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Probe  Asked  of  Fire  Dept 


^  Exams 


(M]if«iif,m  I'Miii.x^^^MgiS^kt^iN^IMilMi 


leW   E.   43rd   PI«M,   L.A. 


Continuous  Publication  for  76  Years 


AD.-4.ei«l 


Vol.    LXXVI-No.   48 


Los   Angelas,   California 


10c 


Thws,,  Feb.  14,  1957 


PROTESTS  G  R  .1  D  E- 
Paul  Ordiina,  Oninha  fire- 
Ttinn  for  four  \inrs.  this  iiiek 
askid  for  a  Civil  Sen  irr  prohe 
into  thr  oral  examination 
given  him  trben  he  applied 
for  fid  mission  to  the  Los  Ange- 
les tire  Depiirtment. 

Fireman 
Protests 
Oral  Test 

A  protest  was  filed  here 
Friday  with  the  Civil  Serv- 
ice Commission  charging 
that  bias  in  the  oral  exam-  i 


NAACP  Demands 
Parker's  Ouster 


Jealousy 


Aging  Man,  72, 
Shoots  Wife, 
Takes  Own  Life 


A  T2-year-old  newspaper  ou.<?- 
todian.  apparently  jealous  over 
his  wife's  interest  in  another 
man.  shot  and  seriously 
wounded  her  Saturday,  and 
then   took  his  own   life. 

Mrs.  Carmen  Jones.  236  W. 
61st  street,  bleeding  profusely 
from  wounds  in  the  chest  and 
both  arms,  staggered  out  of  lier 
house  in  the  middle  of  the 
night  and  called  to  her  next 
door  neighbor,  Mrs.  Winnie 
Ricks.  236  W.  61  .st  street. -"Come 
quick.  My  husband  shot  me!" 

She  made  her  way  to  the  next 
house,  occupied  by  Mrs.  Mary 
Ricks,  where  she  waited  for  the 
ambulance. 

Get  Gun 

At  Georgia  Street  Receiving 
Hospital.  Mrs.  Jonee  told  police 
that  her  husband.  Randall 
Willie  Jones,  Sr.,  came  into 
her  room  affPr  she  was  asleep, 
sat  on  her  bed  and  began  up- 


y^ 


them    two    days 


had    visited 
earlier. 

Jones    left    his   wife,   but    re- 
turned in  a  few  moments  with 
a  .38  caliber  Smith  and  We.sson 
(Continued   on    Page  31 


raiding  her  regarding  a  former 
inations  virtually  excludes   co-worker.    Hniiis    Wiley,    who 

Negroes   from    joining  the 
city's  Fire  Department. 

The  protest  was  lodged  in  the 
case  of  Paul   Orduna.  who  for  | 
the  past  four  years  has  been  a 
fireman    in    the    Omaha,    Neb. 
department. 

AdTisMl  To  Withdraw 

Orduna,  who  wished  to  trans- 
fer to  Los  Angeles,  took  the  oral 
exarnJnation  Nov.  IT.  After  he 
was  finished,  he  was  asked,  to 
wait  a  few  minutes,  and  was 
then  called  back  and  told  that 
his  grades  nn  the  oral  were  so 
low  that  there  was  no  use  for 
him  to  take  the  written  exam. 
He  was  informed  that  even  if 
he  were  to  make  100  per  rent  on 
the  written  examination,  his 
grades  on  the  oral  would  bring 
(Continued  on   Page  6) 


M  Who  Shot 
Negro  Leader 
Found  Slain 

COLUMBIA^!,  .  Ga  —A  white' 
Columbus  sforekrrtier  who  last 
year  killed  a  Xegrn  leafier  of 
the  .NAACP  was  found  .■shot 
fatally  early  Monday  morn- 
ing. 

Lurio  Flowers.  IS.'i,  was  found 
lying   in   the  enlranccwax    of  a 

Negro  theater  across  the  street  |  "Stout   Hearted  Men. "   Featured 

the    program    will    ,he    the 


ftistory  Weel( 
Queen  to  Be 
Crowned  Sun. 

The  most  .successful  celebra- 
tion of  Negro  History  Week  in 
Los  Angeles  will  close  Sunday 
afternoon  when  Our  Authors 
Study  Club,  which  spoii.sors 
the  week,  will  crowrr  a  History 

Week      Queen      at      Town      and 

f^own  Club  on  the  University  of  jHardison  died  of  a  heart  attack 

Southern  California  campus. 

]VIrs.  Elizabeth  Young,  mem- 
ber of  the  teaching  staff  of 
the  Los  Angeles  Publii  Schools 
.'^^'stem     will     chair     the     Coni- 


DIES  US  JOB  —  Chnrlrs 
( (jhnrlie)  Hardis'in  diid  sud- 
denly Sunday  it  fciv  iiioiiu  nts 
after  he  had  reported  for  ii'irk 
fit  the  "Sueet  Drtaws"  cafe 
which  he  manaqcd. 


'Sweet  Dreams' 
Manager  Dies 
On  the  Job 


Charles  (Charlie)  Hardison, 
■19.  died  suddenly  about  9  a.m. 
Sunday  in  the  Sweet  Dreams 
Cafe.  i063  E.  4,3rd  street,  where 
for  the  pa.st  13  years  he  man- 
aged and  operated  the  popular 
cafe  for  his  cousin,  Duke 
Thompson.       j 

Charlie  had  complained  of 
illness  to  his  cousin  on  Satur- 
day and  went  to  his  home, 
4277'2     S.     Central     avenue,     to 


Chief's  Ci^il 
Rights 
Draws  Fire 

Ousler  of  Chief  of  Po- 
lice William  H.  Parker  be- 
cause of  his  expressed  op- 
position to  civil  rights  leg- 
islation was  demanded  by 
the  executive  committee  of 
the  local  NAACP  in  a  res- 
olution passed  ataits  Mon- 
day meeting. 

The  resolution  also  rapped 
the  chief  for  his  attacks  on  the 
so-called  Cahan  decision  bar- 
ring unlawful  searches  and 
seizures  by  police  officer.s  and 
charged  him  with  having  failed 
to  integrate  the  police  depart- 
ment. 

Meanwhile.  Chief  Parker  Fri- 
day wired  Congre.ssman  Pat 
Hillings  of  Wl^ittier  saying  that 
he  "heartily  endorses"  the 
Eisenhower  civil  rights  bills. 

Betracts  ^tand 

"As  a  law  enforcement  of- 
ficer with  nearly  30  years'  ex- 
periehce  and  one  who  is  con- 
cerned with  the  effect  of  civil 
rights  legislation  upon  efficient 
law  enforcement.  I  am  pleased 
to  inform  yoil  that  I  heartily 
endorse  the  provisions  of  HR 
11,51  which.  I  now  understand, 
contains  the  President's  pro- 
gram," Parker  wired  Hillings. 

"It  is  my  opinion  that  HR 
WSX  will  accomplish  the  Presi- 
dent's objectives  in  the  fiefd  of 
civil  rights  legislation  without 
any  harmful  effect  upon  exist- 
ing   law   enforcement,"    the  Los 


V 


SEEKS  SirEE'lHEART  CROli  \  —  h.liznbcth  Mornn. 
rostunie  djsiqn  studint.  is  one  of  the  ontisffinls  for  thf  title 
nf  Stceet heart  of  Trade-Tech.  Selection  will  he  made  Satur- 
day. 


Watts  B^nn  Shot 
From  Ambush; 
Killer  at  Large 

A  dangerous  sniper,  wanted  for  murder,  is  still  at 
",   j  large  in  the  Watts  area,  folbwing    the    killing  early 
IFOMISAnday  morning  of  a  42-yearold  barber,    f 

^  John  D.  Stewart  was  shot  through  the  brain  whik- 
he  was  lying  on  his  couch  at  ^lis  home,  84.5  E.  Imf}ei-iai 

Highway,   where  he  had   fallen  • 
asleep  as  he  was  watching  TV. 

Heavy  Breathing 

The  gunman  was  either  a 
crack  shot'  who  has  a  photo- 
graphic eye  and  who  was  able 

;  to   draw   a    bead   even    through 

j  a  wooden  wall,  or  he  had  fired 

;  at  random  and  the  bullet  had 

*  hit    the    victim    in    a   10(K)-to-l 

:  chance   shot. 

I  Stewart's  wife  of  two  months. 
1  Mrs.  Jeraleen  Stewart,  was 
I  asleep  next  to  her  husband. 
I  She  was  not  awakened  by  the 

shot,    but    was    aroused     about 

2:30  irithe  morning   by  Stew- 
art's    Tieavy      breathing.     fi\s 

face    was    covered    with    blood. 

It   was   coming   from   his  nose 

and  his  ears.  ^ 

Sow  Bullet  Hole         ,. 
.She  <fiought   he   had    had   a 

hemorrhage.     Then     she     saw 

the  bullet  hole  in  his  Head.  She  ' 

called   the. police   and   an  am- i 


rest.    He    returned     to    his    job  I  Angeles   Chief   .said, 
parly  Sunday  and   was   telling 
friends   and   customers  that   he 
hadn't  slept  well] 

Suddenly  he  rollap.sed-  and 
fell  to  the  floor,  dead. 

The  last  person  to  speak  to 
the  well-known  and  well-liked 
cafe  manager  was  spojtsman 
Elihu  "Dot"  M<'Gee.  who  was 
leaving  the  cafe  as  Charlie  en- 
tered? 

Initial    report.-?    indicated    that 


However,  Chief  Parker  re- 
turned to  the  attack  on  par- 
ticular civil  rights  legislation 
when  he  spoke  over  the  air 
Sunday  night  on  the  major's 
regular  Simday  night  program. 
He  said  that  legislation  which 
provides  for  federal  investiga- 
tion of  alleged  civil  rights 
violations  by  police  officers  will 
hamstring  law  enforceemnt 

authorities. 


Girl,  15,  Beaten; 
Baby  Born  Dead 


memorati\c  Coronation  Recop-  ; 
lion  which  will  be  held  from  ! 
three    until    seven    o'clock.  ' 

Atty.  Eddie  Mae  Armstrong 
will  serve  as  Mistress  of  Cere- 
monies. Participants  in  the  pro- 
gram influrle  Lester  Bond  of 
Boy  Scouts  of  America  Troop 
2.38  and  the  Bel-Vue  Commun- 
ity Church  Chorale  Group  di- 
rected by  Doris  Reita  Novel. 
Thomas      Bennett      will      sing, 


I    i' 


I- 


f; 


i    I 


from  the  Flowers  store  in  flown- 
to\\  n  Cofumhus. 

He  had  been  shot  in  the 
temple,  apparently  by  a  .1,5- 
caliber   bullet. 

Flowens  shot  and  killed  Dr. 
Thomas  H.  Bre^vcr.  (il  year-ol^ 
physician,  in  the  office  of  the 
Flowers'  store  in  Febru,Ti\  of 
IP.'jti.  Dr.  Brewer  li^'l  long  been 
a  leadei  in  the  fight  of  the 
Negroes  of  (leorgia  for  inte- 
gration   and    fair   treHltnent. 

The  Muskogee  County  Grand 
Jury  refusefl  to  indict  Flowers 
who  claimed  he  fired  in  self- 
defen.se. 

Sultry  Eartha 
Has  Dinner  with 
India's  Premier 

NEW  DELHI.  India— Sultry 
Eartha  Kitt  ".stood  up''  Prime 
Mlhi.ster  NehrCl  of  India  on- a 
lunch  date  last  Saturday — but 
only  because  her  plane  was 
late. 

She   was   on   time   for   dinner  j 
with   the  leader  of  the   Indian 
people   later  the  same  day.        j 

Eartha    Is    making    a    world  j 
tour.  i 


on    the    program 

winner    of    the    oratorical    con- 

te.s't   to  be  held   Friday  evening 

at  Manual  Arts  High  School. 
Mi.ss  Lillian  Duffy  is  chairman 
of  the  Oratorical  Contest. 
Citations  Planned 
Miss  Rvangeline  Woodfolk, 
secretary  of  the  Planning  Com- 
mittee, will  present  citations  to 
outstanding  citizens  in  the 
community. 

".\mericas  future  in  world 
affairs  may  be  decided  by  its 
treatment  of  its  Negro  citi- 
zens. "  a  Texas  educator  pre- 
dicted Sunday  at  a  History 
Week   mass  meeting. 

Dr.  J^  Reuben  Sheeler.?  head 
of  Texas  Southern  Uni\er- 
sity's  Department  of  Iflstory, 
told  a  capacity  crowd  at  Zion 
Hill   Baptist   Church: 

"The  eyes  of  the  world  are 
upon  us.  America  must  Inte- 
grate and  unite  to  keep  our 
world  leadership."  ■  IfF  substi- 
tuted for  Charles  Wesley,   Cen- 

I  tral     State    College     president, 

j  who   was   unable   to   come   be- 

j  cause  of   illness. 

I  Bigots    Sick 

j      "The  bigoted  person  is  a  sifk 

person   who   h.^s    neve   had  afl 

^Continued  on  Page  2) 


The  coroner,  however,  ques- 
tioned-yhis  diagnosis.  An 
autopsy    is   scheduled. 

H  a  r  d  i  s  o  n  's  father.  H.  A. 
llardi.snn.  came  to  Los  Angeles  i  F.arthy  Black.  l!i,  who  lives 
from  Houston,  Texas  for  the  i  with  her  parents  at  340  Cypress 
.services  which  are  being  held  avenue,  Pasadena,  was  severely 
tf)day.  Thursday,  at  1  p.m.  from  j  beaten  by  a  group  of  teen-age 
the  Harrison  Ross  Funeral,  girl  friends  Sunday. 
Home.  I     Shortly  after  the  beating,  she 

Harrlison.    a    native    of    Guy,  j  gave  birth  to  a  baby,  which  was 
iContinued   on    Page  2)  still    horn,   at  General   Hospital. 


bulance. 

Stewart  was  taken,  to  the 
General  Hoispital  where  he  died 
at   5  a.m. 

Police  reported  that  bullets 
have  crashed  into  two  other 
homes  in  the  neighborhood 
during  the  la.st  two  months. 
Neither  of  them,  however, 
Struck  anyone. 

Upon  investigation,  police 
found  that,  the  bullet  had 
pierced  a  hole  In  the  wall 
about  a  foot  from  the  floor  at 
an  upward  angle.  It  had  ap- 
parently been  fired  from  the 
sloping  driveway.      , 

No  WitaMses 

^  Had  the  klHer  aimed  at  his 

victim,    he   tould    have   dete»- 

(Continued  on  Page  6) 


TIES  TOR  CROU  S-—.hioth,i  of  the  inp  contestants  for 
the  I'rndc-Technical  Juni'ir  Collci/c  Sneelliciiit  tronn  is  Irmn 
Sue  Smith,  vo< ationnl  nursing  student.  I  ote  by  J .000  students 
will  pick  liinner.  (See  story  page  2.) 

Senate  Civil  Rights 
Hearing  Scheduled 


'Digits'  Raid 
Suspects  To 
Seelt  Writs 

Twelve  of  the  13  men  and 
w-omen  arrested  last  week  in  a 
policy  J-aid  are  to  appear  in 
Dept.  41  Thursday,  today,  where 
a  hearing  is  scheduled  on  peti- 
tions for  writs  of  habeas  corpus. 

All  12.  who  are  being  repre- 
sented by  Atty.  Earl  Broady. 
are  out  on  bail.  Bail  for  10  of 
the  defendants  was  set  at 
SI 000.  for  one  at  $500.  and  for 
Win.ston  Dunlap  at  $5000. 

Last  Thursday,  Elbert  "Cot- 
ton'  Gordon,  accompanied  by 
Atty.  Broady.  surrendered  him- 
.self.  It  was  his  safe,  contain- 
ing o\-fT  $13,000.  that  police 
seized  \n  the  raid  and  which 
they  believed  constituted  the 
unb^hked  "take"  of  the  policy 

ring.. 

Gordon  was  later  released  on 
$1000  bail.  Atty.  Broady  states 
that  the  money  represented 
Gordon's  savings  over  a  num- 
ber of  years  in  various  busi- 
nesses. iiTcluding  his  current 
grocery  store  at  32nd  and  San 
Pedro  streets,  and  that  Gordon 


^  WASHINGTON  —  Atty.  Gen.  Herbert  Brownell  will  be  the 
first  speaker  when  the  Senate  Judiciary  .Sub<^oiYimittee  on  Con.sti- 
lutional  Rights  opens  hearings  on  civil  rights\  legislation  today 
iThursdpyi,  Senator  Thomas  C.  Henninp.s,  Dembcrat  of  Missouri, 
is  chairman  of  the  subcommittee.  ] 

Administration    leaders    said* / 'numbers   operators. 

they  hope  to  curtail  hearings  I  indications  are  that  .southerners,  Gordon,  however,  has  &\ 
after  a  representative  number  of  j  including  congre.ssmen  and  sen'-  i  lengthy  police  record,  dating  | 
witnesses  have  been  heard  but  '  (Continued   on   Page  6t  (Contini^d   on   Page   6t  j 


ICTIM—Jokn  D.  Stet.art. 

barber,  mat   killed  wh<  n   ti     ! 
iniper  fired  at   him   while    he 
^as  sitting  before  the   TI     in 

his  living  room. 

ape  Suspects 

Chase  Girls  Into 

iirms  of  Police 

Four  would-lbe  rapists   \vere 
lid  rigqt  into  the  arms  of  '/Tth 
Srreet   ^lice  officers  on   Mon 
day  night  by  three  hysterica!, 
ttfrrified  young  women. 

A  few  minutes  before  mid- 
night, Vesta  M.  King,  21  year 
od  housewife  of  321  W.  77in 
street,  Evelyn  Harrell.  326  \  AV. 
Tilth  street  and  Barbara  Swan- 
s-m.  751  E.  92nd  street,  were 
.sanding  on  the  corner  of  TTih 
aid  Broadway  waiting  tor  a 
bjs. 

A  1950  Mercury  sedan  \kvM 
four  yeung  men  in  it  ran  iheu 
car  up  over  the  curb  close  t^i 
the  women,  then  backed  up 
and  got  out  of  the  car.  The  no 
nen,  now,  thoroughly  frig"af>:i. 
el,  started  running  east  or>  "ih 
s  reet  toward  the  police  sik- 
tion,  while  the  men  cha><»d 
tliem  on  foot  shouting  'Stop.' 
Sized  Up  SituGrtion 

The  men  than  got  back  into 
tlie  car  and  chased 'the  sr-ream- 
iiig  women  who  were  getting 
c  oser  and  closerSto  the  police 
station.  /         r. 

Police    officers   wer«   bropar 
itg     to     end     ttJeir     midnight 
v'atch,    when    thjey  "heard     the 
cjmmotion.   SgJ^R.   L.    Hagen 
baugh  wenfmit  to  .see  what  It 

v-as    all    about.    It    didn't    take, 

Img    for    him    to    size    up    the 

(Continued  on  Page  2' 


had    no   connection    with    any 


'Early  Bird'  Is 
Vulture  -  Grdbk 

iflewsie's  Money 

According  to  newsboy,  Jim- 
ndie     Howard.     1115     E.     14th 

reet,  the  "early  bird."  some 
times  turns  out  to  be  a  \Tal- 
tire. 

At  least  that's  how  he  felt 
about  it  Friday  morning  at  9:.'Vi 


when  he  went  to  make  collec 


tons  for  ne%\rspapers  he  deli\ 


e-s.    Jimmie 


customers  thj  t  a  man  had  beeti 


was    told    bv    hi> 


tliere  already 
"After  seve 


S. 


and  collected, 
al  people  told  me 


S'ECRO  HISTORY  If  EEK—.Mrs.  Tassie.D.  JVright.  founder-president  of 
Our  .hithors  Study  Club ^  sponsor  of  the  weck-lon(f  celebration  of  S'egro  His- 
tory If  eek  in  Los  Anqelcs.  is  shonn  holding  City  Council  resolution  commend- 
ing her  and  the  club.  From  left,  stnndiiii/.  !\frs.  [fright.  Council/nan  Cordon  R. 
Hahn,  A.  J.  "Kelly"  Hiltuuiis^  Hnto,^  H'etk  chairman;  Mrs.  (Slater  Maddox. 


#ifi 

Dr.  .1.  Reuben  Sheclir.  speeiker:  Commissioner  Ednard  Hare  kins,  .Mrs.  Blanehe 
E.  Brooks,  Mrs.  Xoreen  Forney,  Deputy  Supervisor  Gilbfrt  Lindsay,  RfV. 
George  R.  Garner.  Ill,  Judge  Thomas  L.  Griffith.  Seated,  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Young,  Mrs.  Emma  Spencer  and  Mrs.  S.  P.  Johnsok.  \ 


tie  same  thijng.  that  they  had 
already  paid!  for  their  monthh 
sjbscriptions^  I  asked  what  the 
fi'llow    lookfed    like."    said    Jim. 

md   their  (description  fitted  a 
^[ozell  Miller  exactly.  Miller  is 
about  45  years  old  and  he  stui 
t?rs. " 

Jimmie's  manager'  said  he 
hjad  fired  Miller  that  same 
morning.  "Seems  like  Millei 
had  to  take  his  meaness  out  on 
somebody,  so  he  took  it  out  on 
liard -working  Jimmie."  They 
f  gure  Miller  had  collected  over 
$>0. 


fmafurmd 
In  the  iagle 

Special  features  this  week 

•iside  the  Eajie  include: 

Editorials  .....". 


Cburefa  Activities  7 

Sports  8 

Sodol  • 

Derethco  Foster  . _W 

Pvople  and  riacM  ^._....J|1 

Chan  Crawford II 

What's  Cookiag  „.H 

Smart  Set  . ..: >. _  t- 


•) 


I 


r 


■f'\ 


in 


>  -f 


'VI 


^^^mAgm^i^ittm^mmtimtimm^^ttm 


2— The  California  Eagle 
Thursday,   February    14,    1957 


Georgia  Would 
Ban  14th,  15th 

Amendments 

ATLANTA.    Ga The 

Legislature  Friday  made  cm- 
other   attempt   to   turn   the 

clock  back  when  it  asked 
Congress  to  declare  the  14th 
and  15th  Amendment  to  the 
United  States  Constitution 
null  and  void. 

The  Georgia  la^irmakers 
claimed  that  the  39th.  40th 
and  41st  Congresses,  which 
passed  the  Amendments 
after  the  Civil  War,  were 
"nothing  more  than  private 
assemblages,  unlawfully  at- 
tempting to  exercise  the 
legislative  power  of  the 
United   States." 


Golden  Stale. 
Agents  Seek 
Settlement 

The  Golden  State  Mutual  Life 
Insurance  Co.  anrf  the  Golden 
State  Agency  Club,  which  rep- 
resents the  majority  of  the  com- 
pany's agents  in  California. 
were  closeted  in  conference 
,. Wednesday  in  an  attempt  to 
iron  out  the  differences  which 
led  to  Suspension  of  a  numher 
of  the^agents  early  this  month. 

Appro.ximately  4CK1  policy 
writers  are  involved  in  the  dis- 
pute which  centers  around  the 
filling  out  by  the  apents  of  cer- 
tain itemized  report  forms. 

Views  Differ 

The  company,  through  1  t  s 
public  relations  manager-  Mrs. 
Verna  Hickman,  claims  that  the 
firm  is  attempting  to  install 
uniform  practices  and  that  it 
is  well  within  the  company's 
prerogative  to  determine  the 
type  of  forms  required  to  meet 
its  bookkeeping  needs  and  pro- 
tect the  rights  of  policy-holders. 

The  union,  however,  through 
its  special  representative  and 
chairman  of  its  negotiating 
committee.  Ike  .\dams,  takes 
the  view  that  the  new  forms  re- 
quire a  considerable  increase  in 
boo^  work  for  the  agents, 
thereby  decreasing  their  selling 
time,  that  the  commission  on 
the  policies  in  question  is  50 
per  cent  lower  than  on  other 
types  of  policies,  and  that  since 
in  reality  a  loss  of  income  is 
involved,  the  matter  is  negoti- 
able. 

No  Bad  Blood 

Adams  said  that  "We're  in- 
te»ested  in  seeing  that  the 
agents  get  what  they  justly  de- 
serve, and  also  that  the  com- 
pany doesn't  by-pass  the 
union." 

Both  Mrs.  Hickman  and 
Adams-  however,  emphasized 
that  there's  no  "bad  blood"  be- 
tween the  company  and  the 
imion.  Mrs.  Hickman  empha- 
sized that  there  was  no  ques- 
tion at  all  of  any  misuse  of 
funds,  adding  tbat  the  agents 
regularly  made  reports  of  the 
totals  received.  ; 

Adams  insisted  that  Goliden 
State  is^a  "good"  company  and 
that  the  asents  have  no  desire 
to  harm  either  .the  company  or 
the  policy  ownelfs.  He  felt  con- 
fident the  matter  could  be 
handled  through  negotiation. 


.rr  (:UXri:RE\Ch  —Jos- 
(fh  If  .  It'alker,  prngram  di- 
rcctnr  nf  the  /-..■/.  I'rhnn 
Li-n(/ue,  has  just  returned 
jroru  n  Y'juth  Training  In- 
centive conference  in  If  ash- 
ini/t'ii!,  sponsored  />v  the 
I'rcsidcnt's  CJ  o  in  in  i  t  t  e  e  on 
(lovcrnnient    Contracts. 


Palice  Chief 
Blames  KKK 
^n  Bombings 

MONTGOMERY,  Ala—  Police 
Chief  G.  J.  Ruppenthal  Monday 
accused  members  of  the  Ku 
Klux  Klan  for  the  recent  bomb- 
ing of  Negro  churches  and 
homes. 

"Our  investigation,  corrobor- 
ated by  statements  of  some  of 
the  accused  themselves."  he 
said,  "shows  that  these  bomb' 
ings  were  perpetrated  by  mem- 
bers of  the  Ku  Klux  Klan." 

He  also  stated  that  evidence 
against  seven  men  arrested  in 
the  bombings  and  shooting  at 
buses  is  being  turned  over  to 
the  county  grand  jury. 


28th  S*.  "Y" 

In  'Big  Push' 

For  Funds 

'The  Big  Push"  is  the  title 
given  to  concerted  efforts  of 
some  five  divisions  of  the  28th 
I  Street  YMCAs  latter  half  of  its 
afinual  campaign  for  funds  by 
Kenneth  Morris,  Executive  Sec- 
retary. 

Thirty-five  percent  of  the 
$13,500  goal  had  been  reached, 
Morris  reported  at  press  time. 
Clubs  and  'Organizations  divi- 
sion headeq  by  Mrs.  Marnesba 
Tackett  is'  in  the  lead,  with 
Special  Gifts  division  headed 
by  Lorenzo  Bowdoin  running 
second. 


CALIFORNIA  EAGLE 

WANT  ADS 


are   as  near 
as  your  own 
Telephone 
It's    easy    to 
Place  an  Ad 

-  Call  - 


flD.  4-0161 


DEADLINE  WED.  AT  11  A.M. 


Santia  Monica 

NAACP  Meet 

!  Set  for  Feb.  21 

'      Lnren    Miller,    attorney    and 

[publisher   of  the  California 

;  Eagle;  Rex  H.  Minter.  attorney 

i  and  member  of  the  City  Council 

I  of   Santa   Monica,   and   Gilbert 

1 R.    Dale,    Jr..    UCLA    graduate, 

will  speak  on  current  issues  at 

the    February    meeting    of    the 

■  Santa    Monica    NAACP-    to    be 

held    at    the  I  Calvary    BaptLst 

Church,  Broadway  at  20th  street, 

at  7  p.m.,  Feb.  21. 

Miller  will  discuss  pending 
legislation  concerning  "Civil 
Rights,"  Minter  will  elaborate 
on  the  Santa  Monica  housing 
situation  and  Gale  will  stress 
the  importance  of  citizens'  in- 
terest in  local  political  and 
civic  affairs.  E.  G.  Allen,  pub- 
licity chairman,  announced  this 
week. 


Gok(  Coast  to 

Attain  Self-Rule 
On  March  6 

WASHINGTON—   The   Gold 

Coast,  British  West.  Africa,  will 
become  an  independent  state 
within  the  British  Common- 
wealth on  March  6.  The  coun- 
try will  then  be  knov^  as 
Ghana. 

Celebrations  will  start  on 
Sunday,  March  3  and  close  on 
Sunday,  March  10.  Her  Majes- 
ty Queen  Elizabeth  II  will  be 
specially  represented  by  Her 
Royal  Highness,  the  Duchess  of 
Kent. 

Parliament  to  Open 

On  Independence  Day,  the 
first  session  of  the  Parliament 
of  Ghana  will,  be  opened  by 
Her  Royal  Highness  on  ftehalf 
of  the  Queen. 

The  United  States  will  be 
represented  by  Vice  President 
Richard  Nixon. 

Dr.  Kwame  Nkruma  has  been 
prime  minister  since  1952, 
when  the  office  was  created. 
Up  to  the  present  time,  how- 
ever, his  powers,  and  those  of 
his  cabinet  have  been  limited, 
with  the  important  posts  of 
foreign  affair.s,  defense  and 
police  subject  to  the  authority 
of  the  governor  who  is  appoint- 
ed  by  Great  Britain. 

Ovexlordship    Ehded 

With  the  inauguration  March 
6,  the  governor's  powers  will 
be    removed. 

Final  date  for  severa|nce  of 
the  British  overlordship  was 
agreed  upon  following  the  elec- 
tions to  the  104-member  single 
chamber  legislature  in  July, 
1956.  At  that  time  the  Conven- 
tion Peoples  Party  (CPP)  won 
71  seats. 

The  history  of  the  modern 
Gold  Coast  is  comparatively 
short.  Small  British  trading 
settlements  came  under  Brit- 
ish Government  control  in  1821. 
It  is  only  in  the  last  75  years 
or  so  that  the  present  terri-  i 
tory,  covering  92,000  square 
miles,  and  with  a  total  popula-' 
tion  of  some  Ipur  and  one-half 
millions,  has  been  built  up. 
Date    of    Treaty 

Today  the  territory  comprises 
the  colony .  and  Ashanti,  the 
Northern  Territories  and  the 
Trust  territory  of  Togoland  un- 
der United  Kingdom  adminis- 
tration.    ■ 

The  date  chosen  for  indepen- 
dence, March  6,  is  the  date  the 
agreement  between  the  British 
and  the  Fanti  chiefs  was  sign- 
ed in  1844. 

In  1850  the  first  legislative 
council  was  set  up  for  the  area. 
In  1946  the  legislative  council 
had  .an  African,  ma.iority  for 
the  first  time,  and  represented 
Ashanti  as  well. 

Wholly  African 

In  1949  a  wholly  African 
committee,  representing  all 
sections  of  public  opinion  and 
under  the  chairmanship  of  an 
African  judge,  Mr.  Justice  <  now 
Sir  Henley)  Coussey,  was  given 
the  task  of  working  out  a  new 
constitution. 

The  1951  legislature,  by  in- 
cluding representatives  of  the 
Northern  Territories  and  of 
rrans-Volta  Togoland,  repre- 
sented all  the  peoples  of  the 
Gold  Coast. 

The  present  constitution  wa.s 
Introduced  in  1954.  It  follows 
the  British  parliamentary  mo- 
del, except  that  it  provides  for 
only  a  single  chamber. 


PALM  SPRINGS  PAS- 
TOR—The  Rev.   If.  'Mmk 

Davis,  pnstnr  of  the  First 
Baptist  Church  in  Pal  m 
Springs. 


Local  Girls 

Seek  Title  Of 
Sweetheart 

Two  local "  beauties,  both 
students  at  Los  Angeles  Trade - 
Technical  Junior  College,  are 
currently  seeking  the  title  of 
Sweetheart  of  Trade -Tech. 

Elizabeth  Moran,  18-year-old 
costume  design  -student,,  and 
Irma  Sue  Smith,  28-year-old  vo- 
cational nursing  student,  are 
competing  for  the  .sweetheart 
crown  with  nine  other.-beauties 
of  the  college.  They  .represent 
the  departments  in  which  they 
are   enrolled. 

The  winner  of  the  contest 
will  be  determined  by  a  vote  of 
the  more  than  3000  Trade-Tech, 
day  students. 

Announcement  of  the  winner 

will  be  made  at  the  .school's 
fifth  annual  Sweetheart  Ball  to 
be  held  at  the  Riviera  Country 
Club  Feb.  16.  Radio-TV  Star 
Dick  Whiltinghill  will  crown 
the  sweetheart. 

Mi.ss  Moran  is  the  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Clem  Moran. 
1242  E.  123rd  street.  She  was 
graduated  from  Centennial 
High  School  in  June,  19.56 
where  she  was  a  drill  team 
leader  and  frequenj  performer 
in  .school  talent  shows.  '- 

Miss  Smith  is  the  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  James  Smith 
Sr.,  707  .^.  54th  street.  A  gradu- 
ate of  *^  Louisiana  Catholic 
High  Sc|ool,  she  has  studied 
dramatics  and  was  a  member 
of.  her  school's  glee  club.  She 
hopes  toispecializc  in  the  care 
of  cripplid  children  -after  com- 
pleting ller  training  at  Trade- 
Tech.       ? 


Palm  Springs 

Church  Seelu 
New  Quarters 


PALM  SPRINGS— The  Rev.  W. 

Mack  Davis,  pastor  of  the 
First  Baptist  Church  in  Pa-lm 
Springs,  the  only  Baptist  church 
in  the  city,  is  attempting  to 
purchase  two  acres  of  land  for 
the  purpose  of  building  a  new 
church,  and  an  educatonal  and 
recreational  egnter. 

It  is  his  plafnitjf  the  purchase 
aan  be  effpctedj':4tiat  the  center 
KvouTd  include 'a,;  day  nursery, 
snack  bar  and  .social  hall. 

Rev.  Davis  claims  financial 
backing  for  the  project,  but  has 
run  vip  against  ap  impasse  in 
the  purchase  of  land.  The  avail- 
able property  is  under  the  con- 
trol of  the  Indian  Affairs 
Bureau  in  Washington. 

The  pastor  has  attempted  to 
negotiate  with  representatives 
of  the  Indian  Affairs  Bureau  in 
Palm  Springs  and  Riverside  for 
the  past  two  jtears.  but  has 
been  unable  to  obtain  a  com- 
mitment for  relea.se  of  the  land. 

There  are  about  1200  Negroes 
living  'in  Palm  Springs,  on  the 
east  side  of  the  dividing  line. 
.Indian  avenue.  The  land  being 
sought  is  also  east  of.  Indian 
avenue. 


FIRST   IN    OREGON— A    banquet    ,/ivcn    at  the  Multnomah 
recently  iLclcomed  the  Golden  State  Mutual  Life   Insurance    Co. 
such  Ncc/ro-oicnrd  institution  in  the  stale.  From    left.    Unman 
ar,cnt  for  the  company;  Oregon  Insurance  Commissioner   Robert 
Houston.  '  


Hotel  in   Porllahd,   Oregon^ 

to    Oregon.    It   is    the   first 

".    Plummer.   stale   general 

P.    Taylor  and  Norman  O. 


Group  Seeks 
More  Jobs  in 
So.  Los  Angeles 

'A  meeting  is  being  held  Fri- 
day night,  Feb.  15,  at  7:30  p.m. 
at  1688  E.  108th  street,  to  dis- 
cuss mean's  through  which 
greater  job  opportunities  can 
be  secured  for  Negroes  in  the 
South, Los  Aifgeles  area. 

According  to  H.  V.  Brown, 
i  chairman  of  a  newly  formed 
Citizens  Committee  for  Better 
Jobs,  a  partial  survey  of  mar- 
"kets.  dime  stores,  gasoline  fill- 
ing stations,  and  other  busi- 
nesses in  the  area  .'ihows  that 
many  establishments  which 
enjoy  .predominantly  N  e  p  r  o 
patronage,  tend  to  exclude  Ne- 
groes from  their  sales  f^orce. 


Cleo  Cloman  Cleared  in 
Cafe  Knife-Wielding  Battle 

The  district  attorney's  office  Monday  refused  to 
is.stie    a    complaint    against  Cleo  Cloman,  Club  Capri  } 
owner  and  well-known  man-about-town,  in  connection  j 
with  the  knifing  last  week  of  Floyd  Scott, 
Cloman's 


I  Rape  Suspects 

1        'Continued  from  Page  li 
situation    and    he   told    officers 
E.  G.  Langille  and  W.  E.  Lietz 
to    apprehend    the    car    which 
was  chasing  the  girls. 

After     calming     the     women. 
:  Sgt.'Hagcnbaugh  ant]  Sgt.  B.  L. 
'  Hoskins  went   out  and  assisted 
I  the  two  officers  in  bringing  in 
I  the     suspects.     The     women 
i  indentificd    the   four   men.   who 
were     then     placed     unrler    ar- 
rest. Two  of  the  men  were  Nor- 
man   W.    Elliot..  19,    and  'Ray-' 
mond  Walk.  19.  The  other  two 
'  \Vcre  juveniles. 


attorney,     Walter 

Gordon,     said     that    witnesses 

who  appeared  at  the  D.A.'s  of- 

'  f  i  c  e      corroborated     Cloman's 

'  claim    that    Scott    had    threat- 
'  ened  to  'kill   him,   and  that  he 
I  had   acted   in  self-defense. 
j     The  fight  that  ended  in.  the 
1  knifing  occurred  at  the  Uncle 
Randy   Cafe.   4060i.i!    S.   Central 
■  avenue,    last    weekend.      Scott 
'  reportedly     kept     demanding 
money  which  he  claimed  Clo- 
man owed  him  over  a  business 
'  deal. 

I  Sfott,  serious\v  injured  with 
a  six-inch  cut  in  the  neck,  was 
'  rushed  to  the  hospital  where 
he  was  given  immediate  blood 
transfusions.  At  first  it ■  was 
feared  he  might  die  from  the 
wound,  and  Cloman  was  want- 
ed On  a  charge  of  assault  with 
I  a  deadly  weapon  with  intent 
to   commit    murder. 

Scott's  condition  has  im; 
proved,  however,  and  accord- 
ing to  Atty  Gordon,  the  injured 
man  does  not  intend  to  press 
"(■hargcs  against  his  former  em- 
ployer. 


V 


San  Diego  pitcher-  Pete  Mesa, 
^Ko  will  be  in  spring  training 
qamp  with  the  Cleveland 
Indians,  recently  won  12 
straight  games  to  help  Her- 
rnosillo  with  the  Pacific  Coast 
League  of  Mexico  title.  His  12th 
>ictory.set  a  new  record. 


The  Portland  club  of  the  Pa- 
cific Coast  League  has  a  chain 
of  39  tifket  agencies  throughout ' 
the  St  ate -and  southwest  'Wash- 
in.gton.  The,  Beavers  have  "sold 
over  SllO.Ono  worth  of  season 
bo.\    scat    tickets    already. 


Hardison  Dies 

'Continued  from  Page  1) 
La.,  was  a  member  of  the  Pa- 
cific Coa.st  Elks  Lodge  No.  1380 
and    of    the    American    Legion 
Post   in   Houston. 

Other  relatives  are  an  uncle, 
Ike  Hardison,  and  cousins, 
Luther  Hardison,  Duke  Thomp- 
son, Isaac  Hardison,  Ruhamie 
Hardison  and  Marcinia  Hardi- 
.son. 


History  Week 
Finale  Sunday 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
opportunity  to  correct  his  warp- 
ed   notions,"    Dr.   Isidore   Zctcr 
;:lein  told  a  History  We?k  forum 
ar  thh  Golden  Sta°te  Auditorium 
Monday. 

This  is  why  th"  Supreme 
Court  ruled  segregation  in 
schools  is  unconstitutional. 
Gradualism  isn't  even  practical. 
It  does  not  avoid  violence.  It 
encourages  violence  because  it 
encourages  the  bigots." 

Attys.  Edward  C.  Maddox 
and  George  L.  Vaughn  dis- 
cussed the  historic  signifi- 
cance of  the  Sui.reme  Court 
ruling  at  the  iji'jm. 


"This  bourbon's  best 
by  a  Texas  mile 


/-^' 


Sunny  Brook  bourbon. 


that  isl 


/tbnA/cAv 


Sunny  Brook,Bourbori 

Cheerful  as  its  Name! 

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Youf  shopping  cart  is  a  mirror  of  yotir 

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BROTHLRHUOD — Amonfj  partiiipnnl<:  nt  a  Brr,ihrrhnnd  mrrtmp  In^l  If  ednefdayspon- 
iorrd  by  the  y^nlional  Cnumil  of  Jci^ifh  It  n  mm  nt  the  II  rfttidi  Jrnnh  Community  Crntrr 
urrr.  Jrom  Irft.  i]eor//e  \hhini:kn.  Dr.  J  lie  e  Shnemtikcr,  of  the  Frifnd.f  Service  Commit- 
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Counril  of  Jmish   U'omrn.  and  Coiinrihunn   F.  dnard  Royhnl. 


Richardson  To  Judge 
History  Week  Contest 

Dr.  Ralph  Richarrison.  candidate  frtr  ithe  Los  Angples  Bo,ird 
of  Education.  Office  No.  6,  will  serve  as  jud^re  in  the  finals  of  a 
high  school  oratorical  contest  honorine  Negro  History  Week  this 
Friday  evening.  February  1.5,  S  p.m..  at  Manual  Arts  high  school, 

4131  S.  Vermont  Avenue.  * ■ ^ . 

The  contest,  which  is  sponsor-    mm*  mm  \m     ■> 

by  Our  Authors  Study  Club,  will      VLa    ViIaI    MaI 
bring  together  10  boys  and  giris      j\\Q    ^||Ul     PICi 

Cries  Husband; 
Wife  Hunted 

"She  shot  me!"  cried  George 
Reams.  "Call  an  ambulance!" 
he  moaned  as  he  slumped  to 
the  floor. 

The  fatal  shot  fTad  been  fir- 
ed through  the  hallway  door. 
There  was  a  woman's  cry  and 
the  sound  of  running  footsteps. 
Herman  H.  RoV,  of  334  W. 
.50th  street,  carried  his  friend 
to  his  bed,  and  then  called  the 
police. 

A  few  minutes  earlier,  about 

11:30   p.m.   Sunday.   Reams.   4.5. 

a  laborer,  had  knocked  on  the 

i  door  of  Roys  room  and  said  he 

wanted  to  come  in  and  "have 

la  talk." 

'     When    University    police    of- 
ficers  arrived,    the   dying    man 
was  breathing  hoarsely  and  was 
I  unable    to    answer  'q^uestions. 
Roy   informed  the  officers  that 
although    he    hadn't    seen    the 
woman,  he  recognized  her  voice. 
"It   was  Dora    Lee,    George's 
I  wife,"  he  said.  The  couple  had 
;  been    quarrtling.    he    told    the 
'  officers,     over     the     fact     that 
'  Reams  had  stayed  out  all  night. 
I     About  five  minutes  after  the 
i  police  arrived,  a  Georgia  Street 
ambulance   was   on    the   scene. 
The  ambulance  crew  pronounc- 
I  ed    Reams    dead.    The    woman 
'  had  shot  him  in  the  chest  with 
a  .32  (jalibre  revolver. 

Detectives     are     looking     for 
Dora     Lee     Reams,     sometimes 
I  known  as  Dora  Warren.  When 
I  la.'st  seen,  the  3.5.  year-old  wom- 
an was  wearing  a  pink  blouse 
\  and  light  blue  skirt.  She  weighs 
between      115     and      120     lbs., 
'  staTnds   five   feet   seven    inches, 
and  has  three  teeth  missingjn 
,  the    front   of    her    mouth. 


Miller  to  Talk 
On  FEP  Fight 

The  next  regular  member- 
ship meeting  of  the  Los  An- 
geles branch  r»'  the  NAACP 
will  be  held  Sunday,  Feb. 
17,  at  3  p.m.  at  Holman 
Methodist  Church,  3320  W. 
Adams  blvd. 

Featured  speaker  at  the 
meeting  will  be  Atty.  Loren 
Miller,  chairman  of  the  Ex- 
ecutive committee  and  Cal- 
ifornia Eagle  publisher.  Mil- 
ler will  discuss  the  fight  for 
FEP.  There  will  be  a  ques- 
tion and  onswer  period  after 
his  discussion. 

A  report  on  the  coming 
membership  compoign  will 
be  given. 


Athlete-of-Year 
Title  Goes  to 
Raler  Johnson 

Spir(is  G.  Ponty,  general  chair- 
man oif  the  Southern  California 
observiance  of  Brotherhood 
Week,  will  be  present  when  the 
Health  Club  of  the  Westside 
Jewish  Community  Center.  .5870 
W.  Oli'mpic  Blvd.,  honors  Rafer 
Johnsdn  as  the  "Athlete,  of  the 
■i'ear"  on  Wednesday,  Feb.  20, 
at  6:3p  p.m. 

A  host  of  sports  world  cele- 
brities will  be  on  hand  at  the 
annual  dinner,  open  to  the 
public]  when  Dr.  Sammy  Lee, 
last  year's  winner,  presents  the 
award  1  to  the  world,  record 
holder,  in  the  Decathlon. 

They  include  Sam  Baiter,  ra- 
dio and  TV  sport.scaster;  George 
T.  Davis,  Herald-Expre.ss  Sports 
Editor;  Larry  Houston,  Board  of 
Education  official  and  manager 
of  the  1956  United  States  Olym- 
pic track  team;  and  Bill  Schro- 
eder,  director  of  the  Helms  Ath- 
letic  Foundation. 

Murray  Drucker  is  chairman 
of  the  dinner  committee.  Other 
members  are  Robert  L.  Feld- 
man,  Robert  Misrach  and  Al 
Simoni  Ben  Berman  is  chair- 
man Of  the  Health  Club,  and 
Mrs.  Ben  Berman  is  chairman 
of  the  Women's  Health  Club. 


S4is«*v« '■■"%' 


DR.  RICHARDSON 

from  Los  Angeles  .schools,  ac- 
cording to  Mrs.  Lillian  Duffy, 
chairman  of  the  affair. 

In  addition  to  Richardson, 
Charles  H.  Mathews.  Rev.  Har- 
old Kingsley  and  Mrs.  Barbara 
Smith  will  also  act  as  judges. 

Dr.  Richardson  and  Mrs.  Mary 
Tinglof,  candidate  for  Board  of 
Education.-  Office  No.  2,  are 
sponsored  by  the  Committee  for 
Better  Schools,  a  cross-section  of 
community  leadership. 

Rev.  Maurice  Dawkins.  Rich- 
ard Cau'twright,  UAW  Political 
'Action  Director,  and  Sig  Ary- 
witz.  Education  Director  of  the 
ILGWU.  are  prominent  mem- 
bers of  the  Steering  Committee 
of  the  Committee  for  Better 
Schools. 


Two  Honored 

Two  local  residents  were 
honored  this  week  by  the  board 
of  supervisors  for  25  years  of 
county  service,  according  to 
Supervisor   Kenneth    Hahn. 

Honored  were:  Joseph  Gara- 
baldi,  2126  W.  28th  .street.  Los 
Angeles,  an  employee  of  the 
building  services  department. 
and  Florence  E.  Fitzhugh.  8144 
Zamora  avenue,  Los  Angeles, 
a  vocational  nurse  at  the  Gene- 
ral Hospital. 


CALIFORNIA  EAGLE 

WANT  ADS 


SAVE 
TIME    & 
MONEY 

-  Call  - 


AD.  4-0161 


DEADLINE  WED.  AT   11   A.M. 


Jealous  Man 

iContiriued  from^Page  11 
revolver.    Mrs.    Jones  struggled 
with    him.    but    the    gun    went 
off.  and  she  was  critically 
wounded. 

When  police  arrived  at  the 
scene  of  the  shooting  they 
found  the  body  of  Jones,  lying 
on  his  .stomach  on  the  kitchen 
floor,  bleeding  from  a  wound 
in  the  head  iust  above  the  ear. 
The  pi.stol  was  beneath  him.  He 
was  dead. 

They  found  blood  also  on  the 
bed,  and  a  trail  of  blood  lead- 
ing from  the  bedroom  to  the 
service  porch  and  alongside  of 
the  house.  Near  the  bed,  also, 
they  found  a  black-handled 
spring-blade  knife. 


Two  Women 
Become  P.  O. 
Supervisors 

Postma.ster  Otto  K.  Olesen 
this  week  announced  the  ap- 
pointment of  Mrs.  Lucille  Ash- 
ford  and  Miss  Annis  R.  Lackey 
as  supervisors  in  the  Los  An- 
geles Post  Office,  effective  Feb- 
ruary 9.  the  first  Negro  women 
supervisors  to  be  appointed 
here. 

Mrs.  Ashford,  who  entered 
the  postal  service  in  1942,  is 
the  wife  of  Wilbur  N.  Ashford, 
superintendent  of  Gree-nmead 
postal  station  at,  12020  S^  Cen- 
tral avenue.  They  live  at  721 
E.  42nd  street.  Superintendent 
Ashford's  brother,  Emmett  Ash- 
ford, well-known  umpire  for 
the  Pacific  >Coast  League,  is  a 
former    local    postal    employee. 

Miss  Lackey,  of  2031  Eighth 
avenue,  has  been  a^postal  ^rk 
since  1941,  and  for  sorne  time 
prior  to  her.  appointment  as 
foreman  of  mails  she  worked 
"in  the  Manpower  Control  Sec- 
tion at  Terminal  Annex  Post 
Office. 

The  promotion  of  both  Mrs. 
Ashford  and  Miss  Lackey  was 
a  result  of  competitive'  exami- 
nation recently  given  to  postal 
employeesfor  supervisorial 
work. 


Robber  Plays 
Cop;  Police 
Nob  Robber 

While  playing  "cops  and  rob- 
bers" Sunday  evening  i'n  a  bar 
at  3120  South  Vermont  avenue. 
Joseph  Sutton  was  forced  to 
change  sides,  right  in  the  mid- 
dle of  the  game. 

At  about  11  p.m.  "officer" 
Sutton  entered  the  bar  and 
walked  up  to  Nettie  Stevens. 
22  year-old  waitress,  who  lives 
at  1153  We.st  3.5th  street. 

"You  look  pretty  young."  said 
Sutton  flashing  a  card  which 
said  Police  on  it.  "How  old  are 
you?  I'm  a  police  officer." 

Miss  Stevens  was  about  to 
tell  her  age  when  Sutton 
grabbed  her  purse  which  was 
resting  on  her  lap.  He  opened 
i  it  and  was  making  a  thorough 
investigation.  Nettie  grabbed 
her  purse  back  and  the  fight 
wa."^  on. 

Just  when  things  were  get- 
ting real  .  interesting,  two  po- 
licemen entered  the  bar.  Jo- 
seph Sutton,  would-be-sleuth, 
is  thinking  it  over,  behind  bars^. 


Doctor's  Wife 
Found  J>ead  on 
Bathroom  Floor 

Clarrissa  Jones,  36,  wife  of 
Dr.  Albert  Jones,  chiropractor^ 
and  the  mother  of  two  children, 
was  found, dead  on  the  bath- 
room floor  of  their  home  at  2729 
W.  Caldwell-  street,  Compton, 
just  before  midnight  Monday. 
She  was  almost  three  months 
pregnant. 

Mrs.  Jones  was  a  nurse,  em- 
ployed at  Harbor  General  Hos- 
pital and  had  worked  until 
Saturday,  Feb.  9.  For  the  last 
three  weeks,  she  had  been  un- 
der the  care  of  Dr.  Merle  Colton 
of  Los  Angeles. 


Unvent^d  Heaters 

Caution  in  the  use  of  'un- 
vented  gas  heaters  was  uuged 
this  week  by  John.M.  Enriis, 
president  of  the  Building  and 
Safety  Department  of  the  City 
of  Los  Angeles.  ' "    — 


PROMOTED  —  Virgil 
Broun,  first  \eqro  in  Santa 
.Monica  to  establish  a  milk 
route  as  large  as  that  of  any 
competitor,  has  been  promoted 
In  a  hrlter  job  tilth  Golden 
Stale  Dairy. 

NAACP  Head 
Gets  Promotion 
Witli  Mill(  firm 

SANTA  MONICA  —  Virgil 
Brown,  the  first  Negro  to  es- 
tablish a  house-to-house  milk 
route  in  Santa  Monica  as  large 
as  that  of  any  other  competi- 
tive organization  in  the  South 
Bay  city,  has  ju.st  been  promot- 
ed by  his  employer,  the  Golden 
State  Dairy  of  West  Los  An- 
geles. • 

In  recognition  of  his  ability 
to  build  a  successful  business 
on  the  ba.^is  of  establishing  i 
friendly  relationships,  he  has 
been  given  a  position  where  he 
now  officiates  in  the-  whole- 
sale distribution  of  dairy  prod- 
ucts. 

NAACP   President 

Brown.    38.    president    of    the 

Santa    Monica    branch    Of    the 

NAACP,    is    a    man    to  whom 

achievements  count   important- 

I  ly    in    our   scores   of   successes.  ; 
whether  it  be  in  life,  pleasure  I 

I  or   play.  | 

'     One  of  the  young  presidents  ' 
iof   the    NAACP. in    the   Greater 
'  Los    Angeles    area.    Brown    has! 

."surrounded  his  chair  of  com-' 
,  mand  with  an  executive 'com- ' 
'  mittee    of    ci\  ic.    fraternal'  and  j 

religious  leaders  to  guide  him  j 
I  in    programs   of   benefit   to   his! 

people  and  his  community..       ! 
He  is  married  and  the  father  , 

of  four  children.  Bernice  20.! 
I  Virgil  Jr..  18,  Frederick,  15,  and  j 

Gloria,  13.  '       .  i 

A   member    of   the    Board    of ; 

Trustees  of  the  Calvary  Bap-  i 
I  tist   Church. »tre.asurer  of  Troop 

74.  Boy  Scovits  of  America,  and 
[active  in  many  other  civic  ac- 
itivities,     Brown     was    jecenily  ; 
j  elected  president  of  the  NAACP 

without  any  opposition. 


Brotherhood  -  DAR  Style; 
No  Mexicwi  Boys  Wonted 

DENVER  —  A  scheduled  Lincoln's  Day  pro- 
pram  a\;  the  State  Industrial  School  for  Boys  a^ 
Golden  was  cancelled  Sunday  when  the  chairma 
of  the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution  ob 
.iected  to  "Mexican  boys"  carrying  the  America 
flag. 

Mrs.  Charlotte  C.  Rush  of  Denver,  DAR  chai 
man,  said  she  would  insist  that  "only  America 
boys"  carry  "Old  Glory." 

She  added  that  "at  least  half"  of  the  boys  a 
the  school  "are   Mexicans."    She   said   she   "pre 
sumes"  most  of  the  boys  yere  born  in  the  Unitei 
States  but  of  parents  "who  cafne  here  from  Mex- 
ico.   They  are  Mexican  boys,  not  American  boys.' 

The  planned  program  was  cancelled  by  mu 
tual  consent. 

The  incident  created  a  storm  locally  and  na 
tionally,  with  councilmen,  legislators  and  DAR  of- 
ficials loudly  denouncing  Mrs.  Rush's  views. 


■I 


Wlllard  Townsend,  Labor 
Leader,  Dies  In  Chicago 

CHICAGO— Wijlard  Saxby  Townsend,  founder  ind 
pre^dent  of  the  United  Transport  Service  Employees 
Union,  AFL-CIO,  died  on  Feb.  3  at  Provident  Hospijtal. 
He  was  61  years  old. 

A  resolution  adopted  by  the 
executive'  council  of  the  AFL- 
CK)  at  its  recent  .midvvinter 
meeting  hailed  Townsend  as  "a 
great  trade  unionist  and  a 
great    American." 

Townsend  attended  the  Roy- 
al College  of  Science  in  To- 
ronto, Canada,  and  also  held 
an  honorary  LL.D.  from  Wilber- 
force  University.  He  collabo- 
rated  with   Dr.   Rayford   Logan 

in    WTiting    "What    the    Negro  |  sis  Sanitarium  in  Chicago. 
Wants,"  and  also  wrote  many  j  served   as  a  special  repres^nt- 
articles.   one   of   which.   "Trade  :  ative  to  the  International  ( 
Union     Practices,'     was     pub-  '  federation  of  Free  Trade  Un 
lished   in   Japanese.  ^  which  met  in  Japan  in  1932 

A  former  redcap,  he  wa*  in-".  He  is  survived  by  his  wic  ow 
strumental  in  organizing  the  Mrs.  Consuelo  Townsend,  apd  a 
transport  workers   in  1936.  and  '  son,  WiUard. 


since   1940  served   as  presi<^erTt 
of  the  U.T.S.E.  Union-  until 
death.     He   was   vice-presi(^ent 
of  the  National  Urban  I 
in  1945.  and  was  also  a  mjem 
ber   of   the   Labor-Ma 
Conference  called  by  Presi()ent 
Roosevelt  in  the  same  yea 

Townsend  was  a  mem  be 
the  Board  of  Directors  of 
Parkway  Commynity  .  Ce 
and   the   Municipal  Tubercfllo 

He 
nt 
Ton 
ons 


So.  Africo^ass  Treason 
Trial  Inquiry  Resumes 

Preparatory  examinations  in  connection  with  Jo- 
hannesburg's mass  treason  trials  are  continuing  and 
will  probably  run  for  six  month.s.  according  to  a  report 
in  the  Bulletin  of  the  Institute  of  African-American  Re- 
lations,'Inc.,  published  in  Washington. 

When,    the    inquiry    resumed' 
Jan.  9  after  several  weeks'  re 
cess,  500  armed  policemen  sur-  ,  ^^j.^ 
rounded  the  army  drill  hall  in 
Johannesbui-g. 


methods  involving  violence 
The  defendants,  however, 
the   charges    are  trumped 
up  and  that  their  only   'crime" 
is  their  opposition  to  apartlieid 
Accused   are   103  Africans.  23' — segregation, 
whites.  '22    Indians  'and   8   col 


Th«  California  Eagle— 3 
Thorsday,  February   14,   1957 


Birthday  Cake 
And  Fixings  at 
([alphs  Frida 


"You  are  invited. '  says  Jam- 
myi  Brown,  manager  of  Ralijhs 
Crenshaw-Rodeo  store.  3633 
Crenshaw  Blvd..  in  announing- 
the  Community  Birthday  P'lr'y 
to  be  held  at  the  store  fpm 
7  until  8.  on  Friday.  Feb.  t5. 

Ralphs  Groj-erj-  Co.  is  cele- 
brating 84  years  of  service  to 
Southern  California  this  nionth.. 
with  over  $50,000  worth  of ' 
prizes,  special,  sales.  an<l  com- 
munity birthday  parties  i  i  alt 
34  of  Ralphs  Compjete  Food 
Stores. 

"We   hope  everybody  in  this 
area    will    come    to   the    com- 


ored  (mi.xed.  blood t,  including 
top  members  of  organizations 
throughout  the  Union  of  South 
Africa  opposing  the  whitS  su- 
premacy  government. 

All  of  the  accused  are  now 
free  On'  bail. 

The  government  claims  it  is 
trying  to  save  South  Africa 
from  Communist  subversion 
ahd    has    accused    the    defend- '  Central.,  avenue. 


Skid  Row  Site 

"As  part  of  the  face-lifting 
scheduled  for  Skid  Row.  it  Was 
announced  this  week 
Young's  Market  Co.  is  planijing 
to  biiild  a  multimillion-doyar. 
210.000  square  foot  disti 
tion,  center   at   5th_^treet 


ants  of  "incitement  and  pre 
/pwation  to  overthrow  the  ex 
isting    state,  by    revolutionary 


The    building    will    be^  con 


structed  at  the  site  of  the 
Central    Railroad    Station. 


•  <yvl c  <Jv inlc\f  ^yVlortuarics 

LUXURIOUS,  MODERN,  MOTOR  EQtJIPMENT 


CARL  MILLER 

munity  party  at  our  Ralph$ 
Store,'  says  Sir.  Brown.  'There! 
be  ice  cream  and  birthday  cake 
for  all,  with  coffee,  chocolate 
milk,  and  soft  drinks  besides. 
We're  looking  forward  to  see- 
ing you." 

Equally  cordial  invitations 
werg  isswed  by  Carl  Miller, 
mallkger  of  Ralph's  FiguBroaj 
store,  4360  S.  Figueroa.  for  the 
community  party  to  be  held 
there  from  7  to  9  on  the  eve- 
ning of  Thursday,  Feb.  14. 

TO  GIVE  TREES  I 

^11  34  of  the  communities 
served  by  "Ralphs  Grocery  Co. 
are!  receiving  living  trees  to  be 
planted  where  they  like.  ia"  part 
of  ■  the  current  campaign  for 
outdoors  beautification.  and  as 
evidence  of  the  interest  Ralphs 
has' in  the  cornmunities  ser\-ed 
by  this  pioneer  grocery  concern. 

"Trees  add  so  much  to  the 
beautj-  of  a  communit>\  arid 
j  there  are  hundreds  of  yarities 
to  choose  from."  said  George 
Hjelte.  general  manager  of  the 
Department  of  Recreation  and 
Parks  of  the  City  of  Los  An- 
geles, in.  discussing  the  tree-, 
planting  project  with  Walter , 
Ralphs,  Jr..  president  of  Ralphs. 


old 


NEW  ORLEANS  —  The  Soutii-. 
j  e  r  n  Conference  Educational 
:  Fund,  Inc..  has  sent  a  Npw" 
j  Year's^  contribution  of  Sl,56750 
'  to  the  Inter-Civic  Council  of 
!  Tallahassee.    Fla. 


W0^' 


"FA$TE$T  $ELLING  BUIGK  DIALER  IN  SOUTHERN  CAUFORNIA" 

COLONIAL   BUICK 

fItffttrT  a  Brand  New  1957  Buick  2-Doer  for  i 

199  DOWN  •  ^XS^V'™""'''' 


^^$AVE  HUNDREDS  ON  YOUR  TRADE-IN 
if  GREATEST  $T0C;K  TO  CHOO$E  FROM 
if  36  MONTHS  OF   EASY   FINANCING 
if  FAIR  &  FAMOUS  G.M.A.C.  RATES 
if  FABULOUS  SERVICE   DEPARTMENT 


rDriva   North  to   Los   Feriz  Blvd.  . 
■East  on  Los  Foliz  to  Glondaio  Ave. 
IThen   North  to  COLONIAL  BUICK  otj 
1144  So.  Glendale  Ave.  Giendale. 


FREE  APPRAISAL 


CALL  'COUNT'  CARTER  CH.    5-661 1 


COLONIflL  BUICK 


144  So.  Glendale  Ave. 

IN  GLENDALE 


LOatN  MILLH 


The  Re/lgfous  frmmdom  Cemm/ttee  PrmsmMtt 

THE  LOS  ANGELES  NEGRO 

HIS  ACHIEVEMENTS,  CONTRIBUTIONS, 

PROBLEMS 

Sp««k*r»:   AHoriMy  lOREN  MILLER 

Nationally   known  Civil   Right*  Lawyer;  Publithcr  of 

California  EagI*  Nawipapor;  Mtmbtr  National  Board 

NAACP 

Attorney  BERNARD  S.  JEFFERSON, 

Chairman  Board  of  Lot  Angeiot  Urban  League. 

Other  speakers  to  be  announced. 

Place:  Auditorium  FIRST  UNITARIAN  CHURCH. 

Time:  FRIDAY,.4EBRUARY  15  at  •  P.M. 

Admission:  75c  —  l^ail  erdor  titkmit,  oncleso  cfiock  or 
money  order  and  return  envelope.  Benefit:  Tax  Fund. 


DEPENDABLE,  MODERN  EOUIPMENT  is  v&ry  essential  to  an  outstanding  funeral   firm   like  Utter-McKinley's,  which  serves  thousands  yearly.  Every 
Xyfamily  wants  the  finest  possible  for  the  last  tribute,  and  naturally  this  desire  extends  to  limousines  and  hearses.  Then,  loo,  a  funeral  procession  must 
move  exactly  on  schedule.  These- are  some  Of  the  reasons'why  the  Utter-McKinley  Morth/aries  Q,wn  a  large  fleet  of  didillacs  and  other  fine  cars. 


KNOWING  THAT  AWVNY  TRIPS  must  be  made,  and  various  special 
errands  done  on  time,  they  believe  the  finest  cars  and^limousines  afa 
the  surest  and  best.  The  use  of  these  expensive  cars  is  one  of  the  ttems 
included  in  every.  Utter-McKinley  funeral,  at  no  extra  cost. 


ANOTHER  APPRECIATED  ITEM  of  service  is  the  ample  parking  space 
provided  at  Utter-AAcKinley's  for  the  convenience  of  family  and  friends. 
Finest  funerals  on  credit.  Serving  all  cr«eds.  Low  as  $2.85  weekly. 
Shipments  anywhAe  by  Rail  pr  Air. 


16  Convenient  Chapels  As  Near  As  Your  Telephone 


Broadway  ADamt  T-932S 

1254*  S.  Brsadway 

Wilshire  DUnkirk   8-24S1 

♦44  S.  yermont 

South>)vost         PLymoulh  6-928S 

10625  S.  Broadway 

Downtown         Richmond  94133 

S17  Venice  Boulevard 


West  Hollywood         BR.  2-258  T 

8814  Sunset  Boulevard 

Viewpark  AXmiit<(erNl-1 147 

3719  West  Sl.auson.  Avenue 

Glendale  CHapm'an  5-27IB 

624  South  Central  Avenue 

Huntington  Park  LUdlow  •-2t2B 

2672  CUrenden  ' 


East  Let  Angolos        PA.  8-7141 

5245  East  Pomona  Boulevard   . 

HighUnd  Park       CLinten  5-01M 

5860  North  Figueroa  Street 

Paudona  SYcamoro  7-1123 

825  E:ast  Orange  Grove 

Eagle  Reck  CUnton  6-221 1 

4824  Eagle  Bock  Boulevard 


Compton  NEwmark   1-TII4 

.1S01  East  Palmer  Avenue 

»lollywo«d       Hollywood  9-1010 

6!40  Hollywood  Boulevard 

\  alloy  POpiar  3-«20t 

S$30  Lankershim  Boulevard 

liglewood  Oftogon   S-llU 

tl  O  NertN  Locust 


*^ 


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5 .   .  --^X^.5'-.'^J^L 


^-f-- 


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IKCOP 


Monday  thru  Friday 


6:00  BAXTER  WARD   NEWS 


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1957  SAVOY  44I00R  SEDANS 

.Tha  "3  ytart  thtad"  kaauty  wHb  FHShbattea  Pawn  FIHa,  radia,  kaatar, 

whHa  tidawall  tiras,  aad  aiany  athar  laxary  axtraa. 

Raciatar  avary  wMk,  aay  Ralfka  atara. 


NET!  KIDSl 


Ilaatria  aatar  drivat 
Oarta  aar  a  allM  aai. 
ridahil  laaal 
MPH,  kH  alaalria 
IgMa,  karii  raokantMr 
kattary. 


IM  '^MOUkTAINS 
OF  aROCERIES'* 

ItliikaaaiElaatriatkHlata 
4  Wtra  Aaaaaaary  Sat* 
(If-Maaa) 


ii^Jli 


i!&i-»^.<,^ 


t  ■ 


>'J.l 


p^r». 


11 

GAS  RANGES 

Thi  WMt't  Urctsf  ifll- 
inc  fM  ranct,  diluMi 
with  trantpartat  thalf 
that  Ittt  tha  licht 
throufh  ta  tha  eaakinf  sur- 
faat)  irillavatar  brailar  ar 
triple  ratissariij 


>% 


f-m 


4  Two-Week 
Trips  for  2 
toACAPULCO 
and  MEXICO  CITY 

Step  at  baoutiful,  a!r>cenciitiona<l  Hetal  Club  cl«  Ptea, 
Dn«  of  Acopulco's  flncttl   Martin  Lara,  head  of  A^artin's 

Tours,  Mexico's  best,  is  your  personal  guide 
t . .  you  stop  at  Plaza  Vista  Hermosa,  Haci« 
enda  Vista  Hermoso  . . ',  and  in  Taxco  at  Po- 
sada de  la  MisionI 


4  ''BONDED" 
WATER  SOFltNERS 


Fully  «utamatJo,  clau- 
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FILTEX 


VACUUM 
CLEANERS. 


TRAVEI^  TRAILER 

World's  most  popular  traVol 
frallor!  Shasta  No.  1400 
woighs  only  1150  pounds, 
yot  sloops  fivo! 


8 


U.S.D.A. 


FREEZERS 

Fillad  with  ahaiaa  faadtt 
Takaa  np  sa  mara  flaar  tpaaa 
than  an  ardiaary  rafrictrate r, 
yat  givaa  aimatt  18  aaUa 
faat  tf  pliBiad  its nga 


SUPER  QUALITT 
CHOICE  GRADE 


BEEF  ROA 


Chudc 
Pot  Roast 


Lbu 


Seyen  Bone  Rodst  x^. 
Round  Bone  Rodst  ib 

BONE 

Shoulder  Clod 


BROTHER 


Pfana  Vista  Hermoaa 


Warld'a  flaaat  kaaa 

•X,..,«."rr/  SEWING  MACHINES  ^^ 

pawarfal  Biatari        /  WHk  U.U  taad  Haaaakaapiag,  ^-^ 

vHk  attatk*  [    Paraata',  MaCall'a  saaia  at 

Maala.  |    aapravali  aaai^kta  aat  af  It  atfaakaaats. 


^ 


CATERING 

White  House  Ice  Cream 


Pint... 


2.49« 


Quorf. 


JjJeJoni 


Chocolate  Nut^;g 
Cookies  9.0. 31 


Treats 

PACIFIC 
CRACKERS 


1-fb...., 


F  &  P  Fruit  Cocktail 


I o*oz. tt«*t«  •••! 


30-ox., 


Cracker  Jack 

A  POPCORN  CONFECTION 


IH-oi. 


for 


Wuf  tt  ToK 


OBERTI  LARGE 

Ripe  Olives 


9 -or. 


Crisco 

SHORTENING 


1-lb.  Con... 


Wesson  Oil 

65' 


Quort 


Goftoii 


CHEF  BOY-AR-DEE 

Spaghetti  Sauce  ' 

Muahraem or Mtet  Soz......  15^  ISV^oz.     25^ 

Lipton  Soup  Mix 

B««f-V«g«tabl«  Chicken  NomII*  or 

Grten  Pte                 or  Onion  TomotoVegefable 

2  ^?-  29c  2  ')!r  33e  ^,.  .f  3  39* 


Swift^s  Prem 

LUNCHEON  MEAT     12-oz.  Can 
Redeem  ye«ir  ceupeni  at  any 


store 


WHOLE  KERNEL  CORN 


BUTTER  XERNtt 


T-lb.  1-tz. 


fw 


FARMER  UOHN 

Smoked  Hdms 

Whole  er  Fun  SiMnkHeif  Lb.< 

BuH  Ends,  Lb. . . .  53^ 

John 

Bacon        pkg... 


FARMER 

Slice 


LUER  QUALITY  < 

LUNJCHEON  MEAT 

ALL  BEEfj 

Large  Bologcai 

MIDGET 

Beef 


LO..  ••  •  a.^ 


12-OZ.... 


FIRST  WEEK'S  PRIZE  WINNERS 


19^7  Pfymeuth,  Mrs.  N«li  Baiieom 
M«xieaii  Trip  for  Two,  Alicia  Harfzol! 
Maytag  R*frig«rater-Fr««z«r,  No«ll«  Hiekr 
2  O'Kttfo  &  Mtrritt  Gas  Rangts:  Eunict  Bakor, 
Bondod  Wat«r  Softtnar,  Mrs.  Y.  PalmarUa 


E.  T«m«y 


-^: 


• .  ^.>/  ;.v:-j^^w;>;^  "T  r'^\ 


I 


r»-  — 


6:15  JUNGLEI 


6:30  RANGE  RIDER 


>-»j<'j"     ^ 


-A  -  ■ 


CHANNEL 


BIRTHDAY  BARGAIN 


tin  wHh' 
sin  for 


Plus  Gold  Tape  Dividends 

Your  dollart  do  doubU  dUfy  at  Rolphfl  Sovt  your  gold  Mih  logiilor  tapti 
•  and  g«t  any  of  tho  following  FREE! 

j_|       Gloaming  Olympic  lifotimo  stainlou  stool  ImwIs  .  .  .  94-<|t.  tl 
*   .  Ild^  for  2  $20  onvolepoi;  1  Vi«qt.  tiu  for  3  $20  onvoiopn;  3-qt. 
4  $20  onvolopos;  4-qt.  sizo  for  5  $20  onvolopot. 

O     Guarontood  flrtt-quality  luxury  Sandra-Siioor  Nylons . . .  your  cholct  of 
'    Momlou  or  ttrotch,  only  2  $20  onvelopos  por  pair. 

O      Handsomo  4-pc.  placo  sottings  in  pink,  charcoal,  turquelso,  yollow 
^*    sand,    groon  ;  4-pc  placo  sotting  for  2  $20  onvolopos. 

M      Crystal-door,  Swodlsh  Modom-dosign  glosswaro;  any  6  piocos  for  |«mI 
^*    t$20onvolopo. 

FOX  DELUXE  FROZE»^ 


m 


Everyone's  talking  about  the  record-breaking  "Birthday  Bargains" 
In  all  departments  of  all  Ralphs  stores  •  •  •  about  the  fabulous 
prizes  you  {ust  register  for  •  •  •  no  purchase  required  . . . 
about  the  giant  community 
Birthday  Parties  with  free 
refreshments  (see  local  papers 
for  dates  in  your  area).  Don't 

fail  to  take  advantage  of 
"Birthday  Month"  at 


Lb. 


U>.. 


FRYING 
CHICKENS 


1-lb. 

112-oz. 

Pkg. 


3 


Lb. 


Lb. 


Wings 

^  Thighs  or 
(  Drumsticics 


l-lb.  PkQ. 


1-lb.  Pkg. 


5fl^  Breasts 


l-Fb.  Pkg. 
With  Chicken  Ssrvt  Oetan  Spray  Cranberry  Sauce 


33 

65 
79 


tb. 

13c 

1-lb. 
Pkg.. 


M    RATH  BLACK  HAWK  PURE  PORK 

Link  Sausage  i  b  Pkg 


FRESH  FILLET  OF 

ic  Sea  Bass 


Lb. 


59 
57 


OENNISON'S 

^  £hiir  Con  Carne 


lyithBeone 


15V2-OT. 


19 


53 


BETTY  CROCKER 

Answer  Calce  Mix 

WHITE,  YELLOW  OR  DEVIL'S  FOOD 


■f- 


Includes  Chocolate  Fudge 
Icing  &   Pan  HVi-oz... 


31 


FROZEN  PEAS 


PiaSWEET'S  WINTER  CARNIVAL 


10-ez. 


for 


25 


0 


CAKE  MIX 

CINCH 
Dtvib  Food,  Gold,  Spice  «r  Whltt 


IP^    16-or. 


tRdsHi  Grape  Jelly  ^  ^ 

or  Preserves      20  oz  xL  ^ 


CARY 


Maple  Syrup 


12-ox. ...'. 


79« 


I 
I 


1 


C 


I 


DETERGENT 


Gioirt  Picg. 


49 


0 


Plu»  2e  ToK 


SUNSWEET  READY  TO  SERVE 

Cooked  Prunes 


16-or.. , 


25c 


MARCAL 


Paper  Napkins  ^9  of  100    14^ 


STRONGHEART 

Dog 

Food         15'/4-ez.  Con 


2.21 


Fhji  1«  Tax 


rarflixir 

Cat  Food 


8-ot.  Con. . .  .3  for  2#  ' 

Wot  leTox  .     - 


snouiq 


7>4-Ox. 


PREYENTIYE 
BLEACH 

freveeta  ey^  grey  m  «vMe  /mger Je 

28«  ISO... 


47c 


Ptut  la  Tom 


riu«  2c  Tax 


Trend 

LIQUID  DETERGENT 


12-oz.       2    Bonded    56^ 

Plui  3e  Tox 


COACHELLA 
VALLEY 


Grapefruit  ml* 


Lb, 


7 


WASHINGTON 
HOTHOUSE 


FANCY 


KITCHE^  CHARM 

Waic  Paper  ,^^ 

100-ft.  Fioll lO* 


White  or  Wheat  Bread 


FRESH  FROM  Sbt&t  OWN  BAKERY 

FINEST  QUALITY  AND  YOU  SAVE  MONIYI  X 


Standard 
15-oz 


18 


C     Large | 

1-lb.  6i5-or 


26 


5^£^  Orange  Rblls 


DELICIOUS  COFFEE  CAKE  ROLLS  | 
WITH  ORANGE  MARMALADE        I 

AND  NUTS  Pkg.  of  «. 


29 


This  525^^  Coupon 

WORTH  20' 

On  Pnthoso  of  ono  10-lb.  Bog 


C&H  SUGAR 


Good  at  any  ^^tjpA^  Morktt 
Thndoy,  Friday,  Saturday  t  Siindoy  ooly 
fobrvory  14.  15,  16  t  M,  1957 

LIMIT  ONE  COUPON  PER  CUSTOMER 


s 


I  '. 


FIRST  WEEK'S  PRIZE  WINNERS 

Two  Brother  Sewing  Moehines:  Mrs.  M.  P.  Palmer,  Mrs.  A.  H.I  MeCouiload 
Fllfex  Vacuum  Cleaner,  Derris  R.  Loura 
Artistic  Wire  Set.  Mrs.  H.  L.  Gould 
Three  Sunbeam  Electric  Skillets: 

Claude  J.  Welsh,  Rose  Pierce,  Ira  T.  Woadruff 


1, 


y  *l 


California  Bagle 

Loren  MUIt,  Publisher 


piMM  off  AflMrteoN  Iff*  thrMigh  ths  dawooPMrtc 

■•  riPC  on  lOMNf  stoto  OMl  mmomh  wvoIs* 

2.  DocoHt  howiwg  for  ON  Awri— ■■■ 

3.  RoprMontaHoii  hi  •ovommont.  . 

4.  Adoqu<rto  old  ago  p«iMlom  and  s««l«l  Mwirlly. 

5.  Cellollw  borgoinliis  rlghls  for  oil  woridHON. 

4.  Dovlopwont  ami  owcooro gomoitf  of  Nogro  businoM. 

l¥«oppos«: 

1.  Jim  Crow  in  oil  forms. 

2.  Communists  and  oil  otiMr  onomios  «#  domocmqr. 


10SO  lost  43rd  Moco,  Los  Anfolos  11 


AD.  4-0161 


<Jne  <^mporiant  ^yVcws paper 


Political  Spotlight 


XJ\/\f\/X/\J\/\/\JXIX 


Chief  Parker  Again 


Chief  of  Police  William  Parker 
last  week  disavowed  any  intention 
of  opposing  the  Eisenhower  ad- 
ministration's civil  rigjits  program. 
In  fact,  he  said  he  was  enthusT&s- 
tically  in  favor  of  that  program. 
That  was  Friday. 

Sunday  he-  took  to  the  air  on  thje 
mayor's  radio  program  to  launch 
a  new  attack  on  federal  civil  rights 
legislation.    The  bills  he  opposes, 
he  insists,  are  those  which  would 
give  the  Federal  government  the 
right  to  look  into  the  activities  of 
^police    officers   where   civil  rights 
•=Tiolations  are  alleged. 
■    Mr,  Parker's    refrain    was    the 
sanut  one  he  sang  at  Fresno  a  cou- 
ple of  weeks  ago:  the    legislation 
would  hamper  and  hamstring  po- 
lice officers. 

*  The  chiefs  bias  becomes  ever 
rlnore  clear  every  time  he  discusses 
the  issue.  He  is  certain  that  po- 
lice officers  are  a  law  unto  them- 
selves and  that  they  must  be  left 
alone  to  judge  their  own  actions. 
He  is  unwilling  to  admit  that  they 
could  ever  deprive  a  citizen  of  his 
civil  rights  or  civil  liberties. 

The  truth  is  otherwise.  The  rec- 
ords of  the  United  States  Supreme 
Court  bear  eloquent  testimony  that 
time  after  time  police  officers  have 


coerced  confessions  from  prisoners. 
In  one  case,  the  court '  said  that 
they  resorted  to  the  law  of  "the 
rack  and  screw."  In  another  case, 
a  Georgia  sheriff  killed  a  man  in 
his  custody.  In  still  another  in- 
stance, Florida  police  officers  kept 
a  man  in  jail  19  months  after  he 
had  been  ordered  freed  by  the 
courts. 

In  none  of  these  instances  were 

the  police    off icers '  disciplined  by 

^^state  officials.     It  was  only  when 

tni  cases  got  before  Federal  courts 

that  the  facts  came  to  light. 

We  have  put  the  emphasis  on 
cases  originating  in  the  South,  but 
there  are  plenty  of  instances  in  the 
North,  and  right  here  in  Los  Ange- 
les, where  police  c^fficers  have  de- 
nied prisoners  their  civil  rights. 

There  is  no  hope  that  the  situa- 
tion in  the  South  can  be  cured 
short  of  Federal  legislation;  there 
is  plenty  of  room  for  correction  of 
similar  evils  in  the  North. 

It  all  boils  down  to  the'  fact  that 
despite  his  technical  competence, 
Mr.  Parker's  lack  of  concern  for 
,  civil  rights  and  his  long-drawn-out 
opposition  to  judicial  decisions  or 
curative  legislation  in  the  area  of 
civil  liberties  unfits  him  for  the  job 
he  holds. 


Appoint  Judge  Hasti 


The  President  has  an o their 
chance  to  name  Judge  William  H. 
Hastie  to  the  Supreme  Court.  He 
by-passed  a  similar  opportunity 
last  fall  when  he  named  Justice 
William  Brennan  to  fill  the  then 
existing  vacancy. 

Judge  Hastie  is  a  judge  of  the 
United  States  Court  of  Appeals,  the 
court  just  below  the  nation's  high- 
est tribunal.  He  has  filled  the  po- 
sition with  honor  and  dignity  and 
lawyers  know  him  as  one  of  the 
best  judges  in  the  appeals  court 
system. 

Mr.  Eisenhower  said  that  he 
hoped  to  be  able  to  fill  the  present 
vacancy  by  elevating  a  man  already 


on  the  Federal  bench.    That  speci- 
fication fits  Judge  Hastie.' 

Frankly,  the  only  reason  that 
occurs  to  us  for  denying  the  posi- 
tion to  Judge  Hastie  is  that  it 
might  rouse  a  storm  of  protest 
among  the  Dixiecrats.  It  probably 
would,  but  they  would  be  put  in 
the  extreme  position  of  having  to 
rest  their  opposition  on  race  and 

we  are  sure  that  the  majority  of 
senators  would  finally  override  that 

opposition. 

Judge  Hastie  deserves  the  Su- 
preme Court  appointment.  We  hope 
he  gets  it.  The  nation  will  be  the 
gainer  if  he  does. 


Quail,  Golf  and  Ike 


Now  that  Mr.  Eisenhower  is 
down  in  Georgia  we  hope  that  he 
will  take  a  minute  or  two  out  of 
his  busy  pastime  of  quail  shooting 
and  golf  playing  to  remind  his 
Georgia  neighbors  that  it  is  time 
they  lived  up  to  the  obligations 
thrust  on  them  by  the  Constitu- 
tion- 
Georgia,  most  of  us  know,  is 
Herman  Talmadge's  bailiwick  and 
Talmadge  is  the  man  who  brayed 
the  loudest  urging  disobedience  to 
the  Supreme  Court's  decrees  in  the 
school  cases  and  other  cases  in 
which  integration  was  ordered. 

At  this  very  moment,  the  Rev. 
William  Bonders,  one  of  the  na- 
tion's most-respected  ministers,  is 
Hying  under  threat  of  going  to  jail 
because  he  refused  to  bow  to  Jim 
Crow  OB  an  Atlanta  bub   Th«  Sup 


preme  Court  has  said  that  he 
doesn't  have  to  accept  segregation 
on  public  transportation,  but  Geor- 
gia officers  arrested  him  anyhow. 
If  the  President  would  speak 
right  up  and  say  what  he  thinks 
about  this  unconstitutional  treat- 
ment of  the  Rev.  Borders  we  think 
his  statement  would  go  a  long  way 
toward  assuring  justice  for  the 
minister. 

And  while  he's  speaking,  the 
President  ought  to  say  a  word  or 
two  about  Georgia's  statute  vo^hich 
commits  that  state  to  disobedience 
to  the  Supreme  Court. 

After  all,  Mr.  Eisenhower  is  still 
President  of  all  the  people.  We're 
sure  that  his  Georgia  neighbors 
would  be  Interested  in  what  he 
thinks  about  the  Constitution  and 
their  dutx  to  obef  it 


By  OBSERVER  1^^^'w^'9lM^WFWi:vlW^^r^ 

HEADS  POULSON  DRIVE 

Preston  Hotchkis,  noted  civic 
leader,  insurance  executive  and 


lawyer,  has  been  named  Chair- 
man of  Finance  on  the  Com- 
mitt^  ito  Re -Elect  Mayor  Nor- 
ris  Pouison,  at  the  April  2  pri- 
mary,  lit  is  announced  by  Ben. 
P.  Grifl^th,  General  Chairman. 
"The  re-election  x>t  Mayor 
Poulsonj  is  of  paramount  im-. 
portanc^  to  every  wage  earner, 
business  man  and  housewife. 
Being  a  certified  public  ac- 
countant,  the  Mayor  has  creat- 
ed a  rhodern  budget  control 
progranti  and  budgeting  sys- 
tem foff  the  city's  financial 
operations  and  planning,  which 
have  gaji'^ed  national  and  in- 
ternational recognition,"  Hotch- 
kis declared. 

-YE^"  VOTE  ASKED 

Honest!,  fair,  efficient  com- 
bustible rubbish  collection  — 
at  low  cost — will  be  assured 
for  every  Los  Angeles  house- 
holder if  the  city  does  the  job^ 
Allerton  H.  Jeffries  stressed  to- 
day on  accepting  appointment 
as  vice-chairman  of  the  Com- 
mittee to  Vote  "Yes"  on  Prop- 
osition A. 

Calling  the  April  2  municipal 
rubbish  collection  referendum 
"one  of  the  incfSt  important 
measures  ever  to  appear  on  an 
election  ballot  in  thiS;.  city," 
Jeffries  declared  that  the  fu- 
ture welfare  of  Los  Angeles 
will  depend  to  a  great  extent 
upon  the  passage  of  Proposition 

A. 

*    «    * 

DEMOS  MEET 

More  than  1,000  Democratic 
leaders  will  take  part  in  a 
three  day  national  conference 
on-fcocial  and  economic  issues 
jff^n  Francisco  on  February 
15,  16:  and  17. 

At  the  same  time,  the  full 
membership  of  the  Democratic 
National  Committee  will  meet 


Adlal  Stevenson  will  make 
his  fir!5t  major  speech  since  the 
election  at  a  fund  raising  din- 
ner climaxing  the  Democratic 
conclave. 

«    •    • 

BACKS  CIVIL  RIGHTS 

Representative  James  Roose- 
velt today  testified  on  civil 
rights  legislation  at  hearings 
before  a  subcommittee  of  the 
House  Committee  on  the  Judi- 
ciary. 

.  "The  denial  of  civil  rights — 
the  relegation  to  second-class 
citizenship  —  to  any  group  of 
citizens  is  wrong,  morally, 
legally  and  politically.  I  use 
the  word  'political'  in  its  broad- 
est sense,"  the  Congressman 
stated.  "Enactmeijt  of  legisla- 
tion to  safeguard  ^these  rights 
against  constant  erosion  should 
have  highest  priortiy." 

*  •    * 

PROPOSITIONS    BACKED 

Formation' of  a  citizen's  com- 
mittee to  campaign  vigorously 
for  passage  of  Propositions  B 
and  C  in  the  April  2  primary 
election  was  announced  today. 

Propositions  B  and  C  will  ask 
increased  tax  support  to  assure- 
the  employment  of  •  teachers 
needed  for  new  elementary  and 
junior  and  senior  high  schools 

in  the  city.  .^ 

*  *    « 

ENNIS   RAPS   POULSON 

John  M.  Ennis,  candidate  for 
Mayor  and  former  President  of 
the  Board  of  Building  and  Safe- 
ty Commissioners,  today  said 
that  the  Mayor  and  his  City 
Planning  Commissioners  were' 
still  procrastinating  on  the  ap- 
pointment, of  a  City  Planning' 
Director. 

"1  note  that  after'  repeated 
articles  in  the  Los  Angeles 
Herald  Express  and  the  Exami- 
ner pointing  out  tl^  lack  of ' 
coordinated  planning  and  after 
public  statements  made  by  my- 


in  San  Francisco — the  first  such  >  self  on   this   subject,   the   City 


meeting  ever  to  be  held  west 
of  the  Mississippi  -^  and  the 
newly  -  organized  Democratic 
National  Advisory  Committee, 
will  also  convene. 


Planning  Commission  has  fin- 
ally come  up  with  a  recommen- 
dation for  revamping  our  Chao- 
tic planning  system,"  Ennis 
said. 


BaAtleaxe  &  Bread 

By  L9tt«r  B.  Gronger 


»^;.-** 


!i 


Political  "wiseacres"  are  de- 
scribing as  "good  politics"  the- 
forthcoming  trip  of  Vice-Presi- 
den  Nixon  to  help  celebrate 
Independence  Day  for  the  Gold 
Coast  (soon  ::::.:,^,.*>^:  .j^'j 
to  be  Ghana) 
early  in 
March.  It  is 
good  politics, 
to  be  sure, 
but  not  in  the 
cheap  sense 
so  often  im- 
plied. 

O  f  course 
it  is  true  that 
colored    v  o  t-  Granger 

ers  in  this  country  will  be 
proud  of  the  fact  that  our  gov- 
ernment's No.  2  rnan  is  being 
commissioned  to  can^  official 
greetings  to-  the  infant  nation. 
This,  however,  will  be  only  a 
passing  sentiment  and  hardly 
productive  of  political  reward 
in  the  way  of  votes. 

Unusual 

More  important  in  the  sense 
of  good  politics  is  the  fact  that 
the  people  of  Ghana -will  .ap-. 
predate  and  long  remember 
that  the  Vice-President  of  the 
United  States  interrupted  his 
duties  during  a  session  of  the 
Congress  (a  most  unusual  hap- 
pening) to  bring  fraternal 
greetings  from  the  world's  most 
powerful  democracy  to  the 
world's  newest  free  democratic 
nation. 

But  most  important  of  all  Is 
the  fact  that  the  Nixon -mis- 
sion -will  underline  for  nation- 
al and  world  attention  the  ris- 
ing importance  of  the  African 
continent  in  world  affairs — 
and  the  importance,  of  the  na- 
tive peoples  of  that  continent. 
This  new  appreciation  of  the 
importance  of  African  affairs 
could  possibly  mean  a  turning 
point  in  that  continent's  10- 
year  drift  from  colonial  exploi- 
tation towards  a  dangerous 
Fascism. 

African  Foeeiem 

African  Fascism  has  taken 
two  avenues,  and  the  one  is 
only  slightly  more  dangerous 
than  the  other.  Most  danger- 
ous, of  course,  is  the  hate- 
filled,  fear-produced  racism  of 
South  Africa  which  the  Boars 
have  used  as  a-  means  of 
saddlisic  a  poli&»l  dictatorship 
on  that  unhsppy  country.  But 
also  dangerous:  is  the  perverted 
national!]^  ofS^gypt,  which  has 
been  employed  by  the  Nasser 
regime  to  establish)  a  military 
dictatorship  over  tlje  Egyptian 
people,  wl^  the  Aim  of  extend- 
ing it  eventually  to  include  the 
entire  Mid-East^i(orth  African 
area.' 

.    Between  these  two  totalttar* 
Ian  effects  thsre  is,  of  oouise. 


an  important  difference.  The 
South  African  dictatoi%hip  was 
imposed  by  a  few  million 
whites  upon  the  land's  native 
people^— a  people  who  are  in 
an  8-to-l  majority.  And  the 
racial  bigotry  which  is  the  de- 
vice used  is  a  nasty.-  brutal 
racism  that  is  even  more  nak- 
edly uncivilized  than  the  brand 
used  in  Mississippi.  ■ 

Overwhelming  Support 

In  Egypt,  by  contrast,  Nasser 
is  supported  by  an  overwhelm- 
ing majority  of  his  own  people. 
They  see  him  not  as  an  op- 
presser,  but  as  a  savior.  He 
points  down  the  glory  road, 
and  in  following,  his  gesture 
their  e.yes  are  so  blinded  by 
the  vision  of  promised  national 
greatness  that  they  cannot  see 
,the  ha-zards  of  mi.sery  and 
starvation  for  millioris  and 
loss  of  true  freedom  for  all— 
if  Nasser's  grab  at  the  dicta- 
tor's power  should  prove-  suc- 
cessful. 

These  tragic  developments 
have  taken  place  following 
others  equally  tragic  —  Italy's 
disastrous  and  bloody  venture 
into  Ethiopia;  France's^- incred- 
ibly inept  blundering  in  North 
Africa;  and  Belgium's  "benevo- 
lent tyranny"  in   the  Congb. 

f      Shrugged  Off 

Thiey  have  been  possible  be- 
cause a  majority  of  white 
opinion  in  the  world  simply 
has  not  been  much  concerned 
about  the  needs,  desires  or  in- 
tentions of  native  Africans.  Af- 
rica has  been  regarded  as  "the 
white  iflan's  problem"  and  the 
indigenous  population  has  been 
shrugged  off  as  mera  instru- 
ments of  production,  or  blocks 
in   the   way   of   progress. 

The  Nixon  visit  with  all  of 
its  official  trappings  will  star- 
tle many.  They  will  be  im- 
pressed by  the  fact  that  the 
United  States  recognizes  Ghana 
as  the  emergence  of  a  new 
great  force  in  world  affairs. 
They  will  wonder  why  Ameri- 
ca goes  to  such  pains  to  culti- 
vate so  small  a  nation. 

If  they  are  intelligent  en- 
ough these  wondei-ing  observ- 
ers will  begin  t6  realize  that 
Ghana  today  Is  Africa  of  to- 
monow,  and  that  Africa  to- 
morrow will  be  oh  the  side  of 
freedom  in  the  struggle  for 
world  power — or  the  cause  of 
ft-eedom  will  be  lost.  It  is  this 
■  fact  that  makes  «ie  Nixon. trip 
good  politics  regardl^  of  who 
votes  for  whom  in  jthe  forth- 
coming United  States  elections. 


:Tl>e  American  Cancer  Society 
gftt^orts  IT  tumor  boards  in 
Los  Angeles  County,  which  last 
year  gave  free  diagnostic  ex- 
aminations to  over  3,000.  pa- 
tients referred  ^y  their  doctors. 


Feet  of  Clay 


■  "fc ;  -r^ 


^Y  '■^■v-"'»''^-'.-.:5*vif 


Washingtan  School  Plan 
Called  Success 


Probe  Asked  of 


WASHINGTON — Washington's  school  integration  plan  was 
pictured  as  working  smoothly  and  according  to  plan  by  a  top 
Washington  school  official  .'who  called  it  a  "miracle  of  social,- 
adjustment." 

Dr.  Carl  F.  Hansen,  assistant  superintendent  of  Washington 

schools,  said  the  local  board  of      = 

education  is  "Well  on  %he  way" 
to  realization  of  its  primary  ob- 
jective: "The  maximum  devel- 
opment of  every  pupil,  regard- 
less of  race,  creed,  cultural  and 
econornic  status  and  supposed 
capacity  for  learning." 

Hansen  made  the  statement 
in  a  report  published  by  the 
Anti  -  Defarnation  League  of 
B'nai  B'rith.  In  'it  he  reviewed 
the  preparation  and  planning 
for  integration  of  Washington 
schools  and  the  progress  of  the 
program  to  date. 

Four  southern  members  of  a  • 
House  District  of  Columbia 
subcommittee,  after  extensive 
hearings,  i.ssued  a  report  last 
December  recommending  that 
the  integration  program  be 
abandoned. 

However,  two  other  subcom- 
mittee members  refused  to  go 
along  with  the  report. 

Hansen  said  the  "big  fear" 
was  that  integration  would  hold 
back  the  education  of  some 
children.  But  he  said  that  "is 
rapidly  yielding  to  the  concen- 
trated drive  to  effectuate  the 
big  solution." 

"In  the  cultural  Siberia  in 
which  many  Negro  children 
live,"  he  said,  "they  acquired 
too  little  that  is  educationally 
helpful  before  they  came  to 
school  and  as  a  result  teachers 
must  supply  many  of  the  ex- 
periences and  learning  which 
children  should  get  as  a  matter 
of  course  in  home  and  family 
life. 

"The  wonder  is.  then."  Han- 
fen  added,  "that  somany  of  the 
Negro  children  who  have  had  so 
little  in  their  homes  have 
gained  so  much  in  school." 


F 


Sniper  at  Large 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
mined  his  whereabouts  through 
the  front  porch  window. 

There  were  no  witnesses  to 
the  killing.  A  neighbor,  how- 
ever.- Mrs.  Katie  Mae  White,  of 
843  E.  Imperial  Highway,  told 
police  she  heard  a  loud  report 
about  12;30  a.m.,  which  she 
took  to  be  a  backfire.  She  also 
saw  a   car   leaving   hurriedly. 

Ironically,  Stewart,  before  re- 
clining on  the  couch,  had 
moved  the  TV  set  from  its  cus- 
tomary place  oh  the  wall,  just 
where  the  bullet  hit.  Had  he 
not  done  so,  it  is  probable  that 
the  television  would  have  been 
wrecked,  but  his  life  would 
would   have   been   spared. 

Stewart,  who  ran  a  barber 
shop  at  9208  S.  Avalon  boule- 
vard, was  born  in  Pasadena, 
Aug.  16,  1915.  He  entered  the 
armed  forces  on  Jan.  13,  1943, 
and  saw  battle  service  in  the 
Rhineland,  Ardennes,  Central 
Europe  and  Normandy.  He 
was  a .  sharpshooter  and  had 
been  awarded  victory  medals 
for  participation  in  the  Euro-, 
pean,  African  and  Middle  East- 
ern campaigns. 

Father  Antves 

Stewart's  father,  the  Rev. 
John  D.  Stewart,  Sr.,  of  Bakers- 
field,  arrived  in  Los  Angieles 
Tuesday  to  attend  his  son's  fu- 
neral. 

In  addition  to  his  wife  and 
father,  Stewart  is  survived  by 
three  stepchildren,  Jerry,  8; 
Jessie,  4;  and  24-year-oId  Rev. 
David  Tyus,  assistant  pastor  of 
the  First  Timothy  Baptist 
Church. 


Senate  Hearingis 
On  Civil  Rights 

(Continued  from  Page  IV 
ators,   will  try   to   prolong   the 
hearings  as  a  part  of  their  tac-. 
tics  to  talk  the  legislation   to 
death.  "^ 

I  Critics  from  Georgia  and  Ala- 
bama opened  such  a  broadside 
befor^  a  House  judiciary-  sub- 
committee that  northern  mem- 
bers protested  against .  what 
they  call  inflammatory  state- 
rpents. 

Gestapo  Seen 
"Enactment  of  this' legisla- 
tion," Atty.  Gen.  Eugene  Cook 
of  Georgia  said,  "would  result 
ih  creation  of  a  Federal  gestapo 
which  would  hold  needless  in- 
vestigations, pry  into  the  affairs 
of  the  States  and  their  citizens, 
and  intimidate  a  majority  of 
our  citizens  solely  to  appease 
the  politically  pow'erful  minor- 
ity pressure  groups  inspired  by 
the  Communist  ideologies  of  the 
police  state." 

Circuit  Judge  George  C.  Wall- 
ace of  Clayton,  Ala.,  told  the 
subcommittee  he  is  "not  going 
to  permit  any  unlawful  inter- 
ference by  the  Federal  police  in 
my  district."  He  said  he  will 
"order  the  arrest  of  any  Federal 
"agent"  who  goes  into  his  judi- 
cial district  and  demands  the 
jury  list. 

The  President's  program  is 
identical  with  last  year's.  Its 
keystone  is  a  proposal  to 
authorize  Federal  prosecution  of 
anyone  who  intimidates  or 
coerces  voters  in  an  election  in- 
volving Federal  office. 

Other  Provisions 

The  Administration  also  pro- 
poses to  allow  private  citizens 
to  go  directly  to  a  Federal 
court  with  denial-of-rights  com- 
plaints, permit  the  Justice  De- 
partment to  seek  Federal  court 
injunctions  on  behalf  of  persons 
deprived  of  civil  rights  and 
authorize  the  department  to 
bring  suit  against  conspiracies 
to  violate  civil  rights.  ■ 


re  Depf/Tests 


I 


(Qontinued  trom  Page  1) 
doivri  >iis  mark  to  such  an  ex-' 
tef  t  that  he  could  not  pass. 

D  r  d  u  n  a,  however,  look  -th«: 
wr  tten  t^st-  His  grade  was  "76. 
Hii    grades' bj'  the  three  mem-, 
beis    of   the    oral    board    w^; 
43.  45-  and  55. 

Orduna.'  according  to  his  at- 
toriey,  James  R.  Akers,  claims 
thst  a  number  of  the  qu^tidns  • 
asKed  during  the  oral  had  no 
bee  ring  on  his  abilitj'  to  fight  -; 
f  irt  s. 

Heetring  .March  1 

■  f.  jhearing  on  the  protest  has 
bee  r|  set  for  March  1. 

.^.llthough  huge  placards  are 
posted  outside  fire  stations  ap- 
pcc  ling  for  men  to  join  the 
for:e,  only  two  Negroes  w«re 
acdepted  for  training  during  the 
past  year.  One  of  them  was 
asied  to  resign  after  a  few 
we  ?ks.  The  other.  T  o  1  k  e  r  t 
Young.  Jr..  was  permitted  to 
tran  until  a  few  days  before 
the  completion  of  his  six-month 
prnbationary  period., 

.  _J  t  that  time  he. was  called  ih 
and  informed  that  he  didn't 
make  the  grade"  for  Los  An- 
gel Ps  firemen  and  was<^dvised 
that  he  could  either  be  fired  or 
he  could  resign.  He  resigned, 
but  submitted  a  lengthy  bill  of 
paiticulars  detailing  the  in- 
sults and  indignities  to  which 
he  had  been  subjected  during 
his  months  on  .the  force.  . 


V^^omen  Lawyers 

J*  tty.  FMdie  Mae  Armstrong 
wat  among  the.  officers  of  the 
Southern  California  Women 
LaW>ers  Club  installed  by  As- 
sociate Justice  Marshall  Mc- 
Coitib  of  the  California  Supreme 
Court  recently.  She  is  re- 
cording secretary. 

bfficers  include  Inez  Ingram, 
preteident ;  Patricia  Hof stetter, 
firsft  vice  president;  Eleanor 
ScHwengel,  second  vice  presi- 
dent ;  Ruth  Dreyf  uss.  corre- 
spopding  secretary:  Belle  Sie-. 
gel[  treasurer,  and  Jessie  Tor- 
ranjce,    parliamentarian. 


A  L  I  F  O  R  N  I A 
EAGLE 

ih»  Important  Nmwtpeipf". 


'Digif  Suspects 
Seeicing  Writs 

{Continued  from  Page  1) 
back  to  1921,  and  including  nar- 
cotics conviction,  assault  with 
a  deadly  weapon,  bookmaking, 
and  various  lottery  and  gam- 
bling arrests. 

Although  the  reason  for  the 
high  bail  for  bunlap  was  not 
divulged,  police  apparently  be- 
lieved he  was  in  charge  of  op- 
erations which  led  to  the  raids 
at  134  E.  54th  street,  3917  S. 
Main  street  and  1152  E.  34th 
street    ' 

Charged'  in  addition  to  Dun- 
lap,  are:  Toni  Jcriuison  '  Ras- 
bent,  Howard  Bennett,  Arthur 
Glasco,  William  Mason,  Archie 
Meadows,  Edward  Thomas, 
Clarence  Holt,  Florence  Gordon, 
Charles  Hawthorne-  Era  Lou 
Thompsori  and  Emily  Allen. 

punlap's  car  was  the  only 
one  of  11  impounded  by  Federal 
agents  which  did  not  contain 
'ottery  equipment. 


Vo 


1050  E.  43rcl  PL 

Los  Angelas  11,  Calif. 

ADams  4X>161 

LOREN   MILLER 
Publi^er 


LXXVI  No.  4« 

Thiursday,  February  14,  19S7 


F.    I>.   WALLER,    JR. >dv.    Mflr. 

GR/CE  e.  SIMONS.   Executive  EdHor 
EDV/ARt>   "ABIE"   ROBINSON 

-J- .Circulation    Mor. 

CAUME    RUSS Office    Mflr. 

-      B>kY   AREA    REPRESENTATIVE 

E.  •«.    ALLEN 1512   ISth   St. 

Sanlja    Monica,    Cal.,    Ph.:    EX.    5-19»1 

Subscribe  nowi: 

$4.00  for  1   YMr 
$2;S0  for  «  Months    • 
$lJK»^fM  3  Monriis 

Adjudication  Dmm*  Nuittbtr,  12S2aS 
Oat4  of  Adjudication  July  1,  Ifltt. 
PijbMahed  avwy  Thuraday  by  Tho 
9.iJLT"*'"  ^■»'*  Publi»hIi»o^C«.. 
10SO  Eaat  43rd  Place.  Enterad  ,M 
Second:  CUM  Matter  Novanibar  J, 
at  the  Peat  OfTtct  at  1.M  An. 
California,  uMmt  <(!»■  Act 'M 
1  3,  1S7S.'-    I       -  '■-  i  ^       " 

EPRESEffTEO  HArioHMLt^r      > 
.      OY   IMTERSTA^ 
UNITED  NCWW»Al>Mi. 
^      M«  Firth  Ai 
New  York  IT. 


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McCoy  Spotli^ts  Negro  History 


ur'' 


LiiillSsii 


Thursday,  February   14,   1957 


The  California  Eagle— 7 


—SANTA- 
MONICA 

NEWS 


y'Llf  CHURCH  HOME— Impostn,,  $90,00  0  church  edifice  at  53rd  and  Denker  is  the 
ncu.-  home  of  the  Greater  Ebeneter  Missionary  Baptist  Church,  paslored  by  the  Rev.  Alonto 
II  .  L'ltt.  Beautilully  appointed,  the  church  boasts  a  main  chapel  liith  a  scaling  capacity  of 
500.  oraan  and  chimes,  public  address  system,  sound-proof  nursery,  and  Phillipine  maho/^any 
lei  tern,  pciLS  and  other  furniture,  besides  a  seven  room  parsonage.  Formal  dedication  nas 
held  February  3rd. 


Greater  Ebenezer  Church 
Moves  Into  New  Building 

An  imposing  $90,000  church  edifice  located  at  53rd 
street  and,  E>enker  avenue  is  now  the  new  home  of  the 
Greater  Ebenezer  Missionary  Baptist  Church. 

Spiritual  leader  of  the  new  institution,  the  Rev. 
Alonzo  \V.  Lott,  and  some  two  hundred,  parishioners 
moved  into  their  permai 
quarters  on  Feb.  3. 

• 

•    Greater   Ebenezer    stands    in 
the     center    of    a    transitional 


I  Philippine    mahogany    pews, 
!  lecturn  and  furnishings.    Seat- 
ing     capacity     of     the     main 
chapel  is  500.     Other  appoint- 
•community.    It    is    strategically    ^ents   include  13  classrooms,  a 
located  for  the  large  influ.x  of    baptistry,    a    sound-proof   fully 
Negroes  who  have  moved  mto    furnished    nursery  just  off  the 
the  area.  ,  main  chapel,  a  kitchen,  dining 

Interior  of  the  church  is  done  ;  ^^^     ^^-^^^    j^^n^    ^rgan    and 
In   Nile   green.    It   has   wall-to- 
wall  carpeting   throughout,  and    ^^imes  and  a  speakmg  system 

I  throughout  as  well  as  a  beau- 
tifully appointed  seven-room 
parsonage  next  door. 

Quiet  spoken  and  reserved, 
the  Rev.  Lott  is  one  of  the 
city's  more  progressive  and 
civic-minded  clergymen.  He 
came  here  from  San  Antonio, 
Tex.,  where  he  served  as  asso- 
ciate minister  of  the  West  End 
Baptist  Church. 

Greater  Ebenezer,  which  he 
has  pastored  for  the  past  six 
years,  has  been  the  Rev.  Mr. 
Lott's  only  charge  since  com- 
ing to  Los  Angeles. 


BOWEN    MEMORIAL 
METHODIST  CHURCH 

East  36U)  and  Trinitr  Sta. 
John  C  Bain.  Minlstn 

(da   a.m. — Church    School. 
iViSO   a.in.— W»r«hlp. 
7:00  D.m. — Good    Nawi   Hour. 


"Rfnew  Thy  Strength  Like  the  Eagle" 

MASTER  YOUR   PROBLEMS 

BY  DIVINE 

METAPHYSICS 

3    Questions    Answered. 

Send  SI  wttn  Birthdate. 

WILLIAM  H.  FELTON.  Ps   D. 

2473  Seventh  Ave..  New  York  30.  N.Y. 


I 


WARNING! 


BE>VARE  COUGHS 
THAT  HANG  ON 

FOLLOWING  COLDS 


A   stubborn  cough   followirp  a   comrriMl 

eold  may  develop  into  chronic  bronchitis 
^a  condition  far  worse  than  the  cold 
itself.  Before  it  is  too  late  relieve  that 
couph  with  Creomulsion  Cough  Syrup 
rieht  now.  Creomulsion  stops  the  tickle, 
comforts  raw  throat  membranes,  clears 
the  breathing  pa3.>ages,  fights  the  cause 
of  irritation — rjuickly.  It's  safer,  too,  be- 
cau.^e  it  is  free  of  narcotics  or  antihista- 
mines. Don't  let  that  cough  break  you 
'         dovi-n.  Begin  taking  Creomulsion  at  once. 

CREOMULSION 

RELIEVES  COUGHS,  CHEST  COLDS,  BRONCHITIS 


Aliens'  Golden 
Anniversary  on 
Valentine's  Oay 

SANTA  MONICA— A  valentine 

j  for  the  whole  community  is  the 

Golden  Wedding  anniversary  of 

[Eugene  G.  and  Louella  Johnson 

!  Allen. 

I 

I  The  Aliens,  married  February 
114,  1907,  in  Minden,  La.,  have 
I  been  indefatiguable  in  their 
participation  in  community  ac- 
I  tivities  and  have  consistently 
I  concerned  themselves  with  its 
i  problems. 

j     Mrs.  .Allen  was  born  in  Min- 
'  den  in  1884.  Although  she  raised 
'seven  children  and  one  of  her 
17     grandchildren,     she     found 
time  in  h#r  busy  life  to  partici- 
pate fully  with  her  husband  in 
other  activities.  As  Allen  says, 
.  "My  wife  has  been  more  than 
just  a  wife  and  mother.  She  has 
.been  a  companion." 
!      Allen  was  born  in  1880  in  Cot- 
ton   Valley    near    Minden.    His 
parents     died     when     he     was 
young  and  he  raised  a  family  of 
\  six   younger   brothers   and   sis- 
1 ters. 

In  the  years  1909  to  1914  he 
was  active  in  the  national  or- 
ganization of  the  Farmers 
Union.  In  those  days.  Allen  tells 
us.  it  was  necessary  to  issue  a 
new  password  every  three 
months  in  order  to  protect  the 
members  ot  the  union  and  its 
officers. 

The  Aliens  came  to  Santa 
Monica  in  1939  and  have  been 
active  in  all  facets  of  the  com- 
munity's development.  They 
have  both  been  members  of  the 
NAACP  for  more  than  a  quarter 
of  a  century  and  are  still  active 
in  the  association  and  in  the 
Calvary  Baptist  Church. 


BROTHERHOOD  MEETING 

Last  Sunday  evening,  Feb.  10, 
the  Brotherhood,  inter-racial, 
inter  -  denominational  meeting 
of  Christians,  was  held  at  the 
Calvary  Baptist  Church,  20th 
and  Broadway. 

The  message  was  delivered 
by  guest  minister.  Dr.  Kenneth 
Carlson.  After  the  meeting  a 
fellowship  reception  was  held 
in  the  educational  center. 

*  •     • 

ATTEND  FUNERAL 

Mr.  jand  Mrs.  M.  H.  Forte  of 
644  Vernon  avenue,  Venice,  left 
last  week  to  attend  the  funeral 
of  Mrs.  Forte's  mother,  Mrs. 
Maple  Staggers  of  McNeary, 
Ark.  They  were  accompanied  by 
a  neigh^ior,  London  Turner,  511 
San  Juan  avenue,  Venice. 

•  *     * 

EARL  HINES  SINGERS 

The  Earl  Hines  Singers'  pro- 
gram at  the  Calvary  Bapti.st 
Church  last  Sunday  was  well 
attended.  The  program  was 
sponsored  by  Deacon  Booker  T. 
Gamble  for  the  Deacon  Board. 


RETURN  HOME 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Parentha  Battle. 
523  Bay  street,  have  Returned 
home  after  motoring  to  Little 
Rock.  Ark.,  to  attend  the  funeral 
of  Mrs.  Battle's  father. 


GUESTS 

I  Out-of-town  guests  at  Calvary 
j  last   Sunday   were:    Mrs.   Eddie 

Phillips.  San  Francisco;  Mr.  and 
!  Mrs.  David  Richardson,  Mr.  and 

Mrs.    R.   C.   Wallace.   Mrs..  J.   C. 

Williams,  Mrs.  .Mma  Stringer 
jand  Mrs.  Willie  Drungs  of  Los 
[Angeles  and  Private  Louis 
:  Allan  of  Barstow. 


JSSPECTIOX  TOUR — Executive  commit  tee  members  of  the  Xational  Baptist  Sunday 
S(hool  mid  B.T.U.  Congress  are  shoii-n  as  they  insp.'^.'cd  the  $10,V00.000  Dallas  Memorial 
Auditorium^to  be  used  for  the  main  sessions  of  the  Congress,  u-hich  uill  convene  in  Dallas, 
Texas,  June  17-23.  From  left:  Rev.  Bernie  M.  Johnson,  pastor  of  the  St.  Matt  hew  Baptist 
church,  Dallas:  .Mr.  A.  Vandcrslice,  manager  -of  the  Dallas  .Memorial  .i uditorium,  and  Dr. 
Ernest  C.  Esfell,  pastor  of  St.  John  Baptist  C  hurch.  Others  not  identified. 


Yoiith  Plans 
Program  for 
HisbiV  Week 

The  Yduhg  Wonien's  and 
Men's  ijluxiliary  of  the  Mission- 
ary Department  of  the  McCoy 
Memorial  Baptist  Church,  802 
East  4(th  street,  presents,  as  a 

special     feature,     the     McCoy 
Drama  Workshop  in  a  dramatic 
devotional    on    Negro    history,, 
Sundajj  evening,  Feb.  17,  8  p.m. 

Members  of  the  group,  par- 
ticipating in  the  devotional,  are 
Lu  Venia  Witherspoon,  Anita 
Collen  Sherrill,  Eloise  Fortune, 
and  Wilma  Lee  Collar.  The  spe- 
cial feature  will  be  presented 
with  the  following  cast:  Nancy 
Evans,  Charles  Evans,  Irma  Lee 
Kemp,  Chris  Tresvant,  and 
Edward  Tyler. 

President  Ruth  Washington  of 
the  Y.M.M.A.'s,  Deaconess  Belle 
Carter,  counselor  of  the  group, 
and  members  Rev.  Clarence 
Chaml^ers.  Ida  Chambers,  Vala- 
rie  Dralper.  Rev.  Arthur  Fortune, 
Corrin*  Hackett,  Deacon  Mims 
Hackelt,  Joe  Pearl  Howell,  Wil- 
lie Ma^  Miller  and  Lessie  B. 
Webb  invite  the  public  to  this 
effort  in  behalf  of  McCoy's 
buildirg  fund. 

The  N'egro  History  Week  cele- 
bratior  is  annually  honored  by 
this  rrissionary  auxiliary.  One 
of  the  many  projects  completed 
by  this  segment  of  McCoy's 
missiohary    department  ;is   the 


I  Mrs.  Olga  Watts 
Services  Held 

'      Funeral  services  for  Olga  N. 
!  Watts.  71.  of  961  Hollins  street. 
I  were  conducted  Saturday,   Feb. 
9,  at  10:30  a.m.  at  Utter-McKin- 
'  ley's     Broarlway     Chapel.     Rev. 
Jerry  W.  Ford  officiated.  Inter- 
nment    followed     at     Evergreen 
Cemetery. 

I  A  native  of  Houston.  Texas. 
Mrs.  Watts-  had  resided  hpre  for 
56  years.  She  is  survived  t)y  her 
daughter,  Olga  Stovall;  bpthers 
Robert,  Leon  and  Maurice  Mc- 
Cloney  and  two  grandchildren. 


Elder  Tells 
Gold  Coast 
Tour  Plans 

Elder  Clayton  McCoy  of  the 
Church  of  the  Living  God,  Fres- 
(10,  is  here  to  conduct  a  week- 
end revival  meeting  for  young 
people. 

The  revival -.uill  be  held  Fri- 
day. Saturday  and  Sunday  eve- 
nings. Feb.  15.  16  and  17,  at  _S:30 
p.m.  at  the  Church  of  the  Living 
'  God.     "Christian     Workers     for 
1  Fellowship,"  410  E.  31st  street. 
Bishop  A.  -McCoy  Harell,  pastor, 
announced    this  week.   He  also 
extended    an    invitation    to    all 
young  people  and  their  parents 
I  to  attend  these  three  nights. 

A  donation   of  200  shares  of 

capital    stock     in    the    Federal 

Uranium  Corporation  of  Nevada 

is  helping  to  finance  a  .trip  to 

j  the  Gold  Coast  for  Elder  McCoy. 

I  McCoy  said  he  is  making  the 
trip<<o  attend  the  ceremonies  in 
which  Great  Briiairt  will  give 
independence  to  the  Gold  Coast, 
He  also  plans  to  visit  mission 
stations  in  that  country. 

The  uranium  stock,  valued  at 
about  S260,  was  contributed  by 
Floyd  B.  Odium  of  Indio,  an 
industrialist  and  the  husband 
of  aviatrix  Jacqueline  Cochrane. 


aidin'2 


>uneral  services  were  held 
from  The  Peopl^rs  Funeral 
Home,  Feb.  4,  for  Bober  Lealie, 
a  part  time  preacher,  of  343 
South  Sari  Tedro  street. 


pastor 

Ea 
four 


of  one  of  Africa's  Mission 


Stations.  Rev.  E.  A,  Anderson  is 


of  McCoy. 


le  subscriptions  are  but 
dollars  a  year. 


r-LEWIS  METROPOLITAN  I GME  GHURCHn 


^  4900  SOUTH  WESTERN  AVENUE    . 

ISAIAH    SCIPIO,   JR.,   Minister 

9:15  A.M.  Sun.  School  6:00  Ch.  Ytk  Fellowship 

10:45  A.M.  Mom,  Worship      7:30  JP.M    Evening  Worship 


DIVINl  HEALING  rMtOUGH  F, 


AirTH 


AND  PRATEIt 


Vesper  in  Song 


During  Race  Relations  ^W^ek 
at  the  First  Methodist  C|iurch, 
8th  and  Hope  streets,  V  Iv^n 
Harold  Browning  is  being  pre- 
sented in  the  second  ■  of  t\i-o 
programs. 

Mr.  Browning  will  give  a 
Vesper  in  Song  ser\ice  this 
Sunday,  Feb.  17,  at  7  p.m. 


Candle  Store  All  Kinds  of  Religious  Articles 

REV.  H.  J.  NAPJLES 

VWOWD    MNOWNtO    iHKITUAL    AOVItOR    AND    COUNSfOR 
f  Hllf  IN  AIL  AFFAIRS  -  PRIVATB  CONSULTATION 

THE  HELPING  CHAPEL  OF  THE  MASTER 

PROPHMIES  IVIRY  THURSDAY  AND  SUNDAY   NiGHT-«-«:30  PM. 

for    AppeinlmMt    Call    AD.    2-5984    -    »:00    A.««.    f»    •tOO    PM. 

Writ*  P,  O.  Bex  72393,  Axet  StatienJ  Loi  An«*l*t  1,  Calif. 


fr^: 


Subscribe  to  the  Eagle. 


I  ".1.  m.  "^g— gT" 


KARMSON-riOSS 


FUNERAL    HbME     W'-^  fl 


1839    Rres+one 
LU.  87IS5 


Hvd. 


L.  HAftRISON 


Victory  Baptist  Day  School  offers . . . 

The    Basic    Educational    Opportjnities   of 

Other  Schools  plus 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  &  Practice 

ENROLL  NOW! 

Vacancies  Available  for  Kindergarten  Only 
Extended  Day  Care  Program 

"IndividUtil  Instruction  Predominant 
Feature  of  Instruction" 

6:30  A.M.  until  6:30  P.M. 
BUS  TRANSPORTATION  CAFETERIA 

Rev.   Artuhr  A.   Peters,   Pastor;  Mrs.  Florence  Perrette,  Viee-Prin. 
PHONE:  ADAMS   1-2424  or  M732 


DON'T    MfSS 

'Singsational' 

BATTLE  OF 
SPIRITUALS 

featuring 

Meltons  vs.  Jubileers 

TRUE  FAITH  BAPTIST 

Sunday,  Feb.   17,  3:30  P.M. 
6118   South  Broadway 

Rev,  C.  C.  Darling,  Pastor 


Eagle  subscriptions  are  but 
four  dollars  a  vear. 


Announce  New  Way  To 
Shrink  Painful  Piles 

Sdence  Finds  HeaUng  Substance  That  Does  Both— 
Relieves  Pain — Shrinks  Hemorrhoids 


New  York,  N.  Y.   (Special)  - 

for  the  first  time  science  has 
found  a  new  heating  substance 
with  the  astonishing  ability  to 
ihrink  hemorrhoids  and  to  relieve 
pain— without  surgery. 

In  one  hemorrhoid  case  after 
another,  "very  striking  improve- 
ment" wa.s  reported  and  verified 
by  doctors'  obsei*vations. 

Pain  was  relieved  promptly. 
And,  while  gently  relieving  pain, 
actual  reduction  or  retraction 
(shrinking)  took  place. 

And  most  amazing  of-all— this 
improvement  was  maintained  in 
cases  where  doctors'  observations 
were  continued  over  a  period  of 
many  months! 

In  fact,  results  were  so  thor- 
ough that  sufferers  wsre  able  to 
makesuchastonishingstatements 
as  "Piles  have  ceased  to  be  a 


problem!"  And  among  these  suf- 
ferers were  a  very  wide  variety 
of  hemorrhoid  conditions,  some  of 
ID  to  20  years'  Standing. 

All  this,  without  the  use  of 
narcotics,  anesthetics  or  astrin- 
gents of  any  kind.  The  secret  is 
a  new  healing  substance  (Bio- 
Dyne*) -the  disqpvery  of  a  world- 
famous  research  institution.  Al- 
ready, Bio-Dyne  is  in  wide  use 
for  healing  injured  tissue  on  all 
parts  of  the  body. 

This  new  healing  substance  is 
offered  in  suppository  or  oirttment 
form  called  Preparation  H.*  Ask 
for  individually  sealed  convenient 
Preparation  H  suppositories  or 
Preparation  H  ointment  with  spe- 
cial applicator.  Preparation  H  is 
sold  at  all  drugstores.  Satisfaction 
guaranteed  or  money  refunded. 
'»«!.  u.  s.  Pii.  on. 


SPIRITUAL 
SCIENCE  OF  MIND 

REV.  STOVALL 

ton    AfPOIfftMINT 

AX.  1-9831 


Your  Friend  In 
Time  of  Sorrow 


When  sorrow  strikes,  with  the  passing  ot 
someone  dear,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  contv 
plefe  ail  necessary  arrangements.  Our  ex- 
perienced staff  is,  above  all,  tasteful  and 
discreef  at  all  tinnes. 


PFOPIF'J 


FUNERAL 
HOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-7181 


CALIFORNIA  EAGLE 

WANT  ADS 


AD.  4-0161 


DEADLINE  WED.  AT  11   A.M. 


To  help  meet 


M.  B.  B068 


.For  many  families,  sorrow 
creates  both  emotional  and 
financial   emergencies.  To 
meet  the  emotional   crisis, 
Angelus  offers  genuinely 
friendly,    understanding    help. 
For   the    problem    of   unexpected 
expense,  the  Angelus  answer  is 
reasonable   prices  and 
time  to  pay. 


*  SORROW 


*  FINANCIAL 
PROBLEMS 


Funeral  Homes 


LOS  ANGELES:  1030  E  Jefferson  Blvd.-Phon^ 
LONG  BEACH:  718  E  Anaheim  St- Phone 

*•*•*• 


ADams  2-5188 
La  700449     ' 


•f 


i    - 


1 . 


J 


r^8— The  California  EagJe 


ThuTsday,  February  14,  1957 


Hottest  thing  in  the  Califor- 
nia boxing  rings  today  is  a 
hard  punching  19year-old 
featherweight  called  Richardo 
(Pajarito)  Moreno  from  Chal- 
chihuites,  Mex.    ^ 

y 

He  just  about  annihilated 
young  Tommy  Bain  in  three 
rounds  at  the  Hollv-\vood  Le- 
gion last  Tuesday  before  a  turn 
away  crowd  of  some  lO.OOn. 

-The  cool  Moreno  doesn't  have 
all  the  skill  of  a  groat  boxer- 
but  he  has  a  deadly  punch  and 
his  outstanding  ring  personal- 
ity    will     make     him     one     of 

Matchmaker  Jackie  Leonard 
Mexico's  greatest  drawing  cards. 
otXegion  was  so  impresed  with 
his  showing  that  he's  ready  to 
guarantee  any  of  the  current 
crop  of  featherweights  $25,000 
to  meet  Moreno  here  in  an  out- 
door bout. 

Cagey  George  Parnassus,  who 
has  guided  many  wonderful 
latin  boxers  into  the  national 
limelight,  is  the  American  be- 
hind Moreno  and  it  looks  like 
tie's  got  a  real  champion  on  his 
hands. 

The  Atlanta  DaUy  World  report- 
ed  Sunday   that   Sports   Editor 


t 

I 


1  I 


!    I 


Hi 


Marion  Jackson  b-^d  been  in- 
formed by  a  reli^'uie  West  Coast 
source  that  Eddie  Robinson  of 
Grambling  College  was  consid- 
ered for  a  coaching  position  at 
a  major  college  last  month. 

Jackson  called  the  story  "true 
and  accurate"  and  said  it  could 
be  authenticated. 

The  report  said  the  37-year- 
old  mentor  was  "highly  recom- 
mended" by  at  least  two  Pacific 
Coast  Conference  coaches. 

Jackson  said  the  Daily  World 
also  learned  from  another  gen- 
uine source  that  Robinson  re- 
cently signed  a  new  long-term 
contract  at  Grambling  which 
makes  him  the  highest  paid 
Negro  college  coach  in  the 
country. 

Robinson  was  in  Atlanta  Fri- 
day and  Saturday  for  the  100 
Per  Cent  Wrong  Club's  annual 
sports  jamboree  and  would 
neither  conifirm  nor  deny  the 
stories. 

A  capable  gridiron  craftsman, 
he  has  a  career  record  of  118 
victories,  42  defeats  and  six 
ties,  and  has  piloted  Grambling 
to  .seven  minor  bowls  and  one 
national    Negro    championship. 


Bobo  Brazil,  Prof.  Roy  Shire 
Set  For  Mot  Norhircri  Feb.  20 


Promoter   Cal    Eaton    experts 
near   capacity   house   at    the 


BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

IN  OLD  MEXICO 


PRESENT  EVERY 

SATURDAY  AND  SUNDAY 

RAIN   or  SHINE 

THOROUGHBRED 
HORSE  RACING 

rf  A      RACES  ON       f  A 
JLW      SATURDAY       XV 

1m        RACES  ON       m  <f 
X         SUNDAY  X  X 

DAILY  DOUBLE  AND 
QUINELLA 

BOOKS  AND  MUTUELS 

The  Fabulous  5-10  Betting 
Evary  Sunday 

-  POST  TIME  - 
SATURDAY  1:00  P.M. 
SUNDAY   12   NOON 

FANTASTIC   RETURNS 
For  Your  Wager 

Two  Dollars  or  Mere 

Foreign  Book  Open  Daily 
On  All  Major  Tracks 

GREYHOUND  RACING    . 
RESUMES  IN  SPRING 


JOHN  S.  ALESSIO 

■xMirtiva    Diractar 


I  Olympic  next  Wednesday  night 
j  Feb.  20  when  the  bragging,  vil- 
f  lainous  Prof.  Roy  Shire  takes 
;  on  Beefy  Bobo  Brazil  in  a  spe- 
'  cial  off  TV  match  at  7:30  p.m. 

Eaton  is  backing  this  mat 
natural  uith  an  all-star  card, 
which  goes  on  at  S:30'  p.m. 
Popular  prices  of  SI. SO  and 
S2.40  will  prevail  for  this  big 
show. 

The  swashbuckling  Professor 
Shire  vows  to  run  Brazil  out  of 
town  in  this  match,  but  he  has 
his  work  cut  out  for  him.  Bobo 
neither  scares  easy-  nor  loses  a 
match  without  a  battle  royal. 
Just  recently  Brazil  made  mince 
meat  out  of-  another  loud- 
mouthed mat  villain  named 
The  Great   Bolo. 

Shire,  however,  is  a  much 
tougher  foe  for  Brazil  than  Bolo. 
Shire  claims  he  hasn't  been 
subdued  in  almost  ^30  matches. 

Besides  that  Shire  is  quite 
adept  at  tossing  his  fists,  al- 
though it's  not  legal  to  do  so 
in  a  matfest. 

Only  last  year  Shire  took  on 
.Archie  Moore  in  a  boxing  con- 
test. Well,  it  was  billed  as  such, 
hut  Moore,  keeping  in  shape  for 
his  forthcoming  debacle  with 
FIo\d  Patterson,  quickly  had 
Shire  agreeing  that  wrestling 
and  boxing  are  two  different 
sports.  Shire  got  cut  up  and 
the  bout  was  stopped  in  three 
rounds. 


Esker  Harris 
Wins  Golden 
Gloves  Crown 

Esker  Harris,  UCLA's  all -coast 
football  guard  and  defending 
Golden  Glove  heavyweight 
champion,  succes.sfully  retained 
his  crowd  by  kayoing  out  two 
foes  Friday  night  at  the  Hol- 
lywood Legion  Stadium. 

Harris  tkoed  Roy  Smith  in  the 
semifinals  and  came  back  to 
cool  big  Joe  Moya  in  the  finals. 

Harris  is  the  best  looking 
prospect  in  this  year's  amateur 
crop.  He  uill  be  put  to  a  severe 
test  against  teams  of  cham- 
pions from  San  Diego,  Phoenix 
and  Las  Vegas  in  the  regional 
championships  Friday  night  at 
the  Legion. 

ALL-CITY    FINALS 
FLYU  i;it;HTS:     Rud.\     Ley\»    won 
hv    default. 

'BANTAMWKir.HTS:    ("TonTalps   rtpr. 
Lorptta. 

FKATHERWKIGtrrS:      Dyo     lirr. 

LIGHTWEIGHTS:  Gallardo  TKO  1 
Hosack. 

WELTERWEIGHTS:  Rogers  dor, 
Campisp. 

■MIDDLEWEIGHTS:    Williams   doc. 
Berrvman. 

LI6HT-HEAVYWEIGHTS:  Lutchcr 
TKO  3   Chanov. 

HEAVYWEIGHTS:  Harris  TKO  1 
Moya. 


Billy  Peacock 
Preps  for  Bout 

Billy  (Sweetpea)  Peacock 
gives  Rudy  Garcia  a  chance'  for 
revenge  next  Thursday*  Feb.  21, 
at  the  Olympic  when  they  dash 
in  a  10-round  off-TV  bout. 

Peacock  scored  a  one-punch 
knockout  over  Garcia  in  their 
last  meetings  after  six  rounds 
of  fierce  action.  A  left  hook  to 
the  jaw  rendered  Garcia  hors 
de  combat  after  the  ex-GI  more 
than  held  his  own  with  the 
classy  Peacock. 

Matchmaker  Cal  Working 
may  .show  Fugie  Rodriguez  and 
Billy  Evans  in  the-TV  go. 

In  tonight's  (Thursday)  10- 
round  battle  it's  Mickey  North- 
rup  vs.  Leonard  Gaines,  recent 
TKO  winner  oyer  Del  Jackson. 
This  one  will   he  TV'd. 


RACING 


-j^^ 


I 

T 


RAMSEY 


George  Ramsey 


UCLA  vs.  Indians 

UCLA's  basketball  Bruins, 
whose  winning  streaks  were 
snapped  by  Washington  last 
week,  battle  to  get  back  into 
the  win  column  this  weekend 
(Feb.  l.'i-ie)  at  the  expense  of 
Stanford's  dangerous  Indians  at 
the  Pan-Pacific  Au"aitorium. 


CALIENTE— Ten  lucky  cards 
shared  the  ^54,486  Five  -  Ten 
pool,  one  of  the  largest  re- 
corded at  Caliente  last  Sunday. 

Each  cotrectly  tabbed  five 
winners  in  the  six  races  sdt 
aside  for  the  Five-Ter.  handi- 
capping contest  each  earned 
$4,903.80.  Among  the  holders 
were  two  Negroes,  one  from 
Los  Angeles  and  the  other  from 
San  Diego.  The  winning  num- 
bers were  11-6-3-3-5-6. 

SANTA  ANITA— Two  big  at- 
tractions are  in  store  for  the 
fans  at  Santa  Anita  this  week- 
end. The  feature  event  will  be 
the  $50,000  added  Santa  Mar- 
garita Handicap  at  one  and 
one-eight  miles-  it's  for  3-year- 
olds  and  upwards. 

The  supporting  event  will  be 


the  $25,000  ^dded  San  Felipe 
Handicap  for  3-year-olds  at  one 
and  one  sixteenth  miles  on 
Wednesday,  Feb.  20. 

HORSES  TO  yrATCK 

CALLIENTE 

STRIVE— Watch  out  fdr  this  one. 
LEAVENO    MORE— Get    yours    on 
this    ono. 

DOUBLE     JAKIi— Now     ready    4oT 

the    hr.>il. 

DINAWAY-  A    new   romer  can    fly. 

<'HARITY    DATE— My    spprjal. 

GAPER'S-- Not   fit  and  read\ . 

KKEN    MONKY-Pleni>    spppd. 

PEN  ORACLED— My  lonKshol  spe- 
cial. 

SANTA    ANITA 
■  ARQV^SE     Watch    nut    for   this    one, 

DARK    ARMOR     Wnrk?  \  erv   good. 

GE.MELO    In    smart    hands. 

LOU>CI\'DY    -A    fpal    gooriirs. 

PERTKHIRE— Mv    triple   special 

ROSCOK;  MANEY     a  spppd  humpr. 

SILVER  SA.NDAL— Mile  or  ovpr 
homo    frpp. 

FIRST  PETER— My  longshot  hpt. 

Keep  the  column  for  further 
reference,  as  it  only  appears  in 
the  California  Eagle. 


Coach  Ching  Duhm       Face  T}09h  Season 

Coach  Ching  Duhm's  ELAJC  lege  Cubs  here  respectively  on 
baseball    squad    gets    the    acid 


test  this  week  as  they  face  the 
Pasadena  Lancers  at  ELA.  Glen- 
dale  Vacqueros  at  Glendale, 
and  the  Los  Angeles  City  Col-   3:00  p 


WRESTL 


Wednesday,  February  13; 
Thurscay,  14;  and  Friday  the 
15th  on  their  hOme  field.  The 
Huskicfs  will  take  the  field  at 
m. 


iNg 


OLYMPIC  AUDITORIUM 


P 


1801  SO.  GRAND  AVE.  ^OS  ANGELES,  CALIF. 

WED.,  FEB.  20th,  ^:30  P.M. 

NO  TELEVISION 

BOBO  BRAZIL 


—  VS.  — 


PROF.  ROY 

SHIRE  VOWS  TO  ADO  ink  NAMi  OP 
BRAZIL  TO  mS  243  WIN  !  TREAK  .  .  . 
BOBO  SAYS  SHIItE  IS  JUSTJ  A  POP-OFF 


TICKETS  ON  SALE 
Reserved  Seats  $2.40  —  $1.., 
Discount   Cards   Honored   — 


80 


i^ftop  ^^na  *^ave  a^l    U  nrijtimari    J/or  CLfVcrudau  /Specials        ♦        *^ftop  ^^na  t^ave  Ot^t    U  n 


84-Home  Tilts 

The  Holl\-wood  Stars  will  play 
An  S4-{;ame  home  .«:chedu]e 
starting:  against  their  arch-foes, 
the  L..A.  .\ns:els,  on  Tuesday 
night,  April  16. 


5 


INfOHmATION  ON 


OPSN  24   HOURS 


BAIL    BONDS    FREE 

CELES  KING  III  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY 


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'»   <-  ,<taMS         'muxii  ifirmt        9;.vaf:'       jM%K       sMiM.  -    ^mi'^        ^•^i^^.'tf 

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LIGHTER  ..MILDER  .   86  PROOF 


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'>  iv^X  *  <  < :i  VV^;  .- :  >S.:5',.#'<,  v^  ^.« 


Available  in  a  lighter,  milder 
86  Proof  bottling  of  such  superb 
quality  it  has  become 
America's  most  popular  bourbon  I 


C 


t*e   PROOF 

KENTUCKY  STRAIGHT 

BOURBON  WHISKEY 


«i- 


100  Proof  Bottled  in  Bond  available  as  usual 


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^H' 


010  CHOW  DISTILLERY  CO., FRANKFORT, KY., DISTRIBUTED  BY  NAT.DIST.PROO.CORP. 


1 

1 


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SHIRE 


NOW! 
,  tax  included 
Rl.   9-5171 


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I'lfhntari 


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fVf/?y  DAYS  a  SPECIAL  DAY  at '^n/Zimai/^.  EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  aiTu^i/timaif^.  EVERY  DAY 


i^m 


mm 


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■s^^^YOU'LllOSE 
^■*^^  YOUR 

HEART 


DURING  OUR 
VALEKTINE  VALUE  DAYS 


YOUR  TICKER  U  BEAT  QUICKER 


PICTSWEET  FROZEN  ORANGE 

WINnR 

CARNIVAL 

SALE 


I'BI. 

tint 


JUICE 

SUNNY  VALLEY  FRESH  GRADE  A 

LARGE  ECGS  ^  39 


CAMPBELL'S  40'/2-OZ.  TIN 


TOMATO  SOUP10 


YELLOW  BOW  ELBERTA  FREESTONE 

PEACHES 


DEMAND 

TOMATO  SAUCE 


8-oz. 
Tint 


14c 


IWNfl'SUUICIEM 

DRESSING 

MORTON'S  FMZEN 

SPAGHEni 

UTTEI  HKieilS 

TREATS 


IM. 

Jh 


r'l-M. 

u. 
til. 


49* 

$100 

29. 


la 


SHORTENINGS 


n 


CRISCO 

GOLDEN  FlUFFO 
SNOWDRIFT 
SPRY 
SWIFT'NING 


3  £  89< 
3Z89« 
3  n".  89« 
3fi89« 
3S87« 


CARLOAD  PORK  LOIN  SALE 


Economical 
&  Nutritious 

RIB  END 


ROASTS 


Eastern  Grain 
Fed  Hork 


RIB  END     ,  A  ^     I  nm  m       «  -■    '*^^''      mwm 

1st « Ribs    ^OQc  i?"l.  i7c  "•••^^    >nc 


ECONOMICAL 

RIB  END 


CHOPS 


NUTRITIOUS 


IliuT  COOKIES  3>^  T 

rS  IT 

IT 


KELLOMS 

SUGAR  POPS 

jieTIKENT 

TIDE 

IjEISEYHlll  f^ 

INOK-FAT  MILK   £      9 


Vl-n.\ 
Pkj. - 


RIB  END       A^    I  LOIN  END      pp. 

CHOPS  3911  CHOPS  33 


Center  Cut 

;C  I  Loin  or  Rib 

J CHOPS 


LEE'S  FLAVOR  DELUXE 

HAMS 


Skinned  "fxtra  Sniektd 
for  Extra ,  Flavor" 

Full  Shank  Half 


Whole  Hams  .  lb.  51c 


Oscar  Mayer  Pure  Pork 


8-oz.  pkg. 

LINK 
SAUSAGE 


33 


c 


EA. 


Rath's  Racorn 
Eastern 

SLICED 
BACON 


49 


C 


lb. 


m 


JANE  ANDERSON'S  AOED   1-YR, 

CHEDDAR  CHEESE 

(Spatial  Cured  Witcanaln) 

Lb.  65c 


Rath's  Black  Hawk 
Boneless  Butt 

X(W;  I*  EtI 

PORK 
OAINTEE 


FRESH  FILLET 

DOVER 
SOLE 


59c 

•f  ^Ib. 


LARGE  DUNGENESS  FRESH 
COOKED    $p.elaltow^O 
CRABS      Price  Z7< 


FRUITS  "°  VEGETABLES 


TOPS  IN  VITAMIN  A 

CARROTS 


RED  LEAF 


LEHUCE 

EXTRA  FANCY  STRAWBERRY 

RHUBARB 

ARIZONA-RICH  IN  VITAMIN  C 


EXTRA 
FANCY 


FOR 
SALADS 


EARLY 
SPRING 
FAVORITE     lb. 


5' 
19 


ValwitJiM  Iwffar^ 

COOKHS 29pl« 

Valwitiiw 


Sugorad 


voiwitiM       _     g^«,     ■        —w-—        _     ClIOTON    . 
CUPCAKK    4«»2ll       ■     DOUOHNUTS     ■      j  CAKI       * 

k|.Mi«]     I 


VOWfnIfM  PTMICII 

MSTIIIS...2fv20' 


LOS  AN6CLES: 

•  36^1  S.  U  Brci  (It  Radn  Ml,  L.A. 
'2600  S.   Vermont   (at  Adamo.   L.A. 

•  6340  La  TIjtra  at  Cenlincla.   L.A. 
■8440  Lineoh    Blvd.   (at  Mirdiettar).  LA 
•7985  Santa  Monica  Blvd.   lat  Laurel),  L.A 

•  B(H  N.  Dillon  (at  Silver  Lak«),  L.A. 
■7980  Suniet  Blvd.  lat  Laurfl  L.A. 
'4030  Eaila  Rock  Blvd.  at  Flateliir  ' 

WEST  LOS   ANMLES: 

•I.'2I0   Santa    Monica   Blvd.  latBundvi    W    l   ^ 
*<)690  Santa  Monica  Pivrf    'a*  Ruxbur>).  L.A 
■3:5  Lincolii  Blvd.   i  Rnu  An  I.   Vfniro 

•SHI  W.  Olympic  lit  Oakhuntl.  Bnorly  Hilli 
•II56S  National  Blvd  (at  Barrintton).  L.A. 
♦10113  Vmico  Blvd.    (at  ClairiBont).   LA. 


SOUTMim   ARIA: 

•3I4«  W     Imporial   (at  Crontha*).  loilmaM 
■1940  N.  Bullli   (cor.  Bullis  4  Pino),  Con  ft  • 
'4IJ3  N.   Viklni   (at  Canon  4  Balltloweri.  L.B. 
*I94S  E    Fourth  St.  (at  Chrrry).  toni  Boao* 
•!8II  N.   Bcllflowor  81.  (at  South  St. >,  Laki»u*d 
■;iM   Bcllflowtr  Blvd.  (at  Sttarnn  St.).  Lm  AKm 
•22217' Palo    Vardoa  Blvd.  (at  Sonlvodt) 

LA  ruINTI-WHITTIER: 

*  14544  Liftiniwoll  at  ToloFath   Rd. 
*M20  Hacienda  at  Galo.  Pucnto 
1320  Franeliquito  Blvd.    (at  Sunioll 

ORANSE  COUNTY: 

•mil    BrMkhunt  (alChapmia),  tirdaa  firm* 

♦325  Ofaato»«»d  (at  Har^) 


CLINDALS-VALlf  rl  AREA: 

■2430  Glandala  Blv4.  lat  Silvor  Lakoi     LA 
•1104  E.  Chevy  Chaw  lat  Adaaiil   Glwda^ 
■915   W.   Glonaak   (at  Mlahlandl    Gl*n«alf 
•310  N.  SImdalo  (at  ICalinraial   GKitdaK 
1133  W.   Cloooakt.   Glindalo 
826  N.  Gkudalo  (U  qiMiMkii  Ckodair 
'1782}  ShM-aiiii  Wi>  i(at  Whiia  Oakii  v.* 
•IS23I  Vontura  BM.  kat  Sefulndai    V.N. 
*32I7  W.   Mamolla  »t*.   lat  Calitomiai 
•SI4S  Laurel  CanyM  kat  MatMliai   N    Ntlyvd 
*.^708    Biif«ank    (at   EMiteni    Bortanli 

•  eiOl    Laur*i   Caayon     North    Hollyvood 
♦19718  Shorman   Way'  lat  Cwbinl  Cano«a  fk 

•  18847  Voolura  BKrd.l  (at  BalkM)  EatlM 
LAS  VEGAS: 

2200  BMana  Raad    ! 
■Have  Vu  H  Kaail  PtkoriM 
>  I 


■« 


SPECIALS  FOR  THURS.,  FRI.,  SAT.,  SUN.,  FEB.   14.15*16-^7 

LISTEN  TO  KMPC  FOR  OUR  DAILY  RADIO  SPECJaU 

We  Reserv*  the  Right  to  Limit  Qoontitiot.  Sales  Tax  Added  to  All  Taxable  lt*m> 


1^ 


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^  i^ltop  4a^na  ^ave  ^^^t    U nrljtintart    jf-ot  ^vertfciaxf  t^pecials 


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t^hop  a^nd  t^ave  a/^i    J hriftimari 

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IIOXORIXG  P.1ST  PRESIDf■:^^TS—^frmhfrs  of  thr  Silhouette!:  honored 
■past  prendents  nt  their  annual  I  alcntine  eoffee  held  at  the  kappa  kastle  Inst 
Sunday.  Jn  impressive  (fathering  enjoyed  the  annual  affair.  Pirtured  itre :  .l///nv. 
Blanehe-  Merrill,  general   ehairrnan    nf   the   annual   eoffee:    (leeelin    M r.\  eerly 


honored  for  her  sueeess  in  i/uidino  the  Silhouettes  throue/h  prize -ivinning  skits  in 
the  Delta  Jahbcrxioek :  pmt  presidents  Rentha  Besk,  Helen  Smith,  Clara  IV ebb, 
President  Barbara  Mounts  and  Past  President  Lueille  Bryant. — (Adariis). 


THEfR  FAJORITE  rALEXTfXES—Cute  Judy  Dans 
honored  her  friends  and  their  grandmothers  at  a  qay  I  nlen- 
ttnr  party  in  her  mother's  beautiful  .Irlinoton  street  home  last 
ivert.  Pirtured  ahntr  are:  Mrt.  I  ernier  Intum.  1/rc.  II  lUie 
Dnif.  Judy   Paj  IS,  Dorothy  Ifill.  Gail  Smith.  Sharon   Rii" 


Dale  Piersnn.  Miehele  Eomax,  Sandra  Seville.  Joy  .Itkinsnn. 
Joanne  II  ritjht.  Jan  Hill.  Karen  Schaefle,  Carol  "(JooUe' 
Coir,  Louise  llnn/ird,  Melonie  Seolt,  Mariririne  (iushiiir_ 
Joan  .Mnddox,  .\  am  y  Jarfr — 'Ron  land.  J  oyer  .Mnddole  and 
Jriikie  Johnson.   ( .i dams )  .  '  ' 


Clora  Wright  Radio  Show 
To  Spotlight  Club  Groups 


Clora  Wright's  new  and  dif- 
ferent musical  show,  aired 
over  radio  station  KFOX  every 
Sunday  afternoon  from  4:15 
until  5:45.  i."  strictly  class  and 
good  listening. 

Miss  Wright  i.<!  a  graduate 
of  Texa.s  Southern  with  a 
master's  dejjrce  in  Engli.'sh. 
She  is  also  a  jrrailuate  from 
Hal  Styles  School  of  Raiiio  and 
TV    announcing. 

Diirinc  her  army  rareer  she 
was  a  special  srrvire  offirer 
and  arranged  the  army  radio 
show.s   for    12    army   post"?. 


One  of  the  features  of  the 
rioey  Show;  is  the  spotlight- 
ing of  our  many  social,  char- 
ity and  Mvic  or.2:anizations 
and  the  work  they  carry  on 
in  the  community. 

While  the  program  is  a 
basically  musical  show  il  fea- 
tures many  outstanding  fig- 
ures as  well  as  little-known 
individuals  whose  sincere  ef- 
forts play  a  big  part  in  the 
growth   of  the  community. 

A  portion  nf  the  program  is 
directed  at  young  people  with 
whom   Miss  Wright  has  been 


Jack  &  Jill  Set^ 
A  ward  Program 


clo.sely  associated. 

Clever  household  hints  are 
given  from  time  to  flme  on 
the  program  which  is  not 
cluttered  with  heavy  commer- 
cials hut  instead  gives  sensi- 
ble advice  such  as  valuable 
information  a  mother  can  re- 
cei\c  by  participating  in  PTA, 
civif  duties,  and  how  spare 
time  can  be  used  to  ad- 
vantage. 

Very  few  programs  have 
marie  a  serious  attempt  to 
catcli  the  fancy  of  our  commu- 
nity's women.  Miss  Wright's 
cleverly  designed  program  has 
set  out  to  capture  this  vast 
audience. 


Silhouettes 
Hold  Tenth 
Anniversary 

Members  of  the  Silhouettes 
held  sway  Sunday  afternoon 
with  their  tenth  anniversary 
Valentine  Coffee  at  the  Kappa 
Kastle  'honoring  past  presi- 
dents of  the  group  as  well  as 
the  present  leader. 

Robert  Green,  high  Kappa 
fi'aternitv-  official,  introduced 
the  leaders  in  this  order:  Cla- 
ra Wesbb,  Helen  B.  Smith. 
Roatha  Beck,  and  President 
Barbara  Mounts. 

("harming  Blanc'lie  .Merrill 
pinned  beautiful  corsages  on 
tine  honorees.  Cecilia  McNeely 
was  aLso  .saluted  for  her  won- 
derful efforts  in  last  year's 
.Tabberwock  in  which  the  Sil- 
houettes captured   top  prizes. 

Silhouettes  and  their  guests 
enjoyed  entertainment  from 
such  notables  as  Ernest  and 
May  Hiroshcge,  Annys  Fried- 
man, Jerene  and  Susan  Webb, 
Clothilde  Woodard,  Harriett 
Williamson,  Kenneth  Naka- 
mura.  Diane  White  and  Rus- 
sell Weathers. 

Committee  members  who 
helped  make  the  affair  a 
memorable"  occasion  were: 
Blanche  Merrill.  Ethel  Bradley, 
Alice  Sims,  Pearl  Bryant,  Eliz- 
abeth Logan,  Evelyn  Green, 
.lessie  Johnson,  Sara  Inge, 
Betty  Server.  Genevieve  Red- 
fud.  Mildred  Jones  and  Helen 
Jackson. 


Sl)PR.I\()  —  Hope  Foye. 
talented  lyrir  soprano,  'iiill 
appear  in  eoneert'  Friday. 
.Mar eh  I,  at  Second  Bfiptist 
(Church,  14th  street  and 
iirilfith  avenue. 


-The  Los  Angeles  chapter  of 
Jack  and  Jill  invites  members 
of  the  com- 
munity to  at- 
tend its  an- 
nual presen- 
t-ation  to  the! 
March  of] 
Dimes  at  the  ^ 
Pacific  Town  j 
Club.  4332  W. 
Adams  blvd.,  ] 
from  3-7  p.m. 
on  Sunday, 
Feb.  17. 

Josephine  Smith,  president 
of  the  local  chapter,  and  Jes- 
sie Mae  Beavefs,  chairman  of 
this  first  pbblic  meeting,  are 
arranging  an  Interesting  pro- 
gram. Those  attending  will 
learn  of  the  wonderful  work 
th*  local  and  other  chapters 


Mri.  Beoven 


of  the  national  organization 
have  been  doing  for  the  March 
of   Dimes. 

In  1955  Jack  and  Jill  don- 
ated more  money  to  the  Na- 
tional Foundation  for  In-- 
fantile  Parahsis  than  any 
other  single  organization  in 
the  countr.v.  The  total  was  in 
excess  of  S24.000  and  the  Las 
Angeles  chapter  was  one  of 
8  chapters  which  donated 
over  SI  000. 

Mrs.  Margaret  Clark,  head 
of  the  Women's  Division  for 
the  March  of  Dimes,  will  be 
featured  at  the  Sunday  after- 
noon program.  She  will  pre- 
sent the  chapter  with  an 
award  for  their  contributions 
to  the  Foundation.  Following 
the  presentation  a  social  hour 
will  be  enjoyed  by  the  guests. 


Hope  Foye  Condert 
Creating  Interest 


The  sponsoring  c:ommittee 
for  the  Hope  Foye  concert  to 

be  held  on  Friday.  March  !• 
at  the  Second  Baptist  Church. 
2Ith  street  and  Griffith  ave- 
nue, is  pleased  to  announce 
that  community  interest,  es- 
pecially among  the  younger 
social  set,  is  on  the  increase. 

Among  the  clubs  taking  an 
active  interest  in  the  project 
are  the  Sinquinons  and  the 
Recondites  Entre  Nous,  who 
on  the  evening  of  the  concert 
will  serve  as  usherettes  and  as 
hostes.ses  for  the  reception  in 
the  social  hall  of  the  church. 

The  active  sponsoring  com- 
mittee is  made  up  of  the  fol- 
lowing: Misses  Doris  Mallard, 


Vivian  Jones,  Frances  Wil- 
liams- Ruth  Stubhiefield;  Mes- 
dames  Tnmmie  Reeves,  Adele 
■S'oung,  Gertrude  Betts;  Char- 
lotla  Bass,  LaVaughn  Wat- 
kins,  Nicie  Mann,  Mollic  Pat- 
terson, Pauletta  Fears,  and 
Me.s.sers.  James  Hurley,  Harold 
L.  Scott-  Chester  Harris  and 
Frederick  W  i  1  k  e  r  s  o  n.  Mrs 
Bern  ice  Pierce  is  chairman  of 
the  concert  committee. 

Ticket  reservations  can  be 
made  by  calling  ADams  4^-6337, 
ADams    2-6431     or    REpublic 

2-5834.      ' 

'A  club's  best  investment  is 
a  year's  subscription  to  the 
California  Eagle.  Cost — $4. 


SOCIAL  GOINGS  ON  .  .  . 

Friday  night  found  Zrelday 
Sealey  taking  the  "Friday- 
Nighters"  to  the  Huntington 
Hartford  Theatre  to  see  "Hat- 
ful of  Rain."  We  spotted  Mrs. 
Leo  Branton.  Sr..  the  Leo  Bran - 
tons  and  Norman  Hou.stona  en- 
joying this  wonderful  show 
also. 

Same  night,  Puffy  Hill  was 
the  "Ho.stess  wit'h  the  Mostest" 
when  she  entertained  the 
Playtimers  —  Y'know  Gloria 
Malone  is  the  dynamic  prexy 
of  the  group. 

Prexy    Barbara    Mounts    is 
-still  beaming  over  the  success 
of    the    Silhouettes    Valentine 
Coffee  on  Sunday.  Feb.  10. 
Selling  Like  Mad 

Our  conscientious  calendar 
of  interesting  events' this  week 
includes: 

The  Urban  League  Ball  to  be 
held  Friday  night  at  the  Bev- 
erly Hilton  Hotel.  The  tickets 
have  been  selling  like  m-a-d 
and  Miller  Barbour  is  ALL 
smiles.  We  believe  this  is  the 
ONE,  and  we  are  happy. 

We  circled  the  world  pre- 
miere of  the  all-African  film 
"Freedom"  at  the  Egyptian 
Theater  Tuesday,  Feb.  12,  and 
it  is  something  you  must  see 
— it  will  awaken  may  viewers, 
believe  me. 

Spotted  Ruthie  Kenner  and 

her  committee  lunching  at  the 

"Milomo   Tuesday    and    busily 

completing  plans  for  the  Pa- 

(Continued  on  Page  10) 


i 


•  CLUBS 


FA5HldN5 


Thursday,   Februar/    14,,  1957 


California  Eagle— 9 


/i/i 


COXTISEST.^LS  CLUB— .y embers  of  Southland's    neuest    elub    sur^ 
kenner,   second  from   left,   last   Sunday   evening  folloumg'-a  round  of  i 
Western   .ivenue   Lounr/e.   .Members  of   the  elu  b    are    shoiin    expressing 
uonderful  assistance  Kenner  has  rjnen  the'chih.     Pictured    above,    from 
treasurer:  Kenner,  owner  of  the  Miloiiio;  Pat   S treat,   president   of   the 
and  Mary  Hid(jon.—( .■i dams). 


prised    dap^   Bert 

klails  in  the  swank 

ieir    thanks    for    the 

left :    Jerry    Spencer, 

Continentals   Club. 


SE'FTIS'C  COXCFRT  ST. HIE— Three  lovely  members  of  Delta  sonority  expressing  de- 
light over  til  ket  sales  tor  the  sorority's  presentation  of  Leonlync  Price  in  cipncert  on  .March  29 
at  the  Philharii:onic  .hidilorium    are  from  left  .  Betty  H'illiams.  lO-ehairti^ian  of  souvenir  pro- 


Mary  Gi 


patrons'  chairman,  and  Pearl   .Monroe,    tukcl    chairman.    Tickets  for  the 


concert  lire  ircnilahle  from  an\  Delta  memhci 


'^^'C 

1 

- 

Ml'SIC.fL  POIXTFRS  —  I'r.cnous  Clora    I  fright,   commentator   of 
musical  shou-.  is  shonn  nilh  Karl  Grant ,  sensational  organist  .currently  a_ 
Pigalle.    Grant    accepted  an  ■  invitation   from    the   charming  emcee   tn   be   he 
on  the  show  Sunday.  February   17, -from  4:45  until  5 :4'5 .    1 1SO  on  your  di 


'he  KFOX  newest 

ipcanng  at  the  Club 

"in   person  '  guest 

I. — (Sm'ith  Photo) 


20  Century  Sponsmen 
Plan  Pre-Easter  Dance 


Medi 
Plans 


da 


Sammy  Warren,  popular 
member  of  the  Twenty  Cen- 
tury Sportsmen,  announced 
the  club's  pre-Easter  matinee 
dance  on  Sunday,  March  3,  at 
the  Tropical  Zamboanga  Sup- 
per Club,  3828  W.  Slauson  av- 
entie. 

A  gay  ,and  exciting  after- 
noon, featuring  top  entertain- 


ment and  dancing,  is  being 
planned  by  the  group.  Reser- 
vations are  being  accepted  by 
club  members. 

^  The  spacious  Zamboanga 
should  provide  a  .  delightful 
atmosphere  for  the  affair.  The 
members  are  looking  forward 
to  one  of  the  season's  top  so- 
cial events  and  cordially  in- 
vite visitors  to  attend. 


Group 
Tourney 


Initial  plans  were  made  last 
Monday,  Feb.  4,  for  the  fifth 
annual  Charles  R.  Drew  Med- 
ical SociMy  Auxiliary  bridge 
tournamtnt  to  be  staged  April 
11  at  th«  Golden  State  Audi- 
torium, ii  was  announced  this 
week  fol  lowing  a  .  committee 
meeting  it  home  of  the  tour- 
ney  chaii-man,    Mrs.   William 


Beck, 
place. 


1251  •  S.  -St.    Andrews 


I 


^ 


'^-\*~'^yy 


■i 

lit 


•'i  . 

■i 

I 


uos,  J:'A3hifOns,iiomenvzJ<^^ 


10— The  Californa  Eagle 


Thursday,  February  14,  1957 


—   C-^oca-C--'o/a  C—< 


o^nvn 


vinit\f 


Ok 


aynpion   — 


THE   TAN   TONES  —  Singing  grofp  from  Manual  Arts 

High  School  uill  he  Spotlighted  Sunday,  February  10th,  on 

the  ueekly  High  School  Variety  TV  program^  "Sipotlight  on 

Youth."  Co-sponsored  by  the  Coca-Cola  Bottling  Company  of 


Los  Angeles  and  The  Los  Angeles  City  High  Schools,  the  pro- 
gram is  telecast  each  Sunday  from  KTTV,  Chiituiel  11\  uith 
Alex   ' Pick-up-a-couple-of-bucks'    Cooper  as   master   of   cere- 
monies. 


Designers 
Officers 
nstalled 

Some  one  hundred  and  fifty 
guests  enjoyed  the  Creative 
Hair  Designers  fifth  annual 
Installation  ceremonies  last 
Sunday  after- 
noon at  the 
Pacific  Town 
Club. 

Jessie  Mae 
Beavers, 
newspa- 
per wom  - 
an,  was  the 
Installing  of- 
ficer. 

J*'^'h!!;     M«.Mondy 
able      Gladys 

Mondy,  one  of  the  city's  most 
outstanding  hair  stylists,  was 
installed   as   president. 

Other  officers  installed 
were:  Roy  C.  Lee,  vioepresiT_ 
dent;  Alma  Reed,  public  rela- 
tions; Juanita  Crattic,  record- 
in  g  secretary;  and  Frieda 
Carter,  treasurer. 


SMART  SET 


Boy  Scout 
Auxiliary 
Holds  Meet 


The   Women's   Auxiliary   of 
'  Boy  Scout  Troop  No.  238  met 
Thursday,  Feb.  24,  at  the  Vir- 
'ginia    Road    School   auditori- 
um.    Plans  were  made  for  a 
rummage  sale  to  be  held  at 
22nd    and    Central    on    March 
'  16    to    help     raise     money    to 
1  send   Boy  Scouts    to    the  Na- 
■!  tional  Jamboree  in  June. 
The  following  officers  were 
elected   for  the   coming   year 
president,    Mrs.    Joseph    Hill 
man;  vice- Resident.  Mrs.  Al 
onzo  Smith;   recording  secre 
tary,    Mrs.    Leroy   Baskerville 
corresponding    secretary,    Mrs, 
Porter  Swain;   treasurer,   Mrs 
Edward   Harroway;  telephone 
chairman,    Mrs.    Clayton    An- 
derson;    publicity     chairman, 
Mrs.     Bette     Alston;     refresh- 
ment   chairman,    Mrs.    Marco 
Peterson;     ways    and    means 
chairman,      Mrs.      Charles 
Adams,    and    historian.    Mrs. 
'  Frank  Kawasaki. 

At  a  later  gathering,  Wil- 
liam Peterson,  scoutmaster, 
presented  a  film  of  the  1951 
National  Jamboree  in  Phila- 
delphia, where  the  Jamboree 
will  be  held  this  year. 


niniiiiiiffiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiHra 

(Continued  from  Page  9) 
cific  Town  Club's  wives'  bridge 
party   on   Sat.,   Feb.   16,   from 
7:30  until  . . . 

The  Feb.  17  public  meeting 
of  the  Jack  and  Jill  Club  of 
L.A.  demands  attention  for 
Mrs.  Margaret  Clark,  head  of 
Women's  Division  Activities  of 
the  March  of  Dimes,  will  be 
the  speaker.  'Twill  be  held  at 
the  Pacific  Town  Club  from  3- 
.7  p.m. 

Same  day,  same  place,  at  8 
p.m.,  the  Med,,  Dent.,  and 
Phar.  Assoc,  and  Aux.  will 
have  its  General  Talent  Show 
meeting,  Y'all  come. 

Holy  Trinity  Church  will 
have  its  annual  Fashion  Tea 
from  3  to  7  p.m.  on  Sunday, 
Feb.  17,  at  the  home  of  the 
minister,  Rev.  M.  C.  Driver. 
OTHER  THINGS  OF  VALUE 

Our  friend.  Dr.  F.  E.  Younge 
Is  in  "Our  Town"  attending  a 
surgical  meeting  at  the  Am- 
bassador Hotel— Eddie  Jack- 
son Henderson  (teen-age  son 
of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Herbert  Hen- 
derson of  'Frisco)  planed  into 
LA.  with  his  coach  Wednes- 
day to  compete  in  the  Pacific 
Ice;  Skating  competition  at  the 
Pah  Pacific  Aud.— The  events 
Will  be  held  Thurs.,  ,  Friday 
and  Sat. 

Democratic  Women's!  Forum 
of  L.A.  will  have  its  rriember- 
ship  tea  featuring  Hoit.  Rosa- 
lind Wyman  (5th  District 
councilworaan).  Dr.  '  Ralph 
Richardson  (candidatei  for  L. 
A.  School  Board)  and  Rose- 
mary Shidler  (vice-pres.  of 
Dem.  Women's  Foruni).  The 
affair"  will  be  held  on  Mon- 
day, March  4,  at  1:30  p.m.  at 
the  home  of  Mrs.  Edith  Weiss 
on  S.  Beverly  Glen  in  West 
Los  Angeles. 

Wed.,  Feb.  20,  at  7:45  p.m. 
we  .shall  be  at  the  auditorium 
of  Third  Street  School  to  enjoy 
"Some  of  My  Best  Friends  Are" 
—a  panel  of  the  Los  Angeles 
High  School  students  who  will 
discuss  what  it  means  to  live 
in  THIS  community,  Dr,:Burton 
Henry,  associate  prbfeSspr  of 
Education  at  L.A.  State  Col- 
lege, will  moderate  the  panel 
that  win  include  Bruce  Cor- 
win,  Anne  Gill,  Louise  Graves, 
Bob  Iwasaki  and  Ted  Jones. 
THIS  'N'  THAT 

Billy  Daniels  and  Benny 
Payne  were  simply  TERRIFIC 
Friday  night  at  the  Moulin 
Rouge.  'Spose  you  know  Billy's 
mom  is  here  to  see  her  newest 


Br  OLIVIA  DEE 

grandbaby.  She  is  visiting 
Perry  and  Billy  from  Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 

Edythe  and  Norman  Hous- 
ton are  packing  bags  and 
getting  ready  to  take  to  the 
air  for  Mexico  City,  Acapulco 
and  Texas.  Lucky  guys. 

The  Maceo  Walkers  are  vis- 
iting our  town  from  Memphis, 
Tenn.,  for  a  few  days. ' 

We  just  got  the  news  that 
Robin  Robinson,  that  young 
man  with  the  mellow  voice,  is 
now  appearing  on  the  stage  at 
the  Paramount  Theatre  in  New 
York.  WOW! 


Wiley  Alumni 
To  Give  Show 

One  of  the  most  important 
datee  in  February  has  been 
circled,  Sunday  the  24th,  at 
Ciro's,  when  the  Wiley  College 
Alumni  Club  presents  its 
mammoth  Scholarship  Show, 
from  2  to  6  p.m. 

Gertrude  Penland  is  produc- 
ing this  year's  show  which 
will  highlight  many  popular 
entertainers,  the  band  of  Jeep 
Smith  and  a  prelude  of  Spring 
fashions  commented  upon  by 
Lucille  Boswell,  Models  will 
include  Charity  Washington, 
Joyce  Sonier,  Johnetta  Starks, 
Phil  Rhoden  and  Bobby 
Greene  of  Harris  &  Frank. 
Guest  artists  appearing  in- 
clude Lon  Fontaine,  Earl 
Grant.  Pat  Sides,  Big  Bertha 
Henderson  and  the  Titians. 
Charming  Mattie  Lewis  i^ 
president  of  the  Alumni  Club. 


Hill  Toppers 
Plan  Formal 
At  Fox  Hills 

Members  of  the  Hill  Toppers 
Charity  Guild  are  busy  plac- 
ing invitations,  in  the;  mail, 
announcing  the  club's  second 
annual  for-, 
rnal   ball. 

Friday,  Feb. 1 
22,  is  the  date! 
a  n  d    t  h  el 
swank    Foxl 
Hills    Country! 
Club   is    the! 
place.  The  af- 
fair is   strict- 
ly formal  and' 
E  a  r  1     Bostic 
will  provide 
the  music  for  the  evening  of 
dancing  and  gaiety. 

Billie  Nunn  is  president  of 
the  Hill  Toppers,  and  mem- 
bers include  Maria  Cole,  Vel- 
ma  Plummer,  Elizabeth  Green, 
Ruby  Jones,  Jo  Holmes,  Millie. 
Graham,  Hildegard  Bostic, 
Alma  Smith,  Mamie  Harrison, 
Ruby  Allison,  Doris  Armstrong, 
Lena  Barnes,  Alene  Barton, 
Lessie  Baskerville,  Geri  Bran- 
ton,  Celeste  Carter,  Elois 
Davis,  Lorena  Franklin,  Mary 
Anne  Golson  and  Velda  Wil- 
son.. 1 

A  large  crowd  is  expected 
to  attend  the  annual  ball. 


Billie  Nunn 


Dr.  Ruth  Temple 
Is  PTA  Guest 

Dr.  Ruth  J.  Temple,  director 
of  special  Health  Service  was 
guest  speaker  at  the  recent 
meeting  of  the  66th  Street 
FTA  in  the  school  auditorium. 

A  health  skit  was  presented 
to  the  group  by  the  kinder- 
garten grades,  under  the  di- 
rection of  their  teachers.  Miss 
Elizabeth  Collins  and  Mrs, 
Zelda  Griffin. 


Bridge  Winners 

Mrs.  Louise  Arnold,  Mrs. 
Leroy  Gay  and  Mrs.  Sadie 
Arnold  were  bridge  winners  at 
the  recent  meeting  of  the 
auxiliary  to  the  Oxford  Dupli- 
cate Bridge  Club. 


Alumni  Seat 
New  Officers 

The  Southern  University 
Alumni  Association  held  its 
annual  installation  of  officers 
at  the  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Olton  Blouin,  1607  W.  138th 
street,  Compton. 

Atty.  Edwin  J.  Wilson,  of 
Long  Beach,  installed  the  fol- 
lowing officers: 

Joe  Billes,  president;  Morris 
Haydel,  vice-president;  Eula 
Neal,  secretary;-  Genevieve 
Redfiid-  financial  secretary; 
David  Caldwell,  corsesponding 
secretary;  Elizabeth  Cooper, 
treasurer;  William  Taylor, 
business  manager;  Nena  Gal- 
loway, chaplain;  Lionel  Jou- 
bert,  parliamentarian;  Helen 
Gaines,  historian,  and  Jesse 
Collins,  reporter. 

The  regular  meeting  for  the 
month  of  February  will  be  at 
the  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Leon 
Green,  2822  Bronson  street. 


ANNIVERSARY — Birthday  greetings  were  extended  to  the 
Los  Angeles  Pan-Hellenic  Council  during  the  j:elebration  of 
the  tenth  anniversary  of  its  inception  in  Los  Angeles.  Among 
those  present  at  the  Brown  House  to  extend  best  wishes  were 
presidents  of  Greek  letter  organizations.  From  left^  Rev. 
James  L.  Jones.  Phi  Beta  Sigma;  Doxie  Hall  Mason,  Delta 
Sigma  Theta;  Frankte  Johnson,  Sigma  Gamma  Rho;  Hilda 


mien.  Delta  Sigma  Th^ta;  G< 
Theta  and  Western  ^fgional 
Robert,  L.  Demps,  Omega  Phi  P 
Council;  Lenecia  JVeems,  Zeta  P> 
Alpha  Kappa  Alpha;  L.  A.  Jori 
Spencer  Bailey,  ACHR.     ■ 


Bachelor 
Of  Year 
Sought 

Alpha  Phi  Alpha  and  Kaj)pa 
Alpha  Psi  fraternities'  candi- 
dates are  in  stiff  competition 
for  "Bachelor  of  the  Year"  at 
the  forthcoming  Sweetheart 
Ball. 

The  Sweetheart  Ball  is  an 
annual  iffair  of  Pi  and  Upsi- 
lon  chapters  of  Delta  Sigma 
Theta  sorority.  This  year  it 
will  be  staged  at  the  El  Som- 
brero Ballroom  on  Friday. 
Feb.  15. 

The  Alphas  are  sponsoring 
John  Lewis,  and  the  Kappas 
are  sponsoring  Wilfred  Smith. 
The  winner  will  be  chosen  by 
the  amount  of  tickets  sold  in 
his  name.  There  will  also 
be  a  runrfer-up  prize. 

Tickets  may  be  secured  from 
either  contestantr^fheir  spon- 
sors, or  chairmen  of  the  ball, 
Miriam  Canty  and  Helen 
Bowles. 

The  prbceeqis  of  the  Sweet- 
heart Ball  will  be  used  for 
the  Haitian  Relief  Fund, 
which  is  the  project  of  Delta 
Sigma  Theta  sorority. 


Thifd  Annua 
Event  Slated 

The  Women's  Auxiliary  to 
the  Medical,  Dental  and  Phar- 
maceutical Association  along 
with  Dr.  B.  Clarence  Cooke  are 
making  plans  for  the  group's 
third  annual  sweetheart  hour. 

The  affair  will  be  held  Sun- 
day, Feb.  24,  from  4  to  7  p.m, 
at  the  US'.C  YWCA,  857  W. 
36th  place. 

Dr.  Cooke  is  the  founder  and 
president  of  the  Handicapped 
Placement  Center,  a  welfare 
service  designed  solely  for 
physically  handicapped  per- 
sons. The  handicapped  of  the 
year  will  be  cited  during  the 
affair. 

Mr.s.  Lois  MacBeth  Carr  and 
Dr.  Geraldine  Woods  are  co- 
chairmen  for  the  event;  Mrs. 
Victoria  Cooke  and  Mrs.  Elois 
Davis  are  in  charge  of  the  pro- 
gram and  entertainment;  Mrs., 
Tommye  Howard  and  Mrs. 
Ann  Mallory  are  in  ch-arge 
of  refreshments;  and  Edward 
Brown,  and  Mrs.  Ella  K.  Mays, 
both  directors  tor  the  handi- 
capped placement  center,  are 
in  charge  of  the  exhibition 
which  will  display  the  arts 
and  crafts  of  handicapped 
people. 


FATHERS 
ATTEND 
PTA  MEET 

Vermont  Avenue  PTA's  re- 
cent meeting  was  well  attend- 
ed with  a  surprisingly  large 
number  of  fathers  present.  A 
coffee  hour  preceeded  the 
meeting. 

Mrs.  Ralph  paik  reported 
over  $300  cleared  from  the 
cookie  drive.  Mmes.  Theodore 
Jackson,  Gordon  Landry  and 
Spencer  Matsui  were  chosen 
to  serve  on  the  riominating 
committee  and  will  make  a 
report  at  the  next  meeting. 

The  annual  Founders'  Day 
observance  and  program  will 
get  underway  promptly  at 
1:30  p.m.,  Thursday,  Feb.  14. 


Founders'  Day 

Past  presidents  of  Jefferson 
PTA  will  be  honored  at  the 
Founders'  Day  meeting  on 
Tuesday,  Feb.  19,  at  2  p.m.  in 
the  school  cafeteria.  A  special 
invitation  is  extended  to  aK 
parents  of  A9  students. 


Eagle  subscriptions  are  but 
foar  dollars  a  yeas. 


ACADEMY  OF  THEATRE  ARTS 

Now   Enrolling' 


TAP -ACROBATIC -BALLET -RHYTHM 
VOICE -SPEECH -SELF  IMPROVEMENT 


WEbsfer  6-8813. 


DISTINCTIVE  filFT  SELECTIONS 

REAL    SILVER    CUFF 
LINKS     AND     EAR- 
RINGS     Mt      with : 
iridescent     abalone 
and    tortoit*    shell,  j 

Hand-crafted— 
imported— unique. 

Availed     anyplaem  | 

In  U.  5.  in 

gift  box. 

P.O.  Box  42-157 
Lot  Angeles  42,  California 

Sorry,  No.  COD's 
Pair     *  Includes  Fed.  and  State  Tax 


I 


CARLI'S 

$^30* 


I 


DOT'S  DASHES 


hf  DOROTHEA  FOSTER 


The  National  Urban  League  committee,  endeav- 
oring to  surpass  all  previous  Winter  Balls,  met  last 
Wednesday  night  and  put  the  finishing  touches  on  the 
plans  for  the  ball  tomorrow  night  (Friday)  at  the 
Beverly  Hilton  Hotel. 

'Twas  quite  a  party  ELOIS  DAVIS  tossed  for  actor 
FRANK  SILVERA  last  Thursday  evening.  BENNIE 
PAYNE  and  his  charming  wife,  ALICE,  BOOTSEY 
HOWARD,  PEARL  BRATTON  SMITH  (glowing  with 
pride  over  her  first  grandbaby),  HAZEL  WASHING- 
TON (wearing  the  short  bob),  ROSE  TALLEY,  DORO- 
THY JOHNSON  (both  of  these  gals  are  doing  a. won- 
derful job  at  Garden  Gate  School),  JOEL  FLUELLEN 
(ohh,  that  delicious  chicken  he  prepared!),  ONER 
BARKER  (Doc's  piano  artistry  is  great),  ANTOIN- 
ETTE ATKINSON,  HELEN  GARROTT  and  many 
more  enjoyed  the  warm  hospitality  that  always  pre- 
vails in  the  DAVIS'  manse. 

On  Sunday  evening;  ELOIS  and  daughter,  JUDY, 
gave  an  equally  elaborate  party  honoring  the  "grand- 
mothers."   All    the  grandmoms   were   out   iiicluding 
BILLY  DANIELS'  mom  and  ATTY.  LEO  BRANTON'S  ^ 
mom,  who  with  Leo's  dad  is  visiting  from  Baltimore. 
Sunday  Morning 

Sunday  morning,  the  very  interesting  meeting 
with  the  Sunday  Morning  Breakfast  Club  found  hun- 
dreds enjoying  the  timely  message  brought  by  DR.  L. 
B.  ROSS  of  Wilberforce,  Ohio,  who  spoke  on  the  Negro 
in  our  American  History.  Also  on  the  program  was 
MRS.  IRENE  McCOY  GAINES,  national  president  of 
the  Federated  Clubs  of  Colored  Women.  Chatted  with 
MRS.  PATTERSON  and  her  daughter,  MRS.  LAW- 
RENCE PATTERSON,  MR.  and  MRS.  ARTHUR  LEE 
SIMPKINS,  VIOLA  LEWIS,  little  PAULA  HARRIS 
who  shared  the  table  with  my  little  daughter,  AMIN- 
THA,  DEBRA  JEAN  WHITE  and  her  little  FERDI- 
NAND JAMES  WHITE  HI,  and  many  others. 

RICHMONA  DUNNE  entertained  the  Anchorettes 
last  Saturday  afternoon.  Former  member,  BARBARA 
WEAVER,  was  recipient  of  many  telegrams  and  gifts 
on  Saturday  from  the  Anchorettes  and  her  many 
friends,  when  she  married  in  New  York  City. 

League  of  Allied  Arts  met  on  Sunday  morning 
with  BETTY  VAUGHN  and  BETTYE  HOWARD  as 
hostesses.  Members  heard  some  of  the  interesting 
experiences  that  PAULINE  GLASS  had  while  She  was 
studying  in  South  America. 

A  number  of  social  andcivic  figures  were  present 
on  Monday  at  Exposition  Museum  when  KENNETH 
HAHN  presented  MRS.  GLADYS  OWENS  SMITH, 
great-granddaughter  of  BIDDIE  MASON,  first  citizen 
of  Los  Angeles,  a  plaque  honoring  this  great  American. 
MRS.  OWENS'  granddaughter,  LINDA  SPIKES,  was- 
also  present  at  this  historical  recognition  of  one  of 
Los  Angeles'  founders. 

Red  Circle  Dates 

Not  too  early  to  circle  March  23rd  because  that 
is  the  day  Delta  Sigma  Theta  will  present  lovely 
LEONTYNE  PI^ICE  in  concert  at  the  Philharmonic. 
All  the  sorors  are  hard  at  work  to  make  this  the 
greatest. 

Another  hard  working  group  under  the  leadership 
of  NELLIE  BROWN,  this  year's  Spring  Frolic  chair- 
man, is  the  Doll  League  Charity  Club.  Their  affair 
will  be  MAY  5TH  at  LOS  ANGELES  BREAKFAST 
CLUB  and  LES  BROWN  will  provide  the  twinkle-toe 
music. 

Lovely  Installation 

After  the  lovely  installation  ceremonies  last  Sun- 
day evening  at  the  Pacific  Town  Club,  attractive  GLA- 
DYS MONDY  took  the  "gavel  for  the  year  as  prexy  of 
Creative  Hair  Designers. 

ADDIE  ANDERSON  celebrated  her  natal  day  last 
Sunday  by  having  a  few  intimates  in  for  snacks  and 
refreshments.  ! 

Friends  saddened  by  the  sudden  death  of  MRS. 
LENA  WILLIAMS  last  week  at  Los  Camino  Hospital 
in  Compton.  MRS.  WILLIAMS,  well  known  from  coast 
to  coast,  is  the  mother  of  ELLEN  FOSTER  and  RUTH 
DAVIS  of  Los  Angeles,  IRMA  KELLY  of  Long  Island 
and  RANDOLPH  WILLIAMS  of  Richmond,  Va. 

MR.  and  MRS.  EUGENE  HOUSTON  entertained 
their  Couple  Club  last  Saturday  night.; 


Miles,  Delta  Sifm* 
■ecior  for  Pan-Hellenic; 
si  and  president  of  LA. 
li  Beta;  Georgia  Payton, 
in.  Omega  Phi  Psi,  and 


rea 


kfast 


ub  Hears 
rs.  Gaines 

l|[rs.  Irene  McCoy  Galnts, 
na^onal  president  of  the  Na- 
tional Association  of  Ctdored 
Women,  was  guest  speaker  at 
thej  February  meetings  of  the 
pobular  Women's  Sunday 
Moaning  Breakfast  Club.  Mrs. 
Gaines  brirfly  reviewed  the- 
sixty  years  of  her  organiza- 
tjoh. 

Sparing-  the  rostrum  with 
heij  was  Dr.  L.B.  Ross,  lecturer, 
coi^cert  artist  and  educator, 
whb  reviewed  highlights  of 
the  Negro's  contributions  to 
thW,  growth  of  America. 

IK  keeping  with  this 
morSh's  valentine  theme,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  James  Curry  were 
citid  as  the  oldest  married 
coiiple.  The  Currys  recently 
tel^brated  their  sixty-second 
Wedding  anniversary,  Avalon 
Fldrists  were  cited  for  their 
high  calibre  wwk  and  busi- 
ness acumen. 

Internationally  famous  sin- 
gei  Arthur  Lee  Simpkins^  was 
a  ^uest  performer  ai^d  other 
soloists  were  Hazel  Chapman 
and  George  Smith.  Bemiee 
Lawson  served  as  accom-> 
patiist 


Club  Leader 
Given  Party 

Cora  E.  Pollens,  who  organ- 
izep  the  Hollywood  social  club 
jfoiirteen  years  ago,  was  ten- 
dei^ed  a  birthday  part/  last 
we;k. 

Guests  honoring  her  were: 
Mrs.  J.  Braton.  Dr.  Sue  John- 
soi»,  Mrs,  Virgil  Spehcer,  Mn. 
E.  Srazier,  Mrs.  George  Dixon. 
Mite.  Elizabeth  Kay  and  Mrs. 
At^ee  Hayes. 


HIPS 


•X- 


Mah*  yovt  hipt 
tm<i\\ur  amosiftg 
NEW  EASY  way 
«rl  hbn*.  Na  dial 
or  4aigM  lost. 
Usviol  HOME 
whi|«  you  lEST. 
ladUCM  til*  •( 
HIP$,  TUMMY, 
THI^MISwNO 
EFFpRT.  Fvnl 
Santibla. 
HtcftbfvL 
EcAMmicoL 
Wiifiw  Sty: 
"Fatarin^M 
Tcmovsti  from 
abdbmen,  3  in 
from  hipt." 

-mTf. 

"3  ih.  from 


hin|."-M.A. 

"FiMtiiMtL 

FvdhadnyS 


dkildraanu't 
iiSif-ES. 


tuBUByj 


..  liU  T 
low  IS," 


lessf 


N*w,  Eaty, 
No  Effort 

na  bookM  and  PKE  | 
HOME  d«ii»er»i»ratiii. 
W«lP»OVE  AT  NO 
COST  haw  yoa  aMy 
radtoc*  in  tin.  TELE- 
PH6NE-4alk  to  UOY 
od^tori  th«  MU  alt 
aboot  n.  Con  Mw. 

C.  MARIE 


Bargain     Spree    for 
■women  S-fooUJ  and  \ 


TALL  I 
SHOPSJ 
SALE!  I 


DRESSES  (4  big  groups) 
SUITS  (3  larje  groups) 
SWEATERS  (all  styles) 
BLOUSES  (plain,  fancy) 
SKIRTS  (4  big  groups) 
COATS  (big  selection) 
LINGERIE   (various   styles) 


now:  25%  to  50%  off! 
now:  33%  to  60%  off! 
now:  25%  to  55%  off! 
now;  30%  to  50%  off! 
now:  20%  to  50%  off  I 
now:  25%  to  45%  otti 
now:  22%  to  55%  oH! 


HUGHES 


■ 

^E.  5-1872 

r~   i      "W  •  • .  «•»  100AY  "-"~1 

C.JMARIE   HUOHES  I 

21?3  Ridgalay  Dr.  ■ 

Loji  ApgalM  16.  Calif. 

P  Ifiv^d  liha  FMCI  TRtAL  T«SAT- 
Sadflta.  Clva  ma  faB.FKSE  dMails. 

n  PiMjiB  Mod  ma  p 

■tJMli  how  to  RBDU 


HIPS.  WAIST.  TDMMT.  Me, 


Prices  slashed  right  and  I 

lett!    Sensational    store-  ■ 

wide  clearance.  In  every  , 

department!     New  I 

Spring  Tall  Fashions  In-  ' 

eluded !„ Visit  Tall  Shops  , 

this    week!    Charge    ac-  I 

counts      and     extended  * 

budget  accounts  Invited.  • 


LOS  ANGELES 
714    South    Hill    St. 

INGLEWOOD 
209   Cast  Nutwoo(J 

PASADENA 

910  E.  California 

VAN    NUYS 

632S  Van  Nuys  Blvd. 


NooU 

Nanja. 


c^saffiMSur-Sr 


Ci«y. 
Stat4. 


I 

I 


Jftm 


DI 


^UifoiovaiSL  SMKJ 


A' 


=r 


\ 


-t-? 


rs 

les 

,  Gaines, 
I  the  Na. 

Colored 

taker  at 

ot  the 

I  nday 
ub.  Mrs. 
^ed  the 
rganiza- 


|th     this 
le,  Mr. 

were 
j  married 
[recently 
'-second 
Avalon 
for  their 
Id   busl- 

}us  sin- 

1ns-  was 

|»d  other 

fhapman 

Berniee 

accom- 


organ- 

:;ial  club 

VAS  ten- 

Irty    last 

pr  were: 

te  John- 

er.  Mr«. 

Dixon, 

Ind  Mrs. 


\/ 


RRAT-  I 

lotiU-  I 


or 


&  MODERN  JAZZ  QUARTET  AT  CIVK 


GOLDEN  GLOVES  —  Boxing 
fans '  are  talking  about  the 
skirmish  involving  a  healthy 
Kidgley  street  brownskin|  and 
a  featherweight  W.  Adams 
tailor.  The  knock-down  brawl 
ended  in  a  draw! 

EMGINEERIMG— The  naugh- 
ty,, nice  cold  war  between  two 
national  officers  of  the  local 
branch  of  NNWC,  may  break 
out  in  a  rash  anv  day  now! 

EARL  J.  GRirFIN— No  sooner 
had  the  gabby  ex-salesman 
checked  into  his  Country  Club 
estate  from  Hot  Springs,  Ajk. 
than  he  was  off  to  Japan  for 
three  months! 

FOUR  STEP  BROTHERS  — 
The  snappy  dancing  masters 
t)roved  to  the  nation  last  Sun- 
day night  over  the  Steve  Al- 
len's TV  show,  why  they  are 
the  toast  of  two  continents! 

KUMBERS  WOES  —  Coming 
on  the  heels  of  the  big  raid 
last  week-  the  numbers  opera- 


tors took  th^ir  worst  beating.  A 
liquor  derk  pocketed  $1,500 
when  013  came  up! 

RUBY  SHIPP— Smart  and  ele- 
gant women  out  south  Los  An- 
geles way  ace  saying  wonderful 
things  about  the  craftmanship 
of   this   youthful    operator! 

CELLI  GRAVES  —  She's  the 
speedy  cashier  in  Ralph's  huge 
Crenshaw  blvd.  market  and  her 
refreshing  smile  and  pleasant 
personality  rate  high  among 
the  daily  shoppers! 

FOUND— Thelma  Lee.  ex-De- 
trolter,  who  operates  that  smart 
dress  shop  across  th«  street 
from  the  Town  Tavern  on  West- 
ern^^-enuoo,  found  a  lady's 
purJpFloaded  with  "bread."  The 
party  can  reclaim  same  by 
calling  at  the  shop! 

WEDDING  BELLES— A  well 
known  member  of  an  ol  L.A. 
family  will  shock  her  friends 
when  she  becomes  the  Mrs.  of 
a  very  young  man  soon! 


Wkt's  Cooking: 


With 


BARBARA  MOUNTS 


Thursday,  Ffebfuary  14,  1957 


azz 


O 

C— 'raw/ore/ . 


he  California  Eagle— 1 1 


SOUNDTRACK 


UNDERPLAYING  IT  ON  AN  UNDERWOOD  I 

Well,  the  race  is  over.  The  race  foi  the  part  of 
Warner's  ''Band  of  Angels"  is  locked  uf  . 
SIDNEY  PO-nER.  He  will  play  CLARK 
in  the  flicker  .  .  .  Tell  'em  you  heard  i 
MISTER    CALYPSO.    HARRY  4— 
BELAFONTE  just  before  closing  1  piece!  |.  .  .  Exciting 


I 

.1 


Rau-Ru'  in 

The  man  for  the  job  is 

ABLE'S  illegitimate  son 

here!  .  .  .  Chatted  with 


Birthdays  are  wonderful  occasions  for  celebrations  and  at 
Ralphs  you  can  win  valuable  prizes  just  for  registering  during 
their  84th  birthday  observance.  Try  your  luck  by  registering. 

Treat  the  family  to  better  health  by  buying  some  of  the 
sweet  navel  oran°:es  that  are  so  sood  now.  There  is  a  real  buy  in 
coffee  for  the  coffee  hour.   For 


the  whole  family's  enjoyment  |  is  transparent.  Add  1  cup  vine- 
select   a   chuck   pot   roast   from  i  gar  \  cup  brown  sugar  and  '2 


Thriftimart  or  Ralphs  super 
USDA  grade  A  meats.  This 
slices  well  for  lunch  box  sand- 
wiches, too. 

For  our  little  experiment  in 
the  realm  of  cooking  this  week 
how  about  a  Thriftimart  sweet 
and  sour  pot  roast? 

Sweet  and  Sour  Pot  Roast 

Brown    a    3    to    5    pound    pot 


ROBERTA  LIXN 

HAVING  A  BALL — Top  television,  radio  jind  screen  stars 
uill  donate  their  talents  for  the  benefit  of  the  \alional  Urban 
Lcaque  at  the  League's  third  annual  .U'inter  Ball,  Friday^ 
February  15,  at  the  Beverly  Hilton  Hotel.  The  charity  affair 
is  sponsored  by  the  Western  Regional  Office  of  the  Urban 
League.  Appearing  during  the  evening  uill  be  Roberta  Linn, 
formerly  featured  vocalist  iiith  the  Lawrence  If'elk  show,  and 
ivinner  of  several  television  awards  for  popularity  and  per- 
sonality. Dave  Ketchurn,  well  known  comedian  and  one  of  the 
most  versatile  entertainers  in  the  business,  icill  be  on  hand,  fie 


BILLY  DAMELS      . 

is  currently  featured  on  yBC-Radio's  "Bill  Goodwin  Shoii." 
Bill  Goodwin-.hinisclf  will  also  be  on  hand  as  master  of  cere- 
monies. He  has  been  luell  known  to  movie,  radio  and  television 


audiences  tor  of 


?() 


years.   The  fabulous  Billy  Daniels  will 


be  one  of  the  company  of  hcadlmers  u  ho  are  graciously  giving 
of  their  time  and  abilities  during  the  evening.  He  will  have  his 
regular  accompanist,  the  gifted  Benny  Payne,  with  him.  (Calvin 
Jackson,  outs'td/iding  pianist,  arrange*,  composer  and  dccording 
artist,  has  also  consented  to  appear.  Two  orchestras ^  Bob  Wal- 
ters and  His  All-Stars  plus  Armando's  Latin  Rhythms,  will 
supply  fine  music  for  continuous  dancing.  I 


night  at  the  Grove,  and  at  his 
suggestion  we're  going  to  TWA 
up  to  Vegas  as  his  guest  at  the 
RIVIERA.  Intend  to  come  back 
with  the  exclusive  story  on 
what  makes  HARRY  tick?  .  .  . 
Actor  MORRY  ERBY  who  used< 
to  belong  to  the  act  known  as 
'Four  People-sqid  Two  Pianos'  is 
the  lad  who  stepped  '  into 
JAMES  EDWARDS  9^.  Double 
E  shoes  when  Jimmie  strolled 
out  on  Street  Car  Named  De- 
sire. The  fella  did  so  well,  he 
is  being  held  over  for  the  juicy 
part  of  Matthew  in  their  LOST 
IN  THE  STARS  deal!  .  .  .  Saaay, 
what's  the  deal  with  "Praise 
House"  at  the  glamorous  Hun- 
tington Hartford  House.  They're 
trying  to  tell  this  boy  that  the 
whole  plot  is  strictly  from 
"Uncle  Tom"  and  that  the  San 
Francisco    NAACP    will 


WILMA 

RHEA,  the  hat  designer,  gaVe 
this  cclumnist  a  private  show- 
ing  of   hats. 


theipiece  if  it  comes  there.  But 
waft . . .  let's  see  what  happens! 
They  could  be  telling  a  fancy 
story!  .  .  .  Alright,  so  we  know 
what  EARTHA  KITT  thought 
about  NEHRU  but  what  did  In- 
dia's prime  minister  have  to  say 
about  that  girl  child!  .  .  . 
BOBBY  BREWINGTON.  the  tops- 
in-togs  chap,  is  giving  the 
Eleventh  and  Flower  Employ- 
ment Bldg.  an  eyeful  since  he 
started  toiling  there.  His  dapper 
wardrobe     is     a     conversation 


Seventh  Ave. 
Ralphs  Party 
wtd,Feb.20 

"■You  are  invited,"  says  W.  B. 
i  Love,  inanager  of  Ralphs  Wash- 
!  ingtor^  Store.  3617  W..Washing- 
I  ton  Blvd..  in  announcing  the 
Icommiinity  Birthday  Partj'  to 
be  help  at  the  store  from  7  to  9 
Ion  the  evening  of  Wednesday, 
1  Feb.  23. 

j     Ralfhs   Cfrocery   Company    is 
picket  !  celebrating  84  years  of  service 


j  to     Southern     California     this 
month,  with  over  550,000  worth 
j  of  fab  jIous  prizes,  special  sales, 
I  and  -  Community  Birthday  Par- 
ties in  all  34  Ralphs  Complete 
Food  Stores. 

"We   hope  everybody  in  this 

area  v'ill  come  to.  the  Commun- "^ 

ity  Party  at  our  Ralpiis  store," 

says  Mr.  Love.  "Therein  be  ice 

Icreamjand  birthday  cake  for  all, 

;  with  doffee.  chocolate  milk,  and 

■  soft  drinks  as  well.  We're  look- 

{ ing  fo^-ward  to  seeing  you." 


teaspoon  nutmeg.  Salt  and  pep 
per  to  taste.  Cover  tifjhtly  and  [ 
simmer  till  tender.  Thicken  the 

I  liquid  in  the  pan  for  gravy.  I 

I  Serve  with  cooked  peas  and  ! 
turnips.  Potatoes,  carrots,  whole  i 
onions  and  turnips  ,may  be  ; 
added  to  the  pan  while  cooking 

!  for  a  complete  meal  in  one  pot. 

I  This  may  be  oven  roasted. 

Remember  Ralphs  and  Thrif 


roast  in  a  heavv  kettle,  using  2    timart    Markets   for    the    finest 


tablespoons    fat.    .-^dd    ^2     cup 
sliced  onion  and  cook  till  onion 


food  ALL  DAY  in  EVERY  WAY! 
I  See  Displays.* 


IttfOKMATIOM  ON 

BAIL 

BONDS 

OPEM  34  HOURS 

FREE 

\  CELES  KING  ll>  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY            | 

909  East  6th  Street            • 

MU.  S50O    1 

Modern  Sound 
For  Rose  Town 
February  lOth 

A  great  double  bill  consisting 
of  the  swinging  artistry  of  Dizzy 
Gillespie  leading  his  own  Big 
band,  and  the  Modern  Jazz 
Quartet  is  being  brought  to  th"e 
Pasadena  Civic  Auditorium, 
Tuesday  night,  February  19th- 
under  the  auspices  of  Gene 
Norman,  KLAC  Disc  Jockey. 

Foremost  Factor 

Dizzy  Gillespie  and   his   new 
big  Band  is  headed  by  one  of 
the  most  interesting  personali- 
ties  in   jazz   today.   His   given 
name  is  no  mere  coincidence —  | 
it  betrays  his  light-hearted,  un-  : 
inhibited  manner.  Decked  in  his 
famous    symbols;    the    beret,  ! 
horn-rimmed    glasses    and  ' 
goatee,    he    muggs    and     he 
dances,    but    most    of    all    he 
"blows"!    And   the  entire   Band 
picks  right  up  after  him  I 


Glen  McMann  invites  you  to  attend  the  Strip's  most  picturesque  room 
CONTINUOUS  SHOW  AND  ENTERTAINMENT  NIGHTLY 


"The  Voice  With  a  Smile" 


INTERLUDE.  ROOM 


BR.  2-5028 


OPENING    FRIQA 
NO  COVER  -  NO 


ADMISSION 


JIMMY  GIUFi-RE 


CLUB-DU.  2-52061 


-Glen  MeMann  (Former  Owner  of  the  Turban  Kpom)  Manager- 


S4.21C  j 


BRAND 


WAY  TO  BUY 

oii  tmmm 

GOLD  CUP  POCKET  FLASK 


Count  on  Old  Charter  to  come  up  with  the 
smartest  looking  flask-bottle  of  the  year.  We've 
shown  it  to  sportsmen,  travelers,  men-on-the- 
go  . . .  and  they  all  agreed  Old  Charter's  new 
Gold  Cup  Flask  was  plenty  handsome,  plenty 
handy. 

You'll  slip  It  into  your  coat  or  hip  pocket 
easily  (Gold  Cup  has  just  the  right  back- 
curve).  Buy  the  Gold  Cup  Pocket  Flask 
today.  Still  the  same  great  ^^^.,^^,^  ,,  ,^, 
whiskey  you've  always  liked  regular  priea  /n- 
-Kentucky's  Finest  Straight  p,i  „  „j  H«if  Pint. 
Bourbon. 

tick-tock.. .  the  whiskey  that 
didn't  watch  the  clock... 
seven  long  yearsi  ■ 


Gen*  Norman  Presents  In  oncert 

DIZZY  GILLESPIE 


AND  HIS  BIG  BAND 


Modern  Jazz  Quartet 

TUES.  NITE,  8:15  P.M.,  PASADENA  CIVIC 

Tickets  from  $1.50  at  So.  Calif.  Music  Co. 
737  S.  Kill  St..  TU.  1144 


-ENJOY  THE  flNEST- 

*  Cocktails  *   Fun  and  Frolic 

*  Entertainment  *   Heme  Cooked  Meals 


Ty: 


""•"-•"■'  MILOMO 

?9th  &  WESTERN      RE.  5-9585 


Everybody's  Talking  About 

BARRY  BAINES' 

*  Choice  Cocktails 


—  and  — 


*  Delicious  Dinners 

at  Adams   &   Crenshaw's 

Favorite   "Ge#lace"  gx 

fO«    YOUR    ENTERTAINMINT    PLEASURE "^ 

NAT  WILLIAMS,  Singsational  Pianist 
R  A  DD V^C  ~  2636  Crenshaw 

DAKKf    ^  RE.  1-5871 

Plenty  of  Free  Parking 


KEKTliCKT  SIMISHT  BOURBON  WHISKH  •  8S  PROflf  .  I  TEARS  HID  •  OU  CHWTU  DISTIUMT  CO.,  UWUmit  IT. 


^:^^o°-^ 


K* 


Complete 
POT   LUCK   MEAL 
Personally  Cooked 
by  "Dynamite" 


SIR  CHARLES 
THOMPSON 

Prano  &  Organ 
Stylist 


fJm, 


Wliar*  SparK. 
men  «nd  thair 
women  Irieed* 
■(■••t   to  eat   .  . 


DYNAMITE  JACKSON'S 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

Finest  RBod    *    Delightful  Drinks 
Open  fvery  Day:  10  AM.  to  2  AM, ' 

4701  S.  CENTRAL      AD.  2-5918^ 

III 


C»  a  die  a^iuinaon ' 

^36lh1»tYwesleni 


TOWN 
TAVERNL^ 


si/  M  comp<\rae>le 


FINFST 
Wosfern^t^aSuilt 


i 


/ 


I      CALIFORNIA 

I  EAGLE 


WAHT 


DEADLINE:  WEDNESDAY  AT  11  A.M. 


SAVE  TIME 
SAVE  MONEY 


AD.J4-0161 

lADUNi  - 
WED.IAT  11  A.M. 


.Thursday,  February  14,  1957 

I        CLASSIFIED  AD  INDEX 

v;AII    Classifications   Ar*    Numbered 
I   and  Appear  in  Numerical  Order 

ilXlasatfi^tien  No. 

'vLaaals' 1 

.  Situationi    Wanted — Female    12 

fHelp    Wanted — Female     13 

.:  Situation!  Wanted — Male  14 

'Help  Wanted— Male  15 

'■'Employment  Preparation 16 

Employment  Agenciei 17 

.Wanted    to    Rent     _ 18 

ifloome — Furnished     19 

Hotels         19a 

■  Rooms^Unfurnished     20 

;  Rooms — Housekeeping  21 

;(  Rooms  A.  Board  21a 

;  .Apartments — Furnished      22 

;  Apartments — Unfurnished     23 

fi  Houses — Furnished  24 

j.  Houses — Unfurnished   25 

T  Business   Rentals   26 

J  Agencies — Rentals   .  27 

;;  Money  to  Loan    28 

-.    Mortgages  A.  Trust  Deeds  .._ 29 

•    Business  Opportunities 30 

'    Personal    Service*   46 

4'  Services    _ 47 

Child    Care   „.._ _...48.. 

Rug    Cleaning   _. 49.. 

Autos — New    _ 50 

Autos — Used  51 

Auto    Repairs      52 

,    Real    Estate    Loans   ',  95 

<lj  Income    Property  for   Sale   96 

ii>  Income  Property  for  Lease  96a 

"   Business  Property  tor  Sale 96b 

Property   Loans       > 96c 

';   Property    Improvements  97 

4  Real  Estate  Wanted  98 

te  Real    Estate   for   Sale   _   99 

,'    Diseflay   Real   Estate  ._ ICO 

ii   Display    Property    Rentals 101 


I  lEGAL  NOTICES 

t  ' ' 

Jl^  California    Eagle — 41548 

^  NOTICE  OF  SALE  OF  REAL  PROP. 
•;  ERTY  AT   PUBLIC   AUCTION 

A;  (Sale  No.  78A) 

*  Offlrp  of  the  Tax  Collpftor  of  the 
Sj':  Countv  of  Los  Angeles.  State  of  Cal- 
''   ilornia. 

f  WHERE.\S.  the  Board  of  Super- 
>  visors  of  the  Count.v  of  Los  Angeles 
J^!  pursuant  to  the  provisions  of  Divi- 
5;.  sion  1.  Part  6.  Chapter  7  of  the 
J-:  Revenue  and  Taxation  Code  of  the 
i'  State  of  California,  adopted  a  resolu- 
,t.  Uon  approving  the  sale  of  property 
.»  hereinafter  described;  and 

5'  WHEREAS,  there  is  filed  in  m.v  of- 
"V  fire  writt-^n  authorization  for  said 
,"  sale  under  the  hand  and  seal  of  tho 
■J  State  Controller,  to  sell  said  proper- 
_•  ty;  and 

'.!  WHEREAS,  the  minimum  bid  for 
s  each  parrel  is  Ten  i.?10.00)  Dollars: 
'»  THEREFORE,  public  notice  is 
'i  hereby  given  that  unless  the  said 
;•  property  is  -redeemed  or  an  inslall- 
';  rnent  plan  of  redemption  is  initiated 
"  as  provided  by  law.  I.  H.  L.  B\Tam. 
':  Tax  Collector  of  the  County  of  Los 
.^  Atigeles.  will.  commencinR  Mondav. 
•,i  F>bruar.v  25th.  1957,  at  the  hour  of 
,1'  ten  o'clock  A.  M.,  and  continuing 
,  from  dav  to  dav  in  the  office  of  the 
J  County  Ta-x  Collector.  1840  South  Hill 
J  Street,  in  the  City  of  Los  Angeles. 
it  offer  for  sale  and  sell  at  public  auc- 
?  tion  to  the  highest  bidder,  the  lol- 
;:  lowing  described  real  property  :  % 
,■'.,  Parcel  Xo.  735.  Southmore  Tract, 
i  S  9  ft.  of  Lot  8  Block  3.  Assessed  to 
•j  Fannie  Lott  and  Eddie  White.  Loca- 
.  tion — Vicinity  of  43rd  PL  &  Hooper 
i:  Ave.,  Los  Angeles  City. 
)i  P«rcel  N'o.  754.  W.  T.  Thorne.^ 
,ji  Besub  of  Lots  1  to  125  Inclusive  of 
if  fhe    Hawthorne    Tract.    Lot    com    at 

■  intersection  of  W  line  of  Lot  82  w  ith 
. :  SW  line  of  San  Pedro  St.  80  ft.  wide 

th  SE  on  sd  SW  line  6.22  ft.  th  W 
■;;  3.*  ft.  to  sd  W  line  th  N'  thereon 
r  4.89  ft.  to  heg.  Part  of  Lot  S2. 
•  A*«e!>sed  to  Inex  \.  Marienthal.  Lo- 
i';  cation — Vicinity  of  i'lau.'son  .A^  e.  & 
,i  San    Pedro  St.,   Los  Angeles  City. 

,  The  foregoing  described  real  pmp- 
hj  ertv  Is  located  in  the  County  of  Los 
c  Angeles.  State  of  California. 
»l.  For  information  as  to  the  amounts 
! necessary  to  redeem  or  initiata  an 
,  installment  plan  of  redemption,  pro- 
\  ided  the  right  to  redeem  has  not 
/previously  been  terminated,  apply  to 
:Jl  L-  B%ram.  Countv  Tax  Collector. 
.JlMO  South  Hill  Street,  Los  Angeles 
h.5.   California. 

If  redemption  of  the  property  or 
..Jhe  Initiation  of  an  installment  plan 
t^of  redemption  is  not  made  according 
:lo  law  before  the  first  bid  is  re- 
ceived, the  right  of  redemption  will 
;*ease. 

■'  The  real  property  included  In  this 
public  auction  tax  sale  is  located  in 
various  cities  and/or  areas  of  this 
'County.  The  notice  of  sale  published 
ijn-thls  newspaper  does  not  include 
~all  the  properties  scheduled  for  sale. 
;A  complete  list  of  these  properties 
'are  on  file  in  this  office. 
^    Notice   to    Prospective    Purchasers 

■  Prospective      purchasers     are     cau- 

it'Oned  that  the  property  contained  in 
this  notice  may  be  encumbered  with 
foreclosed  or  unforeclosed  delinquent 

.atfeet- bonds,    income  tax   liens,  ease. 

■milnts,  etc.,  vxhieh  may  not  be  can- 
eetled    by    the    tax    sale.    A    complete 

{investigation    of    these    encumbrances 

ifhould  be  made  before  attending  the 

'tax  sale. 

The  miniinum  bid  for  each  parcel 
Is  Ten  ($10.00)  Dollars.  Property 
purchased  shall  be  paid  for  in  full, 
•jwith  cash,  at  time  of  sale,  cashier's 
Checks,  certified  checks,  or  bank 
fnoney  orders  will  be  accepted  in  lieu 
•f  cash,  provided  they  are  made  pay- 
ible  to  H,  L.  Byram,  .County  Tax 
Collector. 
,     Dated    this    31st    day    of    January, 

■  H.  L.   BYRAM.  Tax  Collector. 

.1        (Publish    in    California    flagle 
;.  Jan.  31.    Feb.  7.   14.   1957) 


The  California  Eagle— 
I-LECAL  NOTICES 

NO.   42518 
NOTICE    TO    CREDITORS 

-      No.   385146 

In  The  Superior  I'oiirt  of  rlie  .siiaie 
of  I'alit'ornia.  in  and  for  ilie  (.■oiiiu.v 
of  Los  .\nj;i-l'\<. 

Ui     i.hii    .Maiter    of    tlie     l''..^tatp    of 
.-\.\DK1::\V   \'.   :;i':;i.;.<.   also   known   as 
'  V.VLLKRV     fiO.\".\(!i:.     Die  .■a..'P<i. 

.\otire  IS  hereh.v  ffi\en  lo  cri-iiil- 
ois-haviiiL:  rlaiiiis  asainst  tin---  .«aid 
.leced' nt  lo  file  said  ciaiins  in  ilic 
office  of  the  clerli  of  ihe  aforcsaiil 
coun  or  to  pres'-nt  th*-in  tn  ilip 
uiidersi;;n.=-d  ..ti  liie  offifC  uf  li.-r 
.Attornt-y  Tlioma.-  <i.  .\'f ii.-~oiii.  1111 
l-^ast  \>rnon  \\einM'  in  liie  ('ii,\"  of 
Lo.s  .Vnizi^le.-..  in  llif  aforesaid  roilii- 
ty.  whirli  latirr  officp  i,<  the  j  iai-e 
of  Uusinoss  of  tiip  iindcr.^ii^in'il  in 
all  niauiT.s  pertaining  lo  .^aiil  h,..ihii-. 
Sui-n  rlaim.=  witti  the  m'<-p*^ar>' 
vouchers  nitisl  lie  fil^d  or  pfi->eiilP(i 
a.s  aforcsaifi  within  six  nionih->  aftif 
the    first    pul'lnation    of    iliis    iioiive. 

Dated   Jainiarv    2R.    1957. 

Al.HKRTH.V    Li:i-:   RliJG.-^ 

Administratrix  of  the  Estate  of 
said    descedent. 

Thomas    G.    Neusom.    Attorney. at- 
Angeles,    California,    AD,    2-6149. 
i  rublishod   California   Ka,;Ie 

KpI).   7-14-21 -28 


18-WANTED  TO  RENT 

Landlords  Free 

Tenants  waiting.  All  areas.  RE 
3-5621;  RE  3-1171. 


19-ROOMS,  FURNISHED      

j'         FURNISHED  ROOMS 

I  Furnished  Rooms  for  rent.  Your 
j  companv  welcome.  AD  3-9926. 
!   19-A-HOTELS 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The  Peopte's  Choice 
960  E.  Jefferson 

AD.  3-92^5 

3700  S.  WESTERN 
RE.  4-9346 


NOTICE    TO    CREDITORS 
NO.   385972 

In  the  Superior  t^ourl  of  the  State 
of  Californid.  in  and  tor  thr  Cou^l.^ 
of  Los  .\nKeirs.  In- the  Matter  ot  Ihr 
Estatr  of  t;porKe  .McCuislon.  De- 
ceased. 

.Notice  IS  hrrpb>'  si\pn  h>"  the  un- 
dersigned. K.  A.  \Vin.--lanlc.\  .  Public 
Administrator,  as  .Administrator  of 
the  Estate  of  George  McCuiston,  Dr- 
reased.  to  the  Creditors  of.  and  sll 
persons  haxinc  claims  against,  llir 
s-aid  decedent,  lo  present  thpm,  with 
the  neccssar.v  \ouchprs.  within  six 
months  after  tile  first  tiuhlic.ilion  of 
this  notice,  to  the  said  .Vdniinistr.-Hor 
at  his  office  ;it  Sf*  North  Spring  St.. 
Los  .Angeles  12.  California,  which  s;iid. 
office  the  undersigned  selects  !\s  a 
place  of  businps?  in  all  matters  con- 
nected with  said  estate,  or  to  file 
them,  -With  the  necessnry  \ouchprs. 
within  si\  months  after  the  first  niib- 
hratton  of  tills  notice,  in  the  office 
of  the  Clerk  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  Cniifornin  in  and  for 
the  Countv  of  Los  .Ancelrs. 
Dated:    Feb.    .i.    I0."i7 

K.   A.  ^^'1.N.STANL1■:Y. 

^  Public  Administrator,    as 

Administrator  of  the  Estate 
of  said   Decedent 
Publish     in    California     Eagle    Keh. 
14-21-29-Marph    7.    1957. 


21 -ROOMS,    HOUSEKEEPING 

LIGHT    HOUSEKEEPING    RMs! 
l.SlT'j  South  VVil.son  Place. 


22-APARTMENTS  FURNISHED 

Unfurnished  3  rooms.  Newly 
decorated  apartment  near 
Rampart  and  Temple  Sts. 
Adult.s,  reference  required,  no 
pets,  DU  3-7218. 


22-APARTMENTS-FURNISHED 


13-HELP  WANTED-FEMALE 


FEMALE— Fur  finisher  wanted. 
52.5  W,  Sth  street.  Call  VA 
57.57. 


TOBEY  APIS. 

(Near  Adams  &  Western) 
BRAND   NEW  .  .   . 

MODERN 
FURNITMRE 

Beautiful 

Lobby  and  Patio 

Good   Public  Transportation 

Automatic  Washers   and   Driers 

Telephone 
Singles   —   Doubles  —    Bachelor* 

$55.00  Mo.  Up 

ALL    UTILITIES    FURNISHED 

1 920  West  25th  St. 
RE.  3-1460 


1S-HELP  WANTEO-MALE 


WANTED— Ma.ster  barber.  Good 
busines.s.  Call  Samp.'^on's  Bar- 
ber Shop.   EFbrook  9-9607. 


Help  Wanted 

Master  Barber.  Good  biisine.'is. 
See  Samp.<on.  1924  Lincoln 
Blvd.,  Santa  Monica. 


FURNISHED    APARTMENT 

\V.-\NTED  —  Neat,  respon.sible 
.<;inr;le  man  to  .share  modern  2 
bedroom  apartment,  westside, 
home  privileijes.  Call  after  4 
p.m.  Thursday  or  Friday  or 
any  time  Sat.  &  Sun.  RE. 
1-8171. 


SINGERS 
NEEDED 

Auditions  for  Male  Singers 

Will  Be  Held  at 

2112  West  27th  Street 

Saturday  from 

11:00  a.m.  until  2:00  p.m. 

Professional  Singer* 

Also  Needed  for 

Recordings 

PHONE  RE.  2-7521 

or  RE.  1-7904 


17-IMPLOYMENT  AGENCIES 


ROYALTY 

EMPLOYMENT 

AGENCY 

"25  YEARS  OF  SERVICE" 

1714  West  Jefferson  Blvd. 

RE,    1-4529  RE.   3-3930 

HELP  WANTED:  Women,  cooks 
I  and  general.   Home  nights,  35 
'  to  50.  Stay  $200  per  month  & 
up.   Dishwashers,   hotel   maids, 
waitresses    and    cooks,    salaries 
I  open.   MEN:   Cooks,  dishwash- 
ers, fry  cooks, 

COUPLES:     Top    saUned     posi- 
tions. 

DAY  WORK 

Register  now  for  these  top  pay- 
ing  jobs. 

18-WANTED  TO  RENT     ''      ] 


PATRONIZE 

EAGLE 
ADVERTISERS 


FURN.  APT.  TO  SHARE 

Neat,  respon.-iible  single  man  to 
share  2  bedroom  apartment, 
have  privileges,  convenient. 
Cal  latter  4  p.m.  Thiirs.  and 
Fri..  weekend  any  time.  RE 
1-S171. 

Hilton  Arms 

Hotel  &  Apartments 

Weekly  service  &  utilities.  Clean, 
quiet,  comfortable,  well-managed 
building. 

FURNISHED 
SINGLES,    DOUBLES 

BACHELORS 

M650  and  Up 

RE.  5-81 17. 

1 250  South  Western 

•   BRAND   NEW 

APARTMENTS 

•  COMPLETELY 
FURNISHED 

•  MODERNISTIC 
BRICK  COURTS 

•  3  LOVELY  ROOMS 


65 


MONTH 


WANTED  TO  RENT 

lANOlORD  LISTINGS  FREE 
TENANTS  WAITING  TODAY 

DAILY   RENTALS 
Call  PL.  3-3168 


LANDLORDS 

FREE  RENTAL  SERVICE 
LIST  YOUR  VACANCIES 
WITH   US  -  ALL  AREAS 

Call  RE.  1-2301 


MOVE 

IN 

FEB.   16 

638'/2 

PL 

E.   82nd  St. 

9-4705 

23- 

. 

-APARTMENTS, 

UNFURNISHED 

WANT 
OUT  OF 
LIFE? 


TrtveP... security?... t  home  «  "bmmess  of  your  own? 
Get  started  toward  a.  happier,  in«e  rewarding  life  th« 
Broadway  Federal  Savings  way.  Following  a  regular  sav- 
ings plan  will  give  you  a  very  real  sense  of  accomplish- 
ment . . .  because  you  know  you're  on  the  way  to  a  better 
life.  And  your  money  will  GROW  and  GROW  with 
Broadway  Federal's  hi^  dividend  rate,  compounded  semi- 
annually on  all  accounts.  Were  right  in  your  neighborhood, 
ready  to  give  you  friendly,  personal  service.  Drop  in  today! 
4a  ACCOUNTS  INSURED  TO  $10,000 


Broadway  Federal  Saving 

4501   South  Broadway  ADams  2-4271 


I  BRAND  NEW 

APTS. 

2  LARGE  BDRMS.  EACH 
TILE  BATHROOMS 
GARBAGE  DISPOSALS 
tiLE  KITCHENS 
SLIDING  GLASS  DOORS 
LARGE  PRIVATE  PATIOS 
PLENTY  PARKING  SPACE 
CHILDREN  WELCOME 


PER 

MO. 


100 


LARGE    SELECTION 
SEE  MANAGER 

2120  DELAWARE 

SANTA  MONICA,  CALIF, 
or  PHONE 

PL.  8-3645 


5222  ASCOT  AVE. 

•  FINE  4-FAMILY  FLAT 

•  1   LARGE  BEDROOM  EACH 

•  CHILDREN  WELCOME 


55 


Month 


RE.  2-8318  -  1-8922 
Residence  AX.  4-5612 


,'i 


^ 


DE lUXE 

MODERN 

APTS. 


JUST 
COMPLETED 

RIDGEIEY 
MANOR 

UNFURN.  1  &2BR. 
$90  M.  &  UP 

INCLUDES:  WW  CARPETING 
OR  PARQUET  FLOORS/  EX- 
POSED BEAM  OR  ACOUSTIC 
PLASTER,  INSULATED  WALLS, 
GARBAGE  DISPOSAL,  TILE 
KITS.  &  BATHS,  EXTRA. 
CLOSETS,  LAUNDRY,  FREE 
HOT  WATER. 

OPEN  DAILY  AND  WEEK-ENDS 
10  TO  5 

2222    S.    RIDGELEY   DR. 
NORTH  OF  ADAMS 

1    BLOCK  EAST  OF  HAUSER 

MR.  WACHT 

WE.  8-3871  orGR.  8-4829 


24-FURN1SHED  HOUSES 


3  ROOM  HOUSE 
FURNISHED 

2    Children.  OK.    $55   Month. 

6308  South  Vermont 
PL.  9-7256  -  AD.  3-1041 


25-UNFURNISHEO    HOUSES 


12 


WEEK 


"Never  occupfed."  Single.-  New- 
furniture. 


37 


50 

MONTH 


1    Bedroom.   V/cst.   Child   O.K. 


45 


MONTH 


2  bdrm.  Large  family  welcome. 


65 


Redec.    2    bdrm.   Florence   dist. 
Tofs. 


60 


lovely  1   BR  plus  W.B.  for  tots. 


$ 


75 


4    bdrms.    P   furn.    Gar.   Child. 

MANY  OTHERS-EAST-WEST 
SPECIALIZING  IN  FAMILIES 
WITH  CHILDREN.      • 

Open  Daily  -   Thurk. 
Friday  Til  7  P.M. 

2625  E.  FLORENCE 

LU.  2-5361 


UNFURNISHED  HOUSES 

6   room    house,   3    bedrtns.,    large 
child  o.k.  ^gg 


Unfurnished. 


'Me. 


2   stucco  houses,   2  bedrms.  eech. 

i-:..  *70„  $80 i:: 

6   fabulous   epti.    West   Side.   Two 
bedrms.    CO>l 
e«h.  '0*l 


to 


3    bedrm. 
West 
Side 


•pt.    All    utilities    peid. 

$100 ::: 


FURX.   jr   rXFURK. 

4— I -bdrm.   houses.   Furnished  and 
Unfurnished.     Eastside    arid 

r      $50-$65 


Me. 


Maliette  Realty 

1406}   West  Vernon  Ave. 

AX.  4-8157  _  AX.  4-8158 

AD.  4-8098 


UNFURN.  HOUSE  FOR  RENT 

$55  PER  MONTH— Unfurnished 
3  bedroom  home.  Children  A 
pet.s  welcome.  AX  2-0458. 


25-HOUSES  UNFURNISHED 


i  47-SERVICES 


UNFURN.  DUPLEX  FOR  RENT 
— $65.  3  rooms  newly  decorat- 
ed, one  bedroom.  2  adults.  118 
W.  78th  St.  PL   9-6612. 


28-MONEY  TO  LOAN 

CASH! 

OPEN  9  TO  9 

Free  Appraisals! 

Mark  Twain  Real  Estate 

9801    South  Broadway 
PL.  6-1478 


Stop  - 1  Buy 

2nd 
Trust  Deeds 

My  own  money.  Better 
deal  with  me.  20  years  in 
Los  Angeles.  Or  can  get 
you  a  loan  on  your  trust 
deed  if  you  don't  care  to 
sell. 

Mr.  Lewis 

PL  3-1158  Any  Time 


KEEP  SLIM 
STAY  SUM 

— for— 

•  RELAXING 

•  REDUCING 

Call  PL.  5-3651 

for  Appointment  at 

LEE'S  STUDIO 

116^9  S.  AVALON 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


48-CHILD  CARE 


Child  Core 

Child  care  in  my  home  bv  day. 
All  ages.  PL.  1-8371.  1341  E. 
68th  street.  ' 


49-RUG   CLEANING 


30-BUSINESS   OPPORTUNITIES 
YOUNG  SALESMAN 

Local  rasidtnt,  nttdt  financial 
itsistanc*  to  lacura  valuable  state 
franchise  distributorship.  Honest 
opportunity  will  withstand  inves- 
tigation. Send  post  card  or.  letter 
to: 

DIVERSE  PROJECTS 

POST  OFFICE  BOX  262 

SECTION  4,   LA.    11,  CALIF. 

Cafe.  New.  Plu.<!  Nice  Furn.^  Apt. 

Low  Rent,  On  Broadway 

Easy  Term.'! 

PL.  1-6066  PL.  1-6067 


Man  or  Woman 

SPARE  TIME 
,  NO  SELLING! 

Business  pays  you  a  profit  starting 
first  day.  Work  consists  of  refill- 
ing and  collecting  money  from 
our  machines  in  this  area.  To  I 
qualify  you  must  have  a  car, 
references,  S640  cash  to  secure 
territory  and  inventory.  Devoting 
6  to  10  hours  a  week  to  business,  I 
your  end  on  percentage  of  collec- 
tions should  run  up  to  SlOO 
weekly,  with  very  good  possibili- 
ties of  taking  over  full  time.  In- 
come increasing  accordingly.  For 
personal  interview,  include  phone 
in   application. 

Box  100,  300  S.  Bflverly  Oriv* 
B«v«rly  Hills,  Calif. 


RUG  CLEANING 

GOLDEN   STATE 

RUG    CLEANERS 

BINDING        *        SERGING 

FRINGING     •     REPAIRING 

1667  E.  32nd  St. 
AD.  6935 


96-INCOME  PROPERTY  FOR  SALE 


6  UNIT 

SAOfl      PER  MO 

▼f  fcV         INCOME 

$9,000  DOWN 

WEST  OF  HOOVER 

PRINCIPALS  ONLY 

AX.  4-8157  AX.  4-8158 

OWNER    ANXIOUS    TO 
.     SELL   OR   TRADE 

4  FURNISHED 
APARTMENTS 

Plus  4  bedroom  house  furnished 
Income  $300  month.  Will  take 
country  property  in  trade  or  sub- 
mit. Small  down  payment.  4322 
Morgan  Ave.   Nr.  Vernon  car  line. 

PL.   9-7256 
AD.   3-1041 

96-C-PORPERTY  LOANS 


BOOTH  for  r(>nt.  Good  location. 
Expprienred  operator  only. 
AD  2-9095. 


33-MISCELlANEOUS   FOR   SALE 


1    bedrm.   Adams -Vermont.  2 
kids  O.K. 


FURS 

UNCALLED  FOR 

CAPES  & 
STOLES 


Up 


Fur*  Restylvd  at 
9    less  Than  Half  Price 

ALASKAN 
FUR  CO. 

536  S.  Broadway 

Rm.  500  -  Ml.  55W 


47-SERVICES 


YOUR  TEETH 

Command  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

Demands  Attention 
TODAY-SEE 

DR.  GAY 

Your  Friendly  Credit  Dentist 

•  Plates    Repaired   While   You 
Wait 

•  EXTRACTIONS-Teeth  Pulled 
and  Filled 

•  FAST-FRIENDLY  SERVICE 

1062  East  Vernon  Ave. 

Corner   Vernon   &   Central 
Upstairs 

AD.  4-1397 


New  Loan  Deal 

Bast  in  the  Wesf 

LEGAL  RATES 

Any  Amount  You  Need 

Call  Now 

Hr.  Sloan 

Day  er  Night  -  NO.  S-0377 


$299 

DOWN 

Balance  Monthly 

Takes  Deed 

To  Many  of  These 

PROPERTIES 
BORROW 

$1000 

Or  More 
On   Your 

Real  Estate 

Pay  Back  $15 

Per  $1000  Per  Month 
Until  Paid 


OPEN  MONDAY  NIGHT 
UNTIL   8   P.M. 

-IMMEDIATE    POSSESSION- 

Brand  New  Ttiree  Badroom  Stucca 
Hemai.  Addad  faaturei— Par- 
quat    Floeri— Louvra    windows. 

742  East  110th  Straet-Doubla- 
$450   Down,   Bal.  Me. 

2477  East  lllth  Straat-Frama.- 
$199  Down,   Bal.  Me. 

1366  E  110th  St.-3  Badreom- 
$650  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 


101-OiSPiAY  PROPEITY  UNTAU 


APTS. 


CH 


TV 


LDREN  OK 


ANTENNAS 
•  TILE  KITCHENS 
PAIIKING  AREAS 


97-PROPERTY  IMPROVEMENT^ 


FAMILY  ROOMS 

At  large  as  3  bedrooms  for 
$28  down  and  $28  a  month 

ALSO 

GLASS 

SLIDING 

DOORS 

for 

Spacious  ^;:^>: 

Living     ' 

Marvin  Builders 

CALL 

AN.  1-7149 
WE.  5-9953 

A  (•mptvt*  buiidinf  rcmodtlina 
and  '.  H.  A.  100'>  financing 
••rvic*. 

■(•■r   yard    apl>.    built   far 
.    SSO   Dawa   and  $S0  a   Month 


738    E.  "17th    Street-Frame    $350 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1118     E.     91$t     St.-Frarae-$3S0 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

9213  Beaeh-Naw  3  Bdrm.  Stucco. 
$550   Down,   Bal.  Mo. 

414     E.      107th     St.-Frame-$250 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 


TILE 


1460  E.  107th  St.-Frame-$199 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 

1938  E.  115th  St.-Frame-$2S0 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1104-11041  E.  113th  St.-$399 
Down,    Bal.   Mo.    2    Rentals. 

820  W.  138th  St.,  Comptoii-New 
3  Bedroom  Stucco.  $750  Down, 
Bal.  Mo. 


BATHROOMS 
FLOORS 


HAIIDWOOD 


lOlVERED  WINDOWS 


10523-10525  Lou  Dillon-3  Bed- 
rooms each.  $499  each,  Bal. 
Mo. 


1749    E.    108th    St.-3    Bedroem- 
$499  Down,  Bal.  Mo.  { 

1229-1233-1237     E.  109th     St.-  i 

^    3   separate   houses  with   3   bed- 

roomt   each.    $650  Down   each. 

Bal.  Me. 


98-REAL  ESTATE  WANTED 


PROPERTY  WANTED 

Private  party  wants  to.  buy 
tiomes  for  cash.  Intere.'^tpd  in 
borgains  an>"whore.  Call  PL 
5-1154  or  AD  2-0904. 


1762     I      11th    Pla(«-»2S0    Dawn,    lal- 
anca    Manthly 

j  J037    Nerd    Sti-»et-frama-SJ»»    Dawn, 
Balenc*  Manthly. 

2727    Hyain>-S299    Dawn,    Salan<«    Ma. 

2320  Stackwall-2  ■•drmi..  S2«9  Down. 

2109  I.   113th  St.-Naw  3  Sdrm.   Stwcca. 
$7S0  Dawn,  talanta   Manthly. 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


COMPTON 

SpaciqiH,  Beautiful,  New. 

OMES 
$7ito  DOWN 

•    ^#\#     Non-Vets  &  Vets 

•  3  bedrooms,  2  biths,  2-car 
garage 

•  LOADED  wilh  luxury  Features: 
Garbage  Disposal,  Extra-Large 
Closets,   Large   Level   Lots,  etc. 

•  Close  to  Schools,  Churches, 
Shopping. 

•  Easy  Monthly   Paymenls! 

•  Immediate  Occupancy! 

DRIVE   OUT   TODAY- 
MODELS  ON   DISPLAY 
Kor  Information.    Oill    OXford    ^-1726 
or  UNivprsity  3-.i9.'^ 
l.'^ltli   X-   KalsniHn.    ("onipicin 
(Turn   Ka>l  off  ("cmral  at    Kilt  hi 

VETS 

WHY  PAY  RENT;> 

$25  deposit  and  your  discharge 
plus  $25  per  week  for  18  weeks 
pays  $75  dn.  including  charges  & 
impound  on  a  lovely  2  bedroom 
home.  Then  your  notes  are  $65 
per   month. 

JOHN  H.  KELLY 

NE.  6-2522 


25S2   Santa   Ana— Naw    3   Idrm.   Stucca. 
S499    Dawn,    Solanca    Manthly. 

2SS4   Santa   Ana-Naw   3   Sdrm.   Stucca, 
$499   Dawn,   Balenca   Manthly. 


2556   Santa   Ana-Naw   3   idrm.   Stucca, 
S499   Dawn,   Salanca   Maathly. 


527  W.  103rd  S\. 

Lovely  2  bedrooms  and,  den 
stucco.  Beautiful  hardwood  firs. 
Tile.  Double  garage.  Close  to 
schools  and  transportation.  Call 
Mrs.  Doyle. 

PL.  6-8883 
PL.  5-6032 


We  Have  1  and  2  Bedrm.  Apts. 
For  Rent 

TOMORROW'S  MONEY  TODAY 

.\rl\anie  on  tho  House  You  .Now  Own 
in  One  Da.v.  .Advanced  on  .lour  1st 
Trust  Deed  loanr  if  ue  OK  it.  Con- 
•-olidate  all  >"Our  hills  in  one  loan. 
Forro\»-  SI  000  or  more — pay  back  515 
a  month  per  $1000    til  paid 

WE    HAVE   CLIENTS    WITH 
I  ALL  CASHI 

1  For  Vour  Real  Kstate  Kqurties— 1st 
i  or  L'nd  Trust  Deeds-  Contrarts.  or 
J  an>'  Kquit.v.  you  or  .vour  friend  ha\e 
I  ill  Real  KslRte..If  its  an  instate,  a 
I  --uit  or  separation  or  anytihinE  per- 
I  tainine  to  Real  K.slate.  tirrc  is  your 
:  rlnance  to  sell   for^C.\SH. 

100  CENTS  ON  THE  $1.00 

For  >our  1st  trust  deed  if  satisfae- 
tnr.v  to  Us  (Tedlted  to  the  purchase 
of  anv  propertie.s  we  liave  listed 
tcrnfir— lOil  i-ents  on  the  dollar  if 
}Ou  have  a  T.D.  For  MOO  to  SlO.OOiJ 
wo  will   j:et   > ou  a   deal. 

$98,000   CASH   -   $98,000   CASH 

II.Tve  i-lienis  wnh  f^9S.0i.iO  m  cash  to  , 
tiu>-  real  estate  in  this  district  This  ' 
IS  your  ch;ince  to  sell  out  for  all  rash  i 
if  ^  ou  have  an  eqult^'  or  own  a  house  j 
U'e  have  clients  with  SPS.OOO  in  all 
cash   to  buy   you   out. 


REALTY 
Equities  Co. 

AD.  2-5528 
AD.  2-6101 

Wa   Oa    SO-SO   on    Cammittiant   With 
All  Raal  iitata  Irokari 

All   MOPIRTIIS   AM   SUIJICT 
.    TO  PRIOR  SAll 

4374  S.  MAIN  ST. 


See  Them  at 


11695  99  S.  MAIN  ST. 
I062i  CENTRAL  AVE. 


nl 


8101 


COMPTON  AVE. 


9823  SO,  MAIN  ST. 

I 

BROKERS  WELCOME 


d^ 

M 


-Phone- 


PL.  55/11 
PL.y409 
PL.M4J1 


PL.  3-32IJ 


o| 
ti 


I 


* 


ts 


t 


H. 


Maid  Will  Claim 


f 


STOLEN'  JEWELS 


L|b1^'<^ 


To  Ask  Death  in^Pink  Ford' Hcipe 


Young  Woman 
Identifies  Davis 
As  Attacker 

The  State  of  California  ' 
Wednesday  indicated  it ' 
would  ask  the  death  penal- 
ty of  Charles  Davis,  Jr.,  28- 
year-old  unemployed  can- 
dlemaker  accused  of  armed 
rape  of  two  young:  women. 

He  is  charged  with  kidnap 
at  gun  point,  rape,  robbery  and 
perversion. 

The  trial  got  under  way 
Wednesday  morning,  with  the 
selection  of  an  all-white  jury 
of  nine  women  and  three  rnen 
completed  before  the  noon  re- 
cess. 

The  two  women.  Shirley 
Anne  Brown,  19.  of  6723  S. 
Main  street,  and  Jeanette  L. 
Jones.  1,8.  of  421  E.  93rd  street, 
both  claimed  their  attacker  had 
forced  them  into  his  car  and 
threatened  to  kill  them  if  they 
cried   out. 

Miss  Brown  identified  Davis 
In  court,  but  under  cross-exam- 
ination she  wavered  on  various 
points  in  her  testimony.  | 

Miss  Jones  will  not  appear  at  ; 
the  trial,  but  the  transcript  of 
her  testimony  given  at  the  pre- 
liminary hearing  will  be  read 
Into  the  record.  The  young 
woman   is  out  of  the  city. 

Davis,  who  is  being  repre- 
sented by  Atty.  James  R.  Akers 
Jr..  has  denied  both '  charges 
and  is  expected  to  produce  aii 
alibi  in  his  defense. 
Pink  Ford 

Davis  was  picked  up  after 
Miss  Jones  had  mentioned 
that  the  kidnaper  was  driv- 
ing a  "pink  Ford.'*  Davis  drives 
such  a  car.  He  has  been  in 
jail  ever  since  his  arrest  Nov. 

29. 

The  two  cases  occurred  last 
Nov.   16  and   Nov.  28. 

Miss    Brown,*^  in    her    report 
to 'police,  claimed  she  got  off       KNOXVILLE,   Tenn.  -  Louis 
the    street    car    at    Manchester  .Armstrong,    the    Satchmo.   the 


'Numbers^  Huddle 


CAMF.RA  SH} — (.jamfrn-shy  "\ii'tinns'  sii>p('(t\  turned  their  backs  on  t.nalr  photn/jra- 
phrr  IIttrr\  Adnins  u'lirn  the  /irnup  dppcnrrd  f  or  a  hciriuQ  rhursA':\  on  priiti'ms  (or  liahfns 
corpus.  II  imton  C  Dunhip,  the  man  poluc  hnic  duhhcd  the  k'.nqpin  oi  the  omup  and  -iiho 
dreic  the  htohrst  bad — vVv'l't' — ;.(  shoiirt  in  renter.  Mrs.  Florrnre  (lordon.  ■mfe  of'lJhert 
"Cotton"  Gordon,  in  nhose  safe  police  claim  they  found  :^13,0Lk\  is  shonn  back  to  camera. 
Others  uere  not  identified.  .. 


and     Central     avenues     about 

8  p.m.  Nov.  16.  A  man  walked 

(Continued  on  Page  4) 


Satchmo  'Real 
Coor  While  the 
Band  Plays  On 


Fumes  Believed 
Cause  of  Death 
Of  Hardison 

The  coroner's  office  reported 
this  week  that  the  death  of 
Charles  (Charliet  Hardison. 
manager  of  the  Sweet  Dreams 
Cafe.  1063  E.  43rd  street.  Feb. 
10  was  not  due  to  natural 
causes. 

Chemical  analysis  showed 
that  death  was  caused  by  satu- 
ration in  the  blood  of  carbon 
rnonoxide  gas.  Police  expressed 
the  vipw  that  Hardison  had 
probably  been  poisoned  by 
fumes  from  a  gas  heater. 

Hardison  felt  ill  Friday  night. 
Feb. 'J',  and  believed  he  had 
a    stomach,  upset    from    oysters 


greatest,  the  idol  of  millions 
the  wide  world  over,  was  "real 
I  cool"  Tuesday  night  as  the  Chil- 
I  howee  Park  building  in  which 
I  he  was  playing  shook  and 
;  shivered  from  a  dynamite 
blast. 

"That's  all  right,  folks."  the 
famed  trumpeter  told  his  se- 
gregated audience.  "It's  just 
the   phone." 

His  integrated  band  contin- 
ued to  blow  "Back  o'  Town 
Blues." 

The  dynamite,  hurled  from  a 
passing  car,  tore  a  four-foot 
hole  in  the  mud  a  short  dis- 
tance from  the  building. 

Armstrong  said  he'll  com- 
plete his  tour.  "Man.  I'll  play 
anywhere  they'll  listen."  He 
was  to  play  in  Columbia,  S.  C, 
Wednesday  night. 


\()T  SO  SHY — Archie  Meadous,  right,  uas  snapped  leav- 
in/j  courtroom  ivith  attorney  for  all  12  suspects  picked  up  in 
" S  umbers"  raid  tno  Tveeks  ago.  Earl  C.  Brnadv. 


Walked  with 
White  Woman; 
Beaten  to  Death 


BOSTON.      Mass.—  .4      Negro 

who    protested    against    insults 

hurled    at    his    white    woman 

or  greens  he  had  eaten  earlier    companion  was  knocked  down, 


VIOLENCE  SEEN  IF 
RIGHTS  BILLS  LOSE 

WASHINGTON  —  A  thinly  veiled  prediction  that 
Negroes  may  retaliate  if  violence  against  them  contin- 
ues and  unless  civil  rights  legislation  is  enacted  at  this 
session  of  CongreKs>was  voiced  Tuesday  by  Roy  Wil- 
kins,  executive  secretary  of  the  NAAC'P,  at  hearings 
of    the    Senate    Judiciarv    Sub-  '^^ 


1090.  e.   43rd   Plao*.   L.A. 

\^    Continuous  Publication  for  76  Years 

AD.  4^1*1 

Vol.  LXXVI-No.  49 

Los  Angeles,  California            10c 

Thurs., 

February  21,  1957 

Rev.  King  Calls  for 
March  on  Capital 


<^- 


in  the  day.  He  stayed  home  in 
bed  Saturday  and  Saturday 
nieht. 


kicked    and    beaten    to    death 

here    early    Saturday   morning. 

The  white  woman.   Mrs.   Do- 


committee.    The    Suivommittee- 
has  set  March  5  as  the  date  for 
I      The  white  woman.   Mrs.   Do-  |  a  vote  on  pending  bills. 

VVilkins  testified  he  "cannot 
predict  what  mood  might  be 
at  me.  My  husband  went  across  engendered"  ajjiong  southern 
the  street  and  the  fight  .started.  Negroes  if  they  do  not  get  'a 
It  was  terrible,  more  terrible  minimum  guarantee''  of  con- 
than  a  lynching."  '  stitutional   rights. 

The   man    Mrs.   Caria   called  j     Up  to  now.  he  .said,  they  have 
her  husband  was  identified  as    followed    a    course   of    "nonvio- 


He  got  up  before  dawn  and  '  lores  Caria.  told  police:  "The 
went  to  the  Sweet  Dreams  Cafe  |  men  yelled  'poor  white  trash 
about  4:30  a.  m.  He  told  early 
morning  customers  and  fellow- 
workers  that  he  didn't  feel  well. 
About  9  a.  m.  he  collapsed  and 
died. 

It  was  at  first  believed  that 
death  had  been  caused  by  a 
heart   attack. 

An  autopsy  is  pending. 


Edward  Rose.  36.  of  Back  Bay. 
Four    white     men     attacked 
him.  All  four  e.scaped. 


Negroes  Walk 

So.  African  Whites 
Split  Over  Boycott 

JOHANNESBURG.  South  Africa— A  bitter  fight  has 
erupted  here  between  the  government  and  the  British 
opposition  over  the  bus  boycott,  with  the  rf^groes — na- 
tives as  they  are  called  here — continuing  to  walk  to 
and  from  work,  a  distance  of  nine  miles  each  way. 
The  government  is  accused  of?" 


arresting  whites  who  give  rides 
to  Negroes,  of  slashing  tires  of 
Negroes'  bicycles  and  of  exert- 
ing every  kind  of  pressure  to 
force  the  boycotters  to  ride  the 
buses. 

Will   Break   Boycott 

The  government,  through  its 
Minister  of  Transport,  Mr. 
Schoeman,  replied  this  week  by 
declaring:  'The  boycott  is  be- 
ing exploited  by  political  agita- 
tors. If  th«y  want  a  showdown, 
they  will  get  it.  The  govern- 
ment will  not  give  way  and  we 
will  do  everything  in  our  power 
to  break  this  boycott. ' 

Schoeman,   lepresenting   the 


Dutch  who  control  the  govern- 
ment, also  lashed  out  against 
the  British  opposition.  He  said 
H.  Davidoff  (Laborite  repersen- 
tative  from  Johannesburg)  and 
"his  friends  and  allies  are  the 
greatest  danger  to  white  civili- 
zation. They  are  the  most  loyal 
friends  of  all  subversive  orga- 
nizations in  this  country.  They 
go  out  of  their  way  to  be  the 
mouthpiece  of  the  African  Na- 
tional Congress  and  other  or- 
ganizations. 

'They   will   always  take  the 
side     of     the     non -Europeans 
against  the  authorities  and  the 
(Continued  on  Page  4) 


lence    in    the    face    of    extreme 
provocation." 

Patience   Shown 

He  said  Negroes  have  shown 
great  patience  though  recent 
months  "have  been  marked  by 
almost  continuous  violence  di- 
rected at  Negro  citizens  and 
groups  in  the  South  who  seek 
elimination  of  discrimination 
and   segregation." 

But  he  indicated  this  mood 
rnight  change  if  Congress  does 
not  approve  President  Eisen- 
hower's civil  rights  proposals. 
These  measures  are  "meaning- 
ful," he  said,  and  would  serve 
as  a  starting  point  for  Congres- 
sional action  in  this  field. 

Sen.  Hennings  (D)  Mo.,  the 
subcommitee  chairman,  said 
Monday's  decision  by  the  group 
to  wind  up  hearings  March  5 
was  "  a  great  victory"  for  sup- 
porters of  civil  rights  legisla- 
tion. And  he  said  he  would  op- 
pose any  move  to  force  more 
hearings  before  the  parent  Ju- 
diciary Committee. 

Want  Early  Vote 

Backers  of  the  bills  want  to 
get  the  proposals  to  the  Senate 
floor  early  in  the  session.  Atty. 
Gen.  Brownell  told  the  Subcom- 
mittee that  many  more  South- 
ern Negroes  could  have  voted 
last  year  if  the  administration's 
(Continued  on  Page  4) 


Oily  Question 
Of  Leasing 
Discussed 

To  lease  or  not  to  lease — that 
was  the  oily  question  that  a 
capacity  crowd  of  "Sugar  Hill" 
residents  wrestled  with  last 
Monday  night  at  the  Holman 
Methodist  Church,  3220  W.  Ad- 
ams boulevard. 

.  Judging  by  the  questions  and 
remarks  expres.sed,  the  majority 
of  those  present  took  a  dim 
view  of  the  offers  made  by  the 
three  oil  companies  represented. 
Thev-  apparently  thought  it  best 
to  wait  for  a  better  offer  before 
signing  on  the  dotted  line. 

The  meeting  was  held  to  in- 
terrogate and  receive  reports 
from  the  representatives  of  the 
oil  companies  which  are  inter- 
ested in  leasing  properties  in 
the  Sugat  Hill  area,  beneath 
which  it  is  hoped  oil  will  be 
found.  ■   - 

The  West  Adams  Property 
Owners'  Association,  of  which 
Leon  llene  is  chairman,  spon- 
sored the  meeting. 

Many  involved  and  perplex- 
ing questions  were  posed  to  the 
oil  company  representatives. 

Under  the  guidance  of  their 
president,  Rene,  the  property 
owners  overwhelmingly  ex- 
pressed themselves  as  deter- 
mined to  wait  untiWtenditions 
are  more  favorable  before  sign- 
ing any  leases. 

Mrs.  Ruby  Shelby  is  secretary 
of  the  property  owners'  associ- 
ation. 


Bomb  Injures 
Woman,  Babe; 
ike  Still  Silent 


In  New  Orleans  last 
Thursday,  the  Rev.  Martin 
Luther  King,  leader  of  the 
Montgomery  (Ala.)  bus 
boycott,  called  for  a  mass 
pilgrimage  to  Washington, 
unless  President  Eisenhower 
speaks  out  against  the  terror 
in  the  South. 

At  about  the  same  time  Dr. 
King  w.as  appealing  to  the 
President,  a  new  bombing  out- 
rage occurred  in  Clinton.  Tenn., 
where  ^  suitcase  of  dynamite 
exploded  in  fhe  heart  of  Clin- 
ton's Negro  area.  A  woman  and 
a  baby  were  injured,  and  there 
was  extensive  property  damage. 

Response  in  L.  A. 

Rev.  King's  appeal,  while 
brining  no  reaction  from  the 
White  House,  has  brought  a  re-j 
sponse  from  ministers  in  Los 
Angeles,  the  NAACP  and  other 
organizations  throughout  the 
country. 

After  Rev.  King  sent  a  tele- 
gram to  President  Eisenhower, 
he  told  a  press  conference  that 
thousands. of  Negroes  and  thou- 
sands of  whites  would  go  to 
Washington  in  a  mass  protest 
but  he  did  not  detail  the  pre- 
cise outlines  of  the  pilgrimage. 

This  request  followed  numer- 
ous other  appeals  to  the  Presi- 
dent, made  by  Rev.  King,  the 
Rev.  Ralph  D.  Abernathy,  also 
of  Montgomery,  a  conference  of 
Southern  Negro  leaders  in  At- 
lanta, as  well  as  other  individ- 
uals, newspapers  and  groups 
throughout  the  couritry. 
No  Reply 

President  Eisenhower  has  not 
replied  to  any  of  the  requests 
made  to  him. 

In  Clinton,  scene  of  serious 
riots  last  September  and,  again 
in  December,  police  said  a  suit-, 
rase  containing  four  or  five 
sticks  of  dynamite  was  placed 
across  the  street  from  a  restau- 
rant full  of  people  by  a  man 
who  lumped  into  a  car  and 
raced  away. 

The   woman   was   hurt  when 
the  ceiling  caved  in  at  the  res- 
(Continued  on  Page  4) 


'Denies  Theft- 


JEM' ELS   If  ERE   GlET—Mrs.   Rosalie  McChaney.  pko- 

toqraphed  as  she  left  court  in  If  est  Los  .ingeles  Tuesday, 
claims  the  jeurls  in  her  possession  uere  a  gift  from  her  em- 
ployer, the  iiife  of  Ron  If'aller.  Ram  halfback. 


Silly  Season 

Georgia  Wants  to 
Impeach  High  Court 

,  ATLANTA — This  has  been  the  silly  season  for 
Georgia  legislators,  possibly  in  an  effort  to  make  an 
iriipression  on  President  Eisenhower  who  has  been  va- 
cationing down  this-away,  shooting  quail  and. playing 
■ — ' •  golf. 

Bunche  to  Attend 
Gold  Coast  Fete 


astor 

linked 
To  Theft 


The  50-year-old  maid  ac- 
cised  of  stealing  $11,0(X) 
wDrth  of  jewels  from  the 
\yest  Los  Angeles  home 
o^  Ram  Halfback  Ron  Wal- 
lei'  will  claim  that  the  valua- 
bl?s  were  presented  to  her  as 
a  .gift,  the  Eagle  learned  on 
reliable  authority. 

Mrs.  Rosalie  M.  McChaney, 
wiio  had  worked  for  the  heir- 
ess. Mrs.  Waller,  for  26  years, 
reportedly  will  assert  that  her 
enployer  turned  over  the  jew- 
els to  her.  even  though  an  in- 
si  ranee  claim  has  been  filed 
in  connection  with  the  robbery. 
Friend  Picked  Up 

Mrs.  McChaney  was  arrested 
last  Thursday  as  a  robbery 
sispect  after  her  longtime 
friend,  the  Rev.  Minnie  Moore, 
4c.  was  picked  up  in  an  Oak- 
land motel,  together  with  23- 
y<ar-old;  6-foot  2inch  Ira  Har- 
ris. Police  were  tipped  off  that 
tl  e  Rev.  Moore  and  Harris  were 
selling  stolen  jewelr\-.  "~^ 

Mrs.  McChaney.  a  member  of 
tT«  New  Hope  Baptist  XThurch, 
5iOO  S.  Central  avenue,  for  the 
p  ist  20  years,  was  formally 
charged  with  grand  theft  in 
V  est  Los  Angeles  Tuesday  aft- 
*inoon.  She  is  free  on  $1500 
bail. 

Her  attorney.  George  L. 
Vauhgn  Jr..  saj's  she  will  plead 
(Continued  on  Page  6) 


UNITED  N.ATIO.N'S.  N.Y.— Dr. 
Ralph  J.  Bunche  of  the  United 
States,  a  U.N.  undersecretary, 
will  represent  Secretary  General 
Dag  Hammar.^kjold  at  Gold 
Coast  independence  ceremonies 
next  month. 


As  far  as  public  statements 
are  concerned.  Ike  gave  no  in- 
dication he  was  paying  any 
more  attention  to  the  shenani- 
gans of  the  Geawgia  legislators 
than  he  has  to  the  appeals  of 
Negro  leaders  to  ^peak  out 
against  violence  and  lawless- 
ness. 

Aiding  Enemies 

Latest  accomplishment  of  the 


The  Gold  Coast,  long  a  British  i  Georgia    House    of    Representa- 


.\frican  colony,  will  become  the 
independent  nation  of  Ghana 
on  March  6. 


OUTSTANDING  CITIZEN  —  Maidie  Norman,  one  of 
Hollywood's  finest  actresses,  was  awarded  the  "Outstanding 
Citizen"  citation  by  Our  Authors  Study  Club  in  the  final 
nieeting  of  Negro  History  Week,  Sunday.  Miss  S  or  man,  cur- 
rently co-starring  with  Brian  Don  Levy  in  Phoenix,  will  fly  to 
New.  York,  Feb.  25,  to  complete  arrangements  for  a  national 
Maidie  Norman  concert  tour. 


tives  was  the  passage  Monday 
of  a  resolution  calling  for  the 
imp)eachment  of  six  U.S.  Su- 
preme Court  .justices  for.  of  all 
things,  giving  "aid  and  com- 
fort" to  enemies  of  the  United 
States.  I 

They  came  right  out  and  ac- 
cused Chief  Justice  Warren  of 
"high  crime,  misconduct  and 
misbehavior  in  office."  Jus- 
tices Hugo  Black  and  William 
O.  Douglas  they  accused,  of  ac- 
cepting bribes  fro'm  "Commun- 
ist front  and  subversive  organ- 
izations." 

Ban  on   Athletics 

Before  the  representatives  got 
off  on  the  Supreme  Court  binge, 
Georgia's    senators    on    Valen- 
tines Day  unanimously  adopt- 
ed pi  bill  to  ban  interracial  ath- 
letijcs  and  various  interacial  so-  ! 
cial    functions,    antf   to    make  , 
mandator>'     separate  ■    seating 
and    other   facilities    at    public  : 
entertainments     witnessed     by  i 
both  races. 

A  week  earlier,  Feb.  8.  the 
representatives  started  off  their 
rampage  by  attacking  the  14th 
and  15th  Amendments  to  the 
U.S.  Constitution,  accusing  the 
p)ost- Civil  War  Congresses  of 
being  nothing  more  than  "pri- 
vate assemblages  unlawfully 
attempting  to  exercise  the  leg- 
islative power  of  the  United 
States."         * 

Loot  Protest 

The  call  for  impeachment  of 
the  Supreme  Court  Justices  was 
passed  by  a  vote  of  107  to  33. 
One  lone  man  got  up  in  the  a#- 
sembly  and  spoke  out  against 
the  proposal. 

Justice  Felix  Frankfurter, 
said  the  solons,  was  a  "mem- 
ber of  'the  legal  comihittee  of 

(Continued  on  Page  3) 


^irl,  12,  Finds 
Murdered  Body 
f  Her  Mother 

A  12-year-oId  child  Friday 
fered  the  tragic  shock  of  dis- 

vering  her  murdered  mother, 
ing  face  dowm   in   a_  pool   of 
lood    in    the    family's    living 
m. 

Mary  Mayfield,  of  931  W. 
th  street,  found  Mrs.  Hilaria 
Mayfield  clad  in  a  slip,  saw  the 
blood,  saw  the  pistol  resting 
ear  her  right  hand.  The  child 
lied  her  mother  over  onto  her 
de,  covered  her  body  wth  a 
edsprekd,  then  >^called  the  po- 
ce. 

Husband  Wanted 

After  examining  the  position 
t  the  body,  the  gun,  the  slugs 

und  in  the  room,  police  be- 
eved  Mrs.  Mayfield  had  been 

urdered  and  the  gun  placed 
her    hand    in    an    effort    to 

ake  her  death  appear'  as  a 
uicide. 

Mrs.  Mayfield  had  been  shot 

the  chest.  The  bullets  had 

enetrated   the   lungs   and   the 

ain  arterj'  leading  to  the 
eart.  She  died  of  the  wounds 
nd  of  massive  hemorrhages. 

Wanted  for  murder  was  the 
ead  Woman's  husband,  Eugene 
Mayfield,  52,  a  welder. 

Child  Greets  PeUee 

When  police  arrived  they 
^ere  rnet  by  the  12-year-old 
!  rhild.  She  stepped  aside  to  let 
I  he  officers  enter.  They  found 
I  hat  a  bullet  had  grazed  the 
I  nother's  right  ankle.  Another 
i  jullet  had  penetrated  her  body 
tand  bored  through  the  back. 

Young  Mary  told  the  police 
i  she  had  gone  to  bed  at  approxi- 
mately 10:30  p.  m.,  and  had  left 
ler  mother  and  father  in  the 
iving    room.    She    found    her 
Tiother  shortly  after  8  a.  m. 

While  she  was  talking  to  the 
police  her  young  brother,  Rob- 
ert, 9.  came  into  the  room  for 
:he  first  time.  Both  Mary  and 
tlobert  agreed  that  the  parents 
fiad  been  arguing  frequently 
juring  the  past  few  weeks  and 
:hat  Mayfield  had  threatened 
3n  several  occasions  to  kill  his 
k\-ife. 

Mary  said  that  her  mother 
knew  another  man.  and  that 
she  had  given  him  her  '49  De 
Soto.  Her  father,  she  said,  drives 

yellow  '54  Studebaker  Ccwn- 
mander. 


F*cittfrecf 
In  f fi«  Eogf* 

Special  teatuies  this  weeh 
inside  the  Eagle  tndude: 


Editorials 

Churcb  Actirtttes 
Sports 

Social  

Derotheo  Fester  .... 
People  and  Places 

Chazz  Crawford 

Whaf  s  Cooking  .. 
Smart  Set 


4 

S 
9 
.  7 
..  8 
.10 
-10 
-12 


-_7 


f': 


I 

i 


t 


I 
I 


i 
% 

n 


I  SEARCH  FOR  ADVENTURE      'The  Adventures  of  Col.  Craig." 


CHANNEL 


1 


PARTY'S  STIL 

. . .  and  ^4s^n^  has  Gifts  for  Ev<iryone! 


ON 


Grocery    Company 


Gifts  of  Bargains  such  as  you  seldom  see!  Gifts  of  wonderful  frjee  Stainless 
Steel  Bowls,  first  quality  Stretch  or  Seamless  Nylons,  Smart  ^innerwc^re 
and  glassware  for  Gold  Tapes!  Gifts  of  Free  refreshments  at 

Birthday  Parties  •  .  .  and  gifts  of  fabulous  prizes  . 
all  part  of  the  84th  Birthday  Celebration  this  month  at 


w- 
-# 


■!^: 


4  TWO-WEEK  TRIPS  FOR  TWO 

TO  ACAPULCO  AND  MEXICO  CrTY 

•topping   at   luxury   hotels:    Hotel   Club   do   Pasco 
In  Aespulce,  Plaza  Vista  Hormosa  in  Moxico  City. 


CEl 


DELUXE    FREEZER 

REFRIGERATOR      ^ 

t  Almost  18  cu.  ft. 

of  piannod  sterago  tpaeo 

1  "ShastX"  travel  trailer 

WaigKi  only  1130  pounds,  y«t  it  >l«*p>  five 

4  FILTEX  VACUUM  CLEANERS 
•  RROTHER  SEWING  MACHINES    . 
4  iONDED  WATER  SOFTENERS 
13«  MOUNTAINS  OF  GROCERIES 

I   THUNDERIIRD  JR.  FOR  THE  KIDSt 
4  WIRC  IS.PIECS  ACCESSORY  SETS 

GAS  RANGES 

Deluxe  model,  with  Triple 
Rotisserie^  or  Grille  vator  Broiler. 


MAVONNAISE 

BESTFOODS 
Quart 


SWIFT'S  PREMIUM  OR  NORBEST 
U.S.D.A.  GRADE  A  EVISCERATED  YOUNG 

TURKEYS 

Hens  Toms 

43'      39 


ALL  RALPHS  STORES  OPEN  FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY  22nd. 

SWIFT'S  PREMIUM  EASTERN  GRAIN  FED 

FRESH   DRESSED  EVISCERATED  C,%-,-*fci.:Ke  M     ^    m 

Stewing  OOc  r«?.?f,?r,  t?  , ..  u   4  5  ' 

Chickens   Lb. 


2» 


LUER  WINDOW  PACK 
SLICED 


With  Turkey  serve  Oceen  Spray  Cranberry  Saude 


RATH  BLACK  HAWK 

C  Dainties 

BONELESS  SMOKED 
PORK  BUTTS  Lb., 


69 


Bacon 

CHINOOK  SLICED 

Salmon 


Mb.  Pkg... 


55 


Lb. 


77* 


OCEAN  SPRAY 


Cranberry  Sduce 


Whole  or  Jellied 


Mb. 


23€ 


Delicieui  with  Turkey 


HYPOWER 


Jumbo 
Tamales  2Soz 


25 


HYPOWER 

Chili  Beans  &  Beef 


IN  SAUCE 


1-lb.  14-oz.  Can. 


29c 


FANNIHG'S 

Bread  &  Butter  ^  ^ 
Pickles  i5or 1 9^ 


i^indsag  laiige 

9oz    29c 


RIPE  OLIVES 


NALLEY'S 

Beef  Stew 

...31^     30-or.. 


15-o: 


49 


S!stii  ALL  MEAT 

Franks 


Mb.  Pkg. 


39 


Wheat 
Puffs 


6-or., 


13 


Mfmi 


Swift'ning 


Z 


iSifilK^tiuileniitv: 


SWIFT'S 
SHORTENING 

3-lb.  Con 


•^tfTr*^>r«a/tt\*ikA:/'a\T/«\xr*ar*\*r«Cf«(;/-*Ai/an/»t7/ttrn'*\7/'*tTrftVZr*is/afCr^ 


aMTiteYirax»»7/^\7r«xTr»iT^\n>'«vT/kCf«xrte^:/to7/'«tT/'.r: 


79' 


CATERING 

Chocolate  Bits  Ice  Cream 


Pint. 


2.49 


Quart 


49 


BROCK'S  OR    IMPERIAL 

Chocolate  Covered 
Cherries  Mb  box.. 


59 


SUNSHINE 

Hydrox  Cookies 


12-or. , 


NABISCO  SNOW  FLAKE 

Saltine  Crackers  i  b 


25 


39c 
c 


Kern's 
Syrup 


2-ib. 


27 


Libby's 
Pumpkin 


Mb 

13-oz 


2.29 


FREE  SALT 


Goed  af  any 


,iThis   y(SSS£^  Coupon 
Good  for  one  Free  26-oz.  Pkg.  ff^ojjoA^  Solt,  Plain  or  Iodized 
Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday  and  ^Sunday  only 
February  21, 22,  23  &  24,  mj 

Morlcef  j  '  LIMIT  ONE  SALT  COUPON  PER  CUSTOMER 


■^•^i*'jp*/i««U,'%4>»/i>ir'i»»^^yivwMv^i'*ir«av^a«a«'i^^ 


52! 


CHEF  BOY-AR-DEE 

Spaghetti  &         ^  ^ 
Meat  Balls  is  ^  <«  co.  |iV 


Ravioli 


15V'2-oz.. 


27* 


Canada  Dry 


Ginger  Ale  Sede  Water 

28  oz        2fo49C     28  oz       2  for  43c 


SUPREMA  RED  SOUR 

Pitted 
Cherries 


Mb  ., 


25 


DEL  MONTE  UNPEELED  HALVES 

Apricots      83  oz 15c 


P'js  DeoM4 


Plus    0«CM't 


STOKELY  FORDHOOK  GREEN 

Lima  Beans     Mb 


23c 


STOKELY  CUT 

Green  Beans  Mb 20c 


V.B. 

Apple  Sauce  1 


KRAFT  DELUXE 

Margarine 

Mb.  Marked  "lOe  OH" 
Price39e  Lett  lOe     So'e  Price. 


29 


■  lb.  1-oz 


23c 


Lipton  Black  Tea 


•  lb..., 


45c  p\Tcfi6....25c 


1'. 


i-ib. 


85( 


Pkg.  of  48... 


67« 


FIRST  STATE 

Mushrooms 

Stems  Cr  Pieces  2-oz. 


16e  . «  29c 


Pure  Dextrose 

Reducing  Aid  1  Lb.. 


29« 


Wax  Paper 
19c 


•1 

t 

■■.I 


S?sSs/i±  Coifn  Toastetts 

27 


DELICIOUS  HOME  STYLE 

CORN   BREAD  IN  FL^T  PATTIES 

TO  FIT  YOUR  TOASTER      Pkg   of  6 


Custard  Cake 


Pineapple 

GOLD  CAKE  COVERp  AND  FILLED 
WITH   LUSCIOUS  PINEAPPLE 
AND  CRUNCH 


1  -Lo>er. 


55 


100-ft.  Roll... 

PlJt     Ic    TO' 


LIBBY'S 

Crushed 
Pineapple 


9.ez. 


2.0  29' 


DOG  FOOD 


TOILET  TISSUE 

SCOT 
White,  Pink,  Blue,  Green  or  Yellow 


Roll 


DR.   ROSS 

Horse  lyteat 
&  Beef      iVoz.'c 


Co" 


21 


AJAX 

14.0Z.  Marked  "It  Off 


Price  9c     Sole 
Less  2c     Price 


^assy  Cat  Food 

i     8-02.  Con  15-oz.  Con 


^(or  U       JL<''»mii 


Air  Wick 


MIST 

DEODORIZER  SVz-ez.  Marked  "15c  Off" 

Regular  Price  89e   Lets  15c 

5V2-OZ 50C     Sole  Price. 

Piui  3c  To«  'lu»  J«  Ton 


SKIPPY 


15-oz.  Con 


OH   BOY  FROZEN 

Pizza 
Pie 


MORTON'S  FROZEN 

Spaghetti 


Citrus 
Granulate 


''Birthday 
Sale" 

33' 


10-ez. 


8-oz. 


39 


With  Meot  Sauce       8-oz 


29c 


Soap 


l-<b.-6-ez.. 


28< 


Sweetheart  Soap  1c  Sale 

One  Reg.  Size  Bar  fori  1e  One  Bath  Siie  Bar  for  1c 

with  purchase  of  3  R^.  with  purchase  of  3  Both 

Site  Bors  for  2Se       J  Sise  B«rt  for :J6c 

Totol         M  Bonded  tkgLm  Total  m  Bonded  fife. 

Pr.ce         H     Bars     20C  Pr.ce...  4     Bo7s     O/C 

Plus     IC     To.  !       .  c     ..     •,    T«. 


Coupon 


WORTH  20 


Oi»:  Purcfcoso  of  one  IS-ox.  Jor 
LAURA  SCUDDER  1»loln  or  Nutty 


PEANUT  BUTTER 


Good  all  an 
•  Thursday.  Fridsjy. 

February 
LIMIT  ONI  PEANU 


ly  SfmitAA 
Saturday  'e 


Morkot 
ay  and  Sunday 
aa.  23  fr  84.  1»57 


only 


■urriR  COUPON  pik  customu 


iju!jttjiajiB.jig^g 


The  Deadline  for  Free  Glassware  with  ^S±£^ 


Dividends  is  March  8 


I 


29« 


28c 


If  or   1e 

[Bath 

37« 


4A- 


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at 


Ul 

■J 

o 


4A- 
1» 


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SECOND  WEEK'S 

PRIZE  WINNERS 


J9 

> 

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^^ 


Mexico  Trip  for  Two 


30 

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r- 

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Hotel  Club  de  Pesca 


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4A^ 

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HELEN  DE  SURRA 

DELUXE /^«^ 

REFRKERATOR- 
FREEZER 

Fllltd  with  ehoies  foods! 
Tafcos  up  no  mora  flo^or  spaeo 
tkan  an  ordinary  rofricirator, 
yot  {ivos  almeof  18  oubie 
fMf  of  Diannod  stora|o  spaoo. 

MRS.  ROBT  E.  SESSLER 

GAS  RANGES 

Tho  Wost'o  larfott  soil- 
inc  fat  ran|o,  doluxt, 
with  fransparoRt  shelf 
that  lots  tho  lifht 
throu|ii  to  tho  cookiaf  sur> 
faeo}  trillfvatf r  brollof  ar 
triplo  rotiitorlo. 

MRS.  HARRY  NELSON 
RUTH  RECTOR 

and  ELISABETH  B.  ROTH 


"I 


'BONDED" 
WATER  SOFTENER 


Fully    automatic,    glass- 

linod     inside     and     out,       'Installation  not  included. 

with  a  tO-year  warranty  ^^  J ACOBWITZ 


World's  finest  home 
cleaner  .  .  .  lighter, 
quieter,  with  a  more 
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attachments. 


VACUUM 
CLEANER 


MRS.  J.  EVERETT 
MARSH 


ARTISTIC  WIRE  SET 
H.SCHWARTZ 


3  SUNBEAM  ELECTRIC  SKILLETS 

Clarence  Ferrari,  Mrs.  Freda  Buniring 

and  Mrs.  Bob  Wade 


2 


BIRQIIHEfR 


SEWING  MACHINES 

with  U.L.,  Qeed  Heu«tk«M<nc. 

Prints',  MeCall's  stall  of 

apprevali  eomplafa  sat  of  II  attaohnaiits.    . 

JOAN  THOMLINSON 
and  I.  FEKETIS 


> 

•XI 

Z 
■«^ 


90 
> 


4(^ 

0 

30 


m 


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I" 
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•     RALPH$     $ELL»     FOR     LE$$     • 


.HD  STOl'ALL  FOUSD.1T10\'—The  Lillifin  Rnndolph  Snu/er';.  above,  ui//  npfenr  nn 
the  prnqmrn  at  the  dedicntinn  and  open  house  of  the  Stovall  Foundation,  Sunday  at  3:30 
p.m.  Affair  is  being  held  at  821  ,V.  Hazard  av  rnue. 


Stovall  Home  to  Democrats  Back  Their 


Hold  Dedication 
This  Sunday 

Paul  R.  Williams,  general 
chairman  of  the  dedication  and 
open  house  of  the  ^^tovall  Foun- 
dation, this  week  invited 
friends  of  the  organization  to 
attend  dedication  ceremonies 
in  the  Stovall  Foundation  Audi- 
torium, 822  N.  Hazard  avenue, 
at  3:30  p.m.  Sunday,  Feb.  24. 

Co-chairmen  are  the  I?ev. 
George  L.  Hays  and  Judge 
Thomas  L.  Griffith.  Mrs.  Jessie 
Mae  Beavers  is  chairman  of  the 
day.  '  The  Lillian  Randolph 
Singers  will  be  featured,  and 
Robert  V.  Miller,  Jr.,  M.  D.  of 
the  University  of  Southern  Cal- 
ifornia Medical  Faculty,  will 
discuss  briefly  the  "Needs  of 
the  Aged." 

Clubs  to  be  Honored 

The  many  clubs,  churches, 
organizations  and  individuals 
who  have  given  their  support 
to  the  nonprofit  Stovall  Foun- 
dation are  to  be  honored  dur- 
ing the  ceremonies. 

The  program  committee  is 
chaired  by  Mrs.  Beavers,  and  is 
composed  of  Miss  Bernice  C. 
Wright  and  Mmes.  Delia  Wil- 
liams, Leontyne  King,  Lessie 
Stevenson,  Fannie  DeMan, 
Mary  Jarrell,  Maggie  To\vns, 
Venye  Corporal,  Yalande  Sto- 
•.all  and  Mary  Coleman  Jark- 
.son.  The  Vashtians  Social  Club 
members  will  act  as  ushers. 
Committee  members  will  be 
hostesses. 


'56  Civil  Rights  Plonk 

SAN  IFRANCISCO  —  Northern!  Democratic  liberals 
who  marched  into  Sarr  Francisco  with  the  bands  play- 
ing and  banners  waving  in  the  cause  of  civil  rights 
wound  up  two  days  of  speech-making  and  secret  meet- 
ings by  urging  all  Democratic  office-holders  —  local, 
state  and  national — to  supports 


the    civil   rights   plank  in   the 
1956  party  platform. 

The  meeting,  called  by  Chair- 
man Paul  Butler,  wound  up  its 
work  by  naming  Adlai  Steven- 
son, former  President  Harry  S. 
Truman,  Senators  Estes  Ke- 
fauver  and  Hubert  Humphreys, 
and  Governors  G.  Mennen  Wil- 
liams and  Averill  Harriman 
plus  the  14  members  of  the 
executive  committee  of  the 
Democratic  National  Committee 


the  planks  on  civil  rights  em- 
bodied In  Democratic  plat- 
forms." 

Some  .Democrats  pointed  out 
that  by  the  involved  grammar 
of  the  resolution,  it  really  calls 
for  nothing  specific,  nothing 
that  would  assist  the  party  in 
firming  up  its  position  on  civil 
rights. 

No  Harm 

Butler  explained  the  council 
is  fully  cognizant  tTie  question 
of  civil  rights  Is  a    "very  im- 


to  what  It  called  the  Demo- |  portant  social  problem  in  the 
cratic  Advisory  Committee.  The  South'  but  contended  he  see's 
advisory  committee  will  make    ^lo  particular  harm  as  a  result 


Banks  Supports 
Recall  of  Parker 

"I  fully  support  the  NAACP  demand  for  the  recakl 
of  Police  Chief  William  H.  Parker,"  declared  Erroll 
Banks,  candidate  for  mayor  of  Los  Angeles,  in  a  sp<;-' 
cial  interview  Saturday.  Banks'  candidacy  is  endpisqd 
by  the  Socialist  Workers  Party. 

"Negroes  and  members  .  off 
other  minority  groups  are  es- 
pecially concerned  that  police 
officers  ^hould  not  be  permitted 
to  exceed  their  authority,  ig- 
nore the  rights  of  individuals 
or  engage  in  unlawful  search 
and  seizure.  The  top  police  of- 
ficial should  be  the  first  to  up- 
hold legal  procedures. 

Only  Negro  Candidate 

"One  of  the  reas9ns  I  am 
running  for  mayor  is  because 
of  the  need  to  assure  protection 
for  the  rights  of  minorities  in 
Los  Angeles — against  discrimi- 
nation, against  police  brutality, 
and  for  fair  employment 
(FEPC),  and  full  integration  in 
all  branches  of  the  government 
and  all  phases  of  city  life." 

Bgnks,  39-  the  only  Negro 
running  for  mayor  of  Los  Ange- 
les and  reportedly  the  only  Ne- 
gro ever  to  run  for  that  office, 
is  a  packinghouse  worker,  a 
union  member  and  a  World 
War  II  veteran  who  served  for 
four  years  in  the  South  Pacific. 
Need   Our   Own   Party 

"The  bombings,  in  Montgom- 
ery. Ala.  and  elsewhere  in  the 
South  encouraged  by  Demo- 
crats in  office,  plus  the  refu- 
sal of  tlje  Republican  President 
to  stop  his  quail  shooting  and 
golf  playing  long  enough  to  de- 
nounce ■  the     terrorist     attacks 

against     Negroes     underscores       A**^-  Rayfield  Lundy,  1816 
again  the  fact  that  Negroes  can  !  ]22nd  .street,  is  again  running 


The  California  Eagle^S 
Thursday,  February  21,  1957 


RVXS  FOR  MAYOR  — 

Erroll  Banks  is  first-  Srtfro  tit 
run  for  mayor  of  Los  Angeles, 


Lundy  Seeks 
Wilbwbrook 
School  Post 


official  partjf  statements  "with 
in   the  framework  of  the  1956 
'  party  platform."    There  are  no 
;  Negroes  on|  the  Council. 
"Forthright" 
Chairman  Butler  told  report- 
ers after  the  meeting  that  the 
council's  civil  right's  resolution 
I  was    not    designed    to     "prod" 
'  Democratic    congressmen     into 
j  action   on   civil   rights   legisla- 
tion.    At  the  beginning  of  the 
sessions  he  told  reporters  that 
there  would   be  a  very  "forth- 
right    and     positive"     policy 
statement)  ©h  civil   rights.     An 
Alabama  ~aiternate,  Mrs.  Leon 


of  the  council's  action 

"No  violence  will  be  done  to 
our  political  organization,''  he 
contended,  "as  long  as  we  in 
the  North  appreciate  the  prob- 
lems of  those  in  the  South  and 
they  in  the  South  appreciate 
the  problems  of  we  in  the 
North." 

The  Democratic  Party,  he 
added,  will  continue  to  function 
as  a  unit  ,as  long  as  "we  can 
disagree  without  being  dis- 
agreeable." 

The  council  accused  the  Re- 
publican Party  of  attempting  to 
create   the    false    impression    it 


hope  for  nothing  from  either 
the  Democrats  or  the  Republi- 
cans," Banks  co-ntinued.  "Nor 
can  workers.  What  we  need — 
that  is  workers,  Negro-  and 
white — is  an  independent  par- 
ty of  our  own — an  independent 
labor  party. 

"In  running  for  mayor,  I  am 
advocating  the  for^mation  of 
such  a  party,  as  a  necessary 
step  in  furthering  the  welfare 
of  the  workers  of  this  country. 
New   Korea 

"Even  local  issues  —  such  as 
the  gerrymandering  of  city 
councilmanic  districts,  ghetto 
housing  for  minorities,  oil, 
smog  and  other  city  problems 
— cannot  be  properly  dealt  with 
so  long  as  we  place  in  office 
the  capitalist  parties  and  capi- 
talist politicians — to  say  noth- 
ng  of  national  issues  like  the 
new  Korea  being  prepared  in 
the  Near  East. 

"We  need  our  own  class  par- 
ty that  will  ser\"e  our  interests 
j  instead  of  those  of  the  oil  bil- 
!  lionaires. 

Advocates   Socialism 

"I  welcome  this  opportunity." 
Banks  continued,  "to  put  forth 
the  ideas  of  Socialism,  the  only 
economic  and  political  system 
that  can  'prevent  wars  and  de 


for  election  to  the  Board  3f 
Trustees  of  the  Willowbrcxik 
Elementary   School   District. 

Elections    are    scheduled    fbr 
May  17. 

Lundy    served    as    a    boa 
member  from  1950  to  1953  aid 


CA\niDATL  —  At>v.  Rn^ 

field  Lundy   is  again  a   tand 

date  for  the  Board  o?  Trusted 

of   the    If'illoubfook  Elemen- 
tary SrhonI  Distrtct. 

again    from    1955    to    1?56.    He 


Ga.  Silly  Season 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
the  National  Association  for 
the  AdvaiTcement  of  Colored 
People"  who  had  helped  the 
NAACP  in  "its  objectives  as  a 
Communist  front  organization." 
Other  justices  namfifl  in  the 
resolution  were  Stanley  Reed 
and  Tom  Clark. 


ard  Thomas;  "voted  against  the  !  originated  the  proposal  whcre- 
resolution  while  two  other '  as  it  actually  was  "belatedly 
southerners,  C.  F.  Gravel  of  copied  from  Democratic  meas- 
Louisiana  and  Mrs.  H.  B.  Ev-  ures." 
.crott  of  North  Carolina,  voted 
for  it. 

Congressional  Democrats  were 
"urged  to  proceed  during  trfis 
first  session  of  the  85th  Con- 
gress to  enact  pending  legis- 
lation introduced  by  De&io- 
cratic  members  In  their  unffeg- 
ging  efforts  to  eliminate  di^* 
criminations  of  all  kinds  in  re- 
lation to  the  right  to  vote  and 
to  engage  in  gainful  occupa- 
tions, and  the  other  specific 
discriminations    mentioned    in 


pressions.  and  assure  a  life  of  ,  was  recalled  in  a  special  te 
plenty  for  all  —  and  I  mean'"""  -'-— • —  ^'-•-  ""  -'  *'^- 
'ALL,'  including  Negroes. " 


Ralphs  Stores 
Give  Names  of 
Lucky  Winners 

A  "mSuntain  of  groceries" 
was  awarded  in  a  public  draw- 
ing in  each  of  Ralphs  34  Com- 
plete Food  Stores  at  the  close  of 
the'  first  week  of  registration  as 
part  of  a  month-long  celebra- 
tion of  tfie  84th  birthday  of  this 
leading  grocery  chain,  and  from 
19  other  names  drawn  at  the 
same  time  in  each  store,  a  ' 
further  drawing  yielded  the 
names  of  the  chain -wide  win- 
ners. 

Lists  Posted 

A  complete  list  of  winners 
is  posted  in  all  Ralphs  stores, 
and  additional  drawings  will 
be  held  February  22,  and  March 
1st. 

WINNERS  OF  MOUNTAIN  OF 
GROCERIES:  Mrs.  R.  V.  Dunbar. 
1325  Crenshaw  Blvd..  Norman  B,  Vil- 
la<«na,  421  Myrtle  St.,  Glendale. 
Edith  Gelotky,  3311  N.  Knoll  Dr. 
Norma  Ferrur.  6043  Frv-  St..  Down- 
p>.  Mrs.  H.  E.  Walker.  17041  Bur- 
ton St..  Van  Nuvs.  Marv  Duarte 
142SS1,    nirkens    St..    Sherman    Oaks. 

Mrs.  Carl  R.  Stevenson,  7531  Polk 
Stj,  Anaheim.  Mildred  W.  Cuneo.  301 
S.,  St.  Andrews  Place.  Mrs.  G.  B. 
Hail.  15208  Vallev  VisU.  Van  Nuvs. 
T«irrp.<ia  Wilcox.  7102  Rita  St..  Hunt- 
ington   Park. 

Mrs.  Rose  Ackerman.  1318  N.  Ci- 
trut  Ave.  Mrs  Norman  Bartold.  5516 
CarJtnn  Way.  Ralph  McAdams.  129 
N.  41h  St..  Alhambra.  Mrs.  Marie 
Knnspck  .=145  N  Marincn,  Pasadena. 
Marion  Gidlof  ,3288  Mountain  View. 
\\ .  M>9  Angrles.  Gladvs  W.  Wilson. 
150,5   E.   10th   St  ,  Long   Beach. 

Melvin  UJIakv,  3653  Hermosa  Ave.. 
Manha  Harvev.  1.353  W.  ^rd  St. 
Pearl  Williams.  2201  Hiehland  St.. 
Manhattan  Reach.  Dora  K.  Holbert. 
KI49  N.  .«rreemaii  Dr..  Burbank. 
Krnesi  Bo.'.sard.  139  Sea  Ocean  .\ve.. 
Santa    Monica. 

Mrs.  .Mitina  Thams.  430  N.  Greg- 
ory. Whittier.  W  ilma  Bovd.  .363i4 
E  36th  St  .  LA.  Mrs.  Pearl  Ruon. 
975  Vendome  St.  Esther  Smith.  6611 
Orange  St.  Frank  L.  Allen.  4632>i 
Vineland.  Mrs.  H.  Tanaka.  3039  Vic- 
toria   St. 

Pauline  Green.  4201  Barn  knoll 
Dr.  Mrs.  Phil  Flahem-.  513  N.  Ar- 
den.  Mrs.  Warren  Stout.  14106  Dick- 
ens St..  Sherman  Oaks.  M.  H.  Pehr. 
2032  Paramount  Dr.  Mr.  Jack  Du- 
Boise.  3132  Sawtelle  Blvd.  Frank 
Jordan.  5124  Daleview.  Arcadia. 
2ND    WEEK 

Mrs.  E..  Drinkwatcr.  4536  Chanarall 
Lane.    La    Canada    (R    Foothill  >    woi^ 
the   1957   Plymouth   Savoy   4-door    se- 
dan  in   Ralphs   second   weeks   draw- 
ing. 

Other  magnificent  prizes  were 
drawn  as  follows:  Two-week  Mexi- 
can Trips  for  Two.  Helen  De  Surra. 
415  S.   Harvard   Blvd.    (R  3rd  St.). 

Maytag  Refrigerator-Freezer.  Mrs. 
Robert  E.  Sessler.  846  Weslmont  Rd. 
(H    Whittier).      .     * 

3  OKeefe  &  Merritt  Gas  Ranges: 
Mrf.  Harry  Nelson.  ,-2626  S  Santa 
Ani^a.  Arcadia  (R  Santa  Anital;  Ruth 
Rpctnr.  24C4  West  Boulevard  <R 
\\-\SHTN):  Elisabeth  B.  Roth.  8727 
Shorcham  Drive.  West  Holbwood 
(R     Wilstiirei. 

Bonded  Water  Softener  L.  .lacobn- 
witT:.  137'..  S.  Oakhursl  Drive  (R  Bev. 
Hills>. 

'2  Htotlier  K^^inc  Mathines.  Joan 
Th..mlin>np.  r31  PT-'i'th  Sf  I  ■'-e 
Boat  It  (R  Long  Beach):  1.  Feketis. 
19'!1  W  lioth  St..  Inglewood  (R 
.\lanrhpster\.  , 

Filiex  Vacuum  Cleaner.  Mrs.  J. 
Everett  Marsh.  10851  Pangborn  Ave  . 
(R    Downevi. 

Artistic  Wire  Set  H.  Schwartz. 
3612'-.   W.    4th   St..    IR  3  &  Vt). 

3-Sunbeam  Electric  Skillets:  Clar- 
ence Ferrari.  9S95  Ambov-  Ave.  Pa- 
rcims  (R  \\>odman> :  Mrs  Fr<"ia 
Dunning.  171,^  Covello  St..  V»n 
Nufs:  (R  Ventura  t:  and  Mr«  Bob 
wide.    SS.'V;   Tilden   iR  National). 


Banks  appealed  for  votes  in 
the  April  2  election  on  the  ba- 
sis of. his  10-point  program:  For 
a  world  of  endurinj^  peace,  job 
security,  an  end  to  race  dis- 
crimination, defense  of  civil  li- 
berties,  for  making  Los  Ange- 


call  election  May  29  of  that 
\ear.  Durr'ng  his  earlier  te-m 
he  was  president  of  the  Board, 
1952-53. 

In  connection  with  his  pre- 
sent candidacy,  Lundy  decUr- 
ed; 

"The  Willowbrook  Elemen- 
tary   School    District    has    had 


Gives  Talk  on 
Brotherhood 

Mrs.  Georgiana  Hardy,  mem- 
ber of  the  Los  Angeles  City 
School  Board,  will  speak  at  a 
special  community  Brotherhood 
Festival,  sponsored  by  the  Eiast- 
side  Jewish  Community  Center 
Intergroup  Committee,  213  N. 
Soto  street,  Saturday,  Feb.  23,  at 
8:30  p.  m. 


les  a  100  per  cent  union  town,  growing  pains  during  the  pist 
for  slum   clearance,   lifting  the  -  five  years.  It  has.  howe\er.  im 

tax    burden    from    the    poor,    a  proved     beyond     leaps    and 

fundamental    tackling    of    the  bounds.  It  is  my  prediction  tliat 

smog     menace,     for     .scientific  within  the  next  few  years  \\il 

city  planning  and  for  indepen-  lowhrook    will    lia\c    the    hfst 

dent   political  action.  .  school  system  in  the  county. 


h  i 


Clothes  drying  can  be  child*s  play  I 


Any  time 
is  perfect 

drying  time 
with  an 

ELECTRIC 

clothed  dryer 


Even  youi  youngster  osa  chuck  the  laondiy  into  an  electric 
diyer  and  yoa,ett  be  sute  yooi  dothea  wiH  ccnoe  out  fresh, 
sweet  and  dean.  Raia  or  shine— any  time — an  electric 
dryer  saves  yov  woric  and  worry.  Electric  dothes  dryers  cost 
less  to  buy,  and  many  dectric  diyeis  now  available  require 
no  special  installatko— can  be  plugged  in  anywhere. 
Just  pennies  per  wash  to  run ...  because .. . 

IN  lOB  ANOELBS  BdtCTRICITY  COSTS  ABOUT  K  LESii  THAN 
THR  AVEItA<»  OP  THB  OTHER  U  LAROBST  t)A  CTTIBS 

LO*  ANOCLU  «ITV-OWNCO 

Deparfment  of  Water  andJPower 

•n  VOtM  A»FUANeCS«ALIMMJVK  •■??«— KLICTmCAU.Vi 


f^^olicif  V^' 


wncrs  •  •  •  • 


Armed  Services 
'  To  Drop  Race  Toqs 

SAN  FRANCISCO  —  Protests 
over  "race  tags"  in  armed  ser- 
vices oversea  assignments  have 
resulted    in    a    Department    of 
I  Army    memorandum    banning 
i  racial  designations  on  such  an- 
I  nouncements.    it   was  .revealed 
by  ;he  NAACP's  West  Coast  of- 
fice this  week.  , 

A  club's  best  investment  is 
a  \par"s  subscription  to  the 
Ca!ifiirnia  Fagle.  Cost — 54. 


GOLDEN  STATE  MUTUAL 
LIFE  INSURANCE  COMPANY 


■  SEW  HOURS 


DISTRICT  OFFtCE^- 


8:15  A.M.  fe  8:00  P.M.  Monday 

2550 


CENTRAL  OFFICE 
4261  So.  Central  Ave 


fhrbug/i  Saturday 

WESTSIDE  OFFICE 
o.  Western  Ave. 


SOUTH  LOS  ANGELES. 
11205  So.  Western  Ave. 


'ASADENA 
915  Noth  Fair  Oaks  Ave. 


These   Offices   IVill  Be   Opened 
—    February  12nd,  Washmgion's 


Policy  Owners  Are  Urged  to 
Payments  Into  the  Office  Until 


^ring  Their 
^urfher  Notice 

All  Offices  Are  Opened  for  the  Convenience    , 
of  Policy  Owners  During  the  Current  Interruption 
in  Collection  Service 


For  Business 
Birthday  — 


r- 


\ 


IL-  ^^ii5 


1   i 


4— The  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  February  21,   1957 


hVAVAVAVAVAVAVAVAV*VA«AVAVAVAVAVAV*VAVAVAV«AVAVA«AVAVA-Vj 


California  Sagle 


Loren  Milhr,  Publisher 

Th*  lagl*  tfoiMb  ff«r  tmmplmf  IntosraNon  off  NvgroM  inta  •v»ry 
phoM  wt  Amtrkon  lif«  fkrouflh  tii*  dMiMcrotlc  prM«ss««> 

IVe  favor: 

1.  nPC  en  local,  stof*  and  national  lovols. 

2.  Oocont  houaing  for  ail  Amoricana. 

3.  Roprotontotion  In  Oovommont. 

4.  Adoquoto  eld  ago  ponsion*  and  social  security. 

5.  Collective  bargaining  rights  for  ell  workmen. 

4.  Development  and  encouragement  of  Negro  business. 

We  oppose; 

1.  Jim  Crow  in  all  forms. 
,  2.  Communists  and  all  ether  enemies  of  democracy. 

PublM^d  ivry  Thvnday 
1050  last  43rd  Place,  Los  Angeles  11  AO.  4-0161 


Two  Bucks  for  Freedom 


The  local  branch  of  the  NAACP 
will  kick  off  its  membership  drive 
on  March  7  and  we  hope  that  every 
resident  of  this  community  i^  pre- 
pared to  join  the  Association  and 
help  enlist  members. 

In  particular,  we  hope  that  the 
merchants  of  this  community  are 
prepared  to  do  their  part  this  year. 
They  never  have.  They  have  been 
content  to  reap  the  results  of  the 
NAACP  efforts  to  lift  the  political 
and  economic  status  of  Negroes 
while  offering  neglible  support.  We 
doubt  that  there  is  a  merchant  on 
Central  avenue  or  Western  avenue, 
with  the  exception  of  Negro  busi- 
nessmen who  have  given  the  Asso- 
ciation $100  over  a  period  of  the 
past  two  years. 

Meanwhile,  every  advance  in  the 


Negroes'  economic  status  has 
meant  increased  profits  to  these 
laggard  merchants. 

Of  course,  the  dereliction  of  these 
merchants  does  not  excuse  the  rest 
of  us  from  doing  our  part.  After 
all,  we  are  the  chief  beneficiaries 
from  the  work  the  NAACP  does, 
whether  on  a  local  or  a  national 
scale.  We're  the  ones  who  get  the 
jobs  or  the  votes  or  the  integrated 
schools  when  the  NAACP  wins  a 
lawsuit  or  uses  some  other  method 
to  break  down  the  color  barrier. 

Memberships  in  the  NAACP  cost 
?i  minimum  of  two  dollars'  a  year, 
the  small  sum  of  four  ce*nts  per 
week.  There  isn't  a,  one  of  us  who 
can't  afford  four  cents  a  week,  or 
15  cents  a  month,  for  freedojn. 


March  on  Washington 


While  the  Rev.  Martin  Luther 
King  was  announcing  plans  for  a' 
march  on  Washington  to  persuade 
President  Eisenhower  to  speak  out 
against  continued  violence  in  the 
South,  the  president  was  announc- 
ing that  he  would  lengdien  his 
stay  in  Georgia,  where  he  is  enjoy- 
ing a  vacation.  Since  that  time 
the  crisis  in  Israel  has  shortened 
his  stay. 

The  fact  that  Southern  ministers 
led  by  the  Rev.  King  have  been 
driven  to  the  expedient  of  plan- 
ning the  march  on  Washington 
shows  how  serious  the  situation  is 
in  the  South.  Rev.  King  and  his 
followers  have  thus  far  eschewed 
all  political  activity  and  while  the 
proposed  march  is  not  a  direct  po- 
litical move,  it  borders  on  politics. 

What  we  cannot  understand  is 
the  stubborn  silence  of  the  White 


House  at  this  stage  of  the  matter. 
It  seems  to  us  that  an  announcesr 
ment  or  a  statement  by  the  Presi- 
dent urging  obedience  to  'the  law 
as  decided  by  the  Supreme  Court 
is  a  part  of  presidential  duty. 

The  only  people  who  could  take 
exception  to  such  an  announce- 
ment or  statement  are  those  who 
are  bent  o'n  violating  the  law  or  of 
taking  it  into  their  own  hands.  We 
know  of  no  reason  why  the  Presi- 
dent of  the  United  States  should 
hesitate  to  wound  the  feelings  of 
people  of  this  kind. 

The  President's  very  presence  in 
Georgia  whUe  racial  violence  con- 
tinues unabated  cries  out  fooaction 
on  his  part.  We  hope  t}«tt  he  will 
soon  decide  to  discharge  the  duty 
the  Constitution  lays  on  him  as 
chief  executive. 


The  Chief  is  Wrong 


We  understand  that  Chief  of  Po- 
lice William  H.  Parker  read  one 
of  our  last  year's  editorials  approv- 
ing his  stand  on  integration.  He's 
right.  We  said  just  what  he  said 
we  did.  We  have  also  taken  time 
out  to  praise  the  human  relations 
program  in  the  Police  Department. 

None  of  that  alters  the  fact  that 
the  chief  is  dead  wrong  on  the  civil 


rights  and  civil  liberties  issues  as 
exemplified  by  his  opposition  to 
the  Cahan  case  and  his  futile  at- 
tack on  congressional  civil  rights 
legislation.  His  stand  on  those  is- 
sues is  so  fraught  with  danger  to 
the  welfare  of  the  city  that  they 
outweigh  the  good  he  has  done. 
The  chief  is  out  of  step  with  the 
times.    His  usefulness  is  at  an  end. 


Richardson  and  Tinglof 


The  April  primary  election  will 
be  on  top  of  us  before  most  of  us 
have  taken  the  trouble  to  look  into 
the  merits  of    the    various    candi-  • 
dates. 

We  do  hope  that  Eagle  readers 
will  do  some  home  \\*ork  between 
now  and  April  2  on  the  candidates 
for  the  Board  of  Education.  Ralph 
Richardson,  a  UCLA  professor,  and 
Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof  are  trying  to 
unseat  Mrs.  Edith  Stafford  and 
Mrs.  Ruth  Cole. 

Mrs.'  Cole  and  Mrs.  Stafford  have 
distinguished  themselves  during 
their  terms  on  the  Board  by  oppos- 
ing every  proposal  that  has  an  even 
remotely  progressive  tinge.  Their 
reward  has  been  the  support  of  the 
same  crackpot  groups  that  stood 
so  loyally  behind  Fire  Chief  John 
Alderson  when  he  was  in  hot  water 
for  his  segregation  policies. 

Of  course,  the  incumbent  pair 


has  support  which  comes  from  the 
crackpot  fringe  but  no  Negro  vot- 
er can  afford  to  put  in  with  any 
candidate  who  has  the  blessings 
of  the  northern  equivalent  of  the 
White  Citizens  Councils. 

On  their  part,  Mr.  Richardson 
and  Mrs.  Tinglof  have  been  award- 
ed the  support  of  the  Committee 
for  Better  Schools.  That  commit- 
tee spent  a  great  deal  of  time  and 
effort  in  an  attempt  to  find  candi- 
dates who  are  qualified  and  who 
understand  the  problems  of  par- 
ents, taxpayers  and  teachers. 

Another  thing  that  will  recom- 
mend Mr.  Richardson  and  Mrs. 
Tinglof  to  citizens  of  this  commu- 
nity is  that  they  ^have  the  support 
of  Mrs.  Georgiana  Hardy,  the  one 
school  board  member  who  has  dis- 
tinguished herself  by  her  under- 
standing of,  and  participation  in, 
local  community  activities. 


Political  Spotlight 


.\r\./\j\n./\/\i\j\/\/\ 


By  OBSERVER 


/\  A.  A  A  A  A  A  A  A  A 


BONDS  SUPPORTER 

United  to  prevent  a  critical 
shortage  of  teachers  and  equip- 
ment in  Los  Angeles  schools,  a 
group  of  civic  leaders  today 
were  organized  into  an  advis- 
ory committee  to  work  for  pas- 
sage of  Props  B  and  C  in  the 
April  2  election. 

The  two  school  measures  will 
provide  additional  funds  to 
staff  the  classrooms  and  fur- 
nish supplies  for  new  schools 
in  the  elementary  and  junior 
and  senior  high  school  dis- 
tricts. 

Atty.  Leo  A.  Branton,  Jr.,  Dr. 
Perry  Beal,  Mrs.  E.  W.  Rakei 
straw,  Wesley  Brazier,  Rev.  \P. 
J.  Ellis,  Rev.  J.  Raymond  Hen- 
derson, Mr.s.  Felix  Spuilock,- 
Rev.  E.  C.  Walkins,  Mrs.  Rose- 
mary Holloman.  Mrs.  June 
Pinchhack,  Mrs.  Emily  A.  Jbhn- 
son,  State  Assemblyman  Au- 
gustu.s  Fl  Hawkins,  Lorenzo 
Bowdoin,  and  Atty.  Loren  Mil- 
ler. 

•  »     • 

BOARD  RAPPED 

Mrs.  Mary.  Tinglof.  candid- 
ate for  the  Los  .'Vngplos  Board 
of  Education,  Office  No.  2,  as- 
s.erted  today  that  health  edu- 
cation facilities  in  Los  Angeles 
schools  "are  at  suih  a  low  ebb 
that  children  must  obtain  this 
knowledge  practically  by  os- 
mosis." 

Mrs.  Tinglof  assailed  Board 
member  Mrs.  Edith  K.  Stafford, 
whom  she  is  opposing  in  the 
April  2  election,  along  with 
Board  member  Ruth  C.  Cole,  for 
"lack  of  concern  for  health  ed- 
ucation in  the  schools.  Be- 
cause of  their  backward  think- 
ing," she  said,  "we  have  the 
ironic  situation  in  which  there 
are  now  more  supervisors  for 
gardening  and  agriculture  in 
the   Los   Angeles   schools   than 

there  are  for  health  education." 

*  «     * 

THREATEN  SUIT 

Private  residential  rubbish- 
men  said  this  week  they  are 
preparing  a  million-dollar  libel 
.suit  which  will  name  Herbert 
M.  Baus.  campaign  director  for 
Mayor  Poulson,  Mayor  Norris 
Poulson  himself,  and  numerous 
"John  Doe.s"  for  printing  and 
distributing  political  literature 
which  allegedly  "defames  and 
attempts  to  assassinate  the 
character  of  both  private  rub- 
bishmen  and  the  Greater  Los 
Angeles  Rubbish  Council." 

The  rubbishmen's  lawyers 
will  base  their  suit  on  a  politi- 
cil  pamphlet  signed  by  Cam- 
paign Director  Baus  in  which 
he  flatly  states  that  the  Great- 
er Los  Angeles  Rubbish  Coun- 
cil has  'Hlamned  the  Mayor,  the 
City  Council,  the  Board  of  Pub- 
lic Works,  and  all  others  who 
oppiose  them  .  i  .  with  the  poli- 


domlnated  by  labor  boss  Frank 
Matuja — under  indictment  by 
the  Grand  Jury  for  perjury  , . ." 

•  •    • 

LUNCHEON  SPEAKERS 

Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof  and  Dr. 
Ralph  Richardson,  candidates 
for  the  Board  of  Education,  will 
speak  before  the  Democratic 
Luncheon  Club  at  the  Alexand- 
ria Hotel  on  Thursday,  Feb- 
ruary  21.  according  tft  ah 
announcement  today  by  Johi^ 
G.  Sobieski,  club  president. 
The  topic  of  their  talk  will  be 
"Freedon^  to  Teach." 

UNION  BACKS  ENNIS 

Two  large  Union  groups  have 
given  their  full  endorsement  of 
the  candidacy  of  John  M.  En- 
nis  for  Mayor  of  Los  Angeles, 
it  was  announced  by  Frank 
Hess,  general  chairman  of  the 
Ennis  campaign.  . 

The  first  group  i,?  the  Sys- 
tem Federation  No.  97,  Railway 
Employees.  A.F.  of  L.  and  af- 
filiates. The  second  is  the 
Brotherhood  of  Railroad  Train- 
men. 

•  •     • 

"YES"  VOTES  ASKED 

The  League  of  Women  Vot- 
ers of  Los  Angeles  is  support- 
ing a  municipally  operated 
rubbish  collection  system  and 
urges  a  "yes"  vote  on  Proposi- 
tion A,  the  municipal  rubbish^ 
collection  referendum  on  the 
April  2  ballot,  Mrs.  Murrel  M. 
Loring,  president,  announced 
today. 

In  keeping  with  League 
Policy,  this  decision  was 
reached  only  after  thorough 
study  of  all  Sspects  of  the  prob- 
lem, Mrs.  Loring  said. 

Headed  by  Mrs.  Martin  Zim- 
ring.  a  League  research  com- 
mittee investigated  the  rubbish 
collection  and  disposal  prob- 
lem of  all  cities  in  Los  Angeles 
County  as  well  as  all  sizeable 
cities    throughout    the    United 

States.  t 

'  •    *    • 

MAYOR  BACKED 

Pledging  to  alert  voters  in| 
every  section  of  Los  Angele?  to' 
the  necessity  of  re-electing  Ma-i 
yor  ^'o^ris  Poulson  so  he  may 
continue  his  vigorous  fight  for 
good  government,  41  leading 
citizens  this  week  enlisted  in 
the  Speakers  Bureau 'of  the 
Committe  to  Re-elect  Mayor 
Korris  Poul.son. 

Rallying  to  the  call  of  E.  Tal- 
bot Callister,  Chairman  of  the 
Speakers  Bureau,  men  and 
women  widely  known  for  their 
work  in  civic  affairs  gathered 
at  campaign  headquarters  to 
accept  day  and  night  speaking 
engagements.  They  will  appear 
before  hundreds  of  clubs  and 
organizations,  and  on  radio  and 
television  between  now  and  the 


tical   aid  of  a   powerful   union      primary  election  of  April  2. 

BaAtlcaxe  &  Bread 

By  LestT  B.  Grangmr  I 


Granger 


x:;T3r7rT'^;;T3r?T^CT3r 


A  decade  of  change  has  pass- 
ed since  the  Daughters  of  the 
American  Re- 
volution 
made  the 
front  pages 
of  metropoli- 
tan newspa- 
pers by  bar- 
ring  the 
world's 
greatest  con- 
tralto, Mari- 
on Anderson, 
from  singing 
in  Constitution  Hall  at  the  Na- 
tion's Capitol. 

For  that  boorish  action  the 
DAR  was  rebuked  by  the  best 
and  commended  by  the  worst 
opinion  groups  of  the  country. 
The  leaders  of  the  organization, 
after  vainly  trying  to  explain 
away  the  consequences  of  their 
action,  finally  took  refuge  in  a 
more-or-less  dignified  silence, 
hoping  that  the  rest  of  the 
country  would  eventually  for- 
give or  forget  the  whole  miser- 
able business.  And  so  most  of 
the  country  did,  for  the  inci- 
dent was  sq  absurd  that  a  ma- 
jority could  not  become  really 
angry — only  amused  and  dis- 
gusted. 

Didn't   Leorn   Much 

How  much  the  Daughters 
learned  from  that  experience 
is  now  evident  in  reports  from 
Denver,  Col.  The  DAR  chapter 
of  that  city  sponsored  plans  for 
a  Lincoln  Day  program  at  a 
State  School  for  delinquent 
boys.  The  program  was  under 
charge  of  the  chairman  of  the 
Chapter's  Patriotic  Education 
Committee.  Part  of  the  program 
was  a  pageant  in  which  the 
boys  were  to  carry  Aifterican 
flags. 

The  committee  chairman  de- 
creed that  boys  of  Mexican  des- 
cent could  not  carry  their 
country's  colors.  When  ques- 
tioned by  reporters,  she  Re- 
marked, "I  wouldn't  want 
Mexicans  to  carry  Old  Glory, 
would  you?" 

Things  began  to  happen.  The 
Governor     ordered     the     DAR 


barred  from  programs  in  State 
institutions  "until  the  matter 
l.s  straightened  out."  The  rea- 
gent of  the  Denver  chapter  or- 
dered the  program  cancelled 
because  "the  DAR  does  not 
countenance  such  policies."  The 
committee  chairman  was  re- 
moved from  her  post — in  the 
institution  as  well  as  the 
chapter. 

Helpless   Youngstws 

The  National  DAR  president 
moved  into  action.  She  sent 
telegrams  to  state  regents  of 
the  Southwest — California,  Ari- 
zona, New  Mexico  and  Texas — 
deploring  "the  impression  that, 
the  DAR  as  an  organization 
practices  any  sort  of  discrimi- 
nation against  any  child  in  the 
United  States  regardless  of 
race,  color,  or  religion." 

All  of  this  was  intelligent 
public  relations  in  an  effort  to 
erase  from  public  notice  a  most 
spectacular  instance  of  mean 
ignorance.  It  was  a  hundred 
times  worse  than  the  Constitu- 
tion Hall  business.  Miss  Ander- 
son is  a  great  lady  of  world 
stature  who  could  not  be  both- 
ered by  a^ntediluvian  attitudes 
on  the  part  of  Washington  dow- 
agers. She  is  a  secure  person- 
ality. 

But  those  Mexican-American 
.  lads  of  Denver  are  the  embodi- 
ment of  helplessness  against 
scornful  bigotry.  They  are  pay- 
ing for  sins  committed,  not  by 
themselves  but  by  a  prejudiced 
society  against  tliem,  in  .deny- 
ing them  full  membership 
within  the  American  family. 
The  DAR's  "patriotic  education" 
chairman  was  tearing  open  an 
already-raw  wound,  and  infect- 
ing it  all  over  again. 
Sun  Do  Move 

It  Is  doubtful  that  the  public 
relations  actions  of  the  Den- 
ver and  the  National  DAR  will 
undo  the  damage  done  to  those 
boys  and  others  In  a  like  com- 
munity situation.  However,  it 
is  an  encouraging  contrast 
with  ten  years  ago,  that  in  this 
Instance  the  DAR  felt  called 
upon  to  rebuke  its  offending 


Sauth  African  Whiles  Split 
Over  Bus  Boycott  Tactics 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 
police.  It  was  because  of  their 
actions  and  the  actions  of  their 
dependents  and  supporters  and 
of  the  English-language  news- 
papers that  this  boycott  is  still 
continuing,"  Schoeman  de- 
clared. ' 
Can't  Pay  Fares 

Another  Labour  representa- 
tive. A.  Hepple,  retorted  that  the 
"boycott  was  continuing  be- 
cause the  people  affected  de- 
clared they  were  unable  to  pay 
the  increased  bus  (ares.  People 
do  not  walk  nine  miles  to  work 
and  nine  miles  back  merely 
because  of  their  political  views. 

"The  minister  has  said  that 
since  1944  African  wages  have 
increased  by  200  per  cent.  But 
he  did  not  say  how  much  the 
cost  of  living  has  risen  during 
that  time.  Since  March,  1953, 
cost-of-living  allowances  have 
not  been  increased,  but  the 
cost  of  living  itself  has  risen 
enormously." 

'Cruel,  Heartless' 

He  also  accused  the  govern- 
ment of  adopting  a  "cruel  and 
heartless  attitude"  and  de- 
clared   that    "if    anybody    has 


IS 


been  guilty  of  incitement  it 
Mr.  Schoeman.  The  Minister 
(Schoeman)  has  suggested  a 
number  of  ways  of  supportir  g 
the  bus  company  against  tlfe 
bus  users." 

The  boycott  smarted  late  lafet 
year  when  it  was  announced 
that  bus  fares  would  be 
creased.  The  day  before  the 
boycott  started  a  meeting 
2000  people  met  and  agreed 
they  would  not  use  the  bus*  s. 
Many   Arrested 

The  boycotters  lTa\e  received 
the  jsympathy  of  a  number 
the  European  (white*  people 
Johannesburg  and  e\cn  of  c^ 
tain  employer  associations. 

As  an  outgrowth  of  the  mafes 
protest  103  Africans,  23  white: 
22  Indians  and  S  colored  (mix<'d 
blood).  Including  top  members 
of  organizations  throughout  the 
Union  of  South  Africa,  hay 
been   arrested. 

All  are  out  on  bail  while  pr^ 
paratory    examinations    are 
process. 


Df 

of 


Neg 


May 


ro  Patience 
Wear  Thin 


(Continued  from  Page  11 
civil  rights  program  had  been 
in  effect. 

He  told  the  Subcommittee 
that  from  4000  to  6000  Negroes 
had  been  stricken  from  registra- 
tion rolls  in  Ouachita  Parish  in 
Louisiana  after  being  chal- 
lenged by  the  White  Citizens 
Council  of  the  parish. 

Denied   Opportunity 

Brownell  said  most  of  the  Ne- 
groes were  subsequently  denied 
any  opportunity  to  establish 
their  qualifications,  and  added: 

"Had  the  administration's 
program  been  In  effect  the  De- 
partment (of  Justice)  would 
have  been  able  to  initiate  a  ci- 
vil action  for  the  purpose  of  re- 
storing the  Negro  voters  to  the 
rolls  of  the  registered  voters  in 
time  to  vote  in  the  November 
election." 

Wilkins  read  a  statement 
which  referred  to  recent  "shoot- 
ings and  bombings  of  homes 
and  churches.  .  .  mobs  and 
threats  of  bodily  harm"  and 
"inflammatory  speeches"  by 
public  officials  in  the  South. 

Despite  this,  he  said,  Negroes 
have  been  patient  and  "have 
placed  their  trust  in  the  law, 
the  courts,  in  legislative  bodies 
and  in  the  orderly  processes  of 
government." 

Wilkins  conceded,  under 
questioning  .by  Ervin,  that 
there  are  some  "ghettoes  of  the 
North"  in  which  Negroes  are 
more  segregated  than  in  some 
southern  communities.  But  Wil- 
kins said  there  are  "some  com- 
pensations" for  Negroes  who 
live  in- them— 'they  know  they 
can  always  get  out.  .  .and  go  to 
other  sections.  .  .to  a  theater 
or  a  restaurant." 


Rev.  King  Calls 
Foi^  Pilgrimage 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
taurant.  The  11-month-old  bk 
by  was  injured  by  flying  glai : 

In  Los  Angeles  on  Monday, 
the  NAACP  sent  a  letter  to 
President  Eisenhower,  adding 
its  voice  to  those  who  appeahid 
to  the  "national  leader"  to  u;e 
his  influence  "by  speaking  o  it 
in  opposition  to  such  acts  of 
violence." 

Ministers  Support 

On  Tuesday.  Rev.  Maurice  A. 
Dawkins,  president  of  the  Com 
munity    Church    Ministers'   Al 
liance  of  the  Southwest  Pacif  c, 
likewise  pledged  support  of  th 
ministers    of    his    orgamzatit  n 
and  sent  telegrams  to  the  exec- 
utive committee  of  the  Soutli 
west    Pacific    Ministers'    Emer- 
gency Conference,  of  which  Er, 
T.    M.    Chambers    is    chairmai 
urging  their  united  support  for 
Rev.  Martin  Luther  King. 

Delegates  to  the  Baptist  Mih- 
isters'  Union  of  Southern  Cali 
fornia  and  the  Interdemoninii 
tional  Ministers'  Alliance,  a -e 
expected  to  rally  their  support 
at  their  meetings  next  week 
when  the  formal  appeal  js 
made  to  them. 

Disappolnment 

"It  is  unthinkable  that  m^n 
of  God  should  remain  silent  n 
the  face  of  President  Eiseii 
bower's  failure  to  speak  out 
against  mob  violence  and  tie 
bombing  of  churches  and  min 
isters'  ^mes,"  said  Rev.  Da\v 
kins. 

"It  is  a  great  disappoint- 
ment to  millions  who  had 
placed  their  hopes  in  Eisen 
bower's  Christian  conscienc?, 
his  moral  integrity  and  his 
democratic  idealism.  Some  wl  o 
enthusiastically  supported  him 
are  beginning  to  feel  that  their 
idol  has  clay  feet.  In  tie 
words  of  Jesus:  If  we  did  n<)t 
cry  out,  the  very  stones  would 


*;<».•  ^■S.^afa.^    ..^ 


n 


officer  publicly,  remove  her 
from  office,  and"  warn  other 
states  with  heavy  Mexican  and 
Spanish -American  populations 
against  similar  public  demon- 
strations of  intolerance. 

As  the  Virginia  preacher  of 
an  earlier  day  stated,  "The  sun 
do  move."  Slowly,  it's  true,  but 
definitely  nonetheless.  Some  of 
these  days  the  DAR's  "official 
policy"  may  yet  become  its 
every  day  practice,  not  only 
with  respect  to  children  but  to 
adults  as  well — not  only  Span- 
ish-Americans but  Afro-Ameri- 
cans also. 


28th  S».  'Y' 

Plans  were  completed  eajiy 
this  week  for  a  colorful  'Report 
Tea"  to  be  given  Sunday,  Fea. 
24,  by  the  general  campaign  di- 
visions of  the  Current  YMCZjA 
niembership  campaign. 

Hostesses  for  the  event,  whi(ih 
will  commence  promptly  at] 4 
p.m.  at  the  YMCA,  28tli  arid 
Stanford  streets,  are  Mmas. 
Marnesba  Tackett,  Margarui:e 
Stanford  and  Ruth  Redd  Paill<  L 
Guest  speaker  is  Atty.  Willia|n 
R.  Freeman. 


LOREtM  MILLER 
Publisher 


-  It-     WV^Ui- 


Vol.  LXXVI  No.  49 

Thursday       F«bni«ry  21,  1»57 

F.    P.   WALLER.   JR AdV.   Mgr. 

GRACE  E.  SIMONS,    Exacutiv*  Editor 
EDWARD  "ABIE"   ROBINSON 

, — Circulation     Mgr. 

CALME    RUSS _ - ..Otfic*    Mar. 

BAY  AREA    REPRESENTATIVE 

E.    G.   ALLEN J512   16th    St. 

Santa   Monica,   Cal.,   Ph.:   EX.   6-1H1 

SUBSCRIBE  NOW! 

D  $4.00  for  1  Yoar 
D  $2.50  for  6  Months 
D  $1.50  for  3  Months 
PER  COPY 10c 

Adjudication  Dacrs*  Number  12322t 
Date  of  Adjudication  July  1,  1923. 
Published  every  Thursday  by  Th« 
riL'!*""""'*  E»Ol»  Publishing  Co., 
1050  East  43rd  Place.  Entered  a« 
Second  Class  Matter  November  S, 
1937,   at  the   Post  Office  at   Los  Ar»- 

Reies,    California,    under   the   Act  ef 
isrcn  3,  i879« 

REPRESENTED  NATIONALLY 
BY    INTERSTATE 
UNITED    NEWSPAPER* 
.        545  Fifth  Avenue 
New  York  17,  N«w  Yoi*    . 


I 


•  I 


State  Seeking 
Death  Sentence 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
up  to  her,  pointed  a  gun  and 
said,  "Get  in  the  car  and  don't 
holler." 

Coggad  H*r 

He  reportedly  ^took  her  purse, 
gagged  her  and  forced  her  to 
get  on  the  floor  in  the  front 
seat.  He  drove  around  for  about 
a  half  hour.  Then  he  took  off 
the  gag  and  allowed  her  to  sit 
on  the  seat  next  to  him,  but 
warned  her  to  turn  her  head  - 
so  that  she  could  not  identify 
him.  "   •, 

The  man  continued  to  drive, 
then  parked  the  car  in  a  dark  " 
residential    district     Then    he 
raped  her. 

He  also  took  S8  from  her 
purse  and  some  papers. 

He  shopped  at  the  corner  of 
37th    Drive   and    Halldale,    and  ; 
told  her  to  "get  out  and  dont  ' 
look  back." 

Miss  Brown  said  he  kept  her  ^ 
in  his  car  for  about  three  ; 
hours.  * 

Pointed  Gun 

Miss  Jones,  a  student  said  ■ 
that  on  Nov.  28  she  got  off  the", 
bus  at  92nd  street  and  Avalon  I 
blvd.  As  she  turned  down  iBShi-T 
street  she  saw  a  man  walk-  ; 
ing  across  the  street  toward."' 
her.  ^ 

He  grabbed  her  .arm  and.,- 
pointed  a  gun  at  her  head.  "It'; 
you  don't  want  to  be  killed^  < 
get  in  that  car,"'he  reportedly-; 
ordered.  The  car  was  a  1953  or" 
19.S4  pink  Ford  convertible, ' 
with  a  black  top. 

The   man   forced    the   young.; 
woman    to    lie     dowm     on    the 
floor.  He  Tirove  her  around  for 
a  while,  stopped  in  a  dark  resi- 
dential area,  and  then  attempt-: 
ed  to  rape  her.  He  had  taken  ; 
her  watch  from  her,  but  gave 
it  back. 

He    took   her   back   to   93rd  • 
street,     again    threatened     her 
with  the  gun,  put  her  out  and 
drove  away. 

Atty.  Akers  said  at  the  tim« 
of  the  arrest  that  his  client 
claims  he  was  at  home  with 
his  w-ite,  Mary,  on  the  night  of 
Nov.  16  when  the  attack  on 
Miss  Brown  was  being  perpe- 
trated. 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

"Th»  Importanf  Nmwspapf"    . 

1050  E.  43rd  PI. 

Los  Angolos  11,  Calif. 

ADoms  44)161 


\A- 


-^^_ 


•,-•_ -^^T- V-'"*   '^-- >.'   V' K. '^-»  ■• -J»    -•    -•      .^ 


!■■■ 


ice 

le  1) 

^un  and 
id  dont 


fT  purse. 
her  to 
le  front 
?r  about 
took  off 
ff  to  5it 
Jim,  but 
?r  head 
I  identify 

fo  drive, 
a  dark 
len    he 

Dm    her 

3rner  r>t 
He,  and 
id  don't 

tept  hpr 
It     th  ree 


it.   said 
off  the 
Avalon  • 
93rd  • 
walk- 
toward 

«n4 
kead.  "It 
killpd. 
Iportedlv 
1953  or 
Jvertible, 

young 
on  the 
jund  for 
larkre?!- 
lattempt- 
\d  taken 
|iut  gave 

to  93rd 
tied  her 
I  out  and 

ithe  tim« 

|s    client 

le   with 

night  of 

tack    on 

perpe- 


lA 


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:alif. 
II 


No.  49 
121.  1957 


I.Adv.  Mgr, 
Itive  Editor 
TiSON 
atlon  Mgr, 
>ffica  Mgr, 
JITATIVE 
|12  16th  St. 
EX.    5-1591 


pW! 

Mr 
>htht 
>ntbs 

...  10c 

nbei — I2322t 
^1/    t,    1923. 

Ishing  Co., 
lEnterid  j« 
loYei^ber  J. 
'  at  Lot  An- 
,  th«    Act    9t 

lONALLY 
T'E 
kPEJIS 
|IU* 

York 


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Rev.  Henderson  to  Keynofe 
NAACP  Membership  Drive 

The  Rev.  J.  Raymond  Henderson,  minister  of  Sec- 
ond Baptist  Church,  will  keynote  the  official  kick-off 
of  the  NAACP  1957  membership  drive  March  7  at  8 
p.m.,  at  the  Second  Baptist  Church,  24th  and  Griffith 

"  avenue. 

The  Rev.  Maurice  A.  Dawkins, 
president  of  the  branch,  said  in 
making  the  announcement,  "We 
are  happy  to  have  Rev.  Hender- 
son keynote  our  campaign  as, 
having  just  returned  from  the 
south  in  which  he  visited  key 
cities,  the  message  he  brings 
will  be  of  utmost  benefit  to  us 
in  Los  Angeles.  This  will  be  the 
first  formal  address  on  the  sub- 
ject of  his  trip,  since  his  return." 

Trouble  Area  Films 

During  his  tour  of  the 
"trouble"  areas,  films  were 
made  and  will  be  shown  at  the 
meeting.  > 

The  Los  Angeles  branch's 
goal  this  year  is  45,000  mem- 
bers. In  addition,  because  the 
NAACP  has  been  banned  in 
three  states  in  the  South,  the 
local  branch  has  adopted  New 
Orleans  branch  with  a  mem- 
bership of  5.000. 

The  drive  is  under  the  leader- 
ship of  the  branch's  member- 
ship committee,  chaired  by  the 
Rev.  E.  A.  Anderson  with  Mes- 
dames  Ann  O'Ferrall,  Rosa 
King.  Marnesba  Tackett,  co- 
chairmen. 

Mrs.  Tarea  Hall  Pittman,  reg- 
ional field  secretary,  has  been 
selected  to  direct  the  campaign. 


^ 


uv 


Li£l^ 


Thursday,  February  21,   1957 


The  California   Eagle— 5 


Final  Rites 
Spoken  for 
Pioneer,  82 

Final  rites  for  Mrs.  Anna  Bell 
Kinard  Moore,  82,  pioneer  resi- 
dent of  Los  Angeles,  will  be 
held  Thursday,  Feb.  21,  at  1 
p.m.,  at  the  Church  of  Divine 
Guidance.  151S  S.  Gramercy  pi. 
The  Rev.  Clayton  D.  Russell  will 
officiate. 

Mrs.  Moore  died  Friday  fol-. 
lowing  a  brief  illness.  Her  resi- 
dence was  2740  S.  Raymond 
avenue.  She  had  lived  in  this 
city  for  the  past  52  years. 

Mrs.  Moore  is  survived  by  her 
husband,  He\-\vood  Moore;  four 
daughters.  Mrs.  Pearl  Smith, 
Mrs.  Lillian  Johnson,  Mrs.  Eliz- 
abeth Mackey  and  Mrs.  Ella  | 
Van  Vactor:  two  sons.  George 
and  Doll  Nelson,  and  several 
grandchildren.  j 

Interment  is  at  Evergreen  j 
Cemeterj'.  Harrison  and  Ross  i 
Funeral  Home  are  in  charge  of 
arrangements. 


BOWEN    MEMORIAL 
METHODIST  CHURCH 
Eat  3Stli  and  Trinity  Sti. 
Jeka  C  B«ln.  MlnUtw 

•  :M   a.fn.— Church    SehovU 
11  :M  a.m.— WarsMp. 
7:00  D.m.— doed   Nawa   Haur. 


Palm  Springs 
Baptist  Church 
Ordains  Two 

P.\LM  SPRINGS— The  Revs.  B. 
T.  Washington  and  Paul  May- 
field  will  be  ordained  at  the 
First  Baptist  Cliurch  on  Sunday, 
Feb.  24. 

Rev.  Le  Roy  Davis  and  Rev.  R. 
V.  Hagpert.  Second  Baptist 
Church.  Indio;  Rev.  J.  P.  Prio, 
First  Mission.  Baptist  Ch-urch, 
Banning;  and  Rev.  A.  J.  John- 
son, Friendship  Cliurch.  Casa 
Bl^co.  will  participate  in  the 
or'd/nation  ceremonies. 


"Rent*  Thy  Strength  Like  the  Eagle" 

MASTER   YOUR    PROBLEMS 

BY  DIVINE 

METAPHYSICS 

3   Qjestions   Answered. 

Send  $1  witii  Birthdate. 

WILLIAM  H.  FELTON,  Ps    0. 

2473  Seventh  Ave  ,  New  York  30,  N.Y. 


CARD  OF  THANKS 

Tho  family  of  th*  Uto  Mrs. 
Bloncho  Slator  Williams  graft- 
fully  acknewladgot  and  thanks 
its  many  friand*  for  tha  flow- 
ers and  kind  •xproMJens  of 
•ympathy. 

Mr.    Doway    Williams 
Mr.  Barry  Slatar 
Mr.  Vomen  Slatar 
Mr.  Samuol  Slatar 
Mrs.  Rebarta  Yarbor 
Mrs.  Ethal  Brown 


Ambia  G.^  Black, 
Composer,  Dies 

Mrs.  Ambia  Goodloe  Black, 
local  composer,  died  suddenly 
at  her  music  studio  apartment. 
2035  W.  Jefferson  blvd.  on  Wed- 
nesday, Feb.  13. 

Mrs.  Black  who  *wrote  the 
melody  to  the  current  record, 
"Strange  as  it  Seems,"  was  the 
wife  of  Rev.  Emerson  Black  and 
the  mother  of  Beverly  Clark. 

Her  friends  all  feel  that  "the 
sweet  music  that  flowed  from 
her  pen  is  stilled,  but  the  melo- 
dies linger  on  in  their  hearts." 


Parents  Mourn 
I  Death  of  Twins 

I  Twin  sons  born  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Percy  Buckhalter,  136  East 
;  23rd  streed,  died  Jan.  29. 
I  The  tiny  bodies  were  pre- 
!  pared  for  burial  by  morticians 
1  of  the  Peoples  Funeral  Home. 
{Interment  was  in  Pajadise 
■  Memorial  Park  cemetery  Feb.  2. 


PIANO  CONCERT 

Larry  Brown  and  Eyone  Craw- 
ford will  be  presented  in  a 
piano  recital  at  the  New  Bethel 
Baptist  Church  in  Venice  Sun- 
day, Feb.  24.  at  3:15  p.m. 

Larry,  11-year-old  son  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Robert  Brown,  641 
Santa  Clara  avenue,  Venice,  is 
a  student  at  Broadway  Gram- 
mar School. 

Eyone.  13.  this  son  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Elbert  Crawford.  641  West- 
minister avenue.  Venice,  at- 
tends Mark  Twain  Junior  High 
School. 

Eyone  and  Larry  are  studying 
piano  at  the  Val  Chalk  Music 
Workshop! 

a        *        * 

BROTHERHOOD  WEEK 

Brotherhood  Week  was  an  ac- 
tive week  for  the  Calvary  Bap- 
tist Church. 

The  Women  of  Calvary  at- 
tended an  inter-faith  tea  at  the 
Beth  Sholem  Temple.  Protestant, 
CAtholic  and  Jewish  congrega- 
tions were  represented.  Rabbi 
Bloc  made  a  welcoming  speech. 

Tuesday  found  Rev.  Carter 
and  his  wife  at  the  Miramar 
Hotel  where  the  annual  Lincoln 
Day  dinner  was  held.  Rev. 
Carter  gave  the  invocation. 
David  Weston  and  his  songsters 
provided  the  opening  music. 

The  annuaj^  rotherhood 
Week  dinner  for  the  Council  of 
Churches  in  Santa  Monica  held' 
at   Crflvar>-  was   the  climax  of 

the  week. 

•  •     • 

NAACP 

Atty.  Loren  Miller  will  dis- 
cuss Civil  Rights  and,  legisla- 
tion now  pending  before  Con- 
gress. Atty.  Rex  Minter  will 
elaborate  upon  the  housing 
problem  in  Santa  Monica  in  re- 
lation to  the  Negro  and  Gilbert 
Dale  will  speak  on  the  civic  and 
political  issues  in  the  commun- 
ity at  the  NAACP  meeting  to  be 
held  Thursday,  Feb.  21,  at  the 
Calvary  Baptist  Church,  Broad- 
way and  20th,  at  7  p.m. 

•  •     * 

CHURCH  NEWS 

All  church  news  should  be 
sent  to  Jean  A.  Boyd,  1423  19th 
street.  EX.  5-2567.  Nifws  should 
be  in  by  Friday  of  each  week. 

i''i':rii!iii iiiii|iriiii'!ii':!!!ii!!|ii(!iiiii;i!ii!iiiiiiiii;iii;;iiii|!'iii«iiiiiiii!, ' ill' 2 


J  S  S  1 1  LRS^-i  RY — Shm;..n  above  is  the  Greater  Tnhernacle 
Baptist  Church  at  41.^5  McKinley  nvenur,  u  hirh  will  rrlchrate 
its  60th  anniversary  Sunday,  Frh.  14.  The  Rev.  E.  S.  Johnson, 
shoun  at  right,  is  the  pastor  and  U'ill  conduct  the  celebration's 
services  at  3  p.m.  on  Sunday. 

[Tabernacle 
I  Celebrates 
60th  Year 

The  Greater  Tabernacle  Bap- 
!  tist  Church,  4155  McKinley  ave- 
I  nue^  Rev.  E.  S.  Johnson,  pastor 
■  will  relebrate  its  60th  annivers- 
I  ary  Sunday,  Feb.  24,  at  3  p.m. 

'     All  ex-members  and   friends 
of    Tabernacle    are    invited    to 
participate    in    the    celebration. 
I      The  Rpv.   F.  T.   Eddines,  pas- 
tor of   the  Community  Baptist 
!  Church,  10114  Beach  street,  and 
I  his    congregation    will    join    in 
;  the  services  Sunday   afternoon. 

Dinner  will  be  served  from 
12  noon  to  3  p.m.  at  one  dollar 
a  plate. 


Senior  Choir 

i 

Plans  Musical  I 
AtMt.Moridh  I 

The  Senior  Choir  of  the  Mt.  | 
Moriah  Baptist  Church  presents  | 
its   10th    annual    musical.    "Up 
From    Slavery,"    Sunday-.     Feb. 
24  at  6:30  p.m.  at  the  church,  ' 
43rd  and  Figueroa  street. 

Featured  will  be  Negro  spiri- 
tuals and  poems  composed  by  ! 
Negro  authors.  The  Crusaders  ; 
Chorale  Ensemble  will  be  I 
among  the  guest  artistk  appear- 
ing. I 

A  newly  organized  male 
quartet  will  be  introduced.  The 
choir  is  under  the  direction  of  j 
Prof.  R.  L.  Hatter,  who  is  mini- 
ster of  music.  Randolph  Lami- 
son  is  president  and  the  Rev. 
E.  A.  Pleasant  the  minister. 


ews  trcyn 


MY 

COUGH 

IS 

GONEi 


How  About  Yours? 

For  fait  relief  for  cotighi  following:  colds  or 
fln  do  as  I  did.  Take  Creomulsion  Cough  Syrup 
ftt  once.  Creomulsion  steps  the  tickle,  soothes 
irriution  and  helps  you  to  bresthe  more  freely. 
And  all  without  any  ba4  aft«r  effects.  For 
quick  coofh  comfort  get-^ 

CREOMULSION 

rot  COUGHS,  CHIST  COIBS,  ACUTI  MONCHITIS 


Victory  Baptist  Day  Scliool  offers . . . 

The   Basic   Educational   Opportunities   of 

Other  Schools  plus 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  &  Practice 

ENROLL  NOW! 

Vacancies  Available  for  Kindergarten  Only 
Extended  Day  Care  Program 

"Individual  Instruction  Predominant 
Feature  of  Instruction" 

6:30  A.M.  until  6:30  P.M. 
BUS  TRANSPORTATION  CAFETERIA 

Rev.  Artuhr  A,  Peters,  Pastor;  Mrs.  Florence  ParreMe,  Vice-Prtn. 
PHONE:  ADAMS  1-2424  or  M732 


Your  Friend  In 
Time  of  Sorrow 


When  sorrow  strikes,  with  the  passing  of 
someone  desr,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  com- 
plete all  necessary  errsngements.  Our  ex- 
perienced stsH  is,  above  all,  tasteful  and 
disaeet  at  all^lmes. 


PEOPLE'S 


FUNERAL 
MOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-7181 


I    OgfJen,   Liialx    | 

I  By  Bessie  Lopez  S 

^i,ii;;::i" ':il|j^l'rll::l«il;|illllilll|i::willli:|ffilli!llWi:!'^i,ll:'f 

Wadell  Harper,  a  member  of 
the  Senior  Choral  group  of  the 
New  Zion  Baptist  Church,  was 
given  an  audition  by  the  talent 
scout,  Eugene  Jelesnick.  Harper 
qualified  and  will  be  seen  on 
the  Utah  Talent  Hour,  Feb.  24, 
on  KUTV.  Channel  2.  Mrs. 
Louise  Finch,  the  pianist  for 
Harper,  will  be  seen  with  him. 
She  is  a  member  of  the  Themis 

Club  and  a  Daughter  Isis. 

*  •     « 

The  Rev.  David  M.  Johnson, 
pastor  of  the  Greater  St.  John's 
Baptist  Church,  Los  Angeles, 
was  the  guest  speaker  at  the 
Greater  Zion  Baptist  Church  re- 
cently.   Rev.    Johnson    is    the 

brother  of  Mrs.  Minnie  White. 

*  «    • 

Johnnie  Howard  has  been  re- 
leased from  the  S.P.  Hospital  in 
San  Francisco  and  is  recuperat- 
ing from  his  automobile  acci- 
dent    at    home,    2415     Lincoln 

avenue. 

*  •     • 

Jim  Sykes  is  confined  to  the 

Dee  Hospital  in  room  226. 

*  *     • 

January  Berkeley  was  releas- 
ed from  police  custody  after  be- 
ing held  for  the  fatal  shooting 
of  Frank  Burgess.  The  prelimin- 
ary hearing  found  he  had  acted 

in  self  defense. 

«     •    • 

Two  men.  Clarence  Rogers 
and  Joe  Thompson;  were  found 
guilty  of  grand  larceny  and 
sentenced  to  from  one  to  ten 
>ear.'N  in  State  Prison  by  the 
Second  District  Court. 

*  *     * 

Mrs.  Luetta  Wilson  Himes 
died  at  the  St.  Marks  Hospital 
in  Salt  Lake  City  on  Feb.  14. 
She  had  been  a  member  of  the 
Embrey  Chapel  AME  and  a  sec- 
retary of  the  waiters  local.  Her 
death  was  the  result  of  a  fall  at 
her  place  of  employment. 
»    *     • 

The  New  Zion  Baptist  Church, 
2935  Lincoln  a\enue.  has  open- 
ed a  relief  center,  the  purpose 
I  of  which  is  to  store  food  and 
j  clothing  so  that  it  will  be  avail- 
able to  the  needy  members  of 
the  congregation. 

*  *  * 
I  Eltese  (Little  Beaver)  Wil- 
I  Hams  was  sentenced  to  serve  a 
I  term  in  the  state  prison  for 
I  forgery.  He  had  signed  Mrs. 
I  Annabelle  Weakley's  name  to  a 
check. 


Scout  Award 

Jesse  James,  a  member  of  the 
Hamilton  Methodist  Church 
which  sponsors  Unit  3S2  of  the 
Boy  Scouts,  was  one  of  IS  men 
honored  with  the  Silver  Beaver 
Award  of  the  Scouts  at  the  or- 
ganization's annual  meeting  at 
the  Biltmore  Bowl  Jan.  29. 

James,  a  unit  leader,  commit- 
tee chairman  and  neighbor- 
hood commissioner  in  the  Pu- 
eblo district,  has  '  had  eight 
years  of  scouting. 


Rites  Held  for 
Bennie  James 

Graveside  Masonic  rites  were 
recited  at  the  conclusion  of  fun- 
eral services  Feb.  11  for  Bennie 
James,  79.  a  former  barber.  The 
ritualistic  services  were  under 
the  auspices  of  Angel  City 
Lodge. 

The  late  Mr.  James  resided 
with  his  widow  and  his  son's 
family,  at  2261  W.  29th  place. 

The  body  wa.s  prepared  for 
burial  by  morticians  of  the 
Peoples  Funeral  Home.  The  ser- 
vices in  the  chapel  were  con- 
ducted by  the  Rev.  Jessie  Ford, 
of  Ward  Chapel.  Interment  fol- 
lowed in  Rosehill  cemeterj-. 
Whirtier. 


Cathedral  Choir  Schechiles 
San  Francisco  Concerts  ' 


Forty  members  of  the  Cathe- 
dral choir  of  People's  Indepenc  - 
ent  Church  of  Christ  will  arrive 
in  San  Francisco  via  TWA 
Saturday  morning,  Feb.  23,  to 
present  two  choral  programs. 

The  group  will  appear  in  ^he 
Philadelphia  Seventh  Day  Ad- 
ventist  Church.  1359  Geary- 
street,  the  same  evening  at  8 
p.m.     • 

On  Sunday,  Feb.  24.  the  chor 
will  return  for  a  second  vis  t 
to  the  Third  Baptist  Church. 
Pierce  and  Macallister.  at  6 
p.m.  The  presentation  will  he 
highlighted   by   the   singing  (f 


unusual  anthems,  spfrituals, 
and  especially  anan^ed^kiapel 
music. 

Soloists:  Ruth  Rochelle,  Hazel 
Chatman,  Elinor  Miller,  Victor 
Graham.    Jay    Loft    Lynn    and 
!  Gerald  Garrett  will  appear  un- 
I  der  the  direction  of  Minister  of 
j  Music   Albert  J.   McIJeil.   with 
j  Fannie  Evelyn  Benjamin  at  the 
I  console.  The  choir  will  return 
to  Los  Angeles  late  Sunday  ev- 
ening. 


Song  Sermon 
Presented  by 
Grant  AME 

A  sermon  in  song  is  bein  j 
presented  by  the  Willing  Work- 
ers of  Grant  AME  Church,  105t:i 
street  and  Central  avenue,  fea- 
turing Ralph  Goodpasture  an  i 
guest  artists  on  Feb.  24,  at  1 
p.m.^ 

Goodpasture,  a  well-known 
composer  and  musician,  ha; 
been  appearing  on  radio  anil 
television  in  Chicago.  He  is  th  ! 
minister  of  music  at  the  First 
Church  of  Deliverance  in  Chi- 
cago, pastored  by  the  Rev. 
Clarence  Cobbs.  who  will  als^ 
be  present  at  the  recital. 

A  program  consisting  of  or-i 
ginal  compositions  by  this  not- 
ed artist  plus  outstanding  con 
tributions  by  other  well-known 
musicians  and  singers  will  pro 
vide  an  afternoon  of  entertain 
ment. 

The  Rev.  Henrv'  W.  Murph  i^ 
pastor  at  Grant. 


Mrs.  Simington 
Laid  to  Rest 

Funeral    services    wiere   held_ 
I  from  the  chapel  of  the  Peoples 
'  Funeral  Home.  Feb-  16  for  Mrs. 
Mammie  Simington,  53,  of  1428 
1  East  58th  streer- 
I     Mrs.  Simington  died  on  Feb- 
j  ruary  11.  She  was  a  native  of 
i  Texas.  She  is  sur\Mved  by  her 
j  husband.  Dave  Simington.  Both 
were  members  of  ML  Zion  Bap- 
tist Church. 

Following  services  in  the 
chapel,  the  body  was  interred 
in  Paradise  Memorial  Park 
cemetery  with  the  Rev.  Frank 
Prentice,  pastor  of  ML  Zion,  of- 
ficiating. 


I-  IN  MEMORIUM— 1 

Edna  H.  Porter,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Henry  P.  Madiien, 
Bertha  Lee  Porter  and  R.  B. 
Porter,  Jr.,  acknoWledaes 
with  grateful  appreciation 
your  kind  expressions  of 
sympathy  during  their  r*c«nt 
bereavement. 


Private  Consultatibn  and  SYC  Readings 

Call  for  Appolrttment  AD.  2-5984 

Office  Hours:  9:30  A.M.  •  7:30  P.M. 

SISTER  BEATRICE,  1|374  East  Vernon  Ave. 


Group  Plans 
Annual  Prayers 
For  Oppressed 

Richard  Aubrey  and  Stack  O. 
Williams,  co-chairman  of  a 
committee  of  men  organizir^g 
a  prayer  program,  announced 
this  week  that  the  First  An- 
nual Mass  and  Prayers  for  the 
Oppressed  Everywhere  will  be 
held  at  St.  Pauls  Catholic 
Church,  Washington  and  Bron- 
son.  Sunday.  March  3. 

The  Prayer  program  is  being 
launched  in  an  effort  to  pene- 
trate  the   domestic  cotton  cur- 
tain as  well  as  the  iron  curtain 
:  of  Europe  and  the  bamboo  cur- 
,  tains  of  Asia  and  Africa. 


i-LEWIS  METROPOI^TAN  CINE  CHURCII-| 

4900  SOUTH  ijvESTERN  AVENUE  j 

1SAIAH   SCIPto,  JR.,   Minister 

9:15  A.M.  Sun.  School  6:00  Ch.  Yth.  Fdlewship 

10:45  A.M.  Mo^n.  Worship      7:30  P.M    Evening  Worship 


OfV/NI  HIAt/NG  THUOUGH  f A/TH  AND  PtAYW 

Candle  Store  i       Ail  Kindi  of  Relifliout  Articles 

REV.  H.{  J.  NAPLES 

HIPr  IN  *U  AFrAIBS  j-  PtlVATI  CONSULTATION 

THE  HELPING  ChApEL  OF  THE  MASTER 

nOfHISlIS  IVI«Y  THURSDAY  Wnd  SUNDAY  NIOMT  -  U^.lt  fM. 
^     r*r  Appointmailt  C.li   AD.   i-S9«4  -  9:00  A.M.  M  9:00  P.M. 
1374   lalt  VarlMii   Avaau* 
Writ*  f-  O.  t«x  72393.  AicM  Stotian,  Loi  Aiis*<M  *•  (•>>'• 


r^f^i"!^^^ 


I  K^atRISpN-ROSS 

*  •  FUNERAL    HOME 


1^ 


1839    Rrw+one    Blvd. 


.4    1 

t,  HARBISON 


LU. 


Science  Shrinks  Piles 
New  Way  Without  Surgery 

Finds  Hoalinc  Subctance  That  Do««  Both- 
ReBerc*  Pain— Shrinka  Homorrboida 


New  York,  N.  Y.  (SpeeUl)  - 

For  the  first  time  science  hu 
found  A  new  heklintr  substAnce 
with  the  astonishing  Ability  to 
shrink  hemorrhoids  and  to  relieve 
pain -without  surgerj'. 

In  one  hemorrhoid  case  after 
another,  "rery  striking  improve- 
ment" wag  reported  and  verified 
by  doctors'  observations. 

Pain  was  relieved  promptly. 
And,  while  gently  relieving  pain, 
actual  reduction  or  retraction 
(shrinkinsr)  took  place. 

And  most  amaiingr  of  all— this 
improvement  was  maintained  in 
cases  where  doctors'  observations 
were  continued  over  a  period  of 
many  months! 

In  fact,  results  were  so  thor- 
ough that  sufferers  were  able  to 
make  such  astonishing  statements 
as  "Piles  have  ceased  to  be  a 


problem!"  And  among  these  suf- 
ferers were  a  very  wide  variety 
of  hemorrhoid  conditions,  some  of 
10  to  20  years'  standing. 

All  this,  without  the  use  of 
narcotics,  anesthetics  or  astrin- 
gents of  any  kind.  The  secret  is 
a  new  healing  substance  (Bio- 
Dyne*  )  — the  discovery  of  a  world- 
famous  research  institution.  Al- 
ready, Bio-Dyne  is  in  wide  use 
for  healing  injured  tissue  on  all 
parts  of  the  body. 

This  iiew  healing  substance  is 
offered  in  tuppotitory  or  ointment 
form  called  Preparation  H.*  Ask 
for  individually  sealed  convenient 
Preparation  H  suppositories  or 
Preparation  H  ointment  with  spe- 
cial applicator.  Preparation  H  is 
sold  at  all  drug  stores.  Satisfaction 
guaranteed  or  money  refunded. 
♦Em.  t.  s.  >«t.  aw. 


To  Help  meet 
TBE  DOXTBXiS  BMEftGHKCYH^ 


87155 


For  many  familios,  sorrow 
croatos  both  tmetienal  and 
financial  omorgoncios.  To 
moot  tho  omotionat.  crisis, 
Angolus  offors  gonuinoiy 
friondly,   understanding   holp. 
For  tho   problom  of  unexpected 
expense,  the  Angelus  answer  is 
reasonable  prices  and 
time  to  pay. ' 


SORROW     , 

I^INANCIAL 
PROBLEMS 


OMES 

-Phone  ADams  2-5188 
Phone  LB.700a9 

•        •       •        • 


I-  ^ 


'•1 

I 


\ 


i—Thm  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  February  21,  1957 


LIFE  MiMBERS — Anioritj  thusc  Tiho  phdiicd  Ui  hccDiiir 
$500  life  menthers  of  the  SA.iCP  fiiirim/  Ja<kir  Rulnnsruis's 
recent  visit  here,  are  from  left,  stundiiu/ :  Iriinq  Smith.  Att\. 
George  I  eiughn,  Gilbert  Lirid>ny,  .itty.  (Charles  Fn/dni/;,  II  il- 
linm  Moffett.   Rev.  Mnuriee   Dmvkirts.  llerlxrt   Rhmni.   L.  I. 


Brnckenhury,  Boh  Thomas,  Dr.  H.  A.  Toles  find  Julius  Big- 
ham.  Seated:  Mrs.  ^Ithea  Askerneese.  Mrs.  Herbert  Bloom, 
Mrs.  Lil/ie  Montgomery,  Mrs.  Jean  Thomas  and  Miss  Mary. 
Eekenrode, 


Vegas  Story  a 
Tale  of  2  Cities, 
Says  Bailey 

LAS  VEGAS.  Nevada  —  "This 
city  is  'solving:',  its; growing  seg- 
regation problem;  by  creating 
more  segregation,"!  NAACP  Field 
Secretary  Lester  $ailey  told  a 
capacity  audience  at  Second 
Baptist  Church  here  last  week. 

"West  of  the  railroad  tracks, 
the  city  planners  and  tne  city 
fathers  have  designed  the  most 
complete  package  of  racial  seg- 
regation this  side  of  Mississip- 
pi." Bailey  said. 

Terming  the  "Las  Vegas  Story 
a  Tale  of  Two  Cities,"  Bailey 
charged  that  in  "lily-white  East 
Las  Vmas"  Negroes  are  denied 
service!  in  restaurants,  hotels 
and  places  of  recreation,  except 
in  the  case  of  movie  houses 
where,  he  said,  "there  exists  the 
odd  segregatory  practice  of  forc- 
ing .Negroes  to  sit  along  the 
walls." 

In  citing  what  he  called  the 
"dire  need"  for  a  civil  rights 
code  in  Nevada,  Bailey  asserted 
that  a  Negro  "could  traverse  the 
entire  state  without  finding  a 
restaurant  that  would  serve  him 
or  a  hotel  or  motel  where  he 
could  secure  lodging." 


A  club's  best  investnient  is 
a  year's  subscription  to  the 
California  Eagle.  Cost — S4. 


Maid,  Pastor 
Ron  Waller  Jr 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
not    guilty.    The    preliminary 
Jiearing  will  be  lield  P'eb.  26. 
Pastor  Booked 

The  Rev.  Moore,  wife  of  the 
Rev.  Everett  Moore,  both  of 
whom  are  spiritual  advisors  at 
the  Faith  Temple  of  Universal 
Science,  967  VV.  Vernon  avenue, 
was  brought  down  to  Los  An- 
geles from  Oakland  by  detec- 
tives on  suspicion  of  receiving 
stolen  property.  She  was 
booked  shortly  after  midnight 
Monday  and  was  freed  on  SIOOO 
bail  Tuesday  morning. 

Police  claim  Mrs.  McChaney, 
who  lives  at  11T2S  Belhaven 
street,  stole  the  iewels  and 
gave  some  of  them  to  her 
friend,  the  Rev.  Minnie  Moore, 
who  in  turn  took  a  quick  trip 
up  to  the  San  Francisco  area  to 
peddle  the' "hot  rocks." 
Jewels  Recovered 

Police  further  claim  that 
some  of  the  missing  jewels 
were  found  in  Mrs.  McChaney's 
possession  and  sorrie  of  them 
were  found  in  Rev.  Minnie 
Moore's  possession. 

Among  the  jewels  which  were 
recovered  were  a  topaz  clip,  a 
tourmalene  ring,  a  gold  and 
topaz  bracelet  and  earrings  set 
with   diamonds. 

Mrs.  McChaney,  who  had 
been  working  for  Mrs.  Waller's 
family  since  she  came  to  Los 
Angeles  from  New  Orleans 
when  she  was  only  24  years 
old,  admits  having  some  of  the 
jewels,  but  she  stoutly  insists 
that  Mrs.  Waller  ga%'e  them  to 
her. 


Accused  in 
•3lry  Theft 

Mrs.  McChaney  began  work- 
\  ing  for  Mrs.  Waller,  the  former 
IMar.jorie  Mcrriweather  Durant, 
a  granddaughter  of  Mrs.  Merri- 
weather  Post  of  the  Post  cereal 
interests,  when  her  employer 
was  only  12  years  old.  She  has 
been  working  for  her  ever  since. 

Rooms  Ransacked 

The  jewel  theft  occurred  last 
October.  The  Wallers  had  been 

;  away  from  home  since  Oct.  22. 
Mrs.  McChaney  came  every  day, 
as  she  had  for  all  these  years, 
to  clean  the  house.  She  told 
officers  that  she  left  at  6:30 
p.m.,  Oct.  26,  and  that  at  that 

j  time    the    house    was    in    good 

j  order. 

1  When  Waller  returned  to  the 
;  home.  23.5  Entrada  avenue,  in 
j  West    Los    Angeles,    the    next 

morning,  he  found  all  the  doors 
I  unlocked  and  the  upstairs  bed- 
\  rooms  ransacked. 
I      A  combination  metal  cabinet 

and  safe  had  been  jimmied 
,  open  with  a  small  instrument. 
I  Four  Sinn  bills  and  a  red  leath- 
I  er  jewelry  bo.x  were  missing. 
I      The  dial  of  the  safe  had  not 

been  tampered  with.  Nor  was 
j  there  any  indication  that  any 
i  of  the  doors  had  been  jimmied, 
I  and  it  was  presumed  that  who- 
I  ever  had  committed  the  rob- 
;  hery  had  entered  with  a  pass 

key. 
I      Police     were    also    informed 

that    a -construction    crew   had 

been    working   on   an   addition 

to  the  house  for  approximately 

one  week. 


Why  should  your  hair 
say  you  re  old  and  gray? 


I.  Shompoo  hair  thoroughly.  A»  3.  Apply  Godefroy'i  loriaus* 
H  drJM,  mix  Godafroy'i  LoriatiM  with  handy  applicator  included 
•«  diractad.  in  pdciiag*. 

OODBPROV    MANUPAOTUItlNO    CO.   •  3810 


3.  Aftar  color  hat  developed, 
thompoo  h^ir  again  and  set  in 
your  favorite  ttyle. 
OLIVB    STUBBT   •   ST. 


LOUIS    3.   MO. 


Ministers  Seek 
Integration  in 
Le  A.  Churches 

The  Los  Angeles  Church 
Federation  Tuesdoy  called 
for  the  breaking  down  of  ra- 
cial segregotion  barriers  in 
Christian  worship  as  a  so- 
lution to  "one  of  the  most 
potentially  explosive  issues 
in  modern  culture." 

The  declaration  was  adopt- 
ed at  the  federation's  an- 
nual assembly  at  the  Im- 
manuel  Presbyterian  Church. 

The  organization  is  com- 
posed of  some  800  churches, 
with  congregations  totaling 
1,000,000   people. 


Union  Urges 
Golden  State 
To  Negotiate 

A  dispute  between  Golden 
State  Mutual  Insurance  Com- 
pany and  its  agents  appeared 
to  be  heading  for  a  showdown 
when  the  company  notified  the 
agents  that  they  will  not  be 
paid  on  March  1  unless  they 
bow  to  a  directive  issued  last 
December  ordering  them  to  use 
new  forms  for  reporting  collec- 
tions. 

That  was  the  essence  of  state- 
ments made  by  leaders  of  the 
Golden  State  Agency  Club,  a 
union  representing  company 
agents,  at  a  press  conference 
held  last  Tuesday.  Union 
spokesmen  were  Edward  Ford, 
Don  Smith,  C.  L.  Smith  and  Ike 
Adams. 

The  dispute  centers  around 
procedural  change.s  in  reporting 
premium  collections  ordered  by 
A.  J.  Williams,  superintendent 
of  agencies.  The  union  charges 
that  the  changes  will  increase 
the  amount  of  work  required  of 
agents  and  claims  that  any 
such  change  should  have  been 
the  subject  of  negotiations  be- 
tween it  and  the  company. 

No  More  Pay 

On  its  part,  the  company 
claims  that  changes  in  forms 
are  the  prerogative  of  manage- 
ment and  maintains  that  there 
is  nothing  to  negotiate  with 
the  union.  Agents  received  their 
Feb.  16  checks  but  were  told 
that  they  will  not  be  paid  on 
March  1  unless  they  conform  to 
the  orders. 

A^cnt.s  have  continued  to  re- 
port for  work  as  usual  but  have 
thus  iar  refused  to  fill  out  the 
required  forms.  The  agents  are 
utidrr  suspension  for  their  fail- 
ure to  cnmpl>'.  Union  represen- 
tatives said  the\'  regret  that  dif- 
ficulties have  arisen  and  re- 
peated their  desire  to  negotiate. 
Tlie  union  has  had  a  contract 
with    the   company  since   1917. 


^>   WHAT  S 
M  DOING 

W.  E.  Brower,  your  Telephone  District  Manager  in  Los  Angeles 


If  a  machine  answers,  don't  be  surprised — and  don't  hang 
up.  What  you  hear  is  an  Automatic  Answering  Set.  It  could 
happen  when  you  call  a  business  man  at  lunch  time.  Or  a 
doctor  after  office  hours.  These  remarkable  machines  give 
callers  a  recorded  greeting,  take  a  recorded  message.  They're 
being  used  more  and  more  in  offices  these  days.  And  in  homes, 
too.  By  guarding  against  "lost"  calls,  they  make  your  telephone 
service  more  useful  than  ever . . .  worth  more  to  you. 


Ohe  of  the  most  useful  ways 

to  use  your  telephone  is  for 
shopping.  Especially  when 
you're  guided  by  the  Yellow 
Page.s  of  your  telephone  book. 
At  a  loss  for  gift  or  decorating 
ideas?  Try  browsing  through 
the  Yellow  Pages.  See  if  you 
don't  come  up  with  an  answer. 
Have  a  definite  service  or  item 
in  mind?  Page  headings — in 
easy  alphabetical  order — will 
lead  you  right  to  it.  Remember 
whateveryou  need,  you'll  find 
it  fast  in  the  Yellow  Pages. 


K^^ancer  JLji 


rive 


The    American    Cancer    Society    Drive    was    spearheaded    in 
Southern     California     by:     House     Service     Foreman     John 
Area   Chairman,   and    husband    of   Juanita    Arneaud, 


Arneaud 

Repa 

ant   v.™    .  .»-., 

tendent  George 


aud.  Area  Chairman,  and  nusoana  ot  uuaniia  Mrncaua, 
lir  Clerk  at  youp  Verfion-Avalon  telephone  office.  Assist- 
Vice  President  Eva  Terpsten.  Director.  Plant  Superin- 
ent  George  Turner,    District  Campaign   Chairman. 


ITSITS  COS'GRESSMAS-On  his  reeent  trip  to  II' ashing- 
ton  fis  a  delegate  to  the  International  Christian  Leadership 
Conf^erenee,  Robert  Z.  Hardon,  superintendent  of  -  Building 
Serviees,  visited  with  former  Los  Angeles  County  Supervisor, 
(jnngressmnn  Gordon  MeDonough. 


'  ^  n 


Hubby,  Subdued 
By  Hammer, 
Won't  Prosecute 

When  Percy  Wilson,  25,  of 
11658  Bandera  avenue,  arrived 
home  Friday  evening  about  7:30 
p.m.,  after  a  hard  day's  work, 
he  began  complaining  because 
the  house  wasn't  neat  anci  in 
apple-pie  order. 

This  led  to  an  argument  with 
his  wife,  Ruth  Dean  Wilson. 

Wilson  went  out  and  ,lx)ught 
a  paper  and  came  back  home 
and  lay  on  the  couch  to  watch 
TV. 

Mrs.  Wilson  had  been  think- 
ing the  whole  thing  over.  No 
sir.  she  wasn't  going  to  put  up 
with  this  sort  of  treatment  She 
got  a  nice  big  hammer,  and 
conked  Wilson  on  the  head. 

Result:  five  X-rays,  six 
stitches  and  a  big  headache. 

When  Ruth  and  Firestone 
sheriffs  asked  Percy  if  he  was 
going  to  prosecute,  he  said,  "No, 
darling." 


Judge  Griffith  Chairman  of 
California  Traffic  Meeting 


The  meeting  of  the  Traffic 
Courts  Committee  of  the  Con- 
ference of  California  Judges  in 
San  Francisco,  Feb.  22,  will 
bring  together  judges. from  Ber- 
keley,     Fresno,     Los     Angeles. 


Traffic  Courts  Committee,  states 
j  ".Most   of  the  3804   deaths   and 

].30.9«2  injuries  occurring  from 
I  traffic  accidents  in  California 
!  last  year  were  caused  by  what 
j  ordinarily  would  he  minor  traf- 
I  fie    violations,    except    another 


Monterey,  Sacramento,  S  a  n  i  automobile  happened  to  be  in 
Diego,  San  Francisco,  and  the  wa\.  The  traffic  violator 
Stockton  to  determine  how  they,  !  who  reaches  our  courts  must  be 
as  judges,  can  help  stop  the  impressed  with  this  fact.  It  is 
ma.ss  slaughter  on  our  Califor-  hoped  that  through  the  work  of 
nia  highways.  this    committee    a    State-wide 

Judge  Thomas  L.  Griffith.  Jr..  !  comprehensive  traffic  safety 
Los  Angeles  Municipal  Court  |  program  will  be  developed  to 
Judge    and    chairman    of    the  '  achieve  this  purpose." 


Dr.  T.  R.  Peyton 
To  Open  Clinic 
At  Ros6  Natta 

Planned  as  a  free  public 
service  for  a  vital  health  prob- 
lem, a  private  ^Imic  will  be 
conducted  by  Thomas  Roy  Pey. 
ton.  M.D.,  at  the  Rose  Netta 
Hospital,  Vernon  and  Hooper 
Avenues,  for  one  month,  start- 
ing March  4. 

The  clinic,  which  will  be  open 
to  the  public  withouV  charge  for 
examination  and  medicine,  is 
►for  the  correction  of  constipa- 
tion. It  will  be  open  on  Mon- 
days from  1  to  2  p.  m.  and  on 
Thui^riays  from  6  to  T  p.  m. 


Feed  your  li^aby 

C^^RNAT 

America 
healthy  baby 


"Healthy  baby"  Edward  Cooper  of  Atlanta 


YOU  CAN  TRUST  CARNATION.  It's  the 
safest,  most  nourishing  and  digestible 
form  of  milk  for  your  baby's  formula. 
More  mothers  feed  Carnation  to  their 
babies  than  any  other  brand.  And  more 
Carnation  is  used  in  hospital  formula 


rooms 

otheT  brands  co 
las  that  claim 
sive  compared 
ask  your  docto^ 
the  milk  every 


r 


BRAND  FOR 
CEREALS,  TOO 


I  ■ 


throughbut  the  world  than  aU 

nbined!  Prepared  formu- 

be  complete  are  expen- 

o  Carnation.  Be  sure  to 

about  Carnation.  It's 

ioctor  knows. 


'-] 


YOUR 


I 


Tomorrow  morning,'!^ 
Car»jafio«  in  your 
cream  pitcher... you 'jl 
enjoy  the  rich 
difference  it  makes  in 
your  favorite  hot  or 
cold  cereal ! 


L. 


from  Contented  Cows" 


@*nation 


World's  Leading  Brand 
of  Evaporated  Milk 


@"natii3n 


MiLi: 


Mik 


.rl. 


-■c'«.    '%J<*-%^'*   ^•^ \  '  <^  .^.-  .^  - 


__1 


H  :- 

s 

1    1 

1 

f  ■- 

I- 

lb 

'? 


iued 


;ute 

25,    of 

arrived 

out  7:30 

■'s  work. 

because 

and  in 


lent  with 
5Ison. 

bought 
rk  home 
watch 

'  think- 

aver.   No 

put  up 

ient.  She 

ler    and 

ad. 

Vs.     six 

idache. 

•"irestone 

he  was 

lid.  "No. 


ra 

public 
Ith  prob- 
Iwill  be 
(toy  Pey- 
|e  Netta 
Hopper 
start- 

jbe  open 
large  for 
koine,  is 
lonstipa- 
>n   Mon- 

and  on 

m. 


I 


n 


I 


.: 


500  AtCmdlidan 


GESERAL  CHJlR.\M\—n\  Mi/lrr  Bnrhnur.  stnndi'ui 
left,  direct'tr  of  .It  ntrrn  Reoinunl  nifice  of  Snt'.'inal  L'rhnn 
Lfr.aup;  Elfaior  Pnuell,  uitf  nf  aitnr  Glfrin  Enrd:  Fo>d 
and  Dnrnthy  Dnndridae  (sentrd)  Inok  _mer  the  prnaram  pr\r,r 


m  .'/;,  "^ittl'Ui  ■>{  thr  I.I  'i'^ut  r  //  mlrr  Bi:''.  Iir'd  c.t  the  Hi\j 
i'-:\  ll.'.l'in  h'ltii  :r..\t  I  ':d'A  'i!';ht.  I'.'d'snifd  i:'  o.  ;;i",7 
,hi]:iii.r:n  «l  ihr  h,:!!.  { I r  urd  M"  l)/:-:'i'id>ti-  rfCTifd  thi 
S/'Ji^n'-,!   i  ronn   Ltct'/ur    1  rr.nr.^  nr h   .h^r.rd. 


—     iAJorkers  — 


LEGS  TV  \E  PRICE  COS  CERT— Pi  rhnptcr  nenphMir, 
If  illestine   Bnnkt,   rcntir,   hit   hcen   rcnlly    hurninfj   the    m'tdr 
if.'jht   'jii.    Ai'.ne.   she   hm    distributed   100  posters   and.   uith  ' 
othtri,    hi!    stnmpi-d  and  f'ndt-d    1400   hrnrhures   nrinriitncinfj 
the  Ler^n'xne  Pr:,-,    ,r,r,,rrt  nn  Mnrrh  2.'  nt  the  Phtlhnrritr,rtir 


t  uditnriiini.  Directmrj  th/t  icork  is  Pi  prexy  Eliza  Gipson. 
h'lttnm.  Helping  to  stiinulnte  interest  and  enthusinsm  is  Myrnn 
Carter  r,f  Pi  chapter.  Tnkrts  enn  he  secured  by  calling 
LL  .  '^-2S60  or  from  nn\    Delta  mcmher. 


Betty e  Howard  Rests  in 
'Queen  of  Angels' Hospital 


|lll;i;:l::lK,:|ll'^'"T':::r^!'"'T'|lH!T:l'l":l•™r:;:lI!!»l11li;!■!(l!i:I|;1il;:;|||;:::'l|■:'l;■:ll!li 

I      SMART  SET      I 


Bertye  Howard,  well  known 
socialite  and  wife  of  Dr. 
Wayne  Howard,  noted  pyp.  ear, 
and  nose  specialist,  was  or- 
dered to  the 
Queen  of  An- ' 
gels  Hospital  I 
following  thcj 
Urban  League  i 
Winter  For- 
mal at  t  h  e/ 
Beverly  Hil- 
ton Hotel  last! 
Friday   night. 

Mrs.   How 
ard  was  tick- 
et  chairman 
for   the   winter 
though   the  affair  was  a  ter- 
rific succesfi,  Uie  many  hours 


she -put  forth  m  its  behalf 
took  their  toll  and  her  doctor 
orderod  her  to  the  hospital  to 
relax  and  rest. 

She  will  be  hospitalized  for 
about  six  days  and  then  per- 
mitted to  return  to  her  home 
in  Berkeley  Square. 


Mrs.  Howard 

ball,    and    al- 


Woodsettes   Meet 

Woodsettes  social  club  held 
its  regular  meeting  at  the 
home  of  Nell  Mitchell.  3631 
■"ith  ave.  Members  elected 
their  new  officers  at  this 
meeting.  The  next  club  meet- 
ing is  slated  for  the  home 
of  Rosemary  Angloo. 


^./':!;:'"\::!\j::i:,iuj!i;:rii!i;i;!'::!iii!i;;;i;;;iiiji!;iii:,iii;iijii,ii,ii;;!;.:,j:ii 

THINGS  I'VE  RECENTLY 
ENJOYED 

Among  the  things  that  I've 
enjoyed  recently  was  the  meet- 
ing of  the  Emanon  Club  over 
at  the  residence  of  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  William  Beck.  Reatha  is 
known  everywhere  for  her  gra- 
cious entertaining  and  Satur- 
day she  was  definitely  at  her 
best.  There  was  not  one  ele- 
ment lacking  for  a  perfect  af- 
ternoon and  each  guest  left 
paying  soft-spoken  compli- 
ments to  this  week's  "Hostess 
with  the  Mostest." 

I  enjoyed  reading  more  good 
news  about  Ted  Jones — Teddy 
participated  in  some  lively  de- 
bate Saturday  past  at  the  an- 


,:;;;i  By  OLIVIA  DEE  liiiiniiiiBiiir^iiiinmiiiiiig 
nual  Student  Congress  attend- 
ed by  500  civic-minded  high- 
schoolers  from  private, 
parochial  and  public  schools 

throughout  the  L.A.  area.  The 
meeting  was  held  in  the  City 
Council  chambers  and  when 
the  representatives  of  31 
schools  chose  delegates  to  at- 
tend the  National  Student 
Congress  to  be  held  in  Lexing- 
ton, Ky.,  come  June,  the  fol- 
lowing delegates  were  named: 
Ben  Harris,  Excelsior  High; 
Pauline  Harris,  Santa  Monica; 
Ted  Jones,  Los  Angeles  High; 
and  Jerri  Corbin,  Alhambra 
High.  TTie  sponsors  of  the 
Student  Congress  are  the  Na- 
(Continued  on  Page  8) 


/ 


TC^u^e^ 


The  gay  and  beautiful 
Winter  Ball  given  by  the 
National  Urban  League 
Friday  night  at  the  ele- 
gant Beverly  Hilton  Hotel 
was  something  to  remem- 
ber. 

Members  of  the  Ball 
Committee  served  as  hosts 
and  hostesses  to  over  500 
guests  and  I  must  say  I 
never  saw  women  look 
prettier  in  their  exquisite 
cocktail  and  a.fter^five 
gowns  nor  the  men  look 
handsomer  as  they  chat- 
ted during  the  cocktail 
hour  which  began  the  eve- 
ning. 

Bob  Walters  and  his 
All-Stars  and  Armando's 
Latin  band  kept  the 
guests  dancing  before,  du- 
ring and  after  dinner  .  .  . 
they  were  just  that  good. 

Highlight  of  the  eve- 
ning came  when  two  very 
sincere  people,  Dorothy 
Dandridge  and  Glenn 
Ford,  accepted  the  Team- 
work Award.  Everyone 
loved  Dorothy  for  her  few 
timely  remarks.  She, stat- 
ed, "I  am  looking  forward 
to  the  time  when  there 
will  be  no  need  for  awards 
of  this  type  and  we  all 
live  loeether  with  respect 
for  one  another." 

Glenn's  equally  pertin- 
ent remar^ks,  "I  humbly 
accept  this  awa'rd  in  be- 
half of  my  family  and  my- 
self. Ellie  (his  wife.  Elea- 
nor Powell),  my  child  and 
myself  try  to  live  the.se 
sentiments  in  our  home." 

Just  love  people  like 
those  two. 

Daniels  Superb 

Billy  Daniels  w  a  s  su- 
perb. He  and  Bennie 
Payne  did  such  numbers 
as  "Comic  Valentine," 
"April  in  Paris",  and  "My 
Yiddish  Mama,"  whiph 
was  simply  beautiful. 

Calvin  Jackson  is  al- 
ways refreshing  with  his 
divine  piano  artistry. 

To  list  everyone  there 
would  he  impossible,  but 
among  those  I  saw  were 
Messrs.  and  Mmes.  Kenny 
Washington,  Leo  Branton. 
Lorenzo  Spencer.  Oles 
Hayes,  Paul  R.  Williams, 
Orbie  Harris,  Jes.se  Robin- 
son, Victor  Nickerson, 
George  Smith,  James  But- 
ler, Herbert  Bloom,  Wal- 
ter Davis.  John  Carney, 
L.  B.  Thompson,  Walter 
Goodlow. 

Also  present  were 
Messrs.  and  Mmes.  Loren 
Miller,  Ted  Grai^-,  Howard 
Allen,  Gilbert  Lindsay, 
Steve  Rowland,  Joseph 
Hayes,  Norman  Houston, 
Lawrence  Wilson,  Clar- 
ence Woods,  Earl  Broady, 
Frank  Caines,  David  AVil- 
liams,  John  Kelly,  Albert 
Maddo.x,  Bill  Graham, 
James  Faustina,  Lewis 
Williams,  Edward  Atkin- 
son and  Edward  Maddox. 

Seen  having  fun  wei-e 
Fi-ank  LaVigne.  Dr.  F.  E. 
Younge  of  Oakland.  Joel 
Fluellen,  Toy  Sewell  and 
Clarence  Johnson  of  San 
Francisco.  ^ 


GLUBS 


^a£^ 


FASHIONS 


Thursday,  February  21,   1957 


The  California  EagI*— 7 


It  JEEY  .^LL'MM  S  GIRO  SHOIf— Many  rersatUf  star]  -atll  be  seen  this  Sunday.  Feb. 
24,  at  (.iro's.  lihen  the  Il'ilev  Colleac  Alumni  present  their  big  scholarship  shou.  Shotcn 
standing  from  left:  .Model  Sonier;  Uohart  Be  njamin.  If  ilrv 
tame  ;  and  Bernue  .\  ance .  committee  member.  S  eated  at  the  piano  are  Earl  Grant  and  Pet  Si^es. 
.ill  mil  be  featured  in  the  Sunday  shou-  uhic  h  uill  begin  it  2:30  p.m.  and  tihich  will  be 
produced  b\   G.  G.  Penland. 


V 


—  ^--/cf-   J ogctltcr  — 


DELIGHTFUL  El' EXT— .Members  of  the  senior  choir  of 

uith    a    get-acquainted    social    last    Friday    night.    .4    Bible  quii 

Officers   of  the  group  are  shoun  above.  Seated  from  left:  Jc- 

Shirley  Hickejrson.  vice-president :  Bennie  Part  ridge,  president  :  and  Blanche  Harm,  secretary. 

Standing:    Sathaniel    Harris,    chairman    of    music    committet ,    and    If  illiam    Felder^    acting 

treasurer. 


Grant  .4ME  church  entertained 
t  and  other  games  n-er^  played. 
■ry  If  hit  f,  director  and  organist; 


Senior  Choir  Host  at  Gay 
Get  Acquainted  Social 


A  get-acquainted  social  was 
given  in  the  fashionable  home 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Feld- 
er  Jr..  in  Compton  last  Friday 
night.  A  lavish  buffet  dinner 
and  games  were  enjoyed  by 
those  attending. 


—  /7-     LJcars  — 


The  members  of  the  senior 
choir     of     the     Grant     AMI! 
church    of    which    Rev.    H.  W 
Murph    is    pastor,    sponsorec, 
the  gay  even*. 

Those   attending   the   affai 
were:     Mr.     and     Mrs.    Louii 
Fleming.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henrj' 
M.   Spears,   Mr.   and   Mrs.  Eu 
gene  Trotter.   Evelyn   H.   Gar 
rett    Shirley  Andrews.   Leste- 
E.    Taylo^    Lena    W.    Rhodes, 
Georgia    James,    Alberta    Mc 
Clung,  Ophelia  Barnes,  Addic 
Mae  Byers,  Priscella  Johnson 
Gussie     Alex.     Pauline    Part 
ridge.  Bennie  Partridge-   Juli« 
Blake.  Robert  A.  Hurdle.  Eu 
gene     Williamson,     Dollie    E 
Anderson.  Lillian  L.  Brookins 
.Andrew     Smith.     Norman    A 
Champion  and  Paul  Felder. 


Baby  Boy  For 
The  Joe  Shipps 

Joe  Shipp-  well  known  Nai: 
al  supervisor,  was  presente<l 
with  his  third  child,  las: 
week,  when  his  attractive 
wife,  Stella,  gave  birth  to  ii 
nine  pound  boy  at  St.  Mar>''i; 
Hospital  in  Long  Beach. 

The  new  arrival  was  named 
Kenneth  George  Shipp  afte- 
Joe's  two  brothers.  Mother  an(  1 
baby  are  greeting  friends  a : 
their  home.  1518  W.  136th. 


H.4PPY  OSES— Feb.  IS  marked  seventeen  years  of  uedded 
bliss  for  popular  George  and  Emily  Jones.  The  Jones  cele- 
brated quietly  in  their  fashionable  Compton  home  last  Mon- 
day night  recalling  earlier  days  of  their  marriage. 


Plan  Annual 
Mother's  Day 

The  Freelancers  Charitj^ 
and  Social  Club  met  in  th(! 
home  of  Mrs.  Alma  Wilson  on 
South  Berendo  last  Sunday 
evening.  Plans  were  formu 
lated  for  their  annual  Moth 
er's  Day  Breakfast 


F.-ISHIOX  —  Charmt^g 
Cleo  Bruce,  top-flight  mil- 
lioner.  uill  be  featured  at  the 
second  annual  Preview  of 
Spring  Fashions  on  Sunday, 
starch  3.  from  4  to  7  p.m. 
at  the  K'oodlaun  Yff'C.f 
Branch.  She  will  presew 
some  of  her  latest  designs. 

Continentals        '  . 
Planning    Top 
Affair    ^\    Giro's 

'  An  Afternoon  With  The 
Continentals,  will  be  the 
theme  of  the  ContJn«ntal 
Club's  Ciro's  aifair  on  April  7 
from  2  p.m.  until  7:30  pjn. 

At  the  regular  meeting  of 
the  group  last  Monday  night 
in  the  home  of  Gladys  Robin- 
son, president  Pat  Stpeat  and 
her  committee  outlined  de- 
tails for  tke  event. 

Topflight  entertainers,  out- 
standing stage,  screen,  radio 
and  TV  personalities  will  as- 
sist the  members  in  stagiu* 
one  of  the  spring  season's  top 
affairs. 

Ticket  chairman  Jerry 
Spencer  and  her  committee 
will  canvass  the  community  in 
an  effort  to  establish  a  recwd 
attendance  for  the  club's  ini- 
tial affair  foi  the  1957  season. 


i; . 


(dwitlnued  from  Page  7) 

tional  Forensic  .League  and 
Southern  California  Debate 
League. 

POTPOURRI 

Miller  Barbour  must  be 
VERY  busy  uncorking  cham- 
pagne for  his  office  staff  and 
all  his  assistants  who  helpe(^. 
make  the  Urban  League  Ball 
of  1957  "the  Most."  The  way 
Angelenos  responded  to  the  in- 
vitations was  just  wonderful 
and  it  could  never  have  been 
the  success  it  was  had  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  L.A.  not  been  so  gracious 
about  sending  in  for  their  res- 
ervations as  they  did.  The 
French  have  a  word  for  ALL 
who  participated  —  SPLEN- 
PIDE! 

.  Evie  Coleman  was  stunning 
in  her  exquisite  pale  beige 
bisque  mink  stole  (the  very 
newest  in  high  fashion).  'Twas 
a  birthday  gift  from  her  ever- 
loving  Johnny.  Nice,  No? 

Gotta  take  time  to  wish  a 
speedy  recovery  to  Dr.  Alice 
Garrott,  Vernice  Spann,  Wilde- 
garde  Bostic  and  Dr.  Kathleen 
Jones  King.  Hurry  and  get  out 
of  bed,  you  lovely  ladies— we 
miss  you! 

Opal  Jones  is  home  again 
after  spending  three  wonderful 
weeks  in  New  York  City. 
Vaino  and  Lorenzo  Spencer  are 
packing  their  bags»for  a  jaunt 
to  Texas.  Emily  Portwig  is  en- 
joying Charlotte,  N.C,  by  this 
time.  She  went  back  to  the 
National  Medical  Association 
Board  Meeting. 

THE  WEEK  AHEAD 

Silhouettes  are  entertaining 
their  hubbies  with  "Pot  Luck" 
supper  at  the  Kappa  Kastle, 
Saturday,  Feb.  23,  at  6:30  p.m. 
The  Los  Angeles  United  Na- 
tions Association  is  honoring 
its  president,  Wm.  B.  McKes- 
son (district  attorney  of  the 
County  of  L.A.I  with  a  testi- 
monial dinner  on  Wednesday, 
Feb.  27,  in  the  Crystal  Room  of 
the  Beverly  Hills  Hotel.  The 
social  hour  begins  at  7  p.m. 
Dinner  at  8. 

Women's  Auxiliary  of  the 
Medical,  Dental  and  Pharme- 
ceutical  Association  invites 
you  to  the  third  annual  Sweet- 
heart Hour  of  the  Handicapped 
Placement  Center.  The  affair 
will  be  held  Sunday.  Feb.  24. 
from  4  to  7  p.m.  at  the  YWCA 
at  use. 

Tha^illtoDPers  are  all  set 
for  their  "Big  Dance"  on  Fri- 
day, Feb.  22,  at  the  Fox  Hills 
Country  Club. 

Wiley  College  Alumni  Club 
of  L.A.  will  present  its  Schol- 
arship Benefit,  "The  Vogue 
and  Esquire  Revue,"  Sunday, 
Feb.  24.  from  2  to  6  p.m.  at 
Ciro's  on  the  Strip. 

CUFF  STUFF 

Billy  Smith,  son  of  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  William  Smith  of  Willow- 
brook,  celebrated  his  16th 
birthday  by  inviting  a  number 
of  his  friends  to  their  home 
Saturday  past  for  a  REAL 
GRAND  birthday  pawtee.  We 
understand  the  teen-agers  did 
not  want  to  go  home. 

Mom  Marion  Dow  invited 
friends  of  her  cute  little  nine- 
year-old  daughter,  Denise,  to 
help  her  celebrate  her  natal 
day  Sunday,  Feb.  17.  The  love- 
ly party  was  given  at  the 
home  of  Denise's  aunt  and 
uncle,  Evelyn  and  Fred  Grif- 
fin. 

^  man's  reputation  is  a 
tilend  of  what  his  friends, 
enemies,  and  acquaintances 
say  behind  his  back. 


Doll  League 
Plans  Affair 

Emma  Adams'  beautiful 
West  21st  street  home  was  the 
setting  for  the  regular  meet- 
ing of  the  Doll  League  Club 
last  Saturday   evening. 

Members  discussed  details 
of  the  forthcoming  cocktail 
dance  on  May  5  at  the  L.A. 
Breakfast  Club.  Ann  Odom, 
president  of  the  group,  and 
her  committee  are  planning 
one  of  the  season's  gayest  af- 
fairs. 

Following  the  meeting  the 
members  relaxed  and  enjoyed 
a  Spanish  dinner  prepared  by 
the  hostes.'=. 


Zenith  Club 
Slates  Dance 

Argralia  Earle.s.  reporter  for 
the  Zenith  Charity  and  Social 
Club,  and  president  Christabel 
Jacobs,  announced  a  spring 
benefit  dance  to  he  held  at 
the  Elks  auditorium  and  fea- 
turing the  music  of  Earl 
Bostic. 

The  Zeniths  are  expecting 
their  usual  turn-away  crowd 
and  tickets  will  be  on  a  first- 
come  first  serve  basis. 


Costume  Ball 

The  Pacific  Coast  Elks  Lodge 
Na  1350  and  its  members  an- 
nounce a  comical  and  tacky 
costume  ball  on  Saturday, 
March  9,  from  9  p.m.,  at  5180 
West  Adams  blvd. 

The  people  wearing  the 
most  comical  and  tackiest  cos- 
tumes will  receive  cash  prizes, 
first  prize,  $25.00;  second, 
$15.00;  third,  $10.00. 

t 


—  C^<Jv4^/^   j'oundzY  s  Juaxj  — 


fORTY-MNTH  BIRTHDAY— Services  at  Jhe  Wesley  Methodist  church 
concluded  the  activity  of  the  members  of  Alpha  Kappa  Alpha  sorority  in  Lns 
Angeles  who  are  ohseninij  the  forty-ninth  anniversary  of  the  founding  of  the 
orr/anizatinn.  Justifiably  proud  of  the  rich  heritage  they  possess  as  members  of 


the  oldest  and  Inrcicst  Kcgrn  'sorority  are  these  sorors  pictured  above:  Mildred 
Fort;  Louise  Thompson :  Georgin  Payton,  basileus  of  Alpha  Gamma  Omega; 
Mary  King,  j/ir  u'cstern  regional  director;  Rev.  £.  IV.  Rakestraw;  Jessie 
.M cDanicl  and  Bcrniie  Bnrnum. 


AKAS  HOLD  GAY  CELEBRATION 
ON  SORORITY'S  49th  BIRTHDAY 


Last  Friday  night  over  a 
hundred  women  of  Alpha 
Kappa  Alpha  gathered  at  the 
Beverly  Hills  Melody  Lane 
restaurant  for  a  formal 
banquet  celebrating  the  49th 
anniversary  of  the  sorority'."; 
founding.  AKA,  the  oldest  and 
largest  Negro  sorority,  was 
founded  in  1908  at  Howard 
University,  Washington,  D.  C. 

Invocation  was  given  by 
Benzeir  Graham.  "Alpha  Kap- 
pa Alpha,  in  Times  of  Transi- 
tion," the  sorority's  theme  for 
the  year,  was  discussed  by  a 
panel  which  included  Georgia 
Payton,  Althea  S'ms  and  Viv- 
ian Robinson.  Bernice  Wright 
served  as  coordinator.  A  read- 
ing was  given  by  Georgia 
Ridgway. 

Dora  Taylor  led  the  group 
In  the  traditional,  impressive 
re-consecration  ceremony. 
Helen  Maupin,  co-chairman 
of  the  Founders'  Day  observ- 
ance, served  as  mistress  of 
ceremonies. 

On  Sunday  mornin-g,  the 
three  local  chapters  Worship- 
ped together  at  the  Wesley 
Methodist  Church,  of  which 
(he  Rev.  E.  W.  Rakestraw  is 
pastor.  Mary  P.  King,  Far 
Western  Regional  director,  re- 
viewed the  historj'  of  the  .so- 
rority and  some  of  its  local 
achievements.  Jacqueline 
Broussard  sang  a  special  song 
for  the  occasion. 

Playing  prominent  roles  in 
the  local  observance  of  the 
49th  anniversary  of  the  found- 
ing of  Alpha  Kappa  Alpha 
were  the  three  basilei:  Vivi- 
an Crcdillp,  Alpha  Gamma; 
Georgia   Payton,   Alpha  Gam- 


ma Omega,  and  P'loyriia  Ma- 
thias,  Sigma.  (Gwendolyn  Du- 
.suau  was  chairman  of  the 
Founders'   Day   activities,   be- 


ing a.ssisted  by  Helen  Maupin, 
co-chairman,  and  Lowell 
Mosoberry,  Phyllis  Golden, 
Neo.shb    Tatiim,    Dora    Taylor, 


Beverly  Win.ston,  Sue  Bowdan, 
Armenda  Nel.son.  Ruth  Redd 
Paillet,  Thelma  Brazley  and 
Marion  Maddox. 


—      ■rasnlons    j'ii   jor  ^^Ar  ^^2^^^^  — 


Vogue  Art 
Club  Visits 
Art  Studio 

Vogue  Art  Club  members 
are  persuing  a  new  medium 
painting  in  oils.  Great  interest 
has  been  shown  in  the  art 
classes  conducted  by  Danford 

Goldman  Jr.,  who  recently 
closed  his  show  at  Carmel. 
The  lessons  include  field  trips 
to  study  nature  and  its  col- 
ors, visits  to  art  shows  and 
museums  as  well  as  the  les- 
sons in. Mr.  Goldman's  studio. 

Two  of  the  members  of  the 
Vogue  Art  Club,  Mrs.  Emily 
Jackson  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Col- 
lier, wh^  are  students  of 
sculpting  and  ceramics  were 
guests  at  the  home  of  Dr. 
Glen  Lukens-  .when  he  was 
presented  honors  by  the  Hati- 
an  government  for  his  art 
work. 

Another  group  cultural  ac- 
tivity will  be  the  Leontyne 
Price  concert  which  will  be 
attended  by  the  members. 

The  Vogue  Art  Club  is  still 
going  ahead  with  its  phil- 
anthropic deeds.  Members 
voted  to  aid  the  Woodlawn 
'VAVCA  and  the  twenty-eight 
street  YMCA  in  their  drive  for 
funds. 


APPARhL  EXPERT— Joseph  'Chief  Malbr  oui/h.  popular  proprietor  of  M A LBROUGHS 
HOMES  S    HEAR    OUTLET,  -wrt'?   South   Western   Avenue,   at  Exposition   Boulevard,, 

■uns  the  first  In  significantly  salute  Trade  Tc  chnical  Sueethcart  contestant.  Irma- Sue  Smith, 
member  of  Holy  Same  Parish,  tiilh  some  fa shionahle  feminine  attire.  .■>'  7"  Irma,  formerly 
of  \  C7V  Orleans  and  an  ex-modcl.  marveled  at  Malhrouah's  vest  selection  of  stylish  mer- 
chandise at  iuch  "easy'  prucs.  Individual  cits  lomcr  considcrtilvin ,  distinctive  designs  and  per- 
fect filling  garments  liithin  reach  nf  the  most  modest  incomes  haze  uon  for  Malhrough  the 
admiration   style-n-ise   and  economy-minded   customers. 


—    J nrlfilmayt    J  < 


eamwor 


^    J  crrifiic  —  ^ 


Compton  Elks 
Launch  Drive 
For  Building 

Exalted  ruler  Roy  C.  Brooks 
of  the  La  Cienega  Lodge  No. 
1419  of  the  Elks  of  the  World, 
Compton,  Cal.,  announced 
through  his  committee  on 
Ways  and  Means,  headed  by 
David  Scott,  the  presentation 
of  a  1957  Ford  Custom  Ranch 
Wagon  which  will  kick-off  the 
lodge's  building  fund  drive  on 
May  30. 

Elmeree  White,  former  Elks 
beauty  queen,  will  choose  the 
winner  at  a  social  to  be  given 
by  the  lodge  at  the  Rosella's 
Patio,  385  E.  Imperial  High- 
way, from  3  p.m.  and  the  pub- 
lic is  invited. 

The  beautiful  Ford  Ranch 
wagon  will  be  on  display  at 
Piper's  Market  at  103rd  and 
Central  avo.  on  Feb.  23  from 
12  until  3  p.m. 


Woman  of  Year 

Zeta  "Woman  of  the  Year " 
will  be  saluted  on  the  Cloye 
Show  Sunday,  Feb.  24,  over 
radio  station  KFOX,  from  4:45 
p.m.  until  5:45  p.m..  1280  on 
your  dial. 


8-The  California  Eagle 


i!i 


Thursday,  February^l,  1957 


DOT'S  DAfeBES 


hf  DOROTHEA  FOSTER 


This  is  a  fascinating  community  in  wiiich  to  live.' 
Things  happen.  Post-holiday  time  no  longer  signifies; 
a  slower  pace.  Angelen<is  have  so  much  vitality  and 
energy  that  a  so-called  ["social  season"  is  12  months 

RUTH   KENNER,  chairman  of  the  Pacific  Town 
Club  Wives,  receiving  cbngratulations  on   the   very, 
successful  bridge  tournament  held  last  Saturdav  at 
the  Pacific  Town  Club.  Attrac  ive  LEONTYNE  lONG 
is  prexy  of  the  Wives.    V 

Star  Review 

GERTRUDE  PENlAnd  is  putting  the  finishing 
touches  on  the  Wiley  CJ)llege  Alumni  Club's  star  re- 
view  which  will  have  Ciro's  as  the  setting  and  next  ' 
Sunday  afternoon  as  the  date. 

Milady  getting  thosd  pretty  frocks  ready  for  Fri- 
day night  at  the  Fox.  rfills  Country  Club  with  the 
Hilltoppers  as  hostesses. 

Twelve  Links  forgot  all  about  their  calories  when 
they  met  with  BILLIE  MILLER  last  Sunday.  Billie, 
who  is  a  famous  catereks,  really  did  it  up  in  grand 
style  for  the  gals  and  their  hubbies. 

Guests  came  early  and  stayed  late  with  the  Home- 
makers  last  Saturday  ni?ht  at  Victoria  Hall.  Reason 
was  the  girls  were  su  :h  wonderful  hostesses  and 
Peppv  Prince  played  such  delightful  dance  music. 

Medical,  Dental  an  i  >Pharmaceutical  Auxiliary 
met  last  Tuesday  evening;  at  the  Virginia  road  home 
of  DR.  and  MRS.  C.  P.  CARLINE.  Adding  to  the  fun 
of  the  evening  was  entertainment  bv  EDWTNA  FEA- 
RONCE.  MACK  MADISON  and  BETTY  BRYANT. 
BOOTSEY  HOWARD  was  chairman  of  the  program. 

Students  from  Los  i^ngeles  High,  including  per- 
sonable TED  JONES  (ion  of  LENA  HORNE  and 
LOUIS  JONES),  were  in  the  panel  at  the  Human 
Relations  meeting  last.  Wednesday  night  at  Third 
Street  School. 

EDDIE  JACKSON  HENDERSON  (son  of  DR.  and 
MRS.  HERBERT  HENDERSON  of  San  Francisco)  was 
in  town  last  week  competing  in  the  California  figure- 
skating  conjtest  at  the  l^olar  Paface.  Eddie's  coach 
was  ARMANDO  RODRKJUE^  (oh:  \^hat  a  handsome 
lad  he  is!). 

Sick  List 

ON  THE  MEND:  IlETTYE  HOWARD  confined 
to  Queen  of  Angels  Hosoital  (Bettve  worked  like  a 
Trojan  on  the  Winter  Ball).  ERNEST  (Dynamite). 
BENDY  got  quite  a  scar^  on  his  visit  to  Temple  last 
week — but  happv  to  report  that  Ernie  is  okav  now. 
FRED  GRIFFIN  back  on  the  job.  DR.  AUCE 
GARROTT  underwent  an  emergency  appendicitis  op^ 
eration  at  White  Memorial  and  she  is  well  on  the  re- 
covery road.  ELOIS  DAViS  getting  along  pretty  good 
on  one  foot — she  suffered  a  severe  bum  on  the  other 
one.  CLYDE  HOWELL  resting  comfortably  at  home. 
LEON  PERDU's  mom  is  on  the  serious  list.  CHARITY 
WHITE  up  and  around  i^fter  a  seige  with  the  virus. 
JUANITA  MILLER  not  so  lucky  — she's  still  bedded 
down  with  the  virus  and  will  probably  have  to  cele- 
brate her  24th  wedding  anniversarv  (Feb.  21)  with 
LOREN  holding  her  hand  by  the  "bedside.  CALME 
RUSS  back  at  her  desk  ;n  the  Eagle  office  after  her 
pneumonia  attack.  JOHN  COLLINS  (Ivie's  Chicken 
Shack  owner)  doing  fine  after  surgery  at  California 
Hospital. 

Stone  News 

STORK  NUZ:  GEOFFREY  and  CARMEN  HOLD- 
ER (L.  A.'s  CARMEN  DE  LAVALLADE)  so  very  hap- 
pv over  the  birth  of  their  first  son  who  was  bom  An 
New  York  last  Monday.  \^RGINIA  and  BOB  JOHN- 
SON expecting  their  seco  id  heir  almost  any  day  now. 
ANNE  SHAW  looking  so  very  cute  ia  maternity  garb. 
Ditto  NETTIE  LOWE  who  expects  her  second  in  April. 

Must  say  thanks  to  ill  of  you  wonderful  people 
who  were  so  thoughtful  w  th  Valentine  remembrances. 
It  was  a  delightful  surprise.  ^      ' 


Wiley  a. 
Affair 

Wiley  Alumni  Club  mem- 
bers are  boosting  their  great- 
est affairs  of  the  season,  the 
annual  scholarship  show  to 
he  presented  Sunday  after- 
noon, Feb.  24,  at  Ciro's.  The 
time  has  been  set  at  2:30  p.m. 
with  the  fashion  and  floor 
show  at  4  p.m. 

The  newest  in  men's  Spring 
and  Summer  fashion  will  be 


Have  your  club  subscribe  to 
the  Eagle — four  dollars  a  year. 


Clubwoman  to 
Aid  Committee 

Popular  clubwoman,  Mrs. 
Leontyne  King,  is  among  the 
patrons  of  the 
arts  who  have] 
been-  added i 
to  the  spon- 
soring com-J 
mittee  for  the] 
Hope  Foy  e 
concert  to  he' 
held  on  Fri- 
day, March  1, 
at    the    Sec-  ^ 

ond  Baptist  „  _.  "*'" 
Church.  Lend-      Mrs,  King 

ing  support  to  her  efforts  are 
the  Vashtians,  charming 
group  of  college  girls  whom 
she  serves  as  club  advisor. 

For  ticket  reservations,  tele- 
phone ADams  2-6431  or  4-6337, 


'ub  Plans 
tCiro^s 


shown  by  male  models  Bobby 
Greene  and  Phil  Rhoten.  For 
the  ladies,  models  Joyce  Soni- 
er.  Charity  Washington  and 
top  fashion  designer  Johnetta 
Starks,  will  show  the  newest 
creations. 

Performers  Earl  Grant,  Lon 
Fontaine.  Pat  Sides.  Big  Ber- 
tha Henderson,  Arthur  Lee 
Simpkins  and  the  Titans 
will  provide  the  entertain- 
ment. Jeep  Smith's  Band  will 
play  for  dancing. 


PROFICIEN.T  PERSONX EL— Finest  Food  and  popular 
prices  are  but  a  feu,'  of  the  many  good  reasons  why  more  and 
more  choice  customers  (such  as  Harry  Adami,  Jr.,  left)  are 
making  TIIRfFTlMART  .^L^RKETS  their  favorite  shop- 
ping centers.  Thoroughly  trained  by  market  manager.  Minor 
Clark,  right,  at  Thriftimart's  Vermont  and  .Idams  store,  shop- 
pers unanimously  agree  that  efficient,  energetic  employeeSj  such 
as  dynamic  Doris  Jean  Willis,  charming  and  competent  cashier, 
are  chiefly  responsible  for  the  smooth  operation,  harmonious 
atmosphere  and  inter-racial  tranquility  uihich  prevails  at  this 


conveniently  reached  location.  Drive,  ride  or  vi'alk  regularly 
to  one  of  Thriftimart' Markets  in  more  than  forty  important 
areas  everywhere.  Next  time  you  shop,  stop  and  say  "Hello" 
and  grow  to  know  your  friendly  THRIFTIMART  neigh- 
bors. Read  Barbara  Mounts'  "fVhat's  Cooking"  and  learn  how 
easily  YOU  ran  shop,  save  and  cook  the  easy,  inexpensive 
THRIFIMART  way  each  day^  and  consult  your  California 
Eagle  newspaper  every  week  for  unequaled  THRIFTIMART 
bargains. 

—(Adams  Foto  Page). 


ruRS 

19 


UNCALLED  FOR 

CflPES  AND  $ 
STOLES 


50 


UP 


Furs  RMtylad  at  Lms  Than  Half  Prica 

ALASKAN  FUR  CO. 

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C.  MARIE 
HUGHES 

WE.  5-1872 

Fill      MA&  TOOAT 

I    C.    MARIE   HUGHES 
■    2323  Ridfalay  Driva  . 

I    Lei  Angeles  16,  Califernia  I 

I  S«i4  ia  KAIN  1.  nlu»,  Itm  W<X»I 
I  tioti  ahmt  r**KMig  M,  ,1  woM,  Mps,  I 

!^  *'«fci.   <*««e«»ii   .  .   .  N»  cMk  M»« 
MtMMa  »M  (■«.  jnEASt  NHNTJ      ! 

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■  •  » 


1^1,   1957 


to  live. 

signifies 

|lity  and 

months 

ic  Town 
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Irdav  at 
KINl 


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linishing 
Istar  re- 
Ind  next 

I  for  Fri- 
tth   the 

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Home- 
Reason 
|es  and 

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Id  home 
[the  fun 

FEA- 
lYANT. 
rogram. 
fng  per- 
JE  and 
I  Human 

Third 

>R.  and 
:o)  was 

\  figure- 
coach 

Indsome 


[jonfined 

like  a 

lamite) 

[pie  last 

ly  now. 

ALICE 

ntis  op- 

the  re- 

^ty  good 

le  other 

It  home. 

lARITY 

|e  virus. 

bedded 

J  to  cele- 

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:alme 

fter  her 
thicken 
ilifornia 


HOLD- 
^ry  hap- 
fbom  in 

JOHN- 

ly  now. 
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people 
trances.. 


ns 


lis  Bobby 

Iten.  For 

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ton    and 

Johnetta 

newest 

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lig  Ber- 
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II    I    I    I     I 


FRAT  GAGE  SERIES  OPENS  MAR. 16 


UCLA's  high-ranked  basket- 
ball ^eam,  back  on  the  winning 
track  after  a  pair  of  weekend 
victories  over  Stanford.  86-63 
and' 79-61,  heads  for  Eugene, 
Ore..  Thursday  (Feb.  21)  for 
Friday  and  Saturday's  meeting 
with  the  Oregon  Ducks,  Pacific 
Coast  Conference  cellar  dwell- 
ers. 

Dick  Banton,  the  Bruins'  nifty 
guard,  continued  to  lead  his  ] 
team  mates  in  scoring  with  263  i 
points  in  20  games  for  a  13.2  ; 
average  as 'the  season  goes  into  j 
the   tnird-to-last  weekend.  ! 

UCLA   Still   clung   to   second  | 
place  in  the  PCC  race  with  a  : 

9-1    record,    a    single    game    be- 
hind  league-leading  California  ! 
and   the  same  distance  ahead 
■of      Washington,      who      barely 
managed   to  scrarhble  by  Ore-  i 
gon   Saturday    night,   65-63,    in  \ 
an     overtime     after     walloping  : 
them.   84-62.   the    night   before. 

Going  into  this  weekend's  i 
series,  UCLA  boasts  a  .5-3  vie-  j 
tory  edge  over  Oregon  in  com- 
petition that  began  in  1937.  | 
Coach  Johnny  Wooden  has  now  i 
won  four  in  a  row  over  the  I 
Ducks,  including  last  years  ' 
108-89    finale    which    set    all 


kinds  of  conference  and  UCLA 
records. 

Although  Coach  Steve  Seiko's 
Ducks  have  now  lost  their  last 
eight  games  in  a  row,  they 
showed  they  can  be  dangerous 
by  the  last  game  against  Wash- 
ington and  the  Jan.  29  fray  at 

Seattle  when  they  lost  by  one 

point.  64-63. 

UCLA's  record  now  stands  at 
18  wins  and  two  losses  and 
they  must  now  play  six  final 
games  in  a  space  of  12  days 
with  four  of  them  out-of-town- 
ers  and  a  pair  against  Califor- 
nia on  MaT.  1-2  at  Berkeley. 

Coach  Johnny  Wooden  and 
his  squad  are  scheduled  to 
leave  Los  Angeles  Thursday,  at 
12:4.5  p.m.  via  United  Airlines 
Flight  375,  arriving  at  Eugene 
at  6:20  for  a  seven  o'clock 
workout  at  Oregon's  MacArthur 
Court.  They  will  quarter  at  the 
Manor  Motel  until  Sunday 
when  they  fly  to  Los  Angeles 
on  UAL  Flight  38,  leaving  Eu- 
gene at  10:2.5  a.m.,  arriving  at 
International  Airport.  4  p.m. 

UCLA  starters  for  the  week- 
end will  he:  Forwards  Connie 
Burke  and  Jim  Halsten,  Center 
Ben  Rogers  and  Guards  Dick 
Banton  and  Walt  Torrence. 


Billy  Peacock  Rules  10-7  Edge 
Over  Rudy  Garcia  at  Olympic 


Rudy  Garcia,  the  Fightin'^ex-  | 
GL  and  Billy  (Sweetpeat  Pea-  i 
cock,  high  ranking  banty  title; 
contender,  will  clash  in  a  10-  } 
round  off  TV  rematch  tonight,  j 
Thursday,  at  the  Olympis. 

A  companion  10  -  r  o  u  n  d  e  r,  I 
which  will  be  televised,  sends  ] 
Joe  .Abasta.  the  1955  Cn-Prelim-  j 
inary  Fighter  of  the  Year.  ■ 
against  Oakland's  Leonard 
Gaines,  who  boasts  a  1955  draw  ■ 
with  Ralph  Dupas.  I 


Peacock,  who  stopped  Garcia 
in  the  si.xth  round  last  October 
before  a  S21,7,50  house,  is  a  10-7 
favorite  to  make  it  two  in  a 
row  over  the  Mexican. jsTamester. 

Both  will  scale  126  pounds  or 
under. 

Peacock,  if  he  gets  past  Gar- 
cia, will  tr\-  to  get  a  rematch 
with  Larry  Bataan,  \vho  held 
him  to  a  draw. 

Garcia  .'cored  a  decision  over 
Bohbv  Bell  in  his  last  start. 


AIRCRAFT  WORKER  WINS 
TABLE  TENNIS  CROWN 

Mordecai  Carey,  aircraft 
worker  won  the  Burbank  table 
tennis  championship  held  last 
week  at  the  Olive  Street  Re- 
creation Center  in  Burbank. 


Four  Fzat 
Teams  Set 
For  Play 

By    Edw.   "Abie"   Robinson 

The  colorful  and  excjiting  in- 
ter-fraternity basketball  series 
will  open  Saturday,  Mar.  16,  at 
the  spacious  Jefferson  high 
school  gym,  at  40th  and  Hoop- 
er Ave. 

Last  year  the  Kappas  cap- 
tured the  series  with  a  sparkl- 
ing five  and  one  record  but 
were  upset  in  the  playoff  game 
by  the  scrappy  Sigmas  who 
finis!. ed  the  season  with  a  3 
and  3  record.  The  four  teams 
have  been  prepping  for  several 
weeks,  according  to  a  spokes- 
man. 

Each  year  the  series  games 
take  on  new  interest  and  fans 
are  urge^  to  avail  themselves 
of  the  money  saving  season 
book  which  permits  holders  to 
all  seven  of  the  games  for  the 
terrific  low  fee  '^f  S.5.00. 

The  1957  schedule  is  as  fol- 
lows: Sat.  March  16,  Omega  vs 
Sigma  and  Kappa  vs  Alpha: 
Sat.  Mar.  23.  Alpha  vs  Sigma 
and  Kappa  vs  Omega,  Sat.  Mar. 
30  Omega  vs  Alpha  and  Kappa 
vs  Sigma.  Sat.  April  6,  Sigma 
vs  Omega  and  Alpha  vs  Kappa. 
Sat.  April  13,  Sigma  vs  Alpha 
and  Kappa  vs  Omega.  Sat. 
April  21.  Sigma  vs  Kappa  and 
Omega  vs  Alpha. 

The  plavoff  game  is  set  for 
April  28. 

Charles  Martin,  president  of 
the  Inter-Fraternity  Council 
which  promotes  the  yearly  ser- 
ies announced  that  the  four 
teams  will  be  stronger  than 
last  year  and  that  a  flock  of 
new  faces  will  make  their  de- 
but. A  crop  of  stars  from  Ne- 
gro colleges  is  expected  to  pro- 
vide strength  for  Sigmas  and 
Omegas,  while  the  Kappas  and 
Alphas  are  reported  to  be  at- 
tracting players  from  most  of 
the  west-coast  cblleges. 


Carey  defeated  the  defending 
champion  S.  Brown  in  three 
straight  ga.nes,  21-17,  21-18  and 
2119. 

In  the  semi-finals  Brown  up- 
set J.  Decker  who  in   the  first 


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On  All  Major  Tracks 

GREYHOUND  RACING 
RESUMES  IN  SPRING 


JOHN  S.  ALESSIO 

lx*«u*iv*    Oiractar 


:  round  defeated  R.  Scott,  the  Pa- 
cific Coast  class  "A"  champion. 

,  Decker  also  defeated  Eugene 
Wilson  the  number  two  man  in 

1  the   Pacific  coast   ratings. 

!  In  the  other  semi-final  match 
Carey  defeated  Sylvester  Bell. 
Brown  and  Decker  defeated 
Carey     and     Wilson     in     the 

I  doubles. 

I  Carey  will  defend  his  newly 
won  crown  in  the  Inglewood 
tournament  this  Saturday  and 
Sunday  at  the  Inglewood  rec- 
reation center.  Some  -^f  the 
city's  top  players  will  vie  for 
honors. 


Calvary  Cage 
Team  Leading 

The  Calvary  Baptist  Church's 
basketball  team  was  awarded 
the   church's   perpetual   trophy 

'[  for   winning   the   league's   title 

I  for  the  three  years  in  a  row. 

!  Currently  enjoying  a  unde- 
feated season  and  riding  high, 
wide  and  handsome  in  the 
YMCA  Adult  Church  Basketball 
League,  Calvary  has  won  every 

:  game  to  lead  the  league. 

Members  of  the  squad   are: 
I  Jessie  Satterfield,  captain;  Lar- 
ry   Neal,    guard;    Ernie    Neal, 
j  guard:  Edward  Younger,  guard; 
John    Brown,    forward;     Frank 
'  Smith,   forward;   David   Wilder, 
Jr.,    forv/ard;    and    Joe    Stroop, 
center. 


Canadian  Boxer 
At  Legion  Sat. 

Armand    Savoie,    the    former 
Canadian  lightweight  and  wel- 
terweight champion  who  boxes 
Lauro  Salas  Saturday  night  at 
I  Hollywood  Legion,  held  his  first 
i  local  sparring  drill   last  week 
j  at  Main  Street  Gym. 

'  Manager  Willie  Ketchunj  has 
boxing  preps  lined  up  for  the 
27-year-old  French  Canadian  up 

to  Thursday. 


A  club's  be.st  investment  is 
a  year's  subscription  to  the 
California  Eagle.  Cost — $4. 


Medical  Team 
Leading  Loop 

The  Medical  Pharmacy  bas- 
ketball team  is  leading  the  AAU 
loop  with  a  nifty  four  wins  and 
one  loss  record. 

Paced  by  such  stars  as  Algln 
Sutton,  Chas.  Young,  Billy 
Smith,  Frank  Simmons.  Chas. 
Hill,  Dallas  Perkins  and  Lor- 
enzo Dunlap  round  out  a  neat 
defensive  and  offensive  unit 
and  the  great  all  around  team 
play  is  making  the  Medical 
team  one  of  the  league's  power- 
houses. 


Your  suits 

get  a 
'like  new'/ 
look  at . . . 


(Z.S- '-  ^Ipl"-  ^' 


ers^icfi 


CALIFORNIA  EAGLE 

WANT  ADS 


AD.  4-0161 


DIADIINE  WED.  AT  1 1   A.M. 


\      jO^  You'll  appreciate  the  difference  when  you 

Y^H  send  your  suits  to  us  for  expert  cleaning 

>|^B  service.  They'll  come  back  every 

^^^H  time,  "bandbox"  clean  and  fresh. 

^^^^H  You  II    like   our   modest   prices. 

^^^^^B  for  Free,  Fast  Oe/ivery  cal/  C.B.'s 


ALPHA  SERVICE 

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BAH    BONDS    FREE 

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909  East  6th  Street 


MU.  5500 


Thursday,  February  21,  1957 


The  California  Eagle— 9 


k_ 


J  H  h.  If  lS\hR — Chninpi'rn  I  sfu/ih  Bruncr,  c  tnti  r.  .i/iiTi.f  hoii'  he  uoit  the  juni'ir  /In-ifion 
city-uide  mnrblrs' title  nt  thr  Snliirdny,  Fehrunr\  16,  fnin/f  itmjed'  nt  Queen  Anne  Piny- 
(irnund.  1240  If  est  hnuhinrd.  lihen  he  defeated  14-yenr-^ld  Rilly  Ilendi  r>on.  right.  Ralph 
Borrelli,  left,  director  of  special  etcnts  in  the  L  o.r  Antjelcs  City  Rrereeition  and  Pnrk  Drpnrt- 
mrnt,  presented  trnphief  to  the  ■H'lnnrr  nnd  ru  nner-up.  Bruner.  7.i,  zcho  roidr.r  at  ll^^y,  ,11', 
22nd  street,  represented  Tohrrinnn  Plnyorrjttnd .  Henderson,  11741  Allen  street.  Culler  City, 
tins  entered  frnm  Mnr  I  istn  Gardens  Pln\(jrn  und. 


SANTA  ANITA  — One  of  the 
truly  great  international  spec- 
tacles will  he  the  running  of 
the  Santa  Anita  Handicap  this 
Saturday,  with  $100,000  guar- 
anteed to  the  winner,  S20,00fl 
for  second.  $10.00  for  third,  and 
$5000  for  fourth. 

An  outstanding  field  of  15  or 
more  out  of  the  192  nominated 
last  Dec.  1  seem  assured  to  go 
to  the  post  in  the  golden  gaUop 
for  fame  and  fortune  over  the 
classic  distance  of  lU  miles. 

The  largest  attendance  of  the 

season  is  e.xpected  and  gates 
will  open  a  half  hour  earlier 
and  post  time  will  be  12:30  for 
the  first  race. 

This  writer  picks  HONEY'S 
ALIBI  as  first:    HOLANDES  II, 

i  .second:  PORTERHOUSE,  third. 
If  mud  comes  up,  look  out  for 
SPINNER".    CORN    HUSKER    or 

■BATTLE  DA.XCE.  Holandes  11 
is  the  Future  book  favorite  at 
Caliente. 


$52,002  last  Sunday  was 
shelred  among  13  lucky  ticket- 
holders.  Each  tabbed  five  of  the 
six  possible  winners.ywhich  was 
worth  $3600. 


U 

MA 
H 


Horses  to  watch: 
Caliente 

10MAN— From  Edsworth  Stable, 


El. 


MV 
KE 
CAI 


fit. 

ROMAN — Alio   from   the   same 
stable. 

LIPOLIS     KIN  — Get    yours    oq 
:his  one. 

SWEETIE   PIE— Fit  at  a  fiddle 
tRlA — This   one  can    run. 
IFORNIAN  —  Coming     back     to 

leif,  tab. 


ALU 
IM 


PU 
Wl 


SI 
PIE 


LV 


I  umi 


CALIENTE  — Caliente's   Five- 
Ten  Handicapping  Contest  pool 


Viceroy  has  ihe 
thesf  taste  of 


Santa  Anita 

SHE   WROTE— Watch   out,   fit 
low. 

EM  —  Fast   works,  tab  for   ac- 
tion. 

BLO — My    Special. 
DY     ADMIRAL  —  In    smart 
lands. 

DOUBLE    JUSTICE— Watch    out,    a 
tieeper. 
ER    SANDAL— At   a    price. 
MASTER  —  From     a     winning 
itable."!  , 

BLAZING     H.OME    —    My     long-shSt 
kpecial. 

Special  notice:   Keep  this  col- 
for  future  reference;  it  will 
appear   only   in   the   California 
Ea{:le. 


all! 


Only  Viceroy 

takes  the 

3  steps 

that^lead  to 
smoother 
smoking! 


JL,Stnoofhf 

From  the  finest  tobacco  grown, 
Vicaoy  selects  only  the  Smooth 
Flavor  Leaf.  No  other  will  dol 


2.BiftQQnoe)thf       SQ//L^QfXx^/ 


Each  Smooth  Flavor  Leaf  it  specially 
Deep<:wedL  goUeo  hwwii  thio«ih 
sod  (hioo0i»  for* 


Only  Vioeioy 


Hmx^'m/HOpun 


smooths  «adi  fwff 

nideBoiD|Wfe 


f 


GINGER'  SMOCK  HONORED  AT  RUB AIYAT 


10— The  California   Eagle 


Thursday,   February  21,    1957 


DOOTSIE  WILLIAMS  —  Be- 
cause wifie  is  the  best  person  he 
knows  and  helped  him  build 
one  of  the  city's  top  record  com- 
panies, he's  building  her  a  $45,- 
000  ranch  type  home  atop  the 
highest  pealt  at  136th  and  ] 
Broadway,  electrically  equipped  | 
with  an  eye-beam  so  the  garage 
door  Will  swing  open  a  half 
block  away  so  she  won't  have 
trouble  parkijig  her  sleek  El 
Dorado! 

BIG  BEN  —  The  hefty,  dapper 
dresser  is  gripped  with  the  jit-  '■ 
ters  since  the  gal  with  whom  he  ■ 
staged  that  pier  six  brawl  in  | 
a  westside  after  hour  spot  the  | 
other  a.  m.  had  her  lawyer  serve  | 
him  papers:  i 

ILLINOIS  —  The  gabby  horse  | 
operator  is  sporting  fresh  battle  , 
scars  after  mixing  with  a  chick,  i 
that  threw  left  hooks  with  the  \ 
skill  of  Ray  (Sugart  Robinson',  i 

ALFBETTA  ZETAR  —  Friends  j 
are  raving  over  her  new  View-  i 
park  home  and  the  cause  of  the 
biggest    buz    among    her    ofay 
neighbors    is    the    two    fla.shy  i 
wheels  the  couple  drive  daily! 

CHURCH  FOLKS— A  70  year- 
old  respected  eastside  minister 
was  relieved  of  his  pulpit  after 


35  years  without  a  penny's  pen- 


"  TORRID  TERRI"  .  .  .  h 
the  nnuest  excitfment  to  hit 
the  Angel  City.  The  versatile 
French  -  speaking  Canadian 
adds  her  snng  and  dance  act 
as  the  stnr-perforwer  at'  one 
of  the  city's  plush  niteries. 
Her  blonde  tresses  happen  to 
be  just  one  of  her  many 
"assets"  ,  .  .  but  then  you  can 
see.'.' 


sion,  loyal  members  are  up  In 
arms  over  the  manner  the 
board  went  about  ousting  him 
while  he  lay  sick  In  bed. 

ANIMAL,  HUH?  That  "Doc" 
who  up  and  fired  his  gal  Friday 
because  she  announced  wed- 
ding plans.  Being  married  she 
thought  he'd  be  the  last  to  kick 
up  a  fuss  cause  another  man 
wanted  to  make  an  honest 
woman  of  her  .  .  .  but  he  did! 

MAXINE  HEFFLIN  — As  pre- 
dicted in  this  pillar  recently 
she  is  now  Mrs.! 

OIL  —  Those  excited  home 
owners  being  carried  away  with 
dreams  of  wealth  from  under 
the  earth,  had  better  check  the 
history  of  the,  area.  They'll  dis- 
cover oil  wells  once  stood  where 
houses  now  stand  and  the  Ml 
boom  started  soon  after  old  m^n 
Sutter  reached' down  into  t^e 
Sacramento  River  and  came  up 
with  a  hunk  of  gold! 

HARRISON  &  ROSS  —  By- 
stander observing  one  of  the 
many  pink  motorcade  funeral 
trips,  remarked  "what  a  pretty 
way  to  roll  out  of  this  world!" 

TORRID  LOVE  —  Window 
peepers  are  getting  a  real  show 
from  an  executive  looking  ofay 
and  a  pretty  brownskin  house- 
wife, the  wrap,  rock  and  roll 
action  is  a  scream! 

H.  N.  YARBROUGH  —  Prom- 
inent real  estate  broker  is  off  to 
New  Orleans  with  Albert  Bring- 
ier  mixing  business  and  pleas- 
ure while  motoring! 

AGNES  PARKS  —  She's  the 
five-foot  coffee  cream  brown 
that  attracts  your  attention 
when  you  look  into  the  window 
o#ithe  Novelty  Record  Shop  in 
the  52(^  block  on  W.  Adams, 
owned  by  Sonny  Howard.  Drop 
in  and  dig  the  latest  hits. 

HARRY  BELAFONTE— Ring- 
siding  at  the  Coconut  Grove 
and  catching  the  superb  artist 
recently  was  Sgt.  Tom  Brad- 
ley entertaining  his  wife 
Ethel  on  her  birthday.  Also  en- 
joying the  festivities  were  Mag- 
gie Arnold  and  Fred  Pitts  and 
his  Mrs.! 

YOUNG^LOVE— Westside  so- 
cialites are  giving  Alexander 
Graham  Bell's  instrument  a 
wjorkout  concerning  the  young 
love  in  an  old  married  sister's 
life.  Seems  like  she  arranged 
a  nice  vacation  for  her  hubby 
while     she     loves     and     lives 

NEW  SHORTS  —  Ben  Waller 
is  sporting  a  '57  New  Yorker, 
while  George  Hays,  noted  phar- 
macist out  in  South  Los  Ange- 
les is  piloting  a  gun  metal 
Thunderbird.  Pretty  Emma 
Adams  wheels  a  sleek  black 
'57  Coupe  de  Ville.  School 
teacher  Norma  Roberts  push- 
buttons her  way  through  traf- 
fic in  a  '57  Chrysler  South- 
hampton. Dr.  Jeff  Fowler  finds 
little  trouble  on  the  freeway 
with  his  '57  caddie,  and  Jimmy 
Jackson's  hardtop  '57  Lincoln 
Capri  rounds  out  the  roll  on 
.some  pretty  fancy  buggies! 


-ENJOY  THt  FINEST- 

•  Cocktiils-  *  Fun  and  Frolic 

•  Intartainmcnt  *  Horn*  Ceekad  Maak 


B.rfK.nn.,,    MILOMO 

29th  &  WESTERN      RE.   5-9585 


Everybody's  Talking  About 

BARRY  BAINES' 

*  Choice  Cocktails 

—  and  — 

*  Delicious  Dinners 

at   Adams   A   Cranihaw's 
Favorila  "Ge-Plac«" 

—  —  torn    YOUt    INTIKTAINMINT    FlIASUtI—  —  - 

NAT  WILLIAMS,  Singsational  Pianis}  i 

2636  Crenshaw 

RE.  1-5871 


BARRY'S 


PUnty  of  ff  Parking 


"PRAISE  HOUSE"— A,  new  play  by  Charles  O'Neal  to  play 
the  Huntington  Hartford  Theatre,  Hollywood,  for  2  weeks 
before  opening  in  Xew  York  City  in  A pril.  Producer  is  Hunt- 
ington Hartford.  "Praise  House"  previews  in  Sun  Francisco^ 
Bay  area  this  weekend,  prior  to  its  Hollywood  and  Vine  stay 
next  month.  , 


ON  BROADfVAY  —  Robin  Robinson,  newest  west-coast 
singing  idol,  hit  the  great  White  Way  after  a  "singsational" 
cross-country  tour.  Hr  opens  Friday  in  New  York's  fabulous 
Paramount  Theater.  The  Antler  recording  artist,  with  two 
hits,  "I  Promise  You"  and  "Gypsy  In  My  Soul,"  clicking 
all  over  the  nation,  is  set  for 'a  smash  opening  night. 


'rawtord . 


SOUNDTRACK 


CHAZZ'S  CtRL  FRIDAY  "SITS  DT  (or  Notes  of  «n  lanocent 

Bar-Stander's  Leg  Girl!): 

Dear  Mr.  C:  Here's  giving  yob  a  chance  to  rest  up  <hi  your 
"laurels"  in  your  moment  of  indecision.  Mebbe  you'll  takp  to  thie 
air  for  the  Las  Vegas  story  on  Bdlafonte,  or  maybe  you'll  sur 
render,  to  the   rash   of  sassiety ' 
events  over  the  weekend.  Easy 
does  it,  boy;  ... 

A  couple  of  somewhat  anony- 
mous folks  called  to  say  your 
last  week's  piece  announcing 
the  rumor  that  the  Praise  House 
play  is  somewhat  anti-bellum 
or  Uncle  Tomish  is  just  that 
(merely  a  rumor)  ...  At  any 
rate  the  cast  planed  out  Wed- 
nesday morn  for  their  Sunday 
night  in  Frisco  .  .  .  Actor 
NAPOLEON  WHI-nNG  who  has 
a  prominent  part  in  the  show 
phoned  to  say  it's  a  religious 
play  that's  up  to  date  and  mod- 
ern and  the  locale  is  a  small 
place  in  the  south.  Say's  the 
singing    is    beautiful    and    the 

acting  is  gorgeous,  but  D d 

if  the  man  would  say  what's 
the  deal  with  the  plot!  .  .  .  Say, 
Mister   scribbler,    do   Pasadena 


society  people  know  their  own 
CONSTANCE    WASHINGTON 

(now  an  Eastsidcr)  tip-toed  off 
to  Mexico  the  other  week  and 
married  her  Mr.  Clav.  Remem- 


b»r  it  was  columns  ago  that 
you  whispered  they  were  closer 
than  Gaffers  to  Sattler?  .  ,  . 
And  your  boy  WALTER  OGLES 
will  no  doubt  have  told  it  to 
a  parson  before  the  ink  is  dry 
oil  this  paragraph.  Dunno  the 
doll's  name,  but  I  understand 
she's  a  real  beaut!  .  .  .  There's' 
ail  aspiring  young  singer  try- 
irg  to  reach  you.  Want'k  you  to 
hiindfe  his  publicity  and  pro- 
motion. Told  him  you  had  ■ 
't  irned  your  back'  on  that  sort 
of  thing  but  the  chap  is  quite 
insistent.  Says  he  has  heard 
you  have  some  nice  contacts 
and  can  really  "swing"  .  .  . 
and  heresithe  punch  line:  His 
name  is  JOE  WILUAMSi  .  .  . 
Well  sir,  thje  lad  and  I  had  quite 
a  giggle  over  that  one.  I  even 
si|ggested  he  thange  his  name 
to!  MARIO  LANZA  to  avoid  con< 
fukion.  He  says  he's  better  look* 
\rve  than  the  bigtime  Joe  but 
he^agreed  that  Basle's  boy  can 
sing  mosb  of  the  song  crowd 
inro  bad  health. 


Ginger  Smock 
To  Celebrate 
Non..  Feb.  25 


Emma  'Ginger*  Smock,  often 
tagged  "Class  with  talented 
fingers,"  will  celebrate  her  first 
year  at  the  Riibaiyat  Room, 
Monday  night,  Feb.  25th.  Man- 
ager Von  Wertz  is  planning  a 
big  celebration  for  'Ginger'  who 
has  established  herself  as  one 
of  the  all-time  favorites  with 
William  'Bill'  Watklns'  Rubai- 
yat  cu.«!tomers. 

Many  guests,  artists  and 
friends  of  Miss  Smock  have 
promised  to  be  on  hand  for  the 
big  celebration.  The  entire  pub- 
lic is  invited  to  come  and  share 
in  the  fun  and  merriment  Mon- 
day night,  Feb.  25th. 


GOURMET  GUIDE 

Recommendations  for    Dining  and  Wining 


Troubadour 
To  Perform 
1  Nite  Only 

By  JAN  EDWARDS 
(California  Eagle  Music  Editor) 

Nina  Dova,  folk  singer  and 
skilled  guitarist,  has  been  ac- 
claimed by  ea.stern  critics  as 
"the  most  Individual"  "the 
very  finest,"  and  'really  some- 
thing special." 

We  are  happy  that  she  Is  go- 
ing to  perform  ijfi  Los  Angeles. 
An   artist  who  can   draw  such 


G/en  fAcMann  invites  you  to  often  d  the  Strip's  most  picturesqu*  room 
CONTINUOUS  SHOW  AND  ENTERTAINMENT  NIGHTLY 


''The  Voice  Wifh  a  Smile" 


INTERLUDE  ROOM 


BR.  2-5028 


8568  SUNSET  BLVD. 


-G/an  McMann  (fornfr  Owner  of  tho  Turban  Room)  Managor- 


NOW  PLATING 


NO  COVER  -  NO  AOMISSIOI 


JIMMY  GIU 

•r.     Nermaiirfi*'   TIFFANY    C 


S    SPORTSMEN'S 
CLUB 

Rcnifatveuf  of  Cen>*nr«d  Ckicfct— 
Whara  Good  Sports  Mmmt 

2851    CRENSHAW  at  29th  St. 

FINEST  DRINKS 

CRISP  CHICKENS 

CHARCOAL  STEAKS 


I 


unqualified   praise   must   have 
something. 

Single  Show 

Nina  Dova  will  appear  on 
Impressario  Mary  Bran's  artist 
series  Sunday,  March  3,'  8:30 
p.m.  at  the  Wilshire  Ebell  The- 
atre. 

Looking  over  the  program,  we 
see  that,  beside  folk  songs  and 
ballads,  there  will  be  nonsense 
songs  from  Offenbach's  Operet- 
tas and  novelty  songs  from  the 
West  Indies  which  Miss  Dova 
learned,  on  the  spot,  from  na- 
tive teachers. 

T'is  said  this  beautiful  trou- 
bad  our  wears  magnificent 
gowns,  that  some  of  her  songs 
are  veddy,  veddy  sophisticated- 
and  that  each  number  is  pre- 
faced with  an  amusing  explan- 
ation. 


'FA$TE$T  $ELLiNG  BUICK  DEALER  IN  $OUTHERN  CALIFORNIA 

COLONIAL  BUICK 

•Offers  a  Brand  New  1957  Buick  2-Ooor  for 

$<i  A<^  ^«..-.  ^  it  1^21 


199  DOWN*  16 


PER  WEEK 


'^$AVE  HUNDRED$  ON  YOUR  TRADE-IN 
if  GRiATE$T  $TOCK  TO  CHOO$E  FROM 
ic  36  MONTH$  OF  EA$Y  FINANCING 
if  FAIR  &  FAMOU$  G.M.A.C.  RATE$ 
ir  FABULOU$  $iRVICI  DEPARTMENT 


i Drive  N^rth  to  Los  Felix  Blvd.  .  . 
East  on^Los  Felix  to  Glendole  Ave. . .  .\ 
Then   North  to  COLONIAL  BUiCK  ati 
144  So.  Glendole  Ave.  Glendole. 


FREE  APPRAISAL        call  couNr  carhr       CH.  5-661 1 


COLONIAL  BinCK 


144  So.  Glendal«  Ave. 

IN  GLENDALE 


HUNTINGTON  HARTFORD  THEATRE  'Slfiy^JJ-  i 

2  WEEKS  Only  Beg.  MON.,  MAR.  4  oX^Jir.s 
Pifi0i  TO  nS  9tt04BWi9  HiCMCeMeHTnt 

pmsants 

mmmm 

A  MCW  P\J»  BY 

CHARLES  O'NEAL 

sUrring 

LOUISE  BEAVERS 


PAUL- RHODES  •PARRISB-GOniY 


_>.ftYKMIKF._.CAMPBEt  w. DORIS AKEB 

FOR  SPECIAL  RATES  FOR  CLUBS  AND  ORGANIZATIONS  CALL 
HO.  2-6668.  EVES.  MON.  thru  THURS. :  Orch.  $4.40;  Mezz.  $4.40, 
3.8S;  Bale.  $3.30,  2.75,  2.20,  1.65.  EVES.  FRI.  4.  SAT.:  Orch.  $4.95; 
Mezz.  $4.95,  4.40;  Bale.  $3.85,  3.3q,  2.75,  2.20;  MATINEES  WED.  A. 
SAT.:  Orch.  $3.85;  Mezz.  $3.85,  3.30;  Bale.  $2.75,  2.20,  1.65.  1.10. 
Tax    Incl.    End.   (tamped,    addressed   envelope  for   mail    order   return. 


PRE  "3 

.UB-DU.  2-5206^ 


Patronize  Eogla 


'|^«'*M^^Men«|^p«eMi^^»eeMi^|W»M^ 


LE  CARIBE 


OPEN  5  P.M. 
THURSDAY,  FRIDAY, 

L.  D.  REED,  Bdrtender 


CompU 
POT   LUCK   MEAL 
Personally  Coefcecf 
by  "Dynamite" 


SIR  CHARLES 
THOMPSON 

Piano  &  Organ 
Stylist 


When  Sparfs. 
men  and  their 
wemea  Iriends 
meet   t*  cat   .  . 


DYNAMITE  JACKSON'S 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

Finest  Food    •    DelighHul  Drinks 
Open  Evory  Day:  10  A.M.  to  2  A.M. 

4701  S.  CENTRAL      AD.  2-5918 


CREAM  OF  THE  CROP 

Wat  enjoyed^  '88'  Great 
Dorothy  Donegan  each  day 
during  her^  brief  stay  out 
West  way  at  friendly 

MACEO  BIRCH'S 

CURRIES  ICE  CREAM 

and  SWEET  SHOP 

27TH  &  WESTERN 


AVAILABLE  FOR 
on  MONDAY,  TUESDAY 


BLUE  ROOM,  Cocktail 

•   TURdUOISE 


"Horn*  of  Sonday 

WI   tPICIAllZI   IN 
lHOMI  or   WOMEN'S  SUNDAt 


Advertisers 


LOUNGE 


to  2  A.M. 

and  SUNDAY 


SATURDAY 


mVATE  PARTIES 
and  WEDNESDAY 


and  GRILL 

ROOM  for  DINING 
Morning  Breakfast  Club" 

H^fftltS   AND   tANOUnS 

MOKNINO  MIAKrAST  ClUi 


Clark  Ho^el  &  Annex  * 


rARTY    AND   tANOUIT   SPICIALIStl 
1  §16-1826     SO^TH    CENTKAl     A  VENUS 

SIvd.  and  Central  Avaava 
act   9-5157 


Comer  of  Washingt< 
PRO 


I  Big   Anniversary   Party  I 

Men.,  rcb.   2$)  far  Glaaer  S«M<k     1 
Public   Invited  | 


HOTEL  WaTKINS 
and  RUBAIYJIM  ROOM 

|FOOD   •   FUN   •   COCKTAILk  •   MEflniigg| 
'         Featuring ' 


GINGER  SMOCK 


TRAVIS   WARREN 


VIOLINIST  PIANO-ORGANIST  ^^ 

During  the  New  Year  M  pays  to  visit 


•     -  -  — "       -  —  —  -      ■■!    fv^oj-^     •««     ve«ea 

HOTEL  WfiTKINS 

ADAMS  C  WESTERN         •],        RE.  2-811I 


\yf.  BILL 

*^^^     WATKINS' 


r        DRINKS       J 


36th  PI.  &  Western 


TOWN 
TAVERN 


O  Mcomparabfe 

FINES7^^ 
We$ierVat^~PC 


r 


.CK 


Innocent 

jip  on  your 
ike  to  the 
y^ou'll  sur- 

ago  that 
yeie  closer 
kjer?  .  .  . 
SB  OGLES 

ftold   it  to 
pnk  is  dry 
J)unno  the 
Jnderstand 
.  There's 
finger  try- 
ifs  you  to 
and   pro- 
I  you     had 
that  sort 
is  quite 
|ias    heard 
contacis 
Png"    .    .   . 
line:  His 
IMSI  .  .  . 
{  had  quite 
ne.  I  even 
his  name 
pivoid  con« 
etter  look- 
Joe  but 
boy  can 
ng  crowd 


3f 


iE 

lOAY 

> 

ES 

AY 

1 
1 

NINC 
lb" 

> 

r  ciut 

lex 

1 
> 

'»■• 

^ 

.V 


^ 


\ 


PI. 


^ 


n 


CALIFORNIA 

EAGLE 


WANT 


DEADLINE:  WEDNESDAY  AT  11  A.M. 


SAVE  TIME 
SAVE  MONEY 


-  DiADUNi  - 
WED.  AT  11  AM, 


Thursday,   February   21,    1957 


The  California  Eagle— 1 1 


No. 

1 

-._  12 
_  13 
_  U 


CLASSIFIED  AD  INDEX 

f^W  CUMJficatiens  Ar*   Numbered 
and  Appaar  in  Numerical  Order 

ClaMitication 

Ltgals    ■    - - .- 

8ltuitlon»    Wanted— Femile 

Help   Wanted— Female    

Situations  Wanted— Male  _... 

Help  Wanted^— Male   _ 15 

Employment  Preparation 16 

Employment  Agenctee 17 

Wanted   to    Rent    IS 

Roemi — Furnished    19 

Hotels  19a 

Rooms — Uofurnrshed     20 

Rooms — Housekeeping   _ _...  21 

Rooms  a.   Board    21a 

Apartments — Furnished     „.« 22 

Apartments— Unfurnished    23 

House* — Furnished    24 

Houses — Ulfurnlshed    _ _  25 

Business   Rentals   _ 26 

Agencies — Rentals    _ 27 

Money  to   Loan     .1 28 

Mortgages  A  Trust  Deeds  29 

Business  Opportunities  30 

Personal    Service*   _ _ 46 

Services   — _ - 47 

Child    Care   48. 

Rug    Cleaning    49.. 

Expert   Dental    Care    _  50 

Autoe— Used     - ~ —  51 

Auto    Repairs    52 

Real    Estate    Loans   _ 95 

Income  Property  for  Sale  96 

Income  Property  tor   Lease  96a 

Business  Property  tor  Sale  _ _  96b 

Property    Loans    96c 

Property    Improvements   97 

Real  Estate  Wanted  98 

Real   Estate  for  Sale 99 

Display  Real   Estate    _ 1CC 

Display    Property    Rentals  101 

LEGAL  NOTICES 

NOTICE     OF     HEARING    OF 

PETITION     FOR    PROBATE 

OF    WILL 

\o.  r.,S64J.". 
In  'h<»  ^^upeti'T  1  \iur-  of  rile  .^t^f^' 
cf  C'aiitnr.iia.  'n  a:iM  for  iIip  Count.s- 
pf  l,o«  An^fl^s  In  ih<"  .Mhm^t  hi  i1i» 
L>taTe  of  .\.\ME  l[;t;.\i;  HILL 
IV.  »»a.«ed. 

.\Olne      is      (»■'■>(.>■      ;;:\fn      rha'      Ih^ 

peirion     of     IMwarH     Thnnii'M'ti     for 

thp  Probate  n(  tiie  U  lii  of  inr  ahn\..- 

named  deceased  and  for  the  issuanre 

pf    Lrtt»rs     of     .Artmini>tration     U";th 

The    Will    A'lne.Ted     thereon     to    The 

Petitioner      lo      wtii'h      r*^ferprii'e      i.< 

hereby    mad**    f^^r   further    parr u.-ular.o 

wiil    be    heard    ar    9  15    orlo<~k    a.m.. 

cn  .Marrh  11.   195T.  at   tlif  rotirt   room 

nf    Deparrmon'     5.     iif    iht-    .<iir>.Tior 

Court    of   ihe   .-;taie   pf   California,    iii 

and  for  the  I'ountv   of    l.o..*   .Xntr-ies. 

H.ARULD    J     OSTLV. 

County   Clrrk   ar.'l   Clerk 

of  the  Superior  t'ourt  of 

the   State   of   California. 

in    and    for    the    County 

■    of  Ijis   Angele^i. 

By     A.     DUGALLY. 
Deputy 
D^ted    rehru->r'     •'      1957 
Thomas   G,    Neusam. 
1111    East   Vernon    Avenue. 
Los   Angeles,   California, 
AD.   2-6U9.  K 

Attorney    for    Petitioner 
Publi«h    11 

CALIFORNIA     &ACLE 
heb.    21-28.    Mar.    f 


IS-HEIP  WANTED-MALE 


SINGERS 
NEEDED 

Auditions  for  Male  Singers 

Will  Be  Held  at 

2112  West  27th  Street 

Saturday  from 

1 1:00  a.m.  until  2:00  p.m. 

Professional  Singers 

Also  Needed  for 

Recordings 

PHONE  RE.  2-7521 

or  RE.   1-7904 


22-FURNISHED  APARTMENT 

FURN.  APT.  TO  SHARE 

Neat,  responsible  single  m.an  to 
share  2  bedroom  apartment, 
have  privileges,  convenient. 
Cal  lafter  4  p.m.  Thurs.  and 
Fri.,  weekend  any  time.  RE 
1-8171. 


2S-UNFURNISHE0    HOUSES 


12 


WEEK 


Help  Wanted 

Master  Barber.  Good  business. 
See  Sampson.  1924  Lincoln 
Blvd.,  Santa  Monica. 


17-EMPlOYMENT  AGENCIES 


ROYALTY 

EMPLOYMENT 

AGENCY 

"25  YEARS  OF  SERVICE" 

1714  West  Jefferson  Blvd. 
RE.    1-4529  RE.   3-3930 

HELP  WANTED:  Women,  cooks 
and  general.  Home  nights,  35 

!  to  50.  Stay  $200  per  month  & 
up.  Dishwashers,  hotel  maids, 
waitresses  and  cooks,  salaries 
open.   MEN:   Cooks,   dishwash- 

1  ©rs,  fry  cooks. 

Top    salaried    posi- 


•    BRAND   NEV/ 

APARTMENTS 

•  COMPLETELY  i 
FURNISHED 

•  MODERNISTIC 
BRICK  COURTS 

•  3  LOVELY  ROOMS 


65 


MONTH 


MOVE  IN  TODAY 


"Never  occupied."  Single.  New 
furniture. 


37 


50 

MONTH 


1    Bedroom.   V/est.   Child   O.K. 


45 


MONTH 


1    bedrm.    Adams- Vermont.    2 
kids  O.K. 


28-MONEY  TO  LOAN 


I  SO-EXPERT  DENTAL  CARE 


CASH! 

OPEN  9  TO  9 

Free  Appraisals! 

Mark  Twain  Real  Estate 

9801   South  Broadway 
PL.  6-1478 


2  bdrm.  Large  family  welcome. 


638' 2    E.   82nd   St. 

PL.  9-4705 


23-APARTMENTS,  UNFURNISHED 


j  COUPLES: 
'  tions. 


DAY  WORK 

Register  now  for  these  top  pay- 
ing  jobs. 

1 8-WANTED  TO  RENT 


I  BRAND  NEW 

APIS. 

,  *   2  LARGE  BDRMS.  EACH 
•  TILE  BATHROOMS 

I  •  GARBAGE  DISPOSALS 

I  •  TILE  KITCHENS 

SLIDING  GLASS  DOORS 
LARGE  PRIVATE  PATIOS 
PLENTY  PARKING  SPACE 
CHILDREN,  WELCOME 


NO.   42518 

NOTICE    TO    CREDITORS 

No.  385U6 

In  th*  .Stiperior  Court  of  tho  .^'T» 
ef  California,  in  and  for  ihe  Couny? 
of  Los  .\nKele.-i. 

In  'lie  Matter  of  the  f',.-iiate  of 
.\.VDRKU'  \V  RIGG.-^.  also  known  as 
V.\'U.h:KY    KO.VA'Jt:.     De(ea.=>-'1. 

Noll'--  IS  iiert^lty  pi\f:i  lo  credrt- 
B  s  havine  Llaini?  aiamst  iho  .■^anl 
Jtrced'n-  to,  file  ^ai'i  i  Iaiin.«  iii  Otf 
offi'.e  of  th^  iVr'K  of  tii<>  aforejairl 
couit  or  to  pre.-^-ni  tli-m  li  tlie 
und*r«isne'l  at  the  offi'-e  of  \ifr 
.\liornov  Thomas  c,.  .\eU<oiii.  1111 
Last  \>rnoti  Ave-iiue  i:i  the  Citv  of 
Los  Aiic»-I<>«.  Ill  tlip  aforosaid  Coun- 
t^.  uliK-h  latt<»r  off:' .•  13  tli"  i>'a'-e 
ot  hu-'inps'  of  tlio  ui  'lfr.-iaii<-'l  ni 
a:,  matters  pertairnig  'o  sai'l  e.staie. 
Sui":i  i-|#inn  «i'ii  'he  no.  ^..^.-ary 
voucher!  iiiiJ.-<'  h»  fi;---!  or  pf-en't'l 
a«  ator.-«ai'l  «ithiii  -iv  ino".ih-  a';»r 
lh»    fir-i    tiub'.atioii    o''    ;:i:s    nonce. 

Dated   January    .'S.    1357 

M.KKP.rUA    LEK   RrOC- 

Administratnx  of  the  Eitate  of 
Mid    descedent. 

Thomas    G.     ^eusom.    Attorney-at- 
Angelei.    California.    AD.    2-6149. 
Published    CH':foriiii    Kagie 

Feb.    7-11-21-28 

NOTICE    TO    CREDITORS 
NO.   385972 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  .State 
e!  California  m  and  for  thp  Couniv 
ot  llos  Angeles  In  the  Matter  of  the 
E.state  of  George  McCuision.  De- 
ce.''>ed 

Noti'-<»  is  herebv  E'\on  b\  th^  un- 
dorsigned.  F.  A.  V  in^taniev  Fubli" 
Administrator.  a«  Admini'trntor  of 
the  Estate  of  Grorze  MrCuiston.  D"- 
reased.  to  t^'e  Creditors  of  and  all 
persons  having  claims  against,  the 
imid  deceden'.  to  present  them  with 
the  neces'arv  \ouihers.  within  s;\ 
months  after  the  firs'  publication  of 
thi.<  notice  to  the  said  Adn'in'strator 
at  hi«  office  at  «V  North  Spr'nj  St  . 
Los  Aneeles  12  California  ^^hIr•h  ssid 
office  the  underslcned  se|ect<  as  a 
plai-o  of  biisine-*"  in  all  matters  con- 
nected wt'h  said  estate  or  to  file 
them,  with  the  ne.  e,,arv  \o;ichcrs. 
within  six  months  pfter  the  f.rst  niih- 
li'-ation  o'  rh.s  notK-e  'n  the  offi'c 
pf  the  Clerk  of  the  Siiocrior  Cod 
rf  the   S'=»to   of   t^a';forni-*    in   and   for 

ti^e    ("ourtv-    of     Los      \nKelei 

Datedl:    i'rh.    -,    T^' 

T'      A      V.t.Ns;TANI.:-:V 
Tiiblic   .\dministra'or.   a< 
.\dm!n!-tra'or  of  the  Kstate 
of   said    riecodent 
Piihlsh     in     California     p>2!e     Feb 

lt-21-29-M,-irch    7     Ti57. 


WANTED  TO  RENT 

lANCfloRO  LISTINGS  PREE 
TENANTS  WAITING  TODAY 

DAILY  RENTALS 
Cal  IK.  3-3168 

LANDLORDS 

FREt  RENTAL  SERVICE 
LIST  YOUR  VACANCIES 
WITH  US  -  ALL  AREAS 

Call  RE.  1-2301 


Landlords  Free 

Tenants  waiting.  All  areas. 

RE 

3-5621;  RE  3-1171. 

Landlords  Free 

Tenants  waiting.  \\\  areas 

RE 

3.5621:    RE.   3-1171. 

19.A-H0TELS 

PER 

MO. 


100 


LARGE    SELECTION 
SEE  MANAGER 

2120  DELAWARE 

SANTA  MONICA,  CALIF, 
or  PHONE 

PL  8-3645 


5222  ASCOT  AVE. 

•  FINE  4-FAMILY  FLAT 

•  1   LARGE  BEDROOM  EACH 

•  CHILDREN  WELCOME 


S5 


Month 


RE.  2-8318  -  1-8922 
Residence  AX.  4-5612 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

7h»  People's  Choice 

960  ^  Jefferson 

AD.  3-9295 

3700  S.  WESTERN 
RE.  4-9346 

21-R06mS,    HOUSEKEEPING 


LIGHT    HOUSEKEEPING    RMS. 
1817' 3  South  Wilson  Place. 


22-APARTMENTS-FURNISHED 


12-HElP  WANTED-FEMALE 


WOMEN 
COOKS 

AND  GENERALS 

HOME  NIGHTS  AND 

STAY  INS 


TOBEY  ARTS. 

(Near   Adams   &   Western) 
BRAND   NEW  .   .   . 

MODERN 
FURNITURE 

Beautiful 

Lobby  and   Patio 

Good   Public  Transportation 

Automatic  Washers  arid   Diyers 

Telephone 
Singles   -   Doubles   -   Bachelors 

$55.00  Mo.  Up 

ALL    UTILITIES   FURNISHED 

1920  West  25th  St. 
RE.  3-1460 


65 


Redec.  2  bdrm.  Florence  dist. 
Tots. 


60 


Lovely  1   BR  plus  W.B.  for  tots. 


$ 


75 


4    bdrms.    P   furn.   Gar.    Child. 

MANY  OTHERS-EAST-WEST 

SPECIALIZING  IN  FAMILIES 

WITH  CHILDREN. 

Open  Daily  —  Thurs. 
Friday  Til  7  P.M. 

'2625  E.  FLORENCE 

LU.  2-5361 


UNFURNISHED  HOUSES 

6   room    houM,   3   bedrms.,   larga 
child  o.k.  SftiS 

Unfurnifhed '^'O^  Mo. 

2   stucco   houses,   2  btdrms.  each^ 


^op  - 1  Buy 
^1     2nd 
Trust  Deeds 

My  own  money.  Better 
deal  with  me.  20  years  in 
Los  Angeles.  Or  can  get 
you  a  loan  on  your  trust 
deed  iF  you  don't  care  to 


sel 


Mr.  Lewis 


YOUR  TEETH 

Command  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

Demands  Attention 
TODAY-SEE 

DR.  GAY 

Your  Friendly  Credit  Dentist 


•  Plates    Repaired    While    You 
•Wait 

•  EXTRACTIONS-Teefh   Pulled 
and  Filled 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


PL  3-11.58  Any  Time       ,•   FAST-FRIENDLY  SERVICE 


30-BUSINESS   OPPORTUNITIES 


YOUNG  SALESMAN 

Local  resident,  needs  financial 
assistance  to  secure  valuable  itate 
franchise  distributorship.  Honest 
opportunity  will  withstand  inves- 
tigation. Send  post  card  or  letter 
to: 

DIVERSE  PROJECTS 

POST  OFFICE  BOX  262 

SECTION  4,  I. A.   n,  CALIF. 


Cafe,  New.  Plus  Nice  Furn.  Apt. 

Low  Rent,  On  Broadway 

Easy  Terms 

PL.  1-6066  PL.  1-6067 


East 

Side. 


$70,.  $80 


Per 
Mo. 


6   fabulous   apts.   WiasI   Side.   Two 

L'r$84,.*89;:: 

3    bedrm.    apt.    All    utilities    paid. 

tiz $100 ;:: 

FURX.   ir   VS'FURX. 

4— 1-bdrm.   houses.   Furnished  and 
Unfurnished.     Eastside    and 

S'r;...  $50-$65«.. 


200 


Per 

Month 

I  Up 


FURNISHED    APARTMENT 

IvV .ANTED  —  Neat,  responsible 
single  man  to  share  modern  2 
bedroom  apartment,  westside. 
home  privileges.  Call  after  4 
p.m.  Thursday  or  Friday  or 
anv  time  Sat.  &  Sun.  RE. 
1-8171.  ! 


RE.  3-3930 


13-HElP  WANTEO-FEMALE 

FEM.-\LE— Fur  finisher  wanted. 
.^2.1  W.  Sth  street.  Call  VA 
5757. 

W.XNTED —  E.xpcrienced  lady 
cooi<.  with  .some  capital  to 
operate  cafe  &  malt  shop. 
Call  Mr.  Daniels.  AD.  3-6972. 


IS-HELP  WANTED-MALE 


WANTED — Master  barber.  Good 
business.  Call  Sampson's  Bar- 
ber  Shop,    EXbrook   9-9607. 

HELP  WANTED 
COUPLE 

Apartment  hous*  manager.  Fur- 
nished apt.  Salary.  Westside. 
Hollywood  3-3186. 


HILTON 
ARMS 

HOTEL  AND 
APARTMENTS 

Weekly  service  and  utilities. 
Clean,  quiet,  comfortable,  well- 
managed   building. 

FURNISHED 

SINGLES,  DOUBLES 

BACHELORS 

^^  50anil  Up 
RE.  5-8117 

1250  South  Western 


APT. — 1  rms.  children  O.K.  lo- 
cated one  blook  west  of  .-\la- 
meda  on   lOSth  st.  S50  mo. 
Call,  LO.  9-1728. 
22-APARTMENTS  FURNISHED 


DE  LUXE 

MODERN 
APIS. 


JUST 
COMPLETED 

RIDGELEY 
MANOR 

UNFURN.  1  &2BR. 
$90  M.  &  UP 

INCLUDES:     W  W    CARPETING 
OR    PARQUET   FLOORS,    EX- 
POSED BEAM  OR  ACOUSTIC 
PLASTER.  INSULATED  WALLS, 
GARBAGE     DISPOSAL,     TILE  ■ 
KITS.    &    BATHS,    EXTRAJ 
CLOSETS,    LAUNDRY,    FREE! 
HOT  WATER.  i 

OPEN  DAILY  AND  WEEK-ENDS 
10  TO  5 

2222    S.    RIDGELEY    DR. 
NORTH  OF  ADAMS 

1    BLOCK  EAST  OF  HAUSER 

MR.  WACHT 

WE.  8-3871  orGR.  8-4829 


Mallette  Realty 

1406)    West   Vernon   Ave. 

AX.  4-8157  -  AX.  4-8158 

AD.   4-8098 


MONTH 


Cozy  1  bedroom  bungalow. 
Large  living  room.  Children  ac- 
cepted. 


Man  or  Woman 

SPARE  TIME  • 
NO  SELLING! 

Business  pays  you  a  profit  starting 
'irsf  day.  Work  consists  of  refill- 
ing and  collecting  money  from 
our  machines  in  this  drea.  To 
qualify  you  must  have  a  car, 
references,  S640  '  casri  to,  secure 
territory  and  inventory.  Devoting 
6  to  1,0  hours  a  v/eek'to  business, 
your  end  on  percentage  of  collec- 
tions should  run  up  to  $100 
weekly,  with  very  good  possibili- 
ties of  taking  over  full  time.  In- 
come increasing  accordingly.  For 
personal  interview,  include  phone 
in  application. 

Box  100,  300  S.  Beverly  Drive 
Beverly  Hills,  Calif. 

BOOTH  for  rent.  Good  location. 
E.xperienred  operator  onlj'. 
AD  2-909.5. 

33-MISCELLANEOUS    FOR    SALE 


1062  East  Vernon  Ave. 

Corner   Vernon   &   Central 
Upstairs 

AD.  4-13W 


97-PROPERTY   IMPROVEMENTS 

FAMILY  ROOMS 

As  large  as  3  bedrooms  for 
$28  down  and  $28  a  month 


ALSO 
GLASS 

SLIDING 
DOORS 
for        s 


Spacious  ^^s 
Living     '-- — ^ 


Marvin  Biiilders 

CALL 

AN.  1-7149* 
WE.  5-9953 

A  cempUt*  building  ramodciing 
and  F.  H.  A.  100%  financing 
service. 

Rear   yard    apti.    built   far 
SSO   Dawn   and   SSO  a   Month 


$299 

DOWN 

Balance  Monthly 

Takes  Deed 

To  Many  of  These 

PROPERTIES 
BORROW 

$1000 

Or  More 
On   Your 

Real  Estate 

Pay  Back  $15 

Per  $1000  Per  Month 
Until  Paid 


OPEN  MONDAY  NIGHT 
UNTIL  8  P.M. 


AD.  4-0161 


101 -DISPLAY  PROPEKTY  RfNTALS 

^iB>  II  .1  "-  — 

NOW 


RENTING 


BRAND  NEW 


^    ;t 


98-REAL  ESTATE  WANTED 


FOR    S.\LE— Exakta    Camera 
$100.    photo    enlarger    electric 
dryer,    S75.    NO.   2-4716. 

47-SERVICES 


JOHNSG.N'S  HOUSE  of  Insur- 
ance. Salesman  wanted  to 
manage   office. 


35 


MONTH        I 


3   room   apartment.   Pensioners 
welcome. 


50 


MONTH 


5  room,  2  bedroom,  soon  avail- 
able. Children  O.K. 


65 


MONTH 


Beautiful     large    4    room    flat, 
near    schools. 


55 


MONTH 


2  bedroom  duplex.     Children. 


65 


MONTH 


5     room,    2     bedroom     house. 
Teenagers.  Newly  decorated. 


KEEP  SLIM 
STAY  SLIM 

— For— 

•  RELAXING 

•  REDUCING 

Call  PL.  5-3651 

for  Appointment  at 

LEE'S  STUDIO 

11669  S.  AVALON 


48-CHILD   CARE 


Child  Care 

Child  care  in  mv  home  bv  dav. 
All  ages.  PL.  "1-8371.  341  E. 
6Sth  street. 


49-RUG  CLEANING 


60 


MONTH 


24-FURNISHED  HOUSES 


3  ROOM  HOUSE 

FURNISHED 

2    Childran   OK.    $55   Month. 

6308  South  Vormont 
PL.  9-7256  -  AD.  3-1041 


2S-HOUSES  UNFURNISHED 


S5S  Per  Meath 

Unfurnished  3  bedroom  home. 
Children  and  pets  welcome. 
Call  AX.  2-0458. 


$50  NICE  2  bdrm.  home,  near 
56th  St.  Children,  pets  wel- 
come. RE.  3-59009,  agt. 


5  rm.  house  on  Westside.  Chil. 


95 


MONTH 


Leimert     Park     studio    duplex. 
Very  spacious  2.  bedroom. 


WE  HAVE  THE  FINEST 
RENTALS  IN  THE  CITY 


Open  Daily  9:30  —  6 
Friday  9:30  —  8 

ALL  OVER 
Real  Estate  &  Rentals 

8710  S.  Broadway 
PL.  8-8294    v  NE.  6-6362 


RUG  CLEANING 

GOLDEN   STATE 

RUG    CLEANERS 

BINDING        •        SERGING 

FRINGING    •     REPAIRING 

1667  E.  32nd  St. 
AD.  6935 


I  BUY 
HOMES 
AT  THE 
HIGHEST 
PRICES 

ALL  OVER 
THE  CITY 

I 

-CALL 


-IMMEDIATE.  POSSESSION- 

Brand  New  Throa  Bedroom  Stucco 
tlomei.  Added  features-Par^ 
quet    Floors— Louvre    window*. 

742  East  110th  Styeet-Double- 
$450   Dirr/n,   B#l.  Mo. 

2477  East  111th  Street-Frame.- 
$199  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1366  E  110th  St.-3  Bedroom— 
$650   Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

738  E.  17th  Street-Frame  $350 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1118  E.  91st  St.-Fram9-$350 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 

9213  Beach-New  3  Bdrm.  Stucco. 
$550  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 


i  BDRM. 

i ' 

APTS. 


CHILDREN  OK, 
TV  ANTENNAS 
TILE  KITCHENS    : 
fARKING  AREAS 


414  E.  107th  St.-Frame-$250 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1460  E.  107th  St.-Frame-$199 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1938  E.  115th  St.-Frame-$250 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


,.|j 


1104-110411     E.     113th     St.-$399 
Down,    Bal.    Mo.    2   Rental*. 

820  W.   138lh  St.,  Compton-New 
3  Bedreem  Stucco.  $750  Down,- 
Bal.  Me. 


TILE  BATHROOMS 

I 

HARDWOOD  FLOORS 
LOUVERED  WINDOWS 


10523-10525  Lou  Dlllon-3  Bed- 
rooms each.  $499  each,  Bal. 
Mo. 


1749    E.     108th    St.-3    Bcdreem- 
$499  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 


1229-1233-1237     E.     109th     St.- 
'sep^rate   houses  with'  3   bed- 
rooms  each.    $650    Down    each. 
Bal.  Mo. 


17«^    I<.    11th    Plat.-$250    Dewn,   Bal- 
anc.  Monthly 

.2037    N.rd    Str«*t-Fram.-S299    Dawn, 


1 


Balanc.  Monthly. 


2727   Hyami-S299   Down,   talenc.   Mo. 


ANYTIME-;;:::; 


320  Stockwcll-r.  ■«<lrm>.,  S299  Down. 


AD. 
2-0904 


13th  S{.-New  3   Mrm.  Stucco, 
^      $7S0   Down.  Balanc*   Monthly. 

2S52    Santa   Ana-New    3   tdrm.   Stucc, 
5499    Down,    Balanc*    Monthly. 


2SS4    Santo    Ana-New    3   Bdrm.   Stucco, 
S499   Down,   Balanc*   Monthly. 


2SS6   Santa   Ana-N«w   3   Bdrm.   Stucco, 
$499   Down,   Balanc*   Monthly. 


We  Have  1  and  2  Bedrm. 
For  Rent 


Apts. 


See  Them  at 


11595-99  S.  MAIN  ST. 


111626  CENTRAL  AVE. 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


COMPTON 

Spacious,  Beautiful,  New 

i      HOMES 


750 


96-INCOME  PROPERTY  FOR  SALE     * 


Eastside  Bargain 

$8(10.  DVVN.— 3  family  unit-7 
rm.  double.  5  rm.  rear  hse. 
Inrome  S175.00  per  month. 
Til  is  property  does  more 
than'  pay  for  itself.  It  will 
put  extra  money  in  your 
pocket  every  month.  This 
one  is  red  hot.  PPL.  9-6876. 


3  BDRM.,  2  bath  plus  income 
SIOOO.OO  down.  15-02  E.  121 
street.  Weekend  or  after  4 
p.m. 


96-C-POIlPERTY  LOANS 


New  Loan  Deal 

BoBi  in  the  West 

LEGAL  RATES 

Any  Amount  You  N««d 

Call  Now 

Mr,  Sloan 

Day  or  Night  -  NO.  5-0377 


DOWN 

Non-Vets  t,  Vets 

•  3     bedrooms,     2     baths,     2-car 
garage 

•  LOADED    with    Luxury    Features: 
Garbage     Disposal,     Extra-Large 
Closets,  Large  Level  Lots,  etc. 
Close      to      Schools.      Churches, 
Shopping. 

•  Easy  Monthly   Payments! 

•  Irxjmediate  Occupancy! 

DRIVE   OUT   TODAY- 
MODELS  ON   DISPLAY 

For   Informatinn.    Call    Oxford    2-4726 

or  UNiversit.v  3-5038 

134th  &  Kalsman.  Compton 

(Turn  East  off  Central  at  134th) 

VETS 

WHY  PAY  RENT? 

$25  deposit  and  your  discharge 
plus  $25  per  weelc  for  1 8  weeks 
pays  $75  dn.  including  "Charges  & 
impound  on  a  lovely  2  bedroom 
home.  Then  your  notes  are  $65 
per   month. 

JOHN  H.  KELLY 

NE.  6-2522 


FOR  SALE— Large  lot  on  Ver- 
non ave.  Also  eight  foot 
meat  case  with  compressor 
and  6  foot  florescent  lights. 
Call  Daniels  AD.  3-6972  or 
AD.  3-2063. 


TOMORROW'S  MONEY  TODAY 

.\dvance  on  Ihf  Hoi:>-i  \oa  Now  Own 
in  One  Day.  .\dv.Tn'Cd  on  >our  l^t 
Tru.'it  Deort  loan  if  >(  p  OK.  it.  Con- 
■olidatp  all  >our  bills  in  one  lean 
Borrow  Sl.iW  or  n-orc — pay  back  $lo 
a  month  per  SliViO    iil  rsiri 

WE    HAVE    CLIENTS    WIJH 
ALL  CASH! 

For  Your  R-'al  L'st.ite  Equities — 1st 
or  2nd  TruNt  Deed — Contracts  or 
any  Equity,  >ou  or  your  friend  have 
in  "Real  Estate  If  its  an  Estate,  a 
suit  or  separation  or  anMhine  per- 
taining to  Real  Esiat".  here  is  \our 
chance  to  sell   for  CASH 

100  CENTS  ON  THE  $1.00 

For  \our  1st  trust  deed  it  satisfac- 
tor.v  to  us  rredited  to  the  purchase 
of  anv-  properties  \^  e  ha\'e  listed, 
terrific — ITO  c'-nts  on  the  dollar  if 
^ou  have  a  T.D.  For  510<.t  to  SlO.OOLi 
we  will  get  you  a  deal 

$98,000   CASH   -.$98,000   CASH 

Uaxe  clients  with  y9!<Ul«i  in  cash  lo 
bu.v  real  estate  in  this  district  This 
is  your  ch.mce  to  sell  out  for  all  cash 
if  \ou  have  an  equitv  or  own  a  house 
We  ha\e  client.s  with  S98.i>X)  in  all 
cash  to  buy  you  out. 


REALTY 

Equities  Co. 

AD.  2-5528 
AD.  2-6101 

Wa  O*   SO-SO  •■  Cannifsiaai  With 
Ail  Itoai  litata  Braiiars 

All   nOPIRTlIS   ARI    ^UBJICT 
TO  PRIOR  SiU.1 

4374  S.  MAIN  ST. 


8 


01  COMPTON  AVE. 


<'823  SO.  MAIN  ST. 
IIROKERS  WELCOME 


-Phone- 


PL.  55J1I 
PL  M47I 


^ 


\i 


I 


PL  m 


r. 


T2-Th«  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  February  21,  1957 


What's  Cooking 

With  = 

bamaha  mounts 


Did  you  ever  wish  that  your  food  dollar  would  stretch  a 
little  bit  further?  You  can  all  use  extra  savings  which  careful 
buying  can  insure  when  you  shop  at  Ralphs  or  Thriftimart  mar- 
kets. Check  the  advertised  items  and  make  sure  you  are  buying 
for  less  by  making  your  own  comparison  of  several  items  on  your 

weekend    shopping    list.    Some*- — — 

Stores  will  advertise  one  or  two  ever  try  making  a  fruit  cup  of 
items  at  a  low  cost  and  you  will  grapefruit  sections,  mandarin 
find  the  staples  you  buy  are  :  oranges  and  avocado  or  fresh 
often  higher  in  cost  than  you  [  pineapple? 

Buspect.  This  practice  is  not  true  :  Thriftimart  Chicken  Italienne 
at  Ralphs  or  Thriftimart  where  '  ^.^^  ^  stewing  chicken  or  two 
you  will  find  consistent  savmgs  f^yj^g  chickens  2>2  pounds 
in  all  departments  on  the  best  ^^^^  ^^^^  j^,„  serving  pieces, 
brands  and  the  highest  quality  ^pason  with  salt,  pepper  and 
produce  found  anywhere.  i  paprika    and    coat    with    flour. 

You  will  note  that  our  family  [  Brown  in  hot  olive  oil  or  shnrt- 
ef  advertisers  now  includes  spe-  jening  till  golden  brown.  Remove 
rials  each  week  for  your  con-  [from  pan  and  place  in  roasting 
venience.  saving  you  more  on  pan  or  heavy  covered  Casserole. 
the  kind  of  food  you  want.  For  Pour  off  excess  drippings  from 
instance  this  weekend's  specials  skillet.  Add  a  chopped  onion 
on  stewing  hens  and  Tom  tur-  i  and  green  pepper.  3  cans  of  to- 
keys  make  me  wish  my  freezer  |  mato  sauce.  1  can  chicken  houl- 
space  was  more  adequate  in  lion  or  two  cubes  of  concentrat- 
order  to  buy  now  for  future  use.  <  ed  hoiillion.  and  ^-^  cup  sherry 
Speaking  of  space  in  freezer  ■  wine.  Bring  to  boil  and  pour 
compartments,  do  buy  some  of  [  over  chicken.  Add  1  small  clove 
those  Fradelis  dinners  and  store  ,  garlic,  a  generous  pinch  of  mar- 
for  those  evenings  when  you  1  joram  or  thyme.  Cover  pan  and 
come  home  too  exhausted  to  '  hake  at  350  deg;rees  till,chicken 
cook.  Pop  in  the  oven  and  ser\e.  |  is  tender,  or  about  2  hours. 
You  may  choose  from  fish.  I  Serve  with  rice  or  noodles, 
chicken,  beef  or  ham.  Pick- 
sjveet's  winter  carnival  is  on 
too.  so  .select  the  family's  favor- 
ites now.  If  overweight  is  a 
problem  in  your  hou.se.  take  ad- 
vantage of  the  bags  of  firm  ripe 
grapefruit.  Better  buy  two  bacs 
because  the  rest  of  the  family 
will   love  them   too   for   hreak- 


THRIFTl MART'S    S EH' EST — Newest   store  to  join  the  impressive  Thriftimart  chain  is 
the  complete  market  center  located  at  S662  S.    Placentia  avenue.  Anaheim. 


Injury  Case  Settled  After  3-Day  Trial 


Ralphs  Birthday  Party 

Do  not  forget  to  check  spe- 
cials at  Ralphs  too  this  week- 
end and  register  for  the  weekly 
birthday  party  prizes. 


A  settlement  terminated  a 
three-day  court  hearing  here 
Friday,  in  which  William  Sav- 
ant obtained  a  damage  settle- 
ment from  Morris  Taylor  for 
injuries  received  in  an  acci- 
dent  in  September,  1954. 

Both  men  are  from  Washing- 
ton, La.  Taylor  was  driv^g  the 
car  on  Highway  101  near  Ven- 


tura when  it  skidded  into  a 
truck.  -* 

Savant,  represented  by  Atty. 
Stanley  Malone.  claimed  that 
the  accident  was  caused  by 
"willful  neglect"  and  "exces- 
sive speed"  on  the  part  of  Tay- 
lor. 

The  jury  in  Judge  Ben  Koe- 
nig's  court  Was  out  three  hours 


when  counsel  for  the  litigants 
agreed   upon   a  settlement. 


Three  stirring-  combined 
choral  ijumbers  will  climax  the 
third  annual  Business  and  In- 
dustry Chorus  Festival  to  be 
held  Saturday  night.  March  2, 
at  East  Los  Angeles  Junior  Col- 
lege, .5357  E.  Brooklyn  avenue. 


Thriftimart  Opens 
Store  in  Anaheim 

A  gala  grand  opening  —  Feb.  21-24  will  introduce 
the  public  to  THRIFTIMART'S  newest  and  finest  mar- 
ket, located  at  8662  S.  Placentia  avenue  (at  Anaheim- 
Olive  road),  in  Anaheim.  Four  days  of  celebration, 
marked  by  hundreds  of  extra-special  bargains    and 

scofes  of  prizes  will  herald  the 


addition  of  this  newest  mem- 
ber of  the  Thriftimart  family 
of  outstanding  markets  serving 
Southern  California  .  shoppers 
since  1930,  with  the  best  in 
food. 

Complete  Center 
Providing  the  utmost  in  serv- 
ice to  the  community,  the  new 
Thriftimart  will  be  equipped 
with  the  latest  market  facili- 
ties. Here  in  one  complete 
shopping  center  will  be  found 
grocery,  meat,  produce,  delica- 
tessen and  liquor  departments 
and  a  Van  de  Kamp  bakery. 

For  the  added  convenience  of 
customers,  there  will  be  10  au- 
tomatic check  stands,  fully  a»- 
tomatic  doors  and  ample  free 
parking  space.  Carefuljy  se- 
lected personnel  will  carry  out 
Thriftimart's   famous  policy  of 


fast,  efficient,  courteous  serv- 
ice. 

In  addition  to  reduced  prices 
which  will  offer  customers  sub- 
stantial savings  on  local"  and 
nationally  known  brands 
throughout?  the  Grand  -Opening 
Sale,  many  other  attractions 
have  been  announced. 

■During  four  days — February 
21,  22,  23  and  24— free  balloons, 
samples,  prizes,  combs  and  im- 
ported books  of  needles  will  be 
given  away.  The  Tinkertown 
Train  will  be  available  for  free 


I     ■■• 


Ninon's  BrotKer, 
Citizens'  Council 
LMder,  in  Crash 

KREOLE,  Miss.  —  The  brother 
of  Vice  President  Richard  Nixon 
and  ^e  chairman  of  the  South 
Alabama  White  Citizens  Council 
met  in  an  automobile  duel  here 
Fridak'  and  the  Council  leader 
caijheroff  second  best 

Johpi  A.  Dupont,  36,  of  Irving. 
tdh,  JMa.,  was  injured  in  the 
automobile  collision,  while  En- 
sign  Edward  C.  Nixon,  26,  sta- 
tioneq  at  Pensacola,  Fla.  Naval 
Air  SJtation,  escaped  without  a 
scratch. 

Ni>on,  who  was  returning 
from  New  Orleans  where  he  had 
annojnced  his  engagement  to 
Mis5  Gay  "Lynne  Woods,  was 
quot€d  as  saying  he  "apparent- 
ly   d^zed   off 


rides 


SatuBday, 


INFORMATION  ON 


BAIL    BO 


on  Thursday,  Friday  and 


OMM  u  nouns 


CELES  KING  III  BAIL 


909  East  6th  Street 


NPS    FRI 

AIL  BOND  AGENCY 
f         '    MU.5! 


MU.  5500 


i^hop  4sMnd  *^ave  a>^i    <J ItrlfHmart    ^or  Ci^verifclaif  *^pecials       •       *^nop  ^^nd  *^ave  ^>^t   <J  krlhimari     ^  v/) 


£V£f?y  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  at  M^^/i^iu/-.  EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  aiTht^dmuzt.  EVERY  DAYm 


A  club's  best  in\estment  is    i 
a    \ear's    subscription    to    the 
fast,  lunch  or  dinner.  Did  you  1  California  Eagle.  Cost— S4. 


O   SINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17.50 


< 

UJ 

CD 


o 

Z 


Marcelluf  Reed  .  .  . 

SWANK  SHOP  CLEANERS 

FREE,  FAST  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 
One  Day  Service 

Double  Breasted  Coats  Singleized  M7.50 

All  Work  Guoranfeed 
W.  ADAMS  •  RE.  2-9974 


SINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $1  7.50:^5 


Tastes  so  rich- 
swallows 
so  smooth 


Tho  F'm0$t  Hoifs  and  Hostesses  Serve 

HILL-^HILL 

KElfTUCKY  BOURBON  AT  ITS  BEST 

Also  avoilahlt  as  a  Kentucky  Blended  Whiskey' in  the  familiar\ound  bottU 

mil  s  fflti  wmm.  imisvuie.  nEirucirr  oistRiBUKD  bt:  nationai  dkiihehs  psoducts  coi- 

P«*tlOlt-«NIUO(Y  SIUISHT  BOUIBON  *HIS«t— BOIH  86  HlOOf— KMIDCKY  8UN0E0  WHISKEY. 
W/o  CUM  NEUTUl  SntlTS 


M; 


b 

1 


V 

<5 


1 


• 


1 


DO 
YOU 


WANT 
OUT  OF 
LIFE? 


TraveP . . .  security? ...  a  home  or  "business  of  your  own? 
Get  started  toward  a  liappier,  more  rewarding  life  the 
Broadway  Federal  Savings  way.  Following  a  regular  sav- 
iogs  plan  will  give  you  a  very  real  sense  of  accMnplish- 
ment . , .  because  you  know  you're  on  the  way  to  a  better 
life.  And  your  money  will  GROW- and  GROW  with 
Broadway  Federal's  high  dividend  rate,  compounded  semi- 
annually on  all  accounts.  We're  right  in  your  neighborhood, 
ready  to  give  you  friendly,  personal  service.  Drop  in  today! 
Ail  ACCOUNTS  IN5URSD  TO  $10,000 


Broadway  Federal  Savings 

4501   South  Broadway  ADams  2-4271 


1 


CELEBRATING  THE  OPENING  OF 

AHOTHER 
GREAT 


s 


TABLE  QUEEN  CREAM  STYLE  NO.  303  TINS         ^  ^ 

GOLDEN  CORN  10 


i>r 


TABLE  QUEEN  BRAND-TOMATO 


EVERY  MARKET 


A  SITE  TO  BEHOLD 


JUICE        5 

MORTON'S  FROZEN-BEEF-CHICKEN-TURKEY 

MEAT  PIES  5 

NEWPORT  CUT  GREEN 

BEAKS 


46  o;e. 
tins 


$100 


1 


$100 


1 


,.i  $100 


etnii 


^       Sta-Crisp  Soda 

CRACKERS 


lb.  ctn. 


15 


km  JEMIMA 


PANCAKE  FLOUR  »'  19' 

29 
19' 


L0«  CAIIM 

SYRUP 


tlM. 

I«t. 


QUIU  M  IE6UUR 

QUAKER  OATS 


Pictsweet  Winter  Carnivol 


niOZEN 

PEAS 

FROZEN   MIXED 

VEGETABLES 

rROZEN 

FRENCH  FRIES 

fROZEN-lIAF 

SPINACH 


6  S  MOO 
61"*1oo 


STEWING 

CHICKENS 


FRESH, 
WHOLE 

OR 
nUT  UP 


TOM 

TURKEYS 


U.S.D.A.  INSPECTED 
OVEN  READY 


18-22  LBS. 


JAKE  ANDEISON'S 

BEEF  TAMALES 

JAHE  AMEISOM'S-PIAIN,  CREAM  01  IEE1 

HORSERADISH 

I  6MM  TASTE-SLICEO 

ftlCOnO  SALAMI 

jjEIKErMAlk 

HALF  &  HALF 


5  s  'l'" 
15 
23' 
19 


4m 

lir 


in. 

Pkj. 


n. 

Cli. 


Laura  Scudder 

MAYONNAISE 


Qt. 
Jar 


49' 


BONELESS   BRISKET 

CORNED 
BEEF 


1^ 


Fradelis  Frenti-Dinmr 

FRIED  CHICKEN 


I2.ez. 
Pkg. 


MOJtTON's  mm 
CHERRY  PIE 

MUISCO  FAHa  CIEST 

COOKIES 

SUPIEMA  lEI  SOUl  PIHED 

CHERRIES 


FRADELIS  FROZEII 


MAPLE-LEAF  BRAND  IMPORTED 


CANADIAN 

BACON 


8-oz. 
Pkg. 


53 


c 


CAMP'S  LAMINATED 


FROZEN 

STEAKS 


I^PkB*.        I 


00 


HORMEL'S  DAIRY  BRAND 

SLICED 


BACON 


Lb. 
Pkg. 


59 


c 


GORTON'S  U.S.D.A.  INSPTD.  FROZEN 

FISH      „  cnc 

STICKS     "" 


53 


ROAST  CHICKEN 
HAM  STEAK 
SWISS  STEAK 
FRIED  SHRIMP 


FLAVOI  DE  LUXE 

INSTANT  COFFEE 

SUN  VALLEY 

OLEO 

ORCHIO-ASSOIITEO  COLOB 

TOILET  PAPER 

JElSEYMAIt 

NON-FAT  MILK 


FRUITS  »°  VEGETABLES 


WINTER  NELIS 

PEARS 

U.S.  NO.   r  SPANISH  TYPE 

ONIONS 

ITALIAN-HEALTHFUL  AND  G006 

SQUASH 

ARIZONA-TOP  FLAVOR 

GRAPEFRUIT  8^1^35 


i 


2.19 
2  J  3' 


15 


b 

1 

\f]  *^nop  4a^nd  *^ctve  a^i  ^J linfiimart    J-or  ^ve^\fcia\f  *^pecials 


JACK 


Coconut  g^^ 

MACAROONS  23pk|. 
COFFEE  CAKE_  «.»».,»») 

LOAF  • 

Opwi-Fae«d  \t:>^ 

CHERRY  HE      5T<m. 
(Ucnki)  8-lndi 


Cinnamon 


20*^.^4  ■ 

(tk.riid         B 


LOS  ANGCLE.S: 

■3(121  S.   Li  Bnt   (al  Rod«n  Rd),  L.A. 

•  2600  S.  Vermont  (St  Adanil).  L.A. 
•(1340  Ll  Tl|«r«  it  Ctntlneli.  L.A. 

•  8440  Lincoln   Blvd.   (it   MinehMterl.'vL.A. 
■7985  Sinti  Monlcl  Blvd.  (at  LturtI),  LA. 

•  609  N.  DIIIdh  (at  Silvsr  Laka).  L.A. 
■7980  Sunsat  Blvd.  (at  Laurel).  L.A. 
•4030  Eagta  Rock  Slvll.  tt  Fletcher 

WEST   LOS   ANCfLIS: 

•12210  Santa  Monica  Blvd.  (a-  Bundy),  W.L  A. 
•9690  Santa  Monica  Blvd.    (at  Roxbury).   LA. 

•  325  Lincoln   Blvd     (near  Boja  Ave.).  Venice 


SOUTHERN   AREA: 

•3(10  W.   Imoerlal  (at  Cremhaw).   Injlewood 
*l<)49  N.   Bullli  (cor.  Bullii  4  Pine).  Co(npton 

•  4153  N.  Viking  (at  Carton  L  BellMower).  LB 
■1945  E.  Fourth  St.  (at  Cherry).  Long  Beach 
■5819  N.  Belltlower  Bl.  (at  South  St.).  Lakewood 
■2164  Belltlower  Blvd.  (at  Stearni  St.).  Loa  AlfOi 
■22217  Paloi  Vardea  Blvd.  (ai  SeoulvedaJ 

LA  PUENTE-WHITTIER: 

■14540  Leffingwall  tt  Ttlegraph  Iti. 

•  1120  Hacienda  tt  Gtla.  Puenta 

•  1320   Francisquito  Blvd.    (tt  Suniat; 

ORANGE   COUNTY: 


L^T 


OLENDALE-VALLCT  AREA: 
■2430  Glaadala  Bbd.  (at  Sllvar  L*ka)  L.A. 
■1(04  E.  Chevy  Cttso  (al  Adami)  Glendalt 
■915  *.  aienoak  |at  Highland)   Glendalt 

•  310  N    GlendtlaKlt  California).  GItndtIt 
1133  W.   Glenoaki^  Glendale 

82<  N.  Glendalt  Ikt  Glenoiki).  Gletlalt 
•17625  Shernan  Way   (al  White  Oakt).  V.N. 

•  IS23I   Ventura  Bkvd.   (at  Seoulvedt).  V.N. 
■3217  W.    Mtgnolit   Blvd.    (tt  Ctlllgmlt) 
•5145  Lturel  Ctnydn  (tt  Mtgnolit).  N.  Holly«M« 
•3708  Borbtnk   (tt  Edlion).   Burblnk 

•8601    Lturel  Ctnmn.   North   HollywM4 
•19718  Sherman  Way  (at  Corbin),  Ctnoit  Pk. 
•16847  Ventura  Bhd.   (tt  Bilbot),  Eneint 


■« 


*913l  w"'o  ;m,  1.  (.t  Otkhurrt) '  BmrlV  HMI.  •M62  S  Pltcen^t  aV.:  ;t  Anthelm.Ollvt,  Ahth.lm     LAS  WCAS: 
■11666  Nltlontl  Blvd.   (It  Btrringtonl.  La.         -11881   Brookhunt  (it  Chipmin).  Glrdat  Gn«t     2200  Btrina  R, 


•ions  Vonlct  Blvd.   (it  Cltlrmont).  L.A. 


•  525  Ortngewood    (tt   Hirbor) 


■Hivt  Van 


na  Ra4d 
dt  Kt4» 


b  Baluri«t 


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1^ 


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r 


*^hop  aMnJt^av9  ^sAi  \fhrtftimaH 


\ 


^^¥ 


Pink  Ford  Rape  Case 


■^i'*.*- 


Students  Hurt  in  Crash 


^^^itS'^^^i 


GUIL 


44 


1060    E.   43rd    Piae*.   L.A. 


Continuous  Publication  for  76  Years 


AD.   4-01  «1 


Vol.  LXXVI-No.  50 


Los  Angeles,  California 


Jewels  Hidden  in 
Bed;  Maid  Claims 

Must  Stand 
Trial  for  Tlieft 
In  Waller  Home 


ppeaU; 

i 

Sbys  i'm  | 
Innocent' 

"juilty  on  all  counts!" 

The  verdict  in  the  icase 

,»       TL         c  u  oo    10C-7  of   [Charles  Davis,  Jr.  was 

10c      Thurs.,  February  28,  1957   returned  Wednesday  after- 


TROLLEY  CRASHES  BAKERY— A  number  of  Manual 
Arts  High  School  students  ivere  passengers  of  the  Los  Angeles 
Transit  Lines  streetcar  that  jumped  the  track  at  Vernon  and 


Hoover  avenues  Tuesday  morning  and  crarked  into  a  bakery. 
Picture,  snapped,  moments  after  crash,,  shpwr  trolley  Hedged 
into  store. — (Adams.)  ^     ,  ,  . 


MOVRSLD  —  Mrs.  Clyde 
G.  Howell,  who  organized 
the  Lndies  Auxiliary  to  the 
Dining  Car  Employes  Local 
465.  was  buried  Friday.  (P.  3) 


Hero's  Quick  Act 
Ed^s  Suffering 

By  JAN  EDWARDS 

The  hero  of  Tuesday's  runaway  street  car  disaster 
at  Vernon  and  Hoover  streets  is  Joe  Le  Vaine,  owner 
of  Westvem  Cleaners  at  806  W.  Vernon  avenue. 

It  was  8:04  a.m.  when  Le  Vaine  heard  what  he 
called  "the  most  indescribable,  ear-splitting  crash  I've 

<»ever  heard  in  my  life,  as  though 

the  whole  building  was  being 


Sff'ALLOJr/.D  TIRPE\- 

TfS'E  —^Arthur  (Small 
Black)  Dennis  surdlmued  a 
small  amount  of  turpentine 
Feb.  14,  and  died  /a.  Univer- 
sity Hospital  Saturday. 


Try 


Still  Time  to 
for  Jobs 
As  Firemen 

Young  men  interested  in  be- 
coming firemen  for  the  City  of 
Los  Angeles  now  have  addition- 
al time  In  which  to  get  their 
applications  in.  The  last  date 
to  apply  for  the  next  examina- 
tlqti  for  these  career  jobs,  pay- 
ing $417  to  S489  monthly,  has 
been  extended  through  March  6. 

Successful  applicants  will 
start  training  in  June  at  full 
pay. 

Applications  must  be  filed  by 
mail  or  in  person  at  Room  5, 
Los  Angeles  City  Hall,  or  at  the 
information  window  in  the  lob- 
by of  the  Van  Nuys  Branch  City 
Hall. 

Additional  information  and 
CContiiiued  oq  Page  3J 


'Small  Black' 
Dennis  Drinks 
Turpentine,  Dies 

Arthur  (Small  Black)  Dennis, 
former  head  of  the  Golden  West 
Lodge  No.  86  of  the  Elks,  died 
Saturday  a  week  after  he  had 
swallowed  a  small  amount'  of 
turpentine  "to  make  him  feel 
j  better." 

Dennis.  59.  who  lived  at  1482 
W.  35th  place,  was  a  popular 
sportsman  who  had  been  in 
and  out  of  the  hospital  for  the 
past  two  years. 

His  wife,  Mrs.  Ruth  Dennis, 
said  that  he  had  been  suffer- 
ing for  30  years  from  an  asth- 
matic and  cardiac  condition. 
She  said  that  when  she  return- 
ed home  from  work  about  2:30 
a.m.  Feb.  14,  she  found  the 
contents  of  a  bottle  of  turpen- 
tine that  had  been  around  the 
house  for  years  spilled  on  the 
ni^ht  stand. 

When  she  questioned  Dennis, 
he  did  not  answer.  Later  he 
told  her  and  the  doctor  that 
he  had  taken  "a  few  drops  of 
turpentine  .in  W^ter  as  a  medi- 
cine to  make  him  feel  better." 

He  was  taken  to  University 
Hospital,  3787  S.  Vermont  two 
days  later.  He  was  delirious. 

Funeral  ser\'lcos  were  held 
Tuesday,  with  Conner-Johnson 
officiating.  Burial  was  at  Rose- 
dale  Cemetery. 

In  addition  to  his  wife,  Den- 
nis, who  had  lived  in  Los  An- 
geles since  1906,  having  come 
here  from  New  Orleans,  leaves 
his  two  sons,  Melvin  Dennis 
and  Arthur  Dennis. 


ripped  apart." 

Le  Vaine  ran  out  into  the 
street,  took  one  quick  look  at 
the  trolley  which  had  smashed 
irrto  the  corner  bakery.  He 
heard  screamfng  people  and 
saw  body  after  body  tumbling 
out  of  the  car.  Then  Le  Vaine 
dived  back  into  his  cleaning 
shop  to  call  the  police  and  am- 
bulances. 

Within  two  minutes,  the  po- 
( Continued  on  Page  3) 


Injured  In  Wild 
Streetcar  Ride 

Twenty-eight  of  the  37 
people  injured  when  a 
packed  LATL  Vernon  ave- 
nue street  car  jumped  its 
tracks  and  crashed  into  a 

bakery  at  Vernon  avenue  and 
Hoover  street  Tuesday  morning 
were  Negroes.  Fifteen  of  them 
were  students,  most  of  whom 
were  on  their  way  to  early 
morning  classes  at  Manual 
Arts  High  School,  4131  S.  Ver- 
mont avenue,  four  blocks  from 
the  accident  scene. 

At  a  few  minutes  past  8  a.m. 
the  street  car  slipped  from  the 
rails,      skidded       sideways, 

,  (Continued  on  Page  4) 


Mrs.  Rosalie  M.  McCha- 
ney,  50,  accused  of  steal- 
ing more  than  $11,000 
worth  of  jewels  last  Octo- 
ber from  the  home  of  Ram 
Halfback  Ron  Wajler.  where 
she  worked  as  a  maid,  Monday 
evening  made  startling  accu- 
sations against  her  accusers,  in 
the  presence  of  newsmen  and 
her  attorney,  George  L.  Vaughn, 
Jr. 

She  claimed  she  found  the 
jewels  between  the  mattress 
and  springs  of  Mrs.  Waller's 
bed  when  she  was  -cleaning  the 
room  at  the  West  Los  Angeles 
home,  -235  Entrada  .  dveniie, 
some  time  after  they  had  been 
"stolep"  and  an  inaucaoce 
claim  tiul  be^n  filed. 

"f  •frtajew4lB         * 

She  said  further  that  she  had 
gathered  the  valuables  into  a 
handkerchief  and  had  then 
hidden  them  in  a  football  case 
downstairs.  It  was  not  until  ' 
some  weeks  later,  in  December, 
she  said,  that  she  revealed  the 
hiding  place.  At  that  time,  she 
claimed,  Mrs.  Waller  had  giv- 
en her  some  of  the  jewels,  told 
her  she  could  do  anything  she 
liked  with  them,  hut  suggested 
she  should  not  wear  them  in 
the  vicinity  of  the  Waller 
household. 

At  her  arraignment  Tuesday 
morning  in  West  Los  Angeles 
court  before  Judge  Leo  Freund, 
however,  Mrs.  McChaney  was 
ordered  to  stand  trial  on  a 
charge   of  robbery. 

Mrs.  Waller  Testifies 

■Judge  Freund' mftde  his  rul- 
ing after  Mrs.  Waller  had  tes- 
tified.    Mrs.  Waller  denied  em- 
(Continued  on  Page  3> 


nocfn    "without    recom- 
mendation." 

Tlfis  rules  out,  the  death  pen- 
for  the  tall,  slender,  28- 
oia     unemployed     cindle- 
maker.  The  decision  is  up  to  the 
judj;e  as  to  whether  he  spends 
or  only  a  part,  of  the  re^- 
mai^der  of  his  life  in  jaiL 
Asks  New  TUoI 
Divis'     attorney,     James    B. 
Akefs,  immediately  a^ed  for  m 
trial,    chatging    that    the 
had    misinstructed    the 
and  that  the  verdict  "waS 
.  supported  by  the  evidence. 
D;ivil,  stunned  by  the  verdict, 
insisted  "I'm  Innocent!" 

D  ivls  was  cnarged  with  kid- 
napping  for   purposes   of  rob- 
armed  robbery,  perversion 
rape  in  two -separate  cases 
involving  teen-age  girls. 
Tl  le  case  went  to  the  jury  at  3 
Tuesday. 
(Continued  on  Page  4) 


ACCUSES  ACCUSERS— Mrs.  Rosalie  M.  McChaney,  ac- 
cused of  stealing  jewelry  from  her  employer,  wife  of  Ram 
Halfback  Ron  If.  aller,  this  iveek  in  a  press  itttert'iew  accused 
her  accusers.  She  claimed  the  jewels  were  never  stolen,  but 
were  hidden  in  Mrs.  Jf'allcr's  bed.  Mrs.  .McChaney,  seated, 
is  shoivn  with  her  friend.  Dr.  Minnie  Moore,  also  under 
arrest,  and  their  nttorhey,  George  L.  Vaughn,  Jr. 


Feoturacf 
In  the  Eagfo 

Special  features  this  week 
hiside  the  Eagle  include: 

Editorieds _  4 

Church  Activities  .„ _  5 

Sports   6 

Social   _ 7 

Dorothea  Foster . 8 

Smart  Set 8 

People  ond  Places 10 

Chan  Crowford  II 

Whofs  Cooking _..ll 


Civil  Rights  Bills 
Passage  Predicted 

WASHINGTON— Senate  Republican  Leader  Wil- 
liam F.  Knowland  predicted  Tuesday  that  the  Senate 
will  approve  civil  rights^  legislation  at  this  session  de- 
spite threats  of  a  southern  filibuster. 

Knowland  was  joined  by  House  GOP  Leader  Wil- 
liam   Martin  -who    said    that 


there  "is  no  doubt"  that  the 
House  will  pass  the  legislation. 
Knowland  predicted  action  on 
civil  rights  bills  as  soon  as  the 
Senate  concludes  action  on  the 
Administration's  Middle  East- 
ern resolution.  The  predictions 
came  after  Knowland  and  Mar- 
tin had  attended  the  Tuesday 
morning  conference  of  Repub- 
lican leaders  at  the  White 
House. 

Senator  Thomas  C.  Hennings, 

Jr.,    Chairman    of    the    Senate 

Committee     on     Constitutional 

Rights,    announced    that    hear- 

(Continued  on  Page  5) 


VIE  FOR  QUEEN  TITLE — Four  suniist  C alifornia  beauties  tossed  their  lovely  heads  in 
the  direction  of  the  Zenith  Social  and  Charity  club's  forthcoming  annual  benefit  dance  March 
24  at  the  Elks  Ballroom.  One  of  them  may  be  crowned  queen  of  the  ball.' Standing,  from  left: 
Jacqueline  Renty,  clerk-typist  at  Juvenile  Hall;  Jocelyn  Brown,  Compton  Junior  College 
coed:  Patti  Prince,  employe  of  the  Revell  To  y  Manufacturers;  and  Barbara  Jean  Graham, 
clerk-typist  for  the  Veterans' Jdminisiratiun.  ( Adamtl 


-T-..  9.yx..f  s  ■ 


] 


v: 


-Friend  Shot 
Me.'  Claims 
Dying  Man 

Leander  Peterson,  27,  1346  E. 
47th  street,  died  Monday  from 
a  bullet  Wound  in  his  chest. 
Wanted  on  a  charge  of  murder 
was  a  "friend,"  Jake  Pcrkihs, 
address  unknown. 

Peterson  was  found  in  a  park- 
ing lot,  Saturday,  in  a  1949 
Cadillac,  his  head  hanging  from 
the  open  door,  his  feet  stretched 
out  under  the  steering  wheel. 
•  While  he  was  being  taken  to 
Tweedy  Emergency  hospital,  he 
told  ambulance. attendants,  "A 
friend  shot  me."  Then  he  added, 
"Jake  Perkins  shot  me.  He  shot 
me  with  a  rifle.  Oh,  my  God, 
I'm  dying." 

Witnessed  iiiterrogated  by 
police,  none  of  whom  admitted 
seeing  the  killing-  were  Leby 
Danils,  40,  9322  Grape  street; 
Nathan  Washington,  32,  6634  S. 
Central  avenue;  and  B.  F. 
Tyson,  33,  Glen  Adams  Hotel, 
68tli  and  Central  avenue. 


,H 


Kind  Benefactor 
Learns  Lesson 
The  Ward  Way 

William  H.  Jones,  retired,  of) 
1185  E,  Vernon  avenue,  Apt.  11, 
likes  to  be  a  good  Samaritan, 
so  when  Betty  Johns,  27,  came 
to  his  house  and  told  him  she 
was  hungry,  Jones  went  into 
the  kitchen  and  prepared  some- 
thing good  for  her  to  eat. 
•  Betty  Johns  finished  eating 
and  said  "thank  you"  to  her 
benefactor.  She  said  she  felt 
a  lot  better,  and  left. 

Jones  felt  good,  too — until  he 
found  that  his  wallet  was  miss- 
ing and  the  $18  that  was  in  it. 


G|iana  Freedom 
Day  Scheduled 
F6rMarch6  ; 

ACCRA."\GOLD  COAST— A  na- 
tioii  wiy  be  born  next  Wednes- 
day-when  the  Gold  Coast  sheds' 
its  pre^t  name  and  becomes 
Gh.ina,  the  newest  member  of 
the    British    QpmmdiiweflJtti    of 
Naiion%.  Festivities   wiB  vtaif' 
Sunday  anil  culminate  March 
6  v'hen  Pftrmler  KwanM  NkriK. 
mai  presides  at  the  first  sefe>  ' 
sioi[  of  the  lOi  member  Paitia- 
meiit. 

Vice  President  Richard,  Nixon 
will   head  a  delegation  of  Am- 
erican officials  and  prominent 
lajnnen  who  will  bear  greetings 
of  t  fie  United  States  to  the  new 
nation.    Among   prominent  Ne- 
grcKs  who  are  scheduled  to  ar- 
rive within  the  next  few  days 
are  Lester  B.  Granger,  National 
Uf h  iiiMLeagae   executive,    and 
Rev    aP  Chester   Clark,    repre- 
sent iji«^  the  AME  Church. 
Queen  Bepreseqted  * 
Qieen.  Elizabeth   II  <rf  Eng^-. 
lane   will  be  represented  by  the 
Due  less  of  Kent  who  will  open 
the   first   session    of   the   new 
Parliament    TTie    date    chosei? 
for    Independence    Day    is    the 
an n  versa ry  of  the  agreement 
betv  een  the  British  and  Fanti 
ohie's    which    was    signed    in 
1844 

Nl:rumah  has  been* serving 
as  ]irime  minister  since  1952, 
whei  the  office  was  created.  ' 
Up  to-  the  present  time,  how- 
ever his  powers  and  those  of 
his  :abinet  have  been  limited, 
with  the  important  posts  of 
foreign  affafrs.  defense  and  i)o- 
lice  subject  to  the  authority  of 
the  governor  who  is  appointed 
by   (Jreat   Britain.  ,  i 

Orerlordship  Ended 
W  th  the  inauguration  March 
6.    tlie    governor's   powers   will 
be  removed. 

Final  date  for  severance  of 
the  British  overlordship  was 
agreed  upon  follow^g  the  elec- 
tion! to  the  104 -member  single 
chamber  legislature  in  July, 
19.56,  At  that  time  the  Conven- 
tion Peoples  Party.  (CPP)  won  • 
71  scats.  J 

The    hi.stor\-    of    the    modem 
Continued  on  Page  5) 


Whites,  Neqroeis  Aopeal 
For  End  of  Bus  Jim  Crow 

NEW* ORLEANS  —  Integration  of  the  city's  tran- 
.■^it  vehicles  was  asked  of  New  'Means  Public  Service, 
Inc.  and  the  city  government  in  i  petition  signed  by  125 
citizens,  white  and  colored,  inclijding  41  clergymen,  this 
week. 


'i  - 


Four  clergymen  presented  the 
petition  to  the  transit  company 
president,  George  S.  Dinwiddle, 
and  to  Robert  E.  Wall,  execu- 
tive assistant  to  the  Mayor. 

They  were  the  Rev.  Clarence 
H.  Snelling.  Jr.,  Methodist 
chaplain  of  Tulane  University; 
the  Rev.  Eugene  McManus, 
S5.J.,  parochial  school  teach- 
er; the  Rev.  Thomas  C.  Aycock, 
Jr.,  Episcopal  rector;  and  tfie 
tt£w.  Samuel  L.  Gandy.  college 
chaplain. 

The  petition  prepared  by  the 
Southern  Conference  Education- 
al, Fund,  Inc.,  expressed  can- 
cem  that  ttis  problem  be  solv-iv(^ 


\   ' 


ed  "iunder  the  guidance  of  the 
highest  type  of  moral  princi- 
ples. '  It  called  upon  authori- 
ties a  "honor  the  supreme  law 
of  tie  land  and  to  implemmt 
it 

"Tb  ignore  or  attempt  to  dr- 
cunH'ent  what  must  oatat 
woulil  give  strength  to  law- 
lessness .  .  .  We  therefore  urge 
our  IJKal  authorities  not  to  wait 

court  order,  but  ra&er  to 
initiiite  a  positive  program  of 
compliance  .  .  .  Beal  inditfer- 

or  apathy  is  bound  to 
constitute  an  invitation  to  those 
of  exjtremist.  persuaafon  to  pro* 

disturbatnoi." 


»i 


£1:^ 


a£i^ 


vat.  r rr^  -.x.-  •  -  -■-  v-  ^-^*:9-  j:«ft4^«i!$i!tStv:s3S.;^;i-~: 


t\ 


■i    -«.i.tf» 


mM 


•i"^''-^..    ■  -  r  ;•'■'■    ,, 


'  "^-■■■*'!^' "'■ '■  ■'"-""t*' 


1 


KCOP 


mmmm 


I  suncH  M*  uvMiuu  '« I*  ::siSVnL^- 


«««!fijrr 


^€i£DM 


Grocery   Company 


gp$ei$lM^*^ 


The-HOnctrfbYftflr*'  Evtiit  you've  Imm  waiting  fori 
Rolplis  brings  you  your  cll^e~1irstocl(-u|^on.fonious 
Hunt  Tomoto  Foods  ot  reolly  great  savingsl 


OKEEFI  t  MERRin  SAS  UlUt 


Ust  Dqr  to  Registw         |  Plymouth  .      Two-week  Trips  for  Two  j  :r»„xr  «H.r™r.r 

FABULOUS  PRIZES  1 1957  4.Door  Sedans         To  Aeopuko  and       j  jifi^jSHsS: 

I    With    Pushbutton    Pewar   Hit*,    radio,   hoator,   >  MeXICO    ClfV  •  •  •  ^ONOeD  WATER  SOFTENERS 

Miytag  Refrigerator-Freezers       i  whin,  .idow.ii  Hr.^  ond.many  oth.r  luxury  i  ^,j>^^^  .o,^h^  c/-.  h^  u  j^^^  T?urERti«!l"m'SE  kidsi 

.. ..  _      k    -.  -1 J  -. I     OKirui.  I      Plata  Viitg  M*rmeza  Fn  M««iae  City.  |  uiibk    ■■.bibmb   <*iiaaciiBV  •■«• 


Aim—t  II  CO.  fl.  of  ptannod  tloraga  tpam 


\        WIRE  ll-PIRCR  ARSRSSORY  SRTS 


flUMTS    ' 

Tomato 
Juice 


13'/i-oz. 


2.15 


e 


HUNTS  SOUD  PACK 

Tomatoes 


fUPIR  QUA! 


.%  STEAKS 

c 


9 


14H^ 


15 


Club 


tlunts 


HUNTl 

Tomato 
Paste 


4-os.. 


iiu: 


7 


♦(UNTf 


Chili  Pep(>er 
Catsup  i4.<». 


22c 


HUNTS 

Chili  Sauce  11  i4'e«..vn«; 22c 


TOMxrojOiirsup 


HUNTS 


14^ 


Lk 


91 


T-BoJie 


U.S.D.A. 
CHOICE  GRADE 


95 


Vbk 


Porterhouse  or 
Boneless  Top  Sirfoln     i& 


Swift's  Preituum  Frozen  Meats 

CHOPPEO  ^    CC 

0  Buttered  Beef  Sleaks  so...^.^  3 

Loin  Luncheon  Steaks  or      j.  « 
Beef  Sandwich  Steaks  <^.;^4  d  ^ 


BHMaai 


9  9  ^^^"^^^''9^^  Patties 


KcdMiH  your  CMipeni  ot  any 


1 2-o«™ . . 
Storo 


43 


HORMit  SLICED  g   #%>■ 

Canadian  Style  Bacon  >k;'.^v3y^  Fresh  Fillet  of  Rockfish 


i»b»«  •  «  •  •  «  o  • 


33c 


25 


HORMEU 

Chill    CON  CARNE 

With  Ream  •  IS'/^-oi.. 

AMERICAN  BEAUTY  ITALIAN  STTir 

Spaghettr  ^^ 

Dinner    8^»;,-,-i,......lw 

III  tuAttkmmmm 


SEUNbU  IM^ItTEO 
'SLICE© 

Coifed  Ham  ttu. 


Honey  Ruff  Bread 


A  NUT-LIKE  FLAVORED  LOAF 
AN  OLD  TIME 


FAVORin  large  1  -tb.  «.S-ez. 

^  ii'ifrf|-|ni ilWf 


26 


Walnut  Pound  Cake 


SERVE  WITH  fbJBi* 


I 


ICE  CREAM 

WONDERFUL  DESSERT         BecK 


49 


AMERICAN  BEAUTY 

Noodles 

FifM,  Brood  Of  Wi«l* 


■m  ^'^rfsr- 


15 


PRICE 
SALE 


KRAFT 

Salad  Dressing  Vi 

On*  8-es.  Itolinn  Dreulng  for  Vi  Prko  wMi  »n« 
8-ex.  Cotim  Drottins  ot  Jm   ^^    _ 


Reguior  Pnc* 


Tetof  PHe**,. 


42 


VAN  CAMP'S 

Spanish 
Rice 


CATERINfi 

Butterscotch  Ripple 
Ice  Cream 


pint 


2.49 


CHUNKY  FAMILY  SIZE 

Chocolate  Bars  ^    $100 

WITH  RAISINS  fir  NUTS      8-01 


3.M 


»lui  *t  Tax 


>DAMS  »  BROOKS 

Butter  Toffee 
Peanuts 


1  S-^tai     •*•••»•      ^M  I 

SBEttisssaBSBa 


$|23 


PACIFIC  THIN  FLAKi 


•■ 


Saltine  Crackers 

Mb>  4-pQck 

23 


1! 


BEL  AIR  Plain  OTC 

Croutons        Ch«o«tfrGariia 


-MOMMMW- 


35c 


KRAFT 

Sliced 

Cheese  ««^. 

Amorican,  Pimonte  or  Jwlu        '/i •  lb. ..  OO 

aHBmsn/ii|  wi  lyi  ^.t;  f  ^i  wjigW^^RBgr 


SILVER  SKILLET  FROZEN 

Corned 
Beef 


CHANNEL 


OOLD  TAPE 
DIVIDEND 


FREEwHhSSM 

MvtIciMt  Ralphi . 
atli  CMli-ltofMir 
TapMl 


DISH 

GLASS  DRYIR 


DISN  DRAINER 


Ftir  Ml«rai  Hiki 


With  D0ubl8.stMniiifd  T*Jw«HrT«i«r».^'^«;<» 
aUSS  DRYER,  aRd        p~ 


P«rtabl0  Silvsr  CaMy! 


iclativi  YliylmaM 
Plastlt  atatlaf 


■iaii«MMI^-«>«»-«Miiiii6Bi 


79 


AAORENO 

Frozen 
Beef  Tacos 


13,V^-9X....*»« 


39 


FRADELIS  FROZEN 

Swiss  Steak 
Dinner 


12-ez. 


89« 


MORTOI^'S 

Frozen 
Spaghetti 


^'^^'^  .       ^TWs  y^Ssii   Coupon 

WORTH  25^ 

On  Purchase  of  one 

1-lb.  Can  5?«^  COFFEE 

Regular  Price  99c    less  This  25c  Coupon    Total  Price  74c 
Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday  and  Sundoy  only,  February  28,  Morch  1,  2  &  3,  1957 

Goo«r  o»  ony  ^ttt  Morket  l-»MIT  ONE  COUPON  PER  CUSTOMER 

fm  fB  -ri'  n  I'tf*  f  ^  ^  «^«imjjjk^aB 


[HiWl^mRflBwliftWihR<iiil*f*\WtHMlilHlPUI^ailMlWg8 


KELLOGG'S 

Special  K 
Cereal 


iM^aaMMMa 


i^^-vi. 


27 


VAN  CAMP'S 

Beanee 
Weenees 


i2'Os««  •<**••« 


27c 


FULVITA  BRAND 

Vitamin  A 


Bottle  of 
100  Copsules 


*1.19 


TM-ot.. 


»lu>  U  Ta« 


37* 


BETTY  CROCKER  REGULAR  OR  CHOCOUTI 

Coconut  Macaroon 
Cookie  Mix 


t! 


13-o»,. 


rlCTTY  CtOCKIR 

-Brownie  Mix  um........^.34c 


:    Saak    fc  i  !■  i   1 1 1 1 


TOMATOES 

HUNT'S  SoRd  Pock 

10 


KRAFT  : 


Red  Currant  Jelly 


10-ox.  Morkod  "Sc  Off"  Sa!o 
Prie*  38c  Lom  5e  P^ce 


23 


XLNT 
Tomales 


i5-oz*>  •••••#• 


19c 


Lux 
Flakes 


mmmmmm 


La  rot  Pkg.. 


34c 


t;^!**».. 


McCormick 
Tea 


TEA  BAGS 

Pkg.  of  i8 . 


67« 


SKIPPY 

Pet 
Stew, 4 


Vj-or.  Can 


2.23 


FlexibU  Poiy«thyl*n« 
DRAINBOAtD  TRAY 

Matchini  colers!  Slepti  for  perfect 
jRte  siRk.  FREE  with  2  $20  eavitepei 
•  Ralphs  Geli  Cash  Rtfister  Tapes! 

Hurry  to  cei|ipl«t*  Y^vr  ••#{' 
OhiMwcHv  DhrMMid  mida 

A^RqH3! 

Kmp  savins  tap* j  for  FtEB  DiallMr 

Stffeh  or  S0omUss 

NYLONS! 

in  60  gauge,  1 5  ^MiUr . .  %  FREE  with  t 
$20  MvalopM  of  Rabha  Gold  Topoa! 

Regular  Ny lons,  oO-gauge,  IS- 

denier  •  •  •  guaranteed 

first  quality!  Yours  for 

just  1-$20  envelope  of 

Ralphs  gold  cjash-register 

tapes,  y        I  y  J 


»lu«  'e  Tm 


TOMATO  SAUCE 

HUNTS 


TOMATO  JUICE 

MUNrs 


WOOLYH  LIQUID 

Wool  Cleaner 


8-ot 


49 


tut  2c  T^ 


Ammonia 


Pint 


10 


Rinso  Blue 

DETERGENT 


eRAHAM 


Quart. 


Hut  1c  Tw 


17 


Giortt 
Pkg..\ 


77 


CRACKQS 


WATCH  FOR  EXCITING  HEW  GOLD  TAPE  FREE  OFFERS  SOON! 

THIRD  WffK'S  PRIZE  WIHKERS: 


19S7  PfyMooriirMnnSOTT^^^loy:  Moilcoo  Trip  for  Two,  Mi«.  itiMt  All«i:  Mayto«  RofilgortofProooor.  JorfMi  Loom-;  3  O'Koofo  4  Morritt  %m  Rmm^s.  HiMo  L»iMo   fttov  Am  Jbk 
MalM  P«v*;  BomM  Wotor  SolNoor,  Cbarios  MeLarood;  Hltot  Vocoin  Clo—or.  Mn,  R.  B.  SatHot;  2  Brothor  S«wIb|  Moclilawb  Pwcv  0.  hmr,  Uwb  J.  Alhi  ■»;  Aititfk  Wb»  te  r 
L  StMHRM:  2  SMboM  ilodrk  SUIIol*,  Bill  WIflitr.  JmIIo  OK  VMM.  Mn.  Pay  D«  H«rdt.  •»>^or..  «imm  wn  m.  i 


» 


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t 


FRO^T  PAGE — The  California  Baffle  this  ueek  came  in  lor  its  share  in  the  celehratioK 
of  Ratpht  S fires'  84th  birthday  party.  The  company,  in  appreciation  of  the  cooperation 
accorded  Ralphs  hy  Adiertisint)  Manager  Francis  P.  M'allet,  "What's  Cooking"  Editor 
iBarbara  A  founts  and  the  entire  staff,  presented  the  pr.per  XiAih  a  specially  baked  lSx22-inch 
cake,  representing  the  "Front  Page."  The  fros  ted  replica  nas  complete  with  a  blue  Eagle  em- 
bedded in  n  black  masthend,  headlines,  colum  n  rules  and  all.  bearing  the  message:  "From 
Ralphs  to  the  California  Eagle,  You  Take  the  Cake."  Mrs.  Mounts  is  showing  preparing  to 
dt   the  honors. 

Henri  O'Bryant 
Again  Controls 
Robe  Company 

Henri  O'Brj'ant,  whose  choir 
robe  manufacturing  company 
went  into  banicruptcy  in  Janu- 
ary, is  back  in  business  at 
the  old  stand,  thanks  to  the 
generosity  and  cooperation  of 
two  of  the  Southland's  leading 
ministers. 

When  the  business  was  put 
on  the  'block"  Monday,  it  was 
purchased  by  the  Rev.  B.  W. 
Wade;  pastor  -of-  Pilgrim  Bap- 
tist Church,  and  tthe  Rev.  L.  B. 
Moss,  president  of  the  Califor- 
nia State  >^aptist  Convention 
and  also  pastor  of  the  Park 
Avenue  Baptist  Church  in  River- 
side. 

Almost  immediately,  accord- 
ing to  0"Bryant,  the  two  min- 
isters deeded  the  business  back 
to  him. 

"We  take  this  action  in  be- 
half of  O'Bryant,"  the  minis- 
ters stated,  "because  ^at  this 
time  he  needs  the  people  whom 
he  has  so  ,  graciously  helped 
through  the  years.  His  work 
has  been  an  in.spiration  to  our 
churches  througiiout  the  coun- 
trj-." 

0'Br\-ant  gives  as  one  of  the 
reasons  for  the  firm's  recent 
difficulties  an  attack  upon  his 
business  by  corripetitive  com- 
panies. He  claims  that  a  letter 
written  to  pastors  of  the  city 
by  the  Academic  and  Church 
and  Choir  Gowns  Co.  over  the 
signature  of  its  owner.  Harry! 
Starley, -has  damaged  him.  He  | 
has  filed  suit  against  Stanley- 
and  the  company  for  5250,000. 


Scfiool  Employe 

Struck  by  Auto, 

Dies  in  liospital 


Arthur  Wilson,  56.  of  2836 
Summerset  Drive,  an  employe 
of  the  Board  of  Education,  died 

in  Georgia  Street  Receiving 
Hospital  at  7:30  p.m.  last 
Thursday,  two  hours  after  he 
^vas  struck  by  a  car  as  he  was 
crossing  the  intersection  at 
Crenshaw  an.d  Adams  blvd. 

According  to  the  coroner's  re- 
port, .he  suffered  a  fractured 
pelvis  and  abdominal  hemor- 
rhages. 

The  car  which  struck  him 
was  driven  by  Delia  Wenz,  71, 
a  retired  school  teacher. 

Funeral  services  were  held 
Wednesday  at  10:30  a.m.  at  the 
Conner  -  Johnson  Mortuaries, 
with  the- Rev.  G.  R.  Washing- 
ton officiating. 

He  is  survived  by  his  wife, 
Rosemell  Wilson:  and  father 
and  mother,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wood 
Wilson. 

In  another  accident  at  81st 
and  Hoover,  in  which  two  auto- 
mobiles collided  about  7  p.m. 
Friday.  Alexander  W.  Lawrence, 
40,  of  1215  Lewis  avenue,  Long 
Beach,  was  killed. 

He  was  the  nephew  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Albert  Poole,  9704  S. 
Broadway. 

Funeral  arrangements  are 
being  handled  by  San  Joaquin 
Mortuary,  Stockton. 


SA'STA  MOMCA  SAACP—One  of  the  most  successful  meetings  of  the  Santa  Monica 
yAACP  was  held  Thursday  with  tuo  prominent  attorneys,  Loren  Miller,  publisher  of  the 
C/ilifnrnia  Eagle,  and  Rex  M  inter,  of  Santa  M  onicn,  as  guest  speakers.  From  left:  Rcr.  If.  P. 
Carter,  pastor  of  the  Calvary  Baptist  Church  ,  where  the  meeting  was  held;  Miller;  Minter; 
and  I'lrgtl  Brown,  president  of  the  branch.  fS  tory  Page  5/) 


The  Calffomta  E»gle-3 - 

Thursday,  February  28,  1957 


FHAtoDeny 
Insurance  to 
Biased  Builders 


NAACP  Youth 
Organize  at 
Area  Meeting 

The  Southern  Area  Youth 
and  College  Council  of  the 
NAACP  was  organized  last  Sun- 
day. Feb.  23,  at  the  quarterly 
meeting  of  the  ^^A.ACP  South- 
ern Area  Conference  held  in 
Riversi.de. 

The  organization  of  the  youth 
group  was  supervised  by  Atty. 
Franklin     Williams,     regional 
secretary-council.     The    follow- 
ing    temporary     officers     wer% 
chosen:      president.    William 
Simms.    Santa    Barbara;    vice- 
president,  Amos  I-'iaac.  San  Ber- 
I  nardino;     secretary-,    Lucy    Ad- 
I  kins.    Las    Vegas;    and    corres- 
I  ponding  secretary.  Ruby  Bowie, 
I  Los  .\ngeles. 
I     The   youth    council    has    the 


Mrs.  Clyde  Howell  Dies; 
Mourned  by  CommiHiify 


ROBE  BUSI\ESS  RESCUED  —  The  O  Bryant  Robe 
Manufacturing  Co..  uhich  went  into  bankruptcy  in  January, 
was  purchased  at  auction  Tuesday  by  two  of  the  Southland's 
leadmg  ministers  and  turned  back  to  Heni  O'Bryant.  Above, 
O'Bryant  is  shown,  center,  with  the  ministers  who  rescued 
the  business.  The  Rev.  B.  fV.  Hade,  left,  and  the  Rev.  L.  B. 
Moss. 

Ron  Waller's  Maid  Must  Stand 
Trial  in  $11,000  Jewel  Robbery 


Jim  Crow  End 
Asked  for  All 
Illinois  Schools 

CHICAGO  —  Legislative  ac- 
tion to  wipe  out  segregated 
schools  is  being  propos.ed  to  the 
70th  session  ©f  the.  Illinois 
General  Assembly  by  the  Illi- 
nois Conference  of  Branches  of 
the  NAACP. 

Gerald    D.   Bullock,   president 
of  the  Illinois  N.^ACP.  in  an- 
nouncing  lie   proposals   noted 'The  first  project  for  the  youth 
that  both  in  Chicago  and  down-  I  is  the  annual  queen  contest'  to 
state    there    are    a    number    of  |  rai.se  funds  for  delegates  to  the 
de   facto  segregated   schools. 

It  has  been  estimated  that 
close  to  100.000  Negro  children 
in  the  state  still  attend  all  Ne- 
gro schools  or  those  that  are 
predominantly  so.  and  that  in 
onl.v  a  small  number  of  commu- 
nities are  Negro  and  other  min- 
ority group  teachers  employed. 

The  propo.sed  measure  would 
provide,  among  i-other  things, 
for  the  withholding  of  state 
funds  from  any  school  district 
which  allows  discrimination  in 
the  employment  of  teachers  be- 
cau.se  of  their  religion,  race, 
color,  national  origin'  or  ances- 
try, s 


nent  clubwoman,  died  We'dnes 
day.  Feb.  20.  at  her  home.  1374 
E.  56th  street.  Mrs.  Howell,  a 
native  of  Trinidad.  Colo.,  came 
to  California  in  1924  and  mar- 
ried Lovic  E.  Howell  in  the 
following  year. 

Mrs.  Howell  organized  the 
Ladies'  Auxiliary  to  the  Dining 
Car  Employees,  Local  465,  in 
1935.  and  served  as  its  first 
president.  Sne  was  a  member  of 
t.he  Literary  Art  Social  Club, 
the  Des  Bouer  Art  Club,  t  h  e 
Community  Service  Council, 
and  a  number  of  other  clubs 
and  {organizations. 

Mrs.  iHowell  is  survived  by 
her  husband,  Mr.  Howell;  a  sis- 
ter, Mrs.  Grace, Guess,  one  un- 
cle and  four  cousins. 

The  Utopia  Club  members 
were  active  pallbearers  and 
members  of  Local  465  and  the 

,            ,     ,.       ,  „   »v,-  i  Brotherhood     of     Sleeping     Car 

same  tvpe  of  structure   as  the    „_  .„  „         „  v,  n 

,^     -^ : ,._      _.j    \__^,,  I  Porters    were     honorary   pall- 
bearers. Members  of  the  fcadies' 


Mrs.  Clyde  G.  Howell,  promi-ythe  Angelus  Funer*al.  Home  on 

Friday.  Feb.  22,  at  2  p.m..  with 
interment  at  Lincoln  Memorial 
Cemetery. 


adult     organization     and     will 
meet    simultaneously    with    it. 


national  convention  in  Detroit. 


MOTOR  VEHICLE  DEATHS 

Motor  vehicles  killed  6700 
people  in  the  United  States  in 
1913.  In  19.55,  thev  killed  3S.300. 


Eighty  young  delegates  at- 
tended the  council  formation. 
Representatives  came  from  Las 
Vega.s,  China  Lake.  Long  Beach,  |  g^j^g 
San  Bernardino.  Riverside.  Mon-  ' 
rovia.  Santa  Barbara  and  Los 
Angeles. 

Max  Mont,  secretary  of  the 
Comrnittee  for  Equal  l^ploy- 
ment  Opportunities,  was  the 
keynote  speaker.  He  reported 
on  the  status  of  FEP  legislation. 

Individual  branch  reports 
were  made  by  the  chapters 
present.  Elbert  T.  Hudson  ga\e 
the  treasurers  report.  Frank  H. 
Barnes  presided  and  gave  the 
president's  report.  Percy  Ander- 
son, Long  Beach,  j^as  elected 
second  vice-president. 

The  next  area  meeting  will 
be  held  in  Monrovia  on  Mav  IS. 


Au.xiliar>'  with  its  president 
Mrs.  Goldie  Washington,  at- 
tended the  services  in  a  group 
A  pumber  of  clubs  and  or- 
ganizations were  represented 


Many  outstanding  citizens  of 
the  community,  among  whom 
were  Mrs.  A.  C.  Bilbrew.  J.  L. 
general  superintendent 
of  the  Union  Pacific  Dining  Car 
and  Hotel  Department,  and  Ed- 
ward Hawkins,  city  commis- 
sioner of  public  works,  attend- 
ed the  funeral.' 


Mitchell  Asks 
Bias  Bon  In 
School  Bill 

WASHINGTON  —  Use  of  Fed- 
eral ,  funds  to  construct  more 
segregated  schools  Would  be  a 
"major  national  calamity-."  That 
is  what  Clarence  Mitchell,  di 
rector  of  the  W^ashington  Bu- 
reau of  the  NAACP  told  a  House 
Committee -Tuesday.    ' 

Mitchell  urged  the  subcom- 
mittee to  attach  an  anti-segre- 
gation amendment  to  any 
school-aid  bill  it  votes  out.  The 
group  is  considering  several 
proposals,  including  an  admirh 
istration  measure  which  would 
provide  Sl.300.000.000  over  the 
next  four  years  for  school  con 
struction. 

An    anti-segregation    amend 


■With  'Washington  an^Ore- 
gon  legislatures  ready  ifFpass 
legislation  forbidding  segrega- 
tion or  discrimination  in  pub- 
licly aided  housing,  Albert  M. 
Cole.  Federal  Housing  Adminis- 
trator, announced  that  builders 
who  violate  a  simUar  New  York 
law  will  be  denied  FHA  mort- 
gage insurance. 

The    New    York    law    forbids 
builders    and    developers    from 
discriminating     in     the     sale 
or    rental    of    housing    units  f 
built   with    FHA   mortgage    in- : 
surance  or  V.A.  loan  guarantees^ 
and  also  forbids  segregatioo  in' 
such  housing.  The  Washington  , 
and  Oregon  laws  will  be  simi- 
lar. 

The  New  York  law  is  admini- 
stered by  the  State  Commission 
Against  Discrimination  and  if 
that  Commission  finds  that  a 
builder  has  violated  the  law. 
FH.\  will  simply  refuse  to  is- . 
sue  mortgage  insurance.  Loss 
of  such  mortgage  insurance 
would  strike  a  heavy  blow  at 
builders  since  it  would  prevent 
them  from  getting  needed  cred- 
it for  home  construction. 

In  explaining  its  course.  Fed- 
eral Housing  Administration 
said:  "Even  though  an  agency 
of  the  Federal  Government  can- 
not be  responsible  for  enforcing^, 
a  stateN  law.  the  FHA  has  an 
obligation  to  see  that  its  facili- 
ties are  available  to  those 
builders  who  do  business  ethi- 
cally." 

A  suit  designed  to  assess 
damages  against  builders  in 
Sacramento  who  have  discrimi- 
nated again.st  Negroes  in  the 
sale  of  FHA  housing  is  now 
under  advisement  The  plaintiff 
in  the  ca.se  also  seeks  an  in- 
junction to  prevent  future  dis- 
crirriination. 


Fire  Dept.  Jobs 

(^ Continued  from  Page  1) 
!  applications  can  be  obtained  at 
j  the.  above  mentioned  locations 
I  and  ahso  at  Room  300  in  the 
I  San  Pedro  Branch  City  Hall: 
I  Room'  18  in  West  Los  Angeles 
'  Branch  City  Hall;  Room  1  in 
I  Venice  Branch  City  Hall,  or  by 
'calling  MI.  5211.  or  writing  to 


was  later  defeated. 


ment  was  tacked  on  a  similari  ■  Room  5.  Citv  -HaU,  Los  Angeles 

bill  last  year  and  the  measurej ;  12.  Calif. 

These  positions  offer -all  ci'vil 
ser\ice  benefits,  including  pro- 
motion by  competitive  exami- 
nation, -p^id  holidays  and  vaca- 


"rnvt 


TURN  SIGNALS 

enty-two  states  -have  made! 


turn  signals  on  new  motor  ve|  ]  tions,    a    five-day    work    we^ 

ng  to  j  plu.s  si 


hicles^  compulsory,  accopdi 
Funeral  services  were  held  at 'the  National  Automobile  Club 


Hero  Rushes  to  Phone,  Calls 
Police,  Ambulance;  Aids  Victims 


f Continued  from  Page  1) 
phatically  that  she  had  given 
any  of  the  jewels  to  Mrs.  Mc- 
Chaney.  denied  that  she  had 
ever  seen  the  jewels  under  her 
mattress  or  in  a  football  case. 
She  told  also  of  discovering 
that  the  jewels  were  missing 
when  she  returned  to  her  home 


Mrs.  Waller's  jewelry  lying 
around  the  house  when  she 
fleaned  up  and  that  she  gen- 
erally took  it  home  with  her 
for  safe  keeping. 

She  said  she  had  given  the 
.jewels  to  Dr.  Moore.  whMn  she 
had  known  for  a  long  time,  as 
a     birthday     gift.     Dr.     Moore, 


in  October  after  an  absence  of  j  who  was  also  present,  said' that 
several  weeks.  after     receiving    the    birthday 

Officer  Hooper  also  took  the  I  present   she   had   gone   to  San 
gtand   and   testified   that   after  j  Francisco  for   a   preaching  en 


gagement.  While  there  she 
had  talked  to  a  friend.  Ira  Har-. 
ris.  who  had  told  her  he  knew 
where  she  could  sell  the  jewels, 
if  she  .so  wished. 

He  made  a  contact  tor  her 
with  a  man  named  Jimmy  at  a 
furniture  store,  who  in  turn 
said  he  would  have  to  show 
them  to  someone  else.  A  price 
of  $700  was  mentioned.  Dr. 
Moore   turned    over   the   jewels 


b 


Mrs.  McChaney  was  taken  into 
custody,  she  had  admitted  tak- 
ing the  Jewelry,  and  had  ad- 
mitted also  that  she  was  aware 
that  this  was  stealing.  Offi- 
cer Hooper  stated,  however. 
that  he  had  not  obtained  a 
written  confession. 

Pastor  Held 

In  another  action  Tuesday  in 
Dept.  41,  Mrs.  McChaney's  di- 
minutive    friend.     Dr.     Minnie 

Moore,  pastor  of  the  Faith  Tern-  1  to  "Jimmie,"  and  that  was  the 
pie   of   Universal    Science.    967    •  •      •  '  " 

W.  Vernon  avenue,  was  ordered 
to  appear  in  Wqst  Los, 'Angeles 
court  March  12.  Dr.  Moore  is 
charged  with  receipt  of  stolen 
property. 

Both  Mrs.  McChaney,  who 
lives   at  11728  Belhaven  street, 

and  Dr.  Moore,  were  allowed  to  1  to  them  there.     He  cam 
remain  free  on  bail. 

In  the  interview  Monday 
night,  Mrs.  McChaney  said  that 
she    frequently   found   some   of 


last  she  has  seen  of  them,  she 
declared. 

She  and  Harris,  however,  did 
have  an  appointment  to  meet 
a  man  by  the.  name  of  "Caru- 
so" in\  a  motel.  Caruso  —  Dr. 
Moore^  didn't  recall  his  last 
name — was  to  bring  the  money 

-but 
so  also  did  the  police  and  ar- 
rested both  her  and  Harris. 

rs.   McChaney's   arrest  fol- 
lowed. 


Missing  Person 

Anyone  knowing  the  where- 
abouts of  Ida  McCree.  formerly 
of  Philadelphia,  is  asked  to  get 
in  touch  with' Atty.  Corriell  Rid- 
ley   at   once:    at   229   N.   Broad 


^Continued  from  Page  !'> 
lice  and  four  ambulances  were 
on  the  scene — thanks  to  ;one 
man  who  was  more  interested 
in  getting  help  to  the  injured 
than  in  seeing  for  himself  what 
had   happened. 

After  he  had  called  for  help. 
Le  Vaine  went  outside  to  join 
the  rescuers.  "The  trolley  had 
knocked  over  a  fire  plug  and 
the  area  was  flooded  with  wa- 
ter," he  said.  "Isaw  one  wom- 
an lying  unconscious,  covered 
with  water;  She  looked  as 
though  she  was  almost 
drowned."  * 

He  said  the  trolley  was  fit- 
ted into  the  bakery  shop  like 
a  glove..  Grace  Johnson,  the 
baker's  wife,  was  pinned  up 
against   the   wq,ll  and   her  as 


way, 

Mrs. 
known 
Willis. 


Room  210.  Madison  9-2581.  i  •"^'stant  was  lying  on  the  floor. 


y[ 


McCree    may    also    be 
as  Ida   Carlton  or  Ida 


Local  Optometrists 
Attend  Conference 

SAN  DIEGO.  Feb.  21— Dr.  S.  S. 
Brown  and  Dr.  Jesse  C.  Beasley, 
members  of  the  California 
Optometric  Association,  were 
among  several  Los  Angeles  op- 
tometrists who  took  part  in  a 
series  of  important  discussions 
here  at  the  52nd  annual  con- 
vention which  ended  on  Satur-' 
day,  Feb.  23,  after  a  four  day 
meeting. 


The  assistant  escaped  with. mi 
nor  injuries. 

"Thirty-seven  people  w  e  re 
suffering  with  broken  limbs, 
i  bruises,  and  cuts.  About  20 
people  who  vvereii't  seriously 
injured  were  in  a  pitiful  state 
of  shock.  It's  a  miracle  that 
nobody  was  killed/' 

When  the  Eagle  reporter  in- 
terviewed Joe  Le  Vaine,  he  was 


suffering  from  a  headache  and 
was  still  badly  shaken  up  from 
the  noise  of  the  crash.  He  told 
us  he  had  been  in  London 
bombing  raids,  he'd  had  shells 
exploding  around  him  in  Bur- 
ma, and  he  knew  what  it  was  to 
hear  400  cannons  going  off  at 
the  same  time  as  they  -did  in 
the  battle  of  El  Alamein  in 
Egypt.  "But  even  a  weapon  of 
war  sounds  tame  compared  to 
the  thunder  of  this  crash.  The 
building,  arid  all  the  area, 
seemed  to  quiver." 

Joe  Le  Vaine  claims  that  the 
police  and  the  ambulance  crews 
were  "just  wonderful,  because 
it  was  a  very  difficult  rescue 
job." 

The  Eagle  claims  thaf  Joe 
was  just  wonderful,  too.  .And. 
for  his  clear  thinking  and  quick 
action,  we  name  him  "Man  of 
the  Hour." 


sick  leave  and  retirement 

benefits. 


Standard  tries  4  flood  of  fire  to  make 
worn  out  oil  fields  prodube  again 


A  LOT  OF  CARS 

Topping  all  previous  records, 
motor  vehicle  registrations  in 
the  Los  Angeles  metropolitan 
area  exceeded  the  3.000.000 
mark  during  1956.  a  5.8  percent 
increase  over  the  number  of 
vehicles  registered  here  in  1955. 


I 


^r 


'FA$TE$T  $ELLING  ftUICK  DEALER  IN  $OUTHERN  CALIFORNIA" 

COLONIAL   BUICK 

*^**— "  a  Bfcmd  N«w  1957  Buick  2-Deer  for 

199  DOWN  •  ^16^^^"'^^'^ 


if  $AVE  HUNMED$  ON  YOUR  TRADE-IN 

*  GREATEST  $TOCK  TO  CHOO$E  FROM 
*3«  MONTM$  OF  EA$Y  FINANCING 
if  PAIR  &  FAMOUS  G.M.A.C.  RATE$ 

*  FABULOUS  SERVICE  DEPARTMENT 


FRE^  APPRAISAL        call  couNr  carter       CH.  5-6611 


COLONIAL  BUIGK 


144  So.  Glendole  Ave. 

IN  GLENDALE 


IVHAT 

DO 

YOU 


OUT  OF 
LIFE? 


TVavd? . ..  seamiiy? ...  a  borne  or  "bttskiess  of  your  awn? 
Get  started  toward  a  hapfHer,  mote  rewarding  life  the 
Broadway  Federal  Saviigs  -way.  FcJlowing  a  regular  sav- 
ings plan  wjiB.  give  yoa  a  very  real  sense  of  accomplish- 
ment . . .  becaase  yo«  knovt  you're  on  the  way  to  a  better 
life.  And  your  money  will  CROW  and  CROW  with 
Broadway  FederaTs  high  dividend  rate,  compounded  seim- 
annuafiy  on  aH  aceooots.  We're  right  io  yonr  neighboihood. 
ready  to  gjioe  yon  friendly,  personal  service.  Dr^  in  tod^ 
AU  ACCOUMFS  INSURED  TO  $10,000 


Broadway  Federal  Savings 

^501    South  Broadway  ADams  2-427  1 


Fire  flooding  produces  heat  and  pres»«w  to  hoii.o^l.prerioudi  %»- 
netnerabU  ail,  dnving  it  undergroHnd  to  nearby  producing  weiU. 

MANY  INACTIVE  WELLS  STILL  HAVE  LOTS 
OF  OIL  l^ft  underground  in  spite  of  the  industry's 
great  advances  in  oil  recovery.  Our  country  must  have 
this  oil  to  meet  the  growing  power  requirements  of 
industry,  the  Armed  Forces  and  motorists.  That's  why 
Standard  is  trying  a  new  ccmservation  exp«iment 
called  "fire  flooding." 

We  ignite  some  of  the  oil  in  a  pool . . .  eontrtJ  burning 
by  r^?ulating  the  air  supply.  Heat  and  pressure  drive 
the  oil  to  surrounding  wdk  for  pumping-  It  will  take 
more  than  a  year's  time  and  a  million  doDars  to  see 
if  fire  flooding  works.  We  think  it's  worth  the  effort 
because  it  could  add  more  to  U.S.  underground  oil 
resCTves  than  the  discovery  of  aa  entire  new  oil  field. 


wifl  Med  ■  1966 


1954 

borrab  p«r  <loy 


1966 

13,000,000 
barrels  par  day 


Stan  lard's  petroleum  engi- 
neers say,  "Back  in  1925  the 
induitrj'  coeld  predict  wily 
"abow  20<>^  recovery  from  a 
new  1  ield.  Modem  sectmdaiy 
Teeoy  ery  methods,  of  which 
fire  looding  is  one  of  the 
latent,  eoald  more  thaa 
doube  reoovay.'! 


STANDARD  OIL  COMPANY  Of  CAI.IPORNIA 

plma»  mhmmd  to  amrvm  yom  bmttmr 


U 


1  ■■- 


,*•»»<?  *:--»-:-  i  ■'.—".'--'   '  -       . 


-mmr 


m 


--.jic--*-»-  ■•■- 


iffiMtta 


tm 


naBsaamamm^ 


'  -, 


I. 


I 


„t.At. 


:i^ 


-'^•. 


•t- 


i-- 


»T 


t 


4— The  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  February  28,  1957       ,  |A»AVAVAVAVAVAVAVAV*VAVAvav*v*VAVAVAVAv^vAV«AVAVAVAV*7«y»w 


California  Sagle 

Lor9n  Miller,  Publisher 

Th»  tagl*  ttmtdt  Hr  tmmptmtm  iiit««ratl^  of  NaflroM  Into  •vary 
^liaM  «f  AiiMrkaii  life  thrmiflh  tha  damocratk  procaMaa. 

Wf  favon 

1.  PIK  an  lacal,  stata  and  notional  lavals. 
3.  Dacant  hoifsing  for  all  Amarlcans. 

3.  Raprasantotion  In  Gavarnmant. 

4.  Adaquota  aid  ago  pansiant  and  social  saeurity. 

5.  Callactiva  borgoiniing  rigiito  far  all  worlunan. 

«.  Davalapmant  and  oncauragamant  of  Nagro  businass. 

We  oppose: 

1.  Jim  Craw  In  all  farms. 

2.  Cammunists  and  all  athar  anamias  of  domocrocy. 


PuMatfd  tv'ry  Tkuhdtiy 
10M  lost  43rd  Ploco,  Los  Angolas  11 


AO.  44161 


CWS 


'.pap 


QY 


heaving  Us  Behind 


■  While  California  legislators  are 
giving  every  indication  of  trying  to 
kill  pending  fair  employment  bills, 
the  legislators  of  Washington  and 
Oregon  are  preparing  to  strength- 
en civil  rights  legislation  in  those 

States. 

Both  Washington  and  Oregon 
have  FEPC  laws  and  each  of  those 
states  now  plans  to  ban  discrimi- 
nation in  all  publicly  aided  hous- 
ing. In  addition,  each  of  them  is 
planning  to  entrust  enforcement  of 
laws  against  discrimination  in 
places  of  public  accommodation 
and  amusement  to  state  commis- 
sions. 

Enforcement  of  state  laws  ^  by 
commissions  has  the  advantage  of 
throwing  the  full' weight  of  the 
state  behind  anti-discrimination 
laws  and  has  proved  a  much  more 
effective  device  than  that  of  .  de- 
pending on  enforcement  through 


suits  filed  by  private  individuals  oi 
by  prosecutions  for  misdemeanors. 
Commissions  cSn  investigate  al- 
leged discrimination  and  if  they 
find  it  exists  they  can  issue  ^'cease 
and  desist"  orders  which  bring  ef- 
fective pressure  on  discriminatory 
individuals. 

Prohibition  of  discrimination  in 
publicly  aided  housing  is  a  long 
step  forward  because  it  means  that 
builders  and  developers  must  either 
stop  discriminating  or  lose  the  ad- 
vantages that  come  from  their  use 
of  FHA  and  VA.  The  Federal  gov- 
ernment has  just  advised  New  York 
that  it  will  deny  all  FHA  and  VA 
benefits  to  builders  who  violate 
that  state's  law  against  such  dis- 
crimination. 

Unless  California  wakes  up  and 
moves  forward  we  are  going  to  find 
ourselves  far  behind  Washington 
and  Oregon  in  the  area  of  human 
rights. 


Time  For  A  Change 


Roy  Wilkins  was  correct  in  warn- 
ing Congress  that  a  new  mood  will 
be  engendered  among  Negroes  if 
civil  rights  legislation  is  defeated. 
As  he  pointed  out,  Negroes  have 
been  patient  in  the  face  of  threats, 
of  violence  and  of  open  (Jefiance  of 
the  Constitution.  He  was  right  in 
saying  that  they  are  getting  tired 
of  the  kind  of  treatment  they  have 
been"getting  in  the  South  and  that 
no  man  can  predict  what  course 
their  resentmerif  may  take. 

Rights  of  Negroes  have    been 


guaranteed  by  the  Fourteenth  and 
Fifteenth  Amendments  for  90  years, 
and  they  have  been  flouted  for  just 
that  long.  Even  the  most  ardent 
exponent  of  gradualism  can  hardly 
ask  for  more  than  a  century  of  pa- 
tience. 

The  Administration-backed  civil 
rights  laws  offer  only  a  minimum 
of  protection  for  civil  rights,  a  min- 
imum that  should  have  been  afford- 
ed years  ago.  This  is  1957  and  it's 
time  the  nation  overrode  the  South 
and  compelled  obedience  to  the 
Constitution. 


A  Nation  Is  Born 


A  new  nation  will  be  bom,  or 
more  accurately  an  old  nation  will 
be  re-bom,  next  week,  when  the 
independence  of  Ghana  is  formally 
proclaimed.  Ghana  (as  if  every- 
body didn't  know)  is  the  new  name 

for  the  British  Gold  Coast  of  Africa. 

There  are  strings  to  Ghana's  in- 
dependence. The  new  natiofl  wiU 
be  a  member  of  the  British  Com- 
monwealth of  Nations  and  there 
are  some  vestiges  of  British  con- 
trol left. 

However,  the  important  fact 
about  the  whole  matter  is  that  an 


African  nation  has  been  raised  from 
colonial  status  to  that  of  full- 
fledged  statehood.  What  is  hap- 
pening there  today  will  happen  in 
other  parts  of  Africa  tomorrow,  or 
the  next  day,  or  next  year. 

As  a  member  of  the  Common- 
wealth, Ghana  will  take  its  place 
by  the  side  of  South  Africa  unless 
that  nation  withdraws  as  it  is  al- 
ready threatening  to  do. 

Ghana's  emergence  into  freedom 
Is  a  harbinger  of  things  to  come,  of 
that  day  when  the  colored  coun- 
tries of  the  world  will  take  their  • 
places  in  the  family  of  nations. 


The  Sound  And  The  Fury 


i 


We  can't  figure  out  just  how 
much,  if  anything,  Democratic  pol- 
iticos  did  to  advance  the  cause  of 
civil  rights  in  their  San  Francisco 
meeting.  Goodness  knows  there 
was  plenty  of  brave  talk  and  a 
great  deal  of  arm  waving  and 
breast  beating  connected  with  the 
show. 

When  the  whole  thing  was  over, 
nothing  much  had  been  done  ex- 
cept to  give  Democratic  office  hold- 
ers a  pep  talk  about  their  duty  to 
uphold  the  civil  rights  plank  in  the 
1956  platform.  Since  nobody  was 
ever  able  to  find  out  just  what  that 
plank  meant,  it  would  seem  that 
everything  was  left  in  a  state  of 
(leasant  confusion. 

h     . 

■  1    .h    '  / 


The  Democrats  can  now  tell  Ne- 
gro voters  that  they  are  all  hot  and 
bothered  about  civil  rights  and  can 
still  explain  to  their  Southern 
brethren  that  remaining  in  the 
party  won't  hurt  them  a  Single  bit. 

The  Democrats  have  got  to  make 
up  their  minds  one  of  these  days. 
Either  they  are  going  to  knuckle 
under  to  the  South  and  sink  back 
to  their  pre-1932  status  of  a  minor- 
ity party  or  they  can  strike  out 
boldly  on  a  progressive  course  and 
win  back  the  big  city  vote  they  lost 
in  1956. 

Right  now  they  are  talking  out 
of  both  sides  of  their  mouths  and 
saying  nothing. 


Political  Spotlight 


fAfAtATAfAfATATAfATAS  '7  OBSEBVER  UWaWaWaWaWaW^W^WaWM^ 


AFL  SUPPORTS  TWO 

Official  endorsement  of  Mrs. 
Mary  Tinglof,  candidate  for 
Board  of  Education  Office  IJo.  2, 
and  Dr.  Ralph  Richardson,  who 
is  running  for  Board  pffice  No. 
6,  was  voted  last  night  by  the 
United  AFL  Voters  League. 

The  action  will  carry  with  it 
support  of  the  TOO.OOOmember 
body  in  Los  Angeles  County, 
according  to  Thelma  Thomas, 
director  of  the  Leagues 

A  statement  by  Miss  Thomas 
said:  "Mrs.  Tinglof  and  Dr. 
Richardson  will  provide  the 
help  we  so  desperately  need  on 
the  Board  of  Education  fo  fis- 
sure our  children  of  a  decent 
education. 

"These  two  ,  fiije  candidates 
are  eminently  qualified  in  terms 
of  knowledge,  background  and 
ability  to  work  for  better  edu- 
cational facilities  in  Los  An- 
geles." 

*     *     « 

LUNCHEON  SPEAKER 

John  M.  Ennis,  attorney  and 
civic  leader,  Mffho  is  candidate 
for  Mayor  of  tbs  Angeles,  will 


mately  26,000  union  members 
In  the  Los  Angeles  area  when 
he  urged  re-election  of  the  in- 
cumbent mayor. 

"Poulson  has  favored  inte- 
gration in  the  Fire  Department 
with  no  favoritism  for  any  race 
or  group.  He  has  consi.stently 
favored  better  wages  for  city 
ernployees  and  all  workers.  He 
has  insisted  that  all  city  de- 
partments, including  the  Police 
Department,  be  fair  to  minor- 
ity groups,  and  he  has  opposed 
second-class  citizenship." 
•     •     » 

HEALTH  BILLS 

The  South  Central  Area  Wel- 
fare Planning  Council,  together 
with  its  parent  council  of  the 
Los  Angeles  Region,  today  Ls 
on  record  to  support  and  work 
for  pa.ssage  of  community  men- 
tal health  bills  now  pending  in 
the  State  Legislature. 

Action  of  the  local  cotincil 
and  the  higher  body  parallel.? 
that  of  other  community  or- 
ganizations who  see  Immedi- 
ate need  to  face  Up  to  mount- 


speak  before,  i  h  e    Democratic     ^"2  problem.s  of^  mental  heaUh 
Luncheon    Club    on    Thursday, 


Fob.  28.  at  12:1.t  p.m..  at  the 
Alexandria'  Hotel,  Fifth  and 
Spring  streets,  according  to  an 
announcement   by  John  C.  So- 

bieski,  club  president. 

•  •     • 

PROPOSITIONS  OK'd 

i  Officers  of  civic  groups  and 
other  prominent  Angelenos 
mapped  plans  for  organized 
support  of  Propositions  B'  and 
C  at  a  noon  luncheon  meeting 
this  week  at  the  Clark  Hotel, 
426  S.   Hill   street.  ""~ 

Propositions  B  and  C  will  pro- 
vide funds  to  employ  teachers 
Ieeded  for  classrooms  of  new 
lementary  and  high  schools  in 

the  city. 

•  •     • 

LABOR  ENDORSEMENT 

Organized  labor  will  gfve 
strong  support  to  Mayor  Nor- 
ris  Poulson's  campaign  for  re- 
election, according  to  Perry 
Nethington  of  the  local  unit  of 
the  United  Steel  Workers  of 
America,  which  this  week  an- 
nounced its  formal  endorse- 
ment. 

The     Steel     Workers     Unloii 


LEGISLATIVE   MEET 

The  Fifth  Annual  Conference 
on  Legislation  will  be  held  by 
Women  for  Legislative  Action 
on  Saturday,  March  2,  1957  at 
the  Hollywood  Knickerbocker 
Hotel  from  12:00  to  4:.30  p.m.  it 
was  announced  by  Mrs.  Daniel 
C.  Marshalli  president  of  the 
Los  Angeles  Council  of  the  or- 
ganization. 

Keynoting  the  workshop  pan- 
els will  be  Mrs.  Catherine  Cory, 
Executive  Director  of  Friends 
Committee  on  Legislation;  Wil- 
son Riles,  Vice-President  of 
American  Civil  Liberties  Un- 
ion; and  Hank  Ziveta,  Ameri- 
can Federation  of  TeacTOrs. 

»  «  V    . 

YEAKEL  HEADQUARTERS 

Bob  Yeakel,  candidate  for 
Mayor  of  Los  Angeles,  today 
announced  establishment  of  his 
campaign  headquarters  at  3801 
West  Seventh  Street, .Los  An- 
geles. J. 

Reese  Taylor,  Jr.,  Tom  Fears, 
Mrs.  Frank  Smith  and  Reaves 
Nichols  have  announced  their 
support  of  Yeakel  and  agreed 
to  serve  as  committee  members. 


president    spoke    for    approxi 

Baiileaxe  &  Bread 

By  Lmtfr  B.  Granger 


Gicdiger 


Twenty-two  years  is  a  long 
time,  I  thought  to  myself  as  I 
looked  around  the  Starlight 
Room  of  the  Waldorf-Astoria. 
A  very  long  time,  indeed-  I 
thought  agaJn  as  I  identified 
most  of  the  1.50  labor  leaders, 
busine-ssmen  and  city  officials 
who  comprised  the  luncheon 
gathering. 

Bon  Voyage 

The  group  had  gotten  to- 
gether to  bid  bon  voyage  to 
Theodore  W.  Kheel,  National 
Urban  League  president,  and 
myself  before 
we  start  our 
delegation  trip 
to  the  Inedpen- 
dence  Day  cele- 1 
brat  Ions  of 
Ghana.  Joe 
Curran,  head 
of  the  National 
Maritime  Uni- 
on, and  Mike 
Quill,  chief 
of  the  United 
Transport  Workers,  were  there 
as  hosts;  Larry  Gerosa,  City 
controller,  represented  the 
Mayor;  judges  and  other-digni- 
'taries  of  city  governmentr  lead- 
ing lawyers  and  businessmen 
and  similar  notables  helped  to 
grace  the  occasion. 

Twenty-two  years  is  the  dif- 
ference between  a  man  being 
hale  and  vigorous  at  50  and 
dying  in  his  early  seventies,  I 
thought,  yet  this  meeting  rep- 
resents a  complete  revolution 
in  the  thinking  and  social  hab- 
its of  New  Yorkers.  There  has 
been  no  violent  struggle,  just 
a  series  of  sharp  and  seeming- 
ly unrelated  tugs-of-war,  but 
here  is  New  York  settled  down 
into  an  entirely  new  pattern  of 
relationships  —  and  nobody 
seems  to  be  in  the  least  way 
disturbed  about  it.  ' 

Twenty-Two   Years   Ago 

Twenty-two  years  ago  the 
Maritime  Union  was  locked  in 
a  dog-eat-dog  strike  with  lord- 
ly ship-owners  —  and  winning 
the  strike  in  the  face  of  bitter 
winter  cold,  bread  lines  prod- 
(  need  by  the  depression  and 
'  goon-beatings.  The  Gold  Coast 
was  just  another  one  of  Brit- 
ain's West  Africa  colonies;  the 
average  American  wasn't  sure 
whether  the  ^territory  was 
across  the  Atlantic  or  a  fash- 
ionable section  of  San  Francis- 
co or  Chicago. 

The  workers  on  New  York 
City's  bus  and  subway  lines 
were  too  busy  fighting  each 
other  for  promotional  and  seni- 
ority advantages  to  be  giving 
thought  to  building  a  strong 


union  to 'fight  for  all  of  them. 
The    National     Urban     League 

■  was  fighting  for  survival 
against     the     indifference     of 

■  business  and  labor,  the  attacks 
of  the  Communist  Party  and 
the  sneers  and  smears  of  cyni- 
cal "liberals  and  leftists." 

Conditions   Change 

And  now,  twenty-two  years 
later,  here  is  the  Gold  Coast 
emerging  triumphantly  into 
the  free  nationhood  of  Ghana. 
Here  is  the  National  Urban 
League-  joining  hands  with  the 
Mayor  of  New  York  and  the 
heads  of  two  powerful  labor 
unions  to  send  greetings  and 
mementoes  of  friendship  across 
the  sea.?  to  Prime  Minister 
Kkrumah. 

The  NMU  remembered  Kwa- 
me  Nkrumah's  active  member- 
ship in  the  union  by  sending 
him  an  inscribed  compass  to 
"help  him  guide  his  nation;" 
Mayor  Wagner  signed  an  en- 
graved message  lauding  "the 
Ion  gsuffering  sacrifice  and 
great  human  dignity"  display- 
ed by  the  Ghanese  in  achieving 
freedom;  the  Urban  League 
sent  an  engraved  and  per- 
manentized  .scroll  recalling  the 
Prime  Minister's  words;  "We 
prefer  self-government  with 
danger'to  servitude  in  tranquil- 
ity." 

Labor  at  the  Waldorf 

And  this  took  place  in  the 
most  relajfcd  atmosphere  im- 
aginable— one  hard  to  conceive 
of  20  years  ago.  For  in  the 
midst  of  the  depression,  only 
the  most  powerful  and  prestige- 
laden  labor  unions  thought  of 
using  the  Waldorf  mee,ting-and- 
dining  facilities.  Today  the 
Waldorf  belongs  to  all  the 
people.  Colored  New  "lYorkers 
who  did  infrequently  attend 
affairs  on  Park  Avenue  in  the 
early  Thirties  did  so  with  some 
self-consciousness,  if  not  stiff- 
ness. Today  stiff nesg"'is  gone; 
self-consciousness  is  a  rarity. 

Today,  a  medical  student 
from  the  Gold  Coast,  Seth  On- 
wona,  could  acknowledge  the 
occasion  in  behalf  of  the  peo- 
ple and  prime  minister  of 
Ghana  and  could  say:  "Afri- 
cans never  stop  being  sur- 
prised \)y  the  wonderful  kind- 
ness of  the  American  people," 
and  mean  it.  We  are  a  long 
way  from  being  kind  as  a 
witole — or  consistently.  But  we 
have  discovered,  most  of  us 
Americans,  how  enjdyable  it  is 
to  be  kind,  naturally  and  with- 
out fear;  and  learning  this  les- 
son and  practicing  it  will  some 
day  produce  the  habit 


>i 


Street  Car  in 
Wild 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
smashed  into  an  automobile, 
sheared  off  a  fire  hydrant,  hit 
a  pedestrian  and  rammed  full 
tilt  into  the  Quality  Baking  Co., 
800  W.  Vernon  avenue. 

Hurled  Through  Door 

As  the  car  crashed  into  the 
bakery,  pinning  Mrs.  Grace 
Johnson,  61,  against,  a  counter, 
13-year-old  Virginia  Durden,  of 
275  W.  48th  street,  a  student  at 
John  Muir  Junior  High  School, 
was  hurled  through  the  rear 
door  of  the  streetcar. 

She  was  knocked  unconscious 
as  she  fell  to  the  street,  flood- 
ed with  the  water  gushing 
from  the  broken  hydrant.  She 
was  the  most  seriously  injured 
of  the  street  car  passengers 
and  was  taken  to  Suburban 
Hospital  in  South  Gate,  suffer- 
ing from  a  possible  broken  jaw 
and  with  deep  lacerations  on 
her  head  and  hands. 

Serious  Injuries  - 
Also  seriouslv  injured  were 
Mrs.  Lillian  Ball,  36,  of  274  E. 
47th  street,  who  was  taken  to 
General  Hospital  with  back, 
arm  and  leg  injuries:  and  Mrs. 
Leona  Smith,  27,  of  6719  S.  Main 
street,  who  suffered  spinal  and 
neck  injuries.  She  was  trans- 
ferred to  Temple  Hospital. 

The  Negro  students  injured, 
most  of  them  not  seriously, 
were: 

Fred  Carter,  17,  of  5634Vs 
S.  BsoadwoT*  who  suffered  a 
foot  injury. 

Elise  James,  IS.  of  1206  E. 
60th  street  whose  arm  may 
hare  been  fractured. 

Tonja  BelL  16.  253  E.  49th 
street. 

Glen  Mabsoa.  17,  561  W. 
47th  street. 

Emma  Halloway.  19.  216  E. 
49th  street. 

Lovella  GeodwiU,  17.  646  E. 
38th  street. 

Jonnie  McCracken,  18. 405Vs 
E.  65th  street. 

Annette  Elliott,  19.  403Vs 
Park  Front  Walk. 

Julia  Hill.  16,  1615  E.  21st 
,  street. 

Marion  Jones.  16.  138  W. 
61  St  street 

Elizabeth  Hollands.  17.  257  ' 
'  E.  43rd  street. 

Mary  Monroe.  17.  335  E. 
57th  street 

Ruth  Ann  LewU,  17.  628  E. 
51st  street. 

Jacqueline  MarshalL  17> 
2185  Cambridge. 

Others  Injured 
Others  in  the  street  car  who 
were   injured  were:  - 

Henrietto  Miles,  SU  1533Vt 
E.  48th  place,  back  and  chest 
injuries. 

Joseph  Brandel.  45.  44S5 
ATalon  bouleTord,  possible 
wrist  frotfture. 

Louise  Johnson,  44.  619  E. 
40th  ploce. 

MUdred  Reid.  23.  291  E.  45tb 
street  fxi'ck  injury. 

Dellie  BeU.  34.  1423  E.  53rd 
street  internal  injuries. 

Henrietta  Datrisea,  24,  ISlVs 
E.  54tb  street 

William  Brewer.  53,  147  E. 
47th  place,  bock  injury. 

Ethel  Brown.  49,  13571/2  E. 
48th  place,  bock  injury. 

Amy  Gronres,  39,  1813  E. 
Vernon  orenue. 

Rosetta  Gkdbrath.  31,  734  E. 
43id  ttiMt. 


Davis  Foupid  Guilty 
in  Pinic  FWd  Case 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 

Circumstantial  evidence 
weighed  heavily  against  Davis. 

There  was  the  identification 
by  both  young  women,  Shirley 
Anne  Brown,  19,  of  6723  S.  Main 
street,  who  repeated  her  identi- 
fication in  court;  and  Miss 
Jeanette  L.  Jones,  18,  of  421  E. 
93rd  street,  whose  testimony  at 
the  preliminary  hearing  was 
read  into  the  record  but  who 
did^ot  appear  at  the  trial. 

There  were  the  lipstick  marks 
on  the  trousers  of  Davis'  ^ray 
suit;  the  social  security  and 
identification  cards  of  Miss 
Brown  found  in  Davis'  posses- 
sion; and  the  pink  Ford.  Miss 
Jones  had  identified  her  at- 
tacker-as  driving  such  a  car. 
Alibi 

Against  these  circumstances 
were  the  testimony  of  Davis' 
wife  and  mother  and  his  two 
friend^,  George  West  and  Mrs. 
Lavassar  West,  neighbors 
who  live  at  5961  Avalon  blvd. 
Davis  and  his  wife,  Mary,  live 
at  5937  S.  Avalon   blvd. 

The  Wests  and  Davis'  wife 
gave  him  a  positive  alibi 
for  the  night  of  the  first  attack, 
Nov.  16,  when  Miss  Brown  was 
assaulted.  His  mother,  Mrs.  Inez 
Davis,  provided  him  with  a 
partial  alibi  for  the  night  of  the 
second  attack,  Nov.  28,  when 
Miss  Jones  was  the  victim. 
Attacked  Loo{>holes 

Atty.  Akers  attacked  the 
loopholes  in  the  prosecution's 
presentation.  He  raised  the  im- 
portant question  of  why  the  dis- 
trict attorney  had  not  brought 
into  the  trial  the  report  of  the 
crime  laboratory  which  had  ex- 
amined both  Davis'  Impounded 
car  and  the  gray  suit  with  the 
lipstick  marks  on  the  trouSErs. 

He  argued  that  the  prosCTu.- 
tion  would  certainly  have  sub- 
mitted this  report  as  evidence 
of  Davis'  guilt  had  the  report 
shown  that  Miss  Jones  finger- 
prints were  on  the  ca'f^Xor' 
strands  of  her  hair  on  the  seat 
covers  or  if  there  had  been  any 
other  proof  that  she  had  been 
in  the  automobile. 

No  Proof.  Soys  Akers 

Similarly,  he  argued,  the 
prosecuton  would  have  brought 
in  proof  that  the  lipstick  on  the 
trousers  was  the  same  as  that 
used  by  Miss  Jones,  or  that 
stains  on  the  trousers  showed  a 

Beatrice  Butler.  '22.  134  W. 
49th  street 

Auto  Passengers  Hurt 

'  Those  riding  in  the  car 
crashed  into  by  the  trolley,  all 
white,  were  also  injured.  Mrs. 
Alice  Noyes,  the  driver,  was 
taken  to  Centinela  Hospital, 
and  one  of  the  passengers,  Mrs. 
Florence  Simpson,  w?is  taken  to 
Good  Samaritan  HospitaL 

In  addition  to  Mrs.  Johnson, 
Misi  Melba  Thomas,  46.  of  1731 
W.  Vernon  avenue,  was  in  the 
bakery  when  the  street  car 
crashed  through  the  front  She 
was  injured,  but  not  seriously. 

The  street  car  jumped  the 
tracks  when  it  hit  a  switch 
which  derailed  it.  Cause  of  the 
action  of  the  s.witch  is  still  un- 
der investisatioii.     ^ 


\l 


sex .  act    had    been    performed, 
had  there  been  such  prooL 

Failure  to  bring  in  this  evi- 
dence, Akers  argued,  indicated' 
that  there  was  no  proof. 

He  also  attacked  the  prosecu- 
tion for  not  having  Miss  Jctges 
appear  in  court  so  she  could  be 
cross-examined  b^ore  the  jury, 
and  so  that  her  statements  en 
the  stand  could  be  checked  wifli 
those  she  had  made  at  the  pre- 
liminary hearing. 

stressed  Discrepancies' 

He  stressed  her  vague  descrip- 
tion of  her  attacker,  the  fact 
that  she  had  stated  he  did  not 
smoke  (Da\is  says  he  smokes  a 
package  of  cigarettes  a  day) 
and  other  discrepancies  in  her 
testimony  and  that  of  Miss 
Brown.. 

On  Monday,  Davis  took 
the  stand  in  his  own  defense.  He 
denied  that  he  had  ever  seen 
either  Miss  Brown  or  Miss  Jones 
prior  to  his  arrest.  He  denied 
that  he  had  attacked  either 
women.  He  declared  that  he  was 
at  home  with  friends  on  the 
night  of  Nov.  16.  that  on  the 
night  of  the  28th  he  had  spoken 
to  no  one  from  the  time  he  had 
left  home  after  dinner  until  his 
return  around  10  pjn.  (Mias 
Jones  had  said'  she  was.tn  his 
car  until  about  11  pjn.  tiiat 
night). 

He  denied  that  he  possessed  « 
gun,  said  he  had  found  Miss 
Brown's  identification  cards  in 
the  street  denied  that  he  owned 
a  brown  suit  or  brown  shoes. 
(Miss  Brown  had  said  he  was 
clothed  in  such  an  outfit) 

Davis  was  picked  up  Nov.  29, 
the  day  following  the  attack  on 
Miss  Jones.  He  is  28  years  old, 
an  unemployed  candle  -  mako-, 
who  has  steadfastly  maintained 
his  innocence  ever  since  his  ar- 
rest 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

"The  Importmt  Ne«rsp«p«r" 

1050  E.  43rd  PI. 
LosAn9»iM  11,  Cdif. 


ADams  44>16l 


LOR  EN  MILLCR 

Publisher 


Vol.  LXXVI  No.  50 

Thursday      Fobrwary  2B,  1M7 

F.   P.  WALLER,  JR Adv.   Mgr. 

GRACE  E.  SIMONS,  Exacutiv*  Editor 
EDWARD  "ABIE"   ROBINSON 

. Circulation    Mar. 

CALME    RUSS OffHM    Mar. 

BAY  AREA   REPRESENTATIVE 

E.    G.    ALLEN 1512   letll   St. 

Santa   Monica,  C«l.,   Ph.;   EX.   S-18i1 

SUBSCRIBE  NOWr 

D  $4.00  fOT  1  Ymt 
a  $2-50  for  «  Months 
D  $1-50  for  3  Months 
PER  COPY lOe 


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*, 


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Adjudication  Dwree  Number  XXSm 
Date  of  Adjudication  July  1,  ISO. 
PubllrtMd  evwy  ThurMav  by  T*e 
Califomia  Eagle  Publialilna  CmT. 
1050    Ea«    43r3    Mac*.    B3e«*TS 

REPRESENTED  NATtONALLV 


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=  1 


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formed, 

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lients  on 
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descrip- 

[the   fact ' 

did  not 

fiokes  a 

a    day » 

in  her 

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|iss  Jones 

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Calif. 
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No.  50 
28,  1957 

-Adv.    Mgr. 
butive  Editor 

Inson 

elation     Mgr. 
LOffice    Mar. 
INTATIVE 
l512    16th    St. 
EX.    5-1591 

lOW! 


...  lOe 
nber    1ZftZ3 

my  t,  1923. 

Siy  by  Th« 
lUning      Co., 

Entered  ai 
Ifevomber    3, 

at  Lot  An. 

th*  Act  of 

I^NALLY 
TE 

kPEM 
|u« 
V*rli 


Concert  Presented 
By  Sunrise  Choir 


A  near  capacity  crowd  was  on 
hand  last  Sunday  at  Holman 
Methodist,  3320  W.  Adams, 
when  the  Wesley  an  service 
guild  presented  the  Holman 
Sunrise  choir  in  concert.  The 
first  half  of  the  program  fea- 
tured the  choir  in  three  selec- 
tions: the  anthem  "Almighty 
God  Our  Father,"  followed  by 
the  spiritual  "Ride  the  Chariot" 


500  Attend 
Stovol  Home 
Ceremonies 

An  audience  of  over  500  was 
present  Sunday  afternoon  in 
the  auditorium  of  the  Leonard 
Stovall  Home  to  participate  in 
the  dedication  ceremonies  hon- 
oring the  late  Dr.  Leonard 
Stovall,  president-founder  of 
the  Outdoor  Life  and  Health 
Association  now  known  as  the 
Stovall  Foundation. 

Featured  during  the  program 
were  Paul  R.  Williams,  interna- 
tionally  known  architect;  Judge 
Thoams  L.  Griffith,  Jr.;  Victor 
Carter,  president  of  City  of 
Hope:  Dr.  H.  Haude  Hudson. 
president  of  the  Broadway  Fed- 
eral Savings  and  Loan  Associa- 
tion: Dr.  Robert  V.  Miller  of 
the  Beverly  Hills  Clinic;  repre- 
sentatives of  the  mayor  of  Los 
Angeles  and  the  Board  of  Su- 
pervisors. 

The  Lillian  Randolph  Sing- 
ers provided  music. 

Thirteen  clubs  and  individu- 
als who  sponsor  rooms  and 
tmits  in  the  Leonard  Stovall 
Home  were  presented  with  cer- 
tificates of  appreciation  during 
the  program,  which  was  chaired 
by  Mrs.  Jessie  M.  Beavers, 
newspaper  woman. 


Celebrate  90th 
Anniversary 

WASHINGTON— Howard  Uni- 
v«rsity  will  observe  the  90th 
anniversary  of  its  founding  on 
Friday,  March  1,  in  two  Charter 
Day  programs,  morning  and 
evening. 

Principal  speaker  at  the 
morning  exercises  will  be  Dr. 
Frank  M.  Snowden,  newly  ap- 
pointed dean  of  the  Qollege  of 
Liberal  Arts  at  Howard. 

Four  alumni  will  be  cited 
for  outstanding  post-graduate 
achievement.  They  .are  Dr.  Ken- 
neth B.  Clark  and  his  wife.  Dr. 
Mamie  P.  Clark,  of  New  York 
City:  Dr.  Eugene  H.  Dibble  Jr., 
of  Tuskegee,  Ala.,  and  Atty. 
Clayborhe  George  of  Cleveland, 
Ohio. 


Bicycles  To  Be 
Auctioned  Off 

The  quarterly  police  auction 
of  bicycles  and  general  mer- 
chandise will  be  held  Saturday, 
March  2,  at  8  a.m..  at  the  San 
Pedro  Street  entrance  to  the  Los 
Angeles  Police  Administration 
Building,  151  N.  San  Pedro 
street. 


with  sporano  soloist  Alise 
Waters.  For  ita  final  selection 
the  choir  sang  a  capella  "Open 
Your  Eyes,"  with  Fred  Burton, 
baritone  soloist. 

Choir  Director  Earl  Grant  was 
heard  in  an  organ  solo  "Largo" 
by  Anton  Dvorak.  Charles 
Herndon,  tenor,  sang  an  original 
composition  written  by  his  ac- 
companist Miss  Carrie  Williams. 

Supplementing  the  program, 
the  choir  had  as  guests  some  of 
the  young  concert  artists  in- 
cluding choir  soloists,  Joe  Wil- 
liams, tenor;  and  Fred  Burton, 
baritone;  lyric  poprano,  Willie 
Pearl  Whitelow,  tenor,  Ernest 
Walker;  dramatic  soprano.  Ella 
Lee;  mezzo  sqprano.  Jewel 
Anderson;  and -soprano,  Betty 
Wright. 

The  climax  of  the  program 
was  the  singing  of  the  Quartette 
from  Rigoletto. 

Donald  Jackson  appeared  as 
accompanist  for  the  soloists  and 
Mrs.  Shirley  Freeman  as 
mistress  of  ceremonies.  Rev.  L. 
L.  White  is  pastor  of  Holman. 

Illinois  Urged 
To  End  Frat 
Racial  Bars 

URBANA.  III.  —  The  Cham- 
paign-Urbana  branch  of  the 
NAACP  this  week  called  upon 
Fred  H.  Turner,  University  of 
Illinois  dean  of  students,  to 
"withdraw  recognition  from 
any  social  organization  which 
has  a  demonstrated  policy  of 
excluding  racial,  ethnic  or  reli- 
gious groups." 

Time  limit  urged  by  the 
branch  was  Sept.  1,  1960. 

In  the  meantime,  the  uni- 
versity is  asked  to  take  steps 
to  sponsor  an  educational  pro- 
gram for  fraternities  and  sor- 
orities with  the  object  of  chang- 
ing national  constitutions  and 
local  attitudes. 


DuBois  Writes 
Historical  Novel 

Dr.  W.  E.  Du  Bois,  the  dean 
of  American  letters,  has  corri- 
pleted  a  monumental  study  of  | 
what  it  has  meant  to  be  a  i 
Negrt  in  the  Unitpd  States  from 
1870  to  the  present.  This  work 
is  in  the  form  of  a  novel,  total- 
ing 1500  pages,  to  be  issued  in 
three  volumes,  one  a  year,  be- 
ginning, in  March,  by  Main- 
stream Publishers  of  New  York. 

Overall  title  of  the  triology  is 
The  Black  Flame.  The  first  book 
is  entitled  The  Ordeal  of  Man- 
sart. 

Dr.  Du  Bois  wTote  two  novels 
a  generation  ago  and  is  the 
author  of  such  classical  stud- 
ies as  The  Souls  of  Black  Folk, 
and  Black  Reconstruction. 

The  New  York  Public  Library 
has  accepted  for  its  permanent 
exhibit  a  bust  of  Dr.  Du  Bois  by 
William  Zorach.  This  statue  will 
be  formally  presented  to  the  li- 
brary in  April  by  Van  Wyck 
Brooks  and  other  notable  men 
of  letters. 


ttr'c 


Thursday,  February  28,  1957 


The  California  Eagle— 5 


Second  Baptist 
Concert  Scene 
For  flope  Foye 

Hope  Foye,  brilliant  young 
lyric  soprano,  who  will  appear 
in  concert  at  the  Second  Baptist 
Church,  24th  and  Griffith,  Fri- 
day evening,  March  1,  comes 
directly  from  Mexico  City, 
where  she  was  just  awarded 
the  annual  prize  for  the  1956 


r-LEWIS  METROPOLITAN  ONE  CHURGHn 

4900  SOUTH  WESTERN  AVENUE 

ISAIAH  SCIPIO,  JR.,  Mfnittar 

9:15  A.M.  Sun.  School  6:00  Ch.  Yth.  Fellowship 

10:45  A.M.  Mom.  Worshiji     7:30  P.M.  Evoning  Worship 


OrVfNf  HIALINO  THROUGH  FAITH  AND  PRATCR 

Candle  Store  All  Kindt  of  Raligieus  Articlas 

REV.  H.  J.  NAPLES 

weais  UNowNto  sunnuAi  advisor  and  eouNsiioR 

HIM  IN  ALL  AFrAIKS  -  raiVATI  CONSULTATION 

THE  HELPING  CHAPEL  OP  THE  MASTER 

Pte^HHIII  IVWY  TMU«$OAY  AND  SUNDAY  NIOHT  -  •-♦iJO  F.M. 

rw  Appalntmsnt  Call  AR  2-5«84  -  9:00  A.M.  la  9:00  P.M. 

1374  last  Varnen  Avanna 
Writa  f.  O.  tax  72393,  Aicaf  Statian,  La>  Anaalai  3,  Calif. 


CpXCERT  —  Hope  Foye, 
talented  lyric  soprano,  nill 
appear  In  concert  Friday  eve- 
ning,  March  1,  at  the  Second 
Baptist  Church,  24th  and 
Griffith  are. 

series  by  the  Manuel  M. 
Ponce  Musical  Association. 
Robert  Flak,  of  Hollywood,  will 
accompany  her  at  the  piano. 

She  is  being  .<!ponsored  by 
Bernart  Promotions  in  associa- 
tion with  Miss  Vivian  Jones, 
president  of  Sinquinons;  Mrs. 
La  Vaughn  Watkins.  president 
of  the  Recondites  Entre  Nous; 
Mrs.  Leontyne  Kins.  Vashtians 
club  sponsor;  and  an  interested 


Choirs  Exchanged 

The  Ocean  Park  Methodist 
Church  and  the  Calvary  Baptist 
Church  of  Santa  Monica  e.x- 
changed  choirs  for  last  Sunday's 
services.  This  fine  example  of 
brotherhood  was  enjoyed  by  all 

who  participated. 

•  »    « 

Sick  List 

Ella  Carter,  ISeSVi  17th  street; 
Ethel  Bently,  General  Hospital; 
Allene  Wardlow,  St.  John  Hos- 
pital: Ethel  Sykes,  1907  18th 
street;  Walter  McNeal,  12th 
street;  Mary  Dumas,  1904  ISth 
street;  Dillie  Rice,  17th  street; 
Oray  Blanchette,  General  Hos- 
pital; Virgil  Dansby,  Wadsworth 
Hospital;  M.  B.  Allen,  19th 
street  and' Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  A, 

Lawrence,  1801  22nd  street 

•  •     • 

John  McFodden 

John  McFadden,  1024 4  7th 
ave.,  Venice,  passed  away  Sun- 
day, Feb.  24.  He  is  survived  by 
his  wife,  Mrs.  Zelman  G.  Mc- 
Fadden. Funeral  arrangements 
are  being  made  by  Spalding's 

Mortuary. 

•  •    •  ' 

Ernest  McQueen 

Err^st  McQueen  died  at 
home,  1927  18th  street,  Sunday, 
Feb.  24.  He  had  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Santa  Monica  for  27 
years. 

Mr.  McQueen  was  a  mason 
and  a  member  of  the  Board  of 
directors  of  Calvary  Baptist 
Church.  Funeral  services  were 
held  Wednesday,  Feb.  27  at  the 
church  at  2  p.m.  with  Dr.  W.  P. 
Carter  officiating. 

He  is  survived  by  two  nieces, 
Mrs.  Virginia  Burks  of  Pitts- 
burgh and  Mrs.  Laura  Den- 

nison  of  Clevelanc^. 

■•'•'.  • 

Areo  Conference 

Delegates  from  Santa  Monica 
attending  the  quarterly  meeting 
of  the  NAACP  Southern  Area 
Conference  in  Riverside  werei 
Virgil  Brown.  Bernice  Brown. 
William  Lazenby,  Virgil  Brown 
Jr.  and  E.  S.  Allen. 


DEAD  —  Ernest  McQueen, 
1927  ISth  street,  Santa  Mon- 
ica, XI ho  died  last  lueek,  was 
a  Mason  and  a  member  of  the 
board  nf  directors  of  the  Cal- 
vary  Baptist  Church. 


Choirs  to  be 
Consecrated 
At  Victory 

The  Victory  Baptist  Church, 
4802  McKinley  avenue.  Rev. 
A.  A.  Peters,  pastor,  is  invitings 
the  public  to  attend  the  instal- 
lation of  the  minister  of  music. 
Rev.  J.  Earle  Hines,  and  the 
consecration  of  their  combined 
choirs,  the  Voices  of  Victory 
and  the  A.  A.  Peters'  Chorale,  at 
6:00  p.m.,  Sunday,  March  3,  in 
the  church  sanctuarv. 


Guests  Preacli 
At  McCoy  Sun. 

As  the  dedicatorial  services 
for  McCoy's  modern  educational 
unit  and  youth  center  continue 
on  Sunday,  March  3,  the  pulpit 
of  the  McCoy  Memorial  Baptist 
Church,  802  E.  46th  street,  will 
be  filled  by  guest  ministers 
both  morning  and  evening. 

An  invitation  was  extended 
while  Pastor  E.  A.  Anderson 
was  on  a  recent  month's  leave 
of  absence,  during  which  time 
he  attended  the  executive  board 
meeting  of  the  National  Baptist 
Convention  Inc.  at  Hot  Springs, 
Ark.,  where  he  was  selected  a 
member  of  the  board. 

The  morning  message  will  be 
brought  by  Dr.  J.  T.  Stewart, 
pastor  of  Galilee  Baptist  Church. 
Shreveport,  La.  The  evening 
message  for  Holy  Communion 
will  be  brought  by  ,Dr.  T.  M. 
Durr,  pastor  of  Zion  Baptist 
Church,  also  in  Shreveport, 


KARRIS0N4{0SS 

FUNERAL   HOME  | 

1 047    rwfrovw    ofv<a» 
LU.  17155 


Your  Friend  In 
imm  of  Sorrow 


when  sorrow  strikes,  with  the  passing  of 
someone  dear,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  com- 
plete  all  necessary  arrangements.  Our  ex- 
perienced staff  is,  above  all,  tasteful  and 
discreet  at  all  times. 


PEOPLE'S 


FUNERAL 
HOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-71t1 


Victory  Baptist  Day  School  offers . . . 

'    Th*  Basic  Educational  OpportunltiM  of 
Othar  Schoeb  plus. 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  A  Practica 

ENROLL  NOW!  j 

Vacanclas  Availabia  for  Kindargartan  Only   j 
Extandad  Day  Cara  Program 

"Individual  Instruction  Prademlnant 
Feature  of  Instruction"  \ 

«:30  A.M.  unHI  6:30  P.M.  i 

lUS  TRANSPORTATION  CAFHIRIA 

Rav.  Aituhr  A.  Feter^  Fasten  Mrs.  Florenu  Fan«lt«,  Vica^rin. 
FHONE:  ADAMS  1-2424  or  M732 


PUMST  -  Robert  Flack, 
baritone  •  pianist  -  composer, 
ivill  accompany  Miss  Hope 
Foye,  lyric  soprano,  uhcn  she 
sings  at  the  Second  Baptist 
Church. 

citizen's  committee  of  some  25 
persons.  Rev.  George  R.  Gar- 
ner will  act  as  official  host. 

Immediately  following  the 
concert,  a-  reception  honoring 
Miss  Foye  will  be  held  in  the 
social  hall  6f  the  church. 

The  concert  is  scheduled  for 
8:15  p.m.  Tickets  may  be 
purchased  at  4310  S.  Central 
avenue,  1055  E.  41st  street,  or  in 
the  office  of  the  Second  Baptist 
Church.  Phone  ADams  4-6337 
or  ADams  4-8497  for  reserva- 
tions. 


Minister  Visits 
Palm  Springs 

Rev. .  F.  M.  Perkin,  visiting 
New  York  minister,^  concluded 
a  series  of  Brotherhood  meet- 
ings last  week  at  the  Church 
of  God  in  Christ  in  Palm 
Springs  before  a  large  nightly 
attendance. 


Revival  Weeks 
Start  Monday 

The  Southern  California 
Council  of  Ministers  is  sponsor- 
ing a  two  week  soul-saving  re- 
vival froro  Monday  night, 
March  4  through  Sun  da  y^ 
March  17.  Union  comunion  ser- 
vices will  be  held  at  the  close 
ot  the  revival. 

The  opening  meeting  will  be 
held  at  the  Liberty  Gospel 
Temple,  1020  E.^  Vernon  ave.. 
Rev.  Pauline  Coffee,  pastor  and 
vice-president  of  the  council. 
Rev.  E.  J.  Tann  is  chairman  of 
the  evangelistic  committee. 


Organ  Dedicated 

The  First  Baptist  Church  of 
Palm  Springs  dedication  ser- 
vices for  the  church's  new  piano 
and  organ  will  be  held  Sunday, 
March  3. 


BOWEN    MEMORIAL 
METHODIST  CHURCH 


East  36tb  and  TMnlty  Sla. 
John  C.  Iota.  Mlolstaf 

SiSO  ■.m.— Churcn  SehML 
11  :M  ■.mrf-4WarahjB. 
7iS8  •.m.— ttood  Raw*  Haufb 


"Renew  Thy  Strength  Like  the  Eagle" 

MASTER  YOUR  PROBLEMS 

BY  DIVINE 

METAPHYSICS 

3   Questions  Answered. 

Send  SI  with  Birthdate. 

WILLUM  H.  FELTON.  Ps.  D. 

2473  Seventh  Ave.,  New  York  30,  N.Y. 


OBITUARES 


MISS  AUGUSTINE  D.  FORD, 
2145  Harvard  blvd.,  died  Feb.  21 
in  her  home.  Rev.  J.  A.  Wheeler 
officiated  at  the  services  held 
just  before  the  body  was 
shipped  to  Memphis,  Tenn. 

Miss  Ford,  a  retired  school- 
teacher, lived  here  lor  12  years. 
She  is  survived  by  a  sister.  Miss 
Thelma  Ford. 


JOHN  BARRY  BROOKS-  161G 
E.  48th  street,  died  Feb.  IS  at 
home.  Funeral  services  were 
conducted  from  the  Peoples 
Funeral  Home  with  the  Rev. 
Ralph  King  ofhciating. 

The  deceased,  a  former  Navy 
and  Merchant  Marine  sailor, 
was  employed  by  the  Los  An- 
geles County  as  a  truck  driver. 


BABY  HICKS,  the  infant  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Garfield  Hicks, 
5242  Long  Beach  blvd.,  was 
born  and  died  February  21.  The 
infant  j  was  interred  at  Paradise 
Memoijial  Park  Cemetery  on 
Feb,  2$. 


Ghana  Becomes 
Nation  March  6 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
Gold  Coast  is  comparatively 
short.  Small  British  trading 
settlements  came  under  British 
Government  control  in  1S21.  It 
is  only  in  the  last  75  years  or 
so  that  the  present  territory, 
covering  92000  square  miles, 
and  with  a  total  population  of 
some  four  and  one-half  mil- 
licMis,  has  been  built  up. 

Date  of  Treaty 

Today  the  territory  comprises 
the  colony  and  Ashanti.  the 
Nort|[iern  Territories  and  the 
Trust  territory  of  Togoland  un- 
der United  kingdom  adminis- 
tration. 

The  nation  becomes  the  first 
dependent  nation  in  Africa  to 
become  a  member  of  the  Brit- 
ish Commonwealth.  It  is  the 
land  from  which  the  ancestors 
of  most  American  Negroes 
came.  Its  population  of  4,500,- 
000  is  99  per  cent  African. 

Dr.  Nkrumah  helped  to  pay 
his  way  through  college  in  the 
United  States  during  the  years 
1935  to  1945  by  working,  as  a 
member  of  the  NMU,  on  the 
ship  "Shawnee"  of  Clyde  Mal- 
lory  Lines  between  New  Yotk 
and  Vera  Cruz,  Mexico. 

5  He  received  the  degrees  of 
A.B.  in  economics  and  sociology 
and  Bachelor  of  Theology  from 
Lincoln  University,^  and  the 
M.S.  in  education  and  M.A.  in 
philosophy  from  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania  before  return- 
in*  to  his  native  land  to  em- 
bark on  a  political  career.  He 
was  awarded  his  doctorate  in 
law  by  Lincoln  on  his  last  trip 
to  the  United  States  in  1951. 


Civil  Rights  Bill 
Passage  Seen 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
ings  on  civil  rights  legislation 
would  terminate  Tuesday. 

Members  of  the  Senate  Judi- 
ciary Committee's  Subcommit- 
tee on  Constitutional  Rights 
are:  Hennings,  Joseph  C.  O'Ma- 
honey  (D-Wyo.),  Sam  J.  Er- 
vin,  Jr.  (D-N.C),  Clin  D.  John- 
ston (D-S.C),  William  Langer 
(Rep.-N.  Dak.),  Arthur  V.  Wat- 
kins '  (Rep.-Utah  •,  and  Roman 
L.  Hruska  (Rep.-Nelj.). 

The  committee  has  before  it 
fifteen  bills  and  a  proposed 
Congressional  resolution.  One 
of  the  bills  contains  the  Presi- 
dent's program.  It  was  intro- 
duced by  Senator  Everett  M. 
Dirl<sen,  and  is  co-sponsored  by 
a  large  number  of  Republicans. 
Four  bills  were  introduced  by 
those  Senators  who  were  mem- 
bers of  the  Committee  on  Con- 
stitutional' Rights  last  year. 
These  bills,  approved  by  the 
Constitutional  Rights  Commit- 
tee last  year,  were  submitted  to 
the  Judiciary  Committee,  where 
they  died. 

A  number  of  other  bill|  were 
submitted  by.  Senator  Hubert 
Humphrey  (D-Minn.),  with  nu- 
merous co-sponsors.  One  bill, 
contained  in  a  committee  print 
prepared  at  the  direction  of 
Senator  Hennings,  is  a  compila- 
tion of  the  non-conflicting  pro- 
visions of  the  bills  now  being 
submitted,  by  Senator  Dirksen 
on  behalf  of  the  administration, 
and  the  four  bills  submitted 
earlier  last  year  to  the  Judici- 
ary Committee  by  the  Consti- 
tutional Rights  Committee. 


GUEST  SPEAKER— Dr.  J.  T.  Stnuart.  pastor  of  Gtdilee 
Baptist  Church  in  Shreveport,  La.,  and  president  of  Louisiani^t  '•. 
Baptist  Convention,  uill  preach  at  McCoy  Memorial  Baptist  ' 
Church.  S02  /..  4fi-th  street,  iSunday  morning,  March  J.  1 


t 


Santa  Monicd  NAACP        ! 
Organizes  Y^uith  Council 

SANTA  MONICA  —.  Thirty  teen-agers  under  thfe 
guidance  of  Mrs.  Zeke  G^ann  organized  a  youth  coun- 
cil and  set  themselves  a  goal  of  100  mernbers  just  be- 
fore last  Thursday's  meeting  of  the  NAACP  at  the  Ca! 
vary  Baptist  Church,  which  drew  an  audience  of  150^- 
The  principal  speaker.  Lor^y,^^^.^^  ^^  ^  ^^  ^^ 

Miller,   attorney   and   publishjer  ]  participation, 
of    the    California    Eagle,    dis-  j     An  honorary  memjaership  hi 
cussed  the  housihg  problms^jof  [the  branch  was  presented  toMr.*^ 


minority  groups  and  the  dis- 
crimination against  Negroes. 
Orientals  and  Mexicans  in  the 
(Jreatcr  Los  Angeles  Area.  He 
elaborated  on  Housing  and  Civil 
Rights  Legislation  now  pending 
before  congress.  j 

Rex  H.  Minter,  attorney  ahd 
member  of  the  City  Council  jof 
Santa    Monica,    explained 
methods    used    by    real    est 
agents  to  discourage  prospect 
buyers    and  'renters    who 
j  members  of  minority  groups 

Gilbert  Dale,   a  politic 
science  major,  urged  fuller  par- 
ticipation in  local  and  civic  ^f- 


and  Mrs.  Herbert  Allen  and 
their  daughter,  Jo  Ann,  partid-' 
pants    in    the    CHnton.    Tenn., 
school  integrafion  fight,  by  Mr£r 
Blanche  Carter. 

A  resolution  to  send  a  tele« 
gram  to  President  EisenhowCT 
protesting  the  recent  Clinton 
bombing  was  passed. 

NAACP  president,  Virgil 
Btown.  presided  over  the  rteet- 
ing  and  Rev.  W.  P.  Carter  of 
Calvary  gave  the  invocation. 


LATE  REGZSTBATION 

Late  registration  is  still  open^^ 
for    classes    at    Lofe    ,Angele«       , 


fairs.  He  urged  complete  regis-    Trade-Technical  Junlor^'Collegti 


Private  Consultation  and  SYC 

Call  for  Appo  ntment  AD.  2-5984 

Office  Hours:  9b30  A.M.  .  7:30  P.M. 

SISTER  BEATRICE.  11374  East  Vernon  Ave. 


Special  Mass 
for  Oppressed 
Set  for  Sun. 

A  Mass,  with  special  prayers, 
will  be  celebrated  in  Sf.  Paul's 
Catholic  Church,  Washington 
hlvd.  at  Bronson,  Sunday, 
March  3,  at  9:30  a.m. 

The  Prayers  for  the  Oppress- 
ed committee^  comprised  largely 
of  postal  employes,  will  take 
the  lead  in  the  move  that  is 
calculated  to  spread  through- 
out the  world. 


PLAINLY  MARKED 


.-5>» 


There  i.  no  price  myst.nr.tAng.Iu. 
Funer.1  Home.  The  pnc  •«  •'■ 
w.y.  plainly  n,"W«l-  r..d.bU  .1 
rgUnee.  And  the  intimet.  d«j:..ic^ 
of  whet  to  spend  for.  funer.1  fMH 

with  th.  family.  Full  use  of  our 
f,ciliti.»,  our  be.utiful  church,l.ke 
or  drewing  room  ch.p.l,  finest  pro- 

fMsion.l  car.,  tr.nsport.tion  .nd 
extra  details  of  service  .re  included 
in  the  cost  of  every  funeral. 


Funeral.  Homes 

LOS  ANGELES:  1030  £  Jefferson  Blvd.-Pfwne  ADams  ZSM 
LONG  BEACH:  718  E  Anaheim  fit-Phone  LB.  70OM9JL. 


Lfi. 


miih 


"-r'  «  .^- .... 


£&& 


■i^AMl 


..,...^,„  -.-,^^^aB^,»r-,»^>^-^.^Ml 


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<(£— TTie  Califomfa  Eagfs 


Thursday,  February  28,  19^7 


Top  personalities  in  the 
Bports  world,  ranging  from  ath- 
letes to  news  commentators, 
will  be  honored  Friday  eve- 
ning. March  S-  when  the  lOOTr 
Wrong  Club  hosts  its  first  an- 
nual Sports  Award  banquet  at 
the  Fox  Hills  Country  Club, 
5800  W.  Slauson  avenue. 

Among  those  to  be  cited  at 
the  gala  event  will  be  Willie 
White,  Jefferson  High's  city  and 
State  sprint  champion;  Billy 
Younger,  Jordan  High's  all-star 
gridder;  Charles  Dumas,  ex- 
Compton  Collega  star  who  is 
now  enrolled  at  USC  (Dumas 
is  the  first  man  to  clear  7  ft.  in 
the  high  jump);  Rafer Johnson, 
second;place  decathaWi  place 
winner  in  t  h  e  '56  Olympic 
Games;  Tom  Wilson,  the  L.  A. 
Rams'  star  who  established  a 
new  ground -gaining  record  for 
a  single  game  against  the 
Green  Bay  Packers  last  season; 

Also  UCLA's  Pete  O'Garro; 
Coach  Dave  Williams  of  Jordan 
High  School:    Coach  Tay  Brown 


Red  Sanders;  SidZiff.  Mirror- 
News  sports  editor;  Sam  Baiter 
of  KLAC;  Earlene  Brown,  and 
J.  G.  Taylor  Spink,  publisher  of 
the  Sporting  News. 

Organized  in  early  fall,  the 
10O'"r  Wrong  Club  boasts  an  in- 
terracial membership  of  some 
130  members.  Club  objectives 
include  scholarships  for  deserv- 
ing young  athletes;  contribu- 
tions to  worthwhile  charity 
projects  (the  club  has  already 
purchased  its  life  membership 
in  the  N.\ACP) ;  proper  guid- 
ance for  hish  school  athletes; 
creating  fellowship  among 
sports  lovers,  and  welcoming 
visiting  athletes. 

The  group  meets  every  Wed- 
nesday evening;  and  the  mem- 
bership is  comprised  of  a  cross- 
section  of  community  males, 
including  athletes,  writers,  re- 
porters, doctors.  law>-ers.  busi- 
ness and  professional  men.  etc. 

Originators  were  Lloyd  La 
Beach.  Harry  Thompson,  Brad 
Pye  Jr..  Bert  Kenner  and  A.  S. 


■'^■^-■■yg^ 


'i _' ' . 


((■  ^^^^j^pO^  DERBY— Entries  are  now  open  in  the  fourth  annual  Pmeu-ood  Derby 
oniciats  of  the  Dept.  of  Recreation  and  Parks  announced.  Bovs  /.?  years  and  under  are  eligi- 
nrn\      J  '"    -^^  '"""  ""'•  ^""'^^^'^  *'"  "'"^    available    at    all    Los    A  nodes    City    play- 

f/U        ,T  ""'/""  ""  ■^^"^'""  ""''""^  ^r^''''  """^  ^''^  ^''''^-  >'  '"P'^<^h  becoming  the  out- 
standing father-nnd-son  project  of  the  year.  I  '  ■  >■      ' 


of    Corrjpton    College;     UCLA's  i  "Doc"  Young. 

Tombstone  Smith  Seeks 
16th  Straight  Ring  Win 

Tombstone  Smith,  the  elon-ithe  ISth  and  Grand  boxing 
fated  state  welterweight  cham- j  arena  has  unbeaten  Jimmy 
pion,   will   be  shooting  for  his  |  Palazzola  tangling  with  young 


16th-  straight  win  as  a  pro  when 
he  boxes  Joltin'  Joe  Miceli  in 
next  Thursday  night's  10-round 
main  event  at  the  Olympic. 

Miceli.  a  veteran  of  11  years 
fn  the  rings,  has  fought  five 
world  champs.  He  scored  a  lop- 
sided win  over  Art  Aragon  at 
the  Olympic  in  1955. 

Smith,  in  his  last  go,  whip- 
ped Don  Jordan. 

Tonight's  10-round  feature  at 


Artie  Dixon.  Harold  Dade's 
hard-hitting  protoge.  Dixon  can 
boast  of  wins  over  boys  like 
Sonny  Hett,  Henry  Bronko  and 
Larry  Maldanado. 


65  Prospects 
Start  Drills 

Sixty-five    prospects    reported 
for  spring  football  practice  at 

Florida  A  &  M  here  last  week. 
The  crop  includes  five  fresh- 
•men  who  enrolled  during  the, 
second  semester  from  Jackson- 
ville. 


Aggies  Whip  Morgan 

A&T  College  won  its  13th 
basketball  game  while  dropping 
only  one  contest  since  the  sea- 
son got  under  way.  About  2.000 
fans  saw  them  down  Morgan 
State  College  60-52. 


Mdtdom's 
Meanies  Sign 

Lord  Carlton,  one  of  mat- 
dom's  top, meanies,  and  Gene 
(Mr.  America)  Stanlee  will  tan- 
gle in  a  special  off-TV  wres- 
tling match  at  the  Ol^-mpic  Au- 
ditorium next  Wgictnesday  at 
7:30  p.  m. 

Fans  have  flooded  the  Olym- 
pic bo.xoff ice  with  telephone 
calls  and  letters  asking  for  this 
match. 


City  Softball 
Play  to  Start 

Play  in  the  1957  Inter-Agen- 
cy Boys'  Softball  competition 
Will  be  launched  in  three  divi- 
sions on  Monday.  March  11,  the 
Los  Angeles  City  Recreation  and 
Park  Department  announced 
yesterday. 

According  to  Ralph  Borrelli, 
director  of  special  events  in  the 
department,  neighborhood- 
playground  Softball  leagues 
will  begin  play  March  11  and 
end  May  13.  District  or  area 
play-offs  must  be  staged  by 
'onday,  June  3.  and  Inter- 
''cncy  play-offs  are  sched- 
uled June  10-12. 

There  will  be  no  agency  fi- 
nals in  the  midgets'  division, 
for  boys  12  years  of  age  and 
under,  but  district  playoffs  may 
be  held  if  the  district  or  area 
director  approves,  Borrelli  stat- 
ed. The  other  two  divisions  — 
junior  for  hoys  13  and  14  years 
of  age.  and  senior,  for  the  15-, 
16-  and  17-year-olds — wijl  com- 
pete at  all  levels. 


Kappa  Cage  Team  Holding 
Secret  Workouts  in  Watts 

The  big  red  Kappa  basketball  i  Perkins.  Tony  Pinkins,  Leo  Hill 
team  will  be  out  to  defend  its  j  and  a  flock  of  newcomers 
championship  when  the  inter- 
frat  series  gets  underway  Satur- 
day, March  16  at  the  Jefferson 
High  School  Gym. 

This  year  Jackie  White,  ex- 
Harlem  Globetrotter,  will  coach 
the  Kappas  and  he's  faced  with 
the  problem  of  replacing  such 
goodies  as  Willie  NauUs,  Morris 
Taft  and  Leo  Brandon. 

Howe\'er 


White,    according    to    report, 
I  will   stress  more  defense  than 
any  other  Kappa  team  has  fea- 
tured during  the  years. 

Most  of  the  series  teams  will 
be  stronger  this  year.  Alphas 
appear  about  the  weakest  mem- 
ber of  the  league,  according  to 
operator  X. 


according  to  our 
operative  who  managed  to 
smuggle  his  way  into  one  of 
the  Kappa's  secret  workouts 
held  in  air-tight  secrecy  in  the 
Jordan  Downs  project.  White 
will   field  a   snappy  crew   built 


around    such 


Grambling  Wins 

GRAMBLING.  LA.  (SPECIAL) 
—The  Grambling  Tigers  stepp- 
ed up  their  bid  for  an  NCAA  or 
NAIA  tournament  berth  Mon- 
day night  with  a  slick  103-80 
victory  Over  Arkansas  State 
'  AM&N  College  . 

Combining    a    good    defense 

""-urfth    a    strong   offense.    Fred!. 

Hobdy's     hirelings     practically 

smothered  the  visitors. 


Bruner  Wins 
City  Marble 
Championship 

Isaiah  Bruner.  13,  Toberman 
Playground  marble  ace.  out- 
shot  40  contestants  last  Satur- 
day to  win  the  City  champion- 
ship finals  at  Queen  Anne 
Playground. 

Bruner  competed  in  junior 
Cages  13  and  14)  division,  which 
is  the  top  classification  in  the 
competition. 

In  the  midget  C12  and  under) 
division,  the  winner  was  Wil- 
burt  Jones,  .12,  of  2116  Naomi 
street,  previous  champion  at 
Central  Playground. 

Albert  Solano,  11,  of  13035»'2 
Carl  street,  Pacoima,  was  run- 
ner-up  in   the   midget  contest. 

The   finals   were   held   in   11 

rings,  each  9  feet  in  diarheter, 

chalked  out  on  the  playground 

.     ,      ,    ,  ,  .      T-        t        .         under  the  supervision  of  Ralph 

to  be  held  on  the  East  Los  An-  ,  Borrelli,  director   of  special 

geles  Junior  Collegeoval  Satur-  ;  e^p^ts  for  the  City  Recreation 

and  Park  Department 


AAU  Relays 
Set  Mar.  9 

A   total    of   750   top   athletes 
will  compete  in  the  AAU  relays 


Cage 
On 


stars    as    Dallas 


Al 

iJilnJo 
idoiJt 


Aces 
l-Stars 


STARS  BOAST 
YOUNG  SOUAD 

The  Hollywood  Stars,  will 
have  a  3S-man  squad  reporting 
to  their  spring  training  camp  at 
Anaheim  on  March  11,  when 
Clyde  King  takes  over  as  the 
Stars  12th  manager,  club  Pres- 
ident Robert  H.  Cobb  has  an- 
nounced. 

The  Stars'  average  age  is  23.7 
years  per  man — just  a  trifle 
higher    than    the   record-break- 


J/tii  DAP  Team 
Honored  With 
C.  C.  Banquet 

Honoring  champions  and 
junior  division  Inter-Agency 
runners-up  in  the  senior  and 
Touch  Football  competition,  the 
Los  Angeles  Junior  Chamber  of 
Commerce  and  the  Owl  Drug 
Co.  sponsored  a  banquet  at 
R  e  X  a  1 1  Square,  8480  Beverly 
Boulevard,  last  week,  the  los 
Angeles  City  Recreation  and 
Park  Department  reported  yes- 
terday. 

Individual  medals  and 
trophies  was  presented  at 
the  banquet  to  the  Res^eda-Tar- 
zana  Tigers  and  the  77th  Street 
Deputy  Auxiliary  Police,  win- 
ners and  runners-up  in  the 
junior  division;  and  the  77th 
Street  Deputy  Auxiliary  Police 
and  Benedict  Playground  teams, 
which  placed  first  and  second, 
respectively,  in  the  senior  divi- 
sion. The  sportsmanship  trophy 
will  be  presented  to  the  Majar 
Juniors  of  the  Cathftlic  Youth 
Organiaztion. 


flACING 


-j^(SS» 


I 

T 


RflMSEY 


CALIENTE:  It  was.  bargain- 
basement  day  in  the  5-10  pool 
at  Caliente  last  Sunday,  when 
a  new  record  number  of  70  win- 
ning tickets  paid  688.40  each 
for  picking  five  winners. 

The  pool  totaled  $53,550.  The 
winning  horses  were  Green 
Robe,  Chief  Sealey,  Moving  On, 
Alizumba.  Reliapon  and  Fancy 
Dresser. 

Caliente  is  now  making  plans 
to  conduct  its  annual  future 
bgbk  on  the  Kentucky  Derby  on 
May  5. 

John  S.  Alessio,  executive  di- 
rector, =  also  .announced  that  a 
future  book  on  the  Gold  Cup  in 
the  summer  at  Hollywood  Park 
will   be  inaugurated   this  year. 


g-y 


mlho  Real  Handicap  to  be  run 
on  the  turf  course. 


Andy    Gilmjour     and     Eli.seo 
Nino,  standout  basketball  play 

ers  for  East  L.  A  Junior  College. .  jng  figure  of  23  last  spring, 
accepted  invitations  to  play  on       X,  „      „„  ^■  /a         .u 

the  Metropolitan  All -Star  team  I     °^  *''^  ^  ""^^     '"^^^  .""  ^^^ 

The   Metro   All-Star   game    i.s    '''^^^''-  ""'•''  "^^  P^^^^''  ''^  *'^'^'' 


scheduled  for  Saturdav  night, 
March  2,  at  Bakersfield.  Tt' 
annually  pits  the  conference 
champions  again.st  a-  l^and- 
picked  tearri  from  the  other 
seven  colleges. 


the  SOyear  mark  — :  veteran 
right-handed  pitcher  Ben  Wade, 
who,  is  (lean  of  the  club  ^t  34. 


Carlos  Ortiz 
Choice  Over 
Lou  Filippo 

Sharp-punching  Carlo§  Ortiz 
of  New  York  is  favored  by  an 
11-5  margin  to  chalk  up  his 
2lst  straight  ring  win  at  the 
expense  of  Lou  Filippo  in  Sat- 
urday night's  Hollywood  Legion 
Stadium  main  event. 

Ortiz  recently  defeated  Bobby 
Rogers  on  national  TV  in  Chi- 
cago and  in  two  prior  Legion 
bouts'  has  .stopped  Wildcat  Phil 
Kim,  and  decisioned  Mickey 
Northrup. 

Both  tighters  finished  their 
training  chores  last  Wednesday 
at  the  Main  Street  Gym. 


SANTA  ANITA:  It  will  be 
Derby  Day  at  beautiful  Santa 
Anita  this  Saturday.  The  best 
3-year-old  ever  to  run  at  the 
miracle  course  will  gopostward 
in  the  SlOO.OOO-added.  A  crowd 
of  60.000  is  expected  to  witness 
this  big  event. 


HORSPS  TO  WATCH: 
Coliente 

BEN     REWARD  —  Look  out  for  thia 

one. 
DON   TONV— Has  worked  f««t. 
LAMPWICK — A  real  goodie. 
BROOKLYN    BUM— Six  furlongs  to  a 

mife. 
COLD    SNAP  —  From  a  smart  stable. 
KEEN   MONEY— Go  back  to  this  one. 
SKY     TONY  —  My   long-shot   special. 
KOOL     KID  — Off  bad,   give   another 

chance. 

Santa  Anita 

PRINCE     KHALEO  — My  double  XX 

special  for  the  Derby. 
QUICK  PAYMENT— This  one  can  fly. 
EUGENjO— Frt  as  they  come. 
SULLY  SECRET— A  real  goodie. 
WINDSOR     SERIAL  — Get    yours   on 

this  one. 
GATE      SMASHER  — Tab    for    early 

action. 
ROOK — Fit  as  they  come. 
WITH     GLORY— Longshot  special. 

Keep  this  column  for  future 
reference  as  it  only  appears  in 
the  California  Eagle. 


Brains  vs.  LAJC 


Coach      Duhm's      promising 
baseball  team  at  East  Los  An- 
geles   Junior    College    faces    a 
This    writer    picks    Prince   stiff   test  when   thev  face  the 
Khaled  to  win.  The  cofeature   Bruin  Frosh  on  their  home  dia- 
will    be   the  $2.5.000added   Ca-fmond  Friday,  March  1. 


T 


Scores  26  Points 

Bob  Laemmle's  26  points  led 

■■ — j  Los   Angeles   State   to   a   77-32 

Eagle  sub.scriptions  are  but  j  CCAA  basketball  win  over  Long 
four  dollars  a  vear.  "    fieach  State  last  week. 


Dr.  Cowen 

Has  a  Special 
Credit  plan 

Just  For  You! 


geles  Junior  College 
day,  March  9. 

First  event  of  the  Southern 
Pacific  AAU  Relays  comes  off 
at  10:00  a.m.  Entries  include 
teams  from  UCLA.  USC,  Occi- 
dental, Whittier,  L.A.  State  and 
all  junior  colleges  and  many 
southland  service  teams. 


100%  Wrong  Clnb 
Planning  llnnnal 


HOBBY  SHOW 

If  you  have  an  unusual  hobby 
•r  collection,  you  are  eligible  to 
enter  the  Ninth  Annual  Califor- 
nia Hobby  Show  to  be  held  at 
Shrine  Exposition  Hall,  April 
5-14.  it  was  announced  by  Fred 
J.  Tabery,  director. 


BUST  SPOTS  ON  CHROMIUM 

Chromium  parts  on  your  au- 
tomobile will  develop  rust  spots 
if  the  bare  steel  has  been 
exposed  by  .scratches  in  the 
chrome  f  i  n  i  s^h.  Chromium 
should  be  protected  regularly 
by  an  oil  or  wax  film. 


The    members    of    the    lOO'' 


Contestants  had  to  win  two 
out  of  three  games  to  advance 
toward  the  finals.  Winners  in 
the  semi-final  and  final  rounds 
won  three  out  of  five. 


V 


DO  YOU 


Many  Commtinities 
Metro  Serves?  ^ 


Brains  vs.  Bears 
For  Loop's  Lead 


The  long-awaited  PCC  basket- 
ball biggie  pitting 'twice-beaten 
UCLA's    flashy    Bruin    quintet 
against   once-beaten    California 
Wrong  Club  held  their  regular  |  comes^  off  Friday  and  Saturday 


Wednesday  meeting  at  the 
Milomo  Lounge,  2829  S.  Western 
Ave.,  and  various  committees 
reported  on  the  progress  of  the 
group's  first  annual  banquet. 

The  Fox  Hills  Country  Club  is 
being  Considered  as  the  site  of 
the  affair  and  the  S7.50-a-pIate 
dinner-program  will  be  empha- 
sized with  top  entertainment, 
awards,  and  dancing. 

The  club  has  paid  up  half  of 
its  life  membership  pledge  to 
the  NAACP.  Suggestions  on 
how  to  improve  the  organiza- 
tion were  given  by  Jack  Tenner 
and  Mack  Robinson. 


at  Berkeley. 

Radio  station  KNX  will  carry 
a  play-by-play  account  of  both 
games,  with  starting  time  for 
Friday's  game  being  8:30  p.  m. 


The  1957  Pacific  Coast  League 
Sketch  Book  has  been  "released 
-to  newspaper,  radio  and  televi- 
sion writers.  It  contains  sketches 
on  players  in  the  league,  their 
lifetime  records  and  other  vital 
information  to  those  covering 
PCL  games. 


INtOHMATION  ON 


OUN  24  HOURS 


BAIL   BONDS    FREE 

CELES  KING  ill  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY 


909  East  6th  Street 


MU.  5500 


Your  suits 

get  a 
'lii^e  new'^ 
look  at . . , 


C.S- ''  ^Ipl"'  -S' 


ervice 


\    jAk  You'll  appreciate  the  difference  when  you 

V^^B  send  your  suits  to  us  for  expert  cleaning 

>n^B  service.  They'll  come  back  every 

J^^^  time,  "bandbox"  clean  and  fresh. 

^^^^n  You'll    like    our   modest    prices. 


ALPHA  SERVICE 

435  E.  VERNON  AVE. 
ADams  2-9363 


BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

IN  OLD  MEXICO 

PRESENT  EVERY 

SATURDAY  AND  SUNDAY 

RAIN  or  SHINE 

THOROUGHBRED 
HORSE  RACING 


10 

11 


RACES  ON 

SATURDAY 

RACES  ON 

SUNDAY 


10 
11 


ONCE    A  YEAR  we  call  the 
roll  for  your  information.  Here  is  the  list  of  135 
Southern  California  communities  you  can  reach  in  a  depend- 
able Metro  coach.  Figure  out  how  much  money  and  driving 
tension  you  save  by  riding  Metro,  next  time  you  have 
occasion  to  visit  one  of  the  places  named  below. 
Figure  it  out  — and  try  going  Metro. 


DAILY  DOUBLE  AND 
QUINELLA 

BOOKS  AND  MUTUELS 

The  Fabulous  5-10  Betting 
Every  Sunday 

-  POST  TIME'- 
SATURDAY  1:00  P.M. 
SUNDAY  12  NOON) 

FANTASTIC    RETURNS 
For  Your  Wager 

Two  Dollars  or  More 

Foreign  Book  Open  Daily 
On  All  Major  Tracks 

GREYHOUNb  RACING 
RESUMES  IN  SPRING 


JOHN  S.  ALESSIO 

ixacwNva   DIrMlM 


Mhambra 

^^^■^^^^^^B 

^^^^"^ 

Sierra  Madn 

AlU  Lorn* 

Sierra  Vista 

Anaheim 

CuWer  Cn» 

lamandaPaak 

PacoMia 

South  Gate 

Arcadia 

Downey 

La  Puent* 

.    PalosVefdes 

South  Pasadena 

Arlington 

Ouarte 

La  Sierra 

Panorama  Ci<r 

Spadra 

Azusa 

Eagle  Rock 

La  Verne 

Paramount 

Studio  City 

BaHxM 

East  Los  Angete* 

Loma  Lmda 

Pasadena 

Sunland 

Baldwin  Put 

East  P»sa(Je«n 

long  Bead) 

Pico 

Sunset  Beac* 

Bell 

El  Monte 

Los  AngelK 

Playa  Dal  Hmf 

Sun  Vailoy 

Bellflower 

El  Segundo 

Lynwood 

Pomona 

Surfside 

Belmont  Short 

El  Serene 

Manhattan  BMet 

Redla<ids 

Tarzana 

Beverly  HiUs 

Enciiro 

Maywood 

RedondoBesek 

Temple  City 

Bolsa 

FirestoR*  P«k 

Midway  C% 

Reseda 

Tujunga. 

Brea 

Fontana 

Monrovia 

Rialto 

Universal  e% 

Brentwood 

Fullertoa 

Montet>ello 

Riverside 

Upland 

Buena  Park 

Glendale 

Monterey  Pw» 

Rosemead 

Van  Nuys 

Burbank 

GlenOora 

Montrose 

San  Bema«dta» 

Venice 

Cano«a  Patk 

Granada  HiMs 

Maoles 

San  Oimas 

VeritugoCMir 

CastellammMi 

Hermosa  Beadi 

Newport  B««li 

San  Fernanda 

walnut 

Claremont 

Highland  Park 

North  Hollywood 

SanGabhai 

Watso. 

Clearwater 

Highway  HigMandi 

North  Lone  BmcJi 

San  Mann* 

Watts 

Clifftoa 

Hollywood 

Northridga 

San  Pedro 

West  Hollywood 

Col  ton 

Huntington  Bueh 

Norwalk 

Santa  Ana   ' 

West  LOS  Angtta* 

Campion 

Huntington  Pi* 

Ocean  Pai* 

Santa  Fe  Sorintt 

Westminster 

Corona 

Hynes 

Olive 

Santa  Monica 

Westwood 

Covlna 

La  Canada 

OneonW'Wiw 

Seal  Beach 

Whittier 

CucaniBiHi 

La  Crescesli 

Ontario 

Sepulveda 

WHminitai 

LaHabn 

Oranga 

Shtntm  om 

LaketMOd 

BMMfie  PiKirtW 

S<t«a<IM 

Yesi.  .  .  Or.  Cowen's  crtSl 
ferrfis  ore  more  liberal  and 
easier  than  ever  before . . 
Come  in  and  learn  how  easHy 
you  con  obtain  your  new 
Deritol  Pjates.  Regardless  of 
hoW  small  you  wish  to  ntqke 
the  I  payments,  remember  it 
doeisn't  cost-  you.  one  extra 
penlny  to  use  Dr.  Cowen's 
Liberal  Credit.'  . 

FEATURING  NEW  TRANSPARENT 
MATERIAL  AND  fRUBYTE  TEETH 

Ask  your  dentist  why  so  many  ^jlafe  wearers  prefer  this  n«w 

type  of  derfture.  You  too  can  benefit  by  the  improvemenU 

of  modern  dental  science.  S4e  somples  ot  Dr.  Cowen'$. 


THERE  ARE  NO  EASIER  CREDIT 
TERMS  OR  LOWER  PRICES 


for  Metro  tRMjel 
(flformatioii,  e 


I 


TRinity 

7731 


METROPOLITAN 
COACH  LINES 


PEHSIOHERS 
WELCOME 

You  can  obtain  Dental 
Plates,  or  other  needed 
Dental  Care,  on  a  spe- 
cial plan  under  the  Cali- 
fornia Medical  Assist- 
ance Act.  Visit  Dr. 
Cowen  s  Offices  for  full 
information.  -^ 

QUICK  PLATE 
REPAIRS 


1 


DINTISTRY 


•B«lD.iIWOr«         .c»Owss         •P.AU 
•  [XT«.CI10N$         •IIUINCS  .  ,. 


Dr.  Cowen  will  take  core  of  all  your  den- 
tol  needs  RIGHT  NOW,  and  you  can  pay 
LATER  .  .  .  after  Voor  work  is  completed. 
Wo  mtereii  or  carrying  c/iorgos. 


I 


-r- 


DR.  COWEN 

your   friendly    '.red/f   Dentist 

5th  and  BROADWAY 

Enfrcncc:   31S  West   5th   Strc-cl  -  Mefropo'itsn   Bidq 

OVER  NfWBERarS  #   PHONE    Mil       IIQI 


na.^.  ft.  /• i%^>.|  ^^ —  f rnftntly  LocrttJ  U 

•  Santa  Monica  •  Hoilyweed  •{  HuntinstM  P^rfc  •  Uiw  tigcfc 
•  Olandala  •  Paaadana  •  RijrMsida  •  Pomona  •  Venlw* 

OPEN  DAILY  9  AM.  TO  5:30  P.M.  r-- 


^ 


1    / 


-r— ^.-■,^-. 


Golden 


Lodge  Holds  Gala 


—  jLjclta  K^^onccrt  C— - 


oyntniticc  — 


be  run 


for  th.ii 


IS  to  a 

stable. 

I  this  one. 

special. 

anbther 


^  % 


ar    eai-ly 


DELTA  SIGMA  THETA  SORORITY— Mtmhers  should 
he  lauded  for  their  enthusiastic  work  nnd  the  grouAnii  interest 
they  hene  aroused  in  the  Leontyne  Price  concert  to  be  presented 
at  the  Philharmanic  Auditorium.  Marth  13,  at  S  p.m.  Tickets 
are  moving  fast  but  the  committee  reports  that  it  still  has  a 


fell'  choice  scats  a-  ntlable.  A  record  nttcndtince  is  expected  to 
hcfir  this  outstandma  artisl.  Drhns  pictured.  frnm\left,  front 
rriu  :  ll'illestine  Bnnks,  Hatlie  MtClure,  Zelma  Bell,  F.liia 
Gibson,  Ai/een  U  oodson,  Ernize  Mnzique,  Dorothy  Tim's, 
J^Iyrnfi    Carter,    Mary    Alice    If  alton.    Lea    Bryant,    general 


chairman  of  the  affair.  Back  roiv:  Mary  Glenn,  patron  s  chair-' 
man;  Jean  Shropshire,  Stella  Lee  If  yndon,  Imoacne  Seusom, 
Sybil    Thomas,    Inez    Middleton.    publicity    chairman:    Ethel 
Maddox,  chairman  of  souvenir  program;  Betty   If  illiams,  co- 
chairman,  souienir  program;  and   Thelma  Mitchell,  co-chair- 


man, concert  committee.  Proceeds  from  the'  March  23  affair 

.  iiiJl  go  touards  the  sorority's  scholarship  fund,  making  possible 

annual  awards  to  outstanding  high  school  students.  Tickets  are 

also  on  sale  at  Evelyn's  Card  Shop,  2070  W est  fefferson  Blvd., 

or  call  LU.  9-2^0.  I 


—  C^lks    J  c 


icia 


Is- 


t»mni»  awtyf  "i>M>m  i  ,  iwi  n  .  nii»iw..w«B»y)|> 


ji 


^i-^'if:-  r^\^. 


"».- 


CLUBS 


FASHIONS 


Thursday,   February   28,    1957 


V     .  7 


.* 


JS'STf^ERSARY   DASCE — Golden   ff'est  Lodge   Elks'   officials   ncre   hosts  secretary:  Sathaniel   ll'atts.   Exalted  Ruler  of   Golden    If'est   Lodge   \o.   S6; 

at  one  of  the  gayest  fotmals  of  the  season,  when  they  celebrated  the  26th  anni-  George    R.    Clark,    Financial   secretary :   Joseph    Duncan,    Recording   secretary; 

versary   of  the    Temple  last  week.  Shown   prior  *»   the   dance  are,  from   left;  and  Bennye  lance.  Inner  Guard. — (Adams) 
Bernard  Parnell,  Esteemed  Lecturing  Knight;  Louts  B.  Pinkney,  asst.  recording 


—  <JLjancc  \m.^ontynittcc  — 


5,000 
THREE 

The  brilliant,  fab- 
ulous 26th  anniversary 
dance,  of  t  h  e  west's  re- 
nowned Golden  W^e  s  t 
Elks  Lodge  No.  86.  last 
Saturday  night,  was  the 
biggest  social  event  of  the 
weekend. 

Five  thousand  guests 
arrived  at  the  Elks  hall 
and  didn't  leave  until  5 
a.m.  The  formal,  one  of 
the  merriest  anniversary 
affairs  in  years,  spread 
over  all  three  floors  of  the 
beautiful  temple,  4016  S. 
Central  ave. 

Past  Exalted  Ruler  and 
past  financial  secretary, 
Horace  D.  Milan,  intro- 
duced the  master  of  cere- 
monies, Past  E.xalted  Ru- 
ler C.  L.  Smith,  who  head- 
ed the  popular  lodge  for 
four  successful  years.  ' 

He  presented  gold  pins 
to  the  otf  icers  as  ■>  they 
were  introduced.  Nathan- 
iel Watts,  Exalted  Ruler; 
Wilftam  N.  Cole,  Esteemed 
Leading  Knight;  Kerry  E. 
Harrison,  Esteemed  Loy- 
al  Knight;   Bernard  Par- 


ATTEN 
STORY 

nel.  Esteemed  Lecturing 
Knight;  George  R.  Clark, 
financial  secretary;  Jo- 
seph Duncan,  recording 
secretary;  Earl  Parker, 
treasurer;  John  .Hepler, 
Tiler;  and  Marvin  Hogg, 
Esf^uire,  all  received  pins. 

Other  officials  are: 
James  Wallace,  Inner 
Guard,  and  Dr.  A.A.  Wil- 
liams, Medical  Examiner. 
Trustee  board  members 
are  Claude  L.  Shipp,  Jr.; 
W.  B.  Tolliver,  Robert  L. 
Dykes,  Homer  M.  Baker 
and  Alphonso  A.  Robin- 
son., Comrtiittee  heads  are: 
William  (f,.  Faulkner,  Ma- 
thew  L.J  Lipscomb.  Man- 
nie  Cam|pbell.  J  i  m  m  i  e 
Coleman,  Horace  D.  Mi- 
lan, Monroe  Elgin  and 
William  Caldwell. 

Directors  are  Sid  Camp- 
bell, Perry  Parks,  Millard 
F.  ,Lacey,  Rev.  William 
Parnell  and  Roy  Norman. 
Marsl^all  Denton,  Jr.  is  the 
legal  advisor;  Alexander 
Norman,  liaison  officer; 
Walter  Carnegie,  chair- 
man    degree     team    and 


The  California   Eagle— 7, 


ELKS 
AFFAIR- 

John  E*  Rector,  manager    *  -i. 
of  club  room. 
Nathaniel  Watts,  newly  .       ^ 
(Continued  on  Page  8).         «•  i 


BEAUTY  —  Ruby  Shipp. 
skillful  beautician  in  the 
Haywood  Salon,  is  gaining 
prominence  as  one  of  South 
'Los  .ingeles'  most  talented 
hairstylists.  Her  skill  and 
knowledge  is  ihown  in  the 
styles  she  creates. 


|en- 

»oy 

led. 


m 


FLAWED  AXSUAL  AFFAIR— Committee  members  are 
shown  above  taking  bows  for  the  wonderful  anniversary  dance 
which  attracted  five  thousand  guests  and  occupied  all  three 
floors  of  the  Elks'  Temple.  Private  parties  were  held  in  the 
building't  banqutt  hall,  offices  and  meet\pg  rooms.  In  jact. 


{> 


Brother  Bills  and  their  guests  literally  too'k  over  the  plact  last 
Saturday  night.  Pictured  from  left;  Mathcw  L.  Lipscomb, 
special  entertainment;  Johnnie  Marhis,  chairman  of  the  com- 
mittee; Herman  If  ells  and  Joe  Friar,  decorations;  and  John 
Helpler,  imitations. — (Adams) 


V 


PACIFIC  STATES  LEADEii  —  The  26th  annual  affair 
given  by  the  Golden  If'est  Lodge,  celebrating  the  opening  of 
the  Elks  Temple,  was  one  of  the  most  elaborate  in  the  Tem- 
ple's history  and  certainly  well  attended.  Five  thousand 
guests  answered  the  invitations  that  had  been  mailed  earlier  this 


It' 


Vk 


month.  Guests  arrived  from  all 
from  left;  Claude  L.  Shipp,  Jr., 
Thomas  ff.  Sparks,  President  of 
tion;  Lenon   T.  Page  and  Maj. 
■Loyal  Knight. — (Adams) 


rr  the  State.  Pictured  are,  ' 
•airman,  Boai-d  of  Trustees! 
Pacific^  States  Elks  J  snath,;'- 
Kerry  E.  Harrison,  Esteemed, 


li 


^ 


II 


!:^ 


—  <jtapp\f  ifjirtltclaxf  — 


i 


SfVEET  SIXTEEN  —  Pr««y  £/fanor  y^ann*-  Hunt  (center) 
celebrated  her  sixteenth  birthday  last  Friday  night  in  her  par- 
ents' beautiful  West  23rd  street  home.  She  is  the  daughter  of 
Officer  Dunbar  Hunt  and  his  tvife.  Eleanor,.  Her  young 
friends  showered  her  uiht  gifts.  Pictured  from  left:  Alberta 


Jones,  Rosemary  Alexander,  Florence  Atkinson,  Beatrice  Dear, 
Juanda  Lee,  Sharon  IFilliams,  Eleanor,  Richard  Wright,  Renee 
,Thierry,  Carolyn  Hunt,  Joyce  Regin,  Richard  Cecil,  Sandra 
Spieghts  and  Edris  Aubry. 


—    r^alpfts    jr  artxf    J  inters  — 


FOR  GOODNESS  SAKE— Larry  Katze.  left.  Dads  Root 
Beer  representative;  Juanita  Jackson  and  Beflye  IVyman, 
competent  cashiers  and  hostesses:  Gilbert  JV.  Lindsay,  field 
deputy  to  Supervisor  Kenneth  Hahn;  Wellington  B.  Love, 
manager  and  host  of  Ralphs'  Seventh  Ave.  at  Washington, 
Blvd.  Store  and  T.  H.  Dabney,  California  Eagle  advertising 


representative,  tcelcomed  a  capacity  crowd  of  customers  and 
friends  to  the  celebration  of  Ralphs'  S4th  yeaf  of  service  to 
Southern  Ca/ifornians.  Highlighting  the  festive  occasion  was 
the  acceptance  of  a  Canary  Island  Pine  free  by  Lindsay  from 
Love,  as  part  of  Ralphs  Stores'  campaign  to  beahtify  thirty- 
four  location/^  throughout  Los  Angeles  County. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiBHi^ 

SMART  SET      [ 

lIlOIIHinilPlWH^  OLIVIA  DEE  DuniliBiniillilinilS 


§ 


Didja  see  Mildred  Bonan- 
on's,  Leo.  on  Channel  4  Sun- 
day? Y'know,  he  is  executive 
director  of  the  St.  Louis  Ur- 
ban  League  and  was  one  of 
the  Ttey  participants  In  the 
program  "A  City  Decides," 
that  dealt  with  desegration  in 
St  Louis.  One  principal  of  a 
high  school  who  was  being 
questioned  by  a  Caucasian 
parent  as  to  how  he  planned 
to  make  integration  work  in 
his  school,  told  the  parent, 
"We  plan  to  teach  fairly, 
honestly  and  equally" —  and 
I  say  that's  all  there  Is  to 
that. 

Robin  Robinson,  the  talent- 
ed young  protege  of  George 
Hymer's  is  breaking  records 
while  at  the  Paramount  The- 
atre in  New  York.  George  flew 
back  to  the  opening  and  he 
Is  still  beaming  over  the  ter- 
rific reception  the  young  man 
got. 

Speaking  of  openings.  New 
York,  n'  such — that  interna- 
tionally famous  tenor,  Ar- 
thur Lee  Simpkins-  is  about 
ready  to  dash  off  to  the  Latin 
Quarter  for  his  stint  there. 
Mrs.  Simpkins  will  accom- 
pany him,  of  course,  and  I 
know  the  Country  Clubbers 
hate  to  see  her  leave,  ^e  still 
regret  missing  the  meeting 
Saturday  past  when  she  was 
hostess  to  the  group. 

HERE  N' THERE 

Spotted  Ouida  Williams,  Dr. 
Vada  Somerville,  Rosemary 
HoUoman  and  Owen  Sim- 
mons taking  notes  ort  the 
positive  school  program  being 
offered  by  Dr.  Ralph  Richard- 
son, English  proffessor  of 
UCLA,  who,  along  with  Mrs. 
Mary  Tinglof,  is  running  for 
office  on  the  L.A.  School 
Board  In  the  April  2  election. 
The  luncheon  was  given  by 
♦TTie  Committee  for  Better 
Schools"  Tuesday  noon  on  N. 
Bedford  Drive  in  Beverly  Hills 
and  wsMS  attended  by  about 
75  women. 

The  D.  A.  Hawkinses  are 
•Tireezing  around  town"  In  a 
be-yootlful  white  and  black 
Eldorado  —  '57  of  course. 
Chairman  Bootsey  Howard  is 
still  getting  raves  for  her 
"rock  n'  roll"  program  last 
Tuesday  night  at  the  Med., 
Dental  and  Phar.  Aex  meet- 
ing. Understand  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
Cullne's   house   on   Virginia 


road  Is  still  rocking. 

Third  Winter  Ball  Commit- 
tee of  the  Natiorial  Urban 
League  will  have  a  'ball" 
over  at  Duane  Vest's  home  on 
Vineyard  Friday  night. 

Pacific  Town  Club  members 
and  wives  will  have  a  joint 
installation  banquet  on  March 
2  at  8  p.m.  at  the  club  house. 

JUST  THINKING 

Just  for  today  I  will  be  hap- 
py.  This  assumes  that  what 
Abraham  Lincoln  said  is  true, 
that  "most  folks  are  about  as 
happy  as  they  make  up  their 
minds  to  be."  Happiness  is 
from  within;  it  is  not  a  mat- 
ter of  externals. 


Zenith  Club 
Will  Select 
Ball  Queeti 

Zenith  Charity  and  Social 
Club's  annual  charity  ball  on 
March  24,  at  the  Elks  ball- 
room,  with  Earl  Bostic  and  his 
great  band  is  causing  quite  a 
bit  of  excitement  in  the  young 
set.  Four  young  contestants 
are  entered  in  a  queen  of  the 
ball  contest. 

This  year  Christabel  Jacobs, 
president  of  the  club,  and  Ar- 
gralia  Earles,  chairman  of  the 
ball,,  placed  the  emphasis  on 
youth  and  will  make  an  all- 
out  effort  to  attract  the  cream- 
of -the-crop  through  their 
queen  contest 

Four  young  pretties  vying 
for  the  queen  honors  are  Bar- 
bara Jean  Graham,  a  clerk 
typist  for  the  Veterans  Ad- 
ministration; Jocelyn  Brown,  a 
magazine  cover  girl;  Patti 
Prince,  a  toy  maker  and  Jac- 
queline Renty  a  clerk  at  Juve- 
nile Hall.  Friends  are  backing 
each  contestant 

The  selection  will  be  deter- 
mined by  the  amount  of 
tickets  sold  in  the  name  of 
each  contestant 


A  LASTING  GIFT — Ralphs  Seventh  Avenue  and  Washing- 
ton store  presents  to  Deputy  Supervisor  Gilbert  Lindsay,  rep- 
resenting the  community,  a  Canary  Island  Pine.  Making  the 
presentation  of  the  lasting  gift  is  JVcllington  B.  Love,  store 
manager.  The  gift  was  part  of  Ralphs  S4th  birthday  celebra- 
tion last  Wednesday  evening,  in  u/hich  customers  and  well- 
wishers  enjoyed  ice  cream,  cake,  coffee  and  soft  drinks. 

Jeffs  Alumni  Plan  Election 


Visit  San  Diego 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hamilton  Batt 
well  known  Palm  Springs 
couple,  spent  last  week-end 
visiting  her  sister,  Mrs.  Alfon- 
•o  Picket  in  San  Diego. 


The  rejuvenated  Jefferson 
High  School  Alumni  Associa- 
tion will  elect  a  new  slate  of 
officers  at  its  next  meeting  in 
the  school  cafeteria  Marrti  26 
at  8  p;m.  The  organization  is 
inviting  all  Jefferson  grads  to 
participate  in  this  election. 

At  the  group's  February 
session  Mr.  Samuel  Hammer- 
man, Jefferson's  present  prin- 
cipal, spoke.  The  winter  gradu- 
ating class,  Demetrians,  was 
presented  and  invited  to  join 
the  Alumni  Association. 

Mr.  Hammerman  stressed 
the  importance  of  returning  to 
Jefferson  not  only  for  the  pur- 
pose of  renewing  old  acquaint- 
ances, but  to  promote  interest 
in  the  school  and  to  help  pro- 
mote a  better  relationship  be- 
tween the  community  and 
Jefferson.  In  addition  to  Mr. 
Hammerman's  talk,  the  group 
was  entertained  with  music  by 
Lorenzo  Flonroy. 

Information   relative   to 


membership  and  meeting 
dates  may  be  secured  by  phon- 
ing ADams  3-2386. 


37th   St.   PTA 
Mothers   March 

Mrs.  John  H.  Owens,  chair- 
man of  the  37th  Street  PTA 
March  JFqr  Polio  and  her  com- 
mittee collected  one  hundred 
and  seventy  eight  dollars  and 
thirteen  cents  in  the  recent 
drive. 

Those  mothers  marching  for 
polio  were:  Mmes.  •  <Maceo 
Campbell,  E.  Agram,  Frank 
Billings,  Curtis  Thomas>  Char- 
les Macon,  James  Scott,  Ray- 
mond George,  Cecil  Ballard, 
Katie  Lucas,  William  Aiken, 
Corney  White.  Elizabeth 
Brooks,  Olive  Allen,  Riley 
Butler.  E.  Clayton,  Flora  Mc- 
Reynold,  Nathan  Whitsett, 
William  Jackson,  Robert 
Dancer,  Augusta  Baskerville, 
and  L'Dora  Acrey. 


Founders      ■  ^~^^^  ^'"^°'""  ^'^''^ — 

Honored  at      —  J'OHr  ks^\ 
Ascot  PTA 


uccns  an 


d 


Thursday,  Miroary  28,  IfHy 


"'■^a 


JKi 


The  Ascot  Avenue  PTA  held 
its  annual  Founder's  Day  ob- 
servance in  the  auditorium  of 
the  school,  Feb.  20,  7:30  p.m.. 
Mrs.  Fannie  Changers,  Presi- 
dent presiding. 

Topic  for  the  evening  was 
"The  Good  of  the  Pfist  Builds 
Hope  for  the  Future."  The 
meeting  was  highlighted  with 

a  skit  by  the  students  entitled, 
"Beautiful  Garden  of  Chil- 
dren," conducted  by  Mrs.  Ar- 
menda  Nelson. 

Mrs.  Chambers,  the  presi- 
dent was  presented  an  hon- 
orary life  membership.  Past 
presidents  honored  with  gifts 
and  corsages  were  Mrs.  Mary 
K.  Johnson,  Mrs.  Stroud  and 
Mrs.  Liney  Terry. 

Other  guests  honored  were 
past  principals,  Mrs.  Bessie 
Burke,  Mrs.  Alma  Covington. 
Mrs.  Jeannie  A.  McCormick, 
and  Mrs.  J.  A.  Major;  Second 
Vice-President  of  Tenth  Dis- 
trict California  Congress  of 
Parents,  and  Mrs.  Carl  B. 
Formna,  president  of  Fremont 
Council,  Tenth  District. 

Dr.  Samuel  J.  Rowe,  the 
principal  of  Ascot  Avenue 
School  was  honored  with  a 
gift  from  the  Ascot  Avenue 
Parent-  Teacher's  Executive 
Board.  Mrs.  Liney  Terry,  his- 
torian, gave  a  brief  sketch  on 
the  achievement  of  the  asso- 
ciation. 


'  Littleton  to  tiiik 


SOCIAL  KNIGHT— When  lovely  ladies  surrounded  Samue 

birthday,  he  took  the  opportunity  to  pass  out  tickets  to   his  c'uh^s  forthcoming 

Park  Manor,  Saturday,  March  9.  Left  to  right:  EUada  Kin^ 

son,  Littleton  and  Mary  Saunders.  (Adams) 


DOT'S  DASHES 


hf  DOROTHEA  FOSTER 


Samuel 


Birthday  Feted 


htm  a  Jiappf 

event  at  /te 

Frances  William,  Sue  Them^- 


Littleton 


Party  circuit  still  moving  along  at  a  brisk  pace 
but  mostly  in  the  Friday-Saturday-Sunday  bracket. 
F'instance,  the  rains  failed  to  dampen  the  spirit  of  the 
Hilltoppers  and  their  gue.*rts  on  Friday  night  at  the 
Fox  Hills  Country  Club.  Guests  felt  they  were  view- 
ing a  fabulous  fashion  show  with  the  ladies  of  the 
club  wearing  such  gorgeous  creations.  L'TANYA 
came  in  for  much  praise  for  her  gown  and  for  the  one 
she  designed  for  HILDEGARD  BOSTIC. 

A  merry  pace  was  the  "round-the-world"  dinner 
given  by  the  "Deuces"  on  Saturday  night,  DR.  ED-" 
WIN  WITT  was  chairman  and  planned  a  delightful 
evening  consisting  of  cocktails  with  GEORGE  and 
JOSEPHINE  SMITH,  many. dishes  of  other  countries 
displayed  in  a  very  appetizing  manner  at  the  home  of 
JACKIE  and  SANFORD  SMITH  and  ending  with  danc- 
ing at  the  beautiful  Leimert  Park  home  of  RUTH  and 
LEONARD  SPENCERi 

Same  night,  RUTH  BALL  entertained  the  Doll 
League  Club.  Ruth's  hubby,  GLADWIN,  celebrated 
his  birthday  that  night  and  the  wee  hours  found 
many  guests  still  enjoying  the  warm  hospitality  of 
the  Balls. 

Going  Away 

Monday  evening,  C.  G.  PRICE  departed  via  Amer- 
ican Airlines  for  the  West  Indies  but  not  before  his 
charming  wife,  KAA,  threw  a  "going-away"  dinner 
party  in  the  Cloud  Room  of  Mike  Lyman's  Airport 
Restaurant.  About  22  .friends  enjoyed  cocktails,  din- 
ner and  chit-chat  before  the  fabulous  colonel  depart- 
ed. Kaa  will  join  her  husband  in  two  weeks  and  then 
they  will  travel  for  about  two  months  before  return- 
ing to  their  Hollywood  home. 

Beautiful  and  festive  was  the  25th  wedding  anni- 
versary of  MR.  and  MRS.  GEORGE  BROWN  of  West 
36th  place  last  Sunday  evening.  Incidentally,  those 
unique  silver-and-white  decorations  were  the  artistic 
design  of  BILLYE  and  CHARLES  BROWN  of  Avalon 
Florists. 

Omega  Psi  Phi  making  elaborate  plans  for  their 
Starlight  Formal  at  the  Beverly  Hilton  on  March  15. 

Over  400  people  helped  SAM  LITTLETON  cele- 
brate his  birthday  last  Saturday  night. 


Maxine  Heflin 
Repeats  Vows 
In  San  Diego 

Maxine  Heflin,  popular  dress 
designer  and  well  known 
member  of  the  community, 
and  Oscar  Gibson,  Los  Angeles 
Railway  employees,  were  mar- 
ried quietly  in  San  Diego  on 
Feb.  16. 

The  wedding  climaxed  a 
two-and-a-half  year  romance, 
the  bridegroorn  hails  from 
New  Orleans,  "rfie  couple  are 
receiving  friends  at  their  6th 
avenue  home. 


The  one  birthday  Samuel 
Littleton  will  long  remember 
is  the  one  he  celebrated  lasl 
Saturday  night  in  his  fashion- 
able south  Los  Angeles  home 
at  135th  and  M%Unley  ave. 
Littleton,  one  of  the^  besi 
known  members  of  the  Social 
Knights,  is  a  popular  staffer 
at  the  General  Hospital. 

One    hundred    and    fifty 


Iotas  Sponsor 
Theater  Part/ 

Members  of  the.  Iota  Patronj 
Board  of  Alpha  Pi  Chapter! 
sbrority  will  sponsor  the  pre-| 
miere  of  "Lost  in  the  Stars"; 

Funds  raised  from  the  af -  j 
fair  will  go  to  the  sorority's 
scholarship  fund.  The  place 
and  time  win  be  announced  I 


friends  came  to  wish  a  real 
nice  fellow  many  happy  re- 
turns. The  party  was  a  happy 
one  with  scmie  ot  the  city's 
most  attractive  youn£  ladies 
in  attendance. 

The  Collegiat^  a  group  el 
young  musicians,^provided  the 
evening's  music.  The  band 
played  many  classy  tuses. 
Littleton's  magnificent  <»llec- 
tion  of  records  provided  de- 
lightful intermission  music  ' 

The  Collegiates  are:  David 
Bowden,  alto  sax;  Charles  Mc- 
Culla;  piano  and'  tenor  sax; 
Malbom  Littleton,  piano  and 
drums;  Robert  Collins,  brngo; 
and  Joe  Davves,  driims. 

Mary  Littleton  with  the  aid 
of  her  sister  Ella  Mae  Norman 
and  MoUie  Dorsey-  deserve 
sweeping  bows  for  arranging 
the  gay  event. 

Some  of  the  many  guests 
were:  Mmes  and  Mrs.  Herman 
Faulk,  William  Albrams,  Wil- 
liam Bigelow,  Charles  Macon, 
Carey  Foster,  Robrt  L.  Postel, 


Lloyd  Henry,  Marshall  Green, 
Leon  Taylor,  Leo  Lindley,  Wil- 
borne  Johnson,  James  Mc- 
Daniels.  Luther  Butler,  Vi 
Brown,  Fainnie  Porter,  Ivy  Dell 
Harris.  Miercidine  Henry,  El- 
zada  King,  Susie  Thompson, 
James  L  a  n  e  y  and  Harold 
White.       I 


HIPS 


^1 


OFF  TO  BWI-Col.  G.  G. 
Price,  well  known-  business- 
man and  realtor,  left  this 
week  for  a  three  month  trip 
to  the  British  West  Indies, 
and  his  summer  home  in 
Kingston,  Jamaica. 

Sportsmen 
Set  Dance 

The  Twenty  Century  Sports- 
men's gala  pre-Easter  matinee 
dance  will  be  held  at  the 
Tropical  Zamboanga  Supper 
Club,  3828  W.  Slauson  ave., 
Sunday,  March  3. 

Chairman  Sammy  Warren 
urges  everyone  to  secure 
tickets  from  club  members  for 
the  Sunday  afternoon  dance 
which  will  start  at  4  p.ni.  and 
last  until  9.  For  reservation 
call  AX  3-0000. 


Have  your  club  subscribe  to 
the  Eagle'— four  dollars  a  year. 


5,000  Elks 

(Continued  from  Page  7> 

installed  leader  and  his,  ^„.^j  *,^^^.,  «v/u.v  **  *uoi,:», 
dance  committee;  Johnnie  F  Booker  Easley,  Travis  Foley. 
Mathis,  William  N.  Cole, 
Joe  Friar,  John  Hepler, 
Marvin  Hogg  and  Mathew 
L;  Lipscomb  certainly  did 
themselves  proud.  Every- 
one attending  agreed  that 
this  year's  affair  was 
top's. 

"Celebrate"  must  have 
been  the  lodge's  secret 
pass  word  all  this  month 
and  the  Brother  Bills  did 
just  that. 

Watts  was  host  to  a  gay 
before-party  for  top  brass 
and  their  guests  and  later 
held  court  in  his  executive 
office  at  the  Elks  Temple 
after  2  a.m.  The  activities- 
lasted  until  dawn  when 
the  parties  went  off  to 
breakfast  and  church  on 
Sunday  morning. 

Out-of-towners  from 
the  Pacific  States  appear- 
ed in  large  numbers  with 
Thomas  W.  Sparks  of  Val- 
lejo,  president  of  the  Paci- 
fic States  Association, 
heading  the  impressive 
guest  list.  Among  the  out- 
of-towners  were:  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Eddie  Harris,  Frank 
Tillman,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
John  Adams  and  Forrest 
Copeland  all  from  Oak- 
land. From  San  Diego 
came:  Mrs.  Susie  Griffin, 
Josephine  Haywood,  John 
Payne,  Clara  Nelson,  Eth- 
el Moore,  L.  B.  Gilliam, 
Marie  Taylor  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Joe  Houston. 


tmollor  omaxinf 
NEW  EASY  way 
at  hen*.'  N«  dial 
or  weight  letk 
Um  at  HOME 
while  you  (EST. 
IcdMcat  tita  «l 
HIPS,  TUAAMY, 
■THIGHS.  NO 
EFFORT.  Funt 
SantibI*. 
HaaMtfuL 
Econemicot 
'Wmma  ttf- 
*'Four  mchet 
iciitoveo  iron) 
aboouMU.  3  B 
from  nips. 

*3  in.  tron 
hip."— M.A. 
"r  int  time  riaee 
Tve  had  ny  3 
diildrenmyti 
is  flat."— E.S. 
"DtennzewM 
ISjBowia." 

Yoamay  loee 
less ... 


/ 


A  club's  best  investment  is 
a  year's  subscription  to  the 
California  Eagle.  Cost^4. 


K 


N«w,  Easy, 
No  Effort 

FtEE  beaklat  and  FIR  I 
HOME  denentlratt*!!. 
We  mOVE  AT  NO 
COST  how  yo«  awy 
radvca  ia  tisa.  TEIE- 
PHONE— talk  to  LADY 
odvitori  (ha  totli  tM 
R.  CoD  HOW. 

C.  MARIE 
HUGHES 

WE.  5-1872 


. .  mah  tosat  < 

SiJJ'*'"^  HUOHEa 
2123  Ridgeley  Or. 
Lot  Angaloa  16,  Calif. 


mj!|«<UB>anBITBIALnCAT-  I 
RENT  br  yaor  U*r  «~— Hfirt   I  «a-  i 

■>tieB.  Gi«a  ae  fun  raEESStT^  ! 
Otinm  MBd  FREK  rhfie  WmAI^  ! 
mp«*^ate  t^JS^SPOK  SIBOr  j 


■a-^— I 


aiM««wti. 


t. 


,[3 


r 


i^(^'.,:^ 


»«'^>'>M- 


:  j^'^^X';;:;^.  ";v     '  .- 


lf57 


t 

»    "    ■-■"'.'g 

'.•■ 

w 

iappy 
\t  the 

\omp- 


m 


a  real 
jpy  re- 
happy 

city's 
ladies 

ip  of 
Ided  the 

band 
tunes, 
collec- 
ted   de- 
lusic. 

David 

Hes  Mc- 

^r  sax: 

^no  and 

bongo; 

[the  aid 
Gorman 

I  deserve 
ranging 

guests 
lerman 
ss,  Wil- 
I  Macon, 

Postel. 

Foley. 

Green, 
ey.  Wil- 
es Mc- 
per.  Vi 
jlvy  Dell 
in.-,    El- 

ipson, 

Harold 


I  un-  ■ 
I  abb.  I 

p-BeokUt  I 

bzE  or 

iNocMt. 


UIC 


t 


. 


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4 


Thursday,  February  28,  1957 


The  California  Eagle— 9 


ORATORICAL  H  ISSERS  —^  Headquarters  for  the  nrntorual  crintest .during  Our  Auth- 
ors Club's  Xeoro  History  Jf'rek  celehration  ic  as  nt*Mnnual  Arts  Hiph  Sehnnl.  Ltllinn  M. 
Duffy  ivns  chairman.  Pictured  arc.  seated,  irn  in  left:  John  C.  Fnx.  assistant  superintendent 
of  Lot  Anaeles  Citr  Schools:  lassie  D.  H'ri  aht,  president  of  Our  Authors  Study  C.luh; 
and  Mrs.  Duffy.  Sttlnding,  from  left:  Amy  .1/  arie  Jones,  A''nold  Sharpe.  oratorical  tiinner; 
Barbara  Rosehurr,  second  place  n inner;  Addison  Cress,  Jr.,  uho  tied  uith  Miss  Jones  for 
third  place,  and  Mary  Thompson,  fourth  plet  ee^iniier.  Scholarships  Here  donated  by  A n- 
gelus  Funeral  Home. 


l'\rF.ILISG  PLAQUE  —  Citizens  t/atherrd  at  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Museum  to  liitness  the  umeilina  of  a  plaque  dedicated  to  the  memory  of  Biddy 
.Mason,  early  y.eqrn  settler  m  Los  A nr/rlcs.  The  umetlin/^  ivas  planned  hy  Mrs. 
.4rtishia  Jordan,  meriihcr  of  Our  AuthnY  Study  Cluh,  durina  the  History  If  eck 
CelebraJton,  Shown  above  are:  Ethel  Bfuington,  Georgia  Robinson,- 1  aaie  D. 


If  right,  Artishia  Jordan,   Irene  McCoy  <Gaines, 

Beck.    Myrtle    Crnuzard,    Gertrude    Hicks.    John 

Gladys  ().  Smith  (granddaughter  of  Biddy  Vinson).  Supcri  isor  Kenneth  Hahn, 

Jean  Delacour,  Rev.  George  R.  Garner,  Ida  Robertson  and  Esther  T.  Greenly. 


lugusta  Bacon,  Mrs.  Percy 
Shacklcfnrd.    Jessie    Terry, 


History  Week  Top  Winnef 
Is  Jefferson's  Arnold  Sh 


rtrnold  Sharpe,  Jefferson  High 
school  student,  gave  the  prize 
winning  oration  and  won  the 
1937  Negro  History  Week  ora- 
torical contest  at  the  Manual 
Arts    school's    auditorium. 

John  La  Mar  Hill,  president 
oi  the  Angclus  Funeral  Home, 
presented  the  winner  with  a 
S2oO  srholarship.  Runncrs-up 
were  Barbara  Rosehurr,  second; 
Amy  Marie  Jones  and  .\ddison 
Cress  jointly  receiving  the 
th"ird  award:  and  Mary  Thomp- 
son, fourth   prize. 

Miss  Heath  Crowned 

The  crowning  of  Miss  Negro 


MXTH  ASMAL  HISTORY  JFEEK  —  Church  niaht 
durina^  the  celebration  of  \egro  History  It  eek  for  Our 
Authors  Study  Gluh  was  held  at  the  First  African  M ethodist 
Episcopal  Church.  Rev.  M.  Frederick  Mitchell  u-as  chairman 
of  this  event.  Dr.  Timtthy  .M.  Chambers'  address  on  "The 
Srifrr)  and  Hit  Outlook  in  the  A  ru'  If'orld  Today"  hinh' 
li'/htrd  the  ezenina  mretint;.  'Pictured .  first  rotv  from  left: 
'The  Rev.  H.  B.  Grant.  G.  R.  Carter.  Solan  K'llliam.  L.  D. 
Revoal.  \.  S,  Curry,  H.  Douglas  Miles  and  Isiah  Seipio. 
Second  row:  George  Hays,  If.  M.  Dandridge,  M.  Frederick 
I  Mitchell,  .-!.  P.  Shan.-,  Timothy  M.  Chambers.  G.  W.  Reed. 
John  Bain  and  J.  D.  Hoiiell. 

'DlZTf'  GILLESPE—  Amazing  ,  ROBIN  ROBINSON  —  Night- 
man of  music,  will  be  the  next  clubbers  at  Hollywood's  Bar  of 
'modernist'  featured  in  concert  j  Music  are  raving  about  the  re- 
at  the  Pasadena  Civic,  by  jo\-ial  freshing  young  singer.  He  is 
Gene  Norman,  during  February,    being  held  over! 


fine  funerals 

COST  LESS 

at  Utter-McKinley 

mortuaries  I 


Rert  fs  prnf  fh»t  Otter-McKinley  provides  the 
finest  possible  funeral  services  at  the  recognized 
lowest  prices.  During  the  past  year,  the  following 
typical  prices  were  paid  for  Utter-McKinley  fine 
funerals.  And  every  funeral  is  complete,  regardless 
9i  price  at  Utter- McKinley's. 


361  Funeral 
395  Funeral 
630  Funeral 
697  Funeral 
565  Funeral 
411  Funeral 
3S9  Funeral 
190  Funeral 


services 
services 
services 
services 
services 
services 
services 
services 


below  $100 
from  $100  to 
from  $200  to 
from  $300  to 
from  $400  to 
from  $500  to 
from  $600  to 
over  $700 


$200 
$300 
$400 
$500 
$600 
$700 


I  History  climaxed  the  ninth  an- 
nual   celebration    with    Velma 
Barge,    last    year's    winner, 
crowning    Gladys    Heath,    the 
1 1937     winrier.     The     coronation 
I  was  impressive  and  the  queen 
!  was     attended     by     ladies     in 
■  waiting;    Laura    Jewel    Meade, 
\  Mildred   Clay,   Sanfra-  Thomas- 
Earline    Toni     Whit,     Jane     R. 
Brown    and    Lady   Sharon    Na- 
varro. 

j  Mrs.  Wright  HonoreKd 

The  ninth  annual  celebra- 
tion opened  with  a  mass  meet- 
ing that  attracted  1500/|^ople 
to  the  Zion  Hill  Baptist  tturch 
with  Dr.  Timothy  Chambers, 
host  minister.  Dr.  J.  Reuben 
Sheeler,  director  of  the  history 
department  of  texas  Southern 
University,  spoke  on  "We  Hold 
These  Truths." 


Other  Events 

events    of    the 


week 


Other 
were: 
■'Music  for  Americans  All"  at 


Bovard  Auditorium  with  Dr. 
Johnson  Hall,  Joachim  Chass- 
man,  Verna  Arvey.  xhe  Hamil- 
ton Methodist  Church  choir, 
Mrs.  Lucille  Hule\-.  Jeanne 
Jacksen  and  Will  Grant  Still. 
Clarence  David  Hargrave  was 
chairman  and  Mrs.  Anna  G. 
Morrow  was  co-chairman. 

The  Medical,  Dental  and 
.Pharmaceutical  Association  in 
program  at  the  Mt.  Sinai  Bap- 
tist Church  with.  Rev.  H.  M. 
Charles-  host  pastor,  presented 
the  role  of  the  Negro  in  these 
fields.  Drs.  Perry  W.  Beal.  John- 
B.  L\ons.  Walter  W.  Davis  and 
Roy  Andrews;  and  Mrs.  Marj- 
orie  Cranford.  Otis] Rene  and 
Dr.  Wayman  G.  McGoo  partici- 
pated in  the  program.  SI 300  in 
scholarships  was  given  to  three 
universities.  ,  / 

Mn.  Gaines  Speoker 

1  A  luncheon  for  350  guests 
was  sponsored  by  the  Califor- 
nia Association  Of  Colored  Wo- 


arpe 


i  m^ns    Clubs,    southern    section. 

Ms.  Irene  McCoy  Gaines,  Na- 
tional president  NACWC,  was 
'  giiest  speaker.  Participating  in 
I  thfe  planning  and  the  program 
j  w^re:  Mmes  Gertrude  R.  Hicks. 

Ida  Mae  Robertson,  A.  C.  Harris 

Bifbrew-  Maggie  Marshall  of 
1  Oakland,   Frieta   Shaw,    Arlene 

Johnson  and  Miss  Maryjane 
'  Barton. 

i     At    the   Coronation    reception 
,  held  at  the  Town  and  Gown  at 
LSC  awards  were  presented  to 
th|e     following:     Honore     Levy, 
education;     Kathryn     Graham, 
linerature;   Bernice  Weight,  so- 
cial    work;      Maidie     Norman. 
Dijama;    Dr.  Leroy  Weekes  and 
:  thie    late    Dr.    Leonard    St  oval, 
mpdicine;   Dorothy  Rowland 
at^d  LA.   Period  Furniture  Co. 
!  (Henry     Broodier-     president). 
j  public   relations:    Paul    (Tank) 
I  Younger,     sports;     Dr.     Horace 
MJays,    Religion:    Jud^e    David 
Williams,  law:  Emily 'Johnson- 


DRESS  DESICSLR—Mattie  Tarvm,  left,  chairman  of  the 
Ylf  CAAI  oodlaun  Center  annual  fashion  shon-,  and  John- 
etta  Starks,  ivcll  known  dcsianer,  viei<  one  of  the  springtime 
fashions  to  he  featured  on  Sunday,  Mar(h  3,  from  4  until 
7  p.m.  at  the  Center.  Chapeaus  hy  CJeo  Bruee  will  he  shown 
and  modeled  hy  Dorothy  Jones,  Doris  Dixon  and  Anna 
Thomas.  *  , 


HISTORY  n  EEK  QUELS 

—  Attractive  Gladys  Heath 
lias  crowned  queen  of  S  eqrn 
History  IT  eck  celehration- 
Sponsored  by  Our  Authors 
Study  Cluh.  .  ^ 


Complete  funerals 


Utter  m-Kinleii 


BROADWAY  MORTUARY 

4254  S    BROADWAY    •    ADams  1-9325 


If 


WARNING! 


BE>VARE  COUGHS 
THAT  HANG  ON 

FOUOWING  COLDS 


.  A  Btabbom  eougii  foflowmg  a  eommon 
eokl  may  develop  into  chronie  bronchitis 
— a  OMidition  far  won«  than  the  cold 
its^.  Before  it  is  too  late  relieve  that 
eoug'h  with  Creomulsion  Cough  Syrup 
rigrht  now.  Creomulsion  stops  the  tickle, 
comforts  raw  throat  membranes,  clean 
the  iH^athing  passages,  fights  the  eatu« 
oi  irritation — (jnickly.  Ifs  safer,  too,  b»- 
eatMC  it  is  free  of  narcotics  or  antihista- 
minea.  Don't  let  that  eo«gh  break  yoa 
doiWB.  Begin  taking  Ciwoamlskm  at  once. 

CREOMULSION 

RELIEVES  COUGHS,  CHEST  COLDS,  BRONCHITIS 


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Command  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

Demands  Attention 
TODAY  -  SEE 

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For  quality 
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First  requirement  when  you  buy  food  and 

drink  for  your  family  is  quality:  quality  you 

can  trust . . .  quality  without  question.  That's 

why  you — and  careful  shoppers  like  yourself — 

invariably  brinj  home  cartons  of  Coca-Cola. 

For  seventy  years,  Coke  has  been  quality 

leader  in  the  beverage  industry.  It  merits  your 

jMofidenfia*  and  that-oifour^anily. 

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i 

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€ 


Slappy'  White  Friday  Niglit  at 


-.■-■■J',- 


''        •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •'  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  *  •  ••  *  *  *  *  •  •  •  •  •  *  ^«^ 

DIANAH  WASHINGTON  ON  HAND  AT  JAZZLAND 


DEMETRIOS  VIL.A\ — Dtrntor  of  "Praise  House,"  goes  over  some  dramatic  scenes  in 
"Praise  House"  rctth  Han  Rhodes  and  Louise  Beavers  who  star  in  this  new  stage  play  at 
the  Huntington  Hartford  tuo  ureks  starting  Monday.  March  4.         * 


10— The  CalifornJa  Eagle 


Thursday,   February  28,   1957 


lUaSl.  SIMPSON— Several  na- 
tional magazines  are  dickering 
to  do  A  spread  on  her  $100,000 
Chicken  ranch  in  the'  Valley. 
They  claimed  she's  got  a  mint 
in  eggs: 

WOODY  STRODE— The  ex  UCLA 
great,  football  star  and  team- 
mate of  Kenny  Washington 
and  Jackie  Robinson  is  likely 
to     capture     Academy     Award 


THANK  YOU 

2(Hh  Century  Spertsmsn 

Ar*  Taking  This  M«ans  of 

Thanking  Th«ir  Many 

Friends  for  Their 

Endless  Kindnesses 

You  alid  Yours  Aro 
Cordially  invited  to 

a  Pre-Easter 

MATINEE 
DANCE 

Sunday,  March  3 
4:00  P.M.  Until 

TROPICAL 
ZAMBOANGA 

SUPPER  CLUB 

3828  W.  Slauson 
Avenue 

DeiMlien  $1.00 

DANCING         ENTERTAINMENT 

For  R«Mrvatian«  Call 

AX.  3-0000 


laurels  for  the  terrific  job  he 
does  in  the  brilliant  Ten  Com- 
mandments currently  running 
at  Warners  on  Wilshire! 
CHARLES  WILLIAMS— N  o  t  e  d 
PR  man,  was  dropped  from  the 
staff  of  Jax  Beer  Co.  (who's 
next?).  Joe  Baker,  one  of  the 
country's  tops  in  the  PR  field, 
turned  the  Western  Division 
RCA  Victor  and  KRCA  accounts 
over  to  the  Williams  office! 
DINAH  WASHINGTON  —  Mar- 
ried Eddie  Chamberley,  tenor 
sax  player  with  Lionel  Hamp- 
ton's ork.,  in  Washington,  D  .C., 
Sunday  eve.  Hamp's  due  in 
town  in  March  I 

BIG    REN  — He's  really  got  the 
blues.  No  sooner  was  he  served 
with  a  lawsuit  than  narco  of- 
ficers set  up  shop  In  his  apt! 
JULIUS  J.  CLAY  — One  of  the 
proud  students  who  graduated 
from    historic   McDonough    No. 
35  in  New  Orleans,  would  like 
to    meet    classmates    who    re- 
member such  illustrious  school 
professors  as  Speaker,  Stalles< 
worth,  Thomas,  Bennett,  Sprig- 
gins,   Neal,   Blancha,   Maxwell, 
Simmojis,  Carpenter  and  Alexis. 
He'll  be  holding  court  at    his 
Creole  Club.  4376  S.  Main! 
SUE   THOMPSON— She  designs 
women's  clothes  and  has    the 
[build  to  make  'em  look  good! 
i  SUCCESS— Ouida  Williams  and 
j  Hilda  Allen  don't  know  it,  but 
I  their  rise  to  social  prominence 
j  and  success  is  inspirational  and 
I  was    voted    a    good    guide    for 
mothers    with    growing 
daughters  to  follow! 
j  EARL  JOHN  GRIFFIN— He  pens 
!  a  card  from  Japan  and  claims 
I  that  country  is  the  most! 
HARMON    SCALES— Ex- Angele- 
no,   finding   New   York   to   his 
liking    has    renewed    his    sub- 
scription   which    indicates   he'll 
be  there  for  another  year! 
PAT    STHEAT  — Shapely  presi- 
dent  of   the   Continental   Clpb, 
and  members  are  selling  tick- 
ets for  the  cluKs  exciting  Ciro's 
show  April  7.  Don't  say  no  to 
.  this  one! 
PALM   SPRINGS  — Police  put  a 
(  Continued  on  Page  11) 


?\ 


CmmmynHy  Civic  lAuwit  Attn.  Prmsmnts 


NARIAN  ANDERSON 


Sat.  Eve.,  March  16th 

8:30  P.M. 

PHiLHARMOlilG 

AUDITORIUM 

TIekrtt   M.SO,    S3.00,    $2.  SO 

$2.00,  $1.50 

On  Sale:   Box  Offica  Ml.  3500  . 

and  So.  Calif.  Muaic  Co., 

737  South  Hill  and 

All  Mutual  Aganeiaa 

Mail    Order*   Accepted 


Clever  Comic 
In  New  Revue 
For  Funsters 


Versatile  showman  Slappy 
White  arrived  in  the  Angel  city 
this  week  with  his  all  star  New 
York  show,  slated  to  open  at 
the  Club  Oasis  Friday,  (tomor- 
row night)  March  1st. 
Neat   Nita 

Slappy  White,  known  as  a 
top  comic-  just  completed  a 
tour  of  the  east  where  he  has 
appeared  at  the  nations  top 
niteries.  The  new  show,  with  all 
new  faces,  promises  to  be  one 
of  the  most  entertaining  in  tihe 
city. 

Eric  Dolphy  Band 

Start  now,  making  plan.<!  to 
he  on  hand  opening  night 
March  1st  for  the  Slappy  White 
show  at  the  Club  Oasis.  The 
policy  of  no  cover  or  door  ad- 
mission will  still  remain  in 
effect.  The  swingsational  band 
of  Eric  Dolphy  will  provide  the 
music  for  your  listenifig  and 
dancing  pleasure. 


Ralphs 
3rdWeek 
Of  Winners 

Mrs.  Mary  C.  O'Malley,  1458 
Echo  Park  avenue,  won  the 
third  1957  Plymouth  four-door 
Savoy  sedan  in  Ralphs'  third 
week's  drawing  for  winners  in 
the  prize  contest  celebrating 
Ralph.s'  84th  birthday,  with 
over  $50,000  worth  of  fabulous 
prizes. 

Valuable  Prizes 

Othe  magnificent  prizes  go 
to:  Two-week  Mexican  trip  for 
two — Mrs.  Ethel  Allen,  3020  W. 
T5th  street;  Maytag  Refrigera- 
tor-Freezer. Judith  Lenzer,  1451 
Durango  avenue;  three  O'Keefe 
&  Merritt  Gas  Ranges  —  Hilde 
Laible  of  3644  Serra  road,  Mary 
Ann  Jay  of  8629  Springer  street, 
Downey,  and  Maxine  Faye  of 
208Vi  W.  Chestnut,  Glendale. 
Other  Lucky  People 

Filtex  Vacuum  Cleaner— Mrs. 
R.  D.  Buttles,  7623  Bella  Vista 
street;  Bonded  Water  Softener 
—Charles  McLarand,  12710  Mat- 
teson  avenue;  two  Brother 
Sewing  Machines  —  Percy  D. 
Fraser,  1462  E.  Wilson  in  Glen- 
dale, and  Lewis  J.  Ashburn  of 
121  Anned  drive,  Placentia; 
Artistic  Wire  Set  —  Florence  L. 
Sherman,  1042  N.  Ardmore  ave- 
nue. 

.     County-wide  Winners 

Threie  Sunbeam  Electric  Skil- 
lets—Bill Winter  «f  9270  Nagle 
avenue.  Pacoima,  Julie  Drago- 
von  pf  2297  Midlothian  drive, 
Pasadena,  and  Mrs.  Fay  De 
Hardt  of  336  S.  Rexford  drive, 
Beverly  Hills.    • 


y  ■        , 

Blues  'Queen' 
Hit  of  Strip 
At  Jazzland 

An  even  newer  Dinah  Wash- 
ington, trim  and  full  of  vim, 
but  in  better  voice  and  with  a 
bigger  show  than  ever,  opens 
this  Friday,  March  1,  at  the  new 
Zardi's  Jazzland  in  Hollywood. 
Record  Favorite 

The  "Queen  Dee'"  will  warble 
everything  from  her  earliest  re- 
cording hit  "Blow  Top  Slues," 
to  her  newest  Mercury  releases 
including  "I  Know"  and  selec- 
tions from  her  latest  album 
•T)inah  in  the  Land  of  Hi-fi." 
New  and  Different 

The  new  Jazzland  owners. 
Jack  Gordon,  Pete  Snyder  and 
Joe  Collins.,  promise  continued 
lop  star  entertainment  and 
lower  prices  for  Zardi's  cus- 
tomers. 

Slim  Gaillard  also  held  over 
to  be  featured  on  bill.  Make 
your  reservations  early  by  tele- 
phoning Hollywood  5-3389. 


DIS'AH  H'ASIII\GTOX— Three  dress  sizes  smaller,  hut 
nicely  curved,  demonstrates  at  Zardi's  Jazzland  she  has  Inst 
none  of  her  verve  and  sparkle  nor  missing  a  single  heat  in  her 
inimitable  song  stylings.  Plan  to  be  on  hand  and  uelcome  this 
grand  lady  of  song  Friday  night,  March  1st. 


muwMvy^nviy  i  J'i  iihti-hiih'  ».'»iri'»  v *t'/»«u". » •  .i«' * '* 


'NATHAN  THE  WISE*  SATISFIES 

By  JAN  EDWARDS  (California  jEogle  Drama  Critic) 

James  Logan,  co-producer  with  Edward  Jones,  of  Gotthold 
E.  Lessing's  famous  comedy-drama,  "Nathan  the  Wise,"  gave  us 
a  wonderful  lead  in  his'  curtain  -speech  at  the  New  Hampshire 
Theater  Saturday  night.  Last  week  was  "Brotherhood  Week,"  said 
Mr.  Logan,  "and  if  ever  there  was  a  play  Jailored  for  the  ideals 
of  brotherhood,  'Nathan  the.?> 
Wise'  is  it." 


f.l 


How  true,  how  true.  "Nathan 
the  Wise,"  which  is  presented 
by  a  very  professional  group  of 
actors  at  the  New  Hampshire 
Playhouse,  offers  a  most  amus- 
ing a  most  convincing  argu- 
ment foi'  the  ideals  of  true 
brotherhood. 

Delightful  Parable 

At  first  we  were  restless.  The 
costumes  were  good  but  the 
sets  were  horrible  and  the 
dialogue  seemed  bewildering. 
Then  something  happens — ^The 
Jew,  Nathan,  tells  the  Sultan 
a  story  and  the  play,  which  up 
to  now  has  been  a  caterpillar. 


becohies  a  beautiful  butterfly, 
and  j  the  audience  sits  spell- 
bound and  enchanted  for  the 
rest  of  the  evening. 

Otio  Waldis  Is  a  kindly,  wise 
and  fitterly  lovable  Nathan.  He 
tells  I  the  story  of  a  ring  which 
is  h4nded  down  to  the  favorite 
son  ind  tells  it  with  wronderful 
artistry.  We*  thought,  however, 
he  snould  have  told  his  story 
onlyito  the  audience  instead  of 
turnijng  toward  the  audience — 
then  no  one  would  have  sus- 
pected •  there  might  be  a  ser- 
mon [involved. 

Lillian  Adams  plays  Daja.  -*. 

(  pontinued  on  Page  11) 


1 


■opening  FRIDAY,  march    I 


DINAH  WASHINGTON 


PLUS  SLIM  OAlUAIkD  QUARTET 


ZARDI'S  JAZZLAND 


HO.  5-3389 
HOLLYWOOD  A  VINI 


Gfen  MeManh  invites  you  fo  atf  end  the  Strip's  most  picturesque  room 
CONTINUOUS  SHOW  AND  ENTERTAINMBNT  NIGHTLY 


"Ihe  Voice  With  a  Smile" 


INTERLUDE  ROOM      BR.  2-5028     8568  SUNSET  BLVD. 


-Gl»n  McMann  (Form»r  Owner  of  thm  Turban  Room)  Managmr~ 


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FINEST   DRINKS 
CRISP  CHICKENS 
CHARCOAL  STEAKS 


BILL 
WATKINS' 
ADAMS  A  WESTERN 


HOTEL  WfiTKINS 

RE.  2-8111 


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POT   LUCK   MEAL 

Personally  Coofced 
by  "Dynamife"    ' 


JACK  CMAZIN  rMMTU 

LINCOLN 

ajrri  «  Cantral  AB.  U11 

Starta  Saturday 

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Start$  Sunday 

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Everybody's  Talking  About 

BARRY  BAINES' 

*  Ciiolce  Cocttaifs 

—  and  — 

.  ;  «^]       *  Delicious  Diimers 

(\  awd/^  *'   Adams   A   Croniiaw's 

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4 


at   Adams   A   Cro 
Favorite   "G»-Pla 

^  POR    YOUR    f  NTIRTAINMtN^  .PLIASURf  ~-  > 


NAT  WILLIAMS,_Singsat|onal  Pianist  ^ 

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SINGER  ETTA  MOT  EX  tvill  accompany  her  husband, 
Claude  A.  Barnett,  Director  of  the  Associated  Xepro  Press, 
tt  Gold  Coast  in  Africa  for  the  celebration  March  6  when 
that  country  becomes  the  new  and  independent  nation  of 
Ghana.  Misf  Mot  en  nilt  represent  XBC-lf'MAQ  and  ex- 
pects to  secure  tape  recordings  for  use  on  her  radio  show 
ivhich  emanates  from  Chicago. 


People  &  Places 

(Continued  from  Page  10) 
stop   to  the  operation  of  some 
of  the  town's  big-time  brown- 
skin  sportsmen! 

JOHN  THOMAS— The  hefty  po- 
liceman, is  a  serious  music  stu- 
dent at  L.  A.  High  School  and 
blowing  the  long-hair  stuff! 
THE  RABBIT— The  buglary  de- 
tail went  on  the  prowl  and 
nabbed  a  Westside  after-hou^ 
kingpin! 

EDUCATION  — That  South  San 
Pedro  office  that  once  housed 
mostly  ofay  clerks  with  warm 
and  friendly  personalities,  now 
houses  a  bunch  of  brownskins 
with  that  I'm-better-thanyou 
attitude  and  one  little  clique 
thinks  it  is  a  crime  to  say  "Good 
Morning"  to  a  fellow  workerl 
MAE  JOHNSON— Ex-dancer  of 
the  fame  Club  Alabam  days  is 
doing  a  terrific  volunt^r  job 
with  the  Well  -  Baby  Clinic, 
while  working  as  a  ni^ht  nurse! 
F-B-EYES  —  A  well  known 
gardener  is  being  closely  watch- 
ed by  Uncle  Sam  because  his 
sleek  Coupe  DeVillc,  mad  Lei- 
mert  pad,  silver  blue  mink  for 
his  'old  lady'  and  elaborate 
Sunset  Boulevard  love-nest  for 
his    gorgeous    'grey 


Show  Business 


(Continued  from  Page  10) 
Christian  woman,  with  com- 
plete security  and  charm.  El- 
mera  Schrogin,  a  yery  young 
lady,  Itakes  the  part  of  Recha, 
Nathan's  daughter.  Miss  Schro- 
gin seems  to  warm  up  as  the 
play  progresses.  In  the  last  act, 
her  voice  and  personality  be- 
come magically  mellowed. 

Terence  de  Barney,  who  plays 
a  dervish  has  some  specially 
good  dialogue.  Henry  Delgado, 
a  young  Knight  Templar,  is 
tall,  handsome  and  romantic. 
Both  actors  are  excellent. 

Modem  Axabiem  Miss 

Vlcki  Bakken  interprets  "Sit- 
tah,"  the  Sultain's  sister,  as  be- 
ing a  vivacious  and  most  un- 
langorous,  unsultry  bachelor- 
ette.  Not  at  all  what  we  would 


What's  Cooking 


With 


BARBARA  MOUNTS 


One  of  the  sure  signs  of  Spring  is  the  sale  of  lamb.  To  sat- 
isfy your  desire  for  the  best  cuts  at  economy  prices,  your  neigh- 
borhood Thriftimart  stores  are  offering  leg  and  shoulder  roast, 
rib  and  shoulder  chops,  neck,  breast,  shanks  and  lamb 
patties.  At  the  low,  low  prices  at  which  these  are  offered  you 
can  stock  your  freezer.  Speak-> — -— -  :  -     r 

ing  of  freezers,  there  is  also  a  !     P^^^aps  your  man  is  a  steak 

spedal  sale  on  quality  ice  cream 
and  frozen  tuna  pie.  | 

In  brand-name  canned  foods 


you  cannot  find  better  foods 
than  those  processed  by  Iris 
and  Smart  &  Final.  Stock  your 
pantry  shelves  now  for  care- 
ftee  meal  planning. 

Lamb  From  Thriftimart 

Thriftimart's  rolled  shoulder 
of  lamb  may  be  dry  or  pot- 
roasted.  Cook  at  325  degrees  for 
about-  two  hours  for  a  three- 
pound  roast. 

If  you  like  to  e:^«riment  with 
different  flavors  "^^r  food,  try- 
fixing  a  leg  of  lamb  or  shoul- 
der <nit  by  rubbing  generously 
with  garlic  and  seasoning  with 
a  mixture  of  U  teaspoon  gin- 
ger, "4  teaspoon  dry  mustard,  1 
teaspoons  pepper  and  2  tea- 
spoons salt.  Sprinkle  with  the 
juice  of  a  lemon  and  a  table- 
spoon of  carraway  seeds.  Roast 
in  a  hot  oven  (430  degrees)  for 
20  minutes.  Reduce  heat  to  300 
degrees,  pour  over  a  half  cup 
of  sherry  and  cook  eo\'ered  or 
uncovered  for  about  two  hours. 
Baste  frequently. 

If  you  like  tomato  with  lamb. 
add  a  can  of  tomato  soup  with 
the  wine.  Sen-e  this  with  fluffy 
mashed  potatoes  and  a  green 
vegetable  for  color  appeal. 


enthusiast.  He  will  be  most 
pleased  if  the  meat  compart- 
ment of  ypur  refrigerator  is  well 
stocked  with  those  USDA  first- 
choice  T-bone  steaks  from 
Ralphs'  ultra-clean  meat  coun- 
ters. Broiled  to  tender  juiceness 
and  served  snuggled  beside  a 
baked  potato  and  tender  green 
brocolli  and  golden  carrots. 

Try  combining  celery  and  on- 
ions with  carrots.  Dice  the  cel- 
ery, cube  the  carrots  and  cut  up 
onions  or  use  the  pearl  onions. 
Season  with  salt,  sugar  and  a 
bit  of  oregar^o  for  flavor. 

This  is  the  last  week  to  reg- 
ister for  the  valuable  prizes  of- 
fered on  this  anniversary  sale. 

The  excellent  bakery  prod- 
ucts' offered  by  Ralph.^  save 
time,  tempers  and  money.  Be- 
sides bread  and  cakes,  there  is 
a  complete  line  of  all  types  of 
freshly  baked  goodies.  <■ 

Newest  member  of  the  fam- 
ily are  those  round  tender  pats 
of  delicious  corn  bread  made^ 
thin  to  pop  into  the  toa.ster  for 
breakfast  cnioyment.  These 
make  excellent  bases  for 
creamed  tuna,  chipped  beef, 
poached  eggs  or  topped  with 
apple  sauce  and  sprinkled  with 
cinnamon  they  make  excellent 
breakfast,  luncheon  and  dinner 
tempters. 


iMrOMurroM  oh 


OftN  7*  MOURS 


BAIL    BONDS    FREE 

\  CUES  KING  III  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY' 
909  East  6th  Street  •  MU.  5500 


1615    N.   Vina 
Hellyweed 


HUNTINGTON  HARTFORD  THEATRE 

2  WEEKS  Only  Beg.  HON.  MAR.  4  oX^J'« 


pfMeirU 
A  NEW  PUY  BY 

CHARLES  O'NEAL 

stamng 

LOUISE  BEAVERS 

piL-RHODeS-PARMSH'COOLET 


WHITMG*  NELSON -WOOD 

i  BrilliMt  Citt  9f  40 


} 


llJiaaiKF CAMPSL  .-..OOffiAKBB 

FOR  SPECIAL  I^TES  FOR  CLUBS  AND  OReANIZATICNS  CALL 
HO  2-6668.  EVES.  MON.  thru  THUBS.:  Oreh.  »4.40;  Men.  14.40, 
3.«5:  Bale  »3.30.  2.75,  2.20.  1.65.  EVES.  FRI.  A  SAT.:  Orch.  $4.95; 
Mmz.  »4»5  4  40:  Bale.  »3.85.  3.30.  i75,  2.20;  MATINEES  WED.  A 
SAT.:  Orch.  »3.«6;  Mmz.  I3.86.  3.30;  B«lc  $2.75,  2.20.  1.65,  1.10. 
TaK  ln«l.-En«l.  ctampad.   addraaa*^  •nv«lop«  lor  mall  ardar  return. 


•^ 


•^ 


have  led  the  boys  to  believe 
he  is  pushing  more  than  a 
lawnmower. 

ROBIN  COMBS  —  Pretty  and 
proficient  assistant  to  'Gentle- 
man' Gene  Norman,  is  greatly 
responsible  for  the  'down 
sounds'  presented  In  concert  to 
girlfriend  modern  music  lovers.  ' 


expect  of  a  12th  century  Sul- 
tan's sister.  But  in  spite  of  her 
quick  movement^  and  happy 
assurance.  Miss  Bakken  is  like- 
able. 

Producer  James  Logan  plays 
the  Sultan.  When  "Sittah"  is 
on  stage,  Logan  made  us  think 
of  a  Hollywood  actor,  but  when 
he  plays  opposite  "Nathan,"  Lo- 
gan becomes  "The  Sultan." 

Chester  Morrison,  who.  played 
the  Patriarch  of  Jerusalem, 
should  have  had  his  hair  pow- 
dered and  acquired  at  least  one 
wrinkle.  Chester  just  didn't  look 
old  enough  or  sour  enough  to 
have  so  much  authority  and  to 
be  so  mean. 

Peter  Brocco  plays  a  Friar, 
and  the  audience  liked  his  per- 
formance.  Between  Mr.  Brocco 
and  the  audience  there  is  a 
very  special  rapport. 

"Nathan  the  Wise"  is  per- 
formed Wednesday  through 
Sunday  evenings.  Incidentally, 
this  play  is  "required  reading" 
for  several  university  English 
classes.  The  play  should  defi- 
nitely be  "required  seeing"  for 
anybody  suspected  of  religious 
or  racial  intolerance. 


The  California  , Eagle— 11 
Thursday,  February  28,  1957 


MARIAS   ANDERSOX. 

America's  First  Lady  of  Song, 
will  he  heard  in  concert  Sat. 
etc..  .March  16,  at  Philhar- 
monic .1  uditorium  as  an  event 
of  Community  Civic  Music 
.iss'n.  Progrd'm  will  feature 
selections  from  the  works  of 
Haydn.  Schui^ert,  Massenet, 
Dvorak  and  other  noted  com- 
posers. 


^^^rj  SOUNDTRACK 


.  Actor  BERNARD 
HAMILTON  is  appearing  off- 
Broadway  in  "Climate  of  Eden" 
and  doubling  as  a  mix-master 
of  groove  juice  at  an  intimate 
bar-room  in  New  York!  .  ... 
Luscious  LENA  WALOEN  (tal- 
ented HOT'S  wife)  is  also  glam- 
orizing the  State's  Employment 
Bldg.  on  Flower  Street.  She 
sometimes  models  those  casual 


is  bs^ck  at  the  old  stand  at  tli4 
BACKSTAGE  cltib.  Business  is 
booniing!  . .  Glamour  gal  ISMA 
MARJLOWE  was  a  dream  lndc> 
ing  kt  the  DE  PAOR  OPEBA 
GALA  and  her  charming  nioa>  - 
was  with  her!  . . .  Choice  baddy' 
WILLA  BOOKES  may  not  havc^ 
been  making  headlines  lateH^ — 
but  she  is  the  same  adorakle 
chicK    that    always    captivatea 


togs  for  Ebony  Mag  and  hes  ;  any  croup  she  chooses  to  rub 
the  commercial  designer!  ...  elbows  with.  Former  newsgal 
Award  winner  ERNIE  FREE-  has  the  kind  of  personality  thlt 
MAN  has  recuperated  from  his  servos  as  a  tonic  for  those  oC  U* 
recent  illness  and  the  musician  vi-ith  [frazzled  nerves. 


Q  SINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17.5 


Marcellus  Reed  .  .  . 

SWANK  SHOP  CLEANERS 

FREE,  FAST  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 
One  Day  Service 

Double  Breasted  Coats  SIngleized  $17.50 

All  Work  Guor«nt«Mf 
4963  W.  ADAHS  •\  RE.  2-997.4 


UJ 
Of 

eo 


O 


t^hep  a^nd  i^ave  ^y^l    J krifiintart    ^or  d^vertfclaif  t^pecials       •       i^ltop  ^/^nd  *^ave  O^i   <J  thrift 


IsiNGLE  Breasted  suits  $i  7.5055 


tintarf 


VERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  aiTh^i/litnuzt. EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  D  AY  aiTrzi/iifnuit .  EV  ERY  DAY 


^     THE  BIG  - 

S      ANNUAL.. 


Mf..*. 


:fS'< 


■yJ-^i. 


:i:u 


U.S.D.A.  GRADED  "CHOICE",  FED  LAMB.  SEVERAL  CARLOADS  HAVE  BEEN     • 
PURCHASED  FROM  WILSON  and  COMPANY  FOR  THIS  GIGANTIC  LAMB  SALE.     : 


SQUARE  CUT  SHOULDER 


LAMB  ROAST 


lb. 


TABLE  TRIMMED 


LAMB  LEGS 


SHIN 

BONE 

OFF 


lb. 


U.S.D.A.  GRADE  A  HENi 

TURKEYS 


OVEN 
READY 

11-13  lbs.  Av.  Wt. 


lb. 


CAUrORNIA  BltAN»-OVm  tEAOY 

JIOASTING  -  4-5  lbs. 

CHICKENS 

RUPRTS  FROZIN  FiUr 
OP  OCIAN 

PERCH 


A. 


PACinC  LAROI 

FRESH 

OYSTERS 


ic 


LAMB  CHOPS 


SHOULDER  CHOPS 
ROUND  BONE  CHOPS 
LARGE  LOIN  CHOPS 
SMALL  RIB  CHOPS 
SMALL  LOIN  CHOPS 


Lb. 


Lb. 


Lb. 


Lk 


Lb. 


LEE'S  FLAVOR  DELUXE 


PICNI 


CRY-O-VAC 
WRAPPED 


lb. 


BREAST  OF  LAMB 
LAMB  NECKS 
LAMB  SHANKS 
LAMB  PAHIES 


Lian 


Lb. 


Lb. 


Lb. 


Lb. 


rARMUR  JOHN  OR^M  "A" 

SLICED 

BACON 


^ 


lb. 


RATH'S  BUCK  HAWK-MADY 
TO  EAT  'BONBJSS  WnX 

DAINTEE 


HORMELSPURI 

PORK 


SAUSAGE 


BRCHNUT  STRAINib 

BABY  FOOD 

»|00 


4V4-OS.  $1 
GLASS 


PICTSWBT  PROZIN- 
(Vnntsr  Carnival  Sals) 

Orange  Juice  6 

PLAIN  or  CHOCOLATI 

OVALTINE 

HEINZ  VlOnABLE 

SOUP        8 

HORMK  CHILI-WITH  MANS 

CONCARNE  4;.2'*r 

,M**»*»»»*****************************'> 


lOV^ 


IRIS  FINE  FOODS 


■•.SMSIN 


APPU  SAUCE 

CORN   enaa  Styli       D     Hm      I 

BUTTER  BEANS  8^2*M- 


WBeie  Rew 

POTATOES 


It.  MS  SIN 


8"-»M 


OSCAR  MAYER  I       -  iw 

WIENERS         ^   47' 

PINniRO'S  GmUINI  KOSHER 

SALAMI  u.  79< 

GRAM  A  CHUNKS 

SWISS  CHEESE    •^59' 

SUNSHINI 

HYDROX  COOKIES 


12-«i. 
PKOS. 


S#00 


COUNTY  FAIR 

CREAM 


24-OI. 
PKGS. 


PICTSWEET  FROZEN 
(Winter  Carnival  Sal*) 

Strawberries  4  • 

FOODCRAFT  KOSHIR  DILL 

PICKLES        3' 

REGULAR  PACK 

KOTEX 

STARKISr  FROZIN 

TUNA  PIE 


rkt*. 


f*#»##*»*»»»#»»***»»»»*#*»»*»»»*»»»#»»#» 


ptcTswnr  PROSN 

i;  CUT  BEANS 

'   ncTswiiT  nom 


WINTER  CARNIVAL  SALE 


Bl^M-^ 


BROCCOLI  SN"*  6 

nenwirr  nozm 


eta*.     I 

ii  PEAS  &  CARROTS  6 'i:i'r  11 

tln.S1M  \'< 


$   ncTswiiT  neiM 

il  SQUASH  


•(■1. 


1' 


LARGE  BAR  SOAP 

IVORY  j 

JERSIYMAID 

NON-FAT  MILK 

JERSiYMAW 

CHOC  MILK 


for 


IRIS  OR  SMART  A   FINAL 

COFFEE 


Co 


WESTWOOD 


ICE  CREAM 

SUNNY  VALLEY-GRADi  A-FRiSH 

LARGE  EGGS 


\  SAL 
CTNS. 


DOL 
CTN. 


FRUITS  °  VEGETABLES 


FULL  OP  VITAMINS 


CARROTS 

FRESH 

SPINACH 

GREEN  ONIONS  OR  RED 

RADISHES 

ARIZONA-TABLE  SIZE 

GRAPEFRUIT 


lbs.. 


bun. 


bun. 


for 


OOUGW^m  ktmTSt  I 
CAKI  4»*«-«*  I 


W,"* 


w  * 


[b 


SPKIALS  FOR  THURS.-FRI.-SAT..SON,  FM.  3«-MARCH   1 


LAURA  SCUDMR 

PEANUT  BUHER 

it^i.  s^oo 


a-3 

lIstM  to  KMPC  for  our  Daily  Radio  Special*.    W»  rasarva  *•  rl^ht  f 
quantitiw.    Sales  tax  added  to  taxable  Hems. 


EVERY  DAYS  A  SPECIAL  DAY  AT 


Itmll 


.  EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  aiThii/Unnnf 


RIcHvoND  9-6251 


^^Hl^^^ 


i^kcp  a^nJ t^ave  a^i  ^J nriftimari   J-er,  Q^er^da^  i^pccioiU         •        t^kop  a^nd  i^ixyt  O^  _ 


U 


^^iam:^ 


'ja^BmaeBiSsm 


matts^ima^i^m 


tffittSMHMOtt 


%riftimttH 


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>  »w»«^T«»g*^ '"fc..i«^<^"><av''^y%»^ I 


S 


CALIFORNIA 

EAGLE 


WANT 


DEADLINE:  WEDNESDAY  AT  II  A.M. 


SAVE  TIME 
SAVE  MONEY 


'  .1- 


M).  4-0161 


12— The  California   Eagle 

CLASSIFIED  AD  INDEX 

All   Clauificatlons  Are   Numbered 
and  Appear  in  Numarical  Ordar 

Clataificatien  No. 

Situations    Want«d— F»fTi«l«    12 

Help  Wanted— Femil*  i3 

Situations  Wanted— Male ]* 

Help  Wanted— Male  is 

Employment  Preparation is 

Employment  Agencies ]J 

Wanted   to   Rent Jj 

Roome — Furnished ;• 

Hotels  _ !•• 

Rooms— Unfurnished    ~  JB 

Rooms — Housekeeping  J' 

Rooms  A.   Bo»rd  ^i* 

Apartment*— FurnisRed     — « 

Apartments — Unfurnished    ** 

Houses— Furnished      -  £* 

Houses— UnfuTntshed,_.-».  » 

Xutiness  Rentals         »• 
genciee — Re«t«»s           .-  * 

M«««y  to   Lean  3 

M«rt9«9e»  A  Tr»»i  C»**<n  4* 

BwsmeM  Octw'*"*'' ♦*  -Jv 

Mteeeiune^us  '.«•  *J>e  ** 

Parsonst    *•<-»•«•♦  -  ** 

Sar«"ees  *, 

CiMid   Car*       -.  ** 

Rug    CiM">"a  t^ 

Expen   Pe^t«<   Ca"-*    .  ,  » 

Autos— <.»*d    „  -  *' 

Auto    Rec^.r*  Jf 

Real  Estate  U>ai»»  » 

Income  Pr>.».e*rt>   tt*  Sate    .  _.      -  *• 

Income  Pr»p«rt,»  f^r  Leave  **a 

•usinese  Pr^rpsrty  f»r  S«le  »*h 

Property    L^a-^s  **e 

Property   lmpnjvefl>««ts » 

Real  Estate  Wanted W 

Itoaf -Estate  tor  Sale M 

Display  Real  Estate  1C0 

Displa?  Property    Rentals  .  —101 

UCAl  NOTICES 

NO.  43662 

I— LEGAL    NOTICE 

NOTICE    TO    CONTRACTORS 

Notice    is    herehv    given    th.it    the 
Board    of    Education    of    the    City    of 
Los    .\ngeles    will    receive    bids    for 
furnishing  all  labor  and  material  for 
tit   follow^inK  -nork: 
Kind   of  Work  and   Name   of  School 
or   location 
Data  of   Bid   Opening 
MOVING     AND     RESETTING     OF 
BUILDING     C-4     FROM     STONE- 
HURST]    AVENUE      SCHOOL      TO 
TWENTY-EIGHTH    STREET 
SCHOOll. 

MARCH  14.    195T 

Each  [bid  shall  be  in  accordance 
with  dif^pWings.  specifications  and 
ether  contract  documents  now  on 
file  in  the  MAINTENANCE  AND 
OPERATIONS  BRANCH  of  the  Busi- 
n-ss  Diivision  of  said  Board.  1425 
South  San  Pedro  Street.  Los  An- 
seles.  Prospective  bidders  may  se- 
cure copies  of  said  drawinss  and 
specifi'^ations  at  the  office  of  said 
MAINTEflANCE  AND  OPERATIONS 
BRANCH. 

Pursuant  to  the  Labor  Code  of 
the  State  of  California,  the  Board 
cf  Kducation  has  ascertained  the 
general  prevailing  rate  of  per  diem 
wages  for  each  craft  or  type  of 
•workman  needed  to  execute  the  con- 
tract or  contracts  which  will  be 
awarded  the  successful  bidder  or 
bidders  as  follows: 
CLASSIFICATIONS: 
Apprentices 

May    be    employed    in    conformity 
with  Section' 1777.5  of  the  California 
Labor  Code. 
Riggers 

Same  wage  scale  as  craft  to  which 
ri^sine    is    incidental. 
Welders 

Same  wage  scale  as  craft  to  which 
welding    is    incidental. 

Hourly 
CLASSIFICATION  Wage  Rate 

•CARPENTERS 
Foreman  shall  be  paid  not  less 
than  25  cents  per  hour  more 
than  the  hourly  rate  of  the 
highest  classification  over 
■which  he  has   supervision. 

Carpenter    $3.00 

^LABORERS 
Foreman  shall  be  i>ald  not  less 
than  25  cents  per  hour  more 
than  the  hourly  rate  of  the 
highest  classification  over 
which  he  has  supervision, 
laborers.  General  or  Construc- 
tion       2.30 

Effective  Effective 
2-1-57        6-1-57 
•HOUSEMOVERS 

FOREMAN     $2.89  $3,015 

•HO  US  EM  OVER 

JOUR.MEYMAN     ..  2.e3  2.755 

•YARD  MAINTENANCE 

MAN    ?*3  2.755 

•JUNIOR 

HOUSEMOVER  ••  •• 

•—Plus  Health  and  Welfare,  etc. 
•• — Effective  June  30.  1956.  the  hour- 
ly wage  rate  for  the  classifica- 
tion Junior  Housemover  will  be 
advanced  after  each  six-month 
period  to  the  extent  of  25'%  of 
the    difference    between    the    be- 

5 inning  hourly  wage  rate  of  the 
unior  Housernover  and  the  then 
current  hourly  wage  rate  for  the 
classification  of  Journey- 
man Housemover. 

The  rates  of  per  diem  waees  for 
each  of  the  various  classifications  of 
work  shall  be  the  hereinbefore  set 
forth  prevailing  rates  of  hourly 
wages  multiplied  by  eight  (8).  Eight 
(8)  hours  shajl  constitute  a  day's 
work;  it  being  understood  that  in 
the  event  that  workmen  are  em- 
ployed less  than  eight  (8)  hours  per 
dajf.  the  per  diem  wages  shall  be 
deemed  to  be  that  fraction  of  the 
per  di'm  wages  iierein  establi.«hed 
that  thf  number  of  hours  of  eraploy- 
zneiit  bears  to  eiEnt   (8)   hours, 

WORKING  RULES 
1.  Where  a  single  shift  is  worked. 
eight  (8)  consecutive  hours  be- 
tween 7  a.m.  and  5  p.m.  shall 
cons'itute  a  day's  work  at 
straight    time    for    all    workers. 

3.  Forty   (40)   hours  between  -Monday 
7    a.m.    and    P'Yiday    5    p.m.    shall 
con.^titute      a      week's      work      at 
?traifc''f    lime. 
All    work   performed   in   exce.«s   of 

ht  i8i  hours  r>er  days  or  forty 
hours  p'^r  week  or  on  Holi- 
days.' Saturday.s  and  Sundays 
shall  t'e  paid  for  at  the  rate  for 
overtirfte   of    the    craft    involved. 

4.  Holidays  as  herein  referred  to 
shall  be  deemed  to  be  New  Year's 
Day,  Decoration  Day.  Independ- 
ence Day.  Labor  Day.  Veterans 
Day,  Thaiik.5giving  Day  and 
Christmas.  If  any  of  the  above 
holidays  fall  on  Sunday,  the  Mon- 
day following  shall  be  considered 
a  legal   holiday. 

It  shall  be  mandatory  upon  the 
contractoi;'  to  whom  a  contract  is 
awarded,  and  upon  all  subcontractors 
under  him  to  pay  not  less  than  said 
general  prevailing  rates  of  per  diem 
wages  to  all  workmen  employed  in 
the  execution  of  the  contract. 

Notice  Is  also  hereby  given  that 
all  bidders  may  submit  with  their 
bids,  a  sworn  statement  of  their  fin- 
ancial responsibility,  technical  abili- 
ty and  experience.  Such  sworn  state- 
ment may  be  required  to  be  fur- 
nished before  award  is  made  to  any 
particular   bidder. 

Each  bid  shall  be  made  nut  on  a 
form  to  be  obtained  at  said  MAIN- 
TENANCE A.VD  OPERA  TIONS 
BRANCH  of  the  Board  of  Education 
and  shall  be  sealed  and  filed  with 
the  Contract  and  Insurance  Branch 
of  the  Board  of  Education.  Room  209 
1425  South  San  Pedro  Street,  Los 
Angeles,  by  not  later  than  2;00  P.M. 
on. the  date  or  dates  shown  above 
and'  will  be  opened  and  read  aloud 
In  public  at,  or  about,  said  time  in 
Room  210  at  said  addr(*!s. 

When  the  contract  nrice  i?  in  -ex- 
cess of  one  thousand  dol!ar.<»  ($1,000.- 
00).  a  "formal"  contract  shall  be  en- 
tered Into  on  a  form  which  may  h" 
examined  in  the  Contract  Office  of 
the  Board  of  Education,  and  surety 
bonds  of  a  suref.v  company  satisfact- 
ory to  the  Board  of  Education  cover- 
ing an  amo'int  aonroximateiv  equa' 
to  seventy-five  per  cent  (75'%)  of 
the  contract  price  for  labor  and  ma- 
terial, and  one  hundred  ner  cent 
(lOCT,*  for  faithful  performance, 
shall    be   furnished. 

The  Board  reserves  the  right  to 
re.lecf  any  or  all  bids,  and  to  waive 
■ny  informality  In  anv  bid.  No  bid- 
der may  withdraw  his,  bid  for  a 
period  of  sixty  (60)  days  after  the 
date  set  for  the  opening  thereof. 

By  order  of  the  Board  of  Education 
of  the   City   of  I^s   Angeles. 

S.  C.  JOYNER 
,  Business  Manager 

DATED:    Los    Angeles,    California. 
Fehruar>'  21,  1957. 
Publish  in 

THE    CALIFORNIA    EAGLE, 
Feb.  28  and  March  7,  1957 


Thursday,  February  28,   1957 


1-LIGAL  NOTICES 


NO.   4;»46 

LEGAL     NOTICE 

NOTICE    TO    CREDITORS 

NO.  .-issrisg 
In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 
of  I'alifornia.  in  snn  for  the  County 
of  Iavs  .Vngeles  In  tiie  Malter'of  the 
K.<t«te  of  .lames  Thomas  Wllkins. 
dcti*Asrd.  Notice  is  hrrrh\-  gi\en  bv 
the  undfrsijjnrd.   K    .V.  \\  INSTANL'^, 

I  Pl'BI.lr    .VDMINISTRATOR.    as    Ad- 

j  niinislrKlor  of  the  Estate  of  James 
Thom-is    \V  llkm.^.     Dercaspd.     to    the 

I  Cr^ditoo    i>(.    ,ind   all    pcrsvns   having 

'  .laimi  aiLAiiui  the  s.tid  deocndcnt. 
tv*  p:x*\onl  tht'in.  with  the  iioressar>' 
v\*u\.'h»*t\  wittitn  >i\  months  after 
iO^f  fux!  publu-.ition  of  this  notice. 
I^>  trtc  s.iul  ,\i1nvinlstr,Hlor  at  his  of- 
t'.>v    <«'.     .■*'»<    Nv'rth    .•^pring    St..     Lns 

t  Vnsv'c*  M.  C'difiM'nia.  which  said 
v»fT^•v  iS.t*  itndt-rslsncii  .-^^Mccts  as  a 
(»'*>■*  .>f  bwvinrss  in  .'(II  matters  con- 
'**s-:»Nt  \*'!h  x.iid  cstrttc.  or  to  file 
•."^r"'*  *^t'.t^  ih<f  ncccsar\'  \ouciiers, 
«  '"(^n  ijv  months  .'^fter  the  first 
i'.sMu*!Sk>n  of  ttMv  notice,  in  the  of- 
'v*  .»(  ;^*  I'irrk  of  the  Superior 
v'\H;!«  ,»t  ttie  Si.ite  of  C'^lifornia  in 
»R\t    ^.M     '.^.e    ^'ount\     of    I.rt,<5    Angeles. 

,      IVCfsi      »Vb;u.irx     .";\    l;lo7. 

!  r      A      W  INSTANLEY. 

TuMic    .Administrator,    as   ad- 

I  mini.str.itor   of    the   estate   of 

I  .>««\d    det-e<1ent. 

Publish    m 
CALIFORNIA    EAGLE. 

;  F»6.   »:    Msrch   7.   14  and  21,   1957, 


,NO.     l.'^l'l 

NOTICE    OF    HEARING    OF 

PETITION    FOR    PROBATE 

OF     WILL 

No.     .TSet'-'.T 

In  the  SuiHTior  ^''tniri    of  the  .*^tate 

of  I'alifoiMia.    'n   .ind   for  the.Count>' 

of  I.os  .Vnseles  In   the  .Matter  of  the 

Estate     of      ANNIE     IRE.NE     HILL 

De<  e.'ijed. 

Notice     is    herehy    gixen     that     the 
petition     of     Kd\\ard     Thompson     for 
the  Probate  of  the  Will  of  the  above- 
named  deceased  and  for  the  issuance 
of    Letters    of    Administration     Witli 
The    Will    Anne.xed    thereon    to    The 
Petitioner     to     which      reference     is 
hereb.v  made   for  further  particulars 
will    be    heard    at    9:15    o'clock    a.m., 
on  March  11.  1957.  at  the  court  rdom 
of    Department    5.    of    the    Superior 
Court  of  the   State  of  California,   in 
and  lor  the  County  of  Los  Angeles, 
HAROLD   J.    OSTLY. 
County  rierk  and   Clerk 
of  the  Superior  Court  of 
the   Statr-  of   California, 
in    and    for    the    County 
of  Los  Angeles. 

By    A.     DUGALLY, 
Deputy 
Dated    Fehru"--.-    i-,    1957 
Thomas   G.    Neusoim, 
1111    East   Vernon    Avenue, 
Los   Angeles,   California, 
»D.    2-6149, 

Attorney    for    Petitioner 
Publifh    in 

CALIFORNIA    EAGLE 
Feb,    21-28,    Mar,    7 


NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 
(S^O.  385972 
In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 
of  California,  in  and  for  the  County 
of  Los  Angeles.  In  the  Matter  of  the 
Estate  of  George  McCulston.  De- 
ceased. 

Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  un- 
dersigned. E.  A.  Winstanley.  Public 
Administrator,  as  Administrator  of 
the  Estate  of  George  McCuiston.  De- 
ceased, to  the  Creditors  of.  and  all 
persons  having  claims  against,  the 
paid  decedent,  to  present  them,  with 
the  necessary  vouchers,  within  six 
months  after  the  first  publication  of 
this  notice,  to  the  said  Administrator 
at  his  office  at  !=n8  North  Spring  St.. 
Los  Angeles  12.  California,  which  said 
office  the  undersigned  selects  as  a 
place  of  business  in  all  matters  con- 
nected with  said  estate,  or  to  file 
them,  with  the  necessary  vouchers, 
within  six  months  after  the  first  pub- 
lication of  this  notice,  in  tlie  office 
of  the  Clerk  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California  in  and  for 
the  Countv  of  Los  Angeles. 
Dated:    Feb.    5.    1957 

K.    A.    WINSTANLEY. 

Public  Administrator,   as 

Administrator  of  the  Estate 

of  said  Decedent 
Publish    in    California    Eagle    Feb. 
14-21-29-March   7.    1957. 


■+- 


NO,   42518 

NOTICE    TO   CREDITORS 

No.  385146 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 
of  California,  in  and  for  the  County 
of  Los  -Angele.i. 

In  the  Matter  of  the  Estate  of 
.^NDRET^'  V.  RIGGP.  also  known  as 
V.\LLERY    RONAGE.    Deceased. 

Notice  is  herehy  given  to  credit- 
01  s  having  claims  against  the  said 
lecedcnt  to  file  said  claims  in  the 
office  of  the  clerk  of  the  aforesaid 
court  or  to  pre.^ent  them  to  the 
undersigned  at  the  office  of  her 
Attorney  Thoma.s  G.  Neusom.  1111 
East  Vernon  .Vvenue  in  the  City  of 
Los  .\ngele.s.  in  the  aforesaid  Coun- 
ty, which  latter  office  is  the  place 
of  husine.<'s  of  the  under.-'iffned  in 
all  matters  pertaining  10  said  estate. 
Sucn  claim."  with  the  riecessary 
vouchers  must  be  filed  or  presented 
as  aforesaid  within  six  months  after 
the    first    publication    of    this    notice. 

Dated   January    28.    1957. 

.\LBKRTH.\    LEK   P.IGGS 

Administratrix  of  the  Estate  of 
said    descedent. 

Thomas   G.    Neusom.    Attorney-at- 
Angeles,    California,    AD.  .2-6149. 
Published   California   Eagle 
Feb.   7-14-21-28 


11 -REDUCING  TREATMENTS 


KEEP  SLIM 
STAY  SLIM 

— for— 

•  RELAXING 

•  REDUCING 

Call  PL.  5-3651 

for  Appointment  at 

LEE'S  STUDIO 

11669  S.  AVALON 


15-HELP  WANJED-MALE 


WANTED— Master  barber.  Gooti 
business.  Call  Sampson's  Bar- 
ber  Shop,   EXbrook   9-9607.  • 


17-EMPlOYMENT  AGENCIES 


ROYALTY 

EMPLOYMENT 

AGENCY 

"25  YEa'rS  of  SERVICE" 

1714  West  Jefferson  Blvd. 
RE.    1-4529  RE.   3-3930 

HELP  WANTED:  Women,  cooks 
and  general.  Home  nights,  35 
to  50.  Stay  $200  per  month  & 
up.  Dishwashers,  hotel  maids, 
waitresses  and  cooks,  salaries 
open.  MEN:  Cocks,  dishwash- 
ers, fry  cooks. 

COUPLES: 
tions. 


Top    salaried    posi- 


DAY  WORK 

Register  now  for  thesa  top  pay- 
ing jobs. 


18-WANTED  TO  RENT 


,  Landlords  Free 

Tenants  waiting.  All  areas.  RE 
3-5621;  RE  3-1171. 

WANTED  TO  RENT 

LANDLORD  LISTINGS  FREE 
TENANTS  WAITING  TODAY 

DAILY  RENTALS 
Call  PL.  3-3168 


19-A-HOTELS 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

The  People's  Chofce 

960  E.  Jefferson 

AD.  3-9295 

3700  S.  WESTERN 
RE.  4-9346 


25-UNFURNISHED    HOUSES 


UNFURNISHED  HOUSES 

2-6    Room   HeuMt,   3    bedrooms 
•ach,    Chilctron    O.    K. 

575     ,0    $100   MO 

5— S     Room     Apti,,    2     bedrooms 
each.  Children  O.  K. 


S7S  »  S80 


Mo. 


22-APARTMENTS-FURNISHED 


HILTON 

ARMS 

HOTEL  AND 
APARTMENTS 

Weekly  service  and  utilities. 
Clean,  quiet,  comfortable,  well- 
managed  building. 

FURNISHED 

SINGLES,  DOUBLES 

BACHELORS 

M6  50  and  Up 

RE.  5-8 1 1 7 

1250  South  Western 


TOBEY  APIS. 

(Near  Adams  &  Western) 
BRAND  NEW  .  .  . 

MODERN 
FURNITURE 

Beautiful 

Lobby  and  Patio 

Good   Public  Transportation 

Automatic  Washers  and   Dryers 

Telephone 
Singles  —  Doubles  —  Bachelors 

$55.00  Mo.  Up 

ALL   UTILITIES  FURNISHED 

1 920  West  25th  St. 
RE.  3-1460 


Me. 
FURNISHED  &   UNFURNISHED 

7-4  Room  Apts.,  2  bedrooms 
each.  Furnished  and  unfurnished. 
Children  O.  K. 

$60  »  $99.50 

14—3  Room  Apis.,  furnished  and 
unfurnished.    Children    O.    K. 

$50  to  $55  Mo 

Bachelor  and  Kitchenette  Apts, 
furnished  and  unfurnished, 

$35,0  $45  MO 

Landlords,  why  let  your  rentals 
remain  vacant  while  Mallette 
Realty  has  clients  with  jobs  and 
cute  children  waiting? 

Mallette  Realty 

14061   West   Vernon   Ave, 

AX,  4-8157  -  AX.  4-8158 

Res.   AD.   4-8098 


26-BUSINESS  RENTALS 


STORE  for  rent  or  lease  on  Ava- 
lon.  $60  mo.  Call  after  11  a.m, 
RE  4-3218, 

28-MONEY  TO  LOAN 


CASH! 

^     OPEN  9  TO  -9 

Free  Appraisals! 

Mark  Twain  Real  Estate 

9801   South  Broadway 
PL.  6-1478 


FURNISHED  APT.  FOR  RENT 

Furnished  afpt.,  ut,  pd.,  2204  7th 
avenue,  RE.  4-1897.  Close  to 
transportation. 


23-APARTMENTS,  UNFURNISHED 


APTS.  FOR  RENT 

$50.00  MO. — 3  and  4  room  apts. 
for  adults  and  children.  Lo- 
cated one  Block  west  of  Ala- 
meda on  108th  street.  LO. 
9-1728. 


DE lUXE 

MODERN 

APTS. 


JUST 
COMPLETED 

RIDGEIIY 
MANOR 

UNFURN.  r&2BR. 
$90  M.  &  UP 

INCLUDES:  W/W  CARPETING 
OR  PARQUET  FLOORS,  EX- 
POSED BEAM  OR. ACOUSTIC 
PLASTER,  INSULATED  WALLS, 
GARBAGE  DISPOSAL,  TILE 
KITS.  &  BATHS,  EXTRA 
CLOSETS,  LAUNDRY,  FREE 
HOT  WATER. 

OPEN  DAILY  AND  WEEK-ENDS 
10  TO  5 

2222    S.    RIDGELEY   DR. 
NORTH  OF  ADAMS 

1    BLOCK  EAST  OF  HAUSER 

MR.  WACHT 

WE.  8-3871  orGR.  8-4829 


25-UNFURNiSHED  HOUSES 

^ ! 


$50— NICE  2  bdrm.  home  near 
56th  St.  Children  and  pets 
welcome.  RE  3-5909. 


Stop  - 1  Buy 

2nd 
Trust  Deeds 

My  own  money.  Better 
deal  with  me.  20  years  in 
Los  Anseles.  Or  can  get 
you  a  loan  on  your  trust 
deed  if  you  don't  care  to 
sell. 

Mr.  Lewis 

PL  3-1158  Any  Time 

33-MISCElLANEOUS  FOR  SALE 


STORE  FIXTURES:  Show  cases, 
mannikins,  dress  racks.  Call 
after  11  a.m,  RE  4-3218. 

47-SERVICES 


AMAZE  friends.  Cigarette  smoke 
rings.  Yoga  secret.  $1.00.  C.  J., 
P.  O.  Box,  929,  Indio,  Calif.    . 


JOHNSON'S  HOUSE  of  Insur- 
ance. Salesman  wanted  to 
manage   office. 


48-CHILD  CARE 


CHILD  CARE  in  my  home  day 
or  night,  infants  preferred. 
Call  AD.  4-0392. 


Child  care  in  my  home  by  day. 
All  ages.  PL.  1-S371.  34f  E. 
68th  street.  . 


49-RUG   CLEANING 


RUG  CLEANING 

GOLDEN   STATE 

RUG    CLEANERS 

BINDING        •        SERGING 

FRINGING     •     REPAIRING 

1667  E.  32nd  St. 
AD.  2-6935 


96-C-PORPERTY  lOANS 


New  Loan  Deal 

Betl  in  the  West 

LEGAL  RATES 

Any  Amount  You  Need 

Call  Now 

Mr.  Sloan 

0«y  or  Night  -  NO.  5-P377 
97-PROPERTY   IMPROVEMENTS 

FAMiLYROOMT 

At  large  «t  3  bedreomt  for 
$28  down  and  $28  •  month 


ALSO 

GLASS 
SLIDING 
DOORS 


Marvin  Builders 

CALL 

AN.  1-7149 
WE.  5-9953 

A  csmpl.t.  building  ram.il.llng 
and  f.  H.  A.  100%  llnancing 
i.rvlc.. 

R.ar  yard   oats,   built  far 
$50  Dewn  and  $S0  a  Manlh 

99-REAl  ESTATE  FOR  SAIE^ 

VETS 

WHY  PAY  RENT? 

$25 'deposit  and  your  discharge 
plus  $25  per  week  for  18  weeks 
pays  ,$75  dn.  includincj',  charges  & 
impound  on  a  lovely  2  bedroom 
home.  Then  your  notes  are  $65 
per   month; 

JOHN  H.  KELLY 

NE.  6-2522 


.*.a4c4j 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


750 


COMPTON 

Spacious,  BeautiFul,  New 

HOMES 
DOWN 

Non-V«ts  1  Vet* 

•  3  bedrcMoms,  2  baths,  2-car 
garage 

•  LOADED  with  Luxury  Fea+ures: 
Garbage  Disposal,  Extra-Large 
Closets,  Large  Level  Lots,  etc. 

•  Close  to  Schools,  Churches, 
Shopping. 

•  Easy  Monthly  Payments! 

•  Immediate  Occupancy! 

DRIVE   OUT  TODAY- 
MODELS  ON   DISPLAY 

For  Information.    Call   O.Xford  2-4726 

or  UNiverMty  3-5938 

134th  &  Kalsman.  Compton 

(Turn  East  off  Central  at  134th) 

We'll  trade 

brand  new 

beautiful 

3-bedroom, 

2-bath  home 

in  the  San  Fernando  Valleys' 

most  convenient   location. 

Includes  luxury  features, 

built-ins  galdrs.' Street  paved> 

curbs,  walks,  driveways, 

landscaping  and  sewert 

in  and  paid  for. 

FOR 

Your  present  home,  paid  for  or 
not,  vacant  lots,  trust  deeds, 
bonds,  securities,  trucks  —  or 
almost  anything  of  value. 

PACOIMA  PARK 
HOMES 

Vaughn   and   Borden   Streets 
San  Fernando  Valley 

Phone:   EMpire  9-9162 

IM 

920  ACRES 

of  Choice   Land 
Priced   to   Sell 

You  Too  Can 
Ov/n  a   Ranch 
in  the  Country 

This  Weekend  Drive 
Your  Family  to  the 

PERMS 
GRANJAS 

SUBDIVISION 

Ranches  and  Scenic 
Home  Sites  As  Low  As 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


$299 

DOWN 

Balance  Monthly 

Takes  Deed 

To  Many  of  These 

PROPERTIES 
BORROW 

$1000 

Or  More 
Oji  Your 

Real  Estate 

Pay  Bacic  $15 

Per  $1000  Per  Month 
Until  Paid 


OPEN  MONDAY  NIGHT 
UNTIL  8  P.M. 


-IMMEDIATE    POSSESSION- 

Braitd  New  Three  Bedroom  Stucco 
Hemes.  Added  features— Par- 
quet   Floors— Louvre    windows. 

742  East  11 0th  Street-Double- 
$450  Down,   Bal.  Mo. 


$300 


Per 
Acre 


Terms  as  Low  as 

$50  Dn.,  $25  Mo. 

-  CONTACT  - 

MALLETTE  REALTY' 
14061  W.  VERNON 

Office:  AX.  4-8157  or 
AX.  4-8158 

Res.:  AD.  4-8098 


invest  Today  in  a  Carefree, 
Healthy,   Happy   Tomorrow 


Directions:  Take  Hwy.  395 
into  the  city  of  Pspfis.  At 
the  corner  of  4th  and  "D" 
turn  right  (W%s?  on  4th,;. 
then  go  four  bl^rks,  turn 
right  (ner'h)  4r'd  follow 
paved    road    to    subdivision.' 


Address: 

Perris,  Calif. 

Perris  Gran<gs 

Rt.  2.  Box  79 


2477    East    11 1th    Street-Frame.- 
$199  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1366    E      110th    St.-3    Bedroom- 
$650  Dewn,  Bal.  Me. 

738    E.    17th    Street-Frame    $350 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1118     E.     91st     Sl.»Frame-$350 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

9213  Beach— New  3  Sdrm.  Stucco. 
$550  Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

414     E.     107th     St.-Frame-$250 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1460    E.     107th    St.-Frame-$199 
Down,  Bal.'  Mo. 

1938    E.    115th    St.-Frame-$2S0 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1104-11041  E.  113th  St.-$399 
Down,    Bal.    Mo.    2    Rentals. 

820  W.  138th  St;,  Complon-New 
3  Bedroom  Stucco.  $750  Down, 
Bal.  Mio. 


10523-10525  Lou  Dillon-3  Bed- 
rooms each.  $499  each,  Bal. 
Mo. 


1749    E.    108th    St.-3    Bedroom- 
$499  Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1229-1233-1237  E.  109th  St- 
3  s6parate  houses  with  3  bed- 
reomt each.  $650  Down  each. 
Bal.  Me. 


1762    I.    Ilih    Place-$2S0    Dawn, 
one*  Monthly 


Bal- 


2017    Nord    Si 
Baianc*  Mei 

rfrt   Hyam<-I 


Strael— Froma— $299    Dewn, 
Menlfily. 


$299   Dewn,   Baianc*   Me. 
2320  Steclcw«tl-2  Bedrms.,  S299  Down. 


2109  E.  113th  St.-New  3  Bdrm.  Stucco, 
$7S0  Dewn,  Balance  Monthly. 

2SS2   Santa   Ana-New  3  Bdrm.  Stucco, 
$499   Down,   Balance   Monthly. 

25S4   Santa   Ana— New   3   Bdrm.   Stucco, 
$499   Dewn,   Balance   Monthly. 


2556  Santa   Ane-New   3   Bdrm.   Stucco, 
$499  Down,  Boloiice  Monthly. 


We  Have  1   and  2  Bedrm.  Apts. 
For  Rent 

TOMORROW'S  MONEY  TODAY 

Advance  on  thp  House  You  Now  Own 
in  One  Dav.  Advanced  on  \'our  1st 
Trust  Deed  loan  if  we  O.K.  it.  Con- 
solidate all  >our  bills  in  one  loan. 
Borrow  Sl.iXXI  or  more— pay  back  $15 
a  month  per  SHXK)  'til  paid. 

WE    HAVE    CLIEfOTS    WITH 
ALL  CASH!      ' 

For  Your  Real  Estate  Equities— 1st 
or  2nd  Trust  Deeds— Contracts.'  or 
any  Equity.  \ou  or  your  friend  iiave 
in  Real  Estate.  If  it's  an  Estate,  a 
suit  or  separation-  or  anything  per- 
taining to  Real  Estate,  here  js  your 
chance  to  sell   for  CASH.         .  ' 

100  CENTS  ON  THE  $1.bO 

For  your  1st  trust  deed  if  satisfac- 
tory to  us  oredited  to  the  purcha.se 
of  any  properties  we  have  listed, 
terrific— 100  cents  on  the  dollar  if 
you  have  a  T.D.  For  SlOO  to  $10,000 
we  will  get  you  a  deal. 

$98,000  CASH  -  $98,000  CASH 

Have  clients  with  SS'S.OOO  in  cash  to 
buy  real  estate  in  this  district.  This 
is  your  chance  to  sell  out  for  all  cash 
if  ^o^  have  an  equitv  or  own  a  house 
We  have  clients  with  S98.000  in  all 
cash  to  bny  you  out. 


REALTY 
Equities  Co. 

AD.  2-5528 
AD.  2-6101 

Wo  Oe   50-50  on  Cemmitfiens  With 
Air  Bteal  Ittate  Brokert 

ALL   PROPIRTIES   ARI    SUBJICT 
TO  PRIOR  SAII 

4374  S.  MAIN  ST. 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


WHY 
PAY 


When  It's  Easier 

to  Own  a  Home 

Than  Live  In  a  Tent? 


EBONY 
HOMES 


TRACT 


•  3  Large  Bedrooms 

•Brand  New  and   Modern 

•  Latest 
Improvements 

•  Finest  Features 

•  Near  Everything 

•  Two  Car  Garages 


SMALL  DOWN  PYMT. 


WEI», 

loi-cjis 


%: 
' 


Df  ADUNf  - 

.AT11  AeM^ 


lOl-nSPlAY  PROKRTY  RINTAU 


NOW 

RENTING 


BRAND  m 


2  BDRM. 
APTS. 


CHILDREN  OK 
TV  ANTENNAS 
T  LE  KITCHENS 
PARKING  AREAS 
TILE  BATHROOMS 
H\RDWOOD  FLOORS 
UIUVERED  WINDOWS 


A 

i 

\ 


A 


% 


month 


Citrus  &  Highland  Ave. 
In  Beautiful  Smog-Free 

NORTH  FONTANA 


-CALL  -TODAY- 

VAIley  2-ii4 


OR 


Elgin  5#3 


Secyrity  Assurance 
Homes 
incorporated    * 


i:. 


z^- 


S^  Them  at 


.ee 


11695-99  S.  MAW  ST. 

10626  CENTRAL  AVE. 

8101  COMPTON  AVE. 

9813  SO.  MAIN  ST. 

BROKERS  WELCOME 

-Phone—   - 

PL  5-5711 

-    i 

1. 8-0409 


91  mi 


^  .'  <. 


:Vf 


■'^         '    I 


k. 


y 


G 


> 


I 


Is 

)ORS 
K)W$ 


ap 

at 

ST. 
IVE. 
IVE. 

ME 


4 


Falls  From  Bed  dt  Counly  Hospital,  IDieS 


GOLDEN  STATE  FIRES 


*- 


^ 


Hit  the  Bricks 


m /^sif^^^(^^  <^ 


POUSDISG  THE  PJl'EMENT  -  Events  of  the  Golden  State  Mutual  Life  Inuimnce 
Co.  "hit  the  hricks"  1  uesdny  ajter\126  men.  some  tilth  a  quarter  crntury  expiriencc ,  uere 
fired  from  their  johx  in  a  union  dispute.  Above,  pickets  outside  the  offiie  r,t  42^1  S.  Crntrfd 
tn'enue  include  f.dxLin  Snecd  (center J,  Ednard  Eord  (right),  Sidney  Catnphell  and  Roy 
Spencer. — (Adams).       ,  ; 


C.-!LL  GOLDES  STATE  'U\FA I R'— Pickets  outside  the  Golden  State  office  at  :5th  and 
K'estern  carry  sinns  drrlnrina  "Gulden  State  .M utnnl  Life  Guilty  of  Unfair  Labor  Practice," 
end  "(rSM   Refuse:/  to   Bargain   CoUectii  el\."  —  f.-fdanis.) 


Oil  Companies 
Woo  Westsiders 


The  oil  that  may,  or  may  not,  lie  beneath>the  sur- 
face in  the  West  Adams  district  had  everybody— well, 
almost  everybody — in  the  district  in  a  man-sizec^  tizzy  , 
this  week  as  three  riva.l  oil  companies  were  trying  to 
curry  favor  with  property  owners  in  the  area. 

■ '•■    The    Guihpr5;onBurkp,   I'nion 

land  Signal  Oil  companies  are 
i  all  trying  to  secure  oil  leases 
in  the  area  and  each  of  them 
is  wooing  property  owners  with 
claims  that  its  particular  lease 
is  best  calculated  to  start  a 
flow  of  liquid  gold. 

Guiberson-Burke,  first  on  the 
scene,  has  hired  Libby  Clark, 
local  public  relations  expert, 
and  she  wasn't  a  bit  bashful  in 
telling  the  Eagle  why  her  em- 
ployer is  entitled  to  the  leases. 
First  and  foremost,  she  said, 
Guiberson-Burke  is  offering  a 
20  per  cent  royalty,  which 
means  in  English  that  the  pro- 
perty owner  gets  20  percent  of 
the  oil,  if  any,  that  is  ulti- 
mately produced. 

Five  Year  Leases 

In  addition  to  all  that.  Miss 

Clark    says,    her    employer    is 

only    seeking    five    year    leases 

(Continued   on  Page  4) 


Son  Is  Held 
After  Death 
Of  Stepfather 

William  Frederick  Acton.  987 
S.  Catalina.  was  being  held 
this  week  on  a  charge  of  pos- 
sible homicide,  following  the 
death  of  his  stppfaihcr.  Ben- 
jamin Thpodrire  r>a\is.  IS.  in 
General  Hospital  last  Wednes- 
day. 

An  initial  charge  of  assault 
with  intent  to  commit  murder 
was  dropped,  after  it  had  been 
shown  that  Davis  was  injured 
during  a  fight.  Whether  or  not 
a  homicide  charge  will  be  filed 
will    await   the   autopsy   report. 

Father  and  son  had  reported- 
ly both  been  drinking  and  had 
exchanged  angry  words.  The 
son.  Acton,  had  also  quarreled 
with  his  mother  and  threatened 
her  with  a  hunting  knife,  in- 
flicting a  superficial  wound  on 
her   arm. 

Later  he  went  into  the  bed- 
room where  he  ..saw  his  step- 
father standing  on  a  chair  be- 
hind the  door,  with  a  hammer 
!  1  his  hand.  Acton  said  Davis 
tried  to  strike  him.  but  he 
Jcnocked  him  off  balance  and 
tht  elder  man  fell  to  the  floor. 

The  son  said  he  then  "lost 
.(Continued  on  Page  3) 


South  African 
Gov't  Proposes 
Censorship 

JOHANNESBURG  —  Ap- 
parently angry  that  news  of 
South  Africa's  treatment  of 
its  Negroes  has  been  pub- 
lished abroad,  the  govern- 
ment has  introduced  a  bill 
to  clamp  censorship  on  the 
press. 

The  bill  would  restrict 
South  African  newspapers 
and  part-time  correspond- 
ents for  foreign  publications. 

Aim  of  the  bill,  says  the 
government,  is  to  prevent 
publication  of  anything 
likely  to  disturb  race  rela- 
tions and  to  define  what 
constitutes  "dangerous  com- 
ment." 


1060   E.    43rd    PUm,    L.A. 


Coqtinueut,  Publication  for  76  Years 


AB.  4-01 11 


Vol.    LXXVI-No.   51 


t6s  Angeles,  California 


10c 


Thurs.,   March   7,    1957 


Rev.  King  Needles 
Nixon  in  Ghana 

Gold  Coast 
Greets  Dawn 
Of  New  Nation 


-<«'- 


County  Hospital 
Won't  Discuss 
Woman's  Death 

A  woman  patient  at  Gen- 
eral Hospital  was  found  on 
the  floor  near  her  bed  late 
last  Wednesday  night,  and 
died. the  following  evening. 

The     death     of     Mrs.    Carrie 

1  Johnson,  49.  a  domestic  who 
lived  at  260n  .S.  Orchard  street, 
was  at  first  listed  by  the  cor- 
oner as  possibly  caused  by 
falling  out  of  bed.  Following 
further  investigation,  however, 
the  cause  of  death  was  given 
as  a  stroke. 

General  Hospital  authorities 
refused  to  comment  on  the 
case.  When  queried  by  the 
Eagle.  L.  A.  Witherill,  assist- 
ant director,  replied  through 
his  secretary:  "No  statement." 
Mrs.  Johnson  was  taken  ill 
Tuesday,  Feb.  27,  and  was 
driven  (o  the  ho.spital  by  a 
friend.  Miss  Dorothy  Walker. 
1238  W.  Adam  boulevard,  about 
noon.     She  was  reportedly  suf- 

i  feting   from    hypertension    and 

'  an   intestinal   disorder. 

I      About  10:.30  p.m..  attendants 

found   her  on   the   floor  of   her 

room,  and  it  was  assumed  she 

(Continued  on   Page  4) 


Li 


Pickets  M 
Company 
Contract  broken 


rch; 
Claims 


I* 

XEEDLFS   -W.VO.V  —  Thr 

Rei\  Martin  Luther  K  i  n  g  , 
boycott  lender,  met  Vice  Presi- 
dent \ixon  m  Ghana,  Tues- 
day, and  urged  him  to  make  n 
first-hand  investigation  of  con- 
ditions in  the  South. 


!13  Nabbed  in 
'Numbers'  Raid 
May  Go  Free 

According  to  rumors  in  the 
Hall  of  Justice,  th.e  district  at- 
torney has  refused  to  return 
indictments  against  the  1.3  men 
a'nd  women  seized  early  in 
February  and  accused  of  oper- 
ating a  gianf  numbers  racket. 
The  cases,  it  was  understood, 
would  be  submitted  to  the 
grand  iiiry  nexl  week  which 
I  may  hold  the  13  to  answef  or 
NEW  YORK-Another  round  '"^Z  ^'-^'I'i^'=f  the  charges, 
in  the  campaign  to  win  unre-  \  ^ny.  Earl  C.  Broady.  repre- 
stricted  freedom  of  travel  for  f"^'"^  ^^^  ^"t'^^  P""""?'  >"«• 
newsmen  opened   last  Tuesdav  i  ^^^''^  comment  on  the  report. 


Worthy  Asks 
For  Renewal 
Of  Passport 


when  reporter  William  Worthy 
filed  an  application  for  renew- 
al of  his  passport  at  the  State 
Department's  New  York  Pass- 
port Office. 

Worthy,  a  correspondent  for 
the  Afro-American  newspapers, 
was  accompanied  by  William 
Kunstler,  American  Civil  Liber- 
ties Union  attorney.  The  ACLU 
has  announced  that  it  would 
bring  legal  action,  if  nece.ssary. 
to  maintain  Worthy's  right  of 
travel. 

Worthy  was  informed  that  it 
would  be  several  weeks  before  lS.500   to   $1000. 


ACCRA.  Ghana— At  the 
stroke  of  midnight  Tues- 
day, the  Union  Jack  was 
hauled  down  from  atop  the 
Parliament  Building,  and 
in  its  place  soared  aloft  the 
red,  gold  and  green  stand- 
ard of  the  independent 
-State  of  Ghana. 

The  cry  of  "Freedom!  Free- 
dom!" rang  out  from  .50.000 
throats,  to  the  accompaniment 
of  brilliant  fireworks  knd  the 
sound  of  talking  drumls. 

As  the  legislators  and  the 
throng  of  celebrants  watched 
dawn  break  over  the  new  sov- 
ereign nation,  some  American 
delegates  here  were  still  smart- 
ing over  what  they  considered 
the  down-grading  of  'Vice-Pres- 
ident Richard„I^.^iXDO  at  an 
official  banquet. 

Earlier  Tuesday  Nixqn  unex- 
pectedly met  the  Rev.  Martin 
Luther  King,  leader  of  the 
Montgomery.  Ala.  bus  boycott, 
at  a  convocation  at  Accra  Uni- 
versity College. 

Ur^ed  Investigation 

Rev.  King  urged  Nixon  to 
make  a  firsthand  investigation 
of  the  racial  situation  in  the 
Southern   United  States. 

He  told  newsmen  he  wanted 
Nixon  to  see  conditions  in  the 
South  so  he  could  make  a  per- 
sonal report  to  President  Eisen- 
hower. 

"We  are  not  sure  the  Presi- 
dent knows  all  the  violence 
and  desperation  in  the  situa- 
tion,"   King   remarked. 

Alphabetical  Seating 

The  banquet  incident  oc- 
curred Monday  night.  The  vice- 
president  was  not  seated  at 
the    head    table,    although    the 


S^ 
Ai 


A  dispute  that  has  been 
of  the  year  erupted  into  what 
Insurance  Company  called  an  "i 
members  of  the  Golden  State 
that  represents  Golden  State  a 

Whatever  the  correct  name,-*^ 
the  facts  are  that  Golden  Gate 
fired  126  agents  Saturday  and 
terminated  its  collective  bar- 
gaining agreement  with  the 
Agency  Club.  Men  who  were 
fired  had  from  3  to  25  years 
service  with  the  company. 
Agents  began  picketing  com- 
pany offices  all  over  the  state 
Tuesday. 

On   the  surface   the   dispute 
centers   around   what  the  com- 
pany called  the  refusal  of  the 
agents  to  "make  certain  month- 
end    collection   reports   on   the 
forms   and   in   the   manner  re- 
.  quired  by  the  company."  Lurk- 
ing beneath  the  surface,  agents 
claimed,   is   the   fact   that  the 
company  is  displeased  becau* 
the  Agency  Club  has  been  dis- 
I  cussing  affiliation  with  the  In- 
'  surance  Workers  of  America,  an 
AFL-CIO  union. 

iWant  RaUe 
Differences  '  between  the 
company  and  the  union  cropped 
out  Jan.  30  when  the  company 
directed  agents  to  fill  out  cer- 
tain forms  for  what  are  called 
its  "special  ordinary  policies." 
Agents  protested  on  the  ground 
that  the  forms  would  require 
from  three  to  five  hours  extra 
work  per  week  and  asked  for  a 
raise  in  commissions  from  ten 
to  1.5  per  cent. 

Insisting    that    the    require- 
ments  as   Xe<  filling   out   forms 
i  are    "management   responsibil- 
;  ities  to  the  policy  owner  and 
the    state    of    California,"    the 
company  refused  the  raise  and 
also    recused    to    arbitrate    the 
dispute?  with   the   union. 
A    deadlock    developed    and 
(Continued  on  Page  3) 


smbldering  since  the  first 

G(ilden  State  Mutual  Life 

legal  strike"  and  what 

i*  gency  Glub,  the  union 

gents,  called  a  "lockout." 


SO.OOO 

< 

'57  Goal 


M 
Re\ 

uit>. 

site 

\.: 

pai.  1 


}fIX  SPEAKER  —   The 

J.   Raymond  Henderson 

tell    of    trip    to    bombed 

s    in    south    at    opening    of 

AGP    membership    cam' 

n  tonight,   Thursday. 


.KX  the  time  of  the  arrests 
some  of  the  newspapers  report- 
ed that  the  police  dragnet  had 

snared  the  principals  in  a  mil- |  ;,p]pga'"f;"from'Peking7Marshal 

lion     dollar    racket.       None    of  j  ^-4^^    Jungchen.    was    so    hon- 

those    .lailed    had    very    much  ,  ^^^^   5^^^^^  aj^ng  ^.jt^  China's 

cash  in  their  pockets  or  pocket-  I  ^pputv   premier   were   Britain's 

Ijooks.     Police,      however,     did  1  jj^i^hp^  ^f  Kent,  official  repre- 

safe    belonging    to   El-  I  ^p^fati^.g  ^f  Q„een  Elizabeth  II, 

land    R.   A.   Butler.   British   Lord 

Privy   Seal.    Explanation   given 


seize    a 

bert     "Cotton"     Gordon,     which 

reportedly  contained  $13,600. 

Winston    C.    Dunlap.    701    E. 
Tfith  street,  was  given  the  high- 


the  State  Department  acts  on 
the  application.  The  passport 
i  was  due  to  expire  March  4. 
[  The  Afro-American  reporter. 
I  who  also  serves  as  a  special 
1  correspondent  for  the  Nevv 
1  York  Post  and  the  Columbia 
Broadcasting  System,  touched 
I         (Continued  on  Page  4i 


est  hail,  $.tOOO.  The  others  were 
freed    on    bonds   ranging   from 


Those  arrested,  in  addition 
to  Gordon  and  Dunlap.  were 
Toni  .Tohnson  Rasberry.  Howard 
Bennett,"  Arthur  Glasco,  Wil- 
liam Mason,  Archie  Meadows, 
Edward  Thomas 
thorne,  Clarence 


for  the  seating  arrangements 
was  that  countries  were  assign- 
ed   alphabetically. 

Both  Nixon  and  the  Rev. 
King  were  official  guests,  as 
were  also  Dr.  Ralph  Bunche, 
assistant  U.N.  secretary  gener- 
al: Congressman  Charles  Diggs 
(D.,  Mich.1;  Virgin  Islands  Gov- 
ernor Walter  A.  Gordon;  the 
Charles  Haw- j  Urban  League's  Lester  Gran- 
Holt.  Florence  I  ger;     Congresswoman     Frances 


Gordon.  Era  Lou  Thompson  and  .Bolton  ( R..  Ohio);  Mason  Sears, 
Emily  Allen.  I         (Continued  on  Page  4) 


featured 
In  the  Bagle 

Special  features  this  week 
Inside  the  Eagie   include: 

Editorials „ 4 

Church  Activities  5 

Sports 9 

Sodal   _.  7 

Dorothea  Foster 8 

Smart  Set  7 

People  and  Places  10 

Chazz  Crawford  _ .10 

Whafi  Cooking   8 


Man  Crushed 
Between  Auto, 
Light  Standard 

X)run  Bell,  construction  work- 
er,  of  2500   Hobart   street,   was 
crushed     to     death     Saturday 
when  he  tried  to  bring  his  run- 
away car  under  control. 
I     Bell  parked  his  car  on  Grays- 
I  by   street   in   San    Pedro   about 
!  7:1.5  a.m.   and   started   to  walk 
to   the   construction   job   in   the 
3500  block  on  Graysby. 

The    car    began    to    roll    to- 
I  wards  Paseo  Del  Mar,  and  Bell 
sprinted    to    the    front    of    the 
auto,  opened  the  car  door,  and 
tried  to  grab  for  the  brake.  The 
I  car  sideswiped   an   ornamental 
I  lamp  standard.  Bell  was  crush- 
ed   between   the   standard   and 
the  car. 
^     He  was  thrown  tathe  ground 
by  the  impact  and  was  dead 
I  on  arrival  at  San  Pedro  Hospi- 
tal. 


THAXKS  FOR  YOUR  INTEREST— Ronny,  left,  and  Gwen,  whose  pictures  appeared  in 
the  California  Eagle  several  weeks  eigo  in  an  appeal  for  adoptive  parents,  this  week  are -saying 
"thank  you"  to  the  more  than  300  parents  who  hewe  filed  applications  with  the  Joint  Re- 
cruitment Project  for  Minority  Adoptive  Hemes.  The  response  has  been  tremendous^— but 
the  need  for' homes  continues. 


GentleJobber 
Crashes  Party, 
Takes  ^50G 

There  were  about  25  victims 
early  Saturday  morning  of  one 
of  the  most  polite  robberies  on 
record.  Only  one  of  the  25.  how- 
ever, Melin  Carr.  57.  a  hod  car- 
rier, of  805  E.  25th  street,  re- 
ported the  theft. 

The  other  24  seemed  a;  little 
bashful  about  getting  in  touch 
with  the  police. 

Friendly  Game 

The  men  had  gathered  to- 
gether for  a  friendly,  innocent 
crap  game.  Suddenly  a  man, 
about  25  years  old,  with  a  Ja- 
maican accent,  came  in.  He 
was  very  polite,  even  though 
he  did  "hold  a  .38  caliber  re- 
volver in  his  right  hand. 

"Would  you  gentlemen  mind 
going  into  the  other  room?"  he 
asked  in  his  most  charming 
manner. 

Some  of  them  did  mind,  and 
suggested    that    the    courteous 
one  put  away  his  gun  "because 
some' one  might  get  hurt." 
•I'm  Not  Ploying' 

"I'm  not  playing?"  said  the 
visitor,  gently  but  firmly,  toy- 
ing with  the  trigger  of  the  re- 
volver. Then  he  lined  up  all  25 
against  the  wall. 

Without  raising  his  voice,  the 
young  man  said:  "Will  all  of 
you  kindly  put  your  money  and 
pocketbooks  on  the  table?" 
All  complied.  He  then  asked 
(Continued   on  Page  4i 


DIMCTS  CAMPAIGN  — 

.'if  IS.     Tarea     Hall     Pittman, 

field   secretary,    u-ill    direct 
local  XAACP  membcrshif 

Local  NAACP 


Oiiens 
Drive 


"I 


Member 
Tonight 


Visited  the  Troubled  Areas 
of  <he  South"  will  be  the 
theniie  of  a  talk  given  by  key- 
notef.  the  Rev.  J.  Raymond 
Henderson,  at  the  L.A.  Branch 
1957  membership  kickoff  meet- 
ing, tonight.  Thursday,  at  8  p.m. 
at  t  \e  Second  Baptist  Church, 
24th  street  and  Griffith  avenue. 

Re^-.  Henderson,  who  has  just 
retui  ned  from  a  trip  to  the 
SoutT.  will  describe  his  observ- 
atioiis  in  Montgomery,  Ala., 
Atla  ita.  Ga.,  and  Tallahassee, 
Fla.]  Movies  of  the  bombed 
churches  and  homes  will  be 
show^n. 

Seek  SOAW 

Acrording  to  Rev.  E.  A.  An- 
derson, chairman  of  the  NAACP 
membership  committee,  divi- 
sion leaders  will  be  presented, 
ontinued  on   Page  3) 


Admits  Murder 

Threat  of  Gas 
Brings  Change 


When  the  prosecuting  attorhey  in  Long  Beach^^fT- 

death  sentence  at  the 


Chamber 
of  Hea 


day  insistehtly  demanded  the 
opening  of  the  trial  of  Ernest) Gibson,  charged  with 
murder,  the  defendant  hastily  ai^pealed  to  his  attorney. 
Earl  C.  Broady. 

Gibson  begged  Atty.  Broady 
to  save  him  from  the  gas 
chamber.   Although   up  to   that 


I  that 


Adair    street.     Police    claimed 


moment    the    33-year-old    man 
had  maintained  his  innocence, 
he   now   asked   that   he   be  al- 
lowed to  change  his  plea. 
Accopts  Plea 

The  court  accepted  a  plea  of 
murder  in  the  second  degree, 
dismissed  the  jury  that  had 
already  been  selected,  and  set 
March  29  as  the  date  for  sen- 
tencing. 

Gibson,  who  lived  at  1313  E. 
56th  street,  was  accused  of  the 
Christmas -night  stabbing  of 
Mrs.  Esther  Kay  Moore,  of  4043 


thre\r  his  companion  from  the 


car 

Fort 

haste 


state 

tim 

Upon 


ibiM 


■^  "•"- 


tammaSBJSiiisiiSiSSimSSaam 


taumse^a 


■Mtt&K^iM^Ba 


after  the  knifing.  Gibson 


qn  a  dark  street  outside  of 
MacArthur,    then    in    his 
to    make    his    get-away 
ran  Aver  both  of  her  legs. 
^potted  Woman's  Fonn 
A  Soldier  passing  by  spotted 
the  4'oman's  form  lyii^  on  the 
He  also  noted  a  car  speed* 
ing  away. 

Mrs.  Moore  was  taken  to  th« 
hospjtal     in     an     unconscious 
presumed  to  be  the  vie- 
of    a    hit-and-rmn    diiveR 
examination,  however,  tt 
(tontinued  on  P«fe  4)      . 


^.' 


y 


<.j 


.  ,■#  * 


^(■S, ^^^■^~— -(^  JL-"" ..  I",*,v^    f^  "I'"  ^y^ 


i-n 


•     r 


2-The  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


^  Message  of  Importance 


from 

Guiberson 


Biirk 


To  All  Property  Owners  Concerned  With  Subsurface  Oil  u^d  Gas 
Leases  in  the  West  Washington- West  Adams 


DO  NOT  SIGN  AN  OIL  OR  GAS  LEASE  with  any  com- 
pany, whatsoever,  until  you  have  been  clearly  shown 
the  TRUE  facts  regarding  the  percentage  of  lessors  in 
your  immediate  neighborhood. 


1' 


Area 

DO  NOT  BE  CONCERNED  with  unsubstantiated  per- 
centage  claims  made  by  oil  companies.  These  claims 
may  include  areas  several  miles  away  from  your  home 
and  not  be  ot  any  particular  consequence  to  you.  These 
claims  may  even  be  outside  of  the  entire  district! 


iTou  Should  Be  Vitally  Concerned  With  Subsurface  Oil  and  Gasf  Leases 

Signed  in  Tour  OWX  IMMEDIATE  IVEIGHBORHOOD 

IN  ORDER  TO  GET  THE  TRUE  FACTS, ...you  should..^ 

(1)  Know  the  names  of  your  neighbors  who  have  signed  leases  and  with  whom  they  have  signed. 

(2)  Actually  see  true  copies  of  these  signed  subsurface  oil  and  gas  leases. 

(3)  Make  sure  you  see  an  accurate  m^p  of  the  area  where  these  leases  were  signed. 


y 


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I 

I 
I 

I 
I 

If 

I 

I 
I 

I 
I 


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o 
m 

z 

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> 


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OLYMPIC 


P/co 


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> 


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■ 
I 


LEGE^U: 

COMPANY  "A"  «  —  -  >  - 
COMPANY  "B"  •    •     •     • 

GUIBERSON  &  BURKE  MAIN 
AREA  AS  SHOWN  IN  MAP 


aL 


GUIBERSON-BURKE  AREA 


1 


HI 


.IFe  cordially  invite  you  to  come  in  and  let  us  show  you  the  facts.. first  hand. 


GUIBERS 


6l  burke 


1     I 


BRANCH  OFFICES  AT  1847  SO.  WESTERN  (AT  WASHINGTON)  OPEN  7  DAYS  A  WEEK 

REpublic  1-8483  REpublic  4-8585 


! 


1 


♦-t??**^- 


IS 


;s 


1 

I 
I 


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SlCrS'  OIL  LLASh — Larr\  lliil,  initir,  disnisses  ml  htiu- 
he  h/!f  just  sianfii  uilh  Jtiri  Jiuiifs.  rep', sfrittitr,  i'  of  diii/ur- 
son  and  Hiirkr.   The  11  ills  li;  r  ut  2.\^7   II'.  2.hd  sir,,!.  I'ri.ni 


Ifft.  Virqil  Hill.  Mrs.  A li,e  Hill.  Larry  Hill  and  James,  uith 
John  Hill  qivina  his  dad  moral  support. — (Smith.) 


Golden  State  Picketed  by 
126  Fired  in  Union  Fight 


KSOJI  S  A  GOOD  THISG—Mrs.  Emily  Johnson,  presi- 
dent of  Consolidated  Realty  Board,  Inc..  is  about  to  sii/n  on 
the  dotted  line  for  Allen  d  uiherson,  president  of  (1  uiherson 
end  Burke,  on  a  lease  granting  suhsurjaee  oil  and  gas  drilling 
rights.  Mrs.  Johnson  oans  several  ralualile  pieies  of  properity 
in  the  ff'est  Adams  Hriijhts  area. —  /Smith.) 


'Look'  Quotes  Publisher  on 
Strides  in  Race  Relations 

NEW  YORK — A  prominent  lawyer  and  newspaper 
publisher,  Loren  Miller,  this  week  hailed  Los  Angeles, 
once  a  racial  trouble  spot,  for  the  great  strides  it  has 
made  in  race  relations.       " ,  iT  ".u"         ^  "x- 

■  Johnson    is    the    second    Negro 


Miller,    a    board    mennber    of, 


ever  to  hold   this  position. 


both  the  NAACP  and  the  Lrban,  .-^^  students  elected  me 
League,  and  publisher  of  the  „n,^-  because  of  the  issues  .  .  .1 
California  Eagle,  declared  in  y^ere  has  been  an  improve-  I 
the  new  issue  of  Look  Maga-  ^^p^j  j^  j^e  general  attitude.  ' 
7ine  that  Los  Angeles  is  now  gut  there  are  still  problems.  '• 
one  of  the  nations  leading  ,  g^d  none  of  us  should  be  com-  I 
cities  in  enlightened  race  and  piacent."  John.son  .said  in  Look.  ' 
community   relations.  ,  ;  j 

Miller  said  in  the  magazine:  '  C^b*   I^  UoI#I 
"There      are      many,      many    OOll   IS  nClu 
Tough    spots,    of    course,    but    I  I        (Continued  from  Page  1> 
regard    Los    Angeles    —    and    I    his    head"    and    began    beating 
thirTk  most  Negroes  regard  Los    Davis.    After    the    fight    Davis 
Angeles  —  as  one  of  the  better    was      unconscious.      His      wife 
cities   of   the   naiion."  bathed     his    wounds    and    put 

Miller's  .sentiments  were    him    to    bed. 
backed   by   21year-nld   Willard        The    next    day    he    was    still 
Johnson,    president    of    the   stvi-    unconscious,  .She  called   a   doc- 
dent    body    at    the    University    tor.   who   took    him    to   General 
of    California    at    Los    Ar^geles.  '  Hospital  where  he  died. 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 
the  company  suspended  the 
agents  as  of  Jan.  .31  but  con- 
tinued to  pay  them.  On  Feb. 
2.T  it  notified  the  union  and 
individual  agents  that  they 
would  be  ''terminated"  as  of 
March  1  unle.s.s  they  filled  out 
the  forms  as  directed.  They 
refused  and  the  firings  fol- 
lowed. 

"The  actions  of  the  company 
officers  and  management  per- 
.sonnel  in  dealing  with  the 
matters  involving  insubordina- 
tion of  agents  and  termination 
of  contracts  has  the  unanimous 
approval  of  the  Board  of  Di- 
rectors." George  A.  Beavers.  Jr., 
chairman  of  the  company 
board,  said  Tuesday. 

Collections   Drop 

Ike  Adams,  president  of  the 
Agency  Club  and  spokesman 
for  the  agents,  told  the  Eagle 
that  collections  on  industrial 
policies  had  dropped  .55  per 
cent  in  the  month  of  February 
and  predicted  a  further  drop 
in  the  ensuing  months  unless 
the   dispute   is   settled. 

Adams  said  that  the  union 
i.s  no  longer  seeking  arbitra- 
tion but  is  now  demanding  that 
the  Company  negotiate  with  it 
for  increased  commissions  to 
compensate  agents  for  the  ex- 
tra work  involved. 

'The  company  wants  the 
agents  to  do  a  bookkeeping 
job,"  Adams  said.  "If  we  are 
going  to  do  that  we  have  to 
be  paid  for  it  just  as  we  are 
now  paid  for  a  similar  job  in 
industrial  insurance  collec- 
tions." 

Has  170  Agents 

The  Golden  Slate  has  some 
170  agents,  about  140  of  whom 
were  members  of  the  Agency 
Club.  The  126  who  went  on 
strike  are  all  members  of  the 
club  and  are  employed  through- 
out  the  state. 

The  agents  this  week  ap- 
pealed to  poliiy  holders  to  call 


!  or  write  the  company  appro\ing 
the   stand    of   the    agents.   The 
I  company  said   that   it  expected 
\  collections   to  be  mailed  to  the 
home   offices   and    said   that    it 
i  is  now  filling  the  places  of  the 
'  men    who    are    no    longer    em- 
ployed. 


1001  DIFFERENT  BARGAINS! 

TOWX  FAIR 
BAZAAR 


I  YOUR  ONCE-A-YEAR  OPPORTUNITY  TO  BUY 

I  NEW,  NAME  BRAND  i 

'     •  CLOTHING  *  FURNITURE  *  GROCERIES  i 

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I  AT  BETTER-THAN-BARGAIN  PRICES!  • 

I  -  PLUS  -  I 

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CHILDREN'S  CARNIVAL  | 

SUNDAY,  MARCH  10,  11   A.M.  | 

STARTS  FRIDAY,  MAR.  8-6  P.M. 
THROUGH  MONDAY,  MARCH  11 

SPONSORED  BY  CENTRAL  JEWISH  COMMITTEE 
TO  BENEFIT  THE  CITY  OF  HOPE 

SHRINE  EXPOSITION  HALL,  700  WEST  32nd  STREET 
ADMISSION  15e 


once  in  a 
ceuturij  has 
50  fine  a  bourbon 


The  superb  quality  of  lighter,  milder 

86  Proof  Old  Crow  has  made  it 

America's  most  popular  bourbon! 


( 


KBNTUCKV  STRAiaHT  aOURSON  VI^HISKCV 
••    ^HOOF 

JOO  Proof  Bottttd  in  Bond 
available  oi  usual 


AB  WOW  oisniiorr  co.,FRAHKroRT.KY.,  distributed  B^T.oiST.nwacoup, 


Dr.  Hill  Attends 
Nat'l  Meet  on 
Hospital  Bias 

Dr.  Julius  W.  Hill  of  1242  W. 
Jefferson  Blvd.  hsrs  been  cho.sen 
by  the  Charles  Drew  Medical 
Society  as  their  representative 
to  the  Imhotep  National  Con- 
ference on  Hospital  Integra- 
tion meeting  which  is  to  he 
held  in  Wa.^hinc;tnn.  D.C.  March 
9.  Dr.  Hill,  orthopedic  surgeon 
and  a  recent  graduate  of  the 
Los  Angeles  County  General 
Hospital  where  he  interned  and 
did  his  residency  in  orthopedic 
surgery,  will  be  the  lone  rep- 
resentative to  the  meeting  from 
Southern  California. 

The  sponsors  of  the  meeting 
are:  The  National  Medical  As- 
.sociation.  the  NAACP  and  the 
Medico-Chirurgical  Society  of 
the  District  of  Columbia. 

Dr.  Howard  to  Speak 

The  purpose  of  the  confer- 
ence is  to  get  first  hand  infor- 
mation from  various  regions  of 
the  country  on  the  current 
status  of  integration  in  hospi- 
tals of  both  staff  and  patient, 
and  through  cooperation,  study 
and  understanding  to  recom-, 
mend  positive  remedial  pro- 
grams. 

Dr.  W.  Montague  Cohb  is 
chairman.     Brief   addresses   for 


Goal  of  50,000 
I  NAACP  Head 

(Continued  from  Page  1> 
;  as  well  as  details  of  the  drive. 
j  Rev.  Anderson  said:  "We  seek  • 
'  4.5.000  members  for  the  L.  A. 
I  branch  .and  .5.000  for  our  adopt- 
I  ed  branch.  New  Orleans.  We 
j  must  meet  our  quota  if  the 
i  association  is  to  rejnain  effec- 
I  live. 

I      "We  know  our  enemy  is  well 
organized    and    well    financed. 
It    is   imperative  that  we  com- 
pel   all    right-thinking    citizens 
j  in    the    community    to   join    us 
j  in   this  great   effort."  i 

1      Rev.  Ander.son  explained  that  ' 
i  .5.000  volunteers  are   needed   in 
the    drive,    and    urged    all    per- 
I  sons   to   call   the   NAACP   office. 
:  4261  S.  Central  avenue. 
'      Music    for    the    meeting    will 
be  directed  by  Miss  Doris  Nor- 
\ell.    The    Bffl    Vue    Communit\-  '< 
I  Chancel     Choir    will     give    two  i 
I  musical  .selections. 

Atty.  Loren  Miller,  chairman 
of     the     executive     committee, 
I  will    serve    as    master    of    cere- 
'  monies. 

Mrs.  Tarea  Hall  Pittman..' 
N.AACP  regional  field  secretary. "^ 
will  direct  the  campaign.. 

A  special  meeting  for  NAACP 
membership    workers     will  ,  be 
held  Sunday  March  10  at  3  pVn. 
at     the     Zion     Hill  ~  Fellowship 
Hall.  51st  and  McKinlev'  avenue. 
j      Mrs.    Anne    O'Ferrall    is    co- 
chairman  of  the  drive. 
I      Mrs.   Rosa  King,  co-chairman 
I  of  the  Membership  Committee, 
i  is     arranging      lunch     for    the 
Campaigners. 


ATTh.SDS~Dr.,  Juli.;^    If. 
Hill,   r,  pretenttnti    the    Ch.irles' 
Drexi      .Midiiiil    Soiietw     uill 
attend  muting  in  If  asliiii//ton 
on    hospital  integration. 

the  sponsoring  organizations 
uill  be  gi\en  h\-  Dr.  T.  R.  M. 
Howard,  president  of  the  Na- 
tional Medical  A.ssociation.  Roy 
Wilkins.  executive  secretarv  of 
the  NAACP.  and  Dr.  Edward  C. 
Mazique,  president  of  the  Medi- 
cn-Chirurgiral  Society.  Dr.  Rob- 
ert S.  Jason,  dean  nf  Meharrv 
Medical   College,  will   speak. 

A  lealflet  sent  to  dnctor.s^ 
throughout  the  United  Slates 
slated: 

Negroes  Left  to  Die 

"Despite  recent  advances  in" 
the  elimination  of  racial  bar- 
riers in  many  health  area.«— 
notablv.  medical  schools,  medi- 
cal so<.-ieties.  nurses  organiza- 
tions and  many  hospitaN.  both 
tax  supported  and  volui:tary— 
colored  Americans  as  a  whole 
are  still  not  able  to  enioy  the 
full  advantages  which  our 
great  hospital  .<ystem  affords. 
This  applies  to  both  patients 
and  profes.<:ional  and  r.'inpro- 
fessional  per.sonnel,  aid  to 
nearly  all  sections  of  the  coun- 
trv." 


YOUTHS  ORCASTlt  —  Young  people  of  the  Southern 
California  area  organized  an  Area  Youth  Conference  at  the 
y>AACP  regional  eonferenee  held  in  Bi', reside.  Shoun  uilh 
If  est  Con<t  Regional  Seeretary-Counscl  Franklin  Ji'illiams, 
right,  are,  from  lelt.  Lorraine  Adkinson,  Las  J  egas.  secretary ; 
Amos  Isnae.  San  Bernardino,  f  lee-ehairman :  If  illtam  Simms, 
Santa  Barhara.  ehnirnian,  and  Ruby  Boiiie,'  Los  Angeles, 
assistant  seeretary., 

M.i.„  Anders^.  Picked 
Among  'Most  Beautifur 

NEW  YORK — Famed  contralto  Marian  Anderson 
ha.s  been  named  one  of  the  world's  four  truly  beautiful 
women  by  the  interjiational  star,  Marlene  Dietrich. 

The    actress,    writing    in    the.- ■ — 

current  issue  of  McCall's  mag- 
azine, said  that  Miss  .Anderson 
is  one  rif  those  select  women 
who  have  that  rare  inner  beau- 
ty that  is  essential  to  be  truly 
beautiful    and    happy. 

Marlene  Dietrich  de«rTihed 
Miss  Anderson,  who  holds  the 
distinction  of  being  the  first 
Negro  to  sine  in  the  Metropoli- 
tan Opera  Hou«e,  as  "a  dedi- 
cated human  being  who  seems 
to  have  a  mission  and  is' 
aware  of  it  ...  I  do  not  know 
Marian  Anderson:  I  do  not  have 
to.  Her  inner  beauty  shines  not 
only  in  her  voice:  but  her  face 
tells  it,  and  her  eyes.'' 

Miss  Dietrich's  other  selec- 
tions for  the  world's  most  beau- 
tiful women,  which  are  pub- 
lished in  her  article.  "The  Dan- 
ger of  Being  Beauriful.''  in  Mc- 
Call's. include  socialite  Betsy 
Cushing  Whitney;  French  night 
club  singer  Edith  Piaf:  and  the 
late  Italian  actre.ss,  Eleanora 
Duse. 


The  Calrfomw  Eagle— 3^ 
Thorsday,  March  7,  1957 

Foresight 

Car  Thieves 
Take  to  Heels 
As  Siren  Wails 

Robert  B.  Heller,  a  salesman 
who  lives  at  4303  Beeman  ave- 
nue. Studio  City,  is  listed  on 
the  police  blotter  as  the  victim 
of  an  attempted  burglary  Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

But  he  didn't  get  hurt  nor 
was  he  robbed. 

A  newsboy  on  the  corner  of 
Maple  avenue  at  the  1000  blocl^ 
saw  two  men  prjing  open  »" 
windwin^  on  Heller's  two-tone 
Chevrolef.  He  was  about  to  do 
something  about  it  when  he 
heard  a  police  siren. 

At  the  sound  of  the  ominous 
wail,  the  two  would-be  thieves 
took  to  their  heels  and  by^th- 
time   Heller  dashed   out  of  th^ 
building  at  1024  S.  Maple  ave- 
nue, 4hey  were  long  gone. 

What  the  robbers  didn't 
know  was  that  it  wasn't  a  po- 
lice car  at  all.  Heller  had  hadi 
the  foresight  to  have  an  alam^ 
system  installed  in  his  car. 
When  the  windwing  was  pried 
open,  the  screeching  alarnf 
went  off. 


Frank  Barnes 
Re-elected  Area 
NACAP  Head 

The  annual  election  of  the 
-NAACP  Southern  Area  Confer- 
ence was  held  Saturd-ay.  Feb- 
ruary ,2.'?.  at  the  first  quarterly 
meeting  of  IP.'T  in  Riverside.      : 

Officers   elected   for  the  com-  ] 
ing   vear   are:    President.   Frank  , 
H.  Barnes.  Northride.  re-elected: 
fifst    vice-president.    Percy   .An- 
derson.    Long     Beach:     second 
vice-president.  Lillie  Montgom-  , 
ery.   Palmdale.  re-elected:  third 
vice-president.    Latinee   Gullat- 
tee.    Santa    Barhara:    treasurer,  i 
Wililam   F.   Anderson.   Los   .An- 
geles:   secretarv.    Mary    Ecken- 
rode.  Los  .Angeles,  reelected. 

The  .Southern  .Area  Confer- 
ence consists  of  24  N.AACP 
branches  in  Southern  California  " 
and  Las  Vegas.  Nevada.  There 
were  1.52  delegates  from  IS 
branches  present.  i 


LOS  ANGELES 

race 

relations 

r 

success 
story 


How  is  Los  Angeles  showing  the  rest  of  the  country-  how 
race  relations  can  be  successfully  handled?  What  concrete 
reasons  have  made  the  hatred,  tear,  suspicion  and  mis- 
understanding all  hut  e^aporate  in  the  past  10  years?  Read 
this  i*<ue  of  LOOK  Magazine  for  this  report  on  the 
h\iman  side  of  integration.  Learn  of  the  major  part  played 
hv  !ad;o  <ration  K.N.X  in  thi<  cru-ade.  .And  find  out 
what  vet  has  to  be  done.  Don't  miss  the  answers  in 
LOOK. 

I 


Today  get 


LOOK 


MIKE  GORDON 


MIKE  GORDON  SAYS:  "It's  Our  Birthday 
and  You  Are  Invited  to  Share  in  Our 

Celebration" 

MIKE'S  SHOE-O-RAMA'S  FIRST 

Anniversary  Sale 

MARCH  7th  through  16th 

YOU  CANT  AFFORD  TO  MISS  THESE 
TREMENDOUS  VALUES! 


'•  MEN'S  SHOES 

176  pairs  of  every  description 

•   BIG  BOYS'  FAVORITES 

1^4  pairs  at  bargain  prices 


LADIES'  HIGHEST  STYLES 
300  pairs  in  newest  colors 

GIRLS'  FINEST  FOOTWEAR 

1 50  pairs  for  keen  teen-agers 


•   CHILDREN'S  CHOICE  PAHERNS 
'225  prs.  all  sizes  and  colors  for  young  boys  and  girls' 


EXTRA  LARGE  &  EXTRA  SMALL  SIZES!   WE  INVITE  THE  HARD-TO-FIT  FOOT! 

MIKE'S  SHOE- O- RAMA  * 


Finest  Shoes  for  the  Entire  Famliy 

2614-16  CRENSHAW 


RL5-8542 


■-^i^aami^ 


i  .- 


■-#~w  ^  .*.re  iiifc.Brfi  ■ifrr-.T^,. 


4— The  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  March  7,   1957 


VAVAtfAVAVAV*V*tAV*T*ll*V«*WAt«V«At*t«AVAt*Virorv. 


California  Sagle 

Loren  Miller,  Publisher 

Th*  l«gU  stcmii*  for  cempl«t«  integration  nf  N«f r«M  into  ovory 
photo  of  Amoricon  lifo  through  tho  domocrotic  proeoMOS. 

We  favor: 

1.  FIPC  on  local,  stoto  and  notional  lovol*. 

2.  Docont  housing  for  oil  Amoricons. 

3.  Roprotontotion  In  Govornmont. 

4.  Adoquoto  old  ago  ponsiens  and  social  socurity. 

5.  Colloctivo  bargaining  rights  for  all  workmon. 

4.  Dovolopmont  and  oneouragomont  of  Nogro  businoss. 

We  oppose: 

1.  Jim  Crow  in  all  forms. 

2.  Communists  and  all  ether  onomios  of  domocrocy. 


^ubl'shod  Evory  Thursdsry 
1050  East  43rd  Ploco,  Los  Angolos  11 


AO.  4-0161 


c/Ac  K^mportant  ^yXewspap 


cy 


Oil  and  Rumors  of  Oil 


Mention  the  word  "oil"  to  the 
average  property  owner  and  he  is 
at  once  caught  up  in  a  vision  of 
vast  riches.  He  can  close  his  eyes 
and  see  a  gusher  in  his  back  yard 
and  raining  golden  dollars/all  over 
front  room,  dining  room,  bedroom, 
kitchen  and  bath. 

Or  he  remembers  Uncle  Ned  or 
Aunt  Mary  who  lived  back  in  Okla- 
homa or  Texas  and  who  retired 
when  they  "brought  in  oil"  on  the 
family  farm. 

There's  another  side  of  the  pic- 
ture, too.  Mr.  Property  Owner  re- 
calls stories — all  too  true — of  the 
swindlers  and  worse  who  descend- 
ed on  southern  communities  and 
induced  illiterate  and  semi-literate 
Negroes  to  sign  innocent-looking 
papers  which  turned  out  to  be 
deeds  giving  away  oil  rights.  Or 
he  recalls  how  fast-talking  sales- 
men induced  other  Negroes  to  sell 
their  oil  rights  for  messes  of  pot- 
tage. 

These  two  conflicting  attitudes 
are  at  work  in  the  West  Adams 
areas  these  days  as  oil  companies 
are  trying  to  get  leases  from  prop- 
erty owners  in  that  area.  Truth 
to  tell,  these  oil  leases  are  pretty 
formidable  documents  with  about 
six  pages  of  fine 


$••  Your 
Lawyer 
Before  You 
Sign 


print  that  is  so 
much  gibberish 
to  the  average 
man.  The  prop- 
erty owner  who 
wants  the  riches  that  he  hopes  will 
spout  out  of  his  back  yard  doesn't 
know  whether  to  sign  or  not.  We 
■wouldn't  dare  to  advise  anybody 
whether  he  should  or  should  not 
sign  an  individual  lease.  That's  up 
to  the  lawyers. 

However,  when  these  leases  are 
stripped  of  all  their  legal  mumbo- 
jumbo  what  emerges  is  the  fact 
that  rival  oil  companies  are  in  a 
race  to  lease  property  in  the  area 
between  Olympic  boulevard  on  the 
north  and  Jefferson  boulevard  on 
the  south  and  between  Vermont 
avenue  on  the  east  and  La  Brea  on 
the  west.  They  figure  there's  oil 
there. 

It  stands  to'reason  that  nobody 
is  going  to  drill  a  well  on  each  in- 
dividual lot.  The  law  wouldn't  per- 
mit that  even  if  the  companies 
wanted  to  do  it.  What  the  com- 
panies propose  is  to  pool  ail  lots  in 
the  area  in  40-acre  parcels.  Two 
wells    could    then 


the  oil  for  the  property  owners  in 
some  cases  and  one-fifth  in  others. 

No  one  property  owner  gets  all 
of  that  one-sixth  or  one-fifth.  It 
is  divided  up  between  all  of  the 
owners  in  the  parcel..  Suppose,  for 
example,  there  were  60  individual 
owners  of  lots  of  the  same  size  in 
the  parcel.  Each  owner  would  get 
one-sixtieth  of  the  one-sixth  inter- 
est or  one-fifth  reserved  for  the 
property  owners. 

Oil  leases  don't  interfere  with 
the  owner's  use  of  the  property.  He 
still  has  complete  control  of  his  lot 
down  to  a  depth  of  500  feet  and 
since  most  of  us  don't  get  that  far 
down  the  lease'  won't  make  a  bit 
of  difference  in  our  daily  lives. 

That's  about  how  the  matter 
shapes  up.  Some  of  the  oil  com- 
panies are  offering  more  than  oth- 
ers for  the  original  signatures  on 
the  lease  and  for  yearly  rentals, 
but  at  best  those  sums  don't 
amount  to  much.  The  real  hope  of 
making  anything  lies  in  the  gam- 
ble that  oil  will  be  discovered. 

And,  there's  one  more  thing.  No 
company  can  drill  until  it  gets  51 
per  cent  of  the  signatures  in  a  par- 
ticular parcel.  When  51  per  cent 
of  the  owners  have  signed,  other 
owners  can  share  in  the  oil  that  is 
produced  by  join- 


Company 
Must  Get 
51   Per  Cent 
to  Drill 


ing  the  lease  on 
the  same  basis  as 
the  original  51 
per  cent.  The 
only  gimmick  is 
that  those  who  have  signed  a  rival 
lease  can't  get  in  on  the  oil  pro- 
duction unless  the  company  with 
which  they  have  signed  surrenders 
its  rights  to  the  outfit  that  got  the 
.51   per  cent   of  the  signers. 

That's  all  we  know.  We  leave 
the  rest  to  the  lawyers.  We  don't 
know  who  has  and  who  hasn't  got 
the  required  51  per  cent  in  any 
particular  parcel.  All  we  know  on 
that  score  is  that  the  air  is  filled 
with  claims  and  counter-claims 
which  will  bear  investigation  by  the 
individual  lot  owner. 

P.S.:  We  don't  know,  either, 
whether  you  will  get  rich  if  you 
sign  a  lease.  Our  geologist  friends 
tell  us  that  it  all  depends  on  the 
size  of  the  well,  the  size  of  your 
lot,  the  quality  of  the  oil  and  the 
state  of  the  mar- 


Royalties 
Divided 
Between 
Owners 


be  drilled  for  each 
40-acre  parcel 
and  all  lot  own- 
ers within  the 
parcel  would 
share  in  the  oil  produced. 

Property  owners  don't  get  all  of 
the  oil,  of  course.  Th6  company 
that  invests  the  money  to  do  the 
drilling  and  conserving  the  oil  gets 
mx)st  of  it.  Leases  being  circulat- 
ed in  the  area  reserve  one-sixth  of 


We  Sure 
Wish  We 
Had  An 
Oil  Well 


ket  when,  as,  and 
if  oil  is  found. 
We  do  know  that 
there  are  a  sub- 
stantial number 
of  lots  in  a  40-acrc  parcel  and  that 
if  two  wells  are  brought  in  on  each 
such  parcel  they  will  have  to  be 
pretty  darned  good  wells  to  rain 
many  dollars  on  the  individual  lot 
owner. 

P.P.S.:  We  sure  wish  we  had 
an  oil  well.  Or  at  least  that  we 
owned  a  lot  in  an  area  w  here  some- 
body was  going  to  drill  an  oil  well. 


LeUs  Beat  Detroit 


The  Detroit  NAACP  is  bragging 
ajl  over  the  nation  about  the  fact 
that  it  has  a  membership  of  18,316. 
That's  a  pretty  good  figure  but  we 
hope  that  Detroit's  leadership  in 
the  NAACP  doesn't  last  very  long. 

The  reason  for  that  hope  is  that 


we  want  the  Los  Angeles  branch 
to  do  even  better. 

The  Los  Angeles  quota  this  y^ar 
is  .50,000. 

We  know  that  you  will  join  and 
we  hope  that  you  will  get  your 
neighbor's  name  on  the  dotted  line. 


Political  Spotlight 


,\f\.f\l\I\l\lXf\t\t\l\ 


\ 


By  OBSERVER  iAOAWAO«»AO.Wi»AWiWAO^ 


POULSON   SUPPORTED  day  by  Yeakel.  with  Reave  F. 

Scores  of  outstanding  leaders  Nichols,   past  departnient  com- 

of  the  Negro  community  in  Los  mander     of    the    Veterans    of 

Angeles    have    formed    an    or-  Foreign  Wars,  serving  as  chair- 

ganization  to  campaign  for  the  *   man. 

reelection      of     Mayor     Norris  Nichols,     long     a     nationally 

Poulson    and    will    put   especial  -known    leader    in    veterans*    af- 

emphasis  on  their  drive  in  the  fairs,  is  secretary  of  the  power- 

55th.  62nd   and  63rd   assembly  ful    Veterans    Political    League 


districts. 

This  was  announced  by 
Edward  A.  Hawkins,  campaign 
manager  for  the  area,  who  said 
that     campaign      headquarters 


and  has  served  as  secretary  of 
the  American  Legion  Luncheon 
Club  for  11  years.  He  organized 
and  was  commander  of  the 
Santa  Fe  American  Legion  Post 


would    be   opened    March    1    at      573  and  was  a  founder  and  de- 


4251 'i   Avalon  Blvd.  Assembly- 
»-  man     Augustus      F.      Hawkins, 
.brother  of  Edward  A.  Hawkins 
/will  be  campaign  director. 

The  executive  committee  for 
.'  the  campaign  in  the  Negro 
community  includes  the  follow- 
ing prominent  citizens:  Clyde 
Broadnax.  Roger  Q.  Mason, 
Paul  R.  Williams.  John  Lamar 
Hill,  George  Vaughn.-  Erskine 
Ragland.  Herbert  Greenwood, 
Charles  Fielding.  Norman  Hous- 
ton, Mai  Whitfield.  Albert  Mad- 
dox.  G.  W.  Stafford  Smith,  Df. 
Dickerson   Hawkins. 

Leon  M.  Giles,  Loren  Miller, 
Elbert  Hudson,  Dr.  L.  L.  "Hollo- 
man,  Wyman  Stanle\-.  George 
Beavers.  Earl  C.  Broady,  Mrs. 
Emily  Johnson,  Waiter  Gordon, 
Clinton  Arnold,  L.  M.  Blodgett, 
Dr.    P.    Price    Cobbs,    Dr,    J.  A. 

SomerviMe. 

•     *     « 

FUNDS  FOR  TEACHERS 

Nearly  75  percent  of  the 
funds  sought  in  Propositions 
B  and  C  will  he  used  to  em- 
ploy teachers  for  Los  ,\ngeles 
.schools,  Glenn  E.  Carter,  trea- 
-surer  of  the  Support  Our 
Schools  Committee  and  assist- 
ant vice  president  of  the  Bank 
of  America,  announced  this 
week. 

The  new  income  will  make 
it  possible  to  hire  an  additional 
1000  tochers  needed  this  year 
for  new  classrooms  of  elemen- 
tary and  junior  and  senior 
high  schools.  Carter  said.* 


partment  commander  of  the 
Veterans  of  World  War  I.  He 
is   legislative  chairman   of   the 

latter  organization. 

*     *     * 

SUPPORTS  RICHARDSON 

.  Esker  Harris,  All-Coast  guard 
on  last  year's  UCLA  football 
team  and  a  brilliant  student 
as  well,  today  urged  the  elec- 
tion of  Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof  and 
Dr.  Ralph  Richardson  to  the 
Los  Angeles  Board  of  Educa- 
tion. 

Mrs.  Tinglof,  community  lead- 
er, i.s  running  for  Board  office 
No.  2,  and  Dr.  Richardson, 
UCLA  Professor,  is  campaign- 
ing for  Board  office  No.  6. 

'The  Los  Angeles  education- 
al system  is  suffering  from  a 
number  of  serious  problems- 
overcrowded  classrooms,  half- 
day  sessions,  a  shortage  of 
qualified  teachers  and  a  lack 
of  guidance  and  counseling 
facilities  for  emotionally  di.*;- 
turbed  youngsters,  to  name  but 

a    few,"    Harris   declared. 

^     *     » 

Back  Rubbish  Collection 

A.  J.  Gock.  civic  and  busi- 
ness leader,  today  pledged  his 
support  to  Proposition  A,  the 
municipal  rubbish  collection 
referendum  on  the  .April  2  bal- 
lot which  already  has  gained 
stronjr  city-wide  endor.sement. 

Gock  called  municipal  rub- 
bish collection  "one  of  the  steps 
forward  which  we  must  take 
if  our  city  is  to  continue  to 
grow."  He  deplored  the  fact 
that  Los  Angeles  is  one  of  the 
few  large  cities  in  the  nation 
still  relying  on  archaic  and 
hazardous  methods  of  refuse 
disposal. 


VETS  FOR  YEAKEL 

Formation  of  a  Veterans' 
Committee  to  Elect  Bob  Yeakel 
Mayor  was   announced   yester- 

Battleaxe  &  Bread 

By  Lmsttr  B.  Granger 


Grongar 


A«  1  dictate  this  column  1  am 
mentally  lumping  feverishly 
ahead  of  my  subject.  I'm  think- 
ing ruefully  of  the  few  hours 
that  remain  before  my  wife  and 
lemplane  for  the  Gold  Coast — 
of  the  numerous  jobs  that 
should  have  been  done  and 
now  cannot  be  done  before  I 
leave,  as  well  as  of  the  exciting 
vista  of  progress  that  stretches 
before  us. 

Curicuisly  enough,  the  fact  of 
my  own  Gold  ('nasi  ancestr>' 
had  np\  er  meant  much  to  me 
imtil  now.  My  father's  great- 
grandfather came  unwillingly 
from  that  ro\in- 
tr\-  to'  Barbados 
in  what  is  now 
the  British 
West  Indies. 
He  was  a  slave, 
as  was  his  son. 
His  son's  son 
was  born  a  free 
man  and  served 
in  the  British 
constabulary. 
My  father  left 
Barbados  at  the  age  of  15  as  a 
ship's  cabin  boy.  He  left  the 
ship  in  Philadelphia  ten  years 
after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War 
and  began  a  new  life  that  was 
to  be  extraordinarily  fruitful 
and  satisfying. 

Compute  Cycle 

Now  my  father's  son  com- 
pletes the  cycle  in  my  return 
t«  the  Gold  Coast.  .\nd  com- 
pletes the  historical  cvcle  as 
well;  for  that  Gold  Coast  which 
was  a  way-station  for  slavery 
has  now  achieved  its  own  free- 
dom and  is  the  bright  promise 
of  similar  freedom  for  tens  of 
millions  of  Africa's  exploited 
darker  people. 

But  enough  of  philosophy. 
The  exciting  fact  as  I  write  is 
that  I  leave  on  the  next  day 
with  an  impressive  group  of 
fellow  Americans  who  will  help 
to  comprise  what  is  probably 
the  largest  delegation  of  Amer- 
icans ever  to  visit  Africa  on 
other  than  a  military  mission. 
Plane  Won't  Wait 
The  Vice  President  of  the 
United  States  will  take  off  in 
a  plane  an  hour  ahead  of  our 
party.  He  will  be  followed  by 
two  plane  loads  of  newspaper 
reporters  and  publishers.  Before 
and  after  them  will  come 
streaming  Americans  of  various 
skin  color,  positions  of  wealth 
and  of  public  prominence,  but 
all  of  them  together  in  one  con- 
viction that  the  establishment 
of  Ghana  as  the  first  Negro  na- 
tion in  the  British  common- 
weal t  h  is  important  to  the 
people  of  the  entire  British 
Commonwealth  and  to  freedom- 
aspiring  peoples  the  world  over. 


Sorry.  I've  got  to  go.  That 
plane  wont  wait.  Mrs.  Baird, 
yrtu  take  it  from  here. 

P.S.  from  Mrs.  Baird:  The 
plane  <iidn't  have  to  wait— for 
present  and  on  time  were  those 
fortunates  scheduled  to  take  in 
this  important  friends  -  making 
mission,  including  a  number  of 
persons  already  well  kBown  for 
their  interest  in  domestic  af- 
fairs and  now  showing  an  ex- 
pander! interest  in  international 
relations.  We  stay-ai  homes 
could  do  no  more  than  wave 
longinglx-  as  Pan  American's 
Flight  152  soared  into  the  blue, 
and  silcntl>'  pra\'  for  a  safe.trip 
and  a  thoroughly  successful  ex- 
perience. 


50,000  Cheer 
Ghana  Freedom 

'Continued  from  Page  11 
U.  S.  representative  on  the  U.  N.^ 
Trusteeship  Council,   and  Pres-1 
ident    Horace    Mann    Bond    of! 
Lincoln  University. 

Significont 

The  achievement  of  inde- 
pendence by  Ghana  is  regard- 
ed^ in  many  quarters  as  poten- 
tially one  of  the  most  signifi- 
cant to  take  place  in  Africa  in 
modern  tirnes  and  its  impact  is 
already  heing^elt  elsewhere  in 
the  continent.  South  Africa  is 
among  the  countries  which 
^ere  to  be  represented  at  the 
ceremonies. 

Nationhood  came  to  Ghana 
(the  name  is  taken  from  an 
ancient  African  kingdom  that 
flourished  for  nine  centuries  in 
the  West  African  interior)  ex- 
actly 113  years  after  the  legal- 
ization of  British  authority, 
nine  years  after  the  politically 
pivotal  march  on  the  British 
governor's  residence  in  Chris- 
tianborg  Castle,  and  six  years 
after  the  release  of  Kwame 
<  "The  Man")  Nkrumah  from 
prison  so  he  could  become  the 
leader  of  government  business 
rather  than  serve  out  a  sen- 
tence for  activities  which  had 
up  to  then  been  regarded  as 
seditious. 


County  Hospital 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
had   fallen   out    of    bed.     She 
complained  of  a  severe  head- 
ache.    She  died  the  following 
evening  at  8:15  p.m. 

Mrs.  Johnson  is  survived  by 
a  (Viughter,  Mrs.  Katherine 
Green,  2682  L  street,  Saii  Diego. 

Funeral  services  are  being 
held  from  the  chapel  of  the 
Angelus  Funeral  Home  at  10 
a.m.  Friday  morning. 


1  I 

A  New  Nation  iis  Born 


=^ 


LETTERS 

to  the  editor 


Oil  Companies 
Woo  Westsiders 


^. 


To  the  Editor: 

The  Joint  Recruitment  Project 
for  Minority  Adoptive  Homes  is 
beginning,  to  feel  that  some 
real  progress  is  being  made  in 
trying  to  .secure  adoptive  homes 
for  over'  2.50  children  of  mi- 
riority  backgrounds.  To  date 
over  300  applications  have  been 
made  as  a  result  of  the  adop- 
tive home  drive  which  began 
January  10,  1957. 

The  California  Eagle  was 'one 
of  the  leading  papers  which 
helped  spearhead  this  drive 
with  a  series  on  Minority  Adop- 
tion. As  a  result  of  their  ef- 
forts, the  futures  of  these  chil- 
dren are  beginning  to  look 
bright.  Many  of  these  children 
will  soon  have  homes  of  their 
own  with  familes  to  love  and 
share  their  affection. 

The  lack  of  adoptive  homes 
was  the  problem  that  existed 
in  Los  Angeles.  It  was  present- 
ed to  the  public  for'their  !«>on- 
rern,  consideration  and  .solu- 
tion. The  readers  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Eagle  could  choos^  to 
ignore  it  or  meet  the  challf^nge. 
Your  overwhelming  response 
proves  that  the  public  is  ihter- 
ested  in  these  children  and  will 
meet  the  challenge  by  seeing 
that  every  child   has   a   home. 

Although  progress  is  bping 
made  rapidly,  children  are  be- 
ing given  up  continuallj^  by 
their  parents  for  adoption.  The 
need  for  adoptive  parents  is 
still   critical   and   necessary. 

For  the  wonderful  coopera- 
tion in  only  a  short  period-  of 
time,  the  Joint  Recruititient 
Project  pxprei-ses  sincere  j  ap- 
preciation for  the  service  you 
have  rendered  the  rhildreh  of 
your  community.  In  addi|tion, 
the  Eagle's  st.aff  has  our  con- 
gratulations for  a  tremenflous 
joh  well  done.  I 

"Adoption  for  these  rhilriren 
will  mean  happine.'^s  for  you 
and  for  them." 

!    JUDSON  C.   HIXSON  JR., 

Project  Worker. 
'     Joint  Recruitment  Project 
for  Minority  Adoptive 
Homes. 


City  Council 
Seeks  Probe  of 
'V  Car  Crash 

The  City  Council  last  Wed- 
nesday instructed  the  City's 
Public  Utilities  and  Transpor- 
tation Department  to  study;  the 
cause  of  the  accident  in  which 
a  streetcar  jumped  the  tr&cks 
at  Vernon  avenue  and  Hdover 
street,  crashed  into  a  shop  and 
injured  37  persons. 

•The  motion,  which  was  made 
by  Councilman  Gordon  Hahn. 
requested  the  city  department 
to  work  with  the  California 
Public  Utilities  Commission  on 
regulatory  measures  designed 
to  eliminate  the  po.ssibility  of 
such  accidents  in  the  future. 


Admits  Murder 

(Continued  from  Page  1^ 
was    discovered     that     a     deep 
knife  wound    in   the   left  chest 
was  the  cause  of  death. 

Mrs.  Moore,  the  mother  of 
Mrs.  Doris  Potts,  6.30  E.  29th 
street,  had  allegedly  been 
keeping  company  with  Gibson 
for  several  years  and  at  one 
time  had  been  living  wifhjiim. 
Their  relationship,  however, 
had  reportedly  been  a  stormy 
one.  Gibson  is  said  to  have  cut 
Mrs.  Moore  on  two  previous  oc- 
casions. She,  in  turn,  allegedly 
threw  lye  in  Gibson's  face  dur- 
ing one  of  their  arguments. 


^Continued  from  Page  1) 
and  "that  means  that  they  are 
serious  and  are  ready  to  drill." 
Rivals,  she  scoffed,  want  ten 
year  leases  "so  they  can  hold 
the  oil    in    reserve." 

Miss  Clark  also  pointed  with 
some  prrde  to  the  fact  that 
Guiberson-Bupke  has  employed 
her  firm  for  "public  relations 
and  advertising  on  a  cit\-wide 
basis,  not  just  in  the  Negro 
community."  More  than  that, 
she  says,  they  have  employed 
Hugh  Mac  Beth  as  counsel  for 
the  operation  and  have  em- 
ployed two  Negro  lease  men. 
That  means,  she  says  with  a 
flourish,  that  her  employer  is 
interested  in  the  community. 
Union  Clainv 

Union  Oil  spokesmen  weren't 
a  bit  more  bashful  than  Miss 
Clark.  True  enough,  they're 
only  Oii'^ring  a  16*3  percent 
royalty.  Union  said,  but'  they 
pointed  with  more  than  a  min- 
imum of  pride  to  the  fact  it  is 
"the  only  (ompan.\'  (iirrently 
leasing  in  the  area  which  mar- 
kets products  Ihrougli  iis  man\' 
neighborhood  service  si.itions. 
and  in  addition  is  engaged  in 
exploration,  production  and  re- 
fining. Unions  policy  of  good 
public  relations  must  be  main- 
tained whether  we  are  selling 
gasoline  at  service  stations  or 
whether  operating  under  an  oil 
and  gas  lease." 

Signal  Oil  company  also  has 
an  interesting  story  to  tell  and 
is  anxious  that  residents  should 
have  a  clear  understanding  of 
what  is  involved. 

Union  Is  .seeking  leases  in 
the  area  between  Vermont  on 
the  east.  La  Brea  on  the  West; 
Olympic  on  the  north,  and  Jcf- 
fer.son  on  the  South,  Guibcrsnn- 
Burke  has  marked  off  an  area 
between  Olympic  on  the  north, 
Adams  on  the  South  and  be- 
tween 4th  avenue  on  the  west 
and  Normandie  on  the  east. 
Tug    of    War 

The  real  gimmick  in  the  tug 
of  war  between  the  rival  oil 
companies  is  that  no  concern 
can  drill-  in  a  particular  area 
until  it  gets  ,51  per  cent  of  the 
owners  signed  up.  Then,  and 
only  then,  can  it  apply  to  City 
Council  for  a  permit.  Union  Oil 
has  divided  the  area  into  40 
acr^  plots  and  now  claims  that 
it  has  .51  per  cent  of  the  leases 
in  nine. of  those  tracts.  It  waved 
a  notarized  affidavit  to  prove 
that   very  point. 

Guiberson-Burke  which  has 
marked  off  55  acre  parcels 
claims  to  have  51  per  cent  of 
the   signers    in   one   such    area. 

Where    one    concern    gets    51 

Smiling  Robber 

(Continued  from  Page  D 
Carr  to  put  the  loot  in  a  paper 
bag. 

Holding  the  bagjin  one  hand, 
the  gun  in  the  other,  he  backed 
away  and  out  the  rear  door. 
Just  as  he  was  leaving,  he  re- 
marked: "Gentlemen,  I  hope 
you  all  have  a  nice  crap  game, 
but  please  have  more  money 
next  time." 

Had   Accomplice 

The  suave  gentleman  had  an 
accomplice.  While  he  was  op- 
erating inside,  another  man, 
also  polite,  was  standing 
guard  outside.  When  Ike  Wil- 
liams came  to  the  rear  door,  he 
was  stopped  and  told:  "The 
police  are  in  there.  I  advise 
you  not  to  go  in."  He  didn't. 

The  players  estimate  they 
were  taken  for  over  $500. 

Newton  Street  Officers  Buck- 
ner  and  Higgins  showed  Carr 
mugshots  of  several  robbery 
artists.  He  identified  one  of 
them  as  the  gentle  intruder. 
Police  are  now  looking  for 
Leonard  C.  Jennings,  who 
seems  to  fit  the  description. 


per  cent  of  the  signatures  in 
a  given  area  other  property 
owners  may  join  on  the  same 
terms  as  those  offered  wiginal 
signers  but  those  who  sign  ri- 
val leases  can't  get  in  on  the 
lea.se  unless  the  company  with 
which  they  have  signed  gives 
its  consent. 

When  an  area  is  pooled  all 
owners  who  sign  the  lease 
share  in  whatever  oil  Is  pro- 
duced and  marketed  on  a  pro- 
portional basis.  Thus  if  there 
are  100  lot  owners  in  a  partjcu-' 
lar  area  each  would  jet  one 
one-hundredth  of  the  one-sixth 
or  one -fifth  royalty  that  is  paid 
owners. 

U:  \n  says  it  plans  to  drill 
two  wells  for  each  40  acre  par- 
cel. 

The  oil  leases  will  not  dis- 
turb the  owners  of  the  Iqts.  The 
V  .^lls  will  actually  be  drilled 
in  one  small  area  and  will  be 
slanted  toward  the  oil  pools. 
After  drilling  is  finished  the 
rigs  will  be-  removed  and  the 
area  landscaped.  Experience 
has  shown  that  the  landowner 
will  have  no  difficult\-  in  sell- 
ing his  land  after  he  has  sign- 
ed such   a  lease.  ■     » 


Worthy  Seeks 
New  Passport. 

(Continued  from  Page  \'^ 
off  a  major  controversy"last  De- 
cemljer^when  he  entered  Com- 
munist China  in  the  face  of  a 
State  Department  ban  on  travel 
to  that  country. 

The  government'  announced 
his  pa.ssport  would  be  revoked 
when  he  returned  to  the  United 
States  and  that '  the  Treasury 
Department  might  prosecute 
him  for  violation  of  the  Trad- 
ing-with-the-Enem.v   Act. 

Worthy  filed  with  the  pass- 
port office  a  letter  from  C.  W. 
Mackay,  editor"  of  the  .Afro- 
American  newspaper  chain. 
staling  that  the  nevvspapef 
hacked  Worthy's  application. 
The  letter  said:  "There  is  at  the 
moment  no  plan  for  assigning 
Mr.  Worthy  abroad.  However, 
because  of  continuing  and  fre- 
quently unexpected  news  de- 
velopments in  many  parts  of 
the  world,  we  wish  him  to  have 
in  his  possession  at  all  times 
a  valid  passport  in  order  to 
facilitate  any  sudden  departure 
for  news  coverage  at  any  point 
outside  the  United  States." 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

"Tha  /mportanf  Nmwspapr" 

1050  E.  43rd|  PI. 

Los  Ang*l«s  11,  Calif. 

ADoms  4-0T61 


LOREN   MILLER 
Publisher 


Vol.  LXXVI 
Thursday 


No.' 51 
Manh  7,  1957 


F.    P.   WALLER.    JR. — Adv.   Mfr. 

GRACE  E.  SIMONS,   Exacutiv*  Editor 
EDWARD   "ABIE"   ROBINSON 

Circulation    Mgr. 

CALME     RUSS Office    Mgr. 

BAY   AREA    REPRESENTATIVE 

E.    G.    ALLEN 1512    16th    »t. 

S«nt»    Maniea.    C«l.,    Ph.:    EX.   5-Hi1 

SUBSCRIBE  NOWl 

n  $4.00  for  1  Y—r 
O  $2.50  for  6  Months 
G  $1-50  for  3  Months 
PER  COPY 10c 

Adjudication    Decree    Numb«r    ISSSt 

Date    of    Adjudication    July    1,    KOS. 

Published   every  Thursday  by  TIM 

>rnia      Eagle      Publictting      Be., 

1050    East    43rd 


California      Eagle      Publictting 

--    -       -  -        -  ,(( 

Second  Class  Matter  November -3, 
1937,  at  the  Pest  Office  at  LOs  An- 
geles, Califorfiia,  under  the  Act  ef 
March  3.  1879. 

AEPRESENTEO  NATIONALLY 
BY    (NTCRSTATC      - 
UNITED    NEWSPAP£IU 

54$   Fifth   Avenue 
New  York  17,  New  York 


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1st  AME  to  Hear 
Bishop  Jordon 

Bishop  Frederick  D.  Jordan,  pre.siding  bishop  of 
fi«  Fifth  Episcopal  District  of  the  AME  Church,  will 
preach  at  the  morning  .service  of  the  annual  Men's  Dav 
»bservance,    Sunday,    at   First   AME  ,Church,    Eighth 

street  and  Towne  avenue. 
Bishop  Jorrfan  became  widely 
known  here  in  both  religious 
and  civic  groups  during  more 
than  a  decade  of  ministry  at 
historic  AMK  and  Ward  AME 
Churches.  In  19.'i2  he  was  or- 
dained a;  bishop  in  the  AME 
Church  and  assigned  to  South 
Afriea. 

According  to  Joseph  C.  Ellis, 
program  chairman,  special 
Men's  Day  services  are  sched- 
uled for  both  the  morning  and 
evening  hours.  In  the  evening, 
Henry  Pettigrew.  prominent 
AMK  layman  and  member  of 
Walker  Temple  AME  Church, 
win  be  the  speaker.  Special 
music  by  the  Senior,  J.  S.  Ed- 
wards Gospel,  and  Youth  Choirs 
will  be  featured  in  the  two 
services  . 

E.  J.  Porter  is  the  Men's  Day 
^general  chairman.  Other  chair- 
men are:  W.  Thorfias  Person, 
finance:  Philip  M.  Robinson, 
ways  and  means:  James  Derry, 
publicity:  and  Howard  L.  John- 
son.    CO. chairman.      Rpw    John 


GUEST  SPE.1KF,R  —  Rr. 
Ret.  Fredemik  D.  Jordan, 
presiding  Bi>kof>  of  thr  Fifth 
kf>i>rop(tl  Diytrnt  nf  llif  A  M  F. 
(,hurih.  lull  hr  thr  Men  a 
Day  spi'iikir  ^u>uln\  riinrninn 
at  First  AME  Church.  Sih 
and     Foj:  rw    nii'iiit'. 


■OWEN    MEMORIAL 

METHODIST  CHURCH-^ 

East  36tli  and  TriDitr  Sta. 

John  C  Baia,  MtaUtw 

•  :M  (.m, — Churcn    School. 
II :M   a.m.— Worohtp. 
7;M   •.m.— fiood    N«w«    Hour. 


"Renew  Thy  Strenqth  Like  the  Eagle" 
MASTER   YOUR   PROBLEMS 
BY   DIVINE 
I     METAPHYSICS 

3    QjesUons    Ansvwred. 

Send  $1  witn  Birthdate. 

WILLIAM   H    FELTON,   Ps    D 

2473  Seventh  Ave,  New  York  30,  NY. 


Private  Consultation  and  SYC  Readings 

Call  for  Appointment  AD.  2-5984 

Office  Hours:  9:30  A.M.  •  7:30  P.M. 

SISTER  BEATRICE,  1374  East  Vernon  Ave. 


/         DIVINt  HIALING  THROUOH  fAITH  AND  PKAYBR 
C^ndU   Star*  All  Kindt  of  Religious  Articles 

REV.  H.  J.  NAPLES 

WOULD  UNOWNtO  iHIHJUAl  40VISO*  AND  COUNSILO* 
HIPP   IN  ALL  ArrAIRS  -  PRIVATi   CONSULTATION 

THE  HELPING  CHAPEL  OP  THE  MASTER 

PteeHUIIS    IVMT   THUKSDAT   AND    SUNDAY    NIOHT   -    *-»:}e    P.M. 
For  Ar^inlmoiit  Call  AD.  2-S«*4  -  t.OO   A.M.   ••  «:00  P.M. 

1 374   loft  Vor^n   Av«ilu« 
Writ*   P.    O.    tax    72393,    At<s»  itatiaa.    Lot    Ane*Ul    3,    Calif. 


Your  Friend  In 
Time  of  Sorrow 


when  sorrow  strikes,  with  the  passing  of 
someone  dear,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  com- 
plete all  necessary  arrangements.  Our  ex- 
perienced staff  is,  above  all,  tasteful  and 
discreet  at  all  times. 


PEOPLE'S 


FUNERAL 
HOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-7181 


fine  funerals 


at  Utter- McKinley 
mortuaries  I 


Here  is  proof  that  Utter-McKinley  provides  the 
finest  possible  funeral  services  at  the  recognized 
lowest  prices.  Ourins  the  past  year,  the  following 
typical  prices  were  paid  for  Utter-McKinley  fine 
funerals.  And  every  funeral  is  complete,  regardless 
of  price  at  Utter-McKinley's. 

361  Funeral  services  below  $100 
39S  Funeral  services  from  $100  to  $200 
630  Funeral  services  from  $200  to  $300 
697  Funeral  services  from  $300  to  $400 
565  Funeral  services  from  $400  to  $500 
411  Funeral  services  from  $500  to  $600 
389  Funeral  services  from  $600  to  $700 
190  Funeral  services  over  $700 


^ptur'c 


Thursday,  March  7,   1957 


The  California  Eagle— 5 


f— SANTA- 
MONICA 

NEWS 


D.    Howell    is    the    minister    at 
First    AME    Church. 


Benjamin   Davis' 
Services  Held 

Funeral  services  for  Benia- 
min  Theodore  bavis.  4S.  were 
ronducted  Monday.  March  4.  at 
1:30  p.m.  at  I'lter-McKinley's 
Wilshire  Chapel.  Interment  fol- 
lowed   in    Lincoln    Cemetery. 

A  native  of  Ohio.  Da\is  had 
resided  here  for  IS  months.  He 
lived  at  98T  S.  Catalina  avenue 
and    died    Wedne.sdav'.    Feb.    27. 

Davis  was  a  World  War  II 
veteran.  He  leaves  his  wife, 
Esther;  daughter.  Sue  Davis: 
sons.  Kimmy  and  Benjamin 
Davi.s:   mother.   Aquila  Davis. 


SENIOR   CITIZENS 

The  Senior  Citizens  Club  No. 
1.21  is  planning  an  interesting 
program  for  March  21  at  the 
home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  Slink- 
'.  er.  1217  20th  street.  All  mem- 
I  hers  are  requested  to  bring  a 
covered  dish. 

Officers  of  the  club  are: 
I  president,  E.  G.  Allen:  vice- 
'  president,  David  Kauffman; 
I  secretar\'.  Ophelia  Cole;  pub- 
;  licity  chairman.  Mildred  Walt- 
'  ers;  ways  and  means  chair- 
man. Mrs.   Henry  Goodeyon. 

*  •     *■ 

SAD  JOURNEY 

Mrs.  Ola  M.  Stewart  of  2S01 
Delaware  avenue  left  for  .^sh- 
riown.  .\rk.,  la.st  Saturday  to 
attend      the      funeral      of      her 

brother. 

*  «     * 

ONE  BRIGHT  SPOT 

M.  B.  Allen,  194.i  22nd  street, 
reports  that  on  the  recent,  trip 
he  look  through  Te.xas  and 
Louisiana  on  his  wa>-  lo  .Ark- 
ansas he  found  onl.\'  one  cafe 
on  the  hichuav  where  Negroes 
were  served  without  having  to 
go  in  through  the  back  door. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Deller  Odoms 
are  the  proprietors  of  the  cafe 
in  the  little  town  of  Fopney  on 
Highway  80  in  Te.xas  where  all 
are  .served  regardless  of  their 
creed  or  color.    . 

*  «     « 

VISITOR 

Visiting  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  A. 
Lawrence,  1S03  22nd  street,  is 
their  God-Mother.  Mrs.  Robur- 
die  Wade  of  E\anston,  111. 


Church  Accepts  Large 
Area  in  Red  Cross  Drive 

The  Rev.  Edward  William  Beasely,  pastor,  and  the 
congregation  of  Triedstone  Baptist  Church,  5570  W. 
Adams  boulevard,  joined  the  ranks  of  the  1957  Red 
Cross  Fund  Campaign  on  Friday,  March  1. 

"''    Residential  division  chairman 
Mrs.  Llovd  C.  Smith  announced 


Men's  Program 
Set  at  Hoiman 

The  observance  of  Men's  Day 
at  Hoiman  Methodist  Church, 
3320  W.  Adams  blvd.,  is  ex- 
pected to  attract  more  than  one 
thousand  people  at  its  three 
special  services. 

Men's   Day   is   sponsored   an- 
nually    by     the     men     of     the 
church  and  has  always  been  a . 
highlight  of  the  church's  \eariy 
activities. 

The    Reverend    L.    L.    White, 
pastor   of    Hoiman.   will    be   the 
speaker   at    the   S   a.m,  service. 
Lawrence     B.     Wilson,     former  I 
U.S.,  Vice-Consul    to    India-^and 
now^ — executive     \ico-president  i 
and    manager    of    the    Superior; 
Escrow   Company,    will    be    the  I 
guest    speaker    at    the    11    a.m.  I 
.service.    Special    music    for    allj 
services    will     be     provided     by 
the     Methodist     Men's    Chorus, 
under    the    direction    of    Elliott 
D.  Lewis. 

The  evening  service  schedul.-  ' 
ed    for   4    p.m.    will    feature    an 
extemporaneous   chain    talk    by  , 

outstanding   business  and   P'o- I  peoples    Mortuarv    Home,    the 
fe.ssional^men   ..f  the  city.  The    ^,,^g,^^^^   ^^^.    p^^ce    in    Para- 
male   chorus   will    present    spe-    ^j^^  'Memorial    Park    cemeterv 
cial     arrangements     b\-     Lewis 
and   will    feature   soloists   .Alex 
Winfield,  James  Middleton  and 
Elihu  Sloan. 


this  week  that  Rev.  Beasely 
and  his  church  members  have 
volunteered  to  take  charge  of 
West  Wilshire  area's  Division  9, 
which  extends  from  Pico  to 
Adams  boulevards  and  from 
Highland   to  Fairfax  avenues. 

With  a  goal  of  $2,025  to  raise 
for  the  Red  Cross  campaign, 
more  than  230  door-to-door  vol- 
unteers will  be  needed,  Mrs. 
Smith  said. 

Members  of  the  Triedstone 
Baptist  Church  who  are  partic- 
ipating as  section  chairmen  in- 
clude Mmes.  C.  L.  Williams, 
Willie  Lee  Green,  Dorothy 
Smith  and  Estel  Blackwell. 

Other  section  chairmen  in- 
clude Mmes.  Ella  .Anfinson,  Er- 
ma  Riley,  Carrie  Hill  and  Kea- 
met   Walter. 


OBITUARIES 

LEAN'DER  PETEP^.  26.  of 
1346  E.  47th  street,  djed  Feb. 
26.  A  native  of  Texas,  the  de- 
ceased was  a  metal  worker. 

-Mr.  Peters  is  survived  by  his 
wife.  Be.-^sie  Peters.  Following 
services    in    the    chapel    of    the 


Polio  Sunshine 
Assn.  Features 
Gospel  Singers 

The  Spiritual  Five  and.  the 
Sensational  Wonders.  v-eU 
known  local  Gospel  singers, 
will  perform  Sunday,  March  10, 
7:30  p.m.,  at  the  Soul  Saving 
Center  for  the  Handicapped, 
operated  by  the  Polio  Slinshine 
Assn.,  Inc.,  at  4265',2  San 
Pedro  place.  The  Key.  P.  Collins 
is  general  supervisor  of  the 
mission  and  evangelistic  de- 
partment. 

Both  groups  are  members  of 
the  Polio  Sunshine  Assn.  and 
the  Interdenominational  Quar- 
tets arjd  Singers  Alliance  of 
America,  Inc. 

Members  of  the  .Assn.  are  in- 
vited to  meet  Robert  'i'oung. 
chairman  of  the  vvorkers  con- 
ference, in  the  office,  426.5  San 
Pedro  place.  Thur.sday,  March 
7,  at  7:30.  Refreshments  vv-ill 
be  served. 

The  fifth  anniversary  of  the 
Polio  Sunshine  Assn.  will  be 
celebrated  .March  18  at  the  Soul 
Saving  center  and  on  Sunda\-, 
March  24.  at  thie  -New  Mace- 
donia Baptist  Church,  27th  and 
Paloma  .streets.  The  sermon 
will  be  preached  bv  the  Rev. 
N.  E.  Taylor. 


Trinity  Baptist  Will  Held 
First  Buildinci  Fund  Rally 

Sunday,  Marcfi^  10, 11  a.m.,  is  set  for  the  first  Build- 
ing Rally  of  the  Tlinity  Baptist  Church,  3421  S.  Cimar- 
ron street,  according  toithe  announce^nent  of  the  pas- 
tor. Dr.  J.  L.  Caston,  who  is  leading  the  drive. 
The   church    is   currently  en'-^- ■ " 

Mefropoiilan 
Choir  to  Sing 
At  Olivet  Sun. 


gaged  in  building  its  sanctuary 
on  the  site  at  Jefferson  and 
Cimarron.  A  $25,000  cateh  goal 
has  been  set  for  Easter  Sunday, 
the  first  gathering  of  funds. 

The  pastor  has  organized  the 
drive  into  100  squadrons  in- 
volving 1200  workers,  who  have 
canvassed  tl;ie  membership  for 
pledges.  These  pledges  are  to  j. 
be  paid  in  three  rallies,  March 
10,     which     is      hext     Sunday: 


The  Young  "Peoples'  Choir  of 

Metropolitan      Ba  p  t  i  s  t 

Church  will  sing  at  the  Olivet 


March  31,  and  April  21.  Easter     Baptist     Church,     981.    E.     35th 


Sunday. 


street.  Sundav.  March  10.  at  3 


The  work  on  the  building  p^  j^^^  ^^^^^^^  Hammond  i. 
has  been  proceeding  on  a  cash  .  .  ...  ^, 
I  basis  and  this  rally  will  re-  '^^  ?'«"'«•  «"d  director.  The 
■  place  funds  used  up  to  this  Rev.  Quincy  Lee.  assistant  pas- 
j  point.  Paul  Cassell  is  the  tor  of  the  Metropolitan  Baptist 
I  building  contractor  and  Paul  Church,  of  which  Rev.  J.  E. 
-  R.  Williams  the  architect.  Evans  is  pastor,  will  give  the 
— sermon. 

The     Senior     Choir     of    .the 
j  Olivet  Baptist  Church  will  also 
sing.    Lucille    Bacote    Blair    is 
I  pianist  and   director  and  Wes- 
ley Coleman,  president. 

Rev.    Spencer    M.    Blair    will 
give   the    invocation.   The   pro- 
'  gram  will  last  one  hour. 


Bishop  Lewis 
To  Speak  at 
Lewis  Sunday 

The  Rt.  Rev.  F.  L.  Lewis,  pre- 
sidiijg  bishop  of  the  5th  Epis- 
copal District,  will  preach  at 
the  morning  worship  Sunday  at 
Lewis  Metropolitan  CME 
Church,  1900  S.  Western  ave- 
nue. I^v,  Isaiah  5cipio,  Jr..  is 
minister. 

Bishop  Lewis  is  the  president 
of  the  College  of  Bishops. 

Open  house  and  dedication  of 
the  new  parsonage  at  1632  W. 
49th  street,  recently  purchased 
by  the  chruch,  will  be  held 
after  services  Sunday.  The 
Steward  and  Stewardess  Boards 
will  be  hosts  and  hostesses 


Arbor  Day  at 
Will  Rogers 

The  Will  Rogers  Park  Staff  is 
holding  its  annual  tree  plant- 
ing ceremony  on  Arbor  Dav', 
March  7  at  2:30  p.m.  at  the 
-park,   1335  E.  103rd  street. 

Special  guest  wiU.  be  Super- 
visor  Kenneth    Hahn. 

The  program  highlights  will 
be  provided  by  the  St.  Law- 
rence School  students.^ 


r-LEWIS  METROPOLITAN  CME  GHURCH-i 


interment  took 
dise  Memorial 
with  the  Rev. 
officiating. 


J.    A.    Wheeler 


10th  Annual 
Teen-Agers' 
Musical  Set 

The    10th    annual    Teen-Age 
Musieale   on   Sunday   at   4   p.m. 
wa.s    announced    by   the    Neigh- 
borhood     Community     Sunday' 
School.  326  E.  47th   place. 

Some  of  the  visiting  artists 
who  will  appear  are:  Ch'arlena 
and  Florinda  Casteneda,  Mi- 
chael Davis.  Sam  Holland. 
Jackie  Howard.  Mary  King, 
Webster  Lytle,  Diane  Proctor, 
Toni  Robin.s'on,  Jackie  Simon. 
Ralph  Tenson.  Vivian  Thomp- 
son, Clarence  Warren.  Anthony 
Wheatly.  Wynette  and  Diane 
Willis.  Bettye  Jean  Wright, 
Johnny  Wright  and  the  Aeoli- 
an chorus  of  Manual  Arts  High 
School. 

Neighborhoods     own     talent 
scheduled    'to    appear    includes 
Lois  Brown,  Naomi  Brown,  Wil- 
liam Colbert.  AWce  Clark.  Jackie 
Clark,    Randy     Green.     Gennell 
Hawkins.  Phyllis  Jackson.  Glo- 
j  ria      Jeter.      Isabelle     Johnson. 
I  Johnny    Johnson.    LeRoy    Mad- 
1  do.x.    Olvarene    Morgan.    Bertha 
!  Norwood.    Mildred     Turner,    Jo 
I  .-"Lnn    White    and    Darlene    and 
Edna   Wright. 

Miss  Emma  Myles  is  the  pro- 
gram director.  Rev.  H.  M.  Col- 
lins   is    pastor. 


Golden  State 
shows  Growth 

Golden  State  Mutual  Life  In- 
surance company  is  now  oper- 
ating in  si.x  states  and  has  pas- 
sed the  SlOO  million  mark  in 
life  insurance  in  forc-e,  accord- 
ing to  reports  made  at  the  an- 
nual meeting  of  policy  owners 
which  was  held   Monday. 

Directors  elected  at  the  Mon- 
day meeting  are  George  A'. 
.Beavers  .Jr.,  Helen  E.  Batiste. 
Norman  O.  Houston,  Luther  .M. 
Hudson,  Edgar  Johnson,  Char- 
les H.  Matthews.  Bertha  B. 
.Nickerson.  John  W.  Rice  and 
Dr.   H.  H.  Towles. 

Other  reports  showed  that  the 
company  now  has  more  than 
five  and  a  half  million  dollars 
in  first  mortgages  to  home 
owners.  More  than  ten  million 
dollars  has  been  lent  to  policy 
owners  since  the  company  was 
organized. 

,  A  quarter  of  a  million  dollars 
in  Life  and  Accident  policies 
is  now  in  force,  officers  report- 
ed. Members  and  beneficiaries 
were  paid  a  million  and  a  half 
dollars  in  insurance  clairns  for 
the  vear  19.5fi. 


N-  CALVIN  ALVIN  FITZGER- 
ALD. 70,  of  1609'j  E.  42nd 
street,  died  in  his  home  on  Feb. 
2.5.  \  native  of  Arkan.'^as.  he 
had  been  a  resident  of  this  city 
for  .30  years. 

Mr.  Fitzgerald  was  laid  to 
rest  at  the  P,aradise  Memorial 
Park  cemetery  on  March  4  fol- 
lowijig  funeral  services  at 
which  the  Rev.  J.  A.  Wheeler 
officiated. 

He  is  sur\ived  by  his  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.   Lucille  Wells. 
•     •     • 

WILLIA.M  DAVID  THOMAS, 
66.  who  died  suddenly  in  his 
home.  954S  Compton  ave..  Feb. 
24.  was  buried  March  2  in 
Paradise  Memorial  Park  ceme- 
ter.v  following  lites  coiiducted 
by  Rev.  J.  A.  Wheeler. 

The  deceased,  a  native  ot 
Texas,  was  a  long  time  resident 
of  Arizona.  .\  sister,  .Mrs.  Gertie 
Mae  Davis,   survives  him   here.' 


Prayer  Day 
Is  Planned 

The  World  Day  of  Prayer  will 
be  observed  this  Friday  from 
10  a.m.  to  4  p.m.  at  the  City- 
Wide  Mission  Church.  7801  S. 
Main  street.  Rev.  Lu  Voilie 
Williams  and  Rev.  Lucille  L. 
Woods  are  the  ministers. 

At  11  a.m.,  Mrs.  Martha 
Webb,  who  visited  the  mission 
field  in  Monrovia,  Liberia,  and 
attended  the  World  Baptist  Al- 
liance Jubilee  in  London,  will 
speak.  Mrs.  O.  V.  Holliway, 
minister  of  music  at  the  Wash- 
ington Memorial  Church  of 
Christ,  Holiness,  and  her  group, 
will  entertain. 

Everyone  is  urged  to  bring  a  ! 
lunch    and    enjoy    the    hour    of  i 
fellowship  that   will  start  at  1 
p.m^    The  church,  will  provide 
punch.  /  , 

Mother  -Sims,  outstanding  ■, 
missionary,  will  take  charge  at  i 
1:30  p.m.  Rev.  J'.  P,  King,  min-  ! 
ister  of  the  Full  Gospel  Baptist  ' 
Ch.urch.  wil  preach  at  2:30  p.m. 


9:15  A.M 
10:45   A.M. 


4900  SOUTH  WESTERN  AVENUE 

ISAIAH   SCIPIO,  JR.,   Min'wtar 

Sun.  School  6:00  Ch.  Yth.  Fsllowship 

Morn.  Worship       7:30  P.M    Evening  Warship 


KARRISON-ROSS 

FUNERAL    HOME 

1139    Firestone     tM. 
LU.  87155 


I.  BARKI80N 


Womanless  Wedding 

Opportunity  Baptist  Church, 
1112  E.  23rd  street,  announces 
a  "Womanless  Wedding"  to  be 
held  at  the  church,  Sunday  at 
7:30   p.m. 


Eagle  Want  Ads- 
15  werds  for  SI 


Victory  Baptist  Day  Scliool  offers. . . 

The   Basic   Educational    Opporhjnities   of 

Other  Schools  plus 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  A  Practice 

ENROLL  NOW! 

Vacancies  Available  for  Kindergarten  Only 
Extended  Day  Care  Program 

"Individual  Instruction  Predominant 
Footure  of  instruction" 

6:30  A.M.  until  6:30  P.M. 

BUS  TRANSPORTATION  CAFETERIA 

Rev.  Artuhr  A.  Peters,  Pastor;  Mrs.  Florence  Parrette,  Viee-Prin. 

PHONE:  ADAMS  1-2424  er  M732 


Subscribe  to  the  California 
Eagle.     One  year,  $4 


Free  Clinic 

Thomas  Roy  Peyton,  M.D.,  Is 
conducting  a  free  clinic  Mon- 
davs,  1-2  p.m.,  and  Thursriavs, 
6-7  p.m..  for  a  month  at  Rose 
.Netta  Hospital.  4412  S.  Hooper 
avenue.  Examination  and 
medicine  for  correction  of  con- 
stipation will  be  without 
charge. 

The  first  clinic  was  held 
Monilav. 


Science  Shrinks  Piles 
-^New  Way  Without  Surgery 

Finds  Healing  Substance  That  Does  Both— 
Relieves  Pain— Shrinks  Heinorrbeids 


Complete  funerals 


Utter  m^Kinley 


BROADWAY    MORTUARY 

4254  S    BROADWAY    ■    ADam'j   i  9325 


YOUR  TEETH 

Command  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

Demands  Attention 
TODAY  -  SEE 

DR.  GAY 

Your    Friendly    Credit    Dentitt 

•  Plates    Repaired    While 
You  Wait 

•  EXTRACTIONS  -  Teeth 
Pulled   and  Filled 

•  FAST  -  FftlENDLY 
SERVICE 

1062  E.  Vernon  Ave. 

Corner   Vernon   ^   Centi'al 
Upstairs 

AD.  4-1397 


New  York.  .N.   V.    (Sp«fi«I)  - 

For  the  first  time  science  has 
found  a  new  healini^  substance 
with  the  astonishing  ability  to 
jhrink  hemorrhoids  artd  to  relieve 
pain— without  surgery. 

In  one  hemorrhoid  case  after 
another,  "very  striking  improve- 
ment" wa.t  reported  and  verified 
by  doctors'  observations. 

Pain  was  relieved  promptly. 
And,  while  gently  relieving  pain, 
actual  reduction  or  retraction 
(shrinking)  took  place. 

And  most  amazing  of  all— this 
improvement  was  maintained  in 
rases  where  doctors'  observations 
were  continued  over  a  period  of 
many  months! 

In  fact,  results  wore  po  thor- 
ough that  sufferers  were  able  to 
make  such  astonishing  statements 
ai  "^iles  hsvt  cea»«d  to  be  a 


problem  I"  And  among  these  suf- 
ferers were  a  very  wide  variety 
of  hemorrhoid  conditions,  gome  of 
10  to  20  years'  standing. 

All  this,  without  the  «8e  of 
narcotics,  anesthetics  or  astrin- 
gents of  any  kind.  The  secret  is 
a  new  healing  substance  (Bio- 
Dyne*)  —the  discovery  of  a  world- 
famous  research  institution.  Al- 
ready, Bio-Dyne  is  in  wide  use 
for  healing  injured  tissue  on  all 
parts  of  the  body. 

This  new  healing  substance  is 
offered  in  inppotitory  or  ointment 
form  railed  Preparation  H.*  Ask 
for  individually  sealed  convenient 
Preparation  H  suppositories  or 
Preparation  H  ointment  with  spe- 
cial applicator.  Preparation  H  is 
sold  at  all  drug  stores.  Satisfaction 
guaranteed  or  meney  refunded. 
^ •s«f.  v.  s.  »«t.  m. 


A  NEW  WAY  TO  LOOK  AT  FUNERALS 


Iri  tlm«$  piS*  »  fun«rjl  w«j  ^ 
tributs  to  the  departed  only. 
Angelus  Funeral  Home  believes 
in  a  "Service  for  the  Living"  by 
providing  beautiful  tributes  that 
express  perfectly  the  wordless 
emotions  of  the  heart.  We  offer 
understanding  care,  complete 
facilities  and  distinctive  surround- 
ings to  help  the  family  ihrough 
a  difficult  period. 


Funeral  Homes 

Los  ANGELES:  1030  E.  Jefferson  Blvd.-Phofie  AOams  2-5188 
LONG  BEAGH:  718  E.  Anaheim  St- Phone  L  B.  700449 


A^ 


i^KH 


•  — ^  - 


-^-.r^^a^a,^^ 


^i^masaBSsamm 


'-'-^--"-"^'^^^    ^""^  ~ 


A  New  Nation  is  Born 


4— The  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


California  Bagle 


Loren  Miller,  Publisher 

Th«  l«gl«  stands  for  cemplat*  intcgratien  af  N«f raas  inta  avary 
phasa  af  Amarican  life  threush  tha  damacratic  pracassaft. 

We  favor: 

1*  nPC  an  lacal,  stata  and  natianal  lavals. 

2.  Dacant  hausing  far  all  Amaricans. 

3.  Raprasantatian  In  Govarnmant. 

4.  Adaquata  aid  aga  pansians  and  sacial  sacurlty. 

5.  Callactiva  bargaining  rights  far  all  warlcman. 

A.  Davalapmant  and  aneauragamant  af  Nagre  buslnass. 

W«  oppose: 

1.  Jim  Craw  in  ell  farms. 

2.  Cammunists  and  all  ether  anemias  af  damacracy. 


Puhllahtd  Every  Thursday 
1050  East  43rd  Place,  Les  Angeles  II 


AD.  4-0141 


<J Itc  K^mporiani  <y\ewspap 


cr 


Oil  and  Rumoj^s  of  Oil 


Mention  the  word  "oil"  to  the 
average  property  owner  and  he  is 
at  once  caught  up  in  a  vision  of 
vast  riches.  He  can  close  his  eyes 
and  see  a  gusher  in  his  back  yard 
and  raining  golden  dollars  all  over 
front  room,  dining  room,  bedroom, 
kitchen   and  bath. 

Or  he  remembers  Uncle  Ned  or 
Aunt  Mary  who  lived  back  in  Okla- 
homa or  Texas  and  who  retired 
when  they  "brought  in  oil"  on  the 
family  farm. 

There's  another  side  of  the  pic- 
ture, too.  Mr.  Property  Owner  re- 
calls stories — all  too  true — of  the 
swindlers  and  worse  who  descend- 
ed on  southern  communities  and 
induced  illiterate  and  semi-literate 
Negroes  to  sign  innocent-looking 
papers  whioh  turned  out  to  be 
deeds  giving  away  oil  rights.  Or 
he  recalls  how  fast-talking  sales- 
men induced  other  Negroes  to  sell 
their  oil  rights  for  messes  of  pot- 
tage. 

These  two  conflicting  attitudes 
are  at  work  in  the  West  Adams 
areas  these  days  as  oil  companies 
are  trying  to  get  leases  from  prop- 
erty owners  in  that  area.  Truith 
to  tell,  these  oil  leases  are  pretty 
formidable  documents  with  about 
six  pages  of  fine 
print  that  is  so 
much  gibberish 
to  the  average 
man.  The  prop- 
erty   owner    who 


$••  Your 
Lawyer 
Before  You 
Sign 


wants  the  riches  that  he  hopes  will 
spout  out  of  his  back  yard  doesn't 
know  whether  to  sign  or  not.  We 
wouldn't  dare  to  advise  anybody 
whether  he  should  or  should  not 
sign  an  individual  lease.  That's  up 
to   the   lawyei's. 

However,  when  these  leases  are 
stripped  of  all  their  legaT  mumbo- 
jumbo  what  emerges  is  the  fact 
that  rival  oil  companies  are  in  a 
race  to  lease  property  in  the  area 
between  Olympic  boulevard  on  the 
north  and  Jefferson  boulevard  on 
the  south  and  between  Vermont 
avenue  on  the  east  and  La  Brea  on 
the  west.  They  figure  there's  oil 
there. 

It  stands  to  reason  that  nobody 
is  going  to  drill  a  well  on  each  in- 
dividual lot.  The  law  wouldn't  per- 
mit that  even  if  the  companies 
wanted  to  do  if.  What  the  com- 
panies propose  is  to  pool  all  lots  in 
the"'  area  in  40-acre  parcels.  Two 
wells  could  then 
be  drilled  for  each 
40-acre  parcel 
and  all  lot  own- 
ers within  the 
parcel       would 


the  oil  for  the  property  owners  in 
some  cases  and  one-fifth  in  others. 
No  one  property  owner  gets  all 
of  that  one-sixth  or  one-fifth.  '  It 
is  divided  up  between  all  of  the 
owners  in  the  parcel.  Suppose,  for 
example,  there  were  60  individual 
owners  of  lots  of  the  same  size  in 
the  parcel.  Each  owner  would  get 
one-sixtieth  of  the  one-sixth  inter- 
est or  one-fifth  reserved  for  the 
property  owners. 

Oil  leases  don't  interfere  with 
the  owner's  use  of  the  property.  He 
still  has  complete  control  of  his  lot 
down  to  a  depth  of  500  feet  and 
since  most  of  us  don't  get  that  far 
down  the  lease  won't  make  a  bit 
of  difference  in  pur  daily  lives. 

That's  about  how  the  matter 
shapes  up.  Some  of  the  oil  com- 
panies are  offering  more  than  oth- 
ers for  the  original  signatures  on 
the  lease  and  for  yearly  rentals, 
but  at  best  those  sums  don't 
amount  to  much.  The  real  hope  of 
making  anything  lies  in  the  gam- 
ble that  oil  will  be  discovered. 

And.  there's  one  more  thing.  No 
company  can  drill  until  it  gets  .^l 
per  cent  of  the  signatures  in  a  par- 
ticular parcel.  When  51  per  cent 
of  the  owners  have  signed,  other 
owners  can  share  in  the  oil  that  is 
produced  by  join- 
ing the  lease  on 
the  same  basis  as 
the  original  51 
per  cent.  The 
only    gimmick    is 


Company 
Must  Get 
51   Per  Cent 
to  Drill 


that  those  who  have  signed  a  rival 
leasee  can't  get  in  on  the  oil  pro- 
duction unless  the  company  with 
which  they  have  signed  surrenders 
its  rights  to  the  outfit  that  got  the 
.31    per  cent   of  the  signers. 

That's  all  we  know.  We  leave 
the  rest  to  the  lawyers.  We  don't 
know  who  has  and  who  hasn't  got 
the  required  51  per  cent  in  any 
particular  parcel.  All  we  know  on 
that  score  is  that  the  air  is  filled 
with  claims  and  counter-claims 
which  will  bear  investigation  by  the 
individual  lot  owner. 

P.S.:  We  don't  know,  either, 
whether  you  will  get  rich  if  you 
sign  a  lease.  Our  geologist  friends 
tell  us  that  it  all  depends  on  the 
size  of  the  well,  the  size  of  your 
lot,  the  quality  of  the  oil  and  the 
state  of  the  mar- 


Royalties 
Divided 
Between 
Owners 


We  Sure 
Wish  We 
Had  An 
Oil  Well 


share  in  the  oil  produced. 

Propcrt\'  owners  don't  get  all  of 
the  oil,  of  course.  The  company 
that  invests  the  money  to  do  the 
drilling  and  conserving  the  oil  gets 
mx)st  of  it.  Leases  being  circulat- 
ed in  the  area  reserve  one-sixth  of 


ket  when,  as,  and 
if  oil  is  found. 
We  do  know  that 
there  are  a  sub- 
stantial number 
of  lots  in  a  40-acre  parcel  and  that 
if  two  wells  are  brought  in  on  each 
such  parcel  they  will  have  to  be 
pretty  darned  good  wells  to  rain 
many  dollars  on  the  individual  lot 
owner. 

P.P.S.:  We  sure  wish  ue  had 
an  oil  well.  Or  at  least  that  we 
owned  a  lot  in  an  area  where  some- 
body was  going  to  drill  an  oil  well. 


Lets  Beat  Detroit 


The  Detroit  NAACP  is  bragging 
ajl  over  the  nation  about  the  fact 
that  it  has  a  membership  of  18,316. 
That's  a  pretty  good  figure  but  \\^ 
hope  that  Detroit's  leadership  in 
the  NAACP  doesn't  last  very  long. 

The  reason  for  that  hope  is  that 


we  want  the  Los  Angeles  branch 
to  do  even  better.  ' 

The  Los  Angeles  quota  this  year 
is  50,000. 

We  know  that  you  will  join  and 
we  hope  that  you  will  get  your 
neighbor's  name  on  the  dotted  line. 


Political  Spotlight 


-iAAA/\/\A/\Ay\A 


By  OBSERVER  r^sMSS^ESiSESnBSm 
POULSON  SUPPORTED 

Scores  of  outstanding  leaders 
of  the  Negro  community  in  Los 
Angeles    have    formed    an    or- 


ganization to  campaign  for  the 
re-election  of  Mayor  Norris 
Poulson  and  will  put  especial 
emphasis  on  their  drive  in  the 
55th.  62nd  and  63rd  assembly 
districts. 

This  was  announced  by 
Edward  A.  Hawkins,  campaign 
manager  for  the  area,  who  said 
that  campaign  headquarters 
would  be  opened  March  1  at 
4251'2  Avalon  Blvd.  Assembly- 
man Augustus  F.  Hawkins, 
brother  of  Edward  A.  Hawkins 
will  be  campaign  director. 

The  executive  committee  for 
the  campaign  in  the  Negro 
community  includes  the  follow- 
ing prominent  citizens:  Clyde 
Broadnax,  Roger  Q.  Mason, 
Paul  R.  Williams.  John  Lamar 
Hill.  George  Vaughn.  Erskine 
Ragland.  Herbert  Greenwood, 
Charles  Fielding.  Norman  Hous- 
ton, Mal-Whitficld.  Albert  Mad- 
riox.  G.  W.  Stafford  Smith,  Dr. 
Dickerson   Hawkins. 

Leon  M.  Giles.  Loren  Miller, 
Elbert  Hud.'^on,  Dr.  L.  L.  'Hollo- 
man,  Wyman  Stanley.  George 
Beavers.  Earl  C.  Broady,  Mrs. 
Emily  Johnson,  Walter  Gordon, 
Clinton  Arnold,  L.  M.  Blodgett, 
Dr.    P.    Price    Cobbs,    Dr.    J.  A. 

Somerville. 

•     «     « 

FUNDS  FOR  TEACHERS 

Nearly  7.i  percent  of  the 
funds  sought  in  Propositions 
B  and  C  will  be  used  to  em- 
ploy teachers  for  Los  ,\ngeles 
school.'^,  Glenn  E.  Carter,  trea- 
surer of  the  Support  Our 
Schools  Committee  and  assist- 
ant vifp  president  of  the  Bank 
of  .\merira,  announced  this 
week. 

The  new  income  will  make 
it  possible  to  hire  an  additional 
1000  tochers  needed  this  year 
for  new  cla.ssrooms  of  elemen- 
tary and  junior  and  senior 
high  schools.  Carter  said. 

x>         «         » 

VETS  FOR  YEAKEL 

Formation  of  a  Veterans' 
Committee  to  Elect  Boh  Yeakel 
Mayor   was    announced    yester- 


day by  Yeakel.  with  Reave  F. 
Nichols,  past  department  com- 
mander of  the  Veterans  of 
Foreign  Wars,  serving  as  chair- 
man. 

Nichols,  long  a  nationally 
known  leader  in  veterans'  af- 
fairs, is  secretary  of  the  power- 
ful Veterans  Political  League 
and  has  served  as  secretary  of 
the  American  Legion  Luncheon 
Club  for  11  years.  He  organized 
and  was  commander  of  the 
Santa  Fe  American  Legion  Post 
573  and  was  a  founder  and  de- 
partment commander  of  the 
Veterans  of  World  War  I.  He 
is   legislative  chairman   of  the 

latter  organization. 

*  *     • 

SUPPORTS  RICHARDSON 

Esker  Harris.  All-Coast  guard 
on  last  year's  UCLA  football 
team  and  a  brilliant  student 
AS  well,  today  urged  the  elec- 
tion of  Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof  and 
Dr.  Ralph  Richardson  to  the 
Los  Angeles  Board  of  Educa- 
tion. 

Mrs.  Tinglof.  community  lead- 
er, is  running  for  Board  office 
No.  2.  and  Dr.  Richardson, 
UCLA  Professor,  is  campaign- 
ing for  Board  office  No.  6. 

'The  Los  Angeles  education- 
al system  is  suffering  from  a 
number  of  serious  problems- 
overcrowded  classrooms,  half- 
day  sessions,  a  shortage  of 
qualified  teachers  and  a  lack 
of  guidance  and  counseling 
facilities  for  emotionally  dis- 
turbed \ounEsters,  to  name  but 
a    few."    Harris    declared. 

*  *        m 

Back  Rubbish  Collection 

A.  J.  Gock.  civic  and  busi- 
ness leader,  today  pledged  hi.s 
support  to  Proposition  A,  the 
municipal  rubbish  collection 
referendum  on  the  April  2  bal- 
lot which  already  has  gained 
strong  city-wide  endorsement. 

Gock  called  municipal  rub- 
bish collection  "one  of  the  steps 
forward  which  we  mu.«t  take 
if  our  city  is  to  continue  to 
grow."  He  deplored  the  fact 
that  Los  Angeles  is  one  of  the 
few  large  cities  in  the  nation 
still  relying  on  archaic  and 
hazardous  methods  of  refuse 
disposal. 


Batilea^ce  &  Bread 

By  Lmstmr  B.  Grangmr 


Grangvr 


A«  I  dictate  this  column  1  am 
mentally  jumping  feverishly 
ahead  of  my  subject.  I'm  think- 
ing ruefully  of  the  few  hours 
that  remain  before  my  wife  and 
I  emplane  for  the  Gold  Coast — 
of  the  numerous  jobs  that 
should  have  been  done  and 
now  cannot  be  done  before  I 
leave,  as  well  as  of  the  exciting 
vista  of  progress  that  stretches 
before  us. 

Curiously  enough,  the  fact  of 
my  own  Gold  ('nasi  ancestrx 
had  never  meant  much  to  me 
until  now.  M\'  father's  great- 
grandfather came  unwillingly 
from  thai  fo\in-  i. 

try  tn  Barbados 
In  what  is  now 
the  British 
West  Indies. 
He  was  a  slave, 
as  was  his  son. 
His  son's  son 
was  horn  a  free 
man  and  served 
in  the  British 
constabulary. 
My  father  left 
Barbados  at  the  ape  of  15  as  a 
ship's  cabin  boy.  He  left  the 
ship  in  Philadelphia  ten  years 
after  the  close  of  the  Civil  War 
and  began  a  new  |if«»  that  was 
to  be  extraordinarily  fruitful 
and  satisfying. 

Compute  Cycle  -. 

Now  my  father's  son  com- 
pletes the  cycle  in  my  return 
t«  the  Gold  Coast.  And  com- 
pletes the  historical  cycle  as 
well;  for  that  Gold  Coast  which 
was  a  way-station  for  slavery 
has  now  achieved  its  own  free- 
dom and  is  the  bright  promise 
of  similar  freedom  for  tens  of 
millions  of  Africa's  exploited 
darker  people. 

But  enough  of  philosophy. 
The  exciting  fact  as  1  write  is 
that  I  leave  on  the  next  day 
with  an  impressive  group  of 
fellow  Americans  who  will  help 
to  comprise  what  is  probably 
the  largest  delegation  of  Amer- 
icans ever  to  visit  Africa  on 
other  than  a  military  mission. 
Plane  Won't  Wait 

The  Vice  President  of  the 
United  States  will  take  off  in 
a  plane  an  hour  ahead  of- our 
party.  He  will  be  ?  foil  owed  by 
two  plane  loads  offnewspaper 
reporters  and  publishers.  Before 
and  after  them  will  come 
streaming  Americans  of  various 
skin  color,  positions  of  wealth 
and  of  public  prominence,  but 
all  of  them  together  in  one  con- 
viction that  the  establishment 
of  Ghana  as  the  first  Negro  na- 
tion in  the  British  comirioh- 
wcalth  is  important  to  the 
people  of  the  entire  British 
Commonwealth  and  to  freedom- 
aspiring  peoples  the  world  over. 


Sorr\.  I've  got  to  go.  That 
plane  wont  wait.  Mrs.  BairH, 
you  take  it  from  here. 

P.S.  from  Mrs.  Baird:  The 
plane  cUdn't  have  to  wait— for 
present  and  on  time  were  those 
fortunates  scheduled  to  take  in 
this  important  friends  -  making 
mission,  including  a  number  of 
persons  already  well  kMown  for 
their  interest  in  domestic  af- 
fairs and  no^^■  showing  an  ex- 
pandPfl  interest  in  international 
r  e  1  a  t  i  o  n  «.  Wp  stasat  homes  ' 
could  do  no  more  than  wave 
longingh-  as  Pan  American's 
Flight  l.i2  <oared  into  the  blue, 
and  silently  pray  for  a  safe  trip 
and  a  thoroughly  successful  ex- 
perience.    ' 


50,000  Cheer 
Ghanq  Freedom 

'Continued  from  Page  1^ 
V.  S.  representative  on  the  U.  N. 
Trusteeship  Council,  and  Pres- 
ident   Horace    Mann    Bond    of 
Lincoln  University. 

Significant 
The  achievement  of  inde- 
pendence by  Ghana  is  regard- 
ed in  many  quarters  as  poten- 
tially one  of  the  most  signifi- 
cant to  take  place  in  Africa  in 
modern  times  and  its  impact  is 
already  being  fell  elsewhere  in 
the  continent.  South  Africa  is 
among  the  countries  which 
^ere  to  be  represented  at  the 
ceremonies. 

Nationhood  came  to  Ghana 
Mhc  name  is  taken  from  an 
ancient  African  kingdom  that 
flourished  for  nine  centuries  in 
the  West  African  interior)  ex- 
actly 113  years  after  the  legal- 
ization of  British  authority, 
nine  years  after  the  politically 
pivotal  march  on  the  British 
governor's  readence  in  Chris- 
tianborg  Castle,  and  six  years 
after  the  release  of  Kwame 
I  "The  Man")  Nkrumah  from 
prison  so  he  could  become  the 
leader  of  government  business 
rather  than  serve  out  a  sen- 
tence for  activities  which  had 
up  to  then  been  regarded  as 
seditious. 


County  Hospital 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
had   fallen   out    of    bed.     She 
complained  of  a  severe  head- 
ache.    She  died  the  following 
evening  at  8:15  p.m. 

Mrs.  Johnson  is  survived  by 
a  c^ughter,  Mrs.  Katherine 
Green,  2682  L  street,  San  Diego. 

Funeral  services  are  being 
held  from  the  chapel  of  the 
Angelus  Funeral  Home  at  10 
a.m.  Friday  morning. 


11        -  ,11  j    ;ll..i 


^ 


LETTERS 

to  the  editor 


^: 


^ 


To  the  Editor: 

j  The  Joint  Recruitment  Project 
for  Minority  Adoptive  Homes  is 
beginning  to  feel  that  .some 
real  progress  is  being  made  in 
trying  to  secure  adoptive  homes 
for  over  2.50  children  of  mi- 
nority backgrounds.  To  date 
over  300  applications  have  been 
made  as  a  result  of  the  adop- 
tive home  drive  which  began 
January  10.  19.37. 

■Jhe  California  Eagle  was  one 
of  the  leading  papers  which 
helped  spearhead  this  drive 
with  a  series  on  Minority  Adop- 
tion. As  a  result  of  their  ef- 
forts, the  futures  of  these  chil- 
dren are  beginning  to  look 
bright.  Many  of  these  children 
will  soon  have  homes  of  their 
own  with  familes  to  love  and 
share  their  affection. 

The  lack  of  adoptive  homes 
was  the  problem  that  existed 
in  Los  Angeles.  It  was  present- 
ed to  the  public  for  their  son- 
cern,  consideration  and  .solu- 
tion. The  readers,  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Eagle  could  choose  to 
ignore  it  or  meet  the  challenge, 
■^'our  overwhelming  response, 
proves  that  the  public  is  inter- 
ested In  these  children  and  will 
meet  the  challenge  by  seeing 
that  every  child  has  a  home. 
Although  progress  is  being 
made  rapidly,  children  are  be- 
ing given  up  contiriually  by 
their  parents  for  adoption.  The 
need  for  adoptive  parents  is 
still    critical    and    necessary. 

For  the  wonderful  v^opera- 
tion  in  only  a  short  period  of 
time,  the  Joint  Recruitment 
Project  expresses  sincere  apr 
preciation  for  the  service  yno 
have  rendered  the  rhild^en  of 
\our  community.  In  addition, 
the  Eagle's  staff  has  our  con- 
gratulations for  a  tremendous 
job  well  done. 

"Adoption  for  these  children 
will  mean  happine.ss  for  you 
and  for  them." 

JUDSON  C.   HIXSON   JR., 

Project  Worker. 

Joint  Recijuitment  Project 

for  Minority  Adoptive 

Homes. 


City  Council 
Seeks  Probe  of 
'V  Cor  Crash 

The  City  Council  last  Wed 
nesday  instructed  the  City's 
Public  Utilities  and  Transpor- 
tation Department  to  study  the 
cause  of  the  accident  in  which 
a  streetcar  jumped  the  tracks 
at  Vernon  avenue  and  Hoover 
street,  crashed  into  a  shop  and 
injured  37  persons. 

The  motion,  which  was  made 
by  Councilman  Gordon  Hahn. 
requested  the  city  department 
to  work  with  the  California 
Public  Utilities  Commission  oh 
regulatory  measures  designed, 
to  eliminate  the  possibility  of 
such  accidents  in  the  future. 


Admits  Murder 

(Continued  from  Page  1^ 
was    discovered     that     a     deep 
knife  wound    in    the   left  chest 
was  the  cause  of  death. 

Mrs.  Moore,  the  mother  of 
Mrs.  Doris  Potts,  630  E.  29th 
street,  had  allegedly  been 
keeping  company  with  Gibson 
for  several  years  and  at  one 
time  had  been  living  with  him. 
Their  relationship,  however, 
had  reportedly  been  a  stormy 
one.  Gibson  is  said  to  have  cut 
Mrs.  Moore  on  two  previous  oc- 
casions. She,  in  turn,  allegedly 
threw  lye  in  Gibson's  face  dur- 
ing one  of  their  arguments. 


Oil  Companies 
Woo  Westsiders 


(Continued  from  Page  11 
and  "that  means  that  they  are 
serious  and  are  ready  to  drill." 
Rivals,  she  ,scoffed,  want  ten 
year  leases  "so  they  can  hold 
the  oil    in   reserve." 

Miss  Clark  also  pointed  with 
some  pride  to  the  fact'^that 
Guiberson-Bupke  has  employed 
her  firm  for  "public  relations 
and  advertising  on  a  city  wide 
basis,  not  just  in  the  Negro 
community."  More  than  that, 
she  says,  they  have  employed 
Hugh  Mac  Beth  as  counsel  for 
the  operation  and  have  em- 
ployed two  Negro  lease  men. 
"That  means,  she  says  with  a 
flourish,  that  her  employer  is 
interested  in  the  community. 
Union  Clainwt 

Union  Oil  spokesmen  weren't 
a  bit  more  bashful  than  Miss 
Clark.  True  enough,  they're 
only  ofi'^ring  a  16*3  percent 
royalty.  Union  said,  but  they 
pointed  with  more  than  a  min- 
imum of  pride  \o  the  fact  it  is 
"the  only  comp^iv^  currently 
leasing  in  the  area  uhi<h  mar- 
kets products  through  iis  man.v 
neighhorliood  service  sl.itions. 
and  in  addition  is  engaged  in 
exploration,  production  and  re- 
fining. Union's  policy  of  good 
public  relates  must  be  main- 
tained whether  we  are  sellihg 
gasoline  at  service  stations  or 
whether  operating  under  an  oil 
and  gas  lease." 

Signal  Oil  company  also  has 
an  interesting  story  to  tell  and 
is  anxious  that  residents  should 
have  a  clear  understanding  of 
what   is  invohed. 

Union  Is  seel^iiig  leases  in 
the  area  between  Vermont  on 
the  east.  La  Brea  on  the  West; 
Olympic  on  the  north,  and  Jef- 
ferson on  the  South.  Guihcrson- 
Burke  has  marked  off  an  area 
between  Olympic  on  the  north, 
Adam.s  on  the  South  and  be- 
tween 4th  avenue  on  tlic  west 
and  Normandie  on  the  east. 
Tug    of    War 

The  real  gimmick  in  the  tug 
of  war  between  the  "rival  oil 
companies  is  that  no  concern 
can  drill  in  a  particular  area 
until  it  gets  51  per  cent  of  the 
owners  signed  up.  Then,  and 
only  then,  can  it  apply  to  City 
Council  for  a  permit.  Union  Oil 
has  divided  the  area  into  -40 
acre  plots  and  now  claims  that 
it  has  51  per  cent  of  the  leases 
in  nine  of  those  tracts.  It  waved 
a  notarized  affidavit  to  prove 
that   very  point. 

Guiberson-Burke  which  has 
marked  off  55  acre  parcels 
claims  to  have  51  per  cent  of 
the   signers    in   one   such    area. 

Where    one    concern    gets    51 


Smiling  Robber 

(Continued  from  Page  1> 
Carr  to  put  the  loot  in  a  paper 
bag. 

Holding  the  bag  in  one  hand, 
the  gun  in  the  other,  he  backed 
away  and  out  the  rear  door. 
Just  as  he  was  leavjng.  he  re- 
marked: "Gentlemen,  I  hope 
you  all  have  a  nice  crap  game, 
but  please  have  more  money 
next  time." 

Had    Accomplice 

The  suave'gentleman  had  an 
accomplice.  While  he  was  op- 
erating inside,  another  man, 
also  polite.  was  standing 
guard  outside.  When  Ike  Wil- 
liams came  to  the  rear  door,  he 
was  stopped  and  told:  "The 
police  are  in  there.  I  advise 
you  not  to  go  in."  He  didn't. 

The  players  estimate  they 
were  taken  for  over  $5(X). 

Newton  Street  Officers  Buck- 
ner  and  Higgins  showed  Carr 
mugshots  of  several  robbery 
artists.  He  identified  one  of 
them  as  the  gentle  intruder. 
Police  are  now  looking  for 
Leonard  C.  Jennings,  who 
seems  to  fit  the  description. 


CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

"Jh*   Important  Newspaper" 

1050  E.  43rd  PI. 

Les  Ang*l«s  1 1 ,  Calif. 

ADoms  4-0161 

.44 


LOREN   MILLEK 
Publisher 


Vrff^LXXVI 
Thursday 


No.  51 
March  7,  1957 


F.    P.    WALLER.    JR.  ._ Adv.   M(r. 

GRACE  E.  SIMONS,   Ex«ctltiv«  Carter 
EDWARD   "ABIE"    ROBINSON 

Circulation    Mgr, 

CALME     RUSS  Offie«    Mgr. 

BAY    AREA    REPRESENTATIVE 

E.    G.    ALLEN 1512    1«th    St. 

Santa    Monica.    Cat.,    Ph.:    EX.    5-1M1 

SUBSCRIBE  NOW! 

n  $4.00  for  1   Yaar 
0  $2-50  for  6  Months 
G  $1.50  for  3  Manths 
PER   COPY    lOe 

Adjudication  Dacre*  Numbar  ItUZt 
Data  of  Adjudication  July  1,  liZS. 
Published  every  Thursday  by  Th« 
California  Eagle  Publishing  S«-. 
1050  East  43rd  Plac«.  EntarMI  -as 
Second  Class  Matter  Novatnbar "  t, 
1937.  at  the  Post  Office  at  Ljfts  An- 
geles. California,  under  tha  Act  af 
March  3,   1879. 

REPRESENTED   NATIONA1.LV 
BY    INTERSTATE      - 
UNITED    NEWSPAPERS 

345   Fifth   Avenue 
New  York  17,  Naw  Yark 


per  cent  of  the  signatures  in 
a  given  area  other  propjerty 
owners  may  join  on  the  same 
terms  as  those  ,offei;ed  original 
signers  but  those_wlro  sign  ri- 
val leases  can't  get  in  on  the 
lease  unless  the  coinpai'iy  with 
which  they  have  signed  gives 
its  consent. 

When  an  area  is  pooled  all 
owners  who  sigr  the  lease 
share  in  whatever  oil  is  pro- 
duced and  marketed  on  a  prft- 
portional  basis.  Thus  if  there 
are  100  lot  owners  in  a  particu- 
lar area  each  would  get  one 
one-hundredth  of  the  one-sixth 
or  one  fifth  royalty  that  is  paid 
owners. 

L":^  n  says  it  plans  to  drill 
two  wells  for  each  40  acre  par- 
cel. 

The  oil  leases  will  not  dis- 
turb the  owners  of  the  lots.  The 
\  ,^lls  will  actually  be  drilled 
in  one  small  area  and  will  be 
slanted  toward  the  oil  pools. 
After  drilling  is  finished  the 
rigs  will  be  removed  and  the 
area  landscaped.  Experience 
has  shown  that  the  landowner 
will  have  no  difficult}.'  in  sell- 
\ns  his  land  after  he  has  sign- 
ed  such   a   lease        ■  • 


Worthy  Seeks 
New  Passpbrt 

(Continued  from  Paffe  l'> 
off  a  major  controversy  last  De- 
cember when  he  entered  Com- 
munist China  in  the  face  of  a 
State  Department  ban  on  travel 
to  that  country. 

The  government  announced 
his  passport  would  be  revoked 
when  he  returned  to  the  United 
States  and  that  the  Treasury 
Department  might  prosecute 
him  for  \iolation  qf  the  Trad- 
ingwith-theEnem.\'   Act. 

Worthy  filed  wit"h  the  pass- 
port office  a  letter  from  C.  W. 
Mackav.  editor  of  the  Afro- 
.Amcrican  newspaper  chain. 
staling  that  the  newspaper 
hacked  Worthy's  application.  ^ 
The  letter  said;  "There  is  at  the  * 
moment  no  plan  for  assigning 
Mr.  Worthy  abroad.  However, 
because  of  continuing  and  fre- 
quently unexpected  news  de- 
velopments in  many  parts  of 
the  world,  we  wish  him  to  have 
in  his  possession  at  all  times 
a  valid  passport  in  order  to 
facilitate  any  sudden  departure 
for  news  coverage  at  any  point 
outside  the  United  States." 


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1st  AME  to  Hear 
Bishop  Jordon 

Bishop  Frederick  D.  Jordan,  pre.'^idine  bishop  of 
f,«  Fifth  Episcopal  District  of  the  AME  Church  will 
•reach  at  the  morning  service  of  the  annual  Men's  Dav 
ibservance.    Sunday,    at    First    AME    Church.     Eighth 

street  and  Towne  avenue. 
Bishop  Jordan  became  widely 
known  here  in  both  religious 
and  civir  groups  during  more 
than  a  decade  of  ministrv  at 
historic  AMK  and  Ward  .AME 
Churches.  In  19ri2  he  was  or- 
dained a  bishop  in  the  AMK 
Church  and  assigned  to  South 
Afriea. 

-According  to  Joseph  C.  Kills, 
program  chairman,  special 
Men's  Day  services  are  .sched- 
uled for  both  the  morning  and 
evening  hours.  In  the  evening. 
Henry  Pettigrew.  prominent 
AME  layman  and  member  of 
Walker  Temple  AMP:  Church, 
will  be  the  speaker.  Special 
music  by  the  Senior.  J.  S.  Ed 
wards  Gospel,  and  Youth  Choirs 
will  he  featured  in  the  two 
services  . 

E.  J.  Porter  is  the  Men's  Da> 

CUE^T    SPF.iKF,R   Rt.    •'general   chairman.   Other  chair 

men  are:  \V.  Thorftas  Person, 
finance:  Philip  M.  Robinson, 
way.s  and  means:  James  Derry. 
publicity-:  and  Howard  L.  John 
■^on.  co-chairman.  Rp'\  .  John 
D.  Howell  is  the  minister  at 
First    AME    Church. 

V 

Benjamin  Davis' 
Services  Held 


Ut^C 


Trinity  Bciptist  Will  Hold 
First  Bundinq  Fund  Roily 


Hn-     Frfd'rmik     D.     Jortinn. 

prtsidina  Hi-k'-'l'  '■>  thr  H'th 
E^srofic!  hi'!'!'  I  r,'  ihf  i M  t. 
Church,  ui  '"'  '"'  .'/^'i',. 
/)«»■  fpi'i'^''  ^""'/'.>  '>ii,rp:no 
It  Fir<f  .^  M  F.  i.n;',  h.'  Sfh 
tnd    ToK  '-.,■    -;t  ,  ';/,,  . 


lOWEN  MEMORIAL 
METHODIST  CHURCH 
!«•(  Mtb  and  Trinity  Sts. 

Joha  C  Bala,  MlaUtw 

fM  (.n*. — Churcn    Sens«l. 
\\m  i.m.— W»r»h)B. 


».m. 


Sa«d 


•w«    Hour. 


"Reiww  Thy  Strfna;".  Lik»  ne  Eaqlt" 

MASTER   YOUR   PROBLEMS 

BY  DIVINE 

METAPHYSICS 

3    OjfSi.ons    Answered 
Send  SI  *it'  Birthda'.' 
WILLIAM  H    FELTON    Ps    D 
2473  SevWt"  Ave     S»w  Yo'<  30    S  Y, 


Funeral  services  for  Benja- 
min Theodore  t)a\is.  t.*^.  were 
conducted  Ntonda.\,  Marrh  4.  at 
\:^(^  p,m.  at  L'tter-McrCinleys 
Wilshire  Chapel.  Interment  fol- 
loued    in    Lincoln    ("cmeier>-. 

.A  nati\e  of  Ohio.  na\is  had 
resided  here  for  !>:  months.  He 
li\ed  at  987  S.  ("aialina  avenue 
and    died    \Vedncsda\-,   Feb.   27 

Da%is  was  a  World-  War  11 
\eteran.  He  leaves  his  wife. 
E.sther:  daughter.  Sue  Davis: 
sons.  Kimmy  and  Benjamin 
Davis:   mother,   .\quila  Da\is. 


Private  Consultation  and  SYC  Readings 

Call  for  Appointment  AD.  2-5984 

Office  Hours:  9:30  A.M.  •  7:30  P.M. 

SISTER  BEATRICE,  1374  East  Vernon  Ave. 


D/V/Nf  HIAUNO  THROUGH  FA/TH  AND  PRArER 

C«n#«  Slera  All  Kindt  of  Rali^iout  Articles 

REV.  H.  J.  NAPLES 

WMiD  aiMowMfo  innnuAi  aovi5o*  and  couNSfion 

HtPW   IN  ALL  AfFAICS  -  MIVATI   CONSULTATION 

THE   HELPING   CHAPEL  OP  THE  MASTER 
nOMHSiis  iviar  thuksoat  and  sunoay  nisht  -  »-9:]e  p.m. 

Pw  Ara«i"*">*>'   Call   AD.   1-SfM   -   «K)a    A.M.   t*  «:00   P.M. 

1  374   iait   V*ra«ii   Avaiiu* 
Writ*  P.   O.   »«x   72393.   Ai<«t   Statiaa,   Lai   Ancalai   3.   Calif. 


Your  F/iend  In 
Time  of  Sorrow 


VVSen  lorrow  itrikes,  with  the  passing  of 
someone  dear,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  conrv- 
plete  all  necessary  arrangements.  Our  ex- 
perienced staff  is,  above  all,  tasteful  and 
discreet  at  ail  times. 


PEOPLE'S 


FUNERAL 
HOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-7181 


Fine  funerals 


at  Utter- McKinleif 
mortuaries  I 


Here  is  proof  that  Utter-McKinley  provides  the 
finest  possible  funeral  services  at  the  recognized 
lowest  prices.  During  the  past  year,  the  followine 
typical  prices  were  paid  for  Utter-McKinley  fine 
funerals.  And  every  funeral  is  conplete,  regardless 
of  price  at  Utter-McKinley's. 

361  Funeral  services  belovi^  $100 
395  Funeral  services  from  $100  to  $200 
630  Funeral  services' from  $200  to  $300 
697  Funeral  services  from  $300  to  $400 
565  Funeral  services  from  $400  to  $500 
411  Funeral  services  from  $500  to  $600 
389  Funeral  services  from  $600  to  $700 
190  Funeral  services  over  $700 


Complete  funerals 


Utter  m-Kinleij 


BROADWAY    MORTUARY 

4254    S    BROADWAr     •    RDams    i  9325 


u 


Thursday,  March  7,   1957 


The  Caliiornia  Eagle— 5 


f— SANTA- 
MONICA 
NEWS 


Church  Accepts  Large 
Area  in  Red  Cross  Drive 

The  Rev.  Edward  William  Beasely,  pastor,  and  the 
congregation  of  Triedstone  Baptist  Church.  5570  W. 
Adams  boulevard,  joined  the  ranks  of  the  1957  Red 
Cross  Fund  Campaign  on  Friday,  March  1. 

"■'     Re.sidential  division  rhairman 


SENIOR   CITIZENS  ! 

The  Senior  Citizen.s  Cluh  No. 
121    is   pUnninjr  an   interpsting 
program    for    March    21    at    theJ 
home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  Slink-  ; 
pr.    1217   20th   .strppt.    .Ml    mem-  I 
hers   are    requested    to    bring    a 
covered  di.sh. 

Officers  of  the  club  are: 
president.  K.  C  Allen:  vice- 
pre.sident,  David  Kauffman; 
secretar.w  Ophelia  Cole:  pub- 
licity chairman.  Mildred  Walt-  ; 
ers:  ways  and  mean.s  chair- 
man. Mrs.  Henry  Coodeyon. 
«      •      * 

SAD   JOURNEY 

Mrs.    Ola    M.   Stewart   of   2.'^01 
Delawarp   a\enue   left   for  .Ash- 
down,     .\rk.,     last     Saturday     to: 
attend      the      funeral      of      her 
brother. 

ONE  BRIGHT  SPOT 

M.  B.  .Alien.  \9A:->  22nd  street, 
report?  that  on  the  recent  trip 
he  rook  through  Te.xas  and 
Louisiana  on  his  wa\-  to  .Ark- 
ansas he  found  onl\-  one  cafe 
on  the  highway  where  Negroes 
were  .served  without  having  to  i 
go  in  through  the  bai  k  door. 

Mr.  and  .Mrs.  Deller  Odoms  ! 
are  the  proprietors  of  the  cafe 
in  the  little  town  of  Forney^on 
Highway  80  in  Texas  where  all 
are  served  regardless  of  their 
creed  or  color. 

-     *     •  I 

VISITOR  ! 

Visiting   Mr.   and    Mrs.    F..    A. 
Lawrence.    180.3   22nd    street,    is 
their   God-.Molher,    Mrs.    Robur-  : 
die  Wade  of  Evansion,  III. 


Men's  Program 
Set  at  Holman 

The  observance  of  Men's  Day 
at  Holman  Methodist  Church. 
3320  W.  Adams  blvd..  is  ex- 
pected to  attract  more  than  one 
thousand  people  at  its  three 
special  services. 

Men's  Day  is  sponsored  an- 
nually by  the  men  of  the 
church  and  has  always  been  a 
highlight  of  the  church's  yearly 
activities. 

The  Reverend  L.  L.  Whire, 
pastor  of  Holman.  will  be  the 
speaker  at  the  8  a.m.  servire. 
Lawrence  B.  Wilson,  former 
U.S.  Vice-Consul  to  India  and 
now  executive  vicp-pre.tidrnt 
and  manager  of  the  Superior 
Kscrow  Companv,  will  be  the 
guest  speaker  at  the  11  a.m. 
service.  Special  music  for,  all 
services  will  be  provided;  by 
the  Methodist  Men's  Chorus, 
under  the  direction  of  Elliott 
D.  Lewis. 

The  evening  service  schedul- 
ed for  4  p.m.  will  feature  an 
extemporaneous  chain  talk  by 
outstanding  business  and  pro- 
fessional men  of  the  city.  The 
male  chorus  will  present  spe- 
cial arrangements  hy  Lewis 
and  will  feature  soloists  Alo\ 
Winfield.  James  Middleion  and 
Elihu  Sloan. 


Mrs.  Lloyd  C.  Smith  announced 
this  week  "^  that  Rev.  Beasely 
and  his  church  members  have 
volunteered  to  take  charge  of 
West  Wilshire  area's  Division  9. 
which  extends  from  Pico  to 
Adams  boulevards  and  from 
Highland   to   Fairfax   avenues. 

With  a  goal  of  $2,025  to  raise 
for  the  Red  Cross  campaign, 
more  than  230  door-to-door  vol- 
unteers will  be  needed.  Mrs. 
Smith  said. 

Members  of  the  Triedstone 
Baptist  Church  who  are  partic- 
ipating as  section  chairmen  in- 
clude Mmes.  C.  L.  Williams. 
Willie  Lee  Green.  Dorothy 
Smith  and  Estel  Blackwell. 

Other   section     chairmen     in 
elude  Mmes.  Ella  .Anfinson.  Er- 
ma   Riley,  Carrie  Hill  and  Kea- 
mer  Walter. 


10th  Annual 
Teen-Agers'    \ 
Musical  Set    \ 

The  10th  annual  Teen-Age  j 
Musicale  on  Sunday  at  4  p.m. 
wa.<i  announced  by  the  Neigh-  ' 
borhood  Community  Sunday 
School.   326  E.  47th'  place.        "  , 

Some  of  the  visiting  artists  1 
who  will  appear  are:  Charlpna 
and  Florinda  Castpnpda.  Mi- 
chael Davis.  Sam  Holland.  ' 
Jackie  Howard.  Mary  King. 
Webster  Lvtle,  Diane  Proctor. 
Toni  Robinson.  Jackie  Simon. 
Ralph  Tenson.  Vivian  Thomp- 
son. Clarence  Warren.  .Anthony 
Wheatly.  VVynette  and  Diane 
Willis.  Bettye  Jean  Wright. 
Johnny  Wright  and  the  .Aeoli- 
an chorus  of  Manual  Arts  High 
School. 

Neighborhood's  own  talent 
.scheduled  to  appear  includes 
Lois  Brown.  Naomi  Brown.  Wil- 
liam Colbert.  .Alice  Clark,  Ja(  kie 
Clark,  Randy  Green,  fJennell 
Hawkins.  Phyllis  Jackson.  Glo- 
ria Jeter.  Isabelle  Johnson. 
Johnnv  Johnson.  LeRov  Mad- 
dox.  (ilvarenp  Morgan.  Bertha 
Norwood.  Mildred  Turner,  Jo 
.Ann  White  and  Darlene  and 
Edna   Wright 

Miss  Emma'  Myles  i.s  the  pro- 
gram director.  Rev.  H.  M.  Col- 
lins   is    pastor. 


Golden  State 
Shows  Growth 

Golden  State  Mutual  Life  In- 
surance company  is  now  oper- 
ating in  six  states  and  has  pas- 
sed the  SlOO  million  mark  in 
life  insurance  in  force,  accord. 
ing  to  reports  made  at  the  an- 
nual meeting  of  policy  owners 
which  was  held   Monday. 

Directors  ele<ied  at  the  Mon- 
dav  meeting  are  (^orge  .A. 
Beavers  Jr..  Helen  E.  Batiste, 
Norman  O.  Houston,  Luther  M. 
Hudson.  Edgar  Johnson,  Char 
les  H.  Matthews.  Bertha  B 
.Nickerson.  John  W.  Rice  and 
Dr.   H.  H.  Towles. 

Other  reports  showed  that  the 
company  nojv  has  more  than 
five  and  a  half  million  dollars 
in  first  mortgages  to  home 
owners.  More  than  ten  million 
dollars  has  hepn  Ipnt  to  policy 
owners  since  the  company  was 
organized. 

,  -A  quarter  of  a  million  dollars 
in  Life  and  Accident  policies 
is  now  in  force,  officers  report- 
ed. .Members  and  beneficiaries 
were  paid  a  million  and  a  half 
dollars  in  insurance  claims  for 
the  vear  19.5fi. 


OBITUARIES 

LEANDER  PETERS.  26.  of 
1.346  E.  47th  street,  died  Feb. 
26.  .A  native  of  Texas,  the  de- 
ceased was  a  metal  worker. 

.^lr.  Peters  is  survived  by  his 
wife.  Bessie  Pelprs.  Following 
sprvu-es  in  the  chapel  of  the 
Peoples  Mortuarv  Home,  the 
interment  took  place  in  Para- 
dise Memorial  Park  cemetery 
with     the    Rev.    J.    .A.    Wheeler 

officiating. 

>     •     • 

CALVIN  ALVIN  FITZGER- 
ALD. 70.  of  1609'j  E.  42nd 
strppi.  died  in  his  home  on  Feb, 
2.3.  A  native  of  Arkansas,  he 
had  been  a  resident  of  this  city 
for  30  years. 

Mr.  Fitzgerald  was  laid  to 
rest  at  the  Paradise  Memorial 
Park  cemetery  on  March  4  fol- 
lowijig  funeral  services  at 
which  the  Rev.  J.  A.  'Wheeler 
officiated. 

He  is  survived  by  his  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.   Lucille  Wells. 
•     •     • 

WILLIA.M  DAVID  THOMAS. 
66.  who  died  suddenly  in  his 
home,  954S  Compton  ave..  Feb. 
24.  vva.«  buried  March  2  in 
Paradise  .Memorial  Park  ceme- 
terv  iollowing  rites  conducted 
bv-  Rev .  J.  A.  Wheeler. 

The  dpcpa'^ed.  a  native  of 
Texas,  was  a  long  time  resident 
of  Arizona.  .A  sister.  .Mrs.  Gertie 
.Mae  Davis,  survives  h'ini   here. 


I  Polio  Sunshine 
Assn.  Features 
Gospel  Singers 

The  Spiritual  Five  and  the 
Sensational  Wonders,  well 
known  local  Gospel  singers, 
will  perform  Sunday.  March  10. 
7:30  p.m..  at  the  Soul  Saving 
Center  for  the  Handicapped, 
operated  by  the  Polio  Sltnshine 
I  .Assn.,  Inc.,  at  4265' 2  San 
Pedro  place.  The  Rev.  P.  Collins 
is  general  supervisor  of  the 
mission  and  evangelistic  de- 
partment. 

Both  groups  are  members  of 
the  Polio  Sunshine  Assn.  and 
the  Interdenominational  Quar- 
tets and  Singers  .Alliance  of 
America.  Inc. 

.Members  of  the  .Assn.  are  in- 
vited to  meet  Robert  Young, 
chairman  of  the  workers  con- 
ference, in  the  office.  426.5  San 
Pedro  place.  Thursdav,  .March 
7.  at  7:3fl.  Refreshments  will 
be  served. 

The  fifth  anniversarv-  of  the 
Poiio  Sunshine  .Assn.  will  be 
celebrated  March  18  at  the  Soul 
Saving  center  and  on  Sunday. 
.March  24.  at  the  .New  Mace- 
donia Baptist  Church.  27th  and 
Paloma  streets.  The  sermon 
'  will  be  preached  by  the  Rev. 
,  N.  E.  Tavlor. 


Sunday,  March  10. 11  a.m..  is  set  for  the  first  Build- 
ing Rally  of  the  Trinity  Baptist  Church,  3421  S.  Cimar 
ron  street,  according  to  the  announcement  of  the  pas- 
tor, Dr.  J.  L.  Caston,  who  is  leading  the  drive. 

The  church   is  currently  en-'? ' 

gaged  in  building  its  sanctuary  |  mm       »  t*M. 

on  the  site  at  Jefferson  and  '  lUl^ffAnAliVfln 
j  Cimarron.  A  $25,000  cash  goal  ■^■**  "F  ^rjr^rHHi^Bii 
'  has  been  set  for  Easter  Sunday,  ^*L^^«—  M..-.  CS^^h 
,  the  first  gathering  of  funds.  ^fflOll  TO  OIllQ 
'      The  pastor  has  organized  the  !  ^ 

drive  into  100  squadrons  in-  ' 
,  volving  1200  workers,  who  have 
canvassed  the  membership  for-  The  Young  Peoples'  Choir  of 
pledges.  These  pledges  are  to  ,  ^j,^  Metropolitan  Ba  p  t  i  s  t 
be  paid   in  three  rallies.  March  '^  '^ 

10.     which     is      next     Sunday:    Church  will  sing  at  the  Olivet 

MaK?h  31.  and  April  21.  Easter  Baptist  Church,  981  E.  3oth 
Sunday.  street.  Sundav.  March  10.  at  3 
The  work  on  the  building  p.^,  -Mrs.  Delores  Hammond  is 
has  been  proceeding  on  a  cash  j  _,. 
basis  and  this  rally  will  re  '^^^  ?'«"'«'  and  director.  The 
place  funds  used  up  to  this  Rev.  Quincy  Lee.  assistant  pas- 
point.  Paul  Ca.ssell  is  the  tor  of  the  Metropolitan  Baptist 
building  contractor  and  Paul  Church,  of  which  Rev.  J.  E. 
R.  Williams  the  architect.  Evan.-;   is   pastor,   will   give   the 


At  Olivet  Sun. 


Bishop  Lewis 
To  Spealc  ot 
Lewis  Sunday 

The  Rt.  Rev.  F.  L.  Lewis,  pre- 
sidiiig  bishop  of  the  5th  Epis- 
copal District,  vvill  preach  at 
the  morning  worship  Sunday  at 
Lewis  Metropolitan  CME 
Church,  4900  S.  Western  ave- 
nue, f^v.  Isaiah  Scipio.  Jr..  is 
minister. 

Bishop  Lewis  is  the  president 
of  the  College  of  Bishops. 

Open  house  and  dedication  of 
the  ncvv  parsonage  at  1632  W. 
4r)th  street,  recently  purchased 
by  the  chruch.  vvill  be  held 
after  services  Sunday.  The 
Steward  and  Stewardess  Boards 
will  be  hosts  and  hostesses 


The  Senior  Choir  of  the 
Olivet  Baptist  Church  Mtill  also- 
sing.  Lucille  Bacote  Blair  is 
pianist  and  director  and  Wes- 
ley Coleman,  president. 

Rev.  Spencer  M.  Blair  will 
give  the  invocation.  The  pro- 
gram will  last  one  hour. 


Arbor  Day  at 
Will  Rogers 

The  Will  Rogers  Park  Staff  is 
holding  its  annual  tree  plant- 
ing ceremony  on  Arbor  Day. 
March  7  at  2:30  p.m.  at  the 
park,   1335  E.   103rd   street. 

Special  guest  will  be  Super- 
visor  Kenneth    Hahn. 

The  program  highlights  vvilf 
be  provided  by  the  St.  Law- 
rence School  students. 


Prayer  Day 
Is  Planned 

The  World  Day  of  Prayer  will 
he  ob.served  this  Friday  from  : 
10  a.m.  to  4  p.m..  at  the  City-  ! 
Wide  Mission  Church.  7S01  S. 
Main  street.  Rev.  Lu  Voilie  1 
Williams  and  Rev.  Lucille  L.  | 
Woods  are  the  ministers.  ', 

At  n  a.m..  Mrs.  Martha  i 
Webb,  who  visited  the  mission 
field  in  Monrovia.  Liberia,  and 
attended  the  World  Baptist  Al- 
liance Jubilee  in  London,  will 
speak.  Mrs.  O.  V.  Holliway, 
minister  of  music  at  the  Wash- 
ington Memorial  Church  of 
■  Christ,  Holiness,  and  her  group, 
will   entertain. 

Everyone  is  urged  to  bring  a  ' 
lunch  and  enioy  the  hour  of  j 
fellowship  that  will  start  at  1 
p.m.  The  church  will  provide 
punch. 

.Mother      Sims,      outstanding 
mi.-^sionary.  will  take  charge^' 
l-.M')  p.m.     Rev.  J.  P.  King.  mXxiii^ 
ister  of  liip  Full  Gospel  Baptist 
Church,  wil  preach  at  2:30  p,m. 


r-LEWIS  METROPOLITAN  CME  GHURCH-i 

4900  SOUTH  WESTERN  AVENUE 

ISAIAH   SCIPIO,   JK.,   Minictcr 

9:15  A.M.  Sun.  School  6:00  Ch.  Yth.  Fellowship 

10:45   A.M.   Morn.  Worship       7^30   P.M    Evonmg  Worship 


2*feff^ 


*  KARRISON-ROSS 

FUNERAL-  HOME 


L.  HARRISON 


1 139    Rresfen«     BW. 
LU.  87155 


MLK.  BOSS 


Womanless  Wedding 

Opportunity  Baptist  Church. 
1112  E.  23rd  street,  announces 
a  "Womanless  Wedding"  to  be 

held  at   the  church,  Sunday  at 
7:30   p.m. 


Eagle  Want  Ads- 
15   wards   for  SI 


Victory  Baptist  Day  School  offers . . . 

The    Basic    Educational    Opport-jnities   of 

Othtr  Schools  plus 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  t' Practice 

ENROLL  NOW? 

Vacancies  Available  for  Kindergarten  Only 
Extended  Day  Care  Program 

"individual  Instruction  Predominant 
Feature  of  Instruction" 

6:30  A.M.  until  tnSO  P.M. 

BUS  TRANSPOUTATION  CAFETEHIA 

R«v.   Artuhr  A.   P«t«r«,   Pasto^;  Mrs.  'Florence  Parrette,  Vice-Prin. 

PHONE:  ADAMS   1-2424  or  M732 


Subscribe  to  the  California 
Eagle.     One  year.  S4 


Free  Clinic 

Thomas  Roy  Peyton,  M.D.,  Is 
conducting  a  free  clinic  Mon- 
days. 1-2  p,m.,  and  Thursda\s, 
8.7  p,m..  for  a  month  at  Rose 
.\eita  Hospital.  4412  S.  Hooper 
avenue.  Examination  and 
medicine  for  correction  of  con- 
.stipation  will  he  without 
charge. 

The  first  clinic  was  held 
Monilav. 


Science  Shrinks  Piles 
New  Way  Without  Surgery 

Finds  Healing  Substance  That  Does  Both— 
Rebeves  Pain— Shrinks  Hemorrhoids 


YOUR  TEETH 

Commaiid  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

Demands  Attention 
TODAY  -  SEE 

DR.  GAY 

Vouf    Friendly    Credit    Dentiet 

•  Plates    Repaired    While 
You  Wait 

•  EXTRACTIONS  -  Teeth 
Pulled   and   Filled 

•  FAST  -  FRIENDLY 
SERVICE 

1062  E.Vernon  Ave. 

Corner    Vernon    &    Central 
Upstairs 

AD.  4-1397 


New  Yark.  >.  V.  (Special)  - 
For  the  first  time  science  has 
found  a  new  heahng  substance 
with  the  sstonishing  ability  to 
jhrink  hemorrhoids  and  to  relieve 
pain— without  surgery. 

In  one  hemorrhoid  case  after 
another,  "very  striking:  improve- 
ment" wa.«  reported  and  verified 
by  doctors'  observations. 

Pain  was  relieved  promptly. 
.Vnd,  while  gently  relieving  pain. 
actual  reduction  or  retraction 
(shrinking)  took  place. 

And  most  amazing  of  all-this 
improvement  was  maintained  in 
cases  where  doctors'  observations 
were  continued  over  a  period  of 
many  months.'    ^ 

In  fact,  results  ware  go  thor- 
ough that  sufferer*  were  able  to 
make  such  astoniyhingr  statements 
aa  "f  ile^  have  ceased  to  be  a 


problem!"  And  among  theae  suf- 
ferers were  a  very  wide  variety 
of  hemorrhoid  conditions,  some  of 
10  to  20  years'  standing. 

All  this,  without  the  use  of 
narcotics,  anesthetics  or  astrin- 
gents of  any  kind.  The  secret  ia 
a  new  healing  substance  (Bio- 
Dyne*  )  —the  discovery  of  a  world- 
famous  research  institution.  Al- 
ready. Bio-Dyne  is  in  wide  use 
for  healing  injured  tissue  on  all 
parts  of  the  body. 

This  new  healing  substance  is 
offered  \T\Miippositor]/  or  o'ntmtnt 
form  called  Preparation  H*  Ask 
for  individually  sealed  convenient 
Preparation  H  suppositories  or 
Preparation  H  ointment  with  spe- 
cial applicator.  Preparation  H  is 
sold  at  all  drug  stores.  Satisfaction 
guaranteed  or  meney  refunded. 


\i//  D/cin/f>)nl 


SATURDAY 

7iM  fM. 

t* 
•«0  P.M. 

ION   RADIO 
STATION 


'/I   ii  III  I 


PRECIOUS  MOMENTS- 


CHARLES  TRAMMEL 


Brought 


K 
G 
F 


1230  ON 
I  DIAL 


DIAMONiyS 


•^9^f  friiV 


EMPIRE  FURNITURE  STORE: 

::.?.  so    fENTP-M   AVf     AT  4o!l,  <^.T 


A  NEW  WAY  TO  LOOK  AT  FUNERALS 


In  timej  pjst  t  funersl  w«t  a 
tribute  to  the  departed  only. 
Angelus  Funeral  Home  believes 
in  a  "Service  for  the  Living"  by 
providing  beautiful  tributes  that 
express  perfectly  tl|e  wordless 
emotions  of  the  heart.  We  ,offer 
understanding  care,  complete 
facilities  and  distinctive  surround- 
ings to  help  the  fanliily  through 
a  difficult  period. 


UNERAL  Homes 

LOS  ANGELES:  1030  E.  Jefferson  Blvd.- Phone  ADams  2-5188 
LONG  BEAGH:  718  L  Anaheim  St- Phone  L  B.  700449 


Li- 'irsS#*fc.:^ 


i:-,i,  :,.^ 


WF^- 


Thursday  7:00  to  8:00  p.m.  "Roundup" 


/  y. 


r 

"I  SEARCH  FOR  ADVENTURE"  Thursday  7:00  to  8:00  p.m.  "Roundup" 

WHAT^mWFORmI 


CHANNEL 


I 

1 


Anotlier  exciting  Free  "Gold  Tope  Dividend"  Offer 
« . .  handsome  Modernware  Kitchen  Tools  in 

glooming,  mirror-polished,  lifetime  stoinless  steel 
with   heat-resistant,  plastic  handles 
in  smort,  contemporary  colors  of  petal 
pink,  turquoise,  and  jet  block,  electronically  fused 
ond  guaranteed  never  to  come  opart!  Ten  "most 
used"  gadgets  and  racks  to  hang  them  on! 

Only  one  $20-envelope  of  Ralphs  gold 
cash-register  tapes  per  item! 

GOOD  AT  ANY  S^sSsi*   MARKET 

This  5Ss£^  Coupon 


Colltet  all  II 

for  • 

trvly  tffieitnt  kltebtn 

t.  ■•itinc  SpaoR 

2.  Lari*  Tariiir 

3.  Parfarattd  Spean 

4.  Hankartar  Taraar 

5.  Patata  Mathar 
I.  Maat  LiHar 
T.  Saup  Larfia 
I.  Caka  Spatala 
S.  Sarratad  Cirviac 

Knifa 
19.  Ceek  Fark 
I.  Wall  Raak 


IV 


.CL 


I 


Jet 
'Black' 


rrs^TravTr'•^;r•^r%\Tr•^;^•>1r•lIIa^r/•-T/k^twrr•^T>k^T«\r«\TI'•^t/-«^;rii^T^«^T 


r•^T/'|Mr•1I^•^vr•nr•ATtt^;r■\vraXTl'•xTr•tTr-•lar-•^Tr•^Tw<Trk^T/■•fT/'•^TfktrratTn 


,      WORTH  *1.00 

fOh  purchase  of  one  Swift's  Premium  or  Norbest  Hen  or  Tom 

TURKEY 

Thursday,  Friday/Saturday  and  Sunday  only  March  7,  8,  9  &  10,  1957 


LUER  QUALITY 
TENDER  SMOKED 

HAMS 


WhoU  w 

Full  Shonk  Half     Lb. , 

BUTT  END,  Lb. 


53c 


\;^' 


Petal 
Pink 


« 


W'vi 


\n 


r/^ 


j  1 1 •■-• 


t» 


Turquoise 


-Q: 


PEACHES 

KING'S  Fancy  Elberta 
Halves  or  Sliced 


14^1.- 


19 


Fresh  Barracuda 

By  Hit  pi«ct 
Eithtr  tn6 


Lb. 


29«  Lb"**' ^"*' 35c 


5Ss£^  CATERING 

Chocolate  Ripple 
Ice  Cream 


Pint. 


2.49 


Candy 


JAFFE  MINIATURE  MINTS, 
6HIRARDELLI  FLICKS  OR 
ROCKWOOD  j%        0%m, 

WAFERS        1'/2-oz Ofor^d^ 

PIu«    Ic    Tax 


:''»:.r»:./»%.  rv  r»vy«\-v«inr«\-.Y«\v/-«w»<v/« 


I.UER  QUALITY  WINDOW   PACK 

Sliced  _  . 

Bacon    Mb.  pkg..^  a# 

IDLE  WILD  FARMS  FROZEN 
ROCK  CORNISH 

Game 
Hens         14.0Z 


99 


Uedtojvf 


BANANA  CREMES 

Cookies 


6' '2-02 


21 


RIALTO  BLEND  QREEN  &  WHITE 

Asparagus     ^  ^ 
Speorsui^ oz  .  jLw 


ROYAL  PRINCE 
SOUTHERN 


23 


Yams  lib  1  or 

GOOD  lAT  ANY  5fefeii     MARKET 

Coupon 


FISH 


FILLET  OF  EASTERN 
OCEAN 

Mb. 
Pkg. 


Perch 

BREADED 

Sole 

BREAMED 

Shrimp 


12-oz.. 

Pkg..., 

8-oz. 
Pkg 


FROZEN 

37 

43 

59 


OSCAR  MAYER 

Luncheon 

Meat    12  or    Con 


29 


FANCY  WASHINGTON 

HOTHou«  Rhubarb 


Lb. 


15 


ARIZONA 
SWEET 


FRESH 


Grapefruit 
Carrots 

.5' 


TENDER 


LYNDEN 

Noodles  & 


Chicken 


U-oz 


27 


LYNDEN 

Sliced 
Chicken  s-^oz 


53< 


I'TLS 


This 


WORTH  20 

On  Purchase  of  one  lO-lb.  Bag  Russet 

POTATOES 


Thursdoy,  Friday,  Saturday  and  Sunday  only,  March  7,  8,  9  and  10,  1957 


^/m/ftmff^fflJFJi^^J^^*^«^J&J<iiWL!HU»'  LIMIT  ONE  POTATO  COUPON   PER  CUSTOMER 


NIK  NAK  SALAD 

Pears  Mb.  i3-oz. 


25 


MARIE     ELIZABETH   IMPORTED 
SKINLESS  &  BONELESS 


Sardines 


3V4-OZ. 


31 


5^S^  Pepper 


2-oz. 


11'  .19 


Pillsbury  Flour 

I  "3e  Off" 

5Lb  AQc 
Bog  HP  ^ 


S-lb.  Bag  Marked  "3c  Off 
Pric*  52e 
Los  3e 

Sole  Price. 


Woodbury  Soap 


WITH  XL7 

Regular  Size 

3  or  28c 

Plut   Ic  Tax- 


Both  Size 

2.r27« 

Pluj   Ic  Tax 


ALL  CHICKEN 


6-oz. 
Con 


2  0,  27« 


Plui  Ic  Tax 


PEANUT  BUnER 

Creamy  or  Crunchy 

IC       "lAc 


12-oz. 


18-oz. 


PINEAPPLE 

DOLE  Sliced 


15-oz. 


17 


S«*r0  Hfwrt  9  A.M.-f  P.M. 
M«n.  Ihri*  Sat.  9  A.M.-« 
P.M.  twnilay.  S«ni«  tt«r«i 
•|i«ii  later.  Coll  l«c«l  tt«r« 
far  kaurt.  Crtnihaw-Raiiaa 
Mara  m^n  till  mMniglit 
avary  nifkt. 


ize^o^ 


SgJLLS     P^OR      LESS 


ALLSWEET 

MARGARINE 

Mb. 


BAKERY^ 


White  or  Wheat  Bread 

FRESH   FROM  5^£«£s^  OWN   BAKERY 
FINEST  QUALITY  AND  ^^     ^ 

YOU  ISAVE  MONEY!!  ^M    f\C 

Large  Mb,  6.5-oz^b\# 


5Sg^ Cinnamon  Rolls 

21' 


TENDER   ROLLS  BAKED  WITH 
FINEST  CINNAMON,  SUGAR, 
RAISINS,  THEN   ICED  Pkg    of  6 


FRESH   PACT  FROZEN 
CUT 


Broccoli  10  oz  21  for  A  7  ^ 


Vi^Hos^ 


DOG  FOOD 

Be«f- Vegetable,  Chicken,   Liver  »r 
Meal'  Flavor 

15-oz. 

Con 


117' 


Plui    'c  Tox 


Vano  Liquid  Starch 

Vz-Gal.  Mariiad  "7e  Off"  ^L  '^  C 

Pric*  5Je  L*t<  7c  Sale  Price  Vf  ^0 

■. ■ Plu»  2e  Ten 


/ 


RITZ  CRACKER! 

NABISCO 


Mb. 


FREE  with S^S^  Gold  Tapes    .;  Stainless  Steel  Mixing  Bowls!  Dishes!  Nylonsl 


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FISf.R  H  OM.-ISflOOD  ll'EEK—Mrmht-rs  of  V.ctn  Phi  B.ln  s;r'.ruy  k  or- 
jhipffd  at  the  Chur,h  of  Dn  inc  (rU'dnticc  It'!  Srirjitny  n(  part  of  the  fornifil 
f^sfr-nnir  of  Finer  II  nminhno/i  II  rck.  Siiifi/l  Irotri  Irit:  Mnin.  l.rninn 
Ji  efrnr,  rhipter  prffidenl :  Thrlmn  Ptnibirton .  rh'nirman  of  rfilfdunSiori :  \fliic 
R^der,  nuitress  of  ceremonies;  Alpha  P.  Arttolil^  oenrrnl  ihuirnifut .  and  hn'he'- 


trie  Pierte.  proqrnm  ehnirmnn.  Stnndinci .  Ln-irrie  A rnislrong ,  spenker:  Jnsie 
Bnine.  "II  oinnn  of  the  Ycnr:"  Ferrol  Stirkf.  piildicity  chnirrtinn:  Rev.  CAnytoH 
Rij"ii!.  Jir.n  Keele.  t.thel  A  Uxander,  Di  lores  McAdoo,  radio  prograrn  chair'. 
tiian.  find   i  olanda  Bilhni/sley. 


Zetas 

Honor 

Teacher 

The  Finer  Womanhood  Week 
observance  hy  members  of 
2^ta  Phi  Beta  sorority  was 
climaxed  with  a  testimonial 
banquet  honoring  Los  Ange- 
les' "Woman  of  the  Year"  on 
Saturday.  March  2,  at  the 
Clarion  Club  on  Sunset  bhd. 
More  than  300  guests  wit- 
nessed the  presentation  of  the 
Zeta  Plaque  to  Mrs.  Josie  Gray 
Bain  as  "Woman  of  the  Year." 
She  was  honored  for  the  un- 
selfish manner  in  which  she 
has  contributed  hef  time  and 
lervices  to  the  community. 

Mrs.  Bain  has  been  a  teach- 
er in  the  Los  Angeles  city 
schools  for  the  past  eight 
years.  During  this  time  she  has 
served  as  a  training  teacher 
for  Occidental  College,  the 
first  of  her  race  to  be  .so  hon- 
ored, and  as  teacher  at  USC. 
She  was  recently  assigned  as 
vice  principal  to  San  Jose 
Street  Sthool  where  she  has 
served  as  vice  president  of  the 
PTA. 

Mrs.  Bain  is  the  wife  of  the 
Rev.  John  C.  Bain,  pastor  of 
Bowen  Memorial  Methodist 
Church,  and  as  a  minister's 
wife  she  headed  and  spon- 
sored many  organizations 
within  her  church,  as  well  as 
tho.se  on  a  city  and  state  level. 

Mrs.  Bain  was  an  honor  stu- 
dent at  Tennes.'iee  State  Col- 
lege and  Drake  University, 
holds  an  M.A.  degree  from  Los 
Angeles  State  College  and  has 
done  graduate  work  at  USC 
and  Immaculate  Heart  Col- 
lege. 


TERRIFIC  TICKET  .^ALES  —  Memher^  of  the  \r,irl 
Kriiiihts  nrr  nelttna  uhole-hrnrtcd  support  for  thrlr  forth- 
comiri/j  rorktail  party  nnd  dance  this  Sntiirdn\  .  Mnrrh  ^ .  nt 
Pnrk  Manor.  They  are  shoiin  //ifin//  lii,kt  Is  to  the  nieinlt^rs' 
tiive^.  Seated  on  floor,  from  left,  .\lriies.  John  Srriylrs,  James 
Cnthoitn,  Slonfiiall  Jaikson.  and  (.h/irlrs  Maion:  seiond 
roii  .  .\fnie>.  Ciis  Patterson.  Sarnin/  I.it llrton .  Rohert  .-Itkins 


nnd  Curtis  I  hompson.  Standing,  hark  roxc,  Charles  Macon, 
president  of  the  Social  A  niahts :  John  Smylcs,  Stoneuall 
Jackson.  Cus  Patterson,  Rr.hrrt  Atkm/,  Samuel  Lrttlcton, 
James  Calhoun  and  Curtis  Thompson.  Music  iiill  he  fur- 
nished hy  Jeep  Smith'  and  dancinij  rcill  get  undemay 
promptly  at  10  p.m.  and  last  until  2  a.m. 


Charles  Drew  Auxiliary 
Hears  Judge  D.  Williams 


Afbor  Day  --^'^^  Anniversary 


INTERESTING  FACTS 

Delta  Sicma  Theta  sorority 
presents  Leontyne  Price  in 
concert  at  the  Philharmonic. 
March  2.3.  To  say  Miss  Price 
has  one  of  the  finest  voices 
of  this  genera-tion  is  putting  it 
mildly.  She  has  two  other  im- 
portant events  for  this  music 
season  following  her  westcoast 
appearance.  Cleopatra  in 
Handel's  Julius  Caesar  and 
four  performances  of  Verdi's 
Requiem  with  the  Phila- 
delphia rn-chestra  in  >'ew  York 
and   Philadplphia. 

The  society  of  graduate  sur- 
geons of  the  L.  A.  County  Hos- 
pital is  holding  its  Tih  an- 
nual fornm  at  the  .\mhassa- 
dor  Hotel.  Four  hundred  sur- 
geons are  attending  sessions 
of  the  five-day  forum  and 
among  those  we  noticed  were 
Drs.  Walter  Davis,  Welles 
For'de.  Chas.  Brown.  Gregory 
Murray.  K.  Shropshire  and  Dr. 
N.  Ford  of  San  Diego.  A  for- 
ma! banquet  will  be  held 
March  7  for  the  surgeons  in 
the  Embassy  Room  of  the  Am- 
basador. 
IN  MEMORY'S  ATTIC: 

Umm-mm  delightful,  delici- 
(Continued  on  Page  8) 


Mrs.  Dickerson  Hawkins  of 
the  Women's  Auxiliary  of  the 
Charles  R.  Drew  Medical  So- 
ciety, presented  the  distin- 
guished Judge  David  Williams 
at  the  group's  regular  meet- 
ing in  the  home  of  Gregory 
Murray  last  Saturday  night. 

Judge  Williams  discussed 
the  proposed  changes  in  the 
judicial  system  to  speed  up 
the  hearing  of  cases.  In  his 
discussion.  Judge  Williams 
pointed  out  the  advantages 
and  disadvantages  of  the  pro- 
posed changes  as  they  af- 
fected the  judical  personnel, 
the  litigants,  and  the  tax- 
payer. His  talk  proved  highly 
interesting  and  informative  to 
the  attentive-  group  of  ladies. 

Prior  to  Judge  Williams' 
talk,  the  business  meeting, 
conducted  by  the  president, 
Mrs.  J.  Phyrom  Taylor,  com- 
pleted plans  for  a  rummage 
sale  to  be  held  on  Saturdav. 
March  9,  at  2201  S.  Central 
a\enue. 

Mesdames  Raleigh  Bledsoe 
and  Henry  Jenkins  are  co- 
chairing  this  project.  Mrs. 
William  A.  Beck  reported  that 
arrangements  wjre  well  un- 
derway for  the  3th  annual 
Bridge  tournament  to  be  held 
on  May  11,  at  the  Golden 
State  Auditorium.  Proceeds 
from  this  event  will  be  used 
lor    the    nurse's    scholarship 


program  conducted  under  the 
group's  sponsorship. 

Mmes.  Gregory  Murray  and 
Omar  Stratton  were  hostesses 
to  the  auxiliary's  iSaturday 
night    meeting. 


Fourth,  fifith  and  sixth-grade 
students  assisted  in  the  ob- 
servance of  the  Thirty-Sixth 
Street  School  Arbor  Day  cele- 
bration held  last  week  on  the 
school  grounds. 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  M.  M3les 
repeated  their  marriage  \ows 
last  Sunday  afternoon  at  Zion 
Hill  Church,  .with  Rev.  Timo- 
thy M.  Chambers  officiating. 
The  couple  were  celebrating 
their  Silver  anniversary. 


CLUBS 


FASM10N5 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


The  California  Eagle— 7 


T  IVES  FY -FIFTH  YEAR  — Mr.  and  .Mrs.  George  Broi.n,  uell  known  couple,  uere 
honored  hy  friends  on  their  stlzfr  nedding  anniversary  last  ueek.  .Mr.  Broun  ts  the  pro- 
prietor of  Broun' s  Motor  Shop,  and  his  uife  is  financial  secretary  of  Progressive  Baptist 
Church.  ' 

George  Browns  Honor^ed 
On  Silver  Wedding  Day 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Brown 
celebrated  their  25th  wedding 
anniversary  on  Feb. 24  at  their 
home  on  W.  36th  place.  Mar- 
riage vows  were  repeated  with 
Rev.  B.  O.  Byrd.  pastor  of  the. 
New  Hope  Baptist  Church,  of- 
ficiating. 

Guests  were  greeted  by  the 
couple  as  they  .stood  beneath 
an  arch  of  green  fern  with 
t\vo  large  silver  bells  hanging 
from  the  center.  On  each  side 
of  the  arch  were  tall,  white 
wicker  baskets  containing  ar- 
rangements of  pompoms  and 
white  gladiolas  sprayed  with 
silver.  Other  floral  arrange- 
ments and  the  beautifully  dec- 
orated table  were  carried  out 
in  silver  and  white.  The  huge 
wedding  cake  was  silver  and 
white  with  just  a  touch  of 
pink. 

The  bride  was  radiant  in  a 
lace  ballerina-length  gown 
over  embroidered  satin. 

Miss  Eva  Porter,  a  child- 
hood friend  of  the  bride's, 
who  stood  with  her.  wore  a 
pale  blue  crepe  ballerina- 
length  gown. 

Henry  Farrar.  a  life-long 
friend  of  the  groom,  was  best 
man.  The  bride  was  given 
away  by  the  couple's  only 
son,  Charles,  who  wore  a  for- 
mal blue  suit. 


Music  throughout  the  aft- 
ernoon was  provided  hy  Mrs. 
Edna  H,  Porter,  Andrea  Green 
Wade,  Vermya  Phillips  and 
T.  W.  Coggs  Jr. 

Katherine  Adams  and  Ruth 
Moore  were  in  charge  of  the 
guest  book.  The  gift  rooms 
were  beautifully  arranged  by 
Clytie  Gipson.  Roberta  Hill. 
Bertha  Lee  Porter  and  Shirley 
Lochart. 

Harriet  Scott.  Clara  Green. 
Lois  Davis.  Inez  Ward  and 
Thelma  Koerber  were  in 
charge  of  refreshments. 


Other  hostesses  were  Mary 
Fontena.  Elizabeth  Alexis, 
Gertrude  Holmes.  Cleste  Far- 
rar. Vermya  Phillips,  Jeannie 
Farrow.  Althera  Sprueill,  Alice 
Lorant.  Hattie  Williams.  Crys- 
tal Irwin.  Frances  Jones  and 
Curley  Adams.  ■   ' 

The  affair  was;  supervised 
-by  Olivia  Parker,  who  was 
assisted  by  Lelia  Montgomery'. 

Out-of-town  guests  were 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  W.  J.  Pender  of 
Berkeley  and  Mrs.  Marena 
Bell  Williams  of  Kansas  Citj-, 
Mo. 


Lavish  Bon  Voyage  Party 
For  AHhur  Lee  Simpkins 


Arthur  Lee  Simpkins.  inter- 
nationally known  vocalist, 
was  entertained  with  a  lavish 
dinner  party  in  the  fashiona- 
ble home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Vic- 
tor Hugh  Greene,  12(l8  S.  St. 
Andrews  place. 

Forty  guests  were  on  hand 
to  honor  the  singer.  Jenie 
Brewster  played  the  piano  as 
Simpkins  sang  several  of  his 
newest  songs  as  well  as  some 
old  favorites. 

Following  his  stint  in  New 
York's    Latin    Quarter.    Simp- 


kins will  be  off  to  Havana 
and  several  Latin  Amwican 
cities  to  fill  nightclub  en- 
gagements. 

Guests     en.ioying     the     de- 


SPEAKER— Judge  David 
W.  Williams  discussed  tjie 
judicial  system  at  Women's 
Auxiliary  meeting  last  ueeJe, 


FASHION  SHOIV  WINNERS— Among  the  .six  Talla- 
dega  coeds  who  won  prizes  at  the  annual  fashion  show  spon- 
sored hy  the  Foster  Hall  House  was  Frances  Pitts  of 
Pasadena,  daughter  of  Dr.  Raymond  Pitts,  professor  of  edu- 
cation at  Los  Angeles  State  College.  Both  Dr.  and  .Mrs.  Pitts 
<rrc  graduates  of  Talladega  College.  Pictured  from  left:  Car- 
he  Broun,  South    Carolina,   honorable  mention^   modeling; 


Carolyn  Tobert,  South  Carolina,  first  prize,  designing;  Fran- 
ces Pitts,  second  prize,  designing:  Airs.  A.  D.  Gray,  who 
presented  the  awards:  Louise  Anderson,  Houston,  honorable 
mention,  designing;  Maria  Griffith,  Tyler,  Texas,  first  prize 
modeling;  Giuendolyn  Bryant,  Georgia,  second  prize,  model- 
ing. 


SET  TO  TOUK—Arthur^ 
Lee  Simpkins,  noted  society 
tenor,  heads  for  New  York't' 
famous  Latin  Quarter,  ' 

lightful  evening  were  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Jack  Hoskins,  Mr.  anil 
Mrs.  John  Davis.  Mr.  and'  Mrs. 
Julius  Clopton,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jesse  Kinney,  Mr.  and  Mrj. 
PauI^Harris,  Mr.  and  Mr«. 
Percy  Moore,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  M 
Baugh.  Miss  Emma  Goodmaa, 
Mrs.  Grace  Harnden.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Johnny  Norwood,  Mrs. 
Sue  Pryme.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  H. 
Hawkes.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Clar- 
ence Merriweather,  Dr.  aral 
Mrs.  Herbert  Fairs,  Mr.  aJtfl 
Mrs.  Billingsley,  Mrs.  Va^Jie 
W.  Brown.  Frank  Scott  a»l 
Paul  Thompson. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benny  DeQukr, 
Mr.  and, Mrs.  Leroy  Johnson, 
Ovido  Maurice,  Cecelia  Da- 
vork  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hait 
Sheffield  assisted  with  tl|t 
dinnet. 


/ 


> 


8-Th«  California  Eagle 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


DOT'S  DASHES 

h  DOROTHEA  FOSTER 


Positive 


thftw  ^h  !:u  fu-^  "  °^  ^'^P""^  ^5  t"^*  annual  lingeria 
54  ,^;ir^i^''^  \^'\^'fl^  ^'^  ^^^^  P'ace  at  Giro's  March 
1;^^  ♦  ^?py-^^^  HARRIETTE  JOHNSON  wielding  the 
wana  to  bring  the  most  glamorous  "under  fashions" 
to  local  soaahtes.  Already  the  reservation  list  reads 
iute    who  s  who"  in  the  social  circle. 

Exquisite  spring  floral  arrangements  on  the  ta- 
Wes  of  the  Pacific  Town  Club  added  just  the  right  air 
0  f'«Ka"ce  to  the  combination  installation  banquet 
of  the  Pacific  Town  Club  and  the  Town  Club  Auxil- 
iary last  Saturday  night.  DR.  H.  CLAUDE  HUDSON 
was  instalhng  officer  and  ATTY.  WALTER  GORDON, 
master  of  ceremonies. 

It  was  nice  seeing  LEROY  JEFFRIES,  Ebony  rep- 
resentative from  Chicago.  ATTY.  and  MRS.  GEORGE 
CANNADY.  ROBERT  and  JERI  WOODS.  AL  and 
ETHEL  MADDOX,  BETTY  and  HORACE  CLARK, 
DUANE  VEST,  KAY  SIMS,  KAY  PRICE,  FAYE 
OWENS.  STELLA  and  EMMETTE  WYNDON,  VAINO 
and  LORENZO  SPENCER  and  many  other  charming 
people.  LEONTYNE  KING  took  the  gavel  to  head  the 
ladies  while  HAROLD  SCOTT  took  over  the  leader- 
ship of  the  men  of  the  Town  Club. 

Potpourri 
Dot's  potpourri!  NORMA  and  FRANK  HARVEY 
welcomed  their  heiress  last  week  at  Cedars  of  Leban- 
on Hospital.  DOROTHY  ROWLAND  and  LaVERNE 
JONES  complimented  little  DAVID  JONES  (who  now 
boasts  of  being  six)  with  a  birthdav  partv  at  Travel- 
town  in  Griffith  Park.  ONER  and'ADDIE  BARKER 
will  pour  cocktails  on  March  10  in  honor  of  Dr.  Bar- 
ker's sis.  JOAN  BARKER,  who  will  be  celebrating  her 
birthday. 

Phi  Delphians  will  get  together  at  BARBARA 
HERNDON'S  home  on  Saturday  night  to  honor  club 
member  BETTY  WALLACE  with  a  miscellaneous 
fhower.  LOTTIE  and  DAVE  ROBINSON.  JOEL  Mc- 
GUIN.  BILL  WARNER,  ROCKY  and  MARIANNE 
BROWN,  all  agreed  that  JOHN  and  MAYME  KELLY 
take  the  prize  for  the  delicious  barbecued  chicken, 
which  they  served  last  Sunday  afternoon. 

That  was  CHARLENE  JOHNSON  and  CAROLYN 
JOLLY  who  created  such  a  sensation  last  Saturday 
night  when  Lester  Horton's  Adult  Workshop  enter- 
tained at  the  Dance  Theatre.  ALBERT  HAMPTON. 
JR.  will  claim  YVONNE  GLADYS  ROWAN  as  his  bride 
on  March  9th.  Announcements  out  that  ELLA  HUTCH- 
INSON  and  BRYANT  GRANT  have  been  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
since  January  23rd. 

Busineis  and  Pleasure 
EMILY  PORTWIG  combined  business  with  plea- 
Kure  when  she  attended  the  National  Board  meeting 
In  Charlotte.  N.C.  In  Macon,  Ga.,  she  was  guest  of 
DR.  and  MRS.  R.  S.  SMITH  and  was  also  guest  speak- 
er at  their  PTA  Founder's  Day  program.  In  Atlanta, 
Ga.,  she  was  the  guest  of  DR.  and  MRS.  FRED  Mc- 
LENDOX. 

MRS.  EMMA  HOLT  made  it  very  pleasant  when 
she  entertained  her  Idle  Hour  Club  on  Tuesday.  Sat- 
urday afternoon  found  members  of  the  Nanette  Club 
enjoying  themselves  as  guests  of  ELSIE  PARCHMAN. 
MRS.  SETH  LEE  took  her  turn  to  entertain  the  Girl 
Friends  last  Mondav  night. 

MRS.  KELLY  WILLIAMS  and  daughter,  PAULA, 
had  one  of  those  very  delightful  baby  showers  on 
Sunday  afternoon  and  in  the  spotlight  was  MARY 
MARGARET  MOORE  ROSS.  Those  were  clever  name 
plates  that  the  Anchorettes  used  last  Saturday  after- 
noon at  the  Luau  Restaurant  in  Beverly  Hills,  when 
they  celebrated  their  10th  anniversary.  I  understand 
plates  were  the,  work  of  RICHMONA  DUNNE  and 
MARIANNE  BOWMAN. 

SANDY  HILL  JOHNSON  reigned  as  Queen  of  the 
annual  San  Francisco  Link's  Mardi  Gras  Ball,  which 
Was  held  in  the  El  Patio  Ballroo'm  in  San  Francisco. 
SANDY  is  the  daughter  of  DR.  C.  W.  HILL  and  daugh- 
ter-in-law of  CLARA  WEBB  of  Los  Angeles. 

More  Doings 
MITCHELL  MILES  resting  comfortably  at  home 
and  his  charming  wife,  MABLE,  passing  up  all  the 
social  events  until  he  is  better.  DR.  and  MRS.  HOW- 
ARD ALLEN  were  hosts  to  the  Script  and  Score  meet- 
ing last  Saturday  night.  RUTI^  WEBSTER  took  over 
the  hostess  role  for  the  Teacup  Club  on  Saturday  after- 
noon. Medical,  Dental  and  Pharmaceutical  Assn.  met 
on  Wednesday  at  the  Southeast  Health  Center  with 
DR.  JOHN  LYONS  as  guest  speaker.  The  association 
is  making  elaborate  plans  for  its  annual  variety 
s,h  o  w  on  May  18.  IRENE  PARKS  entertained  Les 
Dames  at  the  Town  Tavern.  Topic  of  conversation  was 
their  annual  Comedy  Hour  which  is  scheduled  for 
May  19  at  the  Oasis  Club. 

Birthday  Greetings 
Happy  birthday  to  the  following  nice  people  whose 
natal  day  is  from  March  1st  to  10th:  ADELE  WEAVER, 
OWEN  LITHECOMB,  CHARLENE  JOHNSON,  AL- 
BERTA JONES,  MARJORIE  McPHEARSON,  LOUISE 
BEAVERS.  HORTENSE  GRAHAM.  RUTH  WADE, 
MAE  WHITESIDE,  LOUISE  BLODGETT  and  BETTYE 
HOWARD. 

Sunday  begins  NATIONAL  NEGRO  PRESS  week 
and  the  Sunday  Morning  Breakfast  Club  will  honor 
members  of  the  Negro  press  at  their  regular  meeting 
on  Sunday  morning  at  the  Clark  Hotel. 


mrokMAiiom  on 


OHH  U  MOUKS 


BAIL    BONPS    FREE 

1  cuts  KING  III  BAIL  BOND  AGINCY' 


909  East  6th  Street 


MU.  5500 


WHAT 

DO 

YOU 


WANT 
OUT  OF 
LIFE? 


Ti»»el? . . .  jeeurity? ...»  home  or  ImsinMi  «rf  your  o^m? 
Get  sUrtod  towfard  a  happier,  moM  nmu^%  life  the 
Broadway  Federal  Saviags  way.  FaUowwf  a  Mfukr  asv- 
ings  plan  will  giv«  >-oa  a  very  rttl  amao  of  MOaaiflisb- 
ment . . .  because  you  kntne  you're  on  tlio  w«y  t*  a  bottor 
liie.  And  ymir  money  will  CROW  and  CROW  with 
BroMdway  Federal's  high  dividend  rate,  eom^ouadod  SMai- 
aBouaUy  on  all  accounts.  We'ie  right  in  your  aeifhberilood, 
wady  to  give  you  friendly,  perwnal  mvioe.  Drop  hi  (odayl 
AU  ACCOUNTS  INSURSD  TO  $10,009 


Broadway  Federal  Savings 

4501   South  Broadway  ADams  2-427  1 


The  real  challenge  to  the  onion.  Experiment  with  the 
homemaker  is  wis*  buying  of  amount  your  family  relishes.  A 
ataples  and  careful  planning  bit  of  chopped  parsley  adds 
of  menus  co'^  ^"^  *  ****  **'  vitamin. 

It  is  a  "good  plan  to  have  a  Now.  if  your  head  aches  and 
shelf  stocked  with  items  for  you  are  t.red  and  generally  hst- 
emergencies  that  often  arise  less  and  you  do  not  want -to 
Xn  we  have  postponed  shop-  shop  or  cook  tnen  do  buy  a 
ping  for  one  reason  or  another,  supply  of  those  marvelous 
Xn^iZ>?tant   member  of   this   Abundav.ta   tablets.  They  sup- 


ply    those    vitamins    which    we 


iportar 
supply     should     be-xlarge    and  „  ,  • 

small  cans  of  Carnation  con-  «o.often  lose  by  overcooking  or 
densed  milk,  all  types  of  soups;  us>ng  J^^^^^^^ept  too  long.  We 
mushrooms,  tuna,  tomatoes  and  often  do  not  balance  the  diet 
fruit     Also    include    a    biscuit    »nd  the  body  suffers.  This  food 


and  cake  mix.  You  will  be  sur- 
prised how  convenient  this  lit- 
tle supply  will  be. 
The  items  in  the  ads  for  this 

weekend  which  s^"*  s*^"*/"'    you  foods  aa  fresh  as  is  possi 
money-savers    are    the   turkeys    ^      ^^^  ^^^  j.^,^^   ^^^^.^ 

offered    by   Thnftimart.    Check 
also  on  their  chuck  pot  roasts. 


supplement    does    do    wonders 
for  those  who  take  it. 

In  this  column  we  try  to  get 
you  to  buy  at  Thriftimart  and 
Ralphs   because   they  do  bring 


II  hSTERX  STATE  GOLF  OIIICI.H.S—Olfirfr.Cnf  tl,r 

II  rslfrn  Slntr  (ifi/f  ,1  x>nt  inli'i'i  'nrl  liisl  xirck  In  niitlinf  thf 
I"."'/  fihfdiiif  anti  pinn  thr  ihinl  hhiiiiiiI  .-I >snt  inlirin' s  iliniii- 
pmns  tniirnfx  r,n()(t.  IS.  I''.  _'i'  nl  Biilhnn  gn/f  ('lU'sr  in  San 
DifOi.  .1  ItfndtnQ  ihr  nirrtiti//  ui'r.  trrilni  on  llonr  from  left: 
L'lUisr  Hill.  Mnry  I..  If  o'l/hnnf  niiH  (inrnlyn  f.fitn.  Scinnd 
rmc,   srnlcH :    I'r/ink    D.    Ailiiins    St.:    ( .'/infihii.f    II  iNi/im.t.   T'/i^- 


l^risiiirnt  of  thr  Rn\  .lien  tli/h  In  San  Franrisrn:  J.  Cullen  Ftn- 
Irfss.  prrsidrnt  of  H  rs/rrti  Sinlr.t  A .'•sontiiion  :  Laxu^eni  f  Roh- 
niMii}.  ■{■11  i-piciidi  i\t  r,l  Sun  f)ir(/n  iliih:  and  Thfof)  Smith. 
Ihiid  r'lir.  \tnndinq:  Rudolph  .Mirkfrn;  Robert  (',.  Mnss, 
Piirniii'iitnl  Cliih  in  Arizonn:  Jnnies  Bntllr:  .Inrnn  (].  Lticis ; 
Juhn  Li-ui.f   and  Jntnes  S ffll ,  nlsn  nf  Paramount  Cliih. 


Elks  Ruler 
To  Hold 
Workshops 


pid 
stock  turnover  assures  you  of 
new  merchandise  on  the 
.shelves  daily.  Even  so.  many 
of  us  are  vitamin  deficient. 
Check  our  ad  for  the  finest 
services  and  products. 

If  you  are  struggling  with  a 
wfeight  problem  you  h  a  \'  e 
missed  the  boat  by  not  check- 
ing in  with  our  RelaxaCizor 
demonstrator  for  a  trial.  Take 
my  word  for  it,  you  will  feel 
and  look  better,  fast. 

Cherrr  Coke  Pineapple  Salad 

For  our  recipe  this  week,  whv 
beside  a  green  mound  of  fresh- „<,,  t^y  making  a  tempting 
brocolli  or  bean.^.  salad    and    serving    It    topped 

The  only  thing  that  .suits  me    ^jfj,  equal  parts  of  mayonnaise 
better   is  a   golden   yam   baked    ^^6  sour  cream?     . 
in  the  skin,  and  do  dissolve  a        xq  make  it  drain  one  can  of 
slice    of    Ralphs'    margarine    in    black   seeded   cherries   and   onec 
the  center  for  added  goodness,    (.g^  ^f  crushed  pineapple.  Heat 
ThrKtiraart  Time-taver  the  juice  and  dissolve  1  pack- 

For  a  salad,  serve  a  lettuce  age  of  black  cherry  Jello  in  the  , 
wedge  topped  with  your  favor-  juice.  Soak  1  envelope  gelatin 
ite  type  of  dressing.  My  favorite  in  2  tablespoons  of  water  and 
is  made  with  a  bit  of  blue  dissolve  in  hot  mix.  Cool  and 
cheese  mashed  well  with  add  the  cherries  and  pineapple. 
wine  vineger,  coar.se  ground  Pour  in  one  bottle  of  Coca-Cola, 
pepper  and  mixed  with  a  Pour  into  mould  and  chill  tifl 
generous     amount     of     sour    firm.  Unmold  on  a  bed  of  crisp 


Wisconsin  cheddar  cheese.  Sun- 
valley  eggs  and  Sunshine 
State  orange  juice. 

Ralphs'  Crade-A  Meats 

Whole  or  shank-cut  hams  are 
offered  by  Ralph.s,  and  as  a  fit- 
ling  companion,  be  it  broiled 
a."  a  dessert  or  a  .salad,  check 
on  those  golden  Elberta  peach- 
ps,  halved  or  sliced.  No  kidding. 
^  peach  half  lightly  broiled 
makes  a  wonderful  color-mate 
for  a  plate  of  juicy  ham  nestled 


San  Jacinto  Elks  Temple 
Ko.  10.5.5  of  Compton  will 
honor  Mrs.  Nettie  C.  Jackson, 
Grand    Daughter    Ruler,    who    cream  to  which  is  added  grated    lettuce  and  garnish 

will   arrive  in  the  city  March 

]  1  to  hold  workshop  meetings 
with  the  temples. 

The  San  Jacinto  Temple  is 
one  of  the  Elks'  newest  groups 
and  will  take  this  opportunity 
to  honor  one  of  Eldom's  great 
leaders. 

Daughter  Dorothy  Dawson 
and  Daughter  Ruler  Thelma 
P.  Pettiford  of  San  Jacinto  are 
chairmen  of  the  banquet  to  be 
held  at  Rand's  Roundup  on 
Monday,  at  9  p.  m.  Reserva- 
tions may  be  made  by  call- 
ing  LO.  6-3263  or  LO.  7-1014. 


illlllMlllWIMIIBIWllllllffllllliilllll^ 

SMART  SET 

■r   OLIVIA   DEEmHII!] 


(,'ALA  (JI'h\'IS  Ci  —  Thr  Hi-iiill  Furniture  Strire,  formerly  lornlrd  on  the  nnrlhemt  lOrner  (if 
Fnrly-sixth .  litis  mo^'rd  into  tin  lornirr  F.n.flrrn-  (Jo/unibia  site  nt  4''19  South  Central  a%-rnue. 
.h  (  ordnit}  to  the  nlfl  nrid  pr'ujrr.wnr  runntiu  nity  minded  .M  r.  Smnuel  lleiss,  oiiner  nf  Bi- 
ll rll  I  i/rniture  Store,  this  iii'iir  iins  iiinde  in  order  to  giie  greater  srriue  and  quality  to  the 
I  mil  inu>iit\  .  uith  the  most  reiisnnahle  pin  is.  A  elothiiif)  deptirtmint  uilh  a  ioriiplete  line  nj 
Indiet'   and    mens   urnr   is   n    plniniril   iidililion    in     the     near    liilinr. 


■  Bogan's  Work  in 
Flowers  Praised 

Anita  Began,  proprietor  of 
Anita's  Flower  and  Gift  Shop, 
received  many  compliments 
for  the  wonderful  works  of 
art  in  flowers  she  created  for 
the  dedication  ceremonies 
honoring  the  late  Dr.  Leonard 
Stovall,  founder  of  the  Out- 
door Life  and  Health  Assn. 

Mrs.  Bogan  decorated  t  h  e 
bilge  auditorium  with  flow- 
ers donated  by  Golden  State 
Florists  and  Southwestern  Ev- 
ergreen Co.  Ferns  and  lemon 
leaves  were  transformed  into 
trees  lining  the  hall  to  the 
Stocall  auditorium,  a  garden 
setting  of  sm^ll  boxes  of 
flowers  lining  the  stage.  Bird.? 
of  Paradise,  donated  by  Les- 
sie  Stevenson  and  Delia  Wil- 
liam.s.  decorated  the  piano. 


Have  your  club 'subscribe  to 
the  Eagle^four  dollars  a  year. 


iniiiiiiiiiiiinfflinimiiiiinii 

(Continued  from  Page  7) 

oiis  and  de-lovely  was  the 
black  tie  birthday  dinner  Fri- 
day night  that  Glenna  Hayes 
planned  and  carried  out  to 
perfection  for  her  Joe's  natal 
day  celebration.  Friends  who 
showered  him  with  gifts  and 
many  happy  returns  were 
Vaino  and  Lorenzo  Spencer, 
Evelj^n  and  Fred  Griffin,  Jerry 
and  R«^ert  Woods,  yours 
truly   and   Walter   Davis. 

THE    BARE    FACTS: 

Leola  King  deserted  San 
Francisco  for  her  old  home- 
town for  a  few  days.  She's 
greeting  friends  at  the  Hotel 
Watkins.  Evie  Coleman  de- 
cided to  try  'Frisco  for  a  week 
or  so  to  rest  and  relax — and  I 
envy  her.  Norma  and  Frank 
Harvey  are  singing  lullabys  to 
an  adorable  little  girl.  lOC^r 
Wrong  Club  will  hold  its  first 
annual  award  banquet  Friday 
evening,  March  8,  at  the  Fox 
Hills  Country  Club.  Under- 
stand the  Urban  League  com- 
mittee party  proved  to  be  full 
of  fun  and  found  members 
voicing  the  opinion  that  the 
success  of  future  balls  is  as- 
sured now  that  they  have 
such  a  harmonious  working 
group.  + 

CLUBS  N'  SUCHt'f 

Nanettes    were    tbyally    en- 


Biimnwiiiug 

vmmm 


tertained  Sat.  afternoon  when 
Elsie  Parchman  was  hostess 
to  the  group.  The  Howard 
Aliens  entertained  the  Script 
and  Score  Club  Sat.  night. 
Lullaby  Guild  met  with 
Mildred  Hawkins  Friday  af- 
ternoon and  elected  Betty 
Seville  as  the  new  prexy.  2>ta 
Phi  Beta  sprority  selected  Joaie 
Baines  as  the  "Woman  of  the 
Year."  Inter-collegiate  Coun- 
cil had  a  reception  for  Edison 
Anderson,  director  of  the 
famed  Langston  College  choir, 
on  Sat.  at  2278  W.  25th  street 
The  choir  was  in  recital  Sun- 
day past  at  the  Embassy. 

The  Emissaries,  a  group  of . 
young  men,  met  with  Walter 
Davis  Sat.  to  complete  plans 
for  their  first  dancing  party  to 
be  held  Friday,  March  8  at 
the  P.  T.  club. 


:q  SINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17,501 


CO 
< 

LU 
Of 
CD 


O 

2 
(/I 


yi 


MarccUus  Reed  .  .  ■- 

SWANK  SHOP  CLEANERS 

FREE,  FAST  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 

One  Oay  Service 

Double  Breasted  Coats  SIngleized  M7.50 

AW  Work  Ouaront««d 

4963  W.  ADAMS  •  RE.  2-9974 


L 


ISINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17.50  o^ 


KLECTRIC  IVATCH — Paul  Senland.  public  relations  representative  for  Hamilton 
If^'atch  Co..  demonstrates  electric  natch,  five  0  f  tvliich  uill  be  given  to  Golden  State  em- 
ployes for  "outstanding  community  service."  Golden  State  Mutual  Insurance  Co.  was  chosen 
to  participate  in  Hamilton's  1957  Coinmunit y  Service  Award  program.  From  left,  Edgar  J. 
Johnson,  GSM  executive :  Norman  Houston,  GSM  president:  Neuland:  George  Beavers,  Jr., 
Golden  Statt's  chairman  of  the  hoard. 

LAKE  CHARLES 
GROUP  MEET 

The  home  of  Mrs.  Audrey 
Evans,  2308  11th  avenue,  was 
the  setting  for  the  meeting  of 
a  group  of  former  residents  of 
Lake  Charles,  La.,  to  discuss 
plans  to  form  a  club. 


JACK  CN4ZIM  THiarai 

LINCOLN 

I3r4  «  CMtral  AO.  1211 

StmrtB  Smtunlay 

"ROCK,  PRETTY  lABY" 

"BLACK  WHIP* 

Bill  Robinson 

43rd    n.    a,    CINTIAl      AB.    1-«341 

Staffs  Sundmy 

CALL  THEATRE  FOR 

PROGRAM 


Your  suits 

get  a 

like  new" 

look  at . . . 


You'll  apfirocute  the  difference  when  yeu 
Mnd  y*u^  suits  t«  us  f»r  expert  cJMning 
service.  Theyll  ceme  bscic  every 
time,  "befidbex"  cleen  andfrMh. 
Yeuil  like  eur  medwt  prices. 
Per  Pree,  Pest  BtUvry  call  C.I.'s 

ALPHA  SERVICE 

43S  E.  VERNON  AVE. 
ADams  2-9363 


HIPS 


Make  fMT  hipi 
(mallar  •■•xinf 
NEW  EASY  way 
«t  koin*.  N*  dial 
•r  waighl  tou. 
Um  at  HOME 
whik  yM  KIST. 
l«4u<M  tit*  •( 
HIPS,  TUMMY, 
THIGHS.  NO 
EFFORT.  Fitnl 
S«imM«. 
HNlthful. 
Economical. 
Wmm««  Say: 
"Four  incba* 
trmoved  from 
abdoman,  3  iit 
from  Wpi." 
-M.F. 
"1\  in.  from  ,* 
hips."— M. A. 
"First  time  riae* 
I've  had  aiy  3 
children  ny  tUMB 
is  ll»t."-E.S. 
"Dtaaaua  wa* 
IC,  now  It." 
-C.P. 

Yaaauyla** 
l«a...*rmsial 

Ntw,  Eatyi 
N*  Effort 

net  hmkM  and  FtEE 
HOME  daatOMlration. 
Wa  PIOVE  AT  NO 
COST  how  y««  aiay 
radaca  in  tiia.  TEIE- 
PHONB-^lk  H  UDY 
•dvltori  ilia  talli  oH 
R.  Cad  ■•«. 

C.  MARII 

HUGHIS 


WE.  5-1872 

"""—  ma...  MAIt  TODAT  "•~~i 

I 
I 


C.  MAHIC   HUSHES 
2123  Hidgalay  Or. 
Lat  Angalat  It.  Calif. 


I  OULS??"'*' nipt  TWAL  TREAT- 
I  SIBNT  >y,  your  1*^  aaa>ii)H«L  I  ua. 


{  tiMm.  Civ*  am  Ui  PMX4rtaiUr^ 


I 


I 


f'vS!?-- 


|h     the 

shes.  A 
adds 
|in. 

»s  and 
lly  list- 
lant  to 
I  buy  a 
fvelous 
sup- 
Ich  ^e 
ting  on 

\e    diet! 

lenders 

jto  set 
Irr  anrj 
bring 
possi- 
rapid 
you  of 
the 
many 
firient. 
f  i  nest 

/ith   3! 

|h  a  \  e 

fhrok- 

•Cizrfr 

Take 

III    feel 


xlad 

why 

iptins] 

popped 

inaise 


ran  of 

\d   one 

Heat 

park- 
lin  the 
relatin 
^r  and' 
1)1  and 
^apple. 

■Cola. 

ill   tin 

crisp 


lltnui!; 


I 


when 
hostess 
a  r  d 

Script 

[night. 

with 

ly    ar- 

Betty 
r  Zeta 
Josie 
(of  the 
; Coun- 
i^disoni 
ot   the 

choir, 
[street. 
|1  Sun- 

3up  o£ 

^Valter 

plans 

irty  to 

8    at 


IM2IC 


"^ 


SOUTH  AREA  CLUB  TO  BE  OEDIOATED 


^ 


Looks  as  though  SC  goofed 
*nd  won't  get  to  use  Charley 
Dumas,  world  record  holder  in 
the  high  jump  at  7  ft.  '3  inch. 
He  was  all  se  to  compete  for 
Troy  in  ihe  SPAAU  Relays  at 
East  LAJC  Stadium  this  Satur- 
day. Seems  Charley  got  steered 
into  the  uTong;  course  at  Comp- 
ton  College  that  he  didn't  need 
to  gain  entrance  into  SC  and 
technically  is  scholastically  in- 
eligihle. 

According  to  word  that  being 
passed  along  the  campus  is  to 
the  fact  that  Dumas  passed  the 
required  2'^  units  hut  received  a 
"D"  in  an  English  elective 
course  that  the  college  doesn't 
even  accept  for  entrance  and 
the  "D"  dropped  him  below  the 
necessary  "C"  average  required 
by  the  University  Ave.  college. 

Trojans    officals   feel   that 


Dumi 


was 


victim 


rumstances;  so  will  seek  a  rul- 
ing from  the  rest  of  the  Pacific 
Coast  Conference  school  for  a 
special   rulimg. 

INTER  -  FRAT  SERIES— Since 
UCLA's  Dick  Banton  played  his 
last  college  game  for  the  Bruins 
he'll  be  ready  to  lead  the 
Kappa  team,  when  the  series 
get  underway  at  Jeff's  gym 
Saturday.  March  16..  If  ihe 
brilliant  plavmaker  is  in  the 
Kappa  lineup  oddmakers  favor 
the  Big  Red  Machine  to  cop 
their  second  straight  inter-frat 
basketball  championship. 
TRACK    NOTES 

Rafer  Johnson,  Bruins'  great 
all-around  track  and  field  star 
is  still  sidelined  with  a  knee 
injury  and  may  not  be  ready 
for  competition  until  the  mid- 
April  a  great  blow  for  Ducky 
Drake's   crew. 


Tombstone  Smith  May  Become 
California  Top  Boxing  Attraction 


Tombstone  Smith,  the  busy 
rangy  California  welterweight 
champ,  shoots  for  his  16th 
straight  ring  \ictory  tonight 
(Thursday*  at  the  Olympic, 
When    he   faces   Joe   Miceli. 

A  win  for  Smith  Thursday 
night  could  make  him  the 
darling  of  the  west  coast  box- 
ing fans  since  he's  been  the 
busiest  of  all  local  boxer,  hav- 
ing been  in  action  three  times 
already  and  its  only  March. 

He's  getting  mbre  popular 
P\ery  time  he  goes;  into  action 
boxing  greats  .such  as  John 
Thoma.s,  Willie  Joyce,  Henry 
Armstrong  hit  the  charmed 
circle  onfy  after  they  a\eraged 
a  bout  a  month  and  Smith  is 
followinng  the  same  pattern. 

Smith,  who  currently  is  the 
number  four  bo\-office  attrac- 
tion locally  could  spring  into 
the    top    bracket    with    an    im- 


pressive victory  over  his  foe  to- 
night. 

Olympic  matchmaker  Cal 
Working  has  added  a  little 
sugar  to  bout  bs-  promising  the 
winner  a  bout  with  Kid  Gav^lan 
and  from  here  Smith  could 
project  into  a  national  boxing 
figure  and  perhaps  the  toast 
of  the  coast. 


A.A.U.  Relays 
On  Tap  Mar.  9 

Major  track  an(|  field  com- 
petition, opening  tpe  1957  Sea- 
son for  many  of  tjhe  top  thin- 
clad  .squads  in  Soiuthern  Cali- 
fornia, gets  underway  Satur- 
day. -March'  9.  as  the  Southern 
Pacific  A.A.I'.  Rela>s  take  place 
at  East  Los  .■\ngeles  Junior  Col- 
lege Stadium. 


E)VRN     $50    TO     $100IN     YOUR     SPARE     TIME 


3 

o 

> 

z 
S 


EXTRA  MONEY? 


WE  NEED  DISTRIBUTORS  -  FULL  OR  PART-TIME 

Mem  aed  Women 

EARN  $50  TO  $100  TO  START 

IN  YOUR  SPARE  TIME 

No  Invstment  Nttded 

^$$$$$$$    CALL   $$$$$$$*^ 

*RE  1-6452  or  OR  1-3017^ 

^    $   $     'CHUCK'  WILLIAMS  ft  ASSOCIATES     $   $  -(^ 
EARN     i50    TO    $100     IN     YOUR    SpArE    TIME 


8 


Willowbrook 
To  Show  Off 
'46,000  Club 


Dedication  and  public  in- 
spection of  the  new  .Southern 
Area  Boys  Club.  \33S  E.  120th 
St.,   Willowbrook.   will    be   held 

:  Sunday.  March  17.  it  was  an- 
nounced     yesterday      by      Ray 

'Miller,  the  club's  executive  di- 
rector. 

.At  Ihe  same  time,  the  club 
will  be  turned  o\er  to  the 
southern  area  community  .  by 
the  Times  Charities,  Inc.. 
which  underwrote  its  construc- 
tion. A  board  of  directors  com- 
posed of  southern  area  civic 
leaders  will  operate  the  club. 
;  Roy  C.  Brooks,  accountant,  is 
'Chairman  of  the   board. 

A  12-man  steering  committee 
of  ci\ic  leaders  in  the  area 
composed  of  Herbert  B.  Atkin- 
.son.  Father  Cannon,  Joseph  A. 
Faster,  Earl  Grant,  Lt.  M.  E. 
Bayha.  William  Jones.  Carl 
'Margolis.  Alexander  Rubin- 
stein, Rev.  SL<  Paul  Epps,  Dr, 
William  L.  Smith,  Dr.  John  F. 
Simmons.' Herman  Hill.  Aaron 
H.  Fahringer  and  Omar  F. 
Johnson. 

The    club    is    located    on    a 

i  12. .^00  square   foot   site  of   land 

j  lea.'^ed  at  a  token  sum  from 
Willowbrook       Elementary 

I  School  District.  Times  charities 
has  furnished  approximately 
S46.000  to  operate  the  club  in 
its  first  \  ear. 

I  The  club  will  serve  the  ma- 
jority of  the  2,3.000,  youngsters 
who    li\e    in    the    WiJlowbrook- 

i  Watts,    South    Green    Meadows, 

I  Enterprise  and  .North  Compton 
areas.    More   than   2700   young- 

'  sters    already    have   signed    up 

I  for  membership. 

I  Facilities  in  the  club  include 
a  large  gymnasium,  an  arts 
and    crafts    room,    and    a    com- 

I  plete  library. 

A  wide  rapge  of  group  and 
individual  .al'tixities  have  been 
planned  for  members  of  the 
club,  according  to  Director 
-Miller,  The<;'e  include  many 
team  and  individual  sports, 
mo\ies,  dramatics,  a  club 
newspaper,  trips  to  recreaiion 
areas  and  points  of  interest  in 
Southern  California,  holida\ 
parties,      boxing      tournaments 

,  and  attendance  at  community 
sports  events. 

I  Every  boy  residing  in  ttje 
southern  communities,  between 
the  ages  of  8  and  17,  and  re- 
gardless of  race,  is  eligible  for 
membership  ;in  the  club  at  a 
fee  of  SI   per  \ear. 

An  experienced  staff  of  rec- 
reation workers  will  be  on  duty 
at  the  club  to  assist  Miller  and 
give  expert  instruction  and 
guidance  to  the  club's  mem- 
bers. These  include  a  social 
recreation  director,  a  health 
and  p,\hsical  education  direc- 
tor, a  librarian,  an  arts  and 
crafts    director,    a    secretary,    a 

'  locker  room  attendant  and  a 
buildirig  superintendent. 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


The  California  Eagle— 9" 


w 
I 

T 


RAMSEY 


6«erg«  RaniMy 


BO}  S  (.lA  R  SI'Ahl  —  I  hr  inpnhlf  nirnthrrs  ahnfr  rxpr,t  t'l  srr-r  S'irrif  _'.'.('('('  y'^i/rto- 
flers  Tihn  live  in  the  soi/thrrnt  iirr/i.  Slrindinr/  Ir'irn  Irfl:  Rt:\  .\1illrr,  rxfiii/nr  ilirn  I'/r :'  II  il- 
imrn  Sinints,  soii/il  rccrrfilion  ihrn  I'lr :  Pirikir  (IR'iurkr,  .uirrfnry:  Al  (,hi^ni.  Jr.,  hrriith 
tirid  physiiid  rdiirntl'in  dirtrt'ir:  Pcg(i\-  lih'ih,  Sii  rilr:r\  :  Chr.rlri  B\rd.  loikrr  ruuni  attrnd- 
tint:  hslhir  fhth,  hhninan :  Iritis  (..  liiiyis.  arts  and  trcjty;  hlt'jti  Ci  riff  in,  hiiiiding 
supcrinlcndtnl,  -  , 


C.ALIENTE  in  oLd  Mexico: 
Three  hundred  .5-10  pickers  re- 
ceived $45  each  for  second 
place  in  the  baptism  of  the 
consolation  payoff  at  Caliente 
last  Sunday.  Twenty-one  selec- 
tors shared  first  place,  winning 
SI. 9.32.60  apiece  for  tabbing 
fiye  winners  in  the  six  races. 
The  second-place  pool  acceler- 
ated play  in  the  .5-10  to  a  new 
record  pool  of  S60.120.  The  old 
record  was  557,680  set  last 
Dec.  2.  j 

»  »  V 

SANTA  ANITA  WILL  close 
its  2flth  and  most  successful 
thoroughbred  winter  racing 
season  next  Monday.  Mar,  11, 
with  some  outstanding  attrac- 
tions, ' 


HORSES     TO     WATCH     THAT    ARE 
FIT   AND    READY 

CALIENTE 

WINKING  LOUISE.  Ready  lor 
best     efforts. 

BOLD  A.NSWER.  Look  out  tor 
this     onp. 

f;ENFJlAL  MIKE.  Overmatched  in 
Ia«t    rar-o.  *    * 

KOOI,    Kin,     My    "special. 

PRINCRSS  PATCH.  Plenty  speed 
tah, 

YOlNr,  BUCK.   Now  lit  and  ready 
s-mart    hands. 
SANTA     ANITA 

BALLET    KHAL.   Lookout    lor   this 

one. 

AMBLINGORIX.    My    special. 

KATHER  JOH.N.  Worked  ven-  fast. 

sirKLE-S  HONEY.  .My  gaUway 
special.  "^ 

SOLID   .SON.    In    smart    hands   tab. 

NOTHING  BETTER.  0\  er  a  dis- 
tance  O.    K. 

NOTE:  KEEP  THIS  COLUMN 

FOR  FUTURE  REFERENCE.  IT 

ONLY  APPEARS  IN  THE  CALI-- 

FORNIA  EAGLE. 


SPECTACULAR' 

COUGH  RELIEF 


Special  Formula  Creo- 
mulsioTi  Cough  Syrup 
for  Children  relieves 
couR-hg  due  to  colds 
ritrht  now  —  without 
narcotics  or  antihista- 
mines— stops  tickle- 
promotes  sleep  — 
tastes  good  too.  Get 


^  Ted  Rhodes  Wins 
I  Miami  Golf  Title 


Ted  Rhodes,  top  ranking  pro- 
fessional golfer  fired  a  1.39  in 
the  Ray  Mitchell's  annual 
-North  and  South  Winter  Tour- 
nament to  win  the  .36  holes 
e\ent.  held  at  Miami  Beach, 
Fla.,  last  week. 

Joe  Roach  won  the  men's 
amateur  championships  with  a 
144  and  Eoline  Thornton  one 
of  the  three  Californians  en- 
tered in  the  Miami  tourney 
won  the  women's  amateur 
f  hampionships.  Others' were  as 
follows: 

Lee  'Young,  posted  a  167  in 
the  men's  second  flight  for  a 
third  and  Ollie  Jack.^on  .scored 
a  17.3  in  the  mens  third  flight 
for  the  second   place  standing. 


CREOMULSION 

FOR  CHILDREN 


Legion  Cards  Bouts 

i      March  will  be  a  busy  month 
at    the   Hollywood    Legion    Sta- 
dium   as    Matchmaker    Jackie 
Leonard    has    lined    up    .seven 
main    event.s.    .    .This    Saturday 
night,  March  9,  Jose  Cotero  and 
(Larry    Bataan    mix    in    a    12 
'round  elimination  bout  for  the 
i\acant    State   featherweight   ti- 
tle. .  .Ike  Chestnut  and  Ernesto 
j  Figueroa  go  in  a  non-televised 
iien,    Tuesday,    March    12   . 


'FA$TE$T  $ELLiNG  BUICK  DEALER  IN  SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA' 

COLONIJIL  BUICK 

•Offers  a  Brand  N«w  1957  Buick  2-Door  for- 


199  DOWN  •  '16^'  n^'nwa 


if  $AVE  HUNDREDS  ON  YOUR  TRADE-IN 
if  GREATEST  STOCK  TO  CHOOSE  FROM 
if  36  MONTHS  0\  EASY  FINANCING 
if  FAIR  &  FAMOUS  G.M.A.p.  RATES 
if  FABULOUS  SERVICE  DEPARTMENT 


FREE  APPRAISAL        call  count- cartcr       CH.  5r6611 


COLONIAL  BUICK 


144  So.  Glendale  Ave. 

IN  GLENDALE 


BEAUTIFUL 

CALIENTE 

IN  OLD  MEXICO 

PRESENT  EVERY 

SATURDAY  AND  SUNDAY 

RAIN   or   SHINE 

THOROUGHBRED 
HORSE  RACING 

*  t\       RACES  ON        t%  f\ 
A  W      SATURDAY       A  W 

14        RACES  ON       4  4 
A         SUNDAY         X  A 

DAILY  DOUBLE  AND 
QUINELLA 

BOOKS  AND  MUTUELS 

The  Fabulous  5-10  Betting 
Every  Sunday 

-  POST  TIME  - 
SATURDAY  1:00  P.M. 
SUNDAY  12  NOON 

FANTASTIC    RETURNS 
For  Your  Wager 

Two  Dollars  or  More 

Foreign  Book  Open  Daily  . 
On  All  Maior  Tracks 

GREYHOUND  RACING 
RESUMES  IN  SPRING 


JOHN  S.  ALESSiO 


SOl'THERX  AREA  BOYS  CLlB^ll.w  ir.,m  fr^nt  of  ^o„th  I.ns  A  noelcs'  iu'iics\  duh 
(It  /.i.iV  A.  1 10th  Street.  BuildirKj  mid  equipnient  rnst  nppr'/xi//i'ntely  >2_'('.i'('i'.  E'jnLiirU  see- 
linn  contains  flub  rooms  and  lihrarx,  anil  lar  w  r  rear  >i  i  tion  is  fatly  equipped  (i\  ninaiiiim. 
At  rear  ol  e/xninasium  is  playf/rotind  area,  aho  pa' t  ',j  the  cliih.  Dedication  and  public  in- 
ipcition  irill  be  held  Sunday.  .March   17. 

100%  Wrong  Club 
Slates  Banquet 

The  lOn'^r  Wrong  Club  and 
its  members  will  be  a  social 
item  this  Friday  night,  when 
they  hold  their  first  anntial 
award  banquet  at -Fox  Hills 
Country  Club,  5800  W,  Slauson 
avenue, 

J.  G.  Spink.  .St.  Louis.  Mo., 
editor  of  The  Sporting  News. 
will  be  guest  speaker.  He  will 
fly  to  the  coast  on  Friday,^ 
March  8,  especially  for  thi.s 
occasion  and  will  share  the 
spotlight  with  a  gala.xy  of 
sports  personalities  to  be  hon- 
ored during  the  evening's  fes-f 
tivities. 

Among  the  athletes  to  be 
saluted  that  night  will  be 
UCLA's  Rafer  Johnson,  world" 
decathlon  record-holder;  Pete 
O'Garro,  football:  Dave  Wil- 
liams, high  school  coach,  and 
Henry  (Red)  Sanders,  named 
the  college  coach  of  the  year. 

Charles  Dumas,  the  world- 
record  high-jumper  from  U.'^C; 
Tav  Brown  of  Compton  Col- 
lege; Sid  Ziff;  Willie  White; 
Billy  Yoilnger;  Tom  Wilson; 
Sam  Baiter,  and  Earlene 
Brown,  greatest  woman  shot- 
putter  in  the  nation,  will  also 
be  honored. 


DhDICATlOS  PROC; RAM-Ray  Miller,  rtoht,  executive 
director  of  the  neii-  Southern  Area  Roys  Club,  cr,riirrs  tilth 
Roy  (.'.  Rrooks.  cliaii  iH'.ii  oi  the  board  of  directors  of  the  eliih, 
(ihout  iliibi  forthco'iniK)  dedication  and  public  inspection 
Mar.h    17. 


r/w  f'm9gt  Hosts  and  Hosfssos  Servo 

HILL-^HILL 

KENTUCKY  BOURBON  AT  ITS  BEST 

AUt  available  as  a  Kentucky  Blended  WhUkey  in  the  familiar  round  bottle. 


\     imi  HILL-  CO.,  lOOISYIlLE,  KENTllCKY,  DBITOimJ  IT:  WlKWAl  DCTUiK  PMOUCTS  CJ»., 


KMTIICKY  SIMKHI BOUWOH  WHISKEK   •    Mffl  K  PMOf   •   KEKTBCn 

UENDa  imhsxey,  &%  oum  mm.  awn 


Dr.  Cowen 

HAS  A  SPECIAL 
CREDIT  PLAN 
Must  For  You! 


DR.  COWEN  Says. 


Yes  .  .  .  Or.  Cowen's  credit 
terms  are  more  liberal  and 
easier  than  ever  before  . . . 
Come  in  and  learn  how  easily 
you  can  cbtoin  your  new 
Dental  Plates.  Regardless  of 
how  small  you  wish  to  make 
the  payments,  remember  rt 
doesn't  cost  you  one  extra 
penny  to  use  Dr.  Cowen's 
Liberal  Credit. 

FEATURING  NEW  TRANSPARENT 
MATERIAL  AND  TRUBYTE  TEETH 

Ask  your  dentist  why  so  mony  plate  wearers  prefer  this  new 

type  of  denture.  You  too  con  benefit  by  the  Improvements 

of  modern  dentol  science.  See  samples  of  Dr.  Cowen's. 


THERE  ARE  NO  EASIER  CREDIT 
TERMS  OR  LOWER  PRICES 


PENSIOMERS 
WELCOME 

You  can  obtain  Denial 
Plates,  or  other  needed 
Dental  Care,  on  a  spe- 
cial plan  under  the  Cali- 
fornia Medical  Assist- 
ance Act  Visit  Or. 
Cowen's  Offices  for  full 
information. 

QUICK  PLATE 
REPAIRS 


DiNTISTRY 


•  fXttACTrONS         •  MllINGS  eiNiATS 


Dr.  Cowert*wi!l  lake  core  of  all  your  deiv 
tol  needs  RIGHT  NOW,  and  yoo  can  pay 
LATER  . . .  after  your  work  is  completed. 
Me  interest  or  carrying  charges. 


DR.  COWEN 

Your   friendly    Credit   Dentist 

5th  and  BROADWAY 

tnlroncc:  31S  Wcjf  5»h  Street  -  Metropolitan  Bldg. 


OVER  NEWBERRY  S  0   PHONE 

(i.!*"in;tion   iVirHOur  iPPoiwivT 


IVIU.1191 


Other  Dr.  CewiM  Dental  Offices  Conveniently  Located  in 
e  Santa  Monica  *  Hellyweed  *  Huntington  Park  e  Long  loach 
*  Giondalo  e  PaMdona  *  ltiv«i«ido  *  PooMiia  f  Voirtara 

AM.  TO  3:30  PJH. 


i 


irilNMi 


■MMMMliliiiialliilriMiili 


iitfilililniMai 


iWViW 


m 


Mariaiti"  Anderson  at  PMlliarmoiile 

*       •       •       •       •       •       **•        *       •       *<•       *       *       •        *       **^*        •        *         •         *         •         •         *         *         **!*. 

DINAH  WASHINGTON  TOPS  AT  ZARDI'S 


10— The  Californi*  Eagle 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


WALTER  STANLEY  —  Dapper 
bachelor,  nearly  raiiseti  several 
females 'to  ha\e  heart  failuir 
when  he  failed  to  an<;wer  hi? 
phone  late  Friday  night.  Some 
friends  had  him  off  to  Vegas 
to  marry  but  he  merely  made 
the  trip  to  kick  a  little  siwrfl 
OIL  BOOM  — Folks  out  South 
Los  Angeles  way  are  being 
swamped  with  leases  to  sign 
just  like  the  Westside  preas- 
ants.  Eastsiders  are  playing  it 
cool  waiting  for  the  major 
leagues  and  the  gold  rush' 
HAZEL  SIMPSON  —  Talking 
n\er  plans  for  an  interratial 
summer  resort  with  all  the 
glitter    and    glamour^f    Palm 


■prings: 


^; 


FUNNY — Looking  over  the  area 
of  the  oil  map  as  pictured   hy 


the  powers-that-be  it  seems  as 
though    some    slick    member    of 

ithe    "Keep    Our    Neighborhood 

I  White"  club  figured  it's  a  neat 
wax — what  fool  would  move  off 

I  of  oil   land? 

JEANIE  LIMYOU— Terrific  Hor- 
Ion  dancer,  is  off  to  Las  Vegas 

I  for  a  series  of  engagements! 

!  JERI  LUNG  SPENCER  —  Board 
cd  a   plane  to  join  Prince  Spen- 
cer  in   St.   Louis   last   Saturday 
avemi 

LITTLE  WILLIE  JOHN  —  Pint 
-.ized  blues  shouter.  is  basking 
in  the  hot  suns  of  Orando.  Fla,, 
and  his  hit  recording  titled 
"Fever"  is  running  a  tempera- 
ture on  the  juke  boxes. 
DR.  JOHN  CARNEY— The  noted 

I  skin    specialist,    boasts    one    of 
I  Continued  on  Page  11 > 


DANCE  TO  THE  MUSIC  OF| 

'Red'  Minor  Robinson 

MOST  DANCEABLE  COMBO  AVAILABLE  FOR 
CLUB    DANCES,    SHOWS,    PARTIES,    ETC. 

ICALL  WE.  9-6313  NOW!!j 


-C»rnmunity   Civic    Music   A«sn.    Prtitnti    at    Philharmonic   Auditorium  -  ~, 


SAT.  EVE. 
MAR.  16 


MARIAN  ANDERSON 


Tiek«ts — S3.50.    3.00.    2.50.     1.50 


All-Star  Show 
Offers  Finest 
Entertainment 

Dinah  Wasiilngton  opened  at 
Zardi's  Jazzlan'd  in  Hollywood 
complete  with  new  look,  new 
wardrobe  and  husband,  and  the 
.same  magnificent  voice  and 
showmanship. 

Hard-Working  Artist 

"Miss  Dee"  utilized  her  voice 
to  advantage  with  new  .songs 
and  some  tried  and  true  fa- 
vorites including  "Long  John," 
"1  Wanna  Be  Loved,"  "Blow 
Top  Blues,"  and  a  generous 
portion  of  her  latest  releases. 
The  "Queen,"  pride  of  Mercury 
Records,  coupled  her  perform- 
ances with  clever  showings  of 
her  especially  designed  gowns 
and  dresses  from  New  York, 
working  an  interesting  fashion 
show  into  the.  act. 

The  new  managers  of  the 
HollywoofI  and  Vine  spot  wast- 
ed little  time  introducing  their 
new  policy  of  lower  prices,  free 
finnt  door  parking  service  and 
other  customer-pleasing  effects 
in  the  beautiful  jazzland  room. 

Featured  along  with  Dinah  at 
Zardi's  is  hold-over  Slim  Gail- 
lard,  who.  incidentally,  just 
signed  to  appear  in  the  new- 
Harold  Arlen  Broadway  musi- 
cal, "Jamaica"  in  August,  with 
Lena  Home,  Ertha  Kitt  and 
Ciaillard    co-starred. 


AMERICA'S 

FIRST  lAOY 

OF  SONO 


Box   office.   Ml.   3500  A   So.   Cai.   Music  Co..   737  S.    Hill   A.   Mutual   Agenciet 


INfOtMATIOM  ON 


eeiM  24  NOUCS 


BAIL    BONDS    FREE 

CELES  KING  III  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY 


909  East  6th  Street 


MU.  5500 


Mary  Bran  Prmsmnts 
PhllharmonU  Aud.,  fri.,  March   15,  8:30  P.M. 

JOSE   ITURBI 

First  lot  Angalai  racital  after  triumphtnt  European  tour  of 
renowned  Piano  Virtuoael  Matterpjeces  by  Bethoven,  Schumann, 
Ravel,    Debutiy,    Granadoi,    Albeniz    and    other*. 

Auditorium    Box    Office,    Ml.    8401;    So.    Calif.    Music    Co., 

TU.    1144,   and  all  Mutual  Agoncio. 

RESERVE  YOUR  TICKETS  NOW 

Philharmonic   Auditorium,   Friday,  March    IS   —   1:30  P.M. 


TJNGiRIXE  ts  htr  name, 
and  she's  the  spicy  siiren  tn  the 
'new  Slappy  IVhite  revue  at 
the  Club  Oasis, 


VIOLINIST  PIANO-ORGANIST 

.4  During  tho  Now  Yoor  it  pays  fe  visit 

l/£:  wATKiNS'  HOTEL  WnTKINS 

ADAMS  «  WESTERN  •  RE.  2-«in 


Complete 
POT   LUCK  MEAL 
fmrsoiwlly  Coekotf 
hy  "Dynumit9" 

SIR  CHARLU 
THOMPSON 

Piano  A  Organ 
Stylist 


Where  Spert>. 
men  eeil  their 
wemen  friendi 
meet    te   eat    .    . 


DYNAMITE  JACKSON'S 

COCKTAIL  L0UN8E 

Fin«»t  Feed    •    Delightful  Drinks 
Open  fvery  Do/:  10  A.M.  to  3  A.tA 

4701  S.  CENTRAL      AD.  2 


Ralphs  Names 
Final  Winners 

Rnih  ."Zanders.  T.'i44,3  Dirken.s. 
Knrino.  won  the  Pl\'mouth  19.57 
4-dnor  Savoy  .-iedan  in  the 
fourth  anri  final  drawing  for 
the  wiinners  in  the  prize  rontpst 
(Plebrating  Ralphs  S4th  Birth- 
day, with  over  $.50,000  worth  of 
fabulous   prizes. 

Other  magnificent  prizes  go 
to:  Two-week  Mexican  Trip  for 
Two,  Lila  A.  Hart,  5147  New 
Castle  avenue.  Encino;  May- 
tag Refrigerator-Freezer,  Hattie 
Marksity.  2906  W.  78th  place, 
(Manchester);  Shasta  Travel 
Trailer.  Mrs.  Fred  Sagerman, 
210  Bay  State  street,  Alham- 
bra. 

Three  O'Kfeefc  &  Merritt  Gas 
Ranges,  Mrs.  Fred  R.  Pairet. 
2121  Orchard"avenue;  Mrs.  Har- 
ry Essex.  5536  Welalnd.  Temple 
City;  Mildred  L.  Brittain.  566 
N.  Sunny  Slope.  East  Pasadena; 
Thunderbird,  Jr.,  D.  Winter,  6' 2 
yrs..  9270  Nagle  avenue,  P»- 
coima;  Bonded  Water  Softener, 
S.  W.  Swanson.  1038  N.  Ard- 
more  avenue,  (Vermont  L  San- 
ta Monica.) 

Filtex  Vacuum  Cleaner.  S.  L. 
Cohen,  116  Coldwater  Canyon 
drive,  Beverly  Hills;  Two  Broth- 
er Sewing  Machines,  P.  H.  Sou- 
ders.  1234  S.  Westlake  avenue, 
(Crenshaw-Rodeo);  Mrs.  L. 
Dyck,  4122  Ocean  View,  Mont- 
rose. 

Artistic  Wire  Set.  Mrs.  D.  P. 
Maitland,  2238  Roscomare  road. 
W.  Los  Angeles;  Three  Sun- 
beam Electric  Skillet-s,  Imogene 
Butlrr,  1315  20th  Court.  Santa 
Monica;  William  Cole.  1720  W. 
Willow  street.  Long  Eieach;  Dr. 
T.  T.  Robinson.  606  N.  Rodeo 
drive,  Beverly  Hills. 


MARIA\  JSDERSOS.  xcorld's  most  honnrrd  nrtist.  nill 
hi-  linir/J  III  ('irufrl  Sfitiirtiny  errnnid,  Af/inh  If),  nt  Phtlhnr- 
in'iiiii  .1  uiiilrii  luni  lis  nil  r\iiil  nl  (,'tin  iiiiinilv  (In  ir  .\l  iistr 
.1  ss'ii  inti'iii.  ['r'i(/rnni  unll  ffiliirr  srh  1  linns'  Irnin  Ihr  uork.t  r,f 
lhi\iin,  Sihiilinl,  M nssfnri .  Dvirnt  niid  nlhir  nnird  lOin- 
f"nr's. 


Contialto 
In  Concert 

Once,  perhaps,  in  a  genera- 
tion a  phenomenon  appears  in 
the  music  world:  that  rare  ar- 
ti.st,  who  in  his  own  lifetime, 
becomes  surrounded  by  the 
aura  of  legend.  Jenny  Lind, 
Paganini.  Liszt.  Caruso.  Pav- 
lova, Chaliapin  were  such  fabu- 
lous figures  for  their  contemp- 
oraries; .such  a  lej;end  for  tiur 
own  time  is  Marian  Anderson, 
who  sinps  at  Philharmonic 
Auditorium  Saturday  evening, 
March  16.  as  an  event  of  Com- 
munity Civic  Music  Associa- 
tion. 

Famous   For   Firsts 

Last  year  when  the  Metro- 
politan Opera  signed  her  a.« 
the  first  of  her  race  to  become 
a  member  of  the  fompany.  the 
paeon  of  acclaim  in  the  world's 
press  testified  to  the  respect  in 
which  she  is  held. 

Tickets  ace  now  On  sale  at 
Philharmf)nic  Auditorium  Box 
Office.  Soulhern  California  Mu- 
sic Com  pain-  and  all  Mutua 
.Agencies. 


azz 


'CI, 


SOUNDTRACK 


NOTES   OF   AN  INNOCENT  BARSTANDERI    THINGS  THMT 
•TURNED  ME  ON"  LATELYI  —  Em  ceeing  the  ROCK  'N'  ROLL 

i  CALL  for  two  floors  of  the  swinglngest  teen  set  at  Compton  Jay- 
cee  last  week.  The  affair  was  sponsored  by  the  PTA  of  Centennial 

:  High  School.   Mama,  they  gdve  your  son  'fever'  hut  he  got  a  real 

I  swinging    feeling    out    of  — t-h  e-5^ 

I  deal:  ...  Having    a    drink    with 
columnist   PAUL   COATES   and 


grinning  with  the  guy  o\er  the 
time  I  needled  him  in  print 
over  his  harsh  comment  on 
folksinger  JOSH  WHITE  'who 
was  appearing  at  the  Bar  of 
Music  at  the  timci  .  .  .  Ol'  Bud 


.«>candle-candle  on  the  scorchy 
piece  in  the  current  Confiden- 
tial? Guy  with  a  phony  by- 
line (JAMES  L.  BOYD)  must  be 
actiing  for  a  shaking  from  the 
doll  who  doesn  t  dig  these  HEFr 
s>iers  who  are  trying  to  give  her 
an  "1  Love  Loosely"  reputation; 


dy  Coates  is  about  to  njn  those  \  Shady  scribes  are  more  than  a 

little  "upset  cause  the  dail 
has  more  reserve  than  Princess 
Kelly  . . .  EBONY  SHOWCASE  in 
a    surprise    switch    will    unfold 


eastern  scribblers  slightly  rag- 
get  with  his  'poetic  ifoul'  .  .  . 
Getting  an  earful  of  the  down- 
to-soil  alto-sax  sounds  of  one 
CLIFFORD  WOODS  at  the  early 
ayem  jam  .sessions  at  JASON'S 
on  .57th  and  Broadway!  Man's 
a  gasser  with  his  illustrious 
horn! ...  f 

AND  THEN  I  WROTE  — 
They're  flipping  o\er  the 
brown  skin  babe  from  Britain 
who  is  warbling  about  mad 
love  and  sad  love  at  Ciro's.  Her 
name:  SHIRLEY  BASSEYI 
Will  DANDRIDGE  blow  out  the 


its  'Last  In  the  Stars'  play  at 
the  Civic  Playhouse  in  Holly- 
wood instead  of  on  the  home 
premises.  This  move  will  prob- 
ably save  wear  and  tear  on  the 
movie-town  mob  who  iourney 
acro.ss  town  to  view  the  playB 
and  often  give  em  their  high- 
est praise  and  greatest  support! 
.  .  The  BELAFONTE.  boom 
I  currently  the  hottest  showbiz 
(  Continued  on  Page  11) 


GOURMET  GUIDE 

Recommendations  for  ^Dining  and  Wining 


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THURSDAY,  FRIDAY,  SATURDAY  and  SUNDAY 

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2636  Crensliaw^ 

re:  1-5S71 


BARRY'S 


PUnfy  of  frem  Parking 


% 


H. 


DELM  SIGMA  THETA  SORORITY  PRESENTS  .  .  . 


lEONTYNE  PRICE,  Soprano,  at  the  PHILHARMONIC  AUDITORIUM 


SATURDAY,  MARCH  23rd,  8  PaiW.,  PHILHARMONIC  AUDITORIUM,  427  WaSTH  STa 


Tiekats  an  Sala  at  Southern  California  Music  Co.,  all  Mutual  Tiekat  Aoaneiaat 

Caldan   SUta  Pharmacy,   Adamt'and   Waitarn:    Evalyn   Card   Shop,   M7*  W. 

Jefferson,  or  call   LU.  9-tKO,  or  sac  any  Dalta  Sorer. 


I 


\.- 


c 


^^^^^^■i«i«pwiw9 


;k 


Is  THAT 

■OIX 

ton  Jay- 

it^nnial 
[)t  a  real 

!  scorchy 
jnfiden-^ 
3ny   by- 

HIST  h* 

HEr- 

;ive  hfr 

itatioJi." 

than  |a 

|he    ddil 

Princess 

:ase  In 

unfold 
|pUy  at 

Holly - 
le  home 
]ll  proh- 

on  the 
I  iourne>' 
jt  play^ 
|ir  high 
pupport' 
;.  boom 
Isnowbiz 

11  > 


4tNG 


People  &  Places 

(Continued  frnm  Pagp  10) 

th*  town's  futpst   rpcpptionisfs:  ; 
LVEIXA   HILL— Thp   Charming 
jilrs^of  Dr.  Julius  \V..  the  cele- 
brated orthopedic  surgeon,  soon  ; 
will  announce  a   new   addition  I 
to  the  family! 

CHAS.  B.  SCOTT  — One  of  the 
best-liked  rop<  in  the  depart- 
ment moved  into  hi.s  Leimert 
Park  home! 

DINAH  WASHINGTON  —  She  .'^ 
the  gal  with  the  voice.  Now  that 
she  has  trimmed  down.  Holly- 
wood scouts  are  tagging  her 
The  Body  : 

LOVIE  BRYANT— Shes  proving 
to  her  neighbors  that  house- 
wives should  \isjt  Lees  smart 
South  Los  .Angeles  Studio  for 
relaxing  and  reducing  treat- 
ments to  insure  a  full  and 
healthful   life" 

TV-LOVE.  —  That  hrownskin 
singer  and  tnat  very  influen- 
tial TV'  commentator  are  said 
to  be  Confidential  matcnni' 
LLOTD  LA  BEACH— EvOlym 
pic  track  star.  t\ing  up  husi- 
ness  ends  of  his  West  Coast 
World-Wide  Import  and  F\port 
firm  while  in  Kingsrnn.  Jama- 
ica! 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 


The  CaliforniSj  Eigle— 1 1  |    $ 


^(  SOUXD  TRACK  *s^  « 


hXPL.-l l\S  OIL  I.E.iSKS — Frrri  II  .  Buih,  represcntntii  r  of  the  Union  Oil  Cntiipnny.  rx- 
plnim  trrnis  of  ihr  Sii/jnr  Hill  oil  nnd  qas  lea>e  prnqram  to  the  Lnnqyton  Lnu  Cliih.  fir  is 
fhoi^n  liith  l.ani]\tori  prrsidcil .  Att\.  l.fo  Branton,  Jr.,  left,  and  Mn\nie  G.  Leu !.(.'  pronio- 
tiorini   dire,  tor   oi   the   pronrani    lit    this   area. 


(Continued  from  Page  101 
property)  is  responsible  for  the 
re- issue  of  CARMEN  JONES  I . . . 
Didja.  VIEJAH?  .  .  .  Luscious 
singer  GEORGIA  CARR  (she's 
stacked  like  Kansas  in  AugiJst) 
telling  this  scribe  that  as  soon 
I  as  she  gets  over  a  slight  case 
I  of  throat  huskiness,  she'll  be 
[warbling  those  ear-isistable 
I  songs  in  one  of  the  glamour 
cafes  ...  GERRY  WIGGINS,  the 
piano  man  behind  DINAH 
WASHINGTON  fa  shadow  of 
her  former  self)  at  ZARDI'SI . . . 
Calypso  singer  ED  TOWNS£ND 
got  word  that  he  had  increased 
the  Papa-lation  while  warbling 
a  lujlaby  at  the  Desert  Sands 
(Where  he  is  the  attraction)  .. . 
LENA  HORNE  phoned  her  pal 
MARIE  BRYANT  to  say  she 
hopes  to  do  her  part  in  the  St. 
Louis  Woman  film  while  here 
for  her  engagement  at  the  Co- 
coanut  Grove  ...  LESTER  NOR- 
TON DANCERS  open  in  "VEGAS 
tonight:  .  .  .  DWIGHT  DAVIS, 
who  just  returned  from  Vurrup, 
says  he'll  cash  in  on  the  calyp- 
so -craze.  He's  penned  a  new 
tune  called  "A  Woman's  Place 


ris    Here    With    Me"  ...  SAMMY 
I  DAVIS  may   not   be  called   for 
I  the  scandal-mag  probe...  Fol- 
I  lowing  the  cuirent  expose  mag 
j  investigation,    I    only    wish    I 
j  had  just  the  tax  on  the  addi- 
tional   c«st   (»f    newsprint    that 
I  said   mags   will    need   to  take 
care  of    their    increased   cir- 
cula,tien    .    .   .   Praise    agent 
BILL     TOSTEVIN     allowed     as 
how    our    comment    on    Praise 
House   was    sparking   potential 
box-office  for  the  play,  but  in 
a   fast  shut-out.  HUNTINGTON 
HARTFORD   cancelled    out    the 
j  controversial  show's  opening  at 
■his  Vine  Street  playhouse.  The 
j  theme    was    too    touchv.    .sO"m 
told.   Actress   ROBY  GOODWIN 
penned    from    S.  F.   to   say   the 
reviews   there   were  wonderful, 
bad      and      middle-of-the-road. 
We    at    least    hope    the    superb 
least    may   have   capitalized   on 
the    advance    promotion,     and 
j  been   paid   well  for  their  time 
...  The    CONTINENTALS    fash 
j  ion  affair  at  Giro's  on  April  .5th 
I  will    feature    the    vocallure    of 
TONI  HARPER  I 


^ 
^ 
^ 


<ZI>hop  ^^/Qnd  C^ave  4Z/^{    J hriftimctrt    J-or  ^ver\fJa\f  t^pecials        •        4^ltop  ^:i^nd  i^ave  ^S^t    J lirlftintart     •  (a 


EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  at  TZli/Zi'muT/.  EVERY  DAY  Sa  SPECIAL  DAY  aiThai/Uiuaif^.  EVERY  DAY 


_  OUR  STANDARD  IS 

"  PERFECTION 


PERFECT 
SERVICE  AND  PERFECT 
SAVINGS  LIKE  THIS  PERFECT 


LINE-UP  OF  VALUES 


SUNNY  VALLEY  F«ESH   GRADE  A 

LARGE  EGCS 

SUNSHINE  STATE   FROZEN   ORANGE 

JUICE 

RIALTO  OR  FLAVOR  DE  LUXE 

TOMATOES  2 

BITS   O'HONEY  OR  TABLE  QUEEN 


Ooz. 
Ctn. 


$100 


No.  2' 

Tins 


CORK 


GOLDEN 
CREAM  STYLE 


No.  303 
Tins 


$100 


jj  iW*i''  "-       Hawaiian  6«ld 

PINEAPPLE  JUICE 


CARROT  JUICE  2  ^"i  5 
STARCH  »«     -•    47 

TOILET  SOAf  «%  ^  1^  C 

CAMAY  ^u    i  •*    Z3 


LENTfN  FROZEN  FOOD 


MorroM's 

MACARONI  M^  cwH.  2  I 

MOITON'S 

SPAGHEHl  2 ', 

STAI   KIST 

TUNA  PIE 

CAMMILL-S    CHAM   OF 

SHRIMP  SOUP 


45c 

;r49c[ 

2  i;:;  45c  I 

2r67c 


JIN!  IWEISON'S  CIEESE 

ENCHILADAS 

TIN  CAMf'S 


» «   Pk|. 

tf  1 


3lM. 


29 

PORK  &  BEANS  ^ "  19 

.    69 

3  "c  *r 


WISCONSIN  KEI  CHEESE 

CHEDDAR 

HI  OUICK  iiscuin 

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Jan*  Anderson 

MAYONNAISE 


Quart 
Jar 


U.S.D.A. 

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ROASTS 


TABLE  TRIMMED 
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CHUCK 
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BLADE 
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ROUND  BONE  ROAST     ib.4lM  SEVEN  BONE  ROAST      lb  37* 


HAN  MEATY  lEEF 

SHORT 
RIBS 

LEAN  lONELESS 

STEW 
BEEF 

BONILTIEOSHaULOEl 

CLOD 
ROAST 

FRESH  LEAN 

GROUND 
BEEF 

.  19' 

^^  55' 

59' 

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p|^£3H      U.S.D.A.  Inspactad  Grod*  A  California  Irand 

TURKEYS 


SMALL  BELTSVILLE 
FRY  OR.  ROAST 


lb. 


pl^YINO    WMtwood  Brand  U.S.D.A.  Insptd.  Frexan  Grad*  A 

CHICKENS 


1-lb.  12*oz. 
box 


Keld  Kist  Frexon-2'/4-oz.  Pkg. 

STEAKS  12™.  T 


Rothi  Ra  Corn  Slicod 


BACON 


Lb.  Pkg. 


Lenten  Specials 


CORBINA  QCc 


FRESH         \Uv  ^Q 

PACIFIC  r«^* 

SEA    BASS    FRESH  FILLET     b 

FRESH  OC 

FILLETS  lb.  ^^ 

BIRDSETE      Uv  OCi 


OYSTERS 


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FRUITS  -  VEGETABLES 


U.  S.  NO.  1  WHITE  ROSE 


POTATOES  10 


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GARDEN  FRESH 

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NORTHERN^EXTRA  FANCY 

BROCCOLI 

BLOOM-RITE  ASSORTED 

GLADIOLA  8 


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^  Pur*  Vof  otabU 

WESSON  OIL 


IIUSfTE  PlSSniT  TO  flElSVIf 


FROZEN  PEAS6^'*P 

10' 


H',i-«i. 


TOMATO  SOUPTi. 

HIS  SECTIONS  «^  ,^ 

GRAPEFRUIT       L'"  23' 


LENnN   SUGOESTIONS 


VAN   CAMP'S 

TENDERONI 

DUNIAI   SMAU 

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2  L"  89' 


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11'M.  Pk|. 


Ik.  Cti. 


Ik.  Cli. 


Town  Houso 

FACIAL  TISSUE 

2      300  ct. 
Pkgi. 


Hot  CrMf      **"P*«  '••^  ' 

■UNs       cowan...... W^  | 

A4<  •■►•MM 

J ,         2-Lay«r  Paean  _ 

i.H».p-i      SPICE  CAKE....  ir«.  ■ 

(MtVdMl         4*cW  I 


CLIP  THIS  COUPON 
Good  WED.,  THUR., 
FRI.,  SAT.  or  SUN., 
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GOOD  AT--^  •AsW/i^MARCH 
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LIMIT:  OWE  COUPON  PER  CUSTOMER  F-^^^^- 


■"i 


SPECIALS  FOR  THURS.,  FRI.,  SAT.,  SUN.,  MARCH  7.8-9.10     " 

LISTEN  TO  KMPC  FOR  OUR  DAILY  RADIO  SPECIALS 

Wa  Roarva  fha  Right  to  Limit  Quantit4a$.   Salas  Tax  Added  to  All  Taxabia  Item* 


EVERY  DAY'S  A  SPECIAL  DAY  AT 


RICHMOND  9-6251 


Sliop  ^ndSay^  ^t  O^ltriftimart  \j-or  Overyc/ir^  Specials 


<^«  op  a/^n  a  i^avc  a^i    J  A  ri flint  a  rt 


I 


i 


2.      ii¥ 


I    X 


^ 


i/^ 


vv 


Q 


^ 


To 


in  the 


Signal 

Oil  &  Gas  Co. 

Sincerely  Thanks 

You  for  your 

Support  in  the 

Current  leasing 

Campaign. 


THE    SIGNAL    LEASE    OFFERS    a 

20%  royalty  and  a  provision  to  drill 
at  least  4  wells  to  every  40  acres. 
The  fact  that  the  Signal  lease  is  the 
best  one  offered  is  evidenced  by  the 
growing  number  of  property  owners 
signing  with  Signal. 

SIGNAL  WILL  CONTINUE  to 

truthfullv  inform  the  public  of  im- 
portant facts  about  the  leasing 
situation  in  your  area;  we  don't 
make  impossible-to-prove  state- 
ments to  mislead  you. 

WE  CORDIALLY  INVITE  all  prop- 
erty owners  in  the  area  to  call  or  visit 
the  local  Signal  office  for  complete 
information. 


4t^ 


4^ 


4f^ 


SIGNAL  Oil  AND 
:  GAS  COMPANY 
LEASE  OFFICE 


2501  W.  Washington 
Mevard 

nf  flic  Corner  of  Ariiiigton  Avcvuc 


^      Telephone  REpublic  1*8271 

Respectfully, 

SIGNAL  OIL  AND  GAS  COMPANY 


$$$$$$$  $$$$$$v 


4» 

4^ 


h 


..,, 


CAUiORNIA 

EAGLE 


WANT 


DEADLINE:  WEDNESDAY  AT  11  A.M. 


SAVE  TIME 
SAVE  MONEY 


AD.  4-0161 

-  Of  AOUNff  - 
WED.  AT  1 1  A.M. 


18 
19 
19a 
20 

21 
21a 


12— The  Calrforni*  Eagle 

CLASSIFKD  AD  INMX 

All    CUtsificatiens   Am   NvmberMl 
•nd  Appear  in-NumeriMl  Order 

Ciaaaif  (Cation  ■-  No. 

Legatt  ._ _ „ 1 

Situatiena    Wanted — Pamalc    12 

Halp    Wanted— Female     .._ 13 

SituaUoni  Wanted— Male  _  14 

Help  Wanted— Male  _  15 

Employment  Preparation  16 

Employment  Agenciei 17 

Wanted    to    Rent    

Roema — Furniihed 

Hotela 

Reem»— Unfurniahed    

Rsema — Heu««k««plng  

Roema  A.  Board 

Apartmenta-^Furniahtd    22 

Apartments— Unfurnittied    23 

HouMa — Furnished    24 

HouMe— Unturnlahed  25 

Butlneea  Rentals  _ 26 

Agencies— Rental*  _  27 

Money  te  Leah _  28 

Mortgages  A.  Trust  Deeds  29 

Business  OpportunWes  30 

Miscellaneous   For  Sale  33 

Personal    Servicek 46 

Services 47 

Child    Care 48. 

Rug    Cleaning   _ 49.. 

Expert   Dental   Care 50 

Autos — Used  51 

Auto    Repairs    52 

Real    Estate    Loans  _ __ 95 

Income   Property  for  Sale  96 

Income  Property  for  Lease  96a 

Business  Property  for  Sal*  96b 

Property   Loans  96e 

Property    Improvements  97 

Real    Estate  Wanted 98 

Real    Estate   for   Sal* ...j 99 

Display -Real   Estate  _ ,1CC 

Display   Property   Rentals -.101 

UGAl  NOTICES 

NO.   436*2 

I— LEGAL    NOTICE 

NOTICE    TO    CONTRACTORS 

•  Kotice    is    hereby    given    that    the 
Bo«rd    of    Education    of    the    City    of 
Los     Aneel^c     will     receive     bids     for 
furnishing  all  labor  and  material   for 
t!  t   foltowihR  work- 
Kind   of   Work   and    Nam*  of   School 
or   location 
Date  of   Bid  Opening 
MOVING     AND      RESETTING     OF 
BUILDING      r-4      FROM      S  T  O  N  E- 
HURST        AVENUE       SCHOOL       TO 
T  W  E  N  T  y  -  E  I  G  H  T  H     STREET ; 
SCHOOL. 

MARCH  14.   19S7 

Each  bid  shall  be  in  accordance 
^rirh  drawlnRfl.  specificationa  and 
o.'her  contract  docunienT.«*  now  on. 
file  in  the  MAINTHaMANCE  AND 
OPERATIONS  BRANCH  of  the  Busi- 
ness Division  of  said  Board.  1425 
South  San  Pedro  Street.  Lo.«  An- 
seles.  Prospective  bidders  may  se- 
cure copies  of  said  drawings  and 
sDecifiration-«  at  the  office  of  said 
MAINTENANCE  AND  OPERATIONS 
BRANCH. 

Pursuant  to  the  Labor  Code  of 
the  Stat*  of  Calrfornia.  the  Board 
ef  Education  has  ascertained  the 
ireneral  prevailing:  rate  of  per  diera 
wages  for  each  craft  or.  type  of 
■wcckman  needed  to  execute  the  con- 
t.act  or  contracts  which  will  be 
awarded  the  successful  bidder  or 
bidders  as  follows: 
CLASSIFICATIONS: 
Apprentices 

May    he    employed     In     conformity 
u-ith  Section  1777.5  of  the  California 
Labor   Code. 
Riggers 

.Same  mage  scale  as  craft  to  which 
riTsinr    is    incidental. 
Welders 

Same  waje  scale  as  craft  to  which 
welding    is    incidental.  f 

Hiourly 
CLASSIFICATION  Wage  Rate 

•CARPENTERS 
Foreman  shall  be  paid  not  lees 
than  25  cents  per  hour  more 
than  the  hourly  rate  ot  the 
highest  classification  over 
which   he   has  supervision. 

Carpenter    $3.00 

•LABORERS 
Foreman  shall  be  paid  nof  less 
than  25  cen's  per  hour  more 
than  the  hourly  rate  of  the 
highest  classification  over 
v-hich  he  has  super\ision. 
Laborers,  Ganeral  or  Construc- 
tion      2  30 

Effsctiv*  Effective 
2-1-57         6-1-57 
•HOUSEMOVERS 

FOREMAN    J2.89         JS.OIS 

•HOUSEMOVER 

JOURNEYMAN    ..  2.«3  2.7S5 

•YARD  MAINTENANCE 

.MAN    2.63  2.755 

•JUNIOR 

HOUSEMOVER  ••  •• 

•—Plus  Health  and  Welfare,  etc. 
.••—Effective  June  20.  195«.  the  hour- 
ly wage  rate  for  the  classifica- 
tion Junior  Housemover  will  h» 
advanced  after  each  six-month 
period  to  the  extent  of  25%  ot 
the    difference    between    the    be- 

5 inning  hourly  wage  rat*  of  the 
unior  Housemover.  and  the  then 
current  hourly  wage  rate  for  the 
elassifiratio-n  of  Journey- 
man Housemover. 


Thursday,  March  7,  1957 
1 -LEGAL  NOTICES 


NO.  43846 
LEGAL  NOTICE 
NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 
NO.  386569 
In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 
of  California,  in  and  for  the  County 
of  Lo.s  Angeles.  In  the  Matter  of  the 
Estate  of  James  Thomas  Wilklns. 
deceased.  Notice  Is  hereby  given  bv 
the  undersigned.  E.  A.  WINSTANLY. 
PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR,  as  Ad- 
ministrator of  the  Estate  of  James 
Thomas  Wilklns.  Deceased,  to  the 
Creditors  of.  and  all  persons  having 
claims  against,  the  said  decendent. 
to  present  them,  with  the  necessarv 
vouchers,  within  six  months  after 
the  first  publication  of  this  notice, 
to  the  said  Administrator  at  his  of- 
fice at  808  .North  Spring  St..  Los 
Angeles  12.  California,  which  said 
office  the  Tindersigned  selects  as  a 
place  of  business  in  all  matters  con- 
nected with  said  estate,  or  to  file 
them,  with  the  necesary  vouchers, 
within  si.\  months  after  the  first 
publication  of  this  notice.  In  the  of- 
fice of  the  Clerk  ot  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  Slate  of  California  In 
and  for  the  Countv  of  Los  Angeles. 
Dated:    Fet>ruan-    25.    1957. 

E.     A.     WINSTANLEY.       ' 
•Public    Administrator,    as    ad- 
ministrator   of    the    estate    of 
said    decedent. 
Publish    in 

CALIFORNIA   EAOLE. 
Feb.  28:   March  7,  14  and  21,  1957. 


uNO.    434M 

NOTICE    OF    HEARING    OF 

PETITION    FOR    PROBATE 

OF    WILL 

No.     38642B 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 

of  Califor.-iia.   'n   and    for  the  -County 

of  Los  Angeles  In  the  Matter  of  the 

Estate     of     ANNIE     IRENE     HILL 

Deceased. 

Notice    is    hereby    given    that    the 
petition     of     Edward     Thomp.son     for 
the  Probate  of  the   Uill   of  the  above- 
named   deceased   and   for  the   issuance 
of     Letters     of     Administration     \\'ith 
Tiie    Will    Annexed    thereon    lo    The 
Peiilloner     to     which     reference     is 
hereby    mude    for   further   particulars 
will    he    heard    at    9:1.t    o'clock    a.m., 
on    -Marcb   11.    l^T.   at    the   conn    room 
•if     Department     .'S.     of     ihp     .■^iinerior 
Court    of   the   State   of   California,    in 
ana  for  the  County  of   Los  Angele.'. 
HAROLD   J.   OSTLY. 
Count\    Clerk  and   Clerk 
of  the  Superior  Court  of 
the    State    of    California, 
in    and     for    the    County 
of  Los  Angeles. 
•     By    A.     DUGALLY. 
Deputy 
Dated    Fphruarv    K-<     1957 
Thomas   G.    Nausom, 
1111    East    Vernon    Avenue, 
Los   Angeles,   California, 
.  D.    2-6149. 

Attorney    for    P*tition*r 
Bublish    in 

CALIFORNIA     EAGLE 
Peb.    21-28,    Mar.    7 


NOTICE  TO  CREDITDRS 
NO.  S85972 
In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State 
of  Caltfornia.  in  and  for  the  County 
of  Los  Angeles.  In  the  Matter  of  the 
Estate  of  George  McCuiston.  De- 
ceased. 

Notice  Is  hereby  given  by  the  un- 
dersigned. E  A.  Winstanley.  Public 
Administrator,  as  Administrator  of 
the  Estate  of  George  McCuiston.  De- 
ceased, to  the  Creditors  of.  and  all 
persons  having  claims  against,  the 
said  decedent,  to  present  them,  with 
the  necessary  vouchers,  within  six 
months  after  the  first  publication  of 
this  notice,  to  the  said  Administrator 
at  his  office  at  aOR  North  Spring  St. 
Los  Angeles  12.  California,  which  said 
office  the  undersigned  selects  as  a 
place  of  busines"  In  all  matters  con- 
nected with  said  estate,  or  tn  file 
them,  with  the  necessan-  vouchers, 
within  six  months  after  the  first  pub- 
lication of  this  notice,  in  the  office 
of  the  Clerk  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California  In  and  for 
the  Countv  of  Los  Angeles. 
Dated:    Feb.    5.   1957 

E.    A     WLNSTANLEY. 

Public  Administrator,  as 

Administrator  of  the  Eitat* 

of  said  Decedent. 
Publish    In    California    Eagl*    Feb. 
14-21-29-March   7.    19S7. 


11 -REDUCING  TREATMENTS 


The  rates  of  per  diem  wages  for 
each  of  the  various  classifications  of 
work  shall  be  the  hereinbefore  set 
forth  ■  prevailing  rates  of  hourly 
wages  multiplied  by  eight  (8).  Eight 
(8)  hours  shalj  constitute  a  day's 
W'ork;  it  being  understood  that  in 
the  event  that  workmen  are  em- 
r'oyed  less  than  •igbt  (8)  hours  per 
day  the  per  diera^  wages  shall  be 
deemed  to  be  that  fraction  of  the 
per  diem  wages  herein  established 
that  the  number  of  hours  of  employ- 
metit  bears  tn  eignt   (8v  hours. 

WORKING  RULES 
1.  Where  a  single  shift  is  worked, 
eight  (8)  consecutive  hours  be-, 
tween  7  am.  antrt  5  p  m.  shall 
constitute  a  day's  work  at 
straight  time  for  all  workers. 
2-  Forty  i40>  hours  between  Monday 
7  a.m.  and  Friday  .">  p  m.  shall 
constitute  a  week's  work  at 
straig*  '  time. 
S.  All  work  performed  In  excess  of 
eight  (8)  hours  per  days  or  forty 
•  40)  hours  per  week  or  on  Holi- 
cays.  Saturdays  and  Sundays 
shall  be  paid  lor  at  the  rate  for 
overtime  of  the  craft  involved. 
i.  HoUda>  s  as  herein  referred  to 
shall  be  deemed  to  be  New  Year's 
Day.  Decoration  Day.  Independ- 
ence Day.  Labor  Day.  Veterans 
Day,  Thatiksjiviog  Day  and 
Christmaa.  If  any  of  the  above 
holidays  fall  on  Sunday,  the  Mon- 
day following  shall  be  considered 
a  legal    hoiidJ»~ 

It  shall  be  mandatory  upon  the 
contractor  to  whom  a  contract  is 
awarded,  and  upon  all  subcontractors 
under  him  to  pay  not  less  than  said 
general  prevailing  rates  of  per  diem 
wages  to  all  workmen  employed  in 
the  execution  of  the   contract. 

Notice  is  also  herebv  given  that 
all  bidders  may  gabmit  with  their 
bids,  a  sworn  statement  of  their  fin- 
ancial responsibility,  technical  abili- 
ty and  experience  Such  auorn  state- 
ment may-  be  required  to  be  fur- 
nished before  award  Is  made  to  anv 
particular  bidder. 

Each  bid  shall  be  made'  out  on  a 
for™  to  be  r»btained  at  said  MAIN- 
TENANCE A.ND  OPERATIONS 
BRANCH  of  the  Board  of  Education 
and  shall  be  sealed  and  filed  with 
the  Contract  and  Insurance  Branch 
of  the  Board  of  Education  Room  209 
1428  South  San  Pedro  Street  Los 
Anf»le$.  by  not  later  than  2  00  P.M. 
on  the  date  or  dates  shovin  above 
and  will  be  opened  and  read  aloud 
In  public  at.  or  about  said  time  in 
Room  210  at  .said  address. 

When  the  contract  price  is  In  ex- 
cels of  one  thousand  dollar*  ftl.OOO.- 
OOi.  a  "formal  '  contract  shall  be  en- 
tered Into  on  a  form' which  mav  he 
~  examined  In  the  Contract  Office  of 
the  Board  of  Education,  and  surety 
bonds  of  a  surety  comoany  satisfact- 
ory to  the  Board  of  Education  cover- 
ing an  amount  approximately  equal 
to  seventy-five  per  cent  (75'''^)  of 
the  contract  price  for  labor  and  ma- 
terial, and  one  hundred  per  cent 
nOO%>  for  faithful  performance, 
shall    be   furnished. 

The  Board  reserves  the  right  to 
reject  an.v  or  all  bids,  and  to  waive 
any  Informality  in  tinv  bid.  No  bid- 
der mav  withdraw  his  bid  for  a 
period  of  sixty  (tO)  days  after  the 
date  set  for  the  opening  thereof. 

Bv  order  of  tjie  Board  of  Education 
vt  the  City  of  Lo*  Angeles. 

S;  C   JO'WER 
Business  Manager 
DATED-    Loe    Angeles.    California, 
Februarv  21,    1957. 
Puhllth  In 
"THE    CALIFORNIA    EAGLE, 

Ptb.  II  and  Mareti  7,'1I67 


KEEP  SLIM 
STAY  SLIM 

—for— 

•  REIAXING 

•  REDUCING 

Call  PL.  5-3651 

for  Appointment  at 

LEE'S  STUDIO 

11669  S.  AVALON 

13-HElP  WANTED-FEMALE 

HELP   WANTED 

WANTED— Busines.s  lady  with 
.some  capital  to  operate  bar- 
becue cafe  or  employment 
agencv.  AD.  3-6972.  Evenings 
AD  3-2063. 


IS-HEIP  WANTED-MALE 


WANTED— Master  barber.  Good 
business.  Call  Sampson's  Bar- 
ber  Shop,   EXbrook   9-9607. 


It-WANTiD  TO  RENT 


WANTED  TO  RENT 

LANDLORD  LISTINGS  FREE 
TENANTS  WAITING  TODAY 

DAILY   RENTALS 
Call  PL.  3-3168 


19-A-HOTELS 


HAYES 
MOTEL 

rh«  Peopfa's  Clie/e« 

960  E.  Jefferson 

AD.  3-9295 

3700  S.  WESTERN 
RE.  4-9346 


22-APARTMENTS-FURNISHED 


HILTON 

ARMS 

HOTEL  AND 
APARTMENTS 

Weekly  service  and  utilities. 
Clean,  quiet,  comfortable,  well- 
managed   building. 

FURNISHED 

SINGLES,   DOUBLES 

BACHELORS 

M6  50  and  Up 
RE.  5-8  I  1 7 

]  250  South  Western 


FUKNISHED  APT.  FOR  RENT 

Furnished  apt.,  ut.  pd.,  2204  7th 
avenue.  RE.  4-1897.  Close  to 
transportation. 


FURNISHED    APT. 

4  RM.  modern  apt.  Children  O. 
K.  Located  one  block  west  of 
Alameda  on  108th  street.  $50 
mo.  Phone  LO.  9-1728. 


23-APARTMENTS,  UNFURNISHED 


APTS.  FOR  RENT 

$50.00  MO.— 3  and  4  room  apts. 
for  adults  and  children.  Lo- 
cated one  block  west  of  Ala- 
meda on  108th  street.  LO. 
9-1728. 


17-EMPLOYMENT  AGENCIES 

ROYALTY 

EMPLOYMENT 

AGENCY 

"25  YEARS  OF  SERVICE" 

1714  West  Jefferson  Blvd. 
RE.    1-4529  RE.   3-3930 

HELP  WANTED:  Women,  cooks 
and  general.  Home  nights,  35 
to  50.  Stay  $200  per  month  & 
up.  Dishwashers,  hotel  maids, 
waitresses  and  cooks,  salaries 
open.  MEN:  Cooks,  dishwash- 
ers, fry  cooks. 

COUPLES:  Top  -  salaried  posi- 
tions. 

DAY  WORK 

Register  now  for  these  top  pay- 
ing  jobs. 

18-WANTED  TO  RENT 


DE  LUXE 

MODERN 
APIS. 


JUST 
COMPLETED 

RIDGEIEY 
MANOR 

UNFURN.  1  &2BR. 
$95  MO.  &  UP 

INCLUDES:  W/W  CARPETING 
OR  PARQUET  FLOORS,  EX- 
POSED BEAM  OR  ACOUSTIC 
PLASTER,  INSULATED  WALLS, 
GARBAGE  DISPOSAL,  TILE 
KITS.  &  BATHS,  EXTRA 
CLOSETS,  LAUNDRY,  FREE 
HOT  WATER. 

OPEN  DAILY  AND  WEEK-ENDS 
10  TO  5 

2222    S.    RIDGELEY    DR. 
NORTH  OF  ADAMS 

■  1    BLOCK  EAST  OF  HAUSER 

MR.  WACHT 

WE.  8-3871  orGR.  8-4829 


Tenants  waiting.  All  areas. 
RE.  3-5621 
RE.  3-1171 


Landlords  Ftm 
Tenants  waiting.  All  areas.  RE 

3-5621';  RE  3-1171, 


Ed9U  Want 
IS  words  fei  SI 


2S-UNFURNISHED  HOUSES 

$40  — NICE  3 -room.  1- bedroom 
house  near  Washington  and 
Vermont. 

RE.  3-5909 


$80— SPACIOUS  4-bedrm.  house. 

Children  and  pets  welcome. 

RE.  3 -.5621 


$60— FOUR-ROOM  house.  New- 
ly decorated.  Near  Arlington. 
RE.  3-U71 


2S-MONEY  TO  LOAN 


CASH! 


OPEN  9  TO  9 


Free  Appraisals! 

Mark  Twain  Real  Estate 

9801  South  Irvadway 
PL.  6-1478 


i 


2S-MONEY  TO  LOAN 

Stop  - 1  Buy 

2nd 
Trust  Deeds 

My  own  money.  Better 
deal  with  me.  20  years  in 
Los  Angeles.  Or  can  get 
you  a  loan  on  your  trust 
deed  if  you  don't  care  to 
sell. 

Mr.  Lewis 

PL  3-1158  Any  Time 


i  99-ltEAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


33-MISCELLANEOUS  FOR  SALE 


MISCELLANEOUS  ITEMS 

SELLING  nice  8  ft.  meat  ca.se 
and  compre.s.sor;  also  six  (6) 
foot  neon  signs.  AD.  3-6972. 


47-SERVICES 


AMAZE  friends.  Cigarette  smoke 
rings.  Yoga  secret.  $1.00.  C.  J., 
P.  O.  Box,  929,  Indio,  Calif. 


JOHNSON'S  HOUSE  of  Insur- 
ance. Salesman  wanted  to 
manage    office. 


48-CHILO  CARE 


CHILD  CARE  —  Infants  pre- 
ferred. Day  &  night  perman- 
ent nr  day  &  night  care  if 
desired.  Call  AD    4-0,392. 

CHILD  CARE— Adult  to  care  for 
two  .<imall  children  and  nice 
home.  Elderly  person  pre- 
ferred. Call   pL»  1-2.530. 


Child  care  in  rny  home  bv  day. 
All  ages.  PL.  1-8371.  341  E. 
68th  street. 

49-RUG  CLEANING 

RUG  CLEANING 

GOLDfN  STAn 

RUG    CLEANERS 

BINDING        •        SERGING 

FRINGING     *     REPAIRING 

1667  E.  32nd  St. 
AD.  2-6935 


96-INCOME   PROPERTY  FOR  SALE 


FIRST  OFFERING 

OPEN  SUNDAY 
1:30  to  4:30  P.M. 

3930  Wisconsin  St. 

LOVELY 
LARGE 
DUPLEX 

NEAR  U.S.C, 

LAWRENCE   M.   ROSENTHAL 

2128  PICO  BLVD., 

SANTA  MONICA 

EX.  9-6095 
EVES.  EX.  3-9052 


96-C-PORPERTY  LOANS 

New  Loan  Deal 

at»t  in  th«  Wnt 

LEGAL  RATES 

Any  Amount  You  N««d 

Call  Now 

Mr.  Sloan 

Day  or  Night  -  NO.  S-0377 
97-PROPERTY  IMI>ROVEMENTS 


FAMILY  ROOMS 

At  larg*  at  3  bedrooms  for 
$38  down  and  $38  a  month 


ALSO 

GLASS 

SLIDING 

DOORS 

for 

Spacious 

Living 


Marvin  Builders 

CALL 

AN.  1-7149 
WE.  5-9953 

*  cmpl.t.  buMrfinf  r.m.rf.lln* 
■ii4  r.  H.  A.  100%  flnaiicinfl 
i.rvlc. 

R.ar  yard    .pis.   buMI   far 
SSO  Dawn  and  $50  a  Maafh 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 

COMPTON" 

Spacious,  BedutiFul,  Mew 

HOMES 

'750 


DOWN 

Non-V«»*  A  Vols 


•  3  bedrooms,  2  baths,  2-car 
garage        ' 

•  LOADED  with  Luxury  Features: 
Garbage  Disposal,  Extra-Large 
Closets,  Large  Level  Lots,  etc. 

•  Close  to  Schools,  Churches, 
Shopping. 

•  Easy  Monthly  PaymentsI 

•  Immediate  Occupancyl 

DRIVE   OUT  TODAY. 
MODELS  ON  DISPLAY 

For  iBlormation,  Can  Oxford  2-4736 
or  UNlvaftlty  3-5938 
134th  &  KAlsman.  Compton    . 
(Turn  £ut  ott  Cenutl  At  134tli) 


We'll  trade 

brand  new 

beautiful 

3-bedroom, 

f 

2-bath  home 

in  the  San  Fernando  Valleys' 

most  convenient   location. 

Includes  luxury  features, 

built-ins  galors.  Street  paved, 

curbs,  walks,  driveways, 

landscaping  and  sewers 

in  and  paid  for. 

FOR 

Your  present  home,  paid  for  or 
not,  vacant  lots,  trust  deeds, 
bonds,  securities,  trucks  —  or 
almost  anything  of  value. 

PACOIMA  PARK 
HOMES 

Vaughn   and   Borden   Streets 
San   Fernando  Valley 

Phone:   EMpir*  9-9162 


VETS 

WHY  PAY  RENT? 

$25  deposit  and  your  discharge 
plus  $25  per  week  for  18  weeks 
pays  $75  dn.  including  charges  & 
impound  on  a  lovely  2  bedroom 
home.  Then  your  notes  are  $65 
per  "month. 

JOHN  H.  KELLY 

NE.  6-2522 


um 

920  ACRES 

of  Choice   Land 
Priced   to   Sell 

You  Too  Can 
Own  a  Ranch 
in  the  Country 

This  Weekend  Drive 
Your  Family  to  the 

PERRIS 
GRANJAS 

SUBDIVISION 

Ranches  and  Scenic 
Home  Sites  As  Low  As 


$300 


Per 
Acre 


Terms  a  Low  as 

$50  Dn.,  $25  Mo, 

-  CONTACT  - 

MALLEnE  REALTY 
14061  W.  V!RNON 

OFFice:  AX.  4-8157  or 
AX.  4-8158 

Re^.:  AD.  4-8098      * 

Invest  Today  in  a  CarefreeS, 
Healthy,   Happy  Tomorrow 

Addreii: 

Perns.  Calif. 

PERRIS 

GRANJAS 

Rt.  2,  Box  79 

'  !H 

Palronlzii  Our 
Advertisers 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


$299 

DOWN 

Balance  Monthly 

Takes  Deed 

To  Many  of  These 

PROPERTIES 
BORROW 

$1000 

Or  More 
On  Your 

Real  Estate 

Pay   Bacic  $15 

Per  $1000  Per  Month 
Until  Paid 


OPEN  MONDAY  NIGHT 
UNTIL  8  P.M. 


-IMMEDIATE    POSSESSION- 

Brand  New  Three  Bedroom  Stucco 
^Hornet.      Added      features— Par- 
quet  Fleers- Louvre   windews.- 

742    East    11 0th    Street-Double- 
$450   Down,   Bal.  Mo. 

2477    East    111th    Street-Frame.— 
$199  Down,  Bal.  Me. 

1366    E      110th    St.-3    Bedroom- 
$650   Down,;  Bal.  Me. 


99-REAL  ESTATE  FOR  SALE 


WHY 
PAY 


RENT 


738    E.    17th    Street-Frame   $350 
Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

1118     E.     91st     St.»Frame-$350 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


When  It's  Easier 

to  Own  a  Home 

Than  Live  In  a  Tent? 

EBONY 
HOMES 

TRACT 


9213  Beach— New  3  Bdrm.  Stucco.^ 
$550   Down,  Bal.  Mo. 

414     E.     107lh     St.-Frame-$250 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1460    E.    107th    St.-Frame-$199 
Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1938    E.     llSth    St.-Frame-$250 

Down,  Bal.  Me.  | 


1 104-1 104i  E.  113th  St.-$399 
Down,    Bal.    Me.    2    Rentals. 

820  W.  138th  St.,  Cempten-New 
3  Bedroom  Stucco.  $750  Down, 
Bal.  Me. 


10523-10525  Leu  Dlllen-3  Bed- 
rooms each.  $499  each,  Bat. 
Me. 


1749    E.    108th    St.-3    Bedreom- 
$499  Down,  Bal.  Me. 


1229-1233-1237  E.  109th  St.- 
3  separate  houses  with  3  bed- 
rooms each.  $650  Down  each. 
Bal.  Me. 


1762    I.    11th    Plac«-$2Se    Down,    lal. 
■n<«   Menthly 


2037    Nard    Street-Fr«m«-$299    Down, 
>alan<»  Menthly. 


2727    Hyami-$299    Down,   kolanct    Ma. 


^  3  Large  Bedrooms 

•Brand   New  and   Modern 

•  Latest 
Improvements 

•  Finest  Features 

•  Near  Everything 

•  Two  Car  Garages 

SMALL  DOWN  PYMT. 


101 -DISPLAY  PROPERTY  RMTAU 


NOW 

RENTING 


BRAND  NEW 


2  BDRM, 
APTS. 

•  CHILDRIN  OK 

•  TV  ANTENNJU 


•  TILE  KITCHENS 


•  PARKING  AREAS 


•  TILE  BATHROOMS 


HARDWOOD  FLOORS 


lOUVERED  WINDOWS 


2120  Stackwall-2  ladrms.,  $299  Dawn. 


2109  I.  113th  St.-Naw  1  Idrm.  Stucca, 
$750   Dawn,  tnlnnta   Manthly. 


2552   Santa   Ana-Naw   3   Bdrm.   Stucca. 
$499   Dawn,   kalanca   Manthly. 


2554    Santa    Ana-Naw    1   tdrm.   Stucca, 
$499   Dawn,  Balanca  Manlhly. 


2556   Santa    Ana-Naw    3   Bdrm.    Stucca, 
$499  Dawn,  BaFnnca  Manthly. 


Wo  Have  1  and  3  Bedrm.  Apts. 
For  Rent 

TOMORROW'S  MONEY  TODAY 

Advance  on  the  House  You  Now  0\vt» 
in  One  D«v.  Advanced  on  your  1st 
Trust  Deed  loan  if  we  O.K.  it.  Con- 
"iolidate  all  your  bills  In  one  loan-. 
Borrow  $1,000  or  more — pay  back  $15 
a  month  per  $1000  'til  paid. 

■WE    HAVE    CLIENTS    WITH 

ALL  CASHI 

For  Your  Real  K.staLe  Equities— 1st 
or  2nd  Trust  Deeds-  Contracts,  or 
any  Kquity.  you  or  your  friend  have 
in  Real  Estate.  If  it's  an  Estate,  a 
suit  or  separation  or  anything  per- 
taining lo  Real  Estate,  here  is  your 
chance  tb  sell  for  CASH. 

100  CENTS  ON  THE  $1.00 

For  your  1st  trust  deed  if  satisfac- 
tory to  us  credited  to  the  purchase 
of  anv  properties  we  have  listed, 
terrific— 100  cents  on  the  dollar  if 
you  have  a  T.D.  For  $100  to  $10,000 
w*  will  get  you  a  deal. 

$98;000   CASH   -  $98,000   CASH 

Have  clients  with  $98.U00  in  cash  to 
buy  real  estate  in  this  district.  This 
Is  your  chan'ce  to  sell  out  for  all  cash 
if  you  have  an  equity  or  own  a  house 
We  have  clients  with  $98,000  In  all 
cash  to  buy  you  out. 


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Ex-Red  fingers  Rev>  King  as  Co m m u iii s t 

DINAH  WASHINCi 


Mississippi  Student  Protest 


(JILLR  STRIKE  ^CTIUS—Stud,  nts  at  A  Irom  J  Is  M  C'jihgi  /It  .I/corn.  Miss.,  went 
out  on  strike  Inst  litrk  in  protest  amiinst  nfwspuprr  nrtitli-s  icritten  liy  a  historv  teiuhrr 
nttarking  the  N.f.lCP  and  nrf/iiig  Ntt/roes  to  bide  tintr  ttnif  in  sefkin/j  eqiinl  rights. 


Miss.  Students  Go 
On  Strike  Against 
'Unce  Tom'^Prof 

JACKSON.  Miss.  —  The  entire  student  body  at  Al- 
corn A&M  College  was  expelled  and  the  college  presi- 
dent fired  Friday  after  the  students  went  out  on  strike 
to  protest  articles  written  by  an  "Uncle  Tom"  history 
professor. 


King  Accused  of 
Taking  Negroes 
To  Destruction 


toao   E.   4Srd   PiMa,   L.A. 


Continuous  Pufalieation  Mi  76  Years 


AD.   4>0UI 


Vol.  LXXVI-No.  52 


Los  Angeles,  California 


10c 


Thurs.,  March  14,   1957 


10 


AD.  4-0161 

OUTSIDi  LA.  12c 


Examiner,  Hall  Agree  to 
Pay  in  Newsboys  Death 


Sanders  50%  Wrong,  at 
100%  Wrong  Club  Dinner 

By  ABIE  BOBINSON.  Sports  Editor 

Henry  (Red)  Sanders.  UCLA's  famed  football 
coach,  and  Cleve  Hermann,  National  Broadcasting  Com- 
pany's sportscaster.  each  got  off  on  the  wrong  foot 
when  the  lOCr  Wrong  Club  staged  its  first  Awards 
Banquet  at  the  Fo.\  Hills  Country    CTub    last   Friday 


Sander.s  got  al!  tangled  up  in 
his  own  words  and  used  the 
term  "iiig:Ker"  in  what  were  in- 
tended .MS  complimontarv  re- 
marks about  UCLA's  Negro 
athletes,  while  Hermann  de- 
scribed a  foreign  section  as 
"Pago  Hill"  in  t/yfnir  tp.  -^ay 
!haf  everybody  gets  a  chance 
in   sports. 

f'ootball  players,  athietic 
coaches,     track     stars,      sports 


anccs  by  men  and  wome'n  who 
participate  m  sports  and  those 
who  write  about  them  and 
broadcast  their  doings.  Joe 
Adams  was  master  of  ceremo- 
nies and  A.  .S.  (Doc)  YounK. 
president  of  tlie  club»  put  in 
'  tha.'«-»penirtg  pn4  elqfsing  re- 
marks. 

Athletes  Honored 
Athletes      lionored      inrluded 
Willie  White  and   Billy  Young- 


The  570  students  staged  a 
cheering  mass  demonstration. 
demanding  the  dismissal  of 
t'rof.  Clennon  King  lor  writing 
articles  in  a  Jackson  news- 
paper criticizing  the  NAACP 
and  urging  Negroes  to  bide 
their  time  in  seeing  equal 
rights. 

lasoe  tntiiBatuin 

Earlier  the  school  president. 


Dr.  J.  R.  Otis,  had  recommended 
Kins^s  di<mi.«sal  on  the  groun.l.  I  _^,         ^        ^ 
that  he  had  involved  the  school  ■^ 

in  controversial  issues.  tardlv  minister,  leading  the 

The  students   left  classes  on  i  Negroes  of  the  South  down 


BATOX  ROUGE,  La. — A  |  writers,  umpires  and  sports  an- 1  er.  high  school  stars;   Emmett 
Ne'^ro    ex-Communist    last  ^  ""'""■^''"s     shared     awards     forJAshford,    umpire:    Tom   Wilson 

Thursday  labeled  the  Rev. 
Martin  Luther  King,  heroic  i 
leader  of  the  Montgomery, 
a   das- 


whal 
"most 


were    described    as    the  { from    pro    football;   JDave   Wil- 
outstanding"      perform-'  (Continued  on  Page  Hi 


Tuesday.  On  Friday  Mississip- 
pi's State  College  Board — all 
white  —  held  an  emergency 
session,  after  which  the  board 
declared  the  student.s  had  *"tak- 
(Continued  on  Page  6) 


to   destruction 
shed." 


and  blood- 


Golden  State,  Union 
Seek  Public  Support 

Golden  State  Mutual  Life  Insurance  company  and 
its  126  agents  who  were  fired  on  March  1  engaged  in  a 
hot  and  heavy  war  6f  words  this  week  as  each  side 
sought  to  convince  distracted  policy  holders  and  the 
general  public  of  the  virtue  of  its  own  position. 

^     Ike  Adams,  special  represent- 

Compton  FEPC 
Hearing  Slated 
For  March  19 

A  public  hearing  on  a  city 
Fair  Employment  Practices 
(FEPCi  ordinance  in  Comptun 
has  been  scheduled  by  the  Cit\ 
Council  for  Tuesday  evening. 
March  19,  at  8  p.m. 

Need  for  such  an  ordinance  is 
indicated  by  the  fact  that  al- 
though there  are  18,000  .Ne;:ri>o^ 
and  2.000  "Mexican-Americans 
in  a  population  of  TO.fXX)  there 
are  no  Negro  councilmen,  fire- 
men, or  policemen,  nor  are 
there  any  Negroes  on  the  Plan- 
ning Commission,  Personnel 
Ci!>mmi.ssion,  Recreation  Com- 
mission or  In  the  city  clerk's 
office. 

The  four  city  councilm.en  arc 
at  present  elected  by  distrnis, 
but  a  proposal  appr<jved  by  tlie 
City  Council  would  make  all 
councilmen  elected  'at  lar.;e, 
thus  virtually  precluding  the 
election  of  a  member  of  a 
minority  group. 

The  FEP  proposal  was  pre- 
sented to  the  City  Council  by 
the  Compton  branch  of  the 
NAACP  last  Feb.  13.  A 
was  held  Sunday  at  St. 
tin's  Episcopal  Church  to  ex- 
plain the  issues  involved. 

City  elections  are  scheduled 
for  May  7,  when  two  city 
councilmen  will  be  elected. 


'White'  Waiting  Room 


Mob  Attacks  White 
Who  Aids  Alobama  Pastor 


ative  of  the  Golden  .State 
Agency  Club,  the  union  which 
represents  the  discharged  em- 
ployes, reporter  "vigorous"  pro- 
tests by  polic-y  holders  while 
Edgar  John.son.  vice  president 
of  the  company,  retorted  that 
the  strike  was  •■unlawful."  The 
company  has  cancelled  its  con- 
tract with  the  union. 

The  agents  were  fired  when 
they  refused  to  fill  out  new 
forms  for  what  the  company 
calls  .Special  Ordinary  insur- 
ance policies  on  the  cround 
ihai.  the  forms  required  a  vast 
iiiciea.>e     of     \\(irk.     The\'     dc- 

■  mantled  a  10  per  cent  increase 

'  in  commissions  for  the  work. 
Policyholders   Wooed 

;  On  the  other  hand.  (Jolden 
State  claims  that  it  has  the 
right   to  prescribe   forms  to   be 

I  Used   b\'   its  acenUs  and    insists 

j  that  the  agents'  "refusal  to  re- 

1  port  monthly  premiums  on 
business  procedure  forms 
adopted  by  the  company  inter- 
feres with  manageinenfs  re- 
si)onsihility  to  operate  the  com- 
pany." 

Both    sides    stres'^ed    the    fact 

.  that  Golden  Stale  is  a  mutual 
( iiinpany  "owned   by   it.s  policj 

I  holders,  and  that  it<  officers 
and  directors  are  trustees  for 
the  policy  owners. " 

i  The  lompany  is  trving  to  re- 
store normal  service.  John.son 
said,  in  urging  policy  holders  to 

,  pay  their   premiums  promptly, 
rally  i  pn    the    other     hand.     Adams 
Mar-  1  iifged  the  same  policy  holders 
to  exercise  the'r  right  to  voice 
protests   lo   officers    and    direc- 
tors. 
The  union,  which  is  picketing 
(Continued  on  Page  2) 


He  further  arrii.sed  him  of 
following  the  Communist  party 
line,  and  added.  "I  think  the 
Rev.  King  could  stand  a  close 
investigation." 

Informer   ■ 

Rev.  King's  detractor  was!  The  challenge  resulted  in  a 
Manning  Johnson,  who  for  some  |  mob  attack  upon  Lamar  Weav- 
years  has  been  turning  over  !er  — and  his  arrest  by  local 
names  of  prominent  Negroes  to  {  police.  He  was  fined  S25. 


BIRMINGHAM.  Ala. — Surrounded  by  a  heavy  po- 
lice guard,  the  Rev.  F.  L.  Shuttlesworth.  fighting  pas- 
tor of  Birmingham,  and  a  white  steehvorker  challenged 
Jim  Crow  waiting  rooms  in  the.  railroad  station  here 
last  Wednesday 


government  agencies  as  Com- 
munists or  former  Communists. 
.Most  prominent  among  those 
he  has  fingered  was  Dr.  Ralph 
(Continued  on  Page  6i 


Victim  Arrested 

The  angry  mobsters  hurled 
large  rocks  at  Weaver  as  he 
tried  to  make  his  escape  in  his 
automobile.     Stones     shattered 


the  windows  of  his  convertible 
aiHl  one  of  the  hoodlums  struck 
him  in  the  face  with  a  suitcase. 

It  was  Weaver, 
was  arrested.  H( 
with  reckless  driving. 

"I  left  accelerating  my  speed 
because  a  mob  of  about  .^O  per- 
( Continued  on  Page  61 


SeHlement 
Reached  in 
-Mac's-  Killing 

The    Hearst    Publishing : 
Co.  and  fomier  Los  Ange-" 
les    Examiner    distributor, 
James  R.  Hall,  who  served 
a    five-month    prison  term 
j  for  the  shotgun  killing  of  Wil* 
]  lowbrook    newsboy   MacArthw* 
Mai  one.     reached     an     oiit-oC- 
,  c-ourl   settlement  Tuesday  night 
i  in    the    $100,000    damage    suit 
brought      by     thq     J2-yeaf-old 
jlads  parents. 

j     Trial  of  the  oas*  had  stuted 
;  in  the  marning  and    tvas    ex* 
pecte(l  to  continue  for  aiwut  b 
'week.    The  mother.  Mrs.  Susie 
'  Malone.  was  scheduled  to  tes- 
tify    Wednesday.      Wednesday 
was  March  13.    If  was  exactly 
j  two   years    ago,   on   March   13, 
I  195.5,  that  young  *Ma<-,''  as  he 
'.  was    called,    was    killed    while 
j  riding  in  the  back  of  rheuuck 
i  driven  by  HalL 

I  Emotional  Strain 

Mrs.   Malone   told    her  afloi^ 

ney.  Leo  Branton.  Jr  ,  after  the 

firsr  day  of  ihe  trial,  that  she 

could  not  endure  the  emotion-  | 

.  ai  strain  of  taking  the  witness 

.stand  and  reliving  the  excru- 

j  elating    details-  of    the    death. 

i  She  said  she  and  her  husband, 

i  Louis  Malone.  were  prepared  to 

;  accept    the    settlement  offered 

NEW  YORK  —  rX  Assistant ,  by  the  defendants  earlier  in  the 


I\    rHk    MIDDLk  —  Dr. 

Ridfihe  Burn  h,  ,  ander  secrt- 
tary  •/■  thr  I  niffil  Strtions. 
tins  fveei-  ims  pliitqed  int« 
tfii  I  inter  ','">;  in  the  taypt- 
Isrm  it  eottt!:.  t. 

Bunche  Seeks 
To  Mediate 
Egypt-UN  Row 


SecreTar\-     Ralph    Bunche    Ihisj^jav 
week    caHed    in    Egyptian    offi- ' 
cials    Hi    a    l.ist    ditch   effort   to 
stem    rising    opposition    to    the 
however,  who  i  presence   of    UN    troops    in    the 
was  charged  I  explosive  Gaza  Sttip  and  strid- 
ent demands  for  Egyptian  c-on- 
trnl  of  the  area. 
Press   reports   said    hi*    ."hief. 
(Continued  on  Page  2i 


Aity.   Branton  refused  to  di- 
iContinued  on  Page  2» 


More  Royalties  | 
Demanded  for  i 
Oil  Leases 

Claims  and  counter-claims  | 
filled  the  air  this  week  as  the  j 
battle  for  oil  leases  continned  ! 
in  the  West  Adams  district.  ' 
Two  competing  oil  companies  I 
accused  a  third  competitor  of , 
"misleading"  statements  while  ' 
a  property  owners'  as.«ociation  i 
in  the  area  demanded  an  in-  I 
crea.se  in  promi.sed  royalties  to  i 
2.5  per  cent.  Two  companies  ] 
are  offering  royalties  of  20  per  | 
cent  while  the  third  is  offering 
16-s   per  cent.  ! 

The  Guiberson  &  Burke  and  \ 
Signal  Oil  companies  hurled  , 
the  "misleading"  cliarge  at  j 
Union  Oil  Company  which  | 
countered  with  the  claim  that  j 
it  has  signed  up  3.3tW  leases  in  ] 
the  area  lying  between  Olym-  ! 
pic  on  the  n0rth,  Jefferson  on  | 
the  south.  Vermont  on  the  east  ' 
and  La  Brea  on  the  west.  Un-  \ 
ion  said  last  week  that  prop- 
erty owners  who  sign  rival 
lea.sos  cant  share  in  oil  royal- 
ties of  the  successful  company. 
No  company  can  drill  unless  it 
(Continued  on  Page  6» 


DINAH  WASHINGTON 

Receives 

Deadly 

Candy 

D  !  n  «  h  Washington, 
"Queen  of  the  Blues,"  may 
owe  her  life  to  th«  fact 
that  sh«  ta  cUettas  and 
doesn't  eat  «akly, 

A  heat  tt  fhtmaHmkat  sent  to 
hM  'tvith  a  «ntpO*  iMm  was 
found  Tuesday  aiglit  «•  «wn- 
tain  .sIi\T«f  of  gtess.  carefully 
inserted  into  each  pieca^  The 
swallowing  eC  •ae  mr  more  of 
t  hese  tiny  fragniaats  could  liave 
caused  death. 

Sigaad  "VoariM* 

Tha  type'wntteii  not«  aecom- 
panving  tha  sweet  offering  was 
signed   •Yaaha."     Mim  Wash- 
iK'ontinued  on  Page  6) 

Heart  Attack 
Takes  Labor's 
Jimmie  White 

James  Munroe  White, 
president  of  the  Los  Ange- 
les division  of  the  Brotner- 
hood  of  Sleeping  Car  Por- 
ters and  a  member  of 
its  International  Executive 
Board,  died  of  a  heart  at- 
tack March  9  at  the  Cali- 
fornia Lutheran  Hospital, 
at  the  age  of  58. 

At  his  bedside  at  the  time  of 
his  death  were  his  wife.  Mrs. 
Siizie  White,  and  his  long-time 
friend  and  fellow-worker,  L. 
B.  Thompson. 

Lying  in  Stota 

Mr.  White's  body  is  lying  in 
state  at  the  Angelus  Funeral 
Home,  where  funeral  ser\'icea 
will  be  held  at  1  p.m.  today, 
Thursday. 

Mr.  White,  or  "Jimmie"  as 
he  was  widely  known,  was  born 
in  Atlanta  July  20.  1898,  the 
son  of  Munroe  and  Nanqy  Vio- 
let White.  The  family  moved 
to  Los  -Angeles  when  Jimmie 
was  IS  months  old  and  he  has 
been  a  resident  of  this  cit>'  ever 
since.  The  Brotherhood  wtri<?h 
Mr.  White  loved  was  a  project 
to  which   he  devoted  his  life. 

He  joined  the  organization  at 
its     inception    and    worked    in 
(Continued  on  Page  4* 


UMONS  SUPPORT  PICKETS-V,„on  leaders  in  ih,  Snn 
Francisco-Oakland  area  joined  the  picket  line  outside  the  Oak- 
land district  office  of  the  Golden  State  Mutual  Life  Insurance 
(]o.  Inst  Thursilm'  morning.  Shown  carrying  "Unfair"  signs 
arc,  from  left,  II  illiam  E.  Pollard,  i/cneral  chairman.  Joint 
Council  Diiiiny  Car  Cooks  and  IPatien;  M.  Robinson  Baker, 


% 


it  I  retary  Local  \o.  2  Golden  Statt  .-iainiy  L  nion :  C.  L.  Del- 
lums.  vice  president  and  regional  director.  Brotherhood  of 
Sleeping  Car  Porters:  .4tty.  George  R.  J  aughns,  president 
Trans-Bay  Savings  ir  Loan  .issocialion,  San  Francisco,  and 
agents  Anthony  Bell.  Juinrs  .4 .  Mason.  Larl  Clayton  and  Rich- 
ard Daniel,  vice  president  Local  Ao.  2. 


Pmaturmd 
In  thm  Eegl« 

Special  features  this  week 

inside  the  Eagie  include: 


.„  6 
_  7 
.-  8 

.-  8 
...10 

Smart  Sat  9 

Paepla  and  Place*  II 

Chaiz  Crawford H 

Wtaofa  Ceokla?  14 


Editoriala 

Church  ActiTitieB  .... 

Sports _... 

Sedal „.. 

Dorethaa   Foster  


JAMB  M.  WHin 


■^4' 


\ 


t-The  Calif?mia  Eagl> 


Thursday,  March  14,  1957 


LIFE  MEMBER— Elks  Lodge  No.  86  became  a  Life  Member  in  the  NAACP  recently. 
Shown  nhhvr,  from  left.  Robert  S.  Dykrx.  secretary  Board  of  Trusters;  Ilnriier  Bnkcr.  mem- 
brr  Board  nf  Trusters:  Claude  L.  Shifi;>,  Jr.,  chairman.  Board  of  Trustees:  Xalhaniel  Watts, 
Exalted  Ruler:  KAACP's  Lee  Merriwether :  George  Clark,  financial  snrrtary.  Board  of 
Trustees;  C.  L.  Smith,  Past  Exalted  Ruler  and  meinhcr  of  E.xecutire  Committee,  KAACP. 


Moii  Crushed 
Under  10  H. 
Of  Cement 

A  10-ton  wall  of  wet  con- 
crete toppled  over  on  George  B. 
Blackman.  35,  of  1052  W.  51st 
place,  Tuesday  noon,  crushing 
him  to  death. 

Seventy-five  rescuers  worked 
for  two  hours  trying  to  free 
Blackman.  Some  worked  to  lift 
the  slab,  while  others  tried  to 
burrow  under  it  in  an  attempt 
to  drag  the  injured  man  to 
safety.  When  Dr.  Robert  B. 
ICichols  of  the  Citizens'  Emer- 
gency Hospital  was  finally  able 
to  crawl  under  the  slab  and 
remove  Blackman's  shoe,  he 
was  already  dead. 

The  retaining  wall  was  one 
■  foot  thick.  30  feet  long  and  I'O 
feet  tall.  It  was  being  built  at 
9040  Sunset  blvd.  by  the  Pallis- 
gaard  Construction  Company. 
It  was  to  form  part  of  the  foun- 
dation for  the  new  Scandia  Res- 
taurant and  the  Rennick  Of- 
fice Building  Co. 


Topeka  Girl 
Chosen  Prep 
School  Queen 

Highland  Park  High  School 
Topeka,  Kans.,  chose  as  its 
queen  lovely  Kathryne  Whit- 
ney, 17-year-old  senior  and 
the  niece  of  Eagle's  Food  Eco- 
nomist Barbara  Mounts. 

The  charming  senior  attend- 
ed Highland  Park  schools 
since  kindergarten  and  .serves 
as  vice-president  of  the 
school's  Pep  Club. 

While  Highland  Park  School 
has  always  been  an  integrat- 
ed .school  this  marked  the 
first  time  a  Negro  girl  was 
chosen  queen.  The  bright-eyed 
senior  is  an  expert  typist  and 
has  won  many  honors. 

The  crowning  ceremony  took 
place  during  the  half  time  of 
the  Hfghland  Park,  Ottowa 
basketball  game.  Applause 
rocked  the  gym  as  Kathryne 
Whitney  was  crowned  1957 
Queen. 


Woman,  72. 
Hit  by  Train, 
Hurled  80  Ft. 

Mrs.  Margaret  Harris,  72,  of 
132,19  Filmoro  street,  Pacoima, 
was  struck  by  a  Southern 
Pacific  train.  "The  Owl."  last 
Wednesday  evening  and  hurled 
80  feet  to  her  death. 

She  was  taken  to  Sun  Valley 
Receiving  Hospital  where  she 
was  pronounced  dead  on  ar- 
rival. 

The  accident  occurred  on  the 
Southern  Pacific  right-of-way 
at  San  Fernando  road  and  Fil- 
more  street  a  little  before  7 
p.m.  as  Mrs.  Harris  was  cross- 
ing the  tracks. 

The  engineer,  H.  H.  Beck,  said 
he  was  traveling  about  48  miles 
per  hour  when  he  saw  Mrs. 
Harris  walking  across  the 
track.  He  blew  his  whistle.  Mrs. 
Harris,  he  said,  stopped  at  the 
sound,  then  turned  and  started 
to  retrace  her  steps.  It  was  then 
that  the  train  hit  her. 


Specials  for 

Thurs.,  Fri.,  Sat., 

March  14,  15,  16,  17 


MIRAQE  WHIP 

KRAFT  Solod  DrMsia^ 


TUNA 


CHICKEN  OF  THE  SEA 


Ught  ChiMk 


iVi-oi. 


CHEDDAR  CHEESE 

i-QRcy  Mild 

'"^49* 


ROYAL  GELATIN 

Assorted   Fruit   Flavors 


(Aj(pfi^ 


MEATS 


SWIFT'S  PtEMIUM  CIYOVAC  PACKfO 
BONELESS  BRISKET  F^C 

Corned  Beef 


IOWA  MAND 

SMOKED  PICNIC 

Shoulders 


Lb. 


Lb. 


CER-n-FRESH 
ROZEN 


Fillet  of  Sole 


Lb.. 


^^m 


FRUITS  t  VEGETABLES 

N«.  1    SOLID  M^ 

Cabbage    ^- 


CRISP 


Celery 


Lb. 


FANCY  GREEN 

Romaine 


Lb. 


PORK  &  BEANS 

VAN  CAMP'S 

2<«35' 


C6GS~GliAKU 

SlsSB^t  Lorqe  Fresh 

c 


Dozen 


PEAS 

DO.  MONTE  Ewfy  GoHm 


17-01. 


r****   6««4  at  any  Ralpht  M«rk«f****^ 

i  FREE 

\  TMf      ^oCpA*.    Ceopeo  • 

I      Good  for  on*  con  PEAK  BRAND    \ 

\      DOG  FOOD  MIX    I 

\         Tliunday,    Friday,    Saturday    and    Sunday    only     | 
■  Marcti    M,    IS,    16    and    IT,    1957  ■ 

L«.«,»,..LIMIT   ONI   COUPON    HR   CUSTOMER. m.» . I 


'/ 


Your  Nearest  Ralphs  Is: 

4360  S.  Figueroa  at  Vernon       3456  W.  3rd  St.  at  Vermont 
7813  South  Vermont  3617  W.  Wash,  at  7th  Ave. 

3633  Crenshaw  at  Rodeo  5472  Crenshaw  Blvd. 

HUNTINGTON  PARK,  LONG  BEACH,  WESTWOOD, 
SANTA  MONICA,  PASADENA,  PACOIMA 


Police  Bring  Right  Traffic 
Tickets;  Woke  Wrong  M<in 

Police  Friday  had  the  right  traffic  ticlcets,  but  the 
wrong  man.  Officers  called  on  Clarence  Johnson,  134 
E.  Adams  blvd.,  routing  him  out  of  bed  about  6:10  a.m. 
They  had  with  them  a  fistful  of  warrants,  with  bail 
amounting  to  $140.  Mrs.  Johnson  let  them  in  and  told 


them,  Clarence  is  upstairs." 

Rubbing  the  sleep  from  his 
eyes,  Clarence  said,  "There  must 
be  some  mistake.  I  went  down 
to  traffic  court  on  Wall  street 
yesterday  and  squared  my- 
self." 

He  looked  over  the  warrants. 
"Anyway  this  description  does 
not  fit  me.  I'm  6  feet  2,  and  I 
was  bom  in  1918." 

Police  took  another  look  at 
the  warrants  and  asked  John- 
son if  he  had  a  brother.  They 
went  downstairs  and  woke  up 
James  Johnson,  who  was  asleep 
on  the  davenport.  James  weighs 
157  pounds,  was  born  in  1929 
and  is  5  feet  6  inches  tall.  The 
description  fit  exactly. 

James  Johnson  admitted  he 
had  used  his  brother's  name 
because  he  was  driving  his  car 
and  didn't  have  his  own  driv- 
er's license  with  him.  The  of- 
ficers invited  James,  alias  Clar- 
ence, to  have  coffee  in  the 
county  jail. 


Increased  Parking 
Facilities  Foreseen 
For  County  Museum 

Increased  parking  for  persons 
visiting  the  County  Mu.seum  at 
E.vposition  park  was  foreseen 
this  week  by  County  Supervisor 
Kenneth  Hahn  as  the  Board  of 
Supervisors  authorized  museum 
officials  to  negotiate  for  the 
use  of  parking  lots  now  unused 
except  during  Coliseum  events. 


Bunche  Seeks 
Mid-East  Peace 

(Continued  from-  Page  1) 
Secretary  General  Dag  Ham- 
marskjold  himself  will  fly  to 
Cairo  Saturday  to  try  to  settle 
the  dispute  with  Egypt  on  who 
shall  control  the  strip. 

But  the  Gaza-Aqaha  disputes 
failed  to  stop  Suez  Canal  clear- 
ance. 

While  Bunche  entered  Into 
lengthy  conferenrcs  with  Eg.vp- 
tian  cfficials.  ihc  government 
told  the  U.N.  salvage  team 
under  U.S.  Gen.  Raymond 
Wheeler  to  begin  worlc  on  the 
wreck  of  the  tug  Edgar  Bonnet, 
one  of  two  remaining  major 
obstacles. 

Bunche,  who  acted  as  medi- 
ator in  the  1948  Palestine  war, 
called  in  Salah  Gohar,  Egypt's 
director  of  Palestine  affairs. 
Gohar  conferred  with  Nasser 
Monday  when  the  President  de- 
cided to  order  an  immediate 
administrative  takeover  in  the 
Gaza  Strip. 

The  press  in  general  was 
waging  an  angry  campaign 
against  UNEF  troops  in  flie 
Strip,  charging  that  UNEF 
forces  fired  on  demonstrating 
crowds  of  Arabs  in  Gaza  Sun- 
day. 

One  of  the  demonstrators, 
allegedly  shot  during  tlie  me- 
lee, died  Tuesday. 


TEACHERS  BACK  TINCLOF,  RICHARDSOS—Mrs. 

Myrtle  Johnston  (left)  and  Mrs.  Mnttie  L.  Edmond  (second 
from  left),  elementary  school  teachers,  tell  Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof 
and  Dr.  Ralph  Ru  h'ardson  frit/hl)  of  their  enthusiastic  sup- 
port for  their  candidacies  fiir  the  Board  of  Education.  .Mrs. 
'J  int/lof  is  runnini/  for  Board  of  Education .  Office  A  o.  2, 
and  Richardson  is  seeking  Board  Office  No.  6. 


'Examiner'  Agrees  to  Settlement 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 
vulge  the  amount  of  the  set- 
tlement, but  tlie  Eagle  learned 
that  it  was  close  to  the  high- 
est sum  ever  paid  in  Califor- 
nia for  the  death  of  a  12year- 
old  child. 

Admitted  Negligence  o 
Although  Hall  liad  previous- 
ly denied  that  Jie  had  been 
negligent  in  the  use  of  the  gun 
and  had  insisted  that  the  shoot- 
ing was  an  Unavoidable,  though 
regrettable,,  accident,  as  the 
trial   was   about   to   begin,   he 


admitted  negligence  on  his 
part. 

The  Hearst  Publishing  Co. 
!  and  the  Examiner  had  insist- 
ed, ever  since  the  incident  oc- 
curred, that  they  had  no  re- 
sponsibility, claiming  that  Hall 
was  not  an  employe  of  the 
company  but  an  independent 
distributor. 

The  court  trial  would  have 
tested  that  contention,  and  the 
jury  would  also  have  been 
given  the  responsibility  of  de- 
termining how  much  Hall 
should;5)ay  in  damages. 


Fireman  Wb  i, 
Flunked  Oral  ' 
Passes  Exams 

Paul  Orduna.  Omaha  fire- 
man  who  flunked  the  oral  «• 
amination  given  last  Novem- 
ber,  last  week  took  the  tests 
for  the  Los  Angeles  City  Fire 
Department  and  passed  all 
three  sections  —  oral,  written 
and  physical  agility. 

While  his  grades  were  not 
immediately  available,  lie  was 
informed  that  they  were  "ac- 
ceptable," and  that  his  name  ii 
bSing  placed  upon  the  list  of 
prospective  city  firemen. 

In  the  November  test  Orduna, 
who  has  been  an  active  mem- 
ber of  the  Omaha  force  for  the 
past  four  years,  passed  the 
written  test  but  received  ^tily 
47  on  the  oral,  a  grade  so  few 
as  to  automatically  bar  him 
from  the  department. 

Orduna  protested  the  grade 
and  asked  for  a  Civil  Service 
probe  of  the  oral  tests,  accus- 
ing the  examiners  of  racial 
bias.  That  probe  is  still  pend- 
ing. 

Golden  State 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
Golden  State  offices  throughout 
the  state,  claims  that  the  wMn- 
pany  has  been  "bombarded 
with  letters  and  telephone 
calls"  backing  the  agents.  The 
union  also  persisted  in  its 
claim  that  the  agents  are  not 
on  strike  and  insisted  that 
they  have  been  locked  out  of 
their  jobs. 


•  ij  1 1*^  p  •  »j» 


"^^      "'"'fW*   ^Iif'S-^    -wKi^': 


IF  I  WON  «64,000 

...I'd  still  go  for  Eleven  Cellars  at  634 


It  wouldn't  make  sense  to  pay  more  for 
wine -once  you  know  this  secret: 

Eleven  Cellars  Wines  are  produced  in  eleven  . 
different  wineries.  Each  winery  specializes  in 
the  ■wines!  that  are  made  best  in  its  district: 
California  Port  in  one  winery,  Muscatel  in 
another,  and  so  on. 

These  eleven  wineries  joined  forces  to  bring 
you  good  wine  at  a  reasonable  price. 

Today,  you  can  buy  fine  Eleven  Cellars 
Wines  for  just  63c  a  fifth  for  both  sweet  and 


dry  wines.  Enjoy  the  low-cost  luxury  of  Eleven 
Cellars— tonight! 

MORE  PRIZES  FOR  FLAVOR 
THAN  ANY  OTHER  WINE! 

■^^^^^^  In  the  past  four  years.  Eleven  Cellars  has  won 
^'  more  Awards  for  Excellence  than  any  other 
wine  at  its  price — Special  Divisions,  California 
State  Fair  and  Los  Angeles  County  Fair.  (In 
Special  Divisions,  samples  judged  are  actually 
taken  from  store  shelves.) 


ELEVEN  CELLARS  WINE 


aws^M 


WINE 


CALIFORNIA  WINI  ASSOCIATION  — SAN  PKANCISCO,  CALIFORNIA 


i: 


i 


la    fire- 
oral  ex- 
Novem- 
►he  tests 
:ity   Fire 
all 
written 

tere    not 

he  w«s 

irere  "ac- 

name  is 

|e  list  of 

Orduna, 
/e  mem- 
for  the 
sed  the 
^•ed  only 
|e  so  low 
3ar    him 

He   grade 

Service 

accus- 

K    racial 

ill  pend- 


t-oughout 

khe  com- 

(mbarded 

flephone 

hnts.  The 

in     its 

are  not 

led     that 

out  of 


.VG.V  I[  IIU  CllBi.R:S(J\  V  Bi-RKL—Guincrson  Is 
Burke.  ^,ne  nf  three  ml  companies  nrjntnq  leases  uith  residents 
m  the  Su//ar  Hill  ana.  nunc  un  tilth  a  bumper  eroj;  if  pronn- 
nent  persons  sirinm'i,  nn  the  d'jtted  line  this  i.cck.  hdnnrd  At- 


kinson. Jr...  left,  ouner  of  the  popular  Toun  laicrn,  and 
/  erna  Deckard,  right,  real  estate  broker  and  clubuoman,  sign 
G^B  leases  in  the  presence  of  Steve  If  est  of  th,e  company's 
land  department. 


JOI^    rHE  PARADE — Joining  the  parade  of  local   residents   signing    Guibcrson 
o;!  i.ei-fs  are  Mr.  and  Mrs.  y  at  Fearonce.  , 


w    Burke 


NAACP  Asks 
Paul  Williams 
To  Back  FEP 

Paul  R.  Williams,  noted  archi- 
tect and  Springarn  Medal  win- 
I  ner.  Avas  urged  to-  help  in  the 
1  fight  for  fair  employment  leg- 
islation   in    California    by    the 
I  Executive  Board  of  the  NAACP 
at  its  Monday  night  meeting. 
I     The    Board     took     its    action 
'  after    hearing   reports    that    the 
I  rhances    nf    passage    of    FEPC 
I  laws  at  this  session  dppend  on 
'  the  attitudes,  and  votes,  of  two 
Republican      members     of     the 
Senate  labor  rnmm.ittpp. 
i      Taking     note     of     Williams' 
I  preeminent  p'^jijon  as  a  leader 
in     the     Republican     party,     the 
.N.\.\CP  resiolulion  urged  him  tn 
u~p    Itis    influji^nce    to   prod    His 
party  into  artjon.  It  also  a^kcd 
him    to   enlist    other   prominent 
N"pr<i  Rrpuhiirnns  i-n  the  fight 
r,i   .jrt    the   FKPC   measures   out 
,  of    committee    and    on    to    the 
1  Senate  flnor. 


Florida  Judges 
Thumb  Noses 
At  High  Court 

TALLAHASSEE,  Fla.  —  The 
Florida  Supreme  Court  last 
I  Friday  spurned  a  directise  of 
i  the  United  States  Supreme 
Court  ordering  it  to  smooth  the 
way  for  admission  of  a  Negro 
to  Florida  University  Law 
School. 

The     Florida    court's    action 
was  the  first  instance, in  which 
a  state  has  attempted 'to  "inter- 
po.se"  state  rights  to  block  com- 
pliance with  a  decision  of  the 
nation's    highest    tribunal.    It 
may  mark   ihe  beginning  of  a 
new   campaign   of  defiance   by 
southern     states     which     have 
I  been-  claiming  the  right  to  de- 
:  cide  when  the  school  decision 
i  must  be  obeyed. 
i      Relying    on    the    "compelling 
j  duty"  of  the  state  to  maintain 
the   public  peace   and   preverft 
violence,  the  Florida  court  in  a 
•5-2  decision  denied  the  petition 
cf  Virgil  D.  Hawkins  f-)r  an  im- 
mediate    order    requiring     his 
admission. 

Eight  Year  Try 
Hawkins,    a    49-year-old    in- 
structor   at    Bethune-Cookman 
I  College,    has    been    trying    for 
eight  years  to  gain  admittance. 
The  majority  opinion,  written 
by  Justice  B.  K.  Roberts,  recog- 
nized the  duty  of  the  state  to 
compel  Hawkins'  admission  "if 
it  is  feasible  to  do  so  at  this 
j  time." 

I  But  the  majority  said  it  was 
'  convinced  that  violence  would 
\  break  out  in  uni\ersity  com- 
I  munities  and  a  critical  disrup- 
I  tion  of  the  uni\'ersity  system 
j  would  occur  if  Negroes  were 
I  permitted  to  enter  white 
I  schools  at  this  time. 


Marine  Murdered; 
Police  Question  50 

An  18-year-old  Marine  from  Camp  Pendleton  was 
murdered  Friday  shortly  before  midnight  at  59th  place 
arid  Towne  avenue,  and  police  rounded  iip  50  youths 
in  the  neighborhood  for  questioning.  After  sifting  the 
replies  of  the  Entire  batch,  police  accused  Oliver  L. 
'fShephard,   19.   of    926 

Book  Tells  of 
Hangover  of 
Colonialism 


Clement  Gives  Talk  on  'Second  Reconstruction' 


CONTRACT  AWARDED 

Cdunvilman  Edward  R.  Roy. 
bal  tiiis  week  annouiiced  the 
I  award  of  a  contract  for  grading. 
ATL.ANT.A  —  "Any  nation  ,  Rufu?  E.  Clement  of  Atlanta,  Dr.  Clerfient.  who  was  initi-  hituminnus  paving  and  concrete 
vhich  suffers  a  part  of  its  '  University  said  last  week  at  the  ated  as  a  member  of  the  hon-  gutter  in  the  alley  south  of  22nd 
population  to  determine  which  •  12Tth  anniversary  dinner  of  orary  scholarship  fraternity.  I  street,  between  Central  axenue 
laws  it  will,  and  which  laws  it  ,  Rhode  Island  Alpha  chapter  of  gave,  the  banquet  address  and  !  and  Griffith  "avenue  to  C.  O. 
wiil  not.  observe  is  courting  j  Phi  Beta  Kappa  at  Brown  Uni-i  spoke  on  the  "Second  American  j  Sparks.  Inc.  and  Mundo  Engi- 
disorde'  and  chaos.'  President    versit>'.  !  Reconstruction."  I  neering  Company. 


\    Gjuiberson  and  Burke  Co. 


'i 


Oil  Producers 


PROPERTY  OWNERS 
WEST 


THE  WEST  ADAM 
TON  DISTRICT 


PLEASE  CONTACT  OUR  OFFICES  FOR  ALL  THE  FACTS  ON  OUR 
SUBSURFACE  OIL  AND  GAS  LEASING  PROGRAM 


WE  CORDIALLY  INVITE  YOU  TO  COME  IN.  If  you  are  unable  to  come 
In  Phone  RE.  4-8585  or  RE.  1-8483.  A  field  representative  will  call  on  you, 
and  if  you  desire  he  will  drive  you  to  the  office  and  bring  you  home. 

GUIBERSON  &  BURKE  was  the  first  company  to  recoghi^ze  the  oil 
potentialities  of  this  area.  In  several  sections  we  now  have  sufficient 
leases  to  apply  for  drilling  permits. 

WE  offer  a  20%  royalty  on  a  5  year  lease  which  requires  QUICKER 
drilling. 

BRANCH  OFFICE  ADDRESS 
1847  South  Western  Avenue 


The  violence  which  could  be 
released     by     "colonial     hang- 
over'' is  pictured  in  a  new,  im- 
aginative novel.  "Rage  on  the' 
Bar,"  by  Geoffrey  Wagner. . 

One  of  the  central  problems 
of  the  world  is  illuminated  in 
a  dramatic  series  of  events  on 
an  island  in  the  West  Indies,  in 
which  the  colonial  past  tries  to 
maintain  its  privileges  asainst 
the  present  drive  of  a  native 
people  to  govern  themselves. 

The  contradictory  lo\alties 
evolving  out  of  the  situation 
are  e.xpressed  thiough  Philip 
Teale,  the  new  a'de  to  the  gov- 
ernor- general.  Discovering  a 
native  rebellion  stirring.  Teale 
is  torn  between  his  natural 
sympathies  for  the  mistreated 
Negro  population  and  his  sense 
of  duty  as  an  army  man. 

Wagner  was  born  in 'Malaya. 
where  his  father  was  Commis- 
sioner of  Mal'aya  Police.  He 
was  educated  at  Christ  Church. 
Oxford,  and  at  Columbia  Uni- 
versity. Now  teaching  in  the 
English  Department  ,at  the  City 
College  of  New  Yoijk,  he  con 
tributes  frequently  to  leading 
literary  journals  here  ana 
abroad,  and  gives  a  regular 
book  talk  over  WNYC  in  New 
York. 

The  book  will  be  published 
April  S  by  the  Noonday  Press. 


E.  52nd 
street,  of  the  slaying.  He  denied 
knowing  anything  about  the 
killing. 

The  dead  man  was  identi- 
fied by  a  U.  S.  Marine  Corps 
identification  card  as  James 
Askew. 

Askew  and  another  man  were 
seen  running  west  on  ,  Avalon 
blvd.,  being  chased  by  a  man 
a  ad  three  women.  As  they 
neared  349  E.  59th  street,  sev- 
eral shots  were  fired.  The  man 
with  Askew  said,  "You  shot 
my  cousin."  ' 

Askew  and  -the  friend  ran 
up  on  the  porch  at  the  59th 
street  addiess  and  asked  for 
help.  When  police  arii\ed.  he 
was  still  i  alive,  but  he  died 
before  rhe  ambulance  reached 
the  scene.  One  gunshot  wound 
was  found  under  the  left  arm. 

Askew  -has  an  uncle.  .An- 
drew Sheais.  who  lives  at  S3T 
W.   51st   street. 

The  remains  \^ere  removed  to 
the  Lakewood  Mortuarv. 


Training   Course 

A  Leader's  Training  Course 
sponsored  by  the  Great  Books 
Foundation  will  be  held  at  the 
Mayfair  Hotel.  12,56  West  Tth 
St..  for  nine  consecutive  Tues- 
day evenings  beginning  April 
9.  from  S  to  10  p.m. 


The  -Californi*  -Ea^Ie—l 

Thursday,    March    14,    T957      " 

Friend  Finds 
Man's  Body 
Dead  7  Days 

The  body  of  Mathis  W'oods, 
65.  was  found  Badly  decom- 
posed at  his  home,  976.  E.  56th 
street,  about  5  p.m.  Monday. 

The  coroner  estimated  from 
the  condition  of  the  body  that 
Woods  had  been  dead  seven 
days. 

An  un-\ented,  old-fashioned 
cast-iron  heater  was  going  full 
blast  when  the  body  was  dis- 
co\erec^  The  heater  was  cherry 
red  from  the  heat,  and  the 
temper^ature  in  ,the  room  was 
about  llO  degrees. 

Detectives  G.  C.  Rogers  and 
J.  F.  Smith  reported  that  the 
room  was  filled  with  acrid 
fumes  which  made  their  eyes 
smart. 

The  death  was' discovered  by 
a  friend.  Ravmond  Warfning- 
ton.  who  came  to  \isit  Woods. 
When  he  was  unable  to  get  an 
answer  to  his  knocking,  iie 
pried  open  a  window  and 
looked  .in  Woods  rented  the 
rear  room  of  the  house. 

His  body  was  identified  by 
his  wife.  Mrs.  Estelle  Woods  of 
5107^2    Central  avenue. 

The  funeral  is  being  handled 
bv  Conner-Johnson. 


The  Los  Angeles  County  Op- 
tometric  Assn.  Friday  urged  the 
public  to  support  strongly  more 
iigid  examinations  for  drivers' 
licenses,  more  adequate  vision- 
testing  programs  in  schools, 
and  more  comprehensive  in- 
dustrial vision  safety  programs.- 


STUDENTS  MAY  FILE 

High  school  students  inter-  ' 
ested  in  clerk  stenographer  or 
clerk  tvpist  positions  now  have 
their  entire  senior  vear  during 
whiih  they  may  file  applica- 
tions according  to  action  recent- 
ly taken  by  the  Los  .Angeles 
Citv   Civil   Service   Commission. 


■WATCH   THE    CANDLES 

Chief  Engineer  •  ^Villiam  I. 
Miller  of  tiie  Los  .Angeles  City 
Fire  Department  warn«  citizens 
of  tlie  danger  present  wiien 
lighted  candles  are  u>cd  in  the 
home  and  in  places  wh.cre 
large   groups   of.  people  gather. 


ADLONG  MARKET  COUPON  SALE! 

1 556  W.  ADAMS  at  BUDLONG-'FHUR.,  FRL,  SAT.,  SUN. 

C  and  H  PURI  CANE 


SUGAR  5  J9 

Cusfemer   Muif    Us»    Coupon    From    Adiand   Mkf.    Adv.    en    Pagt    fivt 


( 


Message 


to  .  .  .  . 


GOLDEN  STATE  MUTUAL  POLICYHOLDERS 

and  the  Public!!! 

As  poJicyowr>ers  and  cititens  ©r +t»ls '  coftwnunify  you  have  a  definite  stake  in  the  future  of  Golden 
State  Mutu»J   Life  Insurance  Company.  ^ 

Because  the  policyowners  are  in  real^^'the  owners  of  Golden  S+ate  Mutual,  the  management  de- 
iires  that  all  know  the  facts  of  the  present  difference  existing  between  the  Company  and  th« 
Golde«  State  Agency  Club.  ■      .^         ' 

Since  1946  through  cooperative  relationship  and  a  mutual  understanding  of  the  problems  of«  man- 
agement and  the  Agency  Club  nwny  benefits  have  been  derived  from  this  association  for  our 
policyowr»ers.  i  .     ' 

Indeed,  until  the  present  difference  arose,  we  have  aiways  been  able  to  iron  out  oor  differences 
and  work  together. 

Wage  increases,  compensation,  or  other  employee  benefits  are  NOT  points  of  issue  in  this  particular 
disagreement.  As  far  back  as  January  15,  1957,  the  Company  had  scheduled  a  conference  for 
February  13  to  arrange  a  new  compensation  plan  with  the  agents  and  agreed  to  make  any  ^y 
adjustments  retroactive  to  January  I,  1957.  This  has.Vbeen  the  customary  procedure  down  through 
ttie  years. 

On  January  30  tt»4  agents  adamantly  refused  to  make  out  their  monthly  reports  for  Budgeterm  in-- 
surance   policies  on    the  new  forms   the  Company  had    put    into   use.   Failure   to   comply  with   Com- 
pany  instructions  Vas    hot   onty   non-performance  ot  duties  but  in  direct  violation  of  both  the  indi- 
vidual agent's  contractual  agreement  with  the  Company  and  the  agreement  with  the  Agency  Oub. 

Beginning  January  30  the  Company  began  to  suspend  agents  who  refused  to  comply  with  instruct 
tions  to  put  into  operarion  the  new  forms.  They  are  effectively  in  use  in  many  major  insurance 
companies,  and  also,  th^  Texas  and  Illinois  offices  of  Golden  State   Mutual. 

During  this  suspension  period  the  agents  were  STILL  kept  on  the  Company's  payroll.  Even  after 
this  suspension,  the  Company  urQed  the  agents  to  return  to  work  and  perform  ttT*eir  duties.  When 
tttey  persisted  m  their  refusal  the  Company  had  no  choice  but  to  terminate  them.  This  was  done 
on    March  *  I    to    assure   proper   operation    of  the  business   and  to  protect  the  policyowners. 

Yoti  might  be  interested  in  knowing  that  your  Golden  State  Mutual  agents  work  on  one  of  the 
highest  conimission  schedules  in  the  insurance  ind  ustry. 

Earnings    of   established    agents   range   from   $300  to   $1390    a   month.   In   ADDITION,   the  Company 
affords  them    liberal  welfare   program    which   includes   vacations   and    sick   leaves   with   pay,    a   credit  . 
union,    group   Irfe    insurance   and   retirement  coverage. 

GSM  management  wants  you  to  haUe  this  information  so  that  you  may  know  and  weigh  the  facts. 
The  future  economic  security  in  our  communities  automatically  makes  each  of  you  an  important 
person  in  this  dispute.    The  matter  calls  for   sane  reasoning   and   impartial   obiective  thinking   by  aH. 

At  each  siep  along  the  way  the  Company  has  retrained  from  taking  any  drastic  action  in  tt»is 
disagreement  as  long  as  the  interest  of  policyowners  was  protected.  We  feel  that  the  action  taken 
was  not  onty  justified  but  necessary.  The  first  interest  artd  responribillty.  of  Golden  State  Mu- 
tual is  its  policyowners  and  we  expect  to  discharge  that  responsibility  an6  protect  that  interest  at 
aU  times. 

We  solfcit  each  policyowner's  continued  cooperation  in  bringing  in  premiums  to  the  district  office 
or  mailing  them.  This  Reoperation  will  help  to  secure  the  valuable  protection  afforded  by  your 
Golden  State  Mutual  policies.      ■       i 

DISTRICT  OFRCES  ARE  OPEN   UNTIL  8  P.  M.  EACH   WEEK    DAY,   INCLUDING   SATURDAYS. 

GOLDEN  STATE  MUTUAL 

LIFE  INSURANCE  COMPANY 


LOS  ANGELES   DISTRICT  OFFICES 


Mr.  leRoy  A.  Beavers  Jr., 
4261   South  Central  Avenue 


Mr.  Nolan  Payton,  CLU 
2550  South  Western 


Mr.    Johnnie    L.    Cochran,    District   Manager 
11025  South  Avalon  Boulevard 


...I 


-v-*--— 


4—Vn9  Califomfa   Eagfe 


Thursday,   March    14,    19-67 


CHOSES  QUEES — Knthryn  Lnuisc  K'hitnry  has  just  hcen 
ehnsft  lucrn  at  Hiijhland  Park  High  Srhcn/  in  Tnpria,  Kan. 
Miss  Whitnry  is  ihf  ntrcr  of  Mrs.  Rochale  Mounts,  of  Los 
Anpelrs. — fStnry  nn  Pape  2). 


Council  Members 
Sentenced  to  Jail  in 


MIAMI,  Fla.  —  Four  Seaboard  Citizens  Council 
members  were  fined  and  sentenced  here  last  Wed- 
nesday for  attempting  to  burn  a  cross  on  the  lawn 
in  front  of  a  Negro's  home.  One  of  those  sentenced, 
Fred  B.  Hockett.  is  organizer  of  the  Citizens  Council. 

He.  Frank  L.  Foster  Jr.,  and  * 

James  McSwiney  were  each 
sentenrecf  to  60  days  in  jail 
and  fined  $500  on  each  of  two 
charges.  They  were  accused  of 
illegal  assembly  and  intimi- 
dation. 

Heinous  Offense 

The  fourth  defendant.  H.  E. 
Shaver,   who  had   given    infor- 


J.  M.  White  Dies 
Of  Heart  Attack 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
many  capacities  throughout  the 
years.     He   was    elected    presi- 
dent  of   the  local  organization 
mation  which  led  to  the  arrest  i  in    1948    and    was    elevated    to 


of  the  others,  got  off  with  a 
lighter  sentence.  The  city 
attempted  to  get  the  charges 
against  him  dropped,  but  Mu- 
nicipal Judge  Mitchell  Goldman 
denied  the  motion.  Shaver  got 
a  suspended  30day  jail  sen- 
tence and  a  $100  fine. 

In  addition  to  the  sentences. 
Judge  Goldman  lectured  the 
four,  asserting  their  actions 
constituted  a  "heinous  offense." 

The  four  were  released  on 
$1200  bonds  and  have  appealed 
the  con\iction. 

The  quartet  was  arrested  in 
February  after  they  had  erect- 
ed the  cross. 


'Family  of  Man' 
Art  Exhibit  Will 
Open  March  27 

The  most  complex  art  instal- 
lation since  the  opening  of  Los 
Angeles'  Municipal  Art  Gallery 
Is  being  undertaken  for  the 
"Family  of  Man"  photographic 
exhibit  which   opens   March   27 

-In  Frank  Lloyd  Wright's  mod- 
ern gallery  in  Barnsdall  Park, 
Vermont  Ave.  and  Hollywood 
Blvd. 

"The  Family  of  Man,"  origin- 
ally organized  by  Edward 
Steichen  and  his  staff  for  the 
25th  anniversary  of  New  York's 
Museum  of  Modern  Art  was 
created  from  more  than  2,000,- 
000  photographs  taken  in  virtu- 
ally every  country  in  the  world. 
The  vast  project  is  unquestion- 
ably the  most  searching  photo- 
graphic  survey    of    the    human 

_  race  ever  undertaken.  It  has 
broken  mu.<:cum  attendance 
records  in  many  major  cities. 


the  International  Executive 
Board  in  1950.  He  was  also 
active  in  th^  Labor  Committee 
of  the  NAACP,  having  served 
as  co-chairman  of  grievances, 
and  a  member  of  the  Golden 
West  Lodge  No.  86  of  the  Elks. 
He  was  a  chairman  of  the  la- 
bor committee  in  the  political 
campaigns  of  Lucius  Lomax 
and  George  Thomas.  Mr.  White 
was  also  a  member  of  West- 
minster Presbyterian  Church, 
under  Rev.  Hawcs,  the  family 
pastor. 

Mr.  White  was  hired  by  the 
Pullman  Company  as  a  porter 
Nov.  1.5.  1019.  and  retired  from 
serv  ice  May  1,  1952,  because  of 
ill  health. 

Mr.  White  fs  survived  by  his 
wife,  Suzie,  whorn  he  married 
Dec.  27,  1927;  one  daughter. 
Mrs.  Vivian  Harvey;  a  sister, 
Mrs.  Mabel  White,  living  in 
New  York  City;  Mrs.  Clara 
BrouTi,  mother-in-law;  and 
cousins.  Charlie  Lawrence.  Mrs. 
Eliza  Lawrence,  Mrs.  Nancy 
Harris,  Mrs.  Steve  Roland.  Tom- 
my Reed  and  Mrs.  Gene  Hill. 


Kasper  Pledges 
Shooting  War; 
Heads  for  L.A. 

John  Kasper.  the  nation's  No.  1 
race-baiting  rabble-rouser  who 
is  threatening  a  shooting  war 
to  maintain  white  supremacy, 
is  heading  for  Los  Angeles. 

Now  stumping  Florida,  Kas- 
per told  a  wildly  applauding 
Miami  audience  Friday  that 
segregationists  are  "going  to 
maintain  racial  integrity  even 
at  the  point  of  a  shotgun." 
Threw  Him  Out 
Kasper  spoke  from  a  plat- 
form decked  with  Confederate 
flags  and  United  States  flags 
in  a  heavily  policed  nightspot. 
When  a  Qaaker.  Ashton  B. 
Jones,  tried  to  get  the  floor, 
shouts  of  "throw  him  out" 
came  from  all  corners  of  the 
hall.  Kasper  rejected  the 
appeal  of  the  61 -year-old  man 
with  the  insulting  comment, 
"We  think  all  who  share  your 
views  are  merely  imbeciles." 

He  continued  his  talk:  "Ra- 
cial degradation  has  destroyed 
nations."  Segregation  is  a  "plan 
of  nature  established  by  the 
Creator  in  the  heavens."  He 
praised  the  Florida  Supreme 
Court  justices  as  "real  white 
men"  for  their  ruling  barring 
Virgil  Hawkins  from  the  Uni- 
versity of  Florida  Law  SchooL 
FrlendlT 

Kasper  Is  the  25-year-old  Co- 
lumbia University  student  who 
was  considered  a  "friend"  by 
Greenwich  Village  Negroes.  It 
was  he  who  was  largely  respon- 
sible for  stirring  up  the  hatred 
that  led  to  the  Clinton,  Tenn., 
riots  la.st  September.  He  Is  free 
on  $10,000  bail  while  appealijig 
a  one-year  sentence  imposed 
upon  him  by  a  Federal  court  in 
Tennessee  for  contempt 

Prior  to  his  Miami  speech, 
Kasper  spoke  before  a  Ku  Klux 
Klan  rally  in  Chiefland,  near 
Clearwater. 

The  Miami  Herald  is  featur- 
ing a  series  of  stories  about 
Kasper.  In  one  he  Is  quoted  as 
saying:  "Jail  NAACP,  alien,  un- 
clean, un-Christian;  blast  ir- 
reverent, ungodly  leaders;  ban- 
ish liars;  destroy  Reds  (all 
Moscovite  savages  —  Roosevel  - 
tian  dupes);  expose  Beria's 
■psycho- polities';  death  to  user- 
ers  . . .  hate  mongrelizers." 

It  sounds  illiterate,  but  Kas- 
per seems  to  possess  the  ability 
of  inflaming  h.is  audiences. 

Now  he  is  Headed  on  a  na- 
tionwide tour.  Los  Angeles  is 
on  his  itinerary. 


NAACP  to  Hold 
Meeting  Sunday 

The  regular  membership 
meeting  of  the  Los  Angeles 
branch  of  the  NAACP  will  be 
held  Sunday  afternoon  at  3 
o'clock  at  Grant  AME  Church, 
10435  S.  Central  avenue. 

A  special  film  will  he  shown 
depicting  the  bombings  of 
churches  and  homes  of  south- 
ern Negro  ministers. 

Mrs.  Tarea  H.  Pittman,  di- 
rector of  the  membership  dpi\e, 
will  speak.  The  state-wide 
FEP  program  will  be  outlined. 


SPRING  FROLIC 

The  Atchafas  Club's  annual 
Spring  Frolic  will  be  held  on 
Saturday,  March  30,  9:30  p.m, 
until  2  a.m.,  at  Park  Manor. 
Gerald  Wilson  and  his  band 
will  provide  the  music. 


ADLONG  MARKET  COUPON  SALE! 

1556  W.  Adams  at  Budlong  —  Thurs.,  Fri.,  Sat.,  Sun. 

All  POPUIAR  BRANDS 

CANNEDMILK 

2    TALL  CANS    25^ 

Cutttmmr  mutt  Utm  Cewi>Ofi  frbm  Adimnd  Mk».   Arfv.  •«   Pay*  Hv9 


Gilbcys  Gin  is  the  mie  ^  disUQed  in 
'  11  countries  and  served  round  the  world 


-  sr 


•^ 


Venice 

In  Italy,  as  in  tea 
othrr  natiftnF. 
GILBEY'S  pl«atct  meit. 


World-wide  popularity 
of  Gilbey's  Gin  proves 
you'll  like  it  best! 

Gflb^^Gin 

Try  it  and  see  why 
"the  world  agrees  on  'GJLBETS  please'r 


CIIIET'S  DISTIllEI  IDNBOII  Oiy  CIN.  90  PIOOF,  188:  CHAIR  NEUIItU  SPIIIIIS.  W.  t  «.  CI18ET.  III..  eiNCINNtT!,  BRIi  I 
IKE  INIEINATISNU  (IN- iistilM  ii<  kittlU  li  ttl Uilti<  Stitii,  Eifliiil  Cifiii. Aastrilli. Soutt tfnci, Friaci, Itily, «i|mIiii. iruH,  Ckili, Mum 


Ghana  Efoctod 
U.  N.  Member 

UNITED  NATIONS  — 
Ghona,  tb*  fernMr  Geld 
Coast,  which  obtoiiMd^tt 
ind«p*nd«BO«  from  Eng> 
land  last  Tmidoy  at  mid- 
night,  wag  admitted  to 
the  United  Nations  en 
Fridoy. 

The  new  nation,  t  h  e 
81st  member  of  the 
international  bodyr  was 
welcomed  by  unanimous 
vote  of  the  General  As- 
sembly. 


Cut  Holes  in 
Store  Roofs; 
Find  Police 

Two  groups  ©f  juveniles  this 
week  cut  holes  in  the  roofs  of 
stores  in  the  Central  avenue 
and  Vernon  area,  only  to  be 
tripped  up  by  police  before 
they  could  get  away  from  the 
scene  with  the  loot. 

About  6:30  p.m.  Sunday  two 
pint-sized^  youngsters  climbed 
onto  the  roof  of  4364  S.  Central 
avenue.  They  apparently  had 
their  eyes  on  .some  merchan- 
dise in  the  BAB  Men's  Shop 
at  4362  S.  Central. 

Baby  Cloth*a 

They  bored  a  hole  through 
the  roof  and  slipped  down  in- 
side, but  to  their  disgust  they 
found  themselves  surrounded 
by  dainty  baby  clothes.  Wrong 
shop. 

Undaunted  they  climbed  back 
and  picked  a  hole  in  the  roof 
next  door.  They  lowered  them- 
selves with  a  rope.  This  was 
more  to  their  liking.  They 
took  their  time,  picked  out 
mens  shirts,  gloves,  caps,  cuff 
links,  tie  pins  and.  whatever 
took   their  fancy. 

What  they  didn't  know,  how- 
ever, was  that  when  they  had 
landed  in  the  baby  shop  they 
had  tripped  a  silent  alarm.  As 
the  two  youthful  bandits  left 
the  store  they  were  greeted  by 
a  reception  committee^  of  po- 
lice officers. 

U.  S.  Trading  Co. 

The  other  burglary  occurred 
last  Thursday  at  the  U.  S. 
Trading  Company,  4501  S.  Cen- 
tral avenue,  about  9:45  p.m. 

Here,  too,  a  silent  alarm 
gave  away  the  young  robbers' 
plans.  As  in  the  other  case, 
the  youths  had  chopped  a-liole 
in  the  roof  td  gain  entr>'.  They 
had  collected  quite  a  pile  of 
clothing,  jewejrj',  etc.— ^570.36 
worth  —  when  police  entered 
through   the  front  door. 

Some  of  the  youths  were  on 
the  roof,  one  was  on  a  ladder 
leading  to  the  roofs  and  oth- 
ers were  ransacking  the  store. 
They  had  established  a  con- 
veyor system  of  passing  out 
the  swag.  They  all  talked 
freely  to  police  after  they  were 
apprehended. 

Arrested  were  Melvin  Ray 
Lamothe,  18,  4325  Lima  street, 
and  five  juveniles  whose  names 


Crazed  Man 
Slashes  Wife  in 
Fif  of  Jealousy 

A  flute  player,  crazed  by 
jealousy,  stabbed  his  wife 
again  and  again,  about  10 
p.m.  Saturday,  and  then  did 
everything  he  could  think, 
of  to  staunch  her  wounds. 

After  doing  what  he  !  could, 
the  distraught  man  carried  his 
wife  to  his  automobile.^i  drove 
her  to  Bert  Kenner's  Union  gas 
station  at  Western  and  Adams 
and  telephoned  the  police. 

'I  Cut  H*rl' 

B.  T.  Hart,  40,  of  3612  W.  30th 
street,  told  police,  "I  cut  her! 
r  guess  I  must  have  been  out 
of  my  mind." 

As  police  took  Hart  away 
from  the  crowd  of  people  who 
had  rushed  to  the  scene,  he 
became  hysterical,  ripped  off 
his  shirt  and  attemptedto  de- 
stroy himself.  Police  had  to  use 
force  to  restrain  him. 

Victim  of  Hart's  mad  cutting 
was  Mrs.  Mildred  Hart,  who 
was  rushed  to  the  hospital  with 
eight  separate  woTands  on  her 
face,  hands  and  body.  One  cut 
in  her  chest  was  eight  inches 
long,  another  in  her  abdomen 
was  six  inches  in  length.  Her 
condition  was  reported  as  crit- 
ical. 

Befriended  RiToI 

Before  being  led  from  the 
scene.  Hart  pointed  to  a  knife 
on  his  key  chain,  hanging  from 
the  ignition  of  his  car,  and 
said,  "That  is  the  knife  I  cut 
her  with." 

He  told  police  he  is  a  travel- 
ing musician  and  that  some 
time  ago  he  befriended  another 
musician,  Quinn  O'Dell  Wil- 
liams, and  "took  him  to  my 
home  to  try  to  straighten  him 
out  because  he  was  off  on  the 
wrong  foot. " 

While  Hart  was  away  from 
home  in  connection  with  his 
work,  his  wife  And  Williams 
became  intimate,  he  said,  and 
he  and  Mrs.  Hart  separated  on 
Feb.  4. 

*Went  BerMrk' 

Some  Army  induction  papers 
for  Williams  came  to  Hart's 
house  and  from  them  the  es- 
tranged husband  learned  that 
Williams  had  made  out  his  al- 
lotment to  Mrs.  Hart. 

Hart  figured  that  his  wife, 
without  benefit  of  divorce,  had 
married  Williams,  and  on  ."^at- 
urday  called  for  her  at  the  En- 
cino  place  where  she  worked 
and  took  her  to  the  W.  30th 
street  home,  where  they  began 
discussing  their  affairs. 

Hart  said  he  again  asked  his 
wife  whether  she  had  married 
Williams  and  that  when  she 
refused  to  answer  his  question 
he  "went  berserk  and  began  to 
cut  her. " 


are   being  withheld.     The   rob- 
ber>',    they   said,    was    planned 
while  they  were  at  the  play-  j 
ground.  ' 


THOMAS    NEUSOM 

Omegas  Plan 
Regional  Meet, 
Panel  Talks 

Thomas  G.  Neu.som,  12th  Di.s- 
trict  representative  for  Omega 
Psi  Phi  fraternity,  this  week 
announced  the  schedule  of 
events  for  the  coming  12th  Dis- 
trict refnonal  meeting  of  the 
fratemily. 

Registration  for  the  meeting 
will  take  place  this  Friday  at 
2069  S.  Oxford  street,  at  the 
Omega  fraternity  house. 

Business  sessions  will  beheld 
on  Saturday  at  the  fraternity 
house,  and  an  open  public 
meetinj:  will  he  held  the  same 
day  from  4:30  to  6:30'  p.m.  at 
Mount  Sinai  Bapti.'^t  Church,  La 
Salle  and  Adam.s  boulevard. 

The  subject  of  the  discussion 
will  be  "The  Strategic  Use  of 
Money  and  Finance  in  the  Se- 
curing of  Full  Civil  Rights."' 

Participants  in  the  panel 
will  be  Dr.  William  McKinley 
Thomas  of  San  Francisco,  a 
former  member  of  the  SSn 
Francisco  Hou.«;ing  Authority; 
Atty.  George  Vaughns,  a  for- 
mer Grand  Master  of  Masons 
for  the  California  jurisdiction 
and  a  practicing  attorney  in 
Oakland;  Dr.  H.  Claude  Hud- 
son, a-  National  Board  member 
of  the  NAACP  and  president  of 
Broaflway  Federal  Savings  and 
Loan"*  Association :  and  Paul 
Williams,   architect. 

There  will  bo  participants 
from  San  Dic;;o,  Phoenix,  Ari?.. 
San  Francisco,  Oakland  and 
Fresno. 

The  group  will  attend  church 
services  on  Sunday  morning  at  | 
Wesley  Methodist  Churcli.  52nd 
and   Main   .streets,   pasiored   by 
Reverend    Rakostraw. 

Neusom,    who   has   served  as 
district    representative    for    the  \ 
past  three  years,  indicated  that 
a    larpe    attendance   and    great  i 
community  participation  is  ex-  j 
pected. 


Pasadenon 
Dies  From 
Stab  Wound 

Sylvester  Sisco,  30,  of  S76  N. 
Fair  Oaks  avenue,  Pasadena,  a 
rubbish  collector,  was  stabbed 
to  death  Saturday. 

All  police  had  to  identify  the 
killer  was  the  gasping  words 
of  the  dying  man.  Asked  who 
stabbed  him,  Sisco  muttered 
something  that  sounded  like 
"Melvin"  or  some  similar  name 
that   begins  with   an   "M." 

Sisco  was  found  by  police 
lying  on  his  back  on  the  curb 
in  front  of  12  W.  Dayton  street. 
He  was  bleeding  from  a  wound 
in  the  chest.  He  was  taken  to 
Huntington  Hospital  where  he 
died  shortly  before  7  p.m. 

Dennis  James,  69,  of  1350 
Hillcrest,  Pasadena,  told  po- 
lice that  Sisco  came  into  the 
cafe  on  Dayton  street  and 
asked  for  help.  James  inquired 
if  Sisco  was  sick.  •"No,"  he  re- 
plied. "I've  been  hit  with  a 
knife.     Call   a  doctor. " 

James  went  next  door  to 
telephone,  and  when  he  re- 
turned he  saw  Sisco  staggering 
out  of  the  cafe.  He  collapsed 
on  the  sidewalk. 

Only  clQe  James  could  offer 
was  that  earlier  in  the  day. 
about  11  a.m.,  Sisco  and  a  man 
named  Obie  Moore,  a  street 
cleaner,  had  had  a  violent  ar- 
gument  over   money. 


TO  HARVARD— Dr.  Md- 

ton  ff'ihon.  licnn  of  the 
Schnn!  rif  Biiunifs  nt  Texas 
Snulhcrn  I'riiirrfity.  U' i  1 1 
fcrir  fm  fisilino  prnf,  tspr  in 
the  Grii/luntc  S<  ti'i'il  'li  Busi- 
nrf.c,  Hi^rrnrri  I  nixrrsi'ty ,  in 
the  l''^^7-.^S  SI  hno/  year. 


Woman's  Death 
Believed  Caused 
By  Abortion 

Mrs.  Dorothy  Young..  31.  of 
2138  E.  llth  .street,  died  last 
Thursday    shortly    after   noon. 

Police  believed  the  death  was 
caused  by  a  criminal  abortion 
but  were  awaiting  the  coro- 
ner's repo-rt  before  issuing  a 
final  statement. 


tnyour 
mirror 
today, . . 
and 
see 

'your  hair, . . 
'  lovely  as  fashion 
means  it  to  be  I 


Dr.  Cowen 

HAS  A  SPECIAL 
CREDIT  PLAN 
iusf  For  You! 


DR.  COWEN  Says 


Taday,  gorgeous  new  faiair 
color  ii  fashion  . ; .  and  today, 
you  can  look  in  your  mirror 
afld  sc«  the  same  glowing,  lus< 
trous  colorxliosen  by  models  lik* 
this  famous  beauty  here!  Yes,  with 
Codefroy's  Laricuse  Hair  Coloring, 
you  can  give  your  hair  exquisite  new 
color,  long-lasting,  aatural-looking 
color . ; .  easy  as  t-2-3 ! 

R«««»ii«r— Godefroy's  Larieasc  Hair  G»lor« 
;ng  is  the  famous,  dependable  hradd  in  the  red 
box,  known  and  approved  for  mere  than    )0 
years.  Get  it  at  your  faroritc  Cosmetic  countef 
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mean*  it  to  be! 

18  exquiiit*  shtdts 


Just^ 

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2.  Apply  Ood«froy'« 
t«rl«v(*  with  liondy 
applicator  Included  in 
padtage. 


MFO.  CO. 

alio  euvi   ST.  leuis  %,  Ma 


Yes  .  .  .Of.  Qowen'%  credit 
ferms  are  more  liberal  and 
easier  than  ever  before  .  .  . 
Come  in  and  learn  how  easily 
you  can  obtain  your  new 
Dental  Plates.  Regardless  of 
how  small  you  wish  to  moke 
the  payments,  remember  it' 
doesn't  cost  you  one  extra 
penny  to  use  Dr.  Cowen's 
Libera!  Credit. 

FEATURING  NEW  TRANSPARENT 
MATERIAL  AND  TRUBYTE  TEETH 

Asli  yoor  dentist  why  so  mony  plate  wearers  prefer  this  new 

type  of  denture.  You  too  con  benefit  by  the  improvements 

of  modern  dental  science.  See  somples  ot  Dr.  Cowen's. 


THERE  ARE  NO  EASIER  CREDIT 
TERMS  OR  LOWER  PRICES 


PEHSIOHERS 
WELCOME 

Vou  can  obtain  Dental 
Plates.  Of  ottier  needel 
Dental  Care,  on  a  spe- 
nal  plan  iindpt  the  Cali- 
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ance Act  Visit  Dr. 
Cowen  s  Offices  (or  full 
information. 

QUICK  PLATE 
REPAIRS 


DENTISTRY 


•  UlOOfWOWt         •  C»OWNi         •  PUtTtS 

•  (XniSCTIONS 


Dr.  Cowen  will  tote  core  of  oil  yoor  derv- 
tol  needs  RIGHT  NOW,  and  you  con  pay 
LATER  .  .  .'  ofter  your  work  is  completed. 
No  infereit  or  carrying  charges. 


Your  Friendly   Credit  Dentiit 

5th  and  BROADWAY 

Entrance:  315  West  Sih  Street  -  Metropolitan  BIdg. 

OVER  NEWBEkarS  #   PHONE    Mil       11  Ql 

ItiMIN&llOH    WITHOUT    iPPOINTt^lNf    lilV»    1171 


Other  Or.  Cowen  Dental  Offices  Conveniently  Located  in 

•  Santa  Monica  •  Hollywood  •  Huntington  Park  •  Long  Beach 

•  eieitdaU  •  Pasadm*  •  Riverside  •  Pomona  •  Vonlvra 

OPEN  OAltr  9  A.M.  TO  5:30  P.M. 


U 


P"     HI 


■*f. 


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lused 


;.  "1.  'of, 

lied    la>t 

?r  noon. 
|eath  was 

ahortion 
|he    (.oro- 

suing    a 


ledif 

land 

jsily 

Is  of- 

lake 

V    I* 
fxtra 

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fir  den- 
in  pcf 
j'eted. 


|ted  in 

Beach 
lira 


John  Ameaud 
Named  Cancer 
Education  Head 

The  American  Cancer  Socie- 
K's  chairman  of  District  11., 
(Southern  A  and  Bt.  Mrs.  Ann 
R.  Berry,  'has  announced  the 
district  •  wide  campaign  com- 
mittee whose  members  will  di- 
rect the  joint  educational  and 
fund-raising'  drive  in  April 
throughout  the  district. 

Heading  the  educational  pro- 
jrram  is  John  Arneaud,  who  has 
conducted  planning  meetings 
during  the  past  two  months  to 
map  out  details  for  the  cru- 
sade this  year. 

.\rea  chairmen  who  will 
assist  are  Mmes.  Roberta  John- 
son, Peggy  Grandy  and  Jessie 
Reese. 

The  nine  zones  are  headed 
by  Mmes.  Robert  Burrell,  Alice 
DeCuir.  Ale.\  P.  Shaw  and 
Dorothy  Clarke  in  "A"  area. 
and  Mme?.  Lela  Tate.  Nell 
Gaines,  Margaret  Carter.  Jo 
Aim  Lewis  and  Harriette 
Thomas  in  the  "B'  area. 

.\rneaud  states  that  "Thous- 
ands of  people  can  be  saved 
from  needless  suffering  and 
death  by  cancer,  simply  by  be- 
ins  informed  as  to  cancer's 
seven  danger  signals  and  the 
importance  of  treating  it  in 
time." 

Wednesday,  April  10.  has 
been  set  as  a  24- hour  crusade 
against  cancer  with  a  three- 
hour  concentrated  drive  from 
6  to  9  p.m. 


Bios  Loid  to 
Fishermon's 
Whorf  Cof  e 

SAN  FRANCISCO  —  Grotto 
Number  Nine  on  this  rity's 
renowned  Fisherman's  Wharf 
was  named  in  a  suit  filed  last 
week  by  Ma.xine  Butler  and 
Philip  Gordon,  who  charge  that 
a  waiter  at  the  restaurant  re- 
fused to  permit  them  to  occupy 
a.  booth  overlooking  the  wharf 
solely  by  reason  of  their  race 
and  color. 

According  to  Miss  Butler  and 
Gordon,  they  were  told  by  the 
waiter  that  four  empty  booths 
overlooking  the  wharf  were ' 
"closed  to  the  general  public ; 
for  the  evening."  Minutes  later,  i 
the  two  plaintiffs  charge,  "five  , 
customers  of  Caucasian  ances- ' 
try  were  escorted"  to  the  booths  : 
in  question  by  "said  waiter. "     ; 

The  suit  alleges  that  "for  a 
period  of  at  least  ten  years  . . .  j 
defendants  have  engaged  in  a  j 
policy  of  .  .  .  violating  the , 
rights  of  Negro  customers. ' 

A  total  of  $2,000  in  damages 
Is  being  sought  against  Nino 
and  Michael  Geraldi.  Grotto 
>'umber  Nine  owners.  The  Fish-  ' 
ermans  Wharf  area  is  owned 
and  rented  out  to  tenants  by 
the  State  of  California. 

Attorney  Terry  Francois  is 
representing  Miss  Butler  and 
Mr.  Gordon.  Mr.  Francois  is 
Legal  Redress  chairman  of  the 
San  Francisco  Branch  ^■AACP.  ' 


JAMES  WOODS 


James  Woods 
New  Member  of 
Builders  Institute 

James  Woods,  local  builder 
and  contractor,  has  been  ac 
cepted  for  membership  by  the 
Home  Builders'  Institute,  at  a 
recent  board  of  directors  meet- 
1  n  g,  institute  officials  an- 
nounced Monday. 

Woods,  head  of  the  Woods 
Construction  Company,  is  the 
only  Negro  member  of  the  or- 
ganization. He  also  holds 
board  of  directors  positions 
with  the  Remodeling  Contrac- 
tors' Association,  and  the'Safe- 
ty  Savings  &  Loan  Association. 

Members  of  the  Home  Build- 
ers' Institute,  according  to 
George  Prussell,  executi\e  vice- 
president,  built  approximately 
S3  per  cent  of  all  Los  Angeles 
and  Orange  County  homes  dur- 
ing the  year  1935. 

The  Home  Builders'  Institute 
is  an  affiliate  member  of  the 
National  Association  of  Home 
Builders,  with  head  offices  in 
Washington,  D.  C. 


Health  Center 
To  Be  Dedicated 

The  dedication  of  the  city's 
new  $365,000  Southwest  Health 

i  Center  at  3834  S.  Western  ave- 
nue, is  scheduled    for   2    p.m. 

!  March  19. 

I  The  building,  designed  and 
'  constructed  under  Board  of 
Public  Works  contracts,  will  be 
I  turned  over  to  the  Board  of 
1  Health  Commissioners  and  ded- 
,  icated  to  the  welfare  of  the 
!  community. 

Dr.  Pauline  O.  Roberts,  dis- 
trict health  officer,  will  read 
the  list  of  individuals  and  or- 
ganizations who  have  helped 
bring  the  project  into  realiza- 
tion. 

The  formal  dedicatory  talk 
will  be  given  by  Mayor  Norris 
Poulson. 


Zion  Hin  to  Hear 
Rev.  J.  L.  Hines 

!  Rev.  J.  L.  Hines.  radio.  T.V.. 
and  recording  artist,  will  ap- 
pear in  a  benefit  recital  at  Zion 
Hill  Baptist  Chur'-h,  51st  street 
and  McKinley  avenue,  Sunday 
afternoon,  March  17,  at  3:30 
p.m. 

Guest  artists  will  include: 
A.  A.  Peters  Chorale  Singers, 
Hines  Mu.sical  Chr.rus  and  The 
Matthew  Singers.  The  recital  is 
under  the  auspices  of  the  St. 
James  Community  Baptist 
Church,  Rev.  ?„  Edward  Lee 
Cain,  minister.  Attorney 
Thomas  R.  Douglass  is  chair- 
man. 


Masons  Practice  Thrift 


M.^SOXS  SUPPORT   S.m\(;S   .ISSOCI.iTIOXS—Thr    Grnnd   Lndnc    Prin.c    IlnlL 
Masnns   of   (^nliforma  find  J  urisdi(  tiont   nuikcs  dip'i^its  in  tKfj  hnnl  loan  r.s^'n  ialin'ii.  .///v. 


J/rrhrrl   L.    Ciri  cnun'id .   srcnd    Ir'im    nriht.   dtf'i/tx 


Jtty.   Bernard  Jefferson . 


;;,'//    rnriifir,    //net    •hi(h    fnr    "'J'i'i'    lo 


tnd   ltf,rn   trit.  pre  ndtnt  'if  ^niit\ 


r.iiii    Lr,,iri    .■)  t\',,iriti'jn  , 
•'.Its    ^'..•  ;'/'/'    'nd   L'i'.'l 


and  nnnthir  ehrrk  for  S/.^i'i'  to  .1/.  Lfirl  Ciran  r.  ni,hr.   p'e^idenl   of   It 

.h^neintrm.   I.xtnrne  ie'l  is  the  Riv.   R.  L.  Ijr.rson,  pcstnr  of  AML   Zion   Uhiinh,  i^oryhip 

tnl  //rnnd  .ehnpleiin    of  the  Mnionir   Grand  Lod'je. 


Bombs  Planted    | 
In  St.  Louis,  Mo., 
Clinton,  Tenn. 

From  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  and  from 
Clinton,  Tenn.,  this  week  come 
reports  of  bombings. 

In  St.  Loui.s  a  bomb  exploded 
Friday  night  under  the  back 
porch  of  a  house  whose  white 
oAner  had  listed  it  for  sale 
with  a  Negro  real  estate  firm. 
The  explosion  shattered  gi.iss 
enclosing  the  porch,  blew  off  a 
basement  door,  damaged  ihe 
founoation  and  brok3  windows 
in  houses  on  either  side. 

The  owner.   Emerson  Diveiy. 

was  in  a  bedroom  at  the  tim-? 
of  the  blast,  but  \\as  unhurt. 

In  Clinton,  Tenn.,  police 
found  an  uncxploded  po\verful 
bomb  consisting  of  15  pounds 
(  f  lynamite  in  a  izallon  pail 
(oniif-cted  with  cap  and  fu.se 
Sunrlay  ni^ht  in  the  Negro  sec- 
tion ol  town. 

The    dynamite    v\as    planted 

near  the  house  of  .\llen  Mr- 
Sua'n  whose  son.  Alvay.  14.  is 
one  of  the  .Negro  students  m 
integrated  Clinton  Hi;:h  Sciiixil. 
TMp  Mc-.^\\'ain  home  is  on  Foiv}" 
Hill,  scene  of  a  series  of  dyna- 
mitin^s  since  the  Clinton  riots 
last   September. 


The  Galifomfa   E«gt»--5 
Thursday,   March    14,    1957 


li 


FAMED  COACH  — Fred- 

rrit  k  If  ilkerson.  noted  vocal 
cor.,  h.  t^:l!  !t/;r  in  " t ashion's 
at  $un$et."  a  miniature  style 
>hou  >  p  0  n  s  0  r  e  d  by  thf 
If  o":,n  >  Sirtice  (Jroup  of 
Px  0  pic'  i  Independent 

(.hur.h. 


X  clubs  best  investment  is 
a  vear's  subscription  to  the 
California  Eagle.  Cost — St. 


Vets  to  Meet 

Eddie  Lynn,  5200  S.  Main 
street,  formerly  with  the  10th 
Calvary  regiment  at  Camp 
Lockett.  San  Diego,  has  call- 
ed a  meeting  of  veterans  for  ; 
Monday  night.  March  IS. 

The  meeting  is  called  for  or- 
ganizing veterans.  The  time  is 
7-9  p.m.  The  place.  Wesley  .\rts 
and  Culture  Community  Center, 
SinO  s.  Main  .street. 


VALUABLE  COUPON  $  $  $  -  LIMIT  ONE  PER  CUSTOMER 


Trinify  Sets 

Solo.  Chorus 
Appearances 

TTie  Thompson  Chorus  will 
be  heard  at  the  Trinity  Com- 
munity Church.  4709  S.  Avalon 
bldv  .  on  Monda,\-.  March  1>>'.  at 
7:.30  p.m.  Rev.  Foster  Hydes  is 
pastor. 

The  chorus  consisting  of  Ocie 
Biih  AlhPftha  Smith.  .,Po;.ie" 
Newlon,  Maggie  Brown,  .^^i!d•" 
rod  Eili<nn.  Ruth  Torrance. 
Florin*  Thompson.  Essie  Crom-, 
•^vpll.  Arwiller  Player.  Alverta' 
Walton.  Ida  Mae  Dew  and  Or-  '^ 
cie  Wiliiam.son.  [ 

Merline    Dyer    and    th.-'    Rev. 
Lee     Collier     will     be     soloists.; 
Mrs.    Odessa   Thompson    is    the 
arrompanist.  ; 

The  orogram  is'. sponsored  by! 
the      Liberty      Gr.spcl      Church.! 
Evangelist     Pauline     C  o  f  t  e  e. 
founder.  ! 


Eagle  Want  Ads- 
15  words   for  SI 


ADIONG  MKT. 

1556  W.  ADAMS,  at  BUDLONG 
Op«n  8  A.M.  to  7  P.M.— 7  Days  a  Week 

COUPON  SALE! 

Thurs.,  Fri.,  Sat.,  Sun., 
March  14,  15,  16,  17 

I        IRIS,  SMART  &  FINAL,  CHASE  &  SANBORN       | 
MAXWELL  HOUSE,  MJB,  HILLS  BROS.,  FOLGERS  > 

IC0FFEE<-89cl 


LIMIT  ONE   POUND  PK   CUSTOMER 


^ . 

I  ALL   POPULAR   BRANDS  | 

iCANNED  MILK 


2 


Tall  Cans 


23 


I 

' LIMIT  TWO  TALL  CANS  PER  CUSTOMER ' 


CandH  PURE  CANE 

SUGAR 


5 


Lb.  Bag 


39 


I LIMIT   5   POUNDS  PER  CUSTOMER"  —  — 

I  STRICTLY  FRESH  PEE  WEE  | 

i  EGGS 

1 4  »   $1.00i 

I LIMIT  FOUR   DOZEN   Pit  CUSTOMER !     t 

COUPON  SALl  INDS  SUN.,  MARCH  17,  AT  7:00  P.M.    3 


VALUABll  COUPON  $  $  $  -  LIMIT  ONI  PKR  CUSTOMCR 


1*  Georg*  S*vell«/  at  26,  had  been  a  wai>ter, 
window-dresser,  candy-maker  and  race  driver's 
mechanic.  In  spare  moments,  he  dabbled  in  home 
chemistry.  Through  this  hobby  he  developed  a 
paint  cleaner  and  preserver.  In  1939,  he  brought 
his  product  to  Union  Oil. 

2«  S«v«ll«  demonstrated  how  it  could  be  used 
to  "launder"  our  service  stations  with  better  re- 
sults and  for  less  money  than  we  had  been  spend- 
ing. Naturally  we  were  interestea  in  improving 
station  appearance  at  less  cost.  So  Sevelle  took  on 
the  job  of  cleaning  several  Union  Oil  stations  on  a 
regular  schedule.  He  was  in  btisiness  for  himself. 

3*  The  sole  drawback  was  that  SeveUe  had  nc 
truck  to  haul  his  equipment  from  station  to  sta* 
tion.  His  capital  consisted  of  a  single  dollar.  So 
Union  Oil  agreed  to  lease  him  one  truck.  He  did 
such  a  good  job  that  his  contract  was  soon  ex- 
panded ta  cover  150  stations. 


4*  Today  Sevelle  is  almost  an  institution.  He 
contracts  for  the  cleaning  of  4,000  Union  Oil  sta- 
tions in  7  western  states.  He  employs  35  men, 
operates  12  big  trucks  and  6  house  trailers  where 
his  crews  live  in  comfort.  On  top  of  running  a 
$100,000  a  year  business,  he's  a  Southern  Califor- 
nia community  leader,  an  active  member  of  five 
iQcal  organizations. 

5*  This  story  is  important,  we  think,  for  several 
reasons.  First,  it's  a  real  rebuttal  to  the  defeatists 
who  say  there's  no  opportunity  left  in  the  U.S.A. 
for  a  go-getter  who'd  like  to  be  his  own  boss.  We 
say  (and  Sevelle  seconds  us)  that  there's  ample 
room  for  the  ambitious  to  spread  their  wings. 

1 
O*  Sevelle's  success  also  pointe  up  sontething 
many  people  don't  realize  -the  relationship  be- 
tween big  and  Small  business  in  every  field  of  in- 
dustry is  healthy  and  helpful.  Each  is  dependent 
on  the  other.  So  as  Union  Oil  grows,  it  helps 


other  enterprises  grow  too.  After  all,  any  company 
keeps  on  growing  only  as  long  as  it  pleases  people. 


UNION  OIL  COMPANY 


O*      CALirORNIA 


INCOKPORATID  IN  CALIFORNIA.  OCTOSER  17.  1W0 


This  scries,  spojrsorcd  by  the  people  of  Union  OH 
Company,  is  dedicated  to  a  discussion  of  how 
and  why  America  )j  business  functions.  We  hope 
you'll  feel  free  to  send  in  any  suggestions  or  crit- 
icisms you  have  to  offer.  Write:  Vie  President, 
Union  Oil  Compayiy,  Union  Oil  Building,  Lo9 
Angeles  17,  California. 


MANUrACTURIRS  OP   ROYAt  TRITOH* 
THE  AMAZING  PURPLI  MOTOR  Oil 


UNION  OIL  COMPANY  OF  CALIFORNIA  LAND  &  LEASING  OFFICE 
is  located  at  4354  West  3rd  Street,  Los  Angeles,  Califarnia 
Telephone  DUnkirk  5-3479  or  DUnkirk  5-3470 


I  . 


4— The   California    Eagle 


Thursday,   March    14,    1957 


California  Bagle 


Loren  Mi/Zer,  Publisher 

TIm  logto  tfWNk.fer  coinpl«t«  brtvaroHoii  of  Nbfii 
phoM  •#  AnMriean  Iff*  through  tho  dowiocrotic  proeonot. 

Wm  favor: 

1.  HK  on  local,  stoto  and  national  lovols. 

2.  Oocont  housing  for  cdl.Amoricans. 

3.  Roprosontotion  In  Govommont. 

4.  Adoqucrto:  old  ago  ponsions  and  secini  socurlty. 

5.  Colloctivo  bargaining  rights  for  all  workman. 

4.  Dovolepmont  and  oncourogomont  of  Negro  business. 

W9  oppose: 

1.  Jim  Crow  in  all  rorms. 

2.  Communista  and  oil  other  enemies  of  democracy. 


every 


PiAltth^d  f  very  Thoradoy 
1050  last  43rd  Place,  Los  Angeles  11 


AD.  4^161 


<yAe  important  ^yMcwspapcr 


Pieces  of  Silver 


Manning  Johnson,  a  former 
.  New  York  Negro  Communist,  began 
his  career  as  a  professional  witness 
by  telling  legislative  committees 
on  un-American  activities  of  his 
own  experiences  in  the  Communist 
party  and' by  naming  its  leaders. 
A  little  later  he  ventured  out 

,  and  named  Ralph  Bunche  as  a  Com- 
munist, charges  that  collapsed  so 

I  completely  that  he  became  a  laugh- 
ing stock.  We  hadn't  heard  much 
about  him  since  that  time  and  as- 

.  sumed  that  he  had  returned  to  the 
obscurity  he  enjoyed  before  he 
turned  to  a  profitable  career  as  a 
professional  witness. 

Last  week  Mr.  Johnson  turned 
np  in  Baton  Rouge,  Louisiana,  to 
testify  before  a  legislative  commit- 
ted whose  chief  work  is  that  of  dis- 
crediting integration.  It  was  formed 
In  order  to  help  Louisiana  retard 
and  undermine  the  Supreme  Court 

'  decision  on  school  segregation. 
That  was  bad  enough. 

But    that    wasn't    enough    for 


Manning  Johnson.  He  wound  up  his 
testimony  in  a  blaze  of  glory  by 
branding  Rev.  Martin  Luther  King 
a  "dastardly  misleader."  The  min- 
ister, he  said,  is  following  the  Com- 
munist party  line  in  his  fight 
against  bus  segregation  and  in  his 
•program  of  non-violence. 

It  is  hard  to  match  this  shame- 
ful and  brazen  testimony  that  flies 
in  the  face  of  truth  and  accuracy. 
There  isn't  an  honest  American 
an>'\vhere,  whether  he  agrees  with 
Rev.  King  or  not,  who  doesn't  know 
that  Mr.  Johnson's  testimony  was 
manufactured  out  of  the  whole 
cloth  of  untruth. 

We  don't  know  who  paid  Mr. 
Johnson's  fare  to  Baton  Rouge  and 
we  don't  know  how  much  he  was 
paid  for  expenses.  We  hope  he  got 
more  than  the  traditional  thirty 
pieces  of  silver.  And  while  we're  at 
it  we  also  hope  the  committee 
found  him  a  decent  Jim  Crow  hotel 
to  comfort  him  during  his  stay' 


V 


down  in  Dixie. 


Students  Ari  Right 


The  strike  of  Alcorn  College 
students  in  Mississippi  gives  the 
effective  lie  to  southern  propagan- 
da that  opposition  to  school  segre- 
gation is  the  work  of  outsiders. 

The  students  are  products  of 
Jim  C!row  schools  and  they  are  at 
Alcorn  because  they  are  denied  ad- 
mission to  other  Missippi  colleges 
and  universities. 

The  object  of  their  wrath  was 
a  professor  who  wrote  a  series  of 

articles      attacking     the     NAACP. 
<  They  know  that  an  attack  on  the 

NAACP  is  an  attack  on  integrated 

schools  and  an  appeal  for  Jim  Crow 
in  education.  They  took  the  only 
effective    action    they   could   take 
under  the  circumstances:  they  de- 
manded the  firing  of  the  professor 
who  was  indirectly  supporting  the 
Jim  Crow  system  they  have  learned 
to  hate. 
.  We  are  sorry  that  Roy  Wilkins, 
^.-executive  secretary  of  the  NAACP, 
'  has  made  a  free  speech  issue  out  of 


the  affair  and  has  advised  the  stu- 
dents to  withdraw  their  demands 
that  the  professor  be  fired.  Mr. 
Wilkins  saw  the  forest  and  over- 
looked the  trees. 

Of  course,  the  professor  has  the 
right  of  free  speech.  So  do  the  stu- 
dents. And  whenever  the  exercise 
of  free  speech  injures  a  person,  or 
groups  of  persons,  th^t  person  or 
group  of  persons  has  a  right  to 
strike  back  at  the  person  who  has 
exercised  that  freedom  of  speech. 
The  Alcorn  students  who  went  on 

strike  against  the  professor  were 

as  surely  within  their  rights  as  he 
was.  He  has  the  right  to  attack  the 
NAACP;  the  students  have  the 
right,  and  the  duty,  to  defend  it. 

It  is  futile  to  pretend  that  the 
students  should  have  merely  sought 

corresponding  newspaper  space  to 

answer  him.  They  couldn't  have  got 
it.  The  strike  is  the  classic  weapon 
of  protest  open  to  students.  We're 
glad  the  Alcorn  students  used  it. 


Save  Our  Schools 


It's  hard  to  get  e.xcited  about 
municipal  elections  which  come  the 
spring  after  a  hard  fought  presi- 
dential campaign.  It's  our  guess 
that  the  April  2  primary  election 
won't  attract  many  voters.  We  hope 
%t  does  because  Los  Angeles  voters 
are  going  to  decide  the  fate  of  their 
Bchool  system  in  thct  election. 

Prof.  Ralph  Richardson  and 
Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof  are  trying  to 
oust  Mrs.  Mary  Cole  and  Mrs.  Edith 
Stafford,  two  of  the  most  reaction- 
tjftry  school  board  members  in  our 
history. 

People  are  known-  by  the  com- 
pany they  keep  in  politics  and 
Mrs.  Cole  and  Mrs.  Stafford  are 
keeping  company  with  all  of  the 
crackpots  in  town.  They,  are  being 


cheered  and  applauded  by  the  same 
fringe  lunatics  who  fought  against 
elimination  of  segregation  in  the 
fire  department  and  who  have  op- 
posed every  effort  to  better  race 
relations. 

The  votes  cast  by  Mrs.  Cole  and 
Mrs.  Stafford  are  the  basis  of  their 
support  by  the  crackpot  element. 
As  board  members,  the  two  of 
them  have  opposed  federal  aid 'to 
education,  student  study  of  Unit- 
ed Nations,  decent  salaries  for 
school  employes,  and  every  sem- 
blance of  civil  rights  for  teachers. 

Voters  who  fail  to  cast  their 
votes  for  Mr.  Richardson  and  Mrs. 
Tinglof  will  bear  the  responsibility 
for  dooming  our  school  systems  to 
a  return  to  the  dark  ages. 


Political  Spotlight 

usoBSssmsaaia  »y  observer  tssmsBSEaamsEsm 


•  Richardson,  Tingolof 

"Los  Angeles  needs  better 
schools;  our  children  deserve 
the  finest  education,  instead  of 
the  sub -standard  facilities 
thej^ve»been  provided." 

That  was  the  statement  to- 
day from  Dr.  John  A.  Somer- 
ville,  well  known  community 
leader  and  dentist. 

"Our  children  are  being 
short-changed  by  a  Board  of 
Education  which  is  responsive 
td  pressures  from  selfish  ex- 
tremist groups,"  Dr.  SomerviUe 
declared. 

"We  must  have  a  Board  of 
Education  which  will  represent 
the  total  community  and  which 
will  elevate  educational  stand- 
ards in  Los  Angeles. 

"Fortunately,"  Dr.  SomerviUe 
went  on,  "in  Mrs.  Mary  Tinglof, 
candidate  for  the  Board  of  Edu- 
cation, Office  No.  2,  and  Dr. 
Ralph  Richardson,  who  is  run- 
ning for  Board  Office  No.  6,  we 
have  two  Intelligent,  well- 
qualified  people  who  will  work 
toward  the  solution  of  the  seri- 
ous  problems   confronting  our 

schools." 

•    •    • 

Poulson  Praised 

Fifty- nine  prominent  citizens, 
including  both  Democrats  and 
Republicans,  have  been  ap- 
pointed community  chairmen 
for  the  campaign  to  re-el^ 
Mayor  Norris  Poulson.  / 

This  was  announced  today  by 
Ben  P.  Griffith,  general  chair- 
man of  the  Committee  to  re- 
elect Mayor  Norris  Poulson.  The 
area  chairmen  will  work  to 
bring  out  a  large  bipartisan 
vote  to  re-elect  the  Mayor  at 
the  April  2  primary. 

"The  chairmen  have  been 
named  to  represent  every  com^ 
munity  in  the  city,"  said  Grif- 
fith. "They  will  provide  volun- 
teer workers  with  literature 
and  give  them  guidance  on 
how  to  work  most  effectively 
among  voters  in  their  own 
neighborhoods.  We  invite  per- 
sons from  all  walks  of  life  to 
join  our  campaign  so  we  can 


tir 


\ 


LETTERS 

to  the  editor 


Si: 


=^ 


Dear  Editor:  We  meant  to  get 
this  letter  to  you  sooner-  but  as 
fast  as  we  get  one  campaign 
completed,  we  find  ourselves  in 
the  middle  of  a  hectic  rush 
getting  the  next  one  off  the 
ground. 

We  had  the  best  year  ever  in 
1956.  While  we  naturally  are 
happy  over  the  results,  we  are 
forever  conscious  of"  the  fact 
that  we  need  to  raise  substan- 
tially more  money  in  order  to 
preserve  and  .strengthen  these 
colleges  for  the  challenging; 
days  ahead.  These  institutions 
are  vital  parts  of  the  American 
system  of  higher  education, 
helping  to  meet  the  ever  ex- 
panding desire  on  tfte-  part  of 
young  Americans  to  secure  a 
college  education. 

Since  1944  we've,  collected 
over  $31,000,000  for  our  -mem- 
ber colleges.  And  since  1944  you 
and  other  editors  and  publish. 

ers  of  Negro  papers  have  given 
us  generous  support.  As  I  have 
so  often  said,  this  is  very  im- 
portant to-  us  for  it  gives  us  a 
vital  approval.  We  hope  always 
that  we  will  merit  this  ap- 
proval. 

Many,  many  thanks  for  your 
help,  and  with  kind  personal 
regards. 

W.  J.  TRENT  JR.- 
United  Negro  College 
Fund,  Inc.,  New  York 


To  the  Editor 

Upon  reaching  Geneva,  Swit- 
zerland Jan.  .4  on  that  part  of 
our  tour,  a  group  of  us  visited 
the  library  for  want  of  some- 
thing to  do.         '  ^ 

Imagine  my  chagrin,  embar- 
rassment, everything  of  that 
nature  when  the  clerk  on  duty 
showed  me  the  January  7.  1957 
issue  of  TIME  Magazine  carry- 
ing the  low.  mean  article  on 
the  effects  of  desegregation  on 
Washington.  D.C.  He  pointed 
out  the  article,  so  that  I  would 
not  miss   it. 

After  discussing  it  for  a  few 
minutes  with  him  and  my  par- 
ty members  w  ho  crowded 
around  to  read  it  he  made  this 
comment: 

"I  asked  a  gentleman  who 
was  here  on  Friday  how  this 
happened  under  the  nose  of  the 
militant  NAACP  which  I  heard 
so  much  about,  and  he  said 
THAT  YOU  ARE  FIGHTING  SO 
MUCH  AMONG  YOURSELVES 
THAT  YOU  HAVE  LOST  YOUR 
POTENCY." 

I  could  only  reply,  "That  re- 
mains to  be  seen." 

MRS.  E.  B,  OTEERALL 


have  Mayor  Poulson  continue 
the  sound  business  administra- 
tion he  has  brought  to  our  city 
government. 

•  •    • 

Ennis  Speaks 

Attorney  John  M.  Ennis, 
chairman  of  the  city  Building 
and  Safety  Commission  and  a 
candidate  for  mayor  against 
incumbent  Norris  Poulson  in 
'the  April  2  primary  election, 
will  substantiate  his  claim  that 
many  changes  are  needed  at 
City  Hall  when  he  speaks  be- 
fore the  Southside  Democratic 
club  Tuesday,  March  19,  at  8 
p.m.  at  the  American  Legion 
clubhouse,  9047  South  Vermont 
avenue. 

Launching  a  n  intensified 
campaign  to  awaken  the  public 
to  its  responsibility  for  good 
government  are  the  club's  new 
officers:  Mrs.  Eula  Jordan, 
president ;  Carl  Rasmussen, 
vice-president;  Mrs.  Barbara 
Perkins,  corresponding  secre- 
tary; Mrs.  Eva  Totten,  recording 
secretary;  and  Mrs.  Cora  Has- 
kins,  treasurer. 

a       •       • 

Yeakel  Dinner 

More  than  500  will  attend  a 
testimonial  dinner  for  Bob 
Yeakel,  37-year-old  business- 
man  and  candidate  for  Mayor, 
tonight  (Thursday)  at  7  p.m. 
at  the  Moulin  Rouge,  6230  Sun- 
set Blvd.,  according  to  Atty. 
Benjamin  Chipkin,  chairman  of 
the  event. 

w         *         a 

Banks  Hits  Poulson 

Erroll  Banks,  candidate  for 
mayor  portrayed  Mayor  Poul- 
son as  the  errand  boy  of  the  oil 
monopolies. 

He  contrasted  the  role  of  the 
Mayor,  who.  he  said,  acted  in 
the  interests  of  the  profits  of 
the  big  monopolies,  with  his 
program  to  develop  the  natural 
resources  of  the  state  for  the 
benefit  of  all  the  people.  He 
said  a  vote  for  him  as  mayor  is 
a  vote  to  expose  the  crimes  and 
aims  of  these  companies  and  to 
nationalize  the  industry  in  the 
interests  of  all,  rather  than  for 

the  enrichment  of  a  few. 

•■     •     » 

Pasadena  Election  Set 

Ability  and  not  color  should 
be  the  determining  factor  in 
qualifying  a  man  for  a  job,  ac- 
cording to  W.  Blake  Fair, 
weather,  candidate  for  the 
Pasadena  Board  of  City  Direc- 
tors from  the  fifth  District,  in  a 
talk  following  a  Vesper 
Prelude.  Sunday  at  the  home  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Raymond  Jones, 
2S5  West  Mountain.  Pasadena. 

"All  my  life  I  have  consist- 
ently refused  to  refer  to  a  man 
by  his  color,"  Fairweather  de- 
clared. "I'm  not  interested  in 
his  color.  If  he  comes  to  me  for 
a  job  I'm  only  interested  in  his 

qualifications." 

*  *    * 

Charter  Changes 

Need  for  two  city  charter 
change."?  affecting  the  Depart- 
ment of  Water  and  Power  was 
explained  today  by  J.  C.  Moller. 
Jr.,  president  of  the  Board  of 
Water  and  Power  Commission- 
ers. 

Appearing  as  Propositions  -  2 
and  3  on  the  April  2  election 
ballot,  both  proposed  changes 
are  tied  in  to  Water  and  Power 

personnel  matters.  Moller  said. 

«     «     * 

Prop.  A  Supported 

Proposition  A,  the  municipal 
rubtush  collection  referendum, 
has  oeen  endorsed  by  the  Los 
Angeles  Realty  Board,  which 
recommends  a  "yes"  vote  on 
the  measure  at  the  April  2 
election.  The  action  of  the 
Board  was  upon  the  recom- 
mendation of  its  Legislative 
and  Taxation  Committee. 


King  Accused 
Of  Being  'Red' 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
Bunche,  assistant  secretary  gen- 
eral of  the  United  Nations. 

Johnson  said  further  that  the 
anti-segregation  movement  led 
by  Rev.  King  "could  lead  to 
communism  in  the  South."  Re- 
ferring to  Rev.  King's  state- 
ments about  the  mass  move- 
ment that  led  to  the  Supreme 
Court  decision  outlawin-g  bus 
segregation,  Johnson  said: 
"This  explanation  is  the  same 
as  that  of  the  Communist 
party.  I  wonder  who  is  giving 
him  the  party  line." 

Johnson  was  testifying  at  a 
three -day  hearing  before  .the 
Louisiana  Joint  Legislative 
Committee  on  Segregation. 

Another  Negro  ex -Communist 
from  New  York,  Leonard  Pat- 
terson, also  testified.  He  said 
the  CcHTimunist  party  had  been 
trying!  to  infiltrate  Negro 
churches  since  1929. 

The  same  theme  was  repeat- 
ed by  a  New  Orleans  police 
sergeant  who  was  billed  as  an 
"expert  on  Communism." 

Sgt'  Hubert  Badeaux  said  he 
had  "thousands  of  documerits" 
to  support  the  charge  that  the 
NNACP  has  been  "infiltrated" 
by  ConununistJB. 


Free  Speech  for  Some 


Deodly  'Gift' 
Mailed 


Property  Owners  Asking  Higher 
Rjoyalties  from  3  Oil  Companies 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 
ington  told  police  detectives  at 
Hollywood     station     that     she 
knew  no  one  by  that  name. 

The  murder  plot  was  discov- 
ered about  9:30  p.m.  Tuesday, 
by  a  friend  of  the  svelte  sing- 
er, Mrs.  Ann  Moore,  of  2944 
Palm  Gfove. 

The  songstress,  now  appear- 
ing at  Zardi's  Jazzland.  6315 
Hollywood  boulevard,  received 
the  candy  March  5,  but  because 
she  is  "slimming,"  she  re- 
frained from  tasting  the  tempt- 
ing sweets.' 

Something  Hard 

She  had  offpred  .it  to  others, 
but  no  one  h^d  been  interest- 
ed in  eating  it  until  Mrs. 
Moore  took  it  home  to  give  to 
her  two  grandchildren. 

Fortunately  I  the  youngsters 
were  asleep.  Mrs.  Moore  nib- 
bled on  a  piece.  Her  te€tl\ 
crunched  on  something  hard. 
She  took  it  out  of  her  mouth. 
It  was  a  tiny  .sliver  of  glass. 
She  tried  another  chocolate.  In 
it  she  found  two  slivers  of 
glass.  Then  she  'galled  Miss 
Washington. 

Goodbye 

The  note  that  accompanied 
the  box  read:'' 

"My  tail   is  short  as  you 

see 
Goodbye  tp  you   from  me. " 

According  t«f  Miss  Washing- 
ton's agent,  Jules  Fo,\,  the 
singer  talked  with  police  de- 
tectives for  three  hours  after 
the  attempted  crime  was  dis- 
covered. Det.  Sgt.  Mark  Nolan 
examined  the  candy  and  found 
that  each  piece  had  from  one 
to  three  slivers  of  glass  in  it. 

Miss  Washington,  who  mar- 
ried her  fifth  husband,  Eddie 
Chatnblee,  two  weeks  ago,  said 
she  had  no  idea  ^  who  could 
have  sent  the  "present '  to  her. 

Chamblee  said  they  had  -of- 
fered the  candy  to  about  40 
people,  but  that  no  one  had 
seemed   interested. 


(Continued  from  Page  1) 
gejts  51  per  cent  of  the  signa- 
tures in   a  given  area. 

Claim  Disputed 

tity  Attorney  Roger  Arne- 
be-gh  disputed  Union's  claim 
wi:h  an  interpretation  of  city 
ordinances  that  held  that 
ev(?rybody  who  lives  in  a  tract 
where  oil  is  discovered  must 
shire  in  the  royalties  no  mat- 
ter who  gets  the  lease.  'The 
city  attorney's  opinion  proves 
that  Union  has  been  misin- 
forming the  public  again,"  Sig- 
na    officials  said. 

(Juiberson  &  Burke  issued  a 
statement  through  Libby  Clark, 
local  public  relations  expert, 
sajing  that  it  has  secured  51 
per  cent  of  the  necessary  sig- 
nal ures  in  two  SO-acre  tracts 
and  will  seek  permission  to 
dri  1  on  April  15.  It  is  compet- 
ing with  Signal  in  an  area 
bounded    by   Country  Club   on 


trlct  in   which   Union  .is  <33k- 
ing  leases. 

Union  claimed  this  week  that 
it  has  secured  51  per  cent,  of 
the  property  owners  in  12 'sep- 
arate 40-acre  tracts,  seven  of  • 
which  are  contiguous  and  con- 
stitute a  solid  area  of  280 
acres.  It  did  not  say  when  it 
would  seek  a  drilling"  permit. 

The    Western-Adams-Countr' 
Club  Area  Propert>'  Owners  As- 
sociation has  invited  represen'- 
atives    of   all    companies   to    ■ 
meeting   on   March    IS    wher 
its  members  will  discuss  whir" 
of   the    various   leases   to   Pigr, 
The  association  wants  a  25  pc- 
cent  royalty  agreement  with  an 
oil    well   drilled    for    every   I'l 
acres.  '  It   also   demands  dire' 
payment    of    royalties    to   ea-  • 
property  owner    and    a    m' 
mum  rental  of  §125  per  a'- 


'Red'  Sanders ' 

Is  50%  Wrong 

(Continued  from  Page  D 
liams,  high  school  coach:  Tay 

Brown,   junior   college   mentor; 


Pete 
and 


O'Garro 
Charlie 


Rafer    Johnson 
Dumas,    college 


stars;  Sanders,  college  coach; 
and  Sid  Ziff,  Maxwell  Stiles 
and  J. ,  G.  Taylor,  sports  writ  - 
ers.  Sam  Baiter  got  an  award 
for  his '  broad(fasting.  and  Ear- 
lene  Brown,  Olympic  shot  put- 
ter, got  a  special  accolade  as 
the  outstanding  woman  ath- 
lete.      ,  I 

Hermann,  Mai  Whitfield  and 
Judge  .Thomas  Griffith  were 
speakers  and  Jeep  Smith's  band 
furnished  the  music. 

Sanders'  boo-boo  came  when 
he  told' the  banqueters  that  he 
was  advised  !"not  to  use  too 
many  colored  .  athletes "  when 
he  came  to  UCLA.  He  said 
that  he  disregarded  the  advice 
and  had  used  pvery  colored  ath- 
lete who  had  ability  and  would 
continue  to  do  so.  The  only 
trouble 'with  th£  statement  was 
that  he  didn't  say  "colored" 
and  he  didn't  say  "Negro"  in 
reporting  the  bdvice  and  what 
he  did  about  it. 

Although  Slanders'  remarks 
caused  a  great  deal  of  eyebrow 
raising,,  most  I  of  the  diners 
were  ready  td  forgive  him  be- 
cause his  recolrd  shows  that  he 
has  been  mor4  than  fair  in  his 
attitude  toward  Negroes  who 
have  played  oil  his  football  ' 
team. 


the!  north,  Vermont  on  the  east, 

Jefferson  "on  the  south  and 
Lor  gwood  on  the  west.  That 
arei  is  included  within  the  dis- 


Miss.  Students 

Gb  Out  on  Strike 

(Continued  from  Page  1) 
en    ov^   the   college"    with    the 
"acpuiesence    if    not    the    con- 
sent" of  Dr.  Otis. 

All  students  who  had  not ' 
obek'ed  an  ultimatum  to  return 
to  jclasses  were  expelled  and 
Dr. !  Otis  was  immediately  re- 
placed by  a  new  president. 
Prof.  J.  D.  Boyd,  who  had  been 
stalled  to  assume  the  post  April 

1-    1 

i    New  Administration 

A  new  administration  was  all 
set  to  take  over  Monday,  with 
Pro '.  Boyd  planning  to  accept 
applications  for  re-admission  of 
students- on  an  individual  basis. 

Tde  status  of  Prof.  King, 
whom  the  students  branded  an 
"Urcle  -Tom'.'  for  his  "go  slow" 
■  articles,  wa?  still  in  doubt.  The 
Stale  College  Board  president. 
H.  G.  Carpenter,  told  newsmen 
tha  ..King's  name  had  not  been 
brought  up  at  the  emergency 
me<ting,  adding  "he's  still  a 
member  of  the  faculty." 
Willdns  D»pler*s  Aetiea 

Cirpenter  refused  to  com- 
ment on  a  query  as  to  whether 
the  board's  action  indicated 
approval  of  King's  articles. 

Ir  New  Y^rk,  Roy  Wilkins, 
NAACP  executive  s^retary, 
seni  a  telegram  to  Ernest  Mc- 
Ewen,  president  of  the  Alcorn 
stuc  ent  council,  commending 
the  "spirit','  of  the  students  in 
opp)sing  King's  views,  but  "de- 
ploring" any  pressure  which 
"denies  him  free  speech  on  in- 
tegration." 


Child,  5,  Wins 
ty  Ttilent  Prize 

CljTithia  Jackson,  .5-year-old 
student  of  tKe  Betty  Martina 
Studio  of  Dance,  2606  Harcourt 
avenue,  won  top  prize  in  her 
groi^p  on  the  Bob  Yeakel  TV 
"Rotket  to  Stardom"  talent  pro- 
gran   Sunday   morning. 

Th  e  talented ,  and  personaWe 
child  dance  maxvjel  is  the 
dauihter  of  Mr.  and. Mrs.  Willie 
Jacteon  of  309  E.  115th  street 
Soulfli  Los  Angeles.  She  won 
a  handsome  gold  lettered  stat- 
uette doing  a  tap  da»ce  loutine. 


MobAttacS» 
White  WorkeL 

(Continued  from  Page  1  ■ 
sons  was  attempting  to  eiMici 
kill  me  or  cause  bodily  harm. 
he    testified    in    a  ■  Recoru?i 
Court  trial. 

Blocked  by  Mob 

The  Rev.  Shuttle^worth  and 
liis  wi^^e,  whose  home  i\as 
demolished  by  dynamite 
Christmas  night  because  of  his 
activity  in  opposing  bus  segre- 
gation, entered  the  "white" 
waiting  room  under  a  heavy 
police  escort.  Twice  before  tliey 
were  blocked  by  the  mob  from 
entering  the  Birminghgini  Ter- 
minal. .       ■ 

Weaver,  who  has  openly  ad- 
vocated integration,  sat  do^v^ 
beside  them.  The  mobsters,  in- 
censed over  their  failure  to* 
keep  the  Shuttleswor'ths  out  of 
the  "White"  section,  vented 
their  wrath  on  Weaver. 

The  Rev.  Shuttlesworth  is 
head  of  the  Alabama  Christian 
Movement  for  Human  Rela- 
tions. 

He  and  his  wife  waited  for 
more  than  an  hour  before 
boarding  a  New  York-bound 
passenger  train  as  a  score  of 
uniformed  officers  swarmed  in- 
to the  station  and  guarded  its 
doors. 

CALIFORNIA 
EAGLE 

"Tha  Important  Newspaper" 

1050  E.  43rd  PI. 

Los  Angeles  11,  Cali? 

ADtms  4^161 

LOREN   MILLER 
Publisher 

Vol.  LXXVI  No.  52 

Thurtday  March  14,  1957 

F.    P.   WALLER.   JR. _Adv.    Mgr. 

GRACE  E.  SIMONS,   Executive  Editor 
EOWARO   "ABIE"    ROBINSON 

— Circulation     Mgr. 

CALME     RUSS Office    Mar. 

BAY   AREA    REPRESENTATIVE 

E.    G.    ALLEN 1512    16th    St. 

SanU    Monic«.   Cal.,    Ph.:    EX.    5-1591 

SUBSCRIBE.  NOW! 

D  $4.00  for  1   Year 
D  $2.50  far  6  Months 
a  $1.50  for  3  Months 
PER  COPY   »0c 

Adjudication  Decree  Number  123228 
Date  of  Adjudication  July  1,  1923. 
Published  every  Thursday  by  Th« 
California  Eagle  Publishing  Co.. 
10S0  East  43rd  Place.  Entered  as 
Second  Class  Matter  November  3. 
1937,  at  the  Posj  Office  at  Los  An! 
gel»s.  California,  under  the  Act  of 
March  3.  1879. 

REPRESENTED   NATIONALLY 

BY    INTERSTATE 

UNITED   NEWSPAPERS 

545  Fifth  Avenu* 
Ntw  York  17,  Ntw  York' 


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MRA  Helps  Africa 
Drive  for  Freedom 

By  BARBARA  MOUNTS 

I  took  my  first  serious  look  at  Moral  Re-Armament 
last  Sunday,  and,  frankly  what  I  saw  impressed  me 
very  much.  For  one  thing,  I  learned  that  it  has  be- 
come a  serious  factor  in  African  life  and  thinking,  and 
that  it  was  a  very  important  factor  in  furthering  in- 
dependence for  the  new  state  ?> ■ 


«f  Ghana. 

A  group  of  Africans,  led  by 
Tolan  Ma,  member  of  the 
Ghana  Parliament,  is  in  the 
city  trying  to  interest  Ameri- 
cans in  a  film,  "Freedom," 
which  has  been  shown  in  a 
number  of  theaters. 

The  film  is  an  impressive 
record  of  the  efforts  of  Africans 
to  establish  self-government 
and  the  lesson  it  drives  home 
is  that  the  way  for  man  to 
change  his  world  is  to  change 
himself. 

Moral  Re-Armament's  basic 
philosophy  is  based  on  four  ab- 
solutes— absolute  purity,  abso- 
lute honesty,  absolute  unself- 
ishness and  absolute  love^and 


lOWEN    MEMORIAL 

MnHODIST  CHURCH 

Keat  3Sth  oad  Tilaitr  Sta. 
J*ha  C.  a«la.  MlalatM 

tiM  a.m.— eiiurdi  tch**!. 
nm  «.«.— Wf«r«hjB. 
7iM  •.m.— ^cd   Naw*  Haurt 


its    members    Strive    to    reach 
those  goals. 

Take  a  look  at  yourself.  Are 
you  absolutely  honest?  Or  ab- 
solutely unselfish?  Are  you  ab- 
solutely pure?  Do  you  prac- 
tice absolute  love?  And  if  you 
reached  those  absolutes  "would 
not  that  go  a  long  way  toward 
helping  those  about  you  do  the 
same  thing?  Would  not  our 
world  be  a  better  place  to  live 
in  if  all  of  us  reached  out  to- 
ward those  absolutes? 

The  story  of  Moral  Re-Arma- 
ment  is  too  long  to  tell  in  one 
article  of  this  kind.  Besides.  I 
am  not  competent  to  tell  it. 
However.  MR.\  has  a  headquar- 
ters at  833  S.  Flower  street,  to 
which  everyone  is  welcome.  I 
paid  it  a  visit  on  Sunday  and 
found  it  and  the  activities 
there  more  than  satisfying. 

The  day  of  my  visit,  two  Af- 
rican films  were  shown.  "The 
Tide  of  History"  and  'The  Af- 
rican Tale."  I  can  recommend 
both  of  them.  . 


Pnvate  Consultation  and  SYC  Readings 

Call  for  Appointment  AD.  2-5984 

Office  Hours:  9:30  A.M.  .  7:30  P.M. 

SISTER  BEATRICE,  1374  East  Vernon  Ave. 


^Itur'clt 


Thursday,   March    14,    195^ 


RANTA 
ONICA 
JEWS 


DIVINt  HtAUNO  THROUGH  FAITH  AND  PRAYtK 

Candl*  Stor*  All  Kind*  of  Rali^ious  Artlclu 

REV.  H.  J.  NAPLES 

WOMB  UNOWNIB  SHUITUAL  ADVISOR  AMD  COUNilLOU 
HIPP   IN  ALL  MfAOti  -  PRIVATf  CONSULTATION 

THE  HELPING  CHAPEL  OF  THE  MASTER 

PIOPHISilS   IVIRY  THURSDAY  AND  SUNDAY  NICHT  -  ••9:30  P.M. 
r»r  Ar»aliitin«iit  Call  AD.  2-S9t4  -  9:00  A.M.  t*  9:00  P.M. 

1J74  latt  Varnen  Avaiwa 
Writa  P.  O.  lax  72393,  Ai«l  Station,  Let  Anfalat  3,  Calif. 


Your  friend  In 
Ime  of  Sorrow 


When  sorrow  strikes,  with  tha  passing  of 
someon*  dear,  rely  upon  PEOPLE'S  to  com- 
plete all  necessary  arrangements.  Our  ex- 
perienced staff  Is,  above  all.  tasteful  and 
discreet  at  ail  times. 


PEOPLE'S 


FUNERAL 
HOME 


4250  S.  CENTRAL 
AD.  2-7181 


GUEST    PREACHER 

Rev.  J.  T.  Stewart  of  Shreve- 
port.  La.,  will  be  the  gue.st 
speaker  at  the  Calvary  Baptist 
Church  at  the  Sunday  morning 
services  on  March  24. 

•  •     • 

NAACP  YOUTH 

The  youth  chapter  of  the 
Santa  Monica  branch  of  the 
NAACP,  under  the  supervision 
of  Mrs.  Zeke  Grann,  is  plan- 
ning to  attend  the  Southern 
Area  Conference  in  Monrovia 
on  the  18th  of  May. 

•  •     • 

Visitor 

R.  C.  Owens,  a  student  at 
Iowa  State  College,  is  visiting 
his  parents,  M""-  and  Mrs.  John 
Dooley,  1536  ISth  street,  and 
his  grandmother,  Mrs.  Eugenia 

Ratter. 

•  •    • 

HOSPITALIZED 

Mrs.  Acey  Markham  of  1S27 
18th  street  is  improving  after 
having  .undergone  surgery  at 
the  UCLA  HospitaL 

•  *     • 

CONVALESCING 

Cornell  Jones.  1452  19th 
street,  is  home  after  surgery  at 
the  Good  Samaritan  Hospital. 

Ora  aianchett,  1802  l7th 
street,  has  come  home  after 
spending  seveial  days  in  the 
County  Hospital.  '^ 

•  •     • 

REDEVELOPMENT 

This  month  s  NAACP  meet- 
ing is  to  be  held  at  the  Calvary 
Youth  Center,  Broadway  at 
20th  street,  at  7:30  p.m.  Wed- 
nesday, March  20.  The  meeting 
will  concern  itself  with  the  re- 
development plans  being  pro- 
posed for  Santa  Monica. 


NIHIL  SINE  LABORE 

2yy  ur  2yy  ub,  I  c  ur  2yy  4  m 

W«  will  give  On*  Dollar  in  cash  free,  no  strings  attached, 
to  any  person  reading  the  above  tines  correctly.  Any  one 
from  28  yrs.  of  age  to  60  is  eligible.  Stdp  into  my  office 
any  Thursday  between  11  and  11:30. 

JOHNSON'S  HOUSE  OF  INSURANCE 


THE  BEST  IN  INSURANCE 
6225  SOUTH  BROADWAY 


PI.  9-6876 


"Ren«w  Thy  Strength  Like  the  Eagle" 

MASTER  YOUR  PROBLEMS 

BY  DIVINE 

METAPHYSICS 

3   Questions  Answered. 

Send  SI  with  Birthdate. 

WILLIAM  H.  FELTON,  Ps.  0. 

2473  Seventh  Ave.,  New  York  30,  N.Y. 


THE  CITY  HEIRSr 

SEXTET  OF  CITY 

EMPLOYEES, 

will  be  presented,  Sunday 
night,  Mireh  17,  it  7:30  p.m. 
at  Second  A.  M.  E.  ZIon  Church, 
1201  E.  43rd  Street.  These  fine 
singers  are  directed  and  ae- 
companied  by  Edith  Owen* 
White. 
Rev.  r.  C.  Wofkins,  Pattor 


A  NEW  WAY  TO  LOOK  AT  FUNERALS 


In  times  past  a  funeral  was  a 
tribute  to  the  departed  opiy. 
Angelus  Funeral  Home  believes 
in  a  "Service  for  the  Living"  by 
providing  beautiful  tributes  that 
express  perfectly  the  wordless 
emotions  of  the  heiart.  We  offer 
understanding  carp,  complete 
facilities  and  distinctive  surround- 
ings to  help  the  family  through 
»  difficult  period. 


Funeral  Homes 

LOS  ANGELES:  1030  E.  Jefferson  Blvd.- Phone  AOanw  2-5188 
LONG  BEACH:  718  E.  Anaheim  St-Phone  L  B.  700449 


Prominent  Churchwomcm. 
Mrs.  Cloro  Simpson,  Dies 

Funeral  services  for  Mrs.  Clara  Simpson,  daughter 
of  the  late  Rev.  H.  S.  Harris,  founder  of  the  first 
CME  Church  in  Los  Angeles,  were  conducted  Sunday 
afternoon,  March  9,  at  Phillips  Temple  CME  Church, 
on  Wadsworth  and  43rd  streets. 

Rev.   N. 


The   California    Eagle— 7 


Dr.  C.  Clark 
To  Be  Guest 
At  St.  Paul 

The  St.  Paul  Baptist  Church, 
100  W.  49th  street,  will  begin 
its  annual  commemoration 
services  on  Sunday,  March  17, 
at  11  a.m. 

Dr.  Ceasar  A.  W.  Clark  of 
the  Good  Street  Baptist  Church 
of  Dallas  will  open  a  preaching 
mission  with  those  services 
that  will  continue  through 
March  22. 

Dr.  John  L.  Barnum,  pastor  of 
St.  Paul  Baptist  Church,  an- 
nounces that  there  will  be 
preaching  and  singing  each 
night  of  that  week  at  8  p.m. 


Holy  Name  Men 
Sponsor  Dinner 

A  Parish  dinner  sponsored  by 
the  men  of  the  Holy  Name  So- 
ciety will  be  held  in  the  school 
auditorium  of  the  Holy  Name 
Catholic  Church  at  Jefferson 
blvd.  and  Cimarron  street  Sun- 
day. March  17,  from  12  noon. 

Monsigneur  Roche  is  pastor 
of  the  church.  James  Hej-wood 
is  president  of  the  Holy  Name 
Society. 


Bishop  College 
Plans  to  Move 

MARSHALL.  Tex.  —  Bishop 
College  of  Marshall,  Tex.,  is 
going  to  move  to  Dallas  with- 
in two  years. 

That  was  the  decision  an- 
nounced jointly  last  ,week  by 
Dr.  W.  R.  White,  chairman  of 
the  33-member  Board  of  Trus- 
tees of  Bishop  College,  and  Dr. 
Ernest  C.  Estell,  chairman  of 
the  Executive  Committee. 

Dr.  White  also  is  president 
of  Baylor  University  in  Waco, 
Tex.,  and  Dr.  Estell  is  pastor  of 
St.  John's  Baptist  Church  in 
Dallas. 


C.  Curry  officiated, 
assisted  by  the  following  min- 
isters: Rev.  George  L.  Hays, 
presiding  elder;  Rev.  A.  A. 
Peters,  Victory  Baptist  Church; 
Rev.  John  N.  Doggett  Hamil- 
ton Methodist  Church;  Rev. 
Baxter  Carroll  Duke,  Church  of 
Christian  Friends,  and  Rev. 
Clayton  D.  Russell,  Church  of 
Divine  Guidance. 

Interment  was  In  Lincoln 
Memorial  Cemetery  with  An- 
gelus Funeral  Home  in  charge. 

Mrs.  Simpson,  eldest  child  of 
the  late  Rev.  and  Mrs:  H.  S. 
Harris,  died  Tuesday  night  in 
the  fkmily  residence,  942  E. 
56th  street.  She  was  a  faithful 
member  of  the  Phillips  Temple 
CME  Church,  the  first  presi- 
dent of  stewardess  board  No.  2 
and  for  many  years  a  member 
of  both  the  senior  and  cathed- 
ral choirs. 

Her  request,  to  be  buried  in  a 
choir  robe,  was  carried  out. 

Mrs.  Simpson  is  sutvived  by 
two  sisters,  Miss  Amy  Harris 
and  Mrs.  A.  C.  Bilbrew;  a  broth- 
er, Bass  Harris;  three  nieces, 
Mrs.  Robert  V.  Lucas,  Kitty 
White  and  Maudie  Bilbrew,  and 
two  grand-nieces  and  two 
grand-nephews,  children  of 
Kitty  White. 


Lutherans  Set 
Sunday  Concert 

The  Garfield  Henrys,  interna- 
tionally famous  artists,  will 
appear  in  concert  at  3t.  Paul's 
Lutheran  Church,  390JI  W.  Ad- 
ams blvd.,  on  Sunday,  March 
17.  at  4  p.m. 

The  concert  is  sponsored  by 
Evelyn  G.  Scobey  and  Lillian 
P.  Thompson.  Dr.  Paul  D.  Leh- 
man is  pastor. 


Concludes  Visit 
To  Palm  Springs 

Rev.  T.  H.  Regan  concluded 
his  visit  with  the  Palm  Springs 
First  Baptist  Church,  with  a 
closing  message  last  Sunday. 
He  returned  to  Wichita,  Kan., 
with  Elder  James  Cotton. 

CHURCH—^ 

H»lp  Wanfd  -  Mai* 

Christian  young  men  in> 
terMted  in  ministry  and 
forming  a  new  Church.  Writ* 
giving  ag*,  phen*  and  com* 
plat*  background  in  first 
l*tt*r.  R*f*r*nc*s.  C/e  Box 
150,  California  EagI*,  1050 
East  43rd  Mac*,  LA.  11, 
Calif,  or  call  Los  Angel** 
Michigan  8484. 


YOUR  TEETH 

Command  Attention 

YOUR  HEALTH 

JOmanis  Attention 
*^    TODAY -SEE 

DR.  GAY 

DENTIST 

Your    Friandly    Cradit    Otntitt 

*  Plates   Repaired  While 
You  Wait 

•  EXTRACTIONS  -  Teeth 
Pulled  and  Filled 

o  FAST -FRIENDLY '■ 
SERVICE 

1062  E.  Vernon  Ave. 

Corner  Vernon  &  Central 
Upstairs 

AD.  4-1397 


Men's  Day  to  Be 
Held  at  Holman 

Men's  Day  will  be  celebrated 
at  Holman  Methodist  Churcl;i, 
3320  W.  Adams'  blvd.,  Sunday, 
March  17. 

The  Rev.  L.  L.  White,  pastor 
of  Holman,  will  speak  at  the 
6  p.m.  services.  Dr.  Lawrence 
B.  Wilson  will  be  the  guest 
speaker  at  the  11  a.m.  services. 
There  will  also  be  special  serv- 
ices at  4  p.m. 


Choral  Tribute 
Pttid  Nkrumah 

T^TEW  YORK— A  choral  trib- 
ute to  Kwame  Nkrumah,  prime 
minister  of  Ghana,  was  pre- 
seated  on  the  United  Negro 
College  Fund-ABC  Radio  net- 
work choir  series  by  the  Glee 
Club  of  Lincoln  University, 
Sunday,   March  10. 

Dr.  Nkrumah  is  an  alumnus 
of  Lincoln  and  credits  the 
Pennsylvania  university,  one  of 
the  UNCF's  31  members,  with 
the  training  that  helped  him 
achieve  successt.  


Rev.  Marshall 


Tb  Be  Installed 
At  Solid  Rock 

The  members  of  the  Sdlid 
Rock  Baptist  Church,  4818  S. 
Avalon  blvd..  haVe  schedulel  a 
week  of  installation  ceremor  ies 
in  honor  of  their  minister,  Ihe 
Rev.  R.  M.  Marshall. 

Monday  night,  March  IS, 
members  of  the  Abraham  Bip- 
tist,  church  will  conduct  the 
services.  Tuesday  night,  March 
19.  the  Israel  Baptist  church 
will  participate.  On  Thursday 
night.  Rev.  J.  Victor  and  on  Fri- 
day Rev.  F.  A.  Jones  will  hofior 
Rev.  Marshall.  j 

Sunday,  March  24.  3  p.m.,i'at 
the  Good  Shepherd  Baptist 
Church.  510  W.  53rd  stree"t,  Rev. 
Grant  Harris  will  preach  a  spe- 
cial  installation  sermon.       j 

Rpv.  Marshall,  one  of  the 
comjmunity's  most  respected 
minjister."!,  was  the  pastor  i  of 
Shil|oh  Baptist  Church  for  mjore 
tha^  34  years.  ! 


Baptist!  HoMl^Mc 
Mid-Winter  Mllc^ 

The  Western  Baptist  State  Convention  of  Calif o 
nia  held  its  mid-winter  sessions  at  SL  Mark  Bapti  ' 
Church,  San  Bernardino,  Rev.  Freeman  Williams,  paste 

The  Tuesday  evening  musical,  under  the  directicr 
of  Dr.  Arthur  A.  Peters,  was  a  huge  success,  with  nc 
ther   standing  room   nor  yard^ 


meeting  at  7  p.  m..  at  whi- 
Rev.  Martin  T.  Robinson,  pe 
tor  Friendship  Baptist  Chun 
of.  Pasadena,  spoke. 

Thursday  morning  saw  t' 
Woman's  Convention  in  sessif 
wtih  Mrs.  Maple  Gordon  pr 
siding.  This  meeting  -was  hig  ■ 
lighted  by  a  message  from  E 
Stewart  of  Shreveport,  La.1  pre 


Churches  Win 
Union  Usher 
Board  Prizes 


Tljie  Victory  Baptist  Church  of 
Los  Angeles  and  the  Calvary 
Baptist  Church  of  Monrovia 
won  trophies  for  their  attend- 
ance records  at  the  Union 
Usher  Board.  Southern  District. 

The  trophies  will  be  presefit- 
e<J  every  three  months  to  tihe 
mernber  church  with  grealtst 
participation  in  the  distrjict 
"njiee^ngs. 

THe  scholarship  committee, 
Mrst  Mary  Gordon,  chairman; 
the  Emergency  committee,  Mrs. 
Molliie  Peterson,  chairman;  and 
the  !  special  activities  comniit- 
tee,  Mrs.  Ophelia  Williarns, 
chairman;  held  a  joint  meeting 
last 


Group  to  Sing 

The  West  Coast  Harmoniser 
Quartet  will  appear  at  the 
Solid  Rock  Baptist  Churchy  4S18 
S.  Avalon  blvd.,  Sunday,  March 
17.  at  7:30  p.m.  The  church's 
senior  choir  will  assist  the 
quartet. 


month   to   plan:  a   money 


raising  affair. 


George  Woods 
Buried  Monday 

G^rge  Til.  Woods,  70,  jof 
200>i  W.  TOth  street.  Was  buri^ 
at  Evergreen  Cemetery  Mon- 
day, following  chapel  services 
at  Harrison  and  Ross  Funeral 
Home,  1839  Firestone  blvjd. 
Thomas  Waller  Masonic  Lod;je 
conducted  the  service. 

The  deceased  died  at  his 
homp  on  March  5  following  & 
lingering  illness.  He  was  a 
native  of  Texas  and  had  resil- 
ed in  Los  Angeles  for  more 
than  45  years. 

Surviving  relatives  are  his 
widow  Mrs.  Sarah  Woods,  a 
son,  George  M.  Wood,  and  |a 
daughter.  Mrs.  Juanita  Wood. 


space  available.  Buses  arrived 
from    the    following    churches: 

Second  Baptist.  Riverside;  First 
Baptist,  North  Fontana;  Union, 
Barstow;  Second  Baptist,  Red- 
lands;  Community,  Pasadena, 
and  three  large  buses  from  Vic- 
tory Baptist  of  Los  Angeles, 
bringing   the   lOO-voice  chorus. 

The  convention  was  opened  j  jdent  of  the  Louisiana  Ba^ 
Wednesday  morning  by  the  |  Convention, 
president.  Dr.  C.  H.  Hampton,  i  On  Thursday -afternoon,  t 
The  day  was  highlighted  by  a  executive  secretary  "r  e  p  o  r  t e 
sermon  by  Rev.  David  Camp-  that  the  first  six  months  t" 
bell  and  reports  from  the  na-  Convention  had  succeeded 
tional  congress  board  by  Mrs.  retiring  manv  of  its  major  o 
M.  P.  Moore,  president  of  the  ligations. 
S.S.B.T.U.  Convention. 

Mrs.    Ruth     Brown     was     in 
charge   of   the  young   matrons 


The  session  closed  with 
sermon  by  Dr.  T.  R.  Durr 
Louisiana. 


Announce  New  Way  To 
Shrink  Painful  Piles 


Sdoaeo  Fiode  Haolhf  Sabetaaeo  Thol  DoM  Bo^— 
ReHeros  Pain— ^trialo  Hoinorrhoida 


Kew  York,  N.  Y.   (SpeeUI)  - 

Tot  the  finrt  time  »eienee  hu 
foniKl  a  n«w  heating  subAtane* 
with  the  astonithing  ability  to 
thrink  hemorrhoids  and  to  reli«v« 
pain— withoat  turcety. 

In  one  hemorrhoid  case  after 
another,  "very  striking  improve- 
ment" was  reported  and  Terifted 
by  doctor*'  ohscrrmtions. 

Pain  was  relieved  promptly. 
And,  while  g«ntly  relieving  pain, 
actual  reduction  or  rctractioa 
(shrinlfing)  took  place. 
.  And  most  amazing  of  all— this 
improvemeriTt  was  maintained  in 
eases  where  doctors'  obeerratiena 
were  continued  over  a  period  of 
many  months ! 

In  fact,  resuHa  were  to  thor- 
ough that  sufferers  were  able  to 
make  such  astonishing  statementa 
ai  "Piles  have  ceased  to  be  a 


problem !"  And  among  these  rai- 
ferert  were  a  very  wide  variety 
of  hentorrhoid  conditions,  eoae  « 
ID  to  20  years'  standing. 

All  this,  without  the  nae  ^ 
narcotics,  anesthetics  or  astrin- 
gents of  any  kind.  The  eecret  b 
a  new  healing  substance  (Bio- 
Dyne*  )  —the  discovery  of  a  worW- 
famoui  research  institution.  Al- 
ready, Bio-Dyne  is  in  wide  nee 
for  healing  injured  tissue  on  all 
parts  of  the  body. 

This  new  heatigg  sabstftnoe  is 
offered  in  Mtpppvitory  or  oinprnt^ 
form  called  Preparation  H."  Adc 
for  individually  aealedeeaTeBieBt 
Preparation  H  suppositories  or 
Preparation  H  ointment  with  spe- 
cial applicator.  Preparation  His 
sold  at  all  drugstores.  Satisf  actiop 
guaranteed  or  money  refunded. 
•a«f .  r.  B.  ttx.  «e. 


H.EWIS  METROPOLITAN  ONE  CHURCIH; 

'     4900  SOUTH  WESTERN  AVENUE 

ISAIAH   SCIPIO,  JR.,   Minister 

9:15  A.M.  Sun.  School  6:0O  Ch.  Yth.  FellowshV 

10:45  A.M.  Morn.  Worship       7:30  P.M    Evening  Worship 


-s»«f    n 


IL  HAUUBON 


1  KARRISON-ROSS 

^  FUNERAL   HOME  .  Vi'" 

1 


1839    Firottewo    Blvdi. 
LU.  87155 


M.  E.  BOSS 


Victory  Baptist  Day  Scliool  offers . . . 

Tho   Basic   Educational   Opportunities  of 

Other  Schools  plus 
Vital  Training  in  Christian  Faith  &  Practico 

ENROLL  NOW! 

Vacancies  Available  for  Kindergarten  Only 
Extended  Day  Care  Program 

"Individual  Instruction  Predominant 
Feature  of  Instruction" 

6:30  A.M.  until  6:30  P.M. 
BUS  TRANSPORTATION  CAFETERIA 

Rev.  Artuhr  A.  Peters,  Pastor;  Mrs.  Florence  Parrette,  Vice-Priiw 
PHONE:  ADAMS  ^-2424  or  M732 


MIKE  GORDON 


'T|ianksaMi//fonforyour  response  during  our 
Ffrkf  Anniversary  Celebration.  We  have  com- 
pletely  re-stock^d  and  are  looking  forward  fo 
welcoming  even]  more  personh  this  weekend. 

CONTINUING  iUlKE'S  SHOE-O-RAMA'S  FIRST 

nniii^ersary  Sale 

U.  &  SAT.,  NflRCH  a  15  &  16 

3  MORE  DAYS! 


A  Once  in  a  Lifetime  Opportunity 
T6  Buy  the  Finest  of  Fa  mi  fy  Footwear! 


MEN'S  SHOES 


LADIES'  HIGHEST  STYLES 


BIG  BOYS'  FAVORITES  •  GIRLS'  FINEST  FOOTWEAR 

I    •  CHILDREN'S  CHOICE  PATTERNS 
"All  sizes  and  colors  fo  ryoung  boys  and  girls  ' 


EXTRA  LARGE  &  EXTRA  SMALL  SIZES!  WE  INVITE  THE  HARD-TO-FIT  FOOT! 

MIKE'S  SHOE- O- RAMA 


¥in9St  5ho9S  for  the  Entire  family 

2614-16  CRENSHAW 


RL  5-8542 


Don't.  Forget  to  Tell  All  Your  Friends  and  Nfighbors  About  Our  Birthday  B€irgalns 


Texas  Southern  University 
basketball  team  just  won  its 
27th  and  28th  straight  basket- 
ball victories  and  earned  the 
right  to  compete  in  the  NAIA 
tourney  in  Kansas  City,  which 
is  currently  underway. 

The  fabulous  Tigers  boast  a 
season  record  of  31-1  and  ended 
conference  play  with  a  12-0 
mark.  To  give  you  an^  idea  of 
the  type  of  basketball  ;the  team 
plays,  just  take  a  gander  at 
this  Texas  outfit.  They  steam- 
rolled  over  foes  in  the  NAIA 
tourney  to  pocket  the  prize 
hoiors  at  Omaha,  Nebraska. 
They  captured  the  SWAC  Con- 
ference championship  and  their 


'CHAMP' 


district  six  championship. 

Wellie  Taylor,  a  mere  6'8" 
lad  and  the  teams  center,  clos- 
ed out  the  season  as  the  top 
scorer  with  647  points  or  a  20.2 
average.  The  amazing  sopho- 
more also  took  the  team  re- 
bounding championship  with 
641.  The  team  averaged  91.1 
points  per  game  while  holding 
opponents  to  69.2  points  per 
game. 

Texas  Southern  team  Is  rated 
as  one  of  the  best  teams  in  the 
country  but  because  the  school 
is  not  eligible  for  the  NCAA 
and  must  play  the  little  college 
league,  the  boys  won't  have  a 
chance  to  prove  it.  Last  year 
when  they  competed  as  fresh- 
mer  and  lost  the  NAIA  tourney 
in  the  last  three  seconds  they 
were  preen.  They  are  back  this 
year  much  improved  and  when 
they  are  seniors  experts  say 
you  won't  be  able  to  touch 
them. 


HINS  MIAMI  TOURNAMENT— Ray  Mitchell,  left,  and 
Moss  H.  Kindrix,  congrntulnte  Eolinc  Thornton,  right,  and 
Joe  Roach,  both   of  Los  Angeles  and  iiinncrs  of  the  recent 
North-South  If^  inter  Golf  tournament  annually  promoted  by 


Ray  Afitchell.  Trophies  were  donated  by  the  Kendrix  organiza- 
tion. Ted  Rhodes,  St.  Louis  professional,  captured  the  pro 
division,  I  f  ■ 

^v : . 1. 


ANNOUNCED  AS  WINNER  is 
Currie's  Ice  Cream  by  former 
boxing  cnamp  Joe  Louis, 
who  enjoys  a  Currie's  float 
at  Maceo  Birch's  store,  2660 
So.  Western.  Special  consid- 
eration is  given  all  churches, 
schools,  clubs,  sororities,  fra- 
ternities and  organizations 
who  contemplate  volume 
buying. 

-  CALL  MACEO  BrRCH'S  - 

CURRIE'S  ICE  CREAM 

2660  S.  WESTERN 
RE.  4-9793 


MICKEYNORTHRUP 
IN  OLYMPIC  TEN 

Mickey  Northrup,  rugged 
East  L.A.  lightweight,  takes  on 
flashy  Leonard  Gaines  of  Oak- 
land in  tonight's  Thursday  10- 
round  main  event  at  the  Olym- 
pic auditorium. 

Northrup,  a  formef  Johnny 
Forbes  protege,  will  be  making 
his  first  start  under  the  Ralph 
Gambina  banner. 

Gaines  boasts  a  1955  draw 
with  Ralph  Dupas.  Last  month 
at  the  Olympic  he  lost  a  dis- 
puted bout  to  Joe  Abasta,^ 


EMMETT  ASHFORD 
NAMED  CHAIRMAN 

Emmett  L.  Ashford,  Coast 
League  umpire  and  member  of 
Miracle  Mile  Post  No.  693, 
American  Legion,  today  was 
named  chairman  of  the  First 
Annual  Baseball  Umpires'  Tes- 
timonial dinner  to  be  sponsored 
by  the  Miracle  Mile  Po.st  693. 
Other  members  of  committee 
are:  Julius  G.  Levenson,  Post 
commander;  Harry  Weber,  past 
Post  commander  and  Phil  J. 
Schaeffer,  6th  Area  Department 
of  California  American  Legion 
Junior  Baseball  commissioner. 
They  announce  that  Knicker- 
bocker Hotel  has  been  selected 
for  the  event  to  be  held  on 
March  28.  and  is  open  to  the 
public.  Information  can  be  ob- 
tained by  calling  HO.  5-8335. 


East  LiL  Relays  To  Host  7 
Conference  College  Teams 


YNCA  Benefit  Golf  Tourney 
Slated  for  Rio  Hondo  Club 


BEAUTIFUL 

GALIENTE 

IN  OLD  MEXICO 

PRESENT  EVERY 

SATURDAY  AND  SUNDAY 

RAIN  or  SHINE 

THOIIOUGHBRIO 
HOMI  IIACme 


10 
11 


RACES  ON 
SATLRDAY 

RACES  ON 
SUNDAY 


10 
11 


DAILY  DOUBLE  AND 
QUINELLA 

BOOKS  AND  MUTUELS 

Th*  Fabulous  5-10  Betting 
Evory  Sunday 

-  POST  TIME  - 
SATURDAY  1:00  P.M. 
SUNDAY   12   NOON 

FANTASTIC   RETURNS 
For  Your  Wager 

Two  Dollars  or  More 

Foreign  Book  Open  Daily 
On  All  Major  Tracks 

GREYHOUND  RACING 
RESUMES  IN  SPRING 


JOHN  S.  ALESSiO 


Ixacuthr*    Diractor 


Western  golfers  were  polish- 
ing up  their  putts  and  drives 
this  week  as  final  plans  were 
whipped  into  shape  for  the 
mammoth  8th  Annual  Mid- 
Winter  YMCA  Benefit  Golf 
Tournament. 

Tee  and  green  devotees  from 
the  smart  set  speculated 
whether  defending  Men's  and 
Women's  champions  Al  Mc- 
Daniel  and  Eoline  Thornton 
would  retain  their  thrones  in 
the  face  of  stiff  competition 
promised  at  this  years  golf 
classic  scheduled  for  Friday, 
March  29,  1957  at  Rio  Hondo 
Country  Club. 

The  high  caliber  of  competi- 
tion is  evidenced  in  that  Mc- 
Daniel  held  the  Pasadena  City 
championship  title  for  1956  and 
Miss  Thornton  has  just  re- 
turned from  Miami,  Florida 
with  the  women's  North -South 
championship  award  in  her 
bag. 


Mar.shall  announced  that  entry 
blanks  would  be  in  the  mail 
this  week  and  should  be  re- 
turned to  the  28th  Street  YWCA, 
1006  East  28th  Street.  Los  An- 
geles 11,  by  March  24th. 


PBEP  GRID  STAB 
GBABS  SPOTUGHT 

GRAMBLING,  La.  —  Football 
practice  got  underway  at 
Grambling  College  Tuesday 
with  a  dozen  ex -prep  and 
junior  college  stars  determined 
to  prove  that  their  reputations 
weren't  made  on  paper. 

Railbirds  centered  most  of 
their  attention  on  Don  Stephen- 
son, a  220-pound  six  foot -three 
halfback  who  earned  his  head- 
lines against  enraged  opposi- 
tion. 

Don  scored  26  touchdowns 
last  fall  for  E.  J.  Campbell  High 
in  Nacogdoches,  Texas  and  re- 
ceived scholarship  offers  from 
11  colleges  and  universities. 

He  punts,  passes,  blocks,  runs 
and  tackles  with  frightening 
fury  and  has  a  good  classroom 
and  football  head. 

.Don  was  pigeon-holed  for  of- 
fensive help  next  fall  before  all 
of  the  coaches  had  an  oppor- 
tunity to  see  him  perform  in 
.scrimmage  with  the  squad. 


MY 

COUGH 

IS 

GONE! 


How  About  Yours? 

For  fast  relief  for  coughs  followior  eolds  or 
fin  do  as  I  did.  Take  Creomolsion  Cough  Syrnp 
at  once.  Creomulsion  itops  the  tickle,  sootiie* 
irritation  and  helps  yon  to  breathe  more  freely. 
And  all  without  any  bad  after  effeeta.  For 
quick  eougrh  comfort  get — 

CREOMULSION 

FOR  eOUGHS,  CHiST  CMM,  ACUTi  UONCHITK 


INfOHMMION  ON 


CNN  34  HOUU 


BAIL    BONDS    FREE 

I  CELES  KING  III  BAIL  BOND  AGENCY' 
909  East  6th  Street  •  MU.  5500 


Rams  Film 
Available 

The  Los  Angeles  Rams  1956 
football  highlight  film  is  now 
available  for  showing,  club  of- 
ficials announced  today. 

The  26  minute  narrated 
movie  covering  the  outstanding 
plays  in  six  of  last  sea.son's 
games  is  designed  to  provide 
program  entertainment  for 
high  school  meetings,  .service 
clubs,  church  groups  and  sim- 
ilar organizations. 

Requests  for  the  film  should 
be  made  by  calling  the  Ram 
office  at  WE  3-8291. 


It's  East  L.A.  Relay  time 
again  at  the  big  Huskie  stadi- 
um as  the  ELAJC  track  team 
will  host  seven  other  Metropoli- 
tan Conference  colleges  in  this 
big  affair  Friday,  March  15,  at 
1  p.m. 

San  Diego,  Bakersfield,  Santa 
Monica,  Long  Beach,  El  Cam- 
ino,  Valley,  and  Harbor  have 
entered  a  full  contingent  of 
track  and  field  athletes  for  Fri- 
day's classic. 

Based  on  their  showings  In 
the  AAU  Relays  last  Saturday, 
the  home  ELAJC  Huskies  and 
the  Harbor  Seahawks  look  like 
favorites.  However,  Bakersfield, 
San  Diego,  and  El  Camino  were 
not  entered  last  week  and  are 
unknown  quantities.  Also  many 
AAU  events  were  cancelled. 
Had  they  been  held  it  is  highly 
probable  that  Lonp  Beach,  San- 
ta Monica  and  Valley  would 
have  scored  much  better. 

Friday's  field  events  are 
scored  by  totalling  the  indivi- 
dual marks  of  a  threte  man 
team.  This  of  course  pays  off 
on  overall  depth  rather  than  in- 


dividual brilliance. 

However,  some  of  the  indivi- 
dual stars  entered  include: 
Broad  jumpers  Bob  Cook  (Har- 
bor), John  Callaway  (Long 
Beach),  and  Charles  Perry 
(ELA);  Pole  vaulters  Duane 
Telliano  (ELA>,  Mike  Welling- 
ton (Santa'  Monica)  and  Curt 
Chappell  (Harbor)  who  also 
high  jumps;  HiRh  jumper 
Frank  Washington  (ELA):  Shot 
put  and  discus  ace  Norm  Volen 
(ELA);  Valley  .sprinter  Kenny 
Dennis;  and  Santa  Monica 
miler  Ernie  Strauss. 

Admission  is  free  for  three 
hours  of  top  J.C.  track  and  field 
competition. 


Val  Verde 
Park  Plans 
Big  Festival 

The  Val  Verde  Park  Cham- 
ber of  Commerce  is  making 
plans  for  its  fifth  annual 
Green  Valley  Festival,  Parade 
and  Coronation  Ball  on  June 
8  and  16.  All  who  wish  to  en- 
ter floats,  riding  group.s,  mo- 
torcycle units,  color  guards, 
marching  units,  drill  teams, 
majorettes,  pompom  groups, 
etc.,  can  apply  for  entry 
blanks  now. 

The  Chamber  is  asking  that 
girls  attending  junior  or  sen- 
ior high  schools,  ages  1.5  to  19. 
interested  in  vying  for  the 
honor  of  being  queen  and 
reigning  over  the  parade,  con- 
tact Mrs.  Marguerite  Carr. 
president,  at  the  headquarters 
of  the  Val  Verde  Park  Cham- 
ber of  Commerce,  Route  .3, 
Box  104-W,  •  Saugus,  or  Mrs. 
Ada  Polk,  chairman  of  the 
parade  committee,  at  3764  S. 
La  Salle  avenue.    ' 


Harness  Racing 
Gets  Underway 

The  first  full  week  of  racing 
durin.T  the  27-day  Western  Har- 
ness Racing  Association  meet- 
ing gets  underway  at  Santa 
Anita  this  week  with  Raring 
Secretary  Harry  Hatch  carding 
an  excellent  five-day  program. 


ORTIZ.  FILIPPO 
TO  TRY  AGAIN 

Carlos  Ortiz  and  Lou  Filippo 
have  agreed  to  terms  for  a  re- 
match of  their  controversial 
March  2  no  decision  bout  at 
Hollywood  Legion  Stadium. 
Legion  Matchmaker  Jack  Leon- 
ard made  the  announcement 
yesterday  that  Ortiz  and  Filip- 
po will  meet  in  a  nonteJevised 
10-rounder  Tuesday  night, 
April  9. 


DEL6AD0  VS.  PARRA 

Vince  Delgado  wants  a  crack 
at  new  California  feather- 
weight champion  Jose  Cotero — 
providing  he  hurdles  Ernesto 
Parra  of  Mexico  City  in  Satur- 
day night's  Holl>'wood  Legion 
Stadium  main  event. 

Delgado  turned  in  one  of  his 
best  performances  to  date  last 
month  when  he  held  favored 
Larry  Bataan  to  a  draw.  The 
22-year-oid  ex-GI  has  won  11 
out  of  14  starts. 


Carver  Jr. 
High  PTA 
Holds  Meet 

The  Carver  Jr.  High  PTA  held 
a  meeting  observing  Founders 
Day  recently  in  the  school 
library  with  the  president, 
Mr.'i.  John  Smith  presiding.  Re- 
ports were  made  by  Mmes. 
William  Walton,  Eddie  Mat- 
thews, C,  J.  Thompson,  and 
Helen  Bailey. 

Mrs.  William  King,  Program 
Chairman,  spoke  on  Founders 
Day.  William  Bailey  led 
group  singing. 

Ten  past  presidents  were 
honored:  Dr.  Eva  W.  Young, 
and  Mmes.  Margaret  Rake- 
straw,  Geneva  Wallace,  Matil- 
da Elam.  Thelma  Wilson, 
Myra  White,  Carl  Foreman, 
William  Walton.  Orie  Boone, 
and  Charles  Reed. 

Mrs.  Leroy  Lee,  life  mem- 
bership chairman,  presented  a 
life  membership  pin  to  Mr. 
William  Bailey,  men's  mem- 
bership chairman.  Principal 
Austin  Dixon,  welcomed  par- 
ents and  friends  and  spoke 
of  improvements  being  made 
at  Carver. 


Cage  Playoff 

Fontana  played  Riverside  in 
the  final  basketball  playoff  at 
the  Palm  Springs  high  school's 

gym. 


A**.  H  JO  iiK.  tK 


ACTION... 

£xcrtr>iQ,. 


Q  SINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17.50 


Marcclliis  Reed  .  .  .'  -' 

SWANK  SHOP  CLEANERS 

FREE,  fAJT  PICK-UP  AND  DEIIVERY  t 
One  Day  Service  ^ 

Double  Breasted  Coats  Singlelzed  $17.50 

All  Work  Guaranteod 

4963  W.  ADAHS  •  RE.  2-9974 


ISINGLE  BREASTED  SUITS  $17.50  Co 


"FA$TE$T  $ELLING  BUICK  DEALER  IN  $OUTHERN  CALIFORNIA 

COLONIAL  BUICK 

Offers  a  Brand  New  1957  Buicic  2-Door  for 


199  DOWN  •  16 


PER  WEEK 


if  $AVE  HUNDRED$  ON  YOUR  TRADE-IN 
if  GREATE$T  $TOCK  TO  CHOO$E  FROM 
if  36  MONTH$  OF  EA$Y  FINANCING 
if  FAIR  &  FAMOU$  G.M.A.C.  RATES 
^FABULOUS  $ERViCE  DEPARTMENT 


Drive  North  to  Los   Felix  Blvd. 

■  East  on  Los  Felix  to  Glendale  Ave. . .  .1 
CThen  North  to  COLONIAL  BUICK  otj 
1144  So.  Glendale  Ave.  GlAidale. 


FREE  APPRAISAL 


CALL 'COUNT' CARTER  CH«    5-6611 


COLONIAL  BUICK 


144  So.  Glendale  Ave. 

IN  GLENDALE 


Bakersfield 
Host  Golfers 

Twenty-five  members  of  the 
Cosmopjolitan  Golf  Club  ac- 
cepted invitation  to  play  at  the 
Kern  River  Country  Club  in 
Bakersfield  last  Sunday.  The 
Bakersfjeld  Club  arranged  a 
full  day  of  golf  for  the  visitors 
and  dinner  at  the  Elks  Hall 
followir^g  the  rounds. 

Members  arranging  the  pro- 
gram were:  Bill  Wilkerson, 
Leon  McKenzie,  Lemmie.Boyd 
and  L.  J.  Rice. 

Cosm(^politans  an.swering  the 
invitation  were  Gilbert  Jones, 
Leroy  Glay,  Williams  Anderson, 
Alonzo  j  B.  Pemberton,  Frank 
D.  Adailns,  John  Dailey,  Law- 
rence  Jones.  Clyde  Blake,  Robert 
Crawford,  Leroy  Jennings,  J. 
Cullen  Fentress,  Lionel  Kelly, 
Theron  Kirk,  Theop  Smith,  Al- 
bert Swain,  Alex  Peoples,  Andy 
Howardj  Chester  Carson,  Early 
Jones,  Lorimer  Matthews,  Dr. 
Joe  Howard  and  Elliott  Jenkins. 


LINCOLN  TBACK 
TEfflV  WORKOUT 

J£FFERSON  CITY,  Mo.  —  The 
Lincoln  University  track  team 
began  work  this  week  in  prep- 
aration W  their  1957  track  sea- 
son. wl|ich  opens  Saturday, 
March  23,  with  a  track  contest 
at  Little  Rock,  Arkansas,  with 
the  Philander  Smith  Relays  . 

Four  outstanding  meets  are 
on  the  Tigers  schedule  this  sea- 
son. Thejy  are  the  Oklahoma  A. 
ai^  M.  Relays  at  Stillwater, 
Okla.,  oin  March  30:  the  Em- 
poria State  Relays  at  Emporia. 
Kansas,  on  April  12  and  13;  the 
Kansas  University  Relays  at 
Lawrence,  Kans.  on  April  19 
and  20;  and  the  Drake  Relays 
at  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  on  April 
26  and  'A7. 


8-The  California   gagle Thurscfay,  March   U,  195^         ij 


RACING 


0«erg«  lUmMy 


BEAUTIFUL  GALIENTE 
OLD  MEXICO:  Albert  Work- 
man Sr.,  45,  of  Los  Angeles  won 
the  $40,841.40  first-place  pool 
of  the  Caliente  5-10  handicap- 
ping contest  last  Sunday  to  be- 
come the  second  highest  single 
winner  since  the  race  track  in- 
troduced the  5-10  last  April. 
Horses  to  Watch  at  Caliente 

BIG  FRANK— Look  out  for  this  one. 


TM    MOHEVA— A    new   comer   u-ith    class 

tab. 
SPEED   FRANK— A   real   goodie. 
HALREN — Left  al  post   last   out   go 

bark. 
MY  JEZ — Now  ready  for  best   pffon. 
TIGER    JAY— Plentv  earlv    speed. 
COFFEE  HOUR— Just  beaten  O.   K. 

next   ou'i.. 

OLD    MIU Will    best    the    t^'si. 

PK-RSISTANT    PAT— Mv    spert'al. 
KOOL    KID — Go   back    to    tdis    one 

Keep  this  column  for  future 
reference.  It  only  appears  in 
the  California  Eagle. 


ORIOLES  AND  CHI-CUBS 
IN  BENEFIT  AT  WRIGLEY 


Big  League  baseball  moves 
to  Wrigley  Field  in  Los  An- 
geles Friday  night  ahead  of 
schedule  in  the  name  of  Sweet 
Charity, 

The  Baltimore  Orioles  and 
the  Chicago  Cubs  will  play  a 
benefit  for  the  John  Tracy 
clinic,  specialists  in  training 
pre-school  deaf  and  hard-of- 
hearing  children  and  their 
parents  in  speech  and  lip- 
reading.       I 

From  the  prooeeds,  scores  of 
similarly  handicapped  young- 
sters will  be  provided  the 
means  of  learning  to  talk  and 
to  "hear"  by  watching  lip 
movements. 

Reese  Taylor,  oil  executive,  is 
general  chairman  of  the  com- 
mittee staging  the  charity 
event.  Tickets  may  be  secured 
at  the  Clinic,  806  W.  Adams 
Blvd.,  Wrigley  Field  Boxoffice, 
and  all  Broadway  Department 
Stores  for  $2.50  each. 

Honorary  mascots  for  the 
game  include  little  Gale  Dol- 
ing, 4'i,  of  13945  Lanark  St., 
Van  Nuys,  and  12-year-old 
Johnny  Goul,  11312  Dempsey 
Ave.,  Granada  Hills.  Gale  cur- 
rently is  a  student  at  the  CJjnic, 
and  Johnny  is  a  graduate,  both 


now    leading    almost    normal 
lives  despite  their  handicap  of 

deafness. 

Numerous  film  stars,  TV 
celebrities,  and  other  perform- 
ers  are  slated  to  provide  pre* 
gjime  entertainment. 


TENNIS  ENTBIES 
BMiE  ACCEPTED 

Doubles  entries  in  the 
seventh  annual  Los  Angeles 
Spring  Tennis  Tournament  for 
Class  "B"  and  Class  "C  lob- 
and -smash  enthusiasts  must  be 
filed  by  5  p.m.  next  Monday 
(March  18)  it  was  reported  yes- 
terday by  the  co-sponsors  of  the 
classic,  the  City  Recreation  and 
Park  Department  and  the  Los 
Angeles  Municipal  Tennis  As- 
sociation. 

Gus  Bowan,  president  of  the 
Tennis  Association  arid  official 
referee  for  the  tournament,  an- 
nounced that  the  doubles  entry 
fee  is  S4  per  team,  and  that 
the  matches  will  start  Satur- 
day-Sunday, March  16-17,  and 
continue  each'  Saturday  and 
Sunday  thereafter  until  the  top 
player  in  each  of  the  five 
events  is  determined. 


ADLONG  MARKET  COUPON  SALE! 

1556  W.  Adams  at  Budlong— Thurs.,  Fri.,  Sat.,  Sun. 

IRIS  -  SMART  &  FINAL  -  MAXWELL  HOUSE  -  M.  J.  B. 
CHASE  &  SANBORN  -  HILLS  BROTHERS  -  FOLGER'S 


COFFEE  89 


c 


LB.  CAN 


Cmfomtr  Mutt  Um  CavpMi   from  AdIanJ  Mkt.   Adv.  en   Pat*  H"' 


For  quality 

without 
question 


Fi^t  requirement  when  you  buy  food  and 


drin]£ 


can 


"Coke" 


for  your  family  it  quality:  quality  yon 
trust . . .  quality  without  question.  That's 
why  you — and  careful  shoppers  like  yourself— 
invainably  bring  home  cartons  of  Goca-Ck>Ia. 
F|or  seventy  years,  Coke  has  been  quality 
leaded  in  the  beverage  industry.  It  mmnts  your 
confidence,  and  that  of  your  family. 


COCA-COLA  BOTTLING  COMPANY  OF  LOS  ANGELES 


is  a  registered   trademark. 


e  I9M.  THE  COCA-COLA  COMMMT 


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Rf:ADY  FOR  ISTLR-FRA  r  SERIES—Omegas'  eye-catching  cheer  leaders 
practice  under  the  tvntrhful  eye  nf  dapper  L.  J.  Jordan,  president  of  the  Omega 
fraternity,  as  the  opening  games  of  the\1957  basketball  scries  near.  Standing  from 


\i 


left.  Jordan,  Carohn  Jordan,  }\atalic  Collins,  Joan  iirccne,  Patricia  Reris  and 
Mildred  Rand.  The  Onier/as  mil  meet  the  Siginas  in  the  icries  opener  Satur-^ 
day,  March  16. — (Adams). 

Urban  League  Guild  Sets 
Homemaking  Style  Shovy 


A  special  program  featuring 
modem  dress  and  homemak- 
ing tips  will  be  presented  by 
the  Urban  League  Guild  Fri- 
day, March  15.  Guild  presi- 
dent, Mrs.  Lola  L.  Beavers 
announced  last  week. 


GUILD — Lol/t  L.  Bem'frs, 

president  of  thr  Urban  Lea- 
gue Guild,  invites  the  public 
to  attend  the  Guild's  home' 
making  program. 


The  program,  open  to  the 
general  public  without  admis- 
sion charge,  is  scheduled  to 
begin  at  8  p.m.  in  the  audi- 
torium of  the  Golden  State 
Insurance  Co.,  1999  W.  Adams 
blvri.  The  title  of  the  program 
is  "Styled  for  Modern  Living." 

Cooking  and  clothes  drv'ing 
demonstrations  are  planned. 
In  the  fashion  line,  the  latest 
styles  and  fabrics  now  on  the 
market  will  be  shown  by 
"Nadine   Originals." 

M  a  r  g  o  Macloskey.  Home 
Economist  for  the  Southern 
California  Gas  Co.,  will  round 
out  the  program  of  modern 
living  techniques  with  a 
demonstration  -  of  up-to-date 
methods  for  taking  the 
drudgery  out  of  meal  plan- 
ning  and   homemaking. 

As  an  added  attraction,  Mrs. 
Reaver  announced  that  three 
local  appliance  dealers,  Gil- 
bar  Sales  Co..  Sav-Way  Tele- 
vision and  Appliances  and 
Simon's  Washer  Shop  and 
Appliances,  are  furnishing 
door  prizes  for  the  event. 


Thursday 


Exd 
Se 


ri 


Open 

attention  will  be 
1  the  colorful  and 
inter-fraternity    bas- 


The 
games 
weeks, 
pit   the 
Sigmas 


m/, 

CLUBS 


FASHIONS 


March    14,    1957 


The   California   Eagle— 9 


iting 
es 


i^ianta    f^^ointers 


To 

Society' 
focused  ( 
exciting 

ketball  series  which  gets  un- 
der\*ay  at  the  spacious  Jef- 
ferson hij;h  school  gym,  41st 
and  Hooper  streets,  on  Satur- 
day, Mar(h  16. 

series    consists    of    12 

ard    will    rim    for   six 

The   first   games   will 

Cmegas    against   the 

1  n  d     the     Kappas 

against  tlie  Alphas. 

The  annual  games  have  be- 
come a  cla.ssic  and  one  of  the 
spring  seison's  most  attrac- 
tive social  events. 

The  Kappa's  draw  support 
from  the  huge  Silhouettes  or- 
ganization, which  is  .sort  of 
an  auxiliarj'  to  the  fraternity 
and  often  assists  the  group 
in  its  activities.  The  Omegas 
look  forward  to  support  from 
the  Delta;;,  who  provide  them 
with  a  rousing  female  cheer- 
ing section. 

Alpha  TVives  are  always  in 
there  for  the  Alpha  team  and 
the  Sigmas  are  hoping  to  in- 
terest the  Sigma  Gamma  Rho, 
Zetas,  Lainda  Phi  Lamda  and 
AKA's  foi    bench  support. 

'Fratenizing"  is  this  year's 
series  thi?me  and  the  Inter- 
Council  (Committee  members 
are  urging  new-comers  to  the 
city  and  lormer  fraternity  and 
sorority  members  to  plan  to 
attend  th  e  seijies  and  renew 
old   c  a  m  p  u  Sj  acquaintances. 

Within  the  Iframe-v^ork  ol 
this  year's  series  games,  spe- 
cial betH'een-the-games  ac- 
tivities will  be  arranged.  It  is 
hoped  that  some  of  the  series 
players  that  staged  the  first 
inter-frat  games  in  the  old 
Jefferson  high-school  gym 
more  than  twenty-five  years 
ago  will  l)e  on  hand. 

Yeah,  the  chants  of  "our 
team  is  red  hot"  will  be  heard 
come  Saturday  night,  so  bring 
out  that  tattered  old  college 
rooter's  cap  and  join  the 
weekly  basketball  fun. 

The  1957  basketball  sched- 
ule is  as  follows: 

SATCRD.W.    MARCH   16 
Omega    vs   Sigma 
Kappa  V9  Alpha 

SATURDAY.    MARCH  23 
Alpha   vs    Sigma 
\  Kappa  vs   Omega  ' 

sattIrday.  march  a? 


a    year  s 
California 


kuTntrodt 


{rodtdction 


Onopa    \'s    .Mplia 
appa    vs  Sigma 
SAXPRDAV.    APRIL  6 
gma  vs   Omega 
Alpha   vs   Kappa 
SATURDAY,  APRIL  IS 
Sigma  vs   Alpha 
Kippa  vs  Omega 
SATWRDAY.  APRIL  21 
Sigma   v«   Alpha 
Omega    vs    Alpha 


SET  SHOT — Ernie  Bond,  stellar  player  of  this  year's  Sigma 
fraternity's  basketball  team,  and  pretty  Parmela  Brown  both 
agreed  that  this  year's  team  uill  be  hard  to  beat  and  the  Sigma 
cheer  leaders  nnll  be  the  snappiest  ever. —  CAdarns). 


Annual  Alpha  Easter  Show 
Slated  For  Bilttnore  Bowl 

April    21,    from 


A  club'$  best  investment  Is 


subscription    to 
Eagle  Cost— $4. 


the 


Fabulous  Calypso  music  and 
the  glamorous  movie  star, 
Rita  Moreno,  will  be  featured 
at  the  Alpha's  annual  Easter 
scholarship  extravaganza  in 
the   beautiful   Biltmore   Bowl 


SHAPIXG  UP — I' he  Kappa  fraternity,  uhic  h  usually  boasts  one  of  the  firtest  crops  of  cheer 
leaders,  uill  ac/ain  have  ns  hivcly  and  shapely  a  group  as  ever.  Pictured,  seated  from  left, 
Jacqueline  Cochran.  Roberta  U' right  and  Connie  Marcee.  Standing  is  Dallas  Perkins,  one  of 
the  team's  star  players,  and  Beverly  Miller.  Lusty  lungs  also  play  an  important  role  in  the 
basketball  series. — f  Adams). 


Thrifty  Sixteen 
Crown  Queen 


■  Mrs.  Georgia  King  was  hon- 
ored by  the  Thrifty  Sixteen 
Social  and  Charity  Club  last 
week.  A  large  gathering  came 
to  pay  homage  to  her  as  she 
was  crowned  Miss  Thrifty 
Sixteen  For  1956. 

Mrs.  King  and  her  co-work- 
ers were  victorious  in  a  con- 
test the  club  is  conducting 
among  its  membership  to 
raise  funds  to  pay  for  a  life 
membership  in  tlie  NAACP. 

The  coronation  ceremonies 
were  held  at  the  Phyllis 
Wheatley  Home  on  S.  Harvard 


boulevard.  Ira  Bounds,  who  is 
well  known  in  religious  cir- 
cles,  crowned   the  queen. 

Mrs.  Gertrude  Booze  in- 
stalled the  officers  for  1957. 
The  losing  team  in  the  con- 
test served  the  refreshments 
for  the  evening. 


Buffalo  Vistor 

Attractive  Francis  Bivans, 
well  known  Buffalo,  New  York 
business-woman,  is  visiting 
the  west  coast  ana  is  the 
house  guest  of  popular  Ollie 
Browning,  owner  of  the  Liquor 
Spot  on  Crenshaw  blvd. 

The  visitor  is  making  the 
rounds  of  social  events  and 
will  remain  in  the  city  for 
several  weeks. 


Plan  Reception 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  T.  Bats  of 
Palm  Springs  are  planning  a 
lavish  wedding  reception  for 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  Thomas,  who 
will  be  married  on  Sunday, 
March  17. 


Hear  the  "King" 

Mrs.  L.  Johnson  and  Mrs.' 
K.  McWilliams  enjoyed  the 
social  rounds  of  Palm  Springs 
last  Sunday.  The  highlight  of 
their  visit  was  dinner  and 
cocktails  in  the  Chi  Chi  Club, 
where  Nat  Cole  is  currently 
appearing. 


on    Sunday, 
5  to  10  p.m. 

Pepe  Fernandez  and  his 
.sensational  Afro-Cuban  combo 
plus  a  caist  of  twenty,  includ- 
ing beautiful  tropical  dancing 
girls; ;  will  present  a  dazriftig 
show  stressing  Calypso  and 
Cha  CHa  Cha  music. 

Th^  Mwengue  featuring  the 
Dryden  School  of  Dance  stu- 
dents, the  Cha  Cha  Cha  in 
-swingtime  by  Jeni  Le  Gon's 
dancers  and  Bobby  Leigos 
and  his  Haitians  will  be  high- 
lights. 

Lovely  Rita  Morendo,  one 
of  20th  Century  Fox's  featured 
stars,  will  be  presented  Al- 
pha Phi  .Alpha's  annual  Inter- 
cultural  Award  for  1957. 

Proceeds  will  go  to  Alpha's 
scholarship  fund.  For  reserva- 
tions phone  REpublic  2-3688 
or  REpublic  1-S3S8. 


COOL  OPERATORS— The  Emissaries  debut  into  South- 
land's young  society  toof:  place  at  the  stvank  Pacific  Town 
Club  in  an  introductory  dance  Friday  night.  The  gay  affair 
attracted  a  record  number  of  young  people  and  a  dcUg'htful 
evening  was  enjoyed.  The  club,  whose  age  limit  is  from  17 


to  19,  will  devote  its  activities  to  social  and  charity  work. 
Members  are  from  left,  Divight  Hawkins,  Ronnie  Berry  man, 
vice-president;  Jf  alter  Davis,  Jr.,  president;  Gordon  Bell, 
secretary  •  Larry  Montieth,  sergeani-at-arms;  Mike  Gray, 
Ronnie  Bancom  and  Jlvin  Claiborne^  treasurer — (Adams). 


mmm 


We  offer  a  "toastess"  to  the 
host  and  hostess  with  the 
mostess  this  week  —  none 
other  than  Oner  and  Addie 
Barker,  who  invited  a  few 
friends  in  to  their  lovely  West 
25th  street  home  Sunday  for 
their  sister  Joan's  birthday 
celebration. 

Twas  SO  much  fun — good 
food,  merry  and  gay  guests, 
beautiful  music,  and  those 
artful  touches  of  yellow  and 
green  here  n'  there  just 
seemed  to  invite  guests  to  re- 
lax— and  this  thev  did. 

WHO^WHAT— WBT       -  . 

Nellie  Lutcher  is  appearing 
at   the   Keyboard   in   Beverly 
(Continued  on  Page  14) 


■■■■■ 


■■■■■■■■■MM 


r 


Deltas  Await  Philharmonic  Concer 


ANTHERIA^  CLUB — Members  of  the  Anthenan  Club 
flashmi  their  best  Sunday  smiles  last  Sunday  afternoon  in 
front  of  the  plush  Tonn-  Tavern  ivhere  they  held  forth  with 
a  gay  cocktail  party  in  appreciation  of  their  many  wonderful 
friends.  The  affair  drew  one  of  the  largest  gatherings  of  the 
year.  Pictured,  first  row  front,  from  left,  Glendean  Ballard, 


Rena  Dunn  and  Gloria  Si^nnujn  Second  row,  June  IFil- 
lianis.  Christine  Brown,  linogcnc  It  inston,  Margaret  Cock- 
ran,  Florena  Towles,  Sonny  Cnss.  whose  hand  provided  the 
iiuisir:  Taye  tiotttninn,  Estelle  Shefrwood  (club's  advisor). 
President  Ruth  Iloggett  and  Geraldme  Nelson. — (Adams)* 


JXSr.UJ.JTlO):  party— The  Hilliuppirs  Charity 
Guild  ht  Id  its  inskilldlion  party  l<\st  Saturday  in  the  home 
of  f^cs.ue  Baskervilh'.  Seated  on  flohr  from  left:  Alma  Smith 
find  Dons  .irmstrrku/.  Second  row'!  Lbzaheth  Green,  Hilde- 


garde  Bostic,  Billie  Sunn,  Ruby  Jones  and  Lena  Barnes. 
Standing:  Joe  Holmes,  Lessie  Bnskcrville,  I'clma  Plummer 
and  Jessie  Mae  Beavers,  installing  officer. 


10— The   California    Eagle 


Thursday,    March    14,    1957 


Leontyne  Price,  brilliant  soprano. 

Soprano  To  Sing 


Leontyne  Price,  the  brilliant 
yountj  soprano,  will  he  pres- 
ented in  rerital  here  hy  Delta 
Sigma  Theta  Sorority  on 
Marrh  23.  at  the  Philharmonic 
Auiiitorium. 

Two  years  after  finishing 
the  advanced  course  at  the 
Juilliard  School  of  Music  in 
New  York.  Miss  Price  was 
a  star  on  Broadway.  Kow, 
less  than  throe  years  later 
she  is  an  international  .star 
of  the  concert,  opera,  and 
radio  and  television  fields. 
B