Skip to main content

Full text of "Chicago Daily Tribune 1937-07-07: Vol 96 Iss 161"

See other formats


cwclananted: Dd. S, Taly 6.—[Spe- 
cial.J—The long awaited senate fight 
on President Roosevelt's - proposal. to 
pack the Supreme court got under 
way suddenly and in earnest today, 
with a:wartiing from Majority Leader 
Joseph T. Robinson that:night sessions 
would be held if the opposition lead- 


Fans. 

In calli: tip abigieaers’ packing biN, 
Robinson announced that it was his 
intention to keep it before the sen- 
ate until final disposition should be 
made of it and that not even.a mat- 
ter of such - import as the All-Star 


nature of a subst! 

vides . for temporary  in- 
creates in the size of court by not: 
more justice a year. on. the 
basis: of t members more than 
75 years of age who refuse to retire. 
# This is . ‘tlie. Hatch-Legah compro- 
~ ‘mise adopted by the’ ‘administration 
when the President’s original bill, 
obviously’ dead; was abandoned The. 


administration Jeaders declare they| 


ite, in order to ) 


beating 1po a filibuster, forthe sen- 
. mains in the same levislative 


3 when! it recessés, and can ‘do so 
j _—— ledinn is a rule which 


| $650,000. 


of Inland Steel hearing. 


tute! in safety drive. 


|ica’s ‘cup. 


| season: Sépt. 5. 


N. 


|’ Experiiental farms diary. 


‘women dead; eight hurt. 


-the jobs. 


esis) diel bs 


Serap Book:] 
Wednesday, 
July 7, 1937, , 


FOREIGN. 

Plan to search islands and reefs. in 
Pacific near Phoenix Islands for 
Amelia Earhart. Pagel. 
. American Clipper and British fly- 
Ing boat each cross Atlantic in sur- 
vey of new route. Page 1, 

.Germans angered by Ambassador 
Bingham’s speech on European dic- 
tators. | Pagel. 

_Britain..mobilizes troops in Pales- 
tine to prevent riots as new partition 
plan is announced. ' Page 2. 

France may abandon border watch 
for arms | unless Italy and Germany 
rejoin naval patrol of Spain. . Page3. 

Madrid troops launch drive west of 


| city: drive rebels-from long held posi- 


tions. © Page 8. 


WASHINGTON. 

Senator Robinson opens fight to 
pack court through “compromise” 
amendment. ’ Pagel. 

Democrats undaunted: by disclosure 
‘of law evasion-in book sale for cam 
paign funds. ‘ ps Page 4. 

' Roosevelt promises: “layman’s bal- 
anced budget ” this year. Page 4. 

DOMESTIC. 

Teacher, denying cocktail rumor, 
won't quit; demands board “prove 
1 Page 1. 

Gov. Horner signs 41 bills; vetoes 
eight; permits two others to become 
law. Page 9. 

Indiana odd jobs ‘man inherits 
: Page 11. 

Shawneetown prepares to move to 
higher ground. Page 14. 

LABOR DISPUTES. 

Ohio grand jury indicts two hun- 

dred for rioting as steel plants re- 


ildida Saedind to ono: inn trad 
jury as result of fight at Ford plant 


jas labor board opens hearings under 


Wagner act. Page 7. 
Labor board examiner ordered to 
permit official reporter to include 
“off the record testimony” in record 
Page 8. 
LOCAL. 
Robber-rapist strikes second time in 
six days; stabs ‘girl. Page 1. 
Fireworks venders fined: and jailed 
Page 5. 
,Bus.collides head-on with auto; two 
Page 9. 
‘How ‘courageous Chicagoans keep. 


off. relief. rolls; use resourcefulness in 
finding jobs. 


Page 18. 
~ 1937 graduates with personality get 
Page 15. 
SPORTS. 
Goinez faces J. Dean in All-Star 
game today. - Page 21. 
‘De}iberator makes best.time of Ar- 
lington meeting. 
Good news, swimmers! 
entry limit to Monday. | 
Ranger is picked to defend Amer- 
Page 21. 
National pro football league to open 
, Page 22. 
Horton Smith’s 138 Sasi British 
open golf. Page 23. 
Guldahl to get Radix trophy at Chi- 
| C@go open. Page 28. 
New York commission approves 
Louis-Farr bout. Page 238. 
EDITORIALS. 
Proposed Budget Change; Achilles 
‘at Uvalde; As Mr. Farley_Delivers the 
Mails; A‘Good Appointment. Page 10. 
' FEATURES. 
Cones puzzle. 
Deaths and obituaries. 
‘Music review. Page 17. 
News of society. _ naieyye mle 13: 
Radio news and:programs. Page 19. 
Page 28. 
.. FINANCE, COMMERCE. 
‘« Prance* ‘cuts: rediscount rate we ease 


Page 4. 
Page 14. 
Page 16. 


4 gt tm 


Insulting. 


BY SIGRID SCHULTZ. 

‘. §Chieato Tribune Press Service.] 
BERLIN, July -6.—Robert Worth 
Bingham, the United States ambas- 
esnine SAGOF tO London, 


. 
‘es New York City 
and Cardinal 
George. Mundel- 
ein of Chicago as 
the butt of Nazi 
anger. The am- 
bassador. Was : as- 
sailed because in 
an independence 
day speech in 
London he said 
the United States 
had been com- 
pelled to join 
Great Britain: in 
rearmament by dictator countries in 
Europe. 
The Nazis charged that Bingham 
insulted Germany and Italy and dis- 


played “arrogance and ignorance,” as 
the 


Robert Worth 
Bingham. 


oh ar Soave Nazi ‘newspaper, 


areiet Plea Stirs Wrath. 

The newspaper, angered at Bing- 
ham’s plea‘'that democracies defend 
‘themselves against despots, said the 
Nazis are not seeking to spread their 
principles abroad. 

“If there is any talk of defense, 
then we should speak of defense 
against the arrogant and teacher-like 
attitude of the defenders of western 
ideals,” it added. 

[Bingham told the American soci- 
ety in London that “if there is no ar- 
gument but the argument of force 
then we must fall back on that. My 
hope is that there must be in these 
despotisms at least some remnants of 
sanctity. There must be some who 
realize that they have imposed wpon 
the British commonwealth and the 
United States an armaments race. 

[*We did everything in our power 
to avert it, but it is a race, and the 
British and ourselves inevitably must 
win. I admit the strongest argument 
that can be made for dictatorships— 
they offer a better method of prepar- 
ing for war. But I am very sure that 
democracies provide a better way to 
finish a war.”] 

Points to Strikes in U. S. 

‘The newspaper attempted to ridi- 
cule Bingham’s statement that dem- 
ocratic nations are happier than na- 
tions with dictatorships. 

“American troops are busy control- 
ing American workers who for near- 
ly a year have been diverting them- 
selves by staging strikes, some of 
which are of the most violent kind,” 
the article concluded. 
The Deutsche Allgemei 
of Berlin said: 

“Is an American ambassador | ac- 
credited to a European capital .to 
make inflammatory speeches about 
other European peoples?. Ambassa- 
dor Bingham in London -has incited 
the so-called. democracies against the 
so-called dictatorships in an‘ absolute- 
‘be incredible manner. 

‘Defends German Policy. 
“This diplomat, who has a peaceful 
mission to fulfill, proclaims America’s 
renewed interest in. Europe,. but with 
an appeal for competitive rearma- 
ment, He asserts that ,a..‘ despot’ 


Zeitung 


‘|has forced England and America to 


rearm and that now these: two cqun- 
tries must make oertain of. winning. 


Page.25: | the race. 


_ " Any American diplomat ought. to} 


Calls London Speech . | 


he'laccused: - 
ordeal... shoul like, wigs hear- 


th Bite TM Mls 


SEE: TEE J4f: 
; Tithe 


brie t . 
Se Ss 
od r 
Ribs ee ~ hs 


A = . Logg. . 
P, 7 try ‘ “ -? ¥ <7? 
ve v<« e ~ ‘ ~ -~- = = ~ z 
"¢ ~ = ~~ eee P eR, a 
Se eed arm - bua , 
+. . 27? Te or > ee. = : . 
eet Se . me PT et 
é 3 o - ~~ — es Poe : 
_ ~ ; ‘ yy 
rt = hs Se a _ =. 
- — weer . » 
a ~ 


*y 


aa . 
” - _ -, * 
: . wasn <« 5 eos So 
—_s sad Pe eS pikes # OC ee > 
4x a <> . ~ ~ 
AR St See = > og ome t <hr wee 
ws a4 - — . - + > < 
> oe = oe 
at, 


a we 
7 Rad ; rat whe 
- RS Lae ke ee 
5 ° ~“’ . —_— a — 
wher gs Bee SX * oe ee 4 
ca ~ ay ara 
7 + = 


RD 


See 


- J 
- Ere 
water a a 
. ~ - : 
ep mt 


yo 4 
* <s = ¥ 


Dah 


a> ere ng ee een 


See Te: 


-—- 


fy 
ie & 
fe CREBELLION 


SR Pee Ne 
oo Sy g ge 
BR cee NS ee 
57. quboae ee 
> 2 


P 
Base +: 
Co 


— Me Werk hethen, 
tt im ~— oer be - “ 
He 2 eee - seareen antl 
MR es — — ~ 
—e ee ¥ —~ + nme ~ all 
“ 


te 


ry ARS: 
x ~¢ 
wel - 


a a 
- yy 
- CRAG Re OPP RENE 


P . 


~~ ~ 
ov >) 


3 

> x 
a 

hs 


6 Ye % . , 
‘ e <= “ “ 
a “ * > * ~ _— . . 
Y : ote, - 
. ~ ™ - ‘ ’ ‘ 
Aye attand ; . : Gis . ; 
. a % Pe Nn, <n ’ 
ay P ee 
« . “4 ‘ a i . . Q 
ey > : a atone Pere hs 
P ~. ee ee a eS » 
= ¢ : 
2 “ ¢ 


— 


RTI oxerescan — 
PO Ose 
oL* . 7 


_ (INDEPENDENCE 
MUST GE 


x= “ 
® oF 
— eee » 
> 
eer ma | % 
Beta sat eee 


RY Sets a 
2s 
~ >*\ 
” 


% LR 
OTL eee co 
SEO — > A 


~ ees ¥, 
°T hey 
— 
Bt tak. Si Wig 


ee - R 


~ * 
DIO 


* 


¥ - K 
ene : . pani 
- RY Lt Ys ar 
x ne -) “ 


Saas SS 


*~ 
a SS Roars 


cen ie 
f owe ey bss 


_ 
~<A 
a Xt 


2 BS Oe ES sadcaihe aed, RR 


ao 


. 
2 ree 


NotaDrink, So 
Teacher Balks 
at Being Fired 


Saugus, Mass, July 6.—[Special.J— 
Gossip of cocktail parties allegedly 
presided over by 
pretty Isabelle 
Hallin, and which 
led to her dismis- 
sal'as a teacher 
in the high 
school, has blown 
up a tempest in 
this New Eng- 
land village. The 
citizenry is split 
into two hostile, 
bickering camps. 
Today the 
blonde Miss Hal- 
lin irfdicated that 
the school board 
members will 
have to do more 
than extend an 
“invitation” if 
they expect to oust her from the posi- 
tion. she, has‘ held through two school 
terms. She has engaged an attorney, 
and indicated that the board not only 
will"have to to fight to separate her 
from her job but will have to fight in 
the open. 


Offers No Explanation. 
A bit puzzled, a bit angry, the 26 
year old teacher asserted: 


Miss Isabelle Hallin. 
[A. P. Wirephoto.] 


hear a rumor that I was supposed to 
have had the cast of the high school 
play ‘at my “house for cocktails and 
cigarets. .But that is nonsense.” 

The school board at its meeting 
last week gave MissHallin “leave to 
resign,” but no explanation of its ac- 
tion. Members said - there were no 


‘charges: against -her.- . - 
The teacher . ‘promptly. palate 
jher rejection of the inv Ong add- 


‘ing, “’. ‘+ even ‘inthe * k ages, the { 
othe ! wie ie trial by 


“"They haven’t told: me ‘of any} 
charge against me, although 1 did 


THE WEATHER 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 7, 1937. 


Sunrise, 5:22: sunset, 8:28. Moon rises at 
5:57 a.m. tomorrow. Jupiter, Saturn, and 
Venus are morning stars. Mars is an eve- 
ning star. 

CHICAGO AND VI- 
CINITY: Fair 
Wednesday and 
Thursday; Warmer 
Wednesday with 
gentle to moderate 
south to southwest 
winds: continued 
warm Thursday. 

ILLINOIS: Fair 
Wednesday and 
Thursday; warmer 
Wednesday; continued warm ‘Thursday. 


5 TEMPERATURES IN CHICAGO 2 


For 24 hours ended at 2 a. m. duly 7. 


TRIBUNE 
BAROMETER. 


For 24 hours ended 7:30 p. m. duly 6: 
Mean temperature, 74; normal, 72;. depar- 
ture’ from normal since July 1, none; de 
ficiency since Jan. 1, 18 degrees. 
Precipitation, none; deficiency since July -1; 
66 of an inch; total since Jan. 1, 15.40 
inches; deficiency since Jan. 1, 1.51: inches. 
Highest wind velocity, 11 miles an hour, 
from the northeast at 9:03 p. m. | 
Barometer, 7:30 a, m., 80.18; 7:30. p. m., 
30.06. 
duly 7, 1936: 
Maximum temperature, 95; minimum, -72; 
mean; 84; clear; precipitation, none. 
[Official weather table on page 29.] 


mained at-3.to'2 in favor of forcing 


her resignation. 

A graduate of’ Jackson college, Miss 
Hallin has been teaching at the high 
school for two years. Under the 
school board rules, a “ probationary ” 
teacher. must be elected three con- 
secutive times before she becomes a 
permanent member of the’ depart- 
ment, 

. “If ‘Miss Hallin does not resign,” 
a board member explained, “she will 


come: uP for. negiec ae -and pepeevly 


"Must Be-Béie-Fall | 
* Pittsburgh, 'Pay July 6.—(@)—“ 
ble-headers.” nse be. wo: Noa ay 


Robber - Rapist 
Stabs Girl, 21, 
in 2d Attack 


(Picture on back page.) 

A robber-rapist,: who uses a ‘knife 
to terrify his victims, struck for the 
second time in six days in the same 
west side neighborhood last night. 
He entered -the room of Miss Cather- 
ine Neary, 21 years. old, 1850 -Monroe 
street, and stabbed her in the left 
side when she screamed. Then he 
escaped. 

Miss; Neary, a maid:at the Presby- 
terian hospital, was asleep: when. the 
prowler invaded her room. She awak- 
ened, to see him bending over’ her, 
knife in hand. “Don’t: scream,” the 
man ‘warned. 

Gries Out in Terror. 
Miss‘ Neary cried out in terror and 


‘the ‘intruder -lunged at her with the 


knife. The victim’s screams brought 
her sister, Helen, running to the 
room. “The stabber fled through’ an 


unlocked ‘screen’ door at the ‘rear, by, 


which he.had: entered the house, 
The wounded girl was taken to the 
office of Dr. B. C. Kolter, a physician, 
1834 Monroe. street. 
wound was not dangerous. 


, Miss ‘Neary and ‘her:sister said the 


intruder wore a white. handkerchief 
to conceal his face, ‘They said he was 
about 5 feet 10 inches tall and 
weighed about’ 155. pounds. 

Girl, 18, Attacked. 

Warren avenue police said the 
description tallied with: that of the 
moron who attacked a girl, 13 years 
old, as she lay in bed beside her 
sleeping baby brother early on the 
morning of June 30. Then ‘the man, 
who was armed ‘with’ a knife, forced 
the girl to go.to the room where her 


parents slep’ and- “bring him their z 


money, fir tata! to: si 


‘od id 
rx * , & 
x os cc . = i oa 
7. . = ° ’ oe Low’ or 
¢ . = y 
. of id as : ayo As 
: ; : See : : - ox - 
. Z nites 2 £ ” 
A ie aoe Wane f : 
Bi Art; ah ee ‘ = 
: 
ag. BH d ‘ ae ‘ : a 
; se a4 py ae ek ; 4 *. : 
e ; ‘ 8 " a ren we 
_ x % ¥ * a © x : 
; ‘ Bas tet aa 5 Sy A : ’ s iad * ie ; , arg wy 
4 > ve Ryd ‘+ tad } , +s re are = at, > - ed ree, Waste 
’ ~ , 2 F =e — .. ; 4 B 4 et 
pone: Sa 
- 3 
} : “ — 
_ | 
Ps 
: ' ee. 
; 1 
bien é 
“4 ; bs . 
: aa 
. ‘ 3 
 o 
$ 
* 
j 


Shannon at’ Foynes, Ireland, at 10:50 


He __ said . -the- 


‘BY DAVID DARRAH. 
{Chicago Tribune Presr Service.] | 
(Pictures on back page.) 

LONDON, July 6.—“ The, trip was 

relatively easy.— like a joy ride,” de- 


clared Capt. Harold E. Gray, as the 


No Trace. of Flyers 


Pan-American Clipper III. glided 
down to the waters of* the River 


a. m. [4:50 a.m. Chicago time] today. 
He and his crew of seven had com- 
pleted in 12 hours and 29 minutes 
the west to east survey. flight~of. the 
projected British- American trans- 
Atlantic passenger and mail route. 

Sixteen minutes later [5:06 a. m. 
Chicago time] ‘the: British Imperial 
Airways flying boat Caledonia ‘landed 
at Botwood, Newfoundland, the west- 
ern terminus of the 1,995 mile: line. 
Capt. A.:S. Wilcockson and his crew 
of four made their flight in 15 hours 
and 28 minutes. | 

Shaved and Fresh. 

The crew of the Clipper stepped 
from the plane at Foynes showing 
no trace of fatigue, although they ad- 
mitted no one had slept. They had 
dinner en route. All were smoothly 
shaved. 

“We can do our shaving and dress- 
ing just as well in the air as we 
could on a train,” said Capt. Gray. 

“We flew above 10,000 feet the 
whole way, with a nice sky and sun- 
shine above the clouds,” he said. “On 
the other hand, in all my experience 
in ocean flights over the Pacific [ 
never have: seen such an unbroken 
stretch of clouds—they lasted nearly 
throughout the flight. 

“We entered the stretch of clouds 
just 200 miles after leaving Newfound- 
land and emerged only as we reached 
the coast of Ireland. Sitting atop the 
clouds for twelve hours, however, is 
a delightful experience. We were 
able to take astronomical observa- 
tions from the sun and stars and/|ar 
inake certain Of our bearings, and I’ 
was able to pick up radio messages 
from the ships along the route from 
time to time.” 

Pass, but 60 Miles Apart. 

The Clipper and the Caledonia, Gray 
revealed, passed each other in mid- 
ocean at. 9:15 p. m. [Chicago time] 
last night but were sixty miles apart. 

“We spoke to each other by Morse 
code,” he added, “and 1 was able 
to give Capt. Wilcockson detailed 
weather reports of what lay ahead of 
him, while he was able to do the 
same good turn: for me. 

“The trip was relatively easy, but 
it would hardly be fair to judge 
Atlantic weather on the basis of this 
one journey. Nevertheless, I do not 
think there should be any difficulty 
in operating a regular service across 
the Atlantic.” 

Capt. Gray said the boat landed 
with approximately 900 gallons of 
gas left. It had averaged about 156 
miles per hour. 

Viscount Swinton, British secre- 
tary of state for air, sent telegrams 
of congratulations to the American 
and British: flyers. The Clipper will 
fry to Southampton tomorrow, accord- 
ing to present arrangements, and 
there will prepare for the return 
flight. 

Irish Crowds See Landing. 

Crowds of people, some of whom 
started out in the. early dawn in 
donkey carts, massed along the quay 
side at Foynes to see the Clipper 
arrive. As the Clipper’s engines 
were heard in the distance the 
crowd began to cheer. Then the 
giant flying boat was seen coming 
in from the sea. 

It‘ circled around Foynes ‘and, grad- 
ually reducing speed, floated grace- 
fully onto the water, taxiing.a: short 
distance ‘down the river with the 
crowds yelling “Bravo! Welcome to 
Ireland! ”’ 

Capt. Gray waved a greeting to the 
thousands jammed along the river- 


[Continued on. page 2, column 3.] 


VACATIONING | 


vf KE ye “- 


Missing Five Days. 


(Picture on back page.) 

_ HONOLULU, July 6.—)—The bat- 
tleship Colorado changed its course 
today and sped toward Winslow Bank, 
175 miles east of Howland Island, in 
the hunt for Amelia Earhart, and the 
navy moved to codrdinate the far- 
flung searching expedition. 

The tactical shift coincided with an 
apparently growing belief that if Miss 
Earhart and her navigator, Capt. Fred 
J. Noonan, were alive they had 
reached an island or a coral reef, 
Small islands are numerous beginning 
some 200 miles to the south, east, 
and northwest of Howland, but 
virtually are unknown in the previ- 
ously. searched area to the north. All 
these ‘islands wil be scanned by, 
planes. 

Flyers Missing Five Days. 

Miss Earhart and her. navigator 
have been. missing five days. Their 
plane came down last Friday on a 
2,570 mile flight from -Lae, New, 
Guinea, for Howland. 

The Colorado, which had been 
heading. from Honolulu toward the 
area north of Howland: where the 
coast guard cutter. Itasca, the navy 
minesweeper Swan-and the British 
freighter Moorby had been search- 
ing, planned to release its three cata- 
= 6 ga over vet cheat Bank 
a. en eaand hinee c of 
the Phoenix Kiovsin which center at 
about 280 miles southeast of Howland, 

Special lookouts were stationed on 
the battleship late today to watch 
for any floating objects and officers 
said they would light searchlight 
beacons. 

Navy Takes Over Cutter. 

Coast. guard authorities said the 
Itasca, which is under the command 
of Commander W. K. Thompson, had 
been placed under temporary super- 
vision of the navy to permit better 
search coérdination. 

The two ships were expected to 
meet. early tomorrow to refuel the 
Itasca, which has borne the brunt of 
the search since the aviatrix disap- 
peared. The Moorby, which had been 
assisting the Itasca’ and the Swan, 
decided to proceed to its next port of 
call. 

The Japanese airplane carrier Ka- 
moie and the Japanese survey ship 
began a search of the Marshall Islands 
area, about 500 miles northwest of 
Howland. 

Believes Flyers Are on Land. 


Shortly before the search «plans 
‘were changed, George Palmer Put- 
nam, husband of Miss Earhart, re- 
ported the. directional bearings taken 


on the most likely of the mysterious. 


radio signals from that region all 
pointed to the Phoenix Islands. 

Putnam said if any.of the numer- 
ous radio reports seemingly from the 
lost world girdling’ plane were gen- 
uine, the ship must have been down 
ona reef or’an -island. 

He said he had determined defin- 
itly that the plane would not have 
beén able to send signals if down in 
the water. 

' Putnam expressed mide tics of 
the naval and coast guard efforts, 


which included sending of the big: 


aircraft carrier Lexington and three 
destroyers from San Diego, Cal. 

“They have done everything pos- 
sible,” he said, “and 1 am grateful 
for their extensive efforts.” 

elt Expresses Concern. 

President Roosevelt at Washington, 
D. C.,. expressed..concern for Miss 
Earhart’'s safety. He said the.search- 
ers had been ordered to cover as 
much territory as possible. ' 

Despite the unprecedented ~ mobili- 


B || zation. of naval forces for the hunt,, 


: 


esr <you. ‘havea. I 


|| the navy department said it was ine 


| possible to estimate whether it ine 
volved apa! in addition: to gy of 


ati ds 


Donte Ace Ae By. r My ‘ Ais ye ee en 
ALi Buje ease ue i Dy. ih GeO Rig ee ON eae 


Oy) 
vm 
inp t 


until about 9:30 a. m. [Chicago time] 
but were unable to read them and 
said there was no assurance they 
‘were from the Earhart plane. 


Lexington Picks Speed. 
Ww oe { Associated Press Wirephoto. } 
ashington, D. C., July 6.—(/)— 
The naval carrier Lexington Commander W. K, Thompson of 
reported to navy headquarters to-| the coast guard cutter Itasca, which 
night that she was 2,500 miles from) is searching for Amelia Earhart, 
— Island at 4 p. m [Chicago | migsing aviatrix, in the mid-Pacific. 
The Lexington, which is carrying — —— 
%: planes, will join the search -tor : 
Amelia Earhart it she has not been WINDS AND OCEAN 
found by the time the vessel reaches aoe 
the scene, |The: Lexington left San CURRENT STUDIED 
lego Sunday. : 
The ag Mac aa she was pro- IN AMELIA HUNT 
ceeding ‘at knots, wi ‘a not 
and a half of top speed. This was (Map on back page.) 
five knots above the highest previous| One reported message from Amelia 
report of 28. Earhart placed her plane's position 
The Lexington’s commanding oifi- !281 miles north of Howland Island and 
eer has said he expected to reach | drifting southwest. Last night the 
i roads, about 75 miles Bae battleship Colorado was heading ‘or 
wands at 8 p. m. [Chicago €4 ‘a point 100 miles southeast of Howland 
~ pg i al tanker Ramapo, en route Island. The two points are shown on 
from: San Diego to Guam, has oeén |* Map on the back page as I [north] 
ordered to divert its course, meet the | #2d II [south]. 
Lexington at Lahaina roads and re:; At point I the United States hydro- 
fuel her. Officers said refueling graphic office chart for July shows a 
should take only a few hours. water current moving east. Prevail: 
ing winds blow toward the west and 
Rules Against Compuleory ‘southwest. Boatswain’s Mate Louis 
Fire Drills in Schools akecnaees of the United States coast 
guard said that wind would affect the 
m™ gee oe and course of the plane if it were high out 
prevention bureau do not at weak tnd water ¢ ts if-it 
have’ the right to hold compulsory |: ae ; eee: SUR ; 
firé drills ‘in were almost submerged. 
public, private, or paro “If the reported message from Mi 
chial schools in the city. This was po ) = - 
Harhart is true, her plane apparently 
the: opinion Corporation Counsel Bar;|... 
nan Sues all to Fi is being blown southwest against the 
et Hodes sent yesterday to #ire | current by the southern edge of the 
Commissioner Michael J. Corrigan northeast trades. 
and Chief George E. Graves of the! 7, position II Miss Earhart’s plane 
fire prevention bureau. Informed of) ,ouid be in a water current of west: 
Hodes’ opinion, Graves said the fire ward drift, with a velocity of froin 
department’ will ‘not conduct drills|94 to 72 miles an hour. Prevailing 
unless invited to by the proper aU-| winds in that area are from the east 
thority, but requested will supply |anq southeast—tending to blow the 
help for drills. plane west and northwest. As wind 
a he a 2 " and water would join in moving the 
Parachute J umper Killed plane in the same direction, it may ne 
assumed the plane would be movinz 
Before Crowd i in lowa rapidly northwestward either toward 
(Pictures on ‘back page.) or beyond Howland Island. 
oat Oak, Ia., July 6.—7)—Charles 
P Anineise ng, hd yours vad of Pike Take Second Body from 
coun ; a chute per, fe . 
300. feet 'to his death here today. He P lane Wrecked Last Winter 
had gone aloft, as a large crowd| Salt Lake City, Utah, July 6—(»— 
watched, beneath a hot air balloon.|A second body: was recovered late 
Suddenly the balloon collapsed and {today near the wreckage of a West- 
he fell to his death before he could |ern Air Express transport plane that 
open ‘his parachute. Armstrong nad |fell with seven persons Dec. 15. The 
been a préteadonal parachute jumper | body was that of John F. Wolfe, Chi- 
for 18 years.’ 


I} Valera of the Irish Free State, | 
}| by Minister of Industry and Commerce 
11] Sean Lemass and officials of the Brit- 


| ist air ministry and the peur 
HT Airways. 


The flyers were entertained at a 
public luncheon attended by De Va. 
lera and many local notabilities. 

The success of the experimental 
flights of the Clipper and the Cale. 
donia was hailed here as showing 
conclusively that the projected At- 
lantic service has become a practical 
possibility. 

Britons Fly in Clouds. 
[Chicago Tribune Press Service.) 
BOTWOOD, Newfoundland, July 6. 
—The British flying boat Caledonia, 
making an experimental chap vapohpasin 

flight from Foynes, landed in the har 

bor at 7:36 a. m., Newfounland ‘bien. 
today. The giant boat circled the har- 
bor twice before ianding, and the 
captain, A. S. Wilcockson, and the 
crew came ashore in a launch at 8 
a. Mm. 

Capt. Wileockson, First Officer 
Charlies H. Bowes, and Wireless Up- 
éerators Thomas &. Hobbs and ‘Thomas 
A. Vallette composed the personnel of 
the flight. 

“We made the trip in 15 hours 28 
minutes from buoy to buoy,” said the 
captain. “ Flying conditions over the 
Atlantic were not so good for three 
quarters ot the way. ‘There were 
rather low ciouds, a lot ot drizzle, 4nd 
head winds of 30 to 35 miles an hour 
which dropped to about 20 miles an 
hour for a time and gradually died 
away for the last quarter of the 
course. The average speed was 132 
miles per hour. 

Ship Behaves Perfectly. 

“We are delighted at the time made 
under the conditions. The ship be- 
haved perfectly. We struck the New- 
foundland coast ten or fifteen miles 
off Funk Island, then headed across 
the mainland under wireless direc 
tion from the Botwood station, which 
was very useful and successful all 
through, We were interested to note 
the large and numerous bodies of 
water while fiying over Newfound- 
land. 

“We took a course 25 miles longer 
than the great circle course. We used 
1,700 gallons of gasoline and landed 
with about 900 gallons left.” 

The Caledonia will fly next to 
Montreal and from there to New 
York. The captain declared the suc. 
cessful trips of the Caledonia and the 
American Clipper II1., which reached 
Ireland this morning on a flight from 
Botwood, show that regular trans- 
Atlantic service is close at hand. 


Lindy Returns to England 


After Four Days in Franc: 


LYMPNE AIRDROME, Encland, 
July 6—(A)—Col. Charles A. Lind- 
bergh landed here this afternoon 
from France, after four days of con- 
ferences on St. Gildas Island with 
the scientist, Dr. Alexis Carrel. 


ELDREDGE ELECTRIC 
SEWING MACHINE 


because 


@ Eldredge gives you everything you 
look for in a sewing machine: per- 


formance . 


long life , . . grand 


value . .. beauty in design. 


@ Eldredge features 20 models in at- 


tractively styled cabinets: 
American, Duncan 


Early 


Modern, 
Phyfe, 


Queen Anne and others. 


@ Eldredge regards Quality as its first 
principle of construction and Service 
as the second, assuring you of Satis- 


faction, 


@ Every Eldredge machine is approved 
by Good Housekeeping and the Un- 
derwriters’ Laboratory. 


Naabetl aN Td 


haa : 
"Minneapolis, Minn., July 6.—\Spe- 
cial.J—A football helmet borrowed 


from the team at the University of 


Minnesota will protect Dr. Jean Pic- 
card, the stratosphere fiyer, when he 
goes aloft at Rochester, Minn. to} 
test his nwt craft of 80 small 


head from any y bumping inside the 
gondola aden the balloons. He pians 
to make his flight within ten days, 
and expects the cluster of balloons 
to take him up 2,000 or 3,000 feet. 
The flight will test the efficiency of 
such a craft-for a stratosphere at- 
tempt. 


MAYOR SUGGESTS 
RAILROAD TRACKS 
UNDER A'RPORT 


The possibility of depressing the 
Chicago and Western Indiana rail- 
road tracks in a covered subway 
instead of removing them from the 
Chicago airport in order to enlarge 
the landing field was suggested yes- 
terday by Mayor Kelly. 

The mayor pointed out his proposal 
was merely an idea in case the pres- 
ent plan of removing the tracks fails 
to go through because of some insur- 
mountable obstacle. Engineers are 
now striving to perfect details of the 
present plan under which the city 
would give the railroad a new right 
of way for the line across the airport. 

The tracks now bisect the square 
mile of land available for airport 
facilities. 

Engineers of the city, the railroad, 
and the Bankers Trust company of 
New York, mortgage trustees for the 
railroad, are making surveys and ap- 
praisals in an effort to agree on a 
right of way north of the airport. 


OCEAN SHIP MOVEMENTS. 
Arrived. At. From. 
Westernland - Antwerp .....New 
Columbus 


Calandouis askew’ 

Pres, g.. 

New 

Normandie 

City of Norfolk | 

Amer. Merchant.I R : 
Exochorda Marseilles ... 
Stavangerfjord...Oslo 

Washington Plymouth .. 

Rotterdam Reykjavik ... 
Volendam Rotterdam 

Puris cooee St. Nazaire .. 

Autitania .......Southampton.. 

Veeudam ........New York ...Rotterdam 
Pennland .New York ...Rotterdam 
Amer. Banker...New York ...London 
Sailed. From, For. 

«eseessbremen New York 
eene*e ene h . New York 


Columbus 
Pilsudski 


ON : , mons 4 
cae 3 ~~ NAS Bet . : Soe cottst 

wa SS ed ech S ~ 

’ ~ : 

“ ~~ aN _ ee Se ‘ae 

EA ROE Ce es 

SR a ee ae PAS TSN : . 

- & we . SSS" SISOS OS OE OS 

a aa staat tia asceacantinainaes 


shorts a are of cool, ab- 
“sorbent mercerized 
| eotton— they've be- 

come especialy popu- 
her ir hie te. young 


2... fellows 


JOCKEY SHORTS 
OR SHIRTS 


50c 


4 neat, snug fit at all 


Jardealile, “Seven British Poennesale 
approximately 7,000 men, and about 


3,000 police Peserves: were held in 


readiness. 
It was believed that the Palestine 
commission’s report would propose 


proposals will be made public at 11 
o'clock tomorrow night. 

Loudspeakers attached to radios 
and public address systems have been 
installed in all polling booths and 
all theaters, where performances will 
be interrupted for the announcement. 

Both Arabs and Jews have shown 
strong opposition to the partition 
plan as it has been described un- 
officially. 


YOUNGHUSBAND 
SUIT DEPOSITION 
PLEA IS GRANTED 


Attorneys for J. Leslie Younghus- 
band and his wife, Mrs. Lillian Hawes 
Carter Younghusband, who is suing 
for divorce, were given permission 
yesterday by Judge John C. Lewe to 
take depositions from residents of 
Florida. 

The wealthy cosmetics manufactur- 
er has met his wife’s charge of cruel- 
ty with a counter charge, accusing 
her of misconduct. One of his wit- 
nesses, his petition states, will testify 
he saw one John Doe, clad in bath- 
robe and beach shoes, leave her apart- 
ment in a Miami Beach hotel last 
March 6. 

Judge Lewe continued until Mon- 
day two other petitions. One, by 
Younghusband’s lawyer, asks that the 
$125 a week temporary alimony be 
vacated, and the other, by her law- 
yer, asks additional solicitors’ fees of 


$5,000 


1,064 Young Men Put 


in Army Garb at Camp 


(Picture on back page.) 

Uniforms were issued yesterday to 
1,064 young men who reported for! = 
duty at the annual Citizens’ Military 
Training camp at Fort Sheridan. 
About 250 more are to arrive today. 
Tomorrow morning the oath of al- 
legiance will be administered by Col. 
Charles H. Bonesteel, post com- 
mander. Col. R. -C. Rogers will be 
in charge of the camp, which will 
close Aug. 4, Starting today the 
cadets’ routine will be: 5:45 a. m., 
reveille; 6, calisthenics; 6:30, mess; 
7:30 to 11:30, drill; 12, mess; 1 to 4, 
supervised athletics; 5, mess; 11, 


to fit you perfectly 


JOCKEY SHORTS 
OR SHIRTS 


75c 


The world’s coolest 
shorts; they’re made 
of open mesh with a 
gently supporting 
pouch of soft mercer- 
ized cotton. The ribbed 
shirts are exceptionally 


BELLIN ATHLETIC 


Ideal for summer and 
year round wear-—the 
wide lastex band as- 
sures you of a trim, 


in waist line ~ 
bines utmost ease 


Pirin to be cavemeetanel ‘under Lez 


British plan to be announced today. 
There are to be a Jewish state, an 
Arab state linked to Transjordan, 
and a corridor which will remain 
vader 808 British pandite, 


Be 2s Kas ud 7" 


EMPLOYES DOUSE 
LIGHTS OF CAFES 


IN PARIS STRIKE| 


[Chieago Tribune Press Service.] 


PARIS, July 6-—About 9 o’clock 


tonight the Champs Elysees, Paris’ 
famous boulevard, was hit by one of 
those sudden strikes which has char- 
acterized the past year of the Popu- 
lar Front régime. 

Three cafés—the elegant Rond 
Point, looking out on the famous La 
Lique fountains; the Marignan, fav: 
orite hangout of the movie folk; and 
the Colisee, red lethered, plate 
glassed café in the colossal manner 
of the Berlin .beer hall—all near 
Place de la Concorde, suddenly 
turned out bewildered foreigners and 
doused their lights, Police, nightly 
bivouacked nearby for just such 
emergencies, rushed up to shoo away 
the guests and crowds of spectators. 
Employés demanded that the na- 
tional 40 hour week be made to apply 
to them, 

Fourquet’s in the upper Champs 
Elysees, the swankiest of all Paris 
terrace cafés, also was temporarily 
affected. At the exposition five res- 
taurants were closed by strike. Em: 
ployés of hotels which are filled with 
exposition visitors threaten to strike 
Saturday. 


Chicugo Duily Tile. 


THE age peu NEWSPAPER 


Wednesday. July 7. No. 161. 


Phas Sunday. ‘Tribune 
OP nicumavent . Chir 


eine 
oe 108 F ul, outside ‘ot of 


Mich. and 
00° ver. year, By ikon 


“tales other than fll. 
ally bine 
ner Sear? aw * dunday Sritrane 


and 6. ety af" eo Rca: 


Vol. 1. XCV1. 


Ri. blished a 
Ko. Fh ia 


e ps fee 
i +i 


ead ge Ae Ohlone un 


masculinized underwear 


A crotch construction that will free you for all time of climbing, 
binding, squirm-provoking underwear. T 
absorbent, mercerized cotton with self-closing Y-front-——made 


The pouch is of soft, 


SHORTS 


y 


A ae ee a NE RN INE eS ct wR 


~ me 


4 " 3 .™ ‘ 
e Ae an” HOrie > + BAP ee 
x in at es: ei oa 4 Lbs nahi: os 
: * aD > y ery re 


Choose from Our 
Complete Collection of 


PALM BEACH 


SOLUS 


Why swelter in temperatures of 80’s and 90’s 
when it costs so little to own a Palm Beach 
Suit? Remember, two-thirds of the summer is 
still ahead of us. And for only $16.75 you 
can select any suit (except Formals) in our 
complete Palm Beach collection . . . smart, 
richly patterned dark tones for business... 
light, colorful checks, glens and pastels for 
sport ... Sea Foam White for vacation and 
evenings... sun-repellent Solar W eaves. 


133 South State Street 
South of Palmer House 


RO OG A LEE I 


A STRAIN ON THE FAMILY TIE 


a 


2 ITS JUNIORS OWN FAYULT- 
i ‘ToLO HIM HE CovLdD 
WATCH BUT NOT TO py. w 


a u 
° Bie ME 


satvesn ii 
TRO 


ee mie, CPB ee rem me * 3 as Ses LS pay. oe hate” rnapatiae . ig TG 3 wa a4 Sie ee Ze i! ria ~ ol > ith be x - 7 vey aye 1B oeroe Thane s B “ 4 
Cae ited Be Se Res : | a Ce precatste’ ae atin ¥ _ eee is ; ae a ve? ie oe Aah. PRB oS 
asta, AS s ' . $. . > f ¥ 4 : : g ote ot a ig i i fu ; ‘ 4 
bys $35 &. ova ; bs ne ia ’ Sim +" = cee a > lnk = = ia Pyare Sona = $= Bro ~ < 
: m - 4 an oe Ome -7 
. y A>” " oa et a Be fee es Me - oo > 3 r 
. . \ A ; nee A Be x. ae 


: bes ett Er is “eet ie ae or bh pt of 


| ‘Those tr ii are t Bing Ae 
Atoh} each : ong burch i 


as a Be as ie Bee M 


S 
_ 4 
a: 
o 
: Sites dads ' 
SD oR ES " 
¥, wy Se = ‘ > 


RR RR RR a 
ao = <2 
Cr Re he eas 
ee Ai 
So ET Nicos 


ae 
mere 


- a, 


Pr. 
Bee. 
¥ 
pate ee < 


W ere $11.95 


~ i a 


Ti 2. 


905 PAIRS 
W ere $10.95 


ie st 


1131 PAIRS 
Were $8.95 


SIZES 4 TO 11 
But Not in Every Stylel 


Youthful S tyles for 
Now and Later W ear 
Enjoy luxurious foot comfort in 


Adaptos at a money-saving price! 
Perfect-fitting, long-wearing! All 
with the famous built-in comfort 
features! Many whites! Oxfords! 
Straps! In kids, gabardines, 
suedes, blacks, blues, browns, dis- 
continued styles! All at $7.45! 


@ WIDTHS AAA TO EE 


LANE BRYANT 


101 N. WABASH AVE. 


¢€ 33 
$or Summer Lep 
Feel fine—keep alkaline 
—with Vichy Célestins 


Wekems & 
McKesson & Ro 


& Schmitt, a 420 West Ontario St. 
le, Inc., 200 East Illinois St. 
ins, Inc., 540 W, Randolph St. 


ANDEL'S 


sii ce Pe 


- ies : 
fa 


: ‘AIR-CONDITIONED 
IN 82 DEPARTMENTS 
AND. ROOMS! 


The Ones You Use Most 
‘is the S ou whale 


Six irst, fifth, 
floors = ait-condi- 


ON THE 


(phe.seis. a “very hara” battle was| | 


‘going on about 15 miles west of M 
rid, where the government: Jaun he 


an offensive yesterday mornij 
The struggle was fought "around 


ents, the announcement said. 


The government said it had cap- 6. 


tured the towh of Brunete after an 


early monrhog air bombing and held ‘ 


rebels. 


it, seizing 81 


_ ‘The loyalists claimed an advance of | 
15 mileés—which means a deep 


into ehemy territory with a serious) 
threat to the rebel forces besieging 
Madrid. The loyalists occupied a 
tions which had been held for months 
by the rebels. - 

The attack began with intensive 
aerial action against the rebels’ front 
lines and rear guard. A gasoline de- 
pot, 18 miles southwest of Madrid, 
was set afire and destroyed. Loyalist 
planes in a battle above Navalcarnero 
brought down two German made 
rebel planes. 


Advance on Santander. 

HENDAYE, Franco-Spanish Fron- 
tier, July 6. —(#) — Rebel dispatches 
from the northern front tonight de 
clared Gen. Francisco Franco’s army 
had pushed its north coast conquest 
into Santander province with the cap: 
ture of two strategic pinnacles, 

Troops advancing along the Bilbao- 
Santander road by way of Castro 
Urdiales overcame government forces 
and took Mount Castro Alen and 
four trerich lines. The peak is a nat- 
ural fortress 2,600 feet high on the 
border between Vizcaya and Santan- 
der provinces, 

Near Somiedo, on the Asturian 
front, the rebels announced they 
destroyed.a government battalion in 
taking the Somiedo heights. 


Mass Troops Near Teruel. 

VALENCIA, Spain, July 6.—(#)— 
Government observers reported to- 
night large forces of rebels, including 
Moors, were massing along the Ter- 
uel front. New troops, they said, 
were being distributed along the 
Whole length of the rebel salient in- 
land and north of Valencia. 

The heaviest concentrations were 
reported at Villel, about sixteen miles 
south of Teruel at the confluence of 
the Reggio and Turia rivers. The 
Turia flows southeast to Valencia, a 
distance of about seventy miles on a 
straight line from Villel. 


DIES OF HEART ATTACK, 


Gust Heft, 53 years old, 1201 West 47th 
street, a laborer, died in the County hospital 


last hight after suffering @ heart attack in a 


regtenrant. employed in the project. 


wa Shas 


AS ey 
Ss i 


eke 
ar Aa 


. washed 


‘Villanueva de la Canada.and Quijorna, or 
_ the rebels rushed up strong rein«} | 


“fAssoelated Press Wirephoto.) - 
Enzo Fiermonte (right), boxer 
of Mrs. Madeline Force 
Astor Dick, handcuffed to another 
prisoner as he was taken to work- 
house in New York yesterday to 
werve term for old trafic offense. 


Néw York, July 6.—([Special.J~— 
Enzo Fiermonte, who gave up the 
boxing ring for the society page when 
he married Mrs. Madeline Force 
Astor Dick, lost by a delayed count 
in Jamaica trafic court today. 

He was given five days in the work- 
house by Magistrate Gustave Wie- 
boldt for ignoring a summons for 
speeding and having no operator’s li- 
cense, served on him. on Grand Cen- 
tral parkway three years ago. In ad- 
dition, he was given a verbal spank- 
ing. 

Before he went down for the jall 
count, the impeccably dressed [talian 
floored a photographer getting ready 
for a picture. The photographer re- 
fused to make a complaint, accepting 
an apology instead. 

Fiermonte not only ignored the 
original summons, but also evaded 
a warant issued for his arrest. 

By sticking pretty close to his 600 
acre plantation near Charleston— 
given to him by his wife as compen- 
sation for not going back to Italy to 
fight for Il Duce against the Ethi- 
opians—the former fisticuffer was 
not disturbed by the law. 

‘Then he c&émeé north and publicly 
announced an intention of competing 
in the second international Vanderbiit 
cup race. The authorities, whose 
memory proved good, saw to it that 
he was arrested at the Roosevelt race- 
way on July 1. 


Mussolini Builds 60 New 


Airports for Military Use 


ROME; July 6.—(4)—An official an: 
nouncement today said 60 airports, 
virtually all of them for military pur- 
poses, were under construction in 
Italy, a total of 25,000 workmen being 


COOL AS A LAKE BREEZE..,.. 


HOTTEST SUMMER DAY 


Not just C-O-O-L, but air conditioned! Draw a deep breath as 

you enter our doors] Delightfully cool 

refreshes youl It's filtered 

air-conditioning] 90 healthful that even hay fever sufferers won't 
: sneeze in ‘its schitary coolness! You'll enjoy the cool servings. at 
} Manders” even more, shopping in cool comfort, 


fresh . . . clean dir 
. made dust-free by 


OB ng 


A 


naval patrol,  digrupted wheit” realy 
and Germany withdrew in anger over 
alleged Spanish attacks on their 
patrol vessels, and neutral gtiard of 
the Portuguese border must be ‘re 
newed, 

Andre Charles Corbin, the French 
ambassador to London, was instructed 
to present the French stand at the 
Friday meeting of the 27 nation non- 
intervention committee, officials said. 

France Fixes on Terms. 
Conditions which France placed as 
a price for continued surveillance of 
the ‘Pyrenees bordering Spain were 
outlined thus: : 

“FIRST—Naval control must.be re- 
established under some form or — 
but offering sufficient guarantees to 
be approved by the French cabinet. 

“SECOND—Control of the Portu- 
guese frontier must function as for- 
merly or following a new formula of 
equal efficacy.” 

[An end of the Portuguese frontier 
patrol, which had been wnder the 
supervision of British officers, was 
announced by Portugal last week 
after diaruption of the naval control 
scheme. | 

Officials indicated that unless 
France's provisions are met by the 
neutrality committee France must 
feel obliged to end supervision of her 
own territory considering it unfair to 
permit the possible arrival of men 
and munitions to rebel Spain while 
the government frontier is. closed. 


Britain Moves for Compromise. 

LONDON, July 6.—(#)—The British 
government moved toward a compro- 
mise tonight to break the deadlock 
over nonintervention in the Spanish 
civil war. 

Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden 
told the house of commons: 

“We have not only made our own 
proposals; we have declared our read: 
iness to consider any other proposals 
that are just and fair.” 

British statesmen still were ada- 
mant in refusing to continue the non- 
intervention scheme without naval 
control, but informed sources said 
Lord Plymotith, chairman of the non- 
intervention committee, might not ob- 
ject to regarding observers without 
warships as constituting full-fledged 
control. Under this plan neutral ob- 
servers in Spanish ports would be 
substituted for the naval cordon in 
waters around Spain. 


Meets Italo-German Objection. 

Informed sources pointed out that 
its merits were that the warship prob- 
lem raised by Germany and Italy 
would be eliminated, while France 
and Britain would win their point 
for maintaining control. They said, 
however, the British government has 
not advanced this plan “as yet.” 

The British steamer Gordonia, 
bound for Santander, failed to reach 
her destination when confronted by a 
Spanish rebel warship. It was re 
ported at first the merchantman had 
been stopped by the rebel vessel and 
two British warships steamed to her 
side. 

The British admiralty later said the 
Gordonia’s owners had _ instructed 
the ship to proceed to Bayonne for 
further instructions. The British war- 
ships, the admiralty said, “just hap- 
pened to be there” and only observed 
the incident. 

Government officials professed no 
alarm over the incident, pointing out 
that the board of trade yesterday 
warned the British shipping rebel ves- 
sels were trying to capture all ship 
ping in the vicinity of Santander. 


STRICKEN IN THEATER; DIES. 
Stricken while watching a motion picture 
in @& theater at West Randolph street, 
Benja Bierman, 40 years old, of 621 
Unive avenue, died a few minutes later 


You, ll say...9ts the 
ed 


a oo ee 
e Sy . : ee 4 F 
Re OR TR 


‘motored 
plane, vats Ade 


rying iva ao maaan ere 


passengers © Canadian northwest. 


anid: Pilet Grand: MeComachib, made} 


the journey. of approximately 1,000 
ee ee Nae Oe 
| After passing Grand Prairie, — 
miles northwest of Edmonton, holtd 
winds slowed the ship down to ninety 
miles an hour. — 
Weather Grounds American. 

HAZELTON, B. Cy, July 6—/)— 
James O, Phelps, young pilot from 
St. Louis, today kept his. monoplane 
grounded here awaiting clearer 
weather before continuing his “ ex- 
perience” flight to Whitehorse. 
Phelps, piloting a second-hand mono- 
plane, landed here Saturday night. 


CLEVELAND FINDS 
10TH BEHEADED 
TORSO IN RIVER 


(Picture on back page.) 
Cleveland, O., July 6.—I[Special.J— 
The ghost of the: “Mad. Butcher of 
Kingsbury Run” rose again today to 
haunt this city as police were con 
fronted with another torso murder 
mystery—the tenth in less than three 


years. 

Parts of the dismembered body of 
the latest victim were taken from 
the Cuyahoga river; near the West 3d 
street bridge, this morning. 

Five parts of the body were found, 
but the head was missing. Both 
thighs, cleanly severed at the hips 
and knees: the left upper arm and 
the lower portion of the torso were 
found just east of the bridge, almost 
within the shadow of the Terminal 
tower. The upper part of the torso 
was found wrapped in a newspaper 
dated June 22 inside a burlap bag. 

Today’s victim was found @ short 
distance from the spot where the 
ninth victim, a woman, was found a 
month ago. 


FINALLY DECIDES 
TO GIVE UP CCC 
JOB FOR $40,000 


Kansas City; Mo. July 6—)— 
N: Harold Barmon decided to resign 
today from a $30 a month job in a 
CCC camp, despite his 45 years, and 
take charge of a $40,000 inheritance. 
He decided after a Probate judge 
grew impatient at his delay in claim- 
ing the money. 

Barmon inherited the estate from 
his mother last March. But, he ex. 
plained, he had obtained an account- 
ant’s job last fall in a CCC camp, 
when he needed a job badly, and was 
loath to give it up. 

When Barmon appeared today be- 
fore Probate Judge Mitchell J. Hen- 
derson and still appeared reluctant 
to devote the necessary time to set- 
tling the estate, the judge took mat- 
ters in his own hands and sent a 
telegram to the CCC camp at War- 
rensburg, Mo. Then Barmon agreed 
to resign, 


BombWrechsPriest’ sHome; 


Renews Porto Rican Strife 


PONCE, Porto Rico, July 6.—(#)— 
A bomb exploded today at the resi- 
dence of the Rev. Father Aguilera, 
destroying part of the building, 
library, and furnishings. Bombings 
have been frequent since eighteen 
persons were killed in a clash at 
Ponce last March 21, Palm Sunday, 
between Nationalists, militant advo- 
cates of independence from the United 
States, and police. 


a7 


jury convened: on. July 1 to inyesti- 
gate. the. matter and it.was under-| 
stood. tonight that. the durore :DOSae 
reading the transcripts. ni 

The first witnesses called before | 
the grand jury included Ellis, Gil 
more, Sweet, Mrs, Jewell: Methvin, 
wife of a Methodist minister and 
stenographer who took down most of | 
the conversations re over the 
wires, and Mrs. L..H. Shannon, an- 
other stenographer. 

All of the conversations heard in 
the Dickerson apartment afd in the 
governor’s executive chambers have) 
been kept secret. Why the instru-/| 
ments were’ installed remains uf} 
answered by any of the participants, 
The majority opinion, written by; 
Justice Benjamin C. Hilliard of the|™ 
Supreme court, held that Ellis’ aw) 
tions were pomennrty fetmich to free 


SEES RTE 
Soeepteceeay Deccan 


SS 


gti nce 
~~ > : 3 see 


: Sinton 


AIR SERNA ON 


Sea 


<a as, S x 
aa: 
= 


SANS 
aia SER 


se - 
te eat at — 
Se a MRS 


Brucewood 


white suits of cool 


KOAT-A-KOOL 


Full lined with Eastman crepe 
so your deep-tone blouses 
won’t show through 


50% silk; 50% acetate; 

super cool, wrinkle-resist- 

afit, gorgeous; they’re 
wonderful suits 


$1750 


Sizes 12-20, 38-44. Other 
whites Hes. to $15——7th fi. 


SE , Be _ ne ee 
Rieter cates eee : 
a - ? 
“ . . “ 


We' ve baat tt easy for 
@very man to plan a com- 
plete Howard wardrobe 
With a small outlay of 
Money. All you need do 
ig open a Howard Ten 


Payment Thrift Accounts 


Select the garment you 
prefer and defer your 6s 
ments over a period 
weeks. You pay the on 
cash 


eee te site LO WR ae 


Sy 


il Pienaar 


Bs Pe bere ee a 


DE SOE MGs aE Se 


vs ; mS 4 sP. Pe © 
ohes, cori te WOR eo 
sg ts $5. ¢ aba AYT. sh aing “aehades = : 
7 peer reg i 


bie : 


individuals | era 
is being pressed 
vigor. Additional 
sent into the field to My anes con- 
cerns that have profited from past 
or hope to profit from futerg govern: 
ment contracts; 
Roosevelt ‘Keeps ‘Silent: ¥ 
President Roosevelt, while waxing 
righteously indignant. over evasions 
of tax laws, to condone by 
_ his silence. his 
' corrupt practices act ‘through the de-|§ 
vice of selling to corporations for $250 
each copies, of the ‘Democratic’ con- 
vention book specially autographed 
by the ident. This | method of. 
evasion was, explained in a ‘national. 
coeabadida letter. 
The boldness of the con tinued vigle- 


tion of the law by the committee is : 


due to the fact. that the Democrats 
control the prosecuting machinery 
and through their overwhelming ma- 
jorities. in--both. .houses. can prevent 
FY congressional investigation. | 


tative Bertrand H. Snell) 


of New York, Republican leader of 
the house, has: received a deluge of 
information to support his demand. 
for an investigation. 


fidavits supplied him is one by Hil- 


series | 
re- | 


dreth Frost, an attorney of Colo 
Springs, Col, who told of a 
of alleged reprisals witn which 
says he was threatened after he 
fused to subscribe $500 for 100 copies 
of the ordinary edition of the con- 
vention book. 
Friendly Relations Ended. 
}rost said that the Colorado Map, 
‘Abstract and Title company, which 
he controls, entered into a contract 
with the Denver office of the Reset- 
tlement administration 
1936, to supply abstracts of title to 
submarginal lands in the northern 


part of Teller county which the Re-| 
adminisuration was ac-/ 


settlement 
quiring for a public playground. The 
Resettlement administration, he said, 
also accepted a number of options 
which he offered. 

His relations with the Resettle- 
ment administration, Frost said, were 
friendly until he refused to subscribe 
for the convention book. He said he 
told the representative of the Demo- 
cratic committee who called on 
that he did not feel obligated om 
scribe, as he was a Republican. 

The Democratic committee’s sales- 
rnen, the affidavit said, reminded him 
of the profits he had received from 
the administration and assured him 
that he would be “better off and 
would profit greatly in future busi- 
ness” if he made a contribution. 

At first the salesmen, Frost de- 
clared, promised that two of the 

books would be autographed by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, and later, as an added 
inducement, hiked the number of au- 
tographed copies to five. 

Frost, according to his affidavit, of- 
toma to pay $5 for a copy, but the 
Democratic salesman refused to con- 
sider anything less than $250. 

Immediately after his refusal to 
subscribe, Frost said, “trouble be- 
gan.” He was visited by an attorney 
for the Denver office of the Resettle- 
ment administration. 


Alleged Threats Listed. 

The attorney in that visit and in. 
subsequent telephone conversations 
“made a series of threats,” which 
Frost listed as follows: 

“A threat to cancel the contract 
with the abstract company. [This was 


s evasion of the. 


Among the af-| _ 


[TRIBONE Photo.) 


: MRS. RITA JOOST. 

jatiee’ ‘Joseph’ B:’ David yesterday 
granted an uncontested‘ divorce to 
Mrs. Rita Wilson Joost, 30 years old, 
from William H. Joost; 56 years old, 
wealthy retired head of a grocery 
chain. ‘The grounds were cruelty. 

A temporary alimony order of $175 
4a month was increased’ to $200. we 
cently the couple arranged a prop- 
erty. settlement. Mr; Joost receiving 
his prized possession, a stuffed 18 
pound wall eyed pike... 

Several months ‘ago Joost settled 
for .$3,500 an ‘alienation of affections 
suit tiled by his wife’s former nus- 
tand, ‘Fred AH. Wilson, 2309 Devon 
avenue, a) tormer employé. Wilson 
has, remarried. Mrs. Joost, who tives 
at 6928 Wayne avenue, retains cus- 
tody of a daughter, Norma, 7, by her 
marriage. with Wilson. 


START SELECTION 
OF. FURCH..JURY; 
NONE IS CHOSEN 
€ Picture on back page.) 
Selection of a jury qualified to in- 


flict the death penalty was started 
yesterday in the 


in March,| 


‘Strate the continuity of Mr. 


jJater done by the Resettlement ad-} 


ministration . in. Washington, . 
said in the affidavit.) 


“A threat to dispute certain: items | 


the bills. 
“A thireat to hold up. “a making of |: 


in 


ich rs and the sending of them to 1 iinsis: 


on for payment. 
“- threat to prevent, or greatly de- 
lay, the payment of vouchers. 
“A threat to secure the use of 
WP. . funds to set up a competing set 
‘abstract books in ‘Teller county, 
to put my abstract company 


business. 
“i. threat that the resettlement 
are | their own. 
‘ eee a 


ca a | 


Criminal court of 
Judge Rudolph 
Desort for the 
tviel of DE, 
Frank J. Furch 
Jr., 37 years old, 
a chiropodist, for 
the murder of 
Mrs. Norma 
Schmidt, his 
second divorced 
wife. The session 
adjourned for 
the day, howev- 
er, after fifteen 
veniremen had 
been questioned 
without one jur- 

: or’s being cho- 
De, Frank Furch, sen, Both Assist- 
ant State's Attorney Morris G. Meyers 
and Defense Attorney Samuel A. 
Hoffman used their peremptory chal- 
lenges freely. 

Attorney Hoffman indicated he 
plans an emotional insanity defense 
to combat the state’s charzes that Dr. 
Furch killed Mrs. Schmidt in her 
apartment at 317 Belden avenue last 
Feb: 26 because she refused recon- 
ciliation. with him. 

Mrs. Myrtie Furch, the defendant’s 
first wife, and her two children, Joan, 
14, and Buddy, 9, were in court, but 
Jacquelyn Sehmidt, 11, adopted daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Schmidt, who saw the 
shooting, was absent because of ill- 
ness. She is expected to be the state's 
main witness. 


BOOKS TO TELL 
CAREER, POLICIES 
OF. ROOSEVELT 


Washington, D, C,, July 6.—(Spe- 
cial.!|—President Roosevelt has de- 
cided to prepare for publication early 
next spring a selection of various 
public ,documents in five. volumes 
dealing with his administrations as 
governor of New York and as Presi- 
dent of the United States. That was 
announced today. Judge Samuel I. 
Rosenman, an adviser, will help. 

The object is said to be to demon- 
Roose- 
velt’s social and economic philosophy. 
The ~works are to be published by 
Random House and will carry his 

‘guid to his second inauguration. 


popYy FOUND IN LAKE. 
‘The body of a man tentatively identified 
as James Cuff, 55 years old, of 5609 South 
mis street, was found in the lake near 
Romer — een: = had been 


AS : 
thi 


We 


‘- 


| 
ell 


iN 


1. 


° 
* 
: 


t 
sy 

2% 
\\| 


esis a2 SEGRE Ea acerca d® 


HLL 


ATL 


Nt 


‘ih 
ALL 


4 443 


4 


‘budget in’ te ‘present ‘fiscal: year, 
» July 1,. by a voluntary] 


congress... 
| letter June 23-to: department heads. 


slashing of appropriations voted by 
“Mr. Roosevelt payenied: that in al 


he urged that each impound ten per. 
cent of . its appropriation and at- 
tempt to return the saving to the/ 
treasury. He estimated that if his 
wish is followed 400 million dollars 
will be saved, 

: For Layman’s Balance. 

The saving of 400 million dollars, he 
said, would achieve a “layman's bal- 
anced budget.” Accountants. still 
wovld hold the budget out of bal: 
ance, because it would not include 
the 400 million statutory debt retire- 


ment item. 

A saving of 400 million dollars 
would not have balanced the budget 
of the fiscal year which ended last 
June 30. The deficit for last year 
was. $2,811,318,310. 

The President explained that not 
every department could make a 10 
per cent cut, but that some depart- 
ments would be able to make greater 
cuts to set the general average at 10 
per cent. The army and navy cannot 
be expected to cut pay, nor can they 
be expected to reduce rations from 
45 to 35 cents a day, he said. Nor 
can the national debt cost be re- 
duced. 

Some reduction in activities will 
follow as a result of the budget bal- 
ancing effort he said. He made it 
clear that the departments would not 
be policed by the budget bureau, but 
would direct their own economies. 


Worried About Woman Flyer. 


At the conference on the afternoon 
of his return from a five day visit to 
his family home at Hyde Park, N. Y., 
the President said he was very much 
worried over the plight of Amelia 
Earhart. He revealed that he had 
been following every step in the 
search since her plane was forced 
down. 

He declined to comment on reports 
oi a break with John L. Lewis, C. L. O. 
leader. He also refused to discuss a 
report that he had been approached 
by a senator with a proposal under 
which he would attempt to heal the 
breech between the C. I. O. and the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Asked if he still was bringing pres- 
sure On Senator Robert F. Wagner 
[D., N. ¥.} to run for mayor of New 
York, the President laughingly said 
that was another form of the “have 
you stopped beating your wife?” 
question. 

He expressed hope congress will 
enact his government reorganization 
plan at this session and said he plans 
to send letters within a day or two to 
the chairman of the senate.and house 
agriculture committees urging pas- 
sage of the “ever normal granary” 
farm bill. 


MAIL THIEF WHO 
POSED AS PRIEST 
GETS 3 YEAR TERM 


Stanley Nemchausky, 23 years old, 
who donned a priest’s garb to cash 
checks which he had stolen from mail 
boxes, was sentenced yesterday to 
three years in Leavenworth: peniten- 
tiary by Federal Judge Charles H. 
Woodward. 

Nemchausky pleaded guilty to a 
charge of theft from the mails and 
admitted he had cashed more than 
$2,000 in checks which he found in 
stolen letters during the last eight 
months. 

Six weeks ago, according to Assist- 
ant District Attorney John J. Mores 
chis, Nemchausky rifled the mail boxes 
in the homes of two Catholic priests, 
the Rev. Father S. B. Goodwin, 1055 
Loyola avenue, and the Rev. Father 
Edwin A. Dickenson, 7111 Constance 
avenue. | 
He then purchased priest's clothing 


—STOUT WOMEN 


For Cool Summer Comfort 


Larger Women! Take: advan- 
tage of this low July ‘Sale 


Price | “on 
:: | 


ve. op of lovely nef, it 
i — control fee 


and. cashed two checks. - two checks. 


their usefulness.” oe Baba | 
as have oft often thought,” said Mr.| 


Lane Bryant Special! 


ae 


a4 & 
with 


not always conscious" of the time 
| | fhe: climax of 


, “that politics is not 


Robinson later 
an occupation; ‘it ise disease, and, by | 


the eternal, when it. gets in the blood 
and-brain there is no cure for it.” 
Senator Robinson emphasized re: 
peatedly, however, that age limit 
fixed by the substitute proposal is 75, 
‘instead of 70, as in the President's 
original bill. This seemed to be par- 
ticularly pleasing to Robinson, for it 
would give him ten years on the 
bench, exactly the time of service. re- 
quired for retirement on full pay. 
Senator Carl Hatch [D., New Mex- 
ico], who signed the judiciary com- 
mittee’s report ‘severely condemning 
the President’s bill; spoke today in 
favor of the compromise which he 
helped to draft. He said he had 
been. deluged by letters commending 
his stand against the original bill. 


Not Humiliating President. 

These letters, Hatch said, con- 
tained such expressions as “ Now is 
the time to humiliate the Presi- 
dent?” “Now is the time to beat 
Roosevelt,” “Follow up the report 
by impeaching the President.” He 
denied vehemently that those who 
signed the adverse report had any in. 
tention of humiliating the President. 

Senator Joseph C. O’Mahoney [D., 
Wyo,], another signer of the adverse 
report, also denied that any. reflec- 
tion upon the President was intend: 
ed. He anticipated this argument on 
the part of administration leaders, 
saying: 

“It is perfectly obvious to me that 
an effort is now being made to make 
it appear to the country that weare 
trying to humiliate the President.” 
a 


to get 


Store Hours 
9:30 A. M. to 
5:30 P. M, 


} ‘won't retire. ye put it “men are] ty! 


Choose GOLDEN WEDDING and you choose 
choice whiskey ... rich whiskey .. . all 
whiskey... that has had no peers 


Mark the Merit S Say 
in this “‘ Mark of 


Merit” Whiskey. 


Golden Wedding 


JOS. &. FINCH & Co., 
INC., SCHENLEY, PA. 


1887 The Hubs Fiftiath Yaar 1937 


TODAY’S THE DAY!.. 


these cool suit specials 


Bantamweight Crashes 
TROPICAL WORSTEDS 
and White Tropicals 


Dark and Light Shades — § 


Best Values We Know of at 


(Coat and Trousers) 


It’s old fashioned to let hot weather make you uncom- 
fortable. Now up-to-the-minute men wear cool, lightweight 
garments. Here are the fine suita you'll want and need— 
smartly tailored of light yet sturdy fabrics usually found only 
in higher priced garments. We expect them to sell out in a 
ue hurry, so don’t delay selecting yours. 


Single or Double Breasted, Plain or Sport Back Models 
Sizes from 34 to 52 in All Proportions 


Clearance! 


HARTMANN 


at very substantial savings 


$25 $45 


*black or and 
brown domestic 
tweeds aniline 


dyed hides 


e 1 
; 


*elephant 
grained 


cowhide 


*imported 
British ani- 
line dyed 


hides 


* canvas du. 
cord 


* sealskins 


i UASAADEN ANT AORAAHOREAETOANUA TERE TTDRRES HAUT 


* pigskins 
Mostly ene of a kind 


Here’s an exceptional buy in men’s fine luggage. 
We were able to get this collection of Bondstreeters at 
far below regular cost . . . by taking the fine odd 
pieces which the Hartmann factory had on hand. 
And we’re passing that saving on to you. Every case 
is handsome, practical. Every case is an excellent 
value. Most of them are two-suit models in both 24 
and 26-inch sizes. But you'll also find some one and 
three-suit models ... if you come early enough, 


The Luggage Center 
First Floor, Middle, Wabash 


& COMPANY 


All our stores will be closed Saturdays 


; 
= 
= 
; 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
= 
2 
= 
= 
= 
z 
= 
= 
= 
= 


at 1 oclock during July and August 


SSM MAHAN 


PLL LL LLU LU1 L is 


| 


CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


HORIZONTAL 


Thoroughfares 
Vegetable 

. Desertlike 
Univalent hydrocar- 


bon radical 
. Mast 


Nap 
Sharp, prolonged 
squeak 

10. Foolhardy 

14. Object of adoration 


15. Unit of measure 


. Abrade 

. Creature 

. Member of lawmak- 
ing body 
Toward a higher 
place 
Metal 


. Flower plot 

. Subject to wind and 
sun 

. Cat’s murmur 
Anger 
Boundary 
Foreign coin 
Perpetual 
Culinary director 


VERTICAL 


. Wale 
Vapid (dial. Eng. 
var.) 
Appropriate for song 
31. Superior 
32. Reason 
Book of Bible . Pronoun 
Small European . Missions 
n 43, Toiler 
Feels contrition . Meddles 
Song passage . Penitential discipline 
Subside Crazy one (slang) 
Shooter marble 
Winnow 
American lake 
. Not any 
Flower 


16. Silkworm 
. Other 
. Homes 
. Liquid quantity 
. Go down 
Long marks 
Pair 


. Stir 
3. Girl’s name 
. Perceive 
. Chemical compound 
. Moist earth 
7. Golf accessories 
. Grasses 
. Trees 


Ry 


56, 
57. 
58. 


Secondhand 

Turn on axis 
Small quantity 

59, Utters 

62. Shoshonean Indian 


YESTERDAY’S PUZZLE 
SOLVED. 


Party-colored 

At leisure 
Deprivation 
Chosen 

Imply secondarily 
Was sorry 


5: Et 


A > 


by Ba | 


26. Weapon 
27. Handle 


iz 


Catv gence ape Roane 


és of the Amur é 
7 were arrested following the de- 


“A dispatch from Hsinking, Manchu- 


ko, to the newspaper Nichi Nichi| 


Stated that Russian Dictator Josef 
Stalin’s purging. operations are. 
Mutinies were reported in several 
places and an ominous atmosphere 
prevails on the frontier. 

From Harbin came reports that 
large numbers of Russians were en- 


be endeavoring to prevent a further 


Semi-martial law prevails in many 
soviet areas along the Manchukuo 
border, according to the dispatch. 

New Border Battle Fought. 

‘MOSCOW, July 6—(#)—A govern- 
ment communique tonight said both 
sides suffered heavy casualties in a 
clash between soviet and Japanese- 
Manchukuan soldiers Monday. 

{Last week a border dispute over 
Sennufu and Bolshoi Islands in the 
Amur river resulted in an armed 
clash and bitter diplomatic exchanges 
which ended in 


SN 


an agreement to’ 


sued, resulting in a number being 
killed and wounded. 


British Plane Lands 3 Cent 
Air Mail in South Africa 
DURBAN, Natal, South . Africa, 
July 6.—()—The Imperial Airways 
flying boat Centurion was groomed 
today for its return flight to England 
after inaugurating a new low cost 
airmail service between England and 
South Africa. The Centurion left 
Southampton June 29, and landed 
here yesterday. It carried nearly two. 
tons of first class mail at the ordi- 
nary postage rate of three cents per 
half ounce over the 7,260 mile route. 
The fiying boat Corsair left Durban 
Sunday on a pioneering flight to 
Engiand. 


“of illegal 


from 
The 


“eluded drownings 


cago. 
Injury List Doubles. 


Although fireworks did not bring 
death to any person in Chicago, the 
list of those injured by. explosives 

led 158, more than double of last 

r’s total of 61. : 
: were reported yes- 


|terday. Leo Bobrowski, 12 years old, 


1521 Lincoln street, lost portions of 
two fingers when he stumbled while 
running from a firecracker some one 
else had thrown on the Foss park 
beach in North Chicago and fell with 
his hand on the firecracker as it 
exploded. .- Daniel Ritter, 12, of 3458 
North Clark street, was burned by 
an exploding firecracker, and Leona 
Anderson, 22, of Kewanee, was 
burned by a firecracker tossed into 
an elevated. train at the Fullerton 
avenue station. 

Heaviest of the fines imposed on 
fireworks vendors here yesterday was 
one of $200 and costs meted out to 
Fiorian Pacanowski, 23 years old, a 
clerk ina grocery at 2301 South Sac- 
ramento avenue, by Judge Justin F. 
McCarthy in the Des Plaines street 
court. 

Frank Hawski, 10 years old, 2329 
South Sacramento avenue, who was 


em ee Cm oer nem 


. ay 


> GA ‘ t 


38. year old, 133¢ Newberry avenue, 
and Michael Beeler, 26 years old, 849 
ze McCarthy in Des Plaines street 
court for lack of evidence. 


Judge 


isa 


another woman, — 


4 


. . 
jury deliberated nearly 18 hours. — 


by 


. meee BO 
a he PORES + RRR Ie . 
CREE HAIN YB 8S PRESIDED ENE PAIS FE ARR 1: RARE LER 


Beet a8 a i 
Adad ede A AM WP 


. . Met on 
EEE SYED GSES IEA A ROE Ss SABIE te egg, RMA KE : 
REET EM TRS AMIR OLE AA BEL RL 


Henrici’s reputation for the service of 
exceptionally fine food is both an ob- 
tradition ligation and a compliment, We real- 
ak Manclel a ize that you come to Henrici’s with an 

anticipation that probably makes you 
a little more critical. here than you might be elsewhere. So 
throughout our organization you find a constant effort to do 
things in a little finer way ... and with an extra regard for 


every detail that affects quality. Here food is plainly what it is 
sup to «+ « - no embellishments disguise shortcomings in 


And prices are moderate. 


@ood food 


ty. 
Henrici’'s Is Air Cooled and Air Conditioned 


RICP 


» between Clank & Deas 


SERVICE © 7FAsMe TO MIDNIGHT 


CONTINUOUS 


W #3 4 


trial lasted a week and the! 


QUALITY VALUE, SATISFACTLON-—LIBERAL CHARGE & CREDIT ACCOMMODATIONS 


UPER LUXURY SUITS 


for year ’round & summer—customized 


yy Pf 
J fj f f, tf) YY 
: ( 


v4 
, a 


Tf, 
Vii ff 
MES Vi hi 


-. SORE SS 


It’s a tremendous season-end clearance—offering powerful and 
irresistible values—many thousands of year ’round and summer 
suits sharply reduced in spite of greatly increased prices in keep- 
ing with our policy of closing out our stocks before each new sea- 
son. Sport styles, drapes, double and single breasteds—all colors, 
weaves, patterns. It'll pay you handsomely to buy now 


by our best makers—reduced to 


PRADA DEBI MRS EIN YS 


§ SUITS—LONGS, SHORTS, STOUTS, REG 


YOUNG MEN’S- 


9” 


VALUE SUITS 


year “round & summer 


weaves—reduced to 


HAND-CRAFTED SUITS 


of custom type weaves in year "round and 
summer weights reduced to 


$2 


ZEPHYR LIGHT SUITS 


cool, shape-retaining tropical 
worsteds reduced to 


‘22* 


EXAMPLES OF THE BIG SAVINGS 


| __ 460 and #65 suits with 1 or 2 trousers reduced to *49°° 
‘445 and #50 suits mith 1 or 2 trousers reduced to *39°° —#35 and 437% suits with 
__ 1 or 2 trousers reduced to $29°°-—#29° suits reduced to #22% 


eae ha 
Pew & 


, ENTIRE 4TH 


LONG STOUT—ENTIRE 


Q a0 


fe 


ee ee eS es Se 
Sees = P 


A complete line 
of 


Electric Fans 


in a wide price range! 


No need to swelter in sum- 
mer’s heat when _ air-cooled 
comfort is no further than 
your nearest Walgreen store 
and an electric outlet. Here 
you will find a COMPLETE 
line of guaranteed, depend- 
able fans ... ranging in size 
and price to meet your own 
requirements. GET YOURS 
NOW .. . before the next hot 
sy-ll . . . then enjoy it the 
entire summer long! 


88-inch Streamlined 
“Mastercraft” 


The SUPER-POWER fan... 
makes 2,200 revolutions per 
minute, Streamlined, al!- 
chrome model — attractive in 
any room. Remarkably quiet; 
delivers an unusual 89 
quantity of air for its 1: 
size. 


8-inch Modernistic 


“Aircraft” 
ee ee 


at 3.5 

Powerful, noiseless, smooth-run- 
ning. S constructed .. . 
stands up well under constant 
daily use. black-crack- 
le finish base with chrome trim. 
Non-radio interfering, 


. - Sfot sw O44 3 ¢ 


“- 


“Vidrio” 


ELECTR 


Complete 
with cord....... 


-Here’s an unusual and exceptional value in an 
efficient electric fan. Has §8-inch blades; 


smooth, quict-~-ning motor . . . non-radio 
interfering. Green crackle finish. Complete. 


10-inch Size 


Oscillating 


Sensational 
value at only.... 


priced at only. hee 


Extremely sturdy. Finest grade 
materials make this fan far supe- 
rior to others at this price. All 
chrome blades; attractive wire 


Snaeeeee 


W YORK CENTRAL 
we 


GOING SAT., JULY 10 
Ail Standard Time 
Passengers for Cio] umbus, 
Pittsburgh, Youngstown and 
Beaver Falls-New Brighton, 
Ly. La Salle St. Station 8:50. 
P. m. Return Sunday night, 

Consult Agente a 


APPLICATION FUR 


RIBUNE Aa 


AND SUBSCRIPTION TO THE DAILY TRIBUNE 


POLICY 


coverage eventually increases to $11,250 on continuous renewal, Issned 
Insurance Co., Chicago. NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION. One policy 
Issued only to applicants over 10 end under 70 years of age. 


the Chicago Tribune. SEND NO MONEY. Accredited represent- 
collect 25c. Official Carrier will collect monthy thereafter fer 
insurance will ‘apse @ subscription le stopped! 


%. the Tribune de- 
lwered to myhome by Carrier, sin days 
week starting immediately, for which 

the lar rate. 


} am a Home Deliz- 
ery subscriber and: 
agree to continue, 


Accident Policy?. eateleieie eee/aletererere’ace: cereresecome 
aortoostn! a his es ede 


Do you apply for this $7,500 Travel 


' . 
Your Namef eT ee Che ee Ce ee ee ee eG eee eeWoe eee wee ve'e’erre 
Name 


Address? .- sare "eC Cee eee emleese cee eee were ss se eee ee eeeeeeseses «Apt. le caeced 
Street ’ 


Pe eee Ne ee »Phone?. alee ee ee eee eeeeeg 
ve State : 


Your Age? .:.-emrwn's Date of Birth?...... PRP UREN ASE PER EEE SY TY eye ee gk 


> Ba gt ™; , 
ee ee ee ar ae 


= 
oe I me, MT a 


Are You Blind or Deat?. .cevcwvewasweos, Ate You Crippled? wewsenecoresees 


> 
‘cute 
: . 
— ie 
a 
ss 


feeerdee ove Seeeeresensess es saaaens 


ae: ete on egg Saye Big ie _ 
Bs se 
¢ . aay, . yr: hig Wag 


a A 
hing £ <o3" sg at ait 
3 a alll ca 
PC RE! Pa FOR 


PORE TT A 3" aap 


‘Whom Insurance Is to Be Paid im Case of Your Death? (Reneficiary) — 


eS eee 


PINSURANLE 


s * 5 sa * , * - ww resi! gs 
” : as a Sige: ae Vata eis: es Se ORES ibe e aie re eas Seipie “oe oe wast Bcscane te ees ae ere 


Dae > ‘Dpoare Bai eit ae ces Ze Bard 
: a ee athe ¥! 
‘oO. iS pia Brut se Bra ag a Np pit 


: - itn Pars — rey “a Fe Oe ty e ee ~ : maf ee = 
—— scald ig | he Shaan BIN = ps EE BEN DS, PP REE 
f s P eek Sas “ m2 ; 
At y, a ff 4 iL 
¥ eS z = 
big eh. ” = 

- “= 
CTAT Ta Ak ak 


for any store to ‘pefcain| | 1 company were threate: o tentative 9 
fully promoting the joys the gare county = dary to-| “| last night | i ithed leat J 
ain tic ns to be chad b by ce return : indictmen Ee | | | olis: oatea: by Gov. ™M. rs a tracts. which ex 
‘ in sses F VCTY | ee toetere een inate hn | ’ ford Townsend of Indiana broke up. 
‘ i ose @ sane Saale }inal position that the law ‘provides effective june, 1939. mince 06 estes sree Se Setea.| | Weekingioh. OS dey. toaehe 
“heart 7 Caer i student  Reaoge Fescoeg included! for protection of workers who want i : ———| Near Akron, in the Canton-Massillor | 

| is | » sellin aivaaity in’ New sige ba a among 200 named yesterday by|to work and that the plant will not| district, officials were incr easing | bill nih permite eae = a 
a car sate for pay matter, | Stevens, alias Stevenson, recently dis-|gtand jury at Youngstown, Q.| be redpened until Indiana-authorities ei is still closed because of the| dogs with 
moth spray, shoe trees, or spool | missed as an organizer by the Steel| which investigated steel disorders: | are willing to give that protection. strike. coaches 


cotton. But evening dresses, ‘in- Workers’ Organizing committee, the| He jis accused of rioting. : M enaced by ‘Pickets. Piles see oe company sent ba 


: present spearhead of John L. Lewis’ 
fants’ wear, silk h Hosiery. radical C. 1. ae ee ee ee Because of the menacing picket vice president and ‘puearel counsel; 


» ac 1¢. Burke is charged with rioting dur- 
1iture—these and “many ing the battles between sone and | Qhio National Guardsmen workers en- ‘ial , 
ys are a different matter, | strikers at the Republic Steel corpo- | tered the three plants of the Repub-| the company has been asking Gov. ago DP 
: ps ration plant here on June 10 and 19,| lic Steel corporation at Cleveland, | 7 .insend to send troops to safeguard to 
“Merchandise” should set the/tTwo men were killed in the latter; Which had been shut by the strike| | kick elas Gib 40 tation to the ‘Van A. Bittner, Great Lakes direc- 
tone of the physical surround. shot. : for forty-one days. Only a few pick-| “° ae tor for the Steel Workers’ Organiz- 
Bic te’ ee ets were on hand to hoot and jeer. | Plant. The workers themselves and |ing committee of the C. I. O,, hurried 


rr Meh. of ily pes Pg sing| The nae Heit gg sillie Siete: Estimate Half Are Back. ministers of East Chicago have joined | to Indianapolis. 
ng charges him with ripping up railroad} Normally the mills employ 6,000. in the request, and Mayor Andrew! (Company Representatives Leave, 


copy wh ch describes it. A terry tracks when rail service into a plant|Company officials estimated 3,000) Rooney of East Chicago has made a/ 7, governor and Indiana's labor 
robe for Fae algo. may COM-| of the Youngstown Sheet and Tube, were back at work. C. I. O. leaders | formal appeal for troops. commissioner, Thomas F. Hutson, con- 
tain precisely the same number|company was disrupted. Others| disputed the figures, asserting most| But the governor said last night, | +.-:6q arst with the company repre- 
of yards of fabric and be of the | named in the indictment face charges|of the returned workers were clerks ce oT collapse of the tagger sentatives, But after two long ses- 
same. color as a breath-taking | of inciting to riot, carrying concealed|and stenographers, not makers of at he saw no reason for sending | gions the company officials departed, 
ns, and removing railroad prop-| steel, and that strike breakers were | ‘TOOPS, a8 there had been no disorder | ...in> their 
hostess. gown. Described dis- | WSePon® St A t. ying their position was unchanged. 
tely, the t obe | °TtY: All indictments were ordered | being imported trom Alabama. = Bittner then conferred with the gov- 
passiona y, the terry fF served immediately. National Guardsmen, posted beside Truce Hoped For. ernor, but left after a brief visit to 
might be. done justice and the - “This grand jury is not through / machine guns at company gates, were; The governor, who last Wednesday | return to Chicago, 
hostess gown and iis potential pos- yet,” declared County Prosecutor Wil-| reinforced in: the dangerous strike| night arranged a truce that brought} Employés, idle since the strike be- 
sessor a grave injustice. ; liam A. Ambrose. “It has been inves-}zone near-the plants proclaimed by| reopening of the Imland Steel com-| gan May 26, have been clamoring for 
So 1 the ie h f. tigating the strike violence for four|Sherif Martin O’Donnell, by 384 city| pany’s East Chicago plant, had hoped|a chance to go back to their jobs for 
ie ong as. a F “eci gw days. We are receiving OEE policemen and seventy-five deputies. | to effect a similar truce that would|some time, despite efforts of the C. 
2 dash ant wee eee fn complaints and evidence of lawbre Without violence, Bethlehem Steel’s| reopen the Youngstown plant, which, |I. O. leaders who called the strike to 
c descrintive af belaht aaa ° ing in the strike. huge Cambria works at Johnstown! with more than 7,000 employés, is the} keep them in line. 
pic ae Whe eo orig eng Bo compose Under the protective guns of 1,500 | reopened after the three day holiday. only important steel mill in this area The employés are becoming increas- 
a fitting paean of y esc praise for | = 
a misty negligee? 


An antique oriental rug may cou- 
tain no more colors and no glossier 
threads than an inexpensive but hon- 
est modern imitation. But what of 
its mellowed warmth, its shimmering 
beauty, and the incomparable 
of pattern wrought through months 
of artistry by tireless human fingers? 
Can data tell the tale of these? 


In the extent that emotional appeals 
induce people who siould have things 
to buy se: est those pepeam bgt 
society and pro ity generally. In 
the degree 2 = get ce slackens 
sales and production, colorless selling 
performs a dis-service to society. 


The fault with advertising is not 
that it uses emotional, picture-pro-. 
voking words. The trouble enters 
when turgid and stirring copy is used 
to describe not -what is for sale, but ye a i a & sa 
what the writer thinks the reader wants ee Ee, HE IE , mee EE 
it to be. : eS CU ee 
Copyrizht’ 1937 by é I A a ee pe. i a is x. Be: a fais f pct septate ss! 
Marshall Field &@ Company: 


ee Ses 


ee Lene te eta 
PR MM Natl ys Kern 
ee artes a te es 
¢ thas ost 
ie ; 
Bie #, ero 
f, O 


Pet 


‘, or ves 
sry te 
Rete 


“ 


- 
Pe en 
f 
ss 


LT LID 
DL 


ene 
Raa 
XW EE ~* 


4 €4 ales 


vaCUCK 
._ Z- po’ AJ & R s 


See 


oe 
os 


hig ohne ae <> eR 
— oN Se ~ ~" ~! = ~~ 
x ." ‘te - a“ ~~ 
he eee 
ae . 
_ “ oe ~< . 


bad | | pee i : sae ee acannon Sages Satine ete 
i i i e g U qj i 5 c [ \ . c e slight cost, it’s decisively one of the world’s 


least costly cars to run. 


uly ° Sth | betw e eC ni | It’s built in every detail with the care and 


soundness that make Studebaker workmanship 
IN GAS AND ite envy of the entire automobile industry. And, 


it’s all alone in many innovations . .. doors that 


OIL SAVINGS: cick tighty, tightly and silently without slam- 


ming ... inimitable Helen Dryden styling . . , 
HIS year the really knowing car buyers trunks of a roominess to make you gasp 
have a favorite that they'll back against the steering that halves the turning effort of parking, 


worle, isp soe! eneeety, Styted, Save ew Try Studebaker’s automatic hill holder and 
Studebaker. ; ; 
you'll never want a car without it again. Enjoy 
Impressively big in every dimension, the new the comfort of the Studebaker ride and Stude- 
Studebaker is amazingly low priced to buy. baker’s refreshing ventilation. The trade-in 
And with its built-in Fram oil cleaner and its value of your present car very likely will cover 
gas-saving automatic overdrive, available at the Studebaker down payment. 


Michigan Ave. at 26th Sf. THE STUDEBAKER SALES co. OF CHICAGO Calumet 6480 


6335 Broadway 7730 Steny Island Ave, 4653 Wasiingten Bivd. 3822 Lewrence Ave. 


CHICAGO 1834 Ridge Ave., Evanston ILLINOIS—Continued 
WEST-NORTHWEST SUBURBAN—Continued ener Auto & Repair Co. 
Commercial Moter Cu.. 2717 W. Madison St. tee Motor Sales, 5508-14 W, Geneva—Charlie’s Garage 
Mansfield Motor Sules.. 5850 W. Division st. Rd. Glen Ellyn—Avenue Garage 
Newman Auto Mart, Ine., 2424 Milwaukee Av. MLM Woon PARK — Elmwood Park Motor Harvey—Harvey Motor Sa 
Thomas Garage & Sales. 2408 S. Crawford Av. Sales, 7246 W. Grand Av Hishland Park—Hichland 8g Motors 
Tod Keller Motors, G41 N. Da se Av. LA GRANGE—Walter Nehroeder Motor Sales. Marengo—Kunde Motor Sa 
Dual Moteur Sales, 2648-56 N. Cleero Av, a Rak Hill ne Av. Nesereiic been ie yy Garage 
00D—Pollitz Motor Sales, 107 Lake St. aperville—Perry’s Auto 
SOUTH oa P Warren Motors, Inec., 610 Madi- Waukegan—Conzeiman Mo 


ei soy Z saps 
a 1 bere Netional Motor Car Co.. 6201 S. Western Av. 
TOO VIC: : Ga GR I — ROUND TRIPS A MONTH Retinal Motge tar Ga oan Sects 4° Weal, Giigamgnouth, side Sarees 

& e : : ch nth. ILLINOIS les 

i | Sie) & 20th and 26th day of each mo Stax Motor Sales, 5849 8. Ashland Av. By 

| : es Me thig o: 2nd, Sth, 14th, of each month. Roseland Motor Sales, 112th and Halsted bbs M as Crone Colter 2 aa 

ye From g d and 29th day of @ ee ue Island—Biue alan E. Chicago—Kast Chicazo @ 

SUBURBA! uth Br Anburban Motors Hammond—Fred Lute Aw 


a vs 
Something uew— “Ups! 
8 up! I 
a three step 
. ve LI POP BH; vs Woe ey ¥ Me Bi | s é is | Ci 5 (0 
sae Wig A COMED Tee a. * on FRA 


avel convenience .«- smariness without pretense 


tr I Briefly, 
Superb comfort . . . every t Overland Route trains: 
that reflects the sper ROY full standard-width steam-powered 


include: a 
© “Downstairs” and “upstairs: bedrooms, single or en sul 
© De luxe streamline observation-lounge oie 
@ Round tables in dining car—roomy and com 

“go poe : @ Barber, bath and valet cow heal ae 
= “Dewsstales Bodroos © Registered Nurse-Stewaraess 20a 
et 5 hours-42 minutes to San Francisco!—49 — O 

p almost 10 hours over? steam train service 


tee eset 


caaeapemae 


a saving of 


eal 


age. iis Se Zi 
eS AO sd Mes OF Le } A 
GO” Meg 4 
ST Me I Ae : 
“te ie ah, 


COE re ale 


THE SCHEDULE Eastbound 
ital ) _ Br. 2:00 p. m, (and day) 
9:10a. m. Lv. Standard Ar. 3:45 a. m. 
Lv. 11:00 a. m. 


Semen she ersten 


| os : A oe : 11th, 17th, 23t ad 
. Lag ame:  *% | From San Francisco: 5th, th the ™ sailing” dates of the PARK RIDGK—Park Motors, 26 Park Av. ‘rygtal Lake—Peterson’s Garage Highland—Grimmer’s Garage and Sa 
‘ i : ting e BERWYN—Walter Schroeder Motor Sales De Kalh—Saw 3 P Im 5. : , 
. * ae S pooping EE OE EEE | NINER— alterna es Hl HIGH-SPEED service to and trom 6830-41 Ogden Av. : Elxin—H. L. veg ator Sa Sales Whiting—Tillews Suver Service ne 
hiring cosis, use Tribune en ‘SAI “(RANCISCO— assur dar month!—this in addition to : | 


3 help wanted ade to find one ee tne Dining Cos See Francisco every third day ' famous Overland Limited 


ee Ss Pn ee SPEED DY wiTH SAFETY. EXTR 2 eT hee SUNDAY, JULY 18 


ot your organization, 


n and reservations apply to 
’ aT. ees UNION PA 


yee ai: ae EF 


_ pena r. barbecue, evening 


— 


NY Me ee oe ar ee od & 
. is » Wee ? - 


‘es 
bi 


= the arrest "s 


es sae 
“opened its hear- 


plaints that the 

company is guilty 

of — labor 
nasa Liddy. sits et : 


nigh: uare was, how- 
ever, no direct : anaibiion between 
the grand jury action and the labor 
board hearings. — Pleas Judge 


and the dare nding with “assault 


with intent to do great bodily harm 
less than the crime of murder.” 


Charge Wagner Act Violation. 


The labor board, of course, was 
considering the battle only in its 
acoects as an alleged demonstration 
ot the: methods of intimidation and 
coercion 1 by Ford Motor com- 
puny bosses to prevent workers from 
joining the United Automobile 'Work- 
ers’ union. union, which is an 
afiliate of John L. Lewis’ radiéal 
Committee for’ Industrial Organiza: 
tion, has charged that the company 
prevents its 120,000 workers from en- 
joying collective bargaining as guar- 
anteed by the Wagner act. 

The warants signed by Judge 
Liddy upon the recommendation of 
Prosecutor Duncan McCrea, a Demo- 
crat who prides himself upon being 
generally known as a “friend of the 
U. A. W.” charged ‘the. 
defendantk nated with the beating. 
of Richard Merriweather, a iapraber: 


of the U. A. W. west side local which ic 


union official who was ane in| 


he was called to testify sackiaiea in| 
Detroit at hearing of national labor) } 
relations board. ae 
EE OC Ti 8] erin 


is leading the fight for organization 
of the Ford plants here, — 


Everett Moore, head of the service 
department of the Ford Motor com- 


pany, was the first individual named, 
Others were Wilfred Comment, a su- 
perintendent on the assembly line at 
the River Rouge plant; Samuel Tay- 


Oscar Jones, and Russell J, Edick. 
In addition to these men there were 
warants issued for the arrest of 
“John Doe.” 


Called Professional Fighters. 


In releasing the information this 
afternoon Prosecutor McCrea assert- 
ed that Sarkisian is a former profes- 
sional wrestler, that Jones was a pro- 
fessional boxer competing under the 
name of Jackie Young, that Cries at 
one time was a wrestling referee. 
McCrea also said that Goodman has 
a long police record. 

Judge Liddy has been investigat- 
ing the ‘fight. which occurred when 
union leaders sought to distribute 
union literature to men doming off 
the afternoon shift at the plant, for 
more than a month. He/‘had scores 
of witnesses testifying in his court- 
room, among them Richard T. Frank- 
ensteen and Roy Reuther, members of 
the U, A. W. executive council, who 
were most seriously beaten. 

‘It was considered strange here this 
ances ngon that the warrants did not 
2 _the defendants with the slug- 


a 
(ae ee Vex. 
Begs See ee 


quate ni Seo: 
Pts vi ver t ae peta, Fe 2 ut: ees) 
wad 1 5 6 3 ¥ 
WE i 


spec wg = 
"The w 
- ay ie y, “ak. 
4 y _ 
¢ » 


i] 
od per h 
Pas oo © 
SeLee 4 F 


é to disprove the toe, began of 


|the Fora company that the fighting 
on May 26 took place on property be- 


to the company and invaded 


One of the first witnesses called to 
the stand was John K. Norton, an 
engineer of the Wayne county road 
commission. He was asked by Sugar. 
to éxplain just what property around 
the River Rouge plant was ‘public 
ground, what belongs to the Detroit 
street railway commission, and what 
portions of its belong to the Ford 
Motor company. 

Then ensued a lotige wrangle be- 
tween the lawyers and the witness 
during which the topography of the 
battle ground was carefully explained. 
In effect it amounted to this: 

The battle took place at gate No. 
4, which opens on Miller road in 
Dearborn and less than half a mile 
from the Detroit city limits. At that 
point the Ford company has leased a 
large plot of ground to the street 
railway company, so that a dozen 
separate tracks have been installed 
on the east side of Miller road. 

This has been done so that fifty 
or more street cars can simultaneous- 
ly load or unload at that point, Per- 
haps half the men in the huge plant, 
which has’ a total pay roll of 87,000, 
come to and: depart from work aboard 
the street cars. 

The plant itself, however, is on the 
west side of Miller road, which lies 
in a north and south direction. So 
that employés will not be forced to 
dodge vehicular trafic on the street 
the Ford Motor company built a large 
overhead bridge with about a dozen 
stairways leading to it from the 
ground on the east side of the road. 
The bridge then extends directly to 
the second floor level oF the automo- 


by the union ew and leaders. 


3180 per 
«loa thereafter. hes were m 


Aug. 22,- 1922, 
and separated last March 28. On that 
day, Mrs. Mendelsohn testified, her 
husband slapped her face, and twice 
struck her after they separated, She 
was represented by Attorney Samuel! 
Wittelle, 


bile plants. ‘The battle of Miller road, 
it seems, began when Frankensteen, 
Reuther, and others climbed the stair- 
way to the overhead bridge and ad- 
vanced. 

This action, the Ford cOmpany con- 
tends, constituted trespass upon 
private property inasmuch as none 
of the union*men was ah employé of 
the company, and the bridge can be 
entered only from the ground owned 
by the company and leased by the 
street railway. 

Who Owns the Bridge? 

Sugar and counsel for the board, 
John TT. MeTernan, Laurence A. 
Knapp, and Christopher W. Hay, con- 
tend that the overhead bridge is not 
private property of the Ford com- 
pany. They assert that the Ford com- 
pany has leased the ground, the 
bridges, stairways, power lines, and 
other appurtenances of the terminal 
there to the railway company. By 
this token, they say, any person who 
can use the railway is entitled to use 
the bridge. 

Sugar, at the beginning of the hear- 
ing, announced it was his purpose 
to prove this point, and he asserted 
that the Ford company had no right 
to protest the appearance of the 
union men on the bridge; that the 


railway company alone might have 


legally objected to their presence. 

At the noon hour recess Norton, 
Examiner Lindsay, and all the attor- 
neys for both sides went out to the 
plant and carefully looked over the 
ground. Norton brought a 200 foot 
Steel tape and he and Lindsay care- 


Directly and indirectly. Jewel cus- 
pasmie provide regular work for 
searly: 19,000 heads of families. 


ascites 


RT Eee eed 


Never before! Never again! 
Such magnificent dresses at such 
a remarkable price! They were 
wo up to 915.95 and were rare 
values at $6.99—bat at $4.99 they’re 
spectacular! Let nothing keep you 


away from Grayson’s tomorrow! 


"My qa 


x printed chiffons 
pastel crepe 
* white sharkskin ense 
* nets, marquisettes, lace 
* gorgeous formals 
* novelty tropical sport; fz 
dark summer sheers 


Mes 


SIRI SS ae 


* 
a 


TILER AIRE OPW MLY IND BEIT RMI I, WE AT 


sce vqeet re 


A FLORAL NEGLIGEE 
to make you: cool and sweet 


The cool serenity of a garden lying quiet in the shade. 
The sweetness of roses, ess of carnations. That’s 
what you'll suggest if yon waft down to breakfast, float 
into dinner, arg these exquisitely designed Sum- 


mer 0 


A little maddening to onlookers who may. be ae 
—but very satisfying to oneself! And what husban 
doesn’t love being married to a vision? 


Cool washable sheer. Silvery 

carnations are spilled 
all over it. F Seatectan cape 
sleeves gather onto accented 
siuitders. Effect of grace 
and softly flowing lines, down 
to the slight train. Yellow or 
white Seed. 10 to 42. $12.95 


Rough crepe. Bouquets of 
roses widely spaced, Roses 
appliqued around the neck 

on the tiered sleeves. The 
skirt dips into a small train. 
Deep yellow roses on creamy 
ouakens: blue ‘or - roses 
on white. 10 to 42. $12.95 


ng Apparel 
Fifth th Flor’ Soh » State 


a ha tie neh = aes 3 iy R ey v ate int ‘ 2. a 
y a Pi wis kG eB: ers oT, ee 
gem a Fok . > rar <*> . —_ es ? 
ee <p AP OS actrees aj Vpgn oS a "s a ’ ” — " 
b k wart - ‘ Z er I Ee PP a ER i <- eet SE, ees 
A SP iat Py a4 Wes x x 7 - 
x ~~ . 1 a iad Ae sR * ¥ . y - 
4 4 ‘a > - re . es A - : 
~ . ee tee ie* ; te - ~ “ ¥ y , 
a ad A . Sab wp Sap ee te Hak ede ‘ : at 2 
“ey x 4 38 ~~ a 7 : “ ‘. x % 4 
z 4, a % “ oe r Sa ica s “ . Fah yes . 
$ 3 SS < wy y4 
; Sy See Lor arr 4 ‘ ce > 2: a eee 
ys t : ¥ ae Cay ast i Ane ‘ Fy Sn As : 
3 : \ Var, é : — «CF 
E R ” B x y Po * ™ oy Na rue F 4 


ze 
: 


PET ATL EPREAEL TT 
tit} sebtaiie i 


He 


uit 
ete 


it 


ad 


the Inland attorneys. The reporter 
was ordered out after he had refused 
anf rg making notes on discussions 
hich Examiner Wood had ordered 
official record. 


ing any appeal to the’ federal courts 
from the findings of the examiner 
and the labor board. 
Answer Goes Into Record. 
Ernest S. Ballers. chief counsel for 


yesterday inserted in the trial record 
a reply from Benedict Wolf, chief 
trial examiner of the board, stating: 

“I am instructing the trial ex- 
aminer to permit official reporter to 
make a full.stenographic report of 
all off the record’ proceedings for 
use of the respondents. These mat- 
ters not to be considered part of 
official transcript.” 

Examiner Wood, announcing his in- 
structions from Washington, read a 
long statement in which he defended 
the exclusion of statements from the 
record as a disciplinary. measure by 
which the trial examiner may confine 
argument within the proper scope of 
the case. He said he interpreted the 
Washington ruling as a partial grant- 
ing of the petition by the Inland at- 
torneys appealing from his ruling of 
Saturday. 

Reporter Is Withdrawn. 

Court reporter troubles continued 
tc delay the hearing. Examiner Wood 
had read his statement in the absence 
of counsel for the Inland company, 
and when they resumed their places 
in the hearing he instructed the offi- 
cial reporters to read to them the 
record of what had taken place in 
their absence. 

Several times he corrected the re 
porter sharply on mistakes in his tran- 
script, then asked that the head of 
the agency which has the official re- 
vorting contract appear before him. 
Following their conference, the err- 
ing reporter was withdrawn from the 
hearing and did not reappear. 

Cc. L O. Aid Resumes Stand. 

Testimony was not resumed until 


shee i an 


Conductiie:Matires Today; 


54 Years with Railroad 


Charles A: Woodworth, 71 years 
old, 3407 Fulton boulevard, will re- 
tire today as a passenger conductor 
after 53 years and 11 months with 
the Chicago and North Western rail- 
road. Mr. Woodworth started as a 
freight brakeman in 1883, became 
freight conductor in 1887 and a pas- 
senger conductor in 1900. 


Strike Over One Nonunion 
Man in Plant; 2;100 Idle 


Detroii, Mich., July 6.—[Special.J— 
When members of John L. Lewis’ 
United Automobile Workers:of Amer- 
ica. struck today in protest against 
working ‘with a nonunion man, the 
Chrysler corporation’s Dodge truck 
plant closed, throwing .2;100 men out 
of employment. 


. Met, ~ ee : se 
ie 3 Satie pd is 


OLDS 


PRICED BUT 


OUT 


( > iy 


sees 
orp are 
oe 


5 “ 
Solera ls 
os ie 
Y 


ee EN 


TTLE ABOVE THE LOWEST 


wite 


AT) 


TEETER 


the afternoon session. Then Stanley 
Sherman, secretary of two of the lo- 
cals of the C. I. O. steel union which 
brought charges of unfair labor prac- 
tices against the Inland company, re- 
sumed the stand. 

Attorney Ballard renewed his re- 
quest that the company be given per- 
mission to copy the list of members 
claimed by the union and met re- Ee ea ae igh: 
newed objections from I. S, Dorfman, ss ee 
attorney for the labor board. In the Pee: Fie a pe 
course of arguments, Attorney Bal- ager ee 
lard indicate. that the company 
wishes to assemble proof that some 
of the alleged members have since Se a oe 
resigned from the union, or that in ee : a 
some cases they might have been en- SL? Ge iE EE Bite 
rolled through coercion. 3 


WORKER SUING 
C.1.O. FOR LOSS 
OF HISWAGES 


Noblesville, Ind., July 6.—[Special.] 
—The case of John W. ‘Triplett 
against the United Auto Workers of 
America, docketed in court in this 
city today, raises the question of 
whether or not striking workers can 
legally. keep those who desire .to. work 
out. of: plants. by occupying the prop- 
erty. One hundred and fifty-five em- 
ployés of the guide lamp division of 
the General Motors corporation are 
made party defendants. 

Triplett alleges that the defendants 
had possession of the plant for two 
weeks during which time he was not 
permitted to work. 

He asks judgment against all of 
the defendants for wages’ which he: 
lost while he was not employed. It 
is said this is a test case to. ‘deter- 
mine if an employé can be prevented 
from working by strikers although 
nothing in the complaint indicates 
such action. 


MepethTe 
i 


; 
' 


"PEPE dade dh “ 
HHAHEEEET HP ETUUAUAR 


tieh 
| 


jie? 
’ 


For the average figure. Sea 
Island cotton combined with 
mesh lastex. Invisible boning. 
Semi-uplift bust of Alencon 


pattern lace. Also in tearose 
or in white double voile. $5 


For tastidious freshness 
combined with control— 
SUMMER BIEN JOLIES 
for every figure type 
You can launder them endlessly. You.can be as dainty _ 
about a Bien Jolie as if it were a handkerchief. And 
when you're in the nice cool Pence ng e— whatever 


its type—is properly, gently 


Bien J s use the coolest of cool fabrics—cut so ingen- 
iously that airiness never detracts from control. — 


BORROW MONEY on Watches, 


Diamonds, Jewelry, Silverware 


1% A MONTH 


NO OTHER’ CHARGE OF ANY KIND 
You can gét-a loan of from $1 to $1,000 
in a few minutes. No questions, no en- 
dorsements by friends. No note to sign. 
LOANS MAY BE PAID OR REDUCED 
BY INSTALLMENTS 


Interest is not deducted in advance. No 
fees or fines for you to pay. ~ 


Since 1899 this Society has made 1,800,- 
000 loans. totaling over $76,000,000. 


COURTESY—DIGNITY—SAFETY 
FIRST STATE PAWNERS SOCIETY 
Under State Supervision 
42 South Clark Street, near Monroe 


Our service spares you the 
embarrassment of borrowing 
from friends. We will make 

you a loan without note, endorsement 
or any assignment of wages, 

The First State Pawners:Society was 
formed in 1899 by the Merchants Club, 
as a public.service. It-operates under the 
active direction of prominent: Chicago 
citizens who serve without pay.. You 

-areassured of courtesy and of an imme- 
diate loan. The property you leave with 
‘us will be as safe and secure as in your 


© How. would you meet those sudden 
and necessary expenses for doctors, 
nurses, hospital care? 

This Society was formed and is oper- 
ated for the express purpose of helping 
you in an emergency like that. It ‘makes 

money available, instantly and at low 

interest rates, to people who need funds 

but who have not stock or bond collat- 

use, Ex — [g| , Cuticura Soap and Ointment - eval for bank loans. ey 
at | due to external _ sina acto, : Instead of stocks and bonds you can 
‘ . a ps the borrow from us on the collateral of jew- 
serif watches, diamonds, silverware. : 
_ The interest charge on omy loan, from 
_ $hte sep is ahi 


Pounded ‘1899, Operated es « Public Service 
DIRECTORS 
A. AL Carpenter John Y. 
Kent Chandier ord 
atane & Sek 2 
T... Donnelley 


ba lk | 
to Lieut. 
the Hudson avenue police, — 
ompan by Attorney ‘George Y 
| “In trying to pass another car in|‘. Methodist. he 
gt ; | the 1800 block of North Clark street, juries ineurted ea en vere kil 
, Black, husband of ‘the see-| Duffy's cab brushed the curbing) | Ni ome din Bein, a led v nd fate 
m; Black’s sister, Vera, and| where Robert Martin, 6, of 334 Con-| -messmemmmememmemmemnses _ es ai. — 


us passengers were ae’ cord place, was sitting, and killed 
e bus driver, Robert’ _ 22, the boy. Duffy told Lieut. Rohan 


ne 


Evanston | last Fri was meee 8G ee ae yo oR Shining han ayaa ae — ® Beautiful 3-thread sheer for dress wear! 
terday CF cya ‘William | H.| §  _._ FROSTY WHITE gg, a F THE PET OF THE PARIS —_ ¢ Every pair has the famous’ ’Monotop” feature! 
Schermerhorn and ~ made by the Til. a | : : » % OPENINGS! SLEEK yg 4 ° Every pair. ¢ grand buy at this low price! 

nios: carey ry aac after an| § ry harkskin ae gall i ° Exclusively at Mandel’s in Chicago] 


investigation, | Schermerhorn’ and; - ry? : — Ki © $tock up now for the summer! 
Ses eee Toppers SM Black by~ Lene 
the rear of the first section at the) _— — ee Also Our Famous Exclusive. 


Davis Wives: sate ee FOR DAY AND NIGHT : ner” 
- ‘cheer Economy: Hose 


a vg bsg fuperintendent’s of. : 
| | 4-thread ringless crepe twist sheers for hard wear! 


accepted responsibility for 

through a block signal, had left the ) | 

service. eS : : } y Both styles in four lovely shades: ‘ 
Chicago Transit Chiefs | ae oa is | 3 : 9 ROYAL WINDSOR (bright copper) 


Meet with Mayor Today| | __. Y TOWN DRESSES CUBATAN (leathery tan) 
Mayor Kelly will seek a frank dis- .. 3 3 CARIB (light copper) 
‘Cibeion: of the whole question of uni- ) BRITISH BEIGE (neutral beige) 


fication of Chicago’s local transporta- % | : i 
tion systems in a meeting today with MANDEL'S AIR-CONDITIONED HOSIERY SECTION FOR BARGAINS—FIRST—STA 


operating heads of the Chicago Siur- | nes : | : | . 
ORS ey ie MANDEL'S 
company [elevated lines], and the | 

Chieago Motor Coach company. The | aad 

meeting was called by Mayor Kelly ie Ye ; | 

last. week following the failure of aint @ ih Y SCOOP PURCHASE! 

committees representing the elevated | | 


and surface lines to reach a basis | | 

for financial consolidation of the two \ Z : 

systems. phe te | | , | — | 

Detective Freed of Death Yi | wt ee VI MV H 
_. Charge After Accident | \ iy i I | 


Detective Joseph Connelly, 42 years \ Double duty darlings you'll 
old, 7815 South Winchester avenue, p lor 

wan found not quilts: of sandaust- adore] Sleekly TAILORED with 
ter yesterday by Judge Rudolph De- deep REVERS, pleated backs, 


sort in a Criminal court bench trial. 
The case grew out of an automobile short or three-quarter sleeves. 


accident on Feb. 20 in which Mrs. , 
Susan Van Allen, 64, of 9130 South Wear ep by DAY with DARK 
Oakley avenue, was fatally jnjured. : rocks, with EVENING FROCKS by a 
Srodiaa, Detective Cooncliy tentitied night. White only. 12 to 20. : : | & 1,200 DRESSES THAT 
that ‘his car skidded into the woman , . 7 | “Wy 

7 : eet. | ee ty BE $3 AND $3.95! 
ae ee ee oe Sent MAIL YOUR ORDER OR PHONE STATE 1500. MANDEL'S JACKETS—THIRD——WABASH MPG SHOULD $ $ 


Grant Park every night at 8-00 


They'll look COOL and 


LOOK YOUNG AND COOL ; | POISED on the hottest 


summer day. They're 


IN OuR FAMOUS ; : J OPAQUE and don't need 


much undermeath. 


AR b Uy; They're SLEEK and slim- 
ope at one attor-| Wt H - t t } C Yrarning and definitely CHIC. 
_ ney general ites ‘ana’ $188.200 f “ Smart young women will 
‘the governor's office and the exe te : ) snatch them up to WEAR 
from NOW till September. 


Washable Dresses A Sa she Ais 


B. Shoulder zipper. 12-18. 


FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY . - C. Ric-rac trimming. 12-18. 


MAIL YOUR ORDER 
OR CALL STATE 1500 


SHOP IN MANDEL'S AIR-COOLED PIN MONEY SHOP -— FOURTH — WABASH 


ee 
te 


NDITIONED IN ROOMS 


’ 


& 
—_ 

Zz 
_— 


# 
- 


The cool, simply TAILORED ad | : | : DIN 4 \ware MANY PETER PAN:SANFOR- 


dresses you crave when 
the mercury mounts} Count IZED SHEERS INCLUDED! 


sted SR, Hid veinie Renaud §sreenen 


tt ch tenner se re ye © Imported Belfast Linens 

colors and easy laundering. | Pp { : a. © Sanforized Batistes: 

Sizes 11 to 17, and 12 to 18, 3 eT umes | | ea * Imported Swiss Voiles 

A. Black, white, saddle. These famous perfumes in enchanting true | 3 : | * Printed P owder Puff Sheers 

= Sis eat ak flower odors, now priced sensationally low in | : 5: Aa Shantung peeee 
ue, erry, ac : : oe ale. | - /e | | ° t Piques!. Dotted wissl] 

saddle, esti qrOen. aque, this. specie 4 sage - seam , | ——— * Everfast Crashes! Sheers! 


C. White, aqua, blue, rasp- 
» honey ‘or maize. 


white, jf! vz. | ertur beeen ees 


Ft RA Ee SS 


1... rebeees 


Se eee 


Sat Mctalecna: BP SRye Cm 


“~ 


Riles ie: x 7S fs 


H drone they an ie einen whose name is on 


| - President Roosevelt's cea on administre- 


“five manegernent ina report’ paved last week 
ose@ that a ‘radical changebe’ made in the 


"method of apptopriating funds: for the. operation. 


I is ‘followed the will be given 
- blanket authority to. spend, ed sum of 

a each year for wha Ver purposes he sees 
‘Bt. 

“ Current budgetary, Cagftro}is or should be a 
responsibility of the ent,” said the com- 
mittee. “This responsibility does ‘not how rest 
squarely upon. thé, Presid ent because of the im- 

of powers in the present sys- 


management.” 
hittee calls the “ improper dis- 


of the federal government. Ht. the ‘committee's 


s to consider the justification 

Witefn of public expense recommended in 

get by the President, and finally deter- 

nether each item is worthy. If it be 

A that congress is more willing to spend 

the President it should be pointed out that 

ire! - since the present system was adopted has 
congress etree a larger sum than the 

Under the prevailing seiinins congress is the 
final authority which decides whether funds 
should be t for a purpose considered desir- 
able by i President... This is a plan which 
evolv: he desire of the people for insur- 
an burdens being imposed upon them 

without their consent, as expressed through their 
 degislative representatives, 

r exercise of financial control by the people’s 
tatives “is very old,” W. W. Willoughby, 
a well. known authority, has pointed out. “It 
was extracted from both King John 
end Edward I. It was violated occasionally by 
the Tudors, and was a crucial point in the strug- 
gle between parliament and the Stuart kings, 
cu in the civil war of 1642-1649 and the 
re _of 1688. The accession of William and 
Mary and the passage of the bill of rights settled 
set ben exclusive right of parliament to levy 
$ Bemrgeep expenditures.” 
xcept in the dictatorships of Europe 
_Sowhergacent inthe dtr the au- 
thority,jwhich the President’s committee has 
ed fo him. For, although the budgets under 
e Panlla entary governments do not contain 
ii which our appropriation bills do, there 
are r restraints which prevent the premiers 
from .proceeding contrary to the wishes of the 
legislative branches of their governments. The 
very, continuante of the government in office can 
be términated quickly under the parliamentary 
system “byrvotes of no confidence. The power of 
cor rests upon. its power to withhold appro- 
priatio and to specify for what purposes public 
funds may be spent.. 

If ‘what the committee recommends is good for 
the federak government it ought to be good also 
for the inferior governments. Some mayors we 
have had would have done even much worse 
than*they did if they had held blank checks good 
for all there was in the city treasury. The Illi- 
nois legislature has just adjourned after appro- 
priating ‘nearly a half billion dollars. Power to 
spend that at a governor's pleasure would make 
the governorship a post of unlimited opportunity. 

There can be no doubt that what the committee 
asks for the President seeks, for he has repeat- 
edly. sought to obtain lump sum appropriations. 
One lump sum grant was for 5 billion dollars 
and that sum was employed, as many will recall, 
with powerful political effect. . 

Under the dictatorships whiclt have already 
swept away parliamentary government in a large 
portion of the world the executive, legislative, 
and judicial branches of governments are merged. 
‘The present congress, more particularly the sen- 
ate, has already done much to thwart the prog- 
ress of Sy nse It has given evidence 

to preserve the independent 

gas of the government. 

at the vicious proposal of the 

$ on administrative man- 

2 2 hie is. to. Fetals hes! ig independent 


R. oe DELIVERS. 


Sy aay ie 
‘ % ; 
e 


| Vice President should be seen and not heard, 


| mess men these days, 


they Heonasiter Chicago business | 


their list that.a purchase will put the purchaser 
on Mr. Farley’s list of good citizens and that 
‘the good citizen may call Jim up any night and 
‘ask a favor of him, which will immediately be 
extended. 

If this isn’t an explanation of the freedom of 
the mails in San Francisco, maybe Mr. Farley 
has a better one. 


ACHILLES AT UVALDE. 
Mr. Garner has held to the principle that the 


wisely, it would appear, even more for him than 
for most men who have been in his position. 
Once when he did reply ‘to a question asking 
him how in the world he could get along with 
the outfit running the federal government he 
said something that made good reading every- 
where except in Washington, 

Now Mr.-Garner has decided that he needn’t 
even be seen. He not only is not heard on 
Capitol Hill but he has withdrawn his pres- 
ence from the busy place, and, although he 
doesn’t talk, he is causing a great deal of it. 

Some of his cronies may know why he is tak- 
ing so long and so mysterious a vacation in 
Uvalde, Tex., but others are wondering. It’s 
beginning to be common gossip that Mr. Gar- 
ner’s absence from the halls of statecraft is 
intentional and intended also to have significance. 
It is supposed to be his way of saying that as 
a right winger in the Democratic party he has 
had all of the left wing he can stomach. 

The Achilles simile should not be overelab- 
orated. The V. P.’s tailor probably finds little 
of the Greek god in his patron’s measurements, 
although we have no doubt that if Mr. Garner 
got his spirit up he’d chase any one around the 
walls of Troy until he cczught up with him. The 
Achilles motif in American public life just now 
atso suffers from the fact that the besieged are 
for the most part the people who want to work 
and who are in factories which our modern 
Greeks, both intellectuals and warriors, want to 
keep closed. 

In a way Mr. Garner is doing a commendable 
thing. His absence may indicate that presently 
there will be a real split in the Democratic 
party, with the right handers socking the left 
handers and the left handers socking back. No 
ill to the country would come of that. For the 
present Mr. Garner has done something worthy 
of emulation. He has retired unto himself, and | 
one of his recent pictures shows him as a poul- 
try farmer. A whimsical Vice President, Thomas 
Marshall, came out of his befitting silence once 
long enough to remark that what this country 
needed was a good five cent cigar. Probably 
what it needs now is a good long vacation of a 
political sort. 


A GOOD APPOINTMENT. 


An important transfer in the state department 
brings to Washington, as assistant secretary 
of state, George §S. Messersmith, who re- 
linquishes his post as our minister to Austria. 
Mr. Messersmith is one of our career diplomats 
of experience and distinction. Entering the con- 
sular service in 1914, he has served in Canada, 
the Dutch West Indies, Holland, Belgium, Argen- 
tina, and Berlin, and as minister to Uruguay and 
Austria. His promotion has been well earned 
and brings into Secretary Hull’s immediate offi- 
cial staf an aid of demonstrated ability in both 
the consular and diplomatic services. 


Editorial of the Day | 


SECURITY KILLS INITIATIVE. 
{Burlington (Vt.) Free Press.] 


President Harold W. Dodds of Princeton univer- 
sity raps the present day emphasis on social security 
as an ideal for youth: 

**In our quest for happiness we are in danger of 
elevating security from the minor position in which 
it belongs to a dominant place in the scale of human 
values, by By confining its eyes to the lMmited ho- 
rizon of security a nation may not only wither its 
own soul but act positively to defeat the economic 
as well as the spiritual security which it seeks, Pre- 
occupation with security breeds insecurity. For so- 
ciety concentration upon security is suicidal, doomed 
to practical as well as spiritual failure. Each oné 
of us requires the spur of insecurity: to force us to 
do our best. Unfortunate he who has been born in 
security, double unfortunate is he who molds his 
conduct with security as his goal.”’ 

This coincides with the observation of many bus!- 


~The young man who has courage and enterprise 
today to sell anything on commission is a rare bird. 
| We venture to estimate «hat not one of the college 
graduates out of 100 in this part of the country cares 
to enter sales work where their ability to produce 
‘sales determines their day to day income. What has 
| changed? Simply this,—they seek security. They 
|| will probably lose plenty of income and plenty of 


ae 5,000 ‘or | opportunity while they are pursuing anything so 
1 to serve themseives, time serving and elusive as security, Meanwhile the | 
ERO RE SS TS fat and now Soe - wie ees gumption have less cet rags and 


next to aching’ . “ 


er we Perhaps He Had Better in: It. 


en hides Daily Reminder, wa 8, We butane Pod, 


the count a) Tear aly is doing pretty well at 
his chosen profession of collecting wedding gifts 
in Cuba. | 


STRANGER AT THE DOOR 
One of our former gangsters, who might well 


have been ruined by repeal, as so many were, 


instead turned legit and is now part owner of a 
tavern. As such, he is a holder-up of the morali- 
ties and is much pleased that his wife and chil- 
dren go to church with some regularity. He 
often says so in the vernacular of his ex-calling. 

A new assistant pastor of the church went 
one afternoon to call on the family and was just 
walking out as Mr. Ex-Gangster arrived. . 
“Who,” he demanded of his daughter Ellen, 10, 
“is that slick lookin’ gee?” And the young lady 
responded: “Daddy, that’s Dr.. Smith; he’s got 
a piece of our church now.” 


END OF DREAMING. 


Empty are all your dreams when I would hear 
The salty wind and feel the tangy spray, 

And see white sails dip low, then disappear 
Beyond the curving water’s lifted splay. 
Sweeter than words the engine whistling near 
Warning that soon it hurries toward the bay 
To join its iron throb along the pier 

With what incoming tides will have to say. 


* 


When dreams no longer mark my east and west, 

I shall resume my hours with homey things; 

Forgetting that I felt against my breast 

The urging beat of restless eager wings, 

Then I shall listen as a good mate should 

If you but talk . . . and I believe you would. 
Rose Myra Phillips. 


FROM the esteemed Sateve Post comes this 
assertion: “Gussie kept what he called a gen- 
eral store at. Lake Angel. It was mostly a beer 
joint and headquarters for fishing boats and 
angleworms tacked on to the side of the house 
he lived in.” Iris Eyes, who avers she has never 
traveled in Minnesota, asks us please to explain 
why the folk out that way go to the trouble of 
tacking up angleworms for decorations. And we 
don’t know. 


Why the Ice Cream Was Late. 
(Campbell, Neb., Citizen, via Anon.) 

Our morning Hooten Nanny became derailed 
Monday morning just west of the crossing in 
Russiatown, the cause being cattle grazing 
along the right-a-way. Buts Koch’s big white 
faced bull disputed the right away but came 
out badly the loser. He was knocked down 
and the train trompt on him and rolled him 
for about fifty feet, and it is doubtful if he 
had a whole bone in his body. However he 
did succeed in causing the four front wheels 
to jump the rails, and the car bumped on the 
ties for almost a hundred feet. The rear 
wheels remaining on the rails. The train also 
hit a cow, but at last reports she is still going 
on all fours, but somewhat bruised up. Post- 
master Balthazar went out with a car and 
retrieved the mails as did a few of the mer- 
chants who went after their icecream,’ An 
engine was sent for from Edgar and they made 
town about noon. 


WE LEARNED LONG AGO to believe in the 
sincerity of people who tell us things.. Not often 
have we been disappointed. When the Rev. R. 
Anderson Jardine informs the world, “I came to 
America to preach, not to fill my pockets,” we are 
sure he means it and are willing to give him the 
benefit of any doubts that others may express, 


FUMMATION OR FUBTRACTION? 

My fifter Sufie is fimply impoffible;: fo fmart 
at our houfe but fo hopelefs in fchool. Yefter- 
day fhe was fent to the delicateffen for fome 
fupplies, but when the coft was ftated fhe dif- 
played fixteen cents to the falefman. “No, no!” 
fcreamed the falef perfon, “Not fixteen cents, 
fixty cents. Can’t you fee the difference?” “Oh 
fure,” refponded Sufie, “ feventy-fix cents.” 

Incunabulus. 


SPUTTER. 
I'll make your dad-blamed column yet; 
And when I do you're goin’ to get 
Burned up with satire keen that sizzles— 
valews mine is the kind that fizzles. 
The Underdog. 


ONE LEARNS that the Irish constitution of- 
fered by De Valera scraped the edge of defeat 
because women voters felt insulted by a docu- 
ment designating home as the place for them, 
This is an unpleasant truth, and the women of 
Ireland are no different from those in America, 
who demand the right to be on juries and then 
dodge service as earnestly as the men when it is 
granted. And the Irish were always, except in 
America, agin the government. 


Just the Same, the Taxpayers Are Tired 
of the Shooting. 
(Litchfeld News-Herald. via W. 8.) 
A CORRECTION: | 
John Gunn is the assessor for Walshville 
township instead of William E. Cannon, as 
stated by the News-Herald in a story on the 
assessment for 1937 of that township. 


CONCEPTS change from generation to genera- 
tion, and Mary Marie points out that the funny 
papers have now convinced the newest lot that 
the rolling pin is an exclusive weapon used by 
Amazonian ladies in the subjugation of mere hus- 
bands. 


SIR: esas ‘the ‘aaitae ‘of the Hometown 
paper went with his wife to a movie. Tired after 


[Brno Snips angie ghar iy ce 


ge Ey 
‘mentally alert, possess good vision,’ and |. 


‘every 'y one about the ' ‘shop must be 
be free from aches and pains. A work: 


pertection in the “manufactured article 
counts for so much. A life may depend 


that the threads are cut true. 

While some occupations are more dan- 
gerous than others, risks may be re- 
duced to a minimum through the in- 
stallation of protecting devices guarding 
the eyes, fingers, hands, and other parts 
of the body. It is generally agreed that 
safety campaigns have saved not only 
thousands of lives but ten times the 
number of potential disabilities. Most 
concerns have established, therefore, 
fold objective: 


[1] that all employés 


‘Shall be kept in optimum physical trim 


for their own sakes and that of their 
families, and [2] that the company hall 
be subject to the fewest possible days 
lost because of illness. 


a 

Every one should be willing to submit 
to a physical audit, as thereby disease, 
if it exists, is detected before much 
damage has been inflicted. In addition, 
the design is to fit the man or woman 
to the job; to eyaluate his or her ability 
and to make certain that placing a per- 
son in a position of responsibility will 
not endanger co-workers. 

Realizing that health education may be 
at a relatively low ebb in certain com- 
munities, many organizations have in- 
augurated a system of health instruc- 
tion. Bulletins dealing with seasonal 
diseases, suggestions as to diet and ex- 
ercise, and the hazards of ill health are 
set forth in simple terms. Furthermore, 
the sanitation of the plant is an example 
that speaks louder than words, and light, 
ventilation, cleanliness, adequate bathing 
and toilet facilities, lunchrooms, etc., all 
play a vital réle. 

~@e~ 

There are two destroyers which care- 
ful checkups will help to conquer—tuber- 
culosis and syphilis, The former may 
come on so insidiously that early detec- 
tion is imperative. Practically every 
case that is identified in the beginning 
stage is certain of cure, and there is a 
reasonable chance of recovery for those 
in whom the infection is recognized late. 
This emphasizes the value of X-ray plates 
of all workers, particularly in the young- 
er ages, who exhibit symptoms of fa-. 
tigue, lassitude, or lack of zest. Such 
& procedure costs something, but it is 
one of the most important safeguards of 
health. 

The time may come when routine 
blood tests will be demanded, as the un- 
treated victim of syphilis is bound to 
face incapacity sooner or later. He will 
be obliged to stop work in order to fight 
a fire that has gutted the building [the 
body]. If a positive Wassermann is dis- 
covered at the outset the flames may be 
quenched before the conflagration has 
passed beyond control. As most of us 
realize, in its later stages this plague 
affects the nervous system profoundly. 
fogs the brain, and destroys the power 
to perform. 

But to guard against these diseases 
one examination is not enough. Tests 
should be repeated every two or three 
years, with tho instruction that the pa- 
tient is to report to his private physi- 
clan promptly upon the appearance of 
symptoms, 

A man of 50 has the right to assume 
that he will live 20 years; a man of 
60, that ne will live 14 years. But one 
cannot ignore ordinary health standards 
and expect the maximum longevity. 
Every one should conform to rules ot 
hygiene which are of common knowledge 
~proper clothing; good food; some at- 
tention to the mouth, the teeth, the 
digestive tract, and the skin, and enough 
rest to insure rebuilding of used up 
tissues. 

~~ 


RHEUMATIC FEVER. 


Mrs. P. R. writes: What are the symp- 
toms by which rheumatic fever can be 
recognized in children? My six year old 
runs a temperature of 100 degrees or 
more in the evening. 


REPLY. 

Symptoms of rheumatic fever include a 
temperature ranging from 100 to 102 de- 
grees F., moderate fretfulness, malaise and 
some prostration, loss of appetite, sore 
throat, and pain in the joints. After the 
onset of the disease there are usually pro- 
fuse sweats, great thirst, coated tongue, con- 
stipation, and scanty, highly colored, acid 
urine. 

As in most infections the evening temper- 
ature is higher than at any other time of 
day. Hence a careful examination should be 
made as the cause must be found and elim- 
inated if possible, 

ete ceed ; 


AIR SICKNESS. 


O, T. writes: Would taking a glass of 
orange juice, toast, and coffee before a 
§ hour air trip prevent air sickness? 
Should one suck an orange or a lemon? 
How about smelling salts? What could 
one give a 7 year old child to prevent 
nausea, 

REPLY. 

Unless you should happen to encounter 
“rough " air you will probably not be sick, 
and maybe not even then, Freedom from ap- 
prehension is more important than a light 
meal. If you think ciirus fruite and smell- 
ing salts will help you, take them along. 
Children seldom suffer from air sickness. 

~~ 
PUFFY EYES. 


O, J. K, writes: 

1. What does puffiness under the eyes 
signify? 

2. What causes the facial muscles about 
an inch under the eyes to twitch? 

REPLY. 

he Slight 
that you are growing old; severe puffiness 
may indicate kidney or heart disease. 

2. Habit spasms are often dependent on 
some mental habit. Occasionally, however, 
there is a real nerve irritati 


ihe high standard of the product | 


upon the strength of a bolt or the fact | 


health centers of their own with a two-| 


puffiness may indicate merely 


} 


app 
F 


é From Acress the Sea 


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE 


BY ANDREAS BACKER. 
[Chicago Tribune Press Service.] 
OSLO, Norway.—The first thing to 
attract the attention of the traveler 
arriving by boat at Oslo, Norway’s 
capital, is the fortress and castle of 


Akerhus, 

Akerhus is one of the most famous 
buildings in Norway, second in inter- 
est only to the cathedral of Trond- 
hjem and the Hakonshallen in Ber- 
gen. It dates from the 13th century 
and was built by King Haakon V. 
He often lived there and later it be- 
came thé residence of the kings. 

The fortress has suffered many 
sieges, and in 1527 it was destroyed 
by fire. It was rebuilt and during 
the reign of Christian IV., somewhere 
about 1624, the fortress was repaired 
and has not been altered since. 

That same year, Oslo, the old capi- 
tal of Norway, was burned to the 
ground and King Christian ordered 
the population to move into a new 
town situated just below the Akerhus 
and protected, by its.cannon. He 
christened the new capital Chris- 
tiania, by which name it was known 
until 1925, when it was renamed 
Oslo. 

In 1716 the Akerhus was besieged 
by Charles XII. of Sweden, but it 
proved too strong for him and he 
was forced to retire. Now the for- 
tress is just an “ancient monument”. 
A good deal of money is spent in 
keeping it in repair and it is of 
course open to the public. Local 
festivals are held here and it is here 
that important foreign visitors are 
entertained. 

The fortress contains “ Liberty 
Bell” which was presented to Norway 
by American women to commemorate 
the separation of Norway from. 
Sweden in 1905. This bell is rung 
only twice a year—on New Year's 
eve and on June 7, the anniversary 
of the historic separation. 


| FRIEND OF THE PEOPLE | 


fhe volume of Legai friend mati necesst 
tates printed statements on common qtes- 
tions. No copies or records of the letters 
or answers are kept. Hence. follow-up letters 
should be complete in themselves. If ques 
tions are based on some previously printed 
problem a clipping of the article should 
accompany. Most of the replies are mailed 
Letters bearing no name and address are 
disregarded. A self-addressed envelope will 
expedite handling. 

PROBATE PROCEEDINGS. 

Oak Park, Ill., July 2.—[Legal Friend 
of the People.J—I am the executor of 
an estate which has been turned over 
to a lawyer to be probated, but I would 
appreciate any advice or information you 
can give me on the questions following: 
The value of the estate is approximately 
$4,300—there being about $300 in cash 
turned over to the lawyer [after funeral 
bills were paid] and property which was 
sold by him through a real estate agent 
for $4,000. 

1. What legal fee should be expected 
for the handling of an estate of this size? 
Does the court set this fee, or the law- 

er? 

‘ 2. How long after the estate has been 
taken to court for probating can we ex- 
pect the money? 

3. Will the lawyer furnish a full ac- 
counting of any money spent by him 
and deducted from the estate? 

4. Since the property was sold by the 
lawyer through a real estate agent, Is 
there any way of checking the price re- 
ceived for the property? L. S.W. 

1. The Illinois statute says that the ad- 
ministrator’s fee shall not exceed 6 per cent 
of the personal property. In our opinion 
the lawyer’s fee should come out of this. 

®, Ordinarily an estate should be closed 


shortly after the year for fling claims. 
3. Yes, in the sense that a final account 


will be filed in court. 
4. One way would be by getting in touch 


with the purchaser. 
TRIBUNE LAW DEPARTMENT. 


he ’ 
PROBATE OF WILL. 

Chicago, July 3.—[Legal Friend of the 
People. }]—I ‘would sincerely appreciate it 
if you could answer the following ques- 
tions for me: 


will? * 


ag io 
1, 1 i Aaa sonnet, of aap 
the word meats merely 


3. 1 there any set fee for the services| fF 
| of- an exeeutor? | Ge re 
Brig) 


and addresses. 
People, The Tribune. 


A BRICK IN THE BOUQUET. 
Chicago, July 2.—Please accept my ap- 
preciation of your editorial in today’s 
issue, *‘Some Acts of the Legislature.’’ 
This leads me to say something I have 
deferred saying for a long while which 
I want to get out of my system, and it 
will express the same thought of most 
of my friends, who have frequently said 
to me what I- am going to say to you. 
They, like myself, are Republicans most 
of the time. 

There is not a better newspaper than 
THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE in all America, 
and there is not in all America a news- 
paper which is less esteemed than THe 
TRIBUNE. That ought not to be. In ad- 
dition to being the best newspaper, you 
make the best appraisals of political situ- 
ations. Because of these two virtues you 
ought to be the most beloved newspaper 
in all America. 

The trouble lies In the way you state 
your cases. You don’t like the C. I. O. 
and hence there is nothing you can say 
good about this organization, and yet it 
must contain literally hundreds of thou- 
sands of men who are just as sound in 
principle as you and the rest of us try 
to be. There is nothing too bitter for 
you to say about it, and Mr. Orr’s car- 
toon in the same issue expresses this bit- 
terness in its most ideal form. 

The result of these overstatements— 
wholly rabid in their expression—is that 
you cause a reaction in the minds of 
many of your readers to an extent that 
they refuse to believe even that which 
they may know to be true. A man as 
well as a newspaper should not be over- 
zealous of his virtues, and the only time 
this occurs is when there are overstate 
ments of a given fact or situation. 

The public wants to know the truth no 
matter whom or what it concerns, and if 
it is told the truth there will always be 
enough people who will form true judg- 
ments that they will constitute a major- 
ity whether Democratic or Republican, 
Your editorial referred to gave the Illl- 
nois legislature credit for having passed 
some good laws even though it consists 
mostly of Democrats. Would it not be 
equally right that you should be equallv 
fair in all things you publish and give 
the readers a chance to form their own 
judgments as to the right and wrong of 
an event? You have the same right, of 
course, but it is the manner in which 
you state it that causes your paper to be 
less esteemed than it should be. 

It gets my goat to have to buy the 
New York Times in order to get both 


Writers should confine themselves to 200 or 300 words. Give full siaialiad 
No manuscripts can be returned. 


Address Voice of the 


sides of the case when we have right here 
in Chicago a far better paper. Of all 
the institutions that deal with public 
affairs and seek to influence public opin- 
ion, a newspaper should be the one which 
more nearly reflects a true situation and 
an honest opinion. THE CHICAGO TRIB- 
UNE is capable of doing both. Why 
won't it? W. W. WILLIAMSON. 


THEM COTTONWOODS. 

Chicago, July 2.—Perhaps if M. E. M. 
found it his unappreciated privilege to 
rake his yard several times a week, pick 
the cotton which accumulates on rose- 
buds, etc.; ferret in among the growing 
plants in beds to eliminate the long 
strands which bear the cotton and seeds, 
and, lastly, to eliminate the countless 
millions of plants which spring up from 
these seeds in flower beds and walk bor- 
ders, he might not consider the request 
of Mrs. N. S. that all cottonwood trees 
be destroyed as quite so foolish. Even 
the screens in windows and doors yme 
so thickly covered with this suse 
they must be cleaned. There are many 
beautiful trees which do not make the 
nuisance of themselves the cottonwood 
does, and I think I speak authoritatively, 
as there is one in the yard next door to 
us which is absolutely a nuisance to all 
the people in the block. I think Oak 
Parkers were wise when they voted to 
cut down all cottonwood trees. 

A COTTONPICKER. 


WAGES AND PRICES. 

Chicago, July 1.—Fellow worker, to 
my conception logic inescapably shows 
that labor leaders fail to perceive that 
it’s economic futility to call workers out 
on strike for an increase in wages so long 
as there is a power above—the govern- 
ment fixing prices which we as consumers 
must pay. What good is a 3, 5, or 10 cent 
an hour increase in wages when that in- 
crease is invalidated over night in so far 
as the grocer, the butcher, the clothier, 
the shoeman, fuel, and the landlord are 
concerned ? 

If our labor leaders were as fundamen- 
tally interested in the principles of union- 
ism as they are in seeking membership, 
then organized labor would, to my com- 
prehension, get somewhere. By this I 
mean the trend which is prolonging the 
depression, curtailing employment, and 
suppressing right and initiative can only 
be explained by laxity of leadership in 
the principles of unionism, which to my 
mind is due to selfishness and stupidity. 

Emit G. LAINGA. 


THE CAPTAIN RUNS IT AS A SIDELINE 


[London Opinion (Copyright).] 


1; What steps are necessary in order to| fe 
ceiate an | 
2, Can an heir be an executor of the : 


Pet caste oR 


ght -he| OVERCOME BY EXHAUST F 

gratin gy ag tg, Se Sip 

a : motor exhaust fumes yester 
+ | ruck. collapsed in a restaurant at| Austria. 

® But he stuck it {5100 South Kedzie avenue, and was taken |". | we 

Mee Out during the | Sette Cor ge et timerion, 2 career man in the | 
“an odd job or)s x 


two. .— 
His wife and. 
two > daughters 


PR AES tag. Nive pie dg sibs 
> < 7 


+. 


au a * i RELEASED PATTERNS, MILL TRIALS AND 
mpm sae edt , 77 N Tt gots EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 


or private char- 
ity. He never was 
on the WPA rolls. 


- "Bee Nichols. And in the end|= | sl 2 . =|3 i 
he licked the depression. 2 llth . =|s ) : 

Tonight the face of Leo Nichols, 48, | = — | | i - ee : | 
is one vast grin. He said he received | = _— - | = | 


word from District Attorney Buron 


Fitts of Los Angeles, Cal., that he is 


: i ) tol inheritance me —_ F al re oie | Ble : | 
of $650,000 ftom the estate of a great. F Cc <<. SS 6 | i and other Oriental reproductions woven by Karastan 


uncle who made a fortune in the °49 
gold rush. 
Goes to Work as Usual. 
“The Lotd helps those who help 
themselves,” said Nichols as he went, 
as usual, t6 his job as night watch- 


m at the Gardner Dairy Equip- |= 7 =| = : sages 
ment factory. pigs Semiannual hosiery selling tf 
| ; : |= 4 ’ 
“Ella and .I have had a hard time |= =\= a 
and a lot of bad breaks,” he said, |= =| ; 
“but we're in the clear now.” = ee e\= , 
Shy Sst he EVERYDAY 


size of his inheritance, he said: “I’m 
flabbergasted. I hardly can believe it.” 


In fact the only composed member >, ® 
of the Nichols family was his grand- 
daughter, Beverly Jean Wright, 11 . 
months old. She's her grandfather’s 


particular delight. Very specially priced 
Wife Visits Her Neighbors. 3 : 
Mrs. Nichols was flying about 


among the “neighbors, accepting con- 
gratulations on her good fortune. 
Cne daughter is Olive Belle, who |= by 


lives with them. The other, Mrs. 
Harlan Wright, wife of a young 
farmer. _. = 
“First off I’m going to disappear | = Ideal stockings for vacation time .. . these 


completely, starting tomorrow,” de- |= : 
cared Hichols, “ Already @ flock of |S 4-thread favorites are lovely and sheer enough 
people have started telling me how |= to complement your daintiest Summer dresses 


to invest my money. : » ++ Wear amazi well for ¢ 
“When I get the first payment of | = : on ee ingly enough oe Oneereet 
$100,000 in August, I’m going to buy use with spectator and sports things. Grand for 
a big auto and a house for Beverly all-round Summer hose—the colors have that 
clear dull tone so flattering to the legs. And 


Jean and her parents. Then Ella and 
1 are going out to Denver for a year. 

the special price is perfect for everyday hosiery 
budgets. Sizes 814 to 11. 


— 


TALLER MEE 


Listed are only a portion of the Even an expert, comparing these “Wonder Rugs of Amer- 
muuny exceant yetuee tncleied : ica” with the costly originals, can scarcely distinguish be- 


KARASTAN RUGS tween the true Oriental masterpieces woven by hand and 
| Approximate Sale the gorgeous reproductions made on Karastan’s almost 


size price human looms. The subtle gradations of color . . . rich 


S ‘) 5 
oe ae depth of pile . . . lustrous sheen. . . and enduring wool 


4,6x6 feet . . ++ -839.90 yarns identical with those used in the Orient are typical 


Co 8 gee ‘oes only of Karastan’s expert weaving. The opportunity to 
9x12 feet... ..$149.50 buy these rugs at greatly reduced prices can be offered only 
9x15 feet. . $198.50 twice a year—now, and again in January. (uantities in 
9x18 feet. . . 8239.50 : ee | 

1x15 feet. "$259.50 all cases are limited. 

12x18 feet. . . $298.50 

12x21 feet. . .8349.50 


KARASHAH RUGS ' Third Floor 


Cad Santo 
Teo COME on ok vied cee es Oe South, Wabash 


Ont? feet. 66 ke ack ss ae 


KARA-KIVA RUGS 
De TORR og ks ccs vv vee 
Bu5 fee, 5, ooo. nk vance 
4.606 feet..........25.0aeeele 
$.6x10.6 feet...........-P4 900 
Ovi fiat... ki cce ccs cee 
OxIB feet. . nvciccccccss hae 


mm erm rm rte re ree ne 


eee ee 


an bee hahaa hs hannanaaenanenanaeat anneal 


en 


ih EATER 


EAR FAAUEUSLAUERGHGUOTOOERNGLECEES LACS OUAGL HESS EOE ORO ALOE 


I've always wanted to see Denver. 
We'll travel for a while, then invest 
our money, and come back here.” 


$20 a Week His Top. 


The best job Nichols ever had was | 
in a Milwaukee munitions plant dur- 
ing the war. After that he moved 
here, and never has made more than 
$20 a week. 

“I piled up a lot of debts during 
the depression, trying to keep my 
head up and off relief,” said Nichols. 
“My -creditors stuck to me. Now: 
they'll find my word was good.” 

His inheritance comes from Joseph 
Daniels, who died 25 years ago. 


Casts Doubt on Fortune. 

Los Angeles, Cal., July 6.—{Special.] 
~—Word that Leo Nichols of La Porte, 
Ind., had received news of an inherit-. 

ance of $650,000 from a relative who. 
had been in the California gold rush 
met with doubt here. District Attor- 
ney Buron Fitts declared that neither 
he nor any member of his staff knew 
of such an estate for which an heir 
was being sought. As far as the local 
newspapers were concerned, they were 
unable to confirm the story. 

“The names Daniels or Nichols 
mean nothing to me,” the district at- 
torney said, “ though there have been 
several inquiries about them today 
and about a supposed will that we 
never heard about out here.” 


BROKER’S HOME BURGLARIZED. 
When Robert A. Little, an insurance 
broker, returned from the week-end holiday 
to his home at 2741 Asbury avenue, Evans- 
ton, yesterday he found a burglar had stolen 
$460 -in clothing. 


Favorite warm weather shades: 


TEMPO e BRICK ° FIESTA 
SECRET e PEBBLE 


First Floor, South, State 
Also Evanston and Oak Park 


“erry ttertrrrern 
th Babi ba 


rete 


For a befitting vacation 


7 


SM MT 


hn : gi fir ¥ "f cis Sle 
jt 2 ‘ ®t t 
ee pee a 


~ 


el 
ee eee eee 


iall priced 
i a i . ecially de 


VOTE TNOAEER TOOTS GERDA EAST SS TOSSES POAEAE AAAS SE EUG OYE TEE ANTEATER ERRSGOEO HOSUR EULA ULE TEOOUHHGTEREAETNGHELUUEEUE 


American Maid 
contour shaped 


HYTEREEEEOEROEESOODDODROOETEVEEPE HORE HHOO ASO HEOO ASE EEO STRRUOAS UU OSGGAGOETANLER AOE UH GGEUETEERPPUOOGUEUGESO LAER 


e One of America’s finest, fastest $ 

~ trains. Every modern travel com- | = 
You'll sail into the hotel dining room with no 
telltale dip of a slip. You'll stand on the pier’s 


edge, silhouetted in that bright, bright light, 
with never a bulge or a transparency. 


That is, you will if you take American Maid 
slips vacationing with you. Their four gores 
conform to your figure’s contour. They have a 
shadow proof panel, low back bandeau top, 
adjustable shoulder straps with lastex ends for 
freedom. _The suedeskin rayon they’re made of 

-Fully Air-Cor = won't shrink, sag or run. And you needn't iron 

cago 1 = them! Tearose or white. 32 to 40. $2. 

nis ‘ - Pullman |; _Knit Underthings . 
ies of inert a Fifth Floor, South, Wabash 
ee eT ee ee Also in Evanston and Oak Park 


ide. 


reen, wineg oa 


AOUUUARUYAVAEAGGEA EERO GEOTURMUEAREREARORE EEE AAG VARA EERE UE ARES 


SSR 
peers tains 
: ae WRN on ergy, ae 


Tee ee. Cae 


NO eee . ctte 


ee ee 


oe whe - 


somes 


ae 


A Tk aly 


« 


«4.4 88) & ee Ree 


= 


% 


TOTAL DAILY NET 


Seat aS 
SOR 
rattan 


> 


‘OTH the short 


term view and the long haul perspective 


_ benefit advertisers. Knowledge of new devel- 


opments coordinated with a familiarity with 
well-established trends enable the advertiser 
to buy space more effectively. 


The chart and figures on this page 
report conditions today and the 
changes in the total daily circula- 
tions of Chicago newspapers dur- 
ing a period in which headlines 
blazed the news of two major de- 
pressions and five presidential 
elections—a full generation in time 
and, in the history of the majority 
of going concerns, a major span 
large enough to obliterate from con- 
sideration all but the basic facts, 

This dynamic period offered to 
all Chicago newspapers the same 
opportunity to win new thousands 
of readers, 

The chart shows how one Chi- 
cago newspaper capitalized this 
opportunity to the full. 


It shows the steady progress by 


which the Chicago Tribune, from 


its 1917 status of second in the 
field, doubled its circulation and 
attained to its present position of 
leadership in total daily circulation 
as a result of an uncompromising 
policy of printing the news. 


Today Tribune total daily circu- 


- Jation stands at 822,486. This is 


375,016 more than the total daily 

met paid circulation of any other 

Chicago newspaper—an all-time 

high in reader preference for the 
ibune, 

In the 1917-1937 period Tribune 
total daily circulation increased 
from 395,442 to 822,486—a gain 
of 427,044, or 108%. 


This is a gain over seven times 
greater than that of any other daily 


P¢ID CIRCULATION NO 


newspaper in existence in 1917. It 
is a gain practically as large as the 
present total daily circulation of any 
other Chicago newspaper. 


- Between the lines of the chart 
may be read a fundamental truth 
about the newspaper business: 
People buy a newspaper first of all 
to get the news. They want it while 
it is fresh, not history. 

They want first-hand accounts 
written by competent full-time re- 
porters, not press bureau handouts 
slanted to suit the purposes of 
some individual or organization. 

Because the Tribune delivers in 
attractive format the most compre- 
hensive coverage of the news, it is 
the only newspaper today which 
delivers majority coverage of all the 
families in metropolitan Chicago. 


Because it prints the most provoc- — 


ative editorials and the most appeal- 
ing feature departments, comics, 
cartoons and photographs, the 


Tribune today reaches practically 


as many families as any two other 


Chicago daily newspapers com- 


« 
; > ‘ 


A newspaper’s effectiveness as a 
medium for selling the products of 
advertisers is in proportion to its 


ability to sell its own product. What 


the advertiser gets out of a medium 
depends on what the editor puts in: 

As the Chicago newspaper which 
has achieved the most success in 
widening the market for its own 
product, the Tribune is best able to 
help merchants and manufacturers 
widen the Chicago market for theirs. 


~ — 


| 


CHICAGO DAILY TRIBL 


of Circulations of Chic 


JULY _7, 1937, 


1917-1937. Twenty eventful years that stretch 
from the Russian revolution to the revolution in 


_  Spain—from the 


= 


ication of Kaiser Wilhelm 


the Second to the abdication of Edward the 
Eighth—from the last stand of the Hindenburg 
line to the last flight of the Zeppelin Hinden- 
burg. They were years that saw keener public 
appreciation of newspaper values and new public 
- - demands on newspapers which, above all other 
Chicago newspapers, the Tribune satisfied. 


eeeneeee 


0 


a5 


é 


nm 


ee BPs amy ara at oe er ee eee en ee T+ wren ~~ MG I PENS re + - 
=! 7 p * me | 


« 


Ne 


Y CIRCULATIONS OF CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS, 1917-1937 


, 


6 months 
periods ended 
March 31 


Chica 
Tribune 


Newspaper 


News 


per 


Newspaper 


~“— 


Newspaper 
H 


New 


1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923. 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
+933 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 


in over 
1917 
ercent 
Gain 


Loss from 
1917 
Percent 


395,442 


367,798 


424,026 
420,703 
460,739 
499,725 
537,134 
587,748 
619,336 
700,443 
761,548 
791,797 
837,146 


844,607 


823,053 
825,980 
767,282 
795,082 
800,999 
803,192 
822,486 


427,044 
108.0% 


392,279 


$06,283 


330,216 
398,489 
384,209 
415,056 
404,916 
424,983 
474,210 
488,492 
561,796 
571,433 
559,386 
568,743 
538,148 
501,899 
431,091 
459,938 
447,911 
436,956 
447,470 


$5,191 


14.1% 


452,162 
377,044 
386,474 
390,377 
412,220 
397,484 
386,016 
400,254 
410,513 
401,502 
432,092 
438,820 
432,796 
458,085 
439,225 
423,942 
407,365 
416,417 
404,327 
413,362 
430,887 


Trib 


irago 


142,347 


179,067 
189,548 
155,859 
167,838 
204,648 
260,679 
341,272 


289,094 
326,244 
334,073 
395,861 
338,959 
334,289 
354,892 
383,936 
403,806 
410,850 
419,612 
405,174 
428,725 
409,275 
328,491 
340,369 
364,491 
360,033 
329,720 


122,699 
110,641 
116,807 
117,588 
116,829 
117,483 
119,452 
120,449 
123,016 
123,771 
125,007 

71,093 


UTIL 


THE WORLD'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 


. dé 


fe 


- 


IN EXCESS OF 800,000 « TOTAL SUNDAY NET PAID 


- 


CIRCULATIO 


37,407 
36,624 
40,817 
44,020 
41,381 
35,468 
39,197 
36,913 
40,986 
52,582 
40,487 
38,672 


193,415 
157,338 


Paper H 


207,015 
150,308 


merged with 


Paper lon May 2,1918 


and became Paper D. 


NOW IN EXCESS OF 1,000,000 - 


~~ 


| 


‘to careers ving relief clients, 

were told yesterday by case workers 

and officials of employment agencies.. 
Turn to Resourcefulness. 

The experiences reveal a tenacity 

and resourcefulness in contrast. to 
the attitude of following the course 

a lease resistance, which has been 

adopted by many of those on relief. 

At their own requests, the names 
of those people, who are pulling 
themselves froin the brink of pov: 
erty, are not published. Few of them, 
however, had any experience in the 
jobs they now are doing. 

A former minister in a small farm- 
ing community came here several 
years ago when his congregation was 
broken up. He and his wife and 
their three small children live in the 
vicinity of Clark and Center streets. 


Start Sandwich Service. 


To make a living the former min- 
ister and his wife started a sandwich 
service. She purchases. the..meat, 
cooks it, and makes up loads of sand- 
wiches in baskets. Her husband 
travels from factory to factory dur. 
ing the lunch hour, selling the sand- 
wiches and has built up a business 
which nets him $25 a week. 

This case came to the attention of 
a case worker ‘or the United Char- 
ities of Chicago. Several of the 
former minister’s neighbors are re- 
ceiving charity, but he never has 
made any such request. | 

Near the Union stockyards lives a 
woman whose husband died several 
years ago, leaving her and their four 
children penniless, after they always 
had enjoyed comfortable circum- 
stances. 

Spurns Relief; Scrubs Floors. 

Disdaining an opportunity to go on 
the relief rolls, the woman went to 
work scrubbing floors in an office 
building. She managed to send two 
of the older children to high school 
and they now are working their way 
through college. 

The Illinois state free employment 
service pointed to the case of a col- 
lege graduate, a chemist; who was 
thrown out of work a year ago. The 
employment service had nothing to 
offer along the lines in which he was 
trained, so he accepted work as a 
bus boy in a_ coffee shop... Three 
months later he was assistant man- 
ager in the shop. A few months ago 
he became manager of a loop restau- 
rant. He is 30 years old and lives 
near Ontario and State streets. 

Another case is that of a man 60 
years old, who was seriously injured 
in an automobile accident in 1932. 
He had been well-to-<do, but when he 
finally recovered a year ago he had 
no money left. He found a job as 
elevator operator in a.north side hos- 
pital—a type of work he never had 
done before—and he now is head of 
the. night crew at the hospital. 

A war veteran, 47 years old, living 
on the near north side, came to. the 
free employment service three months 
ago. He had experience as a sound 
technician but was out of work and 
his family was broken: up. 

Takes Temporary Job. 


He took a temporary job as porter 
in a chop suey house. A few weeks 
later he found a job with a film 
manufacturing company. 

Although he is handicapped by de- 
fective vision, his ability as a sound 
technician was recognized by the film 


A girl, 17 years old, with a high 
school rae but no. special 
trainin “4 ) was faced With 


> he ti, yg 


ihe 7 Ir 


rng ome 8 


‘Tribune Press Service.] 


[Chicago 
Madison, Wis., July 6.—[Special,.]— 
1A bill which not only extends but 


broadens the power of the state de- 
partment of agriculture and markets 
to fix fluid milk prices both to pro- 
ducers and consumers in Wisconsin 


was signed by Gov. Phil La Follette 


today. 

Under the 1935 Griswold milk price 
fixing law, which expired on July 1, 
that state department was authorized 
to regulate prices in all cities of the 
first, second, and third class, and in 
cities: of the fourth class down to a 
population of 5,000. Smaller munici- 
palities came under ‘the law only by 
petition. 

The new law, pushed through the 
legislature during the last hours be- 
fore adjournment last Friday noon, 
makes no distinction. It authorizes 
the department of markets to go into 
any commodity. regardless of size and 
fix producer and consumer prices if, 
in its own judgment, it.regards such 
an order as necessary. 


the prospect .of going on relief when 
her father died. She and her mother 
lived in a shack in an alley on 
North Halsted street. The girl found 
work as an assembler with an elec- 
tric clock company. 


Iron Lung Fails to Save 


Young Man with Paralysis 

Kansas City, Mo. July 6—>)— 
James Mickey, 24 years old, died to- 
day of infantile paralysis in an “iron 
ling” to which he was rushed 250 
| miles from Lincoln, Neb., Sunday 
night. He was the son of Prof. Clark 
E. Mickey, head of the civil engineer- 
ing department at the University of 
Nebraska. 


tig LG YY 4 My, ne 
Yj jp YY Yj ; 


v 


” ” 
- ou 


Pepper told a coronae’s: jury tonight 
that she had killed May Elvin Allen, 
her lifetime chum, in Monday’s 
“gossip slaying” in a cow ‘pasture 
near here. only after being: shot at, 
slapped, atid beaten with.a club. | 
The story of the 17 year old. girl 


was corroborated in some details,} 


denied in others, by additional wit- 


nesses. 
dict of the jury was that Miss Allen, 
also 17,.“came to*her death by gun 
wounds at the hands of Jessie 
Pepper.” 

H. H. Allen, father of the dead girl, 
announced he would file formal 
charges of murder against his daugh- 
ter’s chum. A second warant today 
charged her mother with “assault, 
intention of murder, and assisting in 
murder.” 

On the witness stand, Mrs. Allen, 
mother of the slain. girl, disclosed 
the cause of the quarrel. 

“They had been telling lies. on 
Elvin,” she. testified. “She spent a 
month with her Uncle Bill in Vivian. 
Jessie told that. Elvin had a. baby 
while up there. She told Elvin’s fel- 
low, Percy Methivin.” 


Wife Granted $10 a Week 
Pending Divorce Hearing 


Although he was an automobile 
salesman, said Mrs. Evelyn Kulan, 
23 years old, 7411 South Peoria ave- 
nue, her husband, Anthony, refused 
to take her for a ride, saying this 
privilege was reserved for cash cus- 
tomers. At the request of her attor- 
ney, Victor Frohlich; Judge John C, 
Lewe .awarded Mra. Kulan $10 a 
week pending a hearing on her di- 
vorce bill charging cruelty. 


GREYHOUND 


NEW YORK - DETROIT 


LIMITED COACHES LEAVE: 
9:00 A. M. —~ 12:15 P. M.* 
EXPRESS COACHES LEAVE: 
7:00 P. M. — 10:15 P. M. 


One Way $12.95—Round Trip $23.35 
“Extra Fare $1.00 


CLEVELAND 


LIMITED COACH LEAVES: 
12:15 P. * 


EXPRESS COACHES LEAVE: 
7:00 P, M. — 10:15 P. M. 


230 8 


i209 


LIMITED COACH LEAVES: 
12:15 P. M.* 
OTHER COACHES LEAVE: 


5 A. M. 
A. M. 
A. M. 


P. M. — 
10:15 P. M. 


One Way $4.00—Round Trip $1.20 
*Extra Fare 25¢ 


PITTSBURGH 


LIMITED COACH LEAVES: 
9:00 A. M.* 


OTHER COACHES LEAVE: 
1:30 A. M. — 7:30 A. M. 
2:00 P. M. er acerEs 3:15 P. M. 

6:15 P. M. 


One Way $6.95—Round Trip $12.55 
*Extra Fare 50¢ 


P. M. — 9:00 P. 
1:59 P. M.. 


Ome Way $4:50—Round Trip $8.10 


170 N. State 


West Side, 4334 W. Madison St. 


t Stony Toland’ Ave. 


When she finished, the ver- 


ve — 41:30 A. M. 
M, - 


Pemuied snctauialhay s Sicaday . the 
United States naval reserve — boat, 
Hawk, the showboat Dixiana, tied up 
at Michigan City, Ind.; yesterday be- 
came a showboat without a show. 
The “Tobacco Road” company of ac- 
tors, after viewing the wrecked stage 
and scenery, decided to leave for New 
York. The play, banned in Chicago 
by eaves sede mea been ven 


—And it isn’t a “snail’s pace” either! Yet, it isn’t 90. Just 


A iin PE TR 


a 


| City: since-Sune 21.:- 

The crash again CS when’ 
trol stuck on the Hawk, commanded 
ys Capt. C Oy F. Heslar, preventing’ it 

co 


lanes a part of Chicago's 
dignaiad life for several years, was 
leased this year by the owners, Float- 
ing Theater, Inc, to Sam H. oe 
man | and Jack “runic cer 


a. ee Cs B. & Q. "RAIN 


AT CICERO DEPOT 


‘The body of a woman killed by a 


Chicago, Burlington and Quincy sub- 


‘urban railroad train at. the Cicero sta- 


morgue last night as that of Mrs. Ber- 
tha Hess, 47 years old, 4734 Grace 
street. Her husband, Walter, said 
| Mrs. Hess had been ill for three years. 


see 


x 


HERBERT 


CIGARETTES 


"Theres SOMETHING about them you'll like” 


. Kern ae 
: eee 
= ain Sie 
Seated neue EP sent, 
OO Benes 


THE EFFECT OF DRIVING SPEED ON 


GASOLINE CONSUMPTION 


MILES TRAVELED ON 10 GALLONS OF GASOLINE AT VARIOUS SPEEDS 
be a Se aac eee BRB) MILES 


Ol __iiiiii ne toh ts: 
25 MPH MME.21 MILES 


what spéed will give you the best gasoline mileage is for 
you to find out. But the important fact is that there #s one. 
Find it, Use it. If you’re out to save dollars on gasoline, 
do as much of your driving as possible at that speed. 'Train 
yourself to come back to it instinctively, the way a base 
runner comes back to touch the bag. It keeps you “safe,” 


and saving. 


If you want to know dozens of other ezsy ways'to cut 
‘your gasoline costs, ask your Standard Oil Dealer. The 
Standard Red Crown gasoline he sells 
is only one of the ways. The rest are 
packed into Bp pook “How to SAVE 
AS YOU DRIVE”: And that’s free: 


Cats differ in the effect of speed on gas consumption. ; : : In the car mentioned 
above there is less difference than in most between 35 miles per hour and 50, 


_ 


Daas MRT = 
Yi hd oe 
Pe oe 
ae Ty 


ES gh EDOM AS Co hr Se 2 le ye ra Ria eet Saat 


Fgh Nee 
at t tT; 


For, x ‘$9 _ yay ns 
Cate RP SE: oe oh ee - 
By copies te dh aa y 
ib i a F 
a ’ : ¢ *, ; 
j 4 
: ’ 


: teansantodn? Ts July-4:—18pei 14 
en. one of the old- 
| est fo 


Illinois and ee 
twice rav-| 
aged by 
Ohio river) 
flood waters 


in the last}: 


quarter of 
1. century, 
is preparing 
6 move. 
The actua! 
work of re- 


movies the 
Le hoe ‘county — 
orgy tohigher 
oe 6 mS Kertuct|| | ground ad. 
a “ jacent to 
the Shaw- 
neetown High school will. begin this 
month, a government. authority. dis- 
closed here today. The high school 
is situated on Hlinois route 13 about 
three miles west of the town's pres- 
ent site. 

Cempleted ‘engineering estimates 
indicate that two years will be re- 
quired for the project. Drawings and 
plans have been made and a model 
for a new town is on display at Shaw. 
neetown. The model was prepared by 
a woman architect, Mary Long Whit- 
more of Metropolis. Her plans were 
accepted by the Gallatin county hous- 
ing authority. 


UL Ine LiL | re 


— 


sam ee Se WES Ay! PR AL TE Ee 


Ea 


: - 3 ‘Page. pee tee 


Elimination of the bua bowl” with 


[its billions of grasshoppers in Colo- 


rado and. Wyoming has been made 


lof railroads, Siacadie: MOA workers 


HAROLD ‘TEEN—JUST 4 A WEE ‘SNACK 


New Step for Housing Board. 

The relocation of Shawneetown, 
with its 1,400 inhabitants, marks the 
first time the state housing board 
has used the powers which are en- 
abling the Gallatin housing authority 
to launch condemnation proceedings 
if necessary. 

Rebuilt on its new site, the town 
will be free of all flood menace. No 
part will be on ground less than 400 
feet above sea level, and ali will be 
25 to 50 feet above the point reached 
by the crest of last January’s flood. 
The new town will be laid out as a 
model city. 

Purchase of a site was made pos- 
sible through funds to be forthcom- 
ing from the state department of 
public works and buildings. The bi- 
ennial appropriation for the depart- 
ment was increased $150,000 so that 
the state could buy the site of the 
present town for a state park. 


- Other Assistance Given. 


% 


fete PAST LLUAN'S". 
BED TIME— YOU CAAT 
SEE HER Now! 


~~ eS 


Syl 


~ 


SS 


: = 3 = 


aE 


SSS 


SSsgcv 


SSW 


SS 


‘he 


WHEEL) FOS LUTIUNINEMNE DD ediaiiiiLe 


AUNT panne: COULD 


THANKS, 
goa 


GOOD aRAVY*? HE CONSUMED 
j2 COOKIES~- 4+ BANANAS~— 
2 PIECES OF PIE- ANO 
A BUNCH OF GRAPES! 


WELL ,I VOW 


Weil; 
ie 
i :* 


mm 


ll 


(i 


The Federal Housing authority, the 
Disaster Loan corporation, the Home 
Owners Loan corporation, and the 
Reconstruction Finance corporation 
have guaranteed assistance. in ad- 
dition, rehabilitation grants made by 
the Red Cross will aid in establishing 
flood sufferers in new homes. 

All buildings will be constructed 
for permanence and each home will 
™ modern in design. Various types 
will be available, and families finan- 
cially able may buy homes of ‘more 
expensive design. 

The design of the new city is revo- 
lutionary. Main street will be 100 of a heart ailment. 
feet wide. Bordering it will be a five old. 
ek ‘alias tak eg 8 eg Mr. Ross came to Chicago from 
crass aus 4eees. Between the park- sn hg Til., “~ lived in prob ise 

; or many years. e was a graduate 
“ey et ee of the Chicago Art school and an‘in- 


walk : 
12 feet wide structor at Lewis institute here. In 


GIRL’S TRADI NG 1926 Mr. Ross left newspaper work 


PENNY ROSS, ONCE 
TRIBUNE COMIC 


THe TRIBUNE and other newspapers 
for the fifteen years prior to 1926, 
died yesterday in his home in Oak- 
land, Cal., after three weeks’ illness 


ARTIST, IS DEAD 


Marion T. [Penny] Ross, who drew | 
the comic strip “Angel Child” for | 


He was 56 years | 


: and moved to California, where he 
ACCOUNT ENTERS became an interior decorator. He 
MRS. HALL’S SUIT 


An accountant testified yesterday 
that a $3,500 balance remained in a 
$29,000 trading account in the name 
of Miss Bernice Cwik, 23 years old, 
secretary of Charles L. Hall, wealthy 
publisher of horse racing tip sheets, 
and that Hall had access to the ac- 
count. 

The witness was called before Jus- 
tice George W. Bristow of Paris, Il., 
sitting here in Superior court, by At- 
torney Benjamin H. Ehrlich who con- 
tends Hall covered up his assets 
when his wife, Cathryne, recently 
won a divorce and an $80,000 settle- 
ment, 

Pending Hall’s appeal, Mrs. Hal! 
has received none of the settlement 
except $60 a week. The hearing on 
her petition for a larger sum was 
continued until tomorrow. Miss Cwik 
‘has been named by. Mrs. Hall in a 
$100,000 alienation of affections suit. 


Thomas Kerwin, 36 Years 
with Crane Company, Dies 
Thomas Kerwin, an employé of the 

trafic department of the Crane com- 

pany for 36 years, died yesterday in 
his home at 3344 Walnut street. He 
was 62 years old and a native Chi- 
cagoan. Surviving are his widow, 

Anna Walsh Kerwin, and a sister, 

Miss Alice Kerwin. Funeral services 

will be from the residence to St. Mat- 

thew’s Catholic church Friday morn- 
ing. Mass will be celebrated.in the | 

church at 9:30 a. m. 


William i Waterhoian, 62, : 


_ Loop Restaurateur, Dies 
“William L, Waterhouse, 62 years 
peg 6902 Paxton avenue, died of a 
heart attack 
oagewl He had 


planned many fine homes in Piedmont 
and San Francisco, and he was a con- 
sultant for A Century of Progress Ex- 
position in 1933. Recently Mr. Ross 
went to Hollywood, where he designed 
sets for several film studios. He re- 
turned to his Oakland home when he 
became ill. 

Surviving him are his widow, the 
former Myrtle Barnard of Oak Park; 
a son, Gilbert; two brothers, Marshall 
and Owen of Chicago, and two sisters, 
Mrs. Mary Ross Richards, Chicago, 
and Mrs. C. A. Hinds, Albany, N. Y. 


ENDS OWN LIFE; 
PICTURE OF DEAD 
WIFE IN HIS HAND 


The body of Dr. Carl Otto Bauth, 
67 years old, i111 Fifth avenue, Wil- 
mette, was found in the operating 
chair of his dental office at 140: North 
State street yesterday by Dr. Charlies 
oa Wright, who shared the office with 
him. — 

Dr. Bauth had taken poison. In 
one of his hands was a picture of his 
wife, Ann, who died ten months ago. 


“I cannot go on. My love for Ann 
was too profound, too deep rooted. 
O, the desolation of life without her! 
It is unendurable.” 

An inquest will be held at 9:30 a. m. 
today. 


J. E. meee, 76, F 


nday at Dewey Lake, ae 


He left a note in which he wrote: 


“MOREBIRTHS, FEWER 
DEATHS IN CITY FOR 


FIRST 6 MONTHS OF °37 


Dr. Herman N. Bundesen, president 
of the board of health, made public 
figures yesterday showing that the 
general health of Chicago’s residents 
is improved this year compared with 
the first six months of 1936. Deaths 
from all causes decreased. from 19,- 
461 to 18,543, while births increased 
from 21,734 in the 1936 period to 22,- 
373 this year. Deaths from nearly all 
types of communicable diseases de- 
creased. Following is a comparative 
summary of eight diseases and the 
number of deaths they caused in the 
six month periods: 


19236, 
Infant deaths 
Searlet fever 
Whooping cough 
Diphtheria ..... Fe ei 
Cerebro spinal fever... 


43 
27 
Bil 
; vedecas Me ~ 2,297 
Heart dlsetec igs eee aay 5,945 
The downward trend of deaths from 
cancer and heart disease shown in 
the tabulation is the first for many 
years. 


Boy of 17 Is Found Dead 


in Park Swimming Pool 


Zigmund Zabowski, 17 years old, of 
5811 Fullerton avenue, was found 
dead last night in the swimming pool 
in Riis park, at Fullerton and Meade 
avenues. Capt. Henry Stannenberg 
and a fire department rescue squad 
tried in vain to revive him. Physi- 
clans were not certain whether he 
had died from heart failure or from 
striking his head while. diving. 


Ex-Judge John J. Rochford 


Dies at Indiana’s Capital 
Indianapolis, Ind. July 6.—[Spe- 
cial.J—John J. Rochford, 72 years old, 
an attorney here forty-five years and 
a former county Superior court judge, 
died this afternoon. | 


*e*fpnaeeene 


eee tee 


PAY TRIBUTE TO 


GEN. J.G.HARBORD | 


AT BLOOMINGTON 


Bloomington, Hil, July 6.—tSpe- 
cial.]~—Charles G. Dawes, former. Vice 
President and ambassador to Great 
Britain, joined with Bloomington and 
central Illinois in paying honor to 
Maj. Gen. James G. Harbord, dis- 
tinguished world war veteran of Mc- 
Lean county, here today. A memorial 
tablet was dedicated on the site of 
the general's birthplace, six miles 
southeast of Bloomington. 

Mrs. Kate Orendorff, 87 years old, 
an aunt of Gen. Harbord, and his 
only living relative now in the county, 
unveiled the marker. The ceremony 
was under the auspices of the Mc- 
Lean County Historical society. 

At the dedication Harbord said: 

“My mother and wife, were they 
alive today, would have loved you 
for the honor you do me. My wife, 
more than any other, was responsible 
for anything worth while that, as a 
son of McLean county, 1 may be 
thought to have accomplished.” 


Services for Mrs. Lowden 
Will Be Conducted Today 


Funeral services for Mrs. Frank O. 
Lowden, wife of the former governor, 
will be conducted at the Lowden Sin- 
nissippi farm near Oregon, Ill., at 11 
a, m. Chicago time today. Graveside 
services will be held at Graceland 
cemetery here at 3:15 p.m. Dr, Fred- 
erick Shannon will be in charge at 
both services. Mrs. Lowden died at 
her home ne Monday. 


Edward F. Parker, Tire 


Company Executive, Dies 

Edward F. Parker, 44 years old, 
Chicago district manager of the Gen- 
eral Tire and Rubber company, died 
of a heart attack yesterday morning 
in his home at 6806 Crandon avenue. 
He is survived by his widow, Harriet; 
and three daughters, Mrs. . Ellen 
Stoley of Akron, ~ O,, Ruth and 
Marjorie. : ) 


“+ 
an 


Felegance 


af | 
. 


TO SIFT RESIGNATION 
OF CHICAGO COLORED 
BOY FROM ANNAPOLIS | 


Washington, D. C,, July 6.—ISpe- 
cial.]—The resignation of George J. 
Triver, colored youth of Chicago, 
from the naval academy at Ann- 
apolis, Md., will be investigated by 
Representative Arthur W. Mitchell 
[D., iL], only colored member of 
congress, he said today. 

Mitchell said he had made an ap- 
pointment with Acting Superintend- 
ent Todd of the naval academy to 
discuss the resignation. The con- 
gressman quoted ‘Triver’s mother, 
who lives here, as suying she did not 
know why the boy resigned. Mitchell 
quoted the superintendent as saying 
that Triver made no complaint of 
mistreatment when he resigned. The 
boy explained that he realized he 
was not fit for naval service, Todd 
added. 

“ Another Negro whom I appointed 
to the academy was railroaded out 
of it,” Mitchell declared. “And [ 
want to find the facts in this case. 
They said the first boy, James L. 
Johnson, dr., was deficient as to eye 
sight, English and deportment, all 
of which was a lie.” 


Mrs. Bertha Thorsness 
Faneral Will Be Today 


Funeral services for Mrs. Bertha M. 
Thorsness, 423 North Central avenue, 
widow of Marcus Thorsness, former 
president of the village of De Forest, 
Wis., will be at 11 o'clock this morn- 
ing in the Moreland Lutheran church 
in Austin, with burial at De Forest. 
Mrs. Thorsness died Sunday at the 
age of 16. 


10 HIGH SCHOOL 
POOLS TO OPEN 
FOR CHILDREN 


Swimming pools in ten public high 
schools are to be opened immediate- 
ly, to remain open during July and 
August for the use of children be- 
tween the ages of 10 and 18. James 
B. McCahey, president of the board 
of education, acting on the suggestion 
of Mayor Kelly, issued this order yes- 
terday after informal conferences 
with members of the board. 

The pools are in the Fenger, Cal- 
umet} Englewood, Du Sable, Farragut, 
Kelly, Austin, Marshall, Schurz, and 
Steinmetz High schools. They will 
be open five days a week from noon 
until 5 p. m. Girls will have exclusive 
use of them Mondays and Tuesdays 
and boys Wednesdays, Thursdays, and 
Fridays. 

The new three unit outdoor swim- 
ming pool, largest in the city, located 
in Washington park, will be opened 
Thursday night: Mayor Kelly wil!! 
make the dedicatory address. 


Services for Mrs. Nichols 


Conducted in Evanston 


Funeral services for Mrs. Viola Wil- 
son Nichols, wife of Frederick W. 
Nichols, retired superintendent ot 
school district 79 LEvanston], were 
conducted yesterday in the Second 
Presbyterian church, Evanston. Mrs. 
Nichols died Monday at the age of 
79 in the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Bruce Corzine, 2322 Ewing avenue, in 
the suburb. She had been a resident 
ot Evanston for 50 years and was a 
member emeritus of' the Evanston 
Woman’s . club. -A son, Henry. W. 
Nichols of Superior, Ariz., also sur- 
vives. 


sensitive lining of your nose and throat. 


The fine tobaccos i in Spud Cigarettes 
are mellowed mild with just the right - 
amount of menthol. hale or cork, 154. 


and even Colorado National Guards- 
men, | 
While. huvidreds of men and trucks 


have been pressed into action in 
mixing, carrying, and spreading the 


‘poison to kill the insects; which al- 


ready have devastated hundreds of 
acres of farm lands, railroads added 
to the offensive their lethal weapons 
of fire-belching weed burners. The 
burners throw a singeing blast onto 
the hoppers along the rights of way. 


Kicks Husband on Way 


to Court; Granted Decree 


Mrs. Doris Sharkansky, 24 years 
old, 1920 South Ridgeway avenue, 
was walking behind her husband, 
Isadore, a. poultry dealer, yesterday 
as they neared the courtroom of 
Judge Joseph B. David for an airing 
of their domestic troubles. Suddenly 
turning on her husband, she berated 
him for not supporting his son. Then 
she kicked him. Sharkansky turned 
on his heel and left the building and 
Mrs. Sharkansky continued into 
court, where she was granted a de- 
fault separate maintenance decree, 
custody of Louis, 16 months old, and 
$5 a week. She charged desertion. 


MONUMENTS AND MAUSOLEUMS, 


ee Ae eee tn 


MAUEOLEUM s—MON UMENTS .. 


ee reliable 
CHAS G6. BLAKE Co., 
1000 B. 67th-st. 


Pairfax 9876. 
Erected auywhere. 


Send for free booklet. 
CEMETERY MARKERS MOND MENTS AT 
savings. Sears State-st Store. 


asement.. 
GRANITE CO., 


° 


POWERS INC. — 
” TRIBUNE TOWER. DELAWARE 3152. 


CEMETERIES, 


SAC. 4, OR 8 GR. LOT MEMORIAL PE... 
ramon, cem. pr.; choice loc. Lon. Lon.6318. 


wane PK. 4 aad # tan SECE, "Ki. 0178 
Pk TF. ax 7? 75 179. 


O'HANLEY ine MUNBRAL 


DEATH NOTICES 


in Memoriam, 


WALSH—James EB. Walsh. In memory of 
my dear husband, who passed away one 
year ago today. HELEN WALSH. 


COHEN—Winifred Durkin Cohen. In lov- 
ing memory of our dear wife and mother, 

who passed away one year ago today. 
HARRY, JUNIE, ONALD, and BOBBIE. 


Fraternal Notices. 


PLEIADES LODGE, NO. 478, A. F. & A. 
M.—Members will assemble at lodge hall 
Thureday July 8. at 1 p. m., to attend 
funeral of Brother William Holmes 

D: COSNER, Master. 


F. 8S. MOYER, Seey. 


BABEL—Ben Babel of North Chicago, I1., 
beloved: husband of SHlizabeth, dear father 
of Sara Crown, Norman, and Grace. Fu- 
neral Wednesday, 2 p. m., at chapel. — 
Roosevelt road. Interment O. KEK. O. J.. 
Waldheim. Please omit flowers. 

BADER—Emma Bader nee Judea, July 5. 
Loving mother of Robert O.: sister of 
Amanda Ulrich and Otto. Funeral services, 
Thursday, 3 p. m., at funeral home, 5200 
N. Western avenue, corner of Foster. Inter- 
ment Graceland. 


BALDWIN—Clara G. Baldwin, July 6, be- 
loved datighter of John A. and Nellie E. 
McCallum, fond sister of Marion and the 
late George, sister-in-law of Mrs, Rachel 
McCallum. Funeral services at memorial 
chapel, East 63d street and Evans avenue, 
Thursday. July 8, 1937, at 3 p. m. Inter- 
ment Mount Hope. 


BERGEN—Henry P. Bergen, husband of 
Catherittle Gonser Bergen, father of Walter 
¥., brother of Mary L. Funeral Thursday, 
July 8 at 9 a. m., from residence, 6200 
S. Bishop street, to St. Theodore church, 
Intermént Mount Olivet. 

HERTSOHF—Christian P. Bertsehe, beloved 
husband of the late Margaret F. [nee Kava- 
navigh], fond brother of Albert, Fred, the 
late Joseph. and Mrs. Margaret Mundy. 
Funeral Friday, 10 a. m,, from residence, 
5908 Magnolia avenue, to St. Ita: ehurch 
Interment All Sainte’. 

ROHRER—Cash Bobrer, suddenly, beloved 
husband of Gladys, loving tather of Elaine 
and Ronald. Fimeral Thursday, July 8, at 
2:30 pp. m., at funeral home, 4255 WwW. 
Division street. Cremation at Waldheim 
cemetery, Albany~ 3600. 

BLITZSTEIN—Anna: Blitzstein [nee Pager], 
age 39 years, of 8819 8. Michigan avenue, 
beloved wife of William. fond mother of 
Léland, Erwin, and Norma. loving dauch- 
ter of Bertha and the late Jaéob,. sisier 
‘of William and Harry Eager; Selma 
Schuliz, and the -late. Ben Eager. Puneral 
today at 8:30 pv. m.. from chapel; 4225 

onsen) t road, Interment F..0. W. 
cemetery. 

CAREY—Marie Carey, nee Gerstetier, beloved 
wife of Carroll, fond mother of Annette, 
Doris and Donald Carey. Funeral Thurs- 
day, July 8, at 9 a. m. from late residence, 
6148 S. Komensky-av., to St. Nicholas of 
Tolentine church, Interment Holy Sepulchre. 


CARLIN—Blizabeth Carlin, beloved wife of 
the late Frank Carlin, déar mother of 
Harriet. Puneral Thursday, July 8, at 9:20 
a. m., from her late residence; 5956 W 
Lake street, to St. Lucy church. Interment 
Mount Carmel. Canal 1844, 


CARLSON—Hafinah Carison, fond sister of 
Leontine and the late Signe, Carl A., and 
Mathilda. Remains at funeral home, 3918 
Irving Park boulevard, until 2° p. m., 
Thursday. July 8. Services at Second Meth- 
odist Episcopal chureh, Irving Park boule- 
vard and Avers avenue, at 2 po. m. — Inter- 
ment Mount Olive cemetery: 

CARSWELI--Rey, George Charies Carswell, 

af his home in Harvey, U., July 5, 1937; 
husband of tta, father of Mrs. G. N. 

Jennings, Mra, Stewart Walden, George E., 

Allan W.. Clyde C. and Beatrice, funeral 

Thursday, 2:30 ». m.. at Pirst Methodist 

church, Harvey. {Interment Hazelwood. 


CAT I'C— as Catio. husband. of Cather- 
ine, tather of Lewis S.. Anna M. and Mrs, 
Effie rr Services Thursday. July &, 

‘2 Dam, at 125 W. 4th street, Hinsdale. 
Meriber of Illinois St. Andrew's society, 

i764. and Melrose © Abbey 
"07 F. & A..M.. Anterment 


CHAPMAN Rama usiian, neve Longfield. 
tee | ‘of the tate Joseph, tond | 
* mother Peg lh and McKinley Chapman, 

: Funeral from late 
iden Pe sven cg 
vices M jueaee uL, me 
ebure Pa ann my, . 
biem. 


: 


LD—Ellen By Du ifield, ets 5. 19:37. 
of Fay A., Sidney, Tracy 


the Tate Ora Eekornian of Mus. 


Taarse page germ 0739. 


TAMDGS—Milared Jandos, daughter of Mary 


nister of Biaieand Liar: 


chanel, 86 — road. Cicero 
servi fay. 2:30. D. ma,” interment 
Woodlawn ceme 


KASE—Flora Kase tole Perlstein), beloved 
wife of the late Jacob, devoted mother of 
Ida Friedman, Bertha . 
Ethel, Lillian Seal, 

sister. of Moses A. 

Wabansia chapter, O. &. 

Sisters of Charity, Sisterhood 

Beth Itzchok. Services Thursday; 2 Dp. ™i, 
at Memorial chapel, 5206 Broadway. em i 
terment Northwest Hebrew Cone., a. 
heim, Family at 4940 N. Spaulding ave- 
nue, Please omit flowers... 


KUTTNER—Flora Kutiner, ‘of the Library 
Plaza hotel, Evanston. Services Thursday, 
2:30 p. m., at chapel, 1460 Sherman avenue, 
Evanston. Interment Graceland. 


LAURY—Marie Laury, aged 75: July 4, 
1937: beloved wife of he fate Max ©. 
Laury, mother of Mrs. Elsa Laury Botthof, 
Mrs. Gisela Moyer, and Erich C. Laury. 
Services at home, 156 Abingdon avenue. 
Kenilworth, Wednesday, July 7. at 2:30 
Dp. m. Interment Rosehill cemetery. 


..OWDEN—Florence Pullman Lowden, wife 
of Frank O. Lowden, mother of Pullman 
Lowden, Florence Miller, Harriet Madlener, 
and Frances Drake, Po away suddenly 

in her sleep early hs ag ‘at ~ Minavlestvent 
farm, Orezon, Ill. Servicés July 7,10 a. m,. 
standard time; at Sinnissippi: farm, . Orezon, 
Tl.. Services at grave, Graceland cemetery, 
Chicago, at 3:15 p. m. daylight saving time. 
Pi¢gase omit flowers, 


MAT.S—Isadore Mals, beloved husband. of 
Rebecca, dear father of Jack, Bertha, Paul, 
Nathan, Bessie, and Ilda Krissman, Funeral 
Thursday, 10 a. m., at chapel, 3125° Roose- 
velt road. Interment Jewish Waldheim. 


NEFF—Verlerable Brother Cyril Neff, 0, 
Carm,, July 6, at Niagara Pals, Ont.; for- 
merly of Mount Oarme! dish school, Chi- 
cago, Remaing will lie in sfate at St. 
Cyril church Wednesday, 7 Dp. m. Office 
of the Dead Wednesday evening, 7330, Fu- 
neral mass Thursday morning at 9:30... ln- 
terment Mount. Olivet cemetery. 


NOONAN—John Noonan, beloyed husband of 
Mary Higgins Noonan, fond father of Ray- 
mond, Mrs, Mae Donovan, Leonard, Arthur, 
Clarence, and the late Franeis, George, and 
Joseph, fond brother of Mrs. Mary Beezan, 
James J. Noonan, Mrs. Anna Giynt, Pat- 
rick Noonan, Mre. Margaret McGreal, aud 
the late Mrs. Della Whalen, Mrs. Kate 
Jordan, Mrs. Rose Myers, and Thomas 
Noonan. Funeral Thursday. ‘July 8, at 8:45 
a. m., from his late residence, 6759 Cor- 
nell avenue, to St. Laurence church. Inter- 
ment St. Mary cemetery. Member of Damen 
council, K. of C., and local, No. 241, Street 
Car Men's union. 

O’BRIEN—See Schwartz notice. . 

O"TOOLE—Nora O'Toole. nee O'Malley, Jily 
6, 1937, of 113 W. 18th street; beloved 
wife of Patrick J., sister of Patrick, Ed- 
ward, and Thomas O’Maliey, Mra. Mary 
Anne Burns, Mrs. John J. Moran, and Mrs. 
J. Walsh. Funeral Friday, 9 a. m., from 
chapel, 1820 8. Michigan avenue, to St. 
John church. Interment Mount Olivet. 


PERNER—Withelmina F. Mergner Perner, 
resting in ehapel. 7350 Cottage Grove ave- 
nue. Funeral services Thursday. July 8, at 
1:30 p.m. Interment Oak Woods. Phone 
Stewart 0076. 


PLAMONDON—Elizabeth Cacile Plamondon, 
July 5. daughter of William Nelson and 
Elizabeth Hauck Plarniondon, ‘sister of 
William Nelson Jr. and Peter. Funeral 
Thursday, July 8, 1937. at 10:30 a. m., at 
St. Francis church, 9th and Linden ave- 
nue, Wilmette. Interment private. Kindly 
omit flowers. 

QUATROCHI—Anthony Mazzo Quatrochi, age 
26 years, suddenly, of 1739 Addison street: 
beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Mariano Qua- 
trochi, fond brother of Mrs. Rose Johnson, 
Prudence, Joseph, Mrs. Jennie Cook, Mrs. 
Mary MeKenna, Frances, Salvatore, Yolan- 
da, and Josephine. Funeral from chapel, 
3413. Lincoln avenue, Friday, July » 9, io 
St. Andrew church, at 10 a. m. Interment 
St. Joseph cemetery. For information call 
Graceland 2424. 


RELLIBHEN—Anna A. Rellihen. July 6. of 
Na Park, Ill.:. wife. of the Jate Otto, 
mother of Ralph and William Reilihes, 
and Mre. Bunice Volkman of Villa Park. 
Services Thursday. July 8. at 2 p. m.. at 
chapel, 124 Madison street, Oak Park. at 
Lombard avenue. Interment Oakridze. 
Member of Circle chapter. No. 688, QO. E. 
S Eastern Star services at «hapel, 
RHODE—Elizabeth K. [Alice] Rhode, July 8, 
of 2688 Farwell avenue, beloved wife of 
Grant M.,. dear mother of Kathryn E.., 
Grant M. Jr.. and Janet £., danghter of 
Mrs. Elise Fuchs, sister of William J., 
Otto L., and Mrs. Richard A. Kreller. Ke- 
mains at chapel, 3415 WN. Clark street. 
Services at ‘2 p. m. Friday at the Buena 
Memorial Presbyterian church, 4301 Sheri- 
dan road. Interment Mount Olive. Member 
of North Shore ehapter, No. 840, 0. E. 5. 


ROCHE—Jeremiah £. Roche of 2806 Wilson 
avenue, beloved husband of Mary A. [nee 
Breen], fond father of Arthur B., Maurice 
E., and Mrs. Ramona E. Boehmere. Fu- 
neral from chapel. 4542 Ravenswood ave- 
nue, Thursday, July 8. 9:30 a. m., to Our 
Lady of Mercy church. Buria) Minonk., Il. 

ROSENSTEIN—Mrs. Lydia Kosenstein, ree 
Morris, July 6, beloved wife of the Rey. 
Dr. Max Rosenstein, fond mother of Leon- 
ard and Gilbert, sister of Linda, Alex, and 
Sidney Morris. Burial Friday, July 9. 10 
a. m., from chapel, 3021 W. Fuilertom ayc- 
nue, to Isaiah cemetery, Dunning. Los An- 
geles, Cal., wanes please copy. 


SAW YBE—-Danie! 


jel hee Jr. and Jack; at hore, 4 
evenins, July 5, in Aiusdale, Fil, 

at funeral home, 14 &. 1st street, Hims 
Services Wednesday, 3 op. Gt. ‘ab 
Home cemetery chapel, Forest ry og ty 

SCHWARTZ—Eddie Schwartz of 15 N. May- 
field-av., beloved husband of Kittie O’Brien 
Schwartz, son of the late Gus and Neil 
Schwartz, brother of George, At ehape!, 
4817 Madison-st. Funeral Thursday 3:80 
a@ m., to St. Catherine of Siena chure 
Burial Mount Carmel. Austin 1137, 

SULLIVAN—Mary Ward Sullivan, the 6, 
1937, beloved wife of William | », fon 
daughier of Mrs. Hichard Kelly, sis- 
ter of Edward and William Ward and Mrs. 
Edmund Kiep. funeral! from 9 
sister, 1018 Oakland ayeent ai 
day, July 8, 9:- 
church at 109. iathutient stowed’ “gan 
cemetery, Joliet. 

THORSNESS—Bertha M. Thorsness, July 4, 
1937, of 423 N. Central aveniies if 
the late Marcus, mother of ie) Ge 
and Tennard Clarence orstiess, si 
Mrs. Betsy Swalem, ar 
—, _ Ole ae 


Huron, Austin. 

TRA VERS—Harry wietae’ 
of the late Jane Travers, 
George and granddad of 
Thursday. 11 «. m., at 
Clark street. 

WARD—Annie F. Wal 
late Martin and Je 


Wecorted eae. Dept. T-30 
fackson Blvd., Chicago, Til. 
fabash 2345 ’ 


ga sail eNO Tour 


Book, I am interested in a tour to......... 


swimming ee re 


7 435 as reyes a 
rado Springs; 
5 Pikes Peak and the 
Garden of the Gods; then four 
eventful days in Mountain 
National (Estes) Park with its 
_ superb Alpine landscapes. 


ate cma ay 


Both tours truly all-expense. 
Lge transportation in 
coo 


ROUND T 
From 
In Coaches and Chair Cars 


duly 10-11-17-18-24-25-31, Ang. 1-7-8 
in addition 


Round Trip in Slee " 
21-day 4 yet 


Some of the facts disclosed: 


proximately 13,000 more persons 
sailed for Europe aboard ships of the 
Cunard-White Star Line than in the 
first half of last year. Carryings this 
year were 49,562, as compared with 
36,639 in 1936, a gain of 35 per cent. 


Four Carry 4,670 Passengers. 


In the last few days of June four 
eastbound vessels of the French 
line carried 4,670 passengers—a figure 
not equaled by that company since 
the boom days of 1929. 

There were more than 7,000 passen- 
gers on six ships of the Hamburg 
American Line-North German Lloyd 
between June 26 and 30, This sur- 
passed all previous records made by 
that company. 

Between June 25 and 29 more than 
3,500 persons embarked on or de- 
barked from steamers of the Holland- 
America Line, thereby hanging up 
another new mark. 

Ninety-one ships will leave New 
York, Boston, Montreal, and Quebec 
for European ports this month. That 
makes an average of nearly three a 
day. 

Rail Trafic Grows. 


The western railroads operating 
out of Chicago showed increases up 
to 25 per cent last winter, and expect 
to do even better this summer. 

One of the Great Lakes steamers 
leaving Chicago last Sunday morning 
had to turn down 200 applications 
for space. 

Business is so good in the national 
parks that the Lake hotel in Yellow- 
stone has reopened to take care of 
the overflow. It had been closed 
since the beginning of the depres- 
sion. 

Many of the cabins and hotel rooms 
at Mammoth cave in Kentucky have 
been reserved for months in advance. 


FIRST CHICAGO 
1936 TAX BILLS 
IN MAILS TODAY 


Chicago taxpayers will begin receiv- 
ing their 1936 property tax bills to- 
day. The first of the bills for the 
city, which were placed in the mail 
yesterday, were for South township 
which includes the loop district. Bills 
for the rest of the city are expected 
to go out in the next two weeks. 
The real estate tax bills for South 
township show an average increase 
of 9.84 per cent over the 1935 bills, 
while the personal property bills are 
up 9.2 per cent. The total 1936 real 
estate bills for the township aggre- 
gate $26,607,725 against $24,213,837 for 
1935, while the personalty bills 
amount to $15,779,088 compared with 


$14,449,527. 


The tax rate for city townships is 
$9.52 for each $100 of assessed valua- 
tion against an average of $8.37 last 
year. Although the rate is at a rec- 
ord high, the tax bills are consider- 
ably under those of seven or eight 
years ago, due to decreases in as- 
sessed valuations. 


Aurora Magistrate Parks 


on Left Side; Fines Self $1 


Police Magistrate Lambert M. 
Ochsenschlager of Aurora fined him- 
self $1 yesterday for parking his car 
on \ the left side of the street. 


the three day Fourth ourth of July noliday, 
In the period ending July 1 ap- 


* 
a 
: , “i 
t ee 
; as ‘ 
eu x A 
ey 


The figures did not include the = | 


{Acme Photo.] 


Prince Charles of Sweden and 
Countess Elsa von Rosen, a com- 
moner, who were married yesterday, 


STOCKHOLM, July 6.—(#)—Prince 
Charles of Sweden sacrificed any 
chance of inheriting the throne today, 
He married Countess Elsa von Rosen, 
a commoner. The nephew of King 
Gustav V. of Sweden and brother of 
the late Queen Astrid of the Belgians 
lost his title and prerogatives in the 
Swedish royal family. 

He acquired a new title, however, 
becoming by royal decree Prince 
Charles Bernadotte. His bride, daugh- 
ter of the Swedish court master of 
ceremonies, became Princess Elsa. 

Prince Charles was the third mem- 
ber of the Swedish royal family in 
recent years to forfeit his crown 
rights for love. The new princess, 
seven years older than her husband, 
who is 26, was divorced in 1935 from 
M. Aglos von Rosen. She has three 
children, 2 

Neither King Gustav nor King Leo- 
pold attended the nuptials at Kvil- 
linge, Oestergotiand province. 


Four in Sisterhood Leave 


to Teach in Kaiseng, China 


Four Sisters of Providence—two of 
them Chicagoans and two Chinese— 
left Chicago last night to teach in the 
high school in Kaiseng, China, oper- 
ated by the order. The four sisters 
were graduated last month from St. 
Mary’s of the Woods college in Indi- 
ana, where they were trained for the 
sisterhood. They are Sister Theodata, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hag- 
garty, 1322 Albion avenue; Sister 
Mary Evangela, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John O'Neill, 3010 Fullerton ave- 
nue; Sister Agnes Joan of Kaiseng, 
and Sister Bernadette of Peiping. 


| portant “than a good sch 


“mhey've landed ee ate 3 hi une grad- 
of the University Foro 
‘e glad now, they can tell you, 
untied the midnight oil, 
one thing more im- 
ip rec 
‘ye found, to a young man 
looking for a job, 
That's personality. 
~‘There’s no course in it, There's no 
defining it. Those young men with 


t 


| Jobs wouldn't say it’s knowing when 
| to wear tails and when to wear a 


tux, They wouldn't say it’s knowing 
how to wear sport clothes well or 
when to play a customer's game of 
golf, 

They might say it’s. looking as if 
you knew all those things, and more. 
Aided by Placement Board. 

The 128 with personality and a 
Place on the pay roll aren’t the only 
June graduates who’ve found jobs. 
They're the ones whose jobs came 
through the university’s board of vo- 
cational guidance and placement, 
headed by Robert C. Woellner, execu- 
tive secretary, and John C. Cannon, 
placement counselor. 

Mr, Woeliner and Mr, Cannon dis- 
closed yesterday that the 230 men of 
the June graduating class who asked 
their help in finding work learned 
this: 

Big corporations hiring college men 
are most interested in personality. 
Scholarship comes next. The employ- 
ers prefer men who come from the 
upper 20 per cent of their class. Men 
who've been debaters, or editor of 
the school paper, or class officers 
have an advantage. It helps, too, to 
have an athletic record. 


Formal Education Ended. 


The jobs found by the 128 are prin- 
cipally with banking houses, insur- 
ance firms, and manufacturing corpo- 
rations such as steel and rubber com- 
panies. Having won bachelors’ de- 
grees, the 128 have completed their 
formal education. Others of theif 
class will take higher degrees in 
preparation for professions, 

The average pay the 128 will get at 
the beginning is $115 a month, with 
a range from $100 to $150 a month. 
At the worst of the depression the 
average for the university’s gradu- 
ates was $75, and the jobs, even at 
that average, were scarce. 

That’s a good start toward the first 
million. 


Out of Work 10 Months; 
Gets Job and Falls Dead 


Elizabeth, N. J., July 6.—(#)—Unem- 
ployed for ten months, George Ditzel, 
50 years old, got a job as a night 
watchman today and fell dead as the 
boss was explaining his duties. 


TO CANADA 


Travel the route of the Maple Leaf 


TO TORONTO-MONTREAL 
EARLIER ARRIVAL AT TORONTO 


The faster schedule and earlier arrival at Toronto will be 
greatly appreciated by home-going travelers and business 
men requiring hotel accommodations. 


THE MAPLE LEAF 
Ly. Chicago daily (Dearborn St. Sta. ) 
10:30 a. m. (Daylight saving time.) 
Solarium Parlor Car, Dining Car— 
Chicago - Toronto. Sleeping Car—Chi- 
cago-Montreal. A// air-conditioned. 


THE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 
Lv. Chicago daily (Dearborn St. Sta.) 
9:00 p. m. Daylight saving time.) 
Buffet Lo Solarium, Sac car 
—-Chicago-Toronto. Sleeping car, 
dining car — Chicago - Montreal — /// 
air-conditioned. 


INTER-CITY LIMITED—Leave Chicago daily (Dearborn 
Street Station) 11:30 p. m, (Daylight Saving Time) 


DE LUXE COACHES 
City ‘Ticket Office, 4 South Michigan Avenue, Telephone R A Ndoiph S54 


Consolidated Ticket Office, 163-165 W. Jackson 


lyd. ao 54 os 


Dearborn Station, Telephone HARrison 9 


GRAND TRUNK-CANADIAN NATIONAL 


9:30 te 

80 P.M 

Largest Marine 
Ballroom 
on Lake 


Park: 
ae os 


(a4 


Sn ne Pe 


(4 AVG 


% 


— 


| ~ COLORADO, 3 


x J ay oe an ee 
i $7 »Y Pat fo Ss Re 
* os. ae ee 3 


Air Conditioned by Nature. Rest, 
relax and play in cooling breezes 
from the snow-capped Colorado 
Rockies. Avoid summer heat... 
get refreshing sleep every night 
... have a glorious vacation with 
Denver as your headquarters. 
Rocky Mountain National Park 
will thrill you with its grandeur. 


Central City Play Festival 


SO PBDADEAHOBOSDEAE BE 22D EF BBASE 
Denver Convention & Tourist Bureau 
1634 Court Pi., Denver, Colerade 


Please send me FREE Information and 
booklet about vacation attractions of the 


Denver region. 


Neme 


Address 


July 17 te 
August 7 


NEW YORK. 


NEW YORK’'S 
OUTSTANDING 
HOTEL VALUES 


$e -2-ROOM' 
gs SINGLE ® "Sep SUITE 


Add to your New York stay the 

comfort and convenience of a two- 

room suite — Parlor, Bedroom, ' 
Bath—at one of New 
York’s largest and 
most convenient 
hotels, and at a price 
ordinarily asked for 
a single room. One 
or two persons from 
$5.00 per day. 


CANADA, 


IN CANADA 


Enjoy the Royal Welcome of 


~» f 
Ih sé 4 


ROYAL YUH 


TORONTO, ONTARIO ‘ 


ge largest 
hotel in the 
British Empire 
paar 
Lake Ontario 
Stop here on 
your way to the 
north woods of Ontario . 


aes oe 7? 


oS as 


La 


— 
tne 


s, 


; aia i far 


 e 


> a 
24 6 ae > Sl 
i. et \ 
> S i") #40 4 we” eee ' 


woo 


athe 


,. to Mus- 


Including fascinating visits at 
DETROIT, SARNIA, THE“SO0”, PORT ARTHUR 
and FORT WILLIAM—DULUTH 


ONE WEEK *68*° 


Leaving Mondays and Fridays 


The only cruise of its kind !...on the 
biggest, most luxurious lake liners, 
to the far shores of Lake Superior 
and return! Sports, dances, mas- 
querades, cruise gayety ! Rate in- 
cludes round trip rail transporta- 
tion to Detroit, accommodations 
and all meals on steamer, picnic 
outing at Sarnia; forest drive to 
famous Kakabeka Falls, sightsee- 
ing trip at Duluth. 


Daily inne Trips from Toronto to the 
SAG op alles hs Round Trip 

Thousand Islands—Rapids of the 

St. piiabine 8 oe ebec 


from 
CHICAGO 


Visit Canada-Your Friendly Neighbor 
For information and reservations, pely railroad ticket 
ts or A. P. Williams, Cen’! 
4 led., Room 301, Chicago, 


CANADA ADA STEAMSHIP LINES 


sensueaaauae 


ENJOY A 
7 DAY 


CRUISE 


044 tHhac 
BiG SHIP 


GAVE | ve ON YOUR VACATION! Meet a 
2130 miles of 

poet . bee ft 
and Brie— Bu Falls Georgian 
—= = by « visit to the 
GAY SOCIAL err a Days 
and Nights—smart t Clab, alive, clever, 
sho beaatiful Baliroom 


up-t te floor ws— 


_ 
I gi 
: # 


A PORT. for. every. PLAN 
“IRELAND + ENGLAND. 
FRANCE > GERMANY 


LEISURELY + + + JULY: 10 


DEUTSCHLAND 


EXPRESS: + + = ©. JULY 19 


Ht YOR 


EXPRESS ++ © © JULY 223 


NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 


COLUMBUS 


LARGEST: EXPRESS TO INCLUDB 
IRELAND + + « « JULY 1% 


“BRtMel 


SWIFT EXPRESS + + JULY 18 


See Your Travel Agent in regard 

to accommodations still available ' 

or vacancies through last minute 
changes; or inquire direct 


Hamburg-Ametican Line 
North German floyd 3 


130 West Randolph &t., 
Chicago, Ill. 
Telephone: Franklin 4130 


y 
All Expenses #325"" 


Conducted Tours 
Tourist Class Is Top 
“One Class Run-of-the-Ship” 
* England — Coronation Celebrations 
* France—Paris International Exhibition 
* Holland—Land of Tulips and Canals 
* Belgium — Antwerp — Gay Brussels 
july 24, Aug. 7, 21, Sept. 4 
Write for Complete Detgils 
YOUR LOCAL AGENT OR 


* RED STAR LINE 


CHARLES KOZMINSKI, Gen'l West'n Pass. 
Aq't, 307 WN. Michigan Ave., Chicage, [1. 


limit. On sale 
y. 


Round Trip in Sleepers, 
3ist limit. On 


A Bermuda VACATION 
as 3131 rom Chicas VEL, Go. “ask for infor 


Inc., 55 E. 


LARGEST koka Lakes, French River, Georgian 

in NEW tad Loat hae Bay. 1200 rooms with tub bath and 
‘ . shower and Radio Loud Speaker . . 

$4 and up per day. Renowned con- 

Witte, masias lee cert orchestra... roof garden danc- 

hedge sy cee See ing. Meals at popular prices in the 

y “- Imperial Room and Venetian Room. 


ming Pool and Gymna- 
sium—Free to Guests _ THOS. J. WALL, General Agent 
1 E. Jackson Boulevard, aa lil, 
Phone: Wabash 


oA fat Hote! . 


Canaide to sunse bene were 

lounges—*‘ get * parties. 

ENJOY ALL THE THRILLS OF . 

OCEAN VOYAGE—All the charm of 
Sailings on the BIG SHIP 

SEEANDBEE every Friday. Book 

Ask your ae Agent for free bookiet. 


SUFFALO TRANS. CO. 
TO SWEDEN 


STATE] 212 9 
png og 


July 
Swedis 
WEST INDIES & OARIBBEAN CRUISES 
from New York 17 & 18 days, #199 and up? 
from New Orleans, 8 to 16 days, and up, 
UNITED FR . 
111 W. Washington St. Tel, State 7741 


As low 
mt oer 


——— 


HAL rh fy 
aes Hehe 5 


14600 Rooms 


Hotel 


PARK CENTRAL 


S@th ST. at 7th AVE., New York City 


on the palatial 


STEAMSHIP TICRETs 
‘from New York 


pee 31 bepartan 2 
cRirsous 
$395. Inquire 
a North Michigan 
el Agent 


y or 
ate 3286, or any Trev 


. 3 / j f ) 
Pana OA \} {A 


-DAY VAGATION 


| LAKE CRUISES, 


CHICAGO TO BUFFALO (Niacara aed 
eet cular é ba Wed Pa 
Sail On Large, Steady, M 


a —Telephone WABASH 6474— 


cacy | MID-WEEK and WEEK-END CRUISES to 
WISCONSIN. Historic MACKINAC ISLAND, $19.25 up 


4 i, Lge / open “ee Warning: Secure Reservations Zariy 

“4 i Pa é is _ ; : by - . Kd so f a iat 5 - ‘4 * 
A ad ad ‘ . ° ” - ~~ A Ce ) . ox f ’ 
ve Wie Ke ( PES LE — —— OB ve of , ae, Ke, LY oe re 
ek occ Paw nH — —- : ~— IIE LOLI oy “ae hts -. ; ‘ x i j ¥ 
VT pegylated stg wig EE Le SE Brit r , Hn agi BE at U T 7 F wv L, | : Yi# &£ 
’ + LILI PI Le > . , “ , d * A Pd vets e Ay | r ; . ’ i 
2 ae - / Oy als - - ’ a es J 4 . " . 


B. J. KENNEDY, Authorized Agent 
203 SO, DEARBORN ST. SUITE 301 
NIPPERSIN oi 
HOTEL AND COUNTRY CLUs Ne 
GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN Peers de Aso . 


Most modern and complete 
region. 67 miles from 


course. Gaited 
New thrill 
Shinner 


WISCONSIN, 


| QUAINT FRENCH 3 pAYs | 
CANADA $69.00 


JOURNEYS, INC., 333 N. Mich. Ave, Sta. 1330 


ee 


are va ae ste bath. Frew silings 
rip w priva nee s 
direct to dock at Hamilton on Monarch af 
Bermuda and PA of Bermuda, 
Bermuda Line, 180 No. Michigan Ave. 


Sum & daye—A 
thro i eae ae ti _ 


See 


ALL-EXPENSE 


LAKE TRIPS 


CHICAGO TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS 
232 W. Monroe &t, 7 State 2889 


Lap? 


oe | 


rm: 3s mR HORI - |ALL LAKE LINES 554.50 
bathers—Cabana beac 
nner f swimming pool. | va ds{land clif 0 ec ur | Week's cruise 
stone and stucco cottages. American plan. P MARNELL & rcEne : 
‘huts Bidg. Travel Service. 5511-2; 6593 : 


Daily $4.50, All-expense, including 
Woukis shin tuon and arene 4 
eekly $31; Sunday to Friday : 
Rate basis: two to a room. VACATION TRIPS 
Great lakes—resorts—sea cruises—all expense 
and independent tours 
und trip transporta- | RAYMOND-WHITCOMB, 220 } N. MICHIGAN 
RIVER CRUISES - 


7-Day Xi. tuneabe Tours 


Chicago office (never closes) Includes | 
333 N. gon nt a ae Owitseriand FA, 's golf, ae 
i | Bay, ete. Wri ie dot fe | 


Illustrated folder upon request. 
8, room, 
$ 


e phe ahg 2A th 
8 Days—Al!l Ex 


OR PLAN. YOUR OWN 
LOW COST TOUR | 


Go one way —return another. Stop off 


1 _ where you wish. Stay as long as you like. 
| We'll be ae you a i shal own 


4 pss fe eS 
ne Wisco 32 
~ ; f p 


S54 


a ute a Heo Do % lly le hy it PA ON CI TT | 


¥ 


* 


-” 


a 


ee 


16 «> 


= . 7S 


WEDNESDAY. 


ait 


— Dyicag 9 Dxily Or thane =" he Tia Rian tha Mo Mowios 


Shoulders Are: 
Key to Wearing 
~ ‘Clothe'’s Well 


Miss Donnelly Gives You 


Some Posture Tips. 


BY ANTOINETTE’ DONNELLY. 


(Copyright: 1937: By The Chicago Tribune- 
N. ¥. News Syndicate, Inc.) 


Yesterday we promised to speak 
today of the “clothes shoulders ” that 
have come to be of such recognized 
value in movie scouts’ search for fu- 
ture box office attractions. 

What are clothes shoulders? It’s 
@ good phrase, isn’t it? You recog- 
nize those shoulders at once, although 
you may not be able to diagnose 
them. You recognize them instinc- 
tively in women who wear clothes with 
a particular air of distinction. The 

dress may be picked off a bargain 
vack, but if you have the clothes 
shoulders you can fool all of the 
people all of the time about its cost. 
. More, you have the well known “air” 
which makes you distinctive looking, 
too. You carry your head better and 
you walk with the awareness that be- 
speaks poise, youth, and lightness. 

‘We get into the habit of thinking 
of shoulders as erect or rounded, 
something to be whacked at and 

thumped. to keep on the upright 
track. A good way of thinking, at that, 
if thinking reminds us that we are 
slumping ourselves. But thinking of 
them as Gethes hangers is an even 
better idea %é the sex that is vain 
about its clofies, at least. If it is a 
_+ Mice frock we take pains to see that 
 §t is put on the closet hanger so 
- there’ll be no wrinkles or shoulder 
bulges when next we go to don it. 


— 

Let us think of our shoulders in 
the same way. Make them de luxe 
hangers. If they’re rounded, as you 
know, they’ll crinkle and wrinkle the 
frock. If they’re thick they'll ruin 
it. If they're hollowed out, again 


Pe a! 
eo. = 
oe ad 

se 4 


Fo oy % 


4 

* 

~| 

*. 
Ss = 35! 


= 


: 
i 
‘ - 


= 
- 
.. « “3s 
oe : > 
8 =) ae — SOs wa Ena a 
. ~: 7) a, 


i, nda dk ey Ps 


: 


lingont Play” 


SLAM MATHEMATICS 
READJUSTED BY PSYCHOLOGY. 


[Copyright: 1987: By Ely Culberteon.} 
Outside of the question of the deli- 


cate. plays involved in many slam 
contracts, the longer one plays with 
a weak player against strong oppo- 
nents the greater the mathematical 
probability of disaster. ‘Therefore, 
with an inferior partner and superior 
opponents a small slam should not 
be bid on an even chance, such as a 
blind finesse. With a superior part- 


slam should be attempted on slightly 
less than an even chance for success, 
and a grand slam with slightly less 
than a 2 to 1 chance, 

TODAY’S HAND. 

“Dear Mr. Culbertson: The follow- 
ing hand ‘will, I hope, interest you as 
an example of turning dummy into 
the long trump hand. 8 

South, dealer. 


a 
~ 


thinking about them as clothes hang- 
ers isn’t enough. You must begin 
further away to whip them into 
shape. You don’t force them back 
on their own momentum, freally. 
They won't stay, for one thing, and 
the military erectness is not milady’s 
charm, 

You have to work them loosely and 
easily. But :you’d better begin away 
down at the toes, get them pointed 
straight ahead, pull the abdomen in, 
raise the chest, and let the shoulders 
fall where they may, with the head 


” “ 
4 Ae r - 
‘ 7 eg © ang are 
ee 7 o 7 - 4 ‘ 
Hohe Bt. A a? y'*, 
su” ,'. - > sy 
cat aa ar 
os oe > sy a ee 
oe ss hae 
ic Pe “a, 
ve Fig’ ee SF. . 
i nae oe Ed 
i 4 . = ¥ at Te ater . 
G £. Su «ue a 
a. . Ts ee 
44 7 ” ~ hae te 2 
Al tlle ae ay. ¥ «2 
i as 
r < 
\\" 
ae ; = 


/ me * ie 
a ig tf, Je aa P 
“ges Magma RAIS NS 
7 ewrrgs Toe a Cnet oe MAY q -y 
ee, eS Dae ? ; 
Pig s , é 4 


WS 
@ ? 
oo 

) : 7 = ts : e) P, 

. | ball 7 nd aad ai t “* af m 
—- 32% > 7 « ; * ’ ~ ; ., i 

m Sa mt - is : 

- ‘ fo “~ es ja 4 f = 
7 _ “ ; 
4 in bh 7 7 P ¢ 
4 - ‘ : {- * ) 
24 3 } a f 7 
:¢ SO ~ 7 ae ¥ 4 
a SS a a 
| - ee 
4, . . , 
* 
ae | 
’ 
7 * 
. 


held with prideful erectness. 


nee eese OPC erasers 


eeere 


eenee 


eeeeee 
eeeede 


eeave 
eeee 


OO 


a ‘* “¢ 
ev a ie Ty 


= ese 
re + 
gs 
6 ABN 
“4 _\ 

SO PAM C98 
ELI LOLS on KA LTA ELE EAR A 
PPS PLP he 
BP aad whe aE RI i 


p?” " 
« & “«é 
~ > 
m/s: Mu 
ah 
RR LIS ARR TE TT Re 


ae 
~- 
¢ ‘ ~ ’ 
, - ie. 
J “3% 5 
¢ a a5 ‘ * 
a3) * Gas 
Se be tp 
a j 
“ * 
A. 
Yy ++. 
~~ ge 7 J 4s 
s] 


- 
ae 


ep ee 
Ss ee ee 
Oe 
PP 
ol Ot Oe 
Oe 
Oe 


9 
OOOO ODOODOO 
Fe ne ne ee 


i 
“ee Sig 


Ae ae 
Fel Bi 


| Culbertson} “Gald Bock of Bi 


| Pass 


South, dealer. 
North-South vulnerable. 
NORTH 
iS ne ee 
= VAKI105 2 
@Q6 
WEST EAST 
AKQ92- & None 
wort ¥Q863 
- @ None , @#KI97432 
hT98632 — ES 
‘ERA ois v2. eee 
| &A108 54 
Aa ee Meese ‘Y None é 
| =. '@ 41086 
&AQ104 


Mr. Gulbertson will discuss this 
hand in tomorrow’s article. 


Bias 


‘The bidding: 


South West North 
1 spade Pass §2:no trump Pass 
}3 spades Pass 4 spades Pass 
Pass ae 


“West. opened the heart queen, 
which North won with the ace. A 
club was led, which the king won. 
The heart jack was returned and de- 


- |elarer. trumped.. A spade. to the ten 


put the lead with: North, for a second 


|club, which the: queen. won. 


. “East could see no: better way of 
getting declarer’s trumps out of the 
way than a ‘third. heart lead. The 
last club was won by the ace, and 
the last heart returned. Declarer 
trumped. Declarer led his last trump, 
threw the lead into dummy with a 
diamond, led dummy’s king of spades, 
and the last two tricks were won by 
high diamonds. 
“Yours truly, 

“'W. G. P., Champaign, Ill.” 
Dummy reversal undoubtedly was 
the correct technique on this hand, 
but the declarer’s precise method of 
effecting this reversal left a great 
deal to be desired. It was not only 
unnecessary but highly dangerous to 
put on defenders the onus of leading 


a ee ae See 


. 7 
3 , ie 
. 
we ae 
7 
oe 
oe 
PP PF LE PLOT RAR LA RAR RAE RARRR ie 
Cie sae ae soe Oe a eae Cee 
LLL IIL KIO 4 Kee 
. wee . ¢ <e 
- as A 
va - 
ae " 
. wate f ° fy 
- 
- 
7 
fe 
- 
- 


hearts for the declarer to ruff. They 


- "4 ¥. 
aS 


1S THE O-KE-DOKE? 


eeeee 


eeeteee 
eeeeenee 
Stearate 
eeerene 


days. It’s O-ke-doke! 


It’s the signal to “get going” 


tween-meal snack, and an 
at their parties. .. : 
Get a family-size package 


ae 


Tomorrow's Hand | 


the situation was as follows: 


: 
 - 
& a - 


three no trump. What should South 


might not have been so accommodat- 
After West won the club king the 
return of a heart was all right. But 
when declarer ruffed this, entered 
dummy with the spade ten and led 
another club, East certainly should 
have seen the light. At this point 


NORTH 
AK 5 
¥86 
@#KQ3 
& 8 : 
WEST EAST 
| 9 @es 
y¥ 109 ¥K4 
$3763 @©04 
es atic aQ9 
7 SOUTH ge 
AAQT 
¥y None 
@A1052 
ad 


Now, the low trump lead by East 
would have cooked declarer’s goose. 
He would not be able to draw trumps 
without loss and, at the same time, 
ruff out all of dummy’s hearts. 

South’s technique went astray at. 
the second trick. After winning the 
hedrt ace a heart should have been 
returned and ruffed, then a low spade 
led to the ten spot. A second heart 
ruff should be followed by the cash- 
ing of the spade ace, which would 
reduce dummy to the spade king, 
East to the six, and South to the 
queen, A diamond to the queen, the 
ruffing of dummy’s last heart with 
the spade queen, another diamond to 
the king, and the cashing of dummy’s 
high trump, while declarer discarded 
a club, would complete the correct 
dummy reversal process without hav- 
ing depended on the enemy for as- 

ce, 

TODAY’S QUESTION. 
Question: South opened the bid- 
ding with one no trump. Opponents 
did not bid. North responded with 


do now with: 
AAIDL4YASES OAQTI &KQ7? 
Answer: Pass, as partner was not 


Neen a neeeoietiemenmenenennnmmeneimnsnnaetiietanaentineennanemenmentaeentbereemet aa ee ee ee ee re 


CHEESE-FLAVORED POPCORN! 


Big crunchy-fresh kernels with the rich flavor of fine 
cheese. That’s what everybody’s talking about these 


All around the town O-ke-doke is the hit of the best 
parties. It’s the appetizer at the swank dinner affairs. 


evening. Bridge clubs are voting for O-ke-doke on the 
corner of every table. For luncheons, smart hostesses are 
sprinkling the soup with the crispy golden kernels. | 

And the youngsters are O-ke-doking, too. For this 
‘cheese-flavored popcorn is a wholesome, nutritious be- 
easy treat for you to set out 


today. Toss a few kernels in 
your mouth and see what a flavor-kick you get. You'll 
say O-ke-doke too, and you'll Jove it! ~ a 


strong enough for a forcing takeout, 


eeeee 
. 


when guests drop in for an 


of spice. Jean Muir provides a large 


Robert Young 
~ Has Silly Role 
in Silly Story 
You Like Cast in "Manied 
Before Breakfast." 


“MARRIED BEFORE 
. BREAKFAST.” — 
Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 
Directed by Edwin L. Martin. 
Presented at the Oriental theater. 
THE. CAST. 

Tom Wakefield.............Robert Young 

Kitty MOORS. ccc sénnanabus -Florence Rice 

June Be@ylin,...cccccsseos DUNO Clayworth 

Tweed ... sseceseccceesss Darmett Parker 

DO vdicccs kab cccus oose Warren Humer 

Miss Flecter.........05:.......4elemn Flint 

Mrs, Baglipp........+.....Irene Franklin 

‘Renmeth........sccececcs+ssHugh Marlowe 

Mr. Baglipp........+0.....,fom Kennedy 

Police Sergeant,...........Edgar Dearing 

Good Morning! : 

The apparent ambition of producers 
to make Robert Young appear as 
Screwy as possible is again realized 
in this opus. 

The entirely ridiculous story discov- 
ers him going about the business of 
being a nutty good Samaritan to a 
pretty girl employed in a ticket office, 
and her backward insurance salesman 
fiancé to whom she’s been engaged 
for five years. ... 

The hectic night he and she spend 
batting around here, there, and every- 
where—for reasons the picture shall 
disclose—results in the breaking of 
two engagements and the formation 
of a new one. 

The picture is a crazy conglomera- 
tion—sometimes funny and sometimes 
not. But you do like the players, and 
so, forgive the scenario writer much. 


“HER HUSBAND’S 


SECRETARY.” 
Produced by Warner Brothers, 
Directed by Frank McDonald. 
Presented at the State-Lake theater. 
THE CAST. 
CAPOL. ..séccveccsercassvceccecssssOQQn Muir 
cocvcvcceencesceses OVOEy Roberts 
Bart... .ccccecscscccceseccees. Warten Hull 
Stevenson... .....cceceess, COSeDh Crehan 
+ Agatha Kingdon..,........Clara Blandick 
Steven Garron.........Addison Richards 
Dan Kingdon............Harry Davenport 
Mr, Blake, .....seceeceeee++-. Gordon Hart 
Miss Baldwin........+e..Minerva Urecal 
LOwis6......ccsccccccoccss EMUliNG Garon 
Conscadddoebeakeccacs aes Holmes 


KIND: Rank and file drama about 
office wives. ; 

ACTING: Good, bad, and indiffer- 
ent. Beverly Roberts, Warren Hull, 
and Clara Blandick contribute a bit 


amount of sap. 
DIRECTION: Not bad. 
STORY: Unoriginal. 
DIALOG: Ditto. 


PHOTOGRAPHY: All right. 
AUDIENCE APPEAL: Tepid. 


See you tomorrow. 


Tomorrow's Menu 
BREAKFAST 
Grapefruit Juice 
Bacon Waffles Maple Sirup 
Coffee Milk 
LUNCH 
Salad of Ham, Rice, and Peas 
Stuffed Celery Radishes 

_ Toast ; 
Date Filled Cookies 
Orangeade 
: DINNER 
‘ - Baked Veal Chops 
Escalloped Potatoes 
Harvard Beets 
Leaf Lettuce with Vinegar 


| Not one, not two, but virtually 


| tioned! Restaurants, Bar, Cocktail 
| Lounge—even the barber shop! 

_All the more reason to stop at the 

Pennsylvania when in New York | 


; BE Fe Ae A. McKownes Presider t : EA: Duggan. Man dges 


na’ Be 
.. 
Wi 


: x y” 
AY 


To its alluring glamour the Hotel 
Pennsylvania adds in summet- 
time air-cooling on a lavish scale. 


every public room is air-condi- 


this summer! 
Convenient to any- | 
where by foot or 5c 
stébway. | 


Rates begin at 


$3.50 


Bee) 2. “STATLER. OPERATED = 
FACROSS FROM PENNSYLVANIA STATION, N.Y. 


~ 2200 
ROOMS 


each with private 
ba 


decide it is better not to 


[May Join Debutantes| 


[TRIBUNE Photo.] 
Miss Mary Jane Wegg is one of the Frederick J. 
Weggs' attractive daughters. 
the coming season's debutantes, unless her parents 


She will be one of 


combine a debutante sea- 


son with a school career and send her to Pine Manor 
Junior college. The Weggs are making tentative 
plans for a trip to California later this summer. 


- 
5 
Soe oes Ny - a maletenstaner onto pnd “< x <! 


Crisp Spinach © 


Is Featured in 


a Quick Meal 


t's to Be Used Fresh in 4 
Healthful Salad. 


BY MARY MEADE. 
Copyright: 1937: By The Chicago Tribune} 
Fresh, crisp spinach, delicately fia- 
vored summer squash, and cold, suc- 
culent watermelon, a triumvirate of 
refreshing summer foods, take pos- 
session of the business woman’s quick 
dinner for today. 

Spinach is about the most inexpen- 
sive vegetable on the market now, 
and it is delicious not only cooked 
and served with a little bacon fat and 
vinegar, but raw, as a salad ingre- 
dient. It’s as a salad, or part of a 
salad, that spinach is used in this 


menu. 
BUSINESS WOMAN’S DINNER 
Breaded Veal Round Baked Potatoes 
Fresh Spinach and Hard Cooked 
Egg Salad 
Sautéed Summer Squash 
Cinnamon Rolls [Bakery] 
Watermelon ; Coffee 
To prepare the veal eugg@ in pieces 
for serving and dip each*piece into 
diluted egg. Roll in fine seasoned 
bread or cracker crums. Brown in 
hot fat on both sides, reduce the heat 
to very low, cover the pan closely, 
_ allow the veal to cook until ten- 
*, | 


‘ —e 

There are excellent baking potatoes 
available now. Their skins are smooth 
and firm and they need little wash- 
ing. In order to save time medium 
potatoes rather than large-ones may 
be selected for baking. They should 
be well brushed with unsalted fat 
before they are placed in the hot 
oven, so that the skins will.be tender 
enough to eat. 

The most common summer squashes 
are the scalloped “ pattypan” and the 
Italian zucchini. The latter somewhat 
resembles a cucumber. If the skins 
are tender, the squash may be cut 
in pieces and cooked without paring. 
Seeds of young squash are good, too, 
but if any of the seeds seem particu- 
larly large, they may be scraped out. 
Squash should be cooked only until 
tender, in boiling, well salted water. 
Overcooking gives a mushy, unappe- 
tizing product, When the pieces may 
be easily pierced with a fork the 
water may be drained from the 
squash and the vegetable is ready 
for sautéeing in butter. 


-~o 
To make the salad, the spinach 
leaves, carefully washed and dried, 
are chopped rather coarsely and com- 
bined with sliced hard cooked egg. A 
French dressing to which a little 
chili sauce has been added is excel- 
lent for use with spinach and egg. 
A little finely sliced green onion and 
chopped pickle may be added to the 
plain dressing if chili sauce isn't 
available. ae ie: is 
The only important point to men- 
tion in connection with the service 
of watermelon is that the melon 


Ho". LOOKING GLASS 


PARIS.—[Special.]—“ Pedicure Chi- 
nois” is a placard you'll find hung 
out all over Paris. It is the fashion, 
and has been for some years, for the 
French woman to have her pedicures 
as religiously as she has her mani- 
cures—and the Chinese pedicure is 
by all odds the favorite. 

There is something utterly luxuri- 
ous about a good pedicure. It makes 
one feel rested as well as beautifully 
turned out. And the Chinese pedi- 
curists, who are so popular in Paris, 
pride themselves on their skill in 
giving the perfect foot massage to 
top the treatment. They, as one 
French woman explained to us, seem 
to have almost boneless but strong 
hands which make the massage a rit- 
ual of relaxation. 


-o~ 
In the Chinese pedicure each toe 
nail is cleansed, shaped and lackered 
as the finger nails are in the regula- 
tion manicure, The aim is to have 
one’s toe nails as flawless in shape 
and in texture as one’s finger nails. 
The cuticle is tenderly pushed back, 
the nail itself oiled and creamed and 
buffed. Each toe is manipulated to 
preserve or to encourage an attrac- 
tive as well as a healthy toe-line. 
Lacker to match that on the finger 
nails is usually worn—and with the 
open toed sandals popular here this 
is usually of a dark shade. Each 


| City Ticket Office 
178 W. Jackson Bivd., Phone Central 7600 


Chicago Office: 
HOTELS STATLER COMPANY, INC. 
77 WEST WASHINGTON STREET 


“ 


foot is massaged with cream or a 
friction lotion ‘for as long as fifteen 
minutes, at the end of which the foot 
is snow white and the skin satiny. 


-o- 

Here the pedicurist steps pretty 
much into the chiropodist’s territory. 
Where at home we consider the pedi- 
cure’ merely ornamentation and the 
chiropodist session the best bet for 
corrective treatment, the Chinese 
pedicurist of Paris is inclined to com- 
bine both fields: Whether or not 
that’s a good idexz we can’t say—but 
we will say that the French woman’s 
foot is apt to be more attractive and 


Vv 


should be fully a very cold. 
* 


Hutchins to Assist — 
St. John’s in Revival 


of Liberal Education 


New York, July 6.—(4)—Dr. Robert 


M. Hutchins, president of the Uni- 


ersity of Chicago, announced today 


he had accepted appointment to the 
poard of governors of St. John’s col- 
lege in Maryland in order to assist in 
“a revival of the ancient purposes of 
education.” 


He said the Maryland school “is an 


American sisters. 
ELEANOR NANGLE. 


certainly better tended than her 


Kelvin C. Vanderlip, Son 


would be performed here July 16. 


=] chlo 
/ MILWAUKEE 
ST PAUL 


LV. CHICAGO1:00P. M. (2 P. M. Daylight Time) 
EVENING ARRIVAL AT NORTHERN RESORTS 
_. ip Top Tap, Parlor Cars, Dining Car—50¢ lunch and 65¢ dinner; Luxury- 


Phone Franklin 6700}. ss115 


_ of Banker, Weds July 16 


New York, July 6—#)—Kelvin C. 
Vanderlip, 25, son of Frank A, Van- 
derlip, international banker who died 
a week ago, obtained a license today 
to marry Miss Candace Alig of Park 
‘avenue. She is 25 and a native .of 
Louisville, the daughter of Otto F. 
Alig. Vanderlip, who is in the real 
estate business, said the ceremony 


excellent place to try out the idea 
of educating people to live, instead of 
to earn a living.” 

Stringfellow Barr, who succeeds 
former United States Prohibition Di- 
rector Amos W. W. Woodcock as 
president of St. John’s, and Scott 
Buchanan, the new dean, served for 
the last year on a University of Chi- 
cago “committee on liberal arts” 
which has drawn up a report on how 
to revive the ancient liberal arts edu- 
cation. . 

Dr. Hutchins predicted the under- 
taking at St. John’s “might be a turn- 
ing point in American educational 
history.” Four young men from the 
University of Chicago and one from 
Oxford in England are being added to 
the faculty in addition to the new 
dean and president. . 
“There will be emphasis on the 
classics—not on the languages but on 
great books,” he said. “We want to 
get away from present liberal arts 
courses which are dreary because 
they are just a mass of history and 
social science and badly taught lan- 
guage and literature.” 

The trouble with most schools, he 
said, “is that they are overwhelmed 
by the professional and vocational in- 
terests of students. and professors, 
feeling their jobs are undignified, 
are more interested in research work 
of their own.” 


Sete te 


Lounge Coaches. Every car air-cooled. 
Schedule and Low Round Trip Fares 
Union Station Central Time From — 
Ly. Chicago wens scones cst 1:00 p.m. Chicago za ee — 
= oe evrrerncsesese a PMs os $10.40 daily, on aaa % ‘s — 
» TOMMGNAWE ..ccsceccesess Pelle «oo : Grad , 
ti Chica re) edauti y¥ Spaced. to:suct nA 
Se ee, Per cee eakeness meen ss Sees iis Oo climaxesas Victoria Falls... Angkor... 
Ar. Goodnow ORRIN p.m. Sa 10,95 tral Time. ; Borneo . ° and the new first-time port cf 
Ar. Hazelhurst Ceoseeetoasece 8:47 PMs oo 11.20 Tourane for Hue wondrous capital cf 
Be. BAR . ccccvcvcscccceceee 8:50 p.m. ee 11.25 THE FISHERMAN A : N ¥ J 6 $1900 
Ar. sclutcsecssncce 900pam, 1, 1125 ‘Fridays only, will Say ol cagges eadioteey Aig ue 
Ar. Woodrutl cccicccvccccces 812 Pils os 11.25 leave Union ta “ with $ OFS GXCUFSIONS. 26@ Your local 
Ar. Arbor Vitae cecccccsccoes O19 p.m. .. 11:35 6:30 Pp. m Cen agent or CUNARD WHI E STAR, 
= SGYMOP noe vccdevccccsccs on oe en Time safe + st pg eae Nt poe Salen, or Thos. 
. Plum BOO vi ceded cddcciac ee yA : . . ' 
Ars Stee Lake cccccccvccscese b nae es i880 bce = _—e 
it CHICAGO TICKET OFFICES . | . 


th ~ 
ea Wa ER 
BOTH HEMISi.17 1355 
*v »* a 


WORLD €.x! 


a a a ee 


* . 


= . > 
Pee es 
¥ 
* ' :. im , 
- © = ; 
+ . 
Neo a Se tae “a 2S Ay 
 \, et a © we es 
+ alba : re 
? 7 
‘ : 
. 


something of a problem for the 
next two months or so, with 
more vacationists leaving town each 
day. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Ball, who 
have been visiting his parents, Dr. 
and Mrs, Otho Fisher Ball, returned 
east yesterday to sail for a six weeks’ 
holiday in England. 
. The young Balls will arrive in time 
for the last gay weeks of the Lon- 
on ‘season, and will visit a number 
ef friends and relatives, including, of 
course, her parents, the George Pinck- 
ards, in London, and his sister and 
brother-in-law, the Gerald Wellesleys, 
ho are back at their place in Sussex 
Fhe thele air trip to the Dutch East 
Indies. 
i The Balls are remaining in town 
ost of the summer. 
+ The Solomon B. Smiths cut short 
the holiday week-end to leave for a 
vacation in Germany, where they will 
‘explore the countryside by motor with 
@ school friend of Mrs. Smith. They 
will be away five weeks. 


‘Mrs. Jacob Baur 


Returning to London. 
Mrs. Jacob Baur, who went abroad 


in time to see the coronation, has 
been in Germany as a delegate to the 
convention of the International As- 
sociation of Commerce in Berlin. She 
represented the Chicago Association 
of Comme:ce and the Illinois Manu- 
facturers’ association. 

i “Mrs. Baur is returning to London 
for another visit with her son-in-law 
and daughter, the Bartle Bulls, and 
probably will go to Paris and to the 
Riviera for her usual visit with Mrs. 
Charles Harrington Chadwick before 
returning home late in the fall. 

Mrs. Robert C. Orr is joining Mrs. 
Ralph H. James and Mrs. L. Hamilton 
McCormick when they sail from 
Montreal for England July 16. Miss 
Elien Adair Orr, the Orrs’ elder 
daughter, who went abroad with Miss 
Jane Swift to see the coronation, is 
visiting friends in France now, and 
her sister, Miss Nancy Orr, sailed just 
the other day. Mrs. Orr is joining 
her daughters in London and will 
motor with them through England, 
returning home in September. 

This will be Mrs. James’ annual 
visit to her children, Mrs. Gordon B5. 
Stannus and Mrs. Charles C. Smith, 
who are living in England, and 
Charles James, who now has his 
atelier in Paris and is living at the 
Plaza Athénée. From Paris Mrs. 
James will go to Florence to visit her 
aunt, Miss Margaret Enders, before 
Sailing for home on the Rex on 


Sept. 30. 
Mrs. McCormick 


to Visit Relatives. 

Mrs. McCormick will visit her 
brothers and sisters in England, and 
they will go to Austria, where her 
son, Leander McCormick, and his 
wife are now at their home in Kitz 
buehl. 

This is the house that the duke of 
Windsor was rumored to have leased 
as a honeymoon refuge for himself 
and his bride, but Mrs. McCormick 
says that the duke’s interest in the 
place dates back to two years ago. 
One of the duke’s equerrys visited 
the house with the intention of rent- 
ing it for the prince of Wales, but 
found it too small for the host of 
aides-de-camp and secretaries who ac- 
companied him even on vacations. 

Mrs. MeCormick will remain abroad 
about three months and will sail for 
home from Trieste on an Italian boat 
that puts in at Ragusa, the Island of 
Patmos, and Algiers. 

Mrs. Americus F. Callahan is fore- 
going her usual trip to England tis 
summer, since her son, Miller CxZa- 
han, who has been living thet<« for 
several years, is coming here ‘#fth his 
wife and 6 year old son. They will 
arrive Aug. 14 for a month. Most 
of the time that they are here they 
will spend with Mrs. Callahan in 
Michigan or Wisconsin. 

Harold Beacom sailed last week on 
the Bremen to spend six weeks on ' 
the continent. Dr. W. Oliver Brackett 
is sailing today on the Queen Mary 
to join his wife and children in Scot- 
Jand for several weeks. They will re- 
turn to Lake Forest late in August. 


Fleming Sisters 
in Scotland. 


“Miss Josephine and Miss Lily Flem- 
Ing, daughters of the Joseph B. Flem- 


{Continued on page 19, column 1.] 
—X—X—X—X—X—X—X—X—X—X—al_—s_—SXSXN!_ 


oy 


o Relatives, Travels 


matinées and informal suppers. 


pique. 
coat extends only to the waistline. 


create for this outfit. 
sketch at the left. 


pattern costs ten cents extra. 
Style No. 1504 


‘a yard of 39 inch material. 


36, 38, and 40 inches bust measurement. 
inch material, with 1% yards of braid for the dress. 


1504 
HAT-2541 


‘8 


» WOMAN’S AND MISS’ DRESS. : 

That indispensable summer mode, the one piece dress with low back, 
and accompanying bolero jacket, takes a turn for glamor in the version 
presented today.. It is so sophisticated an outfit that you will wear it on 
many and varied occasions, for spectator and active sports, for teas, 


The original is fashioned according to the scheme shown in the sketch 
at the right. The frock is of sparkling white pique, trimmed with black 
rickrack braid. The bodice is carefully fitted all the way to the waistline, 
and the skirt gradually acquires width so that the hemline is_ crisply 
flared. The jacket of the original ensemble is of black and white printed 
It has no collar. The sleeves are generously puffed and the 


little 


There is simply no end to the color and fabric combinations you can 
Another sparkling version is illustrated 
The frock, untrimmed, is of printed cotton, linen, or 
tub silk, with the jacket of a harmonizing plain shade. 

The stripped crown hat which goes so well with this ensemble has 
its own pattern, No. 2541, and is available in one size only. This separate 


in the 


is designed for sizes 14, 16, 18, and 20 years, and 32, 34, 


Size 16 requires 3 yards of 39 
The bolero requires 


CHICAGO TRIBUNE, F. 0. BOX 
Inclosed find 


Write plainly. givine size 


Number and 
ey ives iC Ks 


State eetaeeveeeee eee eeeeaereaeeaeeeaeeeve see 


Order Blank for Clotilde Pattern 
CLOTILDE PATTERN 
Grand Central Station, 
Please send me the Clotilde Pattern 
Pattern No, 1504, 


of pattern desired. 
in stamps or coin Leoin preferred; wrap it carefuliy]. 


NEW YORK CiITy 


listed helow: 


Include 10 cents 


®eeer eaves eeeeeeaeeeeP eoeete oe 


eee Reese ataee eset eeneseee 


2 em 


 * 
Constance Bennett Sues 


Ben Hecht and MacArthur 

New York, July 6.—\LSpecial.J— 
Constance Bennett is suing. the 
writing team of Ben Hecht and 
Charlie MacArthur for $52,500, con- 
tending they failed to deliver a mo- 
tion picture manuscript as provided 
by contract. The suit came to light 
today when Miss Bennett’s attorneys 
sought permission to examine the 
writers in advance of trial. Hecht 
and MacArthur deny they signed a 
contract requiring them to complete 


Relaxed Mental Discipline 
Held Danger to Schools 


Lake Geneva, Wis., July 6—P)— 
One of the gravest dangers to mod- 
ern. education is the relaxation of 
that mental discipline which attended 
schooling in other years, Dr. Houston 
Peterson, Columbia university so- 
ciologist, today told delegates to 
the first midwest conference of the 
American Association of Adult Edu- 
cation. Dr. Peterson said the new 
educational methods tend to neglect 
attention to both books and the se- 
vere mental discipline of former 


YS Rog oe ware SE.\ im Ue a t—— re ee a hind” Vendo a) 


r | Sws Ne A 


a ere 


Famous Sta 
eee rS a 


Next Monday. 


» BY EDWARD BARRY. 
- Helen Morgan, singing star of 
“Show Boat” and “Sweet Adeline” 
and @ feature of hundreds. of import- 
ant night club revues, will appear at 
the band shell in Grant park at 7:30 
o'clock, next. Monday evening in con- 
nection with the twelfth of the cur- 
‘rent. series.of free lake front con- 
certs. This announcement was made 
last night by Maj, James P. Holmes, 
commentator for the 1937 programs. 
Miss Morgan is the first nationally 
known guest star to appear this sea- 
son,. Last year’s roster incl:ided Rudy 
Vallee, Dave Rubinoff, Andre Kostel- 
anetz, and John Charles Thomas. 


—— 
Last night’s program was given by 
the admirable Chicago Philharmonic 
orchestra, which boasts — Richard 
Czerwonky as conductor and Michael 
Wilkomirski as concertmaster. Ruth 
Lyon served as soprano soloist. 
The first half of the evening offered 
music from the standard symphonic 
répertoire; after the intermission 


}came lighter things of the salon 


order. 
Mr. Czerwonky knows how to give 


music and manages to prevent an im- 
pression of diffuseness even in a work 
as long and serious as the Tschaikow- 
sky fourth symphony. This he does 
by means of powerful phrasing, vivid 
differentiation of parts, and. consist- 
ently good tempi. One might quar- 
rel, however, with his extremely 
rapid pace in the andantino of the 
symphony. 

Miss Lyon has a lovely lilt and 
joyousness in her singing. The num- 
bers she chose were well suited to 
emphasize these qualities. The “ Bird 
Song” from “Pagliacci” was fol- 
lowed by Strauss’ “Voices of 
Spring”; that, in turn, by “The 
Maids of Cadiz.” 

Night after night these concerts 
given ih cool and spacious Grant 
park are rolling up an attendance 
figure that any attraction in the 
world might respect. They are free, 
of course, which makes a great deal 
of difference but which does not ac- 
count fully for the enthusiastic pub- 


lic acceptance that they have won. 
-e~ 


Some of the reason may be found 
in the excellence of the programs 
themselves. ‘These are no old fash- 
ioned summer band concerts offering 
nothing but the “Poet and Peasant” 
overture, and medleys from “Il 
Trovatore” and “Aida” and a few 
marches. The symphonies of Bee- 
thoven, Brahms, and Tschaikowsky, 
and excerpts from the Wagner music 
dramas find frequent representation 
on the programs and Satisfy the taste 
of that large and important section 
of the populace which desires the 
best in art but which cannot afford 
the luxury of winter concerts. 

This series of nightly programs is 
sponsored by the park district of Chi- 
cago in coéperation with the Chicago 
Federation of Musicians. James C. 
Petrillo, board. member of the first 
and president of the second, is in 
charge of the project. 


ee 


— 


@ 


SOF FFT RA RESP SOR FOAL” 


PONS SS 


- 


at this new low price! 


Misses’ sizes 
3 Peet 4 ta “j % > A 
rai 3 x 4 iid os 5 : "es 


r to Appear 


interest and definition to outdoor 


| 


Lo 


Special Sale... 
COOL EMBROIDERED NETS! 


$795 


They’ve been selling this season for 10.95—but, . 
because of a special purchase we can offer them 


tailored, they're perfect for so many important 
summier occasions. In soft pastels, or dark colors. 


This early fall daytime dress features a double necklace of old gold coins strung on 
a fine gold chain attached to the dress at the back. The short sleeves are mod- 
erately shirred and the dress has a molded bodice top. These new details offer 
a preview of the new showings already in Chicago shops and stores. 


[TRIBUNE Studio Photo.} 


———— 


Royal Archers 
Guard King at 
Scottish Court 


EDINBURGH, Scotland, July 6.—- 
(P)—King George VI. of Great Britain 
paid tribute to his Scdttish. consort 
tonight by holding the first royal 
evening court Scotland has seen in 
more than 30 years. 

The oak paneled throne room of 
Holyrood house, where Bonnie Prince 
Charlie danced with his. court 200 
years ago, was a brilliant setting for 
the modern court. 

The king, on a state visit with his 
queen to their northern realm, wore 
the uniform of the colonel in chief of 
the Scots guards. 

A gold brocade gown in a scroll 
design and with an Indian embroid- 
ered gold train was worn by Queen 
Elizabeth whose father is the Scottish 
earl of Strathmore. Upon her head 
glittered a diamond and ruby tiara. 


-@- 


Nearly 500 ‘attended the function 
held with all the formality of similar 
affairs in Buckingham palace. More 
than 200 were presented to their 
majesties, the majority of them Scot- 
tish debutantes who usualy must 
journey to London for presentation at 
court, 


Men of Scotland’s ancient families 


has. A. Stevens & Co., 19-25 No. State $t#.: PZ 


«| 


#. 


PEAS PIP LAELRRD Sh 


° 


Napanee | 
x 


~~ 


et > 


— 


Lx 


RARE 


* 


4 


BEIT NI ar DAO 


Na atthes | 
fy 


x5 


”~ 


PMS > 


om 
a) 
aa - _ 
m 7 i ae 
pane $ ie 
~ Se 
“7 . : 
my wi, 


Cool, crisp, beautifully 


a: ee 
= 


Tonight's Program 
at Grant Park 


8 O'clock. 


Free Admission. 
BAINUM'S BAND, 
Glenn Cliffe Bainum, cunduetor. 
Lilyan Cole, soprano, soloist, 
Overture, “* Holiday ”’ 
[First Chicago performance.] 
[al Gypsy Caprice; “ Zingaresca”’... 
[b) Spanish march, “ Amparito Roca ”’ 
5 Texidor 
Ne ik pa n'y s dae da ¢einiomele wk To be selected 
Valse de Concert fopus 47}.. Glazounow 
Manx Tone poem, “ Mannin Veen”... Wood 
Concert march, ‘ Lads of Wamphray ” 
i ¥ Grainger 
[Pirst Chicago performance. ] 
Suite, ‘‘ London Again’’ 
[al “ Oxford Street” [march]. 
[b| “ Langham Place” [elegy]. 
fc] “ Mayfair” [waltz], 
[a] ‘*‘ Rhapsody in Rhumba” 
{First Chicago performance. | 
Eb) * SEE Sar ss i vn oa kone can cd eane eee 
Incidental music from ‘ Cavalcade ".Coward 
Concert march, “ Skyliner’’;..........Alford 


Bennett 


appeared either in their colorful 
Tartan kilts or in the uniforms of 
crack Highland regiments. 

The royal company of archers, the 
king’s ancient bodyguard in Scotland, 
was on duty-in the state chambers 
in green cloth uniforms embroidered 
with golden thistles and wearing 
cocked hats decorated with cock 
feathers. 

Turreted Holyrood will be the scene 
of other brilliant functions, including 
a garden party, receptions, and other 
affairs during the state visit. 


DOWNSTAIRS 
AT STEVENS 


CN LAE IRR NF iA RY 


= 
~~) 


LSD ee 


= 


- 


— 


LED L, Poe 


LP. <n 


es 


+ 


= 


BY POPULAR DEMAND— 
MORE OF OUR SMART. 
“BISHERMAN'S WIFE” 
FULL PLEATED SKIRT 
SHIRT-TYPE BLOUSE | 
« An outstanding summer 
-) fashion—we simply can’t keep 
‘) ms Bed ff 
> Adapted. fromthe. . lovely 
‘| graceful’ costumes of ~ the 
: aceon ee See 
> with tailored shirt-type 
\ blouse, and patent belt. Sizes. ¢ 
(| 12 to 18in black and’ white, — 


a" 
. 


Pra 


Charles W. Cadman 
to Speak at Music 
Festival Luncheon 


Charles Wakefield Cadman, emi- 
nent composer, best known for his 
“At Dawning” and “From the Land 
of the Sky Blue Water,” will be the 
principal speaker at the First Chi- 
cagoland Music Festival luncheon, 
which will be held in the Silver 
Forest of the Drake hotel Friday 
afternoon, Aug. 20, the day before 
the eighth annual festival concert to 
be held in Soldiers’ field. Reserva- 
tions for the luncheon may be made 
at the festival headquarters, room 


: r. Big blo 
clips come at the same price. 


Clever strip effects of white patent 


'lether outlined in gold metal are sti'l 


spectacular accents on trim copper 
brown, navy, cypress green or black 


tailored suits and they’re still mod- 


estly priced. 

Small iridescent sea shells jingte 
merrily in bracelets and clips. Tiny 
metal forget-me-nots in chalk white 
and delectable shades of pink, blue, 
and green are popular. See the 
whites with glittering rhinestone 
centers or the lettuce green or pow- 
dery blues for an extra thrill. 


-_s ’ i 
The cracked ice bracelets and neck- 

laces, looking just like the names, 
are new and are causing excitement. 
Melon ball necklaces, the kind that 
resemble large hailstones, are fast- 
ened to vivid green leaves and strung 
on a frail thin gold metal chain. 
These are beautiful against light or 
dark colored clothes. 

— 


Tiny white simulated berries are 
effective with all kinds of summer 
clothes and even for early fall black 
sheer wools and crépes. These come 
in clips, bracelets, and chokers. The 
white confetti ornaments come in 
multi strand ropes for high necklines 
and in bracelets. Some of the white 
is accented with scarlet or green but- 
ton closing devices. 

This white costume jewelry can be 
used for smart clothes dramatics at 
a smaller cost than white frills. 


‘ii 

Fashion photograph ..-. preview 
of the new fall necklines. . . show- 
ing a dull crépe dress with. moder- 
ately shirred short sleeves, a high 
smooth neckline and the newest of 
gold coin necklace trim. Such a neck- 
lace is attached to the dress itseif 
providing the only contrast. The 
dress will be found in a’‘Chicago shop. 


[For information concerning the 
articles mentioned, call Rhea Seeger, 


1418, in Tribune Tower. 


ee 
me 


STATE STREET OPEN 


Satm urith 
chiff on 


NIGHTROBES 
LONGER, FULLER, EX- 
QUISITELY DETAILED, 
THEY HAVE ALL THE 


EXPENSIVE. THINGS! 


There’s news in every line of these beautifully styled 
ort Nets remee colat iiczed bedi 


nightrobes. 


hide <§ ! : 
a Bees 
& 
¥ a e » 2 h om Pile 2 er 
- * sh ,, > Le 


CHAS. A. STEVENS & CO.=——— 


EARMARKS OF REALLY: 


Superior 0100.] 


2:48 TO 5:45 CHICAGO 


Satin 
with 
lace 


Printed 
Satin 


; 


; 
re 


~ -£ 
fe 


. 


| 


4 
: 


fae Dimtad ‘S * 
Paras fe mt 5 B.. © ae a 5 es 
Borate ay ts raed - ee mee 
A FIP Sm te 1 ti od hey eae 
Sak a ; FEB? oy EK at o 
Be: SRS a: + eee ise Ԥ 
; 


ee at. " 24 piss rT ™ 
ren Pe Vie eis ae Lace ee P Se en 
oe gee art Tee tay 5 A 


a one 


H 3 


INSTAL 


. ME! iT 
i TREACHERY CO! VE fi 
. “Tt shouldn't be hard to pull up stakes ant 
ruefully ve left most of our 


ruefully, “ We ggage bel 
 Michaey Silvas ane: gaily. ““ We'll accumulate sor 
he bce to the dog and strode out 1 ¥ ac 
hatiess and coatiléss, tn the biting air, 
intensely blue sky. He was a strikingly 
ment bécame him. But his @yes were 


PUR teag ee — 
Par es 2 thse 
v 


Katharine was doing. Ta nupfoad ha name son" was shining Gown on | 


Katharine. 
. Millis watched him almost Neeteotgies _. could not seé his set 
fad nor hear him murmuring Oe damn and 


edit 2 damn! 0-6 damn! 
‘e 

John Millis had been shocked by his wee wits tima 

relieved. The situation had been growing increas 
-. Laura had made hime fair proposition. — 
Michael. against him or to rouse the boy’s 
allow the boy’s natural generosity in money matters to usual, 
she was to see to it that at no time did he John Millis and his needs 
In return tor this Millis had solemnly ‘that never would he do 
anything to harm Michael. Millis recalled with slight discomfort the 
menace in his wife's eyes as she exacted this promise. He had been relieved 
at the way it had been worded. He was strong for the letter of the law 
and the honor of a gentleman. 

Millis had spent the afternoon and evening with a lady whom he ad: 
mired. 
tion. He liked them difficile. It was the chase which amused him, not 
the ultimate capitulation, When that happened, he lost interest. Today 


“Good legs!" the man said approvingly. " Mighty good legs! " 


he had lost interest. He returned home iate in the evening, slightly 
triumphant, a good deal angry and bored. 

it was in moods like this that he always came back to Laura. This 
time Laura was not there. The house was empty. He felt shaken, and 
tmmore than a little misused. Why should she teave in such indecent haste? 

He had not Known how empty a house could be. He sat on the iow 
s0fa in the hall where his wife had liked to sit and staréd at the winding 
stairway and at Michael's window seat. He could not belleve that, sooner 
or iater, one or the other would not appear on the stairs. Only a servant 
passed him noiselessly. Millis fancied that the man looked at him with 
some curiosity and that his respect was just a little exaggerated. 

Millis dismissed the thought hastily. It would never do to let his 
imagination ruh away with him. But he decided that he would get rid of 
these servants and hire a fresh batch. They knéw more than was good for 
them. He would say that he was closing the house for the winter, as 
mother and the boy were going south, and he would be with them much 
of the time. Then he cringed slightly. He knew how politely they would 
accept his statement, and the cotmments which would be made below stairs. 

Suddenly it came over him that he was not in an enviable position. 
The middle of the month was approaching, and bills must be met. His own 
balance at the bank had dwindled to almost nothing. He had been warned 
three months ago that the allowance made to the Millises for the support 
of Michael! ended automatically when the boy came of age. Business men 
were already less keen about extending credit. [It was Michael to whom 
they were kowtowing now. Millis grinned as he recalled the boy’s annoy: 
ance at their obsequiousness. Queer duck, Michael! 

It had mot been a bad life he had ied here, he reflected. He rather 
wished it.might have gone on indefinitely. It might have, too, if he had 
been left to handle the boy without any interference. He’d have knocked 
a lot of silly notions out of, his head and would have got him harness broke. 
He could have taught him not merely how to handle his money, but how to 
spend it. Of course Michael might still be handled. The trouble was, the 
boy was hairtrigger, and nobody's fool. It would be, even now, an interest- 
ing battle of wits, but Michae! had the whip hand. For that matter, Millis 
scarcely cared to spend the rest of his life earning the respect of his foster 
son, and that would be absolutely the only hold he would ever have on 
Michael now. 

The man moved restiessly. What was it he had been meaning to do? 
O, yes—get the thermos bottle. He wandered up to Michael’s room. It was 
not dismantled at all; and the spirit of the absent boy was so present that 
Millis felt guilty in intruding. But the thermos bottle was gone. So the 
kid had taken it with him? Well, it was his. 

Millis paused to look about him. It was a rodém which he had never 
invaded, It was the kid’s room, The walls were literally covered with 
pictures, small snapshots, beautiful enlargements, pencil sketches, photo- 
graphs made by skilful professionals—a bewildering array. All of one girl! 
Millis was ready to admit that the boy had made a wise choice of subjects. 
Katharine photographed superbly. 

The man strolled about examining them all, Aftér some deliberation 
he selected the one that pleased him most. It was a charming little snap- 
shot ot Katharine in a bathing suit, standing on the edge of a stormy lake. 
Het hair was blowing in the wind, her face was ecstatic with joy, and she 
looked like wendy “soy ingly rte spirit of the storm. 

“Good tegs! ' the man said approvitigly. He gave it a long and v! 
survey. “ Mighty good legs!” i " _—— 

With ruthless indifference to its exquisite mounting, he ripped the 
picture trom its frame, and stored it away tenderly in a small memorandum 
book which he catried in his breast pocket. Then he threw himself into 
the old Morris chair and gave himself up to lazy contemplation of the 
intéresting picture gallery. His expression was not quite what it should 
have beén. 

It was an agreeable hour ‘vhich Millis spent there, stretched out lazily 
in Michael’s chair, wooing in imagination Michael's sweetheart. 

“ That,” he said amusedly, “ would be an experience worth having. Mike 
would be sore, but how would he know? Those are not things girls tell.” 

He rose, snapped on the lights, and surveyed himself in the mirror, a 
cool appraising survey. Suddenly, with an angry snort, he picked up a 
heavy silver motinted brush from the dresser and hurled it at his own 
reflection. He was his own most exacting critic, 

The crash. of glass and the forlorn litter in the peaceful room dteeetan 


him considerably. He Up one of Michael’s Indian clubs and aid 
about him vigorously, the wreck was complets, he walked o 
and closed and locked the line vighaso 


“Hobson,” he said rete ‘Magnificent young English chauffeur whom 


he kept as a badge of reape and whom he cordially disliked because 
the man resolutely de be undignified, “my son asked me to say 
that for the nbet eek got rl wk ut uri dna tha ean 
Be at her apartment at night. Be ready to take 


, and be waiting for her 
On @&rth for her, d 
of your. ee ‘ell 


.“Your car, prey 


“TI have no cat, Hobson. The cars belong to Mr. Michael. 
So do I.” - 


So do you: 


‘ See ao i pane BoA operas. Ghee fia : ee : ‘ $e ns b SNe ok ed ae 
a: Perk: See Ly Sk ed aE Oh Rite ae eS Rp ese * - Wr rete EB 3 bed AIRE ee 
ied Palas tee Se teh TSS Sp aS NS PANS eh Dye ete ee bee hoe mh egress he acy co arn hy? SON ial eeta a Pw Th Pb Te Nite ere mad ue 
SOS eo SS ery Sle as ane. both Megs oe AS My tient See P yp Sig, Oe RE A SUP AUS eee ee Miah pity was SBS Cathy spk 
Bish ee Pie mae Eo Beate take ; Ares Re a ee alt oe ay ces Abs Sate oe See ASSES picer s ‘ a 
> c ee RTT 


bata One 


He had recently taken up women of fashion and blameless reputa- 


ling figures. Too much depe 


a > ; 
* v iy il Ss 
Lid te eis Cy a : 
Fac, = oy, i. FAL HOES oe tah) a” ri 
rt aie anaes, Kad nc nak eee i ber Tae CANES Dea 
im gree? in? Peay Ne es 7 OS ps 


nes 2 Sa 4 : 
yy Piet eres gn an 
- yi aVciedn ie ke t ‘ 
4 Life o> iS se * 
as PRT ie su AR Nae cSt ea gett on ee i 
pee RE D sath re 
Sao od et 5 + 
C. Mite ve 


5 a) at é is - 
Potent OR a j aaa : Jeujen : * RES = Re 

© i Teen eee ey) ray Se ete BIS Ya 
2 4 + x a, ee Pe petra tat 5 enh SR Cg kT Pay ae ; Pe SSR ie pee $6 

¢ $ ¥ “s Yi Cue cain eee Lie th vey ne 

x 2 i Sy We Ma PRR ee ae aa Se) hae 3 hate Oe te nes 3 . 

icdtone * % tf capa ery he 5 a yet Shae Me ae 5 OP ey 2 ee 

* es Gea ea pA aS ENG Peres a te Rha sane eee 2, = 


a he ~ > we 


ene 


ps fae Dae Oe ee é } 


As 7 
Ne ee j a ae 
ce -% Eo a Rass sb : 
He Teh ey ee oo oo EY tim ret ear it et eg oot 
Baek " oes Pe mies EPS GPCR oA Mes 
a ase Se ee atte, etugen arate 
+ ¥ ee oe aa 
See ns 
agra Sy i 
tite S oeaan ry are 8 
TS Wiig Sent: Rae Mths oa Ty, 
ike sic ee eg ey iat: 
achat: \, oe . i 
3 ; tS D a 
2 a iy she St 
Bh Ad Oe! Sipeab ek i — Bide vies 
G Thee. Ae eee Bead Bosh ise: ahs hire bpeane See A! 
mi ec tone eee at. i tae, yh 
we te “See? Secures sei: 4 , 
Rages ‘Cares Yeas ter, : a ‘ whe nig 
Pint 1 Nie i IT ph ted 4 Bn RRR rr 1 eee Re 
Satay r, tage Sa ask “ es we 2 page ae Dil, aaa ety AY RE CRORE Es 
oth NES ES = man oe q Py Uk s re 2 a i Ea : 
ee z Ei 2 oa Stam ; 
rig ae » 5 ! tet i: See 
: igs ? i, [Be bili “4 : dp, m3 e me ae 
Ry oF “ ay, a >) “aly 1 i: u vs a i » 
. a my by ; a Sie i a Pe 
, : TALL" mae hah fe ie oA) Te oe 
- . E ieee, pe ETE us Livi 
: 5 ait Sa aan a AS IC. 
ree . ORE oe SN ite gh RONAN 10 Pe BN SER Ne oe ree: nc Den : 
re . Te : pyar se PERT RFE OIC SAO TES Me Coe RES DAL 
3 ; sia i at} Sian So ' oe Pe eo, cto ae 
A ea $ 2 Se be oe 32 2 ; a ‘4 en see 
: ae ieee a ey f Pint mist . ie sae an ‘7 
Ae were . *, oad 7 4 : . tea ape 
de 2. a ° 2 a etae : Peter ro a 
eo 2 f i . Phi ay 
5S 4 att . Sirens Net 
e . joann oa Fi ee 
x ; z , pe oF nn ie 
oe oe rt a > tas : ate J ay 
4 PR | 4 . n . re. ’ ‘ a 
- Php 5 pt p + ss * - 3 x) 
oy a & hb = & ae Rae aor “ Mi 
epee % E A is ae 4 Pie 5 ccs i i 
b oS ha He de. a aaa a Si ; we * cme it legs ie Ca , 
" Z r Ben nd , e . en - bi a Sr SB 
dill ———- 3 pst s 3 wer - tg % a ees re “hy 
" \ a B . y ney 
° Phe > rf Bs er fas 
' . 2 7 a. i] cn, 
; a a fo ae atl ree 
~ IS, a : : ; 36 
, ae Bats 1 Boy . 
% ‘en aes We ka: $e 
Orch. - : ae me 
: ¥ pa ss y seat’ 3 pet 
’ po Ne , ae es ‘ eo Se 
eee .. ; : ; s . om CRT 
7 2 * pale Cie ar 
5 ns * ‘Z Rh ° =| a 
* Af 
: A : : ae ee : 3 
4 oe ; A eo , : Wok, : 
‘ sid ras . : : tbe Pe in fea 8 4 i: 
4 oes 4 
j a? ‘ er 4 i kode =i oy 
- . 3 pane " : 
ie ow esis 3S +: 
ye ¥ 4 7 
“4 : ¥. = 
/ I acts i | ae 
@ nw x ‘ a - 
: and App ie 
— ni P. 4 Pt 
A : | 7 s We eB) 
: . Si ts te 
pe ¥ ‘ i ge 
4 nN oe 4 
5 re i 
Py S 


ietillaa fae Wier en 


sconmagh® DORE. BLAKE. : 
ia ade oie chap 


wena. b vd pone before he may 
think of is a popular quer: 


@. ] 
a 


| marrying 
1 eee ~Faghenadiogs bork 


be answered offhand, merely 


Coos 
the two who are embarking on the 
new life, 

The environment in which the 
young man and the girl have been 
raised is a determining factor. True, 
they will not expect to start out 
on the same scale exactly to which 
they have been accustomed in their 
parents’ homes, yet the status of 
those horties has a definite influence 
on their ideas and their plans for 
their home. Things that would be 
considered necessities by some 
couples would be real luxuries to 
Others: One coliple may be content- 
6d to live in small rooms in an un- 
pretentious helghborhood, the girl 
working along with the boy, willing: 
ly and gladly doing without the week: 
ly manicure, the latest coiffure, and 
content with an occasional movie for 
recreation, 

~~ 

Such people could marry on véry 
little and still find happiness. For 
another couple, this life would be 
drudgery. The things that were. !ux- 
urles, and thoroughly appreciated 
whenever available to them, would 
be necessities to the second couple, 
and without them tney would. not 
be coritenhted. So, the thing to do is 


Quilt Based on 
Triangles Gives 


a Rustic Effect 


VV: 
Ag 


cwurew ine 


Hill and Hollow. 


Patterns of this design are 5 cents, 
stamps or coin. Addtess Nancy 
Cabot, Chicago Tribune, or call at 
one of the Tribune Public Service 
éffices, 1 South Dearborn street or 
Tribune Tower. 


BY NANCY CABOT. 

A slightly rustic note is achieved 
in the title of this quilt, and the 
theme is cleverly carried out in the 
pieced block by the simple use of 
triangles. A combination of printed 
and plain materials is used, and the 
blocks are set together to form an all 
over design. Blue, white, and blue 
and white printed materials are the 
favorites for this cool loéking pattern 
which is ideal for Us@ as & Summer 
Spread. “Hill and Hollow” was 
pieced in Tennesseé in 1855, and re- 
cently has enjoyed @ revival of its 
old time popularity. 
fn 
MOTION PICTURES 

_ SOUTH 


rw eww 


I MET HIM IN 


© 902 Fametenn arm 


CHARLIE CHAN ON mr 
Warner OF 


__Extra--Louie-Braddeok x 


eee Alm sm ae te ee ted ee 


re TIVO} 


REY Lt 


SPENCER TRACY 
GLADYS GEORGE 
| FRAHCHOT TOKE | 
im THEY GAVE 
. Hi AGUR 


MA. 
bontn F9P 2 
TE. «fst AedlexOu, Lat 


ot Ltr i RACAL 
Ot edzie eatures. | 
Lo Beaty 


GAL ene oy, 2 
Src way g oh 


~ WINNIE WINKLE, 


LY 7’ 


to sit down with paper and pencil 
and figure out just what you'll need 
to start with. You have your own 
scale and know just what you must 


have, 


Then, too, a young man must con- 
the kind of girl he is marry- 
ing, whether she is one who would 
adjust herself to reverses should they 
Would 
she stand by him, see him through 
the difficulties, encouraging him, even 
willing to assume some of the re- 
sponsibility, if necessary? 
a helpless creature, one who 
to brag about her inability to do 
If 80, 
he’ll need a bank account, for he can 


sider 


be m 


anyth 


et early in their life. 


ing around the house? 


expect no help from her. 


Some young men have a way of 
meeting difficulties and overcoming 
them, letting nothing stand in the 
way of their sticcéss, while others 
are inclined to be discouraged by the 


first 


setback. 


MOTION PICTURES 


SOUTH 


MODERNLY_ AIR-CONDITIONED 
WARNER BROS. THEATERS 


AVALON 


at 
ponet. t G 


“A STAR 
is BORN” 


In Technieolor 


"xete 


Lee a i. ‘, 
~~ Well Balaneed Single ey re Progam! 


BEVERLY 


CAPITOL 
arene —_ 
a eee 
THE PAUPER” 
ng ee 


D Gard. Dd cog meme ebtnly Coo 
¢ and 2 te Ranh 


SACTS VA WEEVICCE 


‘CALL IT , BAY and Ae 


ynor 
arch 


HIND T HEADLINES’ 


Added! 


MacDONALD. 
Nelson 
EDDY. | 
7 | 
dé TD 
Vree Parking MAYTIME 
i 
GROVE Faye. pen IN 
COOLED! HE CITY” | 
- ae | 
ar 
8 ne wrens ret “WAY OUT west’ $ | or 
Ndded 4 Mew Edition “MARCH OF en] |i 


- Alw Cool ! 

a | IG H LAN D 7¥ian Hunter, Aatta Louie, 
Olivia De De Havilland, “CALL if A DAY” 
aur 


Mar 
I all New — Hadas OF TIME” 


COSMO 


SIMONE SIMOR, tn a 8 


iMON In ah 
oe eataae ol Single pastes Program ! 


HAMILTON 


MUNI in “TH 
Rovaling Keith in EOTOR’ 


} 
Olen wcianted siad 


«Mal ee Always | Cool! | 
June bavi Play iN EXILE’ ¢ 
“7TH H jas, ew 


7K ent Die 


own" | 


IAWES § STEWART a and 


VEN” 


7\et- 


Ly kins and 


} 
t—-Always Cool! | 
i LOve™ | 


aed ee he. 


Or is she 
likes 


| CINEMA, ORR ebay lars Vou 


WHILE THE 


TOASTING AND THE 
COPFEE IS PERKING |! 


MOTION PICTURES 


ee eee fe FF fF 


woman 


N ORTH | 


SPENCER TRACY 
GLADYS GEORGE 
FRANCHOT TONE 


THEY GAVE | 
HIM A GUN 


‘PARADE 


nae 


Ant} 


t 


Ext.: Louls-Braddock Fi 
Sher.-Dev.—0 
Claudette ADA Plus G Fa Wi irae! 


Extra! LOUIS.BR, BRADOOCK Fight pictures 


RIVIERA "ites ee tore! eo 
Pius=“OHARLIE CHAN eo 
Extra! LOUIS. BRADDOCK. right Pietures 


CENTURY AgTAIRE RogenS ] 


Clark -Diversey 


” 
Western Devon PL use Your 
LMONT Tyrone Power < 
Linooln-Ashiand "Cafe Metropole 
[PANTHEON Bt 
og aa 
NORSHORE “Gale Metropole,” Lora 


Young, Tyronne Power Pius—‘Mountain Justice’ di 
4728 Sheridan—2 Features ty 
‘s Ae’ 


KESIDE | “coxtaetat cit 


LA Ameche, Ann Sothern, ‘50 FR 1" 
C0 VENT 2058 N. Clar Slain’ oan 

“WHEN LOVE is YOUNG” 
PLUS—‘Outeasts of Poker Flat” & “Popeye” & 
ue sama, oom 


308 W. NORT 
a BIG ronta 


Jean, Harlow 


“MIDNIGHT TAXP’ 


and “CHINA PASSAGE” 
ee WARD Bouse St. “‘L’'—Free Parking 
CY aa, 


> “UM AYTIME” 


i “WAY OUT WEST” fis a 


Oliver 


— 


eer SL LOI 


mo ont COOLED 
édish Film 
ASSOAF TON’ 


° JULIAN aint 
SHERIDAN 


N ROAD NR. IRVING 


EXCLUSIVE 


NORIH SHOWING 
JANET FREDRIC 


GAYNOR MARCH 


A STAR 


SHERI 


> ay J 
0 op a et RR he we * 
y 9 , § Pe! 
oP, & 
>i ’ 
WE can! Fae Ss 93 P 
e ered Pic ae 


TLL Sust @UANCE RU 
THE MORNING PAPER 


my See of Bee 
PDE wn Dee oF oi hte F : ¢ 
; * peek 
e fek de Ae a : 
- ‘i ‘2 a 
etc, + — pings : eB 
i 
¢ ; ts “f 
- : A? ow 
oe we 
<5 ot ted 
Sates § : 
‘¢ 
& 
. 
PS 
P 


HOLY | 
"cores Bun RUNNING 
OVER THE Ail 
~ '5 BURNING! 


St A 


MOTION PICTURES 
Fes Aai WE 8. WN 


: Teoapey, bARuNe = 2 WAS LATE FoR Worex | 
| AND I DIDN'T WANT ANY SREAKPAST, 
, ANYWAY omen BOVE, Whe, 


mm ( + 


Be hie.2 


MOTION PICTURES 


-~ PAPAS 


IS BORN 


*& COOLED by Refrigeration 
OVOGUE. 0, tuisen want? 


9912 Sheridan—COOLED 
“WHEN LOVE IS YOUNG” 
“tnternesa Can't Take Money’’ 


400 6746 Sheridan Road—COOLED 
» ? | MAY LIVE,” Chas. Boyer 
jean Arthutes"‘Mie ORY 18 MADE AT NIGHT” 


DEV OLIVIA 
ev ON DeHAVILLAND| HUNTER 
0226 B’dway—Cosled =, “CALL IT A DAY" & 


th 


a in Pr PPB LD 


OF 1937" .:: 
MILTON BERLE 
a JOE PENWER 
r PARKYAKARKAS 
| WORRIET HILLIARD 


1% 4200 
> oe * 
OR 


son 
On in Pe 
gudevitie 36 


Jt HUSBAND'S 
SECRETARY’ 


| 


LAKE SHORE ®” AP ULES 
Bitte Rab WN EA 


Frances Drake in “ MIDNIG BEE Re Oe 
N 40 W. Division, 
DEARBOR pO Sead 
aughton Cc. Melds. A 1 ad a Wahoa 


and Helen Hayes, Wankeun. Her Love Story’ 


C ALO 5400 N. CLARK—Onpen 6 P. M. 

COOLED by “Refrigeration 
Joel M ea—"In rnes Can't Money’ # 
Virginia Bruee—"“WHEN LOVE IS YOUNG" 


1225 N. OLA RE-COOtan 
RCH OF TIME” 


TAN pons “Mi AYTIME” 
BRYN M AWR 1325 Bryn Mawr at ‘L’ 


e Over England” 


W. C. Wade —“MississiBer 


DA NORAMA vin MRFORR SHOWING 
frene Dunne, Robt ._ Rayior, si nifieént Obsession” 


eel wae il ape 


USBAND panty 


114) LW SON—2 Bis Features 
DE DE LUKE ict E iva OV i 


MAD Ess 


“Sniernen Chl Gant yee Money’ 
GOLD CO 


CLARE & LaOnTS 
KAY BRAN GOLD COAST, | 2c ‘y ih” 


WAY PASSAGE” 
NORTHWEST 


_ i? ie i i 


w ww 


~ GE aMFORTARLE 
THEATERS 


ilm—Complet 
4 IN PARIS’ 
ihe Wallace Berry 


aii G8 boa Free Park—Jean Muir San 


Her H fd’s Secretary’ 
“18TH CHAIR,'’ Lewis Stone 


J 
NELSON EDDY 


“MAYTIME” i 


TERMINAL 


KENW 00D BELPARK with John Barrymore 
47th & Kimbark —PLUS— 

HARPER enzo tate jer, Joel MeCrea, barbara “CRYSTAL LAUREL & HARDY == 
Stanwyck, eee Sie North & California Full-length Peature! Sy 
5812 L k. Virginia or aa 

HYDE P ARK «x Tayi, , iWhen Love 1s Young will Rogers Wes arr 
=— —_ oe ~~ | 05635 Belmont Ave, 
5th. & Hal Mat. 6:30, 200 ‘ ts Be 
RAMOVA ae Siemans ie. Havilland BILTMORE Division; amen 2, nt 2, Hits B 
Roland Young in “CALL IT A DAY’ Don Ameche, ‘80 Roads to Town,’ Ann een Sh 


wih ie TO LADIES—CUT G 


EADLINES’’ 


_wiihe "TO LADIES—COT 
GLASS STEMWARD | 


2 Features Bap 


ALB A edzie & Lawre 
ina Passage’ 


JACKSON PK.°7 desc 


Margaret Lindsay. “SONG OF THE CITY’ | 


b 
ae 

ii 
wth 


——ak as Madsie & Lawrenseent 
Leslie Fenton in 
Ags Muni, “Woman | Love,” Mitiam Hopkins 


WAY 


Kent Kent Taylor 


y.see & Western un ie Beton” 


MICH 


nd 3 Lake gee : ith ae 


} 


4 


DD 
If ‘tes HE ca Miriam Hopkins 


110 E. Cardsia~ C0 
aa aE nwyaul 


Patra 


arr | 
_ wor tt 


GIRL IN THE 


RAY 


* Kaulte—Betta Davis, Leslie Bac | 


HUMAN 


gus DAGe 
75th—* ‘LOVE ix BLOOM" — & Alle 


N ORTHWEST. 


Pron Ay 


|RARLA 
Riann sinh ; Bs Deut Mini... 
> ad. a te er 


ee ‘When Love Is Young’ 


. AD 


ene E. JOAN CRA VFGRE 
HOt OUSE” 


‘Dancing seaky 
WALLAch ¥ 
ROBT. MONTGOM! 
3639 C 
AMO, 3h O 
Fhe 
4051 Br ONE 


Fal teh 


_ ee 


if 
‘ WAY 
3308 LAWRENCE AV. ¥ wht 


MILLION Swi i ND 


ENT 
see ine “Het Te ELT 


” “GREAT HOSPITAL 
3319 N. Clark—Cooled vrs TERY Rene po 
N Randolph & Dearbo 
z|@BIOGRAPH| » ue |soTHERN \LWAYS COOL! 
2433 Lincoin—Coocled ROADS Ds Fy nant A Shiee & howtngs 
‘ r0 toll “Thunder in the C ; 
ae CI in—OOOLE Night 
a] North CENTER 8 Miss Ea, 'a. Robinson of ystery’ | 
PPR wh oy Fa + Hospital Mystery’ LA SALLE Madison- srg rae St a Bone Ox 
° ORE . oor" oreee | sg Showin EDDIE NUGENT in 
WOMAN T LOVE” & Oheries, Goyer, dean, Arthur, ee AE Nt od ite Me Gir: 
Leo Carrillo, “HISTORY 18 MADE AT NIG as pt hh 
id and Beilmont—COOLE — - 
eVIC wr. Brus, “WHEN LOVE 18 Youna” —AIR-CONDITIONED— 
Preston Foster, “OUTCAST of POKER FLATS’ Werld PLAYHOUSE ne Ss 4 
Soar. ich. Ave. 
Cont. 11:30 A. M. to Midnight—35e to 6:30 P. M. 
7074 N. Clark—2 FEATURES 


Wats, $00 & 150—Eve., 100 & 206 


Sothern, Merle Oberon, Eric Blore 


MAURIOE GHEVALIER skncenD 


ERGERE” 
Adolphe OE i P Rochelle Hudson, 


Janet Beether 
WALLAGE BEERY “THE, WiGurx 
LINCOLN 3164 Lincoln ayy: aft ATURES an 
OF ARTHUR CARRILLO 


ry Is Made At Night” 


Ricardo Cortez, Gail Patrick, “Her Husband Lies’ 


WOOD Eves. 25c~-1823 MONTROSE 
Mat. Daily=-Cool~3 Features 


“LAST OUTPOST’’—Cary Grant, Claude Rains 


“SPENDTHRIPT’ Henry Fonda, Mary Brian 
‘MIDNIGHT TAXI’’—B. Donlevy, KF. Drake 

DEVON AT CLARK ST 
RIDGE l5c 1:30 to 6:3 6b Gis eats. 
‘SONG OF 


OITY’’- ndcbins oe ‘Lindsay 
Virginia Bruce, Bit Taylor—‘‘When Love Is Young 


ee ied? i 
AVENUE ai oe) ia keyracoaat 
a ean ea iat “pic els 

a itis, Madingn, 2-—-BITS—3 
4 STA R met t Nukent 8 Nat fat Senden 
B’DWA AY Str vie cousin aaiae MacD 04 
CRAWE “GR 


+ = Craw ford— 
emengg aor ae Heer 


tetnes C 


CRAWFORD 


CRAY 


a SUBURB A N e 


OM To hep Mee 
‘HEART'S DESIRE’ 


Bewitching. Tuneful Musical Romance 
—STARTING SATURDAY 


“UNDER the RED ROBE” 


CONRAD VHEIDT 


= 
ES i 
((@ 
=e 


wt eee. 


7 WE WIT 
| PARADE’ 


FRAMED 5 


SPENCER TR TRACY 
GLADYS GEORGE 


FRANCHOT TONE 


THEY GAVE 
HIM AGUN 


i| | PARADISE “01 cor 


* del” L 6 DAN sd 


i 
NE 


LSON EDDY 
4 ison "'"MAYTIME" 


John itt more 
SENATE (unit 2) aanoy 
[Gesitral “WAY OUT 

West 


3535 W. Roo: 


wien SR RATA tnt 
Bak stands ter BE = BE seme 


CHICAGO 


onl 
open mi 


ies 
Pak 


, Og 19:4 r 
by wight Life aries 


$t gf 
Rreakfast , 


or 


Oven 8:45: Pr Oha 14 4 
DROP IN FOR A LAUGH! 


Oven 8:45 a.m. Pr Cho 14 6 
Fightin’, Loving Marines! 


The 


meine” 


+)ick Powel x 


“MIDNIGHT MADONNA” 


Starting Tomorrow 


Elisabeth Bargner 


“DREAMING LIPS! 


YAN ‘toy 


otiinK a eau yk 


SONOTONE 


Cont. Noon to Midnight. 250 to 
LAST 2 DAY 


“NIGHTINGALE” 


Aliso MOSCOW MAY DAY PARADE 


CLARK ETS Fe aEAE 


BNpe ee 
V B 
JUNE bi sabi 


‘TRE OVER 
wera 8: An, oa 
: A, 


vay WABASH 


B500 to 6: 


MAYWOOD. 


OAK ARK 
LAKE are tag gar 
TAN Yon ‘Surermore, “MAYEINM 
eee was ata tt as | 
ee 
LAGRANGE 


;| LA GRANGE Siciosie eames 


Jeanette MatDonald, “MAYTIME,” Nelson Sddy 


the heey 


pte hatte ban 


a ols a 


"THY. ast 

Pps 5B) : yOUNG" 
man OF BA ONTs iT 
- frend Av 


Ee DD} 


Letton-M —2 Hits 
Tudson— ‘' " hut 8 ay Live” |. 
om WA WEDDING” 


: nwill; 4 { ‘ 
eas A dots Nain yee SI bis a 


HA’ ARVEY. : 
Pay ede a . ae 
pst. tA Di! + 


TN 760 OOLE iD 
ON . bas 
é “a Sis 


ll td lead id ll ll 


~ MATINES DAILY Free ne 
a Phe wee 


Wings of Morning’ Ht, Fonda; Anne 
peg Friday—Louis-Braddéck Fight 2 


a FOREST. PARK _ 


a 


’ 1057. Ww. co 
a Pops ad C, 
BXILE’ 


nd | “ 
Pe OF POKSE 


PARK 2980 W Lang. $t.—15e 
JOHN BOLES iN ~OMLY ~<a 
\USTIN: morons is M 


seas Shae 
EVANSTON 
: 4 THEATERE 


er 


HS 


Ss 
7 
re. 


ee a 
oR aL “em 


CHS sh % 
Why Pech 
Artists 


rete non 


ve . & ime atin Re SS it rahe t 
Arg AYIA ee sone nh 
hd Si bi o. 


ee nd yi 
eS Sate 


» 
ete. 

pes 

i > ad 

Sis 


— _ 
7 a 
xa 8 9% 


ut Byorg 


ta - Fe PLE Mian le 
. i = 
¥i 3 . * 


WR 


id} age Ava Bae 


io. 
Pees, 


“;, 


. 4 
: : i * ; 
IE Fy =< = © e? Sepere J sieyt Pe ' ehis T ” r a nh = ge Tay ; recer wwe - Tr’ ; eal 
on . Vimeecs ¥ | e) ’ ' aE So nek SS 
ier, nevianc nicer * ‘ ‘ NSTTONnc or 7 , Armir , innuchkeepsi 2 2 anc - ~ - — 
. ; : ved . sige AD: can gy Ie A PBR EE get ane es SRE aie 
: aba roressc S conauctin. ire" ' . - : n¢ P aan Dp—Sport vie . , 
at . Ciao y “ yO NM ic r atc a ss -" , aF: Ona: ‘ : Ji. e} $5439 3 s £ é 2 $ 
bs Se ' 4 i ’ t ar etetei zi ; ; } Mite ti ts a re te - 
+% sete " <5 ‘ » ete ° ] / ft ne " i} r i} r : Me : ‘: o § = 4 . a . ae 
: ' a ‘ ‘’ 5 3 pS ‘ wees Y y 3 ie : ; * “ 2 3 F 
ner i ' ; euourpan HO aT DM . . oe 
4 ’ $8 eiek . s 2 ; ? : te: & scarite ) ae at te =i% 
" W . : W-G Ssteamt t; sa pte 9» CBS as =O n jOOKinNg tC 
: : rey “¢ “ £ 4 ° : S¢ - - R - r r o ; i 30 Wh age 2 ; + TE) ; ; 
he ‘ ve pepe. t ~> oe 7 . wats ix) ’ . : 4. e fc - ps > 
, ss = ‘ a 5 ate ® A ‘ Ris ] S 2 . - tue *, 7 ; £ 
e ; =e ° > é . * ud > ae . - : 4 eo 
a sit . ’ i 5 it ; ee ° e 2? - Reg ; i 6 
‘ € : Aus ~ y : ; , ." & came n connection WIT: ; - or . = ' 
e) ACh Uc : 2 +5 y Viornir JEVOTIOL . AS ¥G) my evar sport Bvie i ; . ; ‘ "OWwel 3 DOC 4 rir rteele . : ‘ 
* e - t , *¢ h - ~ - : oe ee ee & , ; arn Hen = aa 4 - é & rs v, 
ALI IC. SOT) arnic 4 - y =p 68 oie y be ‘Gey ’ rnpo "> yy i he : 63. . . omorroy . Fr ; - 7 ae: . 3 ‘ si > a 
“ ’ , } , ae | ee Ro ae RE eS Ee ae eee saith ee a ” — ees : : q ; 
- > " * VV - ; r ser 7 " 4 VV 8 OU : eOovernir ‘ SR aS Rn Sa Sasa a? CRS Ea tae ES ay aie 
2 . -  yiFe s a5¢ s : er. e . fie > -2 4) : .? = . - . - 7 
> ae ' _- 5 saru Mic mee 4 * 2c Ss AC . ‘ ; P 
5 *)) ¢ sh ' ‘ i Th ‘ ; } . > AG t rn api " ; a y Ph . i : 
ic = : & - ® sie ' we 5 / . 
Yu : . it : . Dik) na is . it LLiCSt eae ie ° . . I WV ayn King DTCic p - Ji . ¢ a gis ‘ BE i a mi — s 
j . . o ttle © - tege ' bi % f \ ; " ? ay ve 9 RET er V ry ; ‘ ' 
x . ~y 3. $} - oye - 4 
’ OE - —s - . ' ste . a no e a ee , “Fe A 4 A Twenitir sha rn 
w ec- ~ - ~ ¢ , 4 ’ . j 7 ‘ : : 
; xsermar tie ae tyke is , Rated ~ 5 » 3 Oise  r epi AS ‘ ~ es ’ t a?: 18 a . : | 
“ " + . ‘ 
ic sic 4 SS U , : ae vv ‘ Lbe Morir ReVUue : lio w ne W Ct 3 ACiLy arcnoe ; 
5 se $3 “4 - " s < >%) 
. 2 S ’ m" 
ii= SUVIIUINVUIrCS YCec - =o )~] U chs . slain ¥ Ls p ie LLIC : aT Pnken VIUAUCGS 8 s : a0) 
* x , ; ’ 
re a6 Dall : ’ " i> ate ¢ a F ® > «9 ¢ 4 x) > . ‘ 4 eT ok on el* . i i i 
= i ~ S| - | 5 - * 4 Se ta 
ay . : ; ~ it Re ‘ . , . : anh . J 9 ‘ “ . Si@ei, 7i° 
: ; ry ong % © et STC Wy ‘ JEL. y UT : WV -() : venr WA ES 
Tue ‘ , : * Pas : t : ; ; i i ‘ ait WR - ; Leal" 1039 a4 o}4 4 8 : ‘ 
s .¥: 
vV jl 7 tiete @he: VV eee. 4 i e . Aa ’ ~~ ae ie Mi . ’ ” > ey . sO 
. - 2 - a ; 4 
: ‘ a - 7 os * JUG ran - . y ~ ‘ mponon TOM a 8 '¥ nAOeyY 4 " ’ ele 5 ‘ 
7 ‘ ‘ A LIE te. webs * 5. : Lk i A) 
€ 
ons t ono vViT'S Je ’ Uw PLt : b—Supr me E : pia TT 
DO Ds . U C pay 2424) , . - ¢ 7) a ox 2 $i> a GF &/ ; - 4 . | ' * 5 i 
. ; ; ei) ~T : ¢ . ae ’ ’ +34 7 3 @ z 2 
elds ele ete S Eg : : nes " ; Tn : ‘a | 
’ f e { " } a ’ 4 , . . ee : : . * . | By 1? 43 ef ‘ ; pits er « 
PF e€) ' i : Ll eee. é 7 : . i Body on 
- . . U 7 ‘ -§ ALIS, wes) ; \ : . : VV ‘ . PNT Serer t * 2 
: : 0 ‘ ' : ’ - . 
© 5 £ i.e. ay } * a 4 ‘eie ® + ' ; " a ef ee. , Fi ee ; 
nsom c aT: : ne ; n€ WIN TD h and ah 3¢ ¢ i ! pret 4 
> . " a i ttar ‘ee . ~ . . ; ” . ’ 
rest Sto h Age faes +? - i) “ Sale’: ° s B' nr Fie ' A ‘ $¢ * ~ ‘ SVvmpDAor 4 e eT ay a ; aT ‘ ; 
~ e _ 'ta« , > ~ 
4 ‘ omplete Storv hor ‘ y ele tide $ ° 5onem n Sy¥ymppor seoOnce é; ; 
- =}. : ; ~ ! ‘ ATYy OT ‘ 
. : S . Wy DBN hold Grimm a nte : ; : t pmeorre 
‘ : t a ° ’ ne 3 : - : ‘me OC no 
aT . asaay : 5 0 ¥ ; ; A bd ‘ renin ‘ DUE E re Cc 1e7F aC : 
- ; — atc - ; ‘4 t ‘ pi¢ arn r ; Pelee ; * 
1e 2 s * , +? , - i ‘ : . 'taene 4 . 29 Ja! e AM ° , ’ 
Ts. . er. ’ - ics is : : ne ahs , . ¢ 5 ele ia i Ac . a 
. » ‘ * a. * oe , 
’ ‘ : abee elepee y iV é eler: nilare WV I : ite th 8 nHoOTrae s)3 ; ‘ ne rn $ 
v¥ J ‘ ne sf yTwood ’ STOaRaACE ‘ ; ; ’ VV | ver ne eee ‘ 
; ~ ~ - 
‘a 4 p ‘ ti > . « ny - ‘ Pe eT | . «,e? > = ad 
DO OU ; aie ae : , 
» OF . } " & a ‘ : : etele eee ‘ . 7 o8 5 * i i r¢ | 
* “< é é J . JE ve J AG PARAEN . r ; tif yy t ‘ wio ; ateai Ls ' i} > - elf . + peaee. 7 . . 
"Bateti. Moos a " als A e)¢ ¥ » ie Lee ‘ ’ ‘ . 
. ~ a &. 
viTs Ss aTery WV 3 vV 2e8 - > , ne 
; & s : ponas vr : . ‘ sieele " ~ 22,8 a. 2 7 nes : ~ nde U M e 
: ; / é t +? eis . e ‘A t Ua “Bie =f: A ey J 3 = 
Jil . . oe D317 4 . ; WV ‘ etme ee anning anc mr prg an “ Dnsiaerec 2 : ‘ ae 
“ M “ y es ‘Bigsi. Tans H 
= é + j ~ se . . ¥ 9 a . 7 
. ’ cy ; 4 ' & s pa b * aT ~ ® a ; a — . 5 “3 ; . 4 e\e). . : ~ . ; ’ 
i ' ‘ ‘ * ‘ ‘3 . Oreste 
~ ele 7 & 7k Sicas - ; 2 Ei wil » u ‘ " . . > c > “ . 
: : —— a > . seas HK : UJ S FP LP AY. . : , v¥ J iS 12 UVve Mi ar ne nec : we ste 
' Suda & e rnan : 
. . aJ e > ~ a 
7 - -eye J ‘ - - nt At) Rorirectnon Wife r Yh F ; S we ; VV H aro W evinis 
' : ; o i i ' rt iG: i p«) ' J . 4 +? : e : BYVUU JU U “ 
’ i » i . 
: a U - se. 2 3 ies 3 esas ‘ UJ ’ 1 . > . 
3 ‘ ‘ - . ; VacVUonaic U Bele ARES WC ; 2 a6 y erow 5 yas saic ’ : , 
~ . ~ ' . =! “: ‘ : £ 
‘ = ° e: ~~ Ld aus tit " . 5 7%) Ds ‘? : ‘ ; ry < ° t) y 2323. 4ande : ’ A /. . 
viie ‘ ’ CQ — " ele ‘ . $7. Baeise ] : 
tZavea - ea: 7 ~ 7 ei at: ¢ 36 AS WV ome . . . ~ - . » } 6}. ace "3 
7 : b~ ail F J ’ $3 3g te Sie y ‘ee 3 O18 =" ‘? . : - bs > 5° 
vV ALS OW Re ; ‘ U ewe benine ite BW YC , : U ae SU ALU Vv Ui hy 
a ome ' $ U . v : : D4 mth? . -- . : . : caput 
Ww H p Ts " ett ete : . 2 Ao o38 ets weorge ‘e:be > 4 . e 6 : - 7 a ¥ ; 
19 : Ns Dene , 
4c YY ¥ nG ae 4 : = : : aCe rae ’ LOS uf u ~F- ° ; Shoe rau Wy i : 
i » * DDS ; nac ; om p : : ; - 
; i ‘ y ‘ . . ' wttié +. #,¢ + ™ 7 3 
LV. sBete vs ® a0 ALC : 2 u f J ‘ : wut thei rr $3 eo LJPres ; : e H is POONA re P| | . 
WMAQ hethm in the 0:00 fAQ mos ‘n’ Andy : - D broade ' : ere an exciting that you can start at no ex- 
r ~ 2 > " 7? « 
RINE DF Wir's SNe WRRM—Retwe » Reokends ne FB : sme Manac D hug n progran anokesme said 1 . pense. § your toda new labels will be Goa: 
? om . - 
anc . , Jouchte C WITT on dh Ting BBM—Pc Melodie given a » These can be made into ? bs 
- 7. *~ > * > 
od : 1+ ; ’ * ; 
; . . " . . . : me 1 ) . + M iy ; 
he Gosp ’ : a , bridge le t and other 
$ $ off: tAate sited : : PF | } 4 Pe 
ut 'Boh Hawk nolish © » 1 am. 1D : : ; ¢ ' oreh : home are free with your purchase of z e 
J 3 a ° 4 
ring horse OW : ¥ orm : Goldenrod lee Cream 
s . 6 it ¢t i teh 300 a 20 _-_ ~e i os . eS : “Fs ; rn - . rn * 
. . - a Ms & e : . ~ & 4 ~ * ~rias : ; 
or ‘ : OMmor;ro ML “ . se 000 : ie 
= ar oT : mony FHi-§ —— : 5 Ev omonse 40 0 Bed U ‘ : 
* af " s eeie : - —t bk ° peat é - a ‘ . . a 7 j 2¢ ' ° / -) ; ; a 
- . wt > 7 a * + )i — “i 7 2 ~ ry o 
efett. wte = eh F . 3 ~ 2 ° 
5 wTIN..F oe ‘ 0 RE nda F AiG A beautiful label will be en to you absolutely pe 
> as * "tele i * Aa " ‘ : ‘ md = ons D.4 t % : “Shs Bhar: i . . ° 576? © Cc : 
hag rpc Mig ie oe : aT 64 8 Ns lage pag EE ; as ple | wee, von ® Geldenred Ice Cream. Call Boule- 77 
; of ? are 5 ; owers a ak fer the of nearest Goldenrod deal i a 
: hor : j ese " onvention & ‘ : MAOQNo i ee hie . sdio wus re pre , var your | er. ; 
° . - i ' « ¥ dy ~ _ « 
1? ’ , ‘ v 4 
“46 : ’ “Bete " . 5 ase ore af: . OL U ‘ wo ; : . : f ,7 ; & 7 
i a : atiairs. £5 y . : 
('meae ’ . & elese ‘ . ot. ; 
¥. ~ ~ ; ‘ ‘ 
A . C =e +? - ¢ ; ’ Reg . : oe . . . . " ' t £ ’ tie i ° 
> +? r 7 nn V 2 ryt 4 ng ren - 2 : a “ fy a ae 4 > , 
. - ia 
mo - r . _ . *“a* a) + - 
. . . : ‘ . 4 
mA 3 ] ’ J e ~ a be J S LA) 4 oO we ee . = ” ‘ . . : - + * ] Fre , ae L ; ‘ 7) 7 tie ae 2 ? : $e): 4 . Py 2) 5 s7 0 ’ . 1 ; nf 
t 5 r te y t Ti seaake ifs ‘ ho : 
A . se : OL o - ’ ° . re , ‘0 
J 7 : : s ‘ ~ é J Md - Ms 4 1% ® . OP os mn ; r » = ete}* ee* ths “ie ° 2 ’ 3 ; 
e Py 7 ’ 4 ane LP > . ~- . } 1 ~ va’ ; 
. ¢ JC - . . ° a) 6 ; An : 
} wv a wary Mio ‘ vit os ‘ oie . > e ul = ’ As . i i Ht 
+ ry ‘ H P4 " 149 ele 
ve ; OLE ~ “eedie a! ot hig int ; nth ‘a une : shee ve 
vy e Jane ' | 40 
A) A r) e a1 ’ 2 
“rohe 0 MAG Bi: aarding : ‘ ; : - : . ; zt ' : ; 
5 iF ne wre nce oc \ Ma j ' f a - ; : ar Ee NI .wtard arche 2 ano V; ' AUKE R00 ' 
A OC a se : cy ei. ' J - one 7) « bed ; ; 
g 6I- ee | eae si. os ° | 2 AY \ : +¥- ’ . ie r i ote . 3 ry yy) “e = 'y : ’ a eye . » ¥ *vo e stede ; : aT. 
7% a - ‘ ’ ' 
WTeRRYW Heler on —~ a , o) sis a ©¢ hud a s7regc . a ad 520 e ’ ne ; < 
¢é ee siete J = @)>-%" ,thehe . ’ er. . > ; . 2 cit 
a) 0 mond eyeP. Q t tie. ' = — 
~ . ue ' . ; FA 
n¢ Vi; VV aTY ae PmMe 7 ? Sn Pe ~ Vi 4 ‘ : " . 3¢ ' De rer 5e 2 ’ ’ : ne £ 2A C — j 
De ‘ OU 3 f 
my r) _— ° _ rr - Y ws 
7) * ’ ‘ - . ~ . " . J , ; A F ; P 
; ‘ yo 3% Co . , “sg é r2 ] U aa DitiIerin . 3 OS 3 eat & & : s ; ~ a * 2 @£¢) iF rd iS ~ f a £ 4 : > | J hi ad f Z 
ttar . , 7 P gq. 3 ¢ 
: ; 2 Hendersor ' : - 7 é TC » ey 


« | " 7 e / ih oe : ehe Ps . . 5 > ‘ ron . : ” a 
Sh 3 - & anc WREN Fen am OF : ne: yi U : - _—* , , , # ; ASA SIA MUOWN WED-FRI-5:30-5:45 


— ae . 2 & = ECs ‘8 ¢ e er. ‘teeke . * 
LP Bd ; ¥ : » iay 
a) ‘ * . 
~ “7. - ; - rf - " ate : & SOD ns : 
: ce s nOSDI1LE MAG : Hickory : tha: DE Ane . ; : U U 
iil ‘ 4 ’ > ~ ~ ‘e vA f : “ . ' rieten = 
- ~o - " * ’ ; . i ‘. = " . . ‘ 63% * sa: 
aw SHULILC ic Si eett. . WR " c . . : Wicd . , tay & hdd ; ; ; ; . - y 
® ‘ 5 F j , 
2 ? = . . \ ay Ti . & it ¢ née lise h ’ rn ‘ 
m teers n : . : . WM F ‘ elite . on Fe sie ’ s nise IV . sete ‘ j Le j > 
> eh: e 5 Ov \ am ' 
vv . ~ . Sr * . U uC ¥ , : 1 * 
r n one © ‘ Ore ct ‘ wD sree . SU re i Sen =e CT ee ; + AILU : 2244) : 
we Ta ro «Beh ‘ et. ' , 
- she " are “ . ‘ nee oe ¢ rac : : : : " > TF 
: ’ AU s ~ “Vheie. - & 58 VV < Vy Beles n rn 7 WV . . * e - a ° ° - ° ff 
‘ 7 2 ‘ - : - 7 
7 > » " 
. : - ~ . , > e > xs . ebe Pe JOT &. i : ] tie. On r - Je 8 ¢ | mY ’ ™ § a 
~ : ; ie 8 ore 5° 2 : ey. 67: ’ . " . ° : ~ 4 } & % 
, ee pm } : 3 i sande i Vi F | - | 
- : . a : " . 4 . rs - ; . . v WV ¢ * WV - ’ 7 - , * 
eee ~ i “= ~ ¥ ’ * -: . . ‘th ehe r r : e ‘ Pe : 4 iv ¥ 4 ‘ é . 4 t U . £ . F : . / r » 3 ’ : » , 4 f 
ear: * " ‘¢; i i) ' 3 J r iY : 5 : > q A , 
‘* 7 " - ” * . ‘. 4 4 
+ Ore - - : ay . : ‘ f 2 i : wm © § de y. © A £ “ae aig? OF : VW € 
: ‘ . orcs ’ nea * ; ’ - te , ‘ ‘+ ; s . 
3 cs. ’ ; Ay s _- : 7 VV i TERN is BRELAA ONT 
JERI ET ) Y 2 " ese 7 _ > - 
- - . . = ~ ~ ’ ’ * e 
, ‘4! : a ‘ > © ne Spo - ‘ 
ry - = ~ eaten - on — stanqpeeerengaueeaenss — — - oe 
‘* ia . 
' . ne ET 2 6 - j 7 t . é 
< : ‘? rr) . > . 
: ’ => si% A A +. if- 3 
; 
is . ’ if oy i 3 is iit > " ‘ }< 
a, | 
" m . ~~ tt. 4 ‘ ' ' ; : 
iave - ~e sae - y - e ; i “ - ” 
: — 
' . 
te +. ' i 7 +. G AJ be i@iete ’ is ~* i 
“ * . 5 4 
‘ P] ‘ ‘ ° ) WV ’ - a - ry : ° 
: ° . a D and ome AC ’ Hy Hrogram 
ry > a) r ponds . n m 
> ~L* ry = ~ _ * - 1 
: < : 5 LS JUe : U . # AyD Oo “ j s Ws S€ po 
oP eF\) me Sradie : 
' 2 - * 4 anes 
aAcGaock ’ : ° "ake ; ut t Ar Panta aLLaS 
be - . ’ ey te * ry os - 
J ports ODE 
‘ Sse iiit : e ~ : . - 7 “ 
™ 7. - TOUSsic = F 
- . . r) J 4 
ee ~ : t C A ae ore “ee ‘ Uitiais & a » 
) 
. ; ° 2 UC ay * ais 
- ’ - & 2 2 s & = = | . ; 18 ‘ sie ° a - . x) - 
- * . - 
= = " U U A DE Oreo “4 
. ’ " 7 7 o r Ee a , > " é - " - 
. . ~ «8. & r) > A m 0 i " r 
‘i> ’ i ) 
' et): ‘ 4 i Sf) . . aS « e ; ~ ‘ue rn ‘ ti : S¢) OT _ 
— ’ : n 
. Pu ‘ Z 
, = +? . : . ° - * ‘? ° % ¢ a 2 4 : . : 
Xi & J ue in. 
“ - - - > ee 5% 
‘ ' WOME Tes PSLOCi Ua 7 : * 2 . a < D “ Rro Ww nianisc ; oe sete 
Son ene ratate 
° ~ bs oe - 
* ° . * , 4 . ’ * we 
: Jiit : z Rae As | ~ epets “4 : S : 2 5 aC ‘ D 4 mez es 
— ‘7 . a on ' 
. * ut ate cbele JOY ; 
WV a Ps ¢ ‘ . ; A “4¢ $3° . = 4 < 
iit SOL mar - progr mn e : 
’ - Jait t a e : ‘ ’ = rn r < . af 
; . . . 2 — S| s program . ? | 
‘~ . . . o - sd e - , ‘tar . *- 3) r) A - 
’ r e - 7 : r a6 “4: “ a iii . H p Hasene Dee : ey 
- 
” ie 
; | > gta 
+ - . = - “3 3 ' = Ww > vy 
‘ ‘ anc eee ’ Owe C¢ ore ¢ * : ant sss rgneataaa 
* ; iif y i af hy. rou ‘ : " 
YC : 
& $6.8 ’ ° & - . . * "40,28 ete ' . ee Si. te fa . — 4 
. + se . A 
J ’ "7 
. mim : Diz “ 
WV i H \ ’ , 
* , > tv 
A + ’ t “ai . i ' - Ser : 
/ x) . BE 
‘ ¥ = ‘ iy a > 
< “a 
, , ; teens ; . ’ . 
e}e ie ‘ ‘ - g ‘ 
‘ < 
> aa Bh: aT , ™ 
+ 4 
/ Jv we ste al " v 
"et 
; ~ “ “ 
> > 4 | a em Tiate iti i é } i “ 
. . U * t 5 : "a 1 % 
A €) ma rn é - n P “3 
s 
, A A " ~- a . 
‘ ; s > ne i : ‘ ; Vile © ae 68 we j : a “es 
7 é el * * , p 
© * . ‘ 4 « * 4 i] a eis: sis . x) > . woos 4 aa gl 
’ « - rn r ie ’ ipeqe 4 ws . 
- : 7 sie “ s “ie ave * = A i P 7 ‘ Merc ey .: 
> * * ~ - : >, a On a’n® 
; : psteraé 0 ; ; = ~ : Meanie 4 
os : CG , ” 
nnie onnsto “ a ‘ 
7 7 ' v < 
4 2 n ‘ == - . * Z ’ ’ . . ¥ Vv a yO ne ¢ ne y ‘ 
‘ . 
t © , . . 
a motne patens é i's ara on ye : DE o€ 5 BM ny ‘4 See 
) ha ~ .* ~ 
alii =A mir y rY) n 2 . ; : x 
* . 8 mports ‘ nim Jale : ; nh WwW ~~ De ws : 
sr a mee, , 
SC) ae Se a S 2 Per & : ‘ + ee + > : ’ "4: ¢ . ’ H Tr pe OZaAr nian ; 4 oft: 
a r r ry 
: = ; . ; . 
$ onec els ste y ‘ i; - 4 MUU wRDL > . : 
. BBM—Howard Neumille ‘ RY 
e. ’ : : * ie? 2 ‘aes r ’ A elejes ° ~ ‘ a) Raseh Ren me eee . 
fa tl >» "7, 
4 ees 
m . i=) . te 
D iisagreeme ; > in mind is : nsec ; Boys’ and s’ pre ‘ er 
‘? w 
. +7 . Ad . U “2%. *, sal 
’ r s © | Bi ’ a - t . ° 5 ~ ; . Py % 
— ’ ° ‘ ~ - 
» i ; ‘ n02 fc u “ A of 
we / 7&6 7 et ‘ s 4 é ’ ? . € ; Py . ve . 
* *. - - » » ° o : “4 
. : ; , 3 afi Secon AmDO o 
A 
’* ’ “ A 
sete : ; t : ‘ 2 + * s Ve ei’ . . 2 . . . ara Je is 
= '% e 
- . sane . AW : ; : . 
L ‘ ~}- s ‘ ‘ OT) : ‘ : aid |. . ; ? 7 
” 
. neo 4 SOR 
" +? . ‘? " > ; d ‘ — a em 
Sik) « U : a . s J ele i ' 2 s J Rg orgs / P iis - 
= 5 : Ps y r n . , SRS S: : 
SDDDOS + Ons W 3 » £ : > +? n ae r . 8 mo ang ‘ P a. " , 
7? > aw’ Ag ~ 
— bby ‘ 44D, v.. een : , . > ” 
24108 & e ’ JisCe -3¢ - y ‘ ’ = . ons at ’ =. es 
, ‘i! e ay { i ‘ i i x , NW . 
, » 
7 - . =} ; ‘ on 
0 nse ee 5 : ALLA ES < UTLe! : AW—D0 VV insiow me, SY ote’ a 
'* ‘ * . “4 4 
JO Vo U SLRS. ¥ © . et. r aoe . t wPOo g . : ¥ as RR sy 
‘% , LT « ~ m, a Pees, , 
>t; »1; : : o&: O's orar i , A 
tts sie s ’ ete sie “45 7 : eo ‘ - s > ~ - — on Se ~~ *s 
_ ; ~ 15ets 118s alt ° > a P *' S , 
~ 4 . FOOC ‘ si: > 2 e a) * rh %, . ” re » . “ 
4 ul : : . a ‘ macnn : : 
'aear ? 3 . « - eh r« 
P VOU " an VC seete ste ‘ > good Cc D , 2 Duy ¥ICO © VB SL O Pa Pree? 
7 - 
BSiUmMe rs SRE ‘fate : 
$ ‘ ‘ ste a ; sic : Oe t $8 ° ' : opie Fe mee ‘ 
U 5 i s}i ‘ i \ 4 
B's yelt Ti}: 70) er : 8 : : t ; Ae Sic : 5 As VW BBA oOmahaw 
" } 9 J 4 " ° . oe ° . - e1¢e ° 3 . : oe 618 = J “ 
a ‘Zs ; i: sie t md e: os e'é t = eet: + -) ik Hee . - ‘ ° :3ei@ * 
vy 4 uve ’ ne 
4, ~ - ° a 
‘sf: ~ ais “3tets 4 e ° - & * & - r 


efeia Je ’ 32eC, pT: ‘ Se ‘ ; ehuelest:= ; n 
; ! Jiila : R 
=3 3e ¢ ~. ° i © $ 7 @& ajirere vv Res10 7 P r ~< - a » S U - Ji & wi, OVIC JUF 
Ne 7 Go 
‘se te <6) 46) ’ : ’ A] & > " siiis A - ry to * ~ ad 
“se ’ ' $3 Re pias sie ‘f . ete eteie 4 s +f oy % A 
ye ¥ tie ‘ ‘ - ‘ AU . ’ 4 2 
JO ¥U AL ¢ ICL *) i ; ALLD UU 4 TIUC!I tle é : 20 ¢ TLC 14 a 
2 i“ eet? <, 
a Map g*s!, 

4 . senate » 


®, 
> 


ms aie 


: vi : SERME é Nonductc 
America’s , | Inimitable “Mother Gone’), masey, 


~beeding: ere 2 Song shony), Kodaly, Stravinsky (Suite trom “Pe 
Comic “ag gg ee Stylist SAT. fore, July 10: Stravinsky, Shostakoviet 


: ; 
f ~ 7 H 1espiagn 
> 
rd t » t¥ ~~ 
Ssvymnne per Tr a OT ’ s 
’ 
J + 
. 
' Ohare ner A 
n O06 
‘ T AL tRTE : ’ tigti ‘ il 


. «ft D «) % ©: u y : $ Zul? 
: BUY ‘ e 4e AG ps ai ' f ‘ 
’ ee . : eli, 4 eite <eOrr 
at ne ae 2.8) 


and His — \G : $ 
Orchestra : - 


A 


Shele " 
a 
y é 
e : ‘ ; 
4 ] ? 2B 4, * bs f 
" by ats 
ro 4 ¥ : & u ‘25 % 
; a, ae ; 
Weis 
. 
. . 
5 
d “4 . | 
eines * > rp 46 
2 “4 . A 
hy 4 P 
Afi 4s ’ 
7 i’ a 
ly : 
, « 7 Bi ck 
. 2 . r P 
— y 3 + x! 
ia x a 
A; 
’ ' i a» 5 . ‘ * ay 2 Set 
selection Anatoliy shige : , 
A . ! 4 - — at ” Pe ‘ “i ; t: ee > « .- 
— P — ™ ” 7 » cere oe Sih a —— rr) aries . " e * - —— m ™ se 4 
“ 
5 : 
as Fos im 4 
bres ee SaaS fh ‘aes ne phage ieee ibe Ay | \ % HES Sains = how oo. 
. eee ne a tia i a a i Ble ila i as POTS a POP Oe a a Bios oat ete Si 2 : SNS POR Pe 3 f RUN ee pains x reoere pels ao en epee rere De eee wre Sy, d 
be j 
i " SH eas 


pe i a ie 
etfs BS I i ag 4 es as Bat x) 
Se Fe "6 ae at " 4 nd ee “ie or 
2 = = ~ 


36, 50c. 


to 


- 


- Petal, 


50, 


$3. 42 and 44, $3 


Medium, long 


Slip. 


brown. 32°to 42, $2. 44 


Petal, azure, 
black, sun orange. 
and 46, $2.50. 
to..match gown, 


Extra large, $2.50. 


Wie 
44 
e, $2. 


and 46, $1.50. 
32 to 40, 


$1.25. 


garters, $3. 


ders filled. 


State 20006.. 


uit 


Ss 


This- one has 


. 


white. 34 to 42, 


black. 32 to 
Fourth Floox. 


wim 


yps Go 
emi 


; 


tr 


ajamas, 
coral, sun 
40, 


French blue, 


$3.95 


The “maillot,” as you know, is the skirtless style 
that has dived headlong into popularity this season, 


Kmt Underwear; Third Floor. 


S 


Petal, 
44 
6. Scalloped Singlette. Sun 
In coral, royal, turquoise, 


Not sketched, short leg Jarnette. $2... | 
orange, petal, white. 


5. Stryps 
lengths. Sun 
coral, French blue, 
32 to 42, $2. 
Swasser Coat 


and 46, $2.50. 


Bandeau, 32 
2. P 

black, navy, 
Small or larg 
5. Ch 


4. 
Mail and.- teleph 


With detachable 
Sports Shop, 


Maillot § 


\ 


© 
With Drawstring Nee 


and is so grand for active s 


‘adjustable straps. 
and white. Sizes 34 to 40 


\ is 7 
oo 


Baas 


me 


is the perfe 


ion Cost 
gives 


oe eS eS 


f panty girdle 
for active sports. It 


rie 


There’s a Vassare 
{s—This b 


For Every Vaca 
At 
foundation 


Sia tN a Ai 


gusagyiee nent ks 


Or... 


r 
si 


avel 
atin, 


t 
‘a 


$G-50 
jewels bo travel. 
‘Flo 


Robe, Silk Ss 
Perfect 


A Dream of a TF 
Rich PD, 


» 


Umbrella 


aT 


Fourth Floor. 


SOR 
Noe 


Misses’ Moderate Price Frocks, 
i am 


ta 2% ey ‘ 


RN 6. 


b | 


Carson 


“OOOO 
pata a vee «80% 
Wik 


‘Makes Best Speed of 


Meeting. 


BY FRENCH LANE. 


Speed horses at Arlington Park will 
have pecan to think about at the 
breakfast table 
this morning. If 
they didn’t see it 
they heard about 
‘Deliberator from 
Fred A. Burton’s 
sta- 
ble stepping* six 


Everglades 


furlongs in 1:10; 
45 while he eas- 
ily captured the 
Evanston purse 
yesterday after- 
noon. 

It was the most 
brilliant speed 
performance of 
the season at 
Arlington and 
the 4 year old 
son of Wise Coun- 
sellor-Azurita was roundly cheered 
when he sailed past the finish line a 

and a quarter ahead of Fraidy 
Cat, which had trounced Deliberator 
in the Arlington Inaugural handicap 
last week. 
Visigoth Is Third. 

Four lengths back in third place 
was Visigoth, also from Kentucky, 
which had run last in the six horse 
field until the run down the stretch | qc. 
was well under way. Such speedsters 
@s Foyot, Roguish Girl, and Higher 
Cloud were completely smothered by 
the keen display of fleetness Deliber- 
ator shook out of his flying feet. 

"The victory was the first the Burton 
colorbearers have scored in Chicago 
this year although earlier in the sea- 
son Deliberator had performed in 
fashion in Kentucky and 
An New York. 

"The race attracted unusual interest 
because there had been a continuous 
te on at Arlington this sea- 
. as to whether. Foyot or Delibera- 
sor was faster out of the start- 
‘ing gate. Everybody agreed they 
were the two quartered here that 
could get away quickest. 


Seed A. Worhen. 


Fast as Deliberator was out of the 
1 Foyot beat him away. He left 
“e a shot out of a gun and for the 


stretch run started ‘he had pulled 
out. into a lead -of a length and a 
half He kept» right on until his 
chore had been completed in the 
handiest sort of.a way. 

The quarter was run in :22 35 and 
the half in -:45. 3-5. 

*“Deliberator went to the post as the 
favorite, The final payoff on him was 
$4.40 for a two dollar ticket. 


Here are the box scores of the four previous All-Star games, three of 
: which were won by the American league: 


FIRST GAME. 
AT CHICAGO, JULY 6, 1933. 
NATIONAL. 


bt nip coes MRO CoO MCO oI 
COCHOCOMOCOHHON 
CHHHOOCORDHFONOHE: 
COS OF NPOMEE 
COOP OCORCORMECP 


Warneke.p 1 
tEnglish,ss 1 


CK OO COOOOCOOOOKFOH 
OH COCOKCONMHOFDNOM 
COM MDKOSHOCISCCHMOH 


0 
§ Batted for Crowder in a. 
{Batted for Warneke in seventh. 


National .-000 002 000—2 
--012 O01 . 00x—4 


Error—Gehrig. eins runs—American 
revi, te 4; National League, 2. Runs batted 
in—Martin, ine: Ruth 2. Gomez, Averill. 
Two base t—Traynor, Three base hit— 
Warneke. Home run—Ruth. pag 

ce—R. Ferrell. 


base— 
eerie as | 
playa Sart artell” rg Frisch to Terry 


third!: Warneke, 
run mn, &: Hubbell, 1 hit in 2: 


Klem [ Nationa 


Riger [Nation i. Time of game— 


SECOND GAME. 
AT NEW YORK. JULY 10. 1934. 


corcon't 


ee 
COHOHOMDHHOCOOHP> 


tito Ccto 


 SOMSOSS SSS SOOCOSSOHNOW HW 
CSOOSSCOOSSCOHOHOOCOF DH 20/7 
COOSCCOMM COREA OOWDHOrHCO'N 


38 91427 14 


“Batted for Hubbell in thifd® and took 
ace venth. 


Frisch's pl] 


epenes ioe Be 
+ gana for Ja 


an y in h. 
JBatied for Gomez in fourth. 
Batted for Mungo in fifth. 
261 000—9 


000 
» LOS ayes 000—7 


There were two other high spots 
Frisch 


on the program. The first one came 
in the first race when Opera: Star, 
ene of the stylish fillies purchased | ;~ 
last year by Morris Vehon of Chi- 
cago, made the first start of her 
career and stepped straight to town 
at a mutuel ‘betting payoft of $94.40 
for a $2 ticket. 

Even Mr. Vehon, who knew this 
daughter of Victorian-Song Bird was 
& Speedy one, almost fell out of his 
“clubhouse box seat when she went 
“Past the winning post. 

- Allanwood Second. 


: Coming from far back to be second 
‘was Allanwood, owned by Howard 
- Oots of Kentucky: The favorite, 
‘Sweet Showno, owned by Tony Pelle- 
teri, finished third. Opera Star 
“showed speed from the start. She 
‘ran the five furlongs in one minute 
‘and gave indications that she will 
= to ee greater deeds. 


a 


tenes: learue. Ae ag 
Ub Dean. i: Prankipet, 
Harder 2: J. Dean 


Vanderbilt's 
Ranger Picke 
tor Cup Race 


Newport, R. I. July.6.— ( — 


| Ranger, Harold S. Vanderbilt's yacht, 


tonight was n-med as the defender 


-|of the America’s cu> against Endeav- 
e/our II., T..O..M. Sopwith’s second 


to defend the famous 


The assignment 
trophy, the 
third time it has been entrusted to 
Vanderbilt, was given him on his 54th 
birthday. 

The announcement was made by 
W. A. W. Stewart, commodore of the 
New York Yacht club, which has had 


the trophy in its custody ever since 
the schooner yacht America led a 


British challenger. 


\fleet of British yachts around the Isle 
|of Wight and brought it home. 


‘The nomination of Ranger followed 
a conference aboard Tara, power 
yacht of E. Townsend Irwin, vice 
commodore of the club, which was 


j\attended by Vanderbilt, Gerard B. 


Lambert, and Chandler Hovey, skip- 


THIRD GAME. 
AT CLEVELAND, JULY 8, 1935. 
NATIONAL. AMERICAN. 

b bR 


Cramer.cf 
Hamsley.c 
—— 
Gomez.p 
Harder,p 


SOSSOSSOSOCOOHOR, 

SOSSOSHOSOOCOOOHE 

SCOSSOHOH HH WOMDWOH 
+29: POO POWOOO PP 
SOSH SOCOCOFHOH 
COSHONSOOOWOD fy 
SOHRONMOHOOL HET 
HrracoooocoowoPr 


$2.482710 


*Mancuso batted for Walker in third and 
P. Waner batted for Schumacher in seventh. 
tRan for ilson in seventh. 


National .....csseesseesdesee-000 100 000-1 
American Jeb ce ee bouC eb ies sae 010 00*—4 


Errors—Berger and Gehrig. Runs batted in 
—Foxx [3]. Cronin. Terry. Two base hits— 
Vaughan, Wilson, Gehringer, Simmons. 
Three base hit—Hemsley. Home run-—Foxx. 
Stolen base—Martin, Left on bases—American 
Leacue, 7; National League, 5. Base on balls 
—Walker, 1 [Gehringer]: Schumacher. - 1 
(Gehrig]; Gomez, 2 [Medwick, Vaughan): 
J. Dean, 1 [Foxx]. Struck out—Gomez, 4 
renege 2: Medwick. Berger]: Harder. 1 
Ott]: Walker, 2 [Simmons, Gomez): Schu- 
macher, 5 [{Johnson, 2: Foxx, Cronin, Sim- 
mons]; Derringer 1 [Harder]: J. Dean, 1 
[Johnson!. Pitching records—Walker, 2 hits. 
3 runs in 2 innings: Schumacher. 4 hits. 1 
run in 4; 1 hit, O runs in 1; 
Gomez, 3 hits, 1 run in 6: Harder. 1 hit, 
O runs in 3. Earned runs—American League. 
4: National League, 1. Winning pitcher— 
Gomez. Losing pitcher—Walker. Umpires— 
Ormesby fA. L.1, Magerkurth [N. L.1. Geisel 
{[A. L.], Sears ({N. L.]. Time of game— 


2:06. 
FOURTH GAME. 
AT BOSTON, JULY ‘7. =. 
AMERICAN, 


Bl 


COSC OK SHOCOCOOCOHSOCON 
COOCOKOFKHOOCOOCKHKONHMm 
—. 
Ht Dh mete HHCOIm mtg IB ROCE 
SSSSSOSor OKSOHH® 
SOCOKORREEROwrHH 
DONVOHOOAICHOOEsmly 
OH HMWOONOOCCOHROPY 


OOSSSSOM sds HP CWO=1F*2929 


31 4927.11 


‘, *Batted for R. Ferrell in seventh. 
. ¢Batted for Higgins in seventh. 
 Faaeeee for Rowe in seventh. 
Batted for, Demaree in éighth. 
Batted for Whitney in eighthi.- 
* ¥Crosetti batted for Harder in ninth. 


American .....sss0. 000 000 300—3 
National . .020 020 00*—4 


Error—DiMagegio. Runes batted in—Hartnett, 
Whitney, Medwick. Galan, A Applins 2. Gehrig. 
Two base hit—Gehringer. hree base hit— 
Hartnett. Home a = fag om Gehrig. Double 
plays—Whitne Gh. W..Herman. to Collins; 
Appling, Gehringer to Gehrig. Pitching rec- 
ords—Grove. runs .3 hits in 3 innings; 


ls 


, Higgins, Grove 
if Higgins]: 
by Wasseke. 2 Ba se 


kypling, Gehrig] 
pupbel. ? {Gehringer}: off Grove e 
ins is {Coll ns}; 


ow 

Fog Wa 3° [Geh 

gen, Tea 
ae Ses i 


: n . * . 
tional Bie Summers [American league]: 
{ National aan) : ene { American 
League]. . Time 


of game—2 


All-Star Facts 


 Event—Fitth cea! midseason 
game between. National league. All- 
Stars and Arherican league All-Stars. 

Place—Griffith stadium, home of 
the Ameritan league team “of Wash- 
ington, D. C 

Hiebete e’clock Washington and 
Chicago time.) 

Probable weather—Fair and tem- 
perature of $0. degrees. 

A 
000 plus 1,000 :.standees. 

Radio broadcast — W-G-N 
o'clock.) 

Starting lineups: 
_ ‘NATIONALS, 
P. Waner, rf 


Herman, 2b 
Vaughan, 3b 


crowd of 32;- 


{1:15 


AMERICANS. 
Rolfe, 3b 
Gehringer, 2b 
Di Maggio, If 


N ATIONAL LEAGUE RESERVES—Pitch- 
ers: Hubbell and Castleman of Giants, Blan- 
ton of Pirates, Walters of Phillies, and Gris- 


——e 


You Have Until Monday;| 


Add Fifth Section. 


BY WILFRID SMITH. 


(Entry blank on page 22.) 

A fifth preliminary section for the 

Chicagoland 100 yard championship 
swimming races: has been added to 
the four which will be held this week- 
end. Yesterday it became apparent 
that it was impossible for the clerks 
to complete the lists of all: swimmers 
for this week and to mail out post- 
ecards to all contestants. Consequently, 
those who. receive cards this week 
will report for their trials as directed. 
Others..will be asked to compete in 
the fifth preliminary. 

This preliminary will be held at 1 
o’clock on Sunday afternoon at 
Whealan pool, Milwaukee and Devon 
avenues. Immediately following these 
trials, the championships in all ten 
age classes will be held. Qualifiers 


from the four ‘trials this ‘week-end | J 


then will compete with the winners 
in the final Whealan pool trials. 
Entry Time Extended. 

Since it has been necessary to ex- 
tend the list of preliminaries, it was 
decided that an entry blank should 
be run until next Monday for those 
who have not entered and who wish to 
compete in the final trials July 18. 
This entry blank, if sent to the sports 
department of Tue TRIBUNE before 
Monday midnight will permit comipe- 
tition in the eighth annual races. 

The system of sending postcards to 
all contestants is responsible for ex- 
tending the preliminaries. Each boy 
and girl who sends in an entry re- 
ceives a card of acceptance which fur- 
nishes the time of the race, the place, 
and the racing number. 

Don’t Forget Your Card. 

This postcard permits use of the 
pools without charge. It facilitates 
conduct of the trials. And by send- 
ing out the card, the list of contest- 
ants is verified. 

There never has been an entry fee 
for competition in the swim meet and 
this year THE TRIBUNE will pay the 
A. A. U. registration fee for all swim- 
mers 16 years of age and over. Pre- 
viously, contestants paid their own 
‘| registration fees. The meet is sanc- 
tioned by the A. A. U. and thus your 
amateur standing is not endangered. 

In the list of team entries which 
have been received for the prelimi- 
naries Saturday and Sunday are: Lin- 
coln-Belmont department of the Y. M. 
C. A.; Belding playground; Independ- 
ence park and Columbus :park’ of the 
Chicago park district;| Whiting, Ind. 
Community service; Country Club of 
Peoria, Ill.; Jackson Natatorium, and 
the Jewish People’s institute. 

“Y” Enters 11 Boys. 

Carl Anderson, swimming coach at 
the Lincoln-Belmont Y. M. C, A. has 
entered 11 of his boys in three of the 
five age classes. They will compete in 
the trials at California park on Sun- 
day. Clarence Lynest and John How: 
ard Jr. are outstanding swimmers in 
the Class E senior division. The team 
sponsored by Otto Kaecke of Belding 
playground and the team coached by 
Eugene Utz, director at. Independence 
park, are registered for the Sunday 
trials at Whealan pool. 

Catherine Ribovich, Class E, and 
Marion Parsanko, Class D, are veter- 
an swimmers from the Whiting, Ind., 
Community Service club. Last year 
Miss Parsanko finished fourth in the 
event for girls 15 and 16 years oo 
Joseph Brock, athletic director, is 
tain these girls not only will. qualify 
for the championships Saturday at 
Sherman pool, but they will win gold 
medals July 18 at Whealan pool. . 

Twelve boys from Columbus park, 
according to Jim Kelly, instructor, 
will swim in the trials Saturday at 
Cermak pool. There are four contest- 
ants in each of the first three age 


| divisions for boys. 


Yale’s Tide Golf Squad 


_New Haven, Conn, ay: 


‘ - ~ wis 
x UT TELAT a 
P % 4 MY HE HALT 
Hk HHH | THT 
Hl Wh 
Mi Hh 
“ | jer 
A} df i) Mi iif = 4] 


Hi aul Ha 


Stratton and. Mungo 
Are Out. 


‘BY EDWARD BURNS. 

[Chicago Tribune Press Service.] 
Washington, D. C., July 6.—Presi- 
dent Roosevelt will-.throw out thé 
first ball at Griffith stadium shortly 
before 1:30 o’clock tomorrow after 
noon. Then the, players whom Man- 
ager Bill Terry thinks are. the best 
in the National league will play the 


seas 


HH 


| 


ene <n eteee e ~ 


Leaders ‘of the: auadekeias’ and Natiogal : ‘league forces confer: with ‘Cienabeubiau K. M. Landis in: 
‘Washington last evering ‘on final plans for the: fifth annual All-Star game today. 
Ford Frick, National league: president; Commissioner Landis and William Harridge, American league 
president; (standing) Leslie O’Connor, secretary to Landis; Joe McCarthy, manager of the American 
league team, and Charles: Dressen, National — coach. 


Dizzy Dean, St. Louis Cardinal 
star, who will stdrt on, the mound 
for the National leaguers. 


? | Hi 7 ‘John, O. Seys,’ vice president of the Cubs, is the only front: office. man 
} from: either of the Chicago clubs here for the game. . . 
‘worry. was.who.will-fun for Gabby Hartnett, if he gets on base, becatise 


a ae Se er eee 


Version Gee Games of the 
New ‘York. Yankees, the’ American 
league’ ry starting pitcher.’ ' 


ee 
HERE Y’ARE, MEN: 


TWO. ALL-ST AR 
SEATS, ONLY $25! 


Washington, D.C. July 6.—[Spe-| Ba 


fellows whom .Manager Joe McCarthy 
has selected as the cream of the 
American league. This is. the setting 
for the fifth annual All-Star game. 

There was quite a bit of excitement 
about town when it was rumored 
early today that the gent. Terry 
had named as his starting pitcher, 
Dizzy Dean, would not be in town. 
Diz had returned: to St. Louis from 
yesterday's, games in Chicago. This 
led to memories of his announce- 
ment, made at the time he was giv- 
ing the works to President Ford 
Frick: of the National league. After 
vanquishing Frick in a spectacular 
way, much to the league president's 
humiliation and loss of dignity, Diz 
said he wouldn’t play in the All-Star 
contest. 

Mrs. Dean Promises. 

Following today’s rumors that Dean 
was standing pat with. the same de- 
gree of stubbornness that caused him 
to win out in the war. with . Frick, 
National league officials got a wite 
from Mrs. Dean saying she positively 
would deliver the great right hander 
and showman in Washington. She 
personally would see that he was put 
on a plane. 

Diz. missed the plane first. desig- 
nated, but took a later one, in com- 
pany of President Sam Breadon of 
the Cardinals. 

Dean arrived tonight and promptly 
disavowed any intention of passing 
up the game. 

“Tm just a Boy Scout, anyway, 
+ tipre to do my good deed,” he said. 

“The unpredictable Cardinal de- 
clared himself fit to go three fast 
innings tomorrow. 

As Surmised, dust Talk. 

Dizzy denied that his return to St. 
Louis yesterday was prompted by any 
idea of running out. 

“Aw, that’s just a lot of talk,” he 
said. “My arm ain’t just right, but 
| Tl give ’em the best I got tomorrow.” 
There was a rush to the long dis- 
tance telephones today as both man 
agers sought replacements for ailing 
.|.pitchers. White Sox officials notified 
Manager Joe’ McCarthy of the Ameri- 
can ‘league team that doctors... had 
ordered Monty Stratton to remain.in 
Chicago. 

Stratton injured -his wrist sliding 


Left to right (seated):. 


[Associated Press Wirephoto.] 


oe “ARCH: WARD. 

[Chicago. Tribune Press Service. ] 
ASHINGTON, D. C., July 6.—If the American league has anything 
to say: about it, the.1938 All-Star game will be given. back to the 

fans. . .... There has been‘ such widespread criticism of the plan ‘ : 
followed for the fifth annual contest, scheduled in’Grifith stadium “ype eee mee ce - 
tomorrow, whereby the teams were picked by the managers; that the game breaks, but the slender right-hand- 
hardly can survive. . . .. The: American league. wanted. to let the fans|e,r jig in no condition to pitch 
run ‘it’ this year,. but the National league, which seems to have lost sight! tomorrow, although it was said he 
of’ the .primary purpose of the’ enterprise, objected on the grounds that| probably would be ready to take his 
the inter-league encounter should:be a' contest, not a show. . . . Nobody| regular turn against the Red Sox in 
can} quarrel with the idea of making ita, battle, but there is no reason| Chicago Sunday. McCarthy ordered 
to.feel it would be less spirited if the fans were empowered to name the|, Johnny Murphy of his Yankees to 
two! starting ‘lineups. . . . In .its'present form the All-Star’ game is taxation| Tush to Washington to replace Strat- 


ithout. representation and the country never has stood for that... . | ton. 
wae a Su Briel * Stratton’s withdrawal leaves Luke 


Sewell, veteran catcher, the White 
=0x’s .only representative .on the 
American league squad. 


Castleman Replaces M-ingo. 


Van Mungo, the Brooklyn fire 
baller, who was expected to do a 


"*9 President William Harridge of the American league, who has the sup- 
port of his club owners, will try to bring President Ford Frick of the 
National league: and. Commissioner K. M. Landis around to a fans’ vote 
when arrangements for the 1938 game are discussed. . ... Mr. Harridge 
is interested in exploiting baseball and he could see right off that with 
more people haying. a. hand in directing the game more would 
be arguing. the relative talents of the various players. . . . And arguments pn Sp ogre hase ae National 
» Came a sore 
of this nature are healthy for baseball. . . . The All-Star game probably shoulder after pitching against New 
always will attraét’ capacity’ crowds wherever staged regardless of rules,} York Sunday and he will not pitch. 
 but'that’s’a: ‘mattér of minor:importance. . . . Under the system originated} Terry called Clyde Castleman, his 
: bysthe writer and observed in part, at least, for the 1934, 1935, and 1936 i} young right-hander, from New. York 
games, a a fan: from Mud Center, Ark.,. would have as much to say as thé@jto fill in for Mungo. ss 
.city slicker from ‘Broadway and. Wilson. . . . As a consequence, intereg ig The starting National league line- 
1 insthe*game would not be limited to the major league cities, as it seems| Up tomorrow will be composed of 
| to be this year... . jthree Cubs, Gabby Hartnett, Bill 
While this piece was being witeeae:' Washington was buzzing with| Merman, and Frank Demaree; three 
speculation about the Dizzy Dean-Ford Frick situation. . . \, Cardinals, Dean, Joe Medwick, and 
quoted in the morning papers as telling Presidént Frick, and Johnny Mize; two Pirates, Paul 


including President Roosevelt, to take a. jump.-in the.Potom — e| Waner and Arky Vaughan and only 
go te one of Terry’s:own. players, Dick Bar- 


: to. which: is regarded as the Hifeteat honor -a player can same. ees tell. 


| Wetting: Mr. Frick: where to jump is getting to. be.a habit with the Cardinals’ 

star pitcher, but ‘this»is the first time he has taken the attitude “the.public. 
|, be: ‘damned.”'. . . But after Dizzy arrived tonight he said‘ he’d give his best 
| inytomorrow’ 8 game. ae 


Hubbell Is No. 2. 

Terry's contribution of the game 
will not rest with Bartell, however, 
for ‘the second pitcher will be his 
superb: lefty, Carl Hubbell. The third 
pitcher will be Rookie Lee Grissom 
of ‘the Cincinnati Reds, who’ has 
pitched .four shutouts ari who was 
defeated last Sunday by Dean in a 
l1to0 game. — 

Manager McCarthy will employ the 
policy which enabled Charley Grimm 
to lead’ the Nationals to their first 
All-Star’ victory last year. He will 
pack his lineup with his own boys. 
Three of his first four hitters are 
Yankees: and his starting battery, 
Gomez and Dickey, is composed of 

Yanks. Thus the starting American 


cue 
. Mr. Seys’: main 


‘Tuck’ Stainback, who gets about $8,000 a year for relieving Gabby on.’ ‘the 
runways,’ is not a member ‘of: the All-Star'cast. . . . The American league 
‘office staf. is here en massé:. a, The party ficludes President Harridge, 
LL. @C. McEvoy, radio supervisor; Henry P. Edwards, director of the service 
bureau; Lew Fonseca, ‘who *will take shots of the stars. for next year’s 
‘league movie; Miss Dorothy * ‘Hummel, secretary, and Edward Lehmann, 
auditor: .«« Dr. and Mrs, Martin W. Caveney of Park Ridge, Fred Ringley, 
and Peter B!. Carey, chairman’ of the Illinois racing commission, are other’ 
Chicagoans who will attend the game. . . . 

‘Ten Years Ago Today—The Chicago Cubs took possession of first place} jeague combination will be composed 
when they. ees the; Pittsburgh Pirates, 2 to.1... . awa Sharkey | of a Yank majority, five to one each 
arrived in New York to start training for his bout with Jack De | | for the Tigers, Indians, Red Sox, and 
Ban Johnson denied he would resign as president of the Browns. 

‘meeting of the cub owners in. New York. et 


: v9. & i® 


Alf Seats Are Sold. 
Matiager° McCarthy’s ‘follow up 

pitchers, it is believed, will be Bridges 

| and' Grove in that order » with Harder 


fax 5 ced tee Stn “exten wl be 


played on Dec, 13 unless a playoff for 
one of the division championships is 
necessary. 
Bc year’s championship game will 
be played on the home field of the 
western division winner, Last year 
it was played in the eastern section. 
Green Bay meeting Boston at New 
York when severe weather and lack 
o: fan interest in Boston made it 
advisable to move the game to the 
Polo Grounds, 


First Chicago Game Oct. 17, 

Owners have advocated an earlier 
closing date for several years, but 
were unable to wind up a complete 
schedule before the first week in De- 
cember because of the addition of an- 
other team, Cleveland, to the ljeague. 
and because severa] clubs must post. 
pone their home openings to avoid 
conflicts with possible world series 
dates in cities where the football team 
uses a major league baseball park. 
The last three title games have been 
played under unfavorable weather 


conditions. 

Because Wrigley field, home of the 
3ears and Cardinals, may not be avail: 
able until after the world series, Chi- 
cago will not see its first game until 
the schedule is nearly half over. The 
Bears and Cardinals open the season 
here on Oct. 17. Their schedules: 


BEARS. 


Sept. 19-—-Bears at Green Bay, 
Qct. 4—*Bears at Pittsburgh. 
* Qct. 10—Bears at Cleveland. 
t Oct. 17—Cardinals at Bears. 
' Oct... 24—Detroit at Bears. 
Oct. 31—Bears at New York. 
Nov. 7—Green Bay at Bears. 
Nov. 14—Broocklyn at Bears. 
Nov. 2i-—Bears at Detroit. 
Noy. #8-Oleveland at Bears. 
Dec, 5--Beare at Oardinals, 
*Night game. . 
OARDINALS, 


Sept. 12-—Oardingis. at Green Bay. 
Sept. 19—Cardinals at Detroit. 
Sept, 24-—-*Cardinais at Washington, 
Sept. 26—Cardinals at Philadelphia. 
Oct, 3—Oardinals at Cleveland. 
‘Oct. 10—Green Bay ut Milwaukee. 
Oct. 17—Cardinais at Bears. 

Oct, 24—Cardinais at Pittsburgh. 
Oct. 31—Cleveland at Cardinals. 
Nov. 2i—Detroit at Cardinals. 

Dec. 4-—Rears. at Cardinals, 

*Night game. 


The complete schedule: 


Sept. 5. 
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh. 

Sept. 10 [Friday Night]. 
Brooklyn at Philadelphia. 
Detroit at Cleveland. 

Sept. 12. 
Cardinals at Green Bay. 

Sept. 17 et ca Signi. 
New York at Was 
Cleveland at Philadelnhia” 

Sept. 19. 
Bears at Green Bay 
Cardinals at Detroit. 
Pittsburgh at Brooklyn. 

Sept. 24 trees ll Might}. 
Cardinalg at Washingto 


New York at zt 20 
Cleveland at ooklyn. 
Cardinals at Philadelphia. 


Oct. 3. 
New York at. Philadelphia. 
petrets + Green Bay 


Reaokiva at Washinton. 
Cardinals at Cleveland. 
Oct. 4 [Monday Night]. 
Bears at Pittsburgh. 


Oct. 10. 
Philadelphia at Washington. 
t Cardinals. 
Cleveland. 
Pittsburgh at Detroit. 
Oct. 17. 
Philadelphia at New York. 
Pittsburgh at Washington. 
Cardinals at Bears. 
Green Bay at Cleveland. 
Brooklyn at Detroit. 


Oct. 24 
Brooklyn at New Yor ~y 
Washington 4 Philadelphia. 
Cleveland at Green Bay. 
Detroit at Heya 
Cardinals at Pittsburgh. 


Bay at De ccna 
Bears at New York. 
Pittsburgh at pf mocap 
Washington at Brooklyn. 

at dai sys 


Pistsburgh as, New Yo rk. 
Bay at tell gs 


Philadelphia at Brooklyn. 
Cleveland at Detroit” 


Noy. 14, 
Detroit at New York. 


at Bears, 
w at Pitts 
Philadelphia at at ores Bay (Milwaukee). 
Brooklyn at lh oY 


n Bay at New York, 
Detroit at Gerdinal 
Nov. {Thanksgiving}, 


Bears at Deis, 


LATONIA ENTRIES. 


FIRST RACE—Purse $600, 
olds and up, 6 furlongs: 


Bi 
cr Tan. 
ancke 


claiming, 3 


102 

awe 108 
ai 03 
ey 

7 

328 
BY ay 


Love ee iY 


evrreeeveeee 


eee 6 


oC) ct shed m7 fh 
o 


2 year it 5 


eee eeeee 


King 
12! *Sweening 
ree 


rear olds and 
a 
r 


mc 
Scsowre=saec 


FOURTH Aa 
year olds, 


Pf fat fe tt 


oe claiming, 


ett fay is 
101 Rite aker 

ar es a0, bike Be oe * 
M Blaze ...... 9) Bie Ee eas? : 
5 “Brilfisnt peuisht i 


tee 
as ae $600. claiming, 3 
1 mile and 70 y 


Vitamin 8. ph ot 
Ng ‘err eo eevee © 
ty i 


e y 

ih fernardine W. 

st ori ing True 
y 

85 On fog xt Miss 


OF: B ity Limit 
claimed. 


*Master Frank 
* Apprentice allowance 
Cloudy: track go 
DETROIT RESULTS. 
PA CR--P ares $800, claiming, 2 


pg furl 
is [ Mel’ he) 30.00 10.00 6.80 
115 [Lone 4.00 2160 | 


15 
4:02 rye Shek, Bvadne. Blossom 
Gay. Hoe al Lass. Star Mirmaid. Leesburs. 


ye 
ansECO! ACE—Piirse Ft claiming, 3 


pony olds a vee 
ady el, * [Blaber! 50. 60 58.20 19.80 
Renter} 27.60 11.40 
doa, 


Just H 

Norman’ % ‘ 
43° ‘Dream. Sea Gull. 

Panicle. Sioux Chief. Wax. “Lamjoy.. °F *Pent: 

house, and Dark Roamer ran 

THIR BA $800, siajlaian 3 

ear olds 1 hy 

ingsbury, 1 7.20 340 2.60 
5 f{ 2.80 


i 1 
uriongs: 
Fern’dez] i 
11 &: .20 
80 


nd Sart Slates ine. 2 
7.20 4.40 3.80 
6.40 3.60 


2.20 

Jacobs i Mum, Rome Haul. 
deen! 

BACK Purse $800, claiming, 3 


7.2 
nter, High eke 
A ig . Attainment. and Bir 


VENTE go $800, claiming, 4 
1 mile 70. yards: 
Lovely 8 Spy. art { (Hughes 6. 


weet Mottled’. 106 Hf sd 


H “Mise mes sole, Out Of Fire, 
if ueen, 


Joan Macaw, and 


“iE re, a ti, enter. 8 


mena 2" 
DETROIT. 


Gurt Palmer and Lady Patrol......$1 645.20 


yin + trials of the sata annual 100 


yerd free 


ne races sponsored by The “Chicago 


ARLINGTON PARK CHART 


FIRST 
$150; third, 


CE—Five furlon 
100; fourth, 


{Copyright: Regal Press, inc.| 


ongt. Purse $1,100. Net value te winner, $800; second, 


d jo 
AR 


1e 


ge al 


int [i Wee gio Vi: 


v Wt 
CKurtsingor} 109 


1 ee 


PP 6t 


1 


it 


wo 


tter ] 
te Corbett). 109 


1: 


8 
i 
2 
2 
l 
5 
7 
4 
9 
6 
0 


OCW H eH AO-~JO So 


9t4 

L2¢ +h 24 
74 7% 10% Lik 
12 


ria 
Mor i. 1 12° 12° 12 


Str Fin Owner 
144. Ink M.Vehon 
8 2h .Oots 


ds 
4430-1 
, 80-1 
gh'bo. 
“1 

| 


A.Pelleteri 

CalumetFarm a 
BrownellCombs 8.80- > | 
8. play 85. 0-1 
A. ock 4.80-1 
Souihlands table t:- 0-] 
C.W. “ 6090-1 
Seecotices 66.70-1 


Time, :23 
$43.60 ag 


show, 


stretch but 


8-5. a: 
$13.00 show; Allanwood, 
inner trained 
Start good, from gate. 
OPERA STAR, savin 
received a breathing s 
lasted. 
out, came with a 
Latter, under urging early b 


:47 nr (00. Two dollar rg paid: 
$5.90 place $4.20 
4 Lowenstein. Wert ta 
on driving, place cet Mag 
ground throughout and a 
oo the turn wpeneae 
Woon. A 


rush ° me Be retire jginit 


" post at 2 


under strong handling. 


SECOND 
$150; third, 


ACE—Seven Ones, 
100; fourth, 


Purse $1,100. 
$50, . 


Opera Star, $94.40 s straight, 
sh at j, Sweet Bhowno, $ 


value to winner, $800: 


oe 


post 1 minute 


second, 


ree and ny i 


"a Dobso 


GRAY ETHEL | 
SARANARA 


BLOPE 


{C.Calvin] 


=|" 
y 
a 


_— 


eee 
Oe ~IOI Soh DO © 


8. Bebert 
orris] 


“am 
WOO HISW“On 


‘7 ae ae” £e 


~ 


SSF 
Saab Seeaes 


3 


WWD 


__ 


SRN? 
> 


straight, 8. 


good, from permanen 
slow to begin and taken to inside soon after the start, 


VEU, 


H 
fast after swinging to 
ting up. withetoos ape 


ond, came 


J 


83 2-5, :47 2-5 
.40 place, $3 
ner trained by owner. 


ied i 


1:12 3- it 

8.00 show; Minton. 

Went to post at 2:4]. 
rviing, place same. 


t stalls. Won 


wae, 


ON'S rush. 


with fine speed in the last auarter and was goin 
KESTER, on the eile throughout ang  Baving the most speed 


pressure after five-cighths and held on w 


THIRD RACE—One and one-eighth miles. 
$800: second, $150: third, $100: 


Purse $1,100. 
ourth, $50. . 


ome dollar mutuels d: 
$e 00 “place er a pal 
At post 4 minutes. 


outside on the stretch turn and. holdir n Ww 
Latter. raced wide throu ate . 


= ie 


Hueu. 
show; Jokester, 


Start 


began to move up 
after get- 
hout and slow to re- 
astest of all at the end. 


from start, was under 


Net value to winner, 


Horse and jocky— 
REGARDS [J.1 


BISTRITA {ie 
WAR DIMES 
KING PIN 
Sars 


PROSPEOR 


te BL Ee. 


St 


WOUA COIS 


chard 10 


3 
5 
1 
6 
[R.Musser] .102 4 


C.B, aniel 
Mrs.M. aiele 


Mee 5, 
2.60 p 

inner yeotrs 

Start bad, from gate. 


Dl shes 1:16 1-5, 1:42, 1:56. 
$2.40 phew: Bistrita, $8.80 p 
by ©. Sitgrave. Went to post 
Won easily, place eine 


away in motion, held sway under feat bding 


go RDS, 

BISPEthe S bid gradually when under vigorous ridin 

. rated under light reserve for about ft 

MES, well up after three-cight 
He bore over repeatedly in the s 


lef t. BISTRITA 


but could not get up. 
half mile and could not get up. 


FOURTH 
$150; third, 


and 


RACE—Six furlongs. Purse $1,100. 
$100; fourth, wet vain 


$50. 


Two goner FB NG cee pales, 


or seven-eighths, 
riskly ridden out 
ree-quarters o 
ha, jeeee wide 
tretch. 


at B:10K ad vas Dinnes 


had tittle 
anal 


ered a weak 
the 


to winner, $800; second, 


mcieie and 


WISE D 
LUCKY DUCK 


SLEEP ore [A.Robertson 


5 


1.Anderson } 


PP St 3 
a 8 
iy 
pe 
3% 
af 


3 
4 


2 
6 


{J.Westrope a4 


i 


Sir Fin 
5 


Eve 
oe 
0.4 


gladeStable 


a 


Tim 
$4.20 place, 
ner trained 


:46 72. 1:12 1-5. Two ai mutuel 
84,80 ah show: nace, $2.00 one: 


Coronium, , $3.80 


ones. Went to post at 3: 1 eee show; 


driving. ~ Meg game, 


LGR AY RA. 
hack sligh 


eighths durin 


on thet 


aching got furlong, 
whic 


in best form and overcoming a 
urn but came wi renewed 
ie Hi as ready to b ied ane 
she wae not strong 


ene 
a ag 


position on the stretch turn, continued mag 


+e closing strides. Latter dis 


began to weaken after five-eigh 


sine we PS third, 


E--One and one-eighth miles. 
$100; fourth, $50. 


ang de on 


wi 
lay oa wood A in the d drive and «Pkg 


Purse $1,100. Net value to winner. $800; 


andStable 
arson 
ee ; 


‘Dresay. p2°80° thc i 
Ow, Ne 
Start five i Won 


ome, one of ground, fell 
termination after 
inside for three- 
ap to bett tes her 

own DRESSY in 
ustling tactics and 


Horse and 


M 
SHORT a : 


SWEEP [C.Cor 


Fin 
14 


an 


6 
G. Smith] — .. 106% 2 


Owner Ex _ 
-Reilly 
WooltordParm B £63 
G.H.Emick 
Mrs.8.Orr 
H.C 


ge I 
tch 00. 
ae. é 3. Scallon is: 70- i 


don nee, $3.4! 
i . Bayt good, 


low, 0 st cial " 


1:38, 
3.20 show;Our Cou nt. 
wt 2 owner, 
piace driving, 


Tis ae 1 


from gate. Won easily. 


FELLUW. sent to the vig with a bi 


up in Fey 


sah 


perenne 


wing some Goamoee 
while under pressure 


ereafter, m 
and favored aby hi 


ag 7 Be 

was 6 
ereafter. 
furlongs. Purse $1,500. 
rt BES $1,500 


Net value to 


1:50 4-5. Two dollar 
x ie Ee paid: 
t to post at 4:01, 


Ae war Fel- 
WwW; . ran- 
Off at 


in the first ; 
Rp Ts es put 


al 


winner, $1,000; second, 


They uate 


an, Ea Rc Al a3 


"T St 

An aie 4 7, : 
‘Weatrove! A 5 ast 
Poh fyb 

6 3 62 

EY ARON. | 5 ] a4 


Price fesStable 
be rook Farm 


=i 


hs chow se G0 a 


good. r train — place 


746 38-5, 1: > 4-5, 
ey ¢ 2.40, show; vray 


Teo, Sonar muta 
Ward. ont ta eae 


post gs 


pea en TR ho well up from the start and 
se to pressure 


fine response 


command was undae light rest 
wide poy and arly o 


Gipnec. 
th 


g take 
4 ier 


the where 
straight Sa, the sh 
badly outrunfrom ort ot 


B60 


oR 


CE—One and one-eighth 
third, $100; fc fourth, 


ee 


eb 


a rush in 


eer be ee 
aeeene 


Tis 85. 
onli 
art ba 


1:41 ow Bivanih i; 54. 


ie won mae mass Ze : 


| ee ; 


ROCKINGHAM PARK RESULTS. 
FIRST ara pe BB sath claiming, 


ear olds and u 
[Port ster oe 60 12. 2-90 3 10.30 


38 30 
Browneyed Pat, Be There, 
ournament, St. Nick Scotch Pe per, 


IlL., Pocketpiece, Mahi, and Jessic 
Vv. lL. ran, 
Baga gl Be geogg y t A, $800. claiming, 3 
ar olds 
Lotia ¥ fey 102 (Letehiaan "6.20 4.70 3.20 
Good Bo gier, 1ii EScbi 8.60 4.60 
Jony. vas @ [Jaekle 60 
Time, 1:1° 3-6, ais Image, “eg Scout, 
Sendurnen <. use Warmer, Milk, Love Po- 
tion, Crack ‘Flyer, and Informal ran. 
THIRD RBA ACE Purse $800, claiming, 3% 
isc seate 6.50 4.40 
4.00 ey 


nh Smith 
| Bierman]. 
Barba]. 
6. Story Time. Erb, Doctor 
Martin, 


712 1. 
Color, in ger. “High” M 
‘ and Goldma 

PACK Purse $400. 5 2 


year olds, a fturlon 
Stand. Time, 114 shoe] 8.10 4.50 3.80 
7.50 4, yi 


Garden Pool’ 107 
hi | Me ie, 99 aekle 
1-5. Pi cng lB Guard, Woodwaac, 


Step By, and B 


RAC oe $1. £90. claiming, 3 
year olds and u OB -16 m 
Re (Bchemt. i. 50 rap. 4 44 


©. Tetrarch, 
106 rte J 
3-5 won Fal Pal, dionenet 


Lone Hand, 
The Singer, 
Time, ‘4 : 
I.. Thumbs Down. Ritag sno Baby, Shot and 
Shell, and Bt Porte 
SIXTH ACE—Purse 1, 000, claiming, 8 

ao olds ro 1 1- 

aandre 108 rc Hanford) 6.70 3.4% B50 

Message. 1 Sch h) 3.2 

Gallant Pat, 107 Ti's shoe]. 

Time, 1: -46 1-5. Donald Duck. High PM 
Storm ‘Angel, and Kindacorn ran 
SEVENTH RACE—Prurse $800, 


maiden 3 year olds and up. 
aa = peste 380° 5.30 3.80 


24.80 12.90) 
(Bierinanj 5.50 


: S red, Our Uncle John, 
"ioehe. fees auty, Dixie Flapper. 
Hold Out ran. 
HTH 


RACE—Purse $800, claiming, 3 
e: 1-16 miles 

on).... 8.70 5.70 38.50 

u 6.10 4.30 

80 


claiming, 


vear olds and u 


ROCKINGHAM PARK ENTRIES. 
FIRST nga gr ia ee claiming, 8 year 


olds and ak e fare 
iE *Clean FRort 


armed 105 
ankee. L Hives... 4 paper And Gay. tht 
‘the Meee) 


Error 105 
D RACE—Purse $1.1 0, allowances, 
, ar ds, 6 eas 0 


ro 117 2 
D RACE—Purse sh00. claiming, 3 year 
olds eis An miles 
g)*Sainted 


02 
«412 


p On 
TOURTH age ho $1,000, claiming, 
4 year olds and up. 6 furlongs: 


Slavonia 


110'Gena 
RACE—Purse $4,000, 
omlin Handicap, 3 year olds and 
Be Mucho Gusto 


EW hd Spirit 
Lee 10p - 
SIXTH BAUS Tare 
irks and up. eh 
. 


up, 
i 


ean Bae 3 year 
108 
. 108 


ae claiming, 


3 
ar olds and UD. 
HED jroeled * Job ehliereracker 109 
108! *Droll 04 


npra : tread Py 
er 
Vi rprantics allowance claimed, 


DELAWARE PARK ENTRIES. 
FIRST RACE—Purse $1,000, claiming, 
year olds, 6 furlongs: 
aerate: 06 Blue Prelude 
..108 H 


ee: 
iran Walker .101 Deep 
Do It 108 Shady Town .... 
Micro 


bs ) 
cure. H. S. Horkheimer and H. Neusetter 


4 SECOND RACE—Purse $1,000, 2 year olds. 
uriongs: 

ia *?eee © 
In *eeeovenree 
Tr scare epbeeee 


2 


*Cru 


soos LLD Equerry 
.112 Hypocrite 
‘tt8 5 


8 Sea +08 
Purse a 000. claiming, 3 
ee 1O8 Emily Jane .....105 


es * Broadk wes Pree Fi} 
rey Simon ise 110 *Jing i 


Preis 8 
F Rach -Purse $1,000, 3 year olds. 


6 furlongs: 
nova! #e Feast .... tii, 5 gic Perea, 
; ast Mpeg 6 i 


: | Bend ae 
SIXTH 

" | gear ‘old 

I iarw ME eae 

*May Music .... tis 


Han Nrit ‘BACH. Puree 


* *ee 


gi 
te Sand ..... 


ae gt te OE holly: 


Beal 
aralda 
10 ae 


‘EIGHTH RA 
ids and 


> 


u 


eee 
Bok heavy, 


eee ia 


i & « 

wiet Pa 2) ” 
£- ee fe ae 

, a) ee 

a ~—— 

t2. 


On ee | ot oe 
ro he " 


= 


| ARLINGTON PARK, (LL, 
[Fast.] 


1—Headley entry. Vassar. Hertz entry. 


2—Autograph, Ivory Tip, Aerialist. 
3—Bertillon, 
4---Reaping. Sun Captor, Salaam. 
adie e°- CENTIME. Boston 


Ail 
6—Headiey entry; Giant Killer, Privileged. 


7—Parity, Malimou, Mr. Quick. 
8—Belleck, Festoon, Stepinanna. 


LATONIA, COVINGTON, KY. 
Good,] 
1—Fritz Hallam, Zelady. cao Whiskaway. 


2-—-King Preston, Deft, Mi 
3—Capt. Henry. Jubilee Jim, Wise 
4—Prenny. Glowset. Chanting. 
5-—-KNEE DEEP, Bali 0’ Fire, Kitty 


6—Big Gawk, Campagna. Butter Beans. 


7—Vitamin B,. Atina, Mature. 
8—Harper, Dixie Boot, City Limit. 


Heavy.] 
1—Taffirmation, icro, Shady 
2—Grape Thief, Specify. ty In. 
3—Credulous. Balcony, San 
4—Jinx, Pansy’s Firat. True _ 
5--Drudgery, Alice G., Fast Express. 


Sand. 
7-—Balmacan, Paralda, Timepiece. 
8—Hymarque, Aurebon. 
EMPIRE CITY. YONKERS, N. 
{Fast.] 


1—Microphone, Sage Girl, 
2—Flushing, National, Big Wind. 
3—JACOBS ENTRY 
4—Unlimited, Gloom Buster. 


ast. ] 


1—Starogan, Coya, Shantime. 
2—Viajero, Navarre, Steelworker. 
3—Handsome Hal, Sun Abbot. 
4—-Pharatime, Slavonia. Ridgemor. 
56—-MUCHO GUSTO. The 
Prince. 

6—Zembla, Notice Me, Irksome. 
7—Blandishment, Blue Spur, 
8—Palatine, Dormido, Droll Story. 


DETROIT, MICH, 
[Fast.] 


1—Renaissance, Tarpon. 


3--BOB LEE, Strincalong. 
4—Dulcimer, Early Bloom, Losweep. 
5-—-Sickle Bill, Mystie Sign. Fiying 
6—Always Blue, Rosselli. Toni. 

7—Candle Ply, 


9—Miss Twinkling, 


Laurerman. Joe Eaton. 
Sound, Count 


DELAWARE, WILMINGTON, DEL. 


Town, 


6—JOAN ASBESTOS, Dizzy Dame, 


Treasure Ship. 


Free Again. 


Pre War, Durwrack., 
Strolling 
5—Wheatley entry. Born Wise. Pockmantie. 
6—Van Nuys, Monument, Good Flavor. 


BOCKINGHAM, SALEM, N, H, 
ir 


Sainted, 
Fighter, 


Wise Dora, 


Our Justice, 
2—Crack Boy, Hiddenite, Countess Reich. 
Lady Flash. 


‘Eddie Wrack, Oddesa Clark. 
8—High Flag. Legal Gamble, Ted Conrad. 
High Santa, Sun Jug. 


Cross. 


Baker. 


White 


x, 


By. 


Wise 


Dere. 


EMPIRE CITY ENTRIES. 


FIRST RACE—Purse $1.000. 
year olds and up. about 6 


| Nadir 
Frederick .... 
118} pucropnone 
colts and geldings. 
. 116 . National 


ear olds, 


+ Wood! 
baie d 11-16 

year olds an > 
as War uD. 


3 


~ 


ee? @©eeeer? 4 


year olds, about 
0. Unlimited 


V ood! and, 


0st 
Sun 
Strolling 1 
ACE—Purse 3. 000. 
nod _Larkenur. 2 vear olds, fillics, 
ancy Sonja 


Briar’ aa 413 
pckman tle 


78 *Du ; 
orn ise 


‘uiable-Mre. J. G. Dou 
CE—Purse $1.000. cla 
-1.1-16 miles: 

an N 
Wi wncmant 


1g . ek 
*Apprentice allowance claimed. 


claiming, 
furlongs: 


Who paper 113 Fre gain 
SECOND BRACH—Purse "Si. 000. claiming. 
maidens, 


and 
A, jag ney $1, O00. claiming, 3 
8: 
1 | Bethlehemstar 


tEthel’s enone: 
oe j need Lim 
Four TH daha! ent $1,000, allowances. 


oe akaio ds Ae 
20 Gloom Buster ... 


allowances, 


cube 
108 
116 


6 tfur- 


fur- 


as entry 
ming, 38 


selected. Sees ft owned by E, J. 


Baker of St. Charles, Il., will travel 
to Italy for a return match sometime 
during the winter: 
the two horses will race for a guar- 
antee of a minimum of $10,000. The 
amount probably will be more, how- 
ever, as the race will go to the 
track making the highest bid. 

In addition Baker and Givo Maiani 
of Milan, in whose name Muscletone 
races, have posted side bets of $10,000 
each, The Trotting Horse club, 
through its president, BE. Roland Har- 
riman, has been named to handle all 
details of the race. 

Greyhound, which hung up his rec- 
ord of 1:57% last summer at Spring- 
field, Ill., probably will make his last 
start, before going into training for 
the big race, on July 15 at the first of 
Goshen’s two Grand Circuit meetings. 


EMPIRE RESULTS. 
FIRST RACE—Purse $1,000, 
maidens, 3 year old and up, about 
ngs: 
ates. 113 [Gilbert] eee 4-1 8- 5 7-10 
Ravenna, 100 [ Wall] 8-5 4-5 
oyeene. 108 [{Dufford) 10-1 
Tim 1:10 38-5. Wulfatan. 


Steeple Top. Faerie, Merry Kin. "Super John. 
and Mad Duchess ran. 
SECOND RAC Purse $1,000, claiming, 2 


aaa 7-5 3-5 
9-1 rs 


claiming, 
fur- 


10 
o] 
arly Evening, Gold Hai 
Weepor, and Acero ran 
THIRD RACE—Purse $1,000, claiming, 3 
year olds. 1 mile and 70 yards: 
frotem Pole. 110 [Nea 6-1 5-2 ae 
Raby Rattler, 105 ‘Wa 1} 5-2 6-5 
Perfect Devil 115 | Decomsiina? 1-3 
Time, 1:46 1-5. Gabe J. Ebony Paraso). 
Putzen, *Blue King. Salavina, and Rock 
Margot ran. t¢Mrs. W. HB. Misell and Mrs. 
H. Plattner entry. 
FOURTH ge ge a $1,000, maiden 
. 8 ad sh 
5-1 v. 


5-2 7-6 


116 5-2 

1:01 2-5. “ene b End. Dan Cupid. 

steee “eons Jon-Jon, Tedium. Big Victory. 
Crimea. Minimum, and Ron ran. 

FIFTH RACE—Purse $1.200 added, the 
Parkview handicap, fillies and mares, 3 year 
olds and up about furlong 
Drawbridge, 117 LLongces | . 15-2 7-10 1-4 

[ Toees T 7-10 1-4 


Jesting, 121 
1 ick} 1-1 
North Riding and Jewell 


DUE ight 
Dorsett ran. 
SIXTH RACE—Purse $1. — added, pane 
eap, class, 3 year olds and 1 
+Caballero IT. 
*Thorson 118 [Arcaro} 
Thursday. 112 [Steffen 
Time, 1:51 4-5. pee Oruley. Count Stone. 
and Whizzaway ran. ?tDead heat. 
SEVENTH RACE—Purse $1, 00. claiming. 
+ year olds and up, 1 1-16 m 
Midshipman, 117 (Longden |. ye 8-5 7-10 
Miss Dignity ie [Chall 8-5 4-5 
Scatter Brain. 117 Dacamiliss) l1- 
Time. 1:48 1- S ipponese. My Purchase, 
Betty Shaw. Gold Cross, and Fluffy Lee ran 


Grand Circuit 


AT CLEVELAND, 0. 


2:18 PACE [TWO MILE HEATS}— 
PURSE, 0. 
Lew Hal, b. h., by Lew Axworthy-Effie 
dag Parahall ] 
Helen 
(Parker? 2 
Biarritz, br. h., by Volomite [Fleming].3 2 
Lou Abbe, blk. m., by Abbedale [Smart] 2 5 
Case Ace, b. g., by Red Ace [Palin]}.. 4 
Totum, Well I Swan, and Sonny panei 
also started. 
Time—2 :05 3-5, 2:06. 


RAINY DAY SWEEPSTAKES—TWO YEAR 
OLD TROTTERS—PURSE, $1,500. 
Earl’s Mr. Will, b. «c., by Gaylworthy- 
Hester Volo [Berry] 1 
Scovere, b. c., by Scotland [{ White] 2 
Prohibitor, b. ¢., by Protector [Dick- 


erson ] : 
Static, b. f., by Gaylworthy [W. Caton] “& 
by weer re [Fleming] .5 


4 

3 
Airflame, b. c., 5 
Time—2 : 1l 


2:13 TROT—MILE HEATS—PURSE. 
Calumet Dillworthy, ch. h., by Pet . 
the Brewer-Dillworthy {Fleming}. 
Trubrooke, b. m., by Traux feneni "3 
die Brewer, b. h., by Peter The 
the Brewer [Lyman] 3 
Purling Brooke, b. m., by Guy Ax- 
worthy [Parshall] 4 
Calumet Durham, b. ¢., by Guy Abbey 
Fitzpatrick] $ 6 
Guy Scotland, Fez, and Raider also started. 
Time—2 :03 3-5, 2:04 3-5, 2:04 2-5, 
2:22-18 HANDICAP TROT—PURSE, $450. 
Perry Hanover, br. h., by Guy McKin- 
ney-Madame Peters [Short 
J. 8. Van, b. ¢., by Spencer [Scherlerf.1 
Dr. Lee, br. c., by Lee Tide [Nelo- 
chek } Z 


$1,000, 
1 


1 
2 


3 


co] 6 
Miss Stratton, b. m., by David Guy 
[ Dennison } / 

Col. Beatty and Athlone Sally Boy 


oat On 
Radio. | Hout 


- MA geet tone 
eater eens 


% , e 
i < ey 
a oe Se ie 


oe at) 2 
9 : " 


eo . © ree rr 
Puree, ‘1.100, 2 year s 


Bee 8 
5 


ete 


eeerere 


eeteveere 


In: this ‘country, | Quibp 


J. Richard 

C. Kurtz’ger 

H. Hauer 

C. Corbett 

J. Westrope 15-1 
i 8-1 


Reaping . 
Sun Captor .,..,. 
Salaam 

Grey Streak . 
Pompa 

Black Sleeve .... 
Watersplash 

a 

Skee 

virTH wich Pures, 
and up, 7 furlongs: 
Bon Centime 
Boston Sound . 
Count Atlas . 
Tp Nymph .... 


ary 

Leadiag Article.. 
Threadneedle 7 
More News 4 
Good Catch 8 

SIXTH RACE—Purse, 
and up, 7 furlongs: 
*Pre-eminent .... 
"Sparta ... 
Giant Killer 
Privileged ......... 1 
Dogaway .......- 
Sweepalot y 
Grand Manitou .. 
Gold M 10 


9 
8 
7 
2 
1 
3 
6 


Re Balaski 20-1 
$1,100, 3 year olds 


106 C. Corbett 8-1. 
8-1 
6-1 
8-1 


8-1 
118 I. Anderson 5- 
lil A. Robertson 5- 
105 D. Packer 10-1. 
106 RB. Wholley 15-1 
$1,200, 3 year olds 


L. Balaski 
112 KR. Dotter 
107 ©. Corbett 
110 +I. Anderson 
113 A. Robertson 8-1 
108 R.Wholley 6-4 
108 J. Westrope 8-1 
112 J. Richard 10-1 

106 H. Hauer 6-1 

Kandahar 


9 112 L. Haas 15-1 
*H. P. Headley entry. 


SEVENTH RACE—Purse, $1,100, 4 year 
olds: and up, 1% = lea: 
112 A. Robertson 4-1 
107 P. Roberts 5-2 
113 RB. Morris 8-1 
113 M. Morlan 6-2 
108 C. Calvin §-1L 
Peace Move 104 H.Hauer 10-1 
Chalk Eye 3 113 D. Packer 10-1 
EIGHTH RACE—Purse $1,100, 3 year olds 
and up, ly miles: 
J. Richard 15-1 


L, Turner 4-1 
M.L. Fallon &-l 
S. Roberts 

D. Packer 
C. Corbett 
No boy 

R. Morris 
C, Calvin 


2 
5 
9 


3 
1 


Rich Gir] 


Stepinanna 
Think Fast 
Glad Wings 
Tinsel Lady ..... 
Marie Jean 
Boon Time 
Goldspun .......... 


6 


4 
2 


DETROIT ENTRIES. 


FIRST RACE—Purse $300, 
year olds and up 
*Tarpon 


claiming, 3 


3 Baby . 
PE Pyre 113 *Matapeake 
i . Kover. ‘108 ; Stonecrop : 
“Heaalaaucs® 19 seam goee™ 

sa ; 3 20ing Some 

SECOND RACE—Purse eee 

maiden 3 year olds and u A lg furlongs: 
i 104 *Miss Paleite 


ot. Kin 
“ Hi 
Soldier Giri”. *Hood Cover 
oa en, Reigh.. 
ad Flas 


claiming, 


.114 *Salfo 
THIRD RACR—Purse alford 
year olds. 5 furlongs: 
Bob Lee .1106 *Lady Flash .. 
eT Napper Tandy ... 
RACE—Purse $800, claiming, 
eB “ine ena up. ’. Bas nga 
. 0 *No { Chance = «0a cee 
¢ ae 
105 


1 
claiming, 


*Monie 
06 Heavy Sugar 
100 nee ie 

$08 


e 
y 09 Flying Dere 
RACE—Purse 3: 200 =allowances, 
Daily Racing Form puree, 3 year olds and 
up. 1 mile and 70 yards: 
Bi Dey eee 
Ch 
; 


ree $800. claiming. 4 
year olds and es a te 16 mag 
ane ae 


800, claiming, 4 


1% es: 
112 *High Flag 
2 *All Night 
*Legal .-107 *Natalie Mae 
*Montmary ..... .102 Silent pr 
NI RACE—Purse $80 cl 
6 furlongs: 


year olds and up. 
ehtin Bill 
Ted Conrad 


ner" 
ond Age 
i) 


nt rere 
AsQVCceas wwiso 


aiming, 
year olds and up. 
High Santa 
*Just Imperial 


*Miss Twinkling.. aa Genesis : 

Hooligan 118 *Bravo Caruso. 
Weather clear: track fast. 
*Apprentice allowance claimed. 


Downpour Postpones Day’s 


Race Card at Delaware 


Wilmington, -Del,, July 6.—[Spe- 
cial.]—A heavy rain during the nigrit 
and early this morning flooded the 
new Delaware Park race track and 
caused the cancellation of today’s 
racing card. Racing will be resumed 


started. 
08 1-5, 2:10, 2:10 2- 


Time—2 : 
THE FAST 


COMFORTABLE | 
Vy A 5. 


Just step into 


tomorrow. 


8 RACES DAILY 


HYDE PARK STAKES-——SAT., JULY 10 
_ LASSIE STAKES—SAT., JULY 17 


Don’t let the trip going spoil the day, 


a clean, cool “North 


Western” train and you’re there before 
you know it. See the first race and the 
last, without rush or hurry. Plenty of 
fine trains going and returning. 
FAST REGULAR TRAINS 


_ 35 MINUTE SPECIALS —12:45 P. M, to 1:30, (a) 
EXTRA SERVICE saryReaye 


AVON DELA YS—TRAFFIC JAMS? ARKING PROE 


auiring & 7 


~ 


ae 


ae 


ae 
- 


— 
ed 


iS Rat Se aa SR Se) RR A EAE 8 eR ar 
pees SS eTS * Re AES eee. 4 


aa ie AF pie 
EY igo se 
Spel Litas 


- were Ralph Guldahl 


_. ot the second day’s play was 
Kirkwood. 


. * a : 
7; oe met 
t ” = 
4 : 
eet beer Rey ih ty ne Ee, Fa ue ag Ae 
Fe a an eee NINAPE RS Ns A a ea. SEN 
* ' 

ASPs x < & 

est a 

pb a ‘ 


$ for a 36 hole aggregate 
of 145. 


Reduce Huge Field. 
The combined scores of yesterday's 


and today’s rounds have no bearing 


on the title play proper, but only 


the low 140 scorers and ties 
ualifying 36 holes. Despite 
fine 138 will not 

reckoning, the gal- 

who followed Smith yesterday 
| today were convinced that he 
will be a real threat through the reg- 
ulation 72 holes of the tournament. 
he has not quite straight- 


Smith collected three birdies in 
the first ten holes today. He dropped 
an eight footer at the fourth, was 
sn the long eighth in two, and got 
down another good putt at the tenth. 
He yielded this latter on the six- 
teenth, where he overshot and was 
Shy in reaching the green coming 
back. 


United States Is Big Threat. 


There was little doubt in the minds 
of the golf loving Scotchmen here 
tonight that the United States is 
making its strongest bid in history 
for the title which Britons have won 
for the last three years. Right behind 
Smith and Sarazen were three Ameri- 
cans, all bracketed at 142. They were 
Walter Hagen of Detroit, four times 
winner of the crown; Sam Snead of 
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. run- 


‘mer up for the 1937 American open, 


and Byron Nelson of Reading, Pa., 
winner of the Masters’ tourney. 

Following Max Faulkner, British 
dark horse entry from Berkshire, and 
Scotland’s Alastair McLeod, who tied 
at 143, were eight 144 shooters, of 
whom three were Americans. They 
of Chicago, 
United States open champion and 
Ryder cup hero; Ed Dudley of 
Philadelphia, and Joe Kirkwood, 
Australian born American. 


Shute, Manero Well Up. 

Denny Shute of Boston, nationa) 
P. G. A. title holder for the last two 
years, and Tony Manero of Salem, 
Mass., finished the two day trial with 
146’s. Alf Padgham, defending the 
title he won last year, was five shots 
under the qualifying limit of 157 with 
a 152: Sixteen Americans were among 
the 141 seekers who shot under 157. 
The others included Johnny Revolta 
of Evanston, [l., and Charley Lacey 
of Great Neck, N. Y., each with 147; 
Henry Picard of Hershey, Pa., 148; 
Bobby Cruickshank, Richmond, Va. 
150; Robert Sweeny, New York born 
resident of England, who won the re- 
cent British amateur, and J. W. Bai- 
ley, another amateur entrant hail- 
ing from Battle Creek, Mich. 

Henry Cotton of England, pre-tour- 
nament favorite to duplicate his 1934 
title victory, finished with 73—72—145. 
Alf Perry, who succeeded Cotton in 
1935, was around in 72—~74—146. 


The most spectacular performance 


tered by Joe scored a 67, 
four under par for the Burnside links, 
and a@ new course record. _ 

Pairings of the American qualifiers 
for the first two rounds of the 
tournament proper tomorrow and 
Thursday: 

Charles Lacey 


Britain. 
By Nelson and Marcel Dallenmagne, 


and Bobby Cruickshank, 
weeny and John Panton, Britain. 
oF sages 


and Leonard Crawley, 


_ Ralph J. L. Black, Britain. 
Had Dudley z Faulkner, Britain. 

ry r Hagen ice, Winton, Britain. 
Britain 


was regis- | 


Radi ix Ci up = 
Chicago Open 


BY CHARLES BARTLETT. 
Backstage preparations for the $10,- 
000 Chicago open golf tournament, to 
be decided at the Medinah Country 
club on July 23, 24, and 25, yesterday 
were progressing at a merry pace, 
auguring well for the success of the 
1937 season’s richest medal play 
event, 

One of the most important of the 
several preliminary maneuvers going 
on in the tournament headquarters 
was the burnishing up of the Radix 
trophy, major golf's orphan prize 
since the Professional Golfers’ associa- 
tion rejected it last April. The trophy 
for the last three years has been an 
annual award to the professional 
golfer showing the lowest scoring 
average per round in recognized 
tournaments. 

. Dispute Over Trophy. 

The trophy was donated by Harry 
E. Radix, Chicago sportsman and 
president of the Chicago District Golf 
association for three years. Radix put 
up the trophy at the request of a 
former P. G. A. régime, and it was 
duly awarded for two years, in 1934 
to Ky Laffoon and in 1935 to Paul Run- 
yan. Ralph Guldahl of Chicago, who 
won the trophy for his work last sea- 
son, never received it, for George R. 
Jacobus, president of the National 
P. G. A. and members of his tourna- 
ment committee, turned back the 
prize. Leading pros resented this ac- 
tion, and the Illinois section of the 
P. G. A. filed a formal protest. 


Officials of the $10,000 open, how- 
ever, have invited Radix to present 
the trophy to Guldahl] during the 72 
hole battle at Medinah. Guldahl is 
certain to be present, having been one 
of the first players to enter. Ralph 
won the national open title last 
month, scored two impressive vic- 
tories in the Ryder cup matches, and 
is currently one of the favorites to 
win the British open now in progress 
in Scotland. 


Prepare Prize List. 


While making certain that Guldahl 
will receive the Radix trophy, the 
bosses of the $10,000 open are inter- 
ested in another angle of the prize 
question. This has to do with the 
amateur award. list, which M. G. 
[Scotty] Fessenden, recently submit- 
ted to the United States Golf associa- 
tion, U. S. G. A. officials had asked 
those in charge of the tournament 
to keep the amateur prize list within 
bounds. The list of 36 awards planned 
for the Simon-pure winners was 
mailed to John G. Jackson. of New 
York, president of the U. S. G. A., but 
it was learned yesterday that Mr. 
Jackson is now in Europe, and the 
list has been forwarded to R. Arthur 
Wood, Chicago member of the execu- 
tive committee of the U.S.G. A. Mr: 
Wood will thus represent the national 
organization in the final discussion 
over the amateur prize list in the 
$10,000 open. 


Team Scores r 2 
in Pro-Amateur 


A hole in one and a new best ball 
course record featured the 
P. G. A. pro-amateur tournament at 
Techny Fields yesterday. Tommy Ar- 
mour of Medinah and his amateur 
partner, W.'S. Millner, had 32—31—63 
for the new record. Dave Tosh, pro 
at Sunset Ridge, holed his tee shot 
on the 175 yard 8th for an ace. 

Jock Hutchison Jr. and his brother 
Edgar, with 32—32—64, won second, 
while third, fourth, and fifth were 
divided between George Arnold and 
©. W. Anderson, Kildeer; Red Den- 
nison and A. R. Hulbert, Brier Hill, 
and Eddie Gayer and Sonny Rosen- 
berg, Twin Orchards, with cards 
of 65. 

Bob MacDonald, shooting with 14 
year old ‘Tommy MacMoran, son of 
Joe MacMoran, of Indian Hill, had a 
36—32—68 


The scores: 


Tommy Armour and W. §. Mill- 
ner, Medinah . 02 
Jock Hutchison Jr. North Shore, 
and Edgar Hutchison, Glen View.32 
George Arnold and O. W. Ander- 
son, d 34 
Red Dennison and A. R. ee 
Brier Hill 34 
Eddie Gayer and Sonny raneteiien 
Twin Orchards 33 
Dave Tosh and Joe Fall Jr., Sun- 
Ost WAGNe 560i di..% 30 
Jock Hutchison Sr., 
Victor, Glen. View .. 
Charles Penna and Jack ‘Barnes, 
Medinah 
Gunnar Nelson and Alex Welsh, 


Rockford 
Walter Keller and C. F. ’ Deiter, 
Chicago .ao 
Bob MacDonald and ne MacMor- 
ran, Indian Hill . 36 
Jim Foulis and H. E. Abrahams, 


Ruth Lake .... 
Sam gee and oe Cepaitis, 


Old E 
Wilson and Charles Chrisio- 
33 


and dintiee 
a4 


Jim 
pher, Park Ridge .«....... 
Terry McGovern and Charles ‘Rack, 
Deer Path 
Bill Rhodes and Allen Falsenthal, 
North Moor 37 
Jack Norton and B. W. Cerney, 
Big Oaks oe 
Ned Jamieson and Don Hamilton, 
Beverly 33 
Harry Adams and Ted 
Elgin 
Carberry and Jack Hunter, 
Waukegan 
Jock ciao and C. W. Allen, 
Techny Fiel 35 
Joe Smith and Burt Abrahams, 
Ruth Lake 38 
Bill Toland and John Nau, Sunset 
Ridge 
Sandy Armour and Bob. Musick, 
edinah 38 


Wyman, 
38 


Intradistrict team matches of the 
Chicago Women’s District Golf asso- 
ciation at Butterfield and one of the 
regular series of matches in the North 
Shore Golf league at Indian Hill con- 
stitute today’s local golf program. 
The high spot of the week will occur 
tomorrow when Midlothian conducts 
its thirty-fourth Pater-Filius tourna- 
ment. The tournament, best known 
ot its kind in the country, will be 
a 27 hole medal play event this year. 

The C. W. D. A. team matches at 
Butterfield today will bring together 
the ablest swingers from the north, 
west, and south sections of the asso- 
ciation. In the North Shore league 
matches at Hinsdale the North Shore 
team will defend a five point lead 
over Sunset Ridge when it meets 
Skokie. Other matches pit Park 
Ridge against Westmoreland, Sunset 
Ridge against Ridgemoor, Indian Hill 
against Edgewater, and Ridgemoor 
against Evanston. 


Salen: bond ‘ty inithind, too, ‘with a 
Nesceche like I've geet. 


linois: 


= Ni : Sawyer, 


Golfer, to Be | 
Buried Today 


Funeral services for Daniel Edward 
[Ned] Sawyer, one of Chicago’s lead- 
ing amateur golfers thirty years ago, 
will be held this afternoon at 3 o’clock 
in the chapel of the Forest Home 
cemetery in Forest park. 

Mr. Sawyer died Sunday night at 
his Hinsdale home, where he was 
stricken following his return from 


an eastern business trip. He was 
vice president of the Twenty North 


Wacker rive Building corporation 
and was a captain in the United 
States army during the world war. 
He is survived by his widow; a 
daughter, Mrs. John Wakefield, and 
two sons, D. E. Jr. and Jack. 

Mr. Sawyer began his golfing ca- 
reer as a caddy at the Chicago Golf 
club about 1895. He was one of that 
circle of amateurs which included 
H. Chandler Egan, Chick Evans, Bob 
Gardner, Mason Phelps, Warren K. 
Wood, and Walter Egan and which 
made Chicago one of the best known 
golf centers in the game. He finished 
as runnerup to Chandler Egan in 
the 1905 national amateur at Chicago 
and won the western amateur of 
1906 in a thirty-seven hole battle 
with Warren K. Wood at St. Louis. 


KETTLES STOPS 
SUBSTITUTE FOE 
IN THIRD ROUND 


Alex Kettles, former South Bend 
Golden Gloves heavyweight cham- 
pion, scored a technical knockout over 
George Williams of Chicago in the 
third: round of the scheduled six 
round feature bout at Western Ssta- 
dium last night. George Williams 
substituted for Paul Williams, who 
failed to appear. 


In the main supporting bout George 
Engel, Plymouth, Ind.,. welterweight, 
won a six round decision over Bobby 
La Monte of Chicago. Other results: 

Mickey Beal, Chicago, stopped Harry Ward, 
Indianapolis [2]. 

John Hellstrom, Chicago, beat Joey Rich- 


ards, Chicago [4]. 
Joe Moore, Chicago, beat John Rock, Chi- 


eago [4]. 
Rolla Taylor, werrat City, Mo.; beat 
[4]. 


Kayo Kelly, Chicago 


Canadian Cricket Club 


Outscores Chicago, 147-128 


The St. Catherine’s, Ont., cricket 
team scored 147 runs for five wickets 
in a match with the Chicago Cricket 
club at 48th street and the Outer 
drive yesterday. The Chicago team 
scored 128 runs for eight wickets. 
The Canadian club will play at Win- 
netka today. 


Demi: Tas juries 


Al Williams, whose playful antics 
in a winning effort with Al Perry 


precipitated a disturbance among the 


fans at White City Monday, is sched: 
uled to meet Oki Shikina in the wind- 
up bout of the wrestling show at 
Rainbo Fronton, Clark street and 
Lawrence avenue, tonight. 

Al Williams insists that he is able 
to go through with the match, despite 
the fact that he suffered scalp wounds 
from: the effects of a pop bottle 
wielded by an irate fan at White City. 

Chairman Joe Triner of the Illinois 
athletic commission has started an 
investigation as to the causes of the 
demonstration in which several spec- 
tators were injured. A hearing on 
the case will be conducted by the 
board next Monday. 

At the same time the chairman 
revealed that the commission has 
sanctioned the match between Cham- 
pion Everett Marshall and Chief 
Sanooke, listed a* White City Monday, 
as a championship contest. 

Supporting bouts at the Fronton: 

Jack Conley vs. Frankie Talaber. 

Bert Rubi vs. Jack Kogut. 


Jack Curtis vs. Al Perry. 
Pete Holtz vs. Ray Ryan. 
ee 


Louis Thez and Wild Man Edwards 
will be opponents in the main event 
of Promoter Johnny Connor’s mat 
card at Springfield, Ill., on July 13. 

—.- 


Varias Milling, Los Angeles feather- 
weight, who was ‘given a one year 
suspension by the state boxing com- 
mission last May, will have the ban 
lifted on Aug. 1. . . . Commissioner 
George Getz was unable to attend 
yesterday’s meeting because of a cold, 
which kept him on his farm at Hol- 
land, Mich. . . . Ali Baba, former 
heavyweight wrestling champion, was 
given an indefinite suspension for 
failure to appear at the Frunton last 
Wednesday for a scheduled bout with 
Lou Talaber.. . . Rumors that Julian 
Black and John Roxborough, joint 
managers-of Joe Louis, have split up 
were denied yesterday by Black. 

~o— 


The Most Rev. Bernard J. Sheil’s 
dinner party. being given at the 
Stevens hotel in connection with the 
forthcoming international contests be- 
tween boxers representing the Catho- 
lic Youth Organization and South 
America, will be held next Tuesday 
and not this week as published yes- 
terday. F. M, 


a Fight Decisions +] 


ai ohew York—Leanata dei Genio peat 
Mickey Duca [10]; Maxie Berger beat 
Midget Wolgast [8]; Italo Colonello beat 
Joe Lipps. [8]. 

At Pittsburgh—Holman Williams beat Johnny 
Lucas [10]; dimmy Clark knocked out 
George Baratka [1]. 


NewYorkO. KB. 


New York, July 6—[Special.]—Joe 
Louis will make the first defense of 
his heavyweight championship within 
the next two months, Today the New 
York state athletic commission grant- 
ed Mike Jacobs, head of the Twen- 
tieth Century Sporting club, permis- 
sion. to promote a bout between Louis 
and Tommy Farr, young Welsh chal- 
lenger, during the week of Sept. 13, 
in the Yankee stadium. 


In explaining their action the com- 
missioner stated that Max Schmeling 
had refused to enter into negotiations 
for a battle with Louis: When the 
commission voted, a week ago, to 
recognize Louis as the champion, it 
did so with the proviso that the 
Brown Bomber must defend his title 
the first time out against Schmeling, 
should the latter be willing. 


Board Hears from Schmeling. 


Maj. Gen. John J, Phelan, chairman 
of the commission, explained that he 
had cabled Schmeling in Germany in- 
forming him that he would receive 
first chance at Louis, and asking the 
German what his immediate inten- 
tions regarding such a fight might 
be. 


Schmeling’s reply, according to 
Gen. Phelan, was that he couid not 
consider a Louis match at present, 
because he was preparing to fight 
Farr in London next month. Pre- 
viously Farr had assured Jacobs that 
he was willing to forego a Schmeling 
fight for the opportunity to meet 
Louis. 


With the receipt of Schmeling’s 
answer, therefore, Gen. Phelan ex- 
plained that the board had fulfilled 
its obligation as regards the German, 
and informed Promoter Jacobs that 
he had its permission to promote a 
Louis-Farr encounter. 


Plans Championship Card. 


While he asked for the September 
date Jacobs revealed, after the board 
meeting, that he will seek to move 
the heavyweight championship fight 
up a month. He prefers to stage it 
during the week of Aug. 23, and to 
present his all-championship card in- 
volving four class titleholders in the 
week of Sept. 13. 


For his all-championship program 
Jacobs plans to pit Marcel Thil, 
recognized in Europe as the world’s 
middleweight champion, against Fred- 
die Apostoli of San Francisco; Barney 
Ross, welterweight titleholder, 
against Géferino Garcia; Lou Ambers, 
lightweight king, against Pedro Mon- 
tanez, and Sixto Escobar, bantam- 
weight champion, against either K. O. 


Morgan or Harry Jeffra. 


C serene .54 
lian’ 


polis.38 36 .621/St, Paul. . 29 45 .392 


oe RESULTS. | 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 
ae 5; owisrile, 1. 
Gotan uf 73, Ingiapay poli 

ms apo City * 


Minneapolis, 


INTERNATIONAL gee pa 


Newark, 5; Jersey City, 2. 
Syracuse, 8-1: Baltimore. 0-2. 
Toronto, 7: Roch 3. 
Montreal, 9; Buffalo. "4. 


TEXAS LEAGUE. 


14: Houston, 0. 

Oklekome City, 10: Dallas. 3. 
San Antonio, Galveston. 5. 
Tulsa, 8: Fort wel 2: 


SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION, 
Memphis, 7: Chattanooga, 4. 
Atlanta. 9: Little Rock. 6. 


DASHIELL, FATHER 
OF FORWARD PASS 
AND RULES, DIES 


Annapolis, Md., July 6.—(4)—Capt. 
Paul N. Dashiell, U. S. N. [retired], 
chairman of the national football 
rules committee for fifteen years, died 
today from a heart attack in the 
navy hospital, where he had gone for 
eye treatment. He would have been 
70 years old on July 16. 

Dashiell was one of a group of foot- 
ball enthusiasts which met in 1896 
in an attempt to draw up uniform 
rules for the game, At that time 
Princeton, Navy, and Yale used one 
set of rules and Harvard, Cornell, 
and Pennsylvania another. 


The rules were made uniform and 
the present rules committee was 
formed with Capt. Dashiell as chair- 
man. He served until 1911. 

He is credited with being the “ fa- 
ther of the forward pass.” In 1905, 
when football was under fire because 
of the number of injuries, Dashiell 
suggested the pass as a means of 
opening up the game. 


OLD WESTBURY 
AND FOXHUNTERS 
WIN POLO GAMES 


Westbury, N. Y., July 6.—([Special.] 
—Old Westbury and Foxhunters won 
today in the Meadow Brook Club cup 
polo tourney. 

The Foxhunters, leading the Brook 
league, assured themselves of at least 
a tie by defeating the previously un- 
defeated Pelicans, 7 to 5. It was the 


Beaumon 


rs a4 d i | 


played four years ago today at Co- 
miskey park, Chicago. But tomor- 
row’s contest is not expected to re- 
veal loss of the glamor of the orig- 
inal spectacle, a glamor which was 
approximated in the subsequent 
games, played at the Polo Grounds, 
New York, in 1934; in the Cleveland 
Municipal stadium in 1935, and, 
though the crowd was disappointing, 
in Boston National league park last 
July. 

It will be the first All-Star game 
attended by the nation’s chief execu- 
tive. Flanking the. presidential box 
will be notables of the administra- 
tion who are forgetting the. nation’s 
cares to behold the so-called national 
pastime for a day. 


Trenton Senators Romp 
Over the Phillies, 8 to I 


Trenton, N. J., July 6—(#)—Tren- 
NYP league Senators handed the Phil- 
adelphia Phillies an 8 to 1 setback in 
an exhibition game at Dun field here 
tonight. 


SETTING 
the PACE 


® Get out in front with the new 
MONARK SPECIAL, the pace- 
setter in the low price field. 
Here’s a brand new bike, a 
streamlined road eater, that 
will get you places in a hurry! 


It costs only $24:95 


Silver King models from $31.95 


Foxhunters fifth straight victory. 

Old Westbury, 
and Ivor Balding leading the attack, 
routed Greentree, 9 to 4, 

On Waterpury field, the unbeaten 
Aiken Knights won the afternoon’s 
most one-sided decision, crushing the 
Ramblers, 13 to 4. Elbridge T. Gerry 
led Aknusti to a 6 to 4 victory over 


Roslyn. 


with Cecil Smith | 


Ask About Our Budget Paymen? Plan 


First Floor for Convenience 


211 South State S#. 
33 S. La Salle $#. 


Savour the flavor in SCHENLEY’S 
“Supreme” and SCHENLEY’S “Extra” 
Then you’ll know what we mean by friend- 
lier tasting whiskies. Because they taste 
good to men of good taste, the trend’s 
definitely up to SCHENLEY’S WHISKIES. 


A AG + 


EF me US NR oe GE Te Re OR ee ett er pete lar Steg a yor ree oo 


a eet Tone me 


Pritt. RAO oe SE eGR 


aie " 
® 


ee 


s 
Px o nm wily bee 5 


% ' ge , 
are ; : v4 *~ . 
‘ Mee e ¥ ; PBs 
4 i : pth et , ; 
‘ : Rare. ae Chews os Np pote ‘ we « 
Ms “‘ae5. stay 8 Pe + $y. s) 
; as FAs ARS nied oy. 
ma ~ ¢ WF 
ep 4 Me toed tr} 5a ea 
c 1 f ‘ se Ge oe ae eae o> 
* ie ‘ 2 4 ‘ s 
3 j "a Des SS  -_ ew’ f » 
Sas oe: . } ba Seems YY aoe “eo —=  - : 
: J ng i a a ” zt ein, ‘ Ly 4, fae , ey iy * 
; eS ‘ st ce ll ait Ta, . ; = 3 : 
« “-, be . fi ‘ r 2 be “' , » y Me 
ae ame eae te fs, ee Pe ey” ae Sy, ny uate oT eee Singh Aphis 2 rs % ss 
is ne WB ge r ‘ es { os yr. 
"a - ag - " - ui a ¢ + ° po - ? rt 
ct ; : Sk od : } eo cl ? , 
* ¥ t - a - Ps 7 > 3 . a Fy Pars > 
-. To ae - 2 nn " ‘ Rapes shee > 
x k re :. 3 : J s ee 
% ’ - . % : 
wD , . 7 Bll 
‘ y « 


ee - 8S 


oShB nut notl 


S83 


POs =e 


syeryesses 
Baete 
eI 


SeStan on BRSe Ube 


3 
7 


a 
shee. 
Re 3 
eo i 


0 
- "20k a ee ee 
= 7 B......1 i 10 1 at, 
33 mar 4%s ‘57 rigs 
; L hs °55. 2 
Be ao oak 10d 04% 1044 
5s . 
'B1..11 112 ise” : 
a aoe 113% eae 


mee 
ia" Hie a, 
ete rege 2 a “ 


er) 


Wissces. 
SSS9SS83S 


‘ e 

‘ ¥ . 
& f 
4 


ty Tage ag A He nies 
kQsen 4s ‘58.111 - 
A 49 ae Ff 
Ye Pa 107 
3 33%+ 


3 
101% ae bh 8 = 
59 41% 40% + 


4%s ’60. 
La... 33 
4s "34 


79 
09% 109 : 
107% 1 at 
105% 105% 105% . 
01 1% 101%+- 
104% 104%+ 


: % 98 + 
165.105% 105% 105% 4 


is sh. a 1014 102 + 
03% 103%— 
ee 107+- 
01% 102% + 

101% 101% 101% 

06% 106%, 10€ 


10 


* 


yet ett eK 
mUGas be "45 oi 12 Oa 9+ 1 


- 


292s > 


Co eee me : tate RRs 


n5a% *34% e. 
3% 


is 


_ 


~ e- 
SRE. ES a: 


. 


OK KKK SK ee Sete Ss 


_ ‘ 
e #RSs at Rate 


_ reas 


BRIS Mad 
KKESFSESKTKLF 


Suet! > ae 


° * 


BERL 


© UVAcsssess SSM FS? 
me 1-3) be oo » - ba 


CHARWOH ORE RATOMH Ox 


ee '! 9886 98.28 
ero 42...100.8 1 0.10 


~~ 


-_ 


= spite 


| thous. 


8 do 4%s ‘76D.. 
4 do 


6do 4! 
jee 
s' 
$2 interbRTr 7s ‘3 o4% 


3do 7s ‘32 
6s 


85% 

rm 4s ‘60. .107% 
ER 4%s' 80. 103 

w 4: 45. anes 


oo. tt Satis “s . 04 
i4e'97. 101% 
ates 
LehVNY 4%s '40 101% 

4 LehVal Bin io, 3 66 


34s ‘46 90% 9 
rfz4s8’49. ‘7 Ue 
& A 5e '6 
1 Lou&N 44422008. Bo 
2do 4s 106 
9do ist 42 2008.. 98% 
15 do 3%s 2003 .. go 
1L&NSoJtM 42°52. 
8 MaineCen 4s °'45. 108% 
7 ManhatRy ? 90. 32% 
5do 48 "80 ¢ 3 
1 MarionStSh- fore, 8% 
1 MarketStR 7s°40.100 
McCStra Ss ‘51.104% 
A074 


104i 1 ™ 
63% eakt 


84% 85%+ 
107% 107%— 
103 103 
1034 son 


04 + 
101%+ 
ant 

101% et 


93 
101 
= 


11% 101% - L 
88 - 4 


105% 103% 
106% 106% ‘st 
P8344 
9. ”? 


; oe ae YT eee 
FF: SF KESKKRE: FSS KK: TSKE 


ate 


» — 
: 1 REST 


9 “x 
102% 102%4— 
42 a \ 


80 

88% OP 
100° 100 
104% 10414 + 
105% 104° + 


_ 


M% 
l, 
1 


BR. 10644 106% 106%— 1 


"40,104 
*61B.101 


2 M&SL gnbs'34 et. 14 
4do 4s * 5% 
1 MSPASSM 5s'38. 19 
1 do 46 18 


104 104 
100% 1 O10 


MY 
Me 
% 
% 


ear 


_ 
roe 


2 Op 


Net 
High. Low. Last.chge. 


A 
3 


= 
= 
ze 
E 


fe 


~ 
t Bie Bcd ed 


20 Soc 
y 


8 Po 


Ee 
este 
2 


ory 


84 

88 ih 

“7, 2 a 114% 11 114%— 
41% sige 


nee. reget i ag 


ae 


Feoahnmme 


Ee: 
a RY 4s ‘65.106 
ae 


105% 105% -+- 
ea 


* 2K SSE: Ket et ee 


se 
Be 
> Bic : 


maeee 248223 
et 


50% 50% 

aQEAPsisaed. 104 104 

C rig, be 2013 98% 98 

ss 2 13A... 89 88% 
rte . 97 


21 St Oil NJ Ss ‘61, 

89 Stude Gs cv '45.. 
2 Swift&Co 
1 Ten 


a 


Qt 


OO ONC I Oe 


7 


107% 

- 102% 102 102% 
88% 88% 88%+ 
97% 97% pea 
O8%—"" 

O83. +1 

% 86 86%-+ 1 

ro 108% 104% i dl 


YDoc 
7 NY Bdis 3%s ‘U5. tr 100% 100% -+- 
3 do 3%s 100% 100 100%+ 
1 NYGEIH&P 42°49. 113% 113% oe 
7 NYGreenwdLis'46 98 7% + 
7 NY¥Lack&@W4s'73A 97% 


18 NYNH&H = 42% 7do ist 4a 


6do 3%s 


pur ee ee 


111 
12 Utah L&T 5s 


108 10 
4NY Tel 4%s ‘89.107 107 107 
4NYW&Bost4%e46 13% 13% 13% 
25 NiagFalsP3%4s'66.103% 103 103%+- “41% 
4 Niagara8 hag Aoi 101 — * + 


: .116% 115% 1163 + 
3 Nor Am Co 5s'61.102% 102% 102 
2No Am Bd5s’57A.102 102 102 — 1 
68 Nor Je 66 aves. 711 1 G a fae 


Pe Tag 78 104% 104%4+ 


10 Ver Sug 7s '49et 23 


— Vir R 
3 Va&SW cn ope F 

2 Wab rife 5 "75 33 [ 

5 do ist 5s 80... 90 90 

4 it 


% 
% 
o 
54 
% 


4Walwrth 4s 
19 War Br 6s ‘38. 94 
15 War Quin Gs ‘39. 48% 47 


~ ae 


88. oat Raab 104444 


8% + 
1Ont P N F b5e'4h. itt 112 “33 + 
1 OreRR&Nav4s'4.100% 109% 109%— 
8 Ore Sh L 5s '46.117% 117% 117%+ 
14 Or-W RR&N40'61. 106% 106 100% + 


5 a 
80 do 4%s 50... Si 
ft do 6s ‘60 
42 West S 428 2 


: 10 

1 Panh EP ist4s'b2 08% 98% 
10 Para i, 62’55. a a 
35 do 3i%s ' 

2 Parmel 

1 Penn D Ga 0 + 
73 Pen P&L 4%.’ a 101% ehh I 

8 Pen Co 4s ‘'63.. 101% 102 

9 Pen RR gen 5s’ 68. 137 

1 do con 4%s ‘60. .119 

5 do gen 4%8 ‘65.111 
20 do gen 4%s '81..106% 108 108% 1 
I8do 4%6 ‘B4E....107 106% 1038+ 
28 do 4%s = 70. ie 102 102 + 


16do 3 99 
146 do 105 106 + 
are 2 


be 3 
2 PeoG ECChes'43. 116% th 
3 Peor & E inc4s’ 90 16 6 

4 PereMar 6s ‘5G. .101L% 101% 101% 
31 do 4s POSE ia 1% + fi 
8 do 4s '56 91 92 
282 : Pee 2 3 os’ 5 2. daly Ait 418 


1 Wick-Slst 7a’35ct 3 
23 do ev Ta’35ct.... i 
9 Wilkesb&E 58 '42 16 


36 


36 YngstS&T 4s '61.101% 101 
9do 3%s ‘51 


FOREIGN. 


9 Abitibi P&P 6e'53 
2 Adriatic El 7s’'62 
8 Antioquia 78454 


ido lst 76 ‘BY... 

2do 2d 7s ‘67....> 

6do 3d 7s8'57..... 11% 

7 Antwerp 5s '58..100 
126 Argentine 48'72.. 91 
+e 44s ng pe 


t 
of 91 
de 


— : : 
RFR OSPR SES: KK: RSE KKM PKS eS SS 


97 + 
A 6s ‘50, 106% 106% 4 gE 
‘BS. + fg 6% 


3% 23 
15 Va E&P 4s '55A.108 107% 108 
R 3%s ‘66.. “ae on 104% ot 


1 90% 
20 Whi Stl 48604. ie 5 


15% 
7 Wileon&Co 48°65.101% 101% 101%+ % 


11% 
100 


110 
Syat06 3 “ihe 100% 106% 
s8 88 


2T BRASIL re 116 116 116 
"50.105 105 Hy 


10 
34 Un P igt5e2608, 145 115% 115%+ 
118% 118%+ 


756 96% 96 
19 do he a: peak .107 a hae 107 


97 


wee BO 


V+ttteete +144 


swe: 


SEK: 


2 
~ 4 


KKK ee 


~ 


“we 


. PRK: KKKe- 


Sattetesleecrs:” eat! wae” woes 


wik. 


a 


e+e 


111 
100% 106% —. " 
19 Ut P&L | 44. 101% 101% 101%+ ih. 
Fis 50 60 650 


+ 


We 
Y 


5% 
33 3 a 
90 


a1 


ol ear 
29i4— 


8c... 
10 Wal H 4%s ‘45. 108 105 105 + 
"BS an 78% co. 


39 
5s yaa 101 100% 100% 


a7 + 8% 


ra 4. 
101% 


1 


140 139 140 + 7 


oo ere 
100%4— 


91%+ 


«-eeAO1 100% 100%+ 
4 7 PS JUD 1005 


U4 ; 


ese 
SS «) ee 
Sao ‘299 oo oe 
pete A 
‘ Le. : * 
gi = ope Ss 
x hb ‘sy ~' 


rt 


ou 
o ss. 


ee 
HOC er eae 


ge8e 


| B Caen 


1h Capen 


: 
i 


6e *61 Jan... 
6s ‘61 Feb.... 
6s ‘61 Sept.... 

. See 


se 
PROP POD ® 


gesesseee 


Qe 
ase? 
“= 


_ 


» . 
SP Ooo WOH eDW|SDraw 
a eo 


2do 24 Bis '89.. 
4 EstoniaRep 7667 
5 Fiat 7s 


GerCABk 7s 
93 GerGInt 6%48'65. 
4 GerG ek egahesate 


28 8% 28 
100 100 


+ "50. : 
. ; keh eee es 


. 
gs '46.. a) 
Bi 6%s'61 7 


Ss - a y - © 
: = oe . A 
i. * ss " - 
~j ’ " . es “a 3 < = . ee rs 
_ , > he ‘ be Ut itRSS 
. C. wee he, bs ts ; 
"eer . pri oe " , 7 ars 
, ; ; oe, ae eat oe Se Se Sis) MEH mt “3 ‘ x : 
, . a : b of a 4 . te: 
. i : : ‘ Yi RS : “2 : : ae ‘ 
+ a oa 5 .! ~ + af ¥ 
- : . ye See -> a rhe Wiha 
7 ¥ . f ie awe eo x EP Sine CS aby _ Ph Ses m4 é 
x ie Th < ae =e . ee - 
. 4 * : q 5 *. —_ — Kies - 3 or . bo grat : 
3 . * a e an <a Mh ‘ ty . q % - os f 
: 3 i ; ~ = : . + ane ; 
7 — : 4, ‘" - — oa ra eos * oy x - 
: . = 4 . ch a Aue 4 4 oo bo Fi: Rsv 
. x4 2g . > “ - c 
F ree ae ‘ Be Ss 7 ot z 
. x! ar, ‘et a r in 
~- ‘ *, ‘ c : 
< ae : f - f 


5 | Serres 7 
French 74s ‘41. 105% 108 
‘BO. 63% 58% 


wr 

oD 

# 
gaara: kata el ares! 


* m6 


99 

91 + 1 

105%4— : 

S8%— 7% 


29 
26% 
3 


ies OF 
. 28% 


32 
oe 


100 


3 Helsing On '60,105 oe 105 


2 Hungary 7s '44 
81 ItalPubUtil 7s’52 7 
69 Italy 7s '51 

7Japan 6%. 

138 do B%ee ‘65.. .. 
22 Kreug&T 5s'50ct. 

7 Lombard® 7#’52.. 

1 LAHEP 6%s'44.. 

8 MedelMun 64%48'54 

3 Mexirr4%a'43aed. 

3 Mex 4s8'04 asd ‘54 

2 dol0 48 sm asd. ‘45 

8 do 10 48 asd ‘45. 

6 Milan C Gs ‘62 

2 Minas Ger 6448’50 


61% 
7344 
88 


5% 
5Y 
51% 
71% 
27% 


‘6 NSoWales 5s'57.103%4 103% 103% 


1 do 6s '58 . 
11 Nord Ry Gis "BO 


4%48'65.. pe 


eee .1038 


102% 102% 102%+ 


98 97%4— 


bat fhe 102%+ 


103% 103% 
9 981 


« . 98 8 
14 Nor H #I &143'57.108% 103% 1034+ 
8 Oslo Cit¥ 4448'65.100% 100% 100%+- 


§ OsloG& EW khx'63, 101 


43 Pavads'GhAstd asd 
4 Par-OriRR 6%4s8’68 
2 Paulista Ry 78°42 
2 Peru 7 


1 do 2 
10 Pirelli 7 
1} Poland &s 
ido 7a ‘47 
Rdo 6a *°40 
Prague 74s '52.. 
1 Prussia 6%s °51. 


101 101 


Y% 
4 Queensid 7a ‘41..1090%1 
1 RhineWestph7e’50 24% 


i0R de Jan 8s ‘46 


38R @ do: Sul 7s’66 : 


1 Ruhr Chem 6s8'48A 

38 Paulo Cty 8s8'52 

18S Paulo St 8s'60 
18 do 7s ‘40 . 

8do 6s ‘68 

5 a» Cts Ss] 8s8’62 

3 do 62 . 

5 Shinyetsu@etye’bs 
89 Silesia Prov 7s'58 

9 TaiwanEP 5%4s8'71 

1 Tokio C B%s ‘61 
12 Tokio Bi Lt 6s8’53 

2U Stiwk G%4s'47A 
60 Uruguay 6s ‘60.. 


C 


5 
1 Westph UEP 68’53 2 


3 Yokohama 6s ‘61 
rir Ex inte pat. 


2 ee a ne nn a eng 


5 5 
ct—Certificates. 


et. 
=: 


24 
85 


GLEE LENCO ERAT eter ge 


| Guatttalist At the sanar tome the 
drafted 


ecrees which mie twin 
sh the 


francs. [about arn Pog of addi- 
tional revenue. 

‘Operations were also ordered Te. 
sumed today on the commodity mar- 
kets, which have been closed since 
June 21, when the financial emer- 
gency reached a critical point. 

Decline of Frane Big Factor. 

The lowering of the rediscount rate 
was made possible by the decline of 
the franc in the exchange market 
and the removal of the need for the 
government to support the market. 

The rediscount rate by successive 
increases had been boosted to an ab- 
normally high level to discourage the 
export of French capital. At its new 
level below 4 cents the franc is be- 
lieved to be safe from further attacks 
such as led to the crisis of two weeks 
ago. 

The bank’s interest rate on se- 
curity loans was cut from 7 to 6 
per cent and the rate on thirty day 
loans from 6 to 5 per cent. 


Scared Capital Returning. 


Some French capital which fied the | 


country prior to devaluation has re- 
turned to realize its profit. The gov- 
ernment’s stabilization fund is fre- 
ported to have increased its holdings 
of foreign exchange. This outs it in 
a position to maintain the frenc in 
the exchange market should further 
support be required. 

Details of the decrees for raising 
new revenues are not yet known, It 
is understood, however, the govern- 
ment will try several measures to in- 
crease taxes and plug up loopholes 
in present tax laws. 

New levies will produce revenue of 
8,000,000,000 francs, while tightening 
of the present tax measures will 
bring in an additional 2,000,000,000 
francs, it is hoped. This would be more 
than enough to meet the anticipated 
government deficit. 

Exchange Bill Approved. 

LONDON, July 6.—(/)—Royal ap- 
proval was given to the government’s 
exchange equalization account bill 
today after passage by the house of 
lords. The measure is ‘tesignec to 
add £200,000,000 [one billion dollars] 
to the equalization fund to help Brit- 
ain fulfill its monetary agreement 
with the United States. 


PRICE OF FRANC RISES. 

The franc was stronger in foreign 
exchange transactions in New York 
yesterday. The currency was quoted 
at 3.867-16 cents, an advance of 
0111-16 of a cent. The British pound 
rose % cent to $4.95%. Other foreign 
currencies were slightly higher in 
terms of American money. 

Gold in London yesterday was quot- 
ed at $34.975 an ounce, the smallest 
discount below the American price of 
$35 an ounce in many weeks. En- 
gagements of $3,278,000 gold abroad 
for shipment to New York were re- 
ported to the federal reserve bank of 
which $1,612,000 was taken in England, 
$1,262,000 in Switzerland, and $404,000 
in Holland. 


CR A A IEE LED LI aI 


THE NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY 


NORTHWEST 


CORNER LA SALLE AND 


MONROE 


STREETS 


CHICAGO 


RESOURCES 


Time Loans (Secured by Collateral) 
one Loans and Discounts . 
en ‘Securities 


‘ 
Pee tyogee ort 


Demand Loans (Secured by Collateral) $ 8,826,312.39 
9,528,337.59 
« « 27,141,089.33 
114,918,984,71 


. 78,294,090.87 


270,000.00 
1,400,000.00 


963,823.56 
474,738.22 


Capital Stock . 
Surplus Fund . 
Undivided Profits 
Reserve for Taxes, Interest, etc, 

Dividend Payable July 1, 1937 


Letters of Credit and Acceptances 
MeneON® . es 6 8s 


Other Liabilities . ... +e. 


Deposits: 
‘Demand 


STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
At the close of business, June 30, 1937 
LIABILITIES 


. $240,240,262.71 
71,519,242.05 


$3,000,000.00 
6,000,000.00 
3,540,593.79 
8,670,662,60 
135,000.00 


1,011,701.55 
137,630.78 


311,759,504.76 


af 


twin cities over the railroad’s pri- 
S| vate right-of-way. — 

The railroad obtained about $380,- 
000 in revenue from this service 
which it otherwise would not have 
received. Had the railroad not car- 
ried them, the trailers would have 
taken this business over the high- 
ways. 

Operators of trucks report that 
they have found the service highly 
profitable to them for a number of 
reasons. Among them are: 

Freedom from the hazards of 
severe weather and highway travel; 
freedom from legislative restrictions 
on length of trailers, weight, and 
other rules, avoidance of penalties 
for highway operation infractions; 
freedom from restrictions on week- 
end truck operations, and the reduc- 
tion of labor difficulties to a min- 
imum, 

The public is the gainer from a 
safety point of view because of the 
reduction in the number of trucks 


farsa oe or ov snmatng 


on the highways. Taxpayers benefit 
from the fact that the pounding of 


and TRUST 


Net After Reserves. .... 


change Collateral ..... 
Commercial Paper ...... 
Loans and Discounts..... 


gage Loans .........+. 


Bank Real Estate Lease... 


° , . > > 


Other Resources ... 


Capital ..... ieee 
Surplus .. 
Undivided Profits” 

Contingént Reserves 


° . oJ . . 


surance... 


* * . . . 


etc., Deposits 
Dividends Unpaid 


Deposits ....+.+%e6, 


Frank C. 

Robert Anderson 

Herman A. Becker 
Edwin Carson 

Hans D. Claussen 
Peter DeVries 


NK OF 


HALSTED Al 


bas i 


Surplus : 
Undivided Profits 


Uncorned Interest. .... 


Deposits eee ey. eee 


HALSTED AT G3rd 


Real Estate Loans, Net After Reserves. 
Federal Housing Administration Mort- 


> es effet et © @ © @© @ © 


Liability on Letters of Credit. pac ears 


Charles W. Heidel 
Henry F. Jaeger 
Fred H, Korthauer 
Chester W. Kulp 
W. H. McDonnell 


MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 


MUTUAL NATIONAL | 


ee eeee 2 @©e#e8* © © © © © @ © © * & 


Reserve for Interest and Contin- 


s rad ‘ Ko an 
wa “ 
ep 4 + x 

Phy * oF ‘ 


FOR 2 PRICE YU. 


Washington, D. C., July pre 
The federal trade commission 
nounced today it has ordered a cae 
porations manufacturing substantial- 
ly all of the viscose rayon yarn made 
in the United States “to cease and 
desist from rons | into and carry- 
ing out a price fixing combination.” 

The commission said it had found 
after “extensive hearings” that the 
corporations had entered into a price 
fixing conspirdcy which increased the 
prices of viscose rayon yarn as well 
as the prices of cloth and wearing 
apparel made of . rayon. 

The companies named were: Vis- 
cose company, Dupont Rayon com- 
pany, Tubize Chatillon corporation, 
Industrial Rayon corporation, North 
American Rayon corporation, Ameri- 
can Enka corporation, Delaware 
Rayon company, Acme Rayon corpo- 
ration, Belamose corporation, and 


Skenandoa Rayon pi ta 


CHICAGO CITY BANK 


COMPANY 


STREET 


Statement of Financial Condition 


JUNE 30, 1937 


RESOURCES 


Cash on Hand and in Other Banks. . 
U. S. Government Bonds. . 
Municipal Bonds, Net After Reserves. 
Other Listed and Marketable Bonds, 


.$ 9,726,066.39 
2,281,047.64 
632,741.45 


532,796.65 
3,956,101.70 
600,000.00 
2,657,654.40 
1,128,568.05 


749,580.21 


>. *e* © @ @ + . ’ 


>. o o * . . . e . 


Purchased Notes Secured by Stock Ex- 


ee @p tee ee @ fF 


Bank Building 2... 2.0.62 secvee’ 


7 > ° . o > . > > 


Customers’ Liability on Letters of Credit 


693,758.75 
$23,260,716,24 


LIABILITIES 


800,000.00 
800,000.00 
205,023.54 

19,429.78 


62,137.09 


33,855.36 
16,226.00 
2,400.00 
21,301,644,47 


$23,260,716,24 


> 


Reserves for Taxes, Interest ‘and In- 


Federal Housing Administration Tax, 


DIRECTORS 


Rathje 
John Mueller 
Olof Olson 
Adolph Quist 
Joseph Schaefer 
J. Parker Smith 


CHICAGO: 


(Sth STREET 


Statement of Financial Condition 


JUNE 30, 1937 


RESOURCES 


Cash on Hand and in Other Banks . $4,352,708.65 
U. S. Government Bonds........ 1,101,591.07 
State and Municipal Bonds...... 
Other Listed and Marketable Bonds 
Loans and Discounts............ 1,789,232.72 
F. H. A, First Mortgage Loans.... 


Real Estate Loans...... 
Bank Building, Vaults and Fixtures 


Pies Aéaete. . vcd ss bes £es to 


375,220.99 
680,740.07 


833,767.66 

197,880.30 

241,942.32 
44,572.31 


$9,617,656.09 


a @ » 6. 3 @: 6 4 


LIABILITIES 
Gebiiel 6005.2. conee oes 


145,000.00 ‘i a 
51,083.24 «> 


Oe Re. EG Re 
Oe. Fa teeta ee 


“4 ee ee ee a 


pany wa vtornbd fin 1935 as successor 
cs ae nares West rena com- 


stockholders of 
linois Bank and 
Trust company 
[predecessor of 
' the Continental 
Illinois National 
“Bank and Trust 
- company) against 
3 peciaeven direc- 
‘tors of the bank 
eK, more than 
4 a pe was dis- 
_ closed yesterday. 
The suit had been 
- suppressed since 
4 June 26. 

- Many financial- 
bay and socially 
_ promiment men 

are named _de- 
| - fendants in the 
| that the directors 
|répay to the bank all losses, esti- 
‘mated at more than $6,000,000, which 


ooteae 


- Ait CAUSES STEEL RATE 
|| INU.S. 70 DECLINE 
= llinois Bank 


LY FOURTH HOLIDAY 


Due to the Independence day holi- 
day, steel operations are scheduled 
this week at only 673 per cent of 
ingot capacity, the American Iron 
and Steel institute reported yester- 
day. This represents a drop of 7.7 
points, or 10.3 per cent, from the 
scheduled rate for the preceding 
week. 

Operations in the Chicago district 
rose sharply despite the Monday holi- 
day, due to resumption of operations 
by Inland Steel company. The rate 
for this week is 69 per cent of ca: 
pacity against 60 per cent last week. 

A month ago the national rate was 
76.2 per cent, off 1.2 points from the 
week’ before. In the corresponding 
week a year ago the indicated rate 
of operations was the same as this 
week’s rate, 67.3 per cent, a decrease 
of 6.8 points from the preceding week. 

In the like week of 1935, the indi- 
cated rate was 35.8 per cent, up 2% 
points, and in 1934 it was 27.5 per 
cent, a gain of 4% points over the 


5 iad . chy tz - 


SENATE, HOUSE — 
WRANGLES OVER 
FARM TENANCY 


Washington, D. C., July 6.—[Spe- 
cial.J—The senate and house squab- 
bied today over the farm tenaticy bill 
at the same time that the house en- 
gaged in battle with the administra- 
tion over the general farm program. 
Neither contest boded well for pros- 
pects of an early adjournment. 

Members of the house expressed 
loud resentment at the action of the 
senate in amending the farm tenant 
bill to put the government into the 
landlord business, a proposal specifi- 
Cally voted down by the house. When 
a motion was made to send the bill 
to conference, where differences 
might be ironed out, objection was 
offered and a délay caused. 

The senate bill authorized the gov- 
ernment to acquire land, to improve 
ii and sell or lease it. The house 
bill authorized loans to farmers from 
the farm. ¢redit administration, 


Monon Reorganization 


Case Delayed to Sept. 1 


Washington, D. C., July 6—[Spe- 


cial.J—The interstate commerce com- 
mission announced today the post- 


record figure of more than 2 billion 
200 millions reached in the fall of 
1929. 

27 Million Gain for ‘aictiee 


The intfeasé over March 31 this 
year ih loans and discounts amounted 
to approximately 27 million dollars. 
In the first six months of 1937 the 
expansion was 42 million dollars. 

Combined depusits of Chicago 
banks recovered to 2 billion 976 mil- 
lions on June 30—an increase of 314 
millions over March 31 but below the 


-record top of 3 billion 195 millions 


reached 9 months ago. The big ex- 
pansion in deposits since March 31 
has resulted from the return of 
funds to the~city which were with- 
drawn over the April 1 tax date. 

The figures reported by the banks 
on government security holdings 
showed an increase over Mareh 31. 
On the latter date, however, the 
banks had reduced their holdings of 
government paper by sales to cus- 
tomers who were seeking tax exempt 
investments. 


Comparison Out of Line. 


As a result the comparison with 
present holdings of government does 
not give a true indication of the 
trend. The banks have been cutting 
down by degrees their investments 
in government paper as the demand 
for commercial credit has expanded. 

Among the larger banks the Con- 
tinental, Harris Trust, Northern Trust 
and City National reported increases 
in loans and discounts. The First 


earnings over an extended period. 
Important Investment Group. 


“The banks,” the report continued, 
“constitute ofie of the most impor 
tant groups of investors in the mar 
ket. As a group they cannot get ia 
and out of the investment market 
without. completely disrupting the 
market. As a consequence they can- 
not speculate in sectrities without 
undermining the soundness of the 
financial structure of the country.” 

Crowley said that including the 


The report said some banks have 
used profits from: securities specula- 
tion to pay dividends or retire pre- 
ferred stock without making adequate 
provision for possible future deprecia- 
tion in their holdings of securities. 

“When banks speculate,” the state- 
ment added, “they can expect to 
incur losses at some time. The 
FDIC insists insured member banks 
of the corporation make provision for 
losses, and contends that failure to do 
this constitutes an unsound banking 
practice which could lead to. termina- 


citations last year there are about tion of deposit insurance.” 


RESTRAIN ALL BUT 
4 STOCKHOLDERS 
FROM SUING RFC 


Peoria, Ill, July 6—[Special.]— 
Four stockholders of the Central Re- 
public Trust company, Chicago; were 
given exclusive rights .in United 
States District court today to sue 
the Reconstruction Finance corpora- 
tion for possession of the defunct Chi- 
cago bank’s assets pledged as col- 
lateral for loans during the 1932 
crisis. 

Claiming a multiplicity of suits are 
threatened over the same issue they 
secured a restraining order from Fed- 
eral Judge J. Leroy Adair against 
other litigation. 


323 MILLIONS MORE 
SENT BY FOREIGNERS 


—TOU.S. IN QUARTER 


Washington, D. c. July 6.—(Spe- 


cial.|—Foreigners sent $323,024,000 to 
the United States during the first 
quarter of 1937, the treasury reported 
yesterday. This brought the net cap- 
ital movement to this country from 
abroad to $2,929,773,000 since Jan. 2, 
1935, when treasury studies began. 
Of the total, the net amount going 
for purchase of American securities 
was $158,350,000 in the first quarter of 
1937; ‘compared with $600,693,000 in 


der % - i i 
ae Lp oe ; stipes | 4 
oS PP GORY vais & ve nf ver Se = 
oe ae a SES Si ee 
peib Brod: tae i i Oe a? a | ee re ca unit bankers | 
} pee EP oe | oe Ts ke eee ee ned iis ralDeposit 4, = te 3! : fa rie 

mae ee Sacg: oe es eh alee Came pe i ee : Aer Statements of sondition of ‘Chicago Insurance « qs . | ac ave in “ibaa toe te ee Rev ae eo eae 
s ete: ee ee BO: : t sr : s j i 3 : ne, ‘ 5 a 3 banks. on June 30 issued yesterday | | corporation, »\ | 4 Practices,” he said. | m a ef ; pag 

(| {0 ST TT “ is inks ai showed a further gears in em) 3 he ie “7 ¢// ¥/af | The most common practices. on | stocks rose from. Teale. to awed 
Mele als Fd ot ae ey ployment of 3 Ch 4 eas eo te be eg which’ the FDIC frowns, he said, |Six points-today, - Light profit’ taking — = 

| ge” gee i ee poses and a material gain in. de-|. 4 Growléy. . are operation with insufficient capi-|in the closing hour whittled away 
TF i000 RE BS oS RD A EN met oe rm sits, compared with three three months | The se taliotat said the FDIC “has tal, excessive extension of credit to|small fractions from the larger gains, : 
2 ee) fee hg het ee 1. ago, 2 Wiehe viewirig with alarm the: preva- officers and directors, unduly hazard- Steels‘set the pace, with motors, cop = 
is pt. 2, 19 | “H ‘Lokis and discounts of all Chicago lence of speculative . practices by ous or illegal extensions of credit, pers, and farm equipments and sev- ;, 
oe Sor bt BES ae ee Ld | iso. | banka reached # new recovery igh) oy. in handling their investments:’| “ding an excessive volume of haz-|° 1's aivtquat | ‘ 
4 —l : Se aetna ype Pare wena ears ea-rsarraeere ait eee area of $762,165,000—about 50 per cent it added that in recent ‘years many ardous assets, and operation with “ dis- nig vidual issues following ~~ x 
ie a3 TS 18 ry 0 '21 '22 ‘23 24'25 ‘26 '27 ‘28 "30 ‘31 '32 ‘33 ‘34 ‘35 ‘36 ‘37 larger than the low point reached 3 honest, incompetent or careless man-| >ehind.. Rails and utilities. . 
ery | ae bp. | duzing ‘the depression years. . The) Panks Have Bouse sie arices cether| agement.” worked higher, although some of ‘oni : 
1 EE RSE ES » Cahn total, however, is still far below the | *° PF° ' ia Use Profits gains in the latter group were shaded — 
$4 9 Nene Tribane.) ) than seeking to obtain reasonable : for Dividends, : 


in the last hour, when an éasier trend oe 
appeared. < 

Volume was sharply higher, trans- — 
actions totaling 1,409,960 shares, the a 
largest turnover since May 13, 

Bids Exceed Offerings. 

A scarcity of offerings to counter 
balance the bids that had acctimu- 
lated over the week-end contributed 
to the advances. The improvement — 
in the labor situation also helped ahd 
tended to remove some of the hesita- 
tion that had forced traders to the 
sidelines, giving them sufficient cour- 
age to come into the market. 

U. S. Steel common featured with a 
3% points jump. Big blocks of stocks 
ehanged hands at a fast clip. Subse- 
quent support pushed Steel commen 
to 107 for a 5% points net gain. Beth- 
lehem jumped 6 points on somewhat 
lesser activity than U. S. Steel. -In- 
land picked up 5% points, Youngs- 
town 3% points; and Republic 3 points. 
Sloss-Sheffield moved up 10 points on 
1,000 shares. 


Chrysler Above Par, 


Chrysler crossed par early in the 
day and later pushed up to 104% for 

a net gain of 6% points. General 
Rotors moved in heavier volume for 
3% points increase. Other motor 
stocks worked fractionally higher. 

Anaconda was the volume ‘leader in. 
the copper division and rose over 2 
points. American Smelting. added 
over 3 points, while other leading 
metal shares gained between 1 and’ 3 


th in agree receding week. onement of hearings on the reorgan- 1936 1 ; : j 

| 1933, oy tae Sat the yo ge re 2 A . San thaes plan of the Chicago, Indianap-| National had a small decline com-| The suit asks that the RFC be mek rie “ popes an a vii Tepe points. 

jand Savings bank and to assume all | ~~ olis & Louisville railroad, originally} pared with three months earlier. All fee ed gig? oped — a ee 38 itp hig Ps scnheoe in pay epee in| Boeing and Douglas were headlin- 
ad /its liabilities. Con Geo t for July 27%; to Sept. 1, 1937. The| reported deposit increases. iquidated - collateral amounting to/foreig n ericaniers in the aviation. The former 

“8 o ee ee cop 6ah oun ova gape ae ene Bete 4 Savings deposits of all banks on | Several million dollars for the bene-| securities. moved in heavy volume for a 2 poift 


{recently lost a suit to collect from 
the People’s Trust stockholders. 

The suit was brought by Emanuel 
'Skolnick, 5047 North Central Park 
avenue, a stockholder of Continental 
Iilinois Bank and Trust company, on 
jbehalf of all stockholders and was 
‘filed in the Circuit court. It is di- 
rected against members of the board 
in 1932, some of whom are not now 
directors of the Continental Illinois 
National, the new bank. 

_ Present Officers Included. 

In an amendment filed yesterday to 
the original bill of complaint officers 
and directors of the Continental [li- 
nois National Bank and Trust com- 
‘pany were added as defendants be- 
cause, said the bill, they ratified the 
alleged illegal agreement “either by 
| their affirmative conduct or by failure 

to terminate and repudiate said 
agreement.” 

The officers named in the suit are 


of the executive committee, Arthur 
Reynolds, then chairman of the 
board of directors, Stanley Field, 
then chairman of the advisory com- 
mittee, and James R. Leavell, aii 
dent. 


Marlin-Rockwell Stock 


Hearing Is Set for July 14 

Washington, D. C., July 6.—()— 
The securities and exchange commis- 
sion called on the Marlin-Rockwell 
corporation, with offices at James- 
town, N. Y., Plainville, Conn. and 
Chicago, to show cause at a hearing 
July 14 why the registration of its 
common stock on the New York Stock 
Exchange should not be suspended or 
withdrawn. The commission asserted 
the company had not supplied all re- 
quired information in its annual re- 
port filed under the Securities Ex- 
change act. of 1934. 


commission also granted authority to 
a bondholders’ protective committee 
headed by Reese D. Alsop of New 
York to seek proxies and authoriza- 
tion from Dal holders. 


June 30 were 23 millions greater than 
on March 31. The. present total of 
535 millions for savings is the highest 
in more than 6 years. 


RN Re ae 


fit of a trust fund to be established 
for stockholders who were recently 
assessed 100 per cent stockholders’ 
liability. 


oN nee tes er eee NRE nm em SE nee 


Organized as N. W. Harris & Co. 1882 
| HARRIS TRUST BUILDING, CHICAGO 


A much larger amount of. money, 
however, was involved in total Amer- 
ican security transactions by foreign- 
ers. 


Harris Trust and Savings Bank 


Incorporated 1907. 


jump, while the latter garnered 3 
points. Wright-Aero was another 


—<—2 


[ Continued on page 27, column 6.J # 


Statement of Condition g Directors 
June 30, 1937 5 oak ty eel , 
ALBERT W. HARRIS 
Chairman of the Board 
Resources HOWARD W. FENTON 
President and Chairman of Executive 
Cash on hand, in Federal Reserve Bank, Committee 
and. due from Banks and Bankers . , . - . $ 70,214,212.73 DAVID A. CRAWFORD 
TaUST sine U. S. Government Securities, at par and accrued interest: President, The Pullman Co. 
| FE 5 Due five yeats or longer - - - : . . - 6,839,441.60 RANK R. ELI 
eh ; SAVINGS A N K Due lessthan five years + - + + + 2 » 29,397,220.08 . aye Ts sealed 
MICHIGAN AVENUE AT OHIO STREET Due less than five years (set aside under Trust Companies Act 11,011,526.30 
Statement of Condition June 30, 1937 to protect Trust Department’s Cash erase F. O. HALE be 
ee RESOURCES U. S. Treasury Bills at par - j 1,500,000.00 President, Illinois Bell Telephone Co. 
igo rte = "ee State and Municipal Securities, not exceeding market value | ARTHUR B. HALL . 
dhetable Bonds .......0.0.0.cc0ccccccsess. Due five yeats or longer -  - - 6,936,483.61 Hall © Ellie 
* repair teapene Bal nein Due less than five years - > a eee 26,141,862.88 STANLEY G. HARRIS | 
Ba Discouints......0--.0< 010s esses Other Bonds and Investments, not exceeding market — | Vice-President 
filding Equity. .......2.... 00.0.0... Due five years or longer - - 8,390,829.41 BOWMAN C. LINGLE 
mar oe Santee am Due less than five years - + + + + =  . 9,263,010.46 Vice-President 
ts’ Liability on Letters of Credit. .... Demand Loans -  -  - - e. ee ‘AMA os | 
her Ohl vhiw'x's cc dde 62S. Fens Lene ant Bile Dheceidend - - > = 3 " a 46,889,212.46 . a . 
wee . Illinois State and Municipal Securities, not exceeding market value, ae : : : ons Ce 
LIABILITIES deposited under Trust Companies AG. . . 500,000.00 JOHN TSS te ih. 
© CONOR Ge ea ny Ma Federal Reserve Bank Stock - aed. 390,000.00 | FRANK McNAIR on 
= +& an aaensaes Customers’ Liability on Acceptan ces nif Chet of Credit o «|. $36,442.97 Vice-President HO id ae 
Saad sae aan Sah a4 
e ttn eer aren nernseeesssesssreesecessene 1. rt 3 
EER. cad bao S : 
| wet © = ee 


gis bach et ais AEP E YC RR 
Senet ; a 


shine 
> 


* 


- 5S. + homacme 


POON: 


; Bomonw 


© im 29 


Te 
g 


i: DRA wOCOMROOROS 


> 


O2S Soto oO 


| a 48 iti 


E 


_ 
% + “ta eee: rp Re a RN cps ; “ah 
ete , : hah ey 
a Oi. cs, a teed Fes - me 
7 ee r 4 Bes 2 7 Pe: at 6a 
So ; ; rE Sas ig - CO ae 
“4 P ae ; : 
: ; 5 : 2 ao -.s J 
y oP. Neel Seay Ss, PtP. & 7 a” atthw™ Sf dts «ae 
3 Fs se gi oy by G ew ass é 
ag Sierra ae < Bs 7 
: i" “ ; ¥ A. els y tea Tr ma 2 F Bz, 
z ; ‘ ~ <3 ~ - wt & >  - & 
. qi ia = _ a = % : ws % Ya & sf) 
oo - ° 3 ot yi 7 
' 6M ie ee - F 


BEERS 
steely: 


EBERRE 
Fe 


Eg 
we 5 
ae 


400 49% 49% 40%+ % 
2.500 169% 167% 169%+ 1% 
Jicceece 900 7 : 76% 765— by 


wi 
sas 
tf ee en 


900 78% 77% 78 +1 
100 1894 139% sey A in 
100 18% 12% 18%+ 1 


% : = tat F 
‘: a j = et el 
- -_ RA 
ae j , we Ex 2 
P aie = ., 
oy » 
— 
; — 7. ~~ —~< 
: q - ss p od 
a = “an 
- ”. ba art feel 
ee — as : ‘ ‘ Pas 
“ : S ~ & Sn : + 
Fs oe - “ae Don - 
‘ tyr ho 7 he ae : - ef > 


zy 


pees 


Hy : 


Bie 


0 aA 
sy [2] wee 
pid.e. 


Crswneet 


ie 


R ices 
= 1st pid....+s+» 
nce oy eh 
Eureka ac eeseee 
Evans Prod [1]... 
Exchange Buff...... 


F 


Fairbanks uta. Sinai 
{ial 


yee 


cor. 
ip: WO: 


27 
Bee 152 153%: 
bi 3% tisy lis 113%+ 


2 11% 12 
4003 i’ 17544 1%| 7 
+1500 32% 81% 32%+ 


: hee 5.700 
t [. 50s] 2,300 


300 103 
Minn-Mol Imp ..... 2,100 
Minn ah Apescube SM 200 
DoDD vscssesess 100 


Mo-Kan-T 600 
: Clsssaplous 000 
200 


eeeoeeeee 


Mother 

Motor Prod [1. 

Motor bd sy eel [1 "60 
Mueller B [la] 


Marky @ Gc (3. 20] © 
Murray Corp ....-. 1,200 


N 
Nash-Kelv [1 }. 


om 


.+e+-L0,600 
0 
18% 


rane 110 10 iat 
102 103 + 


Tan] 98 
20 ie 115 gt 2 lial | 


eee 


[3] 
[ 


Swm-G ww [.35¢]. 
Do xw [.35¢] “eee 


T 


. a 
ae. 4 : 
3 aie pe 
| al . 
= ne 
Py Mg de, 
ets Fs 
" > ¢ o - 
baal ity Rte ote 
a i, ~~ 
# 


g6n8 


IST 


$8 


" B- PODTIHOKMNVWEH Am oC: 


PBBYD 


8 

8% 
60 
12% 
56% 

22 


33% 
or 
26% 18% 
112% 107% 
24% 15 


Cwm 


Talcott Inc [.45¢]. 100 
Telautograph [.60]. 100 
Nat Dairy Fe f1.2 ] yn 20% 19 9 Tenn Corp [.25¢].. 1,700 

Do pid A [7].... om 1098 109 109 — 2 Tex Corp [2] .....13,800 
Nat Dept Strs...... 600 16% 16 16%+ .ss ex Gulf Prod ..... 1, 4. : 

Do pfd . 70 % 7 6 Tex Gulf Sul [2a].. 1,500 *Since trading in the contract started. 
Nat Distiil (21.. ie ~ 2,000 29% Tex-P C & O [.40]. 5 .. | *Briday’s prices. All prices are for Septem- 
Nat Gypsum ; 1,000 Tex-Pac Land Tr.. 1 ber except butter which is for 
Nat Lead [.50].. ake , 2,100 Thatcher neal ase 34 34 +2 | November; eggs, cotton and soy beans, for 
NatM&Sti Cast [ig] 300 The ¥F 


& 
- 
ode 
rc) 


Flintkote [1]... 
eb Stove fig] 
Food gh gS ee 1 
+Do a Mach | [4.50].. 
Foster Pherae cea 


7. 


Co: owrHRaASCS4I: 
_ > 


300 40% 40% — 
100 108% 108% 108%+ 
00 11% 11% 11%+ 


HIS: WOOD RR MR. 2 He 


< 


delivery 


WHAT STOCKS DID 


or: 


‘[Tuesday, July 6, 1987.] 
TRIBUNE AVERAGES. 


High. Low. 

25 railroads ... 41.78 40.64 
ne senee 210.83 
60 stocks... ...128.35 125.73 


BO stocks one year ago. 125.66 124.18 124.96 
50 stocks two years ago. 99.23 98.09 98.31 


ASSOCIATED PRESS AVERAGES. 
$0 indus. 15 rails. 15 utils. 60 stks. 


.. 51.6 
DOW-JONES AVERAGES. 
Net 


High. Low. Olose. chee. 
80 inodustrials..177.08 173.18 176.80+4-4.58 
. 53.80 82.40 53.724+1.66 
ee 24-94 27.23 27.87+ B84 
ISSUES TRADED. 

Tue. # Fri. 

is cinta ane 

eee ee oe See Pee o° Foo 62 


@eeeeeteeeeeeee PC eeeeseeeee 67 


issues She thd, puduebh akean cee 
ES ee rey Pere 6 
1937 lows eeeeeee son eeeeeeeene 13 


LONDON AVERAGES. 
{London Financial Times.] 
acse the we enes 629.00 000s 127.5+ 8 
. 69.44+ 2 


‘Investors’ Guide | 


Wednesday, July 7, 1937. 
(Copyright: 1987: By The Chicago Tribune. } 


tors’ Guide: Please Please send me all 
information ‘about stock of National 
Biscuit company—A. E. F. 

Answer: Largest American manu- 
facturer of crackers and biscuits, this 
company has plants located in 32 
cities of 21 states. It also has three 

plants and one in England. 
acquisition of a number of es-; 
concerns in the several 

years prior -to 1932, National Biscuit 
built up its preéminent position by 


steady expansion of its own produc |} 


tion and marketing facilities. 
500 ‘varieties of crackers and 


Bisa no 
\ # 


+ AM ROB MwrH rH. - 
om ~2% Pipes 


Ia: 
Gs © 


[4 eS: 
* Mw w~ tes" 


; PABA: Or Barra am wpe: OF: 
+ PORD. QOSBHKOTOhR WOH E-. SO. 


© MNODw: : AAPA 
7 ‘ nour. 


;: aay: 
°* + Witt: 


> ns > 1 > 
» 2 bee: 


[2 BPoeme. He: 
-. A ISOSWwe. 


GES aye 
>. Ges ; 


FPG RK RERE 


Assd Dry 
Do ist pfd [6] .. 
Inv pf ww [5] 
A T&SF [2¢].. 
Atl Cst Line ...... 
Atl G&W In pfd.... 


Do pfd [8] . : 
Atlas Pow {1. 50g) 
Atlas Tack [.25¢] 
Auburn Auto 
Aviation Corp ...-> 


B 
Baldwin Loc 
a 


4 Sia ees <a i 
Do pid asd eeeees 


SRE. HR Kee 


Ke: 


: aka tak 


Bulova Watch [4a] 
Burr Ad Mech [.80] 
Bush Term ...6+- 
Do 7% deb......- 
Bush T Bidg “pita. c 
Butler Bros vee 
Do pfd [1. “— 
Butte Cop & Z.. 
Byers Co 
Byron Jack [.50¢g] 


Cc 


Calif Pack [1 apie 
Callahan Z-Ld 
Cal & Hee [.7B¢1.. 
Campbell Wy {[1].. 
Can D G Ale 
Canad Pac 
Cap Adm A 1506) 
Car & Gen [.10¢]. 
ee ee 
Do pfd [7].. 
Caterpil bite (3). 


T% 
800 169 144% 167 
110 115% 114% 1b 


[5] 

Cent ica [1.50a] 
Cent Fdy . 
Cen Ill L pt (4. 50] 
Cent BR RN J....-» 
Cent Violeta Sug.. 
Cerro de Pas [4].. 5 
Certain-teed eosenee® 

Do 6% pfd...... 
Champ P & F [2]. 
Checker 
Ches & Ohio [2.80a] 
Ches Corp [3]..... 
Chi & E iil pid.... 
Chi &N > te FP ow ne 


eee eeeeer 


32% 
1265 112% 
52% 34% 10. 
2 1380 


PS ee 
» 


d pid. eeeeeer 


G 


Gabriel DS genbeesea 
Gair Robert. .scecese 
Do pid [S8].....-- 
Gamewell 
Gar Wood If ‘35¢1] 
Gen 
Gen 
Gen Bak [.60]....+ 
BronZe...-ceess 
Gil ie iscsaks 
DIG. ...ceeceees 


400 


700 


Gillette [.50g]....- 

Gimbel Bros 

Glidden Co -[2a].... 
Do cv pfd [2.25] 


Gobel . 
Goebel Brew f.20a] 
Goodrich [{.50g] .. me 


Do pf 
Goth Silk H eeteeeee 

Do pid [7] . 
Graham Paige .... 
Granby Con 
Granite C Stl <3. 
Grant W T [1 40a) 800 
GtNorIrOre et[.75¢] 1,800 
Gt No 3,900 


: GB, PROP Ols IB: pete. Gos - OHM: Bes HNO: PS 
i> MB Coiote- Com+ DO: oa: : - &-- ; 


+ WOOsa 


+ OMS: 


Do pid [ 
Green H L 
Greyhound [ '80] 
Do pe [.55] 


Guan 
Gulf Mob & ei gests 
Do pfd 
H 
Hack Water [.75c] 
Do pfd A [1.75] 


Hall Print 
Hamil Watch[.65g] 


ry TMM: 929920: 


er. 
oo ~2 


; PUAkeaevbowmmeavoss: abhb- 


Body 
Hasek Atlas Gl Bot, 


Hollander [ 

Holly Sug [2 26¢).. 
Homestak M[. 8756] 
¢HoudHer A [2.50] 

Do B [1.50] 

+HouseholdF pfai5] 
Houston Oil 

Howe Sound i3ai.. 
Hudson & M pid.... 
Hudson Mot eeteee® 
Hupp Mot 


Tilinois Cent ..++e++ 

Dl Cent Liu [4] ..6 

Do pid one: 
Refin 


Ind *-e eeeeaeeee 
Indust Ray [2] . 
Inland stl [2. 50g]. 


> MIIOIP HWP CSO ow: 


seen 


7,200 
400 


400 25% 3% 
100 we 115 1156 +1 


acne 1.18,300 10% 38 
Goodyear T&R[1 3 

codyeer #& ae 400 122% 120 122%+ 7% 
v 8% 8+ % 


100 45% 4% 4%+ 
200 103% 103 103%+ 1 
900 11% 11% 11%+ 
100 25 25 25 
100153 153 153 + ‘3 


. 1400 388 37 88 + 
1,200 113% 109% 113%-+- 
25% 238% 24%+ 


RRR RA RE 


29 
a 


39 + 3% 
4 


300 68 63 
Do pid [6] “93. aan att 119 
1.25 i. 

a rh : . $00 114% 114 114%—- 
10% 
0 46 46 

600 16% 16 
900 


3% 60% 8% + ‘8% 


9% 10%+ ae 
46 + 2 

16%5\ ---. 
3% 3% 3%- % 
47% 47% 4744+ 2% 


20 104% 104% pat eee 
3% My 


Prins 3%, 


Cut % 
40%+ 2% 
9% 7O%+ % 
4 40%+ 2% 


Ry pid 
Gt West — 40a] ey 35% 


i 
Y, 
i 
% 
. 


Nat Pow & Lt [.60] 2,200 
Natl Steel [1.25¢]. 7,400 
Nat Supply . 

Do pid {(1. 76K) .. 
Natomas [.80] .... 
Neisner Bros [2].... 200 
New Orl T&Mex.... 
Newpt Indus [1.26¢] roe 33 
N Y Air Br (1g]..... 100 

¥Y Central........16,000 
Chi & St‘L.... 00 
0 pfd eeteseeeeee 


C Omnibus ....«. 


- HORM. os GRE. ho 
a) 


+, Sah. Pees 
Om: Ko 


. > 
- > « oo 
* . . 


- O -* 
Sits 


200 89% 88 88 

300 241% 237% 241%— 

110 104% ate 104% 
6,200 12% 11% 12%+ 


Northern Pacific .. 
Norwalk T & R.... 


O 


Ohio Oil [.50¢].... . 800 
on Farm ... 400 


teel 
Do 1 pfd TS '501.. "100 
OutbdM&M [.75¢)]. 400 
Owens-Ill Gl [76g] 1,100 


P 


PacAmFish 


[1. de 100 
Pac Coast 100 


Pac West Oil [ .65e] 300 
Packard Mot [ 104s 9, 000 
Pan-Am Pet 200 
Panhand P & mes 

Do pid 


PADS CRCO IG: 
- s Soeavocoe-..-- 


+ ~ e > ae “2 G- C- - 3 
. ao pe .* ee to~3: ~}2 a9. re. 


Parke Davis[{1.40 
ParkerRust-Pt1 rth 
Parmelee Trans ... 
Pathe Film ..... “ah 
Patino Min ....ce6. 
Peerless Corp ...c+> 
Penick & Ford {1g} 
Penney J © fag). an 
Pa C & 


. 29 aS . *« 


Do pid A 
Pa R R (biel... a 
P G L & 9 ee eoveel’ 
Pere Mara saben then 

Do pfd . 
Petro Corp [ 40g) . 
Pfeiffer Brew [. 60g] 
Phelps Dodge [.80g 
Phila Co 6%pfd[3] 
Phila Rap Tr pfd. 
Phila R RO & I... 
Philip Mor [3. 766) 
Phillips Pet [2a].. 


Do pid e@ereveseseese 
Pitt T Coal @eeeeeea8@ 00 
Pitt United ........ ee 
Plymouth Oil[ .70¢] 
Poor & Co B 


90%+ 2% 


18%+ % 


200: 27%. 27% Ya 
- 10 138 138 138 
23% 23% 43% 


SOR AMAR aka akakaRaRatt 


- 3W- sIcos + Sor Pr: + Co “it 
» Borwacn-.- - >. ‘ 


SAIH: QPPHVWD- 
“I. ©: Ce. 


. > 33 Gs wo bd . > . 
[> GORE. AION: VBEDHEOE. 


>: + NPNOW- 
» §O-10hr 


Thermoid ... 
Thompsn Pr [90g] 
ee enee 


fd 
Tide-Wat As [.35¢] 
Do pfd [4.50] . 
Timk-Det Axle [2e] 
Timken Rol Bg [3] 
TransAmerica [.50] 
Trans & West Air.. 


Twen C-Fox ¥ ant 
Twin City R 
Twin Coach me See 


U 


Dien & CoO..ces.. 
Underwd-E fi "6e]. 
Un Bag & P [2]. 
Un Carbide [2.40¢] 
Un Oil Cal [.55¢1]. 
Union Pacific [6]. 


Unit Dyewood fial 
Do pid [7] 
Unit Hil 


Unit Eng & F [lg] 
Fruit [3 


U 8 Distrib pfd 
U8 Freight [1.75e] 
U § Gypsum [2]. 
EG DGG FT Ticacces 
U 8 Hoff Mach,... 
S Indus Alco.... 
Leather......-. 


Do 1st 
) smelt & R (661. 


U 
U § 
Do 
US$ 
Us 
U § 
U 


Unit Stockyds C50} 
Univ-Cyclops St [1] 
Univ Leaf Tob [3a] 
Univ Pict ist pfd. 
Util P & 14 A...... 


Vv 


Vv Raalte Tl. 375¢). 

Vanadium 

Va-Caro Chem .... 
Do 6% pf (1. 50k] 

Va El&P $6 pt [6] 

Va Ir C Cé Ciuvénxes * 


Ww 


Wabash Ry .esss-- 
DO > OEE Bivksincss 


De Mie Ba cseésia. 
Do pid 11... Ww boos 


Ward Bak As sttinan és 
Do B @eeeoeteoeeeeee 
Warner Pict ..ices-- 
Warren Bros ....... 
Warren Fdy&P [2a] 
WaynePump [1.50g] 
Webster Eisen . 
Wess O <5 [50a] 


% 
WPenn P 7% pf [7] 
W Auto Sup [1.60] 
West Maryland ... 


300 38% 38 
600 84 82 


91% 
37, 100 107 
1,000 132% 131% ere 
‘80 4%, 


34 
eeeee = October. . 
9 


Sw Ske 
84 + 2 


73 


200 72 7 
2,600 101% 100% 1014+ 1% 
2,400 245% 24% 245+ % 
1.500125 123%125 + 1% 
100 91% 91% 91% .... 


1 
100 17% 17% 7b 
800109 108 109 + 
10164 164 164 


90% 91 + 
103% 107 + 


i 
ae 


_- 


SRR Oe 


=" 


~ 


~ 


NEW YORK FUTURES. 


[Yesterday's closing prices, in cents per 
pound unless otherwise stated.] 


Sugar. 


Contract No. 3 ee ae .02 ‘cont 
lower to .01 cent a und age F duly, 
2.55: September, 2.55: Novena: 2.58: De- 
cember, 2.58; January, 2.47; March, 5 47: 
May, 2.51; July, 1938, 2.53. Sales, 9,650 


tons 
Contract No. 4 Lert Sorte 01 to .02 
: ee oe 1.22: 
anuary 
1.32: 


1.35: August, 131 1.36; 158; oy, 1938, 
1.38. Sales, 5,750 ‘tons. 


Coffee. 


15 to 23 cent lower. July, 
Decem 


Rio—Closed ner, 6.76. 


Rubber. 


eee a 19.32; 
: a 19.50; 


19.75; 
19.95; 


Co 


Closed 3% to 5 is higher. July, $1.92 
to $1. get fo coe 93 to $1.93; Sep 
eit et nas ee a 


ber, $1. 
to $1.91%. ‘aslen, 
Cocoa. 


Closed .08 to .10 cent higher. July, 7.29: 
September, 7.53; December, 7.68; January, 
7.71; Mareh, 7 7.84. Sales, 194 lots. 


Cottonseed Oil, 


10 to .15 cent higher. July, 9.23 
to tees August, 9.20: September, 2 
9.24: October, 9.20: November, 9.20: Decem- 
ber, 9.14, January, 9.18; February, 9.20. 
Sales, 53 contracts. 
Metals. 
ad—Closed .08 to .10 cent higher. July 
to Jane, B71 to 6.80 Sales, 1 lot, 
Copper—Closed to 1.23 cents higher. 
suly, 12.94 to 18.00: August, 12.64; “eptem- 
ber, 12.93; October, 12.92; November, 12.91; 
December, 12.90; January to June, 12.89. 
Sales, 34 lots. 
Zine—Closed steady to 05 cent higher. 
6.75: August, 6.60: September, 6.56; 
6. 52: November, 6.48; December 


No sales 
Tin [standard)—Closed 1.55 to 1.70 cent 
higher. July, 58.65: August, 58.50; Sep- 
tember, 58.35: October, 58.25; November, 
68.15: December, 58.05; January, 57.95; 
February, 57.85: March, 57.75; April to 
June, 57.70. No sales 

Tin [straits]—Closed 1.55 to 1.75 cent 
higher. July, 58.80; August, 58.65: Sep- 
tember, 58.50: October, 58.40; November, 
58.30; December, 58 20: January, 58.10: 
February, 58.00: March, 57.90; April to 
June, 5'7.85. Sales, 2 lots. 


Wool Tops. 


Closed .8 to 1.5 cent higher. 
December and March, 111.0. 


October, 


CHICAGO FUTURES. 
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE. 


Lard, 
[Per 100 Ibs.] 
a) Ww. 


t pt 


July $16.20 $16.20 = 20 $16. 20 st0. 05 
September 16.97 17.00 16.97 17.00 16.80 


CHICAGO MERCANTILE a 
{Cents per pound.) 


Do pid , 
Chi Gt West... ++. 6 Hd O Inguransh ct . 500 


Pay 
cht M Or fi. 50a). Intercon Rub ....-: 


: 500 
400 26 
: | Interlake Ir ..++..--18,400 
Chi Paowe ties 400 © 24 v4 1% | 2% 5 Int Agricul 800 


Chi ie pte a 100 47 47 
“gs “RS is ob en een to B01 8,300 110% 107 110%+ 
Chi Rk. te & e RRS 9% | Int Harvest (2. 
Do 6% pid eeeeene 8 pid [ , 800 1 147 147 
Do 7% ~* S 
Chick Cot Ob. sises 


6% 8% 

7 oo Do 2d Gs tkkin ae 10 14% Stor. stands.— Open. High. Low 

20% 2% November ....:..31% 32 
Be 


Low. Close. close 
West Pacific ...... 31% 32 


KE RES 


0 58% 58. 68 
S37: 37 ee 
42 41% 42 + 
"200 114 114 114 + 
200100 100 100 + 
56% 67%+ 2% 
6,800 20% 20% 20%— 
500 100 99 99 — 1% 
Oo. pie 6). ie 30109%109 109 — 
Purity Bak [.380¢] 700 15% 156 15%+ 


6 
49% 


©6320 Go mr im is: 
oy 29 2 ay 
FRESE RKKFSESKK KCFSSSSCSKSE 


+ 
ere) 
Ow@Ue: & 


Dental Y POTATOES. 
s White 3 gene (Per 100 pounds.] - 
Idaho russets—Open. High. Low. . Close. 
November .... -$1.70 $1. Twat she gis 


e 
RIA: POM MD oo hes 


~ 
RRKRKS 
0 


>? 


tg 4 
i 
29 


~ 
a ak 


% BL. + 
P Ase» 18% ig 18%4+- 
13. + 


Int Pap & 
Do 


® 


s* eteeeeeeeere 


© eeeeeeesesees 


1,600 7 “8%  6%L 
Do pid. eevaeeenetees 1,500 101 100% 101 = 
Int By C Am osss- 0 6 6 
Do fd eevee eeeee 50 48% 48% 4846+ 1 
Int ° shoe [2] ssoe» 200 42% 41% 42%+ % 
Int Silver hen eeeere 100 38 88 y 
00 11% A 11%+ “- 
nai ee 


on 

°2 
= 

ware 


ee 
“218 bo 


Ye 1 
Do pid y nase es 30 956 96 965 + 2 
Butter, extra, 92 score. .$ 


¥ Cattle, tops, cwt. 
Yale & Towne [.60] 52% No 2, yel.,. 
Yell Trk 600 25% 23% 
Young 8 & 3 300 36% Ht 
— sar Thboei 2,700 87% 


b=] 
Vs 
++ 
ms 
~ 


RICO Rh be 


ees F 


wee 
ES Bl 


July 6. 

30% 

625 il 
128% 12 
21 

16375 


eke. 


FPS 


aeeeeeveeueee 


Real Silk 00 
Rem Rand [.70g].. 3,100 
Reo Mo es 


yh a 
oa one 2 | Sy ent 
type es 18% 18% 18% 1% 474 27 ' Repub Stl ..........80;600 39% 
Island et 808) 100 28% 28% 28%+ [6].. ‘500 108% ri tt 
J 49% 32 36%- 
Johns-Manville [3] 1,300129 125% 129 ea 4 4% 2014+ a 

i Ep 0 128% 123%1238% .... .8 Reynolds Tob [3] 2 2. ee. _ Zenith Radio [ig]. 1,200 35. 38% 35 + 1% DR cikns éeateieecs 
sanstl ‘td. (3.80ici 60 122 120° 122 44 | eae 60 Bo BS) 0 50 Zonite Prod 200 5% 5% 65%+ % No, 2, white, ba.. 
K is] 2 % 68%+ % 4gBx dividend, First sale since ex dividend date or dates. xr—Hx | 
Kalam Stove [ia]. BO%+ 2%) 38 38 beroid [.6 ; | rights. or extras. last 
Kan City Sou eae Did csccseva | 


Safeway Stra [2].. 1,800 33% 


coe eeeetece 


G9 D> S95.) ~T P+ BS So DOR 
WHteipPoMiayMVoin 


ne ; 
» 


Bh by 


“ge atid ald 


Bh oe Bose 2.8 minsee'6'8 (8c): 2.100. 
as ma % 0 Kroger Groce Groce [1 60) 2,100 


sy i sf a # es is "Ch 
< +, ay eS by, aah does She 3 r AOE Ee a eS Le EA ae} : =f Sag eee 7 5s i, ne 
at ‘ Se iy : fy ay sd fis vf r , a7 ¥ tk 4 n+ 9 ¢ 
* ; : ad, og : meaece 4 '.3 » ° i ‘ we " . | * ee & 
: , i g Ag! . * ; J mn PP a - SSF - x ; 
’ ss ee aed We acid . ky omen 4 2 ie Td eae ee ee ee ok oe Sete iegten oe Ts - 
R Sere er ei 7 : ap - ie ae ‘ v ig ; 
© | ee 3 % ‘ [ov "OA mi gmele 7 ; eS h a cs syehael ae si a 
% ‘ ‘ : .@ 2 ; ‘ Ss ‘ i eet aa — re = eg nad . 
os # sere oo ae . ' ; ee ae ee Pe : iar og yr ¥y en bes pM Meg tig Z. y a 3 re / igs? 9 ee. ve « : 4 
"he ; “9 ee ae ,. : -F DS r .A a . _" u ; 
(400 19% 19% 19% | %@44%; 5-6 months, %@%e%; redisc | 
mae * = e729 Ae a ie es ie ¥ ; aes Spee MEH AY Ry ont vy Pop” ee . rt 
. : 5 4 : "t ' r ‘ : YAS ny 
s ¥ ‘ . « 
iy » j =——~~s has i 
4 oe ta ee 4 Seri 
b <. . 
; Z 
+ 3 
tou cB ak oe 
i; ¥, gama > f 
: 
* 
A 
¥ By 


ie 


nse EpEyatgty 


-_ 
ae > 
» SEED = 
4 4 -« 
ely ty ey ea e, = 
> be 
S| eee eas Lk em > 
; eee 


aveseee 


77? 


: | A, 
"6B. 107% 107 
163C.. 82 


Aivision were not large and aavances| | “°™"Sagimaata 
: GEORGE F. EMERY 


see 


10 iedPel oe , tty ae ate Ani CB AS 
o Inseam’ ed ok gh 98% +i Ai B® Ine 8.87 1 18a ile wi mie, 9:00 2.16| were small, : 
al intere by 8 40% eee pinessee Pras enlaces 18 0:03 Tnterhational oe: and Tele-|  ‘Wiee-President | 
SpSvohwhéD. 79 78% minsStks 6.25 6.00|NYBkTrSh 3.75 ....|graph was an outstan perform:| | CHLED HRACKE 4&TransitCo, 
1} IntersPOvobe HED. 79 1 + » Site it , RICHARD HACKETT 
5 de feb iaroe'8 e+ oait 92: Sy Fe ated b Awntrsh : 69 | utility , adding 1% . seneral Manager, Central DAVID Eg x. aEIMERS 


FRR. RR RE: 


| points Other communications equi , ; 
ties, incl g American Telephone| | | de a gale eel 
‘sgjand Western Union, climbed 1 to 3 e vis bi pty eal 
points. Stock Yard 
4,58 15.8 Manager, Union 
meteP. 20587 21.66 _ Rubber Shares Rise. , & Transit Co, ae 
Aa 266 °.2:| Goodyear and U. S. Rubber were ARTHUR FB Bhag tablet Pika hes a. Maen 
B... 4.20 ..+. outstanding in their group, the for- rep isan er : ndanly we phan Facrasiaty 
BB. 76a °7''|mer on volume and the latter with & Transit Co. Wilson & Company 


if eae 
a 3% points jump. Farm equipments RESOURCES 


BF 
ae 
ee OR ei 
$4 44444 — 


CLYos B. SCHRYVER 
eeansaia -SEEVES 


ie) 

’ BHO < 
y 

te 

~ 


br9 0 is 

a 
8 
! 


re 
++ 


oF 
WH 20m 
S38 


: Se 


‘Do B ...10.68 ....|SupervSh 14.11 15.93 e . 
Fdin Inc.23.54 24.86|TrusstIno 8.01... joined the pace set by other leading 
FaTrsha. 6.11 6.75 nop 96 .... industrials with increases of from 2 Cash and due from banks............... $10,717,520.63 


3 Metro Ed 4s ° Ya 108% oe ae ms 87 | 84 

© isi Val be 248. 080 sine 8 | qatar 688 ?4altrusindsh 147 1.63|%0 5 points, Case Threshing chalk- United States Government Securities..... _7,762,979.37 
6 MissP&LCobs’57. 88 87% 87%— ry ay, 24. .... USEL&PA. 19.96 18. 75\ing up the latter figure. Montgom- M d k 

ane 2 3 MissRivP §s'51..108%108 108 ....|Md Fund | p.ce 20.45 uadtary of ros|ery Ward, up 2%, and Sears-Roe-| | State, Municipal and other marketable 
| "oe War .. 1 3 : ; , fVenezuel Pet 2 SFU at ae ae eas Mut Iny .15.77 17.98 " |buck, up 2%, featured the merchan- ee RS Oe PEPER PEP OOTP OC CRE feo ae 
ea Lash 100 Sao) fee ea: Oy : Walker, Sin’ > 2 | Settee cea Seu aa ii gr ynshdegane sane wens Commercial paper.......-++sseesereees 575,000.00 
old Dist at Wentwth Mtg ‘ol og ty eens ieee UU 
Henk cel om 100 q ; 4 4 4 + NavadaCalk 5s 56 Ht; 83% % BANK STOCKS ; EDUCATOR LAUDS Loans and discounts. *eeeneeeneeneeneeeenenere 3,031,464.19 


100 att abut od 5 NevOal, 6s 56. 834 854 23) : 
0 104 10% 10am 4 R ederal Reserve Bank stock............. 60,000.00 
100 Me ni ) ‘Bd... BA% 94 : CHICAGO, MACHINES’ ROLE Nah siiilics tun and deen of 
8% 8 


30 ie {Nominal quotations.] 
8,5 
R 2,1 


: 
‘ 6 A. 7 738° "at 
‘100 twaleett ‘Tate 1. 00 ist isa aie va ast P&L, rye ‘87. ‘ i aggre Pea: os AS JOB CREATOR ee ES re ee 450,000.00 


1, 3%+ Wright Hare. 1 6 6 tase American National. .270 270 286 . 
+ tYunge Stl Dr Or fee ba 54 -+-- | Ghica le 211 - 911 214 | The common belief that machines Furniture and equipment........-... 1.00 


50 95 95 95 Chicago Tit 
Yukon Gol 2% 
are tye 2a8 228 deve: : City  MAHONS) | +... 135. 180 | 136 | throw men out of work is a fallacy Interest earned, not collected........ 94,340.86 


a Pe IR A MESTIC BONDS. is , 105 Continental Miao, 188 128% 129% ; 
350 121% 114% 121% po : OhioP re a ae fo ; 03 08 | because machines have created more 
300 10. 9% 10 4 Ala Pow 5 Bs'46..102% 101% LOL +P saa ay poe. 108 winds Matinee 38 : jobs for men than they have ever Current receivables and other assets. 28,399.79 


Okla aN@ fs Be 46. Ht | Box * Harrie Trust 0 destroyed, Dr. James Shelby Thomas aman 
‘SLA Trust... 0 » DF. 
6do 4 verses 80% 80 0% | seed ie 5 bs a6: “108 103 \ oa ee ete ace 0 Detroit, director of the Chrysler In- $26.085,719.09 
a 8 Merchandise stitute of Engineering and president LIABILITIES : 

4Alum Co 6:2’ 62 ‘108% 108% Bitty 3 pane ee ; ; 98 ti Boul d.175 g p IAB 
S Alum lid bese ion rt 28 PaCPal i, cs 91 fae Git, sg |Rattonal Belidores ee es Clermen Colege ot Tecnaplegy, 5 IEE PO OTERO ORE 
oa ere re ye Fh eth . at a, ees it 97% or ty pes a bo ie aoe cf yesterday told the Chicago Rotary , 1,000,060.00 

bad e s eee 6.08 
. 9Am Rad 4%s By 4 one te 5 Ba Ha ¢ 80.1, 101% 101 101%+ T i |erminal National... 40% 0% 40% 424%|Club at the Sherman hotel, BOOT EPR TEC eT Pee ey err eee 

Premier Gold. Sam Seem ft bys , NEW YORK, There is no such thing as “ tech- Undivided profits and reserves.......... 434,133.93 


oss ee 7 AppalBlPw 5s'56.107 1064107 + % 14P Vee’ 1pEM 1% ) 

Prewe eval B.. 5 * asih 10 thre. LouG 4a'51. 100% 100% 100% ey j EAM 8 vi i ss deme M4 : ; nological unemployment,” he _ said. Un ed Discount 19,099.29 
bs ind $7 prvi 1] Ta At glee “ates 53 Bim Be%t 1 op iste is, ths 414% 18% if; i 39% 44% | Rist Natl..2810 2450 |The reason for the wrong impression — OR ree ene : 

is ‘62 89% 89 80%"...; Guarauty 7.332 337 |is that persons with narrow vision DOROMIE oc cisccccccceccccsccesseuscs’ aaa 


We 2s 38 ss bs ‘ 49 gee. 4 : hvsdage Mg ey see a machine doing work with one 

4 ) , SO 8 N. 106% 106 CenHanBéT. 138’ 131 Irving Tr...156% 16% ‘ 

200 18) ik” 18 + % 4814 | $FREOE, en Hil 06% 88% 88 3 | cnase Mai. 62 64 |Manuiac iv544 G64 (man that a dozen men formerly did $26,085,719.08 
18% Ist 1%| 8 As GER sin 400 47 10 4do digs SIF. 108% 103% 108%. Z| Chem B&T..64% 66%| Do pfd.. 62 |without it and rush to a faulty con- 

ee | ate tt @ t 4ue 66 oa aoe 99% eo ys rg ee xy rt clusion instead of counting the ma- Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 


% “ 
9 chines, the men who made them and ° . : 
| “gueh WC bs SoA-19 118 113 Empire Tr..30% 91%| Til 13% 14 ae : Serving Agriculture and Industry Since 1868 


° 
# 
+1 


noe 
to 
on 
ss 


ar 
3 
ReK 
~ 
Sows 
Ps 
++ + 


of 
a 


; 
: 


38 


mae 


Ke 
34 


rel DG 
a8 


&§ 


4 Bell TC 58 '55A.119 113 1138 — Empire Tr..30% 31% Tile ‘Gat. 138% 14%/}the men who supply the materials 


es 00 a4 4Bir Gas 56s ‘59. 69% 69 68 —1 F Nat Bost.50 62 
eooatia lav.” % . : 20 pov N P 56s °58.108 102%102% .... and market the products. 


Richmond Rad 5Can Pac 6s '42.110% 110% ea 
"i e U. S. TREASURY 


12 Caro P&L 68°56. 97 96 96 
18 Ced R M bs '63.1138% 118% 113% 
, % {Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 
0 Bits 10 y Washington, D. C., July 6.—The following 
q i 


101% 101 
95 


Goi-+ cout euncere ArreKrea 
Qa. 


5 Cen IPS bs ‘66E.1034%103 103 — 
. SCGCal “414 ‘6S, ‘to8 h iti th 
St Lawrne Ltd 200 1 56... % O82 are § 3 Lap (28 ‘ is a gtatement of the condition of e 
is Pap 2. Cen ray WLEP Ss "657A .102 United States treasury on July 2, 1937: 
+ Tas g , 3StdG&E Gs ‘S5et 69 Income to date this year....§ | 43,187,000 


, Samson Unit. 
ai oat 16%+ Men Mfig.. Income to date last year.... 19,209,000 


5% 
15% 16% 15% fScranton Lace 
1 Seeman Bros. 
Segal Lock.. 
Seiberling Rub 
*Selected Inds 
“Do [al et] 


'SeverekyAir . Gs ph , 
“ta ey 4 , em 13 ToledoEd hs ‘62.108% 107% 108\%— Pub. works and work relief 15,673,000 


3% oe rere 
600 69% 
SimmonsH&Pt 4 : 42. 100% 100% 1004 30 TwCRT 54s ‘52A 80 798 # £80 +.1%/| Aid to home owners 2,363,000 ’ 
Pe Sigs "52. Gb4e 64% + $TU&Co 6s '5048T a 51% ao “&| Deficit this year 123,090,000 
css 100 : 67Com B 4s ‘81F. yobs, 105% i 10 UnL&P 6s ‘74. S4e-- 2%} Deficit last year .....ccceces 24,145,000 ] 
; 300 7 T+ 1 3tde 3%s ‘65H. 02% 103844 108% .... ; 
os pe + 4 


1 ¢#Com § bueaaa 108 103 103 ‘i Decrease --8 98,845,000 
‘ 81 Balance general fund today... 2,644,500,000 
Balance previous day 2,547,600,000 


; 5 5 1 Cc 101% 102 73 w+ 3 
Sou Union Gas 2UtahP&L 5%s'44 94% 04% oa Decre ete 3,100,000 es 
Southland RB 80 4 VirgPbS 6s ‘46. 85% 85 Public debt this date. seeseee 36,633,760,000 f 
{Spenechstr he ae Ph oy os i | Public debt ssse4e 96,638,760,000 Statement of Condition June 30, 1937 


ental I age A 1 4 & Wattht oo ‘57 A. 25 E ul dita. 
+ nv : Re EE : es Xeeae 0 ere 


SEB 8 RRS ESTEE SEER Eb EN Ea CT LON RE eC eee Rot ee oem ene Cash and Due from Banks,. . . je « «+ $308,813,887.04 
if le a? IERIE aero as aman Sipps ie igre epee cammamreteies United States Obligations—Direct and fully Guaranteed, 


Unpledged, . : ‘ ‘ - $227,405,559.41 
City NATIONAL BANK 


Pledged—To Secure Public Deposits, 21,899,860.30 
AND TRUST COMPANY of Chicago 


To Secure Trust Deposits, 25,464,206.51 
208 South La Sallie 


2 


Bis ‘53. 57% 60 re 
B 4'4s'70. 105% 105% 105% i WANOOD. cass sage nsaveaane 23,978,000 


h D 
J R@USY6s'40.108 108 + SN" aE Lee eae te pe Pee 3,290,000 me 
49.102 102 1SidP&L Gs Navy ove 2,610,000 ° 
‘2. 9! 2 1 SyracusL, 68'57B.107% 107% 107%— %!| Veterans’ costs to date.. 1,427,000 
~ 98 17 TexEIS 5a ‘60 .100% 100% 100%-- Agricultural aid 2,302,0U0 


a 1 + G@TexP&L 5s '5G.10414 104% 104%+- Relief *4¥ OU 


“IMO wk St-dis YD 


- 


wae TR ek, ce, coe walle stl wale 
— 


a 


Under Trust Act of Illinois, 550,000.00 275,319,626.22 
Other Bonds and Securities, ; 7 : ; 70,842,680.63 
Loans and Discounts, . : P ; ; - 283,165,433.16 
Real Estate (Bank Building), ° ‘ ; 6,908, 142.32 
Other Real Estate, ; ‘ ‘ ‘ 1,783,470.29 
Federal Reserve Bank Stock, ; ; 1,800,000.00 
Customers’ Liability Account of Pn EE 2,027,218.18 
Interest Earned, not Collected, . ; ; 2,341,602.56 
Other Assets, , ‘ 4 ; ‘ x 225,212.40 


$953,227,272.80 


LIABILITIES 

Capital Stiock—Common, .. $30,000,000.00 
SurplusFund, . . . . 30;000,000.00 
Other Undivided Profits, . . 1,812,573.75 
Discount Collected but not Earned, 825,461.35 
Dividends Declared, but Unpaid, 450,000.00 
Reserve for Taxes, etc., ; ‘ ‘ . ; 2,772,919.00 
Liability Account of Acceptances, bce we 2,310,531.00 
Time Deposits, . . - « $169,862,199.06 

Demand Deposits, + .« .« - 615,5601,816.36 

Deposits of Public Funds, . ° 99,5 79,345.70 884,943,361.12 
Liabilities other than those above stated, . . . 112,426.58 


$953,227,272.80 


Re ee ee 
we re 


*. 


Ss... 


CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION JUNE 30, 1937 


oe RN PR OF moe Om ne Fee ee eee 
= : a ~* 


~-* 


RESOURCES BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS 


Cash and Due from Banks.........$51,051,311.20 Cuanias G. Dawns, Cheirmon 


U, $. Government Securities..... 30,023,619.77 Dowaze S. Bornron 
Pickands, Mather & Company 


State, Municipal and Other 
Securities .......0005. $244,835.35 ee 


i Cu S. D. 
Loans and Discounts....... 38,204,223.79 Piscidat: Banh Maden Corp. 


Federal Reserve Bank Stock. : 180,000.00 Hewny M. Dawss 


‘Accrued Interest .......2..000+ 198,679.57 — 


Accounts Receivable, per contra... 267,404.87 Real E state 


Customers’ Liability on Letters of Gronce B. Duroan 
President, Dryden Rebber Co. 
Credit and Acceptances..... 600,865.15 ae pas 
Other Resources ... 02000000008 69,583.36 Chairman of the Board, Globe Coal Co, 
$128,833,523.06 “Wiline Ene, 
Cuances B. Coopsraen 
Monu/facturer 


LIABILITIES Presser A tee has be 
| Haner B. Hors 
Capital. ° iidtiipiaies eevee eee eee s .$ 4,000,000.00 ; : Pam & Hurd 


ONIN ae ccn'smptes 44-6 4.0. 00:8 0:00:44 2,000,000,00 PR ga ey + 
een Pele: eee eee ee es 462,712.41 : | 


. ee ee 


~—_- 


+ 


eae 
+4 
og 
ae 


; seat: 


aie 


bo rm Sp 
= 
; 


2 


Oe ge aa Ra aE I ne 


regu ers 
Fo AIR! 
— 


~~ 


SE NS i kh ES ee oe pe e-em 
roe Anite cle ll Aa Se oo . - 


in oe 


Board of Directors 
John P. Oleson, Chairman of the Board Edward E. Brown, President 


President, Inland Steel Co, Vice-President 


wmeSsion ts 
+$4+++ +++ 


ee 
A 


ene 


wee 


2 Fae eee ys 


>. Pd 
++) 


_— ~ 
<tc enne 


ee ee. ek 


ie ee 


4 
~| 4 4 | 
= eee ee Se ee ee ee 


——) 


Pere eek masses 


Une . di 7 ~ b 
ae E ie A “s e 2 i é 
i! ¥ ~~ S & - 
ss RE: oh :” q : 
x; 3 A ae ae ih FO - ‘ 
a “gt 9 
a* s a ‘ a 
— J q 


5 
a¢ 
. 


© 
~ 
_ 
- 
” 
J 
* 
~ 
a 
a 
= 


~ 
g 
» 


. Ga a 
MTree ¥ Ker z, a 2a 
ey ee > Se ot RS 
> ae ea é + Bee 
oS ee 
£. wy v 


pee yea net 3 WS is igh 
ah wanterts veesee SL.25% $1. 2 hs ae 


» made a eaetely: ye bse ™ 
lot 25 cents July 1, and is to pay a 5 
cent extra Aug. 3. se 


‘Regular Dividends Voted. 


tional Tea preferred, [llinois North- 
ern Utilities preferred, Schwitzer-Cum:- 


ports| ferred, and capital stock of the Na- 


in the session on profit 
and selling induced by the 
for a breaking of the heatia 
spring wheat belt and a 


‘Closing trades were at net losses 
of % to 1% cents a bushel, the latter 
on July. Wheat futures in Winnipeg 
rallied over 6 cents a bushel at one 
time, but weakened later in the ses- 
sion to close % to 1% cénts lower as 

with Monday and. un- 


A drastic downward revision in 
the estimated wheat crop in the 
western half of North and South Da- 
kota was indicated by trade reports 
as the intense heat over the July 4 
holidays seared fields in that terri- 
tory and in the southérn section of 
the three Canadian provinces. 

Near record receipts of cash wheat 
were reported yesterday. The ten 
Jeading winter grain markets, exclu- 
sive of Chicago, received 9,544 cars, 
or approximately “5,000,000 bushels. 
This compared with about 2,500,000 
‘bushels for the corresponding day 
in 1936. 

Corn Develops Strength. 


Dry weather reports from parts of 


. the corn belt west of the Missouri 


7” 


: 


a 2 


2 
- 


co 


are making rapid recovery. 


river, where there is a decided lack 
of subsoil moisture, resulted in corn 
futures developing independent 
strength. Closing trades were % to 
2% cents higher, the latter on De- 
cember, which represents the new 
crop. Receipts of 690,000 bushels of 
Argentine corn at Chicago over the 
holidays and reports that nearly 20.,- 
000,000 bushels of that grain were 
afloat on the ocean and headed for 
North American ports tended to 
cause the July delivery to lose 
ground on the distant futures. 


LONDON METALS. 

LONDON, July 6.—(/)—Closing prices per 
fon: COPPER—S tandard, spot, £56 17s 6d: 
future, £56 158: electrolytic, spot, £68 bid, 
£65 asked. TIN—Spot. £262 5s: future, 
£262.  LEAD—Spot, £24 lis 34: future, 
£24 7s 6d. ZINC—Spot, £22 8s 9d; future, 
£22 128 64d. 


DRY GOODS. 


NEW YORK, July 6.—(f)—Cotton goods 
markets were more active today and prices 
showed a strengthening tendency. Raw silk 


“was 10 cents a pound higher. Burlap showed 


little change and business was light. Rayon 
Yarns were fairly active. Wool goods mar- 
ket was slow. 


tional City Bank of New York. 
Cerro de Pasco Copper will pay a 
dividend of $1 a share Aug. 2, the 
same as was paid May 1. Sterling 
Aluminum Products, Inc., will pay 
25 cents July 10, the same as was 
distributed May 10. Weisbaum Bros.- 
Brower will pay a 15 cent extra and 
10 cent quarterly dividend July 23. 
Dividends Declared Yesterday. 


Dividends declared yesterday, with 
rate, period and payment and record 
dates, follow: 


July 15 


July 15 
July 12 
Sept. 15 
July 14 
July 15 
July 15 


July 15 
July 20 
July 10 
July 14 


July 20 
July 21 
July 20 
July 8 
Aug. 15 
July 31 
July 15 
July 10 


Al Bros. pf. 75¢e qa....Aug. 1 
Amer. Equitable Assurance 

40¢ a do 10c extra........July 24 
Cerro de Pasco Copper $1..Aug. 2 
Calamba Sugar Estate 40c q.Oct. 1 
Davidson Bros, 7c. 2 
Food, Machinery Corp 25¢ q..July 31 
Globe Hoist .25c a 2 
Illinois oop Duiliti 

pid $1.5 Spay 
Modine ee "Se ‘ 
Nationa] City Bank 50c s....Aug. 
National Tea pfd 138%e q.Aug. 
N Y Merchandise, 20c q 

do 10¢ extra bead euk vata sae, 
Outlet pid 75e q ........ .. Aug. 
Schwitzer-Cummins 25c qa. .Aug. 
Sterling Aluminum Prod 25c. wav a 
Walgreen 50c gq Sept 
Walker Mfg $3 pfd. 75c 
Waukesha Motors 25c¢ extra July 30 
Weisbanum Br.-Brower, 10cq.July 23 

Do l15c extra .... . July 23 July 10 
Western Tab & Sta. '50c a. Aug. 16 Aug. 5 


In the table above the letter “q” 
refers to regular quarterly dividends 
and “s” to regular semi-annual pay- 
ments. 


PRICES OF MEATS 
AND LIVE STOCK 
RISE SHARPLY 


New July peaks for recent years 
were attained in most live stock and 
meats yesterday on abnormally low 
supplies for this season. 

Cattle led the sharp rise in prices 
at the stockyards, top steers soaring 
to $16.25, the highest July mark since 
1929. This price shows a gain of $6.90, 
or 73.8 per cent, over the same day 
last year. 

Hefers brought $14.75, also highest 
since 1929 and $6.00 over a year ago, 
an increase of 685 per cent. ‘Top 
hogs reached $12.75, a new eleven year 
high for the month, showing $1.60 
advance over 1936, or 143 per cent, 
while lambs at $11.75, highest since 
1929, were $1.25 above last year, a 
gain of 11.9 per cent. 

Post-holiday receipts of live stock 
fell below all expectations and 
brought a deluge of buying orders as 
additional gains up to 50 cents and 
$1.00 per hundred pounds were re- 
corded in wholesale meat channels. 


Day Bu Day Story of fhe _,*, 
Experimental Farms “9 


Trees Win Life Fight. 
July 6, 1937. 

HADE trees that were badly in- 
jured by fire when a horse barn 
burned on the Tribune’s Wheat- 
on farm in the spring of 1934 
have lived through two summers of 
severe drouth since the fire and now 
So per- 
sistent have been the trees in their 
fight for life that they have con- 


. vinced tree lovers at the farm of 
- their ability to make the best of the 


most trying circumstances. 

Most of these trees are ordinary 
~ ‘American elms and bur oaks. Except 
for their sentimental value they like- 


* ly would have been cut down and re- 


vr - 


4 


placed by new plantings. But they 
were a part of the farm’s family, 
‘with personalities all their own, and, 
- despite their scarred tops, they now 
far above more shapely 
trees that might easily have been 
ut sie docek 
ae es of these trees are expected 
make full recovery in a few more 
years: ‘Others may never regain their 
~ former shapes, but likely will live 
for a long time. 


. Free from Dicbeine. 


John Wallner, the farm’s head 
ey says the chief reason the 
red trees have made such re- 
recovery is that they were 

ratively free from disease and 
thrifty condition when the fire 

red. Although the bark was 

aly burned — on the sides 

: | to the fire, there 


"were narrow strips of bark left in. 
(soe Rede Mat 


i the fire. 


were burned off, less than the normal 
amount of plant food was needed for 
the parts that remained. The root 
systems were not harmed by the fire 
and were, therefore, able to supply 
more food than was needed for the 
foliage that was ieft. The rapid 
growth made by the trees since the 
fire has been a result of nature’s at- 
tempt to bring about a balance be- 
tween the root systems and the 
above ground portions of the plants, 
Mr. Wallner explains. 


New Growth Spreads. 

Some young American elms that 
were about thirty inches in circum- 
ference at the time of the fire had 
more than half the bark burned from 
their trunks. New growth has spread 
three inches in both directions from 
the sound bark, leaving strips only 
about ten inches wide yet to be cov- 
ered. Water sprouts sprang up 
around the bases of these trees as a 
result of the balance between the 
tops and the root systems being 
upset, but the sprouts have been cut 
back to allow the full strength from 
the roots to go to the tops. 

The burnt places have been kept 
painted to keep the wood from decay- 
ing until new bark could grow over 
the injured areas. 

Two Colorado fir trees actually 
were helped by the fire. They stood 
too far away from the barn to be 
badly burned, but some large oaks 
between them and the barn were de- 
stroyed. Evergreens, especially firs, 
are hermits by nature; they like to 
live alone. Now that the oaks are 
gone they get more sunlight and are 
making better growth than before 
They are putting out new 


branches near the surface of the 


s | ground and also in the tops. 


Regular quarterly dividends were 
| declared on Walgreen common, Na- 


mins common, Altorfer Brothers pre- 


4 
° 


sale 128 oi 
Gaby 11 y. reg St | 


i 39% 


eeeeveeee ene 


Minnea 

1.5 
1.49 
1.46 
1.3 


1.27KGis 

pete <1 

1.23 

oeee "Tsou et 

hd.... pats 
180" i 30 29% 


luth, Winnipeg. 
d.n ** ks 51 "ase 1.48 


eee 


Pagad 


Ss 


is. 
9 
56 
54 
0 @338 
Omaha 


eeeeeeeeen eer 


a 


a.d,..1.32 @33 


red... eeteeeeo ee eee 1.35 @36 
hd.... SII ae 


St. Louls. 
“sas 1.29% 


eee eeeaerree 


WI Fw eH tle moct He 


yel...1, a7a@se's 4. Ma "as 
yel... 24 
jae ke caves a2s%s 


<< ge 15 
h...  1.90%1.81 @33_ 
Omaha, 


Minneapolis, 


ne" Peoria. 


eeeeereeeere feeeeeeeee tee 


Pt DOG Coed 


yel...1.114%@14% 
OATS. 
Chicago. Kansas City. 
52 @52% 46 @B52 
49 @52 44 @50 


“Omaha, 


eeeneeoneeee® 


St. Louls. 


wh. 
wh... 


Minne 

bes 48% 

aeeeenveenee@ 4A6Y 
"oledo. 
544%4@55% 


" Winnipeg. 
66 


Crs Pow Wt 


914@00% 2s 
. 2 yellow i grew at $1.43% per bu, 


Chicago. 


| PRODUCE: MARKETS | 


Eggs, fresh, steady; receipts, 18,906 cases. 
Buiter, % cent to 1 cent a pound higher: 
receipts, 20,064 tubs. Fowls, live leghorn 
hens, steady to % cent a pound higher; re- 
ceipts, 29 trucks. Potatoes, stronger, re 
ceipts. 140 cars: on team track, 245 cars. 

Wholesale Creamery Butter Prices. 

——Chicago-— P 

Whole 

milk. 
93 score. .31% 
92 score,.30% 
91 score. .30% 
90 seore..30 
89 score. .29% 
88 score. .28% 


$7 ecore., ... yee 27% laa 
Wholesale Cheese Prices. 
Phila- 


ai New York. delphia. 


Flats ; 7\4- “18 
Twins 16 -16% 17 Y-17 
S.Dais. 16%4-16% 17%- is. “Ute 1 
Y.Am. 17%-18 
Lghns. Tela" 16% 
U. Government Graded Eggs. 
u. 8. cues framet White loose—30 cents 
U. S. Extras—[Large|—White Cart.—31 cents 
Live Poultry—Wholesale. 
18@ive Legh. hens . ee 
19@2 le. Old r'sters.. 121 Lea @1 sk 
2 ae ‘Turkeys ..:. 1 3@ Be 
eg ica eure se 
@i tie’ 
viet Eggs. 


New 
Yor k. 
3 


Cen- 
tralized. Boston. 
32 
31% 
31 
30 
29 


30% 
29% 


Chicago. 


Tt R/ 
7%, /& 


Extra firsts, 
Less than 

Fresh firsts, 
Less than 

Current receipts 


Storage packed eExtra® .....seseees scekvawe 


Do firsts 
Potatoes. $1.75@2.20 
California, 100 Ibs.........++- coe O1.70@2. 
North Carolina gies 
Arkansas 2.40 
Oklahoma 


50-60 ibs, 
70-80 Ibs 


GRAIN STATISTICS 


United States visibie supply of wheat in- 
creased 6,005,000 bu last week and corn 
589,000 bu. Oats decreased 379,000 bu; 
rye, 81.000 bu and barley, 275,000 bu. De 
tails follow: 
This week. 
Wheat ..16.201,000 
..«« 5,005,000 
. 1,747,000 
sees 1,350,000 - 431. 000 
Barley .. 3.299.000 3,5 4.000 
Chieago Grain Stocks, 
Wheat stocks in all positions in Chicago 
decreased 198,000 bu last week: oats, 224,000 
bu; rye. 53,000 bu and barley, 177,000 bu 
while corn increased 356,000 bu. Stocks 
in thousands of bushels follow: 
Public. Private: Total. Last yr. 
8 


Last. week. Last year. 
11,196,000 gritty 


1.258, 000 
8,935,000 


4 1 

‘ -Contract Grain Stocks. 

Contract grades of wheat in Chicago pub- 
lie elevators decreased 96,000 bu last week 
and corn 29,000 bu. Details follow: 

This week. Last week. Last year. 
594,000 mit yo 


| 92,000 
Soy beans .... 60. 000 45,000 104,000 


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES | 


| 
Wholesale prices ie less than car lots in 
Chicago, as reported by the bureau of agri- 

cultural economics: 
oe cb5 oes ihe .65 to $1.2 ao 


Apples, bu, Ulinois.. 
Asparagus, sq. crate, Aida ones ves 
bunch, 
Beans, string, bu, 
Cabbage, erate, Ti, ; 
Cantaloupes, erate, California. 
Carrots, crate, California....... 
Cauliflower, erate, California. . 
Celery, flat crate, Mich........ 
Corn, bu, Alabama... 
Cucumbers, bu, [llinois......... 
Eggplant, bu. Louisiana......-. 
Kohlrabi, bunch, tlinois........ 
Lettuce, leaf, bu, Ulinois....... 
Do head. crate, California. .. 
Mushrooms, 1 Ib et. Il.-Mich. 
Onions, green, bunch, linois. 
Do 50 Ib sack, California... 

Parsley, box, flinois 

Peaches, % bu, Georgia.......-. 
Peas, hamper. California... oe 
Peppers, hampers fora gsi 
Radishes, bunch, me grown. 
Rhubarb, 40 Ib a Tllinois. . 
Spinach, bu, lino oeveevre by ode 
Strawberries, 16 qt erate, Mich 

Do isc 


see eeeerer 


mi > & Sis 
noeSoe 


$233 


se, $ Ib | bas, “Til, Ind. 30 to 
Turnips, bunch, Minoir,,...,.. .02% to 


BENTON HARBOR FRUIT. 


anticmes pewae. ‘eases owe 6.—[ Spe- 


4 pints, 
coeeat A 
ts, $1.75 to $2. 


pints, | 


| Open. 
Kas. Ok ee 
3 -| Mpls 


: «| Wape Re 


BT 6 


ead 


1.42% 


2208 ig 
Tan 
130% yom 
1,89% 1.41 

“228 1.28 


’ 


46 
tLvpl of ai 
“ay 


B ec 
B Assad a1 ee 


Septemb: 
Kas. C. i. 20% 1.24 
Mpls .:1.40% 1.44 
*Dul 1.29 


eek 


October 
Fille Pg 1.43 
1.39% 1.40! 


Whea 
26% aim” 1.23% 
14a 1.38% 1.38% 


1.4 1.34 
pe 39% 1 37% 


Wheat. 
137 1.89 
typ 1.88 ip 39% 


Kas. ©. .1.21% 

aoe . 1.89 
Wnpg .1.34 

tLvypl .1.39% 


Kas. C..1.28 
Rtdm . .71% 
B A ere 54% 
August Corn, 
ead 54% ps 
ptember 
Kas. C..1.14% get Sree "1.15% 
December Corn. 
845 81%  .83% 
July Oats. 
A7 45% 
66% 64% 
September _— 
.64 
October nob 
56% Hb 
ee — ; 


B Asses 54% 


81% 


45% 
65% 


- 63% 


Kas, © 


45% 


Mpls. 
vs 86% 


Wnpge . 
Mpls 


Wnpgs . 55% 
Woops 

Mpls 

fo, Berea 
Wnpg . 


Mols 
Dul 


October Rye. 
Wnpg .1.038% : 1.08% 1.038% 1.05% 


Wnps 


Mple 
Wnpg 


Mpls 
Wnpg 


Mols 


BME. a6 4 

Wopg Bi ‘80% i ‘84% i. ‘20% 1. RI% 

B A....1.380% 1.381% 1.30% 130% 
August Flaxseed. 

B A....1.30% 1.30% 1.30 1.30% 


Moles 
Dul 


September Viaxseed, 
,. 2,03 2.04 2.02 2.0 
..2.04 ° 04 2.04 2 04 
October Flaxseed. 
Wnpe .1.80 1.86% 1.80 1.83 
December Flaxseed. 
Wnpge .1.80% 1.84 1.80% 1.82% 
$4.95; 


-_ 


*Durum., tExchange, 
4.96. 


1.05% 
1.03% 


63% 
172 


1.83 


Saturday. 


2 
July. 
..2,806 


July 
LOn ou Dec. 


Sept. 
11,716 


Wheat $2,161 


Soy beans 


Grand total 
Oven: Grain Trades. 
Sept. Dec. 


Wheat 66,898 20,898 


Corn, 


Soy beans 


Grand total 
*October. 


Corn, bu. 
637 .000 
433,000 
649,000 
138.000 


140,000 
126,000 
385,000 
164 ,000 


Receipis— Wheat, bu. 
Tuesday .. 9,049,000 
Week ago. ..1,860,000 
2,614,000 

481,000 


794,000 

. 628,000 
. 1,263,000 
301.000 


William C. Spumante 
resident 
Frederick N. Mercer 
Vice-President 
Geor « Malcolm 
Vice- Tes. hier 
Dale E. ce 1 velgag 
Vice-Presi 
Frank M. ob 
Asst. Cashier 
Robert Lough 
Asst. Cashier 
- 


Directors 


William C. Cummings 
John P. Oleson 
Joseph E, Otis 

G. F, Swift 
Henry Veeder 
Rawleigh Warner 
Charles Aaron 
Dale E. Chamberlin 
George A. Malcolm 
Frederick N. Mercer 


Officers | 


BOARD OF TRADE SALES. 


in thousands of bushels.] 


Total. 
46, 683 


34, 005 
18.516 
9,000 
1,481 


149,764 
PRIMARY GRAIN MOVEMENT. 


Oats. bu. 
129,000 


77,000 


134,000 


60,000 


41.000 


78,000 
136.000 | $6@8. Rye straw, rail. $8@10: 
146,000 | Marsh hay, 


Loans and Discounts . . 

U.S. Government Bonds . 
Other Bonds and Securities 
Federal Reserve Bank Stock 
Overdrafts 


Cash and Due ates Banks 


Capital Stock . . .» « 
Surplus and Profits . .s » 
Reserved for Taxes, etc. + 
Reserved for Unearned Interest 13,400.31 
Dividend (Payable July 1, 1937) 15,000.00 


Deposits 


; aneeeee. 


re pre AYO sseceseeee 


National Union Radio capri net 


| income of $47,548 for the year ended 


April 30 after interest, depreciation, 
federal income, and undistributed 
profits taxes, and a special writedown 
of $45,476 on equipment no longer 
used. This compared. with a net loss of 
$90,434 for the preceding fiscal year. 

“There has been an increase in 
volume of sales and prices have ad- 
vanced in some cases,” said the re- 
port of S. W. Muldowny, chairman, 
and Harold R. Peters, president. 


| “The results of the general recovery 


are reflected inthe company’s im- 
proved condition. Opportunities for 
further price increases are limited, 


“~however, as competition for business 


is keen. 
. Progress in Research. 


“During the year we have made 
additional progress in research work 
on cathode ray and other tubes neces- 
sary for television work. 

“It is the expectation of the com- 
pany that improving general business 
conditions will be reflected in an in- 
creased desire for radio sets and 
tubes and it is felt that the company 
is in a position to take advantage of 
any such increase.” 

Raytheon Manufacturing reported 
net profit of $151,277 for the year 
ended May 31 after federal income 
taxes, depreciation, and other deduc- 
tions, including provision of $157,375 
for disputed royalties, against a net 
loss of $80,823 in the preceding fiscal 
year, 

Earns 46 Cents a Share. 


The profit for the year ended in 
1937 was equal to 46 cents a share 
on the common after annual dividend 
requirements on the 6 per cent pre- 
ferred. 

No provision was made for surtax 
on undistributed profits due to the 
loan agreement of subsidiaries re- 
stricting dividend payments and no 
provision was made for legal expenses 
in connection with pending litigation 
as the amount was not determinable 
at May 31, 1937, the company said. 

Earnings reported yesterday were 
as follows: 


FOUR MONTHS ENDED APRIL 30. 
Net Income——— 


Kingsbury Brew...$ 20.8 
YEAR ENDED APRIL 30. 
Nat Union Radio. 47.348 
FIVE MONTH iS ENDED MAY 31 
tCosden Oj] ...... *54,769 PPE LS Rae 
Norfolk Southern .. *194.496 *274,185 
YEAR ENDED MAY 31 
Raytheon Mfg pe *80,823 
Utilities Empl Secur 7.684 300,999 
b prcmel ENDED MARC H 31, 
Carnegie Meta 72 
CQUARTER ‘ENDED APRIL 30. 
Kennedy's Ine 56,616 
JUNE. 
Pioneer Gold Mines 102,000 
"Net loss. 
tConsolidated statement of Cosden Oil 
for four months and Cosden Petr. for five 


months. 
7Before depreciation, depletion and taxes. 


HAY MARKET. 


131,000 


No. 1, No. 2. No. 3. 
. 817@18 $15@16 $10@12 
15@16 13@14 9@11 
15@17 12@14 8@10 
$7@8:; truck, 
truck, $8@9. 
rails, $7@10; truck, $6@9. 
Receipts. 4 cars tame hay. 1 car rye straw. 


Timothy, rail 
Do, truck 
Clover, rail 

Oats and wheat straw. rail. 


oe Cee en A ee et re er te a ee a 


BROVERS 


NATIONAL BANK 
TRUST&@SAVINGS BANK 


Union Stock Yards—Chicago 


Statements of Condition 
June 30, 1937 


Drovers National Bank 


RESOURCES 
$ 3,566,405.41 
9,144,296.01 
2,179,516.88 
47,100.00 
4,798.80 
. 15,842,855.63 


$30,784,972.73 


LIABILITIES 

» $ 1,000,000.00 
890,262.06 
509,146.81 


28,357,163.55 
$30,784,972.73 


Oficers —_| 


William C, Cummings 
President 
es N. Mercer | 
ee 
edge M. Otstott 
Vice Pras. @ Cashier 
Charles S. Brintnall 
Vice-President 
Cassius A. Newman 
Asst. Cashier 


Loans and Discounts. . 
U.S. Government Bonds . 
Notes of the Reconstruction 


ance 


Other Bonds and Securities 


| Drovers Trust and Savings Bank 


RESOURCES 
. $ 4,132,908.83 
4,967,765.98 


300,000.00 
1,238,345.09 
1,073,330.46 

$11,712,350.36 


LIABILITIES 


tion . 


~ Terminal 


4 Mutual NO Ngee Oy ele 2 


National ‘Builders Bank, aS | 
National rag te chistes one 
North Shore 
South East 


eeecerevee . 5,982,000 
STATE BANKS. 


2,816,000 $ 2,442,000 $ 
7,397,000 | 


Upper Avenue ...........» 1,209,000 1,186,000 


867,000 $ 
947,000 
633,000 
1,031,000 
188,000 
8,692,000 
898,000 
4,133,000 
255,000 
79,000 
53,601,000 
- 864,000 
3,704,000 
1,619,000 
1,743,000 
4,941,000 
156,000 
45,496,000 
8,916,000 
3,998,000 
1,260,000 
2,108,000 
220,000 
1,609,000 
791,000 
1,010,000 
1,705,000 
85,000 


781,000 $ 
883,000 
569,000 
1,118,000 

199,000 « 
7,781,000 
705,000 
3,588,000 
241,000 
78,000 
50,744,000 
282,000 
3,225,000 
1,638,000 
1,710,000 
4,171,000 
153,000 
41,386,000 
8,261,000 
3,644,000 
1,148,000 
2,069,000 
156,000 
1,423,000 
602,000 
1,011,000 
1,388,000 
79,000 


ROOM  Kincececks Gecsteeesaee® 
Amalgamated T & S...... 

Austin eee eee sewer eeneeee 

Banco De Napoli T Cee 

Beverly State Sav........ 

Chicago City 
Dreveta Breet: oo cisscscess 
East Side T & 8. .ccscsees 
Hamilton oe eeeeereeeeeteee 
Harris TT & Bust canbe eedes 
Kaspar American 
Lake Shore T & S....00. 
Lake View T & 8S......:. 
Main 
Mercantile T & S.....00. 
Metropolitan 
Northern Trust Co........ 
Personal Loan & Sav.... 
PU. ciiiccsanskuheee 
Pullman T & S...... 
Sears Community State.. 
oS IG Fae Ss eginnaee 
South Chicago Sav....... 
State Bank of Clearing... 
WIV OROU So kcccicnscedesee 
Uptown .. 
West Sist Street.......... 


eeeeeeeeeee ee 


194,007,000 
1,948,000 
10,212,000 
22,722,000 
5,326,000 
11,880,000 
2,808,000 
277,767,000 
4,717,000 - 
14,943,000 
7,441,000 
8,224,000° 
2,614,000 
6,606,000 
2,182,000 
5,465,000 
6,951,000 
605,000 


11,322,000 
25,125,000 
6,005,000 
15,923,000 
3,077,000 
311,760,000 
5,288,000 
16,063,000 
8,183,000 
8,855,000 
2,761,000 
7,490,000 
2,245,000 
5,859,000 
7,474,000 
675,000 


* 
**#eeeeeeveaeeee 


een eevee eeeeaeeee 


aT 


497 000 $ 
2,544,000 
986,000 
1,343,000 
420,000 
9,726,000 
2,363,000 
1,073,000 
344,000 
1,396,000 
70,214,000 
715,000 
3,622,000 
9,708,000 
1,958,000 
5,573,000 
922,000 
92,438,000 
609,000 
4,340,000 
1,907,000 
2,538,000 
626,000 
2,186,000 
698,000 
1,721,000 
2,054,000 
321,000 


56,317,000 
687,000 
3,042,000 
8,318,000 
1,576,000 
3,449,000 
841,000 
73,913,000 
430,000 
3,858,000. 
1,455,000 
2,380,000 
617,000 
1,841,000 
804,000 
1,369,000 
1,687,000 
295,000 


2,287,000 
4,305,000 
956,000 
3,050,000 
3,278,000 
480,000 


CHICAGO LIVE STOCK 


All prices are in —_ per 100 pounds: 
0 


Receipts, 12,000: shipments. 3.000. 
Good to choice, 140 @180 Ibs .$12.25@12. 
Good to choice, 190@210 Ibs... 12. 65@12. 7B 
Good to choice, 220@250 ibs.. 12.55@12.7 
Good to choice, 260@325 Ibs... 11.90@12.75 
Good to choice, 3560@400 lbs... 11.25@11.75 
Light pack. sows, 270@350 Ibs. 10.90@11.25 
Hvyy. pack. sows, 350@550 lbs. 10.50@11.00 
Pigs, common to best 4.75@11.75 

Cattle. 

Receipts, 11,000; shipments, 2,U00. 
Prime steers, 1,000@1,500 1bs.$15.0U0@16.65 
Good to best, 700@1,000 Ibs.. 13.75@15.65 
Poor to best, 700@1,500 Ibs.... 8.00@16.65 
Low grade steers 5.00@ 7.75 
Bulk of steers.......... eeesecce Beene 
Cows, choice to prime.,........ 9.00@10.50 
Cows, good to choice........... 7.60@ 9.00 
Cows, fair to good....... vedecee) DOG Lee 
Cows, common to fair 5.25@ 5.85 
Canners and cutters 3.50@ 6.15 
Hefers, yearlings, fair to best.. 8.50@14.75 
Hefers, common to fair 5.85@ 8.50 
Stockers and feeders............ 6.15@10.85 
Calves, poor to best 5.25@10.00 
Bulls, bologna,*com to choice. 5 50@ 7.15 
Bulls, beef, butch, fair to best 6.85@10. 25 


Everyday Economics 


“* Pig Iron.” 

Basic materials used in making pig 
iron, an intermediate product in the 
process of making steel, are iron ore, 
scrap metal, limestone, and coke. 
Some of these materials frequently 
are transported long distances from 
the steel mill, although companies 
try to locate their plants near both 
raw materials and markets as far as 
possible. 

Big companies usually have their 
own iron ore mines. This gives them 
an advantage over the small com- 
panies which depend on scrap metal 
or supplies of iron ore controled by 
big concerns. The larger companies 
can use iron ore when the price of 
scrap metal is high and scrap metal 
when it is cheap. Frequently both 
materials are used at the same time. 
the percentage of each varying with 
the market price. 

Raw materials are placed together 
in a big furnace in proportions care- 
fully measured by automatic devices. 
Usually the materials are put into 
the furnace in alternate layers so 
they can mix freely when the coke 
1s ignited by blasts of hot air. The 
limestone helps the chemical reaction 
in the furnace to take place. 

The molten iron settles to the bot- 
tom and is drawn off. This is the 
“pig iron” which is later refined 
into steel. The name “ pig iron” was 
adopted many years ago when the 
hot, liquid iron was allowed to run 
along a channel in the earthern floor 
of a casting room into small impres- 
sions or molds leading off from the 
channel. Some one suggested that 
the little molds along the channel 
looked like pigs eating out of a 
trough. 


Sheep. 

Receipts, 56,000; shipments, 50U. 
Native lambs, fair to best.....$10.75@11.75 
Native lambs, common to fair 9.75@1U.75 
Native buck lambs, fair to best 9.75@1U.75 
Native lambs, culls............. 8.50@ 9.75 
West. range lambe, good to ch. 11.50@11.75 
West. range lambs, fair to good 10.75@11.50 
Feeding lambs, best grade 8.00@ 9.50 
Ewes, light, good to choice.. 4.00@ 4.50 
Ewes, heavy, 150@250 Ibs . 3.00@ 3.50 
Ewes, culls to fair 2.00@ 3.00 
Ewes, heavy, 1504 3.00@ 3.50 
Yearlings, wethers 5.00@ 9.00 
Bucks ..... pa deta wae keke ss 2.00@ 3.00 

Comparative Prices. 

HOGS—Bulk of sales yesterday.$11. 00@12.7U 
One month ago ; , 
One year ago 
Top yesterday, $12. 758; ‘average, 

CATTLE—Bulk of sales Leese 

day ; $12, ooo 4 
One month ago 
One year ago 
Top yesterday, $16.25: "average, 

LAMBS—Bulk of sales yester- 

day 
One month ago. 

One year ago 9.75@10.25 
Top yesterday, $11. 75: _ average, $11.35. 


” OHICAGO CURB. 
Prev. 


Sales. High. Low. Close. close. 
Campana Gold.1,600 
Heid Brew Co. 100 
Mpls Brew Co. 50 GF 
Pkebre R&R 135 29% 


$4. 00. 


$11.25@11.50 
11.25@13.00 


NAVAL STORES. 


SAVANNAH, Ga., July 6.—(P\—~TURPEN- 
TIN E—Firm, 34c per gal: van 332. vasks: 
receipts, 644: shipments, 257: stock, 28,435. 
ROSIN—Firm: sales, 915 lots of 280 Tbs; 
receipts, 2,302; shipments, 682; stock, 61,- 
820. Quote: B, D and E, $7 38: F, G, H 
— 1, $7.90: K ‘and M, $994; N, $7.93: 

38. 05: ww and Xx, $8.9 


TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
OF THE TRIBUNE. 


Order for mail subscription must a ac- 
companied by remittance to cover 

Rates in Hiinois {| outside Chicago), In- 
diana, Iowa, Michigan, and Wisconsin: 
Daily, without Sunday, one year. $5.00: six 
months, $2.50; three months, $1.25: two 
months, $1.00: one month. 50 ce 

Daily. with Sunday. one year. 32. ‘50: six 


nan the $6.25: three months G4 
Sunday only, one year, $7.5 Pen month, 


Rates of subscription in postal zones 3 and 
4 [measured from Chicago]. outside of Tili- 
nois, Indiana, Towa, Michigan. and Wisconsin :‘ 

Daily, without Sunday. one year, $7.50: 


one month 
panes only, one year. $7.50: one month, 
Titty and Sunda one year, $15. 
month. $2.00. eis naam ben Sd aman 
and 


ates of subscription in zones 5. 6. 7. 
oad pesatunes from Chicago], Canada and 


Daily without Sunday. one year, $12.00; 

one month. $1.5 
Pandey only, one year, $7.50: one month, 
$19.50: one 


$25.00 per 
year’ with Sunday 

Give postoffive address in full.  tealiding 
county and state. Remit im express money 
order, draft. or im registered letter. at our 
risk. to The Tribune a pad publishers, 
Tribune Square. Chicag 

We cannot be nebo for currency sent 
through the mail. 

Persons wishing to take The Tribtme b= 
carrier may order it by postal card or tele 
phone Superior 0100. When delivery ie 
irregular make complaint. 

All unsolicited manuscripts, articles. letters 
and pictures sent to ae Tribune are sent 
at‘ the owner’s risk. and The Tribune com- 
pany expressly repudiates any liability or re- 
sponsibility for their safe custody or return. 


MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED 
PRESS. 

The Associatec Press is exclusively en- 
titled to the use for publication of all 
news dispatches credited to it or not 
otherwise credited to this paper, and also 
to the local news published herein. 

All rights of republication of special 
dispatches herein also are reserved, 


Daily and Sunday. one year, 
month, $2.50. 
Foreign: “Daily Peete oar wae 


inal 


i 


i aan S wees. tie 
——— a ee ae a a 
a SS OS a a 


| i ae 


eee eee eee eee eee 
eT Nn ET ae” et lt gel ae” ae a Ea el 


RESOURCES 


Cas anp Due rrom BAwKsS ..... 
U. S. Government OsLiGaTions, prRECT AND FULLY 
OPARAMTUNS Gs ee GG 

STaTE anp Mumicreat Securiress . ..... 

Orger Bowps awn Securiti1rs ....... 
Leans, Discovwrs Anp BANKERS’ ACCEPTANCES 
Banwinc Hevses ....... 

Orner Rear Estats.. Negerany 

NeWeTOAUEe oS ee 

Customers’ AccePrance LIARSLITY 

Orage Assets oe SS 


LIABILITIES 
CariraL Funps: 
CAPITAL Stock . i 
Susstee = «°° * 
Unpivipep Prorits 


THE CHASE 
NATIONAL BANK 


OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK 


Statement of Condition, June 30, 


$100 270,000.08 
100,270,000.00 
_ 27,949,972.58 


| 


1937 


~ $ 685,719,656.00 


648 839,776.85 
59 046,899.34 
160,690, 742.31 
809 9°78 015.46 
38 006,949.27 
4,901 381.97 
11,965,269.58 
25 080,275.32 
12,325,458.04 


$2,426,554,424.64 


Oe 
teat “ 
an - . 


e . ° * . e # * « e * ° a 


Accerramons OvTsvTAMbineg. «0. 1. 6 6 ck 
LIABILITY AS Enporser oN ACCEPTANCES AND 
Orwer LIABILITIES 


oe eee 6 6 8 tee eG 


Foreicn Bits 


$ m8 sans 


eels yg Ak ag ao “Sag: est ta oF 
Ba cg tO PORE NTT te See Se ee a's PINS. GOES : ce ot +i 
a lh EI 2 APS oat Se Wha ise FEED a NS Ree pry a we vA 
». ene ne ot Bet * < _ > ae : “5 
. 


- 
gmaeieeees 


Bhan, « jndogs’ 5 © debwcthinege: “rey 
Lh Pe gp OE Sr say 


Sereee 


come fafa fo yh cpenses re ee : 
ee aeiats Seits Se nese poe et me ea 
ood y the | : Or 
States department of commerce. | The June passenger-mile mark 8) : | | 
"The housewife need haul in by the | ?-* sy" pnp hte yte ar gg shat 
heels none of those irrelevant argu-| !"° . pe | ; Reva st : 
ments that she customarily uses to | °° its June, 1936, figure of 8,210,000. )1owa: Fair Wednesday, ‘except possibly 1ocal Atlanta eet eol 
clinch her case—the pertinent evi- It carried 28,121 passengers in May| thundershowers in northwest in late after. Boatc , lear. +s -+seee-s: 
dence is overwhelmingly on her side. | @n@ 72551 In June, 1936. In June, payee coe Bicng east Wednes- | Ruffalo, olen. 0.0... 
Ang if tive mnie 18 1h aise doubt ox 10 | 280% the lina, hatidled only 9,005 pas | O06 To Tr oo ar ccedesmemts Qeeaos lon 
the reason for the increasing fre- | 5°28¢r*: and somewhat cooler in west and north, | Pittshurgh, clondy.... 
quency with which creamed tunafish| During the first six months of this |wiNNBSOTA: Generally fair in northwest, Raleigh. vain... rates ‘ 

Gulf states— Bar ter 3 and change. 


and meatless macaroni dishes are set | Year American ‘transported 129, 935| possibly scatiered thundershowers in east 
before him, let. him refer [in private] revenue passengers a total of 54,026,- and south, somewhat cooler Wednesday ; PE ERGs 8 a aie yor we Pacey 
to the, labor department’s findings. ». | OOF passenger-miles, compared with tages mites po mest caathngad in sorth- ieee = ae fa ‘ Ee Dowling See Bus. pivec.: 
teak 97,783 passengers and 36,482,000. pas- ag opty oS 4 Froage 7 ng ie clacgenermeugeune 
oR for each 15 held. . Gen Ho ouseho} aie Round s Now Kingly Dish. cs KANSAS: Generally tair Wednesday and aso, OPT ys2 04 sa Ee ac OC aid 
‘of ‘one new share ; senger-miles in the first half of 1936.| inisaay: continued warm. of tt ade mace retense ie apy [Pa e : 
eS! os 0 Sere st beeen ewnseene 


eee ee 50 4 
Approve Plan for Officials. Gt Laken (3.400) (ia B80 + apr dani Pave oti wert | The respective increases amount tO/ NoRTH DAKOTA: Generally tair Wednesday | Galveston. clear 
given to an ex- Harnischfeger basic item on the American dinner | 559 ana 48.1 per cent aiid Phnvahey: “wouleWhat aaciex: ta conse | Cimak: HAUOE eto t Partnerships and Tvestineiits ihe 

Approval also was : Heileman @ Brew [1]. 500 9 table, is selling at retail at approxi-| “*: 4, nectar  -aoute: Distriimito anne 


SRR 


we 


2 epee te 
sei 3 


- 
o 
2-IQ-I-4 
OOP) 


-* 
* 


+ : Sete ste Sa 
ee nrerseree 


= 
~ 


3: Cord Pie es Bee eee 
19  Seanlaen D S [1,60]. 
Curtis L 


ene maseseeeee 


eae 


aiatee 
a 


te 
eee 
F4+e+4444 1 Fer 
we 


-R RR LFS RS 


neta ceceeceneaneeddee cas eeeeees: 


“Ring it 


IZ Pig! 
. 3 


. sae endset esecesereedasacenss 


ne 
rf) 
= 


. cceeeenseeeaeeeeeeees 32 
severe reveoene inte s i tcdaioaleune 


sae ervee seawater a etwoeearsee es 


fea House Trailers 
Ex ibiage the yeas 


= 
eaedares azaae 


ne 
e2 


eosin! from 1,150,000 to 1,500,000 
-ghares, of which 64,019 shares will be 
offered to present common share- 400 
holders at $17 a share in the ratio Pi Finance. ee 1.800 


co 
PW 1 
~ 


OPPO OOD 
PAD Pw 


~ 
a = 


Om DO 


if 2] 


$3 

© Sip 
a 
> 
~ a 


CoO: 
ann 
Say 


: too@e: 


oc hactnneaecene = 


usiness ‘Directory pean oe awe. 
Cameras and Optical Gcods "[ See cae 


T sevtes Oh ark rwectes smh ane VKas ere 


oterie Cacoaeaqyees <aaam 
Clothing. "Pure. @ROt Lccckcunsdesdenederae 
Saba oaneg . eeeveteereseee @ +t 


I 


bal el ¥ Ie: 


‘+ MINK ow-~a 
#3 


eee “PULA 
JO wor} Oe2Ig 
*ganoy $Z% 


te] UOIY}idIoeg 


Dors, Cate. Birds. Poultry. ate. 
Dressmaling and Millinery "Schools. + "31 
mplox ment Acencies—Men. tear centeee 
Employmept Agencies—Women....+++-: 
Employment Agrencies—Women........+ 
Finayeinl Service 

Puneral Servic@. 2... ccc cccescvesccoees 
= Wanted—Men. eveteeese at 


7 AH PODS: 


ms 


"Wi 'd OF L “dumaz, 
eeee *£epo} }S0N S18 


‘VUZ1U 18B] }SeMO7 


= 


Cepmeo 


44 sili aes 


© + NO Bs WOR 
FOS. ©: 


>»: oe “toro 
eo: &: CRA 


QO WRG — AID GOI MLIA CNMI Go AOA ATOG PP DOH GO -~BARGTAIED ADWE-J--1 905 


50 

Heller pfd xw [1.75]. : mately 40 cents a pound, It has risen 000 passenger-miles flown last month.| warmer Thursday, , | dan Antonio. clowde 

$25 each to specified executives. Most 4 
Cee ae . ; last six weeks and more than 18 per over the figure of 9,185,000 in May, Se” aed 
‘The New York Central railroad 
Ken Rad T&L [.375].. ; ; : in 1933. Eastern Airlines reported that 11,-| July 6. 6:30 vp. m, 
verti bon Ye 
cent con oie saodh rand nigh La Salle Ext ...ssesers 4\respondingly. Sirloin steak, of which Miles © 
E. , 8 ta Fe, 

$1,211,800 remaining will be redeemed hie hd OE es. 2 4 some 44 cents a pound, when it sells. Cairo, clear 86 88 72. anta Fe, clou 

TOUdON Pack .isssssoee general manager. veland age Boker & +e. ae Fresno. clear 
registration statement with the Se- 

Merch & Mirs A {.60). centage increase in price mounts to 
of $1 par common stock to be issued 

Lost and Foun 

railroad ked the interstat Rat Battery pid. “f {| BASES Be IORy EO On Bown: threesn Y Motorevcles and. RBieycles 
) as e interstate: com- 

: 31 

Bet icapeien 1 that pork chops were selling for an Painting ard toverntlanthoe: ‘ni 

f 90 

amount of 5 per cent 50 year goid ee ee 2 ‘ «| cost in June, 1933. In the last year | | Printing Machinery and Supplies. vee RD 


Horders [1a] .......-..-- e th 
by slightly more than 4 per cent in the | nis represents a gain of 22 per cent Bhrevengrt, “ondy... 
of the new funds \ ne at cent in the last year. The labor de- 
caeauate ae genet toon that | 1936, and 6 per cent over the 10,694,- ee ee ee 
announced that $58,699,300 of a total 
os Sg a etapa : : Other cuts of beef have risen cor- | 985 revenue passengers were carried | gnicago daylight time. 
been turned in for conversion when : ee % : Y% : *| many American males have- forgot- per cent above the May, 1937, figure i aia amen, Pueblo. clost 
wits tat elon ry month in the company’s history, ac- Gitccee Maar 34 ‘| Yel’stone. “Pk. Tie: 
at 102 nterest to June 
Lynch Corp [2a] .. bs on May 18 and 18.7 per cent more 
ion in 
curities and Exchange commission weal Ay +1 aati 
® : 4 Do seeeeeeee ‘ 
mrwagh Voting trust certiicates: ) : Midl Uil 7% Dl 2 ;: ‘| Why Pork Chops Have Disappeared. : Lost ‘and Bound oo. 
Nat Battery pfd [2. 20). 
“merce commission for authority to 
| Peabody Coal B ’ : ' lj 
bonds now outstanding. Penn Ei Sw wy 201. * iy 8% + % the price has risen 9.4 per cent; in NATION BANK AND | Radio. Supplier. and Service......... 
ae Windle’ sc ase ak Sh + %|the last two months 9.5 per cent. iH AL | ait Apartment Buildings ......+--s-+e0--3 
et 


10 
sear stock subscription plan call- United Air Lines reported 11,200,-| east, warmer in northwest Wednesday; ha gg -eloudy....8. 
for issuance of 35,980 shares at 
Hupp Mot ..cscecssesnee Tass cee 
working capital. 
& tae 8 ther. 
Eelloge Switch {.45¢). n+ it is now double in price what it was | 900 passenger miles in June, 1936. ante Ae Oe 
issue of $59,911,100 of 10-year 6 per 
pg vo? gale on its routes in June. This is 10 Miles gee paps 
cle ee 
Creameri + America. Inc. filed tion 2 eo [lal Luly 4 é It costs 4 per cent more than it did cording to Capt. E. V. Rickenbacker, Cincinnati. Car .vavece * 64 °-'| pacific Sia 
eries 0 erica, ‘ a tes— 
Marsh Field 46 f than at this time last year. The per- 
Washington covering 506,647 shares Mickelberry’s Fd .... 1 . 63.9 when a comparison is made with y hy, EEE = ‘ Jowel ¥, Od 6 
Poe een, ens 8k BA + | 1088 f 3 Loses. igh, a aba 
eeeeee ‘ = 
Seek to Refund Bonds. Modine [2] .... : : ; Should the skepticism of the male ij Mortszages [See Real Estate Loans]... 32 
Cleveland and Mahoning Valley | Moving, Storage {See Business Direc. 7.32 
Nat Rep Inv pid ..... 40 4 2 | the list of meat items included in the 7 ff 7 Musical and Dramatic 
). Nat-Stand [1.600] : ‘ 5, department’s survey. He will find | : Ht ier ate aan ‘Wecics 
issue $2,936,000 of first mortgage 4 , ‘o Sonlitttnathe (3). 39% 4 : ; Ht ntine and, 
per cent refunding bonds, maturing ” ge No West Ut 7% pid... Po ‘ ws average price of 37.6 cents a pound i | Personal 
July 1, 1962, to retire a similar : ss : Ror'west Saamee. see ox.|on June 15—-more than double their il Pane aheain Huston) heeeaeer 1: 
% 
Star Gas company, 
The Lone. Star pany Pines Winter ... cesses Pusiners + Bald 


1S: 
02-3: & 


a declaration with the Securities and Quaker Oats [5]..... | 110%+ ended June 15, but the change is de- 


Exchange commission under the hold- Schwitzer Cumm ; . %  20%-+ ceptive. The seasonal decline in the it Suburban 
ing company act for approval of bank + riggs 1 t “y| Price of fresh vegetables and dairy | OF CHICAGO | Wisaeta =o .. 252. cas Ahi Ke See. 


: k C B (1.20). 
loans of $16,000,000. Substantially all Signede Steel {2.50}. ..| products was responsible for carry- | Farm Landa. ---- 
proceeds, it was said, will be used | str 
For Exchange 


224 So Bend 1. Wee tt. 60}. Bee %4|ing the composite price down. Virtu- | Wan 
to retire present outstanding bank owe f -i ally all items included in the price “ae | 
4 nia Std Dredg =? ; 4 L . Mort 
loans. : Do pid : 18 A survey are selling well above a year Statement of Condttion, june 39, 1937 Scales vat 

A; 8.000,000' security | transection eo eon 11381. 54° 934% 24 + %| 880. Sixty of the 84 articles for | Sate deeds 
by the Detroit City Gas company is Gwitt Int [2]... 3: which records are kept also advanced } | Stocks and Bonds 32 
exempt from the Public Utility Hold- 3 rane Co [.50¢] ..... | “+ © | during the 4 weeks ended June 15, | Stoves [Bee Household Appliances]. .32 
ing company act, the S. E. C. an- 9 n eee Util & Ind. pebines 1 Insofar aS meat is concerned the RESOURCES 1 Ragen 
nounced. if : Do pid + %! outlook is far from promising. The Een Be and Suburban] 


ee 8 wi Bankshrs ....++- § cine . q : 
COTTON oe . Woodail’ Indust oe 1 10%+ % the big reduction in the live stock : ; i pevedem vont Ror peeenee eee 
Zenith Rad {1¢) ..... 88 : 34%-+ 1%| population which resulted from the United States Government Obligations, ii ae Apartments 31 


+First sale since ex dividend date or dates, xr—Ex rights, a—Also feed shortage in the recent drouth ' Direct and Fully Guaranteed é 487,180,823.91 


yesterday dividend. 
ee gag rltggpe took markets | exira or extras. e—Paid last year, f—Payable in stock. ¢§- -Declared or paid so far this| years and the government’s effort to hae 8 
and this class of buying was largely re-| calendar year. h—Cash or stock. k—Accumulated dividend paid or declared this calendar| eet the problem by slaughtering Other Bonds and Securities 61,781,876.10 i Travel ack tras 
rage ;< 0ois—MeNn 


spoysible for the active deliveries showing | year. thousands of -animals and paying . i sclaniees van ve v0 st 
dert and closing at f if Trade Schools—Women 
. aggre 2a go cock sed owe aes farmers to destroy millions of pigs Loans and Discounts ° . 229,617,069.52 | Mtl Ag ye [See Hshid. Appl.]. 33 


pound. Easiness in Liverpool was offset and sows. | Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 2,730,000.00 
to a considerable extent by unwanted rains reported sales totaling $2,804,531, a - P R ‘ 
in the southeastern part of the main belt. N A TI ON AL CASH gain of 6.9 per cent over June, 1936. MEMBER BANK REPORT Customers’ Liability on Acceptances 662,435.69 


Department of agriculture estimate will be Sales for the first five 1937 months, at 


he officia! estimate on the Argentine cot- RE Gl > TE R ORDERS $12,877,860, were 11.3 per cent above ASSETS. Other Banks’ Liability on Bills Purchased 17,263.60 Reply by phone as well as by let- 


fon. crop placed the prospective yield at the same 1936 period Tuan a, Hekeet debs 

1 ad with 367,000 bale : . 30, 23, ‘ 
180,000 Dales, comparnd cotton coved 05| RISE DURING JUNE}: mckesson & Robbins, wholesalers} stu gion soe sia 328 a Income Accrued but Not Collected . 3,144,868.95 tet may be siate te ong, Sematse 
to .10 cent higher with New Orleans, 12.45 and manufacturers of drug products, | oans—toial 9,760 9,766 8.460 Banking House ° $ 13,350,000.00 address except Help Wanted ad- 


cents; New York, 12.55 cents, and Houston } 
and Galvest t 1225 cents a pound. reported sales totaling $13,503,872 for! Commercial, indus., a 
Prices follow: P May, a rise of 19.3 per cent over May,| s#ricultura’ toans: cna Real Estate Owned other than ‘Sckinn } Lecat 7, Yous auuaai: te roe 

Chicago Board of Trade. Chain Stores Report 1936. Sales for the first five months; Otherwise secured | House. : : 3.947, 78 wr cerdegan Beeps. yy ~ 


Prev. : 
High. Low. Close. close. were $70,131,017, a gain of 18.2 per cent and unsecured.... 55 8,742, | i} ence in the box of the advertice:. 


” ; " ; . é | Open market paper 46 465 | 
11.87 1198 a3 23 Gains in Sales. over the comparable 1936 figure. penal stg te: atl igen | $1,136,237,901.40 it $100.00 Reward 
11.90 11.94 11.93 National Cash Register company Fruehauf Trailer company, Detroit,; dealers in securities 1,447 1,444 2 if . 
12.15 12.18 12.18 Dayton, O., yesterday reported a ps reported sales for the five months vor cat's securities wad ore } oe paid by the Tribune for in- 
New Orleans Cotton Exchange. eM Aes ' ..j ended May 31, of $4,952,000, compared ta 1169 1.171 = fl ormation leading to the arrest and 
crease of 6.6 per cent in gross domestic , ’ Real estate jJoans. py 
: Se = 11.93 var sechsah: See Fa ra whe with the with $2,885,000 in the same 1936 pt SS ep eee 98 142 62 * cemviction of any one obtaining 
E ‘ wr ioans* a. 2 
128 eee i211 1206|8ame month last year, but for the period, an increase of 71.6 per cent. |“ On securities...... 736 720 LIABILITIES a Ai cahtamde eee Want 
12.18 12.11 12.15 12.11| six months had an increase of 24.9 Sales Totals Compared. ee go oe . . P 616. | 24-Hour a 
| 1,015,616;004.01 | a Serv 


12,19 12.11 1215 12.11) per cent over the same 1936 period.| Sales figures with comparisons re-| U. 8. gov. direct ob. 8,301 8,974 De its ° 
pos Tribune Want Ad-Visers are on 


set ee ORE TRY. J ders totaled $2,941,350, against veveral c Obligat’ns fully guar. | 
.11.91 12.10 11 12.00 12.01 | 4Ume orders totale »941,300, against} ported yesterday by several com- 59 | 
i213 11.97 12.06 12.00| $3,147,775 in June, 1936. For the six panies follow: Oe er Brit 1,360 Acceptances ° ° 682,089.02 | tga so Aste on So 


12.08 11.94 12.02 11.98 Ras th Waderat : | 
Bb cce 8 man toaletnggeteapigt ne Reserve. ‘anke wes 6,400 6,395 ,. Other Banks’ Bills Endorsed and Sold 17,263.60 telephone or at the Want Ad Store, 


12.07 11.98 12.04 11.97 
1212 12.05 12.08 12.04 | $16,154,875, compared with $12,934,100 1937. 1938. Ne nage dagger: oe ast : 
12.13 12.04 ; 12.06 | last year, Green, H. L. ..-8 2,804,631 § 2,625,257 ea ey a bks. 1783 ea oan | Dividend Declared on Preferred Stock, p Seeman Bp oreo Reeser. _ 

pe 


Liverpool Market. Neisner Bros. 2,064,050 — 1 940,204 Other assete—net.... 1.302 1,338 } 
\-COTTON—Re-| _ Neisner Brothers, Inc, reported) gun Ray Drug...... 468,490 436,712 Sin ie Truk. Payable August 2, 1937 . ‘ ‘ 525,000.60 daily until 10 p. m. Sunday until 


% 
Dallas, Tex., and the Lone Star Gas = Prima Co sie y . an The department’s index of food 1 lawse 
corporation, Wilmington, Del., filed i% % Process OOrD vei at aah ‘% +:++| prices declined slightly in the month TRI IST COMP ANY : Hounes PEE ay as oe 
1 | Oak Park, Austin 


SINASH he or 
POH OWh Ae: : 


“adh oat 
 WBOIctwe 


FP LIM 900 FAE-E GEM Aa OI GOr+ 09090909 ~T co nana 


IVERPOO Ju 5. N—Re- " 
ceipts, 12, 00 Mob wl By: Goes Spot, June sales of $2,064,050, a& gain of 6.3 MAY. Demand dep.—adj.. bees 186 $15,289 $14,679 rage 5 p. m. 
quiet; prices 6 points higher. Quotations in| per cent over June, 1936, while sales | McKesson & Rob...$13,503,872 $11,313,418) Time deposits . Bah 6 8aR BENT Dividend Declared on Common Stock, if P - 
pence: American, strict good middling, | +. tne first six months were $9,934,799, SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30. Aion inh yer ap 547 649839 Payable August 2. 1937 1.200.000.06 | Call Superior 6100—Want Ad-Viser 
7.04: middling. a 79: frit low iene. a gain of 7 per cent over the same | Sr¢en, A: 9934799 9.283647 D Sages ae? R forT I : | d Ex ; : : : or Want Ad Office 
a m ne. 6 strict ¢ ordi- ; Sane an oreign banks .... 612 435 | 
6.54 0 ame. SOF: ait 608 One, | DETIOd # Year ao. Sun Ray Drug.,.., 2,813,088 2,477,374) , Oreen & sis oe eserve for 1 axes, interest an Suis 5,378,649.90 
6.73: ba A tea 6.71; January, 6.71; 3 MeKesson & Rob...$70,131,017 $69.289,317 | Capital account .... 3,598 3,597 3,491 
6.73; May. 6.74. | H. L. Green company, variety chain, ' pruehauf Trailer... 4,952,000 2,885,000 *Comparable figures not available. — it TRAVEL. 
ace Se eee Income Collected but Not at $42,742.71 Hi mn 
} Sea. 
if +5 
: Common Stock . 40,000,000.00 it Satine, poi G0: Prisco, $80: Boston, ai 35. 
| Above rates include free .meale via 
| Surplus : 16,000,000.00 it All American Bus Lines. 
¥. ., St. Louis, $4; Detroit. $3: Peoria, $2.25. 
| : : a H — DRTROIT, $3 SP LOUIS, $4 — 
AND TRUST COMPANY $1,136,237,901.40 A] | RPOOE Tiron coogi: UR th 
| 746 8. Wabash. 6266 Stony, Sai, 
: : ee aS : “sutomohiles, - 
f y 4 « | i United States Government obligations and other securities carried at $68,830, 163.18 BOTH RRADRS AND aDVSR'TISE ARB 


7. iddling, : 
Ne ne ee mion , H. L $12,877,860 $11,572,160)” Homestic hanks... 6,017 4,907 6,010 
closed steady. July, 6.68; October, H. L. Green Has Gain. HIVE MONTHS SHUMD MAY 91. | | Other Uistiliiiey ...0 879 004 847 Reserve for Contingencies 12,784,450.20 —— 
« 5 e 
Pref. | FAST. F IDES: EXPRESS + go7 S 
Undivided Profits 8,491,701.96 li} |514 S. Wabash. Wab. 8300. 
are pledged to secure public and trust deposits and for other. purposes : if urged to exercise caution in 


pda dhe Fr trammnortsaien with 


as required or permitted by law. 7 i individuals References should be ex- 
: | changed and carefully investigated. 


EA BAC. © STR ERT AT... WAS HAIN GTO N : 4 — FRESNO OR L. A. 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION it DRIVE, NEW Bit ok oreo Manel 


i | BOARD OF DIRECTORS | Bea 
Statement of Condition as of June 30, 1937 i re ee i} your argent TFORRIA. piliva = 


ghee | t Ptamil individual. 
RESOURCES LIABILITIES S.T. Bledsoe . Presiden, ‘The Atchison, Fopeka & Santa Fe Railway System y St ge co Baa ee 
| Robert F. Caer ti eee AR ek RG oR President, Dearborn Chemical Co. Hy ar ee few, dase 2 bed eae # 


CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS - = = = = - ~%17,876,696.25 CAPITAL STOCK—PREFERRED= = - . $ 650,000.00 | Alfred Cowles . ) Hi | radio; want iumboldt 6016. 
Hi DESIRE RARER Bea. 


| : 3H 
CAPITAL STOCK—COMMON= = © = = - 1,000,000.00 | : Company | ‘tees eudbeneee. “bdlieeds i helo 


U. S. GOV'T. OBLIGATIONS —DIRECT AND FULLY SPs Lt Na eae a 650,000.00 | 
GUARANTEED -ewpmeeeens we ewes 12,673, 455.44 SURPLUS Ht ye eS 0 aad ena 


UNDIVIDED PROFITS = = = © «© «= «= « 302,652.01 


MUNICIPAL AND OTHER MARKETABLE SECU- RESERVE FOR PREFERRED STOCK DIVIDEND = 9,750.00 


eee Oe ns cL aoe RESERVE FOR TAXES, INTEREST, CONTINGEN- | 
cies, €TC.- = = = e es ee ee we Se 791,462.57 


LOANS AND DISCOUNTS + = = = = = = = ~ 15,365,521.22 ell Gl Mines < a m6 ow ww 60,064.44 
69.000.00 LIABILITY ON ACCEPTANCES SS @. @ 2 SSS : 23,522.82 


RTE ae ap ae } heir, Meee 
A Oa NED Rn ee tab pei with eer ete est se eve eR 
Ba STS RIEN E oe eee cane ee Ae a ee ae ROE aid tn Ga ea TI CS ee 


. s 


ES SR a ee 


ee eas a a ak > iy boise’ rs Aa 
ene ns tans tea ly SMe Sa Ae ee tn Oe Ree Ta 
a 


> 4, phe + . “ 

Sits Bish a nce 

fe ARP er a ae Cees 
§ eee ales Rs EY, 


—_" + 


id 


FEDERAL RESERVE BANK STOCK - -—-- 
wisely gee DEPOSITS 


. 23,522.82 "s DEMAND -_—« = = = $43, 149,696. 02 

Ro ite eae | UNITED STATES Gov'T. = 1,222,500.00 

r ad Bc Ras i 134,401 85 oe OTHER PUBLIC FUNDS<- « 25,051, 66 

ase cet LM ete te so ee 79.07 


es tke . ae gle os ers ¥ -. 

Pz sad is po} . ) PRE nn ok pete 
< Ae 5 Ce eka ies tel ee eX ee te ae: 
: Shae Sei de tei pen Ls _ Nn eS oR URS Yemen 1a Ree se 

“a et Oe P Ne %, Let + 
g i i 3 . ef 
Z Os i : : = i 3 3 Rakes at > 
ts 2 c £ = ere aioy oe a 
yO Ter 2 a3 sag { SH 4% Ais ae Sere 
» x A <b Mata y 


whee . grey oR ge 


hee ales 


- pine i “a = Kath ae Poa Sn: i 
GENE ME Rico he Be tae Ete 
paler pe BS 


‘ ea ee Sapo BE 
le « :? a a, . oy . PMD a 
ris ca We Se or 
& ee . ¥ * + 


ON ee ge COR- 


ae ae 


ae 


ACRE FOR 5 
7 vamerabie, te0ld 
acre], 8. 


it 
EE 200, tribune, 
EN FARM ADJOINING 
a 
ees @ 499. rag 


WOODED 

Bee atch Be FG ety’ water, gas, 
@ is. $1,900 cash. 

BEAUTIFUL, woop OF LIBERTY- 


EAST 
w blocks e ig re nearly 2 
a.: oe $120 c. Address EG 


49%, Tribune. 
mEAB 7 X150: et aa STA- 
gi: “tle clea, E E 191. 
AL Hoy QUINLAN 
ee yee TB, CALL UNIV. 


ote <= ; 
AND TYSON. 2600. 
nigeria minutes to loop. 
1,000. 
New. paintd. wh. fr. Dutch col., 4 bedrms. 
h. w. ht. 60 ft. lot, 2 car. gar. Rog. P. 6636. 


LOT 60X145—NO ASSESSMENTS: SPLEN- 
did “ cighborhood, $2.100. Rog. 0271. 


RECLOSURE—11 RMS.. 2 BA., COR. LOT. 
at zoned apt.: income carries. Hol. 6886. 


1 WN BUYS 10 RM, 3 BATH 
31, Cg gf 8 . Miss Schultz. Wil. “Ast. 


Glencoe—25 minates to a | 


680 ee BR. 6 BE 
b., den, pch.. barge. Kenilworth B288. 


MODERN 7 KRM. BRICK RES NR LAKE 
Lge. grounds. Sell below mkt. Glene. 1170. 


ne ree 
Highiand Park—30 minutes to loop. 


BEAUTIFUL WOODED 3 ACRE ESTATE— 
ow, a new. grav north west pers ee 
on w 


eee ¥ $7,500 t0 = avel road. 
m 


3% 


0 “ye gg cale: $760 
impr. pa 
tat Address a {p01 Seay 


Niles Center—34 minutes to loop. 


5 ROOM BRICK BUNGALOW .84,250 
Also several bargain 2 apt. “buildings. 
EALTY Co.. 


WES ER R&R 
4120 Oakton-street. Niles Center 2600. 
| ceeantlntliineeemeaniammemmemeatinn 


Winnetka—21 minates to loop. 
URC. a ote PORCH, 2 CAR GAR. 
x16 $1.000 down. $41) mo 
WISDOM & 60. 526 Center. Win. ; 


4 BEDRM. Bg age a RES.— RS. 
old; best value in . $9,500. Win. O83: 


__ REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—N. W. 


Gene ral. 
ACRE onda gate 
7 Preserve: ae mon 
Address 5° 780" A sed 


Barrington—47 ee to toop. 


BEST a BARRIN ILL. — 200 
ay he =— ‘winter pent. and 
summer 


Se ae pat won and ee. farm 
MBPS. TRIBONE, 
‘MOST BEAUTIFUL 


BEA . 20 ACRE ESTATE. 
Lege Pat one th 

ogee D model barn: mandine 

2 p meg Address M F F 213. Tribune. 


Prospect—26 minutes to loop. 
26 MIN. TO LOOP. 
; 5 ROOMS — — — $36 MONTHLY 


Home suit to =. fully insulated 


ope og 09 cagh and best heating 
spannae. 


and $36 mo. In- 
clades ever th, Pow “Madison. Rand, ee 
HIGH ROLLING LAND— 


picll | Adioining 0 ae qouree rse. _ “Approved. f0 for 


a Ridze—Zi minutes to loop. 
2 gE ONGALOWS—5 RMS, EA.; LOT 127X 
h. w. ht.; fruit trees of all kinds; 
only $6,500; terms. Briargate 3509. 


ggg Peg Ng ee ae" ALAS 


Aug. 1, lat. 


- 


po Berg FOR- 


. or 
new 
view 


General. 
LONIAL TYPE [UNFIN- 
acre farm: tS gy Ae off main 
electricity : 

t 12 miles to ioop. 

; $27.50 mo. Ad- 


DUTCH CO 


NEW 2 STORY 
EW 2 STOR wi 


bivd. vp Eh 
ee 


a = cant 


ie _ Ji root of 
) F 499. ‘tribune. 


| | aoe FRONTAGE: 
ey jase ontside of of ci ua ty ka 
A Sores EG @ 494. Trika 
| ne, 
ane ‘a ieee i eel: le 


no . Grange. 
nedale. Henry A. Miller. 


—_—_——_—_ — — as 


“15 "minates to : 
, BOING’ VALU on 


» 1 $1 


Er res a gn Nea 
[oma eae PE hog, ome ag 


BEVERLY SHO SHORE—THE D 


eye. Dr. atten sane 


Michi 
OM FURN. ams FRONT 
teh: 


 itich, 


rome 


Off the Beaten Path 


but only 59 miles from Chicago. 4 room 
penter built cott with inside ide toilet. ecre 


oe. hectatitutiy 50 ft. 1 $695 complete 
ly w 


sand a 
shite Gah ha ert Fong mein it « 
e 
private punting Boalt terms to responel- 


ble warty Rod eh teh, POETS oe. 


4 RM. HOUSE WITH LARGE PORCH AT 
lake in south Wis.. 60 miles 
A SHACE or “shell, but 


. Terms $150 cash, 
trades, no agents. Aolress EC 534. ‘Tribune. 


— FOR QUICK SALE 
Waterfront summer home 
art of Fox River: 58 miles Chic 


; ready to mere bags 
town. $750. Address N B 4 ” wribune. 


LAKE Sar 


lots. $700 to $5,000: home and lot. $2,500 
to $25,000. Al ae imp. Terms or cash. 
Cedar Point Par iv.. Williams Bay. Wis. 


LAKE SENEVA BUILDER 


MUST SELL 2 MODERN COTT.. $1.000. 
Heavily wooded: gas. elec.. run. water: terme 
to right party. Address A K 9. Tribune. 


Saag ve eo RMS.. SCREENED PORCH 
in tab ar Geneva. 
price of bunga- 
: rms. Car- 

ss M ¥ 410. Tribune. 


AGE $600 
isconsin. Full 
beach: 2% 


as 
low. 
penter built. Addre 


NEED MONEY— 
complete: finest 
of bass. pike. 
hours’ ride: take $100 

ADDRESS N WN 475. TRIBUNE. 


TWIN LAKES—S RM. FURN. HOUSE: LGE. 
lot: take frontage: incl. boate and motor 
elec.. r. w.. gas. Call Nelson, Humb. 2775 
or see ‘care Twin Lak 


QUARTER ACRE BUNGALOW PLOTS NEAR 
the shores of beautiful lake. $98.50 each 
full price. Easy terms. Ideal for summer and 
week-end homes. Address N D 312. Tribune. 


LAKE GENEVA. CEDAR POINT PARK— 
Wooded site: cas. clec.: sacrifice origina) 
cost $325. Address P D 491. Tribune. 


$4, ee. gp eonygeee LAKE, 56 RM. MODERN 
house; large rch, lake frontage, 40x360. 
Pttvate ’ pier. Nirneriie 1858. 


YEAR AROUND 6 gg FURN. CEDAR 
cott.: bath 2 pr . lake. 7 mi. Madieon. 
Ward. 6135 s aD Bh . Pro. 4458. Chero. 


GREEN LAKE, WIS.-150 FOOT VACANT. 
Best side of lake. Plenty of trees. 
D. Greenway, Green Lake. Wie. 


5 R . FURN, LAKE cor, CONCRETE oem 
S880. ms, Address © D $44 Tribune 


MY $2,000 5 RM. COTT.: $750: Sy WwIs., 
lake; 1% hr. Chi. Address AL 1. Tribune. 


SAC. NEW COT.. BOAT. es Oe TOIL. 


Laree Wis. lake. Address MD Tribnne 
_ REAL ESTATE WANTED. 


Houses, 


gg FIDE 


hses, No agt. apply, Address N D1 N ri 127. Tribane. 


a SS. 000 Bago Tha WANT HOME OR 2 
or N. W. Address E D 584, Tribune 
Business Property. 

GooD CORRS» FOR GASOLINE STATION. 
Address FP 205. Tribune. 


HAVE 
fi. 


Miscellaneoas. 


~iAir Pad He S. SIDE IMPROVED PROP.— 
& Co., +1 go 8 W, 63d. Wen. 0687. 


REAL ESTATE | FOR EXCHANGE. 


Houses. 


65TH-PL.. NR. STONY ISLAND—9 RM 
hse. Take some vac. and cash. Mid. 5860. 


Resort Property. 
TAKE CLEAR VACANT FOR LARGE 
equity in riparian rite lot el a ’ State 
Address N F 428, Tribun 


TRADE SUMMER COTTAGE FOR 
Address N_B 413. Tribune. 


ee me oe me 


WiLL 
Chgo., vacan 


see 


REAL ESTATE LOANS, MORTGAGES, 


M ? : 
111 W. Washington-street. paemeces 9121. 
MONEY LOAN NON SOU SOUTH 
artes “anteee tee Uais0 ned 
or SHARP « oF ate We Ona ce 
FIRST MTGES. iN ST 4% TO 

coven dine 7 on snd wt — 
33 N. General Morte Randolph 3477. 
MONEY go 90 LOAN ¢ ON SOUTH 1 SIDE ZROF- 

oat ‘tort mer ; 
Wie Dees riage qresdy, mas made 
: FIRST SRIGAGR LOA Pes 
unig, ohViod ate. 2 (8C% san 

S08 Ww. ashington-st, FRA. 6445. —~ 


(NSUKANCE ae AY ATLABLE—LOWEST 


residen operties 
Sharon Mtge. Co.. 105 W. Madison. oe. 656 
; , MORTGAGES a 


ENMUEHL 
— Ss. pe Rhone ST. Iie. 2200. 


"Eige AS BEAU NORTE ATE 


j WASHINGTON, VRANKI Kua 06 2861 


DEFAULTED 1ST AND 2D 
2 UEtEn Address N F a7, Tri co 


up to _ $6,000, Lous Hori = 4008 Dincic. 


es 


Highes or races ay 


|eoats, 0 ms 


on eautiful 


| DOMESTIC 


we eee “a you to Sion 
a chattel mortgage on 
your furniture, | 


We don’ ‘ask yo to eign a chattel 
ieoctnee on ak you, to alg le, 


We, don’t ie you to sign over stock 
NO ENDORSERS. 


RAT oe A don’t ask “Pia to have any one cise 


ap PROVED & AND fnco™ AND QUI : ED 
sed omar é pie 


Gs tate oun Oo } ane ‘ gre 


SIGNAT 
no time do we call 


our employer 
the terms of the note are fulfilled. 


TO 20 MONTHS. 
‘cod Medd iF PAID SOONER. 


tOAMe oe At, oh ira 


PHONE pecan REQUEST. 


UNDER STATE SUPERVISION. 


7 W. porastit Ri ye 8400 
iN. P 


e 5900 
8 N. OGD le Baks market 4700 


821 W. LE ae aa = 7800 


1212 N.A PR et nswiek 3100 


ue 1400 
ae 8 ete. 2161 


REENLEAF 8060 


ON ANY PLAN 


NO DEDUCTIONS, 


You get the full amount of the loan. 
NO BANK COLLATERAL NEEDED. 


LOANS ON SIGNATURE ONLY. 


PERSONAL 


FINANCE COMPANY 


UPTOWN—PERSONAL. 
4554 Broadway, 2d floor. 


NORTH—PERSONAL. 
4770 Lincoln-ayv., 2d floor, LONgbeach 1321 


IRVING PARK—PERSONAL. 
3982 Milwaukee-av.. 2d fir. -PALisade 0989 
{Over Art Thompson's Clothing Store.] 
WICKER PARK—PERSONAL. 
1954 W. North-av., gr. fir. BRUnswick 2850 
AUBURN PARK—PERSONAL 
757 W. 79th-st., 2d floor. 
WOODLA WN—PERSONAL. 
841 E. 68d-st., 3d floor. HYDe Park 1472 
MARQUETTE PARK—PERSONAL. 
2403 W. 63d-st., 2d floor. REPubli¢c 7229 
GARFIELD PARK—PERSONAL. 
4010 W. Madison-st..2d fir. NEVada 2134 
OAK PARK—PERSONAL. 
1040 North-blvd., 2d floor. Village 6840 
BERW YN-CICERO—PERSONAL. 
6346 Cermak-rd., 2d floor. BERwyn 666 
GREenleaf 6081 
aot 


LONgbeach 4082 


"RADclifte 8228 


EVANSTON—PERSONAL, 
708 Church-st., 2d floor, 


canes to YOUR UNSEEN 
t 9:00 p. m. Tuesday eve. 


SORROW TOWER 


FROM 
Action. .Speed.. Results 


is what you want when you need 


money. You get all that when you 
BOBROW FROM TOWER. 


A PLAN 
FOR EVERY ONE. 
CALL AND LEARN 
ABOUT 


Our New Liberal 
Signature 
Only Plan 


Two full years to repay. Of course 

you can repay the loan as fast as 

desired and only be charged for 

the actual time you keep our funds. 
4 OFFICES: 

40 N. DEARBORN-STREET... .CEN. 6288 
806 W. 64TH-ST. [Cor. Halsted] .NOR. 3020 
4003 W. MADISON-STREET.....VAN 6464 
3985 MILWAUKEE-AVENUE......KIL. 8301 


ti COE, 5. 


TOWER FINANCE 


CORP. 
UNDER STATE SUPERVISION, 


LOCAL LOAN CO. 


18~CON VENIENT TOCATIONS—18 


28 N, Clark, Room 263. Franklin 1082 
77 W. Washington, 10th floor. State 0151 
105 W. Madison, 14th floor. Franklin 0884 
100 W. Monroe, 7th floor. State 1777 
1737 Howard-st.. 2d floor, Rogers Park 8320 
4753 Broadway, 11th floor. Longbeach 7163 
1951 Irving Park, 2d floor. Buckingham 1006 
2800 Milwaukee-ay., 5th floor.. Capitol 3440 
4710 Irving Park, 2d floor. Pensacola 4570 
6255 S. Ashland, 24 floor, Hemlock 4510 
2355 W. 63d-st., 2d floor. Republic 4472 
6856 8. Halsted-st., 2d floor. Englewood 5534 
841 E. 63d-st,, 4th floor. Plaza 8360 
9204 Commercial-ay., 2d fl, So. Chicago 0103 
11106 8S. Michigan, 2d floor. Commodore 8880 
4010 W. Madison, 4th floor. Kedzie 0704 
Cicero, 6012% Cermak-rd., 24 fi. Cicero 6400 
Oak Park, 1140 Lake, 3d floor, Euclid 503 


“Doctor of Family Finances.” 


HOUSEHOLD FINANCE 
CORPORATION. 
Hear Edgar Guest Tuesday eves., 7:30—WLS. 


ee ee eee eee 


and tw. weaves. 


TWO ciphers ie 


201 E. OHIO 


ichi North. 
1 he Pig oy of atichieag ot, 600 Mare 


4750 Washington 


AT CICERO-AVENUP, COLUMBUS 9609. 


471 E. OHIO-ST. 


STREET IS OPEN TO OUR DOOR. 


Open Evenings Till 9 O’Clock/, 


FURN. MART SAMPLES 
SAVE 40% TO 60% 


2 Pe, Liv. rm. mae odd sofas. .....$29-$89 
8 Pe. Bed sels eeeace eR @Oeeeer eee eee 2Z 89 
& Pe. Dinette sets . 9 
Better arnce twin studio “couches . ie be 
c. and p ! up chairs ceteeaseeeee 3 
d é or cmativenan.....<. 5 
x18 TUES eve e ie ewneanaeke 


e 9 3 
8 eee eeeeneeenee Piggergien °° Oe 7.75 69 
Dain: TERMS, DHL, 6824. 


LOANS 


on Your 
PLAIN NOTE 


NO WAGE ASSIGNMENTS. 
NO MORTGAGES, 
NO ENDORSERS. 


Single persons or married couples 
may borrow here on just a plain note. 

We also make secured loans on chat-\\ 
tel mortgage if desired. 


REDUCED COST 


3% mets on anes 
$100. ess; 2% on balance above, 
1887—Fifty Years of Service—1937. 


COMMONWEALTH 
LOAN CO. 


9-—-OFFICES~-9 
NORTH: 
4803 Lincoln-av., Room 215. Lon. 3456 
LINCOLN-BELMONT: 
3166 Lincoln-av., Room 224. Bitter. 3360. 
NORTHWEST: 
4013 Milwaukee av.. Rm. 307. Avenue 0443 
ROGERS PARK: 
1791 Howard-st.., am. 214. Rogers Pk. 0754 


GARFIELD PARK 
1 Crawford, ‘ie: 415. Van Buren 5040. 
OAK P 


ARK: 
137 co Marion-st., Rm. 204. 
Chicago phone: 
BERWYN-CICERO: 
6428 W. Cermak-road. 
rs elbhe ‘phone: 


SOUTH: 

6306 Cottage Grove, R. 305. Hyde Pk. 0604. 
ENGLEWOOD: 

749 W. 63d-st.. corner Halsted, Eng. 1711 


Under State Supervision. 


Village 6886 
Austin 2624 


Berwyn 371 
Lawndale 2882 


ncn and Furniture Mart 


\MPLES AT 50% DISCOUNT. 
69-$75 Parlor Sets.............$39 
9 Be room ts «eteeeeeeee ater $35 
$75 Dining Room Set . $37 
fece Oak rcatlant’ Set... . $12 
9x 2 Rugs eee spenveere $18 

PINK FURNITURE CO. 


FACTORY DISTRIBUTORS. 
Open every evening until 10: Sun. 5 p. m. 


— WASHINGTON-BLVD. 


7 oe Thurs., Sat. until 10 p. m. 
6534 5 . HALSTED- STREET. 


CASH OR TERMS. 


IN TUFT’S WAREHOUSE 
$35. vdok PURNITURE MART SAMPLE. 
i iy dining, bedroom sets, $29-$39: im 
Am. and oriental rugs, $15- 25, cash or terms. 
Allen Furn. Oven eves.. . 6 p.m 


4444 WEST MADISO 1-ST. 


3 ROS USED FURN.. $50: NEW. 389— 
$1 A. B. GC. Storage. 2525 Madison.Op.ev. 


oe IMPORTED ORIENT. RUG., _* 
PARLOR SET. $25. 5540 BROADWA 


Central, 
INOLEUM LAID FREE. . 


le 
" Inlaids 89c, contract prices. Free est. Vict. 
2894. Senner’s, 2940 Wentworth. Open eves. 


South Side. 
7090 COTTAGE GROVE, 


fCOR. 718T AND SOUTH alee AY.) 
FURN. MART AND FACTOR VY ome > ES. 
MOD. PAR. SETS: VAL. TO ¥s11 9... . B39 | pears 
MOD. BEDRM, SETS: VAL. TO $129. . $3 
MOD. DIN. RM. SETS: VAL. TO $98. . .$39 
9X12 RUGS: VAL TO $69.. .$17 


4R. compl., $150; worth $400 
2 YEARS TO PAY. OPEN EVENINGS. 


CHOOSE FROM 1,000 RUGS, 


Bie selection: 6x9. 8x10. 9x12. 315 un: 
9x1 all color brdim, frezettes. $27.50 un: 
9x15. 12x15 and larger. $35 up. Royal Wil- 
tons, $35 up. American Orientals Gulistans. 
Other high gerade rugs. 4 large Gulistans. 12x 
21 Persian design. Klever Shampay Kleaners. 
4633 Cottage Gr. Op. Tueés.. Thurs... Sat. «ves. 


DUNN BROS. STORAGE, 


6714 COTTAGE GROVE-AV. 
FURNITURE FOR SALE. 


NEW IMPORT., DOMES. RUGS $15- — -$25. 

All new parlor. gn din. sets. .$39-$49 
8 rms. furn., $125: ay “5 $175: tms. 
RAPP AGE A PURM, 5746 S. Ashland. 


PARLOR, BEDRM., DINING RM. Layee » ae 


9x12 Rugs 
BROTHERS, 


NELSON 
6910 Cottage. Open eves., Sunday. 


CASH 
930 TO $300 


FOR GENERAL PURPOSES. 


WE HAVD A PLAN THAT 
WILL MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS, 


Signature Only Loans 
Automobile Loans, 


Furniture Loans. 


SERVICE! The Keynote of Our 
Quick, Confidential Loan Plan. 


OUR REPAYMENT SCHEDULES 
ARE FLEXIBLE AND ARRANGED 
TO MEET YOUR CONVENIENCE. 

FROM 1 TO 24 MONTHS. 


Por almost half a century we have 
been rendering a liberal friendly per- 
sonal loan service. {Estab. 1888.] 


Phone Central 4733 


©. ©. ERD 


7 S. Dearborn-st., Room 616, 


We Offer You 


LOANS 


UP TO $s00. 
by the 


SIMPLEST 
Possible Method 


in the 


FASTEST 
Possible Time 


RAL CREDIT. 
ph asa. TERMS. 


Only 2% on balance above $100, 
3% manthity on $100 or less. 


FAMILY 
LOAN 


. Corporation 
202 S. STATE-STREET. 
3D FL. CENTURY BLDG. WABASH 2904. 


INTEGRITY LOANS 


a that you borrow me 
. Just sign a 8 Single or 
ns are eligible. 


perso 
$13.3 39 gfe fawn $200 


saga intclty 
140 WN. DEA EN icor NERS AS “aa PL 


gan, Indiana, or Illinois on yong pies of $2,000 up. 


215 W. RANDOLPH, 


ae? INANCE CORP. 
: eee 5 ieee re, Sats) 


Do You Need Money ? 


YOUR SIGNATURE 
IS OUR GUARANTEE. 


930 TO $300 


CONFIDENTIAL—CONSIDERATE. 
BUSINESSLIKE SERVICE. 


L. T. BAKER & CO. 


30 W. WASHINGTON-ST. 


RANDOLPH 6151. SUITE 1407. 
SALARY—FURNITURE—AUTO LOANS. 


JEWELRY LOANS 


TO +o gel VIEL? BIAINED. 
oo iEbies rs. Private Rooms. 


Susiness Loans. 


$300 to $50,000 


On fixtures and sy estat of 
Factories, Laundries stanurants, 
Meat Markets, ete, 

Also on Accounts TIEN 
OLDEST ESTAB. IN CHGO. 


NO ENDORSERS—TERMS TO SUIT. 
Prompt attention to inquiries from Michi- 


F. BOLAND, 
FRANKLIN 1966. 


$250 TO 960,000 


To Factories, Printing Plante, Sinces, 
Laundries, Rmg. Hses., Bakers, Autos, 
Restaurants, ‘Machine Shons, Trucks. 


Lower, than Usual ates. 


‘ CHANCE FOR YOUNG COUPLE .. 

" Real opportunity, Sell for balance due. 

4 rooms uncalled for furn. All complete. 
GOODMAN'S. 6821 §&. HALSTED-ST. 


N SAMPLE REFRIG 
BRAND cil igh Bm Hotpoint. Copeland. 


6 CUBIC FEET, $79.50. 


new Stewart-Warner. $84.50, 


79: Westin nouns $69. 
unday. 


Plessolue, 
var ton iW. dacknon. 


pen eves. 
CLOSEOUT. 


ished, reconditioned refrigerators. 
A BR ct 1 vear. Also a few not refinished. 


), urry 

} CHICAGO-AY. SUP. 3315. 

lings to 9 Dp. m. Sunday, 12 to 6. 

SACRIFICE FOR IM 

BR pe ope . see gy te te 

. e AY ** 

Fully guar. 220 W. Huron-st. Guan: Sunday. 
GENERAL ELECTRIC, $79.95. 

OO. ag GTON. 9107 COMMER- 

CURIAL-ANENUB. O25m BYze. 10-6 5. M. 


IGIDAIRES—LIKE NEW. a Ue. 
ee Rag big bargains. 4746 N. Wes 


GENERAL ELECTRIC, REC. —: EDISON 


Whse.. 766 W. Jackson. Ope 
RENT AN ELEC. REFRIG.. ni $1 PER 
wk. No other chree. 10 wk. min. Cal, 6950, 
PRI 9; ERLVINATOR. 49: NERO 
ae a $89: easy tms. 6403 S. Halsted 
10 REFRIG.—ALL oT ANA MAKES. RE- 
con., $29.50 up. 920 W. 63d. Open eves, 


| 10 


FISH STORU—ESTAB. 25 
i 3 t Mil 
sickness. Re an ness 


aR SCHL.: NO 
ye rm. fiat. bath. 
eee [21383 W.t. 
NEXT TO 
Elston. 


P oman’ 
Milwankee-av., 


DEL.-@ROO- 
comp., ren 
$875: 1% ¢ 


spat 
an S38. 
ig rooms. Toome R060") 


—- -— — DELICATESSEN-GROCERY — 
Living rms.: very profitable bus, Sup. 3448. 


vite fount Gare ade et £5 N. Western-avenue: 


DRUG STORE—COMPLETE WITH 14 FT. 
soda fount. Lease tainable. Will be sold 
to highest bidder men July 8 11 a. 
1 South Main-street, ret, _Lombard. fiisots 


FOOD SHOP AND ‘THA | ROOM—OAK PARK. 
Specializi 
to sell immedi- 


a count other business: ; YTea- 
sonabis pone Tribune. 


terms: 
Address N O 418, 
FRUIT-VEG.-GROC., CONNEC. MEAT MKT. 
Estab. cor, business; leaving 
city. 2558 Lawrence-avenne. 


FRUIT STORE—NEXT MEAT MKT. AND 
groc.; estab. 6 years. 2420 North Cicero. 


Jewe 
BARNET?'S. gr foot. or BY EA 


TOPS POR PAWN ae, 
watches = 
Room 1106.7 _W. Madison. 


ae eee 
419 COTTAGE 

Chicago’s oldest, 
Selling out. entire 
mae, Caen Pviag. ox et, 50 ones Collies, 

eps. Police itz. er. Se pined | 
$1. Watchors, "Pace. Op. 1 “Bu, 
- — MOR fan 

Waukegan- og = mi, N. of Milw 
Puppies, hse. brk. dogs. Reas. Mort. Gr. 


$5. Wires. 


Span.. le Bags others. e418 W. North-av. 


FULLY STOCKED REXALL DRUG STORE 
in Woodlawn. $7.500 cash. Fife. H.P.0100. 


pyres oak ig rat ad ee CIGS. — LIVING 
quarters: live ; party can't handle; 
via $35. 2256 out s Piivinkeareteent. 


wie mg Rich a age Dope a OTTIES, | WIRES, BOS- 
ons, Cockers, Toy Black-Tan. Foxes: $35 
values, $10: others, a N. Cicero-av. - 


RUBY SPAN... MALE. Y. OLD, $35. JA- 
coby. 847 Oakland: p oe 142.Waukesha. Wis. 


Stoves, 
A JEWEL TABLE TOP GAS RANGE—NEW. 
$25. Open evenings. 621 W. Jackson. 
A WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC re aaa — 
New: 26% discount. 621 W. Jackson 


Vacuum Cleaners. 
ACTORY REBUILT VACUUM rn wo ig 
BD baencfcocceed oh y Ph. Miss Arlen, State 0571. 


yore VACUUMS. REBUILT 
Hiehle. Wellington 7267. 


ene Machines, 

NEW MAYTAG—25C PER WHEE. 
Immediate delivery. 
urchase if desired. 


s 


$1 REPAIRS 
vacu. S30 


RENT 
No * eaten 
Apply. rent on 
Credit ept. repossessed washers, $15 

all cartage © charge if returne 


_ —aEeTHOR BR WASHER OR IRONER — 
25c wk. Free cartage. Thor. Albany 0140, 
FOR SALE—WESTINGHOUSE ELEC. WASH- 
er. Like new. $25. 2354 N. Clark-st.. 9-5 


NEED CASH—MAYTAGS. THORS. 


ea LO $30. 2934 Lincoln-av. Grace. bi 78: 


BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 


Billiards and Bowling. 


1 BILLIARD, 7 POCKET. REG. BRUNS- 
wick. Zwick, care Tavern, 3166 Ogden-ayv. 


Building and Remodeling. 


TILE BATH OR KITCHEN WALLS WITH 
Metile, $45. Belmont 1662 at 6 p. m. 


Cameras and Optical Goods. 
WANT CONTAX MODEL II. F-1-5 LENS. 
Will pay $150 cash. Central 0221. 
Moving and Storage. 


ENGLEWOOD, 34384. 
———-— Coast to Coast ---- 


Weekly trips to principal cities and suburbs. 
Chicago Office, 55381 S. State, 


Direct Motor Van Service 


CAL SES ARTe “N. be -TEXAS—OKLA. 
and Other States o Crating Nance 
SAPEWAY Tree stare VAN LIN 

20 E. JACKSON-BLVD. WABASH S236. 


RETURN LOADS WANTED TO ALL POINTS 

Mich., Wisconsin. Missouri, Cal.. New York. 
Ohio. ete. Wentworth 0109. Trans-American 
Van Service, 540 West 59th-street. 


3 RMS. OF GOOD FURN., $97.50. TERMS. 
GOOLD STORAGE 
2219 COTTAGE GROVE- AY. 
NO MONEY DOWN. EASY PAYMENTS. 


ALLIED STORAGE. 4312 COTTAGE GROVE 


3 RMS. FINE FURN. COMPL 67.50. 
SILVER, 235 WEST 68D- ETE, 8 


SAC. 6 RS. OF FINE FURN., RUGS. ETC. 
Sep. Dir.. 6068 Stony Isl.. Apt. I. Mid. 5838. 


750 YARDS CARPET FOR HOTELS. ETC. 
GROVE RUG CLEANDERS. 6737 Cottage Gr. 


9X12 SPECIAL WILTON RUG. $98: NEVER 
been used. 11835 Stewart. Pul. 4976. 


gh 3 SELL—5 RMS. NEARLY NEW FUR- 
niture and rugs, cheap... 328 W. Marauette. 


ENTIRE ih N. 7 RM. PRIV. HOME. 
Dishes, silver. Leaving city. 8121 Kenwood 


North Side. 

RAILROAD SALVAGE. 
MBO Park SHIPM’ bef gy >See SOILE 
n. one 26-! $35 
“a ape rted Oriental Rugs.....$12-$ 
3-4 Rm. Outfits, Com jete.. ;, 999-8129 
OPEN DAILY TO 10 P SRM 

5540 BROADWAY. 


3 ROOMS, $169. 


We ee in our warehouse three rooms of 
high grade furniture, originally Sold Aor 
386, will sell for balance due. $169. 

allen-Fine Furniture Co.. 3300-16 N. Clarks. 
sireet. Bittersweet. 2339 


IN SCHAULER’S STORAGE. 
200 Gulistan Wilton Orient. i $15-$35. 


25,000 SAME LE BURN. . E-Z TMS. 
4 iM ‘cH GRADe by RN  $98-$149 


B SETS, $29-359. 
4642 7 sen Oe 


DAILY TO 9: SUN. 5. 
REMER STORAGE SALE. 


3 ROOMS FURN., $129. RUGS, $10-335. 
New sample par. tage din. sets, $39-$89. 
Chairs, "pike. radios, $ 95. B-Z TERMS. 
5822 N. WESTERN. Fy yt S., 10: SUN., 5. 


, SPECIAL STUDIO COUCH SALE! 
Hi Gr. Couches reduced to $17. $19. $21. 
All colors! Folding Cots. Mattresses. Beds. 
3631 N. CLARK-STREET. 
Open every evening during sale to 10. 


~ FURNITURE FOR SALE. | 


mg ete three rooms. Owner leaving city. 
Priv. On view at 3625 N. Artesian, Revil. 


ROLL BABY CARRIAGE. BABY CRIB, 1 
high chair. Good condition: sell reasonably. 
Foley, 825 Newport, Well. 5487. ae ae 
COMPLETE 4 Sg Pg tinct Eon ego $2 PER 
week. Thousan and rugs bargs. 
NELSON SROs. "eno. ‘BROADWAY. 


LOCAL MOVING AS LOW AS $5: INSUR 
Long distance moving at return ioad rates. 
Ardmore 1001. Day or eve. Estimates free. 
SAVE 40%—MOVE SAFELY IN PADDED 
compartmt. cars everywh. .and Canada, 
General Movers, 3204 Harrison. Van B. 6878. 
BEN'’S EXPRESS — LOC., LONG DIST., 
fully ins.; satis, guar.; low rates.May.5657. 
UNION VAN LINE, INC.-LONG DISTANCE 
moving: 82 W. Washington-st. State 7645. 


Painting and Decorating. 
DECORATING, PAINTING WORK—GUAR.: 
reas.: estimates free. Humboldt 8060. 


REAL LOW PRICES—PAINTING. PAPER 
hanging, calcim.. anywh, Wentworth 6438. 


Piano Tuning. 


nt SUMMER , RATES ON REPATRING, 
tun., $2; 24 yrs.’ exp.: guar. Cole. Rep. 5218 


Plastering. 


PLASTERING JOBS—DAY. CONTRACT: 
job too small or large. Est.. Normal $616. 


Rug Cleaning. 
— — «— THIS AD WORTH $1.00 
9x12 domestic rue. dusted and shampooed. 
cleaned like new, $3: with this ad, $2.00. 
Phone Lake View 0281. Wlectric Rug Clean- 
ers 8726 Lincoln-avenue. Established 1894. 


34TH ANNIVERSARY (SPECIAL ONLY $2— 
9x12. clean like Spray-glue size. 
The Federal {Est. 34 at LINCOLN 0134. 


9X12 DOM. $1.50: CLEANED ON BOTH 
sides. A to Z% Cleaners. Longbeach 4521. 


$1.25—9X12 DOM.: CLEAN 2 SIDES: WE. 
guar.: go anywhere. K. 0. Bug. Ind. 3430. 


$1.25: TWO FOR $2.25: 9X12 DOM. THOR 
cleaning. XYZ Cleaners. Longbeach 0568. 
$1.25 9X12 THOR. CLEAN BOTH SIDES. 
Exp. rep. M. ¢ HH. Rugs. Kedzie 1614. 


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 


Pianos and ‘Players. 
PIANO—SMALL UPRIGHT. USED: og 
tional value. Will accept terms 50c 
week. Now only $36. P. A: Starck Piano 
Company. 234 S Wabash-avenue. 
CHICAGO'S GREATEST PIANO VALUE— 
Brand new cine ey upright $198 at Cable 
Piano Co.. Wabash and Jackson-streets. 
xiieuark. § var ORY. 2611, 8. ik ; 
iforn 
OPEN DAY 9 A. Me TO SP OM 
STEINWAY GRAND T SACRIFICE FOR wor 
Victor Storage. 4809 W. Lake-st. 

BEAUT GRAND PIANO—COST $1.250 
MUST §S . $165. 6512 N. CLARK. 
EXCHANGED GRANDS. AND UPRIGHTS. 
LYON & HEALY. 243 8. WABASH-AV. 


CLOSING OUT 26 USED GRANDS: SPIN- 
ets. All makes. $125 up. 5408 W. North. 


WILL PAY CASH FOR USED RAND OR 
small upright. Cali } Mrs. Paige, Van.B.1248. 


1-GRAND 1 MIDGET. ALSO } NEW STYLE 
spinet piano. 3238 Harrison-streect. 


KANE STORAGE—RUGS ALL SIZES, $10: 
din. rm. and bedrm. sets. $20 up. 
034. ‘Lincoln-av. 


n Sun. and eves. 
DAVID STORAGE. 3238 LAWRENCE-AV 
Furniture and u 


g Bargains Terms. 
NEW AND USED RUGS AT HAT.F PRICE! 
3531 N. CLARK-ST. Open eves. to 10. 

aoe Northwest Side. 
Hollander Storage salts 


8 ROOMS FURNITURE. $100— 

9x12 Am... Oriental. Wilton nae rite S20 
8x11 Imported Oriental] on rugs. .$16-$20 
Dining, bedroom. parlor sets. $39 


2420 Milwaukee—Op. 
STOCK--B 


“Jenay ‘Lind 4 poster. AlKo mn 


Eves. 


ag to mer 
coil 


or 


PaaS oe at Crawford. 


| svring®. 


$150 TAKES HAMILTON BALDWIN GRAND 
piano: like new. 6242 W Grand-avenue. 


POSSESSED GRAND, 165, ON TERMS. 
yman Piano Co., 6th floor, 209 §. State. 


$375 SPINET, SHOPWORN. ONLY oi pecs $195 
Moist Piano Co., 13th fi. 208 8S. State. 


Accordions, 

PIANO ACCORDION—LEARN TO PLAY 
this popular raat romens on our special 
8 weeks summer course." $2 a weck pays 
for 8 lessons weekly. with accordion and 
all lesson materials. Ask for Particalars, 

Chicago Musical instrument Co. 38308 8 
Wabash. Harri son 4884. Open evenings 


BRAND NEW PLANO clad gh ad AND 55 
getirne lessons for only $1.2 ner week 
rlitzer. 111.8 Wabash Open evenings. 


BASS ACCORDION—BARGAIN F 
ne aa ck 3014 abies 


RE 


Cll AL 


SSR eax 


ee 


i Ff OTC JEN. gttteere: 
DAF MOT 


+ or 


ge ye -MEAT MARKET—VERY REAS.: 
ood Joc.: liv. quarters, 2701 N. Lawndale. 


Ghacmne ares MKT.—EQUIPPED WITH 
elec. refrig. 412 W. 63d-st.. Went. 6827. 


GROCERY-DEL. — CORNER, COMPLETES. 
_ Quick sale, barg. 3758 N. Sacramento, 
GROCERY-MET. MOD.: FIXT., ELEC. RE- 
frig.: other bus. interests. 546 E. 47th. 
HOTEL—NR. N. SIDE. 165 RMS. NETS $800 
mo. $10,000 cash. De Woskin Co. Sta. 9891, 
Loge ae ite. BICYCLE RENTG., REPAIR; 
15 yrs. sm. Evanston loc.: reas.: death in 
tance. gp rts C 395. Tribune. 
HAMBURGER STAND AND LIGHT LUNCH— 
Doing nice business. Owner has other in- 
terests. Priced to sell quickly, 
1955 Howard-street. 


HAMB., BAR-B-Q—LV. TOWN: SACR. $850 
cash: next theater. 3717 Fullerton-av. 


HAND LAUNDRIES—2, DOING VERY GOOD 
business. Good op pportunity for cash buyer. 
Address N ¥F 204, ibune 


LUNCH RM.—WELL EST... STDY. TRADE: 
liv. artrs. rear: ideal for ecple.: must sell 
acct. health. 7326 Harrison-st., Forest Par«. 


LUNCHROOM—SMALL, 21 SEAT; 6 DAY 
factory trade: han dy for couple. 
4733 AUGUSTA-BOULEVARD. 


LUNCH ROOM—WELL EST. BARG. QUICK 
sale, $200. 1825 Sedgwick-street. 
a os MARKET—2 MAN STORE, WONDER- 
ul loc.; up to date fixtures, Low rent. Will 
sell cheap. 310 W. Division-st. 
MILK, BUTTER, EGG STORE—CHEAP. 
Call after 6 p. m. 73804 Irving Park. 


NEWS STAND—CENTRAL AND WASHING- 
ton. Morn. & Sun papers. S. 8..2855 21st-st. 


PRINT SHOP—$10,000 PLANT, LIKE NEW. 
for $6.000, Troik Press, 1531 George-st. 


py ag, ge ge BASIS, WELL 
uipped, low rent, livin nF quarters. Sacri- 
fice, $396. 9438 8. Ashian 


RESTAURANT AND BAR—GOOD NORTH 
location: sacrifice: long established busi- 


easy terms, 


DOBERMA MALE—REGIST’D A. K. C¢.: 
trained: yrs. old: will sac. Edge. 7794. 


Dogs Uoarded. 


BOARD YOUR DOG [{N THE COUNTRY 
clean ken.. outdoor runs Gr. Meadows fm. 
Willow Sprgs. at Rt. 66. La Grange 1712Y8 


AIR CONDITIONED KENNELS. BOARDED. 


beantified. ete. Jimmie Sullivan. Mer. 507¢@. 
LEGAL NOTICES. 


SEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED 
at the office of the Secretary of the Board 
of Education of the City of Chicago, up to 
the hour of 12 noon of Lar agra ong phot 
1937, and egy oe ay mi 3) re in 
Room on the 3rd floor, 228 North Pe Galle 
street. for the following school work: 
EN HIGH SCHOOL Dos suo tng 
93rd & Housto 
General Alteration work roar es Plumbing. 
Plans, specifications, and abe gag sheets 
may be obtained in the Bureau Archi- 
tecture, Room 510, 228 North La Sal e street. 
JOHN ¢. CEE TECT. 
HOWARD P. SAVAGE. 
BUSINESS MANAGER. 


acnicago, July Z 1937. 
MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT, 


—a 


Woodworking Machinery. 

ing Twoctwoncing ‘machiogry. ve 
TE woos Equipment Co.. 630 W. Lake-street. 
DELTA AND OTHER HOME SHOP MA- 

echinery headquarters. ane a - 


Machinery Dealers, 

4. GC. AND. >. O, Me. Le BLOW- 
ers bought, so 
ARTHUR WAGNER C saat 701 W. W. " 


aaa na nee a ey. Sane) 
1 IN. GANG SLITTER. IN, CAP. 
MIDLAND STEEL. Ww ; 


RADIOS, SUPPLIES AND SERVICE. 


ness. Splendid oppor. 3531 Southport-avenue. 


rag Por ag ie ew hl WITH FOUNTAIN—EXCEL- 
lent bus Near University. Owner re- 
tiring. 724 “Clark-street, Evanston, 


RESTAURANT—DOING GOOD BUSINESS. 
Good location. Iliness, sacrifice. 515 Cen- 
tral-avenue, Highland Park. 


RESTAURANT AND TAVERN—IN MANDUD- 
facturing district: old established business: 
long lease: $300 will handle. Seeley 92938. 


REST.—LAST WORD IN EQUIP.: NR. STA- 
dium; aver. bus. $100 day: rt. $125; unus, 
buy: $9,000; tms. KANE CO., 828 N. State. 


RESTAURANT — NORTH OF pone s $400 
cash: will sell. Fairfax 0407. 


$49.95 GRUNOW AUTO RADIOS 
la, Phileo, B. C. A. 
Bie terms. Open- 
_ Washington boulevard. 
PHILCO—NEW a LUXE NSOLE: 
$125: will coir $49. Bot We Toeeans d. 


9237 AUTO RADIO, $14.95 =F 
, Radio, 2157 N. Western. Hum. 4808. 


Service, Repair, Etc, 


— GUARANTEED RADIO SERVICE, _ 
ANY SET. ALB 6U. 


COLLECTIONS. 


and Sunday. 


- 


RESTAURANT IN LOOP-—SEATS 135, GD. 
bus. $1.500 will handle. Dearborn 5863. 


RESTAURANT—GD. BUSINESS: RENT $35: 
long lease: sell, trade. 1555 N. Halsted. 


RMG. HSE.—55 WELL FURN. ROOMS: 
$115; nets $300 mo.: pr. $2,700: hare 
Steinbock & Alexander. 160 _N. La Salle. 


RMG. HOUSE—5U RMS., RENT Ph Ag 45, IN- 
come ous. 3 or lease, Pr. $2,500, terms. 
Barnes & W. Washington. State 0619. 


RMG., = i ROOMS. $425: 64 ROOMS. 
low rent. long lease. 5 No. side. 
Inquire Express Office, 663 'N. State-s 


elai U 
at 140 N Dearborn-street. Centr 
BUILDING MATERIALS, 


Miscellaneous, 


USED WIRE SCREENS, STEEL SASH, ae 
oors, structural steel, all sizes, like n 


do 
Clonick Steel Co.. 1475 S. State. Vie. 1475, 
SPORTING GooDs. 


BMG. HSE.—26 RMS... NORTH; SEN 
only $80: 3 yr. Ise.: very clean, well f 
Pr. $2,000: iaeuna, Muhlenfeld, 700 N. State. 


ROOMING HOUSE—11 RMS., FILLED, IN- 
come, $114: rent, $30. Ph. Seeley 6540. 


RMG. HSE.—26 RB.. RT., $60; INC., $320; 
pr. $1,350. Terms, Capps Co. Sup. 6160. 


TAILOR AND CLEANING STORE—EST. 25 
years; good loc. 1208 8. Paulina. 


TA VERN—GOOD LOCATION: WELL ESTAB. 
Low rent: sell account ill health. Call at 
9257 Cottage Grove-avenue, after 3 p. m. 


TAVERNS—TWO FOR SALE: NORTH AND 
South Side: both established and good bar- 
gains. Margolis. Dea. 0490. 


TAVERN— LARGE BACK ROOM, KITCHEN, 
completely equipped: opportunity night 
club. Bargain, 927 Cottage Grove. 


TAVERN—EST.. LOW OVERHD.. ay. GD. 
for eple. She. 4001. or Hol. 056 
tere 


TAVERN--N. W.: GOOD [NCOME: 
acct. of other business. Kildare 4266. 


TAVERN, RESTR. AND ROOMS-—-DUING 
over $2, 500 monthly: reas. Reg. 7546 


TAVERN AND RATHSRELLER—REASON 


50 ft. bar: 30 tables. 2122 Lincoln-av. 


TAVERN—LOCATED IN 350 RM. HOTEL: 
money maker: no brokers. 212 N. Hamlin. 


TAVERN FOR SALE—CHEAP. 1528 W. 
Belmont-av. Bitter. 8968. 


TAVERN @) BUSINESS: GOOD LOC.: 
Sachamanie ‘Atle 1615 E. 75th-street. 


TAVERN—MOD. FIX.: WIDOW can "T HAN- 
dle, Sac 3328S Armitage-av. Alb. 6755. 


TAVERN—BUSY TRANSFER COR.;: MUST 
sell: sickness: $1,150. 4353 Elston-av. 


TAVERN AND REST. —JUST OUTSIDE 
Chgo. §. W.. sickness. 2-5 p.m. Rep. 5520. 


vee ee BLIND MFG. COMPLETE—200.- 
00 ft. of slats. Plenty orders on hand. 
Cheap on acct, death. 2230 Milwaukee. 


If THE KIND OF STORE OR BUSINESS 

you want to buy is not offered for sale 
today, why not advertise in the Business 
Opportunity Wanted Column? Stop in today 
at the Tribune Want Ad Office, Madison and 
Peavhibeca treats. or call Superior 0100. Ask 
for an Ad Taker. 

Partnerships and Investments. 
SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY — FOR REL, 

pty. in or near Chgo. for est. cash bus. Ac. 
will be turned over and co-op., given by old 
mfr. Invest $1,100 to $1.875 for eat. See. 
Good income, bright future, no selling. Must 
come well rec. Give phone. Don't ans. unless 
U mean bus. Address E F 121. Tribune. 


BE INDEPENDENT! STORE MGR., WANT- 
ed by Fashion Expert: int.: estab. Atieod 
$700; give ph. Addresa N E 428, Tribun 


M mache. also veud NEW gh acd Soo PEANUT 


Lg. | 


WORK DAY OR av aS. OPERATE PEA. 

nut, candy, gum routes; 20 machs., $125. 
Old co. wtanen Gen, Address A 4-448, tbane. 
Coneeasions=. tovations. and Lease», 


piped Le SHOP CONCESSION—3UO ROOM, 

near side hotel needs dining facilities. 
Will rent ground floor space on small per- 
centage basis. No guarantee. 


 Hotetl Ae bcecmtde 111 W. Huron. 


. aie isteibutera, = 
| AIR ROU ATOR i 


BARGAINS! NEW AND USED 
CLUBS. TACKLE. OUTBOARD 
Klein’s. 508 S. Halsted. FREE CATALOG 


TENTS, AWNINGS, ETC, 


TAN LINE, 20e: SHORE LINE. 24e YARD: 
rope and twine, 16c Ib.; tents for rent. 
err, 1 rand-avenue. Seeley 7966. 


AUTOMOBILE LOANS. 


CASH 
in 10 Minutes 


on your auto or truck. 
20 MONTHS TO PAY. 


AVERAGE MONTHLY Cost 
LESS THAN $1.75 ON $100 LOAN. 
DEAL DIRECT WITH OWNERS. 


Private Consultation Rooms. 
WINTER-HIRSCH. 
20 Years in Same Location. 


1842 S. MICHIGAN 


CALUMET 4290, 
New West Side Loca 


4653 W. MADISON 
AUSTIN 1243. 
Under State Supervision. 
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING SPACE. 


AUTOMOBILE HOUSE TRAILERS, 


For Sale. 
TRAILERS, 
INDIAN, sane. P. bee’ B.. grote by 


113 MADISON. SP” oft § 


DE LUXE TRAILER, 
wks. finish, 


mah. 
Rainbow Beach. 75th and ‘3 4) 
19387 ag org DE LUXE i! RAE LEE 
Pet h Aten am 
Private. ae 


PALACE ar 03 8. We 
priv. &425. 1030 
ROYAL (AND PATHFIN OER 
ace ae AER 
2412 S. 
nee Sy B 
equipt.: $295 610. 


KIE FOLD-UP T&T 
ar 6237 S. Morgar 


5 —S1298: 


Eat Sete 


MIXED pure. 2 se tebe’ Mune ees 


$576. See. " owner at 


4 ~ ¥ ie ; > 
*'> 4 rf: Behe 
a 4 . me rs m ree?! 
‘i i tel 4 
I Pe mY vA ° Y, ‘ 
nt ee ee we. te AMA 5 iN ri 3 i 
4 _ { i as chai x ; Cy 
2 b : Pe a te 5 oN iE 
To vr P : Ope: as Se 
Ao Baas x“ 
eA, ; ‘ 4 “4 ts oe asta? Y 
. Ace i anf ae ey ROK oa! ths ‘ 
‘ : WR God ce de Sor rates dit 
en OS poo" WDE S EOC Rg ON, Ra 
: ie “4M Pees r 
LP EEN LL LIED SLL LINO ATHY SE AMA 6 WE 2) Re LEGA DIED ERS RDALN ISO SHOAAGBE sepe  BREPS eat vs 


- ncoe- autnsan 


dat * a revesewennsn senses 


Ey. "33 Willys Sedan eee saynesenenneeensnaens , - | SS eee ee 2 a ie) Be Seo se . oe r 5 ead o* ee: 
oie 4 ah Ford Tudor A eit daa eon dl se eeees ‘ be ; ' ips % ¢ 4 int oy ie : aM ‘ i aN a . xs eh, " 0 ” sedan..... oe 2 eee ae : ne ; 
Sa sai * “Vane 1935 | oe 192 ‘Ford ‘ord Tudor,........ sheaee te eee Be 
a ag "30 Buick 4 Door. ‘Sedan... rene neaenennens ee A CKARD onv. + 82 : ; c x: vr : e: y, ; ‘sy edan... * oe | 45 
7 | 30 Bord ‘Forder eee nee steebeneeaeenens : 5 we : Ks ms 4 : : B bass, “ORE: ee Aa. Dow | as $5 ‘Dow my 


ES ard DOGOE vias iccectenstondconasens _PLYMOU . 5 | 
| A Mas Sodan -.n-nrrverravserrsareers 108] PONTIAC 1088 oa get ge eos si pei to 24 Months. } 
onvert, ee? da STUDEBAKER 1985 sedan, 5 pass.. 496 Passen Motor Sales National Motor ‘Gas Co. 
are Guera 428 Others.: _ if | 3 AUTH, STUDEBAKER DEALER, 
Dodge-Plymouth Dealer, _ 6201 SOUTH WESTERN. 


Fords and Other Makes. | : | | 
Ford Motor Sales Co, | 3737 N. Western-av. ne D— rolehed, “Tike "ran. Sem ah Teas 
“TINCOLN RETAIL DIVISION.” ‘37 Tudor sedan # 1930 6: = By 4. | da LUB 1. 
2220-2229 S. Michigan-av, 2929 Lawrence-av. by a Hike ROW: ‘daany’ ex. ae our. sedan, Wide selection of colors. VEST ‘MADI SON. 

Fehr sedan. special. . : Bas acio. heater, Geiroster furnished. All ecanimancenemnaliaes, | 


teem. garage 0543. DODGES : coupe oe yoni ay cn A 335] New. ed down Te Gown. PLyMouTa 1937, 55 
i ine» angele sae ae 1936 Oe oe Se 3910 OGDEN-AV. (si val aa ea if La a 
CONVERTIS AT FABULOUS DISCOUNTS. pORDS— D SEDAN, $755 Site eatibment: ers for our car down. 
be ene radio bane, Corres ae | 5 3 atl DIVERSEY pape pon | 2 State metore Ger : 


upholstering. ra fo. heater. Lorraine high ts. | 9 
spotlights, bumperettes. chrome wheelings. Chicago Ss Largest : ac 7 
Yor iBa sour ae 3939 Washington-blvd. 


: 19387 Custom Convertible ree Vour cas cee ane ER. B59: SE MA CmeR NRE ie 
8. Michigan-av. Used Imperial 8 cylinder 5 passenger sedan. Assortment oo een CA RS—100 Open evenings uit fi 0p min. oop . | rapt. Ba water bh < 
8 evenings. wabsT LIRELOW &@ PASS. OF 4 DOOR TOURING LITSINGER’S 850) JACKSON ‘BL PLYMOUTHS 736s, 378 in: day merelee and eatts criacan 

PERSONALY : CADILL: asamp ga Used 4 door sedan. Special upholstery and GR ARS Ae ee = ee . $465 to $645. | Reeeie Botor Disc, _ $088 Namie iou-beet. 

1936 "60" 4 ar. a radio. % Bee) Seorearice. Radio. pele eee. Tee) Dea eae cane eae beater ee rd De luxe 2 and 4 door touring sedans: usea:| T ERRAPLANE 736, $465 
SED 1935 “20” town ‘ equipped. These carr have heen _ con FORD 1985 sr $e 36, 9545 built-in trunks, eounes. Dual equip. age 

7 » es S68 Remember, Big Discounts. servatively driven by our neighbor- é have radios, heaters, “nd to suit De inxe tour. sedan: built-in trank eomp.: 
: .* hood owners. Some you would call ee Pe? Phaeton. De ltixe 6 wi coabe rumble weal 1618 WASEINGTOR, E_BIG STORE.” qa : nin. dettomter “aie le 8 STOR | Soe 


CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH DRALER. , 1. ort 
’ §, ulit- ALLL ali r o. 
eso oe ean DOW Pr Bargain WILLYS ‘33, MODEL 77 


GUARANTEED sage a5 eget | cinvacer ainrLow|9495 to $625] “CNiiice  liteaiuae kite. |, ee 
eis a ae CHRYSLER AIRFLOW O LAWDER BROS.. fee ah a a #TOBK.” | ROYAL Sete MicHiGAN AVENUE C8 CHRVnOL er. 

pecs nth De juxe 5 pass, 19835 custom sedan; built 90 DAY GUARANTEE cope DLR. [eat TeNe). SOG VINCE ESS: | Aah ye ee 1656, $645. | 1930 Milwaukee- -av., cor. Western. Arm 9167 2345s S Micha Aa 
PORD—'35 DE LUXE 4 DOOR ~ gee Sei $410, 4 door 6 el. de luxe yannoe = built-in vt gig 2491 Milwaukee av. Belmont 1621 a - Ee lis - saa 


: t clock, " 

Bell Motors, Inc. — CHEVROLETS aes. te hea Soy a , $605. YOUR CAR DOWN, BALANCE $25 MONTH. Built-in radio: like ne Sen hiowrn atur tetan” Guat aaeaiiiak oeek ~ 
ON. “AY. our down, ba years. a} 950 OR CA R ’ 

€ ae oven oxenine ul 1OR Bem gm leer |The Home of the Dodge Car. |{sr°saay AND oily Uickhee PEE | Sal, “eumameae=ss me lew Pee ov} PLYMOUTH 1935, $395 : : 

ROYAL SALES & SERVICE, UPTOWN NASH CoO., The a Best 4 door de luxe series sedan mode! Kor sate. 


Beverly Motors, Inc. LAWDER BROS 
sss & ASETANDAY | ge ToWR SEDAM 850 JACKSON-BL. Murphy Motors | 22sisiias: "mam fi sent shcaeea®, oo ee FORDS 
OLDS 1936, $565 (ilinoix Motor Disc. 4635 Washington-bivd. 1935 % Ton Panel. 


316 MADISON-ST.. OAK PARK | i027 re E ae | CHRYSLER 1986, $675. + sskdien tel iii feca teint <i ls 
u Orize O e e sed. uphols ul vip. 
4 door de tuxe sedan: built-in trunk, cruis- g , AT A bIG Mpistoln NeW CA GUAK. | model made. Radio, bh w. heater. Like brand | touring sedan: built-m trunk, heater, ait 19385 yy, Ton Panel. 
ew. Your cor down, balance $19 ner month. | wheels, no-drait vent., ete. oe cubed yg tg 


1931 4 DOC : 
Glasner Brothers “ 75 | oe 
. 1405 ~ & gear: many extras. Royal 6 cyl. ‘mode! 
410 BURLINGTON-AV.. LA GRANGE 30. 2 OR § mR N 5|= perfect, condition IE gn ll me $875: ear 2720) N, CICERO RAY TENNES MOTOR CO., #0 duy service and oarts givarantee, Sacrifice for + A $580. Gu This car repainted red. Very tow mileace. 
ou 4 gh <2 evga he FOR!)- LINCOLN: ee EACh. Hlinois Moior Disv. 4635 Waxhingioti-biva. | DODGE—BENDE IEGER. INC. OL YMT. Don't buy until you see this barzain. 
wees NAGE UV. wah) N SACRAMENTO. "_—s | OLDSMOBILE—LATEST 1038 DE LUXE 3| 988 WASHINGTON-BLVD. 19385 % Ton Pickup. 
“FORD > 1985 : SEDAN. S885. pass. tour. seedan’ battt-in trunk, no-cdraft A beauty, with reconditioned motor. 


Goode Motor Co. 
1813 8. CRAWFORD-AYV. 6900 VINCENNES 5657 BROADWAY. a ‘ggar® Lite t! t thi 
he ont.. ete. ke ne arc S le ; 


| © ANOTHER SUBURBAN USED CAR. today for only $485. Guar.: terms: trade. 
on es omen IE 1937, 95 CORD 1937, $l, 215 Beautiful gunmeta 1. tudor. Original finish | DODGE—BENDER-RIKGER,. IKC.—PL YMTH k action C7] 
1030 DAVIS-ST.. EVANSTON. Cl { Vy. $5 1937 used 4 door 5 pass. 4 luxe touring | Very low mileage. Thoroughly reconditioned. 988 WASHINGTON-BLVD eit Aste OF 2 nee CHivadiet : 1931 1% ton panel 
mace Built-in De juxe special 4 door sedan: beaut, Used: | sedan: built-in trunk, all dual equipment Ful ly guaranteed, . Ger faed Car ak. ae Cae 8 
4216 IRVING PARKE-BLYD eran anal jecuipment. Ie day 8605 | Se een Ges orton Getropier. arn S785: also 1986 4 door de, luxe ones 1027 SOUTH BLVD. AK PARK. OLDSMOBILE °36 2345 S. MICHIGAN. CHEVS 
bal. 12-24 moe. 90 day fuar-| pri 1.275, Very | il Privat * 
A. J. Lentz Motor Sales, Inc. | *Gpen DAILY -3 a MM. estate cae Vous cer SB tar nari 24 mos. OTA ay Oe Fe gig’ oe ge FORD 1936, $395 ae hee en , nek | dele esac wien Wh wooderini | 1982 1% t. stake dual wheel 
: ' e on: guaran w é 
90 day euprentee 80 day driving tria OPEN DAILY-9 A M. TO 10 P. M. Touring sedan. Built-in trunk. ae luxe AUBURN Aut éaLes CORP bargain a 8140 daoe bea es gps: tease: gle Ss. 


5026 W. CERMAK-RD., CICERO | State Auto annne Sere. : 
Ziesage-npcajenedogh State Auto Finance Corp., equipment; practically new. Term 2426 8. MICHI VIC. #004 mone ¥ gs agg Many others low as 
this s 1932 % ton panel 


Logan Square Hudson, Inc. | 3039 Washington-bivd. 3010 OGDEN-AV. M. & R. MOTOR SALES Olds 364 Dr. Tr 7 urin 
W i ’ fhe , g. Sed., $625 | WAnhuR MOLOR SALES 9542 N. CLARE 
2501 MILWAUKEE-A¥ 3939 ashington bivd. 1360 N, PULASKI-ROAD, 6 cylinder: radio: heater: tike new PLYMOUTH "36 DE L. COUPE L.-B. MOTORS, INC., 


State Line Sales & Service sta.| CHEVROLET 36, $465 CORDS (5), '372-'36s | Dodge ’36 Sedan, $565 |" Ford ’36-’37 De Luxe gate Cae need dee cit Ct aes ts | 6035 BROADWAY 


10550 INDIANAPOLIS-BLVD.| The finest built-in trunk sedan model made. 

Radio. hot weter heater. ike brand new. r de luxe touring sedans; some with | De luxe 4 door touring sedan. Built-in $465 TO $565 rgain price 
do $20 per mouth, 90 : : ’ ’ 975. | DODGE DLR.. 1019 DAVIS-ST.. EVANSTON. | 

your war Coen, peewee cae SUPER CHARGER motors: used: fully equip: | trunk. dual eatip.. built-in ‘radio, heater: |). iuxe tour. sedans: used: builtin trunk; | C/2S 88 4 Door Sedan, $275. | "EvAnsTON CARS ARE BETTER CABS. AUTH. FORD-LINCOLN-7EPRYR DEALER. 


ri arts arantee. T 
day written a p he ped, radio, white wail tires. Will sell to- mechanically wey ect. = me + to gay. e heater: other extras: guar.: terme to suit. AUTHORIZED L 2 L PLYMOU EL BUS ours $567 
sa DOboe EA tee | Al Ruby Has _ reens 


3036 LAWRBRENCE-AY | Illinois Motor Mong 4635 Washington-bivd. la f t. 
day for less than wholesale, Upen eveninae. | told rome Te RIVED 6 a ON LER 4618 WASHINGTON “THER BIG STORE. 8921 N. CICERO- AVENUE. U8. 


: 9 Your car down payment, balance to suit. 
iron. tide woes oe CHEV. "36, $425 EM ChAGR RC eee SiAR):| KATLER-YOUNGQUIST, | .— ronp- tise DE Toxe TDgR 
$ min go op an, built-in trun ra upholstery ’ ; 
4701 WASHINGTON-BLVD De tuxe sedan; like brand new; every cou and finish spotions: car like brand new. At OLDS 86, , $665. PONTIAC BARGAINS ptr > SS 5 
—— Tie’ orice gage be duplicat any DE SOTO 1937, $695 5 43 tremendous saving 4 door sedan; trunk, heater, radio, and de 
AUTHORIZED a9 NTO } SCE CO. Terms NOR RMAL MOTOR SALES. froster. Terme, trade, 37 4 ” 2 DooR TR. wy oe OSE: pu ‘84 Ford % ton panel: 
1340 = 63D. CORNER LOOMIS. 5 pass. de Inxe touring = sy eean: pallt-tn LONGBEACH 4682. 6727 SOUTH STATE. ES fae aa AY : CONY ; 7 6 CYL. : USED: ie New paint. tires. Al. Reduced to 
IH J I) S QO N CHEVROLET—1986 SPORT TRUNK SEDAN. & al 36 - . & pase. tour DODGES Ford ’86 2Dr Trg Sed $447 Low mileage. autiful original jet biack |'36 4 DR. SEDAN: RADIO a4 Also 47 others. All makes and types. 
his is a de =. — cw gn AE ate sed 2: Fa csi Bs” 0 day euarantee 36 ‘B56 ‘84s, ‘88s, 130g. etnias 3 oe ‘a ae et sal ee In best mechanical condition. Value OUR cote ‘eee TRUNE.. 4 Closed All Day Sunday and Monday. 

. - Ss, n ue. a at $3 ‘ EPT. 

’ . M. , ; a is abe of Chicago's best CLaRe-MAPLE CHEVY. 1038 N. CLARK. | ° 2 7168 Stony is oak — eee 10. 


car. Wonderful 
T IE IR IR A Pp IL A N IE other seccessories. Your present car in trade OPEN DAILY -? A M. TO 1 very G00d cate a5 
216 «< J all monthly paymts. . i dans, 4 doors, 2 doors and rum- 
A pA low ag $65 durin spies sale. State Auto Finance Cor P., bic seat coupes: all in new car condition: —_— OM cee Pere re INC OLDSMOBILE—1930 4 DOOR SEDAN. | ‘ TOUR DE EUx : 515 a 
I) IE A IL IE S WARNER MOTOR SALES, 354 , CLARK ° original _ some in colors; priced at a  deaa en ae es $145. Scheffler Pontiac, 5815 W. North.|-35 GonPE DE LU nee 47 Uumps = Stakes oid Panels 
; ’ 3939 Washington=-blvd. | die saving: 160 other tate model cars: al SLps— 468: ALL BODY STYLES: OUICK | ‘34 4 DOOM SEDAN: SIDE MOUNTS.” 44: 
CHEVS. °36s, 37s Briced tes seh? legen — Ford ’36 Convertible ~£ale_orices. MAY [Olds]. 601 E. 69ih-st.| $2 9 DOOR POUR SRDAN: THUNK’: $05 MACKS WHITES. PEDERALS 

$465 TO $595. DE SOTO 1937, $695 GFADDEN MOTOR SALES. coupe, filly equipped. with rumbie seat. Packard 1936, $095 34 2 Py aA a & eh Ms others, ali — 
dual equip.. ete. Exe, cond. Bargain. 39 booR SED. 5 be Mots. weve } B&W. BE te ag 430 es ie 
JOO ? Ede 4 = 


AUBURN—1035 § ot COUPE: RIDE CON-| be luxe tour. sedans, Used. | trunk.| De luxe touring sedan: used, Built-in 
trol. Perfect, thruout. See | some have radio, heater. ete. Terms suit. | trunk. dual access. OVERDRIVE, radio, htr 2810 WEST MADISON. HEALY, 7601 Stony Island. Model 120 4 door 6 pass. de luxe touring | 33 4 
sedan. built-in trunk, radio, beater. orizinal | .Y? % ae SEDAN: -sanendcnade 400 CHEVROLET i¢ 1929 


this tor @ 2 By y @ re - $195. Terme. 4618 WASHINGTON pe BIG STORE. "| Chrome wheels, black finish. Cost $1.218 
ey ye Dealer, 2300 Madison-st. Your car down. bal. 2 vents. 80 day cuar DODGES—19386 FORD—'36 DE L. FORDOR SEDAN... .$406 | cost $1.400: whipcord upholstery, beautiful | 39 = of Lee a t sedan deli A-1 mech 
dark tan: sacr, for $695. Your car down. - oy | ; 5 tion. needs paint. Special 00350 


CHE ’ ROLET '35 sag = Open SEVE N until 10 p 2 min. from loop. = " , ” 

; t ' f DO SEDANS. $50 or your car down: $25 per month. 
AUBURN—19 meagan shoo Wes EDAN. BADIO! 4 acor- tuily DAY DRIVING TRIAL “DE LOXE EQUIPMENT. 1937 STATE AND CITY LICENSE FREE. | balance i2-24 ‘nornths. 90 day suarantee. | *: | A 

B AVENES OPEN DAILY~}) A M. TO 10 P, M. — | 34 2 DOK 12| 2515 MILWAUKEE 2515 


heater. $245. 4000 W. 22d-street. MICHIGAN CHE VROLE: 4 CHOO ROM ROYAL SALES & SERVICE, CO N 
850 JACKSON-BL. $545. 1980 Milwaukee-ay., cor. Western. Arm. #167 State Auto Finance Corp., 30 BuaiNESS COU z — 3 DODGE ’34 PANEL, $345. 


) 9 
‘ Buick ' 37s and oe 2345 Ss. MICHIGAN. DE SOT 36 AIRFLOW JOE NILLES. MANAGER. 2491 Milwaukee-av. Belmont 1621 3939 Washington-bivd. SEDAN COUPES. COACHES 

OLET 1936, $435 0 NATIONAL MOTOR CAR CO. | FORD—LATEST 1933 TUDOR TOURING SE- Western Marquette Pontiac, Clean as day it left factory. Best truck 
e.| CHEVR L 6 pase. tour. sedan; radio, heater. defroster dan: built-in trunk, heater, no-draft vent.. P CK a or 

furnished. Dual accessories. NOW $695. AUTH. STUDEBAKER DEALER. ete.; beautiful gr “finish; like new thruout: A ARD 1937, $845 6617 Ss. WESTERN. B DEALER, 

Sedan. The first prospect who sees Your car down. balance 12-24 months. 6201 SOUTH WESTERN sac. for os 465 uaranteed: ° trade. ‘ ‘ ot paces EVANSTON. 
this fine car will buy it. It’s inet 90 day guaranteed 30 iy driving trial. z ENDER “RIEG FER, oH pa. %, gt & ge oe Ag gyal gy = BIR og ty ROLET— TEST '36 1 
FIN ANY DODGE DitAl. ER. 633 WAS uuNGToN-BLYv. | 8 And 1936 touring sedan. like new. $695. PeOoNeTolsAnGoe heelbase stake: dual he 


Y opiEn if m8 a ok ANCE COMP . z 
ALWAYS 0 versey- ‘ 
39010 OGDEN- AY. DODGE ’36 SEDAN, $495 | rorb—i9s5 pe toxe sepan- ee det eve ber ai 1.2 vears. ai fr guar 1 PONTIAC SEDAN: BRONK.... 0. (23 


Finance Corp. CEE BOLE 98 TOUR. SEDAN $549 nd m h ; 
State Auto Corp., "Looks good.” another beautiful Se ies sourine eden, eutittn trunk. Anq| one And only $100 Ba Dee ‘lecnthiy. pes SEVEN DAY DRIVING TRIAL 


i at a_ bargain 4 door sedan, '86: trunk. radio, heater. dual ts bal ices : 
3939 Washington-blvd. | DODGE | ck. ‘Toi DAVIS BE. BV. EVANSTON. CRRESLBS PLYMOUTH DEALER. access Cost, i. ire like, brand. new others. low vas, 8b curing thie, bed oy de.” any 850) J ACKSON-BL. ‘36 PONTIA sk DAN: i _— FORD "4 PANEL, ONLY $205 — — "34 i PANEL, O81 
, ‘ n, ’ re : (eee ttaser 
UICK 1936 COUPE 7.1036 6 PASSENGER SEDAN. “$8 De Soto ’37 Coupe, 5695 | 5oek senines until 10 p.m, 2 min, from loon. ER MOTOR SALES. 3542 N. CLARK. SEDAN: TRUNK 0.1” fern 
B OneS or your car down $22 50 pe : ‘ ¢ ‘ot win SEVEN ‘D. DAY DRIVING TR ‘a $4 COACH, SALE PRICE ONLY p ; . PONTIAC Cou UPB: DIO... << oe 6727 TH S 
De luxe sport Pe TR 6 wheels: rumbie STATE LICENSE FR Pen 3 ig tg toy a S haeene at 8 0 J ACKSON BI. ie yy, ng Tree N. Clark ackard 35 Club Sedan '35 PONTIA SERA nN: 5 oc ree aa. 
yee gee te t $1. S40. rado. dual aeces $5095 GROSSINGER MOTORS, substantial ing. Fully susranteed. 5 og 9 H 1935 1204 series super 8 club sedan. Builit- COUPE; CONVERT . 395 wiki 1 ton . Pe Se Bax: 
Your cw Gov bal. 2 vears. 80 day euar.| 2658 LAWRENCE. LONG. 7883. SUN. 9102. PACKARD. UDSON 1936, $545 in trunk. trunk rack, heater, dual equipped. | ‘34 PONTIA COUPE: RUMBLE base stake $50 
our car down. 2 Bod 185 De L. Sedan, $465 A wonderful car (euaranteed | at this #pe- goa’ pry bh na 48 
ge ; ) ‘| De luxe touring sedan; built-in . comp. rice of $1,275 | ‘23 PO SEDAN; 2 . 
lack, New '33 PON COACH: a 1936-37 EX 


Open ozenione mel OD wing 2 min. ue. from loop. | — A cpeyRO —-'31 ROADSTER. $160 —j| Open daily and evenings except Sund 
SEVE AY D A meee, fore or a Pd others. | 1441 E. 765th-street. one Midway 7272. door, _pogntital black finish. Excellent — sias0, i ra. Crane 3 + anes Peter SEDAN OR ATER. 
ES ion. | Gost $1120. Now bargain for, goal, 7 PONTI CO .* ' —_ 
ave Sra. sat petiereyon 3) PONTIAC SED.; COUPE; COACH Oe . Particulars 


OTO 
850 JACKSON-BL. | TH STATE, | De Soto 1984 Airflow Coupe. | tims, Checked, to, eive now car patletaction. |Your car down. al. 2 years fear ; 
° 6727 SOUTH Beautiful platinum gray finish: radio, heat- ‘in SOUTH-BOULEVARD, oa PARK. | | Oven evenines until 19. 3, 2 min. fro om loon. | , nen, daily and evenings except Sunday. | -29 PONTIAC SED.; COUPE; COACH. CHEV — "ag 8YD. DUMP BODY,Ja1 IN. "8 GYD. DUMP BODY, 71 


 # 
pract. brand 


Also ‘26 chas«is 


aes A er, other es. Only ‘a: BR 45 
BUICKS ’37s-’36s SADR OSES ORY & $345, $395. mSouthwest Chev... 9! p i $50) al ACKSON-BL. P ACKARD S AUTHORIZED PONTIAC DEALER. and “Same Same eauy.. AL AS iS Sat BG La 


ny 6 papal ag Qver_ 150 other bargain ESSPX—"S1 SEDAN. NEW FINISH. $05. 6 1987 DEMONSTRATORS. 7727 S. ASHLAND OF Sgt SELECTION — sme = BEST SELEct 
: EON teas, 


4 door touring sotene and sport 6727 SOUTH STATE. oof j 
nsed: CHRYSLER-PLY Pi ALER, pr. Mid-City Chevrolet, 1147 Jackson. 
wholesale.” Open ‘Soa BROADWA Ford 86 De L- Fordor $475|IIUDSON '34 SED., $395} Used Touring sedans; radios, heaters. Pontiac 35 Sedan. $435 | 175 mutta sMorene 
? 


pel until : 
ae atone CHEY.—’84 COUPE: FINISHED IN BLACK: : 
Laney Y O'ROUBE OUR mt ett as bf | pare . oday's ose erga shag Sain Wee? st 88 Aictiow ge i pageivol ag w00d A th Baas exc.| 4 oar ogg cet ne ene , pose SAVE UP TO $400 ‘ F  —~ ‘ 
2 min. Loop). and overdrive. On ec nts. ecomp.; heater. Finish. ete.. perfec ar 2 aL EBA 
a SED AN Montgomery Ford Dealer. 2300 Madison-st.| YOGr aig “car down paymt., pal. 24 mos. RANGECRONT- -FLOTOW MOTORS. PACKARD. TWERDAHL PACKARD, eau wc te Seok, Se ee ee EF 3 
BUICK : CHEVROLET—33 COACH. SPECIAL ONLY 86 Broadway at Argyle. _ 894 DIVERSEY WELL. 8400. | top. Mechanical and uphol- : 1G4N 
#15. Reduced from oe 1033 Chic fo-av. ah Evanston, *Gniy. 2127. | FoRD—1936 DE LUXE FO DOR SHDAN.|. Open daily and evenings except Sunday . : | stery tke onths ay. 3 cand _CHASSI ue AMD 
$495 Newberry Bargains. 1 N. Clark-street. ; ,|1441 E. 75th-street. Phone Midway 7272. Naito Bb ah See 10 wee 
padi d nn é~/ ME. ————=——- | LIE SOTO ’38 SEDAN, $205.) _ trunk. radio. heater, trans. dull ray 036 5 4 Chevreiot Th Hat iB 
odel 34-57. 6 wheels, trunk rack. Priced| CHEV. "36 DE L. TRUNK Pig . +. 8495 ’ finish ; —. low mileage; special, $476. 9 ? KAILER-YOUNGQUIST —— acon: boiievar 
ne for this - ont — eure ae dr. hyd brakes. 6 wie ee In wipdestel qposition. 18 months t ope ee no Mem ; HUD ON 36 yourlny oe. op sedan. down, balance. Prey 4 rr DUMP aD 
; a av., own. % n-st. . - 
SHORE BUICK CO.. ce Bvenstot 2717 MADISON. ontgomery Ford oat _F2 — Touring sedan; electric hand, radio, $645.| months. 90 d pony, guarentee, 40 day dr. trial. 5()43 BROA DW AY ey Tet Slane cond vi. ROE, tes 
UTO SALES CORP A NY 


7320 STONY ISL Mi. 6400.|CHEVROLET—86 SPORT COUPE: Rapio, | STUDEEAAEE DEACES. FORDS '88-'84-'35-’36s CE COMPA 
‘ a 7 940 oe ; 
BUICK 1987. piteiin Men “seat wees: bind l ada hata CHEAPEST PRICES Om TEE SOUTH BIDE. an a ET roca mt — 3910 OGDEN- AY ee LONGBEACH 4682000 cao DELIV, 51d (RVING BRS 
ACE . — “ef ’ P ’ ’ Boh 6 DUMP: ‘00D cor 
ontiac ’37s, ’36s COND, $650. 


° ertible CHEAPEST PRICES 
arts 2 door | irunk an: in” officials’ Pee: an valle Bee. yg Taian. 5250 HARBOR MOTOR CO. 70th and Vernon-av.| Al; must sell; $125. Hemlock 6197, 


th officials’ used: di 
leage. saving. MOriy, pty. 4015 WN. Bernard-st. 2a fi. assenger. ‘Exceptionally good running | PORD—'33 SEDAN $ HUPMOBILE—'31 "6" SEDAN $165 | PACKARD—'31 SPORT. PHAETON ....$236 
ST berth ne ole Buick Co., Seer a a oe eonalt tion, Guaranised. _ Another beautifi "Bvansion “car. BUTLER MOTORS, INC... 2560 Michigan. A classy sport model. Haw ver tebe salaee ana’ hele equipped we | gg Eg Ms ND UP EPS 
AB inuertt gure Be € appearance, res ‘ panto tnen 
MAPLE AT DAVIS-ST., EVANSTON. $150. ' 2op-sPRiwt 7820 STONY ISLAND. MID, 6400. | DODGE DLR. a 018 DAVIS.ST. VANSTON, La Salle Str. 8 736 Another beautiful Evanston car at guaranteed like —— new. today | 1936 DODGE 43 YARD DUMP TWoobl 
CHEVROLET—1936 SEDAN TONE ema ven a cautincian pL Aneto, oo ARE = CA a bargain price _| Sour. on —— ent. balance to, suit body: slichtly See Bate. art 
sodas 45 door bully seonn ann |REY.— 31, ORY, COUPE, FW, | Me a sa oat "amesitt’™” | “cand oadtoaty Wah Gotta fase 5 : ; #45 WASHINGTON-BL., {2 min, Chgo. Loop); | “Southwest Chev.. 0280 8. Asi Ost 
io, bot water heater. jike brand new. ees Fb a de Another, beautiful Evanston car. PACKARD Rai? PONTIAC 1935, $465 1932 G. M. C. 1% T. 
sero doms. iar tah oe anna’ © | “CHRYSLER 1937, $795 | nonctter’ “atblenieeenon.| 0727 SOUTH STATE-ST. | a Son, ante, doo! | ob, wen 6 wheel tae 
: | ise use this car with the “average ' tires. built- $79 The anew built-in trunk touring sedan 3 EV. % ia PANEL, GUA 
F Disc, Ei ICALLY itiee, is : dh model made Radio. h. w, heater. Like brand | See Mr. Pierson 8. sacine-er ai — 


, ashingion-bivd, Imperiaj straight 8 de used EVANSTON CABS ABE B THE CALS. P RDS — 198% USED, PR this one was driven 99,1 A 
BUICK 185 MOD. 67. atl Gunl equip; orig, cost 91.22, Positively DODGE—'85 DE LUXE 4 DR. SEDAN. $495. | y new. fully ar, savings. is “broken ke: righ boy radio 2496 &. coe. Wee che dows. talanee ‘320 month. | ForD—ap 4 

no our ¢ and heater. mmacu prerior, | i arg : 90 day service and parte guaran Pr Ry 4 CXL. Pag! _ 3, BY ALS. 
OTORS. person wh cme shai 120 Coupe 36, $645. Titinois Motor Disc. 4636 Washington-bivd. ake: barg. Vesely den. 


same as brand few. Sacr. for $796. Heater. This car is a real bargain. 

5 p. sedan, 6 whis.,. fender saetla. radio and “ON LE 

$50 O 36 PE Auth, ¥ i t-rd, wer. : 

a. ae Finish , uneaister, motor, ore in : r. 198) STATE AWD City License PRE, | 40th. ord Lincoln ae sites Dire, 9048 Heo s Hon. obs tet oh ‘Rayiaon generat A, real 086, sully equipped PQNZIAC—1084 4 DOOR SEDAN. .....-$375 To Kent. 

HILL-PACKARD, N DAII ) M.TO10P.M |ROYAL SALES & SERVICE, RD *36 TUDOR, $46 esiern-av., 1809 Devon. Bri, 3100. Aa or your car down, $20 per mouth. | STAKE TRUCE—1 

State Auto Finance Cor 1930 Milwaukee-av., cor. Western. Arm. 9167 Built-in trunk.  Badio, heater. SAL 1936, $675 Terms, trade. 2235 Michigan. ICENSE sponse. driver 
P-> | $401 Milwaukec-av, Belmont 1621 3739 'W. NOBTELAY, LA LE 19 aa GROSSINGER MOTORS, 

PACKARD 1986 120. 2658 LAWRENCE. LONG. 7883. SUN. 9102. 


: VW oie FPORD—’35 D Ux PEN PHAETON: 

3939 ashington-bivd. DODGE 1986, $548, leather “upholstery, meer” Unee: Life Guard FE gy. PO g vaeeeea Taal 2 ae gar " apee Touring 4 Door Sedan, Equipped radio. | pONTIAC—1935 COA HERE IS A VERY 
Ch j ’ De . pee. sedan with many extras, perfect | 7ubes: poareen mechanical condition. | Original gray finish New it cost $1.590 | heater. Low price of $745. fine car; beau. condition, Ifke new; suar- 
rysier 35 ae $525 cond : must pe, seen to preciated at | $290 cash. Randolph our car down. bal, 2 vears. 90 day gu: 2247 SOUTH MICHIGAN anteed. Only $170 down. 

Coupe. ™ tor fiuish anid upholstery refiect f 3545; guaranteed. FORD—1935 TI ets “TORE SEDAN: Cone evenings AY DR Binh IA : pve ange areaets. Many others low as 
perfec i " prsigew: 5 WA 
little use, Fully guaranteed UPTOWN NASH co., Was $305: now 0 ° today. — — PACKARD, REAL °37 120, $966. WARNER MOTOR SALES, 2637 Southport. 


PACKARD. 5657 BROADWAY. Montgomery Word Deal Ford er. 5. Terms, Ses today. $50) J ACKSON-BL. ah oth et i oo __PONTI AG? "30, $545 


tidy D 


and evenin & ex nd ’ Ford ’86 De L. bes “Tudor, ores 
SE TIRYSCERS | cae seater: | ro IVELATEOE WEE. oxy | LA SALLE "36, 9698 | pacrara re0a a6 7 P. Boden, [Bal ee tia 


“CH RYSLERS foupe, “A beaigiy.” Ista ponitive poe ORD ae OH Ge ‘i . Iuze custom tour. sedan: built 4818 
, 2A : ; ass. de luxe custom of an; n ees he ter: $1 108 
wheal Ki Fr A ied "907 DIVERSEY-BL rim: 0 smite s tifen, special BAL Seontshed. White nn i ees gown | gacita. zat ane itichigan Cal 741 
27 ._ | air branes 2008 tcEéanrat. “tum. Fit balance 12-24 mo Packard ‘85 Std. 8, 5 P. Sed. 


rere 
ee ay DOD 128 COUPE FORD-—-1937 D MOS . LARGE gent. PA 
gets leo ME AE EIremer | 3010 OGDEN@AV, |etiin' 3s te wats chat |B 
sedan, $235- ae FORD—103 TGDNE A UPE. $120, A ° | — PACKARD. 1937 Low tb wii SEDAN — roar vA eae AINT — 
new. tod eipmant Ome am: pouaiilep Whe new | Ford am oui ' groudway. La Sallie ‘84 Sport Coupe ADIO, TRUNK, Usie foie ae, 
CE coos cots BT “Hip. as00 WORDOR SEDAN: CSED: le _paunic ils eon Wilks. “72 6727 SOUT 
: 000 mi.; $6 $495 PACKARD 1980 SEDAN, 6 nee 78 H STATE. 
Pont, ‘35 4 Dr. Tr. Sed., $485 


g piuerr bexin at $740 : 2700 ‘MAD! sad REET. |- — popor a8 1085 Teeniaa SEDAN Sricaiey’ Sard tale aa Motion ct: ) 
SEDAN. Rumble seat, radio, heater. Clean and PACK ARD- 1020 20 m TRA, NEW ; 
quaran ps S155. 5864 Bawy Fully equipped. Guaranteed: like new. 


FELZ Y DIVERSEY-BLYD. — = , Side mounts t condition, $495. | ———SEENs <<! Fr oT 

Tid BRAN HEE_ | CHRYSLER "31 SED) is | ata oe gr = | a 

ACR SOE L., 9049 | sehiotehybett ‘Heys AT KROLL’S i LOLBT. 1147 JACKSON | 6208 COTTAGE te ae Pierce Arrow 733 Sedan | 992! N. CICERO-AVENUE. 

al etapa: AN AY "HEVROLE sil PRAISE saree ; -|= ame marca -AET OW 33 wee Ce 

2845 s. MICHIGAN. DG. 6 LURE 4 DOOR | Pally ny {8 i oe eee : Custom re eB PO LA | 
sae : , tourti tn enn, heater. radio Sam ae <— er » |4 door de tuxe touring sedi be trunk. @ tires... pte ap ee © 395. Terms, $100 do 347 S&S Crawior We pay of your notes o; 

10-0? wie eaaunts, Waa ts aoe 3 Win al RE. |, h. w, ne ter: like t yous 2426 a iicnids iis se ieee —~ ee = | ou: or another car | 

maf Sag 1400 car down varie "TBRCE Skew OAEAT Ol LUXE SB $375, Scheffler Poutiac. 5816 W. North, | COl. 7180. 


4 
ino Set ? Aft: ous ear ‘Biilok the wees 
F aie é i NVI , Te - " i. er : , 


1334 ios © dale . 
v* - deat ; 


aes 


. uti ’ -_—— “LINCOLN, Your “SEDAN i aes —-|— 
iW Yi rales helow cost. t 


Ge pve. ats oe 


9 es Hwee ate Pees oe ee 
‘ Clearance tg ar. ait gee yg! rare. 


7636 STON = TEAR AY. 


ee gar es aitheed as. f 
ist, eae 
Je * 3 
haa 


Ywetty Aa Bees 
RE aE 


ws Si ty <r Relea 23 See Eg se - aes aN aS 
S51) ae Na ee EDR! EPRI: A fies, 2 Da EGO 


pt 


BE ercngenr ete ing 
~~ es 7 J a 
“! § 3 FF (a 


| 
3 
 -_ 


5 


ee PS WHEN. Say PS Se . 


cbr 


i A 
4, a 


Oe At 


ss , ¥ “ r er po Bie ” “ Mired “ > x 4: $ . petite SH 
z 4 “ ‘ ‘ re G : é aS 


ye y 
SE I Ee 3 


ney a4? apap ee 
: : sf , > 


ee pl 
ede Fa! 


ir 


4 s os 
aA 
cia 
i ere ee A) 


a) 


} : 
d t 
& 4 
i 
, : aoe OUP OP RA POE POP tt at AES ES OIE ~iie one CP SDS FUERTE RE OEE OL EE CR EE ASE POL ITE SY a WT OS RYE bm 
» hk P f . 
{ * 7" eo 7 e - * 
; . q ' . * : . 574 
* ‘ ; ! 
. i | 
‘ : 
Res Seas ; a 
~ wo 
<< # 
Be . . o. . 
i * 
ee 
4 bd 
°¥ 
= 
‘a 
“ 
: sei U. S: $. COLORADO 
CIRCLE INDICATES A ADI | 
00 MILE RADIUS OF AREA 
HOWLAND ISLAND - 
. 
5 
ees 
% 
eee S 
is 
¥ 
* 
PP. -$ 
eas 
2 < . 
A. sie . 
La 
jer. . sie a}e¢,7 
8 " ° V\ mpHnotdc O10 > PY » 20 +6 
SOLD : Wi . 4. Nalp : : 
. 7 . . J S * a $ 
AT) . 5 ¢ x ; & aU © $ 
. & 5 ne : . . ATO é t na s 
Q ‘= e ° f J dv 
. g * & « 2 + . - i a s 8 u 4 & Py % | 
a “ é e 4 * w % a oe * 2 3 : 
Alle 2 P PT : ace ¢ D¢ 0 ‘ ° . , * ‘ 2 : 
- C9 ; 
; - p OTD : : 8 : € , , none , i Sie ape 23% 
‘ @ PIG arted Db “48 | 
=38 , - DOL ‘ ’ ave , r 
+ ee 
Pe ae Coy = “A 
- 2 
’ 
“ig 
, 
| % 
i 
' 
: % 
! : 
v ele fas 
Ss , © ANA Ante a4 was 
; ” PPO OL RE Pate 
Le ; ig. pO RRS OB 
ae ee EE esse 
| 7 | = a “ 
| > ae WA IO Z . 
“a / " 
: A a y 2 % 
| 
} : q 
4 i . ¢ : 
' " i 
* ; 
f P {4 
ro oe ’ ‘; SOY, e 
4 4 SSSR os 
7 ip « DA co . s g 
Pr re : . é 3 
| | & 2 = 
: ‘ 
5 Pt, : "¢ , " ere) , : me % 
ee “ 7 
ee = = : ; 
bed ca wo o Ce a 3 ms 
DF 5 8 ; Od 
4 . 
Py ARSO d : . Pa 3 ol0Trado e 101INeC ¢ @ c JP c 
- om 
A : sie ‘ . > ; OG 4 r : 
¢ » B atic - 
4 aApDdDeC * ‘ d U “ d < U Cc 4 ‘ 50 i. 4 ompL : OTE 
é Tic aie < HOC 7 7 Ss : SOz . . : - 
& ‘ Bis 
-aG@ % Ba ca , , nee ssociatec Press Wirenhote . r yee 
- . “age a 
= . . «. A Citic Leis). 
€ & 4 a 4 = +s = - & u ea * rs » o ° 4 - « e - * 
' fy 
id OL & & ‘< | ‘ & J we & " e & 4 J yuk 
4 4 , é ; a n«¢ 4 f , £ 3 , ’ 4 ° , 
f é 2 é Bq j § é 
v % 3 al 
¥ 
See : ee : 
; 
é . ; 
« 
Ke : 
a0 i 
‘sy * 
Ren pape % Be 
ERD DARIO De i ' 
Mipsis Be 
3 | oe ve ; 
*t . f ay Z 
; ‘ set, oe ; 
Sof . @ 
ee ; ' ; 
SA aah ; F | 
foe ; a 
| j op tetel : : 
ee f ' : 
i i : | 
; t riage tliat oatiae 
| ee j 
' ve x 7 * 3 
' ' = ; 
’ ; 
| ie OR is Ses 
oe . ; i aes 
oe i : Be 
Nd = ; | etait ¥ 
aaa" IK AP REI Lal , ‘ 4 
abe Pihecintt ica Gantt 8 hctsbigh Sieh tehnt 4 aseeaeTeiA D es . . . nomen ' . . : s ; 
4 7 2 oes ids gts Sc iet £0, * as ia eo 5 z " " : 
, ges © “ 
Se a ee ee ee iat 


eens ane + a0 rac ase ce satel 


1 3 Z ¥ > : e “ 
2 - ~ 
2 : : | 
b &; ¢ 
d y ° 7 - | ? ” : 3 
J si. 46 ey } 7e : a ‘delete Le ’ +epee ‘ Bec > ew. JtLLic: ; LLIUVCUVSaYr : ‘ i 
4 LZ 
* 
free 
| f 
: ‘ wy : ae fee ee f \ 
i f . 4 2 it “a $s POS eee ree r ” waiie x ; . wee RT ate 3 = - 2 = i 
Shee ras et ae : - cies A : ai aes - 
: ee a Se t 2 er eee, it em 7m ed ; FERNS bi io ee Nata: aS ys is SA 2 as ia aR De aon : ss o pam. * / ra ~ z oe titan aT, i a reine eR AN . bala) : i 
oS te Rie 
; a ve 
ce