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Weather Forecasts 



Victoria and Vicinity : Winds mostly faul- 
tily and southerly, chiefly cloudy wlih 
showers tonight or Morulai 

lx>wer Mainland: Light to moderate 
wine's, ohleriy cloudy with rsln, stationary 
or higher temperalurr. 





€®UmM 



Colonist Telephones 

3usinesa Office S* 

Circulation ** 

Job Printing IS 'J 

Editorial Kooms M 



O >TA1!I.1KIIRI» IMt.) 



VOL, CVII-, NO, 277 



VICTORIA, B, C„ SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1912 



FORTY-EIGHT PAGES 



B 




Reliable Information Is Lacking 
as to How the Two Sides 
Stand at This Stage of the 

T Conflict 



GREEK FLEET FORMS 

EXTENSIVE BLOCKADE 



From Constantinople Comes 
Report of 'Turning of the 
Enemy's Flank — Aari 
Surrounded 



LONDON, Nov.' 2.-^After tf jfi*, : ' tour 

days decisive battle of the war there 

calm for a t&M^tM no ™"» 



■.•ernes from 
fighting, 

Constantinople officials st 
permit messages to be sent o 
capital. How far the Ottoman army 
v. Ill be able to pull Itself together, and 
whether it will make a stand in the 
forts outside of Constantinople, are 
questions unanswered. 

The Servian advance toward Salonica 
continues. The Ureeks claim to be 
pushing steadily forward, bitt the Turk- 
ish messages insist ihrtt the Greek army 

has met With a repuiso: that ths crown 

prince has run away iend that ftl* OreOK 
position is precarious. 

Adrianople and Salonica. are sur- 
rounded by enemies. The Turkish army 
in Macedonia is cut off on all sides. 
Servians, hold all of Old Serv'a and are 
administering the government from the 
undent capital of Uskup. Reports of 
massacres by the retreating Turks with 
barbarous details, are pHing up. 

Diplomacy has done '3°thlng in the 
direction of stopping or limiting the 
wnr. The Powers now await the ex- 
pected final battle which will force the 
Turk to his knees. The allies proclulm 
theif determination to hold all they can 
conquer- Kuropean /■sentiment — cer- 

tainly British sentlp/enl — appears to 
endorse their ambitions, if Austrian in- 
terests ran be arranged. 

Bomori Are Plentiful 

sni'iA. Nov. t. — Persistant rumors of 
the Tall of Adrianople caused great 
crowds to assemble around tin*' war 
office throughout the. day. There were 
also reports that the Bulgarians had 
captured six Turkish trains near De- 
motion. No official confirmation of 
any or these reports could be obtained. 

Kulgartan aviators have made a num- 
ber of flights over Adrianople, and the 
-latest authentic Information is that the. 
bombardment or the forts continues. 

King' Ferdinand visited today the 
height Of Yuracha. from Which he 
vlatt'ed the battlefield and rorts around 
Adrianople. {Subsequently he proceeded 
over the advanced position. Elysrywhere 
thp king was cheered by the troops. 
The royal train stopped at Mustapha 
Pasha, where the king attended B 
thanksgiving service for the Bulgarian 
\lrtory before Liile-Burga*. 

It Is reported that the Bulgarians 
surrounded Torgut Shefklt Pasha and a 
Turkish division on the heights east of 
Serai. After desperate righting the 
Turks hroke the Bulgarian circle and 
(led to '"hatalja. In the battle of Laile- 
Burgas tiie Bulgarians captured eight y 
cannons and 180 wagons of ammunition. 
Fifteen Thonimd Surrender 

BRIvGRAOH:, Xov. 2. — The notorious 
brigand, Issa Boletinatz, according to 
reports, has surrendered with In, 000 
Arnauts to the Servian authorities at 

TODAY'S SUMMARY 



''Give Him a Chance" Policy 
Proves Beneficial — Twenty- 
Six Jails Close Down in New 
South Wales 



SYDNEY, X. S. AY.. Nov. 2.— At the 
annual meeting of the Prisoners' Aid 
Society. some remarkable figures 
were given by the minister of justice, 
Mr. Hall. He said: 

"Within the last few years the gov- 
ernment has closed twenty-six pri- 
sons In the state for the reason that 
there were no prisoners to fill them, 
and that twenty-six included such big 
prisons as i^errima and Trial Bay, 
svhile only one new prison had been 
opened — the Long Bay reformatory. 
In 1895, when there was less than one 
million people in New South Wales, 
there were over -'500 prisoners in the 
jails; now, when there was a popula- 
tion of 1,600,000, there were less than 
half the number of people In the pri- 
sons than there was >in..-1895." 

Lord Chelmsford, state governor, 
who presided, also quoted inter- 
esting figures „ taken from .the. books" 
of the Prisoners' Aid 'Soci<-t>. 

"Out of 350 applications during the 
past year, 1M3 people discharged from 
jail had been assisted, and 151 of them 
found employment, only one out of 
that last number coming back into 
the clutches of the law. It was re- 
markable that in ten and a half years 
only 324 out of 2880 people assisted 
again broke the law. Since Its in- 
ception the association had aided 4871 
first offenders. 

"It was a great thing for .\>\v 
South Wales that she had a law 
which enabled men to be released on 
licence and given a chance to lead a 
decent life again.'' 

He had noticed It again and again, 
and was vers pleased to cite it — the 
trait In the Australian character 
which said, "lilvft him a chance." 
Every Australian was anxious to glee 
a man a chance, and so there seemed 
to him never to be wanting people 
ready to come forward to -aid men 
who had fallen. 



Party of Canadian Northern Pa- 
cific Officials Make Trip Over 
Line Being Built — Progress 
Good — Game Plentiful 




\mm any 

TALK OP m 



». 



Leipzig Editor, Visiting Van- 
couver, Says Anglo-German 
Rivalry Is Only of a Com- 
mercial Character 



REASON FOR A 

LARGE STANDING ARMY 



Greatness Due to 
Military Training— 400,000 
Subjects of the Kaiser i- 
Living in Canada 



. • ■ 




CONDITIONS IN MEXICO 

Refugees Arriving at El Feao Tell of 
Unsettled State of Affairs 



De- 



1 — Calm Succeed! Four-Day Battle, 
precates Any Talk of War. 

2 — Telegraphic New*. 

1 — How .Minority la Safeguarded. 

4 — Editorial. 

» — Hlr George Reld. 

• — News of the city. 

7 — Newa of the City. 

I — In Womin'i Pealm.' 

*— Sport. 
10 — Much Building la Going on In Canada. 
II — Advice to 8peaker*. 
IS — Real Batata Adrt». 
It — Real Estate Ad via. 
14 — Judgment Haa Be«n Reserved, 
IB — Marine. 

II — Weller Brnn.'i Advt. 
17 — Scientific Research. 
18 — Bole Survivor In the nigging. 
1» — Wallace * Clarke's Advt. 
JO — Profit From Fair W*ag Hindiome One, 
21 — Joe Bayley la Back In Town. 
22 — General News. 

2J — Armed AgSinet Foes of the Air 
24— David Spencers Advt. 



MAGAZINE SUCTION 

1 — l.^adc-rs of Women's Societies In Vic- 
toria and Their Work. 

2 — The Function of Navy League*. 

3 — Literature, Mualc and Art. 

4 — An Hour with, the Editor. 
' »■■— Agent-General's Office In Ixindon. 

• — Principal Peterson of McGui University. 

7 — New Ollmpaee of Life of Queen Victoria. 

« — Things Theatrical 

• — A FSse for Women. 
IS — Young Folk's Paper. 
It — Municipal Advts. 
12— Municipal Advts. 
11— London's Qrest Traffic Problem 
14— At the City Churches. 
It— Adrta. 

1« — EsclsjSJon of Astatic-* 
17— Municipal Advt*. 
i*-~ Apvts. 

le— M«»»«tS*l Advta. 
Ad*t* 
2 1 Ojssinss Ad V ts. 
u— Classifies Asrta. 



8L PASO, Tex., Nov. 2. -Refugees 
arriving; hern today say conditions re- 
main unsettled below the border st 
this point. Antonio Uojes has about 
BOO rebels camping; In the American 
settlement of Pacheo. The refugees 
came from the various Mormon colon • 
les and other American settlements in 
the Casaa Orandes dls'.ilct. 

Work was begun today In recon- 
structing; the Mexico-Xorthwestern 
Railway, on which road the rebels 
have burned sixty bridges between 
Juarez and Casss Orande. A nerjean 
railway officials agreed to attempt to 
rebuild T he road a*. .In on a. pr imlse 
I hat full protection would be given. 
All railway traffi.- below tH.j point 
has been partially destroyed. 



SYDNEY, N S. \\\, Xov. 3.— 
The cost of Australia's, fleet will 
be $3,150,000 above the amounl 

estimated This is due to alter- 
ations that have been found to 
be necessary to fit the vessels to 
patrol the rough seas of the Aus- 
tralian coast. The Melbourne, 
one of the vessels for the fleet, 
has just concluded her trial trips 
In England. 




Dramatic Shipwreck on Hat- 
teras Shoal — Life-Savers 
Helplessly Await Opportunity 
to Rescue Sailor 



VICE-PRESIDENT'S FUNERAL 



President Taft sad Prominent Politicians 

Attsnd Bnrtal of Mr. Jamsa 
' U. Sherman 



U. S. BATTLESHIP 

STEAMING TO SCENE 




iaMAaiatti^. 



rjTrCA, X. V., Nov. 2.— With almple 
but Impressive ceremonies, the body 
of Vice-President James 8. Sherman 
was laid away this afternoon in a 
crypt, within a beautiful mausoleum 
In Forest Hill cemetery. Under a 
canvas covering that aerved as a 
shield against a chill November wind 
were, gathered the Sherman family, 
President Taft, members of his cab- 
inet, justices of the supreme court, 
senators and members of the House of 
Representatives and a few intimate 
friends and business associates of the 
viae- president, while without was a 
throng that stood reverently until fhe 
strains of "Asleep in Jesus," by a male 
cboru*. had died away. 



NEW INLET LIFE SAVIXG STA- 
TION, N. C Xov. 2. — A lone survivor 
of the crew of the Xew York schooner 
John Maxwell, driven on the treacherous 
Hatteras Shoal during the night while 
bound from Norfolk to Savannah and 
broken Into two by a raging .sen, clung 
to the rigging of the wreck when dark- 
ness fell tonight. Life savers from this 
and two other stations watched anxious- 
ly, hut helplessly for an opportunity 
to rescue him. A United States battle- 
ship from the southern drill grounds 
and a revenue cutter are steaming full 
speed tonight to reach the spot In an 
attempt to save him. 

Six lives already have been lost In 
the wreck, five of the men .having dis- 
appeared In the waves before dawn to- 
day. The sixth sailor hung on to the 
rigging until late this afternoon, when 
benumbed by the cold arid exhausted 
by the lashing of the waves he was 
forced , to release his hold and was 
swept to death in the sea. The lone 
survivor, who through glasses appears 
to be an aired man was making a brave 
fight for life but It is feared he la 
doomed. An -all day fight was waged 
hy the life aavera, but a tremendous 
forty mile gale made it impossible for 
them to launch their boats, 

■eurrlvsts la atiggimg 

Repeatedly during the day the life 
savers shot a line over the boat but 
est Page Is, Cei. ». 



Ali !Esvxsu Pa-Asu- 1 

I (SaMurral officer JcnctkeTiLftrspj (j 

THE UNWRITTEN LAW 



LORD ROBERTS' 

SOLEMN WARNING 



SYDNEY, X.S.W., xov. 3.-~'J'he 
Sunday Times today gives the 
opinion editorially that It is folly 
of the worst kind to censure. I^ord. 
Roberts ior sounding a note of 
alarm with respect to the Ger- 
man danger, which every one 
must admit is now threatening 
Jreat Britain. Those leaders who 
ask people to shut their eyes to 
the dangers are traitors, 




Ban Diego Man Who Killed Husband 
and Wife Xa Acquitted 



SAX DIEGO, CftJ., Nov. 2.— Hubert 
G. Lewis, who has been on trial dur- 
ing the past ten days for the murder 
Crf Mrs. Kate Tollvcr. was acquitted 
last night. The charge of killing 
Charles H. Toliver is still pending 
against Lewis, but It Is the impression 
that he will not be tried again. 

Toliver and his wife were killed last 
.\1m> Toliver was a balloon enthus- 
iast, and had constructed a huge sir- 
ship. Lewis was associated with him 
in »he venture. One evening, when 
the Tollvers returned to their home 
after a brief absence, Lewis met them 
at the entrance and shot them both 
dead. He was promptly arrested, and 
did not deny the shooting. Ho frank- 
ly declared he had killed Toliver and 
his wife, and said, "I had to do It.' 

The defence was iionilnn'ily insanity. 
but virtually was the unwritten Hw. 
Mrs. Lewis, on the wMccr stand. tO'd 
of atrocious treatment ihc had suf- 
fered at the hands of th-> Tollv«rs. 



MONTREAL STORM SWEPT 

Wild Wind Responsible for On* Death 
and Several Minor Aooidents 



MONTREAL. Que., Nov. 2.-— One 
death and several minor accidents wu 
the toll taken when the wild storm 
swept down upon tue city and aur- 
roundlng country yesterday between I 
and 7 p. m. When the gale wag at 
its height one of the huge doors of 
the foundry of the Canadian 8te*l 
Company at Longue Point, awung on 
It* hinges in the Mast and crushed 
Alfred Michael, a laborer, between it 
and a railroad car. Michael was hur- 
ried to the Western hospital in an un- 
conecleua condition, but died before 
the institution was reached. 



Sixteen Persons Drown When 
Little Steamer Cecilia Is 
Wrecked on Isle Perrot in 
Lake St, Louis 



ONLY FOUR SURVIVORS 

OF THE DISASTER 



MONTREAL. Que., Xov. 2. — During a 
tremendoua storm last night the 
steamer Cecilia, a little boat which plies 
between Montreal and Vallcyfield, sank 
at Isle Perrot. I^ake St. Louis. As far 
as can be learned at least sixteen per- 
sons were drowiwd. comprising men, 
women and children. Only four men 
were saved. 

The survivors are: Lionel Leduc, eon 
of the captain: Jean Leduc, Valleyfield: 
A. Cosselln, Valleyfield; B. H. Balllar- 
geon, Valleyfield; 1-V-llx Cousincau, St. 
Clet. 

Boon after leaving the I«achlne canal 
and entering the lake the atorm caught 
the frail little craft, which was Of '126 
tons, and bejtan to toss It about «t ran- 
dom. Captain Leduc made valiant at- 
tempts to keep the boat under control, 
and In the lulls In the storm made a 
little headway. About 7 o'clock the 
violence of the storm increased, and 
the Cecilia then got out of control com- 
pletely. 

With the force of the 5S-mlle-an-hour 
gale behind her she rushed toa-arda the 
south shore and struck the rocky Isle 
Parrot with a force thajt amaahed her 
thin wooden hull to fragments, and 
threw passengers and crew into the 
water without the slightest prepara- 
tion. 

The shrieks and shouts of the people 
M the water attracted the attention of 
a -farmer named Alexander Leonard. 
fr O stt t sSsft ea »«■■' »». ©»t V 



The information that the Canadian 
Xorthern Pacific Railway Company 
would complete within the present 
season the location of its Island line, 
as far as the act authorizes it to do 
so, was vouchsafed to a Colonist re- 
presentative yesterday by one. of the 
local officials, who, with a number of 
others connected with the road, has 
returned to the capital after making 
nn extensive tour, taking in practical- 
ly all the fields of operation between 
the city and Port Albernl, Cowlchan 
Lake district and Campbell river. The 
trip was made by motor. 

The contractors on the "D" division 
of the Albernl canal section have al- 
ready organized two excellent camps, 
one o-f which, known as headquarters, 
Is located about three miles south of 
Franklin Creek. It Is in this same 
section that It has been found neces- 
sary to remove the government tele- 
graph line, and work upon that pro- 
ject is now in progress, it being im- 
possible to start clearing the right-of- 
way until the telegraph Is placed at 
a safe distance. 

The extent of line that will have to 
be removed immediately is about six 
miles, and, with the further location 
of the line In the direction of Port 
Albernl, It may be necessary to divert 
another stretch, although In the mean- 
time It Is impossible to state that 
authoritatively. Tho points of P.ie 
line between which the Iccatlon is 
still In question are China ('reek and 
Port Albernl. Immediately the first 
six miles of the line are removed and 
reconstructed at a safe distance, the 
work of clearing the right-of-way 
will be commenced, and arrangements 
have been made for the organizing 
of a large staff of laborers. 

The month of Xovember is likely to 
see a great change In the aspect of 
the line In that vicinity. So far, the 
difficulty of getting suitable men has 
hampered the contractors somewhat, 
but it is understood that this has to 
some extent been got over, and thai 
things will move much more rapidly 
in the construction camps than they 
have done hithertb. 

Heavy Book Work 

The work of construction along the 
Albernl canal is particularly heavy; 
In fact, it is stated that for one or two 
miles It will be as expensive as an 
average mile on the main line in the 
FYaser canyon. It Is practically solid 
rock, and, In addition to the blasting, 
will necessitate considerable bridging. 
This class .of work will not be Inter- 
fered with, however, by wintry wea- 
ther, and It Is expected that the con- 
Contlnned on Paste IS, Col. 2. 



VER "g.C., ~ ' "Kgv. " • r— " T M" 

great thinking class of Germans are op- 
posed to war with great Britain, but 
there, as in Bfci|rlahd, there ar- neys- 
pansra i "" 1 soltjiers who talk wnr in 
season and out of aeasoii to further 
their own ends. The editors are look- 
ing for a sensation to nell British le- 
pers, but ll is a dangerous and unpatri- 
otic- *amu they arc- engaged in. The 
sober thought of the German nation is 
utterly opposed to war with Great Brit- 
ain. 1 believe the feeling in Kngland ia 
equally against war. No matter who 
won it would be a, deadly blow to the 
commercial progress of both nations and 
would put everything back at least 25 
years." 

The speaker was Court Counsellor 
Horst Weber, editor and proprietor of 
The Ulustrlrte Zeltung, of Leipzig, Ger- 
many, who with his wife arrived in the 
city today. 

"A few men like Lord Roberts can do 
a lot of harm in disturbing the friendly 
relations bet wren the two nations. Crit^ 
Icisms and statements like those he has 
been making recently incite the masses. 
The rivalry between the two nations is 
purely of a commercial nature and there 
is no reason why that should not be of 
a. friendly nature. The Germans are ex- 
tremely thorough In *^ v %^SB/^,.-..^^ r 
undertake and that is tv h-i -In- Aflffco re- 
spects the German manufacture"™ are 
excelling the British and American man- 
ufacturers In some lines. They manu- 
facture articles to please their custom- 
ers and always rater to their tastes. 
Ten years ,hko I came to the Vnited 
Slates to pick up pointers on the pub- 
lishing business but today I think I can 
say without modesty that the German 
magazine publishers have nothing to 
learn from the Americans. In fact we 
are away ahead in color printing. 
Germany's Standing Army 

"Germany has been frequently criti- 
cised because she maintains such a 
large standing army. llpr position de- 
mands that protection. She Is surround- 
ed by nations that may at any time turn 
hostile. She. us well as Great Britain, 
must keep the trade routes open for her 
commerce. More than that much of 
the commercial and Industrial greatness 
that Germany has attained In the past 
i ten years Is due to the military training 
received hy her subjects. If 200 years 
of peace were declared among all the 
nations tomorrow. I should be sorry to 
see the military training stopped. As a 
large employer— I have over five hun- 
dred people on my payroll — I always 
give flip preference to the applicant with 
a military training, as he Is more obed- 
ient to authority and at the same time 
more qualified to fill an executive posi- 
tion when called upon to do ao. 

"I believe, and the opinion Is becom- 
ing general among thinking Germans 
and Englishmen tbo, that Canada will 
btcome more and more a uniting ele- 
ment between Great Britain and Ger- 
many. There seems no reason why Ger- 
man enterprise should not take a prom- 
inent part In the development of Can- 
ada. There are many Germans here 
now and all are good citizens and pros- 
pering in their adopted country. From 
facts I have gathered. I am sura th»re 
are no lesa than 400,000 Germans in the 
Dominion. 

booking Towards Canada 
"The wonderful development of the 
Dominion of Canada in recent years has 
attracted the attention of the world and 
especially of Germany. 8ince the con- 
clusion of the provisional commercial 
Continued on Page IS, Col. i. 



Fifty Years Ago Todaff 

aJProm The Colonist <>f November ». 1801.) 



Flour Mills— We understand that Iwo Canadian gentlamen are about making 
arrange.nents to build a large steam flour mill In this c-lly. 

Assaying Odd— We had the pleasure the other day of witnessing the os"""* 
of two massive ban. of g«ld In the assay office of Btesrrs Cording ■ CS.„ in 
this city. The process Is very simple, consisting of melting the gold In a 
crucible by the heat of a furnace. Mesars. C. * Ctt have assayed about |U.M» 
per day for ths past few days. 

Scarcity of Lumber— ?uoh Is th« scarcity of lumber In Victoria at th* present 
time that a number of builders have been f oread to •«*P«jd ^<*«' n * ,«!***; 
tlons. The price of the material »*• also .kept pare with lh l ^^.«l'w ^1 ttu 
lumber now being 1*4.00 per thcusand. The cause of the small «»P? , JJ '* •*» . 
market Is accounted for by the fact that the varloua Jumpering s atabUsn taeWU 
on the Sound are unable to fill the various orders of tHs "«*■**<*•. I^JlJ^e 
Ing for foreign ports, and consequently do not oars to attanq to the oroere »r 
the emalUr craft on which ws depend for a supply. 

To I-ytton Direct- A la'g. car.ee named tha VbIm Jaft Uttle'a *J»««J** 
other day for Itftten carrying about four tons »' »^»»^ -**?• J^«S8ff. 
was making haste lest the river should Creese us befoee «e reeened MS «*»W*f>r 

"""The Caledonia— This eteamer has been purchased by J** C*** ** J5Bf^tS5 
for the sum of tl.ee*. It Is the Intention of l «»« J£* J» ro »I '•J** lliw*la?sf 
between this port and Mew Westminster sad Fort Douglas A new ewer s\ t* ;; 
be put in at a cogt of !3.»»». t 



speech, and wag renews* »jr r*sv. mr. ™.t... ."- r;...'^; 
added to the Itat of ninety names obtained St the last meeting 

• ■ '■■■■ " — "" " " ' . ! .. ' " ' ■ '■ * *" W 

■ ■ , i ■ ii ' - 



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VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1913 



"The Gift Centre" 

"MY KINGDOM FOR A HORSE" 
Quoth Richard After the Battle. 
Some People are Just as Keen 
When It Rains to Get An 
UMBRELLA 

Just received — a very exclusive shipment of the latest 
Umbrella Creations, mostty with detachable handles, in plain 
and engraved .sterling silver, chased gold filled, lovely com 
binations Ojf pearl and silver, also ivory and silver. 

Among them arc a lew of the "Broadway Close Roll" — the 
smartest umbrella ever shown. . 

Covers in cither Gloria or All-Silk. 



By the bye, Xmas shopping has commence 
ing aside articles already. Choose your gi 





uncan 






Successors to Challoaer & M*6fcfte« > 



Corn 



ftw <* fn»«**tMl Vl«w Straat* 



■ ' " r i ,. if'is 



mmmm 



COOK STREET 



BETWEEN KING'S ROAD AND HILLSIDE AVE. 
— Two very desirable residential lots. 



52x230 feet. 
1 13x230 feet. 



Price 



$2750 

$6000 



CORNER OF COOK ST. AND JllU.SmK A\ P.— A 
good business location. 73x90 feet. Price ..$6800 

BETWEEN KING'S KD. AND BAY STRK ET—Two 
splendid lots, having a frontage on Cook Street and on 
Blackwood Street. 



50x150 feet. Price 
50x122 feet. Price 



. $3000 
..$2250 



In order to satisfy constant demand, we want a bigger 
listing of Smith Hill properties. We are in a position to 
satisfy our clients. Let us handle your properties. 



WALLACE&CLARKE 

721 Yates Street — — — — — Phone 471 




Campbell's P Xr 



Cor. Fort and linntlim. 



1'lione 1J3. 



^ BOON TO SKATERS 

OUR FEKTECTIOH AHXLI! 3UTPOBTB 
Have comt to hand just at the rlRiu moment, if yoar ankles are weak 
you will Kad them •< perfect support, if your ankles ere strong, they will 
enable you to skate longer and will, greater safety. Adjustable to all 
Si7.es. Per Pair $1.25 



G. H. Muinm & Co.'s 

CHAMPAGNE 

Cordon Rouge, Vintage 1900-1904 



Complimentary Dinner to the 

RED SOX 

WORLD'S CHAMPIONS 

MX Bra. 

Blue Points. Stahl Style 

Thomas Olives N'unamaker Celery ' lOnRlo P.adlsh^s 

Consomme, a la Carrljran 

Fvied \ntivp Smelt.*. Speaker Sauce 

Lewis Cucumbers Hooper Tomatoes Veritas Potatoes 

Baked I.ui.sler, Wood Style 

Potatoes, O'Brien 

T'resh Putnam farm Chicken, a la Wagner 

Jerry Peas Bradley .Jelly 

Sweet Potatoes. Bedlent Style 

Krug Punch 

Salad, a la Gardner 

frozen Pudding-, Cady Style 

Collins Fancy Cakes Hall Bon Bnns 

Bendrlckaon Cheese Ball Crackers 

Pape Coffee 

o. x. Kmart oiaktaoii Cigars 



PITHER & LEISER 

Wholesale Agents, 
Victoria, Vancouver, Nelson, B. C. 



JL 



GREAT CAMPAIGN 




Mr, Roosevelt Holds Two Meet- 
ings Tomorrow — No Suc- 
cessor to Vice-President 
Sherman as Yet Chosen 



OYSTER BAY, N. V., Nov. 2.— "It 
has heen a great campaign," said Mr. 
Hoosevelt lonight. "I don't know 
that there has ever bc-en a campaign 
like It in this country." 

The work of the campaign was al- 
mosl al :m end, and Mr. Roosevelt 
gave lit.tlo time today to politic*. 
There remain only two speeches on 
Mond&J-,, to the "home folks" of Nas- 
sau county, which the candidate "de- 
sires to make largely for sentimental 
reasons. ' 'n Monday afternoon he 
will go to Mlneola by motor car. In 
the evening he will speak to his fel- 
low townsmen of Oyster Bay. 
Prospects In California 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Nov. 3.— • 
Statements were issued from head- 
quarters OT^!$|f etate Democratic and 



■ 



Progressive organizations tonight, In 
which each party claimed a certain 
victory in the forthcoming election. 

1t^ ,; .'e^iB|SiiPSif«w«d ' their assured 
, 'fliajorlty at 60,000 for the state, and 

.. ■■■i'..d. m' ■„', ....Tto aaccaaaor : ;„ ,'■',, ' l M "'" r' 

ference between -^nHHilM^'Taft and 
several members of his caWlnet and 
Republican senators and representa- 
tives, it was officially announced here 
tonight that no successor to Vice- 
President Sherman on the Republican 
ticket would be selected until after 
the election. Governor Hadley, of 
Missouri, is known to be favored by 
President Taft and many of the lead- 
er-'. 

The Wilson-Marshall parade. to 
have l.eon held in New York this 
afternoon, but cancelled because of 
the funeral of Vice-President Sher- 
man, will be held on Monday night. 
Thirty hands will assemble on Fifth 
avenue, and march up the avenue, 
giving an opportunity for all those 
who care to march to fall in behind. 
The floats, designed ■ for use today, 
Will :ilso take part. 



CALM SUCCEEDS 

FOUR-DAY BATTLE 

Continue*! frum Vnitr I. 



Mitrovitza,. They will be permitted to 
return home after giving up their arms. 
»aln» Imp»di Operation* 
REJKA, MontenoRro, x,,v. 2. — Heavy 
rains and winds are impeding the Mon- 
tenegrin operations around Scutari. The 
three rivers surrounding the, town have 
overflown, but an infantry brigade suc- 
ceeded In crossing the Bpyana by pon- 
toon bridge on Friday, reinforcing the 
troops under Crown Prince Danilo. 
There was a mile of mud on elth.r 
bank' df^the river, through which the 
soldiers w«rc compelled to wade waist 
deep. 

Opinion Is divided on the stage of 
siejre. One party demands a vigorous 
assault against Scutari, regardless. - of 
loss — tiic other wants a regular invest- 
ment so that t lie civilian Inhabitants 
may i^o spared, 

An Austrian destroyer has been 
cruising In Montenegrin waters for the 
last three days between Antlvar and the 
mouth of the Boyana river. 

Extensive Blockade 

ATHENS, Nov. :.'. — The blockade 
around Kniretis now extends for HO 
ml.- K'jiortS sn v the. Greeks and 
Servians have effected a junction and 
are advancing on Salonlcj 

it ta reported thai the German Em- 
peror has sent a letter to hi* *,.-: 
Princess Sophie, the wife of Crown 
Prince Constant i n-. whirl] has been 

communicated to the drown Prince. 

congratulating the Greek army on the 
courage it has shnu n. 

I>{pjwtches from Kosani say thnt 
when the Greeks arrived at the village 
of Inell. a white flag was hoisted. The 
Greeks BtWpecUrig treachery sent for- 

wniil BCQUU on w bom the Turkish peas- 
ants opened fire. The Greeks then sur- 
rounded and burned the village. Hn>" 
hundred prisoners were taken and they 
will be trle.l by cnurtnuirl i« I. 
Turkish Bnocssses 

Cl 'NSTANTINOPbK. Nov. 2—A tele- 
grain from SCUtarl dated seven days ago 
reports that the Montenegrins In i.nr of 

their a&saulta against the town lost 

8,000 men killed and wounded. It is re- 
ported from Kavala, on the Aegean Sea, 
thai a Greek squadron has been sighted 
off Knos. The Greek warships were 
convoying a number of transports and 
it Is believed a landing Is contemplated. 

[righting continues along the whole 
line In the eastern tlientre of war, but 
r,o details have been made public. 

It is reported thai Prince Aziz, who 
commanded the Turkish cavalry at the 
battle of Klrk-Kuesseh, and nineteen 
other Turkish Officers will he brought to 

Constantinople for trial by court-mar- 
tial. 

More than 3,000 wounded arrived here 
tonight from the Thraclan plains, 

An official dispatch from Salonica says 
the Turkish forces which started from 
Bolincla have formed a Junction with 
the troops at Varldarl, on the Varldar 
river. A column from Yenidlah Iioh 
succeeded In dislodging the Greeks, who 
occupied a position at Vortekoh, near 
Vodena, In Macedonia. Numerous pris- 
oners and t»n guns were captured. 
Turkish forces, according to advices, 
have descended from Monastlr and turn- 
ed the Greeks tinder the crown prince. 
British meet Mobillalng 

GIBRALTAR, Nov. J.— The British 
cruiser Dartmouth passed here today 
bound for the Levant. The third battle 
squadron will arrive Cirly tomorrow 
fiiim Knglnnd and will proceed east- 
ward after a stay of only one hour. ' 

PORTSMOUTH, Kng„ Kev. 2.-*>Un- 




S!R HOWARD GREY 

Britain's Secretary of foreign Affairs, Who is Likely to Prove a Big 

Factor in the Eventual Settlement of Affairs in the Balkans. 



usual activity In the dockyard here is 
reported in a special edition ol' The 
Evening News, which aay.8 preparatione 
are being made to get the sixth destroy- 
er flotilla read} for .sea. 

The official explanation, says The 
"is that this Is being done merely 
to be in readiness for the quarterly mo- 
bilization on Monday, but we understand 
the preparations me of a much more 
warlike nature. The actual service rat- 
ings have been recalled by notice and 
special messenger, and the men have 
been directed to proceed aboard ship by 
6 o'clock this evening." 

The News adds: "It is reported that 
the flotilla will sail tonight under sealed 
orders. Notices have been posted order- 
ing all submarine men to return to their 
boats at once." The paper says that 
men on leave have been recalled by wire 
to other naval ports. 

Ln Decisive Phzee 

V1KW \ Nov. 2.— The Vienna Relchs- 
post this morning prints a story sent 
by its correspondent with the Bulgarian 
army, Lieut Wegner. It is dated from 
the Bulgarian ' headquarters Thursday 
evening, and says: 

"I have just returned with a train 
of wounded, after having spent three 
I at the front. For three days and 
nights 1 have not been out of my 
clothes. My poor horse could not 
move another step because of exhaus- 
tion. The great and final battle entered 
the decisive phase on Thursday morn- 
ing when the Bulgarian left wing nt 
Bunarhlssar took the offensive with 
mighty impetuosity. The prelude to 
the final crush at arms was a murder- 
ous engagement, which ends very fa- 
vorably for the Bulgarians, especially 
on their right wing at Lule-Burges, 

"On the left wing, where the Bul- 
garian Offense started. the Turks by 
taking the offensive from Serai by way 
of Viza against the Bulgarian lefi 
wing had attempted to meei the dan- 
ger by threatening their line of retrcMi, 

owing to the Bulgarian advance by way 
of Tchatalja. The Turks also had suc- 
ceeded in driving back the advance |>odj 
of the Bulgarians beyond Karagederes! 
and BunnriiissHi 1 . 

•■oil Tuesday morning when the 
mighty Bulgarian counter-attack was 
delivered againS! thetr right wing from 
a line running from Uskup to Hadjl- 

rtikli and MonStirdagh, the Ticks' front 
ranks were simply run i own by a start- 
ling aasauli ft* ted with unparalleled 

dash, yet thaj succeeded In sustaining 

the fight by continually bringing Up re- 
serves. * 

'Bitter, fierce fighting raged through 
the day, in the course of which the 

Turkish main body degenerated into 
senseless musses without consistency 
o r power of fighting. 

Annihilating Fire 

"At the same time the Bulgarian rlt»ht 

wing attacked the Turkish positions at 

I.ule-Bui gas from BskJ It.iba nnd Yen- 
I kin. and drove the Turks from their 
fortified positions on the Telanders, 
Adjn validot> and Rrkene rivers back of 
l.ule-Bui gas. The Bulgarian Infantry 
was splendidly supported by' the artil- 
lery, which, at critical moments suc- 
ceeded In holding down the Turks by 
an annihilating fire With the help of 
the guns, most of the Turkish positions 
were taken by bayonet assaults. Some 
of them were stormed and taken with- 
out any preliminary action or artillery 
support. 

"The dash of the Bulgarian Infantry 
was unparalleled, and, like the tactical 
achievements resulting from It, sur- 
passed all that could be believed pos- 
sible. Four hundred paces and still 
further from the enemy's line, whole 
regiments rose like one man and hurlrd 
themselves in one solid, charging mass 
on the enemy without halting, still fir- 
ing and despising all cover. 

"Their Officers were powerless a^ain-'t 
this burning frenxy to get at the Turks 
with the knifo or bayonet. All attempts 
to hold the troops In leash were fruit- 
less. One regiment hurled Itself on the 
enemy ea the older of a sergeant, to- 



tally disregarding its officers' orders to 
halt and lie down. 

No Decisive Blow 

"Tuesday's fierce engagement had re- 
sulted successfully for the Bulgarians. 
both at Buriiahassir and bule-Burgas, 
yet they bad struck no decisive blow. 
Early on Wednesday morning sirong 
Bulgarian forces were brought by- 
forced marches from Adrianople, and 
renewed the attempt to break through 
the centre of the Turk position. The 
Bulgarian . attack fell partly on the 
Turkish troops drawn up In the fort 
region of Kirk-Killsseh and the Viga 
road and partly in entrenched positions 
northwest of l.ule-Burgas. 

"After heavy fighting and continu- 
ally repeated murderous bayonet as- 
saults, the Bulgarians succeeded by 
noon in breaking through the Turkish 
position, and, in co-operation with an 
attack delivered Simultaneously at 
I^ule-Burgas. in running up the whole 
Turkish wing. 

"Here in the early afternoon began 
a general, retreat on the line at T^ule- 
Burgas and D dereklni, along the rail- 
way and in the direction of Tchorlu. 
The Bulgarians Immediately took up 
the pursuit and -continued to press the 
enemy with extraordinary energy 
throughout the night, the result being 
the Turkish retreat degenerated 
into a wild flight. 

''Meantime, yon their own left wins 
southeast of Bunarhlssar, the Bulgar- 
ians had completely enveloped the 
Turks from the northeast. 

"When dawn broke today (Thurs- 
day) s decisive attack on the right 
flank of the Turks Wai delivered from 
the line at I'run, Belli and Vizar. 
ii. niiy shaken by the previous fiKbi- 
inc. the Tprka were unable to with- 
stand the Bulgarians' overwhelming 
flank attack, abandoning their line of 
retreat tbrotigh Serai Almost totally 
banded, the Turks retired in disorder 

through EDngara and i.opolkoei, directly 

' ith Of '!'• borlu. 

Pursuing the Enemy 
"Hers also the Bulgarians pursued 

the fii 1 my i.y paj alia! and com itimjI 
outflanking movements along the Turk 
main line of communication through 
Serai, Teharkesseni :ind through Ta i- 
keni, and sought to CUl off the enemy's 
retreat lo the Tcha la l.i;i. lines. The 
Turkish losses are enormous. The 

near line of retreat is traceable by a 

long line of discarded weapons and 
equipment, and, also by burning vil- 
lages and the bodies of the massacred 

Christians. The Bulgarians captured 
guns and many thousands of rounds or 
ammunition." 

Battle of Iiule-Burgaa 

I/»MMi\. Nov. 2.— The London hail 

Mail prints a description of the battle 

of LulUe-'Burgas and defeat oT the Turk- 
ish main army. It Is by Ward Price, 

special correspond ant with the Bulgar- 
ian forces : 

•'It is noon, and the hang and boom 
of field nuns, near and distant, and the 
manifold rattle of the fierce rifle fire 
are soon Is among which this telegram 
is written. Here 1 am at the top of a 
gentle slope on the broad, bare, rolling 
plain which reaches on either side to 
the blue distance — a plain where the 
batlb of Lule-Burgas Is being fought 
before my eyes. We are standing by 
our i nr ,n the bare grass with not so 
much as a hush to break Its dull green 
monotony. To the northwest, straight 
ahead towards the town of l.ule-Burgns 
one looks across three shallow waves of 
land before the blue ridge, three mile* 
distant, climbs up against the sky, to 
close the vlata About this ridge and 
in slopes on this side of it, where tic 
Turkish supports are she Bering, th.- 
Bulgarian shrapnel Is bursting, in 
white balloons of line ring smoke. The 
Bulgarians are miklns; rr-ry effort *o 
tarn the left flank in full sight of 
which we are standing. The riiilw >v 
bridge over the riVcr I* the.h'V to lbl$ 
flanking engagement.. The sin is ., *t» 
warm that the boated air trie'.', s across 
lift ncld of view of the gtn*..-l . ■■? run- 
CeatW—t esi raws Ls, Ce». t. 



"40 YEARS OF INTEGRITY" 

SEASONABLE HEADWEAR FOR 
MEN AND YOUNG MEN 





Hcadwcar that is stylish. 

Headwear that is well selected from the best makers. 
Headwear that is seasonable. 
YOU'LL FIND ALL THE ABOVE IN OUR POPULAR 

HAT DEPARTMENT 

Scott's rimoiii Stiff Kats, priced from .' • • 

Henry Heath's Silk Hats, at 

Henry Heath's Soft and Stiff Hats, In all shades, from $3.50 to 

Honry Heath's Ladioi' Siding Hats, at • 

Austrian Velours, in greens, blacks, browns and greys, i^^sBBBs! 

Christy's Stiff Hats, In black and brown, at 

Christy's Soft Hats, in all shades, at from ................... 

Trass' Soft and Stiff Hats, from 

Bobin«or.'s Stiff and Soft Hats, in all shades, $3.00 and .....". 

Townend's Soft and Stiff Hats, in all shades, $3.00 and... ...... 

Townend's Wool and Tweed Hats, ■»♦' : ji' : r - "i" , ''- "- - '- 't V ,- i. n - -". 

John B. Stetson's Soft and Stiff HsSjg,' ■#.''4|4wil a J -gnd ;V. .'. . . .... 

John B. Stetson's Cowboy Hats, at 

Mallory's Soft and Stiff Hats, in all colors, at from ........ .'. 



w. & 




$3.00 
98. OO 
95. OO 
95.00 

.95.00 
93.O0 
92..~>0 
93.00 
93.50 
83.50 

.81.50 
95.00 

.97. SO 
93.00 



ILSON 



THE MEN'S CLOTHING CENTRE 
1291 Government Street and Trounce Avenue 




Stylish Evening Slippers 




Women'* Hmart Kvenln* Slippers In black, 
white and (?nbt satin, black, brown and grey 
Furfle, black, brown and grey velvet, viol 
kid and parent kid. Thene slippers come In 
pumps, colonials and strap slippers with 
Cuban or French heels. Wo color your 
white satin slippers to match the 
jfo« 11. We have the famous Onyx 
Nllk Hosiery la a Urge assort- 
ment of colors. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

We have just received the delayed shipm^u of \\ '<>; ;■< •> 
Misses' and Children's Ballet Slippers. 



i\»i 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled 



W.Cathcart & Go. 



Pemberton Building 



6a 1 Fort Street 



Stuart, Campbell, Craddock & Co. 



Temple Building, 521 Fort Street 



Phone 3860 



CADBORO HEIGHTS 

I.i.t. 50 x i_'0. Splendid situation. Cash, $400, balance on 
terms. Price $1,500 

HARRIET ROAt) 

Lot. 50 x 135, just outside city limits. Cash. $580, balance on 
terms. Price • : . . $1,750 

OAK BAY 

5-room bungalow, up-to-date in every respect. Cash. $1,500, 
balance I, 2 and 3 years. Price $5,000 

MOSS STREET 

6-rOOttl house, modern and fully complete, 100. yards from car 
line. Cash. $1,800. balance over 2 years. Price, furnished. 
$6,500 ; Unfurnished $5,500 



A NEAT LITTLE COTTAGE 

EDGEWARE ROAD, CLOSE TO HILLSIDE CAR 
New Five-Roomed Bungalow, with full size cemented base- 
ment, bathroom, pantry, etc. The house is well built and 
would make an excellent home for a working man. 
Price. $3,000— $650 handles. 




PHONE 14-5 



521 FORT ST. 



t*W\. 



NORTHERN GROWN BANK 

HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG 
Capital (authorized) $6,000,000 - Capital (paid up) $2,450,000 

DIRECTORS 

President Sir D. H. McMillan, K. C. M. G. 

Vice-President Capt. Wm. Robinson 

las. Hi Ashdown H. T. Champion Frederick Nation 

Hon. D. C. Cameron W. C. Leistikow Sir R. P. Roblin 

General Manager - - - Robt. Campbell 

Bill* ot :R*ohanV, T>raft« «n1 Orders onfall Countrlea bougiht and aold. 
• ('arro^lan 'BTnk*r« ,, 'Aii»oci«tlon Money Order* aold. » 

5 ( -ol lee* I una madern ill part, of Canada, and In foreign countries 

Braneheii d!«trlbut«d throughout all Canada. 

jGODFREY BOOTH, Moat** 



Victoria BohmI* 



Sunday, Novam 



b*/a, 



1912 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Over 40 "Buck " Ranges Sold in 

.I ii i >i i i ^ i ■ » i tw » i i » i ' . ■ > ' , ' r " 

Victoria the Last Eight 






St- *r 



, $f#tfat>Wf»- ^ r >^y*^* * t& VW *W l * ' *#^ &^ 




And no end of "BUCK- Cook Stoves 
and Heaters. 

There's several reasons, and we'll 
furnish with t*e names aud addresses 
if ck-slred. 

A SENSIBLE GUARANTEE 

We'll jrive you a price for any 
style of "HIU'K" Tanife set up 
complete In your home, all water 
and other bonnecttehs, saving 
you positively a *lo Mil, and un- 
dertaking to taH« back range If 
same does not properly cook and 
hi at 

6-Hole Ranges up from $2$). 75 

Heaters up $ 3,00 

Terms arranged with respons- 
ible parties. 



Tills iimiKf in your hoiiKo com- 
plete, with water connections, $50. 

18 Inch oven. 



BLIND 



707 FORT SV/rwr 



PHONE 2440 




:**m*m**> 




Amendment to Home Rule Bill 
Which Games Provides a 
Five-Year Term for the Irish 
Senate 



H^i 



The shrewd shopkeeper knows why it pays to Hive his 

premises, and especially his windows, well lighted. He 
knows that not only are his wares displayed to better advan- 
tage, but that light attracts the attention of the passer-by— 
and that is why you will always find his store cheerful and 
attractive by the wise use of electric lights. Mr. Business 
Man, how is your store in this respect? Our experts on store 
and v/indow lighting are at your service. 




Light and Power Department 



Phone 1609 



COUNT THE COUGH CURES! 

We doubt If you could. Their name Is legion, and therVs as 

much difference between their value's as there is between 'their 

names. From any point of view we have not yet tried so splen- 
did a Cough Cure as our 

FERRATED EMULSION 

For Chronic Coughs. It -is a compound oC pure Cod Liver Oil, 
Hvpophospites and Lime Soda. It's good to taste, too. Per 
bottle $1 - 00 

CYRUS H. BOWES 

The Old Established Drug Store 



Phone 272 



613 Pan dora Av. 




BULL DOG CLEANSER 

The Only K*al Tile, Marble, Brick unci Stone Cleanser on the Market. Non- 
lnjurlou*. A sanitary cleanser and purifier. We absolutely guarantee It to 
remove the dirt. 

613 Pandora Street. 



Phone 271. 



FERNWOOD 



Snap Bny, on Avebnry St., between Haultain and Bay St. Stands high. 

50x120. Ti'rms S.ir.o cash. Price $i>50 

Well under market value. 

Oak Bay — Splendid Bite, on Belmont St, Large lot. 81x150x100x61, be- 
tween Beach Drive and waterfront. Close to Golf Links and car. 
Magnificent HC a view. 



Boats for Sale 



This 1* the Season to Bny. Be In time for Victoria's first great An- 
nual Water Carnival In August, 1913. See our Bists. 



REID & SPENCER 

Real Estate and Yacht and Ship Sale Brokers 
733 Fort Street Ground Floor Phone 2690 



SYLVESTER'S POULTRY MASH 

It'i what we call Excelsior Meal, be Ihr a sround grain containing; bone and 
grit, which should be fed In mornln g and evening; and If you want frevh eggs 

— try a box. fl.78 per sack. 

SYLVESTER FEED CO. «> «» 709 Yetes SL 



Local Apples Are Now iivThcir Prime 

Why not get apples when they are at their best? They are 
now the most delicious fruit on the market. Let us have 
your order early today. 

Crab Apples. Per lb. . . .5*£ 

Good Preserving Pears. 

$2.50 



Fancy Jonathans. 

Per box $2.00 

Fancy Kings, $1.75.. $1.50 
Pippins $1.50 



Per box 




Farmers' Exchange 



LIMITED 



ait jonrsov st. 



• 



neon ma. 



— ■ 



LONDON, Nov. 2. — Home Rule wont 
into tlii' cbrntMttee sta^e yesterday. 
Mr, uirrell. secretary for Ireland, moved 
an B miTidmvnt to provide a llve-yem- 
term for the Irish setiate. An election 
would then be Kelt? on a basis o{ pro- 
portional repreWritafibri. tilster to 
have u Berrators; t^tnster 11, Muneter 
9 and OOiUMttighl 6. 

Following Mr. BirrelVa proposal.-, :..■. 
Bonar Law stated tfi« urlim- mirUBter 
had made up his mind mi an *n1 
new constitution on '.ho morning or the 
day when In- announced a change l" the 
whole senate vol 

The lrlBh Unionists, Mr. Law con- 
tinued, at a Joint sitting of both the 
houses, would still be In the minority 
'l^ ; jS>-votoH. \\':th that number against 
them, It would be mere pretein <■ to 
that the minority wen jafeguarc.il 
the clause of the bill guarantees. 

However, Mr. Bin-ell's amnninit nt, 

together with the original clause, was 

carried by 298 votes to 209. 

- :-.- ; - .ii , -;r ~ 




T WORRYING 



itlon Authorities Deprecate Talk 
Threatened Hindu Influx 







fCOUVBR, B. C, Nov. 2— Seen 
ernoon regarding a statement 



which appeared In one of the evenln; 
papers yesterday to the effect that the 
immigration authorities make no se- 
cret of the fact that they would be 
nonplussed if the frequently rumored 
British East India Steam Navigation 
Company's service between Calcutta 
and Vancouver is inaugurated, as it 
would probably mean the Influx o-f 
Hindus to British Columbia, Mr. Mnl- 
colm Reld, -the head of the immigra- 
tion bureau at Vancouver, said: 

"As far as we know, there is no 
foundation for the story at all. These 
rumors are constantly cropping up, 
,uk! th.' immigration authorities re- 
fuse to discuss the matter. The re- 
port was not given out from this of- 
fice, and it is ridiculous to talk about 
the immigration authorities being 
nonplussed In the matter. If there 
had been anything In the rumor, we 
would have been the first to hear 
about It. We have a secret service 
man here in touch with India right 
along. You can say definitely, that 
we are not worrying in the least about 
it — It is a bogey." 

Further than this Mr. Reld would 
not discuss the matter. 

FACING MILK FAMINE 

Halifax Buff era Through Quarrel Be- 
tween Out-of-town and City 
Dealer* 



HALIFAX. N. S., Nov. 2.— The city 
is facing a milk famine because of dif- 
ference of opinion as to the price by 
producers at out-of-town points ■ and 
dealers in the city of Halifax. It costs 
Uitf dealers 4 1-2 and they charge the 
consumers 8 cents. An advance was 
recently decided on by the producers 
on which the dealers based a claim 
that the price to consumers should be 
made 9 cents a .quart. The dealers say 
rather than charge this price they will 
fight the producers. The producers ac- 
cept the challenge and today sent in 
a very much reduced quantity. It Is 
a strike on the proposed advance by 
the producers, the profit to the deol- 
ers would still be sixty per cent, 
whereas at 4 l-4c a quart the profit 
was S8 per cent. 

The City Home awarded a contract 
this week for milk for that institution 
to be supplied at four cents per a'.mrt. 
Meanwhile less milk is coming to Hal- 
ifax and the supply may yet be fur- 
ther lessened. 



PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN 

Mr. A. H. Sparry to Take Charge of 
Construction Work Between Van- 
couver and Port George 



BPOKANB, \\ ii., Nov. 2. — .X. JI. 

Sperry, Jssistanl, general freight and 
passenger agent 'or the Kpok&ae In- 
ternational Railway for the last seven 
years, resigned yesterday to take 
charge Immediately of the Pacific and 
Great Eastern Railway, the Foley and 
Welch railway, which the Spokane 
railroad contractors are building from 
Vanqouver tn Fort George, a distance 
of 800 miles. Mr. Sperry's headquart- 
ers will be in Newport, R C. He will 
leaVe here on Tuesday. 



Wireleia From Aeroplane 
FORT K1LFY, Kas., Nov. 2. — In tests 
of aeroplanes for war service, being 
Conducted here by the war department, 
Lieut Arnold, aviator with Lieut. Brad- 
ley, wireless operator of the U. S. army, 
sent many messages today from an 
aeroplane to a field station five miles 
away. It Is said this is the first time 
such messages have been sent with com- 
plete success. 



Oppose* Rebuilding. 

HATiLEYBUnv, Ont.. Nov. 2.— The 
Haileybury Board of Trade is opposed 
to the rebuilding of the Fnerglte Ex- 
plosive fatcory here. This Is the fac- 
tory which was destroyed by the explo- 
sion In which six persons lost their 
lives. 



▼leer-General mesigna 

PARIS, Nov. 2.— The Matin says Car- 
dinal Respighl. vicar-general to Pope 
Pius, has resigned, following an in- 
quiry ordered by the Pope into the ad- 
ministration of the chancellor of thu 
vlcarate, Monsignor Faberie, which, it 
Is alleged, established favoritism. The 
cardinal, according to the Matin, 
deemed himself responsible for his sub- 
ordinate's action and tendered his res- 
ignation. 



i£* 



Angus Campbell & Co., Ltd., 1008-10 Government Street \ 

■< i . 1 1 i i .i ' 



Very Beautiful Show- 
ing oi "Campbell's" 

— .,..-■.■■■ . .i ■ ■ i ■ ■ p i »""'" ■ ' — " ' ■'■■' ' " " ■ i n I,— i ■ 

Exclusive Coat Models 



The New "Johnnie" Coat, 
1m derniere me— ( )nc of 
the smartest coats of the 
seasi m, iri soft, reyersibla 
blanket doth "I" different 
tones. Thi- i r, shows 
the th idea — 

no seam at all. 

New Reversible Tweed, 
seven-eig'hthg 1 c n ■• I h 
Robespierre pollafj made 
to button close at neck, 
plaid collar and cuffs — 
being reversible side WP^i 
material. Very warm 
coat and extra smart. 

White Blanket Cloth, with 
side patch pockets, large 
ar and cuffs trim- 
it h -black — v e lvet; ' "" 
stitched with white. < >!Ǥ$/ 
of the smart r ts we 

have ever seen of its 
kind, 

Cornflower Blue Bedford 
Cord Coat, large collar, 

with black satin reveres 
and large satin cuffs, 
trimmed with cloth but- 
tons. Very effectively 
cut. 

Green Reversible Blanket 
Cloth Coat, reversible 
side showing collar and 
cuffs of Siam shade. 
Robespierre collar. This 
is one of the smartesl 
-designs we have in Stock. 

Grey Chinchilla Cloth 
Coat, lined with flat- 
heliotrope cloth and 
trimmed with same. The 
. large fancy buttons com- 
plete this smart model. 




OUR Winter Coats for ladies and misses 
this year Completely eclipse any pre- 
vious season, both in point of style 
and the choice of materials. To women in 
quest of distinctive styles, "Campbell's" 
models will at once appeal, as will also the 
very extensive range of prices. The Coat 
section this season is a most important part 
of "The Fashion Centre." 



Snowflake Diagonal 
Tweed, three-quarter 
length and smartly cut, 
large collar and cuffs oi 
the material reversed. 
Very warm — perfect fit- 
ting and trimmed with 
large smoked buttons, 

Esturgeon Blue Blanket 
Cloth Coat, very large 
collar and cuffs, trim 
med with black military 
braid and silk buttons. 
Coat is half silk lined 
with black mouseline 
Budhesse silk- 

Navy Chinchilla Coat, 
paten pockets, three- 
quarter length, with red 
collar and cuffs, coat 6 
lined with: red. . An ex- 
ceptionally durable and 
warm outergarment. , 

Smart Brown Soleil Coat, 

three-quarter 1 e n g t h, 
very smartly shaped 
collar, large cuffs, trim- 
med with black velvet 
and black velvet but- 
tons. 

Navy Blue Blanket Cloth 
Coat, with green stripes, 
larce, fancy collar and 
cuffs. trimmed with 
green cloth and large 
smoked pearl buttons — 
exclusive style. 

Heather Mixture Rever- 
sible Tweed Coat, brown 
and red predominating, 
reversible side being 
large brown check and 
half lined with shot silk 
satin de chene. Very 
chic indeed. 



Black Stripe Zibeline Cloth Coat, seven-eighths length, green with cinnamon brown stripe. Large, fancy collar and cuf|s, fin- 
ished with those large smoked pearl buttons. 

Prices, $9.75 to $47.50 



©mljf Telephone© 
uumlbeip lis 181 




WE OPEN DAILY AT 

8.30 A. HI. AND 
CLOSE AT 6.30 P. M. 



The "Fashion Centre' 



Sea Front 



AT 



Shoal Bay 

A narrow strip of water- 
front. Lot 17, opposite 
Island Park. This is suit- 
able for boathouses or lo<- 
a bathing proposition. It 
is the only bit of real water- 
front for sale on that side of 
Shoal Bay. 

Price, $2500 



Quarter Cash 



H.F.PULLEN 

2056 Oak Bay Avenue 
Phone 3543 




, Toronto's Onstoms Receipts. 
TORONTO, Ont.. Nov. 2.— The cus- 
toms revenue collected at the port of 
Toronto established s new record <or 
the month of October. 1912, with »n 
Increase of nearly $400,000 over a year 
ajro. The collections for the past 
seven months show the remarkable 
g-aln of mors than $3,000,000 over the 
total for the corresponding period in 

iiii. 



Home for the Holiday! 

VOU may want something new for the holiday jaunt, 
A either to the old home or the old friend. 

While Semi-ready Tailoring offers you quick service, we put larger emphasis 
on the quality service, the better clothes for less money, such as only a great 
specialized organization can produce. 

May we show you the new Overcoats, at $15, JS26 arid $%$, 
or the Suits at $15 to $35 ? There is nothing better made 
In the world. Just to show whether you are interested 
now or afterwards. 




Look for the Price 
Look for the Name 
Pevn In the Pocket 
Always tlio r> \me. 



^.:.,..^W^<n..;, ,,^^fta*& 



MEARNS & FULLER 

Douglas and- View Street 



m 



VICTORIA DAILY. COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



®b* Sails (Mcmist 



Ratabllahed 1848. 



^he Colonist Printing and Publishing 
Company. Llm:t#d Liability. 



J. S. ti, MATSON. 

-* •- 

im-1215 Broad Street, Victoria 



ii r. 



Subeerlptlon Kates I»> Carrier 

Yearly »6 oo 

H.«lf- Yearly J.00 

Quarterly - 1.60 

Monthly »o 

Subscription Kate* By Mall 

To Canada, Great Britain, the United Sfa'.'i 
and Mexico' 

Yearly 85.00 

llalf-Yearly 2.80 

All aubacrlptlon ratea' payable In advnnce. 

Mall aubacrlbera are requested t > make 

all remittances direct to The Dally Colonl*;. 

Subscribers In ordering change of address 
should be particular to give both new and 
u J address. 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



CHURCHILL'S SPEECH 

The Hliort .summitry of the speech by 
Mr. Winston Churchill at Leeds shows 



that It was 
anil dellve 




■fr lofty spirit 
it clearness ana 
force. The substance of : wi^f fce sold 
that we must be prepared to bear 
res^slblfatles resulting from the 
t heritage, which our ancestors have 
bequeathed to?, ur. There Is nothing 
very new %i£jhtlJ|ii|fc^bel68B the sub- 
Ject is o 
r some one 



,',H>*ro§,' timely 



in Mr. -Churchill's position 



apeak. It 'was not the speech of one 




•<■•■ -lost captious 
foreign critic could take exception. If 



we may judge of the whole from a pari, 
we must class it as a statesmanlike ut- 
terance from a man who recognizes that 
upon him has (alien the duty of guiding 
the nation along those lines which l.-ad 
to peace and safety. 

In these days tin re is so much said 
and written about loyalty, patriotism, 
imperial responsibility and the like, 
that one approaches such subjects frith 
a dread of being regarded as an uttenr 
of words only. Patriotism — we like tbe 
word better than loyalty, for it means 
all that Is implied in the latter, and 
much more — Is cheapened by much talk- 
ing. It ought to be taken for granted 
that we arc all patriotic, all anxious 
t . do our duty to our country when wo 
have learned what that duty is. The 
points wherein we differ relate to the 
means, not to the end. If every one 
would bear this in mind, there would 
be less bitterness In discussion and bet- 
ter results would be achieved. Mr. 
Churchill takes it for granted that the 
people of the United Kingdom will rise 
to their duty when they understand 
what It is. He has no new political 
nostrum whereby he proposes to bring 
about national salvation. He points 
out that the Empire must be strong on 
the sea, taking it for granted that the 
people will enable him, while he occu- 
plies his position as First Lord. ot the 
Admiralty, to make It strong. He said in 
effect: Here Is what our history teaches; 
here are the unquestioned facts of inter- 
national relations today, not between any 
two countries, but between all countries; 
W« cannot tell from what quarter of 
the sky the next flash of war's light- 
ning may come; but we da know that 
our Empire Is founded upon sta power; 
we do know that it has been maintained 
by sea power, and we are forced to be- 
lieve that It must be maintained by sea 
power. Sea power is to the British peo- 
ple not a means of aggression; it is 
a necessity because the Empire Is linked 
together bj t lie oceans. It la not the 
safety of the United Kingdom alone of 
which we have to think. To British 
people everywhere it Is of prime im- 
portance that the British Isles should 
ever be "c. impasse, > about by the In- 
violate sea"; but Britain is united to 
Canada by the ocean, as Canada is 
united to Australia and Australia to 
South Africa, and Australia to the llrit- 
Ish Isles; ami it Is thus ulso that New 
Zealand, the West Indies and the var- 
ious dominions of the King arc tied to 
the land where the throne Is, and thus 
also Is India kept within the realms of 
the Klng-Kmperor. 

Of no other nation can this, or any- 
thing resembling this, be said. The 
British Empire Is of value t > us who In- 
habit It' and to mankind at large only 
in so far as It represents British Insti- 
tutions, because thpse Institutions ar- 
beyond all Question the best expression 
of free government and equal rights. 
Those institutions have been the pilot 
of the world's progress to liberty. \W 
are doing the work of humanity When 
we strive to make the Empire Imperish- 
able. Mr. Churchill has put the case 
for sea power upon a higher plane 
than party politics, upon a nobler found- 
ation than fear of some foreign power. 
He has reminded us that It Is the duty 
of the British race to remain supreme 
on the paths of the seas. 



There seems to be no doubt Wwt he 
would be chosvn, if the popular vote 
count. si, but It does not. The New 
York Herald of a week* ago published 
the result Ot a canvass of 270, »2:', vot- 
ers indifferently selected from all 
parts of the country. The result was 
as follows; 

Wilson 110.M1I 

Roosevelt 82,878 

Taft 88,418 

l>el,s 17,040 

Compared with the figutes of the 
previous week, these show a slight 
failing off for Mr. Taft ami for Air. 
Wilson, but a small gain for Mr. 
Roosevelt. The Herald says there are 
three uncertain factors In the case, 
which it thinks are: 

The great silent vote in the Repub- 
lican party; 

Inability to gauge the extent of the 
progressive sentiment, which is with- 
out doubt very strong; 

Imposslblllfjl 
"back to , Taf V Mia ftfrosperity 
ment will extendi. 

1 i Vor Vt$» "; information Ot those, per- 
sons, who may fori an interest there- 
in, ' 'we' ' give' • a summary ••91.', ton p rd- 
vlsions for the election of a President 
and Vice-President. 

Each state shall appoint in , such 
manner as the legislature shall direct 
a number of electors equal to the, 
whole number of senators and repre- 
sentatives the state has in the United 
ntnirn flnngrfHH, AM tilt states >p- 




the past twenty-five years the aim of 
parliament has been to build up the iron 
au,d steel Industry, and they claim that 
with the withdrawal of the bounty, 
their products will be Inadequately pro- 
tected. They say that they have at 
present only protection to the extent of 
from 7 to 20 per cent, whereas other 
industries are protected as high us 88 
per e,nl In some cases. Mr. White does 

rot appear to have expressed any opin- 
ion upon the request of the delegation, 
Which, it must be conceded, deals with 
a matter of very great Importance. In 
view of the. existence of large deposits 
of iron ore on this coast, the people of 
British Columbia have a double interest 
In this mutter. Naturally they would 
have no wish to see the cost^-of •struc- 
tural steel or of iron otvjitejl generally- 
advanced; but they would on the other 
hand be gratified at the adoption of any 
policy that would lead to the utilization 
of our own ores. If our ores are not 
soon brought into use, they may have 

m^mmm^ro^, of eh.,.. 

■■■.rs it' i ' '' : ' •:.' . 



gpi? faces rhe ^ ( | | i^» |j> :-n|^hens1o6> ^point these electors by popular vote. 
i but of one who bem^^t^^s^pira-^ 



The electors meet in their respective 
equal to its potential do*$^|^^ by ballot for a Preni- 

noi the sp eec h o f <m sifrmlst . f.W J o a n 
appear to 
nguage to whi 



de nt a nd-V-iee-Preslden-t.-an d the »n |y 



l» restriction* jt»ut by the Coto»'ti^o% 

upon their . choice Is that the person 
voted for must be a natural-born citi- 
zen of the United States, be thirty- 
five years of age and have lived four- 
teen years within the 1'iilted States. 
A further llhhtutton Is that the elec- 
tors cannot vote for both president 
and vice-president from their own 
states. This is to ensure that the 
president ana viccj-president shall not 
be from the ' same state. The 
result of their choice they re- 
turn under seal to the president 
of the senate; who In the presence of 
the 'Senate an i House of .! ltep.re- • 
tlves opens the returns and counts the 
several results. The person having a 
majority of all' the ballots cast, that is 
of the electoral ballots, not those cast 
In the general election, is declort ! 
elected. If no one lias the majority, 
the House of. Representative's shull 
proceed forthwith to elect a President, 
In which case each state shall have 
only one vote. A majority of all the 
states shall be necessary to a choice. 

The vice-president is chosen in the 
same way, provided one person has a 
majority, of the votes cast, but in eus • 
no one has a majority, the Senate shall 
select one of the two having the high- 
est number of votes as vice-president. 
If by the 4th of March next following 
the presidential flection tin Souse of 

i tives shall riot have c 
a pi -sideijt, the . vi-ce-pres. i nail be 
president. 

It Is thus very evident that the 
president of the United States may 
not be the person for whom the mi- 
jorlty of the people vote. It Is also 
evident that there is nothing In the 
Constitution making it obligatory upon 
an elector to vote for the nominee of 
his party. For example, the Taft'elec- 
i light vote for Rons. v. -It, or vice 
versa, or they might pick -out a 
promise candidate and choose him. 
A Democratic elector Is not hound to 
vote for a Democratic candidate, al- 
though he undoubtedly would do so In 
any case. VVe do not recall nn In- 
stan-ce trhere an elector voted other- 
wise than he was directed by the votes 
of his party. 



FBBBIDB1TTXAT, BLBCffOM. 

On Tuesday the people of the United 

States will choowe their president. As 

far as can be Judged from superficial 

Indications, Mr. Wilson, the Demo r 

I can l*c candidate Is assured of election 



IKON AND STEEL 



Strong pressure Is being brought upon 
the Ottawa government by the steel 
manufacturers for an Increase in duty. 
The following statements are summnr- 
ts*d from a memorial laid before II. ,■ 
Minister of Finance: That the protec- 
tion afforded the iron and steel indus- 
tries consequent upon the abolition of 
tire bounties Is now quite Inadequate to 
•nable them t» hold the business they 
had hitherto had with the assistance of 
the bountl -s. wire rods, for Instance, 
arc entlrel; unprotected, and the Indus- 
try Is thus In an anomalous position us 
compared with practically all Indus! 
in Canada. Imports of Iron and steel 
Into Canada amounted to over eighteen 
million dollars, thus Indicating ample 
field for the growth of the Lome manu- 
factured product If present tariff dis- 
criminations and exemptions were re- 
moved. Over twelve million dollars was 

paid by Canada under present condition 
In wages for foreign wor' m n Tor Iron 
and steel Imported. t'nder a policy of 
adequate protection home manufacture 
would be encouraged and expanded with 
B n sultant saving of this twelve mil- 
lions for Canadian workmen. It was 
also urged that Iron and steel manufac- 
ture had now little protection against 
the dumping of large quantities of Iron 
and steel from the United States In 
Canffde. at or below th* U. 8. cost of 
production. < 

• The memorialists point out that for 



a prospect which til 

iion and steel Industry 



lis*; 

wierlca. 



THE EXHIBXMflilV" 

The fine surplus which the eisnjbitlon 
management is able to report; <4emon- 
Strates several things. It shows careful 
and businesslike management. It shows 
that the people of Victoria and vicinity 
sir* alive to their duty to patronise the 
exhibition. It will lead to * restoration 
a t awh ile tsi W iiltaes. ■■ It wi ll atlmut i j ss 



the management to fresh effort It is 
true that the attendance on one of the 
afternoons ^wa* increased $&0$-.. Jres- 



ence o f t h e ro yaT psn y ; bi» Oh tge d t &e r 

hand, the various functions taking place 
In the city on other days had a ten- 
dency to draw away the public, and one 
of these effects may very well be set 
off against the other. 

The surplus Is a very satisfactory 
one. We take the lilrerty of suggesting 
that some of It might be advantageously 
used In Improving the general state of 
the exhibition grounds, which might be 
made much more attractive at no great 
expense. To Mr. George Sangster, Dr. 
Tolmie and their associates, we tender 
very hearty congratulations. 

THOSE WHITE ESKIMOS 



There is no longer any reason for dis- 
puting the account of the discovery of a 
race of white Eskimos In northern 
Canada. They seem to be an exceed- 
ingly primitive people. The suggestion 
that they may be descendants of.- the 
survivors of Sir John Franklin's ex- 
pedition seems utterly absurd. The 
Franklin expedition was last heard 
from In 1809. In that year Captain 
McCllntock dlseovered the last traces of 
It, and among the relics was a tin case 
containing the information that Sir 
John had died In 1847, and that the sur- 
vivors of the party, then numbering 
105 men, were about to start for tha 
Great Fish River. This was written In 
1848. While It Is by no means Im- 
probable that a large number of these 
men survived and reached Eskimo set- 
tlements and there intermarried with 
the native women. It Is almost absolute- 
ly Impossible that their descendants 
sixty years afterwards should have lost 
all record of who their fathers were. It 
Is also in tho highest degree improb- 
able that these men would not have 
left with the natives some account of 
themselves. Also it is Improbable that 
somo of them at least would not have 
found their way to the outside world, 
for the Journey Is by no means an Im- 
possible one It is probably not even 
a very difficult one to people enured to 
tin- hardships of northern life. For 
these reasons It seems nonsensical to 
suggest that their children should be 
living under the conditions reported as 
those of the white Eskimos. 

The explanation that they may be the 
descendants of some of the Norse col- 
onists, who lived yeurs ag > in Denmark 
and disappeared, Is more reasonable, for 
In the course of several centuries it Is 
quite possible' that all r> collection of 
where their ancestors came from might 
be lost by their descendants. But even 
in BUOh a case It Is hard to think that 
no tradition should have been preserved* 
of another country. The report printed 
In The Colonist yesterday says that 
these white Eskimos obtain tire by 
striking stones together and letting the 
Sparks' fall upon flint. This is a palp- 
able error, for as every one knows or 
ought to know, flint Is not an Inflam- 
mable substance, Tinder of some kind 
Is what Is meant of course. This Is 
probably only a clerical error. The 
uther statements made with authority 
seem to be utterly Irreconclleabie with 
the Idea that these people are of Eng- 
lish orleln, as would be the case, If they 
were descended from survivors of the 
Franklin expedition. 



crjujgrjrAx. conduct. 



The Westholme correspondent of 
The Cowichan Leader calls attention 
to a real grievance of the country dis- 
tricts when he states: 

A couple of aportsnvn (7), more 
enthusiastic then experienced, paased 
through Westholme on Sunday in a 
motor car with guns perched at varl-, 
ous angles, presumably ready to o*ioot 
anything thev saw. Apart from the fact 
that it Is Illegal to shoot from a car 
and the ludicrously unsportsmanlike 



side of it, may we again call attention 
to the imminent danger run by pedestri- 
ans by this wildly promiscuous tjrlng 
In the vicinity of public highways and 
byways. In this country the cheap 
firearms and cheaper sportsmen, hum- 
ble defenceless ones carry their Uvea 
In their 'bunds every time they set foot 
out of doors. 

Suoh conduct can only be described 
as criminal. No man who bus the tlrst 
instincts of fair play or common de- 
cency would be guilty of such con- 
duct as described In the paragraph 
quoted, and we trust that an example 
will be made of the next par'y of 
"sportsmen" who are guilty of similar 
actions. 

Motor traffic Is disconcerting and 
cause enough of discomfort to the 
country d-.veller without unnecct- t 
danger being added thereto by the 
careless an<l Illegal use of firearms, 
City folk who use the country roads 
for outdoor exercise (even If the exer- 
cise be taken In 
of a motor car) 'ifflfPPIIflfM^ 

.eople have rights, or they should 
,iven a lesson by the law In the 
respeeV of private right*. 

■ ' j-sr n i-iiii , | - i i - r h i m i 'j ' - ■ ' -'m l m 'J"bbt" *-$ 

' ; ; : ^lis^pf|the greatest Joy* of editorial 
life is to read the effusions of nameless 
crllM, who try to he smart at an 
editor's expense. Such things make one 
feel that he has not lived In vain. 

' ;as,i» n ii ■wsiaa m ..*>ii.i — ia.. W i^iiM.« nH" . u w u aaai 

' The inculcation of the principles of 
temperance is being practised In very 
Tfgnmiis, fannlffls ,1n thf Rnmnn nnthfrttt 



BIRD'S-EYE VIEW 

jQF PANAMA CANAL 



By John Foster Eraser, In 
London Dally Mall. 



The 



fortable body 

DHHWJBKBBajaSjKgMlfrHaMpKt 

-■.wVwwaiiS'SP^ 




schools in the province of Quebec. To 
Impress Upon the minds of children the! 
baneful effect*!* the use of intoxicants, 
th e w « 4 ^ o f t^ w h oo lVo . 



tures Illustrative of the results of ab- 
stinence and the reverse. Illumlnited 
cr.rtis teaching the same lessons '<re 
distributed among the children. 



A German speaker at the Anglo-Ger- 
man conference expressed the hope that 
Great Britain would not stand in the 
way of the purchase by Germany of 
colonies. from countries which could not 
turn them to profitable account. This 
Is somewhat interesting, even though It 
is probably not to be understood as an 
expression of* German policy, for It 
shows how some of the people In that 
country arc thinking. It would be of 
greater interest If tho speaker bail told 
in what part of the world Germany con- 
templates making purchases. 



WHAT THE WORLD'S 



PRESS IS SAYING 



"A Strong Mas" 
The best thing President Taft has 
done Is the \vay he is showing that 
he doesn't care what happens. Cleve- 
land was the last one of that type, 
and the sober judgment, of his coun- 
trymen -Is that he was a good, strong 
man. — Montreal Herald. 



Reciprocity 

If reciprocity had been in force this 
year, not only would the Canadian 
producer have had to accept much 
lower prices If he shipped to . the 
United States, but ho would have been 
deprived of a large port of. his home 
market through the shipping In of the 
earlier American products. As it Is, 
the lower prices across the border will 
bo reflected in Canada, and while the 
Canadian producer is protected 
against undue foreign competition, 
there will be a welcome decrease in 
the. cost of living for Canadian con- 
sumers. — Calgary I [era Id. 



British Emigrants. 

Out of evil good. Colonel Eamb tells 
our readers this week of one whole- 
some effect which the excessive rain- 
fall of the harvest season Is having 
Upon the methods of I'anadlan agri- 
culturists. It has bade them realize, 
as miles of speeches and lectures would 
not do, the necessity of mixed farming. 
The man who has concentrated on grain 
anil neglected (he rest is the man who, 
speaking generally, has been bit hardest 
of all. Colonel Lamb Is able to speuk 
well of the progress of the Salvation 
Army colonists In Saskatchewan and 
British Columbia, and of Canada gen- 
erally he says with perfect truth that 
she still needs British emigrants and as 
many as she can get. — Canadian Gazette 
(London). 



The Wag-as Paid to Olrls. 
Most intimately related to the white- 
slave caII Is the question of pay re- 
ceived by girls who have to earn their 
own living. In Montreal, It Is asserted, 
It costs about $400 a year, or nearly %» 
a week, to maintain decently* girl who 
does n it live at home. The cost of 
living is little If any greater In Mont- 
real than In Hamilton. It Is conceivable 
that working girls who do not get 
enough pay to maintain them In com- 
fort and enable thrni to make a..*ftecent 
appearance should be under tbe ^strain 
of temptation. — Hamilton Herald. 



Hard on Tag Days. 

Every one of these tag days, regard- 
less of the excellence of the cause 
which It Is designed to promote, de- 
grades and demoralizes all who have 
anything to do With It. They are ut- 
terly detestable from every point of 
view, economic as well as moral, and 
they are permitted only In towns 
where the municipal officials are either 
too stupid to know their duty or too 
vicious to uirform it. — New York Times. 



Trestle Tragedy 

ANACONDA, Mont., Nov. 2.— Chris 
Christiansen was killed and two other- 
men were seriously injured today by 
the collapse of a trestle on which they 
were working fifty feet In the air at the 
Anaconda smelter. Twenty-flve men got 
down from the trestle a few seconds be- 
fore It gave way. 



"Yes." observed the American enthu- 
siast. "It Is a great ditch. You see 
those flat cars piled with dirt? Well, 
by the time the Atlantic joins the Pa- 
cific we shall have removed as much 
dirt as would fill such a train of cars 
85,000 miles long, which Is getting 
pretty near four times round the 
earth. Yes, It Is a great ditch!" 

That Is the spirit of the 35,000 men 
who between Colon and Panama are 
digging and blasting, damming rivers, 
lighting landslips, and building lwks 
so that the great cnnal shall be finish- 
ed before the official opening day, 
which is in 1915. 

It is a big thing. The world is look- 
ing on. It Is an enterprise which fits 
tho American temperament. It Is a 
dramatic as well as a colossal under- 
taking. Others have tried to build 
canals across the Isthmus. The French 
camo to failure. Tho Americans are 
going to succeed. Everybody Is work- 
ing at top speed, and the end is within 

^|(9i?>ilj:the first glance there Is noth- 
mg Which excites the ordinary man. In- 
WiWlfc* ordinary man If dumped down 
he#;:nitf not toM that be was looking 
upon excavation for the Panama Canal 
would probably bo no more Impressed 
than If he were looking at Home big 
railway cutting through a, hilly coun- 
try, it -Is only .when no hoars of tlie- 
difficuitb-s encountered and overcome 
and sees the armies €tt men at work In 
the cuts— sweating and grimy the 
syhah* flay aanf ^ssiini the drtTIs eats 



log into th# Who, !• startled When the 
earth reverbeyite* writli violent oxpl»- 
alojrj*. sees giant «i>#nc* <••* into tho 
piling corn With debris, and tha 
4lhe Is shifted oesrer f ; 
by great arms in front of an engine, 
that he begins to retilize the 1'mmeri- 
sty of the undertaking 
What the Americana Have Achieved 

Before the Americans came the Isth- 
mus was one of the earth's pestiferous 
spots: swampy, miasmatic, mosquitoes 
carrying yellow fever and malaria. 
Colon was the white man's grave. Pan- 
ama reeked with uneleanness and dis- 
ease. The Interlylng Jungle bred con- 
tinuous sickness. 

Che Isthmus is not yet a health re- 
sort. But in the Immediate regions It 
is no longer a country dangerous to 
health. The Americans have there laid 
by the heels the mosquitoes which car- 
ried tho disease. All likely breeding 
grounds of swamp are saturated with 
kerosene. Yon go for miles and the 
air stinks with the black, slimy stufL 
Nearly every ditch is smeared with it. 
Where pools accumulate in the vicinity 
of the workings, niggers -With copper 
cans on their backs saunter about and 
spray freely. 

All this has got to do with the Pan- 
ama Canal, because when the French 
were trying their hands, men died like 
illex The first thing therefore the 
Americans set about was to make it 
possible for men to come and work on 
the Isthmus without feeling they were 
having a gamble with death. 

Now five miles on either side the 
tanal is called the Canal Zone. Within 
that area the Americans are supreme. 
They own about three-quarters of the 
territory and thev can acquire the rest 
whenever they like. The two towns 
of Panama and Colon, though really 
within, are technically regarded as out-, 
side the Zone. As these are the only 
towns worth t wopence-half- penny on 
the Isthmus, the Republic of Panama 
must be left- a. few people within Its 
boundaries; so the Amcrcans allow the 
Panamanians to have a government. 
Hut America, keeps control of the sani- 
tation In both towns. 

Pifty asUles of Canal 

From shore to shore the canal Is 
ut forty miles; but live miles have 
had to be cut through shallow shores 
on both sides, so the real length of the 
i 'anal from deep water to deep water 
Is fifty miles. "When you Journey that 
Way to New Zealand you will travel 
from the Atlantic through a straight 
seven miles of 500*t. wide canal. Then 
you come to Ga'tun, and three locks will 
lift you s. r >ft. untfPyou reach the level 
of Catun Lake It is not a natural lake 
but artificial, 164 square miles in area, 

created by damming the River Chagres. 

Across this lake you can go at full 
steam fo r twenty-four miles along a 
buoyed route.- Then you rench the 
Culebrn Cut, the thing of which the 
Americans are proudest because It has 
caused them most trouble. This -cut 
Is nine miles long, hills on each side, 
and the cubic yards of earth and rock 
cut away run Into dozens of meaning- 
less millions. 

'•This cut will get Its water from the 
Catun Lake. So to Pedro Miguel, 
where you will begin going downstairs. 
A lock will lower you 33 l-3ft. to Mlra- 
flores Lake. You will steam across a 
mile and a half of the lake. Then two 
locks will lower you ">4 2 -3 Tt .. and you 
will go on the level of the Pacific. Away 
you go for over eight miles, and you glide 

upon tiic waters oh the west of the 

American continent. Such Is the Pan- 
ama Canal in rough outline. It seems 
rather a simple affair In engineering. 
Yet the more one sees the more one 
wonders and admires. 

On the Construction LlBa 

For several Says I have been Jogging 
up and down the drunken construction 
line, now along the bed of the finished 
way— outside the locked region if. is 
40ft. below sen -level— now scrambling 
over ''slides," then wandering through 
the large white casements of concrete 
locks. 

The noise In tremendous. Bells clrsn-r 
and engines shriek and cars piled with 
excavated earth are rumbling ofj' tu aid 
in the construction of a dam, or a great 
"spit" on the. Pacific side All the rock 
and soil, are volcanic and grey and red 
and irregular. Boom, boon) go the dy- 
namite explosions and a chunk of a 
hillside Is disintegrated. A monster 
of an engine-shovel, almost uncanny 
In Its movements, comes reeling for- 
ward over the uneven way. It bends 
Its head and sticks its snout Into the 
debris. There is a clatter. It Jerks back 
Its head, and in Its maw IS four tons 
of broken rock. It heaves on one side, 
and from a door, under its chin as It 
were, it dumps Its loatd on one of the 
long cars. Then It plunges for another 
mouthful. 

Tha oars ara ugly and battered. Thajr 



have a fence only on the side away 
from the shovel. Between each car and 
Die next is a a.teel plate, so that It Is 
Just iu ;e a long ribbon of a oar. When 
ihe shovel has deposited Its mouthful, 
a bronzed arid sweating American,, 
^vlth his blue shirt open at the throat. 
gives the waggle of a yellow flag, and 
the engine-driver hauls along a few 
yards so the next mouthful ioa.\ bftye 
room. Thus It, goes on with clang an. I 
clamor until the train is loaded. 

Away It rolls. The "dirt" Is wanted 
for a dam in a declivity between the 
hills. It Is not necessary to have liun- 
areds of men to unload. At one end ot 
the car is a steel shield standing at 
an angle. To it Is attached a steel 
rope, and the other end of the rope Is 
attached to a drum spun by an engine. 
The drum spins and, as the shield 
travels over cars and connecting 
plates; ib. debris is sliced i/> I'm- Ride 
overboard. There it lies In a long heap. 
The cats grunt and groan on to othi I 
."work. l T p snorts a "spreader," U n en 
gine with an ar>n stuck on one side. 
u'he arm as It passes along knocks 
ftll the debris 11 it. 

Tha Labor of AU the World 

That is one .,i the futures 'of the 
canal making; the thousands of men 
employed, and yet only a few men en- 
gaged in one place on one particular 
Job. 

When the shovel has eaten away its 
section it has then to start over again 
eating further into the 1^»; j^tlfel^if I 
neck is not long enough to reod|^l|«* 
cars on the former track, along comes 
a track-shifting machine, and with Its 
long steel hands it raises the track and 
places It nearer the shovel, just as 
though it had intelligence and were 
straightening a rope. 

Here* comes a train of cement, an- 
other of broken rook ripped from th i 
cheek of Ancon Hth, near Panama, an- 



other of white sand from the Pacific 
Coast. All are put near where the 
1.000ft. long double locks are being 
jeohatructed. A skinny steel, skeleton of 
a .MOttlem enatM -ittttilsW la tho . 



middle of the Canal, and it has a long 
arm wheh stretches to the Canal side. 
Beneath that arm you see a cab, and 
sitting in it you may discern a man, 
pulling and pushing levers. The little 
cab runs out to the end drops a big 
gobble-spoon among the cement, or the 
broken stone or the sand, and pulls 
ii and carries it to where the mixing 
Is going on and the concrete slabs are 
being made to provide the casing for 
the dock walls, or the mush' of concrete 
rubble with wheh the middle is filled 
The steel lock gates are being adjusted 
and tho air Is rent with the fury of 
riveting. 

There Is the lithe, chewing Ameri- 
can, clear-skinned, clean-eyed, really 
feeling Joy In what he Is helping' to 
accomplish. There are the sluggish 
Spaniards, more sluggsh mixture of 
Spaniard and native, but kept at it 
under the stimulating tongue of the 
gang boss. There are the nig-rc ~. easy 
going, and a- considerable nunsoer of 
them from tho British West Indies; 
there are Italians and Scandinavians: 
there are Chinese; there are even slim- 
limbed, gentle-featured East Indians, 
with heads voluminously swathed in 
dirty turbans. The labor of the world 
has been placed under contribution to 
build the Panama Canal. 



COMING EVENTS 



Companions of tha Torest — A mas- 
querade dance will be given by the 
Companions of the Forest In A. O. F. 
hall on Thursday evening next. An 
enjoyable -titne, Is expected, elaborate 
arrangements being in progress. 

"Tha Holy City" — The choir of forty- 
five voices of St. Andrew's Prepbyterlan 
church will render Gaul's Cantata, "The 
Holy City," In the church on Wednes- 
day evening, November 18. A number 
of prominent soloists will take part 
and a musical treat is assured to all 
attending. The recital will be under 
the distinguished patronage of His Honor 
r.Uut.-Onvernor Paterson, and will 
commence at 8.15 prompt. 

Alexandra Club Quest Day — The reg- 
ular guest day at tbe Alexandra Club 
will take place tomorrow afternoon. 
There will be music and an exhibition 
of miniatures. 

Home Horsing — The home nursing 
classes under the auspices of the Flor- 
ence Nightingale Chapter, Daughters 
of the Empire, will open tomorrow 
evening at 8 o'clock. In the hall of the 
Victoria Women's Club, 667 Fort street. 
Dr. Donald will address the class. 

Social Service League — A miscellan- 
eous programme Is b-eing arranged for 
the league meeting tomorrow to com- 
mence at S p. m. prompt, In the Uni- 
tarian hall, 1230 Government str.eet. 
Strangers and visitors are cordially In- 
vited to attend. Full particulars re- 
garding this league may be obtained 
at the sacred concert held In the Vic- 
toria theatre at 8.15 tonight. 

Baal Batata E a change — There will be 
a meeting of the luncheon committee at 
the Real Estate Exchange tomorrow 
morning at 9.30. Mr. Randolph Stuart 
Is now secretary of the exchange. Tin- 
executive of the exchange will hold its 
next meeting at 4 o'clock on Tuesday 
afternoon. 

Saoraa Concert — The following pro- 
gramme has been arranged for tin- con- 
cert In the Victoria theatre tonight at 
R.ir>. The doors will be opened to the 
public at 7. SO. rrogrammes will be 
•distributed free: Selection, Popular 
Viennese Folk Songs (Konsak); hymn. 
"Yet Sometimes Glimpses" (Whlttler); 
duet, "Twilight" (Geo. B. Xevln), Mrs. 
I). B. Mcl>aren and Mr. R. B. Mac- 
Kenzle; patrol, "The Passing of the 
Hand" (Clarke); so|o, "The Promise of 
Life" (Cowan), Mrs. D. B. McLaren; 
hymn, "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music" 
■ (Cainettc 'address. Rev. Sidney E. 
Ulmlrldge, B. D.; solo, "O Divine Re- 
deemer" (Gounod), Mr. R. B. Mac- 
kenzie; selections, from the popular 
works of Goorge Rosey; hymn, "Holy 
Father. In Thy Mercy"; selection, 
English Airs. 

Opening Bali— Arrangements are now 

complete for tho opening ball of the 

Capital Athbtlc Club, to be held in the 

Alexandra Club rooms tomorrow even- 

I lng. No effort has been sparei^ by the 

; committee In charge to make • the ball 

'a notable success, and It la anticipated 

|bat thalr expectation* will he tnUr 



realledz. The orchestra of Mr. Wllle 
has been engoiged for the occasion. The 
committee states that those who ttg- 
ured on last year's invitation lists. 
and whose names, by mischance, have 
been omitted from this year's lists, can 
receive cards of Invitation on applica- 
tion to any member of the committee) 

The following ore the (dub officers and 

committeemen: President, Mr. T. P. 

Mc'onneii; vie. president, Mr. G. 11.. 
r.lssell; secretary and treasurer, Mr. 
\Y. 11. Croghan; manager. Mr. .1. Hux- 
table; floor committee, Messrs. it. Bray, 
J. Junes, BJ, Irvine, N. Crngban, G. 
Brooks and C Wllle; refreshment com- 
mittee, Messrs. K. Pullin, A. Pike, R. 
Mlln.- g ml !•'. Mrynjolfson. 

<»rd«-r of Beavers — The local colony. 
Benevolent Protective i irder of Heavers. 
bold b general meeting an Monday ai 
Baglea' hill. Government street, when im- 

portant busln«-«» Is down for discussion. 

mi. Msry'g Guild Sale — The ladlea of at. 
.v.ury's Guild, oak I'.ay. will hold a Bale <.f 
«..rl< lu Chris) Church Cathedral Sunday- 
school room on Tuesday afternoon, NoveJM 
bar te, 1H12. 

St. Agnes' Ootid ^n'* 1 — The St. Agnes' 
Guild nf St. James' church are busy prepar- 
ing for. their annual sale, to be held ah.. hi 
the middle of November. All the tables 
will display articles suitable for Christmas 
presents. One table will bo all In white 
and the d llnty light shades, while anm b 
will show bags of every description, front 
the useful bag for darning to the dainty 
opera, bar- A third table will hold odds 

as&iemteV'i-of all sorta. ^WM 

■■«■-•.'"• 
W. C. T. V. Mission Board-~T!i 
a meeting of the W. C. T. h. 
board at the mlaalon room* on Thursday 
afternoon at 2.80, to be followed at 3. SO by 
a aoecMt wnmst tn^mtuiw- ■n4.r< t* tm rjtrifyan 

."" .. ajw»«ssi», f*>'][?^i^- " '"•'"-' . ^st^ffl?ff ' 

considered. 

Theatrical Employees — The regular gen- 
eral meeting ojf Local Union, No. 1«8, 
Theatrical Stage Employees, will be'.' ; |aa)^ 

taw et suing m tin laser pan ^ „ 

o'clock. Business of importance la to < 

up for consideration. 

■ Daughter* „f St. George— The Daughters 
of St. George will bold their regular meet- 
lng.;lB.^i|>i j! • jfc. 'p: i Ut i: 1 : * !: hall tomorrow 
evening. '^•'^b^sbbb! 

St. John's Branch, \V. A. — St. John'B 
branch of the Women's Auxiliary will bo!4 
a business meeting in the guild room on 
Tuesday afternoon at 2.30 p.m. 

Imperial Veterans — No. 24 Company, Jm- 
p<rlal Veteran.-, will hold a meeting In Ho- 
city hall on Monday at 8 p.m. 

friendly Help — Th* l-'rlondly Help As- 
sociation will hold their monthly meeting 
on Tuesday morning at eleven o'clock In 
the marlct't building. 

Native Sens Meet — Th.. regular meeting 
of the Native Sons Society, Post No. 1, will 
be held in Hie K. of P. hall on Tuesday- 
evening at eight o'clock • sharp. A large 
amount of business Is to be transacted, In- 
t-ludlng appointing or committees and 
making preliminary arrangements for the 
annual ball. Several cindidates will be 
initiated, and at the conclusion of the busi- 
ness a social evening with refreshments has 
been arranged for, 

Daughter* of rity Annual Meeting — The 
annual meeting of the Daughters of Pity 
will be held at the Alexandra Club on 
Monday afternoon at 2AJ. Dean Doull has 

■ n.^onted to deliver an address. All mem- 
bers are requested to be present, and a 
special Invitation Is extended to old mem- 

as well as to those newcomers who are 
Interested In work for the children's ward. 
.Nurses' Club — A meeting of the Yletoria 
Nureea' Club will te held on Monday after 
noon at three o'clock at the Alexandra 
Club. After business- Is finished a lecture 
wilt be delivered. A full attendance is re- 
quested. 



SOCIAL AND PERSONAL 

Mrs. Walter Engelhurdt, 12 Savoy 
Mansions, will be at home on Tuesday 
from 4 to 6.30, and the first Monday of 
each month thereafter. 

Mrs. Albert Banister, 705 Cook street, 
will receive on the first Tuesday of 
every month. 

Mrs. Anderson, Duchess avenue, who 
underwent an operation recently in the 
Jubilee Hospital, is progressing favor- 
ably. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Dawson, Harbinger av- 
enue, Is visiting friends in Seattle. 

Mrs. K. M. Reads has returned to 
Mount Kd wards after several months 
spent in an interesting tour round the 
world. 

The marriage took place at St. And- 
rew's church. Vancouver, on October 16, 
of Mr. Arthur Stokes, son of Mr. Ed- 
ward Stokes, Ettlngslmll, Wolverhamp- 
ton, Eng., and Miss Gertrude Hull, 
daughter of Mr. Hugh Hull, North Road, 
Wolverhampton. 

Mrs. W. S. Nason, Bon Air apart- 
ments, 2407 Quadra street, will receive 
on Wednesday and Thursday afternoons, 
November 6 and 7, from 3 to 6, and on 
the first Wednesday of each month 
thereafter. 

The engagement is announced of Ruby 
Florence, daughter of Mr. Thornton 
Fell, of Victoria, B.C., to Staff Paymas- 
ter R. A. Jlnkln, R.N., of H.M.C.S. 
Rainbow, and of Plymouth, EJng. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hanlngton and 
family have removed from Fernwood 
road to 1436 Stanley avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Foster, of Tacoma, 
and Captain Gordon, from Cork, are 
registered at the Oak Bay hotel. 

Mr. R.' F. Groen, M.P., left yesterday 
afternoon for a weekend visit to Butch- 
art Bay, but will be back in the city 
tomorrow. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. Herbert Blake and their 
little daughter, of Shawnlgan Lake, 
have left on a visit to England but will 
return In the spring. 

Mr. Melville, of Hnmenos, Is leaving 
for England next week. 

Mrs. Harry Wllle is 111 at the Jubilee 
hospital. 

Mrs. A. C. Arnold, Monterey avenue, 
has returned from the bast, having 
spent the past five months vialtlng rela- 
tives and friends In Toronto, Midland 
and other eastern points after an ab- 
sence of eighteen years. 

A quiet noon wedding took place on 
Monday last, at the Emmanuel Baptist 
Manse, the contracting parties being 
Kdnn May, third daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. E. C. Harris, Vlnlng street, and 
Mr. George Alfred Thompson, Vancou- 
ver. II ev. William Stevenson officiating. 
Miss I^cna Harris a-cted as bridesmaid 
and Mr. Vincent Harris, brother of the 
bride, supported the groom. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thompsosjs-uclU make their home in 
Vhncouver. ' 

Mr. If. P. Homing, manager of the old 
Drlnrd hotel, returned to Vlctoral yes- 
terday after a year's stay In England. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Proctor, Vancou- 
ver, arc registered at the BmpTess. 

Mr. )>. W. Higgtns. Vancouver, la at 
the Entpres*. 

Mrs. Gordon Hunter was In town 
yesterday xrt* ■a*wai««v» Tafctay 



Surety. N«v.»e •"•*»"■ 3, i9U 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



r> 




Leather Is Still Going Up 



QariesAEaloivG. 




But we arc trying to 

keep the prices down. We 
have the most complete 
line of 

Footwear 

Tn the city. Skating Boot9 
in threat variety. 

Tube and 



Auto Skat_ 

Just received. Gome 
and get fitted correctly. 







Phone 133a 



1 313 Douglas Stree* 



— — 



'jW 'i M . ii -' 



Hotel and Restaurant 



Chefs 



Need make hg t^ofc complaints to the Manaf ement Tdative to 
lack of proper cooking utensils. We have just wiped the straw 

dust off a shipment of heavy steel stock pots, saucepans, ket- 
tles, etc.. that are standardly used in hotel grills and restaur- 
ants. The prices are lower than you would expect. Gome 
in and ask to have them shown to you. 

WATCH FOR SATURDAY SPECIAL 



B. C. HARDWARE COMPANY, LTD. 



I'hone 82. Lorain IJuiiki-s, Japalac, Bapoo Paints, 



825 Fort Street. 



Our Clients Know We Have the 

Facilities for Handling Their 

Best Listings — That's 

Why We Get Them 



life' 1 ' 




And it is up to you to. take advantage of this, and M » Y is 
the time to do it, too. No use waiting for prices to go Ower 
— this is a day of progressive values. The following are 
illustrative of some of our best listings: 

LANG STREET, i 1-2 mile circle— Five lots, 50x110. Onc- 

third cash, balance 6, 12, 18, at 7 per cent. Each, en bfee; 

................ .....$800 

NATES STREET— 6q x 120, between Quadra and Vancou- 
ver. Cash $12,500. balance t. 2 ami 3 years; Price 
: . . . $43,500 

mi APELLE STREET, just off Gorge Road— 50x115. Third 
cash, 6, 12 and 18 months. Price $1000 

Visit Our New Offices and Get Full Particulars • 



Tracksell, Douglas & Ce. 

722 Yates Street -Phones 4176 and 4177 



We Invite You to Examine Our Large New Stock of 

ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

Shades, Art Glass Domes and* House Fittings, Etc. 
before buying elsewhere. We have what you want at the 

BEST PRICES 

HAWKINS & HAYWARD 

Phone 643 Electrical Contractors 1607 Douglas St. 



Victor Victrolas 

II.WIv YOU OXK I\ T YOl'R HOME? 

The Victrola ranges in price to suit every music lover's 
purse. From the wonderful little Style IV. at $.20 to the 
magnificent 

Victrola, Style XVI., at $250 

Considering the Victrola can be obtained on most liberal 
terms if desired, there is no reason why your home should be 
without a Victor Victrola. 

We shall he pleased to demonstrate these wonderful in- 
struments. 



Montelius Piano House, Limited 

1 104 Government Street 
• Factory Distributors for B. C. and the Yukon 



■KAX.X. rmUIT BAJrCX AT OOBOOI KXJlD. 

All cultivated. Paid IS per rent on liivPNtrftedpathiS year, with splen- 
did bulMlngs. This is best buy lr» the district If^ou art <iulrkly. 



Apply 



Fred Pafton & Co. 






*lt i»jw»rd Building 



SIR GEORGE REID 

High Commliilontr for Autoftlla oi 

Ksturn to LoliiaB CMves Imprw- 

slons of Dominion 

sir George Held, tilgh commissioner 
tin Australia, has* just returned to 
Englajld from a. two-months' visit to 
< '..nulla and the United States, in the 
course of which lie delivered addresses 
in iikihI or" tiie big cities of lOastern 
Canada arid the United States. In re- 
ply to questions by a Keuter's re-pre- 
Mentatlvi, the high commissioner said: 
1 think it is quite possible that the 
Commonwealth government will soon 
..insider the question of direct repre- 
sentation in Canada and the United 
suites in more places than one. I 
loinui In the countries visited a very 
pood opinion of Australia as a conti- 
nent with an Immense future, but 
little practical knowledge ubout It. 
The Panama .anal will, I hope, be 
Opened under auspices pointing to 
much closer relations between the 
t'nit.d States and the British lKmiin- 
lons, especially Canada and Australia. 
Tin- primary products of Australia are 
loiuid to be needed more and more lri 
ilted. States as time goes on." 
mUK to American policy In re- 
the Panama canal, In discrim- 
inating in favor of coastwise shipping, 

"It one could forget for a moment 
the. higher*, grounds Involved. a simple 
provision that coastwise vessels **M1« 
carry nothing intended for destina- 
tions beyond the United States would 
cut down the trading issues vary much. 
But I think the questions that' have) 
arisen «annot be solved In that way, or 
in any way other way than by arbi- 
traMnn. Tt thn irwit mnthltc ;!■ rar- 



vous as to the tribunal—and; no other j 
method of all y lng Its doubts can be 
hit upon— is « likely 'that WO would 

jm, alraW ,to-ttv«t ^'iwp«*w:wurt 

j it . i & ^IJi^.jHfQ&ti. y jg i jl i, agd ress- 
In* the ^Igrims of tfca tinted States 

in.MeSv Tprin A U^: : ^MSfo. I ven- 
tured to say, 'to arbitrate when you 



Monday Morning at Finch's 
Exclusive Fashion Store 



feel .like, winning, and to refuse to ar- 
bitrate when you feel like losing, 
would be a. sham lead for the \. orld's 
peace movement.' " . 

i.d about his visit to Canada and 
the question of Dominion naval policy, 
the high commissioner said: 

•The Canadians were very pleased 
with the reception their ministers got 
In London, and seem bent on redeem- 
in? the neglect, of the past so far as 
nava] developments are concerned. A 
strong' movement is on foot for a non- 
party basts of procedure. I. have no 
sort of knowledge of the intention of 
minister!!, but if they wish to give a 
national start to their policy the 
Bhortest cut mi'frht be to propose an Im- 
mediate order for Dreadnoughts, on 
the ground of urgency, loavlns the 
question of the North Atlantic, North 
Pacific, Or North Sea — the question of 
a Canadian navy, or more ships for the 
British navy — for settlement during 
the two years the vessels are being ad- 
vanced to completion. Such a course, 
it seems to me, would put the Imperial 
issii. in a form not to be denied, and 
tld postpone for a later staige all 
divisions of party or opinion." 






A BUSY DIPLOMAT 



How Mr. Saznnofi, Minister of Foreign 

Affairs In Bussla, Tried to 

Stop the War 



A special correspondent, writing from 
Paris under date of October 25, ^said: 
Out of this Bulkan mess rises the 
fiRitre of a worried little man, with 
pointed whiskers, and small, fishy eyes. 
He is M. Sazanoff, the minister of 
foreign affairs of Russia. 

For weeks he has been running about 
Europe, from one capital to another, t« 
arrange for Balkan peace, pleading I] 
one place, promising in another, arguing 
in ' Paris, planning in Balmoral castle 
with the king of Kngland, scheming 
with the emperor in Berlin. 

It was at the very beginning of his 
peacemaking that I pushed by his 
guards, at Calais, France, while he was 
rushing to Paris, and asked him to tell 
a reporter from across the Atlantic 
what the Balkan future looked like. 

"You do not worry about the Balkans, 
huh?" 

"We want all the news." 
"Well, the situation is very grave." 
"Can you stop the war'.'" 
"We are trying- to do so. Now is a 
time for much work." 
"But can you stop It?" 
"I must not talk about what can be 
done. The thing to do Is to do our 
best. Now Is no time for speech." 

Whereupon he took off his hat, in 
a polite bow, and the Interview was 
ended. 

That night lie arrived In Paris. 
In Sophia, BOO miles away, - the 
crowds were marching in the streets, 
crying for a chance to fight Turkey. 
In Uelgrade the Hcenes were similar 
Four battleships were leaving Greece 
to go to Philadelphia for ammunition. 

Balkan soldiers were matching to- 
ward Turkey from the north. Grecian 
soldiers were advancing on Turkey 
from the south. There Is only water 
on the east and west of Turkey, or 
soldiers would have been pressing her 
from those directions. 

Turkey was sandwiched with n veng- 
eance. 

But that night Sazanoff was the most 
hopeful man in ICurope. He nnl M. 
Polncare, the French Minister or For- 
eign Affairs They called the Bulgarian, 
the Servian, the Montenegrin and the 
Grecian ambassadors to France into 
their meeting. 

WJthtn two days Snzauoff had 
brought about an agreement between 
the leading nations of Europe, that they 
would request Turkey to permit the 
Balkan Christians In Macedonia to gov- 
ern themselves. This was all the Bal- 
kan governments were demanding. 

Then Saianoff dashed off to 3erlln 
to taVK t6 Emperor William. 

He did not ride in private cars or 
on private boats, in Ills European sortie, 
Regular trains, ordinary staterooms and 
taxlcahs served his purpose as well. 

Saisnoff Was unsuccessful — but If 
it had not been for him the war would 
have started vejfca before. 
. And why was Saaanoff go Interested 
In Balkan peace! That's easy. 
A Balkan victory may throw Rusala 
/ 



' : 'v. 





DMMENCING Monday morning, every de- 
f. parlment will be replete with money-saving 
-^ opportunities, among whieh will be found 
bargains heretofore unequalled in this city. The 
articles offered are the best efforts of the world's 
leading designers, and will be found to be the latest 
creations in Women's Ready-to-Wear Attire. 









■ 



. • , ... 




I I w 



?y-r. 




' fflthe Milline r y sectlfltt we have 

a very large sbciw&g ol special de- 
' ft* feats which m ust 



■ii 



This Pattern Hat, $10 




fol- 
price reduction will surely 
accomplish that end: 

50 Smartly Trimmed Hats, by our own design- 
ers, regularly sold at $7.50 to $12.50. In order 
to clear, they have been grouped into one lot, 
and you can take your choice 



$5 



Another lot is a large assortment of pattern hats 
— just arrived — which will be sold 



$10 



Coats and Suits 



ver\ large shipment of beautiful Winter Coats 
represents what we have J:o offer in this line, 
the styles and materials of which leave 
nothing to be desired — every coat being ex- 
clusive in design — all the latest fabrics and 
designs are represented, and they must be 
seen to be thoroughly appreciated. The 
prices range 
from 







$17.50 to $50 



Coat, as above, $25 



One-Quarter Off on Every Suit 
in Stock 




Suit, as above $27.50; Hat, $15 




Yates Street 



LADIES OTHTITTING 



Yates Street 



into war with Austria. And Russia Is 
not ready to 'fight. Her army Is soaked 
In Socialism. Her battleship itpws 
have mutinied one after the other. Ther? 
is not a Russian captain who, when he 
HjiyK •'Klre" In war times, can he sure 
that his men won't fire at him Instead 
of at the enemy. 

So Sazanoff fights Russia's wars on 
the field of diplomacy. 

TRAMWAY~TRAFFIC 

October Shows Falling Off, But Ten 

Months' Period Is Larg-aly in 

Xxeeaa of Tear Affo 

Despite the falling off In the passen- 
ger traffic on the local lines of the R. 
C. Klectrlc Company during October, the 
total of the number of passengers car- 
ried by the company for the first t«.n 
months of the year shows a lanr>.' 'n- 
rrease over the corresponding period of 
last year. 

For October a total of 887,729 pas- 
sengers were carried, compared wltli 
76M34 in October a year ago, but as 
compared with the month of Septem- 
ber the returns show a falling off. The 
Increase for the ten months' period, 
however, over that of the same time 
last year was 2,195,281 or thirty per 
rent, the total being 8.881.145 compared 
with 6,«86,864 last year. 

The monthly returns for the year* to 
date compared with the corresponding 
months last year, are given below: 





1912 


1911 


January 


849,012 


548, D29 


February 


767,310 


522.990 




823,88? 


{184.250 


April . • • • 


811.228 


575,742 


May ... 


048,937 


701,466 


June • • • • 


870,624 


889.1 «9 


July 


078.598 


758.894 


August 


971,219 


773,958 


September . .... 


9«7,1»« 


77«,M3 




887,729 


76«.M4 



Total 



• t • • • • • 



8.881,145 



8,«I5,I<4 



FURNITURE BARGAINS 

Our large --tuck is a collection of bargains for the careful furniture buyer. ( )ur goods 
are priced as low as possible consistent with profitable merchandising, but we never sacri- 
fice quality in order to quote low prices. We invite comparison of values — it will be in our 
favor — and then our guarantee of "Satisfaction or money refunded" stands' "behind every 
Mile we make. Our line of Bedroom Furniture is very complete just at present, and 

WE INVITE YOU TJO INSPECT OUR STOCK NOW 



Large Dresser 

Imperial Surfaced Oak 
D r esse r, quarter-cut 
grain. 2 large and 2 small 
drawers, large British 
plate bevelled mirror. 

A real bargain 
CASH PRICE .$16.20 

Many other Dressers in 
stock up to . .?«30.00 




Iron and Brass 
Beds 

A full carload just placed 
in stock at lowest prices 
BRASS BKD— All brass 
bed. full size, large posts 

and pleasing design 
CASH PRICE .$18.00 
We are headquarters for 
Mattresses, Springs, Pil- 
lows, etc. See the val- 
ues we offer 



i 



SMITH & CHAMPION 



1420 Douglas Street 



«« 



The Better Value Store" 



Near City HaH 



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6 



VICTORIA DAILY COLOJNiST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 




NOTICE 



No More West Bay 
Lots for Sale 

We hereby notify the public that 
we will not sell any more lots in 
West Bay for the present. 

You have had your opportunity. 

Real estate agents will please 

cancel all lists of our holdings in 




Victoria Real Estate Exchange 
I Comer Government and Broughton Streets Phone 140a 



WE KEEP THINGS SHIP SHAPE 



Protection Against Fire 



ENGINEERS' 
SUPPLIES 



T.ANOPER 
SOAP 



Cat» be ensured by the « 

... use of 

SHEET ASBESTOS 

We keep it in all thick-, 
nesses for roofs, for 
insulating stoves and 

many other purposes. 
If a fire should occur, 
you can put it out be- 
fore it becomes dan- 
gerous by the use of a 

Pyrene Extinguisher 
for which we are 
' agents. 



CONTRAC- 
TORS' 

AND 
LOGGERS* 

MATERIALS 



E. B. MARV1 

TJ1E SHIP CHANDLERS 

_ .-- V<- -■■'(- ' 

r*W Wharf Street 




NEWS OF THE CITY 

Bemaaded for Be&tenoe — lYcd W. 
MUIm, cliurgeit with unlawfully retain- 
ing In hit) possesion a nurveyor's ln- 
fltrunu-nt valued at $18, the property of 
tlir K.tciulinalt and Nanalmo railroad, 
pleaded guilty to thu chargu In the city 
police court yesterday morning and was 
remanded until Tuesday for aentenoe. 

Charg-ed With Vag-ranoy — Bertha 
Taylor, wl.o uppeare<l before the police 
magistrate In October on the yame 
ih«is« and was ttVOR dlsmlaued, wan 
Charged with vagrancy before Magis- 
trate Jay In thu city police court yes- 
terday mornltiK. Slu; aalced for u re- 
man, I to have time to commit counsel 
and was remanded until Monday, ball 
being fixed at $50. 

Week of Prayer — The coming wrek Is 
to be observed us u w«?ek of prayer by 
the Young Women's Christian AMOdu- 
uon. and u short service will be held 
every evening at the home on Court- 
ney street at 6.30 o'clock. The com- 
mittee asks that the clergy of the city 
shall today make the success of the 
coming campaign for funds for a new 
building a matter of supplication and 
the subject of remarks. 

Vfj$|«* for Cadets— At a recent meet- 
ing of the Camosun Chapter,. Daughter* 
of the Empire, it was decided to offer 
two prizes to the. High school cadets. 
The first is a rifle to he awarded for 
the best shot, and the second a medal 
for general' efficiency In tile cadet 
corps. Camosun Chapter Is the senior 
chapter, of the order In the province and 
Its members have resolved tr- encourage 
to the utmost of their ability the cadet 
movement and patriotism among the 
children. 



Aggravated Assault Charged— Charles 
Graham, who was arrested by the city 
police when about to leave the • city 

in a motor launch bound to Port An- 
geJeA,MtCT, : .a, iftuaPMe to the. 



Money 

to 
Loan 



Carey Road, at junction with Glanford 
Ave. 'Good lot, 60 x 120, with comfort- 
able two-room cottage (furnished). Good 
well, poultry house, etc. All clear. 

$1,500 

$250 cash, balance as rent 



SWINERTON & MUSGRAVE 



o.i!,. 491. 



1200 Government St. 





Close to C. P. R. Wharf and Parliament Buildings 

A ROCKBOTTOM SNAP 

Let 1, Block 63, Michigan Street, just back of Schroder's 
roceiy store, size 57x122. Price, for 30 days only, as 
second payment iS now due 

$5000.00 

Easv Terms 

A.D.Malet&Co. 

403-404 Central Building Phone 3235 




CLAY'S CANDY DEPARTMENT 

New Jordon Almonds, in Barley Sugar— wholesome and very 

good 

CAKE DEPT — Crumpets, Buns, German Tea Bread and Tea 
Tabic Dainties of the best quality 

Try Them in Our Tea Rooms 

r Delivery Tel. 101 - - - Fort Street Only 



This Is a Snap 

5-ronmed modern House and Lot 50x120 to a lane, on Gra- 
ham Street, one minute from rjillside Avenue. Cash pay- 
ment $1860. Price $5600 

T. H. HORNE 

HORSES AND WAGONS FOR SALE 

Corner Johnson and Broad Streets Phone 727 



NIWirAPIII 
MAOA7INK 

OUTDOOI 

rnidim 
fo«M it mm 

CAMPiOONI 
AST WOKK 
CIKCULAKIZINO 



ADVERTIPIN'O 
PI-ACEti THE 
WORLD OVER. 



-6he HUTCHARM 
COMPANY 



ADVERTISING SERVICE 
VICTORIA. B.C. 



lOOKir.Tl 
• rilFT ( AK 
CATALOOllr* 

rsosrtcTviM 
roi.Low.uri 

MULT|0»ArHIMO' 
»r»CIAL CUT 

IERVICI 
MAILINU AND 

ai>i lag 



An officially recognised advertising agency offering adver- 
tising service and merchandising counsel In all branches. Lo- 
cal advertising written. Placing done everywhere Scores of 
voluntary testimonial* aa to results. Charges moaermUv. Wo 
can hel^> you. 

Reference*: 

Merchants' Bank — Canadian Press Association. Toronto. 
Ring as up at MM. and we win eall. 
Offieea at 4I«-«t»-4*e Central Building. 

\ 

t - , ^ 



George saloon where Jos. Goldstein was 
lett unconscious a» a result, was 

■WM&$JM0W***i: '.«*;>*>• c»ty police 
court. The case was remanded until 
Tuesday. Goldstein is in the hospital 
as a, result of the injuries sustained 
u»d is not expected to be able to appear 
for a week. 

Thirteen Club — The members of the 
. Thirteen Club h t Id - the record dance of 
the season In the A. O. F. hall on Wed- 
nesday, one hundred guests being pre- 
sent. Mxs. Ridgard's orchestra was 
In attendance and rendered selections 
from sorlie of the latest music. Supper 
was servW^tt 10.30 after which dancing 
continued till 1.30 a. m. The committee 
vM.pharge were: Messrs. Pilmer, \V. H. 
Harblnson, E. Bowman,' C. Wood. A. 
McFeat, F. Macfadyen, J. Rogers, R. 
Cook and Roe. 

Got Benefit of Doubt — Frank atMJK 
and Charles Howard, who were passen- 
gers on the steamer Princess Royal yes- 
terday morning from Vancouver, were 
charged in the city police court with 
theft from Jos. Porsin. an Italian, 
who was a fellow passenger. The co»- 
pie wore arrested by Cato Ogden, C. P. 
R. special constable on the steamer, 
who testified that he had seen them 
under suspicious circumstances, one of 
them having placed his hand in Por- 
sln's pocket. The Italian claimed be 
had lost $50 and a pair of cuff links. 
The links were found on the floor 
where the constable said the two men 
had thrown them. Magistrate Jay said 
there was an element of doubt, and 
accused were given advantage of this. 

Gymnaslnm Classes of Y. "W. C. A. 

Much encouragement has been received 
by the management of the Young Wo- 
men's Christian Association In the plan 
of opening classes for physical exer- 
cise in the Pemberton Gymnasium un- 
der the instruction of Miss Jarvls, 
whose work among the younger girls 
was so much appreciated during the 
summer. A number of girls have sent 
In their names, and the first lesson win 
be Kiven In the Pemberton Gymnasium 
at the Central school on Thursday night 
at 8 o'clock. Girls who have not al- 
ready procured gymnasium suits are 
asked to get a gymnasium uniform of 
blue with white middy blouse. Any 
further information will be gained by 
application to the^ general secretary, 
Rfln Bradshaw, at the home on Court- 
ney street. 

.Development League Always Busy — 
The secretary of the Vancouver Island 
Development League La preparing, at 

the request o'f The Cowlehan Lciilr. . 
a special article on Victirla for :.ie 
Christmas number of that paper. An 
experienced dairyman from the prairies 
who has looked over much of the 
mainland of the province, says that he 
has seen nothing that has taken 
his fancy as much as this Island 
and lias decided to settle in the Comox 
district. A rancher at Royal Oak has 
left for England to close out his hold- 
ings there and to return. He asks for 
literature in quantity that he may be 
In a position to advise more of his 
friends to oorne out here. Other let- 
tern yesterday were received from Trail 
and Regina, both from men who Intend 
coming Here shortly. 

Guy Pawkes' Banquet — A banquet 
commcmmoratlvo of Guy l'awkes' Day 
will he held on Tuesday, at the I'rlncc 
George Grill, under the allspices of 
L, ( '. 1.. No. 1426. The committee In 

charge have completed preparations and 

look forward to a successful function, 
Mr. S. C. Court will act as chairman, 
and the following tu.ist list has been 
prepared: "Canada," proposed hy Rev. 
Mr. Scott and responded to by \\r\ . J. 
Rohson; "The Empire," proposed by 
Mr. .1. Brarien and replied to by Dr. 
Tnmalin. "Friendly Societies," proposed 

by Mr. J. C. Scott and responded to 

by Messrs. (J. 11 King and V. West; 
"The Loyal Orange Association," pro- 
psed by Aid. O. O'Kell and responded 
to bv Rev. A. .1. Stanley An! and Mrs. 
v.. Henderson; "The Royal mack Pre- 

Cfeptory," propsed by Mr. O. A. Grimason 
and responded to by Mr. Trowsdale, nnd 
"City of Victoria," proposed hy Aid. 
Dll worth nnd responded to by Mayor 
Beckwlth. 



Motor Oar Owner* 

Guarantee their cars against loss 
through Are by carrying a tube of Py- 
rene. Highest endorsements as to effi- 
ciency of Pyrene. Address, Pyrene, 1603 
Douglas street or phone 3405 for Pyrene 
particulars. f * 



Strawberries Bold la Wovember — 

Strawberries have actually been sold 
since the beginning of the mouth in 
the shops of Victoria. Naturally, tiu; 
supply cannot be depended on, but It 
would be rush to say when they will 
finally cease. 

Wharf la JParry Bay — The wharf 
built by the government at the end of 
Taylor's Beach road. Parry Bay, is' now 
practically completed. It has ample 
berthing for craft, being some 600 feet 
ltng, and the Inhabitants of the sur- 
rounding district hope that next year 
it may be made a regular calling place 
for tugs and other vessels plying along 
thu southern shore of the Island. 

Poultry In Comox — Mr. H. Upton, of 
the poultry branch of the department 
of agriculture, left yesterday for a 
visit to the Comox district. There Is 
talk of the formation of a poultry as- 
sociation In that neighborhood, as, 
with t l iu rapidly Increasing number of 
settlers going in there, the time is 
thought ripe for the co-operation of 
the ranchers in the egg and poultry in- 
dustry. 

Inqueot Tomorrow Morning — Though 
at first Dr. Hart, coroner, decided that an 
inquest into the ©**»• of the death of 
Mr. J. c. Wheeler, who BUddenly ex- 
pired at St Joseph's hospital on Fri- 
day morning, would not be necessary, 
he has since determined t& hold an in- 
quiry mad has fixed the Inquest for to- 
morrow morning at 11 o'clock. While 
it Is not thought the late Mr. Wheeler's 
death was due in any way to injuries 
received hy him when the? taxicab, In 
which he was driving at an early hour 
last Monday morning, was run into by 
A motor car at the corner of Tates and 
VftlMtguytir atrftfttn. It was rfHwmmrt butter 
to hold an inquiry. 

The Kaluga Lands — Another step to- 
wards the transfer of the portion of 
the Co l ombia and Western railway 
by Mr. f.. A. Helnsse has been 
Jmkeo by the dispatch, by Hori. Wf ft. 
Ross, of Mr. H. K. Robinson, of the for- 
estry branch, to make a tour of the 
lands and report upon their valusr^jH 
well as upon their minerals and water 
powers. Upon receipt of that report, 
the govornment will be in a position to 
make an offer for the lands. Mean- 
while Mr. Helnze, although willing to 
sell, is faced with the possibility of 
having to pay some ?60,000 In back 
taxes. 

Good Templars— On Thursday evening 
Nulll Secundus Lodge, No. 93, held its 
weekly session in the hall, 721 Cale- 
donia avenue. The business for the 
evening was election nnd installation of 
officers for the next quarter. The new 
officers were duly installed by the 
lodge deputy, Bro. P. Mathisen, as fol- 
lows: Chief Templar, R. Anderton; vlce- 
templar, Sister Jones; recording secre- 
tary, I. S. Soutar; assistant secretary, 
Mrs. MacNichol; financial secretary, R. 
MacNiool; treasurer, I. Anderton; mar- 
shal, I. Bryson; deputy marshal, Mrs. 
I. Anderson; chaplain, R. Patrick; or- 
ganist. Sister Wooding; guard, R. Cole- 
man; sentinel, D. Russell. 

Celestial Batters Hindu. — Tn a fight 
between a Chinaman and a Hindu on 
Constance street, yesterday afternoon, 
the former did great execution with a 
two-by-four piece of scantling, with 
which ho battered in the nose of the 
SJkh. Both were employees of the 
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Com- 
pany. The real cause of the trouble 
is a mystery. The Hindu was at- 
tended to at the police station by Dr. 
Wa-sson. The Chinaman was arrested 
and charged with aggravated assault. 

Brigade Called Out — Burning rub- 
bish in an ash pit at the rear of the 
McGregor block called out the depart- 
ment yeetorday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 
No damage was done. 

rlne Addition to Apparatus — With- 
in the next two weeks Victorians will 
be given an opportunity of witnessing 
a full dress parade of the entire fire 
department, with the full equipment of 
motor and horse-drawn apparatus. Yes- 
terday the latest additions to the 
motor apparatus were unloaded from 
the E. and N. cars, and as soon as they 
can be attached to the headquarters 
fire engine and city service truck tliey 
will be placed in service. These new 
pieces, the two chassis, secured from 
the Scagrave Company, of Walkervllle, 
Ont., are among the finest Specimens 
of the motor-propelled apparatus yet 
secured by the department. Of eighty* 
horse-power and built for the heavy- 
work they will be called upon to do, 
the machines will haul the heavy en- 
gine or truck a« a specified speed of 
thirty-five miles an hour on the level 
or on a five prr cent grade at from 
fifteen to twenty miles. The motor 
apparatus previously Installed has In 
each CASS exceeded the. specified re- 
quirements, nnd it Is believed the two 
new pieces also will do so. To make 
the Installation complete the rear 
wheels on the engine nnd truck must 
be reduced in size and fitted with 
heavy, solid rubber tires. Improve* 
ments are continually being made hy 
the manufacturers of fire fighting ap- 
paratus and the two machines Just ar- 
rived are about the last word in ma- 
chines of their kind. Chief Davis lias 
decided upon a general parade In order 
that the ratepayers of the city may 

see Just what they have been paying 
for. 

The weather 

Mr-teornlonlrnl office, Ylrturla, Tl. C, at 
8 p.m., November 2ml, 1912. 

SYNOPSIS 

The barometer hm fallen considerably oft 
Vancouver Island nnd showers have tipi>n 

general With Mr!) southerly nlnilji on the 

coast, The weather t« fair anil mihi in 
Alberta and Saskatchewan and below 
freezing In Usnltoba. 

TKMI'KllATritF: 

Mln. Miik. 

Victoria. 40 fit 

Vancouver 4t 4« 

tCamloops it 40 

ilnrkervlfle 30 .18 

I'rinoe Rupert 4a 

Cnlg-ary, Alt* .30 4« 

Winnipeg, Man 14 IS 

Portland, Orf 44 60 

San Franclseo, Cal It so 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 

Highest '. 61 

Uowest 4!> 

Average 4« 

Bright sunshine 1 hour and 14 minutes; 
rain, .et inch. 






Velveteen 

N\ c have just received a 
late shipment of Corded 
and Plain Velveteen, in 
black and c<>lm-^ with silk 
finish. 

Special value at, per yard 
60< 



G. A. Richardson & Co. 

Victoria House, 636 Yates St 

Agents for Butterick 
Patterns 




That are serviceable, artis- 
tically . designed and low- 

nriccd met our pvps wh*?n 

^BTW^^^^^mf ■WsT , 4s^~™^a , /BjB»"s)r' ' *4|| TI'Wsw^^M'fllUa* 

we took the cover off a case 
of goods we received^ yester- 
day. The wise ones, who 
have already begun their 
Christmas shopping, will 
find many worthy sugges- 
tions' in this consignment, 
such as Jewel Boxes of every 
size, Traveling- Cases, La- 
dies' and Gents' Card Cases, 
Tobacco Pouches, Men's 
Wallets, Letter Books, 
Traveling Jewel Cases, La- 
dies' Writing Cases and 
Writing Pads. 

See our window today. 
You'll then be interested 
enough to come in and ask 
our clerk to show you a. fur- 
ther display. 

W.H.Wilkerson 

THE JEWELER 
018 GOVERNMENT ST. 











SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1912 

Stock Ranch 

320 Acres 
, » - ' $4000 Cash 

• About 40 acres' cleared^mostly alderbottom land.. 
Running Water and good weS- Good 6-roomed 
house, stafeles, chicken houses, etc. This property is 
splendidly situated,jind is a 

Special Bargain : 

.We pan deliver this for the «. next lew>>;$^s> for 
$7,000— $4,000 cash, balance i, 2, 3 and 4 year^ 



*■ 



Snap 



$1350 Each V 
7 I-ots on Musgrave, close to Uplands. 
';, cash, balance 6, 12, 18. 



Terms, y A 
(B-5-6) 




Fairfield Home 



rictly Modern 7-Roomed House with all con- 
veniences, fine location. A snap at $7000 — y± 
cash, balance easy terms. (E-2-2) 




Foul Bay Road 



Lot 50 x 120, Only $1160 
This is a splendid buy, close to Willows car line. 
Terms, "1-3 cash, balance 6, 12, 18: (C-4-1) 



639 Fort St. 



Phones 2445 and 40-49 



Before "Fixing Up" For 

Electric Fixtures 



DOS'T FAIL TO SEE OCR 
LARGE NEW STOCK 

The selection will 

SATISFY, 

The designs will 

. 11 .:\sk. 

Tbs prices will 

ASTONISH 

you. 

Enquire about th»> NEW 
6TTLK VACUUM - CLE.V.NEU 

Price flO 

(Its efficiency Is marvelous) 



T. L. Boy den 

SIX Cormorant St., Next Fire Hall 
PHONE 01a 



STRONG TEA 
OR WEAK TEA 

You Get What You Ask 
For Here 



The Tea Kettle 

Miss WooUrUlr, 

Ilia Dous/las St.. Opp. Victoria 
Tbaatrs 




w 



When you give a Howard 
Watch you leave no doubt of your 
intention as to quality. The 
Howard has class. It has a 
tradition and a history. It has 
been carried by men prominent 
in ev«ry phase of our national 
progress. 

Price fixed by printed ticket— 
$40 to $150. 

Let us show you this distinctive watch. , 



We carry a very large and 

complete stock 

of these 

Magnificent 
Watches 

Redfern & Son 

The Diamond Merchants 

1211-13 Douglas Street 

Victoria, B.C. 

Established 1862 



Near Saanichton 

30 acres, all good land, 
nearly all cleared, part in 
clover. Spring on property. 

PRICE $15,750 

1-3 Cash"; Balance Arranged 



A. S. Barton 

Member of Victoria Real Estate 
Exchange. 

Phone 2901 
Room 215, Central Building 



BUNGALOW AT FOUL BAY 



IT'S REALLY EXQUISITE AND REMARKABLY 

LOW FRICED 

Six rooms, hardwood floors, beamed ceilings, panelled walls, 
china cabinets, kitchen and bath finished in white enamel. 
Price $5,50O 

Terms $1000 Cash 

Balance very easy. You'll surely like this bungalow if you 
see it. Make arrangements with us Monday to inspect it. 



Bungalow Construction Co., f^d. 



1 

738 Fort Street, Opposite Kifkhatrfr* 



'WW*. 11 JLftU IMI 



. i . o. "{M ume^ y 37 - 



4 



To Builders and 
Contractors 

Before ordering material 
for Interior Finishing, ex- 
amine 

Am-I-Wud Panelling 

In Plain and Hardwood 

Finish 

Samples and Prices on 

Application 

R. ANGUS 

1 105 Wharf St. Phone 1164 



Good 
Tailoring 
Is Not 
Enough 

If a lady can't get her 
suit when she wants it — 
what's the good of the tail- 
oring? 

Promptness requires sys- 
tem. We've got that sys- 
tem. 



AH WING 

143a Government St. - 

a- 









Sunday, Nevimbir 3, 1912 



VICTORIA DAILY COMJMST 



7 * 



Three Big Specials for 

Monday 



Engli 



A 
Our 



lish Saxony Flannelette, in white onl} 
nice, soft make, suitable for children's wear. 
regular price is \2 l / 2 c. 

MONDAY SPECIAL, 10 YARDS FOg $1.00 

Ladies' Knitted Silk Ties 

A real classy Tie in all the latest shades. 
OUR SPECIAL PRICE, EACH, 50t£ 

Ladies' Black Cashmere Hose 

Here is something in Hose which we can't sell 
every day at th^rice. What you pay 35c for all the 
time. Sizes 8 T / 2 to\icx ^M- 

MONDAY'S SPECIAL PRICE, 25^ PAUU 



E. E. WESCOTT 

McCall's Patterns. 649 V'fttW Street 







n il rtl lil ni iiil *i 



— 



■WKWiMitkllMWinHMaM 



Dependable Grass Linens 



Owing to the increased demand for our Gross Linens, we carry In 
atock'*\much\l«|^.v:«lM)fe^|tt«Ai than heretofore. 



Table Cov«n, 

Doylies, 

Serviettes, 




pg-nrniiff Tff;r|-nrffiiai- ■ «w* 

Bert Spread.. 
Tray Clothe, 
Centre Places. 



That we bell cheaper than anybody else can be verified at any time 
by calling upon us. . • 



Fringes, of every description, from, per yard. . . 



1O01-3 Govern- 
ment St. Cor. of 
Cormorant 




Phone a86a. 
P. O. Box 301 



NEWS OFJTHE CITY 

Oak Bay Council — The regular r<nt- 
nlghtiy meeting of the municipal ooun- 
Cil of Oak Hay will he held tomorrow 
at 8 p.m. in the municipal halt 

Explosion Starts Blase — An explosion 
of a lamp in the residence, occupied by 
Mr. Frederick Paine, at :t:> Ontario 
direst, caused damage to the amount nf 
about $25 last night at U o'clock. The 
flame* set the curtains on the win- 
dow iibl.ize, aiul were Spreading when 
the fire department arrived, and BOOH 
put the fire OUt. 

Saturday Evening Concert — The First 
Presbyterian cliurcli choir gave the 
programme at the Saturday evening 
concert last evening in the \Y < '. T. U. 
Mission, Stoie .stroet, piving the part 
of the programme usually given at their 
H. 1 llowe'en concert, Which was so much 
enjoyed. ex-Mayor Hall occupied the 

eltair. 

Hallowe'en Social — A detightrul lial- 
lowe'en social was held in the Belmont 
Avenue Methodist Church on Thurs- 
iiu \ evening under tlie auspices of the 
Voung People's League, About eighty 
young people were present. The roonis 
were suitably lighted and prettily dec- 
the occasion and a unique 
ic was provided. 

grounds at 

ejf ty> Which la atwo* 

fronts on the atftigft 

moat piatutngJt^l^ 

chase prices wnjf ■'.9%&i 

self has ten rooms 

condition. 

is not disclosed. 

jjsanttt 

W. Taylor win. 



P. R. Brown has 
residence and 
fgp*$li* 'prop- 

Arm and ta. ' 

Thsrfcwj; 

The house i t- ; \ 



on - T- 



A CHRISTIE SHOE— HONEST RIGHT THROUGH 

"Lightning Hitch 9 ' Hockey Boots 

For men and women, are the acme of comfort and service- 
ability. Made to protect and made to wear, $4.00 and $4.50. 
Other Hockey Boots at $3.50 a pair. 



PHONE 
131 



%U#*& 



Cor. Government 
and Johnson 





Owner's Sacrifice 



rOOL BAT BOMB 

An absolutely modern six-roomed home, beautifully laid out 
and finished, on large lot 56x1 20, concrete fenced with railing, etc. 
We strongly advise you to see this home before deciding. 

PBZCB f.5,50O CASH f 1,300 

Balance can be arranged. 



I 



rittShCnlumtiialiiYEstinenlsB 



PHONE 324© 



030 VIEW ST. 



Do You 
Care? 



Do you care where you 
buy your Groceries? Do 
you care about the quali- 
ty and value you get in re- 
turn for your hard-earned 
cash? A few trial orders 
convince most folks that 
here, at Jones' Grocery. 
value Is given for every 
cent expended, and that 
much of service and cour- 
tesy 1* given which costs 
them nothing. Try Jonea. 



Bsjems 



car. 



Cook and North 
Phone 711. 



Park Sta. 



Let Your 

Light Shine 

Through a Ham 
Lantern 



II n-on't blow out. It holdi lot* of 
oil. l» easy to fill. It gives • big 
light, It l« well made, la nicely enam- 
eled — nickeled burner. 



$1.60 



Other lanterns without reflectors, 
tOr and CI.OO. 

With reflector*. tl.tS and $t.M. 

Buy one Monday and you win tee, 
things In their proper light. 



R. A. Brown & Co. 

1203 Dosjgias St Phone 3712. 
A doaen irtep* from Yates Street * 



of Counc 



by a deputation 1 

Klliott, the acting re|y4,0*' South yln- 
couver. Councillor Campbell, and muni- 
ahMl lingineer. W. At Clement, in regard 



Invited to Faaadema— Tiie Victoria 
Citizens' Committee has received an In- 
vitation to attend the annual rose tourna- 
ment at Pasadena, California, on Jan- 
uary 1. This event has been held for 
twenty-Seven years. 

rormw Victorian — Mr. H. B. Macken- 
zie, who has been appointed general 
manager of the Bank of British North 
America, wag manager of the Victoria 
branch from t!*0B to 15*07 and has many 
friends here. 

Caledonia CluD Planer — Arrange-' 
merits have been completed for the 
holding of the annual dinner of the 
Caledonia Club, and the announcement 
is made that it will take place in the 
Empress hotel, on Friday, .Novem- 
ber 2V'. 

Xaqulinalt — The municipal council of 
BoquJm&lt Will meet tomorrow even- 
ing in the LaroPBQh street public 
school. in all probability the bids on 
the lighting scheme will be submitted 
r,,r the qounoll'a consideration. as 
they have 10 be in |he hands of the 
Clark at Boon tomorrow. The question 
of assessment Will also be discussed. 
Now that certain by- laws have been 
adopted by the council it will be possi- 
ble to conduct matters affected by 
them in a more definite .manner than 
has hitherto been the case. 

will 
approval. 

Daughter 



t 



. jM&i't to ,|,o^-q^^^f i™ 



i,d- aftei the ms s t husfl ae V )m* J^SS^lSL!Su^SJl^!l iff 
^»^*^;>r ^^ h^*m/Wti^4 Ain. in , terday mornln«<Bt l a^4^lv%*w«' 

^^tJfE£rT*ti7T* 'EJZXJ&..Y, . ,_ A •*-... '. -sfeatMnnr,* '1.1-1? OiitiM itiak^ia St*. 



T 



to the long-standing dispute as to the 
apportionment of the cost of paving 
Westminster road. The minister lis- 
ttned to the representations made, took 
a note of them and promised considera- 
tion. It is probable that a further con- 
ference will be necessary before a final 
settlement is readied. 

October Fire Lou — The October fire 
loss in the city totalled $5,812, accord- 
ing to the monthly report of Fire Chief 
Davis, Ijoss on buildings totalled 
Sfe,820, and on contents, $2,092. The 
total insurance on the premises in 
which the fires occurred, was $42,000. 
Alarms numbered nineteen, sixteen tele- 
phone and three box alarms. The build- 
ings inspected totalled 153. 'The de- 
partment travelled sixty-one miles, E80 
yards. The chief reports full satisfac- 
tion from the two new preeea of motor 
apparatus, and suggests a review of 
the entire department for the benefit. 
"> the members of the city council and 
public. The new fire station In the 
Oak Bay district Is hearing completion, 
and will he ready for occupation about 
I 1, . ■■;n ij<>r 1. 

"Iiensowes" Sold — a s.,:. ,,r prppefrty 
has just transpired. Involving one of the 
oldest and most beautiful residences In 
city, "Leaaowes," th« old home of 
the Todd family, situate on Bt Charles 
street. The purchaser is Mrs. James 
DUnsmuir, and fhe price la given at 
$60. (mm), in addition to the house', which 
Is an old family dwelling, in excellent 
condition, and yet capable of greater 
things under' the hand of the decorative 
artist, there is aj least two and a half 

•acres of land. The property represent-; 
what is, perha&S, one of the finest town 
houses in the district, and it It with a 
view to utilizing It in that capacity that 
the puiviiaser has secured it. The ven- 
dor of the property was Mr, I,. J, Quag- 
llottl. The house is situated on a 
small height, and is led up to by a 
driveway or> both sides, shrubbery and 
garden patches Intervening. Some dis- 
tance from the street on which it 
fronts, the house is afforded the 1111- 

I mixed blessing of quietude, and with 
Its wealth or trees and hush encircling, 
more than .1 tincture 
atmosphere. 

Lecture on the War — Major C. B. 

Simmons ,b rlvered a h . tUZN Oh M 

medanism and the Balkan \V,ir lo ;ui 

audience or some fpjritJ people at the 

V M I'.A. last night He was i n t rod u. , ,1 

i" a Bhori spe ion by the 1 tean or Co- 
lumbia, who said that cvervon,. with ihr- 
interests of the peaae of the world nt 
heart must be watching with the kt*u 
est attention the progress of events in 

the BOUthWest or Europe, Major Sim- 
mons outlined the rise or the Moham- 
medan religion and the spreaiJ or it 

along both northern and southern shores 
of the Mediterranean. He reminded Ins 
audience that in ludla the Brillsh DB 
tlon was ruling over considerably oxer 
sixty million men of this religion, be- 
sides another forty million In central 
Africa, and that unless its prestige was 
Upheld in Europe unrest and disaffection 

might he looked for In the Bast He 
ended With an appeal to Canadians to 
come to Ute aid of Grout Britain bj all 
joining scene organisation which could 
be utilizQ^ for some purpose or another 
In time of war. 

Burses' Club — The members of th e 
Victoria Nurses' Club held an enjoyable 
reception at the Alexandra t'luh <;,st 
evening in honor of the members of the 
Graduate Nurses' Association if Brit- 
ish Columbia who had come over from 
the mainland in order thai an executive 
meeting might be held in Victoria. The 
gathering was presided over hy Miss 
Jones, president of the Victoria Club. 
and the visiting nurses were Miss 
Wright, of New Westminster. public 
school nurse of the Royal City and 
president of the Graduate Nurses' As- 
sociation; Miss Scott and Miss Orey, 
New Westminster; Miss Breeze, school 
nurse, Vancouver; and Miss Judge, Van- 
couver. The first part of the evening 
was devoted to social Intercourse, and 
the members listened to an Interesting 
little address from Miss Wright, who 
outlined the objects and aim of the as- 
sociation. Refreshments were after- 
wards served, and at 10 o'clock an ex- 
ecutive meeting was hold, at which the 
most Important subject discussed was 
the bill for the registration of nurs •* 
to be presented to the legislature dur- 
ing the coming session. This l.ell wlU 
not prohibit any unqualified nurse or 
private individual from nursing, but 
It will prevent such persons from claim- 
lag ts ha registered. 



,tipn the mother appealed to 

but the boat had 'pulled out 

Before 1* "the "complai m was "made. The 



Wye. The principal of the college. Mr 
Dunstan, In introducing the president of 
the Board of Trade, nave figures in 
proof of the large increase In the num- 
ber of the students In training and 
stated that Wye men were in demand 
everywhere, so- much so that they had 
difficulty in maintaining their staff and 
even their students were offered posi- 
tions before they had finished their 
course. 

Mr. Hunt iman's speech was in a great 
part devoted to tile Question of agricul- 
tural education. He was, however, he 
maid, of tha opinion of Lord Heay's 
committee, who held that agricultural 
education should not be hedged In and 
considered without relation to any other 
educational work. He had great praise 
to bestow on those rural elementary 
schools who gave their pupils an inter- 
est in the pursuits in which their liveH 
were likely to be spent 

lit wished to see the activities of his 
department developed In the direction of 
the smaller farming classes. The sum 
of $1,626,000 had been handed over to 

his department by the development com- 
missioners and some of I his money 
would he well spent in tnkiiiR instruc- 
tions to those who could not leave their 
villages at all and In providing short 
courses of instruction for those who 
could only afford to be away for brief 
periods of the year. 

Women's Canadian Club Gathering— 

The-lp!M|ti^ 

tain atV^«^:a»st&^.Nr*^**' 
ar-t*r»odn At $ o'elook 4tr hohot -of- ««§« 

k:Js^*|htiS*;< : the ■ well ' ' known. «*. 

: tho pmm^^ >'to^ir*»torla ' 

B^ : 'isjfTrriila#,''''' : " L -'' 

OfflTWny S9THXS ' 



T 



CANADA'S GREATEST PIANO 



Gerhard 
Heintzman 



IN ABSOLUTELY 
NEW STYLES 




Vancouver police were notified by tele- 
phone, an accurate description of- the 
girl being given. The eloping gli 
the mother claims, barely sixteen 
years of age. 

Templars Elect Officers — Victoria 
Lodge, No. 84, held its tirst meeting 
of the new quarter in St. Barnabas' 
schoolroom on Krlday evening, and! 
after the various reports for the last 
quartet wert read and adopted, the 
following officers were elected for the 
current quarter: Chief templar, A. Wll- 
kle; vice-templar, Sister Nossle Dick; 
recording secretary, U Spry (re- 
elected}: treasurer, Sister Mrs. Bailey 
(re-elected); chaplain. W. Ralston; 
financial secretary. 11. Bailey (re- 
elected): marshal, J. Combs; d<p"> 
marshal. Sister T. Bailey; guard, C. 
Hardy; sentinel, \V. c. Thorns: organ- 
ist, George Allan. \v. r. Pargiter 
was nominated for electoral superin- 
tendent; the appointment of "a juven- 
ile superintendent in inn laid over. 
Lodse Deputy D. L. Allan, was in- 
stalling officer, and Brother and Sis- 
ter Dewar were the Installing mar- 
shals. 

Ward Two Smoker — The autumn 
smoking concert of the Ward Two Con- 

vative Association will tak- 
in the 'Conservative" committee rooms. 
Government street, on Friday next. 
The programme arranged for Includes 
speeches from those who attended the 
provincial convention held .recently at 
Reveistolte, together with other ad 
dresses from the city members of the 
provincial house, Messrs.. F. Davey. H 
B. Thomson, and F. H. W. Behnsen: 
Mr. G. H. Barnard, at, T\, Mr. Leonard 
Talt, president of the local association, 

ml Mi \\ 11 I'ri. • -Mr 

Guy Wklker, chairman of the ward 
association, will preside over the con- 
cert, and he wishes it t,° be clearly 
understood that anyone who Cares and 
can squeeze in will be heartily wel- 
comed. 

Tlrst Troop, Hoy Scouts — Boy Scout 
lera issued by the gornmtesioner an- 
nounce thai there wAll be a no. -ting of 
the first troop under Cant, H H. Wool- 
of the country j i SO n, scout master, at 8l8hopsclpse, 
j-Burdette avenue, on Monday evetjtng at 

8 o'clock to reorganise this troop, form 
patrols, and arrange a programme for 
thfl wint-r season. Any boy wishinK to 
join this trOOp IS Invited to be present 

at .this rally, ami members or the old 
Organisation are asked to bring along 
recruits for enrollment. No nni" will be 
Inst in getting to work forming classes 
for the different grades after the elec- 
tion or leaders and seconds, nnd It is 
hoped soon to bkV< the troop back to 

it.- pld or- tiiii-i position in numbers and 
efficiency. An Interesting schedule or 
practices is planned by t h >• scoutmas- 
ter, which will lie commenced at one, 
ami a hearty response is expected at 
this reunion. The dr-.'ss tomorrow even- 
ing will be uniform, with staves. 

Patriotic Bnt Abusive — When Emer- 
son Ham, six feet, two inches in height 
and built |n proportion, made a vicious 
attack upon Mr. c. 6. Wheeler, accus- 
ing him of beliiK a Herman spy, he 
start- d a miniature riot on Johnson 
street last night at midnight which 
furnished a varied entertainment for 
nearly tw-j hundred passers-by and gave 
Sergeant Harper one of the hardest 
tussles of his police experience before 
he landed the pugnacious patriot • In 
the patrol wagon. Ham was much tho 
worse of his potations, and, fired with 
an intense desire to save the Empire, 
saw red when he espied Mr. Wheeler 
going along the street homeward bound. 
The object of attack was so surprised 
thai at first he had difficulty In realis- 
ing Just what happened but the assaults 
Upon ills person ss well as upon his 
patriotism aroused his Ire and a free-for- 
all fight commenced and was waged 
throuuh Oriental Alley from Johnson 
street to Yates street before the police 
officer could subdue the burly Ham. In 
addition to a charge of being drunk, 
Ham will also face a charge of assault 
to be preferred by Mr. Wheeler. 






yes- 
famiiy 
residence, IWl Quadra street, to St. 
And re w's cathfdltJfe^a^t-aUlV^.-tgather 
jUql e rni e 

o'clock. The pallbearefs 
Carroll, Alfred Ecker, Frank Sweeney, 
Lewis McDonald, Thomas O'Kourke and 
Fred Brown. 

Barpett — The funeral of the late Mr. 
George Barnett took place yesterday af- 
ternoon from the B. C. Funeral parlors. 
Rev. Dr. Scott officiating. There was a 
large attendance of friends of the de- 
ceased and many beautiful floral trib- 
utes covered the bier. The pallbearers 
were Messrs. H. 11. Coton, H. D. Coton, 
Wm. Noble, H. W. Boulton, A. Mc- 
Keown and E. Nicholas. 

Carlow — The funeral of the late Mr. 
Robert Nelson Carlow will take place 
this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the 
family residence, 132 Wlldwood av- 
enue, Rev. W. Leslie Clay officiating. 

Kok Wing — The death occurred in the 
city on Friday night of Kok Wing, >.r 
1720 Government street. The deceased 
was 62 years old and a theatre attend- 
ant by occupation. He was a native of 
Canton and had lived here for 25 years. 
The funeral will take place tomorrow at 
2 p m. from the B.C. Funeral parlors. 

Quon Quock Hoy — The funeral of the 
late Quon Quock Hoy took place yester- 
day morning from the B. C. Funeral 
parlors to the Chinese cemetery. 

George— The death occurred on Fri- 
day night, at 2.'H1 Belmont avenue, of 
Mrs. Jane George, relict of the late Mr. 
Richard George, aged 72 years. The 
deceased was born In Manchester and 
i me out to this country in 1862, trav- 
eling round the Morn. She spent two 
years here and in 1864 went to Nanalmo, 
where she made her home until about 
three months ago, when she accompanied 
two or her daughters, Mrs. George Wil- 
liams ami Miss George, ) to this city. 
The latter is a member of the teaching 
staff of Sir James Douglas school. Three 
other daughters are left. Mrs. y. Dear- 
den, Custer. Iduho; Mrs. A. Pease, Port- 
land, Ore.; and Mrs ,1. Henzell, Tacoma. 
The remains will be taken to Nanalmo 
for interment on Monday afternoon, 
where t lie funeral will take place the 
following morning. 

Dawson — The funeral of the late Mr. 
David w. Dawson took place yesterday 

afternoon rrorn Sands and Fulton's par- 
lors. Hev. K. A. Macconnell officiating. 
The pallbearers were Messrs. A. J. 
Clearv. J. Davis, A. Milli K iin. M. Pen- 
man, w. Graham, nnd F. Gregory. 

Births, Marriages, Deaths 



BORN. 

mittkk up Sunday, October J", the wlfa 
of <: \v. Mutter er "Bishop'! <isk," near 

loin, an. Tew n hart, V. 1.. 01 a «-m 

COMBE Born, to the wife of Captain. Basil 
Combe, a iiauRho-r, en November Had, 

lnu. 



DIED. 

.K)Ri)lsoN---At st. Joseph',! hospital, Oct. 

Kt. Jnacnh'ti hosultal, John Jordlion, of 

MS Toronto street, a/?e n;i {rears. Horn 

tri Yorkabire, Knslaud. 

The remains are reposing nt ihe chapel 
or the H. 1' Kiineral Oo., 734 Mrong-hton 

Street !>„,. nntlee (if flinera! Will t)" given. 

GBORG-E -On the 1st Inst, at ihe residence, 
rr ."? 1 1 Selmom avenue. Victoria, .lane 
George, widow of the late rtlobard 
Oeorn". Aged 72 \enrs. Horn In Mnn- 

. hi iter. Rtagland, 

'I'h. remains will be shipped by the B. 1". 

Kutierai Co, to Nanalmo on Monday after- 
ii.mn Interment taking place on Tuesday 
mornlna No flowers, by request. Nanalmo 
pacers please copy. 
FINT.AYsnN — At the Jubilee hospital. Nov. 

S 1912. John Flnlaysiui, s«e Jfi years. 

The remains are reposing at the Manna 
& Thomson funeral parlors pending funeral 
arrangements, which Will he announced 
later. _^_ 

OAV.D Of THAWXS 



Mr. and Mrs. P. McDonald and fam- 
ily desire to thank their many friends 
foi kind sympathy shown them In their 
recent sad beren vement ; also for the 
beautiful floral tributes. 



AGRICULTURAL^ EDUCATION 

Mr. Bunolman Praises System of mural 
■lementary Schools 



WVE. Kent. Nov. J.— The distribution 
of the prises and diplomas and tha open- 
ing of some new college buildings was 
the occasion of the visit of Mr. Runcl- 
roin. president of the British Board of 



Mrs. Bllen LHtl« and family wlah to 
thank thatr many frtehda and societies for 
theln kindness taring tkeir recent sad 
Trade, to tha agricultural collage of | Mre%vsme«t. 



cabd or thavks. 

Mrs, Mahal Mathews, of uto Chap- 
man Street, wishes to extend her heart 
felt thanks to nil her kind friends. In- 
cluding the school mates of her late 
ion, Claude Mathews, of the 3rd divis- 
ion, Boys' Central, for their kindness 
and beautiful gifts of flowers during 
her recent sad bereavement. 



oabi» or 

We wish to thank our many friends 
for their kindness to our dear mother 
during her recent illness, and for their 
kindness and sympathy to us during 
our sad bereavement. Mrs. Scott. Van- 
couver: Mrs. McCabe, Maumee. Ohio; W. 
M. Preece, Alice Preece, Victoria. B.C. 



CAItO OF THANK*. 

Bllen Little and family 



e famous GERHARD HEINTZ- 
MAN, Canada's admittedly premier in- 
1 '.j ''jijrument, in new styles — that i^ inter- 
esting news for the musical public 

Beginning tomorrow, we shall show 
several of the new styles decided upon 
after long deliberation. They are mag- 
nificent cases, worthy the great instru- 
ment. The first shipment shown in the 
• *^li|$%i^^ arrived and is now on dis- 
mrt t yfif showro o ms , r , 
v/;^0tM»^3Qtl5 : woods, mahogany, 
figured walnut, fumed oak and mission 
and others. .Superb designs and all 
new. 

Same Old Qualtiy —The Best 

Same Easy Price and 

Easy Terms 

Make a point of calling tomorrow, 

whether you are buying or not. You'll 

be interested in these new styles, and we 

will gladly show them to you. 




FLETCHER BROS. 

Western Canada's Largest Music House »'- 

1 23 1 Government Street Victoria, «B. C. 




DEPENDABLE SKATES 

BOYS' HOCKEY— > good boy'* "r be Sinner's »K«te^\ J{-2« 

Al'AlHA— Cheap gr H (1e, rocker bottom, nickel plated y. •»•"« 

< UMAX— V Rood, low-priced hockey akate. \ :"*V, '.••• li'iA 

MICMAC IKATHKKrtrJIiMr-The best medium-priced akate on market, S4.WW 
LADIES' AND OENT8' BRAVER tun be used for fancy akattns. curved -be >t- 

torn, flunged or plain. 12.25 and '"."J ;,'j Sm'imi 

VKI.OV- The finest skate made. Quality and finish unexcelled.. V';, 

STARR FIGtJB561-Ht*h«»t (tradefl The carnival akate for waltalng and f j« ur £ 

TrBE rk H6t'KKYl-Th^ 'skate for the 'professional hockey player. Tully a^ar- 
antoed 

L180 Broad Street FOXS ? * I>0,>^,, , ™ m C ° X ° nM 



LUMBER, SASH AND DOORS 

Always in stock. We specialize in artistic front door's, 
steamed slush, grain fir, and Howard's flush. 

Lemon Gonnason Co. Ltd. 

P. O. Box 363 




If the blood is poor ad filled with tb. 
poisons from dlsc«sad kidney* or inswtiv. 
liver, the tae*rt is aot only starved hit 
poisonad u wall. Thece ara many con- 
ditions due to isapuro Mood— such m 
dropsy, tain*.* spaUs, nwrons debilky 
or tb. many scrofulous eoaJitioos, olosrs. 
" fever-sores," wMt. swallings, Otn. All 
oan be overeosn. sod cured by 



' I 



Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery 



This sup'plias P«r. blood-by ai4i« SS^^TI^ ^!^JS !Si 
parting tone to the whole eiroalatory system. Its a baart ton., and • irant dmd 

mora, baring an alteretire 1 
the poisons from the blood 



alteretire nation 00 



rm. Its e heart tome and a front nam 
Hver and kidneys, it helps to eliminate 



ToTriri. tba blood and inarm*, the rod blood aorps^lan.thdfnby 
tha naraaa on riah rad blood ami doing away with narrow irrimbaity , 
D?. Pioran's Gc4dmi Ms^e^WjmsTary mul dojot pere.it •*»£»* ^ 
to insalt yow hatnfllianoa whh tba " inat ce good kind. ThnT Disoaaory 
has^/saUa/sa^atMnmi it and containa no alaobol or nareotice 
printed on wrapper. 

Dr. Hnren'a Gaaamoa Sane. Mediant Asraraar la aant ftm on ra ^aapt 

% V 

inTiiVsniaii^'llili'iire 






m I 



■■•■ 



-.■■'■;,■ : -..:--, 



*T~y!PV$F, 



8 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



SI 

A Week 



This 
Offer 
Includes 



rho Hsrd Otrl'a Drum 

(Violin, Flute and Hi»rp) 
Happy Days 

< V'ii'lin. I" lute and I hup) 
The Bay of Biscay 

(Harold Jarvisl 
Wh*n Ton and I Wor* Toung 
Margie 

(Will Ma,; land) 
Holy City 

( lliirry Macdonoughf) 
BUrer Bella 
• That Qlr 

Bombmto March 
(Pryor'i 




$1 



A Week 



• Dottbls Eagl* 



Under tb, 
March 

(Sousa's Bapd) 
Waiting- for the »OM«t S. S*S* 

(Heidelberg Quintette} 
When X W>| VlTeWt^gB* OSS 
You Were »#rtfBixt«*n 
(Macdonough' * Quartette) 



Victor Victroia IV 



This handsome little machine 
has the Victor tapering tone arm 
and "goose neck" sound box 

tube. All parts nickel plated. * 



Price, including io double-fac 
Records, giving you 20 selections 

Only $29 

On terms of $10 cash and $< peir 
week. 

At the left and, right we give 
you a few suggestions of 
records you may like. We've 
hundreds of others, of course. 



This 
Offer 
includes 

Where the Hirer Shannon 
riowe 

1 1 la rr\ Ma< doiiough ) 
Sweet, Qeneriere 

(John Wells S Hayden 
Quartette t 
Mary of Arg-yle 

i I la rolil Jarvisl 
Belle Brandon i^^S 

The 1 

( Marry Maodone%jtti> 

'•imej LWIK. All the 




Take |K» «0 the Cobaret . 
(BUly Hurray) 

ot (Hid va *wj tbm world 

for *«m .,,... 

(Orpheus Quartette) 



MATTERS OF MOMENT 
IN WOMEN'S REALM 



The Winter 'a Duty 

We all know thai the population of 
Victoria |h Increasing; at a rapid rate, 
although Tew of u« realize how great 
a change has come Aver Its population. 
Those who have lived In the city tor 
many years have their own circle of 
acquaintances, and the old friendships 
and intimacies continue more or less 
unbroken. PYom time to time tin- 
circle is enlarged, mid new friends 
take the bla.ee of the old, but this has 
been done gradually, Tho.se who come' 
to Victoria from the prairies or from 

the old land Usually have their olvh 
eonneotions. Letters of Introduction 
bring those u bo h,n e no close friends 
or neiar reratlons her.- Into touch with 
older residents, and. in one wsj 0! 
other; fresh circles >,,•„ rnade, riot as 
quickly as mlgni be wished, pel 
bU1 still with out very long fl 
' '>> tnge ol ri 1 ne and 1 he bti oi 

settling in .-• now ronm ., 

the time or mistresses of homes, and 
their husbands are engaged in forming 



through a social centre, in the sum- 
mer, Nature provides ample pleasure for 
all jvho 1l100.se to avail theuist) ven of 
the opportunity for sport and healthful 
exercise. Tlifs fti not the ease in thb 
long, dark evenings of winter. Would 
any of Chap t era of tiie Daughter's or 
the Empire Consider that In this way 
they could contribute to the making of 
good citizens? 



sit. m 
ics. F 



new 

, 

quent letters ke< 

the life the} 

with all t|Srp|v. 

hfftrtache sometimes. 

the^ families of -neweonn .. 

<0 be thought about mWw--!m£tivC 

***•,<* %%»* -#ho. te^vs ; m^MOf' 

leisure to spare. 

There are, in Victoria, a very large 
proportion of men and a considerable 
y_yfef of women who have np n ft ar 




H ....,, v ~ . :: . . . : : smm if .,, m , v nca i. 

relatives, it would be wrong tp speak 
of them as homeless, perhaps, for they 
have means to rent rooms, more or 
less comfortable, or to live i» board- 
\M hwaa or bnM la But m a ny a u e h 



The Beat Immigrants 

A great deal in said about the desira- 
bility of attracting to 1 this province 
people with capital. No one nil! deny 
this. This country .needs money ror its 
development. But do wo not in these 
days undertake the capital or the young 
man and woman who come to this cbunJ 
trj with little money, but with strong 

arms and brave hearts, with skill and 

per.-o veraio ■■ .' i >,, n it the young people 
who struggle to bring up a family and 
who*, in lie- no-jot inie, do ttoir share 

Ol 1 bi H oik OJ llo . niiimtmi ! y so VS lb. 
province U'll'.' It is cry evident that 

tbci • .1 1 .- 1.1.1 •. nil; p< 1. pi,- com las to 
\ .i! cou 1 ' 1 1 -1 ind, W< should wele »m • 

them wj ly". The mechanic, the farm- 

■ I or tl.i laborer who with his Wife 
■ , . 1 . . - conn ( o help us build 

our land, Will n and 

add to Us. population Btroni and vir- 
tuous aoiiB and 'daughters. It was such 
10 have made Canada what It 
and it will lie by the same 
and courage 
t In 



Overcoat WeeK 



t*= 



At the 

^Red Arrow Stores 



M 



^.,'.. „Q,\ | -' ,,.1, 



Hi) ... 

xitss= 




squandered. 

■ '■'':■ -■tifi,y-fr,W;«Vi 



:v , ^r ; -' ' if' . H i 



.. The Deadly Motor-Bus v.... 
A London cable 'says:. The' home a«cre- 
tary made *n- important «tatemi>nt In the 



hnme ef ronimnne rannnlltr In trtfamhita in . 




We want every man and 
young man in Victoria to visit 
tlie "Red Arrow Stores" this 
week and see for themselves 
list what is new in the Over- 
coat line. 

That you arc not rendv to 
buy now does not matter. We 
want to show you, so that ybu 
IJaf^ptnow where to 

you are ready. 

Competent and obliging 
salesmen will ■ gladly show 
YPU through, explain the 
style features arid the 
materials, 

Ask, to see our new chemic- 

ally . treated Oyrtt | »jg that . 



H 




j^^gg ; ! l , i i i 11 n' as; 



u« * m 



Gideon Hicks Piano Co. 



Ph 



one 1 




AL HHIXTZ.MAN 1M AXO— VICTOR VICTROLAS AX1) 



"••'•'"; "':::'. ■".'''■■ * ' 

Prompt Attention to Out-of-Town Orders 



■ 

Government Street, Opposite Post Office 



CORRIG COLLEGE 

llrecon Hill Park. Victoria, B. C. 

Select Hljh-tJrade Day and Uoardln* 
Collega for boye of 7 to 16 years. Refine- 
ments of well-uppnirued aentl*men'« h<jmt 
In lovely Beacon Hill Park. Number limit- 
ed. Outdoor sport-. Prepared for Business 
Life or Professional Examinations. Fees 
Inclusive and strictly moderate. Seven 
\acancles. Autumn term. Sept. 3rd. 

rrincir«t. J. w. cnrncB. m.a. 



COAL 

Quality and Quantity Is Our 
Success 



Hall & Walker 

1833 Gorernment St. Phone S3 



Serviceable Gifts 

Von can present no better , 
gifts than knives, forks, spoons 
or fancy serving pieces of 
the well-known brand 

"1847 ROGERS BROS: 

For over sixty years the best 
made, best designed silver plate. 
No other is "hist as good." 

\Besi Ita sets, dishes, tvafftrs, 

etc., ire tlamptd 
IMERIOEN BRIT* CO. 

BoI.D 1'T LEADUfO DKAI.KBS 

"Silver Plate that Wears"' 



Beauty 

l '" auty in woman avail- 
eth little unless she is prop- 
erly frowned. 



No 

Troubles 

Here 



u 



There's no t r o u b I e, 
madam, about getting your 
Suit made just right if you 
come to me. 



Charlie Hope 

Phone 3689 

1434 Government Street 
Victoria, B. C. 



' 



•".■■-'. 



Ah Hoy *» 

Indies' and Bents' Tailor. 

1428 Government St.. 



*6 



Builders , 
Proposition 

5 Lots, 53 x 120 each 

Two of these are corners, 

one block froifi car 

94,200 FOR THE FIVE 

1-3 cash, 6. u and 18 
months 






EMILY & 
GILL1LAND 

Phone 3318 
704 Yates Street 



Boys' 

Gauntlet 

Gloves 

With Fringe and Red Star 

On, Cuffs 

Prices 75c to $1 

All Sizes, 'from' 4 1-2 to 7 1*2 



Sam Scott 

Boys' Clothes Specialist 

736 Yates Street 

Opp. Gordon's 



MISS EVA HART 

of London, England. 

EXHIBITIONER. K. C. M. SOLOIST 

Lessons In singing and voice 

production 

Studio: 510 Oewegro Street. Tel. 1.4007. 



Just Ask 

For the Big, Fai July 
Labrador Herrings 

At 

FRSKINE5 GROCERY 

Cor. .l"ln>«oii,( ami Qnnilrn Sts. 
_.,.»#*flon»i 1 08. 



Ij gou get it at 



PLIMLETS 



Tl? 

Its all ritjht 



It Certainly Is When It's Value Is $1500 

AND YOU GET IT FREE 

ON AUGUST 15th, 1913, WE WILL GIVE AWAY 



FULLY EQUIPPED 



1913 MODEL 69T 

/ 

Any person purchasing goods to the value of $10 and paying rash at time of purchase 
will he entitled to a ticket participating in the drawing for the car. Coupons will be given 
^with everything, including repairs, but excepting Automobiles and Motor Cycles. Just one 
m<Tc reason for buying that Cycle at Plimley's. 



It* Yatee Street 
Mieaw •»• 



THOS. PLIMLEY 



733-7SI 

Johnson Street 

rhooe mi 



people have no social life. There are 
sober. IntJustrlpus young men who 
spend month*, and ' eve^lMps,' in Vic- 
toria without sitting at "a family tahle 
or spending an evening with young 
people of their own age in the inti- 
macy of the family circle. Sometimes 
the public dance or the entertainments 
of fraternal societies provide substi- 
tutes for the family lif e from which 
young people of good families have 
I themselves. 
The Young- Men's Christian Associa- 
tion and its sister organization provide 
recreation, educational facilities and, 
to some extent, social opportunities for 
young: men and women. Then there 
are the patriotic soi h. while 

keeping a nve the old tjradlUons ami 
associations, provide an opportunity tor 
the making of new friends. The 
churches, through their guilds;, their 
leagues and young- peoples" assocxttt! 
work in the same dire iron, the puh- 
Hc library reading rooms are a great 
boon to young men of studious habits. 
It Is these lonely men win. nil the gal- 
leries of the then re and form the ma- 
jority of the audiences ' at the picture 
shows or the variety theatres, 
are none of "these agencies but mi ;i 
useful plate in city llfht. Bui po ft'ife 
or mother need think that there is not 
room for her kind offices. Her (laugh- 
ter's companion in store or office, If 
she has not a home in Victoria, would 
be (rtftd of an Invitation on a holiday 
or quiet evening. The lad who plays 
on her son's team, or who works with 
him during the week, might apprecl 

Invitation u> dinner on Sunday. The 
business man who has left hi=i family 
at home, would feel his heart warm If 
he had the opportunity to have a frolic 
nith bis partner's or his associate's 
little folks. All this may seem aoif- 
evldent, but there are many oppor- 
tunities of doing little kindnesses which 
we all let slip not from selfishness or 1 
pride, but from simple thoughtlessness. 
Hospitality coats time and trouble and 
some money, but it brings an simple 
ase to the woman who mak< - 
ii.r borne a place to be'remembered ti 

its atmosphere ol .simple kindness and 

hearty goodwill. 

Beautiful Work 
The decorations of the theatre on the 
night ol the nayj league meeting were 
verj oeautlfu] and suitaidr. The credil 
fpi them la dui Mrs, 8 Mteaheri who 
designed, and al the bead of the vic- 
toria chaptei of the Daughters Of the' 
Bmplre carried out. the scheme. Thi 
ladies had the assistance of the bim - 
jackets in their patriotic work. The 
large attendance of ladles both In thi 
audience and In the boxes reserved for 
thr patriotic societies and the hospital 
-auxiliaries shows that the Women of 
Victoria a r» takl ng b kei o Interest In 
Impei lal subjei ts, Their pi • •■• oce ■< rid 

vvort; Contributed not a little to the suc- 
cess ol the meeting. 

Social Centre* 

Thert are people in all communities, 
who, with the heal win in the world, 

. a n npi '-Hi . i tain the! r friends In their 
own homes, 'i-im.,-. are others who will 
nni ai ■■■■tit hospital! 1 1 i bej oannol rc- 
turn. There are corhnannlty needs 

which unl.\- the c on nnin! ty can siipp!)-. 

i Hder and !e rger i 1 1 las hi -, e buoi e 
fully tried the expei tnenl of establish- 
ing social centrei These arc very like 
the chilis which have done greal g i 

in some of the cltfea and villages of 

England when established bj clergy- 
men "i other philanthropic people. 
Concerts, Lectures or carefully super* 
v iscii dances are given in the assembly 

halls of schools or In other rooms cen- 
trally situated In various ways these 
evening meetings tend to draw the 
people of a community together and to 
afford an opportunity for the meeting 
of young people with the approval and 
the companionship of their elders. We 
hear much In these days of the tempta- 
tions of city life and <>r the tendency 
of the young to break away from the 
Influenee and restraints of home. In 
these social centres, innocent diversion 
and that widening of experience which 
young people crave, might be supplied 
without the temptations which some of 
them are too weak to withstand. 

Such work could not be begun and 
carried on without careful thought, 
hard work and some self-dental on the 
part of those who take upon themselves 
the duties of leadsrahip. In a city like 
Victoria much Hood work in cementing 
the various elements of the community 
and In. 'helping It* young people .mlgut be 
done by s small committee working 
» 



the motor-bus traffic In l^ondon. 

Replying to Mr, Kellaway, Mr. McKenna 
elated that 108 persons had boun killed by 
niiitiu-oraniliusis anil 21 „by eject ric trams 
In the Metropolitan area In olaa month*. 






will shed the rain. 
Mert'ft'CJvewoatfc; Prices M&* 



<¥*•, numner of licence* . lasued 'tor tnotor- 
onudbuaes la London during the nine 
inontha ended September SO last Was 1,9*9. 
He was Informed, however, that many ol 
the licences Iksued durlns the end of last 
year and the eatiy pari of 1 !' 1 -' WferS In 
respect of vehicles of tin old typo since 
LDently wltlnliawn. He hid -seen the 
i solutlois pa«sal liy bosougb councils and 
otlier public bodies In London cillloB atten- 



tion to the iiteiea 
sons kin 
which tin 
ability oi many 
which they ran, 



in the number Of per- 

omtiPuiHi'v the damage 

iperty, the unsuit- 

roules through 

. ' v' e isl i . speed at 



which they were driven, /*au "the failure 
or the present system of traffic control by 
the houie office to reuiody any "f these 
ovll*." The Whole 'oil tor, so far as It 
concerned the public safety, was engaging 
his attention, and hi ith the 

cumntlssl'.iii •'. :•' i . t , i i h.-r air- 

further fl'tion bj the : •' ■• possible, 

i'.in p must i„ rem. e. tha.1 i'"'ii" ■ 

. i - h n 1 1 

any power I i i mtrb t-ji i -, rput«»s "r 

to di al w ith question* ol da ma 

Mr. Killiuvnv, ts it not In the |>o.> 
tfic comn ' 1.0 ■"■ '!• h ,v can 

licences sh^H i to such 

Mr. M ■ I: ■ II ' I t>i 'i- e thai 1* ""• - 
It Is a que II i ■' : i w I W"viM i ' 
notice of it. 



Value of Walking. 

I>r. John II. Kinley, president of thn 
College of the City of -New York, and 
Frederick 15, tlndcrwood, preslctcftl of 
the Erie. Railroad, arc both pretty busy 
men. Kach is well on in middle life 
and each has a thousand and one 
claims on .his time. Yet tliesc actlv? 
iiHti find opportunity for stroll-s that 
take them completely around M utli.it- 
tan island and are now pinning a walk 
to Chicago. They get their fresh air 
and their exercise as the Creator In- 
tended they should do — walking on 
their feet and breathing in the good 
fresh air. There is always some way 
for a man to get exercise, If be really 
wants it. — San Francisco Examiner. 

Child Bums to Death 

KfRKKA. Calif.. Nov. 2.— Irene SWctt, 
live years old, died tonight from burns 

win u her clothing cntight fire. 



ELKS' ORDER 
GROWING 
RAPIDLY 



More than One Hundred 
Leading Business and 
Professional Men Have 
Applied for Member- 
ship 



The B'.-tievoietii Protective Or- 
dei "f BJlks of the Dominion of 
i - 1 nada bavi now ever one nun* 

dri d inenii" rs enrolled, which is 

the result Of untiring efforts on 
I Io- part of Air. .1. S. Woocly 

CJake) and bis Staff of a«c 

slslatits. 'J - h<- date for In- 

stalling the Victoria Lodge will 
be announced Pit.i to take pls.ee 
'■ii" Mine during this moral,. 
The Grand Lodge win i»c presenl 

in a body accompanied by a large 
number of members of the Van- 
couver Lodge, who are anxious 
io h, present at the Initiation of 
their Victoria Brothers. 




JACOB s. noon amke) 

The lorai headquarter-, are In the 
Say ward' BulMlNg, room SOS. Of nee 
hour* fraan. S am.. t« ft p,*n. and • 



• ■ »^' ' «r * Mr «'»* « ' s -*<' t ' i - » " A ' vvv . $35. OO 

Weatherproof Overcoats. $15 
" to $30.06 

Celebrated "Toga" Shower 
Coats, $25.00 to . . . $30.00 

English Waterproof Coats, 
$8.50 to ..........$22.50 



Look for the Red Arrow Sign 



N. HARVEY, Ltd. 

614 and 616 Yates Street. Victoria 
Also 127 Hastings Street W., Vancouver 



Plone5 28 
88. 1761 



THE 

CHEERING 

CUP 




week-end. we feel in duty bound to talk of "WeSt- 
Knd" Tea. 

The important part played by "the cheering cup" during 
the week-end is. perhaps; dot fully recognized : in the crisp, 
early morning, or the drowsy afternoon the thoughts inevi- 
tably turn to ;i cup of tea. 

We realize this, and have spared no effort, to provide you 
with a healthful, enjoyable indulgence. 

As the fragrant liquid is poured out for you, you will no- 
tice its pleasant, distinctive aroma, and the smooth, delicate, 
stimulating way in which it affects you when you drink, there 
is every excuse for that second cup — that is — if the wife shops 
at the "Wesi-Knil.'" There is really nothing in town to com- 
pare with our Teas. 



WEST-END' 



GROCERY CO., LTD. 

Corner Government and Broughton 



Before Buying 

See our Ladies' Tailored Tweed Hats from .$1.25 

See our Ladies' Untrimmed Beaver Hats from $4.75 

Sec our Ladies' Long Winter Coats from $7.05 




WE ARE BUXLDING 



H ardy Bay Chicken Farms 

Home and Chicken Houses — 50 Chickens on a 5-acre Farm, 
$10 cash, $10 per month. 

The Western Farming 4 Colonization Co., Ltd. 

General Offices, 5 Winch Bldg., Vancouver, B. C 
Victoria Branch, 5*1 Sayward Block FhOM •§•• 

■ , I Ml I llllll II' . 1*1 



_ . .- . -.. :'- 



1 



mm 

m'. 



Sundry,' Novemher 3, 191* 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Looks Very Much Like Green 
Shirts for Soccer Champion- 
ships — Both James Bay 
Teams Drop 





Yesterday's Remilts 

Keillor 
Victoria Weals, 3; Suns t<! England, 2. 

Thlsil«R, 1; .N,i\y-Estiulmalt, 0, 
Ltt&gUa Standing 

W. L. D. Pta 

FVesta 4 o o 

rhlstlM 2 1 1 5 

James Baya 1 l 2 4 

■ us of England 1 2 1 3 

Xavy-Esqukualt 1 U 

Second Division 

Victoria Wests, 6; Jimos Bays, 1. 

Navy-Bsqutmalt, 9; Corona*, 1. 
North Wards, 1; Y. M. C. A., 0. 

Fifth Regiment, I; A. O. F„ fc"- 
League Standing; 

W. I* D. Pis. 

Welti , '*■.,-..* 10 

Warda ' ".. » .4 1 * 8 

lamoa B*ya ...;...,..... 8 j,f ■■"■'< ■ * 

Coronu I" J f 6 

,Navy-J3*quimsU .''.,$ '»*■«»• • t • • •'•' 

M. C. A. k ;....rl''-'v.-4- ; ' ■■• ■■■■■pi 

■•■. O. f. • . 4 X V 

Fifth Regiment .......... 4 * J. J 

Roth Victoria 'West teama maintained 

their headlong; rush for the championships 

yesterday,, the aenlora by beating the Bona 

of K«*»*na In a close game, » to », and 

■^U»-' intermediates gaining am easy ytetorr 

•M#Sr the James Baya. t to 1. The Thistles 

'ffijsmo up one .place la the senior league 

IfM the Wards duplicated the feat tn the 

•"'?■! 

Wests, vs. Son. 
rior. combination and greater 
stamina Victoria West handed a lacing to 
the Son* of England yesterday afternoon In 
their league game at the Royal Athletic 
park. .The score. 3-2 in favor of the Wests, 
merely represents the margin of scoring 
ability between the teams, but the actual 
difference in play was considerably more 
marked. 

Roth teams earned a point via the 
penalty route; neither of the offences were 
particularly glaring, but Referee Allan in- 
sisted upon the imposition, and as they 
both transpired in the first period of play 
tluy helped him In keeping the exuberant 
ta of the players within reasonable 
bounds. 

Ail. the ncorlng was recorded In the first 

f, the Wests leading off through Touson 

from a pretty rally round the Sons' citadel, 

ill.- ball finding the net through a maze of 

1 layers, After this reverse, which took 

place tv.'thln fifteen minutes from the start, 

Sons broke oft in a disorganized run 

and equalized from a penalty, granted 

ngalnst the fouling tactics of the Wests' 

lino of defence. Hymer kicked the goal 

faultless!}-. In a moment the attack was 

chid to the other end, where, in an 

rt to deflect the ball past the post 

IJixwcli handled. The Inevitable penalty 

till In a score— at the second attempt — 

.he first being nullified through one of the 

era getting In front of the ball. 

Thackeray was responsible for thus placing 

his side again in the lead. 

For a spell thereafter the Wests con- 
tinued to threaten, their combination being 
much more effective than the spasmodic 
rushes of their opponents' front line. From 
a dainty piece of passing play the Wests 
went still further ahead, the whole front 
line participating in the score, the final 
honor of which was accredited to Touson. 
With this comfortable lead the Wests com- 
menced "stalling" a bit and suffered., in 
consequence a few minutes before the inter- 
val was called, the Sons notching their 
second from Kerley and Greenhalgh. 

The second period proved fruitless to 
both sides, although on occasion a goal 
either way would not have gone amiss. The 
Wests owed their win to superior forward 
play. The fact that the Sons opened with 
ten men may be counted In extenuation of 
the Son's defeat, S. Greenhalgh taking his 
place at centre after the game was fifteen 
minutes old. It might also be conceded 
that the centre suffered from lameness and 
was, In consequence, not as effective as he 
might have. been In organizing the attack 
of his wings. The teams: 

Victoria West — Robertson; White and 
Pravoet; McDonald, Poltlgrow, and A. 
Thackeray; Raker, Wright, S. Thackeray, 
i'ouson and Bherrltt. 

Sons of England — Kerley; Hymer and 
lirnwn; Maxwell, Wyllle and Vincent; 
Douglas, (Jieenhalgb. S. Greenhalgh, Coles 
and K. Kerley. Referee, W. Allan. 
Thirties vk. Nav.v-Esqulmalt 

At Beacon Hill yesterday the Thistles 
ram,' back aflfr their crushing defeat at 
the hnnds of the Wests two wueks ago and 
registered a 1-0 victory over Navy-Baqul- 
malt. The game was very ovenly contested 
and but for the brilliant work by the 
Thistles' defence the score In all probability 
would have been different. 

aUleSpia, In goal, played one of the best 
games s<"-n this season. He Is Improving 
■■villi every match. 

The flrRt half found the players some- 
what unsteady. Which condition was aided 
by a bad cross-wind and a ball which 
looked as If It had been through the mill. 
The forward* on both sides were lacking 
In combination, and the attacks generally 
ended In the ball being shot wildly outside. 
Sinclair »hot one In with the professional 
touch that shivered the crossbar and 
bounced outside. Except on that occasion 
neither goal was In any real danger. Half- 
time came without any score. 

In the second half Esquimau switched 
their players a bit and started off on the 
offensive, but were unable 'to score. 

The Thlstlos soon settled down, and 
Sinclair scored from a shot cllse to the 
left corner Esquimau came right back, 
but the Thistles' backs played sterling foot- 
ball and held them goalloss. 

'Most of the Scotchmen's attack was 
directed from the left wing, Sinclair putting 
Across some pretty centres. 

The final whistle blew with Esquimau 
trying hard tn equalise. 

Dave Dotigan reforeed In a satisfactory 
manner. Gillespie, McEwan, Sheriff and 
Sinclair were the stars for the Thistles, 
while Brynjolfsen. Hrowp and Shaw did 
srood work for Raqulmalt. 

Th« teams: Thistles — Gillespie. Sheriff, 
McKwan, Patterson, Corsar nnd Smith, Me- 
JCInnon, Falkner, Sharp, NtvSn nnd Sinclair. 
Navy-Bsqulmalt — Balnea, Shaw, Perry, Tay- 
lor, Brynjolfsen, Brown, McCarter, Worth, 
Wedgewood, Dakers and Baxter. 
Second Division 

The best game In the second division by 
• long way was thst between the Wests 
and .Fames Bays. Tha score Is by no means 
an Indication of jjhe closeness of the play. 
At half time the Waste were but one to the 
good, the Score being 1-0. Referee Uocke 
pronounce* the jjatne one of the beat at 
(which «lte had aver officiated. ttadger. 



THE AUSTRALIAN W A RAT AH RUGBY TEAM 
Which will play in Victoria some time in December. The WaratahB defeated the University of California, yes- 

~i ' .'JL-!', , . n . ... m i - . . r.._n (IT..... ; »I.Wu.mL ••■ tiipvw 



me um 



Bank rnw— W TiiHr,j.' Wflfr«fryflftft| 



Mi 



l e nlay. 



Third : *w~-W. Murphy, E. Fahey. J. Wytta, A. R. Dunbar. P. Adamson, P. CuhntntThtfiti^lMft^^ 
ken. M. Fraser, J. WoK*n. R. HiU. <*• PutTh. A. Kent, H. Jones. Seated— J. Flynn, T. Griffin, W, 
(capt.). Dr. O. Borhsmann (manager), T. Richarda (vlce-capt.), D. Carroll, H, George. 



Prentice 



Ivoeal Rugby men are elated ovor 
the addition of Edwards and possibly of 
Watkins, both tormcrlj tvith the i ai- 
gary fttrgby team, to the Corel Trotn 
Which the repri team to coin- 

hat for the Ml. • I nle and Cooper- 
Keith trophies will be chosen. Both are 
forward* and their coming is especially 
welcome In view o^the fact that the 
Hugtry I'nlon is having some trouble In 
rounding up a Strong pack this season. 

Edwards has already secured employ- 
ment in Victoria and it is assured t.Mt 
he will remain. Previous to coming to 
Calgary about a year ago ho was a 
member of the" Newport fifteen, one of 
the two best Welsh teams. 
f^&femMu the captain of the Cal- 
gary team and, although now a tittle 
past his prime as a Rugby player, is of 
greater fame than Edwards. H* U «l»u 
from Wales. 

Both newcomers were out at thp 
practice game yesterday laflteimoon. Ed- 
wards playing oil one of the teams 
while Watkins watched the game -: om 
tsJlB ■ttOllDtff. T??« >«"« will act ne 




"CHAMPION" 
FORGES 

We have just received 
a full line of the above. 
See us regarding 
prices, etc. 



E. G. Prior & Co. 

Limited Liability 

Corner Qovaramsnt and Johnson 
Streets 




ATES 



ADIESV GENTS' AND BOYS' SKATES 



able to don a uniform for some time ow- 
ing to an Injury received in one of tae 
practices Calgary held - tn, VfetWrt*. 



Although 






Youson, Brown. Ferris, Speak' ("Wests) , and 
Totty (Bays) were the scorers. 

The Navy-Esi|Ulmaltcra furnished a sur- 
prise In the easy manner In which they 
handled the. Coronas, and Y. M. C. A. grave 
the Wards a hard tussle. Klftn Regiment 
and the Foresters played to a draw in a 
gopd game at Beacon Hill. 

ENGLISH FOOTBALL 



LONDON. Eng., Nov. 2. — The rel 
suits <rf the league football gameS 
played this afternoon are as follows: 
First Division 

Aston Villa 5, Mlddlesborough 1; 
Bolton Wanderers 1, Derby County 1; 
Bradford City 1, Sunderland 5; Chel- 
sea 0, West Bromwich Albion 2; Liv- 
erpool 4, Tottenham Hotspur 1; Man- 
chester United 2, Notts County 1; 
Newcastle United 1, Sheffield Wed- 
nesday 0; Oldham Athletic 2, Ever- 
ton 0; Sheffield United 0, Blackburn 
Rovers 0: Woolwich Arsenal 0, Man- 
chester City 4. 

Second Division 

Burnley 3, Grimsby Tciwn 2; Clap- 
ton Orient 0, Birmingham 2; Glossop. 

1, Huddersfteld Town 0; Hull City 6, 
Leeds City 2; Leicester ■ Fosse 1, 
Barnsley 0; Notts. Forest 1, Blackpool 
1; Preston North End 2, Bury 0; 
Stockport County 1, Fulham 0; Wol- 
verhampton Wanderers 0, Bradford 0; 
Lincoln City 3, Bristol City 0. 

Southern League 

Portsmouth 1, Queen's Park Rang- 
ers 1; Swindon Town 2, Brentford 0; 
West Ham United 4, Gilllngham 0; 
Exeter City 1, Northampton 1;' Wal- 
ford.2, Southampton 0; Crystal Pal- 
ace 1, Stoke 0; Coventry City 3, Read- 
ing 1; Merthyr Town 1, Plymouth 
Argyle 1; Brighton and Hove Albion 

2, Norwich City 2; Bristol Rovers 2, 
Mil wall Athletic 1. 

Scottish League 

Clyde 0, Aberdeen 1; Airdrleonians 
1, Dundee 1; Third Lanark 0, Celtic 1; 
Falkirk 2, St. Mirren 0; Ralth Rovers 

3, Hamilton Academicals 0; Hearts 4, 
Partick Thistle 0; Motherwell 5, 
Hibernians 1; Kilmarnock 2, Queen's 
Park 1; Rangers 1, Morton 1. 

Rugby 

South Africans 14, East Midlands 5; 
Cheshire 28, Lancashire 3; Cambridge 
28, Richmond 3; Cardiff IB, Black- 
heath 3; Oxford 3, United Hospital 1; 
Cambridge 1, Casuals fl; London 
Welsh 22, London Irish 3. 




MALAHAT QUINTETTE 

WINS IN BASKETBALL 



The first basketball match of the 
season was played in the S. L. A. A. 
hall last evening between Slmwnlgan 
Lake and Malahat, and was won by the 
latter by 22 points to 20 In overtime. 
At the end of time the score was 20 all. 
The teams were: 

Shawnagan Lake — Forwards, W. 
Blake and C. Stevons; centre, Koenlg; 
guards, J. Stone and A. Hunkln. 

Malahat — Forwards, C. I^aughlln and 
R. Alfred; centre, C. Smith; guards, M. 
Allan and J. Petersen. 

Basketball is reported to be booming 
In the up-islaJld districts and some 
good games are looked for this season. 



K£ic Mcdonald 

One of the most promising of Vic- 
toria's Rugby fullbacks. McDonald 
broke his nose in a recent game and 
won't be able to play for a week or so. 



LIGHTWEIGHTS HAVE 

LAST WORK-OUT 



NEW ORLEANS, La., Nov. 2.— 
Wolgast and Mandot had their 
la.st work-out today for their ten- 
round bout Monday night. Both 
of the lightweights appear in good 
condition. Bets are being made 
at even money. So far the bet- 
ting has been light. There will 
be no referee's decision, but 
merely that of the newspap-r 
men. 



BOY SCOUT FOOTBALL 



The third and fourth troop of tin- 
Victoria Boy Scouts played a match tit 
the Dallas road grounds y-esterday, 

which resulted In a well deserved vic- 
tory for the third troop by the score of 
4 to 3. The two t rams were very 
evenly matched, but "the third slightly 
excelled In shooting. 

Special mention should be made of 
W. Murison, W. II. Brown and R. Xash, 
of the third, and T. lleyland, of Die 
fourth. Both teams used one substi- 
tute, each of whom played well. 

The thanks of both teams are due to 
Mr. A. O, Hughes, scoutmaster of the 
fourth troop, who refereed the game to 
the satisfaction of all. 



AMERICAN FOOTBALL 



pAKLAND CHAMPIONS 

TRIM ALL-STAR TEAM 



OAKLAND, Cal., Nov. 2. — The Oak- 
land , team defeated an all star team 
composed of big league and coast league 
players, 2 to 1, here today. The game 
wa.s fast with Oakland landing five hits 
and the all-stars four. Moskiman, for 
the all-Stars struck out six men and 
Olmstead four. The score: 

R H. E. 

All-Stars 1 4- 1 

Oakland S 6 1 

Batteries — Moskiman and Burns:, 



Olmstead and Rolvren 



Kramer Wins Title 

BOSTON, Mass.. Nov. Y— Frank L. 
Kramer, American champion, won the 
international Indoor one mile bicycle 
championship here, tonight, in two con- 
itovulrve h4ats by defeating Jack 
Clarke, of Australia. The time of the 
first heat was 2 minutes 6 2-5 seconds, 
and the second heat 3. minutes I 3-5, 
seconds. 



l'.i; 



of 



• ef Okla- 
5. 
Utfth, 10; 

, 33; Earl- 



At Hnrvard — lliirvnr.l. 16; I'rlnceton, 

At Pile Aita — Stanford University, 
Olympic, o. 

At Ann Arbor, Mich. — UniVetslty 
Michigan, 7; University of South Dakota, 8, 

At Berkeley — Australians, _■&, University 

of California, 3. 

At Lawrenoe, Kas, — XJnlversltj 
home, 6; University of Kansas, 

At Salt LaJce'^-'UhlversIty er 
Unlvprnlty of Montana, 3. 

At Hloomlngtnn, lnu. — Indiana 
ham, 7. 

At South Bethlehem, Pa. — Carlisle, 31; 
I, "high, 14. 

At Philadelphia -University of Pennsyl- 
'.vanla, 0; Pennsylvania State College, 14. 

At Hanover, N, 11. — Dartmouth, 60; Am- 
herst, 0. 

At Providence — Brown University, tS; 
. University or Vermont, 7. 

At Ivhaca— Cornell, 10; Williams, 24. 

At Moscow, Idaho — University of Oregon, 
3; University of Idaho, 0. 
— IT 
Br< 

ST. LOUIS," 
hen, recently 
St. Louis Natl 
departed tonl) 
At leaving Hi 
offers from 
American tea) 



Breanahsn SI 
ajn offer St 



4>ets Oilers 

;o.. Nov. 2. — ftoger Bresne- 
Heesed as manager of the 
al League Bas»4>alt Club, 
t for his home In Toledo, 
snahan said he received 
o 7{Atlonsl clubs and one 
for his services as catcher. 
Id that he would not consider 
■resent, as he Intend* ta fight 



J fir his contract With the St, Louis club. 



AUSTRALIANS 

iffl TABLES 



Waratahs Beat Weakened Cali- 
fornia Team — Stanford Uni- 
versity Come Back to Form 
and Defeat Olympic Club 



BERKELEY, Cal., Nov. 2.— The Aus- 
tralian Waratahs today won the second 
victory out of three games with the 
University of California, 20 to 3. The 
second varsity team faced the visitors, 
most of the California first line men 
being withheld for fear of injuries 
which would debar them from the 
California-Stanford game next Saturday. 

In the first half the varsity players 
held the" Waratahs to a score of 3 to 0. 
The try by Australia came at the close 
of the half, Tom Richards crossing for 
a score. Australia failed to convert. 

In the second half the Waratahs 
romped over the field, taking twenty 
more points, while California got but 
three, Rosewell Miller, a sophomore, 
who played In the varsity lineup Wed- 
nesday, when California defeated the 
Waratuhs, made the one varsity try. 
Stanford's Win 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Cal., Nov. 
2. — Stanford University defeated today 
th'e Olympic Club of San l'ranciaco, 
19 to 0. The Stanford men were at 
their best and It was evident the. team 
had passed Its period of slump. Today's 
performance has aroused the Stanford 
rooters to a pitch of unbounded optim- 
ism and they feel confident of victory 
over the University of California next 
Saturday. 




Yesterday's 



men who represented Victoria In the 
game against Calgary last Thursday 
were unable to get out, D. M. Grant, 
Carew Martin and Dai Thomas being 
among the number, a fairly good prac- 
tice was held at Oak Bay yesterday af- 
ternoon. The work, of both packs was 
watched closely and, although they 
would divulge nothing, no doubt the 
selection committee formed a pretty 
good Idea as to some of the changes at 
least that will be made In Victoria's 
forward line for next Saturday's game 
against Vancouver. Daniels was tried 
out at fullback but didn't' come tip to 
expectations. Ed Steele showed more 
promising form as fullback on the pick- 
ed team. 






Boys; Hockey mtates, pair $1.- % 

Ladies' and Gents' Beaver Skates, 

pair ^2».<«!> 

Ladies' and Gents' Beaver 

flanged runners, pair; 

Acadia Skates, for ladles, 

Climax Skates, for gents. 

Glacier Skates, for laole 

Hrntla Slratat, gsnte, pali-'il 






Regal Hockey Skates, pair $4.50 
Regal Featherweight Skates, per 

pair $5.00 

Mic-Mac Skates, gents, pr, Jf-i.OO 
Velox Skates, gents, pair, $6.00 
Starr Figure Skates pair, $5.25 
Starr Tube Skates, pair, $6.00 
Dunn's Tube Skates, per pair, 
■ -'•■' ''-•;- ' y> "'" and $o.OO 





Pair 

ockey Boots 
erson's, Leckie's and Ryan's 
PRICES $4.00, $3.75, $3.50 AND $3.00 PAIR 

■. PEDEN BROS. 

Government Street Phones 817 and 663 



CALGARY TIGERS LOSE 

RUGBY CHAMPIONSHIP 



WINNIPEG, Nov. L\— Fighting des- 
perately in the last few minutes of 
play, the Calgary Timers diopped their 
till" of Wrsti-rn Canada llugby chain- 
Diana when tl.ey lost (int. t.0 I in- Winni- 
peg Rowing Club team by the closest 
margin of one point, the score ending 
4 to 3 after a hotly contested fame this 
afternoon. 

A throe-point lead Ruined in the first 
period of pin.* as the result of some 
brilliant klckiny by Stephens gave the 
oarsmen advantage which the Al- 

bertans were unable to overcome, 

Fumbles !>■ the local backs in Ho las) 
few minutes of play nearly lost the 

game for the Manitobans. 

Sensational woi-u by Capt wark, nf 

!!>.• Tigers, kept his team in the run- 
ning right up to the last mlnut i. 



COOPER-KEITH CUP 

The following letter from the secre- 
tary of the Victoria. Rugby Football 
Union explains itself: 

The Sporting Editor, Nov. 2, 1012. 

Victoria Colonist. ' 

Sir, — As there seems to be some 
doubt (from the remarks you made In 
today's Colonist) as to which team is 
entitled to represent British Columbia 
In the Cooper-Keith cup games against 
the Californians, I should be obliged if 
you could And space on your ^porting 
page for these facts. 

The - team that wins the McKechnle 
cup at the end of each season is entitled 
to challenge , or be challenged for t'te 
Cooper-Keith cup, whether held In Cal- 
ifornia or British Columbia, 

Last season Vancouver won the Brit- 
ish Columbia championship, therefore 
they defend the Cooper-Keith cup this 
year, provided the Callfornians eome 
north. Therefore it does not matter 
Whether Victoria or Vancouver win the 
games before Christmas, the result ,- f 
the .games at the end of the seison 
alone counts. A. D. B. SCOTT, 

Hon. See. Victoria R.F. U. 

MANAGERIAL STANDING 

IN NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Ladies and Gentlemen 
Girls and Boys 

Have Your Skates Fitted and Ground Properly 

We have the right kind of sharpener, also the 
right kind of skates and boots. 

Auto Skates ranging from $6.00 to. . 75^ 

Skates Ground and Put On While You Wait 



HARRIS & SMITH 

1220 Broad Street 



AMATEUR ICE HOCKEY 

Some Doubt As to Whether There Will 

Be Xieague tn Victoria this 

Winter 



If there Is an amateur lee hockey 
league in Victoria tliia winter — and 
there is some doubt tha' there will be 
one — there will likely he only three 

teams entered at the most, while there 

are more good playOTS in town than 
there were lost winter, several eastern 
amateurs having been attracted to Vic- 
toria within the UtSt lew months, the 
sport was such a financial failure last 

spsKon owIiik to a deplorable lack of 
class to some of the teams, that those 
Interested feel the necessity of cutting 
down the number of entries. By so do- 
ing the good material will be well 
bunched and amateur hockey of a bet- 
ter order ought to be seen. 

A meeting will probably be called 
within the next few days, at which the 
association will be reorganized If there 
is to be a league. The North Ward.". 
James Bays and Victoria Wests may 
enter teams. 

The Vancouver amateur '""hockey as- 
sociation for 1912-13 has already been 
organized with the personnel of the 
league exactly the name as last year, 
the Columbia*, th* Bankern. the V. A. C. 
and th« Rowing Club being entered. 



Roger Bresnahan fired by St. Louis — 
No successor has been named as yet. 

Frank Chance dethroned by Chicago 
Cubs — Johnny Evers appointed in his 
place. 

Johnny Kllng dropped by Boston, 
George Stalling;* replacing hi in. 

Hank oD.iy to be chased by Ciniin- 
miii; .loe Tinker slated for the Job. 

Hiii P ahlen booked n have a succes- 
sor at Brooklyn. 

Charley i'ooin la In danger of losing 
out at Philadelphia. 

Mr'iraw with Xew V.iik and Clarke 
with Pittsburg secure in their positions 



Uosae%ox i«o»ea Again 
utt.uva, Nov.. 2. — Raymond Caasaatu 

nu.'iln met defeat at the lQOB.1 arena to- 

nighi, Constant U» Burin winnlnj; from Win 

.•lit-, " KiTiciiticuial ur>nilliiK -ni it'll. LS 
MKrln wan awarded ihe first fall on a foul 
In twenty-five nllnuirj. the Mk Frenchman 
l.-K In j,- his head and kicking l.e Marin In 

11,, chest Caaieatut went wild when 
Referee Davy nave the ran in the Belgian 
and grabbing the official'* megaphone, tore 
u into pieces ami hurled the remnants into 
the crowd, in the second Wmi Caseea-ux 

had !.'■ Mm I" "ii the mat with a full Nel- 
son, imt the Belgian buried his opponent 

high Into the nlr mid pinned him fiOWB 
with a. head and h-n hold, 

Welshmen Win 

Ttie Victoria Welsh club defeated the 
sailors of the H. M. s. Algerima, 25 to 0, 
in a Hugby match at the Algerine 
grounds yesterday afternoon. The 

Welshmen tried out two of three new 
forwards with good results, 

Oak Bay Praotice 

The Oak Hay Rugby oltlb Will hold a 
practice at the Oak Bay grounds this 
morning and all players ar,' requested, 
to be on hand. 




RATING! 



3— Daily Sessions— 3 

10 to 12 3 to 5 8.15 to 10.30 



ADMISSION 

Morning— Children 15c Adults 35c 

Afternoon — Children ... 25c Adults 35c 

Evening — General Admission 50c 



R. G. Rowland's Band Every Evening 



ADVERTISE IN THE DAILY COLONIST 






Toronto Wine 

KINGSTON. Ont., Nov. 2.— Toronto 
University won the annual intercollegi- 
ate harrier meet here today. 

Yorkshire Society — A general meeting 
will be held at the office of the under- 
signed on Tuesday, 5th, at 8 p.m. All 
Yorkshire folk Invited. W. O. Winter- 
burn, Hon. Sec. • 

For lunch try the Balmoral Cafe, 
opposite Victoria Theatre. Excel- 
lent cuisine j bast service; moderate 
price*. • 

~ »' .f" " ■ 



RIDE A 



New Hudson 
Bicycle 



ant> KF.i^r cool 



Marconi 

*to 



rfls 



Eras. 



successors 



F. N 



574 Johnson 



Cos tin. 
Street. 



I have now 
Garage at D31 



installed In 
View Street, 



my 



Complete and Moiern Auto- 
mobile Repair Plant 

And have secured the servcles of 
an expert automoblU machinist- 
All rerpairs promptly attended 
to «t reasonable ratss. 

A. G. GEROW 



— 



THORPE'S 

SODA 

WATER 



Made from water 
from which all germs 
have been removed. 



I 






*wrS" 



*&& 



TPT^ 



10 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



^— 



SCOTCH 

WOOL BLANKETS 

What You Need These Cold Nights 

MAKE your rest comfortable with a pair of Gordons Blan- 
kets. They are just the things for these cold November 
nights. They are all guaranteed to be made of pure 
Scotch wool and are almost as warm and soft as eiderdown. 

Telephone our Staples Department and have us send you just 
what vou want. 

A Fine Range of drib Blanket 
and are quite an .addition to the 
blue or pink borders. 



-. %a 




ally pretty, 



m- » -* • » • 



25 x 36, plain whipped. Per pair 

25 s36, satin bound. Per pair V. ...<.. 

36 ^ 54, plain whipped. Per pair 

36 x 54, satin bound; Per^pair . . , 



.fc\ 



. . $2.50 
. . $3.25 
• •$4.25 



> r 



Extensive Range of Scotch- 
Wool Blankets, pink of blue 

^gmmmmmmmmtmmmmm^mmmmtm^mmmmmm^mmmm-mm^^mmm \> f ■ ' ■■■ ■■■■ n w nn ■■■■ ■^■^■we— y mm 



Canadian Wool Blankets, pink 
or blue j>orders. Very good 



MUCH BUILDING IS 




I PAW 




Increase Shown, by the Figures 
for Month of September 
Bear Testimony to Wonder- 
ful Advance of Country 



Tho good record made during prev- 
ious months oi this year as regards the 
estimated expenditure <:» buildings in 
Canada has been maintained in Sep- 
tember, and acordlng to the following 
compilation by Tho Financial Poet, t in- 

total for forty-nine cities and most 
Important towns is over twenty-one 
million. This is a considerable increase 
over the same month last year. Kor 
twenty-one cities east of the Great 
Lakes the actual increase Is $-,-'41,017, 
or 45 per cent; and for twenty-two in 
the West, $',,:!20,336, or practically 
per cent, making on th^.wlij^lili.,^ 
crease of almost seven and 
[VS^fim0fr : M per cent. 

Over the nine months' period the 
showing is also exceptionally good. The 
total of the following list of fifty cities 
Is $157.^70,000. This ttat. of course, 
does not include a. number of our cities 
and towns where no record Of building 
permits is kept. It also must be re- 
membered that thR estimated expendi- 
ture as a rule run from five to twenty 
ner • oh t below the ><*t'lol cost of the 
buildings erected. • ' Taking this Into 
uuiisiii cation. :. very euiiaet vfctlvo eat)' 



million dollars was the total there. This 
is a gain of three and a quarter million 
dollars or 361 per cent. Toronto standi) 
second for the month, with permits 
reaching almost three million dollars, 
an Increase of r,3'per cent. 

Xl*T*n Decreases la »apt*mbar 

Although there are eleven cities that 
in September did not come up to the 
record of tho same month last year. 
Five are east of the (Jreat flakes. Ham- 
ilton, London. Ottawa, .Peterborough 
and Wetland; and six In the west, Nun- 
almo, N'eljon, Port Arthur, St. Boni- 
face. Vancouver and Winnipeg. The 
majority of theso decreases are hot 
large, with the exception of Winnipeg, 
which has Tailed to approximate la*t 
year's record by $860,000.' 

There are a number of lfrge percent- 
age Increases, and without considering 
several small places, where the permits 
last year were extremely small, the 
targes! Increase - -39] per' cent*- is made 
by Edmonton, which during Bentem- 
beT added $1,611,000 to It* already 
large increase over 181 \. 

Kor the first nine months Toronto 

holds 8rst pJace bi tol I, V\ itm'oss <*■ 
second, foHowed'hy Calgary, .Montreal, 
Vancouver. Edmonton, Saekatpon, Vic- 
toria^ Reglna, Hamilton and Moose 
■Taw, all with permits over four mil- 
lion dollars. 

There are twelve Increases over one 
million dollars, the largest being made 
by Edmonton, with a gain of $8,735,000. 
Calgary stands in second place with re- 
gard to Increase, with an advance^ 
$6,000,000. Toronto has ttHmMRKvlK 1 * .' 
•MmSr^mm, '•MM.ODO;. and Sa»- 
S&qdn. $3,000,000, while Hamilton, 
Maisonneuve, Montreal, ftm .:- : ^|m«ini 
MediOtoie Hftt, Mooso Vtfawf »iM, Winni- 
peg haVe gains ranging • proht on* to 
two million dollars. 

A notable fact is that evety «tt/ In 
thf gfllrt s1K.«fr »" tocreaafc They 



BERLIN SEASON 



..Mis,, ,MMm, irtnf.Ta nm fT-TiTTr - ; r -~~r 

range from JtO per cent to * per cent 
In the West there are two, decreases, 
one by Brandon of im.ooo, and one fry 
Vancouver of $837,000. The largest per- 

^ iMfji l fit tf yofiq , hy ,, a tofltelpe 

...letee.n at the cities whose figures 
have been - given above have already 
surpassed the total permits of 1911. 
This fact, coupled with the substantial 
Increases mado in almost every other 
city, denotes that the increased real 
estate activity that has been prevalent 
in Canadian cities during the year is 
to a very considerable extent caused 
and warranted by the rapid and per- 
manent growth that these figures indi- 
The tables are: 



po urs c o ld w at e i o n - t ub winH i uf, an 
Glaring that a capital bo devoid ol geri4 
ulne society as Berlin can never pos- 
sess a Season worthy of the name. 



JHrau QapltaJ AftaUone to rollow 
Jlxampl* of Xaondon 

BliKT^fSf, Nov. I- Berlin has long 
cast covetous eyes on the London 
Reason, and ivas now tuken «t»j>s to 
organize one' of Its own. "Organize" 
la Just tlie word, for, as there aie 

neither traditions nor precedents, a 
Berlin 1 Season must be created. In the 
Germa.ii way, systematically and by 
committee. The project was formally 
launched at a me/etlng this w«<k, and a 
tentative programme drawn up for 
'June, 191$. 

Next summer, it Is thought, would 
be an ideal time to launch a Herlln 
Season, as the silver Jubilee of the 
Kaiser's relRli Is t.i be. .-..mim-numi I 'I 
ba June 15: Brilliant festivities and 
ceremonials will centre round that 
event, ami would Inaugurate tlie Season 
Idea with eclat. 

Professor Relnhardt and cthci proml- 
hent personalities of the theatrical, 
operatic and artistic worlds, have lent 
their names to the enterprise, and the 
provisional menu of entertainment In- 
cludes Shakespearian c*ycle. a fort- 
night of Ibsen, Hauptmann and Suder- 
mann drama, a W*8i^«^el^|pfinj^ff 
Greek tragedies, a cycle -of "mono^W* 
tal German musical works," race meet- 
ings at the QrunewsW' and Ruhleben 
courses. % tt0$ l*j0- at, JohMOlSthal. 
end si dedication of the itadium which: .f • 
Is to be the scene of the 1918 Olympiad. 
Plus the attractions of Berlin "night- 
life," the committee better* their 'pe#*> 
gramme variegated enough to attract 
the most fastidious of globe-trotters. 

Only a heartless writer in the "Tag** 



Too L^te to 
Classify 



•in Vletorta and Sidney 
8 mile* irom Victoria. 

Prloe lib; per sere <;u easy term*, 
brltlsh Canadian Home Hulldera. 
Limited, room J12 Saywurd build- 
ing, {'none 1030. 



• V4 wren 
lt»ll»nj 



F«lrflrld Bargain — Now (-roomed 
buagalow, bardwood Qoora, beamed 
cclllnjjB, furnace, run cemant ba»e- 
luiiit. ceim in walka. trtieu planted 
In boulovard. paved street, and two 
blotlta Iriiu car line. $1,000 ca»h 
will handle. Iiritlsh Canadian 
Hume Builders, Lftnttod, SH Say- 
ward bulldlns. phone 10J0. 



laies Btroet, Improved buaii,,:«ii prop- 
ertj rentlns tor J1680 per tnonth. 
Property in cloaa in an.i oaa be 
' ugtii ;u ;, price t iiiit ik right 
T«rm» given. lirltish Canadian 

Hi. in. I .',.!., | ,..,,] J I I 

bayward liuiMiu*. jfhoae loau. 



1>oiik>»> 8t, ■• »r Yatea; Improved 
proper! i ntlnir for J1000 per 
month. If taken at once can be 
boualu below i he market price, 
lirltish Canadian Home Builders, 
Limited, 314 Sayward Bulldlns- 
Phone 1030. 



Government Ht., 3 large busineu lota,. 
' «•> in, Improved, renting for $1000 
lontn, This property can be 
*d-.»a S«ay term* British Can- 
ii Home Builder*, Limited, tit 
vard Building. Phone 1030. 




St. 



OovernmwKTiifl 
proved; an Ideal uuildlng propoal- 
tlon. Price la very attractive. 
British Canadian Home Buildere, 
Limited, 314 Say ward Building. 
Phone 1030. 

' J I ', l e ', , V 



Imprcrrd Farm, MetchoMn Olat; 

oeie a e l 



8t » um i Iwe t wS t e 



at 



* klnde, firming ImplemenU, new 
10-roomed house, ,. stables, , out- 
buildings, etc.; everything that 
goes to make an J*jaJ ■,-• fanning 
proposition. Price,' **0.0 per %cre, 
14 cash,, balance 1, 'J- and 3 years. 
British Canadian Home Builders, 



bordt^, whipped or sdtlii' 
bound. Serviceable, long- 



w ea r iQ g ■ a n d wel l - a ppearing . 
Price, per pait% <M •§,-■••*" 

$4.50 to ePJLi. 



values-— 

56 x 76. per pair. .... . . ^2L25 

60 x 80, p&c paii*, .777T7.;f&7&- 
64 x 84, 

: 



mate or tne amount or building pian- 
netl in Canadian rltlc-s nod towns, not 
to speak of the building being dons 
in tho Mniaile«- municipalities, is t«?b 
buqdred TttUMjp^ doUars for the ntfl j h 



YT39 Yates Sir 



^c^cndJ^ 






'hone 1391 




tOSONTO 



tew 



FOR BUSINESS 



It would be hard to improve on this model for 
everyday wear. Tailored in meltons, tweeds 
and a variety of rich overcoatings. Warm, 
serviceable and very stylish. We are exclusive 
agents. 

W. & J. WILSON 

THE MEN'S CLOTHING CENTRE 
1221 Government Street and Trounce Avenue 



wmt 



—*. 



month*. 

The increase over last year's figures 
for the corresponding period is forty- 
onf .and ft half mlll'on dollars, of which 
.thirty and one-half are made* by cities 
in the western, una i-ieven in tt.e easM- 
■ in division. Tho percentage in the 
Ea«t is 2(5 per cent and in the West 
•16 per cent. 

For tho month of September, the ap- 
proximate value oi' bmildlncjs for which 
permits were issued was* larger In Cal- 
gary than In any other tity. Over four 




APPRO? 

City 

Rerlln 

Brantford .... 
Chatham ..... 
Unit ......... 

MX 

Hamlllon .... 

Klhseton . . ... 

London , ...... 

Malaonneuve . . 



•• 'Thorough 

Preaton 

■ 'ntliarlne>i , 
Bt John ...... 

Mratford 

Sydney . . ...... . 

'i oronto ...... 

Wratmount ... 
Wlndaor ..... 

Wolland ....... 



MATE VALl'E OF PERM US (ill.lNTi'.II IN HKl'TK.MKKH 
1912. 

:.* 








it: 



> * • • •••'.•• 



^7.150 
102,ii30 
21,450 
27.OS0 
SO, 18 ■ 
■10,209 



168. I U ii 

2,140,018 

219, MB 

64.640 

21,750 

207,475 

&«,2j0 

M.250 

2».'''7i 

.503 

241,276 

. 5»,«26 

, 24, m 

is.ssi 



V 26. 



llrandon 

I'll^ary .4,170,500 



Dnuphln 

filtlmonton 

Fort William 

l.fililirldKo •■■ 

Medicine Hat ., 

Mm.KC JaW 

Nanalmo ...........;....... 

Neliion .....«, 

New ^Vestmlnstrr 

North nattlefortl ., 

Oak Bay 

Port Arthur . 

Prince Albert 

Red Deer 

Reglna - 

st Konlfaco 

Sa:«kil'"Vi 

Vnni'ouver 

virtorla •■••. 

Winnipeg »p< 

Total 21 Eastern cltlee 
Total 2 2 Weetern cities 

Tol a i East and West . 

Kamloopg 

Point Orey 

South Vancouver ' 

Swift Current 

WVyblll'n 

Vorkton 



17.300 
2.023.076 
210.000 
264, 186 
513.1S0 
572.0^5 

10-.300 

14.46* 
101.035 
121,1166 
114,499 

43.700 
iH, 

!8,600 
631. Jin 

80.000 

3f>3.905 

1.670, :ti>5 

■427. i It 

1.728.250 



. .* 7,174.785 ■ 
. . 13.262,01» 

. .120,436,804 
80,500 

17 

162,605 

62.406 

i. 69.4 50 



1911, 
19.460 

. | ;. |0 

M7S 

| -, ..." 

20,400 

771.200 

!'.4,U3 

;;..-. " 

1,167.876 

277,275 

S8.!«51 

6,000 

- 104/'75 

26.000 

>.600 

I8.65Q 

1,904 B CO 

82,010 

4 2,126 

33,660 

16,020 
901.210 

411.790 

147,600 

57.620 

174.500 

181.910 

21.225 

20,620 

84.185 

72.S25 

86,950 

75,550- 

147,600 

17.2 50 

426,700 

143.215 

.1.10.950 

1.7.16.568 

4 0'i. 195 

X,5S8VBO0 

4,933,768 
S. Oil. 683 

.'5.151 



Inc. 
$ 7,700 

17.730 

21,775 

13.nm> 

J&.&50 

•161,000 

18.6 60 

*S9,»«li 

12,4»0 

988,1(2 

•6J.460 

•34,314 

16. 7 5 

102.600 

31,200 

64.760 

10,0 5 

1.017,753 

158.265 

10,200 

•9,5:i6 

*0',«»o 

3,267,160 

. 14,000 

1.611,8*6 

6'. :. 10 

166,666 

388, 6S0 

390,115 

•4,925 

•6.1 70 

16.S60 

49,130 

77,649 

•31,850 

I O!,!G0 

11,260 

106.510 

•63. .15 

32.965 

•166,173 

•800.860 

2.241.017 
5.220.336 

37,101,863 



Per c 



ent. 
39.6 
20.8 

05.0 
95.8 

3S.0 
34.4 
15.1 
S6.3 
20.7 
88.5 
85.0 
97.6 
24.8 

J J. J 

53.4 
94.2 
20.6 
28.6 



136.3 
361.7 

391.4 

12 3 

170.9 

194.1 

214. 4 
2 3.2 

U.I 

20.0 

67.4 

809. t 

42.1 

112.7 

65.2 

24. S 

44.1 

9.9 

9.5 

5.2 

33.2 

45.4 
64.9 

57.5 



Yorkshire Society.— A general meet- 

{Ptf will be held at the office ot the un- 

I'wHRSigned on Tuesday 5th, at 8 p.m. 

All Yorkahlre folk invited. W. Q. Win- 

terburn, Hon. Secretary. » 



LIQUID 
SULPHUR 

The World's Best Remedy 

< l BBS 
(theumatism, Eczema, Mtomacli and Kidney 
• Trouble?, and all skin Diaeacaea, 

BETTER HEALTH 
Means better business, better homes, more 
comfort and happiness. 

Liquid Sulphur Baths Mean 
Be ter Health 

Cost about 2 He each, and are equal to any 
Sulphur Springs In the world. 

Liquid Sulphur tones up the entire 
system. t'sed Internally, In conjunction 
with the baths, cures all ailments caused 
by Impure blood, poor circulation and 
stomach troubles. 

Can Be Taken on Sugar If Yoj 
Prefer 

CSB KATIKK'S OWN REMEDY 

For eala at your druggist 

Price 50c per Bottle 

Den-are of cheap Imitations. 
-Prepared only by . 

Chace & JacKson 

VANCOUVER, H. C. 



Grand total .: 821.087,644 

• | ... • 

AITROXIMATI'-. VAI.IK OK PKItMI TS 

CltJ 

llcrlln » 387.918 

Hrantford 915,020 

Chatham 1611.520 

li.ilt 308,707 

Halifax 404,236 

Hamilton I.6JS.100 

Kinsston 4 10,17.. 

U>ndoa S08.188 

MtUeoneuve ..; 2 182,728 

.M..ntreul 13.:t27.1!i4 

Ottawa »,»*s,7B<) 

I'.'i . Thorough 840.890 

rr<'5t.ni 84)8,760 

St. Catharines 710. 2S5 

St. John 465. 751 

Stratford 323. 

Sydney 537,061 

Toronto 22,24o,3SS 

Westmount 1.499.298 

Windsor 680,718 



ISSl KI) I 1KST NINE MONTIIH 



1911 
t 111 

191 

91 

341 
.'14 
3.549 
I 
730 
' 
1 1 , I 1 9 
3,197 
314 
225 
23 
32 3 
98 
45? 
IK, 60S 
1,11 
665 



318 
.805 

.is: 1 

900 
240 

,6 30 
.086 

S.M 
..;•.! 

a 

6 50 
320 

,875 

,300 
200 

.0 32 
912 

,655 
471 
790 



Hrandon 

i 'alfcary 

1 lauphin 

I'Min.mt.iii 

F'.rt William . . . . 

I.etlihrlrtire 

Medicine Hat . .. . 

M" .•!■<> .lew 

Nanalmo 

Nelson 

New Westminster 
North Ilnltlef.it ,1 

Onk Bay 

Port Arthur 

Prince Alhert . . . . 

Red Deer 

Rcirlni 

st Boniface 

Saskatoon 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

\\ Imtlpejr 



801, 
16,8(1, 

120, 

12.27 1 

2,781 

1.113 

1,419 

4.10S 

246 

250 

1.414 

790 

i 1 1 

S60 

1,828 

310 

5.15 t 



1,000 
7,059 



6.158 
11.026 



877 

tit 

.175 
112 
9 50 
■oiS 
317 
555 
772 
7 65 
113 
046 
00S 
179 
900 
080 
689 
,107 
.350 
.0(17 
.705 
.860 



Total 20 Knstern cities 
Total 22 Western cities 

Totnl Enst and West 

Weston ( 5 mo's. ) 

K 8 rnloopn 

Wetland 

Point Grey 

south Vancouver 

Pwlft Current 

Wevhurn 

Vorkton 



. J53.701.53'! 
. 96.1A8..186 



8*0,1*9 

l n,M7n,:i7<. 

,i .':.:. 
1.638 
i,.'s:t t i60 

863.315 
619,687 

J 376.429 
147.861 
148.080 
911.477 
224.950 
839,252 
617,136 
864.945 
210,920 

4,268,370 
4 1.476 

4.043.641 
13.559.270 

2, 604.1MB 
16,600.500 

»4?. 849, 762 
86,086,877 



Inc. 

I 58,600 

4 16,: 15 

7S.0SS 

137,886 

94.407 

1,078.770 

lh'l.3t.3 
166,337 

1,120,70 

1,907,984 

761.100 

26.670 

16,876 

472.925 

142.550 

226,726 

77.140 

3,731,728 

356.827 

114,923 

•178.252 
5. 000, .MS 
S7.S",0 
8,735,929 
1,498.790 
250,64 8 
1,869.630 



Per c 



eni 

17. 

8 3. 

85. 

37. 

44. 

30. 

78. 

22. 
105. 

16. 

34. 

8. 

8. 

199. 

44. 
2 30. 

16. 

20. 

31. 

20. 



Grand tots! 
•Derreasp 



.3149.872,917 

81.000 

418.343 

211.221 

2.546.848 

2.200.000 

620.988 

638,650 

666.108 

.1157. 270, 04* 



8108, 236,639 



1.SS2.126 

98,91 1 

107.688 

802.636 

5 6 6,005 

528,756 

313,044 

968.955 

00,760 

886,319 

61,032 

3.010.700 

•837.1 73 

8,664.580 

1.626,350 

11 1.164.770 
80, 431, 80S 

J4t.636.278 



18.2 

4 6.0 

287.S 

246.9 

116.8 
29.0 

340.1 
80.6 
66.9 
75.2 
6 5 .1 

261.2 

155.9 
57.2 

113.3 

4 7.3 

20.7 

6.2 

74.3 

6.1 

136.5 
9.2 

2 6.2 
46.4 

38.6 



To investors 



AN ATT»ACTrWTB BUSINESS 

PBOPESTT 1ST NAJf A1MO. B. C, 

OFFERED FOB SALE 

In orrVer to close an Instate the 
Trustees thereof ask for Tenders 
for tho purchase of first class 
property In the centre of the 
business section of Nanalmo, now 
rapidly IncronsInK In value and 
offering a jrood return, to In- 
vestors. 

The property has 62% feet on 
Commercial street, on -which 
there la erected a two-storey 
brick buildlnfr with basement, be- 
lnfr 3 2 Va In width by 70 feet in 
depth, now occupied as a Drusf 
and Stationery Store, and also 
two-storey brick building: having 
a frontage of 30 feet by a depth 
of r.O feet, nml OOCUpled by :i 
Tailoring- Kstablixhment. The 

property Is desirable in every 
way, and will repay Investigation, 
and la offered subject to existing 
leases. 

The highest or any tender not 
necessarily accepted. 



For further particulars apply to 

Dominion 
Trust Company, Ltd. 



Victoria, B. C. 



WE'VE MOVED 

To 1702 Quadra Street 

At the Corner of Fisguard 
FRESH VEGETABLES DAILY 

HONG YUEN & CO 



170a Quadra Street 



. .. . «njft\ 



*— ?* 



Phone 415a 

III li 11 'iii»«e— a*S»ett 



66D99 



B 



Standa for BltTtHBB, and you 
should J4M»t aee them at Hall'a. 
Hair brushes, tooth brushes, all 
sorts and slxea of brushes, but 
all aorxl and all moderately 
priced. 



At HALL'S 

The Central Drug Store 
Phone tfoi 702 Yites St. 



Limited, 814 

Phone 1030. 



Sayward Building. 



Tine* ucre-. of nice, rich bottom land 
oa main Saanleli road, under a 
high Htato of ouitlvaUtm. '•■• i 
loam; an Ideal vugem-blu garden; 
$750 per acre. Terms U cash, bal- 
ance 1, - and 3 years. British 
Canadian Home Builders. Limited, 
room 313. Suyward Buildings 
B hone 1030. 



Sound Investment — Purchase shares 
In British Canadian Home Builders 
while you can at $1.25 per share. 
In addition to profits from our 
liuIldliiK Department, the Real Es- 
tate and Insurance Department con- 
tribute to the dividends on Boms 
Builders' shares. Send for pros- 
pectus; It will Interest you. 




BUILDERS 



Keal Kstate Department 
Members Victoria Real Estate Ex- 
change 
Agents. Royal Insurance Company. 
Third Floor, Say ward Bldg. 
Phono 1030 
Ernest Kennedy, Managing Director 



James Bay 

Corner 

Bargain 

The southwest corner ' of 
Superior and Menzies St., 
opposite Parliament Square. 
This property is 90x55, and 
is specially well, situated for 
business and apartment 
purposes. It is also the 
only corner at the junction 
of these streets do the mar- 
ket. It can be purchased 
at a very reasonable price 
and on very easj terms. 

. v > v 
I have also a list of choice 

James Bay properties, in- 
cluding a number of resi- 
dences, and at absolutely 
the lowest prices quoted. 

Have also an acreage 

within the 3^ mile circle 
that can be. subdivided''' and 
over double the price ob- 
tained. The terms are very 
easy. 



L. H. Ellis 

Phone 940. Room 6, Moody 

Block 

Corner Yates and Broad 



FOR SALE 

Six-room houae in half-mile circle, all 
modern convenieneea, Including- furnaos. 

r*xcs 95^00. 

Apply Ownir 
64 7 Johnson Street Pbona 7*6 



.^•aflM|^k«k^ 


SEE THAT 




DEEP 


CURVE? 


IK^^IIf 


It's the 




lens of the 


M "'ntui^l''^^hh2 ' Bu9fr 


hour. 


r-J v3QBi^H ' ^££^B i^V^' 


It* advan- 


fa 'xilMl ^T^P?^. 


tage* are 


|f%P!# 


vitally im- 
portant to 


m w 


wearers of 




El*—. 


^ FRANK GLUWVTON 


OPTICIAM 




AM rmtm •*., Owr. XM« 





*r- — -.■■•«■ « ■»*» 



-fi»*»p, -I y» . i 



Sunday, Nuvtmbor 3, 1812 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



If You Don't Come Monday 
You Will Be Too Late 



For Trent Street and Foul Bay Road 
Snaps You Must Hurry. We still have a 
number of the block of lots we placed on the 
market two days ago. They are large and 
level, are backed by a lane, have all modern 
conveniences, and are but a hop-stcp-and- 
jump from the street car. Prices arc from 

$1,100 to $1,500 

Terms, one-fourth cash, balance 6, 12, 18 
and 24 months. 

This Is Below Current Values 



■ ■ - 






ADVICE TO SPEAKERS 

M*. X. *■ ton, M. »., Delivers u 

Address Before the MoflKU 

lAfmrj Soolety 



*m*??m 



Island 






?>.-' 




Agents for the Pacific Coast fbe lutunuiee -Co* 
Sayward Block , Phone 1494. 

branches:, go-30 Charing Crnsa Road. LoMtott. 



Rraqf 



Epg ; 



431 Homer Street, Vancouver. 



FOUR PROFITS 

Acreage, Lots 
Building 
Insurance 




British Canadian Home Builders, JLtd. 
purchased a tract of land on the Wilkinson 
road, three and a half miles .from Victoria, 
with a station of the B. C. Electric joining 
the property, some time ago at one-half the 
price the same land could be purchased for 
today. This tract is known as Altadena, and 
is the most attractive in the district, in addi- 
tion to having unexcelled transportation V< 
cil'ities. We purpose building bungalows 
on this tract and selling them on easy 
terms. Everyone knows the profits to be 
derived from purchasing desirable acreage 
close in, subdividing same and building 
homes for cash, and selling on easy terms. 
50,000 shares are now offered for the purpose 
of building these houses, and may be pur- 
chased at Si. 25 each, one-third cash, balance 
six and twelve months. 

This company is at present paying divi- 
dends at the rate of 10 per cent. Buy now 
and participate in the large profits which 
are assured. 

Send for Prospectus, and Free Map 



BUILDERS' 
PROFITS 



BANKERS' 
SECURITY 



BRITISH CMHH BUILDERS 



L.IIV1 ITtD 



riionci. 
1030 »nd 3231 



rhonm 
1080 and Si 31 



Authorized Capital, $500,000 

312-315 Sayward Building, and Trounce Avenue 

KRXKST KKXNKDY, Managing Director 
Agents Royal Insurance Company, Liverpool, England 



Y. M. G. A. Night School 

SPECIAL COURSES — Advertising, salesmanship, short- 
hand, typewriting, English for foreigners, mechanical draw- 
ing, advanced mathematics. Also elementary, commercial 
and boys' classes. 

See Educational Secretary, 
Phone 3980 Blanchard and Vi^w 
REGISTER BEFORE NOV. 1. 1011. 

ft) -> * • i.y-iM,' W | > li WW '.-/«. ' | > s um »M i n 



•Public SpeaKlm;" was the subject 
of woine very practical advice which 
Mr. H. B. Am«t, M. P. for St. Antolne, 
gave to the literary. Society of MoQlll 
University at the McUill Union, nays 
The Montreal Gasette. The public 
speaker, he said, would do well to' bear 
In mind that public upeaking was mere- 
ly an enlargement of private conversa- 
tion, a man who could convince a 
friend in, any private argument should 
be able to carry an audience with 
him, provided he remembered two 
thiiiRa. to keep the subject of his 
speech plainly before lilm In all he 
said, and to express himself lucidly. 
Bafore dealing with any topic In pub- 
lic it was always well, especially for 
young speakers, to so over the ground 
before- hand, and in this preparation, 
the speaker should first gain all the 
Information he could dealing with his 
subject, he should then select the par- 
ticular pointB he wished to'ft make, 
choosing out the facts that were like- 
ly to help liim in making them, and 
finally he should arrajige them In logi- 
cal sequence and as tellingly as pos- 
sible. Speakers should beware of mak- 
ing .unnatural gestures, .or of model- 
W:vMQm4tf\*i closely on ' some 
one else tl^*** heard speak. It 
should always be the weaker'* »lm to 
put tola ca«e tt> *ueb a -way fhf t tha 

. audience . jHom^^mJ^^m^^y' 

this reason U w*. ££l fc* the «*•**•* 

to attempt to vMMfammSH*^ fop 
this, would * e«*ctlvily prevent bis 
words train <»mlaf - 




An informal dabat* was ; i«t«Wrwards 
held on the subject of the Panama 
Canal Treaty. .li*;*|MMi ~Wi*** *e* 
remarks on the subject; without com- 

■jaatttlng hlm s ti f t o t he expression <>£•**■ 
opinion. It was Important, he said, to 
consider what was the spirit of the 
parties who signed the treaty. It was 
a debated point whether the shipping 
of the United States would get no par- 
ticular benefit from the canal, In com- 
parison to that of other nations, if 
their shipping had not the advantage 
in the payment of dues, and the point 
must be considered whether or notthe 
signers of the treaty really believed 
that the United States would gain an 
advantage from the use of the canal. 
In any case. He hoped the matter 
would be referred to The Hague Con- 
vention. In the event of the United 
States refusing this arbitration, when 
It came to the signing of other 
treaties, other nations would take ex- 
tra precautions Mn framing their de- 
mands. Treaties would become a. mat- 
ter, of even greater difficulty than they 
are now in international politics, If it 
were possible for one nation to gain an 
advantage Uy sharp practice. 



ROYAL MINT 



One Hundred and Twenty Million Coins 
Turaefi Out in a Teax 



LONDON". Nov. 2. — People who at 
times find themselves short of money 
will be reassured to hear that the royal 
mint last year made nearly 121,000,000 
coins. This comforting fact appears In 
the annual report of the deputy master 
of the mint. Issued this week. 

in 1911 jthere were "struck" at the 
dingy looking treasure cavern on Tower 
Hill the following coins for Great 
Britain: 





Number 


1'ace value 




of coins. 


of coins. 


Gold . . . 


. :iB,l4S,211 


' 1165,66 1,1 10 


Silver . . 


. ■13,935,469 


11.S06.230 


l ironic . 


. 4.0,846,848 


- " 701.625 



Total ,120,980,518 $178,271,895 

In addition, 25,161,361 coins were 
struck for the colonics. A year's crop 
of "coppers" is a heavy lump in the 
nation's pocket, f.pr the $701,525 worth 
coined 'in 1911 was made up of 240H 
tons of pence, 71V4 tons of half-pence, 
and 15 Ms tons of farthings. Scarce as 
the farthinR appears, over 5^4 millions 
were struck. 

i The royal mint brooks nt rivals, and 
one almost hears a cliuckle of satisfac- 
tion as the report mentions that In 
1 :• 1 1 some 1.710 counterfeit coins were 
taken possession of by the police, 
twenty-seven persons were convicted of 
making counterfeit coins, fifteen pos- 
sessing moulds, etc., and twenty-four 
for '"uttering" or possessing counterfeit 
coins after previous convictions. 



"** \ 



A Thief's Mistake 

PARIS, Nov. 2. — A remarkable theft 
took place here when Important docu- 
ments connected with the recent fail- 
ure of the Bank of 10t?ypt at Alexandria 
were stolon. The thief seems to have 
been, however, of the ordinary class of 
luggage lifters, and the documents have 
.happily been recovered. When the 
Bank of Ei^ypt failed In September last 
year, Messrs. Russell, Harris and Com- 
pany, of Londob. were appointed by the 
British government to examine the 
books of the bunk, and sent out an 
agent to Alexandria.' to bring back the 
necessary documents. The agent ar- 
arrlved In Paris on Friday morning, 
and on bla way out his taxi-cab had dis- 
appeared with Ills lugKaKe and paper*. 
The driver, who was subsequently 
found and Interrogated, stated that 
while waiting outside the shop a man 
whom he took to be his original cus- 
tomer entered. the cab and ordered him 
to drive to the Gara du Nord. On Sat- 
urday a larse packet containing the 
missing papers was found behind the 
street <loo# of a house In the Rue Uaf- 
fltte with a note attached to the effect 
that the thief had made a mistake. Tbe 
agent's private baggage, however. Is 
(Still ml**lng, 



* 



!' ' 



'.!. ' 



J'i'VW .* 



-.-.'. -.■AhsiiSij 



■''*■»■■■ 



v 

Don't make an engagement for Mon- 
day, November 4, 8 p. m.; the Rev. G. 

>B. Berry, of Plymouth, Knirland: lec- 
turer for the Imperial British Israel 
Association, will submit ample evi- 
dence In proof of "our Identity with 
God's ancient people, Israel," which 
will throw much light from the pro- 
Kurope and the near east Meeting la 
Europe and the far east. Meeting in 
St. Jbha's- aehoolroom, off Douglas 

Wfflffli w « la *— ** f" . jCaHoctlanfor 
ai'Pense*. • 



^ 



THIS IS MOST LIKELY JUST 
THE PROPERTY YOU WANT 







. 





Handy to carline, magnificent 
view, excellent soil, cheap and 

easy terms 

Only 33 Lots, So Hurry! 

"Cedarvale" goes before the public tomorrow, and as there are just 33 lots in 
the property, practically all of them excellent building sites, right in the dis- 
trict, that is demanding attention at present, it is very probable that there 

will not be. many of them left a week hence. 

"Cedarvale" offers you an excellent opportunity to make a first-class , invest- 
ment in property that is rapidly enhancing in value. You can do it with a 
small outlay and on exceptionally easy payments. You will own a residential 
lot of the finest type, fit for almost any home, and affording unusually good 

soil for garden or lawn. 

"Cedarvale" is on the' 3-mile circle— comparatively close to the city centre as 

distances go now — it is only six minutes' walk from the end of the Mt. Tolmie 

car line and only three minutes from church and school. 

"Cedarvale" lots measure 50 x 125 feet; they are invariably level, with deep, 
rich soil and very little brush. There are several groves of fine oak shade trees 
on the property, and a part of the subdivision is planted in healthy and valu- 
able fruit trees. 

"Cedarvale" commands a nice view of Mt. Douglas and Mt Tolmie and the 
lovely valley. It is in a very desirable residential section. 

StartingPriccs,Only $400 a Lot 

$50 DOWN— $15 A MONTH— OR ARRANGE YOUR OWN TERMS 

MOTORS AVAILABLE AT ANY TIME OF THE DAY— BE ON HAND EARLY 

AND PICK THE LOT YOU WANT 



THE 



Home Builders Investment Co., Ltd. 



Phone 1769 



734 Fort Street 



■ i 






sT 



>■ i h^ i wi i MWIUM I H I 



■y j j . gii T''" ' ""J i S'' 1 "' ' '"' y ^y*** 







12 



VICTORIA DAli.* %JU1AJMBX 



Sunday, N»vimb#r 3, 1912 




PHOENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED, OK LONDON. ENO. 



Burdette Avenue 



Fairfield— Best Part 



Just off Douglas street. 60x120. Quarter cash, balance 1, 2 Chester Avium, large modern dwelling and lot 78x130. One- 
and 3 years at 7 per cent. Price p-er front foot 1600 third cash, balance at 7 per cent. Price 114,500 




Oak Bay 



Victoria Ave., 53.7x120, together with 8 room new and mod- 
ern dwelling-. Price $6300 

Third cash, balance 1, 2 and 3 years. 



Fairfield Estate 

Moii St., 90x120, close to Richardson. Price SjMiiOO 

Third cash. 



Splendid Home 

MoClure Street, west of Vancouver, 70x130, with modern 5- 
room cottago; well rented. Price $12,000 




:m§ - 



Quarter cash, balance 1, 2 and 3 years. 



mm 



B. C. Land and Investment Agency, Limited 

tv PHONE 125 



VRRNMENT* STOEElr 



« Ira 






Backing 



Property offered for immediate sale 
at a price considerably below what ad- 
cent land has already been sold for. 



Price and particulars on application. 

PEMBERTON & SON 




Situated close to the sea and only one block from the car line; exceptionally 
well built ij/i-storey bungajow, containing drawing-room, dlhing-rootn, kitchen, 
hall, pantry, glass porch, three bedrooms, toilet, ball), full basement, furnace, two 
open fireplaces. Grounds are fenced and have splendid flower beds, shrubs, etc. 

Price $7,500 on Favorable Terms 



P. R. BROWN 



Phone 1076 • P. O. Box 428 

Fkcl^iM^^W^M:- Money to Loan 1112 Broad Street 

Member Vic^pria, Real Estftte Excfc^ge 

SUS 







&&■ — 



m — 







Now assured of adequate 
street car transportation by 
extension of "Uplands" line. 

In a few weeks cars will be 
running and "Highlands" prices 
will be certain to advance, 
time to "get In" is now. 

MAGNIFICENT VIEW 
LOTS 

selling at from 

$850.00 

each and up 

You Have Your Choice of Terms. 
One-tenth cash and oni' ■! 

quarterly. 
One-fifth cash, balance 6, 12. IS 

21 and 30 months. 
One-fourth cash, balance 1, 2 

and 3 years. 
Motors Beady "Whenever You Are 



B NSON & WINSL0W 

Fhone 2154 1203 Douglas Street 



— — 



GeorgeMe 

Real Katate, 



%t * 



Boom 8. Promt* Blk., 1006 Govt, St. 

*. o. boi ait. Mmm mo. 

TODAY'S 8KAPH— OAK BAT 

i*t0M80, fine Jot. l*i 

*?L: .JS? f-f ca.h, balance 
6. 1ST 18. Price .$1680 

Ho»n, aoxll2, two lots, 11 cash, bal- 

aiw 6, 12, 13. Price $3:200 

NORTH END CITY 

Quadra near Tolmle, 54x143, 1-3 cash 

balance 6, 12, 18. Price $1050 

PABKDALK 
Seaton and Cre»«e, corner. 1-3 cash, 

balance 6, 12, 18. Price $750 

Beaton and Sims, corner, 1-3 cash, 

balance 6, 12, 18. Price $750 

Reg-loo, fine lot, 1-3 cash, balar. 

12 18, Price $700 

Cadillac, $300 cash, 6, 12, 18.... $650 




BEAUTIFUL 
HOMESITE 

Over ono acre, nicely treed with 
oak and evergreen, good view of 
mountains and water. Ope and 
three-quarter mile circle. 

A g-enmne bargain at $3,600 

Ella & Stewart 

102-103 Hamley Bldg. - 



Down's Realty Co. 



T g ftuUB 4 033 



berton Bltt. 



For Quick Sale, Close to Beacon mil 
Park — 8-room house, all modern 
with garage. A beautiful homo; 
$6500. Terms arranged. 

Victor St. — Fine grassy lot. 60x1110; 
1-3 cash, 6, 12, 18 $1100 

Hurnside Road — 2 lots, 60x146; 1-3 
or M cash, 0, 12, 18 $1500 

Emma St.— Pine lot, 50x130; 1-3, 8, 
12, IS $1200 

Obed Ave. — Let 50x120; 1-S, «, 13, 
18. A good buy ...$750 

South Saanich — 83 acres excellent 
soli; large sea front. See us for 
terms. 



Double Corner, St; l.ulle and Cran- 
mi.r,- NlreetH, Oak Bay district. 
11)4x115; this is cheap at $3250 

Irmn ulreet, ono lot on easy terms 
$1075 

We have (he most beautiful home- 
site In Durlelth, 120 feet water- 
front by 240 feet deep. 
•' Price $15,000 



. 



Leeming Bros.L- 



524 Fort Street. 



Phone 748. 



: _■ ; 



Have You Ever Heard of 
A "Dunford'' Bungalow 

You, no doubt, have, for they are widely recognized as the best built and 
most comfortable homes of their size. We have , .. 

ONLY ONE LEFT 

And it is a magnificent little place. Stands on a lot 50x129, Forbes 

street. Has five rooms and is strictly modern. It is the last of a 'batch 

of houses "we have recently finished and can be had on very easy terms. 

Price is only 84,000 net. Why not have us sbow it to you? 

Wm. Dunford & Son, Ltd. 



Phone 2315. 



INVESTMENT SPECIALISTS 

231, 232, 233 Pemberton Block. 



Here Is a Good Buy 

PANDOBi STREET— Only 300 feet east ot Cook street, new ten-room 
housr-, concrete foundation with full basement, concrete floor, laundry 
tubs, furnace and very nicely finished. $2,000 cash, assume mortgage 
7 per cent, balance 1, 2 and :1 years. Price only $8,500 



Members Victoria Real Estate Exchange. 
Baywara Block, around Floor. 



Phone 2964. 



JAMES 
BAY 

This district '"»•< many large 1m- 
provemrnt* In vIpw, anil I ran offer 
Mttlta ••xceptlonnll.v H"t I>".vh In M 
at the present time. 

A Double <'omer on Paved Street*, 

near Dallas rtoad for $7500 

A Full 8l*ed JTJpt on Kingston Street 

near Oovernmcnt Hulldlngn and prn- 
posed new C. P. R. block. .. $7000 

A Mnntf end I>ot on Michigan be- 
tween Montreal and St. I.awrenrp 
$7500 



A.W.Bridgman 

Bridgman Building 

1007 Government St. 

Real Estate Loans 

Insurance 



To Real Estate Agents 

For Best Results Advertise in 
i The Colonist 



Salt 
Spring 
Island 



60 acres, 20 neron cleared, fenced, 
good barn, never falling stream of 
pure water run* through full length 
of property. This property has over 
one-quarter of a mile frontage on 
Hooths Canal, and Is only Hi miles 
from Ganges. Price $5,000; termj 
J 2,000 cash, balance arranged. 



Gavin C. Mouat 

Gangen 



Cheap 

JLjyJ Lu 

Charlton Road, near Richmond, BOX 
120 $1,200 

Foul Bay Road, near Fort St., 50x 
140. A snap $1,450 

Laurel 8t., near^entral. 60x132 $1,350 

Hnrton St., near Hillside Ave., 40x120 
■. ... $H50 

Kdgcware Road, »ear Hillside. BOX 
230 ?. ., $1,400 

McNeill Ave., opposite Monterey. BOx 
lit $1,500 

All good buys. 



Grubb & Letts 



Central Buildlngf. 



Gorge 

Austin Ave. — 64x2.15. Price $1,250 

i'arkdale — High and dry lot. Price 

$525 

IfilNldc Ave. — HtWSe and lot. ("ash 

$400, bal. rent. Price $8,000 

Pembroke Ht. — Two high and dry 

lots, 50x14 1. Price $»,200 

AtKEAliK sriTAIII.K. FOR »l "»- 
DIVISION , 

W. Crow & Co. 

Real Estate Brokers, Financial Agents 

Inniiran^e and Imm 

G»re»oho Hlorlc, 732 Vales Street 



Don't Delay, Buy 

io ACRES AT COWICHAN, ONE MILE ONLY 

FROM STATION 

One acre in clover, all practically cleared. All 
good land. 

$2,000, ON EASY TER1 





For sale by 

A. von Girsewald 

REAL ESTATE 

Corner Fort and Quadra Streets 

P. O. Box 900 Phone 2926 



9/4 Acres 

OVERLOOKING "EI.K LAKE" 

And well protested from cold wind 
by Saanich LlttlB Mountain. There 
is a house and a number of out- 
buildings: chickens, ducks, an In- 
cubator and house; 300 apple, pear 
and plum trees; on main road, 
$9,000 



A. Toller &Co. 

004 TATEg STBSXT. 



ALVENSLEBENS 

FARM LANDS 

These 20-acre tracts are a sure, safe investment, as adjoin- 
ing acreage is being held at double the price we are asking. 
Kirst-class agricultural land. No rock. 

Only 930.00 per acre Any Reasonable Terms 

Have you read Alvensleben's Daily Gazette on Page Six? 
Phone 2445 Call cr Phone 639 Fort Street « 



-■ X- 



Building Lots, Oak Bay 

Pleasant Ave., near Brighton $1750 

Saratoga, corner St. David $3000 

St. Patftfck St., 2 lots. Each $1575 

LOTT, MALIN & CO., 

118-119 Fembc-rton Block 
Members Victoria Real Estate Exchange. 



The Building of the Breakwater 

Will enhance values of all adjacent property, nuy before this advance. We huve 
s real ijargaln on St. CiftWTMlM street. 100 yarde only from waterfront, right In 
the centre of developments, 30x120, with cottage rented at $2*. 

rrlce $7,000. Easy terms. 



C. F. de Salis, Roberts & Co., Ltd. 



Hornee Block. Fort Street 



Phone 8S6 



Very Cosy Linden Avenue Home 

This house i.- -ituated a block and a half from the sea and 
half a Mock from the car. Street payed and boulevarded. 
Has seven spacious rooms, finished with the best of material. 
Built-in buffet, bookcase and several fireplaces. Full-sized 
basement, cemented, with furnace installed. 

PRICE $7,500 

On Terms 

BRUBAKER & MEHAREY 

Members Victoria Real Estate Exchange 
Phone 3308 Merchants' Bank Building 



LINDEN AVENUE 

CLOSE TO TEE FABK AND CAB. 

A new and commodious residence, containing dining room, with built- 
in buffet, chlffonit-r. 1 tc., drawing room, cosy don with cupboards, fire- 
place, etc., kitchen, pass pantry, scullery, lofty basement with furnace, 
.stationary tubs. Upstairs, four bed and two dressing rooms, bath room. 
Lot 50x1^0. 

PRICE $8000. TERMS 



STEWART LAND CO., Ltd. 

101-2 Pemberton Block, Victoria, B.C. 
P.O. Box 575 Phone 1381 



0/ 



A Beautilul Home at Foul Bay 

Thin delightful nix-roomed house la situated clo»e to the car and beach. 
A full aire cement basement, stationary washtubs, piped for furnace, 
walls all tinted, Electric Light fixture*, dining room panelled, built- 
in buffet, large reoeptlon hall, panelled, splendid bathroom, "cement 
aldewalks'. beautiful lawn, expensively fenced. Lot 6«xli6. Price, on 
excellent term* f 3500 



R. H. DUGE 

Phone 304 ««3 Douglai St. 



The Daily 
Colonist 



British 
Columbia's 
Leading 
Newspaper 



J 

The Best 
Advertising 

Medium 

i . 



Victoria 
West 



AjrNOTmOEMXUrT— LHTIII 



Half a block from Runnel Station, 
In the centre of progressive activ- 
ity. 110x112 ft, with a good •- 
room house. 

Only $10,500 

|2,500 cash, balance 1, 1 and I 
years. 



Grubb & Letts 

206-t Central •utMUW. 



"■*■» 



i. '. .•::■= LH-iMitiiiti 



. . .• :. 



,.,,..^,.;-^.,..; ..■■■ - * ■■ '- ■■-■■■ ..:-^..- ■■^--.^^■■^^.u.^.^,: ..:.^^ : ... .*.,::.■■ - ■:^ M -:ht.iJm ,:...^.: ^-^l 



Sunday. Novc-riber .<, "ly;* 



v lUl U it l A 1 ) Al L V CO I A)JN 1ST 



13 



SHAWNIGAN FARM 

Seventeen and one-half acrW 6i first-class land, abotft ten acres finder culliva- 
tioh as vegetable garden, also several trait trees in good condition. The balance of 
the land is <n>ud and has some second growth fir and hemlock on it. 

A good two-storey, eleven roomed hpuse, also If^ge ham, new chicken house 
and Chinaman's house. Good water SUppl) from a well. 

This farm has frontage on the E. & X. Railway and the main trunk road, 

Price $6,500.00 



R. S. 



Phone 30 




620 Fort St. [% 

J- if-i ■'" ^WiS» War' *$*!*'•*&} ' ■ ■■'■ ' 

. *'?l«0iRBiil fistat* 




Est. 1890 



, 



— — ■ 



:T 



jmmmymm mmm- 




YOU 



OWN A LOT 



WEI: 



PLAN TO SUIT 
ild to Please 

'urnish the Cash for 



YOU 



- • i 1 1 i 



Morris & Edwards, Building & Investment Co. 

Phone 3074 213 Sayward Block 

City Agents for Los Angeles Fire Insurance. 

v — X 



H iii M iwi ufr 



OTICE is hereby given that the 
partnership heretofore existing 
under the firm name of Stuart & 
has been dissolved by mutual co 
sent. The business will be carried on 
Fred W. Reeves, who has assumed all lia- 
bilities, ar^l to whom all debts owing are to 
be paid. 





if 



FRED. W. REEVES 



**>f-K' 



^.isfjunajn. 



mMmmtiim 



XT*^, 



Absolutely the Cheapest Double 
Corner in Oak Bay 



Corner of Burdick and Musgrave Streets, Cadboro Heights. 
Close to "Uplands" and the new car line. Easy terms. 

Price ...... ... • - • f ' • • -?3000 

Get particulars from us today. 



m—* 






— *— 




FOUR LARGE LOTS ON 
HERON STREET 

With good substantial 



house. Grounds lie very 
high, with splendid view of 

out in good fruit trees. Near 
the Uplands. Car on next 

street 




.■ •'•■... 

See us about this at once 



Heisterman, 
Forman & Co, 

Money to ' Loan 
i2i2 > "BToad Street 




other 

4— 



SHAW REAL ESTATE 

Members Victoria Real Estate Exchan«| 
Phone 1094 302 Pemberton Building 




■'IMOr St., clone to Hillside, 4 lots. 
. Each . • .•'.,; $2,000 

tot, 60x120 ... 

fcmat ...... 

, JmStmi'- Saratoga 
lot*. Each ....... fl, 





:.. 



P. R. FLEMING 

643 View Street 
Phone 2307 



SIDNEY 



A fine Subdivision, containing six and one- 
half acres, on Beacon Avenue, five min- 
utes from wharf. • » 

Price $1500 Per Acre 

One-Third Cash, Balance 6, 12, 18 Months 



_ 



■> "' ■■■'■■ I •■*»•? -%te?f** ! 






£»vt&*; 



' \ ^ 




mMm^h*®^ 



■ A 1 




: *■ . . . . Members VMbria Stock Exchange 

■ . ; ..Members- V^tojria Real j^^'Exci^^t 



Douglas and View Streets: 



Phdne76& 



$1,250.00 

Cash purchases a six-room house in the Fairfield 
Estate, close to Fairfield road. Mouse lias full size 
basement and all modern conveniences. Lot is 57x110. 
This is a good buv at 

$5,250.00 



F'or further particulars, see 





ant <X Linenam 

to Loan. 633 Yates Street. 

Fire Insuranefe Written 



.> .u ' i.w 



■f : -i 



i i. ' » ii ii ' i 



", ' ,< ! , 








■' ■ 





■ 



— 



Between Douglas and Blanchard, $ 6 25 per front fo o t 

n» to let. 



jW-^rf 



;4t^^^0jfeSfcj 







Rents Collected 
Estates Managed 
1205 Broad Street 



ARTHUR COLES 

Real Estate, Financial and Insurance A$ent 
Manager Branch Of/ice Great West Li/a 




fortgages and 
Loans Arranged 
Phone 65 




■wtMMfjhiiMMkit* 




Corner of Cormoran^and Quadra— With dwelling house. 
block from railway station, revenue producing. Price, on 
terms to suit ' 5J521,O0O 

BALLANTINE, JENKINSON & CO. 



1219 Langley Street 



Phone 3415 



Within Vi Mile Circle 

A nice modern bungalow, 5 rooms, with one extra room upstairs. Entrance hall 
nan fin.- cobbled open ■■; living-room nnd dlnin|t-roon» burlni'i' ' 

panellnd, with plate rail; full sized husoinent; new linoleum ana blinds lnclud 
gas range already Install ad, can be bought. Prlc- $S,100] cash $1,000. balance 
arrange. Owner moving to larger home, reaaon for selling. 



WESTERN LANDS, LIMITED 

1201 Broad BtTMt, Corner of View 



. 



Get in Now 

GmrfK St., looking down Oltve st 
48x130. Bxoellent valua »i ..•i.noo 

Oxford Mt.. 60x120 to U> ft. lann. 

Fine homeslie. for *2,000 

Inlet Are., near Oorge Road, two 

ouarter arre lots. <". 1 Investment. 

*?.00(l 

North tjuaclra St., Mar Hillside. 5:x 

1H0- below market value anil for 
a few days at MJ™ 

(irsvhsme St., SlxUft. .lust right for 
a home «l.«AO 

Unit and Shrlbowrne 8ta., good oor- 
n-r. 15x110 for »*.»0O 

Plnewond Ave.. 50x120. with southern 
froirt, level and an excellent site for 
a home *1.75° 



Cameron Investment 
& Securities Co., Ltd. 



rh«» stM. 



•IS Tronnce A»e. 



7 acre* Ju«t nt Ito.rnl Oak. all cleared 
and under eiiltl\ ntlon. »127* an 

7 niCC building Iota on Tolmle Ave. 

For I he seven 8O.K0O 

1 lot on H»in|w,lilre road ?I00<) 

i lot on Douglas iinad (Victoria 

\\" r-wt > f I 100 

1 I >t on nungU* H„nd f/V*lctorla 
Wem[ ) »iooo 

13 .'ash. balance 6. 12, 18 months 
on these. 



Newman & 
Sweeney 

Corner random and Brood 8« reels. 
Tel. 3741. 



1 ■ 



Fairfield 
Estate 

Woodland. Avenue, good building 
lot, cheap. Cash $555, balance 
6, 12, 18 months. Price $1,520 
NOBTH WARD 

street between Bay and 
King's road 

PBICE $1,800 



Abbott & Sutherisiii 

Will ram Dock«j Mgr. 
5 and 6 Green Block, 1216 Broad. 
Phone 3243. Opp. Colonist Office 



Cadboro Bay 

Wall -built house on corner lot. ltL'x 
LSSl beautiful Km it'll and bearing 
fruit trees; near hotel am? aoa; 
chicken houses, etc. Only )(15,500; 
enay terms. 



C. M. Blandy 



l'hone 205.1. 



520 Say ward IShick 



Godwin & McKay 

Hew six-roomed, hoixae, Beach- 
wood Ave.. HardWoOd rioors, ce- 
1 ment Walks, »11 complete. 



Cosy New Five Boomed Bunga- 
low on Hollywood Crescent. 

only - • • • r • J|<4."iOO 

$1000 rash, balance easy. 



The House Men 



630 Yates stw 



,f 1 iriaifr-.ri.Ti 



Phone 3713. 
1 



■■'■ 



VIEW STREET 

Lot 418, opposite Spencer's, on View Street. This property- 
is exceptionally well situated and admirably adapted for a 
large up-to-date business-block, or theatre site. '^^»t 

Apply to: .i|^yp 

A. W.JONES, LTD. 

Members of the Victoria Real Estate Exchange 

1003 Broad Street. Victoria, B. a 

11 1 • 

— ' 

rrvlne Boad, roul Bay — Beautiful, new modern residence with three large 
bedrooms, each with large closet, with window, on a high level. L-ot 
^^"^afia^MpL Terms Can he arranged.' Price $5,500 

Two and One-Half Acres— Waterfrontage, close to city. Price. ... .87,500 

Ideal Waterfroiltage, Foul Bay— Three large lots, good beach. Price $»,500 
Roeebery Street— Rockland Parte, nice level lot 60x130. ......... .f 1,400 

Boaebery Street— Rockland Park, good lot. . '.. . «"»■•' ••«'*-• ***:' • V ■ ■ ■ * 1 > 360 

Toul Bay Boad — Two lots at, each $1,500 

JJuildinff Lots "Quadra Heights," price, each . v^^ * fl.soo 

David Street— Xear Jubilee hospital, good house. ?5,000 

One-Quarter Acre I.ot«— Close to car line. Terms, ?50 cash, baTance $15 
per month. Price - * 500 

w„w Three-Boom Bungalow, together with half acre, on Burnslde road. 

r , , *2.'7SO 

Price • 

1 , ■ 

McPherson & Fullerlon Bros. 

616 View Stree* Victoria, B. C. 



Qgden Point 

y % BIoclc from Brfnkwolrr 

30x135, with 5-roomed modem bun- 
galow, piped for furnaco. 
Price for 3 dt«y» only J.'OOO 

This will prove a moneymaker at 
this price. 



Gordon E. Burdick 

020 Brought on S(. 
l'hone 2ROH l'enibprlon Block 



For Sale 

MUSKRAT 

r ■■ wtll known hunter and 
lumper, gentle nn.l broken to 
Harness, can hG seen at tl,c Ex " 
hfbitton buildings. r.'irticulars 

ED. HEARD 



Oak Bay 

Avenue Corner 

$100 Per Front Foot 



Paul Edmonds 

318 Pemberton Block 



! .1 -,- 'i. rni""nai 



< ; firi.i 



Douglas St. 

Corner Douglas and Herald, with 
small cottage. 91,500 per tront 

foot on long and easy terms. 



R. B. PUNNETT 

Boom 10, TWaJion Blook 
p. O. Box 785. Vhone 1119. 



Cowichan 
Street 

OAK BAY 

Loi f.irt.xr.'in. 

Frier $1600 

T*rmS, l-S cash, balance 8, 13, IS 
monthp, 7%. 



Herman Erb 

416 Central Bldg. Phone 2092 



NKW FIVE ROOMED 

Bungalow 

VICTORIA WEST - 

Froperty S0xl40 
Price $SM0 on tfran. 

Dalby & Lawson 

■H FORT 8TRBET 



514— SOUTHWEST CORNER OF COURTNEY AND 
GORDON STREETS 

Lot 227, 60x98 feet, 70 feet from Government Street. Terms, 
$5,000 cash, $25,000 in five years, $25,000 in seven years. 
Price $75,000 



Note the easy terms,. 




, .4 v.- 



THE GRIFFITH CO. 

Real Estate and Investments — Insurance 
Rooms 5-7-9-1 1 Mahon Building, Victoria, B.C. Phone 1402 



Burnside Bargains 

Burnside Road — Two lots near new Car 
Barn. Price each, on good terms. $1500 



City Land Co., Ltd 

1 20 Pemberton Building Phone 1675 

W. T. Williams .S. C Thomson' Albion Johns 



Business Buys 

Donglaa St., double corner, 120x120. Quarter caah $18,000 

OouKlftK and KIokm Road, 110 fec-t on Klngrs Rottd. Beit to corner of Dous!a« 
si HJaay terms. Per root $800 

Oak Bay Ave., near Junction, largo corner lot. Good store or apartment »ite. 
Good terms. Price - $10,000 

C. S. WHITING 

Phone 1100. «03 Bronghton tt. 



FORT GEORGE 

Two Acre Lots, close in. $60 cash, halancc $10 per month, 

no interest ur taxes. J'Zach $300 

SPECIAL 

52 Acres, 9 miles from city, fronting on two main roads, 10 
minutes' walk from Keatings Station, all first class land, 
[2 acres in fruit, balance slashed and easily cleared, good 
well, house and outbuildings. Price for quick sale, on 
easy terms, per acre $400 



The Nechaco Valley Land Co., Ltd. 



6aio Broughton Street, 



Victoria, B. C. 



TO REAL ESTATE AGENTS. FOR 
-THE BEST RESULTS- 



( 



] 



Advertise in The Colonist 



T 



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VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, Novtmbtr 3, 1912 



• 



NOBLFMEN 



JHE NOBLEMEN'S CHARM 

"He enchants Societies — Half all men's hearts are his." 

— CYMBELINE, ACT. i, Sc. VI. 
Every grade of society admits the charm of tho 

DAVIS 

"Noblemen" Cigars 

2 FOR 25^ 

The millionaire buys ''NOBLEMEN," not because it is 
half the price of imported brands, but because "NOBLE- 
MEN" is exactly what he wants. The wage-earner buys it 
for the same reason. 

DAVIS' have bought and blended Havana Leaf, and em- 
ployed Cuban Cigar Makers for over 50 years. They know 
the business as specialists, and that is why the "NOBLE- 
MEN" Cigar has attained a greater popularity than any other 
2-for-a-quarter cigar on the American continent. , 

"NOBLEMEN" size a-for-a-quarter 
*<SONCHA FINA* size 3 for asc 

h DAVIS & SONS. LIMITED 



Montreal 

Makers of the famous "Perfection" 3-for^a-quarter Cigar 



Wm 



fc* 



m^mmtmmmmmm 



■**■#* 



GOMOX 

We are offering for 10 days only, 77.8 acres, or half of ~% 
Section 228, Township 10, Colliery right-of-way deducted. 
Close to the new No. 8 mine, and town in the making. 

The Wellington Collieries are spending something like $2,000,000 on 
this new mine and electric power plant to work It, which will be the 
largest mine operated in the Comox district, employing 1600 to 2000 men, 
who will want homes near their work — it Is expected that coal will be 
shipped inside of 9 months. 




Co/7/er/es 
Lane/ 



LOT 







/Poac/ to Courtney 2?* AfS/es 



>1 :. 

It will be 



seen from this plan that the Colliery Co. own the other 
half of this quarter section on which the mine, also saw mills, are 
situate, the latter now working, so that it is absolutely 

INSIDE PROPERTY 

And a ready sale to the miners alone for every acre when subdivided. 

Price $275 Per Acre 

Quarter cash, balance i and 2 years at 7 per cent. 



British Columbia Investments, Limited 

Vancouver Island Farms and Acreage Specialists. 
COURTENAY, B. C. PHONE 36 




Mr, Justice Martin to Consider 
Decision in Suit Brought 
Against Iroquois for Loss of 
Tug Noname 



Judgment has been reserved by Mr. 
Justice Martin in the Admiralty court 
in the action brought against the In- 
land Navigation Company of Seattle by 
the owners of thr Tug Noname for 
$37,000 damages on account of the 
sinking of the tug in collision wiih the 
steamer Iroquois off the Fraser River 
in October last year. In cross exam- 
ination, Mr. Russell Thornton, chief en- 
gineer of the Iroquois admitted that 
the steamer was travelling full speed 
in fo». The fc>last s by , the Noname and 
that vessel's appearance out of the fog 
Were practically simultaneous. The mo- 
ment he heard the blast he rang for 
halt speed and Immediately afterwards, 
for full speed astern, "I knew at ones 
that, if the. other boat did not back its 
engines, there would surely be a col- 
lision," witness observed. 

CaptBin'<^ter,'tfee^sitippeir ot ^'the Irb- 
quola at the time of the collision, who 
was helaw until Immediately hsfhrw fhs 



$10,500 

Will Purchase Property With 184.5 Feet 
Frontage on 

Foul Bay Road 

This property contains approximately one 
acre, and is situated in one of Victoria's 
finest residential districts. 

Satisfactory terms can be arranged. 

Benson & Winslow 



Telephone 2151 



T202 Douglas Street 



accident, stated, among other things, 
that there was no time to shift the 
helm or manoeuvre. Upon hearing this 
'answer Mr. Russell observed, "And yet 
you mt his lo r d shi p t o W y g that tfti 



other boat «w»n* drat to^Rort and then 
ito starboard." Witness:/*' "Bhe seemed 
to.". The Iroquois ; ya« makin«a»-*£XO^ 
lutiona— fog speed — and thai meant 14 
knots. In clear weather she made MS 
revolutions, or 15 1-2 to 16 knots. Be- 
tween Seattle and the point of collision 
she was making about 15 knots. 

In reply to further cross-examina- 
tion, Captain Carter said it would take 
428 feet to bring the Iroquois to a 
stop. She could not be stopped in less 
than two lengths. The witness would 
.not admit that it would be safer. in a 
fog to travel at seven knots an hour 
than at 14 knots. "I am satisfied," he 
observed, "that at the time of the col- 
lision she was hot doing 14 knots, or 
we should have gone right through 
her." 

N > Report From Quartermaster 

The quartermaster of the Iroquois, 
August Anderson, who was at the wheel 
at the time of the collision, stated that 
he only heard one blast, and that came 
from right ahead. At that moment he 
saw a boat on the starboard side about 
200 feet away. Half speed and then 
full speed astern were the orders. He 
thought the Noname swung to port and 
then starboard. He received no intima- 
tion from the look-out man that a ves- 
sel Was near. The first intimation was 
the blast. He admitted that the Iro- 
quois always answered her helm very 
quickly and that there was time to 
change her course. No signal was 
given by the Iroquois as to the way 
she was swinging- He could not swear 
that any signal was given when she 
reversed. 

Violated Rule 16 

Mr A. D. Taylor, in summing up for 
the defendants, the owners of the Iro- 
quois, claimed that the Noname had vio- 
lated rule 16, which says that "every 
vessel shall in a f °ff. mist, fulling 
snow or heavy atmosphere, go at a 
moderate rate of speed, having regard 
to the existing conditions. A steam 
vessel, hearing apparently forward of 
her beam the fog signal of a vessel, 
the. position of which is not ascertained, 
shall, as far as the circumstances of 
the case admit, stop her engines and 
then nax'igate with caution until dan- 
ger of a collision is over." Mr. Tay- 
lor also claimed violation of rule 23, 
which says that "every steam vessel 
which 1h ilirocted by these rules to keep 
nut of the way of another vcsk<>1 shall, 
on approaching her, if necessary, slack- 
er, iit r spi t . I, m- fjtop or reverse." In 
closing his address Mr. Taylor pro- 
duced a dins rum of the position of the 
vessels 'it the time of the collision, 
from which be endeavored to prove that 
the Noname turned first one way and 
then another, and went straight across 
the bows of the_ Iroquois. \ 

A Moderate Rate 

Mr, J. A. Raisell, for the plaintiffs, 
Captain Barberie and Messrs. .1. s. Pal- 
ti ii and Charges Johnson, claimed that 
the Noname was proceeding at a mod- 
erate rate of sped, Inasmuch as she 
was only capable of Kolns live and a 
half knots an hour against the tide 
with a scow In tow. The Noname, he 
claimed, did not swing twice, but an- 
swered her helm to the starboard as 
the rules of navigation call for when 
two vessels are appTOachtng each other 
head On, or nearly so. Mr. Kussell fur- 
ther argued tfiat any vessel was going 
at an excessive rate Of speed when a 
peSSSl COuld nol he avoided after hav- 
ing been seen. The fog, tie claimed, 
was so tli|c|< that the Noname could 
only be seen at from ir.o to 200 feet 

while the Iroquois could not be Stopped 
under twice her length, or over four 
hundred feet. This, he argued, showed 
that the Iroquois was going nt au PX _ 
eOssive rate, and he asked that Judg- 
ment be awarded, not only for the loss 
Of the vi ssi 1, hut also for the loss of 
profits through the loss of the tug. 



Esquimalt District 

In th* line of railway Improvement*, corner lot with t*o hou»»»; will rent for 
»4F. per month. Thin will net the purchaser IB per cent on hla Inveatment 
Price $4780 on term*. 

TO UBI — 5-room houae, fully modern at IS& per month with option ot year'a 
leas*. 
James Bey — 1-room houae, furnished, lease for on* y«*r; rent MS per month. 

The Capital City Realty 



». J. BRIOHT 



J»hen* 11*1 



Real Eatat*. Financial end Iaeuranea Ag«n4 a 



ei» VmUm Mrs** 



•aw 



mmm 



Crystal Tbea.tr* — Opening Monday In 
vaudeville, Miss Marjorle Borseheay Is 
the comedienne on the bill and The 
Hunters, a man and woman, in a 
comedy singing, dancing and talking 
act. The pictures are as follows: "A 
Quaker Mother," by the Vitagrn.ph 
Company; "A Golden Curl," a drama 
by the Eclipse Company; "Making 
Briar Pip«s," an educational; "The 
Gypsy," a, Ltrbln drama; "Osean Val- 
ley," a soenic; "The Persistent Fly 
Swatter," the comedy. Here are six 
subjects that will prove Interesting, as 
well as two good acta,. • 

■ <n 



That fiery, biting, smoky 
taste of whisky in general 
is entirely absent from the 



Special Selected 

Whisky 
of the Corby Distillery. 

The sweet, mild 
flavor of this 
whisky is the 
natural quality of 
old, ripe gram; the 
color is the golden 
glow from years 
of mellowing in 
charred oak 

even temperature. 
It is straight, pure 



is 



no 



artifici 
color. That is why 
it mixes best and 
goes furthest, ( « 

At all leading hotels and liquoi 
stores. Bottled in Bond. 

"Corby's of Corbyville 
for Over Half a Century.'* 






> j 



A Stylish and Serviceable Suit 

For Boys of 12 to 15 Years of Age 

For $10.00 



Double breasted and Norfolk Suits 
with knickerbocker trousers (patent 
buckle at knee) in tweeds, worsteds 
and serges; Brown checks, brown 
with fine white stripes, grey, green 
and blue mixtures. These suits are 
nicely finished; buttonhol^gpre fin- 
ished with silk thread} coat cuffs have 
two or three fancy buttons, and 
pockets ale strongly sewed so as not 
to tear away from body of coat 



■■ 1 ■ ■■ 
I 



'w 9 u v 



$1< 

~-^A price everybody can afford to pay 



for such an exceptional value. Bring 
the boy in and see them tomorrow. 




«*-«««* Mtavtft* *— 



Van, ADV. CO- KY. 




c*y» 



"YOU'LL LIKE OUR CLOTHES"— Rgd. 
1017-1019 Government Street, Just" South of Fort Street. 



'THE MODERN ELECTRIC SHOP" 



Sensible Suggestions for Xmas Gifts 




In all the realm of Xmas gifts, we doubt if anything would be more appreciable than any one, or more, of the 
articles illustrated below. They are useful, beautiful and ornamental, and guaranteed by us to be of the very 

highest quality. 




The Electric 
Chafing Dish 

For an impromptu lunch, an 
after-theatre supper, here 
is the very thing. Always 
ready for immediate use. 
Tt heats up quickly and 
floes the work in a cleanly 
manner. 
Price .... 



The Electric 

Toaster Stove 

Can be used on the table in 
any room in the house 




$18.50 








Chops, steaks. b;ieon, etc., can be cooked to a 
nicely. Coffee and toast can be made at the 
same time. Tn short, the Electric Toaster 
Stove is a revelation in do- 
mestic science. Price 



The Electric 

Upright 

Toaster 

Two slices of bread can be 
converted into crisp, fresh, 
delicious toast, right on 
the table. Equally as con- 
venient and economies^ 
when used in the kitchen/ 
Makes a slice £*■ £\£\ 
a minute ^DallU 



$10.00 



The Electric 

Coffee 

Percolator 

Furnished complete with 
cord, ready for immediate 
use by attachment to an 
ordinary electric lamp 
socket. With this you are 
sure of making the finest 
coffee possible — clear as 
wine. Prices, £<i 4 f\4\ 
$21 , $18 and.V"*VV 



Creech-Hughes 
Electric Co. 

1103 Douglas Street 

Next to Corner of Fort 

PHONE 466 




The "Beauty" 
Electric Iron 

There are numerous Electrif 
' Irons made, some good, 
.some no good. In the 1 
"Beauty" is represented 
the very latest achieve- 
ment in Electric Irons. 
That it is the best made is 



a fact beyond 
— 1| dispute. Price. . 



$6.00 



mm 



p* 






"7^ 



.ft* 



MaMSsMMa-MMHriHHBMi 



• " 



Sunday, November 3, !»!■ 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONISI/ 



15 



i 1 1 m 



Awa M a ru v Spoken by Wireless 
En Route Here From Hong- 
kong and Way Ports of the 
Far East 



EIGHT STEAMERS 

COMING THIS WEEK 

Keemun Comes on Tuesday to 
Discharge — Monteagle Will 
Take Full Cargo for Ports of 




■U, jtfif the Nip- 
ted by " wire- 



The steamer Aw'SP 5 ! 
pon Yusen if»l8lla».ih_ T 
leea from «paii ye»t»ra«Ky en route to 
this port from HongKonb and way 
ports, The Japanese steamer Is ex- 
pected to ismttt. the Owter wharf on 
Thursday, She, has 806 tons of general 
merchandise for discharge here. There 
is a full complement of saloon passen- 
gers and $1 steerage passengers, in- 
cluding 49- Chinese to debars, here. 



In .i' ii. Capt. Barnes, is back from an- 
other cruise around Vancouver Island 
Heavy weather prevailed most of the 
imn. ami the steamer was driven t<i 
.-lull, i frequently. At Bull Harbor 
three United States fishing vOSssels were 
found, and two w iff ordered to »eu, the 
third the Washington, being permitted 
to ri main in maki- repairs to lit- r engine, 
This was on October :'a. All the ilnhiiiK 
vessels reported having encountered 
boisterous weather and the Washington 
hail been out from Seattle throe weeks 
und was "clean," the weather beiitg too 
rough to tower her v dbries. 
The Washington had lost both ber 

anchors, the Chalp breaking' an Hho 
dragged when an effort was made to 
bring her up to an anchorage in the 
storm, and the engine bad been disabled, 

thi v. ■ - I making the harbor under sail. 

News was brought that the wireless 
operators at Triangle stated that the 
roof of the etlginehouse had been blown 
off. and some damage had been done to 
the dwelling house The wind at times 
reached such a velocity that the operat- 
ors were scarcely able to stand on their 
feet when passing from their dwelling 
to the station. 

At Plumpirap^ ja logger's boa) 
found containing a rifle, clothing and 
some provisions. No trace was found "of 
the owner! The boat had evidently been 
there for some time, the provisions be- 
ing mouldy and the boat almost full of 
rain. Tt was taken on board and deliv- 
ered to the customs officer at Nanaimo.' 



g*awe» aethn. stati mars 



♦•>inyi naunl arfl 



expected to dock during the coming 
week. Eight In all are anticipated. 
ifcrhe steamer Keemun. of the Blue Fun- 
nel line, will come on Tuesday to dls- 
"JKAsTgd — mnr torn 'Of general caigu -j- 
from the United Kingdeto. moludfng 
everything from casei of whiskey ,td* 
machinery i^ the n^w penaent plant 
jag*. Saahlch . arm and steel for the 
steamer l>lnue»s Muqulnna, The 
same ^iw^M ' r TamDa Maru, 

. of the .'Nippon Yusen Kai- 
i, Is to .■tlw^P^e' Outer "•■'wharf ''out-« 
liour.d to Hongkong \ia the usual:, porta 
of call; Yokohama, Kobe. Moji and 
Shanghai. • 

Taking -big 1 Cargo. 

The Monteagle, Capt. £)avlson, .of 
the C. P. R.. is to leave on \V*dnes- 
<i,iy for Hongkong and way ports car- 
rying a full cargo and many passeh- 
IllUded in tbi fi'eii;iiL Of the 
will be a shipment of wood 
pulp from the mills of the B. C. Sul- 
Itc Compehy at Howe Sound. Four 
thousand tons will be carried, of which 
:• . ' i « > tons- will . be discharged at Kobe 
and the balance at Shanghai. The 
flour shipment '.will be very heavy,. 
: Miut .",,.".00 tens, some of which will' 
1 • carried: from Sound ports by small 
ighters. There, will be also eufli- 
. ■ fient cigarettes to afford smokes for 
any thousands, space having been . re- 
■,i i? by the .British-America Tobacco 
'"or 359 tonrs. There wiir^Mi| 
i Shipments of Condensed '.'milk; oats.. 
:i:>a other freight — the offerings being 
much In excess of the space available. 

Kew Master in Charge. 

The C. V. Ii. ,:;teamer will be in cOm- 
md of a new i master. Qapt. F. X«. 
Davison is going out in charge, re- 
lieving his namesake, who is bound to 
tl:e United Kingdom on a holiday and 
will return as a passenger on the K. 
fl. S. Empress of Russia next .Tilly, to 
. f.ko command of one of the smaller 
n presses, Mr. 'S. C. Blnns will re- 
lieve Mr. Syder as purser while the 
latter goes to England on a holiday 
and will join the Empress of Russia 
when that vessel is completed, , 

Coming for rich. 

The steamer FuUclaTcnce, which Is 

loading on the Columbia river, .will 
Come to load 1,200 tons of salt sal- 
mon and herring which has been 
awaiting shipmont on the Outer wharf 
for the past two weeks. The Futz- 
clarence was expected hern last week, 
hut was delayed on the Columbia 
river. 

Magician En Ronte. 

The. steamer Magician, of the Harri- 
i-Dlrect line, due at. Son Francisco 
lay en route from Liverpool, Glas- 
W and Antwerp, via Santos and Cal- 
■ ifornian ports, is expected at the Outer 
wharf about the end of" the week. The 
Magician, Capt. Harris, left Liverpool 
o:i September 3rd, and called at. San- 
tos, Hnuy.il. Where she loaded a ship— 
ment of coffee and proceeded on Scp- 
t "ruber 26, She passed Punta Arenas 
in October 5, and after discharging 
at San Pedro' proceeded to San Fran- 
iiico, where she will arrive today. The 
Grown pi Cordova, which is following 
in this line, iii Olasgow on October 3, 
find pa ted St, Vincent on October 14, 
Harrison Line Schedule. 

The steamer Craftsman, of the Sax- 
rlson-Oirect. line. left the Vt. 
Kingdom yesterday en route here, 
schedule Of tho line provides for the 
sailing of tho Centurion, which In 
urated this service last .Inly, on No- 
vember 23 and the new Crown of To- 
n-do nil I Veenibcr : 1 Tii' • i i m,-i 
made a voyage to Chilian ports from 
Liverpool. and thence proceeded to 
Delaware, from where she Is on the 
was to the luiitic. Tin- i enturlon is 
due at Liverpool from Puerto, Mexico, 
end Gal v.-ston. 

To Command Niagara 
The R. ML S, Mnlcnrn, C'arrt. IT. S. 
Qlbbi of the Canajparn-Austrarian line, 

is expected t" reach Honolulu tomor- 

Nujw en route, here from Sydney and way 

ports, and Is due b- r, .ii Hi. bi •• nnihK 
of next week. On arrival, Cap I Qibbs 
will lea\e the steamer to proceed to the 
Clyde to take Charge of the new Oans 
dlan-Australlan liner Niagara Capt 

Morrlshy, of the Marama Is awaiting 
of. Vancouver to take over the Mokura. 



FISHING VESSELS 

ORDERED FROM HARBOR 

lfswlngtOB ■•torni From Stormy Orals* 

—Washington Tonal in Distress 

at Bull Harbor 



The, fishery protection cruiser N«w- 




bui. 



London Newspaper Says it Is 
Gratifying to Know That Vic- 
toria Is Making Ready for the 
Panama Trade 



POINT GREY BEACON 

DAMAGED BY STEAMER 

Quadra Brings. News That Aid Was 

Damaged sad Idght Zs Not 

Showing 



The Government steamer Quadra, 
Capt. Mcpherson, reached port yesterday 
fiom Vancouver after replacing the 
beacpn placed on a raft at Burnaby 
s ho al wh i oh h a d' b oon c a rri e d awa y by - 
an unknown tugboat. 

Capt. Mcpherson reported that the 
acetylene gas beacon off Point Grey is 

\)w$ $$$!$■': — — 



The improvement* to be made to equip 
the port of Victoria tO handle the pros- 
pective steamship d, velopment that will 
follow the opening of the Panama canal 
are attracting attention In the shipping- 
centres of the. world. The London Stan- 
dard, in a recent issue, says: 

"One result of the approaching com- 
pletion of the Panama Canal is that rep- 
resentatives of British shipping Inter- 
ests are reported to be Investigating 
Pacific ports with a view to ascertaining 
the most suitable terminals for steam- 
ship lines between Great Britain and 
the Pacific coast. San Francisco, Port- 
land, Seattle, and other great western 
ports of the United States are stated 
to have already formulated plans for the 
Improvement and extension of their har- 
bor facilities. In order that they may se- 
cure a portion of the increased tonnage. 
Canadian ports will have to bestir them- 
selves if they do not wish to see all 
this new trade go to the United States. 
Sir William Howell Davies. M.P., who 
Is connected with the Bristol Dock, is 
reported to have stated, that Uttripg. his 



visit to British Columbia be had seen 
no harbor where there were quay facil- 
ities such as would be required by ves- 
sels using the new canal route. 
— "It isi a owevsr, 
that an expenditure of no lees than* 
£600,000 is contemplated for fine In*. 
provement of Victoria harbor. It must 




not lighted, having been damaged In 
collision, evidently by a tugboat which 
struck the beacon and forced It Out of 

position. *wM$m£ : - 

The Quadra will proceed to the scene 
tomorrow and will remoor and relight 
this beacon. The steamer will then load 
supplies for the west coast and north- 
ern waters. 



A YEAR AT LLOYD'S 




Great Increase of Oil Engines in 
cantlle Marine — Of Statisti- 
cal Interest 






Apart from, its great statistical in- 
terest, the annual report of Lloyd's 
Register of British and Foreign Ship- 
ping, just issued, contains much that 
is significant about the latest develop- 
ments of shipbuilding. It is stated 
that the success of the first vessels 
fitted with the Dlessel engine has led 
to a large Increase in their construc- 
tion, more especially in Holland and 
Germany. There are at tho present 
time being built under the supervision 
of Lloyd's PiCRister, D-iess^l engines 
for 34 vessels, 23 of which range In 
tonnage from 2,000 to io,6ou. Two ves- 
sels of higher power that the Selandln, 
which excitod so much public inter- 
est on her visit to London some 
months ago, are under construction. 

The demand for new steamers for 
carrying oil in bulk, . which was un- 
usually brisk last year, has enormous- 
ly Increased. There arc now prepar- 
ing no fewer than 87 of these yi 
at home and abroad, registering I7f»,- 
ns. Ten of them are 525 feet in 
length. A great development Is tak- 
ing place in the use of oil fuel Instead 
of coal. In bhe United Kingdom from 
January V 1910, to the present time, 
there have been completed, under the 
survey of Lloyd's, 15 oil-carrying ves- 
sels, and 10 other vessels constructed 
with oil fuel bunkers. At the present 
date oil fuel bunkers are being con- 
structed In Ml oll-cafryittg vessels and 
In 19 other vessels. 

The Increasing extent to whloh wire- 
less telegraphy and submarine signal- 
ling are hclng used in pnsscnger 
steamers is shown by the fact that 
there are now recorded at Lloyd's 
tor, 1392 vessels fitted with wire- 
less telegraphic Installations, as com- 
pari fl with of! last year. 

On June .10, clause* assigned by 
Lloyd's were held by 10,445 merchant 
vessels, registering about 21% million 
tons gross. Of this total, over 1 3 14 
million tons are British and nearly 
S% millions foreign. The new gross 
tonnage registered last year was 1,468.- 
ifif,, of which about (58 % per cent were 
built for the Pnlted Kingdom. Thlo 
total was n large Incresso on recent 
years, but was about 20,ouo tons less 
In liiOC-'?. On September 30. the 
tonnage In course of construction Un- 
der Lloyd's survey was 1,820,392 gross, 
a record In the history of the society. 
Th«> year ended June 30 last witnessed 
a notable extension o? the society's 
operations In the United States of 
America. There are 40 vessels of 
17.",,000 tons now in course of construc- 
tion in that country for classification 
la Lloyd's .Register. 



*29Sfe*"2 



be remembered with regard to the dock 
facilities required that only vessels of a 
certain size, from 8000 to 15000 tons, and 
some 500 ft. long, Will be able to pick 
up sufficient cargo to render the trip 
through the canal profitable. On the 
Suez Canal the dues are between £1,000 
and £1,500 on a vessel of this size, .and 
It is not likely that they will be less on 
the Panama Canal." 



Triangle Cloudy; S. EC, Ught; 

IIS'.IS, temp- i*. Sea modi-rate. 

Prince ltui*rt- - 1 inri'iiM! calm; bur. 

18 Id; temp. 1 • tea m ttta ^' r. '-'- 

(.mu he off I - ! • I rthbound 

Princess Popl 1.80, southbound 

Ikede Cloudy; B. !•'... strong;; bar 
9 20 . temp. 1 B . Ila*2 •• ■> 1 ard. 

1 lead Ti 1 e ' '•'•ut Raining . S, E , 
strong; sea m "i* 

KM. -van 1 '!•• id illii. bar. 89.14 

temp. 52 . sea rno& 1 a < ■■ , %, 



Steamship Movement! 

TAi'usiA, s\ 'u.iii . Nov. E>— Arrived; 
Bteamers Teanie, Alaska, Holyok*, Alaska; 
1 lei tnan at< una Al« mdtie, 
sailed: Steamer Charleston, Be ■■ < 1 ■■ 

i.us AMJKi.i'is, pal., Nov, s.-tArrlved 

A. M. Simpson. Coos My galled I 'lielntlls. 

Grays 1 Cai'bOl ; ■ 1 1 1. I. 

.1 1. 1 'urine), l Ii .1 1 1 11 .. .r. 

LIVERPOOL, "V. -'. — Arrived: Ainu 
ochus, Tacoma, vi.i 

BBATTtiB, Wash., Nov. :. — Arrived: 
Kteamera Cbsrlea Nelson, Tacoma; Colum- 
bian, Sun Francisco. Sailed: Steamers 

HucUniajii' (Tharles Kelson, Snu 

Sebars, Port Blakeiey; Santa Ana, Snutii- 

eastern Alaska; Ooklsy, lJongknng; Captain 

\. i'. Lucas, Tacoma: bark J. U. Peters, 
Port Blakeiey. 



Majestic Theatre — "The Charge of the 
Light Brigade," a stirring picture of 
one of the most thrilling incidents of 
modern war. This grda* jrths^tlon 
will be shown Monday and, Tuesday. 
"Ancient Bow.," a young tourist travel- 
ing the west marries an Indian maiden, 
US is killed by a villainous ranger. 
She takes the ancient bow of her fore- 
fathers, dresses herself In tbe feathers 
of war and goes in search of her hus- 
band's slayers. , With unerring aim she 
avenges her husband's death with an 
arrow swift and sure from the bow. 
This Is a western story Incidental to 

irvthB, ihc natural ffftntrtunfiY of Ul. 



dlan love and the spirit of the race. 
Inspiring in Its sincerity and beauti- 
ful In all its scenic splendor. "The 
Love of a Girl,,'.' a romantic picture 

a g ir l'i 

two suitors, though, rejected, still 
keeps honorable love In his heart and 
shows himself willing to sacrifice him- 
self to help the girl and her husband. 
"The . Joker's Mistake" and "A Quiet 
Boarding House" axe two fast and 
furious comedies. * 



. Are TJp)r's;ay<>ijM|;.japBe who are enjoy- 
ing splendid meals bejng served at the 

Hotel Strathcona, Douglas and Court- 
,M|pfiy streets? Have you considered the 



advisability of taking advantage of our 
special winter rates? American or 
European plan. • 



MORNING STEAMER 



Tot 



Seattle 



Via Poit Angeles and Port 
Townjwnd 



Daylight S< rvijse 
Fast Ste.l Steamship 



"SOL DUC 



•> 



Leaves Victoria at IL00 a. in . 
Daily, BSXOCPt Sunday, from Can- 
adian Paclflo Dock. u> turning, 

ttlft, Dally, Kn 
Bunds y, at 1 8.80 a. m. 

s E. E. BLACKWOOD, Agent. 
Tel. 456. 1234 Government St. 



K$m 



SY* 



-rtiyi 



Across the Continent 
Without Change 




For San 
Francisco 



AND 
SOUTHERN CALI 

2 a.m. every Wednesday, 
"or.CITV.OP PU13BLA. and 
Friday trom Seattle. S.S, 
PRESIDENT. 

n Alaska, Nov. *., 11. XX, 
_.WE or CITY OF SEATTLE 
leaves Seattle at 9 p.m. ^ ■ ^' ' - ; 

Ocean and rail ticket* to New l!ork and 
all other Cities via saaJTrsnclacy,, ^^ 
Freight and Ticket OfneSs, HIT Wharf 

itfPlC 

it. P. KITHET ft CO.. Oeneral Agents. 
CLAUDE A. SOLLY. Post ea ge r Agent. 

1003 Government street 



«rt» 



Prepare for the 
— Rainy Da ys — 



And protect yourself from colds by 
having your boot* and shoes fitted 
with substantial 



Soles and Heels 

That wUt realat the worst weather 
that we get. Good uppers deserve 
to have good soles; It pays to have 
the best, no matter what the cost 
may be, but ln< this case the cost Is 
alight. 

I GUARANTEE SATISFACTION 
because I employ skillful mnn ami 
use nothing: but the best of leather. 
If in a hurry, that's just the time 
when I can please you the best, 

F. WEST 

ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

646 Fort Street 



SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE 



ent Wireless 

8 a.m. 

^Polnt Grey— Raining; calm; 20.03; 42. 
|jCape L.azd — Cloudy; calm; 29.81; 47; 
rvnopth. 

Tatoosh— Cloudy; S.K 12 miles; 28.80; 
48; sea moderate. Out, S. S. President 
6.15 p. m.; S. S. Riverside 8.20 a. m.,. 
schooner Camano 7.30 a. m. towing. 

Pachena — Raining; light, S. E.; 29.68; 
51; light swell. 

Eatevan — Raining; 8.E. calm; 29,33; 
48; spoke S. S. Awa Maru midnight, 
position 1,300 miles from Estevan. 

Prince Rupert — Foggy; ruining; S.E; 
29.58; 43; dense. Spoke S. S. Spokane 

4 a. m., left Prince Rupert 3.40 a. m., 
southbound. 

Triangle — Foggy; raining; S.E., ,29.10; 
43; ih-nse. Spoke 9 p. m. 8. 8. Princess 
Ena off Pine Island, northbound; 8. S. 
Mara ma 10.30 p. in. 673 miles from 
Victoria. Arm ytransport Dlx 11 .p. in., 
position 41.67 N. 135.34 W. 

Dteda — Overcast; SAX. 29.90; 40; light 
swell. 

Dead Tree Point—Cloudy; S.E.; sea 
moderate, 

Noon 

Point Grey — Overcast; calm; 29.68; 
49. 

Cape T.,azo — Cloudy; S.E.; 29.70; 50; 
light swell. Spoke 11.30 a m S S. Marl- 

poss passing Nanaimo,*" northbound; 

11.10 a. m. 8. 8. Prince George, Sey- 
mour Narrows. 

Tatoosh — ClOUdy; S.E., 12 mllr^; 
29.75; 52; no shipping. 

Pachena — Overcast; S.E.; 29.56; 48; 
ll^ht swell, 

Estevan — Cloudy; S.E. ; 29.22; 50; sea 
moderate. 

TrlnnRle — Cloudy; ralm; fresh; 29.06; 
47; sea smooth. Spoke Princess Hlna 
8.25 ft, m. off Milbnnk Sound north- 
bound; 3-masted fishing steamer off 
Trlancle; 3-mnsted steamer abeam 10.30 
a. m., southbound, probably the Gray. 

Iki'da — Overcast; S.E., strong; 29.20; 
45; sea rouprh. 

Prince Rupert — Cloudy; N.E.. light; 
29.50; 49; sea smooth. In, Krlnc John 
9.10 a. m.. due Prince Rupert 1 p. m., 
southbound. 

Dead Tree Point — Cloudy; S.E. strong; 
sea moderate. 

Tntooish — Cloudy; east 10 miles; bar. 
29.63; temp. 48. In. str. Nome City at 
fi p. m. 

Point Grey— Overcast ; calm; bar. 
29.67; temp. 47; thick, seaward. 

Cape Lara — Raining; S. E., bar. 29.62. 
temp. 45; light swell. Mariposa In Sey- 
mour narrows northbound 1,46 p. m.; 
Dolphin off Cape Mudge northbound at 

5 p. m. 

Pachena — Squally: S. Hi; bar. 29.53; 
temp. O; light swell. 





risimas Sailing 



TO 



The Old Country 

In Connection With Special Sleepers 
Operated by Great Northern Railway 

"THE COMFORTABLE WAY" 

S. S. Laurentic, from Portland, Me . . December 7 

S- S. Saxonia, from Boston, Mass.. . ..December 10 

S. S. Royal George, from Halifax, N.S. .December 1 1 

S. S. Cedric, from N q ew York. December 12 

S. S. Empress of Britain, from St. John N.B. Dec. 13 

S. S. Teutonic, from Portland, Me.. . -. .December 14 

S*. S. Oceanic, from New York .... ... December 1 4 

S. S. Caronia, from New York . . . .... December 14 

S. S. Mauretania, from New York .... December r 7 

Early application for berths will insure choice lo- 
cations. For rates and other details, call, write or 
telephone. Out-of-town correspondence solicited. 



\\ . R. DALE, 

General Agent. 



H. H. WALLACE; 

City Pass. Agent. 



Great Northern Railway Co. 



1200 Douglas St., Victoria, B.C. 



£*hone 699 




c You 

Going Home lor 

istmas ? 




One flat charge includes all expenses 
and relieves you of all worry if you be- 
come a member of special party leaving 
Victoria December 8, and connecting 
with all final Atlantic sailings. Party 
will be personally accompanied by the 
undersigned. 

Write or call at once. 



CLAUDE A. SOLLY 

Commercial Agent 
Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Ry.,- 

1003 Government Street, Victoria, B. C. 
Phones, 2811-2821 



Special Tourist Sleepers 

Via the Grand Trunk Railway 
In curtncctioir with 

Christmas Sailings 

To the Old Country 

Of the 

S. S. "Laurentic," from Portland, Me Dec. 7 

S. S. "Teutonic," from Portland, Me. . t Dec. 14 

Trains proceed to dock and passengers embark immediately. 
Baggage checked through to steamer in bond. No transfer or 

;flll hotel expensesipjf|i|lp^ 

. 

Other sailings and rates on application. t 
It, is a pleasure to furnish you with particular' 
■ ; j.>v ' „ v :, v •"'., * ./-wiiiuwi, ii ; itj; iaS'V-^ijfcJi ^s . ; ; r x'^i]t : pgSpj 

City Passenger ind5*lcfeet Agent >; Telephone 1242 

Office: Wharf, street, facing . Coog^ Jpfti* 7 

• ■■ 1 ■■» ... _ _ v- ■ ■' ■ "^.--.. <attii-ijj«.iL,i^«,if* -..^. ■..-■■■.,.■. 






|e in Schedule of Hate Line Trains 






x No. 4^-Toronto Express leaves Vancouver 8:45 a.m. instead 
|Wf, of 9 a.m. 

No. 14 — Seattle-St. Paul express leaves Vancouver 14k In- 
stead of 14:30. 'lifi^flj 

No. 2 — Imperial Limited leaves Vancouver at 19:45 Instead 
of 20k. 

The 1 1 145 p. m. steamer from Victoria daily makes connec- 
tion with Train No. 4, and the 2 -.30 p. m. steamer from Victoria 
makes connection with the Imperial Limited. 



C.P.R. Offices, 

1 102 Government Street. 



L. D. CHETHAM, 

City Passenger Agent 




mm 



CANADIAN PACIFIC 

tmopz- 



Christmas 

Sailings 

St. John, N. B. — Liverpool 
Empress of Ireland, Fri., Nov. 29 
Empress of Britain, Fri., Dec. 13 
Through Tourist Sleeping Cars From Vancouver. 
No Transfer — No Hotel Expense. 

Ticket* and Information from any Kallrund or Hteamnhlp Aicnrit 
or J. J. rOBSTER, General A»ent, TV.i Hecond Ave., 8EATTXB 



>■ 



Every Woman's Complexion 

is bound to show whether or not she is in good physical condition. 
If the Complexion is muddy, the skin sallow; if pimples or skin 
blemishes appear it is then attention must be given to improve 
the bodily condition. There is one safe and simple way. 
Clear the system and ourify tlie blood with a few doses of 

This well known vegetable fatally remedy is famous for its power 
to Improve the action of the organs ot'digtstion and elimination. 
They v.i!l regulate the bowels stimulate the liver, tone the 
stomach and vou will know what it is to be free from troubles, 
bom headaches, backaches, lassitude, and extreme nervousnesa. 
They will make you feel healthier and stronger in every way. 
By clearing your system of poisonous waste Beecham's Pills 
will have good effect upon your looks — these they 

Will Bedutify and Improve 

Thm direction* w.la over/ box «ro of racial ralno find Jmportanc* to W f i w ia. 
Sold everywhere, In boxes, 25e. 



••.' *T*+n*wr&;T, 



» nmoLvr- v 



■] 




Why doesn't she taks 

NA-DRU-CO Headache Wafers 

They stop a headichc piomptly, yet do not contain any of 
the dangerous drugs common tn headache tablets. Ask your 
Druggist about them. 23o. a box. 

National DAua and r CMf MiCAl Co. or Cahao* Limits*. \%% 

»^»^—^— A«— — d<p— > — mkmm 



mmmm^^mmm 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



X^KHWHWIWH i w*f«n—M 



PMI 



w- 



ijun ii l—WM 



PW^w^WW^W^P^^^*^" 



ufW>— i i ■ MT W rtHT iiM n w f i n M <" ri"rTTi-mrrt ^T'"T — '- 






18 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 




It is to those who have shuffled off their mortal coil of single blessedness that we address ourselves today. It is to their sense of the economical, to fKeir appreciation of the elegant and good things 
in the house furnishings that we wish to appeal. We know that we are in a position to help you materially on the economical side, and a casual glimpse into our great store, filled to its capacity with good 
equipment for your new home, will convince you that we possess the elegant and substantial things., Young man, if you've just been married or are just about to be, come in and look around a bit. Bring the 
girl with you, for it's a ten to one shot that she's got a better idea of what's wanted in the newly-made nest than you have— and, anyway, what's to be bought. Bring her in, we say, and let some of our 
salespeople go through the building and show you how cheaply a home can be furnished throughout from this store. 




A Large Shipment of New Table 
Linen Just Arrived 

Is Your Table 

Linen "Rich," 

"Smooth" and 

"Heavy" 

The best dining 
table, the daintiest 
meal, may be quite 
mined by an un- 
sightly table cloth. 
Why shouldn't every 
family use only nice 
linen — they can 
afford it. N e\y_e 
think good, pure, 
linen is beyond your 
means. Hear this: 
Weiler Bros., Ltd.. 
has been within your 
means many years. 

Our word is yours that we can keep your table covered with the 
snowiest, neatest linen for less money than you pay chasing butterfly 
bargains. Weiler Bros., Ltd., Linen never costs more, compare the qual- 
ity, it usually costs less. 

Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 54 x 54, at each. . . .$1.25 
Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 63 x 63, at each. . . .$1.60 

Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 68 x 68, at each $1.75 

Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 72 x 72, from each.. $2.00 
Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 72 x 90. from each.. $3. 25 
Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 72 x 108, from each. $4.00 
Bleached Damask Table Cloths, size 90 x 108, from each. $9. 00 
Napkins to match, from, per dozen $1.50 

Pure Grass Bleached Art Table Linen 

MADE BY THE FAMOUS OLD BLEACH LINEN COMPANY, 

LTD., IRELAND 

Extra fine quality. The design is of a daisy chain, and is sold only 
in sets of one Table Cloth and one dozen Napkins in a box, in the follow- 
ing sizes: 

Table Cloth*, fttse 72^72 at, each ..'. IftN.OO 

Table Napkin ■, elze 22x22 at, per dozen flO.TiO 

$1 8.50 per set. 

Table Cloths, size 72x1 OS at, each $11.50 

Table Wapktna, size 22x22,at, per dozen $10.50 

$22.00 per set. 

Table Clothe, size 72x1 2fi, at each $13.50 

Table Hapklna, size 21x21 at. per dozen $1.2.50 

$26.00 per set. 

Table Clothe, size 72x111. at, each $15. 50 

Table Wapklne, size 84x24, at, per dozen $12.50 

$28. OO Per set. 

Table Clothe, OflxlOS, at. each $15. 50 

Napkins, size 26x26, at. per dozen $14.50 

$30.00 per set. 

Table Clothe, slzo 00x1 H, at. each $21.00 

Table Sapklne, size 26x2:., at, pet dozen $14. 50 

$35.50 per set. 
■ -1- -■ • - Basket of fruit design. . • ■pedal design for round table. 









Fabrics Arrived 

Our Fall exhibit is now complete with th6'-' newest, the best and 
the latest productions. We are particularly fortunate in being 
able to show you a variety of the handsomest materials obtainable. 
You cannot fail to find something in oup splendid line to please you. 
Your taste and color scheme can be fully satisfied. You can get the 
proper shades to harmonize with your interior decorations. We 
have our skilled draper to assist you. The new arrivals include : 

Double ami single-faced Velours in greens, £rey, mauve, red, 
blue, gold and brown, and a large assortment of Chintz in a variety 
of beam i t'ul designs. Also a splendid variety of Shadow Tissue in 
mosl exquisite patterns, suitable for loose coverings and casement 
curtains and upholstery purposes. ^ Plain Casement Goods in all 
the desired colorings. Art Serges, Monk's Cloth, Reps, lh-nims, 
and a large variety of materials for curtains, etc. 

Curtain Nets in cream-, hiege and ecru and ivory, prices ranging 
from, per yard, $i .50 to 30*£ 

Madras, cream and ecru, large assortment, from, per yard, 75c 
to 25<^ 

"Sundour" Curtain Materials, cream and ecru, large variety to se- 
lect from, in a splendid variety of colors, from, per yard, $2.00 
to 50^ 



In Every Happy Home the Two Rooms 
Most Used and Most Appreciated Are 
the Dining Room and the Bedroom 




The most of our time is spent in social comfort and rest. It is in the fur- 
nishing of these rooms that we make special inducements that cannot fail to 
meet with the utmost favor. In order to show our hedroom and dining- 
room furniture to advantage, and give you an idea how they will look in your 
own home, we have filled up certain parts of our store to represent a dining 
and hedroom. You will find this idea of. ours a good one, as one glance will 
suffice to convince you of the beauty of these suites,* the quality always being 
of the highest. We can supply furniture for these two rooms in any finish 
you may wish. We have an uncqualcd showing to select from. 

Buffets from $20.00 Dressers from $12.00 



Sideboards from $22.50 

Extension -Dining Tables from 

only ...$7.50 

China Cabinets from $14.00 

Dinner Wagons from $9.00 

Dining Chairs from .'. $1.00 

Chiffoniers from $12.50 



Wash Stands from $5.00 

Iron Beds from $3.75 

Springs from " $3.25 

Mattresses from $4.50 

Pillows from $1.50 

Brass Beds from $21.00 

Wooden Beds from $3.00 



T»bl* Cloth, size 72x72, at, earh 

Table Wapklna, slzo 22x22, at. per dozen 

923.00 per set. 



f 10.50 
912.50 



MAIL ORDERS 

It does not matter what you want, we can get it for you. If you 
cannot come to the store, just write us a note and tell us what you want, 
and we will send it to you immediately and correctly. We have the 
finest Mail Order system in the West. No delay her*. 



Get a Door Mat 
From Our Splen- 
did Selection 
You'll Need One 
Today 

Our Door Mats Are Made to Last 

ALL OF HIGHEST QUALITY 

Come to our second floor and select the door mat to save the dirt and 
mud entering your home. The cost is little and a door mat saves your pretty 
carpets, as well as saves you lots of unnecessary labor. Get a quality mat, a 
mat that will last, the only-kind we sell. Now is the time to get yours. 




Size 14 x 24 

Size lfi x 27 . . . 

Size IS x 30 

Size 18 x 30, with scraper 



HEAVY COCOA BRUSH MATS 
00 <? 



Size 1!> x 32 

Size 29x 3 1 . 

.$1.25 SUe 23 x 37 

.fl.SO Size 2fi x 42 . 

. $1.75 Ki/.r 28 x 46 . 



91.75 
S2.00 
f2.50 
93.OO 
93.50 



Size 18 x 27, at 
Size 18 x 36! at . , 
j 



SKELETON, OR ROPE MATS 
Are Nice and Open— Do Not Hold Dust 

91.00 

91.25 



Size 20 x 33, at 
RUBBER DOOR MATS 



.#1.80 
99.C4 



ssss 



VICTORIA'S POPULAR HOME 
FURNISHERS 



THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY 



WEILER BROS 




VICTORIA'S POPULAR HOME 
FURNISHERS 



tit ■- v« 



Sunday, Novombflr 3. 1912 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



17 



Victoria Theatre 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th 

Madame 

Johanna 

Gadski 

Greatest Dramatic Soprano 
in the World 



Prices: $4.00, $3.00, $2.00 
Gallery, $1.00. 



c n]H-ns Wed- 
nesday morning, 1.0 a.m., 



Curtain: 8:3d p.m. 



■ 




DIRECTION 



M& 



Victoria Ladies' Musical Club 







—— 



SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 



Proposal to Explore tta« 
Wew Guinea 



Interior of 



— 




Tuesday and Wedne s day,- November 5th and 6th. 



> 



t The most brilliant musical event of the season 



s 








ENGLISH OPERA 

COMPANY 



Tuesday evening-, KlolowV delightfully pretty 

light opera,. 



Wednesday evening, Planquett's operatic 



.... dn 



<« 



The Chimes ol Normandy" 

60— TRAINED CHORUS VOICES— 60 
20— Special Grand Opera Orchestra — 20 

Prices— $2.00, .$1.50, $1.00, .75** and 50? 

Seats now -in >ale — Curtain, 8.36^ 



Victoria Theatre 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH. 

«£ ANOTHER COHAN & HARRIS 
3 BULLS EYEHLL ^ 



CHICAGO 

l& NEW YORKS' 

iSENSffTfONAL 

MELODRAMATIC By" 

AUGUST! N NHHUGH 



PriCM, $l.ro, St. 00, 75c. COc. Soats now 
oa- Sulo. Curtain. S.30. 



DO YOUR DUTT- SEE IT HOW 



Arthur Hartmann 



The Worol's Gi 



Ire Dorivttl, the I iclebrated 
('■"roni 1 Pianist. 



VICTORIA THEATRE 



Pfi< 00, j 

prompt .1! ten tion 



Monday, Eocemher 2, 1912. 

| 00 Bos Si ate |2 50. Mw ftrdei « ill receive 



.■■ 



a. 




M5T VAUDEVILLE Its 7 IV 



The Initial Tour t.f 

"THE (3) SPA BROTHERS" 

in a Series of Athletic Accomplish' 
rocnts 

VAN & CARRIE AVERT 

(Introducing Om Flftwioss ''omodlan 

and "< irlginal Bastus/' pan Avery} 

In "The SIfh.i Porter" 

COLLIER ft M WALDB 

World's Premier Holler Hkaters 
The Premier Xylophonist 

QEOROE OARDEH 

In Clasrie and Popular Selections 

A peltglUful Mixed Quartette 
Dore Lyons 

■ARMOmr BELLES AWE BEAUX 

in a Character .Son* lievuc 



TWILIGHT PICTURES 



CHUISTIAMA, Nov, 8. til Nbrwe- 
a/i&n explores .\i. Carl Lumholts Im* la'nl 
before the geographical eoclet) of 
Chrlstlanla hia new scheme, whi-i. Is to 
explore uk Interior of tht world's second 
largest island, New Cum. a M. l,Um- 
I holtz in a man well known in his 
countrymen, having thrice cpnducted 
expeditions to Mexico, where he has 
lived for a cpnsider&hlc ti na-i among In- 
dian tribes. l\j*pl<. who hav.e had oe- 
■ a.slon io foiiov.- tho v, .nil previously 
done by M. L Million ■. n Mexico, ai i 
.stirt- that he in the ntti'ii man for .such 

a task. Thc\ know II. nt be is in S I"'- 

si t inn to prepari hi mat n' for all th 
Acuities ami obstacles which an expedi- 
tion to Xi-u Guinea will ha v.- to con- 
tend wttii, nnd that he win never hesi- 
tate to encounter dUUcultle a - 1( n- 
tlflc trophies are to be obtained. 

M. Iyiimlioit/. declared that his expedi- 
tion would tlrst start for Hatavia. 
whence it will proceed to Borneo. At 
Borneo M. I.iiiuholt/. Intends to stay for 
three to four months, to get acquainted 
SSpK,; 1 ' 11 ' '°untry and chopse sixty to 
|Si^W , Nro<>d,,ahd ;iV reliahle ^caiiiflw' of ' 
the Dajak tribe. Tho-#*«^,*ftcfc M. 
I.umholtjs desires to laveatlfcate Is situ- 
ated on the eaet side of the WMhelmlna 
summit discovered by the Dutch .ex- 
plorer. M. Lorentz. He Intends to look 
for a companion, wlin can draw- mnpa, 
take photos and develop them; further 
he must be able to servo an apparatus 
for cinematography. Besides this man 
he wishes to have two Xorwogl&n assis- 
tants to mike biological and botvlcal 
studies. The expedition Is expected to 
^nt fnr one and a half yoars; It will 



leave Europe the end of this year. 

After the lecture the plan of 3d. 
Luraholta was supported by the highest 
recommendations of four professors o* 



th e uni ve rsity. T ft « «eu«rapMCUl soc- 
iety In London Is, supporting the expe- 
ditlon With a gift of ?250 which will be 
iptded to the fund now being raised in 
his city. 



Playing Upon Prejudice. 

At the Laurfef demonstration at Sorel 
on Tuesday complaint was made that a 
man named Jackson had been appointed 
head of the government works in the 
town. Mr. Jackson is, presumably of 
Kngljsh descent and speech. The idea 
of the reference seemed to he that be- 
couse of the fact some prejudice might 
be created amotin the French-speaking; 
voters against the government which 
appointed him. The Laurier workers 
have gone out of their much advertised 
amity-making business and started 
grubbing for prejudiced votes, incident- 
ally providing the prejudice. — Montreal 
JSatette. 

You can deposit your money at 1 per 
cent Interest with the B. C. Permanent 
Loan Company and be able .'to. withdraw 
the. total amount or any portion there- 
of, without notice. Cheques are sup- 
plied to each depositor. Paid up capi- 
tal over $1,000,000, assets over f 3,000,000. 
Branch office 1210 Government street. 
Victoria. B. C. * 



Westholme Grill 

Special Attractions 
\\Vitli 
MISS QRACE MUNROE, 

1 .yric Solojst, and .' 
Prof. Turner's Unrivalled 
HHS| : ..Orchestra 

Every Evening, 
6.30-8.30 10.30-1 . 



E. F. TROTTER, 

Manager^ 



Victoria Theatre 

MOM>\\. MIVKMHKK It h 





■ *' Td-rcc tu ' - •.';• 

^jucccssrvi 
r*nc£ or rat yzak* 

Price* 1 $i..>n. $i.on, 75.-, :>oc. Seats as 

mUc Noremhnr 1st, 

Curtain K.30. 

Victoria Theatre 

November 7th, 8.15 pan. 
6 pi ia 1 Bin 8 i gemem 

Mme. Harriet Labadie 

Win ihterpt bi Joae Bchegai ij pow< rful 

"The Great Galeoto" 

in nid ..f the Wotiwn'i Auxiliary Provincial 
Hoyni Jubilee Hospital, 

Prloesj i.Mii 1. M.:.n. j 1; 1 

plan opens October Ith Carriages in !» 
p m. 

Noli. Pun nnn ;n .• | s<jUi ftftd in be in 

tii<-ir di>fti» nt tho 1 1 in Ivertlsed. i..u.- 

arrivals will not tir sont.-rl nnili after Act I. 



Victoria Theatre 

Tuesday nnd Wr«!ne«idnj\ Not. filli nnd ctli 

Shechan English 
Opera Company 

T^l< : sd!ly-"MARTHA•■ 

1Vedo«adsy 

"THE CHIMES OF 
NORMANDY'* 

SO— 4'hnrus >'olee«— «0 
tO — Special «»rrh«i»n» — «0 

8aajL-aale..Haturds>. Nui. lu<l. 

**» to H.«». Curtain l.jo. 



B. G. CAFES, LIMITED 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $25,000 

DIVIDED INTO 25,000 SHARl#bF PAR VALUE OF $1.00 PER SHARE, OF WHICH $20,000 

WILL BE FOR THE GENERAL PURPOSES OF THE COMPANY 



It is the object of this advertisement to introduce to your notice the aims and policy of the B. C. Cafes, 
Limited; The stock of which company will be offered to the public for subscription at 9 a. m. tomorrow morn- 
ing, Nov. 4, for the first time, and will be offered for three days in accordance to the Provincial Statutes, un- 
less subscribed for in full before the above mentioned period of time. 




1. 

The stock now offered is a commercial one, and in 
this respect differs from the usual stock proposition 

placed iii'^pl^ps of the public, the majority of these 
;.0tf^i^-j^||sffl^'..relat.ins;- t<> K 
Mining or>il& such specula ti 

It is seldoifrthat the public is offered an 60bHnp-l 
ity of joining in a sound business enteriwaie, : wnere^ 
the profits are large, yet where there is no element of 

speculation. 

3. 

Negotiations are pending for the acquisition of a 
splrnrliri and mitral situation for B. C. CAFES. LTD, 



4. 

is proposed having- a retail baking - section. Re- 
tail tea and coffee counter. Smoking lounge, etc., 
which will swell the general Cafe profits, and as pre- 

t^UWV IMerence will be given shareholders in the selection of 

>■*£ mi mmMm&^lk^ 
ult^.mhv ..ncnuimr staff. 



.»•? 



The premises will be modelled on most up-to-date 
lines, embodying all the latest features of a high-class 
resta urant. It is intended to have a ncw."tlnd novel 



featnr* in the shafce df a men's smoking lounge; also 
Special attention will be devoted to the catering for 
afternoon and evening parties, receptions or dances. 
A business man's lunch will be given each day be- 
ajpecu 12 and 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and alt<»- 
gether it will be the strict endeavor of the manage- 
ment to meet with the requirements of the public 
jte and cater i«. the highest class of trade. . A fea- 
ture in itself will be the reasonable rates and the quick 
service. This will alone attract many patrons. 



taff, the harmony arid co-operation 
>p$^0$$^ent and staff fully guaran-^P 
'ree^r^e.pf^ft^^ systematic detail. 

■ A . ' '-. • '. ■ 

5. 



Those arc facts. ^One Cafe in Viet o wa is ' twMtv 

a profit of over $1 8,000 per annum, and another over 
v$i5,odo during an existence of 10 months. Invest in 
Jjh, jp f Cafe- s ' stock and wafclf your, money grow. 
Books open all the time. Opportunity is knocking at 
your door. Success in life is the result of an oppor- 
tunity taken advantage of. Will you make good 
your opportunity? Remember, they are going. You 
are getting in on the ground floor. The day the Cafe 
is open for business, the price of stock will go up as its 
earning power is demonstrated. We can make terms 
of payment easy if you buy now — but buy NOW. 



Mercantile Underwriters 

FISCAL AGENTS, SUITES 5 AND 6 GREEN BLOCK 



In Co-operation with Abbott and Sutherland 



Open Evenings 



„i ^> .h i 

■'V ■■:{■■: ■■;■; ■ ■- . 



llfl 



1216 Broad Street 



"Watch Our Smoke!" 

It's the favorite tobacco, this B.D.V. — right from 
the crack of the pistol — cool, delightful — a rich, 
creamy pipeful. 





Mild in green label tins. 

Modium ia red label tins. 

toz., ^,'k. 4 os., 5o c> 

B.D V. Cigarettes, 15c. the boa. 



has won out in England and is a winner in Canada. 
It's been a road burner on its rapid way into the 
pipes of Canadians. Ask for B.D.V. at every good 
tobacconist's. When you "get the taste," you'll won- 
der how you ever did without it. The best of the 
leaf ripened to its proper maturity and mellowness. 

Godfrey Phillips, Limited 
London, England 




MAJESTIC THEATRE 



rriifrninmr Monday and Tuesday 
"The CharRe «< the Ughl Brigade." a 
Ureal military picture "Ancient Bow," a 

&; i western atoryi "IPat L<ove of a Girl," 

a strong romantic drama,; "The Joker's 
Mistake," faro* comedy; "A quIhi Board- 
ing House," a fRBt ami fuiinus comedy, 

Victoria Theatre 

Two nights and Saturday matlner, begin- 
ning Friday, November l»t 
MESSRS. SHinEKT AND LEB'IN HAUBR 

Present tho Qrpot London Success 



ITTIllfiWll 



Prniiurtlnp made under the personal 
supervision • nf Mr. Lewis Waller The 
dramatic sensation of the. season's offerings. 
Frifn SOe to gi.eo 

Seat sale opens October aeth. Mall orders 
nosr, 

Curtain, night. S 10; matinee, 2,I». 



CRYSTAL THEATRE 



Vaudeville and IMcture I'rogramme. 
Monday and Tuesday. 

Minn Mar.torii- Oerscheay, comedienne; 
The Hunter*, comedy sinning, talking and 
dancing; "A Quaknr Mother." Vltagraph 
dranvn; "Ossan Valley," scenic; "The Kol 
den Curl," Eclipse drama; "Making Hrlar 
PJpei," educational; "Tho Gypsy," l.nhln 
drama; "The Persistent Fly Bwatter," 
i omeily, 

PRINCESS THEATRE 

Formerly A. O. U. W. Hall, corner Wlanch- 
ard and Vates, 

THE WILLIAMS STOCK CO. 

SCOTTISH PLAY 

"LITTLE MINISTER" 

Prices: I no, zftr and inc. Matinee Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, 10c and 20c. 

Curtain, k ■"• evenings; matinees, 3>4t. 
Keeerved seats on sale. — 

OKAN * HIHCOCKI*. 

*■ Corner Broa4 aatf Vatets. , 



Union Bank of Canada 



Kstabllshed 1865 



Paid-up Capital :... 

Rest and Undivided Profit* 



..$4,762,000 
.'.|3.5»1,000 



Total Assets (ovsr) 167,000,000 

BRITISH COLUMBIA BRANCHES 

Vlotorla, Vancouver (five offlcea), Txlncm Bupert, Haaalton, En derby, 

Vernou and Vanaimo | 

■▲VIVOS DEPAJtTMEjrT AT ALL BBA.KCXES 
Interest Allowed on Depoalte 
A brand) of the Bank haa been esiabli&... u ut 61 Threadnaedla Stf*«t, 
London, Bug;., where Lettefg of Credit;, and Drafts payable at alt Im- 
portant points in Cnnada, ana the United States, oan be putcbaaed, tsu 
Money Transfers by cable or by letter may be arranged. 

Clients of the Bank, when in London, are Invited to visit tho branch. 
Information will be furnished on all Canadian business matters. 



A. E. Christie 



Manager Victoria Branca 



B*ae)a*Ba|B*ataia«l 






; 



^aiakn. ^^M^MMi^iiMM^^ 



.^r>^..i.^,.,.^ 



■ " ■ ...■'■■ "' 



• ; 



",«■«.'.'■ 'I 



IIKWIHn.. 



■ I 



%'W'I» 



O y ^M l J WI U B Kii aMm W W i X Wi l Oih i-JMMw »X mi 4> . » *» " i. -«tw- . 



18 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIS'r 



Sunday, Novembar 3, 1912 






National 
40 

World's Stock 
Champion 

And Winner of the 500-Mile 
International Sweepstakes 
Race, Indianapolis Motor 
Speedway, May 30, I9I2 



to be handled bt i.ocjl1. 
agency. 

The i'K- ml rt-a.1,-1'. !i. ,111 tilt- 

frequency of the Xatlonal i'» vie- 

torles, may be U>U to believe that 

car Is built solely for speed. 

Thin is' not true. The National 




for H,i 

with thia iqea, alone ftPwjff, It* 
unparalelled winnings are but 
demonstrations of the superior 
design, construction, materials, , 
perfect balance and tire econowiri 
all of which are stDSJPtlu'tely wim*J% 
tlal to tfce perfect >W- In y«|*V 



I 



Diawu. 

it* unequalled number Wj^' 
torles In stock car' races, and the 
fact that every National 40 is so 



1 random ta aooa 

prove It stock champion 

The reason for -the stock car 
event— the public asked, "How 
do we kno<v that the ear which 
won this race is the same in de- 
sign, material* and workmanship 
us the car we buy'."' 

To answer thl« question tin- 
manufacturers who were In the 
racing game, formed the Manu- 
Faoturers* Contest Association. 
uid arranged to have the Ameri- 
can Automobile Association 0ro- 
tPct them — as well as the. people. 
This is how they did it. by Intro- 
ducing what has come to be 
i n as the ''stock races." Cer- 
tain rigid rules were laid down 
defining "a .stock car." In gen- 
eral the manufacturer is' re- 
quired to build a certain 
number of a specific kind 
of car for sale before h« can 
race Utat car in a slot U ■ vent. 
The number required to be built 
is determined by a sliding scale 
In proportion to his entire output. 
This makes it impossible for a 
builder to turn out a special rac- 
ing car and enter it m "stock" 
events. 

Of caurWtfi there are "froe-for- 
•:];-." ete.,\ where v speelal race 
i can compete, but these events 
did not teach the public or buyer 
anything about the cars made for 
sale. 

After these rigid rules were 
— and enforced, as they have 
been; to the letter, the people 
knew that the car they saw in 
, iii'tion before them In "stock car" 
events, was identical with the car 
tlii-v puy, and not some ■ •■ 
special' creation for grandstand 
display. 

From a maker's standpoint the 
manufacturer of a racing car 
his product In the extreme 
lest alongside the car of his com-, 
petltor, and gives him the oppor- 
tunity to compare the two under 
practically equal conditions: 

something ho cannot do else- 
where. 

There is always present a feel- 
inn that the cur that stands up 
under the tremendous test of the 

track must be bettor than an 
untried and un-raced car. The 
race track Is the t;reat refining 

ice of the automobile — you 
will frequently hear people nay 

they see no value In raclnjj 
that It is a dangerous pastiin. : 

they never want to drive a 
Ett such speed, etc. They Rlisq 
Che point entirely. For If e Oar 
Kill stand u stral:i of 75 m'.l M an 
hour for three hours at a stretch, 
11 HOI I he best kind of proof 
IhHt It will also lie a reliable 

machine when driven .it one-third 
of thai spa id1 in the BOQ.mlla 
International sweepstakes the 

National del rat -<l the world's 

bast riars nn.i traveled the fastesl 
600 miles ever traveled by man 

an. I machlO '. ill 883 minutes, r, 
k« • on u Ts.T'j mil's p«r 

hour. The faateSI time of the 

National whs during the last 20 

n Ilea Prom Hip repair pit of the 
National mr shot th* signal to 

Dawson to "Go! (Sol Go!" 

Dawson smashed hia foot upon 
the floor of his Blur- National, 
inil under It «d» tin- 11. . Herator. 
I'iie Blue car answered the call 
for all the power and stamina ! t 
had In Its makeup and the last 
.'0 miles were made at an a\er- 
i«e of 84.21 miles per hour. 

No water was added to the rmli-- 
ator of the National car that won 
the BOO-mile rare. \r> repairn 
were necessary, and no adjust- 
ments made. 

Racing la hut a part of the 
National's matiuf«etui !hk process 
Where they test and perfect their 
ears for your enjoyment, safety 
and Indefatigable service. 

The National make no fals- 
claims, no vain gloriou« boasts. 
They point to records and facts 
iiefove whlcfl mere words are 
futile. v . 

The"a«ency for the 'National has 
been secured by 



L* J« 




SOLE SURVIVOR 

IN THE RIGGING 



(..mimical from l"»K«- 1. 



the two men In the rigging were ap- 
parently too numbed to attach It to 
the rigging Failure to get the. line 
fastened, so that thebreeches buoy 
j might be sent out, prevented a rescue 
. In this way. 

Word was sent to Norfolk, where the 
navy yard wireless flashed the news 
I of the plight of the vessel. NVws came 
'■ back here that one of the battleships 
. would steam as near the shoals as pos- 
! slblc and attempt to rescue the men 
i from seaward. The coastwi.se tele- 
) graphs also brought wot.l that thet the 
1 revenue cutter service would .send n 
I vessel. 

While the life Buyers watched, the sea 

j pounding the vessel to pieces, ope of 
I the two men was seen to disappear as 
1 a big wave swept over tfta figging. He 
| hud been wfiiehed from iP, spar 
wliich he had clutched all day. dashed 
j into the sea and was drowned. 

It was rm! until after n ion tba'l I 
Identity of tin vessel became known. | 
I A piece •■' w rei kn -•. . bi m n g t In na nn 
I was washed ashore I nd the force 
of tin- terrific waves 1 •■,.-• n 

two and is fast going to pieces. She 
will be a total wreck xvjth her cargotOf 



er satisfactorily, although the weather 
of late has been very Unfavorable, to 
surveying. 

asms Is Plentiful 

Although n I > ;nvay for about a 
week, the party brought back a brace 
of stories that hear out tho statements 
• l' others regarding tlu> profusion of 

Kune in the northern regions. On 
their way home on Saturday night, 
Just us they wer« making the out- 
skirts of Nanaimo, the headlights "' 
the motor car showed the occupants 
a great black bear not more t'aan a 
hundred feet l:i front of them. He 
appeared to dread the strange glim- 
mer In the wilderness of darkness, 
and scurried off as rapidly as possible, 
nioeh to the comfort of the unarmed 
travellers. 

The other episode concerned on.- of 
the survey parties of tin- company 
"I'eratlr.g out of Port Allierui. None 

of. the men hail arms of any descrip- 
tion,, th.-;,- axes being their only \\ •"• 1 

pons. After getting out into thn bii.sh 
lor a bit, inn of the men espied a COU- 
Snr. lie at once e:ii!.-d to his corn- 
panions. and to-^.'b.r they mnde for 

tho criMii-iiimr aniin.ii. when, to their 
Intense astonishment, they found 
tiiiunseU en gced by, not one', hut four, 
■ invars. Raising their axes, the men 
imed a defeni\'ve attitude and 
ror the attack, which came at 
last from bne one of the Island pan- 
thers. Waiting until the animal was 
within » fe*eohable distance of him. 



the motor car horns announce that the 
statf officers are leaving for the front, 
three or four hours' journey. Many ot- 
(tears go* W the battlefield for the ila \ , 
returning in the evening like business- 
men who Journey between their home* 
and town officea 

Armed Tradesmen 

"We correspondents can envy them 

and chafe tit our imprisonment while 
stirring scenes are being witnessed 
o\er the hlM.s. From time to lime 

strlngs of indifferent Turkish prison- 
ers ami scowling, cut throat Alban- 
ians pass through tile streets. Hands 

of Servian volunteers frequently are 
seen marching to the front. Many of 

lliem are tradesmen, for whom there Is 

no rooui in tin- regiments, but whose 

patriotism forbids them to n-niiin in- 
active at home They .'ire armed with 
short carbines, and their belts, full of 

eartriil«es, hold also big revolvers and 

knives. Altogether, they are well 

equipped and clothed. There la BO 

sign of poverty among the Vrahjii wo- 
re. 11. whose breadwinners are at the 
front. Old men are .seen crowding 
.•\ ery day at a certain houi 
the building where amp5e rations are 
free. 



THE DOMINION NAVIES 



•1 - -nder-in- 

: j In 

ions from a villa 
C Vranjii. In the 



the military 1 
In the outski! 

hills. He has been paying special at 



it lias been suggested in the New 
Zealand parliament by Mr. Myera. the 
late minister of defence, that Mr. 
1 ■■huri liill, If he vl*it» Canada, should 
be invited to extend his voyage to 
Australitisia in order to discuss with 
ministers the foreign situation and the 
■naval provision required to meet it, 
says The London Times of October 19. 
The suggestion may or may not be 
pi leii.-ablc. New Zealand Is unfortu-. 
u.itely a long way off; voyages take 
time; and a strong measure of uncer- 
tainty attaches to t lie parliamentary 
prospects of the cabinet Wfliou Mr. 
Churchill adorns. But we are very 
Klad, nevertheless, that the suggestion 
has been made. It shows that tho 
itlon of Australia and New Zealand 
In matters of naval defence Is excit- 
ing a good deal of reflection upon the 
sp.,t. and, taken in conjunction with 
the recent pronouncement of Mr. Allen, 
the present minister of defence, it 
shows how keen en anxiety exists to 
keep both consultation and preparation 
j abreast of- the empire's needs. AVe 
! have little doubt, moreover, that, suh- 
! Ject to the considerations mentioned 
the suggestion would he wel- 
by Mr. Churchill himself. He 
has already shown a restless anxiety 
to study naval conditions at first hand 
and a sympathetic understanding of 



READ 







"The Tribune" 

Fort George 

TO KKKI' IX GLOSJE Tol'CII WITH DE- 
VELOI'M J-.XTS IN CKXTRAL 

iiritisii 'UMm \ 

» 

The Inland Empire of British Cokrmbia is 

mi rile \'cr^e of th. .'A'h that has 

yet overtaken an) p.ftti of Canada. 

Possibilities Indicated by Alberta 

The great prairie province rta, for 

sJ||i\ 'HI™TO|i@||j|ppib w 11 an increase in popula 
«T^I*-pef.xent in the last decade, and I 
towns, Caigrary arid gdmonton, have become 
. nwitroiiolttstii j^ties. 

One But ManjLResources 

> " ak. ', ^iJfir*." ■■*';'-.-■. ' * • '*s ■ ' "", t' 1 —. ' lei .''■'■•'.» 'i- ' 



- wS 



And 0»'$rli»T\y indie 
ment fl^?Cc»tra^ Briti: 



Turkish Cavalry iti/+he Streets, of Constantinople, on 



THE WAR IN CHE BALKANS 

leir W'av £0 Their 



Mobilizing Depot at Aarianople 



STORM 



HURLS 
VESSEL 



ON ROCKS 



Continued frum fade I. 



who heroically put out in a boat to the 
scene of the disaster. lie found the 
four men saved climbing to the wreck- 
age, these he took safely to shore, but 
though lie searched all night he could 
recover no more. 

A careful search for the bodies was 
carried Ot) all through the morning. 
but up to noon only one body had been 
found, tint of a man, It being picked 
up some miles ^rom the scene of the 
wreck; it is expected tnat the otii. r 
bodies will float down t;.- St. Law- 
rence, some never to he found, which 
will make it impossible to find out just 
how many lost their lives. , 



DEPRECATES ANY 

TALK OF WAR 



Continued frum I'imth I. 



,/ !01->«S Say ward BuUefthj. City. 



treaty in 1910, Germany and Canada 
ha \i- Man Joined by close ties of mutual 
bineflt. The exports to Gerni.iny 
amounted to f 3,500, Uiiti In ml. as com- 
pared with ft, "OO.oaO in 1910, while the 
bnportS from Germany show an Increase 
of over a million dollars in the samv 
period. Canadian shares arc regarded 
mere and more as a lucrative invest- 
ment and Herman business men an 
■ 'lining In larger numbers every year to 
sre the Dominion. 

"In this connection I may say that 1 
have practically completed arrangements 

tn bring out a party ot seventy business 
and financial men frum Germany to tour 
the Dominion next summer. That was 
part nr the object of my present trip, 
my other reason for coming is in con- 
nection with a special Canadian number 
of The Illustrirte Zeltung, which will 
appear soon." 



one of the men swung his axe In the 
air, and, by great good fortune, hit 
the oncoming brute on the head with 
the heavy blade. The contact stunned 
the animal, and, before he. could re- 
cover, the men rushed at hlrri <n.l fin- 
ished him with their axes. They suc- 
ceeded in killing a second, but the 
other two escaped into the woods, 

Tho party reported that all the 
time they were out they saw hosts of 
grouse and pheasants, and, but for the 
fact that they did not even have a 
revolver among them, they would h 
brought home a consider 1 Me bag. 



CALM SUCCEEDS 

FOUR-DAY BATTLE 



Continued From I'agr I, 



CONSTRUCTION 

IS PROCEEDING 



Continued from r»s«i I. 



J 



tractors will be able to push things 
right along 

After leaving Port AlbernI the party 
went off In the direction of Gowichan 
lake, nnd they were able to Inspect 
two miles already constructed or the 
wagon road leading from tho AlbernI 
canal towards Nltlnat. This road Is 
to run from the canal district right 
through to Cowichan lake, a distance 
of about thirty miles, and, of course. 
means a tremendous undertaking. It 
has to be constructed, however, in 
order to get men and material Into 
that ssrt of the country. In fact, ujn- 
tll this roe-d i» completed, or partially, 
completed, the Work in the interior 
cannot bs proceeded with, ef fectlvsly. 

At the present tlm* there ara ho 
roads connecting these parts, and the 
necessity i»f having onf Is' Urgent. . #he 
work along" the Shawnlgift lake and 
Cowichan -Jshe- dlstrictl < 1* prociwtrir 
rather slowly . at present on account 
of the scarcity of iwen, but th», loca- 
tion of «V# line In the extreme north* 



nlng water. You can Just make out a 

long line of the Turkish beads In the 

trenches. At this end of tiu- bridge 
quite plainly you see the firing lnu- 
strung out. 

"on the shoulder of thai slope of 
ploughed land lying' nearest lo us. 
there are pack horses with boxes of 
ammunition grazing In the sheltered 
valley on this Sldi 

"The wreckage ol an army i.< not a 
pleasant sight, There were bandaged 
heads with blood staining through the 
lint in sickly shades of xr-. n and yel- 
low. An old man |U tired a- the little 

barebacked donkey, was traiiini: oho 
bare tool wrapped IP a crimsoned rag. 
A young felloe mi h horse waa held up 
by two other cripples on either si 

hi* head druopini; nn his ri^hl shoulder 

with an unnS turn i twisi 

"It was the agrr.-niin Bulgarian w th 
whom i had been staying with «iv 
weeks ago, who lay on i 1 "' floor, a 

corpse. Just art he had happened t" Cft't, 
and the causa was the progressive de- 
centralization in Macedonia." 

VKAN.IA. Servian Army Headquart- 
ers, Tuesday, 6ct. 29. (Delayed by tie- 
censor. )— "The passage of the Servian 
army has changed bu1 liltb- the ftspeel 
of the frontier town of Vran.in, Which 
lire-serves an astonishingly clean and 
blight appearance. Those acquainted 
With the slovenly, dirty Turkish tpWns 
are amazed to flfd here well -paved atui 
well-drained streets and a pretty white 
village. But for the gypsy quarter 
Viiinja mi^ht almost he a Swiss village, 
shut In as It Is by lofty wooded moun 
tains. 

"Nevertheless the war has transform- 
ed life here considerably. Although th» 
army Is forty kilometers away the towr, 
is full of staff officers and others 
whose duties retain them with th» 
headquarters of the army. The chief 
inn la full of the war correspondents 
All the waiters are fighting at th* 
front. Amusing scenes are witnessed 
when trie o'ffleers and Journalists sit 
down to their meals in the big public 
room characteristic of all Servian inns 

" 'First eortie. flrat aerved* ( has a real 
meaning for those who watt to b* 
served ft the risk of having nothing tp 
est. CoisJBequantly th*r* Is a constant 
pr«K'«sS|on to and fros* th* kitchen for 
piatefuls of whatevefi- h«4>pssis to' be 



tention to the movements of the first 
army, commanded by the crown 
prince, which won the battle of Ku- 
manovn. The battle of Kumanovn. 
ended with the fall il ttl< last ridges, 
th of the town, held 1 the Turks, 
tlius making the Servian victory com- 
plete, Tho first Servian arm-.' Jiael 
driven the enemy back from position 
to position; the Turks contesting tin- 
ground foot by foot. 

Capture of Kumanova 

"A turning movement executed by 

the Servians on Wednesday, however, 

made the Turkish position most pre- 

)us, besides placing the town of 

Kumanova in Servian hands Never* 

less, the Turks resumed the battle 

mi Wednesday evening, opening with 

ry I'lre on the Servian 

position. . • 

"The Servian guns returned the fire, 
and the artillery duel lasted until 
morning. \ bright moonlight, light 
enough to read a newspaper, was ur 
advantage, as the range was found 
time at leas! 1 1 I be tilled shot. 
Then ■ m -i" in burst over the Turk- 
ish entrenchments end batteries with 
deadly effeel The Turkish fire was 
mm b less accurate Their losses iii 

the night bomb trdmenl .\ • re \ ery 
Dawn saw onlj a til 

Slackening lo the cannonade, imt tin- 
Infantry and cavalrj were now 
Broughl Into the field. 

"Long linos ot Turkish infantry of 
the Mrin divisinn were thrown for- 
ward, and poured it murderous fire 
into Servian ranks, mi the- opposite 
side of the crest. This did terrible 
execution Until the Thirteenth Regi- 
men; of Servian Infantrj dislodged 

the Turks after B liriliiant bayonel 

charge. The fighting was continued 

all day. In the afternoon the Turks 
gave way, their retreat being sn diS- 

organlzed that, eontrarj to their cus- 
tom, they left many dead on the field. 
King Peter went bj motpr ear 6ut 
from \'r;.uij,-i, to watch the battle." 



cooked. 



I m*H :..^»«k.ta'H.»M- «.»A».-'^.^i*-*i.ii«*iw»/-*ir*_ '• -B^i-tw ft. «K> MMMIn* 'OuS aniihit- At ><kUh dtatliMitli^i ihvaualh tlo <rt«4l -WkU-. 



Donation to Harvard. 

BOSTON, Muss.. X,iv., 2.— Mrs. Rus- 
sell Sage is tn (Innate B tiew freshmtvn 

dormitory for Harv.trd to be railed 

St.-indlsh Hull AinmiMii i i.i-nl nf the 

girt was made today i>\ the eommlttei 
Ahii-h is working tp raise jj, 806,000 for 
freshmen dormitories. 



Ontario's W. C. T. V. 
ItKA'l.'UKW. Out., Nov. B.— The thir- 
ty-fifth annual convention of the On- 
tario Women's Christian Temperance 
Tnion concluded this afternoon only 
routine business being transacted. 
While not definitely decided It Is 
thought thai Stratford win be the 
meeting place for the 1913 convention. 



the problem of Imperial defence. That 
problem is so complex, in the existing 
state of Imperial relationships, that it 
Is very difficult to deal with it con- 
tinuously, consistently, and as a whole. 
The conditions of the problem are al- 
ways Iible to change, and so are bhe 
different Imperial cabinets. On our 
side, we have recently had to revise 
■our arrangem-i nts In consequence of 
another trying and extremely impor- 
tant German navy law. On the side of 
the Dominions, the victory of Mr. Bor- 
den in the I'anadian elections last 
year has brought a new and mom?n- 
tuous force to bear upon the whole 
process of imperial thought. In New 
Zealand, also, there has been a change, 
or rather' two changes, of government 
since the imperial conference last year. 
Thus i wo of the Dominion prime min- 
isters with whom our government ex- 
changed Views are now out of power, 
while the other two can no longer be 
fully in touch with a position which 
has almost been revolutionized Since 
they wire lure. We do not wonder, 
therefore, that the desire for t -nnfer- 
. noes, or something even better, Is so 
inuutl In the air. 

There Is. It seems to us, an abso- 
lutely urgent necessity for the estab- 
lishment of Some method of continuous 
personal consultation between re- 

sponsible ministers. The readiest 

p actlcal method needs very nttin 
change, it is. as we have often urged 
before, the delegation of a minister 
from each Dominion cabinet to the 
committee of defence. Let tills step 
| be taken, and then at least all eec- 
liona of opinion in the self-governing 
empire will fee! that the British cab- 
policy Is watched, and its state- 
menta adequately checked, by a repre- 
sentatlv* of their own. Botih internal 
ml .-Menial considerations dictate 
such a reform — Internal, because the 
Dominion governments should have 
some safeguard against the Intrusion 
of Hrltlsh party exigencies Into ques- 
tions of imperle.1 concern; external, be- 
cause Europe has .Inst been plunged 
Into the gravest crisis of modern years. 
and not statesman can tell what Cite 
Issue will be. The Dominion gyivern- 
m.uts should he able to learn, through 
their own delegates, how much or how 
little that Issue may affect the com- 
mon Imperial Interests which they 
share: and if «ny one of them decides 
that the emergency requires it to 
strengthen the empire's power, it 
should have the strongest possible 
guarantee that the purpose it ha# in 
view Is faithfully carried out. 



930,000 Damages. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. Nov. 2 — 
Warren Graff, a carpenter's helper, 
who sued tba United Railroads Com- 
pany of this olty for 1 7fi,000 for the loss 
of both legs, was awarded $80,000 dam- 
MgSjs by a Jury today. 

; fa^me^3r^"i*s4 

CHATTANOOOA, T>nn.. Nov. a.— Gen- 
eral Robert W. ITealy.. one o^ the wealth-. 



«jMRMus9e^P ""■ 



Mm 



he develop- 

and' Peace 

s. for this 
d, tens of 
millions of acres of it; it has the timber, it has 
the minerals— all the varied resources that in- 
sure the quickest and soundest development. 





Attractive to the WilcS-Catter 



Deatb of Father Cartas , 

ST. JOHN, N. B.,, Nov. ».— Wor* WSS 
received here Met night or th* dearth, 
of Father Carson of St. George M the 
do Carney hospital In Bc*tori. Re Waa 
born in St. John. ,SR years ago. 

»lrle for deaneries 

»T, JOHN, X. B., Nov. >.— Thirty 
young women from Newfoundland 
passed through tbia «lty last -night 
en route to «t% Andrews to work In a. 
packing factory of the Canadian Can- 

'. ■ t ». tt I* • *-V-i_'^ ' ■ fcj l' *■-# ' -I, 1 ' 3t ^lri'^fl^''j|i 

neries. LlmMad^^/^e. ,.. 

from swsip 

'tilt. IU» DUl 



Everypnfe whjb keeps up- to date knows this 
to be true. And those who think know also 
that this activity necessarily gives rise to the 
sheerest gambling ventures" as well as to pro- 
positions that are. absolutely sound ; that it in- 
spires the wild-catter to his best efforts to 
separate the unwary from their money, as well 
as to encourage legitimate enterprise. 



Example of Fort George 



impanies of various kinds are being and 
vviil be formed with Stock to sell. Tovvnsites 
will be offered. Nj^hese investments may be 
good, bad or indifferent. But it will not be 
amiss here to observe "the general principle 
that the steady increases of property values in 
Fort Gftorge will not profjl the unwary per- 
son who puts money into lots in a so-called 
tovvnsite thai stands not even the chance of 
being a village site. Investors should know 
beyond any doubt what they are buying. 



Tribune's Policy of Protection 



It is the policy of The Tribune, whose 
future is bound up with the development of 
Central British Columbia and Peace River 
District to give the facts without fear or favor. 
The publishers propose, as far as they are able, 
to protect the investing public at large frorrf 
wild-catters. We shall make mistakes. But 
in the best interest of Central British Co- 
lumbia, we shall not knowingly permit the 
plausible vendor of worthless properties tp 
take toll of our rearders, nor of the general 
public, without turning the light on. 



Keep in Touch 



So again we say "Read The Tribune." Keep 
in constant touch with the development of the 
largest ami richest undeveloped portion of the 
Dominion of Canada. The Tribune may 
directly save you hundreds and even thousands 
Of dollars by keeping you from fake invest- 
ments and by showing you the actual oppor- 
tunities, it will likewise be of great positivo 
value. 

If you can't live here yet, do the next best 
thing — "Read The Tribune" — $4.00 per year 
for all the news, the facts fresh f'nm head- 
quarters about Central British Columbia. 
Sample copy, 10c. 

Address 

"The Tribune" 

FORT GEORGE, B.C. 

This Ad Will Not Appear 

Again 



Send me the FORT GEORGE TRIBUNE 

I enclose subscription price— 

j months *,.... ..♦•••*• •••••»•• #*.oo 

Qr 1 yeair -« ••••«•••••••«■»•••♦• •▼4*00 

Sample Copy ..^. ...... ......-.»• toe 



-.: - 



k&AMB 



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ADDR&5S ...... ••.•.•*.. ••..••••••* •»-•*•'* 5 ..• a. 






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Sunday, Nover^bi' J, '~''~ 



VKTOK1A DAILY VOLOMSl 




" '" '" < " ' '- - \"' V?T, PPf:' 



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Thousands of Monied Home- 
Seekers Mill Flock -to Victoria 

BECAUSE 

Victoria and its vicinity possesses the 
finest climate tio be found in Canada. 
Read this item from TheColonist of 
October 30 last : ^^ 

SNOWSTORM IN WINNIPEG 






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Street Car Sorvice Is Demoralized for 
Several Hours , . *y 

WINNIPEG, Man., Oct. 29;— This sea- y 
son's first snowstorm pf fifteen hours' 
duration. Is now a thinjr of the past, 
and is rapidly being forgotten, the wind 
having dropped and the strtet car ser- 
vice which in the early morning was 
demoralled, has nearly regained its nor- 
mal condition. In all, five inches of 
snow fell last night and with a heavy . 
northwest wind blowing, this morning 
Winnipeg's thousands of workers walk- 
ed. Those from the outlying districts 
experienced great difficulty in reaching 
the city. By noon tomorrow if the 
present weather continues, little 
seen of the worst October storm", 
nipeg ever experienced. 

Nothing like that in Victoria in Mid- 
winter, let alone in October. The cor- 
responding day in Victoria was a dull 
day for autumn in Victoria, and yet, 
while this terrific blizzard was raging on 
the prairie, the maximum temperature in 
Victoria was 46.3 and the minimum 32.2, 
as shown by the official records. 

It is this splendid climate that v/ill 
bring the prairie people in armies to Vic- 
toria—when they have made their "pile," 
small or large — during the next few 
years. These people will want desirable 
homesites. The demand will naturally 
cause .values to increase, with the result 
that those who buy desirable, low-price, 
high-grade residential property now 
will be certain of good profits. 

Buy a Lot in Coilingwood Today 

And take the profits later in the winter. 
\o other residential property on the mar- 
ket compare- with this at the price and 
terms. "COLLINGWOOD" offerVyou 
Y< »UR OPPORTUNITY TO ' >YVN 
FIRST CI. \SS RESIDENTIAL LOTS 
AT A FRACTION OF WH \T THEY 
Wild BRING IX A SHORT TIME, 
AND ( ).\ TERMS THAT WILL LET 
YOUR POCKET-BOOK DOWN 
EASY. 

DON'T WAIT— SEE ABOUT IT 
NOW! 





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Beautiful Lots With Rich Soil and Good View, Near Street Car Line, Selling Today for 
$35® sec! Up; on Terms of $50 Cash and $50 Quarterly 



READ THKSK BRIEF* "FACTS ABOUT "COLLI XGWOQD"— THEN MAKE UP YOUR MIND QUICKLY, BECAUSE THE 
BEST LOTS WILL GO AT A RECORD CLIP AT THESE LOW PRICES AND EASY TERMS. 

Property faces new station of Saanich electric line, which is to he in operation December 20 — next month. 

Fronts on Carey Road, with gentle slope, commanding fine view. Glanford Avenue, marking one of Victoria's finest suburban 
residential sections, long since subdivided, crosses rear of propertv. Y. and S. railway line crosses Glanford Avenue near "COLLING- 
WOOl • 

Adjoining subdivision, "Colquitz Heights,'' was sold out some time ago at similar prices. Many re-sales have been made to date at a 
marked advance. 

Carey Road is 4n important main trunk artery. _, 

-Lots are 50x135 and delightfully laid out. Nearly all of the land is under cultivation, and there is a WTe^orchard on the property. 
There arc several charming groves of large shade trees. 

Soil is deep, rich and level, free from rock and naturally drained. Meal for garden- and lawns. Fine house m centre of property. 



Motors Daily From Office of Sole Agents 






Phone 471 



721 Yates Street 



IP TOTJ CAW 
NOT CALL 
CLIP AND 
MAIL THE 
COUPON 
TODAT. 



WALLACE & CLARICE 

721 Tat*« Street, Victoria, B. C. 
Please send mo full dctnlla of your 

"CoiiiiiKwooc!" property. -Thin is not to 
obligate me In any way. 

name. . — ...: ' .. '• ; 

ADDRESS • 



YOU HAVEN'T ALL THE 
TIME IN THE WORLD TO 
"GET IN." GOLDEN OPPOR- 
TUNITIES ARE SLIPPING 
THROUGH YOUR FINGERS 
EVERY DAY— PRICES ARE 
GOING UP ALL THE TIME— 
DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER; 
BUY A LOT IN "COLLING- 
WOOD" AT TODAY'S PRICES 
AND TERMS AND MAKE 
MONEY INSTEAD OF JUST 
SAVING. 

' Now that the taxes are paid for an- 
other year and von have a little cash to 
spare, think seriously of the investment 
opportunities you are passing by. 

Read this from The Colonist of Nov- 
ember 1 : 

"In point of commercial activity, Oct- 
ober, as demonstrated by the bank clear- 
ings, saw all records broken. The 
month's clearings, totalling $17,772,643, 
made a new record, and carried the total 
for the year to date to still another new 
high mark." 

And read this from The Colonist of 
X'ovember 1 : 

"During the first ten months of the 
year ended yesterday the aggregate 
value of the buildings for which permits 
have been issued during that period was 
$6,543,410, compared with $3,167,740 in 
the corresponding period last year, an 
increase of no less than $3,375,670, or 107 
per cent." 

These figures are alive with signifi- 
cance. They mean that Victoria is 
growing at a marvellous rate and yet 
sanely and logically; they mean that 
prices are ascending and that Ihey will 
go on ascending. YOU SHOULD OWN 
A LOT IN "COLLINGWOOD" AND 
YOU SHOULD BUY IT RIGHT NOW 
AVI-IILE PRICES ARE SO EASY AND 
TERMS SO READILY MET. 

DON'T WAIT— SEE ABOUT IT 
NOW! 






7 ~n 




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■MHWMMMCfcJ* ,.«f3fcy ■ 



20 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, Novimb«r 3, 1912 






WAS HANDSOME ONE 



-A Surplus of Over Ten Thou- 
sand Dollars Is Now to the 
Credit of the Association — 
The Figures 



The u. C, Agricultural kssoolmion has 
the caUlying aAtibuncomoat i" m.iwe iu 

the peoplr 01 Victoria Ui.u t ti.- exhibition 
for IBM liua lemilli-cl In a liamUoma fiiiciiv- 
. I:il profit "I ncail> ten UkuikiiiuI dollars 
l.ast yenr there una .1 paltry caSll bal- 
ance of *iM; this year the aaaocUiiOD lias 

VT.i-'i at tin- bank, outstanding cradlt ac- 
counla for |l t 231 and n« buildings worth 

51.717. In IBtl ta.ktnffl at the g.Ucs und 
the grandatand amounted to l)Ut 5S,4:M, 
while this year that sum has been doubled. 
And throughout the following tlnanclal 
Stan -nit'tii it will be found thai, while the 
luiiilU- ha , been given a great deal u 
for "their money than iu form ear*, tills 

M iKe policy has resulted In un Jucreaso that 
always loaves a balance on the right side. 
The people of Victoria need little remind- 
ing as to whom their thanks for this sutU-, 
factory state of thing* are duo to. Dr. 
Toimle, as the association** president, and 
m.-. ' ^.Smiiiarter.. *• M* •e.cret#ry» have fof 
years past borne tho burden *nd heat of the 
day, and the present result Is proof that 
they have not worked m vain. Victoria 
has grown with a rapidity that tetUi the 
machinery of any Individual body within 
her bounds to the utmost; every year now 
will impose harder and harder work on 



i ■■■■ ■■slsjs fa* eahlhltlniis hi 



this balance sheet is good grounds for look- 
ing forward with confidence to the future 
of the big agricultural show of the Island. 
A special tribute is paid by the officials 

to tfcfl b. c. jj-wtrte y«m^4y, «»«• *"« «*: 



WILL THIS PROPHECY 
BE FULFILLED? 



l.e Devoir «( Montreal renub- 
llslieil from a Parisian newspaper 
ti paragraph which nun Interest 
in reference to the present altuu- 
tion In eastern Kuroiio. II -re it is: 

"The year 1.912 premise* to he 

fatal '<> the I tttamaii mj^re, ii' 

we are to believe an ami nt 
legend of the Balkans. A pronh- 
ee.v lias A that Cnli«tanUlH>p]e 
will fall again into tin lui tn I of 

the Christians in the year in 

which the festival of Kaster shall 
ha v (■ been < . 1 n t.l a It ,1 OH Mi' fj 

25. Annunciation i>ay. Tin- 

prophecy was Mimic, ii is said, in 

H53. the year, of tin taking of 
Constantinople by the Turk*; and 
this year. 181JT, 1'or the first time 
since, the, Blaster of the orthodox 
Greek church was celebrated on 
March 26. The prophecy said 
also that as the city of ConBtahf 
tine was taken hy a Mahomet 
(Mahomet II.) it would be taken 
from a Muho'met; and it is a 

lous couamS^mmht^ pt*>hax 





m G 




Til W A FLAT 



•*■** 




Practical Experiment Being 
Tried in London by County 
Council—In Charge for a 
Week 



l.iiN'bON. Nov. ■!.— The London 

County Council, t" w] i Uoodohert owe 

a di . p •!• b'l ol ■' iiitu.le, are trying a 
n..e, ; , < .. [nianl at the BhOl ■'■ 
[■■ 'iinn ai Institute. 

A email flat has been B(ted up to 
r, n.'inbl, .1 in ■ ' l.v as possibb' the 
class of homes to which the trlfls to be 
taught housewifery are accustomed, and 
<&jtfe, six at a time, for a period of six 
weeks, students of the Domestic Econ- 
amy D.y School go Into ro.l.unu .: una 



THE BIG COMPANY 




Ma 






om New 




NAVAL POLICY 

Mr. Armand lavergne Fostering: Opposi- 
tion la Quebec 

■i . - ■ i - 

QUEBEC, Nov. 2. — Armand Lavergne 
held a meeting at Lorette today which 



w a s larg e ly att e nded. The primlpal 
feature of bis address was an attack 
on the government with regard to Its 
naval P«Ucy. Postmaster-General Pel- 



are expected to run the ii 
selves. 

?0' :: iMvak^M'^'Wm/0Kf intended *■ 

into *>rn«(rtlc SeVvflSIF Wf«% i^«HP»y 
meant as a prMtttai prepara^on for 
home life. Extreme simplicity char- 
acterises the furnishing throughout, for 
the "tenants" of 'the fiat are drawn, 
from the, class of the small shopkeeper 
and the artisan. 

For the space-. of -one week.«acn of 
the young students (their ages vary 
from 14 to 18 years) acts! as the 
"housemother" and is responsible for 






Spent three mpnths looking for profitable investment 
throughout her reputed lair — the WV-i. H.1 last he came 
to Coquitlam. He w is pleased, but he Kept his own 
counsel and returned tothe East. 



• 9 





ut Twelve 
rst Division " 

Was the next wte heard of him. ^nly >CbquitIam," he 
added, "andone other place took gbod to hie." 

This man studied Coquitlam. It "looked good" be- 
cause it is good. 

New Coquitlam "MAKE 



Some Good 

Houses and 

Lots 



Fifth Street -Between Sum- 
mit and Fmlaysbn, fruit 
trees on lot ..'..$1,800 

Vancouver Street— Between 
Bay and Kings, 10 x 117. 
for '....'$2,250 

Obed Avenue — 51 x 128, 
water on streel .$800 

McNeill Street, Oak Bay— 
60 x 120 $1,500 

Pleasant Street, Oak Bay — 

Above Saratoga, 54 x 125, 

for $1,800 

St. Patrick Street — Near 
McNeill, 48x120. $1,470 

Linkleas Avenue — 80 x 256. 
Cut into 4 lots. . .$5,800 





Half Ull Acre Qtt Jhe Gorge 
Road, with 5-room hous 

mojdeYn 

Splendid position _ 
— i s ■ 




1 



cell cut ■ arrangements made tor the trans- 
portation ot tha crowds throughout la* 
week to nnd from the fair grounds. 
The accounts read as follows: 
Revenue 



193.00 
G04.93 
55^.00 



Sundries • • • .....-.•■.. 

Sale of feed 

Membbra* tickets 

SubscrlpUon*— 

Clly 1911 deficit * 784.92 

■City- for buildings and 

grounds fi.000.OU 

i'rov. Uovt. for st>rlt)g 

horse show 4,000.00 

Horse show commiti. 

.Mrs. c. Birch ;• •• 26.00 

l'niv. Govt, grunt to fair 5,000.00 

Miss Summers 3.00 

Van. Milling CO, , • 1B.00 

City grant to fair 6,000.00 

Lake of the Woods 

Milling Co. . S6-00 

B.C. Stock Breeders' 

Assn. 227.98 

». C. Dairymen's Assn. 217.00 
Robin Hood Mills . . . . 10-00 

Advertising 

KentB, privileges and concessions 

Knliy fees 

Harness race entries 

Gates 

Grand stand 

Total ..,../.... $47,488.47 

h on hand $ 7,128.79 

outstanding accounts 1,222.28 

New cattle sheds, canvas, safe 

C.I12 1,747.36 



tetlor received oonsiaefaDlo ffllehflSftj 
from the speaker, who ss4d he had In- 
vited Pelletier to be present, but; bjs 
had failed to appear. Xaverghe was 
frequently applauded during hr« ad- 
dress. He was the only speaker. 



& 



seeing that the domestic duties are 
carried out efficiently. With the as- 
sistance of the under "housemother" 
she prepares breakfast for he* "fam- 
ly, " iisiwu aa l i st of th a prtt giainaa 



GOOD" Facts 




20,371.10 



Two Die in Hotel Tire 

ST I.nns, .M.i., Nov. 2. — The second 
body found this afternoon jn the 
ruins of the Berlin hotel, which was 
destroyed by fire early today, - was 
iiU'iitified tonight as that of" Mrs. 
Helen Abies. W. C. Douglas, a local 
financier, was burned in the hotel fire, 
and twenty persons were injured. 



required tot the day «*•#• 
the dinner \ r iM l»»»PPeT. «*#: 

^,,lto^l4tt|b. : 1»i:.do the • 

Accounts have to ha^jirafully Kept, 
the day's expenses entered up each 
evenlneT. and the week's total submitted 
to the minstiesa in charge. Upon the 
"iKHiwemother," too, rests ^^WSS^^' 
allotting their tasks to her staff of two 
parlor and two housemaids. 

s v i >.--: i :v, x.s.w.. nov. 3.— Hundreds 
of people are now booking seats for the 
forthcoming Davis cup contest. Brooksj 
i.'unlop, , Heath and Jones are the prob- 
able Australian representatives. 



2.056.15 

767.60 

14,499.25 

-.299.00 



PJMfcal $10,096.42 

Bxpenditure 

Balance 1911 : .... I 784.92 

Sundry accounts, expressage, in- 
surance, freight, safe, etc.. . .. 1,112.54 

Khvmen • ■ 187 50 

•nor (1911) 25.00 

office expenses — 

Salaries $ 2,295.0fl . " 

Telephones .......... 51.75 

Postage 240.00 

Rent 256.00 

Repair typewriter ... 2.00 2,843.76 

l'rlzes — 

Spring horse show ... 2.348.00 

Kalr >.: 10,134. 6i 12,482.63 

Sports and attractions — 

Mush: 900.00 

Polo game I 

Harness races •. 2,137.50 

Concert ■' 

StJHdrJet HU.OO 3.30B.75 

bal '' a i 220.00 

New cattle sheds, repairs anil 

maintenance 5,187.27 

Advfrtlxlng 282. 

Printing Mil. 

l.nli.'i- at fiir I 2.1SI. 

Lighting ' 1,663. 

Spring Horse show expenses 8,243. 

New roof horse show building, 
dog show building and new 

roads < 3,955. 

Cash on hand 7,U'K. 




i'.lY,i.-'J!- ■> 



ut Advertising 
Waste!; 

^ Daily Newspaper Advertising h ihe best for general 
purposes. There are a score of other good media, all 
assuring excellent returns. But. the orchard improperly cultivated, bears 
small fruit. Ditto with advertising improperly handled. Victorian adver- 
tisers waste hundreds of dollars worth of space daily. We can show 
you how you may get better results at the same figure you now ex- 
id — sometimes less. Ask us. 



penc 



Total $47,1:18.47 

Balance of grant for buildings 

and grounds unexpended 1,044.72 

9,061.68 



Actual profit for 191^ 



Total $10,096.41 

Examined and found cm i 

J. Q KI.I.IDTT. Auditor. 



The only AdvCTti»ing Agency on Vancouver Island r4?cog» 
nized by the Canadian Press Association 

AdvrnNing iik) publicity of all VinA— Plucing done the world over- Form* 
• nd Follow-Up Sy»tem» thai pull -Multisraphing- BooklrU-Prcjprctusn. 



THE HUTCHARM COMPANY 

418-419 CENTRAL BUILDIN3 
PHONE 3233 BOOKLET ON REQUEST 




SACRIFICE 

In Revenue Producing Cusiness Property 

Corner with i 55 feet of street frontage, half mile from 
city hall, on main street and car line. Two-storey 
Building (store and rooms). $7,500 cash, balance 
1 , 2, 3 and 4 years. Price $27,500 

APARTMENT HOUSE SITE 

Frontage on three good street-, jusl p.tttsidS the hah' 
mile circle, 118x128x118. Easy 



terms. Price 



KING EDWARD'S BIOGRAPHY 



Some Interesting- Bidellg-hta Are to Be 
Brought Out 

I^ONDON, Nov. 2. — It wag Btffftifeatttfl 
recently In tills letter thai Lord 

Knollys might com.pilo the authorized 
biography of the lata King, which 
Queen Alexandra now wIwIich to hast- 
en on in view of much that has dis- 
pleased her in recent writing." con- 
cerning Kdward VTT. Lord Knollys, for 
domestic reasons, feels uneciufil to the 
task, which, it Is understood, will now 
be entrusted to Lord Esher. Lord 
Esher was on close terms of intimacy 
with the late King, and, In addition to 
being able to deal correctly with the 
personal aspects of his subject, should 
be trusted to throw some light on the 
political. 

PERISH IN LONDON FIRE 

Three Olrls SI* and Sight Art Badly 
Injured la Keaalafton Ont break 

LONDON. Nov. J. — Three girls are 
said to have perished and eight were 
badly Injured early this morning in a 
fire which broke out in the stores of the 
John Barker company in Kensington. 
Several girls, who were sleeping on the 
promises, were rescued with difficulty. 



IS 



$12,000 



PANDORA AVENUE 



Agriooltaral College* 

WOODSTOCK, N. B„ Nov. 2— Pre- 
mier Flemmlng announced here yester- 
day that "St waa the Intention of the 
provincial government to establish two 
agricultural oolleircs in New Bruns- 
wick, one at Woodstock and the othar 
•5 Sueaez, f 



Close in corner, lOOxiof). This is cheaper than Oak 
Bay avenue property one and a half miles further 
Otit, and is in for an early rise. Easy terms. 

Price ' $12,500 

V. & S. TRACKAGE 

134 feet on track and running hack 288 feet to and 
having a frontage of 134 feet on road. Cheapest 
large warehouse site offering. Easy terms. 

Price $5,000 

OAK BAY CORNER 

Close to the sea and Golf Links, [65XI to feet. Below 
market value. Very easy terms. Price. .$5,250 

ACREAGE 

Five acres on Lost Lake road, no rock. Inside three- 
mile circle. This is closer in than many portions 
of Oak Bay. Easy terms. Price, per acre $1,500 

FINE HOME 

Close to Dallas road and Beacon Hill park, on lot 
78x130. Eight-room, modern, new home, hot 
water heat. Price $14,500 

Anderson & Jubb 

Room 7, Green Block 



P.road Street 

* 



C.P.R. TERMINALS to be 

ni ifii ed about Becemter 15.., 
Arinouncemait officially knl* | 
letined. 

TWO bis? ^|fi^i9j NOW . 
erecting' tbeir plants. 

TIIRKK more that we 
KNOW will soon be there. 

^^HAW more will come. 

GOVKRXMKNT has ord- 
ered Pitt River Harhor 
dredged. 




MILLION Dollar 
jstarted >y the C.P.R. 

GREAT BUILDINq|||S1 
TIVITY — Fourteen houses 
building N'OW in first division 
alone. 

NEW $30,000 station soon 
to he erected. 

K KEN DEMAND for First 
Division lots — ■ especially 
13 roadway, Langan aud Tay- 
lor Street. 




Coquitlam is the ONE new town that everybody 
is now commenting on as the place that is more 
than fulfilling expectations — promising MUCK 
and doing MORE. 

Send your name and address for literature and to 
be listed for the beautiful- booklet, ".Coquitlam, the 
Industrial City," now in preparation— limited edi- 
"• tion. ''ii. 



Also 8-room House on the 
Gorge Road and three 
lots. Barn on property. 
Price ....... :.?11, 250 

HOMES OTXB SPECIALTY 



THE 



ity Brokerage 




Phono 815 



1319 Douglas St. 



The Ideal Hair 
Dressing Parlors 



Room 



?38 Yates St 



■ 



Coquitlam Terminal Co. 



LIMITED 



549-553 GRANVILLE STREET 



VANCOUVER, B. C. 



(Upstairs] 

Manicuring, Face Massage, Shampooing, 
Scalp' Treatment, Etc. 

Hours: 9 a. m. to 5.30 p. m. 
Tuesday and Friday to 8 p.m. 

PHONE 3783. 



"STAR 




KATE 




-THE BEST MADE— FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN 



"Starr" Skates arc made in gfac classes, as follows: 
Genuine Acme Club Skates Acadia Skates 
Mic-Mac Hockey Skates Ladies' Beaver Skates 

Figure Skates Scotia Hockey Skates 



,■ 




"Wherever there's ice there's 
STARR Skates." 

''A winning skater ^thanks his 
STARRS." 

"There arc two kinds of 
Skates— STARRS and imi- 
tations." 

"Sterling is the highest mark 
in silver — 'STARR' in 
skates." 

IMPORTANT 

Rules tn he strictly ob- 
served when screwing skates 

to hoots hy mean- of screws: 
Place the skate centrally on 
the hoot, and screw in. loosely, 
ime of the exireme front toe 
screws, then one of the end 
heel screws, and a toe and 
heel screw 'alternately, all 
merely tight enough to bring 
skate close tip to the boot. 
After all screws arc in posi- 
tion, tighten them up, and if 
properly done, the blade or 
runner of skate will he per- 
fectly straight, and no buck- 
ling will result. 



ONE POINT 

On which you should Insist In 
buying a cough medicine for chil- 
dren Is that It be free from nar- 
■ tlpg. To bo certain of tills you 
should buy 

Chamberlain's 
Cough Remedy 

Which does not contain opium In 
any form — Is also free from 
chloroform and cv.-ry other nar- 
cotic — yet always effects a speedy 
cure, 

Price 25c and 50c 



HICKMAN-TYE HARDWARE CO., LIMITED 



544-546 Yates Street 



WHOLESALE Al^D RETAIL 

Store Phcine 59, Office Phone 2043 




WE have a Fit-Re- 
form Overcoat 
which will exactly 
suit your taste and your 
physique. 

It may be a Fit-Reform 
"Military," "Form- Fitting," 
"Swagger," "Convertible," 
or some other style — but 
whichever style you choose, 
it will make you look as you 
want to look. 

Come in and let us help 
you select it. 

PRICES: 
$15.00 TO $35.00 



ALLEN & CO. 

Fit-Reform 

Corner YfttM mm& 



. .'// 



Allen's! Clothes Fit 



M _ MIM> - aHlMM t« M M^^^ MMMaMMH | HHM 



^ ^^^^^ 



. J.s:;',;;,.;;,^,^;,;;,^.;',.,.^:-^^-^,^-'...' 




Sunday, November 3, 19H 



VTCTOIUA DAILY COLONIST 



21 







I|H3ft any "exclusive feat- 
X tires 5 * that the custom 
tailor may be able to provide, 
you are likely to pay heavily 



- probably more than the 
clothes themselves are worth. 




You should pay only for two things 
in clothes-- -serviceability and style. 

Beyond these, no single feature is worth 
paying very much for. And yet there are 
points about FIT -RITE clothes that it 
isn't reasonable to expect in garments made 
by the small custom tailor. 



Richardson & Stephens 

14,3 Government Street Westhclme Hotel B!dg. 





This 
Offer 



Opposite 

Dominion 

Express 



Of Ladies • Suits 

Is one so remarkable as to insure the attention of Victoria 
ladies. in a marked degree. The perfect tailoring of Mr. Sheer 
is known to scores of Victoria and Seattle ladies, and the ma- 
terials he uses are in keeping with his skill, Until Saturday, 
9th inst., he offers: 

$45.00 Suits of exquisite tweeds, for. .$32.50 

These comprise all the latest weaves and colors. 
In black and blue serges he offers: 

$50 to $60 Suits for the low figure of $37.50 



English and American Ladies Tailors 

907 GOVERNMENT STREET 




Increase your profits by adopting a monthly system of 
multigraphed letters. Cannot be detected from typewriting. 
Prices low, and orders executed on the shortest notice. We. 
have the mailing lists. 

( "-.- ing to the fact that we, have two machines, one run by 
motor drive and automatic feed, we can deliver work 
promptly. 

The Newton Advertising Agency 



Suite 403) Times Building 



Phone [915 



TO CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Waterproof Canvas 

We manufacture waterproof canvas for cement covers, 
wagon covers, freight covers, hatch tarpaulins, bags, etc. 

All Sizes in Stock or .Made to Order 



F. JEUNE & BRO. 

Practical Sail and Tent Makers, 570 Johnson Street 
Phone 795 Ask for Prices Established 1882 

' — - 




Champion of Canada Will Next 
Meet O'Leary in Prince Ru- 
pert — Bout Between Him and 
Barrieau 



.Toe Bayley, the liKhtweiRht • •Vutm- 
pi.Mi of Cawtfia. arrived back in Vic- 
toria yesterday afternoon. He allowed 
absolutely no marks of Mb Oght with 
.Dick J 1. land in Calvary except a slight 
discoloration around one eye. 

Bayley's next fight will probably be 
with O'Leary, a Seattle boy. In Prince 
Rupert. Arrangements have not yet 
been entirely completed, but It Is ex- 
pected that the tight will take place 
this month, probably on some date be- 
tween the 10 th and the 15th. 

There Is considerable talk of a bout 
between Ernie Barrieau, the eraok 
Vancouver boxer, and Bayley, Which 
bout it la Rjropoaed to pull off some- 
where on the B. C. mainland. 

While no forfeits have been posted, 
the managers have agreed that in view 
of the strong public demand for this 
match they would undertake not to tie 
up their charges for any bouts other 
than those which the* now have in 
hand. Barrieau Is matched to meet 
Kid Scaler at Edmonton a week from 



I straits and mountains. It 

■ ■ ■ JL ■ 

can be purchased at a very 
much lower price than is 
asked for adjacent acreage. 

For Particulars, See 

L. H. Ellis 



yesterday while Bayley Is booked to- 
take on Johnny O'Leary, the clever 
Seattle lightweight. In a fifteen-round 
argument at Prince Rupert In the near 

future. ' — r- — ' ' « — — — — — 



Of course th* question at " weight, 
division of purse and referee have 
still to be settled but these matters 
have been pretty well threshed out in 
previous meetings of the managers 
and It Is not expected that there will 
be any difficulty In regard to these 
details if the location of the mllKcan 
be satisfactorily settled. 

When questioned lest night* Toe 
Bayley said that his chief desire waa 
to meet Hyland again. "The sooner 
the better," said Joe. "I hope Hyland 
Is the next, man I meet In the ring./' 

Morris Condon is most emphatic in 
his denial that he. refused to cover the 
$300 put up by Hyland's backers to 
bind another match between Hyland 
and Bayley. "1 offered to deposit any 
sum. from $2000 to $5000 with a sport- 
ing editor of one of the Ca\gnrjr8ijm&\ 
pcrs as a side bet for another fight 
between Bayley and Hyland and .they 
offered to cover $200 of It," said Con- 
don, and he added: "What do you think 
Of that?" ■ 

"With both Bayley and Condon only 
too anxious for another battle It looks 
as if Bayley and Hyland will meet 
again before very long. 

Bayley will now pay particular at- 
tention to Infighting. He has learnt 
what that Is worth and as he reallezs 
that he cannot affbrd to overlook any- 
thing If his ambition to become cham- 
pion of the world is to be satisfied he 
will study that branch of the game 
carefully in the future. Bayley's opln- 
HJ^pf Dick Hyland was summed up 
when he said "Hyland It a good in- 
fif.'htor but he cannot hurt me.' 



ARGOS WINNERS IN 

GREAT FOOTBALL GAME 



Down Bough-Blderg by 12 to 6 — Other 
Canadian Games Testerdny 



OTTAWA, Nov. 2.— In one of the 
greatest Big Four games ever seen In 
this city, the Argonauts downed the 
Rough-Riders here today, 12 to 6. All 
Ottawa was football mad and 10,000 
braved the chilly wind to see the two 
teams in action. The win puts the 
Argonauts right in the running for the 
Interprovlncials and if they can repea't 
the tvick in Toronto next week they 
will be champions again. 

Exhibition Game 

TORONTO, Ont., Nov. 2. — Owing to 
Ottawa College dropping out of the 
Intercollegiate Union, Varsity were left 
with an open date and brought the 
Royal Military College team from 
Kingston to play them an exhil.it Inn 
game. The soldier boys put up a better 
fight than was expected ajid Varsity had 
no cinch when they beat them 5 to 1. 

For Cellar Honors 

MONTREAL, Que., Nov. 2. — The 
Hamilton Tigers and Montreal battled 
here today for the cellar honors of the 
Big Four. It was Hamilton all the 
way and they scored, an easy win, 29 
to 1. 

Alerts Win Title 

HAMILTON, Ont., Nov:. 2. — The 
Hamilton Alerts assure themselves the 

honor Of playing the Dominion (Inn I 
when they handed Tornntos a IS to i 
beating In a senior O. R. !•'. K. game. 
This game gave the Alerts the cham- 
pionship of their union. They draw 
the bye in the semi-finals and the Do- 
minion final will be played In Hamilton. 

McGill Defeats Qneena 

KINGSTON, Ont, Nov. 2.— Mcf',111 
forged ahead in the Intercollegiate 
I'nlon When they defeated Queens II 
to 3 here today. Toronto Varsity will 
need to beat Queens here next week to 
tie it up and a play-off will be neces- 
sary. Queens were handicapped by In- 
juries to their stars and would have 
made a better showing under normal 
conditions. 



Unionists Gain BO Seats 

LONDON. Nov. 2.— Polling took place 
throughout England and Wales yes- 
terday for election to borough councils. 
Besides the local Interest such elections 
arouse, they are regarded as giving 
some indication as to the strength of 
the political parties In the larger 
affairs of the nation. The unopposed 
returns In London were more iium-r- 
otis than ever. In the country th* Un- 
ionists gained over fifty seats, the Lib- 
erals thirty seats and the Laborltes and 
Socialists twenty seats. 



CHOICE 

Sea 

Frontage 

Near 

Albert 

Head 

120 Acres 

This property is all under 
cultivation, has a half mile 
(if sea frontap\ with fine 

situation, commanding a 
it .,'■ 'v$ew of ;thc 



Ph o n e 9 4 ■ ■ i 

Room 6, Moody Block 



— —_ — 



R. RUTLEY 

Ladies' Tailor 



Costumes 
From - 



$30 



Ladies' Own Material 

Made lip 



Tel. 2597 
,408-9 Sayward Building 




Ripe in years. 




Rare in quality. 






• * -.,',■■ ■,■,, , 

The Top Notch of 




The safest and best beyefage for Colonial 

Climes, but test is best; prove best by 

test, and make this whisky with 

an individuality, your chosen 

stimulant. 




the Distillers (Company 

sJtm^ Large*! Scotch Whisky ^■■^ Capital employed 



rej-st bcotcti wiusky 
Distillers in the World. 



EDINBURGH. 
Agents :— R. P. RITHET & CO., LTD., VICTORIA, B.C. 



over A3, 000,000. 



The Best Buys in the City lor the Investor or the Homeseeker 

WILIOWS ROAD, on car lino and half block from Fort street corner. A first class five-roomed bungalow. The best car line buy in the city. This 
Is 1 sure for an increase In value, $500 handles. Price . {j?15.."»00 

■WELLINGTON AVENUE, FAIRFIELD — A fully modern eight-roomed home in the best residential section. AVhen you see this house you will want it. 
Let us aliow it to you. Price only ■'•»•'■ )j*6.SOO 

GEORGE STREET, r AIRFIELD — A real buy for home or investment. A six-roomed new modern house with built-in buffet, book cases, fire place, 
paneled walls and the best of finish tnroug-hout. A good lot on a paved street, and a snap at the price, $600 cash handles, balance like rent 
Price .... .......;.... . • $4,050 






1202 DOUGLAS 
STREET 



BENSON & WINSLOW 



1202 DOUGLAS 
STREET 



OGDEBIS 





CIGARETTE 




60 

100 
ISO 

200 
200 




have a particularly enchanting aroma unlike 
any other Cigarette. PUREST and BEST. 

, Smoked Jill Over Great Britain 

10c per Packet. 

Each packet contains a coupon. These coupons are 
good for the following presents : 
SO Coupons. Nickel "Sheffield" pocket penknife. 



Three-bladed stag-handled "Sheffield" 
penknife. 

Gent's watch chain. 

Box of three full-sized knives and forks, 

"Sheffield" manufacture. 

Small size nickel keyless watch. 

Ladies' watch and wristlet. 



-lf-.k*»_ll. V»i-»WI*. 



I • * ... • 



l>ll—l**l III- 1 II 



22 



VK 



* n 



°IA 



DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, Novtmbtr 3, 1912 



V 





Fostc 



The Furrier 



The best dressed women go to 
"Foster's" for their Furs, and no wonder, 
when our' display has no comparison in the 
West. 



Thi s Is to Be 
A Fur Season 



«_*. 



i -f*She" is going to wear them on every 
ri«easi^a i --at , tailored times-^-and at 



^ 



ili e aaf ttff ai*s. — r 

The becommgness of the new furs as 
shown at "Fosla^^-the soft, warm, 




usness of them — are so 

eminine. 
We've some beauties— exclusive de 
signs — just brought from our workshop- 
Coats, Scarfs, Throws, Stoles and Muffs 

WE SPECIALIZE ON SEALSKIN 
GARMENTS 



at- 

''■Mm 



FRED 
FOSTER 



Furrier 



1216 Government Street, Victoria, B. C. 
Phone 1537 



WARSHIPS TO RESCUE 



J'lurwegrlar. Steamer in » Bad Way Off 
Cap* Hattera* 



NORFOLK, Va„ Nov. 2.— Acqprdlng 

t' report* received iwre tonight, the 

Norwegian .steamer Noreugrla, which 

tided with tin. oaJllag ship Glen l.ul 

south of )iuttcr«Ls, yesterday watnlpjg, 

fori I t.> am Inn- In the teeth of a 

northwest gale because she 

. Irak in X11. Z hold. 

.\ .I'liijjia tonight reported Xo. 1 

led, with ti Blight li'ak In No. 

The roll, .-inn bulkhi ad Is hold- 

I 1 1 ■ p is hi a bad way. She 

■ ■ ' ' 1 reli 1 ieals for assistant e 

1 1 two ii 1 1 1 1, ,,-, ti 1 outhern 

rounds it 'to i sr aid. 



PACIFIC DEFENCES 



Japanese Warshipa Said to Have TaKen 

Soundings and Photographs on 

Australian Coast 



MELBOURNE. Nov. 2.— Allegations 

were made in the House of Rep.re- 

rd.iy that German and 

mese spies were investigating the 

strategical points of the country's de- 



the cabinet ministers do 
not believe that there is any truth in 
the allegations, the fact remains that 
several times in the course of the 
last ten year* Japanese warships have 
been known to take soundings and 
photographs of the bays and ports 
around the Australian coast" -'■ 



it 



Cuban Elections 
HAVANA. N6v. Si— The sweeping Con- 
servative victory of General Mario 



servatlve candidates for president and 
vice-president respectively, which, was 
Indicated by reports* from all parts of 
the istfcnd last 



.appeaj|g-ino*5J*B 
cording to ": ret 
Although theitiaV 




morning 
ized 



laim 
tonight 



there, In little <louht 
that General Menocal has been elected, 
by a slender majority.* 




Presentation of "Flag 

TOKIO, Japan, Nov. 2. — An American 
Hag was presented today by Mrs. Blatt- 
ner on behalf of the tf i<"edera- 

1 of America to Couiitess Okuma. 
Because of mourning for the late 1 

or there was no public eereftionj m 
connection with the ' «jyent. Mrs. 
Blattncr descWbed the presentation 6f 

by Cmintess 
• co Worn 

convention. Both Count and Countess 
Okuma spoke in response, expressing 
the hope that the two flags would al- 
ways be intertwined and that worm n 
influence in the United States and 
Japan would continue a controlling fac- 
tor. 



^^ 



Alco, National and Stufz 

CARS— THE QUALITIES OF WHICH ARE REMEMBERED LONG 
AFTER THE PRICE HAS BEEN FORGOTTEN 




*v 1 



San Domingo Ministers 

SAN DOMINGO, X ov, 2.— Alfred Vic- 
toria, Minister of War and nephew of 
the Dominican president, has resigned 
and the president has appointed Luis 
Pellitcr to succeed him whilo Klias 
ijl'lache has been made minister of the 
interior. 



The buying of an automobile is worthier of mbfc investigation than is usually given it — and 
as surely as the investigation is critical, then the better quality cars quickly show their greater 
cumparative value. 

The buyer of a cheap car rarely ever buys a second one of the same kind. They figure": 
"Once bitten, twice shy," and the second purchase, usually 'a good car. shows up the former 
cheap-skate so badly that no amount of argument would induce a return to the low-grade kind, 
with its trouble and expensive upkeep. 

Varnish No Longer Sells a Car 

The wise Luycr looks under the body, because lie wants something in addition to paint and 
varnish. He will examine the frame, axles, hearings, clutch, transmission, wheeh, an.l all other 
al point-. 

The above cars have no minor weaknesses, are exceptionally economical in .tyres and gaso- 
line owing to their perfect construction and balance. Mechanically they are the simplest cars 
made, and while serviceability is always the first consideration in their construction, the com- 
fort of the occupants is fully assured. 

A comprehensive choice of Models. Immediate delivery on National Cars. 
Roadster, Four. Five, Seven Passenger Cars. Alco Motor Trucks, 6^3, 5, Z X A., 2 tons 

LET ME SEND YOU FULL DETAILS 



E. J. CAMERON 



^ 



201-2 Sayward Building 



Tels 



and L4273 




REMEMBER 

Our Guarantee Goes With 
Every Pair. 



SPECIAL SP 



w* 





ENSAT 




REMEMBER 

This Sale Will Last Only 
a Limited Time. 



REGULAR $3.50 AND $5.00 
GOLD RIMMED 



Eye Glasses or Spectacles 



To Be Sold for One Week Only 
At the Ridiculous Low Price of 



$1 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 




Or Money Refunded 



SALE STARTS MONDAY MORNING, NOV. 4TH, AT 9 O'CLOCK 



WHY? 



EXPLANATION: 



HOW? 



This sensational offer is made to quickly introduce ourselves to the people of VICTORIA, and the province of BRITISH COLUMBIA. The glasses referred to arc 
positively the regular $3.50 and $5.00 kind, and when you come to inspect them we want yon to expect that quality of goods. In order to make, a phenomenal success 
of our opening, we will have at our VICTORIA OFFICE three of onr BEST E YESIGUT SPECIALISTS, thereby giving.every customer the benefit of a most thorough 



SCIENTIFIC OPTICAL EXAMINATION 



EVERY PAIR GUARANTEED 



REGULAR $3.50 AND $5.00 GOLD GLASSES FITTED TO YOUR EYES FOR THE UNHEARD OF LOW PRICE OF $1.00 



Such a startling announcement no doubt makes 
you ask how we can do it. THE STORY IN A NUT- 
SHELL IS THIS — an Eastern .manufacturer has too 
many of a certain line of glasses on hand, and wants 
to reduce his stock quickly. Knowing our ability to 
use large quantities of Optical Goods, he made us 
such a tempting offer that we could not pass it by. 
There are 250 dozen all told, embracing all kinds of 
glasses, including rimmed and rimless EYE- 
GLASSES or SPECTACLES, with or without rims— 
every style to fit all eyes, and frames to fit every face. 

Lowest Prices for Special Ground and Bifocal 
Lenses. 



Artificial Eyes Matched. Oculists' Prescriptions Filled at Hair CATKPArTlftW flMDAWTFFn 
Price. Additional Charges Will Be Made for Special Work 3A I IjrAL I \\3vi 111) AKAN I ECU 




EYES EXAMINED FREE 



A CAREFUL EXAMINATION of your eyes will 
be^made, and glasses perfectlv adjusted by a practical 
GRADUATED REFRACTIONIST. You may be 
sure that they will be correct in every way, even though 
they were bought at the ridiculously low price of $1.00, 
including examination. Our offices are equipped with 
the most modern mechanical appliances known to the 
OPTICAL profession for the testing of the eyes. 

NOTICE— These frames are absolutely GOLD 
FILLED, not gold plated. They occupy the same 
place in the OPTICAL trade as ROGERS' BROS. 
.1847 do in the SILVERWARE line or ELGIN or 
WALTHAM do in the watch business, and are guaran- 
teed by the manufacturers to wear five years and give 
enUfe 1 satisfaction. 



A $3.50 or $5.00 Pair of 

Glasses Fitted to Your 

Eyes, $1.00. 



N ■ ' 



GLOBE OPTICAL 

SUITE 321, CENTRAL BUILDING, CORNER VIEW AND BROAD STREETS, VICTORIA, B. C. 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. Take the Elevator 





Open Saturday Evenings frortl 7 to 9 p. m. 



t>Hib«i8e%5i 



s 



SSSESESE^X^HSEXS 



T 



We will gladly refund 

your money if you are not 

satisfied with purchases 

during this sale. 



* 






Sunday, November 3, 1912 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



23 




'I'm latest M>|T r-i >i ,M<i ifcht, th< 

1 1 .'ii I >ukc, lauoi tied at Po tBmaut 
dock] .ii.i bj i tii 1 1 ■!. ■;,. He ot w i lllngr- 
i.'ii, will, it Ls understood, 
against attacks from ih< ulr, »« 
London Standard. ISxjicI I: iai form 
uT defence w UJ in adopt* .i not 

knowQ, but the tf!pj>c| mast Intrcxlui I 
Into the 1 ireadnougbl hi • bei 1 i a 
doped, and the new shljj will bave but 
one single most to Carry lnr win li 
Installation, and two funnels, tli lat 
ter being '-'protected 
attack; ,, 

ibe iron I »uk Is r< ■ ■ -.*.■# 
thi Qrcadnousrlit anil super i >r< 

i ■ 1 1 1 1 g . i ; i I i 

port, tin- series, ... ting t'n.m the 
original Dreadnought (launched in 
i . in-miry. i:nn;,) Including the Belle- 
rophon (1607.) the St, Vincent 

i it Neptu 1 909 i the i irlon i 1910,) 

and the JCIng Gto V. < launched In 

i 'i-tober of las I year anil now eornplet- 
for sen. ) Each vessel baa marked 
.ii advance upon her predecessor, both 
in the matter of size and armament, 
offensive ns well as defensive,, and al-. 
though the Iron Duke In many in- 
spects resembles the King <3ebrge^.. 
her equipment l» a distinctly new dei 
vplopment. h^^B SlStiJ- Ships tff. 
' ■ > '<ii i 'rii^r aatok ^.are vtfttt'' .. ..Ifaferlw' ' 
borough (prpparItig^§||R^liu|riching : • at.- 



i i ipot 1 1 and tHe 1 ><•! ti i and the 

i :. iii.iu i conti bj t built < 

A~ Hi tin preadnouJJht, the main 

..., in, .ill big gun" 

principle, Len (juns being mounted in 

I larbottea on the main deck. 

In tin- casi of tin Iron liuke these 

.:■ .. much Improved upon that 

i.n.i. i- 1 i in. i w in be practt- 

callj ■ ti rangi and flestruc* 

■ . , powi i to an: ' '-'"■ gw >'" 1 ln - 
1 1 ...ii,. ■ ,i into nir. ii.' \ ■•' i servioa, in 
th i • ■ ight ti'c maximum broad- 

,i. i it out of iter ten hip 

but In the Improved vessel* of 
her i'i" •"" i i" --up i • I uvadnouKhts 
ii.,. i nil battel f, art iriged on tha 

i In -i either n> port 

or starboard md thi offensive pew er 
of i!i. id and asterii haw 

• '!. 

si crecj has bjtan "''- 

the building of the \m\\ 

Duke, inn I rstood thai her 

total length la not far short or 600 

..■ tt ill ll.IV. ;, hi .11 1 til Of 

beam of ' ■■ ' ■ feet and li«i displace- 
ment will be 2."i,noo tons, ho less than 
8.000 torn; having heen built Into the 
the first keelplate was laid 
Inst, this representing Iter 
t at the time of launching. 
if>d displacement will enable 
y heavier buns for her ncc- 
tmont. nhd probably thi* J; 

or *\xt^,i^;;yMifru®i* 

mostly carried in protected casemates. 
Her torpedo armament ;.'.wttl". .opftiprtso 
three tubes, capahle of discharging the 
new' Sl-tn.' ;mi»srieia;./' ; '^M\/ i ^r!»#i^.^ 
power is to be ' giye^.v^J^t»p'iMi',;tur-' 



ship since 
in Januar; 
dead wets 

The inc 
her 




b?ne machinery, capable pf dt veloplng 

a speed up to 22 knots, and the VCSSOl 

win I'oiitain extensive] stare-rooni ac- 
commodation for on as v, , 1 1 as coal 
fuel. As regards defensive armament, 
It is generally understood that In th 
matter of shell-proof str.i plating con- 
siderable developments have been 
made. 

A £3,000,000 Ship 
In general appearanri- the Iron !>uk 
will resemble both the Orion and the 
King Ci-oria- v., nm1, like the latter, 
will liave the officers' quarters In the 
afterpart of the ship, thus reverting to 
the practice that prevailed In w 
of the pre- Dreadnought type. The 

Iron l>uke is to be completed for sea 
In two years from her fraying dOWE 

by January, tflU —by which time boa 

Will have cost the nation two mill,, .a 

sterling— a contrast to her orede. 

of the name name, launched In 1869, 

which was completed at i cost of a 

tenth that siini. 

Already material Is being rea 
at Portsmouth for the warship to 
succeed the Iron Duke on the build- 
ing slip, and a commencement will be 
made probably before the end of the 
year. This vessel will mark a still 
further advance In size and displaee- 
ment. so much so that before the first 
keelplate ls laid the building slip "will 
have to be again extended. Unof. 

.«#%; ^i/^ ,iii^-^l^gt*^ „ and ..(hat, 
llMncfc.' jjwBsytfttl •■*»■ tottrctfiteed. 

■'■■i i r';'" i . '■ ' i^',;:'. 1 ' 'j' f ' ' ■--'— "-,tt/- . . ' ' '^r-. i r---- < i.' ... _' 

%jkmp;>Mi s4m»w, r«pi»*r'. ai tha ; BaI-. 
*M«*|, p q§tffc • «^i^«^i^»lav : . J nieatra,'. 
Orchestra evj^4*WW# : -^» ■ **•**• *■ 



VICTORIA HOVE TO 

IN HEAVY GALE 



Last Passenger Steamer From 
N. me Encounters Storm la 
Beiing Sea 



Cape 



r 









■'■ 

MMaMHMWI 




SEATTLE!, w ash.. Nov. ;. t h 
steamship Victoria, from Nome, the last 
merchant vessel Ravfgatlng Henna Bea 
s.iit ward by wireless Friday night 
that sin- had Been hove to for eighteen 
hours, unable to make headway In a 
gale of niuii. miles an hour, She was 
then 180 mil's north of I.'nlmak Pass, 
wiiieh i Mi. i:iite of thi Baring Bea 
from the Kprth Pacific ocean. She has 
i ''. i passengers and n Iih-ki- shipment 

of furs aiel old The ri'Vrnu.. eiittrr 

Bea i will i'c the last sti t to li i 

Baring Bea which win be closed until 

next May. 

FOR FISHING DEPOT 

rriucess Ena Taking Machinery to All- 
ford Bay for B.C. Fisheries 
Plant 

The steamer Princess Ena of the C 
P.R. Is en route to Queen Charlotte Isl- 
ands with an unusually bulky and valu- 
able cargo, the chief item being machin- 
ery valued at more than ftOO.OOO, con- 
slgncd to the Canadian Fisheries Co., 
Ltd.. Sir George Doughty's enterprise. 
Most of the machinery came by the Bin* 
Vunuel liner Titan, which preceded the 
Protesllaus here. The bulk of this, in- 
cluding two huge boilers, was conveyed 



on a scow shortly after It arrived to 
the t'.i'.u. wharf al Vancouver, where 
it remained until this week, when the 
Princess Ena took it aboard, the boilers 
having to be rolled aboard when the tide 
was at Its lowest on two successive 
■ lav.-. Th< real of the machinery she 
took aboard from the Evans, Coleman 
and Evans wharf ut the mainland port. 



HULL NEARLY READY 



W«w Pacific Coast Liner Congress Will 
i Be Beady for Service In 

June Next 

I'apt. I. x. fcllbbard, superintendent of 
the pacific Coast Steamship Company, 
with headquarters at San PYancisco, 
: who la In Seattle on a business trip, 
aunimiie.'d there yesterda) that the 140- 
foot passenger liner Congress, building 
for the company at the plant of the New 

York Shipbuilding Company, ai Camden, 

j\'..l.. would he read.' I'm' delivery bj 
April IS, II,- sinl it was expected", to 
have the new vessel ready for service 
on June 1. The hull of the Congress is 
rapidly neartng completion, according to 
reports made by (1. \V. Dickie, superin- 
tendent of the construction work. 



Vadso Inquiry 

Capt. Chas. Eddie, of Vancouver, will 
Commence a preliminary inquiry tomor- 
row morning at Vancouver caneetoulg 

. the . stranding' of the :«teai»V^^iil» W 
Baynes Sound. "f-'-V^*, .<■„ ■ ../ 

w.i—^.i - 1 i> n ■■ i a« <i.i ii _n i i^i ^ ii j i ■?■*■« — .. ■■■■■■n wn 'ii i i i inn i hi i «n m ii 

Bator* the show, dine at Balmoral 
Cafe, opposite Victoria Theatre. . Or- 
; chestra every evening till 12.30. « 



A Great Bargain 



SEVEN LOTS ON MUSGRAVE ST. 



Between ()l)inpi;i Avenue and "Iplanils" Car Line 

One Block Away 

PRICE $1,330 ^ CH 

% Cash, Balance 6, 12, 18 and 24 Months 

■pale Opens Monday Morning 






At 10 o'Clock 



•'^ 



LEONARD REID & CO. 



421 



on Building 




— 



«*■#■ 



' -,;":,'...'^i> 
.'. 
iS 1 1 1 Ii m i m 11 1 



•SSSSSS-— 






AND 




Breakin 





arga 




; ^ 



STARTLING CLOTHING BARGAINS IN THE 
BIG CLOTHING DEPARTMENT 

MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S TWEED AND 
WORSTED SUITS, worth to $10.00. 
Dissolution Price 0* '"' 

$4.35 

SUITS like you have always bought here at $12, the 

same handsome patterns and plain blacks. 

Dissolution Price 

&5.Qe> 

MEN'S SUITS, in high grade dark silk mixed"; 
Cheviots, splendidly tailored. Regular price i 1 
Dissolution Price • 

$7.45 

FINE WORSTED SUITS, also Tweed Suits, all 

new colors, that usually sell everywhere at $20. 

1 Hssolution Price 

$9.85 

Those high-class WORSTED SUITS, also silk mixed 
Tweed Suits, perfectly tailored. li seems a pit 
sell them so low. Regular prices up to $22.50. 
Dissolution Price 

$ 11.45 

SUITS, all colors, for best dross wear, hand tailored. 
You tnighl go to any store in Victoria trying in vain 
to duplicate them under " $25. Dissolution Price,, 

$!_'.'); and 

$14.85 

MEN'S, HIGH CLASS SUITS, suits thai are a 

triumph i'i the tailor's skill, that sell feguhirly to^35. 

Dissolution Price 

$ 16.95 

STORE OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9 O'CLOCK 
DURING THE WEEK 

SENSATIONAL BARGAINS IN MEN'S PANTS 
DEPARTMENT 

MEN'S PANTS, worth to $2.50. QC/» 

Dissolution Price vDC 

MEN'S WORSTED PANTS, in jjre\ snipes and 
plain colors, for dress wei Regular <a^ £J/T 
price i" S.v5<). Dissolution Price $livu 

MEN'S PURE WORSTED TROUSERS, worth $4 
to $6. Made in up-to-date styles, costliesl worsteds 

;niil t weeds. &fy Q — 

I lissolution Price $4«tPt) 



CONTINUE AT THE 



GREAT DISSOLUTION SALE 

At the Empire Clothing Co. 

Join the big crowds that will be here Monday, -And get your 
share of this oncoin-a-liiVtimc- opportunity. The world's most: 
celebrated brands of merchandise are now being offered here 
for a short time at prices that are without a parallel, owing to 
the fact thai oyer $18,000 is to be realized in order to meet Mr. 
Kirchhimer's interest in the business, who retires. Be here to- 
morrow when the doors open at 9, and save on Clothing, Fur- 
nishings, Hats and Shoes as you never did before. Head and 
heed every item mentioned here. . 



V 



e 



jf 



THOUSANDS AND THOUSANDS OF DOL- 
LARS WORTH OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
SLAUGHTERED 

MEN'S SHIRTS, prices 75c to $k Dissolution 

Price 

35c 

MEN'S SHIRTS, white and fancy patterns. Price 
$1.50 and $1.75. Dissolution Price 

85c 



CLUETT, PEABODY SHIRTS, regular Si. 7 5 arid 
$2, I tfssi ilntimi Price 



$1.15 



MEN'S FLEECE LINED UNDERWEAR, worth 



75c. 1 >iss< 'hit 11 in Price 



35c 



$1.25 and $1.50 WOOL UNDERWEAR, Pen-Angle, 

Sovereign and k\'lnn Hood brands. 

Dissolution Price 



95c 



MEN'S HANDKERCHIEFS, hemstitched, while or 
fancy borders. Worth 15c to 25c. Dissolution Price 



5c 



MEN'S BLACK AND TAN HOSE, sells al 15c. 
I hssi 'lnti< in Price 

5(J 

SILK TIES, worth 25c, J5t and 50c. Dissolution 

Price 

15c 



MEN'S WOOL SOX, worth 25c and 35c. 

tion Price 



1 )JSM ill!- 



15c 



SUSPENDERS, worth 25c and 35c. Dissolution 



15c 



$2.50 and $3.00 CARDIGAN JACKETS. Dissolu- 
tion Price 



$1.45 



35c and 40c BOYS' HEAVY WOOL RIBBED 
HOSE. Dissolution Pi ice 



25c 



$1.00, $1.25 UNION MADE OVERALLS. 
Dissolution Price 



65c 



SWEATERS AND SWEATER COATS, CLIlg* 

worth $1.75. Dissolution Price OOC* 



$4.00 and $4.50 SWEATER COATS. 
1 )issoltttion Price 



$2.95 



SENSATIONAL HAT B A R G A I N S— THOU- 
SANDS TO SELECT FROM 

MEN'S HATS, worth to $2.00. Dissolution price 

65c 

MEN'S FINE HATS, worth up to $3; including the 
genuine Christy Hats; Dissolution *price 

95c 

MEN'S FINEST SOFT OR STIFF HATS, worth 
up to $4. Dissolution price 

$1.95 

$4.co AND $5.00 STETSON HATS. Dissolution 
prices $2.9^ and 

$3.45 

BOYS' HATS, worth yz,c. Dissolution price 

35c 

MEN, HERE ARE WONDERFUL OVERCOAT 

BARGAINS— EVERY STYLE, COLOR AND 

SIZE" COAT IS REPRESENTED IN THIS 

MAMMOTH STOCK 

OVERCOATS, worth to $[-'.50. **m ng 

Dissolution price «^*»tfO 

OVERCOATS, worth ,to $10.50. Am q- 

Dissolution price vpi»v9 

OVERCOATS, worth to S30. <&1 9 Q£ 

Dissolution price «p-»2«tfv 

RAINCOATS AND CRAVENETTES, worth $7.50 

Dissolution pnYe>. $3.95 to tyJLdoVO 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS IN BOOT AND 

SHOE DEPARTMENT 
MEN'S LACE BOOTS, every pair guaranteed fot 
good wear Many of this lot are g-a MS 

worth S3. Dissolution price . «^JBL»^ftc# 

MEN'S BOOTS for business wear, that mean service 
and comfort. All the newest shapes for ^f QC 
fall, worth to S3. 50. Dissolution price. ... «pX»«fO 

MEN'S FINE BOOTS, made from selected calf-kin 
and vici kid, the best workmanship and finish. 
Every pair guaranteed and actually &ep /»£» 

worth up to S5.00. Dissolution price .... ^*5«VV 

MEN'S FINEST DRESS BOOTS, all sizes styles 
and leathers, worth as high as $7. aq Qff- 

Dissolution price $«>«tJe> 

MEN'S SLIPPERS, worth 75c and Si. 00. /gtZgh 

Dissolution price "w*' 



*v 



Look for the Name and Number Before Entering 



Merchandise Exchanged and Money Refunded at All Times 



EMPIRE CLOTHING CO. 



Out-of-Town Fares Refunded to Purchasers 
of $15.00 or More One Way Within 50 Miies 



563 Johnson Street 



VICTORIA'S LARGEST MEN'S OUTFITTERS 



563 Johnson Street 



1 



i 



ste 



"l ""^11 1 



ae 



m 




"'r'^y^r ;'•■■■■' '^• ! - ■■-■v ■:■■■'■' '■■-■"- 



' 



24 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 




A Making-Room Sale of Furniture Monday 

We Want a Floor for Our Holiday Department, and for One Week Some Startling 
Bargains Wilf Be Offered in Furniture. It Will Be to Your Advantage to Visit the 

Furniture Department on Monday 



Better Quality Gloves 

COST THE LEAST IN THE LONG RUN 

AFTER all, it is the satisfaction of wearing j;l<»\cs that 
nol only look well hut retain their good looks for a 
reasonable time, that makes a glove bargain. 

Treiouss* Dorothy iCJrt Olaoa 01oy»s, 1 .-button length, are to be had in white 
■inly, l'iii:- JflU 5<) 

Tr«foiii«« Dorothy White aiaoa Kid Oioves are to be had iti the 16-button 
length, ami tl.e price is only 'Ip^f^.- $3.23 

94.00 

or black, 

pair ........^.\... .f:t.OO 

Trench Kid Gloves come in colors whlteTand mode, ore 16 •button ianjtb, i,|iii. 

are a bargain at, p^^P*- Sli.r.O 

"Kayser" Silk CHores are to be had In the i«-buttOh length, In the following 

colors: Sky. pink, black. cre*ts,«nd .white, Per pair, only. ...... ^#tjp.;i 

"Tha Kayser" Silk Gloves are to be had in all the newest* shades, and these 

beautifully finished gloves will appeal to .all. - wftftjjfe^ '^«tffi^. taste. 

This line is a 20-button length, and Is a remarkable value at '.; .'.i|f .f3i 
JDfcnrothy Trefonssa Olace Kid QlOVjWU, With K, gLUpa. irfl. ta,,hf; had In Vfllt&X 

navy, tan, brown, grey, mode, beaver, new green, mauve, black and 

$1.50 



Xrafousaa Dorothy Gla.ce Kid Gloves, come in the 20- 
pair 

Trefouaaa San Bemo Sua da Olovaa «re to be had 
also grey and mode. They arc 16-btitton lam 




white. Price, per pair, only 






Dorothy Trefouaaa suede oiovea are to be had in colors black, grey and 
brown. They are a w«ll-finlshed glove, and are a remarkable value at. 



)inlr 



are to be had in colors black, white, 



'errin's Marchioness Glace Kid Gloves 

navy, tan. brown, green, mode, grey* and beaver. They are a reliable 

glove, and are h very special value at this price. Pair SfSX.OO 

White Glace Kid Glovee, 11 button length. Bpeclal ljll.75 

White Glace Kid Oiovea, IK button length JpiS.75 



What Is Better for the Boy 
Than a Good Sweater? 

SOME ATTRACTIVE LINES FOR MONDAY'S 

SELLING 

HF.f\l ; . arc three fine lines that are both low priced 
and well made, and should sell as fa.-t as it is pos- 
sible for the clerks to wrap them up. 
Just at this time of the year the boy must have warmer 
clothes, and it would be difficult to suggest another style 
of garment that will fill the bill as efficiently as the sweater. 
To see these lines is to be convinced of their sterling 
value. ... 

Boya' Wool Sweatera, knitted I* B Fancy honeycomb style and made 
to button on the shoulder. They are to be had in sizes for boys from 
:: to s years old, and are a very Hiiedai value at. each 7.">t' 

Xibbed Sweatera, made of a good mixture of cotton and wool. These 
come in sizes for boys from 3 to 10 years old, mid are made to but- 
ton on Hi- shoulder. They are a \,rv durable and comfortable 
sweater thai will not shrink. Prices 85c, 7Sc and 65<^ 

Coat-Sweatera for Boya. Here la a line that conies in all sizes, and 
being made of a good mixture of cotton and wool, will not shrink. 
Tile e(dors are fast and the garments have a very attractive appear- 
ance. Grey with red trimmings, blue with red. brown and various 
other- color combinations ,u ■»• in <>. had. We recommend this line 
and consider It an unusually good value at, each 75^ 



Are You Interested in Velvets, 
•H 6 Velveteens and Silks? 



1 



Stt1 



F so. \<>u will find many new and attractive lines now being 
displayed i" this department. What may add to the inter- 
est of these lines is the fact that they are marked at prices 
ficientlv low to make them exceptionally popular. 
lust glance over the following items and' you will be read} 
to admit that they look like bargains, but when you have seen 
the goods in the department and notice the rich colors and fine 
linisii of the materials, you VV"H1 be convinced that they are bar- 
gains in everj sense of the word. 

Velveteens and Velvets are unusually popular, and here you will find a fine 
assortment Of makes and colors tfl ebOOSS from. Those made in the single 
width are marked at prices ranging from 11.00 a yard up to 18.7.1, In 
the double width the price is $3.50 

Velveteen Corduroy is another popular and durable material that has a rich 
ap pe a r a n c e and muk.-* m> well. Then .s praoUaa Uy no end to the wear 
thai you wiil get put of this material. A good range of colors to nhnnsc 
from, per yard $1.00 

Heavy SU* Crepaa. Another lot of this hcautiful material has just arrived 
and Includes three shades of grey, two handsome blues, hello, champagne 
anil mole. It is IE Inches wide, and B «ood value at, per yard . . . . $1.73 

Double-Width Satin Is to be had in eight diff.Mf-nt colorings. This is a qual- 
ity that we strongly recommend. Per yard $1.00 

Satin Charmenee. We are now showing a fine range Of colors In this ma- 
teria'. It la t- Inches wide and a very fine grade. in colors it cnm»s 
at, per yard, $2.00. and in black at 12. nil and $2.75 

Corded ■Ilk comes in plain colors and striped effects, and is 33 Inches wid». 
Price* range from $".25 a yard down to .$2.00 



News of Winter Coatings and 
Dress Goods 

THAT WILL BE WELCOMED BY MANY WOMEN 

PARTLY because the prices are small and more because of 
the fact that every yard we are offering is a high stan- 
dard of quality and shows excellent taste. 
We cannot mention all our lines in this limited space, so if 
yoii do not see what you want, please enquire for it in the depart- 
ment. The chances are that we shall be in a position to supply 
yon and save you considerable expense. 

Winter Coatings tire to be had In a variety of styles and colors, and the 
prices range as follows: Per yard, 11.7,6, $2.00, $2.:,u and f I.OO 

Chinchilla Coating. This material has Mold so well that we have only four 
pi. -res left. This is a positive proof of Its popularity and sterling dual- 
ity, it is n special value at, per yard $2.50 

Cream Blanket Cloth is a new line that has Just come to hand, and Is a qual- 
ity that should sell well at. per yard $2.50 

Diagonal Cord Salt'nga are to be had In five different colore, It is a very 
serviceable material and a special value at, per yard, r>2 Inches 
wide - 92.00 

■lack Astrakhan la to be had In two qualities and 1st marked at, pe r yard. 
$3.75 and $5.75 

Cream and Black OeYm—1 Clstfc- Here is a material that atlll holds Its own 
for popularity. Four different qualities are to be had. and the prices 
are 14.00, $4.S m , lt.?ft and $6.75 

lflxed fliiii. Hare la a epectally good line that comes In a variety of col- 
ors, and is 48 inebss wide. Per yard 4 $1.50 

are nor* in ton different colors, and are a value that cannot 
he bttten at the price. *«r *#*<! 75* 

lesansaaaaaaaaeaaaae>eaaaasj»asessseas^^ ■ 111 1 1 1 r'i ii m 1 1 



ALL GRASS CHAIRS are marked down to $2.50 

and $3.50 

$35.00 BUFFETS, various styles. Monday $23.7.") 

$23.75 WARDROBES in Early English finish. .$14.51) 

$8.50 \\\\IU)IU)HLSai^^^^^p^n,to $6.75 

MBS for sale'oii Monday al $10.75 

jBW'.iine designs, marked J^WSW 
COI (:MKS^|pifyandvel()i.r,$5.!)()aii<l....ss.!)() 

$17.S^iP^f»So'lstered in leatherette. .$13.75 





^W^^^M^i 




■■A^V-a 



or Men's lousiness 

or Mackintoshes 

A LOW PRICE, BUT EXCELLENT GARMENTS 




aincoats 




r 



AT the Spencer Store has been in the 
lead For better values at modest prices 
ill is season is a fact that cannot be 

disputed, and here are more good lines to 

support our reputation. 

STYLISH THREE BUTTONED SUITS 
AT $12.50 

Are to be had in new tweeds, serges and worsteds, 
and com* in « variety of colors, Including blues, 
browns, greys and greens, and a variety of Bannock- 
tiwrn mixtures. They are cut on the sack style, and 
are just the style of suit that business men f Ind* most 
appro (onvenlertt. Th" pants are out in the 

seml-pegtop style, and are well tailored and trimmed. 
Ti.at i re worthy of a higher price Is a fart you 

will readily admit when you see the garment?. All 
s-ises are hero. 

200 MACKINTOSHES, OVERCOATS 
AND RAINCOATS AT $12.50 

In this lot there arc heavy tweeds, meltons, beaver 
cloths, cravenette and mackintoshes to choose from, 
and, as all sites are Included, It should be an easy mat- 
ter bO find the Style of coat that will suit you best, 
have military, two-way and plain collars, some 
plain, and others finished with velvet. The prominent 
colors are fawns, browns and Rreys, but there ar^ 
others If you prefer them. 



Just the Hat Men Like 
For Winter 

Here if « late showing of men's cloth stitched hats 
made In the orunh style, and have a dressy appearance 
In addition u> their splendid tfoarine, <iuallties. A 
large vart«tj "'' Bhadej are here to choose from, and, 
hi coarse, all slaes arc Included, 

t ir \ .'i'.v thing ito wear x\iti\ a tweed suit or over- 
coat, aiui. iih they can no I !><■ spoiled i>y heinK erushed, 
thjej should appaal to many men «ho demre an Inex- 
penalvc bill smart hat. 
prices |i.i>0 and f2.00 

50 Pairs of Work Pants 

FOJt MEN WILL BE SOLD ON MONDAY 



At $1.50 



And th&y would be Konrl valuers If we asked SOc more 
Tor them. They are marie of a. good Oxford tweed, 
and come In a great assortment of colors. All slses 
,ii.i Included In this line, and we are safe In saying 
that no belter values are to be had at the price. Per 

pair fl.SO 



Men Should Be Interested in These Shirts 

and Tie Adjusters 

IF there is anything that a man likes, it is to have good shirts arid to be able to adjust his tie in the 
least possible timie and have it look as if it had been tied by a man who knew how. 
It is for these reasons that we presume that many men will be interested in these lines. 
They are as Rood as hands can make them for tlie price we are asking, in fact, they give the average 
garment sold at the same prices a good, long start far quality, To see them is to be convinced that 
these statements are facts. 



Print WegUroa Shirts for Men. We are placing on sale 
Monday 50 dozen of the best print shirts that we have 

, sold for a long time at this price. They are out In the 
eoat style, have starched collarbnnd and enffs and are 
full size In hoth the body and the neck. They «om« In 
a variety of light and dark fancy stripes, slso In plain 
blue ami other colors. ■ The material is stout and the 
garments are very vnell finished. Hlaes from 14 to 17. 
Regular value 11.25. Special for Monday ....$*.. 00 



Men's TJndarwear. line Is a good line of light weight 
shirts and drawers that may Interest you, They are 
made of natural merino, are well finished and very com- 
fortable. Per garment ftO^t 

MS A.d J ueters. perhaps these are just what you want and 
when in a hurry will prove a boon and a blessing to 
the owner. They are made of a covered steel and are 
easy to use. Save, time and worry besides giving your 
tie a better appearance. Call in and see them. Spe- 
cial a», each 23«£ 



David Spencer, Limited 



,t^.^..^ ..„^., .*i ..;, .iv ^ j^..i-i^a: 



ii 



vM^J^mS^k 



ff* 






Handsome Parlor Clocks at Small 

Prices 

Ol'R Eight-Day Mission Clock is 20 in. high and 3$ wide, 
is made oi specially prepared wood, lias a smooth Flem- 
ish Mission oak finish, fitted with 8-day, hour and half 
hour strike movement. 

& Beauty at $4.50 

a piner rinishsd clock, as above $ 5.75 

Wood Parlor Clock. Another good line Is B I i< 8-day enameled Wood 
Parlor Clock, with pointed arched top M I ads i j Inches high and Is 
fitted With eight-day movements, hour strike or I ! Kong, half- 
hour, on separate cup bell. Black enameled finish, with gilt-ilui ed 
' umns and heavy <n.st-gllt ornaments. Special price JjtfJ.ttO 

The Detroit is a dandy parlor clock, finished, a rich, ilack enamel, H 
12% Inches high and 17% wide, has a .5% dial, with red and green mar- 
bellsed mouldings and gilt pillar. The casing is gilt engraved and hafl 
heavy cast-gilt ornaments. Strikes hour on rich cathedral gonK and 
half-hour on separate cup hell. Special price $9.75 

Tha WtWJ/iSi'\s a new double-toned Normandy chime strike, is a handsome 8- 
4mS Parlor clock, Is 12 inches high and 17% wide, has arched dome top. 

' . ' ■: ^ftclt Enamel ' t mwBr i wittt '' ^^ , -yo r ;"gfWh. Tr ia r pe i i z ea 1 gmui ning and 3 gm 

pillars finished with gilt perforated dial 5% inches. Strikes hour ami 
half-hour with a true -Vo.rmandy Chime effect. -Special price. . .$11.75 
We have two big value lines in Alarm Clocks. 

Tha Eznpir* is a beauty, made of seamless brass, heavily nickeled, finished 
with strong carrying handle and button, cut-off on top of clock, 3%-Inch 
bell, metal gong and :iO-hour movement. Intermittent or long, continu- 
ous alarm movement. Is a reliable clock, and is specially low priced 
at *1.90 

We have..frther lines of Alarm Clocks un from $l.i*0 and $1.25 



100 Axminster Rugs of the First 

Grade at a Great Concession 

In Price Monday 

SIZE io^ x 12 FEET, WORTH $32.50, WILL GO FOR 

$21.50 

SIZE 9 x 12 FEET, WORTH $28.50, ARE MARKED 
DOWN TO $19.50 

THE above is the news in brief, bin with the showing 
of rugs that is now to be seen in the View Street 
windows, it should be enau^h to bring a hnge 
crowd of shoppers to this department on Monday morning. 

A manufacturer approached Otlr buyer with a proposition that we 
should buy his surplus'stoek of nearly 200 of hie best. Axminster Rugs, 
.mil lie was willing to sell ihcm for t*eady cash a I a tremendous reduc- 
tion. We accepted his offer, and here is the first shipment, 100 rugs 
In all, to be sold at a small price to effect a rapid clearance. 

There are only two patterns to be had, one is a rich floral design 
that comes In a beautiful two-toned effect in green, and the other Is 
a handsome Oriental effect that shows a skilful combination of reds, 
blues, blacks and fawns. 

This is a chance that yon can't very well" afford in miss if you are 
looking for a rug "f ibis description, If you can't get to the store, 
phone your order, and we will reserve you a rug. 



Bargain News of Nottingham Lace 

Curtains, Bungalow Scrims and 

Tapestry Portieres 

FOR MONDAY 

3« Pairs only Very Pine Quality Wottingham Luce Curtains, 52 inches wide 
and 3 yards long- In white only. All are Finished With IpclSStitCh edges. 
All Brussels net effect, and make a handsome lacy curtain. On sale Mon- 
day at, per pair #4.75 

68 Pairs Oaly Tapestry Portlareg, IS Inches w ide and .1 yards long. In a good 
range of shades In greeps, reds and browns. All finished with knotted 
fringe. Regular |3.60 per pair, on sale Monday at. per pair #2.45 

800 Tarda of Wew Bungalow Scrim, .Ifi Inches wide, all reversible patterns, 
and the colorings arc browns, greens, nd and hlues. For sale Monday at, 
per yard 25^1 

Charming Little Coats in Bearskin 
For the Little Folks 

Hl ; .RP^ yon will find a splendid assortment of charming 
little coats, made of fluffy bearskin, suitable for little 
folks. 

They are made up in many different styles and should be a 
great comfort for your child besides having a dressy appearance 
that will please any mother. The)' come in a variety of sizes 
Starting from children 1 year old, and the prices are very 
moderate. 

Ask to sec them in the Children's Department on the first 
floor on the View Street side. So many different styles arc^here 
to choose from that they baffle description, and even if we at- 
tempted the task, we would utterly fail to give yoti a fair idea 
of their attractive qualities. Prices-start at $1.75 and range up 
to $575- 

Good English Moiret Underskirts 

HERE'S A CHANCE TO GET ONE AT A REASONABLE 

' PRICE 

Wl\ have just received a farge shipment of these goods 
that includes such a variety of cblors and qualities 
that it should be an easy matter tp get the color, size 
and price that you want. 

Even the out-slzes are well represented, and th>:> range of colorn include 
blues, browns, greys, greens, mauves. navy, black, eti . 

Some of them are finished with accordlon-blalted flounces and others have 
peat box-plaited flounclngs. All are finished with drawstring at the waist 
Prices as follows: fl.TS, fa.OO, »8.50, »a.75, »3.50 and $3.75. 

MONDAY BRINGS A SALE OF 

Hot Water Bottles 

NDW the cold nights are approaching we have decided to 
place on sale at our Drug Department one hundred 
Hot Water Bottles, best guaranteed red rubber, 2 and 
3 quart sizes. 

9 quart. Regular prices. $1.75 ami $2.00. for $1.00 

#| quart. Regular prices, $2.00 and $2.25, for. 

JftlM!"- 11 . ' 



••••••• 



^Jiili!!iJJ | JW l ^' lB, - Ji . i ' |l *W l « ^■■•■"!!-j»Er." w L,J ■ l,,M '■"•' "W 



SX3YVOM 





MAGAZINE 




LEADERS OE WOMENS SOCIETIES IN 
MCTOPIA.AND THEIR NOBLEWOPK 










i . a 



Mi.. .£'.,. ... *,^,a '^.jdkJLK: . . .*»..-. i .«.. '.: - . 



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mmmmmm* 



THE VICTORIA COLONIST 



•unday, N*v*mb«r S, 1t1ff 



2E 




JFWetkm @ff 




a¥f L 




Mow a Democracy 
May Edhuicfflt© Htselff 




HIS is the first of a series of ar- 
ticles on the naval problem, 
which Mr. Give Philhps-Wul- 
ley, the president of the Victoria 
and Ksquimalt branch of llie 
Navy League, has kindly consented to give 
The Colonist. It may be added that these arti- 
cles, save the concluding- one, were written 
some eighteen months ago, but their applica- 
bility to the preset*! situation is not in the 
slightest weakened by that fact. 

(Copyright by Give Phillips- Wolley) 
In the spring of this year, an eloquent 
Scotch Canadian, the editor of a great East- 
ern newspaper, told a Western audience that 
the form of government in Canada was demo- 
cratic, that it was a government "of the 
people, by the people, and for the people," 
md every time that he rolled this phrase from 
lis tongue, the P in people grew larger and 
the applause mOr* enthusiastic. I accept His 
•fciement as accurate, frnd take it as the basis 
of the argument which I propose t© advance, 
and join him in the aspiration that the dem- 
ocracy which Canada is cultivating, v may 
grow to a greater measure of success than any 
which has preceded it or may be growing up 



$ 
& 






alongside of it. 

There is no doubt about the jbopularity of 
a democratic form of government. Every 
human bei ng til i fes to " f an hi s own s h o w" a n ^ 



felTa democracy "the show" is supposed to be 
every one's, and everyone is supposed to have 
B. share in running it. 

But to make government under these con* 
ditions as perfect as it is popular, a few things 
are essential, and the first oi these is that 
everyone should be qualified for the intelli- 
gent use of his vote by a competent knowledge 
of those facts upon which he is Expected to 
exercise his common sense. 

To be justified, manhood suffrage should 
involve a manhood universally educated in 
those matters with which it has to deal. . 

This is not all that is required, but it is the 
basis of all. 

It is often argued that the veVdJCt returned 
by a common jury of twelve simple men is 
more satisfactory than one pronounced by a 
single judge, however learned and competent, 
and this may be so, but it must be borne in 



mind that the twelve simple men have the 
facts of the case laid before them, even ham- 
mered into them, in the most thorough 
fashion, and have the law laid down for them 
by the jud^e. 

After Mich a process as that, it is easily 
conceivable that a common jury, being un- 
prejudiced ,and inspired by a common ideal 
of lair play, would find truly upon an or- 
dinary question submitted to it, ^nd equally 
conceivable that the people' of any natitin 
I i. e.. any body of men of common origin, 
traditions and ideals) would return as sound 
verdicts upon national questions as a commop 
jury does in criminal cases. 

But how are the facts, round which the 
many great questions of the day centre, to be 
laid before the people; how are they 
made clear to them; how are they t 
sented to theM^ ; ^m political bi; 



become law, that the duty of each party is to 
show that the other parly is "wrong. 

That a Grit cannot do right is the founda- 
tion of a Tory's. creed ; to show that a Tory is 
wrong (if not a rascal ) is the first duty of a 
Grit 

Unfortunately, the newspapers, almost 
without exception, belong to one or other of 
the great parties, and every question is looked 
at by them very largely from a party point 
of view. 

Even the most honest of men, writing as a 
partisan, can. hardly help presenting facts, 
which affect the questions before an elector- 
ate, in that ligh'l which is most advantageous 
to his own party. 

The result of all this i^ tfiat it is very dif- 
ficult for the man in the street to get at the 



simple facts uncolored, and form upon them 
his own opinion as he ought to be able to do. 
aH "who is going to plav'tlic advocate's part Many attempt- have been made to ovefc 

^^mm^Wi^jtf^ m,^^s l ^M mmt hopeful 



head, or the judge's: par.t in considei^p? 

facts as pje*e^W;,a^d^n*su.tt»ipW^P- 
Undoub^e^ly'^liBatM^'-W^^a'^P* 

do this fc>ti»i^^^^^«Me:, 

not the tf&'- &M%^^ 
the inclination, *$&* still mote: &%*&& *<tpM 
.not know wfaerg -'to i jil'd i the facts> even if they v 
wanted to do so ? ■ '■■.,,,•.■.''■•■,■*'■ *j-, k'X. 

This is an figt °* specialists, and of dele- 
gated responsibility. ; I4le>:js''^i5||^ 
nowadays tha t no man has time to, get 
attend to all Iris own ihterests^jniself 



which is. pernaps. the formation of such clubs 

Mpthe Canadian Club with its many branches, 

the issue of a certain British Quarterly, whose 

writers in every cOtt$jtf of Britain are pledged 

with facts, apart from all political 

'the establishment of "leagues" of 

denominations, '^t^p^0' of si m pi e 




These are those who the leagues have not 
only to educate, but to persuade to submit to 
education. In the case of the newspaper, the 
editor may spend months in the collection of 
reliable' statistics affecting the power of I'.rit- 
ain's navy, and set them out so clearly that a 
child could understand them, but he cannot 
make the public read what he has written; he 
cannot help it if the man in the street pas-c- 
over the paragraph which concerns our safety 
to read and consider the training of Boston's 
Tar Baby. 

The league can do this. They ha\e their 
own special subjects and will talk of no other. 
No man need read unless he wishes to do 30, 
but he can hardly help, hearing when he is 
spoken to. -The newspaper will stop on the 
stall unless ho buyS il ami brings it into the 
railway carriage with him. but the leaguer en- 
ters with him, and cannol lie shtfl up a 
as a book. 

Wm* clergyman, lie speaks ex cathedra; he 
must be listened to ; he is as it were. holy, and 
man may answer him, vvhefefofe. very few 

tt«^rplt*plti' but iW^m^K^P^ "behalf of the 

. contntotr'M|w^f^j»i^nay / be een- 

. and argued with face to face, in the 



LEADERS OF WOMEN'S SOCIETIES IN 

VICTORIA AND THEIR NOBLE 

WORK 



(Continued From Page One ) 
To these problems the women of Victoria 
have unostentatiously applied themselves, 
bringing comfort into the sunless spaces of 
destitution and courage to those handicapped 
by the "birthday's injury." Those who are 
old and helpless' arc being cared for. Some- 
thing is being done for those who are sick 
and unable, to pay. The antidote of clean en- 
vironment 'and tactful aid is being thrown 
about those in the , .menace of sin. Work is 
being secured for the unemployed, education 
promoted, and h>ve of country fostered. 

If some prominence is given in this article 
to some of those who have enlisted them- 
selves in the work, it is not because the others 
who arc unmentioned are less deserving. ft 
is simply that it is more convenient to men- 
tion these societies by the names of the ladies 
who. by reason of the offices conferred upon 
them, stand as the highest expression of the 
cause to which alj. the workers have dedicated 
their efforts. For in such work as the women 
of Victoria have enlisted themselves, even the 
most inconspicuous deserves the. highest 
praise. 

Perhaps the Wrongest of these associa- 
tions is tlic Women's Council, which i^ affili- 
ated both with the National Council of Can- 
ada and the International Council, which has 
branches in most civilized countries. Its aim 
is to unite the workers in the fields of philan- 
thropy, religion, education, literature and so- 
cial reform on common ground, so that the 
sum total of <h ompbshments shall be more ef- 
fective for the whole community. 

The local council was founded by Lady 
Aberdeen, and had. a-- it- first president, a 
woman then, and still, greatly beloved in Vic- 
toria, Mrs. Haker. wife of Colonel I'.akcr, then 
minister of education. 

Miss S. K. Create, who now holds the of- 
fice, is a true representative of the best type 
of Victoria woman. Of English birth, she is 
the daughter of the late Sir Henry and Lady 
Crease, whose names are revered in Victoria. 

Miss Crease 

Miss Crease has been connected with coun- 
cil work since its inception. As convener of 
the standing committee on immigration, she 
has done much valuable work for Vancouver 
Island, and only her associates and the wo- 
men she has befriended have any idea of the 
trouble she has taken to place happily those 
who have applied to her. 

As president of the council. Miss Crease 
unites in an uncommon degree the tact, cour- 
tesy, firmness and ability so necessary in a 
presiding officer. Always ready to put the 
most charitable construction on the motives 
of others, she never loses for a moment her 
own clear sense of right. In a word, the 
president of the Women's Council is a true 
lady. 



a very great measure at any rate, we 
trust the care of our souls to our parson; of 
our bodies to our doctors : .'I our safety to 
our soldiers; of our children to our wives. It 
is our business to provide wages for those 
who work for us. 

We must then find someone who will con- 
sider for us those great questions upon which 
the safety and prosperity of the state depend, 
or at any rate, to collect for us a reliable 
statement of the facts connected with those, 
questions upon which we, the people, are ex- 
pected to pronounce our judgment. 

Who is to do this? 

At first sight it seems to be the office of the 
newspapers, but here we come across an al- 
most insuperable difficulty. 

We are governed by a party system, in the 
practical working of which it seems to have 




Ives "to collect inforrttfpi§ 
ticular question, and 




et 
each upon 
spread th 
the people wno 
for themselves. 

The degree of success attained by these 
leagues, will probably, and should certainly, 
depend upon the honesty with which they per- 
form their tru-t ; the accuracy of the facts 
which they set OUt, and the freedom from 
party bias which they maintain. 

Their task under the most favorable cir- 
cumstances is a must stupendous., one. It 
must be Granted bv anv honest man who 
knows the world, that the most numerous are 
not the most educated; that the most numer- 
ous are not those who have the most time and 
opportunity for considering questions which 
on the face of them do not seem to affect the 
earning of man's daily bread ; and yet the most 
are those who, in the long run. must decide. 
after a consideration of ihe facts, upon the 
policy to be pursued for the benefit of the 
whole state. 





?rsal servi c e . 





oi 

them. 

It may be that what 1 call the league 
movement is a retrograde step from the printed 
word to the personal appeal by word o>TnoUth, 
but whether that is so or not, this- device of 
The People for educating itself has come, and 
come to stay. 

Before leaving the subject, consider for a 
moment what some of these Makers of Public 
Opinion have done in the last few years. The 
greatest of all was not the creation of a, demo- 
cracy, but of one who is almost an autocrat; 
but even in Germany, it is recognized that Pub- 
lic Opinion is really the power behind the 
throne, and therefore that the greatest care 
must be taken in the making of it. 

Here is a brief history of the greatest of all 
modern leagues. It shows at least what a na- 
tional league may do. 

In 1.X48 the Germans learned from Den- 
__ _ — _ 1 , a. 



mark that, however strong a nation is on land, 
circumstances may arise in which that nation 
will be utterly helpless unless she has a strong 
navy also. Subsequent events further im- 
pressed this upon the mind of the nation, so 
that in 1898 the emperor called to his people 
for such a navy as would put the command of 
the sea in his mailed fist ; the nation readily re- 
sponded to his call and a league, the Flotte- 
vcrcin, was formed, which grew in a few years 
to a membership of over 1,250,000, and an an- 
nual income of over $.250,000. 

The work which this body had to do was an 
extremely difficult one. It had to convince a 
people which did not know the sea. that the sea . 
was essential to its existence: it had to make 
the German farmers understand that if they 
wanted room to live in and markets to sell in. 
they must become sailors, and in 'the few years 

the league did this. 
1 > , 




the German leagues 
■ which we lack. 



our country 



something in 
We might paper 

f'th pamphlets. 
. Jpjkhould have 
ire, to remind 
crifice for 



the'; saSjpi^^(^|»'te, which was England's . 
^ idea!, which was at the root of Britain's glory, 
and is the ideal of Germany today. We don't 



tirst, 




rein found Germany a coun- 

iargeiy of inland farmers, as little in 

nth the sea- as the men of Winnipeg. 

taught those farmers the geography of 
ir own country and of their neighbors, and 
has made them understand in what Way the 
command of the sea must influence even their 
inland industries. 

The farmers understood, before the Flottc- 
verein reached them, the theory of delegated 
work, and that those w p ho want to give them- 
selves up to money-making in any form must 
pay a percentage of the population to do their 
fighting for them, so that, whereas in 18(56 we 
are told that Germany's batle fleet consisted 
of four small badly constructed, thoroughly 
inferior ships, that battle fleet today is a dan- 

\ • • • 't 

gcrous rival to Britain's and bids fair in a 
few years to become the most powerful fleet 
the world has ever seen, whilst . Germany's 
inland rustics troop down to Emdon and there 
submit to the grinding of a sailor-making ma- 
chine which in three years' time turns them 
out as like sailors as Germanv can make them. 



on the resig- 
Iride litis 

a sympa- 



♦ 



Lady McBride 
:St child of the local council is the 
Friendly Help Society, which, with Mrs. 
Baker as its president, was formed on the 
27th March, 1895. Nowhere is there a more 
worthy charitable institution, nor one that has 
done more real good. Xo one outside the so- 
ciety itself knows who is befriended by ii. 
and its organization , is such that there are 
few cases of want which do not come under 
its notice. It- presidents have been among 
the finest women in Victoria, and each has 
remained in office till -In- has removed from 
the city or gone to the reward promised to 
those who feed the hungry and clothe the 
naked. 

I.ady McBride, wife of the premier of 
British Columbia, now directs the labors of 
her band of efficient and experienced work- 
er-. Taking office a year ago 
nation of Mrs. 1'errin, Mr-. M< 
proved herself a wise leader ami 
tbetic friend. She does not. a g do too many 
workers among the poor, look upon them as 
a class, but her heart goes out to individuals, 
especially to mothers and children. In out- 
growing Victoria, Lad\ McBride and her as- 
sociates will see to it that help is given not 
to impoverish, but, as in the past, to raise any 
who may have become for a time dependent; 
to the rank of self-respecting, prosperous citi- 
zens. 

Mrs. Henry Croft 

Mrs. Henry Croft, who is regent of the 
Municipal Chapter ol the Daughters of the 
Empire, was one of the originators in this city 
bi that patriotic movement. The people ol 
Victoria will not soon forget the beautiful cele- 
bration of Coronation l)a\. which was one of 
the *ir?t enterprises undertaken by the society 
whose aittl is to strengthen the bonds of empire 
in the hearts of the people; The women of 
Victoria have responded to the appeal made to 
them, and there are now chapters in all parts 
of the city, and a great number of children 
have been enrolled in the Coronation and 
Daisy chapters. 

As president of the Alexandra Club, Mrs. 
Croft took a foremost part in the building of 
the beautiful Alexandra I louse, which has 
served not only for the comfort and conveni- 
ence of its members, but affords a suitable 
place for the functions of many women's so- 
cieties. 

There are few movements for the benefit 
of Victoria's poor and unfortunate in which 
Mrs. Croft has not taken an interest, and her 
help, given unostentatiously, can always be 
counted upon by charitable workers. 

Mrs. Croft's love of flowers amounts al- 
most to a passion, and her^brnntTful grounds 
are often placed at the disposal of hospital 
and other societies. In connection with the 
Horticultural Society and the King's Daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Croft has helped to promote the 
cultivation of flowers, which is a marked 
feature of our civic life and tends in no slight 
degree to the refinement as well as the pleasure 
of the people. 



Mrs. J. S. Ballantine 
Mrs. Ballantine, the enthusiastic and capa- 
ble secretary of the Women'- Auxiliary of the 
Royal Jubilee Hospital, represents the oldest 
01" the women's philanthropic societies of \ ic- 
toria. Besides providing .'for what may be 
called the housekeeping expenses of the pub- 
lic hospital, this society, during the last, few 
years, has raised a fund for a much-needed 
maternity ward, and its president. Mrs. C. W. 
Rhodes. ' W as the first to voice the necessity 
foi a new hospital. The ladies of the socicty 
last spring began the arduous task of raising 
the money needed for a large and modern 
building, ami the citizens responded gener- 
ously to their appeal, contributing $100,000. 
A by-law will, in the near future, at the re- 
quest of the board of directors, be submitted 
to the citizens, sn that the work, bo auspici- 
ously begun, ma;.- be completed and give Vic- 
toria a public hospital in every way worthy of 
her generous and progressive people. 



Mrs. Spofford 

Mrs. Spofford. a native of Nova Scotia, 
who has for thirty-five years been a public- 
spirited citizen of Victoria, is now provincial 
president of the Women's Christian Temper- 
ance I'nion, with which she has been con- 
nected ever since ils inauguration b\ Frances 
Willard. There is not a district in the settled 
parts of tiie province where Mrs. Spofford is 
noi known as an efficient temperance worker, 
for she has been organizer of the society for 
several vcars. She is identified with all the 
work carried 'on by the union, and is a prom- 
inent and vaftted member of the Women's 
Council, having been for five years its corre- 
sponding secretary. At present Mrs. Spof- 
ford is with her husband superintending the 
children, who are. wards of the Children's Aid 
and the Juvenile Court. This work among 
the children is carried on by Mrs. Spofford 
with the conscientiousness, the tact and the 
efficiency that arc characteristic of her work- 
in the many spheres in which she has moved. 



Women's 
ever since 
cause 
. per- 



for the newly-formed 
Christian Temperance I'nion, -%nd 
she has been found wherever a : 
needed an advocate. Mrs. Jenkin 
suasivc and convincing speaker, and her sym 
pathies are broad. In school matters she is 
able to approach questions both from the 
standpoint of a mother and of a teacher. A 
Welsh woman by birth Mrs. Jenkins is at 
once an ardent patriot and a loyal Canadian. 
The work of the Eadies Guild of the Seaman's 
Institute appealed both to her patriotism 
and her motherly sympathy, and she has 
taken the place left vacant by the resignation 
of Mrs. TrOUp; through whose energy and 
zeal the purchase of the site of the proposed 
new building was .made possible.. The Guild, 
under the leadership of Mrs. Jenkins, can be 
trusted to co-operate with the men's commit- 
tee, and not only to finish the building but to 
carrv on the work among the sailors who 
visit our shores. 



Mrs. Jenkins, 
Xo woman is sq well-known for the good 
work she has accomplished for others as Mrs. 
Jenkins, the president of the Ladies Guild of 
the Seaman's Institute. It is perhaps, how- 
ever, as the very efficient and highly valued 
member of the Board of School Trustees that 
Mrs. Jenkins is best known to Victoria people. 
For sixteen years, with a short intermission, 
Mrs. Jenkins has served on the school board, 
having, at each annual meeting, been returned 
by a very' large majority. The services of this 
woman trustee are appreciated fully by her 
Colleagues, and she has served in many capa- 
cities, at present being chairman of the 
finance committee. The government recently 
recognized the ability of Mrs. Jenkins by 
making her a member ol" the first convocation 
of the University of British Columbia, and 
the local Council of Women, at its last meet- 
ing, conferred Upon her the honor of a life 
membership in the Nation*! Council. In 1883, 
Mrs. Jenkins first entered public life as or- 



Mmk 



Mrs. Clay 

There i- no work for the good of others 
so popular among Victorians as the Aged and 
Infirm Woman's Home. The fine new build- 
ing on McClure street is the work of the com- 
mittee, of which Mrs. W. L. Clay is the presi- 
dent. Mrs. Clay is the wife of the Rev. W. 
Leslie Clay, pastor of St. Andrew's church. 
A native of 1'rince Kdward Island, Mrs. Clay 
has proved herself a friend of all good causes 
since she came to Victoria, some eighteen 
years ago. For more, than ten years her 
heart has been in the work of providing for 
the dependent aged women the environment, 
as near as that is possible, of a happy com- 
fortable home. With a committee, in entire 
sympathy wieh this aim, Mrs. Clay has been 
instrumental in replacing old and unsuitable 
buildings by a fine modern structure, suitably 
in cverv way to the needs nf those wdiose wel- 
fare Mrs. Clay has so much at heart. 

» Mrs. Frank Adams 

Mrs. Frank Adams may well be known as 
the friend of the girls of Victoria. With won- 
derful energy she has entered upon the work 
of providing for this city a Young Woman's 
Christian Association worthy of Victoria. 
Through her efforts, the purchase of the pres- 
ent property on Courtney street was largely 
due. Seeing at once its inadequacy, Mrs. 
Adams commenced almost immediately to 
work towards the acquisition of a suitable 
site for a fine institution. This has been ac- 
complished, and now the efforts of the direc- 
tors are being directed towards the erection 
of the building. Mrs. Adams is leader of the 
Methodist Women's Missionary Society of 
the province. With a warm heart and a clear 
head the president of the Y; W. C. A. finds 
many opportunities for the exercise of a true 
Christian philanthropy. 

Miss Leitch 

Miss Margaret Leitch is hctui of the 
King's . Daughters in Jjritisji Columbia.. This 
it an undenotitinationar-reiigious and philan- 



thropic society. Its motto, '"Look up and not 
down, look out and not in. and lend a hand" 
outlines its aims. Wherever there is distress 
to relieve, wherever hearts are sore and help 
is needed, there is work for the King's Daugh- 
ters. Miss Leitch has, since she succeeded to 
office, been successful in carrying out the 
long projected plan of a convalescent and 
emergency hospital at Duncan. In Victoria 
itself, the circles have been instrumental in 
doing much good among the sick and poor. 
Their latest activity is providing a rest room 
for girls. 

Mrs. McMicking 

One of those most interested in its estab- 
lishment has been Mrs. R. B. McMicking, 
president of the Ministering Circle. 

Mrs. McMicking is an old Victorian, and 
one of the first to join the King's Daughters, 
where her kind heart and unflagging indus- 
try have made her one of its most valuble 
members. Mrs. McMicking is also a very 
active member of the Victoria Literary So- 
ciety, and Regent of the Lady Douglas Chap- 
ter of the Daughters of the Empire. 

Mrs. Barnard 

Mrs. F. S. Barnard is the president of the 
Victoria Women's .Auxiliary to the Anti- 
tuberculosis Society of British Columbia. 
This society, with its junior branch, of which 
Mrs. Cross is president, has been instrumen- 
tal in contributing very materially towards 
the support of the sanitorium at Tranquille, 
and the care of tuberculosis patients in the 
city and district. The present officers of the 
society, other than the president, are Mrs. 
Stuart Robertson, Vice-president, Mrs. Her- 
bert Carmichael, secretary, and Mrs. H. A. 
Munn, treasurer. Mrs. Barnard has been 
connected with the society since it was 
founded in 1004 by the late lamented Mrs. 
Rocke Robertson. Ry her many estimable 
qualities Mrs. Barnard has won the esteem 
and confidence of her fellow- workers. In 
their efforts for the preservation of the health 
of the city, the ladies of this society receive 
the hearty support of their fellow-citizena. 

Miss Hiscocks 
With all the energy and enthusiasm of 
youth. Miss Hiscocks and her fellow mem- 
bers of the Daughters of Pity work for the 
support of the children's ward of the Jubilee 
Hospital. All supplies and equipment needed 
by the sick children are paid for from their 
funds. Not only is thought and love ex- 
pended on the little ones, but the pity of the 
girls is extended to the older patients. The 
long corridors and the wards are brightened 
by growing plants supplied by them, their 
taste and skill is called upon to decorate the 
chapel, and on great festivals the hospital 
itself. More than this, the Daughters of Pity 
have contributed towards the purchase of the 
X rays apparatus, and that needed for the 
bacteriological laboratory. Miss Hiscocks is 
a leader who do* « not spare herself, and whe 
(Continued on Pafft Six) 



^]Z£iM&L .. 



. 



■ ■ ■ /,'"':' 



Sunday, Nev«mb«r 8, 1I1X 



THE VICTORIA COLONIST 



I**!*" - 


tdii^u!!!] 



DATES jFROM "THE EMPIRE DAY BY 

DAY" 

Nov. I, 1899 — First Canadian contingent 
sailed from Quebec for Capetown. 

Nov. 2, 1858 — English crown assumed gov- 
ernment of India. 

Nov. 3, 1493 — Dominica discovered. 

Nov. 4, 1839 — Two English war vessels de- 
feated twenty-nine Chinese war junks. 

Nov. 4, 1840 — Acre bombarded with small 
loss; Egyptians lost 2,000 killed and 3,000 
prisoners. 

Nov. 4, 1899 — Relief of Ladysmith. 

Nov. 5, 1805— Sir Richard Strachan's naval 
victory over French. 

Nov. 6, 1704— English captured five French 

men-of-war. ^HttPSillOT 

Icrssians defeated atJjjHST' 




*»?,-: 



Nov. 6, 
man. 

Nov. 6, 1856— Natal raid* fja#j|*J$^^dny. 
Nov. 7, i860— Maoris. defea^dL ■, ,.J ; ,,,,:. 

Battle of IpjKirma<*-*&S4 ,, t ., , 

^mK&glake} .,..*. 

$J$> outlines of the figfet-^Wke those ©f 



Mount Inkerman itself— are' indented and, 
jagged, but 1 well marked. 



6t Period; — Coming up from the wot 



a gun; and, some Russian battalions appear- 
ing in another direction, it was only by a 
swift spring to the rear that his troops, drawn 
up on the Tusk, proved able to make good their 
escape. The 1,500 French troops disposed on 
Bosquet's left rear fell back behind the Home 
Ridge; and., the cavalry which Canrober-t 
brought up to cover the retreat being driven 
from the field by some shells, all this succes- 
sion of adverse occurrences seemed threaten- 
ing to end in disaster. The French troops be- 
came disconcerted, and the allies were from 
this cause in jeopardy. 

..,..: Upon the accession of yet further rein- 
forcements, General Bosquet resumed the of- 
fensive, and with two of his battalions he not 
only defeated that agile Selinghinsk regiment 
which had once more climbed the Kitspur, but 
drove it down over the aqueduct, and out of 
the Inkerman battlefield. He also withdraw- 
both the 7th tefer and the 6th o£ the Xinje 
from' tfeiV she^r. behind the vH^t^lBdge, j 
„and again sejit fa^dorwir&^ttymi^ | 
.by the course of the Eost road, and there -Had 
,$e Engli^h^iji^font^them, A ^ m ■;< JlirPr ^' 
', A t :i8Mta&efi^TriW^*iatill minded to -hold 
fast jMr rtresfwetive i o*ai*$ftmt.i»k Mambhl** 
kerman> both the Russians and. » the French 

now abandoned the offensive ; tat oar 



under Soimonoff, and from the east under Pan- 
■loff> 40,000 assailants moved' forward under so 
•'lfiKJft'M<6K«f darkness and mist that; by no 
pjpipr if in an u u tl y 

ing picket, . General Soimonoff was able to 
plant on Shell Hill a powerful artillery sup- 
ported by heavy bodies of foot. ^|§||§fh e 
commanding position thus rapidly seized, and 
now guarded by sixteen battalions, twenty- 
other battalions, with a strength of 15,000 men, 
were thrown forward to attack General Penne- 
father along his whole front, while a force 
called the "Under-road-column" moved up un- 
obstructed by the bed of the Careenage Ra- 
vine, in order to* turn his. left flank. On his 
righ>t for some time the enemy triumphed; he 
seized three of our guns, he drove from the 
field a bewildered body of nearly 400 foot, and, 
meanwhile, with the Under-road-column he 
successfully turned the position, coming up by 
the Well-way at last to within a stone's throw 
of Pennefather's tents. 

Then, however, all changed, and the mist, 
which had thus far protected the enemy, be- 
gan to favor our people, by taking from the 
enemy their power of rightly weilding big 
numbers, from the few their sense of weakness.' 
It resulted that (with the .aid of some bat- 
teries) 3,300 of our infantry, under Penne- 
father and Buller, found means to defeat with 
great slaughter, and even to expunge from the 
battlefield trie whole of the 15,000 men who 
had assaulted their front, and moreover, proved 
aide to rout the Under-road-column at a mo- 
ment when it was driving into the very camp 
of the 2nd Division. 

The number of Russian officers' struck 
down was appallingly great, and General 
Soimonoff himself fell mortally wounded.,, 
Second Period. — General Dannenberg, n6.w 
coming up, assumed the command, fcnd began 
to act with fresh troops. By attacking not 
only the front of the English position, but 
also the valueless ledge surmounted by the 
Sandbag Battery, he challenged his adver- 
saries to meet him in two separate combats; 
and our soldiery, believing.— though wrongly 
— that the dismantled work must be a part of 
the English defences, fastened on it with so 
eager a hold, that Lord Raglan — in the midst 
of close fighting — could not even attempt to 
withdraw them. The mistake long continued 
to work its baneful effects and the combatent 
part of the English force (now augmented by 
the accession of fresh troops) divided itself 
into two unconnected assemblages, with a dan- 
gerous gap between them. In one of the two 
simultaneous fights thus provoked — that is, 
the one in front of Home Ridge — General 
l'ennefather, with very scant means, proved 
able to hurl back ever}- onset; while in the 
fight for the Sandbag Battery, after long and 
obstinate struggles,- our people drove down 
the whole multitude which had swarmed on 
the ledge of the Kitspur; but, then haplessly 
they went on to do more achieving what I 
have called a "false victory" over the left wing 
of the Russian army. Excepting only a few 
score of men with difficulty restrained from 
pursuit, they all of them poured down the 
steeps, attacking or chasing the enemy, be- 
came dispersed in the copsewood, and in this 
way annuled for a time their power of render- 
ing fresh services. 

Russian troops, it was suddenly found, had 
moved up unopposed through the Gap, and 
the few score of English still remaining on the 
heights then seemed to be entirely cut off, yet 
proved able to fight their way home. 

For some time the two French battalions 
which had come up would take no part in the 
fight; but one of them — the 6th of the Line — 
moved forward at length with good will 
against the flank of a Russian force then mov- 
ing along the Fore Ridge. The enemy thus 
threatened fell back, and the French battalion 
victoriously made good its advance to groun* 
on the west of the Kitspur. 

Fifth Period. — When Bosquet's acceding 
reinforcements had brought up his infantry on 
Mount Inkerman to a strength of 3,500, he was 
induced to advance with a great part of this 
force to the false position of the Inkerman 
Tusk. Upon the approach of a Russian col- 
umn moving up to ground on his left, where 
he fancied the English stood posted, he was 
forced to retreat in great haste, with the loss of 



in ecstacy, and then fled as if our feet bore the 
swift messenger of the gods, and, like Mer- 
cury, we ran without touching the earth, down 
through the avenues of trees to the rocks and 
the urging sea. Perhaps the moon essayed to 
draw «us with her as she drew the tide, tor 
scarcely could we bring our feet to pause 
there on the brink of the water. And had we 
not paused, would the unseen wings that bore 
us, and the spell of the moonlight round us, 
have led us up, perhaps forever, and far out ' 
toward the sky, rosy still, where the, cloud army 
of the sun was marching ever westward, and 
the mountain peaks shone palely luminous in 
a radiance half moonlight, half after-glow. 




still disputing, the victory which' <Bwm 

would thus concede to his adve*#rieSi.ana*tt- 
the fight two hours longer witho**>the ! 

French infantry, passed gradually frorh 
.*$t|g&ir«Dld attitude of aggressive defence to one 
of decisive attack, and at length, by the united 
-power of Lord Raglan's two 18-pounders and a 
small daring band of foot soldiers, put so sharp 
a stress on Dannenberh, that — without con- 
sulting Prince Mentschiloff — he determined at 
once to retreat. 

Seventh Period. — No pursuit worth record- 
ing took place, and General Dannenberg's re- 
treat being accomplished at eight o'clock in 
the evening, the action came to an end. 

From this fight on Mount Inkerman there 
resulted, it seems, to the enemy a loss of 10,- 
729 in killed, wounded and prisoners. The 
piece of French cannon which the enemy 
took was left on the battlefield, and recov- 
ered after the action. No gun, Russian, Eng- 
lish or French, was definitively lost. 

o 

RAMBLING THOUGHTS 



In the mornings the sun woke us very 
early, if the birds, heralds of the dawn, had 
not chirped us into awakening earlier still. 
If sleep did not leave us before the day broke, 

we have heard, . y^l^^EfRpSP'' unseen 
rustling and quivering, and known that the 
night was leaving the embrace of the sea, and 
iktitfcigi ' J$*, shadowy draperies through the 
i^dlaJids §a§ *w*y and away to the West. 

the chlj&M*. Ahi; loving trees and tender 
^c^iford^ and frrig|t, .cool, seawdrenched 



When you were a child, perhaps you lived 
many miles away from the salt water, and old 
memories came to you in dreams of scenes 
that in other lives you knew. Most beautiful 
among those countless dream-pictures was that 
of a wonderful road that led straight down 
through avenues of lordly trees to great grey 
rocks, a limitless stretch ot sunlit sea. and be- 
yond the sea the mountains with their eternal 
snows. And, waking, you wondered if any- 
where there could be such a beautiful place, 
so vastly different from any country that you 
, had ever seen, and you had almost made up 
your mind that the dream belonged wholly to 
a long-dead past, or a future a hundred years 
away, when times changed, and one day you 
found yourself standing out upon the road of 
your visioning. And it was just as if God had 
been showing you the way there ever since 
the childhood dreams, and that all your life 
since the dreams until now had been a long, 
long walk, winding and circuitous, but with 
this for its definite goal. >, 



It is of this green stretch of land with its 
Road-to-the-Sea that we have been thinking of 
all through the months of the cummer, and the 
days of the golden September just gone. For 
another year is to bring great changes, 
changes that must come as the city grows and 
the railways extend, but changes that in some 
instances we do not like to contemplate, and 
we have heard the wind through the long 
nights singing the swan-son,.' of this lovely 
land of our dreams; for the trees must go, the 
grass will die. and the smoke of factories 
freight the breeze on which the perfume of a 
thousand flowers was one- the only argosy. 
The little bays with their clean white beaches 
will know the unsightly pollution of refuse, 
and the rocks themselves will be hidden by 
wharves and ugly freight sheds; the cool 
shade of the woodlands will be a thing forgot- 
ten, the sweet silence of summer afternoons 
mere fragrant memories. 



Never in all the years we have known this 
spot has it seemed quite so hallowed a place 
as it has this summer. Perhaps the knowledge 
of impending disaster has given a voice even 
to the inanimate things, thai must know some- 
thing of the suffering of any sort of change. 
And there has been a constant melancholy mel- 
ody, or rather melodious melancholy, pervad- 
ing all the silences, when the wind itself was 
hushed and the trees still. Especially was this 
noticeable on the White Nights, when the 
moonlight drenched the open spaces with its 
silver sheen, and siftinr* through the boughs of 
the trees in the woodland, traced a shinim 
foliage over the grass. \\ underfill nights, 
beautiful and holy as a prayer. Perhaps that 
was it. Perhaps that '*'as the meaning in the 
great white silence. The earth was breath lnj> 
that prayer that conies In-tore the sacrifice. 
But if the sadness of this thought touched us, 
it could not hold us long. Th<* joy of the in- 
spiration was vaster far than the pity roused. 
Emerging from the broken shadows of the 
wood, we have come out suddenly upon the 
Road-to-the-Sea,, to stand in flura a blaxe of 
purest radiance %*i we have held our breath 



Witty, lh»U to e .fruuvB. S 01 au many y ears 
:falm$fc %tmr*tter #1ft$ children, na^p^a 

4m '/^J&Jftiretell'ing of sorrow is in the song 
l^l'nds today. No more will the placid 
KfP$Hi$.'thc lovely naked forms of the 
little boys, who, morning after morning, 
striped to the skin "to feel the sun close," un- 
consciously worshipping as they stood there 
those, few moments in silent contemplation on 
the brink of the grassy bank. In the after- 
noon, if the heat lay close, we have sought 
1he shelter of the Knolls in the woodland, 
the Knolls where the wind was never still; 
lor across them the vast waters of the Straits 
"on the one side sent its eternal messages re- 
ceived .from the ocean to the waters of the 
harbor on the other side. And there was al- 
ways a little flutter in the air, that touched 
hot cheeks in passing, and whispered of the 
cool depths of the sea, and the glades of deep- 
er woods that, grew close on the foothills be- 
neath ihe eternal snows. 



lifted startled heads. The moss on the rocks, 
and emerald blades in the crevices, the very 
focks themselves seemed suddenly more alive, 
keenly expectant. One noted all these things 
even while one felt the greater part of that 
which was called upon to receive. To us it 
came close because so greatly needed, the chil- 
dren, the other animate and' inanimate things 
about felt it only uncomprehendingly, in- 
stinctively. Out from the blue it came, and 
up from the sea, and from the distant moun- 
tains across the water — one dare not name so 
great a thing. It warmed us like the sun- 
shine and thrilled us like the dear voice of 
some loved one long absent. Yet it was so in- 
finitely more than these! It swept us from 
our feet in ecstacy so that now, looking back 
in the sane and sober quiet of a rainy moriv- 
ing, we still believe that for the moment we 
were lifted from the very earth and up to meet 
that which was coming to us. And we wewf* 
enveloped within the glory of it, the purity of 
Sppt majesty of it for a timeless space-^and 

the *"w*3il c walkin & down from the Rot : k ' 
and out across the green common towards the ; 

woodlands, and every tree, and every blade of ' 

grass was singing, and every flower stpod on 

tjJRtoe and nodded its head in time. And, we 

—how we had change^! how immeasurabje 

Hie Ha ow jedie that h a d e q m « t a us 1 h o w, crnfi* 

plete the yanishjng df the p*U of ignorance 

that only a little while ago had covered r us 

and smothered us. We had been asleep be- 

forepai^«iifc awake now: awake, to, the 



Thomas said unto him, Lord, we know not 
whither thou goest, and how can we know the 
way? 

Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the 
truth and the life. No man cometh unto the 
Father but by me. 

If ye had known me you should have 
known my Father also, and from henceforth 
ye know him and have seen him. 

Philip said unto him, Lord, show us the 
Father and it stiff iceth us. 

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long 
time with you and have you not known me, 
Philip: he that hath seen me hath seen the 
Father ; and how sayest thou then, Show us 
the Father? 

Believest thou not that I' am in the Father 
and the Father in me? . The words that I 

§eak unto you I speak not of myself; but 
e Father that jh$elleth in me, he doeth the 

works. 

Believe me that I am in the Father and the 
Father in me, or else believe me for the very 
work's sake. ';||*|f|| 

Verily, verily, I saith unto you, he that 
beiietijjtt on rne, the works that I do shall he 
<Jo slSo; and. greater works than these shall 
ft* do, because I gc 



.*•*■? 



".• 



In w the . 

erci 



One night in the waning summer we-?were 
awakened, you remember, by the fog^-bells and 
the horns, and the short, sharp, warning whis- 
tles of the incoming and outgoing ships, So 
close to us in our tents was this, and the quiet 
lapping- of the water, that, not yet quite 
awake, we fancied ourselves out in the Straits, 
our boat feeling its cautious way through the 
curtain of thick mist, and we knew that little 
thrill of fear which others were experiencing 
out there on the hidden seas. In the morn- 
ing the sun shone on a dazzled world for a 
few short brilliant hours. And then suddenly 
in from the ocean beyond the hills came 
again the enemy of the sunshine, "terrible as 
an army with banners," and fearfully, awe- 
somely 'beautiful. Closer drew the trailing 
clouds, torn in great rents where the wind 
and the sun had beaten their way through 
them, , but gradually and surely gathering 
their ragged draperies, piecing them mysteri- 
ously together, and forming a compact, in- 
vincible whole again, which for the moment 
the sun was powerless to penetrate. Distant 
hills were long since hidden, and now the 
rocky points a- stone's throw away were lost 
to sight. Soon the woods behind us lay in 
the giant embrace of the misty enemy. It 
piled itself within the walls of our own little 
cove, and laid itself along the grass on the 
cliff. Presently the whole world was one vast 
white cloud, and you and I the only living 
things within it. 'The fog had triumphed over 
the sun and the wind was still. Once more 
from some near beyond sounded the clang of 
bell, the long wail of the horn and the sharp 
barks of the frightened ships. We stood very 
still to watch and listen there on the point that 
crept farthest out to sea. Above us we knew 
there was taking place a battle, of the ele- 
ments, the sun against the fog, and all our 
hopes and sympathies were with the gracious 
sun that loved us. Then all at once, as if by 
magic the great white curtain lifted, parted 
in a thousand icnts, and fled up and away to 
the north, and the million armies of sunbeams 
looded the glad earth and the welcoming sea. 
Bell and horn and whistle were still once 
more and the ships rode in safety. 



Do you remember the day we were very, 
very tired, not with a physical weariness only, 
but tired because of a long-hoped-for attaining 
that somehow seemed farther than ever away, 
'iisappointe 1 over a dozen little things that 
had gone wrong, and sick with a doubt of our- 
selves and the whole world? It was a day of 
days, glorious with a fresh breeze blowing, and 
we' climbed the Highest-Rock-of-AU that over- 
looks the wide green commons; the harbor, 
the city, the Straits and the mountains a beau- 
tiful panorama fringing the closer view 
around. And there we stood and the wonder- 
ful moment come to us. Wholly unheralded, 
wholly unexpected, and yet, when we came to 
think of it, we realized that all our disappoint- 
ment and sadness had been the purposeful 
preparation for this supreme experience. One 
can describe it only in part. It was far too vast 
a thing for the vehicle of words to carry 
Down below us in the grassy stretches the 
little children seemed arrested suddenly in 
their play, and swayed like flowers on their 
stems, their feet rooted in the green, ^ven 
the cowa ceased their peaceful grazing and 






myFa 1i 



je Of God, the Compassionate, 




lat gods still walked the earth part 
of the infinity of the universe. For the mo- 
ment you and I were gods, wonder-makers, 
miracle-workers. Omnipotence touched us. 
Omniscience breathed upon us. We were tall- 
er than the tallest trees; we could reach out 
ottr hands and touch the distattt hills; we felt 
the caress of the cumulous clouds in the far- 
thest blue. It could not last, that moment, 
else I think we would have known mortal life 
no longer, but passing it left us reborn, with 
no thought, no sensation beyond that of an 
all-pervading gladness. Embodying a force 
too great to contain, words struggled to our 
lips, a halting vehicle for that which was pent 
up within our bursting hearts. The words 
came unconsciously. Long, long ago some one 
sang them, millions have sung them since, but 
never before to us had they voiced so mighty 
a thing: 

"My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit 
hath rejoiced in God, my Saviour. 

For He hath regarded the lowliness of His 
handmaiden; 

And behold from henceforth all generations 
shall call me blessed. 

For He that is mighty hath magnified me; 

And Holy is His name." 

There is so much more that one could write 
of this wonderful bit of country. There were 
the days of mighty storms, when the wind 
lashed the sea into a fury and piled it up 
against the great rocks, till the little nooks 
where in calm weather we could sit at flood 
tide, were deluged with spray. There were the 
little green hollows at the top of the Road-to- 
the-Sea, where, even upon the wildest days, 
there was perfect quiet and peace, and not a 
breath of wind stirring. There were the dark, 
moonless nights, full of mystery, the sea, like 
a great black hand creeping further and fur- 
ther into the little cove, until we drew back in 
fear, and sought the cheerful friendliness of 
candle-lit tents. There were the days of 
gracious rain following close upon the spell of 
hot weather, and every little varying mood of 
Nature so full of magical suggestion that our 
thoughts were kept at flood, and left no room 
for vain wishing or useless regret. No one 
voice can adequately sing of the wonders of it, 
such an effort is as slight a thing as a whisper 
in a mighty wind. 

From where we sit we can see the long 
green finger of land pointing out to sea, and 
its tall trees reaching toward heaven. And 
when it is no longer green, and the tall.Jrees 
have made room for unbeautiful things, we 
know that our inward eyes shall always be 
able to picture it, with its Road-to-the-Sea, its 
silvered woodlands on the still White Nights, 
the cool green of the Knolls — between the 
waters and the grey, majestic beauty of the 
Highest-Rock of All. Such loveliness cannot 
die, though their outward forms may vanish, 
their influence must live forever, like the in- 
fluence of great souls, whose outward sem- 
blance has passed away, but whose power must 
last to eternity, being part of Almighty God. 
— o 

THE FAITH OF THE NATIONS 

Praise the Lord, all ye nations: praise Him, 
all ye people. 

For His merciful kindness is great toward 
us and the truth of the Lord endureth forever. 
Praise ye the Lord. 

From the New Testament 
St. John xiv. 

Let not your heart be troubled : ye believe 
in God ; believe also in me. 

In my Father's house are many mansions: 
if it were not'so I would have told you. I go 
to prepare a place for you. 

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I 
will come again, and receive you unto my- 
self; that where I am ye may be also. 

And whither I go ye know and the way ye 
know. 



■',.. A$|., c ome not down from heaven but by 



,$ie "lord's command. His, whatever is be- 
fore us and whatever is behind us, and what- 
ever is between the two. And thy Lord is 
not forgetful. 

Lord of the heavens and of the earth and 
of all that is between them. Worship thou 
Him and abide thou stedfast in His worship. 

Knowest thou any other of the same name? 

Man saith: What after I am dead, shall 
I in the end be brought forth alive? 

Doth not man bear in mind that we made 
him at first when he was naught? 

And I swear by the Lord we will surely 
gather together them and the satans ; then 
will we set them on their knees round hell ; 

Then will we take forth from each band 
those of them who have been stoutest in re- 
bellion against the God of Mercy; 

Then shajl we know right well to whom its 
burning is. most due. 

No one is there ol you who shall not go 
down unto it — 

This, is a settled decree of your Lord — 

Then will we deliver those who have the 
fear of God, and the wicked will we leave in 
it on their knees. . . . 

As to those who are in error, the God of 
Mercy will lengthen out to them a length of 
days, 

Until they see that with which they are 
threatened, whether it be some present chas- 
tisement or whether it be "the Hour," and 
they shall then know which is in the worst' 
state and which the more weak in forces: 

But God will increase the guidance of the 
already guided. 

And good works which abide are in thy 
Lord's sight better in respect of guerdon and 
better in the issue than all worldly good. 

From the Gospel of Buddha 

One of the disciples came to the Blessed 
One with a trembling heart and a mind full 
of doubt. And he asked the Blessed One: 

O Buddha, our Lord and Master, why do 
we give up the pleasures of the world, if you 
forbid us to work miracles and attain the 
supernatural? Is not Amitabha, the infinite 
light of revelation, the source of innumerable 
miracles? 

And the Blessed One seeing the anxiety of 
a truth-seeking mind said: "O shravaka, 
thou art a novice among the novices, and thou 
art swimming on the surface of samsara. How 
long will it take thee to grasp the truth? Thou 
hast not understood the words of the Tatha- 
gata. The law of karma is irrefragible, and 
supplications have no effect, for they are empty 
words. 

Said the disciple: So you say there are no 
miracles and wonderful things? 
And the Blessed One replied: 
Is it not a wonderful thing, mysterious and 
miraculous to the worldling, that a sinner can 
become a saint, that he who attains to true en- 
• lightenment will find the path of truth ^and 
abandon the evil ways of selfishness? 

The bhikshu who renounces the transient 
pleasures of the world for the eternal bliss of 
'holiness, performs the only miracle that can 
truly be called a miracle. 

A holy man changes the curses of karma. 
into blessings. The desire to perform miracles 
arises either from covetousness or from vanity. 
That mendicant does right who does not 
think "the. people should salute me": who, 
though despised by the world, cherishes no ill- 
will towards it. 

That mendicant does right to whom, as 
meteors, dreams and signs are things abol- 
ished. He is free from all their evils. * 

Amitabha, the unbounded light, is the 
source of the spiritual existence of Buddha- 
hood. The deeds of corcerers and miracle- 
mongers are frauds, but what is more won- 
drous, more mysterious, more miraclous than 
Amitabha? 



Tommy— Say, dad, who was Shylock? 

Dad— What! Don't know who Shylock 
was? What. do I send you to Sunday school 
for? Go and read your Bible.— Sydney Bul- 
letin, p > 



THF VICTORIA COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



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TALES OF ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS 



Egypt Under the Ptolemies — Ptolemy Euer- 
getes, or Physcon 

Philometer. who had died a brave death on 
the field of battle, after reigning for thirty-five 
years over Egypt, left behind him a wife, two 
daughters and one little son. I'hilometer's 
wife was his sister as well, and of course the 
sister of that depraved brother of his, Euer- 
getes, or I'hyscon, with whom he had quar- 
reled all his life. There ensued after Puiln- 
tneters death, a series of dreadful mis-mar- 
riage and crime, perhaps without "parallel in 
the whole of Egyptian history. 

Cleopatra, I'hilometer's widow, ii 



A^ieop 



immediate- 



)ok steps to, have her young son crowned 
tg, and he was to be called Ptolemy Eupator. 
But Euergetes, who had been reigning in 
Cyrehe during the Jifetime of. his brother, now 
decided to" put forth his claim to the whole 
Egyptian . kingdom r tso.hc raised a great army 
and march'ext upon Alexandria. Onias, the 
Jew, defended* the city against him, until the 
Romans intervened, and it was decided that 
peace should be restored and that Euergetes 
should marry his brother's widow, and sign a 
document that' her son should inherit the 
throne after his death. , The marriage was 






celebrated with the usual magnificence, and 
during the festivities the poor little son of the 
dead king- Philometer ivas r put to death by 
;etej5^_-Thi&-jdreadfal crime 



seems not to have caused much comment 
among the Alexandrians, who probably did not 

witness the- uphappy mother's grief J but when 
Euergetes began to persecute the people, and 
permit his mercenaries to rob and murder "and 
ravage at their pleasure, there were rumors of 
a riot. The Jews more especially felt the new 
king's displeasure, for had they not stood by 
his brother's queen in her time of trouble ? 
Euergetes threatened thenv withutter destruc- 
tion, but finally changed his mind, probably 
not daring to carry out such dreadful inten- 
tions, as the Jews, who were now largely the 
merchant class, began to leave the city by 
thousands. 

The year following his marriage with Cleo- 
patra, Euergetes went to Memphis to be 
crowned, and here his new wife bore him a 
son. But he had already tired oft her, and we 
read of his putting to death some of his 
brother's friends who had spoken against his 
new mistress Irene. Shortly after this he mar- 
ried again, and this time it was Cleopatra, his 
niece, the younger daughter of Philometer, 
who shared his throne. The divorced and dis- 
honored Cleopatra was allowed to retain her 
title, but not her place by her husband's side. 
There seems to have been no limit at all to the 
vices and cruelty of this tyrannical king. 

i\t last the people of Alexandria would put 
up with his iniquities no longer. The soldiers 
had been without pay for months. There was 
murmuring and discontent everywhere. One 
night the mob rose in the city, and thousands 
strong marched upon the palace. They de- 
manded that Euergetes should appear before 
them. This, of course, the cowardly king re- 
fused to do. Thereupon the great palace was 
set on fire, and, Euergetes with great difficulty 
made his escape and went to Cyprus. 

The banished queen, Cleopatra, was then 
sent for by the Alexandrians. Bereft of her 
children, for her baby boy was with his father 
at Cyprus, she had only her own claims to the 
throne. Nevertheless the people set her up 
and crowned her. and swore fealty to her, and 
all hoped that Egypt might have a short period 
of peace. Cleopatra's birthday dawned, and 
because she had always been a good woman, 
as women went in those days, and had tried to 
i\o her duty no matter how difficult that duty 
was, the people wanted to celebrate the day by 
a great feast and splendid pageantry. The 
festivities were at their height, and Cleopatra 
was seated at the banqueting board, when a 
box was brought in to her with letter bidding 
her open it at once, as it was a birthday gift. 
Cleopatra complied, and found therein thfl 
little head and limbs of her baby boy. The in-_ 
human Euergetes, fearing that the child might 
strengthen his mother's claims to the throne, 
had unhesitatingly murdered him. Such a ter- 
rible crime had it< effort even upon the hard- 
ened Alexandrians .and they ruse as one man 
to defend their queen against her wicked hus- 
band. 

But the fates were not kind to Cleopatra. 
Her army was defeated on the Syrian frontier. 
and the despairing queen sent for aid to De- 
metrius, her son-in-law, king of Syria. By this 
act she alienated the people of Egypt, who 
would put up with any tyranny from their 
own, rather than call in an outsider to rule 
over them. Cleopatra was forced to flee from 
Alexandria to Syria, and the protection of 
Demetrius. In the meantime Euergetes re- 
gained the throne. 

Time went on, and the sins of this wicked 
monarch began to be visited upon him. He 
suffered from horrible disease. His body, we 
are told, was six feet round, atid he was so 
weak from this enormous weight of flesh that 
be was obliged to walk with a crutch. He 
wore a long loose robe like a woman's, that 
reached to his feet and hands, and gave him- 
self up entirely to eating and drinking, and 
sensual pleasures . lie died when he was sixty- 
nine, and his death was deplored by no one. 
lie had been a. monster of yiciousness and 
cruelty, and the country had suffered grievous- 
ly under his misrule. And yet with it all ho 
miraculously inherited something of that 
scholarship which distinguished his worthy 
loreparents, and wrote a sort of history of his 



own lifetime, a commentary on llomer, and 
other things of.no high literary merit, but 
proof that the good qualities of his grand- 
parents were not wholly dead in him. 

■ 

THE STORY OF FRANCE 



St. Louis was succeeded by his son, Philip 
the Bold. He was a man of good but not 
great qualities. His courage is inferred from 
his nickname, but no conspicuous instances of 
it are preserved. He was in Tunis when his 
father died there, and remained there for sev- 
eral months endeavoring, thoUgh unsuccess- 
fully, to make some progress with the Crusade 
that had been so dear to the heart of St. Louis. 
He agreed to accept a considerable sum 
money from the Mohommedan ruler of Tuni 
and return to France. On the way his fleet 
encountered a severe storm and m^m^en "ii 
the coast of Sicily. Five thousan^'ihfe^^^aU' 
the treasure brought from Tunis were lost 
Landing in Italy; he ^%|£§pffiis journey l>y 
land. His wife, who accompanied him, had the 
misfortuhfe to '*j$ft from her horse and receive 
such injtfjrte^ Iftftt sfte^ed shortly after, arid 
Philip res^eC|ifc ^«rney weight*^ down 
with sao^ess arid himself seriously 'ill. 

He Was e^fea^lh dbirie^tic , or foreign 




wais during nis . w 
and gain^honolr '* 
he tried oil all m 
was weak and 
manlike gfiuffi 




elgn o f f i ft een years, 
n$ of th^vlfo; dotrot 

,4d»!wBt*lHit he'. 
d without a"f tates^ ' 

on with whichTJe" 7 
confronted. He unfortunately permitted 
himself to fall under the influence of a barber- 
surgeon of his household, named Peter de la 
Brose, a man of talent, but given to intrigue; 
who mis'sed his opportunity to accomplish 
great things by devoting himself to petty 
things, seeking rather to advance the interests 
of his own family than those of the state. He 
incurred the' hostility of .Maria of Brabant, the 
king's second wife, who was decidedly of an 
active turn of mind. She found sympathizers 
in some of the leading nobles. The. result was 
that de la Brose was charged and convicted of 
poisoning and theft, and was hanged for his 
crimes, the Dukes of Burgundy ami I'rabant 
and many of the Highest men in the nation 
standing around the gibbet. 

Fortune was in one sense kind to Philip. 
The death of his uncle without children gave 
him possession of the countships of Poitiers 
and Toulouse. He strengthened his position 
by ceding Agenois to Edward I. of England, 
and Venaissin to the Pope. Thus he was able 
to establish the crown as supreme over 
southern France, and his reign had the result 
of establishing the whole kingdom more se- 
curely in a territorial sense, by putting an end 
to the important baronies, which had threat- 
ened the power of his predecessors. This was, 
as we have seen, due more to good luck than 
good management. 

Philip the Bold was succeeded by his son, 
Philip the Handsome, who reigned as Philip 
IV. A contemporary writer describes him as 
"eaten up by the fever of avarice and cupidity." 
In addition to these not very commendable 
qualities, he possessed ambitions and an inor- 
dinate love of power. From one point of 
view, that is the personal one, his reign was 
successful. From the standpoint of France 
and the French people, it can hardly be so 
classed, lie asserted the power of the king- 
ship to a degree that it had never before at- 
tained, and was responsible for that national 
cleavage which set in and in the course of time 
caused a complete rupture between the throne 
and the nation. From this time forward the 
French king was no longly only first among 
equals, but claimed the right to stand out 
alone, asserting the powers of a despot, if 
not the title. Many of the kings, who suc- 
ceeded him, were too wise or too weak to ex- 
ert such authority, but the tradition remained 
until the populace put an end to it by putting 
an end to the monarchy. 

Philip the Handsome was very fortunate in 
nearly everything he undertook. He was able 
to make very excellent terms with Fdward I. 
of England, buying that monarch's rights in 
Xormandy and Tours for substantial sums, 
and persuading him to renounce certain claims 
to Ouercv. For such other land as Edward 
continued to hold in France he did homage to 
Philip. The English king's complacency in 
these matters probably arose from the fact 
that he had his hands full nearer home with 
Wales and Scotland. Edward TI. did homage 
for Aquitaine. and married Isabel, daughter oi 
Philip. Tn southern France Philip met with 
success and firmly established his authority 
there. These things were not accomplished 
without some fighting, but none of the battles 
were at all serious. 

His relations with Flanders presenter] a 
more difficult problem. The Flemings were 
at this time the leading commercial people of 
Kurope. The great Fair at Bruges attracted 
merchants from all parts of the known world, 
some of them coming even from India and 
China. Marguerite the Black was at this time 
countess of Flanders, and although her riches 
and influence were great, the people were 
really self-governing. It is not now .of im- 
portance how the war between the French and 
the Flemings was brought about. The strug- 
gle was well contested, but Philip was suc- 
cessful, and the country seemed at his feet. 
He made a tour through it, accompanied by 
the queen, who was somewhat indignant that 
the merchants' wives in Bruges were better at- 
tired than she. "There are none but queens 
here!" she exclaimed. "I had thought that 
none but I was entitled to royal state." But 



Philip's triumph was only temporary. Five 
years after his triumphal journey a little, ob- 
scure, one-eyed weaver named Deconine 
stirred up the people to an assertion of their 
independence. Many flocked to his stan- 
dard, and he was soon at the head of -Jo.ooo 
men. Against them Philip dispatched a force 
numbering 6o,ooo, which met with ignominious 
defeat at Courtrai. 1'hilip's first news of the 
battle come in the form of a bloodstained ipiece 
of parchment upon which one of his dying 
knights had briefly told t lie stbry of the dis- 
aster. 

o « 

THE SACRED NAME 

Third Commandment reads as fol- 
ws: "'Thou shall not take the name of the 
Lord thy God "in vain, for the Lord will 
hold him guiltless that taketh his name in 
vain." What 




It is not 



iifne'.peV- 

sons -SU|^0Se«-;eitnfl^H«OB,<'r v iirist. The 

word Lord, when ^BKm^'^K*P^ 

exactly the same as i* 4m m 'Wmfrtt: It is 

not a *ame> but a tftje. It-is similar -tq the 

is 



,ti*m*\wOrd ' jDom>nus*^^|e^^*lttt ; a , name- 
^M-t^m0m»*\^' titBp-jm&Hs-*- name, 








fust >a 



with jmmfc 

riiea^'taa 

that the Commandment could ncrtr 
plied to the name of Jesus or Christ, arid the 
reference to them in this connection is only 
for the purpose of excluding from the Con- 
sideration of its meaning everything except 
what v it does. refer to. To make the meaning 
of the Commandment clear, it may be added 
that the expression "the Lord th\ Gbd*? is no 
more a name than "our Lord the King" is. If 
the law should say, Thou shah not take the 
name of Our lonkthe King in vain," we would 
all understand that we were not to refer to 
him as George. 

What, then, was the name which the Chil- 
dren of Israel were enjoined not to use? 
Strange as it may seem to say it. we do not 
know with certainty. In Hebrew writing 
the vowel sounds are not indicated, and the 
name of the Deity was written J1JVII. The 
J has the sound of V. Scholars do not agree 
as to what vowels should be supplied in or<jjjM| 
that these consonants may be sounded. A, 
commonly received practice is to insert the 
vowels e. o and a in that order, and hence 
we have the name Yehovah .which we com- 
monly write Jehovah. Others use the vowel 
a in each case, and make the word Yahavah 
Others prefer Yahaveh. Yahveh or even 
Yave. But however it may have been pro- 
nounced, this was the word that the Children 
of Israel were forbidden to say* 

The best scholarship derives the word 
from "haya," which in the Hebrew tongue 
means "to be." We get the same idea in the 
expression used by Jesus when He safd, "Be- 
fore. Abraham was I am." The idea supposed 
to be conveyed by the name is infinite, eter- 
nal and self-sufficient existence. In this con- 
nection Exodus 6: 3 is of interest. Here the 
Deity is represented as speaking to Moses 
and saying: "For 1 appeared unto Abraham, 
and unto Isaac and unto Jacob by the name 
of God Almighty, but by my name Jehovah 
was I not known unto them." This seems to 
mean a great deal more than appears upon the 
face of the words, and it may very well be that 
an important truth underlies it, a truth that 
is both historical and philosophical in its na- 
ture. We gather from it that the monothe- 
ism of the patriarchs did not extend fat- 
enough to exclude a belief in the existence of 
more than one god. Indeed, it would be pos- 
sible to make many citations from the Scrip- 
tures to show that the idea of the Deity com- 
monly received by the Children of Israel was 
that their God was only superior to all others 
and not the Only one. This view of the mat- 
ter reconciles certain variations in language 
used in the Old Testament that would other- 
wise be inconsistent. Thus in the First chap- 
ter of Genesis the creation of the world is 
assigned to Hlohim, which is a plural noun, 
and means the Gods. In the Psajms the word 
Hlohim is employed 323 times, and the word 
Jehovah 654 times. The use of the word l'.lo 
him suggest a pre-Mosaic origin of the text 
in which it occurs. There is no warrant at 
all for the suggestion, no! infrequently ad- 
vanced, that the doctrine of the Trinity is im- 
plied in the use of the word "Klnhim." Merc. 
therefore, we get a simple and wholly reason- 
able explanation of the use of the two terms 
Jehovah and Elohim. and of what is intended 
by the verse quoted from Kxodus. We find 
reasonable ground for thinking that there was 
an evolution in the Hebrew conception of the 
Deity, from the idea of Elohim, of whom one 
being, superior to the others, watched over 
the destiny of the race, to that of one self- 
existent and eternal Being, whose name was 
so far above every name that it was never to 
be spoken. 

By IHVH wc are to understand some- 
thing so far beyond humanity and all created 
things as to be unknowable. "Clouds and 
darkness are round about Him," wrote the 
Psalmist. Isaiah tells us that He is a God 
that hideth himself. The writer of Exodus 
sneaks of Him as being in the thick darkness. 
These expressions are only an enlargement of 
what is implied in the word J 11 VII. The 
patriarchical idea of the Deity was that of a 
person witi-s whom man could be familiar, or, 
an Canon Farrar says of the view held by 
some people of our own day, that "'of a man 



in the next room." The Mosaic idea was that 
which was intended to be conveyed by the 
word written JHVtfj and of whom Zophat 
in the Book of Job speaks when he asks: 

"Canst thou find out the Almighty to perfec- 
tion ? 
It is as high as Heaven, what canst thou do? 
Deeper than Sheol, what canst thou know " 

And this brings us back t-o where we were 
last Sunday. We can only hope to know 
fllVn, and to make Him the controlling in- 
fluence in our lives, when we think of Him 
as revealed to us by Jesus Christ, who taught 
that we are not to stand speechless before 
JIIYIi, but that we may address the Self- 
isterit and Eternal as Our Father. 




The most distinguished of all the French ' ! 
'^Swoy* 0* Canada, by whatever t»tle they 
W*fc called, was undoubtedly Louis de Baude, 
Count of Frontenac. He was torn in 1620 and 
died in i<5£8. He was oT a very distinguished 
family, said to be of Basque origin. His fathe* 
held a high ROst in the household ; of Louis 
XIII., who was godfather to Lottfff and gave 
him his nnrn e. — H e b e ga n military aenrirr 



at theiage of fifteen, and served with distinc- 
tion, ^taR^s a lad giving proof of unusual 
courage anOk resourcefulness. He was ire- 
/utfhaed; 1 hi 1 Ms t wenty-si x th y e a r 
he was ma@^m&remVteMim I*itle .eqilfc- 
valent ,|C#iat of briga^tl^eral. H* ma> 
ried /i&inc de la Grange-Trianon, a lady of 
unusual beauty/whose portrait hangs in the 
gallery of Versailles. Her father disapproved 
of the match, believing that the young people 
were unsuited to each other. They took mat- 
ters in their own hands, and were secretly 
wedded. The union proved an unfortunate one. 
She was imperious and had a craving for ex- 
citement ; he was hot-tempered and headstrong 
and possessed insufficient means to permit her 
to gratify her wishes for high social position. _ 
After the birth of her son, she left her husband 
and became a friend and companion of Made- 
moiselle de Montpensier, -and for some years 
played a conspicuous part in the frivolities of 
the" time. St; Simon, in his Memoirs says of 
her: "She had been beautiful and gay. and 
was always in the best society, where she was 
greatly in request. Like her husband, she had 
little property and abundant wit. She and 
Madame tfOutrelaise, whom she took to live 
with her. gave the tone to the best company of 
Paris and the court, though they never went 
thither. They were called Les Divines. In 
fact, they demanded incense, like goddesses, 
and it was lavished upon them all their lives." 
St. Simon says of Frontenac: "He was a man 
of excellent parts, living much in society and 
completely ruined. He found it impossible to 
bear the imperious temper of his wife; and he 
was given the government of Canada to de- 
liver him from her and afford him a means 
of living." It is pleasant to be able to record 
that, notwithstanding her fondness for gaiety. 
scandal left the Countess free from reproach, 
although at one time Louis XIV. was dis- 
posed to pay her much attention, and she ap- 
parently might have filled the place in the 
royal favor afterwards occupied by Madame de 
Montespan. She did not accompany her hus- 
band to America, but it is said that she was 
always ready to accord him her support in the 
many trials to which he was subjected because 
of the hostility of the Jesuits to him and his 
plans. 

Frontenac was fifty-two years of age when 
he landed in Quebec, and he set himself to 
work upon his task of bringing order out of 
idiaos with the greatest vi^or. He was fired 
by a high ambition. He believed Canada des- 
tined to become a great nation and saw in 
Quebec its future capital. There is no doubt 
that France had at hand one of the greatest 
opportunities ever open to any nation. Pre- 
vious to the coming of Frontenac, Talon, who 
had acted as agent for the king, had written: 
This part of the French monarchy is des- 
tined to a grand future. All that I see around 
me points to it; and the colonies of foreign 
nations, so long, settled on the sea-board, are 
trembling with fright in view of what His 
Majesty has accomplished here within the last 
seven years. The measures we have taken to 
confine, them within their narrow limits, and 
the prior claim we have established against 
them by formal acts of possession, do not per- 
mit them to extend themselves except at peril 
of having war declared against them as usur- 
pers; and this, in fact, is what they seem 
greatly to fear " 

The reference in this extract is to the Eng- 
lish colonies on the Atlantic coast, and the 
formal acts of possession consisted of the 
planting of the Cross and the French fUg 
throughout the great hinterland by the Re- 
collet and Jesuit fathers and the adventurers 
who went with them. In later years, after 
Fere Marquette had explored the Mississippi, 
Frontenac wrote to the king: "Send me two 
regiments of trained troops, and 1 will sweep 
the spawn of the Anglo-Saxon into the sea, 
and reduce all this contiirent^to the sway of 
Your Majesty and to the true worship ol 
Christ." There is very little doubt that he 
could have done so. for not only was he a 
skilled and resolute soldier, but he had the 
confidence of the Indians as well as of the 
French colonists and he could easily have 
organized an expedition winch the. scattered 
FnglLsh colonies could n?t i*§ve successfully 
resisted. But the King' <& Franca (ailed to 



appreciate what his representatives under- 
stood; the soldiers were not sent; Frontenac 
missed his opportunity of founding a French 
Empire in America, and the current of history 
was directed in another -channel. 

The administration of Frontenac was ren- 
dered difficult by reason of the strife between 
him and Talon. We shall in a future article 
deal in some detail with this unfortunate epi- 
sode in Canadian history. At present we shall 
only add that his government was on the 
whole very successful, and that his death was 
very deeply lamented, especially among the 
humbler classes of the people. One of his con- 
temporaries wrote: •"lie was the love and de- 
light of New France. Churchmen honored 
him for his piety; nobles esteemed him for his 
valor; merchants respected him for his equity. 
and the poor loved him for his kindness." . 



othMppbte:' "He was the father of the poor, 
the protector of the oppressed and a perfect 

mjadel of fl^^a aiilriety. M 

Frontenac is the last of the leaders ot; 
French Canada with whom we propose to 
deal. The story of the leading .men ^ri»||- 
the English regime will be begun in a future 
number, after the series of articles on Franco 
has been .concluded. It is postponed for- the 
present in order that, space may be available 



for the treatment of subjects of another class. 

■■ O " ■■■ v 

A WOMAN'S QUESTIOH 



Do you know you have asked for the costliest 

i thin £ ; * mm 

Ever made by the hand above — 

A woman's heart and a woman's life, 

And a woman's wonderful love? 

Do you know you have asked for this priceless, 
thing ; 

As a child might ask for a toy? 
Demanding what others have died to win, 

With the reckless dash of a boy. 

You have written my lessons of duty out; 

Man like, you have questioned me — 
So stand at the bar of my woman's soul, 

Until I question thee. 

You require your mutton shall always be hot, 
your stocks and shirts shall be whole; 

I require your heart to be true as God's stars, 
And pure as Heaven 1 your soul. 

You require a cook for your mutton and beef; 

I require a far better thing; 
A seamstress you're wanting for stockings 
and shirts — 

I look. for a man ami a king. 

A king for a beautiful realm called home, 
And a man that. the maker, God, 

Shall look upon as Fie did the first, 
And say, "It is very good.'" 

I am fair and young, but the rose will facte 
From my soft young cheek one day — 

Will you love me then, 'mid the falling leaves, 
As you did 'mid the bloom of May? 

Is your heart an ocean so strong and deep 
I may launch my all on its tide? 

A loving woman finds Heaven or hell 
On the day she is made a bride. 

I require all things that are equal and true, 

All things that man should be; 
If you give this all. I would stake my life 

To be all you demand of me. 

If you cannot do this— a laundress and cook 
You can hire, with little to pay ; 

But a woman's heart and a woman's life 
Are not to be won that way. 

— E. B. Browning. 



MONTENEGRO 

They rose to where their sovran eagle sails, 
They kept their faith, their freedom, on the 

Chaste, frugal, savage, armed by day and 

night 
Against the Turk; whose inroad nowhere 

scales 
Their headlong passes, but his footstep falls, 
And red from blood the Crescent reels from 

fight 
Before their dauntless hundreds, in prone 

flight 
By thousands down the crags and through 

the vales. 
O smallest among peoples ! rough rock-throne 
Of freedom! warriors beating back the swarm 
Of Turkish Islam for five hundred years, 
Great Tsernagoral ! never since thine own 
Black ridges drew the cloud and broke the 

storm 
Has breathed a race of mightier mountain- 
eers. 

— Tennyson. 

- o 

Modern Morals 
"This latter day or new morality is too lax 

for me." 

The speaker was Jerome S. McWade, the 
Duluth millionaire. He continued: 

"This new morality, which seems in its 
tolerance rather to encourage than to oppose 
wickedness, reminds me of a lad in my Sun- 
day school class." 

"'Now, Tommy.' I said to this lad one 
Sunday, 'now, Tommy, what must we do be- 
fore our sins can be forgive?' : 

H 'Wc must sin,' Tommy replied*"— New 
York Tribune. 



8und«y, Never.ibor 3, 191J 



THE VICTORIA COLONIST 



5 




eg/ (meml3> Office la 



TLqejii Gcn.er2.1s Poaxa^ 



fc&U 




HE -people of , this, province*-.: as 
they %itctt the continuous -apt 
ever-increasing Howf of seffc&irs 
and visitors .from the United 

- tries 



Kingdom, fr o m all the eoua 






of Europe and almost every other part of the 
world, may be apt to accept the results of 
this imnijg|j^^^iyit^Ott;t seeking the fffflffy 
that bring irabout. It is true 'that in British 
>qjbia are to be found millions of acres of 
fertilcsoSL vast timber and mineral areas, 
fisheries thjk seem inexhaustible, and a cli- 
mate which enables the utmost to be made 
of these gifts of nature. But rich as these 
natural resources are. if left to themselves 
they would not account for the enormous in- 





: ^st|^i§D£H^'^vantages,to recommend them. 
In* rJwfc&H «m«,|W)re skilfully ; 4»^prpmin^| 

«¥l«|r;;it|ejrea»evin the population finds a 



being carried on, often unnoticed by the pub- 

l^^lhe various publicity agencies, whether 
i>^(il»jMd , '!>3!F. ; the government or by individual 
bodies of men, w ho,., w ise i n their generation, 
and foreseeing the return of their bread cast 
upon ntaiiy W,fipj|||re content to go on spend- 
ing money for years to obtain in the end re- 
sults which will fully recompense them and 
the land they live in. 

And at the head of these agencies stands 
the office of the province in London which, 



t crest lately manifested in this province. In 
these days it is not enough to have a good 
thin- n> offer people. The world is large and 
they may never hear of it, or be tempted by 
the destription of other lands which have not 



under the direction of the agent-general, the 
lion. J. 11. Turner, has directed so many 
thousands of settlers to the homes and in- 
comes that may be obtained here. 

London is the hull of the universe, and 



into that office in Kinsbury Square come hun- 
dreds of people every working day in the 
week, of all nations, of all classes, and tastes, 
hut all animated by the same desire, to find 
a new home under the English flag' in His 
Majesties dominions beyond the seas. 

Salisbury House is a stately building in one 
of those quiet squares which contrast so 
strongly with the densely crowded thorough- 
fares only a few yards away in the city of 
London. The agent-general's office occupies 
a long suite of rooms on the main floor, and 
once these are entered the visitor finds himself 
in an atmosphere which again forms the 
strongest contrast possible to that of other 
offices in this commercial centre. 

Gigantic moose heads and other trophies 
of the chase frown down on him from the 
walls, mighty salmonidae of different species 
in their glass rases line the room, cases of 
minerals, specimens of polished timber at- 

i 



attract the eye till it is bewildered by the 
wealth and variety of the display, and he turns 
to the literature strewn along the long tables 
in an attempt to. reduce his impressions to 
some sort o! order. In this maps of alb sizes 
and photographs assist, though he will speedily 
find that not in one or two visits will he be 
able to assimilate the vast amount of informa- 
tion with which this office can furnish him. 

So much for the casual visitor, the man 
who at present is only vaguely curious about 
this Eldorado of the West, the man who per- 
haps is only weighing the comparative advan- 
tages of different parts of the world. This 
visit concentrates and focuses his thoughts, 
ami he asks if there is any one who can talk 
over with him his projects of the future. Many 
a one must have looked back with thankfulness 
on his interviews with Mr. Turner or one of 
his staff which ha.- proved the turning point 
in what has been, perhaps, up to then an un- 



satisfactory career. He brings away from that 
interview a flea^ef Vls i OU of "the futur e , and 



has taken the first and most difficult step on 
ijfis way to British Columbia, namely, the mak- 
ing up his mind that, come what will, he will 
get there for a look round at any cost. Tire 
rich man, on the lookout for investments, the 
laborer whose son has written back to him to 
come out, parents anxious about the start <>f 
their sons on the" threshold of their business 
life— all receive the best advice that Mr. Tur- 
ner can give them: many an introduction is 
written out which will smooth the difficulties 
of their first arrival in this country, and when 
they leave the office, they go out in their turn 
to become missionaries to beckon or point 
others to British Columbia.' r 

The government contemplate, it is said, 
moving the offices to a site on a busy thor- 
oughfare nearer the West Knd, but it will 
never be forgotten that the foundation of the 
prosperity which this province is now enjoy- 
ino- was laid' in the rooms of wdtich illustra- 
tions are given on these pages, and which 
therefore cannot fail to have a special interest 
for all dwellers in British Columbia. 
o ■ 

Tn Detroit they tell of a young man who. 
although he made' a great deal of money, was 
always in debt because of his extravagance. 
Not long ago, however, he wooed and won a 
young woman of great wealth, and immedi- 
ately things took on a roseate hue. 

During the honeymoon the bride ventured 
to ask hubby whether the fact that she had 
money made' any difference to him. 

"To be sure it does, my love," was the un- 
expected response. 

Whereupon wifey was a bit alarmed. 
"What difference?" she asked. 

"Why, darling,** continued the husband, 
"it is such a comfort to know that if 1 should 
die vou'd be provided for." 

"And if I should die?" added the bride. 

''Then, darling," was the reply, "I'd be pro- 
vided for.'— Lippincott's. 




Treatau 






f ( By Dr. Lovell Drage, in The National Review j 

7 



ISEASI-' in general has a myster- 
ious interest for most persons, 
and when the disease is acknow- 
ledged to be one of which the 
Cflusation IS unknown and the 
treatment unsatisfactory, and which is fatal 
in its effects, it is the cause of dread. Too 
much mystery surrounds cancer, the nature of 
which has, indeed, been known for many 
years past, although satisfactory results from 
treatment are at present but rarely obtained. 
The disease consists of the assumption by 
certain cells of parasitic, qualities, and the re- 
sult is the formation of a growth or tumor, 
which derives its means of subsistence and 
expansion from its host. The conditions 
which cause this assumption of parasitic pro- 
perties are unknown, but a plausible sugges- 
tion is, that an organism, either belonging to 
the animal or vegetable world, obtains access 
to the cells which are to become cancerous, 
and after having initiated the changes loses 
its own existence and becomes incorporated 
in the cancerous cells. 

The growth having commenced, no symp- 
toms in disc, ie are to he detected in the in- 
dividual attacked until it has either inter- 
fered with the work of one Or more organs or 
by pressure lias caused pain Of discomfort. A 
cancer therefore may nave grown for many 
years before the individual attacked is aware 
that he or she is the subject of the dread dis- 
ease. Thefe are no symptoms of disease to 
be specially assigned to cancer. After vary- 
ing intervals of time the growth spreads from 
the original focus to other parts of the body 
along the course of the lymphatics, and it is 
not uncommon to find these channels infect- 
ed, as soon as the original growth is detected. 
There are periods of activity and quiescence. 
In a few cases a growth has been known to 
cease altogether, and complete disappearance 
is not unknown. After the growth has reached 
a stage of maturity degeneration begins, and, 
in fact, local death occurs. The most com- 
mon) cause of death is the blood-poisoning 



which arises from the absorption of the poisons 
caused by the process of destruction. With 
the exception of the origin of cancer, it does 
not appear that there is much room for mys- 
tery. Moot points there arc, no doubt, such 
as the position of heredity and of the nature 
of predisposing causes, but so far as the prob- 
lem of treatment is concerned the difficulties 
remain in the same position which they have 
always occupied. 

Official pronouncements and semi-official 
communications persist to the effect that sur- 
gery alone can ensure either the cure of the 
patient or amelioration of the distressing symp- 
toms. Charlatanism is the least of the many 
charges which a doctor incurs if he attempts 
to treat the disease in any other way than 
that which the surgeon proposes. Twenty-five 
years ago the large mutilative operations at 
present adopted were impossible, hut step by 
step the surgeon has made it possible in many 
cases not only to remove the original focus 
of disease, but also all those parts which are 
affected, and those parts which experience 
has taught are those most likely to be the 
subject of subsequent attack. Surgery has 
reached the point when the patient can almost 
be removed from the disease, though it cannot 
remove the disease from the patient. No sat- 
isfaction can he felt at such a result, and it is 
obvious that at the present moment the treat- 
ment of the disease is in an intermediate stage. 
Surgerv can be said to be the best meajns of 
coping with the disease at present recognized 
by the professional Brahmin, but to those 
who are not Brahmins, but possess the in- 
stincts of science, it is only too obvious that 
there are methods available based upon con- 
siderations which in the end will lead to com- 
plete success. ^ 

The treatment by exposure of the gowth 
to light rays, such as the X rays or those given 
off by radium, must have a limited applica- 
bility; they are only useful in cases in whieh 
the growth is rte>r the surface of the body, or 
in such a place" it which their application is 



practicable, There is. moreover, a fatal ob- 
jection to the use of these powerful agents: 
the surrounding healthy tissue is exposed to 
their agency as well as the diseased area; 
their activity is therefore applied to healthy 
cells, wdiose vital powers arc appreciably les- 
sened. It is no matter of surprise to me, 
therefore, that the worst cases for medical 
treatment are those in which treatment by 
these agents has been attempted. Another 
objection to this treatment is that cases of 
success are few and far between. 

Treatment by the use of chemical sub- 
stances has up to the present time been handi- 
capped by the activity of the surgeon. It is 
well-nigh impossible to find persons suffer- 
ing from cancer who have not sustained at 
least one mutilative operation, and a mutila- 
tive operation involves great interference with 
the circulation of the blood in the -atrea oper- 
ated upon, equally great interference with 
nerve supply and with lymphatic supply. 
Treatment by chemical substances is of course 
equally handicapped, as are other methods 
of treatment, by the fact that cancer is fre- 
quently of old standing when sufferers apply 
for treatment, and it is also handicapped by 
professional opposition to any other treat- 
ment but surgical. 

The nature of the disease having already 
been explained, it can now be stated that 
chemical treatment can be applied in tvv)j ways. 
The first is by the use of some stibstance 
which can be employed therapeutically, of suf- 
ficient strength to destroy the growth. The 
second is the alteration of the environment of 
the diseased cells, so that their growth can be 
interfered with, and, in fact, prevented. The 
first is undoubtedly insufficient by itself for 
any curative purpose, but it may be used in a 
subsidiary manner. Various powerful sub- 
stances, such as formaldehyde, have a very 
destructive action upon cancers which arc on 
the surface of the body and which have al- 
ready commenced to decay, and can be used 
to lessen the evils of putrefactive changes. 

Some fifteen years ago, when I first began 
to give my attention to this disease, I was 
fortunate in enlisting the services of Dr. Mor- 
gan — now professor of chemistry in the Royal 
College of Science, Dublin— in the work, an^ 



acting upOTJ the suggestion of Dr. Lewis Jones, 
I investigated various thorium compounds 
which the former made for me. Disappoint- 
ment followed, and only one compound, the 
oleatc, was found to be of any use. Dr. Mor- 
gan, however, at my suggestion, made a num- 
ber of the salts of coumaric acid, nearly allied 
to cinnamic acid. Organic chemistry pro- 
vides practically an unlimited field in a sub- 
ject of this sort. None of the old and tried 
remedies in the hands of the physician have 
proved of any value in the treatment of the 
disease, and this being so, the obvious course 
for the worker is to obtain new substances of 
known chemical composition, wdiose physio- 
logical properties can be investigated and as- 
certained. 

At the outset observation had led mc to the 
investigation of the cinnamatc of sodium, 
which is a drug capable of producing in the 
blood a large increase of those white cells 
which are the mosl highly organized element 
in the blood. The exhibition of this compound 
proved," at any rate, that the attempt to treat 
cancer medicinally" was no forlorn hope. Pal- 
liative results were obtained; and Mr. C. B. 
Lockwood very kindly used the* treatment in 
his wards at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and 
relief was given in several cases When that 
sup-con had done all that his services could 
effect. 

This preliminary attempt was one based 
upon the second method above mentioned. It 
was believed that by altering the constitution 
of the blood in the direction of the increase of 
those cells most profoundly possessing the at- 
tributes of living cells, cancerous growths 
could be attacked, and the attempt was suf- 
ficiently successful for the prosecution of fur- 
ther effort. The salts <*f coumaric acid which 
Dr. Morgan produced were found to possess 
considerable therapeutic activity. These acids, 
tested by the Rideal-Walker method, were 
found to possess a much higher antiseptic 
power than carbolic acid when tested with the 
enteric bacillus. Considerable experience has 
now been gained of the value of these chemi- 
cal substances, and from time to time adju- 
vants have been added or rejected, and there 
is now no doubt remaining in my mind that it 
is possible to mitigate the suffering present 



in many advanced cases of cancer.. Unfor- 
tunately- the supply of patients who have not 
been treated surgically or by light treatment 
is very small — only three in all — so it is im- 
possible to advance at the present time a state- 
ment of any value as to rectitude in advising 
patients to refuse operation. But at least I am 
not prepared to press operative treatment upon 
patients to the same extent as formerly, and 
certainly am prepared to ask for continued 
work upon the lines on which I have myself 
worked. 

It is a matter of difficulty to understand 
the mental attitude of official persons, and of 
those who, without disclosing their identity, 
continue to give forth semi-official utterances 
in the press to the glorification of surgery 
and to the disparagement of those who are 
only conscious of honest endeavor to advance 
the treatment of a dire disease. The late Dr. 
James Matthews Duncan in an address at 
Birmingham in 1880 said: "The ideas sug- 
gested by the researches of Toussaint, of 
Greenfield and Buchner, may prove to be 
mere ignes fatui. but they may prove to be 
true guides. It is by following out such ideas, 
cerifying or disproving them by new investi- 
gate mis. that progress is made in science." 

This true saying is too often lost sight of 
my members of the medical profession. 
j* 

Feared Music Disturbed Him 

It happened the other evening, and now a 
certain clubman is trying to figure out how 
he will square things with his wife the next 
time he is "detained" down town. He was not 
going home for dinner, and when his wife 
answered the telephone he said: 

• "Don't wait for me at dinner this evening, 
dear. I shall be detained on business." 

"Very well." she replied. "I'm sorry you 
can't come home; but business is business, I 
suppose. Where are you now?" 

"Where am I? In my office, of course. I 
have had a very busy day." 

"It's too bad you have to work so hard, 
George. But tell me something." 

"Yes dear. What is it?" _,^g 

"How can yo« keep your mind on bwmr. 
ness with the.orchestra playing 'Every tM& 
Movement r"-#Kansas City Star. | ! 

4- 



m 



- ■ ---.-^--^-^-■-^ 



mm 



PPWOTMP 



I ipnuilll.l.ll, J III 



Ltitl V1UXOKJA COLONIST 



Sunday, Novtmbtr 3, 19U 



PiritodpaE IP 




©EH® 





fiflH HMw 





r^R. AUGUSTUS BRIDLE, writ- 
ing in The Canadian Courier, 
says: 

The learned principal of Mc- 
Gill University reduced to a mere 
definition is William Peterson, M.A., LL.D., 
C..M.G. These abbreviations are but a more 
or less colloquial formula for a scholar who 
got his B.A. from Edinburgh University, the 
town he was born in; M.A., from Gottingen — 
classical and English literature; M.A. from 
Corpus Christi College, Oxford; LL.D. from 
more universities than he has fingers and 
thumbs, including Yale, Harvard, Princeton 
0md Toronto; assistant professor of Humani- 
ties in Edinburgh University; principal of 
University College, Dundee, from 1892 to 
1895, when he came to McGill ; CfM.Gv in 
1901 ; a vice-president the Archaeological So- 
ciety of America and president of, the Mont- 
real Society of Archaeological Research; 
president Playgrounds Association .of Mont- 
real 1902; editor of classical works originally 
spoken* or written by Cicero, Quintilian and 
Tacitus, • 

"Let the dead past bnry its dead." 

Th e v e ry g e n ia l a n d hum a n is t ic pr i n ci p al o f 



W 



McGill does not, like some other distinguished 
personages, wear a battery of medals to iden- 
tify him with the past. He is no museum 
speci men to he l ead by labels. In fac t h e is a 
very much alive as well as learned, man., Here 
and there an irreverent collegian calls him 
"'Pete." Cart that's only colloquial respecv 
In this country — including the United States— 
the college president who doesn*t get a hick- 
name may be regarded as a dead one. 

Just at present if a stranger in a smoking- 
car should ask about McGill he would be told, 

"Oh, j-es. that's the college down in Mont- 
real with the big football team that giving 
'Varsity a run for its money." 

Or — "Oh, that's the university owned and 
operated by Sir William Macdonald, the big 
tobacco man ; 3|| 

Another— "Yes, McGill is the best practical 
science university in America and one of the 
best in the world. Ever hear of their en- 
gineering equipment?" 

And the informant proceeds to tell what a 
tremendous outfit McGill has for the teaching 
of modern practical science; the splendid 
buildings put up by the money of Sir William 
Macdonald and the brains of a 'very live facul- 
ty. He probably remembers, too, that when 
the Titanic was sunk last spring there was a 
good deal of newspaper talk about Prof. How- 
nrd Barnes, the rather distinguished inventor 
of apparatus for the detection of icebergs; the 
man who thinks he can solve the problem of 
earlier and later navigation on the St. Law-, 
rence; who camped out one winter on the ice 
for the purpose, of studying ice—because in 
McGill the spirit of the ase finds expression 
and there are men in McGill who keep 110 with 
the trend of the times in science, industry, 
politics and religion. 

It's just possible that a man in the same 
smoker might be inclined to remember the 
man who made McGill somewhat famous in 
the scientific world before Principal Peterson 
came to it from Dundee. He would hark back 
to the name of Sir William Dawson, the re- 
nowned geologist, who did more to explore the 
Laurentian system and the rocks of the north 
and to relate them to the world's evolution 
than any other man ; who was an authority on 
religion as well as rocks; quoted respectfully 
by preachers who from the same pulpits criti- 
cized the agnosticisy of Gold win .Smith and 
knew lit lie or nothing about the ethnology of 
Sir Daniel Wilson, president of Toronto Uni- 
versity, the learned contemporary of both in 
the world of thought. 

For old McGill is right under the moun- 
tain, whose structure the former principal of 
McGill knew in its relation to the past ages of 
the earth. And at the present time a trans- 
continental railway company is boring a tunnel 
through the mountain net very far from Mc- 
Gill so as to let modern Montreal through to 
the other side instead of going around. Al- 
m^sT ahy day you may sec round the works 
conducted by chief engineer Brown some keen- 
eyed member of faculty from the university 
studying this modern marvel "! engineering. 
In the day of Sir William Dawson it was more 
the fashion to study the age Of the rocks in 
the name of religion. In the day of William 
Peterson it's more to the point to rip a sub- 
terranean roadway through the rocks to get 
trains through for the sake of more rooifi for 
the people that want to live in Montreal. 

Of course this has nothing directly to do 
with the personality of Principal Peterson. 
But a great university is bound to affect, per- 
haps profoundly — depending on the man — the 
life and the character of the man at its head. 
This Scotch president from Dundee is not the 
same man he was when he came to succeed 
Sir William Dawson at McGill. Like many 
another Scotchman in Canada he has learned 
that the new world outside of the United 
States has a new way of thinking for the man 
who keeps up with the times. And although 
it used to be the fashion for university men to 
live in the past, it is the necessity now for the 
acute academic intellect to live very much in 
the present and the future. Perhaps this is 
the American way. At any rate many Ameri- 
can college presidents have taken hold of pub- 
lic problems. And at the present time one is 
running for the presidency of the United 
Stftes. In Canada, thanks to ihc publicity 



achieved by the late Goldwin Smith, the col- 
lege professor has had a much better incentive 
to study public problems and to get his name 
into the newspapers than he ever would have 
got in England. 

And Principal Peterson is no cloisterite. 
He probably knows little about the rocks. 
When he came to McGill in 1895. the choice of 
Lord Strathcona, the big university was a 
very demure and almost monastic pile of 
mediaeval architecture snuggled under the 

in tain at Sherbrooke St. West. 

The day I found Principal Peterson at his 
beloved McGill, the old college was but a sort 
of architectural nexus in a bewildering city of 
stone structures extending round a classic 
campus heavy with fine maples and elms. The 
^|ttge from, rocks and religion and pure 
thought to the city of the tunnel through the 
mountain was all prefigured in that array of 
buildings. Of course kvprybody in Montreal 
and millions elsewhere in Canada know that 
the mere extension of thought never made this 
miraculous change in McGill. Like.moat other 
obvious expansions of modern times the' trans- 
formation of McGill is a matter of money— • 
millions of it ! And most of the money come" 

1 tw ^LLir * -r srar.^ " ■ ■ _ll ii "il ' ' ■■n' t """ ' ■■■ _ ■■■ »^i- ■»■«■■■«»«■■ ' "w ^^rwiwiMp 



from one man; also a Scotchman; and as 

Scotcji as William James Peterson; an old 

white-headed man— whose monument is mod- 

„ern Mc,GI|l and oqe of who^C bttt f ricn togP 

president. Just a few weeks before I saw 
Principal Peterson another million and a quar- 
ter had been spent by this same patron of. 
learning on the acquisition of more territory 
for the further expansion of McGill. 

It was the middle, of May. Exams were 
oyer. Students were gone — home to all parts 
of Canada. Most of the faculty were packing 
Up for vacation. A few were busy in the en- 
gineering building. And Principal Peterson, 
with some leisure to be sociable, was still in 
his office at the old pile that used to b 
McGill. 

After a mysterious while he/^came un- 
pompously into the anteroom of ii is inner of- 
fice; a broadish, brown-tweeded man with no 
particular style, somewhat of a bespectacled 
manner, and he sat a bit sleepily sidewise on 
a chain, quite inclined to have a very brief in- 
terview. Just to get him linked up to the 
outer world 1 mentioned t he peculiar inter- 
est of -McGill in the Empire. 

"Yes," somewhat drawlishly, "we are 
much concerned in the Empire." 

He recalled the vi.-its of their Roval High- 




Principal Peterson of McGill 

nesses ; of other governor-generals to*the uni- 
versity; But he veered away to discuss more 
academic matters. 

"'Does the university interpret modern 
life?'' I asked him. 

"Devidedly — yes." 

"Students or faculty, do you think?" 

He smiled foggily. 

"Weill the average student has enough to 
do with his arts course without bewildering 
him over interpretation. Still there is such a 
thing as adjustment. Hmm — yes, there has 
been a great change in McGill since 1895." 

This was the year that Principal Peterson 
came to McGill. 



"The students differ. They are younger; 
more restless; less inclined to the humani- 
ties——" 

Catch a graduate of Edinburgh University 
being a mere utilitarian, even though Scotch. 
The principal had dragged the poetic past to 
McGill along with him; probably at that time 
thinking that Canada had no past except a 
few battles and treaties and Indian camps. 

"Latin I am afraid is being neglected," he 
said. 

He omitted to remark that there are ten 
foreign languages in Canada to one in Ed%r 
burgh ; and that Canada has a bilingual prob- 
lem as old as the hills — without complicating 
it with Latin at the root. However, he was 
highly reasonable. 

The decadence of linguistics—was his next 

genial laiueiitj|^|Sf^»ffe^r*'' ;>■, ' 

"Language study is basic," he insisted. 
"Things first, signs secona^M&y^e very well 
in elementary schools. But : jpbf JaJBjgiiages are 
the great conservatories. /^|l*f|^a^I : k^ow it 
— poohpoohs linguistics,, Wel|fr^t|Mf«fll?tt- re* , 
strict it to Latin— though tfc#e Mi swi$»q*tf 
that it's hard to define £ £%?$$!&% 'IPPgr$Sjfc - 
§Jit in heaven's name lei uflhave^iften abojit «* 
able to uae thetr own tongue e ifiofan^y a nd ac 



far as possible elegantly. Too many college 
graduates arer-^o, t &tp£t**j Miteratc~4>ut 
unlettered. They dbnt' , t^y,., language 

"What— of English poetry?" 

"Ah !" He was touched. This is almost a 
fighting point with the principal. "I have 
been trying to foster the study of English 
poetry in the schools of Canada. It is a treas- 
ure-house of culture." 

Now without a doubt he could have rhymed 
off yards of great poetry that most of us ha\<: 
forg'otten. Surelv he had read and re-read 
"Paradise Lost." ' 

"Oh, we have something yet in academics 
to learn from the old land," he went on. "For 
instance. Scotland began to abolish the col- 
lege freshman, the first-year man, twenty 
years ago. I see Ontario is trying to do it 
now. I suppose that in some departments of 
college work America has set us the pace. 
But not in the humanities. No!" 

"And you think Canada needs more hum 
■?»» 

"The age is too materialistic. "Pshaw! 
Young men leave college imbued with mer- 
gerism, desire for consolidations, sudden 
wealth — all partial development." 

Trouble is — I didn't dare say so — that the 




An extremely interesting discussion on the 
relation of miracles to the Christian fail li 
took place at the Church congress at Middles-, 
brough. 

"The dean of Christ. Church (Dr. Strong) 
declared that recent criticisms of the mechan- 
ical view of modern science had sufficient 
force to shake the claim that the mechanical 
view of nature was the only possible account 
of it. Various signs of dissatisfaction defin- 
itely sugges.ted that the mechanical theory 
was much more seriously on trial than was 
often supposed, and pointed to a view ot the 
world in which the operation of spirit was 
necessary from the beginning. If such a view 
were adopted, the main difficulty disappeared 

They could not regard the operation even of 

material laws as independent of the volition 
of God; and it became no longer nccessarv 
to try to interpret miracle in the terms of the 
mechanical theory of Ihe world. 

"The Rev. Professor Sanday, dealing with 
the historical evidence for miracles, thought 
that, broadly speaking, they must say that the 
evidence for the New Testament miracles was 
good,. In the case of St. Paul, so long as they 
kept to general terms, he should call it more 
than good, even decisive. St. Paul fully be- 
lieved that he had the power of working mir- 
acles, and that he had often used it. If they 
studied his Epistles closely that would see. 
that he lived in what we should call a super- 
natural at nmsphere. 

"What was true about St. Paul was also 
true about our Lord Himself. He not only 



lived in a supernatural atmosphere, but was 
Himself the creative centre of that atmos- 
phere. He used the word 'supernatural' and 
not 'abnormal' deliberately, because he be- 
lieved that there was conclusive evidence of 
the presence of a 'higher cause' in the world. 
But he did not think that the activities of this 
cause were really 'abnormal,' or in any true 
sense 'contrary to nature.' He for one — but 
he believed really most or all of them — would 
be ready to make the utmost allowance that 
could possibly be made for the presence in the 
world of a unique personality. But, on the 
other hand, he for one— and he expected some, 
though not so many, with him — shrank from 
what was really abnormal; And the whole 
problem of miracles seemed to him to reduce 
itself to this: To find the exact point at 
which the supernatural ends and the really 
abnormal begins; to determine in any par- 
ticular case exactly what amount of allowance 
had to be made, and to reconstruct the narra- 
tive as best they could, ami as far as they 
could accordingly. 

''The Rev. F. H. Woods, rector of Bainton, 
said the story of Balaam's ass would imply a 
different structure of the animal's throat, and 
was, therefore, incredible. In the case, of the 
story of the sun standing still, they knew that 
it arose from an old poem. Similarly, the 
flood story was undoubtedly derived by the 
Jews from ancient Babylonian records. When 
they came to the New Testament miracles, 
however, it was clear that in the majority of 
them there was no question of a breach of 



natural law. Take the cases of healing and 
the stilling of the tempest. There was noth- 
ing that happened afterwards in those cases 
which upset the natural course of things. 

''Prebendary Webb Peplof, speaking on 
behalf of ordinary church going people, asked 
how they should answer those who accepted 
miracles as an essential part of the Christian 
creed. Dr. Sanday closed on a point of in- 
decision, but the only authority to which they 
could turn was the Word of God. Christ, 
without hesitation, apparently accepted all 
that was recorded concerning Job, Daniel, 
and Jonah in the Old Testament. Therefore, 
all that was found there was undoubtedly 
true. (Cheers.) The whole Christian creed 
stood upon the basis of miracles, and never 
would they Met go the absolute, certainty of 
all that was recorded in the Scriptures con- 
cerning Christ. (Cheers.) 

"The Archbishop of York said it would 
be a mistake to regard all those who stood 
outside their own intrenched citadel of as- 
surance as if they were in the way of being 
lost. He had been much struck with Dr. 
Strong's words that it was not merely the 
miraculous element of Christianity, but the 
mechanical theory of the world wdiich was 
most conspicuously on its trial. The real 
meaning of the miraculous was that it was 
an assurance given to them that ultimately, 
the Divine Being was free and master in His 
own house ; and it was the coming forth of 
that fact into the .world that carried with it 
the consequences that they called miracles." 



THE CINEMATOGRAPH IN CHINA 

W hen the moving pictures were first intro- 
duced in China, says a correspondent of The 
Evening Standard, the Celestials considered 
them uncanny. For about a year after the 
first moving picture theatre was opened it 
/vas supported mainly by foreigners, such as 
Americans, English and natives of Australia, 
^Germany and Prance. The Chinese, so it ap- 
peared, could not understand the pictures; 
therefore they kept away from them. Once 
in a while a Chinaman would visit the thea- 
tre. After that he was regarded as a very 
foolhardy fellow by his countrymen. One 
day, however, some American naval men in- 
duced a prince to accompany them to the 
theatre. He enjoyed the a^hibition — timidly 
at first, but finally enthusiastically, and he be- 
came a devotee of the amusement. This visit 
of the prince's inspired confidence in the in- 
credulous yellow men, and when they saw 



that no harm overcame the patrons of the 
picture shows they began to follow suit. In 
a few months the theatre was regularly filled 
to its capacity with Chinamen. 



Ruskin's Strong Language 

A Glasgow correspondent of The London 
Standard says that the phraseology of the 
Scott loiter presented by Lord Rosebery to 
the University Court of Glasgow contrasts 
most mnrkedly with another penned by Rus- 
kin when declining a similar honor from the 
undergraduates of Glasgow university. Rus- 
kin had previously proclaimed himself to be 
"the staunchest Conservative in the British 
Isles," but that he held views on the land 
question which no Conservative would sanc- 
tion. 

On requesting a clearer exposition of these 
opinions, the following reply was received 
from the seer : "What in the devil's name 
have you to do with cither Mr. Disraeli or 
Mr. Gladstone? You are students of the uni- 



versity, and have no more business with pol- 
itics than you have with rat-catching. Had 
you ever read the words of mine with under- 
standing you would have known that I care 
no more for Mr. Disraeli or Mr. Gladstone 
than for two old bagpipes, but that I hate all 
Liberalism as I do Beelzebub, and that with 
Carlyle I stand, we two alone now in Eng- 
land, for God and the Queen." 

o -• 

Lacking in Poetry 

W. D. Howells, at a luncheon at Kittery 
Point, said of a certain popular novelist : 

''There is about as much poetry in him as 
there is in McMasters. 

"McMasters, you know, was walking with 
a beautiful girl in a wild New England wood. 

"What is your favorite flower, Mr. Mc- 
Masters?" the girl asked softly. 

McMasters thought a moment, .then 



modern McGill man gets his degree largely 
because of the sudden expenditure of 'great 
wealth by <ne man; and I know very well 
that Principal Peterson enrolls Sir William 
Macdonald among the immortals — and well he 
may! 

Then just to show that he was not as one 
Crying in the wilderness against the materi- 
alistic tendencies of this young country, he re- 
verted to one Harold Begbie, who a few yeais 
ago from The London Chronicle took a'scud 
across Canada, and amid his complimentary 
writings took occasion to rebuke us because 
we had no "golden-winged angel of the dawn" 
chanting the glorious future of this country 
over the clinkety-clank of box-cars, etc. 

"I have memorized" most of ' that splendid 
article,' 'said he. 

(And many there be who have heard 
the* extra-mural addresses of.theiprfncipat) , 
■■ "However/' he said, humorotisryy "I usually 
manage to square my Canadianism by advis- 
ing Begbie to give us time. I tell him it took 
three hundred years after Shakespeare to 
produce a Begbie. What?" 

The point was obvious. Besides— is not 
McGill with us; now and thea reaching out 




';, 1'. 



like a young giant — almost as eagei as the tuii- 
nel worrying its noisy track through the hard 
bowels of the mountain? 

"We have much to lean* in t his coun trpj 
Bltt Wft have gooa^olleggs and schobTsT Can- 
adian youth need never lack the right turn to 
the mind." 

He almost turned one degree in his chair. 
His "time was up. But clearly he had not em- 
barked upon the real sea of his absorbing, 
perennial theme to which he had made allu- 
sion when he began to talk. 

"The Empire," he repeated, almost raising 
his voice. "Ah ! We think of that at McGill." 

I waited. This was no time for fools'* to 
rush in. 

"Remember," he went on, "that McGill is 
somewhat a microcosm of empire. In 1895 
how was she? Dislocated, incoherent — more 
than parochial to be sure, but less, than con- 
solidated " 

Here he was belauding consolidation. 

"We have done our best to unify in our 
progress. But we have marched ahead so fast 
along with the country that we have not al- 
ways found it easy to make' a community of 
interests in the university. Yes, we have made 
McGffl a microcosm of the material world of ' 
progress and science — but we have developed 
men as well." 



LEADERS 0[F WOMEN'S SOCIETIES IN 

VICTORIA AND THEIR NOBLE 

WORK 



(Continued From Page Two) 
inspires her followers with her own spirit of 
enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. 



cleared his throat and answereil;: , 
"Well. I believe I like the whole 



wheat 



best." — Exchange. 



Mrs. Williscroft 

Mrs. Williscroft has, for the past fouf 
years, been president of the Victoria branch 
of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, 
and has been several times elected to the posi- 
tion of vice-president of the Local Council of 
Women. Mrs. Williscroft is a kind-hearted 
lady, who devotes herself especially to the 
reformatory institutions of the W. C. T. U. 
In her the Men's Mission and the home on 
Ida street have a firm friend, and one who is 
ready to co-operate heartily with the boards 
-'appointed by the society for their manage- 
ment. During Mrs. Williscroft's period of 
office, the membership of the society has 
greatly increased throughout Victoria. 

Mrs. Hermann Robertson 

Mrs. Hermann Robertson is the leader of 
a public-spirited and hardworking group of 
ladies who recognize that a city has other 
than purely material needs. As president and 
founder of the Ladies' Musical Club, Mrs. Rob- 
ertson and her associates have contributed to 
spread among the women of Victoria a love 
of music and an appreciation of its beauties. 
Herself an accomplished pianist, she promoted 
during the season a series of amateur con- 
certs which called for faithful study in those 
that took part. Last year, under the presi- 
dency of Mrs. J. D. Helmcken, the Ladies' Mu- 
sical Club had begun bringing to the city 
artists of worldwide fame. So much were 
these concerts appreciated that engagements 
have been made for the present season, the 
second of which will be filled during the pres- 
ent week by Madame Gadski. This new ven- 
ture has in no way conflicted with the ama- 
teur work of the society, which is spreading 
among a growing number of members A 4e- 
sire to excel in the divine art. 
_ o 

John Campbell, of Pittsburg, locomotive . 
engineer, deserves to be put on the roll of In- | 
dustrial honor. He ran an engine for forty- 
eight years without ever killing a human be- 
ing, and without even injuring any person suf- 
ficiently to draw blood. He was never sus- 
pended nor censured by his employers dur- 
ing his long career as engineman, which ter- 
minated happily on September 6, when he re- j 
tired from the position whichl he had so hon- : 
ored. I 



"Mabel is engaged." , 

"Whom to?" ^ T p 

"She doesn't say in her letter. All .that 

she knows so far is that his drat name Is 
Frank."— Detroit Free Press. i 



Sunday, Nov«mb*r 3, 1912 « 



THE VICTORIA COLONIST 




w<SMmp 




®IF Li fte of <Qta 






NTIMATE and charming plimp- 
se 5 of the earlier years of Queen 
Victoria, as sovereign, wife, and 
mother, and of the childhood bi 
the late King Edward and his 
sister, the Princess Royal, appear in the cor- 
respondence of Sarah Spencer, Lady Lyttel- 
ton, which has been edited by her great- 
granddaughter, the Hon. Mr-, Hugh Wynd- 
ham, and is just published in volume form by 
Mr. John Murray. 

Sarah Spencer, afterwards Lady Ly aelton, 
was elder daughter of the second Earl Spen- 
cer, and was born in 1787. She married, in 
1813, Mr. YV. II. Lyttelton, afterwards third 
Lord Lyttelton, who died in 1S37. In the fol- 
lowing year Lady Lyttelton 
household of Queen Victoria. She 
have been a woman of great charm, strong 
character and keen intellect. Her lettpPBi 
which cover the period 1904^^0^^^^^ 
mirable examples of letter writing Ul WMfc: day 
when private correspondence was amplevitt 
substance and often brilliant in iOntt. On* 
may imagine that had this discerning .afldr 
witty lady been living today, she would have; 
successfully ;j.mp1f)yfiri the literary gifts dis- 

played in these letters in some branch of au- 
thorship. Her earlier correspondence, much 
of which is addressed to her favorite brother 
Robert, a nav al o f fi c er, ar e full 6 f political, 

social and family gossip,, and afford valuable 

material to any student of the manners of the 
opening years of the nineteenth century. For 
the present generation, however, chief inter- 
est attaches to the letters that she wrote b^_ 
tween the years 1838 and 1850, because of; 
Lhe light they shed on Queen Victoria's court 
and home. Many an incident and episode 
in the life of that "central figure of the last 
century in England are now rescued from the 
oblivion into which Time would have other-' 
wise consigned them.* Impressive, too, are 
the indications that Lady Lyttelton gives of 
the fine qualities of heart and head which 
were shown by her charges, the little Prince 
of Wales and Princess Royal, afterwards the 
Empress Frederick. Lady Lyttelton was no 
indiscriminating courtier. 1 ler loyalty and 
devotion to her royal mistress and the chil- 
dren do not blind her vision to the realities of 
court life, for whose formality she, herseli 
the mother of five children, had no great lik- 
ing. She even speaks of the ceremonies with 
which royalty was hedged about during visits 
to private houses, as "mummeries." That at- 
titude on the part of Lady Lyttelton lends 
the greater force to her testimony to the sim- 
ple domestic happiness which she observed 
within the royal home circle. 

She enjoyed the complete confidence and 
affection of Queen Victoria and Prince Al- 
bert, who invariably consulted her in every- 
thing concerning the royal children. A deeply 
religious woman, of great serenity of mind, 
she lived to be 82, and died in April, 1870. 
Duties of a Lady-in-Waiting 
It was on Oct. 3. 1838. that Lady Lyttel- 
ton entered on her duties at Windsor Castle 
as Lady of the Bedchamber. On that day she 
wrote to the Hon. Caroline Lyttelton : "The 
queen is perfectly kind and civil and good- 
natured." 

There is a hint of changes in the pronoun- 
ciation of words in common use which have 
taken place since early Victorian days. 

The queen says "gold" open, not "goold"; 
also "Rome" open, not "Room." Also "Prus- 
sia" in my way, rhyming to Russia, in spite 
of the Dean of Chester. 

In August, 1839, there was dancing in the 
Red Room at Windsor Castle. The Duchess 
of Kent waltzed. "Ah! Lady Lyttelton," said 
the queen, ''this room, this music — ain't it like 
old times?" 

An animated account is given of the 
queen's prorogation of parliament a few days 
later. 

"Her speech was most beautifully read. 
Her voice is, when SO raised and sostenttto, 
quite that of a child, a gushing sort of rich- 
ness, with the most sensible, cultivated, and 
gentlemanlike accent and emphasis. She 
raised her head, and uttered. 'Gentlemen of 
the House of Commons." with a little air of 
grandeur that Was very pretty. She was 
frightened, but no one could have guessed it; 
we knew it by the crimson color of her face 
and neck, and a little trembling." 

Lady Lyttclton's duties on this occasion 
are humorously described: 

"'I had, in presence of the whole court, and 
surrounded by all the great officers of state, 
to unpin and remove from her majesty's 
head her diamond diadem, and. taking the 
great crown of England ( Weighing twelve 
pounds) from some grandee, to place it and 
pin it on with two diamond pins through the 
velvet and her hair at the back of her head. 
. . . But when I had to do it all over again 
in reverse on her majesty's return she was in 
a hurry, and the last pin I could not find the 
proper place for in the diadem, and first ran 
it against her royal head (upon which she 
looked up with a comical arch of entreaty), 
and then could not put it in at all anywhere. 
So she went without it." 

"Love Rules the Court" 
In October, 1840, the arrival of a large 

party of visitors at Windsor Castle leads Lady 

Lyttelton to this reflection : 

It make* me feel more towards the queen 

—more of the admiration and wonder which 

some parts of her character excite, more of 



the affection, which others naturally inspire, 
and more, alas! of the regret, and compas- 
sion and' helplessness which many circum- 
stances of her education and present position 
and future fate fill one with. 

The queen's happiness in her marriage is 
indicated in many letters. Music and trees 
began to engage her close attention, because 
Prince Albert was interested in both. 

The queen, admired it (the playing of a 
band) all very meekly. She is learning trees 
and plants; and, in a very pretty and childlike 
manner, when last we walked, told me quite 
gravely and low, half-shy, "That Lady L. is 
a tulip tree, you see— a rare tree, but yet 
hardy — we hope it may succeed though it is 
rather large to be transplanted." Last year 

\ : 'r|^VJ#Jr;''^;.'tfte.4«een visited the' Duke 
j of Bedford *t Wobura Abbejfc^' 

But thequeeft^seelfi^lWays'; 
i girt just <m\* school) f &'&M& 
i about pic^ta 1*8 ^rf Afts;W*»*r 
; thdugn*m«Mi" J ay tWi&tV'Wf 
sHe imed^St-^as 1 pfc 
s mVrf 7 rrfflfri* ^WfflW'larr. ^iffiftitii-^Hgl 




fortafefe^r best a¥ras*geo* imag%al8e, 
wortTiadtJihinif. 



re'M f f curious continent on th 
ce c ding »» >at vi o it to Lord a nd ■ 




but still (February, 1844) very small every 
way. 

Story of the Great Duke 

The Emperor Nicholas I. was a visitor at 
Windsor Castle in June, 1844. Lady Lyttel- 
ton thought him very handsome, but forbid- 
ding; and on the subject of the emperor's 
looks she was placed in a very embarrassing- 
position by the Luke of Wellington. 

'.'.Very good-lodking man — always was so — 
scarcely altered since L saw him — rather 
browner — no other change — very handsome 
man now. Don't you think so?" I had the 
happiness to have this speech made to me in 
a very loud, deep tone by the Duke of Well- 
ington, as we sat at dinner just opposite the 
emperor, who understands English, And I 
had to scream out my answer, 'Yes, very 
handsome indeed!' No escape, he waited, 
wondering 1 did not speak out sooner." 

There are many amusing little anecdotes 
about the sayings and doi 

Idren, as.' for instance: 

Prince of Wales asked the queen m 
railroid carriage, "Pray, mamma, is n< 



frightened, and said nothing on falling off 
herself, but, looking round and seeing her 
brother, screamed out, "Oh, can't they stop 
him? Dear Hertie!" and burst into tears. 

Of the prince, Lady Lyttelton says in the 
next letter: "He continues most promising 
for kindness and nobleness of mind." 
The Queen's Danger at Sea 

in making the passage from Osborne in 
the royal yacht in October, 1848, the queen 
and Prince Albert witnessed a terrible disas- 
ter, and were themselves in some danger. 
Lady Lyttleton describes the accident: 

"As the Fairy was drawing near to the 
magnificent Channel fleet of line-of-battle- 
ships, a sudden ami very violent squall arose, 
and just before the yacht's course (not by 
Her running foul of it) %h1im& full of people 
upset, and went down. The prince saw it 
happen, saw the men all struggling in the 
waves, threw up h *^Slfe; ; »lteslled out over 
and over again to Lord Adolphus to stop the 

ty, let down a boat to go and help, as other 
ships had done. But, on the prince repeating 



'.iit$frM£jlr Fausnanger : 

This visit is very agreeable, surprising 
from absence of formality, contrived by Lady 
Palmerston and her daughter-in-law. The 

\ fault is ' that they are immensely 1111- 
punctual. and make the poor queen wait for 
dinner and drivesvtill anybody but herself 
would be furious. ;1|| 

Mention of Mr. Gladstone (then president 
! of the Board of Trade) appears first in a letter 
dated Oct. 21. 1841. Apparently he and Mrs. 
Gladstone were concerned in the important 
matters of the choice" of a nurse for the infant 
Princess Royal, and the statesman hesitated 
in recommending a certain lady because, she 
was not absolutely "without imperfection." 
His attitude affords Lady Lyttelton a fresh 
proof of Mr." Gladstone being less practically 
sensible than profoundly clever. 
The Royal Children 

In April, 1842. she was appointed go} er- 
ness to the royal children. The first refer- 
ence to her charges in that year is as fol- 
lows : 

My little princess \s all graceful and prct- 
tiness, very fat and active, running about and 
talking a great deal. She. is over-sensitive 
and affectionate, and rather irritable in tem- 
per at present; but it tooks like a pretty mind, 
only very unfit for rougjiing it through a 
hard life," which hers may be. The I'rince of 
Wales, to judge by his noble countenance and 
calm manner, is very iWiligenJ, and looks 
through his large, clear blHe^eyes full at one. 

The children accompanied their parents on 
a visit to the Duke 0.1 Wellington at Walmer 
Castle in November, 1842; The carriage jour- 
ney was full of incident, and not altogether 
to Lady Lyttelton':- satisfaction. 

It was very fatiguing, owing, to the im- 
mense crowd-, the continued cheers, the fright 
Ks; we should sma.-b hundreds at every turn, 
and all the excitement of wreaths and bon- 
fires and triumphal arches, church bells and 
cannons all the way aiong, while we kept fly- 
ing and dashing, escort panting and horses 
foaming, and carriages swaying with speed. 
The children will grow up under the strangest 
delusions as to what travelling means, and 
the usual conditions of the people in England,! 
They must suppose one always finds them 
shouting and grinning and squeezing, sur- 
rounded by banners and garlands. "Where's 
the prince?" Show him! Turn him this way! 
Bless the little face! What .a pretty boy ! 
How like his father!" was screamed at us in- 
cessantly; and once, as I was overheard to 
say to Mrs. Sly, "Hold up the Prince of 
Wales," I was complimented with "Well 
done! That's right, old girl!" 

At one place where we had got out and 
were returning to the carriage through a 
thick avenue of the principal people of the 
place (I believe Rochester), a great fat lady, 
very smartly dressed, caught hold of the 
Prince of Wales, and, almost dragging him 
out of Sly's arms, gave him the loudest kiss. 
"Welb done! I give you credit for that," said 
an amiable gentleman of the company. Mrs. 
Sly has not yet cooled down, her rage was 
such at being taken by surprise. 

The Queen at "Cross-Stitch" 

About this time there is a delightful 
glimpse given of the domestic life of the 
queen and Prince Albert. 

The prince and queen are reading Hal- 
lam's "Constitutional History of England" 
together, most carefully, and for a light book, 
"St. Simon's Memoirs." Very pleasant to 
find him reading aloud to her, while she was 
at cross-stitch. 

For the demeanor and disposition of the 
young Prince of Wales, his governess has 
rarely anything but praise. 

He understands a little French and says 
a few words, but is altogether backward in 
language, very intelligent and, generous and 
good-tempered, with a few passions and 
stampings occasionally; most exemplary in 
politeness and manner, bows and offers his 
hand beautifully, besides Saltjting a U mili- 
taire-all unbitMen. Ue la rflfifci ha^soine, 

,1 ■-,. .. «|rvrv/' %;»♦ :«*q T ^Yf'WKB t fits J* 




dren excited intense interest and kindly feel- 
ing in the spectators. 

"The cheers close to us and the counten- 
ances, everyone looking so affectionately, 
-quite like parents, on the two little creatures, 
stretching over one another to see and smile 
at them, I never shall forget. . . . The per- 
son (a gentleman he seemed) who managed 
the children's luncheon when he brought 
them some wine, which they took very civilly 
and modestly, actually shed tears, and was 
obliged to lt«ive the room. What a striking 
curious thing is that loyalty! And how deep 
and trong in England." 

There was a curious accident at a shoot- 
ing party at Windsor in November, 1849, in 
which a Colonel Grey was injured and the 
Prince of Wales had a fortunate escape. 

A pheasant having fallen, the prince de- 

$$«|p|p, might be picked up, and Colonel Grey 

and the Prince of Wales, close to him, went 

to find it. Just then a shot was fired by Lord 

f ;0^^0,^'''lt rattled straight at Grey, shot 

>MBi|p^.iw.. the - face, and all down one side and 

leg, very slightly, all but one face wound, 

which is quite insignificant, but gave pain and 

drew blood. The Prince of Wales was close 

ini.ng was, of course. 

" more than inter ested, and 



©if IK©yal Visit 



In the above are shown the silver trowel presented to His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Connaught on the occasion of the laying of the corner stone of the Connaught Block at the 
legislative buildings; also the silver paper knife presented to the Duchess of Connaught on the 
same occasion. Both these beautiful specimens of the silversmith's art were manufactured by 
Messrs. Short, Hill & Duncan. 



ling!. I am sorry he said it, for he got such 
shouts of laughter for an'answer that he was 
quite abashed. 

Prince of Wales' Narrow Escape 

The Prince of Wales met with a yarrow 
escape from a most serious accident while 
riding with his elder sister at Windsor in Oc- 
tober. 1847. Their ponies took fright and ran 
away. 

The Princess Royal was quietly thrown 
after a few yards of canter and not hurt. The 
Prince of Wales was run away with at the 
fleetest gallop his pony could go at, all round 
the lawns. He was strapped into his Spanish 
saddle. But, had the pony gone against a 
tree, or under a bough, or down the slopes, 
or had the dear child not been so brave as to 
keep hold of as tight a rein as he could pull, 
and neither to cry out nor move, we should 
now be thinking of him in happiness such as 
I trust in mercy he may live 4o inherit tome 
moreotstant day. He did not cry, and showed 
no signs of fear, after one loud cry for help 
at first. Princess Royal was like herseli, not 



his entreaty and command to stop the yacht, 
in hopes of being more useful, he simply an- 
swered aloud, 'No, sir, I won't,' adding that 
the squall was such the Fairy was hardly safe 
herself, and that, with the queen on board, he 
would run no risk. 'You may order it your- 
self, sir, but op your own responsibility.' 
Meanwhile, imagine the horror of all on 
board! The queen burst into tears. The chil- 
dren saw it all. and were most deeply im- 
pressed. Even Prince Alfred kept describing 
the look of the drowning man. They began 
the day thinking of it* (four men at least were 
lost). The Princess Royal said it had been 
in her mind all night. I almost hope it will 
prevent their crossing in doubtful weather in 
the Fairy again; for, only think, there really 
was danger; the yacht had some trifling bolt 
or screw wrong, and it was particularly neces* 
sary to manage everything right" 

On October 30, 1849, Prince Albert, ac- 
companied by the Prince of Wales and the 
Princess Royal, opened the new Coal Ex- 
change, the royal party journeying from 
Whitehall $tairs to Thames street. The chil- 



sMimii^M 



. — ,. — ■. ... 



..^.^^^'^^ 




J; on, 

there was some excitement when she saw her 
husband fall to the ground, and then raised 
by two men like a corpse ! At first nobody 
could understand what had happened, but it 
proved to be that Lord Canning fainted away 
on having perceived the accident he had had, 
and the awful danger of the Prince of Wales 
from his unlucky shot. I believe no shot even 
touched the dear child. 

The Princess Royal, as Lady Lyttelton de- 
scribes her. must: have shown remarkable 
traits of individuality and character at a very 
early age. Writing from Osborne in 1848 to 
the lion. Caroline Lyttelton, the child's gov- 
erness says : 

"AJ1 very peaceful indoors. Governesses 
reconciled,' and dear princessy playing a 
smooth arpeggio in the room beneath this to 
crown all. The poor child has been now per- 
fectly good ever since we came here. I do 
trust it may please God to complete His work 
and make her prove really a fine character, as 
she has always been, all but. to so strange a 
degree. She continues to reflect and observe 
and reason like a very superior person, and 
is as affectionate as ever." 

At the close of 1850, Lady Lyttelton re- 
signed her post at court, and, on leaving, she 
makes, in a letter to the Hon. W. II. Lyttel- 
ton, this striking allusion to her years of ulti- 
mate association with the royal pair: 

"The result chiefly left on my mind is>a 
fresh admiration for the candor, truth, pru- 
dence, and manliness of the prince, and the 
goodness of the queen, too. I wish I could 
catch some of their good qualities; it would 
be something better to carry away than a 
pension." 

It remains to be said that this interesting 
book, which is illustrated by a large number 
of portraits, contains many more illuminating 
references to famous personages and events 
than it has been possible to indicate within 
the space of this review. The work of edit- 
ing, comment, explanation and introduction 
has been carried out with great thoroughness, 
and exhibits a wise discretion.— London Tele- 
graph. 

o — 

Ruskin's Strong Language 
A Glasgow correspondent of The London 
Standard says that the phraseology of the 
Scott letter presented by Lord Rosebery to 
the University Court of Glasgow contrasts 
most markedly with another penned by Rus- 
Jcin when declining a similar honor from the 
undergraduates of Glasgow university. Rus- 
kin had previously proclaimed himself to be 
"the staunchest Conservative in the British 
Isles," but that he held views on the land 
question which no Conservative would sanc- 
tion. 

On requesting a clearer exposition of these 
opinions, the following reply was received 
from the seer: "What in the devil's name 
have you to do with either Mr. Disraeli or 
Mr. Gladstone? You are students of the uni- 
versity, and have no more business with pol- 
itics than you have with rat-catching. Had 
you ever read the words of mine with under- 
standing you would have known that I care 
no more for Mr. Disraeli or Mr. Gladstone 
than for two old bagpipes, but that I hate all 
Liberalism as I do Beelzebub, and that with 
Carlyle I stand, we two alone now in Eng- 
land, for God and the Queen." 

_ _ _ 

Feared Music Disturbed Him 

It happened the other evening, and now a 
certain clubman is trying to figure out how 
he will square things with his wife the next 
time he is "detained" down town. He was not 
going home for dinner, and when his wife 
answered the telephone he said : 

"Don't wait fof" me at dinner this evening, 
dear. I shall be detained on business." 

"Very well," she replied. 'Tm sorry you 
can't come home; but business is business, .1 
suppose. Where are you now?" 

"Where am I? In my office, of course. I 
have had a very busy day." 

"It's too bad you have to work so hard, 
George. But tell me something." 

"'Yes dear. What is itr 

"How can you keep your mind on busi- 
ness with the orchestra playing 'Every Little 
Movement?"— fUnsas City Star. 



V 



:-:'■'. .,•'-'; .: 



pp^p 9W |^ V MP<.MI.i<.>l,l| ll.llllFf,^!^.^;! 



THE VICTORIA COLONIST 



* Sunday, Nov«nb«r 3, 111*. 





iissrie 



©J 




OADBKIH TOJOB. 

Madame Johanna Gadskl has of late 
added a new note, of exquisite tender- 
ness and gaiety to her well-known dra- 
matic fire and Krandeur of emotional 
utterance. Victoria music-lovers will 
be greatly interested in this latest 
phase of her development when they 
hear her on Friday night, November 8. 
at the Victoria theatre, where she sings 
\inder the direction of the Victoria 
Ladies' Musical Club. The sale of seats 
opens on Wednesday, November 6. A 
Los Angeles critic, writing of Madame 
Gadskl's appearance in that city, says: 

Madame Johanna Gadskl, opening the 
Philharmonic icourse, was greeted by a 
large ' atidti|||j^j!)^1|^^j^att6rium..' l**| 
night—an audience that was cordially 
appreciative and which had JtS appre- 
ciation rewarded by hearing a "ourtd 
alf dozen encore numbers, mostly of 
songs In which the can tu. trice has mnrtu 
herelf especially •dear to the musical 
public. • • 

Madame Gadski was In particularly 
fi»?^i»,«B'tiSe' earlier part. of her pro- 




■ giaxuuie"» l u lim e i 1 tulti e tlian w h e n last 
heard — and gave a notably delightful 

ndition of the beautiful group of 
rahms, Wolf, and Strauss songs, with 
Hgjrjih* optnoO ttte eyeoing. - ' . ' ' ■ ' . ' , 

she "^aj|f' ! '-ioat 00>ie of the ' arttstie" 
charm and finish, -which always' have 
been characteristic of her singing, and 
her voice, last night had more of its old-' 
time beauty and brilliance than When 
she last appeared m Los Angeles. 
M&dame Gadski used the "mezza Voi ■<■" 
in much of her singing last night, and 
her masterly control over the soft, beau- 
tifully produced tones were exceeding! » 
pleasing, even though so much in evi- 
dsnee throughout her programme. 

Madame Gadskl has an abfe accom- 
panist and a piano soloist of ; interest- 
ing ability iti Kdwiii Schneider. Mr. 
Schneider's solo numbers included a 
brilliant "Romance" by Sibelius, and 
Debussy's ''Rain in the Garden,' 1 a scin- 
tillating piece in Debussy's own odd 

Madame Gadski's numbers included 
two attractive compositions by Mr, 
s. hnelder, English songs by Morsc- 
Ttummell, Branscombe, Salter, and Met- 
c..lf; "Elsa's Dream" and "Elsa's Song 
to the Breezes," and "Brunnhilde's Fare- 
well to Siegfried," by Wagner, and 

'YVehe so willst du," "Nachtlgall" 
(Brahms); "In Dem Schatten meiner 
i< ckfii," "Das Vcrlassene Magdleln" 

(Wolfe), and "Meinem Kinde," "Buhe. 
meine Seele," "Das Geheimnls" (Straus). 
Among her encores was "Annie Laurie." 

"OPPICEB 666" 

Like, a genuine, thoroughbred race- 
horse, entered for the greatest of all 
stakes, success, Augustin MacHugh's 
farce. "Officer 666," nightly ran a mlle- 
a-minute and kept up the swift pace for 
seven months in Chicago. Cohan and 
Harris recognize, with the rest of the 
business world, that nothing succeeds 
like success, that continued favor goes 
arm in arm with continuous success, 
and that both mean permanent prosper- 
ity. In view of this, the following 
.statement of attendance augurs well for 
a Ioiik life of the laughable play, ex- 
ceeding the banner record runs of "The 
Fortune Hunter" and "G-u-rtich-Quick 
\ValllngfOrd," both Cohan & Harris pro- 
duction*, in Chicago. "In the seven 
months ending Saturday, August 15. 
'officer 66K' played before audletl 
testing the large capacity of the Geo. 
M. Cohan Grand Opera House. As it 
Beats "i860, this means that so far 5S9.400 

i ■• n. women and i lldren have enjo; I 
the delightful fun and humor of Mi. 
Mac-Hugh's [rresiatlble plaj In 

speaking of the BUCCesS of "Officer 
666" George M. Cohnn himself bright!] 
says: "Tie best speech uttered in 'Of- 
I et 6*16' is not spoken by its players. 
it's the man ir. the box office who 
speaks It and he makes it up a» he 
goes along. When ha Is compelled to 
repeat n over and over, I shake hands 
with myself and resolve to g<> home and 
n rite out another box-Offtce play or else 
see some other fellow Who Is on to thr 
trick and iviv- !i;,u do It 'All Sold OUl 



for tonight's performance" That's it.'" 
••officer 666 " comes to the Viotorl > 
theatre on Monday, November 4. 



JOSEPH T. SMEJJHAW »ETTJ»WS 

Victoria is to have a return visit from 
Joseph F. Sheehan, the famous op 
star, with his specially selected com- 
pany, whose presentation of "II Trova- 
toro" here, a little while ago so delight- 
ed a crowded audience. The chorus 1b 
■the pick of the leading opera companies 
of the day, in order to havO It In keep- 
ing with the all-star cast of principals. 

On Tuesday evening, November '6. at 
the Victoria theatre, the Sheehan or- 
.miznUon will presant "Martha.", *»* 
mW*4ki*toy *ven»n* 'Tha Chimes of 
Xormalidy." ', 

• 1?letow"» famous masterpiece. "Mar- 
iba," with Ita merry, romantic story and 
its music, has been -famous fcir more 
than hair a century. TU* Austrian com., 
poser chose the story pf English court 
and country life « the time of good 
Queen , Anne for musical inustretldn. 
rletta. the beautiful mald-of-honor; 
aary of .court life and sighs for afl 



I is almost appalling In lta realism, wluli 

Bjhoi and shell and gattling gun, and 

ii is worked up to a climax of over- 
whelming excitement. The scene of 
the last act at Sweetwater, presenting 
a cattle rOUnd-UP, is a typical pictur- 
of western bravado and cowboy horse- 
manship. 

"GET KICK QUICK WaLLINOFOM" 

lew plays produced on the American 
stage have attained as much popularity 
as Geo. M. Cohan's comedy, "Get Rich 
Quick Wallingford" and the secret of 
that popularity Is the very human Im- 
pulse to recount enjoyable experiences. 
Every man, woman and child whoi :vmu%. 
:this play immediately becomes a/ .•walk- 
ing, advertisement for it,. and It i« ifttls -.'; 
word -of -mouth endorsement that has , 
helped, mora than any one other ,&«#.* 
turn, to perpetuate the fame of "Get 



\enture. Her maid. Xancy. t* noting 
loath to Join In any harum-scarum itejat 
proposed, so they disguise themselves 

as .sirtant ■ glrla, ytty^WtjSi '4mK$: 



pttf $W j,*^ 1 *!, ■ ^ '^ J M^ ' *^'^' n * ™ 



they attriet: 0» attention of I 
Miinkett, two well-to-do ypun 



Lionel and 
g farm pis 
In search of servants. After much dic- 
kering a bargain Is struck and the girls 
discover too late that the contract Is a 
binding one from which they cannot es- 
cape for n year. Tristan tries vainly 
to rescue them but they arc dragged of!' 
by the young farmers. 

Arrived at the farm [hey display dense 
ignorance of their work, and their em- 
ployers, striving to teach them, only 
manage to fail In love with them, a 
catastrophe which is completed by the 
Singing of "Ttve Last Rose of Summer" 
by Henrietta, who calls herself Martha, 
Tn the night the girls escape with Tris- 
tan's h:lp and go back to court, laugh- 
ing over Ihrir tun. Later Plunkett. 
drinking In a tavern, scs with amaze- 
ment his servant come in as one of a 
hunting party. He tries to seize her 
'out Is driven off by her companions. 

Then comes Lionel and sees his Mir 
tha apparently a noble 1'ady. Undaunted, 
be claims her nervier, but sho • scorns 
him as a '.country clown, and PWmkett 
leads him out dazed. H falls Into a 
melancholy from which e-vm the news* 
of his accession to the earldom .,r Derby 
falls to arouse him. H nrletta comes 
to see l.lm but he does not .recognize 
her. h:.n friends then form a plot and., 
take him to the fair. Her.' he sees tti< 
two servant girls and reason returns 
when Henrietta " sings the lovely old 
ballad. "And so, reunited, the pair en- 
ter upon a happy etredded llf • 

"Tl.e Last Rose of Summer" is only 
one of the musical gem's with which 
this opera abounds. "The Spinning 
Wheel Quartette," "The Good-Night 
Quartette," and equally beautiful, the 
great tenor solo, "Like a Dream," . 
It Is nothing unusual for this splendid 
oompanv to receive ten to twelve cur- 
tain calls on the masterful manner In 
which it renders the famous finale of 
the third act in which the full company, 
principals and chorus, sIhk '"Maj 
Heaven Forgive Her Kindly," 

"THE KOUKD-ITP" 

• 

Klaw and .Erlanger present Maclyn 
Arbuekle in their stupendous produc- 
tion of Edmund Day's famous .play. 
"The Round-l'p, " at the Victoria thea- 
tre on November 18 and 19. 

This play with its heart In- 
terest, thrills Bdld startling sensa- 
tionalism In the most realistic battle 
scene ever presented, has a tremendous- 
ly popular appeal and its engagement 
here will he one of tile biggest events 
of the season. The scones of the play 
are la ;d In Southern Arizona and the 
characters and atmosphere of this re- 
gion are graphically portrayed. The 
broad art of the scene painter and the 
marvels of stagecraft have never pro- 
duced such scenes as these presented 
in "The Round-Up." The battle scene 



THE EMPRESS TKEATKE 

During the past stason there have 
been many importations from abroad by 
Sullivan * Considine. It is said The 
Three Spa Brothers, however, eclipse 
anything In the gymnastic line that 
lias been Rooked. Xba act, u-ide from 
Offering some new l'»ats in hand-to- 
hand balancing, Will afford some bair- 
raising efforts. 

The special tunedy feature -if th-> 
coming week's bill at the Empress will 
be Van and Carrie Avery, in "The 
Night Porter, which Will serve to In- 
troduce Mr. 
teri cation Of 
serve to intr-ji 
cnts of both 

'^»»pr*-r 

■ ' i rfi i ny . M 









j — . ' !■' £ ' ' ?' 



.Ok. .t4.^th«:;' pMfttfiii^ll^^ " 



that lu^^jm^^tksl^iKll^ ?^ : _»»aFl>'ipf:.Bahbie falls to Miss Page 



some «Mfc*#W*»t, 



4W»"»i 




gentlemen, make their debut. This act 
Is described as both beautiful and 
clever. The voices /iare , said to b^pd 



m& 



^f ^v 



MADAME JOHANNA OAD8W 
Who Slugs la the Tlctorla Tbaatre on Trlday Evening, Kovembar 8 



Rich Quick Wallingford," which Is soon 
to be seen In tills city. 

HAUOKXY K1AKIETTA 
1 luring the comlUg season, 

Hammersteln will present Florence 
\Vei>t,er in "Naughty Harletta," the 
most brilliant light opera from the 

prolific pens of Victor Herbert and 
lit la Johnson foUPf. Miss Webber 
will have the advantage Of an unusually 
competent supporting company, as Mr 

Harnmersteio has recruited several of 
the memb (TS and most of the chorus 
from Ids grand opera organizations. To 
further enhance the artistic value of 
"Naughty Marietta" the organization 
will carry its own orchestra. The oper- 
etta will he at the Victoria theatre 
shortly. 



tlie Empress during the coming week. 
Is said by experts to b< the greatest 
living xylopliono player. Most of 
Chopin's numbers are said to be but 
kindergarten exirclsp for Garden. He 
plays an 8-foot Concert Grand xylo- 
phone, tbfl tonal quality of wMcii is 
said to be the most beautiful ever con- 
B true ted. The Instrunifnt was made 
In Italy by tor manufacturers of the 
organ at the Vatican, and is conceded 
to be the finest internment of its 
kind In the world. 

A facinating young Ionian 'and a 
young gentleman, expert roller skaters, 
In the persons of Collier and De WalJ-e, 
who costume their act superbly, will be 
a feature of the coming week's hill at 
the Empress, when Collier and De 
Walde make th<Mr appearance. This 
duo Is one of the most expert of its 
kind in vaudeville. 



PKINCESS TH.EA' 

t'tle Minister" wi 
at the Princess theatre the coming 
week. It Is a story of Poottish life. 
and has a world-wide reputation and 
in it Maude Adams starred for sev- 
eral years. The little minister has 
charge of 8 parish In a manufacturing 
town in Scotland. A strike comes on 
and the owner of tho works appeals 
to the law. which In this case is Baron 
Rlntoul. His lordship comes with u 
s(|iiad of constables to arre3t the lead- 
ers, but Is routed. He goes away,, hut 
threatents to return, bringing with him 
the soldiers. The strikers prepare to 
light, althoufrh the little minister, who 
has a gre;it influence over them, for 
Idds It. , 

It is expected that t lie soldiers will 



,1$ai%ift 4Bi* fo 



ith her. 



she should .do frill justice to it 



are most InitWrtahL- '»The fcittle Min- 
lster" will be played all week with 

^«dB«^,«^Jgurday matinees. 



REPUBLIC A FAILURE 

New Portngnase Leglalatora Pail 
Make a Success of Their Taak 



year, and as the prosperity of the 
country mainly depends on a good har- 
vest. It is evident there will bo in- 
poorer 



to 



LISBON. Oct, 31. — Portugal, under 
the republic, Is steadily going back- 
ward, and figures show that the 
national debt has increased enormous- 
ly. r?or do the Portuguese legislators 
soem to be making a success of the re- 
public. While the new Republican re- 
gime was welcomed even by Royalist* 
■who were tired of an effete monarchy, 
the Republican parliament seems to 
have shown Itself quite incapable of 
putting things straight. Official de- 
partments are mostly run by old Mon- 
archists which the republic has re- 
tained. 

Recently the minister of finance, 
Senor Vicente Ferrelra, visited (Lon- 
don and Paris to sound financiers as 





With the new press law, newspapers 
are prohibited the use of free speech, 
^mS the Royalist Press no longer ex- 

tfifl||; ; " The Republican journals av? 

^JMrly a" semi-official, being the or- 
gan of some special faction of the Re- 
publican party, 

The prisons are overcroweded with 
Loyalists accused of conspiring against 
the republic. The courts-martdal 

daily sentences batches of fifteen to 
twenty conspirators to heavy sentences 
of six years solitary confinement, fol- 
lowed by ten i years' deportation to the 
colonics. 

Although it i is only just that the re- 
public should punish those bearing 
arms or conspiring against it, it is not 
fair to treat them like criminals of the 
lowest type, and subject them to close 
confinement In inadequate cells, 
dressed in hooded shrouds, with two 
eyeholes for the purpose of vision, and 
debarred from ail speech. It must be 
remembered that for the great part the 
prisoners belong to the highest Portu- 
guese aristocracy. 

In view of the general state of af- 
fairs, emigration is assuming alarm- 
ing rfoportions, especially from the 
Douro and Alemteje provinces, and has 
now reached the enormous average of 
7 2,000 for the current year, with pros- 
pect of increasing, which is threaten- 
ing the whole agricultural welfare of 
the country. 

Wbers Divorce Is Zaay 
As to easy divorce neither Australia 
nor America lead the way if we ad- 
mit uncivilized tribes into the • compe- 
tition. Among somo Siberian tribes, 
for instance, a man need only uncover 
his wife's head and walk away: and the 
Eskimo has only to leave his house and,, 
stop away In pretended anger for a day 
or two. In Natal a woman can divorce 
her husband at any time by simply 
placing a. betel nut undnr his pillow and 
taking her departure. And two chop-' 
sticks broken In the presence of a wit- 
ness is sufficient to divorce a couple in 
Cochin China. — London Chronicle. 



OPIUM CONSPIRACY 



Dramatic Evidence at Saa rraoolsco 

Trial Involves Offloers of Paotflo 

Mail Uner 



Tan Avary Is "Tha Wight Porter," at the Xmpraaa Theatre This Wesk 



make a sudden raid, and a guard Is 
stationed with orders that when they 1 
are seen approaching the signal will 
be three blasts on a horn. Lord Rin- 
toul's daughter. Babble, has gro.:»t 
aympathy for the strikers, so she dis- 
guises herself ns a gypsy and comes to 
warn them of the near approach of the 
soldiers. She learns of the signal, but 
the watchman proves cowardly- and 
will not «lve it. «rie tries to blow th« 
horn hernelf but cannot- Meanwhile, 
the little minister finds her, she tt-tls 
hfm that ghe la lost, but If he win 
blow the horn three times her people 
will come to her rescue. Thla he oo«», 
thereby giving the signal. The sol- 
diers eome, but find that the leaders 
hsve escaped. ■ 

Although um falttitttr 4*itfcka> .that 
•ftbktt Is * 9«* **nf ** »«• 



to a new loan. He was informed, how- 
ever, that guarantees would be re- 
quired, which it setems Portugal can- 
not grant without allocating the col- 
onies ,* course which public opinion 
would not tolerate. 

Unfortunately, this state of things 
is reflected on trade, which is heavily 
handicapped. The majcrlty of the 
wealthy classes were Royalists, who 
have left the country. Banks hold 
great ' numbers of unpaid drafta, and 
the money crisis la acute. .The coat 
of living has riaen to such an extent 
that Liabon is now the deareat capital 
in Europe In which to live, vegetables, 
meat etc.. have increased from 40 to 
aO per cent in the last two f.-ars 
widths, exception- of wise (vines), alt 
the srsss hare proved nn pott this 



BAN FRANCISCO. Cat, Oct. II. — The 
name* of three officer* of the Pacific mail 
liner Manchuria, were mentioned In an ln- 
Te*ti«»tton beirun by Cnlted fltetee District 
Attorney John L. McNab, of recent dii- 
cloaureg resardinjr an opium smuggllnc con- 
spiracy which led to the (loath of Fourth 
Officer Edward Mora* at Manila. Second 
Officer W. W. niahl, Fourth Officer H. C. 
Locke, who eucceeded Moiae, and Watch- 
man C. Svoga are the men mentioned. 
McNab *ald he had cabled to Manila euf- 
geitlng- that criminal warrant* be laaued. 

The story Involving the three men waa 
told by Puraer John Philip Bourne and 
corroborated by Chief Engineer and Dr. 
Conrad-Rlchter. The puraer repeated the 
account of Morse'* death.- prerleueir made 
public, verifying the report that hi* body 
we* found floating near the ship with a 
wound on the head. Rlefal and a Chinese 
boatswain held a rope, tha other end of 
which wa* tied about Morte'e Smtot, whan 
he swam aahore with the contraband 
opium, »ald Bourne, They were to draw 
him to the ahlp at a given signal, and fall- 
ing to feel the expected pull on the rope 
drew In and found the dead body attached. 
The purser said he had been told by the 
Chlne»e boatswain that be. the boatswain, 
and Rlehl haetlly attached a weight to the 
body and threw it bark Into the sea. When 
the body floated near the *hlp the next 
day, according tn Bourne, Rlehl descended 
to the water* edge and placed the weight. 
Bourne «ald Locke and Svoga knew of the 
attempt to lend the opium, and that the 
latter had d!*,-.us»»d the finding oi the 
dead body on the end of the rope with 
several perBor.* on board the vessel. 

Mr. McN'ab Included In his cablegram to 
Manila today «n order that tha bay be 
dragged for th* weight which waa attached 
to Mora** body. The hearing will be re- 
sumed tomorrow. 



Some Bale sad atnatlaur. 

DUBLIN, Nov. 1. — The County Idm- 
erlek hunt, on its opening meet a few 
days since, was stopped at Four Elms, 
a few miles from Limerick, owing to 
certain farmers objecting to hounds go- 
ing over I heir lands because members 
of the hunt had taken part In a reesst 
anti-home rule meeting at Limerick. An 
attempt waa made to reason with the 
crowd that had assembled, and Several 
members of the hunt asVld they osuld 
not understand why they should he 
slopped because soma persons had pafc- 
llcly stated their political apastaaia, The 
opposition, however, was | e nra » 1 a*»a» in, 
and Us how**)* 




Sunday, N*v«mb«r %, 1»1» 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 




CLOTHES AND THEIR INFLUENCE 



Professor Teufelsdrockh, the friend of 
Thomas Carlyle, as every reader of "Sartor" 
will know, has reflected deeply upon cloths and 
their significance, but it is very evident that his 
ponderings left him still in a state of ambiguity 
and indecision. 

It would seem that he could never quite 
make up his mind whether clothes expressed^ 
themselves in men, or whether men expressed' 
themselves in clothes . 

I rather think that he came to the conclu- 
sion that ther$ was a good deal to say for both 
views, always rather a disastrous thing for a 
philosopher to do. 

Sometimes he seems to come down quite 
definitely upon one side: "Clothes," he says, 
"gave us individuality, distinction, social pol- 
lity; Clothes have made men of us," and then, 
a few pages further on, he seems to lean al- 
most as definitely to the other: ' i l.u 
he exclaims, "who can look" 
Clothes of a Man into the Man himself, 
if the clothes have already made, the 
what is to be gained, one would lUBfe/JW 
by looking through the clothes * 
the -thing they have made? 



m 





Why ttM 



■•• . a, ... ■ 

and butter, tootfisome cakes and delicate china- 

What is, rtk>re delicious than the "tinkle of, 
the tea-things"? And I think it was the tea- 
gown that brought that into being. 

Before the coming -of the teagowu we just 
drank tea as boors drink beer. 

All sitting round a table, laid as for a feast 
—tea was a heavy, dull proceeding, unlike its 
modern successor. 

The. teagown is everything that it should 
be; it fits the ceremony as a well-cut glove 
fits a well-shaped hand, as perfect music ac- 
perfect words. 
.^graceful lines 
there -is a suggestion o*^r$s^atga origin *£; 



the clothes 



their face value,-' as the late Professor W2-" 

liam James would have put it? 

If a scarlet coat makes a soldi er Of 9, - faVB&*-- 
man, why not, when one sees a man/iaa|2$|ggif& 
let coat, assume at once that there goes a sol- 
dier or a huntsman, actual or potential? 

For my own part that is what I invariably 
do, and experience has taught me that ninety- 
nine time out of a hundred my assumptions 
are correct. 

Show me the woman with an osprey in 
her hat or in her hair, and I will show you a 
flirt 

To experiment with a view to confirming 
the judgment, would be as superfluous as it 
would be perilous. 

Some experiments, though, are not peril- 
ous, but merely instructive and amusing; and 
here is one which I recommend the neatest, 
the most precise of my male readers, if there 
are any, to try for himself. 

Let him for the next few days allow his 
necktie to crawl up over his collar. 

This is easy enough to accomplish. 

All yon have to do is to refrain from fasten- 
ing the tie with a pin in front, or from hold- 
ing it down with a clip at the back of the 

•.neck. 

The tie may be safely trusted to do the rest 

for itself. 

The effect upon your conduct, if not upon 
your character, will almost immediately be 
apparent. 

The chances are that you will lose your 
train or your car on the very first morning, or 
at any rate you will have to run for it, and 
will arrive breathless and disguntled — with the 
necktie, probably, halfway at the back of your 

head. 

If, when you reach your office, you sit 
down to cast up a column of cash, you will 
almost certainly forget to "carry" something, 
and so bring out the total all wrong. 

If you come home late at night, you will 
find, when you are opposite your own front 
door, in the darkness, that you have left your 
latchkey on the mantelpiece within. 

In another day or so disturbing incidents of 
this kind will have multiplied fourfold, and 
you will be seriously thinking of consulting 
cither a doctor or a nerve specialist. Do not 
do either. Simply adjust your necktie after 
the old fashion, and all will be well with you 
once more. _ ( . 

I often think our war office authorities 
made a grievous mistake when they clothed 
the British army in dun color for active service. 

Superficially, no doubt, the idea was ex- 
cellent to relegate the scarlet tunic to parades 
and other ceremonial opportunities — it was, 
that ,dun colors being less conspicuous and 
more invisible than scarlet, the wearers of it 
would more easily avoid bullets. 

But battles arc not won by £ careful avoid- 
ance of bullets! 

On the contrary, battles are won by a read- 
iness, an impetuosity of disposition to meet 
bullets. 

Now, can anyone seriously doubt that a 
man in scarlet would be less fearful of a bul- 
let than a man in dun color? 

The practical warriors of old times were 
alike to this psychological fact — they intuited 
it, probably. 

In the great wars of the last two centuries, 
it was the "thin red line" of the British army 
which ever remained in possession of the 
stricken field. 

It was a true instinct which prompted Nel- 
son to deck hmiself in all his glittering orders 
on the morning of Trafalgar. 

He lost his life — but he won the battle! 

I think it was one of Miss Braddon's hero- 
ines who declared that "the consciousness of 
being well-dressed gave to a woman an in- 
ward peace that religion itself was impotent to 
bestow." 

I often speculate — though not for long — • 
for I am pretty sure which way the truth lies — 
whether tea was the cause of the coming of 
the teagown, or the teagown the cause of tea. 

When I say "tea." I do not of course mean 
the herb, I mean the modern ceremony — 
"tea" in the "five o'clock" sense of the term- 
implying, as it does, quiet and comfortable 
chit*chat, soothing babble about trifles' just 
a stfee of the best sort of scandal, thin bread 




s£ 



, w^n» t n l 




I hold that it is impossible to overestimate 

'ton 'hsuriiiardf «»e *&*&& ****%$ r ^M 

ct is infinitely complex, and 







it color, shape, size, weight an 

material have all something to do with it. 

Personally I incline to attach much import- 
ance to the brim. 

The broad brim, or at any rate the broad, 
flapping brim, the brim that can be turned up, 
or turned down, as occasion seems to warrant, 
would, it seems, engender a certain sloppi- 
ness — or, let me say, looseness"-4n the thought, 
a certain inclination towards license in the con- 
duct...^ 

It causes its wearers to "take things easy," 
as we say. 

Consider, as examples, the American cow- 
boys — plucky as lions — with their sombreros — 
but both their mentality and their behavior 
do seern to lack precision — don't they? 

And then the cavaliers of old! 

Loyal, gallant, reckless to admiration — 
but discipline was not exactly their strong 
suit ! 

For that we had to Took to the Ironsides. 
with their narrow-brimmed headpieces — and 
their narrower minds! 

The boy scout rather strengthens this in- 
dictment. He is an almost wholly admirable 
little chap; perhaps the most hopeful portent 
in this unhopeful world, but — he does stoop 
his head and slouch his shoulders a trifle dis- 
concertingly to those who hold that smartness 
of appearance is a sure indication of smartness 
of soul ! 

I shall feel happier about the boy scout 
when, if ever, that hatbrim of his is ruthlessly 
clipped all round. 

Ah!— but I think I hear you ask— "What 
of the Quakers? Their brims are broad, but 
there was not much looseness of thought or 
.license of behavior about them." 

No, there was not, I will, admit — but if 
their brims were large, their brims were hard 
as well— and there ,no doubt, you have the 
explanation; 

This influence of clothes is a baffling and 
a complex thing. 

Sometimes the influence is immediate — 
direct; sometimes elusive and exceedingly 
subtle. ■ ■'.'-■■<'<■■ 

At any rate", we may often be allowed to 
judge people by their clothes, and it is cer- 
tain that an untidy, sloppy person, cannot 
claim to much smartness of intellect. 

Zi ^y- i 

OOWNS ANO GOSSIP 



My Best Friend— If you have, treasured 
away in that "some-day" box which every wo- 
man possesses; anty really nice_ pieces of lace, 
bring them forth without delay. The some- 
day in which you promised yourself to find 
a use for them has come. It matters not the 
color they are — cream or black or white. It 
matters not the kind, whether needle-run or 
bobbin made. It matters not the place of ori- 
gin — Spain, Flanders, France. Nor need you 
be discouraged that your treasures are but 
small pieces, lacking uniformity of length and 
depth. Give them into the hands of a clever 
dressmaker and she will find a use for them 
on your next gown. Not for many seasons has 
lace been so lavishly used as it is at present. 
Do not misunderstand my use of the word lav- 
ish. It is* not to be taken to indicate rows 
upon rows of lace insertion all of one pattern, 
winding like well-kept garden paths, round 
about and up and down our toilettes. That 
method of using lace is, happily, past. At its 
best, when the lace was good, it was always 
suggestive of the interminable monotonous toil/ 
of the hands that had made it: when it was 
not good lace, it was vulgar. The way in 
which lace is used this season is the right way. 
Each piece 'has a definite object to fulfil. On 
an evening gown it may form one sleeve, break 
a hard line on the corsage, or give weight and 
dignity to an attenuated skirt. Just suffi- 
cient for the designer's purpose is used— no 
more— and no convention interferes with the 
use of as many lace "motifs" of different kinds 
on one gown as the artistic realization of the 
scheme demands. A light Chantilly lace and 
a heavy Bohemian make may be wedded to- 
gether With t>he most 'pleasing result*, and to 




A Stylish Winter Coat 



use black and cream lace together is an ac- 
cepted practice. 

Designs which call for the use of lace in 
larger quantities are not, of Course, neglected. 
The fortunate possessor of a lace shawl, or of 
flounces of valuable lace, is. indeed, to be con- 
gratulated, for many and delightful are the 
uses to which such possessions may be dedi- 
cated. A lace coat accompaniment to an even- 
ing gown is a decorative fad that is being made 
much of at the moment. It is a garment quite 
without reason, of course, since as a wrap it 
is useless, and the dress it covers is complete 
without it. But what of that? It provides wo- 
man with an opportunity .of being beautiful 
in yet another aspect, and so she approves the 
fad. And it is certainly the best, in fact the 
only, way of showing a beautiful lace shawl 
to advantage. To cut such a treasure would be 
sacrilege. To incorporate it in the fashioning 
of a gown involves to a certain amount of drap- 
ing and folding, and in the course of this pro- 
cess the full beauty of the pattern is neces- 
sarily hidden. Again, if the shawl is mounted 
on a thicker fabric the essential charm of the 
lace, which lies in its light transparency, is lost. 
The transparent lace coat is excusable there- 
fore on the ground of beauty, if not of utility. 
On a fascinating example which I have recent- 
ly seen an applique of bright chintz flowers 
made an effective appearance, and the corners 
of the lace were drawn up to form dolman 
sleeves, and on each of these a chintz motif ap- 
peared, holding the folds in place, and. again, 
at the back of the coat where the ends of the 
shawl were lightly drawn together to give it 
some semblance of the shape of a coat, a large 
chintz motif was employed. On nearly every 
skirt — I am speaking still of evening gowns, of 
course — lace appears in some form, bordering 
either the tunic or the underskirt. Then, also, 
we have the flounced dress, the flounces either 
of lace, of ninon bordered with lace, or of the 
two fabrics used alternatively. 

Fashion in footwear tend ; to become more 
sumptuous, and we are growing accustomed 
to a form of luxury which was at first rather 
repellent to English taste. About a year ago, 
when rumors of diamond-studded heels to 
dancing shoes came to our ears for the first 
time, L-remember reading a seriously worded 
article which, in a vague way connected this 
vogue with the. labor troubles and socialistic 
tendencies of the time. Yet had the writer 
considered his subject he would have seen that 
there is nothing calculated to cause a revolu- 
tion in the fact that a woman wears her dia- 
monds on her feet instead of on her head. 
Jeweled footwear is not new in the history of 
dress. In the days wrn'ch we like to refer to as 
the good old timesje%kd shoe-buckles were 
a commonplace of fashion, and were worn by 
men as well as women, and those who could 
wore diamond, buckles ; the rest wore paste. 
But it was good past*, and the workmanship 
put into the settihjfW/'the stones was even, 
better, so that those/ >t 



And I think we should have taken more kindly 
to the pretty fashion of jeweled heels if we 
had not been told the price of the shoes at the 
same time as we heard of the diamonds. But 
that is the way with fashions that came to us 
via New York. Hosiery keeps pace with shoe 
fashions in point of luxury. The newest, we 
are told, are of platinum, and we are again con- 
fronted with the crude facts of a woman's 
hosiery bill, with the consoling addenda that 
"cheaper" stockings of spun metal can be pur- 
chased for £10 a' pair- The extra attention 
that is being given to the matter of footwear is. 
of course, due to the present style of dress. 
With tight skirts the foot is prominently 
shown, and with the slit skirt, more than the 
foot is revealed, making the selection of the 
shoes and stockings an affair of moment. 
■•"■• Colored walkinW* Shoes are ottt o* falter 
wity well-dressed ^romen, t|ie yc- 



become too popular. Shoemakers have suc- 
• ceeded in producing a very soft, pliable patent 
leather, of which the smartest walking shoes 
are made. White silk stockings are still worn, 
but a newer idea is the double hose of fine 
black silk over flesh-pink, giving the effect of 
transparency without its chilliness. 

Underskirts are quietly creeping back into 
favor, though they still remain very unobtru- 
sive items of our attire. With a skirt draped 
closely round the figure as some of the even- 
ing gowns are, an underskirt, naturally, is out 
of the question; but there is a tendency to- 
wards a slightly wider skirt, not only for day 
gowns, but for evening wear among people^ 
whose amusements include dancing, and with 
these an underskirt of restricted dimensions is 
permissible. Usually it takes the form of a 
princess slip of Milanese silk with skirt of 
lace, in the new tussore shade. Crepe de 
chine skirts are also liked with scalloped tdge, 
embroidered in shaded silks. The pleated 
flounce is sometimes, seen, but is set into a 
band of plain material, top and bottom, so 
that no "flair" is possible. 

Are we going to return to the mode of 
the "jacket" and revive a word that has long 
been dead in modistic etymology? Like 
"mantle," the name survives only as a trade 
term, and has a distinctly mid-Victorian ring 
in our ears. We prefer to. describe our outer 
wraps as coats, but there is something in the 
aspect of the newest models which, in an in- 
definable way, suggests the older designa- 
tion. The material of which they are fash- 
ioned is in part responsible for this. They are 
made of broche velvet — a truly Victorian fa- 
bric, though the modern broche is a more 
beautiful production than its earlier proto- 
type. They are made, too, on somewhat sim- 
ilar lines, with cut away" fronts and trimmed 
with bands of fur. You may see almost the 
identical style in the old fashion plates, and. 
occasionally in the family photograph album. 
The high collar of fur at the neck, cosy,' close- 
fitting bands at the wrists, and border round 
the coat are faithful reproductions. They be- 
long to the period of the sealskin jacket which 
at one time it was every woman's ambition to 
possess. It is quite possible that we shall see 
this mode also restored to favor. The length 
of the fur coat is determined by the style of 
skirt which is in fashion. While this remains 
so narrow that it is impossible to wear warm 
petticoats in the winter, the long fur coat is a 
necessity, which women will not be denied. 
But. if, later in the season, skirts take a broad- 
er line, as some prophets predict that they 
will, then we may look for a shorter fur coat. 
There is every reason for it from an economic 
point of view, for the extravagant use of fur 
during the last few years, and the immense 
number of skins which have been used to make 
the full-length,, coats and big stoles and muffs 
have seriously depleted some of the fur-bear- 
ing species. Sealing has been forbidden for 
ten years by the American senate, and this 
means that the skin will be very rare and 
very clear. There are plenty of -substitutes, of 
course, but many women would infinitely pre- 
fer a short coat of real sealskin to the "full 
fifty inches" of any other pelt masquerading 
as seal. 

The fashion of trimming coats with bands 
of fur is a very practical one, which not onl f 
adds to the beauty and dignity of the garment, 
but gives warmth just where warmth is most 
wanted. Even a coat made entirely of fur of- 
ten leaves something to be desired in this 
t way. You may be encased in fur from head 
i to heel, but if there is. a foolish collar to your 
fur coat, which leaves a portion of your neck 
• exposed just under your chin, you may suffer 
, untold discomfort from che too familiar atten- 
I tions of an easterly wind. The, sleeves, too, 
! of the. fur coat are often ridiculously wide at 
the wrist. The bands of fur which fit closely 
round the throat and quite^tightiy at the wrist; 



HINTS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OjF 
VEGETABLE COOKERY 

In addition to the method of cooking vege- 
tables altogether or mainly in the steam gen- 
erated from their own juices, there are several 
other ways in which vegetable cookery, as 
practiced in England, can be improved. Bak- 
ing vegetables in the oven, for instance, offers 
the same advantages as does the steaming — 
it does not waste the nutriment or flavor. 
Moreover, it is very' simple. Prepared in this 
way, the food has a most delicious and deli- 
cate taste, which can be secured in no other 

way. 

Root vegetables lend themselves especially 
well to this method of cookery. Cut up tur- 
nips, carrots, parsnips, swede-turnips, beet- 
root, or, in fact, any root vegetables, in halves 
or quarters or thick slices, or leave medium- 
sized onions whole. Prick them with a sharp 
fork, place them in a casserole or a baking 
dish with a tight-fitting cover, season with 
salt and pepper to suit the taste, dot them over 
with butter y fill the dish about half full of boil- 
ing water, and set it in a hot oven, covering 
until about the last fifteen or twenty minutes. 
Then remove the lid, and let them become 
Slightly JfrfiWtl. It Wi» require from three- 



. ,3of an hour to an hour and a half 
oroughly to cook them in this manner. 
Celery may be cooked after this fashion, 
only it must not be browned. Cut the stalks 
in two-inch lengths. Season with butter, pep- 
per and salt to suit the palate, and bake in a 
covered dish about half full of water. Leave 
the lid on until the celery is thoroughly cooked, 
then add a cupful of milk to the liquor remain- 
ing in the dish, thicken with flour, and serve 
as a sauce. 

Baked Beets 

Wash medium-sized beets, and place them 
in a covered dish about half full of water. 
Bake until soft, when the water will have 
evaporated. Rub off the skin, cut in slices, and 
season with butter, pepper and salt. Place in 
the oven for a few minutes before serving, to 
become hot. 



„ t uu, ,.. ...». n.wov .,..—>$ wete^ten of 
considerable value. r *Yettnere 'i^ai » great, 
outcry against the extravagance bfjtpe fash- , 
ion. It is true that Charles 1 lost his head, 
but I have never heard that the regrettable in- 
cident was tn&rtiltely connected with his feet. 



\ provide just the extra comfort and protect|oV 
; that is Ranted.' Yours sincerely, - M. ; 

■ . , ,, .' . . " - o - ' " *■ ' - ■ ' ''i*' 

Amateur Palmist— I think yw *re f0&*|; 
f to be married twice. ' . ,/ , '<*!,&* 

. Yuun* Ladv— You .think! Well, I'd ratHfe 



Amateur Palmist— I think you are 

be married twice. 

Young Lady— You Jhiok! Well, I'd ratWp* 
you Were sure I was going to be maimed 
once.-*Boston Transcript, 



Baked Onions 

Onions are most digestible, and possess the 
finest flavor when baked in their skins, just 
as you would bake potatoes. When thor- 
oughly cooked, peel them, and break them 
up into small pieces, seasoning with butter, 
pepper and salt. 

Baked Cabbage 

At first thought one would imagine that 
cabbage would dry up and be more like parch- 
ment than a succulent vegetable if baked. 
That is altogether wrong. Baked cabbage 
will be a revelation to those who never have 
tried it prepared in this way. Make a dress- 
ing of breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, a small .£>nion, 
grated, some sage, and one egg. Stuff the 
cabbage with this, either putting it between 
the leaves if it is a loose head, or cutting out 
the heart and filling the cavity if it is com- 
pact. If the dressing is put in between the 
leaves, tie an inch-wide piece of muslin around 
it to hold it solid. Fill the dish about half-full 
of boiling water, cover, and bake in a hot oven 
for an hour and a half or two hours, basting it 
with the liquor in the pan every fifteen or 
twenty minutes. Take off the cover about a 
quarter of an hour before the cabbage is done, 
to allow to brown. This makes a most palat- 
able and delectable dish, and may be sliced 
down like a round of roast beef, 

Baked Vegetable Marrow 

This is as satisfying as roast meat. Make 
a stuffing of breadcrumbs, one small onion — 
just enough to give a soupcon of flavor— some 
mixed herbs, and an egg, moistening it with 
stewed o.r tinned tomatoes, atid season with 
salt and 'pepper to suit the taste. Peel the 
marrow. Cut off the stem end, scoop out the 
seeds, and stuff the cavity with the dressing, 
tying and skewering the end back in place. 
Dot with bits of butter, and bake in a covered 
dish containing a small amount of liquid, un- 
covering and browning it before serving. 

Large cucumbers may be peeled, stuffed 
and baked, and make a delicious addition to 
. the menu. Cucumbers also may be peeled, 
• cut in slices, and baked like ■ celery, without 
: b'e.ing browned, served with a'-saucc made from 
{ the liquid remaining in the, dish. 



Tomatoes may be baked to advantage. 
• •They may be cooked whole, setting them stem- 
; end down in a baking dish and dotting with 
' butter, seasoning with salt and pepper; or the 
pulp may be scooped oul, mixed with a dress- 
ing of breadcrumbs and nuts, or minced meat, 
put back in the" tomato shells, and baked. In 
cooking, them in this way, a thick slice should' 
be cut off the top to begin with, and this 
shquld be. setback in place like a lid after they 

are stuffed. ? ♦ 

When fried in deep fat, vegetables retain 
all their nutriment and flavor. Any root may 
1 be' fried in this, w#v,' //Take turnips or large 
! white' radishes* for &ample. , Cut them in inch 
| cubes; prick them all over with a sharp-tined 
fork, rub into them Salt, pepper and just a sua- 
mciofTof curiy,^powde^ if this flavor is em 
|$ve4i, and fry-in dee$ tat until., tender and a 
r$icV brown. BrinjIlS ?may be cut in; slices a 
'.Quarter or half inch thick, dipped in %gg ami 
breadcrumbs, and fried. 



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THE VICTORIA COLONIST 



Sunday, Nov#mb«r 3, Iflit 





ks Papep 



were 426,000 more births than deaths last year. If 
none of the babies were taken away, there will be 
still an Increase of 156,000, which Is not a great one. 
All the people who come away are among the most 
industrious and enterprising- of the men and women 
of th<? country. Canada will not admit criminals or 
diseased people. 



CURRENT TOPIC; 





be used on. the Pacific coast to 

will 4^)$iih la Dublin, Ireland, 

t of Canada. 



^Jlbwre been, snowstorms In Manitoba and other 
; jpp* on the prairie". The beginning of November Is 
sometimes the beginning Of winter In the provinces 
' a f tWm a6y 'M e wnt i> ln «i ■ ... . 



^|^|^|hf it'te autwnn, it is' reported that Foley, 
Welch/ and Stewart are about tO set fifteen hundred 
men at work on the Pacific Great Eastern, between 



Vancouver and Fort George. 
The. little Crown Prince A 



Alexis, the heir to the 
throne of Russia, who has been reported very ill, la 
reported to be recovering. He is a handsome little 
fellow, and a great favorite. 



There was a splendid apple show In Vernon on Oc- 
tober 24. It was opened by the premier, who spoke of 
the high value placed on Oknnagan apples in England, 
especially in London. - 



Before next week the people of the United States 
will have chosen their president. If either Mr. Wil- 
son or Mr. Iloosevelt go to the "White House, there 
will be Important changes In the management of the 
public business. 



The Creat Lakes and the River St. Lawrence are 
still open, and wheat Is being rushed to sea as fast 
as possible. Still it Is feared that the great elevators 
will not hold all the grain that is being carried by 
the trains to Fort William. 



A railroad accident took place near Toronto when 
soldiers were returning from a sham battle. The 
Chicago Flyer crash, .1 into the train coming In. Two 
men were killed outright, two fatally Injured, and 
thirty-seven hurt. Nearly all were soldiers. An In- 
vestigation Is being held. 



Sir George Murray was In Victoria a short time 
ago. This gentleman spent eighteen years In the 
Malay peninsula, and helped in changing the form of 
government of this part of the British dominions. 
■This district, the coasts of which were once the home 
of pirates, is now a very prosperous country. It pro- 
duces five-eighths of the tin of the world, and, at the 
present rate of progress, win booh be one of the finest 
rubber producing regions. Like every one else who has 
lived in India, Sir George Murray thinks Lord Rob 
a m »1p ^ PM ^ip M ^'l|! 1 a man ot sound J^S™" 1 - 

There have been changes In tho cabinet at Ottawa. 
The Hon, Robert Rogers, who was minister of the in- 
terior, has been given Mr. Monk's position, of minister 
of public works, and the Hon. \V. J. Roche taken the 
place Ur. tki&Z^\fiWii&>H Mr, Coderro, a 
rrenefc.Ca»*M»4f b*4( 'tifrfr .&&« secretary of state. 
This gentleman $jtffl ffi+Utiki-to . hi* -constituency -of 
Hochelaga *of tfetyteotton. The other ministers were 
members ^^lie^oablnet before, and, in their cases, 
another election is not *eaujr*d. It is said that the 
department ot Wines will be placed in charge ot Mr, 



Whose conscience would not let him take his rest till 
he had told his countrymen what he believed to be 
the truth. 



Coder re. 




TT 



making triads with her neighbors «•» 

one. ' Sh##t»#. Mg?M4.--J$$. close alMes, 
1 wvf^^^^H^P*^ oam* to an nil 



Standing about their rights In Morocco, attd 
the past week Ilaly and France have agreed that as 
far as Tripoli and Morocco are concerned" each country 
will treat the other as good neighbors should. Italy, 
Spain and France, with their possessions on both sides 
of the Mediterranean, with England In Egypt, Gibral- 
tar and Malta, would occupy, if closely united, a very 
strong position. Italy, however, Is the ally of Austria 
and Germany. 



The Conservative party of British Columbia held a 
very successful convention in Ftevelstoke on Ootobor 

24. There were many speeches, of coins,, and ^t Would 
lake more than the whole of your pegs to tell :tll that 
was suld. The premier. Sir Richard MaBrlde, spoke of 
the opening up of tho country by railroads and high- 
roads as a very important part of the work ol the 
• • r 1 1 1 1 1 . • n t . He promised that the ; university would be 
opened next year, though, of course, he did not say 
that the buildings Mould be finished by tliut time. 
The attorney-general, the Hon. \v. J. Bowser, showed 
that the government .surveyors had been very busy, 
and that now e great part of the, province was ready 
for settlement. This speaker promised that two-thirds 
of this government land would be given to settlers in 
sections of 160 acres, if they undertook to improve and 
live upon It. Such farms are called pre-emptions.^ 
The premier SpSW-^too, of the careful management, 
j$eh, while spending large sums for needed imprOve- 
ments,. T ,*»pt the treanftrir pmtek^awk**' : 'f* ■'«%■ 



think about today, ■*&*< 



;***■ 



to 



w> 



At present British Columbia obtains Us food either 
from other parts of Canada or other countries. If 
we had no food except wtiat was raised In the pro- 
vince far the greater number of the people, would have 
to go away or .starve. Food will be dear us lonj; as it 
comes from a distance, and freight and duty have to 
be paid, Theiv Is, Professor Elliott reports to the 
minister of lauds, plenty o£ fertile s^)|l In this pro- 
vince to produce vegetables, frill t and grain for a 
larg* population. He- has travelled over the dry belt, 
|Whlch !■ between Ashuroft and Cariboo, 'and exarh- 
i:o,i it eldeely, it will, if cultivated as such land 
should be, produce excellent crops. Professor Bill 
states i tal there are areas which amount to about 150 
miles square in the Cariboo and Chllcotlp districts 
alone. In Nicola and in the Okanagan and Kettle 
ts, as well as in the Kootenays, there are 
\ ry huge areas suitable for dry farming. When 
Is generally known, people who have 
lands In other parts of the world will 
Columbia as soon as the country is oj 
roads and highways. With a market^ 

wiChnn 
such farrtafrTWa^d tfTlgn.' Professe 
who has studies so^and me 




, . ^ . D m , i j.i i r i .ii ii . iji / 111 : ii v n in, i n j ii i i ^ i i m i ^st^ i u i i - , 



IPI III ll ' llMll M I IMUMiil li I M I I ' i ." ' 

in ii'ii.ii >' i ' aft linn ■ 



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Escaped 




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— 



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— 



All the clergymen and a great many members of 
the congregations of the Church of England, on Van- 
couver Island, met in Victoria last week. It was the 
first time Bishop Roper presided over the synod, and 
he told his fellow-workers all that ho thought should 
he done to make the people better. Among other things 
the bishop wants, Is a clergyman who shall spend his 
whole time among the children of the diocese, teach- 
ing them himself, and advising the teachers Who are 
with them always. A new cathedral Is, Bishop Roper 
thinks, needed now, and plans for Its new building 
have already begun. In his journeys through the 
island, the bishop has been studying the needs of the 
people. 



There Is to be an agreement between all nation*; as 
to the measures to be taken to make ocean voyages 
safe. Germany has made her plans already. These 
will be considered at an international council to be 
held in London. The lesson taught by the terrible 
loss of life on the Titanic has been learned. 



Until the law Is changed, lumber planed on one 
Bide will continue to be admitted into Canada free of 
duty, even when It Is suitable to be used at one! 
In building, Is the decision of the supreme court of 



hear this. 

It Is said that a commission will be appointed to 
examine nil the cold storage plants In Canada. It is 
said that not only Is food bought when It is cheap 
and kept till It is dear, but that the length of time it 
is kept renders It unfit for food. Montreal, the largest 
city in Canada, finds the greatest fault with the own 
ers of the cold storage plants. 

The American navy has a splendid wireless station 
at Arlington, Virginia. From this heighth messages 
can be sent 3,000 miles In every direction. This is a 
first step, and a very long one, towards wireless com- 
munication between Washington, the capital of the 
United States, and all the ships and possessions of 
that country. 



t The armies of Montenegro, Servla and Bulgaria 
• were, at the beginning of the war, successful. The 
Montenegrins have advanced till they threaten the sea- 
ports of SkUtah, the Servians are capturing the vil- 
lages that He In their line of march, and the Bulgar- 
ians have won a great battle at Klrk-KHesseh, on 
October 21, and were about to lay siege to Adrianople, 
while the Greek army Is reported to have gained a 
victory In its march on Salonlki. A week after the 
Bulgarian victory, it ,was reported that the Turks 
have won two battles, and are driving the enemy 
back from their position near Adrianople, but later 
despatches seem to show that the advance of the 
Bulgarian nrmy Is unchecked. • 



The raising of black ,ind silver ere;.- foxes has be- 



Canada. The people of the prairie will be glad to ; -|^_Cj>me a great Industry on Prince Kdward Island. One 

of the fox farms Was sold the other day for $100,000. 
The young foxes arc sold to people of other coun- 
tries, for, expensive as are the furs, the animals are 
still more valuable. One pair was sold lately for 
$0^,000. The beautiful little Island has supplied food 
to people oT other cbuntrles. Men and women have 
been contented to have comfortable homes surrounded 
by rich farms, splendid horses and fine cattle. No 
one had a greet deal of money, but there was little 
poverty. This new Industry will bring wealth to some. 
There are thoughtful men who do not think It will 
make better men and women, which after all is a 
country's greatest wealth, or really increase the pros- 
perity of the little province. 



All the men who handle freight on the Canadian 
Pacific Railroad, or who work in the freight offices, 
complain that t heir wages are too low, and that they 
are obliged to work overtime. They have presented 
their case to the company and to the labor depart- 
ment of the government, and threaten to strike unless 
they are given what Is fair. Such a strike would do 
great harm to business. 



One of the people who spends a life In going « boii t 
doing good is Miss Mary Ard MoKenzie," head of the 
Victorian Order of Nurses. She has been In Victoria 
for a few days. Her plan is to put nurses wherever 
they are needed in all the country placea of Canada. 
This will cost, a creat deal of money even when the 
people pay all they can afford. The Duchess of Con- 
naught is collecting money for this purpose. 

At Field, a short time ago, Sir Richard McBrlde 
made a speech in favor of Ganada's helping Great 
P. Itolr's home navy and preparing for the defence of 
her own shores. Tho premier thinks that f'anada 
should not only prepare t<" help herself In future, but 
should show her rrntitlud* to the Mother Country for 
protecting her while she was growing rich and strong. 
This, too, is something for the young taxpayers, who, 
in a few years will be voters, to consider. 



Tf the nations of the world want men to be always 
ready to fight their battles, these men should receive 
money enough to keep their families In comfort and 
lay by something for the time when they are gone. 
We cannot expect that men will Join either the army 
or navy When their pn>' IS lower than that of people 
who nr.> following peaceful occupations. This is what 
Sir James Mills said In Vancouver a few days ago. 
In Australia, men must serve In the army between the 
ages of eighteen and twenty-one. In this way an 
army of defence is always ready in time of need. In 
Canada, there are few men who could defend their 
country if suddenly called upon to hear arms. The 
same thing is true of Great Britain, as Lord Roberts 
b.is often warned the nation. In Germany and many 
niht-r European countries, men are trained to fight 
.t-.st hi, they learn their trades or professions. This 
lb something for Canadian boys to think about. 



Representatives of all the municipal council* in 
this province held a very interesting meeting at Revel- 
stoke. It was resolved to ask the legislature to pass 
a law allowing cities to tax the property held by 
churches and hospitals Just as private property is 
taxed. These gentlemen believe that school truste s 
should allow tho councils to decide how much money 
should be spent for school purposes. Most people In 
Victoria think that the council has plenty to do with- 
out loolttng after the schools. That is why school 
trustees are elected as a separate body. 



The three Indian*, who so promptly hurried to the 
roBe.ua of the passengers of the wrecked Iroquois at 
Saanlch, a year and a half ago, have received medals 
for saving the lives of two men and a woman. Mr. 
Justice. Martin recommended that their bravery should 
be rewarded. They richly deserved the honor they 
received, and, it is to be hoped, the medals will be pre- 
served by their children and their descendants for 
many generations. Their name* are William Titou- 
halem, bob Klutwbalem and T>ouat. 



The •migrant* from tha British isles last yaar 
numbered JTO.OOO, that Is more than a quarter of a 
million. Most of the** people have gone to make 
their homes in other parts of the empire. Those who 
come IP Canada usually become prosperous, Thar* 



The women of Germany nre breaking Into butchers' 
shops becailse they believe that meat Is loo dear. In 
some cases the meat has been stolen and the salesmen 
Injured. Food all over the world Is becoming dearer, 
and no one seems to know the reason. In Canada 
food was cheap and plentiful when far Icsk 'and wns 
cultivated, and there were few rich people anil no big 
cities. There are some people who say that it is be- 
cause people, are not contented with plain food that' 
living Is SO dear. The grandmothers of most of these 
rioting German women were satisfied to give their 
famine* black bread and vegetables. The English 
laborers seldom had meat, and in Scotland porridge 
was the chief food of working men. Yet there were 
great scholars, brave soldiers, and skilful workmen, 
In those days. In the United States and in Canada 
food has been plentiful, and many of the people have 
been wasteful, especially In later years. Whether this 
has been one of the causes of high prices or not Is a 
question that is not easy to Answer, 



■ M a rio ^ s ujss soda s l o wly, ^ t n i ^ » y e g ' : ' l > rtf nios e d r- 
perhaps to keep back the tears. She did not look at 
Slim, beside her on the white-footed broncho, but Slim 
pretended not to notice, and talked Just as if he were 
being answered.. 

"You see, it's this way, M'ree. , A pony's a pony, 
but a trick pony like Babe is worth an awful lot of 
money. That chap from the east has offered Dad ono 
thousand In cold cash for her; a whole thousand, 
M'ree. She's going to be a polo pony, and move only 
in the upper classes; ain't you, Babe?" 

Slim leaned over and gave Babe a playful pat. but 
she curveted away from him easily.. 

"See that side-step she can do!" exclaimed Slim ex- 
citedly. "Wouldn't that make them easterners' eyea 
bulge? And it ain't any teaching she's had. It's Just 
nature. Why, M'ree, you ought to be glad she's going 
to be a pampered pet. That's what I heard tho man 
tell Dad." 

"She's my pet, and I love her, and 1 don't think 
Dad ought to sell her when she's mine," protested 
Marie Louise, forcibly. Marie Louise was likely to 
be forcible at strenuous moments. Back at the ranch, 
when the fur started to fly, old Louis Buteau, father 
of both children, would shake his head, and say; with 
shrewdly smiling lips: 




— 




g's^atlrsi it's f those ff stern chapfc 

bugh there this morning,' and both of 

cigarettes;' What to :s Wt&M»S*. where. 



they throw the stubs? It ain't their woods, 
ift Dad sous the smoke yet." ':.sr V 



"He can't'" answered Marie Louise, shortly. "He's, 
gone with the men fishing." 

"It's got a bully start." Slim was- off his pony, 
lying face downward over the ledge, scanning the 
scene below. "It will reach those spruces in an hour, 
crawling as it is through the leaves. I could keep 
it back that long — maybe, M'ree. I can take my sad- 
dle-blanket and wet It In the little waterfall back 
yonder, and rido down — " 

Marie Louise met his eyes then, and there was a 
flash of understanding between them. They know 
each other well, and they knew, too, what it would 
mean to the timber .belt, and perhaps the ranch Itself, 
If a forest fire started raging through the valley. 

"You do that, Slim," she said, turning Babe around 
on the narrow trail. "I'll «o and tell Dad." 

"Don't run all the way," shouted Slim after the fly- 
ing streak, as It vanished down the mountain, but she 
did not even turn to wave. Four miles lay between 
her and the trout brook, not level miles on a good road, 
but mountain miles, of rough, dangerous roads, where 



ony! Even in the excitement of the 
ride, a surge of indignation swept through Marie 
Louise's' heart, to think of her wild, ligbt-fpoted ranch 
pet spending the rest of her life chasing polo balls! 
And safely away from Sllm's boyish chaffing, she let 
the tears fall freely on Babe'B glossy neck. 

Buteau Was out in midstream, trolling contentedly 

|V lalBpJJsr S^fl b y " wn beauties in the deep pools of 

-^Little ; £§jraniie river, when he heard the clear "Coo-ee!" 

above him dn the hillside. He. knew the signal or 

'lsjtti(«r,#^d, without *Vword. left his fishing. 

"The timber's burning Dad!" cried Marie Louise, 
toward him, and Buteau, shouting the news 
am to his two eastern guests, scrambled ba- 
his own horee. 
night the men from the ranoh worked fighting 
t the fire, and all night Marie Louise rode between 
the ranch and the fighting line, carrying fresh coffee 
ani'fsirtlli. Ott JWin "When It was ovale, and the last 
smoldering embers stamped out, she stood beside her 
father, looking at the blackened trees. Babe was 
near by, nosing hungrily around. 

"That was a good ride you took to warn me, M'ree," 
tho ojd ranchman remarked proudly. "I don't think 
ten thousand dollars can buy that pony, eh?" 

Marie Louise flashed her quick smile at him, and 
said nothing. She knew Babe was safe from polo! 
Slim turned to grin happily at her. 

But Babe only lifted a hungry nose, sniffing to- 
ward where the home ranch lay. — Izola Forrester in 
St Nicholas. 




Lord Roberts, who has Just celebrated his eightieth 
birthday, made a wonderful speech at Manchester a 
few days ago. This great city Is the seat of the cotton 
manufactures,, and the great proportion of her people 
are workers. The great, llttlo old soldier talked, to 
these plain men and women In words which the sim- 
plest of them could understand. He told them that 
Germany had become great because she had prepared 
for war. Sbe had . conquered Austria in 18SS. and 
France In 18T0. Since thst time she. bad never ceased 
to perfect her arrtiy, and had built up a great navy. 
He told hi* countrymen that the British army In not 
better prepared, now than it was before the South 
African war. a«d that a navy without an army cannot 
preserve tha British empire. If Great Britain is pre- 
pared by ««a and tend, there will be peace. Lord Rob- 
erts say*. The>e are many people who will not agree 
with this Speech. But there are vary few who will 
not admire the eld man whose brain I* so clear and 



'SHE LET OUT HER SPEED WHERE THE HOAP LAY CLEAR AH BAD" 



"N'on, non, M'ree Tx)ulse, and you named for the 
queen most charming!" 

Today Marie Louise had clearly forgotten the pre- 
cedent In manners set by the "queen most, eharmlng." 
She was Just a ranch girl, born and bred, tanned, keen- 
eyed, and not very pretty. But there was a grnce and 
vitality about her at fifteen aa she rode Babe over 
the hills that many a city girl would have envied. 
Even Sllm's eys rested on her admiringly. 

She halted abruptly at the topmost point In thr 
mountain trail. Below them lay tl.e Buteau ranch, a 
little, low, log shack, with many straggling lean-tos 
wandering back from it. The sheep graslng along the 
lower hlll-slop-s looked like dull gray rocks, their 
heads bent low. It was late October, and nearly all 
Of the trees were swept bare of leaves. Their trunks 
stood out in shhrri silhouette against the r< d-.ind-yel- 
low-colored ground, ankle deep in the dry leaves. 

Babe lifted her soft, sensitive nose, and sniffed the 
air restlessly. She started to back on the narrow path, 
and Marie Loutser pulled her up almoat crossly. 

But slim leaned forward in his saddle, and looked 
down below them over the rocky ledge., There was a 
■trip of timber there, and from It curled upward 
through the hasy, Still air a thin white cloud of amoke. 
hardly visible. Slowly It rose, and settled, hanging 
above the trees like a cloud. 

"M'ree!" gasped Slim, tense antil alert on tha In- 
ayuU with tha trua scout's Instinct that scents dan- 



a single misstep in places would land pony and rldar 
hundreds of feet below on the gray crags of the deep 
ravines. , 

The smell of smoke seemed to have set Babe half 
crav.y. Bars back, nose out, »he took to the trail a* if 
yfursued. On her back, Marie Louise clung, riding like 
Slim himself, knees gripping the pony's sides, sitting 
well back, swaying With every move of the slander, 
Supple body beneath her. Several times she half 
turned to look buck at that palo cloud of smoke that 
hung over the timber. It looked like the .smoke from 
a great camp fire. Xot two miles away from it, she 
knew, lay' a stretch of good grazing ground, Where a 
bench of choice cattle was herded. One whiff of the 
smoke, and they would all stampede, perhaps dash 
headlong over the brink of a half hidden ravine, and 
lie killed, 

She knew that Slim would do His best to beat It 
back, but M.e si rcngth of one boy was little against 
a fire that had got a good start amongst the dry 
leaves, ami might be smoldering In twenty places. 
So she loo i*il fomvard over Paha's neck, and tried 
to make hor understand what was expected from her. 

Babo realised it. Carofully she picked her way 
down tl.e dangerous places In the trail. U>«» let out 
her speed where the road lay clear ahead. Never had 
Marie Louise enjoyed a ride as she did that one, which 
she thought was her last on Bab*. The fry neat day 
bar pat was to be aold, and ahlnped aast tor a pole 



-o- 



CLOCK OP OLA-SS 



A clock constructed throughout of glass is the re- 
sult of • six years' work on the part of a Bavarian 
glass polisher. The plates and pillars which form the 
framework arc of glass and are bolted together with 
glass screws. The dial, plate, hands, shaft and cog 
wheels ere of glass, and "glass wedges and pins are 
used for fastening the various parts of the running 
gear together. Like the clock Itself, the key by which 
it Is wound is of gloss. The construction of the re- 
markable timepiece was a matter of infinite pains. 
Some of the parts had to bo made as many o« forty 
times before a clock that would go could be produced, 
— Chicago Inter Ocean. 



-O- 



ritANCISCO I. BLA-DERO 



Francisco I. Madero, president of Mexico, was born 
October i, 1873, in the state of Coahuila In northern 
Mexico, where his family had long been wealthy and 
prominent. He was educated abroad, principally in 
France. Later he studied English Uteraturo and agri- 
culture at the University of California When he re- 
turned home he resumed the active management of I 
the vast rubber and cotton plantations belonging to 
his family. His spare time he devoted to literary 
pursuits. Until 1909 he was known only for his vast 
wealth and literary attainments. About that time ho 
began an attack with his pen upon the alleged abuses 
of the Dlnx government, and this brought him Into 
public prominence. Soon he became to be regarded as 
a leader of the opposition to Diaz, and,- in 1910, he be- 
came a candidate for president of the republic. His 
candidacy was one of the causes of the revolution 
that followed. Though without, knowledge of military 
matters. M;idero proved a capable loader, and, after 
months of fighting, ho overthrew the strong dictator- 
ship of Diaz and succeeded him In the presidency. 

, o 

MARTHA AITN'S SOWO 



MO , . 



Martha Ann was out in the backyard hanging up 
the weekly wash of the Brown family, which her 
mother had Just rinsed out As she toiled she sang, 
loud and clear, a merry little son,?. 

The grocer's boy, trudging along the dusty street, 
heard and whistled the same tune, forgetting that the 
basket l.e lield was almost too heavy for him to 
carry. 

Mrs. Brown heard it too. Poor Mrs. Brown! She 
was always at work in her stuffy little house, and 
always tired; but the song flew In through the open 
window, and she smiled at it, because It was such a 
happy I'.ttle thing, and, before she knew it, she, too. 
was s!ng!ng os she moved about — something she had 
not done for many a wary day. 

Baby May heard the rippl'.nt; sounds. Her little 
white teeth were pushing t !v -1 r way up into sight. 
They hurt the little maid, those tiny hidden teeth, so 
that she fretted uneasily, and cried to be comforted. 
But the merry song reached her, and she listened and 
cooed with delight, and reached out her pretty arms 
as if she would catch it and hold it l'flst. 

A sick little girl who had I an Shut in for several 
weeks, and was down-lnarte.l nn.l blue because she 
could not go about, also l-.eard^the song, and uncon- 
sciously hummed the merry tune. 

Just a little song, such us any one might sing, 
quickly sung, and quickly sinking Into silence; but 
what a pleasant mission it had in the world! 

It Ib wortl* while to be a Martha Ann, to drop a 
little oil of gladnesfl on the grinding wheels of life, 
and make them run a little easier and a little smoother 
Even you and I can do that. — The Temperanos Leader 
and League Journal. 

. o . 

OAME OT rAGOOTf 



This gams requires a large room, or It csn be 
played With more freedom out of doors. A circle is 
formed, the players placed in pairs, lady standing in 
front of n gentleman, facing the centre. Each pair is 
railed a faggot. The players must be an even num- 
ber. The faggots being formed, two persons are 
chosen to chase, one running after tho other. The 
person pursued has the right to cross the clrole in 
e\ery direction, and for that reason the faggots must 
be wide enough apart for them to run easily around 
and among them. When the person who is being pur- 
sued does not wish to be caught and made to take the 
pla.:e of the chaser, he places himself In front of one 
of the faggots In the middle of the circle. Then this 
faggot is composed of three persons, which must not 
be. Tho one who finds himself Xo. 3 outside tha clrcl<* 
must th«n start to run to escape being caught. If 
caught, he takes the place cf the chaser, who lets htm 
run after him, or. If he prefers It. enters Into th* 
circle and places himself before a faggot, which pro- 
vides a new runner, who Is obliged to fly at once or 
fores anothar to run by placing hlmawU bsfore g, fa«- 



i 



Sunday, November 




i'OKIA DAILY eOLOJNIST 



w 



Trade Supplied bv T. S. Fry & Sons, Limited, Victoria. B. C. 



ft 






<-4 



CAN YOU INTELLIGENTLY TALK 

Lighting Fixtures 

WHEN YOU VISIT YOUR ARCHITECT? 

E concede to the architects of 

Victoria that they arc pretty 
well versed on lighting ques- 
tions. You will, however, when you build, 

differ fmm your architect's views time 
and again. How import ant is it that you 
should have very well-founded ideas of 
your own, as to the all-essential feature of 
lighting your building. 

Whether erecting a $2,000 Bungalow 
or $200,000 Office Building, it is almost 
equally essential that you give the light- 
ing question advance study. 

We are in closer touch with the cause 
— and effect — part of the fixture btiSB&ess 
than any other institution in our line. 

Our advice, our suggestion, our knowledge and experience and QUf de 
signs and showrooms are at vour disposal. Avail yourself ->f their valuable 

assistance. 



Hinton Electric Company 



911 Government Street 



Phone 2242 



MONEY MAKERS 

200 feet on Queen's Avenue, close to Douglas, at $275 per foot, 

on good terms. 
65 feet on Dallas Road, near Hotel, for $28,000, on good terms. 

TODD & HAY 

Phone 3347 615 Fort St. 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

TAKE NOTICE that the Corporation of the pity of Victoria intends to pass a Local Improvement? Assessment Bylaw for each of the 
undermentioned streets, assessing upon the properties in the schedules hereinafter mentioned the sums of money -for the, length of tint© set 

opposite each said lot as follows: < __ 

P-LAW No. 65 

Fort Street, from Douglas Street to Cook Street — Grading, Draining and Paving with Asphalt, Constructing Permanent Sidewalks of Con- 
crete, with Curbs and Gutters, on Both Sides of Said Street, also Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Laterals 



NAME OF OWNER 



Co. 



, Part 
Part 



F. R. T. 



d 

© 

s 

3 

DO 

Kirk Evelyn Gc-orgiana 

Brown, Annie M 

Luxton, Arthur P 

I.uxton, Arthur P 

Colbert Plum. & Heat. 
Milne, Dr. O. L. . 
Milne, Dr. G. U 
Gillespie & Hart 
Sayward, J. A. 
Say ward, .1. A. 
Stevens George 
Gascorgue, Col. !•' 

Dough ly, George 

Doughty, George 

Hamilton, Mary (Est.) 
Dclser, Max . . 
Hurdlck, N. T» 
Landsberg, _ 
Jstaneland Co.. 1 
McCann, Ge 
Lelser Max 
Colbert, John D. 
Holford, George .... 

Formah, James ....... 

Hague. H. and W. E. - . ...... , . . . » 

McLean, A. & »»'t,ti »'.«;,. **.... 

ww&^--9kwFu*k"^ •••••• 

Anaefaott, GHKinK H. >y; . . . . , . . . . Wi 

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•w«**«*4. •••»*• .E part 

»,* ft. 4 # • • i 



'Mm$&i> 




. .W part 
..Epart 

f'«2--jt ';:it 



Koenig, Mrs. 
Talt & I 

Drake . & 
Pen wftffi. 
Bolger, 
Garcln, 
McLaughlin 
Moore, R, 
Becker, C. 
SSehroeder, 

Fither, Luke 

Whlllana, Mrs. Dr W part 

Hulbert, Henry E part 

Pltber, Luke 

PIther, Luke 

Norman, Fanny A 

Todd, A. E 

Langley, Frances , .... 

Wylde, Alice E. 

Becker. H. C F., et al > 

Becker, H. C. F., et al 

Howard, Mary 

Booth, Mary Ann 

Booth, Mary Ann 
Zlmmer, E. J. . . 
ZImmer. E. J. 

Ford. Clitt ' , 

Smith, Kd. C, et al. 

Crotty, Henry S. 

Raymond, John » 

McMillan, Kliza ; 

Hay ward & Dods , 

Catterrall, Thomas 

Chadwlck. James G E part 

M'-lntosh, W. D. W part 

Cox, Ellen J 

Holford, George ......' 

Lelser, Max 

H "Men, Dr. D. B. E, Epart 

Brehtel & Lennox Wpart 

Bechtcl & Lennox ........Epart 

i lae, R. C. W part 

Hardisty, Joseph 

Hardisty & Courtney 

Small, A. „. ., 

Greenshaw, E. E .Epart 

Wustern Lands, Ltd W part' 

Western Lands, Ltd e part 

Ford Clift ;. .W part 

Brown, Charles R 

"Hryvrii. Charles R 

Gillespie & Hart 

Sinclair, E. B ...Epart 

Iroudfoot, Dr. H Wpart 

Bowker, Mary 

Bowker, Mary 

Haynes, A. E 

iii ins, A. E Epart 

Hall, Mary L. w part 

Haynes & Small Part 

Western Lands,' Ltd Part 

Jones, Dr. O. M. ■• 

Jones, Dr. O. M Epart 

,ng, Thomas H 97 part 

Leeming, Thomas H E part 

Campbell, Duncan E Wpart 



778 
779 
770 
7S0 
781 



H 
16 
IS 
IS 
IS 



lots i t 



so, 
so. 



1011 


17 


1018 


17 


MH8 


17 


1012 


17 


1011 


17 


1010 


■&fflp 


1009 


. 17 


1009 


17 


1008 


17 


1007 


17 


1006 


17 


1016 


20 


1017 


20 


1018 


2fr 


1019 


20 


1020 


20 


1021 


20 


1022 


' 20 


1023 


20 


)m:m 


20 


1025 


20 


762 


21 


781 


21 


742 


21 


741 


21 


722 


21 


721 


21 


702 


21 


701 


21 


701 


21 


682 


21 


681 


21 


271 


22 


272 


22 


273 


2° 


273 


22 


271 


.22 


275 ■ ' 


22 


276 


22 


277 


22 


277 


22 


278 


22 


278 


22 


279 


22 


280 


22 


69 


23 


70 


23 


70 


23 


71 


23 


72 


23 


73 


28 


74 


23 


74 


23 


53 


23 


53 


23 


51 


23 


55 


23 


65 


23 


56 


23 


56 


23 



•SO, > 
30... 

30. 
60. . 
60. 
60. 
80. 
30. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
GO. 
SO. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60.' 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
30. 
30. 
60. 
60 
60. 
30. 
30. 
80. 
' .30. 

r»o: 

60. 
60. 
30. 
27. 

3. 
57. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
30. 
30. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
30. 
30. 

8. 
52. 
60. 
'20. 
40. 
2 2. 
38. 

4797. 



TTJT 

9.93 
9.92 
Ml 



C 
535.80 
i. ::, SO 
895.80 
596 tu 

237. 90 
107 60 
59E 20 

E96 20 

595.20 
E9fi |Q 

695.20 
595.20 
695.30 
297.60 
297.60 
596.20 
695.20 
595.20 

:tfll3r 

297,60 
297.60 
595.20 
695.20 
695.20 
696.20 

50B.30 

396.80 
198.40 
198.40 
396.80 



o 
o 

a 
!r ° 

y. a 

27.20 
27.20 

2 7.20 

27.20 



27.20 

2 7.20 

27.20 
27.20 



a 
o 

k| 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



i 




87.10 
17.80 

27.20 



20.00 



-*9%~ 

M» 

9.92 
9.92 
9.92 
9.92 
9.92 
9.92 

9.92 
9.92 
9.9.2 

9.9 2 

9.9 2 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.S2 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.9 

9. 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

J9.93 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

S.93 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

8.93 

8.93 

8.93 

9.92 

9.92 

9.9 2 

9 92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9.92 

9. 92 

9.92 

7.93 

7.93 

9.92 

9.92 

7.y3 



297.60 
297.60 

IK 

* J SjSMS*- 



27.20 



Tnr 



20.00 

8 0.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 



© 

8535.80 
688.0% 
615.20 

6 7 2.10 
2. : .7.90 
364,80 
H2n.20 
KM 5.20 
Kn-2.40 
61 W0 
6.15.20 
6*6.30 
2.40 
642.40 
297.60 
344.80 
« 12.(0 
615.20 
615.20 
615.20 
317.60 
317.60 
615,20 
635.20 
652.40 
636.20 
40 

218.40 
198.40 



595.20 

297.60 

297.60 

695.20 

595.20 

595.20 

297.60 

297.60 

595.20 

595.20 

595.20 

595.20 

595.20 

595.20 

595.24) 

595.20 

595.20 

595.20 

598.20 

595.20 

695.20 

595.20 

595.20 

596.20 

595.20 

596.20 

696. 80 

595.20 

297.60 

297.60 

595.20 

586.80 

297.60 
297.60 
297. 60 
29;. 60 
5-95.20 
595.20 
595.20 
267.90 
241.10 

26.80 
565.45 
595.20 
595.20 
595.20 
297.60 
297.60 
595.20 
595.20 
595.20 
297.60 
297.60 

79.35 
615.85 
476.80 
158.60 
396 SO 
218.25 
301.35 



20.00 

'" . 20.00 

27.20 20.00 

''gf "f "'. ' . ' *M» 

sr,to . 10.00 

37.20 

20,00 
27.20 20.00 

20.00 
27.20 20.00 



TtW 



<M t .', ■; . ■ 
10.00 . 



%& 



10.00 

10.00 



27.20 
27.20 



27.20 
27.20 
27:20 
27.20 

27.20 
27.20 
27.20 
27.20 



27.20 
27.20 



27.20 
•27.20 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20. 0( 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
IK. no 

20.00 ' 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

; 20.00 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
•20.00 

20.00 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 

20.00 
20.00 
.20.00 
20.00 
20.00 

20.00 




Ki.oO 

10.00 
50.00 



20.00 



f47.0f-4.16 870.40 1740.00 
City's share 



10.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 



10.00 



340.00 



Total 



297.6' 
317.60 
615.20 
652.40 

65fcM»^ 
642.40 
334.80 
317.60 
652.40 
615.20 
652.40 
297.60 
324.80 
652.40 
616.20 
615.20 
595.20 
642.40 
64 2.40 
642.40 
652.40 
615.20 
642.40 
652.40 
642.40 
692.40 
615.20 
615.20 
642.40 
642.40 
615.20 
635.20 
635.20 
297.60 
317.60 
615.20 
615.20 
' 66C.80 
31 7.60 
317.60 
324.80 
317.60 
642.40 
615.20 
615.20 
277.90 
261.10 
26.80 
595.45 
615.20 
625.20 
625.20 
327.60 
307.60 
615.20 
615.20 
615.20 
327.60 
297.H0 
99.35 
535.85 
605. SO 
178.60 
416.80 
218.25 
321.35 

60,004.55 
14,999.00 

$65,003.55 



Si 

u «4 

el ft. 



9 3 
ft C 

39.40 

42.90 
45.25 
4».45 
19.00 
26.10 
46.00 
45 25 
48.00 
45.25 
45.25 
46.75 
47.25 
47.25 
21.90 
25.40 
47.25 
45.25 
45.25 
45.25 
23.35 
23.35 
45.25 
46.75 
48.00 
46.75 
47.26 
31.95 
16.15 
14.60 
33.40 



4S.00 
22.00 
23.36 

46.25 
48.00 
48.20 
47.25 
24.65 
23.85 
4.8.00 
■15.26 
48.00 
22.00 
23.90 
48.00 
45.25 
45.26 
4 3.80 
47.25 
4 7.25 
47.25 
48.00 
45.25 
47.25 
48.00 
47.25 
50.90 
45.25 
45.25 
47.25 
47.26 
45.25 
46.75 
46.75 
22.00 
23.35 
45.25 
45.25 
40.90 
23.35 
23.35 
23.90 
23.35 
4 7.25 
45.25 
45.25 
20.45 
19.20 
2.00 
43.80 
45.25 
46.00 
46.00 
24.10 
22:60 
45.36 
45.25 
45.25 
24.10 
22.00 
7.30 
39.40 
37.26 
13.15 
30.70 
16.10 
23.65 

3679.10 



Si 

3 a 

9 9 
b>< 

788.00 

858.011 

905.00 

889.00 

380.00 

522.00 

920.00 

906.00 

960.00 

906.00 

905.00 

885.00 

946.00 

946.00 

438.00 

608.00 

945.00- 

906.00- 

905.00 

905.00 

467.00 

467.00 

90 5.00 

985.00 

960.00 

935.00 

845.00 

639.00 

388,00 

292.00 

668.00 

»««.00 

440.00 

467.00' 

905.00 

960.00 

964.00 

945.00 

493.00 

467.00 

960.00 

905.00 

960.00 

440.00 

478.00 

960.00 

906.00 

905.00 

876.00 

945.00 

945.00 

945.00 

960.00 

905.00 

945.00 

960.00 

945.00 

1018.00 

905.00 

905.00 

945.00 

945.00 

905.00 

935.00 

935.00 

440.00 

467.00 

905.00 

905.00 

818.00 

467.00 

467.00 

478.00 

467.00 

945.00 

905.00 

905.00 

409.00 

384.00 

40.00 

876.00 

905.00 

920.00 

920.00 

482.00 

452.00 

905.00 

906.00 

906.00 

482.00 

440.00 

• 146.00 

78S.00 

745.00 

268.00 

614.00 

332.00 

473.00 

78,582.00 



BY-LAW No. 191. 

Pine Street from Craigflower Road to Dominion Road— Grading, Draining and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, and Constructing 

and Gutters on Both Sides of Said Street, also Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Laterals. 



Curbs 



— *. 



~m. 



c 

o 

NAME Ol" OWNER « 

• > 

1 

3 
W 

atapnen*, r. h 

Allen, J oh 11 

Brenen, Henry s 

Brenen, Henry S S.E. pt 

Hull, Kate Helen s.W. pt 

Way Chan and Gow Chong 

Harper, J. N 

liarpvi. Mabel M • • • 

Dougiaa, Jamea 

Hibbs, Victoria S.E. pt 

Gray, Muhel 8.W. pt 

ateVejai, V?: s. pt 

Miens, Joaeph H. i>t 

Huitart, W. S 

Jamea, Henry 

Gerow, Augustus 

McGownn, Mrs. Jeanle 

Sayward, Joseph A 

Butter, Bolomon 

Robinson, William 

Kluhr, Theodore 

McKay, Peter H P*rt 

Cotsfprd, .1 i ,art 

Cotaford, .1 

Coleman, P 

Andrews, Edmont, W 

Belbeck, Saunders w. pt 

Wiseman, John W E. pt 

Robertson, Mrs. J. it W. pt 

Dick, W. B N.E. pt 

Anderson. K. H 

]{, adlngi Joseph T. ; 

Roper, Rlchara . , 

McKi'iizte, Small A Part 

McKenzie, A. 3 P» r t 

McKen^ie, A. J *' ar J 

Plummer, Fred P art 

Burns. T. 8 

Painter. James E. Senior 

Fainter, Jamea E. Senior 

Todd, John 

Cave, Anne 

Mould, Walter T. 

Painter. Alice S 



^1 

3 

4 

6 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

i 1 

11 

1 

2 
3 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 
8 
12 
13 
15 
16 
17 
18 
21 
21 
22 
22 
25 
26 
12 
13 
13 
14 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
2i> 
21 



o 

o 

5 

18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
L8-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13r.l7 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 
13-17 



18 

13 
13 
18 



•17 
17 
■17 
22 



18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 
18-22 



d 

o 

i 

■r. 
10 
10 
10 

10 

10 

ill 

10 

111 

10 
10 

10 
10 
.10 
10 

10 
10 

10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

111 

10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



c 
o 

b 



160.0 

mi. II 
60.0 

311.0 
311.0 
80.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
30.0 
30.0 
55.0 
65.0 
5 5.0 
55.0 
65.0 
55.0 
65.0 
55.0 
55.0 
148.0 
45.8 
30.2 
55.0 
65.0 
66.0 
58.9 

r,K.:i 

58.8 
68.9 
55.0 
56.0 
60.0 
40.0 
20.0 
20.0 
40.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 . 
12^0.0 < 

8628.10 



c 

u 2 
v y 

an 

*-> o 
e o 
Mb 

$3.42% 
3.12% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.12% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.4 2% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
2.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
3.42% 
842% 
8.42% 
8.42% 
8.42% 



3 

c 

41 

E 

_. « 

* ft 
I-. O 

a, t- 

c ? 
o c 

c£ 

$548.00 
205.50 
206.50 
102.75 
102.75 
205.50 
206 50 
206.50 
205.50 
102.75 
102.75 
18X35 
188.35 
188.35 
188.35 
1S8.35 
18S.86 
188.35 
188.35 
18886 

506.90 

168, 10 
103^30 
188.35 
188.88 
188.86 
201.20 
201.20 
201.20 
201.20 
18M.35 
188.86 
205.50 
137.00 
68.50 
68.50 
137.00 
205.50 
205.50 
206.50 
205.50 
205.50 
205.50 
411.00 

86680.80 



f c 
if c 

HI o 



21.98 



21.98 
65.94 



21.98 
21.98 

21.98 
21 98 

21.98 

21.98 

21.98 
21.98 



21.98 

21.98 
21.9.8 



a w 

u — 

Q 5 

11 

u a 
v o 
a, O 

$11.40 

5.70 

5.70 

6.70 

6.70 

5.70 

6.70 

6.70 

6.70 

6.70 

6.70 

6.70 

5.70 

5.70 

5.70 

5.70 

6.70 

5.7 

5.70 

6.70 

11.40 



5.70 
5.70 
5.70 
5.7 
6.70 
ft. 7 
6.70 
5.70 
5.70 
11.40 
5.70 
5.70 

6.70 
5.70 
6.70 
6. 70 
6.70 
5.70 
6.70 
6.70 



n> 



-9 
$10.00 



lO.OO 



10.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 



88(1.68 8260.80 
City's Share . 



10.00 



10.00 



♦ 100.00 



9 

$669.40 
211.20 
243.18 
108.45 
108.45 
211.20 
211.20 
211.20 
211.20 
106.45 
108.45 
194.06 
194.05 
194.06 
194.06 
194.06 
205.46 
194.06 
216.03 
194.06 
694.24 
166.40 
113.30 
226.08 
226.03 
194.06 
228.88 
228.88 
228.88 
216.90 
216.02 
194.05 
238.88 
164.68 
74.20 
68.60 
142.70 
211.20 
248.18 
81120 
811.10 
248.18 
811.20 
488.68 

$9168 81 

$2170.87 



<u — 

*s 

c 5 

r^^ 
$70.20 
26.05 
80.00 
13.35 
13.36 
26.05 
26.05 
26.05 
26.05 
13.86 
13.35 
23.95 
23.95 
23.95 
23. »5 
28. 95 
26.16 
2R.96 
26.66 
23.96 
78.80 
19.80 
13.95 
27.85 
27.66 
23.96 
28.20 
28.20 
28.20 
26.76 
26.65 
23.95 
29.45 
20.80 
9.15 
8.46 
17.«» 
26.05 
20.00 
26.01 
86.05 
20.00 
88.01 
54.10 



Si- 
sg 

Is 

$702.00 ; 
260.60 
800.00 
133.50 
133.60 
260.50 
260.60 
260.60 
260.60 
133.60 
138.60 
239.60 
239.60 
239.50 
288.60 
289.60 
261.50 
289.50 
266.60 
239.50 , 
738.00 
193.00 . 
139.50 
878.60 
378.60 
289.00. 
282,00 , 
288.00 
882.00 
287.60 
268.59 
339.60 
294.60 
203.00 

• 1.60 , 

•4,10 
17C00 
3I0.80 ' 

soo'.oo v, 

>«0.I0,( 
••0A«v, t 

Sol! 



1164.70 11647.04J 



T«»tal 1, 



$H,M«.1» 



fak 



^*^^-^- 



"^'-■--•-^-■-■• : — -— •-— 



jmimamm 



tm 



Continued on Page ia 



8> 



1 . 



12 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, Nov«mb»r 3, 1912 



Tbs B«ffUmlBf of tts mad 

In a recent address 81r Wilfred Lau- 
rler referred to the resignation of Mr. 
Monk from the cabinet as being "the 
beginning or tn« end." says The Ottawa 
Cltlsen. He meant to Imply, and In 
fact plainly stated, his belief that the 
action of the minister of public works 
indicated the first crack In the Con- 
servative structure, and the beginning 
of the process of disintegration of 
Premier Borden's administration. 

Without speculation as to the pau- 
city of Sir Wilfred Laurler's claims to 
legitimate prophecy, it may be recog- 
nized that an unintended truth is 
expressed in the criticism. The re- 
tirement of Mr. Monk ,if it meant 
anything at all, signified the "begin- 
ning of the end" of that policy of 
temporizing compromise in regard to 
the concrete relations of Canada to 
the British empire which has thus 
far marked the actions of Canada. 

It is undeniable that tho attempts 
of the Liberal administration to »olve 
the problem and meet the duty of 
empire defence were pitifully small 
and wholly ineffective. The creation 
of a naval policy which consisted of 
the purchase of two small cruisers, 
and the attempt to solve the problem 
off the rocks, was 



the answer made to the empire's need 
in a day that calls for super-Dread- 
iloughts and the experience of genera- 
tions. It was a puttering policy, al- 
ways half-hearted and a compromise 
at bottom. 

But the end of this kind of a pol- 
icy is in sight. The beginning of the 
end, as Sir Wilfrid has unwittingly 
said, is now in sight. Wlun even 
a cabinet minister realizes that the 
determination of the administration tC 
take decisive action in the matter, and 
that his offical protest will be" of no 
avail, it is evident tl.at the new pulley 
has been decided. This ROW policy is 
no half-hearted one. It Is no ama- 
teur attempt to build a nice little 
home-made navy. It is the contri- 
bution, through mediums of < SI - 
ence and efficiency, to the scientific 
structure of na nee, having full 

reitS In the ability of Great Britain 
to expend a defence fund to the 
greatest advantage. 

The end of playing with this prob- 
lem has come. With delightful con- 
sistency, though probably quite unin- 
tentional, the founders of the Canadian 
nayy called their craft -the Rainbow 
and the Niobe. The Rainbow is most 
in evidence after a storm, and even 
then, 1% $i only an optical delusion, 
while Niobe. tho readers of- Greek 



ll Mj l ^_ l , l| i 11 ^ I l .l. l 

•'' ■■ i lM . ll ' l " ' l i III '' I 




^r 



mytholosy will remember, found fame 
in her angering the gods, resulting in 
the slaughter of her offspring and, ul- 
timately her being changed into a 
rock. Herein was prophecy unguessed 
The rainbow-promise and the rocks 
have been most In evidence. 

The day of puttering and comprom- 
ise has gone. From every evidence 
that may be gathered, it is clear that 
the naval policy to be declared by 
Mr. Borden will not suggest any half- 
measures. The full weight of the 
burden of imperial duty will be shoul- 
dered. If the money is needed, money 
will be 8iven. If an emergency exists, 
It will be adequately met. If union 
with the empire means responsibility, 
it win be recognized and undertaken, 

If circumstances will not admit of the 
submitting to the people of a policy 
that demands expedition, the parlia- 
ment, acting rightly on behalf of the 
people, will take the action that duty 
demands. 

Sir Wilfrid was right. The begin- 
ning of the end has come. Or may 
It not be better said, the end o£. the 
beginning? A." new era dawns, un- 
consciously predicted by the dreamer 
of the day before. It Is the era of Im- 
perial unity, with ail flfct- »t Jnvolves 
upon the part of Canada of Wit ana 
of treasure. 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page II 



BY-LAW No. 115 

Grading, Draining and Paving View Street, from Blanchard Street to Cook Street, with Asphalt, 
with Curbs and Gutters on Both Sides of Said Street, between Vancouver Street and Cook Street, 

Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Mains. 



and Constructing Permanent Sidewalks, 
and Providing Lateral Connections for 



NAME OF OWNER 





_^_ — — 



«ii*W«- 



~ 







— A t 201 Times Block 

95x115, DOUBLE CORNER ON COOK STREET, near park and sea— This is the <*|ap<-sj. 
-TTfeaff em the stree t for seml-bus l ricSs p r ope rt y. Cash: $ Z3tt . t Price ,-. . .?♦ ;..;.♦ ♦ •,* * * W < $8»<M) 



NORTH HAMPSHIRE ROAD--#our lots.'ifcftr Oak Bay ^enue, 50x120 each. We can sell 
these en bloc for $1500 each, at one-third cash. Do you realize the way values are jumping in 
Oak Bay? These lots are in the first block from Oak Bay Avenue. Some discerning invest- 
or will grab these. - ,. ] ■-.'.; 

VIEW STREET. 120x120, just above Blanchard, revenue producing— This is adjoining the new 
Oddfellows' Hajl, now being built. If you are looking for a good, solid investment in inside 
business property, come and talk this one over with us. Terms can be arranged. Pricejs 
.;......., ... .;,.. jp/D,uuu 

RICHMOND AND SECOND CORNER— 54x100, on, Mt. Tolmie carline, just outside tjejule 
and a half circle. This is good buying. Third cash. Price $1600 

BAY STREET— Two lots, each 42x130, near Asquith, on north side of street. Bay Street is 
assured a carline. This pair of lots is a splendid building site, and entirely free from rock. 
Terms of one-third cash, balance to be arranged. Can be delivered at, for the two. $3350 

60x100 CORNER ON FINLAYSON STREET, near Cook Street— Paved street, high and ^clrv, 
free from rock. One-third cash. Price • .......... . .SploOO 

PLEASANT AVENUE, Oak Bay— 55x130, near McNeill Avenue. This is good buying in this 
choice locality. One-third cash, 6, 12, 18 months. Price • • • $1550 

FOURTH STREET, just off Mt. Tolmie Road— 100x150, with three-roomed shack and chicken 
run, rented for $10 per month. Third cash. For quick sale, at .$2500 

JOHN A. TURNER & COMPANY 

Room 201, Times Block 



genClCS come unawares 










An A utomobilist may J#ef> his head 
and do the right thing at the right 
moment, but what is the use if his 
equipment is against him f 

MOTORISTS DREAD SKIDDING. A 

greasy street—a sudden application ot 
the brake—and, without a reliable non- 
skid tire, a catastrophe may result. * 

THE GOODYEAR NO-RIM-GUT TIRE CANNOT SKID. The 

angles and edges of these blocks grip the road with a tenacity which 
resists all tendency to skid. 



\m 



The diamond-shaped blocks of pure 
rubber are broadened at the base, dis- 
tributing the weight of the car over 
the whole tread surface. 
The tread is alive-it is flexible. Resil- 
ience is not lost. That is where the 
Goodyear differs from those with bars, 



letters and other projections, which 
deaden the tire and cause the jolting so 
fatal to the adjustment of your motor. 
As the centre blocks become worn the 
side blocks come into action as perfect 
skid-preventers, giving non-skid effic- 
iency to the last. 



No-Rim-Cutting 

Nearly one in four tires is ruined by 
rim-cuttin*. NO-RIM-CUT tires 
•re held in pleoe by the round sur- 
face of the side rind and cannot rim- 
cut, actually saving 23%. 

10# Oversize 

Goodyear tires are made 10% orar- 
slse •- provide for overloading — 
•xtra equipment. This lessen* the 
•banc* of a blow-out, and reduce* 
Vibration. With the average mt 
this add* 25% to the mileage. 



H 



No- * Rim - Cut 

Non - Skid. - Tires 



Look At Our Phenomenal Sales 

To date, over a million tires-rcpraaentinff aome 200,000 
Cart. That means we have the confidence of men who 
know. 



Why not investigate this for yourself P You would be interested hi our 
book— "How to select an AutomobileTire." Ask us to send you a oopy. 

Tbe Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company of Canada. Limited 

Hee.d Office, Toronto Factory, BowsMumlln . 7S 

75x fort Street, Victoria 



Y. M. C. A 

V M r. .\ 

Phelps, Mrs. }•;. . . . 
Phillips, Mary Ann 
Phillips, -Mary Ann 

Col. Lodge, Nil 2, i. i). 



<). F. 



Col. Lodge, xo. 8, I. o. o. i'. 

l.asman, Mark 

wiiham. Walter 

Whittlnjrton, Brnortt \v 

Qunn, Elizabeth $ 

Hartley, Catherine (Est.) 

Gisoombe, Jno. Robert 

■ try (Est.) 

Johnson, E. IS. C. and Sarah J. 

'(_ • - - X * •••■*•*■•■*••• 
5# Xw JL . • «***>• •■*•••• 

xtmB&&ty* •' 

'Wf!f*M«. •«■*§»< M. ............ 

Rennie & Taylor ..;,.» 

Luxton, Arthur P. ....... «»•,.'■.» 

QuagUotU, L. J. and Mrs t , *..u 

Lawrence, '0v-$fc. . , ,', . . k .,-*.. ^?. . 
La*/rence, 0. ft. ...... +£* , v • 

Lawrence, O. B. ..,,«,.t,v>. . 
Levy, H. E. ...... ," t .u {«».*••• 

Levy. II. !•;. ....... s. ..... — • 

Jones, Thomas Henry »»..%.. 
Hayward. Charley '<:.*>£.. t ^?&, 
Clarke, Joseph ......... v. .. ; 

Fleishman. Jacob r. - • «' 



304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
W ])t 811 
Ept 311 
312 
818 
792 
793 




• 794 

C , 795 



M 
o 
o 

3 
u 
u 
11 
11 

H 
11 
11 
• 11 
It 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 



A 

o 



9 

41 

s, 

60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
CO. 
26. 
36. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 



c 


fcU< 


41 w 


5 % 


13.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.76 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.7.5 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.75 


3.7fr 


8.75 


8.76 


3.75 


§& 


m 






»,.i » •> t i +*w 



Anna 



Msleraof Bi Anno .„....*. 

Sisters of St Anna . . 

Hay, Rachael ..,,...,........:..... ^. . 

Brown, H. H., et. al. •«..•..««.•.. « .. . . 

" ts of Pythias. . . . »v* . . ..» • • 



*• m 

../,...; Wpt988 

, «>**\i •■'•'.» Ept 888 

• » (i t <.^V » • •'« ) 987 



c 

« 

E 

II 

8225.00 
225.00 
226.00 
225.00 
22*. 00 
225.00 
225.00 
03.75 
U1-.26 
225.00 
226.00 
226.00 
225.00 
226.00 
225.00 

PJiias'.oo 

225.00 
226.00 
225.4)0 
225.00 
345.00 
346.00 
345,00 
345.00 
345.00 
145.00 
346.00 
172.50 
172.50 
M5.00 
346.00 



i 



" g 

a) O 



29.00 



eg 

S J 

3 o 

ceo 
820.50 
20.50 
20.60 
20.60 
80.60 
20.50 
80.50 



80, 

20.! 



Spencer, W. J. . . ...... 

Qunn, Elizabeth- S. . ■ 
Hartery, Catherine (Est) . 
Black, John W 
Nodek, , Cerllne . 
Richards, Mary 
Shotbolt, W. R. and L. 
Shotbolt, W. R. and L. 
Moore, Fred, et. al. . 

Christie, Jessie G 

MaUery, Sarah \V)i .... 
Bownass, William 
Bownass, William .... 
Clarke. Robert P.- 
Levy, H. E. .... 
Levy, H. E. 'jjjf&n, 
Levy, H: E, 
Clarke, J 
Char! 

Charles, Mary A. 
Charles, Mary A 
Raymond, John . 
Le Roy, Frank . 



;."*"'' 




29.00 

.29.00 
29.00 



20.50 
20.60 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.60 
20.50 
80.60 
20.50 

20.50 



b'8 



16.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 
16.00 



15.00 
16.00 



$2 45.50 
2 (6 5 

2 60.511 

•J IS ..'i 

e r,o 

I 15.50 
260.50 
93.75 
168.75 
260.50 
225.00 
245.50 
260.50 
260.50 
245.60 



E 

£* 

o _ 

1 1 

830.25 
30.25 
32.10 
30.25 
35.70 
30.25 
32.10 
11.56 
30 ..5 
32.10 
27.75 
30.25 

32.10 
30.26 



White, {onaAna i '...-,,,„»t.^v*.'«U 

S tandard S t»am Latittltll^^l^ ?*ii«^Sf* 
Mulligan, . aeorge ■. • vc^imViljiiSS>;|^ 
Reld. J. T.. et. aL^Jlk^P^ *4m&*m& 




225 

112.50 

112.50 

225.00 

225.00 



326.00 

326.00 
225.00 

225.00 
225.00 
225.00 
225.00 
225.00 

25.00 
112.50 
112.60 
225.0 
225.0 
112.60 

12.60 
225.00 
225.00 
345.00 
346.00 
345.00 
345.00 
346.00 
345.00 
346.00 
345.00 
345.00 
345.00 



,^Wftt«C?' .. Jo.50 

■»-*' te' ; '-ris-*j% 20.50 

20,50 

20.60 

20.50 

20.50 



29.00 
.00 



29.00 
29.00 

29.00 

29.00 
29.00 
29.00 



20.50 
20.50 
20.50 

20.50 
20.60 
41.00 
20.60 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 
20.50 



3600 Feet 








$15,900 $435.00 $1,209.50 
City's share 



lift 



15.00 

15.00 
15.00 



16.0°, 

30.00 
16.00 

30.00 
15.00 

15.00 
16.00 
16.00 



$480.00 



Total 



245.50 

260.50 

245.60 

245.50 

245.50 

245.50 

260.50 

245.50 

127.50 

177.00 

245.50 

274.50 

112.50 

183.00 

260.50 - 

266.00 

424.50 

409.60 

395.50 

409.50 

365.50 

409.50 

409.50 

409.60 

365.50 

365.50 

18.024.60 
$ 8776. 98 

$26,801.48 



27.78 
30.25 

32.10 

30.25 

30.25 

30.25 

30.25 

32.10 

30.25 

15.70 

21.85 

30.25 

33.85 

13.85 

16.40 

32.10 

32.80 

52.35 

50.50 

48.80 

50.60 

45.06 

50.50 

50.50 

60.50 

45.05 

45.05 

$2,221.80 



*> E 

I* 

3 

o c 

302.50 
302.50 
821.00 
302.50 
357.00 
30 2.50 
321.00 
115.50 
805.50 
321.00 
277.60 
302.50 
321.00 
821.00 
302.50 
357.00 
302.50 
302.50 
302.50 
302.50 
302.50 
460.50 
605.00 
605.00 
506.0*; 
469.00 
505.00 
469.00 
212.50 
23S.00 
450.50 
606.00 
MLOO 
133.50 
164.00 
321.00 
302.60 
—221.00 
277.50 
302.50 
321.00 
302.50 
302.50 
302.60 
302.50 
321.00, 
302.5 
157.00 
218.50 
302.50 
338.50 
138.50 
164.00 
321.00 
328.00 
523.50 
605.00 
488.00 
505.00 
450.50 
505.00 
505.00 
505.00 
450.50 
450.50 

$22,218.00 




BY-LAW No. an. 



Harbinger Avenue, from Richardson Street to Fairfield Road— Grading, Draining and Paving with a Light Standard Asphalt Pavement, 

and Constructing Surface Drains and Water Laterals. 






c 



NAME OF OWNER 



Irwin, Sarah E. ......... 

Robinson, Anna M. ...... 

Brown. George S. .... .... 

Reld, John 1>. 

Halls, Sydney J •••' 

Dowswell, Robert ........ 

Gordon, Annie J 

Moore & Wlilttlngton 

Moore, William 

Lewis, Edward A 

Cameron, Bertha, W 

Fawcett, Thomas D. 

Cameron, U. O 

i >rr, James W 

Manlry. MlSS Adelaide 

Mauley, Miss Adelaide 

Lemon & Oonnason 

Mitchell, C N •■•• 

Mitchell, C. N 

Dill, James P 

Dill, James P 

Merrill, Mi- S * May B 

Wi ntworth, James E. and Ella 
Bfowir, George H 

Bi n aptvnz 

Borde, A 

Gee. William II 

Pontlflx, H. r 

Easton, William 

riaskctt. MiSj H. M 

AshWell, Allan S 

i u-nny. Eleanor s 

M.,r. . .lames 

Taylor, William 

O'Keefe, Agnes 

Clarke. James B 

Clarke. James S 




11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
18 
17 
18 
19 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
23 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 



27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 



Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fa*r field 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
i- airfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fnlrfleld 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fnlrfleld 



v 

50. 
50. 
50. 
50. 
50. 
60. 
60. 
50. 
50. 
60. 
60. 
50. 
50. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
50. 
60. 
54.10 
60. 
50. 
50. 
60. 
60. 
4 5. 
55. 
50. 
50. 
50. 
50. 
60. 
50. 
50. 
50. 

5o: 

50. 
80.3 



c 
t. o 

*> o 

a o 

$3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3. OS 
3.08 
3.08 
3. OS 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.03 
8.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.03 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 
3.08 



1885.1 



s 
E 

' -- 

u ? 
c 2" 

u£ 

$151.00 
154.00 
164.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 
184.00 
164.00 
154.00 
154.00 
164.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154,00 
164.00 
1«*,00 
168.85 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 

i64jo;3L v '* 

154.00 
138.60 
168.40 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 

114*0 

1*4.00 
J54.00 
154.00 
154.00 
154.00 
247.15 

$5806.00 
City's share 



u 

Q 



s * 

* s 

u c 
a o 
toO 

$15.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15.2 1 

15.24 

15.24 

15.21 

15.24 

15.24 

16.24 

16.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15.24 

15,24 



15.24 
15.24 
16.24 
15.24 
16.24 
1-8.24 
1824 
15.24 
16.24 
16.24 
15.24 
16.24 
16.24 
15.24 
15.24 
15.24 
16.24 



a 

a 



S a 



(10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 



10.00 



10.00 
10.04) 

10.00 



$533.40 $140.00 



Total 



H 
$169.24 
169.24 
169.24 
169.24 
179.24 
179.24 
169.24 
169.24 
169.24 
179.24 
179.24 
169.24 
169.24 
169.24 
189.24 
179.24 
169.24 
179.24 
178.85 
154.00 
169.24 
179.24 
1R9.24 
179.24 
163.84 
184.64 
169.24 
179.24 
169.24 
169.24 
J 79.24 
179.24 
160.24 
179.24 
160.24 
169.24 
262.39 

$6479.40 
$1587.34 

$8066.74 



9 — . 
*h a 

c a 
H^ 
$20.85 
20.85 
20.85 
20.85 
22.10 
22.10 
20.85 
20.85 
20.86 
22.10 
22.10 
20.85 
20.85 
20.85 
20.85 
22.10 
20.85 
22.10 
22.05 
19.00 
20.85 
22.10 
20.85 
22.10 
20.20 
22.76 
20.86 
22.10 
20.85 
20.85 
22.10 
22.10 
20.86 
22.10. 
20.85 
20.85 
32.35 

$798.55 



3 | 

0) »>» 

II 

$208.50 
208.50 
208.50 
20S.50 
221.00 
221.00 
208.50 
20.8.50 
208.50 
221.00 
221.00 
208.50 
208.50 
208.50 
208.50 
221.00 
208.60 
221.00 
220.50 
190.00 
208.50 
221.00 
208.60 
221.00 
202.00 
227.50 
208.50 
221.00 
208.50 
208.50 
221.00 
221.00 
208.50 
221.00 
208.50 
308.50 
823.50 

17986.50 



BY-LAW No. 344. 
Montreal Street, from Kingston Street to Michigan Street— Gradin g, Draining and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, and^Constructing 
Curbs and Gutters on Both Sides of Said Street, also Lateral Connections to Sewers, Surface Drains and Water Mains. 



i 

NAME OF OWNER 5 

s 

3 
00 

Walker, Walter 

Walker, Walter 

Owens, Capt. W. F> 

LeRoy. Frank 

Thompson, Mrs. Joyce N. part 

Rivers, Ronald C. part 

Dobie, Roy L s - P ftrt 

.lease. Matilda 

Holland, Annie 18 

Pappapavler, Anna 17 

Borrowes, Mrs. G. J 16 

Kerr, Donald E 16 

Kerr, Donald E 14 



3 

1933 
1934 
1961 
1962 
1318 
1318 
1318 
1310 
955*1304 

965 A 1304 

966 A 1304- 
955 & 1304 
966 A 1304 









B 




e 




M 




o 


c 

A) »- 

at, 

4. W 


C 
9 

s 

go 


sj 

c 
o 

v a 


"2 5 


d 

a 
o 

u i 

a, c 


| 

5 


1 


*> 


C O. 


fc a 


<- a 


* a 


Cfl O 


g E 


« o 

too 


3 O 

m O 


t5 ° 


86 


120. 


$4.09 


$490.80 


$42.70 


$25.10 


$20.00 


65 


120. 


4.09 


490.80 


64.05 


25.10 


20.00 


86 


121.4 


4.09 


496.25 




12.55 




66 


121.4 


4.09 


496.26 




25.10 


10.00 


44 


40.5 


4.09 


166.30 




12.55 




44 


40.6 


4.09 


165.30 


21.35 


12.66 


10.00 


44 


40.5 


4.09 


165.30 








44 


121.4 


4.09 


498.25 


2135 


12.66 


20.00 


9 44 


48. 


4.09 


198.80 








9 44 


48. 


4.09 


196 30 




12.55 




9 44 


48. 


4.09 


196.80 




12.66 




9 44 


48. 


4.09 


1M.S0 


21.86 


12.65 


10.00 


9 44 


32. 


4.09 


J 180.90 




1 


__ 



149.1 



- - 



ft.S82.36 $170.30 $163.15 
City's share 



$90.00 



o 
H 

$678.60 

599.95 

608.80 

631.35 

177.85 

209.20 

166.80 

660.15 

196.80 

208.85 

208.85 

240.20 

180.90 

$4,806.80 
1.279.99 





a 


*l 


a 


if 


8- 

a a 


il 


II 


ii 


$71.35 


$713.50 


74.00 


740.00 


62.76 


•27.60 


65.55 


•56.60 


21.96 


219.60 


26.80 


258.041 


20.40 


204.00 


67.85 


•7 a. to 


34.20 


242.04) 


25.76 


367.60 


26.75 


217.69 


29.80 


29«.00 


16.16 


1«1.M 



$631.10 



$6,311.0« 



*oUl ....:...... .^ I W«t» 



m. « n 



tf^i^mi, 



J'^ttiii^n'tirriTti'i^ 



a wffljtoa^wO'ia&Mili^v,- , '.ia 




iififigomi^ 



1 1 ■ 







.. . -■ - 



Sunday. November -. "3'* 



VTi '! '< 



<Y (OLOJNLST 



13 




t .;• '. 



<+■->:>?** 



i% ^, 




University School for Boys 



Mount Tolmls 



Victoria. B. C. 



Warden. R. V. Harvey, M.A. Headmaster, J. C. Barnacle, Esq Xmu 
term begins September 11 For Prospectus apply to The Bursar. 



CALL AND BUY 



BJ§r*'' 







M' 






One Matt'i* 

orBoy^s 

A iTrioifciiSr Valise 



>o.4 » a 



- — 






• 



Arthur Holmes 






04.,! J? 
08,5 ■ I 
'vl.SU 







mmm 



1314 Broad Street. Duc| Block ;■]" 



Collegiate 




■ a-vsss 

rxocMand Avenue > - -A - Victoria, 3*,.; .0. 

Boarding and Day School for Boys. Particular attention given to 
backward pupils. Also Preparatory Class, conducted separately. for 
boys of 7 to if years of age. . V . , v|$j|#ijC 

Principal - - A. ». MTTSXETT, ESQ. 

Xmas Term will commence on Tuesday, September 10. 



DYNES & 
EDBINGTON 



Phone 3983 



728 Yates Street 



A Small, But Very Select 
Lot of 

LAKES' SUITS 

S t r i c 1 1 y man-tailored 
coats, perfect fitting, with 
plain and side pleated skirts, 
in heavy cheviot and hard 
finished navy blue serge. 

These Suits are exclusively 

made for us, and we have 

every size, from 1 6 to 44. A 

splendid fall and winter suit.. 

Special offering, 

Price, $22.50 




IDEAS regarding the telephone 
operator's work are of a 
widely opposite character. 
Some people believe that the oper- 
ator has time to chat with her fel- 
low operators or listen to conversa- 
tions; others thtit her work Is one un- 
relieved grind. 

A visit to one of the busiest px- 
changes would show you that the 
operator works In an exceptionally 
sanitary and comfortable environ- 
ment; that her duties, for which 
she has been carefully trained at 
the company's expense, involve a 
high degree of concentration and 
nlmbleness of hand nnd brain, but 
no strain to which a healthy, 
clever girl Is not perfectly equal; 
and that her work Is relieved at 
frequent Intervals, when she may 
relax body and mind In pleasant 
rest rooms. 

She has not a minute to waste on 
anything outside her duties, nor. on the 
other hand, Is she overwhelmed with 
work so that she Is unable to pay 
prompt attention to your calls. 



British Columbia Telephone Co., Ltd.' 

Victoria B. C 




LONDON'S GREAT 

TRAFFIC PROBLEM 

LONDON, Nov. 1. — The extraordinary 
complexity of the London traffic prob- 
lem makes any exact comparison be- 
tween the number of passengers carried 
by 'any particular kind of transport 
almost Impossible. Not only would 
more statistics be required than are at 
present available, but considerable ad- 
justment would be necessary In view of 
the varying conditions. 

It Is possible, however, to construct 
a table which gives one some Idea of 
relative popularity of the various meth- 
ods, although, of course, the hasty or 
biased student must be warned from 
Jumping to conclusions after a brief 
study of the figures. 

For the Sake of comparison, It Is a 
pity that all passenger-carrying con- 
cerns do not make up their accounts to 
the same date. For Instance, the mu- 
nicipal tramways make up their figures 
annually to March 31, the railways half- 
annually to June 30, and the 'bus com- 
panies to October 31. ,Ae regards the 
taxicab companies, no figures as to the 
number of passengers carried are ob- 
tainable. : VjVv' v <i V • 

Owing to the con**^'<a»|*ging 
conditions there is a considerable fluc- 
tuation In the figures of most of the 
<|riUnii.t'< - -3&« '^w;«£«»ltv by; the' ttob 
onflow f rogi on* system to another la 
BWfJly ©ttseto by the dwelling tide of 
London's traffic as a*whole. And this 
ebb and flow takes place not only be- 
tween - th e sya terns given \ta the table 
below, but also between them and the 
tfVpk railways, whlc§ do noKoubltoh 
separate f lgufes of their suburban pas- 
arnxgra. . ,ai • » ■ ', , , ', 

For instance, the chairman of the 
London, Brighton and South Coast Rail- 
way stated at ths last ;b»lf. yearly :me«t- 
1^>^ that during- th s. last two and s. nai f 
years fourteen inAlum' additional "~P<I^ 
sengers had been carried over the elec- 
tf&ied sections of the company's line. 
the attractions of a big exhlbl- 
l. swell the number of passen- 
carried on a line. like the District, 
the Metropolitan or the Central London 
to the tune of hundreds of thousands. 

In choosing, therefore, a period of 
Which it is desired to tabulate compara- 
tively the number of passengers car- 
ried, one is faced with certain objec- 
tions to whatever length of period Is 
raised. 

With a six months' period, however, a 
fairly good comparison may be obtained 
and the table below gives some idea of 
the rival claims of the trains, railways 
and omnibuses, and at the same time of 
the huge total of persons carried to 
and fro: 

Millions of 

Tramways — passengers Total 

L. C. C 267.0 

M. E. T 45.0 

L. U. T 31.5 

West Ham 20.5 

Bast Ham 18.0 

382.0 

Railways — 
Lonuon Electric ....... '51.5 

Metropolitan ......... 50.5; 

District 43.0 

Central London 17.0 

City & South London.. 12.5 
Great Northern & City. 7.0 

Bast London 2.5 

■ '■ ■■ . '" ■. 184.0 

Omnibuses— 

L. G. O ... . 224,5 

National Steam Car ;..'-.,■ 7.5 

■ — 232.0 

Grand total. . 798.0 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page 12 



BY-LAW No. n 3 . 
Blanchard Street, from Queen's Avenue to Hillside Avenue — Boulevards, Curbs and Gutters. 



WOULD POPULARIZE 

NAVAL CAREER 



BERLIN, Nov. 1.— The tendency of 
tlfe German nobility, especially the 
princely houses, to show Increasing re- 
gard to the navy as a career is evi- 
dently being followed by the German 
upper and middle classes, who in recent 
years have provided such a large per- 
centage of the German army officers. 
Undoubtedly this Is no whim or mean- 
ingless' turn of fashion, but is based on 
experience and a sane view of possi- 
bilities, for at present the German navy 
offers a career which many must find 
quite as alluring as the very popular 
service with the army. Perhaps the 
young naval Untenants, cannot make 
sq. rpuch show as the handsome, grey- 
clpakpd youths who sot the pace in all 
the high jinks in the social life of Ber- 
lin; perhaps, too, the army lieutenancy 
Is still to remain the best key to the 
marriage market; and then* again, the 
army officer has his home/" while his 
naval brother has only his cabin. Yet, 
on the other hand, there are many other 
advantages to be considered.' 

Some of these advantages are clearly 
set out In a plea recently published by 
a naval officer that the naval career 
should be still further popularized In 
Germany. In the first place, It may be 
doubted whether entry to any other pro- 
fession or career Is so cheap. An es- 
timate of the entire cost shows that 
about $1875 Is needed before the young 
officer Is self-supporting. This repre- 
sents fees and maintenance, with out- 
fit and pocket money, for the period of 
eight years which passes between his 
reception as a cadet and his appoint- 
ment to a post with adequate, pay. The 
neoessary pocket money is estimated at 
about ten dollars a month until the 
rank of senior lieutenant. The cadet 
corps is open to all who have adequate 
education and are physically fit. and 
only color-blindness or other ocular 
weakness bars to entry. 

Two accomplishments are especially 
useful to the ambitious young officer — 
proficiency In gymnastics and foreign 
languages, especially In French and 
English. After twelve years' service 
the promotion to a captaincy Is almost 
a certalnty^stx years more and he may 
take his place on the staff, and at 42 
or 46 he should be the proud possessor 
of a command. 

The popularity of the career Is un- 
doubtedly Increasing, but so, too, is the 
need of officers. Hitherto only a couple 
of hundred candidates have been ad- 
mitted to the cadet corps yearly, but 
last year the number was Increased to 
240, and tnu year the number is to be 
raised ^'tW. 




NAME OF OWNER 



Burkholder, Mary J. and W. H. 

Burkholder, Mary J. and W. H 

Kecclier, Ada 

Gleger, Thos G 

Fraser, Dr. W. F 

Klrkwood, J. W. and Cunningham M. A. 

Lewis R. H. (Est. of) 

Lewis R. H. (Est. of) 

Morris, W. G. (Est. of) 

Salmon, E. J 

Prldham, E. H 

Prldham, E. R 

Prldham, E. R 

Prldham, E. R 

Ableson, Naomi 

Hughes, Adellna O 

Stewart, W. A. 

Anderson, G. W. and Emma W 5 »•*! 

Anderson, G. W. and Emma 

Brown,' C N» ........•......•••••.••« 

Hunter, J. H. ..*••••♦»•♦•• •i»«"«#«"»*»Vj». 

N agel, M. v- «»•«»?»«#•»« . v.:.*;. « •^•i.'i V/«j#* 
©TOCS, J. It* ««.»..»* •,,••$ »• •.»r» «.• • •"*•-**,,• 
W"SSOOttr J. BL- •»«•»• •'•j_f,»^*lS i »> v »W •'••• 

iwescott, J. el •••••••• **« i «' t i»,v •,•••'•**,» • 

Gleason, John .............. •,*«»Vrv«% 

Douglas, Harriet I. .,.......••..■'.•• 

Porteous, F. G. ..... ..'J,.. ....,.,».»•'.• » 

Porteous, F. G. ............. .....V.%i.i 

Breen, Philip J. .••«...»«•••««,»•■ »v» •# • 
Qsvey, Fred. «•••■•»•■«••»•••••«'•••■• 

Davey, Fred. ........... .,......«. «•»• 

Smith, E. J. .....•'*• * •»•• * .•••'••,• ••*■*•'•• •. 

Thomas, Emma .....|..,.. •.■•••'•'••»"•. 

Hodsoh, Thos. •■••••■••••.*.'•»•••'••'••'• 

AmnuT t m i w > >■ >,m it MM 

Little, P. R. . ... ..... • # . «•'•••••"•"•• • • 

Lee'Kow and Lee, Chas. Yow ...... 

Gray, ' Thos ••,••••••••>••••«••• »j^ • « 1 » 

Morray, d. g. •••..*•••••••... «,••••'• •• 

Smith, Fred. »~». .,,.»,,»«.. »,»■»» *.* , ^*.V* ) 
Williams, lidwart . . . . . . ... .;». . ... . ? ••*> 

Fulton, Daniel . *». • ... •]*•• •»•!•/•.•'»• 
Blttlncourt F. J. ..,..>........._...•.. 

Blttlncourt, T. J. '..."..... SfciiL' 

Mi'( allum, D. ................ ....> f . •.;•':;'•• 

McCallum, D 

Robertson, A. S. 

Robertson, A. S. 

Jeeves, Geo. 'vV^ct 

Jeeves, Geo 

Jones, John . . . '. . ......... 

Jones, John 

Penklth, Geo 

Griffiths, Ester, I 

Riddle, D. A. 

Riddle, D. A. .....'. 

Klngscote, T. H. and Mrs. '. 

McGregor. W. H. C •.".'. \ 

Balcom, R. ««K^»;r' 

Ghadwlck, Geo 

Luney, W. A. 

Heater, Wm. ,,... .* », ;ij. 

Cowers, Lucy 

Trustees Grace Luth. Church ........ 



d 

o 

<j 

m 
Flnlayson 
Fin ley s on 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Klnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside 
Hillside 
Hillside 
Hillside 
Hillside 
Hillside EX 

Hillside Ex 
HlllS.de Ex 
Hillside EX 
Hillside EX 
Hilled* Bx 

5lii.lt " 

HlllSlde EX 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 

ids. 



o 
H 

1181.80 
61.20 
51.00 
51.00 
51.00 
125.70 
65.50 
61.00 
61.00 
61.00 
61.00 
61.00 
51.00 
61.00 
51.00 
51.00 
51.00 
51.25 
51.26 
61.25 
23.45 

: ; 17.80 
61.26 

!!.25 
1.2B 
51.25 

MM 

34.00 

61.25 
«.70. 

; «.«o 

51.25 
51.25 
UOi. 



Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Hillside Ex 
Finlay30n 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 
Flnlayson 



"ttr 

»6.i 

50:3 

50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50:0 
50.0 
50.0 
21.5 
71.9 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
71.9 



Tar 

L02 

'1.02 

1.02 
1.02 
1.02 

1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
.1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 
1.02 



51.25 
S1.2S 

«utr 



c £ 

v a 

h< 

110.00 
7.55 
6.30 
8.30 
6.30 
15.50 
6. 85 
6.30 
C.30 
6.30 
6.30 
C.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.80 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
2.90 
3.40 
6.30 
6.80 
6.30 
6. 30 
6.30 

, «>« 

*4 

4.2 

6.30 

5.35 

6.30 
6.30 



3273.4 



61.25. 

51.25 
51.25 
61.00 
61.00 
51.00 
61.00 
51.00 
51.00 
51.00 
51.00 
61.00 
61.00 
61.00 
21.85 
73.15 
51.00 
51.00 
51.00 
61.00 
61.00 
51.00 
73.15 

$3,339.45 
874.46 

84,213.91 



6.30 

CM 

6.30 

6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 

6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
2.70 
9.00 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
6.30 
9.00 



8411.55 



-'d 

3? 

o c 

8100.00 

76.50 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
165.00 
68.60 
63.00 
63.00 
3.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
62.00 
63.00 
63.00 
29.00 
34.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
63.00 
21.00 
42.00 
63.00 
54.00 
53.60 
63.00 
68.00 

,,-6.1. 00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

6S.00 

63.00. 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63. 00 

27.00 

90.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

63.00 

90.00 

84,116.50. 



BY-LAW tfo. 277. 

Ross Street, from St. Charles Street to Robertson Street — Grading, Draining and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, Constructing Curbs, 
Gutters and Boulevards on Both Sides nf S»id Street, also Lateral Connections to Sewers, Surface Drains arid Water Mains. 




NAME OF OWNER 3 

' f . 

Murphy, John ................... -N part 18 32-3 

Murphy. John .. ............ .N part 17 3 2-3 

Stephenson & Gordon 16 3 2-3 

Stephenson & Gordon 16 3 2-3 

Raymond. Katrine 17 4 2-3 

Raymond. Katrine ..'.«., 16 4 2-3 

Lowe, George S 15 4 2-3 

Lowe, George S. Wml^Mffl* 4 2 ' 3 

Chetham. L. D. ..... 12 4-6 DIv 

Chetham, L. D. . . . . • 11 4-6 Dlv 

Powell, George ^, 10 .4-6 Dlv 

McLaughlin, J. H. .". . . 8 4-6 Dlv 

Fullerton, H. M. 4 4-6 Dlv 

Fullerton, H. M. 3 4-6 Dlv 

Hallson, Ellis • 2 4-6 Dlv 

Cameron, J. 1 4-6 Dlv 

Burbrldge, J. H 20 B 1-8 

Leigh, J. and S. M. 19 B 1-3 

Bond, Vincent 18 B 1-3 

Hall. Jennie 17 B 1-3 

Belbeck, A. A 16 B 1-3 

Belbeck, A. A 16 B 1-3 

Wylde, Emily 14 B 1-3 

Bass, O. C 13 B i" 3 

Skelton, M. A 12 B 1-3 

Jalland Bros -•• * 5 2_3 

Jalland Bros 8 6 2-3 

Wattelet, L. A 2 5 2-3 

Cumming Alexander 15 2-3 

Roberts, J. & N 2 6 2 " 3 

Kelly, Mary Jane 21 6 2-3 

Total 



c 



19 

19 

19 

19 

1 19 

1 19 

I 19 

1 19 

1 19 

1 19 

1 19 

1 19 

19 

■ 19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 



01 

a 

eo:o 

60.0 
57.6 
67.6 
50.0 
60.0 
60.0 
50.0 
56.8 
55.8 
56.8 
65.8 
65.8 
65.8 
55.8 
56.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
60.0 

113.6 
60.0 
SO.O 
60.0 
60.0 
47.0 
47.0 

154.10 

1842.11 



a ■ 
<- o 

&l 

%i 

ei o 

$5.18 Vi 
5.1*34 
6.18V4 
6.18V4 
6.18% 
5.18V4 
6.18V4 
5.18% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
5.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
5.18% 
5.18% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
6.16% 
6.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
6.18% 
5.18% 
5.18% 



c 
B 

■B 

_ v 

t% 

c a 
55 
3311.10 
311.10 
298.15 
298.16 
259.25 
259.25 
269.25 
259.25 
288.65 
288.65 
288.65 
288.65 
288.66 
288.65 
288.65 
290.35 
269.25 
269.25 
259.25 
259.25 
269.25 
259.25 
269.25 
259.25 
688.05 
259.25 
259.25 
269.25 
259.25 
243.70 
243.70 
802.80 



Q 

oi a 
* s 

o) o 

too 



315.30 



16.30 
16.30 
15.30 
16.30 
15.30 
15.30 
16.30 
15.30 
16.30 
16.30 
15.30 
15.30 
15.30 
15/30 
15.30 
15.30 
16,30 
15.30 
15.30 
16.80 
15.80 
15.30 
15.30 



15.30 
16.30 



a 

O § 
0,3 

S «; 

VI C 

I. c 

O O 

VI O 



$5.67 
5:67 

5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
6.67 
5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
6.67 
5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
5.67 
6.67 
5.67 
6.67 
5.67 
6.67 
5.67 
11.34 
6.67 
5.67 
6.67 



5.67 
11.34 



39566.66 3397.80 3170.10 



4 g 

310.00 



10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
20.00 

3290.00 



2 
o 

3321.10 
316.77 
329.12 
298.15 
274.92 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
319.62 
319.62 
319.62 
319.62 
319.62 
319.62 
319.62 
321.32 
290.22 
280.22 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
634.69 
290.22 
290.22 
290.22 
269.25 
243.70 
274.67 
849.44 

$10,413.55 



#4 


J 

to - 


E 


al r 




0) -^ 


Oi —i 


Hj 


t- Bl 


M 3J 


3 


$ c 


OI c 


Q C 


H< 


y< 


839.60 


$396.00 


39.05 


290.50 


40.60 


406.00 


36.75 


367.50 


33.90 


339.00 


35.80 


358.00 


35.80 


358.00 


35.80 


358.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.40 


394.00 


39.60 


396.00 


35.80 


368.00 


34.55 


345.60 


35.80 


358.00 


85.80 


858.00 


35.80 


353:00 


35.80 


368.00 


35.80 


868.00 


85.80 


868.00 


78.25 


782.50 


85.80 


868.00 


86.80 


358.00 


85.80 


368.00 


31.96 


319.60 


30.06 


800.50 


33.85 


338.50 


104.76 


1047.60 


11284.10 


112,841.00 



BY-LAW No. 186. 

Grading Draining and Paving with a Li<*ht Standard Asphalt Pavement, Collinson Street, from Vancouver Street to Trutch Street, and 

/Constructing Lateral Connections to Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Mains. 



NAME OF OWNER 



in 
I 

9 
00 

Bass Georglna C 

I-'edcn & Cooper 

Peden & Cooper 

Mans. Maria 

Johnson, George J 

Stewart, Mrs. M 

Fox, Henry 

Codd, Elizabeth T 

Codd, Elisabeth T 

Bagshawe, R., Jr 

Hears, A. A 

Fawcett. Edgar 

Fawcett, Edgar E. part 

Whitley, Agnes M W. part 

Sears, Smith Dean 

Berryman, Sarah A i • 

Head, William 

Ross, William McKenxie 

Mcllwaine, William 

Luscombe, Louise • W. part 

Ritchie, William E. part 

Van. Financial Cor., Ltd 

Van. Financial Cor., Ltd 

Van. Financial Cor.j Ltd 

Van. Financial Cor.. Ltd 

Van. Financial Cor., Ltd 

Van. Financial Cor., Ltd 

Myers, Capt. William 

Stewart. Arthur 

Cooper, Charles, Jr 

Peden. Alex. 

Fullerton, H. M 



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$3.23 
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177.65 


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177.65 


27 


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387.60 




13.45 




193.80 








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27 


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193.80 




13.45 




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193.80 




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9.70 








184.10 




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193.80 


27 


18.46 




198.80 




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198.80 


27 


13.45 




96.90 


18.60 


6.76 


10 


96.80 


18.60 


6.76 




188.80 




13.45 


10 


198.80 


27 


13.45 




193.80 


27 


18.46 


10 


183.80 


27 


18.46 


10 


193.80 


27 


18.45 


10 


188.80 


27 




10 


887.60 


64 


13.46 




177.66 


27 


13.46 


19 


177.86 




18.46 




177.6$ 


27 


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10 


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228.10 


28.15 


281.50 


228.10 


28.15 


281.60 


228.10 


28.15 


281.60 


401.05 


49.45 


494.60 


193.80 


23.90 


239.00 


207.25 


25.56 


255.60 


207.25 


25.55 


255.60 


244.25 


30.10 


801.00 


207.25 


26.55 


256.60 


207.25 


26.65 


266.60 


207.26 


25.65 


256.60 


9.70 


1.20 


12.00 


197.65 


24.35 


248.60 


207.26 


25.55 


255.60 


193.80 


28.90 


289.00 


234.25 


28.90 


289.00 


217.26 


26.80 


268.00 


234.25 


28.90 


389.00 


127.15 


16.70 


167.00 


117.15 


14.46 


144.60 


217.26 


26.80 


268.00 


234.25 


38.90 


288.00 


244.26 


80.10 


301.00 


244.26 


30.10 


301.00 


244.25 


20.10 


801.00 


230.80 


28.45 


284.80 


466.06 


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828.10 


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281.60 


191.10 


28.66 


236.10 


328.10 


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38463.60 6469.00 $368.20 $130.00 
City's Share 



ToUl 



$7406.70 
2034.08 

$94397$ 



$813.21 $8118.10 



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Continued on Page 14 

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14 



VICTORIA DAILY COLOxMST 



8'Jnday. November 3, 1912 



AT THE CITY CHURCHES 



(Notices for this column mini be reselv«(J 
rot later than 10 p. m., the preceding Fri- 
day.) 

ANGLICAN. 
Cliriat Church Cathetlrul. 

Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity; Holy 
Communion at S a.m. ; mailiiH and Mrmon 
at 11 a.m.; preacher, Hev. A. K Price, Alert 
Bay; Holy Communion utter mating; even 
rung and sermon at 7 pin.; preacher. Rev. 
W. Barton. Matins. 11 a.m.. organ; "An- 
dante," Balome; pnalmn as net; IV Deuin. 
Jackson In F; Benedletua. Langdonj hymns 
220, 8*4; organ, •■.Meditation, " l'i*K«. Even- 
song, 7 p.m.; organ, "Communion," Batiste; 
processional hymn 235; psalms as set; 
Magnificat, Stalner In F; Nuno Dlmlttla. 
titalner In F; anthem. -What Are These T" 
Stelner; hymns. 2-20, 218. 415; Amen, Stuln- 
er, 7 fold; recessional hymn, 219; organ, 
"Offertoire," Wely. 

St. John's, 
Corner of Flsguard and Douglas; Order of 
services for 2'-'ud Sunday after Trinity; Uoly 
i Communion at 11 a.m.; Sunday school at 
'2.30 p.m.; matins, organ prelude; Ventte. 
'Russell; psalms for 3rd morning, Cathedral 
'Psalter; Te Dram, M.8.S. ; lienedlctus, M. 
,a.8.| Benedtotus, Jl.S.S.; hymn 234; Kyrle. 
; Tours, Gloria Tlbi, M.8.S. ; hymns 281, 313; 
torgan postlude. Evensong, organ prelude; 
processional hymn, HOI. Cathedral I'salter; 
Cantate, Crotch; Dcus Mlsereatur, Hopkins; 
anthem. "1 Will Sing or Thy Power," Sulli- 
van, tenor solo, Mr. Edmond Fetch; hymns 

290 27; amen, M.S.S. ; vesper, M.8.8.; organ 

postlude. The Rev. P. J. Ennls. the rector, 

will preach In the morning and the Rev. I* 
_A. tEodd In the evening. 

St. Barnabas. 
Corner of Cook street and Caledonia ays- 
\nue. There will be a celebration of tne 
IHoly Eucharist at 8 a-m.; matins at 19.IC 
, a.m.| choral Eucharist at U a; 1 "--?;"* •***' 
Imon by the rector. Rev. B. G. MlllWV on 

"The Structure of the Church," first of • 
I series on ritual; children's service at I.W 
,'pm.; choral evensong at 7 p.m., me 
f preacher .being the Rev A. E. Price. ">>■«>»" 
i ary at Alert B»»^ ■«?Bs^«*j*«KJ£»J 
I Indians." All seats are free .and -J^WPto- 
■ priated. The .musical arrangements are as 
kfollows: Morning— organ "£ 0mn i u "! o , n ..i" 
I V." Richmond; hymns 624. 6« ;, B 32 and «». 
I communion service. "Simper lkD.« ffer- 

tory anthem, Fltagerald: Nunc Dlmlttls, , St. 

John, organ "Postlude In P." *»«*!•*"": 

In*— organ, "Children's Home," Cowen; 

psalms, Cathe dral g wlfl . J * *"** ! *"' ' ^l? 

farren; Nunc Dlmlttls, Felton; hymns 324. 

813, 8001 offertory anthem. Flttgerald.ves- 
I per. "Lord Keep Me Safe This Night , 

organ, "Lebanon Processional March. Dr. 

Mii'estbroQk, ' ■ 

•R.cio*. R«V J. H. a sw«st;>wiy omf 
muuion at 8; matins and sermon at XI. 
Holy Communion at 12; children •««*» at 
3; evensong and sermon at 7. The music 
will be as follows: Morning— organ^volun- 
^aty. Venlte and psalms. Cathedral Psalter; 
Ve m Deum! 1st V alternative; Benedlctus, 
Troutbeck; hymns 218, 220; Kyrlo, Wood- 
ward- functus. Woodward; communion 
hymn 82 S; Nunc Dlmlttls. Felton , organ 
voluntary. Evening - organ volnn tary 
-psalms. Cathedral Psalter; Magnificat, Gar- 
«ttTNuno Dlmlttls, St. John; anthem. 
-Whet Are These?" Sainer; hymns -.5. 
219 1 vesper hymn, "Now the Day Is Over- , 
organ voluntary. 

St. Saviour's. 

Victoria West: 22nd Sunday after Trinity; 
morning, prayer and h ° y,„ commun i°"' ," 
a.m.; children's service. 2.*0 p.m.; •vening 
prayer, 7 p.m.; subject of morning sermon. 
"A Great Door and Effectual" ;; evening. 
-What : Think To of Christ: Whose Son 

is Her' 

St. Mark's. 

Bolcskin road, the Rev. J. W. » Unton 
vlcan 22nd Sunday after Trinity y litany 
and Holy Eucharist, 11 a.m.; preacher, the 
Rev. G. H. Andrews: children's service and 
the administration of the sacrament of holy 
haotls-n 3 p.m.; festival evensong with spe- 
33 thanksgiving for the harvest 7 p^,., 
preacher the Very Rev. the Dean of Colum- 
bia The offertorj- at thjs servfce will be 
towards the purchase of robes for the choir. 
I'embertoii Memorial i Impel. 

Church of England service this afternoon 
at 3 p.m. Nurses, patients and general pub- 
lic cordially Invited to attend. 



METHODIST. 

Metropolitan. 
Coiner of Pandora avenue and Quadra 
street; pastor, iiri. C, T. Bcott, ha,. D D ; 
deaconess, Hies Bva B. Blllott; services 10 
B.ir... lunlors' service; 10 air... love feast; II 
n m ' public s oi ship i ondui t-sd li Lhi pas 
tor; anthem, "When I Survej the Wondrbui 
Cross ' Miles Foster; solo, Miss Bherrltt; 
subject, "The Mind or Christ." At the 

close of the evening """'" the niu-rainem 
or the Lord's Buppei <n\\\ bi administered 
2.30 p m . Sunday si bool , 7 I G p.m 

. o.ni. r o,i .. ... ..iit.n.' w.irahln i-onil u- I i-'l 



2.30 p.m., Sunday scnool; Ho p. in . mi»u 
recital; 7 3H p m . pUbllt « II Ship ■ 
by the panto.-; anthem, "O Taste and 
Gobs; solo. "The. Ninety and Nine' 



I liy n- 



Ouss; solo. Tne Ninety ana .mh'- ioj ■ ■-- 
quest), Ml8 » Sheriin. subjeot, "Way Marks 
to Fallui. ■• At the close of the service th« 
sai-ramenl of the Lord's Supper will be ad- 
m!-ilstered. 

James Bay. 
Rev. John Robson, B.A., pastor. On Sun- 
day at ii the subject will he a Sacramen- 
tal Meditation; the Gift and Wo- Memorial'; 
the evening subject will be, "will a Splen- 
did >-i'- advantage You'."- Babbath school 
and Bible classes meet «• 8.80; on Monda: 

avenlug the Bpwortb league will >i- I 
conseeration mooting; Tuesday the Boj 
Scouts will meet for instruction; prayer 
meeOng every Thurjuay at 8; Junior league 
m Friday at 7 p.m. 

Ii'airfirld 
Temporary premlsen on corner of BfOII 
street and Fairfield road; at 11 o'clock In 
the morning, the pastor. Rev. D. W. Ganton 
MA., will speak on "The Pardon Bearer 
and again at 7.80 p.m. on "Certainties In 
i -lrlstlan Religion"; Sunday school and 

Bible classes at 2.80 p.m. 

Willows. w , . 

Services In the Arena; Sunday school ana 
adult Bible class, 2.80; preaching service 
conducted by Mrs. Stobart at S.sO. 

BAPTIST. 

First. 
Temporary building, corns* TjMi »4 
Quadra streets; Rev. John Bi WswalelMr. 
B.A.; morning preacher. Rev. Wm. Ro«nM> 
ter. B.A.. of the Lord's Day A4»ll»e«; Jjjtfcj 
•venfng the pastor *i\ pr«sa^» °/»„"JS! 
Tragedy of Samson, or the Perils of Middle 
Life"; at 2.80 p.m, t 'tthe Sunday school mis- 
sionary session, when an address will be 
given by Mis Flora, Clarke from Blmllpa- 
tam. India; Monday at 8 •»», Tm«JN«- 
ple's society; Tuesday at » p.«.. . Wobw» f 
Mission Circle, followed by special meeting 
of Ladles' Aid Society: TbttWaftag evening at 
8 o'clock, mid- week •srylee of «*iwel>$ 
topic. "Temperanee and Moral Reform': 
luu s leal uiiaiig sfsass le*ay as nafi 



Scouts; Thursday at 8 p.m.. meeting troop 
A, Qli ■■ Ud< •• at » i' " l • cholr P racUcr 

I.l TIIKKA> 
Grace English. 

Blaw hart and Queen - avenue; 
\, i ,, Westhelm, pastor; Sunday school 

at 10 a. i n i sarvlee, n i •■" , ' "' 

sermon, "God's Men . to Us the Sou ".' 

-.1, .-. . Us"! I.uthei League. 1 l« 

n rfl ; topic "Thy Neighbor as Thj 
svenlng service, 7.30. subject of seimou, 

"The Judgment on the Unmerciful." 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page 13 



BYLAW No. 151. 
Howe Street, from May Street to Dallas Road— Grading. Draining and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, and Constructing Curbs, Gutter 

and Boulevards on Both Sides of Said Street. 



Morning — organ, "Andsmtlno," Ij«»*«*» 
chant, psalm 31, choir; organ, "Commu- 
nion," Holtlns; anthem. "Now .Unto Him,' 
Palmar; organ. "March." Grey. Evening-— 
organ. "Caatlleae," Wtoeeldon; Saaetus, 
cholrY vocal mtlo, *I WW Bytol.. 1 !*^ 
Comal VUs PMrU*} omsn; ^tamtgnom" 



4imi organ, n 



Choral. 



heeld'on. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC. 
St. Andrew's Cathedral. 
Corner of Blanchard and View street.;; 
the Right Rev. Alexander MacDonald. P.O., 
Hev Joseph Leterme, Rev. Donald A. Mac- 
Donald, and Rev. John F. Silver Masses. 
Sundays: Low mass with five minute ser- 
mon at -8 and 9 a.m.; high mass, with 
sermon at 10.80; sermons, vespers, benedic- 
tion of the biased sacrament at 7 p-m. . 
Holy days of obligation: Low mass at 8.30, 
8 and 9; high mass at 10.30 a.m.; rosary 
and benediction at 7.30 p.m. Week days. 
l,,u mass at 7 and 8 a.m. ; confessions are 
heard on the eve of alt feast days, every 
Saturday and every Thursday before the 
first Friday of the month In the afternoon 
from A until 6 o'clock, and In the evening 
from 7 until 9. Baptisms aro performed 
Sunday afternoons at » o'clock. 

TRESBYTEUIAN. 
St. Paul's. 

Corner Henry and Mary streets, Victoria 
West; Rev. D. MacRae, D.D., pastor, and 
Mr A. R. Gibson, B. A. .assistant. Services 
.ii 11 am. and 7 p.m.; Sabbath school and 
adult Bible class at 2.30. and T. P. 8. C. E. 
it :• 15 P.m. 

St. Columhn. 

Hulton street. Oak Bay, Rev. R. A. Mac- 
Connell. pastor; services at 13 a.m. and 7.30 
p.m.; Sunday Bchool a> 2.30 p.m.; congrega- 
tional prayer meeting Thursday evening at 
g o'clock; young people's meeting Sunday 
evening at 8.30 p.m. 



Emmanuel. 
Corner Fernwood and Gladstone *'»enue. 
Fern wood ear terminus; pastor. Rev. "Wil- 
liam Stevenson; morning, 11. visit of lady 
missionaries on the way to India; evening. 
7.30, the pastor will preach on "The Desire 
or All Nations Shall Come"; Sunday school 
and Bible classes for men and women, 2.30 
u.m.; Monday 8 p.m.. the Young Peoples 
Society, short address by the pastor on 
"Religion and the Moral Life": Wednesday, 
orchestra practice; Thursday 8 p.m.. prayer 
service. The music follows: Morning — 
organ; "Holy, Holy, Holy"; hymn B82, 
Head of the Church; hymn 575, "Hark, the 
8ong of Jubilee"; organ; hymn 770, "Tne 
Green Hill Far Away"; hymn 649, "Jesus 
Shall Reign"; evening — organ; hymn 
"Worship in the Beauty of Holiness"; hymn 
266, "Come Dearest Lord".; organ, solo by 
Mr. Gregson; hymn 474, "The Realms of 
the Blest"; hymn 663, "The Bun Is Gone"; 
organ. 

Tabernacle. 
Corner of Fairfield road and Chester 
street: the new pastor. Rev. Robert Came- 
ron M.A., D.D., will preach at 11 a.m. and 
7.30 p.m. The Sunday school meets at 
2.30 p.m. 

Douglas Street. 
Car terminus, pastor. Rev. H. P. Thorpe; 
services* will be held on Sunday as follows: 
Morning at 11. when - the pastor will preach 
an autumn sermon; in the evening at 7 
o'clock Miss Flora Clarke and party en 
route to India will given addresses. The 
school and Bible classes will meet In tho 
afternoon at 2.45 



Mist KI.I.ANKOI S. 

Unitarian — Service tins morning In Uni- 
tarian Hall, U80 Government street, »i H 
a.m , . , bj Re> 81dnej a Undrtage, 

HI) E i iii VIi tOJ In Theatre at 

8.15; doom ipen el 1 :< n Social gathering 
,,n Frldaj evening at S p.m. 

Boeiely of Friends Friends' Hull. L'ourt- 
.,,., street.; meeting tor worship, u a.m.; 
tint l 10 p m. 

Christian Scie Flrei I hurch of Christ. 

Bcientist, B*S Pandora avenue; services are 

bi id on Sundays si 1 1 a.m.; subject for 

Sundaj Noa 8, "Everlasting Punisbmenl : 

n u meeting every Wednesday at 

8 p.m. 

Chrlstadelphians— A. O. H. hall. Broad 
street; morning 11 a.m., evening 7.30 p." 
address, subjc t, "The Devil; His Origin 
anil Bnd"; A. .1 WaUtlns, speaker. 

Spiritualist— K. U. Sanders, secretary V. 
S. S. The Victoria Splrtuallstic Society will 
hold a meeting at the K. I*. hall at 7..10 
p.m. Sunday. Nurse Inkpen will give clair- 
voyant messages after the lecture. 

Aged Women's Home— The services in the 
Aged Women's Home, McClure street. Will 
he conducted by Rev. R. A. Macconnelt on 
Sunday afternoon at i o'clock, „ 
-Swedish Service— The Swedish Church 
hold, secvice in the Baptist church on Tales 
and Quadra •treats wery Sunday at 4 p.m. 
undarthe leadership of Rot. A. Btwle. The 
•ubjaqt today will be. "How Can I <•« » 
Nice Hornet" 

Victoria Christadelphlan Eccleela — K. of 
P. hall, corner Pandora and ■ D « u «I;f,""**J*; 
•Sunday school at 10, sum.; megUng for 
breaking of bread and exhortation at U 
a.m.; Bible address at 7.80 p.m., miojaet for 
consideration, "The Resurrection"; old and 
new testament teaching. 

International Bible 8*»aen*— R<»om H* » 
Lee building, corner. Broad and Johnson 
streets. Meetings Sunday afternoon and 
evening at 8 o'clock and t. SO p.m. 

Christians gather ed to the nameotwa 
ma JMU » t- 'i i r wt m ee t « u Vlet e fls i » ai l i 
1415 Blanohard street, near Pandora streot. 
as follows: Sunday— 11 a.m., breaking at 
bread; 3 p.m., Sjinday sohool; Um, gospel 
preaching ; Tueeday, 3 P.m,. Blbla clase; 
Friday S p.m., prayai*- meeting. 

B H iu O o e p el — A a s rtmMy . t OT . Car m pnu i t - 
street; meetlnge Sunday nt 8.»B« 7.80 p.m.. 
Tuesd Vy and Thureday at 8 p.m„ 

3, *». Ci A. flswiea or cruelty. Fhon* 
Inspector Kuaaell. 1831 -ecrelary'a 
phone U-173S. ' 



NAME OF OWNER 



Turner, Mrs. V. L 

.Scott, Gertrude E 

Bcott, Gertrude K 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Stevenson, V, w 

Stevenson, K. W 

Stevenson, F. W 

Beurle, w. ii 

Woodford, Chas. V. . . . 
B. C. Land in v. Agency 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Webster, II. k 

Abbott, J. M 

Grant & Linehani ! 
Grant & LineliHoi 
Grant & Linehani 
Grant & Linehani 
Grant & Linehani 
Grant & Llneham 
Fletcher," Joseph 
FetclWS," 
VI 



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107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
1 12 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
180 



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RirFORMETl EPISCOPAZs 
Churrh of Our Lord. 
Corner of Humboldt and Blanchard; 11 
am and 7 P.m.; sacrament of Lord'B Sup- 
per at morning service; Rev. T. W. Glad- 
stone will preach; morning subject, "A Pic- 
ture of God's Servants"; evening, 'The 
Sword of the Lord and of Gideon"; morning 
hymns 4S2. "Pleasant Are Thy Courts 
Above''' 468. "Glorious Things of Thee Are 
Spoken"; 257, ; 257, "Jesus. Thou Joy of 
Loving Hearts"; evening hymns. 645, "To 
Thy Temple I Repair"; «88, "Oft In Danger. 
Oft In Woe"; 837, "Lord Dismiss Us With 
Thy Blessing." 



Used in Canada for 
over half A century 
— used inevery corner 
of the world where 
people suffer from 
Constipation and its 
resulting troubles— 

Dr. Morse's 

Indian 
Root Pills. 

stand higher in public 
estimation than any 
others, and their ever- 
increasing sales prove 
their merit Physicians 
prescribe them. § 

25c a box. 



CONGKEUATIONAT* 

I irst. 
Corner Pandora and Blanchard streets; 
divine worship at 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m. 
The pastor. Rev. Herman A. Carson, B.A.. 
will preach; theme of the mnrnins sermon,- 
"The Unrecngnlzt"'! Christ"; at the <--ln»« 
of, this service the sacrament of the Lords 
Supper will bo celebrated; subject of tho 
evening sermmi, ".Unking Our OwnWdl 
Sunday school, Men's Os-n Bible class and 
Idult Bible class tor women at 2.30 p.m.: 
Monday at * p.m., Young People's society. 
"I.lfo and Work of Livingstone"; Tuesday 
nt 7 p.m , trnnp 8. Boy Scnuts; at 8.16 p.m., 

public meeting for men wh.-n Barry .r.-rf k, 

Internatlonsl Brotherhood secretary. Is to 
speak; Wednesday at 7.15 p.m., troop 7, Boy 



Photographic 
Supplies 

KodakH, Premos, Century, Hawk- 
eyes, Cinematograph,, Cameras 
and Lanterns. 

Amateurs Developing- and Print- 
ing Done at Short Notice. 
Anything appertaining to photo- 
graphy we have. 

ALBERT HMAYNARD 

715 Pandora Street 



How Does This Beautiful Home 

Appeal to You? 

This handsome house is mi McClure Street, between Cook and Linden. It has ten well- 
lighted, spacious rooms— double drawing room and music room, dining room, kitchen, bed- 
room and den downstairs, four bedrooms and bath upstairs. Basement is full size, with 
toilet, furnace, stationary wash tubs. Lot 60XX3O. Splendid garage. This house contains 
every conceivable improvement and convenience of the present time. It is one of the best 
built houses in the city, and is situated in the highest-class residential district in Victoria. 

$12,000 ON TERMS 

Get in touch today with the exclusive agents for this property. 



S. 



Ward Investment Co. 

606 SAYWARD BUILDING 



Jfrtoftf*. Or«« * u»rt*m . 
2*t^ f ;q>»^.Vltfe»lMHft ...... 

JT«teh«p, Grant ft aLIneham ..J.,. 

Fletcher. Grant is Llneham 

Fletcher, Grant * Llneham ...... 

Fletcher, Grant A Llneham 

Fletcher, Grant * Llneham 

Fletcher. Joseph , . , 

Butler, Elizabeth and Flora 

Mackintosh, G W. ., 

•"*aoKin tosh i O* Wi **••«••••■••*«•• 
M a^p jalMLo a Ot. O . IT . 

Mackintosh, G. W- .".» 

Mackintosh, G. W. 

' •*• V/s «•*>•• . e *>.« e « a a ■> # •« • • 4 • • 



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148.0 
60.0 
60.0 
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60.0 
60.0 
50.0 
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50.0 
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60.0 
115.0 
60.0 
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3.43 
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3.43 
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3.43 
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3.43 
3.43 
3.43 

3.4 
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3.43 
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....... 



9^Mt & Llneham 
Grant & Llneham 

May, John B. «>'. .. 

Hirst, Edna F. 

McKeown, Sarah 

Martin Alexis 

8111, Maggie M 

Scott, Gertrude E. .............. 

Scott, Gertrude E. 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Scott, Gertrude E 

Scott, Gertrude E. 

McKeown, A. 

m ivi-own, A 

McKeown, Sarah 

McKeown, Sarah 



Taylor, "William 
Grant, K. A. C. 



. . . . 



its 

131 

130 

131 
182 
133 
134 
135 
180 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
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146 
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3.43 

8.43 
3.43 
3.43 
8.43 
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of 

is 

$490.50 
171.60 
171.60 
171.60 
171.50 
171 BO 
171. r i0 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171. liO 
1 ■1.60 
171 50 
171.50 
171.50 
il.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171,50 
394.45 
171.60 
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in.* 

m 

171.50 
894.45 
868.70 
171.50 

18D.05 
180.05 

imon 




52.6 
52.6 
53.6 
167.* 
60.0 



Fairfield . 

Fairfield 






3.43 
3.48 

3.48 
3.43 
8.48 



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Fairfield -■■•"■;- 50. 

Fairfield 

Fairfield ^ffl'S& 

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Fairfield 
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50. 
50. 
60. 

50. 

60 
50 

50 

50 

50 

BO 

50 



119 



3.43 
3.43 



180.05 
180.05 
180.05 
640.80 
171.50 



«3 

O 

H 
»4no r.o 
171.50 
171.50 
171.5" 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.60 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
394.45 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.60 

m 

•4T180 
894.45 

368.70 
171. C 

1M.06 
lflWiOg 



& 



180.05 
180.06 
180.05 

171.60 



E 

!* a. 
u 73 

3 

s b 

v C 

h < 
560.60 
21.15 , 
21.16 
SI. 15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
81.15 
21 15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
48.65 
21.15 
21.16 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.16 
48.66 
45.45 

-M .1 r. 

88.30 
UiZiL 



5a 

o 
^73 

3 i 

$605.00 
211.50 
211.60 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.60 
211.60 
211.50 
211.60 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
486.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
211.60 
211.50 
211.60 
211.50 
211.50 
211.50 
486.50 
464.50 
211.50 
222.00 
222.00 
222.00 



22.20 
22.20 
22.20 
66.60 

21.15 




VIM ' 

171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.60 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 

171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
408.15 



171.60 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.50 
171.60 
408.15 



W.li 

21.15 

21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.16 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.16 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
21.15 
50.35 



222.00 
222.00 
222.00 
666.00 

211.I.U 

211.50 

211.50 

211.60 

211.60 

211.60 

211.60 

211.50 

211.50 

211.60 

211.50 

811 r o 

211.50 

211.50 . 

211.60 

211.50 

211.50 

211,50 

211.50 

211.50 

503.50 



8472.0 

City's share 



$11,908.75 



Total 



$11,908,76 
. 3,008.78 

.$14,917.53 



$1468.60 



$14,080.00 



Elford Street, from 



;t to Pandora 




Avenue- 



BY-LAW No. 178. 

-Grading, Draining and Paving 
Lateral Connections. 



(Light Standard Asphalt), Curbs and Gutters and 




NAME OF OWNER 



Bryce, Amy 

Tulll, Ada .... 

McDonald, John T. 
Mcintosh, James A 
Colbert, John 
Elford, Theo. ..... 

Elford, J. P. ...... 

Brown, John 

Blck, Sarah Mabel 
Howell, George C. 

Fuller. Harry 

Fuller, Harry 

Mearns, Jane C. ... 
Boulding, George T. . 
Klmhurst, A. V. .••• 
Kim hurst, A. V. . . • . 
Robertson, Albert E. 
i lornwall. Clement A. 
Robertson, G. H. 
Robertson, o. H. . . . 
Heistorman, I.^aura A. 
Hflstcrman. Laura A. 
in of Victoria ••• 

City of victoria 

Elford, John F 

city of Victoria 

Klf'ord. Agnes T. ... 
ford, Agnes T. ... 

Elford, John P 

Bralk, Adam 

Elford, Theo 

Elford. Theo 

Elford, Theo 



d 



s 

3 



' i ^^ 




3 S 



.......... 

.......... 




part 
part 

part 
part 



28 

26 

25 

24 

23 

18 

19 

20 

21 

°2 

6 

5 

4 

3 

2 

1 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

12 

13 

11 

11 

10 



8 

7 

a 

5 
1 



4 

o 

3 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

82a 

32a 

32 

32 

32 

82 

33 

32 

32 

32 

32 

32 

88 

32 

32 

32 

32a 

32a 

32a 

38a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 

32a 



©: 

v 

03 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Ff-rnwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 
I- m wood 
l>i n wood 
Fernwood 
l-Vinwood 
Fernwood 
Fernwood 



I' 

100.6 

52.6 

B2.6 

52.6 

51.3 

49.8% 

49.3V4 
49.3 H 
49.3V4 
49.314 
50. 
50. 

50. 

50. 

50. 

59.6 

II. 

50. 

B0. 

B0. 

50. 

36. 

14. 

50. 

49.6 

3. 
R2. 



52. 

52. 

5 2. 

1B4.9 



fcfc. 

' o ** . 

73 o 

$3.36*4 

3.35% 

3.35V4 

3.35V4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

8.36*4 

13.35% 

8.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.36*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

3.86*4 

3.35*4 

3.36*4 

3.35*4 

3.35*4 

8.36*4 

8.85*4 

3.35*4 

3.35% 

3.35% 

8.3 5% 
3.35% 
3.35% 
3.35% 




c 


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V - 

ox 


o o 


3 O 


> P 


WO 


mo 


Pu 


337.15 


$ 23.92 


$ 9.84 


8 


176.15 


23.92 


9.84 




176.15 




9.84 




i : .; i 5 


23.92 


^.84 




171.10 


28.91 


9.84 


10.00 


165.85 




9.84 




165.35 


23.92 


9.64 




165.35 


23.92 


9.84 




166.86 


' 


9.84 




165.58 


23. P2 


9.84 




lfi7.75 


2.1.92 




10.00 


167.75 


23.92 


9.84 




167.75 


23.92 


9.84 




167.76 


23.92 


9.84 




167.75 


23.92 




10.00 


I B8 $0 


23.92 




10.00 


138.55 




9.84 




167.75 




9.84 




167.75 


23.92 


9.84 




167.75 






10.00 


167.75 


33.92 


9.84 


10.00 


120.80 


23.92 


9.84 


10.00 


46.96 








157.75 




9.84 




166.05 


23.92 


9.84 




10.05 








174.45 


23.92 


9. 84 




174.45 


23.92 


9.84 




174.45 


23.92 


9.84 




174 45 




9.$4 




174.45 


23.92 


9.84 




174.45 


23.92 


9.84 


10.00 


552.75 


47.84 


9.84 


20.00 



-J 
o 


St 

a a 


Total 10 Yea 
Annual Payn 


370.91 


$ 45.75 


$ 457.50 


209.91 


25.90 


259.00 


185.99 


22.95 


229.60 


209.91 


25.90 


259.00 


214.86 


26.50 


265.00 


175.19 


21.60 


216.00 


' 


24.55 


245.50 


188.1 1 


21.55 


246.50 


175.19 


21.60 


216.00 


199.11 


24.55 


215.60 


201.67 


24.85 


248.50 


201.51 


24.85 


248.50 


201.61 


24.85 


248.50 


201.51 


24.85 


248.50 


201.67 


24.86 


2-1 8. 60 


233.52 


28.80 


288.00 


14S.39 


18.30 


183.00 


177.59 


21.90 


219.00 


201.61 


24.85 


248.50 


177.75 


21.90 


219.00 


211.51 


26.10 


261.00 


164.56 


20.30 


203.00 


46.95 


5.80 


58.00 


177.59 


21.90 


219.00 


199.81 


24.65 


246.60 


10.05 


1.25 


12.50 


208.21 


25.65 


256.50 


208.21 


25.65 


266.50 


208.21 


26.65 


266.50 


184.29 


22.70 


227.00 


208.21 


25.65 


266.60 


218.21 


26.90 


269.00 


630.43 


77.76 


777.50 



1735.5% 



$5822.40 



$674.08 $265.68 $ 1 00.00 

City's share. .1871.61 



$6762.16 $83^.80 $8338.00 



Total $8663.77 



Harrison Street, from Fort Street 



BY-LAW No. 181. 

to Pandora Avenue— Grading, Draining and Paving (Light 

Lateral Connections. 



Standard Asphalt), Curbs and Gutters, 



SBB 



PHONE 874 „ 



a 
o 

NAME OF OWNER » 

i 

3 

in 

Harrison, Hon. Ell 

Harrison, Mrs. Eunice M. U ... 
Harrison, Mr*. EBunlce M. L,. ... 
Harrison, Mrs. lOuulce M. L. ... 

Hughes, George B 

Hughes, George B 

Carter, Willlnm O 

Carter, William Part 

Andrews, Richard B Part 

Andrews, Richard B 

BexBrnlth, Edward W 

Humphrey, William 

Edwards, Mrs. Lucy 

Edwards, Mrs. Lucy 

Clements, John R 

KinlOCk, Miircnrct J 

City "f Victoria 

City of Victoria Part 

Clanton, BCbart T Part 

i lempater, W. h 

Dempster, W. H. • 

Kelly, Mary A 

Kelly, Mary A Part 

Beckwlth, John L fart 

Baker, Sarah E 

Marshall Emma 

Marshall Emma 

Brash, Charles 

Baker, E. Crow 

Swlnnerton, Robert H 

Swlnnerton. Robert H 

Cooper, Richard B 

Erb * Colgdarlppe (Est.) 



3 
i 

3 
4 

6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
19 
19 
18 
17 
16 
16 
16 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 
8 
7 
• 















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55 


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36 


Fernwood 


129 


$3.51% 


$453.45 


$35.65 


$5.42 


$80 
10 


35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.75 






35 


Fernwood 


60 


3.51 % 


175.75 




6.42 




3 5 


Fernwood 


50 


3.61% 


176.711 


35.66 


5.42 


10 


35 


Fernwood 


60 


3.51% 


175.75 




5.42 




35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.76 




6.42 




35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.76 




6.42 




35 


Fernwood 


2 5 


3.51% 


87.86 








35 


Fernwood 


25 


3.51% 


87.85 








BE 


Fernwood 


60 


8.51% 


17 5.75 




5.42 


10 


a 5 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51 '... 


176.75 




5.42 




35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.75 




6.42 




.15 


Fernwood 


50 


8.51% 


175.75 




6.42 




35 


Fernwood 


60 


3.61% 


175.75 




5.42 




35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.61% 


175.75 




5.42 




36 


Fernwood 


60 


3.61% 


175.75 




6.42 




35 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.75 




6.42 


10 


89 


Fernwood 


76.8 


3.61% 


269.46 








39 


Fernwood 


38.4 


3.51% 


13 4.75 








39 


Fernwood 


50 


3.51% 


175.76 


35.65 


5.42 


1 


39 


Fernwood 


60 


3.61% 


175.75 


35.66 


5.42 


10 


39 


Fernwood 


60 


3.51 % 


175.75 




6.42 




89 


Fernwood 


5 


3.51% 


17.55 




5.42 




39 


Fern a-nod 


45 


3.51% 


158.15 


35.65 


10 


39 


Fernwood 


50 


*.51% 


176.75 








39 


Fernwood 


60 


8.61% 


176.75 




6.42 




39 


Fernwood 


60 


3.51% 


176.76 




6.42 
6.42 




39 


Fernwood 


50 


3.61% 


175.75 


36.65 




39 


Fernwood 


50 


8.61% 


175.76 




6.42 




39 


Fernwood 


60 


361% 


175.75 


36.65 


5.42 
6.42 
6.42 


10 


89 


Fernwood 


50 


8.61% 


176.76 






-39 


Fernwood 


66 


8.61% 


196.80 




20 


39 


Fernwood 


157 


8.61% 


551.86 


36.65 





3f 



1767 



16,175.70 $285.20 $135.50 
City's Share 



$140.00 



Total 



o 

$524.52 
185.75 
181.17 
226.82 
181.17 
181.17 
181.17 
87.85 
87.85 
191.17 
181.17 
181.17 
181.17 
181.17 
181.17 
181.17 
191.17 
269.46 
134.76 
226.82 
226.82 
191.17 
17.65 
209.22 
176.75 
181.17 
181.17 
216.82 
181.17 
226.82 
181.17 
202.22 
607.60 

$6786.40 
.$1881.62 

.88588.00 



2 * 

4) ,H 

a 
&> 

64 

$64.70 

22.90 

22.85 

27.96 

22.35 

22.36 

22.35 

10.85 

10.85 

28.55 

22.36 

22.86 

22.85 

22.36 

22.36 

22.35 

23.65 

38.25 

16.60 

27.95 

27.95 

23.65 

2.15 

26.80 

21.66 

22.86 

22.85 

26.76 

22.35 

27.95 

22.86 

24.96 

74.90 

$810.70 



Kg 

$647.00 
229.00 
223.50 
279.60 
228.50 
218.80 
228.60 
108.60 
108.50 
235.60 
228.50 
328.60 
128.50 
838.60 
213-60 
888.60 
386.60 
888.60 
166.00 
878.50 
878.60 
336.80 
21.60 
858.00 
816.60 
822.60 
323.50 
367.60 
228.66 
278.60 
338.60 
348.10 
746.0* 

88S07.M 



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Sunday, Nov»mh« 3, 197* 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



15 



A MILLION NEWCOMERS A YEAR 

And What This Will Mean to Western Canada 



We quoted in a previous advertisement some statements made respecting Western Canada by Mr. Vere C. Brown, 
Superintendent of Western Agenfcies of the Canadian Bank of Commerce. Mr. Brown's interview was given right 

it he stated that the incoming stream of population to Canada 

of 1, 



after a 




ern Canada. 



#Ould soon reach a 

• •■,;.. • ■;•••. ''■■'• >'",-- ' >' 

He added: ^'The bearing of these? figures c*fr be better appreciated when it is remembered that the United! States had 
a population of over 80,000,000 before their immigration reached the million mark. It means that the number of our 
Western cities wiU grow with extraordinary rapidity." 

Putting the matter briefly, a million newcomers per yealr means a yearly additional population e<$uai to the official 
census figures for June, ift". of the following cities: 

Saskatoon , 18,096 



= 



Victoria 



. . i-i* 



* iZ*' 6 * 8 



Vancouver .';,.' .;X33,Q03 

'Winnipeg • * * 1 3S.4.3Q 



Moose Jaw 20,623 

Brandon 13*837 



Toronto ' * 4 2 5»4^7 

Hamilton 81,879 

■ 995,8 oo 



' ■ ii i i i' iii jir, ) i i i n i : iii i iii i 



__ — — — 



4. 



#*■***■■ M»-* 



— — 



in n ii " ii . l |' M i i T i i i ] - t i " i \n»>ii" i 



: 



.,# ■ 



Investments That Make Good Make Satisfied Investors 
Read What They Say Regarding This Company 



Yorkton Lots Double in Value 

Ohtapaid e , On t u O c t. > t 1 18 1 



Well Pleased With Moose Jaw Property 

wm w t» j fi o » * » n , i n t. 



"T^T'^ 




Calgary 



43.736 



Edmonton '..'., 24,855 

Regina 30,210 

London .......-...*............. 4^»*77 



Estimate for yourself what this enormous ittHux of population yearly will mean to Canada, and especially to Western 
Canada, which will attract a large percentage o£ ii How many> new cities and towns that population will create! How 
much increase in the production of Canada it will effect! What increase in the country's trade it will create! 

It is a well-defined and indisputable fact that the huge yearly augmentation of population must cause a steady upward 
trend in realty values. It is frequently said that great opportunities for investment in Canadian urban properties existed 
seven or ten years ago. They exist just as surely today. , 

Anyone who has thoroughly read the statements presented and quoted in this series of announcements must realize 
that the years right ahead will witness a wonderful development in Western Canada. The opportunity is here now to 
make investments which will prove immensely profitable, just as those wisely made ten years ago have proved immensely 
profitable. 

American Writer Foretells Coming Uplift 

JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD, THE WELL-KNOWN NEWSPAPER MAN, -HAS PERSONALLY INVESTI- 
GATED WESTERN CANADA AND SAYS: 

"I am an American, but I believe in being fair. ^ 

"Today a good business location in a 10,000 population Western Canada town will bring in ten times the business 
revenue of a similar location in most American towns of the same population. ■ \ , ■ ' . s ' 

"Then, why shouldn't that business location honestly have a greater value? 

"As an illustration, take North Battleford — open prairie only seven years ago. 

"Today North Battleford has 5,000 people, is the best lighted little city in the West, has nine miles of water mains, 
eight miles of sewers, electric light, telephones, wholesale houses, four banks representing a capital of $44,000,000, four 
modern hotels and a new $100,000 hotel under way, a collegiate institute, high schools, exhibition grounds, and many other 
things that go to make the beginning of a progressive city. ^ . 

"I find that North Battleford is typical of other Canadian towns that have grown into small cities.; 
" "Its history of the next few years will be almost identically that of Saskatoon, and conditions are such that I am con- 
fident it will have 20,000 people by 1914." 

Mr. Curwood has been a student of Western conditions for ten years past, and is recognized as one of the sanest and 
most careful magazine writers in the United States. 

Immigration and Investment Values 

WHY CITIES MUST GROW, KEEPING PACE WITH NEW POPULATION 

Note carefully the following statements of well-known and competent authorities regarding the present unprecedented 
immigration movement that is pouring into Western Canada, peopling the prairies and causing new towns and cities to 
spring into existence almost over night. 

The NEW YORK TIMES says: "There is no mystery why Canada is the good thing the United States used to be. 
The process of railway stimulation is the same which we used to practice, and which raised the values of our farm lands 
from ten billions in 1880 to forty-one billions in 1910." 

The SATURDAY SUNSET, of Vancouver, says: "In all the annals of world history there has been nothing to 
parallel the present settlement of the prairies and park lands of Western" Canada. The Atlantic' seaboard of America was 
peopled slowly ; its growth has been a matter of centuries. The Western States have filled more rapidly, while the thin 
streams of immigration flowed westward. Today from both the East and the South a concentrated river of humanity is 
pouring into the Canadian West and building up the country with phenomenal rapidity. The slow-moving and conserva- 
tive East has hardly awakened to the immensityof this movement." 

Modern transportation facilities, traction plowing and reaping, scientific agricultural methods, soil fertlity and individ- 
ual and corporate enterprise— all are uniting as in no previous period to produce an assured and long-continued uplift in 
real estate values. 

In a word, the era of city building in Canada has only just begun. 



International Securities Co., Ltd., 
- »^Wtan4pe». 
Dear Sirs,— As you know, I own lots 6 to 10, 



block «*'|B*«iview Park. Yorkton, Sask., which I 

'i^fljsui • 



rent yo ur -company.-— -— — — — — "" ■-' - 

I visited ttve West recently, and I find my 
Yorkton lota have moro than doubled In value. I 
purchased these lots in January of this year. t 
have hfc several offers from parties wishing to 
buy them at an advance in price. In visiting 



International Securities Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 
Gentlemen,— Last March I purchased from your 
company lots M to 18, Mock 33, and lots SO to 34, 
block 6, also lots 3 to 7. block 33. "The Highlands/*- 



Moose Jaw, Sask. , I recently had occasion to visit 
Moose Jaw, and While there made a personal in- 
spection of "The Highlands," and the lots that I 
purchased there. I am pleased to say that Moose 
Jaw is all and everything that I expected; its de- 
th,e property, I find several houses already built • velopment has been remarkable, and I believe that 

its future development will be even greater than 
Its past development. I found your property, "The 
Highlands," all that you represented it to he, and 
am pleased with my purchase there. 

I have had considerable dealings with your com- 
pany, and have always found you reliable in every 
way, and do not hesitate in recommending and en- 
dorsing your company to any one desiring to make 
yeal estate investments. 

(Signed) DANIEL. HAGEX. 



on this subdivision, and sewers and «lectric 
lights are being extended through the property 
this fall. 

I intend to hold these lots for higher prices, 
which I am certain I will secure.— Yours very 
truly. 

(Signed) GEORGE M. MOWAT. 



Wonderful Progress of Weyburn 

Weyburn, Sask., Oct. 16, 1912, 
International Securities Co.. Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 

Dear Sirs,— When I left Winnipeg three weeks 
ago to inspect the lots purchased from your com- 
pany in Weyburn, I had no expectation of finding 
such a city as Weyburn has grown to be, After . 
a few days of impartial observation, I must say 
that never before have I found a people so hopeful 
and so proud of their town; that the people of Wey- 
burn, every one, seem so satisfied and so enthusi- 
astic, that I am obliged to Join the crowd. The 
only complaint that can be heard Is about the 
scarcity of labor, although a large force of men 
work twelve to fifteen hours ev«ry day laying 
sidewalks, water pipes, sewers, etc., and all these 
works are done in a very good manner without 
regard to the expense. 

Concerning Evanston, this subdivision, is very 
well placed in the way of the immediate expansion 
of the city; the residences of Mr. Moffet, W. Le- 
roux, and a few oth«rs, representing an expense al- 
ready above the one hundred thousand, will be fol- 
lowed shortly by numerous handsome residences 
"erected but three or four blocks from Evanston. 
This has been for me a revelation, and I am think- 
ing now that the literature and pamphlets about 
things in the Golden West are often too conserva- 
tive and far below the reality. I am going to stay 
in Weyburn, and am building me a home here, 

(Signed) EMILE IPPOLITO. 



Appreciates Dealing With a Reliable 
Company 

Montreal, Que., Oct. 17, 1912. 
International Securities Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 
Gentlemen, — It Is very gratifying to receive re- 
ports of progress being made in the properties 
which I have purchased from your company. These 
reports are deeply appreciated by me, and must be 
by your numerous other clients throughout this 
country and elsewhere. 

I am very pleased with all the dealings I have 
had with the International Securities Co., Ltd. I 
have found them very reliable and willing to serve 
their clients. 

(Signed) R. L. APPLEYARD. 



Property Exactly as Represented 

St. Thomas, Ont., Oct. 3, 1912. 
International Securities Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 
Gentlemen, — I purchased some lots from the In- 
ternational Securities Company, and after doing so 
I enquired from some friends ,who had been West 
and over the ground, and had seen the location of 
the property In question. I found that the state- 
ments made by the International . Securities Com- 
pany wen; correct, and that the property was just 
what it was recommended to be when I purchased 
It. 

(Signed) JOHN A. LOCHEAD. 



Regards Canora Investment Very Highly 

Portage la Prairie, Man., Oct. -17, 1912. 
International Securities Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 

Dear Sirs, — Last November I bought from your 
company lots 7 and 8, block 32, In the town of Can- 
ora, Sask. Owing to my condition as a poor man, 
I was very much afraid to buy the 16ts on terms 
of $R0 a month. At three different times I was not 
able to make payment when due, and had expected 
to lose the lots, also what I had paid on them. I 
wrote the company telling them my circumstances, 
and received a reply telling m<> 1 must not get dis- 
couraged and that the lots would be held for me 
until I could make my payment. I just made the 
last payment today, and I want you to accept my 
slncerest thanks. I cannot rIvo enough praise for 
the square deal given me by the International Se- 
curities Company. I would not take $2,000 for my 
two lots today, which would not have been mine 
had your company not given me the treatment and 
chance they did. 

1 Signed) FRED. E. VAILLAXCOURT. 



Erom all sid«s the evidence is pouring in thst the faots «t*t<Ki In tbe pr««»nt series of announcements regard- 
ing conditions in Western Canada are arousing keen and widespread attention. 

Our purpose has been to set forth faots only— and those that are substantiated by the expressed opinions of 
men of standing and sound Judgment. 

These plain facts we have submitted to the judgment of the people of Canada, asking the public to study and 

investigate them and then to act accordingly in view of the present opportunity open for safe and profitable 

investment in Western Canada. 



Property Trebles in Value in One Year 

Fraser Mills. B.C.. Sept. 29, 1912. 
International Securities Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 

Dear Sirs, — As your records will show, I havo 
purchased lots from your company In the follow- 
ing different towns: EntWiStle, Alta.; North Bat- 
tlefnril. Sask.,; Blggar, Sask.; Melville, Sask., and 
Canora, Sask. 

I find that some of these lots have trebled in 
value since I bouerht them twelve months ago, 
while some of them have doubled In value. I have 
had several offers already, but do not care to sell 
for some time yet. My only regret Is that I can- 
not buy more property at this time. 

I may further say that I have made several In- 
quiries from Independent sources concerning your 
company, and find that your reputation for square 
dealing is of the best. — Vours truly, 

(Signed) CHARLES A. MARTIN. 



Pleased With Dealings With This 
Company 

Baddeek. .VS., Oct. 7, 1912. 
International Securities Co., Ltd., . 

Winnipeg. 
llear Sirs, — Last January T purchased from you, 
partly on my own selection and partly on your 
advice, several towne»lte lots in different Western 
towns', 1 have not been able personally to see 
these lots, but have been fortunate during this 
summer to have come In contact with men who 
were familiar with real estate in different parts of 
the West, and from all accounts I must say that 
I am ontlrely satisfied with my Investments. Also, 
that my business dealings with you have boen very 
satisfactory. I have been particularly Satisfied 
with tlie prompt and cheerful in, inner in which you 
have at all times given advice In detail when asked 
for, whirl. Is of the utmost Importance to all, more 
especially to clients at a distance. I am sure cli- 
ents all over will find you the right party to deal 
with. 

(Signed) JOHN G. DAVIDSON. 



INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES COMPANY, LIMITED 



AUTHORIZED AND 
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS OF 



GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC 



For sale of its Townsitc Lots'in Divisional Points of Melville, Watrous, Biggar, Wainwright, and Junctional Point of Tofield, as well as Town of Scott, all located on main line of Grand Trunk 

Pacific Railway between \\ innipeg and Edmonton. 



THE IWTEHNATIOWAI. SHCTTMTOJS CO., X.TD., IS THE OWVEB O* MAHAftEB TOR SALE OF OTHER IMEOBTAWT TOWNSITES OK STJBDIVtSIOKS TO CITIES OX TOWBTS, 

Lethbridge Alta. Brandon, Man. Moose Jaw, Sask. Cardston, Alta. Kamloops, B.C. Weyburn, Sask. Lacombe, Alta. 



AS FOX. LOWS: 



N. Batleford, Sask. 



Regina, Sask. 



Medicine Hat, Alta, Swift Current, Sask. Canora, Sask. Entwistle, Alta. Yorkton, Sask. 

Also land for Fruit Raising near Elko, British Columbia. 



Macleod, Altai 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Inquiries are solicited from investors interested in any above-named Cities or Towns, or British Columbia Fruit Land. These Cities and Towns afford splendid openings for business and 

professional men. Full information will be freely furnished, and booklet, maps, etc., mailed free upon request. Address nearest office. 

International Securities Company, Limited 

1324 DOUGLAS STREET, VICTORIA, B. C. 

ST JOHN, N.B., Dearborn Building. MONTREAL, QUE., Yorkshire Building. TORONTO, ONT., Royal Bank Building. CALGARY,' ALTA., 132 1 First Street West. 

REGINA SASK., Western Trust Building. MOOSE JAW, SASK., Simington Block. SASKATOON, SASK., 10 1 20th St. East. WINNIPEG, MAN., Somerset Buikfcng. 

VANCOUVER, B.C., Dominion Trust Bldg. BRANDON, MAN., McKenzie Building. 



•~iir 



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17 n_ . , 



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18 



VfCTORTA DAILY COLONIST 



EXCLUSION OF ASIATICS 



Attitude of Different Parts of the 

Smpire on a Vary Or»ve 

Problem 



There la probably no ques'lon In 
imperial politics at the present time, 
not even that of Ulster excepted, 
which compares In point of difficulty 
and embarrassment with that of the 
exclusion of Asiatics, amongst whom 
own Indian fellow-subjects of all de- 
grees are included, from other por- 
tions of the empire, says The London 
standard. 

The attitude of the component parts 
of the South African Union has not 
be«n at all times consistent in re- 
sard to this matter. Thus Natal has 
systematically encouraged Indian Im- 
migration for work primarily upon 
the railways and in the sugar and tea 
plantations on the coast. Indian trad- 
••r.-s were mildly encouraged in the 
Transvaal because they were sup- 
posed to be willing to dispose of their 
wares at a less profit than that ex- 
acted by the European storekeeper. 
The Orange Free_J|iaie, on the other 
hand, would not have Asiatics at any 
price, just as It would have no Kaf- 
firs, outside of a limited number of 
reserves, except as servants to Euro- 
peans. The Cape did not court the 
coolie, but would not altogether close 
its doors. It thus occurs that while, 
at the one ond o{ the Ahaln, Natal 
has an Indian pop«l#**o# 0# 1|».OO0 
souls, the Free State, at the other 
end, has practically none at all. The 
Cape has about 15,000, and In . the 
Transvaal thers are not more than 
S.000 all toll?. '• 

Advantage was taken of the feeling 



ai mined fry the ' mu ' vauumi n of C BUn* 
ese, for work on the mines of the 
Hand, to elicit a declaration against 
the further Introduction of Asiatics 
in general, and a v *fy , stringent law 



be selected for the teat — would seem to 
be sufficiently wide to satisfy the moat 
exacting of exclusionists. In the event, 
however, this did not prove to be the 
case. The Dutch members were not 
satisfied that a knowledge of English 
alone would be sufficient to secure, 
to a limited number even of their In- 
dian fellow-subjects, the right of ad- 
mission to their sacred territory. 
Cases arose which compelled the sec- 
retary of state to request that an In- 
dian parent already domiciled In South 
Arrlca. should have the right of ap- 
peal to the courts if his children 
should be arbitrarily excluded. 

In the result, the prime minister was 
compelled to declare that pressure of 
business was so great — In other words, 
the opposition was so hot — that the 
measure could not be proceeded with. 
Acting upon his instructions, no doubt, 
Lord Gladstone pressed General Botha 
to summon parliament in November 
for a special session. The prime min- 
ister consulted his colleagues, and the 
special session has not been convened. 
He has promised, however, that a third 
attempt shall be made next year, giv- 
ing expression at the same time- to 
the hope that further assistance will 
be aforded him in his efforts to find 
an acceptable solution. The assurance 
that this assistance will not be ! de- 
nied has, of course, been given; but 
with the lapse of time the chance of 
the promised legislation ever being 
enacted becomes distinctly smaller and 
beautifully less, if, as is true, the 
union' government outs- but • sorry 
figure In the business, that of the 
imperial government is humiliating 
to a degree, and calculated to alienate 
the respect and confidence of untold 
millions of faithful subjects of the 
King, 



TXS TJMMT UIVII DISPBsVSIOM 

AUCTION SALE 



OF 

Pure Bred Breeding Stock 

AT THE COLONY FABM, 
OOQ.UXri.AM. B. a 

Under instructions from Dr. C. E. 
Doherty, 1 will sell, by Public Auction, 
on the premises, the Colony Kami, 
Coqultiam, on 

Tuesday, Nov. 12th 

1913 

At 1.30 o'clock p. m., the undermen- 
tioned Pure Bred Holstein Rresian 
Cattle and C'y.desdale and Hackney 
Horses. 

7 Pure Bred Holstein Fresian Cows, 
4 fresh at date of sale, 2 due in Janu- 
ary, 1 In February. 

3 Pure Bred Holstein Fresian Heif- 
ers, all from prize-winning sires and 
dams. 

8 Pure Bred Holstein Fresian Bulls, 
all one year old -and under. 

■ 8 Pure Bred Clyde Mares and Fil- 
lies, two of these are imported, and the 
fillies are from prize- winning sires and 
dams. < • ■ 

3 Pure Bred Clyde Stallion Colts. 

I Pure Bred Hackneys. 

1 Span well matched Black Geldings, 
suitable for hack or delivery, about 
2,500 IbB. 

This is a rare opportunity given by 
the government to the farmers of B. 
fi. to isnuwi st their own print and at 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page 14 



* 



BY-LAW No. 201. 



Quebec Street, from St. Jdhn Street to Menzies Street — Grading, Draining and Paving with Asphalt, Constructing Curbs and Gutters on 

Both Sides of Street, also Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Laterals. 



d 

e 

NAME OF OWNER 3 

> 

Simpson, Mrs. S. V. T 1273 

Simpson, Mrs. S. V. T 661 

Pendray, .Mrs. A. J. and W. J 560 

Pendray, Mrs. A. J. and W. J 659 

Clarke, Graham James (Est. of) 658 

Hunter, Hon. Gordon 657 

Roberts, Kate ' Wpt 554 

McNlffe, Margaret & Mary Jane E pt 564 

1 ;.mi.>, George 546 

McKay, Donald (Est. of) 646 

I Kay, Donald (Est. of) 647 

Wilson, A. & W 548 

Mouat,. William Alexander «... 656 

Mouat, William Alexander 654 

Mouat, William Alexander , 653 

M -In tosh, W. D 652 

galley, S. O 897 

Tighe, .Mary ..'..,. ..... 896 

Day, R. a. arid Heisterman, H. G.;.... 895 

Day, R. s., and Heisterman, H. G...... 894 

Sunsmulr, Mrs. Robert (Est of) 898 

unsmMiy *Irs. Robert (Est of) ...-.♦. 899 

Blume. Misses ..v......,.,*,...' »00 

Blume. Misses '.;....■#. - »', ~,i . . . . V* *. . ♦ . *0* 

Mackintosh, Mrs. H. ««. A W Ml 

McLean, w. (Bet ot) .... ;i <y. . . W pt 903 

McLean. W. (Est of) ................ Ept 908 

MeGregor, Mrs. M. ■„■..... Wpt908 

*» *** •....••»•••••••**'♦ ....... ..... «. Sv4 

-Wallace, w. '-Q, , ,,,,.. 4. ......... ...-.».. 905 

*«&m, Mrs. M, ,,,, »0« 

Ormond, Albert* B. ........ »07 

C ee l e p , Ha r r y - y. .v... ".; ' ... .....■.»..;. -|<p- 

OrSunivan. Daniel •<»« 

©Sullivan, Daniel J... , ^910 

O-SuUIvan, Humphrey, r>. (Est of).... Ml 

O'Sullivan. Humphrey. D. (Est of),... Uto 

SgUBb Lydhv J. Jtf*_ 

Stevens, Fanny ..;.........., ..., 987 

Bendrodt. James (Est of): 928 

Caulfield. James . *,.,,.. 929 

Caulneld, Margaret M. ...,.......;.... 980 

Trustees of. St. James Church pt 954 

Trustees of St James Church pt 945 




a 

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263.80 
253. fi U 
253.80 
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242. 16 
287.60 
263.80 
263.80 
253.80 
258.80 
253.S0 
253.80 

■4,53.80 
253.80 
258.80 
263.80 
253.30 
958.80 
253.80 
253.80 
253.80 
853.80 
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8466.30 
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8 8 1. 10 
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242.16 
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269. 40 
291.40 

259 
259.40 
259.40 
281.40 
285.80 
259.40 
259.40 
281.40 
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268.80 
253.80 
263.80 
269.40 
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174.80 
84.60 
90.20 
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229.80 
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67.40 
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21.55 
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IS 

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674.00 
359.50 
347.00 
359.50 
847.00 
352.50 
298.50 
300.00 
320.00 
859.50 
320.00 
320.00 
820.00 
347.00 
352.50 
320.00 
320.00 
347.00 
■913.00 
825.50 
313.00 
813.00 
320,00 
825.00 
215.50 
106.50 
111.00 
. 215.50 
320.00 
283.50 
356.50 
320.00 



259.40 

291.40 
291.40 

116.05 
253.80 



63.20 

32.00 
35.96 
35.95 
14.20 

21-30 



332.-00- 



Newbro's Hcrpicide Saves 



to this effect was passed in the 
Transvaal. The value of Indian labor 

to Natal was so great that the qUs/i* 
tlon appeared to be too large and too 
thorny to touch so far as that colony 
was concerned. The Indian govern- 
ment has, however, views of its own 
as to the treatment to Which its sub- 
jects are entitled, and it did not nicely 
discriminate between what took place 
In one part of South Africa and what 
in another. After a succession of 
vain protests, it finally resolved, pro- 
bably in the hope of bringing South 
Africa to its senses, to 'prohibit the 
Introduction of indentured coolie labor 
into South Africa altogether. This 
determination, somewhat strange to 
say, meets with the support of repre- 
sentative Indians already domiciled in 
Natal, who state, in a memorial ad- 
dressed to the secretary of state, "your 
memoralists Welcome this decision, 
not only because the attitude of the 
Kuropeans generally in South Africa 
is hostile towards legitimate Indian 
aspirations, but also because, in your 
memoralists' opinion, the system of In- 
denture 1s In Itself Inherently bad, and 
savors of a state bordering on slavery." 
-Such being the attitude of the Indian 
irovernment, and the opinions of the 
Indians themselves, it .was scarcely, to 

expected that the imperial authori- 
ties would put forth any special effort 
to -save' a. system which seemed to 
commend itself to none but those who 
were directly interested in its mainten- 
ance. Tiie importation of coolies, 
therefore, went by the board. The re- 
sults have yet" to be seen of the re- 
patriations of the laborers who were 

ady .In the country when the edict 
of the Indian government went forth. 
The case of the traders was obviously 
not on the same footing as that of 
Indentured laborers; and the imperial 
authorities, whilst anxious to pay all 
possible deference to local sentiment, 
have been -naturally anxious, lest the 
proud boast of "Clvis Romanus sum" 
should lose even the semblance of its 
force, to prevent the stigma of exclu- 
sion being placed in any quarter of 
the empire upon the most consider- 
able portion of Its subjects by reason 
of their race alone. 

It was fully understood, therefore, 
when the union of the several colonies 
was effected that legislation would be 
enacted by which the face of the im- 
perial government mlirht h« Biivni 
Bind the special mission with which 
Lord Gladstone was supposed to be 
entrusted was that of bringing all his 
persona] influence, and that of his of- 
fice, to bear upon the task of trans- 
lating this understanding into due le- 
gal form. In that mission It Is now 
perceived that the governor-general 
-has 1 completely failed. The White- 
paper issued 1 since the rising of parlia- 
ment makes no pretence to conceal the 
extent of this failure, and probably 
accounts for the pujtsence of Lord 
Gladstone In England at the present 
time. The Union government, in pur- 
suance of their understanding with 
I>owning-street, submitted to parlia- 
ment in its first session last year S 
bill which aubected all immigrants to 
an equal statutory test, and under 
which all but a few selected Asiatics, 
principally professional men, could be 
effectually excluded. The v provisions 
of this measure would, however, not 
have excluded Asiatics admitted into 
other parts of the union from entry 
into the Orange Free State, and the 
members from the province were so 
unanimous In their opposition that the 
hill had to be withdrawn. The atti- 
tude of the Indian themselves was 
far from unaccomodatlng, and most 
exemplary In recognition of the Eu- 
ropean point of view; but their leaders 
declared that, as a matter of princi- 
ple, they could not accept as a final 
solution any settlement which barrel 
Indians, qua Indians, from access to 
any quarter of the King's dominions. 

A fresh attempt at legislation was 
made in the session which came to an 
end a few weeks ago. The salient fea- 
ture of the measure was an educa- 
tional ten I a prohibited Immigrant 
being described as "any person who 
is unable to pass the education test, 
that is to say, when an Immigration 
offioer dictates to him not less than 
fifty words In the language selected 
by such officer, falls to write out 
those words in that language to the 
satisfaction of that officer." The 
terms of the clause thus limiting the 
right of enur-locklng to the fact 
that either Dutob or English mig^t 




Saves the Hair 

If you want to free your head of 
dandruff and stop falling hair, you 
must sooner or later resort to New- 
bro's Herpicide. 

By using Herpicide first you save 
yourself worry, which is desirable, you 
save money, which Is a consideration, 
and you save your hair, which is the 
most important of all. 

Why not profit by the experience of 
Mrs. S. A. Lee, of 110 South 4th street, 
Richmond, Va., who writes: 

"Four years' residence in India ruined 
my hair until it was but two Inches 
long and very thin. I tried everything 
In Europe and America without bene- 
fit until I was Induced to use Heirpl- 
clde. My hair is now long, soft and 
silky and natural color, while before 
it was quite gray. My friends never 
tire of admiring my hair." 

Mrs. Lee's story is a typical history 
of hair troubles. After everything else 
fails Newbro's Herpicide brings relief. 
It would be just as effective if used 
first " > . ■ - 

Newbro's Herpicide kills the dandruff 
germ and prevents falling hair. It 
stops itching of the scalp almost In- 
stantly. No matter what the claims of 
others', Herpicide is the only genuine 
original dandruff germ destroyer. 

Newbro's Herpicide in 60c and 31.00 
sizes Is sold by all dealers who guar- 
antee it. to do all that is claimed. If 
you are not satisfied your money will 
be refunded. 

Send 10c for sample bottle to The 
Herpicide Co., Dept It, Detroit, Mich. 

C. H. Bowes & Co., Druggists. 

DANCING 

COITNATJGHT BALL TO RENT 
Classes — Adults, Wednesday evening, 
7.30. 

Children — Saturday afternoon, 3 p. m. 
For terms and particulars, apply 

MRS. SIMPSON 

810 Tates Street. Phono R-1821 



HOTEL 

STEWART 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Geary Street, above Union Square 
European Plan $1.50 a day up 
American Plan $3.00 a day up 

New steel and brick structure. * 
Every comfort and convenience. 
A high class hotel at very moderate 
rates. In the center of theatre and 
retail district On car lines trans- 
f erring to si 1 parts of city. Electric 
omnibus meets all trains and 
steamers. 

I HOTEL STEWART 

Vi — 



Maynard & Sons 



A ri "HONKERS 



Instructed by Mr. Kellar, we will sell 
at the Residence 

866 PANDORA AVENUE 

On 

Tuesday, 2 p. m. 

All the 

Furniture and Effects 

Contained in this R-room house. Includ- 
ing: Dlningroom, sideboard, extension 
table, folding bed, camp cot, linoleums, 
rugs, crockery, China and glassware, 

etc. 

6 Bedrooms — 5 full size and single 
Iron bedsteads, springs and maitreeses, 
oak dresser and stand, bureaus and 
washstands to each room, chest of 
drawers, toiletware, Morris chair, lin- 
oleums and rugfij chairs, tables, cur- 
tains, rockers, blankets, sheets, spreads, 
pillows, etc., to each room. 

Kitchen — Cook etove, kitchen table, 

chairs, cooking utertsiN etc. On view 
Monday afternoon • •. ! . .' roing of sale. 

XATKABD ft ion Auctioneers 



their own doors, young breeding stock 
of the very best strains procurable. 
No trouble or expense has bee»i^l!|M|red 
in the selection of the siren axi^«$|ii(jJ-.>, 
-of. t he y oung stock, and they 
gathered in from all over the AmerU 
can continent and the fact that these 
cattle and horses, having captured 
practically all of the best prlzes^at the 
late Dominion exhibition, should be 
proof enough that there Is nothing 
■better to be secured. 

Terms: For sums of $50 and under, 
spot cash, over that amount, cash, or 
lien notes at 3 months will be accepted 
with 7 per cent Interest ; '.:lMg 

Please note; these animals will only 
be sold to farmers and stock-raisers 
of B. C, and that every animal must 
be sold without reserve. 

T. J. Trapp & Co., 

Limited 

Auctioneers. 

Messrs Stewart Williams & Co. 

Duly instructed toy Mrs. Poquette, will 
sell, by 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

At her residence, 

559 Hillside Avenue 

Near Government street, on 

Tuesday, November 5th 

At a o'clock, the whole of her 

Household Furniture 
and Effects 

Including: Bedsteads, springs and tops; 
pillows, bureaus and washstands, a 
quantity of chairs, linoleum, lace cur- 
tains, good range, tables, wash tubs, 
•boilers, sideboard, extension table, 6 
dining chairs, plants, ocbaslonal 
tables, couch, rockers, pictures, mat- 
ting, baby's crib, carpets, toiletware, a 
quantity of harness, garden tools, hose, 
clock and other goods too numerous to 
mention. 

The Auctioneer Stewart Williams 



Davies & Sons 

AUCTIONEERS 

Auction Sale 



Of 

Household Effects 

At our Auction Mart, 

555 Yates Street 

Just below Government Street 

Thursday, 2 p. m. 

Particulars later. 
H. W. Davies, M. A. A., Auctioneer. 

Phones 740, 741: and 1002. 



^r«- 



Maynard & Sons 

AUCTIONKKHS 

Important 
Sale 

Instructed by thr< owner wo will sell 
at salesroom, 726 View street, on 

Friday Next, 2 p. m. 

HIGH CLAS8 

English Mahogany 

Furniture and Japanese 

Carved Furniture 

Including: Grandfather's clocks, tall 
boy chest of drawers, 3 bowfort chest 
of drawers, bedroom suite, very fine 
carpet, arm chairs, set of chairs, oak 
chest, etc., also very fine lot of 
Japanese carved chairs and tables. Full 
particulars later. 



6.00 
6.00 
5.60 



'!"- 



10.00 

10.00 



-*1L 



JM. 



40 
40 

40 

40 
40 
40 



60.0 
60.0 

60.0 
60.0 

3625.5 



jUUL 



4.1* 

t''i,f»W-.' 

4.23 
4.23 



263.80 

253.80 
r 268.80 
.263.80 






5.60 
6.S0 

6.60 
5,60 
6.60 



10.00 



259.40 
260.40 
269.40 
313.40 
281.40 
253.80 



32.00 
32.00 
32.00 

38.65 
34.70 
31.30 



$10,682.50 330.00 184.80 $100.00 $11,297.30 



$1393.45 



359. 

369. 

142.00 

313.00 

320.00 

320.00 

320.00 

386.50 

347.00 

313.00 



$13,934.50 




City's share . .... 



Total 



$3991.78 
$15,289.03 



BY-LAW No. 130. 



Paving Pendergast Street, between Vancouver Street and Cook Street, with Asphalt, and Constructing Curbs, Gutters and Boulevards on 



»si 



Both Sides of Said Street, also Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Laterals. 



e 
NAME OF OWNER jE 

B 

-"■ I 

'■'•«' 

Mesher, G. C. 

Mesher, G. C, '....*. 

Mesher, G. C. 

Mesher, G. C. ................. 

Dixon, J. R. H. 

Mesher, G. C. 

Moggy, James. 

Mesher, G. C. 

Mesher, G. C. ' ■". 

McGregor, J. H. .....".......... 

McGregor, J. H. ............... 

Fairfull, Andrew .......... ..i. • 

Smith, Mrs. E. J. 

Bannister. A. E. Ept 

Vallee, Mary ................... Wpt 

Hough, Annie L. ■ 

Brown, Thomas 

Howell, G. C. 

Kersley, Hanna 

Pprter, W. H. 

Gallon, F ••• 

Greenwood, John 

Mitchell, Wesley N. 

Mitchell, Wesley N. 

Morgan, James Wpt 

Coffee, Elizabeth E. pt 



o 
o 



o 

'-■ 
3 



fa 



•J 

a 
* 2 

.ft fa 

o *• 

t; ° 
a o 



4 


n 


03 


. f- 


Kfa 


31 


83 


Fairfield 


100. 


$3.23 


22 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


23 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


24 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


25 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


26 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


27 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


28 


88 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


29 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


30 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


31 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


32 


83 


Fairfield 


47.4 


3.23 


5 


83 


Fairfield 


100. 


8.23 


33 


-83 


Fairfield 


69.6 


3.23 


33 


88 


Fairfield 


70.2 


3.23 


38 


83 


■Fairfield 


47.6 


3.23 


39 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


3.23 


40 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


3.23 


41 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


3.23 


42 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


8.23 


43 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


3.23 


44 


83 


Fairfield 


47.3 


3.23 


45 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 . 


3.23 


46 


83 


Fairfield 


47.5 


3.23 


47 


83 


Fairfield 


65. 


3.23 


47 


83 


Fairfield 


85.2 


3.23 



1427.3 



a 

B 

.8 
_ » 

c ft 

<D C 

cS 

323.00 
152.90 
152.90 
152.90 
162.90 
152.90 
152.90 
162.90 
162.90 
152.90 
152.90 
152.90 
323.00 
224.45 
226.65 
153.15 
153.15 
158.15 
158.15 
153.15 
153.15 
153.15 
153.15 
153.15 
177.65 
276.10 

$4610.10 



■ 
c 
o 
'C 
o 

U 1) 

£<§ 

20.08 
20.08 
20.08 
20.08 
20.08 

20.08 



20.08 
20.08 
20.0S 



20.08 
20.08 



Q.§ 

3» 

-I 
j- a 

38 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
6.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 



6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 



4 

a 
o 

VI 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



1 

o 



A 

rt fa 
a _ 

3 

e S 

a a 



o "* 

o c 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 

10.00 



$220.88 $120.00 

City's share. 



$110.00 



358.08 


$ 44.16 


$ 441.50 


187.98 


23.20 


232.00 


1S7.98 


23.20 


232.00 


187.98 


23.20 


232.00 


187.98 


23.20 


232.00 


157.90 


19.45 


194.no 


187.98 


23.20 


232. DO 


157.90 


19.45 


194.50 


157.90 


19.45 


194.50 


157.90 


19.45 


194.50 


157.90 


19.45 


194.50 


157.90 


19.45 


I'M. 50 


323.00 


39.85 


398.50 


224.45 


27.70 


277.00 


231.65 


28.55 


285.50 


158.15 


19.50 


195.00 


188.15 


23.20 


232.00 


188.15 


23.20 


: 232.00 


188.15 . 


23.20 


232.00 


158.15 


19.60 


195.00 


158.15 


19.50 


195.00 


158.15 


19.50 


195.00 


188.23 


23.20 


232.00 


188.23 


28.20 


232.00 


182.65 


22.50 


225.00 


280.10 


34.55 


345.50 



$5060.98 
. 1487.16 



$624.00 $6240.00 




Total ...$6548.14 



BY-LAW No. 153. 

Oscar Street from Cook Street to Moss Street— Grading, Draining and Paving with Asphalt, Constructing Curbs and Gutters and Boule- 
vards on Both Sides of Said Street from Cook Street to Moss Street, and Constructing a Permanent Sidewalk on the North Side of Said 
Street from Linden Avenue to Moss Street, and on the South Side f rom Cook Street to Moss Street, and Constructing Sewer, Surface Drain 

and Water Laterals. 



MAtmAMD * sOHl 



AVOtlOB 



d 
o 

NAME OF OWNEH 

I 

3 
t» 

Oliver, William E ■ 

O'Brien, The Misses 

McCurdy, David George 

McCurdy, David George 

Cowper, My. M. 

Mowat, Josephine 

Drumwond, T. D 

Drummond, F. D. 

Pearse, Marshall It -Ept 

i:.-ii. Lorne B 

iiMii'-. jonn 3 

Dewar, James 

Knott, Herbert T 

Marconinl, Alfred 

Sherbourne, John 

• 1 - irne, John 

NnriiH. Fred 

Norris, Fred 

lioroui, Captain 

Shanks. J. A- ••• _ 

MelSehlan, John H »« 

McUtohlan, John 11 

McLachlan, John H «» 

Knymoml. P, A ™ 

Raymnn.l, P. A 4 * 

Pincli. Thos " 

McKay, i"'" 1 y 

Moffat Mary y 

Owen, Mary E. *»* 

Owen, Mary E J° 

Owen, Mary E. 

Owen, Mary E 3 » 

Melrtram, G. G B 

Meldram, G. O ' 

Dawson, Orange, F 24 

Pinch, Thos pt 1-4 

Knott. T. II.' P*->4 

Thompson, Thos. ~ pt 39-42 

Griffith 1 , J.A. -••Pt "-« 

Quamhy. Fred pt 39-42 

Doull, Alex * 

Pcmberton, F. B > 

Pemberton, F. B 4 

Pemberton, F. B 8 

Van Ness, Elizabeth D 

Partob Singh * Naglna Singh... A 



4 
5 

4 
5 
7 
9 

11 

13 
7 
6&T 

18 

17 

16 

15 

14 

13 

12 

11 

10 
9 
8 

9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
9-10.1 
7.8.17. 
7.8.17 
7.8.17 
5.6.19 
5.8.19 
6.6.19 
5.6.19 
6.6.19 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1-2-1 
1-8-1 



6 5 
6 5 
4 6 
4 5 
4 5 
4 6 
4 5 
4 5 
6 5 
6 6- 



2-16 
2-16 
2-18 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
2-16 
.18 
.18 
18 
20 
20 
.20 
20 
.20 



v 
o 

5 

-6, 21 

6. 21 

-6, 21 

-6, 21 
-6, 21 
-6. 21 

-a, 21 

-8, 21 
-6, 21 
6. 21 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



ri 

o 

X! 
O 
V 

DO 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Kalrfleld 
Fairfield 
Fnirfield 
Fair'freW 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
-Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fmlrfleld 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Falrflfcid 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 



3 
o 

fa 



fa 

120.0 
120.0 
110.0 
60. 
60.0 
- 60.0 
60.0 
109.3 ' 
1OO.0 
68.0 
50.0 
50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
5H).0 
50.0 
50.0 
V50.0 
130.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
50.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
30.0 
60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
48.7 
110.0 
106.8 
44.0 
88.0 
44.0 
44.0 
44.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
60.0 
50.0 
100.0 

■ m 

1028.1 






Continued on Page 17 





a 




a 






i 


5W 




m 


£ri 


B 




££ 


c 


4) 

E 


a 




Qg 


a 





c fi 


a g. 


fafa 


i- 

c 2- 


3 

U to 

£ c 




33 

-2 5 
<& 


_J 


3a 


w O 


2 


Hi O 


c 


Of 


3 O 


te 





•V fi 


a 


tffa 


030 


W O 


H 


Ft < 


H<! 


8.70 


444.00 


21.40H 


5.03 


10.00 


480.484 


59.25 


592.50 


3.70 


444.00 






10.00 


454.00 


56.00 


560.00 


3.7P 


407.00 


21.40H 


6.03 




433.43% 


53.45 


634.50 


3.70 


222.00 


21.40V4 


5.03 




248.43% 


30.65 


806.50 


3.70 


222.00 


21.40H 


10.06 




258.464 


31.25 


312.60 


8.T0 


- -222i0O.' 


21.40* 


, 5.03 




248.43% 


30.66 


806.50 


3,70 


. 222.00 


21.40V4 


5.03 




248.43% 


30.65 


306.60 


3.70 


404.20 


21.40V4 


6.08 


io.no 


440.684 


64.35 


543.50 


3.70 


370.00 




5.02 




375.03 


46.25 


462.50 


&7,0 


214.60 


2J.40V4 


5.03 




241.03% 


29.70 


29T.00 


4.72 


236.00 




5.03 




241.08 


29.70 


297.00 


4.72 


.236.00 


21.40V4 


6.03 


10.00 


272.43% 


83.60 


386.00 


4.72 


236.00 




5.03 


10.00 


251.08 


30.85 


308.60 


•4.72 


236.00 


21.40% 


5.03 


10.00 


272.48% 


83.60 


336.00 


4.72 


336.00 




5.03 




241.08 


29.70 


297.00 


4J2 

4.72 


236.00 




6.03 




241.03 


29.70 


297.00 


236.00 


21.40H 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


83.60 


886.00 


4S72 


286.00 


21.4114 


5.03 




262.434 


32.36 


828.50 


4.72 


286.00 


21.40V4 


5.03 




262.4 3 4 


32.35 


823.60 


4; 7 2 


2:16.00 




5.03 


in. no 


251.03 


30.85 


308.60 


4.7 2 


708.00 


2T..40H 


5.03 


30.00 


764.43% 


04.25 


942.60 


4.7 2 


613.60 


21.404 


5.03 


30.00 


670.034 


82.65 


826.50 


4.72 


236.00 


21.404 


5.0 3 


10.00 


272.434 


33.60 


836.00 


4.72 


236.00 


21.40 4 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


33.60 


836.00 


4.72 


236.00 


21.404 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


33.60 


836.00 


4.72 


236.00 


21.404 


5.03 


10.1)0 


272.434 


33.60 


386.00 


4.72 


236.00 


21.40 4 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


33.60 


886.00 


4.72 


236.00 


•21.404 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


33.60 


886.00 


4.72 


286.00 


21.40M 


6.03 


10.00 


272.43 4 


38.60 


286.00 


4.72 


141.60 


21.404 




10.00 


173.00% 


21.35 


218.60 


4.72 


236.00 




5.0.1 




241.03 


29.70 


297.(0 


4.72 


236.00 


21.404 


5.03 


in. no 


272.434 


33.60 


386.90 


4.72 


236.00 


21.404 


5.03 


10.00 


272.434 


83.60 


836.00 


4-72 


229.30 


21.404 


5.0 3 


10.00 


265.73% 


82.7ft 


827.60 


4.72 


519.20 


21.40% 


5.03 


10.00 


555.63% 


68.50 


685.00 


4.72 


496.75 


21.404 


5.03 


in. on 


533.184 


65.75 


657.60 


4.72 


207.70 




5.03 


3 0.00 


222.73 


27.45 


, 274.80 


4.72 


416.35 


21.40% 


5.03 




441.78% 


54.60 


•■ 545.00 


4.72 


207.70 




5.03 


10.00 


222.73 


27.45 


274.60 


4.72 
4.72 


207.70 


• 


5.03 




212.73 


26.25 


291.60 


207.70 


21.404 


5.03 




234.13% 


28.85 


188.60 


4.72 


236.00 




5.03 




241.03 


29.70 


297.00 


4 72 


236.00 




5.03 




241.03 


29.70 


297.00 


4 72 


236.00 




'6.03 




241.03 


29.70 


297.00 


4.72 


236.00 




5.03 




241.03 


29.70 


297.00 


4.72 


141.60 




5.03 




146.63 


18-10 


181.00 


4.72 


472.00 


21.40% 


5.03 


10.00 


608.43% 


62.70 


• 27.00 




• 13,404.00 


8663.65% 


1231.38 


$300.00 


$14,698.93% 


$1,799.9$ 


»17,99f.50 




City' 








3.460.26% 


















$18,059.1* 















d 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



17 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page 16 



BY-LAW No. no. 

Cambridge Street, from May Street to Dallas Road— Gradinr Draining and Paving with Asphalt, and Constructin? Permanent Sidewalks 
on Both Sides of Said Street, with Curbs, Gutters and Boulevards, and Sewer, Surface Drain and Water Laterals. 



d 
5 

NAME OF OWNER ■ 

>■ 

1 

a 

W 

Dobson, William 20 

McKay A Stewart. Miss M. E 21 

B. C. Electric Ry 22 

B. 0. Electric Ry 23 

B. C. Electric Ry 24 

Douglas, J. A 9 

Douglas, J. A 18 

Douglas, J. A 27 

Jordison, John 36 

Jordison. John 35 

Jordison, John 34 

Pike, Albert 33 

Seotvcroft, Wm., et al • '. . 32 

Scowcroft, Wm., et al 81 

<roy, T. L. •..........•.*.•.««,«.. *p 

toy, r. E. . . . . . . . « . . . ■ ••••*.,* ••«« • #w 

McMillan, Miss E. 28 

Mosedale, Cecil J, ............... *T 

Calder, George ....... ........... $• 

C'alder, George W 

McNIsse, Miss M. and M. J 84 

McNIsse, Misa M. and M. J. 23 

Tracey, Catherine' '** 

Redding, J. T„ and Brown. H. A... 21 

Wilmot, Percy B. 20 

Martin, Samuel 19 

Eewls, Sarah H. 18 

Brown, B, H. Had H. H. 17 

Young, Stella G 18 

Morrison. William 16 

Morrison, William 14 

Porter, A. M. IS 

McKeown, A. A 

M e K e own, A. i j 1 1 ■ ■ ■ ■ i ■ ■ ■ » » i , , i ■ ■ ■ — B — 

McKeown, A. C 

McKeown, A. D 

Smith, v. F. •..•••••«•*..■•...... J3 

Hodklnson, E. F. "-. .'.v.. . . » F 

Warren, W. C. H 

B. C. Electric Ry. Co. 26 

B. C Electric By. Co, . 26 

n. c. Electric By. Co. ,. 27 

il. C. Electric By. CO. ... ,28 

Llneham, A. ...................... 29 

H.'inman, Edna I. ................. 80 - 



H 

1-25 

1.26 

1-25 

L>28 

1-25 

27-8$ 

87-81 

87-81 

5-7 & 18-20 

6-7 K 18-20 

5-7 & 18-20 

6-7 & 18-20 

5-7 & 18-20 

6-7 & 18-20 

5-7 & 18-20 

14*18-20 

6-7 418-20 

5-7 & 18-20 

6-7 ft 18-20 

6-7 & 18-20 

6-7 & 18-20 

6-7 & 18-20 

6*7 & 18-20 

6-7 4 18-20 

6.7 A 18-20 

6-7 * 18-20 

6-7 A 18-20 

6-7 418-20 

6-7 4 18-20 

6-7 4 18-20 

b-7 * 18-20 

617 4 18-20 

26-31 

26.81 



v 



s 

K 
K 
K 
K 
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i 



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3 
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3 
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d 
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33 

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Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Kalr'd 
Kalr'd 
Kalr'd 
KalrM 
Falr'd 
KalrM 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
air'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 

Kalr'd 
Fair*d 
JPdlr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Faifd 
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Falr'd 
Falr'd 
F al a' d 



fc 



c 



ed o 

Mb 

6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
5.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.28 1-J 
6.26 1-2 
5.26 1-2 
5.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1 J 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
.-._'« l -- 
*.2*l-*f 
5.26 1-* 
6.26 Ut 
6.261-3 
6.26 1-8 
8.261-,* 
6.261-2 
6.2$ 1-* 

i.tjri-s< i 

5.26 1-2 
6.26 1-8 

6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.24 1-* 

5.26 1-2 
5.26 1-3' 
n,261-2 



18.68 



II 

l- c 
W vj 
$13.70 
6.86 
6.85 
6.85 
6.85 
13.70 
13.70 
20.55 
B 

6.85 
6.85 
6.85 
6.85 

6.86 
6.85 
6.85 
*.8* 
6.85 
6.85 
6.85 
6.85 
6.85 
6.86 
6.86 
6.36 
6.86 
6.86 
6.85 
6.86 
6.66 
6.85 
6.86 
,6.85 



a 

o 

33 

h t 

2 c 

$20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
160* 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 , 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



o 
H 
$776.78 
298.78 
298.78 
298.78 
298.78 
788.93 
788.93 
785.78 
3 7 7.7:! 
298.78 
298.78 
298.78 
298.78 
99.50 
126.03 
298.78 
298.78 
***** 
298.78 
377.7* 
•7T.78 
298.78 
898.78 
288.78 
298.78 
298.78 
208.78 
288.78 
208.78 
2,98.78 
298.78 
869.06 
288.78 
268.80 



B 

> *> 

3 

C C 
1> C 

h < 
$96.80 
86.85 
36.86 
36.85 
36.85 
97.30 
97.30 
96.90 
48,60 
36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
12.26 
16.45 

•4Vm«.85 

36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
46.60 
46.60 
36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
88.8* 
86.86 
36.86 
36.86 
96.86 
86.85 
44.80 
85.60 
21,80 



Si 

o ^ 

3 J 

$958.00 
368.60 
368.50 
368.50 
368.50 
973.00 
973.00 
869.00 
466.00 
368.50 
368.50 
368.50 
368.50 
122.60 
164.60 
368.50 
368.50 
368.60 
368.50 

*#S.W 

466.00 
368.60 
368.50 
368.60 
S68.50 
368.50 
/868.60 
368.60 
368.50 
368.60 
868.6* 
448.00 
866.00 

a 18.00 



BY-LAW No. 77. 
Quadra Street, from Pandora Avenue to Blanchard Avenue — Constructing Curbs and Gutters 



NAME OF OWNER 



d 
o 

■ 



cq 

Trustees Meth. Churoh 

Trustees Meth. Church 

Florence, George 

Hurtman, S. M 

Mh.v, John E Part 

Vluy, John E Part 

Hurtery, Catherlno (est.) E. part 

Gunn, Elizabeth 8 1 

Drake, Isabel J. (est.) 2 

Hartery, Catherine (est.) 8 

Hartery, Catherine (est.) 4 

Forman, James 

Holford, George 

City of \ U-torla 

Anglican Synod of B. C 

Anglican Synod of B. C 

Anglican Synod of- B. C y' t Tii$ i &ffi i> 

Irving, Bruce 

Irving, Bruce 

Irving, Bruce 

Bradshaw, C. W 

Bradshaw, C, W. • 

Bradshaw, C. W 

j ones, t» g. ... . . «.,».'. *.««.... 

Temple, Ernest: ............... 

Temple, Eirneet ........... «• . . 

1 emple, Ernest ............... 

Tuck, Mrs, 8. -It .Part 

Tuck, Mrs. S. M. 

Tuck, Mrs. S. M, 

Tuck, Mrs. S. M. Part 

Brown, 3 ...Part 

Miller, Mrs. J. C. 

McBride, Lady Margaret 

MaBride, Lady Margaret 

Htg«ins, Addle L. 

Higglna, Addle L. . . . 

Gore, W. 8. 

Gore, W. 8. 

T r ust e es Ch r ist Olimea — ' 

Wootton, Mrs. Eliza - 

Ruckhaber, C. W. 

Robertson, Dr. H. A. Part 

Noal, William , .Part 

N eal. . -William , Par* — 

Lelser, Max Part 

McKenzie, B. and D. 

.Plummer, Frank B. .............Part 

Spencer, „W. J". ............... .Part 

Gunn, Elizabeth S .i...*^. 

Galletly, A. J. C. et al. ........ 

Brown, P. B 

Kirkpatrick, Thomas S. part 

Davis, Herbert W N. part 

Sweeney, M. ................. .Part 

Morrison, Wm. and Mrs. ......Part 

Cookson, C. M. .\S. part 

Hawkins, C. W. ........... N. part 



851 
841 
831 
821 
811 
811 
792 
791 
791 
791 
791 
772 
681 




I- 

3 

3 

26 

37 

1*00 

MOV 

1202 

12*8 

n 
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26 

21 

84 
23 
33 

21 
20 
19 

18 
17 
16 



1 

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x 
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5 
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10 
10 
16 
1« 
16 
16 
16 
21 

7 
7 
7 
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6 

6 
6 

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28 
28 

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4 
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4 
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C.C.T. 
C.C.T. 
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C.C.T. 
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C.C.T. 
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a 

I 

4-* 

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120. 
120. 
120. 
120. 

60. 

60. 
120. 

30. 

3". 

30. 

SO. 
120, 

12(1. 
300. 

5 6. 

66. 
120. 

43. 

48. 

48. 

43. 

43. 

48. 

60. 

40. 

««. 

io. 
i.i 

68. 
59. 

49. 

10. 

60. 
61.4 
61.4 
BO. 
99.8 
TO. 
108.8 
62. 



a 



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K6, 
.55 
.55 
.55 
.55 
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S 
P C 

a. a 
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$8.15 
8.1* 

8.15 
8.16 
4.05 
4.05 
8.15 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
8.15 
8.15 
20.35 
3. SO 
3.80 
8.15 
2. DO 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
4.05 
2.70 
8.10 
6.10 
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8.40 



■ 



6 C.C.T. 1 4 8. 4 

120. 

120. 

60. 

70. 

—, -,**. ,_ 



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.86 

.66 
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7 9 . 86 



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3.40 
8.60 
3.60 
S.H0 
«.T* 

P* 

136 
4.20 

-9t**V 



V 



£| 

o c 

y< 

$81.50 
S1..V) 
81.50 
81.50 
40. DO 
40.iM 
81.50 
20.50 
20.f-0 
20.50 
20.50 
81.50 
81.50 

203.50 
38.00 
88.00 
81.50 
29.00 
29.00 
29.00 
29.00 
29.0(1 
29.00 
40.50 
27.00 
31. 00 
61.00 
1.00 
34.00 
34.00 
"Tin. 

a so 

34.00 
86.00 
35.00 
34.00 
67.50 
47.50 
72.50 
42.00 
— D7J1U- 



26-31 
26-31 
26-31 
26-31 

IfcH. 



1-26 
26-81 
1-26 
1-2* 
1-** 
1-26 
1-25 



K 

K 
K 

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Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
Falr'd 
fW4. 





6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-2 
6.26 1-3 
6.261-2 

6.26 1-2 



l.Wi-1 



.101.1 
8777.2 



*.*« .i4 
*.***-* 

6.261-2 

6.2* i-a 



286.96 
236.95 
347.50 
829.10 
881.70 

-'63.-5 
' 263.25 
263.25 
268.35 
263.25 
632.20 



18.68 

18.68 
18.68 
18.68 

18.68 



It 3* 
1M* 

\lfs 

18.68 

18.68 
18.68 



6.86 

18.70 

6.86 

6.85 



13 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



265.63 
273.48 
389:88 
864.63 

367.23 




6.85 
6.85 
6.86 
6.86 
6-85 
6.S5 



114,621.76, 



$821.92 1349.8* 
City's share. . . . 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$490,00 



-weir 

298.78 
298.78 

298.78 
298.78 
667.73 



32.75 
38.60 

48.10 
43.70 
45.30 



M;|* 
36.8* 

36.85 
36.85 
36.85 
70.00 



327.60 
386.00 
481.00 
487.00 

453.00 



"roan* 

368.50 
368.60 

368.50 
368.50 
368.50 
700.00 



$16,283.02 
8,600.31 



$2,008.20 $20,082.00 



>» l lj( i| i' ll 



Total.. ....■ ...'../.• *80.1*8.88 




*7.« 

130. 
•9. 
«0. 

120. 
120. 
120. 

60. 

60. 

64. 

36. 

42. 

78. 



M 

.56 
.68 
.85 
.55 
.66 
.65 
.55 
.55 
.65 
.55 
.55 
.55 



66.00 

66.00 
27.50 
88.60 

35.20 



31.60 



33.00 
66.00 
66.00 
66.00 
33.00 
33.00 
46.20 
19.80 
23.10 
42.90 



BY-LAW No. 196. 

Johnson Street, from Douglas Street to Quadra Street— Grading, Draining and Paving v/ith an Asphaltic Pavement, and Constructing a 

Permanent Sidewalk of Concrete on the North Side of Said Street between Blanchard Street and Quadra Street, with Curbs and Gutters on 

Both Sides of Said Street between Douglas Street and Blanchard Street, and a Curb and Gutter on the North Side of Said Street between 

Blanchard treet and Quadra Street, also Lateral Connections to Sewers, Surface Drains and Water Mains. 



$4383.1 



City's Share 



Total 



$2410.75 
$539.15 

$3009.90 



8.1* 

8,15 
3.40 

4.rr 

4.3$ 

3.90 
8.16 

4.05 
4.05 
8.15 
8.15 
8.15 
4.05 
4.05 
5.70 
2. 15 
2.85 
5.30 

$297. ao 



81.50 
81.50 
34.00 
47.50 

43.50 
39.00 
81.50 
40.50 
40.50 
81.50 
81.50 
81.50 
40.50 
40.50 
57.00 
24.50 
28.50 
53.00 



$2973.00 



-. — — 



NAME OF OWNER 



I 



B. C. Permanent Loan & Sav, Co. 

1 i tts, S. J. ...•.;...•..»••••.*•.. 

fay ward, J". A. . — 

Say-ward. J. A. 

Bray, Richard 

Sayward, J. A. • 

Mouat Est. 

I'lckard, J. H. 

Wuagllotti, W. J. & Mrs.. .......... 

Quasi iotti, W. J. & Mrs.......... • 

^styles. 5». T. (Est) .., 

Styles, S. T. (Est.) .............. 

Casenave, Mrs. E. ............... 

Cameron & Caldwell ............ 

Vlrtur, S. A. ...'.......■. 

Borthwick, Ralph 

lltncks, R. N 

Doig, David 

Sweeney, Michael 

Sweeney, Michael 

i'avies, H. W. .... 

Daviee, Rose A • 

Seabrook, Joseph I. ............ . 

Seabrook, Joseph I 

I,im Bang 

I.im Banor 

Con ves, Lucy .................. . 

styles, 8,,'T, (Est.) 

Styles, S. T. (Est.) 

styles. S. T. (Est.) 

Vitrei His, A 

Yigelius, A. 

B. C. Telephone Co 

Lelser, M 

Styles, B. T. (Est.) .,....;.' 

styles, S. T. (Est) 

■\Vatson, Mary .' 

Melrose Co., Ltd. 

( 'raresche. Dr. A 

Bray, B 

Mable, W, J 

Scott. Robert 

Norrls, Fred 



9 
en 



.',.: •. . ■ 


139 


V 




140 


V 




141 


v., 




142 


V 




14* 


V 




144 


V 




145 


V 




146 


V 




147 


V 




148 


V 




388 


w 


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389 


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w 




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w 
w 




393 


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394 

395 


w 


■» 


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396 


w 


• 


397 


w 


part 


in 


4 
4 


part 


879 


4 


part 


880 


* 


part 


380 


4 


part 


381 


4 


Bart 


381 


4 




882 


. 4 




383 


* 




384 


4 




385 


4 




386 


4 




387 


4 




107 


3 




108 


&£# 




30 


3 




31 


3 




32 


3 




33 


3 




84 


3 




35 


3 




36 


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60. 
60. 

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• 

60. 

60.6 

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63.9 
64.4 
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19.6 

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30. 
80; 
30. 
60. 
60. 

60. 
60. 
55. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 
60. 



2333.7 



$6.05 
5.05 
5.05 
6.05 
5.05 
5.05 
5.0* 
6.0* 
6.05 
5.05 
5.97 
5.97 
6.97 
5.97 
5.97 
8.97 
5.97 
6.97 
6.97 
6.97 
6.05 
5.06 

• 5.05 
5.05 
6.05 
6.05 
6.05 
5.06 
5.06 
5.05 
6.06 
6.05 
5.05 
6.05 
6.05 
5.05 
6.05 
6.05 
5.05 
5.05 
6.05 
6.05 
5.01 










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4) 

S 
— ** 

u o 

c ft 

uS 

303.00 

308.00 

303.00 

303.00 

303.00 

S08.00 

303.00 

303.00 

303.00 

303.00 

358.20 

326.40 

35S.20 

358.20 

.",,8.20 

361.20 

358.20 

361.20 
358.20 

380.60 
824.90 

204.60 
98.45 

161.50 
161.50 
• 151.60 

151.50 

303.00 

308.00 
303.00 
303.00 

303.00 
277.75 
303.00 
303.00 
303,00 
303.00 
303.00 
303.00 
303.OO 

303.00 
303.00 

303.00 



I 



.8 
S> o 
* 5 

4> O 

KO 
74.86 
74.86 
74.8.6 

74.86 

.74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
T4.85 



d 

S • 

A fi 
2 

u e 
3 o 

WO 



7 4 86 



J- .. . - 

■'%$i 



r4.86 



74.86 



74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
74.86 
74.86 

74.86 



■a . 
o 

3 

t-15 

«5 fi 

$ 8.21 $ 10.00 

8.21 i486 

8.21 

8.21 
16.42 

8.21 10.00 

8.21 10.00 

16.42 t 

8.21 

8.21 

8.21 
16.42 10.00 

8.21 40.00 

8.21 
16i42 IO.OO 

8.21 10.10 

8.21 

8.21 10.00 

8.21 

8.21 
16.42 

8.21 , 

8.21 10.00 

:0*.ii': 
«.2i 

8.21 ; 10.00 
ie.42 

19.42 10.00 

24.63 

8.21 
8.21 



10.00 



8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 
8.21 



10.00 
20.00 
10.00 



o 

' - h; 

306.07 

377.86 

396.07 

386.07 

311.21 

39-1.2* 

896.07 

396.07 

394.28 

386.07 

441.27 

333.61 

384.62 

406.41 

366.41 

387.*2 

376.41 

369.41 

451.27 

388.81 

333.11 

220.92 

106.66 

169.71 

234.57 

169.71 

169.71 

319.42 

329.42 

327.63 

396.07 

311.21 

277.75 

313.00 

406.07 

396.07 

386.07 

386.07 

386.07 

386.07 

311.21 

386.07 

311.21 



$12,664.20 



$1497.20 $402.29 $200.00 $14,763.69 

City's share 7,261.46 



r| ■ . 


2'E 


_ N 


<V r-» 


«0 -4 




al m 


c fi 


^"3 
•■•3 3 


«l 


Q fi 


■H*l 


P * 


$ 48.85 


$ 488.50 


46.60 


466.00 


48.85 


488.50 


47.60 


476.00 


38-40 


384.00 


48.60 


486.00 


48.85 


4R8.50 


48.86 


488.50 


48.60 


486.00 


47.60 


476.00 


54.40 


544.00 


41.16 


411.50 


47.45 


474.60 


50.10 


601.00 


46.20 


'452.00 


47.80 


478.00 


46.40 


464.00 


4 5.55 


455.50 


55.65 


556.50 


47.95 


479.50 


41.10 


411.00 


27.25 


272.50 


13.15 


131.50 


20.95 


309.50 


28.96 


289.50 


19.70 


.197.00 


!i#>96 


209.50 


39.40 


394.00 


40.60 


406.00 


40.40 


401.00 


lis 


488.50 
384.00 
342.50 


38.60 


386.00 


50.10 


501.00 


48.85 


488.50 


47.60 


476.00 


47.60 


476.00 


47.60 


476.00 


47.60 


476.00 


38.40 


3S4.00 


47.60 


476.00 


38.40 


384.00 


$1820.76 


$18,207.60 



Lighting Broad Street, from Fort Street to Cormorant Street, with Electric Light Columns bearing 
p Cluster Lights, and Constructing the Necessary Conduits for Carrying Wires Underground. 



Total $22,015.15 



BY-LAW No. 149. 

Cornwall Street, from Richardson Street to Fairfield Road— Grading, Draining and Paving with Asphalt, Constructing Permanent Side- 
walks of Concrete, with Curbs. Gutters and Boulevards, on Both Sides of Said Street, also Sewer, Surface Dr.iin and Water Laterals. 



NAME OF OWNER 



d 

a 



2 

3 

Cameron. Mrs. Beatrix I 

Cameron. James O Part 

Whltrh-rad. Franklin D Part 

Freeman. Alfred A Part 

Kln«t, Alfred Q Part 

Knowlss, B. K 

Dunford & Matthews 7 

Slater, Thomas H 6 

Slater. Thos. H 6 

Sampson, WI Curtis & Pemb'ton, f. b. 4 

Hon I ton. T. C 

Smith, V:il7.a A. Mi'B 

Smith. Kllza A. MrB 

Dawley, W. T 

Robinson, James Wrn 

McGavin, Andrew 

Wong Wah, et al 

city of Victoria 

Partridge, Francis 

Ritchie, Eliza J 

Ritchie, J. (Est. of) 

Ritchie, J. (Est. of) 

McKlnnon, Jane 

Hescott, Wm. D. & John W 

Rothwell, Mrs. E. C 

Hothwell, Mrs. E. C Part 

White, Sidney Fart 

Cowper, Henry M 

Cowper. Henry M Pnrt 

Wooton, Stephen T Part 

Wooton, Stephen T 

Wooton, Stephen Y 

Wooton. Stephen T 



3 5 



3 
12 
12 

14 
1 4 
16 



o 

5 

40 
40 
40 
10 

10 

40 



1X-21 40 
1R-21 10 
18-21 40 
18-21 4 
12 40 



16 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
I 
2 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

10 

9 

9 

8 



39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
7 
89 
39 
89 
39 
39 
39 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



d 

o 
S 

8 

CO 

Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Falrfii Id 
I'alrfi Id 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 

Fairfield 
Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 

Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fslrfleld 
Fairfield 
["airfield 
FalrfMd 
Fairfield 
I 'airfield 
Fairfield 



o 



41 



120 

40.0 

40.0 

40.0 

40.0 

SO.O 

40.0 

40.0 

4<V0 

40 11 

1 10.0 
66.0 
65.0 
65.0 
65.0 

66.0 
66.0 
69.6 

156.6 
65.0 
65.0 
65.0 
66.0 
80.0 
80.0 
40.0 
40.0 
80.0 
40.0 
40.i) 
8n.O 
80.0 
80.0 



J 

a 

1- © 

Ol u 

a* 

4 % 

$4.81 
4.11 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4.81 
4. SI 
4.81 
4.81 
4. SI 



81 
(1 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 
81 



Total 2149.0 



c 
3 
E 

- *> 

1% 

rS E 

O 1-1 


3 

V 


0» c 

it c 

<v 
■ W O 


at 01 

Dg 

il 

& a 

k. c 

3 
M O 


d 

H 

O 
9 

bl 

a « 

d fi 





$577.20 




$4.34 


$10.00 


|*81 :. 1 


192.40 




4.84 


10.00 


206.74 


192.40 




4.3 1 




19fi.7t 


192.40 




4.34 




19fi.7l 


1F2.40 




4 84 


10.00 


206.74 


384. SO 




s,K>; 


20.00 


413.48 


192.40 




4 34 




196.74 


192.40 




4.34 




196.74 


192.40 




4.34 




196.74 


192.40 




4.34 




196.74 


629.10 




S.68 


20.00 


567.78 


317.45 


$20.94 


4.34 


10.00 


352.73 


312.65 


20.94 


4.34 


10.00 


347.93 


312.65 


20.94 


4 34 


10.00 


347.93 


812.66 


20.94 


4.34 


10.00 


347.93 


312.66 




4.84 




816.99 


317.45 


20.94 


4.34 


10.00 


.15 2.73 


334.30 


20.94 


4.84 




369 68 


753.75 




4.84 


10.00 


767.09 


814-66 


20.94 


8.68 


10.00 


352.27 


812.66 


20.94 


8.63 




342.27 


312.66 




8.68 


10.00 


381.83 


317.45 


30.94 


8.68 


10.00 


357.07 


884.80 


20.94 


8 68 


20.00 


434.42 


384.80 




8.68 


10.00 


403.48 


IPi.'O 




4.84 


10.00 


206J4 


192.40 




4.3 4 




196.74 


384.80 




8.68 


10.00 


403.48 


192.40 




4.3 4 


10.00 


206.74 


192.40 


20.94 


4.3 4 


10.00 


227.68 


884.80 


41.38 


8.68 


20.00 


455.36 


384.80 


20.94 


8.68 


20.00 


434.42 


384.80 








384.80 


$10,836.66 


$:SM6 


$186.62 


6370.00 


$11,036.48 


City's lh 


3889.34 






- 




Vatal 


|18,3*4M 



6 

<U _ 

|M Si 

3 

fi s 


Tofcal 10 Years 
Annual Paym't. 


$72.95 


$729.50 


25.50 


265.00 


24.25 


242.60 


24.26 


242.50 


25.50 


266.00 


61 00 


510.00 


24.25 


242.60 


24.25 


342.50 


24.25 


142.60 


24.25 


242.60 


68.80 


688.00 


43.50 


435.00 


42.90 


438.00 


42.90 


429.00 


42.90 


429.00 


39.10 


391.00 


48.60 


486.0* 


44.35 


443,60 


94. SO 


946.00 


43.45 


434.50 


42.20 


422.00 


40.85 


408.66 


44.06 


440.50 


63 66 


635.60 


49.75 


497.60 


26.60 


256.00 


24.25 


242.60 


49.75 


497.50 


26.50 


256.00 


28.10 


281.00 


56.16 


661.60 


51.55 


535.50 


47.45 


474.50 


61367.10 


$13,(71.00 



i 

NAME OF OWNER 3 

|- 

m 
Holland and MxPhillipa ........ Part 

Melrose Co. - Fa*8i).',. 

Brown, P. R. S. part 

Spencer, D. 11 part 

Spencer, D. ■ 

Elliott, McLean and Shandley .. 
Lee Chong and Lee Tau Tow .. 
Johnson, T. S. (Johnson Est.) .. 
Johnson, T. S. (Johnson Est.) .. 
Moody, T. G. ............... i, . Part * 

Parshalle, G. M. M. ............ Part" • 

Parshalle, G. M. M. 

Duck. William ... 

Duck, William 

Lee. Chong 

Raymond, John ...V. S. part 

Council of Salvation Army .'...11 part 
Council of Salvation Army . ...S. part 
Brackman and Ker Milling Co. .'.11 part 
Brackman and Ker Milling Co.... 

Hay, James G. A 

Gray, Andrew part 

Hay ward, Charles 

Meston, John 

Meston, John 

Home, .T. H ..W. part 

Wilson, J. K., et. al 

Victoria Creamery Co. Part 

Bosse and Whlteley Part 

Holland and McPhillips 

Colonist P. and P. Co . Part 

Dunsmulr, Mrs. J. O. (Est. of) Part 

Burroughs, Emily Ellen Part 

Dunsmulr, Mrs. U. O. (Est of) 

Adam, Chas. E Part 

Wilson, A. and W Part 

Templeman, Hon. W Part 




414 

414 

170a. 

170a 

169a 

167a 

166a 

166a 

164a 

162a 

lSia 

161a 

160a 

169a 

657 

658 

658 

659 

659 

fifiO 

535 
1252 
667 
666 
665 
664 
424 
423 
423 
429 
416 
416 
416 
413 
405 
405-6 
405-6 



fi 



W 

w 

w 
w 

w. 
w 

T 
T 
W 
W 
W 

w 
w 
w 
w 

IS 
13 

13 
13 
IS 
13 
13 
13 



^WiS 


6.3 

£ - 

SSI 6 ' 


• .J 1 

3.91 


3.91 


60.0 


8.91 


29.2 


8.91 


80.10 


3.91 


14.2 


3.91 


45.10 ' 


3.91 


60.0 


8.91 


76.6 


3.91 


, 1 88.8 ■:.-' 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91' 


60.0 


3.91 


120.0 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91 


134.0 


3.91 


20.4 


3.91 


40.0 


3.91 


60.0 


3.91 


121.0 


8.91 


25.8 


8.91 


44.0 


3.91 


61.0 


3.91 



2140.2 



3 




c 

m >> 

3 
C S 

a 


03 - 

si 

vj 

IS 
2 


$273.70 


$33.75 


$387.60 


126.10 


15.40 


154.00 


129.05 


15.90 


159.00 


117.30 


14.45 


14 i.r.o 


258.05 


31.80 


818; 00 


258.0.5 


31.80 


3 IS. 00 


258.05 


31.80 


818.00 


258.05 


81.80 


318.00 


268.05 


81.80 


3 IS. nil 


233.65 


2S.S0 


28S.0O 


24.45 


3.00 


30.00 


25S-.05 


31.80 


318.00 


258.05 


31.80 


31S.0O 


25S.05 


31. SO 


318.00 


234.60. 


28.86 


289.50 


114.05 


14.05 


140.50 


120.55 


14.85 


14V. SQ 


55.40 


6.35 


68.50 


179.20 


22.10 


221.00 


234.60 


28.96 


289. 50 


299.10 


86.90 


369.00 


346.80 


42.76 


427.50 


234.60 


38.96 


289.5 


234.60 


2S.95 


289.50 


234.60 


28.95 


289.50 


234. CO 


28,95 


289.50 


469.20 


57. S5 


578.50 


234.60 


28.95 


289.50 


234.60 


28.95 


289.50 


523.95 


C4.R0 


646.00 


79.60 


9.80 


98.00 


156.40 


19.30 


193.00 


234.60 


28.95 


289.50 


473.10 


58.35 


683.50 


100.3.-. 


12. 85 


123.50 


17 2.05 


21.20 


212.00 


199.40 


24.60 


246.00 


$8338.10 


$1031.80 


$10318.00 



BY-LAW No. 290. 

Constructing a Permanent Sidewalk of Concrete on the North Side of Lillian Road, from Irving Road 

to Robertson Street. 



NAME OF- -OWNER 



1'atmore, Percy 

Grahame, Anne 

McPherson, T. S 

Elmhurst. A. V 

Elmhurst, A. V 

Elmhurst, A. V 

Elmhurst, A. V 

McPherson, T. S 

Henry, Se-muel J., and Wm T. .. 



rf 










«J 


6 










§ 















.2 

> 








d 




w< 






M 







2 
1 


J 






3 






| 


m 


J 




CQ 


03 


~ 


41 






Baylls 


68 


110.2 


42 






Baylls 


68 


106.4 


23 


69- 


62 




19-68 


50 


22 


59 


-62 




19-68 


60 


21 


59 


■62 




19-68 


50 


20 


59 


62 




19-6S 


50 


19 


59- 


62 




19-68 


60 


18 


59 


62 




19-68 


50 


17 


59. 


62 

Cltv 


s Share 


19-68 


60 
676.6 




c 
t 

|H 

c 
a 

$15 
14 
7 
7 
7 
7. 
7. 
7. 



d 

3 
C 

a 

.60 
.96 
06 
05 
05 
05 
05 
05 
5 



$165.00 
149.50 
70.50 
70.50 
70.60 
70.50 
70.60 
70^- 



Total 



$657.25 
165.13 

$822.38 



$ 81.20 $812.00 



BY-LAW No. 317. 
Dunedin Street — (Expropriation). 



NAME OP OWNER 



Leitfh. J. L. »nd 8. 

Jones, Kate 

Leigh, CT. L. and 8. 

Leigh, J. L. and 8. 

Leigh. (J. U and 8. 

Lelffh, 3. L. and 3. 

Leigh, tf. L. and 8. 

Leigh, J. L. and S. 

Leigh, J. L. and 8. 

Leigh. 'J. L. and 8. 
Mcllvrlde, Sarah . . . 





U 


*l 






3 


5 


1 


2-7 


4 


2-7 


17 


B. 


16 


B. 


15 


B. 


14 


B. 


18 


B. 


12 


A. 1 


11 


A. i 


10 


A. 1 


10 


23 





•1 


it 




a 


c 


d 




it 


© 


Kg 


1 


1 4-» 

ecu. 


5 


$387.4 


$4.03 


5 


77.0 


4.03 


5 


42.4 


4.03 


5 


4 2.4 


4.03 


5 


42.4 


4.03 


5 


42.4 


4.08 


5 


42.4 


4.03 


5 


43.6 


4.03 


5 


42.6 


4.03 


5 


62.0 


4.08 


6 


172.0 


4.03 





j 


*1 




i 


M 




h 




i 


r 3 

c fi 


a| 



En 




b* < 


11560.96 


$192.50 


61925.08 


S10.30 


38.25 


882.60 


170.60 


21.05 


210.60 


170.60 


21.05 


210.6* 


170:60 


21.05 


210.5* 


170.60 


21.05 


210.54 


170.60 


21.06 


310.M 


171.30 


21.15 


2U.IC 


171.30 


21.15 


3k 3.60 


249 85 


30.80 


SM.00 


*93.15 


85.50 


865.00 



896.0 



84019.83 



3484.60 



f«*4*,M 



Continued on Page 19 



■".'#:- 



. I'trftfewMSMwIHaMMiN . 



18 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 




* 




ATOON 






vSmm 






sst*.- 








THE WONDER CITY OF CANADA 



■;■-.' . * 



Once 




we offer to #f clients and 




■ 



ria an opportunity to share in the marvelous profits thail 




_^, : i|«&&*teion in Saj$at9&n to the citUS 
to$, ^li^ml^ convinced that good prpflfe/M^tof 1f"^*^ ^^j^^^^'t#»#WNi»:^^ff 



tS'p.^^ over two &#&& t&j loft* up to dateias **#*? ft the purchasers,, b**» 

paytaent^lafemakes it possible for almost every oheHd papfietpatel in th^pjofits. by ma£tog^mall |i|nthly j^Uta and ?e»mg after a 
few payments have been made at a good profit ; r v*; &« "v Hj$~- 

I I II ■ II W I II + I ^ i H I N I I III I J lllll ■ I I !!■■ !■ WP— «fr£l I II ) A3 I II q H III ■ ■! I 







7?: " ?: ■ ' .'"'*;"; ' ;" a 



■ 



k 



§li# 



C)BS 



« * 



""vr,?. 







i&\;,. 




©: 




tooim 



Population 1903, 113; 1911, 18,000; Oct. 25, 1912, 27,000 






%>sm 



The erbwtii in population is thcfajresl indication of the prosperity of any city, and no city (possibly in the history of the world) hi 
made such progress and growth asSasfcatoon. H is simply wonderful. Building Permits for nine months of the present year are over 
Seven Million Dollars Within a few weeks an up-to-date street car service will he in operation. Magnificent business blocks are rising on 
almost every corner of the business district. Thousands of homes have been built the past summer, and there is not an empty house in 
Saskatoon today. 






Ml sit ran 




mm 

We Will Place on Sale Two Hundred Lots in 



Clodk 



TOXEPO PA I 





Q 











ABM1TON 

r Lot 

Terms, $10.00 Cash and $10.00 Per Month 

We wish to say and we say it With the utmost Confidence; that in our opinion Lots in Tuxedo I'ark Addition arc the best buying in Saska- 
toon today. Wc have confidence in the future of the city and believe il will only he a question of a few months until the Lots we now oiler 
at $200 each will be wanted for building purposes, when prices will certainly he greatly enhanced. 

T© Victoria Pmelhta^eir! 

Because you are not in Saskatoon, and therefore cannot see the properly, we guarantee that, if at any time within six months you arc not 
satisfied with the Lots you buy from us, that we will, on request cheerfully refund every dollar paid on the contract. This gives you abun- 
dant opportunity to write your friends in Saskatoon and get their opinion, or to make a trip to Saskatoon and examine the property. 

NOTE: 

This advertisement will not tippeaf again, as this announcement, we feel certain, will be sufficient to sell every lot apportioned to our Vic- 
toria office. Therefore, if you want a chance at this propertfi. see us Monday, sure. 





k® This Special -Otter 



THE 

Phone 2613 




O B 





CKca 

1210 Douglas Street 






r v 'i.-^,.i :'■/ ;.-:■!. Ji 



• V , , ||||t iiif^^^^^^^^ *a-^ 




VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



19 



LOCAL IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT 

Continued from Page 17 



BY-LAW No. 193- 

Johnson Street, from Quadra Street to Cook Street— Grading, Drain ing and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, Constructing Permanent 
Sidewalks of Concrete, with Curbs and Gutters, on Both Sides of Said Street, also Lateral Connections to Sewer, Surface Drains and Water 

Mains. 



NAME OF OWNER 



Trustees Methodist Church .... 
Xruste«a Methodist Church .... 
Trueteea Methodist Chuch .... 

Moore, J. W. and Booth, G 

Moore, J. \\\ and Booth, G 

Moore, J. W. and Booth. G 

Moore, J. \V. and Bootli Q 

Angus, J. el al 

Savage, Elizabeth M 

Savage, Elizabeth M ...»« 

Lee Mong Kow 

Lee Mong Kow 

Lee Mong Kow ............... 

Wynne, George 

Munsie, Mrs. C. 

Mim3le. Mrs. C. ............... 

Rockett, Wm. ................ 

Harrison, W. (eat. pf ) 

Wintworth, Ella . .. 

Waterson, H. G 

Robinson, P. J. ............... 

Jamleson, Mary (eat of) 

Jackson, Wm. K. 

Jamleson, Mary (eat. of) 

Belleau, Miss A. 

Martin, Edward J 

Lelser, Sophia 

Zarelli, D. and T 

Rockett, Wm 

Rockett, , Wm. • • • 

TOtftBffiflfiyiinn. PfitrT 

Skilllrig, Waldo 

Bossi, Miss' V.? 

Bossl, Miss A. F .,_..,..*.. 

Ildbury, Miss C 

Hanna, W. J • . ..*« . . . ..... 

Hanna, w. J.. . . 7. ............. 

Hanna, Ida P. ................ 

Hanna, Ida P. 

Fred Foster 

Creed, Jane •...•*•.•-*.*«»».«. 
Creed, Jane . . .........«•••••• 

Wintworth, Ella •• 

Salmon, Kate- ;•••••«»■•»»*•■»••• 

Dnvison, Wm. 

Smith, W. et al 

Florence-, George 










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836 


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W. pt 


835 


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E. pt 


835 


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W. pt 


834 


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834 


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871 


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880 


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6.62 

£62 

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6.62 
6.62 
6.62 
6.62 
6.62 
6.62 



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60.6 

60.6 

60.0 

60.0 

60.8 

80.0 

30.0 

60.6 

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58.4 

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$397.20 


$111.33 




$10.00 


397.20 


111.33 




10.00 


231,70 


111.33 






165.50 




$30.00 


10.00 


399.40 


111.33 


30.00 


10.00 


399.40 


111.33 


80.00 




399.40 


11 1.33 




. 


319.40 


111.33 


80.00 




79.44 
198.60 


111.33 


30.00 




200.80 
897)80 


111.33 




10.00 


111.33 


30.00 






111.33 




■ 



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6.62' 
6.63 

iit 

8.63 
6.63 
6.68 
6.63 

6.62 



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400.1 
490.60 

397.20 
400.60 

40L« 

'IBS' 

400.50 
« 417.01 
886.16 
400.50 
898.80 
400.50 
183.40 
264.80 



'J 



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111.38 

1 < >." . 



111.88 
111.88 



111.38 



30.00 

30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 

80.00 

80.00 
30.00 
30.00 
60,00 
30.00 
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MM 



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i*"i. 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



80.00 
80.00 
30.00 
80.00 
80.00 
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30.00 
80.00 



— ■ 
o 

$518.53 
618.63 
B48.0S 
205.60 
660.73 
640.73 
610.73 
460.73 
109.44 
309.93 
322.13 
638.53 
608.53 
429.40 
400.60 
541.83 
^097.80 

430.60 

41710, 

411.80 
328.60 
198.60 
490.60 
447.06 
687.48 
8(1:88 
468.30 
440.60 
168.40 
408.18 



660.78" 
640.78 
481.60 
648.50 



'n 

* •- 

4/ — 

|h n 

3 

$64.06 
64.06 
42,20 
25.36 
67.90 
66.70 
63.00 
56.80 
13.60 
38.20 
39.70 
66.40 
62.70 
62.95 
49.40 
66. 

89.it 
M.79 

98.70 
i8.tf 
UM 

34.50 
53.10 
66.16 
89.80 

68.06 
66,60 
64.30 
30.00 
60.06 






TOT 

67.90 
66.70 
68.25 
67.66 



$640.50 
640.50 

422. IM' 

268.60 
679.00 
687.00 
620.00 
668.00 
136.00 
382.00 
. 397.00 
664.00 
627.00 
629.50 
494.00 
668.00 

527.00 
627.00 
532.50 
282.00 
246.00 
531.00 

imie 

663.00 
680.50 
665.00 

*4*# 

200.00 
600.60 



Government Street, from Cormorant Street to Humboldt Street— Electric Lighting. 




"in: 

•9T# 
91*80 



4 

NAME OF OWNER « 

> 

1 

to 

Ker, D. R. ct al K. 

Joseph. J. B Part 

Cameron and Clarke Fart 

Cameron and Clarke 

Cameron and Clarke Part 

Powell, George Part 

Brackman Ker Co Part 

Biackman Ker Co Part 

Prior, E. G. and Co Part 

Ooodacre, L N. part 

Quagllottl, L. J S. part 

Colllster, J. R. et al 

Kuginboun, Mra. R N. part 

Parshallo, Graca M S. part 

Wilson, William Part 

l J lttock, Anna Part 

Johnson, Thos. 8., eat. of 

Johnson, Thoa. 8., est of 

Wilson. William 

Union Bank 

Spencer, D 

Spencer, D N. part 

Holland, C. A S. ] 

Helmcken, H. D 

Mi- Id rani and Malony ........ ...1 

Holland and McPhllllps 2 

Holland and McPhllllps 3 

Ricardo Greenwood .it 

RIcardo Greenwood 5 

Bridgman, A. W 6 > 

Hambley, Wymond ...... i 7 r -±- 

Hambley Wyroand ., §.'. ;■>••.. 

Weller Bros. ' 

Rogers, c. w. ................ ,.N. part 

Hlnton Electric Co .C part 

Brown and Cooper '. . ,8. part 

Simmons, A. W. JPaift 

Jones. Stephen ...... ...........Part 

Belmont Building Co. ..'* 

Wooley.CIlvo Phillips 

Johnson, E. M.. .....part 

Pf <a t»uw6v.juuai, mL ut . , — ....Pan 

Helmcken, Hon. J. S. ffl. ........ - 

Norrls, Fred. . «•. .............. . . *• 

SS^fer^v:;;:::-::gS 

eidenboun. W. . . .............. .fttft — 

McMillan, Sir £). H. i 

Hall. Richard 

Dominion Go veJJB)plfj|!t .......... 

Dominion Government * * 

Dominion Government 

Foster, Fred '"•','. 

Hall, Dr. F. W 

Ormond. Olivine N. part 

Bank of Montreal -. ..8. part 

Bank of Montreal 

Say ward, J. A . 

Bone and Hibb«n 

Bone and Hlbben .. 

Morris, E. A 

Mahon, Edward 

Mahon, Edward 

Royal Bank 

Royal Bank 

Canadian Pacific Railway Co. .. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce .... 
Alkman, H. P. W., est. of . . ...i^&i 

Sommer, Joseph •••••.«•« 

1 romls, o. ..................... 

Promts, O .,..,••• 

Vernon, Mrs. C. A., est. of .... 
Vernon, Mrs. C. A., est. of .... ■ 

Holland and McPhllllps 

Holland and McPhllllps 

Holland and McPhllllps 

Holland and McPhllllps 

Hudson Bay Co llji&Ss 

Hudson Bay Co ^JjpSjBjh, 

Hudson Bay Co ..Part 

Porter, Robert Part 

Porter, Robert 

Dominion Government 

Pomlnton Government sllpf 

Dominion Cdvnrnmmt lllPs 

Dominion Government . « 




*1 

a 

>- t 

CO O 

CCfc. 
$6.35 U 
•■86 K 
6.35V* 
6.86V4 
6.36^4 
6.25>4 
6.85>i 
6.36V4 
6.35^4 
6.3 6 ^i, 

6.35 V* 

6.36 V* 
6.3 6 V 
6.36 V 
6.36V 
6.35V 

6.35 V 

5.36 V 
5.35V 
6.35 V 
5.35V 
6.35V 
6.36V 
6.35V 




"9»f 



1258 H 

178 1 

182E t 

1 82E I 

Htl . 1 



Twar 

120.0 

131.0 

41.8 

38.8 

53.9 



5.3 5 V 

6.36 V 
B.S5V 
6.86V 
5.35V 
*MM 
6.85 V 
5.36V 



3 
o 

p 

8168.15 
2M.10 
107.06 
321.16 
80.30 
160.55 
80.30 
80.30 
240.85 
246.20 
107.06 
363.25 
176.06 
176.66 
224.80 
128.45 
353.25 
863.25 
363.25 
853.25 
353.25 
176.65 
176.66 
645.95 
189.15 
128.10 
138.10 
123.10 
188.10 
123.10 

W9.10 
1W.45 
989.88 

117.71 
817.76 

96.35 
224.80 
422.86 
481.70 
949.90 



*i 

e 

» id 

c s 
^^ 

$20.75 
26.40 
13.20 
39.60 
9.90 
19.80 
9.90 
9.90 
29.70 
30.36 
13.20 
43.65 
21.80 
21.80 
27.70 
15.85 
43.55 
43.65 
43.55 
43.65 
43.55 
21.80 
21.80 
67.36 
17.1S 
16.20 
16.20 
15.20 
15.20 
16.20 
15.20 
15.85 



f 9.ll 

642.80 
, 647.65 
330.80 
181.79 
967.70 




tl - 

w 

* g 
e B 

t*< 

8207.50 

864.00 

132.00 

896.00 

99.00 

198.00 

96.00 

99.00 

297.00 

803.60 

132.00 

436.60 

218.00 

218.00 

277.00 

158.50 

435.60 

436.50 

435.60 

435.50 

436.50 

218.00 

218.00 

673.50 

171.60 

152.00 

162.00 

162.00 

162.00 

152.00 

162.00 

168.60 

425.60 

145.00 

146.00 

145.00 

119.00 

277.00 

621.50 

.',.',#94.00 

' .<; 108.00 

077.00 : 

792.00 

798.50 

272.60 

160.00 

356.00 

462.00 

199.60 

199.60 

199.60 

199.50 

199.60 

199.60 

107.00 

93.60 

198.60 

175.00 

148.60 

148.50 

148.60 

148.50 

148.60 

148.50 

148.50 

830.00 

823.60 

148.50 

148.50 

148.50 

148.60 

148.60 

241.00 

231.00 

152.00 

152.00 

152.00 

152.00 

152.00 

72.50 

79.00 

290.50 

843.00 

158.50 

158.50 

409.00 

p. — .. 

$21,608.00 



Pt 

W.pt 

B. pt 

W.pt 




409.16 
899.40 
899.40 
401.80 

397.20 

* oe.2 o- 

881.00 
134.05 

.55 
■ 20 
395.00- 
380.65 
397.20 
398.86 
397.20 
397.20 



111.83 
111.83 

111.33 

111.83 



10.00 

10.00 



10,00 



111.33 

m 

2^168 
111.33 

111.33 
111.33 
111.88 

111.33 



30.00 
60.00 
60.00 
30.00 
30.00 



2,410.7 



$15,957.79 $3,228.57 $1,200.00 
• City's share . 



10.00 



10.00 



$130.00 



Total.....,., 



' 99.3 
443.88 

864.06 
490.88 

568. 5 3 

657.66 

561.98' 

568.53 

640.18 

648.53 

508.53 

$20,516.36 
8,891.79 

$29,408.15 



64.5? 

20.25 
53.16 
70.10 
81.10 
68.06 
70.10 
66.60 
67.65 
62.70 



• 



■ 



$2,530.15 



841 

202.60 
631.60 
7.01.00 

811.00 
680.50 

701.00 
666.00 
676.60 
627.00 



$25,301.60 



■T f" !' m*mm*m m 



' BY-LAW No. 152. 

Oxford Street, from Cook to Moss — Grading, Draining and Paving with an Asphaltic Pavement, Const 
Gutters and Boulevards on Both Sides of Said Street, also Sewer, S urface Drain and Water Laterals. 



snt Sidewalks, Curbs, 



NAME OF OWNER 



Cane. Maurice .........••» 

Pendray, H. . J. .,......••••»••»•• 

Bogarth, ' E. H. 

Preston, E., and Campbell, C ... 

Dempster, P. W • 

Pinch, Ethel , C 

BriRgs, Evelyn •••• *•••••" 

Uobinson, Jane ........••••••'• 

Mcpherson, T. S. . . ... . ..*. ..... 

Drummond. J., and Mills, Wm. ♦• 

Thurman, W. A. 

Thurman, W. A 

Elliott, John 

Elliott, John .....* 

Elliott. John '-•• 

Elliott, John ....•....••'»• 

Elliott, John 

Elliott, John ..♦.►• 

Fletcher, Joseph ...... !•••• 

Scott, T. H 

Croft, T. ......••••«••«•••■•?*•• 

Croft,' T .,.,.,...••••• ... 

Heancy, Joseph ............... 

Brown, E. K ...,.........•■» 

Hi. nes, A. E.. and Small, A. ...» 

Edwards, Adam »■• 

Erickson, B. O. et al •»» 

Hrirkson, B. O. et al ............ 

Erickson, B. O. et al ........... 

Erickson, B. O. et al 

Erickson, B. O. et al .'. 

Erickson, B. O. et al 

Erickson, B. O. et al 

Erickson, B. O. et al 

Marbeouf. Ducy P 

Stevenson, F. W., Grant R. A. C. 

Scott, H. J 

Scott, H. J 

Rogers, A 

■Wheeler, Davlna 

Bargison, EC. B 

Bourne, James 

F>etober, Joaepn 

Taylor, G. L 

Maddock, W 

Brown, William 

Xelson, C. F. 

Nelson. C. F 

Nelson, C. F 

Thornton, Margaret A 



1 l ■y;-XW ! 



6 

9 

7 

8 

9 

22 

31 

IS 

13 

A 

89 

13 

11 

10 



8 

7 



5 

4 



20 
19 
18 

17 
16 
16 
14 
13 
34 
26 
27 
28 
29 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 
8 
7 
fi 



"4-** 

I 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

5-6-19-20 

6-6-19-20 

7-8-17-18 

7-8-17-1S 

7-3-17-18 

9rl0-12-16 

9-10-12-16 

9-10-12-16 

9-10-12-16 

9-10-12-16 

9-10-12-16 

11 

11 

It 

u 

11 

i 

26 ' 

87 

16-19 

15-19 

16-19 

15-19 

16-19 

15-19 

15-119 

15-19 

15-19 

15-19 

15-19 

15-19 

15-19 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

1-2-20 

l-2-2'> 

1-2-20 



H 



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H 

H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 

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H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

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87 

37 

37- 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

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I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

1 

: I 

1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



d 

o 
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to 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fatrfl 

Falrfi 

Falrflojd 

Fairfield 

irfleld 

airfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

field 

Kairfield' 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Falrfi. 1-1 

Fah field 

Fairfield. 

KalrfleJfl- 

Fairfield 



a 

I 



r® 

121.8 

60. 
•60. 

60. 
' 60. 

60. 

60. 
132. 



a 


41 



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ti 


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. 34.50V 


$546.20 


4.50 V 


.. 225.25 


4.60V 


225.25 


4.60% 


225.25 


4.60V 


225.25 


• 4.60 V 


825.25 


4.60V 


226.25 


4.60% 


694.65 



94.66 




495.55 
495.55 
220.70 
180.20 
225.26 
225.25 
225.25 
225.25 
225.25 
226.25 
225.25 
450.50 
540.60 
225.25 
225.25 
225.25 
218.10 
218. Ul 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
218.10 
495.55 



r! 
c 

c 



t. 4> 

«> a 

^'5 
v o 

mo 
$12.46 
12.45 
12.46 
12.46 
12.46 
12.46 
12.45 
24.90 
24.90 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.46 
12.45 
12.46 
13.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.46 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.46 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.46 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.45 
12.46 
12.45 
12.45 



3 o 

WO 

$6.07 
6.07 

6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
8.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
6.07 
8.07 



B 
o 
3 

&! 

£5 
$10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
30.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
in. 00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



3,232.3 



$14,560.75 $634.95 

City's share 



$303.50 $490.00 



5 

& 

$574.72 

253.77 

253.77 
263.77 
263.77 
253.77 
263.77 
665.62 
655.62 
502.62 
624.07 
247.37 
376.27 
276.27 
276.27 
276.27 
276.27 
276.27 
276.27 
261.27 
261.27 
261.27 
569.12 
624.07 
624.07 
249.22 
208.72 
253.77 
263.77 
253.77 
253.77 
253.77 
253.77 
263.77 
479.02 
569.12 
253.77 
253.77 
243.77 
236.62 
246.62 
236.62 
246.62 
246.62 
286.62 
236.62 
246.62 
246.62 
246. 02 
611.62 

$15,989.20 
4. 139. 74 



■I 

I 

m >> 

ofc 
1> — . 

>• 4 
S3 

c s 

H<! 
$70.85 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
81.30 
80.85 
80.85 
62.00 
64.60 
30.50 
34.05 
34.05 
34.05 
34.05 
34.05 
34.06 
34.05 
32.20 
32.20 
32.20 
70.20 
64.60 
64.60 
30.70 
25.70 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
31.30 
69.05 
70.20 
31.30 
31.30 
30.05 
29.16 
30.40 
29.15 
30.40 
30.40 
29.15 
29.15 
30.40 
30.40 
30.40 
63.10 



it 



1 



•3 

a 
c 
o c 
H« 

$708.50 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
808.50 
808.50 
620.00 
646.00 
306.00 
840.50 
340.50 
.340.50 
840.50 
340.50 
340.60 
340.50 
322.00 
322.00 
322.00 
702.00 
646.00 
646.00 
307.00 
257.00 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
813.00 
313.00 
313.00 
313.00 
590.50 
702.00 
313.00 
313.00 
300.50 
291.50 
304.40 
291.50 
304.00 
304.00 
291.60 
291.50 
304.00 
304.00 
804.00 
631.00 



$1,971.30 $19,713.00 



Total $20,128.94 



BY-LAW No. 174. 

Broughton Street, from Blanchard Street to Quadra Street — Grading, Draining and Paving with Asphalt, Constructing Permanent Side- 
walks of Concrete, with Curb and Gutter on the North Side of Said Street, and a Curb and Gutter on the South Side of Said Street, also 

Lateral Connections to Sewers, Surface Drains and Water Mains. 



NAME OF OWNER 



d 
o 

~> 
% 

3 
W 

Boscowltz, Joseph S. part 

Lettlce, W. H 

Lettlce, Robert 

Lettice, Robert 

Mulhollnnd, .Innrt W. part 

Shapland, V 10. part 

Carson, Thomas 

Lyons, Charles Stewart 

Drake, Richard 

Robertson, Hermon A 

Robertson, Hermnn, A Part 

Ruckhabor, Charles W 

B.C.L. A Invest. Agency E. part 

Oalpln, T. D., est. of W. part 

Drake, Richard 

Simpson. Amy M 

Simpson, Amy M 

Duncan, A. M E. pa rt 

Crocker, Henry W. part 

Mellor. George 

Rlchter, F 

Hannington, Dr. E. B. D. 

Pemberton. F. B 







•J 


«l 






a 


a 









*. 




( 

rf 1 




0h£ 






« w 




O O 4) 


« 


3 


CQ W fa 


a 


2G1 


22 


60.0 


$4.24% 


262 


22 


60.0 


4.24% 


2C>3 


22 


60.0 


4.24V 


264 
265 r 


22 


60.0 


4.24% 


22 


30.0 


4.24V 


265 


22 


30.0 


4.24V 


260 


22 


60.0 


4.24V 


267 


22 


60.0 


4.24V 


268 


22 


60.0 


4.24% 


269 


22 


60.0 


4.24V 


270 


22 


60.0 


4.24% 


251 


27 


60.0 


4.24% 


252 


27 


6.8 


4.24V 


262 


27 


63.4 


4.24% 


253 


27 


60.0 


4.24 V 


254 


27 


60.0 


4.24% 


25 5 


27 


60.0 


4.24V 


256 


27 


30.0 


4.24% 


256 


27 


80.0 


4.24 V 


267 


27 


60.0 


4.24% 


258 


27 


60.0 


424% 


S69 


27 


60.0 


4.24% 


260 


27 


60.0 


. 4.24V 



A 

S 

B 
_ *• 

it 


c 


. 

U il 

? a 

it C 

<v 
W O 


a 

u 

II 

3 O 

CO O 


a 

S3 

fel 


$254.70 


$30.00 


* 12.60 




254.70 




12.60 


10.00 


254.70 




25.00 




25 4.70 




12.50 


10.00 


127.36 




12.50 




127.35 




12.50 




254.70 




12.60 


10.00 


264.70 




12.50 




264.70 




25.00 


10.00 


264.70 




25.00 


10.00 


264.70 




12.60 


10.00 


254.70 




12.50 




28.30 








226.40 




12.50 




264.70 




12.50 




254.70 




26.00 




254.70 




12.60 




127.36 




12.60 




127.35 




12.50 


10.00 


264.70 




12.60 


10.00 


254.70 




26.00 


10.00 


264.70 


30.00 


12.60 




264.70 




12.50 





1200 



• 



$5091.00 $60.00 $337.60 $90.00 
, ._^Cvty'»-Snax« 





aJ 


_ J 


• 


B 


h 




■> **» 


>* 






»& 




tM <A 


^ "3 


0) 


3 


11 





*% 


c 


#297.20 


$36.65 


"$366.60 


277.20 


34.20 


3 42 


279.70 


34.50 


3 45 


277.20 


34.20 


.14 2 


139.85 


17.26 


172.60 


139.86 


17.25 


172.50 


277.20 


34.20 


342 


267.20 


32.96 


829.60 


289.70 


85.70 


357 


289.70 


36.70 


387 


277.20 


34.20 


342 


267.20 


32.96 


329.50 


28.30 


3.60 


86 


238.90 


29.46 


284.60 


267.20 


82.96 


329.60 


279.70 


34.60 


246 


267.20 


32 95 


829.60 


139.86 


17.26 


172.60 


149.86 


18.60 


185 


377.20 


34.20 


348 


289.70 


36.70 


867 


297.80 


36.65 


866.60 


267.20 


22.96 
$688.86 


339.50 


$5681.60 


36889.50 


92942.18 







Total 



• •••toot. »•■*«• 



•9899.99 



16-11 

1609 

1607 

1607 

1608 

1801 

1599 

1597 

1697 

1595 

9 

.8 

7 

6 

6 

4 

3 

2 

1 

6 
6 
4 
3 

2 



6 
5 
4 

3 
2 

2 
1 

4 
3 

2 

1 




I 70*0 

I S3 

t 30.3 

1 30.3 

1 30.3 

1 30.3 

1 . 16.3 

1 14.0 

1 30.3 

76 Fort 26.0 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 N Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 60.0 

76 Fort 49.0 

75 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 
76 Fort 22.6 

75 Fort 22.6 

76 Fort 22.6 
76 Fort 36.6 
72 Fort 36.0 
72 Fort 23.0 
72 Fort 23.0 
72 Fort 23.0 
72 Fort 23.0 
72 Fort 23.0 
72 Fort 11.0 
72 Fort 12.0 
72 Fort 44.0 
71 Fort 62.0 
71 Fort . 24.0 
71 Fort 2 4.0 
71 Fort 62.0 



8.258.2 




W6 

6.55% 

5.85% 

6.35% 

6.36% 

5.36% 

6.35 V 

6.35 V* 

6.35% 

6.35% 

6. 36V 

5.35V 

5.35V 

6.36V 

6.35% 

6.35V 

6.35V 

6.35V 

5.85V 

6.36V 

6.85V 

6.35% 

6.36% 

6.85% 

5.36% 

6.35% 

5.36% 

5.35% 

6.S5V 

5.35% 

5.36V 

6.85% 

5.36% 

5.36% 

6.35% 

6.35% 

5.85% 

5.35% 



3 7 4.65 

161.90 

161.90 

161.90 

161.90 

161.90 

161.90 

86.96 

74.95 

161.90 

139.15 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

207.60 

262.25 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

120.40 

196.35 

187.35 

123.10 

123.10 

123.10 

123.10 

123.10 

58.85 

64.25 

236.50 

278.35 

128.45 

128.45 

831.85 



8.20 

19.95 
19.96 
19.95 
19.95 
19.95 
19.95 
10.70 
9.25 
19.95 
17.50 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.86 
88.00 
82.36 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
24.10 
23.10 
15.20 
16.20 
15.20 
16.20 
15.20 
7.25 
7.90 
29.05 
34.30 
16.85 
15.85 
40.90 



W1W: 



. 




$2,150.80 



BY-LAW No. 309 

Lighting Johnson Street, from Government Street to Wharf Street, by means of Electric Light Poles 
bearing Branch Lights.and Constructing the Necessary Conduits for Carrying Wires Underground. 



i 

m 



NAlfE OF OWNER 



to 
Janes, C. H., O. A and Clara J. . J 

Bowen, Herbert O 

Warren, Capt. J. D. &. Mrs. J. D. F 

Sargison, A. G B 

Lelser, Simon A Co. D 

Fltzherbert, C. H C 

Hall, Dr. Frank W S. part 

Hall, Dr. Frank W S. part 

Wilson, Wm. Joseph E. & B....E. part 
Wilson. Wm. Joseph E. & B....W. part 

Vic. Phoenix Brewing Co E. part 

B. C. Land A Inv Agency 

Bossl Carlo (Est) 

Alexander, H B W. part 

Jeune, Fred John E. part 

Phalr, James 

Helmeoken, Hon. J. S 

Helmecken, Hon. J. S 

Holland & McPhllllps Pt 181 

Roland, Matthias (Est)... Part 

B. C. Land A Inv. Agency W. part 

Beckwlth, J. L. A Mitchell, W. N. .C. part 

Victoria Realty Co E. part 

McCandless, Henry W. part 

Davy, Montague S Pt 178 

Wllle. Louis W. part 

Criddle, Percy E.part 

Vic. Phoenix Brewing Co W. part 

McCandleM, Henry A Geo E.part 

McCandless, Henry W. part 

Burns, J. M. A Co., Ltd E.part 

Anderson, EL H Part 174 

Vie. Phoenix Brewing Co Part 

Cameron, W. Q. A C. N Part 

Cameron, W. G. A C. N Part 

Shotbolt, Thomaa Part 

Norrls, Fred - 






o 

*!£ 

182C 

182C 

182C 

182C 

1266 

1265 

1265 

1264 

1264 

1263 

1262 

1261 

1261 

1260 

1258 

1269 

and 182 

181 

180 

180 

. 4 18° 
179 

and 179 
178 
178 
177 
177 
176 
176 

and 175 
174 
174 
173 
173 
172 



m 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

K 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



6 
o 
—• 
9 
« 
to 




'! 



I 

76. 

20. 

28. 

80. 

80. 

80.6 

29.10 

17.6 

42.8 

20.6 

40.9 

68. 

69.9 

32.9 

27.3 

60. 

60. 

60. 

97.6 

66. 

34.2 

26. 

20. 

25. 

30.8 

25.1 

86.6 

45.6 

24. 

29. 

42.6 

70. 

42.10 

14. 

14. 

62. 

67. 



$3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
8.60 
8.60 
3.60 
3.60 
8.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.60 
8.60 
3.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
3.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
3.60 
8.60 
8.60 
3.60 
8.60 
3.60 
8.60 
8.60 



3 


H 


3 

rj 


$273.60 


$33.75 


73.00 


8.90 


100.80 


12.45 


108.00 


13.80 


108.00 


18.80 


289.50 


85.70 


107.40 


13.25 


68.00 


7.75 


153.00 


18.85 


78.50 


9.05 


146.70 


18.10 


208.80 


26.75 


215.10 


26.55 


117.90 


14.45 


98.10 


12.10 


216.00 


26.66 


216.00 


26.66 


216.00 


26.65 


361.00 


48.20 


237.60 


29.20 


128.00 


15.15 


90.00 


11.10 


72.00 


8.90 


90.00 


11.10 


110.40 


13.60 


90.80 


11.15 


181.40 


16.20 


163.80 


80.20 


86.40 


10.66 


104.40 


12.86 


152.70 


18.85 


252.00 


81.10 


164.20 


19.00 


60.40 


6.20 


50.40 


6.20 


187.20 


28.10 


241.20 


29.75 



1683.10 feet 



$5,621.80 



$680.90 



o ** 
«3 

3 a 
o a 
&4 

$837.60 
. 89.00 
124.60 
188.00 
183.00 
857.00 
132.50 

77.50 
188.50 

90.60 
181.00 
267.60 
266.50 
144.50 
121.00 
266.60 
266.50 
366.50 
488.00 
398.00 
161.60 
111.00 

89.00 
111.00 
186.00 
111.50 
162.00 
802.00 
106.60 
188.50 
188.60 
811.00 
190.00 

63.00 

62.00 
281.00 
897.50 

96809.00 



BY-LAW No. 346. 

Lighting Johnson Street, from Government Street to Douglas Street, with Electric Light Posts bearing 
Cluster Lights, and Constructing the Necessary Conduits for Carrying Wires UndergrountL 



NAME OF OWNER 



Mathews, Oeo, F. and Prior, E. O. Part 
Mathews. Geo. F. and Prior, B. G. W. pt. 

L««. Cheng E.pt 

Home, T. H W. pt. 

The St. Jamea, Ltd . E. pi. 

The St. J*mM, Ltd W.pt. 

Punnett R. B C. pt 

Porter, Robert E pt 

Poane, Joseph Homer 

Wilson, J. K.. et at 

Wilson, J. K.. et at 

Duek, Simeon (Eat) 

Ooodacre, F. . . , •••..*• § • • • • • . « 



a 

666 

657 

657 

664 

644 

671 

671 

671 

420 

436 

424 

169a 

159 











•1 


«J 




•1 


-J 




A 


R 


4 



1 

i 


a 

*> f> 

ftCx 

a> •-> 
•2 


3 





— m 


CQ 


s 


05 fc 


h 


h*M 


&< 


U. 


120 


$8.15 


$878.00 


946.60 


9446.00 


U. 


40 


3.16 


126.00 


15.66 


196.60 


u. 


80 


3.16 


262.00 


31.10 


911.00 


u. 


60 


3.15 


189.00 


23.30 


332.00 


u. 


60 


3.15 


189.00 


23.30 


888.00 


u. 


10 


3.16 


31.60 


3.90 


80.00 


u. 


50 


3.16 


167.50 


19.40 


194.00 


u. 


60 


3.16 


189.00 


28.80 


388.00 


2 


120 


3.15 


878.00 . 


46.60 


468.00 


2 


60 


3.15 


189.00 


28.80 


988.00 


2 


60 


8.15 


189.00 


28.30 


399.00 


I 2 


120 


8.16 


878.0C 


46.60 


499.00 


2 


120 
960 


2.15 
Feet 


878.00 


46.80 


409.00 




$2034.00 


9979.99 


19739.60 



fi 



Continued on Page a*/ 



%-' 



Y 



L\J 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday, November 3, 1912 



I 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING KATKS 
One cent a word each Insertion. 10 per 

lent discount for ill or more- consecutiv. 
Insertions -cash with order. No advertise- 
ment accepted fur lot* than 25 cent* 

Business and Professional Cards — or tour 
Unci or under — $1.00 per week 

No advertisement char gad on account tor 
)r»» than {2.00. I'hone No. 11. 

BUSINESS IHIiKdtlKY 



AKT Ulass — A. F. Buy, over tinny years' 
experience In art sld.i '-adud llxhts 
tor churches, schools aiul private twelllngx, 
WorVta and atore. 916 Pandora street, next 
to Methodist church. Phono 594. 



ATTENTION — Have your house cleaned 
by the tianltury Vacuum Cleaning Co., 
1260 Fort street; phone K1802. ^^ 

ATTENTION — To ensure thoroughness 
and promptitude, phone LI 382, The Is- 
land Window Cleaning Co., 731 I'rluoess 
avenue, lor window cleaning and janitor 
u urk. 



PBOFBSSIOKAX DIRECTORY— (Cont'd.) 



RCHITECT — H. B. Orirflths. 1006 Oov- 
ernment street. I'hone 148*. 



Birds. K. "• L B - A -- 

a i 



A 
B 



CTO Vacuum cleaner. i.uiio L:....- 



AtlUAUE Delivery — Victoria Transitu' 
Co.. Ltd. Tel. 188 



BLUE Printing— Electric lilue 1'rliC and 
Map Co., 214 Central building, View 
street. Blue printing, mans. draughting! 
dealers In surveyor's instrunionls and draw- 
tug office sup plies. Phone 1534. 

BOOK15INDERS — The Co'ontst la the best 
bookblndory In the province; the roault 
ts equ.il in proportion. 

OTTLES — All kinds of bottle* wanted. 
Good prlcea paid. Victoria Junk Agency, 
1880 Store st reet. Phone 1836. . 

BRICKLAYING — Contractors get a iwrnw 
on your brickwork front Edmund? Ss 
George. 1028 Bay St.; chimney* and mantels 
a specialty; best work munshlp. 

/CARPENTER and builder— T. ThirkaU; 
V_> estimates free; repair* "* ■P e J'i*Ji'[* 
Residence, 1013 Vancouver St.; phone L3400. 

/ DRAFTSMAN Furniture made W or*M, 
KJ tirst-class workmanship g_ajfA_t«f9. de- 
signs submitted on application. -.; ;8unaarla»Mj 
(late of Maple & Co., Uondcm), . .MaMpar 
Place ave., Foul Bay rtfc. fourth gtreet 
north of Oak Bay ave. , 

CHIMNEY swoop—Lloyd. WlOW W*»S- 
Phone F2183. " ' i . 

COAL— Hall * Walker. Wellington Col- 
lieries coal. Comox antt»»B«Ita coal. 
biackemith-e uSI« Uttt coal specially $>re- 



HELP WANTED— FEMALE 



/CRUSHED Roc* and Gravel— Producers' 
VJ itock and Gravel company. Bunker* 
Htoro street, roof, of Chatham street Phone 
305. Crushed rook, washed sand and gravel 
delivered by teams at bunkers or on scows 
at quarry and 'sBHWt *tt-,*i "fffl')?**''" ' \: 



A 

\ RCHITECT — 8. . 

_Y 3. '2 < 'antral Bulldlns. Vl.toila, B 

8888. ____ 

ARCHITECT — C Elwood Watklns. rooms 
1 and 2. Green Block, corner Trounce 
»■..,, or and Uruad. l'l.one illls: reside no. 

:ii me L1M». . 

/ il , .1. Engi neer George A. Smith. British 
KJ Columbia land surveyor. office at ai- 
b ernt. B. C. ______—— 

ruVIL En.,,neer-H M. T. Hodgson. A". 

Kj Mem msi. of Civil Engineers '/"\ Fr °- 
vtnctal Land Surveyor* Ofttoes 1 ort Al- 
bernl . B. C. . _ 

CIVIL Engineer*— Green Bros., Burden £ 
CO.. civil engineers. Dominion •« B. 
land ilirvoyorn. 1H Pemberton Block 

Branch off.. U in S«l«oa Fort Oaorge and 

Bazolten. D 0. 

( 1 A N A V k N and Mitchell CM1 E n gl nears. 

\J Offices :"T-."JS Pemberton Block, to- 

1$09 1'. O BOX S». Examinations and Le- 
i.orls Irrigated and Drall—Se. Hydr,-l-.Uc- 
{;,! •Development Waterworks. Sewerage 
and Sew age Disposal. 

CIVIL. Engineers— Goro & McGregor— Brit- 
ish Columbia land surveyors. land 
agents, timber cruisers: P. A. &*«**>* J . ; 
McGregor, J. F. Templeton. T. A "*-«>'>• 
timber department. Chancery chl J 1 ml) ""; 
Laniclev street, Victoria, B. C.S P. O. Uox 
«"* phone «84; McGregor building. Third 

street, 3outh Fort fle orge 1 _B^C. 

IVIL Engineer — Clarence Hoard, member 
Can. Soc. C. E„ member Am. Ry. Ensr. 
Association. Steam. Electric, Logging. Hall- 
ways, Engineering and Construction. Office. 
401 Pemberton Bldg., Fhone »«: "^e- 
Empres s Hotel; Phone 1B80. 

€ONSULTING Engineer— W. G. Winter- 
burn. M. I. N, A., receives puplle for 
examination for certificates, stationary and 
Marine, Bl Bastion Square. Phon6 Ufl. 

CONSULTING Engineers — Ca»*v«»_ * 
Mitchell. >37-«J8 PembertoU Wk,, T. O. 
Box »9i Bxarolnatlong and IWportsVWlW- 
tlon and Drainage, Hy«rff-»|tt»ttto PgtMop- 
mont, Water Works. 8ewera«e and S*Ws_« 
X^$fit »i; Supervision of Conatructlon. 

f^BIfTte'r— W. F. Fraaer. XK M, «. Offfloe 
*J TfS Tsttea street, Gai«sche Block. Office 
hour*: »,»0 a.m. t o B p.m. ... '. . ■, 

■ ii i i ' ' 

MANDOLIN, banjo, piano, taught by 
Miss Wlnterburn. 438 Dallas rd.; phone 



GIRL wanted, Appll 
Siu.n -i gtei and Douglas *is. 



Skeenr. Lowe 



A 

a Vi'\.\ Dcvereux Vgency, 131* B"orl st.; 
jL\. telephone ht. hours i lo 8. Wanted, 

■ mpotant ks, ... I 1 ^:<- n lldi i 

. iiii »ai, *:io, also tour general 

■ iking i *\ ages $SS t* 

.. . . mnsii nded. Competent 

., mil .-,.- . also iu-IH a, «n ong 

liugllshwoman (oi houeecleanlng. Wantedi 

a i | ong ,n i (oi i lt«h< '' w "I'lv Pwa ■• io.bli 

, ( iiruing l sekeepers i ed --"" ' ) 

Good ■'■•■" and willing worker* »\ anted 

experienced women roi laundrj work. 



SITIATION8 WANTED— MALE— (Conl'd.) 



MARIUED man s.eks position ss 
drl»ar In private family. Box 



motor 
sua*. 



Co . 1 1 1 1 - 1 






man of 20 years' banking and 
...lal experience wishes to obtain 
work, secretarial or otherwise; csn furnish 
excellent references »"x 1K02, Colonist. 



MA RRIBD 
fins io i 



\ NOTE of thla eron's owns amiss Voung 
j.\ lady wants .IresBinaking or housework. 
dttllj Phone im. 



\ T The Ladi.s Educational, Domeatli und 

^V Busi igeui pistil intt In enj i • 

>ai icy in.. . i italned; I i i nessi ... stan 

iphers, waitreases, nurses, housekeepers 
,., .! domei help always disengaged; part- 

h ; led ind bu« I «»< •' trana- 

t.., n d ils ■••»'! homes i imended. 

126 l ulk,; i I "' ■ '■'■■[' ■ 

in (0 4. Saturdays 10 to I, -Mrs- A. Clarke. 
, 

CtOOlC housekeeper for country; lady going 
J to Europe; suit widow wit* child; * 25 - 

$30. Conk genci:. I '.v ; $80; nurse 

housemaid kept. General help; lamlly three; 
,.,;.. family four; $30. < ook 
for girls' $80 k for ladles' club; 

.;:, fayward bldg. 



KBLIABLB, actlvs young man, good hab- 
its and address, desires position Imme- 
diately; good writer, some business experi- 
ence; capable Of light or heaty work. Box 
IM't. Colonist. 

fpWO Japanese boy* want Job; one has BX- 

JL perienca In cooking, other in home- 
work "1 outside labor. Apply 11B3 Vatrs St. 
fhone 3448. 



of 



u'antkii, by gtagllshman, -to years 

>> age, position as manager or oince 

sei t-etary to < lub or Institution or wou d 

lake iTimplrie charge of warehouse. A|>ol_\ 
BOX 2004, Colonial 



W'aniki), by experienced bookkeeper 

VV any kind of office work. Accounts 
made up and sent out. Good references. 
App'y Box 602, Coloni st. 

brick Jobs 



PROPERTY FOR SALE— (Continued) 



A 



GUUD lot on foul Bay id . only one 
k from ... lino; prji .■ : i '••" i '< 

cash, lOOfl.XlJIft, on Ian.- coner n tew 

feel onlj from u.ik iia\ car, (8S80 ,i " wro* 

Fully modern n.u saven-roomed house on 
loi DOxtsO; i>aiii and iwo toliets, eti »l2o«, 
>, cash, balance $16 pet month. Three lots 
at Bow Island, Alia., aj less than original 

cost. Tne owner inusi sell lliese, and vsltti 

a raunlolpal gas \ieii now assured, these aie 
an exceptionally ko..,i investment, ciaring- 
bould, 201 Central bids, 



PROFERTV rOR SALE — (Coollnucdl 



PROPERTY FOR SALE— (Con«U«u«d> 



A 



lll'NDUKD dollai-H 



per acie profit ciln 

exslli be made on this hundred acres; 
eight and half miles from city, partlj 
cleared, splendid »oil, main road through 
property, close to n C 6Jlectrli tnd E, & 
N. railroads; ailjolulng acreage; same' class 
of land, just changed hands tor *<»<i per 

acre. This Is bona tide bargain at 1300 
per acre. Terms arrangBdj Naiinual 

Realty Co., 12:12 Government. 

-Townley St.. 60x120. *»00; third 

t 2 » Queen's av* 



BEAUTIFUL country home of 10 acres of 
land only eight miles from city, near 
railway nation, i acres cultivated, balance 

llghi c Jeering, With modern 6100m bunga- 
;..,« furrilSh tl, lm mdlng )>lano, etc New 
■ able nou Kti.au., chicken runs and 100 
.hlcketis. Lawn and garden with several 
null trees, l-'oi immediate possession. $9000, 

on icniif. a. ti y. .iawi...id. 3 1 T Central 

bldg . 1. lions 3221). . ■ 



r.- -11 m 
■ ash, 



M Good high 

fhone mat. 



lul. |M7i. J300 



Bvl:'i;.r:;i si -Lol 60x11 ti »1870, 
.m 1, in. a. Herbert cuthbert ^ Co., <>3l 



A B AP 



l.««ll. 



It'AN'TKIi chimneys and imii!! 
Y« by competent man. Box 

. 1 1 >■ 



A BNAP - 



CtOMPETJ wanted for light house- 
J work. Apply at once. 117 Menzlos at.. 
James Hay. ■ ■ . • _____ 

DRESSMAKING— Wanted at once, assist- 
ants and a pprentice-. 886 Michigan s>- 

rpxPERiKtfCED sewing girl 
i- oricei'tt^ rt», *|*olstory 
Apply to Mr, Me»«. carpet de 
Spencer, Lttf . 



— -s- 



THIIPLOyMElNT Bureau - < Vancouver !•* 
lii^MwJ*. W8 Dougla. at. »«P w»J»ted 

and supplied. Pho no 8»1». . . - 

i n . ' .h. ' ii ' . n 111 ' I ' 'i " T "" ■ "1, ■ » ....■ ■ ' ■ ' " ' - . 

.. class ciotnutjf unkn, 1» other* 
need apply. 881 Johnson at ' , 



tiSlRST 
1? neoc 



/CANADIAN Commercial Detective fieryjee, 
yj the modern good and bad debt collector. 
Rents collected. Uur new methods mean 
quick service. Wo furnish rating and pub- 
lish a delinquent lis. which every credit 
house should investigate. A card will 
bring one of our men. li'SS Douglas St. 
RAVMAN — Joseph Heaney, of floe at «6 

Wharf street. Phon e 171. 

A Draj Co., 



DRAYMEN — Victoria Truck 
Ltd. Phone IS. 

XJ Hi 



Works — Paul's Stcair. Dye V orks, 
IS Fort street. We clean, press and 
lepalr ladles' and gentlemen's garments 
• qua! to new. I'hone fi'24. 

Carter a McKtnxle. 



ELECTRICIANS 
practical electricians and contractois. 
Phone 7 10; Res. Phones L2270. RM8T. aelo- 
phone and mot=r work a. specialty. 1318 



Ph 

Broad street. 



MECHANOTHERAPY— D. J, MorrUwn. 
M.T.D-. druglejp physician, graduate 
American College ^MTchwo-Therapy; physi- 
cal deforroltle. and »11 dUwMe* treated with- 
out drugs; consultation tree, S to 12 a.m., 6 
to I JLmT I-t 8u_4,Hor et;; Phone X»m. 

TJOBBRTBON sad Meyer.tela. SrltUvW 
JZv umbia land surveyors! Chancer* Cham- 
bers. Victoria, B. C. P. O. Box 788. Tele- 
pho ne R2332. * »j g ».<'' ' 

SWANNEL &' Noak««s, Dominion and B. C. 
land surveyors, etc.. removed to Fromls 
Block, 1006 Government street. P. O. Box 
E4Z. Telophonc 377. ' 

LODGES AND SOCIETIES 



UENERAl. servant, able to 4* pW» 00o ' t - 
ing; no washing; 8WO* W*g«* * » »3*t" 
able applicant; reference*. Box t!0». C«t- 



G 



onlst. 



It'AXTEIi I'.v English gentleman, ex- 
>> hi my. position of trust In B. C. near 
Victoria preferred; win undertake c»r» of 
ick and Kiipervlslon of labor on farm 
or othei propert] Apply, giving partic- 
ulars as to location and salary offered, to 

008, Colon let. 

OUNG man, 80T requires position in 
office as manager or clerk, shipping 
preferred; excellent references. Box 2121, 
Colonist. 



Two lots, 60-xHO each to a 

lane; best lota on gtreet,; Tnent at., 

close to K,.: 1 si. car; prloi ' •'■*" 
Denny & Cheeseman, 1306 Illau. liar.l st . 
phone 3126. 



A SNAP — Lot 
_"_- 

Box 1028, 



7, 

av. 

Colonist. 



block 
near 



Ct;, 50x!20, on 
Saratoga; 81880, 



ACREAGE — Pachona Valley and 
oose — 133 acres, good soil; price 8^0 
an acre, on very easy terms. British 
lumhla Investments. Ltd.. K36 View St. 



co- 



A 



iltKAOE — Two 10-acre lots fronting <n 




GENERAL servant wanted. Apply XW 
Stanley ave, Wagea W. _, 



"OUNG man, 29. English, married;: five 
- yoars officers mercaittlle merino and 
R. N. R.; left sea four year*, seeks position; 
good references, Box X.M.D., Colonl.t., y 

lldh. ma 

.losltion; 
i|. tjalonUit, 

,.-ii*t*#?»<*?_ 
lO mari'''*^iMi 
home on ruoh; 
Box m*. CotojlitV 

I ' ll I I. 'I 'Hil l ' H I' . Mi ll . 1 i ||.fioi, ) I . II I I , 1 U ll l ll Q l '" I ' '— 

■ a i j; ij l.. ' 11 11 1 11 1 Mi iiiii j i i iii ' wi;-<»ite.-^li i ,ii rr iiiii 1 . 1 ' i jj 1 1 " i " . '' j . ' 1 , ■ 

A YOUNG lady, 28, would like to go out 
A werkjng _jr m day; Apply Mm 

'■fSBkr. ^iFliMklmalt Road, Vletorla Weat. 



like comfortable 
wages no abject. 



ANCIENT Order of Foresters. Court 
Northern Light. No. 6936. moets at 
Foresters' Hall, Broad street, 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday*. W. F. Fullerton, Sec. • 



E 



MPLOYMENT Bureuu— Wing On. 
Government slreeL Phone 2*. 



1709 



EMlLUV.NiKNT bureau. 
Co., B06 Flsguard st 



Wan Ylng Tal 
P.O. Box 1220. 



I.-MKK Wood! Furnaco Wood! Kindling 
' Wood! Prompt delivery. Single or 
double loads delivered. J3.00 double load 
inside limits. $1.50 single load. Phono 864. 
( ameron Mill.' ,, Ltd. 



C^ LASS and Glazing — Every description of 
X «!asa. plate, sheet, prismatic, ornamen- 

T.-j_j -.« TV,.. M_l 



tal, leaded, etc The Melrose Co.. Ltd 
Fort street. . 



61S 



MKKWi Khorthand taught by a gradual- 
VT of John R. Gregg; typewriting, book- 
keeping; day and evening classes. \ Ic- 
turla Business Institute, 547 Michigan st. ; 
phone 3-85.; • 







O.ME Beautltlcrs— A phone call to 4141 
connects you with "Home- Beautl- 
ilers"; any woodwork in the house, garden 
or on lots artistically executed with origi- 

inlity: ask us about it. • 

ARDWARE — E. G. Prior sc Co., hard- 
ware and agricultural implements, cor- 
ner Johnson and Government streets. 



LOYAL Orange Association, Premier Loyal 
Orange Lodge, No. 1610, meets 2nd 
and 4th Mondays, at the Foresters' Hall. 
Broad St. -I. C. Scott, 942 Pandora street, 
Worshipful Master; W. C. Warren. 39 Cam- 
bric 1 ce Street. Sec retary. 

SONS of England. B. S. Alexandra i.odge 
116, meots 1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 
K of P. Hall. H. G. King. Shelbourne St.. 
president; Jas. P. Temple, 1053 Burdatte at, 
secretary. 



HUUBRKBBrBR Wilted ** i * •■ » 
gentlemen, in the country, MO te 140. 

Cook general, family 8} no wagntngj #8°. ; 
Cook general, family 8. W0. Cook •«•»>• 
family 6. 880. Working- hougel^ipar, W0 
te $U. Mlddleaged wotklH* Wtt». Wd.Jf 

r-Wfi Qennr-I, ItftlP. tMi BB-M.. AMP"*., 

. Oenerai help. Port igb. fw*«*.fc:.,Wf^/ / ^j» f »lif;- 

_ i._ iiji . . i n ...» .. I • ... ' . ..■ . . "■ . ." ' . " ■ ■"- * 

TTOUSEKEEPKR for family of two; good 
JUL home for suitable person. Apply, elat- 
ing wages, etc.. Box -2030, Colonist, 

HOUSEMAID, capable, experienced. Old 
I'nuiiirv pirl for town establishment, $30. 
Nurse housemaid, English, for two children, 
$30. Nurse, dully, one child. 820. House 
parlormaid. lady and gentleman. Oak Bay 
iKtittlisli cook kepti. $25. Mouse parlormaid, 
three lodl $25- Nurse for three ehll- 

ili-en. town. $25. Apply at The Ladles 

Ago-K-y, 4'2u Sayward bldg. ■ . 

"Ol'SBKECT'BB for small family, middle- 
aged or elderly English lady preferred; 
suitable person will «e treated as one of 
family. Box 201«, Colonist. 



honaekeepers. c: 
nurse, parlor aBd 
helps, gener * 
Employment . 
near poet office: 



tea 1 Utt ssgff!* 1 * 



T. 



TTENTION 




( tresses, 
houe-. 

1- 



church, school arid post office; Beautiful 
marine view; steamer connecting with \ lc- 
torla five days a week; low price; small pay- 
ment down, balance on terms. Box 1369, 
Colonist. 

"A 1 CRBAOB— 10,000 acres belpw market ; 

•■&. for/full pirtlpulare eee A. von Glrse- 

waid, cornar Kort a«d Q -*d**- ' 

-^ ------ saanlch;. lw 

" olnluj, 
F. G. 



1 ori ■"' 

BEACH Drive — A beautiful trlenv 0) UlO 
Olympli an.; overlooking Bhoal Ha\ . 
Stands liigh and is rbeky; price only 
f Ohio. 1-3 cash, balance <i. 12 ana IK 
tnonthi <". S L eigh ton, Mahoii o.'k. 

BBAUTIFI I. sea !'•« lot In best part of 
oak Hay, BUxK». pTlca 821 - " 

1; Crawford, 317 Central b'J« . phone ■<--'■'■ 

Bl^.\. 'Ii DriVI , lle.n . -raiiin II a 1 .1 , * lill 
bi iiillfu! panoramic vl.-w of the fii.ii:. 
. .020 f 1 ; $3j.i(i; easy i.-.ios. tills Is one of 
1 , , .. homcsUas leti hi this district. 
Heath & Chan a! .var d bl k. 

/ in 1: s !■!•> r .,.,.. Itj lots In the city, Ti 
\j st port, n too and M - 1 

1 . road, 91 I >«0. S 1 4 "<' and 81600 for extra 
lot, !■'• G. 



HOMESITE 2 '-• acre* on four mile circle 
lust Off C.lsnriHd av. ; tine slope, good 
land pauu cleared, with road on '•"" »»'*"' 
v :ti..iii, terms arranged. 1 rompton _ bar- 
ton. 180 IVmberton bld g. 
H~ A.MPSHIRE road, next to corner of 
Brighton .place.- 4Sxl80, $2100. 1-3 cash. 
.- . nrelbei- & Lubbeck, 40t Central bldg., 
I'lion. SIB. _______ 



I'ori. oils. 701 i- Yates M. 



HOLLYWOOD Crescent, 80x120, southerly 
frontage: grand view of sea. shipping 

and mountains. $2100 from owner. Box 
1150. 

HAII.TAIN St., coin.., of Victor, »0xll0. 
$N0U, $300 cash. Sihrelber & Lub- 
l,o, k, 40i i' al bldg., ph one 818. 

H\i 1. IAIN st., the natural n.-iery o; 
what will soon be a thlckW settlo.l 
section Oi Hi.' City; a rtne, centra', thres- 
frontago property having ?Jp teet on Hjr- 
iniii. sunaliie tor a row it stores; I««00; 
quarter cash Another lot, ltioxiso. »2aoc 
Another. 42x126. I14B0-, quarter canli. W . 
Meed :t 1 r Central bldg.; phone 13, \. 



HULTON St.. mx!20. t22uii; '4 cash, bal- 
ance tan)'. .Scliiclbrr A Lubbock, 406 
Central bldg., Phone Mi. 



CtUKAI', easj lota— Haultaln, corner, $1200. 
1 only $280 cash: Haultaln, corner. $1400, 
3300 cash; James St.. Oak Buy. $1750, 1-4 
cash; Fairfield Terrace, extra large. $2750, 

only ? Linden av., $2750, only $600 

cash; all good buvs. Box 2071, Colonist. 



-^"wwrtsi laST*Wl* •» 
Porteona, ftl£'f >tM ; .IV ,^: , 



c 



HRAIOl 

snaps, 40x 
$o500, on easy 
Ltd;, 64a Fort 



ICH, close to Fort St., two 
00, for $3150, and 50x100 for 
terms. J. R. Bowes & Co., 
St.; phone 2724. 



— Good lot. 81050; good terms. 
1874, Waddlnglon 



llota, cloa, 
abort blotsk tro» city llmlta, for dnly. 
each; third cash; the 




below market. 



heeded. WMloBtt l K«E»y 



eae are luat WW «ae1 
bat Immediate cash kg 



' P P ., 1 t»W au i |)ia 



H' 



SONS of England. B. 8. Pride of the Isl- 
and Lodge No. 131. meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesdays in A. O. F. hall Broad street; 
president, F. West, corner Hampton and 
Harrleth road; secretary. W. H. Trowes- 
dale, 520 Williams St., city. ______ 

VANCOUVER. HOTELS 



HARDWARE— The Hickman Tye Hard- 
ware Co., Ltd., Iron, steoi. hardware, 
cutlery. $0 and 34 Yates street. Victoria, 
H. C. ' 



JUNK — Wanted, scrap brass, copper, zinc, 
lead, cas' iron, sacks, bottles, rubber. 
Highest prices paid. Victoria Junk A.ency. 
Btora Btreet. Phone 1336. 



LI v ERY — Victoria Transfer Co., Ltd. Tel. 
129. liest aervice In the city. 

1ANDBCAPE Gardener — James Simpson, 
J till Superior, phone L8964, expert otf 
1 en, forest and ilorist work of every 
,; catalogue now ready, free, of roses, 
shrubs, bulbs and herbaceous plants; qual- 
ity best; prices low; orders solicited. 

ITHOGRAPHING — Lithographing, en- 
graving and embossing. Nothing too 



HDTE-. Blackburn. A. E. Blackburn, 
proprietor, This well known and pop- 
ular hotel, entirely rebuilt and refurnished, 
is nc w open to Its patrons. Steam heat, fine 
commodious rooms, first-class dining room, 
best attention to comfort of guests. Amer- 
ican plan. $1.50 to $2.90 per day. Eurp- 
,.,,1.1 plan, 7S cents upwards. 218 Main 
street. 



IADIBB— The New York Millinery Parlors 
j wm ,•« 11 ir it to > ,<,ur B - tlg - 

factlon foi fifteen days at a 26 

ent discount. Come m and givo us a 
trial. All work guaranteed. Millinery 
taught In all its branches. Day and night 
classes. Suite. 6. Vernnn hotel; phone 1129. 

OTHER'S help, 2 children, good home. 

825. $30. I.»dy help for doctor's house, 

" children, $25. $30. Apply to The Ladies' 

I - Say ward bldg. -, ■ ■;...■ 



o 



PI 



'ORS for -itctrlc sewing machlr.es, 
8-hour day. Apply Turner Beaton Co., 
•Big Horn" brand Bhlrt and overall 
tory, corner of Bastion 
Victoria. 



and Wharf St.. 



waitresses, . 
domestic help requiring positions should call 
at The Ladles' Business Agency, 425 Say- 
ward blk.; phone 2488; office hours 10 to 4, 
Saturdays 10 to 1. lira. A. Clarke, secre- 
tary. .. 

would take care of 
gs. Apply first to Box 



AYOCNG woman 
children evcnln 
443, Colonist. 



ARNOLD av„ »oxlsa r 11*™. 'gga* .Www*. 
Peden & Cooper, 104 Say ward bldg. 

JsSfo 




IN Cadboru Heights on Thompson av., one 
. biotk tr Dunlevy, good buy at $1260; 
1 1 cash, one and two year* coast invest- 
ment ''..., 113 Pemberton bldg. 

iLANDPark, Shorn B» .;n , 1 .,:;.. 1 1 - x I I I . 

price $2800. with Jhoo down. -Beckett. 

Mai. Ltd., ti!3 Fort st.j telephones 

3615 and 2967. 

I _ F you want a country home only 3 V« 
miles from Victoria, we have n 6 '» an-.- 
property with nice 5-rooni bungalow, a gc • ' 
stable, and half the land under cultivation. 
There Is a fine spring with water gravitat- 
ing to house and garden; the new B. C 
Electric Railway to Saantsh nuts within 
half a mile. The price Is $8500 and only 
$2500 cash. Let us show you this. Ilea, 
Brown ft Copeman, 213 Pemberton blk. 



facing- .jmm, 

.* H; Bootn. T 
Brt daTWan bUgg:" l*if ^V&mHMnt it . 

-■ ..in .i I.— ■■! —t ii| ' ■»»fcs»__«aagj»wis»»«~*s»»*l|(i | i' . .H ii .W "' ill ! HUP JJ 8 8J ' ■ 

lORNBR of Burdlok and Muigrave, price 



CIORI? 



nd 

►ata 



BOOKKEEPER. 25, desires position; good 
business experience; excellent refer- 
ence.,. Box 17S2. Colo nist. . ■ 

(CAPABLE, courteous woman of 27 desires 
position In office work; experienced and 
reliable; moderate salary. Address Box 
2134, Colonist. 

C COLORED, lady, A-l worker, wishes any 
■> kind of housework. 809 Caledonia av. 

(CERTIFIED nurse, disengaged, willing to 
J go as nurse companion. L. P.. care 
''.Ik |ta> P O.. pho ne M3687. 

ENGLISH lady, thoroughly experienced in 
secretarial work, stenography, account- 
ing, etc., ilesircx position. Secretary, Box 
20..1, ''olonlst. ' . 

ENGLISHWOMAN, Just arrived, seens po- 
sition as housekeeper In a small fam- 
ily; thoroughly domesticated and capable. 
Write Box 2117, Colonist. 



Iv 



VI. school, shorthand and typewriting. 
• In chargo 'of exper 

rorter. Room «20 HI'.. 



•d court 
block. 



HELP WANTED — M VI K 

LVO von Alvensleben, Ltd.. want* flrst- 

class local salesman; good opportunity 

lor right ma n. 689 Fort St. 

JOT; about fifteen, to work round store. 
1763 Fort. 



B 



CARRIER wanted tor a good route in 
district of Fort s'.rje: and tho Junc- 
tion. Only one living In this district need 
apply. ColonlBt Circula tion Department. 

I HAVE a, good proposition for a real live 
hustler. Apply 2005 Government su 



L 



large and nothing too Small; your station- 
try is your advance agent; our work is un- 
equalled west of Toronto. The Colonist 
s-t'inung ami ruullshlng Co.. Ltd. 

LANDSCAPE arid Jobbing gardener, tree 
pruning and spraying a specialty. C. 
ton, i*0ti Francis ave.; p hunc L1362. 

hardwood 



MAN I 1 \ RBRS' Agent 

.ng, aluminium wares, etc. David 



IxNUFACTURBRS' 

uni wares, etc 
Macfarlane, 1010 Laugley St., Room 2, 

I >i. , Contractors — Hunter & 

i- Jiigj,-, i>17 Fort st., 1'. O. Box 1009. 
. .a 1 mates tree. 



TJATENTS — Rowland Drlttaln. 
.L attorney. Patents Ir. all 



registered 

countries. 

Fairfield building, opposi-.o P. O., Vancouver. 

POTTERY Ware — Sewer pipe, field tile, 
ground fire clay, flower pots, etc. B. C. 
pottery Co., Ltd., corner iiroau ana candor— 

i>LUMUING — Colbert Piutnoing ana Beat- 
ing Co.. Ltd. For firs, class wurkinan- 
inlp In tne above line, glvu us a call. Xeiu- 
uorary office, 755 Urouahtju kireet. l'lione 
iSI 

PLUMBING and Hardware — K. 3mlth, 1943 
uan. Day ave.. pliuiiu 8860, McClary's 

1 any. v ,1 :t.l ilea I i 1 - 

estlma tea 
Box 2003, 



SMART boy wanted to learn motor-cycle 
business. Apply Victoria Motor-Cycle 
and Supply Store . 2007 Government St. 

VI. school, shorthand and typewriting, 
. In charge of experienced court re- 
porter. Room 620 Hibben-Bone block. 



\\ 'ANTED — Two young ladles of neat ap- 
\\ pearsnee to solicit orders; salary and 
cmniinslon. Call between 8 and 8, Monday 
morning. Room 3, Fairfield hotel. Be 
ready for work. 



UTOMAN wanted to sort clothes. 



WANTED, strong. energetic and trust- 
worthy boy. Apply 9 to 10 a. m or 
6 to 6 p. m., Modern Office Supply Co.. 921 

Douglas st. . • ' 

ANTED — Men who are now employed 
in good positions, wanted to work in 
their spare time; good weekly pay. Apply 
evenings, between 7 and 9. Ask for man- 
ager, 1324 Douglas st. 



w 



A N'l'ED— Vestmaker 



M. Llnktaier, 



Apply 
■ nomy Wet Wash Laundry, 1612 

Bridge st. ._ 

\T|T ANTED— Girl for housework every 
>> morning from 7.30 to 9.30; breakfast 
given: Oak Bay district. Write. stating 
wages required. Box 1884, Colonist. Phone 

32 01. 

[ T ANTED — Responsible office girl, over 
IS years. Apply In own handwriting, 
stating salary expected, Must be prepared 
to work at leant two years, write a good 
hand and be quick at figures. Experience 
not essential. 1 506. Colonist. 

WANTED— Young English lady help In 
country; three hours' teaching one 
pupil five lions' housework; $20; good 
" day. 1884, Colonist. 



I74XPERIBNCED housemaid desires posl- 
li Hon; good needlewoman; wages $30; 
city references. Box 1910, Colonist. 

XPERIENCED lady clerk desire* posi- 
tion. Box 1888, Colonist. 



17IDTJCATED young English widow (38) 
J with one child, wishes for position as 
housekeeper to a gentleman. Box 1833, 
Colonist. 



A 4t?p<M«,i» i w ;*g 

lands in Albert*, Will axeb 
toria or suburban property. Those Inter- 
ested would do well to call and get parti- 
culars. Cree & Sloane, 1021 Government 
St., phone 4245^ '• ■■' ' . 

ACREAGE— 14 acres good agricultural 
land for $1870, % cash, and balance 
over three years; see us about this. A. von 

Glrsewuld, corner Fort and Quadra. 

BARGAIN — Level, grassy lot, 50x120. on 
good main road, 10 minutes tj Ml. Tol- 
Bile car; $600; $150 cash, $100 three months, 
-hen balance 6. 12. 18 months; forced to 
sell through unforseen circumstances. Own- 
er, Box 1792, Colonist. 

N opportunity that won't last— As an 
Investment you can't beat waterfront 
property in the Immediate vicinity 01 m.- 
torla; Investigate these Shoal Bay lots; two 
would make beautiful homesite; shel- 
tered, some trees; price $2500 each: one 
lot 55x106 to a lane. $4000: one lot 50x 
200 price $2000; one lot. WxlW, I" -''feci 
homesite $7000; easy terms on tall. Grlm- 
ason & Bunnett. 329 Pemberton bldg. 

GOOD buy— Fifth St., one block from 
Hillside car; an ideal building site; 
$1425; quarter cash, fl, 12. 18. 24. Denny ft 
CheeFeman, 1306 Blanehard st. 

ATTENTION investors:— -Get a door- 
knocker: opportunity is knocking nt 
<-ur door: ' 80-acre Bnlkley Valley farms. 
splendid soli; $600 cash, balance easy: get 
literature. !■ red Heal. 421 Pemberton bldg. 

ACREAGE — Parson's Bridge, a small 
chicken ranch, going concern; price $2800 
on easy terms. For sale by A. von Glrse- 

wnld, corn or Fort and Quadra. 

N exceptional value In Fairfield district 
— Comer SutleJ and Cook sts., 96x11 lx 
for only $8500. easy terms. Monk. 



i tO O , 1 -8 « Mh. i » s-»-e> a e s- r thr a a 
yampa; A. Of. O. Crawford IH Central Wdgi. 
phcjhft tit.M» ' ..•' , ■ . 

CORNER lot 01» car line, Sunnyvale 
Heights, WxmaXST: ,|l ^»* u J?r B » m » e 



S 



paid for elx months ago. |«86; 8160 cash. 

H0X i M .,.. f a^ro- 1 -— — ^ 

CtHEAP to aulck buyer-— A lovely 60-foot 
) lot off Hillside avenue, within Vs min- 
ute, of new carllne. This is a genuine bat- 
gain as owner must sell. Apply owner. Box 
1916, Colonis t. ■ ______ 

C~~100KMAN st. — A nice, level lot and ready 
1 for building for $1300. with usual terms, 
G, S'. Lelghton. Mahon blk. 

OWN bi~the~beach. Foul Bay road, 94 ft., 
splendid home site, for $2800. F. Ij 



IMPROVED rancn, 20 acres, aultable for 
poultry and truck garden, near Shaw- 
nlgah Lake; never-failing springs. Cheap 
for quick »ale. Apply owner. Box 1723, 

Colonlat. '. , 

Bay— Something extra good at an 
old fashioned price; 88 feet fronting on 
Menzles st. «tM?W»*d house, between Mi. in 
nag and Superior sts. for 811.000 on terms. 
If you arc looking for a gilt-edge Invest- 
ment you ataould look carefully Into this. 
— ._ sjala _5_«_ ltuas 



a 



__UB- 



r by Robert Russell, 



T YNDBN ava-^60xt*8; price $3000, with a 
Jul quarter cash. Beckett, Major & Co., 
i.td., 643 Fort a t.; telephones 3616 and 2067. 

t1nKI.EAS av.— Lot 12, blk 3, $1525; this 
JU is the cheapest lot on the street for 

location. Crompton & Burton, 130 Pember- 
ton blk. ■ 



IINDEN ave. — Lots from $2250 to U850, 
_ H. Booth, 7 Brldgman bldg., 1007 Gov- 
ernment St. .; 



1) 



Porteous, 707% Yat KB st. 

•30x110, $1650 



J)AVU 



easy terms, 
eden 4 Cooper, 104 Say-ward bldg. 



Lots 31, 32, and 33, blk. 7, 

Crompton ft 

Barton. 130 Pemberton bldg. 



DL'NLEVY st. 
$1750, 1-3 6, 12. and 18. 



EM'I-I 
and 



Apply Mrs. 



md cleaning; every week. 
B., 780 Caledonia av. . ' 

ENGLISH governess with titled families 
wishes few hours dally, or would nc- 
cept good business post. Thoroughly com- 
petent and experienced. Exceptional refer- 
ences. Box 1896, Colonist. 



D% 



UNeMUlR rd.— Lots at $2100, $2200. 
v2500 and $2750. Beckett. Major ft 
Ltd., 643 Fort St.; telephones 3515 and 2967. 

ft block 
terms. Colin 



DUNLEVY st. carllne, 50x115, 
from Uplands. $1750. 
Powell, 230 Pemherton blk. 



LOOK — Two good lots cheap: Graham St.. 
close to Bay, 50x110. $1776; Fairfield, 
near school, high corner, 50x120, for $17»0; 
terms. P. O, Box 551 or telephone LIU". 

L~~ OT 60x332 facing on Charlton and King's 
road. $1800 net; terms. Apply owner, 
72K Discovery St. ' 

MORE profits — Multlgraph circular letters 
t cannot lie detected from typewriting! 
will increase your business; prices low. We . 
have complete mailing lists. orders 
executed on short notice. Apply Newton 
Advertising Agency, suite 403, Times bldg. 



,OUGLAS street, Just oft on Princess, 58 
xlOO, for $21,000; small revenue pro- 
ducing. Thompson Realty Co., 14 and 16 
Qreec block, phone 3762. 

kOUBLE corner. Hampshire and McNeil, 
to a 
Colonist. 



DC . 
to a lane, $8760 on terms. Box 2 



10 

Montelth & 
Broughton 



Co.. Ltd., Government, corner 



A 



BEAUTIFUL quarter-acre on Quadra 



dentlal properly will be; for sale by owner 
at $1500, on easy terms. Phoqe 2S39. 



\Y 



(1 IRL wants light housework and look 
' after children from 8 o'clock till 5. 



Box 2036, Colonist. 



\Y A 



eminent st. 



Simmons, 907 Gov- 



tallor. 



•\\l'i:ii First-class bookkeeper, able to 
must h 
Box 8048, 1 'olonlst 



w 

Victoria 



Ogure lumber; must have homo in 



TANTED— Energetic and thoroughly hon- 
est man for a few days to distribute 

Irculars. Box 2110. Colonist. 

Ap- 



w 



V\7ANTED — First class shoe repairer. 
>> ply lo«7 Douglas «C 



\\\NTED, a young girl of twonty or so 
1 \ to help In small family. 3 children, 
don't need to be a capable cook. Just have 
nn idea and help generally; wages from 
$20 to $26 according to capabilities. Apply 
nt St. Joseph church. Beaumont, lo Rev. 
Father Flsse r. for further Inform a tion. 

WANTED — Girl for housework every 
morning from 7.30 to 9.30; breakfast 
given; Oak Bay district. Write, slating 
i wages required, B ox 1984, Colonist. 

WANTED — Cooks, cashiers and waitresses 
who Wish ti. own a little business of 
own but lack nm. lent capital. Let 
■ is help you by supplying the balance of the 

-.] . intilt 1 "■!"' 

Writers, salt* 5 and 6, Green hi", k. 1210 
•■I st. , 



HOUSE parlormaid with references, dis- 
er 
onlst. 



rngaged, wages $30. Box 1980, Col- 



*T ADY help or mother's help, Scotch, 
J..- strong, capable and experienced, good 
cook, help with all duties. $26 to $30. Ap- 
ply at The Ladles' Agency, 4 25 Say ward; 
phone 2486. 

LADY wants housework, or by month. 827 
Nlagiira st.. city. - 

ATERNITY nurse open to engagement 
at home or out, vacant room always 
for emergency and private cases. Apply 
Nurse, 2309 Prior St. 



\f OTHER'S help- 
_tJL younj 



it \ i All NG, ptiperhanglng; 

given, Bcsl work only. 
. olunlsl , 



Ki .1 K 
,1 
B, '' 

8 



k h.aslins. 



l'.iul, contractor for 
Quadi a ir,, vi. 



ORTHAND three months' course. I'lt- 

11111111 (Royal) Simplified ByMtem; new 
u nn commences November; intending pupils 
siiouid apply tot tun particulars to the 
Royal Stenographic School, 128 Say ward 

bldg , nigh I io.il ils . 1 lasses. i'hone 2601 

kIH OH HAND — Shorthand School. 1109 
V_l Broad street. Victoria. Shorthand. Type- 
writing, bookkeepina thoroughly taught. 
Graduates fill guod positions. E. A. Mao- 
Miilan. principal. ■_ 

tlTENClL ana Seal Engraving — General 
3 engraver and stencil cutter. Uoo. Crow- 
ther, 81u Wharf street, behind P. O. 



\\ f ANTED — Young ladles and gentlemen 
Vi nit of employment should call Im- 
mediately at Room 22. Brown Block. 1112 
llrobd si., lor good paying positions. 



VV 



'ANTED — Two good reliable salesmen 
for outside work. Godwin & MoKay, 
the Hous. Al.- 1. 620 fate s St.; phone »7 l«. 

\TC7ANTED — Carrier for The Dally Colonist 
YY route, vicinity Gorge and Tllllcum rds. 



Apply Circulation 
Office. 



Dopt., 



Daily Colonist 



Doy In the Colonist 



_1MITH, Russell, shlngiers and slate roof- 
o ers. 2203 Spring road. 



\\t.\NTED— Boys on The Colonist varnish 
\Y room. 

WANTED — Message 
.i.ii, Department 
__ 

w 



WTBD -Well educated woman to rep- 
resent 11 first class co-operntlve pro- 
position, calling upon selected persons. A 
woman of ability should mnke large Income. 

A.UIress B ox 17 10. Colonist. 

\T7ANTED — Nurse housemaid for country; 

\ \ V e, v comfortable home; middle n'l'.i 
woman preferred. Write Mrs. Payne, Victo- 
ria P rivate H ospital, Victoria 

[7ANTED — Int' |ltgent young Indies snd 
gentlemen wno have studied short- 
1 and and tailed to use it successfully. 
Please call al Room 22. Brown Block, 1112 
Broad st- ' 



Bright, capable, tidy 
g English ulrl. good cook, wishes 
post in town, $25, $30. Apply at Ladles- 
Agency, -12!> Say ward bldg.; phone 2486. 

Nt'RHE attendant, hospital trained, plain 
"olOng. light housework, care of In- 
valid; good references; $30 to $35. Chil- 
dren's nurse or care of Invalid, hospital 
trained, thoroughly understands Infants, $30 
to $35; dlsencnped 6th Nov. Particulars 
from The Ladies' Agency, 425 Sayward 
bldg.; phone 2486. 

PRACTICAL woman wanta housework, 
about three days a week. Box 1908, 
Colonist. 



A BEAUTIFUL treed lot, corner of 
Harriet rd. and Obed ave.. overlooking 
Gorge Grove. $1100 net; third cash; real 
snap. Phon e 3130. 2118 Sayward St. 

A BEAUTIFUL high corner lot with oak 
trees on Bowker ave., on car line: 
usual terms; price $2400. Owner, Box li78, 
Colonist^ - 1 

ACREAGE— Strawberry Vale, five acres 
under cultivation in 4 mile circle, 7- 
roomed house, outbuildings, good orchard, 
etc. Price $7360 and good terms can bo 
arranged. For sale by A. von GlrscWald, 
corner Fort and Quadra^ 

ACREAGE waterfrontnge. Gordon Head 
4 acres, for only $2500 per acre Gor- 
don Head; this is the cheapest acreage 
In this nourishing residential district. Box 
1877, Colonist. ■ , 

A BEAUTIFUL lot, overlooking Esqui- 
mau harbor. 74x132; delightful spot, 
charming Bhade trees, exquisite view, cor- 
nic of View Royal and Denman; $1000, 
only $220 cash; secure this plum. Owner, 
211S Sayward St.; phone 3130. 



EVERYONE Is doing it! What? Buying 
lots In our new subdivision at Po,-t 
Albemi, the city of opportunity. For the 
next ten days we are offering lots In our 
new subdivision at prices ranging from $150 
to $260; terms 10 per cent down and 5 
per cent monthly. Don't delay, but call at 
our office and get a map and plat of Port 
Alhernl and this new subdivision. Port 
Albernl Realty Co., 907 Government St., Vic- 
toria; H. C. 



Ij^XTRA good buy— Nice lot and comfort- 
J able buildings ready to llvo in, for 
$1300. Apply Williams, lot 13, block 8, 
Waller ave., near Gorge park. 

1,1 All tFT ELD district— We have the fol- 
- lowing choice lots In this neighborhood 
for sale; they are all good building sites: 
Arnold st., 60x120; third. 6, 12, 18. $1500; 
Hows hi.. 50x116, third. 8, 12 and 18, $2200: 
Leonard St., I7\l24, third, 6, 12 and 18, 
1. Linden ave., 60x103, quarter, «, 12 
and IS, $8000; Cambridge St., 60x132, third, 
6, 11 and 18, 3150. Western Lands, Ltd., 
1201 Broad St., cor. View. 



MONTEREY ave. — 50x120; price $1700. 
Beckett, Major & Co., Ltd., 643 Fort 
St.; telephones 3515 and 2967. 

MUST sell my lot with a good tent house 
on it. two blocks off car; price $12.'.". 
$250 cash. Box 1849, Colonis t. 

Splendid lot, 60x120, fine home- 
tp at $950. on e 
109 Pemberton bldg. 



MARS Si. 
she; snap at $950. on easy terms. Wise 



& Co.. 



s t. — Next 
»e on_ 

itt, XI 

Fort st. ; 'phone., 31. 1 5 and 29ti7. 



to a corner, 



MEN-1ES 
roomed .. 
on frms. Beckett, Major & Co., Ltd., M3 



M 



I SOU AVE snap — Double corner, $2900. 
I'hone 356 5. 

$1800. 



-50x120; price 
& Co.. I 
; telephones 3515 and 2967 



NEWPORT ave.- 
Beckett, Major & Co.. Ltd., 64 3 Fort 



-52x144x110x132, for $1950. 

Ith a quarter cash. Beckett. Major 

A Co., Ltd., 648 Fort St.; telephone? 8618 

n-.ul 2 9 ST. 



FA IK FIELD rd. 
wit 



TL - ORT St 



Lot 1012. tiOxll.2. between Van- 
■ arm Cook st. ; wo can sell this 
property for a little while nt the extremely 
low price of $82,500. Beckett, Major A Co., 
I, id.. 643 Fort st.; phones 35U> and 2967. 



vTASCANA st— Splendid lot, 57x120. near 

Burnslde carllne. big snap at $900 on 

easv terms. Wise & Co.. 109 Pemberton 

bldg. • 

iOg. — Two lots on Maddock av. near 
ve at., 60x120 each; high and 
el view; third cash, balance on terms; 
price each, $1050. The Griffith Company, 
rooms 5, 7, 9, 11 Mahon bldg.. 1112 Gov- 
ernment st. . 



N 



NO. 1C 
Mil 



on Burdlck av. 



-\TC- 1195— Lot 50x120, 
iM fine view, $400 cash, balance 6, 12, 18 
months, Price $1500. The Griffith Com- 
pany, rooms 5, 7. 9, 11 Mahon bldg., 1112 
Government st. _ 



"VTORTH Hampshire, close _ 
-_N eelleot view, 60xl20; price 
Box 2105, Colonist. 

XTlAGARA, close Minztes, 60x120. 
iM and terms. Box 2106, Colonist. 

fSJO. 1224- 
1> 120. n 



Bowker, ex- 
and terms, 



Price 



A BEAUTIFUL lot, overlooking Esqui- 
_\ male harbor, 7»xU2; delightful spot, 
charming shade trees, exQUlslte View, cor- 
ner of View Roval and Denman; $1000; on y 
»220 cash; secure this plum. Owner. 2118 
Sayward st.; phone 3130. 

4 BIG snap— Tolmle ave., corner of Bolle- 
__. vce. 100x120. $1500; third cash. Box 
1878, Colonist. 



\Y 



7 ANTED 

M01 .• 



-First class shoemaker to 

1 7i;:t Fort. st. 



'ANTED Good live real .slate and Stock 
salesmen; good proposition to rlRht 

party. appU •"■ and 8 Qreen blk., opposite 
Colonist office 



tTtTANTBD Young man for itenographei 

'» _ppi] Swiii Canadian Co., Ltd., 



Wharf st. 



UNDERTAKING — llanns _ Thompson un- 
takers. Parlors 827 Pandora av. Grad- 
uate U S. College of Embalming. Contrac- 
tors to 11. M. Navy. Olfiue phone 498; 
res. phone 611. 

UNDERTAKING — B. C. Funeral Furnish- 
ing Co (Haywardst. 734 Broughton 
street. Prompt attention; ouarges reason- 
able. Phones 2235, 8286, 2287. 2238. Chas. 
ltayward, president; R. Hayward. secretary; 
F. Castleton, manager. 



WHOLESALE Wines and Liquors — Tur- 
ner. Beeton Co., Ltd.. Wharf strost, 
Victoria—wholesale only. All the leading 
brands of liquors. Direct Importers. Write 
tor lis ts and prlce a 

WHOLESALE Dry Goods — Turner, Beeton 
A Co., Ltd., wholesale dry goods lm - 
f.orters and manufacturers, men's furnlsh- 
ngs, tents, "Big Horn" brand shirts, over- 
alls. Mall ord ers attended to. 

^Tl/INDOW Cleaners — James Bay window 
VV cleaners and Janitors. H. Kelway, 844 
Coburg St.; phone U2882. 

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORr 

ARCHITECTS — Plans prepared for apart- 
ment houses and bunsaiowa P. O. 

Box 18T8, t ■ 

RCHITECT — Jesee M. Warren, 808 Cen- 
tral Bldg., Vletorla B. C. Phone 80»T. 



iiwNTKi) — Managing steward for grill 

VV enfe who can Invest In shnro of com 

pany. Mercantile Underwriters, suite 6 and 
i, Green block, 1818 Broad sl 

V\TANTRU— Chef with ability to assume 
' » Charge or entering In the best cafi. In 

Victoria; preference given to party who .nn 
take financial interssi In business. Apply 

Bex 1898, ''olonlst. 

[TANTED— Two helpers. Apply E. T. 
Lowrle, plumbing contractor, Domin- 
ion road, Victoria west. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— MALE 



A GOOD rough I "' <aiit» work, day 

or hour. Nothing loo small; will help 
1 '"■ ■ 2128 .'o lonlst. 

a TJTO driver seeks employment, t% yehrs 1 

i\ ■ oe.iei private and workghop. Boi 

2089 'olonl st. , 

COMPETENT, reliable, upright, experl- 
,. n i oi man und wife desire position 

managing rooming boo.-.. ..i hotel] reter- 
Box 1291, ' olonlst. 



UTOMOBILE drivei mechanic wants 
position with private family, town w 
, ounti y Bm I 918, ' olonlst. 



A 1 



RESPONSIBLE young lady bookkeeper, 
cashier, desires position; six years' ex- 
perience. 



lady 
Inn; 
Hot 1715. ColonlBt. 



RESPECTABLE Englishwoman wants 
dally work; honest and trustworthy. 
Box 1967, Colonist. 

TRAINED nurse who has had experience 
In bookkeeping desires office position. 
Doctor's office [inferred. Box 513, Colo- 
nist. 



RAINED maternity nurse open to en- 
moderate, 

I'hone F-8Gr,7. 



T 

1724 Edmonton road 



TWO 
ne 



In 



A c 



CREAGE— See us about lo acres at 
Cowlrhnn; one ncre In clover, all prac- 
tically cleared. It is yours for $2000 on 
ensy terms. For sale by A. von Glrsewald, 
corner Fort and Quadra. ________ _ 



ITIOUL Bay snap for builders or Investors. 
- Two lots. Foul Buy mad, 808 feet from 
car, two minutes from beach, very cheap. 
Apply owner, 1707 Ross St., Foul Bay. 



ITIOR sale— Moss st, 100x120, by owner. 
Apply phone 1,81)30. 



I JUNE lo 
" $ltnn. 



lot on Cook St., 60x100 to a lane, 
J. W. D. York, phone 2829. 



sale. 



ThU Is under 
Owner, R3960. 



Immediate 
Ps 
market and 



waterfront lot, 



IJiOE 

JJ Hollywood Park; $2750; only <A cash. 



a good buy. 



1Q snap — Good 2-roomed house. 12x20, 
on a large, high lot In a good locality, 
close to new proposed car line; only $S'fi'i; 
$2"6 cash. bal. easy. Box 3161, Colonist. 



H 



I-MN'LAVSON St.— This street has all 1m- 
. provements In, and Is snap at $100n, 
1-3 oash, balance «. 12 and 18 months. O. 
ft. Lelghton. Mahon blk^ 

I."^OR aale^ — 160 acres South Salt Spring 
Island; improved, fruit, trees, house, 
hams, etc.; reasonable terms as owner must 
sell at once. Apply Box A.R.F., Colonist. 



A fine corner on Cook St., «0x 
near Fairfield rd., on terms. 
Sii300 The Crirllth company, rooms 5, 7, 
9. 11 Mahon bldg.. 1112 Government st. 

-\TO. 1224 — A fine corner on Cook St.. 60x 
iN 120, near Fairfield rd., on terms $6800. 
The Griffith ^'o., rooms 6, 7, 9, 11 Mahon 

bldg.. 1112 Go vernment St. 

-\TO 1068 — Two lots on Maddock ave., near 
IN Mlllgrove St.. 50x120 each, high and 
fine view- third cash, balance on terms; 
nrtce each $1060. The Griffiths Co., rooms 
f,. 7, 9, 11 Mahon b ldg.. 1112 Government St. 

-\TO 1196— Lot 60x120 on Burdlck ave.. 
JM fine view; $400 cash, balance 6. 12, 18 
months; price $1500. The Griffith Co., rooms 
5, 7, 9, 11 Ma hon bldg., 1112 Government St. 

50x126, with oak trees, 
Box 2139. Colonist. 



o 



LVMPIA avenue, 
$1500; third cash 



OAK Bay— 2 nlco lots near Monterey cres- 
cent for $1300, with easy terms. 3. G. 
Linden _ Co., 4 MaoGregor blk. 



tear Victoria, as lady's maid and house- 
maid; both thoroughly experienced. Ad- 
dress Box 1223, Colonist, for appointment. 

7ANTED, dressmaking, at 84fi Courtney 
Btreet. Phone 1978. 



w 



U'ANTEtl by young 
W housework two or 

week. Apply 1188 Johnson st 

w 



married woman, 
three mornings a 



IV 



w 



;/ANTED An niteiit to S"U our portable 
gasoline lamps; new and liberal pro- 
position. Box 1914, Colonist. 

—A first class fireman, also 
ilacksmith's helper; steady Job to 

competent men Apply John McKay, 723 
Cormorant St.. Victoria. B, C, 



w 



rXTANI 

\\ in 



JSINESS man, whose past experience 

unbraces frdm mechanic In woodwork 
to suceeastul management and organisation 
,, store desires p"»t of rexponslblllty with 
moderate remuneration for intelligent and 
loyal servloe; age 88, energetic, disciplinar- 
ian original and adaptable. Ilanlc and other 
references itox 1898, ■ 'o lonlst; phone 4141. 

wanted evenings. Box 



B 



OOKKEEPING 

l:i..-, CQlOtttSI office 



4HAUFFEUR, experienced, wants situa- 

out 
golf. 



I 1l 

y~> tlon; do all running, repairs; Just out 



from old Country; also uble to teach 
Box 2084, cionlst. 



^rANTFP 



ARCHITECT — Thomas Hooper. In prac- 
tiee In H_C. for 88 years. Plans and 



siSlUICatlons furnished on application. Ot- *fYi*lm*L Is* "twa W«s>" 
iih, New Royal Bank Bldg. »_©»• 881. K , i •••« «aaa» It twa dii» 



men and women to learn the 
barber trade: waxes paid while learn- 
ing- 118 to 886 per week when qualified. 
We' issue the only recognised diplomas In 
the world; learn a trade and he independ- 
ent- the most complete college In the west. 
Call or write for free catalogue. Moler 
Barber College. 848 Mala St., Vancouver. 
B. C 

YOUNG man as assistant In groc-ry store. 
Apply Oak Bay grocery store. 

_r DAT and upwards mads by lnexper- 
qpO lenced salesmen or women on our 
Xmas goods; samples free; send postage, 
twenty centa 3. X- Nichols Co., Toronto, 

Canada ________ 

MEN wanted to e-»t at Good Bate Caie, 
(48 Cormorant St.; 7 white cooks; 



<: 



500 



CTLKB.K wants position in office as genera! 
J assistant, Box 1774, Colonist. 

4i iNSTItriTIi >N superintendent. thor- 
oughly practical engineer, desires posi- 
tion; heavy mill construction, boilers, en- 
gines, machinery; hustler and capable or- 
ganizer; age 29; married; go anywhere. 
Box 1891, Colonist. 

NG1NEER, third class, wants job In 
mill, mine or laundry; good references. 
Box 203B, Colonist. 

barber wants situation. 
Box 1482. Colonist. 



PANTED— Ftret.cliuts young indy ston 
ogrnpher and bookkeeper desires posl- 

lllgh sclft.ol 



Hon at once; win go anywhere 
education; neat, rapid and accurate. 

dress Box 388. Ml. Vernon. Wash. 



Ad- 



\v 



'ANTED — Position as housekee.i •' 
thoroughly experienced young 
Apply Box 1840, Colon! St. 



ov a 

lady. 



BEAUTIFUL 59-acre corner, Corden Head 
district at n genuine bargain; $501 per- 
acre cheaper than adjoining prices. Tele- 
phone owner, 2473 or 8924. 

USHBY St.— A lot for $1400, With a 

quarter cash, Beckett, Major A CO/ 

Ltd., 848 F ori St.; telephones 35 1 5 »rr_s_-*7. 

BEACH drive — A very choice pi 'f 
land. H0xl87; superb view of Straits; 
price $2000. Beckett, Main:- Co., Ltd., M3 
Fori st ; telephones .1615 and 2967. 



Bl'RNSlDK rfl.- 
tl rent fionlage MUrhi a snap nt \ ■ ■" 
1-4 cash. 880 Fort st. 



iAIRFlELD Terrace — Two fine lots with 
rees and good view, 56x132 each; $2760 
each 'i cosh, balance easy Bchrelher 
Lubbock, 405 Central bldgy, phone 845. 



F A . 



k 



']s± 



FOR sale — Two nice flots on Cecilia road, 
together; one cornering on a Iftne, 
Close In; If desired could be cut into Ihree 
lots. Price $3000 on terms. Apply Owner, 
P. O. Box 1 13, clt-y, 

LORENCB st 'U 
$1250, on terms, 
vestments, Ltd., 136 



OSS to Fort, 50x12.',. 

British Columbia fcfl- 

S'lew at. 



BROOKE St.. CO. 4x120. ti, $1900, easy terms. 
I'. den A Cooper, 104 Sayward bldg. 



BKV'II Drive, oak Bay — , 
I, maids Uplands, $2500; 
nnce II 12 and 18 months. C 
meat Agency. 208 Pern lien on blk. 



Bay — .Nicely-treed lol 

1-8 cash, bgl 
Overseas Invest. 



II'IDOW requires work as work'ng hOUSS- 
* V keeper, roik-gencral or any place of 
trust where allowed child of 4; good refe- 
rences, Mrs. Henwood, 857 Heywood av. 



_rOUNG English widow wants post ss 
per to lady 
P.O. Box 486. Prince Rupert 

YOUNG woman wants occasional work 
walling at table for dinners, dances or 



tt home*.' 



Box 1908, Colonist. 



■TjUtPBRin : .•'••:■:. 



I*, 
J wants work of any kind. 
Colonist. 



Box 1888, 



MARRIED couple, 
ftv 



French gentlepeople 
•om Europe, desire position of trust 
or on a mixed farm; thoroughly capable. 
Apply for particulars to The l*dt»s 
Agency, 488 Sayward bldg.. phone 1^*. 



YOUNQ lady stenographer with 1H years' 
experience wishes position In Office 
Address Miss Garcln. Maywood P. O. 

Y 



'OUNG woman 
hours dally. 



wants housework 
Box 1982, Colonist. 



few 



YOUNG Norwegian girl wishes position ss 
cook In a good camp. Box 1902, Col- 

onlst. 

PROPERTY FOR SALE 



4 8NAP- 



■Monterey av*., lot 60x110; would 

make a splendid building lot: price 

J167S. n. H. Hurt, 1118 Douglas St.: phone 

CREAOB— 28 acres with good 7 -roomed 
hnd.e and all outbuildings: cresOt 
through property; only 88»00. with 8788 
cash and balance over three years. Tor 
sal* by A. voa Olraewald. coroes rort and 
Quaora, 



BARGA/1NS In Oak Bay — Seven lots on 
Musgrave st . between (1|yiii|.ln av and 
1'nlandR carllne one block ills'ant; $1860 

each i-< cs.»*i. balance B. 12, IS and 21 
months' sale opens on Monday morning at 
10 o'clock. Leonard. Held * Co., 421 Pem- 
berton bldg. t 

OWKER av -Fine lot, 80x150, with 2 
omed shack; big snap at $2200 on 
easy, terms. Wise St Co., 109 Pemberton 
bldg. . 

EACH Drive— Magnificent Int. 75x1.20, 
nice 13 11 c.l; splendidly situated with 
fine view of bay ;$8800, on easy terms. Wise 
A Cm,. Pemberton blk^ 

BEAT TUT' I. honvsltea for charming 
homes, on specially ensy terms- Rich- 
mond ave. on car Hnc. Blgl88i $1650. Har- 
riet and Ohe.l, corner, netr car and' water- 
front tSxHO, $1600. Oliver St.. south of 
Brighton, fine lots. 108x130. J3750. Esqui- 
mau harbor, beautifully situated. 74x13$. 
$lC r .0- lose this and live to regret; terms on 
above' lots from 1% to 4 ye*r»- _, A OP''>' 
Evans 2118 Sayward St., Spring- Ridge.; 
Box 1124. P. O. ____ 



(VIiASGOW Bt.i nearly half acre, tine VteW, 
I choice siiiff, $2860. Bee 1'. Porte- 
ous, 707 '-i Vales st. 

OBOE- Dandy lot on Portage av., full 
.T sized, with large Br trees, nice ami 

high overlooking city and water; only JlnT.n, 

with 1 t .ash .1. c. Linden & <'o.. 4 MTae- 
Qregor blk. / 



G 



OAK Bay snap— Haiel St., 45x120, with 
a number of fruit trees; $1300 on term,. 
Coast Investme nt Co.. 113 Pemberton bldg. 
AK Bay Esplanade — A fine waterfront 
lot, 60x300; price $8860. Beckett, 
Major & Co., Ltd., 643 Fort st.| telephones 
3 E ! ."> nnd 2967. " 

OLIVER and Central — Three fine wooded 
lots. If the car should run On Central 
this will prove a fine Investment; price 
$54 00. Beckett, Major Co., Ltd., 841 Fort 
St.; telephones 3516 and 296L 



/ kl.lVER 



beautiful wat«rfro-n loi 
nn ideal Homesite; 
price 8*800. Beckett, Major * Co., Ltd., 
r,«l Fori st ; telephones 3515 and 8987, 



'^t ONZALF.S 

.1 which would milk. 



.ONZALEfi Half an acre. $8300. itckett. 
T Ma lot A 

phones 3515 and 2967. 



GUN"/, A I. 
Majoi - Co.. Ltd.. B43 Fort st.; tele- 



st., above 8aratoga, 132x180; 

price $6000; a splendid homesite. 

Itckett. Major & Co.. Ltd.. 648 Fort St.; 

telephones 3515 an t} 2967. , 

X 5ak Bay ave., close to the junction, 
a splendid corner. 54HxDTi. st the very 
low price of $10,500, on terms of a third 
.ash. balance 8. 12 and 18 months: this Is 
a tine Site for three stores. Beckett, Ma- 
jor & to, Ltd., 843 Fort st.; phones 3615 

And 2967^ ____ 

$1600, easy terms. 



( )',: 



eden & Cooper, 104 Hayward bldg. 



easv 
bids 

B 1 



GLADSTONE av. Lol 50x13 
oash 



homesite for 



charming 



J_J 



■:■■.•- ■:.. 



BEAUTIFUL 
homes, on specially easy terms— Rich- 
mond av, on car line, 81x188. $1,580. 
Harriet snd Obsd. corner, noar car and 
waterfiont, 48xM0. $1,50«. Oliver st 
south of Brighton, fine lots. lo«x,1.2P. $1,780. 
Bsaulmalt harbor, beautifully situated. 74x 
132 81.084)1 lose Shis andVvllve to regret; 
terms on above lots from ltt to 4 yjars.' 
Apply Evans, 8118 gayward at., Bgring 
RMfgi »«« Uli, 1». O. 



■>■ — '- ^-^ 



$2000; »3(iii 

W. B. Itevercomb. 1807 Belr 
Phone R4425_ 

("10N7.AI.E8 av. — Extra good lot. 70x180, 
■X magnificent view of the water; fine 
house site, only 814PO; $400 cash, balance 
easy. Wise A Co., 109 Pemberton hldg. 

Lake, with 185 feet water front 
_ge, 5 acres all cleared, with a bouse 
and chicken runs, nice avenue of trees run- 
ning down centre; railway runs through 
property; this la an absolute snap nt 88760, 
with a small cash payment. 
Mahon blk. 



mont ave. 



/-H.EN 
VA age, 



(!. S Lelghton. 



HAULTAIN St.— Two of the best corners 
In this vicinity. In the section of the 
development, this week only $1400 each, 
with only $800 cssh; can you beat UT. J. 
C Linden A Co., 4 MacOregor blk ; phone 
2870. , ' 

HOLLYW OOt> crescent snap— View lot; 
$1500. good terms toast Investment 

Co.. 11$ P emberton bldg. 

TTOLLYWOOD Crescent— Waterfront lot 
J± with -frontage of 67 feel- price 8*958. 
Beckett. Major * Co.. Ltd.. «43 Fori St.. 
telephones 3511 and 2»«7. 



OLIVER St.— A beautiful building lot, size 
BOxUO; price $1575. R. H. Duce, 1118 
Douglas St.i phone 304. 

AK Bay — Three 60 feet lot's on Larch St., 

dose to Golf Links; gl _00 -excti : 1 -» 

.-ash, balance K, 12 and 18 months. .■■■••»• 

seas Inventmant Agency. 



208 Pemberton blk. 



O" - ^ B R y __Deal St.. good lot; price $1500; 
1-8 cash; balance 8. 12 end 18 months. 
Overseas Investment Agency. 208 Pemberton 
blk. — — ! ■ 

0" K Bav— Dunlevy st. (Uplands carllne t. 
two lots $1700 each; one-third cash. 
_.l_ ft oa 6, 12 and 18 months. Overseas 
investment A gency. 208 Pemberton blk. 

AK Bay— Lots below market. Oliver St.. 



o 



$1480; Margate and McNeil. 81880; MOBU- 
rev av near Bamtosra, $1«50. Full Sised 
lots. Dawson ft McOalllard. 704 Ffrt «.. 
opposite Terry's. 

AK Bay, near Musgrsve, one acre, $0«M, 

H. Booth, 7 Brldgman bldg., 1007 <s4— - 

ernment. . 



ITDU'fWQOD crescent— A snap for cash, 
Jtl^riiOO; beatatlftil corner int. sea vie*; 
• it fenced and la grass; rtvanua proauelag. 
Apyly Em 88M, 0«las_flU 



OAK Bay ave., the cheapest corner, flOO 
per front foot. Edmonds, 818 Fans bar- 
ton block. ■ 

AK"lXnt7 ave— 60x11$, water laid on; 



o 



snap $1375; 
Box 881. 



third cash. Apply s*. ■<$. 



OBED and Irma, comer, $#•♦. H. Booth. 
7 Biiilgmsn bld g.. 1007 Ctevornmant. 

AK Bay. nice grassy lol on Font Eay 

road. 60x130, water, .e-raj »1«»_1» 

near Fort « esrllnei P«1e> lUig^Mdh (lit. 

» _-s(ass-d %»rTsTs_Hsr( Js— *^a_J ••••(I ^8^ ^^* m 



Sunday, raovom dot o, it>n 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



21 



ritOl'KKTY I OK SALE— K'oiilluueU) 

/ jAK Hay acreage-- 2-acre lot running 
*■ " through from Laurel it to Boundary 

load. ciin be subdivided Into eight g I 

'"!•■, pries 115,000; easy terau Cros .•. 
Sloane. 1021 Govrrnnifm m . phone 13(8 

piBMBHOKB «i Bast half '.■■>'. 8, (OxUli 
■J- >ut,'i. l'hnii f IS74, Haddin gton (own 

I >kai 'n LAND, Okanagan — »oo (eat ■treat 
J- frontage ana 365 luke frontage, only 
$3,000; will take launch as part paymeiil. 
W, ii sharp. Haywood, Victoria, 

1>L1:asaNT avenue. Ouk Hay, 50x120, for 
$1600, on easy terms British Colum- 
bia Investmen ts, Ltd., 8*4 View «t 

H0BBRT8ON at. and Hollywood Crescent 
— OTttxllS; prloe simuo. Beckett, Major 
A Co., Ltd.. 1143 B*ort St.; telephone* 3615 
and 2967. 

RICHMOND ave.— 50x120; price $1600. 
Beckett, Major On., Ltd., 643 Fort at.; 
telephon es 3515 unil '.'HOT. 

|»<)i'K Hay- Fine, semi-business property, 

J-V lot, 50x120. with fully modern S-ropmed 
house; price $7500. excellent terms. R. i! 
Puce, 1113 Douglas si . ; phone 30-1. 

¥»": KI.AND Park, Avebury St.. close to 
-A- Hillside; beautiful lot, 50x129; $1500, 
1-3 cash, hulance 6. 12 and 18, J. Ft Be 
»~ Co., Ltd., 013 Fort xl.; phonos 272 1 

EICHMOND ave. south, close to car and 
beach; nice building lot; $1600, $500 
caab; balance 6, 12 and 18. Heath & 

chaney, Suyward blk. _____________! 

I >"CK Buy — Close to Fsciulmalt and Gov- 
LV irnmertf at. car line, two house* on 
Jig corner lot, $10,500, on terms. Oraham 
ex.. 8-roo«icd house, two lota from HUlslrlo 
<-nr line, $4700, very eaay terms. Charlton 
St., three lota, 50x140; price 11050 each. 
I Hay rd., lot 50x139; price $^300. C. F. 
Camp bell, 1007 Gove rnment; phone 8474. 

j >OBERTSON St.— A nice lot with all Ini- 
-tv provc.hients on the stroet; price 81800, 

with usual terms: this Is below market 
vnluc. <J. g. Leighton. Mnhnn blk. 



s n 



__ 



IT. JAMES «t.—8axl3»; price *17B0. 
Beckett, Major . Co.. Ltd.. 648 Fort »U 
telephones 8816 and »»*T. • 

OFKCIAIrr-Good lot on .pleasant av., 60* 
125 ; ' price $1500, balance easy. 



R. H. 



Puce ,. 1113 Douglas at,; .pho ne 304, 

C< ARATOGA Mv^-aood' lot. nhe lbcaUbnV 
*- price $1450, term* arranged. K, II. 
Puce. 1118 Douglas St.; phone 304. 

CITANNA „D »v,— $1535; this nrlrn tlefleL 
KJ comparison. Phone 1874 or L1807. Wad- 

dlngton, 316 Central bldg. .. 

SHOAL Bay waterfront— Fine lot, 80x200. 
' magnificent view of the water; very few 
of these Iota left; $2000, on easy terms. 
Wise ft Co.. laf P«,ml>«rfon flflf __ 

ST. Patrick at.— 80x183; price 81575. with 
$575 cash. Beckett. Majdr & Co., Ltd., 
643 Fort st.; phones 3515 and 2967. 

SARATOGA ave. — One of the' beat buys 
In Oak Bay. a lot for $1550, terms. 
Reid ft Greenwood, 723 View at. 

(JPECIAL— Rockland ave., 60x110, for 
*J $4200, terms. Reld & Greenwood, 723 
View St. 

QEMI-BUPINESS — Nice 0-roomed house, 
eO all furnished with every modern con- 
venience, furnace installed; lot 60x120; only 
$9500, and $1500 cash will handle, party 
owning property Is leaving city. J. C. Lin- 
den & Co.. 4 MneGregor blk. 

SJHAWNIGAN Lake— 1 „ acres practically 
*— ' on -writer, with only road dividing; 
Mice $500, on terms. G. S. Leighton, Mahon 

Hk. 

QAANICH farms — 25-acre farm, of which 
eO 21 ncrcs are highly Improved, orchard 
f, to 8 years old: modern dwelling house 
nnd outhouses: two wells of water; on V. ft 
P. Railway; price $18,500, as a going con- 
cern: terms, quarter cash, balance 1. 2 and 
3 years at 7 per cent. 25 acres, holf CURI- 
vntod and half slashed, good house 00 prom- 
ises and store; two hundred fruit trees; prop- 
erty has frontage of COO feet on V. ft W.; 
store Is doing a good business; price $26,000, 
terms ;,: ranged. 10 acres best of strawberry 
land, situated on hill and free from the 
usual small frosts: 1400 'strawberry plain*? 
In use and barn; price $7000, ' terms arranged. 

icres, IS under cultivation, 4 slashed and 
burn, a aoil; on till* property Is .7- 

rnomeil house in good condition, also barns'. 
price $65 per re; terms, third cash, bal- 
ance arranged. 100 acres, 40 slashed, rest 
uncleared land, high up, giving good view 
of Saanlch Arm; price $80 per acre, terms 
arranged. 98 acres, nearly all cleared with 
ivaterfrontage, good beach; house and ouIt 
buildings: this Is suitable for a subdivision; 
price $102,750, terms arranged. 150 acres, 
:, cleared, good 10-roomed house, stone 
foundation; hot and cold water in house; 

commands a good view of the sea: price 
$400 per acre, terms arranged. TOO acres, 
100 cleared, balance very light timber, has 
watarfrontagc. house and outbuildings; 
would do well cut Into blocks with water- 
front' rights; price JJL',500; terms, third 
• ah, balance arranged. 30 acres, all cleared, 
havlig a gentle slope to the south, within 
live minutes of B. C. Electric; price $21,000; 
third cash, balance arranged. IS acres with 
f roomwd house! ; telephone communlcauuu 
With city: this property has 1000 fruit bear- 
ing trees, one and a half acres in straw- 
berries; this is the best of soil and all tile 

ned; price $21,000: third cash, balance 
1. 2 and 8 years.: 50 acres, 35 cleared; this 
property has beautiful oak trees, cottager, 
two ban "i fruit trees; this is about 

five miles from Victoria, within a few min- 
utes' walk of the V, ft S. Railroad, and 
would do well cut into acre blocks; price 
S1000 per acre, terms arranged. From 4 to 
6 acres. Cordon Head, all under cultivation; 
strawberries, various other kinds of berries 
nnd fruii price $2500 per acre, Of the 

whole 8 26-100 acres with house, and out* 
bulld'ngs, $3500 per acre; terms third cash, 
balance eaay. 100 acres with waterfront. 

acres under cultivation, 35 slashed and 
the rest light timber land; on this acreage 
Is a 7-rtfbmtd boose, barn ami outbuildings: 
price $500 per acre; terms $10,000 cash, bal- 
I, 2. >, 4, veins. SO acres, 30 acres 
iltlvntlon, small bi 
:,,,,! mit troeB; stream runs through 

per acre; half 
'.. 2 and ?, years. 1*. II. Krown, 1112 
; ph bne' 1076. . 

V.JOUTH Hampshire rd.. Oak Bay, 110x113. 
VO $8000; 1-3 cash. See A. D. Malet & 
Co., 403 Central bldg., phone 323G. 

CIHKLBOl'RNE St.— Near University, 50x 
r^ 112, 8800; third cash, balance 6, 12, 18 
months Aiu.ly 1». >■)■ B»a 381. 

SHAWNIGAN Lake west arm. Very choice 
corner, 2 ',i acres, near water, fronting 
00 new government road, ••xcellent' In every 
Way 8850; worth double. Terms Vi cash, 
balance arranged. Owner, F, Savage, 1018 
MCI 'lure St., I U v 

UAANICHTOX — If you are looking 

fruit land, let us show you what we 
nave at SaaniOhton, a few minutes' w,iik 
from Carltna ami railway station, close I i 

1 he sea. 9 1-3 acres practically cleared ami 
I he very best soil. Apply owner, P. O. box 
575. - 

OoUTH Hampshire rd., $1675; $600 cash; 
►O 6<i\112. Hee A. D. Mi'.ot ft Co., 108 
C nirnl bldg., phnn. 3286. 

SHBLBOURNE nnd Ryan — Double c 
lOtaj pi Ice $3850 for 

three' or $3800 ■ [out; third 

cash, balance 6, 1 :. IS months; Ibis Is a 
simp, under value. Apply room 6, 638 

fates. 

rn_.N iota near Ml Polml< earllne, Inolud- 

X lng ;r«"iiinl li 'US''; $5000 for whole. 

Coast investment Co., 118 Pembertbn bldg. 

rpwu furnished houfekeftplng rooms, mod- 
JL era. ii" South Turner, James Bay. 

rn\VO lots on Fur lie id. ctoac to car 
J- nnd bench; no rock and grassy; price 

$280Q; i-3 cash, w on builder's terms, it. 
H, Duoe, 1118 Douglas st.; phone nn t. 

a~\\\n corners on liois and WlldWOod, only 
$200ii each. Monk. Montetth ft Co., 
i.i.i.. corner Government and Broughton 

st.-.. phone 14 02. 

rpWO sl.-.y foot lotj on Fifth at., 1T0 feet 
1- front by 135 deep, between Kings and 

Hillside, price for the two. $4200; one- 
fourth cash, balance «. 13 and is months; 
this Is without doubt the best In Insld'i 
property today; see then: at once. \V. S. D. 
Smith. 221 Snyw.-ird block. 



riUM'KKTY FOR SALE — (Contluiifd) 



\ 



"IKU at., 60x130, fine location, for $800 
■■ "t I-. O. Box i^5. 

^' i' rORIA dial < ■ acre*, 5 cleared. 100 

fruit trees, |000 strawberry plains, -'^" 
hens, uiso in roomed Bouae jikI large barn; 

this farm Is three-quarter* Ot a mil) from 

i.i.i! ■ i. ... or siiiuii. h cat .no, price »12,500; 

third cash, balance I. '- and .I > car's. 2i 

acres, is cleared, good »oi., 475 nun trees. 
numerous loganberries, raspberries and 

rhubarb plums: t'hla can be bought for 
$26.3;:. third Cash, l. I and 3 .wars. '» 

acres, near]] all Bleared, with s-roomed bun 
galow, strictly modern chicken house tur 
1500 chickens, good stable, buggy stood etij 
brooder room; price 4211,000; third cash, 1, 
2 and 3 years We can give you from 2 to 
7 -acre blocks, all cleared and the best of 
iand; this U within a few minutes' walk 
of t)i. it <' Electric Railroad, about flvo 
miles 1'rom Che clly hall: price $1350 par 
acre. P. It. grown, 1112 Broad St.; phone 
1078. ______ 

TTtarW street, lot NO, "»:., fi0xl2i), $30,000, 
\ on terms Thompson Realty Co., 14 
ami 1 :. Green blk.; phone 3762. 

TWO excellent lots on Oliver st., each 60x 
140, treed; price for the two, $3150. 
British Columbia Investments, Ltd. ti36 

View st. 

VX71LDWOOD ave.— -50x120; price $1800; 
' V usual terms. Beckett, Major ft Co., 
Ltd., 643 Fort St.; telephones 3515 and 2967. 

YX7ILL sell four acres of excellent land. 
>V all cleared and In cultivation, for 
$3000, with a payment of $300 and the bal- 
ance a 1 igi Col onist, ; 

\X?1HAT about this? — A 60-foot lot on Gov- 
\\ ernment st, James Bay, for, $5800. 
Beckett, Major & Co., Ltd., 648 Fort at.; 
phones 3515 and' 2 967. ' .' ' ' '•'•' " ' ■..' 

YVEST Bay— Waterfront WlU-OOO; .terma 
TT arrunged. Overasuw Inveatmont Agency, 
808 P4H»c^oaj>.'^i|i ^..;-.;i ; ' •' , ■ ■"_■- ; '. ." 

money available fof, the 
ood' <nalde agrnempatj. 




pure 
of sale. ' 
Broad st. 

VX7B h'av* th»'_h!e*pa»H bur on Ct*t««yt 
W road, \rbero lmprovemenes are made. 
81780. Brain- 4k 81m Co.. 737 Fort at 

»» . ISOO p«r acre; eaay 
A Lubbock, 404 Central bldg.. 




w 



I.K II..H I __*»Wi« t 



'ORK1NG men— We have 
car; price only $600 each, with $175 cash. 



close to Richmond ,*v. 



10T. 

Fort ,«t 



n n x.fiifhtfin. M-hnu Mfc. 



II4H hKS FOR HALF — (Continued) 

AN Oak Bay home of sl_ rooms, modern 
In every detail, furnace, etc Situated 
on full-sited lot with beautiful oak trees 
Only $750 cash bandies thlsi balance 
monthly Price only $5250. British Co- 
lumbia Investments. Ltd . 3 (! View st 

4 t'T quickly on this C-rooined bouae, ln- 
j.'1 side quarter-mile circle; business pro- 
perty, lot 30x132, only $5SU0; $2000 cash, 1 
and 2 years. A. L. Proctor ft Co., 408 Say- 
ward bldg.; phone 25H7. 

A SPLENDID sea view and overlooking 
golf . links; fine residence, containing 
10 rooms, thoroughly modern and up-to- 
date in every way; dlnlngroom and hall 
panelled; hot water heating; large lot; 
terms arranged. Apply owner, P. O. Box 
1472. city. 

A BOUSE bargain. Exceptionally well 
built, nearly new 6-roomed modern 

bungalow, corner 1 'lover and Mosa St. This 
home Is vi ry tastefully arrangud, only one 
block from Dallas rd. and handy t'o car. 
Owner leaving city. Price Is cut for quick 
sale to $4750. For terms see National 
Realty t'o., 1232 Government st. (Excluslvu 
agents.) * 

AVERT cheap Duy rrom owner — Now 7- 
roomed bungalow, partly furnished, 
beautifully fitted with china cupboards, 
bookcases, beamed celling; between Fort 
and Oak Bay car lines; 60ft. frontage; price 
$4750. on very easy terms. Apply first to 
Mrs, Darling, corner Oak Bny and Fell st. ; 
or phone 3 3 f! 4 . 

A N artistic bungalow on corner lot 
jt\- Fairfield, 6 rooms, artistically papered 
throughout, buffet kitchen, large cupboard 
accomodation, beamed ceilings, panelled 
walls, fireplace, gooo. basemeut, with 
stationary wash tuba and furnace; a good 
bur and. a pretty home; price $6,300. 
Apply 152 Moss at. ■ -. '■'■'■■ 

AFTER all why pay rent when for $750 
_T*i^_4»Wn (tuff I** « month. Including ln- 
Ur4^-%#,WW^*ir Vou a choice brand ndw 
bungalow of 5 rooms, three minutes fr/m 

tot of 68 HxlOO, and the price la very mod- 
erate at $4300. Beckett, Major A Co.. 
Ltd.. 648 Fort at; phonaa 6516 and 2967. 

A LMOST every one "oomes tj» us for 
4«L houses, both agents and owners; we 
have »00 houses for sale from $2500 to 
$45,000; consult us fox bouse property. 
Bccketr, Major & Co., UA.. 648 Fort at; 
phones 8518 and 2967. 



N eight-roomed 



^Tr^ 



home 



tn Fairfield die- 



JI 



HOICKS, FOB HAIAC — !( ontlnued) 

/ 1 LAlis'i i.i.S't; av— - An 8-roomed, modern 
VX bouae, J740O, $1500 cash. \\ ■'. H. Rever- 
. .ion. [ mi I Belmont av.; phone R4426 

HOI_L,YWOtJD Park snap for few days 
only, S-roomed houae on 'oiner lot 
50.117, all feni el. Prloe *22no on terma, 

8a« Mouls ft Edwards, 213 Say ward bldg. 

phone 20/4. 

HOUSE for sale— Snap, Foul Bay rd., 7- 
roOmed I OUSfl Ul good part of above 

road; $6500, on 1 1 t'-rms _romi>toD ft 

Barton, 180 Pembertoh blk. 

HALF-mlle circle, new 5-roomed house, 
coui'i iii 11. id ■ Into 7 rooms; big i"t. 

only $450U; $Hmu cash; K 1, long terms. 

A. L. Proctor ft Co., 4 OS Say ward bids: 

phone 2 r. & 7 . 

HERON St., a hi ass and four lots for 
$6800, Beckett, .Minor <k Co., Ltd.. 643 
Fort st. Telephones SS1E and 2uti7. 

V 1, MINCER ave^— For $S300 we can sill 

a a splendid B in- -I modern 

hoi 11 this wall paved street: lot 50x 

148; nice garden with cose bashes; $2300 

' - '.. Ltd., B42 

Fort st.; phORM 8618 nnd 2a67. 

HOLLYWOOD Park — Snaps In-oousea nnd 
lots, see Morris .^ Edwards Building 

and Investment Co. Houses built on con- 
tract or on the Instalment, plan, 213 Say- 
ward bldg., phone 3074. 

I\\ ILL dispose of my house on Caledonia, 
of 1 rooms, for $5700. and a cash pay- 
in. . ■ 12200. BQXj 2099, Colonist. 

rCST being completed on corner lot In 
eJ Hollywood, with' sea view, 6-roomed 
bungalow, with full baaenunt, fire-place, 
beamed ami panelled dlnlng-room, built- 
in buii'et and bookcases, wall bed in den, 
large veranda with cement front; , price 
$5500, oh easy' terms. Coast Investment Co,; 
"Oulblers of Craftsman Bungalows," 118 
Pcmberton bldg. • .;'■',' " '■' 

JAMBS Ba*. hear corner Niagara and 
Mensics, moderti «-roomed ■ house, base- 
ment. tuW lob-. 4?8S0. «. Booth. 7 Brldg- 
man Building. 1007 Govemmeaii- ' ' ' 

LINDEN av.— -8-roomod residence, hard- 
wood floors; $10,000 on terms. See A. 
von Glrsewald, corner Fort and Q uadra. 

OSS at, —-Absolutely the hest buy o^i the 

street; fully modern. «^roomed house, 

elegantly furnished, att $0500, or without' 

furniture. |55«0; 1-8 cash, ,ss_ay torms. 

Union Byal. Batatc Co., phono 8708. , 

AYWOOD- Nice, 4-room4ld cottage, with 

o ; finished 



M 



end; one-half block from Cook st nnd 15 
minutes from the car; only $1900; |«50 cash, 
balance very easy. ' J." C. 'klnden ft Co., 4 

MacOr egor blk. ^ / ; <' '■'''"■■'"'"",? ■' 

'°?8 *^ homo— Preufct-t tmn gaJOTn on 

o6it^^^ ns ?S_S^lS_^i ' 

UWK ef'Wll sell unfurnished. Phones 1874 
ff T #ii|n!^%>ddlngton. 316 Centrnl bldg. 

VfEW 5-roomed -house, lot 60x188; $8460; 
iN -$500 cash, balance arranged. A. L. 
Proctor ft Co., 408 Say ward bldg.; phone 

2 597. ' ' " ' .■ 

NBW 7-roomed house for sale, 1128 
Empress ave.; just completed; $4900; 
$800 cash, balance easy, or will take real 
estate for part payment Apply Stevens, 
1133 North Park st. 

NEW modern hotne, only 6 blocks from 
post office, half block from oar, fine 
district, has 90ft. frontage or. pavod street: 
complete 'with all now furniture, including 
piano; price only $13,000, ou terms. Wm. 
Ritchie. 1023 Co'llns on, city. ■. 

JEW, 5-room modern bungalow Belmont 
ave., $3750; $950 cash. 729 Queen's ave. 

NO. 1202 — 6-roomed bungalow, between 
Oak Bay and Willows oar lines, two 
blocks from car; lot 50x120; garage; must 
be Bold at once; $800 cash, balance »*u 
per month: pride $8200. The Griffith Co., 
rooms 6. 7, 9, 11 Mahon bldg-, 1112 Gov- 
ernment st. 



IIOIIHKS FOR RALE— (Continued) 

* — 

IIMHKINi; nun A nice, 4-roomed cot- 
»» tanc. with sewet up street now, for 
$2500, with $50ii cash, balance as rent. o. 
S. Lelgbton. Muhiu blk. 

\ri("ri.)ltlA v\',«i Have ] bouses Just Iln- 
Irbed within on,- nick .it CralgfloWor 

rd.. nice 5-roomed modern cottages, on full- 
slzed lots, $2950 and $3150 respectfully, on 
very easy terms. J. C. Linden ft Co., 4 
MaoGr cgor blk.; phone 2870. 

\''li"l'OHlA West snap — 7-roomed, modern 
residence on lot 60x126; nice garden, 
chicken houses, etc, one lot from car. Price 
only $5250 _on terms. Hee Morrla ft Ed- 
wards, 313 Wayward bldg., phono 3074. 



>0 an 

l ___f_i 

in., xi 



j PERN ST.. second bouse from Fort, hand- 
*i some 7-room house; choice locality, 
fully modern. Apply Charles Watson. 1710 
K'ii't St. 

pr-ROOMED bungalow, situate Carey rd., 
*J large lot; would sell cheap or take ■_ 
to one acre In part payment. Apply owner, 
Box 2041, Colonist 

|'(J\1&1, coiner. blKb lot with 1-rOOm bun 
\)\J galow, $1150; $400 cash, balance over 
2 years. Phone 3566. 

ujjk^e^l'V — Four rooms, bath, hot and cold 
«JP_-O l U water; price (1800; balance eaay. 
Apply 1739 First St., Richmond road,, or L. 
i; Jervis. Tolmle av. and Douglas st 

(!>/;•/ w 1 CASH — New 7-roomed, fully modern 
tlpOUl/ bouse on big lot In Fairfield . -m 
late, one lot from Cook St. car line; price 
$5600, balance arranged. C. F. Campbell, 
1007 Government : phone 3174. 

i_f>AA CASH buys revenuo producing 
4jr>ULM/ property close to half mile circle, 
price $5260. Phone 3565. 

tIfc-tOnfi b d>'s 9-roomed, fully-furnished 
<jp.t __UU house, all conveniences; garage, 
basement, furnace; one lot off Cooki St., 
on McClure . Phones 8090 or 1670. 

will buy nice little house, now, 
large lot. well ^MJjjjMff *«*«» 

10 ii^dly^Smj. •!*•/ J*__*- App'y 

owner, on 



m 



owner, un iimmu— w » T . .,«^~->-«,^r^. ( 

4_1 (ZKfX— HOLLYWOOD Orescent, fine, 
^±OOU modern realdenco facing sea; 



seven large rooms, granite 
$7000 on term*. See MorrU ft 
Bayward bldjr.. phono »07«. 

(BrsWilali ""'win htor * nice. 4-roomed cot- 
WZ\)V\) tage on full-slaed lot within 5 
minutes of the car; $500 cash will handle. 
O. a. T -tight nn Mahnn ] Mfc 



TO LET— HOI HEKEEI'ING HOOMg 



A 



t'OCl'l.E of good rooms; open fire 
place; use of kitchen If desired. 1 1 1 u 
or in park st 



AUENTLEMAN to share large front 
room, separate beds, modern conveni- 
ences; private family; board. Phone L307U. 

APPLi" at 1904 wuadra urmt for fur- 
nished or unfurnished housekeeping 
rooms; moderate. 

A Sl.'1'EUlOU three large room _..,.-.. 
-<^X ment, splendid bath, near Spencer's; 
rent »3u month; immediate possession; up- 
10-datu furniture fur sal-, $U0. ited OrOSS 
it.-al Kstale OtTlce, 1011 G overnment st 

I'ftDKTTE House, 961 Burdette ave.. fur- 
nished housekeeping apartments. ' 



B 



C1UMFORTABLY furnished apartments 
J ut' Derravargh, Eaqulmalt road; also 
furnished rooms. 

1r*OK rent, two unfurnished rooms, use of 
- bal'h, suitable for light housekeeping; 
Close In. Apply 1058 Mason at^ 

17\\ 'RNIKHKU housekeeping rooms. good 
locality. 1476 Gladstone ave., cor. Bel- 
mont ave. 

ITlURNdSHED housekeeping room for r«nt, 
. close In 1709 Douglas. 



UR.MSHED housekeeping rooms for rout 
In clean, pleasantly situated house, near 
car; moderate terms. 4 Menzles, coiner Dal- 
las. 



F 



FURNISHED housekeeping rooms, all con- 
veniences, $10 per month. 1036 Hill- 
side av. 



FURNISHED housekeeping rooms. 2600 
Gover nment st, ' ' ■ 

FOUR-roomed, furnished flat. 8044 Doug- 
las. Phone 792. ' ■'._ 

1 ... 

URNISHED front room for housekeep- 
ing; reasonable, 1124 Johnston st 



F 

t{iurni_hed houa*k_opin« iwpmf, ««• 

JP Government at ' , ! '.'■■•■■' -■■ ' 

"OUSEKEEPING. single and double bed- 






rooms. 444 Kingston. 



JSEKEEPING rooms — At 43* Slmcoe. 
n««r' Mensles. furnished; sea -view, pi- 
ano. Phone L 1715, 



H 



OUSEKEEPINO rooms. 888 Fort ft 



HOUSEKEEPING rooms- «cr itfc- Apply 653 
Blmcoe st 



TO LJCT— FtBNISUKD BOOMS— Coat's. 



I>LEAKANT front bedroom, moderate rent. 
Inquire after 5 a.m.. 568 Toronto at, off 
Government 

KOOMS. comfortable, breakfast. 76 Ltnd- 
den ave.. near eara 

SINGLE room, furnished, to let; close In. 
1708 Douglas st. 

riU) let— Furnished bedroom, every con- 
J- venlence; 
SutleJ st 



breakfast If desired. 102$ 



T 



XMi Kl.Y furnished bedroom; suit one or 
-i-* two (fcntlemen; single beds, terms mod- 
crate. 11 37 North Park. 

rpO let — Large, well furnished room with 
J- grate, suitable for two or three men. 
Phone R813R; 816 Blanchard st 

O let — Comfortable room for two men, 
$4.50 per week. Apply 816 Blanchard. 

rpO let — Furnished front room In new 
J- house; terms moderate. 1102 King's rd. 

THE Columbia, first-class furnished 
rooms. A new, modern building, with 
steam heat and hot running water in every 
room. Permanent and tranalent guests will 
find this a comfortable winter house. 
8peclal weekly rates. Corner of Broad and 
Pandora. 

TRY Sylvester rooms; cleanllneaa and 
comfort combined; $3 per week up; 
central. 715 Yates st. 

mo let — Furnished rooms. Phone RJ442. 



WANTED — Two gentlemen to share room, 
wlib or without board. Phone 1771. 

MONEY TO LOAM 

AGREEMENTS for sale discounted. Hall 
&. Floyor, View and Douglas sts. Phono 
766,' j 

AGREEMENTS of sale wanted; none but 
good propositions entertained. Money 
to loan. Jenklnson, Hartley 8t Colby, 603 
Bayward bldg. 

MONEY to loan and agreements bought 
Apply to E. A. Harris ft Co.. 1229 
Douglas. 

MORTGAGES^ — We are open to discount 
agreements for sale of Victoria prop- 
erty and have several small sums of money 
to : place ion » '40 per cent valuation of 
property. Victoria or district. Call on us 
with particulars. Ilea Brown &. Copeman. 

WANTgP TO KXCHAWQs. 

BLAND Investment Co. stock wanted in 
change for equity In a house and lot 
or for a horse and rig. Owner, Box 1893, 
Colonist 

WILL give Ave lots In good Alberta town, 
value $1400, as first payment on house 
and lot In Victoria, not over $45po, with 
balance monthly. Must be well built and 
modern. Box 166 3. Colonist. 

WLL exchange for automobile or good 
lot, fine new mahogany piano, best 
make, superb tone. Box 2075, Colonist 

TXJANTED — Fully paid stock In the Island 

'» Investment Co. in exchange for a 

Shetland pony and rig. value $300. Owner. 

Boat 1894, Colonist office.^ 

HOUSES FOR RENT 

ALL the furniture contained in a 6-room 
house, consisting of elegant square post 
brass bed, massive fumed oak Davenport anil 
library table, dining set. buffet and ti leather 
seated chairs. Malleable range, art squares. 
for sale cheap; bungalow, close in, for leaso 
to the purchaser of all or part of this fur- 
niture. Box 2133, Colonist ^^^ 

A MODERN 6-reom bungalow, flvo min- 
utes' walk from post office; lease; Im- 
mediate possession; elegant furniture of this 
bungalow must be sold before November 5; 
handsome bed Davenport, Monarch range, 
library table, inlaid linoleum, rugs, dining 
suite, with buffet and six leather seat chairs, 
In (act everything to be sold at once. Phone 
L3950. 

IpOR rent — Four-room modern unfurnished 
flat near Cook st. earllne. 1116 Col- 
linson. Adults only. 



I 



30 



mwo good iota on Flnlayson, midway be- 
JL tween Quadra nnd Cook, Jln.'iO. two 

ethers on Mount Stephen at 1 2 r. 2 .", the pair. 
201 Central bldg. . phone 327 2. 

TO Strangers — See our complete list of 
nouses mid bus befori buying. Our 
experience nnd stnff nre 11! your disposal. 
Call and see us British Columbia Invent- 
ment*. Ltd., 'i 3ti View «:. 

1WUEF. large lets, ench '55x162, lust on* 
. Cook St., $886 ench .1 W I). York, 
phone 2S29. 

rpiIIS Is the on 
X King's road. 
I bird cash. *. 12. 18 A double corner on 
the Shelhoiirne extension car line, price 
M200; $200 cash. $10" every three months. 
1 ns-ell * McTnvl sb. 520 Cen tral bldg. 

NTICTOIUA av- A nice, level Int. close in 
Snrntosa «v.; price only $1600, 1-3 cash. 
l-i in nee 1 and i years. G. S. Leighton. 
---.boa blk. 



—Richmond road near 
ot 60x120, price $1226; 



TXTB8T Bay. victoria and Esquimau—- 
VV Frascr and Lyall, two acres, revenuo 
producing; price (15.000, on terms over 
three years. Beckett, -Major St Co.. Ltd.. 
648 Fort st;- telephones 8515 and Bjtli. 

TAi'- iB - to., citw. t ^'s»a/^Wfc_j l s Sj- 

1.8' cash, balance 0, 12 and 18 months. OVer- 
aeas Investment Agency. 2041 Pemberton blk. 

9 ACRES unimproved land on good road, 
. -' 1 mile from Koenlg's station. Cheap 
for quick sale. Apply owner. Box 1724, 
Colonist 

FOOT lot on Second st, one lot from 

»car, $800. Apply Box 1726. Colonist. 

* ■ 
iXn xl2 ° each, 2 lots on Seavlew ave., run- 
«-*" nlng through to Montrose, $8000. 
Moore * Johnston, Yates and Broad; phone 
627. - ....•.-' : 

pTAxlOe — Lillian rd.. near earllne; level 
0\J lots - r $1500. Moore A Johnston, Yates 
and Broad: phone 627. 

KAxlfiO— -Cedar Hill rd. — High and dry; 
OKI facing west: $1800. Moore St Johnston. 
Yates, and Broad; phone 627. 

pTAxllO— Prior st, between Bay and King's 
tj'j rd.. $1800; compare nriee*. Moore .% 
Johnston, Yates and Broad : phono 627. 

FTAxl20 — Richmond av. south, level lot, 
OU near earllne; $1500. Moore & Johnston, 
Yates and Broad;, phone 627. 

prnxllO, Victor St. corner ]_& $1400; note 
Vu price. $400 cash. Moore & Johnston, 
Yates and Broad, phone 627. 

pff)xl43. Fort St, right on the earllne. 
Ou splendid lot. 12500. Moore &. John- 
ston, Yates and Broad; phone 627. 

K£».\I12, Topaz av., 2 lots 66x112 each, 
«Jt) $315.0 for -the two. Compare prices. 
Moore ftjohnston. Yates arid Broad; phbne. 

627. , ' ' ' . . 

f»Ax 120— Inside the 3-4 mile circle, on 
OU paved street; $3200. Moore & John- 
ston, Yates' and Broad; pho ne 627. 

f\(\xl2<), Woodlands rd., Fairfield, splendid 
yj\J level lot, $1900. Moore & Johnston, 
Yates and Broad; phone 637. . - , 

/^ftxlOO, cofrier lot on Flnlayson st ; this 
Ul/ street la ■ paved. $1600. Moor, v 
Johnston, Yates and Broad, phone 627 

£*Ox97, corner lot on Hillside av., high and 
\JO dry; one of the best business corners 
on the street, "$6800. Moore & Johnston, 
Yate s and Broad; phone 627. - 

QOxl02, Bank st.; 2 lots, $2200; compare 
t/O prices. Moore & Johnston, Yates and 
Broad; phone 627. 

1 nA xl2 0— Hanxpshlro rd., double corner; 
JLUU $3000. Moore & Johnston, Yates and 
Broad; phone 627. 

-J AAxllO — 2 double corners In Hollywood, 
Xl/U splendid view of sea; $4 000 each. 
Moore & Johnston. Yates and Broad: phone. 

627,'. - : --.-■" ' ' 

,-J AAxllO. double corner in Hollywood, 
J-UU commanding splendid view of the 
sea, $4000. Moore & Johnston, Yates and 
Broad; phono 627. 

"t Afi x120 ' Asqulth st, double corner, $2500. 
ll/U This Is a splendid building site, 
Moore & Johnston. Yates and Broad; phone 

627. 

1 flfl xlS0, two lotB 50x150 each, with a 4- 
XUU roomed shack, near earllne, well 
Insld.- tin- 2-mile c Irate, J2600. Moore & 
Johnston, Yates and Broad; phone 627. 

-f AAxllS, double corner Inside the three- 
JUi- quarter mile circle; splendid site 
for apartment house; $9500; on a paved 
street. Moore & Johnston, Yates and 
Bron. I. phone 337._; . 

QrvAxlOS, 5 lots near the Burnslde earllne, 

•«- *'U hlKh and dry. with view of sur- 

"roundtng country, $1000. Moore & Johnston, 

. ..• ml Broa d; phone 627. 

tf|i»)A per acre for 81 acres In HhawnlK.wi 
■I?-,U district; contains bottom land, 
good timber and creeka; vary little rock, 
motor road to property; exceptional chance. 
83 C i'"o,t st. 

$»')AA cash secures 2 fine corner lots. 50x 
_,VU 13 r . ench; clone n«.-- oar line; Innd 
under cultivation; splendid home site; bal- 
easv. Mi, Ml'' Menrs at.; phone 1658. 

dftQAA CASH will buy corner lot, iiuum, 
'4P'3UU ,p Hnultaln st; price $1400; bal- 
ance easy. Haul tain St., next to corner of 
Avebury. $1200; $250, 6, 12. 18. Hulton st, 

84x180 $8300; Quarter cosh-, fi. 12. 18. 
Lubbock, 4 05 Central bldg. 

(ftinn HANDLES James Bay lot. 4 » > x 1 7 . 
tjP-b* FU dear breakwater; price $8400. 

i' 11 m.'x mi", city, 

(ta~| i)f\(\ buys 9-roomed, fully-ftirnl«hel 

fJpL__UU bouse, all conveniences; (tnrage. 

. run-, fun in ; i'i" lot off Cook st, on 

m, 1 nre. I'b. me, aoini or 1«79. 



tricl, one location, rour bedrooms, pol^ 
Ished floors, full cement basement, furnace 
in, laundry tubs, extra toilet In basement, 
fireplace, room for garage; new. This is 
an excellent buy. Price on terms, 15800. 
Box 1378. Colon ist. " .' • . ■ 

OME of seven beautiful rooms. Just 
finished, modern in every particular,, 
situated on largp lot In Fairfield estate, un- 
surpassed-view of sea and mountains. Price 
$5500; easy cash payment, balance month- 
ly. British Columbia Investments, Ltd., 636 
View st. , . '■ . . -' - 

AN Oak Bay bungalow^Flne view sea and 
•^Jt mountains, 6 rooms with sleeping 
porch, panelled dining room, beamed celling, 
buffet, open fireplace, den panelled anil bur- 
lapped, bathroom, separate toilet, piped for. 
furnace, electric chandeliers, laundry tubs, 
everything up-to-date, Just being completed; 
lot 90x70, all fenced; price $4750, $1000 cash, 
balance arranged. Apply owner, F. Prltch- 
ard, at store corner Todd rd. and Cadboro 
Bay rd., t'wo minutes Willows car. 

BEACON st — Close - to sea, park and car, 
a charming 6-roomed bungalow with 
furnace; lot la 50x130; price $6500, with 
but $1000 cash. Beckett Major & Co., Ltd., 
643 Fort st; phones 3515 and 2967. 

BEACON Hill, stone's throw from park 
and sea; handsome, substantial new 
8-roomed house. Owner on premises, 35 
Olympla ave., James Ba y. ... 

BEST house buy In Victoria, in Its best 
residence locality. 8 rooms, new, with 
magnificent view; built-in buffet, concrete 
basement; lot Is worth more than half the 
price asked, and the house Is the best of 
construction; owner must sell; price $5500; 
terms. Adilress Colonist Box 2144. 

BEECHWOOD ave., r'oul Bay— Modem 
5-roomed house, bathroom, basement, 
piped for furnace; price $4000, with a quar- 
ash. Beckett. Major & Co., Ltd., 643 
Fort st; phones 3515 and 296 7. 

CtHESNUT ave.— Lot 50x120 with 5-roomed 
' house, new, modern; price $4300, terms 
ensy. Box 2 008. Colonist. 

DENMAN st .Six-roomed house, cement 
basement, bath, toilet, open fireplace, 
and panelled walls; this house Is quite new, 
well built', and beautifully finished with all 
modern conveniences, and Is situated close 
to the car lino; a bargain at $5500. on easy 
terms. Wise & Co., 109 Pemberton blk. 

DUNLEVY st car line, half block from 
Inlands, $1760. Colin Powell. 230 Pem- 
berton blk. . 

DOES this appeal to youY — Shoal Bay, a 
new 7-roomcd house of two storeys, a 
beautifully laid out garden, dotted with 
One trees, the grounds being an acre In 
extent; this property Is close to the sea and 
will bo much appreciated by those In search 
of a select' home; price $16,750, terms $6750 
cash and balance 1. 2, 3, 4, and 6 year;. 
Beckett, Major & Co., Ltd., 648 Fort at'; 
phones 3 515 and 2967. . 

EIGHT roomed house on Hampshire, : 
south, a short walk from Oak Hay 
earllne; handsome dining and drawing 
roomr, cozy den, three nice bedrooms and 
sewing room upstairs, elegantly fitted bath- 
room, a quits modern residence and a big 
(•nap at $6250 on easy terms. Apply owner, 
us Pemberto n bldg., victoria. . ■ 

FOR sale — Two nice 4-room bungalows 
cheap. Apply owner, corner of Obed and 
Donald, Corge. 

FAIRFIELD — Nice, 6-roomed, modern bun- 
galow on Walton st., with hard 
lloors, panelled dining-room and hall. With 
every modern convenience; furnace also In- 
stalled. If sold within the next ten ilays. 
for $5600, with very easy terms: let us sb 
vou. ' J. C. Linden & Co., 4 MaoGregor 
iilk. ; phone 2870. 

.-MR FT ELD — New, il-roomod house Just 



<J_TAAfi— Hou»e on two lots: vary, hlsh 
fJplUUU situation, one block from. Fort 
«i tsar lto*J •« rooms. 4M.onl.en_ condition; 
owns? \i&& olSF^BtHf tm. Colonist. 

i n ' 11 H i " i | III! ,1 1 ., . 1 . > ll , !'■ ! ""„ ' ■ ' . ' ' ,, ! ' ' ■ ' ' 

' ' , -' , „' , ■ , U BU fM t Utt ' jj_jj_______-___; 

,EEMENT3 for sale discounted. Hall 
& Floyor, View and Douglas sts. Phono 



F 



HOLIES FOR SAJLB 



V \\ DLL built new bungalow, 4 large 

_f-L rooms, birth and pantry, all modern 

pries $3140; cheapest buy In 

only :. minutes from cur, terms to suit. 

Owner, Box TUN, Colonist 

AN extra well built bungalow on lull lot 
In Oak Bay, choice neighborhood, moil- 
respect. Including furnace; price 
r 11 quick snie jr.iiii.i. Sea F. O. 1'orteous. 
7 s> 7 v_ fates »t. 

A GENUINE home bargain — Owner called 
nw,iy from city must dispose of his 
\ cry cosy 5-ii'nnn-il modern bungalow, slt- 
.• : - 1 corner lot. In best part of Fair- 
field, between I'Tilthful nnd Dallas; In order 
to facllllnte Immodlnte sale we are author- 
ize,! to offer this choice home at tho sacri- 
fice price or $47611; $1000 oash, bnlan.-e 
arranged; If you are looking for a high- 
class moderate-priced borne, see this one. 
National Uenlty Co.. 123'.' (Jovernrnent st. 

A SNAP for a few days only. Owner must 
sell. Cory little 5-roomed bungalow, 
up-to-date In every respect; large lot. fur- 
niture, blinds, etc., $4400. Box SS. city. 

\ N-V-'.W 4-ro,.tTi bouse In desirable nelgh- 

_r__ borhood, ..n Rosebury, for $r,oo cash 
nnd a small monthly payment. Box 2101, 
Colonist 

A GOOD 7-roomed house with one acre 
of ground, fruit trees, etc., corner of 
Cadboro liny road and Thistle st. on the 
way 10 the Upland*. A good buy at $10,100; 
terms. The Overseas Investment Agency, 
;os Pemberton block. 
— , , '■' . : 1 — ; > r m 

ANEW 4-roomed bungalow with bath* ; 
room and large basement, fireplace and 
built-in cupboards. $2850. with only $300 
, cash. Room 2. 60C Tales st. 



completed: dining-room and halls bur- 
lapped nnd panneled, beautifully finished 
throughout, with every modern conveniens-, 
on full-Sized lot overlooking the ' I 
price only 85600, J700 essh, bnlftnco as 
rent. .1 6. Linden & Co., 4 MacOregor blk. 

I710R sale — S-roomed, modern flat, steam 
. heated, hot and cold water, togetloi 
with furniture, practically new. Flat 2, 
7 2 5 V. Fort st 

I.^OR sale — 5-room. modern bungalow, Foul 
. Bny: walls tinted; panelled dln-ni 
room; fireplace: full basement; on. bl 
from car; good terms. Owner, phone sri.'.V 

Ij^OR sale by owner — I am pleased to offer 
you a very nice, new, 8-roomed bonus, 
on Linden av., beautifully finished, harjl- 
wood floors, beamed ceilings, etc. See 
owner on premises, 7.S Linden, 

FOUR and five rooms, modern house, for 
sale, close to cur; 101 very m«y terms. 
Apply owner, 25»0 ('"ilnr Hill road. 

I7>OR sale on easy terms, new- nnd modern 
. bttngalOW Just completed, close to lilll- 
gnde and North Ward park. Owner. Boj 
2090, Colonist. 



F 



AIKFIKI.P home — S-roomed. fully mod 
ern bouse; full -sluted basement furn.' 

laundry, panelled walls, closa to sea and 
earllne; price $6800. R. 11. Dues. 1113 
Douglas St.: phone 304 

T71AIRFI_5LD — f!-roomed house, near sea, 
-a- very attractive; only $4800 en terms to 
BUlt, Hee A. von Glrsewald, corner Fort nnd 

Quadra. 

FOR sale — 2 nice Broomed rottnges In 
Victoria Wost, full-sl_ed lot ; only $2950, 
$860 past) ; bnlance as rent. .1. C Linden 
\ Co., 4 Mn-'Oregnr blk.: phone 2870. 

FINLAYSON st — 5 rooms, bath, etc.. 
built-in sideboard. COOlIng cupboards. 
piped for furnnce, cement sidewalks, lot 
50x120; price Is $4000 with $700 cash. Let 
me show you this bargain. A von Glrse- 
wnld. corner Fort and Qundrn. 

OUHrROOM. new. modern cottnxe. large 
lot. handv to enr; price $2750; $300 cash, 
balance like rent. Phone 3(12. 

Foil, Ray — 5-roomed hotne, very large 
verandas on two sides, very well 
built, with b"nmed celling and panelled 
wnlls; a bnrgnln at $6600 with 31000 I ash 
and balance to arrange. See A. von Glrse- 
wald, corner Fort and Quadra. 

I:\RONT at, Foul Bay— A 4-roomed bunga- 
low on lot with (10-foot frontage for 
$2000, and $750 cash. Reckett. Major A 
Co.. Ltd., 648 Fort St.; phones 8516 and 
2P67. 

GEORGE st. — Fully modern, 5-roomed 
bouse, close to sea and earllne; price 
$4050; good terms. B. H. Duce, 1113 Doug- 
las st.. .phone .304. 

1 ■ ■ 

GRANT at.— <ttns* tn esr, S rooms, fur- 
Wir«, can b« had for $1000 on very 
easy terms; very deep S>ot. A. von Glrse- 
wald corner Fort and Quadra, 



F 



jN 



NO. 1201— An 8-roomed 
In one of the very' bes. 
district; 4 bedrooms, din 
kitchen, breakfast room ui 
try. large cloth- 
hall, parlor ami dining r 
basement, furnace In, 1.1 
basement, fire 



tolfet in 
strictly n 
room 
terms, $5 



ct fi 
s is a 
illith 



ouse in Fairfield 
?a.rt* of Fnirfleld 
g room, parlor, 

hall, large paji- 
oii.bed floors In 
>m; full cement 
dry. tubs, extra 
lace; now and 
ntage; plenty of 

sfiap. Price on 



Company, rooms 
, ,, 9, 11 Mahon bldg .. 111% Government st 

"VtEW bungalow, 4 large rooms, burlapped 
-IN ' and panelled, bath, panfry, toilet una 
splendid basement;, big lot and well-built; 
low taxes; two mlnuteB Douglas car; $3000; 
$500 cash, balance as rent, 7 per cent. Own- 
er, 840 Cormorant st. 

"VfO. 1203 — 6-roomed bungalow between 
JsN Oak Hay and Willows carllnes, two 
block's from car, lot 50x120, garage, must 
be sold at once; $800 cash, balance $40 per 
month. Price $8200. The . Griffith Com- 
pany, rooms 5, 7, !», 11 Mahon bldg., 1112 
Government st. 

LOT 3Og2O0i with, a 4-roomed cdtage; 
price, only $1950, cash $360. O. B. 
Leighton, .Mii lnui blk. ■ 

OWN YoUr Own Home-^-Cozy cottage, three 
. rooms; bathroom burlapped and pen- 
ncled, built In furniture, ready to step 
Into, splendid large lot, near car and parks, 
only $1350; small payment down, balance 
llkii rent Ow ner, P. O. Box 119. ■: 

OAK Bay— Bungalow; 6 rooms, $4250 with 
$750 cash. See A, von Glrsewald,- corner 
Fort and Quadr a.; , '. ■':'.'.'' . ,',''. 

ONE brand new 6-room bungalow, lot 
60x120, Just off Clovcrdale av.. $2960. 
Phone 2394. " ■ . ; 

Oscar st.— A good five-roomed house to 
which two more rooms can be added. 
This house Is fully modern, on a paved 
-soo. cash $1600, balance ar- 
ranged. Caswell & MuTavish, 620 Central 
building. 

OAK Bs?y— Close to car, an exquisite 
house on a double corner moasurlr. k 
100x120; a $1000 down wouldn't buy a house 
of this nature; 9 rooms, basi -■- 1 1 1 1 I'ur- 

v-li hud out grounds, wash room. 
Chinaman's room, bullr-ln buffet and china 

t in diriin,,' room, pressed brick 
place In den; an extremely choice location 
on one of Oak Bay's best streets; we can 

this property for $12,000. Beck 
M 1 , r S Co., Ltd . 6 i" Port n : ptwires 

3515 and ^917. , 

OAK Bay — Bungalow, lot 60x120, Just 
■1. for $3750; terms to arrange. 

I'M- sale by A. von Glrsewald. corner I 'oft 
and Quadra. 

OAK Bay — Oliver st.. between McNeil 
:ind Saratoga, For sitle, new house, 

six rooms, wiib 1 rtl.ni hull, bathroom, 

pantry gad linen closet; price $5000; tortus 
$1000 cash, balance 6, It, 18, M months, or 
would tad building lot in Oalc Hay a* 
part payment. Apply owner, Box 2066. 
Colonist 

ORCHARD c.V' \ ""W 7-roomed house 

of two storeys within four minutes of 
sea ami neni with stationary 

torn; lot 46x 

1 in; prbc $5800, wlib $1650 cash, balance 
over nearly 3 years, Beckett, Major & 
,•,, ),t^. ma Fori st.! phones Beta and 

2967. 

ON Monterey live, north — A benutlful new 
two-Sl ■ '- w Ith 7 rooms, ini-rje 

sun room, full ."iii-"' 1. us' ment with fur- 

- ■•; "». stationary wash- 

, ,: .. 1 ,1, balconj . 1 ooma bave beamt .1 

1 : dining room has verj fine 
bull! in sideboard; from the house then- 
is :i charming vi.u- at Mount Baker and 
the sti aits; prlc ■ $6' iO rith $2no« cash. 
balance t. '.-. is. 24 and 80 months; '.f 

I lng lor 11 delightful home call on us 
nnd we'll show JTOU this. Acents. B«Ok»tt, 

,: 1 . . Ltd., 848 Fori st.; phones 
:> 1 '. anrl 2 9117. 

Ri , , and From St.— On n oornet lot, 
, ,\U1, n r, r ned hOUSa for $25,000, 

with tir.no cash. Beckett, ttaldr & Co., 

648 Fort st : ph ones 35 15 and 2967. 

QIN'AP near sea and ciirllnr in Hollywood, 
lo 5-roomod modern bungalow, full base- 
ment fireplace, luillt-ln bookcases, beamed 
celling, electric fixture.", window seats, air 
cooler nnd other cabinet work: $3900 on 
imv terms, Owner, P.O-, Box 1115, 

SlX-ROOMEn modern house, onk Bay av., 
.,n double lot, tl'vnon; v t cash; very 
easy terms. 216 Central bl dg.. phone 290 1, 

TALK with Cole roKiirdlnn five new Cali- 
fornlM bungalows now nearly com- 
pleted, prices from $1*50 10 $6600. on very 
easy terms; larxc. level lots, hard surfaced 
street,, roll cement bnsemerits, furnace nnd 
fli-«plnee, beam celling, panelled walls and 
plat., rail, hardwood floors, tinted wnlls. 
electric light fixtures and window shades; 
In fnct. all ready to Step Into. They are 
beauties and real Louses throughout. In- 
spection by you means a purchaser. I'ail 
on Mr. Cole today from 9 to 11 nnd 1 to 3, 
or Monday. Telephone 3fi2. 

VT/ll.L take rood lot as first payment on 
VV 5-room modern bungalow: closa to 
sea and car line. P. O. Box 1116. 



766. : 



FOB Investment — Modern 6 or 7-roomed 
house, close to business section; must 
be good buy.; terms no object. Apply Box 

2093, Colonist - ..... 

WANT two or three lots in the Oak Bay 
district that are considered good Invest- 
ments; I will pay from $400 to $1000 on the 
first payment. Box 1872, Colonist 

I HAVE Just arrived from the East, and 
have a few thousand dollars to in ve .» l : 
If you will send me your best buy in \ lc- 
torla lots and mention where they are, I wtli 
examine them and see you at once- if they 
suit me. Address to X.Y.Z., Box 699, \ lc- 
to rla, B.C. 

SNAP — 6-roomed house, on lot 30x131, 839 
Caledonia ave., near V. & 8. station; 
owner must leave town; if sold before 16th 
November will take $6,200-, 1-3 cash, bal. 
1 and 2 years; exclusive sale. Nakano & 
Co., Phone 964; 518 Flsguard St. 

TO land locators— Wanted. 800 to 600 
acres on Vancouver Island for ranch 

pu rposes. Box H.M.B.. Colonist 

WANTED — Good lot on Fort St., between 
\\ Trent and Empress sts. Box 2106, 

Ml 1st. ' 



\\ 'ANTED — A cheap lot or your equity In 
\ V same as first payment on neat 5-room 
bungalow; come and sec us about this. Room 

2, 606 Yat es St. ' 

U'ANTED — Agreements % for sale on Onk 
\\ Bay and Victoria property. Crompton 
ft Barton . 130 Pemberton blk. 

TTTTE have Cash with which to buy cheap 
W lots. What have you to offerT Monk, 

Mon telth. ft Co.. Ltd, 

\\UNTED — Cheap lot In Ker Addition, 
V* Walter ave. preferred; owners only. 
Full particulars to Box 1011. Colonist 



WILL pay cash for good lot up to $1500 
from owner. State particulars to P. 
O, Box 1195; usu al commission. • 

WANTEd — Waterfront lot In Esquimau; 
must be reasonable. P. O. Box 1628, 
Vlctorin, B. C. .V- : ; ■'...; 



V"X7ANTED — About two acres for garden. 
VV close In, Victoria high land. Deed 
Vancouver lot $1500, or $1500 equity, l_n;- 
lcy, as first, payment. L2240 Second av. 

west, Vancouver, B. C. 

W/ANTED— Lot close to car; state price 
VV and terms In first letter; owners only. 
B ox 1975, Colonist. 

IIOCSEB WANTED 



HOUSE wanted, close In, not to exceed 
cash $600. Location and terms. Box 
1007, Colonist. • 

ON Monday we require two 5-roomed 
houses In Oak Bay district with $700 
and $600 cash respectively; Immediate sale 
Kiiaranteed if suitable. Beckett Major ft 
Co. Ltd., 643 Fort st. ; telephones 3515 and 
2967. . 



s 



1IX Inquiries In. our office for houses 
^ which can be bought with 'n-0 or $fC0 
as first payment. Send us listings. Beckett. 
Major ft Co.. Ltd., 643 Fort St.; telephones 
3515 n nd 2967. 

W_ can sell at once a 5-roomed house In 
Fairfield with $1000 ensh and balance 
monthly. Particulars quickly, please. 
Beckett, Major ft Co., Ltd., 643 f-ort St.; 
telephones 3516 and 2967. 

W 'ANTED for rent — Cottage, 4 or 5 rooms, 
modern, or to buy on eaay teixns. T. 
Jones, Pandora st, faci ng Chestnut ave. 

TT7ANTED — Modern five or six-roomed 
VV bungalow In nice locality, near car 
line, Fnirfleld Estate preferred. Box 1998, 

Colonist, 

WANTED from owner, small bungalow at 
low price and easy terms. Apply Box 

1969, Colonist^ 

TTTTANTED — From owner, 7 or 8-room mod- 
YV ern homo In Oak Bay or Fairfield. 
Apply giving lowest price and terms to Box 
1271. Colonist . _____ 

FURNISHED HOCSK8 TO I.KT 



AN ideal home — 8 rooms, reception hall, 
drawlngroom, dlnlngroom, breakfast 
room, large kitchen, scullery and pantry, 
four bedrooms, bathroom and lavatory; full 
size, basement, wash tubs, extra toilet; good 
garden; half block from cars, near park; 
telephone paid six months In advance; 
»7B a month. Gillespie, Hart ft Todd, 
Ltd. 1110 banglay St.; phone 2040. 

FURNISHED 6-room cottage to let on 
Dallas road. Apply to Mrs. M. It 



A 

Smith. 

Ir^OR rent — Furnished 6-room house on 
. Florence st Tor $46 per month and 
possession at any time. Apply D. Lewla Co., 
117 Pemberton block, phone 1299. 



IrviR rent — New 4-roomed bungalow, very 
. close In; furniture $250 for Immediate 
sale; cheap rent. Apply flox 1981. Colonist. 



VERY comfortable shack tor sale; easily 
moved. Box 1467, Colonist. 



17\OR rent, modorn rurnlshcd 8-room house 
with garage near Oak Bay Junction 
for two months only from Dec. I ; r.o chll- 
dren; good references required. Apply Box 
192S, Colonist. 

JAMES Bay. 6 rooms, modern, close to sea 
and car, possession now. 416 Luxton 
av.. off Boyd St., view 11 to 12, 2 to 3. 

JAMES Bay, 6 rooms, modern, close to sea 
nnd car, possession now. 416 Luxton 
nv off Boyd St., View 11 to 12, 2 to J. 

MODERN furnished house, every conve- 
nience. In one of the best parts of 
tiie city, $66 per month to responsible party. 
I'bone 4050. 



t^IX room rurnlshed house, $41 per month. 

F> Box 209$, Colonist 

UMAI.I, furnished house for rent or will 
£3 sell furniture. Box 1487, Colonist 



T 



O let. six-room furnisher! house, all con- 
veniences. Apply 2*13 Qusrdra St. 



mo rent— Furnished 3-rootn cottage, sewer, 
X water, electric light and phone, $26. 
1468 Dallas rd.. Ross Bay; phone R4410. 



H 



HOUSEKEEPING room suitable for two, 
18.60 per week. 2623 Bock Bay ave. 

OUSEKEEPINO rooms— -In 2 or » rooms, 
home accommo dations. Phone 792. 

usekeeping rooms, — t i t. Dallas 
b^ffcjBJW L2114. 

1 ...I ■ .." ' .. ' _ ' 

LIGHT housekeeping rooms, hot and cold 
water, with use of basement. 471 
Gorge Road. 

NICELY furnished front sitting room and 
front bedroom, bath, basement with 
wash tubs, hot and cold water, use of kit- 
chen, and conveniences, phone; suit young 
couple. 2118 Sayward st, off Pembroke. 
(Take Spring Ridge car to Fernwood.) 
Phone 3130. ,. 

OOMS to let; no children. 1066 Rich- 
mond. ... 



R 



djTOVES, gas stoves and housekeeping 
O rooms. 817 Pandora st. ^^^ 

fpHREE nice bright unfurnished houso- 
JL keeping rooms, bath, hot and cold 
water; suitable for couple (no children). 
560 Rlthet s t., James B ay. ■ 

ritO rent — Two unfurnished rooms. 1331 
-L Pembroke st. S pring Ridge c ar. 

THO rent — Three unfurnished rooms near 
-L the water. Apply 34 Lewis st, James 



Bay. 



rnuii furnished housekeeping rooms, cen- 
JL tral. «?n a month; no children. 68.S. 



Princess av. 



a"^0 rent — Two suites of 6 rooms eacn unfur- 
nished or furnished, to suit tenant: close to 
sea and car, In private grounds. Apply H. 
B., Thoburn P. O. . 

THREE housekeeping- rotrns, bedroom 
furnished, modern, $15. 401 Skinner 
at;, phone R4071. - . . 

WO front rooms nicely furnished for 

housekeeping; modern. 765 Hill st, 

opposite North Ward school. 

rpo let — Suite of housekeeping rooms, fur- 
JL nlshed complete; all modern. 1122 
Johnson st. 



T 



WO unfurnished housekeeping rooms to 
let Apply 1020 Hulton st. 



TWO housekeeping rooms, unfurnished, 
electric light, bath; central, near car- 
line. $14 month. 1247 Pan dora st '^ 

TO ront — Furnlshod flat of three rooms In 
n_w house; no ch'.ldren. Ill Cam- 
bridge st. ■ 

TWO large unfurnished rooms to rent; car 
stops at door. 1526 Fort street, corner 
of Belmont 

rpWO furnished housekeeping rooms; mod- 
— - ern, at 1733 Cook St. 

THREE rooms, furnace ueated and use of 
phone; close to car line and park. 1035 
Oli phant ave,, off Cook st. 

TWO large front housekeeping rooms to let 
furnished, range, bath, hot and cold 
water, one minute from car, phone 1144 
Pandora. 

fTWYO furnished housekeeping rooms, $10 a 
J- month. Cralgflower road, third house 
past Carey. 

TWO furnished nouaekeeplng rooms for 
rent; modern; no children. Apply 1186 
Caledonia ave. 



T 



O rent — Furnished housekeeping rooms. 
Mulr. 1212 Quadra st. 



TO LET— FUltNl SHED ROOMS 



A 



A: 



A 



NICELY furnished room with board for 
t'wo men. 341 Duned ln st ^^ 

~FIK.N1.SUED room. 342 Michigan st 
phone KB14. 



A FURNISHED room; breakfast If de- 
sired. Burlelth, House, off Cralgfiower 
road. 



T 434 Slmcoe, near Menzles, furnished; 
- sea view; piano. Phone L1716. 



Ll. newly furnished room*, morning and 
K meal and Sunday dinner; fur 



A.I.I, new) 
-Tj_ even In., 

nnce heat and bath: very reasonable rates. 
PleaSS call after 1 o'clock. 2011 Cook st. 



B 



EDROOMS and housekeeping rooms. 734 
Humboldt st. 



DCNSMUIR Rooms, 730 „ Fort st., com- 
fortable, well heated rooms for winter; 
running water; clothes closets; well ven- 
tilated; weekly and transient rates. 



IrvURN-SHBD bed-slttlng room. 1809 Fern- 
1 wood r oad. Phone R -4260. 

FRONT room, two beds; single room. .1803 
Quadra st. 

IT^OR rent- — Furnished front room, ground 
-T floor, suitable for two gentlemen; open 
grate. Also front and back room upstairs 
for housekeeping. 815 Catherine st, opp. 
fire hall. 

J7VURNISHED front room, suit two gentle- 
. men, fuel provided. $4. 946 Colllnson. 

I[>OR rent — Furnished housekeeping rooms, 
close in. 253J Government st 



T\W)-RC")M cabin, neatly furnished. 
HillsKla ave. 



•17 



1,-M'KNISHED rooms, close In; breakfnst If 
. desired; private family; furnace. 1020 



Suilej st. 



F 



U11N1SHED bedroom to let. 323 Men- 

xles. 

FOUL Bay, one minute irom car, front 
bedroom for gentleman. 248 Wlldwood 
avenue. 

FURNISHED room with all modern con- 
veniences. 15S Medina st 

FURNISHED rooms, breakfast if deslrr_; 
prlvste family; close to oar; nice local- 
ity. 1119 Hilda st. next to Fairfield rd. 

] .BURNISHED room. folding bed. also 
- single room; furnace, phone. 423 Parry 
st, James Bay^ 

LARGE front room, suitable for two, $3 - 
week , 1219 Cook st 

LARGE front room, steam hsated. In cen- 
tre of city, 2 single beds; one nice 
single room. 786 Courtney st. 

NICELY furnished front room, eight min- 
utes' walk from city ball. 1611 Cham- 
bers St. second door fr om Pandora st. 

NICELY furnished front sitting room, 
also bedroom; suit two friends; every 
convenience; breakfast If desired; private 
family; clo-o in. 1015 PendergaaC at, 
phone RIIII 



ITIOR rent — 7-roomed house, close In and 
full of boarders. Furniture for sale for 
$500 cash, or $550 on term*. Apply D. 
.Mcintosh, Mahon bldg., phone 1749. 

I,"lOR rent — 7-roomed house, close In, all 
modern, $45 per month. See A. von 
Glrsewald, corner Fort and Quadra. 

I WAS lucky last summer and secured a 
new, modern 7-roomed bouse near Glad- 
stone and Belmont ave. for $36 per month; 
I am expecting to leave about November 10 
and will turn the house over to some one 
who will take my new kitchen stove, win- 
dow shades, etc. Bo x 1933. Colonist. 

SIX-ROOM house for rent 1 , and complete 
furnishings for sale; house rented only 
to purchaser of furniture. Price $500, close 
In. Box 2185, Colonist. 

rj>0 rent — Modern bungalow, Monterey ave., 

— - cor. Central, lease to right tenants. 

Apply after 3 p.m. today. 

rpO lease — House on North Hampshire rd.. 
JL 8 rooms with furnace. Just finished; 
ready for Immediate occupation. British 
Columbia Investments, Ltd., 63fi View st. 

TWO-roomed house for rent on Maple av.. 
near Woodworker factory and Douglas 
st. car line. Apply 248 Beechwood av.. Foul 

Bay. 

, — 1 
rpO rent on Nov. 11, 6-room house on Cio- 
.— vcrdale av. for $30 per month. Apply 
D. Lewis Co., 117 Pemberton blk., Phone 
1299. 

TO let — Now, modern 6-roomed house on 
Burnslde earllne; no small children. 
F. R. Kelly, corner Burnslde rd. and Wash- 
ington av. 

rpo rent on Nov. 11, 4-room house on Rod- 
-«- erlek st. for $20 per month. Apply I_>. 
Lewis t'o., 117 I'eniln-rton block, phone 1-99 

rpO rent — 6-roomed house on Harrison st. 
J- close In, all modern, $36 per month. 

BagSbawe & Co., 224-2:'.s Pemberton bldg. 

fpO let, from December 1, large bungalow, 
J- corner Cook and Kings, full basement; 
stables tor three horses; $40 a month. 

/•-ROOMED bungalow on Colllnson at. for 
*) rent; $45 per month; six months' leas- 
with Option of renewal K'ven responsible 
and careful tenant; house and grounds In 
good condition. J. K. Bowes ft Co., Ltd., 
iit:i Fort st.; phone 2724. 

7-ROOMED house to let; modern, close In, 
on earllne; also furniture for sale. 
Apply 104 Ontario st. 

WANTED TO KENT— HOUSES 



,1L'll.N'lSii_D cottage wanted for a month 



A near Oak Bay or Beacon Hill. Wrltu 
particulars to Mrs. E. O. Cornish, Harwood 

St., Vancouver. 



1TVURNISHED house wanted to rent In 
good location, not less than five rooms. 
if Hiilied at once. Apply N. S. Clarke, Do- 
minion hotel, staling terms. 

____——__—_——— u ' " > v — — — " 

rpo rent— -Slx-roomerb house, Harrison st, 
J- close In, nil modern, $36 per month, 
l.ngshawe ft Co.. 224-5 Pemberton bldg. 

WANTED -Well furnished modern house. 
5 or 6 rooms, family of two; no chil- 
dren; close In. Box 2079, Colonist 



\\ T AN') ED — Close In, small house, fur- 
\V nisli.-d or unfurnished; no children. 
Will pay good rent. Box 1517, Colonist, 

\\ ' A N T Ii D to rent — 4 or 6-room unfurnished 
\\ h>, '.in. . about November 15; adults only . 

permanent; mat.- rent and locality. C. T. 

Kirk by. Pi O. Bo x 670. Victoria. 

\\'.\NT_D to rent — 7-room furnished house 
\Y for good Client, Monk, Montelth ft 
Co., Ltd., Government cor ner Broughton. 

V\TANTED to rent, bungalow with garden, 
\\ elevated position, Horn $30 to $25 per 
month. Box 1968, Colonist. 



W'AMTKD burnished house. 5 or • rooms 
V\ to talte possession Immediately. Box 
200J. Colonist 

VI , r ANTED to rent by responsible business 
\\ man, modern five to seven-roomed 
house. Give particulars; will lease. Box 
1946. Colonial. 



\X7A.NTF.1J to rent — 3 or 4 roomed cottage, 
VV married couple, no children. Box 2067, 



Colonist. __^__________________________ 

WANTED to rent by responsible couple, 
house, from people going away for 
winter; everything will have' best of ears. 
Box 1912, Colonist. 



WANTED TO KETTT 



P 



URNISHED bedroom wanted by yo«"»- 
inan and use of piano; board optional. 



Box 2084, Colonist 



F 

766. 



UTINISHBD houses wanted. Hall ft 
Floyer, View and Douglas at*. Phone 



WANTBI>— Furnished room, hy Sl-fle 
gentleman of refinement; hint and 
bath desired; references If Issis-i Address 
Bon 314ft, Colonist. , „I 



m 



y 



c-cS 



22 



VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST 



Sunday. November 3. 1912 



■ . " 



BOOM AND BOABD 



AT St. Helena, Courtney st., single end 
double bedrooms, with board; very 
liberal table; English cooking; allium heat- 
ed, electric light, balha. Telephone Oil, 

AVERY comfortable home. Room aud 
board 17 per week. 813 Look St.. 
jihone 1061. 



MI8CEIAANEOUB — Cont'd. 



AT 1*116 Fort at 
dence; vacancies about 
I'hone 2881. 



flrat-claaa board-real- 
November II. 



AT The Roaedale, room and board, IT a 
week. 2702 Government, oppoau. .n» 



!• uuntaln. 



BOARD and room for two gentlemen, pri- 
vate family, bath, good cooking; alto 
email room; 1316 Fernwood. next to cornet or 
i ates at. _____————— 

BOARD and room*, beautifully sltuat«d 
on Gorge, cldse to car lino. !•" »uni» • 
aide ave. ; phonn R1126. __________ 

1-ED altllng room with board l'rl\»iw 
y Boarding llouae, 11 76 Fort at. 
OARD and room, terms moderate. MM 

McClure at., off V ancouver. ___ 

BO l< ■• ) 
and modern] reasonable rate* 



BUILDING Mover — PaoJflo (Joaat Building 
Mover. Estimates free. AH work 
guaranteed. I'hone R1713; r»a 1036 Yatea 

■ Urll. . 

7TAST cook stove. 110; child's cot and mal- 
\y tr-sa, 13. 



Ii3« Hillside. 



rOB 8— XJB — MI8CKLLANKOIH (Coot'r", 



I t MdHimld, masseur, 11 now at liberty 

1_ f< |l patient (e-riy morning massage;. 

A|i f i) ,i> lates, phono 3783. . 



1M.VINU boats, Curllaa ueroyachls; see 
' u. tor information on thU moat fa*- 
,„„„„, gport Causeway Boathouae. below 
>».U.; !♦>■ »'»■ _____ 

1.>UH~ aale — One aeoond-hand fireproof 
1 »afc. nearly n-w ; bargain. Apply 

phone . oao. 



1XKMMIKU houses wanted. Hall & 
5 Floyer. Vie*- und Douglaa ate. Phone 



POULTRY A WD LJV__TOC_ 



;»o 



B 



BOARD and room, ju»t i'i 
new and modem; reiunuial 
2630 Quadra, near Hillside. 

BOARD and room In good house for two 
gentlemen; right on carllne, I Hone 

U3205. ' ^_^ . 

room — A. married 
" Te'eklng'aelect board-residence. Inquire 
l-lione 768. 

<-4\H »UN — First-class board-residence: 
l_/ faci ng Beacon Hill park. Phone 3183. 

COMFORTABLE board and lodgings with 
nice English family on carllne. Phone 
R4278, 1841 Glads tone av. 

1 A. Boarding House, 2616 Turner at., 
opposite Victoria Machinery Depot. 



i_r 



1v 'it "sale— Si aharea National Finance, 
' M6u per share. Box 2031, Colonist 



_\ 



u t nee 



1>OH sale • heap for caeh. boathouae, aulr- 
' _bl< toi aunoh up to 21 feet. Apply 

I. \ I __ 

OOD home for small lnfanu; terma rea- 
aonable S86 Caledonia av. 



t'l 



O. 



I 

■ 



rtARBEKRY House— 1008 Carberry Oar- 
#l^-ons. an Ideal spot with h°me»ke 
comforts, bright room., _««*^,J? rst ;f am ? 
meala. public sitting-room With _£!*£_*' 
Shone, baths, etc.; vacancies for **--*« 
of business gentlemen. Phone L-ao... 

/COMFORTABLE hO_d Wlt» jbOM***' *•*' 
\J Mont real St. 

1~71IRST-CLASS worn and board to P***_j* 
< family, suitable for two young men. 
.026 Chambers at. 



XrtURNISHED bedroom., with or without 
-_ board, near Femtwood car. 1MI Don- 

noOD American room and bo»r_ «» 

VX Dal las rd. 

T .DOING, 12 per week; boar 

1- 17 per week. Address 1122 M ears_st__ 

ORMIDALE — Just opened.; Aboard *,"_ 
room, $7. SO; English cooking. 1308 

Stanley- ave., co mer Fort. \ ) 

ART board and room can be'had In pri- 
vate family a: very r6asonable rates. 
with use of sitting room, bath, etc. .81- 

Husaell St.. Victoria West. _____ 

COM and good board In private family. 
Apply 201 Ontario St. 



H^v K s„ur land rlesred by day or Opa« 
mu-t ami douhle Its value. J. Thorlm- 
liert, May w ood P. O. 

HAVE your land cleared by day or con- 
tract and double Its value. J. Thonnl- 
bert, Maywood P.O. ' _____ 

I WANT several steady young men Imme- 
diately to learn automobile buslneaa 
driving aud repairing thoroughly taught, 
cYassca morning and evening. Victoria Auto- 
mobile School. Dunsmulr garage, come- 
Sup erlo r and Men. lea. ________——. 

IF you own a lot I will furnish you plans, 
specifications and money for you to 
build, giving best of work and material, 
cheapest in price. Try me and •**> Box 

1S89, Colonist. 

* *~ ,i "."St " 



our name. Yeoman 
block, phone 2829 

LESSONS in dr 
drawing-room at 
held morning and 




Jp gttww>«i» : *ln»*». »*»»«• ___ 

■■ifASOUERADE dance— Companions of the 
M _%St^_J told their masquerade 
dance In the A.O.F. Hall. Broad street, on 
Thursday, November 7; admission 60c; come 
along and win a prize 



FOR sale — Dainty evening dreaa, new, 
from Regent at., London. England; 
bargain. Addresa D. M. C, 810 Douglaa 
St., phone L,2636. 

H_K_'S a houael— 8-roomed bunguiow, 
tastefully papered throughout, liiuum 
uraule cupbuarua, window bunds, luinaee, 
open nrepiucf, un Canoed comer lot, Cront- 
age UOXK0. price |iii.u. H. A. Bon, 731 H 
Fort at., phono 17 4 1. .^ 

INCREASE your lnisluuss- — timid out Multl- 
graphud leltor* (cannot be detected from 

typewriting); prices lo.v- «■« have complete 
mailing ii»i», orders executed on jh"' l 
notice. Apply Newton Advertising Agencj, 
suite 403 Times Uldg. ■ 

NICE front alttingroom apd front bedroom; 
suit couple; phone and conveniences; 
»30; 7 minutes city. ls.'X 11-4, P. O 

JEW 1125 typewrlUl tor 176. Box 1»66, 
Colonist. 

OVERBOARD ntotora tor aale, lit any row- 
boat; let ub demonstrate for you. 
Causeway Boat bouse, below P.p. 

I)OP Corn Crisp machiin: for silo If lalu-n 
at once. 132 Hastings East, Vancou- 
ver, B.C. 

KEAL. estato agents take notice — My pro- 
perty on Davlda av., Gorge View l'ark, 
Kerr addition, haa been taken off the mar- 
ket. David Dunlop. ^^_ 

CtbUOP for aale, 30 feet by 10 feet 6 In. 
iO beam, maln*«". and Jib, Buffalo 
engine; the atrongeat and best boat for tho 
We»t coast you can buy. Carries 10 tons 
freight; pleasure or work boat; a positive 
snap a.'. 1560. Causeway Boafhouse, below 
P.O. ' 

SOLID oak bedroom suite, pictures, iron 
bedstead, hair and spring mattresses, 
feather bed, pillows, toilet ware, carpet. 
Singer sewing machine, kltcben rai'ge. 
chairs, table crockery, utensils, New Cen- 
tury washer, sealers, oil heater, gun^ elec 
trlclan's tools, books, grnt'e n * w "--__ a !_" 
Whttworth bicycle, accessories; 
able offer refused. 1818 .,u-~ 

Moss St. 

machinery for 

i turn tubular 

1 125 _. 'C. 

m duty mil 

duty- 9x12 «_- 

. complete wttli 

est planer and 

gear, logging 

for «•* 



CHOICE Buff Orpington o'ookerele for 
•ale, Kellerstrass strain. Apply 211 

Ontario at. 

ANCONAS for sale — Laying hens and 
pullets. 11.60 to 12.6" each, alao White 
Leghorn hens and pullets. Apply F. V. 
Hobbs. Mystlo Spring. Cadboro Bay, Vic- 
toria. 



THOMPSON REALTY CO, 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Room 1* and 18 Green Blk. Victoria, B. C 



1/v>k sale— Well trained Gordon Setter, 8 
years old. Address B ox E.8.C.. Colonist. 

JTIOM sale— Irish setter pups, 6 weeks old; 
- prize winning strain. Stuart F. Clark, 
.Maple It ay P.O ., Duncans . 

I"7>OR sale — Milk oows, Jerse_a and grades. 
. also Jersey bull calves. Apply James 
<; French. The Menagerie, Baanlch Road, 
Victoria, B, C. „ 

Tj^olt sale — Andnluatans. Reda, a. I- 
J? Dottes and O. E. game bantama; blrda 
of all ages. P. S. Lampman, Oak Bay, tele- 
phone Y3I164. _^_ 



I.tUH sale — Five-year-old .lorsiy cow, 175. 
1 Lohmnnn. 1312 t.'arlln st. 




17V.) It sale— Heavy team of horses, wagon 
} und harneas: will sill separately; cash 
, , real estate. J A McDowell. 815 Cather- 
ine st 



I/vm sale — Good milk cow, third calf; price 
: 175. H. G. James, Corrle st., off Cralg- 

Qower rd. — 

OR sale— Extra good driving horse 

and chunky three-year-old. Just broke. 

weight 1100. prico 1200. I. G. Postui, Happy 

Valley nl , Metohoeln P. O. 

1740R aale— Pedigree Berkshire boar, 1 
. year 10 months old; Imported, first 
prize winner several exhibitions; grand pig. 
ISO on spot; much below value. H. C. uia- 
flold. Elk La ke. P. O. Box 929. Victoria. 

FEBRUARY hatched laying pullets, Leg- 
horn-Rock. What offers? Box 1926, 
Colonist. 



HOC&ES FOR SALE 
T>AY st, • rooms.' 14600; cask 1700.. - 

"DAY St., 6 rooms, 18600; cash 11600. 

"DAY St., « rooms, 16500; caaH 11600. 

C CHESTNUT St., 6 rooms. 14200; cash 
} 11860. 

YVENMAN St., 6 rooms, 14004); cash 11000. 

DENMAN at., two 4-roomed houses, 14200 
each; cash 1700. 

T7WURTH St., 6 rooms, 14600; cash 11.00. 

ITtOURTH St., 6 rooms, 14000; cash 11000; 
. new. 

L,MNLAYSON St., 6 rooms, 14000; cash 
-T 1600. 

GLADSTONE av., 8 rooms, 17000; caeh 
11500. 

/GLADSTONE av., 9 rooms, 110,600; cash 
VT 13500. ' 

HAULTAIN St., 4 rooms. 13600; cash 
1600. 

TTAULTAIN St., 6 rooms, 18300; cash 1650. 
JOHNSON St., 8 rooms, 116,000; cash 14000. 



CROFT k ASHBY 

Real Estate. Timber, Mines and Coal Lands. 

Phono I»»9- Box 660. 

Ill Pembetton Bldg.. Victoria, B. C 

Vancouver Office. Wlnoh Bldg. 

Members Victoria Heal Estate Exchange. 

TkORT HARDY — Destined to be the north- 
X ern terminua ol Vancouver Ialand rail- 
wavs Port Hardy, the original towns te on 
H_rd'y Bay. Lota, from 1116 up. Xeems, 
116 cash and 1 16 par month. 

NEAR Port Hardy— 5 acre blocks, 140 por 
acra; 11 per acre cash and 11 per acre 
■per month. r 

WATERFRONT — Chemalnus, 14 acres on 
trunk road, 11600; cash 11000, balance 
terms. 

WATERFRONT — Chemalnus, 100 acres, 
112,000; 1300 cash, ba lance terms. 

CIOMOX — 40 acres, good soil, easily 
J cleared, near railway. 11600; 1800 cash, 
balance 1 and 2 years at 7 per cent. A 
splendid buy. 

SOOKE — 160 acres, noar aea and Sooke 
Harbor; 128 per acre. 

ISLAND— 68 acrea, 10 acres cleared, chiefly 
good land, In sheltered w aters; }4750. 

ISLANDS — A number from 11000 to 
120,000. situated near Victoria and Al- 
bernl. 



REA, BROWN & C0PEMAN 



118 Pemberton Bldg. 



Phone 1611. 



QUADRA st., 2 acres with creek through 
one corner; the cheapest piece on tho 
market. Price only 12626; ft cash. 

QUADRA st.. 4 acres close to above; very 
choice residential property; 16000, 1-3 



omh. 



FORT at., corner of Bla.nchard, 60x112ft., 
1UD.0O0; 1-8 i 



cash. 

VfcNEIL and Monterey. In Oak Bay. 2 
AL lots,' 86xll0fl.. price 13160; 1-8 cash. 

cleared and 
>ga, windmill 
and fences; price 1225 per acre. 



COMOX farm — 100 acres, all 
*•..,, if land, house. I.ulldlnj 



EDWIN FRAMPT0N 

REALTY 

Mcijreg or Ulk., Cor. View and Broad 

House Phone XX2118. Phone 928. 



oo : cash 



inspection; 1 H. S.« 
engine; 1 H: 8. & Q. 
gl ne ; 1 Iroa huak »w 
top saw rig;- $'.■ 
matcher; 1 log-: 
tmig Iriil f H ■_ 




UA.. Cowloh-a St_UQ-, », g, 

-t Q-FOOT launch, with small en«li»S;^ll__ 
XO condition and running _ order; -__T 

"oathouse, be- 



K 

R 



OOM and board, 1031 Pandora st. 



ROOM and board for two young men, 
J antes Bay. Box 2085, Colonist. 



R 



OOM and board; every convenience. 

Mary st. ; phone L1354^ 



.11 



ROOMS— Single and double, with or with- 
out board; bath and phono- 



imp. 



UL UW_n, v_*.. _ _— , ". 

433 Superior St., Victoria. 



on car 



OOM and board, private family. 33 Yale 
t.. Oak Bay. 



R 



OOM and board, 10S Pandora st. 



ROOM and board for four young m-n; 
comfortable home, reasonable charges, 
near carllne. 335 Niagara Bt 



ROOM and board suitable for two or three 
friends. Phone L1669. 161 Wellington 
av., Fairfield. 



ROOM and board. 1914 Maple St., near 
hospital. 

ROOM and board for three young men. 
7 Alm a place; phone L914. 

ABLE board and lodging; 16.00 per week. 
1012 Richardson at^ 

TO rent — Nicely furnished single and dou- 
ble rooms and board, woman cook; 10 
minutes from post office. 1024 Packlngton 

B„; phone R3938^ 

YTTWERLY — Rooms, 1409 Douglas street", 
\\ modern and well furnished, all 



NEARLY, one ton of timothy and clover 
hay for g ale cheap. Phone M1282. 
"VTIPPON pressor — Ladies' or gentlemen's 
JN suits cleaned and pressed. 76c; 'only 
pressed, 60c. Laundry Telephone Mil. 
1436. comer Camosun and Rudlln sts., \ lc- 

torl a, B. C. " 

"VTEW surgical Instruments, dressings and 
JN medicines cheap, all or separately. 
1125 Empress, p hone 4198. r 

NEWCOMERS' Social Club. Ladles and 
gentlemen who would like to form 
such a club are roquested to write Box 192., 
Colonist. ________—————-— 

NOTICE to real estate agents— House and 
lot Orchard Vale subdivision Is sold. 
A. W. Smith. 

ONE splendid pair of assay scales, also 
one pair of bullion scales. Apply to 
Shortt, Hill &. Duncan, corner View and 
Broad sis. __________———-— 

PIANO raffle— Tho player piano, property 
of the officers' mess H.M.C.S. "Rain- 
bow," will be drawn for on Monday, Nov. 
11. In Maynard'a auction room at 4 o clock 
In the afternoon. We hope all ticket hold- 
ers will be present. There are stilt a few 
more tickets for sale at Harmony Hall 
piano warerooms, 7 35 Fort st. 

PIANO lessons to beginners. Terms 18 
per month. Spring Ridge and Cook 
distri ct. Address Box 2111, Colonist. 

RESPONSIBLE married couple wants to 
take care of house In exchange for 
rent (two rooms) or manage some prop- 
erty. Bo_ 15 53. Colonist. | 

SKATES — Hollow ground by Lewis St. 
Machine Works. Leave them at the 
City office, 516 Bastion square. W. G. 
Wlnterburn. . 



r^ IVE me 11 per share for 400 British Can- 
VX adlan Home Builder* ehares. on terms. 
Box . 1695, Colonist. 

HORSES for sale— Have on hand 10 bead 
of heavy horses, also one saddle horse. 
Can be seen at our sale ba rn. "f ne J 
Cook and Pembroke ■' 
Derry. prop*. P."; 
R2576 and Y208. 




fORSES. 20 _head Jo ^^j-iS ' _.*«?' 1 



it 



fide rooms; bath adjoining 
steam heat. Phone 3290 



every 



out- 
room; 



Of\ H. P. McLaughlin Bulck. In fine order, 
/A) good snap for four days, only 1350. 
Dondrldge's garage. Oak Bay av. 

O.K-FOOT cruiser, 10 h.p., heavy duty Un- 
OO Ion engine; practically new; absol- 
utely the best value In the boat Una in 
"he harbor; going cheap. Causeway Boat- 

house, below P.O. _______--— 

r7Kf\ SHARES In British Home BullderB, 
( OU Ltd.. for sale at 11 per share, and 
a dividend of 10 per cent said to be com- 
ing. Box 1596. Colonist. 

<2»_„n ON terms of 1300 cash, 110 
3POOU monthly, for new 1900 Pianola 
piano and. 1100 worth of music. Latest 
model, perfect condition, sweet tone, plays 
both 66 and 88-note music Inspection ln- 
vlted; owner leaving city. Inquire 146 

Moss at. . ' ■ - ' 

flFToTvPTbuys 9-roomed. fully-furnished 
JS1--UU house, all conveniences; garage, 
basement, furnaco; one lot off Cook St.. on 
McClure. Phonee 3090 or 1679^ ■ 



:,S.teamt 9r ^ *^»^ 

Apply James G. 
■le, Saanlch rd., 



^REL Lan^^oom, 
TV/TOSS st„ 7 rooms, 16000; c 

MICHIGAN -gt. 7 roome, 'lio.lM^Wi^j 
'IWMJi#' .'______?___•* "ftr "' 







". 



MILK COWS 
French, 
Victoria. B. C. 



o 



NE 8-month pure bred bull torrler for 
sale, 126. Apply Box 2074, Colonist. 



RHODE Island Red hens, pullets and spring 
'..ckena and broilers, also hens of 
mixed breed; removal oause of sale. 14S 

South Tu rner st. 

VTTANTED— A young bull, any breed. A. 
VV McLean, Royal Oak. 



w - ,■ . ■ «?■■_— ^^— — — — — ;,. ri .; ywv, 1 ~r _ 

Q_CAB.^S»Mf^flM|EP_. 

: , ,.,,»„■. , >si>##w»y#i_a''i___^ 

float, •;•-•,, V' v :; i .\ ;. ' ,;;;•. 

i ) i ' i i . li "' H. I 1 ' '•' '•'* 4 . ____'^1 

7_fBAX>OW »UCt; Greenhout»-.:. ga j ii tt ^ - 
1V1 13836; cas h 1885. 

PEMBROKE st,, 6 rooms, 16000; "cash 
11500. 

' 

PEMBROKE at. and DeVby, y rooms. 
14200; cash 11000. 

nUADRA St., 7 rooms, 17000; cash 12000. 



YTJ'ATERFRONT— Salt Spring Island; 1000 
V V acres, par t cultiva ted. 

W'ATERFRONT — Pender Island, 350 acres, 
part excellent land, suitable for sub- 
division. ■■ , 

WATERFRONT — Shawnlgan Lake, 10 
acres with new 1800 house; 13600; on 
road and near hotel; no rajek .; part c. 
V\7ATERFRONT— Portage 'Inlet, 3.79 acres, 
VV 234 ft. frontage. 18600; 



CJAANICH — 100 acres near ~! 
(O cross road, 18 per acre only 

"tTOLLAND ave. — 5 acres and ho 
XX ■* acres bottom land, balance 
etcT, cow, chickens, etc., |T60ft;. : *» 
balance on ter ms^ 

WATERFRONT — Saanich, 240 ! acres on 
main road. . tramline and ^»»W*y, _»»■ 
acre, cultivated, balan<^t.:)*!SPpp; : ;gPWg»6>. 
eultable for-«ub dlvldlng. 




CITY BTJ1LDING SITES 
(jg-i-ifM — lima at., Gorge rd. ; quarter 
«5>_._i-)U cash and Iwms. 

•ttl "1 ^Tl — Walnut st., Pernwood; cash 
tjpj LtJLf. J360 and terms. 

ijpx I 0\J Foul Bay oar close to; third 
cash and terms. 

<j_Q«YrtA — Corner In Fairfield, close car 
W— — UU (Cambridge Bt.); third cash 
and terms. !•,','■ 



soo. «cr_ - r jft WlB, *m 



O ral'rronTy U^g^BSj^^ 

investment. r ___— 

\-X7ATERFRONT-^3ampbell River; eplen- 

Y> did llshing; 'good-lanil; :!P»y^iWPit.1WPy 



U>-| fJAfi— Lot « 6x l'*. Arnold St.; third 
ilP-1-UUU cash; usual terms. 

nun — f\ — Lota close to n,ew Burnsido oar 
line; cash 1100 and terms. 

g)^' .i.CRBS. close to both railways, 
-W I Saanlchton; 1460 per acre. 

ACRES, with houae. Cobble Hill: 160 

per acre. ; ,,_ ., ; ,,...-... 

,i . 1 i i l i i f i i ■ __. 

COX & SAUNDERS i 

Real Estate and Insurance 



tlfANTED— Saddle horse up to weight, 
* » good looker and quiet, for lady. Brad- 
ley Dyne, Duncan, B. C. 

Y"XTANTED— Milch goaf, stale price and 
VV particular s.. P. O. Box 1056. Victoria. 

TEACHERS WANTED 



RICHMOND av„ 6 rooms, 14 200; cash 
11000. 

TJUPERT St., 4 rooms, }360O; cash 11000. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



A FIRST-CLASS family hotel for sale, 
consisting of 18 rooms, newly furnished 
with good lease; a good paying proposlt on, 
11600 will handle this. Mcttlet-ReehUng 
Co., 22 Gree n block. . 

A THOROUGHLY reliable, well con- 
nected business man fan purchase a 
third share In a prosperous business concern 
In Victoria; 112.000 required and services; 
salary 1150 'monthly, and* Quarter^ dividend. 
Apply by letter to Colonist Box B. ■ l . W- 



A COMPETENT Latin toucher who will 

give three or more lessons weekly. Ap- 

>x 1832. Colonist. . 

LOST AND FOUND 



WANTED — ROOM AND BOARD 



(_ ENTLEMAN desires comfortable room 
J and board In private family within 15 
minutes' walk of Government st.; please 
state terms. Box 2048, Colonist. 



WANTED — Two comfortable furnished 
rooms for lady and gentleman with 
option o f board. P. O. Box 765. . 

WANTED — Room and board for two 
young ladles In refined home, within 
reasonable distance. Apply 1335 Grant St. 



YOUNG man wants room and board with 
English family, close to North Ward 
I , i rk or Oak Bay. Box 2131, Colonist. 

YOUNG man desires room and board with 
pr lvnt" family, Box 1739. O'lonlst. 

■\7"OI'NG man wants comfortable room and 
L full hoard with private family: Fair- 
field or close In; phone required; permanent 
If suitable. Bo x IS75, Colonist. 

TO RENT 



SPIRELLA corsets. Orders promptly 
filled by Miss Fleming. 707V* Yates st.. 

room 13 , phone L3100. 

ECRETS of Beauty, Health and Long 
Life, by Prof. Lanyard, pronounced tho 
most remarkable book of the present cen- 
tury Price 60 cents; descriptive circular 
sent upon request. Address Standard Pub- 
"".hlng CO..-P. O. Box 2199. North Vancou- 

v er, B. C. — 

_UNGING and elocution taught by experl- 
to enced London teacher; terms 60 cents 

an h our. Box 1692, Colonist. 

■vriCTORIA Showcase Co.— Silent salesmen. 
V 110 per foot up; special designs pre- 
pared bars, banks, offices, stores. Phone 
2 836. 

WANTED— To meet lady or gentleman 
who would finance a chicken ranch. 
Box 1985, Colonist. 



4, FINE 3-roomed apartment and bath, 
_"_. very central, business or living, rent 
»50 month unfurnished. Apply room 2. 
1011 Government st. 

A YOUNG couple can have two unfur- 
nished rooms with large open fire- 
place, use of bath and kitchen; short dis- 
tance from car, close to sea. Shoal Bay; 
English couple preferred; h.msc too hirRe 
for owners. Apply Patrick Realty Co.. 615 

Port St., phono 2556. 

/tORNEK to lease — Tho northwest cornet 
KJ of Fort and Blanchard sts.; a fine Bite 
for storec or theatre. Apply P. R. Brown, 
1112 Bro ad at. 

I,"M_iVT for vent and furniture for sale In 
: centrally located, modern apartmenl 
hu_e; owner leaving town. Box 1927, Col- 
on! 



w 



T ANTED — PlayerB for orchearfa now 
' being formed. A. H. Mann, 1115 



__ 



Meats St., phone 1658. | 

TOUNG man wishes evening tuition In 

shorthand. Write 1739 First st. 

AM OAA buys 9-roomed. fully-furnished 
ffilZUU nouse. all conveniences; garage 
Moment, furnao,; one tot off Cook St., on 

M f-lure. Ph ones 3090 or 1679. 

JTOR BAL ->-MI8CKLI-_NEOCg 
~"T ^h p. McLaughlln-BuIck. 4-paasen- 
A- iter glass shield, magneto, top. etc.. 
£ood condUlon. Price 1875 cash. Address 

Mox 210-4. lolonist. - . .. 

' . , , i.e. packing— Regulation pack guar- 
A-anteed; 9 cents per box. Address 
Curtis, Victoria P. O. - 



UATS, canoes, launches, for sale. Cause- 
way Boathou ae, below P.O. 

I, V K^M ITU shop and tools for sale; 
lease of tour years. F. Webster, Royal 



^tOR rent — A new shack 12x20, would suit 
V two bachelors; cook stove, etc., partly 
rirnlsrted, 112 a month, Box ,907, Colonist. 

pOR rent, unfurnished 3-room flat, elec- 
• trie light and baths. 1258% Pembroke 
at. W. J. Davla. 



FOR rent— Office on ground floor, Trounce 
alley. Central bldg. Apply Brown 
Bros., 818 View at. 



B 
B 

Oak . 

TTllEAP at 1550-^Just the car for hard, 
\J continuous work, Mr. Real Estate 
Man- In best running order. Hupmoblle, 20 
horsepower runabout; fully equipped; extra 
-Ires- for demonstration, phonoJU04_ 



li 



rARGE room suitable for plumber or stor- 
- ago. 1086 Hillside av. 



OFFICES for rent — Ground floor offices 
on Fort st. Apply Herman House Co.. 
room B, Sayward blk.; phone 2264. 



STORE for rent — Will be vacant Dec. 20. 
Two good windows, largo basement, 
back and front entrance, high ceiling; suit- 
able for balcony; near city ball. Leaae for 
one year; rent very moderate. Apply Box 
1827. Colonist. ' 



iJINOLB room. In town; ft per month. 



.OH sale— An Edison moving picture 
machine equipped either for electricity 
or gas, screen and gas making plant; also 
a first-class magician's outfit, ready for 
operation upon any stage or P}*""*™! ro " 8t 
sell at a bargain. Address Box 2122, Col- 
onist. _________-—————— 

171 OR sale — One 7-passenger automobile, 
■ 40 h.p., good condition; cost 16400; only 
12000; will give reasons for selling. Apply 
I'. O. Box 898^ 

I7K) pr^Te^T win 7 h.p. Flying Merkel 
' motorcycle, 1276 cash. Mr. Markey, 
Campbell bldg., corner Douglas and Fort 
streets. -■ 

Ir^OR sale — Nearly new cabinet grand 
1 piano, cost 1600, will sell for 1275. Box 
2089. Colonist. 



A SPLENDID opportunity to get > «»uu- 
ern up-to-date 25-room rooming house 
with onlv 11000 down. Mettler-Reehling 
c"i ^ room 22! Green blk., opposite Tho Col- 
onlst. ' 

BEST little rooming house to soil. W> 
Yates St., very little money will handle 
this; must be sold at once; also a ."-room 
modern house with a long lease cheap 
renW Wll take part payment In real estate. 
Mettler-Reehling Co., room 22. Green blk.. 
Vict oria, B. C. 

17,OR sale, good reliable nab. business; good 
? reasons for selling. Apply to R. 
Spousei Lamp-on at., near Railway Crossing, 
Victoria West. ______-__— 

FOR sale by owner, a modern hotel, best 
location in Victoria, netting 11000 per 
mo nth. P. O. Sox 1454. ' 

I7IOR sale— Share in good contractor's busi- 
1 nes - This business is a thoroughly 
live onrt and the contracts running are In 
good shape. This Is a first class opporttm- 
ltv to _et In upon first class woik. Every- 
thing open and above board For further 
particulars apply by sealed letter to Box 
2049, Colo nist, 

FOR sale— Gents' clothing and furnishing 
business in live location; etock, etc. 
about 1 3000. Apply P. O- drawer 57.. _ 

IT^OR sale — A restaurant, with cheapest 
' price; have lease, and everything com- 
plete; best location on Johnson st; half 
cash, balance easy terms. Apply to 525 
Johnson st. , 

FIRST class small boarding house filled 
with permanent men boarders, serving 
breakfast and dinner only, and clearing 
1100 per month. Table hoarders, as well, 
could be had If desired. Flno. all modern 
home, furnished complete in every detail; 
gas range telephone, etc. House compara- 
tively new. furnace, etc.. with 1 !«, year lease, 
still In force and «t exceptionally low 
rental- location moat desirable, being near 
Beacon Hill park and on carllne; walking 
distance to post offtee Sale is a snap tor 
11.00: must be all cash, present owner 
going east. Telephone Mr. I'lingl", R3960, 
104) For t Bt. ' ' 

Ij^OR lady or two ladles — A good paying 
. business, easily managed and tJUlek 
turnover; takes very Utile to handle. Apply 
for. Interview. M ux 1826. Colonis t. 

L~ ARGF.lt Profits -Adopt a monthM 
system of circular letters don. t_i 

Muitiarnur, Coannoi be detected from t ,,- 
wilting) Prices low, We have complete 
rmlllnK lists. Order, executed on the Bhort- 

ert n.rteeT Apply New. on advertising 

Agency, suite 403 Times b'.dg . 

ICENRED road house, close to Victoria, 

120 acres of land, i« furnished rooms; 

■rood fishing; $2n.noo; terms arranged, "ver- 

.ea. investment Agency. 208 1'e.n l.er.on blk. 

SALOON fully equipped, doing good busl- 
ncss; a Shap al 12600. Call or address 

Alamo Bar. Port Angele s, W ash. 

ANTED — A partner In established 
business; must be able to handle of- 
fice or be good mechanic; guarantee 11 50 a 
month- 11000 cash will handle; man needed 
more than the money. Box 1948, Colonist. 



ITIOUND — Some time ago, a handbag con- 
. talnlng money and concert ticketa. 
owner can have same by proving property. 

Apply Co lonlat office. ■ 

ljSoUND — A strayed dachshund. Enquire 
-L 1 at tho Island meat market, Douglas 
an d Johnson. , 

IriOUND — White and tan spaniel; It not 
' claimed in three days from this date, 
will be sold to defray expenses. Apply Box 
1938. CoIo niBt. ■. 

LOST — White and black English Setter, 
answers name of Major, 4 M, years. 
Finder kindly phone 2627. 



^HAKESPEAJtE St., 5 rooms, 13500; cash 



sea. 

YX7ATERFRONT— -Near Duncan Bay, IV 

VV acres at ' 1210 per ■ acre. 



gEAVIEW and Graham; corner, 11850. 

m; ■ 11 1» ; . m n'. 

VICTORIA av, and Hudson, MtW4t|m|' 



S 



AWMILLS — Two mills on sea front. 



1750. 



SHAKESPEARE St., 6 rooms, 13500; cash 
1750. 



SHAKESPEARE St.. 8 rooms, 15000; cash 
11000. 

HAKESTEARE St., 1 rooms, 12000; cash 



SHAKES! 
1360. 



^ 



7ILLOWS rd., 4 rooms, 12760; cash 1700 



} 



TTOTEDS — Four on .Vancouver Island. 

TTITII.D lands— We have a number of large 

VV blocks. ^^___ 

TT7E8T of Port Hardy— 7600 acres at 18 

VV per acre. , 

1MBER lands^-Over 6,000,000,000 feet. 



T 

1_»ULP mill proposition with 10,000 h.p. 
. water Dower. 



H, ARTHUR & CO.OTD, 



'9S12 »uoq_ 



•j(iq uoiJequiaj ESI. 



fTWENT et., one lot from Forfijll* 
J- 60x140, 11800. '■&&* 

BEECHWOOD av., two large lots, neat- 
Hollywood Crescent, 12100 each. 

SEVERAL lots in. Parkdale subdivision 
off Carey road, from 1600 each. 

FORT St., 60x112, frontage on Mears st., 
1750 per front foot. 

WE have a nice house, to rent on Duns- 
mulr st. at 136 per month. If' you 
wish to secure It, act quickly. 



TOWN & COUNTRY REALTY 

AND AUCTIONEERS 
124 2 Government st. . Telephone 3253. 



"YTICTOR St., 4 rooms, 13650; cash 1850. 
"YTICTOR St,, 6 rooms, 14500; cash 1760. 



WESTERN LANDS, LTD, 

Branch Office: 

North Douglaa St., corner Saanlch Road 

Phone R2846 



LOST — Will the firm who In mistake re- 
ceived a parcel of books addressed to 
Mr Hllham please phone the Victoria Book 
_ Stationery Co., Ltd.. and they will lend 

for same, 

OST — Liver and white curly spaniel pup, 

7 months old. Finder communicate 

with \V. It. Smith. Maywood P.O. Reward. 

LOST — Pointer dog, one year old. evenly 
marked head; very thin; suitable re- 
ward. F. O. White, 112i Summit av., phone 
L746'. . 

LOST — On Monday, a pair of spectacles In 
case between Quadra and Richardson 
Bts. Plea se return to 1126 Richardson St. 

LOST— Bottom of auto side. Finder 
please retu rn to 1309 Douglas. 
OST— Flat key. white string attached. 
Pleaae return to 209 Pemberton blk. 

LOST— Lady's Minstrel bicycle, almost 
new. Brooks saddle. 59 Moas St., phone 
10-32. , 

LOST Near customs house, long leather 
bill-book, tan color, containing 135 In 
five and ten dollar bills. Return to 628 

Harbing er nvc. Libera l reward. 

OST— Hy dr oplane, gray color. Finder 
please return to Empress boathouae 

,-elvo reward^ . 

\\TVTCH and fob loat on Government Bt. 
\> near the 15c store. Reward given. 

647 Hil lside ay. 

AGENTS WANTED 



HAMPTON' rd. — Close to Burnslde. big lot, 
60x170; pr ice 11000. on terms. 

CREASE ave;, Parkdale — One good, high 
lot left at 1600; llSOcash takes lt- 

Sl.MS av., Parkdale — One good, hign lot with 
sidewalk already In; size 50x112; price 
1750; terms, 125 cash, 115 p er montb- 

AGOOD, new 2-roomed house on corner 
lot In highest part of Parkdale; small 
cash payment and balance monthly; cheap- 
est, buy In this district at 1 1200. 

IRMA st.— Just off Burnslde car line, three 
lots, 60x140; price, op easy terms, eaoh 
}1150. 

HARRIET rd. — Three more fine building 
lots, 60x160; price, on eaay terms, each 
11250. __^ 

HARRIET rd. — 5-room cottage on lot 62x 
120; this sure Is a snap at 12500; 1500 
cash and balance monthly. 



FARM LANDS DEPARTMENT 

A SPLENDID investment, 280 acres In 
MttchDsIn district, fine farm land, per- 
fectly level, all black soil, beautifully situ- 
ated, close .to .waterfront and to the Cana- 
dian Northern Railway. There are one 
houndred and eighty acres under a high 
state of cultivation, together with a new 10- 
roomod house, worth 16000; 600 npple. trees, 
90 sheep, 9 cows. 3 horses, turkeys, pigs, 
chickens, etc. Two acres of potatoes; with 
all the necessary implements. Price 13.5 
per acre. Good t erms can b e arranged. 

A FINK poultry ranch— 17% acres, four 
acres cultivated, new 7-roomed house, 
hot and co'd water; cottage for hired man. 
10 poultry houses and all necessary build- 
ings; bringing In about 1300 per month; 
prlco 18600; term s arranged. 

A FINE dairy farm — 100 acr»s of fine farm 
- land, -60 acres cleared; one mile from 
Hlllbank station; 11-roomed house with 
cement basement; stabling for 25 cows; 1-00 
yards frontage on main road, 1100 yards 
creek frontage; price 130,000; terms ar- 
ranged. 



17TRONT St.. Foul Bay — Two lots, close to 
. sea; price 1950 each; also 6-roomed 
bungalow, not completed, 12000; these arc 
real snaps, for a few days only. 

IF you want a house or ranch or cheap 
lots apply to the Town & Country Realty, 
we have them. '^ 

SIIDNEY waterfront. Furnished bungalow, 
including motor launch; size of lot, 
nail acre; a beautiful home; price only 
14500; cash 12500, balance 1. 2. 3 vears. 

PACHENA Valley — 80 acres good land. 
no rock, 40 acres on lako; 126 per acre, 
1945 first payment, balance 115 per month 
at 6 per cent. 

COMOX — Stock ranch, 300 acres, no rock, 

no stumps, 15 acres lake on property, 

60 acres in hay, wire fenced; 1110 per acre, 
third cash, balance 5 years. 



R. 6, MELLIN 

Sooke Real Estate Offlca. 



ONE reliable man in every town to take 
orders for best custom-made clothes In 
Canada, Highest commlsaloa. Rex Tailoring 
Li, . Limited. Toronto. Oat 

tfgO DAT salary and up, also commission, 
»f!_- for local representatives (either aex) ; 

.. , on I maker; experience unneceKsaj-y; 

sanii . send postage, twenty cents. 

Ltd.. publishers, Toronto, Ca nada. 



PERSONAL 



19 anyone knowa the whereabouts of W. 
A. Oxnam, please communicate with A. 
1 1 Macdonald, st>0 Cormorant st. 



729 Courtney. 



rnWO room cabin neathly furnished. 
L Hillside av. 



627 



T 



lO let — Three unfurnished .rooms. 
Prior st. 



2568 



C% NICE front rooms and hall, bath. 17,17 
*J Denman st. 



MlKCFI.LANEOrB 



FOR ««le — 30-ft. shop counter, gramo- 
phone and records; very cheap. 1604 

Douglaa : ___ 

OR sale-— Loam and manure. Apply 1775 
Fourth »t. or phone 168. 



F 



MERCHANTS' TRUST AND 
TRADING CO,, LTD, 



307 Pemberton Block 



Phone 1766 



w 

Oak. 

8 



ANTED — Shoeing and general smith M 
partner. Apply F. Webster, ROyaJ 



-ROOM furnished boarding house for sale 
cheap; all full; good location. Call 



R40S3 



WANTED— MISCELLANEOUS 



F 



OR sale^ — .22 Winchester rifle In good 
condition. Apply Box 4069. 



A SCHOOL of ehr.rt.hand In charge of ex- 
perienced court reporter. Evening 
class Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 
Room 620. Hl bben-Bone blk. 

A BUG bargain — Double corner In Rich- 
mond Park, 111 ft. frontage to lane; 
prloe UbOs. on terme. H. A. Bell. 731 Vi 
Fo rt et.: phone 1741. 

NTONB tried the Old Country Tea 
Roome. Hlbben block? They are ex- 
cellent — Fro m one who has been there. 

BAtMAGMD promptly naodled at current 
rata* by the Victoria Transfer Co.. 
p beae lit. O ffloe open night and gay. 

BOOK-CniPINa thoroughly taught by ac- 
countant; term* Tory reasonable. P. O. 
Bom l«7Q. t 

■OUILDINOT We are the people you 
JJ» should MM. Teoman -> Pllklngton. Mc» 
CalUUB Mac*, phone MM. 



I7<OR sale at once — Elegant furniture of 
: 6 rooms, leathered davenport, Monarch 
range, dining set with buffet and 6 leather 
seated chaira, rugs, linoleum, bedding; 
everything go_s; all or separately. 1046 
Fort st. ^ 

FOR sale — Cameron Lumber Co. mill 
wood and. slab, II for double load and 
11.60 for single load. Orders promptly 
filled. Phone »«4. 



1[U>R sale, two new heaters, burn coal or 
1 wood. Telephone R 4140. 

FOR eale — A fawn box cloth motor coat, 
fleece lined, nearly new, % length; a 
bargain. 650 Da llae road. 

FOR eale — 1» tons of oat hay. Fred 
Wooster. Flnnerir ranch, Flnnetry rd., 
Cadboro Bay. »_________. 

FOR sale cheap, cook stove, "almost new. 
Enquire 111* Rock Bay. 



corner of 



Ellloe. 



_V>R sale — One 

JC A 



Apply 



—One Vfd 
112S BuVd 



lounge, nearly new. 
dette av. 



FOR aale — Cadillac car in ftref-clase con- 
dition. Stanford. Ml* Langley et. 



BOATS wanted — If you have a canoe, row- 
boat, launch, or yacht for sale, Hit 
them with us; we oah Mil them tor you. 
Causeway Boothouso, below 1' (>., Gel, 2370, 
I'.U, Box 919. 

SCRAP brass, copper, zinc, lead, cast iron, 
sacks and al! klnUs of bottles and rub- 
ber; highest cash prices paid. Victoria Junk 
Agency, 162 Btoro st. : phone 136 

SECOND hand scales and showcase. 141 
Eberts St.. phone 414 1. 

ANTED — A* good twin cylinder motor- 
cycle for rash; must be nearly new and 
a snap. App ly Box 1759, Colonlat. 

ANTED — Good second hand piano; any 
ki nd. Box 2077, Colonist. 

WANTED— Light wagon and strap har- 
neee; must be cheap. Apply 22 Victor 
•t., between Edmonton and Haultain eta., 
Fer nwood, ' 

WANTED TO BORROW 

FROM 11000 t'o 112,000 required on security 
of property In Saanlch worth three 
tlm«w the amount borrowed; good Interest. 
Box 2081, Colonist. 



VICTORIA nnd McNeil, corner, 60-112, 
116D0; 1-3 caah. 

SABA TOG A and Monterey, double corner. 
IiCslIIC, 14200; 1-3 cash. 

gtT, Patrick and Cookman, corner. 48x130, 
►O 11850; 1-3 caah^ 



SOOKE harbor — Well-built furnished bun- 
galow on lot with 120 ft waterfrontage, 
Peterboro canoe included; good shooting 
and fishing; Close to main road and hotel. 
12000. 

SBAFRONTAGE lots irom one acre up, 
beautiful view and good beach, ,frjm 
}760 up. 

BUILDING lots from a Quarter to a half 
acre, overlooking the harbor and with 
access to the water; close to store-and post 
offloe, 1250 to 1600; . 

CJEAFRONT acreage — 123 acre* with three- 
fo quarter mile of aeafrontege, conveni- 
ently situated, 140 per acre. 

"1 AO ACRES — Quarter of a mile of sea- 
X\JO front, good creek, five acres in 
small fruits. houses an* ohlcken runs; 
beautifully situated; 150 per acre. 



KENNINGT0N & G0RE- 
LANGT0N 

Real ^stato and Insurance, Cowlchan nnd 
Co bble H ill 

A f\ ACRES, close to station, 6 acres 
_tU cleared, some slashed, good water, 
cedar And fir, price 14.500; terms. 

OCT ACRES, 1 mile from atatlon, very 
-vO light clearing, on good road, price 
1100 per acre. ' 

QrTi/ ACRES, nearly all cleared, with 10- 
Ol/ 3 roomed bouse, barns, etc., un- 
limited water, pri ce 113.000; terms. 

C^l OOD 6-roomod cottage on Cowlchan 
T Bay, well furnished, to let from 
November 1. 



PENDER -Island — 366 acres. lVt miles 
waterfront. 14000 worth saw togs. In- 
cluding coal right; 170 per acre. 



LLOYD & HULKE 

Real Estate Agents 
Crofton 



CLEGG, BOTTERILL & GAUNT 



709 Fort Street 



Phone 1781 



J, Y, MARGIS0N 

Books and Otter Point Real Estate Office 
Sooke, B. C. 



DUNSMUIR st. — A fine, level lot, 12300 for 
oulck eale; thla without doubt is the 



rrilNLAYSON St.— Two lots for }1600 and 



TTfJATBR-TROUOH Estate— A few _»-*ora 



lots left wbioh nobody can afford to 



w* 



NTKD at once. 12000 on ftret mort- 



gage at I per cent. P. O. Box Mil* 
Victoria, B. 0. 



fltll ANSIT and Cookman, corner, 60x120, 
JL 11960; 1-3 Ciisn. 

/'ircNTUAL av., 60x133. 11660; 1-1 caeh. 

QTJAMICHAN and Metchosln, oorner, 
{1750; 1-3 cash, 

UNION Bay; several good acreage propo- 
sitions. 

ISLAND rd., corner, 44x120, 11875; 1600 
cash. 

KING George Terrace, Shoal Bay, H acre 
cleared and free from rock, command- 
ing fine vlnw of sea, 14000; 1-3 cash. 

M<vcqi:inna rd., Foul Bay waterfront, 
46x188, 12000; 1-3 sash. 

S00KE REALTY OFFICE 

W. Miller Hlgga 

m ACRES In Sooke, 10 to It under cul- 
tivation. 10 to 40 partly cleared, 
timber and soil good, all clearings fenced, 
6- roomed house, new; excellent water, hi 
mile frontage on main road; close to store, 
post office, etc.; stock and Implements go 
with the property; very good bam and out- 

oulldlnga. 

I -. 1 1 ' 

5ACRE8 with Itt chain, of waterfront on 
Sooke harbor; alder bottom land. 

NINE and five-eights acree. one acre 
cleared, with good 7-roomed houee. 
good water and J« foot of waterfront on 
Sooke harbor. £ beautiful pleee et prop- 
erty. 



miss. 

TEN acree, good land. Sooke river; barna, 
stables, et c. Price 16.0 00. 

FIVE ACRES, Books Harbor frontage, 
12,300. 

T7AORTT acree. Sooke Harbor frontage 
JC (cleared). 11C.000; house, barns, or- 
chard, etc. 

-I rtO ACRES, seaf ront, 110,000. 

FIVE acres, seafront, house and shack; 
furniture, chickens, etc., 12.100. 



cheapest lot on' the street; also three others 
near by *f 125 00 each, 

NLAYSON St.— Two 

a d.nrter cash takes them. 

LAMPSON St.— Through to Vicwficld, two 
lots, 50x200: price 14200. 

T" TALL St. — 64x120, 11350, usual terms, 
T>ARADISE st.-r60xI20, 13000, on terms. 

STANLET st.-- -Auolhor moneymaker at 
12300, on terms. 

_->AVE St.— Lot 45x132 with 2-roomod 
\J shack; sna p at 11000. 

WEST Bay waterfront Is going strong; wo 
have 200 feet which can be sold en bloc 
or otherwise. 



OROFTON town lots — These will make a 
spfendld Investment; buy before tho 
trains commence to run; price 1100 and up- 
wards. ^^^ 

A COUNTRY residence, consisting of 10 
acres rnoro or less, nearly all cleared or 
slashed, with 6 V. chains of sea frontage; 
well built house, with water laid on; prlco 
16.600; 1-3 cash, balance easy. 



D, MclNTOSH 



Real Bstate and Financial Agent. 

Mahon Bldg., Government et.. Victoria. B.C. 

Telephone 1749. 



TWO choloo lota oloee to carllne, Hamil- 
ton road and Ryan etreet. 60x120 eaoh. 
only 12100 for both. 

A GOOD new six-roomed houee, close to 
Burnslde carllne, only 14760. 
Terme on above properilea 



LANGLEY & CO, 

Real Estate, Financial ft Insurance Agents. 

A. R. Langley, Manager. 

Room 312, Central Building. Phone 8064, 

P. O. Box 810. 

CRA.IGDARROCH — 4 lots In this Ohoic. 
subdivision; 112.80-1- 

TJROOK st. — Lot 50x110; 11800. 

OAK Bay — 8 modern, new, 9-roomed 
houses on lota 76x140; 19000-19500, 

OAK Bay 8 .lots, 70x160, near beach. 
12850. 

TTU/ORENCE St.— Lot 60x122; 11850. 

TTIOUL Bay— 120x180, on water front; 
Jb 116,600. 

QUPTBRIOR St. — 4-roomcd house, 60x140; 
E> 16600. 



ALLEN 5. SON 

Over Northern Crown Bank. Phone 1660. 
^COTT St., 50x110, near King's rd., 17.000. 

HOLLYWOOD snap— Wlldwood av., next 
to carllne, 180x126, 18000. 

MTJSGRAVB st. and Burdlck ave. — Double 
corner, 90 x142, level an d grassy, 11000. 

IpOUL Bay, Crescent rd., 61x110, with two 
road frontages, grassy lot, magnificent 
view, 114 75. 

SHELKOUHNR St., just off Bay at., a few 
large lots; oak trees and lying fine 
and high, 11050 each. 

OLIVER st. next to Saratoga, beautifully 
finished 7-roomed new house, lot 5Qxllo, 
cement basement and furna ce, only 16660. 

F AIRFIELD snap — Hamley St., 4-roomed 
house, Just completing, 12900. 

MOSS st., oorner May St., «-roomed mod- 
ern house, 16300. 

ALL the above we can recommend as 
good buylngi easy terms can be ar- 
ranged on all. 



JACOBS & HYMERS 

fjucceaeors to the Brain Realty Co. 
ltd Government St. Pbona Is*. < 

PANDORA 0-., betwean Vancouver and- 
Cook, eOalli; price »1«.0*0, 1-1 caeh, 
balance 1, », » and 4 y*ara There Is a 
two-story l-rovm house on thle property; 
rents •!« per month. 

ILLOWS. lot MxlM: prlco ♦1»»6. l-»; 

cert, oaiaoo**- «jr-Mp £ "ft '"•• , 



W 1 




full iaoo-efiiMot Mall*: »Mm «*«•». 
CHk and MTSU t» WtMNM. 



J. H, WHITT0ME&C0, 



Duncan, B. C. 



TWENTT-F1VB acres at Cowlchan Bay; 
very light clearing; excellent supply of 
spring water, 1110 an acre. 



LAW, BUTLER & BAYLY 

207 Central Buildi ng. P_o_e HIS. 

TpkJBNMAN St., US0O. 

TTtDMONTON rd., oorner Riohmond, M**°- 

THING'S rd., corner Soott, lOOxllO, #1600. 

-ajTAR/GATE av., near the watef, I150C 

QIOUTHOATB at., 11B0O. 

TTAMP8HIRE and Central, »18«0. 

T4/TOU.NT Stephen av_ 11176. 

TT/ELLINGTON st.. 2 lot*, each MBM. 

pRAtrODARROCH, 14000. 

JJORTAOH av., $11 00. 



E, D, THWAITES 

Faritsvllle (Nanoose District) 

WRITE or'eKlT oh B. D. Thwaires, Parks- 
vllie, andf get particulars end prlco* of 
' land tor eale la this fast growing district. 
When writing itfto »J»out the amount of 
acreage you require MM Mr what rurpoae. 



WESTERN LANDS, LTD. 

Oak Bay Office, lief Oak Bay Avenue 

(Corner Foul Bay Road.) 

Phone 4250. 



MAGNIFTICENT building site for good 
home, commanding v.'ew of sea and 
mountain*. Hampshire rd. eouth; S lota, 
100x185; price 16000, 1-1 cash, balance to 
arrange. | 

"DRliTTT home on Hampehlta rd. eoalh; 
Jt t rooms, piped tor furnace, good b»ee- 
at-nt* cement weW prieo 14110. (mm ea*_. 



MMgam 



m 



Svndsy, .Msvsmber 3, 101? 



m 



VICTORIA DAILY COtOMST 



23 



LEE & FRASER 

lm Broad St. 

Life Insurant e. Flru Insurance. 

Money to l.uan. 



A\'K base the following huuiei for sale: 

J 1IUNT «t , S-room nous* with larip lot, 
* I It? 14 6, inir Stanley at . price JisOO. 
We are offering this splendid properly for 
a few days at Hi on 



TOWXHHIP Or' ESQIIMAI.T 



Irnilrr, (or Street Lighting 



VISING at., 7-room house, new and mo 
ern, with furnace. J75ot>. 



H 



j- 



ENRY St., 6-room house, J5500. 



HOWE St., 8-room house. all modern, 
with furnace, full basement, uaah tubs 
In basement. Terms, $1500 cash, balance 
to arrange. Trice (5800. 



WATER NOTICE 



For a License to Take and I'se Water. 

Notice la hereby given that Ge.offry 
Thomas Butler, o' Keatlngs P. O., will 
apply for a Ucenso 10 take and use five 
hundred gallons of water per day out of a 
spring which rises on the land heroin 
deicilbed. The water will be diverted at 
i he spring and will be used for domestic 
purposes on the land described as thn east 
half of the west twenty acres of Section 
It. Ttanse • East, South Saanlch District. 
This notice was posted on the ground on. 
the »th day of September, 1912. The 
plication will bo (lied In the office): ef 
Water Recorder at Victoria. 

Objections may be filed with th*. t_ 
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller 
Water Rig-tits. Parliament Building-*, VI 
toria. B. C. 

GEOFFREY T. BUTLER, 
fafe#fr- Applicant. 




NAVAL SERVICE OF CANADA. 

Sealed tenders addressed to the under- 
signed, endorsed "Tenders lor 
will be received up, to noon on November 
20, tor the following descriptions of mis- 
cellanoeus Naval Stores: 



iflu t i W r ' Mki b i lali. T annin es . 
Oakum, 



Oils. 

rollshlng- Pasta, 
Soap, hard and soft. 
All for delivery at H.M.C. Dockyards at 

lIalifaJt...«N.S„- and Esqulmalt,. B.C. 



Taints. 

ra- ■ - 



Forms of tender may be had by appli- 
cation to the undersigned or to the Naval 
Store Officer at either Dockyard. 

inauthorlzed publication of this notice 
will not ue paid for. 

G. J. UBSBARATS. 
Deputy Minister of the Naval Service. 
Department of the Naval Service, 
Ottawa, October 15, 1912. 

LIQUOR ACT, 1910. 

Notice is hereby given that, on the first 
day of December next, application will be 
made to the Superintendent of Provincial 
Police for renewal of the hotel licence to 
■ill liquor by retail In the hotel known as 
the col wood Hotel, situate at Colwood, in 
the Province of British Columbia. 

Dated this :13rd day of October, 1912. 
DANIEL CAMPBELL, Applicant. 

LIQUOR ACT, 1010. 

Notice Is hereby given that, on the first 
day. of December next, application will be 
made to the Superintendent of Provincial 
F'olice for renewal of the hotel licence to 
sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as 
the Parson's Hrldge Hotel, situate -at Par- 
son's Bridge, Esquimau district, in the 
Province el British Columbia. 

Hated this 30th dav of October, 1912. 
RICHARD PRICE, Applicant. 

LIQUOR ACT, 1910. 



Notice Is herehy given that, on the first 
dav of December next, application will be 
made to the Superintendent of Provincial 
Police for renewal of the hotel licence to 
sell liquor by retail In the hotel known as 
the Sidney Hotel, situate at Sidney, in the 
Province of British Columbia. 

Dated this '-5th day of October. 1912. 
P. N. TESTER, 

Applicant. 



LIQUOR ACT, 1910. 

Notice is hereby given that on the first 
nay of December next, application will be 
made to the Superintendent of Provincial 
Police for renewal of the hotel license to 
sell liquor by retail In the hotel known as 
the Oak Dell Hotel, situate at Colwood, lit 
the Province of British Columbia. 

Dated this 22nd day of October. 1912. 
JOHN SOUTHWELL, 

Applicant. 

LIQUOR ACT, 1910 



Notice Is hereby given that, on the first 
day of December next, application will be 
made to the Superintendent of Provincial 
Police for renewal of the hotel licence to 
sell liquor by retail In the hotel known as 
the Coldstream Hotel, situate at Gold- 
.s'.ream. In the Province of British Columbia. 

Dated this 23rd day of October, 1912. 
WILFRID MILLER, 

Applicant. 
. * 

LIQUOR ACT, 1910. 

Notice Is hereby given that, on the first 
day of December next, application will be 
made) to the Superintendent of Provincial 
Police for renewal of the hotel '.icenco to 
sell liquor by reiall in the hotel known as 
the Sooke Harbor Hotel, situate at Milne's 
Landing, Sooke, In the Province of British 
Columbia. 

Dated this i:Hnl day of October, 1912. 

SOOKE HARBOR HOTEL CO., Applicant 
f'hns. H. Harbour. Manager. 

NOTICE 



Notice Is herehy given that application 
will be made to the Board of Licensing 
Commissioners for the City of Victoria, 
B. C, at Its next sitting for a transfer of 
the license of the Hudson's Bay Company 
to sell by retail fermented, spirituous or 
other liquors In quantities of not less than 
a reputed pint bottle, from the premises 
known as 1130 Wharf street, Victoria, B. C, 
to the premises known as 1312 Douglas 
street, In the said City of Victoria. 

Dated at Victoria. B, C, this 10th day 
of October, 11*12. 

HUDSON'S BAT COMPANY. 
By Its duly authorized agent. 

Haroley V. Pratt. 



NOTICE 



In th* Supreme Court of British Colum- 
bia In Ihe mailer of (lustav Sutro, deceased, 
and ill the matter of the "Official Admin- 
istrator's Act." 

Notice Is hereby given that under an 
order granted by Ihe Hon the chief Jus- 
tice, dated 10th day of May, 1912, I. Ihe 
undersigned, was appointed admlnlstra i Bl 
..f the above estate. All parties ha\ln« 
claims against Ihe said esiate are requested 
to furnish particulars of same to me on or 
before the 11th day of November. 1912. and 
all parties Indebted to the above estate are 
required to pay such Indebtedness to me 
forthwith. 

Dated at Victoria, B. C, this 26th diy of 
October, 1912. 

WILLIAM MONTE1TH. 

Official Administrator. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS 

Coast District, Ranee S. 

Sealed tenders marked "Tenders for Lot 
461, Coast District, Range S." will be re- 
ceived by the undersigned up to 12 o'clock 
noon of Friday, the 1st day of December. 
1912, for the sale of that small fraction of 
land lying- between the Indian Reserve at 
Helja Coola and the Necleetsconnay River, 
which parcel of land haa been surveyed and 
Is now known as Lot 46 1. Coast District, 
Range t, and comprises 13.46 acres. 

The upset price to ba at the rats or 
$10.00 per acre, and the payments may be 
made In four Instalments of 26 per cent 
each. The first Instalment of 25 per cent 
to accompany the tender and the balance 
In annual Instalments, with Interest at « 
per cent per annum. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an 
accepted bank cheque or certificate of de- 
posit on a chartered bank of Canada, mads 
payable to the undersigned. 

The highest or any lender not necessarily 
accepted. 

J. MAHONY, 
Commissioner of Lands. 
••1 render Street West, Vancouver, B. C 



Sealed Tenders, marked on envelope 
"Tendsrs toi street Lighting." and ad- 
dressed to the undersigned, will be re- 
i Until noon on Monday, November 
llth. '.I'll, for the Installation of a com- 
plete Bystem of Street Lighting In the 

1 o« BShtp of Esquimau. 

Plans RUty M seen and full particulars 
obtained at the office of the Municipal 
Clerk, sliuaied at the rear of ths Lampson 
Street School. 

Tenders must be accompanied by a 
marked cheque for five per cent i6<"»' of 
Ihe amount ol the Tender, payable to the 
order of the Corporation of Esqulmalt. 
which amount will be forfeited If the party 

tendering declines to enter into or rails to 

complete ihe. contract In accordance with 
his Tender. 

The lowest or any other Tender not neces- 
sarily accepted. 

THOMAS SHEPHERD. 

C.M.C., Esquimau. 
Box D. Thoburn P. O. 

DISSOLUTION OF PARTNEKsIlir. 

To whom It concern: We, the un- 
dersigned, do hereby declare that we have 
mutual!) dissolved the partnership made 
between us on ih<> 3rd day of August, 1912. 
The undersigned A. W. Uratn assumes and 
agrees to meet all outstanding liabilities 
of the said partnership. 
.1 
A 
B presence 
Vintcr. 








NOTICE 

. 

Notice; Is hereby given .that application 
WW W.mad, at the next slttlng-of the 
Board of Licencing Commissioners after ths 
«urr4rat1<* «MP days from, the date hereof, 
for a transfer of the said licence from nvs. 
uous and fermented liquor* from the prem- 
ise* known **"■*>»•; Xsleu 'JM4«s*i^S«g 
Chambers stree^,V|e*ef«l.; ■JWjtO.v*-**. ,»$• 
premises known as the Eltz 

for a tratfifdr, ox><% es^fci 

the undersigned iiiomal jHttVir,, «o Cuu- 

stance Baker, of victaria. flkffiBp* . ^- ;*->■*- 

Dated at ViOttW^J^^, #** ;.**■* dp* 

THOMAS POTTER. 





CANCELLATION O* i'ESE 



Notice Is hereby given that ihe reserve 
existing on crown lands In 'he peace River 
1-ai.it District, notice of « blob, hearing date 
April 3rd. 1911. was published In the Brit- 
ish Columbia Gazette of the 6th of April, 
1911. is cancelled In so far as the same re- 
lates to Townships 111. 113 and lit. l'eacs 
River Land District. 

ROBT. A. RENWICK, 
Deputy Minister of Lands. 

Lands Department, Victoria. B. C, 22nd 
July, 1912. 



NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that the partner- 
ship existing between Herbert W. Ball and 
John P. Young, the business of which has 
been carried on at 269 Cook street, Vic- 
toria, B.C., has been dissolved by the re- 
tirement of Mr. Ball, and the entry of Mr. 
Robert Brock In his stead. The business 
will now be carried on at the said premises 
by Mr. Young and Mr. Brock, to' whom all 
debts In connection with the said business 
are to be paid. 

Dated at Victoria, B. C, this 4th day of 
October, 1912. 




Sealed tenders addressed to the under- 
signed, and endorsed "Tender for Electric 
Elevators for the Customs Examining Ware- 
house, Vancouver. B.C.," will be -received at 
this office until 4 p.m., on Monday, Novem- 
ber 18, 1912, for the work mentioned. 
< Tenders will not be considered unless 
made upon forms supplied by department 
and In accordance with conditions contained 
therein. 

Plans and specifications to be seen on 
application to Mr. E. E. McGregor. Clerk Of 

Works, Vat uver' Examining Warehouse, 

Mr. H. B. Matthews, Supervising Architect. 
Winnipeg, Man., and at the Department of 
Public Works, Ottawa. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an 
accepted cheque on a chartered bank, pay- 
able to the order of the Honorable the Min- 
ister of Public Works, equal to ten per . eat 
(10 p.c.) of the amount of the tender. 

By order, 

R. C. DESROCHERS, 

Secretary,- 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, October 25, 1912. 




SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING regula- 
tions. 

Coal mining rights of the Dominion, in 
Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberla, the 
Yukon Territory, the Ndrtbweat Territories 
and In a portion of the Province of British 
Columbia, may be lease for a tei.u 
twenty-one years at an annual rental of Jl 
an acre. Not more than 2,680 acres will 
be leased to one applicant. 

Applications for a lease must be made by 
the applicant In person to the Agent or Sub 
Agent of the district, in which the rights 
applied for are situated. 

In surveyed territyry the land must he 
de.scrlhed by sections, or lepra] Subdivisions 
of section'*, and In unsurveyed territory the 
iraci applied for shall be staked out by the 
applicant himself. 

Koch application must be accompanied 
by a fee of jr. which will be refunded If 
Ihe