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LO Sy SPN AE REAEL ORE II OTE IE 
o on whe ae pan 


tie 


a 


TO ROOSEVELT 


Set Stage May Not 
Avoid Outburst. 


: : y 
| The Washington Front 


FOREIGN POLICY — Demands to 
know what is America’s foreign 
policy heard in senate; condemna- 

*tion of President Roosevelt's _Chi- 
cago speech on quarantine of 
Japan, and what the public be- 
lieves ‘is an alliance with Great 
Britain. Details on Page 8. 


NAVAL RATIO—Safety of the Unit- 
ed States depends upon mainte- 
nance of a 5-5-3 naval ratio with 
Britain and Japan, Admiral Leahy 
tells congress. Details on Page 8. 

FISHERIES—Alaska salmon fisher- 
ies face ruin unless steps are 
taken to halt Japanese raids in 
Bristol] bay, the territory’s delegate 
tells congress. Details on Page 8. 


BY ARTHUR SEARS HENNING. 
(Chicago Tribune Press Service.] 

Washington, D,.C., Feb. 1.—[Spe- 
cial.J—The vanguard of the 800 small 
busiriess men President Roosevelt in- 
vited to a conference tomorrow on 
the business recession began arriving 

They are coming ‘with all sorts of 
views on the new depression and how 
to end it and all sorts of grievances 
to. lay before thePresident. Appar- 
ently there are going to be some verbal 


° flee 


Picking Done Carefully. 

In order te minimize the danger of 
criticism of the President's policies 
the administration carefully hand- 
picked the business men. ‘About 800 
had written letters to the President 
suggesting that he seek the counsel 
of little as well as big business men. 
A large majority of these correspond- 


ents addressed the President in a 
_Isudatory vein or otherwise evinced 


approval of his policies. 

All of those who seemed safely fa- 
vorable were invited, very few, if 
any, of those who were critical or of 


doubtful : status. Then scores of 


others from whom. no letters had 
been received but who were reported 
by Democratic leaders to be safe were 
also invited. 

Steps also were taken to control 
the deliberations and eventual recom: 
mendations of the gathering. It was 
announced that the letters from the 
small business men showed they were 
interested in obtaining government 
loans and in nine other subjects. So 

sitors.are to be divided into ten 
spe each “to discuss one subject 
‘appoint a spokesman to con- 
| the President. 
_ Subject Dodged. 

"How the handpicking of the subjects 
‘was effected was disclosed yesterday. 
When the President announced ‘the 


“plan for the conference a fortnight 


ago the White House stated that the 
‘Jetters from the small business men 
complained chiefly of.the undistribut- 
ed profits tax and the capital gains 


tax. + daay. nagiaalanesecstelt eae 


and Italy to halt piracy in Mediterra- 


| to state contro’. 


"| Mexican clash. 


| local financing of industry. Page .23.. 
; ae n in Roosevelt policies.Page 28. 


; 1. he ialanicaeageiinadip 


NEWS SUMMARY 


of The Tribune 
{And Historical 
Scrap Book.) 
Wednesday. 
Pebruary 2, 1938. 


DOMESTIC. 


Paul: Wright tells in tears of slay- 
ing wife and friend. Page 1. 
Professional gamblers of Toledo and 
Detroit lose $185,000 when clique gets 
advance information on numbers 
game. . Page 1. 
WASHINGTON. 
Eight hundred small business men 
to confer with Roosevelt today.Page 1. 
Court of Appeals asked to set aside 
Illinois coal prices fixed by commis- 
sion. Page 4. 
Senate approves conference report 
on housing bill and sends it to Presi- 
dent after 18 Democrats reverse stand 
on wage amendment. Page 6. 
Delegate from Alaska urges con- 
gressional action to halt Japanese 
raids on salmon fisheries. Page 8. 
United States navy will match size 
of any warships Japan may build, con- 
gress told. Page 8. 
Senators demand information on 
U. S.-British relations. Page 8. 


LOCAL. 

Horner picks Lucas for senate race; 
Nash forces accept challenge; Prystal- 
ski replaces Jarecki. Page 1. 

A carpenter’s story falls to pieces in 
court; costs him $118.50. Page 1. 

Police squads stationed on lower 
level of Wacker drive after WPA 
rioting. Page 3. 

Reliefers face heavy slash in aid as 
city fund dwindles. Page 10. 

Physicians warn that pneumonia 
time is here. Page 10. 

Judge Oscar Caplan denounces four 
held to grand jury in fraud con- 
spiracy. Page 13. 

Representative J.S. Perry of Wheat- 
on traces slot machine racket to 
Karatz case. Page 18. 

Oxford university settles for $350,- 
000 fraud claims against ex-profes- 
sor. Page 1. 

Hitler studies shakeup of German 
army high command. . Page 8. 


nean. Page 5. 
Japanese government follows trend 
Page 6. 
Chinese declare Japanese columns in 
north central China are blocked at two 
points. Page 7. 
Four slain, ten wounded in new 
Page 13. 
SPORTS. 

Rangers break Blackhawk jinx; 
win, 6 to 1. - Page 19. 

Notre Dame beats St. Louis, 50 to 
25; 11,000 sec Indiana whip Butler, 
42 to 23. Page 19. 

Van Kempen and Yates take two lap 
lead in bike race. Page 19. 

Young German immigrant to fight 
in Golden Gloves tournament. Page 19. 

National league announces its 1938 
schedule. Page 19. 

De Paul books big schedule for 1938 
eleven. Page 20. 

Sophomore to lead Yale trio against 
124th Field Artillery. Page 20. 

Bruins blank Red Wings, 2-0, to 
retain margin. Page 20. 

Chicago skaters compete over Olym- 
pic routes tonight. Page 21. 

Manley junior five, beats Harrison; 
Farragut wins. Page 21. 

Evanston fives win double-header 
from New Trie”. Page 21. 

Jim Clintstock to meet Ali Baba on 
Coliseum wrestling card. Page 22. 

Jocky Adams rides four winners at 
Santa Anita. Page 22. 

_ EDITORIALS. 

Shadow on the Land; Overruling 
the Law; Discrediting Citizenship; 
Face or the Country. Page 12. 

FEATURES. 

Radio news and programs. 

Deaths and _ obituaries. 

Looking at Hollywood. 

Movie review. 

News of society. 

Music comment. 

Drama criticism. Page 15. 

Crossword puzzle. Page 17. 

Experimenta! farms diary. Page 25. 

FINANCE, COMMERCE. 

Offer $67,C.2,000 utility bond issue 
to public today. Page 22. 

Board of Trade committee accuses 


Page 14. 
Page 14. 
Page 15. 
Page 165. 
Page 15. 
Page 15; 


Carell company - ot corn’ manipula- | 


Page 28. 
“ O. ‘Dowles, SEC chief, urges 


rallies, but Europeans fear 


U.S. Steel borrows $50,000,000 from 
banks. Page 28. 
Business Leadiane:toin live stock ‘im. 
dustry to boost meat eating. Page 23. 


ee = ett 
- 


LAID TO FURY AT 
WIFE'S € 


His Mind Exploded, 
Defendant Says. 


(Pictures on back page.) 

Los Angeles, Cal. Feb. 1.—[{Spe- 
cial.]—Paul A. Wright, former airport 
executive, broke down and sobbed to- 
day as he told a jury his own story 
of the fatal shooting of his pretty 
wife and best friend after he caught 
them in an embrace in the Wrights’ 
living room. 

Wright, who is fighting for his life 
against the state’s contention that he 
murdered the couple deliberately, re- 
quired nearly a minute to regain his 
composure after telling of the shoot- 
ing. Then he brushed the tears from 
his eyes and went on relating details 
of the scene he witnessed as his wife, 
Evelyn, and John Kimmel sat on a 
piano bench in the early dawn of last 
Nov. 9. 

“When I saw them there,” he de- 
clared, “everything inside me just 
exploded.” 

Describes Their Position. 

He described the unseemly position 
in which he said he saw the couple, 
then added: “She put her arm 
around his shoulder, and they kissed 
each other. It was then my mind 
went blank.” 

The former Chicagoan was ques- 
tioned by his attorney, Jerry Giesler. 

Q.—Did you have any reason at 
that time to get rid of your wife? 
A.—No. 

Q.—Did you have any suspicion of 
Kimmel? A.—No, he was always a 
perfect getitleman. 

Q.—Did you have any scheme at. 
that time in your mind? A.—No. 

Denies Shooting Knowingly. 

Wright then told of the shooting 
scene and of the explosion in his 
brain when he saw the two together. 

Q.—What cccurred? A.—The next 
tuing I knew I was standing there 
with a gun in my hand. They were 
there on the floor, I realized I must 
pull myself together. The best thing 
I could think of was to call the 
police. 

Q.—Did you knowingly fire that 
oad A.—I did not. 

Q.—Did you have any consciousness 
o. having got that gun and fired? 
A.—No. 

Questioned by Giesler as to his atti- 
tude toward Kimmel, who was his air- 
port assistant, Wright said his friend- 
ship with the man had not changed 
up to the time of the events immedi- 
ately preceding the shooting. 


Meeting at Party Told. 

Wright told of meeting Kimmel sev- 
eral hours before the tragedy at 
party given by the Quiet Birdmen 
and how they had a few friendly 
drinks. together afterward. Next, 
Wright related; they drove to his 
home. . 

Q.—At the time you And he arrived 
at your home, so far as either one 
or both of you were concerned, were 
you under the influence of intoxicat- 
ing liquor? A.—No; sir, we were not. 

Q.—When you got into the house 
did- you see Mrs. Wright? A.—Yes, 
sir. 

Q.—Where did she greet you, if she 
did greet you? A.—She came to the 
door of the living room and greeted 
us there, 

Q.—How did -she treat you when 
you did return home? A.—She kissed 
me and asked if we had had a good 
time, and shook hands with John. 

Then, according to Wright, it was 
cold and they all moved over to the 
fireplace, where a wood fire was burn: 
ing, and warmed themselves. They 
sat there talking over ordinary topics 
of the day, he said. 

Tells of Leavitg Couple. 

Q—How.long did you sit there? 
A.—O, a half an:hour or more. 

Q.—What happened then? A.—I 
finished my drink—John and Evelyn 
were talking. together—something | , 
about his navy flying, I believe, x 
put my glass down by my seat and 


listened to their conversation. Fin-| 
ally I told them that I was getting| | 
sleepy, and might I be excused to]. 


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A Protessor 


Errs; Oxtord 
Pays $350,000 


[Copyright: 1938: By the New York Times.] 
LONDON, Feb. 1.—Itself a victim 


of almost incredible series of misfor- 
tunes, Oxford university today paid 
$350,000 to a group of persons claim- 
ing more than ten times that amount 
as the “dupes” of the university’s 
first director of research in agricul- 
tural engineering. 

In 1924 the post of director was 
filled by Brynar James Owen, who 
had served the British ministry of 
agriculture. in a technical capacity 
since 1918, It was claimed that dur- 
ing the seven years that Owen was at 
Oxford he used his position to sell 
certain worthless patents for the ex- 
traction of: sugar from beets to an 
outside company named the Sugar 
Beet and Crop Driers, Ltd., fraudu- 
lently misrepresenting their charac- 
ter and stating that he was acting 
as agent of the university. This claim 
of agency the university denied. 


Convicted of Forgery. 

In 1931, in connection with an: en- 
tirely different transaction, Owen was 
convicted of forgery and sentenced to 
four years in prison. Sentence -was 
passed for fraudulently obtaining 
$150,000 from the International, Har- 
vester company of Great Britain and 
$165,000 from the Ford - Motor Com- 
pany, Ltd., Ford’s England. branch: ' 

Owen pleaded guilty to forging let- 
ters, representing | that the govern- 
ment would ‘give these two companies’ 
large contracts for tractors, provided | 
the companies would advance money 
for initial expenses. 

University. authorities were ‘dum- 
oa and dismissed ‘Owen. Later 
inv n showed that- che: had. 
bluffed into giving him.a degree, 
largely on, his statement that he was 


$8,750,000 Claims. 


Jom said that it was) is epstie 4 


#6 doctor of'the University. of Wales.” g 


Since 1901 the university hasbeen | 


FOUR MILE RUN 
AND COCKTAIL PARTY 


A-Carpenter’s 
i Story Falls to 


New York, Feb. 1—{Special.]—Dr. 


Graeme -M,. Hammond, who ‘has -par-' 
ticipated in. various forms of sport 
for more than sixty years, celebrated 
his eightieth birthday today by run- 
ning four miles round the track at 


the. New..York. Athletic club. 


Three times a week he goes to the 
club, of which he’ formerly .was preési< 
dent, for a three mile run, but. on 
birthdays he always runs an 


his 
extra mile. 


At the end of the hour’s sprint 
he went.to his consulting room and 
received his patients. Later, at his 
a cocktail 
party, attended by fifty friends. This 
octogenarian athlete drinks whisky, 
smokes black cigars and generally 


home, he was host at 


enjoys himself, 


Dr. Hammond, as a college fresh- 
man, in 1874, won the Columbia uni- 
He held the na- 
tional championship as a fencer for 


versity half mile. 


many years. 


{drunk when arrested. Judge Braude 


DUTCH PRINCESS 


HAS NAME—TOO | 


LONG FOR HERE 


' AMSTERDAM,;:-The Netherlands, 


Feb. 1.—(#)-—The. baby princess of 
The Netherlands, born yesterday to 
Crown Princess Juliana, today was 
named Beatrix ‘Wilhelmina Armgard. 

The name was registered officially 
by. the local burgomaster in the ‘pres- 
ence of Premier Hendrick’ Colijn 
Prince 
‘Her first name, 


while. the. ‘beaming ‘father, 
Bernhard, ‘looked’ on, ° 
Beatrix, by. which she. will be known, 


was. chosen because it signifies “ beau- | 
tiful.” ‘Her other names were after 


{those of her two grandmothers, Prince 


Bernhard’s. mother and Qyeens Wee | 


mina. > 0. Oe i 
The joyful celebrations of the royal 
» 


) _ ‘The iat, question was, “Did you 


Pieces in Court 


Homer Stanley, a Milwaukee car- 
penter, may have had only one ‘beer 
before he was 
2 ; caught driving 
_ against trafic’ on 
North Beach 
drive, Lincoln 
park, Monday 
night, but what- 
ever else it was 
he had besides 
the beer will cost 
him just $118.50 
before he’s 
through with 
Judge J. M. 
Braude of the 
Safety court. 
Stanley insisted, 
in the face of po- 

i cates lice testimony, 

: that he was not 
said well, the fine was all written 
down at $25 anyway, so why not tell 
the: truth. 

Stanley Still Insists. 

Still Stanley insisted. The judge 
offered a sporting proposition. He 
would take Stanley, he said, to the 
crime detection-laboratory at North- 
western university, and let him tell 
it to the lie detector machine. Stanley 
said fair enough. If he was right, the 
fine would be $25 and the judge would 
pay for the test. If he was wrong, 
the fine would be $100 and $8.50 costs, 
and Stanley would be stuck for the 
$10 for the test. 

The first question was, “Did .you 

have only one beer?” 

- Stanley said yes, and the dieatnind 
meee he was telling the truth. 

‘Iie Machine Disagrees. 

“Then he was asked, “Did you have 


janything, else to drink?” and Stanley | 


3 no, put ne machine said he 


tine tad 


ne 


- 


Gamblers Lose 


$185,000 on al 


Straight Tip 


Toledo, O., Feb. 1.—[Special.]—A 
mysterious gambling coup turned the 
tables on Toledo and Detroit opera- 
tors of a betting racket known as the 
numbers game today and cost them 
an estimated $185,000. It was reported 
that similar losses were taken * by 
bankers of: the game in some other 
cities. 

The game is.as popular as horse 
race betting in some cities. It is 
played -daily .by thousands of -betters 
who are permitted to choose a num- 
ber of three digits on which they 
wager that.the numbers they picked 
will correspond with the second, third 
and fourth numerals of New York 
Stock exchange sales or to three 
numbers on the. total money taken 
in during the day at some race track. 
Such numbers are taken from news 
dispatches. 


Winning Coup Described. 

The winning number in Toledo to- 
day was 915, because the total of stock 
sales on the New York exchange-was 
691,590. In. some way not’ yet ex- 
plained the betting clique was able 
to get advance information on’ this 
number before it was published and 
while the Toledo professionals were 
still selling tickets. 

The clique, according to reports, 
sent agents in cars to all parts of the 
city buying the 915 tickets, and when 
the day’s play closed. they held slips 
calling for a total of $125,000 

According to these rumors, the 
same group of betters placed bets at 
Detroit and took $60,000 from opera: | 
tors theré. . The winning: figure in 


erson Park track, 

New Orleans. Although a top limit 

of $5 is put on numbers bets, the odds 
of 500 to 1 make higf winnings. 
Panic Among Gamblers. 

There was panic among the gam- 
blers here as the winning ticket hold- 
ers clamored for their winnings. The 
bankers first annotinced they would 
pay no more than $10 on each bet, but 
others later said they would pay the 
full winnings. 

A few hours after operators counted 
up their heavy losses handbills were 
distributed in Toledo announcing that 
all numbers games would be closed 
until further notice. The circulars 
also stated that when play is resumed 
the winning number will be taken 
from the total bets made at the Hia- 
leah Park race track in Miami, Fila., 
instead of the New York Stock ex- 
change total. 


REVEALS HOOVER 
GAVE HIS PUBLIC 
SALARIES AWAY 


Iola, Kas., Feb. 1—(4)—Charles F. 
Scott, editor of the Iola Daily Regis- 
ter, said today Herbert Hoover told 
him recently he never had spent any 
of the salary paid. him while ,he was 
President, secretary of commerce, 
food administrator or director of the 
Belgian relief program, but had dis- 
tributed it’ where he believed it 
would do the most good. 


THE WEATHER ._ 


‘WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1938. 


Sunrise, 7:02; sunset, 5.06. Moon sets at 
7:39 p. m. Mercury is a morning star; 
Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn are evening 
stars. 

CHICAGO AND VI- 
CINITY: Cloudy 
and warmer Wednes- 
day, rain by. after: _ 
noon oF night, fresh 
to moderately strong 
southeast winds; 
Thursday, rain or 
snow and colder. 

ANOIS: Cloudy 
and warmer Wednes- 
day, rain in north 
and west ventral ‘portions: ° ‘ram vais 
night and Thursday, changing to snow in 
extreme north, shige ouiigor Thareday +s ie 
north. : . 


' TEMPERATURES,IN CHICAGO J 


Wor 24 hours ended n dat 2 a. mi. Webs 22 
MAXIMUM, MIDNIGHT... ...06++.31.. 


TRIBUNE 
BAROMETER. 


MINIMUM, 3 A. WE nist Me 
Unofficial—-_|; 
1 Dp. Mm... 24) 8 Dp. m....28 


ro) 
a 
8 
ba 
ws 


2p, m....26) 2 


PSORIATMH 


ba "1 | 


CHALLENGE OF 
DOWNSTATERS. 


Prystalski Picked to: 
Succeed Jarecki. 


BY PARKE BROWN. 
(Picture on back page.) j 

Congressman Scott W. Lucas. ens 
tered the contest for the Democratie 
nomination 
for United 
States sena- 
tor yester- 

day as the 
spearhead 
of the Hor- 
‘nNer- state 
- ticket. 

He de- 
clared his 
cand idacy 
at a Spring- 
field mee t- 
ing called 
by Gov. 
Horner 
which in. 
dorsed..him , 
in preference to Senator William H., 
Dieterich, whose term expires this 
year,. The same gathering indorsed 
Goy. Horner’s second choice for sena- - 
tor, Speaker Louie E. Lewis ‘of. the Illi- 
nois legislature, for state treasurer, 
and indorsed Auam Bloch, chief clerk 
of the Supreme court, for renomina- 
tion. — 

Two Others. to Be Selected. . 

This state ticket is to be completed, 
it is said, by later selections of can- 
didates for superintendent of public 
instruction and for congress at large. - 
It is expected to be a 100 per cent 
downstate slate. 

While the governor was giana 
up ‘his’ battle plan with complete dis 
regard of the Cook county organiza- 
tion and its two big leaders, National 
Committeeman P. A. Nash and Mayor 
Kelly,. the. Chicagoans were busy per- 
fecting their .own slate, but Nash 
took time off to accept the challenge 
from downstate and to declare his 
own readiness for a primary scrap 
with Horner’s forces. 

Nash Speaks Alone. ; 

In his capacity as. sole spokesman 
for. the Cook county organization, 
which : was:.conceded to him after 
definite evidence that Mayor Kelly 
had ‘refrained to the finish from tak-' 
ing’ any ‘part in the local slate mak- 
ing, Nash said the county committee 
will indorse a state ticket, and that. 
he expects the state. central commit- 
tee, believed under N ash control, will 
do the same. 

Mr. Nash made it clear that so far 
as the offices of senator and. state 
treasurer .are concerned the Nash 
ticket will bea thing far apart from 
the Horner ticket. He refused to say 
whether the indorsements he fore- 
sees will be for Dieterich, whose peti- 
tions. are in circulation, ‘or for 
Michael Igoe, United States attorney 
at Chicago. Igoe is expected to be- 
come an active candidate as soon as 
the Ross kidnaping case is over and, 
in spite of Mr. Nash’s-silence, is. the 
ruling favorite for Nash’s mane 
ment. | oe 

No Promise of Peace, = — 

The mnewspaper~men did extract 
from Nash ohe comment considered 
proof that there i8. no “promise of 
peace between. Chicago and down- 
state Democrats... He -was told that 
in Springfield Gov. Horner told his 
meeting that he had no desire to be 


senmneccnaeng 
a ea 


Scott. w. ‘Lucas. 


wee santos nd J saith 
geen sity iets ‘oxy al ae a ‘ee Sei Se 


tes at 


Abas? 


“The situation concerning the county 


judgeship immediately dovetailed into 


the gradually developing state pic- 


ture. It became known that during 
the day Judge Jarecki and State’s 
‘Attorney Courtney, the most import- 
ant of Horner’s Chicago allies, had 
conferred, and it was believed poli- 
tics could not have been excluded 
from their conference. 


“It was suspected that the confer- 


ence may have been the first step 
toward the building up of a slate of 
some local Horner candidates. It 

as reported that County Treasurer 
ae G. Lindheimer, for whose office 


Sherif John Toman was slated andj; 


whose hopes of a place on the new 
Nash ticket were blasted when Con- 
gressman Thomas J. O’Brien was bil- 


leted for sherif, is disinclined to join 


such a movement. But it is known the 
_ (Chicago Horner followers are plan- 
ning to run several candidates for the 
general assembly. 

Smith in Charge of Meeting. 

F. Lynden Smith, director. of pub- 
li¢ works, who was Horner’s campaign 
manager in the 1936 battles, was in 

charge of the Springfield meeting and 

also was chairman of the steering 
committee appointed to draw up the 
‘list of indorsements. The program 
went through without a hitch and 
Congressman Lucas made his speech 
of acceptance. 

‘Only minor additions were made 
to the Cook county slate at the Hotel 
Morrison meeting. The slate com- 
mittee of the country towns an- 
nounced that their choices for county 
commissioners were Joseph J. Leli- 
velt, chief deputy sherif; Roman Po- 
sanski, city judge of Calumet City; 
Walter W. L. Meyer, assistant Pro- 
bate judge; Nicholas Hendrickse, 
city clerk of Cicero, and William J. 
Kriz, Berwyn. On the siate for 
judges of the Municipal court Victor 
Kula replaced t G. Urbanski. 

Ald. J. M. - [24th] explained 

reports he had resigned the. .chairman- 
ship of the slatemaking committee in 
anger because of the committee’s fail- 
ure to name County Treasurer Lind- 
heimer on the ticket. 
chairmanship only temporarily,” Ar- 
vey said, “because of the turndown | 
of my personal friend. 
quitting the organization.” 


FIVE MOTORISTS 
PUNISHED FOR 
ERRATIC DRIVING 


Five motorists, one a woman, were 
sentenced to jail, fined or forbidden 
ito use their cars by Judge J. M. 
‘Braude in Safety court yesterday for 
erratic driving. They were: 

LUTHER WILKERSON, 51 years old, 
65707 South Homan avenue, driving while 
intoxicated; $100 fine and driving privi- 
leges suspended for six months. 

JOSEPH KELLY, 35, 4300 Washington 
boulevard, reckless driving; 90 days in 
jail and one year’s suspension. 

SAMUEL WADE, 29, 3333 Indiana ave- 
nue, colored; reckless driving; five days 
in jail. 

JOHN MERTZ, 39, 4861 Magnolia ave- 
nue, reckless driving; sixty days in jail 
and six months’ suspension. 

MRS. LILIAJAN ALAOCSON, 50, 49% 
Concord place, reckless driving; six 
months’ probation and 90 days’ suspen- 
sion. 


Invents Heating Device 
Half as Hot.as Old Sol 


(Picture on back page.) 

Cambridge, Mass. Feb. 1.—I[Spe- 
cial.]—Dr. Ra:ph R. Hultgren of Har- 
vard university invented a device 
he calls his electron bombardment 
furnace, which can generate a tem- 
perature of 4,500 degrees Fahrenheit 
—nearly half as hot as the sun. He 
says it will make possible a study of 
40 metals about which little is known. 


OCEAN SHIP MOVEMENTS, 


Penniand ...... New York... Antwerp 
,Ascania ........ New York... Havre 
. Banker.. London ..... New York 
Taft.. Manila ..... San Francisco 
Sailled. | 


For. 
Gerolstern ......N 


| 7 York... Antwerp 
‘Amer. Importe Re won NEW york 


“I quit the; 


I am not | 


a eae ee ee aE 2 
ae! ¢ ce tae aie io eae 
Veal gt aes ~ as = * & = ere a 

x % 


me 


| Four Democratic leaders at meeting in the Morrison hotel yester- 
day, when a slate was chosen for the April primaries. 


Left to right: 


“Michael Flynn, who will run for renomination as Cook county clerk; 


Sherif John Toman, selected for county treasurer race; Circuit Judge 


John Prystalski, named for county judge race in place of Judge Edmund 


In Springfield 120 downstate 
Democratic followers of Gov. 
Horner agreed to support Adam 
F. Bloch (left) of Chicago for re- 
election as clerk of the Illinois Su- 
preme court. They also slated 
Speaker Louie E. Lewis (right) of 
the Illinois house of representatives 
as their candidate for state 
treasurer. 


ACCIDENTS COST 
LIVES OF 106,000 IN 
U..§.. DURING 1937 


Accidents cost the nation 106,000 
lives and 3 billion 700 millions of 
dollars in 1937, the National Safety 
council’s annual summary showed 


yesterday. 

More than 375,000 persons were 
permanently injured during the year, 
while nearly 9% million other in- 
jured persons suffered varying pe- 
riods of disability. 

Of the deaths, trafic took an all 
time high toll of 39,700. In homes, 
32,000 were killed; 19,000 in occu- 
pational accidents, and 19,000 in pub- 
lic accidents other than trafic. [The 
grand total eliminates duplication of 
3,700° occupational trafic deaths.] 

Falls, -as always, accounted for 
more deaths than.any other cause 
except trafic; . about 26,000. Burns 
caused 8,000 fatalities; drownings, 
7,000; railroad accidents, 4,000; fire- 
arms, 3,000; gas, 2,000; other poisons, 
2,000, and 15,000 more deaths were 
unclassified. 

The monetary loss was put by the 
council at 2 billion 550 million dol- 
lars in wage losses and medical ex- 
penses, 870 millions for property 
damage in trafic accidents, and 285 
millions for property loss in fires. 


RAIL ENGINEER 
DIES OF INJURIES 
IN AUTO CRASH 


John Obzarney, a locomotive en- 
gineer, 43 years old, died in South- 
town hospital yesterday of injuries 
suffered Jan. 26 when an auto in 
which he was a passenger rammed 
the pillar of a railroad viaduct at 
Pershing road and Western avenue. 
He lived at 1639 West 57th street. 
The driver of the car was Felix 
Kazmer, 39, of 5314 South Marshfield 
avenue, a switchman, who was not 
hurt. 

Donald Getty, 9 years old, 1443 
North Tripp avenue, was critically 
injured last evening when he was 
struck in front. of 1535 North Karlov 
avenue by an automobile driven by 
Joseph Kawa, 1113 North Homan ave- 
nue. 

Up to 4 p. m. yesterday 103 per- 
sons had been killed by automobiles 
in Cook county since Jan. 1. Of 
these 83 were killed in Chicago, 
where 1,510 were injured in the same 
period. 

[See editorial .page for massacre 


clock. ] 


AND SAVE YOU WORK 


Women tire of preparing meals day after day. 
Come to either ONTRA Cafeteria for a wel- 
come change and from the Visible Menu select 
delicious home-cooked foods. | 
Today~ONTRA offers flavorous Curry of 
Lamb —choice, tender cuts —simmered in rich meat 


K. Jarecki, and Thomas J. O’Brien, candidate for sherif. 
[TRIBUNE Photos.) 


JERSEY CITY POLICE 
DEFY LEGISLATURE 
IN ELECTION INQUIRY 


New York, Feb. 1.—[Special.]—New 
Jersey state police 
dight from en- 

tering Mayor 

Frank Hague’s 

bailiwic of New 


|Jersey to help a 


legislative inves- 
tigating commit- 
tee get control of 
Hudson county’s 
ballots in the 
November guber- 
natorial election. 

The committee 
was foiled by an 
2pinion of Assis- 
tant Attorney 
General Robert 
Peacock that 
state police are 
without authority 
to enter policed a. +P Winephnto.) 
cities, after Jersey City police and a 
pert brunette had balked the com- 
mittee’s efforts earlier in the day. 
Flashing-eyed Alice Seglie, aid to 
Commissioner Charles F. Stoebling, 
stubbornly refused to give up the 
records without the approval of her 
boss. 

Jersey City police, guarding the 
vault where the records are sealed, 
shoved and pushed a representative 
of the committee who had been in- 
structed to break the seal and seize 
the records. 

The grand jury of Hudson county 
indicted 109 members of thirty-three 
election boards today for false re- 
turns in the September Republican 
primaries. 


Court dapeaves Adoption 
of Son by Dick Powell 


(Picture on back page.) 

Los Angeles, Cal., Feb. 1.—({Special.] 
—~Dick Powell, film actor, became a 
father today when Superior Judge 
Robert H. Scott approved his adop- 
tion of Norman Barnes, 3 years old, 
the son of his wife, Joan Blondell, and 
her first husband, George Barnes, a 
cameraman. 


Se . sated 
c aa ¥ f i 
oS % . + page. 
. 2 : * Sp 


the relationship between you and 
your wife, Evelyn? A.—No. 

Q.—Was there anything to in any 
wise change your relationship with 
John? A.—WNo. 

Q.—Did you have anything in your 
mind or heart in the nature of a 
agg to be rid of your wife? A.— 

re) 

2 Hii! you tell just what hap- 
pened? A.—I was awakened by a 
sound. I didn’t know what it was. 
I thought it was something that 
sounded like the piano, and it startled 
me. I got up and went to the door 
of the bedroom and saw the lights 
were on low. Johnny was sitting at 
the piano, I could see only the upper 
part of his face and head. He was 
looking down. I couldn’t see Evelyn, 
and I wondered where she was. 1 
thought she was on the davenport. 
I went in and looked and didn’t see 
her there and then I thought maybe 
she was in the kitchen. Then I 
turned. ... Then I turned ... 
then I saw. ... 


Brushes Away Tears. 


At this point Wright’s voice broke 
and he wiped tears from his eyes. 

Giesler then turned the questioning 
to a statement which Wright made 
to the police several hours after the 
tragedy. 

Q.— Now, you said in this statement 
that “I shot, shot, shot, everything 
that was in me.” Did you recall hay- 
ing pulled the trigger? A.—No, I 
didn’t. 

Q.—Then why did you say that? 
A.—I don’t know—I just tried to re- 
construct. I knew what must have 
happened. 

Q@.—You told Officer Reed you were 
a murderer, that you had shot your 
wife and killed your best friend, did 
you? Did you know you had shot 
them? <A.—I stood there with the 
gun in my hand. No one else was 
there—I must have done it. 


Questioned on Police Story. 


Q.—You told other persons several 
times that you had found your wife 
cheating? A.—Yes. 

Q.—Why didn’t you tell the police 
this story at 7:30 a. m. [when Wright 
made a purported confession in the 
Glendale jailj? A.—I couldn’t—I 
couldn’t—I couldn’t make myself tell 
that about Evelyn! 

Q@.—Who was the first person you 
told it to? A.—My father—days later. 

Giésler then asked Wright to re- 
late his conversation with his father. 
Prosecutors S. Ernest Roll and J. 
Miller Leavy jumped to their feet in 
protest, and were sustained. 

As the day’s court session neared 
a close the prosecutors began their 
cross-examination of Wright, and the 


former -airport executive, who had 


Be Our Guest 
Thursday, February 3rd 
Formal Opening of 
the New 


escé . a murder ny and 
killed a police sergeant in the Bronx 
Friday. Irwin killed Veronica Ged- 
eon, artist’s model, her mother, and 
a male boarder in their home Easter 
Sunday. 

“Tf Irwin is declared to be insane,” 
Mulrooney said, “he will be sent to 
Matteawan. If, after observation 
there, he is found to be sane, he will 
be returned to the authorities and 
may escape prosecution, just as, Lavin 
did,” 

The Lunacy commission appointed 
to inquire into Irwin’s sanity still 
has not reported. Meantime, plans 
are under way for a legislative in- 
quiry into lunacy commissions. . The 
investigation was ordered after Lav- 
in’s murder of Police Sergeant David 
Kilpatrick. 


been on the verge of collapse several 
times during his direct testimony, 
appeared to regain his composure and 
self-confidence. He will resume the 
stand tomorrow for completion of 
the cross-examination, 

Recalls Broken Health. 

Earlier in his testimony Wright de- 
scribed the nervous effects of his 
world war service, his broken health, 
an illness suffered by his wife, his 
own sterilization, and the separation 
from his wife over money problems. 

The witness gave his age as 38 and 
said he was born in Milwaukee. He 
testified he was a sergeant in an 
American artillery unit which saw 
service at the front in France. 

After his war service he told how, 
in 1919, he attended the University 
of Wisconsin. While there, he said, 
he often woke up at night, shouting 
and screaming. On those occasions, 
he related, his brother made him get 
up and drink warm milk or read. 

@. Lby Geisler|—How long did this 
persist? A.—Evelyn used to make 
me get up when I would talk and 
scream at night, 


Tells Loss of Weight. 

Wright testified that when he left 
the university he weighed only 110 
pounds, although his normal weight 
was 160. 

“Mother used to tell me to not let 
things bother me so,” he said. “ Later 
I got a T. B. diagnosis and dad sent 
me to a sanitarium and paid for it. 
I was getting $50 a month from the 
government, which I still receive.” 

The witness said he frequently had 
stabbing pains in his back and chest 
and feared it was pleurisy. 

In relating his experiences in 
France under heavy fire Wright said 
that. one night his unit was shelled 
with high explosives and gas. 

Q.—Did these conditions and the 
effect upon you of these shells con- 


tinue, during the three months you |! 


were at the front? A.—Yes, I be, 


came very nervous. 


In telling of the illness Mrs. Wright 


MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDY SHOP 


3823-29 


138 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE 


Inspect this charming shop repro- 


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Period. See the Colonial mantel- 
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George and Martha Washington at 


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The most beautiful and: 


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BROADWAY 
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CF ATT AND 


Hy It ‘was the “only bel SS ccctla | : 


we ever had he 
eived a letter from 


a department store asking about a} 


bill long overdue, He said it was 
then he learned his wife had accumu- 
lated bills totaling nearly $1,500. 

“We had considerable discussion 
about it,” Wright said, “and I told 
her we were going on a strict budget. 
She said she could get a job and make 
her own living. The upshot was she 
took a separate apartment.” 

Although she got a job as a model, 
Wright said his wife received $200 
a month from him. 

Reconciliation Sought. 

“She lost her job in a month,” 
Wright testified. “She hadn’t been 
used to work and couldn’t stand it.” 

During their separation, he said, he 
saw their child every day and fre 
quently took Mrs, Wright to dinner 
and a movie. 

@.—During that time did. you try 
to effeet a reconciliation? A.—O, yes. 
I felt lost while she was away. 

Then, after a few months, the wit- 
ness related, he and his wife began 
t- live together again. 

Wright said that before the slaying 
tragedy he was president and gen- 
eral manager of the Union Air ter- 
minal at a salary of $550 a month. 

Then he was asked about the depo- 
sition of a Chicago surgeon, read yes- 
terday, which asserted that a ster- 
ilization operation performed on him 
was solely to avert the danger of 
possible childbirth to Mrs. Wright. 

Q.—Was that the only reason for 
the operation? A.—Yes, it was. 


Asked About Photograph. 

Several days ago the prosecution 
introduced a photograph of Wright 
with a group of Hollywood movie 
players. The state contended the 
slight smile on Wright’s face disputed 
the defense contention that he was 
downcast early’ in 1936, when the pic- 
ture was taken. Giesler questioned 
Wright about the picture today. 

“It was a publicity stunt,” the wit- 
ness testified. “ United Air Lines flew 
some people to Palm Springs, and 
when they returned the picture was 
taken.” 

“This lady at your right—had you 
ever seen her before?” the attorney 
asked. 

“No, nor since,” Wright replied. 

The woman referred to was Frances 
Farmer of the movies. Seated next to 
her was Buster Keaton. Others in the 
photograph included John Miljan, 
Nancy Carroll, and Wally Ford. 

Wright testified he first met Kim- 
mel in December, 1935. He said they 
became very friendly, visited back 
and forth, and lunched together. The 
witness said he often dined at the 
Kimmel home during the separation 
from his wife. 


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A GROUP OF DISCONTINUED | 
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Specially priced at ‘6% and $*7.85 


We are also continuing our Semi-Annual 
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bootmakers for men and women 


38 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE 


Report War Minister May ' 


Lose His Job. 


BY SIGRID SCHULTZ. 
[Chicago Tribune Press Servive.] 
BERLIN, Feb, 1A general reor 


ganization of Germany's military high | 
command along lines similar to those} 


adopted recently by the French army 


2. 


was among projects which Relichs-| 
fuehrer Hitler discussed in a recent} 
series of secret conferences with lead: | 


ers of the Nazi fighting services. 

The leaders with whom the Fuehrer 
conferred were Col, Gen. Hermann 
Wilhelm Goering, minister of air; 
Marshal Werner von Fritsch, chief of 
stat of the army; Admiral Erich H. 
A, Raeder, chief of staf of the navy; 
Marshal Werner von Blomberg, min- 
ister of war; Heinrich Himmler, chief 
of the GSP [secret police], Schutz 
Staffel [picked Hitler guards] and all 
other German police. 

Seek Better Cotrdination. 

Since the French reorganized their 
military high command by uniting 
the three defense ministries—~army, 
navy, and air—under the genera] au- 
pervision of Defense Minister Edouard 
Daladier, with Gen. Marie Gamelin as 
chief of staf for national defense, Ger- 
man experts have stressed the need 
of better codrdination of different 
branches of service in Germany. 

Yon Blomberg’s recent marriage to 
a young woman who lacked the social 
background upon which the army in- 
sists for all its officers convinced 
many this was an opportunity to 
carry out the desired reorganiza- 
tion. 

When the chiefs of the Nazi party 
learned that Hitler had received com- 
plaints about Yon Blomberg they felt 
the Fuehrer might be inclined to ac- 
cept a plan to appoint both a war 
minister and general chief of staf. 
The Nazi party felt that only staunch 
Nazis should be picked for the post, 
while the army held that only the 
most efficient men from the military 
viewpoint should be picked, 


Himmler Suggested for Post. 


A number of Nazi officials said they 
wanted Himmler, a former school 
teacher, to become war minister. He 
is 37 years old, ope of the most effi- 
cient organizers in the Nazi party 
and enjoys Hitler’s greatest confi- 
dence. 

Von Blomberg left Berlin with his 
bride Saturday for Capri, leaving Von 
Fritsch, Raeder, and Goering to carry 
on further negotiations with the 
Fuehrer, 

Experts who have been criticizing 
the German army organization also 


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b, » i ; * . ° 


fAceme Photo.) 
CONSTANCE BENNETT. 


Los Angeles, Cal, Feb. 1—@)-— 
There was a certain amount of levity 
in Superior Judge Charles S. Bur- 
nell’s court today when the trial of 
Actress Cotistance Bennett's suit for 
$65,000 opened against the Gaumont 
British Pictures corporation. 

At one point in the questioning the 
defense counsel protested Miss Ben- 
nett, the witness, was answering too 
rapidly for them to interpose objec- 
tions. pet 

“Tf you see any of these gentlemen 
[defense counsel] looking as if they 
had a tummy ache,” the judge cau- 
tioned the actress, “kindly withhold 
your answer until the court has 
ruled.” 

The smartly gowned blonde actress 
testified that she got $35,000 ag her 
10 per cent of the gross American 
receipts for the picture “ Everything 
Is Thunder,” and she should have 
received more. 

Once, when the actress took part 
in a heated debate between counsel, 
Judge Burnell warned her: 

* Just a minute, Miss Bennett. You 
are not here asa picture star. You 
are here only a8 a@ common garden 
variety of witness. All you are to do 
is answer questions and look beau- 
tiful.” 

Her answer was a meek “I’m sorry.” 


appointed task of organizing industry 
for a special “totalitarian service” 
in case of war, the war ministry has 
set up a tremendous organization 
The administrative job alone is suffi: 
cient to keep the war ministry busy. 
The experts, therefore, see a need 
of appointing a purely military su- 
preme commander of the German 
forces. 

Despite the secrecy with which the 
recent conferences were conducted, 
rumors of differences of opinion 
among the army, the Nazi party, and 
economic and industrialist circles cre 
ated serious tension in Berlin. This 
was aggravated by Hitler’s silence on 
the fifth anniversary of his assump- 
tion of power Sunday. 

Industry Seeks to Export. 

The mystery was deepened by the 
failure of Walter Funk, successor to 
Dr. Hjalmar Schacht as minister of 
economics, to take over the new job 
to date and by reports that Goering 
had accused a number of industrial 
leaders with sabotaging the four year 
plan for economic self-sufficiency, of 
which he is head. He charged that 
they were delaying delivery of ma- 
terials needed for construction of new 
plants in which iron is to be extract- 
ed from Germany’s low grade ores. 

Goering threatened to appoint com- 
missarg to run businesses which fail 
to codperate as wholeheartedly as he 
expects them to, it wag said. 

Industry wants the last reserves 
of raw materials to be used to manu- 
facture goods for export and thus 
assure Germany of an income to 
enable it to make needed purchases 
abroad. 

Goering faces the gigantic task of 
reconciling the needs of the army 
with the demands of the Nazi party 
and those of industry. The army con- 
tended that many of the buildings 
which the Nazi party claimed were 
necessary for the sake of German 
prestige deprive the army of the iron 
and steel reserve it needs to con- 
tinue rearmament, 


Ben 


Oe, 
e 
fc 


‘Foreman Beaten by Crew 


of Workmen. 


Police guards stood watch early 
this morning on the lower level of 
Wacker drive at State street to pre- 
vent recurrence of rioting which 
flared early yesterday when a fore- 
man tried to force loitering Works 
Progress Administration laborers 
back to work. 

Angered when he stomped out their 
bonfire, around which they had been 
gathered for a long time, and tried 
to make them go back to work, 
thirty workers attacked the foreman 
and routed a timekeeper when he in- 
terfered. By the time nolice rein- 
forcements arrived ninety WPA la- 
borers were drawn up in battle array. 

Several had been drinking, accord- 
ing to the policemen, who said many 
had seized knives, sticks, stones, or 
heavy wire brushes. Trouble was 
averted by a WPA official, who per- 
suaded the men to return to work. 

Part of Early Morning Shift. 


The workers were members of the 
early moring shift of 1,000 men, part 
of the 3,000 working in three eight 
hour shifts along the lower level, 
For three weeks they have been 
scraping the cement pillars and ceil- 
ing with wire rushes. When warm. 
er weather comes they will apply 
whitewash to brighten up the sub- 
way and increase visibility for mo- 
torists. 

At viaducts and underpasses about 
the city 2,600 other WPA scrapers are 
busy on the same project, which is 
sponsored by the city. The project, 
costing $1,850,000, is scheduled to last 
six months, 

The trouble started at 4:30 a. m, 
when Foreman Andrew Jombanis, 40 
years old, 829 South Marshfield ave- 
nue, ordered his gang of thirty men 
to leave their bonfire and start work, 


Sing and Shout Arotind Fires. 


Jombanis said he didn’t object to 
their getting warm occasionally, but 
that they shouldn’t spend the whole 
night around the fire. Other gangs 
had been standing about fires singing, 
shouting, and indulging In horse play, 
police said. 

When his workers peid no ~ttention 
Jombanis started stomping out the 
fire. One man knocked him down, 
Another swung a red Jantern, break- 
ing it on his head. Others jumped 
into the fight. 

Hearing the commotion Charles 
Volksdorf, the timekeeper, rushed up. 
Drawing support from two other 
gangs of thirty each the WPA’ers 
started for Volksdorf, who ran into 
the Pure Oil building garage for 
safety. 

A riot call brought two police 
s~uads to.face a line of. belligerent, 
shouting men, both white and colored. 
At this point Theron Watt, night 
V’.’A superintendent, arrived and per- 
suaded the men to go back to work. 
He said those who slugged Jombanis 
would be discharged after an investi: 
gation. ee we 


Mn 


thievery and jails, was in troubl+ | 
again today. Now 78 years old, he} 


for three years for loitering in 's||§ 


postofice with intent to snateh| 


purses. 


Guerin, notorious’ as the: first man : | 
ever to escape from . Devil's. Island | 


the French penal colony off the coast 


of French Guiana, had high hopes| 
sharing ir 
half-sister 


until a few days ago 


will, 

On Jan. 22, however, Mrs. Haze: 
M, Griefen of Chicago began actio: 
to validate a will Mrs. Mitchell made 
in 1909 leaving Mrs, Griefen the 
whole estate. : 

In his fight for the estate Guerin 
made several secret trips to Chi 
to talk to his attorneys. Guerin came 
of respectable parents, who lived near 
Hope street and Blue Island avenue in 
Chicago. 


Raccoon Bites Way Out of 
Noose; Police Ambush Him 


Answering reports that a myste. 
rious animal was prowling in the 
neighborhood, Sergts, James Cooney. 
and Thomas Walsh of the Chicage 
Lawn police went to 5834 South Fair 
field avenue last night where they 
found a vicious raccoon on the rear 
porch. Walsh managed to lasso the 
animal but the raccoon bit the rope 
in two. With the raccoon in pursuit 
the policemen retreated to the yard. 
There, from behind a fence, Sergt. 
Cooney shot and killed the animal. 
a 


RARE VALUES 
im GENUINE 


Rothmoor & Brucewood 
FEBRUARY COAT 
LE 
after inventory mark-downs 
from *65-°75-*85 to 


49° 


Some were even $95-—sizes 12 to 
46—half sizes 33 to 45-——5th floor 


MAURICE L ROTHSCHILD 


State at Jackson 


MINK 
COATS 


N ow 


MILLER to: 


166 NO. MICHIGAN AY 


OPEN EVENINGS TILL 


charming, sentimental 


VALENTINES 
10c t %3 


inspired 


by the 


century-old originals 


Hearts and flowers eee lavish, 
eobwebby lace vo tulle 


eile, 
.. ssubele | 


sentiments ae 


& delicate water colors 


fragrances eee tender 


reminiscent of gallantry 


in the early 1800's. The very height 


of stirring missives devoted to romance; 


they’re certain to captivate “your imagi- 


nation oe , capture her heart. ! ae 


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ib $65 and *6§9>° 4 


Brucewood \ 


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3-PIECE SUITS 


‘SO 


new 1938 styles 


New, costly fabrics with billowy wolf 
collars in new 1938 shapes—a new 1938 
styled jacket suit under a new 1938 styled 
coat—-a whole new wardrobe at a price 
you’d expect to pay for the coat alone 


New colors—wheat stalk, flight blue, madeira, 
oatmeal, Sizes 12 to 20—7th floor 


MAURICE L ROTHSCHILD 


State at Jackson 


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AND SUBSCRIPTION TO THE DAILY TRIBUNE 


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- Guffey- Vinson Act Makes 
Thousands dle. 


BY WILLIAM BROMAGE, 
{Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 
Gillespie, fil, Feb. 1.—[Special.]— 
The minimum price code established 
six weeks ago by the national bitu- 
minous coal commission has proved 
so discriminatory against Illinois that 
the working time of miners in ‘the 
state has been reduced drastically— 
in many cases as much as 50 per cent, 
according to’ Joe Ozanic, president of 
the Progressive Miners of America. 
Indignant over the fixing of mini- 
mum price schedules which give Ken- 
tucky and Indiana coal producers 
preferential prices in Illinois markets, 
notably Chicago, Ozanic said unless 
these differentials are eliminated the 
big Illinois markets wil] be lost to 
Illinois operators. 
Earnings Reduced 50 Per Cent. 


“The average wages of miners in 
many sections of the state are’ only 
about 50 ber cent of the level of a 
year ago,” Ozanic said. “While a 
part of this drop is due to the busi- 
ness recession, most of it can be 
traced directly to the code. 

“T am not greatly surprised by the 
outcome of the price fixing and con- 
trol features of the Guffey-Vinson 
bituminous coal act. It is working 
out just about as the Progressive 
miners predicted it would. It is my 
information that the minimum prices 
put into effect Dec. 16, 1937, already 
have retarded the coal business 
throughout the entire country. 

“Too Much to Say.” 

“The officials of the United Mine 
Workers of America are largely re- 
sponsible for the enactment of this 
vicious measure. Henry Warrum, 
chief counsei for the U. M. W. A., 
we are informed, collaborated in 
drafting the bill. We do not know 
how much influence the U. M. W. A. 
has had in the fixing of the present 
price schedules, but inasmuch as its 
officials helpec to write the bill and 
secure its enactment, the chances are 
it had entirely too much to say. 

“The price schedule of $2.15 a ton 
for railroad fuel and $2.75 a ton for 
domestic coal, applying to Illinois, is 
particularly unfair to this state, and 
will :permit the underselling of our 
products by western Kentucky and 
several other coal producing states by 
30 to 50 cents a ton. If this schedule 
is permitted to stand it will certainly 
ruin the Illinois coal industry. 


WITH 8 MONTHS 
TO LIVE, HE MUST 
GO TO JAIL FOR 4 


Dying from an incurable disease, 
Harry Turner, 49 years old, of 614 
Barry avenue, must spend four of 
the eight months he is expected to 
live in the county jail. He was sen- 
tenced yesterday by Judge Oscar S. 
Caplan in Felony court for the theft 
of $1,100 in bonds and checks from 
his sister, Mrs. Ruth Hortop, of 749 
Belmont avenue. Turner is wanted 
also for forgery in Peru, Ind. and 
for violation of parole in Indiana. 


Admiral Wilson Brown 


Takes Annapolis Command 


(Picture on back page.) 

Annapolis, Md., Feb. 1—(/)—Rear 
Admiral Wilson Brown announced to- 
day as he took command of the 
United States naval academy that the 
policies of Rear Admiral David Foote 
Sellers would be continued with em- 
phasis upon increasing nautical activ- 
ities of the midshipmen. Admiral 
Sellers, retiring at the age of 64 after 
nearly forty-eight years’ navy service, 
turned over the command in an im- 
pressive ceremony in the academy 
armory at noon, and departed with 
his wife for their new home in Wash- 
a Admiral Brown is 55 years 
oO 


SON SHOT; greg’ HELD. 
Petersburg, Ind. Feb. 1.—[Special.]— 
Squire Crissom, 69 years old, was held this 
afternoon for questioning after the shooting 
of his son, John Crissom, 23. The son says 
he was shot by his father during a quarrel 
over a dog. 


* 


: POR’ 
“Have Foe 


* 22x) 


180 N. Michigan State 8177 
: Get pres Genuine Acousticon and Hear! 


eld Taken, 


{TRIBUNE Photo.] 
Pat, talking dog owned by Frank 
Elliott, 5472 Fulton street. 


A. talking dog now joins the ranks 
of singing mice in Chicago’s animal 
lore. Pupils of Austin High school 
have unofficially adopted him as their 
mascot. His name is Pat. Other 
data on him: He is a Boston bull, 


8 years old, owned by Frank Elliott, 


5472 Fulton street, who lives across 
the street from the school. 

Veterinarians say Pat has an en- 
larged larynx. This prosaic explana- 
tion of why he can say “I want my 
mamma,” his favorite phrase, Elliott 
accepts. He thinks, however, that 
Pat understands some of the words 
he emits in a strange voice which 
distinctly is not a bark. Pat never 
barks. 

He has learned fourteen words. 
Only certain words can be reproduced 
with his voice box, unusual as it is. 
Elliott tries one after another. He 
began talking two years ago. It was 
a habit for Elliott to sit on a park 
bench with him watching trafic. If 
Pat got up he would be told “ No,” 
and would sit down. One day he 
started to get up, said “No,” and 
seated himself. 


SYPHILIS TALKS 
TO MARK HYGIENE 
DAY IN CHICAGO 


Today, national social hygiene day, 
will be marked by a series of speeches 
and broadcasts in Chicago to push 
the campaign against syphilis. Dr. 
Louis E. Schmidt, chairman of Mayor 
Kelly’s anti-syphilis committee, and 
Maj. Bascom Johnson, director of 
the American Social Hygiene associa- 
tion, are among the principal speak- 
ers. 

Maj. Johnson will speak at 12:30 
p. m. in the Union League club before 
the Juvenile Protective association; 
at 6:15 p. m. before the Illinois So- 
cial Hygiene league at the Chicago 
Woman’s club, and at 8 p. m. before 
the American Youth congress at 
Lewis institute. 

Dr. Schmidt will speak at 7:30 p. m. 
over WCFL. 

More than 3,000 meetings will be 
held in all parts of the country and 
10 million Americans are expected to 
hear about the venereal disease war 
by radio. 


Asks High Court Order 


Convict Back to Prison 


Attorney General Otto J. Kerner 
filed a mandamus suit yesterday with 
the Illinois Supreme court for the 
return of Francis J. Rose to the state 
penitentiary. Rose was sentenced to 
serve one year to life for armed rob- 
bery in Cook county in 1930. He was 
freed in November by Judge William 
R. Hunter of Will county, who held 
there were technical faults in the in- 
dictment. Rose is being held, how- 
ever, at Pontiac reformatory for vio- 
lating his parole. 


SE Ee 
Deaf Thrill 
to New Aid 


The restilts obtained by deafened per- 
sons with the new Coronation Acous- 
ticon are amazing even veteran hear- 
ing-aid users. An entirely new world 
of natural, strain-free sound is made 
available. to deafened ears by these 
feather-light, tiny electrical aids. Each 
one is personally custom-fitted to the 
user and carries a lifetime guarantee. 
Free demonstration at home or at 
our offices. Write for new booklet. 


ACOUSTICON INSTITUTE 


"|Loss of Rail Business Is 


~ Basis of Action. 


BY ‘WALTER TROHAN. 
{Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 
Washington, D. C., Feb. 1.—[Spe- 
cial.J—The .Circuit Court of Appeals 
for the District of. Columbia today 
was asked to set aside. the coal prices 
fixed for [Illinois by the national 
bituminous coal commission. 


The prices were attacked as unjust- 


ly discriminatory by the St, Louis 
and O’Fallon Coal company of O’Fal- 
lon, Ill. The company’s brief also 
assailed the methods by which the 
commission fixed the prices as arbi- 
trary and unreasonable and contrary 
to created law. 

The suit is the latest of a series 
which have resulted from nation-wide 
resentment over price increases im- 
posed under the Guffey coal act, 
which created the coal commission 
to set up an NRA for the soft coal 
industry. Suits have been brought 
by producers and consumers in pro- 
test against price inequalities. 

Ask For Injunction. 


The company, in asking that the 
price scale be set aside, sought an 
injunction restraining the commis- 
sion from taking any action under 
its orders fixing Illinois coal prices. 

The case will come before the court 
tomorrow on a motion for a prelimi- 
nary injunction pending a full hear- 
ing on the complaint. It is to be 
argued by Attorneys Louis G, Cald- 
well and Howard Vesey, Washington 
representatives of the Chicago law 
firm of Kirkland, Fleming, Green, 
Martin &-Ellis. 

The coal company, which operates 
the Black Eagle No. 2 mine in the 
Belleville district, protested in par- 
ticular against the $2.15 a ton mini- 
mum rate set for railroad fuel. It 
charged that it is being deprived of 
its business and a fair opportunity to 
compete in the sale of its coal because 
the commission’s schedules make the 
company’s coal from 50 to 60 cents a 
ton higher than competing coals. 

Differential 50c a Ton. 

“The prices established for coals 
produced by your petitioner are un- 
justly discriminatory against it and 
unjustly preferential to its competi- 
tors,” the petition said. “On the 
basis of delivered preferential estab- 
lished for commercial tonnage, the 


onied Btates one 


pears 
‘Court. of 
peals today seeking a temporary 
order re | 
minous coal commission from enfore- 
ing its fixed minimum price schedule | 
pending determination of the cases 
now before the appeals court. 
In petitions filed last week the coal 
companies are asking that the price 
schedule be set aside on charges that 
it is unfair and that it discriminates 


jand takes property from them with- 


out due process of law in violation of 
the constitution. 

The attorneys said they also would 
request a transcript of the commis- 
sion’s preliminary hearings before set- 
ting the price ‘scale, so they can be 
prepared to argue their cases before 
the appeals court. 


petitioner’s price disadvantage is at 
least 50 cents a ton.” 

In 1936, the company produced and 
sold 115,612 tons, or 34 per cent of 
its total production for railroad fuel. 
During the first eleven months of 
1937, the company produced and sold 
136.816 tons, or 49 per cent of its total 
tonnage for railroad fuel. 


GETS 1-14 YEARS 
FOR FORGERY OF 
MOTHER’S NAME 


CRIMINAL COURT, 
John Schmitterer, obtaining money by 


false pretenses, sentenced to two years in 
the Bridewell by Judge Cornelius J. Har- 
rington. 

James Redfield, forgery, sentenced to 
one to fourteen years in the penitentiary 
by Judge John C. Lewe. 


James S. Redfield, an ex-convict, 
was found guilty of forgery yester- 
day by a jury ‘n Criminal court and 
was sentenced to one to fourteen 
years in the penitentiary by Judge 

John C. Lewe. He was convicted on 
the unwilling testimony of his 
mother, from whose bank account ne 
had taken $6,000 by means of forged 
checks. Redfield refused to take the 
stand. He offered to bet prosecutors 
the jury would not be out more than 
five minutes. He would have lost. 
It was out twenty. 


Queen Marie Worse; Hold 


Consultation in Her Home 
[Copyright: 1938: By the New York Times. ] 

BUCHAREST, Rumania, Feb. 1.— 
The condition of Queen Mother Marie 
of Rumania is understood to have 
become worse. Two French, one 
Czechslovakian, and several Ruman- 
jan specialists held a consultation at 
her palace today it was reported. 


* 


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ate 


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the national bitu-| — 


‘It Be Stopped. 


BY THE REV. JOHN EVANS. 

Gambling in various petty forms 
is not creeping into church meetings 
and socials — it’s there; been there 
for a long time with the folks going 
for it with the bands playing. That, 
at least, is what some Episcopal rec- 
tors have said in replies to questions 
asked by the venerable Frederick G. 
Deis, Episcopal archdeacon of Chi- 
cago. 

Moreover, the archdeacon found 
that of fifty rectors queried twenty- 
cne said they favored a bit of gam- 
bling for the sake of zest and income 
at church affairs. Twenty-five clergy- 
men opposed the practice, Dr. Deis 
said, while several others, he said, 
were not sure about it one way or 
another. 


Report to Diocese Convention. 


Dr. Deis asked the question on 
gambling along with other queries 
concerning church matters in order 
to prepare a formal report on the 
state of the church for the 101st an- 
nual convention of the Episcopal dio- 
cese of Chicago which opened yes- 
terday and continues today and. to- 


om) ts 
Siual edilnw 


On All Clearance Groups 


YOU MAY AS WELL HAVE THE BEST 
MEN'S READY-TO-WEAR 


SUITS 
O'"COATS 
TOPCOATS 


- 


| 


pe Dice es charging Harry 


Bridges, Pacific coast ieectee of the 
C. I. O., seeks control | of labor here 
to foment revolution. 

Patterson made the chargés in oat: 
tioning the Superior court to disallow 
the motion of Bri and hiis asso- 
ciates for a rehearing in a controversy 
involving the.A..F..of L. International 
Longshoremen’s association and the 
Cc. I. O. International Longshoremen 
and Warehousemen’‘s union. 

“The whole. trouble,” the affidavit 
said, “is due to the fact that Bridges 
and his associates definitly represent 
the policy of the communist party of 
the United States to obtain control 
of labor to dissatisfy the people and 
bring about revolution and revolu- 
tionary disturbances.” 


morrow in the Church of the Epiph- 
any, Ashland boulevard and Adams 
street. 7 

This report, based on his questions, 
will be read today. The report de- 
clares: 

“The general convention of the 
church was witnesses against gam- 
bling at church functions. So has 
our bishop. Yet we sell chances, we 
whirl wheels, we give prizes, we do 
a thousand *and one things to get 
something for nothing rather than 
give God a tithe of what we possess 
or earn. 


Urges Cleansing of Temples. 
“The committee on the state of 


TWO STORES 
324 So. Michigan Ave. 


Between Jackson and Van Buren 


the church recommends a cleansing 


| 
| 


WERE $65—$48. 
WERE $55—$43. 
WERE $50—$38. 
WERE $45—$32. 


7 So. La Salle St. 


_— 


Jewel Stores are clean and white; 
prices are low; quality is always 
guaranteed. 


CRYSTAL IN COAL 


“Buchmanism seems to me to bel 
theologically unsound, philosophically | | 
childish, and psychologically unwhole- a 
some,” the bishop declared. — — 


gard as a kind of religious nudism.”| 


CAUSES STOVE TO 
GIVE HOT TUNES 


Harrisburg, fil, Feb. 1.—LSpecial.} 
--Mrs. Dora Reynolds, a widow, has 
a laundry stove at her home which 
for the last week has been issuing 
swing music. She called a radio tecn- 
nician to investigate today and he 
found a crystal set haa been tormed 
in the stove by crystallization of min- 
erals in the coal. A fine wire from a 
crystallized clinker touched a prong 
of the grate, which made it transmit 
sound. There is no radio set in the 
house. 


Sale! Handma 
BLOUSE 


EVERY STITCH DONE BY HAND! 


“A"—Pure dye silk 


tin in 2 
Sizes 32 ay ri “eg 

Famous Makers 
Cleseouts ... 


All Perfect 
Quality 


$6.95 to 812.95 
Values! Save? 


* PURE DYE 
SILK CREPES! 


° PURE DYE 
SILK SATINS! 


Many: Samples and 
l-of-a-Kind! Save! 


Imagine! Hand tacked, 
hand faggoted and hand 
hemstitched! Styled and 
detailed to perfection! 


Mail, Phone Orders 


Taken on Sketched Blouses. 


Call State 1500, Local 33. "C""-Pure dye 


in 
crepe Brn geen ee Ts 


UPPER SUBWAY, STATE 
Sizes ayn to 40. 


ro navy or gold. 
Sizes 32 to 40. 


~ Concerning LIPSTICK__ 


Nothing is so unsightly as the 
ends of plain cigarettes red- 
dened by lipstick. To avoid 
that, smoke a Tareyton Cork 
Tip—it resists lipstick. And 
Tareytons have finer, milder 


“ie  TAREYTON 


15 )] 
“There's SOMETHING about them youl the” 


HERBERT 


NOW 
ONLY 


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* a Y yer by v 
- - ‘ a ey 
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BY DAVID DARRAH. 
[C..tengo Trihune Press Service.] 
, (Picture on back page.) 

SALAMANCA, Spain, Feb. 1.—A bid 
for new international status is being 
made by nationalist Spain |the Fran- 
co insurgent régime! in its establish- 
ment of a regular cabinet for civil 
administration. It will be in a dif- 
ferent position. with respect to gov- 
ernment [loyalist] Spain now that it 
has a regular administration, 

Gen. Francisco Franco, head of the 
rebel régime, issued a decree yester- 
day which abolished the technical 
junta which hitherto had been 
charged with civil administration and 
replaced it with a cabinet of eleven 
members, of which Gen. Franco wil! 
be president and supreme head. 

Franco’s Position Improves. 

The establishment of the cabinet 
follows a recent betterment of Gen. 
Franco's position since he received 
virtual recognition by Great Britain, 
Poland, Jugo-Slavia, and others who 
have established agents in Salamanca. 

The preamble to the decree said the 
new governmental organization does 
not prejudice the definite form which 
the government of Spain may take 
later—that is, whether it will be a 
monarchy, republic, or some other 
form. : 

Two significant points stand out in 
the creation of the new ministries 
and the definition of their competen- 
ces. 


May Seek Vatican Pact. 


The first is the fact that Count 
Francisco Gomez Jordana, the new’ 
minister of foreign affairs, is men- 
tioned as being also. specifically 
charged with relations with the holy 
see. This is interpreted in Salamanca 
as meaning possibly that an early 
attempt will be made to negotiate a 
concordat with the Vatican. 

The second is the fact that the new 
cabinet will embrace a ministry of 
corporations, indicating that Franco 
expects to carry out his plans to give 
his government a distinetly corpora: 
tive trend. 

Count Jordana, who is vice presi- 
dent in the Franco government in 
addition to being foreign minister, 
and thus holder of the biggest job, 
is 62 years old. 

Gen. Martinez Anido, director of 
public security, who was a minister 
under the late Dictator Primo de 
Rivera and was recalled from retire- 
ment by Franco three months ago to 
take on the reorganization of the 
police services, is given a new title— 
minister of public order. 

Gen. Davila Gets Key Post. 

With these two, Gen. Fidel Davila, 
conqueror of Santander and the Astu- 
rias, fills the third most vital post 
as minister of war. 


Sanz Rodriguez, professor o‘ philos- 


fAeme Photo. 

MRS. WALTER WANGER. 

Los Angeles, Cal., Feb. 1.—[Spe- 
clal.)—Mrs, Walter Wanger, the for- 
mer Justine Johnstone, actress, has 
filed suit for divorce from the movie 
producer, charging extreme cruelty. 
Mrs. Wanger asserts that her hus- 
band no longer joves her and that 
she has become nervous and impaired 
in health as a result of the separa- 
tion. The couple was married in 
New York in 1919. 


a et et el 


ophy at the University of Madrid 
before the war, who is reputed to be 
one of the most cultured men in 
Spain, is minister of education. He 
also was a minister under the De 
Rivera dictatorship. 

Minister of the Interior Serrano 
Suner continues in his post. He was 
an intimate friend of young Primo 
de Rivera, one of the founders of the 
Falange [Fascist party]. When he 
represented Saragossa in the cortes 
[parliament] before the civil war 
began he married a sister of Gen. 
Franco’s wife. For a period after the 
civil war began he was in Salamanca 
as secretary to Gen. Franco, 

The new finance minister ig Andres 
Amado, financial genius and a lawyer. 
He is second only in his financial 
brilliance to his intimate friend, Cal- 
vo Sotelo, whose slaying by the Ma- 
drid police was one of the principal 
causes of the outbreak oi the war in 
July, 1936. | 

Count Is Justice Minister. 


Count Rodezno, chief of the _ red- 
capped Carlists LRoyalists! of Na- 
varre, is minister of justice, He is 
regarded as the most beloved native 
of Navarre, having represented his 
people in parliament half his life, 

Fernandez Cuesta, founder with 
young Primo de Rivera of the Fal- 
ange and secretary of Nationalist 
Spain’s only political party, takes the 
agriculture portfolio. The industry 
and commerce minister is the indus- 
trial expert, Juan Antonio Suances, 
and public works minister is Senor 
Antonio Pena. 

Sefior Gonzalez Bueno, a Falange 
organizer and one of the big chiefs 
of the movement, is minister of the 
syndical or corporative organizations. 

Franco’s decree provided that, in- 
dependently of the faculties of the 
ministry of defense, “Gen, Franco 
will keep supreme command of ail 
military, naval, and air forces.” 


Tonight’s Hie Dinner 


FRESH 


PUREE OF SPLIT 


To the hundreds 

of visitors 

in Chicago— 

we extend welcome. 
You will enjoy our 
STEAK, CHICKEN 
and roasted TURKEY 


dinners with their 
interesting trinimings. 


Have you tried 
Tocktalls? 


Luncheons 
45¢ to 65c¢ 


Eleven to Five 
MARY 


Specia! Dinners 
with 
Cocktails or.Wine 
$1,10—$1.35 


8TH FLOOR 
EXP. ELEVATORS 
DIRECT =, 


Bee 


B 
DUTCH APPLE 
CHOCOLATE SHREDLED CASHEW PIB 


Five to Eight o'Clock 


FRUIT CUP OYSTER COCKTAIL 
CHILLED CLAM-TOMATO JUICE 


PEA 
CONSOMME WITH NOODLES 
HOME MADE GRAPE JAM 

BROILED HADDOCK 


BUTTER SAUCE 
e e® 


CASSEROLE OF SEAFOOD NEWBERG 


e °® 
ROAST TOM TURKEY 
DRESSING 
7 . 


BAKED LEG OF LAMB 
MINT SAUCE 


FRIED SPRING CHICKEN 
COUNTRY GRAVY 


BROILED TOP SIRLOIN STEAK 
BORDELAISE SAUCE 


A PORK CHOP STUFFED AND BAKED 


WITH VEGETABLES 
* e 


BROILED LAMB CHOPS 
NATURAL SAUCE 


> am 
ROAST PRIME RIB OF BEEF 


POTATOES SHERBET 
THREE-MINUTE CABBAGE 
LOU SALAD 
WHIPPED CREAM DRESSING 
HEAD LETTUCE SALAD 
PINEAPPLE FRENCH DRESSING 


LACK WALNUI CREAM CAKE 
PIE RHUBARB Pit 


SPBERRY SUNDA 


ICE CREAM ECLAIR WITH 


cAnaues east BIBaRRRO® SAU! 
SEB San eRe 


a 


TEA BISCUITS ROLLS BREAD 


COPFEE TEA MILK 


¥ CAS . ‘ a 

4 . oe 

: ve Rar a te Ae , s 
: te, eee 8 
con. a 


_ Merchant Ship. 


BY SAM BREWER. 
(Chicago Tridune tress Service. ] 

LONDON, Feb. 1.—Great Britain 
Pp tonight to add more war: 
ships to the Mediterranean “ anti. 
piracy" patrol and at the same time 
called an emergency meeting with 
France and Italy tomorrow as a re: 
sult of the torpedoing of the British 
steamer Endymion yesterday with the 
loss of ten lives. [Previous reports 
placed the total dead at eleven.) 

As the three powerg responsible 
under the Nyon arrangement for 
operating the Mediterranean patrol, 
they will consult on efforts to halt a 
renewal of submarine piracy. 

Charles Corbin, French ambassa- 
dor and Count Dino Grandi, Italian 
ambassador, accompanied by nava) at: 
tachés, will meet with Capt, Anthony 
Eden, British foreign secretary, and 
his foreign onfice experts tomorrow 
afternoon, 


Immediate Action Urged. 


They had preliminary conversations 
‘today with Eden, who told them the 
British government had decided that 
immediate action is needed to tighten 
up the naval patrol afrangements, 

The view in Whitehall was that the 
887 ton Endymion was attacked near 
Cartagena by a Spanish rebel subma- 
rine operating from the naval base 
on Malorca Island. The official report 
from the British naval officer com- 
manding in those waters was  ex- 
pected. Meanwhile it was emphasized 
in official circles that Gen. Francisco 
Franco, rebc: commander, has no bel- 
ligerent rights to impose a blockade 
and that attacks on British shipping 
will not be tolerated by the British 
government. 

Alfred Duff Cooper, first lord of 
the admiralty, confirmed in the house 
of commons a report that more war- 
ships are going to the Mediterranean, 
but did not reveal the number. 

With the patrol and fleet maneu- 
vers around Gibraltar and Portugal 
the British already have a powerful 
fieet in and around the west end of 
the Mediterranean. 

Seeks to End Bombings. 

PARIS, Feb. 1.—(4)—Premier Ca- 
mille Chautemps announced tonight 
he had sent an appeal to govern- 
ments of other world powers to join 
with France in putting an end to 
“bombardments” of Spanish civil 
populations. 

Rebel Offensive Halted. 

HENDAYE, France [at the Spanish 
frontier].,, Feb. 1.—(7)—The Spanish 
government said today its troops had 
reconquered territory taken by the 
rebels in the Penarroya sector of 
southwest Spain. Rebel] dispatches 
acknowledged their offensive had 
been halted and fighting had been 
slackened to degultory sniping. 


Angered by Torpedoing of |% 


from Barcelona. The premier ad- 
dressed 180. Socialist and communist 


deputies, as well as a score of French, | 


British, Norwegian, Swedish, and 
JugoSlavian parliament 


year, or a year or two years more,” | 


Negrin said. Admitting the govern- 
ment faces a serious food problem, he 


said it would be “ merciless with prof-| 
iteers.” He warned that the gov-/ 


ernment would “retaliate” against 
rebel air raids by bombing enemy 
towns. 


COURT HALVES 
TAX PENALTIES 
ON 2,200 HOMES 


Small home owners whose real es- 
tate taxes are delinquent may benefit 
from reduced penalties for the years 
1928 to 1932 and can take advantage 
of lower tax rates brought about by 
exclusion of illegal tax levies under 
a ruling of Judge Harry M. Fisher in 
Circuit court yesterday. 

In a friendly suit brought by the 
Polish Roman Catholic Union of 
America in behalf of 2,200 small home 
owners, Judge Fisher enjoined the 
county treasurer from collecting more 
than half of the penalty of 1 per cent 
a month for the 1928-32 period. The 
judge also ruled that the home owners 
were entitled to reduced tax rates 
from 1928 to 1934. 

Other owners whose taxes are un: 
paid for the years involved can obtain 
the reductions by filing injunction 
suits in the Circuit court. 


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Prevailing me. 


Roti CHESLY: MANLY. 


Chicago Tribune Press Service. : 

Wastitng oe, D. C., Feb. 1 —{Spe- | 
cial.]—Escaping defeat or indefinite 
delay by the close vote of 42 to 40,/ 
the conference report on the admin-| 


istration’s bill to insure 

on privately constructed houses was 
adopted by the senate today and the 
bill sent to President Roosevelt. 


The housing bill was tHe first item{| 


on the administration’s program to 
receive final congressional approval 
since President Roosevelt called a spe- 
cial session last Nov. 15 to meet “an 
extraordinary situation.” Passed by 
both houses during the special ses- 
sion, it required another month for 
conference action and final approval 
in the present regular session. The 
administration’s farm dictatorship 
bill, also passed by both houses dur- 
ing the special session, still is tied 
up in conference. 


Switch on Wage Amendment. 


Switches by eighteen Democratic 
senators and one radical on the Lodge 
amendment requiring the payment of 
prevailing wages on all housing proj- 
ects with government-insured mort: 
gages enabled the administration 
leaders, after two days of intense 
pressure, to obtain approval of the 
conference report without’ that 
amendment. 

The prevailing wage amendment, 
offered by Senator Henry Cabot 
Lodge [R., Mass.] and supported by 
the American Federation of Labor, 
was adopted by a vote of 51 to 17 
last Dec. 21. Republicans and many 
Democratic supporters of the Lodge 
amendment, which was thrown out 
in conference, opposed the confer- 
ence report, urging that it be re 
jected and that a new conference com- 
mittee be appointed to insist upon 
the senate amendment. 

When told by the Federal Housing 
administration, the department of 
labor and other administration agen- 
cies that the Lodge amendment 
would defeat the whole housing pro- 
gram, administration supporters in 
the senate who had voted for the 
amendment were forced to switch 
their votes. Republicans and conserv- 
ative Democrats were delighted, 
having maneuvered the Roosevelt fol- 
lowing into a position of running out 
on organized labor. 


Those Who Switched. 


Besides Senator George W. Norris 
Radical, Neb.] floppers on the Lodge 
amendment, all Democrats, were: 

Majority leader Alben W. Barkley 
of Kentucky, Robert F. Wagner of 
New York, sponsor of the housing 
bill; John H. Bankhead of Alabama, 
William H. Dieterich of Illinois, Rob- 
ert J. Bulkley of Ohio, F. Ryan 
Duffy of Wisconsin, Allen J. Ellender 
of Louisiana, Carl Hayden of Ari- 
zona, Herbert E. Hitchcock of South 
Dakota, James E. Murray of Montana, 
Matthew M. Neely of West Virginia, 
Joseph C. O’Mahoney of Wyoming, 
Key Pittman of Nevada, James P. 
Pope of Idaho, H. H. Schwartz of 
Wyoming, Morris Sheppard of Texas, 
William H. Smathers of New Jersey, 
and Elbert D. Thomas of Utah. 

Forty-one Democrats and one Radi- 
cal, Norris, voted “for the conference 
report [in effect against the Lodge 
amendment], while those voting 
against the report [for the Lodge 
amendment] included thirteen Re 
publicans, twenty-five Democrats, and 
two Radicals, La Follette of Wiscon- 
sin and Lundeen of Minnesota. 


Glass Against Bill. 


Senator Carter Glass [D. Va.] 
criticized the parliamentary situation 
in which the fate of the Lodge amend- 
ment and the bill itself were bound 
together. 

Administration leaders declared 
that the prevailing wage amendment 
would wreck the housing program 
and that the Republicans offered it 
for the purpose of sabotaging the bill. 
Majority Leader Barkley said that 
banks would refuse to make real 
estate loans with such a provision in 
force because the government insur- 
ance on the mortgages would be sub- 
ject to cancelation if the contractors 
paid wages below the prevailing 
level. 

Senator Wagner said the Lodge 
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[Metropolitan News Photo.] 
MARY TAKA, 


Mary Taka, Japanese dancer who 
is a favorite with audiences in her 
home city of Tokio, visited. Chicago 
yesterday on her way east. Known 
on the stage as Taka [Cherry Blos- 
som], the girl plays the violin, piano, 
and Japanese koto. She is 22 years 
old. 


amendment would defeat President 
Roosevelt’s proposal for lower hourly 
rates of pay and higher annual wages 
in the building trades. 

_ To these arguments, Senator Bur- 
ton K. Wheeler [D., Mont.], replied 
that without the Lodge amendment, 
labor would have no protection 


against. drastic wage cuts. 

Under existing law the government 
insures mortgages on privately con- 
structed homes up to 80 per cent of 
the value of the property—the house 
plus the lot. The new measure pro- 
vides for the insurance of mortgages 
up to 90 per cent of the value of the 
property on homes costing not more 
than $6,000 


How Financing Is Arranged. 


For instance, a man desiring to 
build a $6,000 home would be required 
to put up $600. He then would bor- 
row-the remaining $5,400 from a bank 
or other commercial loan concern on 
a mortgage against the property. The 
mortgage is insured by the govern- 
ment, ‘that is, the government guar- 
antees its repayment, thus eliminat- 
ing risk and making the mortgage 
an attractive investment to a bank or 
other financial concern. 

On individual homes costing up to 
$16,000 the governmerit will insure 
the mortgage on 80 per cent of the 
value ‘of the property. 

The interest rate prescribed by the 
bill is 5 per cent on the unpaid bal- 
ance of the mortgage, except that in 
certain localities the Federal Housing 
administration may make it 6 per 
cent. The insurance premium rate 
which home purchasers are required 
to pay, now 1 per cent on the original 
face value of the mortgage, is re- 
duced to not less than % of 1 per 
cent nor more than 1 per cent on the 
unpaid balance of the mortgage. In 
the case of 90 per cent mortgages 
the insurance premium rate is re- 
duced to % of 1 per cent. 

The bills also provide for insurance 
on the 80 per cent basis of mortgages 
on large scale, limited dividend hous- 


Stage Setting May Not 
Avoid Outburst. 


‘[Continued from first page.] 


| doing or intends doing to dispel the 


business recession. But he was 
guarded in all his answers and un- 
communicative to a degree. 

Mr. Roosevelt had received earlier 
in the day a delegation of the C. I. O. 
Automobile Workers of America 
headed by its president, Homer Mar- 
tin, which had memorialized him to 
resume pump priming expenditures 
on a large scale for relief of the un- 
employed and to initiate legislation 
regulating basic industries “on a 
basis of limited profit and lower 
prices, per unit of output, unre- 
stricted expansion of production and 
complete reémployment with higher 
rates of pay and shorter hours.” 


Annual Wage Discussed. 


When he was asked whether he 
cared to comment on these proposals, 
particularly the limitation of profits, 
the President replied with a crisp 
negative. 

Mr. Martin said the President had 
pronounced high pressure salesman- 
ship of cars one of the outstanding 
evils of the industry. He said the 
President agreed with his callers that 
wages should be calculated on an an- 
nual basis. According to Mr. Martin 
the automobile manufacturers could 
pay an annual wage of $2,000 on a 
basis of three year seniority to 417,- 
000 workers and still make a fair 
profit. 

The delegation reported that 320,- 
000 automobile workers are now un- 
employed and in need of relief. Mr. 
Roosevelt promised to take the mat- 
ter of relief up at once with Acting 
Relief Administrator Aubrey Williams. 


Dodges Story of Conference. 


Mr. Roosevelt was asked regarding 
a story told by one of the partici- 
pants in his business conference of 
Jan. 11. According to this story the 
President discoursed to the business 
men for half an hour on the plight 
of the hill billies of eastern Ken- 
tucky. Then after holding forth half 
an hour more on the war in China 
the President ended the audience. 
The business men who had been in- 
vited to the White House ostensibly to 
discuss the business recession were 
described as indignant. 

To this the President replied the 
question was one properly answered 
by another question: “Was there 
really?” 

Mr. Roosevelt revealed under ques- 
tioning that he expected to have a 
conference, perhaps next week, on 
measures of relief for the railroads, 
most of which are not far from bank: 
ruptcy. 


Admiral Backhouse Named 


British Navy Chief of Staf 


LONDON, Feb. 1.—(#)—The govern- 
ment tonight announced that King 
George VI. of Great Britain had ap- 
pointed Admiral Sir Roger Backhouse 
to be lord commissioner of the . d- 
miralty and chief of the naval staf. 
The appointment carries with it the 
post of first sea lord. Sir Roger, who 
has been commander in chief of the 
home fleet, succeeds Admiral of the 


ing projects, not to exceed 5 million| Fleet Lord Chatfield. Lord Chatfield 
dollars. is 64 years old; his successor is 59. 


Follow Vicks Plan for Better 


CONTROL oF COLDS 


Catching Cold? 
VICKS VA-TRO-NOL 
Helps Prevent Many Colds 

3 


Cuahe a Cold? 


VICKS VAPORUB 
Helps End a Cold Quicker 


French women in the Parisian. 
social-whirl drink Vichy Celestins. 
They know that this alkalizing 
_ French Vichy helps counteract 
the systemic acidity caused 
by fatigue and rich foods. They 
know it helps keep them 
youthful. ..and charming! 


At Hotels, Clubs, Restaurants, 


Druggists and Grocers 


FRENCH VIC} 


TOKIO, Feb. 1—Japan, although 
very much under the control:of the 


sense that Italy and Germany are 


become one. The vast majority of 
people hold Fascism in distrust. Out 
of gratefulness to Germany and Italy 
for supporting Japan’s recent actions 
in China, efforts have been made to 
paint a rosy picture of Fascism and 
Naziism, but few are advocating that 
Japan adopt this form of rule. 

Swastikas are in evidence in street 
decorations, on the covers of primary 
school notebooks, in window displays, 
on toys and even as designs on ki- 
monos. But this does not mean that 
Japan is going Fascist any more than 
the fact that the Stars and Stripes 
were displayed along a five mile 
route through Tokio when the Lind- 
berghs visited Japan some years ago 
meant that Japan favored the repub- 
lican form of government. 


Abhor One Man Dictatorship. 


The main reason why Japan is not 
likely to go Fascist is that Fascism 
depends on a one-man dictatorship— 
a thing which is abhorrent to the 
Japanese people. They had such a 
form of government up to 1867, when 
the Shogun Keiki Tokugawa was 
forced to return the authority of gov- 
ernment to the throne. For hun- 
dreds of years up to that time the 
country was governed by dictators 
who, being despotic, oppressed the 
people in a manner which makes the 


army, is not a Fascist state in the 
Fascist states, and is not likely to 


Fascists Have Seats in Diet. 

In the diet [parliament] the so- 
called -Fascist party of Japan, . the 
Kokumin-Domei [National league], 
which advocates state control of 
economy, has never had more than 
twelve. seats in the lower house. 

It is not represented at all in the 
upper house. Of the 464 seats in 
the. lower house, the Minseito has 
180 and the Seiyukai 174. These par- 
ties correspond to the Republican 
and Democratic parties in the United 
States. 

Recently business and industry 
have been placed under partial gov- 
ernment control as a war-time mili- 
tary measure. 
ures include control of investments, 
temporary measures regarding ex- 
ports and imports, ship ‘control, a 
law to replenish stocks of govern- 
ment held rice, a fertilizer distribu- 
tion law, a law concerning applica- 
tion of the armament industries’ 
mobilization, an iron and steel man- 
ufacturing law, and a law against 
profiteering. 

These regulations have been re- 
ceived calmly in financial and busi- 
ness circles as well as by the general 
public, due largely to repeated as- 


The emergency meas-} 


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Electric Cooking 


saves me work! 


says Mrs. Henry J. Cousineau 
5241 W. Patterson Avenue, Chicago 


HOME OF 
MRS. COUSINEAU 


“My electric range gives me a great 
deal of extra time for myself. And 


it’s economical, too. My cooking 


costs me 


Vie 
ey: ce e 


@ “My husband, son and I ai/ think that the food cooked on my electric 
range really tastes better. But it means more than that to me, because 
electric cooking saves me work and time. I wouldn't be without my 
electric range” says Mrs. Cousineau! 

Just think what a few cents a day gives Mrs. Cousineau. She has less 
work to do in the kitchen because electric cooking is clean cooking. 
Her pots and pans stay spotless. The automatic timer on her electric 
range gives her extra time to spend as she wishes. She finds — as hun- 
dreds of other Chicago families have found, that food cooked with accu- 
rately-controlled electric heat actually tastes better. <— 

Electric cooking will make meal preparation economical and easier 
for you, too. You'll find it clean, fast and convenient... .See the sh hal 
of modern automatic electric ranges at electrical apt lance stor 
furniture, hardware and department stores, ats at — ‘hood 
downtown Electric — of the Commonwealth Edison Company. 


only about *2 a month.” 


3 ee: eee ee ike. 


Read This Actual Interview 


with Mrs. Cousineau 


Q. Mrs. Cousineau, what do you think of the 
cost of electric cooking ? 


A. I find it economical. It costs me only about 
$2 a month. And I consider that mighty 
cheap, because my husband has a big 
appetite. My son is 20 years old and he’s 
a hearty eater, too. 


Q: Does electric cooking save you time? 


A. Oh my, yes! With the automatic timer on 
my range, | can put an entire meai in the 
oven and forget all about it while 1 attend to 
other things around the house. 1 often 
leave the house for an entire afternoon and 
my meal is ready for me when I return. 


Q. Do you find that it saves you work, Mrs. 
Cousineau ? 


A. Yes, indeed ! My cooking utensils are all so 
much cleaner, now. 1 don’t have to wear 


eapeelt cmt: ecnshiing 906 -atonciig them. 
My kitchen is cleaner, too. 


Q. dad sal soit at rt 


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owl Nd 


Ct ee 


Fe ee ee ee 


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{Chicago Tribune "ress Service,] 


SHANGHAI, Feb. 2 [Wednesday].—| 
today 


A Japanese army spokesman 


‘reported an advance in the campaign 


to capture Suchow, railway junction 
‘in northern Kiangsu province. 

Japanese troops, it was said, occu- 
pied Linhwaikwan on the Tientsin- 
Pukow [Nanking] railway and Hwai 
river and were within striking dis- 
tance of Pengpu. Pengpu is less than 
100 miles south of Suchow. 


troops had withdrawn to the west 
bank of a river at Mingkwang, where, 
it was said, they were still blocking 
Japanese progress toward Linhwai- 
kwan. 

Jap Planes Bomb Suchow. 

The Japanese northern column, the 
Chinese asserted, was still held up at 
Tsining and Tsowhsien, more than 70 
miles north of Suchow. 

The Lunghal railway, which runs 
from the port of Haichow westward to 
the interior of China, crosses the 
Tientsin-Pukew at Suchow. Japanese 
planes yesterday bombed the railway 
zone at Suchow, but 


their military operations farfher into 
central China. 
Food Shortage at Hangchow. 

Both sides made air raids in the 
Hangchow-Nin region southwest of 
Shanghai. Japanese planes bombed 
the Chinese held city of Ningpo. Chi- 
nese have made occasional raids on 
Hangchow, capital of Chekiang prov- 
ince, which the Japanese captured 
on Christmas eve. 

Foreigners arriving from Hangchow 
said the city now has only 125,000 
of its original 600,000 residents. The 
others fled ahead of the Japanese 
army. There is a shortage of food 
and occasional disorders, they re- 


- . ae 
* 7 oe . 
— wit 


Diagonal line ‘thading represents 
Japanese occupied territory. 
Numerals locate (1) bombing at- 
tack on Ningpo by Japanese planes, 
(2) battleground of Japanese and 
Chinese armies west of Mingkwang, 

(3)- railway center, Suchow, 
bombed by Japanese planes. 


3 AMERICANS 
REPORTED SLAIN 
BY JAPS IN CHINA 


[Copyright: 1938: By the New York Times, ] 

HANKOW, China, Feb. 1.—Reports 
of the death of three Americans— 
a man and two women—at the hands 
of Japanese soldiers in Yangchuan, 
Shansi province, last December were 
conveyed to the United States em- 
bassy here today in a message from 
Capt. Evans Carlson, United States 
marine intelligence officer now in 
Shansi. The message was received 
in Chinese through the Hankow head- 
quarters of the 8th Route army and 
was turned over to the embassy. 
Carlson said Magistrate Yih Sien 
of a Shansi city near Yangchuan told 
him the three and a Frenchman were 
killed by the Japanese as a result of 
an altercation growing out of at- 
tempts by the Americans to settle a 
quarrel between the Frenchman and 
his Japanese wife. The men, said the 
report, were shot, while the women 
were beaten to death. All the bod- 
ies were thrown into a cesspool. The 
Americans were not named. 

In view of the nature of the report 
the embassy is accepting the story 


with reserve and is investigating. 


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Foreign Policy. 


[Chicago Tribune Press Service.] 
Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—[Spe- 


the United States senate heard de- 
bate on the administration’s foreign 
policy, demands to know what that 
policy is, and condemnations of Pres- 
ident Roosevelt's threat to quaran- 
tine Japan. 

Whatever the policy of the admin- 
istration may be, declared Senator 
William E. Borah [R., Idaho], public 
opinion throughout the world is 
being organized on the basis of an 
alliance between the United States 
and Great Britain, 

With the whole world proceeding 
upon the assumption that we have 
an alliance with Great Britain, our 
policy inevitably must be affected by 
that condition, concluded Senator 
Borah, the ranking minority member 
of the foreign relations committee. 

Follows Johnson Speech. 

The senate flareup was the result 
of a brief speech made yesterday by 
Senator Hiram Johnson [R., Cal.], 
veteran senate isolationist, in which 
he demanded to know what the for- 
eign policy of the administration is. 
Today’s debate was a four-cornered 
affair among members of the foreign 
relations committee, with Senators 
Borah and Johnson opposing the 


They Grew Hedge 
Apple Trees 


Frank Ridgway, Tribune 
Farm and Garden editor, 
once inquired of Tribune 
readers for methods of 
growing the Osage orange 
tree, better known as the 
hedge apple tree. On page 
25 of today’s Tribune are 
three letters from readers 
telling the methods they 
used to grow these trees. 


On this page also are the 
farm lands want ads which 
each weekday appear adja- 
cent to the want ads. 


HEAD COLD 


course of the Roosevelt administra- 
tion. Qualified support of the ad- 
ministration came from Senator Key 
Pittman [D., Nev.], chairman of the 
foreign relations committee, and 
Senator James Hamilton Lewis [D., 
Ill.]. 

Senator Pittman, while denying the 
existence, tacit or otherwise, of an 
alliance with Great Britain, joined 
Senator Johnson in questioning the 
propriety of President Roosevelt’s 
Chicago speech proposing concerted 
action among nations to quarantine 
Japan. 

Senator Johnson said the Chicago 
speech and subsequent actions of the 
administration left the United States 
in the pusillanimous position of hav- 
ing threatened Japan and failed to 
carry out the threat. 


Should Have Backed Threats. 


“If the responsible head of a na- 
tion says in certain words that he 
will do a certain thing we cannot 
lightly pass these words over and say 
they are mere words that are spoken 
by some individual to which no at- 
tention will be paid,” Senator Pitt- 
man said. 

“Remember, it was the responsible 
head of our nation who talked of 
quarantining another nation. Whether 
he was right or wrorg does not enter 
into the question; but when he was 
willing to quarantfhe another nation, 
he should have been willing to go 
through with that quarantine, for no 
man should utter a threat unless he 
is willing to carry it out. 

“Tf the President says he will 
quarantine any nation which does 
wrong or is an aggressor, then he 
must go through, I insist, and if he 
does not go through he leaves us in 
a position which permits any man 
to inquire, what is the foreign policy 
of the United States?” 


Denies Entangling Alliances. 


Up to that point, Senator Pittman, 
who is not only the chairman of the 
foreign relations committee but an 
influential administration leader, was 
in whole-hearted accord with Sena- 
tor Johnson. He concluded, however, 
with a plea for candor in dealing 
with the foreign policy of the gov- 
ernment and stated emphatically: 

“We have not entered into any 
combination with any foreign coun- 
try looking to any defense of this 
country, any defense of any o 
country, or any military aid to 
other country.” 

When Senator Johnson demanded 
to know whether he spoke “by the 
book,” or with authority, Senator 
Pittman said he spoke for himself 
and was authorized to speak for no 
one else. 


Ireland Will Be U. S. 
Postal Name for Erin 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—I[Spe- 
cial.J—Ireland will be Ireland and 
neither the Irish Free State as it 
used to be nor Eire as the De Valera 
government has recently proclaimed 
it, the postoffice department an- 
nounced today. No explanation was 
given for the department’s brief an- 
nouncément that after using the free 


|State designation for some years it 


would return to the older name just 
as the verdant isle has adopted Eire 
as its name. 


Pennsylvanian Is Sworn 


as Assistant to Farley 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—P)— 
Ramsey S. Black, Harrisburg, Pa., 
was sworn in by Postmaster-General 
James A. Farley today as third assis- 
tant postmaster general. He suc- 
ceeds Clinton B. Eilenberger of Penn- 
sylvania who died last August. 


GOES FAST! 


New Jelly Formula Hits Trouble Spots—Starts 
Relief Instantly — Clears — Dries — Soothes! 


Remember this fact when a 


trils—it’s up and back of them 
“ei big cavern of mucous 


money 
oe 


shrinks the membranes— 
dries! 


Spreads relie 
breath, 
35¢ 


‘Big tu 
vat any c 
back is 


Demand Information on | 


cial.]—For more than an hour today} 


MISS EMILIE D. BARRON. 


Miss Emilie D. Barron, daughter 
of Attorney Harry C. Barron, 17824 
Kingston avenue, was given her doc- 
tor of jurisprudence degree yesterday 
at Loyola university’s midyear cohvo- 
cation exercises. 

Miss Barron was graduated from 
Mundelein’college in the charter class 
of 1934, with an A. B. degree, and re- 
ceived a.gold key award from Cardi- 
nal Mundelein, She was president of 
the Mundelein Alumne association 
in 1935 and a member, at Loyola, of 
the Sherman Steele Club of Brandeis 
Competition and the Junior Bar asso- 
ciation. She was secretary of her 
law class from 1934 to 1936. 


BILLION DOLLAR 
INCREASE SHOWN 
IN INCOME TAXES 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—#)— 
The internal revenue bureau report- 
ed today its collections from all 
sources rose from $3,787,336,060 in 
1936 to $5,617,088,564 in 1937. 

Income tax collections increased 
more than a billion dollars, from 
$1,551,652,595 in 1936 to $2,584,977,631 
in 1937. Miscellaneous internal reve- 
nue increased from $2,232,537,753 to 
$2,353,039,295. Pay roll taxes, a new 
source, totaled $679,071,637. Total cob 
lections from all sources by states in 
the comparative years included the 
following: 

1936. 1937. 
Tllinoie .....++..--$316,322,038 $511,032,173 
Indiana ...se..+--. 74,979,852. 112,928,527 
TOWS ..coccccsesss 14,310,689 23,179,629 
Michigan ........- 217,301,451 340,850,865 
Minnesota ......-. 42,591,759 67,660,371 
Missouri 81,865,564 133,107,995 
Wisconsin ........ 63,496,208 99,307,475 

Income tax collections in the com- 

parative years, by states, included 


the following: 
CORPORATION. 
1936. 1937. 
Tilinois ....0e++e++-$83,887,877 $131,520,400 
Imdian@® .scecesescsse 12,702,009 19,779,743 
TOWER ccvcccctcccesee §,923,186 7,355,865 
Michigan ........-. 65,846,842 113,704,478 
Minnesota ......... 11,613,254 16,860,546 
Missouri ....2.+ee+- 20,872,730 32,278,855 
Wisconsin ...:...-.. 10,285,602 19,675,891 
INDIVIDUAL. 
1936. 1937. 
THlinodis ...+.s00+++-$09,396,503 $109,171,097 
Indiana 9,164,015 16,340,418 
ED. cc ckcaussvcnces. 8,806,070 5,272,905 
Michigan ....+...+. 31,205,335 63,358,683 
Minnesota ......+-. 7,811,887 14,860,368 
Missouri 14,431,386 26,164,830 
Wisconsin 6,444,123 15,341,626 


ROBBED OF $220 BY SLUGGER. 


Howard Jensen, night clerk of an apart- 
ment house at 320 Wisconsin avenue, Oak 
Park, was-slugged by a robber who escaped 
with $220 early yesterday. 


‘EDWARDS. ‘i: 


Chicago Tribune Press Service.] | 
weenie D. C., Feb. 1.—[Spe-| 
cial.J—If the United States 
Japan. is- building . 43,000. ton battle 


ships it also will construct: ships - of] 
jthat size, Admiral William D. Leahy, |. 
_jehief of naval — told con-| 


gress today. . 


The navy’s intelligence service has 


not. been able. to find proof that Japan 
is disregarding the 35,000 ton limit 
fixed by the 1926 London treaty, Ad- 


miral Leahy said: A report to that} 


effect has been published in Italy, he 


jremarked, and attempts are being} 


made to ascertain the truth. 

“It is almost certain,” he informed 
the house naval affairs committee, 
“that the treaty nations would in- 
voke an escape clause and build 
larger ships if it were determined 
that other countries were doing so.” 


Discusses 20 Per Cent Increase. 

The admiral testified at hearings 
on legislation to carry out the 80 mil- 
lion dollar naval expansion proposed 


by President Roosevelt which would 


increase the size of the fleet by 20 
per cent, 

Representative James W. Mott [R., 
Ore.] asked what efforts had been 
made to. determine if Japan were 
building extra size battleships. 

“We have an intelligence depart: 
ment,” rémarked Admiral Leahy, 
“but it has not been able to get the 
information in Japan. Nor do we 
know anything of the tonnage or gun 
calibers. of the new Japanese ships.” 


British Ship Oversize. 


Unless forced to do so by the ac: 
tivities of other nations, the United 
States has no intention of building 
ships larger than the 35,000 ton size, 
Admiral Leahy said. The only such 
ship now known is the British battle 
cruiser, Hood, which has 42,100 tons’ 
displacement. 

So long as the American fleet main- 
tains the 5-5-3 ratio with Great Brit- 
ain and Japan this country will be 
safe, the admiral declared. He re 
luctantly admitted that the British 
navy probably could destroy the 
American navy at present because 
the latter is far below treaty strength. 

“But it would be difficult for any 
other nation to successfully attack us 
as long as the 5-5-3 ratio is main- 
tained,” he said. He added, however, 
that the proposed increase would not 
restore the 5-3 ratio with Japan. 


Reed Leaves High Court 
When Tax Cases Come Up 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—(/)— 
Justice Stanley F. Reed, on his second 
day as a member of the Supreme 
court, disqualified himself from par- 
ticipation today in a series of tax 
cases he filed as solicitor general. 
When the tax cases were called for 
argument he retired from the court 
chamber. 


TOFFENETTIS 


FAMOUS FOR 
HAM AND 


Every once in a while new people come 
in to a TRIANGLE and, after awhile, 
this is what they say: “Gee! how long 
has this been going on? I’m coming 
here, again!” That’s what we get for 
serving LOTS of DELICIOUS foods 
on EACH order. 


6 S.CLARK ST, 
AND FIVE OTHERS IN THE LOOP 


HOOK THAT BIG ONE 


TOMORROW in FLORIDA 


a 
ies id vinta ny 
ee x 
ee 
pF 
KARIM) 


— Ss 
ie ee 


Dixie Trains . 

DIXIE FLYER 

DIXIE LIMITED 
BCS 


Passeek of Wh <.', Neod teky Soc 
night train, Chicago to Florida 


aa (Sections Siotiony * *@'8m 


ee Bi ee CRA Sev re tg Sti he ihie 5 
Mee eee ey CF athT Ff Be 
A sn. ww a a Ai i 


finds 


Ps SSN 


OR AO Te te 


_ 


[Acme Photo.] 
MRS, MARY NORMAN. 


Marlington, W. Va., Feb. 1.—I[Spe- 
cial.J—Bravery while serving as a 
trusty in the county jail here has 
won a. pardon from President Roose- 
velt for Mrs. Mary Norman of Ash- 
land, Ky., who was serving a two year 
term for transporting liquor from 
Kentucky to West Virginia. While on 
duty, three prisoners made a break 
for freedom and felled the jailer, O. 


|B. Curry. Mrs. Norman grabbed the 


jailer’s gun and halted the fleeing 
convicts, finally forcing them back 
into their cells. 


FAVOR PENSIONS 
FOR WIDOWS OF 
WORLD WAR VETS 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—/)—A 
bill authorizing pensions of $22 a 
month to widows and $6 a month to 
dependent orphans of World war 
veterans became today the first gen- 
eral World war pension legislation 
to receive approval of a house 
committee, 

The pensions committee, which 
gave the measure its sanction, said 
the veterans’ administration estimated 
188,000 families would be eligible to 
receive 68 million dollars annually. 


\AAOBTL LION A - *AF EL 


QUITE THE FINEST 
a \ \ TASTING, REGARDLESS / 


Q HAVE LEARNED, ‘GEORGE, THAT SK WUE 
LENDING IS VERY IMPORTANT IN per 

. WHISKEY FINE-FLAVORED. THE ge 

MASTER SAYS THAT CALVERT 1S ZZ 


tye “AUERES BO 


Threat to lee 


Washington, D, C., Feb. 1—I[Spe- 


: cial.]J—Japanese fishing a daa in 


Bristol bay, off 
the coast of Alas- 
ka, will ruin com- } 
pletely the salm- | % 
on industry 
there if allowed 
to. continue, An- 
thony J. Dimond, 
delegate from 


Alaska, told a 
house committee 
today. 

Dimond is spon- 
sor of a bill to 
extend the juris- 
diction of the 
United States 
over the waters 
adjacent to the 
Alaska coast in ts ‘aaadaed br dane. 
order to prevent 2¢#e raids on fishing. 
illicit fishing operations by foreign 
nationals. The bill is aimed at Jap- 
anese fishing fleets, which have es- 
tablished floating canneries, and 
more than 100 smaller vessels in 
Bristol bay. 

Japs Deny Packing Operations. 

Some years ago the Japanese in- 
vaded the waters of Bristol bay, Di- 
mond said. They denied they were 
packing salmon, but were interested 
merely in “experimental” work. In 
1936, however, American merchant 
seamen observed a Japanese steamer 
apparently packing salmon. 

“In 1937,” Dimond said, “the 
Japanese commenced to operate in 
earnest. 

“Men who have had years of ex- 
perience in fishing for salmon in 
Bristol bay will testify that if the 
Japanese operations are permitted to 
continue within a few years virtu- 
ally all of the salmon of that region 
will be caught, the fishery will be 
exhausted and the industry complete- 
ly ruined.” 

Envisions Chain of Packers. 

Moreover, Dimond told the com- 


“Kok = on 

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Bo. 
SESE OOO 


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RRS ay 
Ske 


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" yeyeee, 5 edited . — ey 4? 


Stock Up at This Price 


MODE SS 50’s 


69... 


2 boxes, $1-32 


Modess stays soft 


Modess stays safe... 


Notions, First Floor 


CARSON PIRIE Scott & Co= 


“Sree EE ew kw 


RT WRN ke metre THU SEAR BN we eg tales PRO 


NO SHADOW ON THIS 


The ground hog, with an expert eye, 


‘Looks at the ground, then at the sky, 


vin cee 


: 3 YOU SAY, SIR, 

A THAT CALVERT IS THE 

+} PERFECT BLEND FOR 7 
A PERFECT DRINK 


And says, Today you'll find, good friends, 
The Call’s for CALVERT’S better blends!” 


TODAY's WHISKEY FACT: 


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of the blending art. Calvert 


Spares no ©Xpense to 
fe extra smoothness a = 
vor that yoy get in Calvert's 
"Reserve" and Calvert's 
“Special” blended 


BUY BETTER waskey 


;  etnane, SY BRP 
Ye 


ee See nn Pee re eT tt. Tk So rie 


AIR Rie AT Lats Pia! PA NR syd nny tated 


\ 


= 


+ Ps ie tom ndey Site Fe eet eas 
BBe wey tag Oy Ae Bus ory 


eT 


counts of 10% to 5( 


LRP ADO LIAN 


SATE CRY. WT Pe, 


1 Le ee Pmt te aN i OA ty Re NOMBRE YS eg Na lt ee ANd Ale hl 


aes 


ate Aaban 


~~_ 


: oe REGULARLY $69.50 FEBRUARY SALE SPECIAL! 
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/ 


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$10.98 — resruary 
SALE PRICE 


® Choice of 6 lovely styles. 
® Famous Almco lamps at special February sale 
Genwi d marble 
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FEBRUARY | pM ® Gold and silver, ivory, or bronze finishes. 
SALE PRICE 3 ee ® Each complete with silk shade in choice of colors. 


OO =n 
an a eS 
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Oey, 


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po 12 inches deep. Pearl- | (ae ‘ini 
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(ayn Cs ee “a | aan smooth aluminum in sy S hg on 
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47 in. ‘sain $1.89 10-in. and 12-in. records. Dy- s Es | ; : : y | : | i : | a , SERVICE FOR 3 -p/e, t. or ; Teg. $7.50, at. ‘eee eee 8 @ &e .$3.98 


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For broiling and serving steaks. 


roadcasts and short : 
Pile Bs waves, also. Walnut finish YOUR" SUDGET. 
indow Shelf | cabinet. Just 251 Come early. 


’ 
io 


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As: 


raising. .... | 
33 to 38 in. ... 89e 


$ 


a, 


2 


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Wit hot ‘wetig. Sax me a4 
2 x<" of hot Jem- ; 


" ant ‘ 5 4 s 7 i" 

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. | DORs. ? : Eh ag vee 
F ere bs Be + a > | aoe g _ | 

ae 3 <3 —— - ? = . , | ie °9 

s — oo - wa & A = e & as ’ ¥ ates 
Bayes - ¥ ~ i) 4 7 * B hay ares 
L ° he - = é a 7 - y 2% gt , 
A. - ’ — , BS te i 
sat ee Ae re “Gv: Tred ecia igi PS 4 Hy 
; ese drei een Re: 4 
: s ‘ : 
‘Bie T 1 


Paasonghesatty at the Brooldeia : prior 
Dr. Herman N, Bundesen, president 


yesterday and said nothing when 
asked if they thought they’d see their 
shadow this morning when they do 
their groundhog day weather fore- 
easting. C. A. Donnel, the weather 

of the board of health, and Dr. Irving S.| found better in some cases than the 

Cutter, health editor of Tur TRIBUNE, older serum in carefully controled ex- 

joined yesterday in warniag that} | in the Passavant hospital. 

pneumonia time is here, And they|Of twenty-two patients treated. with 

told what to do to prevent the dis-|the rabbit serum by F. L. H of 


hewhat linc aoather with, rain 
afternoon or night. © 
While Chicago celebrated the end 
of its cold wave Rouyn, Que., shiv 
ered at 59 below zero. Bemidji, Minn., 
reported 34 below. ; 
THIS ONE TOO EARLY. 
Belvidere, Ill., Feb. 1.—[ J— 
Apparently getting its dates mixed} 
and mistaking today for ground hog 
day, one such animal wandered forth 
from its winter headquarters on the 
Elmer Bates farm to be seized and 


Beene types. of ME Be are now 
being fought with serum made from 
the blood of immunized horses. In 
the last three years a new serum 
from vaccinated rabbits has been 
used. with great success. It has been 


iit: sana: 


Escanaba, Mich.., Feb. 4 Pc eb 
—Floods from an ice clogged river, 
accompanied by | 


“BY EARLY APRIL| 


‘ | set yesitianta of 


City’s Funds for 1938 to|pentasute to 


By CALEB 
ANIMALS play, but cannot laugh 
or smile. [It must have been a 
great thing when a smile first’ 
lighted the features of an evolv- 
ing human creature on earth. It 
must have meant a weary way 


man, said it would to too cloudy for 
them to see their shadow in all prob- 
ability, and added that if they over- 
sleep on the one day of the year they 
really do any work on the weather 


peninsula to- 
night. Plans 
were made to 
explode a ton and 


accomplished in the slow struggie 
of man against the heavy odds 
nature originally imposed upon 
him. {.ife was no smiling matter 
when evolving creatures wandered 
the earth in the early eons of time. 

Smiles have evolved with man. 
If all smiling were stopped tomor- 
row — definitely, positively, and 
finally—we would all be sorry we 
hadn’t used the gift more gener- 
ously. 

Have you ever estimated the 
worth of your own smiles and the 
smiles of others to you? Not the 
set and silly artificial grins of 
grimacing insincerity, but smiles 
that mean something—smiles which 
spontaneously start little muscles 
around the eyes and mouth io 
lighting up a face—smiles which 
hearten and gladden tired, un- 
nerved, worried, or harassed peo- 
ple. 

Romantic seventeen, after a 
quarrel, searches the face of sweet 
sixteen in an exquisite agony of 
suspense he may never know again. 
He waits for the smile which will 
burst the day and the world wide 
open with glamour for him anew. 

The tired employe in the office 
of some big boss, sick with fear 
from the scolding for an error, 
waits for relaxation of the angry 
features, for the reassuring smile 
which will announce a new trial is 
to be had. 

The friendly smile of a cus- 
tomer, who senses the hours ot 
service a man or woman behind a 
counter has rendered in a busy 
day, lightens the next hour, and 
makes worth while the extra effort 
required to truly serve better. 

The smile is one gift to man 
which the more profligately he uses 
the more he finds he has left. There 
is something economical about a 
smile, too. An actor needs twelve 
seconds of time to show that he’s 
shocked, and almost as much to 
portray fury, fright, or terror. Joy 
can be registered in one-third the 
time ! 

Copyright 1938 by 


Marshall Field & Company 
OOO 


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LINES 


. weaEEUE —- —— eee 


Doe with 
Kids— 


4-way locket — woman 
piano accompanist—75 
day and boarding school 
for se large 


1:30 pm (thru service) and 
necting 


Be Used Up Then. 


— 


Reliefers are now getting 85 per 
cent of whet the Chicago Relief ad- 
ministration considers a normal 
budget. But by early April, Commis- 
sioner Leo M. Lyons of the CRA said 
yesterday, the CRA will be able to give 
the reliefers only 50 per cent of their 
needs if expenditures for relief con- 
tinue at the present rate. 

Lyons met with the city council 
subcommittee on relief in his office 
for an hour and a half discussion of 
the relief situation. At the end of 
the conference, the commissioner con- 
ducted Ald. William A. Rowan [10th], 
chairman of the subcommittee, and 
Ald. Thomas J. Terrell [29th] on a 
tour of the CRA shelter at 1426 South 
Newberry street. 

City Fund Dwindles. 

The CRA was forced to spend 
about $1,500,000 of city taxes during 
January in addition to $1,887,380 re- 
ceived from the state, Lyons said. 
Needs for February were estimated 
at $3,576,716. The state allotted the 
city only $1,709,094 for the month, 
leaving a deficit of $1,865,622 to be 
met from city funds. 

At the last meeting of the Illinois 
Emergency Relief commission, the 
CRA estimated available city funds 
for 1938 at $4,794,656. On the basis 
of complete expenditure for esti- 
mated needs during January and 
February, the CRA would then have 
only $1,429,038 left on the first of 
March. But the CRA must repay, 
presumably from this amount, $1,- 
200,000 borrowed from general funds 
of the city during last November and 
December. 

Finger Printing Discussed, 

Lyons and the members of the sub- 
committee agreed to discuss with Po- 
lice Commissioner James P. Allman 
the procedures necessary to finger 
print all recipients of relief. 


, 
? u nN 
7 


a half of dyna- 
mite on the ice 
at the mouth of 
the Au Train 
river. The stream 
is seven feet 
above normal 
Stage as a result 
of ice gorges and 
has flooded sev- 
eral homes in the 
little fishing  vil- 


Arrow on map indi- 


lage of Au Train, {iver has flooded fish: 


The decision to ermen’s homes. 
dynamite the ice with a huge blast was 
made when the pent up waters threat- 
ened to engulf a railroad bridge, sever- 
al highway bridges, and more homes. 


River of Ice for 75 Miles. 

Rockford, Ill., Feb. 1.—[(Special.J— 
The Rock river was covered almost 
solidly with ice today from here to 
its mouth at Rock Island, a distance 
of 75 miles. The river overflowed in 
the Prophetstown area and threat- 
ened the Lincoln highway bridge 
over the river at Dixon. 


Blasts Fail to Move Ice. 


Sterling, Ill, Feb. 1.—[Special.] — 
Late this afternoon nine charges of 
dynamite, totaling 600 pounds, were 
fired in Rock river here in a futile 
attempt to break up the ice jam 
The stage of the river is falling grad- 
ually. 


Refuses Plea to Reinstate 


W aukegan F amily on Relief 


Harold Pillifant, Waukegan town- 
ship supervisor, served notice yester- 
day that he will disregard the Wau- 
kegan city council’s recommendation 
that he reMmstate on the relief rolls 
a family which came there from 
Cleveland less than a year ago. Pilli- 
fant said Cleveland relief authorities 
have offered to care for the family 
of five, but the father, Strikor der 
Bedrosian of 564 South Utica street, 
refuses to return to Cleveland. 


Fifty new cages are being reported 
daily. By the end of the month, it is 
feared the ave will r 


ease. New York, twenty-one recovered 


situation it won’t be the first time. 
The weather man said the old leg- 


killed by a dog. 


the common cold, which in many 
cases prepares the field for pneu- 
monia. 

“Colds which start in the nasal 
passages may descend gradually 
along the air passages, finally involv- 
ing the bronchial tubes,” Dr. Cutter 
said. “Thence it ig a short step to 
the delicate air sacs that are inflamed 
in pneumonia. 

Temperature Means: To Bed, 

“Take no risks with colds that are 
accompanied by coughing, particular- 
ly if the chest feels tight, or even 
slightly sore. A temperature means: 
to bed! We can avoid much nasal 
irritation through the use of a small 
bit of white vaseline in each nostril 
once daily.” 

Fevers, pains in the chest, and 
chills, the physicians said, are not 
to be taken lightly. Practical sug- 
gestions they made: 

Absorb vitamin D from the sun or 
in cod liver oil. 

Exercise sensibly and breath fresh, 
humid air. : 
Don’t overeat or become overtired. 
Don’t wear heavy clothing indoors 
and expect it to keep you from a 

chill when you go outdoors. 

Avoid chilling. Should you become | 
—— ee 


AFTER TWELVE 


Our early morning 
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party a success, 


9 PROOF Hiram Walker 


at this Ucki Cows ae 
1O3 ast CHICAGO | 


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CHEAPEST OF AlL FUELS 
Bis! KIND OF HEAT 


FEET COLD? HEAD HOT? 


GET RID 


“Even the prey are warm, ‘Mary 


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choose— gives 
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and saves you 


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local coal mer- 
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easy purchase 


LATEST IN AUTOMATIC 
HEATING—THE COAL STOKER! 


Thousands of home owners are sign ae 


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feeds the 8 om gc esthe heat in your rooms 


OF LAYER-CAKE HEAT! 


PREVENT IT BY 
BURNING COAL 


Hot head plus cold feet is the 
sign of Layer-Cake Heat. The 
chief cause of Layer-Cake 
Heat (air hot at ceiling, cold 
at floor) is stop-and-go fuels 
that allow the furnace firebox 
to get cold. While it’s cold, 
the air in your rooms settles 
into layers. Coal or coke fires 
—with their constant bed of 
glowing coals—prevent the 
firebox from growing cold, 
keep the heat circulating, and 
thus prevent the formation of 
layers. Prevent Layer-Cake 
Heat—with its discomforts 
and colds—by burning steady 
coal or coke, the solid fuel 
for solid comfort! They’re so 
economical, too, that you 
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You save money—yet you 
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burning coal!” 


ee See eae 
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SEO ee RENEE NE he OY RE EEE S 
: a 4 Prag er ayy ™ a“ 


Advertisers Already Has 
Appeared In LOOK 


ADVERTISER _ AGENCY 


Beeman’s Gum e-Dentyne Gum 


Adams Clove Gum « 
AMERICAN PRODUCTS CO....Matteson-Fogarty-Jordan a 


AMERICAN TOBACCO CO... .......ccce0++.-Lard & Thomas 
Lucky Strike Cigarettes 

BARBASOL Giese woccessccsvessveltWh, Wasey & Co., Inc. 

BASSICAMERA CO..........Gustay Marx Advertising Agency 

BAUER & BLACK....................Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 
*“Blue'Jay’’ Corn Plasters 


BENJAMIN AIR RIFLE'CO................Ralph Moore,finc. 
: - ‘Jpena .c Sal Hepatica « Vitalis 
BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORP....Batten, Barton, 
Kool Cigarettes Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 
CARTER PRODUCTS CO. .............-Street & Finney, Inc. 
CENTRALECAMERA CO...Matteson-Fogarty-Jordan Co., Inc. 
CHICAGO WHEEL & MFG. CO.........Weston-Barnett, Inc. 


Handee 
CHRISTY SALES CO...........+..+.+-..-Charles F. Dowd, Inc. 


CHRYSLER CORPORATION.........Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 


Dodge Motor Cars 


CHRYSLER CORPORATION.........J. Stirling Getchell, Inc. 
Plymouth Motor Cars 


CODY (SHERWIN) SCHOOL OF ENGLISH......Schwab and 
Beatty, Inc. 


COMMERCIAL CREDIT CO...O’Dea, Sheldon & Canaday, Inc. 


CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO..........E. W.!Hellwig Co. 
Linit Magic Milk Mask 


CROSLEY RADIO CORP...Douglass Allen & Leland Davis, Inc. 
Shelvador Refrigerator 


CURTISS CANDY CO.............000+see00eB. W. Hellwig Co. 
Baby Ruth Candy 


DEARBORN SUPPLY CO..............Roberte & MacAvinche 
: Mercolised Was 


EMERSON DRUG CO................d Walter Thompson Co. 
Brorno-Seltzer 


EMPIRE ELECTRIC CO... « ccccccccccces Weston-Barnett, Inc. 

EX-LAX, MUU. 6 bios ediccccccccccccccosses. ROR Katz Co. 

EYE-GENE COMPANY. .....cce++e+--Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 

FAIRYFOOT PRODUCTS CO...Gundilach Advertising Agency 

BELLS && CO... ccccccccccccccccese..- 40ung & Rubicam, Inc. 
7 Fels Naptha Soap 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE. ....J. L. Keenan Advertising Agency 


FUNK & WAGNALLS CO..........Franklin Spier and ieee 
GENERAL FOODS sammeasices nupilasaaate. & Rubicam, Inc. 


GEPPERT STUDIOS.............Lessing Advertising Co., Inc. 

H. CLAY GLOVER COo., INC............-Donahue & Coe, Inc. 

GRUEN WATCH CO.. .....0¢+0e0ee0+e+.McCann-Erickson, Inc. 

HALDEMAN-JULIUS CO.....Harrison-Rippey Advertising Co. 

G. H. HARDT................3. H. Brown Advertising Agency 

HEALTH PRODUCTS CORP...William Esty and Company, Inc. 
Feen-a-mint 


HEALTH RAY MFG. CO...........Roberts and Reimers, Inc. 


INSTITUTE OF APPLIED SCIENCE......Matteson-Fogarty- 
Co., Inc. 


Jordan 
INTERNATIONAL CELLUCOTTON PRODUCTS CO.....Lord 
Kleenex & Thomas 


a nerenas. CORRES. SCHOOLS....N. W. Ager & Ben, 


IODENT CHEMICAL CO.........Vanderbiejand Rubens, Inc. 
Iodent Tooth Paste 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON..............¥Youmg & Rubicam, Inc. 
: Band-Aid ; 


KALAMAZOO STOVE & FURNACE CO....... Fulton, Horne, 

Morrissey Co. 

KENTON PHARMACAL CO.....Roche, Williams & Cunnyng- 

Brownatone Hair Dye ham, Inc. 

CHARLES B. KNOX GELATINE CoO., INC....Federal Adver- 

| tising Agency, Inc. 

LAMBERT PHARMACAL CO........ Lambert & Feasley, Inc. 
Listerine Antiseptic « Listerine Shaving Cream 

LASALLE EXTENSION......E. H. Brown Advertising Agency 


LIBBY, McNEILL & LIBBY.....Needham, Louis and Brorby, 
Homogenized Baby Foods Inc. 


LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CoO... Newell-Emmett Co., Inc. 
Chesterfield Cigarettes 
P. LORILLARD CO..........+++++++-Lennen & Mitchell, Inc. 
Old Gold Cigarettes 


MME. LOUISE BEAUTY CLINIC.....A.C. Perry & Associates 

LUDEN’S, INC.......+++e0+eeee0++8- M. Mathes, Incorporated 

GEORGE W. LUFT CO., INC...Cecil, Warwick & Legler, Inc. 
Tangee Cosmetics 


CHARLES MARCHAND CO...............M. H. Hackett, Inc. 
Marchand’s Golden Hait Wash 


MAYBELLINE CO. oc ccc ccecncccvscccess mirtignd-Engel Ceo. 
Maybelline Mascara 


MERCHANDISERS, INC......B. H. Brown Advertising Agency 
MIDWEST RADIO CORP........++-.thne Key Advertising Co. 
MUSTEROLE CO.,.....sccccceseese- Erwin, Wasey & Co., Inc. 
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE....Van Sant, Dugdale & _ 


NATIONAL SCHOOL OF MEAT CUTTING........Charles F. 
| Dowd, 


Inc. 
N. Y. INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY... .Piatt-Forbes, Inc. 


NORTHWESTERN YEAST CO........Hays MacFarland & Co. 
Yeast Foam Tabiets 


PARAMOUNT PICTURES, INC.........Buchanan & Co., Inc. 
Antiseptic 


P 
PHOTO FINISHING SHOP............Hart-Conway Co., Inc. 


POLK MILLER PRODUCTS CORP...Cecil, Warwick & Legler, 
Sergeant’s Dog Remedies Inc. 
PROCTER & GAMBLE CO...Biackett-Sample-Hummert, Inc. 


PROGRESS CORP....................Cowan & Van Leer, Inc. 
Packard Lektro-Shaver 
REMINGTON-RAND, INC.,.......Leeford Advertising Agency 
Remington Typewriters 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.... William Esty & Co., Inc. 

Camel obacco 


« Prince Albert T. 
PAUL RIEGER & CO........... Advertising Agency 
Dorothy Boyd 


Gundlach 
Pajama Suits 
ROYAL TYPEWRITER CO............-Buchanan & Co., Inc. 

Double Duty Tooth Brush 


R. SCHIFFMANN CO... .......ssceseees ° 
es Philip J. Meany Co. 


SCHNEFEL BROS. CORP..........+..N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc. 
La Cross Nail Polish 
R.{B. SEMLER, INC................Erwin, Wasey & Co., Inc. 


SHWAYDERIBROS., INC..............Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 
Samson Card Tables 


SIMON & SCHUSTER, INC......... Schwab and Beatty, Inc. 
Book Publishers 


SMITH BROS. COUGH DROPS. .,....Brown & Tarcher, Inc. 
STANDARD BRANDS, INC...........3. Walter Thompson Co. 
Fleischmann’s Yeast 


A. STEIN & COMPANY............ McJunkin Advertising Co. 


Bayer Aspirin . 


TAX SALES SERVICE........A. N. Baker Advertising Agency. 
| Unives Camera Corp. 
UNIVERSAL PICTURES CO., INC.,.J. Walter Thompson Co. 


x ppeapone on sie Walter Thompson Co. 


. 


% 
‘ae 


re 


le eit Pure 4 ? ees | 
9 Oe at Ole es Bia tao galt, amb ys RTS ER a, Sie mets Dl it as pg? natn 


One year ago:a lusty infant was: born 

into America’s highly competitive mag- 

azine fields The name was LOOK: 
It had no circulation: But it did have a new 
way to tell stories in pictures ss ..a new pic- 
ture languages 

Today, after one year; LOOK has an average 
sale per issue of more than 2,000,000.3.a 
circulation figure which other leading maga- 
zines required years to attain. 

In spite of its phenomenal circulation 
growth, issue after issue; LOOK did not open 
its pages to advertising during its first nine 
months. There was a very definite and logical 
reason—LOOK’s publishers preferred to de- 
termine the reader-interest in this new publi- 
cation at their own expense, before present- 
ing their case to advertisers: 

In the November 9 issue of LOOK; the 
first advertising appeared. The start was mod- 
est; but advertising growth since has been as 
conspicuous as LOOK’s circulation. growth. 
One leading American advertiser after an- 
other has accepted this new picture magazine 
as a new way to reach and influence millions. 
(Turn your eyes to the column at the left for 
the list of products; manufacturers and agen- 


AVERAGING 


2,00 


BUYERS 


be, We ae ga ; 
‘leg. VR 408 be he ae ee See Se aia athe Met 


cies who already are using LOOK’S advertis- 
ing pages. 

LOOK’s dominant place in the reading and 
advertising habits of America is.assured. For 
here is a serious, substantial magazine with 
the avowed editorial purpose; plus the dem- 
onstrated editorial ability; to give the average 
American family a clean; interesting, inform- 
ative program of picture magazine enter- 
tainment: 

LOOK’s hold on its millions of readers ‘is 
soundly based on the universal human desire 
to SEE and UNDERSTAND. 

And as each issue appears it becomes in- 
creasingly apparent that LOOK is a powerful; 
new editorial force in American Lifes 


MORE THAN 


SITS tas RN 


. 


2.100000} 


1900000 | 
1800,000 


[700,000 


1600000 


4,500,000 
[400,000 


1300,000- 


200,000 


100,000 


000,000 


,000 


ld 


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300, 


200,000 


100,000 


* 


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6 2088, Jee 
uke 


rH ‘PRABURR OFFICES. 
CHICAGO—THIBUNE oes 
TOK10—IMPER _ 
Lo 138 FL 


: acer. PAT.ACE. 
PANAMA CITY—HOTEL CENTRAL. 
RIGA—STETINES 1KLA xz 
MILWAUKES—TITLE GUARANTY BUILDING. 
BAS] 42D STREET 


BUILDING. 


FOR ILLINOIS ne CHICAGO 


. End the Parole Bu; 

. Build Deathproof | 

Make Chicago the Fira Cupnthe W orld: 
Faster Suburban Service. 

Up to Date Local Transporiatton. 

A Lake Front Airport. 

A Motor Ferry to Michigan. 

Cut Taxes in Half. 


bs Dok 


Ne Gash 


So 


SHADOW ON THE LAND. 

The American Social Hygiene association has 
appointed today to call attention by meetings 
throughout the country to the urgent need of 
a concerted attack upon the plague of venereal 
disease, namely syphilis and gonorrhea, The asso- 
ciation was formed and named at a time when 
any mention in speech or print of these dread 
afflictions was repressed by a false standard of 
modesty and propriety, and the public remained 
in almost complete ignorance of the ravages of 
these diseases, of their nature and extent, The 
association was organized to undertake the pub- 
lic’s education, but so strong was the taboo 
against public discussion that it felt constrained 
to adopt a name which would not offend, Social 
\ hygiene is a euphemism which means little. Al) 
hygiene is social. All disease is social in its 
consequences, Syphilis and gonorrhea are social 
diseases no more than consumption or smalipox. 

It wag essential to an effective attack upon 
these so-called social diseases that they be called 
by their own names and brought under the light 
of publicity. The surreptitious attack upon them 
was getting nowhere, and the diseases were in- 
creasing. 

The first serious attack upon the venereal dis- 
eases was made under pressufe of the war mo- 
bilization. It is to the credit of the army and 
navy administration that it took measures to 
impose as far as it was practicable a system of 
prophylaxis and treatment upon the armed forces, 
This greatly reduced one of the worst phases of 
war. The health condition of the army and navy 
set a new standard. The attention given was 
the first important mass education on this sub- 
ject. 

In 1913, before the experience of the army and 

navy, THE TRIBUNE engaged in an attack on 
quacks in Chicago. It did not mince words. It 
was the first great newspaper to name syphilis 
and gonorrhea in print. Immediately after Amer- 
ica’s entrance into the war, Dr. W. A. Evans, former 
commissioner of health, then health editor of 
THE TRIBUNE, began a series of articles on the 
history, causes, prevention, and cure of syphilis. 
In 1917 the Chicago city council took action for 
the reporting and treatment of the venereal 
diseases. In 1922 Dr. Herman Bundesen began 
a campaign to bring syphilis and gonorrhea 
under the same regulation as other communicable 
diseases and for official] warnings. 
- But progress in public education was slow. 
The taboo still prevailed throughout the country. 
The first Chicago clinieg were operating. A 
private enterprise for treatment, the Public 
Health institute, was organized by reputable 
citizens determined to do something to relieve 
the situation. The United States health service 
was working energetically to bring about more 
effective state and !ocal action. The surgeon 
general, Dr. Parran, made it a special line of 
attack. In 1935 THE ‘'RIBUNE published a series 
of special articles on the syphilis scourge, with 
editorials using no hush words and present- 
ing the situation as it is known to science, Last 
year it published a second series and a number 
of editorials upon the problem. 

The effect of Tue TRisuNe’s campaign has been 
noteworthy. The taboo is breaking down. It is 
not yet abolished, but it is on the way out. We 


| in actual need to fooa and 0 yaks ane en ‘ : é 


the evils eb reliet cannot be cured ras quiri: 
‘applicants to pretend they want to be ei 


_| The privilege of citizenship is discredited by mak-| 
a — 


deviaed or adopted po toot sanhe of fitness 


although we recognize theoretically that the 
political welfare of the nation depends upon the 
quality of its voters. We talk of the privileges 
and responsibilities of American citizenship, but 
we act as if anybody ought to have them for 
the price of a blank. Now we are offering a 
— for enlistment in the ranks of citizenship. 


caine, ieltialitiny ==. 


OVERRULING THE LAW. 

Last week a Chicago jury acquitted a woman 
charged by the state with murder. The prosecu- 
tion did not ask for the death penalty. The de 
fendant had killed a rival for the attentions of 
her husband, She, not the state, imposed the 
death penalty and executed it. The jury ap- 
proved her action. A courtroom full of applaud- 
ing sensation seekers approved the action of the 
jury. 

The judgment of the jury- was contrary to the 
law and to those principles of justice and public 
policy. which it expresses. The conduct of the 
murdered woman as disclosed by the evidence 
was contrary to morals and it was punishable 
under the law. But the law does not prescribe 
the death penalty for it, nor does it authorize 
any private person to execute the penalty it 
prescribes. The people of Illinois:are free to fix 
the death penalty for such conduct as the mur- 
dered woman was shown to have been guilty of. 
They have not done so and never will. They are 
free to authorize a private person to try and 
condemn and execute the death penalty upon any 
one who has injured him or her by such con- 
duct. They have not and they never will, 

The jury in this case refused to perform its 
duty as jurors. It broke the oath it had taken 
in entering the jury box. It overruled the peo- 
ple of Illinois and made its own law. 

The jury, if indeed none of its members had 
been tampered with, thought it was exercising a 
higher justice than the law decrees. It had no 
authority to do so. It is the sole authority of 
the people of Illinois to establish justice and the 
forms and agencies by which alone it is to be 
anforced. This is an essential of civilized society. 
The jury repudiated it. 

It may be asked why such abuse of law is not 
punishable under the law. The answer is that 
it is the judgment of the people of Illinois as 
expressed in their laws that to make juries re- 
sponsible, in the absence of corruption, for thelr 
judgments would involve worse consequences 
than the occasional breach of their duty. This 
is a wise judgment and is not likely to be al- 
tered. But for that reason it is all the more in: 
cumbent upon citizens in jury service to respect 
the law and faithfully apply it, The jury in this 
case failed in their duty and the emotionalism, 
false sentiment, and fuddled thinking or worse 


which directed their action are directly responsible 


for the prevalence of unpunished crime im the 
United States. 


FACE OR THE COUNTRY? 

Here are the results of the surplus earnings 
tax: 

1. According to a study of the ways and means 
committee of the house of representatives, cor- 
porations were induced to pay out 81.2 per cent 
of their earnings in 1936. It has been recognized 
in the past that sound practice of industrial cor- 
porations is to pay out only half a year’s earn- 
ings, retaining the balance for expansion and 
reserve against adversity. The swollen dividend 
payments were unquestionably due to the surplus 
earnings tax. 

2. The payment of dividends, in excess of the 
amounts indicated by sound business, helped to 
increase internal revenue receipts of the govern- 
ment to $5,599,000,000, an all time record. It 
helped to ereate the kind of a stock market 
boom which always winds up in a panic. 

3. If corporations had been permitted to retain 
50 per cent of their earnings instead of 18.8 per 
cent without the severe penalties of the surplus 
earnings tax, they would have more than a billion 
dollars more than they now have available for 
employment creating expenditures, Falling off 
in purchases of new equipment by corporations 
has brought about the fastest business recession 
ever experienced. The index of industrial pro- 
duction of the federal reserve board, which was 
at a high point last summer, for December was 
at the lowest level for a year’s end since 1932, 

There is mounting evidence that the principal 
cause of the recession is the evil tax law. The 
duty of congress is manifest, except to those 
members of congress who think it is more impor- 
tant to save face than to save the country. 


y Editorial of the Day 


TREE 
fH 


: 


tf 
+ 


| 


i 
i 


| a language. Pioneer ne Bes of Slang 


the s | a ‘The 2 
ae, oo AE Aah ae 7 if 
~ Ae . i> 
ie. % ’ 


was @ short ghee: apes a stude 
“Well, professor,” he said, “e trite peseancaene is 
one that's as old as Methuselah.” 

Joseph C. Ryan. 


A DRASTIC drunken driving law is found on. 
the books in Manitoba, Canada, according to a 
recent article in the Chicago Daily News. The 
article concludes: “This law has reduced drunk- 
en driving accidents about 75 per cent, officialsh 
of the province report.” 

It appear’sh ash if everyshing’sh under control. 

A. D. 8, 


NOT JOY ALONE. 
Not joy alone has set upon her song 
That poignant tenderness. Some sterner blade, 
Refined in the bright fires of life full long, 
Has placed upon her soul its accolade. 
—The keen Damascus sword, so richly wrought, 
And shaped to beauty and enduring strength, 
Bespeaks the skill and knowledge, dearly bought, 
That fashioned knightly excellence at length— 
So I have heard her sing, and seen, afar, 
Beyond the reach of the enclosing roof, 
Visions as shining as the morning star; 
And found, for every mystery, its proof. 
Not Joy alone . . . remembered sorrow brings 
Its deeper beauty to the songs she sings. 

Beverley Githens. 


HOLLYWOOD VIEWPOINT. 
Speaking of swords (re the advertisment for 
the lost Civil war sword reprinted here), Felix 
Adler, a humorist of no mean salary in Hollywood, 
had a grandfather who fought with distinction in 
the Civil wa’. The sword was found among family 
mementos by a not too close relative in Phila- 
delphia, who wrote Adler asking him what to do 

with it. 

“Keep it,” answered tue funny man, 

too big to use to open my mail.” 
Eleanor Howard. 


Queen Million Shekels Herself. 
(From the legal notices in the Hammond, Ind., Times.) 
Queen Million Shekels vs. Engineers, 
Inc. . . . Now comes the plaintiff by 
Stanley A, Tweedle, her attorney, and files 
her complaint herein... . 


A BAD MOMENT FOR THE OLD GRADS. 

When Vitya Vronsky and Victor Babin appeared 
on Northwestern university’s “History and En: 
joyment of Music” series at the Auditorium and 
opened their program with Brahms’ “ Variations 
on a Theme of Haydn’s” Elsie Lockwood of the 
dean’s office half expected to see about a third 
of the audience rise. Tradition says Northwest: 
erners must stand when their song “ Queecumque 
Sunt Vera” is played, and the melody is identical 
with that of the “ Variations.” 


FOR A DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN 
FROM OXFORD. 
(Name on request.) 
You. baited all your questions 
(Barked psychologic hooks) 
That night when you came fishing— 
But not for fish in brooks. 


You thought (Ah, Freud and Adler) 
You’d swiftly analyze 

The mind of one who maybe 
Was prettier than wise. 


“It’s 


You probed, deduced and added, 
And still an optimist, 

Fished on to find out if one 
Could or could not be kissed. 


Ha, Lad-Who-Knew-the-Answers 
(It’s safe now to be candid), 
I didn’t mind your angling— 
I knew, sweet, who'd be landed! 
Pat R. A. 


Department of Shivers and Shudders. 
Sylvia B, Martin swears she saw a nice looking 
young business woman at the Chicago Avenue 
Y. M. C. A, eating banana ice cream, coffee, and 
rolis for breakfast. 


PROBLEM. 

Variety tells the new complaint against the 
weather in Hollywood, by Solly (Two Card Monte) 
Violinsky: 

“The climate changes so often that it leaves me 
confused what clothing to hock first!” 


Oughtn’t He Spell it MacGee? 


FIRST CLASS haircuts—25c, any style, at 

Gomez, Florida, nine miles south of 
Stuart on old highway at John McGee's 
home, where sweet oranges, grapefruit, 
and fancy vegetables grow. $1.25 per 
bushel.—Stuart (Fla.), Daily News, relayed 
by Charles H, Vale, 


INDIVIDUALIST. 

Telephone rang . . . woman named Edna Brown 
on the wire. Said she had been riding on the Lake 
street elevated and when the train got opposite 
227 West Lake street she could see into a window 
on the “L” level, There she saw a man wearing 
a straw hat working at a desk: She kept puzzling 
about this and when she got to a telephone she 


called up the Buffalo Weaving and Belting com: 


pany at that number, but they told her the 3 
with the straw hat was with the John H, ¥ 


Tobacco company next door, She telephoned him 


there to see why he was wearing a straw hat in 
January. ‘io COld She POPE ARRAS to. wear ons, /; 


| {1} the covering of the scalp, 
| short, thick eyebrows and eyelashes, and 
| [3] the fine dewn which covers the body. 
1It is when this latter variety, called 


| to the control of certain glands. 
j}ever a bald spot displays itself on the 


something has harmed the hair follicles 
[roots], or perhaps the circulation is not 


We are born with three types of hair: 
[2] the 


lanugo, develops excessively, particularly 


| with girls, that it may become a source 
| of annoyance. 


As is well known, the hair responds 
When- 


crown and, at the same time, the outer 
half of each eyebrow becomes thin or 
drops away, a metabolism test may show 
that the thyroid gland is not functioning 
up to par. Strangely enough, the ad- 
ministration of thyroid extract may not 


| bring about’ a regrowth, Nevertheless, 


if pituitary gland extract is injected such 
losses are often repaired. 

Too much hair on the body presents 
anything but a pleasant prospect, The 
woman with coarse, black hairs on the 
chin will do almost anything that prom- 
ises relief—even risking the polsonous 
thallium ointments which have caused 
so much damage; or enduring X-ray 
treatments which—if not administered 
with the utmost caution—may bring 
about marked dilatation of the blood 
vessels with a cosmetic effect far worse 
than the beard, 

Many women believe that the occur- 
rence of this difficulty is due tc some 
fault of their own, such as pulling or 
cutting the bristles or possibly the use 
of some special cream. Any interference 
that does not destroy the follicles, 
changes the character of the new crop. 
It becomes stiffer and harsher, hence 
more insistent—from the point of view 
of appearance—that something be done 
to remove it. But there is no evidence 
to indicate that the total amount of stub- 
ble is increased by anything that the 
patient may do. 

The opinion of many authorities, borne 
out by experimental evidence, is that 
superfluous hair in the female usually is 
associated with a menstrual deficiency, a 


y to cause irritation of 
cat tid, Wahine is tes cote oe 
to make the downy fuzz coarser, 


~~ 

Among those who are bald or afflicted 
with thinning tresses, the circulation 
should be investigated as, in many in- 
stances, it will be found reduced either 
by a hatband that is too tight or be- 
cause vessels provided by nature to carry 
blood to the scalp are too small, This 
is the reason that hot packs and massage 
will often stop the disorder provided the 
area is kept clean. The flow of blood 
into the parts is stimulated and this in 
turn may reactivate dormant cells, But 
no one can restore the strands if the 
roots are dead. Treatment is then dl- 
rected toward protecting the remaining 
locks, 

. —_ 
MEAT IN DIET. 

0. S. writes: About how much meat 
may be eaten daily by a patient who had 
one kidney removed sixteen years ago? 


REPLY. 

About two ounces of lean meat. The re- 
moval of one kidney does not limit the 
body's ability to digest meat if the remain- 
ing organ is functioning up to par. 


jell 
DANGER UNLIKELY. 

G. I, writes: Our cook has syphilis for 
which she is taking treatments twice a 
week. Her test is one plus, Is there any 
danger to us? 

REPLY. 


Not if she is well past the second stage 
and is continuing treatment faithfully. 


-o~ 
CELLULITIS. 

S. L. writes: What is the cause of 
cellulitis? 

REPLY. 

Probably a streptococcus infection which 
may occur after fevers, injury, or arise from 
decayed teeth. Any infection, however, may 
be responsible for inflammation of the tissue 
beneath the skin [cellulitis], 


-~o 

RABID SQUIRRELS. 
A. L. writes: Can hydrophobia in a 
human devélop from the bite of a 


REPLY. 
Yes. 


FROM ACROSS THE SEA 


squirrel? 


BY HAROLD TATAM. 
{Chicago Tribune Press Service. } 


BUENOS AIRES.—The Argentine 
government’s reported decision to 
close the meteorological station which 
it has maintained in the South Ork- 
ney Islands for thirty-four years, on 
the ground that the value of observa- 
tions made is very small and in no 
way commensurate with the cost, may 
provide grounds for a first class dis- 
pute with Great Britain regarding 
sovereignty over the islands. 

The Argentine claim to ownership 
of the South Orkneys dates from 
1904, according to La Prensa, which 
has made a thorough search of all 
archives for data in support of the 
claim. In that year the Argentine 
government founded the meteorolog- 
ical station which still exists, and 
every year a fresh band of devoted 
observers goes to those islands to 
pass twelve months in the appalling 
solitude of the Antarctic seas. {n 
1908 Great Britain initiated a “ discus- 
sion” with the Argentine authorities 
concerning the sovereignty of the en- 
tire archipelago in which the South 
Orkneys are located. There was a 
lamentable delay in formulating a re- 
ply to Britain, and in the meantime 
the British government, tired of wait- 
ing, formally annexed the islands in 
1908, 

The Argentine public was not made 
aware of the fact until La Prensa, 
having learned of it from an Italian 
geographical magazine, published the 
news in February, 1910. In 1923 Great 
Britain informed the world of her 
annexation of a considerable portion 
of the Antarctic continent, dividing 
it into sectors, one of which, the 
“Falklands Whaling sector” com- 
prises the South Orkneys, 

Two Argentine ministers of foreign 
affairs have courteously but firmly 
rejected the British claim, and the 
Universal Postal union at Berne has 
been informed that Argentina claims 
sovereignty over “ the islands existing 
on the Argentine coast, part of the 
island of Tierra del Fuego, the archi- 
pelagoes of South Georgia and South 
Orkney, and the undelimited polar 
regions.” 

Nevertheless, not all Argentines are 
convinced of the legitimacy of their 

ent’s contention, and much 
less so of the worth of the islands, 
which they look upon ag a liability 
rather than an asset. Among them 
is Vice-Admiral Ismael Galindez who 
has published a ae | of the South 


Orkneys which contains some inter- 
esting and even startling assertions 
in connection with them. 

Roundly asserting that the islands 
are worthless, and that the money 
spent in maintaining an observatory 
there would be much better employed 
in killing locusts on the fertile main- 
land, the outspoken admiral declares 
that these islands would have lan- 
guished in total obscurity but for a 
worthy Scotch doctor named Bruce, 
who, many years ago, when an inter- 
national scientific congress studying 
the meteorological conditions of the 
polar regions brought the existence of 
these islands to the knowledge of 
ordinary men, proposed to the Scot- 
tish Geographical society. to visit 
them on the society’s behalf. The 
society was charmed with the idea 
and offered Dr. Bruce the use of its 
ship Scotia, provided he could raise 
the funds necessary to carry gut the 
expedition. 

Bruce obtained $50,000 from Henry 
Coats, of thread-making fame, who 
stipulated that any islands to be dis- 
covered should be at once baptized 
Coats Land. Dr, Bruce and his com- 
panions passed through many vicis- 
situdes and nearly lost their ship in 
the ice fioes, but one day he discerned 
land, called the crew on deck to hear 
him name it Coats’ Land, and re- 
turned to Scotland. Mr. Coats, how- 
ever, was disinclined to furnish more 
money for another expedition, where- 
upon Dr. Bruce obtained the ear of 
the then Argentine minister of agri- 
culture, Dr. Escalante, who gave him 
an attentive hearing. Such was the 
origin of the Argentine meteorological 
station in the South Orkneys. 

Vice Admiral Galindez reserves his 
most interesting revelation for the 
end of his paper. He declares that 
one Argentine administration—pre- 
sumably Gen. Uriburu’s provisional 
government—offered the British gov- 
ernment a block of land in the ¢enter 
of Buenos Aires on which to build a 
palatial embassy in return for’ the 
undisputed sovereignty of the South 
Orkneys. 

He also declares that the main 
achievement of the meteorological 
station has been the assertion that 
phenomenal cold spells in the South 
Orkneys are usually followed by 
drouth in the Argentine wheat belt 
three years later, although no ex- 
planation of the coincidence is 
offered, a fact that is curious but not 
very helpful to the ministry of agri- 
culture or the farmers of the republic. 


— a 


ak 


i: FRIEND (D_OF THE PEOPLE | 


The volume of ne 
‘No copies or r 


ten ond met necessitates printed statements on common questions. 
jetters Or answers are kept. Hence follow-up “ts ee 


“What devils the English are. If only they had sent me to Hollywood I 
could have made the last few years into a fine scenario.” 


, 


| VOICE OF THE PEOPLE 


3 


Writers should confine themselves 
and addresses. No manuscripts can 
People, The Tribune. 


A CHURCH-SPONSORED NIGHT CLUB. 
Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 27.—Relative to 
your prominent news item about min- 
isters sponsoring a liquorjess, midnight- 
closing night club for young people in a 
now vacant outlying roadhouse in Mil- 
waukee, the latest news is that pastors 
are divided over what seems to have 
been prematurely sprung by a small 
group of- ministers. As representatives 
of the Milwaukee Ministerial association 
they were activ@é in visiting taverns to 
evaluate their nightlife. This committee 
did investigational work of value and it 
resulted in securing the passage of an 
ordinance to close taverns at 2 a. m. 

This writer looks beck upon three score 
years of lay church association, and an 
activity in American general church life 
of close to forty years. Too often min- 
isterial planning is poorly thought 
through, because the minister lives in a 
greater nonsecular realm than does the 
laity. The ‘‘Lord’s business’’ is the 
minister’s business about seven days @ 
week, and it ig his bread and butter, 

Churches have completed the cycle in- 
cidental to gyms, which idealistic bene- 
factors of more than ordinary wealth 
built, and often the pastors of such 
churches were filled with gladness over 
the hold the gym would have on their 
young folk. But in only a few instances 
did finances permit of employing phys- 
ical directors or any gym leadership that 
very long would be respected by fre- 
quenters of these gyms. Frequently they 
but afforded an opportunity for ‘‘ rough- 
house’’ and disrespect for order and 
the rights of others. 

We knew one pastor who reaching the 
higher age bracket was stationed at a 
beautiful Gothic church, with gym, mod- 
ernized stage, etc., attached which the 
contributions of one wealthy man 
made possible, However, no budget 
for gym supervision. Finally that pas- 
tor asked his superior to secure for him 
another pulpit, telling him that it mat- 
tered not if the salary might be sub- 
stantially lower, *‘ but there must be no 

*? 

We think more pertinent now than 
ministers establishing a liquorless, early 
dosing night club, without floor show, 
would be for them to look to the church’s 
young people’s elders to find in what 
Ways some of these elders may have 
contributed to what the ministers 
now consider to be the delinquency 
of the children, Did not this local min- 
isterial committee publicly report that 
in one tavern parents recognized as 
church members were imbibing freely? 
Their children were begging to get home 
and into bed so that they might, as they 
said, ‘‘ be able to get to Sunday school 
in time.”’ 

If this pastoral-inspired night club, 
‘serving tea in the afternoon,’’ is finally 
developed, we of the older vintages may 
be excused for thinking about what an 
Episcopalian rector, editing a certain 
church monthly, recently wrote: ‘* We 
believe in God and his holy church... 
if only it will be interested in religion.” 

How does the rank and file of the 
ministry feel about making the church 
first of all a spiritual institution? 

CARL F. KECK. 


THE VAN ZEELAND PLAN. 

Chicago, Jan, 28.—A so-called recon- 
struction of world economy has been 
proposed by Paul Van Zeeland, former 
Belgian premier. 

This proposal advocates that the have 
nations make loans to the have-nats in 
return for pledges to observe treaties 
more closely. It appears to me that this 
is tantamount to paying a confidence 
man in the hope that thereby he will 
observe the rules of society more closely. 

To any close observer of the habits of 


he so-callea have-not nations it is clear 


that this agreement will last just as long 
as all things work in their favor. Ger- 
many, Italy, and Japan will jump at 
the chance to obtain credits in order to 
increase their armaments at the expense 
of Great Britain, France, and the United 
States. 

It appears t@ me that strengthening 
our own armed forces for our own se- 
curity is costing us enough without aid- 
ing the enemieg of our form of govern- 
ment to further arm themselves with this | 
form of ee W. H. 


to 200 or 300 words. Gwe full names 
be returned, Address Voice of the 


HARD COAL AND A SOFT GOVERNOR. 

Pontiac, Ill., Jan. 25.—In your editori- 
al in today’s paper entitled ‘‘ Hard Coal 
and a Soft Governor’’ you say, ‘ Gov. 
Earle is himself responsible for troubie 
in which the hard coal industry finds 
itself.’’ 

Now to recapitulate, On Sept. 1, 192. 
the anthracite miners went out on stri 
because up to that date no agreenk. : 
ad been reached between the minc.. 
and operators on a new agreement. |. ° 
agreement under which they had be..; 
working expired Aug. 31, 1925. Miniz: 
operations remained at a standstill unti: 
February, 1926. On the resumption o! 
operations it was found that the anthra- 
cite consuming public had turned to sub- 
stitutes, To meet changed conditions the 
operators put into effect speed-up produc- 
tion. Machine mining replaced hand 
mining. Cheap producing mines were 
worked on three eight hour shifts and 
high cost mines were shut down. 

As a result numerous miners were 
thrown out of work. Those same miners, 
to keep their homes, turned to “* Bootleg- 
ging operations,’ namely, going over 
old refuse banks, which dot the land- 
scape in the anthracite regions, to find 
coal which had been missed in the me- 
chanical cleaning of coal. Others, know- 
ing old workings about the mines, began 
taking coal out through cave holes and 
selling it from door to door at a very 
low cost. At that it was an inferior 
grade. 

This condition was prevalent under 
both Govs. Fischer and Pinchot, and 
still continues. Arrests were made from 
time to time, but Republican judges let 
offenders off with a reprimand. 

However, your paper may save its 
sympathy for the poor operators of the 
anthracite region. Why, I ask you, is it 
now you become interested fn the hard 
coal industry? Why was not the atten- 
tion of the public brought to this whole- 
cale theft of coal from the suffering op- 
erators under Pinchot’s régime? The 
same conditions existed then, 

As one who was born and raised in 
the anthracite regions, worked in and 
about the mines for a period of about 
twelve years, I feel adequately equipped 
to speak on the anthracite industry ana 
cannot help but scream to high heavens 
against placing the blame for the ills 
of the industry on Goy, Earle. Give 
your readers the facts, but don’t try to 
discredit one of the finest men who ever 
sat in the governor’s chair at Harris- 
burg. PauL A. GANNON, M. D. * 


AN UNNEEDED THROUGH STREET 

Chicago, Jan. 28.—In days long gone, 
Western avenue was narrow, street cai 
crowded, truck infested, and Paved like 
the rocky road to Dublin, To facilitai. 
motor trafic, Oakley avenue, parallelin’. 
Western on the east, was made a boule 
vard from North avenue on the north tv 
Roosevelt road on the south, At every 
intersection it was protected by Stop 
signs. 

Now, however, that Western avenue 
has been widened and paved from Evans- 
ton to Blue Island, it is one of the long- 
est, widest, and best thoroughfares in 
this or any other city. Trafic seeks it 
out and is easily accommodated, No- 
body now uses Oakley except the few 
who happen to have reason to go there, 
But the Oakley stop signs remain stand- 
ing. For a distance of about four miles 
in mid-city, all east and west trafic must 
make two full stops within a distance of 
a city block, one necessary and proper at 
Western, and one néedless and annoying 


at Oakley, 
Oakley stop 


Tt is high time that the 
iN sable 


signs were removed, thus relieving 

ists of a needless handicap, and 

Oakley to return as it was to the status 

pe ee a 

streets, W. B. 
BUSINESS TRAINING. 

Chicago, Jan. 30.—A great need of the 

community would be satisfied if a cen- 

trally located public evening school 

would offer college level courses in busi- 


wg 


a 


Rep. J. S. Perry Urges 
High Court Action. 


A connection between Will county’s 
outlawed slot machine racket and 
the case of Abraham Karatz, Cook 
county convict who was freed on a 
‘wit of habeas corpus by Judge Edwin 
L. Wilson of Joliet, was traced yester- 
day by State Representative Joseph 
‘Sam Perry of Wheaton. 

Mr. Perry, who introduced a bill 
in the state legislature to impeach 
. Judge Wilson because he protected 
‘slot machines with injunctions, point- 
ed out that the $5,000 bail of Karatz 
was furnished by Julius Benvenuti, a 
slot machine operator and petty Chi 
cago politician. 

Still Smells Slot Machine Oil. 

“My motion to impeach was lost, 
‘63 to 61,” said the representative, “ but 
‘the slot machines went out. Just 
‘three days after I asked for Judge 
Wilson’s impeachment he dissolved 
the injunctions. But I can still smell 
- the slot machine oil. 

“Judge Wilson has all the lawyers 
in Will county afraid of him. Know- 
ing it was useless to expect the judge 
to do what he should, I wired State’s 
Attorney Courtney—if he wants to 
keep Karatz from being freed when- 
ever he gets near the prison doors— 
‘to ask the Supreme court to issue 
a writ of prohibition against Judge 
Wilson.” 

A struggle of court jurisdictions 
impends in the Karatz case. Karatz, 
a former St. Paul attorney, was con: 
victed in Cook county of embezzle- 
ment. His sentence of one to five 
years was approved by the Supreme 
court, and he was on his way to the 
Joliet penitentiary in charge of Cook 
county deputies when the writ of ha- 
beas corpus was served. 

Held in Cock County Jail. 

A hearing on the matter was set 
for Jan. 28, but when Judge Wilson 
continued the case until next Friday 
and permitted the ex-lawyer to re 
main at liberty on Benvenuti’s bonds, 
Cook county disregarded the Joliet 
jurist’s orders. Karatz was seized, 
brought to Cook county, and locked 
up in the County jail. 

Assistant State’s Attorney James 
Cunningham, who assisted in the ar- 
rest of the convicted swindler, ad- 
mittedly risked a contempt citation 
by Judge Wilson. He said he under- 
stood this, but regarded the judge’s 
freeing of Karatz as null and void. 
First Assistant Prosecutor Wilbert 
Crowley announced Karatz would be 
kept here until the writ is disposed of. 


TERRY DRUGGAN’S 
COUNTRY ESTATE 
IS ORDERED SOLD 


Terry Druggan, who was one of 
the wealthiest of the prohibition beer 
barons, must raise $29,745.76 in cash 
before Friday night if he is to pre- 
vent his 240 acre estate near Lake 
Zurich being sold at the courthouse 
door in Waukegan. Circuit Judge 
Ralph J. Dady yesterday signed a de- 
cree making final the foreclosure of 
the property, but granted a three day 
period of grace. 

Druggan purchased the place for 
$80,000 in 1923, paying $40,000 down. 
In November, 1936, a suit for posses- 
sion of the farm was started by 
Hugo Pick, trustee of the estate from 
which he purchased it. Pick said 
Druggan defaulted on a payment of 
$612.50 due Oct. 17, 1936, and that 
under his contract he was entitled to 
the whole property. 


ORDERED TO JAIL 
UNTIL HE REPAYS 
$29,000 SHORT AGE 


John P. Dignan, a real estate man 
with offices at 105 West Madison 
Street, was sentenced yesterday to the 
county jail until he repays a $29,000 
shortage in his accounts as a trustee 
in bankruptcy, or until Federal Judge 
Philip L. Sullivan modifies sentence. 
» Appointed a trustee in April, 1935, 
for the Walton hotel, 1019 North 
Dearborn street, and the Crandon 
Building corporation, 7ist and Cran- 
don avenue, Dignan in his final re- 
port stated that he had $20,919 on 
hand from the hotel and $9,123 from 
the Crandon building. 

In court, however, he admitted he 
had only $1,101 from the hotel and 
— from the building. 


MRS. ELEAZOR ANDERSON. 


Judge Philip i Finnegan yester- 
day awarded Mrs. Eleanor Anderson, 
25 years old, a dancer, an uncon- 
tested divorce from Carl M. Ander- 
son, 5361 Bowmanville avenue, a tin- 
smith. Mrs..Anderson, who lives at 
3716 Clifton avenue, testified they 
were married Dec. 29, 1930, at Wau- 
kegan. After a separation in 1932 
and a reconciliation, Mrs. Anderson 
said her husband left her on Dec. 7, 
1935. She waived alimony. 


FOUR MEN SLAIN, 
10 HURT IN NEW 
MEXICAN CLASH 


4 


Governor Blames Fas- 


cist Faction. 


MEXICO CITY, Feb. 1—(/)—Four 
men were killed and ten wounded 
today in an agra- 
rian conflict at 
Encarnacion de 
Diaz, state of Ja- 
lisco, while au- 
thorities were in- 
vestigating pre- 
vious disorders 
in which four 
others were 
killed near Mata- 
moros in the 
state of Tamauli- 
pas, across the 
border from 
Brownsville, Tex. 

Two men were 
killed by federal 
troops and agra- 
rian reservists at 
La Rosita, fifteen 
miles west of Matamoros; another by 
soldiers in a clash at El Soliseno 
ranch, twenty miles west of Mata- 
moros, and a Matamoros policeman 
was killed when he tried to stop a 
truck entering the city. 


Telegraph Wires Cut. 

The cutting of telegraph wires and 
an attempt to burn a bridge on the 
Monterrey-Tampico railway were in- 
vestigated by Gov. Marte R. Gomez of 
the state of Tamaulipas to determine 
whether they were connected with 
the slayings in his state. A freight 
train crew found one end of a small 
wooden bridge afire. The blaze was 
extinguished quickly. 

Gov. Gomez blamed the outlawed 
Gold Shirts, a faction with Fascist 
tendencies, named after Pancho 
Villa’s notorious band of raiders — 
the Dorados or Golden Ones—for try- 
ing to make the American people 
think there is unrest in Mexico. 


Led by Foe of Cardenas. 


Gen. Nicolas Rodriguez, exiled by 
President Lazaro Cardenas in 1936 
because of his anti-government agita- 
tion, heads the Gold Shirts. He has 
been active among Mexican elements 
along the border, principally at La- 
redo and other Texas points, since 
he was chased from Mexico. 

Authorities in Mexico City said 
they regarded the disorders as of 
minor importance and purely local. 
They attributed the disturbances to 
“old differences” between agrarians, 
beneficiaries under President Carde- 
nas’ land distribution program, and 
land owners whose holdings were ex- 
propriated. 


A. S. Smith Accepts Liquor 


Scene of Latest Mex- 
jean Trouble Shown 
by Arrow. 


Board Job for 6 Year Term! 


Bloomington, Ill., Feb. 1.—[Special.] 
—Arthur S. Smith, Bloomington baker 
and for the last four years chairman 
of the Illinois liquor control commis- 
sion, announced today that he has 
accepted reappointment for six years. 


“FOR THAT DELIGHTFUL “QUICK REFRESHMENT?) 


| Defense Lawyer veotesta SE 


Severe Criticism. 


Criticizing the defendants severely, 


| Judge Oscar Caplan in Felony court 


yesterday held two officials and two 


employés of the Taylor Washing Ma- 


chine company, 3931 Madison street, 
to the grand jury on charges of con- 
spiracy to defraud. 

While the hearing in Felony court 
on the setting of their bonds was in 
progress, Assistant States Attorney 
Vernon Thompson was taking wit- 
nesses before the grand jury to tes- 
tify against the four. 


One Defendant Dismissed. 

Those held and the amount of their 
bonds, set by Judge Caplan, are Ellis 
R. Taylor of 1015 Forest avenue, Oak 
Park, president of the company, $5,- 
000; W. J. Kenney, 5330 Harper ave- 
nue, a salesman, $2,500; Walter A. De- 
laney, office manager, $5,000, and 
George H. Dye, a salesman, $2,500. 
Cc. E. Sears, who has been a defend- 
ant in the Felony court hearings, was 


| dismissed. Another defendant, E. F. 


Farmer, never has been arrested. 

The judge’s excoriation of the de- 
fendants brought protests from At- 
torney Harry Silverstein of the de- 
fense. Judge Caplan said: | 

“Throughout this hearing testi- 
mony of outrageous acts of misrepre- 
sentation, fraud, duress, and intimida- 
tion has been given by witnesses. 
The tactics used by these defendants 
were not only contrary to law but 
in defiance thereof: 


Assails Practices They Used. 


“The practices adopted and sanc- 
tioned by these defendants were in 
violation of every contact between 
man and his neighbor, a business 
man and his customer. No subter- 
fuge was too small and no artifice too 
great to induce the complaining wit- 
nesses to deal with the defendants 
and, once such relationship was es- 
tablished, the most sinister means 
were utilized to force the customer 
to yield to illegal and unreasonable 
conditions.” 


WATCHMAN SHOT 
IN PISTOL FIGHT; 
ROBBER CAUGHT 


Adam Gladinski, 40 years old, a 
private watchman, was shot and seri- 
ously wounded last evening in a bat- 
tle with three robbers who were 
fleeing after an attempted holdup of 
the Newark Electric company store 
at 323 West Madison street. 

The trio had been routed from the 
store without loot by shots fired by 
Abe Poncher, the manager. They 
fled to the Madison street bridge and 
down steps behind the Civic Opera 
house. They were pursued by Glad- 
inski, who had just left a street car. 
He was shot down about halfway be- 
tween Madison and Washington 
streets. 

Soon afterward the police seized 
Peter Connolly, 32 years old, hiding 
under a platform near the scene of 
the shooting. He was identified as 
one of the three robbers. He told the 
police that he inherited $50,000 less 
than two years ago and became a 
bum after spending it all. He admit- 
ted his part in the holdup, but denied 
he fired at Gladinski, who was struck 
twice in the abdomen. Gladinski 
lives at 2819 South Keeler avenue, 
————————— 


ff ope are pen each other for 


John L. Moran, shoe manufacturer 
of Carlyle, Ill., admitted he registered 
with Mrs. McCoy at a Harrisburg, 
Pa., hotel last Saturday. But he 
insisted his only object was to buy 
lemonade for both. He also said Mrs. 
McCoy’s son, 9, years old, had. been 
their chaperon. 

Moran branded as lies the testi- 
mony of private detectives that he 
had been found in pajamas in one 
room, and Mrs. McCoy in a pink 
nightgown in the other. He said 
there had been no liquor—only lem- 
onade. Tearfully, Mrs. McCoy made 
similar denials. 

‘ Justice Peter J. Schmuck reserved 
decision. 


3 RAILWAY VETS 
GET 3 YEARS FOR 
EXPRESS THEFTS 


Three veteran employés of the Illi- 
nois Central railroad and the Rail- 
way Express agency were sentenced 
by Federal Judge Charles E. Wood- 
ward to three years each at Leaven- 
worth penitentiary yesterday, after 
they pleaded guilty to the theft of 
$10,000 worth of goods from express 
shipments by means of a truck switch- 
ing scheme, 

They are Thomas C. Peifer, 50 
years old, 1802 South 2d avenue, May- 
wood; James C, Downs, 52 of 6223 
Dorchester avenue, and Harry Twine, 
43 of 1522 East 60th street. 

On charges of receiving the stolen 
merchandise, Judge Woodward sen- 
tenced Charles Alberts, 48 years old, 
3447 South Leavitt street, to two 
years in the penitentiary, and his 
sister, Mrs. Rose Dion, 49 years old, 
7834 South Bishop street, to a year 
and a day in the women’s reforma- 
tory at Alderson, W. Va. 


The TASTES in 


taste all at once 


Mrs. Snyder’s candy has so many lus- 
cious startling tastes that taste all at 
once and sometimes singly that little 
folks just stand and eat with one foot 
on another and eyes most closed and 
act as though ‘they’d never get enough 
they’re just like me. 


OUT OF TOWN CUSTOMERS SEND 
ORDERS TO MRS. SNYDER’S MAIN SHOP 
119 N WABASH AVE., CHICAGO 4 
CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW 
FLUFF, creamy milk chocolate PLUS 
huffy mashmaliow PLUS crisp pecans 
equals happiness PLUS. 


75¢ per pound 


BEGINNING 


a 
m7 


i iy 
Th iibbbiaie 


7 


SERVICE BETWEEN 
CHICAGO-L05 ANGELES 


“= EACH WAY = 


Third Day 


The North Western —Union Pacific Streamliner 
“City of Los Angeles’ has proved so popular 
that service will be doubled beginning February 
21st. On that date a second “City of Los Angeles” 
will be placed in regular service; thus providing 
39%-hour service westbound from Chicago and 
eastbound from Los Angeles, every third day. 


Also - Fast Service Between 
CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 
each way, every third day 


Between Chicago and San Francisco, the 
Streamliner “'City of San Francisco” and: the 
streamlined steam-powered “Forty Niner’ pro- 


vide high-speed service each way, 
day, via a Western, Union 
co 


every third 
Aged ona 


———'| ment. compensa nig eae shang Mar- : 
leas? Durkin, state director of labor, |: 


| sented 90 per. cent of the employers : 
[liable under the terms of the act. The|m 


payment deadline ‘was midnight Mon- 
day. 


Individual parents, based on each 
employer’s total pay roll for last year, 
ranged from 12 cents to over $1,000, 
000. The federal tax was 2 per cent 
and the state tax 1.8 per cent, but a 
credit of 90 per cent on the former 
was allowed to employers who paid 
the Illinois tax. Many employers who 
heve not paid received extensions of 
time to avoid penalties. 


was accused of sending Medindia tte 
‘$2,000 through the mail to R. G. Lam- 
berson, an Oak Park published. 

The jury received the case at 3:30 
p. m. Monday. When called in yes- 
terday the foreman reported that its 
members were dealocked six to six. 
Thomas was acquitted a year ago on 


a similar charge. 


ay hn oe age cg an lane 


.|near 47th street in Lyons township. 
_| Keller, who was 22 years old and 
lived at 4443 Wentworth avenue, was 


drowned Saturday when he broke 


| — the ice while riding a bi- 


A L000 LAAUUNAUUL3} 


j ti ipttie iil 2 
ML tt PICeThiTLieeiiieiihal i i 
PALLAATIALALALS ASEIAGS ‘ DITSSSIERS thats 


~~ 


(HL 


Mibitiidill 
HULL 


he 
MURRTTEEL TEL 


Peeite 


’ ’ ’ my ' 
CALTLREETGEELILLGtiii PEST ETTGTEE LEG Eiiiebiieaed | thet 
MUU 


gp. Rie ae 
ITY} yt TittiTh anaanReteaALARERETET TIAL IAiiet ' o7 er re es — 
' i | ; ii Piiaitil iti ij iv if it Pelieeee peti rai iig 
j i PELE PEELRRLLLEELLALAERLLPLATTLATLea HEE i} 


TTT 


HONCETLATEOERU VHT 


MITT 


PAUAAATOOLAATAAAAD LUA 


Pussy Willow prints 
7s yard 


One of our most popular pure-dye silks 
—prints in fresh colored floral and geo- 
metric designs and heavenly monotones 
—all ready to be made into lovely in- 
formal frocks or clever dresses for day 


time wear. 


Wool crepes 


39 inches wide. 


TTT 


$44 yard 


A stunning lightweight wool—in 16 lus- 
cious colors—deep vibrant tones and soft 


pastels, 


It’s a fabric that tailors beau- 


tifully—and easily—just the thing for 
Spring suits, one-piece dresses, or sepa- 


rate jackets and skirts. 


54 inches wide. 


Hand-bloeked 


linens 


$45 yard 


One of the grandest values we’ve seen in 


years! Dress, crepe 


or handkerchief 


linens—in exotic colors and unusual de- 
signs, florals, modern paisleys, lovely 


conservative patterns—each sm 


artly in- 


dividual. 36, 46 or 60 inches wide. 


N... York’s Hotel Pennsylvania 
provides so much for a guest it’s difh- 
cult to single out one feature for 
praise. There’s cushioned comfort and 
every modern convenience in your 
spacious bedrogm...food at its finest 
at reasonable prices in four restau- 
rants...and coustewus Statler service 
from trained employees. Besides, 
Hotel Pennsylvania’s in the center of 
things—convenient to everywhere! 


FEATURES YOU’LL LIKE: 


@SHOWER, OR TUB AND SHOWER, with 
every room, 


@FLOOR CLERKS on each floor to give 
you personalized service. 


@STERILIZED, SEALED DRINKING 
GLASSES in bathrooms. 


Connected by pri- 
vate passageway 
with Pennsylvania 
Station. 


ou Re 


PENNS YLVANIA 


ACROSS FROM PENNSYLVANI) 


Chicago Office: 
HOTELS STATLER COMPANY, ING. 
77 WEST WASHINGTON STREET 


ee 


Excess Uric Acid Causes or 
Aggravates Most 


RHEUMATIS 


And Allenru is a prescription com- 
pounded to swiftly stop the distress—the 
pain—the agony of rheumatism, neuritis 
and sciatica caused by excess uric acid 
or other circulating poisons. 

Often the pain leaves in 48 hours and 
soon the sufferer is back on the payroll 
again—no opiates—no dope in Allengi— 
it's safe and swift.and one real friend in 
time of need—every real drugstore in 
America sells Allenru—just ask for 8 
ounces of prescription Allenru—costs 
about 85 cents. 

DIAMONE 


IOAN JEWELRY 


WATCHES SILVER FURS 
OR ANYTHING OF VALUE 
Courteous, Confidential Service 
Member Chicago Assn. of Commerce 


CHICAGO LOAN BANK 
37 South Wabash Avenue 
Corner Monroe St. 


3rd_ Fidor 


RESORTS AND TRAVEL. | 


Ocean Travel. 


POPULAR 
T.S.S. 
IROQUOIS 
TO THE 


Cruises from MIAMI 
toNASSAU-HAVANA 7 DAYS 


PUERTO RICO $75 


Enjoy star tropical ports...8 

well-planned cruise program, From Miami 

inexpensively, Shipboard Feb. 12 and 
Mar. {2 and 


sports, orchestra, talkies, 

good times...delicious meals. 

Also from New York, 13 days $125 min. 
CLYDE-MALLORY LINES 
M. L. Schultz, W. 7. A., 105 W. Madison St, 

Chicago, o or Authorized Travel Agent 


26 
oR 


eed 


E U R 0 P is complete series 


of personally escorted 
all-expense tours, $298 to $1197. 
ampus Tours, Inc., 224 S. Michican Ave. 


GO CANADIAN PACIFIC 


World Cruise—Europe—the Orient 


- CRUISES: bre Indies; South America; 
Nassau and Havana 
Consult Your Travel Agent or 
HOLLAND AMERICA LINE 
318 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 


—— 


EXPRESS | SERVICE E DIRECT 
TO FRANCE AND ENGLAND 
Cunard White Star. Ltd. 
Book through your local agent or 
32-34 North Michigan Ave.. Chicago, Il. 


EUROPE. AFRIC TA $575.up, all expense. 


Madeira, [taly. 
Athens, Jugo-Slav., Vienna, 


Budapest, Paris. Cruise 


class 8.5. ‘CHAMPLAIN, return cabin class [LE DE 
FRANCE. Raymond-Whitcomb, 320 N. Michigan. 


WEST “INDIES & - CARIBBEAN CRUISES 

from New York. 14. 15 days, $185 and up; 

from New Orleans. $ ‘to 16 days. $100 and up, 
UNITED FRUIT CO. 

111 W. Washington St. Tel, State 7741 


BERMUDA VIA FURNESS — -$70 up round 
rip. — private bath. Frequent sailiucs 
irect to dock at Hamilton on ee Bo 
fermuda and Queen of Bermuda. ; 
rmiuda Lines, 180 No. Michigan a 


ra of any 
ISH AMERI AN LINE, 181 7. 


Michigan Avenue. Telephone State 


——_— ~ a ee 
STEAMSHIP TICKETS 
QUERIES 

a 
AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY 


FLORIDA. 
TEMPERATURE if 7 ° 


SMART LIVING and a a vacation !? 
Mg Me at no extra cost! Learn about 
pn RONEY 
MIA BILT 


VestPgcae at was 


algo five grandchildren. Fu- 
neral Friday, Feb. 4, at 2 p. m., from iu- 


rof. Kyser S Asi er Lt a ‘Sea / pe 538 —) AMT: 7, f’ a ee ae e F, ; ; a eo ak is » fe . : a - oe { ; pga PE Peoresic tr gg ’ by ry oes Py ass y avenue, “ Be pve oS ae iS ; tl: : “ie ’ ne ° 
to New Mus ass. a Pit a «4 LPM] | smtmestes Boutlares notice, =| LEONARD con Leonard, eb. 1. age 00 
husband of | 7 : . 

neral home, 2056-58 AP ype avenue, to 


BY LARRY WOLTERS. | an? p \| ieee Y om | tery chapel, Wedi 
“What popular radio comedian has; | , Y on 4 : : te ty ae © > i oe ee eee LESTER—William K. giro nate 
wooden leg?” Kay Kyser asked | i” ie | . Yow : oO °c 4 | | pocievard, Feb. | wife father 0 a nee. Ha 


Abuind-N, ¥. News : th ) | | at Pel let.” Medat islam 
: fonts | MANNINO—John B. Mannino, 4618 * Damen 
fond wife of ig mege avenue, Jah. 31 8, husband of Lucy 


co-ed member of his new Mutual) | ‘> .¥ I\s = 
Musical Klass in W-G-N’s big audi-| | PJ : 8 ; ep 
ence studio last evening. Six hun-| | x 
dred collegians from Northwestern; . By) 
ar.d Chicago pondered this poser, But | | | . 
Prof. Kyser had to give the answer ws a gaa 
“Charles McCarthy.” ? + Seay, ne Mannino, f 
; : . Erickson. Funeral services Th annino, fond father of Mrs. Marie Cone 
1 um «v|| TODAY'S BROADCASTS FROM CHICAGO STATIONS || OBI T U A R I E ge dag peg A gape, SOOO Tole | fy in aad Jobe, Maman, Fe 
dents [listeners to you] whoop and 2 - 5 ; street. terment Oak Woods. Momber| "°F al from : ere 5501 WN 
cheer as much for Kyser’s new Klass | " 1:45 a erey, © Sot S.No. 192. poy picichegt het ‘anal int Carn 
: ANDARD TIME. — : ENR— . 
as the local campusers, the Mutual f ON mie WAVES. . | ‘ WEEM—Hilltop House. William Morley Cain. Peter Steffens. "Ble Chapel service OW ednesday bob , MARCUS—Nellie Marcus 
network certainly has a new hit show. | ronnon—6:90 Bo Mayer eanntry tlk Today’s Features WMA Q-—Romances and, Rhythm. Notre Dame, Ind., Feb. 1,—[Spe-| Funeral services for Peter Steffens, 00% Wy, Ot chapel, 6927 Cottasc| ia OY ere 
The Kyser show in which selected sore. @ - yd m., ger: mens oF | | anna 5:00—W-G-N—Accordiana. : cial.])—Funeral services will be held|a Wilmette pioneer, will be held at OA tor sverae : es ane L BaOl ak Asiana avenue, EM Bg ; 3; 
guests are asked to join in guessing m., 6.13' mee & Maye cigs ON W-G-N. Wee Ge ee ore on Thursday for William Morley|19 9. m. tomorrow in St. Joseph| husband of Kathryn, nec MeNulty,” father at 9. tm. _ intermént Rosehill cemetery. 
ne rae ra aes, | SOR 'D) me" Around Italy with} A new program, “Evening Melo- WMAQ—Dick Tracy. Cala, 06 years Old, sunomiate DEoseeee | chiitch, In ‘the guburh, ‘Mk. Wietiena | Sader ates. Guid eretea. karan | waneri is agpR Te ae 
ica’s majordomos of radio and their Music.” eno, 81.1 m,, 9.63 meg.; ” rs WOrL—America’ s Schools. of law at Notre Dame, He died of residence, 602 §. 21s avenue, Maywood. / MARKS—Meyer Marks, beloved hus of 
activities is an adaptation of the Kol- IRF, 30.5 m., 9.88 meg. ge, a SS debut on W-G-N ena WIND—Stamp Man. heart disease at his South Bend dled on Monday at the age of 83, in Pcie hot ge ee ©: Churchill, ea late gg loving father of William, 
lege of Musical Knowledge aired for SCHENEOTADY—0:0 100 ;, = Latin-Ameriran my D. See : WG-NeBudd r, and Ginger, home last night. The Rev. Hugh ilmette avenue. He Feb. 1. 1988, hueband of Maude ovewed | oa ‘Stolle White Punes wednesday, 
months from the Blackhawk restau- concert. 19.5 m., 15.33| fifteen minutes’ ,, none Wilts rs tra. O'Donnell, C. &. C, vi sid ‘ ig survived by his widow, Mary, five acme Teeeatl af” teak W t chapel, 422 - pa eat 
meg. ; WOXAF. F814 m,, 9.53 meg. show will be Ba WBBM Ele, a ee fn VERS DRRRONE © daughters, and four sons. Mr. Stef. Ralph Churchi! of Hau Claire’ Wie’ Grothe Vulgpinene “P.O! WwW pl soyelt rode 
rant over W-G-N and which was 4/ pyprm9:15 p. sa it ates *s  eomnainibe heard at 6:30 p,m,  — -_ WEBM—Eleanor ¢ Bowe. oo the university, will sing the solemn) san. was knen Gai his father’ me farm | °F of M. B. Brico of Spokane, Wash. Serv: ae ' 
record mail puller, a by Carl Maria von Weber. DJD, SS £ ee 8 5:30—W-G-N—Charlle Chan, requiem mass, ExJudge Cain was/;, 4, ices at chapel, 2701 N, Clark street, Thure- | MASTIN~Elizabeth Martin, suddenly, Jan, 
oh 4 every Monday, He a es WBBM—Rea © n e Grosse Point settlement, on d 31, sister of Samuel H., John, Neal, 
; ross program: Mrs.| graduated from the University of the present site of Wilmette at ni ay, 8 D, m., private, Please omit, flowers.| Bi. “Dunk also Thomas and Many tase ot 
’ $s CLARK—Louis Austin Clark, beloved hus-| Belfast, Ireland. Funeral services Thurs: 


The picked participants answer m,, 11.77 meg. Walaa ast a e : FBEM—Red C1 rogram: Mr 
recordings. , ranklin oosevelt an e Ri. bras 
Ne ka in 1894. He served as wife was born two years later, also band of Satie Harris Clark, father of Wen- day, 8 p. m., at funeral home, 8200 N. 


questions sent in by listeners, many 00 pp. ee Friday. ae Rev, Msgr. John O, Grady, speakers. county and prosecuting attorney of 
wck Armstrong. & y in the settlement. The two were Gell Harris, Samuel Harris, and Gordon| Western-av., at Foster. Burial Graceland. 


of which involve musical clews pro- NDO 5 “Friends to Tea.” al tou Holger oa on ada wes Q—y 
vided by the orchestra. The Kyser GSD. 25.5 a ks a ; 35—WENKR—-What's the News. Butler county, Nebraska, from 1897 Sterling Clark. Remains at chapel, 4542 
troupe is long on novelties and clever m,, 11.75 meg.: GSC. 31.3 m., 9.58 | Composer of popu- Re : ieee in? ge Annie. to 1901, and was later a justice on childhood sweethearts and were mar-| Ravenswood ayenue, Wednesday, 4 to 9 MeCAULEY—Johs McCauley, late of seat 
in Th meg.: GSB, 31.5 Bn 9.51 meg.; GSU, | lar songs, will be |e: 7 ft AQ-—Tom Mix Straight Shooters, tha HWabraxih wate & t ried in Wilmette in 1876. They cele-| p. m. Services at 2p, m. Thursday, Firet| Hiseins avenue. beloved husband of 
wmanship. ese, as usual, were 40.1 m,, 6.11 mes th Shae ee * rors ~tack Kelly's orchestra. e & State supreme COUrt! brated their sixtieth wedding anni.| Methodist Briscopal church of Evanston,| /&@ Mary Moran McCauley, fond father 
in evidence. A gurprise to many e guest star on Ga ml eco. van an mow. bench, Hig widow, Clara; a son, John; vers t 4 *| Binman and Church street, Private burial.| Of Martin. John Jr.. James B.. and Mrs 
Kyser fans was his previously con- CHICAGO WAVE LENGTHS. Herold Stokes’ ; i aie a and a daughter, Mrs, Marjorie Cain|*° "” *W° years ago. Forest Home. Dorothy Fannon. At funeral home, 46L2 
20 WEN 0 WJJD—1130 “Melodies from Be “a W. AQ—Hal: Totten, Sears, survive CONWAY—Margaret Conway, late of 6125 16 eg: sy Pe if ag aThared nt 
: lp Site ‘ “ , m 1 are 
Win ‘ Edith Virginia Dienhart. Eberhart avenue, fond sister of Catherine; ment Calvary, Member of Brownson coune 


| cealed gift as a comedian. He'll crowd | W:G bs mee an ance i Totten. 
i 0 @ Sky from & BEM Conway Wollman, beloved aunt of James| cil, No. 1030, K. o 
ws 


-— Bing mp y, Fog 9s of woEs—iseo | WeGAN’s audience ve —John Harrington. Charles E. B Mrs. Edith Virginia Dienhart, a 
peaking & ay one shia ys Owen’s orchestra, aries L, DUrgess, ; O'Brien, Mrs. R.' P. Wolfe ae rr foe. MONTAGUE—See Mrs. Nettie F. Nelgon 
tage Grove avenue. 


. WHIP—1489 : ien. 
his questions asked, “What is Cros-| ¥2S—870 —. a ag oe Uncle Esra. Funeral services will be held today| 8™@nddaughter of the late Dr. Florenz Pasmeetie O'Brien ANeevike 9:30 a. m.,| nobles 
by’s real name And gave the an-|,4 yw. P 0 on the in Alhambra, Cal, for Charles E.| Ziegfeld and a niece of the late| friday, at St. Anselm church. - Interment MOSES—Myrtle Moses, at her home, 1423 
Now we'll ask one, “What is Kay WOFL-—You Gotta Get Up. program will be ) W ad Bande: Wilmette until his retirement six| ducer, died yesterday in her home, CORY—Kate 8. Cory, Feb. 1, of 2250 War-| Moses, mother of Mrs. Pat Moses Smith. 
vases seel name?” Bet u all Edna O'De}! , ren boulevard, wife of the late Andrew A.,| Gervices at Graceland cemetery chapel 
egg ’ sis ee tour Wet bettie ee bI months ago, He died in the western 1521 North Austin boulevard. She mother of Mrs. Mattie Laws, Mrs. Minnie anuraday at 2:30 p. m, 
funk. Its James Kern! Pr oy Three Men and tgu neler og prs city on Monday at the age of 67. For| was 82 years old. ‘Surviving ane her| Sout ager Cor, Mr, Bonu sles, 60°) wuxgox_ione wugson, Jan. 31.2038, bop 
G dh a i t di WLS—Morning Devotions. . d, Kirk 6:45—Harold Stokes’ orchestra, 48 years Mr. Burgess was in the serv-| mother, Mrs. Carl Ziegfeld; her hus- Cory, Thursday, Feb. "5. at ° 5 ov Beg? band of the late Mathilda, nee Otechit, fa- 
wn og day gripes of a radio ras AAP Breaktast Express Douglas, Three Graces, the Campus Vee enee's orcheate. ice of the North Western railroad,| band, Walter; two sons, Walter Jr.| chapel, 214-216 8. Western avenue, at Mecy ‘ae ai ris itz. 
“The persistent hoopi d ch WjJJD—Kinney's Hawailans. Choior, and the W-G-N orchestra. WENR—Cheer Up America. his last post being city passenger| and Richard, and @ sister, Mrs. Flor- Ge let gent in aaae of au Plate, and Mrg, Clara  Bichhorct. Service 
e pe whooping an cer! $:00~-W:G.N—" Everyday Words.” A variety of dance music will be WBBM—Boake Carter, agent. He is survived by his widow,/ ence Brannum. Funeral services will| fLeat Rebekah lodge, No. 369, I. 0. O, F.; ig : eg od O alan a a eer 
ing by poring at a Sy seis G—Four Neighbor. offered on W-G-N and Mutual net-| 7: 0 vn ae soar Pitas Gatien Maud, arid two daughters. be held at 2 p. m. Friday in her home. True. Blue chapter, No. 907. 6. 8:6. ‘Base | Zinn tubees eat. 
stars on 9) s ' ape! 
© air for their DOSS, sty work from 10:15 p, m. until 1:30 a. m. WMAQ—One Man's Family. : C bieemeaeiak ‘tasuben: nee Miller, Jan NELSON—Mrs. Nettle #. Nelson of 418 §, 
rant Wheeler. 0 an, | Austin boulevard, Onk Park, beloved wife 


WLS—Lulu Belle and Scotty. 
Zanuck, wonder boy of Hollywood. ee ge a by th Whih-Gavaicade of Aaearice. 
WCFL—Breskfast clu y the orchestras of Jerry Livingston, Wik-dae mts ene Florence C, Bradley. BO Baloved mite or fons, fendi moines oi | Abatin. Doulevard, Oak vark, beloved wits 


: , 105—~ —Gond Morning program. 
The jokes about Bing Crosby s £:15—WEB—Novelodeons, <a dies Leo Reisman, Guy Lombardo, Jack WCFL—Don Norman. Miss Florence C. Bradley, a nurse| Funeral services for Grant Wheel-| 2az¢) Vere, Mabel, Milton. Robert and) snd Mrs. Gertrude Quimby. Member, of 
four boys. . . . Still worse, Eddie 8:80—WMAQ—Whistler and His Dog. Russell, Johnny Long, Johnny John-| 7:15—-WCFL—Stars of Tomorrow. inueil im the cl er, 72 1d, John. Member of Royal Neighbors of] (Cire chanier. No G&S OB. 8. and Oak 
Ciaieats eepidine references to his a de gp son, Aik Wie Sener ’ 7:30—W-G-N—The Lone Ranger [MBS]. employed in e city health depart- ’ years old, a retired contuactor,| Americs, Grand International Aux. Brother- Park. White yt Be ag oo a re : 
five daughters Sopranos who WJJD—Bob Atcher. At 8:45 § WMAQ—Tommy Dorsey's orchestra, | ment for the last eighteen years, wih be held at 7:30 o'clock this eve-| hood of Locomotive FE a 5 aghy Resting | hepaj home. 5708 W. Madison, where sérv= 
ees fan Bentley. ‘49 p. m. Quin Ryan will pre- WBBM—Eddie Cantor, died suddenly yesterday of a heart|ning in the chapel at 1460. Sherman| 2% *7eTal home, 201 W. Take street, May-| toes will be held Thursday, Feb. 3, at 2 x 
pr 0 ne ti ~e' i ne tog oe waaay eno. and Helen. ae sent the reading of Tomorrow’s Trib- WCRis_Streamiings Mplodies. ailment while walking in the 2000] avenue, Evanston. Burial will be in werg Woodlawn Wednestiay, am “Tele! p.m Interment Woodlawn, 
» A an Harding's e. : ‘ ‘ ’ du 
pon Pigg cing [They win Pte WBBM—Linda's First Love. sage «csc Seti with the Rudd) 7:45—WcFL—Her Loule and the Weasel: | block of Webster avenue. She was| Pittsburgh, Pa, his birthplace. Mr. | DESREMAUX—Irene Desremaux, nee Watson, OREN Ser lny O Petee Oar, vara 
’ 9:00—W-G-N—Martha Crane and Helen| O'otners, ernationally known ski- 8:00—W-G-N—K — Drume," 52 years old and lived at 1951 Fos-| Wheeler died on Monday in his home| ‘7¢». 1, 10988, beloved wife of Ernest 0, James and the late Sarah O'Regan, sister 
quite reach them.] eee Sponsors Joyce, ers. ay yser’s orchestra. fond mother of Dona M. and Donald, daugh- of Charles Harold Richard and Robert 
im WBEM-—Pretty Kitty Kelly WLS—Don and Helen ter avenue. The funeral will be held} @t 944 Wesley avenue, Evanston. A/| ier of Ann Watson, sister of Mrs. Walter . Bi ; 
who insist; “Attention, everybody, Other features: WBBM—Tibbett and Kostelanct ; h j-| QO Resan. Funerad Friday, at 0 s.. Mies 
WCFL—Party Line. and Kostelanetz. at 9:30 a. m. tomorrow from the | daughter, Mrs. Marion Truxell, sur | Turner and William Watson. Funeral Fr frau late reeidanee. &111 Givmatan. “a 
_— is ae a a you ae. wit Harry Zimi Time. = a. gas og, ON laa Sve mins) | 5 ore dee Tee chapel at 7066 North Clark street to | Vives, ; day, 9:80 a.m. trom the late home, S<rcn| Epiphany eburch, Burial Holy Sepulchre, 
een waiting 8 gee apgee e unend- ND—Harry Zimmerman. utes Of correc ngiisn, : WLS—Cleveland orche tra, Grego church oes eee we * ~ -| OBZARNY~—John J. Obzarny, beloved hus 
ing plugging of Louella Parsons as Te nes oe tattemcol. : Seed areuy. Se 8:30—W-G-N—Gavlord’s mule (MBs). er amet : . wing, ptm heey oremaainaeapelamemamal band of Mary, fond brother of Rose and 
“ oO Ps ee et : uin an’s News Co . eveland orchestra. ‘ HO « Raa NE ee 8 okie oe hey ! P Bexkot aroune. emper O01 LOCOMOLIVE sineers’ 
Bill Hay's nightly insistence that he | 9:18—WMAQ—soka's Other. Wits — mmene| in WEbM—Ben Bernie\anatads, | Dora Winkelhaken. ty DENY ak Bis | PUENHART Edith vieenty, Diennert, (ne | ‘aseocletion. Puneral services Briday, 8:00 
per ens st ihe Zichen. 1 p. m.—Coast to Coast Frolic. on, Funeral services for Mrs. Dora Win-| (ia a mes | Pichard, fond daushtcr of Edith and the! 1, Bt, ‘Jey anaes. Sihalagen Maan 
8:52—W-G-N—Highlight of Sports. kelhaken, 80 years old, who died on| faa Ph |B ih sind Carl Zlosteld, sister Bag Shia og home, | rection. For information, call Yards 3713, 
, POWERS—Eadmond J. Powers, formerly of 


and Mrs, H. eat chicken noodle soup. WLS—Aunt Jemima, a oeeial 
Is that any inducement to listeners WBEM—Myrt and M ccordiana. 4 | | 
to buy the stuff? ae Sponsors who 9:30—W-G-N—-Get Thin to “Muste [MBS]. §6—Jack Westaway. 9: peg ae vie Ts ga one f Monday, will be held at 2 D. mM. today Poet Bie. ' oti 1521 N. Austin boulevard, Friday, at 2 ‘a | ae 
insist, “Send for this wonderful ga- AO at pisio’ Bill, 7:30—The Lone Ranger [MBS]. phony ae ead 2830 Prag og oaly ee ii : i - “ine sons pang Tek inte Statin: leew Reaahaad: fomk Toueed 
zookus immediately because our free if : Taxp ON OTHER STATIONS. Ww | AStEE See WhLCAgO Ure © TS.) fee Ei nak 8 Fama =| DY B-—Seo Leonard notice of Edward Jr., Beatrice, Phillip, and Helen, 
BBs 4 Cages ETTELSON~—Michael Ettelson of 5128 Dor-| roth t Marti d Mrs, J. P . 

Vv ble | Winkelhaken aided refugees at her x As Be : “4 i ono a aed hekand af Fiore arot aoe Thursday at 9; a ire, norey 


offer will be withdrawn after today.” 6:45—WENR—Cheer Up, America.| 9: NR—Air Show B | | 
- 9:30—W-G-N—M from father’s inn at Milwaukee avenue and| fam z | Beason SR and devoted father of Mrs, Stuart Osten,| 'W. §0tb piace, to St. Gabriel chufch, Ins 
. ee oe brother of the late David. Funeral Thurs- terment Mount Otivek Member of Tom 


{And one month later they are still WBBM—Tony Won's Scrapbook. 7—WBBM-—Cavalcade of America b ? : 

making the same offer in exactly the Oh A A eee Mehees, —Life of Francis Scott Key. g WIND—C Tk || Halsted strvet. “ta ea at s oe ee | aay, 1:30 p,m, , from chapel, 7206 Stony) Moore court, 6. 0. #. 

same words,] WCFL—Melodies. T-—-VWMAQ—One Man’s Family. grandchildren, and ome great-grand-| j= si Island avenue. Intermen RAIL—Patrick Rail, son of the late Patrick 
} FARNHAM-—Robert F. Farnham, Feb. 1. and Catherine [nee peng ahs en a 


WLS—Julian Bentley. 7—WLS—Roy Shield Revue. WENR—G 
ced child. f Robert K, and William P., brother; Michael and the late Mary O’ 
7—WIND—Trafic Court. be slodies st cen Mecormack and Beatrice Steward. Catherine Rafferty, Funeral Thursday, 9 BU 


dley. 7:30--WBBM—Eddie Cantor and == | Oe Services Thursday. at 3 p. m., at chapel,| a, m., from residence, 108 Dupee place, 
| O B I T U A R E S| 10 :00-—W-G-N—Don Pedro and Piano. Deanna Durbin. WMAG ort Pear Henry J. Ross. GH 5203 Lake Park Fe lB Interment pri- Ply enna to St. Francis Xavier church, 
_ Silane tests maren. 7:30—WMAQ — To Dorsey's Wan ous | Panico's orchestra, Henry J. Ross, an architect, who ; eta vate, ee N, a gg si wens pt ye tage ere Please, omit 
2H — n's orchestra. ; te LL Dn arrell, at ree 
planned a number of loop buildings, k ees $135 iiveton boulevard, wife of | RAYMOND—Louis Albert 9 i lg formerly 
St. Paul, Minn., suddenly, in Tucson, 


Harry W. Marsh. WLS—Mary Marlin. music 

° 10:30—W-G-N—-Leo Relsman’s orch, [MBS], 

Milwaukee, Wis., Feb. 1.—[Special.] 1OnBe OE Bematere > a &-—-WBBM—Lawrence Tibbet, Deems WENR—Horace Heldt's me a at the age of 62, Monday night, fi | the late Thomas F.. fond mother of Jos, | of St. Paul, Mir sudden! ‘Tucson, 
> un Kee a ran 7 y: an, ome oO 

Taylor, and Andre Kostelanetz, n the Presbyterian hospital. He lived Fe ti ita J sister of Mrs. Elizabeth Pfoh!| in Chicago, beloved husband of Erma, nes 


-Funeral services were held this osh Higgins. . nie. 
afternoon for Harry W. Marsh, 58 D—Sons of Pioneers. 8—WMAQ—Fred Allen’s in Town Busse's orchestra. at 1320 Wesley avenue, Evanston, SB of Williamsville, N. ¥. Funeral lc Griffin; father of Mrs. Harry Schaefer of 
BM—Magazine of the Air. Hall Tonight 9 a. m., from chapel, 3159 Jackson-bivd.,,; Detroit, Mich.,, son of Harry 8. Raymond, 


years old, former vice president and WLS—Pepper Young's Family . 10:45—WaBM—Plane Parade, with his wife, Mrs. Lillian Ross. The ee ik 
° ; ae icant 79 68 rage Lombardo’s or, [MBS] ‘ to St. Matthew church. Interment Calvary. brother of Mrs. Mabel RB. Cheney and Jack 
8:15—WLS—Cleveland Symphony WMA oa Evanston police building was another WRAGOLA—Frank Fragola, husband of the| §- Raymond, all of Chicago, Funeral Brie 


' general manager of the Pabst corpo- | 10:30—W-G-N—Painted Dreams. Q-—L. Armstrong’s orches 
WMBI—Shut-In Requests. orchestra. Carlsen’ cag! Fb lg orch, | Structure he designed, Services will i i late Virginia, nee Kruhten; son of Nick,| day, Feb, 4, in $t. Paul, Minn, Arrange- 


‘ration. He died of heart disease yes- 
WBBM—Big Sister, 830—-WBBM—Ben Bernie, Jane able Music. be at 4 p. m. tomorrow in the Rosehill | i | and the late Florence, brother of Mra | ments later. : 
si x5 a’ Florence Farella, Mrs, Mary Guiffra, Mrs.| REED—Lieut. Julius H. Reed, 948 Cuyler 


terday morning. Burial will be tomor- Morning Musicale. Ww Under W 
worl Fe in the Pantry. Pickins, Lew Lehr, and Buddy Clark, we nderson. cemetery chapel. ‘ M | Anns Parells, Grace, Charles, and Nick.| avenue, Jan. 30, father of William M. 
A. . Funeral Friday, 9 2. m., from late home, 619/ Reed of Cleveland, O, and Theron C, Reed 


| rte poe Fogger he te ence’ Ww iD— Women’ 's 3e coe SrOerE. 9—WMAQ—Your Hollywood Parade ; 5 
died several years ago. He is survived WLS—Vi —Dick Powell, Rosemary Lane, Bob orches Alice McKay Kendall. | 3 Se? 25th acres’ Interment Mount Carmel. of Evanston. Services 11 a, m. Wednes- 
by his widow, Mrs. Genevieve Del- Hope; Bette Davis and Jeffrey Lynd | 11% on HAR ae ix Day Mrs, Alice McKay Kendall, 53 years} #7 . _Preapnet 0600.” J. Gallagher, dearly ron ato Coder ‘Rapids i perce ings Bo 

| worth Marsh. Witothe in “ Happy Year,” Hugh Herbert and Peewee d fn, *lold, wife of Harvey C. Kendall, ad-| [ | Resa beloved husband of Isabelle [nee Weise- REHOR~Anna ieee: Ho Paes cE 8 5 

WAAB—Foolish Questions. Al Goodman's music. WIND—Zhe Night Watch. vertising executive, died yesterday in : | ee ner of Vinent. 6. ghey Jerry, Joseph, and Rudolph Rehor, Amalie 
her home at 1625 Hinman avenue, L . Mrs. Alexander Mc'| 3129 pm, at chapel, 5218 8. Kedsle aves 


Mary Elizabeth Sanders. . WiJJD—Police Headquarters. 9—WBBM—Gang Busters. 
t Jenny’s Stories. . si i t 
unt Jenny's Stories 9:15—WENR — International Alir- WEB! at anit orchestra |Evanston. Funeral services will be A bees Donal nue. Interment Bohemian National ceme- 
nston see: Funeral from tery. Prospect 3810. 


Funeral services will be held at 2/ 11:00—W Woman in the Store. 
p. m, today in Oak Woods chapel for | Alone. peiol — B. Johnson and 1. Theld at 2 P. m, tomorrow in the First] faa me | «6 | «(Vincent G. Gallagher, 118 TE ir ee cee saa caw ie 
! ; | a ast a m., —~Eda Rivkin, wife 
| Mrs, Mary Elizabeth Sanders, who Smith. 9:45—-WENR—National Social Hy- . img rie Grier's creer {Congregational church, Evanston, : By Wee: Snes ra lg sasevanes Mount Car: Simon, fond mother of Hlisabeth Garchen- 
: died Monday in St. Petersburg, Fila., ack Turner. giene program Gen Mae & Pershing :00—W-G-N—Ka enn Bs mel, Member of Feehan council, Knights son, Nettie Zuckerman, and Leona Glasser, 
at the age of 64. She was the wife of w Virginia Dr Wilb a D ; =| Wade H. Arnold. ae of Columbus. sister of Minnie Shore, Florence Ginsburg, 
Howard P, Sanders. Mrs. Sanders was J Missing Persons . Ray Lyman ur, an r. Wade H. A ge Ve GARDINER—William Lynn Gardiner, Feb. 1. Morris and Ben Gold. Funeral 2 p. m., 
; ' Mowavis OH Thomas Parran, discuss the antt- ade H. Arnold, general agent in P| | | GARDINER William Lynn Gorcewue, piver | Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 4223 Boosovelt xd. 
| the sister of Mrs, William T. Smith, . : syphilis drive. Charles R. Street, Veteran | Chicago for the Missouri and Pacific en oe es Forest, husband of Hattie Gardiner, nee | ROSS8—Henry J. Ross, Jan, 31, 1938, hus- 
' 17340 South Shore drive, and a daugh- uck, I : x railroad, died of heart disease yes- ie 2) ge ae a Christensen. Resting at funeral home, 318- para sth b ton Lillian @ : Ese gy anu 
ter of the late Mr. and Mrs. David S. th Cent nsurance Executive, Dies terday in his apartment at the Evan- FORE ee ae Seiler, Papi - avecee pcs ag ola ae ng +00 Maple avenue, pol ee Foneral 
‘ ae oe 4 p. m., a » at 
Charles R. Street of the Webster |shire hotel in Evanston. He was 53| [ime] aaa. BE | cxvocomto—John Ginoechio, brother of Av-| Semotery chapel. “Ohleago. 


- Mathias. A " 
11:30—W.G-N—Quin es eoagg kl Comment,| 2 et es sieeee Se 
WMAQ—F'arm an ’ L—Continenta es, , . ieee, , a “eo 
a ome hour arieties hotel, veteran fire insurance company | Years old and unmarried LL gt rere ae eG fonio, brotherinlaw of Chafrom chapel, | SHEARN—James William Sheorn, Feb. 1, 
— : OREN beloved husband of Lena, nee Bingezer;. 


Elza H. Reiter. WLS—Ma Perkins. WMAQ—Pepper Young’s Family, 
: WHIP.-OQhristian Counselor. WLS-—Homemakers’ hour. executive, died yesterday in the Pres- ERIN RRL IES bi Be | ee ¥ i 8500 West Harrison street, to Our Lady 
Sere eeevins ie ise M Relee,) aa otivene Dee Ser zat WAAE Pon Pelt one orchestra, | BVtetlan hospital after an iliness of| CG) @ willl ef Sorrows qhureh, Burial fount Carmel. | porn ane, anneal Thursday 
| S| evada : morning, at 9 o'clock, from mortuary, 


Elgin manufacturer, will be held at WBBM—Helen Trent. ; Sai 
1:30 p. m. today in the chapel at 266 won ae _ situs Valent bee” ten days, Mr. Street was born in C MAH IleA 1} } ; wns tail +< IARD GORSKY—Paul ©. Gorsiy, Jan. 80, 1988.) i356 Wellington avenue, to St. Bonaven- 
East Chicago street, Elgin. Mr. Reiter | 11:45—W-G.N—" Way Down East.” WMAQ—Ma Perkins. Mississippi on Jan. 5, 1866, and had| : : if ff IN ASHLANI “sugeseg SE eng erecta), son of Vreda| "um chuten sed St. Joes sunnier 
| died on Monday at the age of 79, He Wiss WIND—Ben Kanter been connected with the insurance| @ ats nial . | te and the jate Julius, brother of Alfred, CCUMMRTTIRN Cilia: Selmer 36 s188 
r . cinch | _ oA te race siree e1ov ® 0 
was pioneer in boiler engineering and | noon—w Elson on State Street, | %30-W-G-N—June Baker, home manage- | DUSiness since 1884. He was former , . : 528-5 R'TA K He funeral Home S18'320 N. Gentral ‘ivenue.| Harry, dear mother of Dr. Nat and Rose 
invented numerous boiler cleaning uthtown Chureh hour. meng. ly president of the Fidelity Phenix There =| b room ~ Austin. home, 3 SDintedas, 1 p. m, Inter-| Lewis, fond sister of Louis Phillips, Fanny 
Bob =< Sade. . 1g Lewin. Birdie Goldschmidt, Sad 
| devices. He founded the Reiter com- : usical Fire Insurance company, but had pent ong ip bers, and the late Ida Goldschmidt snd 
pany, now the Elgin Softener corp- t Revue. been vice president of the Great; ¢ ce h . f _ MONUMENT. AND MAUSOLEUMS., | _ | HALLGREN—See Gorsky notice. Soliae Phillios Weneral serviaae 
seition, 90 sidea eae. WAAF—Symphonio hour. American Insurance company gince| 102 {cago OP | om nf | "Gen aeanen Goatiy’ taleved ee Tees | Skiatan Seu eee 8208 
WLS—Dinner program. : ’ He is survived is A 8 BH WHER On avenue, roadway. interment Free 5ons. 
: P, M. WAAF—Red Hot and Low Down, 1924, by his widow,| .-, e- aK rence E., fond daughter of William and 
Marie Dainton. one ee Robison and His Buck- 9 hE te Health and Training, and a son, : sf ner 4 funerals! Mary Ginnan Heaney, beloved aister of ade er gee Fo titgy ek aoe: Se 
, aceon arcos {MBS}. wos aoe ae Guild, art 5 RRERS_ M Pers a7 Marion Scott and the late William F./ 4). father of Albin, Hugo, and Oscar 
Copyright: By the New York Times.) Cr . WINDY eee gc rmurpn ct 1 Sears State-s tere Basemen Heaney. Funeral Thoreeay, AP wits. Ss Stahle. Funeral services Friday, Feb. 4, at 
—————— | 9:80 a. m., from parlors, 1506 sts] 9:80 p. m,. at chapel, 6107 N. Olark street, 


LONDON, Feb, 1—Marie Dainton, . 7-7.% 
‘Samos es & stage. mimic, died nosed WCFL—Escorts and ; W-G-Nodens ws LiGHTS— * H ur sen funerals FUNERAL DIRECTORS, to St. Philip Neri aya Burial mg: Bie under auspices of Lake View | No. 
a short illness today. She was 56 Music WMBI—Sunday Schoo i | P POLIS OS NPIL AAS ulghre. Information, call Prospec 774, A. F. & A. M. Interment Hosebill. 
3 ' — J : are alwa the fin: RANMA, 32 HEANEY—See Hart notice, a omit flowers. + 
ones. Q Ww me a ' 
ved - 1615 ven 


fortune on the stock exchange, she WBBM—Houseboat mee 
WHIP—Michael and | i 
Arrium Bret aragesvatfous | est, yet always cost DEATH NOTICES: ‘is 


longed to return to the theater and bien 
was i engage Shop igen hate N: L-Piane fre pans. 
comedy en becam e ill, . Voice of 2 > eee “Hour of Romance, | eek ! less! | in cis 


Peter Laux. . 


y OrEanist, a od : a reet Grove avenue, Berwyn. 
z ; ISAACSON—Alfred ae aT In his memory.| ‘neat Bod bch Member Berwyn chapter, STREET—Charles R. Street, Feb 


Omaha, —P)— . assed b, %, 1887. Husband of| ™ 3 
Laux, 70 Pe "old, pest of the ee ee 3 Funeral Homes: tne ~< rr Abie Beaanico, fil father SOUR Abteiane- Sectors, toe Os| eet ot seas 7 8 — 
y : idee: Ste | ity ; n, ‘4 
Associated German Societies, com- WLS—Sci Book ion lie Baffle your husband with stories North: Ph. WELlington 1724 ee LOVING D. DAUGHTER. lair, ved eee Thomas, daughter of Fok alle “ = fe: See 
| behind the news—as “pictured” 9 929 Belmont Avenue — S sod We, “ate Matilda, fond, ster chapel Thuraday, Beb. 8, at 2h a. m. : 
3883 s,| SVO 
M 


posed of groups in six midwest state WMAQ— ad of Life. 
bese: tonight. He was a native of G-N—W Secretary ; weer Covet ‘s lan Roy Dafoe. by Rush Hughes in the § WW Ph HA Fraternal Notices. late M 
Germany. BM—The §:00uWO-N—Del Owere nh, [MBS] | ar 2346 W. op nay 0100 | ox rane eae Mena a:00 p.m, chapel.| hana mop ee, 
sme WLS—Otto and WMAG—Tea Time BORDEN x ais N cen i naira venus, Chicago. ik serv: re ged omy Wedne ay, 
Dr. Charles Frederick D’Arcy. N—Luek 6 WssD—Ben Kanter agent §| South: Ph. CALumet 4030 fees, Oakridge cemetery. Members please 83 ye ow of the late Catholle a fadison adison, Wi : 
. . fee ” servi ‘ t * 
BELFAST, Northern Ireland, Feb. M HUGHES-REEL ai 18m 5. : Ane 4 me. | eS ae it, Beeeiary. and | gensen, Mrs, © inne. ne’ Benen, il st im at 10 ag Che . 


1—@)—Dr. Charles Frederick Fort Pearson WM, bode 6° oe a 
Take “Of all eet ee anG | 14S W Gi Beatles wae me? Sothern. WMAQ 3130 P. di 7 | a 
: a. sMARUETER—Nine Bp of 


rnoon Serenade. me Sheds yf fL@ ny Walter and Robert 

INR—Johnnie Johnston. Se) UW LA fi | Fangbors, Wetng Se ik oc, Rovcaswood 

Bh » Mother . : | We se op Sf 48 VAL cs a j ces Thursday, Q: :30 »: ee er 
t ‘| Pres an church. I at pri 


OE NN Oe - ee . 
LLL LOLOL AOL a ett tartan at an 


[ADVERTISMENT 


<a oe TT 7 wrr ma een es ait 
yr rename prac tetan din VP carded 
oF gh " ae ad ie 
sch ean ns Se 3 ; 
Pie " Sag 5 
be Ee a WE es ae ‘ 
epi p 
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: 


) 


PRANTL PES IL SYNE Ne AP Eo 


ee wee ad - 


; 


; BY CHARLES COLLINS. 

‘The second instalment of Noel 
Coward’s anthology of short plays, 
current in the Harris theater under 
the general title, “Tonight at 8:30,” 
exhibits their versatile author as a 
high life humorist, a tragic dramatist, 
and a song-and-dance sketch writer, 
with excellent.results. It also sup- 
plements first’ night impressions of 
the company as a gifted repertory or- 

tion and increases respect for 

the acting of Bramwell Fletcher in 
particular. 3 

The middle section of this triple 
bill, called “The Astonished Heart,” 
cannot be disposed of as a mere brev- 
ity. Its six scenes take it out of the 
one act play classification; it is 
really a condensed tragedy in which 
Mr. Coward has spread ambitious 
wings as a serious dramatist. It 
deals with a psychiatrist who sud- 
denly becomes his own patient and 
incurable. It is a clinical study of a 
healer of sick minds who plunges 
into adultery, thinking that he will 
find the experience amusing and re- 
freshing, only to become. a _ typical 
maniac-depressive because of the 
strain of the situation. He can find 
but one way to solve his problem— 
suicide, by the classical method of 
jumping out of a window. 


~o— 
Mr. Coward regards ‘The Aston- 
ished Heart” as the most deserv- 
ing piece in his cycle because here 
he has put aside his easy flippancy 
and feline satire to write, if possible, 
like a major dramatist. He has told 
his interesting story with literary 
skill; its emotional dialog has intens- 
ity, vividness, and eloquence. As a 
dabbler in psychopathology he is not 
without information; like most young 
and old moderns he has apparently 
read a book or two on the subject. 
Nevertheless, as a case study I feel 
that “The Astonished Heart” does 
not prove its thesis. To accept the 
story as valid one must assume that 
the psychiatrist was a potential crack- 
pot before he became overwhelmed 
by his illicit love affair. The inci- 
dents submitted by Mr. Coward reveal 
nothing but easy sailing in this 
amour; and the doctor’s sudden can- 
tankerousness about his mistress’ 
past “creaks,” as the saying goes, 
like an artificial plot device, possibly 
borrowed from Daudet’s “Sapho.” 


~~ 

Mr. Fietcher acts the doctor with 
considerable power; Miss Landis 
makes the lady in the case a per- 
sonality of distinction, and Miss Win- 
wood is gentle, understanding, and 
civilized as the wife, although occa- 
sionally on the edge of inaudibility. 

“Ways and Means,” with which 
the bill opens, is a light and witty 
comedy of life among the aristocracy 
of the Riviera. Here Mr. Fietcher 
and Miss Chandler, gorgeously ar- 
rayed for intimate moments, loll in 
and out of bed as a husband and 
wife, penniless and full of social and 
financial embarrassments. They solve 
their difficulty by entering a burglary 
plot with a friendly chauffeur. 

The tragedy of “The Astonished 
Heart” is relieved by a comic cketch 
in which Mr. Fletcher and Miss 
Chandler appear as cockney vaude- 
ville performers rehersing their 
tricks in a dressing room. 


Head of M athodiot 
Education Defines 


Academic Freedom 


Academic freedom is no excuse for 
a college professor to be boorish, or 
undermine the foundations of the in- 
stitution which provides the indi- 
vidual with his occupation and sup- 
port, Bishop Adna W. Leonard of 
Pittsburgh said last night.. Bishop 
Leonard, president of the board 
which supervises the international 
educational program of the Methodist 
church, spoke at the annual meeting 
of the Methodist board of education, 
in its headquarters at 740 Rush street. 
'“The fundamental meaning of 
academic freedom,” the bishop said, 
“has always been the freedom oftthe 
scholar to pursue his investigations in 
his chosen field, to form his own ideas 


$m that field, and to express them 


freely in — ne writing.” 


Mrs. Pedeuvelt Rides in 
HorseShow ;FamilyAttends 


ieago Tribune Press Service. ] 

Wadhitngtos D. C., Feb. 1 -itée- 
_eial.J—Under the eyes of husband 
and her four sons Mrs. Roosevelt to- 
night rode in a horse show at nearby 
Fort Myer, Va. She put her mount 
_ through its paces in a charity show 
to raise funds for infantile 
paralysis sufferers. President Roose- 
-velt motored to the show from the 
2 hosed House “ee dinner. 


Distinctive high hat and 


coat. 


Glorify Linens 
in Smartest of 
Spring Clothes 


BY RHEA SEEGER. 

Early spring shoppers get the best 
breaks, especially in the well stocked 
departments where crisp spring ma- 
terials are hanging about. This is 
the time when you can find unusual 
colors that seldom play a return en- 
gagement; all the gayest and amus- 
ing. prints, in cotton, linen, and 
sheers. This is also the best time 
to find the really exceptional linens. 
And linens for this year of graceful- 
ness.and charm are linens that rate 
headlines. 

Crush resistant linen is the pet of 
all the collection; it comes in stun- 
ning street shades and pastels as well 
as white. It defies all sorts of abuse, 
packed or unpacked; it can be tied 
in swimming hole knots and still 
come out of the twist in surprisingly 
smooth condition. 


-~o~ 
Next in importance come the em- 
broidered linens; grand materials for 
high’ ‘fashion bolero « ‘jackets because 
the designs’ are as colorful as em- 
broidery. 
Another good linen is the lovely 
cutout stuff featuring an allover de- 


with contrasting colored thread. A 
white design has a red thread; pow: 
der pink goes with a deep blue; 
beige with brown, and so on. This 
should make smart dresses for hot 
summer days. Don’t use anything 
in the way of trim to detract from 
the cutout pattern of the material. 

The most exciting new material 
is the filmy fabric called chiffon lin- 


‘en, just as sheer and lovely as its 
name suggests. The colors are de- 


lectable; effective blues, greens, pale 
mauves, and a soft, faded rose, all 


patterns in off-white also copied from 
Wedgwood desi ones 


up now! 
Fashion photograph .. 


[TRIBUNE Studio Photo.) 


short jacket featuring an 


unusual silhouette in the leopard cat fur. The jacket 
is short, being a snappy version of the popular jigger 
lt has high chest pockets, a double row of 
fur covered buttons and a rollover collar. 


sign of rather large leaves outlined 


typical Wedgwood colors with the 


These new bide 2 should be snapped 


» copied 
from _ last eases Be popular and ex- 


THE STAGE 


Yesterday's announcement that 
Helen Hayes, star of “Victoria Re- 
gina,” intends to give four more spe- 
cial performances of “The Merchant 
of Venice” was entirely incorrect. She 
will not give any more performances 
of this production in Chicago. Cause 
of the error: An undated announce- 
ment from her management regard- 
ing her plans, issued from the Grand 
Opera house more than a week ago, 
but inexplicably delayed in reaching 
the desk of THE TRIBUNE'S dramatic 
editor*until last Monday. 


tremely youthful “jigger coats,” the 
newest fur coat becomes just as sleek 
and smart in the same silhouette. 
Notice the double row of fur buttons 
and the clever slanted high pockets, 
A snappy high hat of the same leop- 
ard cat fur as the jacket completes 
the duet. 


Walter C ae Jr. 
and Peggy Sykes of 
New York Will Wed 


(Picture on back page.) 

_ New ° “York, Feb, .1.—(/)—The __en- 
gagement of Peggy. Sykes, pretty and 
socially prominent New Yorker, to 
Walter P. Chrysler Jr:, heir to a mo- 
tor car fortune, was announced today 
by the bride’s mother, Mrs. Walter 
H, Sykes, 

Chrysler, the elder son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter P. Chrysler, is president 
of a building corporation and a direc- 
tor in his father’s company. He is 
an authority on modern art, has 
notable collection of paintings, and is 
active in Y. M. C. A. work. 

He was born in Oelwein, Ia., and 
attended Dartmouth college. 


=Stevens 
Chas. A. Stevens & Co, 

Chicago's Largest Store for Women 
State near Washington 


ee 
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~ 


RY J UDITH CASS. 

O the north, to the south, to the 
west and to the east go vaca- 
tioners these days, depending 
upon what they are seeking. 

Some want sunshine and warm 


| weather; others prefer sunshine and 


weather cold enough for winter 
sports; still others care more for en- 
tertainment than they do for weather 
and they are apt to choose New York 
as their destination, 


But every one, apparently, who 


possibly can is planning to take a 
winter vacation of some sort and 
there are farewell parties galore for 
the prospective travelers. 

Why any one leaving for a trip 
should be given a party has been for 
years a mystery to this reporter. It 
is those who have to stay at home 
who should be given, rather be giv- 
ing, parties! 

The desert is non ers Judge and 
Mrs. George A. Carpenter to Ari- 
zona again. For many years they 
have vacationed in Phoenix and again 
this winter they plan to stay there 
for two full months. They are leav- 
ing Chicago today. 

Another Arizona resort, Castle Hot 
Springs, is where the John Alden 
Carpenters are vacationing now. 
They went west to hear the Los An- 
geles Philharmonic orchestra play 
Mr. Carpenter’s voilin concerto with 
Zlatko Balokovic as soloist, and they 
will be at home on Feb. 10. 

Mrs. Kendrick E, Morgan and her 
daughter, Mrs. William George Lee, 
also are at Castle Hot Springs now. 
They plan to remain there for some 
time. 


Normandie to Sail 


on Cruise Saturday. 

“Sailing Down to Rio,” not in a 
picturesque old square rigger, but in 
one of the largest ships in the world, 
will be a number of Chicagoans. The 
Frank R. Elliotts, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
win M. Ashcraft Jr., Mrs. Edward F. 
Carry, Mrs. James Ward Thorne and 
her sister, Mrs. Alden K. Swift, and 
the Perry Kenlys will be on board 
the Normandie when she sails Sat- 
urday from New York for a twenty- 
two day cruise to Rio de Janeiro, 
stopping at the West Indies and at 
South American ports. 

The Elliotts will have two days in 
New York before sailing. Also spend- 
ing a few days in New York are 
Capt. and Mrs. Ambrogio Cassinerio, 
who are sailing back to Italy Satur- 
day in the Conte di Savoia after hav- 
ing spent two months in Chicago, 
They live in Vicenza,. Italy. 

Miss Peggy Wiley, daughter of the 
Stanley M. Wileys, also is sailing in 
the Conte di Savoia. She will travel 
abroad for two months with eastern 
friends. 


Farewell Parties 
for Stoddards. 


There have been parties day and 
night for several weeks for the A. 
McKay Stoddards, who are leaving 
Chicago to make their home near 
Woodstock, Vt. Mr. Stoddard is driv- 
ing east today, and his wife and their 
two children will follow him by train 
on Sunday or Monday. 

The Stoddards’ new home is a hun- 
dred year old farm of 400 acres on 
which are a trout pool and a water- 


Continued on page 17, column 1.] 


February Fillip! 


in 


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SIGN LANGUAGE 


The Woman’ s ‘Geaohous Orches- 
tra of Chicago closed its season on a 
note of climax last night when the 
third and fi concert brought to 
the Auditorium theater not one 
piquant musical personality but two. 

Erno Rapee, the very Erno Rapee 
whose debonair bearing and highly 
effective musicianship has awed s0 
many out-of-town visitors to New 
York’s Radio City Music hall, served 
the Woman’s orchestra last evening 
as guest conductor. 

And the soloist was Poldi Mildner, 
unbelievably blonde young Viennese 
pianist who appeared at a Tuesday 
matinée of the Chicago Symphony 
orchestra a few years ago but who 
has never before, as far as available 
records go, played publicly after sun- 
down in this city. | 

—_— 


The evening took on a gala air he- 
cause of the cordiality of a large 
audience and the thoughtfulness of 
anonymous beinzs who sent testi- 
monials to both visiting artists. Mr. 
Rapee got what looked like a fine 


big feather; Miss Mildner was con- 


tent with an armload of roses. 

The orchestra played most credita- 
bly, becoming a highly flexible instru- 
ment in Mr. Rapee’s hands and re- 
producing with precision and prompt- 
ness the flow of his ideas. Tricky 
modification of tempo, changes in 
color and volume in the midst of a 
phrase—effects of this sort, achieved 
with a minimum of difficulty, height- 
ened considerably the general inter- 
est of the evening. 

It was easiest, of course, to study 
Mr. Rapee’s expressive personal and 
musical characteristics in the familiar 
“ Rosenkavalier” waltzes and Debus- 
sy’s “Afternoon of a Faun.” In the 
“Leonore” overture of Beethoven, 
which opened the program, the or- 
chestra hac not yet warmed to the 
poii.t of complete responsiveness. And 
the Sibelius Fifth symphony, one of 
the most severe and uncompromising 
and un-Herbertlike items in any- 
body’s répertoire, still requires that 
one keep ears and attention glued to 


the music itself. 
Oe 


Erno Rapee has an imposing mili- 
tary veat in the more robust reaches 
of a score, a flexible and persuasive 
and largely planned répertoire of ges- 
ture for the more ingratiating epi- 
sodes. He cues each entrance care- 
fully, but does not go out of his way 
to be theatrical. 

In the glittering and not very 
grateful “Burleske” of Richard 
Strauss, Poldi Mildner managed to 
take some of the curse off the music 
by making the most of the sligit 
lyrical passages ‘which the work con- 
tains. Her playing was pointed and 
competent until a chance came along 
to show that she can be somewhat 
lyrical, too. 

The Chopin C minor nocturne dis- 
played quite a different Mildner, a 
Mildner who knows how to make the 
top note of a chord sing most en- 
chantingly and how ‘+o give a musical 
period snerest and weight. 

% 


Lecture at Club. 


George Dangerfield will speak on 
“The Rise of the American Novel 
and the. Decline of the English Novel ” 
at 2 o'clock today at the Chicago 
Woman’s club. 


: Eonit- and only at Field’s 
. and only one flip 


feature from our r Spring Tonto 


oltywoet. Cat. Feb. 1. 

Dear Mr. Sullivan: Funny that just 
the night your column appeared on 
Cary Grant I should be visiting 
Tommy and Ella [Lomas] Pender, 
who started him in the show busi- 
ness. Tommy has been ill exactly 12 
months and I know that he’d appre- 
ciate it a lot if you spoke to Mr. 
Leach and had him drop Tommy a 
line for Auld Lang Syne. His ad. 
dress is 354 West 52d street, New 
York City. Sincerely, Frances M. 
Leeds. 

~~ 

Dear Ed: In reference to your line 
that Mitzi Cummings and Maxie 
Rosenbloom are s0-0-0 in love, -In 
same nice way would you be good 
enough to say it ain’t so. You can 
even make it Man Mountain Dean in- 
stead of Maxie, but do please correct 
it, as the reverberations were almost 
fatal. Sincerely, Mitzi Cummings. 


oo 
Dear Sir: . Perhaps you would 
oblige me with material on the fol- 
lowing question: “The Pedagogical 
Values of the Motion Pictures: in 
Character Building.”—-E. G. M., Niag- 
ara university. 

Dear Sirrah: 

something there. 


I think you’ve got 
E. S. 


~~ 
My dear Ed Sullivan: So many 
questions have been asked as to the 
reason for the success of Sonja Henie 
that it is not a bad time to expness 
the opinion of a mother who is a 
movie fan. Do you not think that 
her spectacular success proves how 
fundamentally wholesome is the 
taste of the, American public? She 
radiates a quality of fresh innocence, 
of childish charm, which is a refresh- 
ing antidote to the glamor girls who 
take life and love so seriously. 
Suffice to say that she can re- 
create that particular quality which 
makes old musty ladies attend con- 
firmation ceremonies—innocence. Sin- 
cerely, Mrs..Joseph F. Lamb. 


-~o- 

Dear Edward: After fourteen years 
with Warner Brothers, your pal, 
Mervyn Le Roy cleaned out his 
bungalow today, preparatory to mov- 
ing over to Metro. I thought you’d 
be interested in what we found. A 
photograph of Sam H. Harris taken 
at Santa Anita, inscribed: “ Your ‘ An- 
thony Adverse’ is much better than 
the horse I bet on” ... a humidor 
made from an elephant’s foot, a gift 
from the sultan of Jahore. .. scripts 
submitted years ago by Zeppo Marx, 
Gloria Swanson, Ed Sullivan, and 
others you never suspected... ..A 
note from O. O. McIntyre, offering 
sage advice. . . . A letter from Noel 
Coward, congratulating Mervyn on 
“I’m a fugitive from a Chain Gang.” 
A still from “ Prodigal Daughters ” 
in which Mervyn played Gloria Swan- 
son’s brother . . . a photo of Lou 
Holtz[ inscribed “I hope our friend- 
ship lasts as long as we both stutter” 
. « » the original script of ‘ Anthony 
Adverse,’ thick enough to make three 
pictures .. . a photo of Edward G. 
Robinson inscribed “To a little guy 
SAE EME NON COC LER ALERT, OBOE LE SOO ATE ORGS A EOI 8 EE BE 


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‘Chicago, but his folks moved to Mis- 


‘that: I’m_ grateful. 


[who can dish it out—and take it too”| 


. it really was interesting and I 
houeht you'd like to know. As ever, 
Jules, 


» Dear Mr. Sullivan: In your article 
about Walt Disney, you quoted him 
as saying the first home he remem- 
bered was on Milwaukee avenue, Chi- 
cago. It was my impression that he 
was born in or near. Marceline, Mo., 
and went to school there or at Bos- 
worth, Mo. Sincerely, Marguerite 
Clark, 

Dear Miss Clark: He was born in 


souri, E. 8. 


-o 
Dear Ed: Don’t you think that 
Tyrone Power is the handsomest 
young man in the movies, with the 
most divine and magnetic personali- 
ty? Besides being the possessor of 
unusual looks, he is gifted with great 
charm and responsiveness, don’t you 
think?—Betty Sanders. 
Dear Betty: Personally, Akim Ta- 
miroff is more my type. E. 5S. 


— 
Dear Mr. Sullivan: As a Sonja 
Henie fan, I have been bothered by a 
statement in your column to this ef- 
fect: “‘Happy Landing’ indicates 
that Sonja Henie must find a new 
formula quickly.” Did you mean that 
the picture is no good; that Miss 
Henie is a one type picture actress, 
or what? Everet E. Anderson. 


Dear Evert: I meant that moving 
picture fans will tire shortly of 
Sonja’s pirouettes. She must get a 
new device or her pictures will be- 
come monotonous. E. S. 


- 

Dear Ed: Thanks for that nice ref- 
erence. Pictures have been good to 
me and I’ve had some splendid parts. 
I’m not trying to be a Polly Anna 
when I tell you I’ve loved it all, and 
Sincerely, Una 


Merkel. : 
-e- 


Dear Ed: In “Tovarich,” when 
Claudette Colbert and Charles Boyer 
go out to celebrate New Year they 
forgot one important thing—that the 
Russian New Year doesn’t fall on 
Jan. 1. I hope this will fill five or 
six lines for you on a dull day. 
Charles Merritt. 

Dear Charles: It did. 


~~ 

Dear Mr. Sullivan: If I ever 
amount to anything out here I'll have 
you and Director Henry King to 


E. S. 


thank for it. Regards, Ronda Hatton. 


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Chicago's Largest Store for Women 
State near Washington 


“LOVE IS A HEADACHE.” 
Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 
Direeted by Richard Thorpe. 
Presented at the Oriental theater. 
THE CAST: 
ee LOO... ..eceeeeese.-Gindys George 
Jimmy Sater voces ed 
Mike’... ....2sccececce Mickey 
Joe COMMOM, . . coc ccccecccsec am 
rast OGOH. oo ces coccccsss ME 
Gake ”’...ccccceee cccoces VIEEIMIS 
hic i 4 4 0444000ce8e kiana 
BET cS dnc cocceutasdudseesiceescn 
HotchKiss.......0+0+0++--- Barnett 
Mr. Hifllier. ... occcccccccess OUUS 


By Mae Tinée. 

Good Morning! 

The Oriental’s current screen fea- 
ture is nutty comedy with heart 
throbs. [Sounds like a candy bar.] 
The sort of picture that keeps you 
smiling, wondering a bit, and liking 
a lot the characters who dominate its 
plot. 

The crack brained “love interest ™ 
concerns Carlotta Lee, actress, and 
Peter Lawrence, broadcasting colum- 
nist. 

Carlotta and Peter have been kids 
together and, so, know one another 
from A to Zed. .. . Peter’s deters 
mination to keep his darling from ap- 
pearing in a play he feels is unsuited 
for her—she’s “flopped” several 
times before, as he’s prophesied she 
would—makes the lady crackling 
mad. [And Gladys George can 
crackle—you know that!] 


-~o~ 

Her publicity agent’s stunt of mak- 
ing her the adopted mamma of two 
hard boiled but lovable orphans, a 
boy and a girl, involves Carlotta in 
trouble with the welfare organization, 
the police and the newspapers. .. 4 
But all the’ clouds“have silver linings 
and the sun of Joy Supreme is shin- 
ing brightly for the finale. 

Miss | Georg¢ and Franchot Tone 
give adept, amusing. and; at times, 
touching performances. Mickey 
Rooney and Virginia Weidler as the 
kids are simply great. 

The late Ted Healy is a world of 
fun as the publicity planner and 
Frank Henks as Peter’s dim wit 
henchman who becomes enamored of 
a book on reincarnation, is awfully 
funny. .. . Ralph Morgan is nice 
as a certain rich man who loves but 
is unloved by the fair Carlotta. 

Dialog is peppy and. entertaining 
and the director handled his light, 
bright material with experienced 
touch, 


Open 9:45 to 5:45 


fe : 


goin 


SOME THINGS TO SETTLE. 


Kate and St. Vrain followed the creek down until they came to a sort 
of flat clearing, where they dismounted. The place was shadowed, and Poco 
looked around it, then jumped the stream heading for a big pine whose 


lower twigs would furnish dry tinder to start the fire. 


He had broken several off, when he heard a faint voice close to him say, 


“Who is it 


Poco whirled, his hand dropping to his gun, holding his breath. He 


waited a long time, then said, ‘Where are you?” 
Kate heard the voice and she crossed the creek, too, now. 


Poco went down toward the stream, laid the twigs down, and put a 
match to them. By their growing light he could see a blanketed figure 
under a tree away from the stream. A oanteen, some jerky and guns lay 


beside the man next to a saddle. Poco knelt by him. 


“What happened, fella?” Poco asked gently. Then he saw the note 


left on the blanket and he read it. 


The man studied Poco’s face in frowning concentration, 


“You're St. Vrain,” he whispered. 


3 ok. 


Poco nodded. “You belong with Cardowan’s outfit?” 
When the man nodded, too, Kate said softly, “Did he shoot you?” 


The man shook his head slowly. 
gurprised us. 
“ Where? ” 


The man pointed to his stomach. 


wearily. 


“Two-Way Hornbeck’s bunch. They 
We fought and I got it.” 


“T'd like a 


drink,” he whispered 


Poco said, “No good, fella. It'll hurt worse than being thirsty.” 
The man smiled faintly. “Hell, I'll die anyway. I don’t want to die 


thirsty.” 
“All right,” Poco said. 


After the first deep swig, the man turned his head away, and Poco saw 
his face screw up in agony. He watched a little longer, and then he saw 
that the man was unconscious. He said to Kate, “He'll die.” 

“Isn’t there anything we can do?” she asked. 

Poco shook his head. “When they get it there, they’re done.” 

She turned away. Poco staked out all three horses while she prepared 


the meal, 


It was a scant one, not meant for two, and Poco ate sparingly and 


in silence. Kate, too, was silent. When they were finished eating, Poco went 
over to look at the wounded man. He was still unconscious, breathing 
faintly. Poco took his guns, plugged out the shells, put them in his shell. 


belts, then came back to the fire. 


Kate had been watching him, and she said, “Why did you do that?” 


“T’ve got to settle some things.” 
“What?” 


Poco said without looking at her, “Get the gold. Get even with Cardo- 


wan—and with Two-Way.” 
“Who is Two-Way?” 


Poco said, letting no life into his voice, “The man that got me the 
papers of the agent. The man that killed the agent. The man I was to 


split with.” 


“Did you come this far with him?” 
“No. He double-crossed me, He was waiting here to take the gold away 


from me when I came down.” 


“Did you guess Two-Way would try to take the gold from you? * 
“Not right away. I figured he couldn't get the men together.” 


“Men?” Kate echoed. 


“Couldn’t he do it alone? With a gun?” 


Poco said, “Three like him couldn't,” and there was no boasting in 


his tone. 


“*And the meek shall inherit the earth,’” Kate quoted dryly. 
“How much of it do they own now?” Poco countered, 


“Enough to be content.” 


Poco said slowly, staring at the fire, “ That’s what I thought once, too. 
But I soon learned different. You'd like to see me meek, All right, I get 
meek. I ride into a town—any town—the county seat. I go into a saloon 
for a drink. In two minutes the sherif walks in. He doesn’t draw a gun, 
see, because I’m not meek and he knows it, but if I was, he’d draw one. 
He’d take me over to his office. He’d stick a gun in my face and he'd say, 
‘I want a confession that you robbed the Sacaton National bank last week. 


Sign this paper.’ 


bank was robbed and I tell him so. He cocks his gun and says, 


I’m meek. I was seven counties to the west when that 


‘Sign it. 


It I don’t, he lets the gun off in my face and collects about three thousand 
dollars bounty. If I do sign it, I get a fake trial and ten years in the pen.” 

“And if you aren’t meek?” Kate said. 

“I walk into the saloon and the sherif doesn’t draw a gun on me, he 
asks me to go with him. I do. I stand there and let him sweat trying to 
figure out how to ask me questions he knows will make me mad. He asks 
me questions. I lie, and he knows I lie, but he doesn’t say so. He gets gort 
of a cold feeling in his stomach after a while and he says that’s all. He buys 
me a drink and lets me ride out of town, hoping I'll clear his county before 


trouble happens. See the difference? ” 
“Yes, but there must have been a beginning to this. 
less in the first place, he’d mever ask you in. How did it start? 


have been to blame.” 


Poco looked at her with hot eyes, his lips curling up in a sneer. 


If you were gulilt- 
You must 


id Tf I 


don’t come back with the gold and your dad goes to jail for it, ask him that. 


You won't miss it far.” 


He got up and walked off into the night. When he came back, Kate 
was rolled up in her blankets. One of them was set aside for him to use. 
He laid it over her, then went over to the wounded man, and saw that he 


he was sunk deep in unconsciousness. 


Rolling up in the tarp, Poco was immediately asleep. He woke an hour 
before dawn, and got up, and rinsed his face in the cold water of the stream, 
then built up the fire, Kate was sleeping soundly. He went over to the 
wounded man, and saw immediately that he was dead. 

Picking him up, Poco carried him up above timberline and piled rocks 
on him. When he returned, Kate was still sleeping. Poco took the dead 
man’s blankets and saddle, after building up the fire and leaving a handful 
of shells for Kate. Dawn was just breaking as he saddled the dead man’s 


horse. He was ready to mount, when he paused. 


silently, he stood by Kate, who was still sleeping. 

He looked at her a long time. This was a girl who had no cause to 
treat him kindly, who had even cause to hate and loathe him. Yet she had 
treated him kindly, shared her food and her blankets with him, and still, 
underneath it all, was a hardness, a bedrock distaste for his soiled way 
of life. She would do everything in her power to bring him to justice, but 
she would go about it like a person who knows only a stern set of rules 
and what they demand. No whimpering, no cursing, no cunning or trick- 
ery, just adherence to a code that he sneered at and did not recognize, 


{Continued tomorrow.] 


Walking back to the camp 


THROUGH. | OOKING GLASS 


There are so many kits on the mar- 
ket {too many, if you want our hon- 
est opinion] we can’t often get ex- 
cited about one, but there is a pet 
this season that we are completely 
crazy about. 


° -o— 

It’s a good beauty wardrobe, in the 
first place. It contains all of the es- 
sential and.none of the nonessential 
things that are an irritation rather 
than a convenience when you're trav- 
eling. It’s a nice size. You can fit 
it into a corner of your suitcase or 
/ you can carry it by hand. “ Pusson- 
we'd rather carry it by hand 
je it’s such a stunning piece of 

» luggage in miniature. We 
@ large way for that gray air- 
plane case with its slick bright stripes! 

This kit contains regular sizes of 
the fine preparations with which it 


is fitted. ee es 


cleansing cream up you'll have no 
trouble duplicating. Here’s the line- 


up of contents: 


cleansing cream, tis- 


sue cream, skin tonic, a makeup base, 


lipstick, rouge, 


eye shadow, face pow- 


der, and a generous bottle of liquid 
cléanser that is one of the best of 


all traveling 
cleanser that 


companions. It’s a 
whisks off dust and 


makeup speedily and efficiently. 

In addition to all this to keep you 
beautiful there is a large mirror, also 
a special drawer containing tissues, 
comb, and a sleeping net. You can 
tuck plenty more in this drawer, too, 
if you wish—razor, perhaps, and hair- 
pins and nail file and such. 

This kit is amazingly inexpensive. 


ELEANOR NANGLE. 


[For information about this kit 
telephone Hleanor Nangle, Superior 
0100.) 


> Eases Tightness of Chest Muscles— 
oosens wpe ates To ae 3 


Gable Is Voted 


No. | Customer 
of the Tailor 


BY MARCIA WINN. 

The Merchant Tailor Designers’ as- 
sociation, after due deliberation and 
quibbling between its sartorially mag- 
nificent members, yesterday selected 
America’s ten best dressed men. 

The leit motif of the selection, a 
spokesman said, was established 350 
years ago by Shakespeare when he 
wrote: “A slight disorder in the 
dress doth more me please than 
where art is too precise in all its 
parts.” 

In two words, the spokesman inter- 
preted, tugging at his own cutaway 
and running a finger under his wing 
collar, today’s well dressed man must 
look studiedly casual, whether he be 
wearing a tail coat, a business suit of 
“prosperity green,” a sports jacket 
of Delfft blue cashmere, or bright 
yellow flannel shorts. 


The 1938 list of the casually proper 
points out no single man as magnif- 
icent in all his attire, but rather gives 
a single distinguishing attribute to 
each. The list, with the spokesman’s 
explanation of each choice, is: 


1, Clark Gable—‘“ Noted for the way 
he wears draped coats, loose in front 
and back and wide at the shoulders, 
better than any other man in Amer- 
ica.” 

2 A. §. Kirkeby, Chicago hotel 
magnate [and owner, incidentally, of 
the Drake hotel, where the tailors 
are meeting in fifty-eighth annual 
convention ]—“ Greatest man in Amer- 
ica on trousers. His trousers are the 
right width, the right hang. He gen- 
erally wears about a 22 inch knee 
and a 19 cuff.” 


8. Gene Markey, author—* Immacu- 
late in his clothes; has a wardrobe of 
eighty-five suits alone; brown, green, 
every color in the rainbow. That’s 
his. hobby.” 

4. Alfred Rogers of Toronto—" He 
looks marvelous in cutaway coats— 
morning clothes, you know.” 

5. L. Montefiore Stein, Chicago bro- 
ker—“ He goes in for double breasted 
clothes, even in sports, Everything 
double breasted.” 

6. Frank Gordon McGeough, re- 
tired Milwaukee financier—“ Because 
he owns sixty suits. Just because he 
is from Milwaukee doesn’t mean he 
isn’t a splendid dresser. Why, he 


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Progound 


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1, |@ JOY ‘Bett Davie $, Fran. Tone, gt: AG 
allace Beery, e net -F im 3 hie 

Craw. mL Love Vd ay 

sate: 


WINNIE WINKLE, "THE BREADWINNER: Aren't We 


[ano 
ee’ 


THEY 


¥ 


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SEE HOW WELL 


YES, 
DEAR! 


even has his bathing suits made to 
order. They’re canary yellow flannel, 
two pairs, and $40 apiece.” 

7. President Roosevelt—“ He wears 
executive clothes so well, like direc- 
tors’ suits and cutaways. He has ev- 
erybody else outshone—but not in 
dress clothes,” quickly, “ because he 
always wears tuxedos.” 


8. Warren Wright, Chicago sports- 
man—‘“ He buys more clothes than ten 
other men. He’s a race horse man, 
so, of course, he wears sports clothes 
in all dimensions.” 

9. Mayor Kelly—*“He’s the best 
dressed mayor in the United States. 
In his double breasted suits, with ele- 
gant ties, he looks the perfect busi- 
ness man. Whether it’s a credit to 


MOTION PICTURES 
DOWNTOWN 


| 


his tailor or his physique, we don’t 
know.” 


“We picked him because of his neat- 
ness, not for flashy clothes but for 
neatness. 
out, We understand she buys three 
pairs of trousers for each suit.” 


the tailor designers, suddenly beamed. 
Benny,” he directed. 


picked him tenth—no, one of the ten! 
Maybe he’ll thank us on the air.” 


hold its annual formal supper-dance 
Saturday 


bocker hotel. 


radio comedian— 


10. Jack Benny, 


His wife picks them all 


W. J. Fitzgerald, publicity man for 


“Send a wire, quick, to Jack 


“Tell him we've 


* * 


Sorority Dance. 
Alpha Phi Omicron sorority will 


evening at the Knicker- 


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TURNS IN A 


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SEC TH 
LIVING BEYOND THEIR 
‘MEANS — 


All 


_ NORTH | 


STATE: Ake Mio 
JOHN 
BARRYMORE 


& ont ORGH. HP it PERSON Micrr Cue : 


WOODS 


“WHAT i ee 
“GLAMOROUS NIGHT”—OTTO 


Randolph & Dearborn | 
“Hold ’Em, Navy” 


Lew Ayres—Mary Carlisle 
AN ARTI£T” 


World PLAYHOUSE 


Cont. 11:30 A. M. to Midnight—85o to 6:30 P. M. 


Danielle 
Darrieux 


410 8, 
Mich, wee 


Club de 


GRANADA 


Sher. -Dev.—Open 
‘NAVY BLUE & GOLD’ 


rue Confession” 


$ John Scles-W rence Drake 
LA SALLE Madison-Clark. 16¢ to 6:30) | ‘4ninat “waren of time NAZI EXPOSE 


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Pius Jane baa 
Extra! 


Brdwy.-Lawr.—Open ! 1:30 
ge eee of Shan hail” 


Fathers,”’ ist s 
of Timo NAZI ' EXPOSE 


show’o 


eENTURY 


Cik.-Dyrsy.~‘Nothing Sacred’ , 


‘Damsel In Distress’-Nazi Film 


NORSHORE 


Femmes 


BELMONT “2° 


How.-Cik.— CONQUEST’ 
“NITE CLUB SCANDAL” 


h.—'‘Nothing Sacred’ 
& ‘Night Club Scandal’ 


Adults only—English titles—GIRLS’ CLUB PANTHEON, ee hate 
: : -_ a alla 
eee? NORTH NORTOWN 0 Sort ceeu EST, 
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aa Sheridan—Bargain uaatites 


HELD OVER by POPULAR DEMAND 


Robert Montgomery, Rosalind Russell 
Robert Benchley—Helen Vinson—Micke 


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Also Cesar Romero—“*DANGEROUSLY YOURS” 


By the Water Tower 
Neagle, Anton Walbrook 


“VICTORIA THE GREAT” 


1225 N. Clark. 


rob 


pe 


Sundays 2:30, 6:00, 


“VICTOR 
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etl gp Mey M. with GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SONGS 
A 3143 SheMeld—i0c to 6130; Eve, | 


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Partormonens eee ert aRE ge tiN-| WINDSOR On 
oDAVis. © See ae | Se ee ee 
APOLLO || | eBUcKM “Sei. %t-ouie trey. | DE LONE 


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La 


GEORGE ARLISS—‘ 
Robert Armstrong—"G 


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oe eee iwi 
test March of Time 


of 
R. SYN” 
SAID NO” 


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The Story the First Love Affair of a 


Grawford-Washington. Grace 


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itra on) EBB TIDE" 


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e CRAWFOF RD gts 


ci = 


mule 


“PLL TAKE ROMANCE” 
&—“‘Night Club Scandal’ 


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‘Double Wedding’ BiK 
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WILL ROGERS "Au susna8 
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LUNA Bette “it’s Love I’m After’? 
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Plue—‘“* Go-Round of #938" 


> A KINGDOM 


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& Molly, “This Way, 
Fullerton—“DR. SIN” 


BRYN MAWR > son “7 
SPENCER TRACY, “BIG CITY” 


Edward G, Robinson—"‘LAST GANGSTER” 


Scott Colter, A All A Asmerigan 
James 


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een oes Ladies scary Naughy Gise Adm. 
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a a 
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Warner Baxter, ‘ 


8 Features—"’She Asked an It’*-—"*It’s 
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a 


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& “NIGHT CLUB SCANDAL” 


CLARK . NORTH 
w 


| “EBB TIDE” & Powell, 


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Ray Milland . 
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OAKLAND = “Siconn nowevwoon 


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HAMILTON “VICTORIA THE GREAT” 


‘The WOMEN MEN MARRY’ 


PICCADILLY ui: 


aoine “teden PLL “Take he roitinas 
2:00—4 :50—7 :50—10 3 


NAZI GERMANY EXPOSED 
COMMERCIAL 9150 Commercial. Op. 11:80 


ONLYt 
olding: néw pi 


“MARIHUANA” 


and 1 The Jones Family—‘BORROWING TROUBLE” 


WOODLAWN 1326 KE. vg i 


FEATURES . 
Late Barg. Pr. 15e After 9:50 
‘DINNER A ~ An ap ong Wallace Beery 
Lionel & John B aoe ee ans, Edm. Lowe 
“Special Investigatar’’-—- Wich. + gir Callahan 
“Babes in Toyland’—Laurel & dy, Ch ar, Henry 


MIDWA Cott. -68d—Lt. Barg. Pr. 150 Ast. 9:30 

Open 1:30—Mat. 15c-—-3 Meatures 
“BY YOUR LEAVE,” F. Morgan, evieve Tobin 
‘WOMAN IN THE DARK,” Fay a cremes 


20th Century-Fox Whi 8:45 P.M. Prices (plus Robt. Taylor, Janet Gaynor, “Smait Town Girl? | —————— mes | “SILVER STREAK,” Sally Blane, 
& 

Lh ee eet SOUTHTOWN Fee 

DON AMEGHE - ALICE BRADY Sat, Owl Show, 11:30 P.M. “SHOW BOAT’ — MAT. oY aoe 26e yt . at ee anne rr Dunne — Astaire d& Rogers 

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66 B. VAN BUREN NORTHWEST Suet “YOU CAN'T GET AWAY WITH IT” Fred MacMurray | RAMOVA 35TH & ) HALSTED 

Cont. 1 A M. vo Midnite--250 to 1 P.M. RT nn eee with HOOVER AND HIS G-MEN IN ACTION! ge ty Mga er a TOU BLIP 
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9 se TER | BALABAN & KATZ WONDER THEATERS LINCOLN — ous etree at Belmont FREE TO LADIES—HAND-CUT GLASSWARE 
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mes, Premiere Thursday Event Lombard—‘TRUE CONF ESSION’—MacMu of ” 
§:00"-0-Glock—and Showing 10:00-o-Crovk| || “TLL TAKE ROMANCE” _Ghssware bn Ladies Paying Sve. admission Lot NA Giadys Georse GLLDOG DAE! i Lata ae eae 
CONGRESS .... Howard, “STAND-IN* Sta. Op. 1 n 1:30—Twe Big Hite “ik & Wondlanaets Ane 


Kap FOR tim 


Vivian Osborne—“'SHE A SSRED 
_New Sot Sound System—Perfected 


JACKSON PK. sree OR gs 
Aherne, E, Horton—‘ ‘GREAT 
: Mystery Thriller—* ‘THE SHADOW” | 
MICHIGAN “ALARA arcana aera | 
Young, ‘Tyrone Power,‘ HONEYMOON" 
CHELTEN 79th and Exchange 
Leslie Howard, Bette Davis—*‘It’s Love I'm After™ After” 


HARPER ni Fat atta 


Osis Lake Park—Paul Muni 
HYDE ZOL a” 
E HYDE EA Max | 


ae ~ Kimbark Ave. — Mat Daily 


150 to 6:80— E 
eo in Lesion Now . 


statesiuntne “This Way, Please’ 


—v | @ » CROWN oo rg peng “Double Wedding” : 


j North Ave, at Ratio Features 


gi “BORROWING TROUBLE” 


~g (Gur. Be Wa Wa Wa ~~ . 


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Charles Boyer 
Greta Garbo 


At 9:05 | At 7:00—10:20 


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Open 1:15—‘The Fi 4 
|WALENCIA . Lee. ete Honeymoon’ : 
|CORONET HELD 0 OVER | 


. Pe: a iat ¥ . 
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< - Mar [ 
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SZ 


CL a Nt — 


< Ah Jr., have 


t, Mrs. Poole’s mother and 
father, will een them later. 

Mrs. Otis Chatfield Taylor, Miss : 
Narcissa Thorne, and Mrs. Frederick 
A. Poole Jr. are leaving today for 
Nassau. They expect to return in 
about two. weeks. 


Mrs. John W. Gary 


Going to Honolulu. 
Honolulu will be the destination of 
Mrs, John W. Gary and her cousin, 


| Miss Cornelia Conger, when they sail | 
from the west coast in the Lurline on | | 


Feb. 19. They will be away about six 


weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. George 
son will return to Lake Forest on 
Feb. 10 from a trip to California. 
They plannec. to visit Mr. Richard- 
gon’s mother in Pasadena and then to 


go to San Mateo to be with Mrs. 


Richardson’s daughter and _ sgn-in- 
law, the Rodman Lent Hookers. 

Mrs. Homer A. Stillwell, who lives 
at the Drake hotel when she is in 
Chicago, has left to spend the rest of 
the winter in Pasadena. 


Mrs. Dadley Root’ 


Returning to Europe. 

Mrs. Dudley Root and Miss Sarah 
Hinde are leaving tomorrow for New 
York to sail Saturday for the for- 
mer’s home in Cap d’Ail, near Monte 


Carlo. Miss Hinde is taking her car 


a a 


along so she can take some motor 


trips during the two months she will 


visit Mrs. Root. 

Miss Denyse Root, who accom- 
panied her mother from France eafly 
in the winter, will remain in Chicago 
for another two or three months 
with her father, John W. Root, and 
his wife. It it possible that her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Peter Dudley of Paris, 
will come to Chicago to accompany 


* Miss Root home. 
_ -Dr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Ryerson 


are just back from a two weeks’ holi- 
day in California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wade Fetzer Jr. have 
just returned from a cruise through 
the Panama canal to California, where 
they spent a few days with her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and 


- Mrs. Robert S. Burns, in Los Angeles. 


Mrs. Burns is so busy settling her 


- new home in the Westwood Hills dis- 
_ trict that she may not be able to visit 
| Chicago this spring. 


Mrs. James N. Rawleigh is leavinz 


today for New York for a brief visit 


with her sons, Jimmy, who is at 
Princeton, and Billy, who is at Law- 


 renceville. 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Morse Sr. 


- @re expected to arrive in Chicago on 
_ Feb. 20 from a trip abroad. They will 


_ not open their Lake Forest home im- 


_ mediately, but will stay at the Drake 
hotel for a short while. 


’ Miss Mary Hill Will 


Become Bride Tonight. 
In a home ceremony at 8 o’clock 


tonight Miss Mary Hill, daughter of 
“Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farwell Ferry of 


Winnetka will become the bride of 
James L. Surpless of Wilmette. The 
Rev. Samuel Hurkness will read the 
ceremony and a reception will follow. 

The bride is to wear her mother’s 
satin wedding dress. Her attendants 
will be her sister, Mrs. Harry K. 
Wells of Concord, Mass., as matron of 
honor, and Mrs. Reid Whitney and 
Miss Kathryn Putnam as brides- 
maids. 

Horace Hart will be best man. 
Ushering will be Mr. Whitney and 
Edward S. Hill, brother of the bride. 
Mr. Surpless and his bride will make 
their home in Wilmette following a 
honeymoon in Bermuda. 

Among those who have come from 
far away for the wedding are the 
bride’s aunts and uncles, Mrs. C. F. 
Sayles of New York and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert W. Sayles of Boston. The bride- 
groom’s uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oliver Surpless, have come from 


Ridgewood, N. J. 
Palm Beach 


Party Tonight. 


In an atmosphere as Palm Beach- 


ish as blue water in a pool sur- 


rounded by tables set among palm 
_ trees can make it, numerous young 
people will dine tonight at the Lake 
Shore Athletic club. As a result of a 
_ technical tie verdict in a mattress 
‘ia race between the “City 


poe the “Country Gentle- 

Jast Wednesday night at the 

‘chia Lighthouse benefit, there will 
be another race to: t. 


A small commi representing 


‘University of Michigan alumne in 


‘Chicago will meet for tea at 3 o’clock 
Saturday afternoon at the home of 


‘Mrs, N. W. MacChesney to discuss 
‘plans for an alumnz dinner on March 
4 at the Merchandise Mart. Mrs. Wal- 
-ter E. Mueller of Hinsdale is presi- 


dent of the Chicago alumnae. 
Mrs. Ford r will speak on 
“ Architectural ‘Design Using Flower 
Arrangements” at 11 o'clock this 
“morning at the Georgian hotel. The 
is one of a series arranged 
‘by the arts committee of the Evans. 
aoe Junior longue. 


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WOMAN’S AND MISS’ FROCK. 


Most of the smart linens and cottons being shown for cruise and resort 
wear are styled along simple lines. One \such frock is the pattern illus- 
trated today. It is so delightfully designed that you can wear it simply 
everywhere under the southern: sun, when you're golfing, walking, or 
simply sipping cocktails or lemonade. If you're a stay-at-home, and enjoy- 
ing it, you will like this model for your hovers of domesticity. 

The neckline is high and round, and may be trimmed with a brief con- 
trasting collar or with dainty edging, the scume that trims the sleeves. But- 
tons or a slide fastener may do duty all the| way down the front. A narrow 
tailored belt does the honors for the waistlime. This is a comfortable frock, 
and one which you can make in a jiffy. If\you feel particularly ambitious, 
put a little pocket on the bodice for addedj dash. Use any type of wash 
fabric, and bear in mind that prints are especially effective and particu- 
larly smart. 

Style No. 2056 is designed for sizes 14, 16, 18, and 20 years, and 32, 34, 
36, 38, 40, 42, and 44 inches bust measurememt. Size 36 requires 3% yards 
of 39 inch material, with 1%4 yards of braid jor other edging. 


CLOTILDE PATTERNS ARE It0 CENTS EACH 
Order Blank } 


Grand Central Station, NEW YORK CITY. 


CHICAGO TRIBUNE, P. 0. BOX 537, 


Inclosed find....ccscscs. Please send me the (letilde Pattern listed below: 


Pattern No. 2056. Size.... 


Write plainly, giving size of pattern 
cents in stamps or coin [coin preferred 


desired. Inclose 10 
wrap it carefully], 


Number and SNE RG CbbUOEEASOD4000 60d cnndddpedhscdcduele obaeens0keed 06000 cbdsconccec’ ee 


\e 


City seeeserrense 


SHHHHHHHEHHESHET HEHEHE EEEH OE EE OT EHEEE ETE AOMESER SE HH SHOR ORE HELE EEE SESE Eee 


State Gee ciphhis bnriisauatodibuosenrcasnchshetatuesgskiccsiens Tere ee Terr rere 


WEDDING 


Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Watson, 3011 
North Whipple street, announce the 
marriage last Saturday of their daugh- 
ter, Edith Anne, to Willis Gordon 
Meyers of Chicago. The Rev. Law- 
rence A. Smith of Rantoul, Ill., broth- 
er-in-law of the bride, officiated. Mr. 
Meyers and his bride will make their 
home at se me: —. 


—— 


Illinae ‘Club to Sponsor 
Loan: Fund Benefit Party 


The west side group of the Chicago 
Iilinae club will give a benefit bridge 
party at the Carlton hotel, Oak Park, 
Saturday sifternoon. Mrs. W. I. Brock. 
son, at Village 5000 or Kedzie 6078, is 
taking reservations. Tickets will be 
fifty cents; Proceeds will go to a 
loan fund :for women students at the 
University tof Illinois. 
Se 


Here's a 


Menu Suitable 
for ‘Company 


BY MARY MEADE. 
[Copyright: 1988: By The Chicage Tribune.) 

Don’t think that just because you're 
a working girl you need confine your 
social entertaining to Saturday and 
Sunday meals. Invite some favorite 
friend for dinner tonight, and then 
impress him or her with your versa- 
tility in being able to turn out a per- 
fect meal as well as a perfect busi- 
ness letter. 

Time and effort are reduced to a 
minimum in this plan. Fresh rhu- 
barb, endive, and radishes were in- 
cluded because they are pretty gen- 
erally available in the city markets 
and not expensive, either. 

BUSINESS WOMAN’S DINNER 
Vegetable Juice Cocktail [Canned] 
Filet Mignon with Mushrooms 
Potatoes Parisienne 
Buttered Mixed Vegetables [Canned] 
Shredded Endive and Radish Salad 


with Chili French Dressing 
Toasted Whole Wheat Loaf 
Rhubarb Crum Pudding 
Coffee 
FILET MIGNON. 

Filet mignon [beef tenderloin] is a 
choice cut of meat. The price is rather 
high, but there is no bone or fat. 
Allow a third pound per serving. 
Brush the surface with butter and 
broil in a moderate broiling oven 
until browned on one side. Turn, 
brush with butter, season, and brown 
on the other side. If the meat is 
placed three inches from the broiling 
unit it will be sufficiently done by 
the time it is well browned on each 
side. The steak should be puffy and 
juicy, preferably somewhat rare, to 
be at its best. Overcooking will cause 
shrinkage, loss of flavor, and loss of 
juices. Beware of overcooking filet 
mignon {beware of overcooking any 
broiled steak]. To cook mushrooms 
under the broiler spread them with 
butter and broil alongside the steak 
[not on top of it] after it has been 
turned [8-10 minutes]. Season and 
place on the steak when serving. 
Large, fresh mushrooms are most 
suitable, but the canned button type 
may be used. In that case they may 
be heated in a little butter on top of 
the stove. 

POTATOES PARISIENNE. 

This is just a fancy name for 
mashed potatoes seasoned with a lit- 
tle onion and pimiento and heated in 
the oven. To two cups mashed, sea- 
soned potatoes add one tablespoon 
chopped chives or green onion and 
one tablespoon chopped pimiento. Pile 
into a greased baking dish and brown 
lightly in a moderate oven. 


To prepare the toasted whole wheat 
loaf, cut top and side crusts from an 
unsliced loaf of whole wheat bread, 
leaving the bottom crust. Cut length- 
wise down the middle of the loaf to 
the bottom crust and cut crosswise 
three or four times in the same man- 
ner. Brush outside and between cuts 
with melted butter and place the loaf 
in the oven to brown lightly. Serve 
on a plate and allow each guest to 
break off his mock biscuit. 

Rhubarb Crum Pudding. 

[Serves Four.] 

2 cups graham cracker crums 

% cup melted butter 

3 or 4 stalks fresh rhubarb 

1 tablespoon lemon fuice 

% teaspoon grated lemon rind 

4% cup sugar 

% cup hot water 

Melt butter in frying pan and. stir 

in crums, Stir over low heat until 
crums are slightly brown. Cover the 
bottom of a greased casserole with a 
layer of buttered crums and cover 
with a layer of cut rhubarb. Sprinkle 
with half the lemon juice, grated 
rind, and sugar. Cover with another 
layer of crums, repeat with rhubarb, 
juice, rind, and sugar, and top with 
crums. Moisten with water [better, 
orange juice]. Bake at 375 degrees 
30 to 40 minutes. wer warm with 


Perel 


Copyright: 1938: By Ely Culbertson.] 

Scene: A living room, any Ameri- 
can home. 

Time: The present. 


Characters. 

Mr. Newlywed, sitting North. Only 
a few weeks ago he played a very 
decent sort of bridge. Since his mar- 
riage to a state bridge champion, 
however, he has rapidly deteriorated. 
Now, after every bid and every play 
he searches his bride’s lovely and 
highly expressive face for an approv- 
ing smile which, unfortunately, rarely 
appears. 

Mrs. Newlywed, the declarer, South. 
Should have married before she won 
the state championship. .She was 
warned by several co-experts that she 
was marrying a palooka, but love 
can trap even @ woman champion. 

East and West. Married to each 
other for eight years. Each expects, 
and gets, the worst possible game 
nis the other. 

® @ ®@ 

North: Your bid, my sweet. [No- 
tices that his bride’s eyes are popping 
slightly and that her breathing has 
become labored.) Why, what’s the 
matter, angel, are you ill? 

South: No, no! Let me see. I 
bid . ~ mim. . three no trump! 
After West’s pass North beams and 
bids six no trump. Hast passes and 
South, quite without warant, but 
spurred by a@ Catherine of Russia 
complex, goes to seven no trump. 

West [the masculine third of the 
old married couple]: O, double! (The 
“Q” wrociaims it to be a double 
motivated largely by annoyance.] 
North passes in a strangled voice, 
but South, determined to exact the 
respect due a state champion, re- 
doubles. All pass. West slaps down 
the queen of spades. 

This was the deal: 

South, dealer. 

Neither side vulnerable. 

NORTH 
& 63 
¥ 1086 
$953 
&®#KQI32 


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EST 
31097 
J 5 

10 


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SOUTH 
AAH42 
yA K7 
@AKd 
&Al0 8 
It depresses your playwright to ad- 
mit it, but the state champion played 
thie hand like a national champion. 
She won the opening lead, cashed the 
ace-king of hearte and of diamonds, 
then ran the club suit. On the fourth 
round she discarded her low heart; 
on the fifth round the diamond jack. 
West was all right until he had to 
play on the fifth club. At that time 
he held @&J 10, 92, $Y, - to let 
any card go was suicide. A spade 


Thursday's Menu 


BREAKFAST 
Apricot Nectar 
Prepared Cereal 
Apple Pancakes 
Melted Butter 
Coffee or Milk 


LUNCH 
Carrot Ring with Creamed Broccoli 
Hot Rolis 
Banana Salad 
Baked Honey . Custard 
Milk or Coffee 


DINNER and rose printed materials, “combined 
Broiled Liver with white, are the favorite scheme 
French Fried Onions for the central motif. The entire quilt 
Lettuce, Watercress, Dandelion is composed of “Honey Bee” blocks 
Green, Garlic, and Diced Crisp set together with four inch bands of 
Bacon Salad white material between blocks. Sur- 
Pineapple Meringue Pie rounded by a seven inch border, the 
Coffee finished coverlet measures 90 by 106 
inches. \ 

AMUSEMENTS. _AMUSEMENTS, 

— A GILBERT MILLER HIT! GRAN Seren ori weg 


| Limited Engagement 


SELW Tonight at 8:30 
ee TODAY, 2: :30 


Eu 


ABBEY. PLAYERS 


SE cat 


discard would establish South’s K-4-2; 
the heart or diamond discard would 
establish dummy’s card in the same 
suit, which would result in another 
squeeze when that newly established 
card was cashed. West blanched and 
chucked a spade, praying that de 
clarer had started with only three 
spades. His prayer went unanswered. 
The state champion triumphantly 
rattled off three spade tricks for her 
redoubled contract. The outrageously 
optimistic grand slam had succeeded 
because every outstanding honor, 
down to the diamond ten, had been 
miraculously placed in West’s hand, 
South [to North]: Do you know 
what play I made on that hand? 


North f[adoringly]: No. What, 
pet? 
South: A double Vienna coup! 


East [to West]: Do you know 
what you are for doubling and warn 
ing declarer away from the diamond 
finesse? 

West [apprehensively]: 

East: <A double idiot! 


Tomorrow's Hand 
South, déaler. 
East-West vulnerable. 


No. What? 


NORTH 
A292 
v9643 
#38 
®#KQd5 
WEST EAST 
& K 10 3 A875 
¥K7 ¥AQI2 
10642 @K9 
RASS 2 #10764 
SOUTH 
AATE4 
¥108 5 
@AQ753 
de 9 
Mr. Culbertson will discuss this 


hand in tomorrow’s article. 


Patchwork Quilt 
Uses Honey Bees 
as Main Design 


Honeybees. 


Patterns of this design are 5 cents, 
stamps or coin. Address Nancy 
Cabot, Chicago Tribune, or call ai 
one of the Tribune Public Service 
offices, 1 South Dearborn street or 
Tribune Tower. 


BY NANCY CABOT. 


Three little melon shaped pieces of 
patchwork applied to the corners, 
linking the block together, symbolize 
the honey bee. The center nine patch 
indicates either the comb or flower 
garden and it always is set together 
in a combination of printed and plain 
materials. Golden brown and yellow 
form the bee combination, while pink 


a Positively Ends Sat., Feb. & 
AM H. HARRIS presents 


STAGE DOOR 


by GEO.S. KAUFMAN & EDNA FEREBER 


JOAN BENNETT 
2 GRErt Beg. Mon. Feb. 7 SR 


he World-Famous 


“FAR OFF ILS” gue Mon. Tues, 
at. and Bre. ' 
“NEW COs N” Thurs. Pri., 


at. Mat, 
Eves., B50 to $5.50: WearBat. Mats. 55c-$1.65 


4 | a i trader 
£3 cape’ 


@ | By ANTOINETTE DONNELLY. 


ight: oh The 


“We must get 


| madame! As" may pod ieee ¢ one 
thousands of times before, it is one | 
| of the big beauty worlds left to con- 


And what a_ difference it 
You. are young or you are 


quer. 
makes! 


{old by the mere drop of the feet 


on the pavement. You are smart, 
you are dowdy by the mere posture 
of your body. 

~o ; 
We offer you a slogan to be -te- 
peated a hundred times a day. The 
repetition is guaranteed to make a 
smarter, younger figure of idasiitt. 
“Stand tall. Walk tall, Sit tall. Be 
tall.” That’s all there is to the 
slogan. But what a difference its 
execution will make! 
You cannot order yourself to 
stand, walk, sit and be tall without 
instantly effecting a change in pos- 
ture, without adding to the grace 
of movement so dear to an observ- 
er’s eye. 

At first, when you put your slogan 
into actual training, you may feel 
a bit stiff and military, but when 
you've corrected your posture faults 
you'll forget the slogan and move 
with infinitely more charming and 
youthful grace. 


-~o~ 
When you are working around the 
house, traveling on your way to the 
office, sitting at your desk, chant the 
song: “Tall, girl, tall! Only the 
old bend forward!” Movies show 
you how the advance of years is 
demonstrated when actresses walk 
with the body bent forward. 
When you stand, hold your abdo- 
men in and pull in your derriere. A 
trick of learning how to do this Is 
to slink sideways through a narrow 
space, making yourself as small as 
possible. 


Frequent scalp massage works 
wonders for both scalp and hair. 
Antoinette Donnelly suggests an 
easy, tested method of massage in 
her booklet, “ Bring Out the Beauty 
In Your Hair.” You will want this 
helpful booklet. On sale at the 
Tribune Public Service offices, 1 
South Dearborn street and Tribune 
Tower. Price, 5 cents. By postpaid 
mail, 7 cents. 

x 


Welfare Agencies of 


Chicago Extend Help 
to 700,000 in Y ear 


Seven hundred thousand underpriv- 
ileged or needy persons were aided in 
Chicago last year by 54 child welfare, 
family welfare and protective agen- 
cies, Wilfred S. Reynolds, director of 
the Chicago Council of Social Agen- 
cies, said yesterday. He addressed 
the association’s annual meeting in 
the Drake hotel at luncheon. Ex- 
penditures totaled $46,000,000 and the 
services of 3,300 skilled workers were 
employed, he said. 

Other major welfare and social 
service organizations, including 11 
governmental and 200 privately sup- 
ported agencies, bring the total mem- 
bership to 211, he said. 

No relief or rehabilitation program 
can be operated by rule of thumb, 
said Charles P. Taft of Cincinnati. 
Every one must be given a chance, 
and many classed as unemployables 
are actually employable, he said. The 
federal program purports to take care 
of all employables, but does not, he 
added. 


fee i 


cinadhed “No, 
the matter with 

Yet you, with him all ¢ 
day, see that he’s 1 
and his school 
havior is not what it s ho 
haps, aS we were nige 
the lack of verve, pep, gi 
what you will; the lack 
and accomplishment: _" 
are due simply to chronic 
Some children pass quickly through 
this physical phase, but some haven’t 
as much endurance as others, in 
which case the remedy often lies in 
a reorganizing of your child’s school 
day. i 


oe 

First comes food. This growing, 
ever-active body must have enough of 
the right food. 

By making some changes in food 
and varying the preparation, there’s 
no reason why you can’t increase 
your tired child’s intake. Children 
lose food interest when menus are 
monotonous, just as grownups do. A 
trick I used was to switch luncheon 
dishes to breakfast and vice versa, 
and I'd often skip cereal and use lots 
of whole wheat buttered toast in- 
stead. 


oe 

Rest is the next “ must.” You must 
see that this always tired child gets 
more sleep, and more daytime rest 
without sleep, 

And go light on your child’s extras 
for a while—like music, dancing, club 
meetings, long trips connected with 
visiting, movies, and things you think 
are valuable culturally. Just ease up 
in general in re-planning this tired 
child’s day. 


A new booklet called “Talks to 
Teachers “ or“ The Child in School,” 
is in preparation. The postage for 
it is 6 cents with your large, self- 
addressed envelope. Address Mrs. 
Gladys Bevans, The Chicago Trib- 
une, Chicago, Il. 


Now a 
PERSONALIZED 


Color-Accenting 
SHAMPOO 


The new CLAIROL Personalized Sham. 
poos accent the coler of your hair ag 
they wash it to feathery cleanness! Five 
glamorous colors—Dawn, Brilliantone, 
Sunburst, Coppertone, and 
Starlight. Choosé the one 
that emphasizes the color 
you want to bring out in 
your hair, just as you 
choose face powder ¢ 
to enhance the color 

of your complexion! 


© COLOR-ACCENTING SHAMPOOS ¢ 
“A NEW Clairol Product” 


— OBTAINABLE AT ALL— 


DRUG 
STORES 


CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


HORIZONTAL 
1, Distress 28. Bewildering 48. Beverage 
9, Iron tool 32. Actuality 51. Single 
A a 33, Universe 52. Follow servilely 
15. enoreing RROD 34, Lecture 53, Extension 
from 36. Unite 55. Lover of country 
16. Mass of cast metal 39. Away from the gale 59. The soft palate 
17. Crest 40. Kill game illegally 61. Fragrance 
18. Scoff 41. Orderly collection of 63. Fitness to cut 
19. Worth papers 64. Rough-edged 
20. Parts of garment 42. Affirmation 65. Sell 
22. Interrogative pronoun 43, Evade 66. According to (Ital.) 
24. Point of compass 44. Throb 67. More sensible 
25. Collection of beasts 45. Vexes 68. Extremes 
26. Writing accessory 46. Sound 69. Evil glance 
VERTICAL 
1. Curves 29. Animal 56. Vain P 
2. Indifferent 30. God of war 57. Silly look  / 
3 Domestic 31. Merchandise _ 58. Globule of moisture 
4. Skip with the funds 32. Plane surface of a 60. Advantage 
5 Do gem 62. Retreat 
on nado 35. Tatter 
6. Flower 36. Uncivilized YESTERDAY’S PUZZLE 
7. Horse 37. Other SOLVED 
8. Realized 38. Elk 
9. Legal separation 40. Fire implement 
10. Indian of Tierra del 41. Mournful 
Fuego 43, Visionary 
11, rs 44, Kick 
i, i person 45. Provided that 
13, Pilot 47. Saves up 
21, Empty = id eng 
23. Tract of waste land “ oe y TRACT oMme fever te = 
27, os .. 54. Shift ane 
4. At a distance 55. Body of water 
aa ‘ 
3 2 : be - he a a r : 
a ae a as é ° = hb & 
Et 4 es r et : a 
gee ee ; eee Fee Bae We ae 


Cw ERB geanng.? 
Ls 


‘ 


TEP Den Ye 


Se, - 
Sater petting 2 


luggage tan or royal blue. 12 to 
20, 38 to 42. 
Mail and Telephone Orders Filled. Call 
State 2000. 
Everyday Frocks, Fourth Floor. 


$15 


The Fall-Skirted Mode 
Calls for—Petticoats 


The Jacket-Dress Wears Index Fingers of Fashion Point to Van Raalte Gloves ; Swishy Celanese rayon ‘taifets 


; 


a Bolero This Season 
sei a $71.50 ripped up the side for snug fi, 
The bolero with three-quarter | oe and crisp enough to discourage 
sleeves —s embroidered flowers | ing you to points of interest in Spring gloves. “Elegance,” this suede-like fabric = any tendency for flared wool and 
—feminine details to suit a new glove, indicates the vogue for colored embroidery, gay as a | ’s holiday. “Gad-About,” | Knit skirts to cling. Colors to 
mode. Crisp pique, easily detach- the two-way glove, wool gabardine (new in gloves) with rayon palm, acquaints you with leather contrast (very chic) or match— 
able, _— the basic dress which bindings. The style in Picnit uses machine petit point to-make a lady’s hand more exciting bright wine, Kelly green, cocktail 
ete ‘with a flattering simplicity to hold. In the group, a wide choice of new Spring colors for every new Spring costume. ) blue, black, navy, brown, white, 
of line. Black or navy rayon | Gloves. First-Floor. | : tearose. 26 to 36 waist. 
sheer. Sizes 36 to 44; 1644 to | Lingerie, Third Floor. 
244%. $10.95. | | 
Mail and Telephone Orders Filled. | in gleih calée $7 95 
wool, the 


Call State 2000. Sizes in all | Ay 

We shades are 

Everyday Frocks, Fourth Floor. Pht 16 ing fo % Pye, blue, rose, 
} ed) aqua, beige. 


$10.95 


A New Sait Whose Skirt 
Refuses to Sag 


Excitement in the suit world! | x ee : , : 5 | 
A new type of suit that puts | < = : | Slim Lines—Slim Price 
up an unanswerable argument \y ~ | : in Warm Flannel 
against sagging. It has a girdle- yD xs 
length lastex feature inside the Re | ; A zip front. housecoat in a 
skirt. This makes it hold its . RN | “ane aper re | Fd classic style that will keep it smart 
shape and gives you that slim- "“ | troducing a 
through-the-hips look. Light 66 99 “ = . nephetnd 
sey, ait, ele to 6. | The “Jane Jordan” Stud Dress ‘aa, ah ae two-tone trim goes 
Moderate Price Suits, <——y : all down the front and is echoed 
Biase Dine $17 95 | at the collar and cuffs. Raspberry, 
: | royal blue, French blue, navy or 
; black. 12,1 ae ' e 
$19.95 Especially designed for Carson’s, the Jane Jordan Mail . 5% lanai cg 
ee oi sii ialae Memiies, To cette and Telephone Orders Filled. 
The prints dress is a personality” eens : Cali State 2000. 
come in bines the classic features that make for perfection in a 
pe gy Pi frock of this type with individual details, such as the ie daca nln icleel 


and pastels 


with white. stitched pockets. It comes with short or long sleeves in | oe | 
a wide variety of fabrics: rayon crepe (as shown) in Special! $6-95 
copen, rose, aqua, navy, black; pastel wools; light and 
dark monotone prints. 16 to 44. — 
Mail and Telephone Orders Filled... Call State 2000. 
Women’s Moderate'Price Frocks, Fourth Floor. 


Semi-Annual Sale of Grenweave Hosiery | 


Began Pena 


Y A 
at Hews 


aoa 


ae ae ova 6 ot eee % 
tm a Let Ry 2° +4 3 ? Cg. + aa 
- al “gl , = . M. ~ a 4 ie 
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= Wry ee 
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— 


OVER ST, LOUIS 


— 


Indiana Beats Butler 
Before 11,000. 


Notre Dame, Ind., Feb, 1.—[Spe- 
cial.J—Notre Dame won its 13th bas- 
ketball victory in 15 starts tonight, de- 
feating St. Louis university, 50 to 25, 
in a slow game. It was the sixth con- 
secutive victory and the 14th straight 
at home for Notre Dame. 


St. Louis made a contest of the 
game during the first half, leading 
5 to 1 and tying the score at 7 all. 
It stayed in the game until'the score 
was 15 to 12, then Notre Dame pulled 
away, leading 21 to 12 at the inter- 
mission. 

Tired from weekend games with 
Washburn and Creighton, St. Louis 
faded rapidly in the second half. Dan 
O'Sullivan of St. Louis and Paul No- 
wak and Johnny Moir of Notre Dame 
shared scoring honors with 9 points 
each. Lineup: 

NOTRE DAME 150}. ST. LOUIS 
BF 
21D. Cochran.f 
Brooks.f 
Dud’ hoeffer.f 
Songer.f 
Hassar.f 
O’Sullivan.e 
W. Cochran,¢ 
Muda. 


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=" 


Pc POOKH SU 


wu WSoore OMS 
OSW SOOoOow 


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OSsKroonsecror 


; we 31. Moir 

eeenee 5 a D. 

O'Sullivan [31], W. 

Ref [De Paull. Umpire— 
Powers [Detroit]. 


q INDIANA BEATS BUTLER 


Indianapolis, Ind., Feb. 1.—I[Spe- 
cial.J—Eleven thousand fans packed 
the Butler fieldhouse tonight to see 
Indiana university defeat Butler, 42 
to 23, in a charity game. 

Joe Platt, senior forward from Gal- 
veston, Ind., teamed with Jim Birr, 
Indianapolis center, to extend But- 
ler’s losing streak to five games. 
Birr scored 12 points and Platt i1 
for Indiana. 

BUTLER [ ~ 


Geyer.f 


INDIANA [42}. 


tj: 


HORS once by 
SOCOM NHOny 
QO vor wer = "9 


COMHOHROWOS ON 

SCHOCOSODH WOOO 

COHMOSCONMFOKMOO'Y 
td 


Free throws missed—Johnson [31. Birr [2}. 
grt. Andres. Cosgrove. Merrill. Jazxgers [21. 
. Connor, Joseph. 


CARSON-NEWMAN 
PLAYERS KILLED 
IN BUS ACCIDENT 


Bull’s Gap, Tenn. Feb. 1.—H)— 

Two members of Carson-Newman col- 
lege’s undefeated basketball team 
were killed today when the bus con- 
veying the team to Johnson City for 
a game tonight collided with an au- 
tomobile trailer here. Three other 
members of the team and the driver 
were injured. 
Those killed were Roy Roberts, 22, 
of Sevierville, Tenn., a senior and 
star guard, and James Grissom, 19, 
of Burnside, Ky., sophomore substi- 
tute forward. 

The bus was carrying more than 
twenty students. Nearly all suffered 
minor cuts and bruises. 


College Basketball | 


62; 
Columbia 44; Iowa Wes- 


[ nt. . 45. gritiod ‘ 


| ‘Westminster, 40; Missouri Central, 
48; , 37. 


hee 
+ 


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COME WITH ME- {| CAN } 


——— 
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“THE GUMPS—BE IT EVER SO HUMBLE— 


sO 
ME 


d Reg. U. S. 


J PAF!) 1 


Pat. Off.: 


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> Tribune-N, Y. News Syndicate, Inc. 


~ 


Gloves tournament. 


Jesse Robinson (right), a veteran of Golden Gloves competition, gives a few pointers to Heinz 
Krassau, who came from Germany only five weeks ago. Both boys have entered this year’s Golden 


[TRIBUNE Photo.] 


NATIONALLEAGUE 


German Boxer, 
U S., Seeks Golden Gloves 


Five Weeksin 


ANNOUNCES ITS 
1938 SCHEDULE 


[Schedule on page 21.) 

New York, Feb. 1.—[Special.J—The 
National league schedule for 1938 was 
made public today following its for- 
mal adoption at the league schedule 
meeting. 
As in the last few years, it calls 
for each team to make four trips 
into the other sector of the league. 
The season will be open April 19 and 
end Oct. 1. Last year the opening 
and closing came one day later. 
The opening day’s schedule . calls 
for Boston to play at New York, 
Brooklyn ‘at Philadelphia, Chicago at 
Cincinnati and St. Louis at Pitts- 
burgh. At Cincinnati, opening day 
is a traditional sellout and about half 
the tickets already have been sold, 

Cubs Home Memorial Day. 
The Boston Bees, by opening on 
the road, miss the one-day head start 
they get on a home opening and the 
customary Patriots’ day double head- 
er, April 19. They get Bunker Hill 
day, June 17, however, as well as two 
holidays, Memorial day and Labor 
day. 
Brooklyn, Pittsburgh and Chicago 
also will be at home Memorial day. 
The Fourth of July program calls for 
double-headers at New York, Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis, 
while Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh and Cincinnati will. be home 
Labor day. 


Heinz Krassau, native of Kolberg, 
Germany, who is called Heinie by his 
fellow workers in the mailing room 
of the Walgreen company’s general 
offices at 744 East Bowen avenue, has 
filed notice of his intention to win 
a qualifying berth in the annual 
|Golden Gloves Tournament of Cham- 
pions in Chicago Stadium Feb. 28. 

A wiry blond haired fellow, 5 feet 
tall and weighing 104 pounds, Kras- 
sau, who has been in this country 
only five weeks, has just enrolled in 
the Chicago sectional meets as an 
open class flyweight contestant. 

The tiny German lad, who lives 
with friends at 819 Bowen avenue, 
will appear at the final examinations 
in Trafton’s gymnasium Friday eve- 
ning. He probably will be given per- 
mission to compete in the White 
City trials opening Feb. 15. 


Robinson Praises Krassau. 


Herr Krassau, whose ambition is 
to learn the advertising business, 
“is a pretty good fighter,” Jesse 
Robinson, 112 pound member of the 
1936 intercity Golden Gloves squad, 
said while the two were eating lunch 
yesterday noon. 

“He has a good left jab and a 
hard overhand right to the jaw,” 
Jesse explained. “He varies his at. 
tack and can punch to the body as 
well as the head. Max Schmeling 


eT 


Always 
Something New 


A new month is here and that 
means the approach of real fight. 
ing by new fighters in the annual 
Golden Gloves Tournament of 
Champions in Chicago Stadium on 
Feb, 28, March | and 2. 


Mail orders are being accepted 
NOW for tickets for ‘this ring car- 
nival, as well as for the finals on. 
March 11, when Chicago's intercity 
team will be chosen. 


Make check or money order iat 
able to the Chicago Tribune Char. 
ities, Inc., and mail to Golden 


Gloves Ticket _ Manager, - Tribune 


. 0, $1.65, $1.10 


FRx : ; , 
Pas! PC 
7 ee 


a ; 
: : nee. 3 va, AE pee RR coe SCRE Seay ae + Spe ara 
Saba: = gt age? SS at See ask 
ii e ts se ee Ret Sager ots: Bein its oh 


has coached him a little and he 
seems to have absorbed the knowl- 
edge.” 

Robinson, who was eliminated in 
last year’s Tournament of Champions 
by Jimmy Urso of Detroit, again will 
fight in the flyweight division. He 
will make the trip.to Trafton’s gym- 
nasium with his German friend. 


He Likes Chicago. 


Krassau has no relatives in Amer- 
ica, his mother, Mrs. Else Krassau, 
and two sisters, Hilde, 21, and Char- 
lotte, 24, remaining behind in Kol- 
berg. But he likes Chicago and may 
decide to make his permanent home 
here. It is understood he was given 
the opportunity to stay in‘the United 
States on recommendation of Charles 
Walgreen Sr., head of the drug com- 
pany bearing his name. 

Walgreen became attached to 
Heinie while crossing the Atlantic on 
the Bremen liner, on which the 
young man was employed as an .ele- 
vator operator and office clerk. The 
acquaintance developed into friend- 
ship. The guarantee of a job for him 
followed. 


Thus, the youngster, who has made 
at least 100 trips to this country 
from the docks at Bremerhaven, on 
Jan. 5 got his: chance to end his 
seven years of employment on va- 
rious ocean liners in quest of ad- 
vancement in America, 


Meets Max Schmeling. 

The 22 year old Heinie got his big- 
gest thrill when he met Schmeling, 
formerly heavyweight champion, dur- 
ing a practice bout with another mem- 
ber of the Bremen Boxing club’s team 
in the ship gymnasium. — ; 

Krassau received his opportunity 


to become a boxer shortly after he 


joined the Bremen’s staf two years 
ago, In his first. workout he im- 
pressed the coaches by extending the 
boat’s junior champion. 

Krassau engaged in two bouts, both 
of which he won, in the Ridgewood 
Grove arena, New York, before head- 


was Joey Krauss of the German-Amer| = pected to outdo themselves this eve- 


other was |. 


ican Athletic 


> 


awe Za Bee A NPR oS ie perpen meg pate A id ate: at Tees es bers 
¥ 


VAN KEMPEN AND 
YATES TAKE TWO 
LAP LEAD IN RACE 


Sprint to Front of Field 
at Coliseum. 


Standing 


3 A. M—SATH HOUR. 
Miles, Laps. 
Van Kempen and Yates..,....993 
Kilian and Vopel .993 
Walthour and Crossley.......993 
Audy and Buhler............993 
Zach and Vroomen. 
Ottevaere and Huertgen..... .993 
Le Page and Wambst.........993 
Bielding and McNauwens....993 
Rodak and Korsmelier........993 
‘Peden and Spencer......««+--992 
Camastro and Sactta.......+..992 
Gruber and Heaton... ..«««++- 982 


Leader—Van Kempen. 


BULLETIN. 
Piet Van Kempen and Cecil Yates 
gained a lead of two laps in the six 
}day bicycle race at. the. Coliseum 


ASBVPrrearzasane 


| early this morning in a wild sprint 


session. 


BY CHARLES BARTLETT. 

The. Chicago-Holland duet of Cecil 
Yates and Piet Van Kempen and the 
All-American pair of Jimmy Walthour 
and Al Crossley : in taking 
the midnight lead in the six day bi- 
cycle race in the Coliseum last night 
while more than 4,000 victims of ver- 
tigo were being jolted almost into 
normalcy. 

The shock to the customers con- 
sisted of the behavior of Gustav 
Kilian and Heinz Vopel, the Germans 
who are being favored to win their 
tenth successive race come midnight 
Saturday. Der Herren Kilian and 
Vopel committed a couple of errors 
which were most painful to their.con- 
stituents. At precisely 9:18 p. m. Herr 
Kilian attempted ‘to arrange a pickup 
with Herr Vopel but missed it com- 
pletely and began to fill the Coliseum 
air with rich Teutonic oaths. Herr 
Kilian might well be excused; for he 
and his associate have proved them- 
selves so adept in the pickup tech- 
nique that for them to miss one is 
the equivalent of Jack Manders of 
the Bears failing on a point after 
touchdown. 

Germans Are Outridden. 

In a couple of subsequent jams 
Kilian and Vopel so far forgot them- 
selves as to be outridden by a num- 
ber of their rivals, notably by Cross- 
ley and little Jules Audy, whose hair 
is of such a platinum texture that 
strangers suspect it is a wig. In- 
cidentally, M. Audy was one of the 
hits of last night’s riding and with 
the able assistance of his Swiss part- 
ner, Ernst Buhler, projected his team 
into third place. 

The team of Yates and Van Kem- 
pen was the technical leader on the 
basis of having 206 sprint points 
against the 205 rolled up by: Crossley 
and Walthour. Kilian and Vopel, who 
have amassed the largest total of 
sprint points in the race, an aggre- 
gate of 235, are tied in mileage for 
second place with the Belgian-Ger- 


vaere and Gottfried Huertgen, but 
hold the advantage on. ‘* : 
At one time. during 


the evening 
‘place all by themselves, which was 
quite proper, since a gathering of 
south siders were present to do honor 
to Yates. Walthour and Crossley 
then crowded themselves into the pic- 
ture shortly before the 10:30 sprints. 


: Field Is Reduced. 


This action, a result of 1e best. 
racing of the night, found 


es 
are cr 
, ! 3 
B by aeasties 
a 


man combination of Freddie Otte-| wif 


Yates and Van Kempen owned ‘first| 


and 
Vopel rudely shoved back into second 


The present rule, if in force in 1932, 


times at bat... 


now is up to $625,000. . 


Dumbbell Pome. 


Pretty. snowflakes spic and mite 
Make the roads so slick and white— 
Stalling all cars! 
Stalling all éars! 
—Karlov Karlov. 
x 
Signs of the Times. 


On a.south side hamburger shop: 
“Our meats have the same quality, 
the same freshness, and the same’ 
taste as the better meats sold in high 
grade restaurants, and in order to 
make the imitation more striking we 
charge exactly the same prices.” | 

—Frances R. | 


x * 
Just a Little Detail. 


The boss hired and fired a secre- 
tary yesterday. After he had finished 
dictating a rather lengthy letter she 
smiled sweetly and said, “Would you 
mind repeating what you said be- 
tween ‘Dear sir’ and ‘Yours 
truly’ ?” —Eddie Drake. 

x ** 
Crowding the Hero Bench. 

When the big guy sitting behind 
me said, “Sit down in front!” I 
didn’t say, “Sorry, but I don’t bend 
that way.” —Cliff E. Byrd. 


x ** 
Worst Joke I Ever Heard. 


Bo: Mister, could you give me a 
dime for a sandwich? 

Mister: First let me see the sand- 
wich. —Continental’s Pride. 


{ 


*% 
Isn’t It So? 
The four stages in a man’s life: | 
[1] As a child he is dominated by 


his mother. 
[2] Later he is dominated by his 


sweetheart. 
[3] Then he is dominated by his 


e. 
[4] Later he is dominated by his 


daughter. | | 
After which he is ready. to die. 
x —Charlie Austin. 
: * * 
This Sounds Dirty. 
Now that the government is fight- 


ing monopolies, do you think it will 
catch up with Eddie Drake, Jazbo, 


BY ARCH WARD. 

F THE rule now in force in the American league which requires a player 
to have been at bat not fewer than 400 times to be eligible for the bat- 
ting championship had been in vogue in 1914 and 1932, Ty Cobb would 
have had one less title and Dale Alexander wouldn’t have had any... . 

ln 1914 Cobb had a top average of .368 in 345 times at bat. . 
present regulations Eddie Collins, who was at bat 526 times, would have 


been the hitting king that year with 344... . 


. Under the 


Pata nth : ee SP at PPO 
oS ee ets Roeaeies OO es 
Set aed " 
oe 


would’ have 


made Jimmy Foxx the champion with .364 in 585 
. Instead, Alexander won the 


title with .367, but was at bat only 392 'times. .. . 
The daily average mutuel handle at Santa Anita 
. The popularity of Irl 
Tubbs, Iowa football coach, as a banquet speaker 
has reached a new high. . . . The Ida Grove, Ia., 
Commercial club has invited Tubbs and Capt. Jack 
Eicherly to appear there some time after the 1938 
football season. . . . Superstition played no part 
in the success of the 1898 University of Illinois 
baseball team. . . . According to Robert I. Thorn- 
ton of Henry, Ill., a member of the club, Illinois 
made the trip to Ann Arbor that year in a car 
bearing the number 13, the squad consisted of 13 
players, the bat bag contained 13 bats, and there 
were 13 balls available for practice. . . . Illinois 
won the game, 3 to 0.. . . Joe Lipp, Big Ten official who visited Noble Kizer. 
at Tucson, Ariz., says Kizer is convalescing so rapidly he is preparing to 
take charge of spring football practice at Purdue. 

Three of the six Big Ten championship meets this spring will be held 
at Northwestern university. . . . The swimming and wrestling meets are 
scheduled for March 11 and 12 and the tennis meet May 19-21. . 
McMillan, Minnesota basketball coach; played for a time with the original 
Celtic five of New York, .. . . A Toledo company is experimenting with a 
substance to produce artificial ice, which, if.successful,.-will.make construc- 
tion of a skating rink as simple as putting down linoleum. . . . The chief 
objection to tipless basketball advanced by Coach George Keogan of Notre 
Dame is that the new rule penalizes the good team by making it give up 
the ball after scoring. . . . Both of Charley Paddock’s sons are displaying 
track and field talents. . . . Thirteen year old Prisk Paddock is showing 
a knack for javelin tossing, while 6 year old Paddy is the more promising 
sprinter of the two. . . . Sam Stoller, former Michigan sprinter, has aban- 
doned extra réles in the movies to run exhibitions in the Philippines during 


the next 16 weeks with three former Southern California stars. 
-o— 


Noble Kizer. 


. Dave 


Honeymoon Bridge. 
The Honeymoon Bridge is gone, 
That span of wedded: bliss, 
Where newlyweds sang Love’s Sweet 


Song 
And where the bride was kissed. 


The bridge that stood WNiagara’s 
wrath, 

The hell of waters where they 
hissed, 

Was crushed in winter’s icy path, 


But loving still—The Maid of the 
Mist! —Maude Mac. 
*x 
Encyclopedia Americana. 
Seer: Peeping Tom of destiny. 
—Martin K. Ash. 


%& % 
Daffy Riddles. 
If a gnu ‘can catch cold and take 
gnumonia, do you suppose Su-Lin 


could catch cold and take pandamo- 
nia? —Tim. 


The Wake 
Depends 


Upon Its 

Friends. 
*% 

Science Explains. 

Marion: Sometimes you seem so 
manly and at other times absurdly 
effeminate. Why is it? 

Merton: You see, half of my ances- 
tors were men and the other half 
women. —Marvin Lorig. 


x ** 
Do You Remember ’Way Back When: 
The neighborhood store had a bell 
over the front door that would ring 
when you entered and notified the 


|owner who lived in the rear he had a 


customer ?—D. F. G. 

We boys at the steel mill used to 
work five days a week?—Erol. 
The leaf of-a.sweet smelling gera- 
nium was placed in a glass of fresh 
apple jelly. just to add variety in fla- 
vor?—Mrs. John Bruce. 
Legs were called limbs and undies 


| unmentionables?—Maurice Lazare. 


That 26 inning game was played on 
May 1, 1920, between the Braves and 


ithe Dodgers?—Frank Conte. 


Glass bottles could. be sold for 
junk?—E. E. Meredith. 
A skirt was something the women 


et al.? —St. Lawrence. 


wore?—Joe of Jonah. 


Bi ve 3 
Ten Years Ago Today—Dr. Otto Peltzer, German distance runner, won 
1the 1,000 yard run in the annual] Millrose games at New York... . A field 
of twenty-four was ready to start in the $50,000 New Orleans handicap... . 
Leland LTiny] Lewis’ career as a Northwestern university athlete ended 


ae? ood eae 
- scene 


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= ¢ 


FIRST PERIOD 


Chicagoans to Meet 
Maroons Tomorrow. 


Slaughtered 


NEW YORK [6]. 
Kerr .. 


Mh 


CHICAGO [1]. 
+s» Karakas 
Seibert 
Wiebe 
Romnes 
. denkins 
Weatevwesss . Thompson 


SPARES, 
New York—Heller, Watson, Dillon, Patrick, 
Keeling, Cooper, C. Smith, Hextall, Kirk. 
Chicago—Shill, MeKenzie, March, Gottseliz, 
Levinsky, V. Johnson, Voss, Dahlstrom. 


FIRST PERIOD. 
Scoring—Watson [Heller], 7 717; 
{Coulter], 11:15; Patrick [N. 
Smith], 18:53. 
Penalties—Pratt, Shill. 


SECOND PERIOD. 
Scoring—Shibicky. [Penalty shot], 18:32. 
Penalties—Pratt, Thompson. 


THIRD PERIOD. 

Scoring—N. Colviille [Shibicky], 15:12; 
Shibieky [unassisted], 16:27; Voss [Gott- 
selig-Jenkins], 19:59. 

Penalty—N, Colville. 


gaat G. Smith and Clarence Camp- 
e€ 


N. er Saar ae eae 
M. Colville.........R. W.. 
Shibicky ...., 


Shibicky 
Colville- 


New York, Feb. 1.—(/)—The touring 
Chicago Blackhawks ran into trouble 
in the form of Goalic Dave Kerr of 
the New York Rangers in the Garden 
tonight and limped off the ice at the 
close of their National Hocky league 


battle with the score 6 to 1 against 
them. 


Kerr, bidding for his eighth shutout 
of the season, was foiled in the last 
second of play when Carl Voss. beat 
him: on a corner shot after a face-off 
in the Ranger goal zone. Dave had 
not a chance in the. world to save. 


The Hawks, still five points ahead 
of the tail end Detroit Red Wings-in 
their drive fora place in the Stanley 
cup playoffs, will m*ke their next ap- 
pearance in Montreal Thursday night. 
Then they head for home and a bat- 
tle with the Boston Bruins in the 
Stadium on Sunday. 


Rangers Make Penalty Shot. 

Eleven thousand saw the Rangers 
triumph tonight and remain just three 
points behind the Bruins, pace setters 
in the American division. The patrons 
also witnessed the first penalty shot 
of the season, scored by Alec Shibicky 
in the second period. Chicago also 
was awarded a penalty chance in the 
Same period, but Paul Thompson 
missed the net. 


Shibicky led the New York attack, 
scoring three goals and assisting Neil 
Colville with another. New York count- 
ed three in the opening period and 
two late in the third. 


John Gottselig and Roger Jenkins 
assisted Voss with the Chicago goal. 


New York Goes to Work. . 


Ott Heller launched the Rangers’ 
first scoring maneuver as he skated 
around the Chicago net and passed 
out to Watson, who gave Karakas no 
chance on a flip shot at the seven min- 
ute mark. 


Three minutes later the New York- 
ers made it 2 to 0 when Shibicky 
scored following a pass from Coulter. 
Kerr fell on the puck to prevent a 
Chicago score as Voss passed out from 
behind the net to March. 

Shill extended Kerr with a hard 
shot from well out and a- minute 
later was chased for high sticking. 
Shill just had returned when Patrick 
put the Rangers 3 up on a play with 
N. Colville and Smith. 

The Hawks sent out five forwards 
at the 10 minute mark in the second 
period and on a power play Shill was 
robbed of what looked like a sure goal 
as Kerr skidded out to block the shot. 

Pratt was penalized for hooking 
March to prevent a score and the 
Hawks were awarded a penalty shot. 
Thompson's drive was wide of the 
net, 

The Slaughter Goes on. 


Thompson then was banished for 
tripping Hextall to prevent a score 
and on a penalty shot Shibicky 
scored. It was the first goal scored 
on a penalty shot in the league this 
season, 

Neil Colville made it 5 to 0 for 
the Rangers late in the third period 
when he took a pass from Shibicky 
at the net to score easily. 

At 16:27 Shibicky picked up. the 
puck near the Hawk net and caromed 
one off Karakas’ pads for the New 


a 
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Boston ........19 
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Boston Scores Late in 
- First, Third Periods. 


Boston, Mass., Feb. 1.—()—The 
‘Boston Bruins tonight maintained 
their one and one-half game lead over 
‘the New York Rangers in the Ameri- 
ean division of the National Hocky 
league by blanking the Detroit Red 
‘Wings, 2 to 0, before 13,000 in the 
Boston Garden tonight. 

*-Bobby Bauer scored the first goal 
&t 18:41 in the first period, with Milt 
‘Schmidt and Woody Dumart assist- 
ing. The same line drew credit for 
‘the other tally, made with less than 
‘two minutes to go, when the Bruins 
broke up a desperate rush on their 
blue line and fed Schmidt a forward 
pass. Schmidt darted down the left 
jane without a challenge and drove 
&n angle shot into the Detroit net to 
clinch the game. 
BOSTON 12). 


—— 
POTUGNG c.ccccceses 


Shore *eseeeveeeeeeneeee 
Schmidt 

Dumart 
“Bauer 


DETROIT [0]. 
Smith 


: eevee e eee eee 


Vo es a a 
SPARES. 
Boston—Weiland, Jackson, Goldsworthy, 
apes Hollett, Cowley, Sands, Pettinger, 
1. 


Detroit~Aurie Barry, Sorrell, Bowman, 
Goodfellow, Hudson, Kilrea, Lewis, Howe. 


FIRST PBRIOD. 
Scoring—Bauer [Schmidt-Dumart], 
Penalties—none. 
SECOND PERIOD. 
Scoring—None. Penalties-— Bowman, 


Schmidt. 
THIRD PERIOD. 
Scoring — Schmidt [unassisted], 
Penalty—Barry. 


Referees—Bert MoOaffrey and Babe Dye. 


CANADIENS WIN, 6-1 | 


MONTREAL, Que., Feb. 1—(@)— 
The Montreal Canadiens, led by Paul 
Hayes, routed the Toronto Maple 
Leafs, 6 to 1, tonight and cut the 
Leafs’ lead in the Canadian division 
of the National Hocky league to two 
points. 

It was the fourth consecutive vic- 
tory for the flying Frenchmen and 
their first of the season over Toronto. 
The Canadiens took a 2 to 0 lead in 
the first period and added another 
pair of goals in each succeeding pe- 
riod. Haynes scored once, started 
plays that resulted in two other goals 
and sparked the Canadien attack. 
Lineups: 

TORONTO {1}. : 


18:17. 


18 :41. 


CANADIENS, [6]. 
Cc 


SPARES. 
Toronto—Hamilton, Kampman, Apps, Jack- 
son, Drillon, Chamberlain, Metz, Kelly, Arm- 
strong. 
Canadiens—Burke, Goupille, Haynes, Blake, 
Gagnon, Desilets, Lapine, Joliat, Willson. 
FIRST PERIOD. 
Scoring—Gagnon [Siebert, Haynes). 5:40; 
Haynes [Blake], 18:10. Penalties—Hamil- 
ton, ine. 
SECOND PERIOD. 
Scoring—Blake [Haynes[ Gagnon], 5:25; 
Mantha [Burke], 19:53. Penalties—None. 
THIRD PERIOD. 
Scoring—Drouin [Lorrain, Mantha!. 4:04: 
Fowler [Thoms], 11:01; Canadiens, Gagnon, 
12:48. Penalties—Buswell, Metz, Siebert, 
Davidson. 


Officials—Mickey Ion and Johnny Mitchell. 


Tarleton Five’s 84 Game 


Winning Streak Snapped 
San Angelo, Tex., Feb. 1.—(#)--John 
Tarleton college’s winning streak of 
84 consecutive basketball games was 
snapped, 27 to 26, here tonight by the 
San Angelo Junior college Rams. : 


A A Sl 


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NEW ano USED CARS 

a rs 

Chicagas Loumst lost 
$ 8.83 
13.25 


17.66 
22.08 


$ 6.00 
9.00 
12.00 
15.00 
30.00 44.16 
45.00 66.25 


*If car is to be re-financed 
a semali charge is made to 
cover cost of ete. 


» Quick, confidential service. 
Life insurance in the 
amount of and for the du- 
_Fation:of the loan i | 
in finance charge. Required 
‘fire ‘and theft insurance 
placed through your own 
- agent and actual cost added 
to monthly payments. For 
charges on other amounts 
or periods of time (to suit 
your convenience) ca 


7h. es e. 


150 
200 
250 
500 


) og RP 


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3 Bh Fe hep, STS et * 


Quickly CONNIE AND BURMA 


BOTH GONE-AN’ 
POOR CONNIE ALL 
SET TO GET NOGGIN 


FELLERS ! 


TELL THE 
DRAGON LADY WHAT HAS HAPPENEP 


KLANG HAS \ 
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LITTLE TIME QN 


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THE GUARDS \ PROCEED WITH ‘ 
COMING FoR} PLANS For TorTURE! | 
AT THE PROPER TIME 
THE DRAGON LADY , 

Witk ACT ! | 


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TIME ENOUGH! 
LOW-BORN ONE 
RETURN TOCELL ‘% 
TO AWAIT MASTERS 
PLEASURE ! | 


-_ 


Sophomore to 
Lead Yale in 
Artillery Game 


Yale university’s polo team will be 
led by Alan L. Corey Jr. when it 
rides against the 124th field artillery 
Saturday night in the 124th armory, 
Cottage Grove avenue and 52d street. 

Although only a sophomore, Corey, 
assigned No. 2, has attained a three 
goal rating indoors. Corey gained 
prominence on Long Island two sum: 
mers ago as a member of the Meadow 
Brook team. 

Capt. H. W. Hill, coach of the Yale 
team, wired Col. C. C. Haffner Jr., 
commanding officer of the 124th field 
artillery, that C. M. [Mott] Woolley, 
two goal player, and Ken Schiffer, 
one goal, will complete the starting 
lineup Saturday. 

Fort Sheridan and the Chicago 
Shamrocks will meet in a regularly 
scheduled Metropolitan Polo league 
game before the Yale contest. 


‘eg 


LYLE Yat 
SEL7, 
/ MMs, 


— — - . 


Player, Strud 
Added to Staf 
at Lake Shore 
“Sas gititans i the sted ot the 


Lake Shore Athletic club were an- 


nounced yester- 
day by Edmund 
Loftus, athletic = 
director, with the 
appointments of | 
Walter Player to = 
the aquatic de- J 
partment and @ 
Julian Strud as # 
golf professional. # 
Player, who @ 
earned a fine rep- i 
utation as aij 
swimming coach 
during ten years 
with the Hamil- 
ton club, will 
augment the dual 
Lake Shore pro- = 5 
gram of recre- @*"srmnenaamN 
ational swimming Walter Player. 
and of the development of competi- 


va 
a 


Platak Wins. 
21-1, 21-2, in 
Handball Pla 


Joe Platak, national handball cham- 
pion, defeated Milt Woodward, 21-1, 
21-2, last night to advance to the sec- 
ond round in the Central A. A. U. state 
title tournament in the Madison Ath- 
letic club. Second round play starts 
tonight. 

An attack of influenza has forced 
Dick Martin, who was to defend his 
state singles crown, from the meet. 
Last night’s summaries: 


Robert Nelson, I. A. C., defeated J. 8. Rash- 
kin, Hyde Park ¥. M. C. A,, 34-20, 21-17. 
Marty Swift, 


Bob Quinn, M. A. C., defeated 
Oak Park Y. M. C. A., 21-8, 21 

Sam Se¢hecter, J: P. 1., won by 
from Dick Martin, M. A. C. 

Joe Platak, Lake Shore A. C., defenied 
Milt Woodward, M. A. €., 21-1, 21-2. 

Frank Turk, Joliet Y. M. C. A., defeated 
Herb Jensen, Lake Shore A. C., 21-3. 


default 


21-6, : 
Steve Penko, Joliet ¥. M. C. A., defeated 

John Stenson, M. A. C., 21-18, 21-10. 
Charlies Ravas, Post] H. C., defeated Tony 


tive swimmers and divers. 


D’Alberti, Skyline A. C., 21-12, 21-12. 


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Mother of Hawks’ — 
Publicity Man, 
J. C. Farrell, Dies 


Funeral services will be held to- 
‘morrow morning for Mrs. Katharina 
C. Farrell, 89 years o]d, one of the 
survivors of the Chicago fire, at the 
‘chapel at Kedzie ayenue and Jackson 
‘boulevard, and at St. Mathew’'s 
church, Albany and Walnut streets, 
| Mrs. Farrell died Monday night in 
her home, 3135 Washington boulevard. 

Mrs. Farrell, who came to Chicago 
in 1869, owned a grocery store at Jef- 
ferson and Harrison streets, a few 
blocks from the start of the fire. She 
operated the store with two brothers 
‘and they fled from the neighborhood 
shortly after the flames reached their 
store. 

Mrs. Farrell was the mother of 
Joseph C, Farrell, publicity director 
for the Chicago Blackhawks Hocky 
club, Services will be held at the 
chapel at 9 o'clock and at the church 
at 9:30 a, m. Burial will be in Cal- 
vary cemetery. 


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Mpdsghp thls bp hspgetsvee’ 
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Carbondale to Play Six 


Mexican Basket Teams 
Carbondale, Ill., Feb. 1.—(#)—-Games 
with six Mexican basketball teams 
have been booked for the Carbondale 
Teachers basketball team during 
spring vacation, March 6 to 13. The 


Phys 


ts Seek to Deal with 
Reds, Cardinals. 


New York, Feb. 1.—{Specia].]—Man- 
ager Bill Terry spent all of today 
trying to enginee- some trades that 
would benefit his Giants and the 


jclub’s' Jersey City team, but never 


reached a point in the negotiations 
where he could make a definite an- 
nouncement of a change. And this 
despite the fact that he came out in 
the open and offered Gus Mancuso, 
veteran catcher, and Wally Berger, 
utility outfielder, as bait. 

The corridors of the Waldorf-Asto- 
ria buzzed with mysterious confer- 
ences, as first Manager Bill McKech- 
nie of the Cincinnati Reds, then 
Frankie Frisch of the Cards, and 
finally Burleigh Grimes of the Dodg- 
ers went into huddles with the Giant 
leader. The discussions carried far 
into the night as Larry MacPhail, ex- 
ecutive vice president of the Dodgers, 
visited the Giants’ offices, and Man: 
ager Frisch renewed the talk over 
the phone, But Terry, in quest of a 
young catcher and a second string 
backstop who can hit, finally left for 
Memphis with no great progress re. 
ported. 

Deals Outlined, Rejected. 

Terry admitted he had offered Man- 
cuso, who is a holdout, and Berger, 
te Manager McKechnie for Ernie 
Lombardi, veteran Cincinnati back- 
stop; Dee Moore, a young catcher, 
and Harry Kraft, a young right 
handed hitting outflelder. McKechnie 
was reported mildly interested, but 
General Manager Warren Giles re- 
jected the proposition. 

Terry expressed interest in Frenchy 
Bordagaray, Cards’ outfielder, and 
Manager Frisch was agreeable to 
trade him even for Mancuso. But 
when Terry suggested that Herb 


trip will cover more than 4,000 miles, 


os eee - 


PRIZES! 


N 


x 


o. 28-—C 


Mrs 
“) wd 


1 In 
Se 


Pos oo. 


Movie Star Is:..... 


‘as 


THE PRIZES 


Fire Ole ii kee eh. 
Second Prize......---+-+++: 
TOPE PUES | ov ck «tae sth ce 
Next 2 Prizes—$/00 cack.. 
Next 6§& Prizes— 50 each. 
Next 10 Prizes— 25 each.. 
Next 100 Prizes— {0 each. 
Next 310 Prizes— 5 each. 


TOTAL—490 Prizes... 


~—_— + 


430 GASH 


Bremer, a young catcher from Colum- 


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500.00 
250.00 
200.00 


where — except 


the 


tana and Centenary, né 
the De Paul schedule. Both 


J 


In addition to these four games, 
De Paul will continue relations with 
the University of Illinois, North Da- 
kota, and Wichita, and resume com-- 
petition with Ripon college of Wis- 
consin. 

Ripon will open the schedule on 
Sert. 24 in Chicago. Illinois will be 
met in Champaign on the following 
Saturday. Last year De Paul and Llli- 
‘ois battled to a scoreless tie. 

Thirteeen lettermen, of whom eight 
were listed as regulars, will be grad- 
uated in June. On March 16 De Paul | 
will open spring practice which will 
continue approximately five weeks. 


bus, Ga., be thrown in, the discussion 
ceased. 

Mancuso’s dissatisfaction over being 
offered a contract with a cut in sal- 
ary, together with Terry’s acknowl- 
edged interest in the heavy hitting 
Lombardi as a second string catcher, 
lead to the belief that when the sea- 
son opens Lombardi will be in a Giant 
uniform. 


Dodgers Get Cuyler. 


The Dodgers today announced the 
acquisition of Hazen Cuyler, one of 
the most widely circulated players in 
the league. He has already been with 
the Pirates, Cubs, and Reds. He was 
seriously injured in a training camp 
collision with Alex Kampouris last 
spring and was handicapped through 
the season. He is said to have recov- 
ered completely, 

Manager Frisch said he contem- 
plated converting Terry Moore, an 
outfielder, into a third baseman, shift- 
ing Don Gutteridge from third to 
short, and making a catcher of Out- 
fielder Don Padgett. He praised 
Jimmy Bucher, inflelder acquired last 


PE 


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the Chicago Tribune and mem- 


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s junior basketball! 
team, d champion in the 
junior division, continued its advance 
toward the central section title in 
the City High School league yester- 
day by beating Harrison, 27 to 26. 

Manley led at the half, 18 to 11, 
and while the lead was trimmed to 
19 to 17 at the third quarter, the 
winners never trailed. 

Farragut Takes Second. 

By beating Lindblom, 48 to 21, Far- 
ragut climbed to second place. It 
was Farragut’s fourth victory in five 
games. 

Kelly, whict. has a tie against it, 
went into third place by beating 
Phillips, 24 to 19. Kelly has won 
three and lost one. Riczkus, a guard, 
led Kelly with thirteen points. It 
was the fifth defeat in five games for 
Phillips. 

Jurinek, Tilden forward, was the 
leading scorer of the day in the sec 
tion, making seven field goals and 
three free throws as Tech beat Du 
Sable, 36 to 33. 

Foreman Beats Washburne. 

With the count tied, 32 to 32, in 
the closing stares, Blackburn tossed a 
free throw for Du Sable, but Jurinek 
and Brown wiped out the lead with a 
field goal each. 

In the west section Foreman won 


from Washburne, 28 to 27. 
KELLY (24), PHILLIPS $e 


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HERZL QUINTET 
RALLIES TO BEAT 
WILSON, 34 TO 25 


Herz] Junior college defeated Wil- 
son, 34 to 25, in an Dlinois Junior col- 


SMOOHOS ON cwroce 


MOroOornrnw "9 


lege basketball conference game at. 


Wilson yesterday. Herz] trailed 18 
to 12, at the half, but a second half 
rally with Cohen and Loeb leading 
the attack, sent it ahead in the clos- 
ing minutes. 
HERZL 1341. 


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WRIGHT JUNIOR 
COLLEGE BEATS 
LA GRANGE, 41-36 


Wright Junior college defeated La 
Grange last night at La Grange, 41 to 
36, to remain a contender in the 
Junior College conference. Shecht- 
man, forward, led Wright in scoring 
with seventeen points. Wright led 
at the half, 19 to 12. “ineups: 

WRIGHT | By La GRANGE 


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Notre Dame Stars Will 


Attend Hammond Banquet 


Chuck Sweeney, Andy Pupils, and 
Nevin McCormick, former Notre 
Dame football stars, and Joseph Bo- 
land, assistant coach, will be guests 
Monday night at the annual athletic 
banquet of Catholic Central High 
school of Hammond. 


7 , » mo * i, ¢. 
Or4 “6 Wp; Th, / 


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EVANSTON vins| 
DOUBLE-HEADER 
FROM NEW TRIER 


The Evanston lightweight and 
heavyweight basketball teams main- 
tained their first place standing in 
the Suburban basketball league by 
winning yesterday. 

In the pony games Evanston tri- 
umphed over New Trier, 35 to 31, 
and the Heavies won, 35 to 30, also 
over New Trier. The victories were 
the sixth in seven games for the 
Evanston squads. 

In other games, Morton won & 
double header from Highland Park, 
and Oak Park beat both Waukegan 
teams. Lineup: 

MORTON [34] 


Albaugh.t 


HIGHLAND PE. oF 

Turelli.f 

a spe ’ 
pangler.c 


OO 090 6 

OM OO Rt iy 

bo at pe bt pa ee 8 
nes 


NEW TRIER [3 


Reynolds. f 


EVANSTON 
Van Patten.f 
Migs: 

a z’wski.c 

Gregory. 
Simon.z 

ebb.s 


AUSTIN FOOTBALL 
SQUAD GUEST AT 
DINNER TONIGHT 


More than 200 persons will gather 
in the grand ballroom of the Midwest 
Athletic club, Madison street and 
Hamlin avenue, tonight to honor 
Austin High school’s football team, 
city champion... Civic officials, busi- 
ness leaders of the west side and sev- 
eral sport celebrities will attend the 
banquet, which will start at 6:30 
o’clock. 

Mayor Kelly, A. H. Pritzlaff, Chi- 
cago Public High School league phys- 
ical education director; Wilbur H. 
Wright, principal of Austin; William 
C. Heiland, “Austin football coach; 
Tony Lawless, Fenwick football 
coach; Rudy Schmidt, Austin athletic 
director; Lynn Waldorf, Northwest- 
ern coach, and Red Grange of the 
Chicago Bears will be among the 
speakers. Arch Ward, sports editor 
of THE TRIBUNE, will be toastmaster. 


Prep Basketball 


YESTERDAY’S RESULTS. 
Be CITY LEAGUE. 
Juniors. 
Manley, 27; Harrison, 26. 
Tilden, 36; Da Sabic, 33. 
Kelly, 24; Phillips, 19. 
Foreman, 28; Washburne, 27. 
Farragut, 48; Lindblom, 21. 


PRACTICE GAMES. 
Juniors. 


Hyde Park, 50; University High, 16. 
Wells, 25; Loyola, 17. 


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OOM hm aD 000 __ prepregs nee 


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SCH DNVONMHEDS DOMMOHOHM,™ 
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Seniors. 
Hyde Park, 47; University Hich, 23. 
Loyola, 30; Wells, 20. 


Evansten, 35; New Trier, 31. 
Morton, 28; Highland Park, 164. 
Oak Park, 36; Waukegan, 20. 


Heavies. 
Evanston, 35; New Trier, 30. 
Morten, 34; Highland Park, 28. 
Oak Park, 31; Waukegan, 28. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 
Juniors. 
Fenwick, 29; Marmion, 21. 


Seniors. 
Fenwick, 28; Marmion, 25. 
&. Patrick [Kankakee], 
[Bloomington], 23. 


GAMES TODAY. 
MISCELLANEOUS. 
Morgan Park Military academy at Lake 
Forest academy. 
JUNIOR COLLEGE. 
Joliet at Morton. 
Lisle vs. Wilson at George William's gym. 


28; Trinity 


“DICK Tepe ev Pesca Rae Meeting 


7 


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who finished third 


BECAUSE WE DON'T 
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GOT THAT OTHER (WHEN WE 
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porn cles 
: 


Chicago Skate 
Stars Vie Over 
-|\Olympic Route 


Chicago speed skating stars will 
have the first opportunity of the 
season to try their skill in the Olym- 
pic style of ice racing tonight at 
Garfield park on a 300 meter track. 

Five distances measured in meters 
will be skated, the sprints being 
50. and 1,500 meters. The longer 
races are the 3,000, 5,000 and 10,000 
meters. The latter is more than six 
American miles. All arrangements 
made by Earl W. Solem, president 
of the [llinois Skating association, 
conform to the rules of a world’s 
championship meet, except that for 
the interest of the spectators, the 
skaters will compete in pairs in Aus- 
tralian pursuit style instead of in- 
dividually against time. 


Carry Own Watches. 

Starting from opposite sides of the 
track each contestant will have a set 
of timers to clock the time made 
over each course. To gauge them- 
selves most of the skaters will carry 
their own stop watches, as is the 
custom in European events. 

The better women skaters of the 
association also will compete, for the 
meet will serve as a final drill before 
they leave tomorrow for Petoskey, 
Mich,, to race in the national derbies 
Saturday and Sunday. Among the 
girls will be Elaine Bogda, new state 
champion, Genevieve Swierkos, Shir- 
ley Jameson and Alice [Sid] Steffen. 


Schroeder Heads Men’s List. 

The men will be _ represented, 
among others, by Eddie Schroeder, 
in the world 
events in Davos, Switzerland, in 
1936. He also skated this style in 
the 1932 ani 1936 Olympics. His 
chief opponents will be Bob Sher- 
man, Tony Neberz, the Serro broth- 
ers, Charley and John, and Cornie 
Ewerts. Schroeder holds all of the 
American skating records at European 
distances. 


KAROW RESIGNS 
AT NAVY; TAKES 
TEXAS A.-M. JOB 


Annapolis, Md., Feb. 1.—(7)—Com. 
Andrew C. McFall, graduate manager 
of athletics at the Naval academy, 
announced today M. G. [Marty] 
Karow, baseball coach, had resigned 
to go to the Texas Agricultural and 
Mechanical college. 

Karow will coach the back field 
and baseball] at the Texas school. He 
has been at the Naval academy since 
1936, assisting in football and basket. 
ball. Karow won letters in baseball, 
basketball and football at Ohio os 
university. 


McGoldrick Is 
Named Captain 
of Irish Eleven 


Notre Dame, Ind., Feb. 1. — [Spe- 
cial.) — James Joseph McGoldrick 
Jr. left guard, 
from  Philadel- 
phia, was elected 
Notre Dame 1938 
football captain 
today to succeed 
Alec Shellogg, 
who resigned 
Saturday. 

McGoldrick is 
a graduate of 
West Philadel. 
phia Catholic 
High school. He 
won his mono- 
gram with the 
second team last 
fall. He is 5 feet 
11 inches tall, 
weighs 178 
pounds, and is 20 
years old. His father played full back 
for the Donegal Celtics in Ireland. 

Earl Brown Jr., left end, was nomi- 
nated with McGoldrick on the first 
ballot of the twenty-four monogram 
winners who voted. 


Jim McGoldrick. 


FARR SAYS NO 
TO ADAMICK OR 
BAER AS FOE 


New York, Feb. 1.—({Special.J— 
Tommy Farr’s refusal today to con- 
sider either Max Baer or Jimmy 
Adamick spoiled plans of Promoter 
Mike Jacobs for another indoor bout 
for the British empire heavyweight 
champion. 

Farr said he wanted a match with 
Max Schmeling or Joe Louis before 
their proposed heavyweight title bout 
in June. 

Jacobs forthwith launched plans to 
pair Baer and Adamick om March 11, 
as Farr said he would meet Baer 
again only if Max regained some of 
the prestige he had lost in his de- 
feats at the hands of James J. Brad- 
dock and Louis, 


Give St. Ambrose Player 
Third Transfusion Today 


Davenport, Ia., Feb. 1.—[Special.]— 
A third blood transfusion for Lou 
Martincich, St. Ambrose freshman 
basketball center, was postponed to- 
day when Martincich developed a 
temperature. The transfusion will 
be given tomorrow. Nick Keriasotas, 
freshman football player from Moose- 
heart, IlL, will be the donor. Martin- 
cich underwent an operation for re- 
moval of an abdominal abscess yes- 


terday. 


pee 


Official National League Schedule for 1938 


AT 
NEW YORE 


PHILADELPBIA 


AT 


BOSTON. eenseseseseaeveseooeer 


a Ae 


- 


fori 8 30, May 1 
Aug: ug. 15.16 6 1 hae 


AT 
CHICAGO 


ay 6,7 
1 


Aug. 3 CAT 1 


BROOKLYN ...ccccvcseceoes 


fre viene 
12 tans 7,18 


ag 


ae 


‘4 


sar paelt 


Aug. 


NEW WORE. .ccccccssccess Sept. 


duly 3 


eats 


aie é27 28 


PHILADELPHIA. ..+ +0000. 


, 


PITTSBURGH. evpecceseaases } 


a 


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oe chp ee rene De a aaa 


REDS GET PITCHER. 


Cincinnati, O., Feb. 1,-—-[Special.]—The 
Cincinnati Reds’ list of pitches was increased 
to fourteen today with the acquisition of 
Joe Vitelli, 27, right hander from Albany. 


on 


LEVINSKY WINS. 


South Bend, Ind., Feb. 1.—[Special.]—King 
Levinsky of Chicago threw Cleve Welch of 
New York in three minutes in their one 
fall match here tonight. 


The V'8 engine puts the Ford Truck 
in a class by itself when it comes to 


performance. But the Ford Truck gives 
you more than that. It combines V°8 speed 
and power with economy. 


Only Ford has found the way to make an 
economical V°8 Truck and sell it at a low price. 
It costs us more to build a V*8 engine but it 
costs you no more. Ford methods save you 


many dollars in first cost and in operating cost. 

Every year for seven years the economy of 
the Ford V* 8 engine has been increased. Proof 
of that is written in black and white on the cost 
records of hundreds of thousands of owners. 

The new Ford V° 8 Trucks for 1938 are the 
beet Jocling, sone sconeeneal. Suite: S04: oe 


ST. JOHNS TIES. 

Delafield, Wis., Feb. 1.—[Special.]—St. 
Johns Military academy hocky team played 
a1 to 1 tie with Wauwatosa High school 
here today. 


FEATURES OF THE 1938 FORD V°8 TRUCKS 


@ New appearance for all units.. More comfort, more head 

softer seat cushions. For 134-inch and 157-inch trucks 
— new, larger, quicker stopping brakes with the safety of steel 
from pedal to wheel — easier steering, new worm and roller type, 
with 18-inch wheel—new, larger, safer spindles. New 134- 
inch. wheelbase giving 60-inch cab-to-axle’ measurement and 
improved load distribution. Entirely new one-ton truck line with 
full torque-tube and radius-rod drive, full-floating rear axle 
and other time-proved Ford Truck features, 


hauling and delivery need—including a new 
One-Tonner on the 122-inch wheelbase. 

Prove to yourself that the Ford V*8 Trucks 
do more work, in less time, at lower cost. See 


@e 
Sue enna 


' Los Angeles, Cal. Feb. 1.—(7)—Ty- 
fing the all-time record at Santa Anita 
“or Jocky Johnny" Adams, Amer- 
s leading rider in 1937, rode four 
today. His feat equaled the 
quadruple victory scored two years 
ago by Danny Brammer. 

Adams won with Leonie in the 
third race at a mile and one-eighth. | * 
The horse paid $14.40, $6.80 and $5. 
He brought Carinalis home in the 
fifth over the six-furlong distance, 
paying $17.60, $8.20 and $460. He 
came back to take-the sixth on Time 
Flight. This was the $1,500 Elmwood 
purse at one mile. Time Flight re- 
warded his backers with $25.60, $10 
aénd $5. The eighth and final race 
found Adams aboard Lawsuit, win- 
Ying a head and head duel over 
Onus. Lawsuit paid $13.20, $5.80 and 
$5.60. 

The Elmwood was run over a 
heavy track in 1:41. Time Flight, 
owned by Mrs. J. F. Waters, set the 
pace and held it in a bitter stretch 
duel, winning over the Tranquility 


Farm’s Wild Turkey, with E. E. Fog- 
elson’s Grey Jack third. 


CHUCKLE WINS 
SECOND RACE IN 
CUBA CUP SERIES 


,HAVANA, Cuba, Feb. 1—(/)—Har- 
Old Halsted’s Chuckle of the Moriches 
bay fleet won the second leg on the 
Cuba trophy for international Star 
class yachts today by defeating Deli- 
lah, Sampson Smith’s Ostego lake 
entry, which captured the opening 


vent in the three-race series. 


| 


Chuckle covered the ten-mile, two- 
Jap windward and leeward course in 
1° hour, 44 minutes, and 13 seconds, 
crossing the finish line with a 21 
second lead over Kurush, owned by 
Charles de Cardenas of Havana. 

Delilah finished 28 seconds behind 
Kurush but, on the strength of her 
' wictory yesterday, retained first place 
én the series standings with 12 points. 
Chuckle is second with 11 and Kuruth 
third with 9. 

:-Harry G. Nye Jr.’s Gale, winner of 
' the Bacardi cup for the southern 
Lake Michigan fleet and second in 
the first Cuba trophy race yesterday, 


finished last today. It has a total of 


| 
be 


okuao 
Mario. Durwrack. 


7 points for the series. 


FAIR GROUNDS RESULTS. 
FIRST sh Beno allowances, 4 


ear olds and 
afer 108 rw Vedder! 3.80 4.40 3.00 


108 [Yacanes | 5.20 3. 80 
ster Boy, 114 Cowley) 4.00 


ase - fs ll Rigo an, Old 
an 
SECOND RACE—Purso, $ $700, claiming, 4 
ar u 
ee Nadi %e° mere a at 80 3.00 2.40 
Torch, 116 [Grill 6.20 3. 
D Saloeer. ‘116 [Johnst'e] 
1:15 4- -5. aste, Grace Grier, Blond 
a 


Carte, Oddesa Beau, Donna- 
tPield. John M. Kover. tLove 


138° 4.80 3.60 
eee. 2 Buel ON a 4.4 

; Hi :15 4-5. Gloss Call, Nopalosa Peace, 
t Busy Sto Wenet, affles 
Lad, ‘zebule Old Sponsintan. and Indian Sa- 


‘Field. 
fs * ORTH Rech—Purse $700, claiming, 4 


R 

lds and up, 6 furlon 
Pte ae B40 920 2.80 
+ ime,” “tog weet! 4.4 
Fortuity, 


ceConnell, 
and Master 


he $700 .cdaiming, ¢ 

mile and 70 yards: 
. 113 fRivhord’ 6.40 4.00 3.00 
il {Driscoll}... 6.00 3.80 
108 [Dyer]. 7.60 

: 1-5. Supreme Kiss, 

"Honey Roll. Princess Tour, 
¥: Micke » and Goldkin ran. 
RACE—Purse $700, claiming, a 

1 1-16 miles 
zores 27. 40 ‘10.80 gt 

moat toni 7.60 

3°30 
*Kapena, 
ad- 


ae urse, $700, eS 
th ada 11.20 i338 3 


ide’s D 


00 
20 
3. 80 


y ‘Sa an, *Aurangzeb, 
*Sweet Tokalon, Canpra, Rieciard do, 
and Gabe J. ran. *Field. 


Nita hae ae dee 
8—Maskillo, Boom's. + Pal, Joe Jay. 


‘SANTA ANITA, LOS AN ANGELES, ~ : r 


sontien: Sar 
an, Pass 


a tt 


i Daily Doubles Je 


HIALEAH, a 


- . FAIR GROUNDS. ; 
Margaret Nadi and St. Nick..,........:$43.80 


FIRS 


FAIR GROUNDS ENTRIES. 
irse * eon claiming, 4 year 


RACE-Pur 


LOO] P 


Cruising ....... 


: 


*Thornby 
Taximan 
$s) 

& 


 athaptiee 
e% a eeeeees 
Funderbure 


OaIR 

HIRD 

year olds, = furl ng : 

*Sun Hen rf 

Miss Dolly. ay 109 
1 Flag “409 


*Take Charge.. +3 2 
ome me ioe 1 4 


weights, 2 year olds, 3 
e Sa “ 


Gueationabis ss se 
TPansy'’s Third. aR 


pare. M. R. 


year olds and up, The 
and 70 yards: 


dee) ae ee ee | Ald 
ipearulus ......105 
tustic JOO 202 eed lD 
Cquanimity . 


year olds and up, 
ying Dere .... 
oPureendie 


1 1-1 
Y$ 


*Grey Squaw..... 
Sleepalong 


year olds and up, 13 


*Urchin 
*Longe Count.. sense 
Bogert .. sits os eae 
sAllegory ..+.++-108 


*Tribunal 


claiming, 
yards: 
Society Memory. Bd, 
Imperial Betsy. . 

*Gi bby’s Choice. 


year olds, 
Say Judge. 118 [W 


Grey Nurse, 115 
Time, 0:34 1-5. Chi 
*Byrd Ford, Retake, 

Leerie. , River 


Se wae 
02 [M 


Howden, 110 
Deline Bank, 


Time, :28. PR aa oxs 
and Sir Wag 


po olds and up. 1% 
cnie, 111 [Ad amei 
Ozana, 104 [Connell 
Lady Gold, 106 [Bailey].. 
a 1:57 2-5. 

e 


Caroline, Topsy 


Monica ran. 
6 furlongs 


Royal Rh’sody. 115 
Floragina, 115 | 


Cosette, 108 [Gribblel. 
Time, 13 4-5. 


Polygietus. Keokee., 
SIXTH 
pd olds and up 


d Turkey, 
Fm Jack, 44 
Time, 1:41 

some, 
Mom ran. 


ck, 


ances, 3 year olds, 
Gallator. 118 ieee 
Sorties Son, 118 

Tedium, 1 115 [Workma 


rene Thief, 


ewene 
Onus. 112) 
Galmica, 1 


i {Adam 
Wilson].. 


Tim 1:4 
and tladicbeook, ran. 


109 tse 
14 


—" 


*Little Hetty. 
*Feng L 


. 109] *Shawe Buck 


Bir [09 
FOURTH RACE — Pu 


108!Good Che 
EIGHTH RACE [ substitute’ Pures’ 
4 year olds and up. 1 mile and 7 


Sidney Carton, 118 [Gilbert] 
Pollard 


Rhadames, 


The Flower, 112 agent 


Donna Leona. 115 AB SH a 
Pollard!.. 
1-5. High 


Du *Papenie, 
*Jobelle stable entry. 
SEVENTH RA age gia oy 


RACE—Purse 
4 year olds and up. 1 eet 


A [Connell]... 
5. Cerro, 


104 |My 


tee 


ety Le 


orothy , SENN. 


Our Queen .ee.- 


Eigh 
lrene’s Bob. .... 
Oe PRIS. ces 6s 


OY 
‘Michael sees 108 


1 


OR tt 
CIP AIR P O 


eee 208 


107 
109 


oe 


4 
special 


| sid 


aye eereeeveeeeee¢ 


S. S. Dixie, l 


*Real 


6 miles: 


Morris + kate 
Si "Prank C. ..ccces 
* A nhelation 
6!Yes Polly 10: 
NTH RACH Purse $ $700, claiming, 4 
miles 
*Arctic Star. 
|i Gay Streamer. 
*Masked Coclia.. 
Brass Monkey. 
*Dame Grundy. é* 
Si*Vin Noir ... il 
*Peter J. 
113 a gr onal i~ebird 


$700. 


Peel. 


SANTA ANITA RESULTS. 


FIRST .RACE—Purse $1,000, maiden 2 
3 S Wootten 1409.0 


7.40 3.60 
4.60 


charra, 


Pirate, and Ba 


4:80 


ar, Fresno, 


mil 
"14.40 6.80 
9.00 


.: 
Lone Cloud, Lady Sage, 
Queen Full, 
0 pr hd Jacqueline, Sporting Green, and Santa 


Omar, 


440 3.00 
3.40 


Maria. Droop. 


Fi ins 1 #Sabariel ee 
114/}/¢Flagetta .......i1 

ree D’s Stock farm entry 

Waugh and Miss B. Faulconer 

oO ETH RACE — et 700, claiming, ss se 


*High Diver .... 
*B abae 110 


ok ah Molasses. . 
*Tipin 1 
‘Top Way 1 
Ace of Spades. a 
Mousetrap .......4112 
Hows EReyen 


.105 Q 
XTH RACE — Purse $700, anknine. 


.108 
. 108 


.103 
.113 
- +103 
“LOB 


ne 
10 


©. 


AA ICOwNI-I3S 


3.40 
4.20 
6 


4.60 
Quick Gold, 
Cliff P 


an, 
nner 


SECOND RACE—Purse $1,200 claiming, 4 
year olds and up, 7 fronts ab Chute) : 


4.00 
3.20 
80 


2. 
Berenda, 
THIRD RACE—Purse $1. ~ claiming, 4 


: 00 
40 
4 


FOURTH RAGE—Purse $1.200. 3 year olds. 


2.80 
3.00 


and 


Fda claiming, 3 


21.60 


mile 
aime Flight, 113. (Adame) ~~ 60 9 00 
k 3 [Jo a? 


$1,200, 
le}. .6.80 4. 4-90 


nj. 
3-5. Bri ht News, rd 
amelon, 


$1, >a sotiitedl: 


edro 


ee 20 ‘5.80 
5.60 


. Payne, 


6 
Nasslyn. 


=r09" Py Ren at "17.60 8.20 4.60 
Early Time. 210 [Connell] 


8.20 
4 


0 

Sky O’ Blue, St. Stephen. 
and Steelworker ran. . 

RA Ce—Puree $1. 500, handicap, 4 


6.00 


{Jones . Murvh. Bubble- 
and School 


allow- 


3.20 
5 80 
4.20 
Min- 
and 


3.60 
80 
0 


POURTH RACE—Purse $1 


Petar Check ed 108 


D “sstneeess : WOE 
gees 19) Le 2CLiS 


. 
of ictt bb hee, Sais 


ng. 
200, 
‘dog oo sans 
u Nada ee . ‘oe * a 


Le a a 


E—Pu $2200. ‘maiden 3 
| ore ¢ [chute ¥ 
Day ares a EE 
fedlon™” set eae e eee 18|Playi 
F Gee iT 
4g James erere ‘ 
200. maiden 8 
lds, 7 furlongs [chutel: 
ed aste SES 8 Oven Book py S04 
Race ‘Me RSA & |Crimson Glo 4 
e io ae ee ee 8 cula e«eteeeneeee 
"74 ronine ... Bon n Fly popemeeen t 
oning ...114¢4 
a RACE Pang $1.200. claiming. 3 


year olds. 1 m 
spies Child ovees ROP 
1 08\Cne gers 
Hour od our....100'Bon Hommage ...10 


SIXTH RACE—Purse $1,200. the grade C 
handicap. 4 year olds and up, 6 furlongs 


chu 
A ae Maid pres bt 
tRoyal Feast 12 
Permenarch 


Fleeting i Moon ...100 Bragger ... 


112 
+W. E pe entry. £0. A. Price entry. 
a 200. claiming, 


SEVENTH RACE—Purse 

year olds and up. 1% miles [chute 
= ay back eo Ses * Britis sh 

r 


.1¢ 
11 
| 
ae 


*Apprentice ...... 
Hadtobe ........ 
Splashalonge ...... 

EIGHTH RACE—Purse 
4 year olds and up. ty pal es 


1 
16 Saute Sheik .....112 
claiming, 


ge hute]: 


10 
118 
csp heveeh fam 
eae 118 


dad Duck . 10'Ma 
Apprentice allowance elaiee 


HIALEAH Dark 
Opps & JOCKIES 


FIRST RACE—Three furlongs [nursery 
course straightaway]: oan 
8. 


Horse. P.P. Wt. 
TRON cas 0 ccke 115 E. Arcaro 4-1 
*Catechism ..... E. Arcaro 4-1 
Lady Ethelyn ... C. Kurtzinger 6-1 
L. Haa : 


Huskie Queen... 8 2-1 
The Bride W. D. Wright 5-2 
bo 10-1 

8.1 

5-1 


Jocky. 


Nikki B 

Gin Fritters. ..... 

Polly Fair ( Gee > ; 10- 
Greentree stable entry. 


SECOND oo furlongs: 
Red B 114 C. Bierman 
Ziggy W. D. Wright 
Celtic Legend.... C. Kurtzinger 
Dr. Heiman % R. Eeccard 
Secret Chatter... S. Williams 
Black Foot II.... 1 G. Seabo 
Ravenna J. Renick 
Never Tier 2 I. Anderson 
Izaak Walton ... S. Young 
High Mart No boy 
FVODIN scckcee C. Swain 
Amgood K. McCombs 


THIRD RACE—Six 
Posterity 3 
Huskie Boy 

Evening Shadow. : 


Dw hts Qe or 


3-1 
6-5 
8-1 
4-1 
vieten k J. Anderson 8-1 
Sateibsaiie. ‘ira @ N. Wall 10-1 
FOURTH a mile: P 
Fraidy Cat ..... 6 113 C. Kurtzinger 2-1 
Orientalist E. Arcaro «1 
Tempestuous P -1 
Go Home -2 
Double B ..scsve> -1 


FIFTH RACE—One mile: 


° 


Prat eat rt fea ek peed peak at et feed pet pe 


No boy 

Old C. Kurtainge 
Sunanair ... 
Pompeys Pillar... 
At Play 
Blind Pig.. 
Swabili eeeev0ee0e0e8e8 
Royal Sortie ... 
First Entry ..... 
+Terpsichore 
Early P. Roberts 
Black Gift Decamillis 
*Fanfare Farm ile entry. 


SIXTH RACE—One mile: 

6 114 C. Kurtzinger 4-1 
116 E. Arcaro 12-1 
110 P. Roberts 10-1 
114 J. Renick 8-5 
105 L. Haas 4-] 
Patty Cake 109 V. Thompson 5-1 
Sun Power ‘ 110 S8S. Young 15-1 


SEVENTH RACE—One and an eighth miles: 
Georgia Meaden.. 8 105 Cuscicanna 12-1 
Noble Spirit .. 7 4113 F. Schieh 6-1 
Fiying Breeze ...12 115 S. Young 1 
Wree Spirit ...... 2 118 T.P. a 1 
mage en 5 : 

1 
1 


2" 


ht he 
SSCBPRNOBMSVSAR 


_ 
wm O'dS JOH Be oor 


C. Bierman 


G29 


Alexandrine .... 
Bow and Arrow.. 


Play Chance ....10 
PU secos @ 
Mine Boy........1l 
Prince Dean ..... 4 
Little Banner ... 3 


laze 
113 8. Williams 

113 No boy 10-1 
110 K. McCombs 15-1 
Miss Aline 108 H. Keppler 20-1 
Toothpick 105 T.E.Ward 30-1 


EIGHTH RACE—One and an eighth miles: 
Back Fence .....10 113 H. Keppler 
Heartease ..0.++- 113 T. May 
Jim John ....... 7 118 T. Martin 
TOD 6 oc cecnce 105 A. Clutter 
Starwick ........ 3 110 R. Merritt 
Dignitary 4 113 W.D. Wright 6-1 
Winged Victory.. 2 110 I. Anderson 8-1 
Seawick ........ 6 113 J. Stout 12-1 
Bob Charlie .. oat 115 K. McCombs 15-1 
arit 118 A. Bodiou 20-1 
118 Thompson 20-1 
Pompish 105 A. Schmidl 30-1 


| windup principals in the wrestling 


show tonight in Rainbo Fronton, 
Clark street and Lawrence avenue. 
Jack Curtis is paired with Paul Mil- 
ler, Fred Grubmier with Charley 
[Gorilla] Grubmyer, Buck O’Neill 
with Soldier Thomas, and Roy Rick- 
enbacher with Tony Matrini. .. . 
Harold Rodie, 124th Field Artillery 
armory welterweight, will clash with 
Red McCusker of Northwest gymna- 
sium in one of a sories of amateur 
fights this evening in the armory 
gymnasium, 52d street and Cottage 
Grove avenue. Jerry Authorius faces 
Billy May, Stanley Stockins encoun- 
ters Floyd Nelson, Herb Holford op- 
poses Bob Cole, Alex Collie meets 
Sammy Consolo, Vito Savoldi bat- 
tles Joe Jawgiel, and Wally Zale 
tackles Pete Ferrand... . 


oe 


Johnny Barbara, once a Golden 
Gloves welterweight finalist, and 
Sammy Chivas of Detroit have been 
signed for a ten round headliner in 
the Fronton Friday. . Sammy 
Angott, Louisville junior lightweight, 
and Harvey Woods of St. Paul, who 
whipped Jimmy Le Grone in Milwau- 
kee Monday, appear in the eight 
round featured contest in Marigold 
Gardens Monday. . . . Buddy Baer, 
San Leandro, Cal., 245 pound chal- 
lenger, left yesterday for New York, 
where he meets Gunnar Barlund for 
ten rounds March 4. The big fellow 
was accompanied by his trainer, Izzy 
Kline. . . . A cut eye received dur 
ing a practice bout with Moon Mul- 
lins in Trafton’s gymnasium this 
week has forced Pete Lello to cancel 
his scheduled match with Charley 
Gomer on the Glen Lee-Fred Apos- 
toli card in Madison Square Garden 
Friday. . . . Chester Kozen and Eric 
Hanson, amateur light heavyweights, 
yesterday were matched to fight in 
the Madison Athletic club Friday. 
. . « Lhe first simon pure program 
of the year will be presented in the 
Midwest A. C. one week from to- 
night. F. M, 


“1A. A. U, SUSPENDS 
OWENS’ TOURING 
BASKET TEAM 


New York, Feb. 1.—(#)—National 
A. A, U. headquarters today received 
notice of the suspension of Jesse 
Owens’ Olympians, a touring basket- 
ball team accompanied by the former 
Ohio State athlete and Olympic cham- 
pion. 

The disciplinary action was taken 
by the Northeastern Ohio Association 
of the A. A. U., based upon charges 


of professionalism and reports that 
Owens, himself disbarred for some 
time as an. amateur, had been playing 
part time with the team. 

Participation by Owens automati- 
cally would affect the standing of the 
entire team. 

Floyd Rowe of Cleveland, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Northeastern as- 
sociation, notified Daniel J. Ferris, 
the national executive secretary, that 
the suspensior would stand indefi- 
nitly, pending an investigation. 


RIGGS AND GRANT 
MOVE FORWARD IN 
SURF CLUB TENNIS 


Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 1.—#/)— 
Bobby Riggs of Chicago and Bryan 
Grant of Atlanta today moved toward 
a renewal of their winter tennis rival- 
ry as they advanced in separate 
brackets of the Surf club tournament. 

Riggs defeated Dr. Phillip Hawk of 
Forest Hills, N. Y., 6-4, 8-6, and Grant 
disposed of two Miamians, Paul Rus- 
sell by 6-1, 6-3, and Charles Matt- 
mann by 6-3, 6-4. Riggs drew a first 
round bye while Grant, who started 
a day late, had to play twice to catch 
up with the field. 


fat: © - a % e 4 
~ fee PS SJ aos vy & S i : es : > & 
eee Pe ie . . lS eee Sheed or tee ce 

<a } by : 
See Eye ee Cae Pe te 
* Tees "hae 
; j 3 


-|Ineome to date this year 


Public tigrinies of $67,000,000 of! 
securities of the Appalachian Electric 
Power company will be made today, 
representing the largest financing un- 
dertaken in a single day for four 
months. 

The only other major piece of finan- 
cing done since the market for new 
securities withered away last Septem- 
ber and October, leaving several un- 
derwriting houses “stuck” with 
large amounts of unsold securities on 
their hands, was that of Consolidated 
Edison company of New York on 
Jan. 13, 

Other Offerings Considered. 

The Appalachian Electric registra- 
tion statement was filed on the same 
day as the reported successful sale 
of the $30,000,000 of Edison deben- 
tures, and the two events raised 
hopes of investment bankers that the 


new securities market was opening| 


up again, No other large underwrit- 
ing deals have been announced yet, 
however, although half a billion dol- 
lars worth is reported under more 
than casual consideration. 

The Appalachian Electric offering 
consists of $57,000,000 of first mort- 
gage 4 per cent bonds due in. 1963 
and $10,000,000 of 4% per cent\ de- 
bentures due in 1948. The bonds are 
priced at 98% and the debentures at 
100% by a nation-wide underwriting 
syndicate headed: by Bonbright & Co., 
Inc. 

The financing will simplify debt 
structure, cut interest charges, and 
reduce the company’s open account 
debt to its parent organization, the 
Amiérican Gas and Electric company. 


61 Million for Retirement. 

The $60,431,000 of bonds now out- 
standing will be retired with $61,829,- 
590 of proceeds from sale of the new 
securities. The rest of the net pro- 
ceeds will be used to reduce the open 
account debt to American Gas, which 
stood at $6,968,154 last Nov. 30. Of 
the bonds $10,458,000 principal amount 
held by American Gas will be pur- 
chased for cancelation at the cosi 
price of $9,717,310. The others, held 
by the public, are to be redeemed at 
4 and 5 point premiums. 

The company generates and pur- 
chases electric power which it dis- 
tributes at retail in Virginia and West 
Virginia and at wholesale to other 
companies in Tennessee and, at state 
lines, to companies operating in Ken- 
tucky, North Carolina, and Ohio. 


U. ‘S. TREASURY 


[Chicago Tribune Press Service. } 
WASHINGTON, DD. C., Feb. 1.—[Special.]— 
The following is a statement of the condi- 
tion of the United States treasury on Jan. 29: 
$ 3,492,172,900 
Income to date last year..... 2,436,023,500 


éabectcceéaneeeon 1,057,149,400 
.-$ 238,394,400 

‘. 321,005,500 

costs to date 321,005,500 
Agricultural aid 191,755,100 
Relief 2,940,200 
Public works and work relief 1, 69 038, ‘600 
Aid to home owners......... 264,600 
Deficit this year..... pe ‘287. 800 
Deficit last WON: dc kccicanide 1,735,529,400 


Decrease 957,241,600 
Balance general fund today..$ 2,955,436,300 
Balance previous day........ 2,959,757,700 


Decrease enakaeael 4,221,400 


Public debt this date.........$37,442,619,800 
Inactive gold .8 1,223,017,900 


Increase 


Ve terans’ 


eeeeeeeeee 


Investors Guide 


[ Ragistered U. S. Patent Office.) 


Wednesday, February 2, 1938. 
[Copyright: 1938: By The Chicago Tribune.) 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific. 

Investors’ Guide: I would appreci- 
ate some information on the Rock 
Island Lines.—E. H. D. 

Answer: The Chicago, Rock Island, 
and Pacific railroad is an 8,160 mile 
railroad system operating in fourteen 
central and western states. The sys- 
tem extends from Chicago, St. Louis, 
and Memphis in the east, to Denver 
and Santa Rosa, N. M., in the west. 


18 do aj 4s '95 st.. 


22 Cen Pac 65s 
68 do ist 4s '49.... 


26do 3%s "96 D.... 
3 Chi&Alton 38'49 23% 
28 CB&Q dg tee 103 102% 103 


22 do 3%s Ill 
13 ¢Chi&EDl 5s’51 


llido 3%s 


| wuesday ......+-108.5 Previous day... 


sees 108.8 Year ago seeseeell ip 


joer Wek seeee118.7 1937 low 
— high eevee 104.4 4 1958 low eevee 


nay 


DOMESTIC BONDS. 


3 Adams Ex 4s '48 94 


Hi via Close. 
2g 94 


5 Ala Gt So 4843101 101 101 +1 


8 82 82 
83 Allis-Chaim 48'52, oo ye 103% 103%+ | 
1 


mI 


ldo aj 4s ’95.... 


103%— 


o Rky M 4s '65. fh 101 ai 
4s '62 8 85 


ep k OE in 


4do clt 4s Yee 


45. 8 
1 Atl A D 1st 4s'48 
2 Atl G& WI 5s'59 
1 Aub Auto 4%s'39 


59 B&O rfg 6s gh 
42d 


4, T C ’B9.. 


42 42 
6 Bang&Ar cn 4s’ 61.104 104 104 — 
5 Bell T Pa 65s8'60C.127% 127% 127%+ 


4 Beth Stl 4%s'60.1025% 102% 


20 do 4%s JJ ’61.. 
20 Bkly Ed 3%s 66. 103% 1coe ag ea 
20 Bkin MTr 4%s’66 5 51% 61%— 


102%+ 
94% 94%+ 


5 Bkin UGas 58°45. 107% 107% 107%+ 
o8% 34 Me 


3 do 5s 


4Buf R&P4%s’ 87, 32 
8 CanSou 58 


32 


2 CanNat5s’69 July.115% 115% 115% 


1do 5s ‘69 Oct.. 


.118% 118% 118%+ 


2CanNatR 41s’ 51.114% 114% 1144+ 


2do 4%s 

2CanPac 5s 
"46... 
"OO: cicca 08 


15 do 4s perp 


.114% 114% 114%+ 
‘54. .101% 101% 101%+ 1 
.. 100% 100% 100%— 


55. 91% 9U%— 
38 AT&SF Pr "96. ++ L0B% 107% ya 1 


101 100% 100%+ 
85.do cv 4% '48..108% 103% 1038%+ 
- - 4%s C-A '62..107% 107 107%+ 


Co 


semis i alligate’ 


Xs Paeatanst: 


20 do 4%s '46 st. ...200% 100 100 — % 


9 4 i 
'62..105% 105% 105%— 


88% 88 
6 Caro C&O 5s '88.100%100 100 — 
ae + 1 


1 Celotex 4%s'47ww 73 


7 CenIIE&G 65s’51 98% 


73 


98 nie 
4CenNYP 3%s'62.103 102% 102%— 


1CenRRNJ 4s ‘87 29 


60 63% 
93% 


62% 63%+ 3 


2 29 + 
3 Certain-td 5%4s8’48 58% 58% 58%+ 3 


1 ChamP&F 4%s'50.106 106 106 
cn.5s'39.105% 105% 105% 
"9 118% 118% 118% 


3 C&Ohio 
4do 4%s 
94 


+ 


98% 97% 98%+ "2% 
’°58..103% 103% 103%+ 
. 107% 107% 107%+ 2 

2 


53 *ChicGtWest 48°59 
i 


9 tdo aj 5s 2000.. 


24 tdo gen 4s ’89..., 
10 tdo 3%s ‘89 B.. 


1 t§ChaNnw 6%4s'36 


44%4s 2037.. 
cia Pgs 2037 C 


5 tdo 87 1 
10 HoRiePsice' pg 
10 tdo ev 4%s *60.. 
18 tdo 4s i 

9 §fdo rfig 4s 34 ct 7% 


5 CTH&SE inc5s’60 48 


'49..102% erie gs + age 
16 15% + 


Ye 


48 48 + 
1 Ch Un Sta 48’63D.108% on 108%— % 
105% 17 + ‘ 


9Ch&W Ind 4s'52 88 
4 Childs Co 5s ‘43 57 


57 
4 CinGas&E 3%s'66. ay ley 103% 


4CinUnTm 3%s'71.1 
5do 5s ‘S7C. 


107 
102% 102% ot tga 
88 


57 


79%+ 


79 
1 ClevClin 4%s’ 50. 105% 105% 105%— 
2 Clev&Pit 3%48'48C.106% 106% 106% 


19 ClevUnTm 5%s’72 89% 88 


1Col F&I bs 


1 Colmb G 5s'52ZAp 91% 91% 


92% 


92% 


88% 87% 
5 ColRyPw &14s’65.107 106 107 
8 ComlCred ding antl 97% 97%+ 


16do 2%s 


00% 100% 100%+ 


4 ComiinTr 3i40°B1. 108% 103% 103%-+ 
4ConRiPw 3%8'61.105% 105% 105% 
5 Comith Ed 48’81.106 105% 105%— 


4do 3%s ‘65 


104% 104% 104% 


3 Con Edis 3%s '46.105% 105 105%+ 


56 


102% 103. + 


97% + 


9ConG NY 4%s’'51. ee ie 106%— 


oe Con Oil 3%s °51 
1 Cons Pw 3%s’ 65.106 106 106 
'70....102 102 102 + 


ldo 3%s 
ldo 3%s ’65. 


03 103 


.103 a 
1 Cont Cor 6s 146. 104% Seger spt hy 


1 Crane Co 3%s ‘561.101 


3 CrownCork SB: 106 106 108 


3 CubaNRy 5%s8'42 39% 


6 Cuba RR 7448'46 es 


19 t8D&R G 
1 fD-RGW Seb Asd 5% 


55 55 
47% 


39% 
47% 


54 
2% 13 
5% 5% 


eee 


+1 
i % 
"108% 108% 108% 


26 CCC&St L 4%8'77 64% 61% 64%+ 7% 
7 do gen 4s '96. 79% 79% Vp 


e 


% 


894+ Sif 


| ey Soe JE 
'43.101%101%101%+ % 
~~ % 


Yo 
Ys 
% 


HFEF. 2 RK KKLAKE: 


Ge 


% 


and maturity— 
March ae 


+ 


wre 


hae 


PHOOPORUWO 
bt bt 29 ee 


~ 


8, as ety 


Beee: 
‘ , 


1 ; Ht , ane 
'e. o cf Ag a8 


ete 


6.1 106. 106.1 - 
&:3 1073, me 


eo P. > ae ae abe ee me Wy e 
1, 1073 ‘1076 «1.03 
: 20107214 -4 107.10 107.14 | 


us 

¢ ~ 
# om 
rs, 


is 
eat 


baba bade Moke 


%s, '49-' , 441 
is nad-'42,..1101-22 101.20 101.204 2 101.18 101.24 1.83 102.24 
62-'44..,,..103.31 103.27 108.27— -3 103.27 103.80 2.31 104.31 


UNITED Brg sos TREASURY NOTES. 
{Quoted by C. F. Childs & Co.] 


Asked. Yield. 

101.4 —51-64 
101.21—39-64 
101.30—1 rte 


Bid. 
2 


{Fractional parts of quotations are in 32ds of 1 point.) 


Series and maturity— Bid. A 
B 1%s, June 1b, ’40..101,22 

C 1%s, Dec. 15, °40..101.21 

A FF: March 15, Hi ae 18 

B 1%s, June 15, 

C 1%s, Dec. 15, a 

A 1%s, March 15, "42. 102.9 

B 2s, Sept. 15, 42, ...103.10 103.1 
C 1%s, Dec. 15, °42..102.9 102.1] 


6 Lou&Ark 5s ’69% 


9Lou&N 4%s 2008 
12do un 4s ’40... 
2do 3%s 2003.... 
2 L&NS&NA5s 
5 L&NSJM 46 ’52. 


8 tMan Ry 4s ’90. 
9McK&R 5%s ’50 


20 GO G6 -°71...... 
3 TMS&NW 4s ‘47... 
5 MSP&SSM 514849 
8do 54s '78....... 
27Mo-Ill 5s o% 

10 M-K-Tex 5s ’62A 

13 tdo adj 5s ’67.. 
ldo ist 4s ‘90.... 
8do 4s 
8 tMo Pac 5%s °49 
1 tdo 56s ‘65A.... 


9 Mont Pw 3%s '66 
5 Montr Tr 5s °41. 
5 do 5s 


” NashC&S$L 4s '78 
1 Nassau El 4s ’51 


11 Nat D P 4%s °45. 
47 Natl Stl 4s ‘65. 
1NE T&T 5s '52. 
5 NOGtNor 5s ’83 
3 NOPubSv 5s’52A 
ldo 5s ‘’55B.... 
3N Orl Trm 4s'53 
4*NOT&M 5%%s'54 
1 NY-QE-P 3%s'65. 

4ido 4%s 2013A.. 

29 do en 4s 

19 do 3%s ’'52 

19 do 4s °42. 

27 do 3%s 97... 
BNYC LS 3%s'98 
3 NYC&StL 6s acd 

16do 5%s "74A.. 

25do 4%s °78.. 
5 NYConRR Bs’ 53. 

30 do 4%s ‘53.. 

6 NYEdis 3%s 66. 
8 NYGEH-P 4s’49. 
+3 NYNH-Hev6s'48 
1 tdo cit 6s ‘40.. 
ltdo 4%s ’'67.. 

7 +NYO&Wrig4s’92 
INY Ry 6s ‘58st. 
10 NYSteam 6s '47. 


3 $+ NYS& Wrihs’37 
7TNY Tel 4%s ‘39. 
7 ee 3%s ‘'67.. 
YTrRk 6s ‘46st 
i Niagsh 5%s '50. 
2 Norf&éWw 4s ‘96.. 
4NoAmCo 5s '61. 
1 NorAmE 5s ‘69C 
61 NorPac 6s 2047 8 
2 do 
6 do 
3 do 
77 do 
26do 3s 2047.. 
1 Ogd&LC 4s 
9 Ohio Ed 4s ’65. 
5 do 4s 5g 
32 do 3%s 


3 do 4s *46 

1 OntarioTra 6s’45. 
55 OreRR&Na 4s’'46. 

4 OrWaRR-N 4s’61. 


12 PacGs&El 3%4s'66. 
10 do 3%s ’61 ..... 
13 do 4s ’64 ... 


28 PacM&T 3\s’66C. 
lido 3%s ‘66B ... 
5 PanhnEPL 48°52. 


2 PennGlSd 414s’60. 
15 PenOh&D 4%s8'77. 


19 Pen Co 4s ’63.. 

2 PenRR gen 65s’ 68. 

lido en 4%s ; 
gen 4%s ’65. 
4144s deb "70., 
gen 4%s '81.. 
4%4s '84E .... 


eerveeeee 


41 do 4%s 
40 PhelpsDo 3%8'52. 
1PhB&Ww 4%s’77C. 
ldo 4%s ‘81D .. 
14 Phila Co 6s '67.. 


6 L&JeffBd 4s '45.105% 105% 105%4— 


1 Lou G&E 3%s'66.103 103 103 


48st 


4 Pac Mo list 4838 78 


41 Pen P&Lt 4%s’81 99% 4 


1 Peori&E 1st4s’40 55 
1 Pere a 5s *566 75% 
0 


Net 
High. Low. Close. chge. 
69% 68% 69 a 
% 
86% 85% 86%+ % 


.108% 1038 103%+ % 


og GEN 3 ERY 2 SE Cone 


’63.117% 117% 117%— 2% 


74% 75 — 5 
+ % 
28% 28% 28%+ % 
99 98% 99 + %& 


75 


2 Met Ed 4%s '68.108%108%108% .... 
21 MER&L 5s ’°61B.100% 100% 100% .... 
. 101 rt 101 + % 

7% 17% 17%+ 


91 91 
100% 100% 
73 73% 


63 
22% 


41 NatD 3%s ‘5lww 99% 


9% ; 
1034%1038 1038%+ % 
105 104% 105 + % 
ge > ea me Se 
64%2 64 
91 
91 
60 . 60 60 +1 
33% 33% a 
106 106 eens 


44 NYC rfg 6582013 62% 
dees c 
382 NYC-HR a 


47% 46% 47 

105% 105% 105%—- _—& 
104% 104 104%+ % 
103% 103% 103% + 4 
114% 114% 114% .... 

— 22 = sce 1% 

33 < ; 

22 

8% 

98 98 
106% 106 106%+ 
104% 104% 104%2— 
105 104% 104%— 

12% 12% 12%+ 
106% 106% 1064%— 
105 104% 105 ‘-< 

64 64 64 ex 

93% 93% Y3%— 
118% 118% 118%— 
101% 100% 100%— % 

99%, 99%, 99% 

82%+ 8% 
70 


9 
100% 100 100 — 1 


4 OklaGek "aie 66 99 


9 
100% 100% 100%+ "'% 
111%111%111% .... 
107 1065107 + % 
103% 103 103% . 


1 Otis Steel 4%4s'62 72% 72% 22%+ ‘' 


101 100%100% .. 
104% 104% 104%—  &% 
108% 107% 1a Y%, 
103% 102% 103%+ % 
108%103 103%— ¥Y% 
100 99% 


4Para Pict 6s 55 92% 92 


104 104 
100. 99 100 + - 
99 — % 
96 96 + % 
108% tte > ia % 
102% 102 
+ Son Ae 
109% 109% 109% ih 
9 $0 91 

55 
75% 75%+ % 
65 64% 65 + % 
104%, 103% 104 + % 
108% 108% 108%+ 1 


..108% 108% 108%+ % 


90% 90%— % 


Sales, 
thous High 
1 Unit Drug 5s °53 77 
38 US Rub 5s °47.105 
4 Utah L&Tr 5s’44 80 
9 Utah P&L 5s *44 82 
47Util P&L5%s'47 50 
14 tdo 5s ’59 ..... 50 
2 Vanadium 5s °41 84% 84% 844+ % 
1VertSug 7s’'42ct 9% 9% 9% 
9 VaE&P 43 '55A.108% 108% 108%+ % 
27 VirRy 3%s '66.103% 102% 103%+ % 
7tWab ist 65s’39 52% 562 52 
4tdo 2d 5s *30.... 28 28 28 
5tdo 5s °76 B... 10% 10% 10%+ 1% 
1 Walk H 4,0 '45.103% — aa i 
4Walwrth 4s ’55 66 ae 
14 Warn Br 6s °'39 71% 7 kk 
12 WestchL 3%s’67.102 101%102 + 
1W PenP 4s °61H.109% 109% 109%— 
ldo 3%s ‘66 op (4, Ga 107%+ 
10 WestMd 514s'77A 88% 
13 do 4s ’52 86 
5 TW Pa Ist5s’46.. 
2itdo 5s °46 asd. 
3 Western Unds °51 67 
4do 5s 66 
8do 4%s 50 314 
2 WestSh4s 2361rg 62% 
2 WheelStl 4%s’66A 91 
27 Wilson&Co 4s'55. 97 
17 YoungS&T 4s ‘61 98% 


FOREIGN. 


2 Akershus §6s'63..102 102 102 gies 
1 ¢Antioquia 7s'45B 6% 6% 6%+ 

G6 Autwerp 5s ’58.. 99% 99% 9914+ 

2Y Argen 4s '72 Feb 83% 83 S38%+ 1% 
35 do 4s °72 April.. 83 83 83 +1 
Zl1do 4%s ‘71 93% 93 934+ 1% 
44 Australia 5s’55.106% 106 106%+ % 


h. Low. co chge. 
77 


PREAKEKEEKSERS: 


1 Austria 7s °57.. 


104% 104% 104% $% 1% 
1 ¢BerCityE 6%s’ 51 7% 7M is 


10 fBraz 6%4s'26-’57 

20 tdo 6%s '27-'57. : 

2 7BrazCRE 7s ’562 16% 16 16%— 7 

3 Brisbane 5s '57..101144101%101%+ % 

15 BuenA 4%- -4%s'77 64%, 63% 64%+ 7 

8 do 4%4- -4%esAug" 76 638% 63% 63%— 3 

6 do 4¥ 6-4%s "75.., 66% 66% 66% 

13 FPansds 5s *62...112% 112% 112%+ 

8do 4s ’60.. 109% 109% 1095— 

25 do 3%s *61. icesc bOae 101 101%+ 

9do 3s ’ reine 6 96 96 
dare pes 101%+ 

0% 10 

13 tChileMB 6%s’'61 154 1 at an ae 

11 tdo 6%s °57 15% 

18 fdo 6s ‘6 

7tdo 6s 

1 7Chile 7s 

6 fdo 6s 

12 tdo-6s °61 Jan.. 

4%tdo 6s "61 Feb.. 


10 ¢ChileanM 7s’60 3%+ 
14 Colom 6s ’6lJan 13% + 
24fdo 6s '61 Oct. 18% 13% 13%+ 
7 Copenh 6s ’52.. ere 100% 1004%— 
2do 4'%s ‘BB... 8% 98 98%-++- 
6 ba gue 4 Pay ‘jee 72% 72 
o 5s , 3% 103 ea 
2do 4%s °*49. 100 100 . ings 
ag Denmark 6s "42. 105% 105% 108% 
3do 5%s °'44....108%103% 103%+ 
lido 4%s ’62... - 101% 101% 10vat 
1Dom 5%%s 42... 5 65 65 + 
3do 2d 5%s ’4U.. 63 63 
3 TEl Salva 8s’48ct 26% — 
1 Estonia Rep 7s’67 99 
1 Finland 6s ’°45...108 108 108 — 
4French 7%s 41, 105% 105% 105%— 
2do 7s "49 unst.100% 100% 100%+ 
2 *Ger Psa 5%s’65 27 27 27 ; 
3 7do 5%s ’65 unst 
ltdo 7s ’ 
2 tGer Pega A 78’45 
litdo 6 


4 GitConE]PJa 7s’44 
4 Greek 7s’64 pt pd 
1 Haiti 6s ‘52. 

2 Ital CrCon 78478 
12 Italy 7s ‘51. 

9 Japan 6%%s 54. 
5do 65%s ’65. 

1 tLeipzig 7s °47.. 
3 tf MexiIr44s’43asd 
15 Mila City 6%s’52 
1 tMontevideo hie 9 
4N Sou Wal 5s 
2do 65s 


23 Orient Dev 6s’53 54 4 54 — 1% 
2 Oslo City 4%s’55.102% 102% 102% 
2 Panama 5%48'53.108% 103% 103% 
Pee st asd &% 36% oy 


1 ‘Poland 8s 
5 tdo 6s ’40 


0% 2 
4Queensid 7s °41.108% sont 108% 
ltdo 6s ” 109 109 109 


2 Dow Chem 3s8’51.104 104 104 

14 Duq Lt 3%s °65.107 106% 107 

14 ElAutoLite 48°52.100% 100% 100%+ 

6 EIPNGas 4148'51. <i 102% att gi § 
68 Erie rfg 65s ‘67. 18 17% — 
46 do rig 58 '75.. is + 1 
29%+ 
22 — 


5 tRio de J 6%s'53 
3 TRioG do § 8s’46 
4ido 6s ’68 
20 Rome 6%s ’52.. 
47RuhrCh 6s’48 A 
1 tSaoPCty 6%48'67 
10 tSaoPauloSt 7s'56 
17 do 7 


9 tdo 7 sal Mint 

2 +Silesia bn 7s "58 

1 tSilesia L A 68°47 25 265 
15 Sydney 5%s ’55. ‘104% 104% 104%+ 

1 Tokio City 5%s’61 53% 53% 53% 
65 TokioElLt 6s *563 53% 


90% 
13 Phil Elec 3%s’ 67. 106 105%106 + % 
1 tPhilRdC&I 68°49 45% 45% 4% 
2tdo 6s '73 ...... 16% 16% 16%+ "1% 
54 epee 4 = ‘37 23% 23 23%+ % 
3 PillsbryFM 68’43.109 109 109 tga 
6 PCC&SL 5s 720A. 108 107%108 + 2 
108% 108% 108%+ 2 
eeeeeeL00% 100 100%+ 
.108% 108% 108%— 
14 PortlGenE 414s’ 60 50%, 49% 
126 tPostalT&C 5s’53 14% 13% 14%+ 
0 PotomEP 3%s’66.104% 104% 104%+ 
5 Pressed StlC 5851 80 80 #£80 
1 one = 73 


The road’s lines also extend as far 
north as Watertown, S. D., and Min- 
neapolis, Minn., and as far south as 
Gaiveston, Tex., on the Gulf of Mex- 
ico. 

The road filed a petition to reor- 
ganize under section 77 of the federal 
bankruptcy act on June 7, 1933, be- 
cause of inability to meet interest 
payments as a result of declining rev- 
enues. A plan for reorganization was 
filed by the road in federal court 
July 15, 1936. 

The plan would reduce fixed charges 
to $2,499,531 from $14,334,986, or 
roughly 80 per cent. Refunding of 
| present obligations would be accom- 
plished through issuance of up to 
$60,000,000 in 3% per cent bonds Sse- 
cured by a first mortgage on the 
road’s entire property and about $159,- 
567,000. of new 4 per cent income 
bonds. All classes of security holders 
would participate in the reorganiza- 
tion in varying degrees. The next 

hearing on the reorganization plan is 
scheduled for Feb. 28, 1938. 

The reorganization plan also pro- 
vides for an extension of outstanding 
-pank loans and ee et Nov, 
nance corporation loans. As of Nov. 
1, 1937, the road owed the RFC $13,- 
718,700. Federal Judge Wilkerson in- 
dicated in Chicago in November, 1937, . 
that he may be obliged to enter an} 


8% 8% 8 
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ae atah tik ake 
a akakakakar: 


_ [HIALEAH PARK FORM CHART | 


lace, $5.70 show; Xavier, $6.90 place, $5.40 shows Sickle Lass 

43 3. by Sir Gallahad IIl.-Negrina. Been . RB. Bath 
iz BEVIDERE broke very fast and, showin ring 

led all the way ng nicely in hand. 

and held on weil. 


Winnin 
SICKLE LASS finished perth 


FIFTH RACE—Seven furlongs. ‘Three ar olds. 
ner, ner, $700; second, $150: third, $100: foarte, $50. 


5 do ist 4s ‘96 .. 
10 do gen lien 4s’96. 

1 do cy 48 3A .. 

1 Erie&Jer 6s ‘55. 

6 Erie Gene 6s °57. 

1 FairbMorse 4s’56. 99 99 9 1 
1 FrancisSug 68°56. 42% 42% 42%— 2% 
13 GenMotAcc 38’46.103% 103% 103% 
6 do 3%s ’561 ....102%102 102 — 
7 GenStiC 5%s °49. 49 48% 48%+ 
27Ga&Ala cn5s’45. 21 21 

% Goodrich 4%s'56. 96% 95% 


eS 


SG" Two year olds. Purse $800. Net value to winner, 
third, $ fo 


PE $600: second, $125: urth, $25. 
Wt PP Jocky 
Bierman 


s PATRICE .115 
MAT Wall 


* 


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1 3 


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ce 


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118 

115 

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118 


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12 tdo 6%s ‘51 C.. 30 
3 Uruguay 8s °46 48% 48% 
5 Vienna City 6s’°52.100 100 100 
1 tWarsaw C 7s’58 60 60 60 
12 Yokohama 6s’61 57 55 66%+ 


xin—Ex interest. ct—Certifica t8e 
flat on account of default. Setting te 

reasons other than default. §Matured bonds. 
Negotiability impaired pending investigation, 


Co 
So 
+. 


HEOdpohsse 


5 

ee 

e 

g 
ERKRKEKS: 


Wall 
C.Kurtsinger 
$.Williams 
$.Renick 
W.Ray 


1:25 2-5. Two Goller mutuels d: Aces Lt 1 
= ER. One Jest, oy sad Bena , .60 ad: Stella M Pe Y Dine fda my ee .. ny 
Grandace-Wildw wner, C. Trentanelli, Meainor C, Hu Pb 


» 


e*ee@eeeeeoeveeenes 


OBE OOP D~1DWMWO>s 


he 


ROD IV 
bt bs BO BD 
eR 


10 GtNorRy 5%48'52. 95 91% 92 
5 Gt Nor 4%s’76D. 81% 81% 81% 4 +RioGrW lst4s’39 42144 42% 4244 
9 $*RIA&La4%s'34 9% 9 9 — 
15 SafewyStrs 4s'47.102% 102% 102%+ 
9 SaguenyP4%4s’66.101% 101 101%+ 
3 $tStLIMS4sRG’33 59 #£«3568 59 + 
“st L S FPF ahi 

. 10 

13 


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:34 3-5. pe, 8 


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ny 3 Haas 
4 i on ae fry. Woolford, elon. $7.60 etraight, $8.60 pl 
ee 8 ace, 
ae en shee ee : Wimbledon, $68;40 show “Bg 
D : ainer, H. Jacobs. — 
t, drew away into a long lead 


way and was next best. 
inside and stood long drive gamely. 


os 
wl RAGE Six, furlongs. Four 3 Tie 2 : zh, $50.00" Purse $1,000. Net value to 
Str | 


Jocky 


ot 


# aa 


fdo 4s 


‘StP-KCSL4%4s'41 < 

SA&APass 4s °43 7 

SanAntPS 6s ‘52. 100% 100% 109% 
‘SeabAL cn 60’45 9 + 
tdo 6s ‘45 ae 


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A career | 
LITTL JOCK GRE ta 8, : 


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is ii 


PS he! ee Cero ee eeee 
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| T | 


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30 do 4%s '66 ..... 32 
4 do 5s ’BS eeeeve 

89 IC&CSLNOSs’63A. 38 

23 do 4%s 
1 Ill Steel 4% 107% 107% 
8 InlandSti3%s ’61 104 

18 §tin ; % 

26 §tdo 


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55605066506 31—w 
11 


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emcommonaemown 25 


H.Simmons 


str 7.20 
38°50 30 show. "Win tw cope . oh 


a. 
4 ae falloped vafone! a Se BF 


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5 
ES 


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Four 
$100: "fourth, 


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gegeseeees 


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: 3S : sche aterteh eto dea . 


aoe oe ; : 
el Wee is 


ACES WILD vecka pote fast and show a liking for the 
the w 
ALONG. was ridden with poor deed: S was en wide all the way, 
~ Horse 
fy 
TO THE RE 7 a 
RILLIANT 5 Se iene YF. 
11 
0 
Two dollar mutuels p no oes $5.40 ht, $3.20 pl 
$3.60 sh $576 show. Winner’ 3 
FENG at home in the g He raced PELTER 
up very fast and was next ber. 
tired badly after showing speed for six furlongs . 
cal 
MAURI See eaeateeeares. * 
R- een eve *# (sibbeendven eee 
ANNER ......005.+-109 
for the first mile, atone 


wide gap and at end was bein be ON 
and whe aban’ in lanl oie GORE sao ce row 
MAEBA 
SIXTH RACE—One mile. Three year ol " 
winner, $700; second, $150: ae $100: pile $50. ws rae ne vine 
FENG ep ae He 
oF 
Vv RY BUSY <0 Saeiegy *eeee'e @s a i] " 6 
4h €£ WD Wri ght 
aia “Dpslala. 3.90 D von o The Rescue, 2° 
3, Kai Feng-Bred aes g ting Owner, Mrs. K. Fyne er, K. Ramsey. “"Start 
d UPSLALA into ype then 
drew aw winning gen AO . oing. UPSLALA mov a°u 
TO THE RESCUE ran good race Pi eee oe dl PLAY finished gamely. PEL 
SEVENTH RACE—One mile 
Net Net value to winner, $700: nee fy $1 nied, 
wt 
camel ee ewe eee eee eee 
PINACA **eeeeee@eaeeteeneaee iis 
i oa WEEP see tterrncverne ddd 
. i 
oa dollar mutuels 
86 "pls rea ani 
Me wher, Fanfare Farms, 
RE i ra Bh we ore al as 
WE! a Tan P never» Zactor 


Bat 
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"904 


Board of Trade Quiz 
Results Told. 


BY THOMAS FURLONG. 

The Cargill Grain Company of Illi- 
nois and its three principal officers 
were charged with willful manipula- 
tion of the corn market during and 
prior to September last year in a 
report made public yesterday by a 
special investigating committee of 
the Chicago Board of Trade. 

The committee, concluding an in- 
vestigation lasting two and one-half 
months, reached the conclusion that 
the Cargill interests attempted to 
corner the corn market by buying 
up all the corn available for delivery 
on September future contracts, at the 
wame time holding the principal 
“long” interest in the contract, The 
investigation further showed, the 
committee said, that the short in- 
terest in September corn was scat- 
tered among a large number of per: 
sons and firms. 

Charge Law Violation. 


The operations of the Cargill firm, 
the committee contended, constituted 
a violation of the provision of the 
federal commodity exchange act gov- 
erning price manipulation. 

The short sellers were cleared by 
the committee of all allegations of 
attempting to manipulate the market, 

Individuals cited by the committee 
were John H. MacMillan Jr., prési- 
dent of the Cargill firm; Edward J. 
Grimes, vice president and counsel, 
and Philip C. Sayles, vice president 
in charge of Chicago operations. The 
Illinois company is a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Cargill, Inc., of Minne- 
apolis, Minn., the holding company 
for one of the largest grain elevator 
and merchandising enterprises in the 
country. 

Hearing on the charges made 
against the company and its officers 
will begin March 1 before the direc 
tors of the Board of Trade. The in- 
vestigating committee was headed by 
William H. McDonald. 

Find No Evidence of Raids. 

Throughout the period in which the 
September corn contracts were traded 
in, there was no evidence of a con- 
centrated short interest in the mar- 
ket or of shorts raiding the market, 
the committee asserted. 

The largest speculative short in- 
terest in corn during September was 
held by the Farmers National Grain 
corporation, government financed 
market codperative, the committee 
reported. The codp was short 2,460,- 
000 bushels Sept. 18, against which 
it held only 643,148 bushels of cash 
corn with which to make deliveries. 
Its purely speculative short sales 
totaled 1,816,852 bushels or 16.6 per 
cent of the total short position. 

Loss a Factor in Dissolution. 

The loss which Farmers National 
took on its corn market operations 
is said to have been one of the prin- 
cipal reasons for the recent decision 
by stockholders to dissolve the co- 
operative. The federal government 
put upward of 20 million dollars in- 
to the corporation on which it is 
expected to recover very little. 

Daniel F. Rice, one of the largest 
operators on the exchange, was short 
1,197,000 bushels of September corn 
during August. He was the second 
largest short in the market. 

The committee said that the ef- 
forts of Rice and Farmers National 
to buy up~ corn to make delivery 
against their short sales were frus- 
trated by the Cargill interests, which 
purchased corn in such large quan- 
tities that they had complete control. 

Overbid Other Buyers. 

Eighty per cent of the corn called 
for by September contracts was 
owned by the Cargill company on 
Sept. 24. At the same time Cargill 
bought up 4,378,000 bushels of cash 
corn during August and September, 
overbidding other buyers and making 
it impossible for others to acquire 
grain in any voltime, the committee 
said. 

“Cargill’s position in September 
corn,” the committee said, “was at 
all times from Aug. 31 to Sept. 23, in- 
clusive, almost entirely speculative. 
On Aug. 31, 1937, Cargill had con- 
tracts for forward shipment of 767,- 
684 bushels of old domestic corn and 
forward contracts for the purchase 
of 25,250 bushels of old domestic corn. 
Its forward purchases of new domes- 
tic corn were 185,900 bushels and its 
forward sales of new or old domestic 


the history of the exchange. An acute 
_gcarcity of corn existed because of 
the short crop of the preceding year. 
‘The deadlock between the longs and 
shorts finally was broken when the 
_ exchange ordered the settlement of 
all contracts at $1.10% a bushel. 


Washington, D, C., Feb. 1—is 
cial.J—Dr. J. W. T. Duvel, chief of 
car whdae tel Oe Cae 
oe said tonight that the CEA in- 


mber 30 


& 


eer yr: 


OS. 
Ce 
Spuktemteeeeaediieamteeen sete 


oo 


= ~e 
eee ee 
ncten inns as -susereone 


eene, 


COseyright: 1938: Ry The Chicase Tribute.) 


Trade Chiets 
UrgePublic 
to Use Meat 


Coéperation with the live stock 

and meat industry in its program to 

increase consum- 

er demand for 

meat products 

was pledged yes- 

terday by lead- 

ers in manufac- 

turing, retailing, 

fF railroading, pub- 

e lishing, agricul- 

ture and other 

industries at a 

meeting of 

friends of the 

live stock indus- 

try in the Pal- 

mer house. The 

meeting was 

called by the In- 

stitute of Ameri- 

back live stock can Meat Pack- 

industry. ers for the pur- 

pose of helping to improve the mar- 
ket for meat products. 

Thomas E. Wilson, chairman of Wil- 
son & Co. and a director of the in- 
stitute, discussed the present prob- 
lem of live stock and meat pro- 
ducers. 

Cites Decline in Live Stock. 


He pointed out that the cost of 
live stock has declined 43 per cent 
for steers, 37 per cent for lambs, and 
37 per cent for hogs from peak 1937 
prices, and that, as a result, pro- 
ducers are losing $30 to $50 a head 
on cattle sold, and correspondingly 
on other animals. 

Wilson said the basic problem lies 
in the curtailment of meat consump- 
tion. 

“In the 10 years from 1901 to 1910 
inclusive,” he said, “meat consump- 
tion per year was equal to 146 pounds 
per capita. In 1937, the average per 
capita consumption was 120 pounds. 
This difference of 26 pounds per cap- 
ita means a decrease in demand at 
the present time equal to 5,600,000 
cattle, each producing 600 pounds of 
beef.” 

He said at the present time meat 
of better quality and at cheaper 
prices than at any time in recent 
years is available to the public. 


Urges Prosperous Agriculture. 

“We must see agriculture pros- 
perous if the country is to prosper,” 
he added, “and live stock is the back- 
bone of agriculture. All of the value 
produced from live stock represents 
from 43 to 45 per cent of the nation’s 
farm income.” 

Following Wilson’s address, Wil- 
liam Whitfield Woods, president of 
the institute, called on leaders in 
other industries to express their 
views on the program to eat more 
meat. 

William B. Warner, president of 
the National Association of Manufac- 
turers, asserted that manufacturers 
would back the live stock industry 
in its movement, and that industry 
and agriculture “must of necessity 
be largely interdependent.” 

Publishers Pledge Aid. 

Col. R. R. McCormick, publisher of 
THE TRIBUNE, said the facilities and 
good will of publishers should be 
used to put the present problem of 
the meat industry before the public. 

“Every year confirms the law of 
supply and demand,” said Col. Mce- 
Cormick, “ When prices are low there 
are two ways of raising them, either 
by decreasing supply or increasing 
demand. As to the benefits of the 
first method, there is a difference of 
opinion. As for the second means— 
an increase in demand is beneficial to 
every one.” 

Aid of publishers was also pledged 
by Paul Scott Mowrer, editor-in-chief 
of the Chicago Daily News; Glenn 
Frank, editor of Rural Progress, and 
Clifford VY. Gregory, associate pub- 
lisher of Wallace’s Farmer. 

ee E. Smith, president of the Na- 

SS ah Retail Fain 


W. B. Warner says 
manufacturers will 


‘ein, seoee, | 


INCOME FROM SPECIAL 
CITY WARANTS IS HELD 
SUBJECT TO U. 5. TAX 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1-—“/)— 
The United States board of tax ap- 
peals today denied federal income tax 
exemption for income from special 
municipal tax bills, or warants, such 
as paving taxes collectible only from 
the owners of property adjacent to 
the improvement. 

The principle was laid down in a 
decision in which the board upheld 
a $783 tax deficiency assessment by 
the internal revenue bureau against 
T. I. Stoner of Des Moines, Ia. 

Stoner had invested in some Tulsa, 
Okla., sewer tax warants and claimed 
these were the same as municipal 
securities which are not subject to 
federal taxation. 

The board maintained the sewer 
tax warants could be paid only from 
taxes on specific pieces of property 
and were not general obligations of 
the city of Tulsa. 


said grocers were ready to support 
the program. 

“In behalf of individual retail 
grocers,” Smith said, “we are inter 
ested in promoting the welfare of 
the country through a meat cam- 
paign and through anything that 
helps the farmer.” 

Aid of the railroads was pledged 
by J. J. Pelley, president of the As 
sociation of American Railroads. He 
said the institute’s plan to educate 
the public was a “wise movement” 
because of the ignorance of the pub- 
lic about the live stock situation. 


AUTO INSURANCE 
FIRMS PROTEST 
PALMER RULING 


Springfield, Ill., Feb. 1—(#)—Rep- 
resentatives of thirty-five automobile 
insurance companies attended a hear- 
ing of the state insurance department 
today to protest a proposal of Di- 
rector Ernest L. Palmer that occu- 
pational ratings be outlawed. 
Attorney John A. Bloomingston of 
Chicago, representing the General 
Accident, Fire and Life Assurance 
corporation, testified that figures 
showed that automobiles, even 
though in nonbusiness use, were sub- 
ject to different hazards, depending 
on the occupation of the driver. 
Palmer contended that the plan, 
which, for example, would charge a 
different rate for a cashier of a hotel 
than for a cashier of a drug store 
was discriminatory. Palmer said the 
hearings would continue through 
Thursday, be recessed for ten days, 
then resumed. 


BUSES, ‘L’ LINES 
GAIN IN TRAFIC; 
CARS CARRY LESS 


Trafic on buses and elevated lines 
increased during January, compared 
with January, 1937, and that on the 
surface lines declined, according to 
reports from the companies yesterday. 
The Chicago Motor Coach company 
reported that revenue passengers car- 
ried in January increased 5.47 per 
cent over the corresponding 1937 
month, Trafic on the “L” was 4,2 
per cent above January, 1937, the Chi- 
cago Rapid Transit company reported, 

The surface lines carried 58,990,139 
passengers in January, a decline of 
3,81 per cent from January, 1937, In| 
December, 1937, the lines carried 
61,736,458 passengers. 


THE RICHARD 


speculative venture. 


learned your present business or 
about it. It is entirely a matter of 


The function of the W 
help you become a com oy agg 
| your own market 


oP . 
OE etn se cont ee 
- 


r 


Bankers Lend 
Fitty Million 
to U.S. Steel 


New York, Feb. 1.—(#)—The United 
States Steel corporation announced 
today it had borrowed $50,000,000 pay- 
able in one, two, and three years, 
from banks in New York, Chicago, 
and Pittsburgh. 

The corporation arranged for these 
loans, it was said, in anticipation of 
substantial outlays for new construc- 
tion work now under way. 

The financing was the first under- 
taken since 1929. Last year Wall 
street understood an issue of pre- 
ferred or common stock, or a bond 
issue, was under consideration, but 
later the money market was regarded 
as unfavorable and the plans never 
were carried through. 

Dividend Arrears Paid. 

In the meantime, however, all divi- 
dend arrears on the preferred stock, 
amounting to $9.25 a share, were 
paid, and a dividend of $1 a share on 
the common stock was distributed. 

The parent corporation, it was re- 
called, paid off all bonded indebted- 
ness in 1929 through an issue of com- 
mon stock. Subsidiary companies 
have outstanding funded indebtedness 
of approximately $111,596,000. 

Benjamin F. Fairless, president, re- 
cently testified before a senate com- 
mittee that the company planned to 
spend more than $80,000,000 in plant 
improvements and expansion in 1938, 
and that more would be allocated 
should conditions justify it. The pro- 
gram is a part of one under which 
about $230,000,000 has already been 
expended. 

Plan New Birmingham Plant. 

Chief of the projects are the big 
Irvin works being built in the Pitts- 
burgh area, costing $60,000,000, and a 
new plant project at Birmingham 
costing $40,000,000. 

Net working assets of the corpora- 
tion as of Dec. 31 were reported at 
approximately $372,334,000, compared 
with $391,330,566 the year previously. 
Expenditures for plant expansion and 
payments of maturing bonds of sub- 
sidiary companies totaled $133,600,000 
during the year. 

The company did not disclose the 
banks involved in the financing an- 
nounced today, or the interest rate. 


REFUSE TO DISCLOSE SHARE. 


Officials of Chicago banks would 
not discuss yesterday the extent of 
their participation in the United 
States Steel corporation loan. It was 
estimated that the banks here fur- 
nished nearly a third of the $50,000,- 
000 total. 


STEEL INDUSTRY 
PAY ROLLS SET 
RECORD IN 1937 


New York, Feb. 1—(4)—Pay rolls 
of the steel industry in 1937 totaled 
$976,000,000, the highest on record, 
the American Iron and Steel insti- 
tute reported today. The 1937 total 
was 16 per cent above 1929 pay rolls 
of $841,000,000, 

Employment in the industry Iles 
wise established new records in 1937. 
An average of 572,000 employés were 
on pay rolls, or 25 per cent more than 
in 1929, when 458,000 were employed. 
Steel ingot production in 1937 was 


about 9 per cent below the 1929 peak. 


D. WYCKOFF 


CourRSsE OF 
STOCK MARKET INSTRUCTION 


(Not an Advisory Service) 


[s DESIGNED for those who desire a definite market policy founded 
on market understanding and thoughtful planning, rather than sheer 


Certainly you can learn to anes ae the stock market, just as you 
+: Cece 
exactly what you have to do and koe ae to do it. 


shot Course is to give y ou. this training : 
investor or trader, fully ‘capable of directing 


sone is nothing secret 


ession. 
d experience; kn 


facts— 
, ei s—mail the tee ; 


% . age epee a 5 A ati — 


Name | eee eee sso chennee urea 
‘Street nea Ao, was apa. a 
Og ‘ - 


City Se ae Maar 


t 
- : 
; to 
- 4 


Inflationary Policy 
Still Is Feared. 


The American dollar yesterday de 
veloped more steadiness in the for- 
eign exchange market than it has 
shown for a week. It rose in value 
in relation to English money and 
most other foreign currencies. The 
French franc was an exception, clos- 
ing slightly higher against the dollar 
after its recent acute weakness. 

The British pound closed % cent 
lower in New York at $5.01. The Hol- 
land guilder declined 0.01 cent. The 
French franc ended 0.0025 cent higher 
at 3.2825 cents. 

The new shock to European confi- 
dence caused by the sinking of the 
British steamer Endymion was said 
by exchange brokers to have been a 
contributing influence in depressing 
the value of foreign currencies. 


Watch Value of Dollar. 


The external value of the dollar has 
been watched closely as an indicator 
of foreign opinion of the economic 
outlook in the United States. Recent 
declarations of economic policy by 
President Roosevelt were blamed for 
the recent weakness of the dollar 
against European currencies. 

Continental Europe in particular 
has been disturbed by the trend of 
affairs.in this country and the ebb of 
confidence in the dollar was reflected 
in a decline in its value in relation 
to continental currencies. Before the 
depression in business set in last 
August, the dollar was regarded by 
most foreigners as the safest invest- 
ment in the world for capital. The 
heavy shipments of gold to this coun- 
try showed the foreign state of mind. 

These opinions have since been 
modified and gold has been moving 
out of the United States in moderate 
volume. The uneasiness of the for- 
eigners has been heightened by the 
statements of the President as to how 
the country should attack its eco- 
nomic problems. 


Fear Troubles Like French. 


The statement of the President that 
wages should be maintained at a 
high level had an inflationary mean- 
ing to foreigners, The trend of events 
in France in the last year is fresh 
in the minds of Europeans and to 
them the Roosevelt administration 
appears to be embarked on an eco- 
nomic course similar to that which 
has brought the series of financial 
crises in Paris. 

British opinion has shown more 
confidence in the dollar. The English 
profess to believe that a stable dollar 
is reasonably certain for at least 
another twelve months. 

Foreign interest is now focused on 
the discussions in Washington as to 
how the administration may continue 
its “pump priming” financial policy 
without taking a decisive step toward 
monetary inflation. 
on 


Gen. Robert E. Wiss Giih) |e and William o. Douglas, chairman of 
the Securities and Exchange commission, principal speaker at the dinner 


of the Economic club at the Sherman hotel last night. 


joining column, 


Story in ad- 


(TRIBUNE Phoio.] 


Woolworth’s 
Sales, Profits 
Rise in 1937 


With a new peak in sales, increased 
income from foreign affiliates and 
profitable operations on recently ad- 
ded higher priced lines, the F. W. 
Woolworth company had a slight in- 
crease in net income last year over 
1936, the company’s annual report 
showed yesterday. 

Net profit in 1937 arpounted to $33,- 
176,509, or $3.40 a share, compared 
with $32,624,988, or $3.35 a share, in 
1936. This was the highest income 
since 1931, when net profit was $41,- 
348,795. Sales for 1937 were at a rec: 
ord high of $304,775,189, against $290,- 
378,407 in the preceding year. 

S. H. Kress & Co., showed net prof- 
it in 1937 of $5,856,447, or $2.30 a com- 
mon share, compared with $5,852,395, 
or $2.30 a share in 1936. 


Safeway Stores Report. 


Safeway Stores, Inc., reported 1937 
net profit of $3,078,047, or $2.62 a 
Share on 804,358 shares. This com- 
pared with profit in the preceding 
year of $4,157,252, or $4.03 a share on 
798,924 shares. 

Devoe and Raynolds company, paint 
manufacturers, had net income for 
the fiscal year ended Nov. 30, 1937, of 
$609,683, or $4.05 a share on the com- 
bined class A and B stock. This com- 
pared with income of $707,210, or 
$4.49 a share, in 1936. 

Real Silk Hosiery Millis, Inc., Indi- 
anapolis, reported net profit for 1937 
of $20,583, or $1.11 a share on the 7 
per cent cumulative préferred stack, 
compared with profit of $116,615, or 
$6.30 a preferred share, in 1936. 

Illinois Bell Telephone. 

Illinois Bell Telephone company, 
subsidiary of American Telephone 
and Telegraph company, yesterday re- 
ported net income for 1937 of $13,- 
207,545, or $8.81 a share, compared 


[Continued on page 25, column 3] 


’ 
- 


AMERICAN MINES YIELD 
GOLD, SILVER WORTH 
220 MILLION IN 1937 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1.—(P)— 
Gold and silver mines in the United 
States and its territories turned out 
$220,964,529 of the monetary metals 
during 1937. 

Preliminary figures announced by 
the bureau of mines showed gold 
production of 4,752,801 fine ounces 
valued at $166,348,035, and silver pro- 
duction of 70,838,514 fine ounces 
valued at $54,616,494. Both the vol- 
ume and value of gold output was 8 
per cent higher than in 1936. The 
increase in quantity in 1937 over 
1933, when government decrees and 
legislation raised the price of gold 
from $20.67 to $35 per fine ounce, was 
85 per cent. 

Silver production last year was 15 
per cent higher than in 1936, and 
26 per cent above that of 1935. The 
increase in 1937 over 1933 was 204 
per cent in quantity and 569 per 
cent in value. 


MILWAUKEE LINE 
REPORTS LARGER 
LOSS IN 1937 


The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul 
and Pacific railroad had a net loss 
in 1937 of $14,221,271, compared with 
a net loss in 1936 of $13,196,108, ac- 
cording to an earhings report filed 
yesterday with the interstate com- 
merce commission in Washington, 
D. C., by C. E. Oliphant, chief statis- 
tician. The report was submitted in 
connection with hearings on reorgan- 
ization of the road being held by the 
commission, 

The Union Pacific railroad yester- 
day reported December net operating 
income of $2,315,822, compared with 
$3,893,026 in the corresponding 1936 
month. For the years 1937 net oper- 
ating income was $22,886,260, a de- 
cline of $2,184,367 from the preceding 
year. 


| SECChieftain Lauds 


Chicago Leadership. 


A demand that the various stock 
exchanges of the nation reform and 
@ suggestion that the financing of 
enterprises be transferred from New 
York to the communities in which 
they are located were the high spots 
of an address here last night by 
William O. Douglas, chairman of the 
Securities and Exchange commission. 
He spoke before the Economic Club 
of Chicago at the Sherman hotel. 
Discussing the problem of the 
stock exchanges, Douglas said he has 
been heartened by the activities in 
Chicago which resulted in a proposal 
being made to the members of the 
Chicago Stock exchange for a paid 
executive staf, fully authorized and 
responsible for administrative action. 


Calls Move Significant. 


“I want to emphasize how truly 
significant it is that Chicago had the 
foresight and initiative to take the 
lead,” Douglas declared. “It is sig- 
nificant because it indicates that the 
Chicago financial community is 
thinking about—and acting upon— 
its own problems without waiting to 
see what the east intends to do. 

“Too often, in finance, cities out- 
side of New York have been content 
to sit back and wait for New York 
to assume leadership.” 

“TI look to the time,” he contin- 
ued, “when Chicago can come into 
its own in the world of finance. 
What is true of Chicago, is true of 
other regional centers. Phases of 
these local problems vary greatly 
from those of Chicago. Yet they 
have common elements. One relates 
te the stock exchanges. Another re- 
lates to the financing of local indus- 
try, including small business.” 


Warns “Job Will Be Done.” 


In stressing what he termed the 
need for the reform of stock ex- 
changes, Douglas only once gave an 
indication of a threat. He said that 
those exchanges that assume a vigi- 
lant réle in their conformances with 
the securities act will find in the SEC 
their stronger ally. Those that do 
not, he said, will find the SEC a fair 
and honest but exacting taskmaster. 
“In other words, the job will be 
done,” he said. 

Douglas spoke a good word for the 
New York Stock exchange, saying 
that the recent report of the ex- 
change’s committee studying methods 
for reform “shows real wisdom and 
courage in an effort to solve a per- 
plexing problem.” 

He said the report of the New York 
committee recommends a stock ex: 
change governed on democratic busi- 
ness principles. The New York ex- 
change is considering the hiring of 
a paid executive staf. 

Saying that neither he nor the SEC 
wanted the power to elect a presi- 
dent of the New York or other ex- 


| [Continued on page 26, column 1.) 
aN 


This advertisement ia net and is under ne eircumstances te be construed as an effering ef these securities for jails or as 
a selicitation of an offer to buy any of such securities. The offering is made only by the Prospectus. Tius advertisement is 
published on behalf of only those of the undersigned who are registered dealers in this State. 


New Issues 


Appalachian Electric Power Company 


The Fi irst Boston eae 


$57,000,000 First Mortgage Bonds 
4% Series due 1963 


Dated February 1, 1938 
Price 98°4% and accrued interest 


Due February 1, 1963 


$10,000,000 Sinking Fund Debentures 
442% Series due 1948 


Dated February 1, 1938 
Price 100'2% and accrued interest 


Due February 1, 1948 


Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained enly frem such of the 
undersigned as are registered dealere in securities in this State. 


Bonbright & Company 


Tucker, Anthony & Co. 


, ae =" 
$ ' . FF 
¢ XY #4 . % pike +9, d : 
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P esi sags nk ca ——— — ——E - a: — seer Oe Ee 
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ater ae cen nanan A ttn tp as ne a ae 
CMe ley vet ey Be Description, 


De ta Aalooues 4 
aoe Ld ‘West... 


ee Ne re 


rc. .: 
9% Rotiaee Padtae. 


0. 


11% Ohio jou’ tae}. eheewe a 
24 Oliver Farm Equip 
2 eat | 

ev ce 
Hd Otis eeeee i see 6 
13 ‘Ovtbhd M&M 54 +E 
48% Owens-Ill Gl [.25¢e] 10 


P 
Sym-G ww 
9% PacAm Fish [1.20] 2 ve 
4 ¢tPaec Coast Wee Rt 5 5 Do xw Faker 
sone ere — ay ae eRe 
ac Was . 
* 13% Pac Mills eeeeoeeee + Ln Bs re od Rg 
Y% Ye ve) 112 tPac Tel&Tel |8].0.60 
fd 16].....0.10 11% Pac W Oil [.75g]. 3 
Sage her 34 68H OK ‘56% #4 Packard M [.25¢). 
1% Panhandle P & R.. 


- 
: ee 


ox 

1. 

vo, 
Wf 3 
37 


div. ved $s— 
Acme 
5 ai 
1% 


ic i te Cie VARs h Ca i tool [4]... 
ry whict peegtles pieah gel oi 5 tae sit 
ceding session. Nonferrous metal and} 73 1% Advance Rumely . 

| an rem "Reduction ong 


= 
a ae 
“ ma, 2 ae, y 
P34 TUR 
% '. eee ¢ 
ee eee 


‘tutes market. "he yw-Jones 

ot commodity futures prices ound 
at 52.92, up 0.10 from the pects 
close. 

Rubber futures dectined from 0.13 
to 0.20 cent lower on sales of 83 lots, 
with the March contract traded at 
from 14.57 to 14.60 cents a pound at 
the close. 

* Metals Were irregular. Copper fu- 
tures were 0.08 to 0.09 cent higher, 
‘tin futures climbed 0.35 cent, zinc 
was unchangea, and lead was 0.06 


Boag 
ease eon 


~ 

ce 
Co Or Co wh OO 
PRKERER E 


“eis® 


2 ; = 
++4+4++4++44 
a 


| Micke nd 32° new lows. 
The volume of trading again was llegheny 
small, dropping to 691,590 shares, as) 0% ,.1% AiGnemapye [6al 
compared with 760,000 shares’ yester- 14% 1 Allied Mills [2¢].. 
day % 6% Allied Steres ..... 
: Allis-Chal [3.50g¢] 2 
Alpha P Cem [1]. 
Amal Leather eer 


bEes 


YQ 
Oe ee 


- & 


dg 20 27 
zs i 8 aT a1 
ss 2 82 
Ce ae 2 
4 18 
+ 
3 6 
1 
1 
1 


{Pairbanks Co pfd0.30 
F Mo 5 


— 
Co 1 Co 29 Go 


. =: 
= 


a ae 


* 
7. 
: 


-~o- 
“A singular development was the at- 
tempt by some traders to stimulate 
enthusiasm by bringing forth re- 
cently neglected issues.‘ In this con- 
nection it was noted that several of 


REE KKK 


Noe IhO-) 
we 


P 4 
1+ 
» 


Tex PL Tr 1.208) 


the issues which stand to benefit 
from the proposed housing drive were 
a bit more active. 
“United States Steel common came 
back to close % a point higher, just 
under its best quotation of the day, 
after encountering resistance on the 
rise. Republic and Youngstown added 
fractions, 
“With the approach of the day 
when the interstate commerce com- 
ion must reveal its decision re- 
garding the 15 per cent freight rate 
meee asked by the _ railroads, 
‘rier shares hardened, reportedly 
anticipation of favorable action. 
inges were mostly fractionally 
her, 


ey eo 
‘In the utilities Consolidated Edison 
worked higher after a shaky start 


and added a fraction, as did most’ 


Do pfd [4g] ... 
AmCh&Cbl [1.50¢] 15 


Am Colortype .... 


11% Am Com Ale [.50g] 


13% AmCrystSug [.50e) 


1 
2 
2 


78% tDo dad 16].0 we 


$5 AmEncausTiling 
3 Am & For Pow... 


7% Do 


pfd 
10 Am oHa waiiSs Tlal 1 
3 <AmHi a ; 


33% AmHomeP |2.40k 


1% Am Ice eeeeeeeeees 
17. Am Locomotive .. 


60 Do pfd [7g] 


9% AmM&Fdy [.20e]. 


29% Am Metal [3g] 


~ 
Crs tomesow 


i 
Corn 


25% tAmNws (1. 798). a. 20 


4% Am Pow & Lt 


11% AmRad&StS 


17% Am Rolling Mills.. 19 


66 Do pfd [4.50] 
10 <Am Seatg [1.25¢] 


1 
2 


28 tAmShipBldg [2].0.70 


Fed Wat Svc A... 12 
26e] 1 


pid [6].. 

{Fuller @ A 2d pf0.50 
G 

Gabriel Co A..... 


Do pid [7%]. ake 
G Elee [2. 20g]. 
Foods [2].... 


Dp Lom 
OOH IOP He 


d [6]. 
Gen Pr ] [.90e].. 
Gen Pub Service. 1 
GenRySignal [.25e] 2 
= Real & Util.. 19 
: 


5 pfd 
% Gen ne nee [2¢].. 


= Rae Raa: 


Do pfd ......,..0.380 
Paraf Co Inc [4g] 3 
Param Pictures .. 56 

Do 2d pfd [.60]. 2 
PkUtah CM [.15¢] 13 
Parke-Davis [.50e] 
Parmelee Transport 
Pathe Film ...... 
Peerless Cor (.30¢] 
Penick & F [1.50¢] 
Penney J C [é4aJ. 
Penn-Dix Cement . 


Hike ho tos 


Peoria & East..... 

+P Mara pf pf [5].0.60 
Petrol Cor ([1.27¢] 4 
Ph Dodge [1.60¢]. 28 
PhilaCo 6% pf [3] 1 


% Phila Read C&l... 4 


Philip Morris [8]. 19 


¢ Phillips Pet [2] .. 33 


tPirelli [1.68%¢].0.80 


Pitt Steel 
TDo pfd ..... 50 
TDo 5% pid +1040. 60 
Pitt United 
Plym Oil (t. 40a). 6 
Poor & Co 


sakat: atk 


sak at attat tak : 


i?) 
oo 
eK 
++ 
~ 


The! Pale 6s vsccvds 
Thermoid Co . 
Thomp Pr [1. 70¢1. 
% Thompson-Starrett.. 
Tide WatAOil a pa aj. 


TimkenRollB [3a]. 
Transamerica [.75] 
Trans & West Air. 
Trans&Will [.60g]. 
Tri-Cont Crp 
Truax-TraerC[ 80]. 
TwCen-F F[2.50¢]. 


Undrwd-El!| 4. ieeey, 


Un Pacifie [1. 50el. 
Do pfd [4]... 
United Air Lines.. 
United Airer [lg]. 

% United Crp [.20g]. 

Do pfd [8] : 
United Drug [.50¢] 
Unit Dyewood [1]. 
United Elec Coal. 
UnitEng&F [.50e]. 
Unit Fruit [3a]... 


“oor ® 


— 
29 CO StH oo Go CO 


{.25¢] 


= 
OWonr 


U 


3s 


we OT 


Bre 
: Pee : 7 ea 
; wk: : 3 Rete: SR mR tL eee 


to 0.07 cent lower. 

Hide futures were 0.05 to 0.08 cent 
lower, silk was narrowly irregular, 
and cocoa’ futures dropped: 007 to 
0.08 cent on sales of 225 lots. Sugar 
futures declined 0.03 to 0.05 cent in 
the world contract, and were un- 
changed to 0.01 cent lower in the 
domestic contract. Coffee futures 
were irregular, with the Santos con- 
tract off 0.01 to 0.08 cent and the Rio 
contract closing 0.01 cent higher to 
0.08 cent lower, 


FUTURES SUMMARY. 


Chicago. 
was ao eae — 8 | aon 
Feb. 1. Jan. 3 
Wheat, ioc _ one $ a4 $1: 30% $ By 
b 59% 8% 81 56% 


Corn. 
31% 
74% 
Soybe’ ns, ‘bu . pee: 


Lard, 9 
Cotton, Ib.. 


SE eR. 
sist tol ae 


44% AmSmelt&R [.75e] 29 
other leaders. 23% Am Stl Fars [2]. 42 


‘Gold mining stocks moved mod- 8% Am Stores 
estly higher for the most part. 25. Am Sug Ref (21.. 


,.Motor stocks were actively traded 
Chrysler and General Motors regis- 


—~ 


Unit Gas Imp [1]. 

U S$ & For Sec.... 

“ : s yo La ne 1 
S Hoffman Mch. eoes 

U § Indus Alco .. 1 rg ag Ib. 

U S$ Teather A... 2 8% % 8% 8 “8 | Coff., Rio, Ib 

' US Pipe&Fdry [2]. 


tGenSteelCast pfd. 260 
Gen TheaEq[1.25¢] 
Gen T&Rub [.50g] 


a M4 % Gillette Saf R 1] 
AmTel&Te!l 9 ” 
139% AmTel&Tel [9].. 7 Do pfd [5].. 


63844 Am Tob B [B}.: 6 67? ee 

138% Do pfd [6] .... 1 ¢ 33 Gimbel Bros 
5% Am Type Fdrs ... 
85 Am Wat Works 


Butter, Ib.. 


Press Stl C ert 17 
4 Eggs, doz.. 


Do ist pfd [.25] 
Do 2d pfd [2.50] 1 
Proct & Gam [2]. 5 
Pb Sv NJ [2.60]. 5 
tDo 8% pfd aig 136 


OS Or to to Oc Ol OP DO “J OD ~329 


wee: 
ax aE KE at 


Glidden Co [2a]... 
% Gobel Adolph 


tered fractional improvements. 

American Telephone and Telegraph 
Was conspicuous in the communica- 
tion group, easing % point to a new 
low for the last two years. _ 


New York Binds. 

‘New York, Feb. 1.—[Special.]—Buy- 
ing of railroad bonds broadened today 
and became more vigorous as the 
market entered February, the month 


in which investors in railroad securi- : 


ties hope the interstate commerce 
commission will sanction an increase 
in freight rates. For the first time 
in many weeks the market became in- 
creasingly active in the railroad sec- 
tor as prices advanced. 

The most spectacular gains, rang- 
ing from 3 to 5 points, were in obliga- 
tions of Southern Pacific and South- 
ern Railway, with New York Central 
issues lagging not far behind. Broad 
improvement also was registered in 
the prices of Baltimore and Ohio, IIli- 
nois Central, Missouri Pacific and 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas securities. 

*dn the highest grade groups further 
substantial advances occurred in the 
Burlington. 

Most industrials did well and utili- 
ties were better in spots. 

Less interest was displayed in 
United States treasury obligations 
which were traded in desultory fash- 
ion at prices which in most instances 
were fractionally higher. 

Foreign loans were quiet and most- 
ly firm. : 

Chicago Stocks. 
‘Chicago stocks moved upward yes- 
terday but trading continued ex- 


4 Am. Woolen .... 


28% Anaconda {[1. 75¢). 201 


88 Anacon W & C... 


25% Arch Dan M [2].. 
95 Armour Del pf [7] 
5% Arm Ill [.70g]. 
30% Armstr Cork [. 25e] 
6% Assd Dry Goods.. 
34 #£Associat Inv rBal. 
dy, Atch T&S F [2¢] 
62% Do pfd [5] ‘ 


20% Atl Cst L [1.500] 


5% Atl G&wW Indies. 


% 20 #£=Atil Refining [1].. 
104% Do pfd [4] 


pfd [3] 
42% Atlas go {3.75¢] 
3% Auburn Auto 
3% Aviation Corp 


B 
7% Bald Loco ct. 


7% Balt & Ohio . 
9% Do pfd 


1S) 
Gs 


CO 29 COM 0D HH Oe oes Coe 


1 


86 +Bang&Ar pf [5]. 0.20 


14% Barber Co [l1g]}.. 

8 Barker Bros | .75g] 
13 # Barnsdall Oil [1].. 
10% Bayuk Cigar [.75al 
15% Beatr Cream [la]. 


97  Beechnut Pkg [4a] 


10% Bendix Aviat [1]. 
16% Renef Ind Ln [2¢] 


29 Best & Co [2.50a] 
13 


53% Beth Steel 


11 
1 


1 
1 


19 


7 
3 
2 


14% Do 5% pid [1].. 13 


89% Do 7% pfd [7].. 
14 Biack & Deck [1] 
11% Blaw Knox [1.20¢g] 


2 
1 
7 


27% BoeingAirpl [.40g¢] 45 


23% Bohn Al&Bras [4g] 


1 
87? tBon Ami A [1le].0.10 
40 tDo B [.625e].0.10 


17% Borden Co [1.60]. 


22 Borg Warner [2a] 14 


17 Bow R Bear |.50e] 
7% Bridgpt Br [.75¢]. 
19% Briggs Mfg [46]. 
23 Brigs&Stra [3. 50g] 
1% Bklyn&Qu Trans.,. 


15% Bullard Co 


24%4 Bulova Watch [4]. 


7% Burling Mills [1]. 


1 


> Kate: 


s Greyhound [.80a]. 


GEE kao 


Pa Re Ee 


© aaki ¢ akakat: 


Goebel Brew 20a) 
Goodrich B F [lg] 
GoodyT&R [2.50¢] 

Do pid [5] ..... 
Graham Paige Mot 2 


29 Co 
BE OCOABNOwHROH 


Fea 
GraniteCs (1. 1266) 
Grant W T J 
Gt Nor IrOre[. 


Gt WestSugl2.40a] 
Green H L [1.60a] 


* Ol ag mm CO © 69.29 2929 Co 


Do pfd [.55].... 
H 


Hall W F Print 
Harb Walker| ry] 
Hat Corp A [.20e] 
Hayes Body . 
Hecker Prod [.60] 
Hercules Motor [1] 


waQe or 


% Hercules Pow|.75g¢) 


tDo pfd [6] ....0. 10 
Holland Furn[.5Ve) 13 

tTDo pid [5]....0.20 
Holly Sugar{2.25e] 1 
Homestak M[4.50] 51 
Houd-Her A [2.50] 1 
Household Fin[{4a] 1 

Do pid [5] .... 1 
Houston Oil 6-ae 
Howe Sound [3a]. 4 
Hudson & Man 1 
Hudson Motr{. 25) 11 
Hupp ver Looe. a 


Illinois Central ... 10 
tIll Central LL[4].110 
Do pfd 5 


sonar Rayon [ ‘25e] 17 
Inland Steel [4]... 3 
Inspirat Copper ... 38 
Interb Rap Trans.. 1 
Interchem Corp ... 2 
tDo pid (él. +0020.20 
Intercon Rubber 1 
Interlake Irn[ 65¢) 26 
Int Agricultural .. 3 
Do pr pfd [3¢].. 1 
Int Bus Machi6a] 1 
Int Hary [2.60].. 19 
Be he Biase 2 
Int Hydro Elec A 16 
Int Mer Marine... 3 
Int Mining’ [.90¢] 13 
Int Nick Can [2a].149 
Int Pap & P . 


Pullman [1.50a]... 6 
Pure Oil [.25¢].. 81 
Purity Bak [.60]. 11 


Quaker Sta Oi] [1] 1 
R 


Radio CofA [.20¢] 53 
Do cv pfd [3.50] 4 
Radio-Keith-Orph . 20 
Reading Co [2] .. 
Rem Rand [.25e]. 13 
Reo Motor Car ... 5 
Republic Steel ...¥ 75 
Revere Cop & Br. 19 
Reynolis Met [1] 2 


% Reynolds Spring 


tReyn Tob hs 20e] 0. 60 
Do B [1.20e].... 26 
Richfleld Oi1[.25¢] 6 
Roan Ant Cop ; 
Ruberoid [.60a].. 5 


S 


Safeway Stor [2a] 6 

TDo 5% pfd [5].0.20 
St Joseph Lead [2] 14 
vy Monae Fran .. 1 


pfd 
Sav Arms [1.50g¢] 1 
Schenley Dist [3] 3 
Do pfd [5.50]... 


% Schulte Ret Sirs. 


tScott Pap [.40e12. 60 
Seaboard Oil [1]. 
Sears Roeb [3a].. 11 
Servel Inc [1] 
Sharon Stl [1. 20] 
Sharp & Dohme.. 
Shattuck FG[.60a] 
Shell Un Qil [lg] 
Do pfd [6.50].. 
Silv K Coali [.25e] 
Simmons [(2.25¢].. 
Skelly Oil [1.50¢]. 
Do pfd [6] 
tSloss-Sh [1. 50g] 0.10 
Sm & CT [1.625¢] 1 
Socony-Vac [.80g]. 51 
So Am G&P [.20¢] 31 
So P BR Sug [2]... 1 
So Cal Ed [1.50a] 2 
Southern Pac...... 69 
eeeee 18 
ieee rm 
[4] 1 
Sparks Withington. 1 
Sperry Cor [1.20g] 31 


MPOQQTwr wwe 


U §S Real & Imp ., 
U 8 Rubber 12 

Do ist pid .... 
USSmeltR&M ge 

Do pid [3.50]. 
U 8 Steel 

Do pid [7] .. 
USTobacco pf [7 1. 0. 40 
UnitStockyds [.50] 
United Stores A., 
Util Pow & Lt A. 


V 


Vadseco Sales . 
VanadiumCrp fig] 
Va-Caro Chem ..., 
Do 6% pf [1.50¢] 
*+VaEl&P$é6 pf[6].0.90 
4 *Va tron C & C€.0.10 
VirginianRy pf [6] 1 


WwW 


Wabash Ry .cccce 2B 
Dol DIG A seice «9 
Walaeeen Co [2] 1 
Walker HG&W [4] 9 
Walworth Co [lg]. 23 
Warner Bros Pict. 26 
Warren Bros 17 
Waukesha Mot [1] 2 
Wayne Pump [2]. 1 
WessonO&S[.625e]. 4 
tWestPenEIA [7].0.10 
WPennP 7% pil7].0.20 
TDo 6% pf [6].0.70 
West Maryland .... 
West Pacific pfd.. 1 
West Union Tel... 26 
WestinghAirBr [1] 6 
West El & Mfg [le] 49 
tDo pid [le] ..0.10 
WestvyCh pfd [1.50] 1 
Wheeling Steel ... 5 
White Motor 14 
White Sew’g Mach 3 
Do pfd 10 
Wileox Oil & Gas.. 
Wilson & Co...... Pee ¥ 
Woodward Iron ... 3 
WiworthFW [2.40] 18 
Worthington P&M 3 


b 


Yellow Tr & Coach.137 

TDo 7%pf [7] .0.30 
Young Sp¢g & W... 2 
Yngst S&T [3.25¢] 67 
Young St Dr [.26e] 7 


Z 


Zenith Radio 13%+ %& 


n . 0720 .0475 

Since ‘trading in the contract started. All 
prices are for May delivery except butter 
and eggs, which are for February, and hies 
for June, 


NEW YORK FUTURES. 


[Yesterday’s closing prices in cents. per 

pound unless otherwise stated 7 
Cottonseed Oil. 

Closed 03 to .05 cent lower. February, 

vue oar ay 7.59; April, 7.60: May, 7.61: 

an ugust, 7.65; Septe .69, 

rl eptember, 7.69 

Coffee. 


Rio—Closed unchanged to .07 cent higher. 
March, 4.55: May 4. 27; July, 4.04: Senkeas. 
ber to December, 4.03. Sales 1,500 bags. 

Santos—Closed .01 to .08 cent lower. March, 
6.39; May, 6.15: July, 6.05: September, 
6.02; December, 6.03. dears 22,000 bags. 


Sugar, 

Contract No. °3 (dedidatte!—Cidesd un- 
changed to .02 vent lower. March, 2.24: 
May, 2.63: July. 2.27; September, 2.28: 
January, 1939, Pag Sales, 6,1E9) tons. 
Contract No. 4 [world]—Closed .03 to .05 
cent lower. March, 1.05; 1.07%; 
July, 1.09%; September, 1.12; January, 
1939, 1.16%: March, 1.17: May, 1.18%. 
Sales, 15,100 tons. 

Wool Tops. 

Closed unchangéd to .05 cent higher. May, 
77; July and October, 75.7; December, 75.5. 
Cocoa, 

Closed .04 to .08 cent lower. February, 
5.39; March, 5.46; May, 5.45; July, 5.51; 
September, 5.55; December, 5.67. Sales, 

225 lots. 
Rubber. 


13 to .20 cent lower. February, 
March, 14.87; April, 14.64: 
June, 14.75; July, 
September, 14.94; October, 14.99; 
November, 15.04 : December, 15.09; January, 
ts 


4o2939, 16.14, Sales, , 


My 


Closed .05 to .08 


8.94: June, 9.26: 


ber, 9.91. Sales, 95 lots. 


+ ee Closed % cent lower “to ty 


Sales, 
Metals. 


. tremely light. Volume totaled only 
12,000 shares, compared with 13,000 3% 2 Bush ger geet dat 


| 19 Butl Br pf 
shares on the preceding day. 3% Butte Cc Ps Z {.10g] 11 
1 


tSpic Mfg pf A[3].1.70 oar" 
*Do pf [l. 25k). 0. ‘10 Spiegel Inc [1].. 7 TUnit of trading ten shares. *Ex dividend. xr—Ex rights. a— Witieessttealilll 08 to .09 
Int Shoe [2] 2 TDo pfd [4. 501 0.50 Also extra or extras. b—1/10 share of $2 preference’ stock. d—| February, 8.93; March. 8.95- april 8.97: 
Of the fifty-nine series traded, twen- 8% Byers AM Co.. Int Tel & Tel. eye "geen ee Square D [2g] ... 7 1/25 share of $3 preferred stock. e—Declared or paid so far this} May, 9: June, 9.04: July, 9.08; August, 
.ty-seven advanced, thirteen declined, 30% Do p [2%. 50g). 0.20 Do for 11 Std Brands [.80].. 17 % 8% 8% calendar year. f—Payable in stock. g—Paid last year. h—Cash or| 9.09; September, 9.10; Ocisben, 9.12; No- 
‘d 193 h ed. THE TRIBUNE Cc InteraDeptstt?. 75¢] ‘2 stock. k—Accumulated dividend paid or declared this calendar year. | vember,” 9.14; December, 9.15: January, 
an were unchanged. tD6 ptd [7]...0.1 G his %y Sales to 11 a. m., 180,000; to 12 noon, 370,000; to 1 p. m.,| 1939, 9.17. Sales, 63 lots. 
‘average of twenty stocks closed at 19. Calit Pack [250a) * J % 8% 460,000; to 2 p. m., 540,000: total, 691,590 shares. Lead—Closed .06 to .07 cent lower. 
9.53, up 0.17 from the previous close. eS ra Do $6 pr pfd... 1 15% 15% 15% WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. 1.—[Special.]—Odd lot purchases| February and March, 4.48; April to August, 
’ : 6% Cal & Hee [1.10g] 19 Johns-Manv [3a].. Do $7 pr pfd... 3 19 19 18% by customers were 147,812 shares on Jan. 31; sales, 110,325 shares. | 4.49: September, 4.50; October, 4.51: No- 


Zenith Radio rose % to 14%, pos 15% asi rea ak “aa a (1) 56 vember, 4.52: December and January, 1939, 
ing a total gain of 1% points in the an wry G Am..- : 4.53, Sales, 3 lots. 

7 Canad Pacific .... % Y% % Th Kan City South.. 7 7 e . 
|dast two days. * 99 Cann Mille f. Kayser J [.26e].. MONEY, GOLD, AND SILVER | BO ARD OF TRADE GRAIN FUTU RES on "inne 458 Se ae 
= ime “Se! Cas _ og 1 ieneey Manes Wha 1% pot Tin [standard and Pree mega aE g 

arp e g ‘:°| NEW YORK, Feb. 1.—()—Bar silver =| cent higher, February, 40 are 
; © Kennee Cop [2a] .104 : Me at April, 41.05; May, 41.15; June, 41.25: July, 
| - WHAT STOCKS DID He plerpil Tr I %y 44 Y% 7% Keystone 8 & W.. : se 7% 44%c, unchanged. [Prices, Feb. 1, 1938, in dollars per bushel. soe A 21 ae eee 
‘ eeeeve y, 53% Y, + 


Sat: KE ak 


= 
— 
A. 
& 


a 
a 
+ 


Re KF: 


ee 


Kresge 8 § [.30e] LONDON, Feb. 1.—(/P)—Money, %%. Dis- heat. , October, 41.65; November. 41.75; December, 
“or niegt [1.60] gy egw J eon > ge ghee Open. — lox. Close. i ga ae " bes Sie eo Low, | £1.85; January, 1939, 41.95. No sales. 
bgp Pe A EN Rag B+ aE ee a '88%- 89 .89% 88% 1.12%-112% 1.05% CHICAGO FUTURES. 
Oe een ee ee 89% ‘88 1.08%-1.08% .91% CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE. 
| a ey te ae — —— oe mn 
,| trading today ted States dollars clo ; : ; 59 1.05%-1.05% .81 . 
30.42f [3.287 cents to the franc], com- ‘ea aa ; 10% Sen: Sen nee. Ler. 190 sone.) wand 
pared with 3.280 cents to the franc in New| September .. 6 % j 6 94 - 94% 62% . | pen High. Close. lose. 
York overnight. Exchange on London, ats. .$ ry 52% 8.52 $ 8. ry $ 8.52% 8.57 
(152f 62%c. Principal. rent issues in the| May ..,...... 31% . 81 ; ; Re 49%- 49% 42% 8.75 8.75 8.70 8.70 7 
bourse were: 3%, 6Bf, 65c; 4%s “A,” 72f | July rig ; ; : 29 : 44 (32% uly 8.87 885 8.85 
80c; 4%s 1937, 107f 20c. September .. : ; ; .41%- .41% .30% pn Sb 8.97 : 8.98 8.97 
MONTREAL, Feb. 1.—()—Silver futures Rye. Clear Be 
closed unchanged to ten points — No sales, | May ...ccssee ; ‘ ‘ ‘ : 1.10 =.84 ? $11.20 $11.20 sir .20 $11.20 $11.30 
Bids: February, 44.65c; March, 44.45c; May, | Jwy ‘ ‘ ‘ .99%-1.00 “72%. July 11.70 11.70 11.70 11.70 11.72 
44.35¢c; July, 44.16¢. September ee ‘ ‘ ‘ . O07 ‘ 89% .69% .66 CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE. 
n Butter. 


: oy Beans. 
Foreign Exchange. MEM ascccoise 1.04% 1.06 1.04% ; 0 1.56% 1.06% {Cents per pound.] 


{Quotations in American cents.] OU dccevvadc 1.04% 1.04% 1.04% 1.554106. Prev. 
Feb.1. Jan.31. Wk. ago. Yr. ago. Stor. stands.— Open. Higch. Low. Close. close. 
London ..601.00 601.387% 499.81% 489.68 30% 30% ae aan 


t tam tam f2l1 CASH GRAIN fe GRAIN IN OTHER || oi 30% 30% 30% Bom 
Sey aaa a3. ie MARKETS [ Cents peg ae 


Refr. stands.— Open. High Low. Close. close. 


ewe 


NWP 


[Tuesday, Feb. 1, epet 19% Gelot Corp (1.8 20¢i 3 
TRIBUNE AVERAGES. 3% Cent Foun 
ss Net 85% Cerro de Pas fie] a. 
High. Low. Close chge. as% Do. 6%. fds 0.40 
@5 railroads... 22.01 21.70 21.88 4.35 32% Ches & O [. 760). 15 
[25 industriats. 154.03 151.94 153.56 +2.54 1° Chi & N West.. 
stocks.... 88.02 86.82 87.72 +1.45 % Chi Grt West 


at 11. Chi M Ord [.25e] 
a —— % Chi M St P & P.- 


, 50 stocks one yr. ago. .140.12 137.86 139.38 1 bat Tes he Honk 
"50 stocks two yrs. ago. 120.15 118.82 119.63 9% Chi Pneu. Tool... 
ASSOCIATED PRESS AVERAGES. oS 


30 indus. 15 rails. 15 util. 60 stks. 


Met change .+1.2 3 +4 
Tuesday .... 62.3 e 31.5 > 3% Childs Co 
Month ago.. 62.6 33.0 67 ©6-B9 tCIee pf [6.50]. 03 
Year aco .... 99.5 52.6 2% City Stores 
: 34.9 19% Cle Gf Br [2. 80g] 
31.0 33% Clim Mol [1 70g] 
% 13% Cluett Peabdy [1] 
113 CocaCola {[3al.... 
8% Colg-Palm-P ; 


_ 
SES. RS 


Lee R&T fares: 
Leh Port C [.26e] 
leh Val B B..... 
Lehman Corp [1]. 
% Lib-O-G Gl [4g]. 
LibMcN&L [1.40g] 
Ligg & Myers [4a] 
Do B { 


~ 


COOrWPRFOSY RE ADeH Ob Ode 


Liquid Carb [1. 60] 
Loew's Inc [7.50¢] 
EtG TUG  awe'ccvss 
Lone St Cem [Sa] 
Long Bell Lumb A 
Lorillard P [1.20] 
Do pid [7]......9.6 
Ludlum Stl [.26¢] 
M 


~ 


akaka@ak: al aakatatetat! tart 


Mack Trucks [la] 
Macy R H Co [2] 

2 t My Mecmatop  [2:7663 
91% Do pfd [6] : agmaCop [2.75¢ 
21 Collins & Aik {5e] , 22 wae 9 Manh Ry mod etd 
8 #Col & So ist pf.0.10 bi Manhat Shirt [1] 
15 Col Fuel & Ir [ig] 1 6 Mar Midland [.40] 
DOW-JONES AVERAGES. 17% Col Best A [1.95¢] Marlin-Rock|4. 768] 

Net G Col G & B (456) 53 hall 


Low. Close. chge. 12 Colum Pic vte [1 


122.69 123.97+2.10 65 Colum Carb [4a]. 


31% Com] Credit [4a]. 
19.22 19.534 .32 36, Coml InvestTr{4al 


7% Com! Solvents[.60] 
40.00 40.424 .66 1% Com’with & South. 
23% CmwlithEdien[(1.256] . 
20% lem-Nairn{[2] 4 Y% McGraw Elec [1]. 10 
145% Consol Airer [.50g] 5 15e]} 1 
20% Cons Edison [.50e] 
91% Do pfd [65).. 


a 


Official receipts of grain at Chicago Tues- 
eye Wheat, 11 cars; Pao ae ate oats, oe 
cars; rye, 2 cars{$ barley, cars; soy February Wheat, 14 % 21% 21% 21% 
beans, 1 car. Range of cash grain prices peer graded Prose a atin % . 
per bu in leading markets: Open. High. Low. Close. .| February . 19 19 18% 18% 19% 
WHEAT. B. A....1.10% 1.11% 1.10% 1.10% 1.10 CASH PRICES. 

Chicago, Kansas City. St. Louis. March Wheat. [ Wholesale. ] 

@eeeeeveses 974%@1. 00% 1.01 *Rtm, e e6eced x ‘ Chi . 
@eeeeeeeeee 97 96%@97 B. A....1.10% 1.11% 1.10% . . Feb. m 
secesseseee 98 @93% 91%@93% | tLvpl..1.138% 1.14% 1.13% 1. fattes! exten Sh wee oS 
‘ . ° Perr e ry ge eu niin i oh i Mago Cattle, tops, cwt 10.50 
2.35 2.3 2.35 2.3 : Ceeecconers 98% @1.04% Sean tet , 92% .938% .92% 93% . Clear bellies, Ib.... 

Czechos] . 3.51% 3.51% ; 51% 3.49% ‘ Crrerevens Winni Simian or Corn. No. 2 yel, bu.... 
Finland . 2.22% .222 222 2.17 mL AS, 1.12%@23%, . os 88% Eggs, extras, doz 
: ‘ Wnpg. .1.26% Hides, hvy packer, rains 


Canada .1'00.014 100.01% 100.00 . 
28.00 29.40 - tLvpl. .1.11% 1.12% 1.11% 1. Howe 0008, @Wbecss0c0 


Argentina. 27. .80 ‘ 1.20 
ne, 8. og ‘ 33.42 92% 92%@1.08% duly Wheat. eaineees. 
Brasil a1 4 ; oledo, Omaha, | K. C.... .86%  .87% .86% 87%  .85% RRR Si 
ong 0 g. i'snecedbcaweunesane 00% @01% 1 0 “4 Mpls, 1.01% 1.02% 1.01% . . Oats, No. 2 white, “bu. 
youl eel : ; . *Steel scrap, ton 
pe. ot. . Wheat, No. 2 hd, bu.. 


: : CORN. 1.02 
Melville Shoe {le} 42 42 . 5 415 30 Chicago. fLvpl. .1.11% 1. 12% i. ‘11% *Average price Chicago a and Pit 
New York. 


Mengel Co ..secses 
0 September Wheat, 
Rectan. 19. $0 BB @55% Mpls. .. .97% oT 97% : {Prices per pound.] 
| Mexico -» 27.80 ek ane one October Wheat. Antimony, American.,..$ ri 
" 644% | Wns. .1.00% te 00%  .99% 1. ng Weg OE on sae 
~ *Nominal. t Registered. eeereresens @eteaeesesesr B. A 78% mera Co ; electrolytic 5... 
Ces, Pe ria. diac: Scie 2 Do expo. eervteeeeceees 


7% : 
LONDON AVERAGES. 27%4 Cont Ins [1.60a].. 29 7% 65% M a siaecn © 
1% Motors 10 1% 3% 7 Mission {1.2561 es 4 yel.. sete bS% 4 50% oo | ROM, on seeeee cseees hoc . ‘ | va nena 


[London Financial Times Cont ' 
: 7 , 28% Cont Oil Del [.25e] 19 3 Mo-Kan- vevees PRIMARY GRAIN MOVEMENT. {4 Sei’: 48 Mae Gar. gg ilagapen ie 

Be rans ieren te St oe 80% 61 80% L 1% Mo Pacific pid..." + Receipte— Wheat, Corn, Oats, [5 Yeles. scesesceees K. C.... 56% 56%  .56% 56% | Sugar, raw, 96 duty D 
Matis Che eesereceresceseoesesssseses 64.7+- sf : uo as ress 3 2 . Tuesday eeeeeeee . 289,000 814,000 171,000 h Ceeeesvesese ereeeeegsere B, ivi 65 6444 7 Do — refined be ee ee 
| oneaeee ot. (esi Week ago .......265,000 441.000 203,000 
Montg Ward {. ov s Year ago 147, 138,000 
+*Mor&Ess| 3. 875 4. £* 9.29" * 90. 292,000 


Mother Lod 56 4 
Motor Prod 4 of] "7 : : 4 at P sis.. 
11% Tuesday ...+++.++279,000 


Week ago s pacce «429,000 760 
‘Year ago ........263,000 
1936 595 0'e0'e sd ae 


M J 51 1 etl 
-Am Sugar.,. tDo pfd [5 04 
rag’ ({1661..1.10 Murray’ “— [.25¢] 6% _ BAY MARKET. 


go Lit pene ereerenes Uv. grades— 
é i al eeeeesseore 73 7™!% 6 Curtis blishing 6 44%, ae Hy Wy % Nash-Kelv {.125e] 25 | Timothy, OORT iad 1 9 LA: t | : 
i. i | 212 206 B10] 54 4, Curtiss-Wright . 4% 4% 4 20% Ct teies easy toy ee Ae Altalts, relict! Bogee 14@10° 2) eee a ma) Eicdearstt teh” MORSE. orld > Ay 2 71 | Bigh | a i 

ae ae nee ieGunvGH1S 501080 “in” ae" ae” te 43° 41 NatBd&Sb[26e] 1 41 41 41 41” ....| Oat and wheat straw, rail $7.00@8 Milwankse ssccse | 88g iacaedic | ee — tow ae 
= eeu “imade a ao} a3 dak 15k iy deme tase Bites Gea Hae ae ted [aaa = OTE ESRSTaN | my eee 


. Wis Samy SETS so | 


Orscr 
-_ 
am 
— 
S 
3 Be 
Cr te 00-3 6229 Ph a9 29-3 
© 
coon 
++] 
oO 
= aR: RAR: Ra: 


— 
y= 
6? 

rary 
8 
ERS! 
a 
me 
~ 
~w 

- 
Coc 
Re 


Tuesday. Monday. 
SES ES ES PEE EE 378 


or syrserseest ieee 171 1% Consol Film ind.. 
Seseeeoeseesesesesessess 4Y, Cons Laundries = 
sca 8% Consol Oil [.80]... 
TTTTTITTTTITT Tire S44 yy 88 Consol Textile sees 
covccccccedecess 1S 5 4 Consol’nCoal [14a] 
12% ContainerCrp[1.20] 
10% Cont Bak A...... 
1% Do B eevereeeeees 
73 Do pfd isi. ss 

% 38% Cont Can [.50e 
107 Do pfd [4. S07. 

Cont Diam Fib. eee 


RR 
FRFKSKE LK 
nwo FODHE Ph 


MN 0% 6 ba8 i Gakeemons @eeseeevere 


_ 


SE 


- BRD 
MMOH HRAOMHWMWHHE 


© Mmabharnwa 


en la cB 


_ @@@ ee eeeaoseteeeeeesen 


pase Cemeie City. St. Louis. | K. CO... , , . Wool 83 
™ 33 | iG <a BO ee eeoeeerens K Cc Se tember Corn, 1 ; i 4 : 
338% @33% 2% seeeeseosene a: gobi ep Flour, std ye bb, Minn$ 6.00 $ 5.85 
33 Lead, Louis. 


SUWOBON osisceesess May Oats. . 
Duluth. Rossa Minneapolis. | Mpls. .. : ; |} 28%] Zine.” Ib, EB. St. Loui rag 08 


31 Wnpg. . .49 49% 48% ; onus 
eeeeeveeeee ‘ COMMODITY INDEX. me 
ae eae aa ee Mpls. .. . a Press weighted ‘wholesale rice 
Winnipeg O37) Heo October Oats. nar Spe cl M ago. Yr. 

50 ce ee | i mat = o. ad 


et etereaeeose 5! 


22 Cream ofWht[.50e] 


~ 
= 00 ph GO 4 GO 29 CO 


% Cuba Co 
on (Cuba R BR pfd d....0.20 
Cuban 


44 ddd de 


ww POD Wore 
PO RRS Rall Ste a Sennett ennai nensrsteinnideinn sen con 


BCLUER Aton 


DANGIC® ..++eess) seeeee 
: e ef -y-pdeang . meeeed 
sunuaer seeeves. 4 


pent SE me 


Se’ : : ; 
ge na |S 
ig OM, 7 6 _ 
4 a - , 
- sats 
a : ™ % 
Van ban ; hay Rs 
Si te ¥ P ‘< 
sai ; Nat Wig 
= Sa 
1 BS 0o 
i ve 
Sea t : 
Ss Nee * 
eae 
> - " 
= 


si oats 


¥. oS ae pat? “A hae se. 
Kg Se! ue St! Ra Soe Vea eae 


shes mene SA Es Selb ga ION ORES 
a x zt, 


‘ee fe ie 5 Ee Re Mee Ti Nag ta) eee pat gaat pd i 
SRR SERS TOR AE 
RE TORS CE ND NS a 4 ESCY 

Rickie le " 

> Bist 
4 7 


> — + : . iy a ‘i . es ¢ “ 5 « é ¥, ~e, ae eal 
ae yee ARR any rai ae te Aeleerea g  o ar tergT fara eh, 
s nf ¢ ‘ Pee Nee 
oe Boe oe 


es, of Ei 2 
be 5 nn RE 
CS OE 


BN | Thirty-two auto 
y | panies affiliated with the National Bu- 


- Debate Freight Increase 
at |. C. €. Hearing. 


Washington, D. C, Feb. 1—(P)— 
Railroad operators and repranente: 
tives of the Na- 
tional Association ~ 
of Railroad and 
Utilities Com- 
missioners gave 
clashing testi- 
monytoday 
about the rail- 
roads’ request for 
a i5-per cent 
freight rate in- 
crease. 

-The interstate 
ecommerce com- 
mission heard Lu- 
ther M. Walter, 
co-trustee of the 
Chicago Great 
Western railroad, 
plead that the 
railroads needed Luther M. Walter. 
mot only the increase, but protection 
from wage increase “abuses,” and a 
better division of revenue. 


John E. Benton of the commis- 
Bioners’ association asserted that 
consolidation of lines rather than in- 
creases in rates would solve the rail- 
road problem. 

Two Witnesses Clash. 


“The railroads need the full in- 
crease in rates,” Walter said. 


“If the time has come when the 
railroads cannot operate without rais- 
ing rates, then they must be con- 
solidated and placed on an efficient 
operating basis,” Benton countered. 


Defending his own program for 
partially pooling the revenues of rail- 
roads to give “the consumer access 
to every point of production and the 
producer access to every point of con- 
sumption,” Walter demanded: 


“How, other than by pooling, is 
the public to be sure that it is not 
going to make the fat pig fatter in 
order to give the hungry runt enough 
to live on?” 


Opposes Government Ownership. 


Walter insisted that the railroads 
wished to stay as far away as pos- 
sible from government ownership. 
But speaking of the Chicago Great 
‘Western, he said that if it was to be 
saved from government ownership, 
“something must be done.” . 

Charles Cotterill of the Middle At- 
Jantic States Motor Carrier Confer- 
ence, said trucking rates should be 
increased also because present trans- 
portation rates were too low to cover 
operations. 

Douglas Smith, representing the 
Railroad Security Owners’ associa- 
tion, pleaded for public understand- 
ing of railroad problems. 
| ‘The Live Poultry Shippers’ associa- 
(Mion of Chicago filed a brief oppos- 

any increase in freight rates on 
shipmen 


‘poultry ts. 
tocks of Gasoline Set 


Record as January Ends 


New York, Feb. 1.—(4)—Gasoline 
tories jumped 2,059,000 barrels 

fin the week ended Jan. 29 to the 
highest level in history. Estimates 
’ the American Petroleum Institute 


Now ok, Feb. 


reau of ty. and Surety Under- 
writers today put into effect in twen- 
ty-five states a “safe driving” pro- 


at the end of each year to drivers 
who have no accidents. 

The refunds would amount to ap- 
proximately 15 per cent of premiums, 
officials of the bureau said. At the 
same time affiliated companies an- 
nounced a rate increase of 5 per cent, 
meaning that the premium refunds 
actually will amount to about 10 per 
cent, 

88 Companies Are Menibers. 

The bureau has a membership of 
thirty-eight stock companies. A num- 
ber of nonmember companies write 
insurance at rates followed by mem- 
bers of the bureau and it was under- 
stood that such companies also would 
follow the lead of member companies. 
Mutual companies and many others 
do not plan to follow the “safe driv- 
ing” program at present, it was said 


here. 
The plan applies only to policies 


“ 1.—TSpecial.J—, wi 
le insurance com-| said. 


gram calling for premium refunds} j 


ments, delayed ty : urther study, or 

not yet acted upon by the state de-| 
4iinois, the state in- 
mm t has not acted, 


A few members of ‘the national 
bureau have objected to the. plan. 
One of the companies, the Con- 
tinental Casualty company of Chi- 


|cago, has asserted that instead of 


adopting the “safe driver program” 
it will reduce premiums a flat 15 
per cent from new bureau rates at 
the time the insurance is written in 
states where the new rates are ef:- 
fective. | 

An official of Continental Casualty 
expressed the opinion that the “safe 
driver” program was unfair to the 
public because, he said, it might re- 
ward the “lucky” driver rather than 


the safe driver. 


Everyday Economics 


{Registered U. S. Patent Office.} 


This daily feature is presented_in 
response to requests for simple ex- 
planations of matters concerning 
finance, business, and the@markets. 
Suggestions from readers are wel- 
comed, Address “Editor, Hveryday 
Economics,” 


Leases. 


Many persons come into contact 
with leases. Renters usually sign 
leases for their apartments, and many 
stores occupy leased premises. Nev- 
ertheless, leases frequently prove be- 
wildering to some persons. 

Briefly, a lease is a contract be- 
tween a landlord and tenant govern- 
ing the period of time the tenant 
is to occupy the premises, the rental 
he will pay, and other obligations of 
both parties. Leases usually are in 
writing, but some states permit a 
lease for less than one year to be 
verbal, 

A lease may contain any provisions 
that the landlord or his tenant find 
agreeable, although there are stand- 
ard forms used in such renting. In 
order to avoid confusion and later 


misunderstandings, the landlord and 


tenant should discuss carefully all 
the provisions governing the occu- 
pancy of the premises, and incorpo- 
rate these provisions into the lease. 
The tenant, as well as the landlord, 
should understand all the terms con- 
tained in the lease. 

No legal limitations exist as to the 
length of the term of a lease. It may 
be made for one day or a thousand 
years. 


Tomorrow: Holding Companies. 


Edison Annual Meeting 


~ Is Postponed to April 5 


Date of the annual meeting of 
Stockholders of the Commonwealth 
Edison company has been changed 
this year to Tuesday, April 5, James 
Simpson, chairman, announced yes- 
terday. Stockholders formerly have 
met on the last Tuesday in February. 
The change was made, Simpson said, 
in order to allow a longer period 
for taking the annual audit and pre- 


paring the annual report. 


Day By Day Story of fhe Yt, 
Experi Mental Farms 2s 


Revive an Old Art 


Feb. 1, 1938, 
IONEER methods of growing 
hedge apple trees may be tried 
out this spring at the Tribune’s 
Wheaton farm. Attempts will 
be made to revive the old time art of 
preparing and planting the seeds of 
‘the big green apples, also commonly 
called Osage oranges, as practiced by 
early settlers on the prairies who 
used them to grow hedge fences. 
All the old hedge row fences are 
from the farm, but there still 
many of the hedge apple trees 
acattered about the place. Twenty- 
Ss toot bushels of the apples were picked 
last fall and stored in a fruit cel.- 
lar. Men at the farm want to grow 
of the trees for landscaping and 
- wind breaks. Their past efforts 
growing these trees from seeds 
have not been successful. 
Recently the farm manager has re- 
ceived numerous letters from people 
Who grew hedge apple trees years 
© organ’ the methods they fol- 
ed in saving, preparing, and plant- 

dng the seeds. Some of these sugges- 
will be tried at the farm. 


: Advice from Wenona. 
ogg Woolf of Wenona, IIL, 


‘60s and ’70s when they 
emand for fences on the 
prairies. I gathered the ap- 
as they were ripe in the 


stirred them daily during this soften- 
ing process. Then I strained them 
through a burlap bag. This left all 
the seeds released from the pulp so 
they could be spread out and dried.” 

Mr. Woolf says the seeds should be 
planted in the spring in well pre- 
pared seed beds. He suggests plant- 
ing them in rows so the plants may 
be carefully weeded and cultivated 
a they are ready for transplant- 

g. 

Mrs. L. Harmon of Bloomington, 
Ill, says that she has been successfu] 
in getting hedge apple seeds to 
sprout by cutting the apples in half 
in December and pressing the halves 
tightly to the ground and leaving 
— over winter without any cover- 

g. 


Cultivated Like Corn. 


R. L. Galpin of Galesburg, Ill., in. 
relating his experiences with grow- 
ing hedge apples back some seventy 
years ago, says: 

“We washed the seed ‘out of the 
pulp in the spring and prepared a 
good seed bed and planted the seed 
12 inches apart in rows 3 to 4 feet 
apart. We cultivated the plants the 
Same as corn, leaving them in this 
bed two years. Then we took them 
up, cutting the tap root about 8 
inches below the surface and cutting 
back the top of the plant to balance 
the plant with the root system, 

“'We worked the fence row into a 
»| g00d seed bed and put the plants 12 
inches apart in the row. We con- 
tinued to cultivate them until they 
were large enough to take care of 


nie "4 - $C Ottaw = * y i - , , eer 4 
S NEAE aD me: j: 3 RICH 


SALES, PROFITS 
OF WOOLWORTH 
COMPANY RISE 


Other Firms Report 
Varying Results. 


[Continued from page 23, column 6.] 


with $12,761,666, or $8.51 a share, in 
1936. During the year, the company 
had a net increase of 72,416 tele- 
phones in service, compared with an 
increase of 73,309 in 1936. 

The company’s 1937 profit was the 
largest on record; compared with a 
previous high of $13,075,212 in 1929, 

The Commonwealth and Southern 
corporation yesterday showed 1937 
net income of $15,124,836, or 18 cents 
a common share, subject to audit and 
year-end adjustments. This compared 


in 1936. In December, 1937, net in- 

come was $1,166,248, against $1,893,600 

in the corresponding 1936 period. 
Butler Brothers Earns Less. 


Butler Brothers, Chicago merchan- 
dising corporation, yesterday re- 
ported that unaudited 1937 net earn- 
ings were equal after preferred stock 
dividend requirements to $1,261,000 in 
1937, against $1,908,000 in 1936. The 
1937 figure was equal to $1.12 a com- 
mon share, compared with $1.70 in 
the preceding year. 

Noblitt-Sparks Industries, Inc., Col- 
umbus, Ind., had net income for 1937 
of $924,049, or $4.84 a share; com: 
pared with $1,044,094, or $6.57 a share, 
in the preceding year. The company 
makes automobile accessories and 
parts. 

The preliminary report of the Sig- 
node Steel Strapping company and 
subsidiaries for 1937 showed net 
profit of $401,281, or $2.43 a common 
share, on 133,324 shares, compared 
with 1936 profit of $374,523, or $2.37 
a share, on 124,116 shares outstand- 
ing. The 1937 profit was highest in 
the company’s history. 

Day’s Earning Reports. 

Net incomes of companies reporting 
yesterday follow: 

YEAR ENDED » DEO. 31. 


$ i, Poy 904 
Aetna Ba Brng Mfg "221. 645 
Butler Brothers ... #1,261,000 
Com. & South . 15,124,836 
Compo Shoe Mach. 301 ,004 
Giant Port Cement 


1936. 

$ 2,157,677 
172,761 

71,908,000 

13,349, ‘810 


Acme Steel 


H Kress ° 
Merch&Miners 7. 
Mo Portind Cement 
Noblitt Sparks Ind 
Real Silk Hos Mills 
Safeway Stores.... 
Savage Arms .....- 
Signode St Str..... 
Southw Bell Tel... 


401, 
17,965, ett 
Jas Talcott 4 


46,565 
323,657 


, 346,948 
83,176,509 
‘END ‘ 


e*eeeeeee 


32,624,988 
107,210 


SIX MONTHS ENDED DEC, 31. 
Hodophane ...... 161 
Satie Withington 

QUARTER 


Outb Marine & Mic *53,205 


ER. 
K C Pub Sve 25,087 51,433 
*Net loss. tAfter preferred dividends. 


CHICAGO GROUP 
GOES TO CAPITAL 
BUSINESS PARLEY 


Eighteen representatives of small 
Chicago business firms left yesterday 
afternoon for Washington, D. C,, 
where they will present Secretary of 
Commerce Roper with suggestions on 
what the government can do for busi- 
ness. About 500 executives from all 
parts of the country have been in- 
vited to the conference. 

George F. McKiernan, president of 
a printing company at 430 South 
Green street, said he would recom. 
mend that a joint commission of 
business men, tax experts and gov- 
ernment officials be appointed to 
revise tax measures. 

J. Frank Grimes, president of In. 
dependent Grocers’ Alliance of Amer. 
ica, will urge an administration policy 
of restoring business confidence, 


Month’s Customs Revenue 
$917,606 in Chicago Area 


h the Chi. 
cago office by local importers, who 
thus save the expense of having an 
agent at te ata or order. 


with $13,349,810, or 13 cents a share, | 


|One Extra, Some Cuts} ,2: 


and Omissions. 


One increase, one extra, two re-| 
ductions, two omissions and numer-| 


ous regular payments summarize div- 


idend actions taken by corporation | 


directors yesterday. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co. headed the 
list of corporations ‘to pay regular 
quarterly dividends at rates prevail- 
ing in the past. Others included 


Brown Shoe, Butler Brothers, Tide | Bii 


Water Associated Oil, and Union 
Tank Car. ~~ 

Vick Chemical declared a 10 cent 
extra along with its 50 cent quar- 
terly dividend, duplicating the Dec. 
1 payment, and Ontario Manufactur- 
ing company boosted its April 1 pay- 
ment to 50 cents. It paid 40 cents 
a year ago, 50 cents July 1, 35 cents 
Oct. 1, and 25 cents on Dec. 20. 


Hecla Cuts Payment. 


The Hecla Mining company cut its 
March 15 payment to 10 cents. It 
made two payments of 20 cents and 
two of 25 cents each last year. The 
Hollophane company ordered a 30 
cent dividend for March 1. During 
1937 it made four quarterly payments 
of 50 cents each and paid an extra 
of 20 cents in June. 

The Vogt Manufacturing company 
will pay 20 cents on March 1, the 
same as last Dec. 1, prior to a 25 
cent year-end disbursement. It paid 
20 cents each in the first two quar- 
ters of 1937 and 40 cents in the third 
quarter. 

The Barlow and Seelig Manufactur- 
ing company ordered the regular 30 
cent quarterly dividend on the $5 par 
class A stock, but took no action on 
the $1 par common. It paid 30 cents 
or. the latter Dec, 1, following a 20 
cent initial payment Sept. 1. Cush- 
man’s Sons, Inc., declared a dividend 
of 87% cents on its 7 per cent pre- 
ferred stock, but took no action on 
the $8 preferred stock. 


Day’s Dividend Action. 


Dividends declared yesterday, to- 
gether with rate, period, and pay- 
ment and record dates, follow: 


Barlow & Seelig class A, 


Brown Shoe, 
Butler Bros., 


*Cen Ill P Sp 
TCushman's jae 1% pt, 87%c. Mar 1 
Fajardo Sugar, $1 qd..........-Mar 1 
Hecla Mining, LOC. .sesserseres Mar 15 
Holophane, 30c 
Kendall pid, $1.50 q........- 1 
Mead Corp $6 pfd, $1.50 q. ‘rar 1 

Do $5.50 pfd, $1.87% q:...Mar 1 
Noma Electric, eb 
TN'west P 8 7% pfd, $1.75.Mar 

TDo 6% pfd, $1 a6... ciosnaeer 
Ontario Mfg, W005 .2veiskc ieee 
Purity Bakeries, 15c..........Mar 
Rustless I & S pfd, 62%e q. + yes 
Sears, Roebuck, 75¢ d........ 
S’east Greyhnd pfd, 300 a. ae 
Sunray Oi] pfd, 68%ec q......Apr 
Tidewater Asso Oil, 25c q....Mar 
Timken Boll Bearing, consume 
Un Tank Car, 40c q...+++++.-Mar 
Vick Chemical, 50c¢ q......«.-Mar 

Do 10¢ Oxtra..s.cccccccccee» Mar 
Vogt Mig, hick 64 0b babedéete cae 


wocahal Becae 


*On arrears, which will be $19.50 April 
15. +On arrears, which sell at $8.90 on 
the 7% and $7.62% on the 6% stock, as 
of March 1. fJHalf of regular rate; leaves 
arrears of $7 a share March 1. 


The letter “q” in the table refers 
to regular quarterly dividends. 


U. S. BRIEF RAPS 
UTILITY PLEA TO 
SUPREME COURT 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 1—(4)— 
The government told the Supreme 
court today that the Electric Bond 
and Share company’s attack on the 
registration provisions of the public 
utility holding company act “rests 
upon a paralyzingly narrow concep- 
tion of the power of congress to reg- 
ulate interstate commerce.” 

The government brief was filed in 
advance of next week’s arguments on 


the validity of the registration pro- 2 


visions of the 1935 law. These pro- 
visions deny the use of the mails and 
facilities of interstate commerce to 
holding companies which refuse to 
register with the Securities and Ex- 
change commission and submit re- 
ports of their corporate structure. 
The Electric Bone and Share com- 


f 
pany in its own brief filed last week, y 


described the provisions as “a for- 
mula for control of all business by 
the federal government.” The com- 
pany and 26 subsidiaries appealed 
from the Second Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals, which upheld the registration 
provisions. ‘The government brief, 
signed by Attorney General Cum- 
mings, described the company as “a 
mighty corporate barony.” 


WIDER CONTROL 
OF OVER COUNTER 
TRADING URGED 


Washington, D, C., Feb. 1—(P)— 
George C. Mathews, member of the 
Securities and Exchange commission, 
urged “codéperative” regulation of 
“over-the-counter” security markets 
today as a means of protecting in- 
vestor and dealer alike. 

Testifying at hearings on a bill 
drawn to carry out the commission’s 


legislative recommendations. Math-|' 


ews told the senate banking com- 
mittee additional regulation of over- 
the-counter trading was an “impera- 
tive necessity.” Not only because of 
| the large volume of such trading, but 
because “ ee ea 
evasion of regulation of exchanges 
under the exchange act be fore- 
stalled.” 


zation of 


The bill would ioe for cma Richmor 
security d into volun-| gRoot 


t 

*Bickfords ... 
ss EB was 
a Ridge . 


Do cv pfd. 
*Bridgpt Mch. 
Brill *eees 
Brown Co pfd. 
*Brown Rubb. 


BufN&EP pid. 
Bunk Hill &S. 


Cab&Wire pfd. 
Carnation .... 
CP&L $6 pf. 
Carrier Corp . 
tCarter J W. 
tCatalin Am. 


6% pf. 
tCentrif Pi .. 
TCharis ..ces 
Cities Service. 

ae 
CityAuto Stpg. 
Clde Neon Lts 
Club Al Uten. 
#Colon Devel. 

TDo cv pid. 
#Col F&I war 
Colts Pat F.. 
Colum O & G 
Com & So war 
#Comwith Dis 
ComP&L Ilstpf 
Com W Svc. 
#Com 8 M vite 
Cons Copperm 
?tCousG&E Bal 
?Con G&E Ut. 
Cons Mng & S 
Cons Stl Corp. 
#Cord Corp... 
*Co1rroon & BR 
Creole Pet.... 
Crocker Wh.. 
4Cusi Mex.... 


Darby Pet. cee 
*Dejay Strs... 
Duval Tex.... 


Eagle P Lead 
East.Gas & F 
East Sta Corp 
?+Easy W M B 
El Bond & Sh 

iG DEG ace 
ElLBo&Sh $5pid 
Ei] Pow As... 

AO: A wees 
EIP&L 2d pidA 

Do war,... 
Elgin Nat W teh 
EmscoD&Equip 
tEquity Corp.. 
?Esequire Coron 
Evans Walilo.. 
tT Ex-Cell-oCorp 


Ford Mot "Ltd 
*Frank] Ray.. 


*Gen Alloys.. 
Gen hata de e 
Gen Invest. 
tGen Tel.. 
Georg Pow bt 
Glen Alden. 
Godch Sug é 
TO: Dewees 
Goldfield Con.. 
TGorh Ine A. 
TDo pfd ... 
Grd Nat Films 


H 

tHud BayM&S 
Humble Oil... 
fHygrade Fd. 


lil Iowa Pw pf 
Imp Chem Ind 
a Oil Ltd. 
Ins Co N An. 

Int Cig Mch.. 

Int Hyd-£l pf 
tInt Pap&P w 
Internat Pet. 
fInter Radio.. 
tinter 8 Raz B 
tinter Util B. 
tIntersHomeEq 
Inters P Del pf 
Iron Firem vtec 
tirving Air Ch 


tJacobs Co... 
Jones&LauStls 


tKingstonProd 
Lake Shore M 
Lakey Fdy&M 
Lehigh C&N.. 
fLion Oil.... 
Lit Bros 

*Lockheed Airc 
Lone Star Gas 


srotidon Pack 
fLouis L & E 
McWill Dredg. 
assey Harris 
*Mead John.. 
Mesabi Iron.. 
*Mich Bump. 
{Mich G&O.. 
tMich Stl T. 
Midvale ... 

*Midwest Oil. 
#Molybden 

?#Monogrm Pic 
Mont Ward A 


Nat Sug Ref. 
Navarro Oil. 


Niles-Bem-P ., 

fNoma Elec., 

Nor AmLt&Pw 
Do ptd 


Pitts 
‘Prud Investrs 
Do ety eereoe 


tts Worg... 
Pl 


Br Am Tb B.. 


1,700 6% 


= 2929 
PP B00 


POPE cna 
il a 


1,700 
100 
1, ane 


+4414 


eee” att 


wey S ¥ > ee 
er, eT 4 t any 
: Fs Pea. 8? SS - 
: - . PRR ys Beis pcan ee 
a “ E ms j 
> > me 
% eS, 
F ¥ “ Se P 
- * > ark 7 - gs Me 
ws 4 ~— 2 
aap tye wig 


: tama: gee 


> a ater db: 


ee: 


eR: 


+ 


900 2% 2 

20132 182 1382 

25 238% 23% 23%— 
6% 6%+ 


100 5& 5 
40118 118 118 
00 7 7 7 


25 94% 94% 94%+ 
20 111% 111% ae 
100 9 9 20 - 


2 a 71, 9% 
- 20 ean wn 103%" 
200 


ry 


~ * e 
: PRR: : 


> % Su = OF 


atl aE ater 


at aetatak: aakart 


so ata: 


> 
. 


ea 


i® 


<. 


oes ES Hi: ris if spies ca 


ba 


Do 
Unit L & PA 
Do ev 


pfd 
tUnit “Prot Sh 
TUnit ShpydA 
tDo : ee@eenee 


Unit Shoe M. 

Do pfd .... 
TUnit Specialt 
TU S Linespfd 
U § Radiator. 
Unit Verde Ex 
TUnit Wall P 
Utah Idaho § 
Util Pow & Lt 
Util & Ind pfd 
TUtility Equit 

Do pfd ... 
t Valspar Corp 
Venez Mex O 
Virg Pb. Sv pf 
Waco Aire ... 
Tt ington O 
*Wettwth Mfg 
tWest Va C&C 
West Air Exp. 0 
Wright Harg 15, 000 
tYukon Gale , 200 


—— 


aS 


_ 
RSE! 


Lit 


~ 


aT 
C060 S Mh Oo 
- 
++ 


++ 
eats ata 


See 
be 


OO He 
7 
Be 
aR 


eee ee: etal 


b+ or BS oe 
nes 
ake 
it 
bt 2s 


6 
= 
| 
5 > atatat ae 


DOMESTIC BONDS. 


Sales in 
thous. 

5 Ala Pow 65s '68. 76 
16do 4%s '67 


71% 70 
5 Alum Ltd 65s8'48.106% 106% —" 
107 


21 AmG&E 5s 2028.107% 107 
3 AmP&L 6s 2016. 71 


Net 
High. Low. Close. chge. 
76 7 


70% 


% 
1% 
Ye 


7144+ 


71 


4 AppalE]Pw 5s’56 104% 104% oo + i 
12 AppaPw6s2024A 109% 109 109 
99% 


3 tArkLouGas 4s’51 99% 

6 ArkP&L 5s '56.. 90% 

8 As Elec 4%s'53.. 36 

1 AsG&E 5%s’38IC 74% 
10 do 5s bn 29 
15 do 5s’ 73. 


2 AtlanCityE13%4s'64 orks 
3 TtBaldw L 6s’50. 


66 66 
1 BellTCan 6s’55A. 438 112% 119% 


10 Beth St 6s ‘98. 
83 


1 CanNorP 5s 33. 103% eo ae eat 


138 Caro P&L 5s'56. 87% 


7% 
1 CedRapMfg 5s'53. 1iaig gn 114% 
% 96% 96% 


14 CenIllIPS 5s’56E. 96 
ldo 65s 
lldo 4%s 


2 CenStEl 
2do 5s °48 ‘ 
6 CenStP&L 5%s8'53 42% 


> 2 
ar RS 


> aRakak! a@akak: 


83 
874,— 


1% 
4 ¢ChiDisE 4%s’70.105% 105% 106%+ 
5 ChIR&USY 5s'40.106% 106% 106%— 


Ys 
2 ChiRy cod xi 5s’'27 44% 445% 445+ 1% 
53% 57+ ‘ 


3 Cities Ser 5s’'69. 53% 
ldo bs Pasteeser? 57 
7 do 5s’ 58. ‘ 
86 do 5s 

9 CitSGas 5%48'42.. 


Hs 
95 


8 CitSPow 5%3'52. 49 
6 tComSuS%s'48A 103 103 


1 CommunP&Libs’57 60% 60% 
34 #+CoELBal3%e’71 105 104% 105 
5 ContG&EB 5s’58A 69% - 


3 Cudahy 3%s'55.. 94 

6 DelEIP w 5%4s’59.100 100 
4 DetCGas 6s'47 A.105% 105 
7 do 5s’50B 102% 102, 


9 Empo&R 3. ahd 76 ‘ 
4 BrieLig 5s8’67 ...103% 103 
2 FstoneTire 5s'42 2.105 7 
10 FiaPéL. 6s’54... 81 
2GaryE&G 5s’44 st 86 Ss 
13 GatinP 5s’56 . 
1 GenBronze 68°40 67 
2 GenPUt oe haa ~ 


1 tGuarInv 58'48A 34 


34 
4 HousL-P 3%s'66.104 104 
1% 61% 


23 IndSvc 5s'50 
7do 6s’63 A 


7IndP&L 5s8'57 A. 108% 105% 105% 


SIntersPow 6s8'52, 25% 
26 do 65s’57 41 
14 IntersPS 65s'56D rh 

Ydo 4%s’'5 

5 Ia-NebL&P 5s’67 oe 

1 IaPubSve 58°57 .100 

102 1tSupPw 6s'63 A 41% 

1 JacksnvG 5s’42 st 33 

4JCP&L 4%s’61 102% 108 


41 

67% 68%+ 1% 
62% 62%— 1% 
93% 93%—- ae 


100 100 
He 41% % 


% 


51% 53% 1% 
94% 94% .... 
4CitSGPipe 6s8’43.101% 1014%101% 

11 CiiSP&L 5%s'49. 49% 48% 49%+ 
48% 48%+ 


Ys 
Ve 
iG3.—. % 
604+ % 
fe 
agg 1% 


100 — 2 
105. ees 
met % 


Ye 
ete 


108 
81 


85 + 
.103% eas LO3%+ —" 
68% 
0 


ie 
104+ % 
614%4—- 


." 
% 


25 
414%4— 


102 _— 
92 — 2 


82 82 
72% 12+ i 


61 74  "%3% 
8 LehPS 6s 2026 A.100% get 100%4+ 


1 LexUtil 5s8’52 .. 95% 


2LibMeN-L 65s’42. ‘103% 103% 103 103%4-+ 
103% 103% 16 


5 LonglisiILt 6s'45. 
6 LouP&L 5s’57 


73%+ ry 


‘, 
fs 
1% 


95%+ 


5 Metro Ed 48'65G.105% 105% Te 
8% 58% 


8 Midid Val 65s8'43 
80 MilwGLt 4%s ’67 
1 MinnP&L 6s’55.. 
6 MissP&LCo 5s'57 
1 Miss Pow 65s °55. 
2¢+Mo P §S 5s’60.. 
2Mont-D P 5%s'44 
24MunSS 6%s8'37 ct 
8 NatP&L 5s 2030B 
1 Nev Cal E 65s’56 
11 NEngG&E 5s *50 


3% 
1NOrl PS 6s ht 65 
7do 65s '42 st...... 90 


trl 1% 
99 > 


.' Sweet Potatoes 


‘**!| Beans, string .... 


gaee 
si : 
vA 


P 5040. “469 108 102 yy 
&L 6s '55. ‘eit Z 4. 


tag 
ov 


88%. 88% 88% 
aElP 5%s'72.112% 112% 112% 
- 4443’ 61F.107% are 107%4— 
do ‘ase "SIF. +h 04 
5P SN J 6s 


ee eases Ee ees 


58% oc ae > ion 
60, 104% 104% 104 

eaveds 108% 108% Tosi 
4%s'68.104% 104% 104%+ 
4 4s'51 51% 651 -61%+ 

s'61A 92 92 92 
105" w'P S 6s ‘454.100 100° 100 — "Sy 
9 §Std G&E 63°35. 45 43% 


3 Std Inv 5i%s '39 asi 
4Std P&L 6s ’57.. 4 4441 
2Snp Ill 5%s 68. 106 106 106'+ % 
1 Tenn B P 6s ’56 67% 67% 67% 
4Tex ES 5s ’60. 94% 94%, 94% 
2 Tex P&L 5s '56..103 ‘103 103 
1 Tide W P 5s'79A 83 oa 
5TCRT 65%s ‘52A 59% 

4 Unit ENJ 4s 


83 ees 
% 


ldo 5%s ae 

5 tWal-Ast 5s '54. 16 6 ry 

2 Wash W P 5s’60.105 105 105 
17 West T U 5s’57A 88% 834% 83% 
5 WUGE 5%s '55A.1056 105 105 


FOREIGN BONDS. 


1 Cauca Val 7s '48 e 8% 
1 §Chile M B 6s ’31 
3 Com P B 5%s '37 
1Ger C M 7s '47 
1 Guan&WR 6s ’58 
7 Ruhr G 6%s’538A 
4Sant Chile 7s’49 
1 Terni Elec 614853 
3 Unit E Sv 7s'566 
3 Unit Ind 6s °45 


*Ex dividend. xr—Ex rights. § Matured 
bonds; negotiability impaired pending investi- 
gation. tOfficially listed on application by 
the corporation. ur—Under rule. ww—With 
— xw—Without warants. war~—War 
rants. 


| PRODUCE MARKETS 


EGGS—Unchan 
11,278 cases, BUTE ne ~— Unchanged. Ke- 
ceipts, 7,652 tubs. ry POULTRY—Un- 
changed, Receipts, 23 trucks. POTATOES~— 
Steady. Receipts, 74 cars, on team track 
371. MIiLK—Grade A, 3.5 per cent butter 
fat; price paid producer at farm, $2.25 per 
100 pounds. 


Whelesale Creamery Butter Prices. 
——Chicago—— Phil 
Whole Cen- 


%4c lower. Receipts, 


Boston. 


score.32% 
score .32 
score. 31% 
score. 30% 
Wholesale Cheese Prices. 
ee Boston. New York. Philadet. 
Flats. ceeseasere LOM-1L8B 
Twins, 15% - 16 16%4-17 


32 
31% 
31 


= s. 


8. 


Live Poultry. 

22@26c |Geese 12@19¢ 
‘Leghorn hens.12@19c 

tn 


Z1@2se 


Capons 
Broilers— 
biden tiga 26¢c/Old roosters .. 


Dressed Poultry. 
furkeys, yng..246@Z8c Capons 
Turkeys, 01d.21@24%c 

Fresh Eggs. 

Extra firsts, cars 

Less than cars 
Fresh firsts, cars.... 

Less than cars 
Current receipts 
Dirties 
Checks 


. d80@S2e 


PROC CC CHC HEH Bee coos. $1.380@1.40 
-- -$1.05@1.07% 
Colorado 1.35@1.62% 
Wisconsin e i aa U5 
Country —— Veal Carcass 
5U@6U 


bs vac /30@100 Ib. 12%4@14 4c 
70@80 Ibs. 10iG11%e 110@12U Ibs 15%e 


-~o0r-eee-ca = see -—.- 


FRUITS AND ) VEGETABLES | 


Wholesale datoes in less than car lots in 
Chicago, as reported by the bureau of agri- 


cultural 9 < ae 
-$0.60 to $1.25 
00 3.75 


Appies, bu. Ill.. 


Beets, Ill ........ 
Cabbage, crate 
Carrots 
Lettuce, leaf, bu, Il 
Do, head, crate 
Lemons, box, California 
Mushrooms, 1 Ib ct, Ill.-Mich. 
Onions, Ill, 
Oranges, box, 
Parsley, 
Peas, bu, Mexican 2.6 
Peppers, 1% bu crate, Texas.. 2:00 to 


Rhubarb, box, 5 Ibs, mi 5 to 
.85 to 


-85 to 


Turnips, bu, Iil.. 


| CHICAGO STOCKS | 


Tuesday, February 1, 1938. 
Shares sold CORRE: ccvvsccccd covvccs ASOD 


Description, 
div. rate, $s— 


Year 


Armour & Co [.70g] 


Asbestos Mig 


97,000 


Sales. 
100 
50 


Assoc Invest [3a].. 
Tr 60g 


Berghoff Brew [1).... 
Borg-Warner (3a) ‘ 


Brown F & W 
Bruce 
pullee Bros [6 


Ol.» 
Cen Ill P Sv pidide] 
Ss W 


2% Decker & Co 
Dodge Mig esc) 
aoa e iawn 


eee 


4 igiand Unit’ "7-2. 1,000 
 & Hart pid. 1 


Total sales 1938 to date........ 607,000 


Total sales 1937 to date .. - 2,493,000 
——UClosing—— 


Open. High. 
5% % 


ERR Sts 


Rise in Securities - 
. Influences Grains, t 


E CHICAGO GRAIN FUTURES 


‘Closing. prices on the May deliv. 
ery of principal grains on the Chi»: 
cago Board of Trade yesterday? © 


Yesterday. Monday. Yr.ago. 
Wheat «..........-.80.94% $0.93% $1.28%" 
Corn 59%  .58% 1.05% 
Oats 31% .31%  AP% 
WE bi iene bb taceds 44% -73% 1.10 |. 
Soy beans ......... 1.05% 1.04% a. 


(eee eee eoeeese’ 


Wheat futures in leading . North. 
American markets advanced . more 
than 1 cent a bushel yesterday. as the 
result of buying induced b arog 
and dust’ storm reports from 
southwestern winter wheat bel? 
strength in securities, and moderate 
revival in the export demand. 
With the ‘exception of a foiecast’ 
for rain or snow in Nebraska and’ 
Kansas there was nothing in the gen 
eral run of the news yesterday to 
induce traders to take the selling 
side of the ‘market. Prices worked 
gradually higher, the upturn being 
re by a revival of inflation 
ears. 


Corn and Rye Higher. 


Corn futures closed % cent'a bushel 
higher, rye was as much as 1% cents 
higher,- and soy beans wére 1% to 
1% cents a bushel higher. 

Reports from H. C.’ Donovan, crop. 
expert with Thomson & McKinnon, 
the Santa Fe railway and the Robin- 
son Elevator company, Salina, Kasy: 
Stressed the unfavorable outlook for 
the winter wheat crop in ‘the south- 
west. During the day soil drifting 
was reported in western and central’ 
Kansas. The continued dry weathér’ 
in the American wheat belt had some 
effect on the Liverpool market, 
where wheat futures-were % to 1% 
cents a bushel higher. 


Dust Storms Unusually Early. 


Although all interests in the trade 
continue to regard it as too early in 
the season for a serious crop scare: 
to develop, the fact that dust storms 
have occurred in the dry areas nearly 
a month ahead of the period when 
high winds are a normal seasonal 
occurrence tends to make the wheat 
market sensitive to weather develop- 
ments, ~ 

Export sales of 300,000 bushels of 
corn were reported yesterday. 


[LLINOIS COAL 
SAFETY RECORD — 
BEST SINCE 1911 


Springfield, IL, Feb. 1 .—_(?)—James 
McSherry, director of mines and min- 
erals, said today that the rate of one. 
fatal accident for each 704,452 tons of 
coal produced by shipping mines last 
year was the lowest in twenty-seven 
years of Illinois coal mining. — 

The margin of safety was 27 per 
cent higher than during the preced- 
ing year, when each 553,504 tons 
mined resulted in one fatality. 

“The safety record of Illinois mines 
has shown an improved trend in re- 
cent years, and stands well above that 
of coal mines of the United States as 
a whole,” the director said. 


—--— «<= 


MORE RAILWAYS 
REPORT DROP IN 
FREIGHT VOLUME 


Excepting the Missouri’ Pacific, 
which showed a gain from the pre- 
ceding week, railroads reporting car 
loadings yesterday for the week end- 
ed Jan. 29 carried less. freight than .. 
in either the preceding .week or the... 
corresponding week a yé€ar ago. 

Figures, together with comparisons, 
follow: 


Wk. ended 


age Central. 
o.-Kas.-Texas .. 

pean an Pacific... 

Gulf Coast Lines.. 5,101 

Int. Gt. Northern. 

St. L.-San Fran.. 

Southern Pacific.. 

Wabash ; 


CHICAGO GRAIN ~ 
TRADE SMALLEST 
IN MANY MONTHS 


Trading in grain futures on the 
Chicago Board of Trade in January 
aggregated 692,895,000 bushels, the 
smallest business since October, 1936," i 
when sales were 588,000,000 bushels.” 
As compared with January, 1937, 
Sales showed a decrease of 326,210,- 
000 bushels. Sales of grain fu 
as reported by the Commodity 


a ag 


‘| change administration follow [in thou- 


sands of mgr : 


Jan., 1938. O74: 361 

Dec., 1937. 655,722 

Nov., 1937..780,376 

Jan., 1937..684,827 

Jan., 1936..389,222 460,717 


U. S. Rejects Dam Cement 
Bids; Calls Them Too High. 
Washington, ‘D. C., Feb. 1—[Spee 
cial.]—Secretary of Interior Ickes, ans 
nounced today that all bids had been’ 
rejected covering 750,000 barrels of’ 
Portland cement for the Marshal? 


Ford dam under construction near 
Austin, Tex. The lowest bid. which 


i oaaceldl sociress sae Gai a eee 


4 


ee eee ee | 


Lauds Chicago; Asks Less 
Dependence on N. Y. 


_ [Continued from page 28, column 8.] 


changes Douglas said past experi- 
ence has shown the wisdom of going 
to an outside source for an execu- 
tive. 

“Some institutions by their very 
nature are excellent training ground 
for executive administration,” Doug- 
las continued. “But it may be doubt- 
ed if, even in the largest commission 
houses, there is the opportunity which 
exists in a large industrial or other 
organization to develop this kind of 
ability.” 

Douglas declared that the need for 
reform of stock exchanges has risen 
largely from the change in invest- 
ment habits. Before the war, he said, 
only a few of the more wealthy per- 
sons apart from. large institutions 
were in the stock market. Now, he 
said, the public is in the market on a 
large scale. 

Stresses Need of a Shift. 


Stressing the desirability of trans- 
ferring financing from the New York 
market to other communities, Doug- 
las said: 

“Granting the desirability and the 
mecessity of having a great national 
market for capital funds upon which 
the whole country can draw, it re- 
mains true that the dangers of leav- 
ing the small local enterprise without 
an adequate mechanism for obtaining 
adequate capital cannot be over- 
looked. It is a major national prob- 
lem which presses for local solution 
in almost every community.” 

Out of a total of 411,000 corpora- 
tions reporting balance sheets and 
filing income tax returns in 1934, he 
said, 386,000 had assets of less than 
$1,000,000. Thus, the corporations 
with less than $1,000,000 of assets 
were almost 95 per cent of the total 
corporations, 


Cites Small Industries. 


Small industries almost invariably 
have been financed by the plowing 
back of earnings into business, by 
commercial bank credit, and occa- 
sionally by private financing, Douglas 
said, adding that the risk involved in 
the financing of small companies 
made such financing difficult. Conse- 
quently, he said, there has been a 
natural tendency on the part of the 
public to invest in the large, well 
known companies. 

“Tt may be found that the risks 
which lie in our own back yards here 
in Chicago are just as good as the 
ones which have become glamorous 
because they have caught the fancy 
of the larger markets,” Douglas said. 

Sees Decentralization Trend. 

He declared that many develop- 
ments are now working toward mak- 
ing it easier to do the financing of 
small companies in their own com- 


| munities, He noted a trend in favor 
_ of decentralization of control. 


“The. holding company device is 
being seriously challenged,” he said. 
“All of these movements afford in- 
creasing opportunities for local in- 
terests to assert themselves, to be 
rid of absentee management and re- 
mote financial control.” 

This change, he said, will give a 
great opportunity for local banks, in- 


domestic electric refrigerator sales in 
the United States at 2,500,000 last 
year, an increase of 18 per cent over 
1936. Cooper said his company had a 
24 per cent sales increase and ex- 
pects to show an even larger gain in 
unit sales this year. 


-e~< 
The annual Chicago division sales 
meeting of the Holland Furnace com- 
pany will be held Friday at the 
Knickerbocker hotel. F. H. Ault, gen- 
eral sales manager of the company, 
will speak. He is to announce a new 
low price model warm air furnace. 


-e- 
Francis S. Wilson Jr, of Fuller, 
Cruttenden & Co. son of Justice 
Francis S. Wilson of the Illinois Su- 
preme court, yesterday was elected a 
director of the Rollins Hosiery mills, 
Des Moines, Ia., at a meeting of the 
board held in the offices of the Chi- 
cago corporation, the company an- 
nounced yesterday. Rollins Hosiery 
mills has an office in the Merchan- 
dise Mart building. 
-o- | 
Samuel Zemurray, who started busi- 
ness forty years ago as an 11 year 
old immigrant boy in Mobile, Ala., 
by buying a cargo of ripe bananas 
and selling them to a small dealer, | 2° 
became president of the United Fruit 
pany yesterday. He has been 
aging director since 1932, and suc- 
ceeds Francis R. Hart, who died Jan. 
18. TT. Jefferson Coolidge, former 
undersecretary of the United States 
treasury, was named chairman of 
the board. t 


-e- 
H. E. Newcomet, vice president with 


region of the Pennsylvania railroad. 
J. M. Fox, division engineer of the 
Chicago terminal division, succeeds 
R. H. Crew as division engineer in 


OFFICIAL WEATHER 
FORECAST 


The official] forecast for today and tomorrow 
and yesterday’s table of records follow: 


WISCONSIN: Snow in central and north, 
show or rain in extreme south portion 
Wednesday and Thursday; not so cold 
Wednesday. 

INDIANA: Cloudy and warmer Wednesday; 
rain Wednesday night and Thursday. 

LOWER MICHIGAN: Cloudy Wednesday, 
with rising temperature, snow in west and 
north portions; snow in north, show or 
rain in south portion Thursday. 

UPPER MICHIGAN: Snow Wednesday and 
Thursday; rising temperature Wednesday. 
MISSOURI: Kain Wednesday or Wednesday 
night, and probably Thursday; rising tem- 
perature Wednesday in east and south; 

colder Thursday in west. 

IOWA: Snow in north, snow or rain in 
south, rising temperature in central and 
east portions Wednesday; Thursday snow 
and colder. 

MINNESOTA: Snow, rising temperature in 
south portion Wednesday; Thursday snow 
and colder. 

NEBRASKA: Snow or rain Wednesday, 
colder in extreme west; probably snow and 
colder Thursday. 

OHIO: Fair and warmer Wednesday; Thurs- 
day partly cloudy and warmer, possibly 
occasional rain. 

NORTH DAKOTA: Snow Wednesday and 
possibly Thursday; colder Wednesday night 
and Thursday; fresh to possibly strong 
shifting winds. 

SOUTH DAKOTA: Cloudy Wednesday and 
Thursday with occasional snow; colder 
Thursday; fresh to possibly strong shifting 
winds. 

KANSAS: Unsettled, local rains Wednesday 
or Wednesday night and probably some 
snow or rain Thursday; slightly warmer 
Wednesday in extreme east, cooler in south- 


surance companies, dealers, brokers,| west; colder Thursday, 
investment advisers, and business 
men to capitalize on the business de- eee Bl 5 of 
veloped in their own communities. Place of observation. g S S $ ~o 
State of weather cS of , " ge 
r ° s lomal 7 
CHICAGO LIVE STOCK eee Oe 2 oe 
pare ——| Central standard time 5 g : § :& 
[All Gees mao are in dollars per 100 pounds. ] i Sa, 
Hogs. East central states— 

Receipts, 28,000: shipments, 3,500. sspenn WT a ness cdxes > 10 10 =—8 «.. 
Good to choice, 1400180 Ibs..88.50@ 8.76 | Chics CIOUGY .--+-+-0184, $8 40 18 os. 
Good to choice, 190 8.45@ 8.70 | Cincinnati, cloudy......N-H. 28 30 14 22: 
Good to choice, 22 380 tbe. 7.95@ 8.45 Cleveland. Sends BES. =. .38 18 16 ..; 
Good t choice, 260@825 ibs.. 740@ 7.95 | Detroit, cloudy........—B. 18 18 4 ... 
Good to choice, 350@400 Ibs.. 7.15@ 7.40 | Escanaba, clear........E. 0 O=22 62 
Light pke sows, 270@350 lbs.. 6.85@ 7.15 | Evansville, cloudy.....8.B. 38 40 18 ... 
Heavy pkg sows, 350@550 Ibs.. 6.75@ 7.10 | Fort Wayne. cloudy....5. 28 Ae os 

» COmimon to best............ 6.25@ 8.50 | Grand Rapids, clear...8.B. 22 22 f ees 

Cattle. Green BnOW....... N. 4 4-20 .01 
Indianapolis, cloudy...8.B. 32 82 12 .., 

Receipts, 8,000: taipments, 2,500. La Crosse, cloudy....2. 16 16 +6 ... 
Prime steers. ale. coca eae 500 1bs..$9.75@10.50 | Ludington, cloudy..... E. 13 an 3 #1 
Good to Ibs.. 7 75@10.50 adison. cloudy.......8.8. 20 20 0 ... 

- ew 700@1, pre mark +p 16@10. 50 Marquette, snow. ee¢eee 8. 2 © eee 
Low $HORT. svvsessnsess 6.008 8:75 elles EES eee ee 
Bulk of steers......... sesesvseeee 6.60@ 8.2 Crane. Ceeey.....B.. hm to 
Cows, choice to prime.......... 6.00@ “ps Marie. cloudy. S.W 0-14 21 
Cows, good to choice....,...:... 5.65@ 6.00 g. Sto. Ma ili., cloudy.s.2. 38 $4 13 eas 
Cows, fair to 0's cU6bc ¥i.560 5.1 5.65 West eentral states— 
Cows, common to i a cee’ 4.85 5.10 ismare clo oaye 3 12 12 ~12 eee 
Canners and cutters... Stee eeesssvbe ‘: Soom 4.65 ch ty. cloudy...8.E. 18 18 2 eee 
Hefers, yeariings, fair to best.... 6.35@ 8.00 | Concordia, cloudy..... Ss. 44 46 14 ... 
Hefers, common to fair....,..... 5.00@ 6.35 | Davenport, cloudy......N. 29 25 10 ... 
Stockers and fedders............ 4.75@ 8.00 | pes Moines. Goudy.,..B. 26 28 6 ... 
ves, poor to best.............. 4.560@13.00 | Hoge® Sane Goudy... F ca o4 °° 
. bologna, com to choice.. 5.50@ 6.75 | Dubuauc. cloudy....... SB. 24 24 “6 °° 
&, beef-butchers, fair to best 6.00@ 7.00 bulatl Bere N.E. (2 4-18 ane 
Sheep. = ney. oT tEe roo Bol. 18 zs “af eee 

Receipts, 14,000; shipments, 2,500. sate. ady......,88. 2 32 tf Reais 
Native lambs, fair ob greg sbauee $7.00@ 7.75 ‘ eleugy. ob. § —20 .. 
Native lambs. ag Eig 6 7.00 atte, Coney .. - 5 - 24 26 3 Ke 
Native buck lambs, fair to besi 6.000 6:76 oma City, cloudy.8. 44 50 26 .., 
Native lambs, eull “ae se 3 6.50 aha. elou were fe 8.5. 36 36 s eee 
Fed west lam’ to ch 7.76 sca: Somes - » NE, : Es 3 ? eee 
eres len fair to good 7; 7.50 Lenin clots. aot 4 36 16 Fir 

; lambs. | ge RBs 7.76 .- St, aul. cloudy. .§E. 10 13 « ee 
bs, best 7.26 ita, clou 44 48 20 .., 
Ww: i to choice.,.. 3.6 3.85 iston. clow osteo ams 4 410 ..,, 
rg to good.... etee .26 .b0 pastern tes— 
Ewes, culls fair.. st peseenens 50 25 eg Clear.....ss....N. 16 
Ewes heavy, “so@ebO ‘The oases 95 50@ 3.25 tlanta, Clear....ssesss, N-E, 44 
earlings, wethers Seeerttierteesetee 4.560@ 6.76 fale » roel oT ee #1 
Bucks POO OEPE HOPES ce eebebisbdbbbe .00@ 3.00 my a, - eoveer E 26 
Comparative Prices. ay” Sewésea .t ae 
Bulk of sales vesterd dents, eleat... 
Sess sales veserder...87-8h@ 70 en se 
year agco........... 10.30 aaington EN dara lage 80 
Clee tterday, $8.75; 0, It states— 
Ca of sales z: Amarillo ye FA aboard 86 
One month ABO e ose ssssssess 9. clear......E- | 62 
7, ago... ee8hee “eens ; Fa , ossasne Ww, 66 
‘ e ; 10.50: 5. . u ** so 40 BB 4 
. of oop : 25@ 7.60 bem omy sebee BE, 4 
month Bere S pt eens 8.7 * : " ¥++. BE. 4 
ee 
» 97.78: aver age, cw . Clear... ..5 EB, 50 
Ant . Clear..,..8.E. 68 
veport, cléar.......8.E. 52 
clou dy.. eeeeece EB. 3 
urg, clo udy...... : 


eee 
eee ee 
*@eeveeenesd 


See Sstescexases 


aie oes E REE RE" 
<1 se cane Be ye teas mS jon Ron 2 
avs Py Se Se 


itent freight claim agent at Phila- 
delphia on Jan. 16, 


-o~ 

Railway Express Agency, Inc., an- 
nounced appointment of E. S. Buck- 
master, effective today, as superin- 
tendent of agencies in Chicago to suc- 
ceed I. Longaker, who has retired 
after forty-eight years of service. 
Buckmaster will retain supervision 
over commercial activities in Chi- 
cago. C. F. Wilmington, assistant 
general agent here, succeeds Buck- 


headquarters in Chicago, announced |} 
several promotions in the western De 


master in charge of the city office. 


WANT AD 
INDEX 


Page Col. 
Apartments—See To Rent. 
qeaiea’ Sales eee teeeev eee eseeeeeee eee . 28 7 
Automobiles— 
sed Automobiles—For Sale.......29 1 
ore eereeeveee eeestevee sve wes eae 6 
eee eener e@eeeeeeeeeee chie obec 6 
To i coves esse 6 
Repai iring and "Accessories....e...s 29 6 
Loan *@eeeeeeeeeeeee eeeneneeer eeee 29 7 
Tires: eepwreseesepeeeeeeeeeeeeneeveaee ese .29 6 
Credits eeeeene eee eee a eeee .29 6 
Autos, Trucks to , Rent bas covenseate ue 6 
Auto Hou Trailers ce sé wie seine ee 6 
Barter and *#e@eeeeteseoaeee eee 28 7 
par and Store a mes. subse shah od 2 
 % nd etesve preeeee + : 
Betting “et ty Arig ipa ete.) ..<..27 4 
Bysinpes pores 
Business for Sale. se ebepesaces esesene 8 
Partnerships and Investments ..... 28 68 
es 28 8 
Concessions, Locations and pasate “28 8 
usiness fquipm OIE hak bp eks 660s ta) 
siness Service......:. *e@eeeneceeeeeees Bs 8 
anted eseeeaeeseee © . e*e@eeeeeeeeeeenee 28 8 
Business Personals ...................26 3 
Business Directory ............ RB REP << 28 2 
Cemete és e*#eCeeeeeveeee eees ee@eseeees 14 7 
Clothing Furs, etc.. eteeeeteeeeeeeesces 2-28 5 
Coal Ee i. neu acess w én 28 2 
Collections ef #8 @e a cdeecddbcvauu 4 
Danci ER cd eh a sc ene WORE a 
Death Notices ..... ARE he pENBIES, & 1 7 
es ee OE ee i a eenc cows 29 7 
: ing and Millinery Schools. 37 4 
Employment Agencies—Men ......... 26 s 
ployment Agencies—Men .........27 1 
mployment Agencies—Women .......27 2 
Financial Serv Serer 7 
estes **«e . eeeeeeeeeeeee 9 » 
Help Wanted—Men oa eee0 S@eeseeeeeen € @ 5 
elp anted—Women.......ccsces 2 
Hotels aa pnd Apartment. Mates... pt 6 
rnishings an 4 Furniture. saan {1 " 
eome Furnishings Rs saciaesi es 7 
Household Appliances .......sseecess 39 7 
ouses—See Real Estate and To Rent. 
Instruc tion ®@eeeeeeeeeeeen ee eee eeaee deste 6 
Jewelry Ola "Gold, ic cevnesdwiaes 28 5 
Loans—Personal and alenass’ : 28 6 
t t ee ai aks 27 + 
Machinery hee Eaquipment............ ° ae 
ortg [ ae Bstats Loans]..2 5 
otor | eed se i ae 6 
oving, Storame T8ee. Susiness “pir.1.2 2 
sr asicas end Dr es ons tens oat 38 - 
s a os i as tones eet 
menos y urnirare and oobteonge 28 2 
I i cane 4 
Pianos t See Musical tintbameniel 28 7 
Piano Tuning [See Susi iness Dir.]....28 2 
Printing Machinery and Sunplies..... 28 8 
Badioe. Eppes es, and Service....... 28 7 
qbartment CN ee 
ee Property ... te eeeeees 0 BG 3 
Houses Built to Gane iumes ae 3 
Seeeeee ee eeeeeaeeaeee e*ete . eeee 4 
ub an eeteeoeveeeeeee eee ieeet ce 4. 
subt Pro perty on ee Se 4 
Other Cithes Pubes Janes Mikadilioces e0eede 4 
Reso rts eee eeeev een eae © eevee eeeseee isceauee 5 
Far m Land eeneeteaenee *e@eeeee ee eeeaeeeee .25 7 
Industrial. , SOM bbbbeeaees Wrge: 2 
I na a ves dasihédd ccna 5 
or Exchange eee eeeed eeseecee ornoe ee 5 
" Mortgages e#eeeaeeeese o eee “a9 5 
eSR®eeeeeeeceeeneee - eeeteeeeeeeeeaete 4 
gesies Machines . POCA ETE AEIIE 6 
Situat ons Wan DS EAE a 4 
Sporting Goods ........... soebedteuns = 7 
at Cc ane Sang t eeeeee e@eeseeeoeeeeeeeene 2 5 
Store an ar Fixtures ,... gecyéadione 2 
To Rent— 
EER, BOS nee 87 5 
Houses Joly and Suburbani.... oncéane 7 
RESIS OES Sean + 7 
Apartment is cde6 thd chs ak ehckesci os me 1 
Apartments and Rooms to Share....2 7 
becca ished Apartments ...........0... 28 1 
Ss eeteeseseveseeees eeetece @eeseeee 28 2 
Often nd Shops ...... beded6000easiaan : 
In dustrial Property eeteeeeees o +088 ; 
Trave os eeeee see 27 4 
Trade Schoolse—Men *eeeeeee eae eeeeeevet ee 27 1 
ayy fs B wks oseutewees ee 27 3 
ey pewritare and “Tiee ESS 5 
were yaness ee Hsia, Appl.]...29 7 
a a Re erty 8 
Wet re oat 
pT Ne eae okie bbe cs debi sions oe 27 6 


24-Hour Service 

Tribune Want Ad-Visers are on 
duty 24 hours a day, every day 
of the year, to receive Want Ads 
by telephone or at the Want Ad 
Store, 1 South Dearborn. The 
Want Ad Store in Tribune Tower 
is open daily until 10 p. m. Sun- 
day until 5 p. m. 


Convenience 
A Want Ad-Viser is as near to you 
as your telephone. If you have a 
telephone, your ad will be charged 
to you. If not, or if you prefer, a 
Tribune man will call at your hemes 
or office. 


Ad Writing Assistance 
The Tribune maintains an expert 
ad writing department to help you 
word your Want Ad to secure the 
best results. There is no charge 
for this service. 


$100.00 Reward 


will be paid by The Tribune fot 
information leading to the arrest 
ane ee + one obtain- 
ng money fraudulently through 
Want Ads published in te columns. 


Call SUPerior 0100—Want Ad-Viser 


or Want Ad Offices 
Tribune Tower 1 South caarbert 


PPL 


Vitamin F Permanent Wave, 


.w as “et ag A gol 


F wave, hair styl and. seo 


ans 10c 

sa uth. Beye 

7, yale ee 
$4, STEAM Othe . 302 aa 


e trim,se' oy’ 
sit P. 


eb. Ae 
~ bane ‘ 
et dt e vita 
emg WAVE $1. BLBO, : 
Nina Parker, r re Rand ar. 


ti 
m- 


ail al Pad ~ 


Relies 
aor 


x ets Ries er ert a as rene rs = Rae 
Pei eg Sees lag Rit SS a Ray TER oct a RS or ia BOLE ee gt 
ie es ah BA ee ye OY ae vie ~~ Ae 

~ ee . on 4 > 
oh Pe eet 


21; N. U. comrel.; full, pt. time. Jun. 8623. 


wet eesreea tes OFFICE: YG, MAN. 
23; exc, refs, Grace. 6012. 


GEN, OFF.—2 ras, EXP.: 26: DHS. POS, 
with rel. firm; refs, Address A 400, Tribune. 


os  - SGLE., PART TIME, 20 . OF- 
cé, pp. exp. Address A 422, Tribune. 


ser SEEnGs YRS.’ COLLEGE: 5 YRS.’ 
- Address A 502, Tribune. 


TY PIST—-61 IN BS.: P, PERSON- 
ality: 8 yrs. off. 330 | dress ery Tribune, 


Accountants ani Auditors. 


A Oni: Seam alae 
clos 
tax, fin, atmts., systems, 
ACCTG.-BEKPG.~-TAxX- RNS: 
in handling consignmt.; commiss.: 
reas. rates: pt. time. Leonard: Wab. 5237. 


ACCOUNTANT—BOOKS KEPT PART TIME: 

stmts.; all taxes. w rates. Ardmore 1427. 

ACCOUNTANT — AUDITS — TAXES — PART 
__ time bkkpg. Hellman, Webster 4561, 


ACCT’G-TY PIST—33, GOOD BACKGROUND, 
reliable, steady. Address A 480, Tribune. 


Meudite. i H. ©. 6536. 


PXP 
accts.; 


R, CENSED — Pansigin ng | 


oe - | EN. 
nighis. South Shore 4686. 


COOK—ASSIST SALAD OR SANDWICH 
girl; exp,; ref.; neat. Col. Ken, 3964. | 


COOEK—COL.: NURSE: LAU 
Stay or go. _ Day ' work, 


get HSWE. QD. Pt. a gg ga ast 

ad lee on at ‘wittdws. Own roam. ne 0 Py 

GENERAL HOUSEWORK—COOKING: 
German woman: 4 days, $ 


YNG, 

day. Ard. 5953. 

GEA. HSEWK., COOK.-COL.: GD. WORK- 
r; rel.: home nités. Kenwood 


918. 
say HSWEK—ABLH GIRL: i. LDRY 
excl. with children; refs.; stay. Hum abe. 
GEN. HSWE., COOKIN Bi ST 8; 
etay or reference, es ce 61 


aK ae HITE, wane EXPD.: ao 


eioty 1189 riba 


K.—GEN.; A-l COOK; NBAT EVINED 
Sani ull Of Beet, Bas me. Atl, 2651 


ay? ee OR WhK, 


ie IN PRI. ADULT 
dress A 


483, Tribune. 
se tew 1706, 


HEWK—GE: eee y 
a A M is 
home; exp. nurse. Ad 


HSWK.—EXP. SWEDISH 
work: good references. $15. 


driv 
to chow worth. t <advesa’ d ry a Tac 


bay MGE. BLDG. N. 
exp.: have ine. AGaress. A eon ‘eibine 
AGE OF 27. HAVE 


Salesmen. 
SALESMAN~—I, AT THE 
all qualifications of a wg salesman. [I am 
oing to build into an exec. pos., for whom, 
don’t know. I am interested in sale Baya 
tral olin: — cere or fn Pp 
rial se eres n do 0 
Suclid 2630, "Address N'A 203, Tribune. 
aE HE REE TICaGiTEae HIGH SCHOOL 
netat age 19, Geaites position with futur 
verti 
She Sey or address 


ing gt alee aaleg organisation. 
~~ ret bee iG, MAN, 76: POS ce ‘si aa 
ouse W r] 
pable . esman. Pee A 460, 
JR. s. FG., 6 YR. DIR... RET. 
rdue. Aiircas A 468. Tribune. 
as oar rT 
. Des. pos. 
SRO 380. WANTS MERI- 
torious line; conim. Address A 506. Tribune. 
Professions and Trades. 


ribuneé, 
MN .—EXP. 
sls.: 
AL EXP. Vv AR: 
th fut. Hetk 359: 
ASSIST, FOREMAR, PROD... DIE SET OR 


gen. mach., stampi aap maint. epot weld.; 
some uniy, tec. train roll up sleeves 
or superin.: gd. reas. ‘sprig last pos. 
ADDRESS O D 224, TRIBUNE, 


DHS. POS. AS BEAU- 
dress A 303, Tribune. 
24: PLING. MA 

shp. exp., mch, incl, Address A 465. Tribune. 


CARPENTER—A1 MECH.: YG... FAST: 
yrs.’ exp.; day or contr.; reas. Ave, abt. 


CHEM. ENGR.—AGE 27: EXP.: DESIRES 
perm, pos; eXc. ref. Address A 402. Tribune. 


COMPOSITOR—F AST, 'ACU., ABLE TAKE 
h. shop. Omens, 8942 Lake Pk. Atl 5099. 


BARBER—YNG., LIO 
ty culture apprent. 


BRASS WK.—YNG., 


. Ad 


DESIG, DR. OF Pye PROD ORION 
A I yr. exp. PRPS ne 
Sin ree mT YRS.’ “ae r.3 YOUNG: BE 
references. Address A 458, Tribune. 
_ APTS. AND yo Pp gh yale’ MY ABILI- 
expertl. and Or part 


vel 
mm. Address A ia Tribu bune. 


DRAPTSMAN—MECH. STR. ENG.: 1 
exp.; will lv. town. Ad ss A 484, Tribu 


EMB DALMER-YG MAN EXPARIENCED 
steady aoe Say pret. Kedzie 6093. 
MACHINIST—5 YRS. GEN. SHOP EXP., DE- 
sires tool, die maker apprentice wk.: Ye. 
man. Address A 493, Tribune. 
7 YRS.’ ; 


MACHINIST—H. S, GRAD: 
mill., horiz. mill.} . gal. ace. Pen. 6905, a 5, 


MAINT, MAN—Al, —¥ EXP., 
Elect., stm., plumb., carp. Ref. aw as: muri} 


PAINTING, ERHANGING, CALC 


a 


ter prices. 20 yrs.’ exp. Armitage $404 
PAINTING AND PAP ~s HANG.— WK. 
. Bruns, “6033. 


guar,; hame your price, 
PAINTER AND PAPER HANGBER, Al, FAST, 


tearm. or hotel. Address A 292, Tribune. 
EX. COOK An? PA et mae VALUE 


to concern, 
MANAGER, Sin SEGRE = HSEPR.— 


a 
Middle aged. Club, hotel. Refs. She. 6340. 
Housekeepers and Caretakers, 


HSKPR.—SMALL ADULT FAM.: REL. 
Amer. Prot, past mid. age.; gd. cook; 
home; refs.; reas. Address A ags° Tribune. 


ee ne eee 
s r ° 
Good cook. Address A O73. Tribune ~— 


HSKPR.—REFINED, WHITH WOMA N 26, 
with girl 4, exc. ‘cook and m Widower 
Address A "507, 


or bach. home. reuate 
HEP COUPLE, EMPLOY R SEM 
nv Good cook. Lake View ra 


oh A dito 
489, Trib 


cook: N.W or W. Address A une, 


Shned: af “edulis, wee on one $319. ee 


ned: 
HSKPR. —EXP.;: sirve.t Ned Hi $16 wi -AMN, fai: 
Toy Pier g” AGE B: GERMAN-H -HUNG, CPL, 


age: gd, ck., 16 wk. Lak. 
a ae noc uc, 8141, 1881 Eddy. 
—NEAT WOMAN, DO HSWK. OR 
7 yor child, for rm. and bd. Cen. 5000. 


Nurses and Governesses, 
GRAD, NUBRSE—WILL CARE FOR et 
3034, 


Phe Tribune docs net hnew- 
ingly q@ecept Help Wanted 
advertismenis which mierep- 
resent the nafure or tecms of 
employment, or advertis- 
ments fer Sales Help which 
do net indicate the type of 
product or service to be sold 
and the form of compensa- 
tion. Report any misrepre- 
sentations er requests for a 
cash bond, deposit, or ‘ne 
vesiment for samples not 
siteted in the advertisment to 
the Tribune, Superier 6190. 
Leeel 323 (ier complainis 
ealy). 


Executives and Manugers. 


EXECUTIVE WANTED. 


Now employed in sales or production 


ACCT. —OFC. MG 1 ETR LUM. in mfg. specialty line. -. ie dissatisied 
€xD.! CAD.; : aon ae ‘Address A 647 Odo ne.| MAID—EXPD, AS HSWKR.. LAUNDRESS:| with Tis present pros He must 
XCCOUNTING, BKKPG. SERVICE — PART | pSeeee a eer Pullman 9488. know his proposition | oroughly, have 
' _ rg .t| Sales contacts and ready mar peri- 
sim: Simtel taxes: low rates, Roe, 0110. ap 3 ge = ae ¥ qExr. WITH 10 LDN: ence , ‘br siness man ma aes eclate with 
A EEPING—PA cee rn capita star 
NURSE GIRI-—RELIABLE: COL.: BEFS.; 
ly statements, Rates r CAs. | Orlian. - SORE: care of children eves. Went. 9191. Call 9- 3. ae — ree Peq., ete. -ieplie 
Executives and Managers. Coupl o- confidential. Address P C 267, Tribune. — 
cate pt ay a2 | SUPE ae a Rai P™| | SALES MANAGER 
routine, Ts.’ ban av. oO 
auditor and d asaistant cashier, ney CHAUF -BUTEER—80 CPLE WIFE | 4, Aseressive gil buther ales, depertmnent -_ 
BAUED.. eo FO Peer. oa YRS’. o Clubs, Hotels, and Restaurants 7, s0r 6 erienced 5 producer. ary 0 
° mmission. an 
frman., plt. will handle rte! COOK—EXPD. IN SMALL RESTAURANT, ayant any on ive details that will warrant 


ADDRESS P Y 436, TRIBUNE. 


MANAGERIAL OFFich 
tion, Gentiles. Avey f 

responsibly and 

cludin 


Also 


ull ge in- 
ary. 


you spe 
te f 


na onality, feligion starting « 
unior executive wanted. 
Address A “550. Tribune. 


CAN 


pable of making a 
candies, 


Professions and Trades. 
DY MAKER—EXPERIENCED MAN CA- 
eneral line of cocoanut 
Address 0 178. Tribune. 


CENCa ate 


ONSTRUCTION SUPERIN- 
et gooany and walls 
Projects peparationa. 


“ne 
Tri Bi 


CAR 
str 


abutments, walls. etc., 


PENTER —- BXPERIENCED IN CON- 
ucting form — for concrete piers, 
tor iis viaducts, 


ade separations. State e 


some prciecs you have wor usd ron. 
Address A 477, bune. 
AGER~ 


DESIGNER-PRODUCTION MA 
Well esta cecessful 


tion and willin 


Give 


at 
SepINATOR~EXPERIENOED “ON PIDRS, 


tablished ss factory, 
suc 


an experien 
séeking permanent connec- 
to take financial interest. 
ormer connection 
se DG 37, Tribune. Tribun 
TRACHR-ERBAN a ND BOY— 
A ickes 0 ibune. 


age and 
Addre 


S. pref 


Isn’ 


YOU LOOKING FOR? 


t permanent position with good in- 


come ana opportunit 


nos wel ge ages 
ages | ee 


in it receiv a 
bonus and in Raditien s 
available 


ou By wi 
you have the right” atthe 
is —— ooees 
a growing b 
good percentage 


for advancern 


drawin 


149 


the 


usines 


ent with 
mterested 
35 


. ap 
South ad 
» 9 a. m. to 11 a. m, only. 


gales 


men 


or willin 
25-45 
about their work. 


and 2 


o popular 
: gt peak in 
man, this will moan, ‘a substantial 
commission eee shea 


on 


TO 


A 


pt ag om 1 


sus 


pee 


EV 


BRIGHT YOUNG MAN 
ABOUT TO TAKE A WIFE. 


Establish yourself with one of the 
re) seensasens, in the world—C 

% Chevrolet will reach 
As a Chevrolet fee. 
aine 


atest 
RO- 


n 


& 
py nen 


ned instru 


“I 000 Leads Waitine 


Will hire 4 men with selling experience, 
men with unusual ambition, age 
q 


0 gay “I will” na follow through. 


men 


to 4 


who 
Plen ep of money and abund 
tuni co-ordina 
and y. This is educational work 
with national institution oy 
stantial commi 


AND SALES P a pe 


who 


fied. 


We 
file ‘aratomh and all pros- 
men selected 
ane sides. Ap- 

a m. to 


There are several openings in our Appli- 
Department for neat appearing, 
ambitious young men, over 20 years of age, 
willing to start at the bottom and earn pro- 
motion by honest and persistent effort. Ex- 
orough training and 


ance 


COMPANY. 


Sales 


perience unnecessary. 


and 2:0 


co-operation given. 
accounts and ate commission nis on. 8 


to 4: 


00 pb. 


Compensation: 


salbaniar nian EDISON 


Drawing 


NORTH a MEN. 


A large furniture company will place 5& 
men in their new account department show- 
ing people an a. 


No Merchandise to Sell. 


Must be neat and capable of ne pub- 
lic; experience in our line 

These are permanent po 
lent future for those who make good. 
$26 per week to start on our drawing ac- 
count bontis and commission plan. 
in person to Mr. Zuber, 3318 Lincoln-avenue. 


dione’ tions with excel- 
About 


Apply 


LT 


__£0 anywhere, "take View 1760, 

PAINTING. CLEAN'G — STORES. BRST AN: 
rants, halls, taverns. ~~ Austin 556 
PAINTING—HIGH t CLASS INT, 
ing. Meet any p ey. 2017 


SHIPPING OR BEORTY ING,” Cie, BXPD. 
Hi-school grad. Refs. B. eoTe 


TOOL, AND pis aN ONe EX. ex: 
perience, wishes part time wk. Spa, 8940, 


Clubs, Hotels, and eee ae 


CHEF-STEWARD—AI1: YRS." EXP. 
hotel, club, rest.: i econemitea fee ee 
leave city. Addre 


CHEF—ALL ROUND P&P.. WRITTON BBP, 


Gd. butch.. 10 yr. 1 pl. Vic. 9656, 


_ Siete ptsoaalty. Mrsa fhe 


N pao ity 
UNION meee puta =n gag 4... 4 LAST 


lace, e€ ence rvice 
best of references. “Tel Brookfield tise: 


House re Ng gen 
COOK.-HSWK.—A-1; BACH.: 
_ long exp.: city ie . oN VAN awens 62, 
HOUSEMAN, GARDENER. CHAUFF.—EXP., 
cln,, honest, Lackawanna 6469, _Johansen. 


HSMN., CHAUF., COOK, SERVE, YARD 
work: lt. col., mat} good refs. s. Mid. tite. 


Farm and Garden Help. 


FARMER—YOUNG MARBRIED, EXP. 
hog, chicken and grain raising: #088 milk- 


IN 


or; refs. . Address A 4899, Tribune a 
Chauffeurs. 
CHAUFPFEUR—YOUNG: CAN DO WosTt 
anything. Good refs. Call Stewart 3124. 


wt ee ggre Typists, Ete, 

TY PI . G, MAN : 
5° | CLERK TYP optional.; A-1 rote’ ited, 6640; 
SECY-STENO.—COMPT.. FAST. ACCUR 


CY.STEN Sy aed CO. 
” vari d 


AS or 
des. an breaks tone his tdieast “a by ag 


of f work: exp. sowie oper: 
teat ye dani tor, win 


window was — 
he eh eet ox 


-CONVI 


487, 


rc. MAN— "36 CAF 
el, ho rin A " Adareok eT 


whe i: no se bg rear ae 
Se "37 AT nF 


refa, 


WANS 
work: 


a. 
sd 


= Std pereon,_ purses home. Back. alls, for bridges, via-| WEN OUR JOB IS BUILDING 
GOVERNESS OR TUTOR—2 YRS.’ COL-| aucts, an e separations, State ase and ies? 
lege, ¢xp. with children; ref. Key. 0626. | experience : ma dress ; A 475, mail _ or "HO: BUILD YOU To EAR 
INFANT'S NU te fig ake EXP, SP GAS ON ATTE TH MORE we SY. YOU MUST Be 
my intent Hist Good ad dispo sition. Refs.| exp. Smal cash bond. Bars. Salary and TO LEARN TO WORK AND 
wor 16. comm. 7800 Stony sland-avenue. 10 Gur AWAD. A Uta, iG nae 
ear RSE—ANY SE = s.’ “HOSP AND RAININ 
pr: $16 wi, Bit 8030, oe ie oSo.m| ee H soHdor, » CoM S10 a7 QUAL 
J th recen - on avy steam hammer EXPERIEN 
Mein Fiche tothe Gosia Soh aie B BL in forging job shop. ‘This is not # drop.| EDED, aust 2e, BETWEEN 26 
NURSE — TRAINED, PRACTIOAL; ANY Sate catean nualifien an txoarl cnn bee | Oke Uveute CeECEOL cals 
; a unless qu e rt steam - 
case; $14 week. Ran an toes mersmith, Natl. Metal ‘Trades, 643 Fulton, SOUTH MICHIGAN. = 
NURSE—ENGLI EFIN D. BE, LD.| Newspaper Correspondent. i7o A YOUNG MAN WHO s 
person or GLIse. REFINE Be} ‘s refs. ° ig! L Pp te Pp i PUNCH HIS LAST TIME or of 
arge metropolitan news ~~ has opening is is your opportunity to lear 
Nurses’ Registries. for writer w 0 can, Speak, gan ah ust cae calkamiacente at se at 
NURSES FURNISHED ON ALL CASHES— young, single, well eé se 
Acme Registry, 9645 N. Burling, Well.6586, perionte dealrabley ,{0, travel. Newspaper ex-| you “th eee cape it ea ood Fhe 
NURSES wie FURNI HED ANY TIME FOR $8 O H 501. TRIBUNE. profite right away, sag ay ged 
st set Aete Hout, He oO operas ani aD GRavaR Waning) FS one i mae 
Laundresses and Day Work. er | ‘ of tra ned experts and instructors hiwey 
DAY WORK—LIGHT COL. GIR EXP.: be # ony ee os ae a full partic Mr. Sommers at 6501 N . Western-av. 
some Indy., no windows, Mid. 4074. AT ONCE. 
FIRST CLASS LNDRESS.—GD. IRONER. n.| T4tanr SPEOIIOA TION WRITER AND 
fast cleaner: by day: $2. c. t. Atl. eon: tate Su pesston, exD.. sal. We will employ several neat appearing 
LAUND—Al ier CLN - , WRI dented. Addiess GF 487 Ae agg hn Did Be hg ae A gay 
_— esire a ermanen onne Ww a 
Any da 2. c, f.2 par Ba OH been. Pe pti a ENGINEER pon ie geal organization | eg re ee 
CAUNDRESS_GEEMAN. TAK RG tate ore tele aul in ia | «COGN & Gay. and start at our te 
ee cP alate 2g Bd Aba yh 5 
“‘ * age ar mploymen an , 
at fast worker: $2 and ca pretindy Ly ‘ 5. SUDERINTENDERT Room 618, "303 North "Wabash-avenas’ 
WASHING, ONING, CLEA Rey For special machinery mfg. plant employ- 
day: exp.: Bs mid, age; secon 4, He aaekine. ‘ 0 m8 SomDr eg nets Pes “ peeps ory neigh 
is.; mid, age; second. Bel.4711. ne a ops, w n " ; ] 
wae BY THE tL a ae 50, CARPARE. | vost have actual exp. in, supervising a shop taileen, Saat g Bh BS it be for 
colored. Kenwood 2744. of this kind an mu st b e@ able to show a Chicago. Wis.. and all nearby states: strictly 
Stenographers, Typists, i'm, Ete. good fecgtd OF || of results obtained. Give age, pad Give exp., references or nO, attention 
BEG NNER— ABLE. ¢ AP ABLE, Ni NBs AT ARR ry: ay .. 7% otated Tribune. ia. Lene caro manufacturer. Address O A 
—— TAIT, 3: HOTEL 
EXEO. SEC.-STEN.—SWED.. SaoRP OFC. aR teady. Gall Eingola_ 1141, oA yertising pian. wea pr eat at foun 
det.: pat., gem. law. acctg., Eng. Ave. 6163. The T FvibGns ailtke exuded low rasan only. a resent "men are making bis 
G - OFrie Wiis ~WOMAN, Y M po A who can qualify for man- 
exp.: refs. Stow $078: to persons who advertise for positions. {or on ‘ ues. be. pbie a ananee es y diese 
KEY aWED, came es Trris?, 3 | For information and as e in writ- Comm bore 
‘ ply SUPERIO 
pie yea. ae : ck. 6008. =z | ing an advertisment stop at the Want | SYStaM INC, 995 N. Wells-st. 
C RRE orn. 
edii¢.. 8 ria exp exp. all brane brane lal collec: | 4 office, Madison and Dearb New, Red Hot Newspaper 
tion, finance, zood at com: | sts., or in the lobby of Tribune Tower. we is dad ati din aan 
petent.. “ Som . dg for neat ¢ live wire men, Ls Wore 
Clubs, Hotels, age sr ety th pubervisors, Liberal comm. 
HOTEL CLER INGL -45: SWITCH-| per wk. App 
board exp. Hog N. Ee asite. OF AE eae Ks ihe ea F 42°: 2017. 3 ur Bia e bare. 
any aga Se. yor 
é RRE st ; 
2 ‘ahh ~ epee om 4i53 Ay at. 
it P ARM BE | 2 hard i weeare of néat Saye weno: Moe 
own r 
a req. Torgt—ca EN GEP ood iricome hetnidiiet es exéeliont future. 
Oo experience teres. We train you. 
venpaageer ir Call after 10:3 m. The J. R. Watkins 
APPLIANCES—S Bee APPLIANCES. | Co.. 810 W. 76th-ai. or 2220 N. Western, 
Radios and furniture fare. Leads fu rnished. Draw. 
eet, and co 4 ABS, mnished, Best a ASSURE A REAL FUTURE. 
torage 2s + Sys roduct that is a necessity in every 
= __eottake rove, hamet ns competitions and you sell direct 
e percentage 


. 0 
ee Sale 


§TENO. ee 
off. exy.: fum. re 
STENO.—HXP. B 
bkpg.,. Dictaph 


e. Dea.3483 


STENO.—-A-1: OFC. 
STBNO GENERAL 


at Of % ‘ , 


exp: neat 
IN Ar . - “$ ry : 
0 ’ ‘ 3 > , | ' ® r 
re M , - : = 
8 sam. “* : oe 
1 Gte,! yng. id Ww. 2. 
STENO,-SWIT Saag ged hae a3 
$' . : I, oe mi. C , 
ae + a capable: rt be nner. | Moti: 
+ J a: : ott ater iy 
c. i . det. nt. B Ait 
a ~ en" 
| T vf) > & A 4 
af @—GIRi At 
ry ; a. & hs i‘ om . 
| aoe : OR, BXED:: 


EF eA 


4 


ees 


DA Bie aah srt Sale 


eek, me. yee dealers 


ars; leads 
LEIOT DU iia 
SALE 


erns and «liquor 


- es . 


earnings; 
Apply 


expenses advan 
8S. Dearborn, R. 1306, 9 to 18. 


Tell 


us 


ut oe 


ive wane a? mors be bet, 3 ‘Bo ‘and 6 
a ‘Prefer r educational pal 


one guste 


nies 


Oak ED Ke 


na 


leads. 


ae 2. MEN HIRED LAST WEEK BACH 


ockets by Sat. 


vit ast educ, 
salesmen. 


GROGERY TRADE 


iets mow in 


fast rebeati 


ogee cape 


in Samer. 


ing item. 


sag 


as oe sl Psd babe 
per month is the feat 


ae, us Bag" aca: ec 


At 
pro 

men 

comm 
A 


Pray 
Mer. 


WILL wink 


3 men over 27 for a speci 

and new furn. customers. 

manage on about $2 
Sal 10: 


* 


with 


i1- 


12, "500. No 


os 
te IE: ing 3 
- 
ry 
me 


car] 


aed gW MANAGER—OPENING “- 
pass 
od Sarntnns fuaran 


ae be ae | AYA 


oe 


FOR 
& 


yg 


z 


‘iba 


4 


| You as “7 LEARN 
; TM GONG TO ere 
| A PARTY Syn 
a OKs, | 
\Y ¥ i “ 
3 J (Ny)! i 
A Can nM 
LIN 
Ey MRE righe, 1908, by ll! 4 (ly) 
we _ SITUATIONS WANTED—MEN, __|__ SITUATIONS WANTED—WOMEN. | HELP WANTED—MEK. HELP WANTED—MEN. 
Bookkeepers and Clerks. Domestics and Cooks, — — i Salesamen. Sirus Bee Balesmen, Lid 
he cA COL DUR. PRI.: EXP, OFC, DHT.; COOKING—HO lOe Pt yee $12-$15. WHAT KIND OF JOB ARE 


IF YOU HAVE AMBITION, 
IF YOU WILL WORK HARD 
IF YOU WANT 
TO GET OUT OF THE RUT 


then we have a real opportunity f 
selling an article for the kit ae tg that has 
no competition. wothin else ~¥* on ti 
arket. as we 
eaters. 


co for pt promoti 
A lly 
osees 


y A 
pom, but is jm, demand 
And, sae No 


place, Chicago, 
ineomeieetek: ta wonderful Dro ed 

strated. Lune serv 
immediately after the demonstration. 
Car necessary. 


DON'T FORG 2 FP. 
WEDNESDAY. 


By: comuany with 
. +4. 30th- 
Welass: 


M. SHARP. 


COMPETENT SALESMEN 


secking a permanent connection where 
immediate earnings are available, will be 
interviewed by an executive of an or- 
anization national in sopne ant peeiae 
rom 9: to To the 


R,. B, Thornton, New 
Sheridan-rd. and Law- 
rence-ave, 


INVESTIGATE 


THIS OPPORTUNITY. 
$25-$30 per week to start to those who 
can qualify for openings in new department 
of Chicago’s foremost furniture company. 
Expersenes unnecessary ag the 5 selected will 
be given special training. Must be neat, am- 
bitious, and over 25 > ae of a a9 Positions 
are permanent an r friend pppporhaaity 
for those who make good of com- 
ensation, including advance etn 98 and 
sus with Grawing account privilege. Apply 
son on 
R. NELSON, 834 W. 63D-STREET, 


Agents. 
OVER 300,000 DIAL PHONE USERS. Fas. 
Bects for bepae ae invention. First 
ou 


make 8 190% pro homeo ruickl: ome. 


in 


‘Act ickly. 
Ww. mont. Act quick RM. 825. 


CIGAR SALESMEN — TO SELL DIRECT 
from factory. 186 N. La Salle. 


Miscellaneous. 
NIGHT WATCHMAN. 


Must have car: good All State Speci 
Police, 12 W. Garfield, jade a 


PATROLMAN—#5 YEA ae wie 
wat a, nighs, yi (service i 3 3 es 

0 2 a mmission. 9-10 a. 
Room 508 80 South =. -"2 ™ 
son 0 CED MAN— OFFICES 


ADpERaS. BUSTBIAL SPA 
MANAGER—IN HOOMING. HOUSE HE 
ehange apt. for services. 413 nmore 

If you have not found the kind of 
position you are looking for, read the 
Salesmen Wanted ads. Earnings of 
salesmen are unlimited and many ¢on- 
cerns are looking for inexperienced 
people whom they can train. 


Employment ae 
5 7B. SALESMEN; 24-26 aah 
ouENi cienha @ 


TIME 
READY TO W 


—* 


2 YEARS’ axe? 


eseeeeeaoneaneee ee 


ps aoe; 


COUNSEL, INC., 
MERCHANDISE MART. ROOM 227. 
DESIGN.-DEVELOPT, ENGR 


——— Retrigeraiion a agai Seas _-_—- 


ADV. MG Dept, _Str. 
Millinery. ‘Prom’‘] Trall'g ose essential 1. $6, 000 
ASST. SALES MGR... 25-3 D. 5005 


ee aU i pO Ta REM RS 8 
5 YNG, -23, train for sales... $65 
BUSINESS oN ee S$ CL. HSE. a 


8. State. 
HARRIS OFFSET PRESS aa ~»--940-$50 
SHIPPING CLERK, read blue prints..$18 
TOOL DIE Cements job shop @XD.......+. 
40c\Sprayer . 


Punch Pre 
AUTOMATIC GLUE MACH, 
DISHWASHER, MACHINE 


OPER. ... 


SALES—OFFICE SUPPLIES...... $125 
SALES—IN USL’. rai _— éeee . 
IALTY—Trave 150 

SEVERAL TORIORS- Hochola’ tera.$86 plus 


TRIANGLE, 25 E. JAGESON: 


HEAD SHIP. CLK.—EXB TP 

DEPT. STORE ADVERTISING MGs & 38 200 
YOUNG ANK TELLER........ 

'Y—To Lrn. Bank., . Grad., a A Oea2e 
Glader Corps, 1 10 S.Dearborn 
SALHS CORRHSP.. FAN BLO 
ALES i EE : 

Iw MAK : iW MACH. PA : 


aie 


Ste bees ee te a 


vereg 
G. eettee#e eee 
CONSOLIDAT 11TH PL., 209 s. st 


DEAF. SMAN. MEOH... 6 gi 
Oe, tee a ‘saaktaee 2 


bins igtter tt aeons er, ‘pic 


. CAR WASHER & GREA 


qaser ai and er og 


me We oe eeece 7 ee 
feago Garage Owners, 16 "Woeat | 
BS ape: 


COMB. HOUS 


A 
oo x MHA ne 


gg aig og AND ERECTIO} 
steam ch oye es supervise 20 


eet ee? © @s 


0; PROT 
Po 


Offe mses H, s. as: 


eeasd 


oo Bas me gee ons 4 


ADE. oer $140 


eeneeeve  } ’ 
vas HAVE 2 YRS. 
ity "23-27... $100 + exp. 
TOR 0 


’ . Bove! /777) 50 
= -H-A-Y, 1% Ww. Washington 


S MGRS., 2, FOOD MFRBS......$7,5 
cones GE.. Asst.. Mfr...... 3; 
}ODUCTION MGR., Adv. Agcy., Natl, 


leave. 


33% 


*- *# 


Ss 


hts C0 yh 120 606m 
S 
;, 


a 


ooo 


oods, see 

+» om 
BSMN. co By Ors JACKSO 
—2 YRS. COLLEGE, 25 | eer 
ENGR., 28-30. 
YG ALESMEN, “ipavel. 


: R ECUT Elec Appl. .. 
NDU Bony 2 EQUIP. Sales. ae 000 
§ 


lente 
BeSeeee 


- 


" 10, 00 
-ST, 


3. 


OC ROLLER XD. «+ 
Er Accts. -Sales. PClerical Dept. 
Buyers and M 


A.J. McCOY & ASSOC., INC., 
SUITE 1130. 140 SO. DEARBORN. 


Employment Service, 


SALARIED Tora? 0 a 
$2,500 to $25,000 


role Reroughiy, organized advertising serv- 
of years’ recognized stamlone and 
reputat: hag carries on otia- 
for positions of 

: @ procedure individualized to eac 
) ent's “personal requiremcuts. Several weeks 
red to negotiate und ah indiciduai 

of his own 


must. anes the moderate cost 
Pampaign. identity is covered and if em- 
ployed. present position protected. [f you 
nave actually earned over #2. 500 vend only 
name and address for details. 


R. W. BIXBY, ILNC.. 
141 Delaware Bidg.. Buffalo. N. Y. 


EXECUTIVES, 


Contact uployers roves our confidential 
nd_ effective ethods. Write for details. 
THE NA TIONAL BUSINESS BOURSE. 
W. Jackson-blvd. Established 21 years. 


LARIED ig ho gd SEE OUR AD IrHis 
‘column Sun. Wed. K. W. KHIXBY, INC, . 


TRADE SCHOOLS—MEN, 


_— 


ALLIED SHOPS 
Offer Thoroughly Practical Training 
MACHINIST TRADE. 


TOOL & DIE MAKING 


i DESIGNING AND DRAFTING. 
Automatic Screw Machines. 


n in the most complete training shops in 
merica. Gect experience on actual machine 
ork. Start now. Days. evenings. Low fee. 

s employment help. Write for free book: 

“Practical Machine Shop Training.” 

VISIT ALLIED SHOPS TODA 


Allied Screw Machine Co., 


{SCHOOL DIVIiSION.|1 
509 W. Lake-street. Dept. T. Hay. 1136. 


W-E-L-D-I-N-G. 


Short intensive course. Come a oe wee 
our welders at work day or nich 
FREER COLLEGE. 2027 Ss. WABASE. 


Agito WEEK FREE TRIAL. 
RN THE PRACTICAL WA 
DI MACHINISTS. 
AIR CONDITIONING. 
CHANICS. BODY AND FENDER. 


fe eo Diese] Plus Training. 
FREER LLEGE 2027 S$. WABASH 


FREIGHT TRAFFIC 
MANAGEMENT 


TE COLLEGE OF ADVANCED TRAFFIC. 
Chicago's oldest resident traffic school. All 
ge of freight traffic taueht bv experts 
ith combined experience of over 250 
Pars, Hu ndreds of successfu| graduates. Lib- 
; employment help. Enroll niggas Phone 
rite or visit. a. m.-9 a. m. 
330 S. Wells-st. Dept. C- 5. Harr. 8649. 


AIR CONDITIONING 


hould excite the live wire who really wants 
ir poportenity for steady employment and 
wee BAS Interesting and easy to learn un- 
2. Industry supervised method. 

Be mspect our laboratory and shops 
cone 4 ‘America, Write or p 

Mittance pass and “ 

on an ir Conditioning Institute. 

wrence-avenue. Phone Longbeach 6100. 


1938 Government Jobs 


Men. women. Start $105-$175 per month 
pendable. Prepare immediately for Chi 
examinations. Short hours. Influence 
essary. Common education usually suf 
Full particulars and tist posttest 

REE. Write today. 2h coached free 
mually. Franklin Institute Devt. 1158 860) 

North Michigan. 


- — GET OUR FREE BOOKLET — — — 
EXPLA,;NING HOW WE TEACH . 
BARBERING 
nd place you in a good job. Demand and 


ages are the best in years. Day and eve- 
ning Call. write, or phone. 


MOLER SYSTEM, 
177 N. State-st. CEN. 


ORMER— 


U.S. EXAMINER 


a aelp p os Bp you for P. O. clerk, R. R. 
' k., general clerk. inspector of 
laborer, guard. file 
ete., exam- 


Lag 


in 


6393. 


sor tiene or liquor, 
typist. steno.. bookkeeper, 


TTERS 
W. Washington Suite c1b. “franklin 9784. 
BE A TRAFFIC MANAGER. 


owing businces profession. 
Le led. We have over 20 years’ 
EXT are NOW recocnized as BEST 
Chi . Free employment help to our 
isit 10 a. a. to 9 pd. m. or write 


Freight Traffic Institute, 
5 W. Adame-st.. Dept, T-22. State 2330 


OOL & DIE MAKING 
gyal TRADE, 
para. gg nt TRAINING. 

rp = IR SHOPS. on ane. anaes 

hool of Mechanical Trades, 

LN. 5 een Monroe 2346. 


‘PARE FOR JR. ACCOUNT ASTD JOB-— 
led instructions to be studied in you! 

: we cover Hh lh necessary 
a iunior accountant’s 
prepared by nationally 

NOW Private coaching and 


minations 
ERICAN ACADEMY OF many Tor 
se 76 W. Adams. State 6782. 


ADVERTISING 


ATTRACTIVE WELL PAID FIELD. 
ver °o gery gos 

re tical spare time traini 
nat peeston a or pa 


[CHIGAN-AV. AT 20TH. ST. 
, U. 8. SCHD&. EXPERT DIRECTS 


e “J S. GOVT. JOBS 
ONL SCHOOL. EVE. CLASSES. 
We nesters tee ng. 37 wvan waren. Wenake 


a IN DRAFTING. 


' wn as epti f Sup. amily, of 3 bet. 9 9: ith. 


4 R SURGICAL COR- 
A. ee Co., 310 ‘Wood- 
ward. Detroit, Mich. 


Sh 
ALTERER; EXPD. LY 
39 . _Sinte. Rm. i164. 


FUR FINISHERS— ONLY: STEADY 
work possible. ' BG00 a Ww. Madison-street. 


NU — GRADUA HORE 
ene ine TE, NORTH SHO 


Resort. Winnetka 211. 
OPERATORS—SIN COATS 


LE EDLE, 
ton 0 aie Dark. 110 Sortie bowlacena at Mar- 


WOMAN—TO MAKE SLIP COVERS. 
rienced. Address O G 257, Tribune. 


Household Help. 
ga to renga —- FOR pads SLY Hea FO 
uples penerate subheading “ Couples 
iemenintee fol rei wthis eubclaesification 
COOK—WH., EX Pah 5 Pasha Se 
1 ate 


GEN. HSWK.—WHITE. COMPETENT MAID, 
cook, st ms laundry. 1 small child. Own 
room Forest 2752. 


GEN. SE eee S THUROUGHLY EXP.; 
. Mae i refs.; permanent = to 
right party. fg ota O J 386, Tribun 
GEN. HSWK., PLAIN tage WH. ; oNDEE 
35: child 3 yrs.: stay; good home; 
own rm.-bath: $10. ays See ‘661 
GENERAL HSWKE.—WHT.. GD. COOK: NO 
ldry.: 2 children: stay: $10. Sou. Sh. 4141. 


GEN. HSWK.—WHT. GD. COOK. 28 TO 33. 
Own rm. and bath. No idry. $10. Lak.5826 


GEN. HSWK. MAID—WHITE; REFS. RE- 
quired; 3 ; 3 adults; stay or go. Bit. 1778. 


GEN. HSWK.— ~—PLAIN COOKING. STAY 
nights. Refs. required. Hyde Park 6592. 


GEN. HSWK.—WHITE: REFS.: EXPD.: 2 
schl, chil.: own rm. bath. 9-3. Drex. ave. 
GEN. HSWKE.—WHITE: NO COOKG., 

washg. Own r., gd. home, $5-$6. Hol. “838 


GENERAL GUSEWORK—GIRL, WHITE. 
Own room, bath. Good home. $8. Mid.2647. 


home. Off ev Sun. Em uple 
sch}. children; aa Polland, 5465. nataciie. 


GIRL—PLAIN COOK, LIGHT LDRY. NO 
windows. 2 children. Mother emp. Sun- 
day off. 4943 Sheridan, Apt. 181. Lon. 2000 


at alg Ue argent 1g ¢ Ss. Peak BE eat seer 
, : mother emp sch. ¢ r 
lan 2000, Room 181. 4943 Sheridan. 


GIRL—WHT. GEN. HSWK. CARE OF CHILD. 
No lidry. Stay. $7. Lakeview 7349. 


GIRL — WHITE, ABOUT 25; PLEASANT 


aaa 


A ets eeee 


Rehington 


eeseeevee & 
beeese sees 


F. KKPR.—LITE. STENO... 
19 BEEP BILLER—SOUTE 
SHCRETARY-STENO.—Real futur: 
ASSEMBLERS OTTAN ¥ 


weeteeeoaie 


TRIANGLE, 28 E. JACKSON. 
MOLENE, ee 


EDIPHONE:- : STENO.—8 DA ee 2 
os oe "Salie-s =e 

Shirt Finishers eth fe ty aig 38) ¢ 

CADILLAC, 14 E. JACKSON. 


20 W. 
Ediph sien s.. 


ACKSON. 
nds. a5 


‘Loon. $35 
. tyD.., TLS sido 


CORBOY-CALVIN. 
bk . $40)! 
Steno., law: secy.34 
Law steno. ~ corp. + 
Law ste b 30] 
Maneca. Ts. .$18-$20' Fil 


a Ts ae OPER. ; STENO.-B 


KEPR 
S. 14..$25/BAKERY SALHS. ‘$12 
OSMETIC ABELERS, $12 — 
1 a ++ «$10 


ER MACH. .$14\WA AITRESSES 
COUNTER GIRLS.$12|JEWISH 

MONARCH, 166 W. WASHINGTON. 
STENO.-SECY., SALES.........0..000...8 i 


Switchbd. young. attrac. tnteteeeaedn bake 
Col, hotel maids. 
, Waitress 


and 


Fountain girls.... + 
Bakery sale 5: Housemaids.. 
No. Side Gorsolidates 1001 Leland. 


CHOICE ig oy COUPLES. MAIDS. 
Lee, opp. Davis vanston. . Davie s Sil 


TRADE SCHOOLS—WOMEN, 


16. 


~~ ~~. 


Chicago Business College. 


ORIGINAL AND (GNLY. EST. 1887. 
Largest [25 rooms]. oldest and only school 
teaching switchboard. with live boards. 
PBX Box Multiple 2 pos. Hotel inelud. 
Reecptionist, #2 port oouree GREGG MUN- 
N STENOG.. 5 D wk., with Bus. Ene. 
complete. ICTAPHONE. FILIN 
*TOMETRY. 3 to 8 wks. BOOKKEEP- 
NG by mo. or course. Cashiering 2 wks... 6 
machines, $2 up. TYPING. individual tmetr. 
SPEEDWRITING, 100 word min. in 8-10 wks. 
Not a machine. Free demonstrations 1] a. m. 
daily: Tuesday, Thursday. 6 p. m. Free plac- 
ing. Lots of calls, Visit all depts. this fine 
university teacher school. Both sexes. Catalog 
free. Don't be confused. OUR ONLY SCHOOL 
190 N. State. Franklin 4122-3-4-6. WALTER 
D. HARRIS. B. S. M. A.. Pres. 


GIRL — CAPABLE TAKING CARE BABY: 
em. apt.: 1t. hswk.: asst. ck.: stay. ie ad 


GIRL—WHITE, YG.; HSWK.: SM. 
wash.: gd. hm.: $6. 1301 Eimdale. ey base 


GIRL—EXP. GEN. HSWK. LIKE CHILD'N. 
No ldry. Own rm. Stay. Sheldrake 6914. 


GIRL—GEN. HSWK.: EXP.: NEAT WORK- 
er; stay: Siegel. 1951% Humboldt-blvd. 


MAID—WHITE SWEDISH PREF.: EXPER... 
for 5 room apt.: 2 adults, 1 child: laun- 

dry and cook: pleasant room: $10 week t 

start. Uniform furnished. Hyde Park 8080. 


MAID—2D, FOR PERSONAL ATTENTION 
to elderly lady: asst. light hswk.: — 
hsehld. Ph. after 5:30, Fair. 2840 


wer jo aphhaga GOOD et GENL. “SEW 
rm. and radio. child 5 years, No 
Phe! ey Start $7. i oerces 5677. 


NURSEMAID—WHT., EXPD.. 20-25: CARE 
mo. baby: no hswk.: $6: gd. home. 
Buc. 2066. 


NURSEMAID—WH. 
Own rm. Refs. $7 ts start. 


YOUNG WOMAN — WHT.. GEN. HSEWEK.. 
plain cook., assist baby; gd. sal. Gra. 6360. 


baht TRIBUNE OFFEKS SPECIAL ky 
to persons advertising for positions 
ror further information stop at the Want 
Madison and Dearborn streets or 

in the lobby of Tribune Tower. 


Couples. 


COUPLE— WHITE, GEN. HSWE., HSEMAN, 
own apt., $40 mo.: refs. Kenwood 14165. 


HOUSEMAN—EXP. WITH TOOLS. ALSO 
maid in rm, house. 4132 Kenmore. 


Clubs, Hotels. and Restaurants, 


COOK—WHITE, EXPD., 20-40, FOR TAY- 
ern. 7200 S. Halsted. Vincennes 3608. 


COOK—FOR JEWISH OR | 5 ea 
cooking. Leave town, Sheldrake 6921 


HOUSEKEEPER FOR WOODSTOCK COUN. 

try club May list to Nov. ist. Salary and 
all you make serving meals. Living quar- 
ters at cluno. Write Secretary, Woodstock 
Country Club, Woodstock, Il. 


PASTRY COUK., COLORED: EXP. WOOL- 
shire Restaurant, 2107 E. 71st-strect. 


WAITRESS—DVER 23 YEARS, FOR DAYS 
or nights. 1000 West Taylor-street. 


Saleswomen,. 


FURNITURE AND RADIO SALESWOMEN— 
2; straight sal.: colored trade. 556 E. 634d. 


A splendid Opportunity for 
the Right Woman. 


A permatent connection with excellent fu 
ture is available to a well educated, ampbi- 
tious woman, preferably with car. calling Ov 
parents with an educational program. We 
furnish direct leads from imi4icrested pros 
pects. Advance Sage egg assuree attrac: 
tive earniuigs rs. Smith, Suite 608 
307 N. Michieas avenue, 


— THE BOOK HOUSE FUR CHILDREN — 
HAS A PERMANENT POSITION 
for a vapable. well educated woman !28- 
451: experience not nevessarv, Should be 
free to travel. Special financial ar rangemet 
while oS ee ges: ag Page eg fe earn 
ings of $45 a week an Sce Miss Helen 
Gillett. Suite’ 1004. 00 uN Michigan. 
PERMANENT POSITION, | 


Woman, pleasant, courteous handling cus- 
tomers; over 29: rmanent position; good 
pay to start: libera eee — hag eo 


omen's wear. No 
Weds., 10-1%, 209 209 8. 5 3 oatast “Suite ADS 


AVERAGE $3 $30 WEEKLY. 


Steady work; hosiery and lingerie; no ex- 
erience required: excellent commission. See 
rs. Rand, 229 West Washington. 


Ww MEM —~ OVE 30. DEMONSTRATE 
% Dresses’ a. 


are time. Experience 
ansieneeie: Pest satisfied with $2.50 
commission daily. Janaliene, Dept. 722. 
Indianapolis, Ind ana. 


CHIL.; OTH. HELP. 
Mid. 9182. 


ATTRACTIVE GIRLS 


Excellent opportunity for those who van 

qualify for fasion. myaite Bae. Sizes 14-18. 

Small tuition fee. Free placement service, 
SPECIAL CLASSES FOR CHILDREN. 


Avply at studio at once or mail coupon. 
Name ... 
Address ... 


VERA JANE STUDIO 


“ AMERICA’S FINEST AND BEST 
KNOWN MODELING STUDIO.” 

64 E. Jackson-boulevard. Wabash 93832. 

SUCCESS IN LIFE DEPENDS 15% UPON 
VOCATION—85% UPON THE ‘TRAINING 


BEAUTY CULTURE 


is America’s No. 1 Industry for Women— 
but to be able to select the proper training 
place—we have prepared “ Precautionary In- 
Saemation ’ a booklet that will save. you 
time, money. and worry. Don’t do anything 
until you get it. Open day or evenings. Call. 
write or phone. 


MOLER SYSTEM 


177 N,. State-st. CEN. 6393. 
Adjoining Chicago Theater. 


eeeeeeaeeeveeeeeeaeveee ee eee eee ee ee Gee 


eee e@eeaeeeveee eeoeee ee eC eeeeeeeeeesv ee ease 


+ sett F ~ Pe 
ee Oe , 
ae % e < a: ey wae ? 
pe ‘te: wd easel weeteoeeeeeer ; ; 
ag? j I , a x ~ 
. sot! - A ODEP..eces 2. saad ss 
o% - ee AGT IR tee tie ee ee 
ae ok - #eeeseee : 
” a * 
. .; 
oe Fd 
7 . iJ ey, . if 
yt i AX em 15. 
Airbrush a ES vs ; 
* ae Za’ \T Sr OD. 15 
pr its TRL, REST AN 
a bs , Sve PAU 
% 5 See: Eat < « 
eee 5S Tr. 
by 
. ¥ 
Ais as 


$55 


fea tresses 12 
ES et ag se! ea AR .$10|Housework. $16 +0 


reservation immediately? 


NATIONAL SCHOOL OF COSMETICIANS. 


108 N. STATE. STATE 5087. 


North Siders! South Siders! 
Enroll in Beauty Culture 
or Body Culture Massage. 


pete BEA AND BODY 
a os rag vour ne cateeraned. 


SELAN’S 


WON 1iST PRIZE 
in National Hair ‘air Styling Contest. 
Selan’s enroll more re, etudente 6g, Sgn) 


than any other beauty schoo ust 
be a reason, Visit and | see for yourself. 


SELAN’S BEAUTY SCHOOLS 
Free ioole.. yA r juates. 
Nesta 


anjalon Whe 


COMPTOMETRY. 

Best 8 ‘and 12 wk. course, incl, TYPING. 
individual instruction, Day or evening. ~ Ac- 
tual experience; prompt placement. Catalog. 

tig ft i oon orthand., 

‘ Pitman, 8-6-10 mo. courses. 
initettiate ual ‘uate. On school whith includes 
ede ges and. Swi in Stenographic 
Course. Placement Free. Catalog on request 

" Switehboard-Typing. 

Most complete Switchboard train 
America, All live boards. Actual Tis” ot 
included. Comparison invited. 

Individ. alning: 


Accounting. 
Beginners and advanced. 
Century College, 105 W, Madison. Fra. 847 
‘ILFARN BEAUTY CULTURE. 
! PRACTICAL; THOROUGH! 


CIA ONS tf RATE, 
RTRUDE HA oe 
. 5007. 


16a_N, State-sireet, ____ Cent, 5007. 
-IRESSMAKING—MILLINERY SCHOOLS 


LEARN DRESS DESIGNING, DRESSMKG.. 
pattern drafting, millinery, or power mach. 
Day or eve. Best equipped school Est . 1902. 
Free Bookict ‘T.” Master College, aoe State. 
DRESS DESIGN.;, PATTERNS, DRESSMKG., 
millinery. Forest Academy, 209 S. State- st. 


PROFESSIONAL FRENCH DRAPING — 
ess ign. P : ept.T. 


Typing 


eves. 


LOST AND FOUND, 
TO FINDERS. 


If you have found a cat or dog, a 
pocketbook, jewelry, or fur, and can- 
not locate the owner through the 
“Lost and Found” advertisments in 
The gee call and go through the 
“Tost and Found” index at the 
PUB BLIC SERVICE OFFICE, 

1 S. DEARBORN-STREST. 


TO LOSERS. 


Tf you are listed in the telephone 
directory you can charge an adver- 
tisment of your lost article by tele- 
phoning Miss Miller of the Tribune 
ud taking department, Superior 0100, 
Your advertisment receives the bene- 
fit of free listing in the Tribune 
Publie Service office mentioned above 
for a period of two months. his 
service facilitates the recovery of 
__lost articles advertised. 


BILLFOLD—LOST—BROWN, FEB. TEL. 
booth, N. W. depot. Reward. Pal. ska. 


SR EC LOS ANTIOUE GOLD AND 
carnelian: loop district, Feb. 1: rew. Phone 
MR. VAN BUREN, Wabash 2288. 


BROOCH — LOST — CAMEO AND GOLD: 
keepsake: Sun. A. M., near 55th-Black- 
stone.: liberal reward. Webster. Mid. 9702. 
CAT—LOST—GRAY, BLACK STRIPED FE- 
male, vic. Wilson-Spaulding. Liberal reward. 
Independence 2190. 


ies ph decatey your a es 


UNIVERSITY HOTE HOTEL 
New, mod. 10 100 Dore 106 baths, nr. 1 ‘Cex 
BRST HOTEL VA Cee aee: 
: AiG 


- as 


a oi 
Tt) 


DREXEL 8342, 


RAE Se Bagh MONT gM 
ye: 


ELIZABETH $124— 
home Siac hint gd. isan 


KIMBAR 6224, CREST APTS.—LGH., LGT. 
ha bath. Also s¢ rm.; reas, “iG 


cae 8117—LGK. be VATE FAM: 
uth Shore ey 651. 


ily. 
NORMAL-BLVD. wscipdoch UU. 
NOR WON 


ew double aie 
trans.; cafe: $6 


aera, *r Teh apts, eas 


YALL,’ 6067—COZY, VU N DJ. 
bath: quiet duit ‘fam: all shige aie oy 


JACKSON PARK PLAZA, 
Homelike Rms. with Complete Hotel Service. 
7 $5 A WEEK UP. 
1e2d ¥e. ys wie J TE CKSON aR 
ont TH-PL.,. E., 1449-—-NICEL ttl pas 

a. rms., ‘sgl. and dbi, A . $2-$3. 

: Hotel Rooms, — 
SOUTHLAKE HOTEL, | 


4711 KENWOOD-AY. 
Outside, modern newly decorated. artly 
furnished rooms: rile tub or shower t a 
ecmm inte hotel _, service. 


Rentals from $6 Weekly. 


$6 WK. Room with Private 


bath. eh a enjoy these pormiortable. light. 

warm oms -Unexeelled service 

All "Sarene of transportation at door. 
LAND ROT 


1550 East 6G3d-street at Jav ‘Ikson Park, | 


METROPOLE HOTEL 


8 story Fireproof Hotel. Newly decorated 
furn. 300 rs.. 250 vr. bths.: low as $5.50 wk. 


2300 S. Michigan, Vie, 3400. 


THE MAYFLOWER HOTEL, 


6125 KENWOOD-AVENDS. 
Attractive rims.; all with bath and shower. 
Moderate rentals. [nspection invited. 


-— LAKERIDGE HOTEL —— 


-—— — — 4665 LAKE PAK 
Neatly furnished rooms. All with bath and 
shower. Excel, trausp. $6 per week and up. 


. pie 0: RENT Suhel We ae Ole he « « 


6150 GREENWOOD-AY, 
" Nicely furn. and attract. priced. Alt rooms 
with bath and abowers. inspection invited. 


TO RENT—ROOMS—NORTH. 
ADDISON- ST... 726—~BEA0, STM. HT, FUR. 
ft. rm. Mrs. Pierson [priv.|. Wel. 0535.Rea. 
_ = vate * % “BROADWAY: HOTEL — — 


a week and 
3020 Broadway. 


uD. 
Bittersweet 1600. 
BUCKINGHAM-PL.. 686—LG., FRT. BED- 
sit. rm.: new. furn.: 


Ven. blinds: remod.: 
pri.res.: 24 hr.ht.: 


air von.; sep.ent.Gra.3904. 
CEDAR-ST.. E., 60—GIRLS’ DORM.: 


INDIV. 
beds, wardrobes. 3 or 4 in lge. rm., $3.50. 


CLARK, N.. 2026 MOHAWK 3460. 
NEW BLDG... OPP. LINCOLN PARK. 


HOTEL CLAYTON, 


300 MOD. ROOMS. _ BEAUTYREST BEDS 
$5.00-PER WEEK-$5.00. 


FREE RADIO. 10 MIN. TO LOOP. 


|THE RAVENSWOOD. 


i8—BEAU. 3 APT. 
sett Wied. PAN. ‘nee 


Refined residential ho ont ern, 244 
. turn. ; lh , kit. 


* 


BOARD AND LODGING. 


wy ww ~ 


South Side, 
ARM RM.; 


1512—LOVELY W. 
6.50-$7.50; I. C., L. Mid. 3554. 


Rolaway bed. 


bar ST. a 


1 meals; 
North Side, 
RE- 2—BE 
Leon GIRLS, RADIOS. BOARD OPTS 
ae ts ea 5643—HSE. FRT. DBL. FACING 
lake: ex, mis. pri. fam. Reas. Sun. 9319. 


.VeL ee. 730-—BUS, GIRLS: LOVELY 


hm.: prt. bath: near $6.50-7.5U. Bitt. 1378 
DEL, M OTEL—454 MELROSE A‘I 
ake Shore, outside rms.: 


ari} 8240 N. All 
with meals, $10. ae Atmosphere of priv. elub. 
ROOM—PRI. FAM.; 


REF, MAN. 
Gentile. Nr. Ede. ere el. $6. | Sun. a 3632. 


GOLD COAST RESID.—ATTR. RM. WITH 
board; reas. Delaware 5009. 


Convalescent Homes, 
welder penn im. her home, La CARE TO 
e @ room: 
peasonable. _Berkshire — 8081 a 
oe 1 OR 2 PATIENTS - In VELY, 
yon ome. Reg. nurses in attendance: nr. 
Edge h. hotel: "heat refs. Longb. 6342. 
OME FOR AGED INFIRM MILD MENTAI 
AND CONVALESCENTS. MID. 1605. 
HOME. NOT INSTITTVITION. NTRSE: 
care for elacrie ladies. Reas. Oak. 4124. 
NURSE—WITH IDEAL HOME. WILL TAKE 
elderly lady or conval. Briargate 1899" 


Children. 
BOARD INFANT OR SMALL CHILD: ROOM 
for parent: reasonable. Evergreen Pk. 7293. 
PRIV. FAM.--EXC. CARE. BOARD CHILD. 


Nr. school; mother opt. Reas., Mans. 6335. 
WANTED—TO RENT—ROOMS, 


MAR. CPLE.—SON 19: DES, TO BE RECD. 

in refnd. rage Gentile hm.: privileges: no 
other roomers: . N. S.: reas. terms: meals 
pref., but neh God ” Address N 261. Tribune. 


as i WISHFS RM., BD., PRIV. BATH OR 
lav. E. of Bdwy. res N 310. Tribune. 


HOTELS AND APARTMENT HOTELS, 


PRI. 


LIVE DOWNTOWN 
AT THE 


GREAT NORTHERN 
HOTEL 


The Great Northern has set aside a 
number of its most attractive newly 
decorated rooms and suites for perma- 
nent guests. Above average size rooms. 
Large windows. Excellent closet space. 


$50 UP MONTHLY. 


Chicago's outstanding value in down- 
town quarters. See typical rooms and 
suites today, 


HARRISON 7900, 


DEARBORN, JACKSON AND QUINCY. 
Opposite Postoffice. 


CLARK, N. 1601, APT. 38-—-LOVELY 
clean, warm, sunny rms., $2.50 up. Mitchell. 


DEARBORN-ST.. N.. 1447—NEWLY FORN 
outside rms... private baths. Hotel servive. 


DOG—LOST—PART FOX TERRIER-BOSTON. 

Black-white front, 4 white feet: verv short 
tail: answers to “Jiggs.’’ Rew. Centra] 6313 
or Palisade 7284. 


GIRLS! oo 
INCREASE YOUR INCO 
Become Fashion and Pataareniie Models 
A BUSY SEASON STARTING 
Style shows. Fashion films, dress salon. 
Our training is a short cut to thia 
profitable profession. 
placement service, low tuition. 
Visit oar studio at once or mail coupon. 


OO deus 
Address 
MALLON FRIEL STUDIO, 


32 W. Randolph, 6th floor. Dea. 3106. 


Wilfred Training 


FOR SUCCESS IN BEAUTY CULTURE 
Join Wilfred’s March of Progress! Day and 
evening inane. now being formed. Eaxy 
rates and Come in and see the 
happy. busy Wiltred Bh ers preparing for 
unre ) peceee in a Ne vocation 

HONE OR aROURST BOOKLET T 


‘WILFRED 


ACADEME 1, AIR & BEA ae i asta 


SHINGTON-ST T, 
Corner vatate. ag 5861. 
Also New York, Boston. Brovokirn. 
Newark. Philadelphia. Pittsbure!. 


ALLIED BEAUTICIANS 

INSTITUTE OF BEAUTY CULTURE. 

Complete Beauty Course. 
TERMS ARRANGED AS LOW AS 


$1.50 Per Wk. 


FOR FULL TIME DAY SCHOOL. 
S85 N. WABASH. DEA. 6818. 
Open Mon., Wednes., and Friday evs. until 9. 
SWITCHBOARD, $1.25. 


PBX Hotel live boards, Key, Cord Dial, 
Receptionist, Grege or Munson Shorthand 
beginners or advanced. Dictation practice, 
20¢ hour or 10 hours $1.75. Free course in 
typing. Individual] attention. Competent 
instructors. Placement service, 


Chicago Commercial College 
180 W. Washington. Franklin 4803. 


SALESLADIES-NEAT APPEARING: EXP. 
unnecessary: 21-30. Introducing new art 
work. Straight salary, Permanent prsition 
FINE ARTS ASSOCIATION. 509 8. Wabash 
WOMAN — REAL ESTATE EXPERIENCE: 
sell smal] improved terms close to city: 
low prices: i Sa at on must have ref- 
erences. See L D. 33 Washington-st. 
BIG - SENISSIONS FOR SPARE TIME 
Sell Personal Stationery. Everyday Card 
Assts. Wallace Brown. 36 S. State.. Dent. CT 
SELL BIRTHDAY, #VEKYVAY CARUS—BHIU 
commission. Grogan Co., 122 8. Michigan. 


Miscellaneous, 
YOUNG WOMAN — VERY ATTRACTIVE: 
t hair, be photographed. Beaut 
Salon. 2012 N. Western-av. eO12 1 noon, nail 
Nurses’ Registries. 


ASSISTANT DIETITIAN, OUT OF CITY. 
X-RAY TECH.. ST BE REG. NURSE. 
SHAY. 936 N. MICHIGAN. OPP. DRAKE. 


— NURSES—AT ONCE. PRIVATE egy Rey 
Chgo. Registry, 2818 Cambridge. Gra. 02 


Kmployment Agencies. 
iA yg ving maa. 20000222 80> $40: + 
Waitress, ua si ae ne gee 

es Bn 
2494. 


G 
840_N, AGEnce 
i SERVICE, 


ZINSE PERSO ting Nan 


Dietapho one Pani 9 
140 South sacha Room 1548. 


Nat’l. 


"$20 | Ant. 


HEIM BEAUTY SCHOOLS_ 


965 92 DOWN 


Complete Course. ‘ern 
MARCEL KIT COSMETICS INCLUDED 
Day and nce Clasres 
DOWNTOWN. SCH 


GAKY, | AY. 
MILWAUKEE. Wi«.. 2165 W. WISCONSIN.-AY. 
Rates slightly hicher in Garv and Milw: aukee, 

AMERICAN SosoOL 

OF BEAUTY CULTTIRE 

Offers a 51% Saving to the Ist 

25 Girls Enrolling Before March 1st 


for ce Complete Course Inc. All: Kaui 
[h9 N. STATE-ST. Sih flr. CENiral hide 


Good Pay While Learning 
PRACTICAIL AND BABY NURSING 

No Hizh School Reauired. Winth 

6206 AN, nibron avenue. free Borate 

SWITCBBOARD LIVE BRDS, KECERT 

Real Placing Serv. ! heh PION 


of 4 boards sl latest Hotel nneiterdt 
hetnal exverence Ss & duai inate 


dav~ or eve Vi 
Field's Annex Ken 24 N Wahash Gen ody 


Br. 
og 
ash 
SOPORTRROT? a FOR AMBITIONS WOMEN. 
Learn ee! practical oe in 8 
ag vt ge Bernar School of Nursin 
454 Hyde Park-blvd. Drexel OD LE: 6241. 


A MGR. bag ASKPR. 
cces Et fee, CLERK. ETC 
fo 


Paw: Na 
1. 32 NN. 8 Ab § 


Pelee 
AT: Beanry pes 
of Be fats hg 


tS, 
EE alee 


ASSAG GE. 
r'eu40, 


* 


_WOMEN 


AoA 


ys Nite. 
. ‘* i. 1 vs de hington, 
r TT ITTTR’ — 


DOG—LOST—WHITE AND BROWN. FOX 
terrier type, foraale. red harness, vic. St. 

Louis and Polk-st. Rew. Kedzie 2121. 
. SPITZ: 


OGL FOUNDOSAT. EVE.: WHT. 
Hyde Park-blvd. at Woodlawn. Mid. 1990. 


DOG—LOST—MALE BEAGLE, BLK., TAN, 
white. Reward. No questions. Kil. 7391. 


EN Ne ae 
780 


. T. Wells. on Sinclair mae 

Nolan, Sinclair Refining Co., 185 S. La Salle- 
street. Randolnh 7070 

WITH 


HAT—LOST—LADY’S PONY SKIN 
silver fox head vic. 3600 North Pontiac: 
rew. Call MR. MARTIN, HARRISON 0514. 


OPERA GLASSES—LOST—PEARL INLAID 
in velvet case. Loop hotel, Wednesday, 
January 26. ward. Prospect 7800 


RING—LOST—3 DIAMONDS EACH SIDE, 2 
centered, platinum gold, op theater bldg. 
Keepsake. Viberal reward nglewd, 731 


WRISTWATCH — LOST — vert, 8: GOLD: 
Omega: initials “ N. L. C.. 19: iy * on back: 
South Side. Thursday eve. Rew. Long. 1710 


WRIST WATCH— LOST—LADY’S, WHITE 
gold: initials M. 8. Thursday, vicinity 
South Shore: reward. ‘Butterfeld 4564, 
WRISTWATCH—LOST—LADY'S, DIAMOND, 
Jan, vic. Washington and Cicero. Re- 


2 
ward. Wabas ih. 2288. 


ee .. 


PERSONAL. 


HAVE LEASED KENARD APT. HOTEL. 
56746 Kenmore, to Julius Burt. Respons. 
for my own debts only. Frank L. Nathanson. 
SOLD BEAUTY HOP. 9003 S. ASHLAND— 
Not responsible Vior debts contract. by any- 
one but myself. RHOMA G. NION. 


ROY ae Big Sd YOu. THING 
ie Sige and home. Mother 
a 


olandiear’ tor eu 


iapeps Suet thos one cans 
r ot respons, tor 5B CO . 
one but thar f, E. WINSTON MORGAN. — 


NOT RESPON. FOR ANY DEBTS EXCEPT 
those contr. by myself after Jan. 28, 1938. 

Charles Cushing, N. Lavergne. 
AT Ty 3258 


PUBCHASED GROCERY STORE 
Lakewood: not resp. for debts contr. by 
Be pass owuer aft. Feb. 5. Wm. Hoehmann. 
PURCHASED CANDY STORE 914 MILWAD- 
ee-ay., Jan. 21: not respon. for debts contr. 
by any ole but myself. G. H. Baude.. 


NO’ RESPON., FUR VDEBIS CONLRKRAUTED 
by any one but myself, — KARL CARDY. 


NOT RESP. FOR DERTS EXCEPT THOSE 
contracted by myself. ROBERT BOLDS. 


NOT RESPON. FOR DEBTS CONTR. BY. 
anyone but myself. HOWARD J. STULL. 


wd « L.—EVERYTHING FORGIVEN: 
TRAVEL, 
‘Munda, 
“FREE MEALS 
LOS ANGELES, se, 50, 


New York, we ah co 50. 


LOW RA 
St. Louis, *. an eoria, Be Sie $3 
sta ON _State. 


5614 Ss. W < ase pcan: 
28 
ae 'Call_ Wabash ea 
ROUND TRIP EXCURSION 
$1 
19.85 
ag 


LADEL, StS. JO NEW Y 
‘TIMORE.. Paw heal eh 


Large Lu) Hesererg Se 


Fastest ° 
20 EK. aitnix RANDOLPH. saa’ 


— — BUS 1 oe aie ok AtD — — 
215 N° State, 8 a kite 0303. : 

gerne om : 

BUTH READERS AND. ADVERTISERS ARE 

urged to se caution tn ol iggien 

areal rf Sea Fin ae oe wit 
individua rice 

charged and 


siucted 


JUNIOR-TERR., 818 [4300 N.J — LIGHT 
warm rm.; suit. 1-2: exc. tran,; pri. resid. 


KENMORE 4071--BEAU. FIURN. LARGE FR. 
rm.: pr. fam.; gd. tran,; reas. Gra. 4665. 
MAGNOLIA, 4520—ATTR, NEW DEC. FRT. 
rm.. T. wat.: lg. closet: $3.60: Wil. L. bus. 
OAKDALE, 434. 2D—DBL. RM.. 2 CLOSETS, 
hm. priv.. gr. piano: bus. Reas. L. V. see 
6330—BEAU. LGB. 
priv. home: brkfst. opt.: os tr. She. iné. 
WABASH, N.. 870—2 RM. $8. SLEEP- 
ing rooms, $4. Walking py le to loop. 


gt he ae AND EXPENSE—10 MINUTES 
to te newl decorated, $3.25 double, 
4. a5. sg inelny “ry a) 4 Four éges—gym. pool, 
enced parkin our alert service. 


1508 N. RTH AVN ad "a ‘Licht 2633. 
THE WYNDON HOTEL, 


Nicely furnished: some with showers. 
Com iste pow! * service. Weekly. $3.50 up. 
aily 828 WINDSOR. 
$6 WEEK UP. DAILY $1.80. 
ALL ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATH. 
WINDALH HOTEL SUIM Wiuthromavenue 
QUIET. ATTRACTIVE ROOMS COMPLETE 
club Erbin hg yd ait hr, serv.: 1 * tranep. 
LI {ONT Y A. 

3333 N. se Acide ones OP a 3338. 


OLD WORI.D ad eS) ae ae RMS. 
Private bath. L'AIGL.OR 2: OR 22 E _ Ontario, 


BRIGHT RM.—2 WINDOWS. or CLOSET 
twin beds: oar. L and bus. $4.50. Bri. 5784 
100 ROOMS WITH BATH—$6 PER WEEK. 
Hotel Frances, 5054 Winthrop. Lon. 8933. 


NICELY FURN. RM.—BUS. WOMAN F&M- 
ployed pref.; Rogers Pk. Rog. Pk. 4731 


Hotel Huooma, 
4948 KENMORE. LONGBEACH 4234 
HOTEL NORTHMERE. 

All outside rooms: refurnished, recarpeted 
and redecorated: every room with bath or 
shower: complete hotel service, Argyle L 
bus, or surface lines. $5.50) weekly and up 

$5—~NO HIGHER-S5. 


LUXURIOUS HOTEL kag FOR LESS. 
Bath and pitower: 24 hour hotel service. 
THE STRATFORD. 4131 SHERIDAN-RD. 
EEDA HOTETS. 

- genet SEA HOUTEL-—#20 + ale als 

tes, connecte, bath wk, for 


torn. wo, Single» with bath, bath, $6.50 w 50 ag i uD, $2. $2 day day. 
: TO RENT—ROOMS—NORTHWEST, 


HUMBOLDT. RI. vD., N.. 1982 — NICELY 
furnished, $4 up: good transportation. 


MONTICELLO, N. {4600 BLK.iI—VERY LG 
Igt. rm.: refined Jewish fam. Key. 4683. 


FRT. RM... LG 
6a.: Driv. home. 


SHERIDAN-RD.. 


ST. LOUIS. N.. 2441—DBhL. 
os., empl. cple.: men, $3 


» « LIVE. IN 
RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT. 


It is mach more homelike, yet within 12 
minutes of the loop via C. & N. W. R. ia 
modern building, cafeteria, gym, swim.. 

near churches, public evening high aueak 
bus and surface lines: 24 hour service. 


VIN PARK Y¥. M. C, r 
4251 Irving Park-bivd. Pensacola 1070. 


— CONVENIENT AND REASONABLE ——- 
15 minutes to lonp. Modern rooms #4-$5 
wk. Sew crystal pons tile bathrooms. Good 

toed tp, 2 ry ca ys ive Club petvtienes. 


To RENT—ROOMS—WEST. 


ADAMS. 4213—COZY FRONT, "WARM. SIN- 
gle room, $3: good transportation. 


HARDING, §S.. es 3D raf Palnygs aa OK 
bus. woman: kit. priv.: gd . 6279. 


ADV [ANTAGES OF THE ay, ‘ 


ideal living quarters, an ha rivileges 
24 hour service: all tran $4-5. w eekly 


Sears- Roebuck Y. hs Cc. 5% 
820_ Kedate-av, NEV ada, 3800. 


TO ‘RENT — HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS, 


ge tego - Sénth. side. 
6501—1-2-3 | sit 
ORE to. Bac alse chenne cee te 


NY "DEG. a3 4. 7 i 


newly Tan furnis ihe: compl, 


DEARBO RN PLAZA 


a APTS., $12.50 WK. UP. 


OOMS $9 PER WEEK: DAILY, $2.50. 
RRIECHENET TE APTS.,. $50 MO. UP 
Newly decorated, Refurnishing and carpeting 
in progress, Newest 15 story bidg. on 
Ford Coast. Walking distance to Lwop. 
032 N. DEARBORN-ST. WHI. 6464. 


MARK TWAIN HOTEL 


NEW FIREPROOF BLDG. 5 MIN. TO LP. 
Daily, $2 Up; Wekly., $8 Up. 
Beautyrest Mattresses, Tub. Shower, 
FREE RADIO IN EACH ROOM. 


Single rooms. suites. service 
111 W. Division. at Clark. Lincols 7i10 


HOTEL SHORE CREST 


420 WRIGHTWOOD-A DIV. 4800. 
OT enLOUEInG LINCOLN PK. AND LAKE. 

De offer you attractive. dignified BB eal 
ings. true home comfort: 3-3% room kit. 
apts.. comp. serv. from $100. HO LIKE 
rooms WITH BATHS. $10 up. Excel. cafe. 


The Commonwealth 


AT THE GATEWAY TO LINCOLN PARK. 
PINE GROVE AT DIVERSEY-PKWY. 
250 rooms. Thermostatic heat control. 
Unexcelled cuisine in our beautiful new 

dining room, Barber and benny shop. Valet. 

Garage. Reas. rates. Phone Diversey 9805. 


DEVONSHIRE HOTEL, 


IDEAL WINTER RESIDENCE, 
The most conveniently located hotel 
ou the near north side. 
24 hour hotel service. $7 week up. 
Special! Pyapnil | rentals to permanent guests 
19 EAST OHI SUPERIOR 4900 


WIL-MAR HOTEL 


11 W. DIVISION-ST. 


Attractively furnished 1 rm. Pullman egy 


Garage 


Conveniently located. Rentals $37.50 u 4 


hour desk service. SUPERIOR 7248. 


HOTEL ALCAZAR 


BUUU WASHING'ITON BLVD, 
Modert), smartly furnished, outside rooms; 


complete notel service. 10 minutes Loop. 


Rentals from $6 Weekly. 


THE ESSEX APTS, 


830 SUU'TH DURCHESTER 
AND 83 ROOM KITCHENETTES 
Attractive furnished apurtments atid hotel 
rervice. Convenient transportation: half block 
tilinoiws Central Elevated and purtace Lines 
Rates $50 un Weekly rates $12 50 wp. 


SHELDRAKE HOTEL 


1-2-3 rin. kit. apts. OVERLOOKING LAKE 
Unuxuaily attr. furn. Compl. hotel service 
Bus at duor. Rates as low as $45 PER M 

4520) CLARENDON AV. LON RHO. 


NORTH PARK HOTEL, 


CORNEK OGDEN-AV. A'T CLARK. 
Opposite Lincolu purk. Mohawk 8200. 
Beautifully furnished 1-23 rm. apts. Com 
piete hotel service. All oniside large apis 
10 min. duwntown. New. dec. Reas, rates 


Lincoln Park Arms Hotel. 


Bedrm. apts., very attr.: inador bed in liv. 

rm Beau. view of park. lake. Day. week. 
lso 1 rm. apts.. twin wr double beds. 

738 PINE GROVE-AV. MOBAWK 3102 


HOTEL CARLING. 


You should see our $6 week private show- 
vA SOore. Daily. $1.60 seen galerie up Our 
ining room serves excelie 
1313-N. LA SALLE-ST. MOHAWK 120U. 


Dearborn Parkway Apts. 


1504 N. DEARBORN-PKWY. SUP. 3368. 
Available new. cozy rm, apt.. compl. 
hotel. service... ‘Also attrac. hotel rooms. 


DREXEL ARMS HOTEL: 
Rooms with bath, $6 "Borel, Scie Pps yy 
DRE. 3160. 

NEW VICERO HOTEL, 


tect gs nd re Peon: a this fine 8 
x n 
story gg A sof t As low as $7 per week. 


BUENA Eek APT. HOTEL. 


SHERIDAN- spt ~—Keau. furn.. newly 
42 Pit «2-3 rm ts.; eidp. hotel! ev¢.: 
dei; 1. at Coe eames “4 


EDGEWATER 
BEACH HOTEL 


STYLE 01 
FURNISHINGS FROM MODEL 
SUITES NOW ON DISPLAY. 


SINGLE APARTMENTS ARE PRICED 
FROM $65. TWO ROOM SUITES 
FROM $110. NEW SUNPARLOR 
SUITES FROM $175. 


COUNTRY CLUB LIF® WITH CITY 
ADVANTAGES, 


Sudler & Co., Rental Agents, 


Noble T. Macfarlane, Apartment Manager. 
300 BLOCK Sheridan-road. 
elephone Longbeach 6000. 


211 


E.Delaware-pl. 
1 ROOM 
Furnished Kitchenettes | «: 


FROM 


$47.50 TO $75 


Rentals Include Gas, 
Light and Refrigeration. 
Free Maid Service. 


24 HOUR SWITCHBOARD SERVICE. 
Convenient to Loop and shopping centers. 


OVERLOOKING THE LAKE. 
WHITEHALL 4450. 


A STEVENS 
APARTMENT 
FOR $50 


ATTRACTIVE MODERN ROOMS. 
CONVENIENT LOCATION. 
INTELLIGENT SERVICE. 

APARTMENT FLOOR ELEVATORS, 
SPECIAL BREAKFAST ROOM. 


Stevens Apartments 
SINGLE FROM §$50. 


STEVENS HOTEL 


Phone Mr. Plenzey. Wabash 4400. 
Sudler & Company. Rental Agents. 


MORE FOR YOUR MONEY. 


Fort DEARBORN Hotel 


CORNER LA ar) el Penal VAN BUREN-STS 
550 rooms. 18 modern fireprool 
bidg.; newly PP ates 9 Sen furnished: large 
attractive outside rooms’ close to your work 
and downtown activities 
ECIAL RATES. 


$7.50 Weekly. $1.50 Daily. 
OPPOSITE LA SALLE STREET STATION. 


WELLINGTON ARMS 
2970 SHERIDAN-ROAD. 


Smartly furnished 1 to 4 room kitchen 
apts.; overlooking Lancoin Park and the 
lake: 15 minutes from the toop. Furnishec 
and unfurnished. Rates begin ai $40. unfurnh. 
$55 furn. Daily rate. $2.50 up Bit. 4600 


SARATOGA HOTEL. 


NEWLY a ROOMS. $5 WEEK. 
27 S$. DEARBORN RANDOLPH 7020. 


APARTMENTS AND 290MS TO SHARE 


CONGENIAL YG. JEWISH WOMAN EMPLD. 
rent rm. or shr. pleas. 2 bedrm. apt. with 
same in Hyde Pk. Gd. tran. Reas. Hyd. 8867 


A COMPLETE ROOM. APT... AND BOARD 
service. Chicago Room ‘2S, Dea. — 


BUS. CPL... SHARE MOD. 4 RM 
north. same: own rm.:; ex. trans. Lak. BBE 


TEACHER WILL SHR ATTR. 3 RM. APT. 
with yg. woman: teacher pref. Abe. 0715 


1 OR 2 GENTLEMEN TO SHARE APT 
with same. Palisade 0666 after 6 p. m. 


MAN WILL SHARE 7 RM. PENT HSE 
with family or emp. couple. Lak. Bund 


MAN WILL SHR. EXC. 3 ROOM APT. 
eame: all trans.: reas. Eves., Ard. 6736 


REF. GIRL SH. BEAU. APT. SAME—NEAR 


lake: tw win weds; radio; reas. Buck. 1727. 


¥ 


ee ee ewe 


TO RENT—HOUSES, 


~ PAI OOS 


ee North Side. 
SUBL. MAR. 1-OCT. 1. 5 RM. BRK. BUNG. 
with gar. 2450 Coyle-av. Hol. 
Northwest Side. 
$41)-$42. Sin ae 5 ROOM BUNGALOWS 
a 7610 W. Grand-av. Merrimac 6000. 
Sthharhban—North. 


£. KENILWORTH, 3 BLKS. LAKE, SCHLS.. 
trans.: 5 bedr. i bth., $125. Kenilw. 5288. 
amen sn. <—Seerasnnases 


 ewout Etat. 
53381 LAKE PARK-AV.—3-4 RMS., MOD. 
refrig. eas. elec. free. $42.50. Agent on 
premises. Hyde Park 8525. 


Two, and Yhree Reoeouss, 


2-3 ROOMS 


a _ to $37.50 
Mrs. MecCurd: Drexel 83335. 
SUBL. 3% ee “CANVAS WALLS, KLEC. 
refrig., tile bath. shower, $40. Avaliable 
Feb. 1. Flesvizg, 8213 8. Cottnge Grove-av. 


6440 MARYLAND—2 ROOMS: ELEC. REF: 
street car and L transportation. $3. 


One, 


5540. 7. 


Ze qin % ae 

0 _Blacks pease Pe . ates Pre ws ™ 

. ' . PEER: + seat cat ; 
phdaeiagborn nanan 


pn pag se Ce 


Ghisaco’s Most ee 
Apartments. 


2-6 Rooms 
The Rentals Are 
Surprisingly Low 

Valet (he a 


smoke shop, library, 
maid, houseman and other 
Extra rooms for your guests. 
Motor coach from building af - 
10 minute interv en 8 to 9 a m. 4 


Elmer A. Claar & Co., Agts. 


Whitehall 4180; hs 


BROADMOOR APTS. * 


7606 BOSWORTH-AYV. 


CORNER HOWARD-ST. 
1-2-3-4 rm. Sa 
6 ory Areurocd Big. 5 ‘shopping 
ments: cony, rans, inclu 
dist.. theaters, churches an nding 
Carpeted floors: as ‘oa eles = 
tricity; elevator service included in rent. aie OH 
hour switchboard service. 
$42. 50 ad, Ia 


See Res. Mar., I. er Bg iH 2 5170,” 
3520 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE 


1 spacious 3% room apt overlooking dri 
Bedroom and in-a-do: in-a-dor. Moderate a. 


rate rental. 
— — 415 FULLERTON PARKWAY — —. 
2-3 $6 


Roo 0 and up. 
Opposite Lincoln "Parks: 24 hour 
PETER F. REYNOLDS. 


elev 
LINCOLN 1518, 


— — 718- oe Be dha Bag co nn _-_—~ 


3 and 4 room apts.. 
Modertinad” , f. uillities. a 50-3 5. 


520 SURF-ST. 


d 5 room apts.; tile bath: good trans, 


Reasonable rental. Janitor on premises. 


— 


One, Two, and Three Rooma. ee 
2322 Commonwealth Apts. - 


Spacious 3 room apartment. Carpe 
Rental includes gas. elec. refrigeration, 
hour desk and. switchboard service 

2322 COMMONWEALTE. LC AVENUR, 


933 FOSTER-AY. 


Barg.: 2% rms.: Pullman kitnt.; exe. view; 
free Tight. gas, refrig. : newly decor.: 
$52.50: nr. lake, best trans. References. 


734 WRIGHTWOOD, 
2 


3% room apartments; 


2507 WINNEMAC-AY., 


Mod, 3% Ige. light rms., 3 closets, inador, 
shower, refrig. See Mrs. Harz on premises, 
5920 RIDGE—2Z RM: APT. ELECTRIC. GAS, 

refrizg. included. Excellent trans. Conven. 
to schools and stores. Agent on premisess 
Longbeach 1838. 


1400 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


3 ROOMS, liv. rm., bedrm., kitchenette, 

$75: gas. elec. refri. incl. Agt.. Whi. 4180. 
ROOMS, CARPETED: TILE 

new bidg.: free gas. It.. refr.: subl.. 

1369. Greenleaf. Ball. Lon. 2355. till 6 p. m, 
3 LARGE, LIGHT. AIRY ROOMS—AMPLH 
closet space. Opposite lake. Bus 

Immed. poss. 7100 Sheridan-rd., $45. 


3 ULTRA MODERN 
7 story elev. bidg.: free carp 
frigeration. 1505 Morse-av. Shel 
121s VICTOR-AYV. 
inudor. Free refrig. $34. 
4501 MALDEN—2¥% RS.; LIGHT, —— a 
frig. $35 up. Nr. L, bus. surf. Edg. 8409.” 
1051 DAKIN —2 ROOMS: men a 50: FRE 
gas, refrig.: modern: rood trans, 
2-3 R. KIT.—FREE REFRIG:.: re L AND 
bus. 1365 Greenleaf-av. Rogers Pk. 


BATHS 


ike E8205": 


Four, Five, Six Rooms, and Larger. 


3750 Lake Shore Drive 


5 TO 8 ROOMS. 


EXCLUSIVE APARTMENTS. 
Large, spacious rooms; wood-burning 
i 6s, cross ventilation; swimming 

Coutncis = in every way. 


1016 HOLLY WUOD-AV.- —6-7 ROOM APTS.; 
block west of. Sheridan-road;: Lake view: 
unusually well arranged; large rooms; 
and sleeping porches. .. $1156- $136 


only ~ 


beds: free g 
See agent on premises or call Randoink S171; : 


$32.50... 


at anor” 


gg foray Tg aa Sen 


[5800 NN. 7": —, 
Exc 


6360, ~ 


665 GRACE-ST.—5-6 RM RM. APTS:; 1 BLOCK ~ 


west of Lake Shore-drive and park. Well 
arranged, attractive room 


ing porches. $65-SV0. scaceiane: ‘6480. * 
180 E. DELAWARE, 


5 room apartment includes 2 master bed- 
rooms, with colored tile baths. Gas light —; 
refrigeration included in rent. 


Direction Downs Mohl & Co, 
I. M. RYAN, MGR. 
1400 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE,. 


6 rooms, targe living room, 3 bedrooms, 
2 bath rooms, East. South and West exp 
sures: gas, licht and refrigeration ineiqed 
in rental of $170. Agent. Whitehall. 4180. 


999 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE, 


9-10 rm. apts. in Chicago's finest a nt-plee.2 
mod.: tmm occu. Reas. rental. Ran. 502! 


— — — 3750 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE — — — 
8 rooms, stu parlor, 3. baths: spacious 
rooms, clos.. 
library: 4 exposures: $275 mo.: 
5 RMS.. TILE BATH AND KIT.. SHOWER _ 
stall. canvas walls. Reas rent. 2809 Luuot* 
av. For particulars phone Briar. 1111. 


6 RMS.—SUN PAR. 7 BATHS, THROUGH . 
ventilation; nr. la L. bus: immed: poss. 
Raymond Realty Co.. Te 508 Howard. Bri.1668. 


~ — — 2341 COMMONWEALTH-AV. —- — — 
Sublease 6 rooms. 2 haths: high floor, . 
Reasonnble, Central 5050. 


and sleep- | 


WHITEHALL 5100. 


ow 


wood burning fireplace: paneled: 
restricted. - 


- 
_ 


RMS.—SUBLEASE. ON INDIAN BOUN- , 


dary park. Swim. nool, recreation rm.: req 
stricted bldg. Sacrifice. Hollycourt 4646. - 


AQUITANIA APTS.—SUBLEASE 5 RMS., 3>- 
baths. $126. Will sac. carpeting and Ve 
netian blinds. 


Long. 4834 for appointment. és 


12-922 LAKESIDE-PLACE — — —._ 


9 
5 light rms.: lge. front porch, Compl. 
All lew G. ‘ thiria.= 5U. See janitor. 


3 OUTSIDE KMS. — MOl).: REFRIG.;: 1% 
biks. |. C.: will sell furn ‘2356 Yater. 2d 
MARCH 1ST—3%: IN-A-VOOR,. TILE BATH 
shower, refrig.. free gas. 8124 Iindiana-av. 
3 LG. RMS.—NR_ 1. C., BUS, SURF.: FREE 
It... gas: reus. : mmmd. poss. 1457 BK. Béd-st. 
3 RMS.—VERY LIGHT, NEW. DEC., $25: 
stoves furnished; vony. tr. 6056 Normal. 
1643 E. 67TH EAST END!i—S RMS... RE- 
frig.: all trave.: avail. now. Hyd. 9378. 
434 E. 1LO9TH-ST.—3 LARGE FRONT RMS. 

$37.50. 2 biks I. C. Pullman 8019. 


Four. Five, Sit Rooms, and Larger. 


VISTA HOMES 


HAS AVAILABLE 
5 ROOMS, 2 BATHS. 
5TH AND 9TH FLOORS. _ 
7 ROOMS, 8 BATHS. 
2D AND 6TH FLOORS. 
8 ROOMS, 4 BATHS. 


16TH FLOOR. 
fireprvof, elevator  blidg. 
fetal —— bart and M 
U. of 


Chicago, 


light: sinple Bienes space, 
connection, Immediate Pal Re- 


stricted tenancy. 


3830 STONY ISLAND. 
DORCHESTER 7015. 
“SOUTH SHORE’S FINEST. 


6 2 baths: breakfast rni.; garage, 
7370 SOUTH SHORE-D 


6919 CHAPPEL. 
OWNEE. nae 6754. 


r¢. “hi 
ist 

-_ ownage 
+ ¢ a 
shiek 


") oan <7 
< tate “wager! 


foo aA AS 


~ 83740 PINE GROVE —- —- - -—= 
4 rooms. inador: excellent location and . 


transportation. Rental very reasonable. —_ 


dec, - 


~ 


— —247 GUNNISON—4 LARGE ROOMS—— . 


Shower, bath. refrig 
Well kent tarticliliG... i vs wocwseccenes eackwes oe 


4747 MALDEN- ee — MODERN BLDG. ON 
attractive st. 5 r . gun par.. slpg. poreh, 
a. W. CR ROXTON “eo Cco., 4723 


1446 JARVIS—COR. APT.. 6 LG.. - BMS. 
sun parlor: 2 baths: near L a ” fake. 
H. W CROXTON & CO.. 4723 Broadway.” 


newly decorated. = 
$40 


roadway ’ . 


— 1356. ROSEMONT—COR. GLENWOOD — ~ 


6 light rooms: private front 


A. ¥ W. CROXTON & CO. 


4723 Broadway... 
6 AND & SPAC. ROOMS—2-3_ BATHS: $35. 
beach. golf course, all trans. 
sito” ‘700 race Park-bivd. LAK. 6480. 


SUBL. LUGE. 4 KM. 
1547 Sherwin, el. Park. Rog. O68a, = 


4 APT. 2D—REDRM. act ATS © 
ag Mod. Gd. trans. Bare. aulin 
Ps Yo “WANT A BEAUT. 
ngh On reas. rent, call eo is. 


MARSHAL. FIELD GARDEN APA 
homes 411 Blackhawk-st. Lincoln 2 


ee eee at 
APT.; SUN PARLOR, 
Pk. 


714 BUCKINGHAM. PL.—5 sata 
: G. E. ref ria > immed. 


7418 73: 
tile hath: free. refrig.: 


4103 BROADWAY. 2D FL 
Re sfriz.. ae heat. 


TO peareromny APARTMENTS. 
Gee Also Hotels ‘and Apt. Hotels.) 


SOUTH. 
THE CARYLCOURT 


a with beneties, with, or 
a i and schools. 


te apts 

conse 
CROWD FOR SPACE? 
RBS ae 


tama Ee serv. Bid. ‘igor N. 5 ms 
~ WEST. 


DE LUXE 2%-3% ROOMS. 
be, _ shower 


aa 7. i43 ¥. Parl ia 


“THE CHATEAU"'—1-2-3 RM. FURN, APs. 


GE ra ian gee 
* Gate. Apply aol & Ba: 8. W. = OrCamnor | 8 


Kariov. Mrs. 
ROSANN END-AV., 1% aa 
kit. apis.; 


WEST 
; maid, linen; all tr 


TO RENT—STORES. 


»s 5 


1009 EAST 68D-STREET. 
cing Bot Feet reste, sais raiuet, quot tales. . 
location fer women's appare! 


t 
store. 30x115. 
South Side Management Co. 


DORCHESTER 7900. 


—N. W. COR, 79TH-ST. AND RHODES— 


Available f ancy Feb. location 
for oo mart en and dry goods store. 
DORCHE 


7900. 


13038 &. 63D-ST.—STORE: CENTER HYDE 
Park district: suitable retail apparel: lo- 

cated in large apt. bldg. Siger Realty, Ran- 

dolIph 2376, or on necmiaeh. 


LG.. MODERN STORE. 7450 ARCHER. SU 
mit: gd. for food m SRD dollar store. 


mfg. or any bus. 


“TUxURT © AT LOW COST. 


RS ea |S 


“BELVIDERE APT. a 


room 


PARE- xi <3 a, 2 
elec. refriz- 


AV.—3 ras, fight. | = 
Co.. Fairfax 


> 4 ae Bg RTLY 
as on Ba 


. free phone, 
$45 


duty maid ser. 


eg Reel light: 37.50 w “4 ‘rm, kit 
pees ey Sa 
_4414 ELLIS—3 25 "Ei, OONPE. FURN. 


ROO PRIVATE 
on a oo sry, blaze 7434. 


. 


AN. AV. —PRIV. Bart < CLEAN 
free cas. elec.: $4 


North Side. 
a W. CROXTON ¥ "CO. " 4723 Broadway. 
— aa wee hase Eee AND RESi. 
Ee aa WD Wika Beane 


Northwest Side. 


. 3301 LAWRENCE-AV.. — : 
3313 LAWRENCE-A 


For information phone , te EY 1114, 


West Side. 


DAYS FREE RENT: STM. HT.: IDEAL 
ee del tailor, reas. rent. Col 10066. 


t0F r meats. 


TO RENT—OFFICES AND SHOPS, 


ew 


Central. 

32 N. STATER—S. W. COR. WASHINGTON. 
Fireproof bldg.: one fioor, also attractive 
Offices: oorth tient: a as : 
leop: room 

cept. rm. up: "beau ui neste anare 
phone, steno. SWIGART & . Room 601 
WUE RERED PRIVATE OF FICES. $2U0—RE- 
Cc ROOM: PHONE AVAILABLE. 
DESK oom, b SLU BLDG WELL LOCATED. 

82 HINGTON- ST. ROOM 4 


OFFICE STUDIO OR DISPLAY Sate 
. in dg. oe rent. EDWIN J. BOWES 
IR. & Co., 54 


single 


E. Erie-st. Whitehall 6026 


z ICEL $35: SGInATRE 
5 Rls Nice - at Slag "5107 Kimbark. _ 


4 RMS. STEAM HEAT CLEAN: ELECT. 
refrig.: priv. Gane aut fe 5148. 
EAST END-AV.— ELE- 

bi = maid service: t be ge SS g243. 


COMPL. rn gee oS toa IMMED 
poss. : $60. Ca 28 : Sag. 7749 eves. eves. 


com OE , SURF., 
a, ye ye 6808 ER a, or.6001 


SOUTHWEST. 


b. CAneeaee URNISHED 1 AND 2 
- $6 up. Elec. refrig.. ras. Nene 


NORTH. 
6320 KENMORE APTS. 


1-2-2%-3 ROOM APTS. 


: smartly 


ae § 


Ra tr 
Ideal shopping center. 
RENTALS 

cheerfully welcomed. 


661 1 Sheridan-road 
—o GHAM 0701. 


inspection of these 
at see, ogy elev. bidr.. 
Manager 


attrac- 
over: 
on ov 
eR gas 3 room apts.—$45 to $80. 


BOD1 KENMORE APTS. 
Sobenestiea sn By acnuneee. cy 
eee” fo eat” 
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED. 
1400 LAKE SHORE-DR. 


5 room greed 
large living boos. 
one 


bedrooms. 2 bathe 

oh pe ee pag 
overlooking la 

ns Bvery foot, overlogkin . 4180. 


Pine at 
Desirable hachele _ ss ga now. " gvailable. 


space: attra civehy ign. Fon $ : ample closet 


ie ae a 


riskee as 443 8. DEARBORN—DESIR- 
offices: reasonable rents. Goran 
Farwell, Inc.. Exc), Agents. HAR 0479. 
FURR. PRIV. OF FICE—LIGHT. COR. KM.. 
arpet, seeti. and phone eerv. inci.: $17.50 
$27. 50. 203 8. Dearborn-st. Webster 1693. 


WESTMINSTER BLDG.. 110 S. DEARBORN 
Exceptionall 1 genirable daviirht o 
FRANKENSTEIN & CO. CENTRAL 5753 


INDIVIDUA]I wate AND SECKE‘LAHRIAL 
RVICE. Private office, desk, mail. phone; 
Entire 6th floor. 201 North Wells-street. 


— LARGE em 2 PRIVATE OFFICE — 
nis : 


ROOM 300. 


10 8. es - Me RM. 748—NICELY FURN 
priv. off.: secretary service optional. 


BEAUT. FURN. OFFICE — REAS.: : FULL 
serv. Rm. 611. 120 S. La Salle. Fra. 6217. 


TEP SORE. SECRETARIAL , SERY.. pau. 
Mail: 24-hr. phone serv. 3383 N. Michigan 


SUBLSE. OFFICE—INCL. BNO, sweD 
105 W. Adams, Rm. 704, , 4624 


$1 MO. UP—MAIL-PHONE met DESK 
space: reliable. 202 S. Dearborn. Rm. 902 


er *. A eee GHT,. MOD- 
Single and ep 


TO RENT—MISCELLANEOUS, 


OWNER WILL REMODEL BLDG IF NEC- 

essary. Suit. for garage and phowreom. 
factory. laundry. etc. Located on N. W. BR. R. 
in . sub. O G 204 


__ OFFICE FURNITURE AND DEVICES, 


CHAIRS DESKS. FILES. 
TABLES, BOOKCASES. CENTRAL 4820. 


WANTED AT ONCE—OFFICE FURNITURE, 
adding machines. —— <n cash 

registers, salvage mdse anal 0966. 

250 STEEL LOCKER SHELYV.. STOR. 
cab.. ete. Central, 20 W. Syubbard, Del. $495. 


TYPEWRITER. $10: DUPLICATOR. $12: 
_Dictaphone. $25. Pruitt, 172 N. La Salle. 


WE BUY AND SELL OFFICE FURNITURE 
_1027-29 MADISON-ST. SEELY ae 


NEW AND USED DESKS, CHAIRS. TAB 


files, safes. 160 W. Lake-st. Randolph 0 tif 


iain Bs. APTS. 
6040 WINTHROP-AYV. 

furnished, and decorated 

u. furn.: $42.50 up. 


644 vs es 


- $42.50 up; nicely fu 
treeyretaei' oh | north of pater gy * 
block, nor Graceland 1014 
Aa LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 
‘One 4 room furn. ae. aot overiasnans metsnont 
Ample closets. Reasonable rental. 
The Kenard, 5746 Kenmore. 


Sanny 1-2-3 rm. apts., $42.50 up; nicely 
furn.: complete serv.; nr. lake, _lake, all transp. 


OFFICE FURNITUR SBA RING HOUSE. 
New-used bargs. 236 W. Lake. Dea. 3456. 


40 DESKS. 80 ae STEEL FILES. 
bkeas.. ofc., partitions, safes. 3917 Sheridan. 


BARGAINS WALNUT FACT. SAMPLE 
desks. chairs. files, ete. 172 W. Monroe. 


~1.000 STEEL TRANS.. CASES. SPECIAL— 

Kendricks. 218 W. Jackson. Central 4325. 
SAC. DOCTOR'S OFFICE EQUIP. guts © ts 
Hudson. Dev. 1744 $.10 8. oD Mee 


STORE AND BAR FIXTURES, 
STORE FIXTURES. TAVERN 
hamburger and funch . 
stock, new and used. The lowest ws. 

ells 


SUBL. 4-6 MUS., 5 KM., % BATH APT.:; Bx- 
quisi appointed a 


nd decor.; = rent for 
| price ae anturn.: $125 “mai 
peime light, gas. 


941 Carmen. Eoee. 4313. 
ASHLAND APTS. 
gan cledities refrie, maid” Hestcted. 
Under New w Management. 
sol Tl, "BE Rial ct atte sta? 
817 LAKESIDE-PLACE. 


- . apts.: 9 story fireproof bidg.: 
ital metas reasonable “rent, Lakeside Piaza. 


811 EASTWOOD-AYV. 


- ts.. 8 fireproof bidg.: nr. 
oi oe ee p~ . Bs. rt. twood Beach Apts. 


4826 SHERIDAN-ROAD. 


_. 1-2-3 rm. apts.: beau. furn.: hotel serv 
ew bidg.: reasonable rentals. " Sherlore apts. 


adeipe LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


eee ee Pe a lobby floor 


Bitteraweet 2346. 


As "Boe @ HAWTHORNE-PLACE. 
a1, netr.; $87.0 up.’ Bue, 0147, 
ie g Liv’@ BM. ge 

furn’d lovely, chee cheertul: 
“4 QUAINT 


ran a a 161 7 Marie. 


} ) UP. 
trans. 
Drive 


reas. a 3 rs: 


© a7. 

< - wis j 

tle < 
; we % " ne ; 

« Ek Lente ati, =, 

lat o Per GE gyre « =! p 
Ck—-4 ROO BED- 
« _ - 
ir “c can ‘ 
acta a pt f 
- 


Liv. 
ults. 


Easy pay. Chas. Bender Co.. “a 2 
NTERS: 


6 AND 8 FT. DOUBLE Doge! 
also all porcelain, 15- a0 and 30 cu, ft. 
refrig: very cheap. 220 —— a ‘Sun. 


MANICURE TBLS., $6: WAY. 
mach., used, 35066 Pal paaee tia a Wells. 


MEAT SLICER—’37 ELECT.: ayy POR- 
celain scale: best offer. SC Ae | he 


INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY. 
ULTRA MODERN 2 (STORY BLDG.—46, 3,000 


l a to Bs ‘sll ee esice ri 
pect. oere ater gat sides eas "4, ft 


TO oor ONCE: 1445 a 
30x156; garage. storage or heavy manu- 

facturing. one Austin 4188. 

FOR SALE OR RENT—1 STORY S D. 
mod. factory. 25.000 sq. ft. Ran. kG 

1 STY BLDG. peel pe: LIGHT 3 SIDES: 
yard; reas. Also 1 sty., 9,000 ft. Sun. = 


=gD. * 1 ors, ok BLDG.—35.000 (89. 


BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 


Advertising. 
— UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT COUNSEL 
Announces an interesting course including 
‘nine lectures on merchan an market 
research investigation. ms cooperation with 
Advertising and Publication experts. Entire 


sg a NROS, etures, 
E. Ran. 9368. 
Furniture Repairing & Upholstery. 


leather 
ork Estimates "hh otis Gon pholeterine 
Studio. 345 W. Hubbard-sit. Del. 7844. 


reread eRe eenstarathnneree-aeeanonanemnes 
JOHN EVANS UPHOLSTERY—LOW PRICES. 
finest work. 4525 Clifton. Ard. 3847. 
Moving and Storage, 
LOWEST LONG DISTAN o”v. TES. 
DOASETOCOAST. PA 


WENTWORTH 0109, 


TRANS-AMERICAN, 540 W. 59TH-ST. 
SAVE 40%—MOVE SAVELY IN PADDED 


aly Ag ig MT 


General Movers, St 


9 8. 
PART OR ‘ 
Toi ay A 


Piano php 
Normal 6418" | = 


ihe TUNED, $ 
ring, reas.: ruar. 


Rug ————— 
$4 JO 


ous ont cane Oe 


nea ria 0 aaa 
a PEAT BBR—G7 AMS. HE Shade 
OT ee. | Dehuing Co. ENGE WT, One. "whan apa? 


HYDE PARK—6 ! —@ APT. 2 B ae 
rent, $6500, "Hyde Park 7000, 


South west Side. 


oD 2 APT... 2-5 
gts; Betale” wants otter 
$3) Le 


$1.000 DOWN—DE LUXE 2. T BRKE.: 

; Kedzie: 2 car gar. em. 7900. 
North Side. 

See BARGA 


tm. te.: Ai 
balance long. 


$3.360- 
easy 


DE L 
Lincoln Park dist.. 
ft. lot: income, 
$15. cash. Owner will take 
_ 1554 W. Devon. Rog. Pk 
BEAU APT.—6 LIGHT RMS. 
paths, Fit. cabinets, so woodw the. ‘rk 


Walier pe Pema st N. *etark at foster 


2 FLAT 3 rm. fat Bide RMS. a FT, BA 
with 3 


SEMT. 
t 12 vrs. ug 
only a 00; . 
SCHANE DAHM 


AND. 
* North Shore: 6 rm. unite: porehes; 2 eat 


garage, paved alley. Al cena, or Jo 
BIGH eeetited MOD. 2 APT.: 


H. 
tile bath. exc. eon. and 
loc. Price $11 000: owner, Sun. 


— 10% CASH—RENT PAYS “BA % 
r 3H. brk.: or. L. Dirks, 1166 Dive 


(aay, OLIVET: QUALITY 2 my 
peh.; 
imag. 


stm. heat. R 
RECL 4-6-6 -5-6 Eass.. 
ar GAR. 
Irving Park. 


UXE 6 APARTM 
400: ' 


6 FLAT 
00; 


sanene 2 FL... BR.. ae M 
Full _br.. $! $5,000. Dette, 1922. Irvi 
Northweat Side, 
SMASHOUT. 


pbrk. 5's. elec 


Poach bye 3 apt. 
ar brk. gar. Grvstal-st. W. of a. yet ‘be 


$2. 000 dn., bal. . Rubin. Rand. 7055. 

7 Aen we $1,860 YEAR FOR 

cart ,000 rea a 6 and income, a 
omé a bee mls 


ts, 
$4.500: oe 0 quired. L. Morris, 
Division and 3 85. TAtiankeesaven te. 


MODERN 2 i agg ad $7.500 
ere refrcera- 


anges. r wane good t 
ARTHUR KRUGGEL & CO.. 4865 Broadway. 
OWNER WILL SELL 12 APARTMENT 
building located 2128- nS Fae Sawyer-av. 


Full particulare upon Gg. B, Lotte- 
man, P. O. Box, 1151 Miara! Beach. Fila. 


HIGHWAY TAx RIGHT | 
outeide we! ag 370, 8160 cash 
| alee rea} — th of 80 
Wath o 


4 oh dir 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAR—S, W. 


Oak Lawn—36 minutes to loop. . 


2 AC 
4 it et ae: i 
rutin, “Banat 


ae. Saas 
naan, 


WILL SACRIFICE 


rhe. A uarige om Gavel cans 
Se. & garage 


my 4 rm 
poe 


E, OIL HEAT. GAR, 1 
to b d steam 


. to S008. a 
es: the as payment. 


$3 
D 642, Trib 


, une, 


bs) he 


i o Ree 1, > 
ene a hn a 4 B: as 
: } iN Femhe Vs 
de dee ee 3 eS 
1 Re PP eho Ne ee aa e's 
BS : = j & Hw 
oe aa 4 lt 
17 4 r.’ 
2 . 4 
” 
a 4 + 


. nts <a aan 


} 8 
ver 1.8 
rave 73,800: 
wineaedbe, 4 
50 BUYS 500 VAL ik ta ‘tee 
m pF i oe fed. orig Ay: fi lot over- 
i rivate lake, ee 
Seite a A 297. | 
AGE Baa 


oat de, Np Y 8 
gibt. RECEIVER Lax YD x 
iving; $060 Address P 8 306 sai 


ane 
sehti209 Terme’ Py fare rs rep 


yr Calinn Bre IN a Wie feat ava 


Land Classified aluabehinceits 
will be found in the News Section 
adjacent to the daily feature “ Ma jc Be 
Day Story of the Experimental : 


REAL ESTATE WANTED, 


ew 


Apartment Buildings. 
SO. SHORE—2 OR 3 APT. BLDG 6 RMS. 
Under $14, G00, Dorchester Gans” 3 


2A Loom Ouse WA 

mflectrie , ght large. eh wee = mL 
ian, 6211 S Trov, me 

ant 


as | ae ee PORE 
ll 

ag 
“down. 


Shire 


Isl ae pn gy 
$20 month. Address E 342, Tribune. 
ACRE. oo 7i8sT 
e. 


BARGAIN 
send. 
. Tribune. 


 aadalind 
weer 
Y $2, a5 an aD % ACRE 


and 
roads. Terms 
MUST SAC. 
Poad for $1,000, on easy terms. 
367. bune. 


on pa 
REAL _ESTATE—SUBURBAN—NORTH. 


~~ 


<< minutes te loop, 
P| BARGAINS—10 
$7.91 a $1,006 . et BK interest 
for 15 
EALTY CORP. 
Wvansten 
STORY BRI at 
"Ratu ral firepl.., a ak tant 


AUTO. 
rm.. 


Greenleaf 0 O@71. 


6 ROOM BNGLISH—N ORSER YOR 8: Ser WwW ANG NG 
$8.500. $2.000 cash, Rogers Park © oset “ie 
$6,500—TERMS—6 REDRMS. & BATH 

lime, rms.; 4 car war. Rox, 26164. Univ, 3800. 


Glenecoe-—-24 minutes to loop. 


$17.000 BRICK COLONIAL. BAST L0c.: 
4 bedrm.. 2% baths. oil heat. Glencoe 305 


Hubbard Woods—21 min. to loop. 


SMALL WHITE HSE.—-HUBBARD WOODS: 
6 rms., 2 baths: $11,500. University 7444. 


TODAY'S BEST BARGAIN—6 FLAT og ve 
Superior-st.. near Western-av.. on” 
oe BROS.. RANDOLPH Sg 
MOD. T AND STORE GAR. 
stm. frig Pull fi price, $11.500; tms. 
Inquire "5886 We Ww North-av. or Mer. 6400. 


MOD. 10 “FLAT. 3 RMS. 
sale, $25, . Acme Rity., 4126 gt eS 


Went Side, 
OTN As RO oft 880 
ti at 


br. bldg., h, rg 
$1.200 yr. 3055 Ja Jackson-blvd. K 


te COR. BLDG.: RENT: $5,640 ES. 
gle 500, $6,000 L. Mo 


4008 Division-st, or 3585 dMilwaukec- av. 


REAL ESTATE—BUSINESS PROPERTY. 


Pd 


CASH, BAL. 


“Northwest Side. 
$2,000 DOWN BUYS STORE 125 FEET 
deep. 6 room apt. above, 10 years old; 
steam heat: Ba gh » See 6,900. 
AN 
sane. carage, 100 feet feet. Ri a 
¢ répairs. 
BUY NOW BEFORE PRICES RISB. 
LOUIS MORRIS, 


4006 Division. 3586 Milwaukee-av. 


PEE 


“South Side. 
$750 DOWN, 


6 monthly payments on this 

rm. weteke Tans. Located near 79th-Ash- 

land; ood arped Ee; eeeping Re whiny : VaCaDE | mmmme 
now: n cliffe ay 

DONALD. F. MOORE. 7748 S. ASHLAND. 


HAVE THE BEST 


brick bungalow: h. 
th. 2 car gara . 3 fy 4th 


Modern 6 room 
: d Feltacia. orcs 5.950. 

an 
JOHN McCARTHY. 1405 W. ea-st. B Rab, 5000 
ae 7215 ST. LAWRENCE-A 

2 story ee residence: & fini rooms: 
s. Open for inspec- 


garage: ; 
tion. Price. 3 600, 00. 

O'BRIEN & CO.. 
111 W. Washington- st. Rand. 3062. 


HERE’S A BUY. 


A 6 room brick bungalow, corner lot; 
es water heat, enclosed porch. Ogles- 
by near 83d. Will smash out at $6,- 
250. Hyde Park 2603. 


IF YOU HAVE A STEADY POSITION ITION AND 
can raise $500 or more, allow us to show 

you our model bung. Pos. April 15th. Tota! 

monthly cout incl. taxes, $42. Glatt & 

, 8026 Cottage Grove-av. Vin. 

; a BRK. BUNG. rm yaad WALLS: NAT 
firepl.. elec. refr., zlz gar.: or. schi. 

in xood ‘cond. 1742 RB. BAth- piveat. Sac. 2438. 


— — PRICE $4,000 — — $750 CASH — — 
Will buy modern 5 rm. brick buneg.. 
lee. lot. ‘Avelcn, nr. 79th-st. Vine. 8000. . 


$4,400—6 RMS.. 2 CAR GARAGE: GOOD 
cond.: near 72d-Laflin. Stewart 3602. 


5 RM. OCT. BUNG.—H. W. HT. 2 CAR GAR. 
N. Beverly, nr. schl. $1,000 dn. Ced. 1602. 


Southwest Side. 
— OFFICE OPEN TILL 9 P. M. DAILY. — 
ae ae rel — fine 5 rm. oem. Dts. | © 
go g. Car gar., enc. 
cond. Nr. Su th-Pranclesn, Want offer $5. 260. 
F. ALVORSEN CO., 
3145 W. 634-street. Hemlock 4300. 


North Side. 
— 6 ROOM BRICK BUNGALOW: 
garage; close to all facilities: 
condition. Must be sold immedia 
$7.500. Terme to suit. Mr. Thie. 
ga gg pape np ROOM 
g 


ow: 2 ag g h. w. heat: arched 
doorw r immediate sale at $ $8, 000. 


Walter BE: BE. Garisak. 2312 Devon. R. P. 3467. 

| ORCS Ne NOREEN taige ne 
é. as 

Steinbach ne Co. ‘6170 Broadway. R. P. 2737. 

7 RM—MODERN. 1% BATHS. EDGEWAT- 

er: gas heat: $7,000: terms, ot = 


$3,750, FUL RICE, BUYS MY “” 
Melrose, neat oadway. © ay. Call Ran. 6960, 


"ROR ak ae REP 
"large lol Make offer, 8 Sneid, "3602. — 


Northwest Side. 


THE CAREFUL igkbened SEEKS AN INDI. 
vidually desi arge lot. Prac- 

tical | ont. uilt to insure comfort. 

ese dis ao = mente at sy serv haath ] 


th 
blk, N 
A: 2, Vek he Bo Erving Park-bl. 
STREET 
Brick 


og age Ag WA LO ee hd. 


2 i 
Bun oo rooms, tr water heat. 


= terms, 
REENSY ‘5612 North-av. Merrimac 4300. 


Reg 
Prins 0 
GREGOR, 


2 css 
gS 
“eri. S508. 


RICK BUN- 


poner 2 5 eas water ht. 
wor mall’ cash Das Palisade 1461, 


"only 64,380,” $700 Teauie HH % 


foom "$1.7 
Ts “Morrie, “£008 Ditiion or 3 
BUNG., 


jen. oe ra 


.75 
iia? Pt 


cero-a 
ina OF 
nt. 7795 


P gh oe em RM. BRICK 


Niles Center—31 minutes to loop. 


BARG.—MOD, 5-6 RM. RES. 56.500 UP. 
_ Jos. J. Hansen, ordi N, Steak we Cc. 3382. 


Wilmette—22 gpg to loop. 


OWN 
Sacrificing 81x172. iy 
surrounded by the very finest Nor 
homes, Phone Rogers Park 


rpalocrtiat oath 2 APARTMENT IN FINE FINE 


me. of Wilmette. Lot 50x 
Price .500.. Hollycourt @886. 


toe Shore 


ePark. es | 19, BOM, Ba BIPE 


a np 

WANTED— IVD 5 
that $15, tS Ete ObO cole he ag 7 . er 
Addre iress O- J 333, Tribun une, 


ay 


TRADE 2 FLAT, 


sRONPT ACTION ON FIRST MORTGAGHS 


re 


INSURANCE FUNDS et ag edgy hone And 


OQ tue & 


Farms and Acres. 


WANT MICH. gays F WILD LAND: 40 TO 
80 acres: cash. Address A 496. Tribune. 


Miscellaneous, 
ASH FOR PROPERTY ANYWHERE 
bargain. Add E 6 


REAL ESTATE FOR EXCHANGE. 


Apartment Buildings, 


7 om resid Si ag ve ah — 
ro e n water or Rogers 
Park. Phone Rogers P Park 8037. 


_ MEAL ESTATE LOANS, MORTGAGES, — 
viieth FIRST MORTGAGE TOANS 


“— 
oie S vinas BLDG. AND LOAN ASSR.. 
20 W. Wasbington-street, Pra. 6445. 


IF 


Chicago ra ay te ht. or snetalment. 
BR MELD B ROTHERS., 


term 
111 W. Washineton- ~ pe BR 9121. 


rates residential and inco roperties. 
Sharon Mtge. Co.. 105 W. Madison, n. 5656. 


WANTED—LOAN OF $2.200 ON FIRST 
mortgage. wena Aya private nici only. 
ADD G8, 


TRIB 


WH BUY a00D OR DEFAULTED MTGBES. 
at reasonable discount; 
Richard Mtg. Co., 120 8. La Salle. Fra. 6217. 


FOR SALE—LITTLE CO. OF MARY HOSPI- 
wn bonds, as hoa | 44%: matur, '40-'49. 
. Gould 9 3, LaSalle, my, 2622. 


SRG aa WESTERN MORTGAGE CO. 
lends up to 80% FHA. See our Sunday ads. 
1976 Milwaukee-avenue. Rrankwiee 6200 
PAIN. LOWEST BATES. 
ASHINGTON. FRANKLIN 


WAN. LORIS & CASPER RS INC 
Sbu0. 


In rest rates as low as 444%. Dor 


a minutes to loap. 
i os bg oe at tan ke Sgt of P 
5 c, sun rm ; 
pibg.: le. lot. Pr. $7000 vin pope. 6576 os 
$2.900 BUYS BEAU. BOXi80 FT. “Tor. 
Among new homies. All epec, pd. Winn.253. 


General, 


SMATLT, LAKE — BEAUTIFUL Woons: 

nearly 7° acres Ech of Lake Forest: 
city water. gas. electricity: on main paved 
road [no assmts.) 4.500, $1.000 


cash Tew A nS ED MEN 


JUST OSS BEAUTIE UL SKOKIE- 
bivd. farm estate, nearly acres; near 
Lake Forest Blectri station foutside of town 

limit, low tax rat tes}. B chea ap on terms. 

ADDRESS E J er TRIB NE, 

FARM—5 ACRES. ENTIRE BLOCK OF N. 
crete road sroncaue: See nr. schoo!: 

betw. Sheridan- ‘POE Price $760, 

$150 cash. A wag E bune. 


PARM — NEAR | BELVIDERE-RD -SKORIE- 
Bassey F200 25 pa eee 


bivd.. 
REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—H, W. 


Monnt Prospect—26 min, ta leop. 


- MODEL aeMES NOW COMPLETED — 
Se 650 TO $5,600 

RT. 54—2 BILE N. OF MT" PROSPECT. 

SMITH & DAWSO STATE 3861. 
min 


‘WORKINGMAN'S IMPROVED COUNTY 


farm: small new cottare: sealed: 2 coat 
paint job: street paved’ schooi min plain view: 
electricity: about 40 minutes drive to loop. 
Price $1.250: zane cash. $15 mo. ddrese 


E N 106. Tribune 
4% ere NR Fiche tal 344. Tribune, 


cash. $10 mo. Address EJ bune. 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—WEST. 


OPAPP LL 


Austin-14 minutes to leon. 
BEDROOM, 


ANT OF ¥ 00. CASH. 
Pilgrim, 6637 W. Lake. Aus. 1680. Vil, 5100, 


Berwyn—17 minutes to toop. 


— § ROOM BRICK BUNGALOW, $4.250 — 
Kohout Bros., 6200 W. Cermak. Cra. 5800. 


Downers Grove-—37 minntes to loop. 

6 RM. FRAME. NEWLY DEC.: FURNACE: 
ST whee wie ia Rk. a. | 

rar.: mtge.: to pr. 

eash: C., = Q. serv. Dunham. 6145 ‘Main. 

RMETTES ONLY 


DEE ces sew we 
oP aaa ha panty $25 down, balance 
ddress 


JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, OLD GOLD, ETC. 


CASH FOR DIAMONDS 
OLD GOLD, JEWELRY 


1.94 Kt. DIAMOND. BLUE $ 


Diamonds, 


DON 
wGartitied "ADB Brokers and Jewelers. 
ae 


Will a 
LEV 


I HAVE p. regs iY 2421. ae ~ es 


STOCKS AND BONDS, 
WE BUY BEAL ESTATE BONDS. 


Sic. 
wi 4, bonds, 34, La, | rt ree 


PAWN TICHETS, GOLD TEETH. SILVER. 
MEMBER Chicago Assn. of Commerce. 


Chicago Gold Smelting Co., 
37 So. Wabash-av., 3d Floor. 


WHITE 
Unusual luster. Attractive 
all platinum rin 
whids diamonds in 
Y PRICED 
Pawn Tickets Bought for Cash. 


THE U. S. LOAN BANK, 
10 North Clark-st., 6th Floor. 


ALD'S — 34 WEST WASHINGTON-ST. 


Pe cat J rs fa appends 
Dineaaeee. poe A fs by Bo 
Highest Gash Prices Paid. 


ought, 
DIAMOND MARQUISE 
y's all 


Tor get in lad a 


1,07 


ig : on 
with 4 marauise a By my $145 
for appraisal at no cost to you. 
INS 'S LOAN BANK, 
9 N. CLARK-ST, 


CASH IN DIAMONDS. OLD GOLD, PAWN 

CKETS. WATCHES, DENTAL GOLD. 
ETC. ROMACK GOLD REFINING CO. 
7 W. MADISON, AT STATH, — 601. 


DIAMONDS PAWN TICKETS, D GOLD. 
silver, yatoher. etc. Hi . prices paid. 


WELERS Bx 
11TH FLOOR, 32 Sere ATR. a 8905. 
SWE TICKETS. DIA- 


READY CASH FO 
monds, watches, dental gold. jewelry. etc. 
. 0843. 


CHICA WELRY 
ROOM . 10A GO 7 * MADISON. DE 
SELL YOUR OLD GOLD ? 
RELIABLE UNITED SME G WOR 
coe S. State-atreet, corner Monroe. anae ah 
yy WE PAY CASE: SHLL 
BorD rte Diamonds. 
Quinte One fi. Rts ct 


— Wabash. 
A FOR OLD GOLD. SIL Pe 
” a antion es. dental a yy and 
brac, Chicago Silver 


House. 108 W. BA a 


O A 262. Tribune. 
ME sigh “ee ae FRT.; GD. 
nr. grade. hi 
owner sav’. "tor $4. Hoga 


Bunham. 6156 sal 


Oak Park--16 minutes to loop. 
2 nee. BLDG.—5-5, gy cae PCE.. 


: 2 car gar.: fine : $1,000 
cath "alee monthly, “033 ‘SOUTH. BLVD. 


HOUTA, ig | HARAIBON, 6B: nbt: at 


BRICK 2 FL M HT., 
ft. lot: pi oo 8.600" Baca 610. 
River Forest—17 minutes to loop. 


LIQUIDATION SALE ON CHOI _ 
~ Cusac Realty Co. For. 2044. sg SAB. 


Villa Park—26 minutes to loop. 


WISCONSIN-AV.—5 ROOM BUNGALOW. 50 

other berbain lanree ‘a mes. Y. Morne. 4006 
r homes orris, 

Division or 3585 ae aukee . ss 


BARGAIN! $2 
sold now.. subj, 
2250). 


Wesatchester—35 minutes to loop. 
age EACH: ELEC. 


obese iaal iets 


AKTON-ST. NILES BALAY Seuo, 


POULTRY o% VEGETABLE FARM-—CITY 
water, nr ee BE RCD L no og yeh Pa 


and Bu Go 
NS Md “—[ribune, 


1-5 nid Address 
ah N SUBU | 


iB LOT, I Wapkaca eam 


INVESTIG 
be . nR rverside, 


Western eines, I insdale, Henry 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—MISDEL’S 
24% ACRE CORNER _ 


40 a ig EL ; 


corner 


trom he 2 AUS CF os 796 
» 40 5 V Tt | 


. ‘waye 


4 ; 


ee yom Pawn 


NDS AND 
somes. Dent 


FUR AUCTION 


Pursuant to the statutes of the 
state of tiincis, the undersigned has 
the required notices and will 
+ for sale and sell at a 


19 
oe utldine at 17 N. 


§ 
Sag yee Kyo ae 
owing d bed 


with, namely: 
White ermine jacket. 
J coa 


Cocoa ermine coat. 


Chas, A. Stevens & Co. 


le fur coats, $2600. 


oe GAs 


"200 tar sample 
Be 7 “08 


; i apinanene DITERS | aun SUPP 
ad rs =| 


4 be! 
i. vibe ‘ais spobd wh sic wire aie mooted 


JUST SIGN YOUR NAME 


NO CHATTEL MORTGAGES 


LOCAL LOAN CO. 


i" 
SOA OTR, 2 i ieee 


EVAN 


NO ENDORSERS 


ture Salary 
prefer, 10" bo 


u 
es 


he ae 


PACTUAL 


e MONEY: 


me 40 


YOU HA 


omnes 


UNDER STATE SUPERVISION, 


tate. 
SSA [ ae ~ orph §5 


Hear Edgar Guest Tuesday eves.. 


Ret ENDORSERS 


NO WAGE [xpos MENTS 


18—CON VENIENT LOUATIONS-«18 


5th floor. Capi 


. Ashland. 24 floor. 


105 W. Madison, 14th floor. Franklin 0884 

100 W. Monroe, 7th floor. ; 

28 N. Clark, Room 254. 

77 W. Washington, 1th floor. 
1737 Howard-st., 2d floor. 
4554 Broadway, 2d tioor. 
1951 Irving Park, 2a fir. 
2800 Milwankee-av., 
4704 Irving 
6255 8 
2355 W. 63d-at., 24 floor. 
6856 S. Halsted, 24 floor. 

841 B. 64d-st., 4th floor. 
9204 Commiercial-av., $d fi. 
11106 8, Michigan, 2d fi, 
4010 W., Madison, 4th fioor. 
Cicero, 6012 Cermak-rd., 2d fi, 
Oak Park, 1140 Lake, 3d floor. 


State 1777 
Franklin LOsz 
State 0161 
Rogers Park 832U 
Longbeach 7164 
Buckingham 1006 


tol 8440) 


k, 2d floor. Pensacola 4570 
Hemlock 4511) 
Republic 4472 

Englewood 4534 
Plaza 836U 

So. Chicago 10% 

Commodore #88) 

Kedzie 0704 

Cicero 6400) 

Euclid 603 


“Deetor of Family finances.” 


HOUSEHO! D 


FINANCE 


CORPORATION. 


7 :30—WLS. 


VEnue 


bag a 


TON PH 


NO WAGE ASSIGNMENTS. 


COMMONWEALTH 


NORTH SIDE: 
3166 LINCOLN-gy. 
Be 
4809 LINCOLN-av 


1791 HO’ 


SOUTH 
6306 


H 
749 W. 63d-street at Halsted, 


1 N. actin SAU = Lake. 
ne stin 
BERWiN. cresico 


LOANS 


Without Endorsers 


Whether you borrow on your auto, 
furniture or on just your plain note, 
you will never be required to ask 
others to sign. No endorsers or ware 
assignments required on ANY loan. 


Reduced Rates 


3% monthly interest on balances of 
$100 or less; 2% on balances above 
$100 to $200; 1% on balances above 


$200. 7 


Friendly 


Personal Loans 


$30 to $300 


Use our 


to get cash when you need 


simplified loan method 


it. 


Signature Only Loans. 


Automobile Loans. 


Furniture Loans. 


COM 


OF igneous SPR VICE. 


MEMORATING 50 YERARS 


Phone Central 4733. 


C. ©. ERD 


S. DEARBORN-ST. 


ROOM 616. 


instruments, golf 


yor 


508 § 


LOANS — Bh ing Gage 3 RATES ON JEWELRY, 


elnthin 
otting fe 's, 


elu bs, 


cameras, binocula 
§. HALSTED. STREET. 


LOAN COQ. 


Rusiness Loans. 


OVER 50 YEARS OF SERVICE, 
9-OFFICES-—9 


Ashland at 
. BIT tersweet 3360 
Western at - 
‘ Sree 3456 


V5 Cice 
. 807 ror AVEnue 044:4 
AnD ‘at Clark, om 

OGers Park 0754 


SottAcR GROVE, Rm. 
¥De Pak 0604 


cor. 
224., 


+ cor. 


Jmont 


om 
. ENGlewood 1711 


OLDEST ESTAB. 


Prompt 
gan, India 


9 W. WASHINGTON-ST. 


$300 to $50,000 


mn fixtures and equinment of 


oO 
wactories: Laundries 
cat Markets, Hotels, etc. 
Also on Accounts 


IN C 
NO ENDORSERS, 


F. BOLAND, 
FRANKLI 


Restaurants, 


Receivable. 


HGO. 


TERMS TO SUIT. 


attention to inquiries from Michi- 
Da or Illinois on loans of $2,000 uD. 


N 1966. 


t Madi- 
AN Buren 5040 


204, 
. Village 6886 


CMRI AR Ridgeland. 
Ph., LAWadals 2882. rw 


371 
Chgo. Ph STATE SUPERVISIO 


What do YOU require 


—— a things you insist upon: 


Priva 
Simplicity 
Plenty of Ame to Repay 
pale A ga Cos 
e 


A 


LOANS up to $3 


UPTOWN PERSONAL 
4750 Broadway, 2d floor. LONgbeach 4090 


NORTH PERSONAL. 


es 8 NG PARK PERSON NAL. 
BORS Milwaukee-ay.. 2d fi. 
[Over Art Thompson's Clothin 

WICKER 
i964 

AUBURN PARK PERSONAL. 
767 W. 


WOODLAWN PERSONAL, 
841 E. 63d-st 


MARQUETTE PARK PERSON 
2403 W. 63d-st., 2d floor. 


ow PARE peor AL, 


OAR, f ABE PERSO ONAL. 
wie fos, og 
6346 Cermak-rd ”; 


EVANSTON PERSON AL. 
708 Church-st., 


when you borrow? 


Friendliness 11 
Businesslike 


No Special Security 


No Extra Fees 
No Hard and Fast Rules 


You will find that we meet YOUR 
requirements when you need CASH. 


ble 


$250 TO $60,000 


To Factories, 
L' dries Rmg. akeries. A 
Rese, Machine Shops. 


Ta bting 


FASTER SERV 


Plants, Stores, 


utos, 


FOR LOWER R 
FOR aed A COURTEOUS TREATMENT, 


Telemeonn Cenarad. | $582 


for a representative to call on 


T MONROK. 


__ FINANGIAL SERVICE. 


e 


you, 


National Acceptance Co. 
ENTRAL 5532. 


_RADIOS, SUPPLIES AND oe 


COMPLETE § ve H—ALL PLANS. 
ome in TODAY. 


PERSONAL 
FINANCE CO. 


Hundre 
EDISO PE 
OP 


9 

16x. Was $180. 
of new mid 
WHSE. O 


LONgbeach 1321 


PALisade 0989 
g Store.] 


4770 Lincoln-av.. 2d fi. 


PARK PERSONAL. 
ARMitage 0833 


‘ red, now. 


22.60 


9: used coneoles. si 


__ OPEN 


EVES. SON. 


W. North-av., gr. fi. 
79th-st.. 2d fi. RADcliffe 822% 
HYDe Park 1472 


AL. 
RHEPublic 7229 


. 3d floor. 


OW adison-st.. 2d fi. NEVada 2134 


Floor 
Open eves 


Oe ee ELECTRIC—12 TORE. : BANDS 


5 tube midget Fadios. % 
Sunday. 1 


samples ex. acts, 
‘2651 Milwaukee. 


ich oi 
ge 8 


95: Phileo auto radio, 6 tubes. 


60 . Washington. 


$22 95: 


95 up. Open eves 
Hay. 3020. 


North-bivd., 24 floor. VILlage 6840 


SACK. 
Humboldt 7068. 


18S a CO— USED 
252 W 


ONE MONTH 
Division, 2d. 


BERwyn 666 


— $89.50 GRUNOW. ALL WAVHE, 
Commonwealth, 775 W. Jackson. Op. eves. 


$19.95 — 


24 floor. GREenleaf 6081 | ON 


HLIAO. 
there. 


E 38 116XxX 
price. $1125 Bn) 


REG. $225, OUR 
4435 Pullerton-av. 


Your Money Problems 
CLEAN THB SLATER WITH A LOAN. 


T. B. WARD, INC. 


8 S. Dearborn. 


$40. 4719 Lincoln-av., 3d 


gg 1988 PHILCO XX MODEL: MUST 
a 


floor, 


Let Us Solve 


Service, Hepnir, Kte, 


—~ —« $1,.00—RADIO SERVICE--$1.00 — — 
_Any place. any time. GUAR! FAIR. 7923 


0 Play—no pay. 


-_ EXPERT SERVICE ANYWHERE—$1 
Seeley 4807. Ard. 1391. 


$25 to $300 
ON YOUR 
SALARY 


_ SUARANEaE RADIO SERVICE. 


$1 — 


ADIO SERVICE. ALBANY 6460. 


-_ 


_ MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 


FURNITURE 
AUTOMOBILE 


Room 408. 


Pianos and Players. 


—_ 


D. 


his bargain at Private 
Fireproof Piano i donlgpetey a s. SAN 
and 39th-street. Oven until 9 


Phone Randolph 2060, 


Most of Our Business 


30 W. bib citindigyai oor -ST. 


aeons Pas 
CAR PAYMENTS 


ee 


OM SE. FINANCE CORP. 


RE 


lf You Need $30-$300 


oa 


L. T. BAKER & CO. 


i 
REDUCED 


poymesie 6 on taking car or much of of your 


‘parents and. pro: 


D 


Ww. — K] 
2611 S. California. 
Bes 2 BARGAIN — paar New ¢ aN 


to 
Noth ag PA to a 


senminn ‘onan until 9 p 
USED GRANDS AND SETS 


WUR eR 111 S. Wabash. 
AS $10 DOWN DELIVERS A 


SW" plano 


ALL pene cg 
rae 2 
wer 604 Repu 
WANTED TO BUY—USED GRAND PAKS 
from private family for cash, Mer. 4026. 


BAY. SMALL Conan & 
“eran al 1 ak . en. $75 UD. Si0a we 
Bu Teas. 


Ww. Ww 
arrison-iret 


gia 


Lf upr. 


GRAN 
nut Bidest 


oTaroAs SARE GBT G 


a 


arty = = Seas cash Sheldrake S707, 
rivebuitt 


cond 


B at prices: 


_ cncasey FINEST PIANO “Sere -— 
Re jon : ight \ 


, COMPA NY "RAGTORY, 
Open. 8 9. 


only Ter 
Ma > gg is 


$225. $275. Low t 


aw eek. 
deliver 


no Co. — South Wabas 


$150 


erms. 
Open eves. 


to | 
Cable "Fiene 


our 


0., $05" é. Wabash. 


‘RA ND—LIKE 


wn, $ 
lic . Bide. 209 


NEW: 
at fbn 


SONS GRAND 


piano: like new. # eee 
7 


; 


PAY case ah USED 


rs. Paige. Van 


ve 


P worth, 


Accordions. 


Terms with 
go Murical I NaERA. Open. even 


$165 


CCORDIONS—BARGAINS IN USED 
f ng. demonstrator with tree leg All 


South 


oan” 


CONFEC 
rent: $9 
CURTAIN 
sonable. 


IONE 
CLA 
t 


edz 

living ce ee 
fist bide Penn, 
vHeated. Doing N-G 


Near stecl mills ‘Reas. ton. ng-av, 


EL-GROC —PRIC B; PAY Nori eo, 


D 

auto ‘Tel. 
DELIC.-BAK. = DS—OLD Ss 5. 
Kitehn hnt. dist. oe aie Wah | 
DEL.—APT. DIST a 
with bath: sacr. S70e 1 


DEL.-GROCERY—7852 Pace iL 
x . 


0 


$3 


“us 


reftig.; clean stock. 
DEL. -CANDY- CHL. 

bldg : ise. clean stock: jive ntre’ ty 
DRUG STORE—S. §:: BUS. Ts 

_ Paying prop. Address 46 
ELEC. APPL, BUS.—SO. SIDE; 
est. 6 pat. adv. 

cash 

oD 283, 
yeti WI LL 


YR. su: 
party. Rog. 


Sales : 

invest, req, Addvess 3 

GARAGE—ON PAY 
at a sacr. Address 


GARAGE—80 CAR: 3 
derfu] opp. to reliable 


GAS STA.—SUPER GREASE vee. 


teries. tires, 5 encl oaures. e. Long lease, a : 
Fulton-st. 


low. "i 400 gal. 
GAS. wedi — AUT O REPAIR, FULL 
steam heat. low fic 


uipped 
$1,800. 4101 FULLERTON R 


GAS STATION—ON S 
tions in town. Give Yo TH BRP Re: 
a 


per gallon. 224 and Baise eS 
GROCERY- MARK BT—MOD.: 


sales $55.000 case 
Acme Husiness Pl ig 139 lg Jean 


GROCERY -DELIC.—4 S.. 2G 
opp. for Pol. eple, 2235 ee 4 


GROCERY AND FRUIT — 
Acct. other business. 1906: Me Pe reek. 
%. Visca 


GROCERY-DELIC.—PLENTY © 
lv. rims.: sacr. cash; 7306 
1 prod HERY_LARGE s. ACCREDITED 
uces big pro rees 
Address D q 33. Tr ibun * ase - 
HAMBURGER AND SND H 
Well established. 7009 North Ghark, 


LADIES: READY-TO-WEAR SH UES- 
ours; fll. Well established, food loc. ine 
D.. for stea income. Will 

M. FREEMAN, Bondi hy, Galesburg. 


MEAT MARK#T-—-HYDE PARK: VERY aay 
ern: small down payment. Mid. 3245. 


MEAT Faeroe gt OF aS 1933: Par 
elec, refr,;: rt. $830. Reas, 416 Lingoln-a¥ 


PAINT. eae PAPER, DECORATING 
Store—Old established. Ideal RCORATING pain) ‘ls 


contractor. Sell complete o ce & 
Investixate. Hyde Park 190 {398° 


suit buvrer. 

PRIVATE SANITARIUM AN] ‘CLINIC SP 

. Cializing in all chronic di loc, 
: ine 


3. i 
Micb. Brk. bidgs.- latest equip. 
ae 


OC A- 


| X-Rays. new Packard 12 am ulance, 
Gotan big bus.. wish to retire. Exe, ‘ 
Only $85,000. Address D F # . Tribune, 


RESETATRANT—AMERICAN: Goo D 
fully Uipped: sac. at very 
ven. 


: equ 
why? tana details 
ween 5 and 7 p. m. 4243 aypole-avenue. 


RESTAURANT-—LIVELY PLACE age 
thriving business: sell chea ; giliness 
pels sale. Ma Ster ing, 1911 th 

CASH; “50 


RESTAURANT—PR. $5.500, 
bus.: lg. ise. Stephens. 82 . Wash.,R, 41 


a HOUSE~—28 R.. 2 BASE. FLATS: 
heart of oodlawn: income over $50 
Bin. 1,000 handles. Hyde Pk. 7975. 


RMG. HSE.—54 WELL FURN. ROOM 
$176; all apts. nets $300: pr. $8, BOO" tn = 
Steinbock & Alexander, 180. No. La Salle. 


ROOMING HSE. ait aes. : ‘NICELY FUR- 
nished: newly de income: rent 
$37.50. Pr. $400" a 3108 Bissell-street. 


RMG. HSE. 58 RS.‘ RENT 
ise.: food, sae poe ($2,900, ‘on 7100: i 
rea, Don PF. om ” Sentherst t. 
= USE. —72 B.: Ra = or $225: IN 5 
: rea.$3.000, De Woskin cn Absa 
cae DEPOSIT VAULT BUD 
6005 Irving Pk. Address ae G 208. 


| sprees Eas, O° OW bchee 


TAVERN-RESTAURANT-LIQUOR STORE - — 
Beautifully decorated. complete equipmer 
all modernistic. Busy transfer corner. Mug 

see to appreciate. 756-758 Bast 634-street 
or call State 3488. 
TAVERN — WELL ASONABLY Agus 
priced: established Seslinces. ae 
lin. Lawndale 2658 
gg Picken An? PROPERTY _— COUNTRY 
50 m W.: stock and fixtures? 
MBs, $2. 800, Drake Rity., 3646 Montrose, 
TAVERN — REASONABLE. B 
ment, See owner. 11-4, 2609 Rok Halsted. 


TAVERN AND Pe Raat - - BULLE 
equipped. 4751 


TAVERN SACRIF. ron EST OFFER. SE 
owner, bet. 3-6 p. m., 1513 N. Crawford, 


TRACTOR-TRAILER AND ROUTE WITH 
established a ek ome Ry mg 


tween Chgo. and Mil 
vearly. Address DG 29. hd 


VACUUM CLEANER SH¢ SHOP—ESTAB. 4 Bier 6318; 
with bath incl.: furn.: as. Bue. 6319. 


5C a0 $1 STORE FOR ita in SOW Oe TOW 
5.000, western Iowa. $5,000 cash Nl 
swing deal. Address D @ 36, Tribune. a 
It the kind of store or business you 
want is not offered for sale today, why 
not advertise in the Business Opportu- 
nity Wanted Column? Stop in today 
at the Tribune Want Ad office, Madi- 
son and Dearborn-streets, or call Sue 
perior 0100. Ask for an Ad Taker. 


Iuvestmenta, 
ITY FOR 
ished 


oT. 
Oo 


bune. 


Partnerships an¢ 


EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTU 
man to take over ap est 


5 cash. 
segguunent phone Mr. Welton. Svau! 


Distribators. 


-— = oe JOBBERS WANTED — — = 
CALL ARMITAGE 2013. 


Concessions, Locations, and Lenauel 
FOR RENT—DESIRABLE SITE FOR DIN-| 
~ A <a. next to new, 

ae loca on highly st 
pe 2" Talfod 060 population’ if tc an ay 
P. O. Box 556, Peoria. Il. 


ivaeren tine — AS § 


20x20 available, or = 
salesman with book Bh hed-y ability as >: 


ner, Green 7788. . * 
SPACE IN BEAUTY SHOP Sg Ba FOR 


millinery; $15 mo. nee gas, 
West side. ansfield 


me : 
Illinois. 22 

PEC MACH. D 
a i 
sade Bese 8 . Tesch, 


NPR'S T—WHO NO | 
ccaiees tenia . 


o6e P 
Or gas ata 
Ambroz. 4948 


3 st Ford pee | 


ot Pa 


Buick (4 pass. COMPeD $80 
_ Toe ~~ 


‘Reconditioned Motor. 


784 Hupp Sedan...............-§65 


a Nash Sedan................$95| 


A Really Fine Car. 


Small 6 Motor. 


a 120 Durant Sedan. Lesasaessss eee 


be had on some of these cars. 
100 
Dodges, Fords, Chevs., 
" Plymouths, Hudsons, Nashes, 
Lafayettes at a 


GREAT DISCOUNT 


It will pay you to shop early. 


COME TODAY 
2 STORES. 


2508 S. Michigan 
236 E. 24th-st. 


NASH SALES, Inc. 


Factory Distributors. 


Me "35 COR. onie Met Lider agen. 


BUICKS ’37s, ’36s 


1987s, $565 UP. 
1986s, $498 UP. 


RS. 
[16 TO CHOOSE, FROM:, ALL pee RS.) 


a. our 
- Bosters, et a mts. 8 di dual bow ete. 
P. 


OAK PA ae TRANCE. co 
4618 Washington = blvd. 
BUICK 1987. 


WE UNDERSELL 


°87-41 56 pase. a. dr. sedan, 6 61 sedan, 
- trunk, side 
moun seat upe. Built-in nee eS 


“various colors 


AUBU 


. Some 
WN. BAL. 12-24 MOS. 
YouR 6 OAR EER. OPEN EVENINGS. 


3910 OGDEN-AV._ 
“BUICK 1937, $695 


li “8” Special Sedan: trunk 
gomp. a eee — a. Say y a 


Your car d 2 day. cua 
are VING RIAL. 
- CEN a4 TeinA 7, DAY DRIVING THT, 


JACKSON-BL. 
~ BUICK °37, $695 


41. 4 door with trunk. 
—_ choose from—All colors. 
four CAR OR $100 DOWN, 


CAPITOL FINANCE CORP., 


- 2235 MICHIGAN-AV. 
BUICK ’37-41 


Tour sedan. Eauinped with 
wine wot tives, radio. heater. 

8 car jus e ne - 
cial discount. Also 7 Sh 
same eauip, az# above. 


2247 S. MICHIGAN © 
Buick ’37 61 Sed., $945 


EMIL DEN oe” INC., 


49 ‘27. rangitt 


PARTICULARS PH. CRAWFORD 4100. 


BUICK °37-67, $765 


Long wheel base sedan. Radio. heater. 
white wall tires. built-in luggage com- 
partment. Original cost $1.646. 


Michigan Ave. Chevvolet, 
Michigan at 24th-st. 


BUICK—1037 MODEL 81 4 poe TOURING 
heater. ing Goodyear 
low mi oxdog ig FRR an 


is car looks and runs like the day it 
left the factory. Priced to sali today 


LAWDER BROS., 
6900 VINCENNES, 1 BLOCK W. OF STATE 
OPEN SUNDAY. 


EVES. TILL 10. 
BUICK 1980 57, $78. 

5 pass. 4 dr. sedan; good husky transp. 
Buick Dir., 3807 Lawrence. 
— — — BUICK—1932 86, $146 

Victoria 5 pass. coupe; gd. condition. 
PACKARD CHICAGO, 
84TH AND MICHIGAN. CALUMET 7413. 
BUICK ’87 41, $7783. 
mileage; a sedan ; solar heater: low 

Levy Buick, 2257 Michigan. 
SoicK. cK—i904 4 DOOR TRUNK SEDAN. 


41; 
Dor. 2310. Ruby ny 7158 Stony Island. 
bafo Wiroabway 


aye} 4 DR. SEDAN 
ED 


ER. 


Cadillac ’35 Sed., $595 


modal oe be a sedan. 5 pass.: black 
al cost $3.685. Very low 
_- wa pass for new car. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


_ Michigan at 24th-st. 
Cadillac 736 V-12 7 Pass. 


twood sedan, 4 door, with trunk. radio. 
oe $1,275. 


2317 S. MICHIGAN 
Cadillac “8367 P. Sed. 


Fleetw side mounts. radio. heater. 
chrome w Pohecte' $1.175. 


2317 S. MICHIGAN 


Cadillac Real 37, $1,075 


Trunk ik 
brand de a a 
” KRUEGER 


: ce {ODEL 60 SEDAN, Al 


. own. $900. Buc.i324. 


Bate « 1937, $425 


action, 5 
pr inyid auphol. saa 


Chevrolet. “eles 
Dor. 2310. 


36 SEDAN, $345 


de ‘ees 5 pass. sedan: radio. htr.. ete. 


_ BURKE, 6788 SWEET aay. 


RURY CHEVROLET. 
CF’ VROLET—1955 


ADTH. DODGE DLR 


CHRYST.ER 


“PUBLIC 
and 
apaseinogiuis ALIKE 


45%, 
aS, a 


potas as ieee a8.++> 


ALL fens BA 
300 Others 


100 CARS UNDER $100. 


TERMS TRADE 


RAY TITUS 
5710 BROADWAY 


CHEV. °37 SEDAN, $495 


npg me ES ark xe access MASTER ere- 
radio. 


Fou a WF: + ‘ Pi Psithes 


850. “TACKSON-BL. 
~ CHEV. 1937, $495 


'7 to choose fro Various colors.] 
door Master Sedan. Also to redan 
Zour ehonice 


. 12-24 
day evarantee. * 
OAK PARK AUTO FINANCE COR 


4618 Washineton = bivd. 


C-H-R-V-D.0-1 -P-T-S 


1984-1985-19386-1987 


MASTER DE LUXE Cor ae COACHES. 
TOWN SPORT SEDAN K.'D. 
Your car down nayment. teal, S25 ner mo. 


Southwest Chevrolet, Inc., 
9220 S. ASHLAND. CED. 3500. 


CHRV. ’36 DE 1... $395 


5 Pass. Town Sedan. Trunk. dual eauinp. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 
9245 MICHIGAN-AY, 


Chev. ’36 Sed., $365 


Built-in trunk. heater. many other extras. 
Al) dual ennin., black finish. Your car down. 
helencee 12 24 monthe. 


De Soto Dir., 3148 Lawrence. 


‘RA MASTER DE LUXE 2 DOOR 
sedan: knee action. turret ton, trunk space. 
hed. brakes, full Chev. eapt. Appearance 
clean ase new! gr A age perfect: priced 


fear aniecl enale at SAD! 
CT.ARK-MAPT.R CHEV. 940 MILWAUKEF 


CHEVROLETS 
Large indoor etock of clean need cars. 
ATT. MAKES ANN MODE ELS. 
Some low as 845: term 
Warner Motor pave, 1242 trvein Park. 
OPEN STINDAY. 


GHEVROLET ‘84 COUPE. 
Good chane, Far enjole este ante R196. 
7158 STONY ISLAND, 

ING DOR. 23210 


© PNOOR SEDAN: RA- 
din, heater. ete. A real hareain at S825. 


$25 DOWN AT KROLL’S. 
7215 8. HALSTED. 


CHRVS'.ER ’37, $645 


5 . 4 door de luxe tourae aed- 
dan, built-in trunk. OVERDRIVE. 
eadtin, Leona defroster hae at cost. 
Like Our regular «uvarantee. 
CHRYST. ER ‘DEALER. OPEN EVENINGS. 


3019 OGNFENSEAV. 


Chrysler ’84 Sedan, 


$295 


Priced low, 
Co.. 
M 


CHEV.— 


6 evlinder. & wheels. 
SOUTH ttt BUICK 
7320 STONY ISLAND ID. 6408. 


Chrysler 1937 Royal, $645! 


De fuxe 4 dr. trunk sedan. overdrive. dual 
equipment, built-in radio. heater, defrosters. 
Very low mileage. New car guarantee. 


“WE HAVE THE CARS WE ADVERTISE.” 
MICHAEL MOTOKS, 7405 STONY ISLAND. 


CHRYSLER—1936 IMP. AIRFLOW SEDAN 
5D pass.: trunk, overdrive, radio, hir.: $595 
New Car Dealer. Open Sun.. Eves, Til] 10. 


6201 SOUTH WESTERN, 


CHRYSLER—AIRFLOW SEDANS — — 
19356 and 1936s. All in verfect condition. 
WESTERN MOTORS. 6445 5S. eae 


“#5 cus Jt gag OW SED.A 
overdr.’ nriv.: trade 1929 8. 52d-av. Aine 


CORD 19386 SEDAN. 


WE UNDERSELL 


4 door custom sedan. low mileage: like new 
CHRYSLER DEALER. OPEN EVENINGS. 


3910 OGDEN-AV. 
DE SOTO ’37 SED., $495 


4 DOOR SUORING sedan; 
dual —— Special $495. 


Bargain! It’s a 
ult: n trk., htr.. 
Your car down, b 2 
OPEN AR Ee 
CENTURY FAINAN i ¥ DRIVING Trt 


850 TACKSON-BL. 
DE SOTO ’36 AIRFLOW 


4 door de luxe sedan. overdrive. built- 
in gran. custom model: cost erst 
$1.300. Our price only......... 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


Michigan at 24th-st. 
DE SOTO ’35 SED., $361 


** Not a trick ad.” Heater, other extras: 4 dr. 
May Motors. ‘“‘House of Bargains.” Olds. Dir. 


7417 S. HALSTED 


De Soto ’36 Trunk Sed., $480. 


scnafont de puxe sedan, built-in trunk. loads 
of extras, fully cuarantee 

SUNNYSIDE MOTORS, 4511 LINCOLN-AYV. 
DE 


SOTOS—190387'8 4 DOOR TOURING SE- 
danst some have heaters. radios. Al! colors 

While they last. $595 

Bernard rd & Lee. 103: 1033 Chicago-av. Evanston, 


DE SOTO—LATE 19387 4 DR. TOUR. SE- 


dan. overdrive, trunk. radi heater. etc. 
Like néew thruout. M Must sell Rockwell 6177. 


DODGES 


BRAND NEW. 
1937s 


4 door Contos sedans . COUNT. of colors. 
LIB RAL DISCOUN' 
: 80 


1937 


SOM ie ee CARS. 

4 door ities ty Hens colors 
sotinmant puivemes 24 iow a 

ew car guarantee 2 


$595 
YOUR CAR DOWN. BALANCE 2 YEARS. 
The Home of the Dodge Car. 
MURPHY MOTOR SALES, 
AUTHORIZE! DODGE DEALERS. 


| 2720 N. CICEROWy. 


185 Olds Soak: vsn898 $300| fl 


85 Terra Tr. Sed.. 350 
’34 Olds Tr, 

88 Ford De | 

'83 Olds Tr, § 

'88 Auburn §&§ 

31 Chry. Sed 


29 Grhm. 7 iy ec 
29 Ford Coupe . eke 


See Us First 
Kailer-Youngquist 
Lon.4682 5043 Br’dway. 
DODGE 1986, $435. 


6 wheel, pa ule. Bee ee ; mod- 


erne ole. 
suid ar 8807 Ratyrence. 
Bea eg 1986 Cours: ; 


new th iRroughout, 8 hentae bullrle ee for on 
DGE-B Guaranteed, Rema = PLYMTE. 
988 WASHINGTON-BLVD. 


DODGE 1984, ee 
4 ager A sedan S Sseipment. 


78 i wae 
YOUR CA ALS 0 A MONTH. 


Dodge Bayes 2720 N. Cicero 


Fords 208 Fords 
BEFORE YOU BUY 


SEE 


Lawder Bros. 


AUTH. FORD DEALER. BESTAB. 1890. 
FINEST SELECTION OF 
R. & G. FORDS 
IN THE CITY. 

R. & G. means renewed and guaranteed. 
1931s to 1937s. 

ALL MODELS. ALL PRICES. 
A CAR FOR YOU AT THE 


PRICE YOU WANT TO PAY. 


All Other Makes 


Lowest Prices Ever! 
Also Linc.-Zephyr '36 and '37 4 door sedans. 


6900 VINCENNES=-AV. 


1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE-STREBRT. 
Open Sundays. Eves. to 10, 


FORDS 1986 


$75-DOWN PAYMENT-$75 


TUDOR 


$19.90 PER MONTH. 


LITSINGER’S 


925 JACKSON-BLYVD. 


OPEN SUNDAY AND EVENINGS TILL 10. 
Ford ’387 De L. Tour. Fordor 


Here is a perfect car. “ool with 
radio, heater. gabe i cae 
white wall tires. own. Also 

luxe tudor, pon Bet equip- 


: . @are, all years. 
and models to choose from. 


GLENN E HOLMES, ING., 


30 W. LAKE-S ANDOLPH 7171. 
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS. 


FORD ’36, 5315 


Fordor and ype sedan and coup 
Very clean, ee Beet: A eg | R's to PS316. 


0 MOS, 
CHRYSLER ABEALER. 


SPEN EVENINGS. 


3910 OGDEN=AV. 
Ford ’37-85 Coupe, $425 


De |. model: radio, htr.. white wall 
tires: full de |. equip. Also '37-85 sed., 
4 dr.: radio. htr.. fully ean. $145 dn. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 
Michigan at 24th-st. 


FORDS-FORDS-FORDS 


‘37-86 deluxe tudor sed 
’36 tudor: original paint Tike new 
'86 de luxe coupe: regio, 
‘36 deluxe fordor sedan 


2247 S. MICH iGAN 


FORD 1985 


Business coupe—a good one—black finish. 
5 wire whis. mohair upholstery, heater, etc. 
The best buy anywhere at this price. 


7158 STONY ISLAND, 
RUBY CHEVROLET, INC. DOR. 2310. 


FORD—1936 5 PASS. SEDAN: RADIO. 

heater. nerfect tires: very clean: low mi.: 
absolutely like new. #90 or your car down, 
balance $18 per mo. 8 state license free. 


PRUDENTIAL FINANCE, 
1647 N. CICERO. OPEN EVES. 
Ford ’86 Cabriolet, $485. 


Beuu, maroon while wall coupe, rumble 
seat radio Bis. bow lis, dual equpmt.., 
got Pig BET? ‘ one. a Re. ae tax. 
wow B sOuTH BO PviRD. “OAK PARK. ‘An BERS. 
FORD ’37 TOUR. SED., $428. 


Factory built-in. trunk. Practically 
brand new: 90 day «cuarantee, You 
car down, balance $25 s month. 


Dodge Dealer, 2720 N. Cicero 
—FO D—1987 FORDOR, | TRUNK SEDAN— 


heater. Only 1 left 
New Car aler. Open Sun.,' Eves. Till 10. 


6201 SOUTH WESTERN. 
FORD ’86 CONVERTIBLE 
Pass. Club Case. ie. Wpupe, Redio. Heater. 


h _— 
$Ob46 S. MIG 


IGAN 
—FORD—1936 4 DOOR . TRUNK SEDAN— 
Full de luxe. Only 


New Car Dealer. Open Sun., Eves, Til] 10. 
6201 SOUTH WESTERN. 


Be wedthas COUPE, $365. 


very clean; SE me to $365. 
pad pe Motor Co. 242 Ww. Ratha 


ia i £0, Money A BEAUTY. 
5 t 


back 
Fg it. Elliot se. Ine. bie 
Howard-et, © th. 


5 


jay. Au Ford Dealer. 

FORD 35 S FP. . SEDAN, $240, 
HEATER: LIKE NEW THROUGHOUT. 

De Soto-Plymouth Dir. 3520 ARCHER. 


FORD—1935 BLACK TUDOK SEDAN; 
heater, ett... $2456 th er ‘“Barhborized " 
ears. Harbor Motor és. 733 Cottage Grove. 


ORD~—1936 D Bigs ts UPE. $349, KA- 


dio, heater his t Ka 
DE oro Bikals a, waite PO MADISON: 


"lar tn a hina vas car of og 


W. J, LANAHAN . INC.., itt s. ¢ ey 
PORD—1835 SPORT COUPE, HT TR. LOW 
rea 
CHEVROLET DEALER 4857"\ Wn, $266. 
FORD—-1097 TUDOR.............. sips 
Radio and heate rr: 86 model 
- JOHN P. LYNCH. 1520 N. HALSTED. 


VORD—1987 DE LUXE CLUB COUPE $450 
anal 8300, B. $400, 


Ee Pa, ure S. vgs | Bae | 


UR., ONLY. 


me tTEL We Hit 


5th, 


N. VERY CLEA — 
eine “hed we bate 


HUDSON 137 Seu 
4 ap lone perinase. built 
oe Orie meet SP 480. Gin ested S896. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


Michigan at tth-s6. 


3 ne 
Ene ee 


dan; ; bi fn 


sc ibe 


850 JACKSON-BL. | 


aw “Clu 
ans: chi Sonpes 


LA SALLES, 1936. 


nditi laa lies to ou 
fo ie. Saticn. Wide ‘selection of 
+ we touring eo 


ont ou ch Bake 


PLYMOUTH 36, $365 


a aut 4 hn dal pile 
1-34 if 
Ba EN ay Ras. 


3910 OGDEN.. V, 


few gener ble 
np . 


ces ra 725. . 
Special Tone antyy. Tour. Sedan, $595. 


CADILLAC, 2258 §S. Michican. 
CALnmet 4185. Oven Evenings. 


~— a pA SALLE—10378 BoAND a tal sel 


virt 
cars we r tar and Foryatble 
know van 


FEE ath omnnerr sa 


roving: peat 


Dodge Dealer, 2720 N. Cicero 


Plym. ’36 Sedan, $395 
5 a 5) oy CtOHY DEA ple new. 


3000 LAWRENGE-AV. 8000. 
“PLYMOUTH 1038, $3 neee- 


5 iaege’ ha 


black fi oT 


$20 A MONTH. 


yen i! recognize the 
La Salle ’34 Sedan, $395 
4 door de l. Fleetwood. Radio. trunk: 
Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


2345 MICHIGAN-AV. |, 


PLE MOUTH 1986 SEDAN. TRUNK, BADE, 


A good buy $59 or 
$20 per month. 1988 s 


heater, white wall tires: very clean, low 
your car heaers just 


ra. 
tate license 


PRUDENTIAL FINANCE, 
637 N. CICERO. OPBN EVES. 


LINCOLN-ZEPHYR 


Late 1936 sedan: hae ALT, 1 EQUIP- 
MENT. RCA RADIO. McCord Me fetes 2 dee 
lights, white walls; eitivels like new. 
Your cir 5. 4 

ears, ay 
7 pay'D VIN RIAL. 
CENTURY FINANOE DRIVING ext 


850 JACKSON-BL. 


Also 200 unbeatable bar 
COOK COUNTY 


Plym. ’36 Sed., $295 


Perfect cond.: like new; nem ¢ o Seems 
rms. en Sun 
ble Pare 1340 W. 63D. 


‘PLYM. °36 SED., $345 


4 door: black finish: fully equipped. 


BURKE, 67383 S. WESTERN. 


36 LINCOLN-ZEPHYR ’37. 


O CHOOSE FROM. 
radio, spotlight. beautiful 


PEVANS TOM CARS A 


Plym, ’35 Tour. Sed,, $3825. 


a Eimer i value ever offered. 

> ee and see this car $09 

1019 DAVIS: ST, STON. 
3 ARB BETTER ‘R CARS. 


8 T 
4 door sedans: 
Boish: very low mileage. sae tell from a 
Also 1926 sedan: radio: 
white wall tires. ete. Only S675. Tms., trade. 
Also '37 Line.-Zephyr coupe, Like new. Bare. 


LAWDER BROS., 


6900 VINCENNES, 1 BLOCK W. OF STATE. 
OPEN SUNDAY. EVES. TILL 10, 


Lineoln Zephyr ’37 4 Door 


A beautiful car in eve wa 


Plym. ’38 De L., Sedan, $ $219. 


Mohair uoholatery: black finish, aA nother 


DODGE DER tote Gk yak oro areMD price. 
EVANSTON CARS ARE one he 
PLYMOUTH—'34 P. £. 3 


DE LUXE a 4 
pearance posters. Senmut motor, best 


i oo 
cond. shruout Unusual 
CLARK MAPLE CHEV.., 


Sedan 
Bauler ed with radio, heater. and white wall 
tires. pegnditioned and gvuaranteed. Priced 


for immediate sale 
GLENN E . HOLMES, INC., 


yA be 


anv. 
CHEVY, DLR. 1111 Chicago-av,. 


’86 Sed., Radio, $398. 


hyd. AGS positively spotless. 
ay., in Evanston. Evanston. 


W, LAKE- ST, NDOLPH 2171. 


80 RA 
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS. 


PLYMOUTH—'37 


a oe 
eoRET TH DLR.. 


ROYAL SALES. D 
LWAUKEE-AV. 


1930 AND sobs 


Lincoln=-Zeph. ’36, $695 


P 


HEATH 
MID-CITY CHEVRO bi 4 t147 Wt TAURSOR: 


Raa Hees LURe, Pics ID 
MOUNTS. ¥, $235, 


ed.. r heater. white side wall 
fee.. palo. so little will pags for new. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


PLYMOUTH—'37 SEDAN: HEATER...$495 


Bernard & Lee, 1033 oa ies 


Michigan at 24th-st. 


bgeotutag ’°36 TOUR. SEDAN. 


PLYMOUTH— 36 “TOURING SEDAN. “$306 


permare & Lee, 1088 Chicago-ay., | Evanston. 


xe Radio, heater. bapa trunk. 
one” Ss perfect in every reepec 


Special for Today, $5785. 


et fom 


‘34 OD,; PERF, .$175 
DE SsoTo- Spree pie” 2 E GARFIELD-BL. 


RAY TENNES MOTOR CO., |” 


LYMOUTH—COUPE '35, PRIVATE es 
bargain; quick sale, 4718 Winthrop 


FORD-LINCOLN-ZEPHYR DEALER. 
2451 N. SACRAMENTO AT MILWAUKBER. 


PLYMOUTH—’36 COUPE: HEATER: ONLY 


$295. aeeeey Bargains. 1035 N. a 


NASH ’33 SED., $185 


PLYM.—1932 P. CONY. ss take ty 
JOHN P, LYNOH. 1520 N ALSTE sh 


De luxe 4 door. dual eauipment. 820 down. 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, 


PLY 
Dor, 2310. Ruby Chev., 


M.—'33 COACH, A HON RREEEES ay y 
7198 Siouy Yaland. 


2345 MICHIGAN-AV. 
NASH— 36 2 DR. TRONK SEDAN; RADIO 


heater, overdrive: like brand new 
Dor, 2310. Ruby Chev.. 7158 Stony Island. 


OLDSMOBILES 


’37s=—-Only 2 Left—’37s 
Officials’ Cars, Like New 


door de luxe sedans. all have radios. built- 
n trunks. heaters, defrosters, seat covers. 


BIG SAVINGS! 


Pontiac 1984 Coach...... : 


Pontiac 1986 8 Sedan. 


5701 Broadway. 


‘$280 


De luxe; fully eqpt.: perf. cond, thruout. 


Pontiac 1984 Bus. Cpe...$250 


Ebohy black: beater; except. clean. 


Pontiac 1985 Sedan 


Heater, radio, trunk: excellent condition. 


Pontiac 1986 6 Sedan 


Heater, radio, trunk: exeellent condition. 
... 6528 


eater, radio, trunk: low mi.; true value. 


Broadway Buick Co. 
Lon. 7700. 


La Salle-Erie Motors 


AUTHORIZED OLDSMOBILE DEALER. 


661 N. LA SALLE 


OPEN THIS SUNDAY. 
OLDS 1937 “8,” $695 
OLDS. 1936 ‘6,” $595. 


and 6 ai. 4 door da yd sedan: Tame. heater, 
trunk comp.:;: uxe model. 
our car down, 5 80d 


P-O-N-T-1-A-C-S. 
BRAND NEW, $797. 


DAN, 5 PASS.. FULLY EQUIPT 
IAC ” SEDAN, % 
TIAC N 


OPH ENTURY Ba LBs DEVE haa, 
850 JACKSON-BL. E 
OLDS 1936, $445 


1986. 2. pans. 4 gees and 2 door tour. sedans 
rad ene defroster reed at Cala. 
ahs uphol. 


Your car owe. ge hy 


BONTIAC 7 —_ 


pass. sedan. Bxcel. cond, and appearance. 
xtras, radio, heater, defroster furn, at cost. 
to pay. M idaed reg 


SLER HAT ge dey OPEN E BNINGS. 


“3010 OGDEN-AV. 


et da ec i 1924 ‘mom fo DAT 
3910 OGDEN-AV. 


" oan rang sas 
OLDS 1937, 5595 


6208 C 


Pontiac ’386 Sedan, 


$395 


6 hint 4 i S80) Ra Buick’ pow. 


TTA GE GR MID, 6403. 


ase. de luxe tour. sedan; butte. dn irpak, 


5 
NEW. Ful We ce, $805. gan Py car down. 
alance 12.94 months. 00 day Guu 


4618 Washington = blvd. 


PONTIAC 1937, $595 


uxe tour. sedan; i 
all I Boal egal a heater, ete, VIRTUALLY 
Ediabine 12- 24° py WR % 


4618 Washington - blvd. 


Your car down, 
day guarantee. 


Olds ’36 Trunk Sed., $480 |_—_ 


Yes. a real '36 4 door trunk se- 
dan, radio: a er value car far be- 
low. the mes ae 


FELZ a aw Ars no) Denar PELE. 


1132 
OLDSMOBILE AOBILE '86, S108. 


—~ — PONTIAC—1987 COUPE, 


3011 
2658 LAWRENCE. 


$585 — — 
Low mileage: new car antee, 
$85 or your car  dowh. fon monthly. 


GROSSINGER PONTIAC, 


LAWRENCE, yee 5321 


7883. 


Heater. 
Sedan, Dual i guaran oo: 


Finjeh and paondition ported ect 
8000 "LA WRENCE-AY. 8000, 


PONTIAC ’37, $595 


Touring sedan. Dual equip, Heater. clock. 


2247 S. MICHIGAN 


OLDSMOBILE 1986, $495. 


4 dr. tour. sedans, rpato. htr., trunks, ete.; 
prac. a "ah car, n't one, Your 


car or KA ges Pits ta ao onths, 
OLDS. ’37 TOUR. SED. 


Radio. heater: fully equipped. $605. 


a TIAC~ 


PONTIAC 86 ot 
2 door ma ver 


BY ees ob per 
ous ‘ as RAD ae | 


WTTAG aE TE SED ss 
- Milwa 
C~'31 SP* 


gan Square 
1@ UF .¥, ic ae at 
thweet Chey. 0220 } Ash ue 00. 


2247 S. MICHIGAN | 
OF PS.="3: tern ahi Adak | a was 
“PACKARD “6” 1957. 
We Undersell 
ue He aad 


STUDEBAKERS 
'37-'86-’85~-'34, 
ALL MODELS 
‘At Close Out Prices. 
_ CERTIFIED CARS. 
Prices Cut to the Bone, 


TERMS TO TO SUIT. 


‘STUDEBAKER BRANCH, 
 -tabeah pt hag dag 


hand inieribr th 


HTL Bebe 


“az01 SOUTH dr Bett 


eins ae 
Tg a a3 
37 


koieatenne rs ae ’ 4 Ri, gon Sy 
EADS ABS CHICA 0, 


‘worda "raul, on 
‘For ‘ais 


“Ruby Has the Trucks” 


Pantle—Stakbs-Vann-Dulto 
an .— 3— 8. 
Lowest Prices— Te 

All trades “hoter ted 


Ruby Chevrolét, Inc. 
7158 Stony Isl. Dor. 2310. 


CHEV. “ane 4 d appear; TON PANEL: 
= ge ven a few thou- 
for advertising 
w its value to 
es and PrOR Ups 


orden at | 
in clty’ iit Pe GHEY, OPEN HOGS | en 
940 MILWAUKEE. 


GOOD TRUCKS CHEAP. 


1936 Ford 1% ton express truck, $295. 
19 4 Chev. 157 in. pa chassis, 10 ply duals. 
by Ala "34 odes ton ene. $225. 
‘aa C % ton on panel $i4 other real 
truck AB City dhe. 1147 Jackson. 


Federal 3 Ton Cab.-Chas, 


Suitable tor dump or tractor service. 900x 
20 tires. 193 

at $475. 

GENERAL MOTORS USED TRUCES, 
1700 W, Pershing-rd. 


LIQUIDATING 


NANCE CO. REPOSSESSIONS, 
SPs ie 
eae 


HYD 


OPEN 


CHEV. 
4 


eeere 8 


#380 UP 
AND PANELS. 3 

. & W.. 827 W. 35TH-ST. 
LS... + RRES 
x20....$250 
ter brakes, 
1936, Tma. 


"HON EB CANAL 8800. 


T. INCLOSED PICKUP. $95. 
1980 FORD % T m 808 PICKUP, $06 


others om 
Southwest Chey., 9 Aebleod Ced. ae 


FORD—10935 131 nOE oF 
inna nia 021 $0. 


AUTOCAR Me 


RUCK, 1716 W. PERSHING 
REO+1% TON ‘35 PANBL DELIV. EXC 7 
con, $475. Best offer. Cal. 6611, Kiken. 


100 TRUCKS=}$$50 AND OUP; ery 
ae panels, dumps. ae OGDEN 


"PERVHCT MOTORS. 1280-8. A 3 


= '34 157 IN. STAKES, DUALS: A-1 
cond., $275. Wright, 1101 N. Clark-street. 


. fee D 1% TON PANEL. Al. 
310. Ruby Chev., 7158 Stony Island. 
—'36 TON PANEL ) 
Shirin.” 5719 BROAD AY. 
Wanted, 


WILL PAY CASH FOR 1% TO 2 TON 4 

wheel front and rear drive truck. regard- 
less of conguice of motor, tires, or body. 
Cali Lyons 6 ; 


MAN TO BUY TRUCK TO DELIVER OIL— 
Steady work. 210 NORTH TALMAN-AV. 


Track Trailers. 


= 
DODGE D 


20 FT. 


PHONE CANAL 8300. 


"Gest ee ee Bhat ee Pagal winds 

tractor, able to hase oy Gross 

earnings $700 to $1 800 monthly eenrnet 
ADDRESS O G 434 UNE 


20 FT. “2003: wi $225: ie: ‘a 


___ AUTOMOBILES WANTED. 
CASH FOR YOUR CAR 


We pay off vour notes or mortgages: cive 
you cash or another car for your equity. 


Coi. 7180. 4647 Madison. 


BUICK WANTED—LATE MODEL | SEVEN 

passenger Buick. Must be in excellent con- 
dition with good rubber. State terms or low- 
est cash price. F. M. Paris. 406 E. Green- 
street. Champaign, Ill. 


SEE US FIRST 


vt top prices. Don’t lose 
our car for Dptanes due. 
2247 38; MICHIGAN, VICTORY 12868. 


HIGHEST UCASH rf Aad PAID FOR CARS 
Bring var and title ake home cash. 


2246 MICHIGAN. 
Upei: ¢vea. sui Val. 44357. 


FEYERBEND. SOUTH SHORE 7021 
Wodti Stony Island, wants to buy 100 used 
cars: any make, any model: in good cond. 


CAKS tN GOOD COND: HIGHEST Nd 
prices. 5424 Broadway. Sunnyside 65 


JUNKE—CARS AND TRUCKS WANTED— 
Call Palisade 0373 or eves. Hum. 9306. 


JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS ete em 
Cat Beeoatee 1 oy until 10 p. 


CLEAN '34-'36:'36 LIGHT CARS ares, 
for . 5665 West Lake-street. 


_ AUTOMOBILE HOUSE TRAILERS. 


992 Foot Reefer Trailer. 


ono tires, repainted, like new a 
rote MOTORS USED TRUCK 
= indlanaay Calumet 4545. Ae 45. 
DOME ’'37 TRAILER—SLEDPS 4. 
spower. heater, stove, refrig., elec. 
me light ing. Ori nal cost $1,395, 
Chrysler Dealer, 3651 Ogden. 


$265 1948 NEW §8 a PL BS 21-17 FT.. 
values to $1.125. Op. Sun. eves 
Factory Clearance sais "i 824 Kinzie, 


‘3 ULT DE wu. 4 PA, EC, BRA 
j Pgs ac.: termes or rent. BIR Irving fo 


1938 ROT AL AND ALMA TRAILERS AND 
used. erms. 


Orr, 2684 8. Michigan. 


Wanted, 


WILL PA 16, fo 18 CASH—BEST USED HSE. 
water. 6 to 1 Pe oun et ize Lpacee no. 


9 FI; 


TRAE ove 


AUTO CREDITS. 


ache ee sacar ie Bi 


Oldsmob| te for $ 


i = Pere Motor FC, A ‘i Mae | | 


rom 9 a. m 


3 iS dals 
ik. Nam 6 


“lark. 


iecia 3 


rr of 


iis “TON: on ER 


model, an exceptional value 


___ Virginia 1700. 


Deal direct with owners, 


Private Consultation Rooms.|- —— : 


WINTER-HIRSCH 
20 years in same location. 
1842 S, MICHIGAN. 


Any Finance or 
Loan Co, 
on Your Automobile? 
WE CAN 
Wael Your Present Balance 
Give You More Cash 
. Reduce Your Payments 


20 MOS. TO PAY AT LOWEST RATES. 
FRIENDLY, CON EIDONTTAL SERVICE 
SINCE 1919. 


Injand Investment Plan 
pic ago Oak Par 


Mi diao 
Wabash oOne ean: Buel ia ARd And, 


Representative wil) call at your requgst.. 
__HOME FURNISHINGS WANTED. 


Fe ee 


FAIRFAX 6180 


HIGHEST CASH PRICE for u furnt. 

ture. hahid. epoca Call hav or night 

See SHAMROCK hefore ent. 
ntire city and sabutte ali 


CALL KENZIE 1 300. 


Wk PAY CASH 
BEST sevine a PRICES for used furniture, 
Galle mapen ines, and e¢rane Raa |: 
Ile answered in CITY OR SUBU 
~ Ee AWNDALE 0828 —~ —- — = 
~ Highest prices paid for furniture, rugs, 
grand Plaga. a Call day-night anywhere, 
: LL 6900 — 
"hae “cash pnt et furniture, rugs. sewing 
machines and grand pianos. 
nog WERLL Opi WILL AY YOUR 
; need furniture, rigs at once 
ae NEEDS FT) WITH RE Ras. GR 
piano, linena, paintin . dishes, Lon. 411 
SUNNYSIDE 6000. aoen USED FURN.. 
rugs. gr. pianos at once. Pay vour nrice. 
WANT ORIENTAL RUGS. GR. PIANO. FINE 
furniture. naintings. ete. Edge. 7580. 
~NEED AT ONCH-FINE FURNITURE, — 
PIANO: RUGS. RDGEWATER 1307. 


NORTH SIDERS—BEST PRICES FOR FUR- 
niture, rugs: CLARKE’S, Lonebeach 4711. 


FURNISHING a al ROOMS—NEED r Maiti 


“te 


linens 


HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, 
g Electric Refrigerators. 
GIGANTIC REMODELING SALB! ‘ 
" 1°000 Frigidaires, Kelvinators, Norge. G. E.. 
and many others. Floor samples, reposses- 
sions. amgrecan, Prices start. $39.50; 


Geos: '$ WHSE. OUTLET, 766 W. Jackson. 
~ 48 CENTS A DAY si shou 


Frigidaire samples. all sizes. Lowes 
terms. Open evenings and Sundays. 406. 


RECONDITIONED ELECTRIC REFRIGERA: 
tors of nat'ly “ike makes, $85, Hunde 

to choose Bio ~ new, fully eu guarante 

=~ UNDA 


OR. ANGLE ae Westingh 
orge, estin oe. 

sa Brieidaire, ‘36 $79: terms. Sun am. 

eves. and Sunday. 621 West J 

smi’ yong ALL PORCELAIN “ras 
w: 6 cu. ft.: $50: rec. ; tms, 621 Jackson. 
aweE REFRG. —COST $139: Now $69.95 
Open eves.. Sun. 601 W. Washington-bivd. 


Ol1l Barners and Stokers,. 
NATIONALLY KNOWN OIL GAS BURNER 
for homes and 2 flats: closing out 20 Sor 
hot water, steam or hot air furnace: 380 
ahah while ar last. See Mr. Zerwer, 3801 
Lawrence-avenue. 
15 STOKERS AT CLOSEOUT PRICES |! IN: 
stalled and guaranteed. Call Beverly 0070. 


Stoves. 
4 GAS-4 COAL “ge ® RNG. DEMO., $49.50 
Slightly chi BLE OP RANGE, 
$19.95. $19.95. EDISO $s wit E., 766 W. Jackson. 
JEWEL TA Lf a TABLE TOP GAS RANGE—NEW 
325; tms, Op. eves.-Sun. 621 . Jackson. 


NATL. B KNOWN STOVE—ALL SonCESA DT 
cost $69.95. Now $29.95. 601 Washington. 


pain Oleaners, 
HOOVER, E APEX. REC. 
aay, guaral oe $14.96. Open eves.. Sun. 
son's Whse. Outlet. 766 W ackson 


Washing Machines. 


NEW SPECIAL, $22.50/% 


NEW THOR. MAYTAG. A. 8B. C.. WEST- 
INGHOUSE and many other nationally ad: 
pot f may ag on sale. Eg gh. — Reger 


eves. to 9 m.* Sunday 
Edison's Warehouse Outlet. 766 Ww mB. 


RENT A NEW MAYTAG—25C PERK WEEE. 
No obligation. Immediate delivery. 
Apply rent on -purchase if desired. 


LINCOLN 6900. 


CREDIT REPOSSESSKD WASHERS. 
Small cartage charge if returned, 


WHY RENT A WASHER? 


Buy one 6§0c per week. Bargains $15 and 
up. Maytag, or, Prima, ete. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Phone Maytag, Seeley 5264. 
MAYTAG AND THOK: LIKE NEW: $22. 

Ree. Terms. Op. eves.. Sun. 62) Jackeon. 


THOR WASHER OR [RONER RENTED. 25¢ 
week. Free cartage. Thor. Albany 0140, 


INQUIRE ABOUT RENTING A WASHER— 
— 260 WEEKLY. NEVADA 1360 — 


CLOSEOUT ON 25 AGITATOR WASHERS 
_ $12. 50 and up! Call Beverly 0070. 


NEED ROOM—35 LATE STYLS THOR. 
_Maytag, etc., $15 to to $30. 2034 34 Lincoln-ay. 


W GEN. EL. ” WASHER—COST | 
34. 95. Op. eves., Sun. 6 601 W. 4b FR bay 


$79.95 G. E. WASHR.., NEW. FULLY GTIAR. 
$2750. 275 W, Jackson. Qpen eves.-Sunday. 


DOGS, CATS, BIRDS, PETS. 


$20 


RUG SPECIA | 
aie a ise me cal eee eee 


TWO SHOWRODEE 


201 E. OHIO 


Block lock Bast of Michigan nat, 000 t 600 North 


ii 50 Washington 
AT CICEKO-AVENUE. COLUMBUS 9609. i 


Central. 
paid free: in Wy ge battleshin.  Carpetingy $1 
d. or see 0 those 
‘isanine. Vic. edve 
CARPET. 750 YDS.: LINOT ; 
home, store, office. Cheap. Dir, ge0 re: 


Serners, 
South Side. 3 
AUCTION, AUCTION. 
will TODAY Feb. 


We 2. ‘ 
— the , Bute stom of, ae wi aan re 
of the Ace Furn = of 10 


in lots — parcels 
CHICAGO. 


h-st. 
Plait for cant, without sreserye 
FURN. MART by tenngali-q 


iecuslane si chairs, 25 
Beni rags, Open 
aes 


Rug and Likeleur Sale. 
While they inst. 


> § 3 , 
>, t : 
> . 


th ; 
a 10 upp SUR cat a aa 
23 po ad 
ARS oye ie 
ae oi ONLY $1.50 PBR 
3 Room De Luxe 
50 GENUINE, AMEBIOAN, 


CHINESE & 9x1 39. 
GOODMAN'S, 6821 5, ALSTED STREET 


PARLOR, BEDRN.. _ DINENG RM. SETS. 35 
9x12 ol 15 


Shia $90. 
IENTAL AND 


att, Rug ose a parlor se “Tdi 8. 
, | aes " a ae ae pment. - = 
$ G0. tone 1 
"a 46 3, Asblond: 


am or ae, © ON, 


148 6, 
Gr, 


. WIL 


” allied 5g ae Co . 
OFF 
| a oe, eae ee 
North Side. 
NEW—REPOSSESSED. 


ELL FOR R BALANCE DU DUE 
os 15 
ue 
10-$12 


° a R sees 
atts, al ugs. nants . 
TERMS—2 YEARS TO PAY. 
*"B540 BROADWAY, 
OPEN DAILY TO 10 P. M., SUN. TO 5. 
Furniture and a 50% Off. 
AMERICAN 

paree Pe rm.. ‘Dining Am Rm. he $98 
4 Room Quality BEET Te! 


Easy Terms. Open every eve. and Sunday. 
6130 BROADWAY. 


THREE ROOMS OF HIGH GRADE FUBNI- EURNI- 
ture-Living room. om and 
hohe Will's _itgve bal, Original i 
ae r 
ee Wallen: Ae Furni alaneg tug. “ais. 
Clark ‘street. Bi A 


oft 


ag % 
140 PARLOR SETS. 

125 hedroom. din. sets. +3 
Nelson Bros, Open eves.. Sun. 6310 Broadway. 
RUGS AND FURN. FROM STORAGE LOTS. 

Excellent values! Good condition. Save! 
3531 N. CLARK-ST Open Tonight to 10. 
PARTY SACRIFICING 5 RS. HIGH GRADE 

furn, like new. Will separate. Large Ori- 
ental rug. $36. Dealers. Ede. 2954. 
HOUSEHOLD FURN. CHEAP. MUST SELL 

at onee on account of illness. 1512 N. Hud- 
son. Div. 1744, bet. 10 a. m.-5 p. m. Wed. 


etal, Aaa Oabarleta Bag 
ering exer 
Tisch. 421 itoheoas. Bittersweet 6160. 


STORAGE RUGS, FURNITURM — — 
_ Kane Storage. 2034 Lincoln-av, Eves.. Sun. 


DAVID STORAGE. 34238 LAWRENCE, AV. 
Furniture and rugs, Ba Terms. 


MASON & HAMLIN GR i "gaTNGS 


_arapes, autiques: priv. par 
RROl1, il, BABY CARRIAGE—M Le moe : 


cesereeaiengetegetiane tease 
like new. Also elec. mataie, Line. 4 

BPA US. LIVING RM. TUR 
_lamps, Reiser. 4732 N, ace ¥ ax 


TWIN ROLLAWAY BE 


mattresses. 4648 ps. INNERSPRING 


North west ent Side, 

eoil 
at 

33 


4 —_. Sieg 


z Co..  ufiwantese. 


ll tall 


MIXED PUPS, $1: SHEPS, $3: FOX TER: 
aries $5: Wires, Scotties, Bostons, Cockers, 
redales, others. 2413 W. tia enue, 


aSeee PUPS--9 WK. BEAU . PED 
B. ears. screw tall. 1137 ft Roeng ee .96 
— — 9120 N. WAUKEGAN-ROAD. 
Pups oad gr. dogs, all breeds, % price. 
ND SANI- 
Dadt Harlem 


be 3 eythane By 
S: A MOS. 


Low as $2, 
RoRRON FOFS—RBAL Berkshire 6770 
Pieautles: reas, 4643 Dover, EED. Higroe 
Cora wires, Fox Fox, N cnews, 9408 s. Grostarn’ 


(See “Also. Hoasehele “Appliances. | °° 


General, 


Sensational Sale 


Furniture Mart Samples|* ; 


At %4 ACTUAL COST 
471 E. OHIO-ST. 


Corner Lake Shore-drive jon the take!. 
OPEN EVENINGS. 


Po Be Bg (BF ag A gt old potas. ae 


any other s 
$19 TO $1158. 
3-4-7 Pe. Highest Quality Bedroom Seis. 
$22 TO $oO9. 
7-8-9 Pc. Dining Room Sets. 
$39.50 TO $195. 


198. af Sag New ne 


= 
rugs. $12. Cash or 
Sun.. 4. Baer dtevenn 1827 


TS WaNTORY Baie Oe or as 
giarany “Saturday o8 ‘ Brand at Sacramen 40D 


“6x1 9F12 Fi 'm. he 


ander Storage 
eving 4 


thet ‘din 
RUG SALE—DOMESTIC 
prices. Natl. Storage. 


TERMS OF - SUBSCRIPTION 
FP 3 THE TRIBUNE. 


ata" | mat ae 
ey 


sisiie. one year, Sos vegan 


etek 6 mearared "om “@hieagol.”Gineds® Sod 


Mt thong Sunday. one rear, $14.00; 
4 sunday ‘e ess, $18.80: one 


aw <aubeamnns "3st » " ae ee: —c-ee ae 3 - 
Le ee se ee ere he , rs Mt, ogee, y a Shinto Sasa ee ee ee te 


, 2 s 


ate et et ee Le ee —_-2 A se ai 


WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY % 


Wright Tells Story of Slaying from S 


ARETE AAT Ee AR ap SOIT Re Se APOE OW 


ESS 
eShiehinsenntes 
seconnacmnaaennnte 
Se 
Shcatenatats” . A 
Re 


— 


“x 


, Pz ese 2 SEAT ea pet oes 


Ae 


an 
SS 


wS 


<n 


PIR aan 
“te OOO 


Part of picture of’ Paul Wright and movie group introduced as evidence at murder trial. Left to right: Buster Keaton, 


Frances Farmer, Wright, John Miljan, Eddie Sullivan, pilot; Nancy Carroll, and Wally Ford. The picture: was taken in 1936. 
{Associated Press Wirephoto.] (Story: on page 1.) 


County Judge Edmund K. Jarecki, dropped from Demo- 


cratic slate. Circuit Judge John Prystalski took place. 
[TRIBUNE Photo.] (Story on page 1.) 


Paul A. Wright under stress of emotions as he testified 


in own defense at trial for slaying wife and John:B. Kimmel. 
[Associated Press Wirephoto. ] (Story.on. page 1.) 


Peggy Sykes, New York society girl, and Walter P. [Associated Press Photo.] 
Chrysler Jr.. whose engagement was announced yesterday. A war scene in Spain on the road from Leon into the Asturias after loyalist bombardment. The rails of railway bridge 


[Acme Photo.] (Story on page 15.) hung in the air after rest of structure had been blasted away. The insurgents now control the area (Story on page 5.) 


ss ete 


ee 


Pare ve - 5 3 : : 
a : Rs - 
sa a es ‘Sts Sia ; on. OBL Brora, 


> 
Ve 


IP hh ne 
Ciena, 


~ Actor Dick: Powell, his wife, Joan: Blondell, and: her son 
by former marriage, after Powell adopted boy yesterday. 


{ Associated’ Press Wirephoto.] (Story on page 2.) 


OEE 
ER i: 


SOLIS 7 


fy 


Whe, 


Oy 
hn, 


Harvard with electron, bombard- 
of 4 ft degrees, half heat of sun. The result of head-on British train ‘crash at ford, England, on Jan. 21. ~One.man was killed and many 


e 
4 


(Story. on page 2.) spli i by. the force of the, bi) lice x D hit-a train-which was standing still.