315 305 310 - 5 
Goodyear 100 $19 19 19 - V« 

Goodyear p 175 $33 33 33 

' " ' 780 $15* 15* 15* ♦ * 

300 $17 17 17 

230 $30* 30* 30* 

3800 750 745 250 
4000 320 315 320 
5832 $53 * 52* S3* ♦!* 
105 5160 160 160 ♦lO 

3500 425 425 425 
1500 $6", 6* 6* ♦ * 
10 * 10 * ♦ * 
177 


7300 400 380 

1100 $18 18 

18650 135 175 

1986 $11* 11* 

MO $12* 17 

$5* 5* 

110 101 

160 ISO 

$30* 30* 

$6* 6 6' 

175 156 165 

$16 16 16 

$77 26* 27 ♦ * 

$18* 18". 18* ♦ * 

85 76 85 +7 

$24 23* 23* - * 

$70 70. 70 

$9 I* 9 
$7* 7* 7* 

$7* 7* 7* ♦ * 

$ 10 * 10 * 10 * ♦ ", 

$8 8 8 

$5* 5 5 

$10* 9* 10* ♦ * 

192 1S4 190 *2S 

100 98 99 ♦ 2 

$ 12 * 12 * 12 * 

$8* 8* 8* 

$9* 9* 9* - * 
435 425 435 ♦ 10 

$13* 12* 13* ♦ * 
$5* 5". 5* ♦ "• 
$24* 74V, 24'/, 

$15* 15* 15* - * 
$16 16 16 

$8", 8* 8* 

$13* 13* 13* 

78700 105 85 105 + 20 

M to O 

900 $12* 12* 12* ♦ * 

9179 $12 11* 17 ♦ * 

400 $20* 20* 20*- "« 

200 $26* 25". 26* ♦!", 

13200 259 250 259 - 1 

2500 95 95 95 

1375 $17* 17 17 - * 

45942 $32* 31* 31* - * 
4600 255 250 255 

600 191 191 191 

1400 $10* 10* 10* ♦ * 
150 $10* 10* 10* ♦ ", 
500 215 715 715 

10800 1S2 ISO 150 

700 445 445 445 - 5 

9900 $7* 7* 7* ♦ * 
4400 300 265 300 

1776 135 132 132 - 3 

1343 


390 

♦ 

10 

Nor Cl ?60p 

200 

$27 

27 

27 - 

4 

S»«ler Ml 

2525 

$17* 

17* 

17V* 

18 



Nor Cl 7850 

500 

$21 

21 

21 


Sobev Stor 

100 

$12* 

12* 

»*'♦ * 

135 

♦ 

9 

Nor Tel 

45341 

$39* 

39* 

39*- 

* 

Sogepet 

1000 

140 

140 

140 -2 

11* 



Northgat 

1000 

$K>* 

10* 

10* ♦ 

* 

Southm 

5193 

$36* 

35* 

36* 

12". 

t 

* 

Northld 

inss 

101 

90 

100 


Spar Aero 

1436 

$10* 

w* 

10*- "i 

5* 



Northstar 

500 

$7* 

7 

7* 


Spar Aero 

p 400 

$21* 

71 

21 

104 

— 

3 

NW Util p 

200 

$42 

42 

42 - 

* 

Spar w 

510 

300 

300 

300 - S 

150 

♦ 

2 

NS Savngs 

413 

$11* 

11* 

11* 


Spooner 

20150 

154 

145 

145 

30* 



Nowsco W 

1295 

$27* 

26* 

27* ♦ 


SI Brodest 

400 

$13 . 

13 

13 - V. 


7950 

25467 

4770 

1000 

16400 

300 

5900 

614 

1670 

1500 

11198 

31018 

11300 

100 

2350 

2S0 

420 

9852 

9800 


Graft G 
Graft G A 
Graft G p 
‘ Grandma 
Granduc 
GL Forest 
Gt W Life 
Gt West S 
G Goose 
G Goose 9* 200 $10 
Grevtmd C 200 177 


Grevhnd z36 $16', 16 ; 

Guar Tr p 1900 $16* 16* 

Guard Cap 400 $10 10 

Gulf C 106995 $34* 33* 

Gulfsfr 137079 $9* 9". 

H to L 


16 * 0 
10 ♦ * 
33* - * 
9 * ♦ * 


MDS Heltti 
MICC 
MICC 8* 

Mice 8 p • 

MSZ Res 
MTS Inter 
Mdan H A 
MB Ltd 
Madeline 
Madsen 
Magna A 
Magna B 
Magnason 
Magnetcs 
Maislin l 
Maistc WII 
Malartic 
Man Bar 
Maritime 
Mar T 860 
Mar T 940 
Mark Spnc 
Mass Fer 
Mas F A 
Mas F B 
Match an 

Me Adam _ „ 

Me Intyre 3745 $83* 82 

McLaghln 200 $9 

McLghl 9 p 400 $18 

McLghl 10 p 300 $11 

McLghl w 100 $5' 

Meicor 2200 $18 

Mentor 6500 $8* 8* 8* 

Mercantil 1850 $20* 20* 20* 

Merland E 44076 $10 9* 9* 

Midcon 200 250 250 250 

Minrl Res 
Mitel Corp 
Moffat A 
Molson A 
Mol son B 
Monenco A 
Monel a P 
Mtl Trust 


Nu-wst A 28210 $22* 21 21 - * 

Nu Wst B p 150 $18* 18* 18' • 

Nu Wst % p 2500 $19", 19* 19’ j 

Nutort Res 9000 104 95 KM ♦ 8 

Numac 6700 $35* 34* 35 - * 

OPI 900 $34 32* 34 ♦ 7 

Oak wood P 23941 $20* 19* 19* - * 
Obrien 23300 280 770 275 - 5 

Ocelot A 100 $3IV. 31* 31". - t 

Ocelot 6 27600 $32 31 31 —1 

Okanagan 700 $19 18* 19 ♦ * 

Okan A p 100 $12 12 17 ♦ * 

Omega 3100 $7* 7* 7* 

Onapmg 7800 485 465 465 -10 

Oshawa A 6100 $9* 8* 9 

OsiSkO 6800 47 45 45 -3 

P lo S 

PCL Indust 700 475 475 475 ♦ 5 

Pac Coper 6600 345 345 345 +5 

Page Pet 3255 $29* 28* 28* 

Page Pet 7 1300 $15'/, 15* 15". 

Pagurian A 5650 $8* 8* 8* 

8500 $6* 6* 6'. 

12550 $17* 16* 17* ♦ * 
5150 $6". 6 6* - * 

1050 $6* 6". 6* 

2383 760 255 255 - 7 
11090 $82* 81 82* ♦ 1* 

7000 130 170 
9300 795 790 
18500 435 
■700 350 
7000 470 


2667 

110S3 

1300 

1950 

16500 

4200 

3745 


$25* 25". 25*- * 
$9* 9* 9* 

$9* 9* 9* 

$7* 7* 7* - * 

$ 8 * 8 * 8 * ♦ * 

$16* 16* 16* ♦ 

$16* 16 16* ♦ ', 
67 64 64 —1 
79 -2 
83* ♦ ?* 


10* 11 
5* 5* 

17* 18 


Paloma P 
P amour 
Pancana A 
Pancana B 
Pan Centr 
PanCan P 
Pango Gld 
Partake 
Pe Ben O 
Pedlar ind 
Peerless 
Pembina 
Pennant 
Peningtn p 
P Jewl A 
Petro Sun 
Petrofina 
Petrol 
Pevto Oils 
Fdionix Oil 
Phnx Oil w 
Pine Point 
Place G 
Placer 
Pommex 
Ponder 
Pop Shops 
Powr Corp 
Prado Exp 
Precamb 
Premier C 
Provigo 


385 

350 

470 


QMG Hldg 17200 $7 
Qasar Pet 5800 $5* 


130 

290 -10 
400 -45 
350 
470 

4700 $12* 12* 12*- "i 
18705 265 756 258 - 5 

500 450 450 450 

3300 $14 13* 13* - * 

7/06 375 360 365 ♦ 5 

510 $58* 58 -58* ♦ * 

500 $9* 9* 9", 

100 $27". 27* 27". - 1 . 
1225 $8". 8* 8". 

1500 200 200 700 
1158 $35* 34* 35* ♦ 

11300 315 305 305 - 5 

55400 $22* 21 71* 

3000 155 151 

1200 217 212 

1195 175 160 

4025 $15* 15* 

7000 93 '93 

4600 $6* 6* 

4800 $24", 74 
225 $32", 32V, 

■“ 6 * 


» ♦ * 


Que Sturg 

Ram 

Rchmn 

Ranger 

Ravrock 

Redpath 

Redstone 


151 
212 ♦ !? 
175 ♦IS 
15* ♦ * 
93 - 5 
6 * 

24", ♦ 1 
32* 

6 * - * 
5* 

5* ♦ * 


71700 $6 

7068 $23* 22* 23 

7590 $11* 11 11 ♦ * 

18105 $41* 40 40 -1 

41300 440 425 435 - 5 


1050 $16* 16* 16* i 
25000 172 163 172 r 
Reed Pap p!3000 $13* 13* 13". . 
R Sth A 10143 $9* 9* 9* 
Reichhold 2300 $13". 13 13 

Reich 7* p 800 $1/ 17 17 


9392 

252 

748 

250 - 2 

Reitman A 

Z10 

$16* 

16* 

16V 

16405 

$30* 

29 

29 —IV, 

Res Servic 

10900 

$12* 

1? 

12 

400 

$17* 

17* 

17* 

Revelstk 

200 

$9* 

•9V, 

9 J ( 

18170 

$33 

33 

33 

Revnu Prp 

20415 

195 

186 

195 

1200 

$31* 

31* 

31*- * 

Rileys D 

600 

235 

23S 

m 

300 

$12* 

1? 

12 —V, 

Rio Algom 

8853 

$34* 

33* 

34* 

500 

100 

W 

100 

R.0 8 5 

2825 

450 

445 

450 

zSO 

$20* 

20* 

20* 

R.O Alto 

8000 

300 

775 

300 


Bombr 

159 

$15 15 

15 



C Rambler 

BOO 

480 

480 

480 ♦ 5 

Harlequin 

10734 

$23 

21* 

23 ♦ 1 

Moore 

ISM 

$35* 

35* 

35*- * 

Bonza O 

73420 

$11* 11* 

M* 

+ 

* 

C Rexspar 

5500 

56 

55 

56 - 5 

H Wood 

750 

135 

135 

135 ♦ 5 

Mtn States 

977s 

$10’. 

10 1 

10", - * 

Bonanza W 

1170 

$5* 5": 

5* 

4 

1 ( 

Con Textle 

100 

$6* 

6* 

6* 

Hatleigh A 

800 

$5* 

M 

5*- * 

Muncpl S L 

NO 

$5* 

5* 

5*- * 

Bow val 

178997 

$23* 22* 

23 

_ 

* 

Con Distrb 

4500 

$9* 

9* 

9* — 

Hatleigh B 

140T 

$5* 

5* 

5* 

Murphy 

29985 

$34 

3? . 

33* ♦ 1* 

Bow Vly 7 

750 

$87* 85* 

85 1 



Conventrs 

2500 

$17* 

17* 

17* ♦ * ‘ 

Hawker 

1852 

$18* 

18 

18* ♦ '• 

N 8 Cook 

90C 

$6 

5* 

6 ♦ '• 

Bow m pr 

ZllO 

$45 45 

45 



Con west A 

500 

$5* 

5* 

5' • ♦ 17 

Haves D 

14.1 

$8* 

8". 


NBU Mine 

MOO 

375 

370 

375 

Bralor Res 

2750 

$15* 15’• 

15* 

4 

* 

Con west B 


445 

445 

445 

Hedwav A 

'TOO 

$5 

450 

455 -10 

Nat Bk Can 6900 

$13* 

'3 . 

13* 

Bramalea 

620 $>l —H 

It 

— 

*T~ 

Cop Fields 

22S0 

$18 

17 

17* ♦ ', 

Highfield 

7500 

320 

315 

320 . 

Nat Drug 

300 

$12* 

12* 

12*- * 

brascan A 

4 ms 

$29-x 78* 

79 

4 

', 

Corby B 

ISO 

$17* 

17* 

17* 

Hdmger A 

160 

$60 

fl 

60 

Nat Pete 

7800 

380 

3’0 

375 ♦ 5 

Brenda M 

4075- $34 : 34 

34* 


* 

C Falcon C 97890 

$12". 

M* 

1? ♦ * 

H Bav Mng 

8925 

$29* 

29* 

29* ♦ '• 

Nat Trust 

1850 

$26 

25* 

25*- 

Briqhl A 

Z50 

$17* 12": 

17": 



Coseka R 

35930 

$21 

20* 

21 

H Bav Co 

2724 

$75", 

25 

25 - * 

Ncmco 

16100 

335 

325 

325 « 

Br.nco 

9790 

Sf 8 

8 

_ 

* 

Costain Ltd 

300 

$9 

9 

9 — * 

HBC or 

640 

$20 

20 

20 

Neomar 

750 

400 

395 

395 t- 5 

Brinco p 

606 

$5": 5* 

5* 



Courvan 

6500 

175 

170 

175 

HB Oil Gas 76465 

$35* 

35 

35 - * 

NB Tel 

741 

$19* 

19* 

19* 

BCFP 223990 

$15* 14* 

14* 

_ 

* 

Cra*gmt 

1300 

$5* 

5* 

5* 

Husky Oil 

49320 

$18* 

i"* 

IT* - V, 

NB Tel 185 

3*7 

$20 

19*. 

19*- . 

BCRIC 

85215 

$6': 6* 

6* 

4 


Cfwn Life 


$70 

69* 

69". - * 

Husky A pr 

Z60 

$36 

34* 

34* 

N Kelore 

mg 

S8 

54 

57 - 1 

BC Phone 

8207 

$17 16* 

17 

4 


Crown 8* 

300 

$19* 

19* 

19* 

Husky B pr 

900 

$35 

35 

35 

N Provid D 22750 

56 

48 

56 ♦ 8 

BCPh 4*» p 

Z20 

$44* 44* 

44* 



C Zelrba A 

m 

$24 . 

24* 

24". ♦ * 

Hydra Ex 

1455 

90 

Of! 

90 —3 

N Que Ragl 10300 

$5V. 490 

495 +10 

BCPh 4* p 

434 

$57 52 

52 

4 

1 

Crush Inti 

200 

$137. 

13* 

13* - * 

IAC 

5566 

$10* 

10* 

10* 

N Sen 612800 

133 

111 

131 ♦ 2 

BCPh 1956 

100 

$55 55 

55 

— 

1 

Cuvier M 

27000 

92 

IS 

87 - 1 

ITL Ind 

7300 

780 

280 

280 -5 

N York Oil 

’700 

305 

295 

295 -10 

BCPh 4 84 

470 

$13 17* 

13 

— 

* 

Cyprus 

9305 

$21* 

71". 

21* ♦ * 

IU mti 

8807 

$18* 

18". 

18* 

Nfld LP A 

M20 

$25 

24* 

25 ♦ . 

BCPh 5.15 

310 

$59 59 

59 



Czar Res 

10510 

$18". 

N 

18 -V. 

Imasco 

4 SO 

$50* 

50". 

so* ♦ * 

Ntld Tel 

376 

$107'. 

10* 

10* - '. 

BCPh 5* O 

350 

$60 60 

60 

— 

7 


D 

to G 



Imp Oil A 

28553 

$457. 

44* 

44*- * 

Nfld Te 975 

100 

$20": 

20": 

20* 

BCPh 6 pr 

zlO 

$64* 64 * 

64* 



DRG Ltd A 

2200 

17* 

7* 

7* ♦ * 

Imp Oil B 

Z66 

$45* 

45* 

45* 

Ntld Te 885 

100 

$19* 

19", 

19* ♦ "T 


. -10 

Rolland 500 $8* 8* 8*+* 

Roman 133996 $65 62 65 ♦!* 

Ronyx Cor 7400 465 455 465 ♦ 5 

Rothman 1508 $25 24* 25 ♦ * 

Rothm 2p 100 $14 14 14 

Royal Bnfc 24664 $50* 50* 50* ♦ * 
Ryl T £ M 200 $10* 10 1 , 10* — : 

Ry Trsco A 10409 $15* 15* 15* ♦ * 

Ruprtlnd 2100 $5* 5* 5* 

Russel A 236? $70 20 70 

Russet 9* 700 $19* 19* 19* *— * 

St Fabn 167820 68 58 63 — 1 

StL Cem A 100 $25 25 25 

Sandwell A 100 $11* 11* 11* 

Sceptre 20600 $14* 13* 14 ♦ * 

Sceptre w 4400 $7 6* 7 ♦ . 

Schneid 300 $16* 16* 16* ♦ ' < 


Stand I A 100 $8* 8* 8". 

Steep R 490 435 435 435 ♦ 5 

Sieinbg Inc 445 $21 71 21-1 

stmbg 195 200 $19* 19 19 - ", 

StelCO A 52174 $34* 34 34* ♦ V. 

stelco C p 23855 $27 26*.26* ♦ * 

Stcrystm 5500 360 350 350 - 5 

Sler Trust x2S $13* 13* 13* 

Sud C 113525 IS* 5 5* ♦ v, 

Sulpetro B 31205 $26* 24* 25* ♦ * 

Sulpetro 7 pi3700 $24 * 23* 24* ♦ * 

Sul Ivan 700 340 330 340 ♦lO 

Sunbrst E 26300 82 77 77 - 3 

Suncor pr 5100 $27* 27* 27V, 
Talcorp A 300 $8* 8* 8* ♦ '/« 

Teck Cor A 1610 $19* 19 19* 

Teck Cor B 35473 $18". IT 1 * 18 ♦ * 
Tel Metr 8 700 $23* 23* 23* - * 

idedvne 700 $10* 10 10* ♦ * 

Tex Can 5964 5117* 116 116 -', 
Texaco pr 23 $220 220 220 ♦ 4 

Txsglf 11681 $50* 48* 50". ♦2". 
Thom L 1000 150 135 135 -20 
Thom N A 42201 $18 17* 17* - * 

Tombill 1500 1 54 151 151 -3 
Tordom 400 $26 25* 25* 

Toromonf 361 360 360 360 -10 
Tor Dm Bk 21799 $32". 31* 31* ♦ * 
TD Rlty p 700 $20", 20", 70* ♦ * 
Tor star B 73929 $26 25* 26 ♦ ", 

Total Pet 8740 $28* 27* 27* - * 
Total PA p 95$ $48* 48 48 -1* 

Toll Pet w 3200 $17 16* 16*- * 

Traders A 10840 $15* 15 15* ♦ ", 

Traders 5 p z7S $19* 19* 19* 

Tr Can Res 15100 $7 6* 6*—* 

Trns Ml 9998 $13* 13", 13",- * 
Trns Wst 7210 $7* 7* 7* - ' ■ 

TrCan PL 95910 $25* 24 * 24*-', 
TrCan B pr 400 $32", 32* 32* — * 

Tricentrol 3855 $20* 19". 19".-* 

Trimac 5300 $78 27", 27*-'. 

Trimac wf 3 600 $24", 24* 24',- ", 

Trin Chib 25500 50 43 49 ♦ S 

Trinity Res 19425 $15* 15* 15* ♦ * 
Trizec Crp 190 $33 * 33". 33".- * 
TruWalf 300 110 110 110 

Turbo Cl A 2263 $28* 27* 27*--* 
Turbo Cl B 5197 $78 78 78 

Turbo 8 * 5400 $32 31* 31* ♦ '.« 

Turbo w 2125 $21* 21* 21*- * 

Ulster Pet 14941 $6* 6* 6*-Vi 

Unico A *70 $5* 5* 5* 

Un Carbid 600 $29 29 29 

UGdS A 12484 $11* 11* 11",- * 

UGas 5* 300 $30". 30* 30* ♦ 2 

UGas 8* 901 $25", 25 25", ♦ ", 

Union Oil 600 $41* 41 41 - * 

Un Asbstos 560 $5", 5", 5", 

U Cans© 1819 $23* 22". 22* - 1 

Un Corp 600 $28* 78* 28* ♦ * 

un Fn Mgt 300 450 450 450 -10 

U Keno 4510 441* 38* 41* ♦!* 
Un Reef P 7100 92 90 90 -9 

U Siscoe 5900 $20* 20 20* - ' • 

un Tire 7p 9700 225 225 225 - S 

UW OG 7000 4Q0 400 400 

VGM Trsco 30? $7* 7* 7*-". 

verstl Cor 4850 $16* 16* 16* ♦ * 

Verstl Cor p 1350 $14 13* 14 ♦ * 

Verstl wt 2 78550 $6': 6* 6* 

Vestgron 1700 $17 la* 16*- ’• 

Villcentre 35500 $10 9* 10 

Vulcan Ind 3620 $73", 22". 22".-I* 
Wainoco O 500 $36 36 36 

Waiax A 5770 $20 20 20 ♦ * 

Wlkr C HM286 $78* 27* 28 ♦ * 

Wlkr Con 9 TOO $37 37 37 ♦1* 

Wlk C 7* 34470 $27* 27 27* ♦ * 

Wal Redkp 100 $6 6 6 

19400 $6* 5>. 

300 -$8': 8" 

36600 no 


fight inflation and major 
oil companies reported an¬ 
other round of large profit 
increases. 

Exxon, the largest in¬ 
dustrial company in the 
United States reported it 
earned $1.03 billion in the 
second quarter, up 24 per 
cent over the same quarter 
of 1979. So far this year, 
Exxon has earned $2.96 bil¬ 
lion. 

The gain was not as im¬ 
pressive as the leap of 
more than 100 per cent re¬ 
corded in the first quarter, 
and was below some Wall 
Street estimates. 

The Federal Reserve in¬ 
tervened in the federal 
funds market in a move 
that was interpreted to 
mean it has not decided to 
ease monetary policy. That 
action sent interest rates in 
the bond market up. 

ACTIVE STOCKS 


Stock prices rose briskly 
early Tuesday, partly be¬ 
cause a report issued after 
the market closed Monday, 
had shown short interest at 
a record. Persons who have 
sold stock short — that is 
sold stock they do not own 
— must eventually buy 
stock to cover their short 
positions. But the rally 
ended after lunch. 

The NYSE composite 
index dropped .16 to 69.91. 


Alcan 
Alcoa 
Aid Chem 
AlChlm 
Am Air 
Am Brnd 
Am Beast 
Am Can 
Am El P 
Am Motor 
Am Tel T 
Ampex 
Asarco 
Ashland 
All Rich 
AvCO 
Avon 
Bell How 
Bendix 
Beth St 
Boeing 
Boise Cas 
Borden 
BorgW 
Brl My 
Brunswk 
Burl Ind 
Burl Nor 
Burroughs 
Caterpill 
Col Beast 
Celanese 
Chase M 
Chessie 
Chrysler 
CleveEl 
Coca-Cola 
Col-Palm 
Comsat 


QUOTATIONS 

»* Inlands! 
66* IBM 
51* Ini Harv 
27* INCO 
8* Int Paper 
80* ITT 
30* Johns-Man 
31* Kaiser Al 
10* Kennecott 
5 Kraftco 
52* LTV 
24* Litton 
40* Lockheed 
36* McDDoug 
<7* McLean 
23* Merck 
38* MerLvn 
28* Minn MM 
48 Mo Pac 
25* Mobil 
39* Monsanto 
39'/. Motorola 
25* NCR Corp 
37 Natomas 
44* Newmont 
12* Nort Sim 
21* NwestEn 
40 Owen III 
64* Pac Gas 
58". Pan Am 
51* Pan El P 
52* PeopEn 
45* PepsiCo 
36 Phil El 
6* Phil Morr 
16* Phil Pete 
35", Pit Bowes 
15". Polaroid 


30-. 
65* 
31", 
23 


23", 

30', 

45* 

12 * 

56* 

31* 

35", 


57 

69 

76* 

54 

55* 


Slock 

Sales Close Ch'ge 

Con Frt 

75* 

EngMnCh 

652100 

'36* ♦!* 

Con Nat G 

43* 

IBM 

553000 

65* - '. 

Cont-Data 

61 

Sony Corp 

578100 

10 - * 

Con Ed 

25* 

CocaCola 

519900 

35* ♦ * 

Cont Oil 


East Kodak 

505300 

58". ♦!* 

Crown Ck 

30": 

Boeing 

492700 

39*-1 

Crown Zell 

4>* 

Texaco Inc 

485500 

38 ♦ '. 

Della Air 

47* 

PepsiCo 

457100 

24". ♦ ". 

Disney W 

50'. 

McDonn Dg 

449300 

35* ♦ * 

Digital E 

77* 

DowChcm 

410600 

35 ♦ 1 

Dow Chcm 

35 

Mobil 

363100 

76'. -1". 

du Pont 

44': 

AlcanAlum 

356100 

3?’. ♦ 

East Air 

ID". 

CharterCo 

354400 

19* ♦ * 

East Kod 

58’'. 

City invest 

345300 

26'. 

El Paso 

20* 

FordMot 

330800 

28". - >. 

Exxon 

71* 


Schneid p B 320 $16 
Scintrex 1200 $7* 
Scot Paper 13500 $17". 
Scot York 5600 


BCPh 6 80 zl00 $18 18 

BCP 10 16 p 100 $27 
Bribl Reef 30200 734 


Brunswk 
Budd Can 


16300 $14-- 13* 
865 $6* 6* 


18 

77 ♦ - 

133 ♦ ] 

14 ♦ - 

6 * ♦ 


CAE 18270 $20* 19* 20* ♦ * 

CIL 960 $26", 26* 26". ♦ * 

CME Res 9160 335 330 335 -5 
CMS Mines 2000 110 110 110 
Cad Fry 33221 $24* 23 24* .1* 

Cad Fry A 642 $9 8* 9 ♦ * 

Vancouver 

VANCOUVER (CP) — 
Prices were down in active 
trading Tuesday on the 
Vancouver Slock Ex¬ 
change. Volume was 3,779,- 
171. 

Of stocks traded, 133 ad 
vaneed, 207 declined and 
203 remained unchanged. 

B.C. Resources Invest¬ 
ment Corp. led trading in 
the industrials and gained 
.10 to $6(4 on 66,913 shares. 
Daon Development Corp. 
advanced '/, to $10% on 3,- 
200 . 

Copper Lake Explora¬ 
tions led resource and de¬ 
velopment board traders 
and dropped .03 to $1.70 on 
157,300 shares. Suncxeo 
Energy gained .06 to $2.36 
on 72,100. 

< <* 

Complete tabulation of Tuesday 
transactions Quotations in cents un¬ 
less marked $ Net change Is from 
previous close of same lot type. 

Net 

Stock Sales High Low Close Ch’ge 


Dalco Pet 7800 $9-i 
Daon D 102736 $10", 

Daon A 100 $7' 

Daon 8* p 2400 $8 

Daon 9V, p 200 $8' 

Deiour 139863 155 
D Eldona 22000 242 


8 - 

8 * 


Delhi Pac 

Denison 

Dicknsn 

Digtech 

Discovry 


8 

8 ". 

151 151 

235 236 -4 

6500 96 93 93 -1 

16558 $46* 46". 46* 

16925 $17* 16* 17* ♦ 1 

2000 $9* 9* 9*-’ 

9400 210 204 207 ♦ 4 


Inco 

tnco ^.OS 
Irtdal 
Intercity 
Inter C B p 
IBM 

Int Mooul 
Inti Thom 


63535 $26* 26* 26* 

1340 $22* 22* 22* 

8800 $14* 14* 14', « 

5230 $17* 17 17*4 

ZS0 $17 17 17 

983 $76 76 

2500 $9* 

3700 $9* 


76 


intpr Pipe 24544 $18* 17* 18* < 


ipsco 
Inv Grp A 
Iron Bay T 


6574 $32 31* 32 

100 $18* 18* 18* 
300 $6* 6* 6", 


Nnor 
Nick Rim 
Noble M 
Nor Acme 
Noranda 
Norbaska 
Norcen 
Norcen B 
Norcn 288 
Nor lex 
Normick F 
N Canada 


162000 44 39 

10600 48 47 

300 165 160 


17700 

75943 

4500 

58258 

225 

2575 

54500 


160 


-15 


145 138 145 . - 

$28". 27* 28". ♦ f 
75 75 75 

$35* 35* 35* — 
$20 20 20 
$63", 63", 63* 

43 35 39 ♦ 4 

800 $7* 7* 7* ♦ * 
>000 100 100 100 ♦ 5 


Seagram 
Seaway pr 
Selkirk A 
Shaw Ind 
Shell Can 
Sherritt 
Sigma 
Silvana Mn 3900 
Silvmq 
Silverwd A 
S Sears A 
S Sears B 
Sklar M 
Skye Res 


16 16 
7* 7* - ' 
47 17* ♦ ' 

6* 6* 7 ♦ 1 

64* 64* 

6* 6* 

26 27 el* 

15 15 


26130 $64* 

ISO $6* 

614 $27 
11400 $15". 

20681 $35* 35* 35* . 

49387 $13", 13 13* . 

250 $39". 39 39* ♦ ’ 

$6* 5* 6 
23500 54 51 54 ♦ 3 

300 $14", 14", 14", - ’ 

2102 $ 8 ". 8 ". 8 * 

156 $8". -8". 8* ♦ ' 

1000 238 735 238 .12 
19800 $15". 14* 14* — ' 


Wardair 
Warn Can 
Wrlntn 
Weldwod 
Wstburne 
Wcoast Pi 
Wcoast T 
w Cost w 
westeel 
West Mine 
Westfield 
Weston 
Wstn 4' :p 
Whonok A 
Wilanour 
Wlteo 
Willrov 
Windfall 
Woodreef 
Woodwd A 
Wr Harg 
Yk Bear 
Y La mb ton 
Zellers A 

BBC R un 
BM Rt un 
C Perm un 
C Realty u 
TD Realtv 


2152 $24 24 

900 $35* 35 
6100 $27* 27’ 
14570 $14* 14 
5622 $5* 5 
100 $40". 40 
7725 $20' 

2100 370 
2581 $26 
205 $57 
49704 $13 
2300 


6* ♦ * 
8 *- * 
106 

74 - * 
35", ♦ * 
27* ♦ * 
14*- * 
5 - * 
40" 


London 

LONDON (CP) - Closing stock quo¬ 
tations Tuesday in new pence unless 
pounds or U.S. dollars are indicated. 
Associated Brit Foods 107; Babcock 
and Wilcox 92; Bass Charrington 232; 
BICC 134; Blyvoors $16 9-16; BOC In 
ternaflonal 80 Boots 214; Bowater 
180; Brit Am Tob 283, Brit Assets Trust 
93; Brit Petroleum 346; Broken Hill 
Prop 760; Buffels $41; Burmah Oil 204, 
Canadian Pac £15*. Charter Cons 223; 
Cons Gold 526, Courtaulds 68; Do 
Beers 10 1-16; Distillers 209, Dunlop 
79; F.S. Geduld $63; Gen Elec 474; 
Glaxo 224, Grand Metropolitan Hotels 
157, Gr Un Stores A 444; (Toest Keen 
25*, Hawker Siddeley 232, Hoover A 
162; ICI 374; Imp Tob 81, inti Thomson 
337, Kloof $32'/.; Marks and Spencer 96 
Minorco 332. Metal Box 306. Philips 
383; Pilkington Bros 253. Plessey 215. 
Rank A 184. Rio Tlnto Zinc 475 Roan 
Consol 180; Sel Trust £12 5-16. Second 
Scott Inv 117',; Shell T and T 426 
Tanganyika 334, Thorn EMI 318. 
Trusthouse 193; Tube Investments 
282; Ultramar 342, Unilever 508. Vaals 
$73".; Vickers 144; Western Driefon 
tem $85. Western Deep Level 153; West 
Mines 257; W Holding $73'/.; Wool 
worth 60; Zambian Copper 33 Bonds 
Brit Trans £63*. Brit Cons 2", £22*. 
Treasury 8", £94'/,; War Loan £33* 
The Financial Times industrial index 
486 7, off 9.3. 


Fairchild 
Firesione 
Ford 
Gam Sko 
Gen Dvn 
Gen El 
Gen Food 
Gen Mot 
G Tel El 
Gen Tire 
Ga Pac 
Gillette 
Goodyear 
Greyhound 
Gull Oil 
Hilton 
Homeslake 
Honeywell 
Houston 


Repub St 
Reyn I 
Revlon 
Rockwell 
Scott Pap 
Sea Cstle 
Sears 
Seatram 
Shell . 
Singer 
Sony 
So Cal E 
South Pac 
Sperry 

r/'i Stand Cat 
J* £un Oil 
78 « Teledvne 
42 Telex 
74* Texaco 
54* Tex Gulf 
30* TWC 
4’* UnCarb 
27* un Pac 
17* un Brd 
30 un Oil 
27 UAL Inc 
>5* U.S. Steel 
17 Wesl Air 
43* Weslqhse 
37 weverhv 
64* wometco 
89* WOO) worth 

29* Xerox 
Zenith 

BOX SCORE 


Issues traded 
Advances 
Declines 
Unchanged 


Tues. 

1922 

760 

763 

399 


46* 

37 

25* 

76* 

70* 

25 

74 

37* 

50* 


10 

25* 

38 

52* 

79 

40 . 

153 

3* 

38 

43* 

15* 

46* 

50* 

13* 

55 


74* 

36* 


57* 

12 * 


Mon 

!9?0 


Gold 


19* 19*- 
360 370 
25* 25*- 
56* 57 r 
12", 12* r 
6 * 


Silver 


44300 110 101 105 

17200 $9* 8* 9*a* 
22900 218 211 218 ♦ 1 

9700 59 57 57 ♦ 2 

z50 $25* 25* -25* 

500 4?5 42S 425 ♦ 5 

4965 $13 17* 12* 

100 160 160 160 ♦ 5 

977 $10* 10* 10", 
Trust Units 
400 114 14 

2170 $9", 9* 

1055 $7* 7* 

600 $6* 6 
555 $24* 24" 


Closing basic price ot l.OOOounce 
certificates in the Victoria area, ac¬ 
cording to the Scotiabank, $16.00 U S. 
bid per trov ounce and $16.40 asked. 
PrgviousdavllS 50gpfl$lS.9Q 


LONDON (AP) - Closing gold 
priQgs Tuesday, in U.S. dollars a trov 
ounce London 617.00; Pans 618.51. 
Frankfurt 612.50; Zurich 613.50; Hong 
Kong closed. 


C MATTHEWS AGENCIES^ 


SHELVING 
STORE FIXTURES 


V 388-4123 J 


14 

9* r 
7* < 


24". 


* 


Aaron 
Abclla 
Action 
Aieta 
Allex 
Arm a 
Am Flnl 
Am Pyd 


8500 
2300 
3800 
5000 
7100 
71200 
13350 
1400 335 


145 140 140 -10 

100 100 100 

125 m 120 

380 365 380 

575 545 555 - 10 

335 335 -$ 


Cmwl 
Con Am 
C Bound 
C Cinola 
C Five St 
Csf 

C S Butte 
C S Rdgc 
C Trn Col 
Con Sv 
Cop Got 
Cop Lafc 
Coralta 
Cornwl 
Corprte 
Cosmos 
Covnex 
Cream 
Cusac 
Dankoe 
Damsc 
David 
Davnpt 
Dlt pet 
DPP 
Dly vrd 
Dora 
Dorado 
Dual res 
Dusty M 
Eagle R 
Erlv Brd 
El Coco 
EOx 
Enex 
Entrpr 
Equity si 
Eurocn 
Forum 
Futurty 
Galvstn 
Gnl Egy 
Giant Ex 
Glamis 
Global 
GokJbtt , 
G Gate 
Golex 
Gowga 
G N Pete 
Get Pac 
Gmwd 
Grndst 
Grove 


2000 55 
4000 70 
7300 85 
200 $12 


66 TD 
85 85 

12 12 


MOO 770 265 270 
100 755 255 255 
3500 40 37 37 

600 120 120 120 


-2 
— * 


5500 ' 42 
7900 710 
5800 255 250 


157300 175 155 170 -5 


7736 625 600 

10100 490 480 

1300 ISO ISO 

5600 90 85 

500 177 127 


610 
490 
150 
90 
127 

7700 117 11? 116 

400 585 5 70 585 

500 295 295 295 

46500 95 81 92 


4700 810 
3167 55 


6800 180 175 175 
3147 440 475 435 


♦ I 

♦ 10 
♦ 15 


Mosqto 
Mtn Slat 
Mtneer 
Mndee 
Musto E 
Mutual 
Nw Gth a 
Nesbitt 
N Aston 
N Cinch 
Newest 
N Frontr 
Newhk 
N Minex 
N Scope 
New tye 
Ni Cal 
No 6 Mot 
Norco 
Norex 
Nortefc 
Nthair 
Nth Hart 
Nth Sth 
NW Vent 
NRD Mn 


6600 500 480 500 ♦ 25 

100 $10* 10* 10*- * 
8500 48 4 5 48 

100 100 
119 119 
85 85 


1000 119 
1500 95 


♦ 1 


400 190 190 


500 120 17* 120 

3700 135 131 135 4 4 

8700 760 245 245 -5 

28400 193 179 180 —11 

13350 480 460 470 -10 

2500 105 100 100 

4400 260 740 260 ♦TO 

1800 140 135 140 


z300 75 
2300 $12 


75 75 

11 * 11 *- 
75 75 

8000 425 410 425 


17 


2000 76 

3400 $12* 17 
5835 525 495 510 - 20 

2000 45 43 45 4l 

3900 455 450 455 -10 
4100 140 139 139 -1 

2450 450 420 470 


Temagi 
Terato 
Terra 
Thor Ex 
Thnrwd 
Tintlna 
Tor non . 
Trnscl~ 
Trident 
Tri Powr 
Tri Star 
TRV Mn 
Tundra 
70th Cep 
UCbrge 
U Fortne 
U Herne 
U Wstld 
Valiev 
vat Pete 
ventra 
Veronx 
Vestor 
Wasp 
Wkm N 
W Warnr 


Amark x 1000 720 


21500 

180 

in 

170 

-10 

Amore 

5000 

120 

7450 

795 

765 

790 

- 5 

Arbor 

3500 

170 

400 

305 

300 

300 

-10 

Aea 

.3000 

95 

51900 

126 

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125 

♦ 5 

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1000 

105 

11100 

37S 

365 

375 

♦ 5 

Anzako 

10000 

48 

4800 

335 

335 

335 


ARK 

6700 

76! 

2540 

365 

350 

350 

-20 

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500 

141 

2500 

176 

176 

176 

•-78 

ARY 

17500 

110 

500 

320 

320 

320 


Ashcrft 

6400 

355 

2000 

315 

310 

310 

-5 

Aurus 

500 

70 


3000 43 
>500 $12 


43 


162 -3 


11 * 11 ? 

19500 1025 900 990 - 35 
108 $23 23 73 

3300 120 170 120 

3500 165 162 

7200 160 150 150 —10 

2000 98 95 95 —4 

1000 125 125 125 -10 

3500 230 225 230 

7000 270 264 270 +5 


9400 

155 

148 

150 

-10 

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500 

$9* 

9* 

9". 

— * 

Wstfort 

5000 

790 

775 

77S 

9500 

70 

65 

67 

-3 

Nuspar 

67000 

58 

S3 

57 

♦ 4 

Wgroth 

5100 

495 

490 

490 

3200 

91 

90 

90 


Ohio 

KJ000 

146 

145 

145 


Westly 

2600 

375 

375 

375 

2900 

550 

550 

550 

- IS 

O'Lori 

16000 

29 

28 

29 

♦ 1 

Wsfmnt 

8500 

800 

775 

795 

4550 

170 

160 

165 


Omni ' 

11400 

265 

255 

255 

-5 

Wward 

1500. 

380 

355 

360 

9000 

29 

27 

27 

♦ 1 

Osec A 

9300 

180 

175 

175 

-5 

Wharl 

10700 

750 

740 

750 

1800 

$8 

8 

8 

♦ * 

P Cassar 

200 

205 

205 

205 


Wndmil 

1000 

130 

127 

130 

1200 

335 

335 

335 

-15 

P Cst Ind 

1000 

41 

41 

41 

—2 

Ykn Rev 

3500 

85 

B0 

80 

11200 

170 

160 

165 


P cypres 

28040 

445 

420 

425 

-25 

Zenith 

25700 

126 

120 

121 

WOO 

150 

150 

ISO 


P Foam 

600 

100 

100 

IM 

-10 

Zenore 

7000 

65 

60 

60 

2200 

$32* 

32 

3? 


P Ai ht-r 

8000 

40 

39 

40 


Zone 

11300 

250 

250 

250 

25700 

340 

330 

330 

♦ 10 

. P Arctic 

3400 

225 

225 

725 


Warrants 

and 

Rights 

2400 

118 

115 

118 


-iParagn 

4600 

190 

180 

180 

—5 

Amfto w 

8100 

45 

45 

45 

1000 

40 

40 

40 


Pegsus 

3300 

725 

700 

725 

♦ IS 

Argo w 

1000 

84 

84 

84 

7200 

760 

260 

.'(Vi 


Pen wst 

8900 

730 

225 

225 

-5 

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14300 

30 

79 

29 

19200 

570 

550 

550 


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9900 

144 

135 

135 


Bia w a 

600 

15 

15 

IS 

15439 

ITS 

163 


-7 

Pepoa 

500 

ss 

55 

55 


Bee w 

13000 

70 

20 

20 

100 

230 

230 

23u 

♦ 5 

Perry R 

3600 

95 

90 

90 

-5 

Cni w 

30500 

9 

6 

9 

28300 

93 

89 

90 


Piper 

7500 

570 

560 

570 


Cobre w 

4000 

30 

30 

30 

500 

786 

786 

286 

—4 

Plains 

12250 

180 

170 

ITS 


Cow w 

8900 

88 

85 

85 

6000 

155 

150 

150 


Prare pc 

970 

380 

380 

380 


Enex w 

6000 

12 

11 

1? 

77500 

90 

77 

M 

♦ 9 

Princss 

10300 

31 

25 

25 

-5 

Ete w 

7500 

6 

6 

6 

11750 

80 

75 

80 

♦ 5 

Prism 

ZtO 

420 

470 

470 


Grnwd w 

11300 

60 

58 

60 

1000 

70 

7t) 

70 

♦ 3 

Pyx exp 

17904 

129 

122 

172 

♦ 7 

Ibr w 

5500 

65 

60 

60 

1500 

185 

175 

185 

♦ S 

Qumtk 

500 

$6* 

6* 

1 6* 

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7800 

11 

11 

11 

37300 

415 

395 

415 

♦ 5 

Quins tr 

9400 

290 

275 

780 


Lib w b 

13700 

10 

10 

10 

71926 

197 

183 

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-17 

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2200 

355 

350 

350 


Lion w 

5000 

1? 

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1? 


18400 365 330 355 


70 69 69 -I 


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7900 

390 350 

370 

-20 

Hatlmfc 

1800 

72 

72 

72 

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30100 

179 

168 

168 

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Pn ach w 

4000 7 

7 

7 

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J400 

$10 10 

10 

— * 

Hecate 

4000 

M)1 

100 

100 


Reef 

9000 

545 

540 

540 

- 15 

Par w 

1500 16 

16 

16 

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14700 

89 87 

85 

—1 

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3300 

177 

170 

170 

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690 

IX 

IX 

IX 


Pwl w 

7900 50 

50 

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'Anglo Bo 

11900 

365 355 

265 



7700 

115 

181 

111 


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235 

715 

220 


Reel m 

73000 X 

X 

38 —2 

Arcdia 

7/000 

70 60 

70 

♦6 

MOSt 

too 

IS 

130 

130 


Rimrcfc 

3500 

32 

X 

32 


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sew i2 

12 

12 

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7700 

$1 7* 

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3800 

120 

115 

170 

♦2 

Rio Plat 

2500 

112 

IX 

IX 

—2 

Svr Cf w 

5300 10 

W 

N —2 

Argyll 

7000 

305 305 

305 

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1000 

90 

86 

90 

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RiJbv T 

2500 

92 

91 

9? 

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15700 10 

i 

10 

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3700 

690 6U 

690 


Initial 

SI 

W 

30 

70 


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MW 

35 

35 

35 


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3000 25 

25 

25 

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saw 

595 585 

590 

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Int Balfr 

wo 

■5 

385 

385 

♦5 

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WOO 

65 

65 

65 

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1200 31 

31 

31 ♦ * 

Avtno 

13500 

700 190 

200 

♦5 

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57300 

713 

70S 

285 

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Ronrco 

4200 

248 

335 

335 


Uwr w 

79300 99 

.94 

95 -5 

Azure 

7000 

76 76 

76 


Inti mak 

580 

155 

155 

155 

—4 

Rosmc 

1)00 

IS 

137 

138 


vnt w 

5000 7 

7 

7 -1 

Banner 

’6W 

445 475 

440 

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1 Shasta 

6400 

IS 

148 

IS 

♦5 

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ww 

75 

75 

75 


Wim wt d 

15600 5 


5 

Barrier 

7000 

90 90 

90 

♦ 3 

1 Stndrd 

saw 

IW 

WO 

WO 


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48W 

86 

06 

•6 


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*000 is 

14 

14 -1 

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7300 

160 155 

155 

—5 

Inv* Res 

18300 

U6 

WO 

165 

-5 

St ehas 

3100 

9 

53 

9 


Zenor w 

uew 12 

11 

12 

Btmorl 

7650 

$24 73* 

23* 

- * 

lona Svr 

4W0 

378 

268 

265 


Saxton 

S3W 

662 

650 

69 

♦ W 


INDUSTRIALS 


Benson 

20000 

37 16 

36 

♦ 1 

Jet Star 

MM 

241 

248 

240 

-5 

Scart 


49 

425 

435 

—5 

Baico 

1300 $7 

67. 

7 

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8200 

XU TOT' 

700 

—5 

Joy Ind 

6175 

265 

250 

265 


Scathe 

TWO 

745 

735 

735 

— s 

BCFP 

15W $14* 

14* 

w* 

Bianca 

"W0 

275 260 


-15 

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'U 

9 

9 

9 


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155W 

tw 

U» 

177 

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BCRIC 

4691$ 69 

627 

650 * W 

Htk Dmd 

3880 

WO WO 

WO 

-W 

Kamad 

3000 

136 

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IS 

-4 

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55W 

46 

45 

44 

—1 

BCT 6 pf 

•5 16J* 

41* 

63*3 

eWdme 

m 

725 725 

275 

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715S 

2W 

770 

2W 

♦ IS 

Saatu 


85 

85 

85 


Buck h 

TWO IX 

IX 

IX 

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woo 

97 97 

97 

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Karin Ik 

7800 

78 

40 

30 

♦5 

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WO 

we 

Kit 

we 

♦2 

Cdn jvtn 

1224 MS 

145 

US 

Btv sky 

16)0 

$12* 12* 

17* 

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F4«th 

54280 

72 

46 

44 

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6580 

9 

IS 

9 


Cantor 

TOO 9* 

S* 

5* 

B6, pr a 

7350 

$17. It* 

1I-. 


Kent E 

TOOL 

66 

64 

64 

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Shatter 

SOOC 

715 

TW 

m 


Daon 

53W SW* 

w 

w* ♦ * 

Brent 

5050 

$» , •* 

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♦ * 

Ktondx 

380 

IW 

IW 

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5Me4d 


N8 

ITS 

IK 

♦4 

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WW S34 

24 

34 

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1WM 

75 W 

W 

—4 

KMbby 

WOO 

255 

79 

750 

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5IW0 

3M 

7W 

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aw tw 

m 

115 .5 

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WM 

85 II 

15 

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L4CO 

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wt 

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no 

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325 


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55 

9 -1 

Hr Oev 

7S4BB 

980 165 

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LJMCO 

■80 

64 

46 

66 

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62W 

xjo 

315 

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WW 623* 

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till 

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nw 

756 

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tWI 29 

225 

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two 

26 26 

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I38W 

340 

275 

235 


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a 5 775 

775 

275 

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ww 

88 

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IJW 735 

275 

275 *15 

(dn punr 

wo 

665 , 465 

445 

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l/l 

155 

155 

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834 

26 

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110 M? 

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130 

125 

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235 

29 

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w 

51 SI 

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ww 

446 

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648 

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466 410 

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4WB 

448 

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74 74 

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645 

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ww 

m 

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Avlnch 

Avance 

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Banbry 

Bnqwst 

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Belmnl 

Bencrp 

BED 

Bmc oil 

Bonevil 

Bounty 

Brandy 

Br S llbk 

Bro res I 

Bronsn 

Brx min 

Bur Gld 

Cal Dvn 

Calor 

Cmron 

Cannon 

Car me 

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Cascda 

Casia pt 

Catalna 

Cathdrl 

Cherkc 

(.hoper 

Clear 

Cleaver 

Cold Lk 

C Reach 

Cont Mrl 

Cod 

Cor vet 

Crescnt 

Cumo 

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Denvr 

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Donegt 

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Eaglet 

Eaton 

Egaiite 

EMor 

Elecfra 

El paso 

Erl Res 

Eskimo 

Excl.br 

FarraN 

Fletwd 

Fury 


80 80 

46 46 -3 

8 5 86 -4 

73 73 +8 

105 M3 -2 

95 95 

63 
75 


20000 26S 
7000 61 
3100 250 
500 73 
1500 30 
4000 70 

76S0 175 
500 68 
3600 135 
7000 155 
S000 49 
1000 80 
3000 183 
400 .540 
3000 80 
4500 47 
12500 90 
1500 74 
1500 113 
1000 95 
4500 63 
6300 75 
7000 47 
2500 74 
1000 67 
5000 44 
1900 330 
7000 57 
7500 55 
5000 75 
1400 170 
26000 40 30 40 

500 85 85 85 

z300 43 43 43 

1500 130 130 130 
49300 145 135 135 
28100 165 160 164 
9400 ITS 
9900 790 
4500 70 
500 780 
1200 110 
17000 50 
5500 55 
4300 105 
3600 430 
13000 400 
700 110 
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74900 169 
3000 75 
US 


200 

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2000 

59 

■ 

59 

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115 

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Mma 

7000 

175 

175 

175 

-10 

169 

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Mckmv 

1500 

84 

84 

84 


94 


Mecca 

5000 

58 

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V) 

-10 

101 

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Merldn 

7700 

85 

SO 

M 

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48 


Moly Mit 

1600 

80 

71 

71 

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760 


NCA Mrl 

5816 

IX 

136 

138 

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141 

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500 

55 

55 

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107 

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3600 

135 

137 

137 

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350 

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Nlthex X 

7000 

67 

67 

67 

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20 


Ntn engy 

1000 

89 

1 

89 

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255 

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• 1000 

50 

50 

so 

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Northil 

1000 

50 

50 

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♦ 1 

750 

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13000 

80 

70 

70 

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73 


Nu lady g 

10500 

ISO 

IX 

IX 


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Oliver 

10000 

83 

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80 

-5 

68 

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1000 

60 

60 

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169 

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Oriana 

13500 

27 

76 

26 


68 


Paliv 

5200 

205 

200 

205 

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135 

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Paa 

5100 

150 

135 

IX 

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155 

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Panthr 

4000 

75 

75 

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48 

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Pnglv 

7300 

60 

60 

60 


80 


Penn E 

5700 

470 

400 

400 

-15 

175 

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Philco 

7300 

55 

55 

55 


540 

♦ IS 

Phoenx 

500 

60 

60 

60 



Pico 

Ppi 

Pistol 

Ponev 

Psidn 

Pdf 


7500 70 66 
75700 263 75S 
72900 105 100 
19000 75 77 
14400 150 145 
13500 68 


70 

255 -5 


NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS 

Due to the recent fire 
our Yates Street store 
is closed. 

We invite you to come to our Distri¬ 
bution Centre at 770 Spruce Street 
for all your office needs. 

We re just off Douglas Street, ©ext to 
Imperial Building Supplies. 




6 & D 


388-5164 

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00 
and for your convenience 
Sat: 9:30-5:00 

COMMERCIAL 
STATIONERS (1975) LTD 

770 Spruce Street. 388-5164 


47 47 

74 74 


320 320 
57 57 

51 51 

74 74 

120 120 


780 780 
110 110 
45 47 

55 55 

WO 100 
385 390 
385 400 
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3800 

275 

265 

265 

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10000 

119 

116 

119 

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Rado 

2000 

220 

215 

770 

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3900 

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115 

115 

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17500 

40 

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7500 

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3300 

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7500 

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4500 

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500 

35 

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7000 

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Roanke 

3000 

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500 

75 

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Sahqua 

1000 

65 

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Samsn 

2000 

64 

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San Ant 

800 

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3500 

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5000 

480 

435 

435 

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Scheer 

3200 

IX 

145 

145 

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Sew 

WO 

IX 

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Sevmor 

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11 

81 

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Siboia 

1000 

47 

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Sienna 

6800 

106 

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100 



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21500 

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Ssv 

2500 

95 

95 

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1000 

56 

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6000 

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70 

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W 

57 

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US 

'71 


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WW 

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>45 

4‘ 


etd w 

48W 

X 

V 

77 

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ab 

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Gate 0 t 

WW 

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-4 

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Ml 

4 

6 

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345 

2X 

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Liuv w 

ww 

>; 

1? 

77 

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—4 

Mavrw 

Ml 

tr 

17 

tr 

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x 


Mra m 

WOW 

W* 

It 

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9 

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el 

Cm • 

Ml 

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Rwgulor C«nificataa 

C.th.bl. Certificates 

1 year 

10 3 / 4 % 

10 1/4% 

2 years 

111 / 4 % 

10 1/4% 

3 years 

111 / 2 % 

10 1/4% 

4 • 5 years 

11 3/4% 

10 1/4% 

6 years 

10 1/4% 

9 3/4% 

7 20 years 

9 3/4% 

9 1 /4% 


Above rates are for certificates where interest is 
paid annually. $1,000 minimum Cashable 
certificates can be cashed at any time at 
reduced rates Semi-annual and monthly interest 
is available at 1/4*/« less than the above rates 
Monthly interest is reduced a further 1/4% on 
amounts less than $10,000 
Ail rates subject to change without notice 


Canada Trust 


Cl 


View at Broad 

(Mon - Tnur* 8 30 to 4 30 Fnto 


C , 































BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1080 


Institute 


Mutual 

funds 

TORONTO <CP>—Recent prices ot 
investment funds supplied by The in¬ 
vestment Funds Institute of Canada 
Tuesday. They are the nef asset value 
per share or unit (NAVPSI last circu 
lated by the fund in accordance with Its 
pricing practice as contained in the 
prospectus of the fund, n—no sales 
charge. * — U.S. Fund, y — delayed 
NAVPS. xd—ex-dividend. 

Universal Croup 
fcquity 1511 
Income 4.42 
Infematnl 497 
Resource 8.55 
Non Members 
vnAltamira Fd 6.51 
Assoc Inv 9.61 
vBeaucanagx 6.60 
Canapex Gr 
yHypolhed 10.04 
vObligatns 8.97 
Capital Grth 5.67 
xChasc 824 

ynComCp Mtg 9.66 
Coop Tnist Gr 
vnCoop Fnd 14.73 
vnLandmk 18.70 
Oesiardins Gr 
vActions 12.71 
v Hypothec 4.19 
vlnlematnl 10.06 
yOblioatns 4.67 
vQuebec 618 
nySpec 889 
Dixon Krog Gr 
Dixon. Krog 17.30 
Heritage 460 
vanguard 13.07 
vDomeoultv 17 19 
vDomln Comp 13.50 
Dreyfus Group 
vine 14.96 

vlnlematnl 22.09 
nExecutv Inti 1 22 
nFst Cdn Mtg 10 II 
Fiscon Fund 6 22 
Harvard 13.51 
Industrial Gr 
Indust Amcr 3 48 
Indust Div 726 
Indust Eq 1137 
Indust Gtb 7.26 
Indust Incom 8 81 
Indust Pens 32.46 
Keystone Gr 
xCus K? 6 37 

xCus S I 19 39 

xCus S 4 8 04 

xlex Rsrch 18 37 

xManhatn 3,76 
yMaritime Eq 400 
Marlborough 1007 
nNatrusco 21.81 
NW Group 
Canadian 856 
Equity 1238 
xOnc Wm SI 18 04 
xOppenhmr 9 76 
Pemberton Gr 
nPacific Div 7.81 
nPacfic Ret 568 
nPacific US 702 
PHN Group 
vBond 953 

vCanadian 14.18 
yDiv income ll 10 
Fund 1994 

vPoded 45.07 
nyRRSP 22.89 
PMF Managmnt 
nPension Mu 17.64 
nxanadu Fd 8 10 
nPutnam 12.91 
Pret et Revenu Gr 
American 1406 
Canadian 9 44 
vFonds H 4.8? 
Rctraite 10 20 
Sterling Group 
Equity 8 90 
vMortoage 481 
vSynchrovest 7 22 
*Tech. 1164 
v Trade* 5.37 
Trans Canada Gr 
A 630 

B 69 10 

C II 56 

United Group 
Accumula 763 
Aceumula R 803 
American 237 
vCont Mortg 504 
Horizon 5 15 
Security 4.25 
venture 6 03 
venture Ret 9 74 
ny Waltame 33 60 
Western Gwth 7 30 


Alberta 

Complete tabulation of Tuesday 
transactions. Quotations in cents un 
less marked $. Net change is from 
previous board lot closing sale. 

5lock Sales High Low Close Ch'ge 
9S3 260 255 255 -5 
500 150 146 150 -5 
3000 445 430 435 -10 
300 280 280 280 *5 

7300 167. 0% 6%-% 
5900 233 225 213 *8 

2000 $5^ 5"? 5% 

300 240 240 240 * 20 

UU 8>* 8 4 » - % 


AGF Group 
Amer Grwth 8.14 
Cbn Gs Egy 10.00 
Cdn Sec Glh 10 94 
Cdn Trusteed 4.16 
Corp Invest 7.95 
Corp Inv Stk 13 69 
Gwth Equity 594 
Japan 15.20 
nMMF 11.22P 1000 
Oplion Equity 5 00 
Special 9.23 
Bolton Tremblay 
Cda Cumul 12 04 
Income Fund 9 87 
Internatnl 10.76 
Pld Resourcs 11 68 
Taurus 13.62 
Calvin Bullock Gr 
Ac rotund 2 49 
vBanner Fnd 5.68 
*dCIF 628 

xdCIF incom 10 15 
Central Group 
vCam Grwth 7 86 
v Compound 804 
vDividqpd 8.51 
vl und 4000 5.65 

vlntl Energy 3.17 
vlntl Grwth 5.57 
vlntl Income 3.89 
vNat Res Gth 6 28 
vNorttm Egy 5.88 
vRevenue Gth 4.31 
vLmivest 7.33 
CSA Mgml Gr 
Goldtund 5.51 
Goldfrust 6.49 
Conled Group 
Dolphin Eqtv 7.10 
vDolphm Mtg 4.98 
C undill Group 
y Security 888 
value 735 

Dynamic Group 
vnDvn Amer 5.80 
vnDyn Fund 15.45 
ynDyn Incom 5.91 
Eaton Bay Group 
Commwth 2118 
Dividend 5.33 
Growth 7 45 
income 3 91 
internatnl 7 10 
Viking 9 56 

Guaranty Trust Gr 
ynlnv Equity 12 67 
vnlnv Income 3 98 
vnMortgago 9,84 
Guardian Group 
Enterprise 1.65 
GIS Income 5 54 
vGwth Fund 21 87 
North Amer 8.28 
Mutual Acu 7 49 
Sec Income 9.86 
World Equity 7 03 
Investors Group 
vBond 445 

vDividend 8 16 
vOrowth 18 21 
y internatnl 9 75 
v Japan 10 14 
yMortqage 4.73 
v Mutual 7 78 
vProvidt Stk 10.00 
vRetiremnl 11.41 
vnjones Hewrd 4 60 
Montreal Trvsl Gr 
v Equity 2307 
y Income 7,82 
vlnlematnl 10 83 
vMortoage 9 46 
Principal Gr 
vCollective 1303 
vOrowth 7 17 
v Venture 6.54 
vBond 294 

Prudential Gr 
Growth 10.64 
income 4.81 
vSask Dev Fd 4 74 
Scotiatund Gr 
Scotiafund 1.67 
Scotiatd Mto 97 
Templeton Gth 8 08 
United Bond Share 
RovFund 1310 
RovFnd Inc 496 


Acroll 
Amalta 
Am Chrom 
Aquarius 
Baretta 
Barons 
Bearcat 
Bonn 
Camel 
Can Aran 
Can Bashaw 3400 285 
Can Pioneer 600 56 
Chipman 1200 220 
Cimarron 1700 440 
Cinnabar Pk 1000 92 
Clareplnc 3000 100 


3750 

4e?5 


61 


Clearport 
Concept 
Cultus 
Dixie 
Encounter 
Edmonton 
Flag 


60 60 
285 285 
5% 5'. 
220 220 

425 440 
92 92 

1900 240 240 240 
9325 »r. 7 5 « 7 ’4 
54900 95 91 94 


2000 25 
5000 270 
2000 290 
4000 260 


Ft Norman 

100 

370 

370 

370 

*10 

Gascon* 

2700 

395 

390 

390 

-5 

Gold Lake 

3400 

390 

370 

390 

♦ 20 

Gulch 

7350 

415 

400 

415 

♦ 20 

Gldn Brier 

16400 

149 

135 

144 

♦ 3 

Howe Sound 

1500 

80 

76 

00 

♦ 5 

Int Tika 

4100 

725 

770 

225 

♦ 5 

Jupiter 

1500 

730 

770 

720 

-10 

Kelvin 

700 

155 

1SS 

155 


Lariol 

7000 

700 

180 

700 

♦ 20 

L obeli 

3500 

75 

71 

71 

—4 

Loll 

7700 

75 

75 

75 

*10 

Matrix 

3500 

ts 

85 

85 

-5 

Madison 

1034 

75 

75 

75 

-5 

Madre 

500 

100 

100 

100 

-1 

Malor 

1100 

150 

150 

150 

*5 

Mis East 

16700 

75 

70 

75 

♦ 5 

Missl 

7900 

170 

160 

165 

♦ 5 

Ml Jamie 

7300 

185 

ISO 

180 

-13 

Maxvillc 

6900 

95 

90 

90 


Naham 

7000 

100 

100 

100 

-5 

N Gateway 

900 

S7 

0% 7 


New Pass 

700 

60 

60 

60 

*3 

NewDorl 

1800 

195 

195 

195 

—4 

Nimrod 

6500 

135 

130 

no 

-2 

North Coni 

2000 

47 

47 

47 


Omega 

100 

$7', 

1 7*4 

1 7'4 


Onvx 

1500 

S6 1 < 

1 6' 4 

1 6'« 

— 1 a 

Ortoit 

500 

$7 

6'i 

1 6'. 

* ’* 

Par amounl 

700 

%P< 

I 7 1 ; 

i 7% 

- >b 

Parkland 

900 

180 

170 

170 

—5 

Penstar 

1000 

106 

106 

HM 

♦ 2 

Peregrine 

7150 

S5'v 

. SVi 

. 5% 

* ’» 

Poco 

60600 

335 

375 


-15 

QCTV 

100 

$13’, 

. 13'. 

, 13". 

♦ % 

Radial 

39400 

170 

Ill 

H3 

-10 

Renabie 

3903 

400 

MO 

395 


Rio Alto 

1000 

780 

780 

780 

-30 

Saco 

J600 

170 

119 

170 

♦ 1 

Saslex 

7000 

66 

61 

66 

*4 

Savanna 

3000 

144 

140 

Ml 


Seagull 

5600 

99S 

390 

M 

-5 

Sparrow 

5000 

155 

150 

155 

-10 

Strand 

300 

$5% 5 v b S'» ♦ '• 

Sunmist 

1100 

165 

164 

164 

—6 

Surf 

17900 

140 

130 

134 

-1 

Tiverton 

1760 

350 

350 

3S0 

*10 

Tobe 

2500 

45 

45 

45 

-5 

Trov Gold 

1700 

$6' 

6% 6% — % 

Twinrich 

1650 

$5% 5% 5% ♦ 1 • 

Universl X 

16450 

390 

340 

340 

-10 

Windjamr 

4100 

780 

275 

275 

♦ IS 

XRG 

460 

47S 

450 

450 

-25 

Zephyr 

3800 

$5$ 5% 5; 

i 

Black Gold 

1000 

IS 

95 

95 

-3 

Cavalier 

141 

450 

450 

450 


Gulf Can 

100 

$33' 

« 33'- 

. 33 

■ * '< 

NW Trust 

503 

$43 

38 

43 

.9 

NWTrst prA 1121 

$43 

4? 

42% 

. »3 

Total sales 402.595 





Flax 

Jlv 

OcT 

Nov 


Grain 

WINNIPEG 

i Quotations in tonnes > 

Open High Lew Close Mon 

— — — 377 00 378 00 

378.00 389 00 378.00 383 50 387 00 
181 50 386 90 38 ) 50 384 00 385 00 

Spt 346 00 354.30 346 00 348 50 349 60 
NOV 356 00 364 20 356 00 358.50 360 00 

Jan 365 00 369 50 365 00 365 50 367 90 

Barley 

Jlv 142 50 144 20 141 10 143 00 143 50 

Oct 135 00 137.80 134.50 136.50 135 00 

Dec 132 00 135.30 132 00 134 50 1 32 80 

Oats 

Jlv 126 20 127 30 126 20 127 00 726 80 

Oct 123 50 125 70 123 50 125 40 124 40 

Dec 124 70 124 70 124 20 124 70 123 30 

net 


Feed wheat 


Commodities 


Jlv 

Oct 

Dec 

Rye 


155 50 156.40 155 00 156 00 156 90 

156 50 158 50 156 50 158 00 157 00 

IS4.S0 155 30 <54 SO 155.40 I S3 50 


Silver. New York (per lOOox.) 

Jlv 

— - - 191.50 187 50 


Open High Low Close Ch'ge 

Oct 

189 20 196.70 189 70 196 0Q 191 40 

Jul 

1560 0 1614 0 1560.0 1610.0 *57.0 

Dec 

187 90 184 90 187 50 184.90 183 90 

Aug 

- — - 1611.0 *50 0 


CHICAGO 

Sep 

1573.0 1625.0 1573.0 1625.0 * 50 0 


(Quotations in bushels ) 

Copper. New York (per 100 lbs > 


Open High Low Close Ch'ge 

Jul 

101 65 103 40 101 65 103 30 *155 

Wheat 


Aug 

- - — 103 70 * 1.60 

Jul 

4.28% 4.34 4.21% 444 * 05 

Sep 

102.50 104 85 102.25 104 50 *160 

Sep 

4 373 . 4 44 4.37 4.42' 1 ♦ .05% 

Lumber. Chicapo (per 1.080 bf > 

Dec 

4 56% 4.60% 4 54% 4 58% ♦ 04-. 

Sep 

210 50 210.50 213.10 114 30 -1 50 

Com 


Nov 

716 00 217.50 214.80 215.40 —1.00 

Jul 

3 II'. 3.19 3.14% 3.15%-.04% 

Jan 

713 50 215 40 21? 50 713.80 * 0 80 

Sep 

3 tin 3 22% 3 10 3.18*. *.00% 

Plywood. Chicago (per 1.000 sq. ft.) 

Dec 

3.24% 3.29' j 3.21% 3.27% * 04 

Jut 

705 00 705 00 703 00 703 50 - 7 50 

Oals 


Sep 

706 80 707,00 707.50 703 80 -2 50 

Jul 

1.75 1 78 1.75 1 78 * 04 

Nov 

707 70 707.30 204 50 70i 80 -7 50 

Sep 

183 . IBS'; 1.81 1 8?>. ♦ OP. 


Livecattle, Chicago (per 100 lbs ) 


1 93% 1.95% 1.91% 1.93% ♦ .02 


Aug 

70 45 

71.97 

70 3? 

719? 

♦ 1.40 

Soybeans 





Oct 

60 30 

69 50 

68 00 

59 45 

♦ 1 25 

Jul 

7.55 

7 S7 

746 

7.57 - 

-.02 

Dec 

69 15 

70.70 

69 10 

70.15 

* 80 

Aug 

7.53 

756 

7.38 . 

7.41%- 

-19% 

Livehogs. Chicago (per 100lbs.) 


Sep 

757 

774 

7.50 

7.51 - 

-.10% 

Aug 

41 70 

47 40 

41 65 

47 17 


Soybean oil 





Oct 

40 10 

40.85 

40.00 

40 57 

♦ .15 

Jul 

77.00 

27.28 

26 70 

1 27 16 

* -04 

Dec 

43 30 

45 00 

4315 

43 85 

♦ 2? 

Aug 

77.03 

77 05 

26 74 

1 76 83 

-IS 

Porkbellies. Chicago (per)( 

nibs.) 


Sep 

27 23 77 80 

27 00 

27.05 - 

-.35 . 

Jul 

40 85 

40 85 

39 60 

40 40 

-1.20 

Soybean meal 





Aua 

39.75 

40 50 

38 60 

39 97 

- 85 

Jul 

707 00 

203.30 

201 (X 

1 203.10 

♦ 1 20 

Feb 

57 90 

57 95 

55 95 

56.05 

-1.90 

Aug 

707 80 

20S X) 

799 5( 

1 200 30 

—4.40 

Gold. 

Chicago (per 01 

) 



Sep 

704 30 

207.50 

202.00 203 00 

-4.00 

Jul 

— 

632 50 

— 

637 50 

♦ 20.0 








Aug - 635 SO — 635 50 + 20.5 

Sep 615 50 644 00 614.50 642 50 * 25.0 

Gold. Winnipeg (per oi.) 

lib ounce contracts 
Open High Low Close Mon. 

Jun — - - 696 00b 673.00a 

Spt 615.00 644 00b 615.00 644.00b 619.50a 
Dec 631 00 663 00b 631.00 663 00b 637 00a 


5-OOOH HATCttMCX 



3200 DOUGLAS ST. 
382-2313 7-a 


1 


“JUST 
A FEW” 

Got an idea? Now 
from, new system, new 
sales pilch? We II print 
"just a few" eco¬ 
nomically. so you can 
try It out. Saves money Mi 
for you! 

IDEALETTER 

SIRVICI Bfel T U 

2524 Government 9.^052-9296 

(Across from tt*> RoMbud Bakery) 


I 


Silualed on a hillside garden on a no-through "hide 
away" road in the exclusive GONZALES area, a 
unique 3 level residence designed to capture the 
magnificent views of sea and city Beautifully Uled 
and spacious reception hall. 22’ dining room with 
pegged oak floor, 22’ family room with healilator 
• ireplace and sun and view balcony. The IT - kitchen 
is beautifully appointed with spacious breakfast 
area and adjoining laundry room and sauna There 
are 3 bedrooms, the master upstairs, full ensuiie 
across the hall from the large living room Excel 
lent guest level with bedroom, den. full bathroom 3 
bathrooms 2 healilator fireplaces larig sundeck 
Kcd cedar decor throughout I 20 S ooo 


Gnome-spotting in Zurich not easy 


By HUGH MULLIGAN 

ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) — The first 
thing I did when the express pulled into the 
Zurich station was to look around for a 
gnome. 

Having lived in England for eight years and 
listened to a succession of Labor party politicians. 1 
knew the gnomes of Zurich for what they were: 
mischievous malevolent money manipulators re¬ 
sponsible for most of the world's monetary prob¬ 
lems. 

Lord George Brown couldn't have said it better 
Kor it was he who popularized the term “Gnomes of 
Zurich," which afterwards fell so easily from the 
lips of prime ministers Harold Wilson and Jim 
Callaghan. 

According to William Satire’s Political Dictio¬ 
nary, Brown, as British foreign secretary in 1964. 
accused the "gnomes of Zurich" of making a killing 
on the revalued pound sterling when currency 
speculators who downgraded Britain’s credit stand 
ing forced the Labor government to adopt another 
austerity budget. • 

A gnome, especially a neutral, non-aligned 
Swiss one, was a handy bogeyman for any politician 
to have around at election time. Gnome flogging was 
a standard feature of every paid party political 
broadcast during my tenure in the British Isles. 

The word gnome, Safire writes, was coined by a 


16th-century Swiss alchemist who investigated min¬ 
ing and the diseases of miners. 

He says the word "is from the Greek ge-nomos, 
earth dweller, and originally meant a misshapen 
being who guarded the mines and quarries of the 
inner earth. . . . The mining derivation made 
Brown’s phrase especially apt. in Zurich, the 
gnomes deal in gold, a metal that was the quest of 
the alchemists." 

Wil Huygcn’s best selling Gnomes book of a few 
years back puts the 
average height of a 
full-grown gnome in 
the prime of life (about 
275 years of age) at 
15 centimetres. 

The gnomes of 
Zurich are much taller 
— mostly normal 
human size — and 
there was no trouble 
finding them. They 
were hurrying in and 
out of banks with an 
attache case in one 
hand and three news¬ 
papers in three differ¬ 
ent languages tucked 
under the other arm. 

The male of the species invariably wears expen¬ 
sive Italian loafers dangling a gold tassel and a 



T bishim? 


severely cut German suit with shoulders that seem 
to conceal the coathangers from his last three 
hotels. He wears gold-framed tinted eyeglasses, 
chomps on a Davidof f cigar and carries his garishly 
visa ed passport in a handsomely tooled Florentine 
leather wallet. 

In their attache cases, gnomes carry a calcula¬ 
tor, a fold-up umbrella, several financial magazines 
in several languages, a Swiss chocolate bar (the 
gnome quick lunch) and a bottle of mineral water 
(gnomes are suspicious of everything, especially 
the local water). 

Gnome conversation is a gazetteer of pesos, 
baht, zelotes, drachmas, rubles, krone, rupees, 
escudos, cruzeiros, yuan, dong, piasters and other 
global tender. V 

Ask a gnome, "How’s things?” and he will 
counter-ask if you want the computation in yen, 
marks or dollars. 

In general, they are stolid, almost stumpy in 
build, like Swiss medieval church architecture. 
Gnomes are prompt, meticulous, cautious, aggres¬ 
sive, slow with the quip but quick with the calcula 
tor. They jog, determinedly, for relaxation, and 
prefer the stately tea danz to the disco. 

If someone approaches you in the Zurich airport 
and whispers, “change money?” — this is not a 
gnome. But if the air reverberates with a chorus of 
unseen sprites cooing "the rate today is .6171 U.S. 
dollars to the Swiss franc,’ you know the gnomes of 
Zurich are at hand. 


Metals 

LONDON (AP) - London closing 
metals Tuesday, in pounds sterling a 
tonne; sllverin pence a trov ounce. 

Copper soot 942-943; future 957-958. 

Tin spot 7.2307,250; future 7,200-7.- 
210 . 

Lead spot 342 344, future 353 354 

Zinc spot 297-298; future 307-308. 

Sliver spot 655-657; future681-682. 

Aluminium spot 744-746; future 722- 
723. 

Nickel spot 2.790-2.799; future 2.8)5- 
2,822. 


Rm OH ic« 
sea-1420 


timimtmimn 


out cm (24 hra.) 
477-1841 

RttUVlTB. 

»» 


BCFP profit 
sharply off 


B.C. looks better 


VANCOUVER (CP) — 
British Columbia Forest 
Products Ltd. reported 
Tuesday net earnings for 
the first half of the year 
were down to $29.6 million 
from $49.1 million for the 
first six months of 1979. 

Share earnings were 97 
cents, compared with $1.61 
last year. Company shares 
were split, 2 for 1. in April 
so the stated figures per 
share are half of what they 
would have been had the 
shares not been split. 

The company said in a 
news release earnings for 
the second quarter of 1980 
were $11.8 million on net 
sales of $211.7 million, 
compared with $26.2 mil¬ 
lion on sales of $204.3 mil¬ 
lion for the same period in 
1979. 

■ Company pre.Went Ken 
Benson said the demand 
for market pulp, newsprint 
and coated paper remained 
strong throughout the 
perjod and exchange earn¬ 
ings on U.S. dollar sales 
increased. . 

The decrease in earnings 
was due mainly to lower 
woods products earnings 
and higher interest costs 
from increased borrow¬ 
ings. 

Benson said the lower 
sales volumes and substan- 


Money 


The bank's purchase price ot U.S. 
funds In fhis area Tuesday, accord¬ 
ing to the Royal Bank of Canada, was 
I 1480 for cash. I 1485 for travellers 
cheques and 1.1080 for coins. Their 
selling price was 1 1600 tor cash and 
1.1585 for cheques 

MONTREAL (CP) - U S dollar in 
terms of Canadian funds closed Tues¬ 
day down 1-25 af $1.1529. Monday's 
close was Si. 1533. Pound sterling was 
up 18*25 at $2 7549. In New York, the 
Canadian dollar was up 3-100 at $0.8674 
and pound sterling was up 7-10 at 
$2.3895. 

Nominal selling price of other mon¬ 
ies in Canadian funds: Australian dol¬ 
lar 1 3375; Austria schilling .0932; Ba 
hamas dollar 1.1560; Barbados dollar 
.5780; Belgium env franc .041100; Ber¬ 
muda dollar 1 1560; Brazil cruzeiro 
.0654; xBulgarla lev 1.3939; China ren 
mmbl .8000, xColombla peso .0231; 
xCzechostovakia crown 2300; Den 
mark krone .2145; East Caribbean dol 
lar 4300. France franc .2850. Ger 
many mark 6600; Greece drachma 
.0275; Hong Kong dollar .2350; xHun- 
garian forint .0368, India rupee 1515; 
Irish pound 2 4800. Italy lira 001390; 
Jamaica dollar .6500; Japan yen 
.005240, Kuwait dinar 4.3300; Mexico 
peso 0500. Nether I and guilder .6020; 
N Z. dollar 1.1400; Norway krone 
.2395. xPoiand zloty 0389; Portugal 
escudo .0237, xRomania leu .2572; 
Saudi Arabia rival .3470; Singapore 
dollar .5460; South African rand 
1.5100; Spain peseta .01625; Sweden 
krona .2795; Switzerland franc .7185; 
Trln-Tob dollar .4835; XU.S.S.R ruble 
1.8149. Venezuela bolivar .2782. lx- 
F ixed monthly rate). 


Igonzales/dSon’I 

■ Panoramic Views of i 
i Sea and Rockland 
i - 1950 Fairfield Place 

S OPEN HOUSE WED. aid THURS. 14 P.M. j 

i 
i 
i 


tially lower price.s for lum 
ber, plywood and wafer- 
board reflect the steep 
decline in U.S. and Cana¬ 
dian home construction. 

Benson said the collapse 
of U.S. housing construc¬ 
tion will continue to be the 
key factor in 1980 results. 
Prices for lumber in North 
American markets have 
shown some recovery from 
the lows in April of this 
year, but continue to be 
uncertain and remain well 
below the higher prices 
achieved in 1979. 

Exxon 

net 

rising 

NEW YORK (AP)— 
Exxon Corp. Tuesday re¬ 
ported a $1.03-billion profit 
in the second quarter as 
higher crude oil and natu¬ 
ral gas prices and rising 
foreign refining earnings 
helped raise net income 
24.1 per cent from levels of 
a year earlier. 

Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), 
meanwhile, said its earn¬ 
ings gained 124.1 per cent to 
$451.3 million, largely as a 
result of sharply higher 
Alaskan oil production and 
prices. 

Exxon, the world's lar¬ 
gest oil company, said its 
quarterly earnings were 
restrained by $314 million 
in foreign-exchange losses 
as the U.S. dollar weakened 
and by a slight decline in 
profits from domestic re¬ 
fining and marketing divi¬ 
sions. 

Exxon's second-quarter 
earnings compared with an 
$830-million profit in last 
year’s second quarter. 
Per-share earnings rose to 
$2.36 from $1.88, and sales 
rose to $26.2 billion from 
$18.6 billion. 

I 

Livestock 

CALGARY (CP) - Receipts Tues 
day at the Calgary public stockyards 
totalled 700 cattle and calves consist¬ 
ing of light receipts of slaughter cattle 
with a normal supply of feeder steers 
and heifers. Trade was moderate with 
most cattle being only average condi¬ 
tion and trading with lower under 
tones. Al-2 steers sold steady to 50 
cents lower Slaughter heifers traded 
$1 lower condition considered Lean D7 
and D3 cows traded steady. Thicker D1 
cows sold to the lower end of quota¬ 
tions. Bologna bulls sold steady. Al-2 
steers over 1,000 lbs. $73-$75.30; A3-4 
70-73. Al-2 heifers over 8S0 lbs 68.5(F 
78. A3 4 65-68. Dt-2 cows 47.50 50; 
D3-5 44-48 Good bulls 57-61.50. 


AIRCRAFT 
HANGAR 
FOR SALE 

Victoria 

International 

Airport. 

5400 M). ft. 
includes 400 so. ft. 
office space. 

656-2633 

(*54-30*2 res.) M7 


! TEDWALF0RD 


WANTED 


USED 

OFFICE FURNITURE 

Please Call 
Vince Ryan 

3M-1231 

■TAN ounce 


VANCOUVER (CP) - 
British Columbia's econ¬ 
omy survived the recent 
U.S. recession because of 
increased capital invest- 
ment in the province and a 
lessening dependence on 
the U.S. housing market, 
say bankers. 

Brian Carter. Bank of 
B.C. chief economist, said 
the province resisted the 
recession because of coal 
sales, pulp and paper ship¬ 
ments and sales of non-fer¬ 
rous metals to countries 
other than the U.S. 

Carter said B.C.’s, eco¬ 
nomic outlook will improve 
now that the worst of (he 
American recession is 
over. He added that the 
province’s lumber Indus 
try, which suffered most, 
should sec a recovery as 
U.S. housing starts return 
to early 1979 levels. 

Economic growth in B.C. 
is expected to be 2.6 per 


Housing starts 
not that vital 

eentin 1980, rising to 3.4 per 
cent in 1981, Carter said. 

A Royal Bank report on 
B.C.’s economy stated 
capital spending In the 
province will increase by 
17.1 per cent over 1979, the 
biggest ycar-over-ycar 
gain for any province. 

The report predicted an 
increase of 0.8 per cent in 
B.C.'s gross domestic prod 
uct but this is expected to 
improve to a 3.3-per-cent 
year-over-year gain in 
1981. 

The Canadian Imperial 
Bank of Commerce pro¬ 
jected a 1.2-per-cent in¬ 
crease in B.C.'s economy. 

Douglas Peters, vice- 
president and chief econo¬ 
mist for the Toronto Do¬ 
minion Bank, said recently 


that Canada's real gross 
national product is expect¬ 
ed to grow by 1.5 per cent to 
two per cent next year. 

Peters and Carter both 
said the Alaska pipeline 
project will spark part of 
that increase. 

Although economists 
forecast a slight increase 
for B.C.’s growth within the 
next year, they warn the 
economy is reacting to fall¬ 
ing interest rates, which 
are expected to bottom out 
by (he end of the year. 

They also warn that in- 
flatio’n, (hough fulling now. 
will increase this coming 
winter because the govern¬ 
ment has not established an 
energy pricing policy. 

However, the province 
does have enough resil¬ 
ience in various sectors of 
the economy to remain 
afloat should the housing 
market in the U:S. fall once 
more. , 


Shell Canada 
Appointment 



■ m 

I *. 1 


John G. McIntyre 

Shell Cunadj Li mi led 
announces the appoint¬ 
ment ol John (i. Mclimrc 
to the position of Western 
Marketing Region Manag¬ 
er. Vancouver, responsible 
for oil products marketing 
in-Western Canada. Pre¬ 
viously Regions Manager. 
( entral Marketing Region. 
Mr. McIntyre is a gradu¬ 
ate of Loyola College. 
Montreal. *** 


Montreal 

CLOSING AVERAGES 

IN UT BA CO PA 

Chgc -1 04 —0.77 * 4 7? -0.39 -0 16 
Tue* 394 00 259 99 371 49 364 17 189 71 

Preck) 395 84 260 76 366 77 364 56 189 87 

Wk Ago 388 17 25148 354 95 357.74 183 24 
MI*go: holiday 

80hi 42$ 98 273.35 367 09 381.38 709 16 

80lo 315 25 216 57 782 55 797 02 161 23 

Volume 877,7$ I 


2106 Oouglat bt 


On Vancouver 
Island there is a 
new number for 
quality brochure 
printing: 

656-0171 

ASK Ki*M ONI 

Ot H WAIF S STAFF TO 

CAU. ON ViM 

Manning I Ytss 



i*ti Bui :mm 
SiJ.it, M < Ullil 


* ISSUE OF 

$ 1 , 150 , 000,000 

NON-CALLABLE 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA BONDS 

DATED AUGUST 1, 1980 

The Bunk of Canada is authorized by the Minister of Finance to receive subscriptions for a loan io be issued lor 

cash as follows; 

2 year 6 month 10'/,% bonds due February 1, 1983 
Issue price: 100.00% yielding about 10.50% to maturity 

I merest payable February I and August I 

and 

5 year 2 month 10%% bonds due October 1, 1985 
Issue price: 99.50% yielding about 10.87% to maturity 


Interest payable October I and April I 
Iwo months’ interest payable October I. 


and 


9 year 4 1 /, month 11 %% bonds due December 15, 1989 
Issue price: 99.75% yielding about 11.29% to maturity 

Interest payable December 15 and June 15 

four and one-half months* interest payable December 15. IV&0 • 

and 

22 year 6 month 11 -%% bonds due February 1, 2003 
Issue price: 99.50% yielding about 11.81% to maturity 

Interest payable february I and August I. 

The new bond:* will be available in denominations .of SI,000, $5,000. S25.000. SI 00.000 and SI,000,000. 

The 11 '/ 4 9o bonds dated August 1, 1980 and due February I, 2003 will be issued in a maximum amount of S450 
million. 

The Bank of Canada has agreed to acquire a minimum of $350 million of the new bonds. This acquisition will be 
open as to maturity except that the total will include a minimum of S85 million of the 2003 maturity. 

Proceeds of the offering will be used to redeem S267 million of Government of Canada bonds maturing on 
August I, 1980 and*for general purposes of the Government of Canada. 

The new 11 ‘/ 4 Cc bonds due December 15. 1989 are tn addition to S325 million of 11 V/c bonds due December 15. 
1989 and dated December 15. 1979. February I. 1980 and June I, 1980. 1 he new IIV/7 bonds due February I. 
2003 are in addition to SI.250 million ot 11 V 4 r c bonds due February 1,2003 and dated February I, 1980 and June 
I. 1980 

I he new bonds will be dated August 1,1980 and util bear interest from that date. Principal and interest when due 
are payable in lawful money of Canada. Principal is payable on maturity at any agency of the Bank.of Canada 
Interest is payable without charge at any branch in Canada of any bank. Definitive bonds will be available on or 
about August I. 1980 and thereafter in two forms: bearer form with coupons attached and fully registered form 
with interest payable by cheque. Bonds of both forms will be in the same denominations and lulls 
interchangeable as to denomination and or form without charge (subject to statutory transfer requirements 
where applicable). 

The new bonds are authorized pursuant to an Act ol the Parliament of Canada and both principal and interest 
are a charge on the Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada *■ 

Application* for the new bond* mas be made, subject to allotment, through any inse*tment dealer eligible to act 
as a primary dl*tributor or through any bank in Canada 


!♦ 


Department of Finance 

Canada 


Ministers dee Finances 
Canada 














































> 


8 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


BUSINESS 


Construction values in slight dip 


TORONTO (UPC) — The 
value of construction starts 
across Canada during the 
first half of 1980 was $7,733 
billion compared to $7,801 
billion for the same period 
last year, or a I per cent 
decrease, it was announced 
Tuesday, 

The total number of 
dwelling unit starts in 1980 
was down 18 per cent from 
the 1979 figure; starts for 
apartment building units 


were down 6 per cent; de¬ 
tached and semi-detached 
housing starts were down 
26 per cent, while the total 
number of job starts in all 
categories was down 21 per 
cent. 

All the news, however, 
was not bad. 

A 15 per cent gain was 
reported in the institutional 
category? defence and law 
enforcement structures 
were up 76 per cent; public 



ACCOUNTANT 


Our client requires an accountant/office manager 
for their rapidly expanding business. Candidates 
should be enrolled in the 2nd or 3rd year CGA/RIA 
program or have the equivalent experience. Knowl¬ 
edge of computer data processing, job costing and 
financial statement preparation is required. 

Please call: 

Price Waterhouse & Co. 

(383-4191) for an interview or submit resume to 
P.O. Box 398, Victoria, B.C. V8W 2N8. 


■ Public Service Fonction publique 

I w Canada Canada 


LIVING UNIT OFFICER 


CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA 
MISSION MEDIUM SECURITY INSTITUTION 


This competition is open to both male and female 
residents of the Province of British Columbia. 
SALARY: $17,405-520,205 per annum 


DUTIES: Under supervision, the incumbent maintains 
control, custody and supervision of inmates within 
assigned areas of the institution; participates as an 
active member of a Living Unit Team in a program 
directed towards the positive correctional manage¬ 
ment of inmates and performs other duties such as 
participating in training courses, team meetings or 
other activities designed for improved communication 
and operation of the institution. 


QUALIFICATIONS: Ability normally required to com¬ 
plete secondary school plus working experience in¬ 
volving extensive person-to-pe/son relationships: evi¬ 
dence of stable work history preferably with experi¬ 
ence in a correctional setting; willingness to work 
shifts in an institutional environment and an ability to 
work well with other staff and inmates. Knowledge of 
English is essential. 


NOTE: A written exam and oral interview will be held. 
Successful security and medical clearances are condi¬ 
tions of employment. 

Additional job information is available by writing to the 
address below. f 

Toute information relative a ce concours est disponi- 
ble en francais et peut etre obtenue en ecrivant a 
l adresse suivante. 

Send your application and/or resume, quoting Refer¬ 
ence Number 80-V-CSC-86 before August 8. 1980 to: 
Nicole Legault. Regional Staffing Officer, Correctional 
Service of Canada, Regional Headquarters, Pacific, 
P.O. Box 10058, Pacific Centre. 700 West Georgia 
Street. Vancouver. B.C. V7Y 1B9. Telephone number: 
666-3286/1033. 

PSC Clearance Numbers: 710 186 004-710 186 009 


■ - Public Service Fonction publique 

■ ~ Canada Canada 


CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA 
KENT MAXIMUM SECURITY INSTITUTION 


These competitions are open to male residents of the 
Province of British Columbia. 


LIVING UNIT OFFICER 

REFERENCE NUMBER: 80-V-CSC-87 
SALARY: $17,405-520,205 per annum 
DUTIES: Under supervision, the incumbent maintains 
control, custody and supervision of inmates within 
assigned areas of the institution; participates as an 
active member of a Living Unit Team in a program 
directed towards the positive correctional manage¬ 
ment of inmates and performs other duties such as 
participating in training courses, team meetings or 
other activities designed for improved communi¬ 
cation and operation of the institution. 


QUALIFICATIONS: Ability normally required to com¬ 
plete secondary school, plus working experience 
involving extensive persori-to-person relationships, 
evidence of a stable work history preferably with 
experience in a correctional setting, willingness to 
work shifts in an institutional environment and an 
ability to work well with other staff and inmates. 


CORRECTIONAL OFFICER 

REFERENCE NUMBER: 8Q-V-CSC-88 
SALARY: $14,450-518.350 

DUTIES: Under supervision, the incumbent maintains 
surveillance over and controls the movement and 
activities of inmates, controls vehicles and pedestrian 
traffic in and out of the institution; operates base 
station radio, telephone switchboard, othqr communi¬ 
cation and electronic devices as required, performs 
escort duties, operates and assists in the operation of 
control posts; makes scheduled and unscheduled 
patrols, counts and searches inmates and performs 
other duties. 


QUALIFICATIONS: Ability normally required to com¬ 
plete secondary school, extensive experience involv¬ 
ing person-to-person relationships and evidence of a 
stable work history Knowledge of English is essen¬ 
tial. 


NOTE: A written exam and oral interview will be held. 
Successful security and medical clearances are con¬ 
ditions of employment for these positions 


Additional job information is available by writing to the 
address below 


Toute information relative a ce concours est dispom- 
bie <#n francais el peut etre obtenue en ecrivant a 
I adresse suivante 


Send your application and/or resume quoting appro- 
pnate reference numbers before Augubt 8 1.980. to 
Nicole Legault Regional Staffing Officer. Correction¬ 
al Service of Canada Regional Headquarters Ra- 
‘ ific P.O Bux 10058 Pacific Centre /Qg We si 
Georgia Street Vancouver BC V/Y 109 Tele¬ 
phone-number 008-3286-1033 


building was up 28'per cent; 
educational building 
climbed 21 per cent; com 
mereial gained 13 per cent; 
wholesale and retails 
stores were up 47 per cent; 
business services rose 42 
per cent and office building 
showed a 6 per cent in¬ 
crease. 


Investment 
funds hit 
$3 billion 


Skilled-worker crisis by 1985 


Earnings 


Fruehaut Canada Inc ., six months 
ended June 30 1980. S3.lll.000. *1.15 a 
share. 1979,52,770,000, $1.0? a share 
Nova Scotia Savings and Loan Co., 
for six months ended June 30: 1980. 
1347,000, TO cents a share; 5039.000. 51 
cents a share 

Shell Canada Ltd., six months ended 
June 30 I960. 5181,500,000. SI 71 a 
share. 1979, S106,500.000. 99 cents a 
share 


NEW 1980 

CHRYSLER CORDOBA ■ 


/art. 


Economical 6-cyllndor, 
automatic. Stock No 
30291. 


SALE 

PRICE ONLY 



3200 DOUGLAS ST. 
382-2313 in 


TORONTO (CP) — 
Assets of Canadian invest¬ 
ment funds exceeded $3 bil¬ 
lion for the first time at the 
end of the second quarter 
and are continuing tljeir 
best growth record in a dec¬ 
ade, the Investment Funds 
Institute of Canada said 
Tuesday. 

The institute reported 
assets of its 81 members 
stood at $3,005 billion on 
June 30, an increase of 
12.18 per cent from the first 
quarter and 22.66 per cent 
from the second quarter of 
1979. 

Investment funds are 
companies which use their 
capital to invest in shares, 
bonds and other securities 
of other companies, and 
are known as mutual 
funds. 

Keith Douglas, president 
of the institute, said in a 
statement, “Realizing the 
impact of inflation in the 
value of savings, the small 
investor has found invest¬ 
ment funds provided a su¬ 
perior rate of return.” 

Sales of shares in mem 
her companies exceeded 
redemptions by $20.3 mil 
lion in the second quarter 
and. 


TORONTO (CP) — Can 
ada's shortage of skilled 
workers will reach crisis 
proportions by 1985, says 
Warren Allmand, chair¬ 
man of a House of Com¬ 
mons study of employment 
opportunities. 


Worker retraining pro¬ 
grams financed by the fed¬ 
eral government are not 
succeeding, the Liberal 


member of Parliament told 
the first global conference 
on the future Monday. 

“Too often they are re¬ 
training workers for jobs 
that don’t exist,” he said, 
and retraining compensa¬ 
tion for unemployed work¬ 
ers is too low. 

"Instead of unemploy¬ 
ment insurance, why not 
give laid-off workers re¬ 
training?” he said, noting 


Dividends 


Bank ot Montreal, 39 cents, Aug 28, 
record July 31. 

British American Bank Note Co. 
Ltd.,50ccnts. Sect. 15. recordAug.3i 
Canadian Utilities Ltd., 2nd pfd. O, 
67.5cents, Sepl. 1, record Aug. 7. 

Color Your World Inc., three cents. 
Aug. 15, record Aug. 1 
Crown ZellertMKh Canada Ltd., 37.5 
cents, Sept 12, record Sept. 2. 

Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd., 25 cents. 
Sept. 30, record Sept. 5. 


Extendicare Ltd., 7.5 cents. Class A, 
lOcents; both Aug. 15, record Aug. l 
Finning Tractor and Equipment Co. 
Ltd., 15 cents, Aug. 28. record Aua 13 
Keeprite Inc., 20 cents, Aug 29, rec- 
ord Aug 15. 

Laidlaw Transportation Ltd., Class 
A, five cents. Class B, six cents, 934 
per cent pfd. C 24.375 cents, is* pfd. 
E, 20 cents; 9V« per cenl pfd C, 
24.375 cents, 1st pfd. E 20 cents; all 
payable Aug. IS, recordAug 1. 


that such payments might 
have to be higher than 
uemployment insurance. 

The study group Allmand 
heads is holding hearings 
across the country to deter- 
mine what jobs will be 
needed in the 1980s and 
what measures should be 
implemented to ensure that 
enough trained people are 
available. Its report is to be 
presented to Parliament by 
the end of the year. 

Although the govern¬ 
ment is spending about $700 
million this year on re¬ 


training, Allmand said 
Canada has one of the high 
est unemployment rates 
and one of the most severe 
shortages of skilled work 
ers in the world. -- 

In many cases, Canadian 
workers are competing for 
Jobs with workers from 
Singapore, Hong Kong and 
other Third World eoun 
tries, he said. 

“We have to start from 
the premise that full cm 
ployment is a national goal 
and the economy should be 
structured to provide jobs 
for all who want to work." 


OFFSET PRESSMAN ' 


Progressive commercial printing plant in Okanagan 
Valley requires experienced journeyman offset press¬ 
man Must have 4-colour experience and desire to con¬ 
sistently produce high quality work Excellent working 
conditions Salary commences at $10 38/hour (mini¬ 
mum) with quarterly increments and attractive em¬ 
ployee benefits 

Submit resume stating qualifications and experience 
14 colour press samples would also be helpful I in con¬ 
fidence to: 

WAYSIDE PRESS LTD. 

Box 446, Vernon. B.C. V1T 6M3 Ph. (604) 545-2341 


ACCOUNTANT 


For a professional theatre company. 

Responsible for full set of books to trial balance and 
statement preparation. Duties include preparation 
of deposits, payroll, accounts payable, accounts 
receivable, cash flow. 

Applicants must have extensive bookkeeping ex¬ 
perience and be familiar with basic accounting 
principals and procedures. Accounting student or 
recent graduate preferred. To start August 15, 1980. 
Salary oommensurate with experience. 

Apply in writing to; Eric Macdonald. 

General Manager 
Bastion Theatre Company 
1002 Wharf Street 
Victoria, B.C.. V8W 1T4 


eft 




THRIFTY FOOD 




s S8&ssS* r LOCATED IN THE FAIRFIELD PLAZA, 1590 FAIRFIELD ROAD 

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES, 


- THRIFTY MEAT BUYS|| THRIFTY GROCERY BUYS* 


CANADA GRADE “A" BEEF 

SIRLOIN TIP STEAL2 




FRESH REGULAR 

GROUND 



ONTARIO JBSkA / 

CHEDDAR., 9fl% 

AUCCCC MEMUM / U 

VnCCOC MATURE OFF REG. PRICE 


PREVIOUSLY FROZEN 

CHICKEN 

CUTLETS 


1 B 


SCHNEIDERS COOKED 


PICNIC 

SLICES 




SCHNEIDERS - _ 

SMOKED BACK139 
BACON I 


SCHNEIDERS ASSORTED^ ^ • 

liver CQc 

CHUBBS ,«aKI 


pizza plus - _ 

DELUXE MINI 169 
PIZZA I 


CHUBBS . 


NINE LIVES ASSORTED £ Aft 

CAT FOOD ^4/i 00 

INSTANT COFFEE „, 5 ” 

ICECREAM ...1" 

NABOB m 

JEUTPCWPER-^^,/1 110 

PM MUSTARD ,„49 

BURNS ffeQA 

CANNED HAMS_..Z 88 


THRIFTY FOODS IS LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED AND 
OFFERS YOU FRIENDLY SERVICE AND COMPETITIVE PRICES 
FEATURING QUALITY MEAT AND PRODUCE. 


WE HAVE AN EXCELLENT SELECTION 
OF CANNING AND FREEZING SUPPLIES 
AT COMPETITIVE PRICES 


STARKIST 

SOLID WHITE 


149 


E.D. SMITH 

LEMON 
SPREAD.. 5oo K jv 


79 


4 


BEST FOODS 


750 ml jar 


1 


49 


f$ii% NEW CROP! J&S 
.WJ CANADA FANCY -JR: 


NESTLE S ASSORTED 

MINI 

PUDDINGS 3 Ur 


79 


NESTLES TROPICAL BLEND 

ICED TEA 
MIX 


32-az. tn 


199 


DEL MONTE MIX OR MATCH 

CREAM CORN, PEAS, 

PEAS & CARROTS, A 
CUT OR. BEANS.*2 


09 


lb. 


49 


LOCAL FRESH 


VEGETABLE 169 
OIL .h.I 


1 L ML 


ENGLISH 

BREAKFAST 
MARMALADE i^j. 


i 


19 




CAMPFIRE 

MARSH- 

MALLOWS..*.'* 


59 


LOWNEY’S CHOCOLATE 

BUNDLE 
BARS 


i a 


KAL KAN 

DOG 

FOOD 


79 * 


SUNG0LD 


APPLE or ORANGE 
DRBKCRYSTALS .«,* 


99 * 


LOCAL NO. 1 APi 

CABBAGE,, 25 


I IMPORTED FRESH _ JiMl 

CORN z COB § F 

STORE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9-9, SAT. 9-6, SUN. 10-6 fa,™ 1 plaza 


SARA LEE—FROZEN 


. 1 * 


DELNOR FROZEN 

MIXED 

VEGETABLES 


i B 

>4A$ I 


, 


a 


■ 













































































BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 9 


Closing prices of all traded options. 
Sales unit Is 100 shares. P denotes 
puts. (Trans Canada options combine 
Montreal and Toronto exchange option 
trading): 


Options 

Ab Prc 

Ab Prc 

Ab Prc 

Ab Prc 

Ab Prc 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alt GA 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Alcan 

Agutin 

Agutin 

Agutin 

Agutin 

Agutin 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

Asama 

A*sama 

Asama 


Fb 20 
Ag 17* 
Ag 20 
t*v 20 
Nv 22Y» 
Fb 35 
Fb 35 p 
Ag ?7Vj 
Ag 30 
Ag 32* 
Nv 30 
Nv 32* 
Nv 32'^p 
Nv 35 
Nv 35 p 
Fb 30 
Fb 32'i 
Fb 35 
Fb 35 p 
Fb 40 
Ag 25 
Ag 27V, 
Ag 30 
Ag 32' ? 
Ag 35 
Ag 35 P 
Ag 37 1 j 
Ag 37*p 
Nv 77* 
Nv 30 
Nv 32'j 
Nv 35 
Nv 35 p 
Nv 37V, 
Nv 37’,p 
Nv 40 
Sp 40 
Sp 65 
Sp 70 
DC 65 p 
DC 70 
Ja 20 p 
Ja 22' i 
Ja 25 
Ap 22'2 
Ap 25 
Oc 27* 
Oc 22*p 
Oc 25 
Oc 25 p 
Oc 27V, 
Oc 30 
Oc 32' jp 


Bell Can Fb 20 
Bell Can Fb 22', 
Bell Can Ag 22' 2 
Bell Can Nv IT* 
Bell Can Nv 20 


Brsch 
Brscr 
Brscn 
Brscn 
Brscn 
Brscn A 
Brscn A 
Brscn A 
Brscn A 
Brscn A 
Brscn A 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk NS 


Fb 22’, 
Fb 25 
Fb 27V* 
Fb 30 
Ag 25 
Ag 27V, 
Ag 30 
.Nv 22'“? 
Nv 25 
Nv 27* 
Nv 32V, 
Fb 25 
Fb 27’, 
Fb 30 
Ag 22' 1 
Ag 24* 
Ag 27'. 
Ag 30 
Nv 25 
Nv 27V, 
Nv 30 
SP 30 


Bk NS DC 30 
BP Can Oc 45 
BP Can Oc 50 
Bow Val Ja 13* 
Bow Val Ja 13*o 
Bow Val Ja 15 
Bow Val Ja 16*0 
Bow Val Ja 20 
Bow Val Ja 25 
Bow Val Ap 72', 
Bow Val Ap 25 
Bow Val Oc 13* 
Bow val Oc 15 
Bow val Oc 16* 
Bow val Oc 17 | 
Bow val Oc 18* 
Bow Val Oc 20 
Bow Val Oc 20 p 
Bow Val Oc 71* 
Bow Val Oc 21*p 
Bow Val Oc 22', 
Bow Val Oc 22’ 2P 
Bow Val Oc 25 
Bow Val Oc 25 


CBth 

CBth 

CBth 

C line 
C im B 
C Im B 
CP Ltd 
CP Ltd 
CP Ltd 
CP Ltd 
CP Ltd 
C Ti A 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Oom M 
Dorn M 
Dorn M 
Dorn M 
Dorn M 
Dorn M 
Oom M 
Oom M 
Dorn M 
O Pete 
0 Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
O Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D Pete 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 


OC IS 
Oc 17', 
OC TO 
SP 22', 
Sp 25 
OC 25 
Ag 37’ ,p 
Ag 40 
Ao 50 
Nv 40 


Vol Int Last Close 

71 647 170 S20* 

10 2tt 52* 520* 
20 927 65 520* 

3 727 125 520* 

8 438 50 520* 

5 38 52* 533* 

1 2 S3 S33J/4 

11 190 16*533* 

2 257 54* 133* 
11 416 185 133*4 

1 564 54* *33*4 

20 344 S3 *33*4 

10 17 150 *33*4 

21 630 140 *33*4 

3 3 12-4 *33*« 

2 74 S7V, *37 

5 23 *5'. *37 

140 149 *4’ , *37 
5 10 *3 *37 

5 5 175 *37 

3 58 511* 537 

80 204 59* 537 
137 709 16'-, *37 
225 690 *4*. *37 
276 494 190 *37 

23 39 85 *37 

209 448 85 *37 
1 17 *2 *37 

20 367 *9'. *37 
19 566 *7' * *37 

33 296 54* *37 
204 547 *3 *37 

22 58 185 *37 

27 156 160 *37 
IS 33 *3', *37 
10 JO 85 *37 

1 116 *26*% 166*4 

1 475 56* 566* 

7 197 *3*4 *66*4 

2 15 *5'* *66*4 

. 2 87 57* *66*. 

10 10 100 *23 

3 131 *3*123 

6 56 12'. *23 

3 3 *4'4 *23 

1 1 S3* *23 

36 264 *2' , *23 

11 43 130 123 
67 700 125 *23 

1 v 86 *2’', *23 

72 415 75 123 
10 303 35 *23 

12 40 19'/, *23 

15 253 125 *20’. 
10 79 30 *20* 
10 1515 5 *20'. 
10 365 *2* 120’ . 
10 806 75 *20'/. 
10 10 *7**29 

2 47 *5*4 *29 

3 119 $3* *29 

4 8 12'4 *29 

18 270 *4 *29 

23 361 12 *29 
70 242 50 *29 

3 306 16*4 *29 

2 235 *5* 129 

24 633 *?*.i29 

3 148 70 *29 

10 198 *5 128'. 
30 787 *3**28'/. 
30 74 150 *28'. 

2 29 *7 *28'. 

19 136 *4**28* 
163 386 190 *28* 

10 31 30 *28* 

78 343 *4'-. *28* 
18 557 12* 128* 
225 1290 75 *78* 

3 71 *2**32 

12 123 *3**32 

34 337 *4**46 
156 334 190 *46 

5 13111 *23* 
30 149 10 *23* 
54 313 19' , *23* 

7 5 50 *23* 

13 435 15**23* 
131 299 *3 *73 • 
900 900 14V. *23* 

25 25 *4 *23* 
5 357*10**23* 

25 814 18* 123* 
472 1348 17 *23* 
10 249 *6* 123’. 
468 567 *5**23* 
405 2 759 *4* *23'. 

21 194 100 *23* 
17 1184 *3**23* 

10 115 )65 *23* 
74 1862 *2* *23 . 

11 87 *2**23* 

158 1360 175 *23* 

1) 21 *4 *23* 

17 131 85 *15* 
25 336 20 115* 

20 254 5 115* 

1 10 *3**26 

10 68 185 *76 

10 82 *7**26 

3 15 5 *42* 

1 598 52* 542* 
10 198 5 *42', 
105 477 *3**42* 


Pete 

Pete 

Pete 

Pete 

Pete 


DTex 

CanP 

CanP 

CanP 

CanP 

Gull 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gull 


Nv 45 

Ja 25 

Ja 35 

Oc 45 

Oc 45 p 
Oc 50 

75 

2 

1 

7 

10 

6 

217 140 *42* 

3 *5**29* 

1 *13 *46 j 
535 *4 *46* 
II *7'.146* 
445 *7'. *46': 

OC 55 

11 

114 120 *46 : 

ja no 

1 

35 5)6 116 

Ja 120 

1 

16 <14* 116 

AplTO 

2 

7*17* 116 

Oc 80 

2 

52 *32 116 

Oc 90 

4 

84 *74 116 

Oc 45 

1 

41 *23 116 

Oc too 

6 

86 *20 116 

oc no 

8 

167*13* 116 

Oc 120 

14 

99 *8* 116 

Ja 65 p 

3 

16 160 *84 : 

Ja 80 

21 

205 *16'« *84 j 

Ja 80 p 

4 

75 SA *84 . 

Ja 85 

25 

125 *13 *84* 

Ja 85 p 

14 

30 18 '• *84 : 

Ja 90 

8 

138 *10 *84* 

Ap 80 

3 

3*19 *84* 

Ap 80 p 

14 

14 *6‘« 184’ j 

Ap 90 

14 

15 *14'j 184': 

Ap 90 p 

1 

1111* *84* 

OC 60 

3 

328 *26'. 184’j 

Oc 65 

11 

382 122’«184* 

OC 65 p 

10 

60 70 *84* 

Oc 70 

10 

668 *18**84* 

Oc 75 

3 

859*15**84* 

Oc 75 p 

2 

105 *3 184* 

Oc 80 

36 1748 *10* *84* 

OC 80 p 

62 

166 *4* 184* 

OC 85 

171 2048 *8**84* 

OC 85 p 

12 

125 *6 *84* 

Oc 90 

147 1223 *6* *84' 2 

Oc 90 p 

7 

101 19 *84' 2 

Sp 17* 

45 

171 *2*114* 

Fb 72* 

7 

67 S3* *23* 

Ag 70 

28 

320 *4 *23* 

Ag 27* 

31 

939 175 123* 

Ag 25 

8 

452 50 123* 

Fb 27* 

3 

115 *9**33* 

Fb 30 

M) 

307 18 *33* 

Fb 35 

9 

396 *5**33* 

Ag 26 

15 

855 *8 *33* 

Ag 28 

10 1459 *6* 533* 

Ag 30 

57 4243 *4* *33* 

Ag 3? 

55 3823 *2* *33* 

Ag 32 p 

33 

312 )00 *33* 

Ag 34 

161 3739 16S *33* 

Ag 34 p 

48 

261 165 *33* 

Ag 36 

171 4378 80 *33* 

Ag 38 

154 2707 50 *33* 

Nv 76 

10 

326 *8**33* 

Nv 30 

108 1768 *6* *33* 

Nv 3? 

42 1141 *5**33* 

Nv 32 p 

10 

165 *2**33* 

Nv 34 

80 1726 *4' a *33* 

Nv 36 

272-2404 *3 *33* 


Bonds 


Options 


PACIFIC 

SEAFOODS 

(1977) LTD. 

SMOKED 
ALASKA 
BLACK COD 

Two smaM fttots to oach 
vacuum pack ad pouch. 
Individually frozon 
10 tot par carton. 


2 


00 

_ ** 
m wmmd 

OftOCftS 


PHONE 
OHLV PLEAS* 

388-7555 


Gulf C 

Nv 36 p 

5 

70 14* 133* 

MB Ltd 

Nv 27* 

70 

529 *4**31* 

Shell C 

Fb 40 

$ 

7 

Gulf C 

Nv 38S 

100 2915 *2* *33* 

MB Ltd 

Nv 30 

20 

282 13**31* 

Shell C 

Ag 30 

9 

763 

Gnstar 

Ja 25 

5 

15 *12 *36’ : 

MB Ltd 

Nv 32* 

43 

279 *2**31* 

Shell C 

Ag 32* 

35 

637 

Gnstar 

Ja 35 

7 

7 *4 *36* 

MB Ltd 

Nv 35 

40 

95 )00 *31* 

Shell C 

Ag 35 

48 1567 1 

Gnstar 

Oc 30 

3 

84 *8 *36 j 

Moore 

Nv 32* 

5 

100 *4**35* 

Shell C 

Ag 35 P 

1 

69 

Gnstar 

OC 32' 2 

28 

137 14**36* 

Inco 

Fb 20 p 

10 

12 75 126* 

Shell C 

Ag 40 

7 1465 

Gnstar 

OC 35 

21 

41 *3**36* 

Inco 

Fb 27Vj 

2 

128 *2* 126* 

Shell C 

Nv 30 

5 

182 

HB Mn 

Sp 30 

1 

115 150 129* 

Inco 

AO 22'/* 

5 

640 *3**26* 

Shell C 

Nv 35 

6 

980 

HB Mn 

Sp 32* 

15 

54 110 129* 

Inco 

Ag 25 

48 1129 185 126* 

Shell C 

Nv 35 p 

1 

131 

HBOC 

Fb 32* 

10 

120 17* *35 

Inco 

Ag 25 p 

10 

110 40 *26* 

Shell C 

Nv 40 

24 

s?s ; 

HBOG 

Fb 35 

10 

17 *5**35 

inco 

Ag 27* 

20 1249 50 *26* 

MICO A 

Fb 30 

12 

151 

HBOG 

Ag 32* 

2 

104 *3**35 

Inco 

Ag 30 

6 1636 10 *26- 

stlco A 

Fb 32* 

1) 

127 

HBOG 

Nv 32* 

10 

220 *5**35 

Inco 

Ag 30 p 

10 

115 13**26* 

stlco A 

Fb 35 

95 

220 

HBOG 

Nv 35 

10 

96 *4* 135- 

Inco 

Nv 25 

33 

816 *3* 126* 

stlco A 

Afl 22* 

4 

341 

HBOG 

Nv 35 

5 

9 *2* *35 

Inco 

Nv 27Vj 

52 

895 165 *26* 

StICO A 

Ag 30 

480 

724 

HBOG 

Nv 40 

5 

78 *2 *35 

Inco 

Nv 32’/$ 

20 

179 60 *26* 

Stlco A 

Ag 32* 

27 

604 

Husky 

J4 20 

69 

142 12 *17* 

Inco 

Nv 35 

1 

251 45 126* 

Stlco A 

Nv 25 

15 

146 

Husky 

Ap 20 

89 

74 *2*117* 

Nat Bk 

Fb 12W 

16 

68 *2 *13* 

Stlco A 

Nv 30 

18 

529 

Husky 

Oc 14* 

13 

373 *4**17* 

Nat Bk 

Ag 12* 

5 

236 85 *T3* 

Stlco A 

Nv 32* 

55 

722 

Husky 

OC 15 

19 

383 *3**17* 

Nat Bk 

Nv 12* 

12 

305 160 113* 

StlCO A 

Nv 35 

44 

39 1 

Husky 

OC 17* 

25 

926 12 117* 

Norcn 

Fb 35 

4 

66 *4**35* 

T D Bk 

Sp 30 

7 

39 

Husky 

Oc 20 

410 

731 1)5 *17* 

Norcn 

Fb 40 

4 

22 190 *35* 

T O Bk 

Sp 32* 

9 

19 1 

IAC 

Mr 10 

1 

17 *2 *10* 

Norcn 

Ag 35 

9 

703 140 *35* 

Total P 

Ja 25 p 

5 

27 1 

IAC 

Dc 10 

10 

273 140 1H)* 

Norcn 

Nv 40 

5 

431 100 *35* 

Total P 

Ja 27*p 

5 

30 1 

IAC 

OC 12* 

K> 

83 60 *10* 

Nor an 

Fb 22Vi 

10 

331 *6**28* 

Total P 

Ja 30 

5 

247 

ion A 

Fb 35 

4 

79 *12* *44'. 

Nor an 

Fb 25 

10 

91 *5 *28* 

Total P 

Ja 32* 

17 

37 

ion a 

Fb 45 p 

15 

21 *3 4 *44* 

Noran ’ 

Fb 27Vi 

10 

138 *3**28* 

Total P 

Ap 30 

1 

1 

ion a 

Fb 50 

4 

145 *4 *44* 

Nor an 

Fb 30 

2 

33 *2**28* 

Total P 

Ap 30 p 

1 

1 

ion a 

Ag 35 

5 

258*10**44* 

Noran 

Ag 20 

6 1089 *8 *28'a 

Total P 

Oc 25 

8 

314 

ion a 

Ag 35 p 

-5 

97 10 *44* 

Noran 

Ag 22* 

3 1855 *5* *28' a 

Total P 

Oc 27* 

65 

66) 

ion a 

Ag 39* 

3 1617 *5*144'. 

Noran 

Ag 25 

65 1667 S3* *28’ a 

Total P 

Oc 30 

42 IJV/ 

ion a 

Ag 39*p 

2 

130 20 *44* 

Noran 

Afl 27* 

35 1405 120 *28* 

Total P 

OC 32* 

31 

397 

(Oil A 

Ag 44* 

78 2178 *2* *44* 

Noran 

Ag 30 

35 

963 45 *28* 

Total P 

Oc 35 

9 

381 

ion a 

Ag 44*p 

8 

105 115 *44* 

Noran 

Ag 35 p 

1 

7 *7 *28* 

TrC PL 

Ag 22’ i 

9 

712 

ion a 

Ag 49* 

92 2150 50 *44* 

Noran 

Nv 22* 

7 

363 *5**28* 

TrC PL 

Ag 27' j 

5 

590 

ion a 

Ag 54* 

1 

1078 25 *44* 

Noran 

Nv 25 

40 

783 *4**28* 

TrC PL 

Nv 22* 

17 

722 

ion a 

Nv 39* 

IS 

750 *7* *44* 

Noran 

Nv 27*» 

15 1481 52* 528 ■ 

TrC PL 

Nv 25 

1 

240 

ion a 

Nv 44* 

122 1499 *4* *44* 

Noran 

Nv 30 

22 

611 145 *28* 

TrC PL 

Nv 27* 

3 

140 

ion a 

Nv 44*0 

7 

40 *2**44* 

Nor Tel 

Ja 35 

1 

40 16 *39* 

Segrm 

Ap 60 

20 

20: 

ion A 

Nv 49* 

35 

957 *2' 4 *44* 

Nor Td 

Ap 45 

4 

3 *2 *39* 

Seorm 

Oc 60 

156 

337 

lOil A 

Nv 54* 

34 

56) 150 *44* 

Nor Tel 

-Oc 40 

„ 6 

50 165 *39Va 

Segrm 

Oc 65 

136 

726 

1 Pipe 

Ag 15 

2 

5 *2*118* 

Powr C 

Ag 12* 

7 

165 *3**15* 

Segrm 

Oc 70 

5 

182 

1 Pipe 

Ag 17* 

16 

316 75 *18* 

Powr C 

Ag 15 

20 

366 85 *15* 

Wlkr C 

Sp 25 

128 

981 

1 Pipe 

Nv 17* 

1 

435 130 *18* 

Powr C 

Nv 17* 

1 

102 45 *15* 

Wlkr C 

SO 27* 

14 

892 

1 Pipe 

Nv 20 

20 

263 20 *18* 

Rang 

Ja 40 

10 

33 S7V.S40 

Wlkr C 

Sp 30 

24 1426 

Kaiser 

Oc 30 

11 

178 S3 *30* 

Rang 

Ja 45 

2 

148 *4* *40 

Wlkr. C 

DC 77* 

4 

2TO 

Kaiser 

Oc 35 

2 

149 125 *30* 

Rang 

Oc 35 p 

1 

84 100 *40 

Wlkr C 

Dc 27* 

2 

350 

Labat A 

Ap 25 

30 

130 110 123* 

Rang 

OC 40 

37 

247 *4**40 

Wlkr C 

DC 30 

11 

376 

MB Ltd 

Fb 27* 

1 

29 *5**31* 

Rang 

Oc 40 p 

4 

70 *3* *40 

Wcoast 

Mr 12* 

1 

1 

MB Ltd 

Fb 30 

S 

51 *4**31* 

Rang 

OC 45 

50 

365 *2**40 

Wcoast 

Mr 15 

23 

40 

MB Ltd 

Fb 32* 

1 

4 13**31* 

Rang 

Oc 45 p 

2 

78 *5*140 

Wcoast 

Sp 15 

14 2B2U 

MB Ltd 

Ag 20 

60 

67 *11* *31* 

Rov Bk 

OC 40 

20 

25 *11* 150* 

Wcoast 

Dc 12* 

l 


MB Ltd 

Ag 27* 

197 

369 *4’ j *31 * 

Roy Bk 

Oc 45 

7 

145 *6 *50* 

Wcoast 

Dc IS 

31 l 

MB Ltd 

Ag 30 

135 

710 *2 *31* 

Rov Bk 

OC 50 

5 

101 12**50* 

Total volume 12268 


MB Ltd 

Ag 32* 

13 

181 65 131* 

Shell C 

Fb 32* 

10 

44 16* *35* 

Total open Interest 

203400 


45 *35* 
95 *35* 

30 *35* 
16* *35* 
13* *35* 
90 *35* 
45 US* 


spending Toyota, Ford nearer 
manufacturing pact 


on rise 


Ul’i 

on. 

07*. 


17/‘. 

U7>. 

Uh. 


U8 
»M’. 
IM 1 , 
IMVi 
* IMV, 
lU'.i 


OTTAWA (CP) — Capi 
tal spending by the petro 
leum and natural gas in¬ 
dustry from extraction to 
marketing is up sharply 
from a year ago, with dra¬ 
matic increases especially 
since 1975, figures from 
Statistics Canada indicated 
Tuesday. 

The agency projection 
says spending on construc¬ 
tion, machinery and equip¬ 
ment for petroleum and 
natural gas extraction in 
19S0 is up 32.2 per cent to $5 
billion compared with $3.7 
billion a year earlier. 

Meanwhile, spending on 
energy-related transporta¬ 
tion, including rail, water 
and pipelines is up an esti¬ 
mated 73.7 per cent at 
$459.3 million from $264.3 
million last year. 

Similarly, outlets of oil 
companies are spending 
24.4 per cent more on mar¬ 
keting related capital in¬ 
vestment. 


TOKYO (UPI) — Toyota and Ford are 
planning to jointly manufacture auto¬ 
mobiles in a venture aimed at easing 
criticism of Japanese auto exports to the 
United States, industry sources said Tues¬ 
day. 

The models involved and the number of 
cars to be produced still have to be 
decided. But Japanese businessmen and 
industry analysts said they were confi¬ 
dent that an agreement on those details 
would be reached. 

“Both have pride and they cannot scrap 
the project. The project will surely ma¬ 
terialize," said Sumitomo Bank president 
Ichiro Isoda. 

Japan's major economic daily, the 
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, said in a front¬ 
page story that Ford President Donald 
Petersen has shown increasing interest 
in the joint venture. 

It quoted Petersen as saying he hopes to 
continue negotiations with Toyota 
“through mutual cooperation and conces¬ 
sions.” 

Industry analysts said they see the 
project as a healthy step toward reduc¬ 
ing mounting complaints over mushroom¬ 
ing Japanese auto exports to America. 


The venture could also boost sales for 
ailing Ford. 

News of the talks between the two auto 
giants surfaced July 9, when President 
Carter was in Tokyo to attend memorial 
services for former Prime Minister Ma¬ 
sayoshi Ohira. 

The Nihon Keizai Shimbum said Peter¬ 
sen met hjs .counterpart, Fiji Toyota, 
president of Toyota Motors, on June 24 in 
Tokyo. 

The negotiations between the two auto 
makers have not been without snags. 

Toyota, the world’s second largest auto 
manufacturer and the biggest in Japan, 
expects the joint venture to produce less 
than 200,000 passenger cars a year, Isoda 
said. 

Ford has insisted the number be higher, 
he added. 

"They (Ford and Toyota) have also 
differed on what kind of a model they 
plan to make,” he said. 

Auto industry sources in Tokyo say the 
two car makers may use former Ford 
plants in the United Stales for the ven¬ 
ture. 

How many jobs would be created by the 
joint project, when 1 it would be located, 
and when it would start was not dis¬ 
closed. 


Treasure 
Island 


TORONTO (CP) — Price* were 
largely unchanged in brisk trading on 
the Canadian bond market Tuesday 
The short end ol the market was 
down 10 cents Mid . long-term, pro¬ 
vincial and corporate issues were un¬ 
changed. Day-to-day money was 
avatlableaf ti per cent 


Prices in effect until July 29, 1980 or while quantities last. 

We reserve the right to limit quantities. 


KHUSE 


REVY’S GREAT JULY SALE 


I 




2 W 


x 10 

GREENHOUSE PACKAGE 


Precut with base walls fully as¬ 
sembled. putty, nails, solid cedar 
door and 250 ft. of glass includ¬ 
ed. Do-it-your-self instruction 
sheet. 

CONCRETE 


349 


|00 


REVY 
PAINT 

Interior/Exterior Latex 

All-weather latex to use on stucco, 
wood, masonry. White. 

Reg. Retail 11.95 

9 95 

gal. 

All-Weather Exterior Gloss 

White alkyd gloss for exterior wood 
surfaces. Non-chalking. 

Reg. Retail 11.95 

9 95 


10% OFF ON ALL 
HAND TOOLS IN STOCK 


9” Bench Saw 
and Stand 

Rugged tilting arbour 
saw features 22 , 'x37'’ 
table with extension. 
Includes saw stand 
and extension. Motor 
and blade guard not 
included. Rockwell 
6201B. 


INCINERATOR 


BLOCK 

32x32x32 

No mortar required, 
just place blocks in 
position. 


SALE 


CONCRETE BLOCK 

BARBECUE 

New design. No mortar I: ■< 
required. Fast assembly. , 
Two grates included. Ap- K 
proximately 33" outside 
diameter 


ea. 


|95 j 

each 1 


(Rockwell 


hi.. - ' ‘- 


PICNIC TABLES 

Outdoor living is more tun with a sturdy 6-tt. 
cedar picnic table in your backyard. Legs and 
braces are pre-drilled lor 


CEDAR 

COMPOST BOX 


easy assembly. Package 
comes complete with 
hardware and instruc¬ 
tions. 


•a. 


195 


V. 




V 


Precut from rough cedar, 
ready to assemble. 


each 

Approx, size 4 x6'x36" 


UTILITY UTILITY 

ROUGH CEDAR rough cedar 

i"x6”x4' .59*.... POSTS 

1”X6”X5’ ......'75°each 

1”x6”x6’ . . 89°each O" 

1”x8”x4’ . 79°each 4x4x6 ’. “ ea 

1”x8”x5’ . 99°each 099 

1”x8”x6’ .... 1.19 each 4x4x8’ . 1# ea 


C/S-S4S 

CEDAR 


2x4 

8 and 10 only 


2x6 

8 and 10 only 


35* 

lin. ft. 


CEDAR PATIO TABLES 

These sturdy cedar tables fold A j- 

flat tor “take anywhere " con- | 
venience. 30" tables are I ■■ 
made of 2" cedar. ■ ML 

42” ROUND 
CEDAR TABLE 42 95 

Made of 2” Cedar ML 


BENCHES 


| v For 42" round Table 
““ 30”x12" made 

lin. ft. o» 2 cedar 


195 


A FENCE FOR 
EVERY YARD 


,_n=n 


THE KENT 

nr* 


Level 

Pickets, #2 




■ k fa fa e 


IT 


LOG CABIN RAIL 

Includes 4 x4 cedar posts, peeled, rough- 
sawn rails and galvanized nails Mm 48 
lineal feet 


jimmmmiml' 

Level picket fencing lor a traditional look, 
includes 4 x4 cedar posts 2 x4 utility 
rails 1 x6 fir-hem pickets and nails. Mm 
of 50 lineal feet. 4 high 

i 49 

lin. ft. 


GOOD ~ y ^ 
NEIGHBOUR No. 2 

Includes 4' x4 cedar posts. 2 x4 fir rails 
and 1x6 and wider rough cedar and nails. 
Min of 50 lineal feet 


GOOD NEIGHBOUR 
NO. 1 

4x4 posts, 2x4 rails, 1x6 and 
wider rough cedar and nails. Min. 
50 lineal feet. 

4’ 5’ 6’ 


4’ 


5’ 


6’ 


279 019 


lin. ft. 




Gergt R4. East 188-32111: 
OPOI VM am la kit pm. 

SATURDAY 


Well Help You Build It Better 



























































































: ■ ' -V ■ :• . . ■ ■ 

M ' 1 ? 



We're clearing our end-of-season lines throughout the store to make room for the arrival of new fall merchandise. 
Wednesday, July 23rd to Saturday, July 26th while quantities last. PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY. 


HOUSEWARES 

40-Pce. Stainless Steel Flatware Set 

19.99 


Hi-Ball Glasses, set of 4. 4.99 

Pitcher Set with Tray 4.99 

Steak Knife Set 2.99 

7-Pce. Ironstone Salad Set 7.99 

Melitta 10-Cup Coffee Maker 7.99 


Housewares, Main Floor. 

Home Furnishings Building 

SMALL APPLIANCES 

Proctor 4-Slice Toaster 32.99 

Standard Appliance Waffle Iron 26.99 

Westbend Frypan, nutmeg brown color. 

39.99 

^ Small Appliances. Main Floor. 

Home FurnrSnihgrs'Stjltdrng 


SPORTING GOODS 

Saucony Trainer Jogging Shoe. 5-Star 
rated. 29.99 

Depthking Downrigger. with built-in 
counter 79.99 

Women's Adidas Love Set Tennis Shoe 

19.99 


30% Off all Badminton Rackets. Reg 
8 98-60 98 6.29-42.69 

Unisex Hi-Rise Bicycle in burnt orange 
color 79.99 

Crab Trap, plastic coated wire construc¬ 
tion 19*99 

Little Chief Smoker 48.99 

Sporting Goods. Lower ^ain Floor 


PAINTS 

Stippletone Wall and Ceiling Texture 
Finish. Ultra white Gal. 9.99 

Home Style 

Exterior Flat Latex Gal. 9.99 


Home Styler 

Exterior Alkyd Gloss. Gal. 11.99 

Home Decorator Flat Latex for interior 
Available in off white colors plus white 

Gal. 9.99 

Ot. 3.29 


Home Decorator Interior Latex-Semi 
Gloss. For kitchens and bathrooms Avail¬ 
able in 8 off-white colors plus white. 

Gal. 11.99' 
Ot. 3.49 

Le-Baron Polyester Paint Brushes — 

100 mm. 4.69 

Paints. Lowar Main Floor 


HARDWARE 

6-Gal. Shop Vacuum, vacuums wet or 
dry. inside or out Model 61201 69.99 

Black & Decker Router with powerful t 
HP motor. Model 7616-04 69.99 

•- J 

Spacemaster Metal Shelving with 5 
adjustable shelves Model 670548 

21.99 

Black & Decker Jig Saw. cutsibevels. 
curves and holes Model 7504-04' 19.99 

Hot Spotter All Band Radar Detector 

117.99 

Cartrim by Mactac in assorted colors 34 
ft. lengths 14.97 

Brake Fluid. 16 02 . 2.19 

Hardware. Lower Main Floor 


TOYS 

Lil Count-A-Long Bus Ride-On with 
beeping horn, lift up storage seat, play 
tokens For ages 116 to 3 years Reg 
19 99 14.89 

Three Table Top Games: Spare Time 
Bowling, Half-Time Football and Double 
Play Baseball. For ages 8 to Adult Reg 
5.99 4.79 

Fisher Price Suzie Seal, a solid wood 
pull toy for ages 1-3 Reg 5 99 4.79 

Tag A Long Clown Doll, approx 12" 
high in colorful costume Gift Packaged 
Reg 9 99 7.99 

Toya. Lowar Main Floor 


NOTIONS 

Wooden Coat or Pant Hangars, set of 
3 2.69 

Fantastic Brush 14 | 

Notions. Lowar Mam Floor 


JEWELLERY/WATCHES 

Solar Powered Quaru LCO Alarm Cron 
ograpti Watch with time keeping mode 
alarm mode, chronograph mode end light 
Gold color 69.99 

Italian Chain* in Starting Stiver and 
V armed (gold plated tdver) Group in 
dude* chain* for neck ankle and wn*< 

>■•9 16.64 

Jrnb, SwHw 


Clearance of Women's 

FASHION WEAR 

Special groupings clear from all areas at Eaton's Fashion 
Floors. Save on fashions from Women's Shoes, Sportswear, 
Lingerie, Body Fashions, Coats, Dresses, No. 1 Shop, Signa¬ 
ture Shop. A great selection of fashions at Big Savings! 

3" to 236" 

Similar clearance in Eaton's Peppertree, Main Floor and 
Popular Price Sportswear, Third Floor 


LUGGAGE 


DRUG/SUNDRIES 


MEN'S SHOES 


Clearance of Samsonite Hard Shell At¬ 
taches for legal size folders Some have 
combination locks. In brown, tan or wine 
colors Carry-on size, 13x18 width, 3". 
4" and 5". 

Classic III, 3" Reg 77.00. 59.99; 4 
Reg 80-50, 63.99; 5" Reg 84,00, 

•6.99. 

Classic IOO, 2 Reg 86 00. 67.99; 3" 
Reg 89 00 70.99; 4 Reg. 93.00, 
73.99; 5" Reg 96 00, 75.99. ^ 

Sigma Attaches. 3" Reg. 103.00 81.99 
5" Reg. 108 00 85.99 

Luggage. Third Floor 


WOOLS/FANCY GOODS 

Rug Kits, contains pre cut Acrylic yarns 
and stamped canvas. Approx 18x24 
Choose Hootie Owl" or "Sailing" 9.99 

Quilted Knitting Bags, designs by Pen¬ 
ney Machine washable. Outside patch 
pocket. 9.99 

Afghan Kits. all-Acrylic yarns in shades 
of greens, browns, roses 5.99 

Floor Tapestry Frame. 15 only. Dark 
wood finish. Approx. 27" wide 9.99 
Wools/Fancy Goods. Third Floor 


HOUSEHOLD LINENS 

Fieldcrest 'Catalina'' Towels: Bath 

6.97, Hand. 4.25 f Face. 1.75 

"Assorted Sheets and Cases 

2.97 to 22.97 

Assorted Comforters in various prints. 
Twin 26.97, Double 29.97, Queen 
37.97 

Assorted Table Linens, choose from doi¬ 
lies. runners, placemats. table cloths, 
napkins plus more. 990 to 49.99 

Assorted Kitchen Linens. Group includes 
aprons, tea towels, bun basket liners and 

more. 99C to 11.99 

Household Linens. Third Floor 


CAMERAS 


BUSINESS MACHINES 


Glade Flow-Through Air Freshener 89$ Status Leather Dress Shoes in 3 styles: 

The Brogue, rich brown leather uppers 
with double sole Broken sizes. 24.99 

The Moccasin, four eyelet tie with stitch 
styling black leather uppers, double soles 
Broken sizes 24.99 

The Plain Toe. grain leather uppers with 
three eyelet tie and double sole. In black 
or brown colors. Broken sizes. 24.99 

«r / “ Men's Shoes. Main Floor 


Milk Plus 6 Combination Pack, includes 
160 ml cleanser and 110 ml mois¬ 
turizer. 3.85 

Aqua Fresh Toothpaste, 100 ml 89C 

Vaseline Lotion, 500 ml plus 32% 

more. 2.29 

R.ach Toothbrushes, 694 

Q-Tips, 400 s 1.B7 

Drug/Sundries. Lower Main Floor 


Kodak Instant Flashes. Model B&C 

24.99 

Pantax Banjo Camara Straps. Reg 7 95 

2.99 

Camara Gadget Bag. 2 Only. Reg 
4996 29.99 

Super View Slide Sorter. S Only, Reg 
2895 19.99 

Vivitar 700 Pocket Camera. Reg 47.99 

34.99 


Viking Cartridge Auto 12 Typewriter 
12 carriage with automatic return Full 
office keyboard 44 keys. 88 characters 
Full **b pica or eW type 
carrying cat# 


BARGAIN CENTRE 

Men s Sport Shorts, elastic waist in 
colours of red. green, white, navy 

S.M.L.XL. 4.99-7.99 

Substandard Sport Socks, white with 
colored stripe top. One size fits all 99$ 

Men's T-Shirts in assorted styles and 
colors. Short sleeved Broken sizes. 

4.99-11.99 

Men's Polo Pyjamas. 100% cotton with 
round neck and short sleeves. Elastic 
waist. S. and M. only. 6.99 

Bath Sheets, large size. 48x72" Blue, 
red. pink, brown. 14.99 

Women's Long Sleeve Blouses in vari¬ 
ous colors and styles. Broken sizes. 9.99 

Women's Pants, elastic waist, assorted 
colors. Broken sizes. 6.99 

Women's Dresses by Marjorie Hamilton. 
100% polyester in long or short sleeve 
style. Floral patterns. Broken sizes. 11.99 

Bargain Centra Lower Main Floor 


HOSIERY 

"Sheer Indulgence" Panties and Hose 
in One by Kayser. 2 Styles 

Regular 1.69, Control Top. 1.99 

Selection of Discontinued Pantyhose in 

assorted styles and colors. Control Top 
Support and Regular included Limited 
sizes and colors 64$-3.75 

Selection of Danskin Bodysuits, shorts 
and tops Limited sizes and colors 

7.99-21.60 

Hosiery. Main Floor 


MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Short Sleeved Shirt in assorted colors 
and patterns S.M.L.XL 


Men's Walking Shorts in 100% polyes¬ 
ter or potyester/cotton blend Assorted 
colors and patterns Broken sizes 32-40 


Men's Velour Pullovers in long or short 
sleeve styles Assorted colors in broken 
sizes >4 


Luggage MV** 

144,11 


100% Silk Ties in venous stripe colors 


Men * Judo 

of brown, blue 
velour On* sue 


BOYS' WEAR 

30% Off Entire Selection of Boys' 
Shorts. Sizes 4-16, S.M.L. Reg 5.98- 

6 50 4.16-4.58 

20% Off Le Colutier Jesns. 2 styles to 
choose from. Sizes 7-16. Reg. 18.50 

14.S0 

20% Off Klondike Jeans and Cords. 

Regular and Slim Cut. Sizes 4-6X. Reg 
1198 a.BS 

25% Off Entire Selection of Summer 
T-Shirts. Sizes 4-16. Reg 2.98-11.50 

2.23-6.62 

Boys' Wsar, Third Floor 


INFANTS' WEAR 

25% Off Infant's T-Shirts with short 
sleeves Reg. 3 28-8.68. 2.46-6.51 

25% Off Buster Brown T-Shirts and 
Shorts. Reg 4 78-7.48 3.66.6.61 

29% Off Strolee Highchair, Reg 67.98 

47.66 

27% Off Infant's 70 Coil Mattress. 

Reg 34 00 . 24.80 

Infant's Wsar. Third Floor 


GIRL'S WEAR 

Summer Tops in sleeveless, short sleeves, 
round or V-neck styles. Sizes 7-14 Reg 
4 98 to 11.98. 3.99-5.99 

Summer Shorts, various colors in Satin 
and cottons. Sizes 7-14. 3.99 

Summer Pants in plain shades of red. 
green, turquoise, brown and blue. Sizes 
7-14 9.49 

Summer Satin Bomber Jackets with 
knitted cuffs. Sizes 7-14 9.99 


Summer Dresses in a wide assortment of 
patterns and fabrics. Sizes 2-6X. 

GirH Woof . Third Floor 


DRAPERIES 

Pinch Pleated Semi-Sheer Drapes in 

colors of rust, beige, white or blue 
75x54 " >•.••, 100x54 *4.96. 

76x84 ’ *0.99, 100x84 ' 94.99, 
125x84" 44J8, 150x84" 


by Ceuidfiekf Color* 
beigS' 100% polyester 
lit* all 


terns. 

Tsvan. 


Ail are quilted and lightweight 
36.66, Queen. 


Look for Many Non-Advertisod Specials around the Store 


PICTURES 

Unfinished Wood Door Mirrors, approxi¬ 
mately 12x48". 11.99 

Pictures. Second Floor. 

Home Furnishings Building 


FABRICS 

50% Off Plain Polyester. dress and 
blouse weight in a good color selection 
Approx 115 cm wide Reg 3 97-15 00 

m 1.66-7.46 

50% Off 100% Polyester Seed Jersey. 

In various fashion colors Approx 150 
cm wide Reg 20.00 m 6.66 m 

50% Off Dress Weight Wool/Nylon 
Blend. In light summer colors Approx. 
150 cm wide 

Reg. 7 00-18 00 m 8.46 m 

50% Wool Blend Heavy Boucle. In dark 
shades Suitable for Fail coats or suits 
Approx. 150 cm wide, Reg 30 00 m 

14.66 m 

Fabrics, Third Floor 


GARDEN SHOP 

Deluxe Electric Charcoal and Log Light¬ 
er. Reg. 10.95 5.65 

Barbecue Tool set, 3 pee Includes tongs, 
fork and lifter. Reg. 6.35. 3.86 

Fireplace Bar-B-Cue, for indoor, outdoor 
and fireside dining Reg .14.95 7.85 

K-Tel Barbecue Cooking Aid Tender 
and Spice, meat tenderizer and spice 
dispenser. Reg 4 99 2.66 

Black & Decker Cordless Electric Mod 
4 Spot Vacuum. 1 only. Reg 44 99 

26.99 

Spool Tool, for holding extension cords 
neatly Reg 12 98 8.98 

McCulloch 16" Chain Saw. Model No 
510 2 Only. Reg 274 95 239.95 

McCulloch 16" Chain Saw. Model No 
320. 1 Only. Reg 259 95 229.95 

McCulloch 12" Chain Saw. Model No 
1 10 2 Only Reg. 144 95 119.95 

Black & Decker Lawnmower Replace¬ 
ment Bag. (does not include frame ) Reg 

15 95. 10.95 

Humming Bird Feeder. 9-oz. Reg 7.90 

5.50 

With Perch. Reg. 9.29 6.59 

Water Spike. Reg 4.29 2.89 

Water Eze 50’ Indoor Watering Hose. 
Reg 11.99 7.99 

Charmglow Gas Barbecue Grill. 3 Only 

Reg. 299.95 229.95 

Garden Shop. Main Floor. 

Homo Furnishings Building 


HANDBAGS 

Vi Off Fashion Leather Handbags. 

Choose from brown, black and tan colors 
in assorted styles. Mostly one-of-a kind 
Reg 60 00-120.00 39.99-79.99 

Benton Canvas Handbags. In 3 styles 
Natural, tan or brown. 14.49-19.29 

Men's and Women's Tilley Small Leath 
ers. In assorted styles. 2.99-12.49 

Handbags. Main Floor 

* - ... I 


ACCESSORIES 

Women’s Tube Tops. In assorted styles 
and colors. Terry, Spandex or cotton 
fabrics 1.99-3.99 

AcciuorrtS, Main Floor 


BOOKS 

Family Circle Cook books: Group in¬ 
cludes meat, buffet entertaining fast 
meals, vegetables and meatless meals 
brunches and lunches 2.99 

Large Selection of Counter Soiled 
Books. From regular slock with assorted 
titles including the latest best sellers 

2-99-16.00 

Beaks. La wn Main Floor 


STATIONERY 

AM Occasion Cards, including Birthday. 
Anniversary and Friendship 25 cards 
with envelopes Beg 2 99 1.90 

Novelty Key Rings, with a mmsture 
Thong attached Rag 1 98 904 

C ewdsmps re ry BtHenery. by Tachstykrt 
m up to data graphic designs Assorted 
style* and color* Reg 3 60 to 20 00. 

1.76-19.00 

*!,.■■■ ry Uaa,tll.Neo 



< 





















\ £l)e Colonist. 


THE CAPITAL 


* * Section Two/Wednesday, July 23, 1980/Page 11 


MERRYFIELD’S 
GREAT-GRANDSON 
KNOWS TRICKS 
OF THE TRADE 


Harrison 
pops dart 
into 
colorful 
tube 




He peers into tube, 
hand poised; 
dart’s secure in base 


At 15, 
he’s 

in magic 
circle 


Mike Harrison is more likely to pull a 
flower from behind your ear lhan he is to 
talk about his growing career as a profes¬ 
sional magician. 

The 15-year-old Harrison has been in¬ 
terested in the ancient art of sleight-of- 
hand for3!4 years. 

While being modest about his accom¬ 
plishments to the point of shyness (but 
only offstage) he'll likely go far in the 
profession if he stays with it. 

HE WON RECOGNITION from his 
peers and elders at an international con¬ 
vention of magicians in Oregon at the 
weekend. 

He won the award for outstanding 
showmanship and production, beating out 
competitors in eight other categories for 
the top honor. 

Mike, who’ll be going into Grade 10 at 
Dunsmuir high school this September, 
also won the junior category (14 to 18 
years) award at the convention, spon¬ 
sored by the Pacific Coast Association of 
Magicians. 

HIS MOTHER. Irene Harrison, said her 
son, the youngest of six children, be¬ 
came interested in magic when he was 
given a “little magic kit advertised on 
TV" for Christmas in 1977. 

He started practising with it, became 
more involved, and eventually dropped 
most of his other activities to pursue the 
magician's art. 

"He's met with Tony Eng and other 



Colonist photos by Alex Barta 


Medical experts support 

r 

one-hospital child services 


Gift of $500,000 assures 
the best for pediatrics 


A $500,000 gift from the Queen 
Alexandra Hospital for Sick Children 
will make the pediatric unit at the 
new Helmcken Road Hospital “one of 
the finest units in the country,” 
Queen Alexandra Hospital board 
chairman Michael Field said Tues¬ 
day. 

The money, which comes from the 
Queen Alexandra Hospital's endow¬ 
ment, will be primarily used in the 
pediatric ambulatory care unit at the 
hospital. The unit was “non-existent" 


when the Queen Alexandra Hospital 
and the Pearkes Clinic first became 
involved in its planning. Field said. 
Since then it has been significantly 
improved with the advice of out¬ 
side consultants from across the 
country and consultations with local 
physicians. 

“We see It developing into a region¬ 
al centre, serving the Island and the 
Charlottes,” Held said ; 

The hospital, now under construc¬ 
tion, will be completed some time in 
1982. 


Pollution highest 
at Cordova Bay, 
Sayward Beach 


The most polluted beach 
in Greater Victoria in the 
last month was Cordova 
Bay, according to bacterio¬ 
logical tests conducted by 
the regional public health 
department. 

The lest results, ex¬ 
pressed in mean log aver¬ 
ages of fecal coliform bac¬ 
teria, with 200 being the 
maximum permissible 
level for swimming over a 
five-week period, show that 
all four sampling locations 


at Cordova Bay exceeded 
the limit. One location had 
a coliform count of 1,295; 
others had counts of 785, 
429 and 348. 

Runnerup as most-pol¬ 
luted was Sayward Beach, 
just north of Cordova Bay, 
with 847 at one location and 
91 at another. 

Other beaches over the 
200 mark are Mount Doug¬ 
las (292 and 324), North 
Prospect Lake (334), and 
Esquimau Lagoon at 
Portsmouth (355). Beaches 


Voila! A bouquet 


local magicians to talk trade and pick up 
some pointers, and also docs some ven¬ 
triloquism." 

HARRISON LIKES to involve young 
children in his magic (they're called “ef¬ 
fects" in the trade), and brings some 
comedy to his routines as well. 

He has numerous professional per¬ 
formances under his belt and last Christ¬ 
mas turned away more jobs than he could 
handle. In addition, he’s performed for 
seniors groups, a lodge convention, at 
Woodward's and McDonalds, and volun¬ 
teered for some of the shows at folkfcst. 

Harrison recently was chosen a Vic¬ 
toria representative in the Pacific Na¬ 
tional Exhibition talent quest and will be 
performing there in August. 

WHILE NOT quite ready to make an 
elephant vanish from the stage—partly 
because of the logistical difficulties of 
carrying one around—he's quite a show¬ 
man. 

In a way, he's following the steps of his 
great grandfather, Frank Merryfield, a 
popular Victoria magician for many 
years until his death some 15 years ago. 


PHYSICIANS BACK 
BEACH CLEANUP 

Sewage treatment to clean up the Capital Region’s 
polluted beaches appears to have unanimous support 
from the region’s physicians, one physician concerned 
about the problem said Tuesday. 

Dr. Romeo Sanglap, who has been drumming up 
support foraewage treatment from other physicians, said 
Tuesday that they arc "almost unanimous. They are 
really supportive of the idea." 

Talks Tuesday with executive members of the 
Victoria Medical Society indicate that they are be¬ 
hind the idea, Sanglap said; 

“It sounds now that we will be speaking as one 
voice." 

Sanglap said Monday that while the health risks 
appear to be minimal because of the high dilution of 
bacteria in the waters, the polluted beaches represent 
a threat to mental health and social well-being. 


with counts between 100 
and 200 are Gyro Park (112) 
and Willows (138, 143 and 
36), with the lowest count at 
Willows being the south 
end. 

The cleanest waters in 
the region belong to Kins¬ 
men Park Pool, Durrancc 
Lake, Saxe Point Park, St. 
Mary's Lake, Glen Lake- 
Ayton, Kemp Lake-Chubb, 
Glinz Lake, Langford 
Lakc-Goldstream, and 
Young Lake, with readings 
of five or less. 

Figures for other popular 
locations are Elk Lake, 
nine to 16, depending on 
location; Beaver Lake 
North, 10; Gorge Park-Til- 
licum, 36; Fleming Beach, 
27; Pat Bay, eight to 14; 
Island View Beach, 13 to 50; 
Portage Inlet, 63; Thetis 
Lake, seven to nine; 
Florence Lake, nine to 22; 
the outside of Esquimau 
Lagoon, 17 to 40; Witty’sv 
Lagoon, 34; Weir’s Beach, 
three to 13; Sookc Potholes, 
7; and Sooke Flats, 14. 

Beaches between Ogden 
Point and McMieking Point 
are posted for pollution but 
are not routinely tested. 

Some areas are sampled 
weekly, some only month¬ 
ly. The results released this 
week arc those of the latest 
tests, which could have 
been done one to four 
weeks previously, or more. 


By PALL Dc GROOT 


A blue-ribbon panel of medical consultants 
called in to study child health care in the Capital 
Region has unanimously backed a single regional 
centre for pediatrics and obstetrics. 

The consultants, most of them from university 
medical faculties and children's hospitals across North 
America, “uniformly recommended that pediatric and 
obstetrical services be located in only one hospital and 
that both services should be in the same hospital," 
Michael Field, chairman of the board of Queen Alexandra 
Hospital for Sick Children said Tuesday.. 

The consultants visited Victoria as part of the re¬ 
gional Child Health Care Study, due for release in 
August, which received substantial financial assistance 
from the Queen Alexandra and the G.R. Pearkes Centre, 
Field said. The consultants made no recommendations on 
the geographical location of the services, because the 
study’s terms of reference incorporated the assump¬ 
tion that a regional decision to locate them at the 
Helmcken Road site would stand. 

The preliminary findings of the yet-to-be-released 
study have already had a major impact on the design 
of the new hospital’s pediatric and obstetrical ser¬ 
vices, and those involved with the sfcdy now strongly 
support the idea of a single regional unit, Field said. 
Among other things, ambulatory care at the new hos¬ 
pital has been greatly expanded, and the unit will 
serve as a focal point for children’s health service in 
the region and beyond, Field said. 

The consultants said that bolh pediatric and obstetri¬ 
cal patients require in-hospital access to good medi¬ 
cal specialty services and that hospitalized children 
often require a higher level of specialty service than 
their adult counterparts. Modifications have been carried 
out in planning for the new hospital to ensure that 
specialty services will be complete, Field said. 

He noted that there had been some discussion of in¬ 
fant mortality rates, but little about the handicaps 
among children who survive problem births. 

“Many of these handicaps arc considered pre¬ 
ventable if modern knowledge of reproductive medicine 
could be universally applied. Organizations such as the 
Queen Alexandra and the G.R. Pearkes Centre arc very 
conscious of the number of heartaches and the eco¬ 
nomic cost of handicaps because they work with handi¬ 
capped children. Anything which can be done to prevent 
handicaps would be worthwhile." 

‘THE WAY TO GO’ 

“We have consulted not only with outside consul¬ 
tants, but all the local doctors and specialists and the 
consensus is that regionalization is the' way to go." 
Field said. 

The Queen Alexandra's support for the regional 
centre comes at a time when its future is in doubt. 
Regionalization is strongly favored by the regional 
hospital and health planning commission, but the Capital 
Regional Hospital Board will be discussing today two 
motions which could change that. ■> 

One would give back to the board decision-making 
powers which It has delegated to the commission, 
enabling the board rather than the commission to 
have the final say, and the other would permit the 
continuance of obstetrics and pediatrics at Royal Jubilee 
Hospital for two years after the Helmcken Road hospital 
is complete. 

The latter, supported by Dr. Scott Wallace and a 
number of other doctors, would enable regional resi¬ 
dents to make their own choice between the two hos¬ 
pitals, but opponents of the motion say it will endanger 
high-level care at Helmcken Road by keeping its pa 
tient load below levels required to sustain the activities of 
specialist physicians and nurses. 


Temple work to resume 


Restoration of Temple 
Emanuel, Victoria’s 117 
year-old synagogue, should 
resume within a week or 
two, Martin Levin, chair¬ 
man of the restoration 
committee, said Tuesday. 

Levin said work had to be 
halted in May after the 
stucco was stripped from 
the exterior for several 
reasons, principally to 
allow a sub contractor who 
will remove the paint from 
the original brick to obtain 
a special chemical for the 
job from eastern Canada. 

“We ruled out sandblast- 
ihg — the standard 
method—because the an¬ 
cient brick would probably 


Crystal Pool fee hike stalled 


Crystal Pool swimming 
fees, particularly season 
ticket rates, won’t be in¬ 
creased for the time being. 

And if Aid. Robert 
Wright has anything to do 
w ith it. they won't go up for 
a long time. 

At a meeting Tuesday of 
Victoria city council’s 
parks committee. Wright 
said it would be irresponsi 
ble to raise the fees when 
the city was trying to en 
courage people to use the 
pool 

The proposal by recrc 


WRIGHT FIGHTS $92 PROPOSAL 


ation director Jack Morgan 
to raise fees by about 25 per 
cent was tabled until parks 
committee chairman Aid. 
Ken Sinclair returns from 
vacation. 

Wright told the commit¬ 
tee that if anything, the 
rates should be reduced 
"I see no economic' ad¬ 
vantage in charging 
more.” he said 
Wright added lie knew 


from his own business that 
season pass holders en 
couraged others to use the 
facilities 

When Morgan told the 
committee the season 
passes hadn't been a very- 
popular item. Aid William 
McElroy replied “They’ll 
even be less popular if we 
increase the pric e ’’ 

“Yeah, you’ll wipe them 
out.’ added Wright 


Morgan had recommend 
ed that the price for a 12- 
month pass be increased to 
$92 from $75. A three- 
month season pass, he sug 
gested. should go up to $32 
from the present $26 
The charge for early bird 
and noon hour passes, hr 
said. should be raised to $6 
a month, an inc rrase of $1 
The proposed rales were 
to go into effect Sept I 


start corroding away once 
the outer layer was re¬ 
moved," he said. 

Another reason for the 
delay in progress was that 
a brickworks had to be 
found that could replicate 
some of the original bricks 
used in construction and 
damaged over the years. 

“About eight or nine 
bricks had to have a special 
mould made for them since 
they are of unusual shape,” 
Levin added. 

A brick factory in Van¬ 
couver, Wash., is making 
the replacement bricks and 
reported this week that it 
had fired them and was 
waiting for them to cure. 

Levin said advisers at the 
Heritage Trust were work¬ 
ing in conjunction with the 
restoration committee to 
ascertain the formula for 
the original mortar used in 
laying the bricks. 

" Portland cement, the 
basic constituent of today’s 
mortar, has a different ex¬ 
pansion and contraction 
rate to the old lime-based 
mortars and so we have to 
be authentic not just for 
historical accuracy but to 
meet physical demands." 
he said 

Although the boarded up 


windows give the building 
an abandoned look, it is still 
being used for services. 
Levin said, adding he hopes 
the exterior restoration- 
estimated to cost $100,000- 
will be finished by this fall. 

Meanwhile, the commit¬ 
tee still needs about $75,000 


before it can start work on 
interior restoration, which 
will cost about $150,000 all 
told. 

Levin said donations, 
which are tax-free and will 
be acknowledged, can be 
sent to Congregation 
Emanuel, 1461 Blanshard, 
Victoria, V8W 2J3. 


SUN, FOG 
PLAY UP 

A “solid wall of fog" 
reflecting the setting 
sun was responsible 
Tuesday for a glow to 
the south that some 
Victorians mistook for 
a fire in the Port An¬ 
geles, Wash., area, a 
U.S. Coast Guard 
spokesman said. 


Banana strip may get 
8-storey office block 


Plans for an eight-storey office building 
and a shopping centre in the so-called 
Saanich civic core were discussed by- 
council and development company rep¬ 
resentatives at an in-camera meeting 
Monday, the Colonist has learned. 

The development would occur on a 
triangular three-acre site directly across 
from the municipal hall. 

The core area study unveiled three 
years ago by the planning department 
brought forth a vision of a vibrant “people 
place" along the narrow banana-shaped 
strip of land between Vernon and Sey¬ 
mour. 

But the area, destined to become the 
cultural, institutional and social centre 
of the municipality is rapidly turning into 
a slum, pitted with barely-started con 
structioo sites and boarded-up houses 

The proposal being considered by coun 
cil would be done under a Development 
Area permit 

A municipal hall source said the propos 
al could be unveiled publicly within a 
month 


Planners were asked several months 
ago to examine land uses In the core be¬ 
cause of a lack of interest by developers in 
the 18-acre site. 

Reasons cited by developers include 
three lanes of fast-moving traffic sur¬ 
rounding the core area and high develop 
ment costs. 

Mayor Mel Couvelior recently turned to 
the Greater Victoria Real Estate Board 
for assistance in helping planners rework 
their idealistic concept into a more prac¬ 
tical land-use proposal 

However, chief municipal planner Gil 
Laurenson is convinced the dream is still 
very much alive. 

“All it needs is time to become a reality, 
l-ong-term planning is the key if the 
dream is to become a reality," he said in a 
recent interview. 

Laurenson said be was afraid council 
would succumb to a short-term com 
promise that would jeopardize the over¬ 
all core development 

The police- board asked council last 
month to consider building the proposed 
new $4 million police building in the core 
I 





























t 


I 


V, 


SPORTS 

Page 12/Wednesday, July 23, 1980 * * 



<£()? Colonist. 


Slick-fielding visitors snatch split with Budgets 


Phoenix Southern Truck 
Haiders waited until their 
last chance Tuesday before 
pulling out a split of their 
exhibition men's fastball 
doubleheader with Victoria 
Budgets. 

The slick-fielding visi¬ 
tors hadn't scored in the 
previous 13 innings but they 
pushed three runs across in 
the top of the seventh of the 
nightcap for a 3-2 victory 
before about 500 wind- 


chilled fans at Royal Ath¬ 
letic Park. 

Budgets, now 16-6 in 
Super Series play this sea¬ 
son, had scored a 1-0 win 
in the opener. 

Budgets had two runs 
with only one out in the first 
inning of the second game 
but couldn't solve righth¬ 
ander Gil Aragon, although 
a seventh-inning charge 
fell inches short. 

In the first inning, Ara¬ 


gon hit leadoff batter Dave 
Williams, designated hitter 
Pete Songhurst followed 
with an infield single and 
Williams took third when 
the throw to first went into 
right field. Reg Underwood 
followed with a single and 
Bob Burrows drove home 
Songhurst with a long sac¬ 
rifice fly. 

The score stood that way 
until the seventh, when 
Mark Smith, who finished 
with II strikeouts, hit 


Dennis Umble with a pitch 
to open the inning. 

Butch Chambers singled 
to right field and when 
fielder Dennis Eckert bob- 
bled the ball, Umble came 
in to score. Jim Sharp re¬ 
placed Chambers as a 
pinch runner and scored 
when second-baseman 
Randy Benn’s throw to the 
plate was late after Mike 
Strausser had hit a ground¬ 
er. 

Strausser took second 


base on a wild pitch and 
scored the go-ahead run on 
a single by Jerry Keller- 
hals. 

Bob Wilson and Dave 
Williams reached base 
with one out in the Victoria 
seventh before Songhurst 
struck out and Underwood 
lined out to second base- 
man Kellerhals. 

In the first game, third- 
baseman John Green pro¬ 
vided all the offence with a 


leadoff homer in the second Chambers and a two-out 
inning, his first appear- double to rightfielder Dave 
ance at the plate for Bud- Ferris in the third. 

fiTES Wl"JLi!!3* The Phoenix fielders 
played flawless defence 


team from the Canadian 
national squad at the re¬ 
cent world championship in 
Tacoma. 


The run was all Dave 
Wilson needed as he struck 
out eight batters, didn't 
allow a base on balls and 
gave up only two hits, a 
second-inning single by 


and pulled off a sensational 
double play in the sixth in¬ 
ning after Underwood had 
drawn a leadoff base on 
balls. 

Burrows slashed a drive 
at pitcher Sharp, who 
threw out the sliding Un¬ 
derwood at second. Short¬ 


stop Strausser, evading 
Underwood, relayed the 
ball to first to get Burrows 
by a step. 

The teams play another 
doubleheader tonight, 
starting at 7 p.m. 

pnofoin ooooooo — oio 

aUOGETS 010 000 K —14 1 

Jim Sharp and Butch Chambers; 
Dave Wilson 9-6 and Bob Burrows 
MR: Budgets — John Green (21. 


008 006 3 - 3 J 3 

BUDGETS 200 MO 0-2 6 1 

Gil Aragon and Chambers; Mark 
Smith 16-5 and Burrows. 


Haslam brilliant 
in speedway win 


By REG REYNOLDS 

Cotoolit staff 

Roy Haslam put on a 
sensational driving display 
lo win the second round of 
Ihe Speedweek Northwest 
scries for superstocks 
Tuesday at Western Speed¬ 
way. 

The former Canada 200 
champion thrilled approxi 
mately 4,000 hometown 
fans, winning thrilling 
duels with new track rec¬ 
ord holder Ron Esau of San 
Diego and Bob Fox of Bre¬ 
merton. Wash. 

Both Haslam and Esau 


Legion 
topples 
leaders 
— again 


After spending much of 
the Western Canada Major 
Junior Lacrosse League 
season in the cellar, Esqui¬ 
mau Legion hasn't built a 
rep as a giant-killer. 

But the pesky Legion¬ 
naires have developed a 
knack of picking on the 
league's front-runners. 

Legion upset first-place 
New Westminster Salmon- 
bellies 13-7 at Esquimau 
Sports Centre Tuesday 
night, the Legion's third 
triumph over New West 
this season. 

Tom Woods, a pickup 
from Senior B, helped bol¬ 
ster the attack, firing four 
goals past netminder Ron 
Maelsaac, Mike Thomas 
also put four shots behind 
Mclsaac, who was able to 
stop 34 shots. 

Derek Croucher was out¬ 
standing in the Legion goal, 
fending off 38 drives. 

Terry Jay, Russ Ken¬ 
nedy, John Carruthers 
(who added five assists), 
Bruce Alexander and Dave 
Angrove each scored one 
Esquimau goal. 

In reply, Bruce Cowie 
tallied three times and 
Dave Thornhill twice. Pro¬ 
viding New Westminster 
singles were Terry Miller 
and Ross Gatensbury. 


New Wesl 

kirhmond 

Coquitlam 

Burnaby 

Esquimau 


Additional sport 

14,16,21, 22,23 


G W L F A PIS 

70 IS S 0 2S4 223 30 

12 10 7 0 2« 269 20 

19 8 10 1 209 230 12 

19 8 10 I 243 219 17 

21 7 14 0 2S4 26S 14 


started in the middle of the 
pack for the 75-lap main 
event. 

NASCAR veteran Red 
Farmer of Hueytown, Ala. 
was the early leader but 
Haslam and Esau passed 
him on the 13th lap. 

Esau took the lead on the 
16 th and held off Haslam 
until the 51st lap when his 
two front tires blew. 

Then it was a race be¬ 
tween Haslam and Fox, 
who edged ahead on lap 69. 

Haslam went underneath 
Fox on the first turn of the 
70th lap and when their 
cars bumped. Fox spun out 
and lost a lap, leaving Has¬ 
lam a clear the 

checkered 

SupcrstockfiJvOTran Odie 
Robertson, winner of the 
first leg of the series over 
the weekend at Skagit 
Speedway, was forced out 
of the practice laps with a 
broken rear axle and spent 
almost two hours waiting 
until a replacement could 
be obtained from a wreck¬ 
ing yard on the Malahat. 

The Denver speedster 
entered and easily won the 
"B” main event but was 
forced to start near the 
back of the pack in the 
feature race. 

A1 Vanderbyl of Victoria 
placed second in the "B” 
main and qualified and 
Tom Berrow of Coquitlam, 
who had been “black- 
flagged" for dropping oil 
on the track, successfully 
appealed the decision and 
advanced to the main 
event. 

Earlier in the program. 
Esau circled the Langford 
oval in 15.921 seconds, the 


* * * 

"A" dash — 1. JoeMusfelt, victoria; 
2. Rov Smith. Victoria; 3. Ron Esau, 
San Diego; 4. Bob Fox, Bremerton, 
Wash. 

*’B" dash — 1. Craig Ovson. Vic¬ 
toria; 2. Jim Caudwell, Victoria; 3, 
Brent Metrie, Puyallup, Wash.; 4. 
Marsh Mormyluk. St. Albert Alta 

First heat — 1. Tom Berrow, Coquit¬ 
lam; 2. Gary Nelner, Edmonton. 3. 
Jeff Ploeg. Bellingham; 4 Seigv 
Sawatski, Victoria. 

Second heat — 1. Frank Swords, 
Bakersfield, Calif.; 2. Al Adams, Sur 
rev; 3. Al Vanderbyl, Victoria. 4. 
Dyson. 

Fast heat — 1. Larry Hegeman, La¬ 
keside. Call!.; 2. Roy Haslam. Vic¬ 
toria; 3. Red Farmer, Hueytown, Ala.; 
4. Esau. 

“B" main — 1 Odle Robertson. Den¬ 
ver; 2. Vanderbyl; 3. Nelner, 4. Roy 
Blumenhagen, Bremerton, Wash. 

"A" main — 1. Halsam, 2. Steve 
Starr. Woodland Hills, Calif.; 3. Farm 
er; 4. Adams. 5 Smith. 


Strike over 

WINNIPEG (CP) — A 
strike by jockeys which 
cancelled today’s racing 
card at Assiniboia Downs 
has ended after jockeys 
and horsemen settled a dis¬ 
pute over purse distribu¬ 
tion and racing will resume 
Friday, a spokesman for 
the horsemen said. 


first driver ever to crack 
the i&secnod barrier. 

The track record was 
broken five times in 
qualifying runs with Vic¬ 
toria's Joe Musfelt setting 
the previous standard at 
16.35 seconds. 

Musfelt won the “A” 
dash, Craig Dyson of Vic¬ 
toria won the “B" dash, 
Berrow won the first heat, 
Frank Swords of Bakers¬ 
field, Calif., nabbed the 
second heat and Larry He¬ 
geman of Lakeside, Calif., 
won the fast heat. Has¬ 
lam was second in the fast 
heat. Farmer was third and 
Esau fourth. 

The series continues here 
Thursday night before 
moving to Evergreen 
Speedway in Monroe, 
Wash., for the grand finale 
on Sunday. 



AM> Ban, photo 


Ron Esau (1) of San Diego, who set track record earlier, duels with Bob Fox during trophy dash 


Minor baseball pla yoffs 

Firefighters nip 
Nanaimo team 


Dave DeVana provided 
the winning run with a 
bases loaded single Tues¬ 
day night and Clark Austin 
authored a six-hitter as 
Victoria Firefighters 
vaulted their first hurdle at 
the B.C. Senior Babe Ruth 
baseball championships. 

Firefighters edged Nan¬ 
aimo 6-5 at Lambrick Park, 
as the tournament opened 
with two games. 

Ken Docherty tagged 
three hits for the losers. 

In the other game for 
16-18 year-olds, Ron Hume 
and Arni Stadler combined 
on a two-hitter as Merritt 
slipped past Trail 4-3. 

Dave Demchuck was 
Trail's best hitter, supply¬ 
ing two safeties. 

The tournament con¬ 
tinues today with games at 
3 and 6 p in. North Vancou¬ 
ver meets Prince George in 
the first and another entry 
from Victoria Firefighters 
league, the host team, 
plays a Vancouver-Coquit- 
lam entry in the second. 

In Prince George, Gor¬ 
don Head Cosmopolitans 
pounced for six runs in the 
first inning and carried on 


to a 14-7 victory over Dun¬ 
can in their first game of 
the B.C. Babe Ruth (14-15) 
championships. 

Daryn Lansdell was the 
winner. Cosmos face either 
Trail or host Nechako 
today at 6 p.m. 

Another band of Cosmo¬ 
politans, those battling for 
the provincial 13-year-old 
Babe Ruth crown, went 
down to defeat in a tourna¬ 
ment final at Squamish. 

Vancouver Inter-Com¬ 
munity got by the Victoria 
club 11-9. 

Meanwhile, Darren Co¬ 
pley provided power and 
pitching Tuesday night as 
Layritz clobbered Oak Bay 
12-2 at Hampton Park in the 
second game of the Greater 
Victoria Little League dis¬ 
trict playoffs. 

Copley spun a four-hitter 
while hurling the route and 
cracked a two-run home 
run in Layritz’ seven-run 
fifth inning. 

Copley's mates collected 
14 hits in support, with Dale 
Toronitz connecting for 
three hits. 

Tonight, Gordon Head 
plays Triangle at 6:36 as the 
playoffs continue. 


Lions outclass Bombers 
Als rally to edge Ti-Cats 


Hosts outscore Blues 


BELLINGHAM — Bell 
ingham Mariners didn't 
play like the first-place 
baseball team in the North¬ 
west League's Northern 
Division Tuesday night. 

But they were more than 
a match for Victoria 
Blues. 

Mariners, seven games 
in front of the division, pre¬ 
vailed 8-6 in a sloppy con¬ 
test during which each club 


committed five errors. 

A four-run fifth inning 
gave Mariners, 24-9, the 
push they needed. Blues, 
who slipped to 15-16, re¬ 
ceived two RBIs from both 
Don Hyman and Joe 
Lorenz. 

Victoria 017 Ml 020- 4 10 S 

BolllnoSam 010 140 01a- 111 5 

USOV 12-41. Olio (01 ai» Hyman; 
Hunger. Mathew* 14), Solve (S). 
Chrlalienaen (61. Peterson (8) and 
Flrova HR: Bet-Blume ’ 


Cotontst wire services 

Leon Bright sifted 
through Winnipeg kick cov¬ 
erage and Joe Paopao 
directed a solid aerial at¬ 
tack as British Columbia 
Lions blitzed the Bombers 
26-6 in a Canadian Football 
League game Tuesday 
night. < 

The elusive Bright gave 
the Lions consistently good 
field position while wide 

The Saskatchewan at 
Calgary game will be 
telecast tonight on 
channel 8 starting at 
6:30. 

receiver Al Charuk was an¬ 
other key in the B.C. at¬ 
tack. 

Charuk, with a 21-yard 
pass reception, and Harry 
Holt on a spectacular 65- 
yard punt return, counted 
touchdowns for the Lions 
while kicker Lui Passaglia 
was flawless on field goals 
of 45, 39 and two from 36 
yards plus two converts. 

The closest Winnipeg got 
to paydirt was the B.C. 
eight-yard line late in the 
game. But (he Bombers, 
who have been having 
problems moving the ball 
inside their opponents' 30- 
yard line, had to settle for 
Trevor Kcnnerd field goals 
of 31 and 34 yards. 

The victory by the Lions 
before 23,214 fans at Em¬ 
pire Stadium sets up a bat¬ 
tle for first place in the 
Western Football Confer¬ 
ence with Edmonton Eski¬ 
mos July 30 at Common¬ 
wealth Stadium. 


Shamrocks will honor Dillon tonight 


Bright, burned by Winni¬ 
peg receiver Robert Woods 
in an exhibition loss in Win¬ 
nipeg, played a solid game 
at cornerback as the third- 
year pro appears to be 
making the switch to de¬ 
fence with increasing suc¬ 
cess. 

Although the Lions kept 
the Bombers from scoring 
a touchdown, they did it 
with good pass coverage in 
the defensive secondary 
rather than hurrying quar¬ 
terback Dieter Brock's 
throws. 

Bright left the game late 
in the fourth quarter with 
what appeared to be a 
muscle cramp in his left leg 
and rookie running back 
Leo Sloan of the Lions suf¬ 
fered an ankle sprain. Both 
injuries appeared minor. 

The Lions took a 13-3 lead 
at halftime as Paopao com¬ 
bined with Charuk who 
caught three key passes 
over cornerback Ricky 
Wesson to keep drives 
alive. 

Both offences sputtered 

★ * * 

WINNIPEG 4, B.C. LIONS 24 
First OuwMr 
No scoring. 

Second Quarter 

B.C. — TD Charuk 21 pass from 
Paopao < Passaglia convert) 5:32 
Wpg — FG Kennerd 318:43 
B.C. — FG Passaglia 3612:36 
B.C. — FGPasseglia 3614;35 
Third Quarter 

B.C. — TD Holt punt return 65 (Pav 
saglia convert) 5:59 
Wpg — FG Kennerd 34 11:32 
B.C. — FG Passaglia 3912:55 
Fourth Quarter 
B C — FG Passaglia 452; 15 

Winnipeg 0 3 3 0-6 

British Columbia 0 13 10 3—26 

Attendance— 23.214 


HAMILTON 14, MONTREAL 17 
First Quarter 

Ham — Single Ruoff 501:29 
Ham — FGRuoft 2612:09 

Second Quarter 

Ham — TD Pettersen 15 pass from 
Lemmerman < Ruoff convert) 1:18 
Ham-FG Ruoff 3713:08 
Third Quarter 
No scoring 


Victoria Shamrocks 
chose a fitting night to 
honor one of their greatest 
players of all time. 

Ranjit Dillon. No. 5, of 
the Shamrocks for 14 sea¬ 
sons, will be honored to¬ 
night between periods of a 
Western Lacrosse Astoria 
lion game against world 
champion Coquitlam 
Adanacs which starts at 8 
p m. at Memorial Arena 

The Shamrocks kept 
their hopes of overiuuiing 
the first place Adanacs by 
urpnsing them It * Satur 
day in Coquitlam and they 
I uuld mov e into a tie with 
them with a win tonight 


games remaining. The 
Shamrocks host Vancouver 
Burrards and July 30 and 
finish the season in Nanai¬ 
mo Aug. 2. Coquitlam is at 
home to Nanaimo Saturday 
and New Westminster July 
31. 

Dillon retired at the end 
of last season after adding 
the Mann Cup ring to the 
Minto Cup ring he won as a 
junior in 1162 

The 16-year-old Victoria 
native played 15 games for 
Ihe Shamrocks as a junior 
pickup from 1163 through 
1165. scoring seven times 
and assisting 16 times 

He was a Shamrock regu 
larfrom lWC Ui last season 
and in luUl he appeared m 


366 games, scoring 389 
goals, picking up670 assists 
and only 193 minutes in 
penalties. 

In played in 77 playoff 
games, scoring 61 goals, 
assisting 118 times and tak 
Ing 43 minutes in penalties. 

He was rookie-of-tbe- 
year in 1166. and in his 
sophomore year he was 
named the outstanding 
player in (he WLA He won 
the scoring title that year 
(1167) with 24 goals and 71 
assists and was named to 
the all star team, lie was 
chosen to the all star* learn 
again in 1172 and won tie 
Maitland trophy for best 
combining ability and 


sportsmanship in 1968, 1972 
and 1975. 

Kevin Alexander of the 
Shamrocks has virtually 
clinched the I960 scoring 
title and Jim Lynch of the 
Irish has a good hold on 
second spot. 

In Tuesday's only game, 
three sets of brothers net 
ted New Westminster Sal- 
nionbellies nine goals as 
they defeated Vancouver 
Burrards 14-1 

Dave and Ray Durante 
each scored twice. Mark 
Tuura got two goals and 
brother Ivan added a sin 
gle. and Brian and Bob 
Tasker each had one Doug 
Hayes w-ured three goals 
for Vancouver 


a, vie 

JtnUfKAVk 
Brian Evens. Nan 
DougMavev Van 
Ron Mac Neil. Nan 
Dave Our ante. NW 
Mike Reetie.-Coq 
Ron Pmder. van 
CharnDfWHoaNan 
GordOmltv. Coo 
Eric Courteton. NW 


Art A 
Rk* Baker 
Or l» Hall 


G A PH 
63 U 1H 
49 M 99 

26 

41 37 

42 31 

22 SI 
13 37 
33 33 
21 

24 38 

23 38 


90 

71 

73 

73 

n 

66 

6? 

ft? 


First dowm 

Yards rushing 
vards passing 
Net offence 


TarevPgttot* 

Larrv Be* I 

PavlMKAari 

Larry fc 


Dave Thornton 

Garry C, 
fat L 


8 

m 

133 

237 

Ml 

7 

1137 

22 



in the opening quarter but 
Charuk scored the only 
touchdown of the half at 
5:32 on the second quarter 
by catching Paopao's scor¬ 
ing strike 10 yards deep in 
the end zone. 

The drive started with 
the fleet Bright returning a 
punt 20 yards to give the 
Lions their best field posi¬ 
tion since the opening kick¬ 
off on their own 53. 

In Montreal, meanwhile. 
Don Sweet's 38-yard field 
goal with eight seconds left 
to play gave the Alouettes a 
thrilling 17-14 victory over 
Hamilton Tiger-Cats! 

It was Montreal's first 
victory of the season after 
losing two in a row. The 
triumph also pulled the 
Alouettes into a tie with 
Hamilton and Ottawa for 
second place in the Eastern 
Conference. 

Behind 14-0 early in the 
fourth quarter. Gerry Dat- 
tilio came on in relief of 
starting quarterback Joe 
Barnes and sparked a 
comeback which turned the 
jeers of 32,048 fans into 
frenzied cheers. 

Running-back Alvin 
(Skip) Walker and Dattilio 
each scored touchdowns, 
while Sweet added a pair of 
converts. Leif Pettersen 
scored a TD and kicker 
Bernie Ruoff added two 
field goals, a single and a 
convert for the Ti-Cats. 


After a torrential down¬ 
pour in the second quarter 
which turned the field into 
a swimming pool, the 
(earns had trouble getting 
their offences moving. 


Edmonton 

B.C. 

Calgary 
Saskatchewan 
Winnipeg 


Western Conference 
G W L T F 

2 2 0 0 
2 2 0 0 
2 110 
2 0 2 0 
3 0 3 

Eastern Conference 

2 2 0 0 
Hamilton 2 110 

Ottawa 2 110 

Montreal 3 12 0 

Tonight's Gomes 
Ottawa at Toronto 
Saskatchewan at Calgary 


57 19 
65 30 
39 34 
30 60 
36 82 

28 
55 40 
49 61 
46 51 


Ring champ 
retains title 

HALIFAX (CP) - Gary 
Summerhays fought his 
way past a tenacious attack 
by challenger Roddy Mac¬ 
Donald of New Waterford, 
N.S., to retain his Canadian 
light-heavyweight boxing 
title Tuesday. Dr. Wayne 
Gorman stopped the fight 
before the seventh round 
when Summerhays, of 
Brantford, Ont., opened a 
nasty cut on MacDonald's 
right eye in the sixth. 

Until then, MacDonald 
appeared to have a good 
chance at stopping the ex¬ 
perienced champion as he 
used an effective short left 
to repeatedly tag Summer¬ 
hays. 


Mtt—TO Walker 1 run (Sweet con¬ 
vert) 9:48 

Mh-TD Oetiilto 6 run (Sweet con 
vert) 13:09 

. Mtt—FG Sweet 3814:52 


4 »0 0 0-14 
0 0 8 17-17 


10 

17* 

57 

163 

OI7 

0 

1138 


Penalties yards 
Net Offence is vetch passeno plus 
yards rv^tog. minus team losses 


ii. in a _ _ 

Oaram t If. WvA }«(«• 

l«4 f, 47 vis 8 infer ue* 



RANJIT DILLON NIGHT 
WED., JULY 23 — 8 P.M. 

CANADIAN CHAMPION 

★ 


m 

WORLD CHAMPION 


★ ★ COQUITLAM ★ ★ 

ADANACS 


MEMORIAL ARENA 

irntutum. 


11* 


both team, have threw 

























z 


SPORTS 


THE COLONIST. Wednesday July 23, 1980 13 









To f*r'M**' Wo On 'Pd*#"’ th.t coup^ lor 
in* far* value pm» ncmai hand.ing charge* 
P»OV*Jiriq you COUpCW" try* *-rtf, tie 

purchase o» the c*«xi uC* * MtNNfltd nweon 
Ar> tjthnr application constitutes fraud 
invoke* p'oymq purchase o> suthcienr stoc* 
of suet product -I previous ^0 days) 10 cp^* 




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Racing commission 
deals with appeals 


By STAN COOPER 

Joe Hudon must wait but 
several other harness-rac¬ 
ing drivers and trainers 
know where they stand 
with the B.C. Racing Com¬ 
mission. 

Hudon. fined and sus¬ 
pended last week after a 
positive lest from B.C. Cin¬ 
der following the 10th race 
at Sandown Raceway on 
July 10. will have his appeal 
heard early next month. 
Commission secretary Bob 
Collis of Vancouver said 
Tuesday it will take some 
time to get all parties con¬ 
nected with the incident 
and laboratory repdrts to¬ 
gether. 

Hudon was fined $250 and 


suspended 15 days after the 
compulsory post-race uri¬ 
nalysis had traces of the 
drug banamine, an analge¬ 
sic. Hudon, leading dash 
and percentage driver at 
Sandown, has denied the 
charges. 

Meanwhile, Sandown 
drivers Sten Ericsson and 
Doug Ferguson must sit out 
the remaining 17 days of 
suspensions levied last De¬ 
cember as a result of race 
fixing at Cloverdale Race¬ 
way. 

While not participants in 
the race, Ericcson and 
Ferguson were suspended 
30 days and fined $1,500 for 
benefiting from knowledge 
of the fix and not co-operat- 


B.C. senior g olf 

Joan Lawson 
retains lead 


Wind blown scores mark¬ 
ed the second round of the 
B.C senior women’s golf 
championship Tuesday at 
Victoria Golf Club. 

First-round leader Joan 
Lawson of Uplands was one 
of the many to fall victim to 
the strong winds but de¬ 
spite carding a 13-over-par 
87 she holds a three-stroke 
lead going into the final 
round of the 54-hole test. 

Lawson, the 1979 runner- 
up had an opening round 80 
for 167. Lorraine MaeKen- 
zie and Anna-May Taylor 
of Vancouver are tied for 
second place with 170 and 
defending champion Col¬ 
leen McCulloch of Vancou¬ 
ver is fourth with 171. Ina 
Guile of Chase is fifth with 
172. 

The top four finishers 
will make up the B.C. team 
for the Canadian cham¬ 
pionships Aug. 26-28 at Syd¬ 
ney. N.S. 

MacKenz,ie, McCullough 
and Guile were among the 
few players to improve on 
their opening round 

scores. 

MacKenzie had the low 
score of 82 Tuesday, while 
McCullough carded an 84 
and Guile shot 83. 

Maureen Hibberson of 


Joan Lawson 

Uplands, second with an 8-1 
Monday, blew to a 91 and 
was alone in sixth place. 


. TOP 30 AND TIES 

Joan Lawson. Vic 
Lorraine Mac Komle, Van 
Anna May Taylor, Van 
Cqlleen McCullough, Van 
Ina Guile, Chase 
Maureen Hibberson, Vic 
Frances Hansen, Kam 
Gert Pumfrev. Vic 
Jan Annable, Van 
Jean Stewart, Van 
Joyce O'Connor, Nan 
Mona Pump, Van 
Isabel Rudd, Van 
Flo Chapman, Vic 
Tory Reid, Salmon Arm 
Bobby Collett, Van 
Elsie Saunders, Vic 
JaneyGudewtll, Vic 
Edyttie McCormick, Vic 
Trudle Newman, Camp Rlv 


88- 87—167 

88 8?-170 

85- 8S—170 
87 84-171 

89- 83-17? 
84-9I-I7S 

89- 87-176 

89 87—176 
87-89-176 

86- 90—176 

86- 90-176 
92 85-177 
8790-177 

87- 92—179 

90- 90-180 

90- 90-180 
9190-181 

91- 91—182 
91-91—182 

88- 94—182 


ing with judges during their 
investigation. 

Both drivers were grant¬ 
ed stays in early January 
and permitted to carry on 
with business. They had 
paid the fines and served 13 
days of their suspensions. 
The remaining days were 
ordered to be served from 
July 21 to Aug. 6. 

Trainer-driver Jean 
Mare Bouvier, son of San¬ 
down regular Marcel Bou¬ 
vier, had a five-year sus¬ 
pension reduced to one 
year but he was the only 
accused who had any suc¬ 
cess while appealing a 
number of charges. 

Bouvier will be eligible to 
apply for a new license 
Dec. 26,1980. 

Drivers Roger Proven- 
cher, Rene Bourgeois and 
Bouvier were the most se¬ 
verely penalized following 
the incident in the 10th race 
at Cloverdale on Nov. 5. 

Provcnchcr, who fin¬ 
ished fifth with favorite 
Lebret, was suspended 
seven years. Bourgeois, 
who finished sixth with sec¬ 
ond choice Claybrook 
Barry, was given a five- 
year suspsnsion as was 
Bouvier, who was fourth 
with fourth choice B.C. 
Canada. The race was won 
by 11-1 shot Game Gent, 
who teamed with two out- 
sidfcrs for a trlactor payoff 
of $856. 

Bourgeois applied for an 
appeal of sentence, which 
was dismissed, and Prov- 
encher abandoned an ap¬ 
peal of charges. 

Douglas Booth, an owner 
who was suspended indefi¬ 
nitely with the recommen¬ 
dation of a two-year sus¬ 
pension, lost his appeal bid 
but the proposed penalty 
will not be issued because 
he co-operated with the 
commission during its in- 
vesitigation. He is eligible 
to apply for a new license. 
Normand I.apierre, an 
owner found in violation of 
a number of regulations, 
lost an appeal and a two- 
year suspension stands. 

Results of Tuesday’s 
standardised racing at 
Sandown are on Page 22. 


Soviet swimmer shatters 
barrier in 1,500 metres 


MOSCOW (CP) — Vladi¬ 
mir Salnikov of the Soviet 
Union became the first 
man ever to swim the 1,500 
metres in less than 15 
minutes and the talented 
East Germans won their 
fourth consecutive swim¬ 
ming gold medal and set 
another world record Tues¬ 
day night in the Olympic 
Games. 

East Germans also set 
world records Tuesday in 

★ ★ ★ 

Medals 

Medal standings after Tuesday's 
events at the Olympic Games (22 
events completed): 


Tuesday final Olympic results on Page 14 


Soviet Union 
East Germany 
Hungary 


Dityatin 

. gymnastics champ 


Cuba 

Britain 

Greece 

Italy 

North Korea 

Australia 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Poland 

Romania 

Jamaica 


Connor extends 
winning streak 


NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) — 
Unstoppable Dennis Con¬ 
ner stretched his unbroken 
winning streak to 17 races 
Tuesday by sailing Free¬ 
dom to another victory 
over Russell Long's Clip¬ 
per in America's Cup ob¬ 
servation trials. 

The San Diego skipper 
has dominated the 12- 
metre racing on Rhode Is¬ 
land Sound in two seLs of 
trials against Long and Ted 
Turner, the successful Cup 
defender in 1977. 

One of the three United 
States skippers will be cho¬ 
sen by the New York Yacht 
Club, sponsor of the sailing 
trials, to defend the Ameri¬ 
ca's Cup against a foreign 
challenger in September. 


Conner topped Long, 24, 
by one minute, 14 seconds 
after forcing his rival 
across the starting line 
early, then widening his 
advantage over the course. 

Southwesterly winds 
during the race dropped 
from to six knots at the 
finish from 14 knots at the 
start. 

Conner's only loss of the 
summer came at the hands 
of Turner in the opening 
match of the preliminary 
trials last month. 

The observation series 
continues through July 30. 
but the American skippers 
will meet again in selection 
trials Aug. 19, before the 
yacht club picks a defend- 


cycling — Lothar Thoms 
with a time of one minute, 
02.955 seconds in winning 
the one-kilometre individ¬ 
ual time trial and Harald 
Wolf with a 4:39.96 clocking 
in qualifying for the 4,000- 
metre individual pursuit. 

The Soviet Union also 
claimed gold medals in 
Greco-Roman wrestling, 
weightlifting and gymnas¬ 
tics to continue its domina¬ 
tion after three days of 
Olympic competition. So¬ 
viet athletes now have 10 
gold medals with East Ger¬ 
many counting five. 

Britain won its first gold 
of the Games Tuesday 
when Duncan Goodhew 
triumped in the men’s 100 - 
metre breaststroke while 
Italy got into the medals 
column with a victory by 
Luciano Giovannetti in the 
clay pigeon shooting event. 

Salnikov swam the met¬ 
ric mile in 14 minutes, 58.27 
seconds to win the gold 
medal and surpass the 
four-year-old world and 
Olympic record of 15:02.40 
held by Brian Goodell of 
the U S. 

The perfomance was 
swimming’s equivalent of 
the first four-minute mile 
by a runner because it re¬ 
presented the first time a 
swimmer had maintained 
an average pace of under a 
minute each 100 metres. 

Salnikov was right at the 
14-minute mark after the 
first 1,400 metres before 
blazing the last 100 in 58 
seconds. He defeated silver 
medal winner Alexandr 
Chaev of the Soviet Union 
by 16'seconds. Max 
Metzker of Australia cap¬ 
tured the bronze only .09 
behind Chaev. 

Salnikov said he’s now 
aiming to break the 400- 
metre world record of 


3:50.49 set by Edmonton’s 
Peter Szmidt in the Cana¬ 
dian championships last 
week. 

East Germans won the 
first three places In the 
women’s 400freestyle, with 
Ines Diers, the 
bronze-medalist in the 100 
freestyle Monday night, 
winning the gold in an 
Olympic record of 4:08.76. 
The previous Olympic 
mark was 4:09.89 by East 
German Petra Thumer in 
1976, hut Diers was short of 
the best American time of 
the year, 4:07.84 by Kim 
Linehan. 

Goodhew won Britain’s 
first gold in the 100 breast¬ 
stroke with a time of 
1:03.34, beating silver 
medal winner Arsen Mis- 
karov of the Soviet Union. 
Miskarov was timed in 
1:03.82. Peter Evans of 
Australia won the bronze in 
1:03.86. The best American 
time this,year was a U.S. 
record 1:03.08 by Steve 
Lundquist. 

The Soviet men’s team 
won the first gold medal of 
the gymnastics competi¬ 
tion by more than eight 

Billie Jean 
upset victim 

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) 
— No. 2 seed Billie Jean 
King was ousted by a new¬ 
comer to the professional 
tennis ranks Tuesday in the 
$100,000 women’s tennis 
tournament here. Wendy 
White, 19, of Atlanta, who 
turned pro in June after 
capturing the National Col¬ 
legiate tennis champion¬ 
ship as a student aURollins 
College in Florida, defeat¬ 
ed the veteran King, 6-2, 
6-2, in first-round play. 


points over East Germany 
with Hungary taking the 
bronze. 

World all-round cham¬ 
pion Alexander Dityatin 
led the Soviets with 118.40 
points in the compulsories 
and optionals to finish just 
ahead of veteran team¬ 
mate Nikolai Andrianov, 
hero of the Montreal Olym¬ 
pics four years ago with 
four gold medals. He fin¬ 
ished with 118.15. 

The Russians totalled 
589.60 points, East Ger¬ 
many had 581.15 and Hun¬ 
gary had 575.00. 

The 22-year old Dityatin, 
currently the world’s top 
rated gynmast, led quali 
tiers for the Olympic all¬ 
round championship to be 
decided Thursday. 

Italy’s Luciano Giovan¬ 
netti scored two points 
short of a perfect 200 to win 
the clay pigeon shooting 
event, his first internation 
al title. The Soviet Union’s 
Rustam Yambulatov won 
the silver medal in a shoot- 
off over Jorg Damme of 
East Germany and Josef 
Hojny of Czechoslovakia. 
Damme won the bronze. 

The Olympic hymn was 
played for the first time at 
a medals ceremony when 
Giovannetti collected his 
gold mcdail Italy is one of a 
few countries which, al 
though its athletes have ig 
nored the U.S.-led boycott, 
still refuses to display its 
flag or allow its anthem to 
be used in ceremonies. The 
Olympic hymn and flag 
were also used Tuesday 
when Goodhew collected 
his swimming gold medal. 

The Soviet athem was 
played again when Saksy- 
lik Ushkempirov wod the 
48-kilogram Greco-Roman 
wrestling class and when 
Victor Mazin won the 
60-kilogram weightlifting 
event. 


Saanich club B.C. champs 


and Hove 


Saanich Batesons have 
won the B.C. juvenile boys’ 
softball title for the second 
consecutive season, after 
coming through the losers' 
bracket at the provincial 
tournament In Langford 
over the weekend. 

Batesons defeated Port 
Alberni 4-2 in each of the 
final games of the double¬ 
knockout tourney. Port Al¬ 
berni, the second-place 
team, had dropped Bate¬ 
sons to the losers’ side with 
a 17-inning 1-0 victory Sun¬ 
day which required three 
hours and 10 minutes to 
complete. On Saturday, 
Batesons defeated North 
Delta 2-1 in 19 innings. 


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> 







































































w 


14 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


i 


SPORTS 


charge it 


chargex & master charge 


— Today's menu — 

GOLF 

9 a m — Start of final round of B.C. senior 
women's golf championship. Victoria Golf Club. 
BASEBALL 

3 and 6 p.m. — Continuation of B.C. Senior Babe 
Ruth championships, Lambrick Park. 

6:30 p.m. — Cosmopolitan Senior League: Capi¬ 
tal Radiators vs. Farmer Construction, Lambrick 
Park. 

SOFTBALL 

6:30 p.m. — Stuffy McGinnis Men’s League: 
Athletics vs. Tally-Ho, Central Park. 

6:30 p.m. — Heywood Men's League: Capital 
Builders vs. Knowles, Heywood Avenue Park. 

6:30 p.m. — Macdonald Men’s League: Labatts 
vs. Mayfair Insurance; James Bay Inn vs. Mega 
Power, Macdonald Park. 

• 6:30 p.m. — Victoria-Saanich Women’s League: 

Vidalin Construction vs. Athletics; Strathcona 
Stingers vs. Breakers, Hyacinth Park. 

LACROSSE 

8 p.m. — Western Association: Victoria Sham¬ 
rocks vs. Coquitlam Adanacs, Memorial Arena. 


Bigger, better B.C. Open ingiedew’s 
to feature surprise guest 


Olympic results 


SHOOTING 
Clay Pigeon 

1. Luciano Giovannetti, Italy. 174; 2. 
Rustam Yambulatov. Soviet Union. 
172; 3. Jorg Damme, East Germany, 
172; 4. Josef Homy. Czechoslovakia, 
172. 5. (tie) Eladio Validuvi. Spain. 
Alexandr Asenov, U.S.S.R., 170 
(Silver and bronze medals decided 
by countback.) 

SWIMMING 

Men s 1,SOI metre AWfttt^ ? “St 

dimir Salnikov, Soviet Union. 14:50.27. 
(World record; old record 15:02.40, 
Brian Goodell. U.S., 1976); 2 Alexandr 
Chaev. Soviet Union, 15:14.30; 3. Max 
Metzker, Australia, 15:14.49; 4 Rainer 
Strohbach. E. Germany, 15:15.29; 5. 
Borut Petrie, Yugoslavia, 15:21.78, 6. 
Rafael Escalas, Spain, 15:21.88, 7, Zol- 
tan Wladar, Hungary, 15:26.70, 8. 
Eduard Petrov, Soviet Union, 15.28.24. 

Women's 400-metre freestyle: 1. 

Ines Dlers, East Germany, 4:08.75 
(Olympic record; previous record 
4:09.89 by Petra Thumer, East Ger¬ 
many In 1976); 2. Petra Schneider, 
East Germany, 4:09.16; 3. Carmela 
Schmidt, East Gerrriflpv, 4.10.86, 4. 
Michelle Ford, Australia, 4:11.65; 5. 
Irina Aksyonova, Soviet Union, 
4:14 40; 6. Annelies Maas, Nether¬ 
lands, 4:15.79 


Double success 

Dale Willard of Victoria 
scored a 6-7, 6-1, 6-0 win 
over Stephen Leirc to win 
the under 16 division of the 
recent Oregon State junior 
tennis championships, and 
combined with Mike Young 
of Vancouver to win the 
doubles. 


Men's 100-metre breastroke: 1. Dun¬ 
can Goodhew, Britain, 1:03.34 , 2. 
Arsen Mlskarov. Soviet Union, 1:03.82; 
3. Peter Evans, Australia, 1:03.96; 4. 
Aleksandr Federovski, Soviet Union, 
1:04.00; 5. Janos Dzvongyar, Hungary, 
1:04.67. 

WEIGHTLIFTING 
60 kilogram class 

1. Viktor Mazln, Soviet Union, snatch 
130 kg, jerk 160, total 290; 2. Stefan 
Clmltrov, Bulgaria, 127.5-160 — 287.75, 
3. Marek Sewervn. Poland, 127.5-155- 
282.5 ; 4. Antoni Pawlak, Poland, 120- 
155 — 275, 5. Julio Locsos. Cuba, 1125- 
150 — 2/5; 6. Frantlsek Nedved, 
Czechoslovakia, 122.5-150 — 272.5. 

WRESTLING 

Greco-Roman 

48-kilogram class: 1. Zaksyllk Ustv- 
kempilov, Soviet Union; 2. Constantin 
Alexandru. Romania; 3. Ferenc Seres. 
Hungary; 4. Pavel Khrlstov. Bulgaria. 

62 kilogram class: 1. Stllianos Mi- 
giakls, Greece; 2. Istvan Toth, Hun¬ 
gary; 3. Boris Kamorenko, Soviet 
Union; 4. Ivan Frglc, Yugoslavia. 

90-kilogram class: 1 Norbert Nottny, 
Hungary; 2. Igor Kangyin, Soviet 
Union; 3. Petre Dlcu, Romania. 

CYCLING 

1,000 metre time trial: Lothar 
Thoms, East Germany. 1:02.955 
(world record); 2. AI.eksandr Panfi¬ 
lov, Soviet Union, 1.04.845; 3. David 
Weller. Jamaica. 1:05.241; 4. Guido 
Bontempl. Italy. 1:05.478; 5. Yave Ca- 
hard, France, 1:05.584 ; 6. Heinz Isler, 
Switzerland. 1 06.27. 

GYMNASTICS 

Men's team: 1. Soviet Unio (Nikolai 
Andrianov, Eduard Azarian. Alek¬ 
sandr Ditvatin, Bogdan Makuts. Via- 
, dimir Markelov, Aleksandr Tka¬ 
chyov), 589.60 points; 2. East 
Germany. 581.15; 3 Hungary. 575.00; 
4 Romania. 572.30; 5. Bulgaria, 571.55; 
6. Czechoslovakia, 569.80. 


Tournament organizers 
are promising some big 
names for the 1980 B.C. 
Open to be held Sept. 10-14 
at Glen Meadows Golf and 
Country Club. 

Glen Meadows pro Bill 
Penny, who is also a B.C. 
Professional Golf Associa¬ 
tion representative and a 
director of the Victoria 
Open Society, announced at 
a press conference Tues¬ 
day that Stan Leonard 
would play in the pro am 
and that Dan Halldorson of 
Brandon would be back to 
challenge defending cham¬ 
pion Jim Rutledge of Vic¬ 
toria. 

But what they weren’t 
releasing was what could 
prove to be the biggest 
name 6f all. 

Barry Shaefer of the 
BCPGA merely threw out a 
teaser. 

“We have a celebrity 
coming from Los Angeles. 
From the Hollywood area. 
He’s formerly a scratch 
golfer and his presence 
should bring a lot of ladies 
to the golf course," said 
Shaefer. 

They’ll be announcing 
the mysterious star’s name 
at a later date. In the 
meantime keep guessing. 



Reg 
Reynolds 


golf 


The Original Knight 

Ksolunar tables 

y^When To Fish 
Or Hunt 




According to the Solunar Tables cal¬ 
culated for this area, the best times 
tor hunting and fishing for the next 48 
hours will be as follows (times shown 
are Pacific Daylight Saving Time) 

Minor Major Minor Major 
A.M. P.M. 

TODAY 

8:15 2:10 
TOMORROW 
9:00 2:55 


40 


9:25 


1:40 


2:25 


Minor periods, shorter duration, 

light type 

Major periods, lasting IVa to 2 hours 
are shown in bold. 


In addition to the big 
names, the B.C. Open has 
made progress in other 
areas. For the first time it 
will be a 72-hole event—it’s 
always been 54 in the past 
— and this year the 
guaranteed prize fund is 
$30,000. 

The Chateau Victoria 
and Harbor Towers hotels 
are again thO major spon¬ 
sors, and Labatts is kicking 
about $2,000 into the pro-am 
tournament and a new 
major sponsor is Ballan- 
tine and Sons which will 
provide $2,000 in additional 
prize 'money for B.C. club 
professionals. 

Glen Meadows is hosting 
the Open for the second 
straight year because the 
Victoria group hailed out 
the BCPGA and saved the 
tournament last year on six 
weeks notice. The price for 
handling the tournament 
was to have another shot at 
it with more time for prep¬ 
aration. 

The organizers did an ad¬ 
mirable job last year and it 
appears that with the extra 
time they are going to 
make the B.C. Open an 
even bigger show this 
year. 

SHORT IRONS —Some 
members of Uplands and 
Colwood golf clubs are 
upset about the way the 
Pacific Northwest Golf As¬ 
sociation tournaments do¬ 
minated their courses last 
week. Under tournament 
rules the courses were 
closed to member golfers 
most of each golfing day 
and that included the days 
of the final rounds when 



Travel light this summer. 


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to do something about it. 

At Weight Loss Oinic, our experienced 
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All in private, too. 


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only 30 or so golfers were 
participating...The mem¬ 
bers were further irked 
that entry fee for the 
PNGA men’s tournament 
was only $40 for a guaran¬ 
teed six rounds at Colwood 
while it was only $30 for the 
women at Uplands. They 


feel that the members 
would be better served if 
the courses were left open 
to members and to get the 
$15 green frees from the 
tourists...Rick Truman a 
director of the Victoria 
Open Society says the So¬ 
ciety plans to rotate the 
Open between the five 
major courses if possible. 
He says that if they do get 
permission to use a course 
they'll arrange to make 
proper compensation for 
any revenues that might by 
lost because of the tourna¬ 
ment as a result. 



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THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 15 



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16 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 19S0 


SPORTS 



Alec Merriman 

Outdoors 


Even Horner puzzled by hot homer streak 


BUCK PASSING IS STALLING a project to enlarge 
and create an outdoor educational area and develop a 
\ isible spawning stream for salmon and cutthroat trout 
on, and adjacent to, the Roderick Haig-Brown park prop¬ 
erty at Campbell River. 

Environment Minister Stephen Rogers has told the 
Haig-Brown Kingfisher Creek Society that he is not 
prepared to assist and that the group had gone to the 
wrong ministry for help. He suggested it try Lands 
Minister James Chabot. 

They did and Chabot wrote back suggesting the 
project was the responsibility of Environment Minister 
Rogers. 

”1 wonder if anybody in Victoria knows what their 
department is responsible for?" asks Kevin Storric of 
Campbell River, treasurer of the Haig-Brown Kingfisher 
Creek Society. 

The property of the late Roderick Haig-Brown on the 
banks of the Campbell River has already been acquired as 
a park to commemorate the work of the noted conserva¬ 
tionist and to be used as an educational centre. 

Proposal of the Haig-Brown Kingfisher Creek So¬ 
ciety is to acquire the 26 acres of property directly beside 
the Haig-Brown property and develop it for an outdoor 
education and spawning area. “To make this project 
viable we would have to reclaim Kingfisher Creek and put 
it back on its original route through the Haig-Brown 
property,” explains Storric. 

* ★ ★ 

THE KISH SPAWNING PROJECT would be an 
excellent memorial to Rod' Haig-Brown, who urged sal- 
monid enhancement of small streams many years before 
it became a reality under the Salmonid Enhancement 
Program. This writer suggested such a project at the time 
of Rod's death. 

The Salmonid Enhancement Program has agreed to 
provide materials for the proposed-spawning channel and 
the expertise for stocking and caring for the fish. The 
department of fisheries agreed to provide on-site engi¬ 
neering and technical assistance. No concaete or steel is 
planned for the project. It would remain completely 
natural, just as Roderick Haig-Brown would have 
wished. 

Bob Hurst, community advisor for SEP, has put a 
great deal of effort into the project and has even 
organized school classes that would be prepared to help to 
build and maintain the project. The Campbell River 
Chamber of Commerce has supported the proposals and 
the community of Campbell River as a whole has shown 
support, says Storric. 

Manager Ted Mattiee of B.C. Forest Products opera¬ 
tions in Campbell River has provided hours of work and 
technical expertise on water quality and quantity. 

★ ★ ★ 

STUMBLING BLOCK and where the Kingfisher 
Creek Society has been getting the run around is that it 
must come up with $250,000 to buy the marshland that is 
adjacent to the Haig-Brown property. The Society has an 
option on the property from owner Pease & Sons Holdings, 
but it expires Sept. 1. 

Should the Society not be able to come up with the 
funds by that date Pease plans to fill the marsh and 
develop the site as industrial property. The project and all 
its benefits would be lost forever. 

"Appeals for funding have gone out to many organiza¬ 
tions and both the provincial and federal government. 
Many of the organizations have shown they will support 
the project. However, the attitudes displayed by the two 
senior levels of government have been shocking, rude and 
somewhat irresponsible," says Storrie. "We have heard 
nothing from the federal government and our dealings 
with the provincial government have been time consum¬ 
ing and fruitless. Never before have I witnessed such buck 
passing and unwillingness to make a decision on such a 
high level.” 

* * * 

ANYONE WHO THOUGHT I was just frothing at the 
mouth when I wrote an emotional column emphasizing 
that, despite my continuing battles with federal fisheries, 
I believed it would be "disaster" if management of 
the salmon fishery were transferred from federal to 
provincial jurisdiction should take note of the reac¬ 
tion to Premier Bennett's proposal. 

I suggested the environment would suffer if the 
province ever got control of the salmon fishery. I noted 
the federal Fisheries Act provides the stability that 
protects fish habitat. 

It is interesting to note that only two groups 
supported Premier Bennett’s suggestion that the province 
take over management of the salmon industry and they 
were the mining and logging industries . . . the two indus¬ 
tries which must share responsibility for desecration of 
the salmon habitat. 


Colwritt wtrt services 

Bob Horner of Atlanta 
Braves says there’s no ex¬ 
planation for his torrid 
home-run streak including 
the two Tuesday night in a 
7-5 victory over Montreal 
Expos. 

“I don’t know why,” 
Horner said. “I just hope 
nobody wakes me up until 
the end of October." 

Horner's two blasts ena¬ 
bled the Braves to build a 
5-3 lead which they blew in- 
the eighth inning, partly 
because of a Homer error. 
Glenn Hubbard then got the 
winning hit in the bottom of 


the eighth; a two-run sin¬ 
gle. 

“I can’t say I’m doing 
anything different than I 
was on opening day," 
Homer said. “It just fell 
into place. 

"But you have to be real¬ 
istic. This is a real nice 
streak, but you’re not going 
to do this for a month.” 

Homer drove in four runs 
with the homers, the 19th 
and 20th of the season for 
Homer, who has 15 in the 
last 23 games and 13 in 
July, two shy of the major 
league record shared by 
Hank Greenberg, Joe Di- 
Maggio and Joe Adcock. 

In other NL games, Cin¬ 


cinnati Reds edged Phila¬ 
delphia Phillies 3-2; Hous¬ 
ton Astros nudged New 
York Mets 6-5; Chicago 
Cubs took San Francisco 
3-1 in a regularly-scheduled 
game after the Giants de¬ 
feated the Cubs 2-0 in a 
15-inning game, suspended 
after 12 innings Monday; 
and St. Louis Cardldals got 
by Los Angeles Dodgers 3- 
2. In a late game, Pitts¬ 
burgh Pirates visited San 
Diego Padres. 

Dan Driessen knocked in 
two runs with a sacrifice 
fly and a single as Cincin¬ 
nati edged Philadelphia 
and ruined Steve Carlton’s 
bid for a 16th victory. 


Exhibition Park entries 


In the American League, 
Dan Graham drove in four 
runs with a homer and dou¬ 
ble to help Mike Flanagan 
win his 10th game in Balti¬ 
more’s 8-4 victory over 
Minnesota. Buddy Bell led 
off the ninth with a single 
and later scored on Pat 
Putnam’s single as Texas 
beat Boston 4-3. Kevin Bell 
hit a two-run double in a 
tbree-run fifth inning in 
Chicago’s 6-1 romp over 
Kansas Citv. 

★ ★ ★ 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East 

W L Pci GBL 

New York 59 33 .641 - 

Milwaukee 52 41 .549 7V* 

Detroit 48 39 . 552 8'/, 

Baltimore 50 42 .543 9 

Boston 46 45 -505 12V, 

Cleveland 42 47 472 15W 

•Toronto 40 49 .449 17V, 


VANCOUVER —Entries 
for tonight's thoroughbred 
racing at Exhibition Park: 


First — VMK, claiming, maiden 3 
year olds, 4V, furlongs 

Bunk and Buck (Creighton) 

Annie Bows (Johnson) 

Prince of Tover (Demorest) 

Delta Dynamo (Carresco) 

Alder Jet (Munoz) 

Northern Era (Hoverson) 

Blue Nose (Carter) 

Run'n Renegade (Arnold) 

B.C. Weed (Bodnard) 

Also eligible: 

Green Timber (Johnson) 


120 

120 

115 

115 

115 

115 

115 

115 

110 

115 


-12,400. claiming, maiden 3 
year aids, 4V> furlongs 

Minor Detail (Arnold) ns 

Saanich Mist (Gold) 115 

Tiger Darren (Brownell) 115 

RumWer (Owen) no 

My Bov Charlie (Bodnard) 115 

Charting (Rycroft) 115 

Heritage Oav 115 
Bonnie Premier (DaPonte) 105 

Easter Bud (Loseth) 115 

Also eligible: 

Sir's Image (Wolski) 1 10 

Third — 11,440, claiming, maiden 3 
year olds. 4 'Y fuflongs 

Slow Dancer (Arnold) 117 

Shady Perch (Williams) 117 

Rocklnghorse D (Melanson) 120 

Royaltlna 120 

Token Jenny (Hoverson) 117 

Hemlock Valiev (Creighton) 117 

Northern Delight (Johnson 120 
115 
120 
120 


Slpapu (Rycroft) *20 

To Be Fast (Creighton) 115 

Gummotlon (Williams) 115 

Also eligible: 

Run Joe (Hoverson) 115 

Sixth —12,700, claiming, 3 year olds, 
4V, furlongs 

Charily (Owen) no 

Sherry's Extra Star (Johnson) 115 

Winiealot (Loseth) 117 

Decker Lake Miss (Melanson) no 

Surely Shirley (Creighton) 110 

Remy's Magic (Demorest) 112 

Button Hooker 110 

Neuka Ho verson 112 

Seventh — 14,000. claiming, 3 year 
otds,6</i furlongs 

Boss's Command (Johnson) 112 

Ja Aglonette (Mena) 112 

Whispering Sal (Hoverson) 112 

Burning Drum (Carrasco) 113 

SassMeBack (Loseth) 112 

Mag Talk (Carter) 112 

Cindy's Back (Arnold) 115 

CommandOf Time (Wilkinson) 110 

Eighth — 55,200, claiming, 3 year 
olds and up, furlongs 
Juft Deal (Carrasco) 115 

Cherlescrest (Hoverson) 112 

Beat Fast (Creighton) 119 

LeavinOwen 109 

Never Charges Jr. 116 

Wily Waters (Arnold) 116 

Sinful Duke (Melanson) 116 

L.T.'s Bud HO 

The! Jay (Loseth) 119 

Park Dancer (Rycroft) 114 

Ninth — si2,500, allowance, 1 year 
olds, *'T furlongs 

Sukev Tawdry (Arnold) 117 


BramoieHIII (Hoverson) 

Oakev's Shadow (Carter) 

Chamalnus Belle (Melanson) 

Boundary Drifter (Carrasco) 

Sweeter 'nWillie (Johnson) 

Summer Sauce (Creighton) 

Blushing Minstrel (Williams) 

Tenth — S2.640, claiming, 3 year olds 
and up, 4V> furlongs 
Poona Shot (Arnold) 

Protractor (Munoz) 

God's Penny (Rycroft) 

Royal Truce (Gold) 
k aka De Heart (Creighton) 

Ole Conkle (Hoverson) 

Apoengtow (Johnson) 

Welcome North (Williams) 
Beachmaster (Carrasco) 

Lord Beniamin (Loseth) 

Also eligible: 

Fire Ball (Arnold) 

Swift Summer (Loseth) 

Freedom Charger (Patter) 

Triple Two (Rycroft) 


117 

117 


Kansas City 

Texas 

•Oakland 

Minnesota 

Chicago 

Seattle 

California 


West 


Baltimore 400 030 100- 0 10 0 

Minnesota 000 300 010- 4 7 0 

Flanagan (10-0) and Graham; 
Erickson (3-7), Corbett (5), D. Jackson 
(7) and Wynegar. HRs Balt — Gra¬ 
ham (6); Minn — Mackanin (1). 

Cleveland 400 000 00O- 4 « 0 

Seattle 000 000 000- 0 4 1 

Barker (10-7) andDiaz; F.Bannister 
(64) and Hill. 

Milwaukee 000 QOO 000- 0 4 1 

New Yerk 000 030 OOx— 3 10 0 

Sorensen (7-6), Augustine (5) and 
B.Martinez. C.Moore (8); John (15-3) 
and Oates. 

Second Game 

Milwaukee 027 000 000- 4 4 0 

New York 010 000 000- 1 4 0 

Travers. Mitchell (2-0) (2) and 
C Moore, R.Mav (7-5). Bird (6). Gos- 
sage (9) and Cerone. HR Mil — 
Money (13). 

First Game 

Toronto 041 000 001- 4 0 0 

Oakland 100 000 100- 2 4 4 

Jefferson (3-6). Garvin (7) and 
Whitt; Keough (10-10) and Newman, 
Essian (9). HRs Tor — Velez (16), 
Howell (5); Oak —Newman (9) 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East 


37 .602 - 
46 46 . 500 10V, 
44 50 .468 12V, 
43 50 .462 13 
42 50 .45/ 13V, 
38 54 .413 17V, 
.374 21 


* Not including second game 


Detroit 000 022 OOP— 4 7 2 

California 110 200 llx— 4 14 1 

Morris, Weaver (4). Rozema (5-6) 
(6), Lopez (8) and Parrish, Knapp, 
Hassler (1-0) (5), Clear (8) and 
Whitmer. HRs: Det-Parrish2 (16). 

Texas 000 201 001- 4 10 1 

Boston 000 002 010- 3 9 1 

Perry. Darwin (9-1) (7) and Sund- 
berg, Torrez (5-11) and Rader, Fisk 
(9). HRs: Tex —Staub (4). 

Chicago 001 230 000- 4 12 1 

KansaiCity 100 000 OOP-1111 

Trout (5-10). Prolv ( 8 ) and Sell- 
heimer; Busby (0-1), Pattln (5) and 
P^ter. 


Pittsburgh 

W 

52 

L 

40 

Pci GBL 

.565 — 

Montreal 

50 

40 

.556 

1 

Philadelphia 

47 

43 

522 

4 

New York 

44 

48 

.478 

8 

SI. Louis 

4? 

51 

452 

10 '/, 

Chicago 

38 

51 

.427 

12 '/, 

Houston 

West 

53 

40 

.570 


Los Angeles 

51 

43 

543 

2 ', 

Cincinnati 

49 

45 

.521 

4 1 ’, 

San Francisco 

46 

48 

.489 

7>i 

Atlanta 

43 

49 

.467 

9'/» 

San Diego 

38 

55 

.409 

15 

San Francisco 

100 000 000— 1 

6 1 

Chicago 

000 300 OOx- 3 

l 70 


Bordley (2-1). Griffin (5), Minton (8) 
and May; Lamo (9-8) and Foote. HR: 
SF-Clark (18). 

• Suspended Game 
San Fran 000 000 000 000 002- 2 8 0 
Chicago 000 000 000 000 000- 0 10 0 

Whitson, Minton (9), Holland (10), 
Griffin (13). Lavelle (3-S) (14) and 
May, Littlelohn (7). Reuschel. Sutter 
(9), Tldrow (11). Caudill (12) 03) and 
Foote. Blackwell (9). HR SF — Hern¬ 
don (5). 


Pittsburgh 000 010 120- 4 10 0 

San Diego 000 000 012— 3 10 1 

Bibbv (12-1). Romo (8), G.Jackson 
(9), Tekulve (9) and Nicosia, Lucas 
(3-6). D’Acguisto (8) and Tenace. 
HRs; SD—Winfield (10). 

Montreal 002 100 020- 5 9 2 

Atlanta 000 401 07x- 7 13 4 

Lee, Gullickson (6). Bahnsen (6-4) 
(8). Fryman (8) and Carter; Niekro 
(8-12). Camp (9) and Benedict HRs 
Mon — Bernazard (5). Cromartie (9); 
All - Horner 2 (20) 

Los Angeles 020 000 000- 2 9 0 

St . Louis 000 101 10X- 3 4 0 

Sutton (7-3) and Yeager. Kaat. 
Urrea (3-0) (3), Littlefield (8) and 
Simmons. HRs LA —Cev (13); StL — 
Simmons (14). Durham (4). 

Philadelphia 010 000 100 - 2 9 1 

Cincinnati 010 002 OOx- 3 7 0 

Carlton (15-5). McGraw (7) and 
Boone; Soto (4-4) and Bench. HR: Pha 
— Boone (6) 

New York 01) 300 000- 5 9 0 

Houston 012 003 OOx- 6 12 0 

Pacella, Bomback (3). Glvnn (33) 
(4), Miller (6) and Stearns; J Niekro, 
Roberge (1-0) (4), D. Smith (7) and 
Ashbv. Pu|ols(7).HR: Hou —Leonard 
(3). 


Blizzard ace 
on sidelines 

TORONTO (CP) — The 
knee injury Jose Velasquez 
suffered in a 2-1 win for 
Toronto over Fort Lauder¬ 
dale Strikers in a North 
American Soccer League 
game isn’t as serious as 
first believed, but it may 
keep the classy Blizzard 
midfielder sidelined for the 
remainder of the regular 
season. 


Lady Be Prompt (Owen) 
Gold Bar (Munoz) 

Easy Niki (Demorest) 

Also eligible: 

Super Sonic (Bovd) 

Glory Grabber (Demorest) 
Cape Solitaire (Bodnard) 
Miss Bandoln (Johnson) 


112 
120 
115 
120 


r-eurtn — 12,400, claiming, 3 year 
aids and gp, 4 1 > furlongs 

Easter Gem (Melanson) 119 

Prosperpine(Losefh) 119 

Shery'sCapri (Creighton) 

Do Attend (Rycroft) 

FavoriteStar(Da Ponte > 

Lady Occo( Demorest) 

Langley's Sanya (Owen) 

Sonlota Doll 

Tracey's Tenuity (Patzer) 

Pass the Wine 
Also eligible: 

Low Nickers (Wilkinson) 119 

Fifth — 13,200. claiming, maiden 3 
y«ar oMv 4V> furtongs 

Phoenix Grove (Arnold) 111 

Turn of the Tide (Ho verson) 115 

Around Three Turns (Owen) 

Lorenzo (Mena) 

Peace in the Mideast (Loseth) 

Pop's a Cop (Johnson) 

Northern Faith (Frazier) 


122 

109 


114 

109 

116 


115 

115 

115 

115 

115 



NEW 1980 B200 
DODGE MAXI VAN 



Power steering, power 
brakes, radio. 5 2 litre en¬ 
gine Stock No. 80353 


uu 


*8644 s 



■ 382-2313 7-22 i 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a 


Island 
Saw Co. 


017 Chatham Street 385-5300 


MINI GOLF 

OPEN 
10 a.m. 
to 

9 p.m. 

VANiLMAN And HIGHWAY 17 




HILLSIDE GULF 

Service Centre and Car Wash 

Complete Automotive Repairs 

MECHANIC ON DUTY 

Mon.. Tues. and Saturday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Wed., Thurs and Friday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 


592-2444 /TTi 

Gulf Gulf 

309S Shelbourne 


MOMCi 

£ DRAW WINNER 1$ 

(FOR WEEK , :i¥: 

M JOLT tSJULY 1») S* 

Xv The third week's major vX 
prize winner Is vX 

A. J. COOPER i$: 
ttX of POWELL RIVER, B.C. £$ 

who caught a 5-pound. 5- i;'.;'.; 
ounce COHO on July :'x- 
nth vX 

vX; Mr Cooper will be pre- vX 
santed a O M C 4.5 h p vX 
vX Johnson Outboard Motor X;!; 
vX at the closing ceremonies Xv 
September 28 >X* 

Stop 31 

l FISH i 

jg: (AS OF JULY 19) W 

1 41 pounds, 3 ounces, X£ 

vX caught by Jim Robson ol 
Xv Surrey. BC. July 8 at Ac- 
ttve pass 

2 . 40 pounds. 4 ounces. 

vX caught by G McDormand 
•:»M of Victoria. B C , July 9 at Xv 
Xv Beechey Head W 

Xv 3. 38 pounds. 13 ounces, vX 
caught by Colin McAllister vX 
X* of Victoria. B C., July 5 at vX 
vX Beecher Bay Xv 

I OVER $100,000 i 
£ IN PRIZE&! 

X\ further information phone, vX 
\v the BC Salmon Derby ai vX 
•X* 669 1788 or write ' Oerhy >X; 
!;X Office Bayshore inn 1601 W Xv 
X\ Georgia St Vancouver B C vX 
;X ; V6G 2V4 Xv 


“^dmonions Klondike 

Julyl6-26 

l Vc haue d date in-Alberta's capital this summer. 


The madness ol the Gold Rush 
returns. 1 With saloon girls and kick 
lines, and handsome villains 
striking it rich. Edmonton 
becomes the bustle and boom 
town ol the Klondike that it wasI 

DOWNTOWN 

The city breaks loose 1 Wild 
entertainment is found 
everywhere Ouiet lounges 
become swinging door saloons, 
with dancehaH girls, banio 
pickers, and honky tonk pianos. 
And outside, bands march 
anytime, anywhere 1 

SOURDOUGH RAFT RACE 

Over 10O bizarre rafts, manned 
by outrageous pilots choke the 
North Saskatchewan River m 
their rush (or "mstam fame’ as 
World Champion dl the 
Sourdough Rati Race 


THE PROMENADE 

Take a Sunday stroll with dashing 
gamblers, ladies in lace and 
sequins, and with dusty old 
prospectors, as 200.000 
Klondikers parade their finery 

KING OF THE KLONDIKE 

Could your brute strength take 
you through this decathlon ol 
pioneer skills, this battle of the 
brawn" 5 A small fortune and 
coveted title of King of the 
Klondike’ goes to the winner 


ding tl 
and Fa 


Northlands Exposition and Fair 1 
When in Edmonton, check with 
one ol the lour Edmonton Visitors 
Bureaus, or call 4T1-K-DAY tor 
daily events. 





iftunderbird 

' a™ 


o 


SHOWER STALLS 

METAL 

SHOWER STALL 

This 30")t30" heavy gauge steel . 
cabinet with Durofoam base, will J 
give years of satisfactory! 
service. Complete with taps ! 
shower head and curtain #6402 ’ 
Regular $94 95. 

$87 9S 

FIBREGLASS 
SHOWER STALL 

No worries about staining with 
this shower stall CSA approved, 
heavy 32"x32" fibreglass shower 
stall comes complete with drain 

#6415/WHITE 
Regular $247.95 


<9* 




#64 28 ^COLOURED 
Regular $26995 


$22995 
$24995| 
NEO-ANCLE 
SHOWER STALL 

aeatuifuily styled 36"x36", csa 
approved corner shower stall is 
especially suited where space is 
limited includes tempered 
safety glass door and marble- 
mold base with drain. #6431/6444 
1 }} I Regular $39490 

yy$364 9 ° 


mn 


Elegantly Styled* 

POLISHED 
BRASS 
CENTRE 
SET 

Add beauty to your bathroom with this 
elegant faucet which features 4" centre- 
set with pop up assembly for tne drain 
#6457. Regular $69.95 

$4g95 


BATHROOM VANITIES 

16"X20" 

SINGLE DOOR 
VANITY 


I6"x20" White vanity 
comes complete with csa 
approved I7"x21" marble- 
mold top #6460 
Regular $69 95 

|$59 95 b 


* n 


6"X6‘ 
CERAMIC 
TILE 

vChoose from an attractive 
'selection of ceramic tile 
designs that will add style 
and charm to your home 
#6486 

Regular $1.19 

•99C 

Sq.Ft. 

Outdoor specials’ 1 

FLOODLIGHT KIT' 

Kit includes lampholder and a 
150 watt weatherproof bulb. 
#6509/6512 Regular $10 52 

$795 

Enjoy A Bug Free., | 
Summer 

tUG 
KILLER 

Makes barbecues and I 
evenings out on tne porch I 
more enjoyable #9X2000/ 
64*9 Regular tM 95 I 

$79*51 


k 


18"x24" 

TWO DOOR 
VANITY 

18"x24", Two door vanity 
comes complete with csa 
approved I9"x25" marble- 
mold top #6473 
J Regular $102.95 

$89 95 




l: 


Tfiunderbird 

•Electrtc#Ptumblng#ughtlng#Decoranng#Kltchen cabinets 

2929 DOUGLAS ST. 
386-2921 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-5:30 
Fri. 8:30-9:00 
Sat. 9:00-5:00 
Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Ute your handy Charge#. 

Matter Charge or 

Thunderbird Homeptan Card 

Price* effective 
thru to Monday. July 28 

Bring in your plans or ideas for free estimates Prices I 
j subtecr to stock on hand we reserve rhe r ight to limit j 
(Quantities 




* 






















































































Safeway Meat Specials 


TOP SIRLOIN STEAK 



Boneless Beef. 

A Barbecue 
Favourite. 

(*5.93 kg). - 
Canada Grade.. 


SAVE 

76*tt.(si.ru)| 


SAVE 

36'lb (7f 4) 


SAVE 

90' 1 


SAVE 

36' it (7t'bi)| 


SAVE 1 

36' 1 


SAVE 
30' 1 


SAVE 

50' 


BEEF LIVER 


FRESH PIZZA Family Size. 800 g Package 


BOLOGNA 
LIVER CHUBS 
LUNCHEON CHUBS 
DELUXE PIZZA 


In the Place. 

Olympic. Vac Pak Places. ($1.96 kg) 


Schneider's. Assorted. 
250 g 


Schneider's. Mini. 

Deli. Assorted. 250 g. . Each 


McCain's. Mini. Frozen. 

Crispy Crust. 16 oz. (454 g) Package.. 


SAFEWAY 


Scotch Buy 
Margarine 



INFLATION FIGHTERS 


lib. (454 g) 
Package. . . 



Beans 
with Perk 


Scotch 
Buy. 

14 fi. 02. 
(398 mL) Til 


2J9 


Cut Green 
Beans 


Taste Tells. 

14 fl. oz. 

(398 mL) Tin.. 


Macaroni 

Dinners 


A Cc “a CQ 

49 Hx.2for9v 


French Fries Scotch Buy. Regular or Crinkle Cut. 


Froien. 2 lb. (907 g) Bog. 


55 c Tomatoes 


Hash Browns irfeb'sr. 


69 c Kernel Com 

51 c Mannalade r.*1.35 Shampoo 


In Brine. Town House. 

14 fl. ox. (398 ml) Tin. . 

Or Creme Rinse. Scotch Buy. 
Assorted. 900 ml Contoiner.. 


Green Peas sswsrt85' Dressing for Salads sst’1.39 Baby Shampoo 


45' 

99' 

*1.19 


Peas SCairots SK5sr.“ 2„89' Mixed Vegetables r.^» „.2i.89‘ Trash Bap 


Prices Effective: 

July 21st te 27th e 

Everything you want from a store 


In All Your Safeway Stores in Greater 
Victoria, Colwood and Sidney. 


We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities. 
Sales In Retail Quantities Only. 


and a little bit more 






















































ScUeMUffrvi exciting 



Assorted 

Flavours. 


All Purpose. 

1 lb. (454 g) Package, 


Assorted. 
184 g Tins 


Lucerne. 2% or 
Creamed. 1 kg Tub 


Yogourt 
] Bread 
] Dinner Rolls 
iTwin Pops 


Lucerne Country Pure 
Assorted. 200 g Tub.. 


Skylark. 100*/. Whole Wheat. 
24 oi. (680 g) Sliced Loaf.... 


B.C. or Washington Grown 


Skylark. Pisa. Potato or 
Seuao. Package of 12..., 


Snow Star. Assorted. Frozen. 
Package of 12-75 ml Bars... 


California Grown. (33 c kg) 


| Canning Supplies 

Wide Mouth Lids 

Magic Button. Package of 12. 

49* 

Regular Lids 

Karr. Box of 12.. 

69* 

Mason Jars 

Kerr. Wide Mouth. Pint*. Box of 12 

*5.” 

Mason Jars 

Karr . Wida Mouth. Quarts. Box of 12. . 

s 6” 

Salmon Jars 

Consumer C/ess. 250 ml Use. Bex of 12 

$3» 

Carlo Crystals 

*•*■(•*§) Package. . 

47* 



u 




























































1 - 


. /»■ 




afeeciafo i*t eve/up defeantmerttf 


"» T YX I 


*. / V Vt 



TOWN HOUSE a> 

AWefuice 

APPLE JUICE 


\% V/X L 

VVi / 


SMI 

3V 

Pure. Choice. 

48 fl. oz. (1.36 Litre) Tin. 


\ 


' i "M a 

IV \ \/\ 



I-* — 


TRULY FINE 
PAPER TOWELS 


> 


TOlci 


Ls 


I 

\ 


SMI 

56 e 


Assorted 

Colours. 


roll 

pkgJ 


E. 


SEAD 

TTUCE 

c. Grown 
1 .1 Grade 


BUNCH GRAPEFRUIT 
RADISHES I JUICE 


B C. or Calffoml. 


3512139 


Soufh.m Sun. 
Umwootonod. 90S ml Sl*». 


Each 


flower shoppe 


Check Our 
Selection of 
Fresh 
Flower 
Anangements. 


Prices Effective My 21st te 27th 

In All Your Safeway Stores In Greater 
Victoria, Colwood and Sidney. 

W. M. MWM M LMM OimMWm SALES W MCT AH. OUANTITiee OMLV 



J/\A A 































































hi*'-. ■' k 




























































































-\=r 


SPORTS 

f—Yearling— 
brings 
$1.7 million 

LEXINGTON, Ky. 
(AP) — An agent for a 
Greek shipping mag¬ 
nate paid a world rec¬ 
ord $1.7 million for a 
bay coll by Lyphard 
out of Stylish Genic in 
Tuesday session of the 
Keeneland July select¬ 
ed yearling sale. 

Sir Phillip Payne- 
Galwey of the British 
Bloodstock Agency- 
England bought the 
colt for Stavros Niar- 
chos, who has exten¬ 
sive racing Interests in 
Europe and who paid 
$1.3 million for the colt 
Nureyev in 1978. 

The yearling is a 
grandson of Northern 
Dancer, whose off 
spring have fetched 
impressive prices at 
this year's Keeneland 
sale. 

Two Northern Danc¬ 
er colts brought $1.23 
million and $1.4 million 
at the sale Monday 
night. 

Seven Northern 
Dancer yearlings 
brought a total of $4 7 
million Monday. 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23. 1980 21 


Softball 

Forland 

sparks 

Tally-Ho 

Nobody was fooling 
Wayne Forland at Central 
Park Tuesday night. 

The Tally-Ho third base- 
man rapped out four hits in 
as many trips to lead the 
charge in a 7-3 victory over 
Labatts in one of two Stuffy 
McGinnis Men’s Softball 
League games. 

Forland singled and 
scored in Tally-Ho's four- 
run first inning and went on 
to drive in two runs, as did 
winning pitcher Larry 
Cole. 

Keith Heppell supplanted 
the 14-hit attack with three 

safeties. 

Losing pitcher John Kil- 
gour took the punishment. 

In another contest, Mel 
Nelson and Victoria Athlet¬ 
ics shut down Tod-Hackett 
on five hits in a 3-0 victory. 

Ernie Holness’ second- 
inning base hit drove home 
brother Bob for what 
proved the winning run 
At lleywood Avenue 
Park, Ingraham slipped by 
Athletics 6-5 in a men's 
league game. 

Kandy Epp had three 
hits, including a homer, for 
the winners. 

In Victoria-Saanich 
women's league play, Be- 
misters were propelled into 
a tie for first place by the 
pitching of Marilyn Bolton. 

Bolton won her 13th game 
in 13 decisions as Bemis- 
ters throttled Tillicum 
Shoppers 9-0. Marilyn 
doled out three hits, strik¬ 
ing out two. 

Sherry Thorsteinson and 
Terry Crocker each had 
two hits and two RBIs for 
the winners. 

Bemisters and Island 
Dryco Breakers arc now on 
top with records of 17-2-2. 

In another game. Mavis 
Underwood was credited 
with the shutout in Butler 
Brothers’ 6-0 win over 
MacDonald Furniture. 

In Macdonald Men’s 
League games, Mayfair 
handled Trafalgar 9-5 and 
Coast Projects crushed 
Saints 12-4. 

Athletics cio on s— 3 s t 

TM Hachett 000 QM I— ■ SI 

Md Nelson and Jim Boyd; Nick Ni¬ 
cholas and Tom Robertson 

illy Mo 41# Ml •— TMI 

ibatts 071 000ft— 3 34 

Larry Cole and Dwayne Robinson, 
John Kilgour and Ross Barnett. 

Mariina leads 

NEW YORK (AP) — The top 10 
money winners on the women's protes 
sionat tennis tour, as supplied by the 
Women's Tennis Association 
Martina Navratilova 
T raev Austin 
Billie Jean King 
Chris Evert Lloyd 
E vome Goolegong 
Wendv Turnbull 
Kathy Jordan 
viromia Wade 
Oreer Stevens 
PamShriver 


Radio/hack 





Mi? \ 

V 


Mn ^ n n 


Clarinette-98... 
to buy these 
components 
separately 
would cost 
much more! 

Save a bundle on a luxury cassette player- 
recorder/AM/FM/phono stereo music system! 
Save even more, by recording your own stereo 
cassettes! Clarinetle"’-98 — the “everything sys¬ 
tem"! Built-in stereo cassette deck lets you record 
and play your favourite music Digital counter, 
lighted VU meters and level controls. 3-speed 
changer has cue/pause lever and auto shutoff 
With diamond/sapphire stylus and hinged dust 
cover ’’Sing-Along” feature 13-1198 



Portable AM/FM 
cassette stereo 


SCR-2 does it all! Play pre-recorded 
cassettes or tune in to FM stereo or AM 
Record your own tapes “off-the-air” or 
“live". Auto level; tone and balance controls 
and a “Wide-Scope" switch. Two 3" 
wide-frequency speakers 2 built-in 
condenser mikes for stereo recording 
Feature-packed! AC cord Use also 
with 6 "D" batteries' or 12VDC adapter 
(not included). 14-805 



»„„;10Q95 

Now 189 95 I * I 



AM/FM/FM stereo 
8-track player... 
what a way to go! 

On highway, on water — 
listen to your favourite 
music while you cruise in 
ypur car. van or boat! We 
made a great purchase! Now 
we offer you this deluxe unit 
at an incredible price! 
Nationally advertised at 
$139 95. 8 watts. Fader con¬ 
trol. Bass boost switch for 
deep bass. 2 x 7 x 4-3/4”. 
Mount in or under dash. 
12-8001 


12-1850 


Deluxe 30-watt 
auto speakers 


Bring theatre sound to your 
auto, van or mobile home! 
5-1/4" heavy-duty cone speak¬ 
ers with 8 02 . magnets. Hi- 
compliance Extra-large 8 x 8" 
enclosures. Flush-mount. 



I /- ■/ ^ t /s ri( 

AM/FM 

stereo-wide 

sound 

everywhere! 

E-x-p-a-n-d the 
sound for enhanced 
stereo depth and 
channel separation! 
Concertmate'“ 
AM/FM radio has 
twin 4" speakers. 
AFC. more. AC/bat¬ 
tery switching AC 
cord. Use also with 6 
”D" cells'. 12-709 


DUoF0NE®-32 
automatic memory 
telephone dialer 

Touch only one button to dial 
any of 32 frequently called or 
emergency phone numbers! 

(Use DUoFONE-32 on dial or 
pushbutton phones). 14 digits 
— you get instant, one-button 
dialing, even for long distance! 

A built-in LED digital clock 
and timer. Has AC adapter 
Uses 9V battery" Not for party 
or multi-line use. 43-280 



Wireless AM intercoms... just plug in and start 
talking! Keep in touch all through the house 




LAMGFOftD STORE 

727 Go d Ur i i w Am 47* 332? 


RADIO SHACK S ROUCT ON ITEMS OFFERED IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT 

The products in this ad were selected m advance of this offering therefore situations may octuf 
•vnere certain products may not be available at ad stores H the product <s temporarily out of stoc A *> 
issue a Ram ChecA enabling you to obtain the item a' the Ad« 
effect at Radio ShacA stores and are the mammumat Authorized Salas Centres (Dealers) Dealer sa<e 
not obligated to etocA but may obtain the full Radio bf>at> line We m <0 not liable for typographic a 
errors 

AM registered trademarAs are the property of Tandy Corporation Tandy Electronics 1 imted be mg a 

registered user 


MAVFAMt STC 

tiVlMf Coxa— « 


2 * 27 ' 


r 














































































22 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


SPORTS 


Boxla schedule ends 


League champion Esqui¬ 
mau Universal Sheet Metal 
and Victoria Athletics post¬ 
ed wins Monday night as 
the Vancouver Island Se¬ 
nior B Lacrosse League 
wrapped up its schedule at 
Pea rices Arena. 

Athletics, who finished in 
second place with seven 
wins and five losses, 
stormed to a 23-17 win over 
Saanich Metro Honda while 
Esquimau completed an 

Tennis leaders 

NEW YORK (AP) — The hap 10 
tennis winners list: 

1 Blorn Borg. Sweden 1445,500 

2. John McEnroe, U S- 1324.905 

3. vitas Gerulaitis. U.S. *262.491 

4. Jimmy Connors. U.S. *250,200 

5WojtefcFibak, Poland *159.864 

6. Guillermo Vilas, Arg *154,762. 

7. Ivan Lendl. Czech. *148,388. 

8. Gene Mayor, U.S. *145.256. 

9 ViiavAmrltrai. India *144.930 

10. Brian Gottfried, U-.S *130,673. 


unbeaten league schedule 
with a 13-3 win over 
G. & W. Landscaping. 

Dwayne Ferguson with 
seven goals and three as¬ 
sists paced Athletics while 
Robbie Clifford had four 
goals and four assists. 
Kevin Kennedy, Mark 
Shore and Bob Darraugh 
each fired three goals. 
Owen Richmond and Gerry 
Bell scored five goals each 
for Saanich with Richmond 
picking up four assists and 
Bell three. Gerry Vonk 
scored four goals and had 
five assist. 

John Entzminger and 
Kim Browning, with two 
goals each, and Kandy 
Bryant with a goal and four 
assists led Esquimau. 

G.&W. and Metro 
Honda each finished with 
2-9-1 logs. 


Sandown Park racing results 


Results of Tuesday 
night's standardbred rac¬ 
ing at Sandown Park: 


FIRST —*880, l milepace, claiming. 

Loki (Matthews) 4 60 3 30 2.10 
Sudsey Dudsey (M. Bouvler) 8.90 2.20 
Barbwire Brad (Smith) 2.10 

Time: 2:08/3. Exactor: 3 & 6*21 00 
Outaslght Swede. Macs Glory, Altai 
fa Tom. Iron Clad also ran. Senga 
Carter scratched. 


SECOND - *•». I mile pace, claim 
*9 

Lennies Choice 

(Guest) 4 40 4.30 2.50 

Cheyenne Mohawk 
(Graham) 22.90 5 90 

Peggis Sugar Plum (J. Bouvier) 9.20 

Time: 2:10/4 Exactor: 5& 7*61.90. 
Accident — did not finish — Dustys 
Rambler, Hazel B Bow. Pop Mcklyo. 
Lustre Stream. 


THIRD — *800. I mile pace, claim¬ 
ing 

O Promise Me 

(O.Sibiga) 4.40 2.90 2.40 

Nova Rose (Guest) 3.50 2.40 

Dianes Man (Quinlan) 2.90 

Time: 2:07/2. Exactor: 8 & 4 *17.90. 
Ray. Fleeting Fame, Todds Choice. 
Outasight Margie also ran. Loyal Nibs 
scratched. 

FOURTH — *800. 1 mile pace, 
claiming. 

Rebel John 

(Arsenault) 18.70 8 50 9.30 

Virden Boy (Linford) . 7.20 4.00 

Bee Bee Brook (Guest) 4 90 

Time: 2:08/2 Exactor 7 4 8*98.30. 
Mid Royal. Senga Suntan, Nechako 
Chris. Bosco Frank. Ceelav Mathy also 
ran. 


SIXTH — *1888, 1 mile pace, claim 
ing. 

Nechako Teena 

(Wiggins) 20.50 5 80 2.80 

Hoi ridge Bob (Guest) 5.40 3.50 

Bav Bethany (Tonkin) 2.60 

Time: 2:08/1. Exactor: >4 2*44.60. 
Merc Kimberly. Dus tvs Esther, En¬ 
sign Win. Union Miss. Delta Chief also 


* 1188 , 1 mile pace. 


FIFTH - * 


R, 1 mile pace, claim 


Von Von (Hudon) 3.20 2.70 2 40 
Irish Bravo (Stymest) 3.30 2 70 
K Cash Adlos (Graham) 3.40 

Time: 2:07/2. Exactor . 64 7*9 90 
Speedy Bluebird. Dusty* Knight. 
Spindrift Two, Little Tamarack also 
ran. Tea N Crumpets scratched. 


SEVENTH 
claiming. 

Saska Wind 

(Matthews) 17.90 7.20 2.70 

Barber as Don (Olito) 3.00 2.10 

Mr. joeKooKTonkin) 2.10 

Time: 2:06/3 Exactor: 44 1 *258 30 
Our Boy Chester. Rays Golden 
Patch, B.C. Canada, Holrfdge Bryan 
also ran. 


EIGHTH - *1208, 1 mile pace, 
claiming handicap 

Come Back Due 

(Quinlan) 6.30 2.60 2.80 

Beau Gerry (Arsenault) 4.00 4.50 
Deacon Brodie (Urquharl) 4.00 


Time: 2:05/3. NEW Exactor: 5 4 > 
*25 90 ' 

Baron Lea A. Mediator Hanover. 
B.C Arden, R. C. Grattan also ran. 
Northridge scratched. 

NINTH — *1688, 1 mile pace, claim 
ing. 

Lucky Armbro 

(Jungouist) 8.80 3.10 2 80 

Count Force (Smith) 3.10 2 30 
Red Tip (Bowman) 2.70 

Time: 2:06/1 Exactor: 54 1*13.50. 

Gil Counsel. Bethany Pegassus also 
ran. Amber Ferric scratched 


• *1850, 1 mile pace and 


TENTH - 
trot. 

Betty Dauber 

(Cameron) 7.30 3.40 3.10 

Shadows Charlie (Arsenault) 4.30 2 70 
Combat Osborne (Burke) 2 40 

Time: 2:06/1 Triactor: 3,8,2 *53.20. 

Spikes Duster. Great Roots. Peggy 
Bow, Daubers Gayle, Sea Stone also 
ran 

Attendance. 1356. Handle: *107.344 


If you have a used oil 

disposal problem... 

here’s your solution: 

Call 245-3833 COLLECT 

• 24 hour collection service 

• Trucks fully equipped to handle all tanks 
and locations 

• Professional drivers with pager 
communication to depot head office 

• Assistance with your tankage 
requirements 

Waste Oil Salvage Co. 

A Division of Mohawk Lubricants Ltd. 

Highway #1, Cassidy. B.C. 


JULY HOME 

• _ t 

Discover our vast selection of distinctive furniture and rugs at 
Woodward’s where the values of gracious living are of primary importance. 


& I ■' 



q 

. . 

H* ■ 


r 

4 

. i 

: Wfcl I 

■;n 

mm 

i 




A. Dinette Set by Reflection International A marveluu* 
wav to create a delightful, welcoming look for your dining 
urea Dazzling f> piece set add'* a dash «>f sliced Pecan in iis 
oval table finish to spice up family meal times Plus f«»ur 
(hairs in Queens Guard camel with dark brown trim 
Specially priced during our July Home Living Sale 


B. Dinette Set by Reflection International is beautiful 
practical furniture made t«» be enjoyed every day Adds 
elegance and convenience to limited space living f eatures 
Pecan Nina inlaid" finish table and four chairs with natural 
wood arms, upholstered in an attractive Saddle Laredo 
dkide. A smart contemporary set at a moderate price 


Occasional Tables quality constructed by Detkraft in 
traditional style with Contempra cherry finish 

C. Rectangular Cocktail Table SALE 


SALL 


469.00 469.00 


D. Lnd Table SALL 
L. Round Lamp Table SALL 
N<*t shown) Commode SALL 
Hound Cocktail Table SALL 


129.00 
119.00 
129.00 
149.00 
174.00 

WOODWARD S IURNI1 URL 


F. Arakstan Rugs All the mystery, and fascination of the 
orient are woven into stunning, -rich designs of these 
Arakstan rugs (Sizes quoted are approximate] 


s':r * i r:r sale 

399.00 

SAI E 

99.00 

27" x 72" SALL 

61.00 

4 * Octagon SALL 

74.00 

4' Round SALL 

74.00 

V7" k HT SALL 

219.00 

• 4 SALL 

34.00 

27" > 108" SALL 

99.00 

O'7" Octagon SALL 

210.00 


. WOODWARD'S FLOOR COVERINGS 


M/omUuli 


The Store That Has It AIK 

l Aood*atd\ May lair, Phone Mb-MU. Store Houry: V.JO a.m.-i.MJ p.m. Monday to Saturday. teening chopping Wednesday, Ihuryday and today nighty 'til VMI p.m. 


I 















































LIVING SALE 

Find what you’re looking for in a top quality camera and accessories 
as well as more nice things for your home at the best possible prices! _ 




The Store That Has It All! 


Woodward* Mayfair, Phone UU> JJ22. More Hour*: *40 j.<n.-5:J0 p.m. Monday lo Saturday lvetting c h oppin g Wednesday, thurtday and today night* til *00 pan. 


Patrick 

... job created for him 


A Nikon EM 35mm C*im<*r<t with f 1.8 lens I l. rfronu 
vi yineenng «n its best Small and automatic throw your 
wearies away about incorrect exposure .Just focus and 
shoot with this versatile Sl.R 


218.99 


camera' 

Sale 

Optional Case 

H. Nikon SB-E Speedliqht Hash < hv. s-}T.\ it pi< urn s 
flash, automatically The SB f xout<>matii flash output c« 
trol synchronizes with a pre determtn* 1 
shutter speed 

SALE 


69.99 


SPORTS 


THE COLOKJST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 23 


Patrick steps in near top of Rangers’ staff 


NEW YORK (AP) — 
Craig Patrick, whose fam¬ 
ily has long been linked to 
New York Ranger history, 
was named new operations 
director Tuesday in a 
major front-office shakeup 
of the National Hockey 
League team. 

Patrick, whose grandfa¬ 
ther, Lester, created the 
Rangers and whose father, 
Lynn, and uncle, Muzz, 
coached them, was pre¬ 
sented to the media at a 
Madison Square Garden 
news conference. 

The post was created for 
Patrick and his powers will 
greatly diminish those of 
Mickey Keating, the con¬ 
troversial assistant gen¬ 
eral manager, who will be 


assigned to a scouting posi¬ 
tion in the organization. 

The Rangers also named 
a new assistant coach, 
Andre Beaulieu, to replace 
MikeNykoluk. 

Patrick, 34, who assisted 
Herb Brooks In coaching 
the gold medal-winning 
United States Olympic 
team, will be in charge of 
all trades and administra¬ 
tive duties, including minor 
league operations. 

Fred Shero will retain his 
dual position as coach and 
general manager, although 
the bulk of the latter re¬ 
sponsibilities will fall Into 
Patrick’s lap. It was em¬ 
phasized that Patrick 
would work in a comple¬ 
mentary role to Shero, not 


ments. Richard has a 10-4 
record and a 1.89 earned 
run average. 

★ ★ * 

TORONTO (CP) — To¬ 
ronto universities have 
dipped into the former 
players ranks and emerged 
with their hpekey coaches 
for next season. University 
of Toronto have named for¬ 
mer Blues’ captain Gord, 
Davies to replace Tom' 
Watt, recently named an 
assistant coach with Van- 
codver Canucks of the Na¬ 
tional Hockey League. 
Chris Kostka, an Ontario 
Universities Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation all-star In 1979, has 
been named coach of the 
York Yeomen for the 1980- 
81 season. 


All 

... wants thorough check 


edi savings on English 


Nikon Series t Lenses ( omp.ict «uvf light to perfectly r - u , AIU . .. 

G. Koval Albert Bone China (ire<i 

Tii.itch the c .imet.i .it *-pva«il savings now a.. 

C. 75-150mm f 3.5 Zoom SALE 279.99 ‘J”,",'' Ch "”> 

rresent set or start a nev 

30% off 


19QQQ ,n V° ur present set or star! a new one Buy for future 
I*-'-** shoviers.mil 

139.99 weddings 

■ .. while you 

simpler than 

ever You can catch the uclion at 2 ft.muvs per second with 
the Nikon I M s matching motor 
drive the MI) I 


I). 100mm f/2.8 Telephoto SALE 

E. 28mm f/2.8 Wide Angle SALE 

F. Nikon Motordrive Photography, mad. 


SALE 


109.99 


save on 
•very piece* 


While Quantities Last. 


WOODWARD S CAMI KAs 


WOODWARD S CHINA 


If. Kettle by Sunbeam Automatic low profile kettle 
Stainless steel vessel with removable cord SALE 22.99 

J. Two-Slice Toaster by Sunbeam Time controlled, wide 
slots, dial control, crumb tray Almond end panels 

SALE 30.99 

K. Electric Frypan High dome buffet style vented lid. pr«» 
be control. 11 1 pan Almond lid with chocolate brown ex 

wrtor base SALE 36.99 

L. Steam Dry Iron bv Sunbeam 19 * vent solepiate 

features labor guide K' cord stainless xleel tank __ 

SM i 29.99 

WOODWARD'S HOUSt WARI s 


Names and games 


as one of his superiors. 

Patrick’s grandfather, 
Lester, put the team to¬ 
gether In 1926 and won the 
Stanley Cup In his second 
season. He served as gen¬ 
eral manager for 20 sea¬ 
sons and coach for 13. 

Lynn Patrick, an all-star 
left wing for the Rangers, 
coached them from 1948 to 
1950. Muzz, a top defence- 
man, coached the team in 
1954 and 1955 and was gen¬ 
eral manager from 1955 to 
1964. 

* * * 

AMSTERDAM (Reuter) 
— West German driver 


Hans-Georg Buerger died 
In hospital Tuesday from 
injuries sustained after 
crashing on a warm-lap for 
last Sunday's European 
Formula Two motor racing 
championship race at 
Zandvoort. Buerger, 28, 
crashed his BMW on the 
rain-soaked circuit and 
suffered severe chest and 
head injuries. 

* * * 

ROCHESTER, Minn. 
(AP) — Former heavy¬ 
weight boxing champion 
Muhammad All has been 
admitted to the Mayo Clinic 
for a complete physical. 


All, who entered the clinic 
Tuesday, has said he wants 
a medical clearance before 
launching his fourth try for 
the championship. 

* * * 

HOUSTON (AP) —Hous¬ 
ton all-star pitcher J.R. Ri¬ 
chard, currently on the 
Astros 21-day disabled list, 
will enter Methodist Hospi¬ 
tal today for a complete 
and detailed diagnostic 
study. Richard pitched for 
the last time on July 14 
when he left the game after 
three and a third innings 
complaining of an upset 
stomach. It marked the 
10th time in 17 starts that 
Richard had left the game 
complaining of various ail- 






























24 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, lfWO 


Woodwards helps uou 



Table for Two? 

/ / / ///x 



When there are just two of you, buying food can be a 
problem. Not at Woodward’s. We have smaller por¬ 
tions in all kinds of food that are just right for one or 
two. Come in and see this week. 


WOODWARD'S SUPREME 

Beans, Peas or 
Cream Corn 

lO-fl.-oz. tin 2l for 59* 


OLD SOUTH 


Grapefruit 

Juice. 6 - 6 %-fl.-oz. tins 


109 


MAGIC PANTRY BEEF STEW 

Chicken a la King 

169 

I g pkt. A 


250. 


KRAFT PROCESS 

) 


Cheese Slices 

1 15 


250 < 


HEREFORD 

Corned Beef 


7-ox. tin 


155 


Cut your own steaks 

\\w\\\ \ v 



Here is a unique way to buy top grade steaks. A whole 
strip loin, specially aged longer for extra tenderness. 
Boneless, so that you can cut your own New York 
steaks to the exact thickness and size you want. 


YOU CUT AND SAVE 
GRAIN FED BEEF 


Canada 


New York 
Strip Loin 

. Boneless, 

"A",5" 


B.C. GROWN FRESH 

Mushrooms 

or b 

1 


White or brown 

39 


HP Sauce 


14-fl.-ox. bottle 


119 


Fine Dairy 
Products 


Sunday 

Seafood 

Brunch 

ftFish 

•—* 

Get your Free copy of ‘Sunday 
Brunch at Home’! Great, quick 
ideas for the day off. 

PREVIOUSLY FROZEN 

Red Snapper Fillets 

•b. I 48 

WOODWARD S SUPREME 

Pancake Flour 

119 

Buttermilk . 3-lb. pkt. JL 

PREVIOUSLY FROZEN COOKED 

Lobsters 

949 

200 9 mm 

V 

NABOB 

Marmalade 

159 

Orange or 3 fruits, .... 24-fL-ox. tin A 

BYE THE SEA 

Chunk Light Tuna 

115 

6 -ox. tin A 

OLYMPIC REGULAR OR THICK 

Side Bacon 

1 69 

Sliced,. 500 g pkg. m 

HIGHLINER 

Sole Fillets 

949 

1-Lb. pkt. A 


Grocery 

Specials 


- WOODWARD'S 

English 

Cheshire 

2 59 

SCARDILLO 

Mozarella 

2 19 

_ 

KRAFT CHEESE 


Plain 


.250 


109 
gpkt. A 


TRADITION 

Nabob 

Coffee 

3 29 

_ 

BETTY CROCKER 

Stir *N Frost 

Cake Mix. pkt. 

PEEK FREANS 

Biscuits 


Digestive, Fruit Creme, Home Assort- 179 

®d.600 g pkt. A 


15 


Olympic Values • Meat 


OLYMPIC HOSTESS OR HERITAGE BONELESS 

Smoked 
Hams 
2« 


Cryovac pieces, lb. 


OLYMPIC COTTAGE ROLLS 

Smoked Shoulder 
Butt 

Cryovac halves, lb. 1 


OLYMPIC 

Sausage Sti] 

5 varieties.250 g each 

OLYMPIC BREAKFAST OR PURE PORK 

Sausages 

500 g tray, each 148 

OLYMPIC FAMILY PAK SLICED 

Nock Chicken Loaf 

500 g vaepak 1“ 

OLYMPIC FAMILY PAK SLICED 

Bologna 

■00 g .aepok. each 1" 

OLYMPIC ' _ 

Skinless Wieners 


FRESH YOUNG SPRING 


Stews removed. 


Lamb Legs 

FRESH YOUNG SPRING CUT 

Lamb Shoulder Roasts 

FRESH YOUNG SPRMG 

Lamb Shoulder Chops 


GRAM FED BONELESS 

Rolled 

Brisket 

riaie ana Kourn oomomea 

"A" * l 79 


Whole or butt portion,. lb. 


Ox 


>59 


FRESHLY GROUND 

Ground 


Conodo 






















































I 


I 








THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 25 


===============================!=====«* 

buy better....eat better 


We’ve got great buns 


V V V. v \ \ \ > 



Our hamburger bun selection lets you make super 
burgers. For example, we have double cut buns so 
you can put in 2 patties, 5 inch hamburger buns, 
super giant sesame seed buns and good tasting 60% 
whole wheat,to name a few. Check our buns today. 

WOODWARD S OWN 

Frankfurter Buns 


WOODWARDS 


Bar-B-Q 

Buns 

Made with 60% Whole Wheat 

_c 

for 


6 85 


Made with Unbleached Flour 1 dosen 
WOODWARD S OWN 


J65 

Seeded Bar-B-Q Buns 

Sprinkled with sesame C OQt 

seeds. D ior O 9 

WOODWARD S OWN 

Croissants 

Serve them hot for best C 165 
flavour. U ior Jk 


Can it...Freeze it... Pickle it 



Now is the time to ‘put down’ those Summertime fruits 
and vegetables for enjoyment all winter long. We have 
all the jars, rings and fittings you need as well as all 
the ingredients. 


BERNARDIN 

LIQUID 

Zinc Rings 

Certo 

pkt. of 12 99* 

6 -fl.-ox. bottle 7 9 

WIDE MOUTH 

DOMINION 

Kerr Lids 

Harvest Jars 

pkt. el 12 99* 

case of 12 — 250 ml 4 * 9 

VICEROY GEM 

FOR SEALING 

Glass Lids 

Parowax 

pkt. ol 12 8 9 * 

T 

450 9 pkt. 79* 


Household 

Selection 

flower 

/|i | i. 

Values 

$ Value 

Shops 

wowtMiqs 




HAS IT ALL! 

Personal Shopping July 21st to 26th 

We reserve the right 
to limit quantities 

SHOP EVENINGS 

AMAZE 

Stain Remover 

185 

650 g pkt. A 

WOODWARD S PLASTIC 

Garbage Bags 

059 

pkt. of 20 

KELLOGG S 

Rice 

Krispies 

175 

750 g pkt. A 

GOOD SELECTION OF COLOURS 

TO CHOOSE FROM 

Gladiolus 

8 stems per bunch 

139 

bunch A 

WOODWARD'S SUPREME 

Fabric Softener 

179 

128-fl.-oz. bottle JL 

WOODWARDS 

Bleach 

QQt 

128-fl.-oz. bottle 9 9 

SALADA ORANGE PEKOE 

Tea Bags 

175 

pkt. of 60 A 

GOODHOST 

Iced Tea Mix 

055 

DAISY VARIETY ONLY 

Potted Mums 

Grown in 6" pot 8 ,.each 

A GREAT SELECTION OF TRAILING VARIETIES 

Tropical Plants 

199 

Grown in 4-inch hanging pots ..each A 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 
nights til 9:00 p.m. 

Shop Monday, Tuesday and 
Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 
at Woodward’s. 


24-os. Mil A 

% 

Frozei 

n Food 

• Prodi 


- WOODWARD’S 

Small 

Peas 

1 1 2-OZ- pkt. 49* 

, WOODWARD'S 

French 

Fries 

R5* 

straight cut 2-lb. pkt. W 

B.C. GROWN FRESH 

GRADE CANADA No. 1 

Broccoli 

serve with cheese sauce 

«, 45* 

“ t.C. QUALITY 

B.C. GROWN GRADE CANADA No. 1 

Head 

Lettuce 

each 33* 

I “ RUPERT COO 

Fish & Chips 

1 35 

28 as. ctn. A 

WOOOWARO S SUPREME 

Orange Juice 

1 Concentrated IS*j tl. am. 1 

YORK 

Chopped Onions 

10-ob. pkt. 37* 

WOODWARD S SUPREME 

Grapefruit Juice 

ms* 

B.C. GROWN 

Radishes and 
Green Onions 

L. 19* 

GRADE CANADA 

No. 1 CALIFORNIA 

Tomatoes 

49* 

SARA LEE 

Banana Cake 

l ,4*^ 1” 

MINUTE MAID 

Lemonade 

rafMwwpMfc.l2R.ee. 65* 

SC. GROWN CHINESE VEGETABLES 

Bek Choy, Suey Choy 
* 25* 

IMPORTED 

Corn on the Cob 

6 tor 89* 











































26 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


CANADA 









Uranium mine 
radiation data 
‘manipulated’ 

TORONTO (CP) — A United Steelworkers of 
America representative says information about 
radiation levels to which uranium miners are 
exposed is manipulated and suppressed by mining 
companies and the On- 


Thetis 
towing 
not out 

Vehicles without valid 
parking tickets may be 
towed from the Thetis Lake 
parking lot, but not neces¬ 
sarily, 

“We're not adamant 
about it," parks director Al 
Smith told city council's 
parks committee Tuesday. 

Officially, however, cars 
may be towed from the 
park if they obstruct fire 
access, if they are parked 
at a yellow line or if they 
don’t display a valid park¬ 
ing ticket purchased from a 
spitter at the entrance to 
the city-owned park. 

Until recently, the aider- 
men believed the city 
wasn't enforcing a bylaw 
permitting the removal of 
vehicles from Thetis Lake 
Park. 

When a brief item in 
the Colonist last week slat 
ed that no cars were being 
towed away, some irate 
motorists learned other¬ 
wise. 

In a report to the com¬ 
mittee, Smith said the 
newspaper report “has 
caused extra work and 
some heated exchanges 
with people" whose cars 
had been towed away. 

The committee decided 
to maintain the policy of 
towing cars away. 

Base chief 
hands over 

A change of command 
ceremony will take place at 
Canadian Forces Base Es¬ 
quimau Aug. 28 when base 
commander Capt. Colin 
Shaw relinquishes com¬ 
mand to become chief of 
staff operations. His suc¬ 
cessor will be Capt. 
Thomas Murphy who is 
now serving in Brussels, 
Belgium. 


Regular $15.95 
Per 4 Gallons 


SPECIAL 

PRICE 


$1289 

I £■ 4 


Effective Sale Dates July 21-27 


This week's special is ovoiloble a* 
all Cloverdole Point n Paper stores 
in B C and Alberta 

VICTORIA 382-6148 
2644 QUADRA ST. 

Weekdays 7 30-500 p.e> 

Set 8 30-5 pm Sun 1000-* p m 

SMKT I7CM6 SC fK-M7S __ 

filiwitl tftl Ui Id 17M&8 ORACO 


<> 


Four Quebecers 
given *.horseplay’ 


tario government. 

Paul Falkowski told the 
select committee on On¬ 
tario Hydro affairs on 
Tuesday that radiation sur¬ 
veys conducted by mining 
companies and the min¬ 
istry of labor could produce 
differing readings, but 
results of ministry tests 
were “not available to the 
union or to the exposed 
workers." 

“The system in itself is 
not producing accurate 
records," said Falkowski, 
the union's, Ontario co-or¬ 
dinator of occupational 
health and safety. "The 
system could be designed 
to produce convenient ex¬ 
posure records. 

"It is clear thafthc lower 
recorded exposure figures 
have been entered into the 
records of individual work¬ 
ers when, in fact, the actual 
concentration has been 
higher.” 

Falkowski, commenting 
specifically on the Elliot 
Lake, Ont., operations of 
Denison Mines Ltd. and 
Rio Algom Mines Ltd., also 
said uranium miners were 
protected by radiation 
monitoring equipment 
which was nut of date and 
inaccurate. 

He said there was tech¬ 
nology to provide each 
mine worker with a person¬ 
al radiation monitor, but 
none was used in Elliot 
Lake. 

Falkowski criticized 
jurisdictional confusion 
which secs Ontario's ura¬ 
nium mine workers fall 
under the Canada Labor 
Code rather than the prov¬ 
ince's Occupational Health 
and Safety Act. 

"While we do h^ve differ¬ 
ences and disagreements 
with the Ontario ministry 
of labor,... it is our view 
that if provincial jurisdic¬ 
tion prevailed, there would 
be fewer problems.” 

Falkowski said the union 
also advocated the appoint 
ment of worker-inspectors, 
“with the right to shut 
down a work site and the 
responsibility to report to 
the ministry." 


Terry meets people of Guelph 


Terry Fox, the amputee runner from 
Vancouver who is crossing Canada to 
raise funds for cancer research, 
stopped to exchange greetings with 


handicapped persons who came out to 
welcome him to Guelph, Ont., on 
Tuesday. Fox has completed almost 
half his cross-country run. 


$100,000-search finds 
girls mile from home 


A full-scale search last 
weekend for two 11-year- 
old Powell River area girls 
cost taxpayers more than 
$100,000, a search and res¬ 
cue official said Tuesday. 

Aircraft and helicopters 
from Canadian Forces 
Base Comox, RCMP ves¬ 
sels, four Canadian Coast 
Guard inflatable rescue 
craft and a Vancouver- 
based coast guard hover¬ 
craft combined their ef¬ 
forts in the fruitless mis¬ 
sion which involved 70 
search hours. Several pri¬ 
vate boats also joined in the 
search. 

The chain of events start¬ 
ed Friday when Karen 
Zohar and Michelle Juig- 
mard left their homes at 
Lang Bay, 16 kilometres 
south of Powell River on a 
weekend camping trip. 

Their camping gear was 
stashed in an eight-foot 
homemade dinghy with 
enough food for a week. 

They told friends they 


were heading across the 
strait to Texada Island but 
they didn’t tell their par¬ 
ents. 

A full-scale search was 
launched when the girls 
were reported missing 
about 2 p.m. 

The girls were found on 
the beach one mile from 
home early the next morn¬ 
ing, gazing skyward at 
flares being dropped by one 
of the search planes, an 
armed forces spokesman 
said. 


"They had changed their 
minds about the trip to 
Texada,” he added. 

A total of 160 flares were 
dropped at a cost of $80,000, 
flying time was estimated 
at more than $26,000 and 
the coast guard cost is esti¬ 
mated at $6,000. 

The rescue centre in Vic¬ 
toria, busiest in Canada, 
responded to 2,196 emer¬ 
gency calls of all kinds in 
the first six months of 
1980. 


VICTORIA HEALTH CLUB 
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP 


CALGARY (CP) f- 
There was no evidence that 
a group of Quebec students 
working on a railway gang 
in Saskatchewan were sub¬ 
jected to racial harassment 
by fellow workers, a CP 
Rail spokesman said Tues¬ 
day. 

Earl Olson of Calgary 
said in an interview the 
company's investigation of 
the incident showed the 
men were the objects of 
conventional "horseplay” 
common on railway gangs. 

Marc Cote, 22, of Quebec- 
City, another Quebecer and 
a Toronto native quit the 
railway gang at Gull Lake 
Sask., July 10 after work 
ing for more than a month 
Cote later complained pub 
licly to the Quebec govern 
ment and CP Rail that the 
four Quebecers on the crew 
were harrassed for being 
Frcnch-Canadian. 

It was reported Cote said 
others in the crew of about 
30 workers called them 
separatists and demanded 
they stop speaking French 
among themselves. The 
night before they quit, they 
were bound hand and foot 
and thrown in the camp 
showers, he said. 

Olson said CP Rail police 
who investigated the char¬ 
ges "found no serious inci¬ 
dent of racial harass¬ 
ment." 

He said two of the four 
Quebecers on the gang had 
not quit and said they in¬ 
tended to keep working. 

He also said there was no 
evidence the men were tied 
in any way before being 
thrown into the showers. 

Olson said the horseplay 
resulted because the four 
Quebecers and a few others 


FIREPLACES are 
not efficient but 
there is one that's 
different. Get the 
facts on Page 28. 


did not socialize with the 
rest of the crew at nightly 
parties which are a feature 
of travelling railway work 
gangs. 

Some of the hazing in¬ 
cluded taunts to speak Eng¬ 
lish with the rest of the 
crew but there were no 
demands the Quebecers 
stop speaking French 


among themselves, he 
said. 

The shower incident oc¬ 
curred the night of July 9 
when some gang members 
returning from a party 
woke the four and another 
crew member who had 
stayed behind and tossed 
them in the showers, he 
said. 


Fra^h air 
Rrcplacab 


THE PERSON PICTURED ABOVE IS: 

A) TONGUE-TIED 

B) NOT WEARING PANTS 

C) PUNS A FAMOUS CHARM SCHOOL 

D) STARRING IN A HILARIOUS NEW MOVIE 
| WHAT IS CHEVY CHASE UP TO? [ 


Open 7 
days a week 

tor women 


Open 7 
days a wee* 
tor men 


Get the most out of your summer this year. Start one 
of our special programs today. Reducing, trimming, 
shaping-up. 

733 JOHNSON ST. 383-6113 




JULY 


RED ROBIN 
■FOODSH 


july Food 


WE RESERVE 
THE RIGHT 
TO LIMIT 
QUANTITIES 


Playground equipment 
marked down to clear! 


80013 GYM DANDY SWING SET Features 2 swings. 2 seater 
sky glide, attached colorclad slide, clown ride and trapeze bar. 


94.99 


TO CLEAR 

89040 PLATFORM SLIDE Free standing slide with colorclad 
72" slide bed . 4QQQ 

800614 GYM DANDY SWING SET Deluxe six legged set 
features 2 passenger lawn swing. 2 seater sky glide. 1 swing, at¬ 
tached slide and down ride. 1 0000 

TO CLEAR.---;-IZ 7.77 

24509 GYM DANDY SPORT T Multi play activity centre 
features 1 vertical ladder, overhead ladder. 1 Swing. 1 rope climb. 
2 gym rings. 1 trapeze bar. QO 

80014 GYM DANDY SWING SET Features 2 passenger lawn 
swing. 1 swing. 2 seater sky glide, clown ride, attached colorclad 

TO CLEAR -a.-....’.. 119.99 

80012 GYM DANDY SWING SET Features fish ride, on swing. 
2 seater sky glide with attached colorclad slide *70 AA 

TO CLEAR /7.7 7 

WOODWARD'S TOYS 


(NoMvidl 


ROMPER 

PET FOOD 

», 2/79* 

PR 

CARTON 

CIGARETTES 

769 

Limit of 3 # 

Reg. and Kings . m 

ALL CANADIAN BRANDS 

ICES EFFECTIVE ^ 
JULY 23-27 
'ED. to SUNDAY 

BUDGET 

WIENERS 

,89* 

NABOB 

COFFEE 

REG. or FINE ^^49 

KRAFT MEDIUM 

CRACKER 

BARREL 

I 79 

STICK . ■ 

PURINA 

DOG CHOW 
Q99 

16 kg W 

DETERGENT 

4 39 

3* litres. 

KRAFT PARKAY 

MARGARINE 
4 89 

3 lbs. 

MOTTS 

CLAMATO JUICE 

4 39 

48 o2. 

CANTALOUPES 

59* 

CORN ON THE COB 

6/99* 

GRANNY SMITH 

APPLES 

... 49* 

McCAIN 

SUPER CRISP 

69* 

McCAIN 

SUPER PATTIES 

69* 

VALLEY FARM 

FRIES 

. 39* 


EARLYBIRD SMKS. Anc 

m ? TODDLERS 3 s 


TOP ROUND 

STEAK 

r- 2 39 

T-BONE 

STEAK 

. 3 39 

PORTERHOUSE 

STEAK 

. 3 49 

WING 

STEAKS 

. 3 09 

ROASTS 

2 69 

SIRLOIN TIP 

STEAKS 

2 8# 


Woodward * kOyiwr. 


Hm It All! 

(tow Mum : 4.M Ui.-kN 1 


478 - 6233 . 478 *544 

1155 (AST SAANICH. SAANICH TOM. I AM. » P.M. DAILT 
ill 4712. IS2-402I 


s 












































































Kiwifruit adds new dimensions in flavor 


Exotic 


Nearly 500 years ago the New World gave civiliza¬ 
tion potatoes, tomatoes, corn: in fact, it almost dou¬ 
bled the types of food enjoyed by people all over the 
world. 


Since that time, new types of fruits and vege¬ 
tables have been few and far between. 


treats 


But the New Zealanders have come up with a new 
taste delight: kiwifruit. Available in western Can¬ 
ada for only the last few years, Kiwifruit is unlike 
any other fruit in taste although some people have 
described it as a cross between a strawberry and a 
a banana. 


from afar 


Even its color is different—an emerald green which 
adds new and refreshing dimensions to fruit cock¬ 
tails and other fruit dishes. 

And every bit of the fruit is deliciously edible, al¬ 
though most people don’t eat the skin. You can simply cut 
the Kiwifruit in half and eat it was a spoon — or use it in 
dozens of different ways from pies to milk shakes. 


-Versatility - 
in mangoes 


Mangoes are back! The season just opened with 
bountiful harvests, up 50 per cent over last year. 
This is the year to "Meet a Mango . . . and make a 
friend!” 

Mcxicq, which produces many of the mangoes 
sold in Canada, has benefited from nearly perfect 
growing conditions this season. For shoppers, this 
means good quality, excellent supplies, and prices 
that are expected to be lower than preceding years. 

You'll enjoy this versatile, luscious fruit for des¬ 
serts, breakfast, lunch, or anytime! Try some of the 
suggestions below or substitute mangoes for 
peaches in your favorite recipe! 


TROPICAL BREAKFAST 

1 cup sliced mango 
I cup sliced banana 
1 cup sliced grapefruit 
1 cup sliced strawberries 
6 lettuce leaves 
Dressing: 

Juice of I fresh lime 

1 tablespoon of grapefruit juice (will be left in 
grapefruit skin after taking sections out for 
salad) 

1 tablespoon honey (or more, according to taste) 

'4 cup salad nil 

■4 teaspoon salt 1 

Chill fruit. Blend lime juice, grapefruit juice 
and honey. Add salad oil and salt. Place fruit in 
mixing bowl (except strawberries). Pour dressing 
over fruit. Mix gently. Arrange fruit on lettuce- 
leaves in individual salad bowls. Add strawberries. 
Serves 6 . 

MANGO OMELETTE 

4 eggs 

2 tablespoons whipping cream 

1 tablespoon granulated sugar 
*4 teaspoon salt 

3 tablespoons butter or margarine 

2 large ripe mangoes, peeled, cut into ' 4 -inch 
thick pieces 

>4 cup dairy sour cream 

Beat eggs, cream, granulated sugar and salt 
lightly in medium-sized bowl. Melt butter in 9-inch 
skillet over medium-high heat, tilting pan to coat 
bottom and side of pan. Pour egg mixture into 
skillet: cook, lifting edges of set mixture to allow 
uncooked egg to flow to bottom. Continue to cook 
until omelette is set, but top is slightly moist, about 1 
minute. Layer mango slices over top of omelette; 
spoon sour cream over mangoes, cook 30 seconds. 
Fold sides of omelette over middle. Slide omelette 
onto serving plate. Serves 2. 

MANGOSTEAK 

1 V 4 pounds round steak 
2 large onions, thickly sliced 

1 medium, firm mango, peeled and sliced thin 
1'4 cups tomatoes, sliced 

salt and pepper to taste 

Place meat in greased casserole or baking dish. 
Cover with onion and mango slices and toma¬ 
toes. Season to taste. Bake at 325 degrees about I 
hour, or until tender. Serves 4-6. 

TRADEWINDS PIE 

I small can frozen limeade (6 Oz.) 

Fruit from one mango, cut into chunks 
I can of evaporated milk (5.33 oz.) 

1 container of Cool Whip <8 oz.) 

2 pie shells (baked or graham cracker) 

Mix together and pour into pie shells. Chill in re¬ 
frigerator until firm. May be frozen. Each pie 
serves 6 - 8 . 

MANGO BREAD 

4 cup butter, margarine or vegetable shortening 
% cup sugar 

2 eggs 

% cup ripe mango, cut Fine 
2 cups sifted flour 
I teaspoon soda 
■ 4 teaspoon salt 
I tablespoon lime Juice 
<4 cap chopped nuts (optional) 

Cream together shortening and sugar. Add 
eggs Stir in dry ingredients, cut up mango. Add 
lime, juice Mix all together Add chopped nuts, if 
desired. Bake in a bread loaf pan at 356 decree* 
about I hour, or until loaf tests "done". Cool about 16 
minutes in pan. remove and cool thoroughly on cake 
rack. Yield: One loaf, or about It 20 slices. 


The Kiwifruit—originally known as a Chinese goose¬ 
berry—is believed to have come from the Yangtsc 
Valley in .China. However, a combination of soil and 
climate in two small areas of New Zealand made it 
possible to grow the renamed Kiwifruit in sufficient 
quantities to export it to many areas of the world. It is now 
considered a delicacy in such widespread places as 
Germany, Japan, Great Britain and the United States. 
For those who have tried it in Canada, it is also an exotic 
treat. 

\ 

Here are a few ways you can enjoy the different taste 
of Kiwifruit which is in local stores from now until late 
autumn. * 


JADE SALAD 

Lettuce 
4 Kiwifruit 

2 stalks celery, chopped 

1 tbsp. toasted nuts (almonds or cashews) 

2 radishes, sliced 
1 tomato, sliced 

1 tbsp. salad oil 
1 tbsp. lemon juice 

Line salad bowl with lettuce leaves. Peel and slice 
Kiwifruit and combine with celery, toasted nuts, sliced 
radish and tomato. Mix oil and lemon juice and pour 
over salad just before serving. 


Emerald green fruit from New Zealand improves taste and appearance of salads 


GREENSTONE PIE 

1 cooked 8 ” pie shell 
4-6 Kiwifruit 

2 egg whites 

3 tbsp. white sugar 

Peel Kiwifruit and slice, then fill pic shell with fruit. 

Beat egg whites until stiff. Gradually beat in sugar 
until meringue is thick and glossy. Spread meringue 
over fruit making sure it touches the sides of the with a fork. Layer scoops of ice cream and mashed 
pastry. Bake at 400° F for 5 minutes. Serve at once with Kiwifruit in parfait or sundae glasses. Top with pres 
ice cream or custard. erved ginger. 


KIWI SUNDAE 


Kiwifruit 
Ice cream 

Chopped preserved ginger 


You will need >4 Kiwifruit per person. Peel and mash 


Light, 
luscious 
brunch 
for two 


Summertime, light appe 
tiles and cool, refreshing 
menus go hand in hand. 
What to serve for brunch, 
lunch ora light dinneroften 
becomes the question to 
ponder. Why not take ad¬ 
vantage of an endless vari¬ 
ety of fresh berries? 
Teamed up, they are not 
only a tasty combination, 
but offer contrasting color 
and texture. 

And who says fresh 
grapefruit is only for 
breakfast? Peeled and cut 
into cartwheel slices, ar¬ 
ranged with honeydew or 
cantaloupe and fresh ber¬ 
ries in season, this grape¬ 
fruit combination becomes 
a tasty part of a light sum¬ 
mer meal. For protein, any 
assortment of cold cuts can 
be added. Especially at¬ 
tractive are roll-ups of ham 
and Swiss cheese. Top it all 
off with a light fruit-fla¬ 
vored yogurt dressing. Add 
a pitcher of iced tea or 
fresh lemonade and you 
have it . . . light and lus¬ 
cious summer fare! 


LIGHT ‘N’ LUSCIOUS 
FARE FOR TWO 

4 slices (about 4 ounces) 
ham or salami 

4 slices (about 4 ounces) 
Swiss or Brick cheese 

1 grapefruit, peeled, cut 
in * cartwheel slices 

2 to 3 large strawberries, 
halved or sliced 

1 cup strawberry yogurt 

2 teaspoons fresh grated 
grapefruit peel 

2 tablespoons chopped 
nuts 

K honeydew or canta¬ 
loupe, cut ia 2 wedges 

Top each ham slice with 
a slice of cheese; roll up 
and secure with toothpick. 
Arrange ham and cheese, 
grapefruit, melon and 
strawberries on two serv¬ 
ing plates. To make-dress 


Goodness wrapped in a shell 


Name something that is 
refreshing, flavorful, 
juicy, yet contains only 45 
calories. If your answer is 
a fresh grapefruit half— 
you arc right! Each me¬ 
dium size grapefruit half 
also supplies you with more 
than the vitamin C recom¬ 
mended for the day. 
(Based on information 
from “Nutrient Value of 
Some Common Foods", 
Health and Welfare Can¬ 
ada, Revised 1979.) 

Fresh grapefruit is ver¬ 
satile too. Here are some 
recipe ideas: 

SUMMER FRUIT SALAD 
WITH GRAPEFRUIT 
MINT DRESSING 

2 grapefruit, peeled, sec¬ 

tioned 

3 cups melon cubes or balls 

(cantaloupe, honey¬ 


dew, watermelon, etc.) 
6 fresh apricots, halved, or 
I can (10 ounces) apri¬ 
cot halves, drained 
I cup seedless grapes 
Grapefruit Mint Dress¬ 
ing 

In serving bowl, combine 
fruit. Serve with Grape¬ 
fruit Mint Dressing. Makes 
Gservings (about7cups). 

Grapefruit Mint Dressing 

1 cup dairy sour cream or 

yogurt 

2 tablespoon honey 

2 teaspoons fresh grated 
grapefruit peel 

1 tablespoons fresh 

squeezed grapefruit 
juice 

2 teaspoon crushed dried 

mint leaves 

In small bowl, combine 
all ingredients; chill. 
Makes about 1 cup. 


FRESH GRAPEFRUIT 
FLORENTINE SALAD 

% cup salad oil 
'4 cup wine vinegar 
2 teaspoons fresh grated 
grapefruit peel 
■4 teaspoon garlic salt 
% teaspoon dried tarragon 
leaves, crushed 

1 large bunch or 1 pack-. 

age (10 ounces) fresh 
spinach, torn in bite- 
sized pieces 

2 grapefruit, peeled, cut 

in half-cartwheels 
1 small onion, sliced, se¬ 
parated into rings 
'4 cup (about 2 ounces) 
crumbled blue cheese 
In jar with lid, combine 
salad oil. vinegar, grape 
fruit peel, garlic salt and 
tarragon; chill. In large 
bowl, combine spinach, 
grapefruit, onion and 


cheese; chill. To serve, 
shake dressing well; lightly 
toss with spinach mixture. 
Makes 6 servings (about 9 
cups). 

SALADS ITALIANO IN 
GRAPEFRUIT SHELLS 
2 grapefruit 

2 oranges peeled, sec¬ 
tioned, drained 
t medium zucchini, thinly 
sliced 

'4 cup sliced celery 
'4 cup prepared Italian 
salad dressing 
'4 cup mayonnaise or 
salad dressing 
Grated peel of 1 fresh 
orange 

Grapefruit shells: Cut 
each grapefruit in half 
crosswise; remove any 
seeds. Using a curved 
grapefruit or paring knife, 
cut around segments to 


Celd cats, cartwheel slices of grapefruit aad kemeydew. Iced lea 


tare 


loosen from membrane. 
Remove and reserve 
pieces; drain. Scrape shells 
"clean" with spoon. To 
prevent tipping, cut a thin 
slice from bottom of each 
shell; chill. 

Citrus vegetable salad: 
In bowl, combine reserved 
grapefruit pieces, oranges, 
zucchini, celery and Italian 
dressing. Chill 1 hour or 
longer to blend flavors. To 
make orange mayonnaise 
sauce, remove 2 table¬ 
spoons Italian dressing and 
blend with mayonnaise and 
orange peel. To serve, 
spoon grapefruit mixture 
into a prepared shells. 
Serve with orange mayon¬ 
naise sauce. Makes 4 serv¬ 
ings (about 3 cups). 


RASPBERRY DREAM IN 
GRAPEFRUIT SHELLS 
2 grapefruit 
1 package (3 ounces) 
raspberry jelly powder 

1 cup boiling water 
Ice cubes 

>4 cup whipping cream, 
whipped* 

<4 cup shredded or flaked 
coconut 

2 tablespoons sliced al¬ 
monds 

Cut one grapefruit in half 
crosswide; ream juice to 
equal V, cup. Cut second 
grapefruit in half; care¬ 
fully remove grapefruit 
sections from membrane 
with curved grapefruit or 
paring knife. Drain and 
reserve sections. Scrape 
grapefruit shells “clean" 
with spoon. To prevent tip¬ 
ping, cut a thin slice from 
bottom of each shell. Rinse 
shells; drain and chill. In 
bowl, dissolve jelly powder 
in boiling water; stir in 
cup grapefruit juice. To 
chill quickly, place bowl 
of gelatin mixture inside- 
larger bowl filled with ice: 
stir mixture occasionally 
until very thick, but do not 
set (about '4 hour). 

With electric mixer, beat 
thickened gelatin until 
foamy (about 2 minutes). 
Fold in whipped cream, re 
serve grapefruit sections 
and coconut. Chill 5 to 10 
minute* until mixture 
begins to mound Soon into 
grapefruit shells, sprinkle 
with almonds and addition 
ai coconut, if desired Chill 
until set Makes « servings 
‘Substitute I cup frozen 
whipped topping, thawed 
for tv cup whipping rrrani 


fa (Colonist. LIVING/In the KITCHEN 


Section Three/Wednesday, July 23, 1980/Page 27 


































28 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


LIVING/In the KITCHEN 



Y ou asked about 


ACROSS 

1 All right: Var. 
5 Birds 

10 Mama's mate 

14 Exist 

15 Giant hunter 

16 Sacred bull 

17 "Shake — 

—!": Hurry 

18 African ani¬ 
mal 

19 Journey 

20 Struggle 
22 Chalcedony 

24 — age 

25 Confer 
27 Heckled 
29 Mad 

32 Patriotic gp 

33 Prior to 

34 French upper 
house 

36 Goliath's foe 
40 Iowa city 
42 Unclothe 

44 Mineral 

45 Paths 

47 Of bristles 

49 Progeny 

50 Mont Blanc, 
eg. 

52 Certain 
54 Oeform 


58 Purloin 

59 Can prov 

60 Gadabout 
62 Naval group 
65 Musial or 

Mlkita 

67 Watercourse 

69 Individuals 

70 Hence 

71 Waste away 

72 Wyoming's 
neighbor 

73 Accomplisher 

74 Lords' wives 

75 Withered 

DOWN 

1 Palm leaves: 
Var 

2 Scotch garb 

3 Fir 

4 Exodus 

5 Cough drops 

6 Metric unit 

7 Meat cuts 

8 Holy book 

9 Trapped 

10 Dab 

11 Wet month 

12 Portion 

13 Inquired 
21 Vehicles 
23 Extinct 


UNITf^^eature Syndicate 


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28 Small 
amount 

29 Transaction 

30 Columnist 
— Bom beck 

31 Ventures 
35 Roman 

emperor 

37 Unauthorized 
lawman 

38 Cake expert 

39 Appointment 
41 Bench 

43 Shares 


46 Plod 
48 Smirk 
51 Dug Into 

53 Well-known 

54 Gave medi¬ 
cine • 

55 In: Prefix 

56 Phase 

57 — flrma 
61 Space 

63 Costly 

64 U S. tennis 
star 

66 Conjunction 
68 Poem 



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Drying herbs properly 


By MINNIE BERNARDINO 

Colonist Lot Angetet Times Service 

Question: 1 have successfully been able to grow 
some herbs like oregano, mint, basil, chives and 
rosemary at home. I enjoy using them fresh but I 
would like to dry some and save for later use. 
However the few herbs that I tried to dry in the sun 
were bitter. Because I do not have a dehydrator, I 
would appreciate it if you could give me Instructions 
on other methods of drying herbs. Can this be done 
in a microwave oven? 

Answer Ideally, herbs to be used for drying 
should be snipped before the plant begins to flower 
or during full bloom as in the case of the mint 
family. After flowering, the leaves lose their scent 
and often turn bitter. According to Deanna DeLong, 
author of How to Dry Fobds (H.P. Books), herbs 
should be harvested in the morning just before 
the dew has evaporated and before the heat of the 
sun has dissipated the flavoring oils. Here are three 
methods on how to dry herbs adapted from the same 
book: 

r 

• Bay Drying (for leafy herbs or seed pods with 
long stems): Tie herbs in small bunches by stem 
ends. Place upside down in labelled small brown 
bags. Tic a string firmly around top of bag. To 
permit air circulation and speed drying, cut several 
14-inch holes around bag. Hang bags in uneven 
lengths in a warm spot with good air circulation 
until leaves are sufficiently dry, five to 10 days. 
When leaves crumble easily, roll bag gently be¬ 
tween hands so that the dried herbs will fall to the 
bottom of bag. 

• Room drying on a Tray (for herbs with large 
leaves or short stems, or for seeds and flowers): Use 
an old window screen—wash well and cover with a 
thin layer of cheesecloth. Place one layer of leaves, 
stems, flowers or seeds on top of cheesecloth and 
cover with another thin layer of cheesecloth to 
keep off dust and insects. Place screen in clean 
warm locations, preferably propped on bricks or 
wooden blocks to allow for air circulation under¬ 
neath. Turn herbs over every day or two for even 
drying. 

• Microwave Oven Drying (use only for small 
quantities of herbs): Place four to five stalks with 
leaves between paper towels to absorb excess 
moisture. Set microwave on high for two to three 
minutes. Check for dryness and reset an additional 
30 seconds, or until herbs can be crumbled. To avoid 
any danger of burning, some microwave instruc¬ 
tions call for placing a small glass of water while 
drying in the microwave oven. 

In her book, DeLong docs not recommend sun 


drying for herbs because losses in aroma, flavor and 
color are high. 

Q: To vary my usual cold lunches, I would like to 
be able to pack hot soups or stews for my lunch bag. 

Is It safe to keep them in thermos bottles for several 
hours? 

A: According to a USDA guide on Safe Brown 
Bag Lunches, so long as stews, soups or chilis are 
boiling hot when poured into a sterile vacuum bottle, 
there shouldn't be any problem at all. Salmonella, 
for example, are killed by exposure to 155 degrees, 
which is well below boiling temperature of 212 
degrees. 

Q: As a beginner cook, I tend to oversalt the 
foods I cook. I wonder if you could provide a guide 
for proper amounts for salting everyday foods like 
hamburgers, spaghetti, boiled vegetables, fried 
chicken, stews, etc. 

A: Not only can a heavy hand with salt affect 
flavor but can have ill effects on one’s health. For a 
beginner cook, measuring salt helps, otherwise it is 
better to undersalt than to go overboard. Hope this 
guide helps you; however the amounts are for 
maximum salting: 

In meats, there seems to be no measurement 
rule indicating how much to use with oven or pot 
roasts because the amount of salt is related to the 
surface area exposed. However with ground meat, 
such as loaves or patties, 1 teaspoon of salt to 1 
pound of meat will provide maximum flavor. 

In making roast meat gravy, the salt seasoning 
is generally in the amount of 1 teaspoon salt to 2 cups 
of water but this will depend on the kind of meat 
used and the flavor of the drippings. 

Macaroni or spaghetti—1 '4 tablespoons salt to 
3 quarts water (aboutpound package pasta). 

Poached Fish—1 teaspoon salt to 1 quart 
water. 

Seasoned flour for frying fish filets, chicken or 
veal cutlets —'/ teaspoon salt plus 14 cup flour. 

Milk for dipping fish filets—1 tablespoon salt 
for 1 cup milk (use less salt if crumbs used are 
salted). „ 

Fresh vegetables for boiling— V, teaspoon salt 
to 1 cup water. 

Frozen vegetables—14 teaspoon salt for 12- 
ounce carton or according to package directions. 

Potatoes—1 teaspoon salt to 1 pint water. 

White sauce—1 teaspoon salt to 1 cup milk. 

Meringue—14 teaspoon salt for 1 egg white. 

Stewed chicken— 14 teaspoon salt plus 14 cup 
water for each 1 pound ready-to-cook weight poul¬ 
try. 

Plain pastry —1 teaspoon salt for 2 cups flour. 



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Prices effective July 23 to Aug. 2 



2867 FOUL BAY ROAD 

(Just below Lansdowne) ^ vIm** 
OPEN 9-5:30 DAILY rn Stoste Ch.r». 


Elegant meal 
for couple 
in 30 minutes 


By MARIAN BURROS 

Colonist Washington Post Service 

The 30 minutes needed 
for this meal means 30 
minutes from the time you 
don an apron until the mo¬ 
ment that you sit down at 
the table. 

It does not include shop¬ 
ping for the very few gro¬ 
ceries you will need, and it 
doesn’t include washing the 
dishes. 

This quick meal will fit in 
with almost any sensible 
low-calorie diet plan, but it 
tastes so good no one is 
likely to think of it as low- 
cal food: Chinese broiled 
fish, steamed asparagus 
and green salad with yo¬ 
gurt-grapefruit dressing.’ 
For the heartier eater, it’s 
easy to add some crusty 
sourdough rolls and sweet 
butter. 

Choose strawberries for 
dessert whether you are 
dieting or not. To keep 
them low calorie, spoon on 
some orange juice. For a 
few more calories, spoon 
on a little kirsch or orange- 
flavored liqueur. 

The menu is for two peo¬ 
ple but can be doubled 
easily to serve four. 

30-MINUTE 
MENU FORTWO 

Chinese Broiled Fish—* 

Steamed Asparagus—* 

Green Salad with YOt 
gurt-Grapefruit Dress¬ 
ing—* 

Sourdough Rolls 

Strawberries with Or¬ 
ange Juice. 

Kirsch or Orange Li¬ 
queur 

•—Recipes included 

Staples On Hand: Salt, 
garlic, ground ginger, pea¬ 
nut oil, vinegar, soy sauce, 
grapefruit juice, Dijon 
mustard, orange juice 
and/or liqueur. 

Shopping List: Fish fil¬ 
lets. asparagus, Boston let¬ 
tuce, plain yogurt, sour¬ 
dough rolls, strawberries. 

STEAMER 

ASPARAGUS 

IS to 20 thin asparagus 
spears, depending on 
how much asparagus 
you like. 


FIREPLACES are 
not efficient but 
there is one that’s 
different. Get the 
tacts on Page 28. 


Frc^h air 
Ftraplacas 


Salt to taste 

Break off tough ends of 
asparagus at point where 
they break naturally. Allow 
to soak in water for a few 
minutes to remove any 
grit. 

Bring water to boil in a 
steamer—*. Add aspara¬ 
gus and steam for 8 to 10 
minutes, depending on 
their thickness. When (hey 
arc crisp tender, remove 
from heat to stop cooking. 

*—If you do not have a 
steamer, you can tie the 
asparagus into a bundle 
with some cord and stand 
them upright in an inch of 
water in a double boiler. 
Cover and cook as direct¬ 
ed. 

CHINESE BROILED 
FISH 

% to I pound fish fillets, 
preferably fresh 
(flounder, blue fish, 
pollock) 

Ismail clove garlic 
1 teaspoon ground gin¬ 
ger 

11/4 tablespoons peanut 
oil 

1 tablespoon white vine¬ 
gar 

1 >4 teaspoons soy sauce 

Crush the garlic in a 
press and mix with ginger, 
oil, vinegar and soy sauce. 
Place fish fillets on foil in 
shallow ro.asting pan. 
Brush with basting sauce 
mixture. Allow to sit while 
preparing rest of meal. 
Preheat broiler. 

To cook, broil fish about 3 
minutes, basting twice. 
Fish is done when flesh 
flakes easily with fork and 
is no longer translucent. 

SALAD WITH YOGURT- 
GRAPEFRUIT 
DRESSING 

1 head Boston lettuce 
(any greens will do, but 
you will need less than 
a whole head of most) 

I >/4 cups plain.yogurt 

2 tablespoons grapefruit 
juice 

1 heaping teaspoon Dijon 
mustard 

Wash lettuce. Dry well 
and break up, dividing be¬ 
tween two salad plates. Mix 
yogurt with v grapefruit 
juice and mustard. Spoon 
over salad. 

Note: if you are serving 
rolls, you can heat them 
up in the oven while the fish 
is cooking. 


DR. H. |, CALDER 

wishes to announce the re-location 
of his office for the practice of 

Orthopedic Surgery 

Ste. 307 — Richmond Medical Building 
2020 Richmond Avenue, Victoria, B.C. V8R 6R5 

Effective Immediately 
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WWMT1 ' V «■ 


LIVING/In the KITCHEN 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 29 


Sausage-making: 
Versatile link 
to good eating 


There is no more versa¬ 
tile meat produce in the 
world than that group 0 f 
meal produets we call, col¬ 
lectively, sausage. There 
are hundreds, probably 
thousands of different 
kinds of sausage, from the 
all-North American hot dog 
and simple breakfast link 
to Chinese lop ehong. Sw iss 
bratwurst, French boudon 
and Mexican chorizo. 
Every country in the world 
has a variety of sausage 
specialities upon which 
good cooks rely on for good 
meals at reasonable 
prices. 

In North America, unfor 
tunately, sausage has been 
somewhat overlooked 
(with the exception of hot 
dugs and breakfast links) 
as the basis for good inex¬ 
pensive eating. That seems 
to be changing, if the vari¬ 
ety of sausage products 
that I see in meat cases 
around the country is any 
indication. 

Where there used to be 
only hot dogs, there now 
are sausage products with 
national heritages as var¬ 
ied as the people that make 
up the nation. There are 
I’olish sausages, Italian 
sausages, German sau 
sages, Swiss and Mexican 
sausages—all side by side 
with the hot dog in more 
and more markets. We can 
take advantage of that to 
make some marvelous and 
inexpensive meals if we 
learn what to do with all of 
these different sausage- 
prod uels. 

Let's start with Mexican 
sausage—chorizo, a deli¬ 
ciously spicy sausage that 
cun add a little zip to a 
breakfast or brunch, or be 
used in casseroles and 
slews to feed a small army 
a delicious dinner at a very 
reasonable price. 

Just in case you can't 
find chorizo in your mar¬ 
ket's, riieatcase, I have in 
eluded a recipe for making 
your own, followed by a few 
of our family favorite- 
recipes for serving them. 

CHORIZO 

2 lbs. coarsely-ground 
lean pork 

‘4 fb. pork Tat, rincly 
ground 
2 T. paprika 
2 T. ehili powder 
I tsp. coarsely-ground 
black pepper 
Vi tsp. each, cinnamon, 
ground cloves 
% tsp. each, coriander 
/ seed, ground ginger 
I tsp. each, oregano, 
cumin 

6 whole garlic cloves, 
crushed 

• Vj cup vinegar (5 per cent 
acid) 

Vi cup sherry or brandy 

Mix fat and meat 
thoroughly. Add other in¬ 
gredients and mix to¬ 
gether, using your hands. 
Be sure to distribute the 
vinegar thoroughly 
through the mixture. 


The Butcher 

By MERLE ELLIS 


I’ut the mixture in an 
earthenware crock or glass 
jar in a cool place (50 to (10 
degrees) and allow the sau¬ 
sage to “cure" for at least 
21 hours, preferably for 
two or three days. 

Stuff into hog casings 
and link, then refrigerate. 
If you wish to keep for 
extended times, freeze the 
sausage. This sausage is 
cooked before eating. 

MEXICAN SAUSAGE- 

NOODLE CASSEROLE 


from bones and cut into 
small pieces. Return meat 
to soup. Add sausage and 
potatoes. Simmer until po¬ 
tatoes are tender. Serve in 
soup bowls and garnish 
with bacon and remaining 
chopped onion. If you use 
canned garbanzos, elimi¬ 
nate the cooking of the 
beans and start the instruc 
(ions with the cooking of 
the meat and seasonings, 
using only 2 quarts of 
w tiler. Serves 12 to 15. 


LOSE WEIGHT FOR SUMMER 

ON THE AMAZING 

NO NONSENSE DIET 

• Lose up to 30 pounds in only 30 
days 

• Doctor's prescription not 
necessary. 

• This is the nutritious, safe ft 
intelligent way to lose wet 
naturally. 

• Thousands of people now 
recommend the no 
diet. 


The no nonsense diet deals with 
three basic problems facing the dieter 
appetite, lack of energy, and proper 
nutrition to diet properly you must 
solve these three problems or you 
not lose weight 


APPETITE: The no nonsense moal re¬ 
statement has been designed to curb your 
appetite and to really lower your calorie 
intake 

ENERGY A lot of people will break a diet 
because they dg not have the energy they 
require. The no nonsense meal replacement 
gives you aM the energy you need 
NUTRITION The no nonsense meal re¬ 
placement taken tour tunes a day with 8 
ounces of slum mitk supplies all the nutn- 
ents tor human nutrition Two tablespoons 
m S ounces of m* is equal m nutrition to 
one complele meal 

To date Hu 



‘Fat is monster ’ 
in eating pattern 


MONTREAL (CP) —Ca 
nadians should reduce all 
fats In their diet and not 
wait for researchers to 
agree on just what damage 
fat does to their health, 
says Montreal nutritionist 
Louise Lambert-Lagaee. 

"Fat is the monster in 
our eating pattern," she 
said as site prepared lo 
welcome 1,100 nutrition ex¬ 
perts to a recent confer¬ 
ence of the Society for Nu¬ 
trition Education. 

Mrs. Lambert-Lagaee 
said she believes that there 
is already enough evidence 
that consumption of fats— 
including those found in 
meat,.oils, hydrogenated 
fats and dairy products— 
is harmful. 

She said it is nonsense to 
link a particular food, such 
as butter, to the occurrence 
of a disease. 

Rather, available scien¬ 
tific dala show that the risk 
of contracting cancer or 


cardiovascular diseases in¬ 
creases with the amount of 
fatty foods consumed. 

"We’re improving our 
diet if we reduce the foods 
that arc most often linked 
wilh problems,” she said. 
"Fat is one of those foods,” 

Her opinion, however, is 
not shared by other nutri 
lion experts. 

The United States Na 
tional Academy of Sci¬ 
ences’ Food and Nutrition 
Board recently contended 
there is still not enough 
proof lo recommend that 
healthy consumers reduce 
Iheir intake of fat and cho¬ 
lesterol. 

The statement caused a 
storm of protest from other 
U.S. nutrition organiza¬ 
tions, who labelled the 
board s stand irresponsible 
and publicized its link with 
the meat, dairy and egg 
industries. 


I lb. chorizo or Italian 
sausage 

8 oz. vermicelli (skinny 
noodles), broken 
1 whole tomatoes, 
peeled, cut up 
14 cups chicken broth 

1 onion, cut up 

2 cloves garlic, minced 
I tsp. salt 

Vi tsp. pepper 
V 2 tsp. oregano 
I T.sugar 

‘/a tsp. dried red pepper 

3 T. Parmesan cheese 

1 can chopped green 
chiles 

Brown sausage. Drain, 
set aside and reserve about’ 
2 tablespoons of the sau¬ 
sage oil. Brown pieces of 
vemieelli in oil. Pul in the 
tomatoes, chicken stock, 
onion, garlic, salt, pepper, 
oregano, sugar and red 
pepper in blender contain¬ 
er and blend well. Pour 
mixture over vermicelli. 
Arrange the chorizo on top. 
Cover and cook for 10 to 12 
minutes, until the vermi¬ 
celli is tender. Garnish 
with cheese and green 
chiles. Serves 6 to 8. 

MEXICAN BEAN STEW 

w 

2 ' 2 cups dry garbanzo 
beans (or 3 cans) 

3 qts. water (2 qts. with 
canned beans) 

I lb. beef shanks 
I '4 lb. ham shanks 
I Vi cups chopped onion 

1 clove minced garlic 

2 tsp. salt 

1 tsp. pepper 

2 tsp. paprika 

1 lb. chorizo or Italian 
sausage, sliced 

2 potatoes, diced 

5 strips of bacon, 
chopped, cooked crisp 

If you are using dry gar¬ 
banzo beans, place beans in 
water in a large pot. Bring 
to a boil; simmer for 5 
minutes; cover and let 
stand for an hour with no 
heat, Add beef shanks, ham 
shanks, 1 cup onion, garlic, 
salt, pepper and paprika. 
Cover and simmer for 2 
hours, until beans are tend¬ 
er. Remove meat and let 
soup cool in the refrigera¬ 
tor. Remove fat that comes 
to the top. Remove meat 


Preserved meat cuts 
quick summer supper 




Canadian Prcsv 

VANCOUVER — Cold 
cuts and salad provide a 
summer supper in a hurry; 
cold cuts and cheese, an 
easy-to-prepare appetizer 
tray. Or cold cuts on rye- 
bread. a quick sandwich to 
lake to the beach. 

The favorite cold cuts arc 
Europoan-style sausages. 

The word "sausage" is 
derived from the Latin 
“salsus" meaning salted or 
preserved. 

And these preserved 
spiced meats are one of our 
oldest convenience foods, 
dating back more than 3,- 
000 years. 

Today, more than 500 
varieties of sausage are 
made and eaten throughout 
the world. 

Ulrich Freybe who emi¬ 
grated to Canada from 
East Germany 21 years 
ago. founded Freybe Sau¬ 
sage Mfg. Ltd. in Vancou¬ 
ver. 

The plant has smoke 
houses, steam houses, 
ovens and cooking pots, all 
operated from a computer 
control room, plus curing 
rooms, 125 employees and a 
meat inspector from the 


federal department of 
agriculture. 

The inspector goes into 
the plant at (i a.m., before 
work begins, to inspect the 
machinery which is steam- 
cleaned every day. 

Quality is Frcybe's re¬ 
sponsibility. Since 197(1 he 
has entered his specialty 
sausages in European com¬ 
petitions and the walls of 
his office are framed with 
awards. 

Sides of beef and pork, all 
government-inspected and 
ordered to Frcybe's speci¬ 
fications, arc shipped in 
from Alberta to be- cut and 
trimmed by a battery of 
butchers. 

The meat is so lean that 
extra fat must be pur¬ 
chased for use in liver sau¬ 
sage. Baltic tea sausage 
and Muttwurst. 

Meat lo be smoked and 
cured is frozen for seven 
days at minus 20 C. as a 
further safeguard. 

Beef and pork livers are 
also bought specifically for 
sausage. Natural casings, 
the small intestines of 
sheep, are Imported from 
Australia and New Zea¬ 
land. They arc a must for 


European winners and 
frankfurters, beer sausage 
and some liver sausage. 

No meat extenders, such 
as cereal or flour, go into 
Frcybe's sausage. Skim 
milk products are used 
when needed as binders 
and whole milk is added to 
the white sausage made by 
old European methods. 

Robert Wagner, Vaneou- 
yer district sales manager, 
said some of the basic for¬ 
mulas of the Freybe family 
have been altered slightly 
to meet Canadian stan¬ 
dards. j 

Sodium mlrate, a curing 
salt, is used for all sausage 
except Munich weisswurst, 
bratwurst and breakfast 
sausage. 

Wagner said an estimat¬ 
ed four-fifths of our nitrate- 
intake comes from vege¬ 
tables while just one-fifth 
originates with cured 
meats. 

"Used in proper quanti¬ 
ties. sodium nitrate is not 
harmful," he said. "Our 
levels are below the maxi- 
mum Canadian stan¬ 
dards," 

Salami is made of coarse 
or finely ground ham or 



{>e>-u^YV &sr\d , CzHj-tT 


last 

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bacon cuts, as well as se¬ 
lected beef, it is smoked in 
the first week of the aging 
process. Alder chips are 
us'e-d for ail smoked meats 
with the exception of hick¬ 
ory beef sausage. 


NEW 1980 DODGE 
D150 PICKUP 



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ROAST ib. I 

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CORN. 4/09 

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CABBAGE. k LO 

W Me Colls . _ _ 

PEANUT Ik 199 

BUTTER.£ 

WWHece JS A. 

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IN THE 

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1-k. 


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CHEESE 

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Diet Twin Pkg. 

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30 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 * * 


LIVING/MEDICAL 







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Handsome pseudo-suede in 
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mustang duck 


metre 


High school prom dates 
not what they used to be 


Sweetener ‘facts’ confusing 


Dear Ann Landers: 

Things arc changing so fast 
1 feel like a model-T Ford in 
a world of supersonic jets. 
Can you help me think my 
way through this one? 

1 read in the paper that a 
homosexual in Rhode Is¬ 
land is going (o court to get 
permission to take his boy 
friend to the school prom at 
the Pleasant Valley Coun¬ 
try Club in Sutton, Mass. 

The 18-year-old boy was 
refused permission to 
bring the boy of his choice 
to the prom last year. The 
high school principal 
feared physical harm 
might come to both the stu¬ 
dent anc} his “date." This 
year the young man is not 
taking no for an answer. He 


Ann 

Landers 


is getting a lawyer and 
making plans to fight in the 
courts What is your opin¬ 
ion of this sort of battle? 
—One Brown Oxford With a 
Pink Satin Slipper 
Dear Brown and Pink: I 
assume if the high school 
senior took his homosexual 
date to the prom they would 
dance together. This might 
create some snickers, but I 


THE ACES 


IRA G. CORN. JR. 


"Business is like riding a 
bicycle. Esther you keep 
moving or you fall down." - 
John David Wright. 


Hug Kelsey maintains a 
steady pace in his new book. 
“Winning Card Play” 
(Barclay. 8 Bush Ave., Port 
Chester. N Y. 10573 $13 95 
paperback) Kelsey starts 
with basic technique and 
goes right on up to coups 
and squeeze plays. An excel¬ 
lent work and today’s hand 
offers an illustrative exam- 
pie. 

“Sometimes the correct 
play is by no means obvious. 
In today's case a slip bv 
declarer was counterbal¬ 
anced by a defensive error, 
so that a par result was 
achieved in spite of the 
worst efforts of both sides 

“West' led the spade jack 
and South counted six top 
tricks and saw that three 
more could be developed in 
diamonds The spade finesse 
was clearly an unnecessary 
risk, and dummy’s ace won 
the first trick. A diamond 
was won by West with the 
king, another spade came 
through and it now made no 
difference what dummy 
played. In practice, dummy 
ducked and East’s king won 
and. when East could find 
no profitable leads, declarer 
wrapped up an easy 10 
tricks. 

“East missed a chance to 
defeat the contract at trick 
one. Had he unblocked by 
throwing his king of spades 
under the ace. he could have 
won the first diamond and 
cleared the spades while his 
partner still held the dia¬ 
mond king as an entry. 

“But South had no need to 


NORTH 

♦ A Q 4 2 
▼ A K 9 2 

♦ 43 

♦ J 108 


WEST 

♦ J 10986 
*83 

♦ K72 

♦ 9 6 2 


EAST 

♦ K 7 
*Q 1075 

♦ A65 

♦ 7 5 4 3 


SOUTH 

♦ 53 

♦ J 6 4 

♦ QJ 1098 

♦ AKQ 

Vulnerable North-South 
Dealer: South. The bidding: 


Sooth 

West 

North 

East 

1 ♦ 

Pass 

IV 

Pass 

2* 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

2 NT 

Pass 

3 NT 

All pass 


Opening lead: Spade jack 

give East this opportunity. 
He shbuld have played low 
on the first round of spades 
and put up dummy’s ace on 
the second round. The 
defenders would have then 
been powerless to defeat the 
contract.’’ 

A good hand and a good 
book. I recommend it to all 
players who wish to 
improve their play. 

Bid with Coro 
South holds: 6-10-B 


♦ 53 

♦ J 6 4 

♦ QJ 10 9 8 

♦ AKQ 


South North 

1 ♦ 1 ♦ 


ANSWER: One no trump. 
Slightly better than two dia¬ 
monds since it confirms a bal¬ 
anced minimum hand. 


FREE 

CARRY-IN SERVICE 
ESTIMATE 

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v,np R n WAV !^2^*SE OUR 
VIDEO 

IN-HOME 
SERVICE CALL 

homark 

SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS 

27 BURNSIDE RD. (WEST) 381-5622 9*0 to M0 


JOE CHOW 
Service Manager 


THE PERSON PICTURED ABOVE IS: 

A WORLD FAMOUS OPERA SINGER 
BO DEREK S YOUNGER SISTER 
HAVING HIS NAILS BUFFED 
STARRING IN A HILARIOUS NEW MOVIE 


seriously doubt that anyone 
would attempt to harm 
them. Since this case is still 
in litigation, it would be 
improper for me to com¬ 
ment further. 

I do know, however, of a 
homosexual who took his 
sweetie (a closet queen) to 
the high school prom in 
drag. “She'’ was the best¬ 
looking "girl” there, by 
far. Several of the fellows 
danced with "her" and pro¬ 
claimed her a knockout. 

Dear Ann Landers: My 
husband and I are friendly 
with a couple who live down 
the street. The man’s 
brother is in the .roofing 
business. We mentioned 
that we needed anew roof, 
so he asked his brother to 
come by and see us. That 
was in March. 

My husband and I told 
him what we needed, and 
he said he could do the job 
for $3,200. He promised to 
oversee the work person¬ 
ally. It sounded fine. 

The roof was put on in 
April and it took a lot longer 
than we thought, but we 
were told there were prob¬ 
lems because of weather. 
(Understandable.) When 
the bill came, it was $6,200. 


We were shocked. 

My husband called the 
man immediately and was 
told the $3,200 was for the 
materials only. The rest 
was labor. We feel ripped 
off and want to sue the rat. 
Your opinion is wanted. — 
Done to in Dotham 

Dear Done: You wouldn't 
win the suit, so don’t both¬ 
er. Next time before you 
become involved in any 
construction project, get an 
agreement in writing. 

Dear Ann Landers: Our 
25-year-old daughter has 
been living with a man for 
three months. Her father 
and I do not like the idea, 
but Ellie is self-supporting 
and has furnished her own 
apartment. (He moved in 
with her.) Since Ellie is on 
her own, we feel we have no 
right to tell her how to live. 

We have been struggling 
with the question of how to 
introduce him. My husband 
insists we should be com¬ 
pletely candid and say, 
"This is Henry X who lives 
with our daughter.” I think 
it sounds awkward. I would 
prefer to say, "This is Mr. 
X., our future son-in-law,” 
but I am not sure they will 
marry and don't want to be 
made a fool of. May we 
have your opinion? — 1980 
Mom and Dad 

Dear 1980: Just introduce 
Mr. X as “Elite's friend." 
No need to describe their 
living arrangement. No one 
expects such information, 
and you are under no obli¬ 
gation to provide it. 


Dear Dr. Donohue: Is it 

OK to use artificial swee¬ 
teners or not? I have heard 
so many different stories 
that I don't know what to 
do. I am confused and mad! 
— Mrs.F.J. 

^You’re entitled to be con¬ 
fused, but don't be mad. 

You have to realize that 
advice on such matter is 
based on current knowl¬ 
edge. Decisions often must 
be made on less than abso¬ 
lute scientific proof. But 
that is how progress is 
made. Recommendations 
are changed when new 
facts are discovered. If an 
error is made in recom¬ 
mendations it should be 
made on the side of safety. 

We're all a bit confused 
in the artificial sweetener 
controversy. Recent stu¬ 
dies have dealt with the 
possibility of the swee¬ 
teners causing bladder 
cancer. Results seem to in¬ 
dicate that there is little or 
no risk. However, temper¬ 
ance should be used in ap¬ 
plying any new facts, espe¬ 
cially where they conflict 
with other “facts.” Such 
statements are not contra¬ 
dictions in terms when 
dealing with medical re¬ 
search. 

About all I can suggest is 
that it Is best to avoid ex¬ 
cessive use by all, but espe¬ 
cially by women of child¬ 
bearing age. Non-diabetic 
children and pregnant 
women, unless there are 
reasons to do otherwise, 
should not make these sub¬ 
stances part of their daily 
diets. 

There are many, many 
equally important contro¬ 
versies in medicine still 
waiting for final chapters 
to be written. 


Bulletin Board 


NATURE 

Nature walk and bird 
watching 10 a m. to noon 
Thursday at the Swan Lake 
Nature Centre. Films if it 
rains, 3873 Swan Lake 
Road. For more informa¬ 
tion phone 479-0211. 


FRISBEE 

Junior Frisbee Cham¬ 
pionship sponsored by the 
Victoria Department of 
Recreation and Commu¬ 
nity Services 10 a.m. 
Thursday at Heywood Park 


in Beacon Hill Park. 
Everyone welcome. 

CINEMA 

Films in the Park, 9 p.m. 
Thursday at the Cameron 
Bandshell in Beacon Hill 
Park.. Featuring—Little 
Big Top, Sri Lanka, The 
Violin. 

CYCLE TOUR 

Canadian Hostelling As¬ 
sociation-Outdoor Club cy¬ 
cle-tour to the San Juan Is-*") 
land, U.S. A. July 26 and 27. 
Register early by contact¬ 


ing the Pack and Boots 
Shop, 10-720 Yates Street 
Mall, or phone Dave after 5 
p.m. at 388-4772. 

TEENS 

Esquimau Parks and 
Recreation Commission is 
holding a free summer pro¬ 
gram for 12 to 17 year olds 
weekdays from 11 a m. to 3 
p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
until August 15. Activities 
include rollerskating, 
camping, swimming, arts 
and crafts, softball and 
soccer. For further infor¬ 
mation call 386-6128. 


Dear Dr. Donohue: I 

have a perforated septum 
and have had lots of exami¬ 
nations for it, but no treat¬ 
ment has been suggested. I 
am worried that it might.be 
cancerous. My perforation 
started years ago. About 
the most constructive thing 
that’s been said through all 
this is that “I’ll be able to 
whistle through my nose.” 
Can you offer any help? — 
A.R. 

The septum is the wall 
that separates the two nos¬ 
trils. Holes (perforations) 
in the septum produce a 
whistling sensation. The 
edges of the perforation 
tend to crust and break off 
with bleeding. Repair of a 
large hole is difficult, but I 
would certainly seek out 
another opinion to see if 
yours is correctible. An 
ear-nose-throat specialist 
friend, tells me he uses a 
plastic patch to cover small 
holes. He does this in his 
office. 

Perforations can be from 
an injury, malignancy, in¬ 
fections or from prolonged 
use of irritating nose drops. 
You mention arthritis. It is 
sometimes seen with that 
condition. Your doctor has 
probably ruled out cancer. 

Dear Dr. Donohue: My 

youngest daughter.is al¬ 
most eight. She has, of 
course, received all her 
childhood immunizations 
except for smallpox. Her 
doctor refuses to immunize 
her for this, stating, “The 
disease is safer than the' 
shot." —Mrs. Y.S. 

Smallpox is considered 
eradicated. Routine vacci¬ 
nation of American chil¬ 
dren was discontinued 
years ago. It’s a vaccine 
that has virtually worked 
itself out of a job. Your 
doctor didn't mean the dis¬ 
ease is “safer” than the 
shot. He meant the odds of 
getting the disease are so 
low that the potential com¬ 
plication from the shot is 
not worth the risk, since the 
disease is practically non¬ 
existent today. 


Your Good Health 

By PAUL G. DONOHUE, IH.D. 


TANG’S 

33rd BIRTHDAY S 

Ladles' 

T-SHIRTS, 

SHORTS 

by KATES 

Reg. 9.98 to 15.00 

4" to 7" 

ALE CONTINUES 

PHANTOM 

NYLONS 

Reg. 1.50 pr. 

SALE 

50* 

Limit 2 pairs 

Men’s 

WESTERN 

SHIRTS 

S, M, L, XL 

Reg. 20.00 to 29.98 

SALE 

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SPECIAL SALE 

Reg. 4.00 to 8.99 

99So 1" 

• Ladies shorts 

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and leather 

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Ladies' 

PANTSUITS 

Reg. to 49.98 

SALE 

20\29“ 

OFF 

CHILDREN'S WEAR 

• Jackets 

• Swimwear 

• Skirts and Blouses 

• Dresses and Jumpers 

• Pantsuits 

• Socks and Underwear 

Ladies’ 

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Cotton blende, polyester 
prints. So pretty and cool for 
summer. Sbtes 5 to 20 and 

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Reg. to 39.98 

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m I—CaSr-i*" “ ,e8 ,inal mo°n PE sat. 

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TASTER'S CHOICE Pig 

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COUNTRY TIME 4M 

LEMONADE CRYSTALS .,4.1“ 

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KING FISHERMAN/CANADA 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 31 


Brewery 

unions 

face 

deadline 


VANCOUVER (CP) — 
The contract dispute be¬ 
tween the Brewery Work¬ 
ers Union and the three 
major beer companies in 
B.C. is coming to the 
crunch. 

A 13-hour bargaining ses¬ 
sion ended early Tuesday 
with a demand by the com¬ 
panies that the 1,000 work 
ers accept the industry's 
current offer by midnight 
Friday—or face an indus¬ 
try-wide lockout. 

Eric Harris, chief nego¬ 
tiator for Labatt, Molson 
and Carling O’Keefe, said 
the companies offered a 
ll-an-hour wage increase 
in each year of a three-year 
agreement. This, he said, 
amounted to a 29.7-per-cent 
increase and would raise 
the typical pay of a worker 
on the bottle line to$27,000 a 
year. 

Harris said manage¬ 
ment’s ultimatum was 
brought on by work slow¬ 
downs which had been 
hampering production for 
a week. 

•'We’ve informed the 
union that this restriction 
on operations has forced us 
to put a time frame on this 
matter because we can’t 
permit it to continue,” 
Harris said. 

"Restrictions of opera¬ 
tions are widespread. 
There’s very little beer 
available for distribution, 
and plants in a position to 
produce the beer that's re¬ 
quired for the market 
weren’t able to do it by 
virtue of concerted restric¬ 
tions on production by the 
employees." 

Union president John 
Langley said wages had 
hardly been discussed and 
were not the main issue. 

"We’re not that far away 
in money but there’s a lot 
more than money here,” 
•Langley said. "This is a 
union security issue. We’re 
going to ask the whole labor 
movement in B.C. to back 
us up on this one. They 
(the breweries) are in for a 
big fight.” 

The union president said 
the two sides were far from 
a settlement on the lan¬ 
guage of a contract. 

"The union security 
clauses aren’t there—all 
the reasons they joined the 
union, quite frankly, have 
been put aside, and we're 
not going to be treated like 
that," Langley said. 


Fire hazards 
stay in forest 

PRINCE GEORGE(CP) 
— Only 54 forest fires were 
reported burning in the 
province Tuesday, but the 
B.C. forest service said 
Prince George district 
forests have not soaked up 
enough moisture to be con¬ 
sidered safe. 

Duty officer Jim Haley 
said while only 14 fires 
were still burning in the 
Prince George district, 
forests are extremely dry. 

There have been 1,025 
fires in the province this 
year. 



Nootka Sound yields first tyee 


BIGGEST THRILL of her lifetime came to Califor¬ 
nia visitor Janet Ellis when she caught a 41 ' ,-pound 
chinook in Pedder Bay using white Buzz Bomb and 
15-pound-test line while fishing with Magna Char¬ 
ters guide, Tony Gicas, right. It is in a tie for the 
heaviest fish taken on a drift fishing lure this year, 
but as a non-subscriber she doesn't qualify for the 
Jim Gilbert drift fishing trophy and prize. However 
she does win a King Fisherman Contest fun decal. 


First tyee salmon from 
Muchalat Inlet-Nootka 
Sound area has been regis¬ 
tered for this year in the 
King Fisherman Contest. 

Bob Simpson, who won 
the King Fisherman Con¬ 
test trip to Fiji in 1978 with 
an 11.3-pound coho from 
Secretary Island, caught a 
31 -pound tyee off San Ra¬ 
fael Lighthouse at the en¬ 
trance to Nootka Sound Sat- 
urday on a Krippled 
Minnow and anchovy. 

"It looks like the start of 
them entering Muchalat 
Inlet,” said Simpson, who 
also landed a 21-pounder 
and a 25-pounder as well as 
some other smaller Chin¬ 
ooks during his weekend 
fishing trip. He said there 
are lots of pinks In the Inlet 
for anglers seeking fun 
fishing. 

Latest King Fisherman 
entries: 

TYEE 

Coton ill 

Bob Simpson; 31.8, Son Rafael light 
house, Gold River, Jim Gilbert head, 
anchovy 

SPRING (CHINOOK) 

Redder My Marina 

Georoe Williams; 31.0, kelp bed, 
minnow, 

David Smlrt; 30.11, Race Passage, 
Super Strip. 


Small Quebec airline 
discharged ‘old’ staff 


QUEBEC (UPC) — Most 
mechanics and some pilots 
of Golfe Air Quebec, which 
operated overloaded and 
defective aircraft, have 
been fired by the new 
owners of the small Baie 
Comeau, Que. airline, a 
federal aviation inquiry 
was told Tuesday. 

"We thanked three pilots 
and all of the mechanics 
save one for their services 
in March of this year when 
we bought out Golfe Air," 
Albert Fortier, president of 
Air Gava Ltee. of Seheffer- 
ville, Quebec said at the 
second day of hearings by 
the Commission of Inquiry 
on Aviation Safety. 

In previous testimony 
Pierre Menard, a Trans¬ 
port Canada investigator, 
testified that the qualifica¬ 
tion papers of some Golfe 
Air pilots were falsified 
and the airline often flew 
overloaded, defective air¬ 
craft. 

Menard said that in Octo¬ 
ber, 1978 the door of one of 
Golfe Air's DC-3 aircraft 
opened twice during take¬ 
off from the Mont Joli air¬ 
port to Lac Ste. Anne, Que. 

Following a 1978 investi¬ 
gation into the company by 
Transport Canada inspec¬ 
tors, three DC-3 aircraft- 
one of which Prehiier Rene 
Levesque used as a press 
plane for the 1976 election 
campaign—were grounded 
by engine failures. A IC- 
FYUZ-Islander was taken 
out of use because of a 
broken engine mount. 

The DC-3’s were ground¬ 
ed again this June before 
Transport Canada ap¬ 
proved the purchase of 
Golfe Air by Air Gava. For¬ 
tier said $79,000 has been 
spent to repair one of the 
aircraft, and some planes 
have been replaced with 
Twin Otter aircraft. 

The inquiry, headed by 


Ontario Superior Court 
Justice Charles L. Dubin, 
was asked to examine the 
enforcement of mainte¬ 
nance requirements for 
airworthiness in Quebec. 

In other matters, Pierre 
Rivest, the director of the 
Quebec Ministry of Trans¬ 
port’s Aviation Depart¬ 
ment, called some top 
Transport Canada officials 
complacent. 

“A perfect example of 
their extreme level of satis¬ 
faction appeared earlier at 


Advertising 
helps you 
to know. 


July 23 and July 30 

WIM89AY 

tickets good for 


Michael Kavanagh; 29.8, Church 
Rock, anchovy. 

Doug Weikel; 23.8, Pedder Bay. 
hoot chi e. 

Bud Montgomery,' 22.8, kelp bed, 
strip. 

A. F. SchinkeL Netherlands; 15.4, 
Bentlnck island, hootchle. 

Erk Grubert; 7.0, kelp bed. Silver 
Harv^it, 

J. Robinson; 8.8, kelp bed. Plrken. 

Okk Pringle. 7.0, Race Rocks, Plr¬ 
ken. 

Steve Man zer ; 15.2,8.0, Pedder Bay, 
Buzz Bomb. 

C Dupre; 23.12, kelp bed. Plrken 

R Russell; 9.4, Pedder Bay. strip. 

K Kennedy, Surrey; 2.0, Cudlip 
Point, anchovy. 

D B Waddell; 24.12, Pedder Bay. 
anchovy. 

L. Wilson; 19.0, kelp bed. 

Jim Dr Ink water; 8.2. Race Rocks, 
Buzz Bomb. 

Esther Rancler; 26.5, kelp bed. Buzz 
Bomb. 

L. R. Milton; 16.0, William Head, 
herring. 

Joe Smith; 9.6, 6.14. Pedder Bay. 
strip. 

E. V. Miller; 5.3. Pedder Bay, Stlng- 
slida. 

Ale* Dawduke; 15.0, Race Pass. 
Tom Mack 

W. Ingalls. 8.10. Pedder Bay, Buzz 
Bomb. 

Dave Lupu; 6.8, Church Rock, hoot 
chle 

Roger Wade; 5.0, Pedder Bay, Tlmy 
Strip Teaser. 

Bud Livingstone; 7.8, Church Rock, 
strip. 

Gerry Nuttall; 6.8. Pedder Bay, 
hootchle. 

B. Waddell. 12.14, 8.6, Cudlip Point, 
anchovy 

Roger White; 21.2. William Head, 
Plrken. 

R. Russell. 18.0, Pedder Bay. Strip 
Teaser. 

E R. Gibbons. 10.0, Pedder Bay. 
hootchle. 

Kirk McCrae; 11.4, kelp bed. hoot- 
chie. 

Brian McConnell; S.2, Church Rock, 
strip. Apex. 


Bill Cooper; 10.10, Beechev Head, 
Spring King. 

William Chawrun, Hinton, Alta.; 
26.0. Race Passage, pearl Buzz Bomb. 
Colonist 

Stewart Fyte; 30.0, Pedder Bay. an¬ 
chovy. 

Jessie Seymour; 11.0, Narrows, 
plug. 

Bob Simpson; 25.0, 21.0. 16.0, 13 8, 
San Rafael llohthouse, Gold River. 
Jim Gilbert Head, anchovy 

All Aay Mn r |fl ,Y 

John Salvador. 22.12, Village Spit, 
Plrk. 

Gary Nunn; 8.11, Coal Island, Plr¬ 
ken. 

Angela Nunn; 10.6, Coal Island, 
Stingsilda. 

Fred Turner; 14.2, Coal Island. 
Stingsilda. 

Bob Bailey. 7.12, Coal Island. Tiny 
Strip. 

John Salvador. 18.10, Village Spit, 
Nordic lure. 

Harvey's Sporting Goods 

Murray Kosick; 10.8, 1.38, 12.5, 8.0, 
18 0. Coal Island. Saanichton Spit, 
Rhys Davis Strip Teaser. 

Keith Edwardson; 18.1, Charmer 
Point, Mike's Double Action. 

Andy Donald. 5.12,6.10. Coal Island, 
Stingsilda. 


Angela Nunn; 9.6, Coal Island. Plr 
ken 

King Coho Revot-1 

Malcolm Smith. Royston; 5.8, King 
Coho, hootchle 

Tyoe Marine A Fishing Supplies 

Cv Kim, Campbell River; 6.8, Ar 
oonaut Wharf, Stingsilda. 

COHO 

Campbell River Ledge 

Wilma Kim, Campbell River; 7.2, 
Argonaut Wharf. Stingsilda. 

Salmon Point Resort 
R. MacKerule. Chilliwack; 5.8. Sal 
mon Point, plug. 

C. R. Saunders; 5.2, Shelter Bay, 
bucktail. 

King Coho Resort 

Bob Bruon, Courtenay; 6.0, King 
Coho, hootchle. 

Malcolm Smith. Royston; 6.4, 5.0. 
King Coho, white hootchie. 

Jim Moxin, Comox; 5.12. 5.8. Seal 
Bay. strip. 

Marvin Billings, San Bernardino. 
Calif .; 6.2, King Coho, black pearl Buzz 
Bomb. 

Gunnar Nelsson, Haslev, Denmark; 
5.0. King Coho, hootchle. 

Harvey's Sporting Goods 
Murrey Kosick. 7.0, 5.0, 5.8, Coal 
island. Saanichton Spit, Rhys Davis 
Strip Teaser. 


Colonist 

George Zeilenskey; 6.0. Beechev 
Head,anchovy. 

Ruby Ralph; S.8. Deep Cove, an¬ 
chovy. 

Jessie Seymour; 5.0, Deep Cove, 
minnow. 

Pedder My Marina 

Brian McConnell. 8.0. S.3, Church 
Rock, strip, Apex. 

BUI Cooper; 5.10, Beechev Head. 
Spring King. 

Doug Wage; 7.12, Beechev Head. Sli¬ 
ver Harvest. 

Gerry Smalley, Calgary; 8.0, Race 
Passage, strip. 

Alt Gold. 5.1. Pedder Bay, Super 
Strip. 

LAKE TROUT 

Lake Shore Camping and R V Park 

John Tateham; 2.7, St. Mary Lake, 
troll, worm. 

SMALL MOUTH BASS 
Lake Shore Camping and R .V. Park 

John Tateham; 3.15, 1.13, 2.12, St. 
Mary Lake, Rooster Tall. 

Margaret Tateham; 2.7, 2.11, 1.3, 
1.12. St. Mary Lake. Rooster Tail. 

Blue Gables Resort 

Craig Simms; 1.0. St. Mary Lake- 
worm. 

Doug Irving. 1.12, St. Mary Lake. 
Boio 


CNR sues tug operator 


VANCOUVER (CP) — Canadian Na 
tional Railways on Tuesday launched 
another legal action arising from damage 
to a railway bridge when it was hit by a 
freighter in the city harbor last October. 

CN already is suing the owners of the 
Japan Erica, which knocked over the 
■Second Narrows rail bridge last October 
in dense fog. The railway now is suing 
the owners of two tugboats charged with 


guiding the vessel through Burrard Inlet 
that night. 

In its B.C. Supreme Court writ, CN 
charges C. H. Cates Ltd. of Vancouver 
with negligence and breach of duty on 18 
different grounds—including assisting 
the freighter's passage in obviously haz 
ardous conditions, failure to properly 
use radar equipment, giving poor advice 
to the captain and crew, and failing 
to halt the freighter when collision be¬ 
came imminent. 


this inquiry when Trans¬ 
port Canada officials said 
an incident last June, in 
which an Air Canada Boe¬ 
ing 747 lost three of Its four 
engines on take-off, wasn't 
serious because the pilot 
was able to land,” Rivest 
said. 

“As the pilot in such an 
incident, I probably 
wouldn't be too worried be¬ 
cause I'd know what to do," 
he said. “But as a passen¬ 
ger, I would be very wor¬ 
ried." 



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V 


32 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


CANADA/REGION 


Gallant smile 
makes up 
for lost fight 

Shades of Richard the 
Lion-Hearted and Sir Lan¬ 
celot! Sidney Lions Club 
has resurrected venerable 
sport of maritime jousting 
and members gave demon 
stration on weekend. 
Kight, Randy Taylor uses 
padded lance to knock Phil 
Hendry from perch on 
“steed," a square-ended 
herring skiff. Poliowing 
passage of arms, Hendry 
grins and bears it in salt- 
chuck, below. He’s credit¬ 
ed with idea of sea jousting 
competition for first Sidney 
Sea Cavalcade, to be held 
Aug. 17 at Tulista Park. 
Total of 64 chivalrous souls 
will compete for four tro¬ 
phies during event. 



Shipbuilding cuts 
6 unacceptable 9 



■ ■'!' / 

' 'v 


m,* A 




WM- 

— 





-John McKay photos 


Transportaton Minister 
Alex Fraser Tuesday fired 
off a telegram to federal 
Transport Minister Jean- 
Luc Pepin protesting the 
latest cut in shipbuilding 
subsidies. 

But his move made lit¬ 
tle impression on NDP 
transport critic Don Lock- 
stead. 

The federal government 
has chopped the subsidy 
from 20 per cent of total 
cost to nine per cent, and 
Fraser said he found that 
unacceptable. 

Lockstead said that 
Fraser and Industry Minis¬ 
ter Don Phillips had only 
themselves to blame. 
“They have been enjoying 
themselves bashing Ot¬ 
tawa and now they are 
starting to pay the price, 
“Lockstead said. “They 
can protest now, but why 
weren’t they fighting to 
keep the subsidies weeks 
ago instead of going around 
just being negative on other 
things?” 

The member from Mac¬ 
kenzie said he intended to 
bring the lack of action by 
Fraser and Phillips to the 
attention of the Legislature 
this week. 

Fraser claims the sub¬ 
sidy cut came without 
warning and without prior 
consultation with B.C. 

Lockstead said Fraser 
must have known the fed¬ 
eral government was con¬ 
templating the cutback 
after the deadline for sub¬ 
sidies was announced some 
time ago. 


“They can make all the 
excuses they want,” Lock¬ 
stead said. “But with 39 per 
cent of our shipyard work 
force already out of work it 
seems to me they could 
have been trying harder. 
This decision will cost the 
province hundreds of mil¬ 
lions of dollars in shipyard 
work, and of course the 
workers will suffer more 
than anyone else.” 

Fraser’s cable to Pepin 
slated that as “a result of 


the lack of an improved 
program and the uncer¬ 
tainty for the future, em¬ 
ployment in B.C.shipyards 
could decline by 1,000 with 
in six months.” 

The subsidy reduction by 
11 per cent also dims hopes 
that B.C. shipyards will gel 
a share on new navy con¬ 
struction or that the prov¬ 
ince can now afford to build 
new ferries in West Coast 
shipyards. 


Mom distraught 
for missing girl 

MILTON, Ont. (CP) — The parents of a 14-year-old 
Canadian girl who disappeared while on a family vacation 
in Mexico in February are considering hiring a private 
detective to help authorities in their search, the girl's 
mother said Tuesday. 

Mrs.Frances Sweet said she has written a personal 
letter to Mexican President Ixipez Portillo requesting help 
in finding her daughter, Catherine, who vanished near San 
Miguel de Allende on Feb. 4. But so far she has received no 
reply. 

She said her family was growing desperate for an 
answer to the disappearance, but they fear that the 
pressure of missing person posters might frighten Cath¬ 
erine’s captors into hiding her more securely or physical¬ 
ly harming her. 

Jesse Zuest, a Milton psychic the family consulted, 
has said she believes the girl is being confined, perhaps 
tied up, and may be under the influence of drugs, said 
Sweet. 

The psychic also suggested a search be concentrated 
near the Mexican border around a town with the name 
containing the word, Anna. 

“It’s reaching the point where we've got to know,” 
Sweet said. 

Milton is 20 kilometres east of Guelph. 


Red tape grounds 
glider ‘pioneer’ 


BAIE COMEAU, Que. 
(CP) — Eagle Sarmont and 
his planned flight across 
the Atlantic to Paris in a 
motorized hang glider 
seem to be grounded for 
good. 

Ilis attempts Tuesday to 
get the Canadian transport 
department to lift a 
grounding order ran into a 
brick wall. 

"No, our decision is not 
going to be changed," said 
transport spokesman 
David Austin. "We're not 


going to jeopardize safety 
for the sake of a publicity 
stunt.” 

Austin was commenting 
on Sarmont’s efforts to 
have the department 
change its decision, made 
Tuesday, that the glider, 
dubbed The Spirit of Cali¬ 
fornia, is legally an air¬ 
craft and must therefore 
meet Canadian safety 
regulations before it can 
fly. 

Austin, interviewed by 
telephone from Ottawa, 


Princess meets 
Prairie cowboys 

NORTH BATTLEFORD. Sask. (CP) — Pomp and 
circumstance were abandoned Tuesday when Princess 
Margaret presented awards at a horse show in North 
Battleford, about 130 kilometres north of Saskatoon. 

The princess, in a turquoise-colored silk dress, looked 
out of place among the craggy-looking, sunburned cow¬ 
boys when she presented the awards for the glamor 
event of the competition. 

Bui Margaret, a keen horsewoman, seemed to enjoy 
herself at the fairgrounds, pelting each of the horses in the 
competition, even though one skittish animal made it 
necessary for the princess to step back to avoid clouds of 
dust. 

Despite sweltering temperatures and the strong smell 
of manure, Margaret toured three barns at the fair¬ 
grounds before leaving for Jasper, Alta., where she will 
rest for two days. 

Earlier in the day, Margaret visited Battleford His¬ 
toric Park, a reconstructed stockade with buildings used 
by the RCMP in the late 19th century. 

She then attended a lunch at the Battleford high 
school, where Allan Sapp, internationally-known native 
artist, presented her with one of his paintings as the 
official provincial gift. 

Throughout her three-day vist to Saskatchewan, Mar¬ 
garet remained'polite, showing interest where it was due, 
and waving politely to keep the crowds pleased. 

Her seven-day visit to Saskatchewan and Alberta is to 
help celebrate the provinces' 75th anniversaries. 


Marine Calendar 


NAVY 

Endeavour. Mackenzie. Yukon. 
Qu’Appelle. Cowichan, Si Anthony. 
Provider, Terra Nova. Fundv. Mira 
mlchl. Kootenay. Restigouche. Gatin- 
pdi>—to port 

Porte de la Remc. Quebec. Dau- 
phine—F also Creek 
Oriole— Kilua Kona. Hawaii. Due 
back Aug.16 

OCEAN SCIENCES 
Pari/eau— west coast of Vancouver 
island 

Richardson—Massei 
Vector—Vancouver 
Pandora /(—Baillie Islands. N W.T. 
Pender—Barkley Sound 

COASTGUARD 

Vancouver—in oor 1 

Canned —Yarrows 

Narwhal. Ready- Totinopatrol 

Dourr/av -Georgia Slralt 

Ouadra-on station 

Racer—Victoria patrol 

Rider— Sechett patrol 

J E Bernaer-Sachs Harbor, N * I 


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Pacemperor—Ogden Point 
Kasturba —Royal Roads. 

Key Glory. Swan Arrow— Nanaimo. 
Ocean Bountv-drlll rig in tor re¬ 
pairs at Nanoose Bay. 


also rejected the Califor¬ 
nian’s claim that transport 
officials told him before he 
started out Friday from 
Farmingdale, N.Y., that 
the glider met all the neces¬ 
sary standards. 

"He was written by the 
Moncton (N.B.) office July 
9 and told he did not con¬ 
form to the regulations and 
should not fly,” Austin 
said. 

The regulations require 
aircraft flying over water 
or sparsely populated 
areas to carry safety 
equipment such as flares, a 
life raft and food. The air¬ 
craft must also carry 
enough navigational equip¬ 
ment to allow the pilot to fly 
by instruments alone. 

Sarmont, born Joseph 
Whitmore, said he has the 
safety equipment but not 
the navigational instru¬ 
ments, which he claimed 
aren’t necessary because 
of other precautions he is 
taking. 

He said his flight was 
being followed by a two- 
member “chase crew" who 
could rescue him if any¬ 
thing went wrong. 
Meanwhile, Sarmont won 
. support from an unexpect¬ 
ed source. 

At hearings of the federa I 
inquiry into aviation safety 
in Quebec City Tuesday, 
Michel Doyon, head of a 
Quebec aviation workers’ 
group, objected to the way 
the transport department 
has handled the incident. 

Doyon, president of 
L'Association des Gens de 
I’Air du Quebec, questioned 
the department’s priorities 
in grounding Sarmont, "a 
pioneer," while allowing 
unsafe passenger aircraft 
to coninue flying. 

“If this was the ease (50 
years ago) I don’t think 
Lindberg would have been 
able to cross the Atlantic in 
the Spirit of St. Louis. If the 
hang glider corresponded 
to American norms, why 
should Canadian author¬ 
ities object?” 


July 23 and July 30 

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PARLIAMENT 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23; 1980 33 


Pipeline bill 
passes, MPs 
off until fall 



% Tuna racing fish peace—Tory 


* 


OTTAWA (CP) — MPs 
started a three-month re¬ 
cess late Tuesday night 
after turning down a New 
Democratic Party motion 
to reverse the govern¬ 
ment's decision on the 
Alaska Highway natural 
gas pipeline. 

The Liberals and Pro¬ 
gressive Conservatives 
joined to defeat the motion 
153 to 28 shortly after mid¬ 
night EDT, ending the NDP 
protest over the pipeline 
after haggling between the 
three parties Tuesday 
about when the summer re¬ 
cess would start. 

MPs THEN endorsed the 
government motion to re¬ 
cess until Oct. 15. 

The compromise which 
secured the holiday was of¬ 
fered earlier Tuesday by 
Government House Leader 
Yvon Pinard and included 
the vote on the pipeline 
issue, as demanded by the 
NDP. 

THAT SOLUTION to the 
NDP protest, which kept 
MPs from starting their 
summer vacation last Fri¬ 
day, came after a day of ru¬ 
mored deals and dead¬ 
locks, party House leaders 
scurrying in and out of the 
Commons and several hur¬ 
ried NDP caucus meetings 
at their seats. 

Stanley Knowles, veter¬ 
an NDP House leader, said 
he could not remember a 
day in his 31 years in the 
Commons when House 
leaders had met four times, 
as they did Tuesday. 

"WHY, WE’VE worn the 
rug out” in Pinard's office, 
said Progressive'Conser- 
vative House Leader 
Walter Baker. 

Deals suggested earlier 
in the day fell through with 
the New Demoerats and 
Conservatives blaming 
each other. The NDP want¬ 
ed an extra day's debate 
while the Conservatives 
said they wouldn't make 
any commitment on a re¬ 
cess if things didn't wrap 
up Tuesday night. 

PINARD’S compromise 
let the Conservatives go 
home when they wanted 
while giving the NDP the 
vote they had demanded on 
the pipeline issue and extra 
time for the debate. 

By going two hours be¬ 
yond the normal Commons 
quitting time and cancel¬ 
ling private members' 
hour, the NDP got as much 
extra time as it would have 
had by carrying its protest 
through the usual three 
hours available on the short 
Wednesday schedule. The 
deal also limited speeches 
to 20 minutes and gave the 
NDP one-third of all speak¬ 
ers. 

THE NDP admitted from 
the start there was no 
chance its protest would 
change the government's 
decision, but the party has 
used the extra Commons 


Support 
grows 
tor vote 
on arms 

OTTAWA (CP) — A 
group of 95 MPs, including 
32 Liberals, hope to swing 
government support in 
favor of a a possible United 
Nations resolution for a 
worldwide referendum on 
nuclear disarmament. 

The MPs supported a let¬ 
ter which was delivered 
Tuesday to Prime Minister 
Trudeau by Operation Dis¬ 
mantle. a group opposed to 
the buildup of nuclear 
arms, which says only 
eight of 117 MPs ap 
preached during the last 
three months are against 
the referendum idea Four¬ 
teen were undecided 

LIBERAL Paul M< Kac 
MP for Thunder Bay Ali 
kukan said the issue will 
probably be raised in the 
party 's caucus 

However, the key MP 
among five Liberals listed 
as opposed to the idea is 
External Affairs Minister 
Mark MacGaiga*) The 
minister has said hr does 
not think rWrrrduni results 
against nuclear arms 
would drier countries from 
budding up i heir arsrnah 


sittings to publicize its 
stand. Leader Ed Broad 
bent said he is satisfied 
with the attention his 32- 
member caucus has fo¬ 
cused on the issue. 

But before the deal was 
announced Tuesday after¬ 
noon, no New Democrats 
were allowed to speak in 
100 minutes of debate as 
two Conservatives and a 
Liberal held the floor. 

THE NDP motion, pro¬ 
posed by energy critic lan 
Waddell, condemned the 
government for approving 
construction of southern 
Canadian sections of the 



Broadbent 

... party gets way 

pipeline without solid guar- 
antees the rest of it will be 
built and without deals to 
swap Alaskan gas in the 
future for Canadian gas to 
be exported now. 


OTTAWA (CP) — A new 
fish war between Canada 
and the United States could 
erupt if albaeore tuna mov¬ 
ing north into West Coast 
waters arrive before nego¬ 
tiators deliver a bilateral 
fishing agreement, a fish¬ 
eries committee was told 
Tuesday. 

Former environment 
minister John Fraser 
warned that unless an 
agreement is reached be¬ 
fore the tuna arrive in 
large numbers, ? major 
confrontation is likely if 
Canadian authorities start 
arresting American fish¬ 
ermen. 

“IT IS unbelievable that 
the government has waited 
this long before acting,” 
said Fraser, Conservative 
MP for Vancouver South. 
"This could go far beyond 
the tuna fishery.” 


The Commons fisheries 
committee was told by fish¬ 
eries department officials 
that a few tuna have al¬ 
ready been spotted off Brit¬ 
ish Columbia and large 
schools are expected in 
about todays. 

LAST YEAR, 19 Ameri¬ 
can fishermen were arrest¬ 
ed when they followed the 
tuna into Canada's 320-kilo¬ 
metre zone. Their cases 
are still before the courts. 


At that time, the U.S. 
insisted jts fishermen bad 
the right to fish tuna any¬ 
where while Canada ar¬ 
gued that its federal laws 
prohibited them from en¬ 
tering Canadian waters. 


FISHERIES Minister 
Romeo LeBlanc told the 
Commons earlier Tuesday 
that Canadian and Ameri¬ 
can officials would soon 


start preliminary negotia¬ 
tions and agreement is 
likely. 

Conservative MP Tom 
Siddon from the B.C. riding 
of Richmond-South Delta 
said he understands the 
U.S. has proposed a recip¬ 
rocal agreement giving Ca¬ 
nadian fishermen access to 
tuna in American West 
Coast waters in return for 
American rights off Can¬ 
ada’s West Coast. 


RON McCLOUD, direc¬ 
tor-general of the fisheries 
department in B.C., told 
the committee “there is 
some need for urgency” to 
get agreement because the 
tuna are arriving ahead of 
schedule. 

The fish follow masses of 
warm water which are 
moving north faster than 
expected by department 
scientists. 


ANTI-LOANSHARK BILL NOW LAW 


OTTAWA (CP) — Legislation to outlaw loansharking 
and to remove outdated limits on credit union interest 
charges was passed in all stages without debate in the 
Commons on Tuesday. 

The bill removes a limit, imposed in 1956, of 12 per 
cent on loans under $1,500 made by credit unions, caisses 
populaires, trust companies and luan companies. 

It also makes It a criminal offence to charge more 
than 60 per cent annual interest on a loan. 


This is to make it easier for police to prosecute 
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rates and use threats, blackmail and often physical 
violence to collect. 

The bill still must be passed by the Senate and must 
receive royal assent to become law. This may be delayed 
until the fall because the Senate has already adjourned for 
the summer. 


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Overt. 30R 012 190 C. Reg $7 39 $5.69 


Paint brushes 
in 2 sizes 


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Tapered, flagged bristles are shaped into 
rounded chisel for easy application, edging 
and even finishing. 

50 mm. 30R 040 871 . $7.99 

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Save $ 40 

Electric airless sprayer 
for a 

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139 


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34 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 



PORK SIDE 4 9 fl 

SPARE |0!l 
RIBS I . 

Previously Frozen ■ ID. 


GOOD HOST 

ICED 

TEA 

MIX 

24-oz. tin 




I 

S 8EUSH 69* 

! 



CANADA GRAQE “A” BEEF 

OUTSIDE 
ROUND 


or 


FULL CUT 
BONE-IN 

WILTSHIRE SLICED 


RUMP 
i b ROAST 

Rnnalaet 


Boneless 
BULK 


Previously 


HAM WM 

WILTSHIRE SLICED gk gt 

LUNCHEON CQ 
MEATS -05 



COOKED-119 BEEF — 

I- SAUSAGE 

. WILTSHIRE gk 4 A 

I CORNED Oil 

BEEF^r L * 

SCHNEIDER'S - 

MHNEIDERS SLICED a.. REGULAR 1JJ 

SIDE »• 16S w;ene RS |" 

| each 


4 varieties 


BACON 

schneideI 

MINI 


SCHNEIDER'S FROZEN 

Reg. or 

SIZZLERS * 



1 -ib. pkg. 

SCHNEIDER'S 

HEAD 
CHEESE 
CUPS 3751 1 “ c ' , 



SUNSPUN 

SALAD 

DRESSING 

500 ml jar 



SAVARIN 

FROZEN 


SUNSPUN 

BEANS 

WITH 

PORK 

14-fl.-oz. tin 



BLUE BONNET 


3-lb. pkg. 


HEINZ ASSTD. 


■1 


79 


CALIFORNIA Canada #1 

39V 

TOMATOES 

CALIFORNIA Canada #1 

CELERY 

19'. 

U.S. Canada #1 

PEACHES 

45'. 

LOCAL BUNCH 

CARROTS 

65* 

2 bunches SlF 


FORTUNE 


CHOICE 

TOMATOES 


28 fl. oz. tins 


69 


e 


LIBBY'S 


FRUIT 

COCKTAIL 

14 fl. oz. tin . 


65 


♦ 


MEAT PIES 

Beef — Chicken — Turkey 

491 


ROYALL 

LUNCHEON 

MEAT 


l 

s 

s 

3 

i 


12-oz. tin 


McCORMICKS lie 

McBIG iflU 

COOKIESl 49 

RheceieueWp 700 g I 

Creme Assorted ■ 

Assorted P k 8- 



CLOVERLEAF CHUNK 

LIGHT 

TUNA 

184 g tin .. 


1 


19 


MAPLE LEAF 

FLAKES 
OF HAM 


184 g tin 


I 


SUNSPUN (14 fl. oz. tin) 



2 

in tomato sauce ... tins 
FOREMOST OR PALM 


79 


BICKS 


9 


SWEET MIXED 
PICKLES 


15 fl. oz. iar 


99 


4 


WYLERS FLAVORED 

DRINK 

CRYSTALS 

pkg. ot 3 — 92 g envelopes ■ 


79 


ROGERS 


9 


PANCAKE 

SYRUP 


1 litre jar 


149 


SNACKERY 

PANCAKE 

UIY Regular or 
111 IA Buttermilk 

1 kg. bag .*.. 


rj 


ICE 
CREAM 


129 


HIGHLINER FROZEN 

COD 

FILLETS 

16-oz. pkg. 


199 


MINUTE MAID (Pink or Plain) 


FROZEN■ 
LEMONADE 


12V» fl. oz. tin 


69 


9 


FOREMOST OR PALM 

PLAIN 

YOGURT 

500 g pkg. 


75 


4 


FOREMOST OR PALM 

FRUIT 

YOGURT 

500 g pkg. . 


83‘i 


—S 

49*5 


S SUCARYL 

no 
msw 

185 ml 


UID 

EETENER 


169 


NABOB 


COFFEE 3 


49 


HUSKY 

DOG 

FOOD 

(25 oz. tin) . 


tins 


89 


4 


PAMPERS, TODDLERS 

DISPOSABLE ftftg 
DIAPERS j 09 


pkg of 24 


BETTER BUY 

LUNCH 

BAGS 

pkg. of 50 . 


GRILLTIME 


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LIQUID 

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32 fl . oz. 


1* 


COAST 


BM SOUP f 

Pkg. of 3 Bath Size . I 


BETTER BUY 

LIQUID 

DETERGENT 


32 fl. oz. 


J09 


CUT RITE 


WAX PAPER 
REFILLS 


100 ft. roN 


m 

i 


• Prices Effective Wed., July 23 to Sun., July 27th. < 

STORE Shdboume Plaza • Cadboro Bay Village f 

LOCATIONS: 2187 Oak Bay Ave. # 230 Cook St. # 880 



4 We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities • 

Colwood Pla*a Sunday Stora hours: 
EsauimaR Rd. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

(Oak Say Closed Sunday) 

































































AUDIOVOX SOUND SPECTACULAR 


PROVINCE 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 35 


Bennett starting public push on constitution 


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A major public infor¬ 
mation campaign to 
bring B.C.’s constitu¬ 
tional demands to public 
attention has become a 
top priority for the pro¬ 
vincial government. 

Premier Bennett 
wouldn't say Tuesday what 
form the information cam¬ 
paign would take, nor 
would he even guess at a 
possible budget. But he left 
no doubt inside and outside 
the house that he intends to 
seek public support for 
what will be his final posi¬ 
tion when he attends the 
constitutional summit con¬ 
ference in Ottawa in Sep¬ 
tember. 

HIS ANNOUNCEMENT 
lent further fuel to specula¬ 
tion that the culmination of 
(hat information campaign 
could be a public referen¬ 


dum in which the people 
would be asked to endprse 
the government’s position. 

Bennett’s announcement 
came in the form of a reac¬ 
tion to a challenge from 
Alex Macdonald (NDP— 
Vancouver East) during 
the daily question period in 
the Legislature. 

Mdedonald drew the pre- 
mier's wrath when he 
asked when the govern¬ 
ment intended to take the 
Legislature into its confi¬ 
dence and tell members ex¬ 
actly what B.C.'s position 
is on constitutional 
change. 

THE PREMIER said the 
government’s position on 
the constitution had been 
made clear with the publi¬ 
cation of a series of papers, 
British Columbia’s Consti¬ 
tutional Proposals, which 
were widely distributed 


following the October, ISIS' 
Conference on constitution¬ 
al reform. 

He said that while there 
had been some modifica¬ 
tions in position since then, 
the basic thrust remained 
the same. He said he was 
sorry Macdonald and his 
NDP colleagues had failed 
to read and understand the 
proposals. 

BENNETT ALSO took a 
critical swing at a now-old 
David Barrett statement 
when he held office. During 
his period as premier, Bar¬ 
rett once said that he would 
be prepared to give the 
federal government the 
ownership of B.C.’s petro¬ 
leum industry "if the fed¬ 
eral government would na¬ 
tionalize” the industry 
across the country. 

Bennett said high on the 
list of demands B.C. Is 
making to Ottawa is a 


-off policy 
to the deve 


comes to the development 
and control of natural re¬ 
sources. 

“WE ARE TRYING to 
protect what you would 
have given away,” Bennett 
snapped. 

Macdonald accused him 
of being "guilty of a delib¬ 
erate twist, a half-truth,” 
and repeated his demand 
that the government take 
the people into his confi¬ 
dence and explain in detail 
what B.C.'s position is on 
various constitutional 
issues. 

Bennett ignored the ac¬ 
cusation but said he would 
take the advice of Macdon¬ 
ald and “vie will go on an 
active campaign to involve 
the people directly to win 
their support for our poli¬ 
cies.” 

OUTSIDE THE house he 


attempted to give the Im¬ 
pression that he had given 
an on-the-spur-of-the-mo- 
ment reaction to Macdon¬ 
ald’s suggestion, but when 
askod If it was a spontane¬ 
ous idea or one he had been 
planning for some time 
anyway, he gave a vague 
reply. 

It has been rumored for 
several weeks that the gov¬ 
ernment was cranking up 
its “information” machine 
to take the word to the 
people in the form of adver¬ 
tisements, speeches and 


Inspector demanded 
for interest conflicts 


B.C.’s conflict of inter¬ 
est laws are grossly inade¬ 
quate, Charles Barber 
(NDP—Victoria) charged 
Monday. 

Barber wants Municipal 
Affairs Minister William 
Vander Zalm to hire a full¬ 
time inspector of munici¬ 
palities whose job it would 
be to investigate and, if 
necessary, prosecute char¬ 
ges of conflict of interest 
at the local government 
level. 

Such an inspector could 
help establish a new code of 
ethics for elected and se¬ 
nior appointed officials at 


the local government level, 
he said. 

"We’re sick and tired of 
hearing from people about 
all of the investigations and 
the allegations and cur¬ 
rently the 17 separate po¬ 
lice investigations going on 
around British Columb/a 
on conflict of interest,” he 
said. 

Barber said the Union of 
B.C. Municipalities has al¬ 
ready requested the in¬ 
spector be hired, but the 
Social Credit party has 
been so preoccupied with 
its own scandals and in¬ 
quiries that it hasn't had 
time to do it. 


July 23 and July 30 

WIMS9AY 

tickets good for 


QVER 11,000 BONUS CASH PRIZES 


with this classified ad... 


THREE CUTE KITTENS to flood 
homes FREE. Will deliver. 
Phone xxx-xxxx. 


I found good homes for three kittens. And it's not easy even to give away cats, as 
many of you will know. Mind you, I used a little psychology. The ad, as you'll see, 
said "Will deliver" which meant we could, by taking them to the homes ourselves, 
check people out and see whether we felt comfortable leaving the kittens there. Do 
you know, we had forty phone calls off that ad during the three days it was 
in the daily papers! You can't beat that. ' *** 

DON RYAN 


public seminars. It has also 
been suggested that de¬ 
pending on the response re¬ 
ceived during that cam¬ 
paign, the government 
would base a possible 
referendum decision. 

ASKED BY the Colonist 
if he had advanced his 
plans far enough to prepare 
a budget for the informa¬ 
tion campaign Bennett re¬ 
plied, “I’ll see you later.” 

Earlier in the house Mac¬ 
donald had pleadpd for a 
debate on the constitutional 


issues so that the govern¬ 
ment could present a bi¬ 
partisan position to Ot¬ 
tawa. 

Bennett refused that re¬ 
quest bluntly. 

"Will you develop bi-par¬ 
tisan proposals? Macdon¬ 
ald asked. 

“NO," ANSWERED the 
premier. “We intend to de¬ 
velop non-partisan propos¬ 
als." He said partisanship 
’ of any kind had no place in 
the current negotiations. 

Barrett tried to stop the 


aroused premier in his 
tracks by asking when he 
intended to answer the 
many questions posed lo 
him during debate on his 
estimates. 

“We’ll leave the frivo¬ 
lous questions to be an 
swered elsewhere,” Ben¬ 
nett snapped in reply. 

THIS WEEK Intergo¬ 
vernmental Affairs Minis¬ 
ter Garde Gardom is in 
Vancouver attending the 
third week of a round of 
preliminary conferences 
on the constitution. 


Vm DAYS 




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36 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


CANADA/REGIOH 


‘Will real 
economy 
stand up’ 


i 


TORONTO (UPC) — Hazel Henderson, a re¬ 
nowned community activist and economist, said 
Tuesday the world’s futurists must tackle outdated 
economic theories by first asking “will the real 
economy please stand up." 

Henderson said, in a keynote luncheon speech to the 
First Global Conference on the Future, that the main 
problem in dealing with the world's economic ills is de¬ 
fining the problem. 

“I think the point we (futurists) are at is saying 
‘will the real economy, at last, please stand up,’ ” she 
told some 1,300 delegates to the four-day conference. 

She said one of the crucial problems with the North 
American economy was the declining productivity—or 
decreasing levels of worker output compared with the re¬ 
sources needed to run the industries. 

INSTEAD OF INVENTING new ways to stimulate 
industry, Henderson said futurists must convince econo¬ 
mists to reconsider the problem. She said people should no 
longer be worrying about declining labor productivity, but 
look instead at productivity of other factors of produc¬ 
tion. 

Top on her list was the need to improve productiv¬ 
ity of energy, making' every unit of energy used in 
industry produce more. This, she said is. what en¬ 
ergy conservation is all about. 

The British-born economist, who lives in the Unit¬ 
ed Slates, said economists wedded to Keynesian prin¬ 
ciples concentrate on labor productivity because it is a 
“profoundly political" transition to look critically at the 
other factors. 

WHEN INDUSTRY’S declining productivity was at¬ 
tributed to labor, "then workers are to blame," she said. 
But if the drop in productivity is due instead to ineffi¬ 
cient capital, “then management is to blame and 
Wall Street and government become the people we 
have to argue with.” 

She said the level of productivity “has been over¬ 
stated" in the past because tremendous social costs— 
such as pollution, or developing frontier areas— were 
never before calculated into industry’s cost of pro¬ 
duction. 



Committee balks 
at consultant’s fee 


Everything’s just ducky 


Lori St. Croix of London, Ont. is a 
mother—with little bit of help from 
her oven. She had been feeding a 
mother mallard duck for tlwee 


weeks, when it suddenly disappeared 
leaving her eggs behind her. Lori 
saved six eggs and warmed them on 
her oven door until four hatched. 


A standing committee 
recommendation that a 
consultant receive $3,850 to 
determine whether Saan¬ 
ich should spend an esti¬ 
mated $00,000 to improve 
communications with resi¬ 
dents on local area plans, 
was rejected by council 
this week after Mayor Mel 
Couvelier termed the exer¬ 
cise a waste of money. . 

Aldermen recommended 
a week ago that G.T. Woods 
Associates Ltd. be hired to 
evaluate the cost and effec¬ 
tiveness of alternative 
methods of communication 
for local area plans. 

Couvelier said the muni¬ 
cipality had staff capable 
of maintaining liaison with 
the electorate and he could 
see no reason to waste 
money paying a consultant 
for pat answers. 

“To spend $3,800 to a sup¬ 
posed expert to tell us what 
we already know is to my 
mind a total waste," Cou¬ 
velier added. 

The eight meetings held 
on the Cordova Bay plan 
and meetings to discuss the 
Gordon Head plan had at¬ 
tracted several hundred 
persons, the mayor noted, 
adding that he had been 
impressed by the atten¬ 
dance. 

Aid. Irene Block agreed ' 
the turnout at meetings had 
been impressive but sug¬ 
gested this was due to ac¬ 
tive community associa¬ 
tions in Cordova Bay and 
Gordon Head. 

“But this community 


Individuals ‘must build Third World links’ 


TORONTO (UPC) - The 
crucial task facing the 
West is creating mutually 
beneficial links with the 
Third World, Lewis Perin- 
bam, vice president of the 
Canadian International De¬ 
velopment Agency said 
Tuesday. 

“The developing coun¬ 
tries are not a threat. They 
are a new frontier of im¬ 
measurable promise,” 
Perinbam told delegates 
attending the First Global 


Conference of the Future. 

Individuals and busi¬ 
nesses must help build 
these links, instead of leav¬ 
ing the responsibility “ex¬ 
clusively to the govern¬ 
ment", he said, in what 
some organizers called 
“the most impressive 
speech” of the conference. 

Perinbaum was one of 
hundreds of international 
leaders speaking to 5,000 
delegates from around the 
world attending the four- 
day conference. 


Speeches and 300 semi¬ 
nars on topics'including 
politics, economics, educa¬ 
tion and resources are fo¬ 
cused on the conference 
theme “Thinking Globally, 
Acting Locally.” 

Perinbam said both the 
developed and Third World 
countries would benefit 
from closer links because it 
would increase interna¬ 
tional trade for the West 
and increase self-suffi¬ 
ciency for the developing 
nations. 


“It is tempting to blame 
cheap Third World manu¬ 
factured imports for rising 
unemployment,” but re¬ 
ports have shown "four and 
a half times as many jobs 
were lost due to new tech¬ 
nology than through cheap 
Third World imports,” he 
said. 

The misconception that 
developing countries were 
“incapable of managing 
without aid is dangerous 
nonsense”, he said, noting 


that in 1978 developing 
countries financed 70 per 
cent of their needs by their 
own efforts. 

“We must recognize that 
aid is not a ‘give away’. It is 
a subsidy to or domestic 
economy,” he said. Inter¬ 
national aide has helped 
the economies and pur¬ 
chasing power of the Third 
World countries, who in 
turn trade with the West, he 
said. 

The recent report of the 
Brandt Commission, a 



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ELTON JOHN 

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MTU. Dlanewn film i !■ 11 ** 

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6.99 u..~,.6.99 

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Clearance 
3 LP's, each: 


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99 :: 


f rwwww ? ffye??????teeewwwef f ?feeeeeewreM 1 




Clearance 
8-Tracks, ea.: 





Prices Effective While Quantities Lent. 


•A119V 



OfPAHTMCMT Sfoats 

. I . * • - 


Town and Country Shopping Contra 
Douglas Straot and Saanich 


h Marty 

id i n ti id p i 


S~\ ENJOY THf WED GRILLE 

r FROM LIGHT SNACKS 

' \y TO MEALS,.. 


participation is not evident 
in some neighborhoods and 
it is up to council to make 
every effort to communi¬ 
cate with residents," Block 
said. 

In other business, eoun 
ell: 

•Agreed to rezone prop 
orty at 3896 Finnerty Road 
to allow construction of 
three-single-family homes. 

# Called a public hearing 
to consider rezoning land at 
4558 Cordova Bay Road for 
a restaurant. 


a Endorsed a rezoning 
covering property at 3850 
Epsom Drive. 

a Appointed aldermen 
John Mika and Mary Casi 
lio as council representa¬ 
tives on a handicapped citi- 
zens’ transportation 
advisory committee along 
with Corrine Trench, Fre 
derick Kimmons, Donald 
Jones, Pat Guy, George 
Bate, Douglas Ottenbreit, 
John Kyle, Brenda Lewis, 
Jack Smith and Helen Aus ; 
tin. 


July 23 and July 30 

WIMIBAT 

tickets good for 



group of 19 international 
leaders, should be used as 
“a blueprint" for a better 
world, he said. 

The report called for re¬ 
formed world institutions, 
such as the World Bank, a 
system of world taxation 
for stabilized financial 
flows and reduced military 
spending. 

Voluntary aid given by 
North Americans in¬ 
creased by at least 10 per¬ 
cent .last year, he said. 


[ 0(164 

*3^foods 

t|S| ; 307 OLD 

ISLAND HWY. 

“MDCORNER OF HELMCKEN 

V * HUMS ID EFFECT Tam. M 8 la Sa M| X 

SUNDAY IM r N Wa laiaraa Um ri(M to tea. maaNMva 


GAINERS 

PURE PORK 139 
SAUSAGES 500 g | 

RANDOM CUT mMA 

SLICED 7Q* 
BACON J 3 

REGULAR Jo/a 

GROUND 119 
BEEF id. I 

GR A BLADE BONE-IN 

CHUCK 129 

STEAK »l 

GRADE A BONE-IN 

CROSS RIB 159 
ROAST « 1 

MINUTE MAID MM A 

ORANGE 09* 

juice ,7 0. 33 

GAINERS 

SAUSAGE 169 

STICKS 500 g 1 

1 STRAWBERRY 169 
SHORTCAKE ™ # 1 

FLEISCHMANNS Aja 

CORN OIL 019 

MARGARINE £ 

ISLAND FARMS AAA 

ICE 199 

CREAM 1 

McCain WMMa 

super 7(r 

FRIES 2 * Iv 

REALEMON Jpa 

LEMONADE 159 

CRYSTALS 674, 1 

success Mm a 

SLICED Ok* 

PEACHES 7**03 

UPTONS ^ ft* 

ICED 189 

TEA MIX 74. 1 

OCEAN SPRAY J 4A 

CRANBERRY 119 

COCKTAIL 40. 1 

KRAFT J 4 m 

PEANUT 115 
BUTTER 5m, 1 

CHASE A SANBORN AAmA 

COFFEE .2” 

SUCCESS MMa 

WHOLE kQC 

TOMATOES 78.33 

PEAK FREAN mm Jh A 

DIGESTIVE EOt 
COOKIES zoo,*! 

MISS MEW Jaa 

CAT 129 

FOOD 80 . 5/1 

PURINA HIGH PROTEIN MMA 

DOG C49 

MEAL , k9 U 

CAPRI 4 ROLLS MM A 

BATHROOM QQt 
TISSUE *,03 

2 ROLL PKG. 

PAPER 109 
TOWELS 1 

Hi .19* 

SUNLIGHT MAA 

DETER- 028 

GENT ste.3 

r Lwm's brings 
\ f on fair poets 

SN060V 138 » 

“ f wary day of 

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WHOLE JB. 

WATER ID 

MELONS „ 13 


PINE- 0Q< 
APPLE .33 


CAM NO 1 JLa 

CORN ON 10 

THE COB 6/1 


MO lUMNft MMa 

IMMftTM OfU 

4 | 4 » 


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V 


COURTS/REGION 



Judge Harold Alder handed a 19-year old man a 
10-month jail term Tuesday in Victoria provincial court 
fora house break-in Jan. 31. 


William Clifford Scott, of 1226 Rudlin, was caught in¬ 
side a residence at 3093 Washington by an occupant, ran 
out, and was apprehended a short lime later. A watch had 
been taken in the break-in, court was told. 

Scott had received an 18-month term for two counts 
of breaking and entering Sept. 5, 1978 in Victoria 
and previously had been given 14 days for two break-ins in 
Medicine Hat on Aug. 22,1977. 

ANOTHER 19-year-old, Kirk Grant MacMillan, of 
855 Ellery, received a total of eight months and 15 days 
in jail from two judges Tuesday. 

MacMillan received an eight-month sentence from 
Judge Gilbert Hogg for possession of a stolen car, 
impaired driving, and refusing a breath test demand 
made by Colwood ROMP. 

Court was told a 1963 Chevrolet was “hot-wired" 
and taken from in front of a St. James Street residence 
New Year's Eve. The vehicle was driven off the 
road at Yorkshire into a water-filled ditch and Mac¬ 
Millan was arrested. MacMillan was belligerent to 
the point of spitting in an RCMP officer’s eye. 

Hogg said he would recommend MacMillan serve 
his term at the Boulder Bay camp. 

Less than an hour later, MacMillan appeared be¬ 
fore Judge Blake Allan and pleaded guilty to driving 
while under a licence suspension. 

Allan was told the incident occurred May 26 in the 
700-block Dominion where Esquimau police spotted 
MacMillan driving a vehicle. When officers caught 
up with him in his driveway, MacMillan told police 
he had been under suspension but was now allowed to 
drive. However, a cheek indicated that MacMillan’s 
licence had been suspended April 12 and was under sus¬ 
pension until June 18 for accumulation of penalty 
points. 

MacMillan had previous convictions for mischief, 
taking an auto without the owner’s consent, theft, 
driving with a blood-alcohol content over .08, and 
two convictions for driving while under suspension. 

Allan made the 15-day sentence consecutive to any 
MacMillan was now serving. 

ALLAN ORDERED a pre-sentence report for 20- 
year-old Donald Patrick Jackson, of 2988 Leigh Road, who 
pleaded guilty to auto theft. 

Crown counsel Don Laughton said Jackson arrived in 
a pickup at 660 Rockingham about 9:20 p.m. May 16, and 
later drove off in a Mustang belonging to Carol Arlene 
Ardin. Laughton said Jackson drove the stolen car to 
Nanoose Bay where he struck a bridge and caused 
$2,000 damage. Jackson then hailed a taxi back to 
Nanaimo. 

Jackson had previous convictions for dangerous driv¬ 
ing. wilful damage, driving with a blood-alcohol content 
over .08, and two counts of driving while under suspension 
and possession of stolen properly. His last conviction for 
possession of stolen property was Feb. 18, 1980 when he 
was fined $100. 

Allan remanded Jackson, who is not in custody, 
until Aug. 11 for sentencing. 

A 17-YEAR-OLD youth, Terry James Minnie, of 
1656 Earle, has been charged with attempting to de¬ 
fraud a 79-year-old woman of $1,400 in connection with 
a prepaid burial plot. 

Minnie elected trial by judge without jury and a 
preliminary hearing was set for Oct. 29. 

ALDER SENTENCED a 26-year-old man to seven 
days in jail for his second drinking-driving offence in 
less than two years. 

Enrique Garcia Romero, of 3155 Earl Grey, pleaded 
guilty to driving with a blood-alcohol content over 
.08 Dec. 23. 

Crown counsel Richard Law said Victoria police 
were called to the Quadra Villa apartments at about 
1:50 a m. because Romero was knocking on a door. 
Officers called a taxi for Romero but were sum¬ 
moned back two minutes later because Romero was 
again knocking on the same door. 

This time, police arrested Romero for being drunk 
in a public place and transported him to police cells. 

However, there had been a minor fire in the cells and 
police again called a taxi for him. 

Court was told Romero again redirected the cab to 
the Quadra Villa and the taxi driver saw him get into 
his vehicle and drive off. 

Police went to Romero’s residence and asked how he 
got his car home. Romero said it had been towed 
there by a tow truck but admitted he drove it when 
officers said they would check the tow truck firms. 

He had been convicted of impaired driving in Octo¬ 
ber of 1978 and fined $375. 

FINED FOR drinking-driving offences were: Martin 
Christopher Houghton, 20, of 9211 Lochsidc, $450; Deryck 
Ernest Hazel, 49, of 29 Bushby, $450; Robert Ashton, 74. of 
-1815 Sooke, $400; Donald Gardiner, 33, of 10159 Third 
Street, $100; and Marvin Harvey Thomas James, 19, 
of 12 Cooper Road, $300. 

In addition, James was ordered to complete 80 Hours 
of community service work and was fined $35 for driving 
without a valid licence. 


Service Thursday 
for noted scholar 


A funeral service will be 
held Thursday for Dr. Ri¬ 
chard Beck, a leading fig¬ 
ure in Scandinavian lan¬ 
guages and literature in 
North America, who died 
Sunday at the age of 83. 

Beck ntmed to Victoria 
in 1967 on retirement after 
38 years at the University 
of North Dakota where he 
served for nine years as 
chairman of the depart¬ 
ment of modem and classi¬ 
cal languages. 

He donated an extensive 
library of Scandinavian lit 
eralure to the University 
of Victoria and was hon 
ored both in his Icelandic 
omeland and in the United 
tales for his scholarship 
nd efforts in promoting 
Scandinavian interests 
The author of poems, ar¬ 
ticles and books in both 
ngiish and Icelandic, he 
gave mure than 1.200 ad 
dresses in North America 
and Scandinavia He re 
presented the Icelandic 
Nsjuiflal league in North 
Kmrru t when Iceland oh 


served the 25lh anniver¬ 
sary of the founding of the 
republic in 1969. 

Born in Reydarfjordur, 
Iceland. June 9, 1897, Beck 
graduated from state col¬ 
lege, Reykjavik, and 
moved to Canada in 1921. A 
year later he went to Cor¬ 
nell University at Ithica, 
N.Y.. for graduate work in 
English and Scandinavian 
languages and literature. 

He joined the staff of the 
University of Dakota in 
1929. Beck married the for¬ 
mer Margaret Brandson. 
the daughter of Icelandic 
pioneers who came to Vic¬ 
toria in 1887. 

He is survived by his 
wife, son Richard of Iowa, 
daughter Margaret of Cali¬ 
fornia. brother Valdi Beck 
of Winnipeg, grandchil 
dren, nieces and nephews 

The service will be al 1:3# 
p m Thursday at Crace 
Lulhcran Church. 1273 
Fort, with cremation to fol 
low. The Becgs joined the 
congregation on moving to 
their Victoria home at 2a 
Marlborough la IM7 



upermarhet 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 37 


We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities 


COLWOOD CORNERS 

I860 ISLAND HIGHWAY 

OPEN 9-9 
7 DAYS A WEEK 

Prices effective July 22,23,24,25,26 


GR. A VEAL ^ . 

SIRLOIN 029 

STEAK .0 

GR. A VEAL ^ 

LOIN 0 

CHOPS,0 

[49 

FRESH 

VEAL 099 

CUTLETS ,0 

GR. A VEAL ^ 

RIB 0 

CHOPS .L 

199 

i 

SHOULDER 199 
STEAK. 1 

FRESH . 

VEAL 1 

PATTIES , 1 

99 

VEAL afl- A 

BREAST. I 79 

FRESH . 

COD 1 

FILLETS , 1 

|49 

CENTRE CUT _ _ 

PORK LOIN 169 

chops ...» 1 

TENDERLOIN ENDS 

PORK LOIN 1 

ROAST 

129 


NEW ZEALAND BONELESS BEEF 

TOP ROUND STEAK 

2 19 


NEW ZEALAND BONELESS BEEF 

ROUND STEAK or SIRLOIN TIP 

ROAST 


99 


NEW ZEALAND BONELESS 

SIRLOIN TIP 
STEAK 


lb. 


2 


29 


LOIN RIB ENDS 

COUNTRY STYLE 
SPARERIBS 


lb. 


'j 29 


OLYMPIC SMOKED 

BAVARIAN 

SAUSAGES 


. lb. 


]49 


BREAKFAST DELIGHT 

SLICED 
BACON. SOOgpkg 


99 


0 


OLYMPIC 


WIENERS. 79 


HOME 25 x12” 

FOIL 

WRAP 


69 


GROCERIES 

3BY S m ^ ^ LIBBY’S 

89* 

28 oz. NFnF 


SLICED 

PEACHES 


DEEP BROWN OQC 
BEANS 00 


BICK’S POLSKI 

DILL 

PICKLES 


. 32 oz. 


1 


09 


GRILL TIME 


KRAFT 


CHARCOAL 

BRIQUETS 


10 lbs. 


I 79 


HEINZ 


TOMATO 

CATSUP 


15-oz. 


99 


0 


PEANUT 

BUTTER 


■ 1 Vi kg 


2 


79 


WEST 



WE.49 


0 


CATELLI 


LONG SPAGHETTI or 
CUT MACARONI . 


.1 kg 


1 


19 


HUNT’S 

STEWED, CRUSHED 


TOMATOES 


. 14 oz. 


53 


0 


KRAFT 

SLICED 

CHEESE 


. 1 kg 


3 


79 


KRAFT 


MED. CHEESE 
STICKS 


12-oz. 


1 


79 


RISE N SHINE 

LEMONADE 

CRYSTALS 


pkg. 


57 


$ 


SILVERWOOD 

SOUR 

CREAM 


.500 g 


89 


SUN RYPE 

RAISIN 
PIE FILLING 


SWANSON 

TV DINNERS 
BEEF, CHICKEN, 

TURKEY 


.11 oz. 


1 


19 


GOOD MORNING 

ORANGE 

MARMALADE 


. 24-oz. 


1 


19 


M.J.B. 


.19-oz. 


89 


4 


GRANTHAMS 

FRUIT 

DRINK 


. 10 oz. 


69 


DELNOR _ A 

KERNEL CORNCQC 
MIXED VEG. 2«»Uv 


INSTANT COFFEE 

4 79 


GAINES MEAL 

DOG 

FOOD 


.8 kg 


5 


49 


FABRIC 

SOFTENER 


IMALING WHOLE 

GREEN 

BEANS 

MET 

TISSUES 


14-OZ. 

tins 


79 


PACIFIC 


.200’s 


89 


CANNED MILK 

2 79* 

L 385 ml IV 

Limit 6 tins per customer 


39 


NABOB 


CASCADE _ „ _ 

DISHWASHER 099 PANCAKE 
POWDER 


128 oz. 


VALLEY FARM 

GREEN 

PEAS 


I 


R LU SYRUP 

ROdUCE 


2 lbs. 


59 


P 

pL 39* 

cor 



nil M 

NECTAR- 


LOCAL | 

IR0MAINE 



39 


AULI- CQc 
flower | 



























































































4 


38 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


IlRftftpSgfiassnife 


mm 


THE BUTCHAKT GARDENS — OPEN EVERY DAY 

— Gates open 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

NIGHT ILLUMINATION — The entire 35 acres and 
the Ross Fountains arc transformed into a fairyland at 
dusk. 

ENTERTAINMENT — A SHOW BARGAIN — All 
> listed entertainment included in regular admission to 
Gardens. 

MON. THRU FRI. — “JUST FOR FUN** — Delightful 
outdoor musical revue. Songs, dances, laughter, with a 
full company of performers and musicians. 8:45 p.m. 
Mon. thru Fri. 

MON. THRU SAT. — THE BUTCHART GARDENERS 

— 6 to 8 p.m. Mon. thru Fri. and Saturdays 7 to 9 p.m. 
Musical fun for children of all ages. 

SATURDAYS — FIREWORKS! — “THEATRE OF 
FIRE*’ — a superb pyrotechnic spectacle devised in 
France expressly for the Gardens. With music. At 
dark. (Saturday, July 26 — 10:00 p.m.) 

SUNDAYS — Grace Tuckey Puppets — 3:30 and 4:30 
p.m. Enjoy the tranquility of the Gardens under the 
night illuminations. From dusk. 

THE BUTCHART DINING ROOM — 10 to 7:30 p.m. 
Lunches and Teas until 4:30 — THE BENVENUTO 
BUFFET, 5 to 7:30 p.m. 

THE GREENHOUSE RESTAURANT — Cafeteria 
style, 10 to 7:30 p.m — COFFEE BAR SERVICE 
always available. 

THE SEED AND GIFT SHOP — Always open. 

15 ACRES OF GARDENS — The Sunken Rose, Japa¬ 
nese and Italian Gardens and The Ross Fountains. 


night-life centre, 919 Douglas St., 383-7137. fea¬ 
turing “THE OLD FORGE” Nightclub with live 
music of “THE BROTHERS FORBES AND 
FRIENDS.” 3 Discotheques — “THE STING,” “THE 
CUCKOO’S NEST” and “IVY’S” and a unique lounge 
called “BIG BAD JOHN’S” featuring Hillbilly atmo¬ 
sphere. Luncheon served daily in “THE STING” and 
lunch and dinner served in the “CUCKOO’S NEST”. 
“Everybody know who’s Number One!” 


CENTURY INN — “DECA-DANCE DISCO¬ 
THEQUE**, “Our Pub”, entertainment daily. 


THE ROYAL OAK INN — 4890 Elk Lake Dr. — Invites 
you to your choice of entertainment nightly — THE 
STRATHMORE DINING ROOM, LE CHEVAL 
LOUNGE, THE THATCH with rock ’n roll music, THE 
PUBLIC HOUSE and THE TOBY JUG COFFEE 
SHOP. 658 5231. 


THE CRYSTAL GARDEN — Explore the exotic world 
of plants, birds and reptiles as displayed at the Crystal 
Garden, open 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. every day! Visit 
Gift Shops, Tea Room — and Restaurant. 


STEWARTS — Nightly dining par excellence — 
Victoria’s best — Louise Rose attne piano. 388-7021. 

SHAWNIGAN LAKE INN - NOW OPEN TO EVERY¬ 
ONE! — Full outdoor facilities. Dine daily in the 
Hldaway with Live Entertainment nightly. Featuring 
Sat. and Sun Brunch. Just 40 minutes from Victoria. 

743-2312. 


ENTERTAINMENT 


Movies ( on hold 9 as actors strike 


HOLLYWOOD (AP) — 
Some striking television 
and movie actors—and 
their film crews—re¬ 
mained on locations across 
the United States on Tues¬ 
day as two major per¬ 
formers’ unions wrangled 
with producers for a stake 
in the lucrative pay TV and 
videocasselte market. 

About 20,000 members of 
the American Federation 
of Television and Radio Ar¬ 
tists went on strike Tues¬ 
day, joining 47,000 Screen 
Actors Guild colleagues 


who walked off the job 24 
hours earlier. 

The guild represents 
actors in movies and 
filmed television shows. 
The striking federation 
members appear in tape- 
recorded prime time televi¬ 
sion shows. 

Although talks with stu¬ 
dios and networks were 
continuing on virtually an 
around-the-clock basis, the 
joint guild-federation 
strike halted shooting for 
almost all American theat¬ 
rical film and prime time 
television productions. 


American actors have 
walked off the movie set of 
A Whale for the Killing in 
St. John’s, Nfld., in support 
of the strike. 

But a handful of U.S. 
actors working in two 
movies being shot in Toron¬ 
to— Misdeal and A Ticket to 
Heaven—remained on the 
job Tuesday. 

The strike is expected to 
have little effect on Cana¬ 
dian films being made in 
Canada, said a spokesman 
for the Association of Cana¬ 
dian Television and Radio 
Artists, because few 


American actors are in¬ 
volved. 

A key issue in the U.S. 
actors' dispute is their de¬ 
mand for a 12-pcr-cent 
share in producers’ gross 
receipts for sales of shows 
to new “supplemental” 
markets—pay TV, video¬ 
discs and vtdeocassettes. 

“They pay an actor, 
when he’s out on the road in 
a play, for every night he 
acts,” said actor James 
Stewart. “Well, I think 


there’s an argument that 
for eyery flight a thing is 
shown on pay TV or disco- 
television or whatever, I 
think there’s an argument 
that an actor should have a 
part of that." 

The unions also are seek¬ 
ing a 40-per-cent raise in 
minimum pay scales, now 
up to $785 a week, and im¬ 
provement in benefits. In¬ 


cluding dental and optical 

care plans. 

The producers have of¬ 
fered an 8.4-per-cent scale 
increase in the first year of 
the contract, but want 
actors working on original 
pay TV and other supple¬ 
mental market productions 
to be paid at 80 per cent of 
scale. 



WQNW0FITAU. 

A Wonderful new musical from 
the authors of Aone of Green Gables. 
Newcomhe Auditorium. Provincial Museum 

Sponsored by Victoria Art Gallery 
Tickets at McPherson, Visitors Bureau, 

Hillside Mall, Brandywine and 

Museum Box Offices. (PINAL WEEKS) 385-3424 j 


RIFF 

RAFF 

Tues.-Thurs. 
July 22-24 

15 Bastion Square 
’Information 


The ROYAL 
UPIZZAN 
JALUONS. 


GREAT 

WHITE 

STALLIONS 

MIDI FAMOUS 
91 THt 
DUNH MOWS 



in the ' 

CANTERBURY LOUNGE 


CARL 


310 GORGE 
ROAD EAST 


THE MIRACLE 
OF THE 
r WHITE STALLIONS 


at 


LiScrto's 


FOR EXCELLENT 

STEAK and SEAFOOD 

LUNCH 11:30-2:30 (CLOSED DINNER from 500 p.m. 
TUES. through FRI. MONDAYS) TUES. through SUN. 
(3 MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN VICTORIA) 
AMPLE FREE PARKING 

HILLSIDE AT QUADRA m 386-8982 


plus - r /gw 

• THE SPECTACULAR 1 — 
HORSES OF SPAIN' 

• TONY THE WONDER HORSE• 

• THE AIRS ABOVE THE GROUND 1 

PRESENTED BY THE 
CITY OF VICTORIA 
VICTORIA 
MEMORIAL ARENA 

TUESDAY. AUGUST 5— 

8 00 P M 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 
6.50-7.50 

SPECIAL PRICES O A P 
A CHILDREN 
12 VR8. and UNDER 
2 OO OFF REGULAR PRICE 
TICKETS NOW ON SALE ARENA BOX 
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MALL. BRANDYWINE HATLEY PARK. 
KEYS SOUNO CENTRE. SIDNEY 
1(H) A M.-5:00 P M 
DAILY EXCEPT SUNOAY 


TRINKWON 

382-2151 22 t0 2 

t 

Tuesday thru Saturday 8:30-12:30 



CITY OF VICTORIA 
DEPARTMENT 
OF RECREATION 

IN COOPERATION WITH THE VICTORIA MUSI¬ 
CIAN'S ASSOCIATION, LOCAL 247 AND THE 
MUSIC PERFORMANCE TRUST FUND 

Presents a 

BROWN BAG CONCERT 

in 

Centennial Square 
WED., JULY 23 at 12:00 NOON 
Enjoy the musical sounds of the 

Two of Clubs 

FREE ADMISSION * EVERYONE WELCOME 


ato idwAM 
August t, 21 and 27 



ENDS 

THURSDAY! »c 

FEATURE NIGHTLY fc30 A 9*0 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:15 

tnimn 

Qn*a at MbUt 3S24J7I 


























































































































































































ENTERTAINMENT 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 39 


It’s golden, 
and the last 

TORONTO (CP) - The gold medal that Evelyn 
Hart of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet won for being best 
female dancer at the International Ballet Competi¬ 
tion in Varna, Bulgaria, will be her last. 

The competition, held every two years, ranks with the 
Moscow Ballet Competition—where Karen Kain and 
Frank Augustyn won awards several years ago—as the 
most important event of its kind. 

But when asked whether her victory in Varna made 
her want to enter the Moscow competition or any 
other, the 21-year-old dancer replied: “No, I’ve had 
it.” 

“I'd seen very few overseas dancers before this 
summer, and it was a good chance to see where I 
stand. II taught me that there arc some technical 
things that I II never do, and that my priorities arc 
more artistic than technical,” 

Miss Hart, who returned Saturday from Bulgaria 
willi her partner, David Peregrine—who won bronze 
metal for male dancing—was already rehearsing Monday 
for Winnipeg’s next season She explained in a telephone 
interview the process that led to her victory. 

“I had been in the dance program at the Banff Sum¬ 
mer School, and two Russian ballet teachers in dif¬ 
ferent years mentioned that I should compete at Varna. 

"It was enough to make me think seriously about 
it.” 

Miss Hart had begun her first serious training at age 
It in* London, Ont., from Dorothy Carver, whom she 
considers a major influence. She was offered a scholar¬ 
ship at the National Ballet School in Toronto, but stayed 
only three months. 

At 17, she entered the professional stream of the 
school of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet where she was 
given private lessons every day by principal David 
Moroni. 



Years of art-work 
in need of a home 


*Married ’ in honeymoon city 


Boomer, right, star of the television 
series of the same name, and female 
pooch Cynthia hold still for the cam¬ 
era after they were ‘married’ by 


Mayor Michael O’Laughlin, left, in 
Niagara Falls, N.V. Helping the 
mayor is Chuck Steiner of the Niag¬ 
ara Falls chamber of commerce. 


GRAHAMDALE, Man. 
(CP) — Armand Lemiez 
has spent 50 years creating 
almost 500 oil paintings and 
21 life-size sculptures. 

Now he’s looking for a 
place to put his collection. 

“The problem is the 
sculptures cannot be 
moved,” he said. 

“I don’t know what will 
happen to them when I am 
gone. I have nobody — no 
son, no family to take it 
over.” 

The 85-year-old Belgian 
immigrant has lived alone 
on a farm near here since 
the death of his mother 35 
years ago. 

The paintings and sculp¬ 
tures, displayed in Le- 
miez’s house and back¬ 
yard, have become a 
tourist attraction. But Le¬ 
miez said the Manitoba de¬ 
partment of tourism has 
not been co-operative in 
finding a place to put 
them. 

He would like to see the 
paintings moved to a build¬ 
ing closer to Grahamdale, 
about 180 kilometres north¬ 
west of Winnipeg. 

Some of his paintings, 
which are hung or nainled 


GOP show flop on TV 


NEW YORK (AP) - The 
Republican National Con¬ 
vention consumed all but a 
few hours of prime-time in 
the week ending July 20, 
and CBS won the ratings 
race with help from a half- 
dozen programs broadcast 
after the networks’ politi¬ 
cal coverage concluded. 

Viewer? generally ig¬ 
nored the campaign cover¬ 
age, figures from the A.C. 
Nielsen Co. showed. Of 52 
programs broadcast in or 
just before prime-time 
during the week, the high¬ 
est rated of the convention 
reports was CBS’ Thursday 
night wrap-up. No. 24 in the 
ratings. 

The week’s five lowest- 
rated programs were con¬ 
vention reports broadcast 


by CBS and ABC Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday 
nights in the hour or half- 
hour before the start of 
prime-time. 

The three highest-rated 
programs for the week 
were from CBS’ Sunday 
night lineup, The Jeffer- 
sons, with a rating of 20.7, 
followed by SO Minutes and 
Alice.' 

CBS had the week’s six 
most-watched programs, 
and eight of the first dozen, 
contributing to a rating for 
the week of 11.3. NBC and 
ABC tied for second place 
with ratings of 8.7. 

The extraordinarily low 
ratings for the week were 
due almost entirely to poor 
marks for convention cov¬ 
erage. 


NBC's research depart¬ 
ment estimated about 85 
million viewers saw at 
least some of the conven¬ 
tion coverage broadcast by 
the three networks. 

' Though the convention it¬ 
self did not attract viewers, 
a special Monday night edi¬ 
tion of CBS’ 60 Minutes, 
featuring an interview with 
the eventual Republican 
presidential nominee, Ron¬ 
ald Reagan, did well in the 
ratings — 17th place. 


/ mrar 

M mZ OPEN 


10 

to 
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VANALMAN and HK3HWAY 


a.m. I 

to I 

b-m. I 




FIGHT BACK 


Demand the superior 
reproduction quality 
of offset printing with 
the instant service of 
a quick copy centre. 

It will cost you 
remarkably little. 

See the instant 
printing specialists . . 


FOTOPRirfT 

747 Fort St. 
382-8218 


r 


yiNNje's 

^ WHERE DOWNTOWN 
GOES DOWNSTAIRS 

DINNER 
SPECIAL 

CHINESE DINNER 
BUFFET 

“All You Can eat!" 

$ 4.95 per person 

Monday thru Friday - 
Evenings from 5:00 p.m 

Reservation* 382-963 1 

Lower Commerce Mall 
1175 Douglas at View J 

--- -SCT*?,!*.T . ■ 1 -’“'T fi 

, : - i % r i 



on the walls of the wood and 
concrete buildings, are of 
political and historical fig¬ 
ures. Others depict por¬ 
traits of his family and 
friends and the rugged life 
of the area’s settlers. 

Lemiez said much of his 
art expresses the injustice 
he felt so keenly during the 
Depression of the 1930s. 

"During the depression, 
we shipped 12 head of cat¬ 
tle, got $12 and paid $60 tax 
(on his land). That’s what 
made me a radical.” 

Tils strong feeling about 
the United States involve¬ 
ment in Vietnam is repre¬ 
sented in an emotional se¬ 
ries of paintings and 
sculptures depicting the 
war and role of former 
president Richard Nixon. 

"As a symbol of the U. S., 


I made a policeman with 
the head of an eagle to 
catch Nixon," he said. 

The inscription on the 
sculpture reads: "Nixon 
guilty of burning Vietnam, 
Laos and Cambodia, Wa¬ 
tergate scandal tax eva¬ 
sion.” 

Lemiez arrived in Can¬ 
ada in 1911 and, after work¬ 
ing in Winnipeg to raise 
money, purchased his 160 
acre homestead for $10. 

Over the years he experi¬ 
mented with growing fruit 
trees and raising fish, but 
said his interest in art was 
renewed by a hired hand 
who had studied painting in 
Germany. 

Lemiez said he still keeps 
10 head of cattle around so 
he doesn’t have to cut the 
grass. 


McPherson Summer Theatre Company 
In Co-operation with CFAX 1070 
presents 



EYES 
AND 
THINK 
OF 
ENGLAND 



outrageously 
funny 

British Comedy! 

Directed by 
Allan M. Purdy Wed. through Sat. 

JULY 25 to AUGUST 30 — 8 P.M. 

(no show* Aug. 20-23) 

McPherson playhouse 

Tickets $5.50, $6.50, $7.50 available at 
719 McPherson Box Office (386-6121) and usual outlets 


suromerf un t hin g 


GAME RULES 


1. Winners will be chosen by random drawing 
from all valid entries All winners musl answer a 
skill testing question 

2. Winners trom the previous week will be pub¬ 
lished m the Saturday Times and Sunday Colo¬ 
nist 

3. It is not necessary tor contestants to buy the 
Colonist or Times to enter the SUMMERFUNTHING 
contest An exact drawing ot the entry form printed 
in the Colonist or Times may be made on a plain 
piece of paper Note copies produced by any other 
process will not be accepted 

4 The SUMMERFUNTHING fudges will have the 
final decision on any interpretation ol Game 
rules 


5. As a condition ot receiving prues, recipients 
agree to allow publication of their names and pic¬ 
tures in the Colonist or Times tor no additional 
consideration Submission of an entry indicates 
acceptance of all rules No prize substitutions 

6. The contest is open to all readers of the Daily 
Colonist and Victoria Times on Vancouver Is¬ 
land and the GuM Islands Employees ot Victoria 
Press and their immediate families are not eli¬ 
gible to u.'ter 

7. In fairness to alt. the Colonist or Times cannot 
answer questions or respond to phone calls or 
letters regarding THE SUMMERFUNTHING CON¬ 
TEST 

8. All winners will be determined by a random 
draw trom all valid entries 


Mail your entries to 

‘ Sum merf un t h i ng' * 
Poat Office Bo* 1390 
Victoria. B.C. 

VBW 3C4 


or drop your entries off at 

Victoria Press 
2621 Douglas St. 

Monday through Friday 
8.30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

A new puzzle will appear each day. but the weekly winners wiN be selected from all 
entries submitted for the previous week s puzzles 

To be eligible your entry must be received by 5 30 p m on the Thursday following 
the week the puzzle was published 

Enter daily, or as often a6 you wish but be sure each entry is submitted m a 

separate envelope 

CRACK THE SAFE DAILY IN THE COLONIST and TIMES 


1st 


Play it daily and 
be eligible to win 
weekly prizes. 

It’s easy and it’s 
fun — just follow 
the instructions 
below... 


HOW TO PLAY 

Locked inside the SUMMERFUNTHING sale are many valuable prizes. Some of those 
prizes could be yours it you find the correct PASSWORD that opens the combination lock It's 
an exciting game that's tun and easy to enter The instructions on the dial give you the position 
ot the letters in the SUMMERFUNTHING PASSWORD AM you have to do is find the first 
letter to start For instance, suppose you started at the letter E and the Instructions read 2nd 
LETTER-FOUR COUNTER CLOCKWISE. Count four spaces in a counter-clockwise direction 
trom the letter E and you arrive at the letter A The next instruction reads 3rd LETTER-EIGHT 
COUNTER CLOCKWISE, so count oft eight spaces in a counter-clockwise direction trom the 
letter A and you arrive at the letter S. Finally the 4th letter. SIX CLOCKWISE means you count 
in a clockwise direction from the letter S and you arrive at the letter Y. In this example the 
PASSWORD is the word E-A-S-Y To give you another clue and to add to the interest, each 
day s password is scrambled and you will find it at the bottom of the illustration. 




A SET OF SAMSONITE 

LUGGAGE 


2nd 



A METAL DETECTOR 

with built-in discriminating device 


3rd 



DEWM 

Chefs 


BARBECUE SET 

s apron, hat and mitts 
(5 sets to be won) 


unscramble the 
clue, then 

CRACK 

THE 

SAFE! 



HOW TO ENTER 

Complete the puzzle and fill in the PASSWORD ’ on the entry form. Clip out the 
entry form and send it to us in an envelope with the puzzle number printed in the top 
left hand corner ot th« envelope (As illustrated.) 

Be sure to include your name, address and phone number on the entry form 

Enter as many times as you wish but make sure each entry is in a separate 
envelope 


PUZZLE NO. 32 


PUZZLE MO- NAME 


POST OFfKf BOX 1 JtO 
Vic TOW A. ax. 

VOW 0C4 


THE 

PASSWORO IS 


YOUR NAME. 

YOUR ADDRESS . 

YOUR POSTAL CODE . 
YOUR PHONE NO. 


O 


Today s Summerlunthing 
password relates to an 
item that may often b« 
found in a safe. 


PUZZLE NO. 32 


1st letter: 
2nd letter. 
3rd letter: 
4th letter: 
5th letter: 


YOUR GUESS 

4 counter clockwise 
15 clockwise 

13 counter clockwise 

5 clockwise 


o 


1 TODAY S SCRAMBLED CLUE) 
WORD IS: 

SNAPL 

J - 


V. 



















































































40 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, »Bft. 

EVERYWHERE 1 GO, 

PEOPLE POINT,. 






The sort of cold, wet spring weath¬ 
er we endured this year can play 
merry oltf havoc with the rose gar¬ 
den. Rust and black spot especially 
thrive under wet conditions. This 
year I have had so many gardening 
friends complaining specifically 
about the disfigurement of their 
cherished roses with black spot. 

This fungus disease appears in 
black, circular spots on the leaves 
anywhere from an eighth of an inch to 
half an inch across. The margins of 
the spots are not usually regular and 
may be surrounded with a sort of 
yellow halo. If the disease gets a good 
hold, it can just about defoliate a 
plant. Sometimes the canes are 
marred as well, with reddish-purple 
markings. 

Black spot, if not checked, will 
become worse from year to year 
because the fungus survives on the 
diseased leaves and canes. Fungus 
spores are spread by rain splash and 
the disease just generally flourishes 
in cool, damp conditions. 

Knowing how a disease spreads 
gives us our best clues for checking it. 
In fact, to combat the three big rose 
problems—rust, mildew and black 
spot—preventive measures are the 
same. 

First, keep fallen leaves picked up 
and burned. Take away all prunings 
and burn them. In the fall, when you 
do just a very light pruning of strag¬ 
gly canes to prevent winter wind 
damage to them, pick up all fallen 
foliage at the same time, remove it 
and burn it. Then, in spring, when you 
do your big pruning job, don't be 


afraid to prune drastically. I like to 
remove all but four or five canes at 
ground level and the remaining canes 
I cut back to an out-turning bud at 
about a foot and-a-half to two feet (45 
to 60 cm) above soil level. 

I'm just a drastic pruner by nature 
but this may have a lot to do with 
avoiding these fungus, diseases—the 
more that is cut off in spring, the 
more likely you are to be rid of any 
unwanted organisms lurking in the 
canes. 

If you spring prune early, before 
the buds start to grow, then give a 
dormant spray of lime sulphur, one 
part lime sulphur to one part water. 
To keep trouble-free during the sea¬ 
son, standard recommended proce¬ 
dure is to spray with a fungicide like 
Benomyl every two weeks. 

Having said that, i would like to 
share with you some of a recent 
reading “search” I have made of al¬ 
ternate methods of dealing with some 
of these rose problems. We all have 
probably heard of growing garlic or 
chive under roses to reduce aphids 
and intensify blossom scent. 

I know one lady who swears she 
gets complete control of black spot by 
watering with soap flakes. She shaves 
Sunlight soap into hot water, shakes it 
up to dissolve it, dilutes it and waters 
it on the bushes. She keeps doing this 
throughout the season and the result 
is new foliage that is blemish-free. 

One chemical company is doing 
intensive research on soaps. Soaps 
are likely our oldest known pesti¬ 
cides. Soaps are all fatty acids neu¬ 
tralized with a base. Some fatty acids 


are highly toxic to insects. Specific 
fatty acids spare beneficial insects 
but affect the destructive ones. Many 
fatty acids are highly bacteriacidal 
and some are fungicidal. It often 
seems that more and more the Old 
Wives are being proved wise by sci¬ 
ence. 

Another tip I read about is to clean 
the soil completely below the roses at 
pruning time and leave it exposed to 
the sun for a time to help “sterilize" 
the soil. Once the soil has had a good 
bake, it is mulched with compost or 
hay. 

Watering roses by trickling the 
water on the ground rather than 
sprinkling will help restrict the 
spread of fungus diseases as well. 
Overhead sprinkling in the evening is 
a special invitation to trouble since 
the foliage cannot dry off before 
night. 

Many of us consider that the only 
proper and aesthetically pleasing 
method of growing roses is in a bed of 
their own. Then, we can say elegant¬ 
ly, “Please do come and see my rose 
garden.” However, it would surely be 
more practical to grow roses, not in 
beds of their own, but doted round the 
garden among the perennial plants. 

This way, if any particular pest or 
disease settled on one rose bush it 
would not automatically pass on to 
the next one. Also, perennials are 
pruned in much the same way as 
roses—just cut back lightly in the 
fall, the major pruning done in the 
spring—and so they can become com¬ 
panions of convenience for the gar¬ 
dener. 



Every four years, 40 to 50 
million Americans vow 
that if their man doesn’t 
win the presidency, they 
will move to Canada. 

This year is no different, 
and I have heard many of 
my dearest friends say, “If 
Reagan is elected, I'm tak 
ing the family to Canada.” 
Or, "If Carter gets in for 
another four years. I’m 
leaving the country.” 

The trouble with these 
threats is that the Cana¬ 
dians take them seriously. 
Since they are so short on 
population, the idea of 40 to 
50 million new immigrants 
makes their mouths water. 

The Canadians start 
building new homes and 
schools to accommodate 
the disenchanted Ameri¬ 
can voters. Shopping 
centres are constructed, 
contracts are given out for 
drive-in theaters and 
motels. 

The Canadians repaint 
all their buildings and 
touch up their lawns to 
make the Americans feel at 
home. 

Night classes are given 
on how to treat the new 


arrivals. Welcome Wagons 
are beefed up, and new fac- * 
tories are built to provide 
jobs for the millions of 
Democrats or Republi¬ 
cans, who say they can¬ 
not live in the United States 
under a Communist Demo¬ 
cratic or Fascist Republi¬ 
can regime. 

To facilitate the move, 
Canadian customs officials 
are told not to opeb any 
luggage of American Im- 
migrants. Canadian 
Mounties are instructed to 
go easy on traffic tickets. 
No expense Is spared in 
preparing for the influx of 
people. 

But what inevitably hap¬ 
pens is that after the elec¬ 
tion the 40 or 50 million 
people, who vowed they 
would go to Canada, 
change their minds and re¬ 
main in the United States to 
stick it out under "That 
Man in the White House. 1, 

I saw it happen when 
Nixon beat Hubert 
Humphrey, then when 
Nixon defeated McGovern, 
and again when Jimmy 
Carter beat Ford. 


Canada was waiting with 
welcome arms for all the 
people who said they 
couldn’t live in the U.S. any 
more. 

Nobody came. 

All the hopes and dreams 
of the Canadians to double 
their population overnight 
vanished, but it left a taste 
of bitterness that lingers 
on. 

The greatest cause of 
anti-American feeling in 
Canada can be attributed to 
our presidential election- 
year promises which peo¬ 
ple in this country have 
failed to keep. 

How long can the Cana¬ 
dians keep building up their 
country for people who 
promise to go there, and 
then refuse to leave the 
U.S.? 

At the moment Canada is 
in a terrible quandary. The 
ambassador in Washington 
has reported that 45 million 
Democrats have vowed to 
go to Canada if Ronald 
Reagan is elected presi¬ 
dent of the United States. 
He has also reported that 
surveys indicate that 40 


million Republicans will go 
if Jimmy Carter stays in 
the White House. 

Canada must decide in 
the next few weeks whether 
to go through the motions 
of preparing for them or to 
ignore those vows as idle 
threats. Suppose this time 
all the people who say 
they’re going to Canada 
really do? Yet suppose the 
Canadians spent all the 
money and nobody shows 
up? 

It seems to me it is in¬ 
cumbent on every Ameri¬ 
can voter not to say he’s 
going to Canada unless he 
really means it. If he is 
sincere about it. he should 
notify the Canadian immi¬ 
gration authorities. 

I know it's hard to ask 
people at the height of an 
election campaign not to 
make threats they have no 
intention of keeping. All 
I’m suggesting Is that if you 
want to tell someone you're 
leaving after the election, 
tell them you’re going to 
France, where they don't 
care if you come or not. 



We haven’t had a quiz on "ologies' v 
and “isms” for a long time, so let’s 
see how you do on these rather 
strange specialties, practices and be¬ 
liefs. To make it a little easier for the 
chronic complainers (“too hard," 
they whine), I’ll demonstrate again 
my sweetness of character by putting 
it in multiple choice form. Thus sim¬ 
plified, you ought to get close to half 
of them correct. Off we go: 

1. An “Onomastician" is someone 
who (a) repairs jaws; (b) designs 
sailing vessels; (c) traces the ori¬ 
gins of names. 

2. A “Pantheist” is someone who 
(a) worships nature as god; (b) be-. 
Ileves in personal immortality; (c) 
criticizes all religions. 

3. A “Limnologist” is someone who 
(a) teaches sketching; (b) studies 
illumination; (c) investigates condi¬ 
tions in lakes and ponds. 

4. A “Sinologist” is someone who 
(a) denies original sin; (b) is versed 


in Chinese culture; (c) teaches sign 
language to mutes. 

5. An “Oologist" is someone who 
(a) studies birds’ eggs; (b) treats 
snake bites; (c) exposes faulty logic. 

6. An "Irredentist" is someone who 
(a) claims land belonging to another 
country; (b) practises dental hy¬ 
giene; (c) specializes in Indian af¬ 
fairs. 

7. An “Axiologist” is someone who 

(a) produces scientific cutting-tools; 

(b) provides mathematical proofs; 

(c) studies ethical and religious 
values. 

8. A “Chirographist” is someone 
who (a) analyzes handwriting; (b) 
treats the spinal column; (c) inter¬ 
prets X-ray plates. 

9. An “Oncologist" is someone who 
(a) interprets dreams; (b) treats 
tumors; (c) studies molluscs and 
clams. 

10. A “Polemicist” is someone who 


(a) organizes political parties; (b) en¬ 
gages in disputation or controversy; 
(c) formulates diplomatic policy. 

11. A “Planganologist" is someone 
who (a) collects dolls; (b) devises 
tonal systems; (c) investigates the 
properties of caves. 

12. An “Aphorist" is someone who 
(a) processes honey for human con¬ 
sumption; (b) concocts drugs that 
arouse sexual desire; (c) makes terse 
statements embodying a general 
truth. 

13. A "Metrologist" is someone who 
(a) examines metal fatigue; (b) is 
versed in measures and weights; 
(c) forecasts weather conditions. 

14. A “Morphologist" is someone 
who (a) compounds pain-killers; (b) 
diagnoses sleep patterns; (c) studies 
shapes and forms of organisms. 

ANSWERS: 1 (c); 2 (a); 3 (c); 4 (b); 
5 (a);6 (a);7(c);8(a);9 (b); 10(b); 11 
(a); 12 (c); 13(b); 14(c). 


Wednesday Prime Time 


■ 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

1 8:30 

I 9:00 

1 9:30 1 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

SI 

Happy Days 

BMM 

aneteUWee* 

hews 

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BmM 

Noweltes 

Portraits 

SI 

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Wedwsdey Nitft 

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News 

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| Seat* Tontfif Tic Tec Don* 

J Reel People 

[otfrenf Strata 

[peehOlUl* 

Oumcv 

News 

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Hopens heron 

jft WMtail 

1 Baseball tee* 

News 

SI 

wild 

j PM Meoexw | 

Mov* Tatars Uft GfeimMs 

News 

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CFLNntai-lnProf 

Emar fancy 

AUu 

Mews 

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Planter* PI ) 

OeatPenorrr 


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Hafa**, heron 

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▼-WWW jOuHST*** 

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C-1 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 



VITAL STATISTICS 


1 Births 

8 Miscellaneous Cards of 
Thanks 

308 Deceased Cards of 
Thanks 

305 Deaths and Funerals 

312 Florists 

310 Funeral Directors 

309 inMemorlam 

313 Miscellaneous 

311 Monuments 

NOTICES 


14 Announcements 

16 Catering, Banquets and 
Reception Rooms 

15 Coming Events and 
Meetings 

20 Lost and Found 
18 Places to Visit 

EMPLOYMENT 


28 Employment Service 

21 Help Wanted —General 

22 Office Help 

26 Part Time — Temporary 
Help 

24 Sales Persons and 
Agents 

30 Situations Wanted 

23 Skilled Trades 

25 Teachers 

BUSINESS SERVICES 


36 Services Directory 

PERSONAL SERVICES 


33 Bands. Musicians and 
Orchestras 

40 Business Personals 
43 Dancing 

42 Education 

41 Legal Services 
71 Music Teachers 
39 Personals 

34 Pre-Recorded Music 
32 Trade Schools 

38 Travel 

MERCHANDISING 


83 Aircraft 
117 Antiques and Arts 
78 Bicvcles 
80 Boats and Marine 
65 Building Supplies 
93 Cameras. Supplies and 
Photo Finishing 
127 Chicks, Poultry. 

Hatching Eggs. Supplies 
101 Children's 
Miscellaneous 


INDEX 

116 Coins and Stamps 
135 Farm Implements 
60 Fuel 

97 Furniture 
105 Garage Sales 
120 Garden Supplies 

99 Groceries, Meats and 
Produce 

95 Heating & Fireplaces 
130 Heavy Equipment and 

Machinery 

128 Livestock, Supplies and 
Events 

96 Malor Appliances 

100 Miscellaneous for Sale 
103 Miscellaneous Wanted 
109 Miscellaneous to Rent 

77 Motorcycles 
70 Musical Instruments 
125 Pets and Supplies 
92 Sporting Goods 
81 Sailboats 
94 Store and Off Ice 
Furniture and 
Equipment 
115 Swaps 
63 Timber 

98 tv. Stereo. Radio Sales 
and Service 

112 Wanted to Rent, 
Miscellaneous 

AUTOMOTIVE 


155 Automobile Financing 
and Insurance 

164 Auto Body and Painting 
168 Campers, Trailers and 

Motor Homes 

166 Cars and Trucks Wanted 

150 Cars for Sale 

148 Lease Vehicles 

149 New Car Directory 
160 Parts, Accessories and 

Service 

151 Sports, Import Cars 
158 Tires 

154 Trucks, Buses and Vans 

156 U-Drive and Auto 
Washing 

ACCOMMODATION 


185 Convalescent and 
Rest Homes 
175 Hotels 
178 Summer Homes. 

Cottaoes and Resorts 
181 Tourist Accommodation 

RENTAL 


201 Apartments to Rent. 
Furnished 

200 Apartments to Rent, 
Unfurnished 
203 Apartments Wanted 
206 Duplexes to Rent 


207 Duplexes Wanted to 
Rent 

202 Furniture to Rent 
215 Halls. Warehouses, 
Stores and Offices to 
Rent 


199 Housekeeping Rooms 
Wanted 

211 Houses to Rent. 
Furnished 

210 Houses to Rent, 
Unfurnished 

212 Houses Wanted to Rent 
205 Rental Agencies 

190 Room and Board 

191 Room and Board Wanted 

193 Rooms to Rent 

194 Rooms Wanted 
704 Shared 

Accommodations 


FINANCIAL 


233 Mortgage Loans and 
Insurance 

234 Mortgages for Sale 
230 Personal Loans and 

Insurance 

235 Wanted to Borrow 

REAL ESTATE 


240 Business Opportunities 

241 Business Opportunities 
Wanted 

247 Commercial or 

industrial Properties 

258 Condominiums 
253 Country Homes and 

Properties 

270 Exchange Real Estate 
290 Farms for Sale and 

Wanted 

263 Garaoesfor Sale, Rent, 
Wanted 

293 Gulf Island Properties 
250 Houses for Sale 

265 Houses Wanted to Buy 
295 Listings Cancelled 
268 Listings Wanted 

271 Lots for Sale 

294 Mainland and 
Out^jf-Provlnce 
Properties 

169 Mobile Homes and 
Parks 

273 Property for Sale 

274 Property Wanted 

244 Revenue Property 

245 Revenue Properties 
Wanted 

259 Town houses 

285 Up-Island Properties 
256 Waterfront Properties 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES 


All rates quoted are for In¬ 
sertion in both The Daily 
Colonist and Victoria Times 


10 word minimum 
I or 2 days 

17c per word per day 

3 to 5 consecutive days 
14c per word per day 


Real estate, mobile home, 
rental, clubs, organizations 
and business advertising 
does not qualify for these 
rates. 


10 word minimum 
1 or 2 days 

23c per word per day 

3 to 5 consecutive days 
20c per word per day 

6 or more consecutive days 
17c per word per day 


Any advertisement which 
varies from 6 pt regular 
classified style shall be con 
sidered semi-display. 


1 or 2 days 

81 c per agate line per day 

3 to 5 consecutive davs 
74c per agate line per day 

6 or mo# consecutive days 
67c pefbaate line per day 

Contract rates for local busi 
nesses available on request 


Regular Classified 22« per 
word. 

Semi-Displav 854 per agate 
line. 

14 agate lines per column 
inch. 


BIRTH NOTICES 


Up to 30 words S5 00 
Each additional word 17c 


DEATH NOTICES. 
MEMORIAL NOTICES 
AND CARDS OF THANKS 

75c per count line per day 

3 consecutive davs 
65c per count line per day 
SINGLE PAPER 
DEATH NOTICESONLY 
67c per count line per day 


Private Vicloria Press box 
numbers are for use only for 
replies to advertising pub¬ 
lished in the Victoria Times 
and The Daily Colonist 


VICTORIA OFFICE 

2621 DOUGLAS ST V8W 2N4 
Classified counter service. 
8:30 a m to 5 30 p m , Mon 
to Fri Closed Saturday. 

DUNCAN OFFICE 

Advertising, Circulation. 
Editorial and General Infor 
mation. 

746-6181 

109 Ingram St. V9L1N8 


TERMS OF PUBLICATION 

Canadian Newspapers Company Limited shall not be liable for non-Insect I on of any 
advertisement beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. 

In the event of error occurIng the liability of Canadian Newspapers Company Limited shall 
not exceed the charoe for the space actually occupied by the Item In question. 

All claims of error in publication shall be made within 12 hours thereafter and If not 
made shall not be considered. No claim will be allowed for more than one Incorrect 
insertion nor for errors not affecting the value of advertisement 
All estimates of cost are approximate. Advertiser s will be charged with space actually used 
«. A,l ,_22Y e £ ls,n P 5°° v subject to the approval of Victoria Press, who reserves 

the right in its sole discretion to classify, reject or insect copy furnished 
All advertisements must comply with the British Columbia Human Rights Act. This act 
states no advertisement may state or Imply a preference, limitation or specification on the 
basis of an applicant's race, religion, colour, marital status, ancestry, place of origin, age 
or sex (unless the matter relates to the maintenance of public decency AND prior 
proval has been obtained through the Human Rights Branch) 

While every endeavor will be made to forward replies to box numbers to the adver 
tiser as soon as possible, we accept no liability In respect of loss or damage alleged to 
arise through either failure or delay in forwarding such replies, however caused, whether by 
negligence or otherwise 


NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT 

Full complete and sole copyright In any advertisement produced bv Canadian Newspapers 
Company Limited is vested in and belongs to Canadian Newspapers Company Limited, 
provided, however, that copyright IN THAT PART AND THAT PART ONLY of any such 
advertisement consisting of illustrations, borders, signatures or similar components which is. 
or arc. supplied to Vicloria Press bv the advertiser in the form of reproduction proofs, veloxs, 
etc . and incorporated in said advertisement shall remain in and belong to the advertiser 


CIRCULATION INFORMATION 


The Daily Colonist 383-4111 


Victoria Times382 3131 


Wherever carrier service is maintained. 85 00 per month 
. By mod- Vancouver isiandandGuit Islands. S7 ooper month. *5)00 per 3 months. 840 00 per 
6 months. 810 00 per year Rest of Canada. *8 Oo per month 872 50 oer 3 months. 845 00 oSTt 
months, 8«0 00 pry year 

Outside Canada. 870 00 per month. 8240 par year 
BY MAIL 

, ^ ^ Saturday TimesOnlv Sunday Cotomsf Only 

Canada 60 cents per copy. 830 OOper year Outside Canada. 81 10 per copy. 855 OOper vaar 

fheDailyCokm<sf 5acond Class mail registration No 051« 

Vic (art# T imes 5ecundOJest mail registration No 0675 

<51 AND REPRESENT A tIVfci 
Duncan. Chemamus - Mr MIL TON MOt » 7466>•• 

Naneano 75686JJ Lake Cowichan /* t/U 

Port AJbern. Mr * rad Whr 72403)7 


1 BIRTHS 


AKERMAN — Morry and Janice 
are happy to announce the 
birth of Joseph David. 8 lbs 12 
oz. on July 13, 1900 at Royal 
Jubilee Hospital A brother tor 
Rachele, Jacqueline and Jar>- 
Ine. Thanks to Dr. Baptv, Dr. 
Prevost and Dr. Gerry. 

BOWES — Margaret and Barry 
are delighted to announce the 
arrival of their son, Trevor 
Eliot. 7 lbs. 13 ozs., on July 3, 
1980. A brother for Chris¬ 
topher. Our special thanks to 
Dr. Bryan Murray, Dr. Karen 
Leonard and the wonderful 
maternity staff at the Jubilee. 


HAAZEN — Julia Christine, 
daughter to Nick and Kathy, 
first grandchild for Joanne and 
Howie Morrison. Born July 15. 
1980, 5 lbs. 7 ozs. Many thanks 
to Dr. Bassett and Staff at 
Victoria General. 

KLAVER-Born to Brian and 

Gwen, a girl, Michelle Lynn, 
7—lbs 2—ozs , on July 19,1980. 
Thanks to Drs. Forgle and 
Black and Staff at Royal Jubl 
lee Hospital. 

LONGMUIR—Born to David 
and Doreen (nee Elliot), CFB 
Petawawa, Ontario, on June 
29, 1980, a son, Kyle Elliot. 
7lbs. l?ozs. Proud and delight 
ed are grandparents, Mrs. and 
Mr. (Delores and George) El¬ 
liot, Klngstone. Ontario, and 
Mrs. Ruth Cosby, Vicloria, 
B.C. Great Grandparents. 
Mrs. Alfreda Mertens, Men- 
den-lstroohm, Germany, Mrs. 
and Mr. (Agnes and George) 
Elliot, Coillnoswood. Ontario 
and Mrs. Cathy Guest, Vic¬ 
toria, B.C. A very welcome 
nephew for Heather and Call 
Longmulr and Jay Pearson 


MacDONALD — Dougald, 
Sharon and Robin are pleased 
to announce the arrival of a 
girl, Lisa Mary, 7 lbs . )5 ozs 
on July )4, 1980 at Royal Jubi¬ 
lee Hospital. Thanks to Dr. 
Shorting and maternity staff. 


RAINER — Born to Jerry and 
Cathy, a girl, Dianne Mar ay, 7 
lbs 3 ozs., on July 20th, 1980 at 
Royal Jubilee Hospital. A sis¬ 
ter for Andrea, Teresa, Angela 
and Lesley. Many thanks to 
Night Crew 

SANDERSON-Born to Bill 

and Joanne (nee Belscher), 
July 20th, 1980 at Royal Jubilee 
Hospital. Crystal Anne, 8—lbs. 
7—ozs—a sister for Shannon 
Thanks Drs. D. Bell, Leonard 
and wonderful Maternity 
Staff. 

STORVICK — Wayne and Kathy 
wish to announce the arrival of 
their daughter, Melanie Kate. 
Born July 6, 1980. weighing 
2350 grams (5.3 lbs.) Many 
thanks to Dr. Johnston, Dick¬ 
son and Jagdis and the great 
maternity staff at Victoria 
General 

14 ANNOUNCEMENTS 


20 LOST aMl FOUND 


LOST: DOG, MEDIUM SIZE 

K ey Poodle Terrier X answers 
"Punkln". Shelbourne— 
Cedar Hill X area. 477-3629. 


LOST: ONE BROWN DOG 
with some black, red collar, an¬ 
swers to 'Whiskey", Gordon 
Head area. 477-1245. 


LOST BLACK SMALL FEMALE 
bernese cat. large golden eyes. 
Brentwood Bay/Wallace Drive 
area. 850 reward 652-4108. 


FOUNO: SATURDAY ON WIL- 
kinson near West Saanich road, 
cushions with flowered cover for 
chesterfield or chair. 658-5778 


21 


NtLMUMTO 

GENERAL 


FULLTIME TELLER 
Required by the Bank of Nova 
Scotia, experience preferred but 
not essential, willing to train In¬ 
dividual wtK> meets our require 
merits We offer full benefits and 
competitive salary. Apply in 
person at Hillside Shopping 
Centre branch. 


FOUND GRAY AND WHITE 
female kitten, approximately 
10-weeks old, house broken. 
656-0074. 


FOUND: YOUNG ALL WHITE 
kitten, Cloverdale-Tattersal 
area, on Lovat 382-8488 or 
385-6182 


LOST TWO KITTENS, 1 OR- 
ange, 1 grey short-haired tabby. 
Haultaln/Fernwood area. Con¬ 
tact: 1528 Haultain or 5924033 


LOST 2-YEAR OLD MALE 
Irish Setter Retriever Cross, 
Oak Bay area, reward. 598-2215, 
382 3996. 


THE DAILY COLONIST HAS 
profitable adult sized routes 
available in the Saanichton Pen¬ 
insula. Brentwood and Saanictv 
ton routes have monthly profits 
from S60 00 to 5250.00 taking 
from 40 minutes to 2Vj hours 
I daily. For further information 
! please call G. ROSS, 383-4114 
local 163 _ 

CHILD CARE WORKER FOR 
Nanaimo Theraputlc group 
home. Salary 51400 to 81,300 per 
month dependent upon expert 
i ence and eductatlon. Job de 
j scriptlon: shift work, working 
i with teenagers, using a team 
I approach. Send resume to 2935 
! Wildwood Ave., Nanaimo B.C. 
1 by July 28th, 1980. 


LOST: BLACK AND WHITE 
female kitten, with pink collar, 
probably Esquimau area. 
382 5967 598-1720 


LOST: SAXE POINT PARK 
area, black neutered male cat, 
white on paws, under neck and 
on face. 382-0798 


NIGHT AUDITOR/ 
DESK CLERK 

for mid size downtown Vancou¬ 
ver Hotel. Must be fully experi¬ 
enced and have good work rec¬ 
ord. Apply in writing or In 
g?rson^ Sands Best Western, 1755 


LOST: LADIES GOLD WIT 
rtauer watch In downtown area. 
382-7550. 


Alpha Home Care 

Is accepting applications Mon¬ 
day through Friday 9:30am-3pm 
for a part time homemaker posi¬ 
tion (4 hours per day) in the 
Cordova Bay area. Please apply 
in person at 3371 Oak Street. 


GOLD WATCH CHAIN. 24”. 
lost Topaz Park-Quadra School 
area. Reward. 385-3348 


LQST: SIAMESE KITTEN, 
Quadra'HlllsIde area, July 20th 
381-0083. 


LOST: GREEN MALE BUD 
gle. Oak Bay Rec area, Monday 
595-8796 


WANTED - MANAGER FOR 
small dtv hotel and beer paro- 
lour located in Interior of British 
Columbia. Salary commensu¬ 
rate with experience and ability 
Equity position available for 
qualified individual. Send com 


LOST SINCE JUNE 20TH. 
blue budgie, Burnside/Tililcum 
area. 385-4706. 


LOST: JAPANESE SPANIEL, 
OGjgflower-Admirals area. 


LOST: FROM WEST SAANICH 
Road, fluffy grey female cat. 


PSC WORKERS CO-OP SEEKS 
male or female and worker- 
manager owner to distribute 
whole foods in Victoria area. 
Knowledge of natural foods, 
business management skills, co¬ 
op process and ability to drive 
truck would be assets. 386-3880; 
Monday to Saturday. 


j FOUND: FLUFFY HALF 

K >wn tabby kitten. Brentwood 
ive. 652-2792. _! 

FOUND: SET OF KEYS NEAR j 

Crystal Gardens, Sunday eve- 
ning. 384-3390. 

LOST: TAME GREEN BUDGIE 
with yellow head. Lake Hill area. 
reward 479-5820. _ j 

FOUND: SET OF KEYS ofl 

Shawnipan Late Rd. ,7»-5F?? 


OPENING SOON 
THE 

Property Store 

Inquires welcome, 382 5444 

ANIMAL'S CRUSADERS GAR 
den party, will definitely take 
place Saturday July 26,2 5pm if 
fine. 2199 Lafayette Street If 
wet, St John Ambulance Hall, 941 
Pandora. 386-9832 

MARILYN'S FOREST OF 
Dolls is now open from Tuesday 
Saturday, 9:30-5 at 3318 Oak St 
The store for doll makers and 
collectors 

IS C0MM6 EVENTS 
AND MEETINGS 


LOST: ONE SATCHEL, BLUE, 
one book, car keys, etc. 382-8876 


FOUND: 3 KEYS AT TOPAZ 
Park tennis court. 384-3158 


HELP WANTED 
GENERAL 


CARETAKER COUPLE FOR 
ranch In Invermere, B.C. One 
person to do housework, one per 
son to do gardening-handyman 
work. 85 per hour, per person 
References required. Mature 
couple preferred. Accomodation 
supplied Apply *205-3400 Doug- 
las Street or phone 382-4274. 

EUROPEAN SPA 
Wanted instructor for mens de¬ 
partment. Must be mature, slim, 
dynamic personality and enlov 
working in a friendly atmo¬ 
sphere Personal interviews 
only between 10 am. - 1 pm 
weekdays. 1570 Hillside (no 
phone calls please). 


DRAFTSPERSON 
for the 

CAPITAL REGIONAL 
DISTRICT 



Every Wednesday 
745 West Burnside 

Five Early Bird 
Games 7pm 
20 Regular Games 
7:30 Dfn 

Good Neighbour Games 
and Bonus Games 
USUAL GOOD PRIZES 
Plus Min. Jackpot $100 
Five Extra Games 



, To perform skilled design draft¬ 
ing duties of a civil engineering 
nature including perparatlon of 
detailed working drawings, pre¬ 
liminary and final plans. Draft¬ 
ing assignments will include 
work on such projects as sewage 
treatment plants, mechanical 
piping, large diameter water 
mains, sewers, pumping sta¬ 
tions, water distribution systems 
and associated structural civil 
engineering works. 

Applicants should be senior sec¬ 
ondary school graduates with 
course work In drafting and 
other engineering oriented sub¬ 
jects preferably at a technical or 
vocational school level. In addi¬ 
tion, applicants should have pre- 
, vlous civil engineering drafting 
experience In a local oovern 
ment or engineering consul¬ 
tant's office. 

Applicants should possess a 
valid British Columbia Driver's 
Licence. 

The successful candidate will be 
entitled to a broad range of em¬ 
ployee benefits as provided In the 
Union A agreement 

Applications will be received bv 
the Employment Officer, Capl 
tal Regional Dlsfrlct, P.O. Draw¬ 
er 1000. Victoria, B.C. V8N 2S6, 
no later than July 29th, I960. 


SELL THE HOTTEST 
PRODUCT IN TOWN! 
Sell subscriptions for Victoria 
Symphony's exciting 1980-81 
season by telephone. Salary 
Phone Mary at 385-9771 during 
business hours 

Alpha Home Care 

is accepting applications Mon¬ 
day through Friday 9:30am 3pm 
for live in homemaker. Please 
apply in person at 3371 Oak 
Street. 

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
Turn your time into money In the 
beautiful early morning sum¬ 
mer sunshine Profitable Colo¬ 
nist adult and student routes 
available in the Oak Bay area 
Contact Mr Carbol 383-4114 at 
the Colonist Circ. Department 


MATURE AND RELIABLE BA- 
bysitter required to look after 
our 1 year old in our South Oak 
Bay home, commencing Sep¬ 
tember. This Is a permanent 
part time position, Mondav-Fri- 
day, 8am-2:30pm. 598-1260 after 


EVERY 

WEDNESDAY 

VICTORIACURLING 

CLUB 

Early Birds6:45p.m. 

SINGLES SCENE OANCE, 
Saturday July 26th, everyone 
welcome. White Eagle Hall. 
Tickets available at Hillside 
Mall. Sorry no tickets sold at the 
door Information 384-5683. 
382-6020, 479-6050._ 

VICTORIA'S PRIDE LIONESS 
Club will be holding their regular 
meeting Thursday July 24, In the 
form of a weeding party at Camp 
Shawnigan. at 6:30pm, or soon 
thereafter. All members are 
urged to attend._ 

NEW YORK YANKEES 
Bv bus, August 19. 20 & 21 In 
Seattle Reserve 381-5847 

20 LOST Md FOUND 


LOST GINGER STRIPED 13 
month old neutered male cat dis¬ 
appeared from Filmer Rd near 
Cedar Hill Golf Course while 
blasting was going on 3 weeks 
ago Great family pet Reward 
offered Cats' Protection 
League, 59^5731_ 

LOST: APPROXIMATELY 2 
weeks ago, ladies diamond ring 
along route Bethjne Avenue, 
Saanich Road, Quadra Street. 
West Saanich Road. Wallace 
Drive. Woodward Drive. Sea 
Drive. Reward. Please phone 
598-1389 


SHORT ORDER COOK 
Small private social club re¬ 
quires mature, experienced per 
son tor nioht shift Prefer some¬ 
one who also enjoys home 
baking, must be personable and 
war - 

BABYSITTER NEEDED GOR 
don Head school area September 
June. Monday through Thurs¬ 
day. Maximum 25 hours. 2 boys 3 
: and 5 (afternoon kinder oar den) 
Car necessary, prefer parent 
with play mate for 3 year old. 
477-5055. 


W CREAMCHEESE 


HILLSIDE MALL 


We are looking for a sales orient¬ 
ed and hardworking, conscien¬ 
tious individual who has a mini¬ 
mum 2 years ladles fashion 
experience. Previous supervi 
sorv responsibility an asset. 
Please apply in person between 
912am, Monday-Frlday. 


MODELS WANTED 

If you are a model or want to 
be...WE WANT YOU! 

Apply now 

New Dimensions 

EM 


opening for experienced hair 
: stylist. Good working conditions 
! In a new modern salon. Commis¬ 
sion plus. For more information 
call George at 388-6364 or come 
In to Head Liners at 850 Blan- 
l shard Street. _ 

HEADAAASTERS 

HAIR DESIGNERS 
Requires hair stylist, full or part 
time. Excellent working condi¬ 
tions. Phone Joel, 384-2010 after 
6pm for Interview. 

UNISEX HAIR STYLING 

Requires experienced hairdress¬ 
er for busy salon, Hillside Mall. 
Excellent wage or percentage. 
Please call for Interview, 
595-0633._ 

MOTEL CARETAKER FOR 
' Duncan area. Mature couple. 

1 Good salary, oood living quar¬ 
ters Apply PO Box 395, Duncan 
BC V9L 3X5, statino experience, 
age. telephone number, etc. All 
replies confidential. 




MANAGER 

CARETAKER 

Capable person to manage trail 
er park, cabins and camp ground 
year round. In Parksvllle. B.C 
Some experience necessary 
Starting September 1st, 1900 
Comfortable home provided 
Write Victoria Press Box 513 


LOST PLEASE HELP FIND 
Phoebe small pale brown tabby 
cat with short kinked tall. Her 
young owners are very 
dlsraught over her loss Beacon 
Hill and Dallas area 383-2201. 


SUBSTANTIAL REWARD OF- 
fered for information leading to 
the return of young cream col¬ 
ored male cat, answers to Stan¬ 
ley, Belmont Park area. July 19. 
478 8809. 478-7767 


LOST FRIDAY. APRICOT 
colored cockjpoo dog around 
Cedar Hill golf course area An¬ 
swers to Sparky. Reward 
477 1408. 386-3690. 


LOST BROOCH. CRESCENT 
shaped, diamond set, on Dalhoo 
sic, between Beach and East- 
downe. Saturday night. 592-1319. 
Reward ^ 

FOUNO LOVING OBEDIENT, 
very hungry male dog. Black 
Lab cross with white markings 
at Camp Prinoie. Shawnigan 
Lake 5988165 112 743-2108 


LOST WOMANS OOUBLE 
band gold tone wedding ring, 
vicinity o» doctors medical ctln- 
■ c Reward 385 9114 after 
Slfpm 

FOUND VIC WEST AREA, 
young Siamese cat. Phone 
31/ SMI before 5 pm ask tor 
Mrs Schour After i pm phone 

1084071 


GOVERNMENT LICENSED 
driving Instructors or will con¬ 
sider training To Instruct on 
trucks and buses Must have a 
valid Class 1 drivers license. 
Must have 3-5 years truck driv¬ 
ing experience. APPLY BY 
LETTER to Saferway Driver 
Training School Ltd. 483 Burn¬ 
side Road East, Victoria, V8T 
2X3. 


FRIENDS&C0. 

HAIRSTYLISTS 

Opportunity for 2 talented hair 
cutters with or without cllentels 
Phone Hillside 592-5252 speak 
with Gerard or Mario or phone 
Hartwlg Courts 308-6618 speak 
with Patrick 


HAIRDRESSING 

INSTRUCTOR 

To teach theory and practical 
Previous experience or have 
held a Provincial licence for 
♦wo years Salary 512,000♦. Vf 
tor Hairdressing Sch 
Fort St Victoria. B e. 

300-6222, Home 306-4547 


LOST BLUE POINT SIAMESE 
female cat. oil white with grey 
points. Gordon Head are* 
477 ?7<9 

LOST GLASSES ON OAF BAY 

bus a» on Margate Kd b e twee n 
Newport Ave and Oak Bay 
Beach Hotel W* 700 5 *Nw *>*», 


VICTORIA SECURITY 
PATROL LTD 

Raqutres full and part time se¬ 
curity guards Must be neef In 
appearance and bondeble Pre 
vlous police, military or security 
experience an asaat Apply In 
person at 3453 Quadra St Mon 
day to Friday, I 30-4: Mpm 

CARETAKER 

sap e amhar 1st Couple to man 
age two small apartments. Oak 
Bav area Outies halls and 
lawn-, approx I hour pgr day 
> bedroom suite luppllef re 
due ed rent Suit rjouple one work 
•ng or retired couple Victoria 
Press Bd* <07 

NANNY HOUSE KEEPER FOP 


EUROPEAN DELICATESSEN 
requires experienced sales per 
son for full or part time for shift 
to 9pm Please only If fully ex¬ 
perienced, able fo work alone 
and interested In a permanent 
lob. Apply 384-4991. 


JAMES BAY PIZZA PIEMAN 
has an opening for an expert 
enced sandwich lunch cook. 4 
hours per day or possibility of a 
split shift over dinner hour if 
additional hours required. Apply 
Rd from l-4pm 


at 858 Esquimau B 


NEEDED EXPERIENCED IN- 
terpreters; Inuit, Porteuguese. 
Turkish, Pharsi—Persian, Pol¬ 
ish, Swiss, Italian, Greek, Pam 
iabi, and other languages Send 
resume including phone number 
to Victoria Press Box, 512. 


PERMANENT POSITION FOR 
combination alarm installer and 
security guard. This position is 
flexible In either field but re¬ 
quires experience in all aspects 
of electronic protection. Send re- 
sume to Victoria Press Box 502 


INTELLIGENT APPREN- 
tlce, welder or mechanic to work 
with a progressive company in 
the Victoria area Please aoply 
in own handwriting to 1842 Keat- 

isa, Cr v°. s x s 35r a - R R ’• vlc 


DANCE TEACHERS. RECEP- 
tionist. supervisor, counsellor. 
Experience not necessary, will 
train.Apply in person or call 
from 1-6 pm, Monday to Friday, 
71$ Yates Street. 385-1476 


BEVERAGE MANAGER 
Fully experienced in all aspects 
of beer parlour, including a II 
censed pub for large Vancouver 
island hotel Victoria Press Box 


HELP WANTED 
GENERAL 


RELIABLE PART-TIME BA 
bvs tter needed Immediately In 
Sooke. My home, or yours If near 
Sooke Elementary. References 
required. Call after 7pm or on 
weekends, 642-4281 


COOK HOUSEKEEPER 
needed tor island estate, July 
15th to Sept 15th S500 monthly 
plus room and board Student 
OK Call Victoria Radio 


SHORT ORDER COOK WANT 
ad immediately, evening shift 1 - 
9 pm. Apply in person. Jacob's 
Family Restaurant, K Marl 
Centra.Must be dean 


arss a< 


REQUIRED FOR AOOLT. NO 
pet. prestige apartment, mature 
bondeble car el eking couple, 
written references required on 
interview Vicloria Press Be* 
401_ 

EXPERIENCED DINING 
room (Mk wan t ed Short* Res 
teurenf Apply in person with 

-Jtsiuvt 

ie cahs 


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
Full and part-time chamber¬ 
maids. Applications at front 
desk. 

ROYAL OAK INN 

4680 Elk Lake Drive 

REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY 
combination cocktail wait¬ 
er/waitress bartender for cock- 
tall lounge. Apply in person. 
Coachman Inn, 229 Gorge Road 
East. 

WOULD LIKE LIVE-IN 
housekeeper, someone needing 
home. Must be attractive, non- 
drinker, responsible, love chll 
dren and domestic life 
112 748-6164, anytime 

WANTED: A COMPETENT 
loving babysitter. In the Unlver 
slty area, for 2 children, ages 1 
and 2. Tuesday, Wednesday. Fri¬ 
day; beginning September; ref¬ 
erences please 477-5606. 

HAIRTRENDS 

James Bay Square, requires an 
experienced hairstylist who Is 
versatile In all facets of hair 
care. Please phone 38T-324S to 
arrange an Interview. 

MATURE PERSON WITH 
pleasant telephone manner re¬ 
quired Must be able to deal with 
public and be willing to work 
evenings. 28 hours per week 
Victoria Press Box 403. 

LIVE-Ilf HOMEMAKER. FOR 
family In country home. Monday 
- Friday. Llve-in, evenings and 
weekends free. Private room 
and board included. References 
please. 656-5024. 

PARTS DELIVERY PERSON 
required- must have good driv¬ 
ing record. Apply: Parts Marv 
ager, Metro Toyota Ltd., 625 
Frances Avenue. No phone calls 
please. 

E .^ P , E R 1 E NCE 0 desk 
clerk for modern Victoria hotel. 
Good working conditions with all 
benefits. Fulltime employment 
Salary negotiable. Apply Vlc 
toria Pres Box 404. 

HAIRSTYLIST, EXPERI 
ence, clientele necessary. High 
commlslon. Phone for appoint 
ment, 595-4711. Evenings 
383-1096. 

EXPERIENCED, LIVE IN 
caretaker required for 13-suite 
Esquimalt apartment block. 
References. Call 478-0580.6-8 pm 
only. 

EXPERIENCED WAIT- 
erv waitresses and hostess/host 
with bar experience. Apply 
2pm-4pm afternoons, Dfno's 
Place, 4011 Quadra. 

EXPERIENCED SHORT 
order cook. Tues.—Sat., 
2pm.-6pm. Apply In person be¬ 
fore 4pm at The Esquimalt Dell, 
1153 Esquimalt Road. 

WANTED. PERMANENT MA- 
ture person to work in fast food 
coffee shop, must be quick and 
have very pleasant personality 
Phone Mr Howard, 383-8232. 

BABYSITTER REQUIRED 
for 15-month boy, September 2, 
1900. *10 a day 0-5:30, Monday to 
Friday. Gordon Head to town 
preferred. 721-3117, after 6. 

NEED RESPONSIBLE BABY 
sitter for 3 year old and 5 year 
old. 10 am - 6 pm. Saturday to 
Wednesday, August 2 - 23. 
388-9816 after 6. 

EXPERIENCED WAITER/ 
waitress required for evenings, 
dining room service, with knowl 
edge of drinks, approximately 30 
hours per week. Call 381-5744 

EXPERIENCED DESK 
clerk for downtown hotel. Avail¬ 
able for scheduled shifts. Apply 
with resume to Victoria Press 
Box 506 

OAK BAY 

Live-In housekeeper required 
for mobile elderly gentleman. 
Car available for licensed driv¬ 
er. *150 per month. 592-9835 

EXPERIENCED WAIT 
er/waltress wanted for night 
shift. Apply In person Perlklls 
Restaurant, 531 Yates. No phone 
calls please. 

EXPERIENCED WAITERS- 
waltresses. Full shift, 3-11pm. 
Weekends off Apply In person 
Day and Night Restaurant. 622 
Yates. 

REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY, 
picture framer, commercial ex 
perience necessary Apply in 
person at Fast Frames, 1213 
Wharf, 385-6722. 

ENERGETIC YOUNGER PER 
son to work in glass shop. No 
experience necessary 40 hour 
week at *4.50 hpur Reply to Vic¬ 
toria Press 510 

HOSTESS/HOST CASHIER 
Experience preferable. Respon¬ 
sible attitude a must! Evening 
shift Apply In person, Smittys 
Pancake House, 850 Douglas 

MCDONALD'S RESTAURANT. 
1732 Old Island Highway, Is now 
hiring for September. Full time, 
shift work. Apply In person only. 

EXPERIENCED MEAT 
wrapper wanted, union shop, 
apply Shop Easy, 3651 Shel¬ 
bourne between Ham—2pm 

COOK REQUIRED FOR 
hotel restaurant, union estab¬ 
lishment. Apply in person, 2852 
Douglas Street, ask for the Chef 

EXPERIENCED SHORT 
order cook required. Apply In 
person between 4-6pm, 404 Que¬ 
bec Street 

PART-TIME MATURE Ex¬ 
perienced help, some cooking. 
Goroe Hotel Fish 8i Chips, 1071 
Tllllcum Rd 384 1344 

DRIVER/ OWNER WITH 
small P/U truck or van for couri¬ 
er service. Reply Victoria Press 
Box 497. 

WANTED: ROOFER WITH 
all types of roofing knowledge, 
must have 3 years experience. 
595-7722. 

MAID WORK FOR MOTEL, 
must work weekends. Apply In 
person. Friendship Inn. 39Goroe 
Rd East 

URGENT. MATURE SITTER 
tor 4 and 1 year-old, on-call situ¬ 
ation. my home (Esquimalt). 
388 9475. 

DESK CLERK WANTED FULL 
time evening shift. 386-2421 be¬ 
tween 7 am.- 3 pm. ask for Willy. 

WANTED MATURE. EXPERI- 
enced waitress/cook helper. 
Apply Douglas Hotel. No phone 
calls please. 

WANTED PERSON WITH 
good working experience and 
handling power tools. Victoria 
Press Box 408 

MATURE CASHIER HOST- 
ess/host. for night shift only 
Apply in person after 4:30pm at 
Peacock Restaurant. 

SALAD PERSON AND SHOR 
t order cook Apply The Apple 
Tree Restauranf. Hlllside Shop¬ 
ping Center 

EXPERIENCED 6ARTEND- 
er. 4 or 5 evenings per week 
including weekends. 658-5594. 
9785 5th Street, Sidney 

BRENTWOOD INN 
Evening cook wanted 652 2413 

DAYCARE APPROVED BABY- 
sitter 7 to 5. Phone after 6 
382 2991 

EXPERIENCED BAKER 

iimnaillital In, - 1 * ‘ 

w m muj HTwnraitfiy w nK*ii 

shift Phone 595-24IS. 

WANTED DAYTIME BABY 
sitter In areaaround Wei Her Av 
enue 456-7409 

PERSON FOR CARE FACIL 

^ e iSsr3Ci. , »' - — - 

MATURE, LIVE-IN MOUSE 


♦or appointment nu 


22 OFFICE HELP 


CLERK/TYPIST II 
for the 

CAPITAL REGIONAL 
OISTRICT 
ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT 

Salary : *1040-51120 per month. 

Using a Ml com 2000 word pro¬ 
cessing unit to type engineering 
contract documents, technical 
reports and correspondence, 
operating small switchboard 
and radio; receptionist duties, 
other related duties. 

The successful candidate will be 
eligible for a broad range of 
employee benefits as provided In 
the Union Agreement. 

Candidates must have a mini¬ 
mum typing speed of 50 w.p.m., 
good knowledge and experience 
of, oft ice procedures. Preference 
will be olven to those with train¬ 
ing and related experience In the 
operation of an electronic word 
processing unit. 

Applications will be received bv 
the Employment Officer. Capi¬ 
tal Regional District, P.O. Draw¬ 
er 1000, Victoria, B.C., V8W 2S6, 
no later than Wednesday. July 
20th, 1900, 


TELLERS 

Our new Saanich Centre Branch 
has positions available for full 
time and part time tellers. One ot 
these positions may be waiting 
f°i VP 0, If vou enjoy meeting the 
public, have an eve for accuracy 
and detail, and see the Impor¬ 
tance of excellent customer ser¬ 
vice. Canadian on-line banking 
experience Is preferred and pre¬ 
vious cash experience is essen- 
tlal. Good grooming Is a must. 
Salaries are based on experience 
and performance and a compre¬ 
hensive benefits package Is of¬ 
fered. Please come In to com¬ 
plete an application. If yob have 
questions, call Mrs Lynette Ren¬ 
nie at 382-8111 

CANADA TRUST 

650 View St 
Victoria, B.C. 


RUN THE SHOW! 
Enthusiastic? Self-motivated? 
Determined? Dynamic? Outgo¬ 
ing? A centrally located adver 
Using firm requires a manager 
to look after all phases of the 
business. Involvement and re¬ 
sponsibility will be yours If you 
have office experience and like 
meeting people. Theatre back 
ground would be helpful. This 
could be the opportunity you've 
been waiting for, call Marilyn 
Mlckelberry now at 385-3425 for 
details. 


I ! cNjfok# 

\>»T0HMM\ 


eWUKE INTERNA TIOMAL COMPANY 


LEGAL SECRETARIES RE 
quired. corporate/ conveyance/ 
word processing system in¬ 
terested In becoming a top— 
notch leoal secretary? if you are 
a skilled and experienced secre¬ 
tary, with or without law office 
background, an expanding me 
dlum size Victoria firm offers 
excellent training and experi¬ 
ence Achieve vour ambition for 
a challenging and lucrative ca¬ 
reer Resumes and references in 
confidence to Victoria Press Box 
495. 


PERSON FRIDAY 

Dlcfa, typing, reception, general 
bookkeeping to trial balance 
Able to work on own and handle a 
variety of duties. Position avail¬ 
able Immediately. 

PRIME PERSONNEL 
270-1070 Douglas Street, 
385-7012 


REQUIRED IMMED. 
EXPERIENCED. CON¬ 
VEYANCING SECRE¬ 
TARY. SALARY FROM 
$1,200 to $1,400 PER 
MONTH DEPENDING 
ON EXPERIENCE AND 
ABILITY. CALL 388-4444. 


MAJOR OIL COMPANY 
requires full time new ac¬ 
counts/customer service clerk. 
High school graduation, previ 
ous office experience, typing and 
familiarity with In-house mini 
computer essential. Excellent 
salary and benefit package 
available. Please send complete 
resume In writing to Victoria 
Press Box 509 


ROYALTRUST 
TELLER 

Experinced preferred. 40 WPM 
typing required. We will train 
suitable candidate with cash ex 
perience. Position now open. 
Hours 8:30 - 4:30 Monday to Fri- 
day. Phone Mrs. Wilson 38843 n. 


WE NEED A MATURE CAP- 
able bondeble person, a non- 
smoker with own transportation, 
experienced in bookkeeping, 
banking, collecting accounts, a 
good typist able to take phone 
orders and price Invoices. 
Wages negotiable It Is impor 
tant to state age, experience and 
supply references. Victoria 
Press Box 511. 


ROYAL TRUST 

Jr position requiring approx. 1 
veers experience, typing must 
be an accurate 50 wpm. This job 
also Involves careful record 
keeping and simple accounting 
procedures Phone Mrs. Wilson 


111. 


EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEP 
er required. Applicants must 
have experience with cash, ac 
counts receivable/payable and 
payroll. Previous computer ac 
counting knowledge an asset 
Please reply In writing, stating 
experience and expected salary, 
to P.O Box 2099, Sidney. B.C 
V8L 3S6. 


RECEPTIONIST/ SALES CO 
ordinator required full time. 
Duties Include: general recep¬ 
tion and office functions; typing; 
and assisting Sales Represent a 
five with sales orders. Must have 
good telephone manner, and be 
able to work with minimum su¬ 
pervision Apply in person at 
3330 Tennyson Ave. 


LEGAL—CONVEYANCER 
Experienced conveyancer re¬ 
quired Immediately for either 
part time or full time post I on 
Some working background in a 
legal office essential together 


LEG'S** 

Receptionist bookkeeper re¬ 
quired for downtown legal of¬ 
fice, minimum of 4 years office 
background necessary, coupled 
with experience in l-write ac¬ 
counting system, some typing 
Salary *950 386-9021 


EXPERIENCED. MATURE, 
steno-bookkeaper-secret ary for 
busy diversified office- Fairfield 
area Req'd compatibility and 
personable contact with public 
Real estate accounting an asset 
Bonding and ref. req'd. Victoria 
Press Box 494 


REQUIRED: A PERSON 
dev for a one person office, 
bookkaapir 


FRI 


no experience and 
of meat Industry an 
ITbenefits included For 

-w please call Mr. D Ml 

chfol at 385^551 on July 23 or 24 


LOANSCLERK 
Langford bank looking for an 
experienced loans clerk Re- 


SHORTHAMO TYPIST R£ 
gulredfor lawyer s office Legal 
experience net necessary but 
goad secretarial tkUH essential 


22 r OFFICf HELP 


C-1 


SECRETARY WANTED FOR 
youno lawyer. Large, happy 
firm Some general experience 
and at least 60 wpm accurate 
typing required. Resumes and 
reterenes to 3rd Floor, 844 
Courtney St, please. 


REQUIRED URGENTLY 
An experienced Conveyancing 
Secretary for small pleasant law 
practice. Some experience in 
bookkeeping an asset. Salary ne 
gotlable. 381-4444. 


ticket. Wage negotiable with ex 
perience, 382-2644 for appoint 
ment 


TWO EXPERIENCED TELL 
ers required at Scotia bank, 
Douglas and Courtney branch 
Please apply In person. 


TRAVEL CONSULTANT. MIN- 
imum 1 year I.A.T.A. experl 
ence. Featherstone Travel 
477-0131 


SKILLED TKAMS 


MacMILLAN 

BL0EDEL 

requires a 

STEAMFITTER/ 

PIPEFITTER 

for Chemainus Sawmill Division 
located on southern Vancouver 
Island. This is swingshlft work 
with the union wage at *12.885 
per hour Applicants must nave a 
B.C.T.Q. with sawmill experl 
enceprefer red 

For further Information, please 
contact: 

Personnel Department 
P.O. Box 540 

Chemainus, B.C. V0R 1K0 
Phone 246-3221 


ELECTRONICS 
TECHNICIAN 
To service broad range of audio 
visual, communications, stereo 
and hlfl equipment. Good wor 
king conditions. Reply In writing 
stating salary expected to: 
Queale FJectronlcs, 1004 North 
Park St, Victoria, V8T1C6. 


DINING LOUNGE 

Requires cooking staff If you 
are enthusiastic, responsible 
and looking for an opportunity to 
work with a fast-growing restau 
rant apply In person only With 
references to Mrs. Carter, 
Charles Restaurant. Royal Oak 
Center between 11am and 6pm 


AUTO MECHANIC 
Competent licensed auto me¬ 
chanic required bv service sta 
tion, 521 Lyall St. Knowledge of 
all makes and wheel alignment 
experience essential. Refer 
ences required. For Interview 
call Manager at 382-0015 be 
tween 6am-4pm 


BACKHOE OPERATORS 

Qualified Case 580 rubber tired 
backhoeoperators Experienced 
operators only need apply to OK 
Trucking Co. Ltd., Dispatch Of 
flee. 2720 Turner St 


NURSE REQUIRED FULL 
time or part time for the Port 
McNeill and District Hospital on 
Northern Vancouver Island 
Phone collect 112 956-4461 or 
wirte P O Box 790 Port McNeill. 


TELEVISION TECHNICIAN 
required for bench work and or 
field work. Must be neat In ap- 
pearance«*a^good in dealing 
with Pdm^r Apply Victoria 
Press Box 386 


EXPERIENCED CEMENY 
finisher needed for small Vic¬ 
toria business Own transporta 
tion needed. Call evenings 
388-6275 pager 2924. Leave name 
and number 


EXPERIENCED MECHANIC 
wanted for fleet maintenance 
*1500 per month; plus benefits 
Including dental. Apply PO Box 
' 1, Static ‘ ■" ‘ 


4235, ! 


ition A, Victoria. 


REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY, 
top notch automotive painter 
Apply to Mr Orton Ker, Mestons 
AutoBodv: 382-5142 business; 
478-7092 residence 


ONE CARPENTER'S HELPER 
and one experienced carpenter 
required for approximately 4 
weeks work, starting immedi 
ately 478-5218 after 5pm 


EXPERIENCED CABINET 
maker tor local shop specializ 
Ing in apartments. Phone 
652-3211. 


EXPERIENCED DECKMAN. 
shingle sawyers, shake and 
shingle packers, 112-726 7269 
after 5pm' 


WANTED: CARPET LAYER 
and ceramic tile I aver. Experi 
enced only 384-2221 


WANTED QUALIFIED CRIB 
blng^nd framing carpenters. 


WANTED: EXPERIENCED 
dump and boom person. 479-7960 

or 59? 9697 


CRANE OPERATOR. MUST BE 
experienced, for job in town 
381-6727 


SALES PERSONS 
AND AGENTS 



'THE BESTSELLERS" 
REAL ESTATE 
CAREER 

TRAINING 

PRODUCES 

SUCCESS 

Block Bros will train you in 
sound proven methods enabling 
vou to quickly reach your de 
sired level of success. Successful 
progressive salespeople 

ARE NOT BORN, THEY 
ARE TRAINED 

Call today, interviews by ap 
polntment only. (Held strictly 
confidential.) 

CALL 

"THE BESTSELLERS" 
Sidney-Colwood 478-5561 
Bill Woonacott 
Douglas St. 386-3231 

Bob Hahn 

Shelbourne 477-1841 

Bob Cullum 
Bernie Wilkinson 


MEN-WOMEN 

If i960 has been good, but not 
totally satisfying then perhaps 
vou are restless and need a 
change We are Canada's lead 
Ing Cemetery Organization with 
36 properties In all. 3 other prop 
enles are currently under con 
struct ion We now he ve an Imme 
'late opening with a secure 
irture In this non competetive 
eld Training, bonuses, com 
mission, and a financial sales 
incentive programme If you are 
neat bondable. and own a car, 
give us a call Direct sales ex 
perience not necessary but a 

swrs, 

asset For confidential Inter 
4^ITS4 Ph0n * 

HATLEY MEMORIAL 

GARDENS 


EXPAMOIMG WESTERN CA 


TAXI DRIVE• 


CLASS WAR 
wmm HI5 tv 


J and i veer eM» C*inert licence ^ E i T ■ 

vizz'txz.axv* 















































































































































































































































































J 


C-2 

* 24 SUES PERSONS 
4ND AGENTS 


LICENSEE) 

REAL ESTATE 
SALESPEOPLE 
WANTED 

Modern office with good park¬ 
ing, needs more PROFESSION 
AL SALESPEOPLE, excellent 
COMMISSION SPLIT, some fin 
anclno available to assist In our 
many varied company listings, 
i or further details call In confi¬ 
dence to Ken Porter, 388-7868, of 
di op In to 23 Burnside Rd. W. 

DUNSMUIR 

PROPERTIES 

LTD. 


Gntuifc, 


WESTERN HOMES LTD 
\J037 ctoyrdaf S86-J464 J 

REAL ESTATE 
PRE-LICENCE 

Tutoring for all Interested par¬ 
ties Small groups. Nofutureem 
ployment obligation. For full de- 
tails call now CENTURY ?1 
Western Homes Ltd. 386-3494 (24 
hr si 

EXPERIENCED SALES 
PEOPLE 

We are expanding Into the 
Victoria area, and we need more 
team members. To qualify you 

must: 

1 Be experienced in direct 

dies 

2 Be willing to work hard and 
accept Instructions. 

3. Have above average income 

ooals. 

•l Be dependable and wish to 
aive our clients the best in 

service. 

If YOU FEEL YOU QUALIFY, 
call 38 1-2213. Thur-Sat. 

lpm7pm. 

SALES POSITION 
Leading national appliance 
manufacturer requires a repre¬ 
sentative for an established re¬ 
tail network. Complete training 
program, salarv. commission, 
expenses and benefit package. 
< all Mr G. Bell at the Roval 
Olympic Hotel. Wednesday. Julv 
?Jth, l?am-5pm. for interview. 
.<88-5513. 

f ASH I ON RELATED COM 
uanv require managers in 
Greater Victoria area, sales ex¬ 
perience an asset but not neces¬ 
sary Must be self motivated, 
and relate well to people. Some 
evenings involved Transporta¬ 
tion necessary. For information. 
. dll 474 2535 

DISTRIBUTORS 

WANTED 

Magnetic raised print signs. 40% 
commission Apply bv mail to: 
A l Magnetic Signs. 25099 Dewd- 
nev Trunk Rd. Maple Ridge. 

B C V2X 3N5. 

SELL THE HOTTEST 
PRODUCT IN TOWN! 
Sell subscriptions for Victoria 
Symphony's exciting 1980-81 
season bv telephone. Salarv. 
Phone Mary at 385-9771 during 
business hours. 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 
WITH 

the Monach Life Assurance 
Company can be yours. An inter¬ 
view can tell us both If we need 
each other, Please phone 
384 6511 

WANTED, SALES REPRE- 
sentatlve In Victoria and up-ls- 
land for small kitchen appli¬ 
ances. Capable of doing store 
and In home demonstrations 
C ommlssion basis. Call collect 
iK4 4922 or 721 3988 


SALES MANAGER 
t or small advertising co. For 
voung out-going responsible, 
self motivated person. Manage¬ 
rial, clerical and sales. Base sal 
<n y and commission. 388 5052 for 
iiHwintment. 


LOOKING FOR A FUTURE? 
Want more out of life? Could you 
use S50,000 a year or more? In¬ 
terested? Invest one hour of your 
time to investigate this opportu 
mfy For appointment call 
477 8928 


EXPERIENCED SECURITY 
sales person required to service 
commercial downtown core In 
all aspects of security Including 
alarm leasing and service Sal¬ 
ary and commission. Send re- 
sumc to Victoria Press Box 502 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADS. Uni¬ 
versity students who enloy 
working with people. Would you 
like to supplement your wav 
through university? Write to 
Victoria Press Box 309 


K MRT-TMEv 
TtMMNUHYNfU 

EUROPEAN SPA 
instructor needed for Men's De¬ 
partment, part time, at night. 
Must be healthy, enthusiastic, 
and like to work In a friendly 

view apply 1570 Hillside, no 
phone calls. 

COOK REQUIRED FOR SUM- 
mer school. 4 Vj weeks. Duties 
included regular meals to be 
served 3 times per day for ap¬ 
prox 170 people. Shift work In¬ 
cluding weekends. Salarv nego¬ 
tiable according to experience. 
For interview please call. 
595-2626 

DENTAL RECEPTIONIST, 
permanent part-time, after¬ 
noons, experience in dentistry or 
related fields. Dr. L. Talarlco. 
595-2933 

WANTED: TWO PART-TIME 
floral designers, must be experi¬ 
enced. Apply, Phone 592-2923, 
evenings 598-2069 

RELIABLE CLEANING LADY, 
Spartan-West SVanlch Road 
area. 479-7058 evenings. 

21 EMPLOYMENT SOVlCi 

PROFESSIONAL RESUMES 
Realistic prices 

Personal. Individual attention 
384-4428 

RESUMES THAT GET JOBS. 

Professionally prepared. 
Personal, confidential service. 
385-6145. 

30 SITUATIONS WANTED 

ENGLISH AUTOMOTIVE AND 
commercial partsman-man- 
ager salesman, highly self moti 
vated, 11 years experience In the 
parts wholesale trade looking for 
interesting and challenging posi 
♦ion at any level In the Victoria 
area. For resume and/or Inter¬ 
view ring 479-8839. 

TOOLS SHAPE NED 

Free pick-up anoBeilvery. Gar¬ 
den tools, scissors, knives, lawn 
mower blades, axes. etc. 
598-4872. 

QUALIFIED. EXPERIENCED 
hotelman seeking management 
position in hotel. Presently em¬ 
ployed Vancouver. Phone 
598-8295 (message). 

MAN WITH TRUCK WILL DO 
cleanup, hauling, chainsaw 
work, etc. Reasonable. Tony 
474 1014. 

TYPING ASSIGNMENTS Un¬ 
dertaken bv experienced secre¬ 
tary. Please call Christine 
477-8456. 

YOUNG MAN SEEKS GAR- 
dening work; yard cleanups or 
maintenance; tough lobs wel¬ 
comed, 384-0912. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT WILL 
do gardening and house clean¬ 
ing Call between 7-8am and 

8 30- 10pm 382-0768 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER 
needs work, interior, exterior, 
small plaster repairs. 592-7137. 

EXPERIENCED GARDENING 
couj>l^have^2 open days per 

WANTED: SMALL CARPEN- 
♦rv iobs. fence building, renova¬ 
tions. Mike. 384 1089 

MAN WILL DO GARDENING 
aml^ard cleanup. Phone 

RENT—A—KID 

Help with odd iobs. 387 5506 

33 BANDA, MUSICIANS 

AND ORCHESTRAS 

WANTED HIGH ENERGY 
lead vocalist for heavy metal 
rock act. Full time only. 382-8344, 
Bob & Peter 

LEGACY RECORDING STU- 
dio. Top quality demos and rec¬ 
ord production 386-5501 

34 PU-UCORDEDMUSK 

ASHLEY SOUNO. EXCEL 
lent sound system, fantastic 
light show, music system for all 
tastes, special wedding packaoe 
$100. Please call 383-6866 after 
5pm. 

SPINKY'S 
$100 and up 

656-165? 

CJR CANNED MUSIC. 
598-4717. 

MUSIC MAN CANNED MUSIC. 
Give us a call. 479 8043. 

36 BUSINESS SERVICES 

AND DIRECTORY 


benefits, vacations, automo¬ 
biles. early retirement, plus 
qreaf income potential. Minimal 
tee No risk. No obligations. Call 
lack at 381 1211 

CONGENIAL SALESPERSON 
required for new quality ladies 
wear shop, in downtown Vic¬ 
toria. E xperience a prerequisite 
for this full time position. 
M2 266 6566or 385-6811 

VICTORIA'S FINEST LADIES 
wear store requires qualified 
full time sales people. First 
class working conditions in a 
prestige environment Reply to 
victoria Press Box 501. 

TELEPHONE SOLICITORS 
needed. Preferably experienced 
and mature. Work from your 
own home. Hourly waoe plus 
bonus Please call between 
8 30an 5pm 386-6958 Ext 109 

MATURE TELEPHONE SO- 
11 ctor needed for local business. 
Experience essential. Call be 
f ween 7PM-9PM. 383-5129 ask for 

Brant 

CAREER POSITION. PLEASE 
call 38V 6134 after 5 for recorded 

message- 

25 TEACHERS 


■ 

jCHARTERED ACCOUNTANT. 
; available for bookkeeping, write 
up work, financial stalement 
preparation. From personal 
residence. Murray Ellis. 
385-1011. 


Repairs 


LOW RATES 

Refrigerators, freezers, ranges, 
automatic washers, dryers, 
dishwashers repaired. Phoenix 
Appliances. 384-0423. 


APPRAISALS 
Fast Efficient Service 
Lynn Holmes F R.I. R.l. (B.C.) 
Landmark Properties Ltd. 
386-6762 


BRENTWOOD BAY DAY CARE 
Mother with 2 years licensed ex¬ 
perience has vacancies as of Au- 
gust 1st. Call 385-5039 


School District 85 

VACOUVER ISLAND NORTH 

Applications are Invited for the 
following vacany effective Sep¬ 
tember 1.1980. 

50% Home Ec/50% S.S. 
Grades8-10 
Alert Bay. B.C. 

t he successful applicant will be 
responsible for development of 
Career Education in Home Eco¬ 
nomics. 

Please send information on 
background, training and refer 

encesto 

District Superintendent of 
Schools. Box 90, Port Hardy, 
B C vOn 2p0 


WILL BABYSIT, MY HOME, 
daytimes. Monday Friday, ages 
3 and over. Tattersall-Quadra 
area 382 3786. 


2t PMT-TIME M 

TEMPOIUNY HELP 

PART TIME TELLERS. 

S5-S7 per hour 
Westcoast Savings is looking for 
a few bright and enthusiastic 
people for steady Monday and 
jdturdav part time teller post 
lions In our Victoria branches If 
you have good people skills and 
i-njov challenging and interest¬ 
ing work call us Previous bank 
mg experience prefer red but not 
i-ssenhtl. Reply to Bob Craw 
lord. Ml 7924 


WESTCOAST 

SAVINGS 


MOTHERING HEIGHTS 
offers excellent day care on 1 
acre quiet street, 479-0496 


WILL BABYSIT, MY HOME, 
Wooico area, anytime, reason¬ 
able. 385-6907. 


WILL BABYSIT IN LAKEHILL 
home. Monday to Friday, 3-5 
year olds. 479-4788 


BUTTONS & BOWS DAYCARE 
Center, 312 Benhomer. 478-1314. 


Brick Uytre 


STEVE'S MASONRY. SPECIA- 
lizing in chimneys, facings, and 

t£!Sni v sol?* irs work au *'" v 


ANY KIND OF BRICK OR 
block work. Quality workman¬ 
ship guaranteed. 478-1108 after 


FIREPLACES. ARCHES, CIR- 
cular hearths, feature walls, re- 
tainlng walls, etc. 38S-7898. 


remake 


KITCHEN CABINETS. BATH- 
room vanities, counter tops, all 
custom built or refacing old cabi¬ 
nets with new modern designs 
with low price. For tree estimate 
477 6954 


Budgeting a gain this 
wee* ? E xcetlent earnings 
tor pert time setting No 
experience necessery. 
Cell M4 714S. answering 
14 hrs 

txPtXlSMCtO I.Mt 

. ,X«r to, huparmwtal Q«. 
Ha, Sana inn. to Vic. 

i<x'.#».atoea. *n 


RENOVATING? 

Want soma laaasl Kltchaat. 


• spec IM tty 
<M fffHtm, 
G Smettzer. 

INTERiO 

zzrr. 

m REM 
MR* and 

ICS 

OAK BAY 

omwpunrty CiMMlV 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
AMB DIRECTORY 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,19H0 


FINISHING CARPENTRY, 
basements, sundecks, siding. 
Free estimates. Reasonable. 
Terry 652-457? 


SORRY. DUE TO WORK 
overload. Bob Innes 59A2795 will 
not be taking on any new work 
until August ttth. 


COMPLETE HOME Con¬ 
struction and renovation ser¬ 
vice, t' - ‘ " 

mat 


ce, design assistance and est¬ 
ates. 479-8733 


CEDAR SIDING IS OUR SPE- 
clalty All types and styles. 
Guaranteed workmanship. 
388-7835. 


PERMA CONST. LTD. 

FREE ESTIMATES,384-2323 


FINISHING CARPENTER, 
cabinet maker. Don Miller, 
642-5339 


SUNDECKS AND ALL OTHER 
carpentry work, tree estimates, 
ask for Tom or Paul. 721-5286 


CARPENTERS AVAILABLE. 
381-0145 


Jones 

>-1897 


FRAMING CREW AVAIL- 
able Call Kase 652-3433. 


ALL TYPES OF CARPENTRY 
work and renovations. 478-8588 


Cuyat Hn W i 


-—ID L 

holstery cleaners, residential 
and commercial. "Wetakeprlde 
In our work''. 384-6622 10% dls- 
count with mention of this ad 


REGIONAL CARPET CLEAN- 
Ing, steam cleaning. Living 
room, dining room, hall, $45. 

478-8518 


SPECIALIZING IN UPHOL- 
stery. carpet, steam cleaning 
Guaranteed iob. low rates. 


PHIL'S CARPET CLEANING, 
steam cleaning carpets, Chester 
fields, chairs. 474-1808 


Carpets mi Ikiilum 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
MDDMECTMY 


m. ,*t. « - - «-«x . - A. 

UTlTTBf, wCWWBft 


ARCHITECTURAL. STRUC- 
tural drawings, quantity takeoff 
and estimates prepared. 19 
years experience, hourly-con¬ 
tract. 721-5047. 


ARCHITECTURAL DRAFT- 
Ing. Energy efficient residential 
planning. Hourly rate, contract, 
certified 479-0896 


ft BUSINESS SERVICES 
MDDWECTONY 


film Sliziif 


HARRY, 477-6S34 
Residential. picture or glass. 


Bettors Bermp^^eo 


5” CONTINUOUS GUTTERS, 
special contractor rates. Old 
wooden gutters renewed. Irwin 
industries, 382-5154. Freeest. 


Floor Covering Specialists 

CUSTOM 

DRAPERIES 

—Bedspreads— 


REMODELING 
RENOVATIONS 
Painting, carpentry, landscap¬ 
ing. Reasonable rates tor quality 
work. Phone Bam. to 10pm. 
383-3704 


STRONG TRUCK, STRONG 
back, will do anything, moving, 
cleanup, yard work, painting, 
etc. Phone Randv 382-1261 
38? 5460. 




r <J°' CEDAR HAL MALL 
/ 1551 CEDAR HAL I ROAD 


Custom Drapes/Bedspreads 


NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL, 
we do them all. Call Mark or 
Dave, 382-0391 or 383-2972 after 5 
pm. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Free estimates. 


NO JOB TOO BIG. NO JOB TOO 
small. Painting, carpentry, ren¬ 
ovations, fencing, finishing car 
pentry, small cement lobs, haul 
log Call Terry or Bob, 385-5620 


SEMI RETIRED BRITISH 
drapery consultant will make 
drapes from your material or 
ours. Supply arid install drapery 
track, window shades. Venetian 
blinds. 598-0015 


Drtssaalfaf 


GISELE'S CUSTOM DRESS- 
maklng. Design, alteration, res¬ 
tyling. All work guaranteed. 
Monday Friday, 8-5pm. Satur- 
day by appointment 386-4434 


ALTERATIONS FROM $1.50. 
New dresses. $15. 1112 May 
Street 38S-6S48 


ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
pairs, also, girl's and Barbie 
clothes sewn. 383-4108 


CARPETS AND LINOS LTD. 
FLOOR COVE RING 
SPECIALISTS 

715 PANDORA AVE 386-2401 


FRED SHORT FLOOR COVER- 
Ing, expert installation of car¬ 
pets, linos, tiles, hardwood Re¬ 
pair work a speciality. For 
estimates 478-5788, 388-6275 
pager 1473. 


VICTORIAN. 18 YEARS Ex¬ 
perience, cheap for cash. Small 
room or whole house. Written 
guarantee. 384-4252 anytime. 


G AND R CONCRETE FINISH 
ers, all type of concrete work No 
lob too small Phone 383-8985 
after 4. 


"SPRAYMAN" 

Specializing In all types of tex¬ 
ture ceilings and walls satisfac- 
tlon guaranteed. 652-3601 


$11.95 PER HR. 
27-vear old student with Va-ton 
truckwIHckHTaulln^ and mov¬ 


ing. 388-7126 t 
4:30pm 


To*m, after 


STRONG MAN WITH 1 TON 
truck will clean attics, base¬ 
ments, yards, carports, reason¬ 
able rates. Call 384 2675 days 
only. 


HAULING: TOP SOIL. SAND, 
manure, wood, garbage, etc. Eu- 
geoe 383-3528. 


TWO YOUNG HANDYMEN 
with pickup wifi do anything. 
595-2483. 478-5735 


WILL CLEAN ANO HAUL, 
etc. Very reasonable. Tony. 
474-1014 


2 MEN WITH y* TON TRUCK 


LIGHT DELIVERIES BY * 
ton van, $8 per hour 38? 1439 


BOARD. TAPE, TEXTURE. 
Over the phone estimates. 
598-9593 or 595-1S41 evenings 


Bactrical extractors 


RG HELLER ELECTRIC 
Resident, commercial, small in¬ 
dustrial. Old home rewiring. 
Very reasonable rates. 478-4032. 
If no answer 385-5335. 


mi _ 

BATHTUB 

DOCTOfl 


OLOER HOMES REWIRED— 
No down pymt. We finance at 
bank rates with approved credit 
EDDY'S ELECTRIC—385-7666 


Construction or Service Elect 
Free estimates. Call Henry 

384-3323 (24hrs) 


WHY SETTLE FOR LESS? 
When remodelling vour bath¬ 
room your choice should be qual¬ 
ity, service, a meaningful guar 
antee. experience - and lots of It, 
then price! Our In home bathtub 
: resurfaclng/chlp repair. In over 
30 colours, may be a little more 
expensive, but darn well worth 
| it - Over 25 years experience 
serving you! 

"Often imitated... 

I Never duplicated" 


3< 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
AND DIRECTORY 


38 HSMESS SERVICES 
AND DIRECTORY 


383-5614 


CONCRETE WORK. PATIOS. 
drlvmrxvT. sidewalks Freeestl 
mates. 3*1-13*1. 


CoranfeTfeg 


CUSTOM CERAMIC TILING, 
free estimates. All work guaran¬ 
teed. 656-5494. 


CERAMIC TILING. TOPQUAL- 
jtv work, low reasonable rates. 


DO YOU HAVE SMALL ELEC- 
trlcal wiring lobs? No one Is in¬ 
terested? Please call evenings, 
652 5809 



Eldred Electric 
382-8728 


SMALLER JOBS. OLD. NEW. 
Service calls. Most reasonable 
384-6315 evenings. 


LICENSE O ELECTRICIAN 
will do new wiring, rewiring, hot 
water tanks installed 479-9765. 


Clii i j Sanrica 


■ 


Excavating 


NOCASH NEEDED 

Attics, basements, yards. Any 
kind of lunk hauled away. Also 
buy & sell anything of value. 
Bob's, 386-2451 or 478-8789 


VICTORIA RECYCLING 
Free removal, scrap cars, hlde- 
a-beds. square frldoes and freez¬ 
ers. working or not. 388-6275 
P6ger 177 anytime. 381-5353 eve¬ 
nings 


REASONABLE CLEANUP 
Yards, basements, etc. also 
free estimates. 479-Sf 


hauling, ti 
656-5671. 


CLEAN UP YARDS. COM 
posts and basements, prompt 
service, reasonable rates, 

478-4943. 


R & B CLEAN-UPS BASE 
ments. yards, compost, etc. $1? 
hourly or lob rate. 595-3928. 


MANSELL BOBCAT SERVICE. 
Weekend specialists. Call 
478-9458, 478-2570, for leveling, 
backfilling, septic fields, post 
holes, sand, gravel or topsoil 
supplied, spread, leveled 


A-l BOBCAT SERVICES 
Complete range of Bobcat ser¬ 
vices Including power raking 
and stone removal. For profes¬ 
sional service call Steve Cook, 
479-2205 


LYLE'S BOBCAT SERVICE 
Residential, commercial, land 
384 * 742 ? a0d < * rlvewav oracJirso 


WOODWORKERSLTD 
Manufacturers of K.D. lumber 
and cabinets. Introduces its new 
line of fashion furniture. Intro¬ 
ductory offer on 3 piece teak or 
walnut melamine wall units, 

'ebtes *$68* ** tables ' * 85 ' * nd 
ALSO*— New exclusive line of 
European Blum cabinet hard¬ 
ware Come down to the old mill 
and see us. Weekdays 7:30-5:00. 
Cr. Hillside and Bridge 388-6645 


REGLAZE BATHTUBS ON 
premises white or coloured, also 
sinks, stoves and frldoes. Porce 
lin or fiberglass surface also 
chip repairs Phone Abbey Re^ 
finishing Company. 381-2073. 


COMPLETE REPAIRS, RENO 
vations and hauling done Satis 
faction guaranteed. 384-8075 
pager 1708 


SUNDECKS. CARPORTS, 
stairs, or perhaps a finished 
basement Whatever your need, 
give us a call, 388-7835 > 


krtorior Dtsifu 


ROBERTSON'S EXCAVATING 
Track machine with back hoe 
Roads, basements, backfilling. 
595-8530. 


BRENTWOOD BOBCAT SER- 
vlce, backhoe work, sand fills, 
leveling, etc 652-3519, 656-7089 


BEST WAY CLEANUP, 
yards, compost, garage, etc 
Free estimate. S12.hourly or lob 
rale. 4794)285. 


CLEANUP MAN AND EMPTY 
truck looking for work,reason- 
able.385-7965. 


CLEANUPS. BASEMENTS, 
attics, yards. «- 


lunk hauling, 658-! 


omposts 


HAULING ANO CLEANUPS. 
Basement, yard, compost Free 
estimates. Eugene's, 383-3528 


FILL IT TO THE BRIM, $30. 46 
ton truck with racks. Phone any- 
tlma 385-614? 


HAVE TRUCK, WILL HAUL - 
refuse removal at flat rates. 


big or small Call Paul, 478^832. 


FATHER ANO SON WITH VAN. 
delivery, cleanups, etc. 386-9500. 


___ _ _ _ILL. WIL 

clean and haul. Paul; 477-4537 


STEVE BUTLER 
CONST. LTD. 

Commercial-residential, reno¬ 
vations and design. Please call 


JONES BROS. 
CONSTRUCTION 
Complete custom homes. Let us 
give you 

Phase of' . _ 

anew. 656-2164,656-1897, 


i estimate on any 
r home Top refar- 


WHEATON 

CONSTRUCTION LTD. 
General Contractors 
Building Consultants 
385-5702 


Phoenix Fencing 

We specialize In chain link fenc¬ 
ing from yards to tennis courts. 
For free estimate call 384-2024 


FURNISHING YOUR 
NEW HOME? 

or 

| REMODELLING vour 
PRESENT HOME? 

ST ANOARO Furniture's 
professional design staff Is 
j ready to help. Call 382-5111 for ai 
appointment 


MILLER'S FENCE ANDGATE. 
supply and/or install chain link 
fences, residential. Industrial, 
tennis courts, dog runs and re¬ 
pairs Free estimates 6567529 


FENCE CITY 

All types fencing, chain link, or 
wood, tennis courts, dog runs, 
etc. Nothing, too big or small. 
Call 383-3425 for estimate. 


ISLAND CHAIN LINK 
Fencing In wire or wood 
Small lobs a specialty 
477-0331 


EUROPEAN CRAFTSMAN, 
all types of fencing and repairs. 
Guaranteed work. Gordon Head, 


Fbofag mi SaMhg 



COMPLETE FLOOR CENTRE 
Hardwood, Carpets and Linos 
532 William St., 3844343 
Nights: AI, 386-3078 
Mika, 652-4308 


QUALITY LANDSCAPING 
Ltd. Pruning, gardening, main¬ 
tenance and cleanup. New lawn 
preparation, power raking, 
eerlatlng, stone work. Monthly 


FREE ESTIMATES, ROTO- 
1 11 1 ing. rotovatlng, lawn care, 
tall grass cut. edging, chain saw 
Ing, tree removal, brush 
cleared, general cleanups, open 
or covered hauling Call the 
Hardy Bunch. 385-5620. 5-9 pm. 


Janitor Sarrica 


VICTORIA MAID SERVICE, 
experienced maids and lanltors, 
no lob too large or small, work 
guaranteed. 384-3344. 


ATTENTION LANDSCAPERS 
Professional or amature 
No more raking or picking 
stones. Call A-1 Bobcat Service, 
479-2205 for complete pre-seecF 
ir>o preparation. 


DUTCH LANDSCAPING LTD. 
Professional Services In new 
lawn preparations, designing, 
layouts, planting, low mainte¬ 
nance gardens. Fully guaran¬ 
teed. Free estimates. 47&1023. 


PORTUGESE LANDSCAPING 
Stone work, rock walls, fire 
places, and landscaping. Free 
estimates. Reasonable prices 
Jose Vlvalros 386-6665 


CREATIVE LANDSCAPING 
Designing and redesigning. Ar¬ 
tistic layouts. Free estimates. 
Dutch Horticultural back 
ground. 477-7882. 


LANDSCAPING AND STONE 
work, retaining walls and fac¬ 
ing, good workmanship, 
598-21 lr. 


ED'S TRACTOR SERVICE. RO- 
tovaflno. leveling yards, brush 
cutting. 479-2204. 


MmhgAStom* 

MOVES AND DELIVERIES. 
iugene^fsS-fsM^en 1, 

ACCEL MOVES, EFFICIENCY 
at a lower rate. 381-2059 

PaMm ai D*c*rat*n 

PAINTING AND DECORAT- 
mg. interior and exterior, paper 
hanging a speciality. 30 years 
experience. All work guaran¬ 
teed. Immediate service on 
small lobs. 479-9401 after 5 pm 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER, 
interior and exterior. Small re¬ 
pairs If needed References 
available. Guaranteed work at 
reasonable rates. Free esti¬ 
mates 479-2210. 

TWO EXPERIENCED PAINT- 
ers. interior, exterior, special 
rates for senior citizens Com¬ 
pletely equipped, to get the iob 
done fast. Very inexpensive. 
Phone after 5pm. 385-3888. 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER, 
interior and exterior, small re¬ 
pairs If needed, references 
available, guaranteed work at 
reasonable rates, free esti¬ 
mates 479-^975. 

GARRETT PAINTING, PA- 
perhanging, interior and exteri¬ 
or, fast and friendly service. 
For free estimate please call 
Charles Garrett 478-0992. 

EXCELLENT WORK, PRO 
fesslonal interior and exterior 
painter, wallpapering a spe 
cialty Haynes Painting, 384-5263 
or 384-8075 pager 1227. 

OLD AGE PENSIONERS PRE- 
ferred. Residential painting. 
Yellow pages or Garth Glover 
Painting, 385-6422. 

B.M.B. PAINTING, RESIDEN- 
tial & Commercial, free esti¬ 
mates, reasonable rates. 20 
years experience. 642 4522. 

IF QUALITY AS WELL AS 
price Is important call Specialty 
Painting. Solid references. 
5954424 

QUALITY PAINTING! REA- 
sonable rates. Start immedi¬ 
ately! Hourly or contract 
598-6139 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR 
painting. Reasonable rates. 
Free estimates. References. Ian 
Downle, 479-0146. 

EXPERT PAINTING BY FULL 
time professionals Work 
guaranteed Free estimates. 
386-0508 or 384-4201. 

MERINO PAINTING AND 
Decorating. Professional work 
manship guaranteed. 384-6104 

18 EXPERIENCE, PAINTING 
and decorating. Free estimates. 
Guaranteed work. 381-2567. 

JOURNEYMAN PAINTER, 1 

has own equipment, will work by i 
hour or contract. 478-3167. 

PAINTING. INSIDE AND OUT. 
Free estimates, low rates,. | 
477-0876. 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER | 
will do interior and exterior, 
small plaster repairs. 592-7137. 1 

INTERIOR PAINT SPECIAL- 
ist; reasonable, free estimates. 1 
Margot. 383-4798 

PAINTING, NO JOB TOO 1 

small, interior and exterior. 
Contact Steve 382 6566 

PUsttrtrt 

PLASTERING AN0 STUCCO- | 

and lathing Ask for Jim Eve- 1 
mng calls welcome 478-1118, ' 

1 Jimy's Plastering & Stucco. 

STUCCO 

New and older homes stuccoed, i 
Quality work. Brook Plastering, 
i 478-8775 

PLASTERING. STUCCO AND 
stucco wire. Quality work, com¬ 
petitive rates. Free estimates. 

1 652 9029.477-4084. 

STAN OLSON 

383-0897 

COLEMAN PLASTERING ! 

Quality lath and stucco, i 
: 478-9976 

FRIEDRICH PLASTERING 
^ and stucco. Older homes. 

1 656-2064 

p2A$J€RrNG, STUCCO, RE- 

pairs, reasonable, 479-4779. 

Phmkiig «i Huttag 

NEW FIRM 

i Renovations, new construction, 
discounts. Law and Son Plumb¬ 
ing Service Ltd.^658-8112. After 
< hours 658-8163 

REPAIRS AND RENOVA- 
tions, 20 years experience, rea¬ 
sonable rates. 24 hour service. 
652-5813 

LOW COST PLUMBING RE 
pairs, excellent workmanship. 
Days: 383-0149; evenings and 


DAVIDS PLUMBING 

Hot water tanks, plumbing re¬ 
pairs, drain cleaning 386-8881 1 

DAS PLUMBING SERVICE, 
alter at Ions and repairs. Reason¬ 
able. 478-0965. 

REASONABLE RATE PLUMB- 
er, 24 hour service. Free esti¬ 
mates, 477-5742. 

JIM MCGREGOR REPAIRS. 
384.5320, 385-9739 

Prirtkg l T]r**i*tti>( 

ATS Typesetting Services 
Quality typesetting and paste-up 
service. Fast turn around at 
competitive prices. 

812 Cormqrant St. 385-2076 

RtfriftratiM mi 
AtfCwAtiMBg 

BURNETT REFRIGERATION 
Fridoes and freezers serviced In 
your home. 382-4134 ( 24 hrs) 

WHITE'S REFRIGERATION. 
Prompt, efficient servlo In vour 
home 381-2653 (24 hrs ) 

iMhg 


Tidirfci 

durodek 

Vlnvl sundeck floor covering for 
new and old decks. Free esti 
mates. 478-0641. 

TaDm 

LEATHERWEAR ALTERA- 
flon$. repairs, remodelling, 
cleaning and dyeing. Ellev r s 
Leather Fashions. 738 Johnston, 
383-7834 

BRITISH CUSTOM TAILORS 
Closed for July. Back Aug. 5 with 
our annual Aug. sale. 

1311 BLANSHARD 383^2632 

OAK BAY TAILORS 
Custom tailoring, alterations, 
ladles and mens. Leather altera 
tlons. 1826 Oak Bay, 598-4131 

Tre. itrrict 

DANGEROUS TREES RE 
moved, accurate topping and 
falling. Thlnlng and limbing. In¬ 
sured 478-9346 

OLYMPIC TREE SERVICE 
Falling, topping. da«tgerous tree 
removal. Insured. 478-2850. 

TONYS TREE SERVICE, 
trees removed, pruned, etc. Rea 
sonable 474-1014 

UpfetMtcy 

GREGG FURNITURE 

Est. 1959. Guaranteed work, free 
estimates. Competitive prices on 
new furniture or reupholstery. 
1000's of fabrics, fabric rem¬ 
nants small or large yardage at 
greatly reduced prices. 

388-7365 2300 DOUGLAS 

ACE UPHOLSTERY 
381-1321 

Quality workmanship. Europe¬ 
an craftsman. Free estimates 

SEMI RETIRED UPHOL- 
sterer recovers vour chair, $75 
with vour material. Chester 
fields, $150. 478-1262. 

WanhwiMEgHDMt 

STEEL SHELVING, LOCKERS, 
Binning and storage equipment 
J.N.D. Enterprises 

1431 Lang St 59A9380 

WaUhii 


31 PERSONALS ’ 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 
3834415 


H BUSINESS 
PERSONALS 


PERSONALIZED 
DATING SERVICE 

Helps you meet the people who 
want lo meet you, whether 
you're looking for sincere friend¬ 
ship or a life long relationship. 
Call today 

478-3213 

Canada's largest and most ac- 
five dating service. 


FILL YOUR NEW MOLDS 
with cement and turn out land¬ 
scaping stones to satisfy a grow 
ing market. Full variety of 
molds Included In our starter kit. 
Training provided. For all de 


IF YOU DON'T NEED AN 
OFFICE BUT YOU DO 
NEEDAN ADDRESS 
USE OURS 

Mailing address (lockup boxes) 
T elephone answering 
Secretarial assistance 
CAPITAL OFFICE SERVICES 
219-1207 Douglas St. 3867324 


PROFESSIONAL TAROT 
card, palm reader and advisor 
may help and advise on all prob 
lems, special price with this ad 
All readings private and confl 
dentlal. Open from 10am. to 10 
pm. located at 3339 Maplewood 
Rd. off Cook St. 


C-2 

BUIUMM SUPPLIES 


Im) 


HOME LUMBER 

i BuMbf Seppkat 

470 Afdeiw Rd 


"SWINGERS" 

Join Canada's fastest growing 
adult contact magazine Single 
oals may place FREE ads. $4 for 
latest Issue or free information 
write: J&D. P O Box 1383 Vic 
torla, B.C. V8W 2W3 


PATIO SCREEN DOORS. ALSO 
fly screens for windows. Old, 
established, guaranteed, Dun 
can, Ltd. 385-4258 from 6 to 9 
amor during evening. f 


Self Care Hair - Churlev Morn 
Natural Haii styling - You owe it 
to yourself. Phone for compli 
mentary consultation. 385-7223. 


COMING TO VICTORIA SOON: 
Silva Mind Control Course: Free 
lecture. For more information 
call 385-3877. 


INSTANT CASH FOR 
B.C.R.I.C. Shares, Harbour 
Square Ticket Sales, 910 Govern 
ment St. 38)4114. 


ACHY FEET. HEADACHE, 
backache? Vita-Flex Reflexo 
logy relieves. Feet: 5 minutes, 
lunch-hour . 383-5562, 384 3841 


WELDING REPAIRS. REA- 
sonable price, 923 Caledonia. 
Berny. 386-1164. 


WMtwCItaMre 


BOB'S JANITORIAL SERVICE 
Take a summer vacation, let us 
cl^an your windows prqfessiqn- 


FOR SATISFACTION TRY 
Capital City Building Mamlen- 
ance. Residential and commer¬ 
cial 382 2662 10% discount with 
mention of this ad. 

31 TRAVEL 


TENSION RELIEF. RELAXA 
tlon exercises and/or massage. 
Phone Hugh Macpherson, 
595-4914. 


QUIT SMOKING. SEND $2.98 
and stamped self addressed en¬ 
velope for secret to success. Sta- 
tionC. Box 6191. V8P 5L5. 


HYPNOSIS COUNSELLING 
Licensed consultant Bill Bov 
chuk Call 382 4092 


STOP SMOKING PERMAN 
ently. University proven suc- 
cessful. no obligation, 382-2262. 


ASTROLOGY READINGS FOR 
appoUitment call Wayne at 



IMRS PAYN-JONES. TRANCE 
, medium, questions answered, 
j 386-3603 __ 


JanUlar 

381-1125 


The Holiday Home Sitters 

BON VOYAGE? 

Before you place vour vacation 
reservations, place a call to Jan 
Mar. We'll worry about vour 
yard, vour pets, your plants and 
your mall, while you're having 
the vacation of vour life. Next 
time you leave town, leave the 
worryingtous Bonded. 


PSYCHIC READINGS, TEA 
cups and cards Fondue Pot Res 
taurant. 1100 Yates. 388 4468 


CARD READING IN DEPTH 
Seventh Year_6561753 


MAUI—BEACHFRONT 

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM, 
FULLY FURNISHED CONDO¬ 
MINIUM. PLENTY OF REC 
RE AT ION AND MILES OF 
SANDY BEACH WEEKLY 
AND DAILY RATES AVAIL¬ 
ABLE 383-4124 


ABC ELECTRIC LTD. 

831 YATES ST 382-7221 

Electrical lawnmower repairs 
All makes. Free pickup & dellv 
ery victoria area. 


FARMER 
CONSTRUCTION 
Design— Renovations 
30-5121 


T.4C. BUILDERS LTD. 
Framing 

385-5293 _385-85*7 


QUALITY FRAMING 

Frae estimates 
^1 or 652-2421 


HARVEYS LANDSCAPE 4 
Garden Service Experienced 
Chinese gardener. garden main¬ 
tenance and new lawn specialty 
Garden designing, redesign. All 
phases. 479-^78, 3644621 

TERRA NOVA 

For vour lawn reluvtnetlon, gar¬ 
den restoration and yard mai- 
tenence Free estimate 3814660 


QUALITY GARDEN CARE 
end maintenance ottered at ree- 
wnatole rates. 4744451. 


ROCKWORKS. RETAINING 
walls, stone-facings. Call Dave 
595-7746. 


Mm 


i Soviet 


EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIR 
Reg 4tS BURNSIDE E 3>6-3222 


**f&sttr«t 


DALE MILLER CONSTRUC- 
tlon Custom homes Renova 

£3*?. * nd ,wv 


EVERGREENS. HEDGES EX- 

4 * 


ttom F 
iwdng 1 


S TRACI 
■vetlngi 


TOR SERVICI 


T 


DRUM CARTAGE 

I Truck tor every move FuMy In¬ 
sured Reasonable rates. Free 
estimates, call 3t3-986i 


FOUNDATION ANO FRAMING 
crow ovaliaMe now will build to 
||yi ^Iteetet contractor 




GARDENIN^AT^FAIR PRICE 


ALL TYPES OF ROOFING AND 
repairs. Call Blue Diamond 
Roofing tor free estimates, all 
work guaranteed. 595-7722, 
595-4219 


K&M BUILDING 
Building, renovations, roofing 
and drywall. Free estimates. 
5954332. 4747110 


10 YEAR WARRANTY ON 
reroofing shingles supplied bv 
Hestoj) Brothers Roofing 


ASPHALT SHINGLES, ROOF- 

ing end re—roofing. Reasonable 
rates. Free estimates. 3t6-9t91, 
656-3492 


PARKER JOHNSTON LTD. 
1855 BLANSHARD. 3U-91I1 
"Rooftng Victoria Since 1915" 


TAR ANO GRAVEL ROOFING 
and re-roofing. Phone Control 
Sheet Metal, 4741114 


SHAKES ANO SHINGLES. 

aa* * 


MAUI 

Deluxe 2 bedroom fully 
furnished condominium avail¬ 
able Located on a safe sandy 
beach. 

OK Trucking Co Ltd 386-3414 


DELUXE 2 BR . 2 BATH CON 
dominium on sunniest beach in 
Maul. Good bookings still avail 
able. $500 for month of August. 
477-3039. 383-9512 


FATHER AND YOUNG SON 

S ng to Toronto, first week in 
gust. Will deliver your car for 
flat rate, or need a ride however 
far. 3844171, Larry 


EUROPEAN FOOT CARE 
Bv Monika 478-1245 


REFLEXOLOGY-FOOT 
Massage Call Marilyn 595 4789 


EDUCATION 


Gzrtiuiy, 


21 


® 

WESTERN HOMES LTD. 
\J037 Ck)Vfdele 366-5404 J 


REAL ESTATE 
PRE-LICENCE 

Tutoring for alIVnterested par¬ 
ties. Small groups. No future em¬ 
ployment obligation. For full de¬ 
tails call now CENTURY 21 
Western Homes Ltd. 386 3494 ( 24 

hrs). 


TUTORING—PROFESSIONAL 
help by experienced teacher. 
French, math, new and old 
methods. 594 2331. 


PRIVATE TENNIS LESSONS. 
$10 per hour, my court 592 1705. 


FUEL 


LADY WITH TICKET TO LAS 
Veoas would like lady with 
same. Pay your expenses. Lat 
ter part of August. Victoria 
Press Box, 500 ‘ 


HAWAII BOUND? ONE BED- 
room condo In Waikiki with pool 
and view, 656-4111 or 656-5328. 


PERSONALS 


I'M A SINGLE 30 YEAR OLD 
male, 6', 145 pounds. Likes 
camping, traveling, dining, 
dancing, sports and quiet times, 
seeking slim girl or similar Irv 
terests or can add to mine. I 
work up island but travel to 
Victoria frequently. We can't 
meet unless you write. All letters 
answered. Thank you. Victoria 
Press Box 484 


PROFESSIONAL MAN. Di¬ 
vorced, mid-forties, pood health, 
considerate and affectionate, 
seeks lady on whom to lavish his 
affection, a woman to cere for. 
lovingly and tenderly. I en|ov 
selling, hiking, music, elegant 
restaurants, fight-hearted corv 
versa tlon. 3864041 


BEAVER FUELS 

Full cord of green alder. $70. 
Well split, free delivery. 
382 9325 


FULL *4 TON PICKUP LOAD 
of seasoned alder, split and de¬ 
livered. S45 479-7444 


PRESTO LOG SPECIAL 
240 for $59.95 -delivered. 
386-1750.479-8877, 


SPLIT ALDERWOOD FOR 
sale. $70 cord delivered. 477-9853 
between 6-8pm 


ALDER WOOD, SPLIT. DE 
livered, $45 pickup load, $70 
cord. 4744815 


CUT YOUR OWN ALDER. THIS 
weekend only. $20 a pickup load. 
479 7444 John. 


TIMUR 


WITNESSES 

Anyone who witnessed the acci¬ 
dent at McKenzie & Saanich, 
Julv 22nd. Involving a taxi. After 
6pm. 6S84989or before 384-1121. 


NEED CRISIS LINE IS THE 
place to phone tor community 
Information and referral num¬ 
bers. Available 24 hours a day. 
NEED wants to be of service fo 
you, 3866323. 


32 YEAR OLD MALE WOULD 
like to meet a woman 20-32 for a 
sincere relationship, social 
drinker, but not into the bar 
scene. Reply Victoria Press Box 


WANTED TIMBER 

FELLED, BUCKEDor 
STANDING 
Fir, Cedar or Hemlock 
Ideal Sawmill Ltd. 
385-044) 


WANTED 

Standlngor felled timber Selec¬ 
tive logging and bulldozing 
ELI6LAKE TIMBER 658 5046 


Jir>g and bull. 

VKE -T IMBn 

BUHJNNfi SUPPLIES 


JUBILEE BUILDING 
SUPPLIES Ltd. 


50 YEAR OLD MAN WOULD 
like woman to share live aboard 
house boat. Life very simple, 
means not a must but helpful 
Reply Victoria Press Box 460 


ATTRACTIVE COUPLE, LATE 
30's, would like to meet another 
couple for quiet dinners and ro¬ 
mantic evenings. Victoria Press 

Box 417 


RAGING ECCENTRIC. NA 
ture lover, child hater, musi¬ 
cian. working man, 34. wants to 
meet lady with similar tandan- 
das 4794177, 


INEXPENSIVE RE-ROOFING, 

isaTiTjau*"'- wriod 


PREGNANCY ANO BIRTH 
control counselling, victoria 
Birth Control Clinic. For ap 
pointmeot phone 365-3351 

GENTLEMAN. OIVORCEO. 
nommoku. sincere would Ilka 
to meet unattached lady J2 42 
Victoria Press Bow 455. _ 

MALE. ?t. FRUSTRATED 
everyday Ufa. seeks new 
' j* Victoria 


INSULATION 
R12 $160 M 

R20 $260 M 

R28 $370 M 

ROOFING 
DOMTAR 
Asphalt Shingles 
Permatlte $10.95 Bdi 

Truseal $ 9.95 Bdl 

LUMBER 

2x4x6' Shorts 624 each 

2x4xt' utility $1.11 each 

2x4x10'utility $145 each 

Dashwood Windows 
Merit Cabinets 
Floor Coverings 

Seturdev.l OO - 5:30 






FRAMING CREW 
Bros Cons 


HAVE YOU GOT VJJu« fcfcTl 






BE* 


ours’ 

•nfiai conversion 
364 404? or Rick 


M8k CARTAGE 
$30 nor hour tor 7 man end 3 ton 
♦ryckwlth 2# box Insured 


CALL THE 
ei E h 


_ EHor tl 
«e»smgLtd 


E PROFESSIONALS 

rVrns? **" yr ° 


EUROPE BY CAR CONGE 

RlN young im son tq shore end 
SOveennonse* 477 *15 


PLYWOOD SALE 

STANDARD 

4x8—5/16 Std fir J6.25 
4x8—% Std fir 57.50 
4x8—'/j Std fir 510.25 
4x8 —'Vs Std fir T&G 512.50 
4x8 — 3 /* Sid 514.50 

Factory D:UnS 
4x8—V, 8.50 55.95 

4x8—Ve 11.50 56.50 

4x8-58 16.50 510.25 

4x8— 3 /< 18.50 513.50 

LUMBER SALE 

STD. and BTR FIR 
2x4—6' 5155 

2x4—92'/, pet Studs 5255 
2x4—8'—14' 5285 

2x6—8—14' 5285 

2x8—8'—24' 5310 

2x10—8'—24' 5365 

Louvered Bifolds 

# 1 Select Mahogany 
c/w hardware 
'/2 LouverFull Louver 
2668 538 534 

5068 574 565 

Duroid Shingles 

210 wf. No. 1 Asphalt self 
seal. All colours in stock, 
per bundle. 59.95 

INSULATION 

FIBREGLASS 
PRICE PER 1,000 sq.ft. 
R12—4" 5165 

R20—6" 5265 

R28—8” 5375 

GYPR0C 

Price per 1,000 Sq. Ft. 
W GYPROC 5135 
! 5 /b" FI RESTOP 5180 
STUCCO WIRE 530 
iPERMAX 56.50 

Deliveries made any¬ 
where on Vancouver Is¬ 
land and Gulf Islands. Be¬ 
fore you buy compare our 
prices. For quality, ser¬ 
vice and guaranteed sav¬ 
ings, phone: 

jy&ML 

building malarial* 

3005 J AC KLIN-RD. 

2x4— ECON $99. M 

1x8—ECONshiplap $120/M 
3 V'K3 BOARD per sheet $5.50 
4" CE R AMIC TILE 8S<d$Q.ft. 

1 «■' ASPENITE per sheet $5.95 
4x8- Vj" Drywall per sheet $4 19 

OPEN MON -SAT 

478-5509 


FENCING 

Light constructed 3' picket fence 
50 — $49. Standard 3' picket 
fence 50' — $69 4' board or good 
neighbor fence 50' — $72. 
SAANICHLUMBER 
1496 ADMIRALS RD 
385-7486 


SS LUMBER, 6535 FORD ROAD 
Duncan opposite Forest Mu 
seum, up Drlnkwater Rd, second 
roadon right ; axl2"cedar bevel 
sidino. $325 3M. 1x8" cedar 
channel siding. $285 BM 1x8" 
rough red cedar 23« lineal tool 
112-7465041 


CHEAP NEW FACTORY SAL- 
vage glass, and thermo units 
Less than ’'j regular price Win 
dowscreens. $1 $4 Can deliver 
Works rear of Stagg s Lumber, 
Fifth Street. Sidney. Open Mon 
dav-Frldav 12:30-4pm. Saturday 
8-12noon 656-6656 


ALUMINUM WINDOWS 
Discounted prices for odd sizes 
Also, thermal conversions, patio 
doors, screens, aluminum sid 

ino and gutters. 

Alcan Building Products. 6680 
Mirah Rd (off Keating X Rd.) 
652 3901 


’ i PRICE SALE ON RESIDEN 
tial garage doors Single and 
double wide doors plus replace 
ment parts sold daily. 9am 12 
noon at 685 Wilson St or phone 
386 3672 


SLUGGETT& BROWN 
JOINERY 

Wood Windows, Doors. Frames 
526 DISCOVE R Y ST 382 3011 


18" HANDSPLIT BARN 
shakes, top quality, good supply. 
$56 Delivery available 652 4368 


CEDAR FENCE POSTS. SPLIT 
or round, also fence rails. Phone 
652-4870. 


SINGLE PAIN 8X5 FIXED 
window $50. Single pain opening 
Sx4$35 656-4266 


70 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


USED PIANO 

Next to new Heintzman studio 
Plano. Slight cabinet damage, 
oak finish S2795 

USEDORGANS 
Hammond, Draw bars, percus¬ 
sion $1495 

Lowry Holiday, ideal for begin 
ner $695 

Many More Too Numerous 
To Mention. 

Delivery and Lessons Included 
Terms Available 

BALDWIN PIANO & 
ORGAN CENTRE 
"Right Across From The Bay” 
1736 DOUGLAS_3810551 


1*772 Kirkpatrick 652-9141 

OFF KEATING X RQAQ 

i HOUSECRAFT 
HARDWOOD ' 

HkNkiM Lid j 

J 

[ NOW IN STOCK 
T BB* Am 

AM TILE AT DIRECT IM 
xic«, a •WHfirur saving 


VERY SPECIAL FLOOR 
MODEL!! THOMAS "TRIAN 
ON" THE ULTIMATE IN 
ORGANS AS USED BY 
LAWRENCE WELK.SAVE 
$2000 TRADE IN THAT ORGAN 
FOR THISBEAUTY THAT HAS 
EVERYTHING FULLY 
GUARANTEED 

BERNIE PORTER 
MUSIC 

I 725 CALEDON IA 382-9542 

PARK FREE 
CLOSED MONDAYS 
JULY AND AUGUST 

JUST FOR YOU! 
a guitar tailored to vour needs — 
from OOYSSEY You select the 
components, wood and finish, to 
the finest detail We'll give you a 
price In one day's time, and your 
guitar in 6 8 weeks — sells 
i faction guar anteed ai 

McMusic 

COL WOOD 

7244 Sooke Road_478 462? 

CLEARANCE SALE 

All guitars and amps must go no 

vrrmts&'S.r 0 tLtc 

Still Nw best god* 
ter vicing and repair sat 

THE GUITAR SHOP 

m* 


i ONLY $4 7$ 
•far and amp 




301 $014 

MAMM Li S PAUL COPY Wl TH 
* acelletH umdittun $395 


Wi* 

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































C3 

70 MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


>«/( 


THIS WEEKS SPECIAL 
HAMMOND 2 manual or 
model 9722 with rhythm 
bench was $1595 NOW $1495. 

GLEESON MUSIC CITY 

'Homeof HAMMOND Organ 
714 FORT_388-962 

ANTIQUE 
PIANO STOOLS 

STARTING AT $75. & UP 
SCOTT PIANO & ORGAN 
U00 Blanshard_386-243 


American make, P.A. Stark, 
circa 1916, cabinet refinished. 
Mechanism rebuilt and guaran¬ 
teed. $2995 or closest offer. 
Phone An ‘ ‘ ~ ' 

477-6439 

JUBILEE TENOR SAXO 
phone. Complel 
Pamus price 
MUSIC, 1108 
Port), 386-8475 


All stainless steel 3 good cym 
bols plus hi hats. $3200. 
112 748-1208 


Specialists in piano restoration. 


Fort, 385-3307 


$400 479-7680 or 592 8380 


piano tuner, for sale, good condi- 


cellent. $350. 385-1747 


MASON & RISCH PIANO, EX- 


HAMMOND ORGAN. LI00, 
nice condition, offers on $900. 
382 5742. 


SELMER MARK VI ALTO SAX 
ophone. 5 piece drum set 
Zildjian cymbals. 595-3768 


months old. 479-9253. 


595-0791 or 479 4662 


71 MUSK TEACHERS 


'Enroll To-Day" 

FOR 

PROFESSIONAL 
INSTRUCTION 
Guitar -Accordion 
Piandl Orums 
Organ - Violin 


MUSIC 


piano and voice. 388-9153 


MRS DIANE FERGUSON 


area. 477-7078 


Your home. 386-4210 


Gordon Head area, 477-6439. 


77 MOTORCYCLES 


NEW 79 


400 CUSTOMS 

INCLUDES 

* Frei 9 ht and Prep 

* Carrier and Backrest 

* Deluxe Eng. Guard 

$2199 

ALL 1980 

HONDA CUSTOMS 

200,400,650. 750,900 

IN STOCK NOW 
PLUS 

NEW 79 

HONDA CB 650 
$2699 

ALL AT 


77 INT0RCICUS 

VESPA MOTORSCOOTERS 
MOPEDS— 18 MODELS 
ISLAND MOTORS. 385-3515 

602 Esquimau Rd. Dealer 5138 

1977 BMW R100S 1000 CC, 
large Krauser bags, excellent 
condition Phone 6560076 any¬ 
time after 4:30pm 

1977 YAMAHA TRIALS, LOW 
mileage, great shape, $800 or 
offers. 477-0548 after 5pm, 
478j-S451 after 7pm 

19^5 KAWASAKI 900, EXCEL- 

lent condition, must sell this 
week. $2100 or better offer. 
112 748-0605. 

79 XS ELEVEN TOURING SPE 
clal, completely Vetter 
equipped. Immaculate. 652-4280 
after 3pm. 

75 YAMAHA RD250. EXCEL 
lent shape. 7850 miles, rebuilt 
motor. $750. View at 61 Caton 
Place 

1978 HONDA 250 XLS. LADY 
conditioned, road driven, helmet 
included. 4000 kms, $1450 or best 
otter Colleen, 381 5124. 

1977 YAMAHA YZ80, NEW 
sprockets, chain, tune-up. excel¬ 
lent condition. $450 firm. 
112-748-1527 Duncan 

WINDJAMMER WITH BRACK- 
et for 1980 Suzuki 750 or 1100. 
Almost new, $500 . 5954)051 after 

5. 

Brook lands Motorcycles 
HARLE Y-DAVIDSON HONDA 
937 Fort Dealer 6121 383-5926 

79 YAMAHA 750 SPECIAL, 
custom paint, oood running con¬ 
dition. $2300. 38*2936 

MUST SELL 76 GOLDWING. 
Immaculate condition. What 
otters? 381-1902 

1978 BLACK YAMAHA 500, 
mao tires, front and back disc 
brakes $1400 383-4074. 

1974 HONDA 500 CB, EXCEL- 
lent running, fully dressed. 
$1800 383-7751. 

75 HONDA GOLDWING 1000, 
low mileage, one owner $2900. 
652 2264. 

SUZUKI 500, GOOD CONDI- 
tlon, new tires, $800 or best otter 
6562492 or 652 9655 

78 GS 750 SUZUKI, 3600 KM, 
excellent condition. $2600. 
592 9298 

1979 750K HONDA, 1300 KM. 
windshield, back traveling case, 
extras, 382-3326. 

1980 YAMAHA 1100 SPECIAL, 
4000 kms, excellent condition, 
479 5338 

1965 YAMAHA 250. NEEDS A 
little bit of work, $200 or best 
otter. Ask for Terry, 384-4805 

77 SUZUKI DS185, NEW PARTS 
and extras. Very good condition. 
Otters on $800 38*1254. 

1979 MOBBYLETTE MOPED 
for sale. 900 km. Excellent condi¬ 
tion. $400. 383-1292 

1975 YAMAHA 100, LOW MILE- 
aae, good condition. 385-5477 
after 5pm. 

1979 KAWASAKI 400 LTD, Ex¬ 
cellent condition, $1850. 
6561723 

76 CAN AM 250. PAIR OF 
leathers, size 32 waist; pair size 

11 motocross boots. 3864216. 

1975 200CC YAMAHA STREET 
bike. 6200 miles. Excellent. $650. 
477-3319 (Peter) 

1974 YAMAHA 80, MECHANICS 
special. $150 or best offer. 
477-9235. 

1976 YAMAHA DT-17S, BEAU- 
tiful. not a mark on it. $800. 
112 743-3062 after 5pm. 

1975 HONDA SUPER SPORT. 
400 cc, 4 cylinders, $750. 
384 5659 

1976 HONDA SUPER SPORT 4 
cylinder 750 with windjammer. 
19,500 miles. 652-2728 evenings 

1978 YAMAHA XS 1100E, LOW 
highway miles, immaculate, 
extras. $3500. 386 1048, 477-6560. 

1975 360 CB HONDA, 9500 
miles, backrest. Offers on $750. 
478 1227. 

79 YAMAHA 650 SPECIAL II. 
592 3236, weekdays, after 5. 

112 390-2692, weekends. 

1978 HONDA CB550, 10,000 KM, 

A l condition. 2 helmets. Serge, 
after 5pm 38*9207 

1971 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
Sportster, fair condition, $2600. 
otters. 383-0103 evenings 

79 YAM X750F, TESTED, LOW 
miles, bars and luggage. After 
4om. 59*1304 

76 400 SUPER SPORT, GOOD 
condition, extras. Must sell. 
$750 4 77 3917, 479-1122 Mike. 

1979 RM125N. EXCELLENT 
condition, runs well, looks trick. 
642 3214 


1978 YAM 100. STREET. NEW 
condition, 2 helmets, must sell. 
$700 592-5475 or 592-0261 


1970 BSA ROYAL STAR A50. 
Springer front end. Completely 
rebuilt. Offers. 656-4139. 


1980 HONDA CM400T, LIKE 
new, low mileaoe. lady 
$2000 595-7622, 388-4433 


71 TRIUMPH, HOG WHEEL, 
hard tail, asking $1300. 721-3668. 



TRIUMPH 1958, 650CC. CHOP 
per 382-6856 after 7pm. 


M-X SALE 
ON NOW 

ALL 1980 MODELS 
MX 100 reg. $939 SALE $859 
MX 175 reg. $1399 SALE $1299 

MAXIM 1 


p.s. 

we still have a tew 1980 400 
SPECIALS in stock. 

ALL AT 


MINI BIKE FOR SALE, $160 
firm price. Please call 383-3857. 


MUST SELL. 78 SR500 YAMA- 
ha. low mileage. $1200. 383-3128 


1979 GS750 SUZUKI, VERY 
clean. Open to offers. 382-2549 


1977 YAMAHA XT 500 EN- 
duro, good condition. 592-6222. 


WANTED: HARLEY DAVID- 
son sidecar. 479-0671. 


78 550 HONDA, OFFERS. 
477 2775. 



TOO MANY 
USED BIKES! 

From 50 cc to 1400 cc 
HONDAS, YAMAHAS 
SUZUKI, HARLEY 
Many 500 cc and up 

NO REASONABLE 
OFFER REFUSED 

AT 


925 Yates St. Dealer 5245 
382 1928 _ 382-4515 

VICTORIA HONDA 


tV79 HAftLf V DAVIDSON 
‘4JCrt*tor 1 00b < «ndv apple red. 
< ca n pM ei y stock excellent can 
di«ion JJtO k lcmefers $4500 

4/ 7357 


BICYCLE 

gmfel shop 

2S42 GOVERNMENT ST 
384-4722 

1215 ESQUIMAU RD 
388-6712 

LARGE SELECTION OF 
NEW 6 USEO BIKES' 
TRAPES WELCOME 


FIVE NEW 3-SPEED BIKES, 
two ladies. three man s, com¬ 
plete with lights and many 
extras Phone 6S2-4240. 64 pm, 
Monday to FrIdoy. 


BOY S BICYCLE, BRC. 19" 
frame, recently overhauled $65. 
592 93>$ 


NISHIKI 10 SPEED (OLYM- 
ia) 23 frame As new $198. 


pta) 23' 

ian-SM2 


? » GIRLS HIGH RISER Bl 
tytievgoodcondition $45each 


EXCELLENT CONDITION 7 
agaeler for boy 4 to* years. $2$ 


BOATS mi MARINE 


CENTRE LTD. 
BOATS 

GLAS-PLY 

HOURSTON GLASCRAFT 
MIRROCRAFT 
BAYLINER 
CANAVENTURE 

STERN DRIVES 
BMW Volvo Penta 
OMC—Mercruiser 

OUTBOARDS 

JOHNSON 

SEAGULL 

NEW LOCATION 
730 HILLSIDE 

382-8291 

Service entrance from 
Market St. 


■OATS m4 HUME 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 

a BOATS mi MAXINE M 


IT'S 

BOTTOM TIME! 

Come and let us do your bottoms 
with our fast and efficient 
pressure washer. Phone for ap¬ 
pointment for travel lift or ma¬ 
rine ways for haul outs. 

Canoe Cove Maripa Ltd. 656-5633 


WELL KEPT AND IN GOOD 
condition 19* fiberglass hardtop 
with 170 Volvo Inboard/outboerd 
on trailer. $5,200 or nearest 
offer. Can be seen at 6624 Ebor 
Terrace off Amity Dr , Sidney. 


uulIt by Philbrooks, fully 
eoulpped, value $40,000. For sale 
or exchange for real estate In 
Gordon Head. First time on 
market. 477-8804 


Open 7 Days a Week 
| 656-5711 656-3915 

Evenings, 652-4386 


DOUBLE EAGLE 

New 17' Deluxe 

* Full camper top 

* 2 elec wipers 

* 80 HP Mercury el. 

* 2000 lb. galv. EZ Loader 

* battery and box 

* Reg. list $10,267 

PACKAGE $9,240 

****** 

GOOD SELECTION 
MERCURY and 
HONDA Outboards 
IN STOCK NOW 

MULLINS 

MARINE 

925 Yates St. 382-4515 


^Star 
^Marine 


TIPTON'S 
OUTBOARDS LTD 
Vancouver Island's largest 
Evlnrudedealer. 112 749-3263 

40 T. PACKER INS, FIBER 
GLASS AL. FISH HOLD. 8V.71 
G.M. C. OR L. & HERR. GILL- 
NET LIC. AVAIL. SOME HAL. 
GEAR. 112-624-5354 


MARINE BROKERS 
SAIL 8, POWER 
9843 — 2nd. St . Sidney 
656-3112 


CHARTERS 
Fishing, cruising, diving, etc. 
Hourly, dally, weekly rates. Also 
weekday specials. Venture Boat 
Charters.l12-753-553\ 


mercury 
marine 

385-1457 800Cloverdale 

VHF 

SPECIAL — 55 channel dual 
watch marine radio telephone 
• with antenna arfd PA horn 
! $699.50 CB units $109,95, VHF 12 
channel $399.95. 

I B.C. SOUND & RADIO Service 
| 931 FORT _ 383-4731 


CAMPION 
DOUBLE EAGLES 
SUNRUNNERS 

LUND Aluminum 
JOHNSON Outboard 
ROADRUNNER Trailers 

bob wbifto 
maria* U4. 

SALESANDSERVICE 
Corner Harbour and Resthaven 
656-7286 

SUMMER HOURS 
OPEN 7DAYS 
9a.m.-6p.m. 


6u/. 


GAS DOCK 

Open Every Dav 
8a.m.-9p.m. 

VAN ISLE MARINA 

1 Tsehum Harbour Box 2130 

656-1138 _ Sidney, B.C 

| 22 CABIN CRUISER. VOLVO 

i Inboard/outboard, head, sink, 
I reberth, compass, CB, trim tabs, 

: blower, bilg pump, depth 
1 sounder, anchor pack, peddles, 
new carpeting. This boat is in 
top notch shape. Can be seen 
evenings and weekends. 
382-5622. 


24' COMMANO BRIOGE 1974 
Reinell, new canvas. CB, depth 
sounder, low hours $12,500 In¬ 
cludes moorage until March. 
382-0075 or 598-3178 


BOATS mi MARINE 


SELLING 25' TOLYCRAFT Ex¬ 
press Cruiser; valued to $8000. 
Consider smaller boat or truck 
as part trade. 381-6623 days. 
656-4850 evenings. 


14' K&C WITH TRAILER, 80HP 
Johnson, much recent work, 
semi new top, good ski boat, 
$1595. Must selTT382-4179 let 
ring. 


24' COMMANO BRIOGE, 188 
Merc I/O, FWC, head, galley, 
dinghy, trim tabs, etc. $13,000. 
Consider pickup, car or ? in 
trade. 478-4562. 


19FT. F/G STUERY ECONOMI 
cal 4 cyl., 140 Merc. I.O., CB, 
AM FM, head, dual bail.. Caul- 
kins trailer, $8500 or near offer 
652-5534, 


1978 TELSTAR 26' FIBER 
glass boat. 350 V8 Chrlscraft, 
FWC, command bridge, sleeps 5, 
3 burner propane stove, oven, 
standuphead, 25gal. fresh water 
tank Cabin finished In teak, dual 
controls, sounder, 24 channel 
CB, 100 gallons of fuel, 2 tanks, 
Nlea Prime mufflers, stainless 
steel shaft, 16” propel lor, 3 bat¬ 
teries, power steering, elec, trim 
tabs, breakfast nook, 6'6 clear 
a nee in cabin, auto, bilge pump, 
Kistar filter, fire extinguisher, 
vapour fan, stainless steel rail¬ 
ings, bow and stern, gas sniffer, 
anchor and chain, running 
lights, anchor light, self draining 
deck, top windshield. Boat has 
lust been completely over¬ 
hauled. Asking price $23,500. 
Can be seen at anytime. Isnowin 
the water. Call Bruce Lockhart, 
388-5714 or 382-6315. 


FOR SALE BY OWNER. 197926' 
Campion “Toba”. Twin 140-280 
Volvo, 180 operating hours on 
each. (80% trolling time). Com¬ 
mand bridge. Alcohol stove and 
oven. Head, extra long range 
fuel tank. Depth sounder. VHF. 
This boat Is immaculate and like 
new $29,900. 656-3125 


24' COMAAAND BRIDGES 
Bell Boy, 1881.W.C, $15,900 

Reinell 1901.0. $13,900 

Sangster marlin, clean $15,900 
Bell Bov 188 f w.c. $15,900 

Sea Ray ISSf.w.c. $16,900 

CEDAR GROVE YACHTS 
656-2580 


19* BRANOLEMAYR, 2 50 OUT 
boards, upper cabin, needs work 
and repainting, $2000 or otters. 
Will sell engines separately. 
384-2901 


14' ALUMINUM BOAT, 7Vj HP 
motor, and trailer. Asking $800. 
3868095 after 3pm 

60 HORSE EVINRUDE, $600. 
Trailer for 16' boat. $135. 
479-0082 

12Va' FIBERGLASS SKI BOAT 
and trailer, no engine, asking 
$1000. 59*3092 

HERRING SKIP. 7X22, TERR- 
efic work or pleasure boat. $2500. 
Call 658-8703. 

16' SKI BOAT, INBOARD 327. 
Goes well. $3500 or best otter. 
59*7868. 

16' WOODEN INBOARD, WITH 
trailer, great for fishing, offers. 
479-0790 

15'/»' SANGSTERCRAFT 
fibreglass, $3000. Gator trailer, 
$1000. 6565818 

SEARS ESKA 5 HP OUTBOARD 
motor, just been rebuilt, $135. 
388-6467, 382-0677. 

27' MONK CABIN CRUISER, 
priced for quick sale, $5500. 
384 1280, 381-2229. 

9' MINTO SAILING DINGY, 
bare flbreolass hull, $150. 
6564382. 

| 31' CHRIS CRAFT. TWIN EN- 

glne and boathouse. 642 4838 

18' CUSTOM JET BOAT. MINI- 
crulser, seats 6, 3864497 

1979 50 HP EVINRUDE, $1000. 
727-2308 

PRAM DINGHY. 8' PLYWOOD. 
$75. 386-2797. 

2 INBOARD/OUTBOARD 
Mercury propellers 479-1539.L 

10' RACE HYDROPLANE. $125. 
383-0875. 

“C" LICENSE OFF OF 20' 
boat, $8,000 479-0548. 

11 SAILBOATS 


2T CALGLASS SEDAN, MER • 
cruiser 165, trim tabs, sounder. 
CB radio, oallev, dinette, head, 
V-berth, anchor pack, dinghy, 
656-4267. * 


VANGUARD SKI-BEE. 65 
mere, and trailer, O'Brien's 
skiis and accessories, excellent 
condition. $2400. Phone 595-4434 
or 652-1682 Jerry.. 


INFLATABLE 12' CALAGH- 
ari-Ghigi, immaculate condi¬ 
tion, plus Johnson 18 horsepower 
outboard, $1,500. Leave message 
for Michael 479-8112. 


VICTORIA BOAT MART HAS A 
large selection of stern drive as 
Well as inboard gas ♦ diesel 
power boats, priced from $6,500. 
4S3 Head St ,383-3324 


I c ■ T 

(cruising boat sales! 

Off-shore cruising sail boats 
only. Pat and John Samson, Can¬ 
ada's cruising boat specialists. 
Will help you find the right boat 
for your budget. 

36' Ketch, immaculate, $49,000. 
37' Schnr. Pacific Vep. $60,000. 
42' Cutter, guality, $68,000. 

40' Sloop, aft cabin, $89,000 
48' Ketch, family boat, $79,000. 
30' Tahiti ketch, new. $45,000 
30' Pacific 30, new. SM.000 
These and more-write or phone 
for information. Open 7 days a 
week BirdsEyeCove, Maple Bay 
near Duncan. 112-748-8950. 


1Z Mill 

New cedar planked on oak 
frame, copper fastened. 2 rowing 
positions Professionally built. 
656-5466. 


27' ALUMINUM OOUBLE 
ender. 8'6 beam, 2 cycUnder die¬ 
sel power, very economical, lots 
of room (could be used as live- 
aboard). many extras. $9800. 
She's not that fast or pretty but 
very reliable and comfortable. 
479-3689. 


ONE STOP FAST AND COM 
petitive service for all your boat 
Ing needs — sail or power. Phil 
brook's Shipyards Ltd . 2324 > 
| Harbour Rd., Sidney, 656-1157, > 

9'6" FIBERGLASS DINGY.) 

| doubled hulled, windshield, i 
steering wheel and cables Ask 
; ing $550 Phone evenings 656-7686 
or 656-5044. 

14' RUNABOUT, GLASS OVER 
plywood. 18 hp Johnson and trail-1 
er, $600 10 hp Johnson, in good 
shape, $150 or will accept trade. 

I 479-5839 


FOR QUALIFIED LISTINGS 


386-7555 

CAPITAL CITY 

BOAT BROKERAGE 
AND SHIPYARDS 


RUNABOUT LISTINGS 
REQUIRED 
14'-21' models. We also offer new 
i Bayliner and Vanguard out¬ 
board runabouts. Contact Harry 
for further information at Thurv 
derbird Yachts (Runabout Div.) 
656-7323. 


Complete Repairs & Service 
Commercial & Pleasure 
Call Tom or Wayne Lewis 
130 Kingston St 


MARINERS 

compare our services & prices 

MERCURY€NGINES 
EZ LOADER TRAILERS 
MARINE SERVICES 

Open7davs: 7a.m. -7p.m. 
2072 Henry Ave., Sidney 
656-7311 656-7664 



FIBERGLASS 

SUPPLIES 


j have a complete stock of 
resins, mat, doth, roving, etc. 
Expert technical advice and ser¬ 
vice. 


1979 14'4” GREGOR ALUMIN- 
um, welded Quality construction 
(no rivets to leak), 1979 20hp 
Johnson, approximately 25 
: hours use, 19796001b Roadrunner 
I trailer with large wheels, spare 
tire, bearing buddies plus other 
i accessories, $2300. 382-8806 

I FOR SALE OR TRADE FOR 

Corvette, 18' Flbreform 233 
Merc I.O. 6 horse Johnson out- 
i board. 2500 pound Roadrunner 
| galvinized trailer with power 
i winch. Swim grid. AM-FM cas- 
, sette. Low hours. Must be seen. 
384-3569 

CHEOYLEE 
Diesel Trawlers 
For Information Call 
ANGLER'S ANCHORAGE 
MARINA 

652-3531 933 Marchant Rd. 

_ Brentwood Bay _ 

^ BOTTOM PAINTING 10'-70' 

SHAFT & PROP REPAIRS 
ENGINE OVERHAULS 
SPEEDY & EFFICIENT 
SERVICE 

Philbrooks Shipyard Ltd., 2324 
I Harbour Rd., Sidney, 656-11S7. 

40* MOTOR YACHT GREN 
fell design professionally built 
1962. Now the home of an experi¬ 
enced shipwright. Mint condition 
throughout. June 1980 survey. 
$72,500 Phone Squire 8i Coombs, 
384-3363 


17' BRANDLMAYR, 65 HP 
Merc, Lowrance sounder, Naufi 
lex top, 2200 pound Calkins trail¬ 
er, excellent shape. $4200 
478-4176 


"LosUft ^kLChls 

NewC&C Yachts 

15% Yacht Mori. O.A.C. 
Trades welcome. 

Trade-Ins 

78 ISLANOER 32 $68,950 

72C&C27 $25,950 

79C&C24 $19,900 

79J24 $18,900 

2270 Harbour Rd., Sidney 
Days 656-7744 
Eves. 592-5606 


27'5 BAYLINER VICTORIA, 
command bridge, aft cabin, 
under 300 hours. Tike new, value 
30,000. Reduced to 26,000 
338-8816, Courtenay. 


SQUIRE & COOMBS 

MARINE BROKERS 
45 Bastion Square 384-3363. 


CHRYSLER — SEAGULL 
MARINER OUTBOARDS 
Ken Praslng Equipment 
934 Goldstream_478-9313 


San Juan Yachts 

21'Used $ 8,500 SOLD 

21'Used $8,500 

21'New $10,979 

23'New $17,577 SOLD 

28' New $45,960 SOLD 

7.7 New ARRIVING SOON 
The Above Sold Yachts 
are on dlsplav courtesy 
of the new owners 

Ccve^artna 

and^achtSales^Ltd 


II SAILBOATS 


C-3 


Sail away for $1050 479-6619 


AIRCRAFT 


Cherokee, I 
or otters. V 
ing Club. 


SFMTMGGOOOS 




EVERYDAY LOW PRICES 
SALESSERVICE 
SELECTION 


Rem. 22/250 2X 7 $399 — Win. 
Mod. 100 auto 308 4X f— 
SHOTGUNS — Stever 

pump $119— Browning 1L_ 

$399 — Win Mod. 12 trap 12G. 
$595 — Rem 1100 auto 12G r' $424 


Browning 45 auto $469 — Walttv 
ier P38 9MM $294 — Astra 357 
Rev6” Adi. sights $189. Roger 22 
auto Bull Bar $216 — Colt 38 
Oft/Tar 7Vj$29S. 

Use Our Free Lay Away Plan 
EXPERTGUNSMITH 
ON THE PREMISES 

1307 BROAD 385-3429 


M STORE OFFICE 
FURNITURE mt EQUIPMENT 

VICTOR 510 CASH REGISTER. 

1 year old, excellent condition, 
$490; steelcase filing cabinet. 

Best Offer. 598 2647 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 
T.i — 59 calculator, PC—100A 
printer, 5 modules and 100 pro¬ 
grams $500. Stuart 598 4236 

STEELCASE DESK. PITNEY- 
Bowes photo copier. And other 
office furniture. 9am 12 noon, 685 
Wilson St or phone 3863672. 

2 SE RVICE DELI CASES, COM- 
plete with refrigeration com¬ 
pressor, excellent condition 
$2500. 592-5621. 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS T.I.-59 
calculator and PC 100A printer. 
$400. Bruce, 478-2108. 

NCR CASH REGISTER, 4 
totals. $350. Phone airport gift 
shop 656-3600 

« HEATING A FIREPLACES 

ELECTRIC HOT WATER 
heater, 3,000 watt, Elco, outer 
casing bashed and outer case 
needs minor work $10. Guaran¬ 
teed to work. 383-6629. 

SWEDISH FIREPLACE, 
grate, screen, pipe. Good condi 
tion. $180 385-0M7 

FURNACE. TANK AND DUCT 
work. What offers? 1102 Locklev 
Rd, 382-6498. 

OIL COOK STOVE WITH TANK 
and stand $75. 479-3938 

K MAJOR APPLIANCES 


f§PECIAUv? 

iGUNS"~ , i 


NOTE out new Gun Line number 
VICTORIA'S ONLY 
SPECIALTY GUN SHOP 

OVER 1.000GUNS IN STOCK 


576 Yates St. 


383-1044 


RIMPAC DIVERS Ltd 

If vou have always wanted to 
learn to scuba dive, now is the 
time to enroll in a course starting 
Aug. 11. It's safe, it's fun, it's 
exciting, and the cost is reason 
able when you loin in a scuba 
diving course taught by "The 
Professionals" at Rimpac 
Divers, 9818 Fifth St., Sidney or 
phone 656-6313. 



FRANK WHITE'S 
SCUBA SHOP 

832 Fisgard 3854713 


Next Scuba Course 
Starts July 28 — Register Now 
Advance course starts July 25 


Family Camping Equipment 
Backpacking, clothing, tents 
SALES—RENTALS—SERVICE 
629 Pandora_ 384-2224 


TWO BEAR RUGS WITH FULL 
head mounts, excellent taxi¬ 
dermy work, both spring bears. 
Grizzly $3000. Black bear $1000, 
firm. 656-7843. 


WATER SKI 

Taperflex, slalom intermediate- 
advanced slalom ski, dual boots. 
Excellent condition. $160. 
592-0417. 


A ‘Deep 
^ »™) Y, 


10992 Madrona Dr. 

656-2810 


RIFLE PRIZE SHOOT 
S.V.I Rangers - Luxton Road 
6pm Wed June 23 


Johnson electric, sleeper seats, 
full canvas, E-Z load trailer. Im- 
maculate. 1801 Hollywood Cres. 

17' REINELL, 115 MERCURY, 
new 1979. Asking $7,500. 
112-748-1448 or 112-746-4847 after 


428 E. Burnside 
386-1811_386-7814 


NAVIGATIONAL 

AIDS 

We have charts, books, parallel 
rules, dividers, protractors, 
compasses and much more for 
charting your course at 

McQUADE'S 

MARINE SUPPLY 


1252 Wharf St. 


388-4343 


New Listings 

34' MONK. CB diesel, excellent 
condition $38,500 

23* GLASS PLY 1651.0. immacu¬ 
late. Mayne Is. vessel. On 
dlsplav. $14,900 


A c Dccp 

^ and^ 


Covc c Marina 

Wh« Sales'-Lid 


DIESEL TRAWLER CHB 34' 
tri cabin. Better than new condi 
tion. boathouse kept $84,900. 

652 3336 


QUALITY REPAIRS AND FIN 
ishing by iournevman-ship- 
wright Reasonable rates 


LATE 75 BAYLINER, NIS 
queally Sedan 22' j\ 200 Volvo. 
FWC. many extras, $12,900 or 
otters 478-1963. 


CANOE, 14' SPORTSPAL, EX 


attachment for motor. $275. 
479-3757, 


20' GLASTRON CABIN CRUIS- 
er. Mercruiser 160 I/O. head, full 
canvas, trim tabs, sounder, etc. 
Sleeps 4, clean and well-kept. 
With trailer and Sidney moorage 
only $5,188 or will separate. 
656-7184. 


17' WATER SKI BOAT WITH 
1966 95 horsepower Mercury, ap¬ 
proximately 50 hours on com¬ 
plete rebuild, electric start, tan¬ 
dem trailer, completely 
outfitted with ski gear. $2800 or 
best offer 474-1311. 


31' FIBERGLASS OVER PLY- 
wood, planing hull, Perkins die¬ 
sel.' furnace, etc. Designed as 
liveaboard Appraised at $30,000 
replacement value. Otters on 
$20,000 Homebullt. Phone 
478-3777 


EXCELLENT CONDITION 
Must sell. 17'ply No leaks. 60 HP 
motor recently checked out, hull 
and top side new paint, head, 
lockup cabin, electric start, 
bulltln 10 gallon tanks, $1400. 
382-8614 or 721-513?. 


22' CABIN CRUISER. VOLVO 
I/O, head. sink, compass, CB. 
trim tabs, blower, bilge pump, 
depth sounder, anchor pack, din¬ 
ghy. Boat In top-notch condi¬ 
tion. Can be seen anytime; 


ADVAACE 
VACHTI ITD. 


MERCURY 

MERCRUISER 

SERVICE 

Marine $ Power Products 
402 A Esquimau Rd. 382-1211 


S and BROKL_ 

TONSTOSERVE YOU 


KERAGE 


SALES 

4 LOCATIC-,_. M 

Bosun's Marina 656-5558 

10775 McDonald's Park Rd 
Sidney, B.C. 

Oak Bay Marina 598-3366 

Pedder Bay Marina 478-1771 

NANAIMO 

Newcastle Marina 753-1512 


THUMDERBIRD 
YACHT 
SALES 

WFSTPOUT MAMMA 

Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 


Boat Trailer Springs 

Parts and repairs. Prompt ser¬ 
vice. Logan Spring and Suspen¬ 
sion Ltd. 60 Crease Ave., 
384-2744. . 


CALIFORNIA 
20' Fleeter aft. 135 Johnson out¬ 
board, Inboard tanks, gauges, 
and extras. One of a kind in 
Canada. After 6pm, 642-4944 


Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 
2075 Trvon Road. Sidney, B.C 
656-5832 

NEW and BROKERAGE boat 
OPEN 10a m-7p 
-lEsa 


CLOSED TUE 


DAY 


Bob Allison will take your 
car, boat, trailer, mo- 
home or PROPERTY in 
trade on a 26' TOLLY- 
CRAFT, new power and 
reconditioned. Ptione Bob 
at 38S-87S6. Reg Midgiev 
Motors Ltd. 


MERCRUISER 
PARTS & SERVICE 

Canoe Cove Marina Ltd. 656-5633 

NEAR NEW 16' RUNABOUT, 
i full canvas, trailer. 85HP Mer¬ 
cury, kicker am—FM stereo. 
1 CB. 3fuel tanks. Excel lent condi 
tion throughout $5,995. 383-5879 
after 5pm. _ 

40' STEEL HULL "C" Li- 
senced pecker with 15 ton hold, 
eoulpped tor geoduck diving end 
crab fishing. Including 85 West 
Coest traps. $35,000 firm. 
384-5571 or ft*68S7. 


MUST SELL 22' FISHING 
boat, 318 Chrysler Inboard FWC, 
radio, sink, anchor, head. Best 
otter will take It. 388-9602 


Evlnrude, galvanized trailer, 
anchor, rod holders. New condi¬ 
tion. 479-4347. 


raller. Asking $2500. 478-6683 

CAMPWAYS 4-MAN INFLAT 
able boat, complete with floor 
boards, windshield, pump anfl 
repair kit. After 6 pm, 652-2277. 


Johnson, trailer, tech, CB, aux 
lllerv bracket, $6000. 592-7911 
after 2pm, 384-3119 after 7pm 

18' KLINKER WITH DEPTH 


Merc. 7Vj Merc, tilt l 
er, many extras. $45 
Offer. 112-743-5291 


THE BOAT LOFT 
Inflatable Boat Centre 
381-1323 563A John 


Gas, diesel. I.O. 
and evenings. 


69 20 HORSE POWER MERC. 
Good running condition. 
656-4837. 


WANTEO TO RENT 24-28' 
motor cruiser. BC Dav weekend. 
382-7211 local 298. 


STEEL HULLS BUILT TO CUS- 
' boats. 


•s specs. 
386-9715 


14'6” K&C FI BE RGLASS BOAT, 
motor and trailer, good condi 
tion, offers. 592-6675 


16' FIBERGLASS OVER PLY- 
wood boat and trailer $500 or 
best offer 479-5044 


2 MAN RUBBER BOAT. LIKE 
new. oars, pump. Included $75. 
598-7859 


BUDGET HARDWOOOS LTD. 

Mon-Wed 4-5 Set 9-5 
415-B Hillside 386-333 



K & C 2T FLYING BRII 
twin l«5 malar, a* 
shower, depth 
phn many other exti 
appointment to view 386-8121 
days or »4g9 evenings 

SPECIALIZING IN BOAT 
flage, pennants, end banners 
tapeanddeeipn a* 
4 an heavy duly nylon 


WANTED: 12' DAVIDSON 
selling dinghy with center board. 
Evenings 477-5521 


I under warranty. 


13' RUNABOUT, FIBERGLASS 
w^r^ywood. $100 5956631 or 


r SPORTYAK DINGHY WITH 

aa,y “ ‘ 




MEN'S SEARS 18 SPEED C HAP T E RBQAI $ 





*Sj£' THUMDERBIRD 

* Aj, VACHT 

SALES 

* W WESTPORT MARINA 

Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 

1 2075 Trvon Road. Sidney, B.C. 
6565832 

NEW SAILBOATS and 
BROKERAGE SAILBOATS 
OPEN 10a.m. 7p.m. 
CLOSEDTUES 

ADVANCE 
SAILING SCHOOL 

OAK BAY & SIDNEY 
CYA CERTIFICATION 
Basic course, $189. 
656-4041 

UNDER $20,000 

|76trihRD26 $17,900 

79 C&C 24 $19,900 

79J-24 $18,900 

All 1-owner boats In mint condi¬ 
tion All have North Sails, all on 
dlsplav at Gypsy Yacht Sales, 
2270 Harbour Rd., 6565591. 

TANZER 7.5 

Ready to sail away, all basic 
equipment, 9.9 Johnson, canopy, 
moorage, immaculate condition, 

I used 2 seasons. B Dock, Van Isle. 
$18,000. 721-3073 after 6pm. 

GRAMPION 23. EXCELLENT 
condition, 4 sails, 6 hp Evinrude, 

1 anchorpack, running lights, CB 
radio, 20 gallon water tank.Gim- 
balled stove plus many other 
extras, $12,500. 383-3353 or 

1 388-6275 pager 2525. 

VAN EAGLE 

Cruising 26'*iaida MK II, main 
and Genoa, Outboard, propan? 
stove and oven, wood and elec¬ 
tric heat, stereo, Aladln (amp, 
dinghy, insulated, teak and ash 
throughout, $17,500. 382-2849. 

29* CUSTOM '77, 8'9" BEAM, 
fiberglass on wood, stabilized 4 
ton cruiser. 4 sails. 42 HP Gray 
marine. Solid, safe and spotless. 
$22,500. Deep Cove Marina, 
6562810. 

SAILTREND 

Marirre Supplies & Clothing 
Open 9-6. Closed Sun./Mon. 

1 1157 NEWPORT S92-2711 

SAANICH LUMBER YARDS 
PRAM DINGHY KIT 

SABOT KIT 

KAYAK (Partly assembled) 

1496 ADMIRALS ROAD 38*2486 

GYPSY YACHT SALES 
“Exctusivety Saittwats'' 
Listings Wanted 

6565591 2270 Harbour Rd. 

10' PLYWOOD. PARTIALLY 
fibreolassed, very stable, ideal 
for children or beginner, new 
sail, offers. 99*5561. 

23' VENTURE CUTTER. CUS- 
tom Interior, Honda 7.5, moor¬ 
age. trailer. Asking $9200. 
479-3883. 

1 14' WOODEN SAILING DIN- 

ghy, almost new. tan sails, lee 

1 boards, boat cover. $785. 
59^2719 

| POCKET CRUISER, GAFF 

; sloop, 23'LOA. Seagull engine. 

: good condition. Strong boat, $7.- 
I 7006561554 

! 20' SAILBOAT. 10 MORSEPOW 
er Evlnrude motor. In excellent 
condition. Call S-7 pm. 
112 752-9795 or 112-752-9424. 

j WANTED: FIBERGLASS 

1 weahandir sailboat, IS to 21*. 
Phone 38*0069 

STEEL HULLS BUILT TO CU&- 
♦omers^sgecs. Scoria boats, 

LASER, GOOO CONDITION. ‘ 

,WVlWJX k " c ‘ m -\ 

76 CAT ALIN A 77, EXCELLENT 

‘.KSiU'&Jtjsr' 





GUN SALE CONTINUES TILL 
; Saturday July 26th, Rlc's Trad¬ 
ing Post, 555 Johnson Street, 
384-5422 


REMINGTON MOOEL 1100, 
deluxe grade. 20 gauge, 3" mag- 
nem. vent-rib Brand new, never 
been fired Asking $47S. 478-3508 


WET SUIT AND ACCESS 
ones, 135 lb., 5.6' Best offer 
386-1158. 


NEW WINDSURFER FOR 
sale. 479-1302 


WANTED: USED SCUBA 
gear. 479-1302 


BSA AIR RIFLE WJTH SCOPE, 
immaculate $95 takes. 598-8788 


caucus, supfues 

aa6 PHOTO FINISHING 


island 

colour 

labs 


(fli 


Plus 8 locations to serve you. 
SAME DAY SERVICE on all C41 
films — in by 10 a.m. out by 5 
p.m. 


FANTASTIC SALE 
ATTHE ELECTRIC 
EYE NOW ON. 
GIVE AWAY 
PRICES. 


LENS SPECIAL 

Elford speed and M.G. 
paper. Another 10% oft 
our regular low selling 
price. Sale ends Aug 15. 


_ Summlcron, Leitz Elpro 
close up lenses Via. Vlb, Vlib, 
4x5 view with Graf toe beck with 
esser. $275. Memiya C-3 pro¬ 
fessional 2% with 80mm 2.8, 
grip, Porroflex, etc. $250. 9Qrnm 
Optar lens, 300mm Wollensak 
for 8x10. Superb Nlzo Super 8, 
Var logon power zoom, like new. 
$250 Bolex Macro-Zoom Super 8, 
like new, $225. Misc. photo 
graphic items and 400 maga- 
zlnes. 478-6435. 


H H*** 

PHOTO SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 750 
Phone 246-4741 
On Trans-Canada Highway at 
Chemalnus 


PENTAX Sf» 1.1, 1/1000THS OF 
a second. 35, 300 and 400 mm 
telephoto lenses, with Auto 4 
flash. Immaculate. $1000 firm. 
385-4665 


KITS CAMERAS 
New and Used Equipment 
1. Low*r Commerce Ma 
8-5236, Mayfair Mall 


HASSELBLAD 500 CM. WITH 

Swr- 7 


KONICA AUTOFLEX T3 3SMM 


MAMIYA 645. 4VMM. 1SOMM 
frnsfl and many extras 


WANTED 8X10 ENLARGER. 
113-7T- 


used 1ft-734-8892 




TER. ENLARi 






BILL'S BARGAIN BARN AP 
pliance Warehouse located at 
98 West Burnside Road next to 
Capital Market has the largest 
selection of reconditioned appli¬ 
ances in Victoria. Stoves, wall 
ovens, fridges, some with left 
hand doors, washers, dryers, up¬ 
right and chest freezers, all in a 
variety of sizes and colours. 30 
day warranty. Buy, sell, trade, 
dicker and deliver. 384-5721, 
384-5235. 


RECONDITIONED 

Washers, dryers, ranges, 
fridge 
Allmai 
Open : 

2519 Dc 


KITCHEN AID DISHWASHERS 
1980 models in stock. Mortal ap¬ 
pliances for less. 

KENYON SALES 

386-1214(24hrs ) 


6 MONTH WARRANTY 
Reconditioned refrigerators, 
freezers, washers, dryers and 
ranges. Trade-Ins wanted 
PHOENIX APPLIANCES 
384-0423 2009 Fern wood 


SPEEDQUEEN 

Sales Service Parts 
HASTINGS APPLIANCES 
2100 Douglas 386-7734 


JUST ARRIVED. LIKE NEW, 
Inglis washers and dryers, per¬ 
fect condition, fully gauranteed, 
$185 and up First come, first 
served. 2519 Douglas Street, 
385-2033 


97 FURNITURE 


F Icolwoodlamgford 

urnitureland 

noun 

Buy now and take advan¬ 
tage of super savings on 
brand new. quality home 
furnishings before we 
take inventory on the last 
dav of this month. 

20 TO 40% OFf! 

on almost everything in 
our store. Chesterfield, 
bedroom, and dining 
room suites, chairs, re- 
cliners, sofa beds, mat¬ 
tress and box units, bunk 
and mates beds, kitchen 
sets, coffee and lamp 
tables, wall systems, open 
stock of dressers, chest of 
drawers, night tables etc. 
- also lawn and patio sum¬ 
mer furniture and much 
much more! Need credit? 
Open a revolving charge 
account today. Sale hours 
• 10 am to 6pm daily. Sun¬ 
days 11am to 5pm. Shop 
early for best selections. - 
It's really worth a drive to 
1610 Old Island Hwy. (Six 
Mile Market). Tel. 
478-1921. 

r lCOLWOODLAMCFORD 

urnitureland 


f ? Tillkum 
Furniture 


1633 HILLSIDE 


VICTORIA'S 
FINE FURNITURE 
CENTRE 


■ - ap/j,., 



KENMORE HEAVY DUTY 
enamel stacking apartment 
sized washer and dryer, l'/j 
years old. $575. After 6pm, 
382 2387 


FRIDGE. STOVE. GE TALIS- 
man frost free refrigerator. 
$300 McLary Easy stove, $150 
After 6. 382-4408 


1115 FORT ST. 384^6441 

BUY-SELL 

APPRAISE 

1115 Fort St. 384-6441 


KALVINATOR SIDE BY-SIDE 
refrigerator freezer. RCA dish 
washer. Both excellent. 
721 5286 



Butcher 

Block 

Shop 


STAINLESS STEEL GE 
built—In oven and range with 
steel cabinets attached, good 
working condition. 595-2288. 


4011 QUADRA 479-5921 
Solid maple butcher block 
tables and counter tops 
also authentic Bentwood 
chairs. 


MOVING. MUST SELL. RCA 
dishwasher, top loading, excel¬ 
lent running condition. $125. 
477-0575. 


MOFFET DELUXE 30" 
ceramic top self cleaning oven. 
Harvest Gold, like new. $550. 
382 9401 


REFRIGERATOR, PHILCO, 
Copped one, left hand door, 9 4 
cubic feet. Excellent condition 
$95 or best otter. 478-6987 


APARTMENT SIZE STACKING ] 
portable washer and dryer, gold, 
near new, excellent condition 
$425. 382-8368 after 5. 


30" RANGE, CONTINUOUS 
clean, rotlsserle, removable 
door, new condition, $290. 
479-0768 


COPPERTONE 2 DOOR 
fridge $250. White range $135. 
Washer $165. Dryer $125. 
479 3209 after 4 


MOVING, FROST FREE 
fridge, stove. Firm $450. 
383-3525 


CONSOLE PIANO, WALNUT, 
$1250. Hammond organ, M-300. 
mahogany. $1100. Stereo, leak, 
modern, $125. Captains bed/ 
desk, maple, $200. Childs white 
dresser, desk, bench, $75. Ches¬ 
terfield, 4 sea ter, loose cushions. 
$200. Chesterfield, chair, wood 
trim, $200 Ping pong table. $75 
Wool shag area rug, 8x10, 
green/gold, $100. Tiffany swag 
lamp, $60. Table lamps, green, 
$75 pair 658 1066,4-8pm, 

FOAM MATTRESSES 
The sensible alternative 
4” & 6" In all sizes 
THOMPSONS' 

FOAM SHOP 

3318QAKST _ 385 7622 

LIVING. DINING AND BED 
room furniture at clearance 
prices. If you find any price 
lower than us we will pay you 
triple the difference. 

DODD'S Furniture 

2563 Quadra 3886663 


OLOER BEATTY WASHER 
and dryer, good working order, 
$100 each. 658-8733 


NEARLY NEW GOLD INGLIS 
dryer^trade for portable or sell. 


SEARS FRIDGE AND STOVE, 
oood condition, $250. Phone 
477-7767. 


3 HOSPITAL BEDS-MODERN, 
adlustable with superb mat¬ 
tresses $175 to $250 eaph. (Ideal 
i for elderly or convalesing) with 
or without siderails. Tel: Bill at 
598-9977 or view on Saturday 9-5, 
Sunday 12-5. 1002 Vancouver 
Street. 


KENMORE DISHWASHER, 5- 
cycle, excellent condition, $350. 
474 1992, 383-1403. 


VIKING WASHE R AND 
dryer, good condition. $120. 
385-6989. 


WASHING MACH IN E , 
Beatty Town, good working con 
dltion, $100. Must sell 383-0274 


19TH CENTURY ELEGANT 
“fainting couch"; three curios 
cabinets of various sizes, in ex¬ 
cellent condition; pair of green 
and oold wing-back fireside 
chairs. The Arts Connection, 
381-2332, 


WASHER AND DRYER, GOOD 
working order, $200 or best otter 
59*3928 and 382-4493 


WANTED: SQUARE CORNER 
freezer for around $75. 381-1513 
or 474-2971. 


MUST SELL. FRIDGE*- ANO 
stove. 38*6051 after 5pm 


23' CUBIC DEEP FREEZE. 
$100, otters. 652-5733 after 6pm 


23 CU.FT. FREEZER, $225. 
478-7833. 


17 FURNITURE 


LATEX 


BARGAIN BASEMENT SPE 
clal— 7 pc. colonial solid hard 
wood dining room suite to clear 
$998, consists of buPet, hutch, 
round extension table, 4 chairs 
Echo Furniture. 704 View St,. 
384-2214. 

ROUND OAK DINING AND 
coffee tables Variety of Oak 
chairs and buffets. Specializing 
In restoring YOUR wood furni¬ 
ture. Call Middle E* 


TEAK BEDROOM SUITE, 
teak frame with two sldetables. 
mattress. Two 9-drawer dress 
ers, one with mirror 1 year old 
$1400 firm. 385-3736 after 
4:30pm.' 


MOVING MUST SELL PLUSH 
wine velvet chesterfield and 
chair with 4' high black tri light 
floor lamp. Replacement $2,000, 
asking $825 or best offer 
477-8943. 


MATTRESSES 


The mattress that gives even 
support to all parts of the body, 
truly the most comfortable mat 
tress of all. 

MATTRESSES 

3'3" size, each place $199 

Regular size, each piece $249 

Queen size, each piece $28? 

King size mattress $399 

MATTRESS 
TOPPER PADS 

E N JO Y the luxurious comfort 
Thick Size. Rubber Foam 

1 In. 39x75 827.25 $ 8.SS 

2 In. 39x75 8S2.7S $17 25 
lln. $4x75 837 75 $11.15 
2 Hi. 54x75 $72 90 $2365 

Tfc 8SS K: 

it $3,18: 


SOLIO WALNUT SINGLE BED- 
room suite, headboard, box- 
i spring, and mattress, 6 drawer 
I dresser with mirror, small desk 
$500. Also curtains, different 
sizes and colours. 479-4551 

! SIMMONS HIDE A BED. $175. 
39” box spring and mattress $45. 
; Occasional chair $25. Arbor ite 
chrome table and chairs $75. 
Walnut chest of drawers, $125. 
383-1927 


COUCH AND CHAIR. 1 
years old, excellent condition, 
grey/beige In colour. $450. Kit 
chen table and chairs, $100. 
388-6642 


PROFESSIONALLY 
cleaned chesterfield and chair, 
excellent condition, floral de 
sign, slip cover Included $200 
47%-S72S .~ 

EXCELLENT CONDITION 
SOLID WOOOd 

Attractive 6 piece master bed 
room suite, queens I ze bed frame 
included 479 3830 



IMMEDIATE D€UVERY 

**s9?sr D , ?f’s,r. c ,s.^ 

Gregg Furniture 

qpaltty furniture store — 
e you can see how It's 


“ENROLL NOW' 
Accepting applications for fall 
beginners woodworking and 
lathe courses Tools & Space. 
38*9600. 338 Catharine St 

6 DRAWER MIRRORED 
draaagr, good condition. $150 
Childs record player $20 Other 
miscellaneous items 316-2648 or 
3P-W39 

LOVELY PATTERNED COLO 
niei ches t er f ield suite, i year 
old, rust and green colour on 
btegr background Asking $750 
Rhone 4 u mt after l« am 


M»7365 LAI 


XSS&ZF ssplii 

M**4ll Wi wi iu w 






























































































































































































































































































































































































































C-4 

97 FURNITURE 


HIOE-A-BEDS FOR SALE, 
custom rebuilt, fabrics vour 
choice, save SSS. 3886275 paoer 
877 anytime, 381 5353 evenings 

VANITY AND STOOL, $75; BED 
spring and mattress. $35; circa 
1935. Two press backed chairs, 
$35 each. 47*4452. 

ANTIQUE WHITE VANITY 
dresser, and stool, $100. Double 
bed bookcase headboard, $30. 
Bride doll, $20. 382-4959. 

LARGE WINGED CHESTER 
field suite, top quality. $475. Lo- 
veseat In oald velvet $180. Both 
excellent condition. 992-4060. 

SINGLE SEAR POSTURE— 
Mate box spring and mattress, 
excellent condition, $150. 
474 1992, 383-1403. 

MOVING OUT OF TOWN, 
must sell. Twin bed and mat¬ 
tress, oval kitchen table, 3-plece 
sectional couch. 388-4973. 

7 PIECE MAPLE DINING 
room suite, round table. 30" 
hutch and buffet. $650 or offers. 
478-7833. 

CANOPY BED, COMPLETELY 
portable with box spring and 
mattress, $250. After 6, 382-4408. 

SOME HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
ture, pictures, artificial flre- 
Place- 598-9859, 656-3121. 

WALNUT DINING ROOM 
table. 4 chairs with matching 
buffet, $895.658-1156_ 

8 PIECE DINING ROOM SUITE 
including buffet and hutch, ex- 
cellent condition, $700.474-2683. 

WANTED USED HIDE-A-BED 
In good condition. $150-200. 
386-9604. 


TV. STEREO, RADIO 
SAJIS SERVICE 


6R0CEIKS, MEAT 



CHESTERFIELD AND CHAIR 
$350. Chrome table and 4 chairs 
$75 656-5246_ 

WOttDEN PLANT STANDS, 
wooden lamp; pictures; miscel- 
laneous furniture. 477-9216. 

WALNUT DINING ROOM 
suite, table, 2 leaves, buffet, 6 
chairs, $1000. 477-7390 

3 PIECE BEDROOM SUITE 
with bookcase bed, $250 or clos- 
est offer. 385-4683 

SOLID WOOD DESK FOR. 
sale, well made. After 5pm, 
595 2976. 


IN THE HILLSIDE MALL 


SUPERB SOUND SYSTEM, 
Classic Luxman 308, Micro Selkl 
Solid 5, Sony 6660 reel to-reel, 
unsurpassed Mlchaelldes Hol¬ 
land custom rosewood encIn¬ 
sures, best offer over $2200 (cost 
of speakers alone). Reason for 
selling: unemployed, need 
money. 478-6435._ 

COM HI RENTALS 

Now at a low price of $15 a 
month. Call today Cltv Centre 
TV Sales and Rentals 477-6971. 

MAGNAVOX, HITACHI 
The home of quality service 
ELECTRON TV SALES and 
SERVICE 100 Burnside Rd. W., 
383-5432. 

26" ELECTROHOME COLOUR 
TV. Good working order with 90 
day tull warranty. $199.95. 

ATLAS STEREO A TV 
763 Fort St._385-7712 

YAMAHA CR1020 RECEIVER 
2x70 watts RMS, Teac A1200 
open reel tapedeck, Dual CS504 
manual turntable, Telec MX1 
disco mixer. 383-8832,6-9pm. 

PIONEER MODEL 1006 IN 
dash AM-FM stereo with stereo 
cassette and 2 speakers, one 
year old, new, $410, will sell $250. 
call 383-1444 or 381-1233 

ONE STEREO SYSTEM: 
Marantz amp 11S0-D, Bose 501 
speakers. Pioneer PL 540 turn¬ 
table. $1200 or will sell separ 
ately. 382-9810, anytime. 

YAMAHA CA600 AMPLIFIER, 
CT600 tuner. Dual 510 turntable, 
Akal CS707D cassette deck and i 


FRESH LING COO AND SNAP- 
per, direct from commercial fish 
boat, (BC Maid). For Informa¬ 
tion call. 477-2434. 

RASPBERRIES 904 PER LB, 
bv the flat. Book orders before 
August 10th. 112-74*0113 Cowl- 
chan Delta Produce Ltd. 

RASBERRIES FOR WINE. 404 
pound when available. Phone 
Cowichan Delta Produce, 
112-74*0113. 

RASPBERRIES. LARGE SIZE. 
Si .05 lb; apricots, eating and 
canning _vz^s^ blueberries. 

ALBERTA GRAIN FED BEEF 
Pork, veal. lamb, information: 
381-6621. 

PORK SIDES. CUT, WRAPPED 
and frozen. 954 per lb. also beet 
and veal sides. 479-3021. 

HAMMOND FARM. U—PICK 
raspberrrles Tuesday and Wed 
nesdey, 854LB 6950 Vevaness. 

LAST CALL FOR CHOICE 
raspberries, 81 lb. picked. 

U-PICK RASPBERRIES, 804 

per J^ound. 3670 Ha<>PV V * ,l<v 

CANNING TOMATOES, 20 LBS 

ton Vi. off O&Wd Ra"'** MM 

LIVE CRABS DELIVERED 
$1.25 per lb. Phone 656-3444 

RASBERRIES, PICKED 
$1.25 lb. 652 2771. 

RASBERRY ORDERS TAKEN. 
65*8933. 

CANNING TOMATOES. 20 LBS. 
$6. 3965 Shelbourne St. 

RASPBERRY ORDERS 
Taken after 6pm, 652-1338. 

in mscaiMEous 

FOtttU 


WATERBED WITH CAPS. 
383 7669, 656-3537 

7 PIECE CAPTAIN'S BED- 
room suite, $795. 478:3712 

100" CHESTERFIELD WITH 
chair, $350 Phone656-1316. 

DOUBLE BED AND METAL 

frame, $75. 384-6647. 

CHESTERFIELD AND CHAIR, 
Victorian style. $400. 384-7842. 

LARGE MAPLE COFFEE 
table, $75. 652-205?. 

BEDROOM SUITE $100, 2 
green chairs. 384 7247.„ 


SACRIFICE. SANSUI AMP, 
BSR turntable, Akal front load¬ 
ing cassette deck, 2 Akal 2-way 
speakers, records and tapes. 3 
months old. $500 firm. 383-6450 

deep freeze! SILVERTONE RADIO, 
stereo and black and white ty 
combination, cabinet 57" long, 
all in good working order. Excet- 
lent tone. 656-5002. 

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES OF 
colour TV's, free in-shop esti¬ 
mates. Call now 477-6971. City 
Centre TV, 3970 Shelbourne St. 

$45 BLACK AND WHITE, $145 
color. Good condition with no 
risk guarantee. 383-8774 or 
382-1234_ 

STEREO COMPONENT SET, 
turntable, amplifier and speak¬ 
ers, Noresco. 3 years old, $400. 
After 6, 382-4408. 

SONY 70 WATT AMP, $295. 
Sears Pro turntable. $125. Sony 
Mic, $25. MIc stand, $30. Or clos¬ 
est offers. 595-4376. 


RENTTOOWN 

Refrigerators, freezers, wash¬ 
ers. dryers, dishwashers, micro- 
waveovens, televisions, stereos. 
Extremely low monthly rates. 
Sample-TV's from 
SlOper 


INSTANT 
DELIVERY AND 
NOCREDIT 
HASSLES. 

100% of vour rental payments 
will apply If you decide to pur¬ 
chase. First 6 months Interest 
free. Call now:- 

ATLANTA TV & Stereo 

1525 PANDORA 

595-3922 


CLASSIC FUNKY OLD COUCH 
aiKl chair, <275.479-8402. 

98 TV. STEREO, RUN 
SJUiS and SERVICE 

Open 'til 9 Nightly! 

385-5555 

STEREOS-TV'S-VIDEO 

Technics-Panasonic 

SPEAKERS 
AR-KLH-Cerwin Vega 

FULL SERVICE WARRANTY 
—5 yrs. parts 8, labor on most 
new sound equipment! 

—Loaner supplied during ser¬ 
vice. Nocharge 
—Full credit upgrading 1st vr. 
—No down payment (OAC) 

—In store bank financing 
—Yes, we take trades! 

—Free delivery 

CHARGEX-MASTERCHARGE 

Technlcs Sound Pkge. 

35 watt Technics receiver SA300. 
turntable SL02 SBP25 3 wav 
speakers with ADC Mag car¬ 
tridge. 5peclal$749. 

No Down Payment 

Low Monthly Payments (OAC) 

Color TV Specials 

Panasonic 26" consoles 

special $899 

Panasonic 20" color (PXepgcial I 
$599 No Down Payment, Low 1 
Monthly Payments (OAC) 

VIDEO—PANASONIC 

Panasonic PV1100K Video 
machine. Special $1099. No Down 
Payment. 

Car Stereo Specials 
Pioneer—Panasonic 
Open 10-9 Daily 10-6PM 
Sat. 


ACCUTRAC 4000, $429. KEN- 
wood K R2300. $195. Akal 
GXC760D, 3-bead, 3-motor, $599. 
Branch Circuits, 386-2544. 

COBRA 139 XLR EXTRA 
power mike, $400. DX 160 short¬ 
wave receiver, $100. Phone Ken, 
598-8104. 

MUST SELL. SEARS STEREO 
component, am/fm, cassette, 
turntable, stand, 70 albums. Sec- 
rlflce. $300. 388-4973. 


COLOUR TV. 25", GOOD 
working order, etc. $125. 
386-2861 

TANGENT RS8 FULLY MOOI- 
fled. $1,100. 478-4138, 478-5415. 

26" COLOUR PHILLIPS TV 
382-2549. 

12" COLOUR PORTABLE RCA. 
good condition, $100 592-0254 


CHILDS BIKE, $19. 9X12 OVAL 
braided rug, $45. Fridge/freezer 

R s doors, excellent, $495. Sew- 
g machine. $39. Coleman 
camping stove, $22. Camping 
lantern, $19. Brass table, $39. 
Crab trap, $24. Captains bed $99 
Chesterfield and chair, modern, 
119. Push lewnmover, 99. Over 
stuffed chesterfield and chair, 
newtv reupholstered, very com¬ 
fortable. $995. Teak dining room 
suite. 7 piece $495. Telephone 
table. $19. TV stand $19 Propane 
tank. 20 pound. $25. Reclinar 
with vteratar and neater, $159. 
Acordlan Hohner. 120 bass, $149. 
Colour TV. good, $149. 30" elec¬ 
tric range, co ppectone, contin¬ 
uous clean. $350. Automatic 
washer and dryer, good condl 
ton, $350 pair. Drasser with mir¬ 
ror, $39. Spanish saddle, very 
elaborate, $495 Acetylene torch 
and hose, $49 Coffee fable. $19 
And lots more at Royal Oak 
Trading next to Royal Oak Shop 
ping Centre, 4488 West Saanich 
Road. Open 7 days, I0am-6pm 
weekdays. 479-1913. 


CUT VELVET SOFA & LOVE 
seat $599.95; sofa bed, as new 
$196.46; deluxe Admiral port- 

- • • -*■-*- - -L. _ ■ -* - — - 

oisnwasnar 


cost $850, as new, $500. 479-1836. able dishwasher $299.95; as new 
- deluxe 5 pc. dinette suite $299.95; 

COM PONE N--- 

sale 595-0773 


NT STEREO FOR 


ii:i’i3rrcraiii 



• microwave 

• color TV 

• stereo 



rentals 

• service 

• sales _ 


89 GROCERIES, HEAT 
mV PRODUCE 

SEAFOOD 

"Fromprocessor to you 
No Middlemen'^ 

10lb boxes IQF Sole filets, 
S20. 301b boxes IQF Grev- 
cod filets, $37.SO. 301b 
boxes IQF Lingcod filets, 
S40.50.101b boxes IQF Red 
Snapper filets, $12.00. 
Frozen whole tuna 79* lb. 
"IQF IndlvIduallyQuick 
Frozen" 

Much more frozen and fresh. 
No brokers or wholesalers 
Please 

801 Coldstream Ave 
Open Sundays. 478-2544 


30” Kanmora alac. range 
$199.95; Walnut 4 drawer chest 
$79.95; Colonial hi back tweed 
sofa $189.95; brown tweed Colo¬ 
nial chair $79.95, pr. of royal 
blue swivel rockers $249.95; 
French Provincial sofa and 
chair $269.95, Simmons hide-a¬ 
bed $119.95, console style coffee 
table $69.95; old walnut drasser 
and chest $299.95, assorted re- 
cllpers from $99.95; oM over 
stuffed sofa, recovered $150; 
dinette with swivel chairs 
$159.95. 


CThsIradgg 

388-6264 715 Ftniayton 


FREE 

CARRY IN SERVICE 

ESTIMATE 

Bring vour TV - stereo to Ho- 
mark. We will give vou a free no 
obligation service estimate, we 
guarantee It. 

USE OUR 


$1Q. 


SERVICE CALL 
The lowest price service call 
anywhere bv qualified techni¬ 
cians. « 

SPECIALS 

20" colour $100 Oft $449.95 

20" Remote $250off $699.95 

55 watt receiver $100 off $449.95 
Sanyo microwave $150 off $599.95 

TRADES WANTED 

Use vour trade-in as vour down 
payment Come In and make a 
deal. 


• microwave 


• color TV 


• stereo 

• rental# 


• service 


• sales J 

27 W Burnside Rd 

381 5622 


VIDEO MOVIES 

Now you can enlov the movies 
vou want to see when you want to 
see them! Without commer 
ciats! New titles include: "Oh 
God!", "Dirty Harry", "Blazing 
Saddles 1 \ - The Deep", and " The 
In Lews ". Many more titles 
available in both VHS and Beta 
formats Join Youngs Trade-A 
Tape Club now and watch more 
for less!_ 


JtOONGS 


SEAFOOD 

Your food bills too high? From 
processor to vou, no middleman. 

This week's special 

Fresh whole dressed Ling Cod 
79«tb 

Frest Turbot fillets, 884 lb 
Fresh sole fillets. $1.89 lb 
Frest cod fillets, $1.59 lb 

Freeze Your Orders 

Will custom freeze any order of 
fish you require 

F&H Processors at the Flshln' 
Hole, 801 Goldstream Ave. 
478-2544 

We also have a complete selec¬ 
tion of meats at competitive 
prices. See Joe Wolff. 


TILLICUM 

FURNITURE 

Good selection of swivel rock¬ 
ers, all colors In nylon velvet. 
Reg. $319, now only $288. 4 pee. 
sofa, chair, loveseat & ottoman 
for only $888. Braemore sofa and 
chair in racing strip#, only $588. 
Hankln sofa and swivel rocker, 
was $1,095, now only $788. Sat of 3 
nesting tables. $99. Dealcraft 9 
pee. dining room suite, was $3,- 
495. now only $3,188 Maple table 
and 4 side chairs, only $488. Mi¬ 
crowave Toshiba, rag. $719. now 
$658. Admiral stoves from $368 
and up. Frtapes from $519 and 
up. Admiral freezers 7 cu ft, 12, 
15 and 18 cu ft. a good selection 
and a good price, 370 G 
East, 3*4613. 


OPEN DAILY EXCEPT SUN. 
10:30-4:30 

LOCAL AND B.C. PRODUCE 
Berries In season 
Blueberries 
Peaches 
Apricots 
Cherries 
Fresh vegetables 
Tomatoes 
Cucumbers 

Saanich Fruit Growers, corner 
of Keating X Rd. and Vevaness. 
652 1138. 


CAPTAIN COOKS BAKERY 
Ltd. 1025 Cook St., corner Fort 
St , 386-1020. Closed Saturdays 
and Sundays Closed for hoi Wavs 
from Aug. 4-9. Our wrtWto bread Is 
made from unbleached flour and 
honey, no sugar added or try our 
100% whole wheat bread made 
with hooey, no sugar added. 

10 for $6 


FRESH SALMON 
Direct from the fisherman to you 
fresh salmon dally. Buy now for 
canning and freezt 
prices are rf ” 

largest setae.,_ 

prices at Fisherman s Market. 
16101 stand Highway, open 7 days 


•zing while the 


784 FORT 


382-5512 


imagine! A full sotowoofer sys¬ 
tem for less than S500 The all 
new Steub sup system features 
dual woffers and two mini apeak 
ers wt«h dome tweeters lor optl 
mel Imaging and dispersion 
Near itnowef CAV 

CAW 

f 8*A VATE5 (IN TMt (4AL1) 

Colour Rentals 

TV from$20Par Mu 

Mais furniture 

in? I Conk V M-UM 


Okanagan Fruit 


Apricots Peaches 
Transparent apples 
Bill Bevtev Garden Ce 
6 mile market 



0 Gorge Rd. 


New and Used 

Hida-begs. $169 to $3*9; Single 
size Hide-bed, $249 , 2 pc. Ches¬ 
terfield suites, $119 to $639; 
Wooden rocking chairs, $79 to 
$139; 3 pc. Cmfee table sets, 
$44 95 to $199; 5 pc. Dinette sets, 
$79 to 8449; Duncan Phyfe drop 
leaf tables, $179 to $349. Set of 4 
chairs, $299; I pc. round oak 
dining suite. 8119S;Cadar chests. 
8199; Complet e bedroom suites, 
$249 to 1549; Orest of drawers, 
|39tot219; Dressers. $79 to8299; 
Single beds. 839.95 to $199, Va¬ 
cuum cleaners, $34 to $79; 9x12 
rugs. $29 to $299. Visa or Master 
Card 

Pandora Furniture 

1050 PANDORA_3834319 





^ Qen& ', 

1115 FORT 8T. 

BUY-SELL 

APPRAISE 

1115 Fort St. 384-6441 


U-RICKiRASPBERRIES BOOK 
orders before August 10th 654 
par lb. bring your own contain 

T r$. r A ••realigns only. 
12 748-081 j Cowl chan Delta Pr* 


LOGANBERRIES 


P rileG IS CHEAP** 

C-attar eud more nutritious then 


3SONAL JEWELRY COL- 
Ian Dispersal Sale. Apprai 
sals available on Items. Chain of 
22 diamonds and white gold; 

v*Ti 00*0 eno oiemooo mow 
earrings, art deco yellow gold 
and diamond earrings, comem 
porarv yoRow gold and dtomond 
earrings; handcarvad lade and 

uemerine diamond and plefl 
numdtanorrtay; wh H ege U Ldto 
mond and peart dainty pendant 
Moulin Rouge diamond, rubv 

mw) uaitoMi mW| UiawHkM 

jtaly eta; CpSTryery 

scrim d u e. unueuol beads, plus 
many other smeller items 
*1 7332 days iff. 3861819, ave 

n||M| Lw MHMlfllfTWlf DO L l, LL 



in 


MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 

In MISCELLANEOUS 100 

forsau for sale 


M 


I S T E R 


The biggest and best se¬ 
lection of rebuilt and new 
vacuums on Vancouver 
Island. Compact,'Filter 
Queen, Electrolux, 
Kirby, Hoover, Eureka 
etc., etc. always in stock. 
Also bultt-ln vacuums at 
super low package price. 

* We Service What We Sell a 
901 E SQUI MALT (At Head St.) 

UNITS-310GOLDSTREAM 

Next to Hwy. Supermarket 
474-1011 


. Festem 
|*$$Tterbecl 


(Manehard at VWw) 

4CCMTRE 727 2256 
it McKwuN) 


The Plastic Shop 

We are now at our NEW LOCA¬ 
TION — bigoer and better with 
lots of parking, see us for Fiber¬ 
glass, Plexiglass. Polyethylene. 
Storm Windows and much more. 
THE PLASTIC SHOP 
Now at 2215 Government 
386-1477 


MOVING MUST SELL 
100 hp Merc, $300.90 hp Johnson, 
$150. Miscellaneous cabin cruis¬ 
er parts. Tires A78-13. Toyota 
radiator. Child's bed. Hood for 
kitchen range. Dodge hubcaps. 
Limoges china dollhouse furni¬ 
ture. Motorcycle helmets. Com¬ 
pressor. Skis. Antique pot belly 
stove. Water purifier. Artists 
easel. 383-3482 


NEED A WEDDING GIFT? 
Birthday? Anniversary? Choke 
an original work of art and give a 
piece of vour self for lasting ap¬ 
preciation. Also available pot¬ 
tery, wall hangings, photog¬ 
raphy. lawelerv and much more, 
all at unbelievably fair prices. 
The Artist's Showcase, *203-733 
Johnson St. opposite the Johnson 
St. carpertE. 382-5444. 


KNOTTY PINE KITCHEN 
cabinets, new condition. Also 
ribbon grain mahogany kitchen 
cabinets and bath vanity, rea¬ 
sonable. Painted single panel 
doors in frames 2'6"x6'8" and 
other sizes $12 each. 65 sin- 
ole casement windows 22"x50" 
85 each. Indoor outdoor carpet 
approximately 14'xl4' 
$30,595- 7233 


ETON’S 
14ft REHOUSE 
STORE 

749 View St. 


SIZE 16 WEDDING DRESS 
and vlel, used In 1979 Rear step 
truck bumper. Garburator. 12- 
voit Trolling motor. New Flush- 
pmatlc toilet 1969 Roadrunner 
Air Grabber hood. Two 15” 
Chrysler Keystone mags. 3 club 
van seats. Swivel motorcycle 
trailer After 5pm, 479-8385. 
479-0935. 


TWO SINGLE BEDS COM- 
plete. $30 each; sinole bed box 
spring and mattress, $10. 3 chest 
of drawers, $20, $20, $10; bureau 
with mirror, $75; small wooden 
cabinet, $15; couch $15; wooden 
table and 2 chairs, $10; Singer 
portable sewing machine, $30; 
dishes, pots and pans, plants 
3830274 


Rebuilt Vacuums 

New and rebuilt from $29.95. 
Now available — Compact, 
Electrolux, Filter Queen, Klrbv. 
Hoover. Eureka. All one veer 
guarantee. All makes serviced 
All vktorla Vacuums Ltd. 2805 
Cedar Hill at Hillside 595-2622. 


TWO VIKING OIL SPACE 
heaters with fans, as new, $50 
each; old-fashioned bath, wall- 
hung sink, toilet, excellent condi¬ 
tion, $75; seven solid exterior 
doors, 36x81, $15 each; several 
panelled Interior doors with 
lambs, various sizes. $15 each. 
477-6274, after 4 pm. 


GOLD CHAIN. PIN ANO EAR 
rings, silver spoon, antique bas 
ket. brass mirror and pine box, 
child's silverware set, stuffed 
bear, wagon and books. GE elec¬ 
tric curlers, clock, kitchen knife, 
casserole and accessories Mis 
cellaneous odds and ends. 
381 5858 


MATCHED PAIR BAYCREST 
spin washer and portable dryer, 
as new, $420 or near offer Box 
spring and mattress. Queen Size, 
$120. Nice telephone bench, $40 
Queen Anne style occasional 
chair, $30. Sunbeam mixer, $10. 
New white birdcage. Large Irv 
door oblong planter. 384 2574. 


H0MELITE 

CHAINSAWS 

SALES— PARTS — SE RVICE 
RENTALS 

GIBSON POWERCRAFT 
NOW AT 730 HILLSIDE 
382-8291 


AB DICK MODEL 385 17VjX22Vj 
offset press In excellent operat¬ 
ing condition; can be seen run¬ 
ning. ATF Chief 29" offset press. 
Miehle vertkle V5S. Chandler 
and Price hand press. All In good 
working condition. 386-6211 or 


SINGER TOUCH AND SEW 
with console, $100. Double bed 
and mattress, $75.110 volt C4fcln 

.!•fVo ; 


in__.... 

size stove, $50. Small fridge, $10. 
Gold shag rug, 9X6, $25. Set of 
rims fit GM Beaumont, $40. 


72 BASS BRISCOE HARMONY 
cord organ $150 4 drawer filing 
cabinet $100. Reel-to-reel Or un¬ 


dig tape recorder with 25VPIV 
$100. Setting for 8 dinner ware 
"Mid Winter England" rock- 
wood pattern $60. Duncan fife 
table 4 leaves $125. 598-4702. 


HERO PAINT PUMP, MODEL 
1100C, $208. Graco airless spray 
gun (gold) $100. Speodelre com¬ 
pressor. 2 cylinder, automatic 
shut off, regulator. $250. Devll- 
diis spray gun and quart cup. 
$100. Craftsman spray gun. 
quart cup, 850. 479-2075 


HOUSE GROWN PLANTS. 
Couch, coffee table. Portable 
washer spin dryer. Mecrame 
hanging Portable TV Old TV 
and stereo component. 15*oei 
Ion wood cabinet fish tank, needs 
front glass. Everything must go 
by Thursday. 382-5012. 


FOR SALE ABOUT SO STORE 
counters, plywood construction, 
with peg-board sliding front 
doors. 40 * 30 x 28" high A tow 
smaller also available. For 
quick sale 835 and $25 firm. Also, 
3 onto, spiral display fixtures. 
$30 each 642-3331 


CHEAP. NEW FACTORY SAL- 


_• gies* _ 

Lass than regular price Wlrv 
dowseraem. $1-84. Can deliver. 
Wor k* rear of Stage's Lumber, 
- Sidney, C 


day Frta 
*12noon. 


Open Mon- 
Saturday 


8175,6 
room suite $161 
super twin spin dr 

mt* uina 



STIHL Chainsaws 

SALES-PARTS-SERVICE 

g^IS^rW 1 


WASHER AMO DRYER, j 
‘ ,actf i< mower i 




BEAUTIFUL KELVINATOR 
portable/bulltln dishwasher 
with maple cutting board top. 
Excellent condition. Movlrva to 
home with built In $225 Older GE 
dryer, oood condition $40. Gold 
nvten carpet 9 x 12 $15. 7?1-3 t8l 

RAISIN FRIEZE HIDEABED 
8175; left hand Moffat zero zone 

dining room suite $350; gold 
plaid recllner $100; 3 pc. walnut 
bedroom suite $200. Mel's Bar¬ 
gains, 3460 Quadra St. 384-3152. 

NATURAL WOLF COAT, 
full-length, purchased from 
Scubv's In 1979. Excellent condi¬ 
tion. Asking $3500. Lady's size 
12. Call 387-1131 (local 220). 
386-2263. 477-5683. 

SET OF T^V. TABLES, S15- 
Bookcase, $20. Sealv Colonial hi 
deabad couch, $250. Chair, $20. 
End table, $10. Exercise bike. 
$100. Guitar and case. $70. Quick 
broom, $20 385-5590 after 5pm. 

TWO END TABLES; STEREO 
stands; slender bandar; S20 
each. Wet dry vacuum, $25. Oc¬ 
casional chair, $15. Art deco 
dressing table. Toys. Skates; 
several sizes. 38*5X7. 

12X3 POOL WITH FILTER. 
$100; wooden kitchen table and 
four chairs, $150; antique chan¬ 
delier, $150; 12* woooan boat. 
yOMwo old wooden chairs. 

USEO SEWING MACHINES 

1 only Bernina 831 open arm, 
$799. Many others to choose 
from, starting at $39.95. Fully 
guaranteed. Sawyer Sewing, 
Centre 840 Fort St . 38*6228. 

IS YOUR TELEPHONE UNAT 
tended, vou could be losing busi¬ 
ness. Buy or rent an enwserlng 
machine from Interconnect, 1586 
Quadra St. 38*0511. 

TWO BEAR RUGS WITH FULL 
head mounts, excellent taxi¬ 
dermy work, both spring bears. 
Grizzly $3006 Black bear $1000, 
firm. 65*7843. 

4X8 POOLTABLE S2250R BEST 
offer. Sat of crushed brown vel¬ 
vet drapes $50. One weight sat 
$225 or best offer, vinyl bench, 
bars, squat stand. 382-5015. 

6 DRAWER MIRRORED 
dresser, good condition, $150. 
Childs record player $20. Other 
miscellaneous Items. 38*2648 or 
382 5939. 

COLEMAN STOVE. COUCH, 
assorted luggage, door mats, 
glassware, lamp shades, socket 
wrench, golf clubs and cart. 
595-1543,1508 Haultaln. 

BAKER BRICKS, HIGH IN DE- 
mand, clean, 504 each. 250-gal¬ 
lon oil tank; old-style mantel, 
$250; bannister railings. 
477-6824. 

HARRY - 477-6534 
"Broken Window Specialist" 
TRY ME, I'M REASONABLE 

90--16X12X2” CEMENT 
blocks $1 each. One wood finish 
crib without mattress $95, one 
youth bed without mattress $15. 
65*8361: 

BABY BUGGIE, $50. BEATTY 
clothes dryer, $150. Picnic table, 
cedar, $75. Inglls 24" fridge, $». 
GE 24" stove, $5p. Steel locker,4 
door. $50. 479-W75 

UTILITY TRAILER $150. 
Ping-pong table $75. Lined floral 
drapes 150X50", $25 pair, oval 
braided rug $25. Lamps, stereo, 
ml sc. 642 392T 

SMALL TRUNK, WRINGER 
washer, automatic baseboard 
electric heater, man's fllghfbeo, 
two step end tables, pair cur¬ 
tains. 384-7412 

CHAINSAWS 

Alt Becker and Son Lid. 

2981 Tllllcum 384-6414 

Waterbeds 

Davor Night 

47* 7345 

RENT INDUSTRIAL SEWING 
machines, day. week, month or 
rent to own. Sawyer Sewing 
Centre, 840 Fort St. 38*6228. 

15 CHESTERFIELD SUITES, 
all In good condition, make me 
enoffer. Mlsc. Items.47*1311 or 

WOODS-9X12 TENT, NEVER 
used and In box, as now have tent 
frailer. Paid $229, asking $180 or 
best offer . 47*3380. 

ANTIQUE LEGAL Docu¬ 
ments handwritten on sheep 
skin, 16th to 19th century $25 to 
$100. 592-7301 

MASON & RISCH PIANO. EX 
cellent condition. $2100; twin box 
spring and mattress $30. Metal 
student's desk $25 38*8563 

NYLON CARPET 12 X 10 WITH 
underlay, vary good condition 
$1S0. Kenmore vacuum with at¬ 
tachments $50 592-4776. 

COMMERCIAL SLATE POOL 
table- $900 or best offer. Double 
Vilas maple colonial bad, $300. 
477-3156. 

CHINA: ROYAL WORCESTER 
"Concerto" 7 complete place 
sett togs^cups and saucers. $550 

OLD PIANO. CHEAP. GOOO 
for learners, old wedding dress, 
size 10-13; barrel racing saddle. 
383-0573 before 2pm. 


BEOROOM SUITE. BAY 
crest wesher/spln dryer, port¬ 
able dryer, single bed, drawers. 
382-1741 


SOUTH BEND METAL LATHE. 
9" swing, 4' bed. Includes steady 
rest, stand, gears. $1395.385-7693 
after 6pm 


OAK BARRELS, $15. COLO- 
nlal easy chair. $20. Chrome kit¬ 
chen table, $10. 592-4141 eve¬ 
nings 


FRIDGE, STOVE, TV, 
stereo, chair and umbrella set, 
cassette tape deck, set of 
snooker balls. 656-3147. 


ORGAN AND STOOL, $150. 
Small metal desk $20 Aquarium 
and stand $25. 477-4981 after 
5pm 


SWIVEL ROCKER $20; 26" TV 
$10; Occasional table $20; Dou¬ 
ble bed $15; Hydraulic exerciser 
815 Phone 598-2090, 


BAR STEREO, OLDER 
fridge, color tv, standard bike, 
kindling, cookbook, student an- 
cyclopedias. 477-9791. 


COUNTER GLASS OOORS. 
180"L-- — * * 


"L 24"W 38"H. Office dh 
City Office Equipment l 


APLE CRIB ANO 
•d conditi on sty , 
ic, swivel wheels. 


CONCERT PIANO. LARGE 
tors. 382-0670 or 386-2187. 


ROTOR TYPE TV ANTENNA. 


end stainless steel guv wires. 
$25047*7852 


VIKING FRIOGE 16 CU. FT., 
bottom freezer $199.95; sleeper, 
nylon cover $199 95. Mels Fumi- 
lure, 1821 Cook, 385-805. 


PORTABLE SEWING MA- 
cfHne. good condition $50. Brand 
new commode (home) $25. 
477-5507 after 4. • 


ELECTROLUX VACUUM, 
■" " ed, must sell. 


MIRROR 36X56” PLATE 
glass. W bevelled edges, other 
smaller mirrors. $125.47*1311 

4X8 SLATE POOL TABLE, 1 
jear^old, reduced to $625. 

EIGHT BAGS MANURE, SOIL, 
chips or bark. $12 delivered. 
592-7068. 

GRAVEL OR SAND $19; NEW 
concrete slabs 954 delivered. 
592 7068. 

FOR SALE, DINING ROOM 
suite, mini washing machine, 
miscellaneous, etc. 382-1546 

LADIES OIAMONO RINGS, 
oak sideboard, 2 dressers, odd 
wooden chairs. 595-7918. 

GO-CART, GOOO RUNNING 
condition. $350. 721-3638 after 

6pm 

3-SPEED WESTINGHOUSE 
alrcondltloner 8000 btowtth side 
extensions. Evenings 721-3943. 

TOYOTA KNITTING MA 
chine, complete with stand and 
tracer. $650, offers. 47*6425 

TWO WEDDING DRESSES, 
both in excellent condition. Size 
*10. 595-4806 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 
and^mltcellaneous Items. 

LIKE NEW, BRIGHT RUST 
patterned 8x12 carpet, suitable 
for playroom, $25. 477-0575 

BLACK & DECKER COMPACT 
radial arm saw and stand, good 
condition. 477-4185. 

MAPLE BURLS, DRIED 4 
ye^rs.^unf Ini shed, for tables, etc. 

APPROXIMATELY 60 YARDS 
of used green shag carpet. $100. 
477-0603 

STOVE. FRIDGE. WASHER, 
colour TV. Almost new. 
721-5149. 

JOHN WOOD 30 GALLON 
electric hot water tank. Like 
new.3856906. 

16X24 DOUGH-BOY SWIM- 
mlno pool, $795, offers. 47*8870, 
38*5464, pager 689. 

ELIMINATOR 10-SPEED $55, 
Cleveland King flute $70. Phone 
after 5 pm. 592-5031. 

STURDY SUITCASE, SIZE 

iHKsKJs.asnr- 

UNITREX ADOING MACHINE 
with tapes and Muntz * track 
47*2959. 

CHILDREN'S SAND BOXES, 
4'x4'x8" with sand. Fitted Tld. 
$26, delivered. 383-0974. 

DRAPES, TWO SETS, LINED. 

&r&£S'giiJg,} Ktm 

ONE WELL-BUILT POTTERS 
wheel. $200 or best offer Phone 
477-2489, between 9 and 9. 

METAL DOG CAGE. LIKE 
new. 24”x2t”xl5”. Phone 
381-0193. 

ONE COVERED UTILITY 

&feti?‘ss d 5 , ir n ‘ on '’ 2S00 ' 

FOR SALE, APPROX 1.20 AND 

.50 diamonds. 5954001. 

DRAPES, 7 PAIRS. FOR SALE, 
38* 7402. 

UTILITY BOX TRAILER, 
8'X5Vi'. wired 38*6939 

GREENtJUIT. SIZE 42. MUST 

5 YEAR OLD ELECTROLUX IN 
good condition. 47*2523. 

REEL TYPE LAWNMOWER, 
$75. 381-0842 

CCM EXERCISE BIKE, LIKE 
new, $85 47*7678 

GAMES TABLE AND 4 
matching chairs, $275. 59*2647. 

HOT TUB. 6 X4', $1500 OR BEST 
offer. 59*2174 

8' UTILITY TRAILER. NEW 
tires. 38*9017 

PORTABLE MASSAGE 
table, brand new, $225. 3856986 

101 CMMOTS 
MISCELLANEOUS 

ROUND-ABOUT 

CHILDREN'S CLOTHES 

We will sell quality used chll 
drens clothing. 1005 View. Tues- 
Sat, 10-5 p m 3856552 

KIDDIES' KAROUSEL 

Now accepting winter maternity 
& childrens wear, toys, hand 
crafts etc. 2666 Quadra, 383-1122. 

WANTED: INFANTS TO SIZE 

10 childrens wear & accessories. 
After 6pm, 383-1856 or 477-1073. 

WANTED: CRIB AND MAT- 
tress In oood condition around 
$25. 381-1513/47*2971. 

LARGE DELUXE GENDRON 
47*i8& hardlv use< *' 560 

CHILDS CAR SEAT, GOOD 
condition, $20. 47*7678 

6-YEAR CRIB AND MAT- 
tress. $65,477-1366. 

1« HISCEUMEOUS 

aura 

URGENTLY WANTED 
GOLD 

SILVER 

SILVER COINS 

Come in for free appraisals 

NO OBLIGATIONS. 

UNIVCRSAL 

TRADING CENTRE 

584 JOHNSON 383-9512 

Are vou getting ttie 
most from vour 

GARAGE SALE? 

for an auction estimate or a cash 
offer contact LUNDS today. 
38* 3308. The auctloners and ap¬ 
praisers tor Victoria. 926 Fori 


OAK BAY AUCTIONS 

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED 
Good household furnishings, 
tools, garden equipment, tie. 
PHONE 592 5111 

AUCTION EVERY 
WEDNESDAY 7 P.M. 
2036OAK BAY AVE. 


WANTEO URGENT. GOOD 
quality furniture, appliances, 
tools, anything with resale 
value Phone for cash appralv 
als. Royal Oak Trading, 44M 
West Saanich Rd. next to Royal 
Oak Shopping Centra. Open 7 
days. 16am 6pm weekdays. 
479-1913. 


CASH 

We buy and sell vintage clothing 
and accessories, furs, towelrv. 
td all oollecttoH nostai- 
n. Estate appraisals. 
11-5 PM., 577-JotoMan. 
Bay Window. 



URGENT! 


C LiP tr.UX V ACU UM Good Hunting Gum Wanted to 
wwlthpowarhead$158or SPECIALTY GUNS (D(v of In 
tor _tar national Knlw 


OUTDOOR INCINERATOR 
l, 86.9$ da- 


ftsr 


REFRIGERATOR COUNTER 

tap rnapwtant. almeat Raw $230 

Andmfc- 5*42*1 


NEW QUEEN SIZE MAT- 

1 DIAMOND RING, S SAP- 

gWajd l amand ring. 9*1 aoc* 


PROPANE BA I 
to* tank 8M9 a 




Hams 476 1»nwatortSI 




1U 


wants 


Beer Bottles and cans 608 doz. 
soft drink bottles, old car bat¬ 
teries, radiators, copper, brass, 
lead etc. 526 David, 383- U28, *4. 

DIAMONDS 8 GOLD WANTED 
Cash for your diamonds and 
rings In any condition. Universal 
Trading, »4 Johnson, 383-9512. 

WANTED: STEREO COMPO- 
nents. amP ' turntable, speak¬ 
ers. 8-track and/or cassette, also 
tapes. 479-2523,47* 1311. 

WE PAY CASH FOR ALL 
square cornered fridges, stoves, 

s^^srikiiR 

WANTED: PLAIN LINEtL 
drapes, 15'xll", 4'x48". Also, 
freezer, washer and dryer. 
382-8956, after 5. 

INEXPENSIVE SUITCASES 
needed, any stvto, family re- 
turnjnjMo^Marltlmes. Please 

AIR CONDITIONER, LADIES 
bike, camping ang canning 


SELL OLD BOOKS TO THE 
HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 

TOP PRICES FOR OLD POST- 
cards^etc. 383-8311, 5957567, 

FRIDGES. SQUARE COR- 
neted, working or not. 47*2313, 
47*5449. 

CASH FOR YOUR USEO SEW- 
ing machine. Slnoar Sewing 
Centre. Hillside Mall, 9954545 

AYNSLEY CHINA IN THE 
Pagoda pattern. Please call 

WANTED USED FISHING 
teckje^ rods, reels, lures, etc. 

BUYING RECORDS. COOK- 
bo^s^ntaother oociduved books 

WANTED: CHILD RELATED 

!&'fo?Mr'£ n . c M op 

WANTED: SCRAP LEAO UP 
358 per pound, any quantity. 
Phone 47*1913. 

GRANDFATHER CLOCK 

Phone Jerry 652-4546. 

FRIDGES, FREEZERS 
bought. 3W-W13. All Temp. 

WANTED: MOUNTEO WILD 
animal heads. 47*2684. 

WANTED DEEP FREEZE 
and smaller fridge. 47*3231. 

OLD DOtX^PRE-1945. 

OUTDOOR TRAMPOLINE 

592 5581 

WANTED TO BUY OLD VIO- 
llns tor repair. 5956611. 

ROOF RACK WANTED FOR 
Volkswagen Beetle. 38*9794 

24' ALUMINUM EXTENSION 
ladder. 477-9834. 

UTILITY TRAILER 
65*3800 

ik WMtiim 

DEMOLITION SALE. 635 
Rofhwell, dally 9 am. • 7 pm. 
3857789. Kitchen cabinets with 
double ss sink, toilets end sinks, 
old style bath, hot water system, 
radiators, water pumps and 
pipes, furnace, 250 galion oil 
tank, variety of doors. 2 x 4s. 
panelling and mlscellanous 

MOVING. GORDON HEAD 
Teak kitchen cabinets and count¬ 
ertop, stove, dishwasher, some 
furniture, baby clothing and 
equipment, books, 6 man tent 
and poles, Coleman stove, skis, 
miscellaneous household Items 
Saturday and Sunday 1*2. 1905 
Ferndale Road. 

"DEMOLITION SALE". 2 OLD 
(topiexes at corner of Fairfield 
and Cook. Hardwood floors, red 

brick, doors, windows, oil fur 
naces and tanks, fridges, stoves, 
hot water heaters, etc. Week 
days 12 to 7pm. Sat and Sun, 26th 
and 27th. 11 to 4pm or phone 
112-W8-2472 

SAANICH LACROSSE BOOST 

er Club. Breefoot Park. 11-3 Sat¬ 
urday July 26. Donations may be 
dropped oft Thursday July 24 
between 6-lpm at Braefoof 
Park. 

WORLD VISION GARAGE 
Sale Many Items. 876 Leslie St 
(off Saanich Rd). Saturday 
10am. 

DEEP FREEZE, $100, MUCH 
more miscellaneous. 2203 
Seyward, 1:30pm 4:30pm 
5958026 

JULY 24, *5, HOUSEHOLD, 

garden and garage goods. 74 Re¬ 
gina. 

SATURDAY. 10AM-4PM. 506 
Goldstream. Toys and mlsc. 
household items. 

YARD SALE. 231 MARY ST., 
down to ocoan. 8am to 6pm 

IK MCOUKOUS 

TO KBIT 

PARKING SPACE FOR RENT, 
underground, near Government 
buildings. $20 per month. 
38*5944 

ns twin 

69 FORD % TON RANGER 
swap tor W ton or swap truck and 

8' camper for import truck and 
camper. 47*1695. 

'64 SEDAN DEVILLE CADIL- 
lec, fully rebuilt, must be seen. 
Will swap for best travel trailer. 
642-3298. 

Ill CMKalTTiaK 

WE BUY SILVER COINS ANO 
sterling. Universal Trading 
Centre, 3859512 

117 MmQKSaKMTS 


Collectibles Auction 
Tues., Aug. 12,7 p.m. 

This Interesting Auction will In- 



R.C.O. And other 
CHINA and GLASS 
VER andEstate JE'. 

CLOCKS, ARTIFAL _ 

PETS. PAINTINGS and 
PRINTS. BOOKS, MCMORIL 
BILIA and other articles of In¬ 
terest and Value 
CONSIGNMENTS ARE NOW 
BEING ACCEPTED 

926 Fort St. 386-3306 

LUNDS 


OAK BAY AUCTION 
CONSIGNMENTS WANTEO 
ForearAICTir ‘ 
COLLECT# 


HP* 

IE 592 Sill 


"W, JWY W. 

PHONE 592-5111 
AUCTION EVERY 
WEDNESDAY 7 P.M. 
2036 OAK BAY AVE. 


JACOBEAN HANDCARVEO 
oek cheveNe teMe mirror jaoo- 
been hendeerved oak 3 paneMed 



ANTIQUES mi jUTTS 


SOLID MAHOGANY QUEEN 
Anne style extending leaf table 
and chairs, seats 4; matching 
buffet with bevelled mirror, 
,irm 

652-3)48, phone after 4.30. 

HANO OPERATED CREAM 
seperater In good condition, 
sxn. Cast with brass hand water 
pump, $100. 3220 Marlin hexagon 

FURNITURE REFINISHING 
and antique restoration by 
museum trained professional. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 
388-9153 

VICTORIA MEDAL 
& MILITARIA LTD 
Medals, swords, badges, etc. 
Ekxjghf and sold. 1109 Lanolev St. 

LADjeS ETERNITY RING, 
half bend of rubles, half band of 
•maraids, 2 pivot half bands of 
diamonds. $1700 591-9859 

PAIR BESWICK HORSES. SET 
of German beer stein mugs, onyx 
chess set and a Singer treadle 

65*3171° mach,ne ‘ 59> -**59 

SNOW TIGER SILK SCREEN 
painting by Stephen Lowe. Ap¬ 
proximately 2*x4'. Exchange for 

)«^5.r^.3a'^2^ <,u,v * Teo, 

MARSHALL ANTIQUES, 1030 
Fort. We buy quality furniture, 
sliver, china, crystal. TOP 
PRICES PAID. 382-0511. 

WANTED: QUALITY AN- 
tlqua furniture, rugs, clocks, 
palming* silver. Highest prices. 
D. Robinson, 10)9 Fort, 38*6425. 

COLLECTOR WILL BUY OR 
repair any wind-up grama- 
pnone, outside horn or other 
wise. 9954768. 

ANTIQUE LEGAL Docu¬ 
ments handwritten on sheep¬ 
skin, 16th to 19th century $25 to 
$100,992-7301. 

BEST PRICES PAID FOR AN- 
tlque furniture, porcelain, cry* 
tal, copper, brass etc. Jedls An¬ 
tiques, 609 Courtney St. 384 4523. 

FOR SALE LARGE SELEC- 
lion of anitloue light fixtures and 
shades. Wafer glass studio, 1040 
North Park Street. 384 1515. 

PAIR FRENCH BRONZE 
Marly horses, signed Coustou. 
Best offer. 592-6560. 

PLAYER PIANO. PHONE AN- 
derson's Plano Tuning, 477-6439. 

COLLECTOR'S CLOCK, VERY 
ota records 45*5434 

i» unaamn 

8HP SEARS LAWN TRACTOR, 

3 speed forward one reverse, 36" 
mower attachment. Utility cart. 

36" spreader feeder and swaep 
er. $750 complete. 47*6423. 

AS NEW LAWN MOWE R $75. AS 
new weedeater $25. 3859729 

IK BARKN SVmjES 

fnHni 
r atiKuar 

SAANWOOO FARMS LTD. 
Cow manure. 652-2026 or 
652-1743. No Sunday calls 
please. 

■« ■ - ■-« —»« 

nowwjj KftayvTwz 

■XMUnthf 

DON'S TRACTOR SERVICE 

477-3913 

We rotovate, plow, cut grass and 
brush; also loading and hauling 

TED'S TRACTOR SERVICE. 

ZT'SU&.t&iSr : l,v,llng 

ftp Sri, Rads a$ni 

SCREENED TOP SOIL WITH 
manure and sand. $12/yd. Dellv 
ery extra. Sterilized potting soli 
bv bag. E Nixon Ltd. 47*0511, 
Nights 47*1937. 47*2995 

NO. 1 MIXED TOPSOIL. DARK, 
sandy loam. Laroe and small 
orders. Also no. 2 and perk soil. 
Phone, 658-S172, 479-1582, 

GOOO UNSCREENED TOP 
soli $10 yd. delivered within 
Greater Victoria In 10 vd. loads. 
727-2211. 

GOOD NO. 2 BLACK TOP SOIL. 
$6.50 par yard. Over 100 vards. 
$5.50 per yard 652 2523, 
9am- lpm weekdays. 

BY SACK, WEED FREE 
black soil. Open 7 days a week, 
382 2843. 

SANO. GRAVEL. DRAIN 
rock, crushed rock, and top soil. 

1 to 6 yard loads. 65*5406. 

• t SHREDDED SOIL, 15 YARD 
loads, $10 par yard. After 6, 
479-8349. 

GOOD SUPPLY OF PERC 
soil. 47*8349 


477-1777 

ROCK FILL WANTED. VIEW 
Royal 47* 7970. 

is KTSwnmxs 


10 GALLON FISH TANK, COM- 
piete with filter, pump, heater 
and plants. $100. 24" light cover, 
$1$. 17" light cover $10. 16" light 
cover, *. 14" Duomatic tank 
hoa to r, $30 7" universal tank 
heater 15 Large air pump, $20 
Water circulator pump $20. 
479-2075 


I'LL CONTRIBUTE $20 To¬ 
wards waving cost It you will 
give this cat a good home. Her 
name Is Spider, she Is small, 
black and loving with big sad 
ayes, she Is also tired of being a 
stray. Please phone 595-6059 


NORWEGIAN ELK HOUNDS 
I month s old. Male and female, 
points already earned In show 
ring $400 Spayed female obedi¬ 
ence p r ospect 8250. Beartoerry 
Kennels, Ganges. 537-2377. 


PULI PUPS. INTELLIGENT 
little black Hungarian sheep 
dogs,natural guards, herders, 
sonable companions. Sult- 
> homes only. 658-5259 


FREE. 4 ADORABLE 8 WEEK 
old ktrtons. Itttor box trained, 
very loving and affectionate, 
good with small children. 


WANTEO GOOO HOME FOR 
small black spavad Cocker 
cross. 11 months old, had shots 
830. Phof^Otona work 386-8311 


AIREDALE 


SEASHORE PETS 

T r agic a l Fish-_. 

Small Animals — Supplies 
Town 4 Country ^*80313 


PET SHOP LTD. 
Fish— Birds 


GERMAN SHEPHERO PUP 
pies, tap world bloodline, guard 


GERMAN SHE 

■■zss r. 


ONE MALE ANO ONE FE- 

■■ artery*® 

mamtag s 


jararc target 


iF'tL'SZ. 


125 


C-4 

prrsa^sumjEs 


ONE VERY PLAYFUL KIT- 
ten to olve awav, approx 3V* 
months old. housetrained. 
477-7947. 


GRAY AND WHITE YOUNG 
male neutered cat urgently 
needs home. A great pet. Cats' 
Protection League, 598-5731 


PUREBREO COLLIE FOR 
sale to oo to good family on farm, 
12 months old and In excellent 
health. After 5pm, 656-0241, 


KITTENS, READY FOR GOOD 
homes. 2 snowy white, others 
orange stripe with white mark- 
Ings. 592-6990 anytime 


GOOD NATURED 5 MONTH 
old male Doberman pup requires 
good home with a master that 
has time to train him. 656-4712. 


FEMALE DOBERMAN, 3Vi 
months, purebred, must sell 
moving, $75. Call after 5:30, 


REGISTERED CREAM PER 
sian male kittens. Shown bv a* 
pointment only, S98-49S8. 


BLACK ANO WHITE KITTENS 
to give away, litter box trained, 
phone 382-0203 or 385-5503 


6 WEEK OLD KITTENS, LIT 
ter trained, one black and white, 
2 tabby. 383-8567. 


HOME WANTED FOR A 2 
year old female spayed dog who 
needs T.L.C. 386-«)l7 evenings 


FREE TO GOOD HOMES 2 
male litter trained kittens. 
478-8210. 


GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS, 
very friendly, had first shots. 
Need good owners. $40 478-1286 


BEAUTIFUL MALAMUTE 
dog for sale, 1 '/j years old, male, 
S2«. 112-743-4)46 


ONE ONLY, REGISTERED 
apricot female poodle puppy, 
had shots 642 5967 


4 REGISTERED MALE SHEL 
tie puppies, $200 each. Salt 
Spring, 112-537—5082. 


3 YEAR SPAYED BLUE PER- 
slan. Loveable and affectionate 
825.384-1930._ 

FREE KITTENS, 6 WEEKS 
old, all male, pretty and playful. 
479-0736. _ 

DOBERMAN MALE, EARS 
cropped, stub tall, 1 year old. 
8150 or best offer. 385-0763 

PUREBRED MALE SABLE 
sheltle pups. $75. No papers 
474-1400 

MALE FERRET, 3'/j-MONTHS 
oid.^yood pet, use to children 

TO A GOOD HOME, 2 YEAR 
old female Maltlpoo, $60 
478-3060_ 

BLACK LAB PUPS, FREE TO 
good homes preferably with 
children. 4790507 


FREE 5 LITTER TRAINED 
healthy kittens, used to big dog 
642-3676 anytime 


PUREBRED NORWEGIAN 
Elkhound puppies, registered 
Ready August 10. 656-6639. 


2Vj YEAR OLD DOBERMAN 
withpapers, must be sold, owner 
moving, best offer. 658-5675. 


FREE, TWO 8 WEEK OLD FE 
male kittens. Litter box trained. 
477-8227 


BIRD CAGE. LIKE NEW. SUIT 
myna or budgie birds, paid $95, 
selling for $40 386-6045, 383-4680 


BEFORE BUYING A PURE 
bred puppy call Vic City Kennel 
Club r Watchdog" 477 9781. 


HOUSE BROKEN 
2 lovely kittens free 386-0029 
388-9134. 


AQUARIUM, 100-GALLON, 
with stand, under oravel filter, 
light fixture 8250 386-5951. 


BABY FERRETS 10 WEEKS 
Old, $60. After 5pm, 386-1058 


GLOUSTER CANARIES, 1980 
singers 829 38*9236 


CROSS POODLE PUPPIES, 
$40. 478-6981 


72-GALLON AQUARIUM WITH 
all accessories, offers. 385-1678 


GREAT DANES (3) (HARLE 
quin). 656-2340. 


WANTED: DACHSHUND 
puppy, female. 382-5510. 


LABRADOR CROSS PUPS FOR 
sale, 9 weeks old, 386-1350 


MALE AND FEMALe CAN 
arles tor sale. 382-4049 


127 


CHICKS, POULTRY 
HATCHING EGOS 
SUPPLIES 


STANDARD FANCY SILVER 
lace Wlnedots, 1-3 months old. 
Silky banlams for sale. 474-2063 


PIGEONS AND SQUABS 
598-6474 


LAYING HENS, 3 YEARS OLD. 
St.SO each. 479-2357 


in LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES 
MID EVENTS 


JOHN 

MacNUTT 

TRUCKING 

SAWDUST—SHAVINGS 
HOGFUEL 
Large or Small Loads 

479-6560 


AAANDER 

TRUCKING LTD. 
SAWDUST 
SHAVINGS 
CEDAR HOG FUEL 
385-3041 

After 6,479-7629 


ONE REGISTERED MORGAN, 
one registered half Arab, both 
geldings and have their pass¬ 
ports They are well schooled on 
the flat and have worked over 
fences. The Morgan Is also 
trained to drive Contact Alison 
Robb at 652 2833 


REGISTERED PUREBRED 3 
year old Arabian filly, very 
fvoey head, 15 hands, chestnut, 
has pieced when shown Moving 
Must sell Otters being accepted 
112-741-1820 or 595-2062 eve 


1S/16TH REGISTERED ARAB 
•tiding, 5 veers, IS hands, beau 
tlful show and dressage horse, 
experienced rider Only show 
home and sincerely Interested 
Call 65*4167 


WELL TRAINED WELSH 
pony, 11 Vj hands high, good with 
children. 10 years old. colour 
Buckskin with brown mane and 
tall. Trained Western or Eng 
llsh $550 or best offer 59*9357 


M.1HH REGISTERED THOR 
oughbred gelding, 8 years old. 
successfully evented training di 
vision 1980. H2 758 7439 


WELSH PONY, IIVi HH. $450 
•r best offer. 12 veers old, well 
taken care of, pulls carts on 


HORSE SHOEING, GUAR AN 
toad work. Don Borntl, 479*128 


POTOTOES $2 PER 100 LB 
sack. Mtcheii f arm, island view 


BOSTON BULL CARRIER, 

2-. 

u - -- 


AR SHETLAND WELSH 
•aiding, requires exuavi 
fktmJm #4? Mai 


If" ENGLISH SAOOLt SIM 
Rijdta^breaches, MS 4to 1393 

MAMF RE O f HUNOt« f 
••HP Amt. August IS It. 1 
toetonto 0M30»4 




t 


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































C-5 

121 LIVESTOCK SUPFtlES 
MID EVENTS 


FIRST CUT HAY. HIGH PRO- 
teln. fine hav \7 50 per bale. 
652-3096, 1463 Sicily's XRd 

FOR SALE 1 MALE BUFFALO, 
for Information phone 
112-754-2276 

HEREFORD COW WITH 
* "elfer calf, also ho 
a soon. 479-3021. 

SAVE $100 PLUS TAX ON 
brand new Stubben saddle 
479-0787 

5—YEAR OLD QUARTER 
horse Arab geldlno. 14 .3 HH. 
479-0517 


9 weeks, $35. 479 4545 


HORSES BOARDED 
479 2205 


135 fummnaan 


MASSEY HARRIS PONY, 
oood running condition, with 
oood rubber, blade, fuel attach 
ment , $1250 652-5517,652 2704 


141 LEASE VEHICLES 



urgent. 595-1467. 


POTATOES. $35 PER TON OR 
$2 per sack. 652-1546. 


YORKSHIRE SOW AND 13 PIG- 
lets, 8500 478-3871 


130 


HEAVT EQUIPMENT 
AND MACHINERY 


CHE 


• UMlin 

CALL TODAY 
VICTORIA 384-4144 
For these and other used 
equipment bargains! 
Dealer Licence #00217A 


FINNING 


CHE 


1976 John Deere 9550 backhoe at¬ 
tachment, fits most JD ma 
chines, good condition $4,500 

1977 Drott 50 excavator 1 V* yard 

GM diesel power, low hours, runs 
well $69,000 

1974 Massev Ferouson 44 loader, 
2 yard bucket, runs well $24,506 

1973 Case 580B loader backhoe, 
oood condition $17,500 

Finning Tractor, Victoria 
384-4144 


D8 CAT, SERIAL NUMBER 
D8H-10,046. DAT angle dozer, 
89B winch, fully screened and 
guarded Bush blade available. 
With work 112-749-3365 or 
112 749 6987. 


WISCONSIN ROBIN 
New 4 cycle engines 2 4 HP $175 
each; 8 HP electric start $450. 
New 2 cycle engines 1.5 HP $75, 
2.5 HP $125, 4 HP $175. Private 
sale, 658-5663. 


1965 JOHN DEERE 2010 
crawler, R.O.P.S, angle blade, 
brush blade, plus 1959 Interna 
tional 190 tandem ramp truck 
and extras. 642 5358. 


73^INTERNATIONAL 2050 
dump, DV 550, 6-spead Alison 
automatic, 3-speed auxilllary, 14 
yard reliance box, excellent con- 
dltlon, 815,000 After 5. 478-8682. 


1972 KENWORTH W924 CAB 
and chassis. Rebuilt NTC400. 5 
and 4 trans, SRD 44 rear end. 
478-1951. 


FARM IMPLEMENTS 



FARM, LAWN AND GARDEN 
EQUIPMENT 


Satoh and Power King Tractors 
* Gas and Diesel/12-38 h.p. * 


Serving the Peninsula and 
lstands for 50 years. 

2046 KEATING XRD. 
652-4437 _ 652-1121 


MACHINERY LIMITED 

610 ALPHA STREET 3844)641 

FORD TRACTORS 
Lawn and Garden Tractors 
10-20 H.P. 

Farm Tractors 
2 Wheel and 4 Wheel Drive 
13-335 HP. 

DL-595-4A 



Lawn 6 Garden Tractors 
7hp - 28 hp 

Diesel F arm Tractors 
72 hp 775 hp 

Full Line of Attachment s 
Good Supply Of Used Tractors 
657 1642_SAANIChToN 


»4l»n_ mZiU 

J GRIEVE MOTORS LTD 
vanruuwor »Hears iarpaaf isrrr 

fiSBrEfasiza 

>4 lu 4J ha * wR lew of an act) 
ar& '.AAHKHTOa 


We Thought You 
Should Know 


We've got the 
USED 

Equipment Values 
and Selection 
You're Looking for! 


FT 9456-1975 CAT D8K TRAC¬ 
TOR w/double tilt angledozer. 
winch, R.O.P.S. Undercarriage 
averages 50%. except carriers— 
10%. Pins & Bushings turned. 

AS IS Campbell River $75,000 

FT 9156-1963 CAT D6C TRAC¬ 
TOR w/angledozer, winch, 
R.O.P.S. Undercarrlaoe at re¬ 
placement stage, otherwise unit 
runs well. 

AS IS Port Hardy $26,600 

FT 9269—1969 CAT 966C 
WHEEL LOADER w/4 yd. buck 
et, soundprotf R.O.P.S. cab, 3rd 
valve, lailhouse guard, 23.5x25 
tires —30%-80%. Requires work 
on boom differential and trans. 
AS Campbell River $40,000 

FR-4589—1979 CAT 910 WHEEL 
LOADER w/G.P. bucket, 
R.O.P.S.,3rdvalve, 15.5x25—L3 
tires —95%. Excellent unit. Only 
100 hours on meter. 90-dav war 
' ranty. 

SELECT BUY Victoria $58,500 

FK 7706—1955 Bantam T35 LOG 
LOADER cable operated log 
loader w/oooseneck boom, truck 
mounted, Tandem drive. Sepa¬ 
rate cab Needs some adjust¬ 
ment. 

AS IS Nanaimo $6$000 

F R-4514—1970 CAT D5 TRAC¬ 
TOR w/angledozer, winch, 
R.O.P.S. Undercarriage aver¬ 
ages 75% and better. Good 
operating condition and appear 
ance. 30-dav warranty. 

Campbell River 

CERTIFIED BUY $48,500 

FR-6671 —1974 CAT D4 LGP 
TRACTOR w/straight dozer, 
new R.O.P.S. w/rear screen. 
Undercarriage below averaoe, 
except tracks 95% and carriers 
100 %. 30 In. shoes. 

AS IS Vancouver $29,000 

FT 7017—1976 CAT D6C TRAC 
TOR w/angledozer, new 
R.O.P.S w/rear screen and 
sweeps. Undercarriage aver¬ 
ages 75 80% New 24 In. shoes 
90-day warranty. 

SELECT BUY Vancouver $94,000 
“All Units Sublect to Prior Sale” 

FINNING 


★ IS ★ 

INTEREST 

All lease plans consist of two fac 
tors — depredation and the cost 
of money. For a limited time, 
ENSIGN CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH will build you a 
competitive lease on any 1910 
Chrysler built car or truck for 

★ 12 ★ 

MONTHS 

WITH AN OPTION 
TO BUY THE VEHICLE 
YOU HAVE DRIVEN AT 

V FULLY 

V DEPRECIATED 

V VALUES 

ENSIGN LEASE 
LTD. 

Quadra at 
Caledonia 
386^2411 

DEALER NO. 5620 


149 HEW CM 
DIRECTORY 


GlenOak 



AS LOW AS 


Stock No. 80206 

384-1144 
Yates at Cook 

GlenOak 



Dealer No. 6616 


150 CARS FOR SALE 


GlenOak 



'TELLAFRIEND' 


73 CAMARO 

$ 3950 

73 COUGAR 

$ 3950 

74 VOLVO S.W. 

$ 5250 

74 AUSTIN 

$ 2250 

74 L.T.D.A.C. 

$ 3450 

75 GREMLIN 

$ 2150 

75 VALIANT, 6, ATS 2450 

76 L.T.D., 51.000M $ 3450 

7* TORINO S.W. 

$ 3450 

77 RABBIT Sedan 

$ 5750 

77 CAMARO 

$ 5950 

77 PINTO S.W. 

$ 4450 

7* BOBCAT 

$ 4250 

78 L.T.D. 

$ 5450 

78 MONTE CARLOS 5450 

79 LTD WAGON 

$ 7450 

79 PLYMOUTH 

$ 5750 

79 SUNBIRD 

$ 6250 

79 COUGAR XR7 

$ 6450 

79 OMNI AT 

$ 4950 

80 T-BIRD, DeluxeS 8250 

80 CAMARO 

$ 7450 

Tuns 


68 FORDVS-ton 

$ 1650 

72 VAN, 1 owner 

$ 3450 

77 BLAZER 

$ 6150 

77 G.M.C. * TON 

$ 4950 


GLENOAK FORD 

YATES AT COOK 
3*4-1144 
OCALCRMM 


A 


CAM’MAMT 

OPEN 9-9 
474-2233 


IS* CMS FOR MU 



I MCCALLUMl 

MOTORS 


★ ★ 


EDITION! 
l\ 


BERTONE COUPE 

MYSTIC SILVER 
METALLIC 


FOR* 

★ ★ 


79 Bronco 4x4 
79 Volvo 245 SW 
78 Mazda GLC 
78 Volvo 242 DL 
ft Volks Rabbit 2 dr 
77 Volvo 242 DL 
76 Peugeot 504 SL 
76 Pontiac Firebird 
75 Volvo 164 E 
74 Merc Bobcat SW 
72 Volvo 144S 
71 Volvo 145 SW 
67 Volvo 123 GT 
67 Mercedes diesel 

Mil MORE 
TO CHOOSE FROM 

BCAAINSPECTED 
FOR YOUR 
PROTECTION 


100% BANK 
FINANCE 
OAC 


VICTORIA'S 
VOLVO CENTRE 


★ mm ★ 

Corner Yates and Cook 
Dealer 5603 


1171-1919 


TV MUSTANG, 2.1 LITRE. V8, 
^itomatlc p.s„ radio, orange 


autoi 

$519! 

1979 

Hsu 

1975 


1979 Mustang, automatic. 2.3 
lltre^y., p.s, radio, dark blue, 

979 Cougar XR7, 302 VI. auto, 
P.S., P.B., radio, buckats, Lan¬ 
dau roof, $5495. 

1980 Citation X—body, V6, auto, 
PS, 4—DR hatchback, $5995. 
1980 Tram Am. V8, P.$7, P.B.. 
auto, red, $8195. 

1978 Ford Econoline van. M ton, 
351 V8, auto, radio, p.s, p.b. 


351 VI 
$5395. 

9 Hc« i 
(Olvlslor 

feu 


HERTZ RENT ACAR 
Ivlslon of owbar Leasing) 
rv ~glas St., Victoria, B.C. 
da vs a wiek. 388-4411 
Dealer *6499 


1979 LEBARON WAGON, 
beautiful condition, automatic, 
power steering, power brakes, 
cruise control, undercoat, posi 
five traction, 360 cu. in, lean 
bum, uses any oas, remote mlr 
rors, rear ipNMr, deluxe light 
package, approx. 31,000 kilome¬ 
ters, will consider Beetle or Im¬ 
port pickup trade up to value of 
81500 Price $6900. 477-6184. 


Special Edition 

1979 Dodge Asoan Special Edl 
flon Wagon. Deluxe Interior. 
AM/FM radio, only 13,000 klm, 
ps.. pb., Must be seen—priced to 
selL 382 2313. Will* Dodge 
ftrysler. 3200 bouglav Dealer 


1980 FORD THUNDERBIRD. 
blue. V-8, auto., ps , pb , power 
windows, radio, white vinyl roof, 
bucket seats with console, 
DEMO ON TOOAY for $8,795. 
Don't miss this one — trades 
welcome. 388-5714. 382-6315. 
fridge St Motors — Dealer 


1979CAMARO 


POWER STEERING & POWER 
BRAKES. SMALL V8 WITH 
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION. 
LESS THAN 7000 MILES. $6850, 
112 746-7641 


1980 4 DOOR CITATION 
Hatchback Demo, 4 cylinder, 
< steering, radio, aa- 
elnt and much 
' Sale $7295. 
“LSr- 


automatit, 
frostw, 7-tone pain' 

more. Retail $C7S.MMMI 
Brldoe St Motors D L5161, 
388-5714, 382-6315,652-4244 



... h> be 
- . i^ JPIP radpa ww- 
me. Bridge St Motors OL5161, 


TRY US FIRST! 

79 Horizon, hatchback. Tremen¬ 
dous M.P.G. One owner, low 
miles! Make an offer! 3884921. 
Metro Honda. Dealer 5*78 


TRY US FIRST! 

79 Sunbird station wagon, euto- 
, $4995. J884921V Metro 
i, Oaaiar $876. 


79 VOLVO 244 DL 

4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic, 
^war steering, must soli. $7995. 




1979 DATM WAGON. IK 




WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 

IS* CMS FOR MU 151 CMSFMUU 1* CMS FOR MU 



CHRYSLER 

PLYMOUTH 


I THOUGHT 
III 


ALL UNITS 
CHECKED 
BYCARCLINIC 
DIAGNOSTIC 
CENTRE 


'80 Dodge D150 PU 
'79 Ford Mustang II 
'79 Plymouth Caravelle 
'79 Chrysler Newport 
'79 Bulck Skyhawk S 
'79 Datsun 510 
'79 Chrysler 300 
'79 Dodge Omni 
'79 Chev Camaro 
'78 Plymouth Horizon 
'78 Mercury Cougar 
'77 Pontiac Trans Am 
'77 Ford Pinto 
'77 Chevette 
'77 Cordoba T-Bar 
'76 Dodge Charger 
'75 Olds Cutlass 
'75 Ford Pinto S.W. 

'75 Chrysler Cordoba 
'74 Datsun B210 
'74 amc Gremlin X 
'74 Dodge Dari 
'74 Jeep Cherokee 
'73 Colony Park SW 
'73 Toyota Corona 
'72 Ford Pinto S.W. 

'72 Datsun 1200 
'72 Cortina 


PLUS MANY 
MORE 

GOV'T TESTED 
PLUS 2-YEAR 
WRITTEN 
WARRANTY 


WANTED! 

GOOD CLEAN 
USED CARS 
CONTACT: 
DON REDECOPP 



Chrysler-Plymoutti 

Ltd. 

DOWNTOWN 
YATES AT COOK 

Dealer licence number 
D5295 

386-2411 

Open Weekdays 
Till 9:00 


1177-1171 


Musi sell '77 Plymouth Fury sta- 
t Ion wagon, oold, 58,000 miles, 
still 1 1 months International war¬ 
ranty on It. $2500 or bast otter 


77 Mercury Marquis 

4 dr. HT, P.S, P.B, V8 AT. Only 
14,000 mi. A beautiful car $5795. 
B Madsen Motors Ltd. 478-5011. 
Dealer 5450. 


1977 DODGE ASPEN 4 DR. CUS- 
tom sedan, slant 6 auto, P.S, PB. 
radio. Light green with dark 
green interior. 31.000 ml. Extra 
excellent condition. $4895. 
Brldoe St Motor Co Ltd., Bruce 
382-6315 or 388-5714 Dealer 5161. 


1977 SUBARU, 5 SPEEO, 
sports coupe, deluxe model, 
front wheel drive, radial tires, 
AMFM radio, excellent condi¬ 
tion. Highway 45 miles per oal 
Ion $4500 2840 Cralgowan Road 
384-0191. 


77 HONDA 

2 dr. Hatchback, 4 cvl., 4 sod . 
radio, radial tires. $3,495. Paint 
er Motors. 3005 Douglas, 
3884196 Dealer 5802. 


TRY US FIRST! 

ir 4-door Brougham 
00 miles—mint condi - 


1. Metro Honda. 



—W8Y US FIRST! 


mflro 


Hi 


ESSO CAR CLINIC 
INSPECTEDAND 
RECONDITIONED 


s 


79 Acadian 
79 Corolla 
78Celica 
78 Toyota PU 
78 Datsun PU 

77 Ventura 

78 Subaru 
77TR7 

77 Bobcat SW 
77 Civic 
77 Monarch 
77Chevelle 
77 Camaro 
77Volare 
77 Cougar 
77 Granada 
77 Corona 
76 Rabbit 
76 Malibu SW 
76 Corolla 
76 Dodge Van 
76 Toyota PU 
76 Mazda 
76 Dart 

76 Ramcharger 
76 MG Midget 
76 Datsun Wgn. 
75 Corona 4 dr. 
75 Volvo SW 
75CorollaSW 
75 Pacer 
75 Audi 
75 Corolla 
75 Dart Sport 
75 Comet 
75 Landcruiser 
75 Cadillac 
74 VW Beetle 
74GMC Van 
73 Dart 
72 Westphalia 


74 Marina 
74 Gremlin 
74 Comet 
74 Appolo 
74 Colt 
74Toronado 
74 Ambassador 
73 Corolla 
73 Corona 
73 Cortina 
73 Pinto 
73TR6 
72 Datsun PU 
72Cellca 
72 Cougar 
72 Fiat 
72 Mazda PU 
71 Duster 
71 Capri 
71 Ford PU 
70 Datsun 
70 Mini 
69 Sunbeam 

68 Datsun SW 
67 Jeep 

66 Pontiac 
66 Mustang 
61 Mercedes 

69 Austin Healey 

OPEN FROM 
8a.m.-9p.m. 
SAT.,8a.m.-5p.m. 

100% Bank Financing 
O.A.C. 


METRO TOYOTA LTD. 
M5FINLAYSON 
(Across from Woodwards) 
_ DEALERtWO 

milRQ 

IMiTCI 


TRY US FIRST! 

77 Hoode Hatchback, standard. 
3884921. Metro Honda. Dealer 
5876. 


TRY US FIRST 

Pinto, only 31,000 Km. 
M84921, Metro Honda. Dealer 


TRY US FIRST! 

1977 Honda CVCC. 5 speed, new 
motor. Top condition! Metro 
Honda, 3884921. Dealer 5876. 


1977 HONDA CIVIC, NE 
. vlri 


front tires, new snow tires, vinyl 
roof, new exhaust system, excel 


1977 PLYMOUTH VOLARE 
station waoon. radlals, 40,000 
miles, excellent condition. $4700. 
478-8161. 




78 VOLVO 242 GT. UNIQUE 
looking, many GT options, lm- 
maculate. $9500 4788701 


77 COUGAR XR7, SPECIAL 
edition^ loaded, must be seen. 


1978 CELICH GT LIFTBACK, 


£a«2Wsi?' v9 ° od 


MOVING MUST SELL '78 
sssa.* Ivlc. Best offer.' 


1977 HONDA CIVIC AUTO 
mafic. 544)00 kilometer s , mostly 
highway $3300 firm. 381-3259 


1977 T-BIRD. 36,000 MILES, 
every ootlon Including power 
moonroof . $8000 382-oiS 


1977 BUICK REGAL, 2-OOOR 

SSS'mmS* 0 "* tetud,n ° * 


MKSMt? 


77 MUSTANG. 47488 MILES 4 


n mini mm. naff miles, 
SZSM or tm) ohar KIMS I 


M7. RgAm ACJRf aiRQ. W 

&»i!idX8i.gi 





fiSE 


It* CMSFMUU 



ABOVE AVERAGE 
from General 
Motors 

71 OLDS Toronado 53495 
'77CADILLAC Coupe 

$11,500 

'80 CAMARO Cpe $7995 

from Ford: 

'77 FORDcust4dr $3995 
'78 ME RC Bobcat wgn 

$4695 

'79 FORD LTD 4 dr $5995 

from AMC: 

'68 RAMBLER American 
$2195 

75 MATADOR Cpe $2495 
75 PACER 2 dr $2695 

REGMIDGLEY 
MOTORS LTD. 

"The Super Lot" 

Douglas at Cloverdale 

- 385-8756 

Dealer Lie 5186 


Wands 


CAR CENTRE 

YATES AT QUADRA 


'80 Honda Civic 
4-door Hatchback 

V CHECK THE 
Spacious Interior 

V CHECK THE 
Fuel Economy 

V CHECK THE 
Low Price 

BUY OR LEASE 
FROM 

VICTORIA'S 

FIRST 

HONDA DEALER 
SALES —LEASING 

BANK FINANCING. 

INSURANCE, 
LICENCE PLATES 
ALL AT OU R ONE STOP 
NEW&USEDCAR CENTRE 

386-6707 

Dealer No. 5668 


78 TRANSAM, AUTOMATIC, 
power steering, power brakes, 
power windows, radlals, tilt 
whe^ velour Interior, $8,500 


77 COUGAR XR7, POWER 
steering, power brakes, auto 
mafic transmission, maos and 
radlals, 25,000 miles. 477-4435 
after 5. 


1977 HONDA ACCORD, ONE 
owner, 50,000 miles Mlchelln ra¬ 
dlals. AM-FM. 5 speed. Mainly 


TRY US FIRST! 

78 Honda Accord, automatic. 
Very low miles! 3884921. Metro 
Honda. Dealer 5876. 


'78 CAMARO, Z28, POWER 
steering, power brakes, power 
windows, tilt steering, 4-speed 


77 HONDA CIVIC, EXCEL- 
lent condition. 36.000 miles. 
$3295, trades considered. 
478-4529, 


1978 CHEVETTE CHEVRO- 
let. 4 cylinder, excellent condi¬ 
tion. $4500. Call after 5pm. 


MOVING. MUST SELL 77 AUS- 
tln Marina, excellent condition, 
30,000 miles, $3300 or best otter. 
Call after 5pm, 383-3216 


1978 TRANS AM 

6 litre auto. T-Top. black on 
black, 20,000 kilometers. $7500. 
383-8985. 


1977 HONDA CIVIC HATCH- 
4:30pm 


1978 ZEPHYR, 2 DOOR, 
power steering, power brakes, 

388*6tf?‘°w ml,eaoe 8 


'78 ASPEN, 2-DOOR COUPE, 6- 
cyllnder, power steering, power 
brakes, automatic. Perfect con¬ 
dition $6000 firm. 3884806. 


'77 MAVERICK, AUTOMATIC 
transmission, power steering, 
power brakes, radio. $3650. 
477-8215. 


78 LEBARON. LADY DRIVEN. 
Immaculate, all options, had 
TLC. 477-1931. 


1175-1171 


75 CADILLAC 

Fleetwood Brttam de Elegance. 
Fully loaded, air, windows, tit) 
steering, Independent 6 way 
seats, cruise. A beautiful auto- 


VICTORIA1 OWNER 

1976 Mercury Comet, 4 door. 6 
cylinder automatic, 23,000 miles. 
83,99$. McCetlum Motors, call 
Lindon 382-6122 or 642-4425. 
Peeler 5603. 


1976 TOYOTA COROLLA SR5. 
mint condition throughout, 1600 
cc. S speed, 30 miles per gallon 
city. 36 miles per gallon high¬ 
way. Must sell due to layoff 
478-5863 


QUICK SALE, 1976 CHEVELLE 
Metlbu 4 door, ona owner, power 
steering, power brakes, tilt 
wheel, AM radio, very low mile 


1975 RABBIT, 4-SPEED, FOG 
njjhts.^stereo speakers. $3650. 


76 THUNDERBIRO, EXCEL 
lent condition, every option 
381-5716. 


76 RABBIT 2 DOOR 4 1 
excellent condition. 


SPEEO. 

$4100. 


76 MAZDA 008 WAGON, GOOO 


197$ COUGAR XR7. WHITE. 


sUifoSSSSaher SEi 

1974 RABBIT, 2 DOOR NEW 
40880 miles 


ssa 

jmCEUCAG T AFTER 6PM 

UrtMr 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


I 


IE 


SPORTY CARS 

78 FIAT X19 Bertone 
Targa convertible, fin¬ 
ished glistening black, 
low mileage, 1 owner car, 
cassette stereo, Immac. 

$7695 

78 DATSUN 200 SX Sport, 
auto., AM-FM stereo, 
power mirrors, metallic 
blue, Immac. $5995 

71 TR6 Roadster, me 
chanically fine, needs 
some detail work and fin¬ 
ishing. Super buy at $2395 

* * * 

ECONOMY 

79 CHEVETTE Hatch 
back 2-dr auto. Choice of 2 
— red or yellow. $4595 

79 SUBARU FE (fuel effl 
dent) 5 spd. coupe. Super 
low mileage.. $5995 

75 VEGA Hatchback, low 
mileage. 4 spd. $2495 

74 PINTO wagon, auto. 
Highway mileage, me¬ 
chanically sound. $1995 

73 VW Super-Bug, stlck- 
shlft auto, low I owner 
mileage. $3395 

71 DODGE Colt, 4 dr, 4 
spd, unbelievable 40,000 
miles! Must be seen. *2195 

70MAZDA18004 dr, 4 spd, 
low mileage, 1 owner. 

$1895 

69 SUNBEAM Alpine GT. 
Hardtop, automatic, new 
mag wheels, fun to drive. 

$1695 

69 VW Squareback wagon, 
4 spd, 1 owner, some rust, 
needs minor mechanical 
attention. $1295 

* * * 

MANY MORE TO 
CHOOSE FROM 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 Douglas 
(Opposite ICBC) 
Dealer 6605 384-1)6) 


75 MUSTANG 

V8 , spd, radio. Very clean 
S349S B Madsen Motors Ltd 
478-SOI). Dealer 5450 


75 RABBIT 

2 dr, 4 cvl, 4 spd. Like new, Only 
$3795 B Madsen Motors Ltd. 
478-5011. Dealer 5450 


TRY US FIRST! 

76 Honda Civic, 4 speed, silver In 
colour/ J3295. Metro Honda, 


TRY US FIRST! 

76 Honda station wagon, $3495. 
388^5921. Metro Honda. Dealer 


TRY US FIRST! 

'76 Acadian, automatic. $1995. 
388-6921, Metro Honda. Dealer 


1976 FIREBIRD, BLACK, 350, 
automatic, completely rebuilt. 
Only Firebird like It In Victoria. 
Atkhiy $6000 or best offer. 


'76 CORDOBA. POWER WIN- 
dows, seats, trunk. 60-40 seats, 
air conditioning. Very clean. 
$5200. Phone after 6pm, 


1976 CAMARO, 305, AUTO- 
matlc, power steering, power 
brakes, excellent condition. 
$5400 or best otter. 477-7718 after 
5pm 


TRY US FIRST! 

52495)8! -6921 
Dealer 5876. 


- eoa station waoon, 4 spd. 
$2495. 388-6921, Metro Honda, 


76 ACADIAN, 4 SPEED, RA 
dials, radio, new brakes, new 
exhaust, good condition. 37,000 
miles. $3200,479-0696evenings. 


76 LINCOLN MARK IV, IMMA- 
culate. must be seen. * 107-1450 
Beach Drive. $9000 or offers. 
598-6632. 


1976 DATSUN B210, EXCEL- 
lent condition, new cassette deck 
and speakers, 37,000 original 
miles. $3200. 656-2355. 


76 CAMARO RALLY SPORT, 
factory 350 4-speed, new T/A ra¬ 
dlals, excellent shape. Best otter 
to $5500 388-9972 


1975 VEGA, COPPER Co¬ 
loured, automatic, hatchback, 
low mlleaoe 41.000. $1700. 
386-5540 


75 ASTRE GT HATCHBACK. 

WJjBSr-jjniUJS! 

motor with 304)00 miles 479-9262 


75 DODGE VALIANT. 318, 2 
barrel, lady driven, bills to prove 
work recently done, lust tested. 
$3300. Must sell. 38*6496. 


75 OLDS ROYALE, BLACK, 
tu V loaded, custom options, low 
mileage, Immaculate condition. 
*1500. 381 


75 CHARGER SPECIAL EDI- 
tkxi, top of the line, completely 
loaded 384 7506 


75 FIREBIRD ESPRIT, $3,750. 
F*ower stearing, power brakes, 
tilt wheel. After 4 477-0779. 


75 DUSTER, 6-CYLINDER 


1975 HONDA HATCHBACK, 57,- 
miles. 4-speed. Offers. 


000 mil 
M2-69Q3 


1975 HONDA CIVIC 4-SPEED, 
MJ0 ° 


75 PINTO. CLEAN, NEW 

aft 


1f73 • 1>7# 
W^XoISoBILE I 

Rovele, excellent < 


DELTA IS 
kpyjl^MCdllant condition 



MMr steering. 

ars 

and tape, flit 
n Good Might 
an $2108 


1974 MAVERICK. AUT 

B 


ML 


mn FOR DC TAILS. 




I* CJUM FOR UU 



VOLKSWAGEN 


971 YATES at Vancouver 
3852415 


79 Rabbit Sunroof 
78 Rabbit Diesel 
77 Rabbit 4 speed 
77 Rabbit Diesel 
76 Rabbit 4 speed 


72 Ventura 

$1895 

72 Chev 

$1695 

71 Toyota 

$969 

69 Rambler 

$487 

64 Ford 

$185 


DOWNTOWN at 

Speedway Motors Ltd. 
971 YATES 

Dealer 5180 * 385-2415 



Sl/BUffSfl/7 


THE HOME OF 
LINCOLN. 
MARQUIS, COUGAR, 
XR7, ZEPHYR, 
CAPRI, BOBCAT, 
FORD TRUCKS 

ALSO 

TOP QUALITY 
USED CARS 
ANDTRUCKS 

SUBURBAN 
MOTORS 
3377 Douglas 
3866131 

Dealer 5528 


73 DART 

4 dr sedan, V8. P.S, P.B, AT, 
vinyl top, 30,000 mi. Excellent 
condition. $2895. B Madsen 
Motors Ltd. 478-5011. Dealer 
5450. 


74 DATSUN 710 

2 dr., htp., 4 cvl., 4 spd., In 
excellent condition—only 44,000 
miles. $2,595. Painter Motors, 
3005 Douglas, 388-6196. Dealer 
5802. 


ELCAMIN0 

73 454 consol auto., swivel buck 
ets, p. windows, mags, radial 
TA's. $3,295. Painter Motors, 
3005 Douglas, 388-6196, Dealer 
5802 


ECONOMY 

74 Datsun B210. Very low miles, 
new paint. Economical 4 cvl.. 
4-sod. Must be seen. Only S2495 


74 MUSTANG 

4 cyl., bucket seats, radio, white 
wail tires, 4-spd. $2995. 382-7313 
Wllle Dodge Chrysler, 3200 
Douglas. Dealer 5881. 


1973 VOLKSWAGEN 412 STA- 
tlon Wagon, automatic trans¬ 
mission. AM/FM radio, rear de- 
foooer, Mlchelln radlals, 46,000 
miles. Looks new. $2950. 
598-4936. 


1974 FORO LTD WAGON, 61,000 
miles, power brakers, power 
steering, power windows, radio, 
heavy duty towing gear, 721 ra¬ 
dlals, beautiful condition. 2 Vlc- 
torla owners, $3500. 598-2659 


TRY US FIRST! 

74 Bobcat Stn. won. Villager, 
standard shift. 38*6921. Metro 
Honda. Dealer 5876. 


TRY US FIRST! 

73 Flat 128. Excellent running 
condition, $1195. Metro 
Honda.38*692‘- 


>21. Dealer 5876. 


73 MAZDA. ONE OWNER. Ex¬ 
cellent condition, 33,000 miles, 
recent paint, new battery, muf¬ 
fler, Mlchelln radlals, stereo, 
$2395. 479-9793 


CONVERTIBLE 

73 Cougar 351. 598-9859 or 
656-3121. 


73 VEGA, 4 CYL., AT. PRICED 
to sell. $888. Palm Auto World 
Inc. 386-8385.3342Oak St. Dealer 
5260 


73 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER, 
black, gold Interior, must be 
seen, offers on $2400. 383-5514 
days. 382-9806 evenings 


1974 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
Mark IV. gold, 54,000 miles, good 
condition. $84100 or best offer 
592-8993. 


1973 DATSUN 610 ST AT ION WA 
gon, excellent family car with 
on V 8,00° miles. $2795. 


73 AUSTIN MINI, NEW 
brakes and exhaust, 60.000 
miles, $1500 or best otter. 
382-0210 after 5:30pm 


73 VEGA, AUTOMATIC, 
hatchback, 444)00 miles. Vary 

B&tf- ' .. 


Inspected $1200. 


74 DATSUN B210 2 DOOR 4 
speed, excellent condition, city 
tested, $2100. Roper, 388-5445 
days, offer 5pm388-5193 


1974 BOBCAT STATIONWA- 
gon, real clean car. Haw dutch 
and tirai. $2200. 4794)946 after 
5:30pm 


1974 DATSUN STATIONWA- 
gon. 1-owner, service records 

gtesreasr*- 


•YOTA COROLLA, GOC 
n^condlfon, offers * 


Offars*ANernoons BUG ' 


74 SATELLITE. FAMILY CAR. 
Igf&O/ «**H c*rad tar, 318. 






1* CMSFMUU 


C-5 




1 






CHEVROLET 

OLDSMOBILE 


MALIBU 

79 MALIBU 4-door, V8. 
automatic, power steer¬ 
ing, brakes and radio. 
Finished In green with 
green vinyl trim. Only 

$6150 

RABBIT 

76 RABBIT 4 cylinder, 4- 

speed, radio. Finished in 
yellow, black vinyl trim. 
Great for short hops. 
Only $445Q 

VOLVO 

72 VOLVO 4-door 144 
model, 4 cylinder, auto¬ 
matic, radio. Finished In 
blue, blue cloth trim. Ex¬ 
ceptionally clean local 
car. Only $3950 

MALIBU 

79 MALIBU 4-door, V8, 
automatic, power steer¬ 
ing, brakes and radio. 
Finished In white with red 
cloth trim. Only $6160 

HORIZON 

78 HORIZON 4-door 
hatchback, economical 4 
cylinder, automatic, fin¬ 
ished in green with 
matching trim. Only 7300 
km. Only $5850 

BUICK 

77 BUICK Regal 2-<ioor, 
V8, automatic/ power 
steering, power brakes, 
radio. Finished in yellow 
with blck landau top and 
white vinyl trim. Only 

$4750 

MOST CARS 
BCAAINSPECTED 

MON.-FRI. 
8:30a.m. - 9p.m. 
SAT. 9-6 

Millstream Chevrolet 
Oldsmobile Ltd. 

1730 Island Highway 
474-1211 
Dealer Uc. P-5831 


1974 OLDS OMEGA, 2 DOOR. V8 
automatic, mags, low mileage 
$3600 479-9629 after 5pm. 


74 CELICA ST, 2-DOOR HARl 
top, new tires, pood running co 
dltlon. $3400. 652^781. 


1973 LTD. 4-DOOR, Al 
power brakes and steerlr 
$2500. 478-2481. 


74 VOLVO 145E STATIONWA- 
oon, automatic transmission, 
radial tires, $3500 3864)316 


1973 TOYOTA COROLLA 1600, 2 
door, automatic, asking $1,299. 
727-2132 after 4:30. 


1974 DATSUN B210, 63,0 
2H«.2 door, standard, $ 1 , 2 ! 
727-2132 after 4:30. 


'74 SATELLITE SEBRING, 


1973 TOYOTA COROLLA STA- 
tionwagon, 1600 cc. clean and 
economical. $1600 firm. 479-2695 


'74 BUICK 2 DOOR HARDTOP, 
71,000 miles, excellent condition 
$279$ or best otter. 478-6032. 


1974 BUICK APOLLO 2 DOOR 
hatchback, low mileage. 
652-2231. 


1974 HONDA CIVIC, 6- 
dials, radio. $ 2200 . 386-' 
(days); 652-4992 (evenings) 


1974 CHEVELLE STATIONV 
gon, V8, good condition, test 
$1,750. 38*7654. 


1974 FIAT 128, GOOO CON 
tlon, must sell. Otters. 386-38; 


1971*1972 


1971 MUSTANG MACH I, 
brand new burgandy paint, 
chrome spoked mags, tilt and 
power steering, power brakes, 
electric windows, other options 
A high profit Investment, $8500 
or reasonable otter. 595^5483 


1971 DODGE POLARA, 2-DOOR 
hardtop, vinyl root, V8 360, 2- 
barrel, automatic, power steer¬ 
ing. power brakes, rear de—fog, 
city tested. Mechanically excel 
lent. Must sell; sacrifice, $1050. 
383-7160. 


RETIRED GENTLEMAN'S 
1971 Ford LTD. power seats, air 
conditioning, beautiful Interior, 
very attractive, rust free exteri¬ 
or, has been oarage kept. Excel 
lent mechanically, only 63,000 
miles. Asking$1450 598P015. 


SECOND OWNER, 35 M.P.G, 
1972 Renault R-12, 4 door sedan, 
standard, radio, Mlchellns plus 
mounted orlps, tested, excep¬ 
tionally clean. Asking $1595. 


ESTATE CAR, 1971 PINTO, 
new motor, transmission, paint 
lob, receipts for all work done 
Asking si900 Before 3pm. for ap- 
pdntment to view 386-8256. 


VI-VEGA 

Corvette white. 350 L48, M-20. 
narrowed 12 bolt posi, radlals 
and rally wheels. $6500 invested 
656-3238 


_ 62,000 miles, 6 Mlchelln 

radlals, buckets, new parts. Im¬ 
maculate. Must be seen. 


MOVING. MUST SELL BEAU 
ttful 1977 Marcury Montego MX 4 
door Brouahem, excellent <rondl 
tkxLrww tires, tested, etc. $1750. 


71 PLYMOUTH S.W., P S., P.B, 
roof rock, only $788 Palm Auto 
World Inc 3864385. 3342 Oak St. 
- 5260 


72 RENAULT R12, 4 CYL., 4- 
sod , be quick at $947. Palm Auto 
World Inc 3168)85. 3342 Oak St 
Dealer 5260. 


WELL MAINTAINED 1972 4 
door Mazda RX2, oraot 

S fe 


1972 PONTIAC LEMAN* LUX 
ury, 94400 miles, 350 V0 out* 
mafic, $1754 or best offer 


1922 CADILLAC SEOAN DE 
Villa, 57.000 miles, best offer 
over $3000 595 6903 between 
_ 


n OAT SUN 4 SPEED. NEEDS 
tears, on bach, overvtfWie else tn 

VfittTjnt'ftm* 4 *' %4 *° 


LN CONTINENTAL 

rod teeftwr Wu 


OWNER LEAVING TOWN. 1977 










































































































































































































































































































<3 


C-6 ^ 

ISO CMS FO* SALE 



Mercedes-Benz 

PORSCHE 


80 CITATION 

Sharp four-door hatchback V6 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, radio $7,195 

80 CAMARO 

Silver and grev beauty. V8 aut* 
mafic, power steering, power 
brakes, radio. Only 12,500 miles 
and like new $7,995 


ISO CMSFORUU 


D 
0 
D 
G 
L 
A 

VOLKSWAGEN 

AUDI 



ICENTURY 


Silver and black Buick V8 auto¬ 
matic, power steering, power 
brakes, radio. This is an exo 
tionally nice car! 


excep^ 

$8,295 


IT-BIRD 


Only 2.000 miles; 11 months fac 
torv warranty. V8 automatic, 
power steering, power brakes, 
power windows, radio. A beauti 
fulunit! $8,895 

80 SEVILLE 

Only 1.000 miles on this luxury 
Cadillac Medium brown metal¬ 
lic with beioe plush interior 
•Must be seen! $22,600 

79 DATSUN 210 

Choose from two and four door 
units in a variety of colours. 
Automatics, with radio, side 
mouldinas. heavy duty under¬ 
seal Priced from $4,895 

79 AMC SPIRIT 

OL litlback. 6 automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, power 
locks, radio, etc (16 options) 
Only 11,500 miles $5,495 

79 DATSUN 510 
STATION WAGON 

Nice 510 with automatic, custom 
roof rack, radio, other extras 
$6,995 

79 CORONA 

Very nice Toyota 5-speed hatch 
back, power steering, power 
brakes, AM/FMradio $6,995 

78 DATSUN 510 

Several to choose from Auto¬ 
matic or standard All with 
radio, side mouldinas and under 
seal Low mileage $4,995 

78 MERCEDES 

300CDtwodoor hardtop finihsed 
in silver and power by 5-cvl. 
diesel engine. Automatic, power 
steer ino power disc-brakes, 
sunroof, AM/FM station-seeker 
and cassette stereo $25,700 ($10, 
000 less than replacement cost) 

76 MERCEDES 

Maqnlflcent 450SEL sedan fin¬ 
ished in brown metallic with off 
white leather inter lor. Sunroof, 
AM/FM station-seeker/cassette 
stereo, light alloy wheels Only 
36,500 miles $29,770 ($20,000 less 
than replacement costf 

73 VOLVO 145 
STATION WAGON 

I-uel injected, automatic, air 
conditioning, radial tires. A very 
nice unit! $3,995 

72 MERCEDES 

Beautiful 300SEL 4.5 finished in 
anthracite grev with burgundy 
leather interior. Features in¬ 
clude sunroof, air conditioning. 


OPEN WEEKDAYS 
TILL 6 P.M. 

Government 

at 

Hillside 
385-6737 
Dealer 5053 


Vour Largest 
Volkswagen 
Audi 

Dealer On The 
Island! 


PREMIUM USED 

80 Capri Ghia, auto S9I95 
79 Audi 5000, loaded 

SIS, 950 

79 Chevette 4-spd. 55295 
79 Aspen Sedan, auto 

$4795 

78 Audi Fox, auto. $7895 
78 Audi 5000, loaded 

$13,550 

78 Audi Fox, 4spd. $7,495 

78 Datsun 510 Won $5995 
76 Rabbit auto., air con. 

$5,395 

76 Dasher Hatchbk. $5495 
75 Beetle $4295 

75 Mustang, auto. $3795 
74 VW 412, auto. $3695 
73 VW 412, 4-spd. $3,495 

4X4'S 

79 Blazer, auto. $8,595 
78 Blazer, auto., air., 

loaded $11,450 

76 GMC Jimmy, 4-spd. 

$6,595 


UP-TO 60-MONTH 
SCOTIA PLAN 
FINANCING 
AVAILABLE. O.A.C. 


PLIMLEY 


JAGUAR — ROVER 
TRIUMPH 

M.G. — MINI— SAAB 

1010 YATES ST 382 9121 


— vi,u,mi, 9irr. 

79 Ford Granada ESS 

$749! 

79 SaabGLE $15,46* 
79 Volkswagen Getaway 
$13,49! 

78 Ford Fiesta $419! 
78 Honda Accord $599! 
78 Pinto Pony $4695 
77 Cadillac Sedan de 
Ville $10,995 

77 Chrysler Cordoba$5495 
77 Pontiac Lemans 
wag. $4595 

75 TR7 Coupe $6295 
75 TR6 Roadster $5995 
74 Mercedes Diesel $9295 
73 Ford Torino $1395 
73 Toyota Coupe $695 

OEALER 5351 


door hardtop, power steering, 
power brakes, radio, good condi- 
tion. >1250. 385-9179 


paint, mags. Good running com 
dition. Just been tested- $1300. 
477 2140, 


71 OLOS CUTLASS SUPREME, 
350 cu. in, 3 speed auto, TA's, 
excellent, $2700. 38.“" * 

652-4670, 


miles, one owner, radio, gas 
heater, rear defogger, $2000 
479-0768. 


72 MUSTANG. 351 CLEVE- 
lend, radials. stereo, new paint 
Good condition. $2500. 721-3109, 


1972 VOLKSWAGEN FAST 
back, 3 speed standard, good 
tires, radio, offers 479-2939, 


72 FORD CUSTOM. GOOD CON- 
dition. $1200 or best offer. 
478 5558 


72 2 DOOR SCAMP V8, NEW 
tires, excellent condition 
65? 4280 after 3pm 


72 GREMLIN 6-STANDARD, 
clean, low miles, tested $1200 
4786162 


‘72 VW STATIONWAGON, 
automatic, radio. Michelins. 
good condition, $2150 383-9723. 


71 CRICKET. 4 CYLINDER. 4 
speed, radio, runs well. $700 or 
best otter 386 7288 


1971 CHRYSLER 300. LOADED, 
needs some work $450 firm 
383-0693 


71 CHEV WAOON, NEW 
transmission, automatic, $600 
negotiable, 385 9346 


1971 MUSTANG MACH I. EX 
celient shape, priced to $611. 
S?700or best offer 361 5625 


72 VW BEETLE. CLEAN. RE 
liable, new tires and shocks 
Otters 366 5976 


W%mi 


VERY RARE 
1966 Chrysler j00 two door hard 
tap sport model Power seats 
power windows power enlerwia 
♦ iH triescapK wheel «vtum«ti ( 
dimmer Engine, transmission 
brakes and steering recently re 
donr tntgrror comptetets 
«*d to arigtnei Radial t 
around No reetoneur « ■■ 


Douglas Volkswagen 
Ltd. 

3329 Douglas Street 

388-5466 

Dealer 5100 


'(j 4 COMET CALIENTE. 30? 
aulo, 7 door hardtop Excellent 
investment, appreciating in 
value Selling to buy home All 
new running gear, body work, 
and paint Stock buckets and 
console Lots of chrome Beauti 
ful Interior. Too many new 
things to mention $3750 479-0453 
after 6pm 


' CONVERTIBLE 

3 1970 Pontiac Parisienne. excel¬ 
lent nearly new condition, power 
’ steering, power brakes, 350 
cubic inch. V8 automatic, dual 
exhaust, sea green with white 
♦op and emeral green interior. 
Offers Must sell 383-0274 

1967 CHEVROLET BELAIR. 4 
door, well maintained, oood con 
dition, power steering, power 
brakes, 283 cubic inch, V8 auto¬ 
matic, radio, 1 previous owner, 

- blue with black interior, $900 
Must sell 383-0274 

1968 JAVELIN, 1500 MILES ON 
rebuilt 304, headers. 4 barrel 
carter 625. 2M50—15 s with Key 
stone rims. New radiator, bat 
♦ery, starter and solenoid Needs 
transmission and body work. 
Otters on $850. 382-5015 

69 MUSTANG 

2 dr HT, V-8. auto, PS, PB. low 
mileaoe. An exceptionally clean 
Victoria car 381 5544. BSG Sp6 
cialty Motors. Dealer 6033. 

’ 1969 FIREBIRD, RECENTLY 

rebuilt 350, new Holley, headers. 

; new trans with shift kit, 60 ’s and 
, maos all round, am/fm cassette, 

1 booster. $3500 or nearest otter 
477-6190 or can be seen at Cad 
boro Bay Shop Easy 

68 MALIBU 327ClD 

2-dr. HT, new mags and tires 
Auto, PS, PB. All stock and 
quick 381 5544. BSG Specialty 
Motors. Dealer 6033. 

70 CAMARO 

350 std.. buckets, mags, radials, 
trade up or down. $3,295. Painter 
Motors. 3005 Douglas. 388-6196. 
Dealer 5802. 

TRY US FIRST! 

'68 Vauxhall automatic. Spot¬ 
less, with only 47,000 original 
miles, $995. 388-692), Metro 
Honda. Dealer 5876. 

67 CAMARO. GOOD RUNNING 
condition, 6 cylinder, needs 
minor body work Reliable car 
$1700 firm. Wanted: 65-66 Mus 
tang right fender and door 
382-4926 

1963 CHEVY II BISCAYNE. 
blue, 6 cylinder, 3 speed stan 
dard. 4 door, tested, new brakes, 
new exhaust, 3 new tires. Needs 
clutch $250 or best offer. 
652-2377 

1970 1600 DATSUN STATION 
wagon, 2-owner car, 34,000 ocigl- 
, nal miles, 4 new tires. Good con¬ 
dition. Clutch needs repair $1000 
or nearest otfei*. 595-6631 or 
477-1225. 

1968 DODGE CORONET, 440, 2 
door hardtop, vinyl roof, V8, 
automatic, 318, poWer steering, 
power brakes. Mechanicalfy 

A 1, original 81,000 miles. $950. 
383-7160 

1970 PLYMOUTH SUBURBAN 
stationwaoon, power steering, 
power brakes(new), extra snow 
tires on rims, excellent condi¬ 
tion, must be seen. $1400. 
474-2015 after 6pm 

MUSI SELL, LEAVING TOWN, 
66 Ford Fairlane. rebuilt 302 and 
trans, new paint, wide tires, 
mags, excellent condition, many 
extras. $2200 or b*st offer. 
385 4828 after 4pm, Rob 

SCARCE CLASSIC MOOEL, 
1968 Dodge Coach, tested, brand 
new tires, etc. Personal reasons 
for selling; asking $1200 Rides 
smooth like new car. Call 
386-7485. 

67 COUGAR, RADIO. CAS- 
sette, new paint. 289 tour speed, 
special wheels, sharp, with 

many extras A must to see. 
592-0428 

CLASSIC 

'68 Javelin, 6-cyllnder. 232 auto¬ 
matic, midnight blue, new betted 
tires No rust Good condition 
$2400 381-0177. 478-4631 

1965 THUNDERBIRD. AUTO 
mafic, power steering, power 
brakes, electric windows power 
seats, black, good condition 
Must be seen $5800 592-7468 

1969 COUGAR. 524)00 MILES. 
351 Wlnvor. automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, very 
good condition $3300 or best 
After 5pm, 479*465 

, STREET DUNE BUGGY F OR 
sale Fiberglass body and tap. 
gas heater • hrome wheels new 
exhaust system $1200 or offers 
II? 789 442*after 5pm 

ONE OWNER >9*9 METEOR 9 
passenger station wagon 190 Vi. 
automatic, power steer mo 
power brakes »usf tested $1095 

4 Tv 120/ 



150 CUSFMSAU 



*Dc *Pape) 



80 Chevrolet 4 dr, hatchback, V6. 
auto, ps, pb, 2Tone. Immaculate 
with only 1500 miles. Balance of 
factory warranty available. 
Priced to sell. 


L 



76 Scorpion. 5-speed, leather, 
told back convertible top. Very 
beautiful — very Italian. A rare 
find. 

77 Cadillac Seville loaded 

78 Seville Custom Opera Coupe 
80 Datsun 280ZX 

80 Le Car, economy plus! 

78 Bronco 4X 4 9,000 miles, 

78 Trans Am. 4-spd. one owner. 
6,000 mi. 

77 Jaguar XJScoupe 

78 Cordoba, 12,000 mi., as new. 

77 Nova auto, 6. 21,000 mi. 

76 Olds Omega Coupe. Clean! 

6? Mercedes 220 SE Coupe 

78 MGB 18,000mi.-Mint! 

Open8:30 5:30 Closed Sat. 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD. 
Indoors at 779 Pandora 
384-8035 Dealer-5311 


£cs Carr's 

SALES and 
LEASING LTD 


80 AUDI 5000S 
79 COBRA 
79 PRIXS.J. 

79 FIAT Xl/9 
79 CUT. BRM. 

70 BENZ280S 

Many More 
Quality Pre-Owned 
Vehicles to Choose 
From. 


38M444 


INDOORSAT 

854 Pandora at Quadra 

Parking Rear _Dealer 6690 


1968 CORTINA. HAS NEW 
motor I600cc, $650 for parts bills 
to prove, stereo system, city 
tested, $1100 or best offer, 
592 9598, 381 1816. Must sell. 


67 CHEV IMPALA SS CONVER- 
tible, 56.000original miles, otters 
on $2500. 595-3703 afer 8pm. Can 
be viewed at 2722 Shelbourne 
anytime 


69 BEAUMONT. 307 3 SPEED 
auto New exhaust, brakes, 
tires. City tested. Mags. Silver 
with black vinyl roof $2000. 9-5 
Monday to Friday 478-8131. 


TOYOTA CORONA MARK II. 
new candy apple red paint, 
motor has 60,000 miles, excellent 
running order, $1800 or best 
Otter 652 1408 


1968 BUICK GS 400 4 SPEED, 
car is immaculate condition, 
less than 500 miles on running 
gear. Noiriflersplease. 382-6343. 
384-4978. 


'69 Z 28, FACTORY 302, SHOW 
room condition 54.000 original 
miles. Askingprlceover $10,000., 
no triflers please, contact Bob. 
748 4688 or 743 5231 


1969 AMBASSADOR DPL 2 
door deluxe, power steeing, 
power brakes, air conditioning, 
new tires plus much more, test 
ed. Asking S2I9S 477 0949 


I960 CHEV IMPALA, 4 DOOR 
hardtop, original owner, power 
steering, power brakes, low 
mileage, must see. Asking $3900. 
477-0695. 


66 AUSTIN 4 CYL . 4 SPD 
Priced to sell $497. Palm Auto 
World Inc 386-8385. 3342 Oak St 
Dealer 5260. 


1967 CUTLASS SUPREME CON- 
vertible "Rare". Yates Auto 
Sales, 388-7722. 950 Yates 
Dealer 5268 


1970 PONTIAC PARIS. 2 DR. 
HT. Recent valve grind runs 
well asking $1150 . 384-2744 days 
479-0510 eves 


1947 PONTIAC, 4 DOOR, IN RE 
storable condition. Excellent 
project car. $850. 385-7740 days, 
383 1650 evenings. 


'67 CHEV MALIBU, 2 DOOR 
hardtop. 327, 3 speed automatic. 
$2000 or best otter After 5pm, 
386 1058. 595-9983 


64 BEAUMONT. 6 CYL , 
priced to sell $497. Palm Auto 
World Inc 386-8385, 3342 Oak St. 
Dealer 5260 


1968 VAUXHALL VIVA, AUTO- 
matic, AM—FM cassette, days 
call Mike 388-4500, eveninos, 
386-0523. 


'67 CAMARO. 250 CUBIC INCH, 

4-speed. New engine, trans, 
tires. Good condition $4000 or 
best offer , 642-3889, 474 1549. 


1964 PLYMOUTH FURY. 4- 
door sedan. V8, tested, radio, 
new tires, excellent condition. 
$900. 382-5883 after 5pm. 


1968 FIREBIRD HARDTOP, 350 
automatic, over $2500 spent in 
last 2 months. Excellent condi 
tlon $5200 firm. 721 3046 


66 VOLKSWAGEN. 2000 MILES 
on new 1600 motor, complete 
with stereo. Offers. 385-4360 
after 4:30pm 


1951 FORD MONARCH, TEST 
ed till 1981, oood shape, 74,000 
original miles Motor has blow 
by $2200 firm. 478-362S 


MUST SELL THIS WEEK. 62 
Meteor, new motor, trans, etc. 
View at 1861 Newton 7 30-9pm or 
phone S9S-1830. 


63COMETCONVERTIBLE. IM 
maculate condition, new top and 
clutch, 6 cylinder. $3600 after 
S: 30 pm 477 3383 or 65*8361 


1967 MERCEDES BENZ 250S. 
good condition, runs well All 
reasonable offers considered. 
Must set!. 595-7337. 


69 SWINGER. VERY CLEAN 
and fast, all new Phone Dave 9^ 
weekdays; anytime weekends. 
382-0789 


67 TOYOTA CORONA. DE” 
luxe rebuilt engine new clutch, 
body oood. must sell $750 771 
Station Road, Langford 


68 OLDS, GOOD SHAPE, 
power windows, steering, 
brakes, good rubber, radio, $600 


69 VAUXHALL, BODY IN 
ywvi shape, needs motor work 
Stars (olllp 386 4222.9am 4pm 
or 598 1470. 6pm 8pm 


MVJI XI 

Sfss-ir" 


IS MGB >•>&0 MILLS. EXTRA 
motor and extra soft top M 
spare pans asking $100 / 
inquiries, 647 3264 «Hc* 6t tn> 


K MU5TANG 




iso cusfmuu 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1»H0 

{ISO CARS FOR SOli 151 




DATSUN 

CENTRE 



★ ★ ★ 

78 DATSUN 210 
25,000 KM 44195. 


76CELICA 
coupe, auto, trans. 38,900. 
mi. S4995. 


77 FIREBIRD 
36,000 mi._ 45995 

76CAPftl 
H/B. 5 2,000 ml. 43995. 

79 DATSUN 310 
front wheel drive, 16,681 
KM 45195. 


75 DATSUN 710 
4 spd, 42,100 mi. 43495. 


800 BLOCK MS 

381-5222 

FORT mill BAY 

592-2471 


SAUNDERS & HITCHMAN 
LTD. 

2040 Cadboro Bay Road 
Dealer 5059 


[ pacific] 


PEUGEOT 


75 VW Bus $5895. 

72 Volvo S.W. $3995. 
78 LeCar GTL $4695. 
77 VolareCPE$2895. 

77 Honda H/B $3995. 

76 Mazda wgn $3295. 
2 - Diesel Rabbits 

78 Celica GT $5995. 
78 Bronco 4x4 $8995. 

77 Mazda GLC $3995. 
76 Dodge Dart $3395. 

73 Mazda wgn $1895. 

BANK FINANCING 

385-1451 Dealer 5253 
Blanshardat Johnson 


© 


SAUNDERS 
SUBARU 

sales & service 

1824 Island Highway 
Colwood 474-2211 


77 Gremlin 6 auto 43895 
77Chev4x4 PU 45,895 
76 Mazda 4 dr, 4 spd, 

30,000 mi. 42995 

75 Fiat 131 S 43895 

73 Olds 442, swivel seats 
42395 

72Torine4dr. 41095 
72 Charger 2 dr. 4895 
72 Dodge PU, V8, AT. 

42,695 

Saunders Sales & Service Ltd. 
1824 Island Highway 

474-2211 474-2251 

Dealer 5932 


1968 2 DOOR SEDAN, CHE- 
velle, rebuilt engine, good run¬ 
ning order, excellent transporta 
tfoh, $500 or offers. 478-0242. 


70 NOVA SS 

350, 300 horse, 4 speed, vertigate 
shifter, very clean. 478-7542 after 
5. 


'63 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL, 
beautiful shape. Lots of money 
and time invested. 656-7368 after 
5:30 


66 PONTIAC, V8, AUTO, 4 
door, 80,000 miles. Second 
owner Perfect condition. $925. 
After 6pm, 642 4944 


69 CHEVELLE SHOW CAR, 
asking $6500. Has to be seen. 
478-9252. 


MUST SELL. 1954CHEVROLET 
sedan, good condition and run- 
ning. 478-1835 


69 DART SWINGER, 340 4- 
speed, rebuilt high-performance 
motor, $2500 firm. 479-4215. 


CLASSIC 

64 Rambler Classic 770. 381-6605 
afters. 


70 MONTE CARLO. 350, HEAD 
ers, hood scoop, lots of extras. 
Good condition 658 5149 


1965 METEOR, 2 OOOR. GOOD 
transportation, just tested. $750. 
383 8296. mornings. 


1970 SUNBEAM ARROW, EX 
ceptlonal condition, low mile 
age, automatic $1500 598 7201 


MUST SELL. TRADES CON 
sidered Mint 1965 California 442, 
loaded 478-7580. 


1957 CHEV BELAIR. GOOO 
condition, $1800 or best offer. 
479-0121. 


1970 OATSUN 510. 4 SPEED, 4 
door. 60.000 miles $1000 or best 
Offer 386 7809 


RARE 62 BUICK ELECJRA. 
plus 62 with rebuilt engine and 
tram, no fritters. 595-5361 


1965CHE VROLET IMPALA. 29.- 
000 miles on rebuilt 283, good 
shape 382-2619. 


1958 CHEV BISCAYNE, 4 
door, econo 6, standard, tested, 
good shape, $11» 652-9323 


1964 THUNok 


k.I.OJEXCg. 


19*1 THUNDt RBiRO AMO 1*63 
Corvette Need s work, afters 
384 875) 


OFFERS 1970 MAVERICl 
vry good cendHxw 4tad$22 



EMPRESS 


PONTIAC 

BUICK 

GMC 


T 


76 ACADIAN, AUTO. 

75 MUSTANG 

76 HORNET S/W 

75 VALIANT 2 DR., HT 

77 GMC 3 /«. 4x4 

78 TRANS AM 

76 ASPEN S/W 

77 GMC SUBURBAN,4x4 

78 CORDOBA 

77 CUTLASS 4dr. 

76 DODGE 3 * VAN 


$3495 

$4195 

$3595 

$3395 

$6395 

$8995 

$4695 

$6495 

$5395 

$4?95 

$4895 


SPMT, IMPORT CARS 


79 FhAT X19, MINT. BUR 
gandv with tan interion Pirelli 
tires. Dual Webers, header, in¬ 
credible performance and han¬ 
dling. For more information call 
Greg Brady, Les Cars Sales & 
Leasino, 854 Pandora, 385-4444 
or 3864)171 after hours. Dealer 
6690. 


76 Lancia Scorpion 5 spd. 

77 Jaguar XJS Coupe 

78 MGB 18,000 miles —Mint! 

62 Mercedes 220SE Coupe 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD 
I ndoors at 779 Pandora 
384 8035 Dealer 5311 


1M TRUCKS, BUStS 
MID VMS 


GARDEN 

CITY 


AUTO LEASE LTD. 

HOME OF THE 


1976 CORVETTE. YELLOW, 
L82, 350 automatic, power 
brakes, power steering, power 
windows, AM—FM radio. T— 
roof, new tires, new brakes. $10,- 
500. 382-2165. 


79 VOLVO 244 DL 

4 door, 4 cylinder, automatic, 
power steering, must sell, $7995 
384-8466. 


red MGA. rebuilt engine and 
transmission, with papers. 
$5300 Call Bjetl, 385 1515 days. 
386-1462 evenings 


OPEN 

Mon.-Thurs.,9-9 
Fri.-Sat.. 9-6 

2867 Douglas at Topaz 
382 7121 Dealer 5701 



Cornell gm 

USED CARS 

YOU CAN 
EXPECT A 

GREAT DEAL 
FROM CORNELL 

A ★ * 

“HIGHEST $$$ 
PAID" 

For Clean Low 
MILEAGE TRADES 

OPEN MON.—FRI. 9-9 
SAT. 9-5 

Finlayson and 
Burnside 

385-5777 Dealer 5378 

SACRIFICE, 1968 REBEL STA- 
tionwagon, 6-cvlinder auto¬ 
matic, $695. 477-9216. 

1964 VAUXHALL 2 DOOR, 4 
speed, good condition $350 
6588533 

1969 RAMBLER AMERICAN. 6 
cylinder, good condition 
592 6222. 

1970 TOYOTA COROLLA, 
needs work. $250 firm. 38^1067 
after 5pm 

DARK GREEN 69 VOLKSWA 
oen f astback, good shape, $1. 
500 966 Poyal Oak Or.. 65*8667 

WHITE 67 CORTINA, 1500, DE 
luxe, 4 door. $575 Phone 384-1597 
after 5:30 pm. 

I960 CADILLAC COUPE DE 
ville, $2,000 or nearest offer. 
592-0149 

1965 RAMBLER CLASSIC 2 
door automatic, tested until 
March 81 479 5839 

66 MUSTANG, GOOD SHAPE, 
$1800 or best otter Must sell 
478 9117 ^ 

60 VOLKSWAGEN. RUNS 
great, city tested. Economical. 
$600 385-1346 after 5pm. 

'64 SEDAN DEVILLE CADIL 
lac fully rebuilt, must be seen 
$4500 or best pfter. 642 3298 

1970 MUSTANG, BOSS 302, NO 
rust, 23,000 original miles $8500 
or best otter 652 3435 

1967 VW BUG, 42,000 ORIGINAL 
miles, body rusted, as Is, $450 or 
best otter 382 1871 before 8pm 

1968 TOYOTA CROWN DE 
luxe, 386-1021 (days); 652 4992 
(evenings). 

56 METRIC VW, MANY NEW 
parts 656-4837 

69 VW BUG, NEEDS SOME 
work, otters. 381 2019 

69 AMBASSAOOR. EXCEL- 
lent condition $900. 384-5546. 

1970MAVERICK, 73.600MILES. 
oood condition. $1500. 478-5707 

70 MAZDA R100, NEW MOTOR, 
radial tires, offers. 382 1467 

1963 DODGE SLANT 6 STAN 
dard, $150. 479-1317 after 5pm 

1970 FORD MARQUIS STA- 
tionwagon, $600. 474-2916 after 5. 

62 STUOE BAKE R 2 DOOR 
automatic, as (s. 383-1415 

'69 T BIRD, CLEAN. $2500. 
382-1314. 

68 VW, GOOO CONDITION, 
cassette stereo, $1400. 478-7584. 


HOWTOWRITE 
A GOOD 

CLASSIFIED ACTION 
AD 


1—IT'S BEST to start your ad 
with the name of the article or 
service you have to otter it 
you have an apartment, 
room, etc . for rent, or prot> 
erty for sale; start your ad 
with the locatfon. 


2—BE CLEAR. Readers respond 
mord quickly and favorably 
by giving complete, definite 
information. Always include 
the price in vour advertise¬ 
ment. 


3—MAKE IT EASY for the read 
er prospect to reach you. Al¬ 
ways give vour telephone 
number or your name and 
, address If you do not have 
regular hours, state a prefer 
red time for the prospect to 
get in touch with you 


greatest reader attention by 
using consecutive insertions 
A six day order is best and 
costs less, and you can, of 
course, stop your ad as soon 
as you get the results you 
want You pay only for the 
days vour ad appeared 
Lower yearly rates are avail¬ 
able to those who wish to keep 
♦heir services or products be 
fore the public 


5—PLACE YOURSELF in the 
reader's position and ask 
yourself what you want to 
know about vour otter The 
answer you give will make a 
good Want Ad 


6—G4VE YOUR PROSPECT 
every inducement you can 
with good copy Classified ac 
tion ad readers have the 
money and are already in 
terested m buying the mer 
cnendise or service you have 
to offer the details and mfor 
matton you oive are the most 
important 


7—IP PLACE YOUR AD. call 



he most com 

a , m 4 *lo M ni 
mv mr owgh Friday 
ta 5 * pen Saturday 
I allow the reader K 


picte < o»ef *ge 
are men • « < 

I m Monday through Fr.day 
» to 5*. p m Saturday 


1974 AUDI FOX, VALUED . 
over $4000. Sacrifice $3500 or 
besl offer. Will consider dirt bike i 
plus cash. John, between 69pm, 
478-1597. _ 

1974 260Z, GOOD SHAPE, j 
spoiler, louvers, AM FM, radial | 
tires, with spare and 2 snow 
♦Ires. $4350 or best offer. 
477 9685 


4 WHEEL DRIVE 

30-35 M.P.G. 

j 77 CHEV Vs 4x4,4spd. 

177 Chev 3 /, 4x4 
] 77 Super Cab 
77 GMC V, PU V8 auto 
176 Ford Super Cab 
69 Ford PU 3 /, ton 

TRAOESW6LCOME 
No Reasonable Otter Refused 
100% FINANCINGO.A.C. 


1973 CORVETTE, 454 AUTO- 
matic, power steering, power 
brakes, power windows, 
tllt/telescopic steering wheel. 
$7900 386-2379 after 5pm 


immaculate car - AMFM cas¬ 
sette, leather seats, new tires, 
new exhaust $4500 firm 
381 2183. 


72 TRIUMPH GT6, GREAT 
condition, 6 cylinder, new trans 
and clutch, sunroof and more 
Must be seen. $4500 477-9345 
384-3179. 


69 LOTUS EUROPA 

$6900. Excellent condition. 
382 4408 evenings 


BMW FIAT 

CAPITAL CITY AUTO LTD 
1750 GOVT 386 7508 


1979 CORVETTE 
Beautiful condition, many op¬ 
tions and extras, must be seen. 
$15,500. 384-5461 


1976 TRANSAM FORMULA, 
white on white, rare 455 with 4 
speed, 36,000 miles. Trade con 
sidered. 5079 Lockhaven Dr. 


78 FORD % TON 

stepside, ve at, P S. P B, l 
miles, tilt steering. Like nc . 

$5795 

76 TOYOTA SR5 

short box, excellent buy at $4295. 

74 FORD F100 

I V, ton V8 AT, P.S, P.B, U 
heavy bumper with hitch, si 
1 window $: 

73 DODGE 

| Club Cab v, ton, V8 AT, P.S, P.B, 
radio, 53,000 mi. . $2595. 

B MADSEN MOTORS LTD. 
j 2691 SookeRd. (Glen Lake) 
478-5011_Dealer 545 

78 GMC JIMMY 
This 4x4 is a local oneowner un 
featuring auto, PS, PB, am/fr. 
cassette with 40 channel CB 
White wheels with raised white 
lettered tires. Has not been used 
as an oft road vehicle 381-5544. 


GOING TO UBC, MUST SELL 
1972 240Z, 4 speed. 49,000 miles, 
good condition, offers on $4600. 
727-2782, 478 2405. 


1972 RED FIAT 124 SPORT 
Coupe. Rebuilt engine and trans¬ 
mission. Radials and mags. 
Some rust. $2200 firm. 721-3046. 


1974 FIAT X-19, IMMACULATE 
condition throughout, low mile- 
doe. superb handling and econ 
omy $4395 After 5pm, 386-1019 


1975 MGB, IMMACULATE IN- 
terior/exterior. Tonneau cover, 
stereo 8-track radio. $5200. 
642-4748 


p.b, $5395. 

HERTZ RENT ACAR 
(Division of owbar Leasing) 
901 Douglas St . Victoria, B.C 
Open 7 days a week. 388 4411 
Dealer #6499 

CHEV VAN 

1979 J, 4 ton, long wheelbase, V-8, 
I auto,, ps., pb.. radio, side win- 


1967 MERCEDES BENZ 250S, 
good condition, runs well All 
reasonable offers considered. 
Must sell. 595-7337 


'72 SPITFIRE CONVERTIBLE 
$1800 or best otter. Can be seen at 
Derick's Bay Services, 638 John. 
382 1314. 


ngget.,_,_ 

dition. Tires excellent, body bet¬ 
ter than fair. Partially camper - 


between6-7:30pm 


1980 Z28 4 SPEED, T ROOF, 
8,000 kilometers. S9500 478-6030 
after 5pm 


75 CORVETTE, IMMACU- 
late, blue lacquer paint, $11,000. 
479 1315. 


6-1 TON ON DUALS 
1971-1976 Chevs and Fords, 
autos, 4 speeds. One with fi 
deck dump. 

Georoe Eno Truck Sales 
Dealer #5166 

2810A Rock Bay Ave-—38630 


1972 FIAT 128, WELL CARED 
for. AM/FM radio, radial tires, 
$1100. 38*4419 59*9078 


1965 SUNBEAM TIGER, MINT. 
Otters to $14,500, small trade 
considered. 474-1017. 


1977 MGB, 33,000 MILES, TON 
neau, winter tires, roll bar, good 
condition $5800 firm. 474-2640. 


WANTED: TR250 OR TR4A IN 
good condition. Reasonable. 
Dana. 598 313*or 595 1913 


GMC JIMMY 

74 350 auto., p.s., p.b. Grea’_ 

purpose vehicle Runs great! 
$3,295 Painter Motors, 30(“ 
Douglas. 388-6196. Dealer 5802 


dual tanks, 60,000 miles, 
power steering, 302, heai 
white spokes, new exhausl, mi 
tires, brakes, shocks, offers. 
383 6105 days, Dave. 


1972 TR6, GOOO RUNNING 
condition, offers to $4300. 
477 9685 


1976 TR7, 39,000 MILES, Ex¬ 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
592 8278. 


75 MG MIDGET, 33,000 MILES. 
$2800 Good condition. 381-1784 
after 5pm 


BLACK '68 TR4A. REBUILT 
engine Must sell. $2200 or best 
otter 383 8676 


72 CHEV VAN, 


interior finish. Must sell, no rea- 
sonable offer refused 
3868S8469 PM 


478 1515 da vs, ask for Bob. 


73 TRANS AM. $3,000 IN EN 
gine, very fast. $4800 477-7413 or 
477 2628 


GOOO C 
t offer. 4 


74 FIAT X19, NEW TRANS, 
new clutch, new brakes. $4200 
3867760. 


74 VOLVO, LOOKS AND RUNS 
oood, $3000 or best otter. Phone 
388 7326 


74 FIAT 124 SPORT- 5 SPEED, 
nice shape. $2250. 477-8478 


77 TR7, GOOD CONDITION, 
many extras. Otters 595-6744 


1972 CAPRI V6, 2600, EXCEL- 
lent condition, $2100 381-2183 


_ -spee_. ._ 

steering, power brakes, fiber 


otter 656-6864 or 598-4824 


option except air conditionim 


mileage, tested, excellent condi¬ 
tion, $3800. For detaf 
382 9223 after 6pm. 


otter, 3865074. 


Around the world or right 
here in Victoria classified 
ads are working for other 
people. Why not put one to 
work for you today? 


154 TRUCKS, BUSES 
US VMS 


LIKE NEVy27,000MILES 

75 Ford van. Includes all recrea 
tional facilities. Will accept par 
trade. $8900 Must sell. 478-8354. 


Excellent mechanical condition, 
immaculate. $4250.939 Redfern. 
595-6618. 


miles. Automatic, radio, dual 

tanks and hubs. 112-7 - 

after 5. 


GlenOak 

# 

xr»-» 

roru 


TRUCKS 
VANS —4X4'S 
SUPER CABS 

AS LOW AS 

★ J 6870 ★ 

STOCK «802*0 

GlenOak 


1977 GMC VAN, SUNROOF, 
viior, finished Inside, 305 V8, 
dual exhaust, 28,000 miles. Ex- 


3976 FORD %-TON RANGER, 
power steering, power brakes, 
automatic transmission, 
canopy, 60,000 miles. After 6pm, 


1973 GMC Vj TON 454 AUTO- 
matlc with power steering, 
power brakes, transmission, 
body and running oear excellent. 
592-9338 


1977 FORD VAN, VELVET CUS- 
tom Interior, captains chairs, 
AM/FM cassette, alarm, equal¬ 
izer hitch, digital clock. 17500 
or offers. 383-8319 


1976 FORD 12 PASSENGER 
club wagon, 460 engine, power 
steering, power brakes, cap¬ 
tain's chair $5500 or best offer. 
478-2731. 


76 GMC VAN. 350 AUTOMATIC, 
power steerlno. power brakes, 
custom Interior, sunroof, head¬ 
ers. new tires. $4900. 479-8817 
after 6pm 


77 BLACK DODGE STREET 
van, cruise control, maos, 
extras. 34,000 km excellent 
Offers on $5,800 for quick sale 
47MMB. 


11976 TOYOTA PICKUP, 
canopy, automatic, 29.7SD ml las 
: Excetlant mechanical < 

; Immaculate. $4250.9Jf 
I 595-6618. 


I 939 Radfern, 



Wcrkd Inc 1664)65. 3U2oJkZ* 






-J AUTO 

mm 





154 TRUCKS, IUS£S 
•MO VANS 

1963 INTERNATIONAL 
school bus, partially camper- 
l/ed. $3000 firm. 478-9954, 
382-6554 after 6pm 

1970 CHEV STEP VAN, BODY 
poor but fixable. Good motor, 
auto trans. rear end and tires, 
$500. 479-9981 

1977 K5 BLAZER 4X4. AUTO 
matic, excellent condition, 2 V,- 
nco miles. $6,850 or best otter 

4 74-1549. 

72 GMC SHORT VAN, CUSTO-, 
ml zed, brand new 60 watt stereo 
package. S5S00 or best offer 
656-02/6 

1977 GMC Va TON SUBURBAN, 
350, V8, 16" wheels, trailering 
package. Sierra Grande. $6800or 
best offer . 477-9949 

1976 DOOGE MAXI VAN. 
automatic, power steering, low 

1 mileaoe $4500 or nearest offer. 
382 2116,9am-5:pm. 

78 TOYOTA LANOCRU ISE R 
pickup 4x1, 4 speed, canopy, 
many extras, 15,000 miles. 
382 4615 Offers on $7700 

1970 ECONOLINE FORD VAN, 
fully camper (zed, good condi 
tion $3600 or best otter. 385-6188 
after 6pm. 

73 DATSUN PICKUP, 1600 CC. 
insulated canopy, snow tires, 80 , 
000 miles, offers on $ 2100 . 

595-5849 

1976 DATSUN SPORT TRUCK 
and canopy. 40,000 miles, sun 
root, white spoke wheels, $4500. 
59* 5226 after 6. 

1976 V* TON CHEV CAMPER 
special plus 8' Galaxie camper, 
both very good condition, $9500 
479-0305 

1976 ECONOLINE, 6-CY 
clinder. 3 speed Hurst, custom 
interior 95% finished, many 
extras. Offers on $6000. 386*475 

4X4 '67 CHEV Vj-TON, 350-4 
speed, PTO winch. $2200 or 
otters. B.C. Autowrecking Ltd.. 
652 1181 Dealer #5034 

1975 DODGE B200 , 6 CYLIN- 
der automatic, power steering, 
power brakes. Insulated, $2700 
382-6949 

1972 FORD Vj-TON. NEW 
power train, transmission, re¬ 
built 3 speed. 360 cc $2000 firm. 
384-6607, 5-7pm 

74 FORD SUPER CAB, 40,700 
miles with 9'V 75 Okanagan 
camper, $7500 or will sell separ 
atelv 478-7833 

1976 FORD 12 PASSENGER 
club wagon, power steering, 
power brakes, deluxe interior. 
$4500. 38* 5432 

'71 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER, 
soft top and hard doors, black, 
rebuilt motor. $3500. 2727 
Walq.38* 5951,478-3457 

TILTING FLATDECK TRAIL- 
er. tandem, 20'x8'. offers on 
$2950. 47*5194. 

1972 MAZOA PICKUP. EXCEL 
lent condition. Offers on $2500 
385-5687 

1973 FORD F250. AUTOMATIC, 
good condition. $2800 Days 
656-6612; evenings652-7008 

1968 CHEV SUBURBAN, 283 4 
speed, good condition, tested till 
July 01. 38* 5505. 

1966 VOLKSWAGEN WINDOW 
Van. good running condition, 
$850 477-7857. 

GMC J / 4 TON, LOW MILEAGE, 
special custom camper shell. 
477-1931. 

75 DODGE 6. AUTOMATIC, 
camper roof, all power, excel¬ 
lent condition. 47*9430 

1973 FORD F250, POWER 
steering, power brakes, 390 V8, 
automate $2700. 478-5950 

1961 MERCURY '/i TON PICK 
up, good tires and brakes $350 
John 47*8840, 478-9812 

1976 JIMMY 4X4, 33,000 MILES, 
350 automatic, 1-owner $6500 
477-3043 

74 BLAZER. LIKE NEW 
throughout, many extras. Look 
at this one Best otter. 592*428 

1976 FORD CUSTOM, %-TON, 
51,000 miles, good shape, with 
cap, $3800. 385-8770. 

It JEEP CJ5, LOW MILEAOE. 
V8, power brakes and steering. 
381-5716. 

1958 CHEVY '/j-TON, 70,000 
original miles. Call after 6 pm, 
382-6203 

77VW VAN, EXCELLENT CON 
onion. 24,000 miles. $8200 Phone 
477*277. 

74 FORD COURIER, 60,000 
original, $2250 firm. Call after 6, 
384-4198 

1972 CHEV *.-TON, GOOO CON 
dition. canopy, good gas mile¬ 
age $2200 477-7718atter 5 

69 KENWORTH LW 923, CAB 
and chassis, 335.5 ♦ 4,38,000 rear 
end. Must be seen. 112-743-4673 

1973 DATSUN PICKUP TRUCK 
1600 Needs paint job. $2000. 
474-2596 

1972 GMC VAN. CUSTOMIZED, 
new paint, transmission, 
sunroof, mags $3950. 477-6003 

37 CHEV PICKUP, ALL ORIGI- 
na^jjart^not running. 478 4097. 

'72 DATSUN PICKUP, WITH 
381*952 000(1 cond,tion 

1975 DOOGE 1-TON KARRY 
Van, 37,000 highway miles. Open 
to offers After 5,47*3719. 

1970 GMC 4X4, P.S., P B . 4 
speed, electric winch, radials, 
$3200 642-3281 after 8 pm 

4X4 

77 GMC J /4 ton, 10,000 lb winch, 40 
channel CB 382-4692 after 5:00. 

MUST SELL BY WEEKEND 66 
Ford Supervan. $600 or best 
offer 592-4217 

'74 JIMMY 4X4, GOOD RUN 
offer 479 ?532° n ' * 2500 or best 

CUSTOM 1 TON PIZZA VAN. 
fully equipped. 1978 GM, $20,000 
firm. 112 749*140 

1977 FORD 250 PICKUP. 6 
cylinder motor, posi traction, 
nice shape, $4500. 385*677, Jim. 

FURNITURE VAN. 8X16, REA- 
sonable shape, $1800. 38*0677, 

1970 VW VAN, CAMPERIZED, 
good condition. $2100. 652 2828 

FOR SALE 79GMC 4X4. PHONE 
479-2721 or 642-4497. 

FORO ECONOLINE 79, 24,- 
000km, 4-speed. $6,500. 38*3495 

1950 FORD Vi-TON, GOOD FOR 
restoration. $1000.642-3949. 

1969 CHEVY W-TON. 350 4- 
speed, $1150. 727-2308. 

63 MERC W-TON. 4-SPEED, 
needs box. $450. 47*6832 

1972 INTERNATIONAL '/» TON 

6 cylinder 4 speed, $900 479 3938 


72 FORD E200 VAN. 63.500 
miles. 38*1469 after 4pm 

1980 JEEP RENEGADE 
479-6*66 after Spm 

^Sc c 2 S.u;s ^ u70 


67 DODGE WINDOW VAN. 
stant 6, rum woM. $595 479*107 

a. F 2s?-a, T sa^ CKUp - 



IH IKS 

COW ABO MOTORS LTD 
SEMPEfcIT TIRE 
DISTRIBUTOR 

Meat Hie* tn Hoc* tar m im 
#*H CJ#Try our pik« Hm 


is* ntuf 


p-6 


FOUR 15L60 TIRES. -LESS 
than 1000 miles, mounted on 
Chev 5 on 5, 15x7 tornados, with 
lock nuts and caps. $6S0, or trade 
for rally wheels. 479-7240 after 
6pm. 


NEWTIRES 

Four 15" Firestone steel belted 
radials (GR78-15), regular $103, 
for only $85 each 3861997 


WANTED: TIRES, ANY SIZE. 
$5 $10. Must be BC testable 
474-1311. 


Classified 

Advertising^ 

386-2121 

8:00a.m. - 6:00p.m. 

Mon. - Fri. 
8:00a.m. - 5:30p.m. 
Sat. 


160 PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
AMD SERVICE 

TIRE LTD 


ALIGNMENT 

SPECIAL 

$ 12.88 

Most North American 
and Import Cars 
Trucks extra 

Includes caster and camber ad 
lustment. toe-in and checking of 
front end parts. 

We also: 

—Install front end parts 
—Supply and install Monroe or 
Gabriel stocks 
—Rebuild brakes. 

Your Safety Service Center 
1620 Blanshard_382 7283 


Osaka Hil 
Motors 

TOYOTA DATSUN HONDA 
VW RABBIT 
Behind Oouglau St. 0«iry Queen 
383-3043 


HABITAT'S 

EQUIPMENT CENTRE 
994 COLDSTREAM AVE 

474-2144 TH078A 

ENGINE REBUILT SPECIALS 

4CYL IMPORTS FROM$630 
6CYL. DOMESTIC FROM $552 
8CYL. DOMESTIC FROM $642 


REBUILT 427, CAM, NEW 
Edelbrock Tarantula manifold 
and valve covers Headers, 780 
Hollev. $1200. Munzie with Vertl 
gate and clutch assembly, $600 
Shortened 12 -boit posi, Sommer 
Bros. axle, new shocks and trac¬ 
tion bars, 4:11 oears, $1000 Mis 
cellaneous. Taking offers. 
595 7779 


CAR RADIO 

AM, AM/FM, AM/FM Stereo, 
radios from $49 95 
Expert installation availaBle 
B.C. SOUND & RADIO Service 
- 383-4731 


931 FORT 


SPRINGS 

Complete Repair Service for 
cars and trucks. LOGAN 
SPRING & SUSPENSION LTD . 
60 Crease Ave. (Behind Budget 
Rent-A-Truck) 3862744. r 


EDWARD MOTORS LAD 
IMPORTPARTSCENTRE 
Filters, ignition, brakes, susben 
slon, clutches, engine parts, etc 
TRY US TODAY 
Phone 384-8086 


RADIATOR REPAIRS, FAST 
top quality repairs at Maurice's 
Auto Body. 4?7 Beta St., phone 
386-3381 or 384-8094 Located be 
hind the Burnside Pav and Save 
Gas Station. 


JAPANESE AND DOMESTIC 
car and truck parts. Serving 
Great Victoria and the Saanich 
Peninsula BC Auto Wrecking 
Ltd, 7481 West Saanich Rd, 
652-118) 


VICTORIA4 WHEEL DRIVE 
FREE WHEELING HUBS for 
any make of 4-wheel dr i ve. 

597 Hillside at Rock BaV 
D 13531 3866511 


1965 GTO, 75% FINISHED, 
small block Chev, 4-spc«d. 12 
bolt, best of everything, all new. 
rebuilt and machined. Whole or 
parts 383-3981 


CAR TRAILER, TANDEM, UN 
finished, offers. Utility trailer, 
unfinished, otters. 474-1493 after 
^ . - an< j 4:30, 


engine, hew pistons and, rings, 
stock crank, new cam bearings 
and bored .030 over. Otters on 
$500. Ken 477-5S84. 


DEMO CARS 

Built 67 Ford $250 63 Ford 2 door 
hardtop, nice black butlon in¬ 
terior. 352 auto. $200 firm. 
478-4248 


USED PARTS FOR DAT6UNS. 
Tovotas, Pintos and Hondas 
Bob & John's Auto Body. 
112 743-9141, CObble Hill. 


TURBO 400 TRANS, $150. CHE V 
v„ ton 2 speed power glide. $75 
1955 57 Chev bellhousing. $40. 
3860027. 


MGB AND IMPORT CAR RE 
pairs. Guaranteed work. Used 
and new parts. United Outlaws 
Garage, 474-1088 


FIAT SPYDER PARTS, RE 
built transmission, good engine, 
etc. 385-7740 days, 383 1650 eve 


64 ACADIAN, EXCELLENT 
parts Including 68 synchro trans 
mission with hurst shifter. Good 
glass and rubber, etc. 479 3864 


VICTORIA RECYCLING 
Free scrap car removal . 388 6275 
pager 877 anytime. 381-5353 eve¬ 
nings 


mission with shJftfclt, 74*77 Ca 
maro grIH and front end ports 


MUST SELL, FIBERGLASS 
canopy with side louvered win 
dows. good condition $350 or 
offers. 479-8051. 


3-1976 FORO VAN BLUE PAS 
senger seats Excel lent r 
tlo n. barely used Cell 47 


I 479-0864 


VEGA PARTS 
3868775 betare 2pm 

19*9 DODGE O ART. BOO V 

CHEV J SPEED STANDARD 

i«» 








































































































































































































































































































































































































T 


C-7* . 

ICO PARTS, ACCESSORIES 
AND SERVICE 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 


68 727 TRANS. RAD AND 
grill for 68 Satelite. Steve 

478-5481. <T ■ 


trunk lids, etc. Beetles, vans 
cheap. 474-1088. 

WRECKING 68 VALIANT, 
also dual exhaust for 65 Chev. 
$25. 478-2955. 

2 MOBILE HOME AXLES, 
hubs, tires, springs. S250. 
474 2083 

HOLLEY 650 DOUBLE PUMP. 
$70 Hooker headers, for 289 or 
302, $75 478-3712 

WRECKING OR MAKE GOOD 
demo car: 68 Chev, 283 v8. auto¬ 
matic 474-1848. 

WANTED: 67 OR LATER VW 
Beetle transaxle, 387-3609 davs. 
(Lorraine) or 382-0139evenings. 

283. TOTALLY REBUILT. 
-.— t r best offer. 


many extras, $450 or t 
478 6832 


DUAL POINT CRAGAR Dis¬ 
tributor for 302 Ford with 351 
cam. $6$. 2f$0Tudor 

57 BAJA BUG, RUNS, NOT RE- 
gistered, 477-4846 call after 
5pm. 

WANTED.'SCATTER SHIELD 
for small block Chevy After 6 
weekdays. 474-1793. 

CHASSIS MOUNT CAMPER 
tie downs, $40 each or $75 pair. 
383 9847 

FORD 289, 48,000 MILES, 
phone 381-1227 after 7pm or 
477-0330 anytime 


IN CARS AND TRUCKS 
WANTED 


CASH FOR GOOD, 
CLEANUSEDCARS 
THOMAS PLIMLEY LTD. 
1010 Yates St. 382-9121 


CASH FOR GOOD USEDCARS. 
B. Madsen Motors, 2691 Sooke 
Rd (Glen Lake), 478-5011. Dealer 
5450 


UNIVERSITY STUDENT RE 
auires reliable economical 
transportation. 381-0474. be- 
tween 5 and 7 pm. 


CAMPERS, TRAILERS 
Ml MOTOR HONES 



preferrably long box (not camp 
erlied) 479-3005 after 4pm. 


1964-66 VALIANT STATIONWA 
gon, 6-cycllnder, tested, good 
condition. $1000 maximum. 
386-1368. 


HAVE CASH FOR A 65 TO 70 
Mustang or 67 to 69 Cougar 
384-8075 Pager 1332. 


CAR IN GOOD CONDITION, 
able to go through Esso Clinic 
test. 386-6S45. 


Dealers For: 

★OKANAGAN* 

★SCAMPER* 

★COLEMAN* 

650 Burnside Rd. E 
Dealer 6732_384-02)3 


IK CAMPERS, TRAILERS 
a*A MOTOR HOMES 


197V •' CUSTOM BUILT CAMP- 
er, 3-wav fridge, stove, heater, 
lacks, excellent condition, offers 
on $3200. 479-6377 


—.Empri_, 

tex-home, A-l condition, 18,000 
miles. $14,500 or offers. 721-5194 

URGENT, MUST SELL 11*6" 
deluxe Caveman, completely 
self-contained, like new condl- 
tlon, many extras. 478-0629 


1977-79 FORD F250 RANGER 
XLT or Lariet. 460 motor, air, 
camper special. 478-7130. 


69-70 CHEV OR PONTIAC- $300 
or less 479-0135 


ist 


CAMPERS, TMIURS 
and MOTOR HOMES 


Holldalre Travel Trailer, 
'mint' condition, well 
equipped with Awninp, 3- 
Wav tridoe, 3 burner 
stove, oven. Furnace, 
Biffv. Dual propane and 
TV aerial. 

$4995 

Reg Midgley 
Motors Ltd. 

736 Cloverdale 385-8756 
Dealer Lie. 5186 


F G-60 tires, 5375. 



FOUR TURBINE MAGS, 
14"x6", to fit Toyota, complete 
SI 75 After 6pm, 388-7516. 


Excellent CTOdltlon. 381 0867 or 
384-9294 aSTfor Tina or Dennis. 

CAR CASSETTE TAPE DECK 
with Pioneer speakers, brand 
new. 479-9174. 

WHOLE OR PARTS. 64 RAM- 
bler American 220 automatic. 
642-4359 

65 CHEVELLE. A STOCK CAR. 
new engine, lots of spare parts. 
64? 3910 

WANTED: 700X15"TIRE AN05 
stud rim to fit Ford pickup. 
384 1089 

WE HAUL SCRAP CARS FREE 
Associated. 478-9571 


SCRAP METAL AND CARS 
hauled tree of charge. 386-0990, 


56 CHEV SEDAN DELIVERY, 
whole or parts. 479-3393. 


1979 HOff6‘A CVCC CIVIC. AS 
is. Best offer 595-8889 388-1432. 

THREE PASSENGER SEAT 
for van, like new, $150. 478-4452 

292 CHEV ENGINE COM 
plete. $100 658-8418._ 

AIR CONDITIONING UNIT 
SI50. 384 5546. 


LAYTON- 
0+1 NOOKS 
LITTLE CHIEF 
KITKAMPERS 

NEW 

76 — 23' Wlnnabaoo Chlettan mo¬ 

tor home 440, PS and PB, cruise, 
dual gas tanks, turnace, roof air, 
eve level oven, large fridge and 
freezer, generator power lacks, 
power step and Mlchelin tires. 
21,000 miles! $19,950 

77 — 32' Lavton 5th wheel. Fully 
sett contained plus laroe fridge, 
duct turnace, roof air with heat, 
In new condition. A bargain at 

$9,950 

I 

I 74 Sundowner HT trailer, fridge 
land furnace. $1995 

72 21' Terry, fully self contained. 
Very clean. $4995 

YOUR DOWNTOWN 
R.V. PARTS DEPOT 
1703 BlanshardSt. 385-5012 
Dealer 5183 


1976 DODGE CAMPERIZED 
Kary Van, 360 engine, auto¬ 
matic, power steering, power 
brakes, air. 32.000 highway 
miles, 3-wav fridge, stove, oven, 
furnace, electric water pump, 
lots of storage. 6'2" ceiling, Insu 
lated, extremely sturdy body. 
$8,200. See at 7171 West Saanich 
Rd., Brentwood Bay weekdays. 
656-3253 aftec6p.m. 

20' MOTO CHALET MOTOR 
home, 318 Dodge motor and 
chassis. 38,000 miles, original 
owner, power steering, power 
brakes, fully equipped with bath¬ 
room, fridge, furnace, sink, 
stove and lots of cupboard space. 
Will take panel truck as trade- 
in. 479-5155 or 620 Mann Ave. 
Apply after 5pm 


RENTING MOTORHOME, 23' 
Winnebago. $250 week, 84 mile, 
available August 23-30. after 
September 13th 479-3471, 


69 CHAMPION MOTORHOME. 
26' with 110 volt generator, fully 
equipped. Government sticker 
to June 81 $5,000. 384-1350. 


72 GMC VAN CONVERSION. 
Sleeps 2. On display $4995 as 
Is. Colwood Car Mart, 474-2233. 
D6716. 


NEW MAXIVAN CONVER 
sion, fully camperlzed. raised 
roof, factory air and cruise, 
extras, warranty 3875 Seaton 


28' CONVERTED 69 GMC BUS. 
75 motor. 12,000 miles, sleeps 7, 
3-wav fridge, stove, bath, flush 
toilet, stereo, $8000. 724-1011. 


HARDTOP TENT TRAILER, 
sleeps 6-8. Fair condition. View 
at 3841 Carev Road. Make an 
otter. 


TIRED OR DRIVING ALL 
I over the Island, fighting traffic, 
searching for campsites? Solve 
these problems bv becoming 
owner of a lot equipped with a 21' 
trailer and metal shed In a pri¬ 
vately owned park on Shawnigan 
Lake. Reduced to $14,500 tor 
quick sale. Call Langley 530-0404 
evenings. 


75 9'/j' OKANAGAN CAMPER 
on 74 Ford Super Cab, 40,700 
miles, $7500 or Will sell separ 
atcly. 478-7833. 


BOAT LOADERS FOR CAMP- 
ers, motor homes. Installed. 
478-3796 or 478-2754 


WE WILL BUY YOUR GOOD 
used Rec. Vehicle. Peden R.V. 
Ltd., 2855 Quesnel St , 386-3464 


13' 69 SHASTA TRAILER, 
good condition, porta potti, $1, 
200 or best offer . 595-6515. 


FOR RENT 1970 FORD VAN. 
fully camperlzed, sleeps 2. $150. 
per week, 104 mile. 478-0208. 


FOR RENT. OLOER 13' TR*IL- 
er. small car pulls, sleeps 4, 
reasonable. 478-3368 before 3. 





1980 SECURITY Class A 
24'/j' motorhome, fully 
loaded with the com¬ 
forts of home. $35,900 


ALMOST NEW. 4 SPOKE MAGS 
and tires. iA>u<< S3S0. MSCW'3. 

CANOPY FOR SHORTBOX 
truck, $150 or offers. 478-3874. 

164 AUTOBOOY 
AND PAINTING 

EXPERT ItBC AND COLLI- 
sion work performed. Specializ¬ 
ing In late model automobiles. 
Andrew Tlmmis 388-6229 


166 


CMS AMO TRUCKS 
WANTED 



ER 


11980 SECURITY wide- 
| body 20' motorhome, 
fully loaded — AM/FM 
cassette, air conditlon- 
! ing, flush toilet. $23,900 

11977 VW factory van con¬ 
version, excellent con¬ 
dition. Propane and cold 
water. Only 
27,000 miles. This unit 
must be seen! 

382-2313 
3200 DOUGLAS 
ATCLOVERDALE 

DEALER 5MI 


RENTALS 

MOTORHOMES —CAMPERS 
—TRAILERS— 

July and Aug. bookings full. 
Book early for Sept, and Oct. 

PEDEN RV LTD. 
386-3464 

FOR RIjiNT OR SALE 
MOTORHOMES 
WEEKLY — MONTHLY 
GARDEN CITY AUTO LEASE 
LTD. 2978 Douglas, 382-9111. 
Dealer 5721. 

DOGWOOD TRAILER SALES 
PARTS —PROPANE 
WESTERN WILDERNESS 
Campers 

WILDERNESS Trailers 
2630 Dev (lie Road 
Highway 1 at Mlllstream 
478-6841_Dealer 5390 

BRITANNIA VANS 
1980 Maxi van conversions, 
raized roof, all appliances. 
Starting from $14^900 
1080 Golds tream 

478-2713 Dealer 6703 


GMC *« TON. LOW MILEAGE, 
special custom camper shell. 
477-1931. 


11' CAVEMAN CAMPER, Ex¬ 
cellent condition. $3600. Phone 
after 5pm, 479-0228 


8' UNICORN CANOPY, 2 IN 
side lights, roofrack, bed, and 
more. 386-0347 


, 1973 VW WESTPHALIA, MUST 
sell, leaving country. Any offer 
i BUI 388-5523 or 479-0719 _ 

OKANAGAN CAMPER, GOOD 
i condition, offers on $1500. 
385-5687. 

196716' VANGUARDTRAILER, 
stove, fridoe. sleeps 4, $1800. 
595-7377 after 5pm 


1972 TRAILER. 16'/ 2 '. SLEEPS 
six, hot water, toilet, $3500. 
386-7256 


i 16' FLYTE TRAILER, SLEEPS 
l 6. excellent condition, $2400. 
! 656-6851. 656-7092, 479-1758 

RV SITE AND MEMBERSHIP, 
i Honeymoon Bay Association, 
I Cowichan Lake. 598-2577 _ 

! 1972 WINNEBAGO 19' VERY 
I good condition. Sleeps 4. Fully 
| contained. $8900. 598-9430. 

! 8' CAMPER. SLEEPS4. STOVE 
and fridge, good condition. $1400. 
478-4943. 


1976 VANGUARD MOTOR 
home, on Ford chassis, power 
steering, power brakes, cruise 
control, roof air. CB, AM/FM 
8-track stereo, trailer towing 
package. Immaculate condition. 
Nanaimo, 758-2718, after 5 pm. 


22' NOMAD TRAVEL TRAIL- 
er. tandem wheels, sleeps 6-7, 
3-wav fridge, stove and oven, full 
bathroom with shower, hot 
water heater, furnace, battery 
charger, equalizer hitch. $4800. 
595-5367 after 4 pm 


SELLYOUR CAR 


I 


YOU HAVE 
OUROFFER 
INSTANT CASH 
Premium Automobiles 
Only 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD. 

779 PANDORA 384-8035 




1975 VANGUARD 20' Motor- 
home, excellent condition. 
$12,995 384-0213 CAMOSUN RV 
CENTRE. 650 Burnside E. 

! Dealer 6732. _ 

76 FORD F250 CAMPER SPE- 
; cial c/w 8' custom built camper. 
3 way fridge, porta potti, fur¬ 
nace. Intercom. Excellent condi- 
i tlon. $6495. complete On display 
Colwood Car Mart, 474-2233. 
06716. 


9'V VANGUARD CAMPER, 
fridge, stove, heater, good condi¬ 
tion, $2000. 477-3948. 


1973 VOLKSWAGEN WEST- 
phalia. excellent condition. 
$4500. 112-746-7353. 


74 TERRY 25', SELF CON- 
tained. good to live In for 2 or 
travel. $5400. 656-4161 


CHASSIS MOUNT CAMPER 
tie-downs, $40 each or $75 pair 
383 9847 


UTILITY TRAILER. 4'X8' IN- 
side, wired and tested. $150. 
479-7485 


1977 VW FACTORY VAN CON- 
iTent condltl 


CLEAN PRE-OWNER 
VEHICLES NEEDED 
LES CARR'S 

664 PANDORA AT QUADRA 

•385-4444 


the Highest Prices for 
Your Clean Used Car 
TRY US—YOU'LL BE 
SURPRISED! 

CONTACT 
CARL SPICER 
Used car mgr. 
Empress Pontiac Buick 
GMC LTD. 

382-7121 „ DL01227A 


WE NEED CLEAN 
USEDCARS 

SEE LES STARLING 

SUBURBAN 
Motors Ltd. 

3377 Douglas 386^131 

Dealer 5528 

WE BUY 
ALL 
MAKES 

McCallum Motors Ltd. 


TRAILER SUPPLIES 
LTD. 

PROPANE —REPAIRS 
AND 

APPLIANCE SERVICE 
Custom Building 
and 

Van Conversions 
Large Parts 
and Accessories Store 

652-3941 

Mon.-Sat.9to5 
Sun.12 to 4 

6459 Patricia Bay Hwy. 


...Hen _ 

Propane and cold water. Only 
27,000 miles. This unit must be 
seen! Wide Dodge Chrysler, 3200 
Douglas St. 382-2313. Dealer 
. 5881. 


8' CAMPER WITH JACKS, 3- 
burner stove, ice box. $1300 or 
offers. 478-4770. 


74 BARTH MOTORHOME. 
383-1212, after 6 479-0218. 


16' LEISURE TRAILER, SINK, 
stove, sleeps 5, $900. 478-4053. 


11' CAMPER, GOOD CONDI 
tlon $2150 or offers 478-3892 


CAMPERETTE, FITS IM- 
port, $400 or best offer 383-8566 


1979 FRONTIER 10' CAMPER. 
I stove/ oven, 3-wav fridge, 3- 
plece toilet facilities. Excellent 
I condition. 1976 Dodge Club Cab 
Camper Special, dual tanks, low 
mileage, $11,500. Will sell separ 
ately. 384-8803; 384-8720. 

13*6 TRAILER, HOMEMADE, 
I fibreglass insulation, propane 
stove, sink, icebox, lacks, elec¬ 
trical and water hookups Sleeps 
2 adults, and 1-2 children. $875. 
I 2860 Tudor _ 

i 73 Timber land camper for Im¬ 
port truck, propane water, 
Tacks, dual lights, sleeps 4. Sell 
tor $1700. or rent $50. per week 


1976 OKANAGAN 9W CAMP- 
er, lots of extras $4500. 385-5171. 


8' FIBERGLASS CANOPY, 
good condition, $350. 478 9224 


LONGBOX CANOPY. INSU 
lated, with lights, $400, 598 7656 


in Noatu hoiks t» 

AND PIUWS 

G0LDSTREAM Im¬ 
mobile HOMES LTD. — 
T/Can Hv Sooke Lk Rd 200 

New Glen River 14x70's. 14x52 
Premier preowned with car¬ 

port /toolshed. Also a selectiorvof 

2/3 bdr. D/wides to be relocated. 

We are In need of clean homes to d 
list and sell. Give us a call for an aS 
appraisal and we will handle the ™ 
selling for you. 

MARSH SMITH, Bus. 478-1751. 

Res 478-8774, DL 1280 HE 

24x52 

Don't let this one slip bv. Im- 
maculate 3 bedroom double, ha 
close to Victoria, bus route. Must jr 
be seen tobe appreciated. Priced 
right. Dealer 6463-A 3 

H8.R MOBILE & 

HOMES 478-8354 ii 

AFFORDABLE br 

3 bedroom, IVj baths. Including PIT 
5appllances on an exceptionally op 
nice large lot in Florence Lake ? K . 
Park. Ideal for familv. $44,000. , .! 
Take possession In August, o p 
478-7597 after 5:30. No Agents ° ,V 

bat 

14x70 wa 

Craigflower area. In Twin Oaks, 
deluxe home, moving to Vancou- , 10 
ver, must sell H&R Mobile Lar 
Homes, Dealer 6463-A. 478-8354 (( 

SPOTLESS 1975 2-BEDROOM, f* 
12x68 mobile home, ample stor 
age and parking, patio and 

112-743-9544. 

PARK VILLAGE 

F amlly park In Sooke. Slnole and 
double wide pads to rent. Sorry 
no dogs 642-4497 

CEDAR CREEK MOBILE 
Homes Park, Mill Bay, has 
space available. 112-743-2449. 
112-743-2591 - 

12' X 56' KNIGHT MOBILE j ^ 
home, with sun porch, serious 
inquiries only. 478-4003 or 
478-2330. 

PRICED TO SELL FAST! 

12x68 4 appl, wrap around sun 
deck, fenced vard, separate 

D.R. 474-2154 Buvrlght. D6162 

1152 SQ.FT. OF LUXURY! Spe 

Eye level oven, sunken tub, wet tior 
bar, beautiful waterview. Nice! * 
474-2154. Buvright. D6162 * 

5 MIN. TO CITY! 

1979 14x60. Beautiful home! A * 
buy! 474-2154. Buvright D6I62. 

ONLY $9600! Fr 

A great 2 BR. waterfront home! * 
Call 474-2154. Buvright. D6162. 

SPACE AVAILABLE, $75. 7111 C 

Westcoast Rd, Sooke. 384-0857 or 

642 4277. 

WANTED BY RESPONSIBLE _ 

working couple, trailer to rent or s~ 
rent-to-own. 386-7838 or 385^8046 | 

171 SUMMER HOMES, ( 

COTTAGES mi RESORTS 

TO LEASE: COTTAM POINT 4 

(south of Parksville) waterfront < 

bungelow, architecturally de- , 

signed, 3 bedrooms, fireplace, 
electric heat, carpeted, semi- 
furnished. Available early Sep¬ 
tember to end of June. $550 per V 

month. 598-3793 after 3 pm. 

LAKE COWICHAN WATER 
front. 2-bedroom furnished cot- All 
tage, boat ramp, golf course Vj- cial 
block Week from August 2nd- pro 
September 112-745-3436. C U 

CO 

SELF CONTAINED SUITE CO 
available weekends or weekly, frot 
10 miles south ot Campbell age 
River, ocean view. Reasonable ^ 
rates. 112-923-5106 Ac 

111 TOURIST 

ACCOMMODATION f 

HARTNELL HOUSE ■ 

1204 Yates St p 

Fully equipped modern kitchen I r 
unit bv week, dav (10 min.). II 
Close to downtown. Linen. 1 
dishes, C.T.V., parking. 383-0742, L 
386-2812. 

NOW AVAILABLE 
immaculate one bedroom suite 
in prime quiet location 2 blocks 
from downtown. New furnish- 2 b 
ings and interior decor. Weekly am 
rates 384 1776or 388-7324 abl 

OCEAN FRONT EXECUTIVE F 

home, fully furnished, secluded D 
with beautiful panoramic view 
of Victoria. 2 week minimum 
478-3680 3-B 


169 MOBILE HOMES 
AND PARKS 


DUNCAN B.C. 


BEAUTIFUL HOME, FOUR 
bedrooms, fully-equipoed. one 
block beach, bus stop. 2 -week 
minimum. 382-8311, 38*4353 


HI ( HI AltOVU VIHKI1 III) 


—16 Yearsof RV Experience 
Ready to Serve You— 

★ VANGUARD ★ 

★ FRONTIER ★ 

★ PROWLER ★ 

★ TRIPLEE ★ 


EXPLORER 25' CLASS A MO- 
1 or home, Dodge chassis with 413 
motor, low mileage. Too many 
extras to list. Immaculate condi- 
tlon. 598-6749, after 6 pm. 


1975 20' MOTORHOME, 360 V8, 
PS, PB, CC, air conditioning, 
new tires, awning, AM/FM, CB, 
completely self contained. $14, 
900 or best offer. 478-S154. 

31 PROWLER TRAVEL 
trailer, like new and 79 Oeluxe 
Ford Van with complete towing 
^ckage. Call after 6 pm 


V Large Parts and 
Accessories Store 

V Repairs and Rentals 

PEDEN RV LTD. 

285QUESNEL ST. (D6418) 4 

386-3464 

Behind Empress Pontiac Buick 


1980 COLEMAN Seneca tent 
trailer, loaded. 384-0213. 
CAMOSUN RV CENTRE, 650 
Burnside E . Dealer 6732 

1975 DODGE SPORTSMAN 
Royal, complete van conversion, 
in excellent condition 360 V8, 
61,000 miles. $8700 or offers 
477-9761. 


FAMILY SUITE ON THE 
I Gorge waterfront in a quiet 
home, bv day or week Available 
July 21.382-5263. 


Our latest Craigflower Rd de¬ 
velopment! First homes going in 
July l .Onlv 2sites left! Enioyme 
maintenance free living like a 
condo with all the benefits of 
owning a lot without the high cost 
tobuvTt! Look Into one of the best 
home investments of the 80's! 
Homes from 728 to 1440 sq ft 
completely finished Inside and 
outside with warranty. View our 
showrooms in Langford (off 
Trans Can Hwv) & “Esqulmalt 
Craigflower Rd”. 

ASK ABOUT "OAKVIEW ES¬ 
TATES” ALREADY TAKING 
REFUNDABLE DEPOSITS ON 
SITES 

Buy Right Homes 

OL6162 474-2154 383 2912 

Langford open dally till 8, Craig¬ 
flower. 10-5Fri - Tues 


Its CONVALESCENT 
AND REST HOMES 


JOAN CRESCENT MANOR 
Retirement Home 
Under New Management 
1045 Joan Crescent 
Rooms Now Available 
Mrs. M. Baker 595-1315 

A Touch of Distinction 


196 ROOM Md BOARD 


RETIREO PENSIONER, 
room and board, everything In¬ 
cluded. 384-6452 


191 


L 


ROOM mi BOARD 
WANTED 


17' TRAVEL TRAILER, 
sleeps 6, fridge, stove, furnace, 
toilet, electric brakes, equalizer 
hitch and bars. Good condition. 
$3500.381-2028. 


NEW 1981 

NOMADS 
HERE NOW 

at 

1980 PRICES 

18*'»' Fully equipped, incl. 

18'V Fully equipped incl. bath¬ 
tub 

21' Fully self-contained and 
winterized for year-round 
use. 


PROPANE 

PARTS —SERVICE 


LEAVING COUNTRY SOLID, 
high compression motorhome 
22' custom made with quality 
i materials. Offers to $6,500. 
. 479-7571. _ 

PROFESSIONALLY BUILT 8' 
canopy, aluminum skin, fully in¬ 
sulated and lined. Interior light, 
4 windows Asking $325. Phone 
evenings 656-7686 or 656-5044 


MOBILE HOME PARK 
POSSIBLY 

CANADA'S FINEST PARK 

Scenic Water 
and Mountain View 
Overlooking 
The Straits ot 
Juande Fuca and 
the Olympic 


WANTED BY WIDOW AS PER 
| manent paying guest, with 
board, suite of large rooms, with 
, view. Oak Bay area preferred. 
Drives own car and active. Send 
details to Victoria Press Box 
| 453. _ 

WANTED: ROOM AND BOARD 
for 1st year UVIc student tor 
September 1st. 384-8466. 

in MOHS TO KBIT 


dooms wurro 


APARTMENTS TO 
RENT UNFURNISHED 




unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 


<ing. swi 
Ilslde-C 


bv welcome. 

>. Aug 1. $750 . 2 BR. 
i. 2nd floor. Heat. Chil- 


v. Aug 
it loptio 


Ibor ,f/s, drapes. 


OPEN 7 DAYS 
AWEEK 

381 2113 Fee $30 





1506 Admirals, 
al features upon comple- 


NO PETS PLEASE 
ntact Resident Managers 
Gary & Wendv Hardisty 

383-4757 

Pacific Valley Mgmt. 



77 Gorge Rd. West 


Pacific Valiev Mgmt. 


david burr 


| BE 384-93351 


FAIRFIELD 


GORDON HEAD 


rente* 38M234 


ONE BEDROOM CONDO, 
adults only, close to Simpsons 
Sears, heated indoor pool, swirl 
pool and sauna, game and hobby 
room, no pets, available August 
15th $325 Phone 384-5382 be¬ 
tween? andllam 


$265 PER MONTH. 2-ROOM, 
separate bathroom, bachelor 
suite. In Fernwood area, 1-block 
from bus, prefer older working, 
non-smoking, non-drinking per¬ 
son. Call between 10am-6pm, 
3810948. 


ROCKLAND 

Brand new 1 bedroom suite, pri¬ 
vate entrance. Teak cabinets, 
carpeted, fridge, stove, washer, 
dryer, electric neat. No children, 
pets, or smokers. August 1st. 
$350.429-8711. 


BRNO NEWSUITE 
1-BR with private entrance in 
older home. (580). Fee 

rente* 38M234 


1 BRCORNER SUITE 
With wrap around balcony! In 
modern bldg! (587). Fee. 

rente* Mi -1234 


NEAR STAOACONA PARK 
2-BR suite in Victorian home 
with hardwood floors and heat 
incl Only$450! (575) 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

AUGUST 1. ONE AND TWO 
bedroom suites, in a Quiet and 
lovely surrounding locations. 
Quiet single ladv. No pets. 
382-5240 


BOB'S 


MOBILE HOMES LTD 
25 Crease 386-3623 

Dealer 5689 


WANTED 

TRUCKS & VANS 
Also will take 
consignment vehicles 
GARDEN CITY AUTO 
LEASE CENTRE 
»7 9Ui _ 7»7»Pouglas 

INSTANT CASH 
f OR YOUR CAR 
Any mefce or model 

METRO HONDA 

mni 


V 

V HC 


l ASH f OK I LI AN I 

t 4 * motors 1 r 




TRIANGLE 
HOMES LTD 

INDOOR 
SHOWROOM 
OPEN 7 DAYS 

Weekdays!a.m 9pm 
Mf.,tam 5pm 
Sun , Noon-5 p m 
CARWASH OPE N 24 HRS 
Franchised dealer tor C Hat Ion. 
Corsaw. Amtorret (antunon, 
Falkland Southwind Jamdorat 
and Diplomat 

in Sidney on die Pat Bay Mery . 
across from Sendown Raceway 
456 1177 656 7751 

Or alar IBMB 

Mobile RV Doctor 

All Ry Repair v 4*7U« 


1965 CHEV *4 TON. 62,000 
miles, c/w 1971 10' Freeway 
camper, self contained, best 
deal In town at $2SOO. After 
4:30pm, 313-3933 


RAVEN RV'S 
VAN CONVERSIONS 
479-3178 


cs 


SITES AVAILABLE 

Phone642 5486/642 597? 

Thinking of Selling?? 

For full professional service to 
ensure your best market price 
call Buv Right Homes. Our ex 
perienced sales staff and exten¬ 
sive sales promotions has 
rfof 


BRIGHT. CLEAN ROOM TO 
rent, on Wark St Shared bath 
and kitchen facilities. $115. After 
1 6 382-4995. _ 


ROOM. SHARE KITCHEN, 
close downtown. $35 week Quiet 
working person. Evenings, 
381-0065. 


V* TON PICKUP TRAILER 
hitch, mirrors, trailer lacks and 
balls, etc Phone after 4:30pm. 
456-3655 


1975 SKYLARK 16W. 3 WAY 
fridge, toilet, turnace. awning 
Excellent condition, sleeps 6. 


ed In most of our listings selling 
in 2-4 weeks! Ask about our 
trade-in program or our guar an 
teed sales plan 1 Call for a tree 
appraisal Go with the company 
with the proven sales record! 

"THE PROFESSIONALS ' 

BUY RIGHT HOMES LTD 
4767154_383-7912 


SLEEPING ROOM WITH 
fridge available now, jJQ7 per 


result month. Please call 3 


BACHELOR SUITE. $192. W/W. 
fridge, stove, drapes, parking. 
Utilities Included except hydro. 
Laundry facilities. 592-/677 after 


WATERFRONT. 1 BEDROOM 
suite, wxw. fridge, range. $400. 
hydro not Included. Available 
September 2nd. 595-5886 after 
5pm. 


OLD ENGLISH STYLE 
2-BR suite with private court 
yard! Only $405! (588) 

RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


194 ROOMS WRITTEN 


WANTEO CHEAPER ROOM 
to rent, 656-3490 


ESOUIMALTBEAUTY 
Laroe 1-BR in new bite 1 Carpets 
and large balcony (589) 
RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 

FAIRFIELO CHARACTER 
bachelor Responsible working 

- - * * * — 8220 


20' STH WHEEL TANDEM 1 
* with Rv \ 


: over vacuum brakes, 
lellpete. $3480 4746279 


FREE 


1977 PROWLER. 2$'. COM 
pletely self-contained, with 
extras, ready to go $5500 
387 7147 or 384-4872 _ 

15 tRAVEL TRAILER 
U mmpi $, icebox. propane stove 
and oven, alartrtc brakes, good 
condition %\m 30-9873 

FOROr FIBRE GLAM TRUCK 
c enopy slldino olass up win 
tew^Jn pood condition $506 

MOTOR 

iksm 


LISTING & APPRAISAL 

H&R MOBILE 
HOMES 

who MM you, 

F«1. efficient, courteous 
service. 

47A41H 

Two 12'x56' 



commodetions for outef. single 
working parsons or students 

asrBgttrcr* -- 


343 VIMCOC STREET. I I 


at 


apartmemtsto 

RENT F 


room and tennis courts. *ln SkF 
nevarea! (567) Fea. 

rente* Mi -1234 


HARTNELL HOUSE 
1204 Yates St. 

Fully equipped modern kitchen 
unit bv week, day (10 min.). 
Close to downtown. Linen, 
dishes. C.T.V., parking. 3834)742, 
386-2812. 


Immaculate one bedroom suite 
in prime quiet location 2 blocks 
from downtown. New furnish 
Inos and Interior decor. Weekly 
rates 384-1776 or 388-7324 


DOWNTOWN 

Laroe 1-BR avail now! Pkrg., 4 
appfs. and util. incl. (566). 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


292 FURNITURE 
TO RENT 


CAMOSUN 

FURNITURE 

RENTAL 


3 Room oroups. bachelor suite). 
Individual pieces, hlde-e-beds. 
rollawevs. menth to month. 


c 


2M DUfliXES 
TO RENT 


FOR RENT, BRAND 
new home 3 bedrooms, 1 '/a 
bathrooms. Close to town 
and all amenities. One 
year lease, no pets. From 
$600. per month. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd. 

386-6301. Eve. 656-1455 


QUIET, MODERN. 2 BED- 
room, finished basement. W/W 
throughout, fireplace, beautiful 
sea view, sun deck, laundromat, 
dishwasher, cable TV. covered 
parking View Roval, available 
Aug. 15. References required 
Prefer quiet career couple. No 
children or pets. $500 . 479-0645 
after $ p.m. for interview and 
viewing. 


3 BEDROOM SIDE-BY SIDE 
on quiet culdesac In Colwood, 
wall-to-wall carpet, fireplace, 
two appliances, drapes Included 
Laroe backyard with storage 
shed. Available August 15. One- 
veer lease and references re¬ 
quired. No singles. $475. Call 
after 5. 592-0521. ' 


erences 1 
. $475. C 

ATI9N 


CENTRAL LOCATION 
For this 2-BR, bsmt. home In 
Gordon Head! Hardwood floors 
and yard! $475! (400) Fee 

renfe* 30-1234 


833 Yates 


383-3655 


203 APARTMENTS 
WANTEO 


RESPONSIBLE COUPLE, MIO 
20's, seek 1 or 2 bedroom apart¬ 
ment in older block or character 
house. No pets, no children. Ap¬ 
proximately $350. August or Sep¬ 
tember 1st. Phone before 11am, 
595-5616 


LAKEHILL 

3-bdrm around level — $485 per 
month. 3-bdrm lower level — 
$445 per month. Both available 
Aug. 1. Jerry Downer. 386-3124, 
Saaspray Properties Ltd. 


3 BR. Duplex. No Fridge or Stove 
$396.00per month. No Pets Pav 
own utilities. Avail. Aug. 1st. 1 
yr. Lease 

David Burr Ltd. 384-9335 


pets or children requires bright 
spacious 1 bedroom suite in 
character home, tor September 
1. Good references supplied. 
5958838 


COLWOODAREA 
Has baautiful 3-BR home on 
landscaped lot! (556). Fee 

rente* 38M234 


QUIET FEMALE CHURCH- 
worker requires a 1 bedroom 
apaprtment in the Fairfield 
area, will pav up to $230. Please 
:uth Ounoar at 477-8613 or 


saws' 


NEEDED FOR AUGUST 1 BY 
quiet family, 2 or 3 bedroom 
apartment Rent $250. With be I 
conv and appliances. Preferably 
semi-furnlshed t - **-" 

595-5971 


d but not essential. 


PHYSICIAN REQUIRES IM- 
medlatelv, 1 or 2-bedroom 
apartment. Maximum $400. Pre¬ 
ferably older house. Oak Bay- 
Jubilee-Rockland area. 
652-3278. 


PROFESSIONAL HOME! 
1-BR brand new waterfront with 
den on large secluded lot with 
private sundeck! Sauna and hot 
tub! (586) 


RENTEX 381-1234 


FEE 


NEWLY RENOVATED 
2-BR with garden and ocean 
view! Only $425! (581) Fee. 

rente* 331-1234 


GRACIOUS COLWOOD SIDE 
bv side duplex, fireplace, 3 bed 
rooms, dining room, 2 children 
welcome. No pets. One vear 
lease. $550 month. 652-3249 after 
5pm. 


REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY 2 
bedroom, $250-$350, for em¬ 
ployed brother, sister with small 
well-behaved dog. 59S-1962 after 
5pm. 


FEMALE UNIVERSITY PRO- 
fessor requires sunny apartment 
in James Bav or Fairfield. Davs 
477-6911 local 4245; evenings 
381-0336. 


COLWOOD; Va DUPLEX, Au¬ 
gust 1st, 3 bedrooms, l'/j bath¬ 
rooms, 2 veers old, temporary 
rental until duplex is sold 

382- 386) or 47^2837 

UPPER DUPLEX, 3 BED 
rooms, reading room. Fern- 
wood. No pets please $475 

383- 2125 


219 


CAREER LADY, NON 
smoker, seeks bright 1 bedroom 
character suite, max. $230. Ref 
erences. 387-5041. After 5pm, 
386-8349 


HOUSES TO RENT 
UNFURNISHED 


RESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN. I 
ape 30, requires lodging, prefer 
ably to sublet small apartment 
for August. Arriving Victoria 
August 4. 652-1249 

QUIET RESPONSIBLE WORK- 
ing male needs one bedroom 
irtment by September 1st. 
to $j 00 month. Refer 
1365 after 5pm 

WORKING GIRL DESIRES 1 
bedroonr suite or apartment in 
Oak Smc/ Fairfield ar< 
592-“*^^ 

NON SMOKING THIRD YEAR 
university student seeks a two 
bedroom apartment to share 
with same. 592-0022 


GIB 


B 


ROWN 

ROS c*n 

l ANSHARD 


YOUNG, WORKING COUPLE 
would like 2 bedroom apartment 
in quiet building. Please call 
595-4498 after 5pm 


1 BEDROOM OR BACHELOR 
suite for quiet responsible work- 
ing man, $250 maximum. 
384-2710. 


MOTHER WITH 15 MONTH 
old baby looking for cheap rea¬ 
sonable apartment, 2 -bedroom, 
$260. 477-5230 


WANTED: APARTMENT OR 
character suite to rent, quiet 
working male, nonsmoker, up to 
$300 per month. 598-9388. 


IN JAMES BAY. MOTHE R AND 
two girls, excellent references, 
up to $350. 386-9659 


VERY QUIET FEMALE 
wants small bachelor or suite 
387-3161, local 29between 8-4:30 


204 SNARED 

ACCOMMODATIONS 


P*op4« H«p<n« People 

$575.00 # 303 - 229 Ontario St., 3 
bedroom town house, 2 bath 
rooms, large family room, 
s/1, w/w, storage space, 
close to downtown. Children 
welcome, sorry no pels. 
Available August 1. 

$500 1031 Costln Ave., 3 bed 
room house, w/w, hwf, s/1, 
dishwasher, owner occupies 
basement and will share 
cost ot heating and garden 
upkeep with tenant, 1 child 
welcome, no pets. 


2 bedroom home with ideal 
location, s/r, FP, drive in 
garage. Lovely garden 
Sorry, no small children or 
pets. Available Immedi¬ 
ately. 

$700 868 Walfred Road, 3-bed 
room home. Custom de¬ 
signed to suit the natural 
park-llke setting. Available 
August 15.1-vear lease with 
option. 

$900. Bear Hill Road, executive 
country home. Quiet, se¬ 
cluded area surrounded bv 
trees. Chalet type, hand 
tooled interior. 3 lovely bed¬ 
rooms, clear well water, ap¬ 
pliances. oil heat, fire¬ 
places. Available August 15. 
Must have references 

For further Information call 
Brown Bros. Agencies Ltd. 

385-8771 (anytime) 


210 HOUSES TO RENT 
UNFURNISHED 


C-7 


RENT&0WN 

A MOBILE HOME. 

Under $400 with pad. 2 or 3 bed- 


locations. H&R Mobile Homes, 
478-8354, Dealer 6463-A. 


TOWNHOUSES! 

2-BR townhouse with stone fire¬ 
place and private patio. Only 
$425. (563). Fee 

rente* 38M234 


SEPTEMBER 1 

3-BR home In Saanich with large 
vard and hardwood floors! Only 
$500. (519). Fee. 

renfe* 381-1234 


SPECTACULAR HOME! 

4 BR bsmt home with rec room 
and wet bar! Double orge and 
In-law suite! Kids and pets both 
welcome and the rent only $725! 
(592). 

RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


AVAILABLE AUGUST 1ST, 
new easy care house on Saanich 
Peninsula. Includes: new appli¬ 
ances, air-tight stove, therma 
panes, fireplace, seavlew, 
extras. Compare value. $695 
monthly. Particulars 652-3802 


COLWOOD AREA, OFF Wl 
Shari Rd. 3-bedroom, 1 year old 
house, dishwasher, family room 
off kitchen, heatilator and ther 
mopane, fenced yard Available 
September 1st, references re 
qulred $600 per month. 478-2767, 


PRIVATE HOME IN CHOICE 
location, beautiful garden 
3 bedrooms, seo.arate dining 
room up; 2-bedrooms, large fire 
place living room. In-law suite 
down. References. $700 
477 5928 


SIDNEY 

Brand new 2-BR home on acre¬ 
age with 2 baths. (568). Fee. 

renfe* mi-1234 


CENTRAL SAANICH, 4-BED- 
room executive home, acreage, 
appliances and drapes Included 
Children welcome. References 
required. Possession August 16 
$750 per month. 652-5804 


OPEN HOUSE JULY 24TH, 
4-8pm. 1020 Belmont, spotless ? 
bedroom house on large corner 
lot, garage, privacy, area ot 
lovely homes. $535 monthly. Ask 
for Mr Wiens, 383-6447 


METCHOSIN AREA 
3-BR family home on fully land 
scaped grounds with garden and 
full bsmt! (539) 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


REFERENCESAMUST 
In order to rent this 2-BR home in 
View Roval that accepts kids and 
pets. (565). 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


3 BEDROOMS, LIVING. DIN 
ing room, fireplace, kitchen with 
eating area, sundeck, no base¬ 
ment, Cook-Flnlavson, quiet 
nonsmokers. $425. 386-2666. 


ESQUIMALT AREA,ATTRAC 
five 4-bedroom home, fireplace, 
wall-to-wall, close to schools, 
available August 1. One familv 
only $430. 383-7836 


2 BEDROOM ON " 7 ACRE LOT 
in Gordon Head. Available im 
mediately- $595. 477-5285 or 
477-8512 


GORGE WATERFRONT, NO— 
step home. ?-bedrooms, fire¬ 
place, large vard, suitable cou 
Pie With 1 child, $550. 385-0177 


CENTRAL SAANICH. SPA 
cious 3-bedroom. Carport, fire¬ 
place. large lot. August 1 occu 
pancy. $540. 388-6876 


? BEDROOM HOUSE. AVAIL 
able August 1,.references re 
qulred. Woolco Area $325 not 
including utilities 382 1780 


ATTRACTIVE 1 BEDROOM 
cottage, part furnished, Swan 
Lake, $450 monthly From Au 
OUSt 1st 477-7346 


MILL BAY SMALL HOUSE 
for rent, $300 to retired couple 
No pets. 474-2447 after 6. 


rooms, 1 v» baths Fireplace! 
Basement $550 478 5319. _ 

I COLDSTREAM AREA, 4 BED 

! room house, quiet area, $475 per 
I month 478-9906 _ 

'SMALL HOUSE, ELK LAKE 
area, August 15 available. $325 
I 652-4654 _ 

2 OR 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, VIC 
West. Available now. $326 per 
I month. 477-8956 _ 

I LARGE 3 BEDROOM. 2-3 
quiet adults, no pets. 477-1931 


211 


HOUSES TO RENT 
FURNISHED 


SINGLE MOTHER, DAUGH- 
ters 1 and 4. seeks female to 
share home. Large pleasant pri¬ 
vate room. Near Hillside Shop¬ 
ping Centre. Non smoker please. 


48^ 


MOTHER WITH 3 YEAR OLD 

S irl looking to share accommo¬ 
at ion. Quiet and responsible. 
Would prefer to share house with 
yard 381-5589 


ROOM FOR RENT. CLEAN, 
quiet home. Non-smoking, vege¬ 
tarian, meditator (TM) . For Au- 
gust or September. 592-4738. 


AFFABLE PERSON TO 
share Fairfield character suite. 
$166. Evenings 384-7902. 


REHTAL AGENCIES 


PLEASE CALL, MANY FINE 
TENANTS WAITING TO RENT 
WE ARE COMPUTERIZED. 
CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE 
AD! 

RENTEX 

710 MARKET ST. 

381-7368 


unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS 
Langford. Aug 22. $725. 4 BR, 
w/w, f/s, w/d. dishwasher, 2 
F P's, Vj acre, back onto park 
Quadra. Oct 1 $750. 2 BR. 2Vj 
baths. 2 kitchens, 2 BR. down, 
f/s, w/d. dishwasher, children 
welcome 

Gordon Head Aug 1 $575. 3 BR. 
1300 sq. ft w/w. Util. pd. Chil 
dren welcome. 

Mon Frl 9-9 
Sat Sun 10-5 
381-2113-Fee $30 


OAK BAY BEACH HOUSE 
2-BR, fully furnished bunoalow 
on waterfront with back patio 
and lovely garden! Only $400 
I (596) Fee 

renfe* mi-1234 

LARGE 4 BEDROOM HOME, 
central location, fenced vard 
and sundeck. Mostly furnished. 
$650 month. Available August 15. 
No pets. 382-6251. _ 

Ithree beorooaas, rec 

room, washer, drver, stove, 
! fridge, living room furniture, 
drapes, rugs, close to Gorge 
Road. 1 year lease 652 9643 


212 


BRAND NEW FAMILY 
home, 3 bedrooms l'/j 
bathrooms, immediate 
possession. One vear 
lease, no pets. Closd* to 
town, school and all 
amenities. *625.00 per 
month. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd. 386-630) Evenings 
656-1455. 


HOUSES WANTED 
TO RENT 


^RSPRRV 


I 2 YOUNG BUSINESSWOMEN 
looking tor 2 bedroom duplex. 
■ cottage or small home for occu 
; panev September 1st. $400 per 
month or less. Preferably Fair 
field, James Bav or Esquimau 
area. Pleasecall 386-1070local 21 
before 5pm., 479-2368 aftet* 5: pm. 
thank you 

WRITER AND HUSBAND 
working in Victoria desire un 
furnished, secluded house or 
cabin within 30 minutes of city 
Normal comfort standards not 
imperative. Will rent several 
months or longer. Business 
hours, 385-6815. 



unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 


FROFfRTlfS LTD / REALTOR 

$700 per mth — 4 bdrm. 3 bath, 
flraplkce, finished bsmt with 
bar. Located In the Cook St. and 
lattersal area. No appliances 
Avail, immed. To view call K. 
Giles, 386-3124 



Save yourself time and money 
List your vacancies with us and 
eliminate endless calls We do 
vour advertising for free. Open 7 
davse week 

381-2113 


1BMN1S 

WE HAVE YOUR LANOLORO! 

SYSTEM 


3 bedroom updated character 
home located lust 2 blocks from 
the beach on a quiet street. Sepe 
rate formal dining room, granite 
; fireplace in living room, private 
backyard, lease required for 1 
year Preference will be oiven to 
couples without children or pets 
$700 a month. Phone S92-S2M tor 




—COMPUTE*!^_ 

—QUALIFIED STAFF 

—GUARANI- 

‘ SAT 

RENTEX 

710MARKET ST 

3(1-1234 


FOR RENT BRAND 
new home 3 bedroom. IVj 
bathrooms. Close to town 
and all amenities. One 
vear lease, no pets. From 
*575 per month 
Patterson Construction 
Ltd.. 

386-6301 Eve. 656-1455 

SOTS J» MR U VIC LOOMS lorn 
ilv hom e In ouiet residential 


ms. family run. 
idoe. 1 baths 


lly home in ouU 
area incl )4bdr 
FT, m«a,friL.._ 

Doap Ceve »ncf appf'antes 


3RO YEAR UVIC STUOENT 
seeks t or 2 bedroom house or 
duplex for school vear com 
menclng September. 1 male oc 
cupant only. Phone Kristen 
381-0498._ 

3 SELF EMPLOYED CARPEN 
ters looking for 3-4 bedroom 
home with working space, any 
where but Esquimalf Will ex 
change repairs for rent Phone 
384-181? mornings 

CAN YOU HELP? RESPON 
sible working couple, to be mar 
rted In August, need apartment 
or small house No pets Will 

supply 

592-779 


2 RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
students urgently need a 2 bed 
room home or townhouse tor 
S eptember 1st. approximately 
$350. References provided 
Ptoaseceil 383^117 


TEACHER. WIFE AND ONE l& 
month old son require small 
house to rent in Victoria area 
Commencing September 1, 1980 
Call cot led. 73*8476. between 2 
and 7 put 


WANTEO TO RENT 2 BED 
room place where child s net is 
welcome For September 1st 
Good references available 
478-5100 


I VW 14 AJW , U ON0044$ AUGUST I AMD 


^ Matty r. 

si?M0 Excellent' conditio*. 

rte;— ut **- r 


t ON $ l MOL A CtNl IAIN 

«wtd •he'ebdfci. utilities* 

ed 



RESPONSIBLE COUPLE 
with two children looking tor 2 3 
bedroom house, with oarage or 


RESPONSIBLE COUPLE fX 
pert mo first Child m December 
meet small house or part house, 
beginning Sept Oct Noy 
386-5117 after 

RESPONSIBLE WORN ING 
stators reputre 2 M 
muhed hoosr 
let Vi ( West I 

MflB 

f>l«_M* T to tejfCH 


V 






















































































































































































































































































































































































































i 




C-8 

212 HOUSES wuns 
TO RENT 


al couple require 2 bedroom 
house, preferably Fairfield. *450 
maximum. No kids or pefs. 
385-3736 after 4:30pm 

WANTED 3-BEDROOM HOUSE 
or duplex, bv August 1st, have 
good references, $500—$700 
monthly. Please phone Gord be 
♦ween 6 -7pm, 383-4259 

REVEREND AND FAMILY 
need house, August 1- September 
1. F (replace, 2-5 bedrooms, rood 
references. Rent or lease. Rev¬ 
erend Johnson, 386-8900 

YOUNG COUPLE GETTING 
married require 1 or 2 bedroom 
house or 1 bedroom apartment 
for end of July. 385-4021 ask for 
Derek.- 

MARRIED COUPLE EXPECT- 
ing first child September desper 
atclv need house or suite. Excel¬ 
lent references. To $375. 

382- 3473._ 

BEFORE SEPTEMBER 1ST, 
for young Laotian refuoee fam¬ 
ily who have proven to be first 
class tenants. Please phone 
383 2714 

MEDICAL DOCTOR 
Requires small home Immedi¬ 
ately, preferably in University 
area. 595-7588 or 477-0672 

NEEDED DESPERATELY BY 
quiet family, one child, for Au¬ 
gust 1st, 2-3 bedroom house, rea- 
sonablc rent, 595-5971 

BY END OF AUGUST. NICE 2-3 
bedroom home for working cou¬ 
ple with 13 year old boy (takes 
good care of yard), 386-7960. 

WORKING COUPLE WITH 
quiet dog urgently require house 
or duplex, $400. 385-3859 
8 am 4pm 

FAMILY OF FOUR NEED 3- 
bedroom house, August 15 or 
September 1. References. 

383- 8093, after 5._ 

WORKING COUPLE NEEDS 

- i.Od. ‘ ' 


QUIET FAMILY NEEDS 3 
bedroom house. Call John 
598 2692 after 3:30 


215 


HILLS, WAREHOUSES 
STORES mi OFFICES 
TO RENT 


KEATING RETAIL 


central peninsula location on 
high traffic road in commercial 
zoning close to several major 
business! 30,000sq. ft. retail area 
over 70% leased and room for 
expansion of 6,000 sq. ft from 
1.000 sq. ft. to 3,100 sq. ft. Avail 
able starting at $560 per month. 

SAANICHTON 

RETAIL 

Retailers, professional and ser¬ 
vices now operating in this fast 
growth area. Up to 2,000 sq. ft. 
and some air conditioned space 
with good frontage and exposure 
to street and parking. Cl zoning 
allows most business uses. 

1010SO FT.$550 
1500 SQ. FT. $800 
F RANK CSINOS 652-3202 

388-6275 Pager 2826 

SEABOARD PROPERTIES 
LTD, 652 1141 


GIB 


B 


ROWN 

ROS on 

lANSMARb 


mpi 


215 MALLS, WAREHOUSES 260 HISIHES5 
STORES mt OFFICES 
TO RENT 


PENN BRIDGE PROFES- 
slonal Building, Royal Oak Shop¬ 
ping Centre, 4475 Vlewmont Ave. 
Only 4 office areas left. 510 sq.ft, 
to 930 sq.ft. For information 
please call 38*6308 Monday Frl 
day between 8:30am-4:30pm. 


CHOICE OF DOWNTOWN OF 
F ICE SPACES to rent or lease at 
reasonable rates. ' 
erty Mana< 

Holmes Ltc 
St- 384 8124. 


r nvfcj III I Clll IKOSC 

»ble rates. Apply Prop- 
anagment, Pemberton, 
i Ltd., 1000 Government 


OAK BAY RETAIL 
Approx. 870 sq. ft. available on 
Oak Bay Ave. Rent $450.00 per 
month. 

Call Michael Burr 384-9335 
David Burr Ltd. 


FOR LEASE 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
671 sq. ft. 

Phone 386-2441 


OFFICE 
CECELIA ST. 

390 sq. ft, good location, good 
arklng, reasonable. 384-1713 or 


BEST 


2.000 SQ. FT. 

Retail space In plaza, 841 Gold- 
stream Ave, available Immedi¬ 
ately, $1200 per month. Contact 
H. Stern, 478-9575. 


840 SQ. FT. 

Town and Country Shopping 
Centre. Contact, B. LAWLESS 
382 7276 or 477-0911. Town and 
Country Realty,~ 


OVER 600 SQUARE FEET OF 
well appointed office space for 
rent. August 1. Excellent loca¬ 
tion. Reasonable rent. 382-5135 
between 10 - 2 . 


PRIME STREET LEVEL OF- 
fice space on Beacon Ave., Sid¬ 
ney. 1000 sq.ft. Available for 3 
year lease at *8.50 per sq.ft. Sld- 
ney Realty Ltd 656-3928 


OFFICE, WAREHOUSE 
1350 and 6350 sq. ft. 831 Devon¬ 
shire Commerce Park, 381-6233 
EY CONSTRUCTION LTD. 


650' OR 950' OFFICE ON THOR 
oughfare near Woodward's. 
Reasonable rent. Owner 
383-8774 


LOUD ROCK BAND Re¬ 
quires rehearsal space. Resoon 
slble people Involved. 592-9381 


DEEP COVE MARINA HAS 
new office space for rent. 
656-2810 


OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 
central location, $250per month, 
386-8435 9 am-5 pm 


r- >inv.c ioo/ 

OenvtUtlon, 

Jm. 

^l00iHjo^SM84 i 8124 

RARE OPPORTUNITY 

Well established business locat¬ 
ed downtown and In major mall 
Excellent history with active 
tourist trade. Good profit with 
only part time Involvement or 
excellent return If more ener 
getlealv Inclined. Cash buyers 
preferred in range of $ 200,000 
BRIANSPARK 


SERVICE STATION 
Excellent opportunity to acquire 
your own established PETRO 
CAN service station In Victoria 
suburb Prime commercial land, 
excellent building (4 bays), all 
equipment and business offered 
at $185,000 with oood assumable 
$113,000 financing. Alternative¬ 
ly, owner will consider selling 
partnership In business only to a 
licensed MECHANIC. For fur 
♦her Information please call: 

BILLREMPLE 

477-1841 658 5795 

BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD 


MOTEL 
17 UNITS 

Recently redecorated and offers 
a good mix of kitchenettes and 
sleepers together with a 3-bdr 
owner's suite. Owner Is anxious 
to sell and Is prepared to assist In 
financing or look at trades. 
$270,000. 

LARRY HADDON 

385-1431 592-7735 

British American Realty Ltd. 


AIR CONDITIONED OFFICE 
space to rent at Gorge Shopping 
Centre Phone 3885812 


STORAGE AREA FOR RENT 
In the Gorge area. 3885812. 


ESTABLISHED 
RESTAURANT 
A well established, attractive 
restaurant and lounge centrally 
located In Victoria. Price Is 
below the replacement costs of 
furniture, equipment and lease 
hold Improvements. This Is a 
wonderful opportunity to have 
your own profitable restaurant 
Priced at $85,000. For details 
call: (MLS46784) 
BILLMcAULEY 721-5457 

MONTREAL TRUST 386 2111 


233 


MORTMtf LOANS 
AND INSURANCE 


RESTAURANT, with little com 
petition and fully licensed. One 
of Victoria's finest and newest 
restaurants, well staffed and 
showing profits Excellent local 
and tourist trade. Centrally lo¬ 
cated with two restaurant areas, 
i and bar Capacity 150 seats. Ex 
I cellent 7-year lease with de 
I creasing rent In 1981. For further 
I details write ComCor, Suite 316, 
! 560 Johnson St. or telephone 
! 383-4123 and ask for Pat or Bill 


1st AND 2nd 
MORTGAGE LOANS 
SOOKE—GULF ISLANDS 
SHAWNIGAN— OUNCAN 
UP ISLAND-MAINLAND 


We specialize In Land and 
Land Development Mortgages 
anywhereinB.C. 


SANDBLASTING 

OPERATION 

Deslreable Metchosin location 
for portable business Family 
; accom. available on approx 3\j 
i acres of subdivided property. 

; Further details and financial 
statements wifh: 

477-0141 LINDA K 479-8565 
The PERMANENT 


Helping People 

1800 Blanshard St . three small 
offices now available from 
250 to 380 sq. ft at $7 50 per 
sq. ft. including heat and 
hydro. 

For further information call: 

Brown Bros Agencies Ltd. 

385-8771 (anytime) 

FOR LEASE 

MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING — 
Doctors' Offices — from 470 to 
1100 square feet Ample Parking 
— well located — 1105 Pandora 
(at Cook) 

For further information call Mr. 
Jack Mitchell at: 383-4168. 


Existing Mortgages Bought 


DOUGLAS HAWKES I 
990 BLANSHARD ST. 384 7128 


$ $ $ $ 

NEEDMONEY 

We have funds to build, buy, 
remodel or refinance Interim 
bridge construction funds — all 
areas — fast, courteous — confi¬ 
dential service Call now: 

Don MacGilllvrav 658-5135 
GLENGARRY REALTY 
479 7138 


SELLING? BUYING? 
Short term 2nd mortgage loans. 
Preferred rates to Realty CM 
ents 

TED BOWDEN 386-7577 

ALL St AR REALTY 386-1255 


BUSINESS, STOCK, 
FIXTURES 

Well established second hand 
furniture business. Good Invest¬ 
ment, strategically located. 
Thriving business. $55,000. MLS. 

LARRY LINEHAM 
595-0134 384 8075 Pgr . 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
595-2121 


PRIVATE FUNDS * 

For 1st or 2nd mortgage, quick 
action, sensible rates, long 
amortizations. 479-4423 anv 
time. 


EXCLUSIVE 
FULL PRICE $69,500 

For a retired person, with me¬ 
chanical ability, and wishes to 
supplement his retirement In¬ 
come For enquiries and office 
appointment call: (ML 47487) 
WM. HOLLICK 

592-6470 386-7521 

BOORMAN INVESTMENT CO 
LTD., 612 FORT ST 


M0RGUARD PROPERTIES 
LIMITED 

b?O-06O Oouqlas 1604 1 383-4168 i 

OFFICE SPACE 
PRIME INDUSTRIAL 
AREA 

Entire floor (approx 1,760 ft), 
well lit partitioned bright of 
fices. Complete with storage 
area, large security valt. etc. 
Good entrance and reception 
area Rate of $5.80 per ft. in¬ 
cludes everything, hydro, taxes, 
etc. Can lease. Good access and 
parking, close to downtown. Call 
386 3414 local 55for appointment, 
OK Trucking Co. 

Quadra/Cloverdale 

Centrally-located, 1300 sq.ft, of 
Ground Floor Commercial 
space, featuring front and rear 
entrances and parking at the 
door. Suitable for professional 
offices or office/warehouse op¬ 
eration. Owner will consider 
short-term as well as long-term 
tenancies with lease rate and 
cost of alterations negotiable. 
Phone 388-4422 

Creighton Property Mgmt, Ltd. 

5300 SQUARE FEET 

High ceilino, dry, with loading 
docks. Ideal for heavy storage. 
Available August 15th. 

CEDRICSTEELE 
8 . ASSOCIATES LTD 
CEDRICSTEELE 388 6258 


P RE ST I AGE OFFICE AP 
proximately 1164 sq. ft Beauti 
ful view of waterfront, heat, 
hydro, cablevisic-^beckground 
music Included. Swimming pool 
facilities and games room, un 
derground parking, partially 
furnished, $4.50 per sq. ft. Large 
storage rooms available. 
383 1731 

COMPARE US 
FOR LOW RATES 
Air conditioned, self-contained 
offices, between Mayfair and 
Town 8 , Country centres. Drive 
bv 3318 and 3347 Oak St. For 
further information call: AS 
Bams Development Ltd. 384-5016 
anytime. Courtesy to agents 

CLEAN, BRIGHT, FIRST 
class space available downtown 
Victoria. 1242 sq ft newly reno¬ 
vated office space within a few 
doors from parkade. also ap 

K oximately 1000 sq ft in a new 
tiding available immediately 
» or further information call 
385-0991 

1744 RICHMOND 
1475 sq. ft. very attractive off ice 
space suitable for medical-den 
tal practice, minimum 3 year 
lease, reasonable rate Phone 
Goortwyn Management Ltd for 
details 388-7923. 

CITY CORE 
RETAIL 

Approx 7,000 square feet right 
downtown — less than a block oft 
Douglas St - would split in half 
for prime retail concern 
Michael Burr 3044335 

David Burr Ltd 

TORRENT 

C ornrner c i#lproperty with small 
office - 1074 GOLDSTREAM 
ave - H8- wide - loo deep 
Monthly rent $750 Call Harold 
Gardner. GARDNER REALTY 
LTD 185 7744 

NtW BUILDING CORNER Of 
► eating C ross Road and Kirkpa 
trick Cres included air condi 
•lonmg carpet drapes, utilities 
U-iaplionr answering service 
tdf further information 
< aM 657 91*6 


UP TO$200,000. TO PURCHASE 
existing well seasoned mort 
gages. Victoria Press Box 478 

240 BUSINESS 
^OPPORTUNITIES 

Retail Store 
Franchise 
Opportunity 

with 

KITS CAMERAS 

Kits Cameras Is a 20 year old 
CANADIAN Company now 
operating 75 Stores in B.C . 
Alberta, The Yukon, California 
and Arizona. 

The Company offers one of the 
most comprehensive start-up as 
well as continuing assistance 
programs Including 
l Aggressive merchandis¬ 
ing program 

2. Advertising and Market¬ 
ing services 

3. Training Program 

4 Bookkeeping and Manage¬ 
ment service 

5. Systems and Operational 
procedures 

Excellent income and profit 
potential for the right 
person. 

Call us now, we have prime 
mall locations available 
in B.C , Alberta and Sas- 
katechwan. Approx. 
SJ5.000 to $40,000 Cash 
investment required. 

KITS CAMERAS 

1601 Yew St., Vancouver 
Cali Collect 
(604 ) 731-8281 


If! 


B.C. MOTEL? 


you have ever thought of own¬ 
ing a motel or resort we haye a 
selection of these propertied In 
all parts of British Columbia. 
Call L. E KIRK, Manager, 
Motels, Resorts Department, 
1 386-2955 or evenings 656 1295. 
CENTURY 21 Mavfalr Realty 
I Ltd. 


MOTEL 

I 75 unit 3 storev total facility 
motel of modern design. Parking 
for approx. 100 cars Complete 
service for vacationers and busi¬ 
ness. PRINCIPALSONLY. 

K.O MOORE 

i P. R. BROWN & SONS LTD. 

385-3435 

RESTAURANT 
FOR SALE 

I Popular center-town restaurant 
i specializing in seafood and sand 
i wlches. Regular local clientel. 
1 Goodcashflow. Financingavail- 
i able Call ED HIGGIN 477-7121 
| or 477-4742 A. E. LEPAGE 
WESTERN LTD 

I RARE OPPORTUNITY IN 
centre town: Unqlue 40-seat res 
I taurant with devoted clientel. 
Present owners retiring after 
most successful career The re 
turns on total Investment of 
$50,000 are far beyond the norm. 
Direct enquiries to Victoria 
Press Box 337. 


BUSINESS 


WEDNESDAY, J ULY 23,1980 

REVENUE ntOKRTT 250 


FOR SALE BY OWNER. TV • 
Stereo Sales & Service business. 
Established customers. 15 vrs. 
same location. Maior franchise 
available. 383-5432. 


PICTURE GALLERIES FULL 
equipment and framing stock— 
call 652-1464 for full details 


....... $38,500. $14,000 down. 

642-5849 after 6 pm. 


241 


BUSINESS OPPOR- 
TUNITOS WANTED 


CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT 
desires active partnership In ex¬ 
isting business enterprise. Vic- 
torla Press Box 506 


244 REVENUE PHOPEHTY 


Rirk Pacific 


BOARDWALK 

& 

PARK PLACE 


Here's vour chance to acquire 
two S/S revenue properties In 
Fairfield near the park. Excel¬ 
lent opportunity tor future In¬ 
vestment while this 5 and 7 plex 
pav for themselves. $89,500 
each. 

Call Mary Allan 595-5141 

Mike Ruddy 656-4089 

or Paoer 792 388-5464 

Park Pacific Inv. Ltd. 383-4124 

SELKIRK 
BY THE GORGE 

Six suite revenue property. Solid 
Investment, si 15,000. 

Call Marv Allan 595-5141 

Mike Ruddy 656-4089 

or Pager 792 388-5464 

Park Pacific Inv. Ltd. 383-4124 


URGENT SALE 
IMMEDIATE 
POSSESSION 

Legal up and down duplex. One 
bdrm. suite up and spacious pos¬ 
sible 3 bdrm. owners suite. 
Priced to sell at $67,900. New 
MLS. 

477-0191 SYLSHUMKA 595-1337 


5 UNITS 

Fairfield, $14,640 GR. INC. 
owner will carry larger first at 
reasonable rate. Priced to sell 
quickly at $119,500. 

Victoria M. Sm'th Realty Inc. 
384-1424 388-S464 Pager 610 


HOUSES FOR SALE 



3647 SHE LBOURNE 477-0141 
LARRY BROOKS—MANAGER 


WHY RENT? 

Let others help pav vour mort ’ 

K oe. Two attractive suites plus i 
sement In-law suite. Jubilee i 
area Otters on $89,900. 595-4063.! 
No agents please. 


SOME EXCELLENT APART- 
ment properties available. Sut > 
stantlal down payments req'd. 
Sorry no phone Information De¬ 
tails bv appointment only 
please. Call Aimer Olson, Royal 
Trust 384-8001. 


APARTMENT BLKS 
AVAILABLE 

Contact Bing Richards 388-7868, 
388-5464 Pgr. 732. 

DUNSMUIR PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


SXSDUPLEX 

Near Town & Country, 2 Br ea 
side, new roof, carpeting, paint, 
etc. 1 side rented at $315, other 
side vacant, should rent at close 
to $400. Only $75,900. 592-0026. 


FOR SALE BY OWNER, 21 
suite apartment In choice resi¬ 
dential area. In excellent condi¬ 
tion. No agents please. Victoria 
Press Box 425 


245 REVENUE 

PROPERTIES WANTED 


SIX 

GOOD 

DEALS 


APARTMENT 

BUILDINGS 

We require 24 to 60 suite build¬ 
ings for our many clients. Imme¬ 
diate action on realistically 
priced buildings. Replies held In 
confidence. 

CEDRICSTEELE 388-6258 
CEDRICSTEELE 6. 
ASSOCIATES LTD. 


1. Nearly new Shopping Centre, 
$1,475,000 with $482,000 down 
— yields over 9% before fin¬ 
ancing. 

2. Superior office space in new 
building downtown, near pro¬ 
posed Convention centre 
Only 980 sq. ft. left at $7.50 
net. 

3. Trade up or down on revenue 
property with charmlno 
South Oak Bay 3-bedroom 
house — sensibly priced at 
$134,000. 

4. 14 suites — Nanaimo all with 
Harbour views $300,000. 

5. 34 Suite apartment site — 
$240,000. 

6 . Bargain tor August — five 
bedroom waterfront house In 
Hawaii, will accommodate 
several families, $125 per 
day, also available during 
winter *200 per dav 

STAN STUART 
Days 592-2407 

Evenings 595-0601 


EASTERN INVESTOR 

Will consider any realistically i 
priced revenue situation up to 
$750,000. Quick decision guar an 
teed. Call in confidence 
GLENN NICHOLLS, F.R.I. 

598 7689 385-9741 I 

HENDE RSONREALTY LTD 


247 COMMERCIAL OR 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES 


Park Pacific 


REVENUE—4SUITES 

Sound building in good rental 
area. (One tenant has lived here 
since 1964), New roof, carpets 
and interior paint. Outside trim 
needs painting. Possibility of 
parking revenue from next door 
building to increase present 
rental Income of $956 per month. 
Owner savs SELL and will look 
at all offers For statement and 
appointment to view suites, call: 

DAVID SCOTT 

385 3435 479 4405 

P R. BROWN 8 . SONS LTD. 

762Fort Street 


OFFICE 

& 

WAREHOUSE 

Two excellent buildings offered. 
Both good investments Owner 
would consider vour trade as 
part payment. 

1 Call Mary Allan 595-5141 

Mike Ruddy 656 4089 

or Pager 792 388 5464 

I Park Pacific Inv. 383-4124 


"9 UNITS" 

TRY YOUll OFFER 
"EXCLUSIVE" 

This "FAIRFIELD HE R I • 
TAGE" located within walking 
distance from downtown in a row 
with other heritage homes This 
conversion grosses approx. $1500 
per month Never a vacancy in 
♦his property. For information 
and viewing phone 

JIMMILLS 

Bus. 384-8124 Res. 388-6752 
Pemberton, Holmes Ltd. 


B.C. MOTELS 


VICTORIA 


80 units 

19 units 

28 units 

33 units 

$1,455,000 

$525,000 

$650,000 

$725,000 

GOLDEN 


32 units 

$ 600,000 

SHUSWAP 


21 units 

24 units 

$300,000 

$489,000 

CRESTON 


24 units 

$385,000 


OFFICE SPACE 

a* 4 gn c 
• tlXutuft 

m, ioT/4 


144 » art V* Parking oa 
iiururtti MM 


100MILE HOUSE 

74 units $380,000 

We have other B.C. listings, 
down payments from $50,000. 
Write or phone for a complete 
list Call MIKE O'DONNELL, 
388-2955 ( 24 Mrs.) — We special- 
ize in Motels, Hotels & Resorts 
CENTURY 71 Mayfair Realty 

FRESH FLOWER If 

NEEDS A NEW 

FLORAL DEW 
OWNER 

Heavy traffic in this de¬ 
partment store location 
assure a continuing sales 
growtti For details call: 

KEN THOMAS 

BLOCK BROS 

REALTY LTD 

MA 222 I _ m-mt 

sowiiNoAun 
i« i*ie e) lane Uetuaaa «> 
#«■* ttmammu center t tueiiant 
potential Fez tut pa tefiee 
58$ 8f7 or VMlAirta Prau In 


SOOKE SALMON CHARTERS 
Includes 3V Chris Craft twin en 
glne boat, boat house, all sup¬ 
plies needed, fishing gear Ideal 
for retired couple. Will remain 
with business balance of 1980 If 
necessary or will trade motor 
home. Phone for more Informa- 
i tlon 642-4838 _ 

1 DELICATESSEN 4 BAKERY 

Fully equipped *49,500 Moderfi 
shopping centre on Saanich Pen¬ 
insula Business Is good, shows 
steady increase in sales. Un¬ 
tapped possibilities. Phone 
652-4623. After 5:30pm. phone 
477 5258 

TRAVEL AGENCY 
$69,000 

I Centrally located, over 'n mil¬ 
lion gross Call: 

RALPH KELLER 385-9741 
! HENDERSON REALTY LTD 

BEAUTY SALON 
For sale or lease, fullvequinped. 
I & station. Located In Port 
McNeill largest shopping 
| Centre Excellent terms. Reply 
victoria Press Box 410 

RESTAURANT 

. Excellent potential for restau- 
1 rant in new Uq Island shopping 
center Leasehold improve¬ 
ments already in place Excel 
> lent leasing terms available 
Reply Victoria Press Box 410 

BECOME MOBILE WITH 
vour own mobile foodstend or 
office Custom mede TT motor 
home conforms to heetttiboerd 
' specifications for vending and 
ment. $6,500 or offers. 


ISRwr 


BICYCLE SALES ANO RE 

slb? -jwb. tffis 

program provided Phont 
KpBoanpm dail, 

LAIIOE fWO MARKt T 
tor tala including HocA and lla- 
lurat. Victoria area FvS price 
I, (p Victoria Piatt 


Investment and tax shel¬ 
ter opportunity bv pur¬ 
chase of new duplex units 
direct from builder. Cash 
flow and management 
guarantees, complete 
CCA package. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd., 386-6301, Evenings 
656-1455 


SIDNEY COMMERCIAL 

Over 19,000 sq. ft. of prime com 
merclal/office in downtown core 
Sidney. Approx. 3000 sq. ft. 
available for new owner Ideal 
medical office building with sup 
porting services in building 
Gross Income In excess of $78,000 
with potential In excess of 
$100,000. Great investment op¬ 
portunity at asking of $645,000. 
PRINCIPALS ONLY. EXCLU- 
[ SIVE with 

K.O. MOORE 

P R BROWN & SONS LTD. 
385-3435 

LOW DOWN 
PAYMENT 
CS1 ZONING 

Good location — 1800 sq. ft. lot 
and bldg Large assumeablc 
MTG at 12% — $66,000 Down 
Vendor will leaseback for 1 year 
FP. $265,000.00 EXCL. 

I MAR J THOMPSON 

477-0141 658-5584 

The PERMANENT 


NEW LISTING 
LANGFORD 
$74,900.00 

An Ideal home for a family on a 
no through street, and backing 
on to a park that includes la¬ 
crosse, box and tennis courts. 4 
Br's plus a hugh family room, LR 
with F.P. W/W throughout over 
H/W. The large lot is fully fenced 
with a run for the dogs. There's 
also a workshop. Call now MLS. 

HARVEY MERRIT 
477-0141 652-9370 

JACK HOWES 

477-0141 721-5100 

FAIRFIELD 
1575 BROOKE 

Immediate doss. 20 vr. young 3 
Br home with 2 Br. in law ste. 
Gorgeous lot—great location. 

MAR J THOMPSON 
477-0141 658-5584 

SEE WHAT YOU 
CAN BUY 
FOR $68,900 

Situated in the Phelps is this 
subdivision clean 4 Br. bungelow 
which Is def Inatelv a must to see. 
If you are searching for a well 
priced home A good sized lot 
with several evergreens In front 
and 3 fruit trees in back provides 
a nice atmosphere. In all there Is 
1622 sq ft. of comfortable living 
area. Call for more information: 

(J. B.) JOT HOME 
477-0141 592-2130 

JOHN BOYLE JR. 
477-0141 598 7878 

THE UPLANDS 
WITH SUPERB 
VIEWS 

A charming home embodying 
2,800 sq. ft. of luxuriously ap¬ 
pointed accommodation in the 
islands most exclusive area. 
Erected in 1940 to exact specifi¬ 
cation it provides a gracious but 
enloyable atmosphere. Breath 
taking views extend over Jaunde 
Fuca straight and Its deep sea 
vessels enroute to and from Vary 
couver. An extremely well 
priced residence at $320,000 
View this exclusive offering 
with: 

477-0141 JOHN BOYLE 598-7878 

QUALITY 
SEAVIEW 
GORDON HEAD!! 

The perfect familv or retirement 
home In an excellent area of 
Gordon Head. 3 Br's, LR with 
FP. Seaviws from the DR. Sun- 
deck and huge country kitchen 
1500 sq. ft. plus on the man, plus a 
10,300 sq ft. lot. Don't wait, see 
this now. Otters on $132,500 
HARVEYMERRITT 
477-0141 652-9370 

JACK HOWES 

477-0141 721-5100 

NEW LISTINGS 

Excellent ? Br. family home. 
Near Bamfieldpark, community 
centre less than 1 block from 
Gorge Immaculate bright and 
cheery home. Room for more 
development in attic and base¬ 
ment. New MLS. Price at $59, 
900. to view. 

DAVE ROBERTS 
477-0141 477-1317 

WALLY MICHAELS 
477-0141 4774884 

The PERMANENT 

[O 

SERSPRRV 

PBOPFRT1FS LTD / RIALTO* 


1911 QUADRA ST 386-3124 

2247OAK BAY AVE. 595-3151 

1677 POPLAR 477-7131 


250 HOUSES FOR SALE 


J? 05 !!! 

Trust 


OPEN HOUSE 
THURS. 2-4 
1424 ST. PATRICK ST. 
Immaculate south Oak Bay da 
plex — both suites have FP and 
separate entrance and utilities 
Upstairs suite has 2 bedrooms 
and downstairs one plus. Excel¬ 
lent financing. MLS $149,000. 
MRS. MARILYN WOODWARD 
477-2722 or 384-8001 

6.5 ACRES 
WATERVIEWS 

SECLUSION-$205,000 
Beautiful view over Saanich 
I nlet to the West from large part¬ 
ly enclosed sundeck. Eleven 
vear old 3 bedroom home with 
vaulted celling In living room. 
Large country kitchen and a nice 
den with FP. Exclusive listing 
with 

GERRY DAVIS, 592-4961. OLE 
KNUDSEN, 479-^764 or 384-8001 

GORDON HEAD 
$116,900 

Two year old, three bedroom 
home wlh familv room off kit¬ 
chen. Wallton built. Double 
flooring, thermo windows, vault¬ 
ed ceilino in living room Assume 
ScfWfi first mtge. at 10%%. due 

OLE KNUDSEN. 479-2764 or 
384-8001 

TOWNHOUSE 

$45,000 

Esquimau location with two bed¬ 
rooms on three levels. Call 
OLE KNUDSEN, 479-2764 or 
384-8001 

THINKING OF SELLING? 

THINK OF GERRYDAVIS 
384-8001 Royal Trust 592-6961 

CENTRAL SAANICH 

$110,000 

Just Listed—almost 2 acres with 
older 2 storev, 6 bedroom, 2 full 
bathroom home on West Saanich 
Rd. 2400 sq. ft. of good living 
accommodation Including living 
room with heatilator fireplace, 
separate dining room, cosv fam¬ 
ily room and large updated kit¬ 
chen. Ideal for hobby farm. Ex¬ 
clusive with 

DORA 81 DEREK WICK 595-2062 
or 384-8001 

NEW LISTING 

2035 Linda Place, Sidney. De¬ 
lightful home with 3 bedrooms on 
the main, 2 bdrmv andrec room 
down. This home Is situated on a 
private lot with fruit trees and It 
has a beautiful blq sundeck fac¬ 
ing south. The kitchen has lots of 
cupboards, built In stove and 
big, big pantry. Drive down this 
quiet cul de sac and see this 
home, notice the shake roof, the 
combination of siding and brick 
and the overall effect, then call 
me to see. New MLS $85,500. 


FAIRFIELD HOME SHARED 
with reliable long-term tenants 
who each have a furnished 
housekeeping suite with kitchen¬ 
ette. Caretakers or owners, 1 
bedroom apartment has private 
southern sunporch looking onto 
back garden. Monthly revenue Is 
$945 but realistically could be 
$1145. Home has new furnace, 
new hot water heater, all copper 
plumbing, tip top wiring and 
fresh decoration inside and out. 
Offers on $115,000. 592-7504. No 
agents. 


ZONED COMMERCIAL 

Close to Quadra on Hillside, 
zoned for neighborhood retail 
business and office. Lot 33x 145 ft 
Large older house to work on. 
Start vour business here. 

ARNOLD MARR 
388-4434 477^233 

WESTMONT REALTY 
(1980) LTD. 


LONG TERM GROUND LEASE 
available on over an acre of 
commercial property In excel 
lent Saanich area. Call: 

Michael Burr 384-9335 

DAVID BURR LTD 


2-Storey 

Character 


EQUITEX INVESTMENT 
REALTY 

Commercial & investment 
CONSULTANTS 386-6071 


250 HOUSES FOR SALE 


HERITAGE DUPLEX 
$76,900 

Built In 1911 this Is a fine old up 
and down duplex with two. two 
bedroom self contained suites in 
original condition. Two fire¬ 
places, high ceilings and plenty 
of character. Victoria west loca¬ 
tion. Good mortgage. Call now, it 
won't last. MLS 

GLENN OR DONNA NICHOLLS 
385-9741 598-7689 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD, 


E 


HENDERSON 

REALTY LTD. 
385-9741 


gonzalestriplex 

$96,500 

Walk to the beach and Invest In 
Victoria's best and still afforcF 
able area. Well maintained and 
updated character building with 
a 2 bdrm and 2-1 bdrm suites. 
Call now, this won't last. Princi¬ 
pals only Call: 

GLENN OR DONNA NICHOLLS 
385-9741 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD 


WANT TO LOVE 
WHERE YOU LIVE 

Well, there's lots to love In this 
classic 3 or 4-BR contemporary 
home in Dean Park. A long wind¬ 
ing drive through stately ever¬ 
greens brings you to this garden 
er's delight set on a secluded half 
acre of graceful landscaping 
This is a sturdy family home 
featuring 2 fireplaces, a family 
room and recreation room In a 
full basement plus a double car 
port and huge sundeck. Call us 
now to view this outstanding 
value at only $ 1 154)00. 

DONNA or GLENN NICHOLLS 
385-9741 598-7689 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD 

DEAN PARK ESTATES 


immaculate throughout and re¬ 
tains much of its 1912 charm 
L.R , D R., and entrance have 
beautiful bay windows (some 
with stained glass) Large bright 
kitchen with mahogany cabinets 
and eating area. Three bed 
rooms, bathroom and sewing 
room up. Some oak floors. Situ 
ated on a beautiful high lot over¬ 
looking parts of the city. A truly 
lovely nome in an equally lovely 
area of similar homes. CALL 
TODAY TO,VIE W. $87,500 

RANDl COLWELL 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD 

477-7131 (24Hrs.) 

2.5 Acres Of Privacy 

Great property for animal 
lovers. This 2.5 acres has a mix¬ 
ture of rock, trees and clearings 
with a very interesting 2 or pos 
slbly 3 bedroom renovated older 
home. The house is loaded with 
charm and character and will 
suit those with a taste for some¬ 
thing a little different. Immedi¬ 
ate possession available. Asking 
price $68,500. Act now before It Is 
gone. Toviewcall: 

DONNA BARTON 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 

477-7131 (24 Hrs.) 


NEW LISTING 
Ascot House — Royal Woods 
i What sets this unit apart from 
others — well — firstly It Is 
i spotless from rugs to walls, the 
j kitchen is big, the dining room 
1 Is separate and large The living 
room and bdrm. face west and as 
a bonus the crushed velvet 
drapes, stove, fridge and apt. 

I size washer are Included. New 
MLS $47,900. 

REDUCED! REDUCED! 
944 Woodhalt — a lot of family 
living at a good price. Check and 
compare — 5 bedrooms, 3 fire¬ 
places, 3 bathrooms, den. rec 
room, vacuum system. Inter 
com. All this plus a super loca¬ 
tion with park across the street. 
$138,500 MLS. 

GREAT TASTE 

This 2 bdrm. ground floor unit in 
Laurel Point was decorated bv a 
professional who has blended 
grass cloth, mirrors and neutral 
ruqs for a most pleasing combi 
nation. Step from vour living 
room onto a private patio, look 
out at the manicured garden or 
dip In the heated pool. A must 
see MLS $110,000. 

For any of the above please call: 
477-0191 JOAN F RASE R 479-6663 

OAK BAY 
REDUCED $4,000 
NOW $94,500 

Only on the market 2 weeks but 
vendor wants quick sale on this 
South Oak Bay property. 3 bed¬ 
rooms, completely redecorated, 
new roof. Phone anytime for 
appointment to view this exclu¬ 
sive. 

GALE CHRISTENSON 
477-0191 477-7047 

NEW LISTING 

A bit of T.L.C. will do wonders for 
the outside of this home. Com¬ 
fortable updated 3 bedroom ac¬ 
commodation on the main plus 2 
bedroom in-law suite down. Oak 
lands area. Close to all ameni¬ 
ties. MLSS65400. Toviewcall: 

LES ADAIR-WILLI AMS 
477-0191 383-9950 

477-0191 BABEJETKO 721-3851 


250 HOUSES FW SU£ 


C-8 


STADACONA 

REVENUE 

Consisting of 2, one bedroom 
units, 1, two bedroom unit, 3 light 
housekeeping plus garage is 
rented $1200 per month gross 
$104,900 

LARRY LINEHAM 
595-0134 384 8075 pgr . 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
595-2121 


5E 


27 SUITE APARTMENT 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Located near Mavfalr, 6 years 
old, elevator. Intercom, covered 
perking, balconies. Low interest 
mortgage Grossing $73,000 
Asking $610,000 Call Barclay 
Forsyth collect at 754-7311 any¬ 
time at Nenelmo Realty Co Ltd, 
Box 511. Nanaimo. B.C. V9R 
54-8. 


ESTATE SALE 




MARINA 1250400 285 WATER 
front ear. 35 miles north of Vk 
tori« EftcetientfioeHendren<«i 

'zzz'xzxrws? 

LUCRATIVE BU‘*<MtS‘, FOR 
■«ek Work from hum* for fez 
daRurtiga hanefH* Pfo*m> kw« 
fmnt §0 omn sates Parted p**' 
itmrqqr* RNwnr Wt Hr, 


IS ideal for owner occwpier 
There ere 4 one bedroom units 
end 2 two bedroom pent-house 
type units with excellent see 
views Priced at $27*480 For 
dH e*ls call 

JACK HENDERSON 656-0240 
HE NDERSON REALTY LTD 

m*u\ 

SXS DUPLEX $89 W 


Awlinm-ii u<« f Am, ii 

MorlM* « I# , lAtarMSi ft, mot ) *•*< 


FRIDAY 

1:30-4:30 

1754 ORCAS PARK 
TERR. 

You will find privacy, luxury and 
beauty in this lovely three bed 
room home Nothing was spared 
In the building. Quality is every 
where Private fenced grounds 
complatelv landscaped. Gra¬ 
cious space, quiet surroundings, 
end a recommended Investment i 
at $165,500 ML a 46739. Sac It 
Friday with vour Host: 

HUMPHREY GOLBY 
592-6730 

OAK BAY 

OPEN HOUSE 

THURS. 1:30-4:30 

2112 PENTLAND 

immaculate 4 bdrm family 
home in traffic free area ideal 
lor in lew set up All serious 
offers to new list of tl 19480 con 
si da red Sea If Thors Vour 

.& m 


BOB FARRELL'S 
HOMES 

METCHOSIN 

1078 Glen Forest way. Excep¬ 
tional quality. 3 bdrm. home on 
secluded 1 acre parcel, muni 
clj>al water supply. Drive by and 

BOB FARRELL 386-3124 

MOUNT NEWTON 
Under construction on 10 acre of 
exceptional view property 
Unique cedar charm with a touch 
of elegance Act soon to edd vour 
flare S2S6400 


BLOCK 
[3 BROS. 


5 FARRELL 


386-3124 


WEST SAANICH 
3-bdrm. full bsmt bungalow 4th 
in bsmt. Large sundeck in im 
maculate condition iO'x.% mort- 

SRoo^cfsisr* 0 ' 0n,v 

BOB FARRELL ty i}U 

REVENUE 

Multi suite conversion under 
wav Bus route. Huge lot and low 
rate mortgage 1250400 
BOB FARRELL 386-3124 

TOP OF 
THE TOWN 
$148,900 

Per chad on a rock surroundndby 
oar dan This 2600 sq ft home 
exudes quality Sbdrms o* 3 and 
I dans Room for pool table In 
detisfittul rat room imtfue 
places 5pat loos plan Much | 


FARRELL 38*3124 


See Our Weekly 
CATALOGUE 
OF HOMES 

WANT A GOOD BUY 
ON A 

LONELY DUPLEX? 
One of the few In the high $80 s 
price range. It's also lonely be¬ 
cause It Is among the few that is 
In top shape It Is one of the few 
♦ hat have great revenue and 
where the tenants pav the ex 
penses. It Is lonely because of the 
value of Its location. Give me a 
call and lets discuss vour flnanc 
Ins mm. 

388-6275 DAN NUGENT 477-1841 
Pager m 1376 

DON'T DRIVE BY 
ME 

Outside I look ordinary 
but inside I'm somethino 
special. 

Open House 

Wed. and Thurs. 7:30-9:00 
1579 Gregory MLS 
LINDA TOMAL 
477X1073 477-1841 

HANDY 

NEIGHBOURHOOD 
OPEN HOUSE 
FRI.-SAT. JULY 25-26 
2:00-4:00 P.M. 

T wo botkoom bunftAkN, only IV, 
btockt from OTnAnfarv school, 
shopping and rpcraatlonat 
iantra Same of Its faatures in 
•Mil ' 


BOORMANS 

I $12 FmI St. 

316 7521 

2045 Ci46m* 84 / Rd. 

595 1535 

BOORMAN INVESTMENT CO LTD. 

OPEN DAILY 
3:00to4:30 

1929 BEACH DR. — Asking In the 
160 s, all offers considered! 
Don't be deceived bv a drive bv 
— It looks small, but has over 
2300 sq. ft.; plus full basement. 
Wfl! Planned, very spacious, ex 
cellent condition —3 bedrooms 
plus den, two full baths, much, 
much more. For personal ap¬ 
pointment: 

OOUG CODDINGTON 
Off . 995-1535 or 388-5464 

Pager 725 

SOUTH OAK BAY 
TREED SECLUSION 
COUNTRY LAND 
TRULY EXCEPTIONAL 

Truly an outstanding character 
residence combining English 
Tudor with superb modern ar¬ 
chitecture. The residence Is sited 
on a beautifully landscaped gar 
den lot, with circular driveway 
and mature shrubery. Inside the 
gracious entrance tover leads to 
the entertainment sized living 
room with marble fireplace and 
French doors to sun patio, den 
and fireplace, wet bar, and part 
nelled in oak. Separate dining 
room leading to the finest gour¬ 
met kitchen you could ever de¬ 
sire. Now a familv room with 
fireplace overlooking a 21'x38' 
heated pool with its own barbe- 
que and kitchen facilities. Ad¬ 
joining office and atrium plus 
two bedrooms on the main floor, 
up the open staircase to 3 bed 
rooms, plus sewing room. The 
master Is 17’x27' with connecting 
sauna, sun patio, ensulte, walk In 
closet and fireplace. Priced at 
$475400. Appointments to view 
EXCLUSIVELY with 

GORDON ADAMS 
Bus. 595-1535 Res. 592-1353 

SOUTH OAK BAY 
CHARACTER AND 
TRADITION 
I s the theme to this fine, 2 storev, 
3-bedroom residence situated on 
a picturesque treed and garden 
lot The main level boasts of 
a large foyar, entertainment size 
living room with fireplace, sepa¬ 
rate dining room, family kitchen 
with sunporch and a family den 
with another fireplace, plus a full 
basement. Asking$139,900. View 
this exclusively with: 

GORDON ADAMS 
Off . 595-1535 Res. 592-1353 

FERNWOOD CHARM 
GARDEN LOT 
$54,500 

Excellent l'/i storey, 3-bedroom 
home In a convenient location 
near all schools, stores and 
buses. This home features open 
staircase to upstairs large living 
room, familv sized kitchen which 
Is up to date and hot water heat. 
Fully fenced lot with fruit trees 
and garden area. To view please 
call: 

GORDON ADAMS 
Oft . 595-1535 Res. 592 1353 

FOUL BAY ROAD 
Oak Bay border. Three bedroom 
home with large din Ingroom and 
living room. Convenient loca¬ 
tion, close to Safeway, recre¬ 
ation centre. Good as residence, 
excellent Investment. Listed ex 
cluslvely for $63,500. 

OLGA ZACHARY 
Otf . 595-1535 Res. 592 2265 

MT.TOLMIE 
CHARACTER 
Close to the University and situ¬ 
ated high upon a double mature¬ 
ly landscaped lot, this 3 bedroom 
home features living room, din¬ 
ing room with pleasant views to 
Mf Douglas, huge modern kit¬ 
chen and eating area 14.6 x 14.6. 
Master bedroom and den on the 
main and 2 bedrooms up (2 piece 
bath). Full basment with laun 
dry and area for future develop 
ment. 

The Interior Is very bright and 
retains Its 1930's charm, while 
the 100 ' wide backvard otters 
total privacy making this home 
well priced at $99,000. For fur¬ 
ther information call 

WYNN WRIGHT 
386-7521 598-9190 

SE 
5MINU 
Home on 2 acres. Attractive 

E ana-bode. 3 bedrooms on main 
arge living room and fireplace 
Sunny kitenen. Full basement 
with lots of room. $99,500. MLS 
CM: 

JOHN HOLMS at 386-7521 

OAKCREST/ 
CEDAR HILL 
$94,500 

BACK ON THE MARKET, a four 
vear old 2 storev home, situated 
on a quiet street In a very pretty 
area. There are three bedrooms, 
(master ensulte), spacious liv¬ 
ing and dining rooms, bright kit¬ 
chen. The lower level has rec. 
room plus more space ready for 
development. High bright I oca 
tlon offers City views. Well 
priced—call quickly. 

GAIL WEINBERG 
Off. 595-1535 Res 598-0267 

PETERDUECK 
Oft. 384-7521 Res. 478-9909 

GORDON HEAD 
UNIVERSITY AREA 
• $1)4,500 * 

JUST LISTED this ImmaculateO 
bedroom family home. It's 2 
vears old, close to all schools, 
racquet club and University. 
Features large living room and 
dining room, large sunny kit 
chen, family room with fire¬ 
place. Assume $57,000 1st at 
10 V 4 % due Sept./83. To view EX 
CLUSIVELYwIth 

GORDON ADAMS 
Oft 595-1535 Res 592 1353 


250 HOUSES FOt SMJE 



I i ADC r$D Hospital staff and people In 

| y^R|ft| feR ^ v j s? s r j n ..s™.,, weti-^, 


990 FORT ST 3W 2233 

OCEAN CITY REALTY 

MARTHA CRES. 
OPEN HOUSE 
SAT. 1-4 P.M. 

See this older, mlnt'tondltion. 
3-bdrm., no basement rancher at 
4020 Martha Cres., priced at 
$81,900 and you'll fail In love 
again, or call Wally King for 
sneak preview. 

388-6275 Pager 741 

NEAR THE SEA 

Near the sea, bus sA'vke and 
shopping In Esquimau a 2bed 
room home that has been excel 
lently maintained by present 
owner. Features Uredlace In 
carpeted living room. Spacious, 
sunny kitchen with eating area, 
full basement with 3rd bedroom 
Well landscaped backyard that 
gardeners will eniovr Asking 
$76,900. 

Marlyn Moore 382-8015 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 381-2233 

HIGH ONAHILL 

Executive-type custom-built 
home with wonder ful view. All 
rooms are large intercom, at 
tached garage, brick and cedar 
exterior, two full bathrooms, ex 
pensive fittings and finishings, 
close to town, possible In-law 
suite. Brand new and owner 
built. An excellent purchase at 
$115,000 

BENGREIG 598 3105 381-2233 

NORTH GORDON 
HEAD 

Lovelv spilt level In area of hioh 
price homes. Three bedrooms, 
two bathrooms, large, double 
carport, sea glimpses, large lot 
Spotlessly clean. Immaculate 
possession, $109,000 
BENGREIG 598-3105 381-2233 

$52,500 

Fantastic value ottered here in 
this 3-bedroom, 1' .-bathroom 
strata duplex. Immaculate in 
side and out. close to shopping 
and schools. Fully genced vara 
Owners have bought. Exclusive 
with 

ANITA 81 ALEX TAIT 
598-0485 381-2233 

FOR THE FAMILY 

tmily home 

-- —ng, thermo 

windows thru-out, cold air re¬ 
turns In all rooms, 3 bedrooms, 
familv room, a great kitchen 
with lots of cupboards for Mom. 
full basement and drive-in ga 
rage for Dad's workshop. Locat 
ed on pretty treed lot close to all 
levels of schools A quite differ 
ent floor plan. Give me a call to 
view. 

Marilyn Moore 382-8015 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 381 2233 

LEESIDE 
VILLA R0YALLE 

Exactly what a Spanish lord 
would call this beautiful deluxe, 
custom-built and designed, ap 

K ox. 7000 sq. ft. 4-bdrm., no 
sement, rancher. Everything 
is deluxe, Including the 2 fire 
places, the intercom and the 
built-in vacuum system and the 
setting this home Is in. Price 
$114,000 Call: 

WallvKing 388-6275 Pager 741 

BY THE UNIVERSITY 
9 MONTHS NEW 
Quality: 1510 sq. ft. of area on 
main floor Spacious modern liv¬ 
ing rm„ dining rm„ family area 
and kitchen, three bedrooms, 
two complete four-ptece bath 
rooms, all on the main floor 
Sundeck so convenient for out 
door living. Plus near 4400 so. ft 
of partially finished area with 
second fireplace and roughed in 
plumbing. Easy care, fully de 
veloped corner lot. Full price 
$129,900. Tovlewdlal 
Cliff Stretch 381 2233/X 595-469? 

RICHMOND 
ATTENTION 


PAC-WEST 



sa.'. 


elude fireplace__ 

•no in living room, bedroom and 
(nan clocks completely coder 
lined, family size kitchen has 
breakfast nook with separate 
dining room, exceMont basement 
has rooms for 3rd bedroom and 
family room Pr*cod at $65400 
To vi e wpioa se call 

KATHY PARLEe 
16-1187 477 1841 


cJavid burr 


INTERNATIONAL REAL 
ESTATE BROKERS INC 

388-6161 
NEW LISTING 
LAKEHILL!! 
$85,500 

A METICULOUS 3 Bedroom full 
Bsm't home. Bright and spa 
clous thru out with entertain, 
ment sized living room, ”L" dln- 
Ing room, family kitchen 
features loads of cupboards, eat 
Ino area and B I oven and count 
er tops; lower level boasts rec 
rm with 2nd fireplaces, oames 
rm , 4th bedroom, 2 pee bath, 
laundry and workshop area At 
! tached double carport. Fully 
fenced back oarden with mam 
cured lawns and fruit trees To 
view this excellent listing phone 
Terry Edan or Sharleen Eden 

I ANXIOUS VENDOR!! 

LOCATION Is Bay-Kinos area, 
and the LOT Is aS'xtlT (zoned 
| R3-2) with back lana access. Add 
i to this the 2 bedroom full Bsm't 
! home with EXCELLENT Rental 
P otential and you have an EX 
CELLENT INVESTMENT prop 
arty Priced low $70'$ but offers 
are WANTEO MLS To view 
phone Sharloon Eden or Torrv 
Edan 3884161 

VALLEY VIEWS! 

SEA GLIMPSES! 

Gorgeous 3 or 4 Bedroom full 
Bsm't home with lower level 

imjsmks 


rava pin, 2 bdrm , full base 
ment home priced at $76,500. 
Call: 

WallvKing 388-6275Pager 741 

SWIMMING POOL 

Not at present, but you sure 
cou I d put a bl g one i n on th I s I a r ge 
lot and still have r^Obm for a 
terrific garden and patio 
$119,500 will also get you a beau 
titul new contemporary style 3- 
bdrm. home with a 2-car oarage, 
a den and a famlv room that will 
make vou the envv of all vour 
friends. See it today with: 

Wally King 388-6275 Pager 741 

LEXINGTON 

INCREDIBLE 

This beautiful 4-bdrm., 3-bath 
room home situated on a small 
lot near UVIc, priced at $137,000 
is a must see to believe the 
interior isincredlbleTCall: 

Wallv King 388-6275 Pager 741 

PENTLAND 
OAK BAY 

On the south side sits a charm 
ino. modern, tudor style, 3-bdrm 
bungalow. Priced at $119,000, It's 
ideal for anybody that needs lots 
of Interior room, little exterior 
room and Is desirouvof living In 
this most popular are*. Call: 
WallvKing 388-6275Pager 741 

MID70'S7 

Large 3 bedroom fanatlv home 
with fully developed In-law suite 
in basement Living room with 
fireplace. Large yard, fullv 
fenced. 12x20 greenhouse. Lots 
of parking. Priced to sell. Ex 
elusive with 

Anita or Alex Talt 
381-2233 598-0485 

BRAND NEW — $85,900 
2719 LAKEHURST 
Stucco and brick exterior, this 
lovely new full basement home 
contains a large living room with 
slate rock F .P., diningroom with 

« lass doors to deck, bright tarn 
v sized kitchen. 3 BRs (master 
BR ensulte) plus main bath up. 
Completed rec room with brick 
F .P. in base The rest of the full 
bse. is rooghed-in for 3rd. bath 
and other development. Thermo 
windows. Large lot. over 80 tt 
frontage Carport with concrete 
driveway. Excellent quality con 
structfon. To Inspect, please 
call: 

LILLIAN CUMMING 

381 2233_656-4SS0 


* Mount Douglas * 
Estates 

HOME OF THE WEEK 

* * * 

This quality built 1,776 so 
tt. home In Gordon Head 
teatures: 

—Cedar exterior and shake root 
—Tnraa bedrooms. 

—Two full beffts 
—Two fireplaces (one beefiia 
tor) 

—Flnlsfwd family rm 
—VauHad cedar ceiling in living 
rm 



FAIRFIELD 
I bedroom f tewey 




CENTRAL SAANICH 
iMt»i«<uia<e 4 4 >**druoni tiurn* 
with ufwoue tea views jVtvaty. 
•w ♦tve street svj sfe Ct* 
rungs Oil 3274. « uurtesy to real 
tars 


-Ooubieoereoe 

bkvhghTin kitchen 
-5 year warranty and m< 
mure distinctive features 

OPEN HOUSE 
Weekdays 1-7 P.M. 
Weekend! 7$ PM 


|£ 384-93351 

E«en N Terr y ( dvr. 


Call Ron at J84 HOI, 
Of R#$ 381-2374 

Jidk4(Mtt(aHikadto|< 






















































































































































































































c 


C-9 

250 HOUSES FOR SALE 



0 F H. Real Estate Ltd. 

>5M McKCNZtE A VC 

CORDOVA BAY 
OPEN HOUSE 
1006 Westport 
Thurs. 1-3 

Good value on this 8 year old, 
one-owner, 3 bed rm home. Catti 
entry, spacious LR with beams 
and FP. L shaped dining rm., EA 
In kitchen. One ♦ half baths. 
Semi-secluded, fenced yard well 
landscaped. Mint condition, 
vendor transferred. Early pos¬ 
session. MLS at $92,900. 

PHIL WARREN 
7-7291 • ‘ 


Atll 


1 Anytime 


250 HOUSES F0t SALE 



OVER \ 
ID 


CORDOVA BAY 
TUDOR | 
OPEN HOUSE 
828 Alvarado Tee. j 
WED. 1-3 P.M. * 

Spacious, 2-storev, 5 bedrm., 
Elizabethan Tudor of charm and 
character. Beautiful location In 
tailored residential area on a 
near thfrd acre lot. Beamed LR 
with Inglenook FP, Intimate 
and/or banquet-size dining rm., 
medieval family rm., library. A 
magnificent family home at 
$195,000. Vendor moving. Must 
be sold. MLS. 

PHILWARREN 
477-7291 Anytime 

WELL! 

SIDNEY! 

3 BEDROOMS! 

ASSUMABLE $20,000 mortgage 
at 10% PIT at $230.37 per 
month. Greenalades school 
nearby. Family home ready for 
another family. MLS 46289. 
MAKE AN OFFER ON $76,500. 
To view; call 

TRICIA PARKER 
477-7291 Anytime 

GORDON HEAD 
4 BEDRMS. 
$119,900 

Over 2900 sq. ft. of finished area. 
19x16.6 LR with floor-to-celllng 
slate FP. 15.6x10.6 DR leads onto 
hugesundeck. Natural slate wall 
In kitchen. Vh bathrms., rec. rm. 
and sauna. 18x16 workshop. 
Built-in dishwasher, vacuum 
andgarburator. 

BRIAN SHARP 

477-7291 384-8075 (Pgr. 316) 

NO STEPS 
2 BEDROOMS 
Charming Garden 

Adear little home withllvlngrm. 
with fireplace; kitchen with 
stove, frldoe, washer and dryer ; 
dining area. Double glassed win¬ 
dows. Near quiet home with a 
charming English Garden. Do 
call! MLS. $69,500. 

TRICIA PARKER 
477-7291 Anytime 

Victoria 
Realty 

V 386-3585 J 

CEDAR HILL 
IN LAW SUITE 

Completely renovated, lust like 
a new pome, two or three bed¬ 
rooms on the main floor with a 
complete one-bedroom inlaw 
suite UPPER FLOOR Offers 
new kitchen cabinets, bathroom 
flxtutrt, floor coverings, com¬ 
pletely repainted. LOWER 
FLOOR; Is completely repaint¬ 
ed, new floor coverings, new kit¬ 
chen countertops Extra laroe 
private lot on a quiet no-thru 
street, easy walk to elementary 
and |r, high. New double carport. 
MUST BE SEEN. Asking$96,500. 
Call today. Jack Lfdstone, 
386-3585.477-9262. 

1174 TRANS CAN 

(At Wilkinson) 

A real nice home at a very at¬ 
tractive price — Only $69,900. 
Trades, terms, offers invited. 
Nice water view too. MLS 47264. 
To view please call Vauohn 
Thompson, 386-3585, res. 
658-854). 

LANSDOWNE 
SEE ME INSIDE 

Spacious bungalow, 2 bedrooms 
plus one down. Charming LR 
with rock FP. Separate DR., 
modern kitchen with sep. EA. 
Sundeck over double carport. 

F ul I hrah basement is R. I. for F P 
and bath Well priced at $79,500. 
Exclusive Please call Leo Van 
Dyk, 386-3585, res. 479-6264. 


Castle 

PROPtRTIES ltd. 


Mt. Tolmie Views 
$159,900 

i f you ref use to fit Into any ploeon 
hole, but still want to roost nigh 
up with the very best, consider 
this knock-out. one-of a-kind 
home gracing the west slope of 
Mt. Tolmie. It features a spa¬ 
cious 1980 open design (1900 sq 
ft.) which accents both privacy 
on an easy care lot and gracious 
multi-level living with views that 
will make your wings flap. 
Hurry, call SHANE BEFURT 
479-0010. MIKE SWEENEY 
388 5050 or at CASTLE PROP 
ERTIES LTD. 386-6164. 

ALLENBYPARK 
COMFORT 
CHARM-$91,500 

This gracious home Is over 2,500 
sq. ft. of family comfort. The 
upstairs features 2 bedrooms, 
convenience kitchen, cosv living 
room and sep. dining room with 
wrap-around sundeck oft Third 
bedroom and den are located 
downstairs, as well as a huge 
laundry area, a workshop and a 
large medieval rec room with 
F P and bar Situatedonalarge. 
fenced lot. this home Is offer edat 
$91,500 For prior viewing, call 
PAM MORRY res. $92*770 or 
388 6275 pager No 2656 or CAS 

ltd 

1052 Craigdarroch 

OPEN FBI.*, SAT. 

2-4 P.M. 

Be sure to see this deceivingly 
large 19*4custombuMfiplH leva! 

r.TZJZ'XZJZSLZZ 

with cmy U — 
large BrlfM 



[hoose now from our 
diminishing selection of 
3-bedroom, l'/Mi- 
room, architect-de¬ 
signed homes. 

Available from 17,000 
down and 1635 per 
month, plus taxes, 
etc. 

FEATURES 

—3 miles to town 
—Close to schools 
—Nextto42-ac. 
park. 

—12% mortgages 
—Full guarantees 

OPEN HOUSE 
2:00TO8:00 
DAILY 


Turn onto G lent ana from Ad- 
mlrals lust south of 
Admirals/Craigflower Intersec¬ 
tion. 



UPLANDS 

GEORGIAN 

A home for the family who en|oy 
gracious entertaining and fam¬ 
ily living. The residence Is Ide¬ 
ally located in the heart of the 
Uplands on a beautifully land¬ 
scaped 132x190 half acre garden. 
Approx 6000 sq. ft of accommo¬ 
dation with ample bedrooms, 
bathrooms plus entertainment 
size living and dining areas to 
suit the most discriminating. 
Please phone to view. 
EXCLUSIVE! 

VIEWS 

ROCKLAND 

CHARACTER 

Located near 'Government 
House on an easy care lot with 
dramatic water views and over 
7000 sq. ft. of accommodation 
The home has 8 bedrooms and 
bathrooms plus den, drawing, 
living, dining and family rooms. 
At present the owners are 


So, you can carry on the present 
use or fill It up with whoever you 
want. Asking $259,000 but WHAT 
WILLITSELLFOR? 

RANDY SMALL 

38S-1431 388-6275 # 2283 




/island 

, /Homes 

Xut 


34b 

cook \.(\ZJicalUi 

mm jr u i 

386-7545 

IT'S HARD 

To find fault with this immacu¬ 
late home, featuring 3 bedrooms 
on the main, 1 V* bathroom, plus 2 
more bedrooms plus 2-pee bath¬ 
room in the professionally fin¬ 
ished basement. Brand new 
W/W carpets, laroe sundeck, 
vegetable garden In the fully- 
fenced lot, large patio, close fo 
all schools, busline, everything 
in this home is spotless. A real 
pleasure to show. MLS offered at 
$89,900. 

GEORGE HESS 
386-7545 385-9307 

OWNER SAYS SELL 
REDUCED BY $13,500 
This type of condominium is rare 
as a hen's tooth. Offering you 2 
bedrooms. IV* bathrooms. Lux¬ 
ury accommodation In the Wind¬ 
sor Park area. Insuite washer, 
dryer, expensively decorated, 
with fantastic recreational faci¬ 
lities. such as Indoor swimming 
pool, whirlpool, sauna and 
steambath. Added bonus 1st as¬ 
sumable mortgage of $78X100 at 
10% due Feb 81 $124,500. 
GEORGE HESS 385-9307 

ISLAND HOMES REALTY 
LTD 306-7545 

(Aniuarn 
\ Hrall) & 

* Im^imml 
I orporulion 

VIEWS 

ROCKHEIGHTS 
$104,900 

This family spilt level home 
'offers 1950 plus sq ft of pure 
comfort. 3-BR. LR with FP. DR, 
I Family Rm, Radoae kitchen plus 

Ttft 

Baker from your secluded 
patios Cakfoview Exclusive 



250 HCNtSCS FOR SALE 



8440 Douglas 


OPEN HOUSE 
1009 WESTPORT PL. 
TUES. & WED. 
6:30 to8 P.M. 

—Located In Cordova Bay 
—3 bedrooms plus 
—Living and dining room 
—Seven years old on large 
lot 

—Quiet cul-de-sac 
—Family room with stone 


fireplace 

—$103,500. New MLS. 
LARRY LINEHAM 

384-8075 Pgr 682 
- 595-2 If 


S9S-0134. __ 

NATIONAL TRUST 5^-2121 


FAIRFIELD 
Character & Charm 

ELEGANT and IMPRES¬ 
SIVE, this lovely home pro¬ 
vides the ultimate in gra¬ 
cious living. Inviting foyer 
has French doors leading to 
a large llvingroom with a 
beautiful granite fireplace 
and Inlaid oak floors. More 
French doors lead to a spa¬ 
cious separate dining room 
with Its original woodwork, 
bullt-ln buffet and leaded 
windows. Modern family 
sized kitchen Is cheerful and 
bright with an abundance of 
cupboards. Two good sized 
bedrooms and modern 4-pce. 
bath complete the main floor 
ofaprox. 1400sq. ft. Upstairs 
Is a third large bedroom. The 
high basement has a 2-pee. 
bath, den or bdrm. with 
great potential for further 
development. Priced at 
$124,000. To view the EX¬ 
CLUSIVE NEW LISTING 
Please call: 

JUNE HOUGHTON 
595-2121 477-6185 

UPPER QUADRA 

Located on a beautifully 
landscaped V* acre with fruit 
trees, orape vines and huge 
separate workshop. Modern 
& unique, this lovely home 
features 4 bdrms, master 
with 4 pee. ensulte and 
lounge, llvingroom, den, 2 
fireplaces, 4 baths In all. 
Asking $147,000. MLS. 

JUNE HOUGHTON 
595-2121 477-6185 

NEAR GORGE 
WATERWAY 
Immaculate 3 bedroom 
home in a choice location 
near Gorge Waterway. 2 car 
garage, large rec. room with 
bar, workshop New roof & 
oil storage tank. Must he 
seen for appreciation of 
value. Favorably priced t r 
quick sale. Asking $88,000. 

JOE MADAY 


477-8746 


595-212! 


J ^Mor!t 


X 


Montreal 
Trust f 

NEW MLS 
VICTORIA WEST 

3 bekm bungalow. Just re¬ 
decorated and new carpet In 
LR, hall, master bdrm and 
kitchen. A real nice home for 
a couple or small family. 
Financing available to quali¬ 
fied buyer. Asking on $56,500. 
For appointment call; 

E. W.PROKOSCH 
386-2111 477-2194 

READ THIS! 

and you'll be dying to view 
this Immaculate bungalow 
located In the Oak Bay Bor¬ 
der and featuring: 2 bdrms 
op the main plus 1 down, a 
family room and rec room 
(all decked out In cedar) 
with a franklin stove, a se¬ 
cluded back yard lust per¬ 
fect for relaxing or enter 
tainlng... the list goes on and 
on. We've priced this beauty 
to sell at $83,900. For viewing 
and further Information, 
call: 

GRAYDON HOOKER 
386-2111_382-1258 


BLOCK 
HI BROS. 


See Our Weekly 
BESTSELLERS 
CATALOGUE 

ALBERT HEAD 

Quiet setting in a rural atmo¬ 
sphere close to beach and parks. 
An immmeculate home with fin¬ 
ished basement and large sepa¬ 
rate workshop, ample parkiog. 
This home has an excellent plan 
and affords a view from the liv¬ 
ing area and sundeck. Situated 
on .64 of an acre of loamy soil for 
garden. 

BOB PAUL 

478-5561 (off) 478-2477 (res) 

$76,500 

3 Bdrms., up, 1 down. V* base¬ 
ment and carport. Large lot 
70'xi4fi' with detached oarage of 

20'x20'. 

PIERRE BERUBE 
478-5561 (Off) 474 2744 (res) 

Pager 3884275 #2764 


$89,000 

Lovely 3 Bdrm 7 yr old rancher 
with slidino patio doors from 
both master Bdrm and family 
rm onto a very pleasant ‘4 acre 
garden See through fireplace 
form L R. Into Family ^m. This 
laroe (1475 sq ft) home is perfect 
tor the retired who likes to gar¬ 
den It Is a pleasure to show. 
JOYCE MACDONALD 384-8334 
RUTHASHURST 591-2976 


Office 


S9S4131 


OAK BAY 
OPEN DAILY 
TILL SOLD 
1:00-3:00 P.M. 

1002 FOUL BAY ROAD 
I Very desirable, well maintained, 
3 Bdrm (2 up, 1 down), possible 
additional l Bdrm down or rec 
room Pleasant grounds Many 
extras. Insepctlon Invited List 
ad at SI ULfeO ALL OFFERS 
CONSIDERED 

JACK ARMSTRONG 3824352 
Office _ 995-5131 



LEE WROBEL 

J8H4JI 


PURE LUXURY 

JATIN 

'Sin By r a 

_ _ Tnlvtsi/t 

jN»ce^jT^storage over double 

ALAN MtcGlUJVftAY 

477 -mo 

GLCNGAJtRVfttM TV 



HOUSES FOR SALE 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23,1980 

250 HOUSES FM SALE 25* HOUSES F0M SALE 


GnM y- 
d Zla 

WESTERN HOMES LTD. 

\ ^1Q37 Clovwde* 300-5404 

Nl 

v,\m 

Old fashion home complete with 
pantry and oak floors In dining 
room and living room. 3 Bed¬ 
rooms, partial basement. 50x120 
lot close to bus and shopping. 
Must be seen Inside to appreciate 
potential. No drlve-bys will be 
given. RENITH L ROBINSON 
477-9292or 386-3494 (24 hrs.). 


"GORDON HEAD 
DECEIVER" 

Be dazzled — not dazed — by our 
new listing. Totally renovated 
inside and out with 1977 addition. 
2 level split offers 3 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, den, 2 fireplaces, de¬ 
lightful secluded yard. Master 
bedroom has 3-pce. ensulte and 
beautiful brick fireplace, cedar 
feature wall and office or den off. 
Laroe living room has fireplace 
Perfect family yard has patio, 
large workshop. Updated 
plumbing, 200 amp electric ser¬ 
vice, aluminum putters, new 
paint outside, fully insulated 
with thermopanes In the addi¬ 
tion. HERE IS HOW TO SPEND 
$83,900 and pet a million. Act 

S uickly on this one. JAMES 
NGUS or CAROL FRANCES 
FENN 386-3494 (24hrs ). 


OPEN HOUSE 
WED. & THURS. 2-4 
565 MOUNTFIELD 
See ibis well kept home, 3 baths, 
3-4 wlrms, 2 FPs, office and 
den. Over 2300 sq. ft. Close to 
schools and town. Only 6 yrs 
old and now to large for the 
owners. It's here waiting tor 
your family. Come and see It 
with CECILE HALSEY 386-3494 
(24 hrs). 


OPEN HOUSE 
9945 BESSRIDGE 
SIDNEY 

2-4 P.M. WED. 23 JULY 
Starter 3 bedroom house, quiet 
cul de sac location. Excellent 
mort. $43,000 at 10.25%. Make 
your offer on $65,000. ROGER 
FRAMPTON 386-3494 (24hrs). 


OPEN HOUSE 
1340 MOORGREEN 
WED, THURS, &FRI. 

7-9 P.M. 

—Mt. Doug Views. 

—Quiet Dead-end Street 
—3.000 Sq. Ft. 

—5 Bedrooms 
—3 Baths 
—2 Fireplaces 
—Potential For Suite Down 
—$133,900. 

RENITH L. ROBINSON 477-9292 
or 386-3494 ( 24hrs). 


SINCE 1887 

(jcm&ctton, 
JCotm*d .ku. 

WESTERN CEDAR 
$68,300 

This 4 yr. old multi level zero lot 
line home was designed for en- 
ioyable living. Immaculate In¬ 
side and out, the main floor has 
living and dining rooms, 2 pee. 
powder room, kitchen with eat¬ 
ing area and access to 2 patios. 3 
bedrooms and 4 pee. bath up. 
Basement with R. I. 3rd bath Is 
ready for development. All this 
plus a great yard and garden, to 
view please call 

Del Williams 385-9855 

Bob Katzer 382-3092 

Pemberton, Holmes Ltd. 
384-8124 


COACH HOUSE 

REALTY LTD. 3*1-5255 


ROYAL OAK 
Character 3 bedroom bungalow 
situated on M* acre lot with coun¬ 
try atmosphere. Laroe living 
room and family room. Make an 
offer on asking price of $94,500. 
M.L.S. 

Tom Gardner 598-2192 

$77,500 

Newly listed, spacious 3 bed¬ 
room home, two up and one 
down. Laroe living room, family 
sized dining rm., and kitchen, 2 
baths. Located in a desirable 
area of Esquimau Excellent 
value at 477.500 with laroe as¬ 
sumable mortgaoe. Exclusive. 

Tom Gardner 598-2192 

COACH HOUSE 
REALTY LTD. 
381-5255 


BLOCK 
|2) BROS. 


See Our Weekly 
CATALOGUE 
OF HOMES 


FOR QUICK SALE 

New 4-level split located In North 
Quadra area. Total 2500 sq. ft., 
sunken living room, master en- 
suife, fam. room and rec. room. 
Quality construction. Now 
priced at $114,900. 

RAY MILAN 

386-3231 _ 388-5464 No. 699 


1746 Jefferson 
Lambrick Park 
Must Sell! 

This lovely contemporary home 
Is one of the best values on the 
market In Gordon Head today. 
Over 2400 sq. ft. of finished area 
offering 3 bdrms., 3 bathrms., 
large deck off dining room, plus a 
private fully landscaped back 
yard. You must come In the 
home to appreciate Its assets. 
The vendor Invites your offer on 
$125,000. 

WE MUST SELL! 

Leslee Farrell 
592-7246, or 
388-5464, Pgr. 665 
Rod Finch 384-1188 

SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 99S-3HI 


P. R. BROWN 


GORDON HEAD 

On a guief cyl-desac, this is a 

sapor ala DR wHN sliding gloss 
dBTSon>oaun<pck, LR m»NI> fP. 
5 bdrms , 3 bathrms , a Mg roc 


JUST LISTED! 
Oil VALIEV VIEW 



PAULINE CASS 
598-1448, or 
388-5464, Pgr. 705 

Mm&rtSL 


GARDNER 

REALTY ltd 


m 


GREAT VIEWS 

For your retirement I 
OPEN to view 

THURS. FRI. SAT. 
2-4 P.M. 


5695 Patricia 


Immaculate two 
double paned wl 


Bay Hlghw 
) bedroom h 
windows, s 


Highway 
‘ home. 

____ sunny 

eating nook. OCEAN and VAL 
LEY views. M.L.S. Come and 
make your otter 

AUDREY MONT 
385-7744 598-7898 


COSY & CLEAN 
$52,500 

Excellent starter. Featuring an 
excellent living room — 19x11, 
with 2 bedrooms. Kitchen with 
eating area and a v* basement 
for workshop, storage and laun¬ 
dry. For further information a no 
viewing please call: 

Art Straight 

385-7744 388-6275 Pgr 882 

4 Bedrooms 
% ACRE 
BEACH ACCESS 
$64,900 

vacant and ready to move Into. 
Home features 3 bedrooms on the 
main plus 2 full bathrooms. 
Fourth bedroom In basement 

R lus development attic 100x284. 

eed lot has a workshop with 
power, aluminum framed green¬ 
house, 3 stall boat shed or ga¬ 
rage MLS 46999. 

385-7744 Martin Battle 598-6605 
385-7744 Cliff Salmond 477-3626 


' $57,900 
GOOD VALUE 

Centrally located 2-BR, full 
basement, stucco home with alu¬ 
minum windows and cosv fire¬ 
place. Nice grounds. Stove, 
fridge, drapes, dresser, bed and 
Venetian blinds Included in the 
asking price. MLS. DON'T 
DELAY ON THISONE! 

385-7744 Martin Battle 596-6605 


SIDEXSIDE 

With full high basements, 
roughed-In plumbing ready tor 
development into In-lew suite. 
One side vacant — other rented 
at $195. 1 105-1 107 MARY 
STREET adjoining Bamfleld 
Park. A good Investmant In 
today's real estate market. 
Clear title — Buv while Interest 
rates are low Immediate pos¬ 
session. ASKING S85,000. ML 
46875. 

HAROLDGARDNER 
385-7744_ 479-2867 


SWINERTON’S 



REALTY WORLD® 
"Not A Duplex" 

Yet anv family will immediately 
recognize the value of having 
that "extra" accommodation for 
family and visiting friends. Two 
complete floors (not visible from 
street) and also a basement lead¬ 
ing onto enclosed rear garden. 
Located close to all amenities, 
this 1973 property Is listed at 
$82,500 with occupancy and 
mortgage negotiable. Call for an 
early appointment to view. 
MLS. 

BOB CARTER 385-2481 or 
598-6143 (anytime). 


mom 

388-7368 


LANSDOWNE 
LOVELY VIEW 
(Well appointed family home 
Close to good shopping and all 
levels of schools. LR with heatl- 
lator FP. 3 BR. Full Bsmt, (4th 
BR finished). ideal for in-law 
situation. Asking $119X100. Leo 
Plgert, 598-1975. 

GORDON HEAD 
$84,900 

Just listed, this lovely, two-bed¬ 
room home — built only two 
years ago on a nice treed lot — 
close to recreation centre. Full 
basement — lots of room for 
further development. Call Leo 
Plgert 388-7868 anytime or 
598-1975 at home. 


BLOCK 
(2) BROS 


SIDNEY AREA 
Good family home, basement, 
easy to develop, good garden 
area In fenced back yard. Large 
sundeck with southern exposure 
and good view of Mt. Newton. 
Guod values at $69,900. 

656-5337 Ted Phillips 656-5584 

On v*-acre with excellent sea 
views from kitchen and sundeck, 
4 bedrooms, IV* baths, rec room, 
megeces, near Sidney. Asking 

656-5337 Ted Phillips 656-5584 


STAl NED GLASS AND BRASS 
I f these features appeal to you do 
not miss this opportunity to sae 
one of the finest examples of 
early 20th century architecture. 
A few prominent features are a 
living room with original wood 
panelling, hand-crafted window 
seat, antique brass chandelier, a 
fireplace nook with tile floor and 
fireside seat. French doors lead 
Into a charming formal dining 
room with built-in china cabinet 
and oak fireplace. Two sifting 

rooms, kr - *-- 

try and a . 
bathroom 
floor. The 
a wide hallway, 
a balcony with 
Sooke Hills. 

To view this fine property_ r 

call Lorraine Strandlund at 
SEAC. Courtesy to realtors. A 
must see at $105X)00. 

Lorraine Strandlund 478-4671, 


M i, 

ana a delightfully decorated 
complete the main 


w storey feeh 
f. 3 bedrooms 
a wide view of 


of the 



SHOPAND 

COMPARE 

Then call me on this lovely and 
large 4-B.R. family home. Just 
recently redecorated on the in¬ 
side and painted on the out. this 
full-basement home now quali¬ 
ties for the B.C. Homeowners 
Grant or the B.C. Second Mote. 
This Home Is located In the Cen¬ 
tral Park area to all of Victoria's 
amenities and we Invite your 
offer on $63,900 today, as the 
owners are moving. 

Carol F. Fenn, 386-3494 (24 hrs.) 
652-4294 

CentuY'^^Westwri^Homes Ltd. 


$7 


WHITTOME'S 


ROYAL OAK OFFICE 
479-1667 (24 Hrs.) 

A JEWEL 

Lovely 2-bedrm. full basement 
home cose to town. Large living 
room with F.P. and a bright 
charming kitchen with sun porch 
off. Fenced back yard with fruit 
and nut trees. Good parking faci¬ 
lities $69,900 MLS. 

479-1667 Mary McGuire 479-7668 
J. H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd. 


OPEN HOUSE 
EVENINGS7-9PM 
4053 Grange Rd 
4030 Interurban Rd 

Two quality built homes are open 
for your Inspection every eve¬ 
ning, by the builder. Full of char¬ 
acter, these 2 and 3-bdr homes 
must be seen. Close to bus. 
schools and other conveniences. 
Priced for quick sale at $85,000 
and $89,900 Phone 658-5825 for 
further details. , 


STRATA TITLE 
DUPLEX 

Laroe modem 2XXX) sq. ft. five 
bedroom up and down Strata 
Duplex on laroe lot. Lower level 
has been almost completely pro¬ 
fessionally developed and would 
make a very specious 2 bedroom 
In-law suite. Electric heat. Lo¬ 
cated In quiet area of Swan Lake, 
close to park. Open to offers on 
asking price of $77,900. Don't 
miss out on this one. Call now — 
Hugh Yerex 479-8169 or 592-2407. 
(MLS). 

MARGE TTS& GOWER 
OAK BAY PROPERTIES LTD. 


GORDON HEAD 

TORQUAY DRIVE 
Five year old West Coast con¬ 
temporary located close to all 
levels of school and recreation 
centre. Two levels, with 1430 
square feet on main, living room, 
dining room, and large sundeck, 
all with view of Mt. Douglas. 
Spacious kitchen with eating 
area and new dishwasher 5 bed¬ 
rooms, family room with rec 
area, 2 fireplaces, 2V* baths. 
Double carport. Large assum¬ 
able open mortgaoe at 10V*%. 
$122,500.477-4244. 


DIRECT FROM BUILDER 
HOMESANDLOTS 
In Colwood. City and seaviews 
from this executive tri-level. 
Lots of room to develop. Also lots 
In new subdivision available. Ph. 
KEN MILLAR 478-1721 or 
384-8075 Pager 519 anytime 


DEVELOPMENT CO. LTD. 


BY OWNER. NEWLY RENO- 
vated modern 1230 sq.ft, 3-bed¬ 
room, full basement home. 
Large living room, fireplace, 
modern kitchen with microwave 
and built-in dishwasher, dinino 
room, sundeck, attached ga¬ 
rage, plus 2-bedroom basement 
suite (rented $300 per month. 
Includes fridge and stove). $82, 
500. To view: 478-9706. 


BY OWNER IN SOOKE. $69,900. 
Immaculate 3 bedroom, full 
basement home with IV* baths, 
dining room, living room with 
floor to ceiling fireplace, good 
sized kitchen with lots of cup¬ 
board space and built-in dish¬ 
washer. Basement is partially 
developed. Large wrap-around 
sundeck and fenced backyard. 
642-5855. 


WESTMONT 

REALTY oo° 388-4434 


BY OWNER 
GORGE AREA 

1538 sq ft, 3 bedrooms, older 
home. With new kitchen, sewing 
room, sauna, leaded glass doors 
In llvino and dining room, large 
sundeck, new roof. Lot size 
76'x 110' Asking $88,900 384-5927 


SOUTH OAK BAY 

BORDER 

Cosy no step 2 bedroom bunoa- 
low Excellent quiet location. 
Steps from Village. Could be Im¬ 
mediate possession. By owner. 
$68,900. 11V*% mortgage. 
386-5138,598-4836. 


10Vi%/3 YEARS 

$53,000 mortgage on full price of 
$105,000 buys a new energy 
saver, 3 bedrooms, cedar front, 
spacious home. Drive by 3986 
Hopkins (off Cedar Hill X Rd. at 
McXenzje^ Viewing appoint 


SOOKE RIVER RD. EXCEP- 
t Ion a I property 2 miles from the 
provincial park, almost 3 acres 
of lovely forest and sunny pri¬ 
vate beach. Large newly built 
artistic home. Must be seen. Sale 
by owner. $145,000. 642-3791 or 
385-3521. 


$62,500 

For sale by owner cosy Victorian 
cottage. 3 bedrooms, living room 
with fireplace, dining room, gal¬ 
ley kitchen, basement with play¬ 
room, sundeck. Fenced lot with 
fruit trees. Victoria West. No 
agents. 385-1958. 


PEAR STREET UNIVER 
sitv. $40,080 at 11%%! solid 3 
bedroom, tull basement home. 
Fireplace In living room. Sepa¬ 
rate dining room, recreation 
room. Drive-In garage. $83,900. 
478-5319 


CENTRAL SAANICH 
Comfortable family home at 
quiet location. 4-bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, fireplace, workshop, 
basement, on easily maintained 
large lands c aped lot, with soa- 
view. Asking $98,500 479-3310. 


B.C. LAND 

AND INSURANCE 
AGENCY LTO. 


QUICK 

POSSESSION 

$73,500 

Attractive home on nicety land 
scaped corner lot In Western 


$75,900 — IN FOOTHILLS JUST 
south of Mt. Douglas on Cedar 
Hill Road. 2bedrooms, M baths, 
2 level concrete block, large liv¬ 
ing room with fireplace. Very 
private surrounded by trees on 
110' lot 658-5433. 


CENTRAL SAANICH. VIEW 
plus large .lot, by owner. 3 be<5 
room, 2X00 sq. ft, spilt entry, 2 
fireplaces, family room with 
games area, ensulte, rural sur¬ 
roundings, dose to amenities. 


2 3725 


1717 FERNWOOO 
1600 so. ft. revenue home. 
Beautifully landscaped lot 
approx. 11X100 sq ft. 

OPEN HOUSE 



tfRm L M»rL,'i»ua. 

BY OWNER 
Prime Gordon Head 
1703 ASH ROAD 
In Artxrfus Grove 
$109*00 

mm 




250 HOUSES FOtUii 


JAMES BAY. COMFORTABLE 
older home, 2 bedroom, living, 
dining, kitchen with eating, 924 
square feet, l floor, close to 
shops, bus and parks. Phone 
592-4557. 


FOR SALE BY OWNER. 2-BED- 
room basement home with sepa¬ 
rate garage at 3400 Wascana 
Street. Please do not disturb ten- 
ants. $47,500. Phone 388-5764 


$57,500 BY OWNE R $57,500 
Two bedroom home, on large lot, 
feature wall with fireplkce, elec¬ 
tric heat. Garage. 4794)946 after 
5:30pm 


COLWOOD, COSY TWO BED- 
room, 1235 square foot home, 
with 360 square foot garage, no 
basement. $60X00. 478-1540. No 
realtors 


CHARACTER HOME, ORIGI- 
nai 1914 woodwork and brass, 
1000 sq ft. Oak lands. Charming 
but needs some work. $65X00. 
Owner, 595-3389 


3 bedroom house on large 
brick fireplace, on Goldstri 
Park. $67,500. 4780779 


on large lot, 
earn 


IMMACULATE 3 BEDROOM 
strata duplex In Colwood. $55,900 
full price, assumable i0'/4% 
mortgage. Call to view 478-4058 


SECLUSION, 2 BEDROOM 
home, oarage, $87,900. Call 
3866552 or 592 3920. F. C. Hully, 
Rea (Estate. 


BY OWNER 

2 bedroom no basement home, 
close In, excellent condition. Low 
taxes. $67X00 385-6047 


PRIVATE. JUBILEE HOSPI- 
tal area, large lovely 3 bedroom 
home, 1833 Newton St. 


4-BEDROOM SPLIT LEVEL, 
1595 Whlffln Spit, Sooke. 
642-5794. 


3-BEDROOM BUNGALOW, 1248 
Fairfield Rd, oood holding prop¬ 
erty. 


2S3 COUNTRY HOMES 
md PROPERTIES 


CAMOSUN AREA 
5-ACRE SECLUSION 
MINI-FARM 
Careful clearing of trees has 
resulted in a bright, airy site 
exposed to the sun but delightful¬ 
ly secluded. The 2-yearpld elec¬ 
tric heat home has 4 bedrooms, 3 
baths, spacious L-shaped living 
room/dlnlng room, with area tor 
further development. Fully car¬ 
peted. A 40'xl6* barn and con¬ 
siderable fencing for the 7 head 
of cattle currently being run. 
About 15 newly planted fruit 
trees. An excellent property only 
minutes from downtown. Offers 
Invited on SI 72,500. MLS. 
BILLREMPLE 

658-5794 477-1841 

BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD. 


SUPERBLY CRAFTED 
LOG HOME 
PRIVATE ACRES 

Delightful privacy and quiet on 
lightly treed 5.72 country acres. 
Spacious and very well con¬ 
structed log home with massive 
rock wall fireplace, beautiful 
pegged oak flooring in entertain¬ 
ment size living and dining 
rooms. Large country kitchen 
with built-in barbeque. Small 
outbuildings plus double carport 
and workshop. Cleared area for 
gardening.$139,000. Exclusive. 

DAVE VOGELGESANG 
477-1841 388-5464 

Office PGR »760 

BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD. 


CENTRAL SAANICH 
VIEW PROPERTY 

Complete privacy In this 2,000 sq. 
ft. 2-bedroom ranch style home 
located on over 11 acres of natu¬ 
ral B.C. Arbutus treed property. 
46x20x8 ft. deep skinny dipping 
swimming pool, greenhouse and 
kitchen garden. Fantastic views 
facing Southwest with great 
solar potential tor hot water heat 
and pool. EXCLUSIVE listing 
and sorry, no drlve-bys. Asking 
$269X00. Details by contacting 
K.O. MOORE 

P. R BROWN 8. SONS LTD. 

385-3435 


HORSE 

COUNTRY 

Peaceful NORTH SAANICH Is 
the setting for this quality built 
6-year^>ld family heme situated 
on 2 ACRES of level lend. MUST 
BE SOLD! Owner will assist with 
financing to qualified purchaser. 
All reasonable offers on $129,000 
will be considered. 

Maureen Pickup 
477-0463 OR 477-7131 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


5ACRES 

Modern spacious home located 
on 5 acres partly treed with a 
lovely meadow. The land suits 
many different uses. Located in 
Metchosln. Priced at $109,900, 
call CHRIS GREIG 386-6164 
CASTLE PROPE RTIES LTD. or 
386-1296 res. or PETER VIN¬ 
CENT 383-5578. 


2.4 ACRES 
ONLY $119,000 
SUPER RANCH HOUSE 
3 bedrooms — master large with 
ensulte. Beautiful cabinet kit 
Dining rm., 3 stall barn, riding 
ring. Phone now to view. 

Ruth Salaga 652-4362 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 381-2233 


2-BEDROOM RENOVATED 
home, has energy-saver wood 
stove, fireplace, sundeck. elec¬ 
tric heat, on Vi-acre lot, 5 
minutes out of Duncan. $43,000 
firm. 112-746-7659. 


$23,900. 3.11 SECLUDED 
acres overlooking the Sooke 
Hills. Road and building site 
roughed in through treed prop- 
erty 642-3263. 


SAANICH PENINSULA 
PROPERTIES LTD. 
2354 Beacon Ave., Sidney 
656-4000 


GORDON HULME LTD. 
Sidnev-Saanich Peninsula 
656-1154 2444 Beacon Ave. 


6 ACRE METCHOSIN FARM, 
house, bam, mobile home, fruit 
trees. $118X00478-9819. 


SI WnORONT 


REPLSPPn 


PROPERTIES LTD 


846 BROUGHTON 3SM4M 

WATERFRONT 
PROSPECT LAKE 
OPEN HOUSE 
WED., 1:30-4:00 P.M. 



to Prnwirl Elomantary School 

down). Inmo motto, borm. 7 
POC^LoAo ond or Icon ot SIS? AM 


DOUG MENZIES 


CkCSPTKMM. 


SI WITBtntWfT 


C-9 


From 6 Last Week 
To 3 

1 Watervlew Arbutus. 4 bed¬ 
rooms. West Coast contempo¬ 
rary. $285,000. 

2 360 degree water views. Tree- 
top>Heights, Cordova Bay. 

3 620 ’C of waterfront. 5 acres 
In Sooke. Beautiful views. $65,- 
000 . 

The Zieglers 
384-8075, Pgr. 310 

SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 595-3151 


WATER VIEWS 
WITH WATERFRONT 
10 ACRES 
$69,500 

At 17 Mile Road on the southern 
slope of the Malahat, turn right, 
then left onto Rocky Mountain 
Road. Wooded and wonderfully 
rugged with potentially splendid 
water views over Flnlayson Arm 
with more than 350 feet of water¬ 
front. For more details. 

JACK THOMAS. 382-8101 or res. 
385-2119. 

Natlonel Trust (344Q-A Douglas) 


SALMON 
OWN 450' 
WATERFRONT 

On 2.6 acres of good soil, timber, 
driveway, well, perked, hydro, 
all tor your dream home. Above 
Juan de Fuca, serene views to 
Olympic Mountains, short dlv 
tonce to Victoria. Call NOW — 
waterfront becomes like gold. 
George Brel ter 478-8493 British 
American Realty 385-1431. 


SAILORS AND 
FISHERMEN 


- — ----your 

own wharf and float, a comfort 
able cottage and a paved drive¬ 
way. This 1.28-acre parcel Is of¬ 
fered at $105,000. immediate 
subdivision potential. Call me 
for details. 

652-3006 Alex Davidson 479-1667 
J.H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd. 


WATERFRONT, LAKE COWI- 
chan, .6 acre. 100' waterfron 
tage, nicely treed, double garai 
and well on property. $45,“ 
383-8529 


iraoe 

5,000 


WATERFRONT LOT, SHAWNI 
side. 


VICTORIA WATERFRONT 
PROPERTIES INC. 
388-4477 


WILUS PT. WATERFRONT. 
$165X00. 652-2008, 656-6112. 


isi 


Treeland Estates 
2 bedroom 
Condominium 
View of Harbour 

This most attractive 2 Bedroom, 
1’/* bath condominium in a con¬ 
crete bui Iding, si tuated on the 4th- 
floor, Is a must see for the adult 
family. Priced to sell at $79,000. 
For appointments to view, 
please call Alec Gower 592-2407. 

Trade Your 
Condominium for 
South Oak Bay 
Home 

This 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom 
home is situated close to the 
VILLAGE on a large, land 
scaped lot. Priced at $134,000. 
Please call Alec Gower 59 2-2407. 

^MARGETTS^ 

& GOWER 

|OAK BAY PROPERTIES] 
LTD. 

L2227 OAK BAY AVE.4 
592 2487 


PAC-WEST 



INTERNATIONAL REAL 
ESTATE BROKERS INC 

388-6161 
GREAT VIEWS 

From this delightful bachelor 
suite. Located on the south side 
on the seventeenth floor of Or¬ 
chard House. Plenty of closet 
space. Offered for $32X00. For an 
appointment fo view, call Rock 
or Brent at 388-6161 on pagers 24 
hrs. 

GORDON HEAD 
$51,500 

Lovely 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom 
condo with almost 1000 sq. ft 
Located close to shopping and 
bus. MLS. For Private Viewing 
phone Terry Eden or Sharleen 
Eden, 388-6161. 


<^> 


Rirk fticific 


EXECUTIVE LIVING 
*59,500 

Large 1 br. and den. Full facili¬ 
ties — Pool etc. Close to all 
conveniences. 


Call Mary Allan 
Mike Ruddy 
or Pager 792 
Park Pacific Inv. 


595-5141 

656-4089 

388-5464 

383-41^4 


PENTHOUSE 
IN THE 

ROYAL WOODS 

Large one br. and den with loft. 
Excellent location All a men ties 
executive axnplex 


In this e 

Call Mary Allan 
Mike Ruddy 
or Pager 792 
Park Pacific inv 


59S-S141 

656-4089 


383-4124 


LOOK 

*404-1170 ROCKLAND 
OPEN 12-2 P.M. 

TUES., WED., THURS. 
Vendor has purchased and 
therefore will give immediate 

-*— on this destrabte tap 

ivy-beth Condo 
' - r-*<*II- 

---— - __Located 

In a small quite well managed 
building at Rockland and Lin¬ 
den. with excellent assumable 
mortgage. Asking $74,900 
Sm it with 

LEE WROBEL 
385-1431 

Briti sh American Raafty Ltd 

(Mngu rn 
i Hi ally A 
mrj*' Inirnlmml 
-nr 1 orporul ion 

OPEN HOUSE 


251 CONDOMINIUMS 


LADY JANE 

1120FAIRFIELD 
ONLY 4 LEFT in this 
brand new prestigious 
condominium. 


0 sq. ft.), laroe 
i eating areas. 


suites (K . .. 

kitchens with c_..._ 

ample closet and storage 
space, double glazed windows 
$71.9(0-80.900. 

9% FINANCING 

BUY DIRECT from 
BUILDER INATTENDANCE 
2-5 T ues.-Sat. 

658-1198 or 381-6452 
Trent Developments Ltd. 


Rark Racific 


A GREAT BUY 
$54,900 

Large 2 bdrm. 2 full bathrooms 
condo. Close to all facilities. 
Fresh on market. 


Call Mike Ruddv 
Or Pager 792 
ParKPac 


656-4089 
388 5464 
■aclficlnv. 383-4124 


SEAFORTH HARBOUR 
VIEWS 

Prestige condominium with 2 
bedrooms, 2 balconies, 2-4 pee. 
bathrooms. The living room con 
tains heatllator rock faced flre^ 
place and Its ceilings are vaulted 
with a skylight. Fascinating 
views from all windows Includ¬ 
ing all activity entering harbour. 
Possession on completion of 
documents. Priced $96,000. To 
view call 

Jack Thomas 

Off . 382 8101 Res. 385-2119 

NATIONAL TRUST 
REAL ESTATE 


ROYAL WOODS 
1005-1009 MCKENZIE 
$70,000 

2-BR, IV* baths. 3rd floor, south¬ 
west exposure overlooking gar¬ 
dens and pool. Most desired loca¬ 
tion In the complex. For further 
information call: 

LAURIE COMO 
(479-1179) 

Realspan Properties Ltd. 
. 388-6454 


CORNER SUITE 
$46,000.00 

This Is a desirable corner suite in 
adult oriented bldg. D/R win 
dow, 2-Br's. V* baths. Close to 
shopping on bus line. MLS. To 
view, please call: 

ELEANOR BRAY 
477-0141 592-1130 

477-0141CONNY YASE Y477-8751 
The PERMANENT 


“WHY RENT" 
Spacious 2-bedroom condomin¬ 
ium with 2 - 4-pce. bathrooms 
Separate dining room. Ensuite 
storage and washing facilities. 
Fridge, stove and drapes includ 
ed in asking price of $48,500. Call 
JIM BAILLIE to view. 479-4594 


TOWNHOUSES 

CCA 

3 unit complex, James Bay, posi¬ 
tive cash flow, $156,000 F.P. 
MIKE O'DONNELL, 386-2955 
anytime CENTURY 21 Mayfair 
Realty Ltd. 


ROCKLAND 

VIEWS 

One bedroom unit with fantastic 
views from Bay window in large 
living room with hardwood oak 
floors and FP. Exclusive with 
OLE KNUDSEN 479-2764 

Royal Trust_384-8001 


JAMES BAY $44,500 

2 Bdrm corner condo, handy to 
Plaza 8i waterfront. Vacant 
quick poss I will talk offers, 
trades or terms. 

TED BOWDEN 386-7577 

ALL STAR REALTY 386-1255 


SALE, BY OWNER, 3-BED- 
rooms, l’/j-baths, wood burning 
fireplace, 2-balconies, under 

J iround parking, 1148 square 
eet, sunny kitchen with 3-appli¬ 
ances. Close to shops, bus. $67, 
900. Call 381-0358 after 3:30. 


EXCHANGE CLEAR TITLE 2 
bedroom. IV* bathrooms, water 
view condominium for property 
or house at Shawnigan Lake. 
386-2144 


BRIGHT, 1 BEDROOM, COR- 
ner unit. Sears area, stove, 
fridge and dishwasher. $23,000 
first mortgaoe at 10%% to Octo- 
ber '82. Asking $38,500. 479-6134. 


Bay. No agents please. 595-5534 
before noon or after 4pm. 


25* TOWNHOUSES 


GRANDOPENING 

BRENTWOOD 

VILLAGE 

T0WNH0MES 

1184 Clark Road 
Brentwood Bay 

18 Two-Bedroom 
Homes 

Priced from $67,900 
to $69,800 

OPEN TO VIEW 
SAT. & SUN. 1:30-5 
DAILY 2-4:30 

Featuring: 

—Three models 
—Enclosed oarages 
—Wood-burning fireplaces 
—Dishwashers 
—Vaulted ceilings 
-Five-year Hudac Warranty 
Directions: Clark Road oft West 
Saanich Rd., one block North of 
Wallace Drive, in the heart of 
Brentwood Village Shopping 

Another superb residential de 
vetapment by Hugo Hucker Con 
structfon Ltd. and 

VICTORIA 
REALTY LTD. 

386-3S85 or 6S2-9155 


$62,900 





DENNIS L. JAMES 

mu 

Pemberton, Holmes 
Ltd. 

3148124 

o« etc i 

unique i la 

tSStffZr 

room colourOd appl'aiicrtT 


























































































































































































50 TltE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23. 1980 

259 TOWNHOUSES 271 LOTS FOR SALE 


3 BEDROOMS 
$59,900 

l mmaculatelv kept — with about 
1400 sq. tt. Living room, dining 
room, modern kitchen with din¬ 
ing nook having glass doors 
opening onto a private patio. IVj 
bathrooms. Basement with iaun 
dry. For details, please call: 

385-3435 JOHN EVANS 477 4452 
P. R. BROWN & SONS LTD. 
762 Fort Street 

UVIC 

Bright corner unit. Large kit¬ 
chen with E .A. and sundeck open 
to fenced patio. Living-dining 
room with brick F.P and over 
looking green areas. 3 spacious 
bedrooms up. Full bsmnt with 
finished family room, laundry 
facilities, and laroe STORAGE 
ROOAA. IVj bathrms. $69,900 
EXCL. 

479 1667 Mary McGuire 479 7668 
J H. Whittome & Co. Ltd. 

BURNSIDE TILLICUM TOWN 
house, 3 bedroom, IVi bath, pri¬ 
vate patio, major appliances, 
pool, $39,900. Private sale. 
479 6527. 


265 


HOUSIS WANTED 
TO BUY 


Calgary Couple 

Require a two or three-bedroom 
home close to buses and shop¬ 
ping vet on a quiet street. Good 
garden area essential. Maxi 
mum $90,000 cash Call CHRIS 
GREIG. 386 1296 or PETER 
VINCENT 383-5578 at CASTLE 
PROPERTIES LTD. 386-6164. 

Retired 

Victoria Couple 

Want to move to a smaller home 
within the 4-mile circle. Must be 
in good shape. Maximum $75,000 
cash Call CHRIS GREIG 
386 1296 or PETER VINCENT 
383 5578 at CASTLE PROPER 
TIESLTD, 386 6164. 

Central Saanich 
Cordova Bay 

Spacious modern 2-bdrm. home 
olus family room. Privacy and 
large lot preferred. Please call: 


PJ 

la 

JUNE HOUGHTON 
595-2121 477-6185 

NATIONAL TRUST 


I have a hard to-please client, 
very interested in locating a 2 
bedrooms smaller home with 
charm and a large garden area 
in the Uplands Gate/Willows 
Beach area. The home Is much 
more important than the price. 
If you have such a property, 
please call PETER VINCENT at 
CASTLE PROPERTIES LTD 
386-6164 or at my home 383-5578 

NO STEP 

3 BEDROOM RANCHER OR 
BUNGALOW URGENTLY RE¬ 
QUIRED. POSSESSION END 
OF AUGUST. PLEASE CALL: 

DON SINGLEHURST 
477-0191 479-9990 

ROYALTRUSTCORP. 


CASH OR TERMS 

Require 2 or 3 bedroom homes 
minimum 900 sq. ft. in good area, 
$50, $100,000, suitable for rental 
or renovation. 

GARY WHITELEY 
381-7233 <24 Hrs.) 

OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD 

JAMES BAY AREA 
Required by Sept. 1. Three bed¬ 
room town house or small home 
up to $ 60 , 000 . If you can help 
pleasecall Bill Carnegie at 
ISLAND HOME REALTY 
Office 386 7545 Res. 652 3677 

I PROMISE 

To spend a minimum of $400 per 
month advertising If I have the 
job of selling your home. For 
more information call: 

BenGreig 598 3105 or 381 2233 

CALGARY RETIRED 
Urgently require2or 3bedrooms 
with a full basement close to bus 
line Up to $100,000 cash. 
BENGREIG 598 3105 381 2233 
OCEANCITY REALTY LTD 

Character home within 4-mile 
radius. Interior work required 
no problem. Up to $85,000 Call 
MELODY VILLENEUVE. 
OCEAN CITY RLTY. 384 8563or 
381 2233. 

HAVE 32' MOTOR YACHT 
built by Philbrooks, fully 
equipped, value $40,000. For sale 
or exchange for real estate In 
Gordon Head. First time on 
market. 477-8804 

CASH CLIENTS 
Wish to buy home with 2-3 
bedrms. Basement if possible 
Phone Victor Wong 592-5454. 
Byron Price and Assoc. Ltd 

SELL TODAY 

investors have cash available 
for homes under $75,000. Call 
LEEWROBEL 385-1431 

British American Realty Ltd 

CASH PAID 

If vour home is suitable for 
rental purposes call my Agent 
Randy Small 388-6275 pager 
2283. British American Realty 

HOUSE IN OAK BAY OR 
nearby area, direct from owner 
Victoria Press Box 493. 

2 BEDROOM HOUSE/TOWN 
house. Victoria, Colwood. Sid- 
ncy. Under $50,000. 598-6948 

268 USTINCS WANTED 


3'/2% TO SELL 
YOUR HOME 

Valuation — No obligation 
Douglas Hawkes Ltd. 384-7128 
Len Thomas (Sr )_384 9176 

270 EXCHANGE 
REAL ESTATE 

HAVE REVENUE PROPERTY 
in Greater Victoria, will ex¬ 
change for home in the country 
or sell. No agents Apply Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 483, leaving 
phone number_ 

10 ACRES, GOOD SOIL. MILL 
Bay area $44,900 exchange for 
similar real estate value. 
388 6876 

271 10T$ FOR SALE 


<^>! 


Rark Pacific 

Dean Park Estates 

42 NEW LOTS NOW 
OPEN FOR VIEWING 

Choose vour new home site now 
while setechon is the greatest 
All treed lots m a beautiful natu 
ral setting, some with sped ecu 
lar ocean views of Haro Strait, 
Mount Baker and the Gulf Is¬ 
lands * 

Located m North Saanich on the 
stapes of Mount Newton, edlom 
•ng John Dean Provincial Park 
» utlyserviced 1 ecretotspriced 
from $404100 

t nitont* dofee to Penerme Lot 
mwo CamUa on East ke e n *eft 
wood, from Pat Bay Highway 
turn off «i Me fevish Mr office 
open daily M> J0tO4 30 



SEABREEZE 

OCEAN- 

MOUNTAIN 

VIEWS 

Next to salmon fishing & clam 
digging on 10.35 or 6.7 acres with 
good soil, timber, driveways, 
well, perked, hydro — ready for 
your country home, but close to 
Victoria. Those view properties 
become a treasure call NOW! 
Georoe Breiter 478-8493 British 
American Realty 385-1431 


BR0ADMEAD 

Visit us at our 
office-display home. 

950 Royal Oak Drive 
8:30 A.M.-5:00P.M. 658-5291 

Or Call 

JEANNIE OEWHURST 
384 8001 (24hrs.) 658 8980 

Royal Trust Co. 

3.17 ACRES 
$34,900 
SACRIFICE 

Choice treed lot with cleared 
buildlno site, sunny, dry and 
level on paved street with hydro. 
Only 1.5 miles from Sooke in 
Broome Hill Golf Course area. 
Priced for quick sale. Only 
$34,900 Exclusive. 
BILLMCAULEY 721-5457 

ARTPEAKER 477 3957 

MONTREAL TRUST 3862111 

NORTH SAANICH 
BEAUTIFULLY TREEDLOTS 
$36,500 - $39,500 

Each acre lot backs onto a 60 
ACRE WILDERNESS PARK re¬ 
served for the exclusive use of 
the lot owners at LANDSEND 
ESTATES. Services to include 
Municipally maintained roads 
and water mains. 12% Financing 
available with 20% down For 
details or brochure call 
Rick Hawkes — D. Hawkes Ltd. 
382 17S4 _ 384-7128 

HOME, SUITE PLUS 
EXTRA LOT 

4-BR home with 1-BR in-law 
suite plus 9,000 sq. tt. panhandle 
lot. Ideal home with revenue or 
investment with building lot. 
Close in parklike setting. All for 
only $135,000. Full details by 
calling: 

K.O. MOORE 
-385-3435- 

1 ACRE STRATA LOTS 
North Saanich. Price 
range $35,000 *42,000. 
Piped water, power, pri¬ 
vate parkland adjoining. 
Terms available. 

477-2330,652-3790 
652-2445,479-4686 

I ACRE 

Close to Deep Cove Trading. 
Level lot cleared. Property 
percs and has a 30 oal per 
minute well, on road & electric¬ 
ity to property $42,900 

LARRY LINEHAM 
595-0134 384 8075 por . 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
595-2121 


WEST COAST ROAD 

2 Lots of approximately one Acre 
each. One fully treed, one 
cleared. $22,000 and $24,000 On 
paved road. Hydro, well water at 
approx. 100 feet. To view call 
RALPH KELLER 385-9741 HEN 
DERSON REALT LTD, MLS 

REOUCEO FOR QUICK SALE 
Woodlev Road, private, treed, 
quiet country atmosphere, 
southern exposure, close to St 
Michaels University School and 
Lansdowne campus $69,500. 
477-0252- Courtesy to realtors 

OVER AN ACRE 

On Sooke River. New listing well 
priced at$27,900. 

AlexTalt 381-2233 or 598-0485 

DEAN PARK 

Terrific view, V 3 acre, cleared. 
Lot 5. Mainview Terrace. $68, 
900. Look and call collect Doug 
Bishop, 403-481 2137 Edmonton 

3 ONE ACRE LOTS AT MILL 
Bay, disposal fields installed, 
one lot has a 58' mobile home 
Phone 478-9567 

SOOKE. TWO SPACIOUS 
properties, partially wooded, 
good elevation, on quiet road. 2 
to 3 acres. 642-5508_ 

CLEARED VIEW LOT, 79'X105‘ 
with all amenities. Central 
Saanich, $42,000 cash. Phone 
592-9611. 

3 SEWERED LOTS, VICKERY 
Road, View Royal $38,006$40,- 
000. 479-9168. 

273 PROPERTY FOR SALE 


v 2’/2 ACRES 

7 miles past Sooke Vlllaoe on 
Westcoast Rd Parklike setting 
with cleared building site. In 
( lodes 2-bedrm mobile home in 
excellent condition, plus small 
"cabin in the woods ” Close to 
boat launching in saltchuck. 
Hydro on ppty Firm price of 
$49,500 

479 1067 DOUGRELF 479 5761 
J H. Whittome 8. Co. Ltd. 

DEVELOPMENT 
PROPERTY IN 
VICTORIA CITY 
CENTER 

One and a quarter acres zoned 
and approved for twenty town- 
houses Listed at $310,000. Call 
ED HIGGIN 477 7121 Of 477-4742. 
A E. LEPAGE WESTERN 
LTD. 

NORTH QUADRA 

l 3 o ACRES. Provlsionarv ap¬ 
proved siXxJivislon low cost of 
development because no roads. 
Includes small fix-up house. 
Price: $187,800. 

479 1667 Marion Foster 384 5908 
479-1667 Wilf Davis 658-8884 
J H . Whittome & Co. Ltd 

1 HECTARE IN ENCHANTING 
East Sooke. make an offer. Ap¬ 
proximately $35 per metre. 
642 5053 Ed. # 


VI PR0KRTY WANTED 


CASH 

Bonified builder developer 
wants lots and land for subdivi¬ 
sion Quick decision. Phone Ka 
sapi Construction 3866191 any- 
bme or 592-6081 res 

HELP UNITED PENTECOS- 
tal group needs a etwreh to rent 
Of buv or cheap property to pur¬ 
chase Colwood/ Langford area 
preferred. Anv Information 
would be appreciated 4784802 
or 478-2224 

DUPLEX STARTER FINOS15. 
JOO cash for downpayment, pay 
$460 per month for your own 
accomodation and you will be in 
business No aoents. Phone 
6S6-00168em. - 10am, 

CASH FOR SUBDIVIOABLE 
land D Hawkes Ltd , 384 7128 

FOR SALE 


WANT TO 

A NUI SAf 

i to Wacra ___ 

put storage barn and small 
ral and 


YANT TO UNLOAD 
USANCE PROPER 1 
acres wanted Suita 


RTY* 


INC OCEAN VIEWS 

acremresident arm iff *it 


_r to accept 

smeU down payment with an 
uuai tump unn reduction Prop 
‘ii, need not toe pretty An easy 
Quick sale to Mm right offer 
** — d ed immediately Men! 

n HIM III — 4W-S344 

VEAf PONT VANCOUVER ■ 
Mad Wddt CeddTns 

*Jutterw a *anrtwl *** 



2m acreage for sau 

AND WANTED 


WILKINSON RD. 
ACREAGE 

3.1 quiet, secluded acres only 20 
minutes from downtown. Old 
cottage on property rented for 
$190 p/mth. $88,000. MLS. To 
viewcall 

DAVID SCOTT 
Res. 479 4405 
_ Off 3863435 (24hrs.) 

V R BROWN 8, SONS LTD. 

SMILE CIRCLE 

5 acres, pond, meadows, treed, 
seclusion among fine new 
homes $85,000 479-6022 

60 ACRES SUBDIVIOABLE 
into 5 lots, sea and country views 
plus stream, 10 miles from Vic¬ 
toria, $178,000. 383-2827 or 
598 1421 

10ACRES$45,000. SOUTHEAST 
sea and mountain views. Par- 
tlallv timbered. Phone 
(604)642 4456 

HAPPY VALLEY, 10 ACRES. 
1000 sq. ft. home, pasture, cltv 
water, treed. $137400. 4760245. 
478-3370 

10 ACRE ESTATES. $44,900 
Mill Bay area. Brochure 
388-6876 

2S5 UP ISLAND 
PROPERTIES 


VANCOUVER ISLAND COT 
tage for all seasons. Campbell 
River area, semi waterfront 2 
bedroom cottage. Sportsmlnded 
family retreat close to Mt. Wash 
ington skiing, and Campbell 
River salmon fishing. Unob 
structed view of the sea and 
mountains. Lot 100 x 194, build 
your dream home on upper part 
of lot. No Agents. Please phone 
338-5260 Courtenay. 8.C. 

VANCOUVER ISLAND COT 
taoe for all seasons, Campbell 
River area, semi waterfront 2 
bedroom cottage. Sportsmlnded 
family retreat close toMt. Wash¬ 
ington skiing, and Campbell 
River salmon fishing. Unob¬ 
structed view of the sea and 
mountains. Lot 100 x 194, build 
vour dream home on upper part 
of lot. No Aoents Please phone 
338 5260 Courtenay. B.C 

170 ACRES. SPROAT LAKE, 
two rented houses, two good 
wells, 30 acres cleared, consider¬ 
able timber value, some subdivi 
sionpotential, a strategically-lo¬ 
cated money-maker with many 
alternate uses. Asking $350,000 
385-2057 0^658-8760. 

4.77 CHOICE WOODED ACRES 
on Cowred Rd., 40 miles from 
Victoria, beyond Mill Bay. Slop¬ 
ing land, big firs, cedars, etc., 
views. Power and phone availa- 
ble. 842400. 385-1470 

ENGLISHMAN RIVER 
5 acre parcels with access to 
river for swimming and fishing 
Near Parksvilla. Priced from 
$24,900. Call Ross Harvev, Cen- 
tury 21 Eagle Realty, 248^191. 

RV SITE AND MEMBERSHIP, 
Honeymoon Bay Association. 
Cowichan Lake. 598-2577 


290 


FARMS FOR SAU 
AND WANTED 


BY OWNER 
16 Acre hobby farm 
4 BR House 

Numerous Outbuildings 
6462078 

293 GULF ISLAND 
PROPERTIES 


ON SALT SPRING ISLAND 
A .56 acre treed lot, close to 
Ganges, on village water, quite 
high above Ganges Road, with 
lovely views and seclusion. Of 
fered by owner at $24,000. If vl- 
sitlno Salt Spring Island, go left 
onto Salt Spring Way (about 2 
miles before Ganges), and look 
tor sign describing Lot 28 Copy 
of plan mailed on request. 
598-4690 after 5pm 

SALT SPRING ISLAND 
ST. MARYS LAKE 
One of these 5 lovely cabins 8 
years old and completely reno¬ 
vated on 1.6 acres of waterfront 
(off paved road) can be yours for 
$45400 

Ruth of Steve Salaoa 652-4362 
Ocean Cltv Realty Ltd 381 2233 

OWNER SALE 100 ACRES 
nicely treed subdlvidable prop¬ 
erty, fantastic home sites. View 
Gulf Islands and Coast Range. 
$2000 per acre, excellent terms. 
112 748-8672_ 

294 MAINLAND AND 
OUT OF PROVINCE 
PROPERTIES 


BY OWNER, $65,900 FP 

3 bdrm home, 6 years old, 1720 sq 
ft, master ensulte, plus 2 baths, 2 
brick f-p, lower floor fully fin¬ 
ished, oas heat, double garage, 
attractive landscaping. Mission 
B.C. 1 hour drive to Vancouver 
on bus line. 112-8269387, 

HAWAII 
BY OWNER 

Ocean view lot in sunny Kona, 
close to town and beaches, un¬ 
derground utilities. $49,500 US; 
terms. 629-6305._ 

VACATION LOT, EXCELLENT 
future development potential, v$ 
acre In NE California, pine 
forest with lake, trout stream, 
stables, pool and lodge facill- 
tles, $9000 478-6388._ 

ONE ACRE LOT ON ISLAND 
of Hawaii Ready to build on. 
3868435 daytime, 382-0289 eve- 
nings. _ 

NE W LOG CABIN, 730 SQ F T ON 
75x200' lakeview lot in southern 
Cariboo. $30400. 112-245-4959 



AOCTIPK 


EVERY WED. 
7:00 P JR. 

■Whan OutHty Stool Bagmt 
WE BUY. SELL 
AMO APPRAISE 

THIS WEEK 
FEATURING: 

Exc e llent selection of re- 
finished oak furniture. 
1930 s complete bedroom 
guiles and overatuffed 
chesterfield Mahogan y 
Queen Anne Style mir¬ 
rored sideboards Also 
wardrobes, china cebi- 


harvest tables, chairs, 
braes candto sticks, pic¬ 
tures. bric-a-brac, appk- 



( Deaths and funerals 


3D5 DEATHS sad 
FUNERALS 


BECK — In Victoria General 
Hospital on July 20, 1980, Dr. 
Richard Beck, aoed 83 years. 
He is survived by his loving 
wife. Margaret; one son, Ri¬ 
chard, of Iowa; one daughter, 
Margaret, of California; one 
brother, Valdl Beck, in Winni¬ 
peg, Manitoba, several grand¬ 
children. nieces and nephews 
Funeral service on Thursday, 
July 24 at 1:30 p.m. In Grace 
Lutheran Church. 1273 Fort, with 
Pastor R. Nelson officiating 
Cremation to folow. McCall 
Bros, in charge of arrange¬ 
ments. 


BOTTING — On July 21, 1980 in 
Victoria, B.C . Robert P. Bot- 
tmg, in his 72nd. year, born in 
London, England He is sur¬ 
vived by hisloving wife Jessie 
Marguerite, five sisters-in- 
law. He was a member of the 
Army, Navy and Airforce Vet 
erans No. 12 and was 47 years 
with the C.P.R. Coast service. 
A Private funeral service will 
be held on Friday, July25at2 00 
P.M. in McCall Bros FAMILY 
CHAPEL with the Rev. D Noon 
an officiating, followed by cre¬ 
mation. (Flowers gratefully de¬ 
clined). Donations If desired 
may be made to the Respiratory 
Research. 1902 Fort St., Vic¬ 
toria. B.C. 


Victoria, B.C., Thomas Wal¬ 
lace Braid, aged 80 years, late 
of 4036 Hodgson Place. He 
leaves his daughter Mrs. Mary 
Sinclair at home, two sons, 
Andrew in Ontario and Tom of 
Nanaimo, eight grandchil¬ 
dren, one great grandchild, a 
brother John in Scotland. Mr. 
Braid was the Session Clerk of 
Trinity Presbyterian Church 
for the past 10 years. 

Funeral services will be con¬ 
ducted by the Rev. G.D. Smith in 
Trinity Presbyterian Church 
2964 Tllllcum Road, on Thursday 
July 24 at 11 A.M. Interment to 
follow in Hatlev Memorial Gar¬ 
dens. If friends so desire, dona¬ 
tions may be made to a charity of 
their choice. 


DUERICHEN — Suddenly in 
Victoria, B.C„on July 18,1980. 
Gerrard Guenther Duerichen 
of *508-701 Esquimau Road, 
born in Germany and a resi¬ 
dent in Victoria since 1957. He 
is survived by his mother in 
Germany and many friends. 
Visitation will be held on Wed¬ 
nesday evening from 7:30 to 9 :00 
p.m. in McCall's Chapel. Service 
will be held on Thursday, July 24, 
at 1:30 p.m. in McCall's Chapel. 
Vancouver and Johnson Streets, 
followed by cremation. Flowers 
gratefully declined. 


HEASMAN — In Victoria, B.C, 
on July 22, 1980, Mr. James 
Thomas Heasman, aged 74 
years, born in Folkestone. 
England and emigrated to 
Canada in 1961, late residence. 
150 Memorial Crescent. Pre¬ 
deceased by his daughter, 
Pauline, in 1974. He leaves his 
wife, Anne, at home; son, Ro 
bert; four grandchildren, 
Ruth. Marcus. Miriam and 
Anne; sisters, Queenie. May, 
Peggie and brother, Albert, of 
Folkestone, England. 
Aranoements to be announced 
by the sands Mortuary Limited. 
Flowers gratefully declined 
Those so desiring may contrib¬ 
ute to the Victoria Cancer Clinic, 
1900 Fort Street. Victoria. B.C. 
V8R 1J8. 

SANDS —VICTORIA 


HOULE — At the residence on 
July 21, 1980. Dora E. Houle, 
aged 83 years, of 203 999 South- 
gate Street, born in Newport, 
Monmouthshire. England, and 
a resident of Victoria for many 
years; widow of Henry J. 
Houle, she leaves her sister 
and brother-in-law Miriam G. 
and George Oare of Victoria 
also sisters-ln-law, Bena of 
Portland and Ruth of Medina, 
California; nieces and 
nephews. She was a long time 
member of Oak lands Chapel. 
Funeral service will be on 
Thursday. July24, at3 00p m. in 
McCall Bros. Chapel. Vancouver 
and Johnson Streets, with Mr. J. 
W. Robertson officiating fol 
lowed by interment at Royal Oak 
Burial Park. Flowers grateful¬ 
ly declined, donations may be 
made to the Cancer Fund. 857 
Caledonia Avenue, Victoria, 
B.C., or to the Gideon Bibles, c/o 
McCall Bros , 1400 Vancouver 
Street. Victoria, B.C. (3864465). 


LAWRIE — On July 22, 1980, 
John Gibson beloved husband 
of Elizabeth (Daisy) Lawrieof 
Victoria, in his 80th year. Sur 
vlved also by his brother Gor 
don, Leduc, Alberta and nieces 
and nephews. Mr. Lawrie was 
a member of The Carpenter 
and Joiners Local 1598. 
Memorial service Friday July 
25 at 1:30 P.M. in the Chapel of 
First Memorial, 4725 Falalse 
Drive. Rev. Laura Butler offi¬ 
ciating. Cremation No flowers 
by request. Arrangements 
through the Memorial Society of 
B.C. and First Memorial Ser¬ 
vices. 


LIME R — Now with his Saviour, 
accidentally on July 19,1980, at 
Kelowna, B.C., Mr John 
Thomas Lfrner, beloved hus¬ 
band of Nellie Limer. of Ri 
chard's Tcail, Duncan, B C., 
aged 28 years. Mr. Limer was 
employed In the forest indus¬ 
try by WFI. Besides his wife, 
he Is survived by his parents, 
Mr. John Limer of Crofton and 
Mrs. Lii Limer of Vancouver. 
Three sisters. Ms. K Belton 
(Kathy) in Victoria, Miss 
Penny and Miss Oiana of Van¬ 
couver. A brother, Thomas 
Services for Mr. Limer will be 
held on Thursday, July 24, in 
Sands Funeral Chapel at 1:30 
p.m. at Duncan, B.C. with Pastor 
Robert Birch officiating. The 
duet will be sung bv Mr. and Mrs. 
Harley Abram. Interment in 
Mountain view Cemetary. 

SANDS—DUNCAN 


McNABB — Eleanora of Vic 
toria, formerly of Regina 
Beach, Saskatchewan, sud 
denly in July 20, 1980, in her 
78th year. Predeceased by her 
husband, an infant son, father, 
mother, three sisters and two 
brothers. Survived by one son, 
Murray (Regina); and one 
daughter. Mrs. R. B. Perry 
(Lois). Victoria; six grand¬ 
children, one oreat^jrand 
child; also two sisters, Lillian 
Berg and Bernice Krause, both 
of Victoria; nephews and 
nieces Mrs. McNabb was a 
active member of Eastern 
Star and Oak Bay United 
Church. 

Memorial service will be held 
Friday. Juty 25. at 2:00 p.m. in 
Oak Bay United Church. Rev. A. 
Jack officiating. Cremation 
Flowers gratefully declined, do¬ 
nations may be made to the BC 
Heart Foundation. Arrange 
meats through the Memorial So¬ 
ciety of B.C. and First Memorial 
Services. 


— After a l_, ... 

AAy IA, mk Jessie A . 
IwMacr *" 1 


beloved wife of VelF 1 
***** Acodemv Close In her 
91st veer. Survived also bv one 

anijahn Meaty and two greet I 



writ_ 



X» WMOKXItM 

DOBBIE — In loving memory of 
a dear husband and father, 
Gordon L_, wt>o passed away 
July 23.1972. 

Nothing can ever take away 

The love a heart holds dear. 

Fond memories linger every¬ 
day. 

Remembrance keeps him dear. 

—Always remembered by his 
wife Janet, sons Gordon. 
Garry and families. 


dear father, Gordon L. who 
passed away July 23.1972. 

If I had one lifetime wish. 

One dream that could come true, 
I would pray to God with all my 

For yesterday and you. 

If teardrops were a stairway, 
And memories a lane, 

I would walk all the wav to 
heaven, 

And bring you back again 
A thousand times I needed you, 

A thousand times I 've cried. 

If all my love could have saved 
you dad. 

You never would have died. 
From son Gor don and family 

SIMMONS—In loving memory 
of my husband, Leslie 
(Simmy), who passed away 
July 23,1979 

Looking back in tenderness, 
Along the path he trod 
I bless the years I had with him, 
And leave the rest to God. 

What would l give to clasp his 
hand. 

His happy face to see. 

To hear his voice, and see his 
smile, 

That meant so much to me. 

If all this world were mine to 
give. 

I'dgive It, yes and more. 

If l could see my loving husband. 
Come smiling through the door 
So many things have happened. 
Since he was called awav. 

So many things to share with 
him. 

Had he been left to stay. 

-Always remembered and sadly 
missed. Lee 


310 FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



THURSDAY 

DUERICHEN 
Mr Gerrard Guenther 
1:30p m. FLORAL CHAPEL 
BECK 
Dr. Richard 
1:30pm GRACE 
LUTHERANCHURCH 
HOULE 

Mrs. Dora Eleanor 
3:00p.m. FLORAL CHAPEL 

FRIDAY 
BOTTING 
Mr. Robert P 
2:00p.m. Private Service 
FAMILY CHAPEL 

McCALL BROS. 
Funeral Chapels 

JOHNSON AT 
VANCOUVER STREETS 

For Funeral 
and Pre-Arrangement 
Information 
Phone 385-4465 



Since 1912 

SCARING and CARING to Pro¬ 
vide ALL TYPES Of SERVICE 
through COMMU N I T Y 
CHAPELS 

Phone Anytime 

VICTORIA 388-5155 

SIDNEY 6562932 

COLWOOD 478-3821 

DUNCAN 7465212 

LADYSMITH 245-2331 

NANAIMO 753-2032 

PARKSVILLE 248-3238 

LAVE RNE and MASON SANDS 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
AND OTHERS 

MADELINE SMITH, also known as 
MADELINA SMITH, deceased. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that creditors and others having 
claims against the estate of MA¬ 
DELINE SMITH, also known as 
MADELINA SMITH, deceased, 
formerly of 3171 Donald Street, 
Victo ria, B.C.. are required to send 
fhom to the undersigned Adminis¬ 
tratrices at Suite 305, 1020 Govern¬ 
ment Street, victoria, B.C., V8W 
1X7, an or before the 6th day of 
September, i960, after which date 
♦he Administrators will distribute 
♦he assets of the said estate among 
the parties entitled thereto, having 
regard only to the claims of which 
they then have notice 

ROSIE BYRNES 
SUSANNA BLEILE 
Administratrices 
CAMPBELL, DONEGANI 
& WOOD 
Solicitors 


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

SCALED TENDERS FOR Electric*! 
wtrtng ot Rve shekerhouses (green- 


**ry be received by the under 
»gne<j ai Room 301. 612 Johnton 
Stfe«< (maxing address 1450 Oov 
Street) Victoria. B C. V8W 
3E7 (*) to 3 30 p m (local time) on 
August 14. I960 and opened m 
pubkc at that time 
Plana and specifications may be 
viewed after Juty ?3. tgfto at 
(1) Construction Association ol 
Victoria. 1075 Aleon Street. 
Victoria V»A 3S6 

C2> Manamo Construction Aaaocia- 

y . J M 37 WjForess q Md 

(3) North VJ Construction Assoc 
*101. 1180 tronwood. Camp! 
bek River ww bP7 

(4) ABm mt Vaaey Conun^son As¬ 
sociation. 3tOt Brrd Street. 
Port Abm V9V rut 

Plans may be Mewed and/or ob¬ 
tained after JtAy ?3. i960 tram 
(I) Technical Services Branch. 
Mena** Fora el s . 1061 Fon 

8t . Victoria vew 3C T 
♦7) Forest Ranger 8o> 909. Parks- 
•Me VOR 7SO 

« Masery S spe n toendara Go»- 




310 FUNERAL DIRECTORS 


yi'jJMrti (1C FaMCal 

~htvnscn c T (Sn’/n£ 


Funeral Chapels 
1625 Quadra St. 
386-3505 

CUNNINGHAM 
FUNERAL CHAPEL 
1155 FORT STREET 
Phone 314-5512 or 3141624 
Offer - 1 ng dignified moderate ser¬ 
vice for all. Geo. S. Cunningham, 
owner, manager. 

FIRST MEMORIAL SERVICES 
Serving the Publk and Exclu¬ 
sive Area Undertakers for the 
Memorial Society of B.C. 
658 5244 


311 MONUMENTS 


STEWART MONUMENTAL 
WORKS LTD. 
ESTABLISHED 1896 
Marble fireplace and tabletops. 
1403 May St. 384-3452 

Memorial of Distinction 


Mortimer's Monuments 
383-6421 

709 KINGS RD. (at Douglas) 
FOUNDED 1877 

312 FLORISTS 


DAISY CHAIN 

I 'pdo'iiJt 


Daisy Chain Florist 

382-2512 435 Simcoe St. 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
AND OTHERS 

Re: Estate of PETER MELLING, 
deceased. 

NOTICE Is hereby olven that 
creditors and others having claims 
against the above, late of * 101-1270 
Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C., V8S 
2N3, are hereby required to send 
them to THE ROYAL TRUST COR¬ 
PORATION OF CANADA, P.O. 
Box 580, Victoria, B.C.. V8W 2P6, 
before August 20th, 1980, after 
which date the Executors will dis¬ 
tribute the estate among the parties 
entitled havino regard only to 
claims of wbich they then have no¬ 
tice. 

OATEO July 18, 1980 
NORA EDOISON 
MELLING and 
THE ROYAL TRUST 
CORPORATION 
OF CANADA. 

Executors. 

HARMAN & COMPANY. 

540-645 Fori Street. 

Victoria. B.C., 

Solicitors. 


SCHOOL OISTRICT NO. 47 
(POWELL RIVER) 

Sealed tenders are Invited for the 
reroofing of 4 schools In this dis¬ 
trict. 

Further details and specifications 
obtainable from the School Board 
Office. Tenders should be in the 
hands of the Secretary Treasurer. 
4351 Ontario Avenue Powell River, 
B.C. bv 2:00 p.m., Friday, 1st Au 
gust. 1980 

D I Reid. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 


AGRICULTURE CANADA 
Invitation to Tender 
SEALED TENDERS for the pro¬ 
tect or services listed below and 
■addressed to: Agriculture Canada, 
Director, Saanlchton Research Sta¬ 
tion. 8801 East Saanich Road, Sid¬ 
ney, B.C., V8L 1H3; Ph.. 6561173; 
will be received until 3:00 p.m. on 
the specified closing date. Tender 
documents can be obtained from 
the Administrative Office at the 
above noted address on payment of 
the applicable deposit 

PROJECT/SERVICES 
To upgrade the Power Distribution 
System at the Saanlchton Research 
Station, 8801 East Saanich Road, 
Sidney, B.C. The system consists of 
two primary metered services se¬ 
parated by the East Saanich Road 
The existing three-phase system of 
both services are to be extended to 
provide three phase 120/208 volts. 
4-wlre service In addition to the 
existing single phase 120/240 volt 
system. 

-Tender documents may also be 
seen at the Construction Associa 
lion Offices at (1) 1075 Alston St., 
Victoria, B.C. V9A 3S6. and (2) 2675 
Oak St., Vancouver, B.C. V6H 2K2. 
Closing Date: August 1, 1980 
Deposit: $25.00 

INSTRUCTIONS 

Anv required deposit for plans and 
specifications must be made in the 
form of a "Certified'' bank cheque 
to the order of the Receiver Gen¬ 
eral for Canada and will be re¬ 
leased on return of the documents 
in good condition within one month 
from the date of tender opening 
Deposits not reclaimed within i bp 
specified time limit will be forfelTTo 
the Receiver General. The lowest 
or anv tender not necessarily 
accepted. 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
ESTATE OF BARBARA HUBER, 
DECEASED. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY given that 
creditors and others having claims 
against the estate of Barbara 
Huber, deceased, late of Winnipeg, 
Manitoba, formerly of 3335 Ma¬ 
plewood Road, Victoria. British Co¬ 
lumbia. are required to send full 
particulars thereof to the Executor, 
The Canada Trust Company, 650 
View Street. Victoria, B.C., before 
the 29th dav of AUGUST. 1980, after 
which date the executor wHI dis¬ 
tribute the estate among the parties 
entitled thereto, having regard only 
to the claims of which It then ha - 
notice. 

THE CANADA TRUST COMPANY 
Executor, by 

COX, TAYLOR. BRYANT, 
Solicitors. 


NOTICE OF APPLICATION 
FOR CHANGE OF NA**E 

NOTICE Is hereby given that an 
application will be made to the 
Director of Vital Statistics for a 
change of name, pursuant to the 
provisions of the "Change of Name 
Act,'' by me: Jean Khemmattv 
Singh of 3360 Veteran St. In VJ5 
toria, V8P 4M9, in the Province bf 
British Columbia, as follows: to 
change mv name from Jean Khem¬ 
mattv Singh to Devi Khemmattv 
Ramprasad. 

Dated this 16 day of July. A D 
1980 

J. K. £lngh 


NOTICE OF SALE 
OF MOTOR VEHICLE- 
Pursuant To The 
Warehousemans Lien Act. 

Whereas Pierre Blondln. 2969 
Fairlea Cresc., Ottawa, Ont., ($ in¬ 
debted to the undersigned, in the 
sum of $692 00 for the storage of a 
1978 Monarch, serial No 
8W33F 537742 and said sum ought to 
have been payed and default has 
been made In the payment thereof, 
notice Is hereby given that the said 
vehicle will be sold at Public Auc¬ 
tion at Victoria Super Service tow¬ 
ing Ltd., 310 Bav St., Vlctora. B.C. 
on Wednesday, July 30- 1980. 
Victoria Super Service 
Towing Ltd., 

310 Bay Street, 

Victoria. B.C. 


I* 


Defence 

Construction 

Canada 


Construction 
de defense 
Canada 


PROJECT: Clean and Deepen Ditches, 

CFAD Rocky Point, CFB Esquimalt, B.C. 

FUe: ES 099 12 

SEALED TENDERS, marked as to content, addressed 
to the undersigned must be received not later than 3:00 
p.m. E.D.T. 

THURSDAY, August 7, 1980 

Tender documents may be obtained by Prime Contrac¬ 
tors only from DCL Plans Section, Ottawa, at the address 
below on deposit of $25.00 payable to Defence Construction 
(1951) Limited. (For tender documents call 613-998-9549 
or telex 053-4231.) 

Security deposits, if called for In the tender documents, 
must accompany tenders. 

W. J. Mulock, Secretary, 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited, 

12th Floor, S.B.I. Building, 

Billings Bridge Plaza, 

2323 Riverside Drive. 

OTTAWA, Ontario, 

K1A0K3 




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PROVINCE 


THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 51 


Tempest in a bathtub rages at Nanaimo council 


By DONNA RKIMER 

Cotoniil correspondent 

NANAIMO — A tempest in a bath¬ 
tub blew up at Nanaimo city council 
Monday night. 

The Incident shocked the mayor 
and left an alderman accusing the 
mayor of unspecified unseemly be¬ 
havior. 

It was all over a request from the 
bathtub society for weekend use of a 
city vehicle to pull a giant bathtub in 


iwo parades in the B.C. Interior. 

The council ultimately voted 5-4 to 
deny the bathtub society’s request, 
but not before Mayor Frank Ney's 
vocal support for the bathtub society 
led to a tew harsh words between 
himself and Aid. Ada Howden. 

The budget select committee, in a 
minority report, recommended that 
the bathtub's society’s request be de¬ 
nied. 

Ney termed the recommendation a 
shock, saying that the society had 


used a city vehicle for several years 
to pull the giant bathtub in various 
parades. 

He said the society would pay tor 
the gas, and that the cost to the city 
was low since the vehicle would be 
used over the weekend. 

He said the bathtub officials would 
be able to obtain a truck elsewhere to 
pull the giant tub but that the society 
"wanted the pride of having a vehicle 
with the city emblem on It.” 

“The thinking of this council has 


really deteriorated. There is no spirit 
or enthusiasm or pride in this city,” 
the mayor said. 

Aid. Howden, chairman of the bud¬ 
get committee defended the recom¬ 
mendation. She said that committee 
members felt they had no control 
over who would be using the vehicle 
and that something might take place 
that would reflect poorly on the city. 

She said one committee member 
had suggested, for instance, that 


someone sitting on the hood of the 
vehicle with a beer in his hand 
would damage the city's reputation. 

“That’s a very, very unfair com¬ 
ment,” Ney said. 

“We should have a look at pictures 
of you, taken in 1975,” shot back How¬ 
den. 

“I’ve never done a thing like that," 
protested the mayor. 

“There are reports you’ve done 
worse, sir," Howden retorted. 

Aid. Jack Little said that the city 


had already given the Bathtub So- ' 
ciety $6,000 in grants and that the 
vehicle request should be denied on 
the principle that the council should 
not undermine the work of the grant 
committee. 

Whether it was the principle, or the 
fear of the beer Image for the tub city, 
five aldermen voted to deny the 
request. 

Aid. Howden and Little were joined 
in their opposition by Alex Ferguson, 
Nelson Allen and Gino Sedola. 


Duncan tourism 
drop blamed 
on volcano fits 


By DEREK RHIND 

* Colonist correspondent 

DUNCAN — An inflationary economy, 
poor weather and the eruption of Mount 
St. Helens' are just some of the reasons 
given for this year’s drop in tourism 
throughout the Cowlchan Valley. 

One local tourist haven, the Silver 
Bridge Inn in Duncan, has reported a 50- 
per-oent drop in tourist visits this year 
ovef Jp9. 

A spokesman at the inn said "business 
is definitely down." 

He blamed it on the slow economy and 
the price of gas. 

He said the tourists from the U.S. "just 
aren’t coming. Most of our customers 
are driving in from Alberta.” 

Tut AREA’S MAJOR hotel facility. 
Village Green Inn, is not as hard hit, 
reporting that business was down slightly 
from the corresponding period last year. 

Village Green manager David Rose 
told the Colonist that “business is a 
little behind from this time last year. 
We’re down about three to four rooms a 
night." 

"However, we were expecting a bump¬ 
er "business this year with tourists, as 
was Victoria. But it just hasn't happened. 

“Advance registrations for August are 
definitely not that good. But this could 
change. Who knows, if we get some sun¬ 
shine we could be turning them away 
again.” 

At the Coho Motel, which was booked 
solid every night during the summer 
last ypar, bookings are down and the 
motel reports an occupancy rate of only 
half to three-quarters full this year. 

THE FACT that there are more hotel 
rooms available this year over last, with 
the opening of the Cowichan Valley Inn 
and the expansion of the Thunderbird 
Motel, may be one of the reasons other 
loc|l,l)otels are reporting a drop in occu¬ 
pancy rates. 

The Duncan Chamber of Commerce 
tourist office reports it is “fairly busy, but 
not booming.” 


Chamber tourist counsellor Joyce 
Schmidt said, "Traffic has not been quite 
so heavy this year as last. We have had 
lots of visitors from Alberta, Saskatche¬ 
wan and Ontario but an absence of Wash¬ 
ington and Oregon visitors.” 

She said the unseasonal amount of rain 
and the eruption of Mt. St. Helens were 
probably the main causes. 

"People just don’t like to drive through 
that area to travel up here.” 

Chamber of commerce president 
Maurice Chemeff blamed the drop on the 
"lousy weather.” 

“MOST PEOPLE don’t want to travel 
when the weather isn’t bright and sunny. 
Why leave Seattle on a wet, rainy day to 
go somewhere else where it’s wet and 
rainy? 

“I don’t believe it’s Mount St. Helens, 
the economy or the gas prices. 

"Who wants to pay good money to be 
shut up in a motel room with a bunch of 
kids screaming their heads off, because 
they can't go out to play in the sun¬ 
shine.” 

Cherneff compared the situation this 
year with a period in the early 1960s 
when there were similar weather condi¬ 
tions. 

“Tourism slumped badly then,” he 
said, "but a& soon as the sun came out and 
the weather improved, so did tourism.” 

“That’s all we need now, a little bit of 
sunshine and business will be booming 
again,” Chemeff said. 

The chamber president also blamed 
the provincial government “for its lack of 
responsibility” by replacing the Princess 
Marguerite with a smaller vessel and 
jetfoil on the Victoria-Seattle run. 


“THAT TRIP has now lost its cha¬ 
risma,” he said. 

Other reasons for the drop have been 
pinpointed by B.C.’s Tourism Minister 
Pat Jordan. 

Jordan says the province’s response to 
the tourist trade is behind the times, de¬ 
signed for the traveller of the 1950s, 
rather than the 80s. 


Details 
secret 
on near 
misses 

Details of an inquiry 
into two near-collisons 
recently involving air¬ 
craft at Victoria and 
Vancouver have been 
considered by Ottawa 
officials but depart¬ 
ment recommenda¬ 
tions will not be made 
public, Transport Can¬ 
ada spokesman Ste¬ 
phen Rybak said Tues¬ 
day. 

“Appropriate mea¬ 
sures have been taken 
to maintain the integ¬ 
rity of the system," the 
spokesman said in an 
interview from Van¬ 
couver. 

In air traffic jargon 
‘ the incidents would be 
called “near misses" 
because none of the 
four planes involved 
had to take evasive ac¬ 
tion. 

The lack of radar at 
Pat Bay didn’t appear 
to be a factor in the 
Victoria incident, 
Rybak said. 

Radar was included 
in the department's 
plans for the airport 
and would be consider¬ 
ed by Treasury Board 
this fall, but it would be 
two years from then, at 
the earliest, before it 
could be installed, he 
added. 

The incident at Pat 
Bay occurred when an 
in-bound Boeing 737 
came within 60 to 125 
metres of a departing 
twin-engine Beech- 
craft. 

The other incident 
took place a short dis¬ 
tance from Vancouver 
International Airport 
one day after the Vic¬ 
toria incident when a 
DC-8 and a Boeing 737 
came too close. 


Demolition plans crumbling 


Plans to demolish the 
Victoria Truth Centre at 
1201 Fort were given little 
chance of success Tues¬ 
day. 

Victoria city council’s 
planning committee told 
centre officials the church 
building would probably be 
designated as heritage the 
moment an application for 
a demolition permit is 
made. 


The aldermen weren't 
impressed by assurances 
from Rev. Emma Smiley 
that there wasn't one thing 
about the building that 
hadn’t been changed since 
it was purchased by the 
church in 1947. 

Even when she told the 
committee that rats were 
running everywhere at that 
time, the aldermen re¬ 


mained unsympathetic to 
plans for the building’s 
demolition. 

The church wants to tear 
down the building and erect 
a new, modern structure in 
its place. 

A model for the new 
building didn’t go over well 
either. 

Aid. Robert Wright said 


the city was trying to pre¬ 
serve Fort Street’s historic 
flavor and there was no 
room for a modern build¬ 
ing. 

He said the church could 
try to persuade the Heri¬ 
tage Advisory Committee 
that the building should be 
torn down. 

“I wish you luck,” he 
said. 


Three more prisoners flee 
from William Head prison 


Three prisoners cut 
their way out of a dormi¬ 
tory and used a section 
of the prison wharf to 
escape from nearby 
William Head medium- 
security prison over¬ 
night Monday. 

The escapers, who 
were serving time for 
breaking and entering, 
were identified as Ste¬ 
phen John Thomas 
Johnson, 23; Gary Allan 
Smith, 22; and Raymond 
Edward Killen, 22. 

Colwood RCMP said 
Tuesday night they 
hadn’t been recaptured. 

"They could be any¬ 


where. They could have 
left our area or they 
could be in Victoria or 
Vancouver,” a spokes¬ 
man said. 

The latest escapes 
bring to 10 the number of 
prisoners who have fled 
this year. 

In January, two pris¬ 
oners tried to swim from 
the jail and are believed 
to have drowned. In Feb¬ 
ruary, two prisoners 
again took to the water 
but were captured. 

Earlier this month, 
three prisoners escaped 
in two separate at¬ 


tempts and have not 
been recaptured. 

Prison director Arlie 
Bender said a new look¬ 
out post will be installed 
and lighting will be im¬ 
proved to discourage es¬ 
capes. 

Fraser 
on spot 

COURTENAY — Aider- 
men here will continue to 
exert pressure on High¬ 
ways Minister Alex Fraser 
in an effort to have the 17th 
Street bridge in a usable 
stage in time for the B.C. 
Summer Games to be held 
here next year. 

Mayor Robert McPhee 
said he was pleased to 
learn the tenders were 
called Monday but queried 
what work could be done in 
the river other than in Au¬ 
gust. 

He said the city,was 
doing work along the river 
on Anderton Avenue and 
fisheries would allow the 
work to be done only in 
August because of salmon 
movement. 


COME TO THE FAIR 

The Victoria West Community “Y” and the PSC 
Workers Co-op will be presenting the second an¬ 
nual Rising Star Country Faire Saturday and Sun¬ 
day in Banfield Park, 521 Craigflower Road. 

The fair will feature music, crafts and food as 
well as clowns, puppets, mime, and an indoorswap- 
and-shop. 

Daycare and new games will be provided for the 
children. 


Saanich 

rewards 

bravery 


A formula governing 
awards for bravery was 
endorsed by Saanich coun¬ 
cil Monday. 

The policy would see a 
medal for bravery award 
ed "for the performance of 
an act of extraordinary 
bravery going beyond the 
call of duty, and involving 
danger of death.” 

An award for courage 
would be conferred on a 
person for the perfor¬ 
mance of an act of great 
courage, going beyond the 
call of duty, and involving 
the possibility of serious 
injury. 

A letter of commenda 
lion would be signed by the 
mayor and presented for 
an act of bravery in which 
the danger of death or seri¬ 
ous injury is remote. 

Dr. Hugh Keenleyside, 
awards committee chair 
man, said assistance had 
been received from other 
Canadian cities and the 
Union of B.C. Municipali¬ 
ties in arriving at the three 
category formula. Col. 
James Stone and Edith 
Gunning were other com¬ 
mittee members. 



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52 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 

NAMES in the NEWS 


FROM MARY QUANT 


i 




Friends toast Judy 
and she toasts back 


Judy Lamarsh was pro 
sented with the Order of 
Canada by Governor-Gen¬ 
eral Ed Schrcyer in a small 
ceremony Tuesday at Prin¬ 
cess Margaret Hospital in 
Toronto, w here she is being 
treated for cancer. A group 
of 30 close friends and offi¬ 
cials, including Ontario 
Lieutenant-Governor Pau¬ 
line McGibbon, toasted 
Miss LaMarsh—lawyer, 
author, professor, broad 
caster and federal cabinet 
minister in the Liberal ad¬ 
ministration of the late 
Lester Pearson—at the 
brief ceremony. Miss La- 
Marsh in turn toasted her 
friends with champagne 
after receiving the insignia 
of the Order of Canada, 
presented to distinguished 
Canadians. 

Months of speculation 
ended this month when 
Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher appointed 
George Anthony Geoffrey 
Howard chairman of the 
board of the British Broad¬ 
casting Corp., one of the 
most quietly influential 
posts in Britain. 

Wllmot MacDonald of 

Chatham, N.B.,' says he 
has a folksong for any oc¬ 
casion and he's always 
ready to sing on a mo¬ 
ment's notice. He had his 
chance Tuesday. MacDon¬ 
ald, a well-known Mirami- 
chi River folk singer, was 
filmed by a crew from the 
Washington-based Smith¬ 
sonian Institution for a se¬ 
ries the museum is prepar¬ 
ing on on Anglo-American 
singing styles. 

Former hostage Richard 
Queen had a "lightheart¬ 
ed” meeting in Washington 



on Tuesday with families 
of other captives still in 
Iran and reassured them 
about the conditions of 
their loved ones, but said it 
was a time to "pray a lot." 
Queen met for nearly an 
hour with 13 family mem¬ 
bers. He then had 
five-minute private sess- 
sions with each of the 17 
families represented at the 
state department session. 

Mary Eugenia Charles, a 
lawyer and staunch advo¬ 
cate of free enterprise, has 
led her Freedom party to a 
landslide election victory 
over Prime Minister Oliver 
Seraphin's centre-left 
Democratic Labor party in 
Dominica, officials in Ro¬ 
seau said Tuesday, Miss 
Charles will become Do¬ 
minica’S first woman 
prime minister. 

The Galloping Gourmet 

says he has become the 
happiest man alive since 
turning to God. Graham 
Kerr, who at one point 
needed $80,000 a year just 
to maintain his trendy life¬ 


style, said Tuesday he has 
developed a positive out¬ 
look toward society’s prob¬ 
lems since becoming a 
born-again Christian. He 
was speaking in Toronto at 
the first global conference 
on the future. 

Leroy Garrett, a black 
pioneer in U.S. radio 
broadcasting, has died at 
the age of 06. Garrett, 
owner and manager of 
radio station WEUP in 
Huntsville, Ala., emerged 
from the cotton fields and 
became the successful 
owner of the first radio sta¬ 
tion in Alabama owned and 
operated by a black. 

After reading that 
whales are partial to the 
tuba, Montreal zoologist 
Gerald lies wondered 
whether they might get an 
even bigger kick out of 
Scottish bagpipe music. 
Next month, lies will have 
a piper aboard ship on one 
of his regular whale-sight¬ 
ing expeditions on the St. 
Lawrence near the piouth 
of the Saguenay River, 
about 500 kilometres 
downriver from Montreal. 
“It’s a serious attempt to 
see if the great whales 
react to bagpipe music," 
said lies. 

A farmer who ploughed 
part of Manitoba provin¬ 
cial road 200 near Plumas 
last year to protest its bad 
condition has been billed 
$1,919 for his action. But 
Harold Kreutzer says he’s 
_ not goging to pay the pro¬ 
vincial government. 

"I’m not going to give 
them five cents,” he said in 
an interview. "The road 
was no good anyway.” 


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A' 

































) 


V 


Island 

109 Ingram, Duncan 
716-61X1 


SIjc Dails 



> (tol outfit. 


No. 189—122nd Year 




t anc,nicer Island's leading newspaper since 1858 

Victoria, British Columbia, Wednesday, July 23, 1980 


Cloudy , 
high 22 

Weather Details 
on Page 2 


* 25C Daily, 30C Sunday 




IVs too good a scapegoat 

tfk flip FI f\\\7 Capital Region District failure 
I/I/ tlltJ 11UW but it does jobs no one else will 



First of live parts 

By NANCY BROWN 

Colonist staff 

The Capital Region District is 
dead. 

Torn apart by territorial and 
personal bickerings and bogged 
down in legal suits, the board and 



Campbell 

... old fight 


its committees continue to meet, 
but progress is almost non-exis¬ 
tent, and decisions are made only 
under pressure of deadlines. 

It has taken 15 years at the 
hands of local politicians for Dan 
Campbell’s daydream of co-op¬ 
eration and mutual support 
among Victoria's seven muni¬ 
cipal councils and seven unorga¬ 
nized areas to fail. 

BUT DETRACTORS should 
not live in hope of getting rid of 
the board. 

Municipal Affairs Minister 
William Vander Zalm, and be¬ 
fore him Hugh Curtis, have been 
prom ising for years to "do some- 
thing" about regional govern¬ 
ment, but that something is not 
going to include major surgery. 

After all, as far as the provin¬ 
cial government is concerned, 
the regional board is a great 
scapegoat. 

IF ANYTHING IS not work¬ 
ing at the provincial level—dog 
control, public transit or what¬ 
ever—it’s a simple matter to 
dump the problem through legis¬ 
lation onto the region. 

Citizen objections are then fo- 



Curtis 

. former chairman 


cused on the regional politicians, 
and their provincial counterparts 
can stand back and applaud as 
the public takes on the region in 
the public arena and through the 
courts. 

It’s been a long and expensive 
15 years for taxpayers since Dan 
Campbell, then municipal af¬ 
fairs minister, brought in the 
legislation creating regional gov¬ 
ernments. 

FROM ITS FIRST $393,356 
budget to this year’s $26 million 
budget, the politicians have 


grumbled and fought and the 
taxpayers have complained. 

The first budget was a model 
of simplicity. 

Directors were responsible 
only for fireworks control and 
parks acquisition, and they met 
in a small office above Govern¬ 
ment Street with part-time secre¬ 
tary Tony Roberts (now Islands 
Trust secretary-treasurer) tak¬ 
ing minutes. 

The regional parks function 
was to cost $393,356, with a fur¬ 
ther $1,000 set aside for essential 
maintenance. All other expendi¬ 
tures totalled $10,000, including 
an honorarium of $1,750 for Ro¬ 
berts. 

REMUNERATION for all 
directors was $2,250, plus an ad¬ 
ditional $200 for chairman 
Curtis. Today, you can’t get one 
director to serve for a year for 
that $2,150 total. 

A sum of $100 jyas earmarked 
in that budget for a sewer 
study—the first expenditure on a 
long road of bungling and politi¬ 
cal manoeuvring that has seen 
the region, financed of course by 
the taxpayer, in and out of courts 
and appeal hearings. . *-a 

In 19X0, regional politicians 
are charged’with administration 
of a $26 million budget covering 
such diverse jurisdictions as 
Willis Point Fire Protection and 
Recreation, and community 
health services. 

Page 2—Region 


Economic union 
deadlock 
blocks accord 

• Bennett to start public push on constitution. 

Page 35 i 

VANCOUVER (UPC) — No consensus on renewed 
federalism is possible, until a compromise is reached 
on the federal government proposal to safeguard eco¬ 
nomic union in a revised constitution, Saskatchewan 
Attorney-General Roy Romanow said Tuesday. 

“I don’t think there’s been real movement yet 
and I don't think there can be real movement until we 
get some of the fundamental issues resolved, of which I 
think powers of the economy is one," said Romanow, 
co chairman of the constitutional reform talks, following 
Tuesday’s closed-door meetings. 

Federal Justice Minister Jean Chretien, the other 
co-chairman, said he was open to provincial sugges¬ 
tions to modify the economic union proposal. 

“But for me it is pretty fundamental. I’m talking 
about economic union in Canada—the freedom of move¬ 
ment of people, goods, services and capital (among 
provinces). I see nothing revolutionary about it.” 

Several provinces have expressed fears that the 
economic union proposal could affect their ability to 
legislate programs to aid their own citizens. 

Pact for builders 
‘best in country’ 


Government pension 
index limit boosted 


VANCOUVER (CP) — A 
tentative two-year agree 
ment was reached Tuesday 
night between the Con¬ 
struction Labor Relations 
Association and unions rep¬ 
resenting 45,000 B.C. con¬ 
struction workers. 

Settlement came follow¬ 
ing a marathon bargaining 
session under mediator 
Clark Gilmore. 

The package provides for 
a two-year wage increase 
of $3.35 an hour and geo¬ 
graphical certification on 


the contentious issue of 
union affiliations. 

Roy Gauthier of the 
Building Trades Joint 
Council said the package 
was the best in the country 
and his organization was 
satisfied. 

Association president 
Chuck McVeigh said the 
settlement was more 
money than the companies 
or the provincial economy 
could afford, but an expen¬ 
sive settlement was the 
only solution short of a 
strike. 


The B.C. Government 
Employee’s Union and the 
government have reached 
agreement on future pen¬ 
sion plans with what 
amounts to virtually full in¬ 
dexing still in place. 

Provincial Secretary 
Evan Wolfe introduced the 
agreement in the form of 
amended legislaton Tues¬ 
day. The legislation was 
welcomed by BCGEU head 
John Fryer as a victory of 
reason. 

The BCGEU had protest¬ 
ed earlier proposed legisla¬ 
tion and demanded a sec¬ 
ond look. The government 
agreed to the second look 
and for the past several 
weeks has been in close 
consultation with the union 
to come up with Tuesday's 
answers. 

One of the main union 
objections was that the 
original legislation would 
have placed an eight-per¬ 
cent ceiling on indexing, 
meaning that however high 
the cost of living rose, pen¬ 
sions would rise -a maxi¬ 
mum of eight per cent. 

In the amended legisla¬ 
tion presented to the Legis¬ 
lature on Tuesday no spe¬ 
cific indexing ceiling is 
mentioned, but union offi¬ 
cials say it is so high as to 
be non-existent. Other 
sources suggest the ceiling 
agreed to is between 12 and 
15 percent. 

Other major changes in 
the amended legislation 
would establish a consulta¬ 
tive committee of govern¬ 
ment and union officials; 
change the distribution of 
contributions from em¬ 
ployees; and provide that in 
future when an employee 


quits and takes a refund the 
matching employer contri¬ 
bution will remain in the 
pension fund rather than be 
returned to general reven- 
cue. 

Wolfe said the changes 
had one fundamental pur¬ 
pose — “to ensure that pen- 
sions promised to em¬ 
ployees will be secure in 
the future.’’ 

The change in the distri¬ 
bution of employee contri¬ 
butions provides that the 


seven per cent now contri¬ 
buted will be allocated 5Y, 
per cent to the pension fund 
itself, I'/, per cent to fi¬ 
nance indexing. 

School teachers, who 
were also challenging the 
earlier pension legislation, 
do not appear to be includ¬ 
ed in the amendments, al¬ 
though their professional 
association has been in¬ 
formed that it, too, will be 
welcome to nominate a 
niember to sit on the con¬ 
sultative committee. 


INSIDE 


Actor Sellers 
rights for life 

—Page 3 


Gnome-spotting 
isn't simple 

—Page 7 


Soviet swimmer 
shatters barrier 

—Page 13 


Yearling sells 
for $1.7 million 

—Page 21 


Radiation data 
‘ manipulated ’ 

—Page 26 


Four blasts 
blow silence 
of St. Helens 


VANCOUVER, Wash. 
(AP) — Mount St. 
Helens broke a six-week 
silence with four tower¬ 
ing ash eruptions Tues¬ 
day after a series of in¬ 
creasingly frequent 
earthquakes, the U.S. 
Geological Survey said. 

A pyroclastic flow of su¬ 
perheated gas, ash and 
rock also rolled down the 
north slope of the mountain 
reaching to Spirit Lake, the 
survey said. 

There were no immedi¬ 
ate reports of injuries. 

Residents of Cougar, 
about 24 kilometres south¬ 
west of the volcano, were 
being evacuated. 

A mushroom-shaped 
cloud of ash towered to a 
height of 14,000 metres in 
the first eruption at 5:14 
p.m., the National Weather 
Service reported. 

It said the ash was head¬ 
ing north-northeast toward 
many of the eastern Wash¬ 
ington areas blanketed by 
ash during the mountain's 
first massive eruption on 
May IX. 

A second eruption Tues¬ 
day came at about 6:25 
p.m.. with a darker cloud 
and larger plume rising to 
above 15.000 metre, said 
Carl Burgeson, spokesman 
for Gifford Pinchot Nation¬ 
al Forest. 

A third plume appeared 
shortly after 7 p.m., fol¬ 
lowed by a fourth blast at 
about 7:20 p.m. 

Within an hour of the first 
eruption, observers in a 
U.S. Forest Service plane 
reported that a lava dome 
which had been slowly 
growing in the crater since 
the last eruption June 12 
appeared to have a hole 
blown through it. 

"It looks like it blew its 
core,” said Phil Cogan of 
the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency. 

A Forest Service spokes¬ 
man said 120 firefighters 
Page 2—It’s got 


Tidal theory 
left in ashes 

Tuesday’s eruption of Mount St. Helens came 11 
days after the period of maximum tidal pull in the 
area this month, blowing a hole in a theory that eruptions 
might be indirectly related to monthly tidal peaks. 

However, the seismologists' jury is still out on the 
case. The latest series of four eruptions which started at 
5:14 p.m. might have been at a time of daily tidal peak, 
said Dr. Garry Rogers, of the Pacific Geoscience Centre 
at Pat Bay. 

Rogers believes the stronger pull of gravity from the 
sun and moon when they are aligned with earth could be 
the “straw that breaks the camel’s back" when an 
eruption is imminent. 

The Pat Bay centre’s seismographs began rec¬ 
ording renewed but moderate quake activity in the 
Mount St. Helens area at the weekend, he said, with 
several registering Richter 2.5 to 3, but the mountain 
was relatively quiet Tuesday, at least until shortly 
after 5 p.m. 

A weather office official said Vancouver Islanders 
need not worry about the possibility of ash being 
dumped in this area because the upper flow of air 
was from the southwest to the northeast. 

At X p.m. Tuesday, the official said, reports were 
being received of ash being visible or falling at Wen 
atchee, Yakima and Moses Lake, all north to northeast 
of the volcano. 

A number of Victorians who drove to area vantage 
points to see whether the eruption’s 10-mile-high cloud of 
ash and steam, was visible may or may not have been 
disappointed. 

Shortly after 7 p.m., a thin, flat grey cloud could 
be seen poking above the sea haze in the general 
direction of Seattle, which is approximately in a line 
with Mount St. Helens and Victoria. 


Run over twice 


VANCOUVER (CP)—A 
man was charged Tuesday 
with attempted murder 
after a fireman was run 
over twice by a car. 

Police said the fireman 
spoke to a driver whose 
vehicle was blocking the 
driveway to a fire hall. 


The car driver rammed 
the truck, knocking off a 
door and hitting the fire¬ 
man. The driver left, then 
sped back and ran over 
Fireman Ross Edward, 
who suffered a broken 
hand and foot. 

Yui Man Cheng, 38, was 
charged. 


First tyee entered 
from Nootka area 

—Page 31 

Angry Fraser hits 
shipbuilding cuts 

—Page 32 

House passes 
pipeline bill 

—Page 33 

Bridge 30 

Business 6-9 

Classified 41-50 

Comics 40 

Crossword 2X 

Editorials 4 

Entertainment 3X, 39 
King Fisherman 31 

Letters 5 

Living 27-30 

Marine Calendar 32 

Medical 30 

Names in the News 52 

Provincial Court 37 


Rapids claim victim, 
second in two weeks 


NANAIMO — A popular swimming 
spot on the Nanaimo River has claimed its 
second life in two weeks. 

A 24-year old Nanaimo man was 
drowned at the White Rapids area of the 
river Monday afternoon, nearly the same 
spot that a 19-year old man lost his life 
JulyX. 

Police had still not released the name 
of the second victim Tuesday evening, but 


said that the man was drowned after he 
lost his grip on a rope across the river and 
was swept into the rapids. 

Eric Ericson, 425 Wharton, Nanaimo, 
drowned two week- when he was 
swept into the rapids, and his body was not 
recovered until several days later. 

RCMP were able to locate the body of 
Monday's victim shortly after the in¬ 
cident. 


Air traffic controllers 
use pilot ‘blackmail’ 


Sports 


12-14,16,21-23 


QUEBEC (UPC)— 
Many Canadian air traffic- 
controllers practise a type 
of "blackmail” on pilots 
who question their actions, 
a federal inquiry into avia- 


B.C. dental plan minus some teeth 


VANCOUVER (UPC) — The 
long promised B.C government 
dental t an- plan will exclude the 
general public, but childn-n up 
to 14 years old, senior citizens 
and welfare recipients will bene 
fit. Health Minister Raft- Mair 
announced Wednesday 
Mair said the plan, to go into 
effect Jan 1. 19*1. would cover 
about 915 two British Columbians 
and cost the government $M5 3 
million in its first year of opera 
Don 

Coverage would be hauled to 


children up to 14, people over 65 
and those who now have their 
medical plan payments paid by 
the provincial government 

The plan will not provide 
“some measure of protection” to 
all British Columbians, as once 
promised. 

Basic dental wort, including 
checkups, x-rays, cleaning, fluo 
ride for children under 19. ex 
tractions, rout canals, fillings 
gum and bone treatment and 
denture repairs, will be covered 


There will be no premiums and 
no deductible under the plan. 

For persons whose medical 
plan premiums are paid by the 
human resources ministry, and 
for those who receive assistance 
with their premiums, the plan 
will pay for dental wort, inciud 
mg wort by denuinsts, to a max 
imum of $7W a year 

For all other senior citizens 
and children up to If. the plan 
will pay 59 per cent of deaui tails 
109 Gbil 


dren will also be eligible for a 
free checkup, including cleaning, 
scaling and fluoride treatment, 
once a year. 

Mair said dentists who chose to 
participate in the plan—it is op¬ 
tional—would be paid according 
to a fee schedule already nego 
bated with the College of Den 
tal Surgeons of B C. 

Dentists will bill the plan 
directly uu behalf of the patient, 
who will receive a copy of the 
claim form submitted by the 


Patients whose dentists do not 
lake part in the plan will have to 
pay their dentist directly for the 
services, then submit a claim 
form to the plan for reim¬ 
bursement 

Dr. Ted Kamagc. president of 
the dental college, bailed the plan 
as a positive step forward in 
dental care. - 
roanoda 

the plan is aimed at 


M helping tl 

children 


lion safety was told Tues¬ 
day. 

“For many controllers, 
concern for aviation safety 
has been transformed into 
a sort of blackmail which 
unfortunately in many cir¬ 
cumstances, harms rather 
than aids air safety," said 
Pierre Rivest, director of 
the Quebec ministry of 
transport's aviation de 
partment and a pilot of 32 
years. 

“It’s not unusual to see 
pilots, some even from Air 
Canada, fear going to cer¬ 
tain airports because 
they're worried about 
being bawled out or ridi¬ 
culed by the air traffic con 
troller," Rivest told the 
commission of inquiry on 
aviation safety 

Rivest. who emphasised 
be was sp e a k ing in a per 
soaai capacity and nut as a 
official, said 
’cuatrutk-rb. who wen 


theoretically at the pilot's 
service, would get revenge 
on a pilot who complained 
about his instructions by 
“certain reprisals such as 
giving him useless and 
sometimes dangerous ma¬ 
noeuvres the next time he 
arrives at that airport ." 

Rivest said some pilots, 
especially the more inex 
perienced, would go out of 
their way to avoid ce/taiif 
controllers, sometimes 
even risking overturning a 
plane on a muddy runway 
mat had no air control rath 
er than submit to the at 
lions of certain control 
lers 

Rivest, who worked for 
Transport Canada for 15 
years and has written two 
books on aviation, said tin 
federal body 's philosophy 
rested on one eritevion 
Wad for a tragic accident 
before taking any action 
towards safety 


Sr 





























2 THE COLONIST, Wednesday July 23, 1980 


OFF PAGE ONE/WEATHER 


Andy Capp 


p 4 





Names and figures for region 


The Capital Regional District board is made up 
of 18 directors from seven municipalities and seven 
electoral areas, representing a total population of about 
240,000 people living in 934 square miles around Victoria, 
stretching from Port Renfrew in the west to the outer Gulf 
Islands in the east. 

Directors, sitting as either the regional board or the 
regional hospital board, meet at 1:30 p.m. on the second 
and fourth Wednesdays of every month in the board room 
on the third floor of the CRD building at 524 Yates. 

Municipalities 

Saanich three directors 15 votes 

Victoria three directors 13 votes 


Oak Bay 

one director 

4 votes 

Esquimau 

one director 

4 votes 

Central Saanich 

one director 

2 votes 

North Saanich 

one director 

1 vote 

Sidney 

one director 

Electoral areas 

2 votes 

Colwood 

one director 

2 votes 

Langford 

one director 

3 votes 

Metchosin 

one director 

1 vote 

Sooke 

one director 

2 votes 

View Royal 

one director 

1 vote 

Saltspring Island 

one director 

1 vote 

Outer Gulf Islands 

one director 

1 vote 


Region: ailing scapegoat 


ON TOP OF THAT, taxpayers 
will be paying for hospitals 
through the same organization 
which meets as the Capital Re¬ 
gion Hospital Board—same 
directors, just a different bud¬ 
get. 

The directors have a third hat. 
There are times when they call 
themselves the Board of Health; 
again, same directors, same set¬ 
ting, but another budget. 

Don't expect to find the direc¬ 
tors in those tiny Government 
Street offices. 


THEY HAVE graduated from 
there, through a suite of offices 
in Bastion Square, to their own 
three storey building on lower 
Yates Street. 

Year by year, they enlarge 
and renovate throughout, and 
this year more expense is antici¬ 
pated to set aside part of the 
office space for a new transit 
department. 

But the decision-making abil¬ 
ity of directors has been in in- 


I'rom Pago I 


verse proportion to the responsi¬ 
bilities. 


TODAY, THE politicians in¬ 
dulge in marathon meetings, 
study lengthy and often incom¬ 
prehensible reports, and defer 
decisions as long as possible. 

Some observers say a major 
reason for regional feuding is 
that each director is represent¬ 
ing a small enclave rather than 
the region as a whole. 

Representatives of the un¬ 
organized districts arc sent to the 
board directly by local taxpay¬ 
ers, but municipal directors are 
council appointees. For all, the 
first loyalty has to be to the areas 
they represent. 

IT HAS BEEN suggested to 
the provincial government that 
amendments to regional legisla¬ 
tion should- include a provision 
that at least the regional chair¬ 
man should be elected directly by 



Couvelier 

... Saanich interests 


regional taxpayers, and that 
there should be a return to the 
system whereby municipal can¬ 
didates wanting regional seats 
should run for election to the 
region as well as to council. 

But the bickering at the board 
level has as much to do with 


personalities as it does with rep¬ 
resentation. 

Chairman James Campbell 
still carries on a long-standing 
fight with Finance Minister Hugh 
Curtis, his predecessor as re¬ 
gional chairman. There are 
times when his apparent desire 
to take pot-shots at the provin¬ 
cial government takes prece¬ 
dence over regional needs. 


SAANICH MAYOR Mel Cou 
velier and Salt Spring Island 
director Yvette Valcourt form a 
lopely little faction on the board, 
supporting each other usually in 
the face of opposition from the 
rest of the directors. 

And Couvelier has been 
known to complain about his fel¬ 
low directors from Saanich, Aid. 
John Mika and Howard Sturrock, 
because he cannot rely on them 
to vote with him to give Saanich a 
block of votes. Mika and Stur-, 
rock frequently prefer to consid¬ 
er regional implications as well 
as Saanich's parochial concerns. 

Next: Parks, the single major 
success story of region. 



Where money came from 


Contributions toward the 
Capital Region District's 
$24-million 1980-81 budget: 

Victoria $1,358,509 

Saanich $2,060,081 

Oak Bay $466,189 

Esquimau $195,564 

Central Saanich $619,900 


North Saanich $592,342 
Sidney $864,289 

Colwood $660,089 

Langford $294,747 

Metchosin $154,583 

Sooke $384,516 

View Royal $111,940 


Saltspring Island $138,615 


Outer Gulf Islands $75,280 
These direct requisitions 
on local taxpayers do not 
include the budget for hos¬ 
pitals, transit levies, reven¬ 
ues that offset many types 
of expenditures, and pro¬ 
vincial grants. 


Birth defects Board members 
spur testing 


TORONTO (UPC) - Ra¬ 
diation tests started Tues¬ 
day on video display ter¬ 
minals in the classified 
advertising department of 
the Toronto Siar, the 
Southern Ontario News¬ 
paper Guild said Tuesday. 

The Guild asked for the 
tests after learning that 
four Siar women em¬ 
ployees had given birth be¬ 
tween October, 1979, and 
January, 1980, to babies 
with defects. 

Tests for levels of micro- 
wave emission and ionizing 
radiation were made by 
staff from the Ontario min¬ 
istry of labor's radiation 
department on about 40 ter¬ 
minals Tuesday and found 
“no trace of radiation,” 
said John Brooks, the news¬ 
paper’s director of commu¬ 
nications. 

“We’ve asked them to 
come back and continue 
testing of all 200," he said, 
adding that he was not sure 
how long the tests would 
take due to other commit¬ 
ments of the testing staff. 

Guild local representa¬ 
tive Linda Torney said 
birth defects in the four 
infants varied. 

Brooks said the guild, 
which has representation 
on a four-year-old commit¬ 
tee with management over 
computer terminal use at 
the newspaper, had ad¬ 


vised in June that defects 
had been discovered in four 
out of seven babies born to 
Star employees working in 
the advertising section. 

He said that though the 
newspaper had already 
conducted its own investi¬ 
gation and was “satisfied 
that there is no connection 
between the YU'S* and the 
birth defects, the govern¬ 
ment testing was being 
done "to make certain the 
equipment is meeting all 
safety requirements." 


The current make-up of 
the Capital Regional board 
includes appointed direc¬ 
tors from municipalities 
and those representing 
electoral areas (* indicates 
an electoral area repre¬ 
sentative): 


•James Campbell, Outer 
Gulf Islands, chairman. 

*AI Beasley, View 
Royal. 

Mel Couvelier, Saanich 
mayor. 

Shirley Dowell, Oak Bay 
alderman. 

•Howard Drummond, 
Colwood. 

David Hill, Central Saan¬ 
ich mayor. 


Ken Hill, Esquimau 
mayor. 

•Ed Lubick, Langford. 

William McElroy, Vic¬ 
toria alderman. 

John Mika, Saanich al¬ 
derman. 

Harold Parrott, North 
Saanich alderman. 

•Don Rittaler, Sooke. 

Norma Sealey, Sidney 
mayor. 

Howard Sturrock, Saan¬ 
ich alderman. 

William Tindall, Victoria 
mayor. j I 

•Mac Tipton, Metchosin^ 

•Yvette Valcourt, 
Saltspring Island. 

Robert Wright, Victoria 
alderman. 


‘It’s got a real bea uty to it’ 

[ From Pago I 


near the mountain were 
evacuated safely. The 
crews had been fighting 
fires started by the May 18 
eruption which had been 
smouldering beneath a 
blanket of ash. 

Burgeson said logging 
crews were also apparently 
out of the danger area. 

"As far as we have it, 
nobody is in the red zone," 
the restricted area around 
the volcano. 

Because the volcano had 
remained quiet for several 
weeks, state officials in re¬ 
cent days had moved to 
reduce the red zone, loosen¬ 
ing the restrictions on pub¬ 
lic access to areas around 
the mountain. 


Initial reports indicated 
a light ashfall in White 
Pass, 88 kilometres north¬ 
east of the peak, within an 
hour after the eruption. 

“It looks like the real 
thing," said geologist Tim 
Halt of the Geological Sur¬ 
vey. “It’s got a real beauty 
to it.” 

Many of the communities 
in the path of the May 18 
ash fall appeared to be in 
the path of Tuesday’s 
cloud, which flattened at 
the top -- J , '-*came anvil- 
shaped as it reached into 
the upper atmosphere. 



July 23, 1980 

Cloudy with sunny 
periods. Winds fresh west¬ 
erly. Tuesday’s precipita 
tion: nil. Sunshine 14 hours 
30 minutes. Recorded high 
and low at Victoria airport 
29 and 15. Today's forecast 
high and low 22 and 14. 
Today's sunrise 5:37, sun¬ 
set 9:02. Moonrise 5:24 
p.m., moonset 2:10 a.m. 
Thursday outlook: mainly 
cloudy. 

East coast of Vancouver 
Island — Cloudy with sunny 
periods. Winds moderate 
southeasterly. Tuesday's 
precipitation: nil. Record¬ 
ed high and low at Nanaimo 
29 and 15. Forecast high 
and low 23 and 1 <. Thursday 
outlook: mainly cloudy 

West coast of Vancouver 
Island — Mostly cloudy. 
Winds moderate north 
westerly. Forecast high 
and low at Tofino 29 and 12 
Thursdai outlook cloud) 

North coast of the Mam 
land — Mostly cloudy, 
periods id fog or drizzle ta 
the morning Winds moder 


ate northwesterly. Fore¬ 
cast high and low 16 and 11. 
Thursday outlook: a few 
showers. 

Extended outlook, Fri¬ 
day through Sunday — 
Mainly cloudy, rather cool 
with chance of a few sprin¬ 
kles or occasional drizzle. 
Highs around 20. Lows near 
12 . 


Como* 

PrlnceOoroe 
williams Lake 
Kamloops 
Dawson City 
Whitehorse 
Fori Nelson 
Peace River 
Yellowknife 
Inuvik 
Seattle 
Spokane 
Portland 
San Francisco 


02 

a? 


9 0.3 

10 14.1 


12 - 


Major eruptions also oc¬ 
curred May 25 and June 

12 . 

Tuesday’s eruption came 
less than a day after seis¬ 
mographs at the University 
of Washington in Seattle 
recorded the first new vol¬ 
canic earthquakes beneath 
the peak in several weeks. 

Six tremblors were re¬ 
corded between 6 a.m. and 
11 a.m. By about 3 p.m. the 
quakes had increased in 
frequency to one about 
every five minutes. 

Scientists said there was 
no immediate indication of 
the meaning of the quakes. 

No seismic activity was 
reported at Mount Hood, 72 
kiiometres east of Port¬ 
land, Ore., which had rum¬ 
bled slightly in the last few 
weeks. 


WE’LL CHANGE 
RUMS, KMTS 
II 


St John s 

Hilif.M 

f redericton 

Charlottetown 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Thunder Bay 

Kenora 

Winnipeg 

Churchill 

The Pat 


Mai Mm Free*. 


Regina 


taorth Betttetoro 
Wl Current 


21 

24 

24 

23 

I* 

23 

24 
24 
V 
21 
?; 
n 
31 
>2 
JO 
)l 

Jl 

33 

* 

30 

Tt 

33 

34 
34 
a 

34 


Mtwad 

Purr »<*#, 


22 

2.6 


TIDES FOR MONTH OF 
JULY 

TIDES AT VICTORIA 
(Tides listed are 
Pacific Standard T imei 

Time Ht Time H* Time Ht Time mi 
_H MFt.IMM Ft-IH M Ff.lM M FI. 

23 0430 3 0 1330 411645 7 32220 ».? 

24 0650 2 4 1400 76 1RD0 7 477SC It 

25 0720 10!14» 7 HOIS 7 AiTMS f t 

74 0005 1 411730 / 7 1040 7.41 

27 0040 9 20035 I 0H7J0 7 0,2005 7J 


TIOfS AT SOOKE 

Time Ht Tune HtiTime Ht'Time Ht 
HWFI.HW H m V II MM ft 
0540 3 4 1310 4 7 14 * 7 3l7IV *4 
0415 2912V 491100 7 * 7305 9a 
0450 7 2 14V 7 7 MM 7 1(2200 90 
Qim lauV 7 3 17V 7 112340 9 9 
0005 13HS09 7 S 1045 49 


»a 

14 


MIXTURE t SET 
DWELL t TIMIRS 
M yaw 

DATSUN 

TOYOTA 

HONDA 

*29.95 

ROTS MCUMER 
■it» mtu 
tar MLS 


CALL *44717 


THREE 

POINT 

MOTORS 


07» 3 I HIS 90 Ha* 4 0 
«0« *9404 7 3 Ha*. «6JM5 00 
0U4J 9«tH0 I 7 1725 19 7 7135 90 
0*5 »0*449 I I >7*9 19atm 00 

0/16 100 1015 4 474 Ml4 7310 I * 



|i CANADA GRADE "A " BEEF 

4 

£37 

SIRLOIN IIP STEAK 

lb. ft 

TOP ROUND 

4 

>37 

STEAK 

■b. ft 

t 

TENDERIZED 

4 

>99 

STEAK 

lb . ft 

L 

FLANK 

ft 

>99 

STEAK 

..lb. ft 

L 

EYE OF 

ft 

>99 

ROUND STEAK 

..lb. ft 

L 

BARON 

A 

V? 

OF BEEF 

1 

61 

Cut from Rump 

L 


or Bottom Round lb. 

m 



S 


IDNEY CUPER 


Prices in effect 

JULY 23-26 


S 


Starr Hours: 

Daily 1346.-00 
Thurs -Fn. 8:30-9*0 
Sun. 10-5:30 



In Sidney's “Downtown" 
Across from Sidnoy Hotel 

Been Serving ttie Peninsula lot 15 years 


CALIFORNIA ■■ ak 

PEACHES . 59 

CALIFORNIA _ 

GRAPEFRUIT 31°® 

CALIFORNIA 30's 

CELERY . 39* 

COOKING m 

ONIONS JSr 


SHELLBONE 

ROAST 

BECEL 

MARGARINE ...i 

ROYAL CITY 

CUT OR FRENCH 
STYLE BEANS. I4ez.tm 

JOY LIQUID 

DETERGENT 

COLEMAN 

HOT MUSTARD.. 


32 ez. 


. 2 “ 

1” 

49* 

139 

59* 

COFFEE MATE ».2 39 

WELCH 4 on 

GRAPE JUICE r 

MAZOLA OIL .m2 29 

TOMATO JUICE .. .89‘ 


OELNOR 

FROZEN PEAS 

McCAIN 

APPLE PIE 

McCAIN FANCY 

MIXED VEGETABLES 

YORK FROZEN 

RASPBERRIES 


.2 lbs. 

12-ez. 

At 


I 19 

b. I 

,1 19 

79* 

69* 


ROVALE 

TOILET 

TISSUE 


89 

rafts mm 


29 



OLYMPIC 


OLYMPIC MEAT PRODUCTS 

COOKED 

HAM SHANK 

lb... 

BUTT END ^ 98° 
STEAKS : *1 38 

i:88 e 

PURE RANDOM WEIGHT 

PORK OR 
BEEF SAUSAGE 

BREAKFAST DELIGHT -^10 

J 18 

COLD MEATS*" 

Me Cheese, 

Bologna, 

Pickle Pimento, etc.h. 


WIENERS 


BACON 


. 1 " 

1 

58* 



LIBBY 

PEACHES 


M HALVES 28o*. 


99* COOKIES. *88* 

ENCORE J|QQ PURITY ORB 

INSTANT COFFEE .-4 w FLOUR.-J 
































































































































Sljc Colonist. 


THE ISLAND 

Section Two/Wednesday, July 23, 1980/Page 11 K 


r 


Tempest in a bathtub rages at Nanaimo council 


By DONNA REIMER 

Coioniit correspondent 

NANAIMO — A lempest in a bath¬ 
tub blew up at Nanaimo city council 
Monday night. 

The incident shocked the mayor 
and left an alderman accusing the 
mayor of unspecified unseemly be¬ 
havior. 

II was all over a request from the 
bathtub society for weekend use of a 
city vehicle to pull a giant bathtub in 


two parades in the B.C. Interior. 

The council ultimately voted 5-4 to 
deny the bathtub society’s request, 
but not before Mayor Frank Ney's 
vocal support for the bathtub society 
led to a few harsh words between 
himself and Aid. Ada Howden. 

The budget select committee, in a 
minority report, recommended that 
the bathtub's society’s request be de¬ 
nied. . 

Ney termed the recommendation a 
shock, saying that the society had 


used a city vehicle for several years 
to pull the giant bathtub in various 
parades. . 

He said the society would’pay for 
the gas, and that the cost to the city 
was low since the vehicle would be 
used over the weekend. 

He said the bathtub officials would 
be able to obtain a truck elsew here to 
pull the giant tub but that the society 
"wanted the pride of having a vehicle 
with the city emblem on it." 

“The thinking of this council has 


really deteriorated. There is no spirit 
or enthusiasm or pride in this city,” 
the mayor said. 

Aid. Howden, chairman of the bud¬ 
get committee defended the recom¬ 
mendation. She said that committee 
members felt they had no control 
over who would be using the vehicle 
and that something might take place 
that would reflect poorly on the city. 

She said one committee member 
had suggested, for instance, that 


someone sitting on the hood of the 
vehicle with a beer in his hand 
would damage the city's reputation. 

"That’s a very, very unfair com¬ 
ment," Ney saitj. 

"We should have a look at pictures 
of you, taken in 1975," shot back How- 
den. 

‘T’ve never done a thing like that," 
protested the mayor. 

"There are reports you've done 
worse, sir,” Howden retorted. 

Aid. Jack Little said that the city 


had already given the Bathtub So¬ 
ciety $5,000 in grants and that the 
vehicle request should be denied on 
the principle that the council should 
not undermine the work of the grant 
committee. 

Whether it was the principle, or the 
fear of the beer image for the tub city, 
five aldermen voted to deny the 
request. 

Aid. Howden and Little were joined 
in their opposition by Alex Ferguson, 
Nelson Allen and Gino Sedola. 


Duncan tourism 
drop blamed 
on volcano fits 


By DEREK RIIIND 

» Coioniit corrctpondenl 

DUNCAN — An inflationary economy, 
poor weather and the eruption of Mount 
St. Helens are just some of the reasons 
given for this year's drop in tourism 
throughout the Cowichan Valley. 

One local tourist haven, the Silver 
Bridge Inn in Duncan, has reported a 50- 
per-cent drop in tourist visits this year 
over 1979. 

A spokesman at the inn said "business 
is definitely down." 

He blamed it on the slow economy and 
the price of gas. 

He said the tourists from the U.S. "just 
aren't coming. Mast of our customers 
are driving in from Alberta.’ 1 

THE AREA'S MAJOR hotel facility. 
Village Green Inn, is not as hard hit, 
reporting that business was down slightly 
from the corresponding period last year. 

Village Green manager David Rose 
told the Colonist that "business is a 
little behind from this time last year. 
We're down about three to four rooms a 
night." 

"However, we were expecting a bump¬ 
er business this year with tourists, as 
was Victoria. But it just hasn't happened. 

"Advance registrations for August are 
definitely not that good. But this could 
change. Who knows, if we get some sun¬ 
shine we could be turning them away 
again." 

At the Coho Motel, which was booked 
solid every night during the summer 
last year, bookings are down and the 
motel reports an occupancy rate of only 
half to three-quarters full this year, 

THE FACT that there are more hotel 
rooms available this year over last, with 
the opening of the Cowichan Valley Inn 
and the expansion of the Thunderbird 
Motel, may be one of the reasons other 
local hotels are reporting a drop in occu¬ 
pancy rates. 

The Duncan Chamber of Commerce 
tourist office reports it is "fairly busy, but 
not booming." 

Chamber tourist counsellor Joyce 
Schmidt said, "Traffic has not been quite 
so heavy this year as last. We have had 
lots of visitors from Alberta, Saskatche¬ 
wan and Ontario but an absence of Wash¬ 
ington and Oregon visitors." 

She said the unscasonal amount of rain 
and the eruption of Mt. St. Helens were 
probably the main causes. 

"People just don’t like to drive through 
that area to travel up here." 

Chamber of commerce president 
Maurice Chemeff blamed the drop on the 
"lousy weather.” 

“MOST PEOPLE don't want to travel 
when the weather isn’t bright and sunny. 
Why leave Seattle on a wet, rainy day to 
go somewhere else where it’s wet and 
rainy? 


Recession, rains 
also pinpointed 
for ’80 downturn 

"I don’t believe it's Mount St. Helens, 
the economy or the gas prices. 

“Who wants to pay good money to be 
shut up in a motel room with a bunch of 
kids screaming their heads off, because 
they can’t go out to play in the sun¬ 
shine.” 

Cherneff compared the situation this 
year with a period in the early 1960s 
when there were similar weather condi¬ 
tions. 

"Tourism slumped badly then," he 
said, "but as soon as the sun came out and 
the weather improved, so did tourism." 

"That’s all we need now, a little bit of 
sunshine and business will be booming 
again,” Cherneff said. 

The chamber president also blamed 
the provincial government “for its'lack of 
responsibility" by replacing the Princess 
Marguerite with a smaller vessel and 
jetfoil on the Victoria-Seattle run. 

“THAT TRIP has now lost its cha¬ 
risma," he said. 

Other reasons for the drop have been 
pinpointed by B.C.'s Tourism Minister 
Pat Jordan. 

Jordan says the province’s response to 
the tourist trade is behind the times, de¬ 
signed for the traveller of the 1950s, 
rather than the 80s. 

In the June issue of Tourism British 
Columbia newsletter, she said: 

"It seems that two-thirds of B.C.’s 
tourism accommodation units arc geared 
to the automobile traveller. 

"It seems unlikely that we can still 
continue to build facilities geared to 
this lifestyle with little consideration for 
current trends if we hope to have contin¬ 
ued growth and economic strength in the 
industry and be able, at the same time, to 
compete in this complex and fiercely 
competitive industry.” 

Jordan also said there was a need to 
develop more and better quality package 
tours for increasingly budget-conscious 
travellers who do not have private trans¬ 
portation. 

SHE SUGGESTED the use of interna¬ 
tional travel agencies to encourage tour¬ 
ists to visit the province. 

In an attempt to reverse the trend, 
some motels have decided to reduce 
rates. 

At least one motel in the area has 
reverted to winter rates and another has 
stuck with its spring prices. 

Mel Fairholm, assistant manager of 
the Coho Motel, said, “Since we reduced 
our prices back to the winter rates, out of 
sheer desperation (business was down by 
almost 50 per cent), we've improved to 
about 75 per cent of normal occupancy.'' 


Courtenay bridge: 
tleat’s on Fraser 


By RUTH McKELLAR 

Cotonttl comifM^Mri 

COURTENAY — Alder 
men here will continue to 
exert pressure on High¬ 
ways Minister Alex Fraser 
in an effort to have the 17th 
Street bridge in a usable 
stage in time for the B.C. 
Summer Games to be held 
here next year. 

Mayor Robert McPhee 
said he was pleased to 
learn the tenders were 
called Monday but queried 
what work could be done in 
the river other than in Au 
gust 

He said the city was 
doing sink along the river 
on Anderson Avenue and 
fisheries would allow the 


work to be done only in 
August because of salmon 
movement. 

“If that is so," McPhee 
said, “it adds credence to 
the suggestion that the 
bridge will not be ready in 
time for next summer ." 

The council will be in 
touch with Fraser both by 
means of letters and. if 
necessary, a delegation 
One of the suggestions 
made by the mayor was for 
use of a bailey bridge dur¬ 
ing the games 
However. McPhee also 
said "Hurrah, at least g‘t 
going fur sure.” 

Meanwhilr. one of the pe 
tturners who tried in halt 
the bridge const milion 


until a public hearing was 
held said the bridge was 
now an accomplished fact. 

Ian Potts, an alderman 
on city council, said his 
group would be meeting 
this week but did not think 
further legal action would 
betaken. 

Potts said there were 
other avenues which could 
be pursued but would not 
elaborate until after his 
group met 

He said there were still 
questions which the com 
milter wished to pul to the 
highways minister 

Cumox Mayor George 
Pierey was out of town and 
unavailable fur < ummrm 
on the bridge lender 



—John Henderson photo 

New barge makes a big splash at Port Alberni 


Making waves at Port Alberni is 253- 
foot, 3,909-ton barge Cape Flattery, being 
loaded with lumber. Ceremonies were re¬ 


cently held for maiden voyage out of city’s 
port of barge, operated by Puget Sound 
Freight Lines of Seattle. Barge will haul 


lumber and newsprint from MacMillan 
Bloedel mills in Alberni to Hawaii and U.S. 
west coast ports. 


Duncan backs 3-storey block 


DUNCAN — A program 
to revitalize Duncan's core 
got a shot in the arm re¬ 
cently when plans were re¬ 
leased of a development to 
upgrade a neglected area 
of Government Street. 

The proposal, placed be¬ 
fore council at a recent 
meeting, would make use 
of a stretch of Government 
between Stedmans Depart¬ 
ment Store and Joe’s Tire 
Hospital. 

The site is currently used 
as a free parking lot by 
employees of nearby 
stores. 

Bob Milman, spokesman 
for Columbia Pacific De¬ 
signs of Duncan and A.E. 
Badham and Associates 
Ltd., the two companies in¬ 
volved in the project, pre¬ 
sented a proposal for a re¬ 
tail-apartment complex 
consisting of a three-storey 
building with 6,000 square 
feet of commercial-retail 
space at ground level and 
26 apartments above. 

The building, which 
would be set back from 
Government Street, is de¬ 
signed around a sunken 
landscaped square and 
open space with outside 
benches providing a pro¬ 
tected area away from 
traffic. 

"The project will bring 
residential accommoda 
lions into the core area for 
senior citizens, adminis¬ 
trative personnel and em¬ 
ployees working in the 
downtown area,” Milman 
said. 

Outlining features of the 
square, Milman told coun¬ 
cil: 

• It is designed to pro¬ 
vide safe and convenient 
shopping for both apart 
ment residents and shop¬ 
pers. A ramp would be pro 
vided for wheelchairs and 
shopping carts. 

• Outside benches would 
be placed in an area land¬ 
scaped with flowers and 
shrubs. 

• The whole complex 
would always be well light 
ed. 

• An easy drop-off and 
pick-up area would be pro¬ 
vided for shoppers and 
real dents 

Milman asked council for 
provision of a large well 
crosswalk and updating of 
the sidewalk in front of the 
development, and the 
opening of the backs of re 
tail outlets on Station 
Street, which runs pa rebel 
with Government, to In 
crease the flow of pedes 
trian traffic 

Mayor Mike Coleman 
said there were matters 
to be ironed out. but recom 
mended the proposal be ai 
• epled M prllw ipu by roun 


in core beefup bid 


cil. Council gave the 
motion unanimous approv¬ 
al. 

Coleman said the ball 
was now in the court of the 
developers, who could ne¬ 
gotiate the financing of the 
project. The current value 
of the vacant lot is quoted 
at $275,000. 

Meanwhile, council was 
faced with the dilemma of 
closing Kenneth Street, in 
the downtown core, during 
the upcoming Summer 
Festival. 

At the request of Duncan 
Downtown Business Asso¬ 
ciation, council had origi¬ 
nally agreed to close the 
street, but council had 


since received a petition 
signed by 27 businesses in 
the area, protesting that to 
close the street July 25-26 
"would completely cut-off 
more than 130 parking 
spaces and our livelihood.'' 

Association president 
Bill Ross told council lie be¬ 
lieved the petition was the 
result of lack of communi¬ 
cation between the asso¬ 
ciation and the Kenneth 
Street businessmen. 

Ross said the petition 
was based on the idea that 
all parking lots would be 
closed but he said this was 
not the intent. 

He said the association 
thought it could satisfy the 


needs of the majority. He 
then withdrew the asso¬ 
ciation's request for the 
street’s closure. 

Aid. Doug Barker said he 
was surprised to learn that 
the Festival Parade route 
would go down Kenneth 
Street. 

“It’s never gone down 
Kenneth Street before and 
it's been a success for the 
past five years," he said. 

In a unanimous vote, 
council decided that the 
parade would now go down 
Jubilee Street. 

A second petition, which 
deplored the state of park¬ 
ing downtown, sought some 


action from council to alle 
viate the situation. 

The petition was signed 
by downtown merchants 
and professionals. 

Aid. Mike Caljouw said 
the matter was already 
being investigated. 

On another issue, Cole 
man said he had received 
many,complaints concern¬ 
ing the length of closure 
thisyearof Aquannis Pool. 

Caljouw explained that 
August was the month cho¬ 
sen for the shutdown be 
cause many users were 
away on vacations, or were 
using area beaches. 

The pool and Jacuzzi had 
to be completely retiled 
and the chlorination sys¬ 
tem renovated this year, 
requiring the pool be closed 
for a slightly longer period 
than normal. 


Accord turns to discord 
over Cathers Lake tract 


NANAIMO — Mayor Frank Ney and 
Aid. Nelson Allen started out in agree¬ 
ment, but in the end there was discord on 
the topic of development in the East 
Wellington Road area. 

A request for a specific 247-lot subdivi¬ 
sion sparked the discussion, but the coun¬ 
cil had other items on its agenda Monday 
night that related to servicing in thd same 
area. 

The subdivision issue was finally re¬ 
ferred jo the city solicitor for comment, 
and aldermen dropped a proposal for a 
subdivision moratorium, while agreeing 
to give some policy decisions priority. 

Subdivision approving officer Tom 
Moscrip had asked city council for some 
advice on the proposed Cathers Lake 
subdivision, at the comers of Westwood. 
Jinglepot and Holland roads. The deve- 
topers wanted approval for a first stage of 
100 lots and were willing to pay off-site 
costs to bring city services to the prop¬ 
erty, including pipe oversizing. 

Moscrip, who is given the statuatory 
power to make his decision independently 
of council direction, wanted to know what 
policy, if any, the city had on accept¬ 
ing payment for off-site services. 

Both Mayor Ney and Aid. Allen be¬ 
lieved Moscrip should not be coming to 
council for the advice, but Alien went a 
step further and said it was the city's lack 
of policy on the issue that had made the 
approving officer seek advice 

Ney felt that Mom rip could accept the 
offer without advice from council 

The aldermen decided to refer the 
issue to the city solicitor, to see what the 
legalities were and if the city could accept 
such off site costs without having the 
paymeni construed as an illegal impost 
fee 

fscy was upset with Allen, howeter. 


over a letter the Northfield alderman had 
written to Moscrip. 

The letter, on city of Nanaimo statio¬ 
nery, outlined Allen’s reasons for oppos¬ 
ing the approval of the subdivision. 

Ney said that he had always under¬ 
stood the approving officer was to be 
"inviolate" and that “no member of 
council has the right to attempt to coerce 
a member of the staff.” 

Allen said that the letter was written, 
not as an attempt to coerce, but as an 
individual's opinion on the proposed 
Cathers Lake subdivision. 

Ney replied that the letter, on city 
stationery, was not as simple as a letter 
from an individual. 

"How can a person employed by the 
city make an honest judgement when he 
gets a letter like this?" Ney asked. 

He added that he intended to pursue 
the issue of Allen’s letter. 

In his letter, Allen raised a number of 
points that he raised again at Mon 
day's council meeting. 

He said that while properties in East 
Wellington area paid city taxes for sewer, 
only part of them were actually able to be 
connected to the sewer. 

In addition, he said, indications were 
that parts of the Millstone trunk that ser¬ 
vices the area would be filled to capacity 
in the near future. 

Allen said that council should first 
decide on the servicing policy for the 
area before the city allows a subdivision 
which would mean extension of ser 
vices. 

Meanwhile. Aid Ada Howden s pro 
posal that the city institute a subdivision 
moratorium for Mi days was shelv ed for a 
mMmI. * 

Council also decided to give priority to 
reviewing such Hems as servicing and 
development pulley. to answer many of 
the types of questions raised during lie 
debate on the ( others l.ato subdiv isumi 


























3P. 


SPORTS 

Page 12/Wednesday, July 23,1980 



Zfyt Colonist. 


Sharp-fielding visitors snatch split with Budgets 


Phoenix Southern Truck 
Haiders waited until their 
last chance Tuesday before 
pulling out a split of their 
exhibition men's fastball 
doubleheader with Victoria 
Budgets. 

The slick-fielding visi¬ 
tors hadn't scored in the 
previous 13 innings but they 
pushed three runs across in 
the top of the seventh of the 
nightcap for a 3-2 victory 
before about 500 wind- 


chilled fans at Royal Ath¬ 
letic Park. 

Budgets, now 16-6 in 
Super Series play this sea¬ 
son, had scored a 1-0 win 
in the opener. 

Budgets had two runs 
with only one out in the first 
inning of the second game 
but couldn’t solve righth¬ 
ander Gil Aragon, although 
a seventh-inning -charge 
fell inches short. 

In the first inning, Ara¬ 


gon hit leadoff batter Dave 
Williams, designated hitter 
Pete Songhurst followed 
with an infield single and 
Williams took third when 
the throw to first went into 
right field. Reg Underwood 
followed with a single and 
Bob Burrows drove home 
Songhurst with a long sac¬ 
rifice fly. 

The score stood that way 
until the seventh, when 
Mark Smith, who finished 
with 11 strikeouts, hit 


Dennis Umble with a pitch 
to open the inning. 

Butch Chambers singled 
to right field and when 
fielder Dennis Eckert bob- 
bled the ball. Umble came 
in to score. Jim Sharp re¬ 
placed Chambers as a 
pinch runner and scored 
when second-baseman 
Randy Benn's throw to the 
plate was late after Mike 
Strausser had hit a ground¬ 
er. 

Strausser took second 


base on a wild pitch and 
scored the go-ahead run on 
a single by Jerry Keller- 
hals. 

Bob Wilson and Dave 
Williams reached base 
with one out in the Victoria 
seventh before Songhurst 
struck out and Underwood 
lined out to second base- 
man Kellerhais. 

In the first game, third- 
baseman John Green pro¬ 
vided all the offence with a 


leadoff homer in the second 
inning, his first appear¬ 
ance at the plate for Bud¬ 
gets since rejoining the 
team from the Canadian 
national squad at the re¬ 
cent world championship In 
Tacoma. 

The run was all Dave 
Wilson needed as he struck 
out eight batters, didn’t 
allow a base on balls and 
gave up only two hits, a 
second-inning single by 


Chambers and a two-out 
double to rightfielder Dave 
Ferris in the third. 

The Phoenix fielders 
played flawless defence 
and pulled off a sensational 
double play in the sixth in¬ 
ning after Underwood had 
drawn a leadoff base on 
balls. 

Burrows slashed a drive 
at pitcher Sharp, who 
threw out the sliding Un¬ 
derwood at second. Short¬ 


stop Strausser, evading 
Underwood, relayed the 
ball to first to get Burrows 
by a step. 

The teams play another 
doubleheader tonight, 
starting at 7 p.m. 


moon o-o io 

BUDGETS 010 000 I —14 1 

Jim Sharp and Butch Chambers, 
Dave Wilson 9-6 and Bob Burrows 
MR: Budgets—John Green (2). 


000 000 3 —1 3 3 
BUDGETS 200 000 0 - 2 4 1 

Gil Aragon and Chambers; Mark 
Smith 16-5 and Burrows. 


Haslam brilliant 
in speedway win 


By REG REYNOLDS 

Cotontst staff 

Roy Haslam put on a 
sensational driving display 
to win the second round of 
the Speedweek Northwest 
series for superstocks 
Tuesday at Western Speed¬ 
way. 

The former Canada 200 
champion thrilled approxi¬ 
mately 4,000 hometown 
fans, winning thrilling 
duels with new track rec¬ 
ord holder Ron Esau of San 
Diego and Bob Fox of Bre¬ 
merton, Wash. 

Both Haslam and Esau 


Legion 
topples 
leaders 
— again 


After spending much of 
the Western Canada Major 
Junior Lacrosse League 
season in the cellar, Esqui¬ 
mau Legion hasn't built a 
rep as a giant-killer. 

But the pesky Legion¬ 
naires have developed a 
knack of picking on the 
league’s front-runners. 

Legion upset first-place 
New Westminster Salmon- 
bellies 13-7 at Esquimau 
Sports Centre Tuesday 
night, the Legion’s third 
triumph over New West 
this season. 

Tom Woods, a pickup 
from Senior B, helped bol¬ 
ster the attack, firing four 
goals past netminder Ron 
Maclsaac. Mike Thomas 
also put four shots behind 
Mclsaac, who was able to 
stop 34 shots. 

Derek Croucher was out¬ 
standing in the Legion goal, 
fending off 38 drives. 

Terry Jay, Russ Ken¬ 
nedy, John Carruthers 
(who added five assists), 
Bruce Alexander and Dave 
Angrove each scored one 
Esquimau goal. 

In reply, Bruce Cowie 
tallied three times and 
Dave Thornhill twice. Pro¬ 
viding New Westminster 
singles were Terry Miller 
and Ross Gatensbury. 


New west 

Richmond 

Coquitlam 

Burnaby 

Esquimau 


GW L F A Pts 

70 15 5 0 254 223 30 

19 10 9 0 246 269 20 

19 6 10 1. 209 230 17 

19 8 10* 1 243 719 17 

21 7 14 0 254 265 14 


Additional sport 

14,16,21,22,23 


started in the middle of the 
pack for the 75-lap main 
event. 

NASCAR veteran Red 
Farmer of Hueytown, Ala. 
was the early leader but 
Haslam and Esau passed 
him on the 13th lap. 

Esau took the lead on the 
16th and held off Haslam 
until the 51st lap when his 
two front tires blew. 

Then It was a race be¬ 
tween Haslam and Fox, 
who edged ahead on lap 69. 

Haslam went underneath 
Fox on the first turn of the 
70th lap and when their 
pars bumped. Fox spun out 
and lost a lap, leaving Has- 
lam a clear run to the 
checkered flag. 

Superstock veteran Odie 
Robertson, winner of the 
first leg of the series over 
the weekend at Skagit 
Speedway, was forced out 
of the practice laps with a 
broken rear axle and spent 
almost two hours waiting 
until a replacement could 
be obtained from a wreck¬ 
ing yard on the Malahat. 

The Denver speedster 
entered and easily won the 
“B" main event but was 
forced to start near the 
back of the pack in the 
feature race. 

Al Vanderbyl of Victoria 
placed second in the “B" 
main and qualified and 
Tom Berrow of Coquitlam, 
who had been “black- 
flagged" for dropping oil 
on the track, successfully 
appealed the decision and 
advanced to the main 
event. 

Earlier in the program. 
Esau circled the Langford 
oval in 15.921 seconds, the 

* * * 

“A-datk —1. JoeMuilelt. Victoria, 

2 Nov Smltti. victoria; 3. Non Esau. 
San DIcqo; a. Bob Fox, Bremerton, 
Wash. 

"B dash — 1. Cralo Dyson. Vic¬ 
toria; 7 Jim Caudwell, Victoria; 3. 
Brent Metrte. Puyallup. Wash ; a. 
Marsh Mormvluk, St. Albert Alta 

First heat — I, Tom Berrow. Coquit- 
lam; 7. Gary Nelner, Edmonton. 3. 
Jett Ploeo. Bellingham, 4. Seigv 
Sawatstri. victoria. 

Second heat - I Frank Swords. 
Bakersfield. Call! ; 7 Al Adams. Sur- 
rey; 3. Al vanderbyl. Victoria, a. 
Dyson. 

Fast hear — 1. Lorry Hegeman, La¬ 
keside. Calll.; 7. Nov Haslam. Vic¬ 
toria ; 3. Red Farmer. Hueytown. Ala.; 
a. Esau. 

*'•" main — I Odie Robertson. Den¬ 
ver; 7 Vanderbyl; 3. Nelner; a. Roy 
Blumenhogen, Bremerton. Wash. 

"A" mam - l Halsam; ? Steve 
Starr. Woodland Hills. Cam.; 3. Farm¬ 
er; a. Adams; 5. Smith. 


Strike over 

WINNIPEG (CP) — A 
strike by jockeys which 
cancelled today's racing 
card at Assiniboia Downs 
has ended after jockeys 
and horsemen settled a dis¬ 
pute over purse distribu¬ 
tion and racing will resume 
Friday, a spokesman for 
the horsemen said. 


first driver ever to crack 
the 16-secdhd barrier. 

The track record was 
broken five times in 
qualifying runs with Vic¬ 
toria’s Joe Musfelt setting 
the previous standard at 
16.35 seconds. 

Musfelt won the “A” 
dash, Craig Dyson of Vic¬ 
toria won the “B” dash, 
Berrow won the first heat, 
Frank Swords of Bakers¬ 
field, Calif., nabbed the 
second heat and Larry He¬ 
geman of Lakeside, Calif., 
won the fast heat. Has¬ 
lam was second in the fast 
heat, Farmer was third and 
Esau fourth. 

The series continues here 
Thursday night before 
moving to Evergreen 
Speedway in Monroe, 
Wash., for the grand finale 
on Sunday. 



Alex Barra phdlo 


Ron Esau of San Diego, who set track record earlier, duels with Bob Fox during trophy dash 


Minor baseball playoffs 

Firefighters nip 
Nanaimo team 


Dave DeVana provided 
the winning run with a 
bases-loaded single Tues¬ 
day night and Clark Austin 
authored a six-hitter as 
Victoria Firefighters 
vaulted their first hurdle at 
the B.C. Senior Babe Ruth 
baseball championships. 

Firefighters edged Nan¬ 
aimo 6-5 at Lambrick Park, 
as the tournament opened 
with two games. 

Ken Dochcrty tagged 
three hits for the losers. 

In the other game for 
16-18 year-olds, Ron Hume 
and Ami Stadler combined 
on a two-hitter as Merritt 
slipped past Trail 4-3. 

Dave Demehuck was 
Trail’s best hitter, supply¬ 
ing two safeties. 

The tournament con¬ 
tinues today with games at 
3 and 6 p.m. North Vancou¬ 
ver meets Prince George in 
the first and another entry 
from Victoria Firefighters 
league, the host team, 
plays a Vancouver-Coquit- 
lam entry in the second. 

In Prince George, Gor¬ 
don Head Cosmopolitans 
pounced for six runs in the 
first inning and carried on 


, to a 14-7 victory over Dun¬ 
can in their first game of 
the B.C. Babe Ruth (14-15) 
championships. 

Daryn Lansdell was the 
winner. Cosmos face either 
Trail or host Nechako 
today at 6 p.m. 

Another band of Cosmo¬ 
politans, those battling for 
the provincial 13-year-old 
Babe Ruth crown, went 
down to defeat in a tourna¬ 
ment final at Squamish. 

Vancouver Inter-Com¬ 
munity got by the Victoria 
club 11-9. 

Meanwhile, Darren Co¬ 
pley provided power and 
pitching Tuesday night as 
Layritz clobbered Oak Bay 
12-2 at Hampton Park in the 
second game of the Greater 
Victoria Little League dis¬ 
trict playoffs. 

Copley spun a four-hjtter 
while hurling the roule'and 
cracked a two-run home 
run in Layritz’ seven-run 
fifth inning. 

Copley’s mates collected 
14 hits in support, with Dale 
Toronitz connecting for 
three hits. 

Tonight, Gordon Head 
plays Triangle at 6:30 as the 
playoffs continue. 


Lions outclass Bombers 
Als rally to edge Ti-Cats 


Hosts outscore Blues 


BELLINGHAM — Bell 
ingham Mariners didn't 
play like the first-place 
baseball team in the North¬ 
west League’s Northern 
Division Tuesday night. 

But they were more than 
a match for Victoria 
Blues. 

Mariners, seven games 
in f ront of the division, pre¬ 
vailed 8-6 in a sloppy con¬ 
test during which each club 


committed five errors. 

A four-run fifth inning 
gave Mariners, 24-9, the 
push they needed. Blues, 
who slipped to 15-16, re¬ 
ceived two RBIs from both 
Don Hyman and Joe 
Lorenz. 

vtct.HA ■ 0)7 001 no- a Ms 

BHIngkont ON 340 »1._ 11| 5 

(Jhev (2-41. Otto ttl AM Hyman. 
Hunger. Mathews (4). Salvo (SI, 
Christiansen lot. Peterson III aM 
Firova MR Bel— Blume 


Coton.il wire services 

Leon Bright sifted 
through Winnipeg kick cov¬ 
erage and Joe Paopao 
directed a solid aerial at¬ 
tack as British Columbia 
Lions blitzed the Bombers 
26-6 in a Canadian Football 
League game Tuesday 
night. 

The elusive Bright gave 
the Lions consistently good 
field position while wide 


The Saskatchewan at 
Calgary game will be 
telecast tonight on 
channel 8 starting at 
6:36. 

receiver Al Charuk was an¬ 
other key in the B.C. at¬ 
tack. 

Charuk, with a 21-yard 
pass reception, and Harry 
Holt on a spectacular 65- 
yard punt return, counted 
touchdowns for the Lions 
while kicker Lui Passaglia 
was flawless on field goals 
of 45, 39 and two from 36 
yards plus two converts. 

The closest Winnipeg got 
to paydirt was the B.C. 
eight-yard line late in the 
game. But the Bombers, 
who have been having 
problems moving the ball 
in