Skip to main content

Full text of "Chicago Daily Tribune 1938-02-03: Vol 97 Iss 29"

See other formats


v4 
— s a. 


a es ‘3 . : : Ro 3 
[| Cpa ee stipe iat!) owe 
< “3 $ “ , eg 


ae ee: ae 


2 ; CE "|. er: 
Bs: Be ee cated 


THE NATION'S MODEL — 


os 


th ; mene 

Yy thy, 

+)24LA 
VEZ | 


f 


February 3, 1938. 


WASHINGTON. 

Militant small business men blame 
Roosevelt and his administration for 
new depression. Page 1. 

Small business men list causes of 
depression and suggest remedy.Page 1. 

Members of congress, tired of “ gov- 
ernment by press conference,” pro- 
test Roosevelt’s semi-weekly. threats 
and hints. Page 3. 


End Radical Policy, 
Military Demands. Sol Bloom tells envious colleagues 
& : how patriotic gesture gives him 47 


cf : jobs; $289,000 all spent. Page 3. 


i Sutil GlbcsesLine | ne colapees 


Paul Wright collapses under cross- 
examination in slaying trial; carried 
from court. Page 1. 
SHANGHAI—Japanese troops smash 
Chinese line after more than week 
of battles and capture rail town of 


Two naval planes collide in Pacific 
maneuvers; ten men missing. Pagel. 
Pengpu, in north central China. 
Page 6. 


Prosecutor’ Dewey plans to rush 
numbers racket king to an early 
trial. Page 1. 
PARIS — France accepts Britain’s 
proposals for ending new outbreak 
of piracy in Mediterranean; seeks 
also to prevent Italy from carrying 
out plans for new activity in Spain. 
Page 6. 


BY SIGRID SCHULTZ. 
(Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 
(Picture on back page.) 
BERLIN—Feb. 2.—Germany, al- 
though officially uninformed, sensed 
a crisis tonight 
which involves 
the incumbents 
of the highest 
places in its gov- 
ernment and 
army. 
Field Marshal 
Werner von 
| Blomberg, minis- 
ter of defense, 
and hig secret 
/marriage Jan. 12 
‘to Erika Gruhn, 
acarpenter’s 


daughter, are the 


Uproarious Session 
In Capital Turns 
- on Sponsors. 


Carried from Court 
After 2d Collapse. 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2.—[Spe- 
cial.]—The small business men who 
were here at the invitation of the 
White House to talk over the reces- 
sion had definite opinions as to its 
causes. and what the administration 
could do to help. 

They condemned President Roose- 
velt and his administration for: 

1. High taxes. 

2. Riotous spending. 

8. Unwaranted attacks on business. 

4. Ill-advised regulation of business. 

5. Failure to adopt a consistent 
policy toward business. 

6. Engendering a lack of confidence 
on the part of business. 

%7. Heeding the advice of theorists. 


BY WALTER TROHAN. 
{Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 
(Pictures on back .page. ) 

Washington, D, C., Feb. 2.—[Spe- 
cial.|—A thousand representatives of 
small business assembled today ‘in the 
department of commerce and literally 
shouted what was wrong with. the. 
country. 

Administration leaders had expect- 
ed a quiet assemblage which would 
be easily guided” by hand picked 
chairmen into expressions of support 
for the  government’s campa 
against big business. What the*ad- 
ministration got was a resounding 
boomerang and roaring confusion that 
almost beggared description. 

Fight for Position. 

Delegates milled about the hall 
fighting for position. The loudspeak- 
ing system broke down. No one paid 
attention to Secretary of Commerce 
Daniel Roper when he read President 
Roosevelt's greeting to the delegates. 

Business..men shouted they had 
come to make speeches not to: listen 
to them. They tore up the’ printed 
programs and took the conduct of 
the meeting into their own hands. 
They fought for the microphone when 
the loudspeaker went on again. They 
fought for it like contestants trying 


(Picture on back page.) 

Los Angeles, Cal., Feb. 2.—()—Paul 
A. Wright, former airport manager, 
was carried from the courtroom late 
today after he had collapsed for the 
second time under a bombardment of 
questions by the prosecution over the 
details of how he shot to death his 
wife and friend, John Kimmel. 

In a hammering cross-examination, 
Chief Prosecutor S. E. Roll took 
Wright again and again over details 
of his story that he shot Mrs. Wright 
and Kimmel when he found them em- 
bracing at 4 a. m. on a piano bench 
in the Wright home. 

Wright collapsed earlier in the aft- 
ernoon and, unable to continue, had 
a bailif rub his pale hands. A spe 
cial recess was called and he was as- 
sisted from the stand. Returning 15 
minutes later, he wept and sobbed 
at several points. As the regular aft: 
ernoon recess neared he collapsed 
again. 

Seeks to Show Premeditation. 

Roll attempted to get Wright to say 
just how far he had advanced into the 
living room when he saw his wife, 
Evelyn, and Kimmel on the piano 
bench, 

“I don’t know,” Wright replied, NANNY 
sobbing, “ but I saw what 1 saw.” NO SAN 

The prosecution theory is that sev- NN | 
eral seconds elapsed between Wright's wis — ; to catch a greased pig. 
first sight of the scene and the. time LO GF ae , "Insists on Opening Prayer. _ 
he shot his victims—and that the : ' . Pe et eRe RIE LANE AE ST RR mene | es One business man insisted the ieet- 

. —-——- comeemeneecemneemm | aise fig’ sould open with prayer. He 
| tried to run away with the micro-: 
phone. It was pulled ‘from his hands. 

The speakers’ platform was jammed. 
Hundreds shouted-at once. Secretary 
Roper was driven-to cover: - 

The delegates had been invited to 
Washington to propose means of end- 
ing the present depression. They. re- 
sponded: with an astounding, roaring | 
literalness, placing the blame for the 
business slump squarely on the poli- 
cies of ‘President Roosevelt and his 
administration. 


FOREIGN. 

German crisis, set off by Von Blom- 
berg’s marriage, threatens purge of 
army leaders. Page 1. 

Italian trans-Atlantic plane falls 
near Brazil; four of crew die; Pilot 
Stoppani saved. Page 4. 

Premier Goga declares anti-Semi- 
tism is an enduring feature of Ruma- 
nian policy. Page 5. 

Japanese smash Chinese line in 
north central China and capture 
Pengtu, rail town. Page 6. 

France accepts British plan for end- 
ing piracy in Mediterranean. Page 6. 

Egypt's boy king dissolves parlia- 
ment and calls new elections. Page 6. 

LOCAL. 

Foreman tells of nightly fires in 
match plant where six girls died in 
blaze. Page 3. 

Credits army air corps with perfect- 
ing stratosphere airliners. Page 4. 

National Hygiene day meeting told 
that responsibility for eradicating 
syphilis rests with youth. Page 4. 

Transit‘unification committee tells 
aldermen of deadlock. Page 5. 
center of the Attorney general asks Illinois Su- 
a RR pen y ‘wt = | ene preme court to take ge of Karatz 
send iat | he eG e case, oe 7 Page 7. 

Draw up senate battle lines with 
Igoe as new factor. Page 7. 

Cost of Illinois relief placed at 
nearly .a billion dollars for last six 
years. Page 9. 
n| WPA. prepares to cut 20,000 men 

| from Chicago rolls or March 1-Page 9. 

Mayor, school, and county leaders 
calm in face of Civic federation’s 
warning of budget deficits. Page 9. 


SPORTS. 


Among the suggestions, offered for 
meeting the depression were: 

1. Establishment of a government 
agency for immediate financial ‘relief 
of business. 

2. Repeal of the undistributed prof- 
its and capital gains taxes. 

8. Repeal of nuisance taxes. 

4. Slashing waste in WPA and 
other federal expenditures. | 

5. Adoption of a specific policy and 
assurance that it will be followed. 

6. Abandonment of the unsound 
propaganda that business can-.main- 
tair high.wages, pay high. taxes, es- 
tablish shorter hours: and. meet in- 
creased costs and at the same: time 


— 
re 


» ons 


Crash in Atr; 
Ten Missing 


San Diego, Cal., Feb. 3° [Thursday]. 
—(#)—Two San Diego-based navy fly- 
ing boats operating with the’ fleet in 
maneuvers 70 miles southwest. of 


slayings, therefore, were premedi- 


e. a bc, : Root panied ~ oe 
tated. — r } noe .. RA 4 
Roll confronted Wright with his D ewey.M O ves 
statement to Glendale police saying, s iia 
for Quick Triad 


“I shot, shot,. chot—everything that 
of Policy King 


was in me.” Wright said he did not 
recall making this declaration, and 

BY WILLIAM FULTON. 
(Chicago Tribune Press Service.]} 


finally insisted: “I have no conscious- 
(Pictures on page 3.and back page.) 


—_ 


‘ 4 * 


wake them.as responsible as business. 

10. Abolition of tax .exempt: securi- 
ties. | i . 

11. Abolition of exempting ‘city 
state, and federal employés from va- 
rious income taxes. ait 

12. Modification of unemployment 
taxes which work a hardship.on small 
business men. i 


Unionville, Conn., Feb. 2.—[Specialf 
—Just plain fed up with young girls 
“that keep me up ‘till 3/in the morn- 
ing and get. me all worn out.” John 
Lorenick, 22.years.old, announced to- 
day. that: he’s going ‘to marry Miss 
Henrietta W. Peiper,'70 years old, a 


‘ness of the shooting at all.” 

Roll virtually completed his cross- 
examination. Defense Attorney Jerry 
Giesler will start re-direct examina- 
tion tomorrow. 


twhen King Edward 
‘duke of Windsor, abdig 
love of Mrs. Wallis Warfield, now his 
duchess. 

Bride Fails to Measure Up. 


Army officers objected strenuously 


De Correvont: -decides -to attend 
Northwestern; will enroll-in fall with 


Denies Knowledge of Shot. 
In discussing the actual shooting 


New York, Feb. 2.—[Special.]—Dis- 


trict Attorney Thomas E. Dewey gave 


spinster, within the next few' days. 


Point Loma crashed about 8:37 o’clock 


His fiancée, a practical nurse who| [10:37 p. m. central standard time] 


SECRET ARIES OF 


Oppose a Third Term. 
In: the pandemonium they called on 


LAWMAKERS ASK. 
TRAVEL PAY, TOO 


Washington, D. C.,. Feb. 2.—[Spe 
cial.]—A movement among the secre- 
taries of senators and representatives 
to obtain 10 cents a mile for ‘travel- 
ing expenses between their homes 
and Washington has reached the ac- 
counts committee of the house.. it 
was estimated that if.a mileage reso- 
lution for secretaries were adopted it 
would cost about $275,000 a’ year. 

Member of congress collected $225,- 
000 travel pay for round’ trips from 
Washington to their homes for the 
Christmas holidays. .— 7 

Because the. regular session of con- 
gress was to-begin early in January 
many members collected their checks 
but did not return home. The largest 
mileage check was $1,238. The small- 
est was $3.20. 


to the marriage on the ground: that 
Frau von Blomberg does not measure 
up to the social standards required 
under war department rules for offi- 
cers’ wives. 

This dissatisfaction broke out in 
the high command of the army and 
served to bring to the fore the latent 
friction between the army and the 
‘Nazi party. 

Reports persisted tonight that Von 
Blomberg resigned his: post as min- 
ister of war last Friday and that 
Reichsfuehrer Hitler is seeking a 
successor for him and at the same 
time is reorganizing the military 
high command. 

Hitler, as supreme commander of 


orders tonight to rush the extradi- 
tion of J. Richard [Dixie] Davis, dis- 
barred attorney “and fugitive from 
an indictment charging him with di- 
recting New York City’s 50 million 
doliar a year policy game racket. 

A swift raid by Dewey’s men on 
an apartment in Philadelphia early 
today resulted in the capture of Davis 
and his showgirl companion, Rose 
Rickert, and George Weinberg, no- 
torious New York gangster. The two 
men were in cells in Philadelphia to- 
night with their bail set at $300,000 
each, pending extradition. The girl 
was released after: bondsmen fur- 
nished a $2,500 bail. 

The arrests were regarded as the 
most important.and far reaching since 
Dewey began his forays into the New 
York underworld three years ago as 
a special rackets prosecutor. Dewey 
said that as a result of capturing 
these two principal defendants, the 
trial of the numbers game racketeers 
would be started in a short time. 


Takes Dead Gangster’s Mantle. 
Davis, who is 35 years old, leaped 
into notoriety during. the last «few 
years as attorney for the New..York 
gang leader, Arthur [Dutch Schultz] 
Flegenheimer, When Schultz, as he} 
was commonly known, died of gun 
wounds in a gang assassination -two 
years ago, it was Davis who stepped 
in to direct his far flung underworld’ 
enterprises. _|A fine, inlaid linoleum it was—and 
‘Disbarment did not-halt the young | only $8 for a » by.12 rug. Mrs. O'Neill 
attorney, who had become a fabulous | said quickly that she jd take 
character by the time he was indicted | three. When could’ they. be delivered? 
ldst summer, Then he fled from the| “We carry our stock right with us,” 
Dewey prosecution, leaving his pent- | 


said one of the men. | 
house, skyscraper office suite and| He and his partner carried) in the 
other evidences of his new found 


rugs.’ They were rolled’ up. > gp ves 
riches. Davis had, boasted~ of ; his 


: The master. salesman cut the cor i 


| a O'Neill that what| dog harness. 
ning for district attorney on the Re- | 58 WS setting was the linoleum rugs | ba: ' 
publican ticket last fall, charged that Stolen War Shell Packed 


for which she had bargained. = 
oem “ But .don’t unrol] ‘em until: they're]: ,esson in Honest 


3 BAS = +e, ~* 
rh, esi 
ude. Sark y : ’ eo 


‘ie 5 a is een fe. 
r ‘s+ ue . : 
IN@iT 
Fee y ie ov. os 67 wa 
x 2 RK : - > 
2 os +} . 4 : at, , - . 
: . - ’ : ‘ ‘ , » * 7 
abou AN > | 1 = 
12 wer re br ‘ * KS 
fete 4 f ger ; ae : Pht ls eee 
' ; i a? eo rT 
a i : > 
nee ae Se) 


scene, Roll asked Wright whether the 
noise of the first shot he fired didn’t 
bring him to his senses. Wright said 
he didn’t know; that he had no 
knowledge of firing the first shot. 

@.—You don’t know if you picked 
up any shells? A.—No. 

Q.—After this happened, did you 
turn the lights on? A.—I remember 
trying..to pull myself together. I 
went to the telephone and said: “ Give 
me the police.” 

Roll showed Wright the statement 
he. made to police which said: “They 
looked up and smiled and kissed 
again. All 1 could think of was ‘to 
destroy that vision.” 

Q@.—Did you think of destroying 
that vision? A.—I felt no emotion— 
everything went blank. 

Q.—Well, was that statement about 
you attempting to destroy that vision 
true? A.—No, I don’t know. I was 
trying to piece things together. 

Dwells on Scene in Room. 

As’ Roll hammered away on the 
scene in the living room as Wright 
had pictured it, the witness wept 
audibly, but Roll kept on, doggedly, 

@.—You say they were seated on 
the bench. A.—Yes. 

Q.—How long did you stay there 
and look at them? A.—I don’t know. 

Q—Did Mrs. Wright put her arm 
around Kimmel’s shoulder. A—She 
was rising at the time I looked. She 
put her left arm around ‘his shoulder, 

Q.—Did Kimmel put his arm around 
her? A.—Yes; he put both arms 
around her. 

Earlier Roll asked Wright whether 


President Roosevelt to declare that 
he will not accept a third term. They 
demanded he get rid of his stumbling 
theorists. They voted to consider the 
problem of taxes, shouting down the 
attempts of commerce officials to side- 
track ,it, Department of commerce 
police were .called to quell the dis- 
turbance. .: 

Speakers were wildly cheered in 
their attacks on taxes and business 
regulation... Few rose to detend the 
President ard received out little sup- 
port. . 

For a time the whole conferen 
threatened to die in a welter of par- ; 
liamentary confusion. ‘During the aft- 
ernoon session order was. restored in : 
the -department of commerce: audi- 
torium: and the various -ubordinate 
sections. formed to consider various 
aspects of the problem. — 

«President Is Silent. 
_ Reports of the progress otf the gath- 
ering were carried to the White | 
House, where the plan of the confer- 
ence germinated. There was nocom-— 
ment from the President or_his staf, . 
though concern.over the “revolt”: of 
small.:business was evident. « . 


four other Austin stars. Page 17. 
Walthour and. Crossley take six day 
bike lead. Page 17. 
Big Ten bars Louis Boudreau, [ili- 
nois basketball. captain. Page 17. 
Twenty heavyweights—count ’em— 
survive Omaha Golden Gloves.Page 17. 
Blackhawks, on way home, to meet 
Maroons. Page 17. 
Bradley five tests Northwestern Sat- 
urday night. Page 18. 
White Sox meet Tigers, Indians in 
eight of first eleven games. Page 18. 
Loyola. quintet to meet George 
Washington tomorrow. Page 18. 
Michigan again denies signing Veen- 
ker as coach. Page 18. 
Hold: last physical. tests for Golden 
Gloves candidates tomorrow. Page 19. 
Charley Burns to box:George Van 
Der Hayden tomorrow. Page 19. 
Twenty-four skaters leave for 
United States championship .meet in 
Petoskey, Mich. Page 19. 
| EDITORIALS. 

Americans in China; A Strong Can- 
didate; A. Substitute for Thinking; 
Undesirables at the Bar; Openings in 
the Army Air Service. Page 10. 

Crossword ‘puzzle, Page 6. 

Radio news and programs. Page 12. 

Deaths-and obituaries. Page'l12. 

Looking at Hollywood. §§ Page 18, 

Movie review. Page 13. 

News of society. Page 138. 

Experimental farms diary. ' Page 238. 

Standard Oil [Cal.] to pay-10 cent 
| extra dividend... | Page 20. 

Utilities’ aid-to recovery drive “ sty- 
mied,” says SEC chairman. Page 21. 
| Government to try more oil com- 
| panies;\charges profit fixing.: Page2L’ 
|. Leaders disagree as to housing bill’s As he shouted, “ No—that’s abgo. 
of | effect on wages. age 21, |lutely untrue—1 never made such'a 

ra g|Statement,” a sudden display of 


last night. 

“our of the fourteen aboard were 
rescued, the commander of aircraft of 
the scouting force announced. early 
today. Names of the rescued .and 
missing were not disclosed. 

The survivors, the announcement 
stated, were picked up by the U.-S.‘S. 
Tennessee and all available surface 
vessels were pressed immediately into 
the search for the others. Planes from 
the battleship will join the search at 
daylight. 

The crash occurred in the vicinity of 
the line of battleships. 

Each of the planes, which took off 
from here yesterday morning. to join 
in-the extensive maneuvers, carried 
seven men. 

Only small bits of the wreckage 
were recovered, it was reported by a 
staf officer who declined use of his 
name. ? 


LAST. EVANSTON 
HARNESS SHOP 
GOING TO DOGS 


Without conceding that .the auto- 
mobile will ever .replace the horse, 
Peter Miller admitted last night that pibo ag 
the harness shop’ he founded 42 years| juicago. AND VI- 
ago—the last one in Evanston—is| cinrry: Cloudy . 
going to be torn down. It is in'the| and somewhat 
middle of a row of buildings from| ¢°!4er baa 
1566 to 1574 Sherman avenue, over-| | pete i pod ry 
looking Fountain square in downtown) ‘crate south wes! 
Evanston, that will be wrecked in 
March. 


owns considerable property in Con- 
necticut.and Florida, went with him 
to apply for a marriage license yester- 
day, and then the couple went to 
New Britain, where Miss Peiper 
bought an automobile. 

“Why should I marry some young 
girl that would keep. me out drinking 
and running around until I’d be all 
worn out the next morning?” Loren- 
ick demanded. 

“This way, I will have a wife who 
can help me be home early and take 
care of my health. She can also help 
me if I want to go into business. 
There’s not many men who get a wife 
like that.” 


GETS A SAMPLE 
OF HOW RARE A 
BARGAIN CAN BE 


Until yesterday assorted door 
knockers, including boys selling mag- 
azines to get through. college, vacuum 
cleaner salesmen, and demonstrators 
of ‘housewares got a ready’ audience 
from Mrs. Edna O’Néill of 319 Sou 
Bell avenue, : 

But, until then, she had never been 
visited by any linoleum salesmen. | 
“They came, a pair, and produced 
‘samples that convinced ‘her at once 
that she was about’ to: buy a bargain. 


THE WEATHER | 


THURSDAY, VEBRUAKY 3, 1938. 


Sunrise;. 7:01; ‘sunset, 5.07. Moon sets ‘at 
,8:42 p.m... Mercury is &' morn ing .star;. 
‘Jupiter,- Mars, and Saturn are’ evening 


winds, shifting to. 
northwest; .. Friday 
ILLINOIS: Mostiy “ay-y. , 
‘cloudy Thursday. | — ’ 
treme south portions, 
generally fair Friday. . 


a — 
ee nis : 
: , 4 
; ‘IN P CHICAGO 
G 
: 


Mr. Miller sold the..shop. several 
years ago to Frank: Chandler, but be- 
cause of ‘Mr. Chandler’s illness . the 
founder was in’ charge when plans 
for razing the buildings were an- 
nounced. The shop still does a thriv- 
ing business, he said, repairing. suit- 
cases and making harness—mostly 


somewhat colder; | 


wm 


¢ oe Pay. Sale  . 
\ is ae ¢ 
Feb. 23° "|: 
* we a 8 C3 
° teeene ‘ Ae t 
+ . walt fs ¥ sj 
ota 


Ley REED eet eS Ne 


ot oe . mete swe 
saan « 


At the putele wa the. eur ss 
business men milled about . eu 
jockying for positions at the fn yok 
of the auditorium where the 

to be heard. On th 


delegates and officers were kn ay ay 
a seething tangle like worms in” al 


can, 


partment of commerce officials shout- 
ed themselves hoarse in -an attempt: 
to get order and could be heard no|- 
further than the front row,. | 
At length Secretary of Commerce 
Roper stepped to the microphone to 
quell the disorder by his presence. He 


began reading a message from Presi- | ’ 


dent Roosevelt and a speech of wel- 
come. | 

Though they could see his lips move 
the business men could not hear 
Roper. From throughout the room 
came the chant of “louder, louder, 


louder,” which beat on the ears like a 


surging surf. 
Roper’s Voice Drowned Out. 


Secretary Roper got redder and red- 
der and redder. He moistened his 
lips with his tongue and took deep 
breaths and shouted, but he could not 
be heard even on the platform. His 
aids contributed to the distusbance 
by attempting to clear the platform 
and bellowing “quiet, please.” 

Roper struggled on. Suddenly the 
loud speaker system went on, but the 
confusion was so great it was impos- 
sible to catch his words. From the 
audience came a shrill voice which 
measured the humor of the delegates: 
“We came to make speeches, not to 
listen to them.” 

The President’s unheard greeting, 
as read by Roper, was: “I welcome 
you to Washington. Your meeting. 
called by the secretary of commerce 
at my request, is intended to more 
intimately acquaint me with the prob- 
lems of smaller business. I antici- 
pate that the suggestions resulting 
from your conference will be very 
helpful to me. I am therefore look- 
ing forward to conferring with your 
committee at the White House to 
morrow afternoon.” 


Debate Gains in Force. 


Mr. Roosevelt’s split infinitive was 
not the last to be cleaved during the 
day. As the confusion increased syn- 
tax was forgotten and debate gained 
in force what it lost in grammar. 

Roper asked his audience, “ Won't 
you please be seated?” 

“No,” came a thunderous roar from 
the room. 

Photographers crowded around the 
secretary. Flashlight bulbs flickered 
like flashes of lightning. Roper spoke 
to the photographers, but kept his 
mouth to the microphone saying, 
“Why take pictures of me? Why 
don’t you take pictures of this splendid 
group of American citizens?” 

And his audience answered 
“ jouder.” 

“And funnier,” a delegate shouted. 

“This is your meeting and should 
be so conducted by you as to bring 
out concrete interpretations of con- 
ditions which a committee to be des- 
ignated by this conference will in 
turn present in such form tomorrow 
at the conference table with the 
President,” Roper said. 


Jesse Jones Tries Hand. 


Roper retired. RFC Chairman Jesse 
Jones stepped to the microphone. 
He was given a warm reception but 
the confusion continued. Jones re- 
tired after asserting he knew the 
problems of smal! business men be- 
cause he is a small business man 
himself and promised sympathetic 
attention to the problems of small 
business men, particularly financing. 

Pandemonium followed confusion 
when Fred Roth, president of the 
Whitney Roth Shoe company of 
Cleveland, who had been named tem- 
porary chairman of the convention 
by Assistant Commerce Secretary 
Ernest G. Draper, attempted to take 
over the meeting. Roth announced 
that discussions would be limited to 
five minutes and asked the delegates 
to “refrain from any remarks that 
might lead to debate and disrupt 
the conference.” 

Charles H. Schnor, Springdale, Pa., 
metal dealer, leaped to his feet to 
charge: “ There is no doubt that the 
chairman is handpicked and I don’t 
want him.” 


Clamor for Recognition. 


Delegates clamored to speak. The 
room was full of waving hands seek- 
ing recognition. Some delegates 
pressed forward, surging on to the 
platform and the microphone. 

That instrument became the scene 
ofa battle. Would-be speakers tussled 
for the microphone like soldiers fight- 
ing over a battle flag. Hands grasped 
and tugged at the instrument. At 
times hands raced up its slender sup- 
port in the manner small boys choose 
up sides with a baseball bat. — 

At length the microphone was sur- 
rendered to Roth. As he turned away 


to get encouragement from commerce ' 
ee 


Breakdown of the loudspéaking sys- H 
tem coupled with the roar of conver: 
sation brought confusion at once. De-} 


% Ko 


“Fred Roth of ‘Cleveland, named 
chairman of the conference of small 
business men in Washington. 


{ Associated Presse Wirephotos.} 

Mrs. Wallace Thauer of Water- 
town, Wis., a table manufacturer, 
speaking. at conference of small 
business men yesterday. 


officials, a wiry, bald headed delegate 
rushed to the microphone, gathered 
it in both hands, and shouted: 

“The trouble with this country is 
Satan has ruined it. We ought to 
start this meeting with a prayer. This 
is God’s country.” 

He attempted to run off with the 
microphone but it was pried from 
his hands. He was invited to go join 
Satan at the latter’s dwelling place. 


Delegates Quiz Roth. 


The room was in a turmoil. Over 
the hubbub Draper roared for a vote 
on the motion to make Roth chair- 
man. A delegate demanded Roth tell 
his business background. Roth said 
he was in the wholesale business. He 
was asked how many men he em- 
ployed. He answered eighteen. 

“You'll: do,” shouted: some of the 
conferees. Another cheered. 

Draper called for a standing vote. 
Most of the delegates were already 
standing. He announced that motion 
had been carried. Roth stepped to 
the microphone triumphantly. He 
was unable to obtain order. 

Roper was sumraoned from out of 
the threshing platform crowd. He, 
too, was unable to obtain order. At 
length he moved that the meeting 
go into ten separate round table con- 
ferences with the auditorium itself 
the site of a conference on miscel- 
laneous matters. 

The proposal met with a chorus of 
noes. On a vote it was approved, 
however. Some of the delegates start- 
ed for conferences ir. various sections 
of the Commerce building. The ma- 
jority preferred to stay and pushed 
forward with demands for recogni- 
tion. 

Police Called to Piattorm. 

With half the delegates out of the 
auditorium there was no lessening of 
the hubbub. Department of commerce 
police were called to clear the plat- 
form. .At the foot of the platform 
delegates waving speeches clamored 
for recognition. It was suggested that 
the chair call on speakers by a roil 
call of states. 

“Second the motion,” a delegate 
shouted. “I’m from the Bronx.” 

Another delegate pressed through 
the crowd, seized the microphone, 
and announced he was Lawrence 
ee 


7 Se 
“0 Sie Ne Sr 


aS 


On air Clestewes. Grospe. 


‘YOU MAY AS WELL HAVE THE BEST 
_ MEN'S READY-TO-WEAR 


| outiins a constructive program. 


She was shouted down. Another 


jdelegate demanded to know whether) 
lithe meeting was turning into aj 


gathering of the Ladies’ Aid society. 
L. T. Orlay of Jamestown, N. D.,, 


jobtained the floor and said the best 


jthing that Mr. Roosevelt could do 
for business would be “to assert he 
will not run for a third term.” He 
was cheered when he urged that the 
administration should cease “ma- 
ligning business and business men 
for political expediency.” 
and Janes Leave. 

There was no letup in the con- 
fusion. Speakers could only be heard 
as far as the first row. Roper left 
the hall. Jones left the hall. After 
Orlay’s attack on the President and 
the administration, Roth recognized 
Charlies Courtney, a New York lock- 
smith, who pleaded that the conferees 
“get behind our great President and 
our great secretary of commerce, be- 
cause, after all, we are all Ameri- 
cans.” 

At length Roth gave up efforts to 
establish order and adjourned the 
convention for lunch. At the adjourn- 
ment Delegate A. F. Schaefer, Phila- 
delphia contractor, raced to the plat- 
form and began a speech. He spoke 
as the room cleared and kept on talk- 
ing to an almost empty hall. Several 
times policemen attempted to shoo 
him from the platform. The loud 
speaking system was cut off, but he 
could not be halted until he had fin- 
ished. 

A tour of the section meetings re- 
vealed them to be, for the most part, 
smaller editions of the auditorium 
crowd. Delegates were hopelessly 
deadlocked in parliamentary tangles. 


Sectional Meetings Lively. 

From the door of the loan section 
came a voice: “Loans is loans and 
capital is capital, he’s out of order.” 
From the fair trade practices section 
came the cry: “ Who’s chairman here, 
you or me?” 

Across the way a delegate told the 
instalment purchase section: “It’s ob- 
vious that it is impossible for us to 
agree for presentation to the Presi- 
dent on the size of down payments 
or the number of months over which 
payments should be distributed.” 

Through the doors of the unem- 
ployment section hearing came the 
voice of another speaker: “My mail 
man told me that half the people on 
relief are drawing their checks ille- 
gally. And that’s true of the whole 
country. This extravagant spending 
must be stopped.” 

Chairman’s Voice Weary. 

At the housing section the chair- 
man said wearily: “There are, 22 
people and 17 groups here; now jwe 
can’t have 17 committees.” 

Confusion was the general charac- 
teristic of the other section meetings, 
except that of the section on develop- 
ment and location of industry which 
attracted only four persons, who sat 
against a background of flags in a 
department office. Each of the four 
eyed his fellows and wondered if he 
could persuade the others that he 
was the person to represent the sec- 
tion at the White House. All said 
sadly that no one appeared to be in- 
terested in the location or develop- 
ment of industry. 


STABS CAB DRIVER; SENTENCED. 

A few hours after a stabbed Ralph Nagel, 
1407 Greenleaf avenue, a cab driver, in a 
dispute over the bill, John Crites, 826 
South Wabash avenue, a war veteran, was 
sentenced in Municipal court to six months 
in the Bridewell for assault with a deadly 
weapon, 


COTTE 


William F, Kelly of New York 
became so absorbed in the confer- 
ence of small business men in 
Washington yesterday that he al- 
lowed his glasses to slip from one 
ear, 


[Associated Presa Wirephoios. | 
A. Cohen, a New York grocer, 
was another who attended the ses- 
sion in the department of commerce. 


Italy Makes Delivery of 
War Planes to Afghans 


[Copyright: 1938: By the New York Times. | 

SIMLA, India, Feb. 2.—A consign: 
ment of Italian military planes has 
been delivered to the Afghanistan air 
force at Kabul by road through Khy: 
ber pass. They were part of an order 
of twenty-one Italian planes placed 
by the commandant of the Afghan air 
force during his recent visit to Eu- 
rope. A number of British planes 
were ordered during the same tour. 
They also have been delivered at 
Kabul. 


Ex-Convict Seized as He 
Tries to Hold Up Store 


John Green, 22 years old, was ar- 
rested last night while attempting to 
hold up a shoe store at 3937 North 
avenue. Policeman Frank Bartusek 
of the Austin station, walking past 
the store, saw Green inside with a 
gun. The policeman drew his re 
volver, rushed in and disarmed Green. 
Green said he is an ex-convict and 
said he lived at 3814 SheMield avenue. 


Specially priced $ 


-avenue and Adams street. 


BY THE REV. JOHN EVANS. 
Bishop George Craig Stewart con- 
demned gambling at church functions 


|yesterday before the convention of 


the Episcopal diocese of Chicago, but 
asked the convention not to act on 
a resolution opposing the practice. 
The bishop said no instance of it 
had come to his attention. The reso- 
lution then was deleted from a com- 
mittee report presented by the ven- 
erable Frederick G. rr archdeaccn 
of Chicago. 
Question Stirs No Debate. 

There was no debate on the ques- 
tion at the convention session in the 
Church of the Epiphany, Ashland 
The de- 
leted section of the report read as 
follows: 

“We recommend that the conven- 


tion go on record as unalterably op- 


posed to the sale of chances or other 


' types of gambling to raise money for 
church purposes.” 


In spite of the bishop’s assertion 


that no instances of church gambling 


had come to his attention, the original 


statement on this subject in the report 


was allowed to stand. 

“We sell chances,” it said, “we 
whirl wheels, we give prizes, we do a 
thousand and one things to get some- 
thing for nothing.” 

In the corridor of the church after 
Bishop Stewart's address one rector 
declared “the church would lose 
about half its income if the bishop 


puts a taboo on games of chance.” 


Another pastor told of parishioners 
who, on friendly terms with police, 


obtained a confiscated roulette wheel 
|} as parish house equipment. 


Elected Rural Archdeacon. 
The Rev. Norman B. Quigg, rector 


lof Christ church, Streator, was elect- 


ed rural archdeacon of the diocese 
to suceeed the Rt. Rev. Dr. Winfred 
H. Ziegler, who resigned to become 
bishop of Wyoming last year. Arch- 
deacon Quigg was dean of the south- 
ern deanery of the diocese. His suc- 
cessor to that post will be the Rev. 
Joseph S. Minnis of Christ church, 
Joliet, 


POLICE BREAK UP 
NUMBERS GAME; 
NINE MEN SEIZED 


Raiding an apartment at 5443 South 
Michigan avenue yesterday, police ex- 
posed a new numbers racket which 
they said is taking large sums from 
Chicagoans in bets ranging from 5 
cents to $1. Samuel Williams, colored, 
one of the nine men arrested, ad. 
mitted being the manager and told 
Capt. Martin Mullen and Sergts. Wil- 
liam Burns and Edward Le Fevour 
how they operated. 

Betters try to guess a three digit 
number determined by a complicated 
computation of parimutuel payoffs in 
horse races. Williams, the police said, 
asserted he has 300 agents taking 
bets. The winning number pays— 
if any one guesses it—$450 on a dol- 
lar bet. 


TONIGHT 


at 6:15 
Enroll now for the famous course, 
" Better English and Better Speech.” 
It is unique and practical. All tuition 
refunded if you are not satisfied. 
Come directly to the class, or call 
J. MANLEY PHELPS 
185 MN. Wakash Ave. Central 2620 


SIZES UP TO 10 


0-G SHOES. pon ae conan Spring 


styles . . 


designed in the O- G Paris Studios 


| the consensus as developed: in Wash. 


ington. 

The group was headed by George 
F. McKiernan, president of the 
Graphic Arts federation. Co-authors 
were R. P. Hastey, president, yh 
berg Sales & Service: Charles R. 
Cowley, president, Marbelite — Arts 
Products company; J. A. Kanter, Kan: 
ter Concrete Form and Equipment 
company; C. A. Sievert, Sievert Elec. 
tric company; W. C. West, Great 
Lakes Forge company; W. R. Vitz, real 
estate, and Joseph B. Kleckner, presi. 
dent of the Motiograph company. 


-— 


ICE DYNAMITED 
TO SAVE BRIDGE 
IN MOLINE AREA 


Moline, Ill., Feb. 2. — [Special.] — 
Ice in the Rock river south of here 
was dynamited today in an attempt 
to dislodge jams that threatened 
further damage to a $500,000 bridge 
being constructed across the stream. 

Two barges, one loaded with steel. 
were sunk and others were beached | 
by pressure of an ice jam that broke | 
above the bridge site. 

The threat of more damage to the 
Moline area was heightened by rain 
that started falling this afternoon. 

Dynamite also was used at Syca- | 
more to break ice floes that threat- 
ened damage to a suspension bridge 
over the Kishwaukee river. After 
two blasts the ice moved down river 
Several hundred feet and massed 
above a $20,000 bridge the state re- 
cently completed. It was said, how- 
ever, that the state bridge was not 
in danger. 


100 Requests Made for 


Tuberculin for Tests 


More than 100 requests for tuber- 
culin to be used in diagnosing tuber- 
culosis have been made by doctors 
from the Chicago Tuberculosis insti- 
tute since its offer to supply the ma- 
terial free, officials said yesterday. 


ANNUAL S A L 


Throw away all your former 
conceptions of what so low a 
price will buy. Here’s super- 
value... the kind of quality, 
style and workmanship that it 
usually takes a $5 bill to buy. 
Shoes that are staunch and 
sturdy, shoes that sail through 
rough weather, shoes that have 
looks and style for good 
weather, shoes that are super- 
values at a super-low price. 


Super-Value 
Shoes 


J 


COMPANION SALE YALUES AT 
sqi5 55S 5g 


HASSEL'S 


MADISON & CLARK °* DEARBORN & VAN BUREN 
Open Saturday Evenings Till 9 P. M, 


The offer was made ten days ago. 


<page Mie 
FUR TRIMMED 
COATS 


from our fine upstairs 
stocks—including 
Stroock woolens 


‘19” 


also Morley coats drastically reduced 
to $19°°.-sizes 12 to 44 


*22° ana *25 


4. * - eae © S&S @ © © FSS OBES SHAFFER ETHPE ESE TR HBSSOEOPEESESESHOHSHOHES ESET O ETS SE SHSHESASCAESSSHE SOE SH ECSEALOEESSSOFOT OSE SEREOHESCEE SES EESEE ERE EHEE EEE EEEOOEEREEHOSEO SEES ESEEES 


oe 
mot ¢ 


2 2: F FF 


ARABARATREARLABRRERE ERE RE ER ET | a SBevrereeeeseeeeee 2eeeeeeaaeteaen 


” a aa a eat ee a a MR ee Re ee ee ee eR ees 
te 5 * rs .o: ed 7 " — _— 
< k z q ae ony ; : Mati: 
7 ne ; ’ 
i Ree 


SHHSS*SSSSSSSSSOSSSVeSsUsStee sus 


feuweeeeeece 


SHOSSHAASASOREDSSEAA ESSE SESH SEHS SOAS LASHES HOTHTRFE SAE SSSRSEDDESHHASEEH 


van 3 bony. tren 


ee oe Wh, 


. ts 
ine Mae Wes 
Ne Rs 


Lh 


"BY ARTHUR SEARS HENNING. | 


(Chicago ‘Cribune Press Service. ] 
eR Washington, D. C, Feb. [Spe 
- etal] Government by press confer- 
ence” is getting on the nerves not 
- @nily of business men but of members 
 . For several weeks business has been 
- experiencing fits of the jitters and 
| the stock market has suffered suc- 
 eessive jolts as President Roosevelt, 
'§m his semi-weekly conferences with 
the press, has thrown out hints of 
/ an intention to crack down on hold- 
ing companies, to resort to inflation, 
to perpetuate the deficit with a new 
program of pump priming expendi- 
tures, and to do numerous other) 
_ things increasing uncertainty of busi- 
| mess prospects, 
| These press conference utterances 
by the President have created com- 
| motion in the business community 
‘and on the stock market because of 
‘the vast power Mr. Roosevelt, un- 
| like his predecessors, is able to wield 


‘in carrying into effect the enigeae 


‘ whim. 
| Huge Funds Back His Threats. 


With a colossal Democratic major- 
ity in both houses of congress and 
| with billions of dollars to disburse 
i to or withhold from the constituen- 
cies of senators and representatives, 
‘the presumption is strong that Mr. 
Roosevelt can carry out almost any 
threat he makes, even if further 
legislation should be necessary. 

There have been rumblings in con- 
gress for som. time of intense dis- 
approval of the President’s practice 
of initiating policies in pronounce- 
ments at his press conferences with- 
oui previous consultation with Demo- 
cratic leaders. The Democrats have 
been grumbling in secret while the 
Republicans have been giving vent 
ts the opinions the Democrats do 
not dare to utter in public. 


Record of Views Demanded. 


Last Sunday Representative Ber- 

trand H. Snell of New York, Re 
publican leader of the house, pro 
posed that the White House press 
conference interviews be made a pub- 
lic record, which could be consulted 
whenever disputes concerning the 
President’s views and _ intentions 
should arise. 
_ ‘Today Representative Paul W. Sha- 
fer [R., Mich.] paid his respects in 
mo uncertain manner to what he de- 
|mominated “government by propa 
ganda.” 

“We have reached,” he said, “a 
wery strange state of affairs in Wash- 
ington, in which the leaders and the 
members of congress have to get their 
a regarding presidential 
policies, both foreign and domestic, 
from the newspapers and radio in- 
stead of from the President directly, 
or from government Officials charged 
‘with the execution of these policies. 

Aims to Stampede Congress. 

“It is a common thing for Mr. 
Roosevelt to announce at his press 
eonferences fundamental changes of 
‘policy Without giving the leaders and 
lmembers of congress the slightest ad- 
wance information. 

“So frequently has this occurred 
that there is a rising feeling that Mr. 
Roosevelt deliberately plans these an- 
mouncements in order to arouse pub- 
lic sentiment before congress can 

ow what is contemplated, and in 
that way stampede the legislative 
body into passing administration 
measures under pressure of a sud- 
denly aroused public opinion before 
sober second thought can bring about 
a cooling of public sentiment.” 

Incidentally Mr. Shafer cited as 
another example of the new super- 
government the mission of Homer 
‘Martin, president of the United Au- 
tomobile Workers of America, to 
Washington to get relief money for 
Michigan. 

Should Right Own Wrongs. 

“The coming of Martin,” he said, 
“indicates that Gov. Frank Murphy 
has abdicated in favor of the Com- 
mittee for Industrial Organization. 
If that is not the fact, then the C. lL, 
QO. is assuming the work of the con- 
stituted officials of the state of 
Michigan in demanding 130 millions 
fo~ relief. 

“Of course there may be some 


MAND 


“(Story 0 on page eh) 


J. Richard (Dixie) Davis, fugi- 
tive “brains” of New York’s 50 
million dollar policy game racket, 
after his capture in Philadelphia 
yesterday. 


{Copyright: By New York Daily News: 
From Associated Press Wirephoto.] 


Mrs. J. Richard Davis, wife of 
Dixie, who was ill and threatened 
with eviction from her New York 
home when she learned of her hus- 
band’s arrest in Philadelphia in the 
company of a former showgirl, 
Hope Dare. 


logic in Martin’s assumption of the 
governor’s job because he and his 
outfit engineered the sitdown strikes 
in Michigan which threw thousands 
out of work. As the man who 
brought about terrible conditions in 
Michigan, perhaps he feels that he 
should be the man attempting to 
rectify them.” 


Set up By Predecessors. 


The White House press conference 
has become a recognized institution 
of government. After President Taft 
had experimented with the idea in an 
informal way, it was established for- 
mally under the Wilson administra- 
tion. All Presidents since have used 
it as a sounding board for administra- 
tion propaganda. And, inasmuch as 
the slightest thing a President says 
or does is news, the White House 
press conference furnishes the most 
efficacious and the cheapest machin- 
ery for dissemination of propaganda. 

Mr. Roosevelt is adept in using the 
press conference for propaganda pur- 
poses and in parrying embarrassing 
questions. 


WIDOW’S ACTION 
AGAINST BIDWILL 
IS DISMISSED 


John Rosen, attorney for Mrs. 
Grace M. Forschner, wealthy widow 
of Palos township, appeared yesterday 
in the Superior court and dismissed 
her suit for an accounting against 
Charles W. Bidwill, Chicago sports- 
man. 

The dismissal came as a surprise 
to Bidwill and his attorney, Howard 
Ellis. The attorneys said no settle- 
ment had been made. 

Mrs. Forschner sued to collect on 
a $252,400 judgment awarded her 
against J. Donald Walker, alias Don 
Champagne, now serving a prison 


term for swindling Mrs. Forschner. 


She charged he invested the money 
she lent him in Bidwill’s enterprises. 
Bidwill denied she had any claim, 
direct or indirect, against him. 


EL'S 


FIRST TIME AT THIS LOW PRICE! 


‘Hollywood V-Ette Bras’ 


IN A GREAT 3-DAY SALE! 


$1.59 


$2 VALUES! 


hin Aviadeitieeae aes 
aintinve .. CA 


BOO ARR RE 


Envious Colleagues Hear | j 


of $289, 000—All Spent. 


BY WILLARD EDWARDS. 
(Chicago nie Press Service. ] 

Washington, D, C., Feb. 2.—[Spe 
cial.]—Congressman Sol Bloom of 
New York today was forced by a con- 
gressional committee to disclose the 
manner in which hé has spent $289,- 
000 on preparations to celebrate the 
150th anniversary of the constitution 
of the United States. 

As director general of the United 
States Constitution Sesquicentennial 
commission, Mr, Bloom has command 
of no less than 47 jobs, he related to 
his envious colleagues. 
is approximately $6,000 a month. 

The house appropriations commit- 
tee recommended that Mr. Bloom be 
awarded an additional $50,000 to pol- 
ish off the celebration in proper fash- 
ion. There was some discussion among 
members not on the committee con- 
cerning the possibility that Mr. Bloom 
had promised to parcel out a few jobs 
as a reward for this recommendation. 


Added $50,000 to Be Opposed. 


In any event, the $50,000 recom- 
mendation will be contested bitterly 
when it is brought up in the house 
tomorrow or Friday. Representative 
Charles W. Tobey [R., N. H.J, who 
some time ago termed Mr. Bloom's 
patriotic activities a “racket,” will 
have some pertinent queries to put to 
the New York congressman, he said. 

Tobey says he had been informed 
by congressional accountants that Mr. 
Bloom’s various celebrations of his- 
toric events have cost the taxpayer 
$1,260,000 since 1932, when the New 
Yorker inaugurated the series with 
a bicentennial commemoration of 
George Washington’s birthday. 

Mr. Bloom has a trifle more than 
$10,000 left of the original $300,000 
constitution celebration appropria- 
tion, he reported, but he has rolled 
up unpaid obligations totaling $87,000 

The report revealed that Mr. 
Bloom has expended $36,748 on 
copies of “The Story of the Con- 
stitution,” written and copyrighted 
by Sol Bloom. The copyright was 
transferred recently to the govern- 
ment at the insistence of congress, 
although Mr. Bloom has asserted 
that he receives no profit from the 
sale of these books. 


More Copies—Bill Unpaid. 


Listed among the unpaid obliga- 
tions is an item of $14,585 for more 
copies of “The Story of the Consti- 
tution,” by Sol Bloom. 

From June, 1936, to date, salaries 
of employés have totaled $163,000, 
Mr. Bloom informed the committee. 
Supplies and material cost $11,000; 
transportation expenses totaled 
$3,100; printing and binding, $29,000. 

Among other expenses listed as 
necessary to the functioning of a 
commission to celebrate the consti- 
tution were the following: 


Communication service, $1,917. 

Delivery and express charges, 
$2,198. 

Rent, booth space for exhibits at 
conventions, etc., $1,130. 

Special and miscellaneous celebra- 
tions, $6,214. 

Office equipment, $5,539. 

Facsimiles of constitution, $1,525. 

Boy Scouts postcards, $850. 

Standard shrines, $10,029. 

Replica shrines, $11,655. 


Art Exhibited—Bill Unpaid. 

An art exhibit at the Corcoran 
Gallery of Art cost $8,750, Mr. Bloom 
reported, noting that this is an un- 
paid obligation. Included in this 


FACTO RY-TO- 


His pay roll} 


[Acme Photo.] 
ARLINE JUDGE. 


Hollywood, Cal., Feb. 2.—({Special.] 
—Arline Judge, film actress, today 
christened her new baby and she 
named him for his father, Daniel 
Reed Topping, wealthy young busi- 
ness man; she announced, as congra- 
tulatory messages poured in from her 
friends and picture fans all over the 
country. The boy, born in Beverly 
Hills Tuesday night, weighed six 
pounds fourteen and one-half ounces. 
She has another son, Wesley Ruggles 
Jr., by her former husband, a direc- 
tor. 


total were the expenses of “maid 
service, guards, coat checks, velvet 
lining for cases holding pictures, pic- 
ture frame, packing, hauling, and 
insurance charges.” 

But the exhibit which his fellow 


‘lcongressmen found of greatest in- 


terest was Mr. Bloom’s pay roll. To 

properly prepare for a celebration of 

the constitution Mr. Bloom found it 

necessary to create forty-seven jobs, 

he reported. The pay roll follows: 
Title— Per Annum Salary. 

Assistant Historian 

Chief, education division 

Chief, art division 

Chief, adminstration division 

Chief, music division 

Chief, distribution division 

Head of special events division ....... 

Head of purchase supplies and esti- 
mates division 

Correspondence clerk 

Secretary to director general 

Secretary and stenographer 

Auditor 


Stenographer 
Stenographer [6] at $1,600 
Stenographer and mimeograph oper- 

ator 
Stenographer [4] at $1,200 
Typist [2] at $1,200 
Head of historic publications divi- 

GO Fis Bai oe vb 0 60s cia bOb 6 be séee coeds $1,800 
Clipping clerk 
File clerk 
Cashier clerk 
Bookkeeper 
File clerk 
Correspondence clerk 
Time clerk 
Mimeograph operator and clerk 
Mail clerk [2] at $1,200 
Shipping clerk 
Stock room cierk 
Shipping clerk ...ccsecoees 
RE WE nn ks sv akde sacdacseses seoeee ® GOO 
Stock room elerk @eeeteteeeteses seeouw B40) 
Mail clerk 
Guards at art exhibit ftomperary.. 


The celebration is to extend to 
April 30, 1939, Mr. Bloom explained 


to the committee. 


YOU PRICES 


February Factory Selling 


FREE—Thick, durable, Olson-made Rug Cushion to fit 


correctly under any size rug you buy. 
only with pour purchase o - 


None given wit 


Given this week 


$25 or more. i tg this ad. 
out it. 


(Tr. 2-3.) 


BROADLOOM 


85 


Square 


Yard 


$3.60 Value 


TO 3 5 80 
, Yard 


$7.75 Value 


Chicago’s largest display of rich, extra serviceable broad- 
loom. peer you'll find sturdy, deep-pile, solid color and 


« « nub 


figured f 


by, 


g, texture friezes . . beau 
duo-tone, embossed broadloom, and many o 


frieze textures . . 
luxurious, 
ers. 9 ft. 


tri-twist, 


and 12 ft. seamless widths; by any length. All the smart, 


new, core colors. 


Of select, new, imported 


wools. 


. 9x15 ft. 12x15 
$35.40: $69.50| $43.96 c0 $68.20| $58.60:0 $117.60 


WILTON RUGS 


‘3875. 


$55.00 Value 


45 


® J 9x12 
Ft. 


$85.00 Value 


Thousands of unusual values await you here at ‘Wilton 
Headquarters” this week. Beautifully woven, extra heavy, 


deep nap, seamless rugs 


direct from the 


n looms at 


savings you cannot hope to find elsewhere. Smart all- 


over patterns and rich, appealing Oriental designs. 


Of 


choice, new,, imported. wools. 


ee ee + + nnn 
_ Extended Payments if Desired 


| : Sclasreim and Factory 
2800 N, Crawford (Pucam) ot] 


"Th Thar bs Paci to a ray 


aa € , Sa 
at ~% % a . 2 ed 
» eee 4 2 : 7 ok 

- y : - <<? | i. 


ieee) Aa 
Nights to 10 hk, 


y é r 3 Or } 


8 ioe base Vial ify — nee emer H: 


Fate ~~ » 
- ~ > all Fae. ¢ 
- nw FT — | ee” 


ae 


Match Foreman Tells 


Lack of Safety Drills. 


Testimony was given yesterday that 
no fire drills ever were ‘ordered or 
held in the plant of the Superior 
Match company, 60 West pigs pa 
street, where a fire last ‘Dec; 16 
sulted in. the deaths of six girl: in 
ployés. Yet, a witness said, there 
were from three to five small fires in 
the place every night. 

This witness, who took the stand at 
a coroner’s inquest, was Howard Kae 
ding, 5541 Van Buren street, the night 
foreman, who also told the jury that 
he was engaged to marry one of the 
girls who died, Miss Jean Lasowski, 
19 years old, 2143 North Austin ave 
nue. 

Telis of Machines Ablase. 

Kaeding said the machines at which 
the girls worked would catch fire at 
frequent intervals, but always before 
the night of Dec. 16 one of the four 
men employés or the seven girls 
would get the fires out before any 
damage was done. 

It was also brought out at the in- 
quest that the four men escaped from 
the place unhurt on the night of the 
fatal fire. Kaeding said his hair was 
singed. The seventh girl ig still at 
Passavant hospital, where it was said 
yesterday her condition is improving. 

The six girls who died were Miss 
Lasowski; Miss Jean Supello, 20, of 
1520 Walton street; Miss Anne Monde, 
21, of 733 West 17th place; Miss Cath- 
erine Terleski, 19, of 819 Cleveland 
avenue;. Miss Olga Kodna, 22, of 1615 


South..Union avenue, and Miss Anna-} 


belle Murphy, 19 years old, of 5257 
South Aberdeen street. Miss Mur- 
phy’s father, Frank, kicked in the 
locked front door and pulled the girl 
out with her clothes ablaze. 

This. front door, giving entrance 
also to the Hamilton Printing com- 
pany on the same floor as the match 
plant; was commonly locked to out- 
siders at 7 o’clock in the evening, but 
Kaeding said it could have been opened 
from the inside, 


Denies Labor Troubles. 

Assistant State’s Attorney Ben Nel- 
son then questioned Robert B. Meitus, 
owner of the printing company, about 
reports that the front door was kept 
locked to prevent union investigation 
of nonunion men among his em- 
ployés, In denying this, Meitus said 
his company had been unionized, but 
admitted on the night of the fire he 
had only two pressmen working, both 
nounion, who were drawing $18 a 
week instead of the $40 scale. 

Meitus’ brother, Harold, of 162 East 
Ontario street, owner of the match 
company, is expected to testify at the 
next session of the inquest on March 
9. At that time laboratory reports 
will be ayailable on the possibility 
that a mysterious gas resulting from 
materials used in making the matches 
may have caused the deaths, rather 
than burns. 


Chicagoland Pays 3 Million 


U.S.Pension Tax in January 


Collections of old age pension tax 
in January under the national social 
security act amounted to $3,027,232 in 
the First Illinois district, which in- 
cludes Chicago, Carter H. Harrison, 
collector of internal revenue, an- 
nounced yesterday. There were 15,301 
returns filed. 


un el & ae ie © te eae | 


Now that it’s two-thirds over, C. A. 
Donnel, the weather man, disclosed 


averaged just 2 of a degree below 


ary of this winter was 12.4 inches, 41 
e-|inches below normal. 

The weather man said the ground- 
hog had a chance to see his shadow 
at 9:45 a. m, yesterday when the sun 
was shining. According to legend, 
that should mean six weeks more 
cold weather, but Mr. Donne] said 
you can’t believe a groundhog. 


HUNT SLAYER 
OF 5 IN SOUTH 
SIDE HOLDUPS 


Police disclosed yesterday that they 
are searching on the south side for 
two colored bandits, one of whom 
has shot and killed five colored per- 
sons in holdups since Dec. 10. Lieut. 
Otto Erlanson of the homicide squad 
said ballistics tests showed the vic- 
tims were all shot with the same gun. 

Those slain were: James Desmuke, 
47 years old, 4227 Indiana avenue, on 
Dec. 10; James Vessell, 41, 3902 Indi- 
ana avenue, Dec. 16; George House, 
46, 4536 Prairie avenue, Dec, 26; Mrs. 
Anna Coffey, 30, 4736 Prairie avenue, 
Jan. 4, and Leon Watts, 40, 4002 Calu- 
met avenue, Jan. 13. 


RARE VALUES 
in GENUINE 


MINK 
COATS 


Now *475 

Now °695 

iiso Now *875 
origingy 


originally 
$775 


originally 
$1000 
wae“ 


1295 Now *985 


BUY NOW FOR NEXT 
YEAR Om BUDGET 


MILLER vo. 


166 NO. wes cette i 
OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9 


REMOVAL 


SALE 


750 PAIRS 
SPECIAL VALUES 


$'7 89 


DISCONTINUED MODELS 
FORMERLY TO $11.00 


a a. ae ey 
~e » 


BROKEN SIZES 
NOW $6.95 


R 


ALL REGULAR ¢ 
STYLES NOW R 
A FEW 


9S - $99 


STYLES $10.85 TO $11.85 


We're moving soon to our new shop at 142 So. Dear- 
born and present stocks must be cut. Every Nettle- 
ton Shoe substantially reduced and a large: group 
of discontinued styles as low as $7.85. 


by buying now. 


BARCLAY SH O ES 
NOW REDUCED TO 


eae soon to 142 So. Dearborn St. 


You'll save 


ae 


| . State 1737 


. 
P . San yf pk OS © a ee . : 
% i ah. - ‘Tp ae? *<, 
Sik. Shela; Ppp ee Oat Oe” A ee ae igh oe, 37 
cme Ne — ee Opa tek Re 


yesterday that the temperature for); 
the months of December and January | 


x 6 
“edie Fg 
* Po , 
-~ wd —s ; srg 
: ¥ a : 
- ~ Ba, Be ~ oe - ot ue eee % bi ie 
‘ " = -_ 7 
Cans, —T Bena Oh OPE = * de 3 
- 


bavi! tients satin Sein hehe = 


4. PE PES ROT RD TEN 


ie ili i ee ieee oi aja! 


eit AS orem Raat 


61759 42275 $25 
BRUCEWOOD DRESSES 


deeply reduced from our 
own stocks to 


a few sold for $29.75—<prints, plain 
colors==sizes 12 to 40 
7TH FLOOR 


All sales final—no exchanges—no refunds 


MAURICE L ROTHSCHILD 


State at Jackso 


HUDSON 
SEALS 


(dyed muskrat) 
in Brucewood’s great 
after-inventory 
fur sale 


‘159 


FORMERLY $225 TO $275 
Sizes 12 to 44——5th floor 


_ MAURICE L ROTHSCHILD 


ees Senate gt Jackson ] 
raveune ACCIDENT "sh 


POLICY 
AND SUBSCRIPTION TO THE DAILY TRIBUNE 


atl 


eeee8s 5 Peo: 
wemewevemess Apt ?. ceneneg 


— a a 


Address? Ceesecs 


» Phone? seyeevemeexe ere 


——_ -_ — - ne a 


Tow Age?. sews. Date of . : Ad: eet, + deters ~ ys 
ase Tou Blind or Desf?. vewwwremvvesmpamevs. Ate You Crippled?. owewwwe ween 
Hame of Forson to Whom Insurance Is to Bo Paid te Case of Your Death? (Benefieiney? 
PUES Li teats oe aaah Relationship wanionee 
Sppiicant’s Signature? meee i ee 


Company Alters Model to 
Cure Defects. 


BY WAYNE THOMIS. 

A Northwest. Airlines transport 
plane crashed near Bozeman, Mont., 
dast Jan. 10 because the tail surfaces 
and rudders were literally shaken off 
the ship by tremendous vibration set 
up as it cruised at high speed through 
violent air currents.: This was indi- 
cated yesterday in a diagnosis of the 
causes of the accident made public by 
the Lockheed Aircraft corporation, 
manufacturer of the airplane. 

The loss of the vital rudder con- 
trols on the speedy ship—it cruised 
at 230 miles an hour, or nearly 50 
miles‘an hour faster than any com- 
parable airliner—left the pilot, Nick 
Mamer, helpless. Mamer, a veteran 
who was considered one of the best 
fiyers in the air transport industry, 
could do nothing to prevent the ship 
from spinning into the ground and 
killing all ten persons aboard. 


Fins and Rudders Missing. 


. Examination of the wreckage 
showed that the vertical fins which 
act as keel area for an airplane, and 
the rudders were missing. There was 
evidence to indicate that these sur- 
faces had been whipped out of the 
plane while it was in the air, accord- 
ing to the company, and forces sufii- 
ciently great to cause this damage 
could only be set up by tail flutter. 

The term “ flutter,” aeronautically 
speaking, means violent vibration 
which can cause heavy metal wings 
or other parts of airplanes to ripple 
and shake like a piece of cloth in a 
strong wind. When the fluttering of 
airplane parts is prolonged beyond a 
few seconds a major structural fail- 
ure invariably occurs. 

That was what happened to North- 
west’s Lockheed Zephyr, also known 
as a No. 14. The ‘tail of the airliner 
began to shake, probably in tune with 
or at the same rate of vibration as 
some other part. The shaking rapidly 
increased and then, before the pilots 
could cut their speed, the fins and 
rudders were snapped off. 

Change Plane Design. 

In order to prevent such an acci- 
dnt in the future, it was stated by 
the manufacturer, the company has 
changed the tail design. The strength 
of the tail unit has been reénforced 
by adding heavier spars and heavier 
gage metal skin, and lead balances 
have been placed on the movable con- 
trol surfaces of all 14s. These bal- 
ances are widely used in the aircraft 
industry to prevent the vibrations 
which build up into destructive flut- 
ter. 

“These precautions . . . have been 
completely tested by the army air 
corps and have been fully approved 
by the air commerce bureau for 
strength, vibration, and airworthi- 
ness,’ the corporation’s announce- 
ment said. 

The Lockheed 14 is a new type of 
airplane which received approval of 
the federal air commerce bureau last 
fall. All the 14s were grounded after 
the accident and the order is still in 
effect. 


ST ATE’S DIRECTOR 
OF CONSERVATION 
STARTS SHAKEUP 


Springfield, Til, Feb. 2.—[Special.] 
-— Dismissal of one game warden was 
described today as the beginning of a 
general reorganization of the state 
conservation department by Thomas 
J. Lynch, acting director of the de- 
partment. 

Lynch’s action follows complaints 
made against the department by men 
in the Peoria area and also follows 
ai: investigation made by the director 
concerning alleged favoritism to Ross 
Dixon, Peoria commercial fisherman. 

It is charged that Dixon was given 
permission by the state conservation 
department to take carp and buffalo 
by placing seines under the ice, which 
is forbidden by the state fish and 
game code. 

Lynch said today he found no 
evidence of tllegal seining in the Illi- 
nois river. “The seining under ice 
was authorized,” Lynch said, “upon 
recommendation of Francis D. Hunt, 
the department’s fish culturist, when 
the water was low and the action 
Was necessary to save game fish.” 


Steals Policeman’s Star; 
Gets Three Months’ Term 


For sté: ling a policeman’s star TJ u- 
lius Fehr{ 34 years old, 38 South Gen- 
esee street, Waukegan, was sentenced 
yesterday to serve three months on 
the state prison farm at Vandalia. 


Police Magistrate Clarence Brown | 


found him guilty of ‘larceny and va: 


THE. ai aily Or 


Vor XCvIE. ‘Thursday. Feb. 3. 


Publishéd © dai or ne 
fe. pe iga 


Tower. 
mete : 
e, '812.50 per ge 


No. 29. 


h Su “y Trt ane. 
red) ar recon cla mater be i 
ce a c un 
arch 9, 1879. i 


~ > a é 


"WAVY LINES INDICATE 
HOW THE VIOLENT 
VIBRATION AT THE TAIL. 


wete missing when it fell. 


DOTTED LINES SHOW WHERE 
| VERTICAL TAIL SURFACES 
pWERE TORN OFF THE aie 
‘ a SOS < ~~ cee RT 
The Lockheed Airerals corporation, manufacturers of the North- 
Wést Air Lines’ plane which crashed near Boseman, Mont., on Jan. 10, 
yesterday announced that the vertical fins and the rudders of the airliner 
Tail flutter, or violent vibration, is said to 
have shaken them from the plane and caused the pilot to lose control. 
The company has changed the tail design of the planes. 


SYPHILIS FIGHT 
1S YOURS, YOUTH 
MEETING TOLD 


Hygien@ Day Speaker 
Urges Blood Tests. 


Young people were urged last 
night to join the crusade against 
syphilis at a large mass meeting in 
Lewis institute, 1951 Madison street. 
The speaker was Maj. Bascomb John- 
son of New York, director of investi- 
gations for the American Social 
Hygiene association. 

Last night’s meeting, sponsored by 
the American Youth congress, the 
Illinois Social Hygiene league, and 
the Chicago board of health, was part 
of Chicago’s observance of national 
social: hygiene day observed at more 
than 3,000 meetings throughout the 
country at which the nation-wide war 
against venereal diseases was de- 
scribed. Several million people took 
part in the programs, according to 
the estimates of Dr. Walter Clarke, 
executive Airector of the American 
Social Hygiene association, from his 
New York office. 

Plan to Enroll 5,000. 

The Lewis institute meeting was 
also the occasion for a drive for en- 
roliment of an anti-syphilis youth 
committee of 5,000. Those enrolled 
pledge themselves to take blood tests 
for the detection of syphilis. 

Introduced by Dr. Louis E. 

Schmidt, chairman of Mayor Kelly’s 
anti-syphilis committee, Maj. John- 
son told his audience of young peo- 
ple that not only would the eradica- 
tion of venereal disease help solve 
the nation’s health problem but that 
it would also aid in minimizing un- 
employment. 
“If you fail to aid you are not 
meeting this challenge,” he said, “for 
you cannot escape this responsibility; 
it is yours.” 

The young men and women were 
especially urged to submit to syphilis 


soon as they know they are nag become 
parents. 


Fight Inherited Syphilis. 

“This precaution would remove one 
great group of syphilis cases,” Maj. 
Johnson said, “ because at least 60,000 
syphilitic babies are born each year 
in this country. Countless others are 
killed by the disease before birth. 
None of these need die if diagnostic 
tests are made early in pregnancy.” 

Maj. Johnson said that a bill now 
is pending before the New York leg- 
islature which would require every 
expectant mother to submit to syph- 
ilis tests. He also said that several 
States are considering laws for pre- 
marital examinations such as the Sal- 
tiel law in Illinois. Oregon has re- 
cently enacted one and New York, 
Virginia, and New Jersey have meas- 
ures under consideration. 


GETS JOB, FALLS DEAD. 


Logansport, Ind., Feb. 2. [Special.]—Alex 
Vernon, 68 years ‘old, dropped dead appar- 
ently of heart disease when he reported for 
work as a Pennsylvania railroad mainten- 
ance department employé today. 


for three 


our famous 
$115 hosiery 


| 7 


3 pairs for $2.25 ’ 

A heel within a heel— 

specially constructed to 

give lots of extra long 

‘wear, although a sheer 
3 thread 


tests before marriage and again as. 


TWO LAWYERS NAMED 
BY COURT TO DEFEND 
KIDNAPER OF ROSS 


When John Henry Seadlund, for- 
mer Minnesota miner and woodsman, 
is placed on trial! for the kidnaping 
of Charles S. Ross, he will be repre- 
sented by Attorneys Floyd E. Thomp- 
son and Frederic Burnham. 

Seadlund, taken from the county 
jail to the United States courthouse 
under guard of deputy marshals, was 
not allowed to enter a plea when he 
was arraigned yesterday before Fed- 
eral Judge John P, Barnes, who ap- 
pointed the lawyers after the prisoner 
said he had no legal adviser. 

After visiting his client in the 
afternoon, Attorney Thompson, who 
was formerly chief justice of the IIli- 
nois Supreme court, said that he 
would go to court this morning and 
request a continuance until next Tues- 
day. 

“Attorney Burnham is out of the 
city,” he said, “and will not return 
until Monday. I want him to assist 
in deciding what the plea shall be. 
There will be no need to have Sead- 
lund in court again this week.” 


WIVES I AND 2 
SEND TOMBSTONE 
MAKER TO JAIL 


Edward H. Troost, manufacturer of 
tombstones, spent last night in the 
county jail because two women, his 
first wife and his second wife, caught 
up with him. Today he will face 
them both before Judge John J. Lupe. 

Troost was arrested by deputy 
Sherifs in his office at 3957 Belden 
avenue. His second wife, the former 
Ella Mae Perry, one time cabaret 
entertainer, who has a_e separate 
maintenance decree, told the court 
she had been trying for months to 
coHect back alimony. 

Mrs. Mary Berkmeier Quinn, attor- 
ney for Mrs. Caroline Troost, wife 
No. 1, said she had sought Troost 
since 1935 to collect $1,600 in ali- 
mony. Wife No. 1, who is an invalid 
living in Elmhurst, was ordered to 
be present today. 


AIRLINER MAKES 
RECORD FLIGHT 
ON REGULAR RUN 


A United Air Lines Douglas DC-<3 
airliner yesterday made the longest 
nonstop trip on record for any reg- 
ularly scheduled flight, when it took 
off at Salt Lake City and landed 
6 hours 19 minutes later at Chicago 
airport. After the 1,300’ miles the 
plane still had enough fuel to fly 
another three hours. 

No passengers were aboard, the 
load consisting. entirely of mail and 
express. The trip was the second 
section of the regular overnight San 
Francisco-Chicago run. Passengers 
were all on the first section, which 
made stops at Cheyenne and Omaha. 


days only 


_SPECIAL SALE OF 


Brucewood 


HOSIERY 


our regular 
*1 hosiery 


69° 


3 pairs for $2 


r 


All silk—ultra sheer— 
3 thread crepe — for 
years the best seller in 
our entire stock—and 


rightly so 


ALL SIZES—IN THE NEW SPRING SHADES 


a. a6 months’ supply! 
“sorry—no phone or mail orders 


Pilot Saved; Dumped Gas 
Catches Fire. 


NATAL, Brazil, Feb; 2.—(/)—Capt. 
Mario :Stoppani, noted oem Sve: 
was injured 
and thef —: 
four | mem- 
bers ' of his 
crew were &: 
killed today f 
when the 
trans - At- 
lantic sea- 
plane he 
was pilot- 
ing fell into 
the sea and 
burned, 

Stoppani, 
claimant of 
the world 
distance 
record for 


eA 


RIODEJANEIRO 


ey ea rh tg ae. wes 


= a v > & 
Whit 8 5 i. ee on 
+ 


f Associated Press Wirephoto.] 
Mario Stoppani, Italian flyer, 
only one of crew of five on Italian 
seaplane which fell into sea and 
burned on an attempted flight from 
Brazil to Spain. 


seap lanes, Cross locates place 
was res- where plane burned. 


cued by the German plane Samum 
of the Condor syndicate, which 
rushed to the scene, fifty miles off 
the coast, and found him clinging to 
a pontoon which was torn off the 
blazing wreckage. 

Commander Blume of the seaplane 
Boreas returned here tonight after 
flying to the aid of the Samum, 
which had been unable to rise from 
the heavy seas near the scene of the 
tragedy. 

Spilled Gasoline Burns. 

“We saw Stoppani grasping one 
pontoon which was disjoined from the 
plane,” Commander Blume said. “ He 
was injured and is now aboard the 
Samum.” 

Mechanic Butz of the Boreas said: 

“We flew at an altitude of 10 to 20 
yards above the plane, which was 
wrapped in enormous flames.” 

Aeronautical experts said the disas- 
ter was. caused when gasoline 
dumped into the sea to lighten the 
plane for landing caught fire. Stop- 
pani had turned back toward Natal 
when the plane, en route to Cadiz, 
Spain, developed engine trouble: sey- 
eral hundred miles at sea. 

[The disaster was similar to that 
which destroyed the Pan American 
Airways’ Samoan Clipper near Amer- 
ican Samoa m the South Pacific on 
Jan. 11. An official statement said the 
Clipper was destroyed by a fire and 
explosion incidental to the dumping 
of gasoline to lighten the load for 
landing. Unofficially the belief was 
expressed that the dump valves, 
under the plane’s high wing, permit- 
ted the highly explosive fuel to vapor- 
ize sufficiently near the exhaust of 
the engines to cause combustion.] 

Ethiopia Veterans Die. 

Cutter No. 4 of the Air France 
line picked up an unidentified body 
near where Stoppani was found. 

The cutter was standing by await- 
ing the arrival of the German cata- 
pult ship Schwabenland. The cutter 


then will return to Natal with Stop- 


pani and the dead airman. 
The four dead were Capt. Enrico 


Comani and Capt. Mario Viola, both 
iii cecelthcodianditetnditianacienaateen tienen dinhenaendad thant adnatencnedmndtindndiniantamentntaiamecndinenedtneentiiaienane 


veterans of the Italian campaign in 
Ethiopia; Sergt. Jaria, and Mechanic 
Pagliani. 

The Italian seaplane was the one 
in which Stoppani flew 4,200 miles from 
Cadiz to Brazil in December and 
claimed a world’s seaplane distance 
record. 

On Dec. 2, 1936, Stoppani claimed an 
altitude record of 22,070 feet for a tri- 
motored seaplane carrying 11,012 
pounds of cargo. 


OUSTED BROKER 
HELD ON CHARGE 
BY EX-PARTNER 


Douglas E, Brown, who was. ex- 
pelled from the Chicago Stock ex- 
change on Jan. 13, was arrested yes- 
terday on a warant charging him 
with operation of a confidence game 
by Sergt. Harry Newman of the 
state’s attorney’s office. He was 
seized in a Milwaukee sanitarium, 
waived extradition and was locked up 
at the Chicago detective bureau for 
a hearing this morning in Felony 
court. 

The warant was issued by Judge 
Oscar Caplan on complaint of Luke 
E. Williams, 70 East Walton street, 
also a broker. Williams charged he 
was defrauded of $5,000, although at 
the state’s attorney’s office it was 
said the amount was much larger. 

Brown said his arrest was the re- 
sult of a misunderstanding while he 
and Williams were partners. Brown, 
who is 32 years old and lives in Hins- 
dale, was a floor member of the ex- 
change, doing business for brokers. 
AE A REE RRR EL BE ARCS Se ERS A AO ITY ILI LE IEC ELLE A 


f ADVERTISMENTIT 
HELP STOMACH 
DIGEST FOOD 
Without Laxatives—and You'll Eat 
Everything from Seup te Nuts 


‘Fhe stomach tia digest two pounds of food 
@aily. When you eat vy, greasy, Coarse or rich 
foods ex when you are nervous, hurried or chew 

ly—youc stomach pours out too much fivid, 
oar food doesn’t digest and you heve gas, heart~- 
nausea, pain or sour stomach, You feel sour, 

sick and upset all over. 

Doctors say never teke a laxative for stomach 
pein. It te dengerows and foolish. Kt takes those 
littie biack tablets eatled Bell-ans for Indigestion 
to make fhe excess stomach fluids harmless, relieve 
distress in. 5 minutes and put you back on your 
foet. Belief ts so auick ft is amazing and one 25¢ 
package proves it. Ask for Bell-ans for Indigestion. 


= S ae sia anes 
‘bet 


sat a ba ae RE AM ey a, ee: a Siok wae ek SGM Sn i gi ane ile a Ls 
. * Fy PROLOG ean Eo 8 


— . - 
<i vee 3 
Sr ory ae 
> 
- Was * 
* ts ae } 
4 $ 
< a oy 
a 4 
- 4 
> 


Days of High Flying Here, 
Says Col. Johnson. 


ees 


The “day of the stratosphere air- 
liner, flying at high speeds through 
thin air at heights above 20,000 feet 
and, avoiding most. storms and ‘bad 
weather conditions which prevail at 
lower levels, has arrived, said Col. 
Louis Johnson, assistant secretary of 
war, last evening. He added that. the 
army air corps has contributed a 
major share of the pioneering and 
experimental work which has made 
this possible. 

Speaking at the Saddle and Sirloin 
club in the stockyards before 250 avi- 
ation leaders here for the Interna- 
tional Air show, Col, Johnson reported 
that the air corps engineers have 
built a satisfactory substratosphere 
airliner. He said they now know how 
to regulate the temperature and at- 
mospheric pressure inside the ship to 
make it comfortable for passengers 
-even though the machines soar into 
the cold, lifeless air of great heights. 


Just Like 12,000 Feet. 


- While the substratosphere plane 
rises to heights of 25,000 feet the pres- 
Sure inside the cabin corresponds to 
that of an altitude of 12,000 feet and 
neither passengers nor crew experi- 
ence discomfort,” he said. 

“While the thermometer readings 
outside vary from 100 degrees above 
zero to 54 degrees below, those inside 
the pressure cabin enjoy a tempera- 
ture of not less than 50 nor more 
than 70 degrees Fahrenheit.” 

Although the experiments in strato- 


COLOSIMO’S 


2125 South Wabash 
7 COURSE $4.50 


DINNER 
BABY LOBSTER 


with Whole 
We Coter 


to Banquets ond Parties 


REGULARLY 


PRICED $7.00 
NOW ON SALE AT 


*0.G MYSTIC ARCH 
trade-mark registered 


-L 


. The Mystic Arch 
Metatarsal Button 
Heavy steel shank 
Sponge rubber filler 


0-G MYSTIC ARCH SHOES FOR WOMEN 
FINEST QUALITY BLACK or WHITE KIDSKIN 
SHOES. WITH STYLE AND LOTS OF COMFORT 

Sizes to 10 AAA to EEE : 


Sizes 


O-G MYSTIC ARCH SHOES FOR MEN 
BLACK CALFSKIN, BROWN OR WHITE LEATHER, 
BLACK KANGAROO (high or low shoes) 


5 to 14 — to EE 


Mail and Telephone 


O'CONN 


205 STATE ST., South (at A 


4616 Sheridan. Road 
3300 Lawrence Avenue 


6348 Halsted Street, South 


bf 
: 
pA 
ee 


Milwaukee Avenue 


1255 
‘2748 je Eo erg Ayenue 


son seid the army 
to believe that dt 1s here 
for commercial and : 


“With ite aecteal will depart many 
of the hazards of flying in bad 
weather,” 
“Greater speeds without the sacrifice 


army, first to advance modern air- 
craft with its tremendous speeds, first 


lers, now offers you this stratosphere 
plane as a great and significant step | 
forward in the harnessing of the} 
stratosphere for the use of the human 
race,” 


First 5 of 40 New Double 
Deck Buses Put in Service 


The first five of forty new. double 
deck coaches, costing about $800, 000, 
have been delivered to the Chicago 
Motor Coach company, Benjamin 
Weintraub, president, said yesterday. 
They will. be distributed over the 
main lines of the company. New 
coaches in operation now number 
289, representing an investment of 
$4,150,000. 


sleet ar ae 


the colonel continued. | 
of comfort will be attained. Our|} 


to develop controlable pitch propel-} 


Wa ge Mal. 9 


Baa ae oe x ~a 
4 
‘ 
— , “ 
aaa a tas © 
. a 
+ 


o oe — EO = 
“ a bait: 


ir " NIG 
OCAL 0A E 


1 LO IB ER CB ATT te MOE ea 2: lle TERR. 


1212 N.ASHLAND ie BRUnwick 
fA Isted | 
4913 MEW SUE at Cicero AVEnue 1400 | 


Our advance Spring show- 
ing of carpeting includes all 
the most interesting new 
textures in lovely figured 
patterns, Swedish primitive 
designs, thumb-twists, and 
the new light plain colors. 


and vou'l decide on Pshodlan’s 


BROADLOOM 


SPECIAL: TWIST 
BROADLOOM 


337%. 


9xI2 Size 


347-40 


Convenient Payments—No Carrying Charge 


shman 
16South Wabash Avenue 


OVER HALF A CENTURY 


ros. 
Near Madison 


IN CHICAGO 


Copyright, 1938, Axton-Fisher Tobacco Co. 


%. SOOTHING 


Made of correctly mentholated fine tobaccos. 


Let be Clecarthealed! 


The sensitive passages of your nose and throat—your Smoke Zone 
—are irritated by ordinary cigarette smoke. 

They close up on your smoking pleasure at the sign of a cold. 

Keep those passages navigable, clear and open with soothing 
smoke—SPUD Smoke—scientifically mentholated for the good 
and comfort of your Smoke Zone. Spud Smoke keeps your head 
clear, your breathing easy, and your nose and throat passages 
soothed and open! You’re going to like Spuds. Yes, you! 


Plain 
or Cork 


EE 


not. only helps break up 
builds up the body. © 


tality. 


tests. 


THE REASON WHY IT is 


Lifferent™ 


BECAUSE Father John’s Medicine 
is not “just another cold remedy”. 


It 
colds, but 


Its healthful, nourishing elements aid 
in maintaining pes vigor, and. vi- 


Its value as a proven treatment. for 
colds is acai by. asdsations mui : 


. : & 
at bo RE Ee ee ee ee yo 


asst. $1.70 value. 


Mlk Chocolate Gevered | 


| 
| 


’ ORDER TODAY 
_ VALENTINE PACKAGES 


Wa 
MIME 
F TTE 


rTTER 
CANDY AA ADE 


Hungry? Well sometimes big hungry 
men come in and put-gobs of butter and 
salt and red paprika all over it and sit 
and eat and eat and eat and eat and eat 
and eat and eat until they fetch bottom 
and then they butter the shell and eat it, 
too, our baked IDAHOS are so good. 
Ss . Cc | oN RQ K > T e 


AND FIVE OTHERS IN THE LOOP 


|Drivea Defense Measure, | 


,the salt of the earth,” 
1“ That may be true. 
whole contents of a salt shaker fall 
Jinto the soup the housewife is tempted 
jto throw away the stew.” 


[ADVERTISMENT] 


COUGHS! 


Get After That Cough 
Today with PERTUSSIN 


When lyou catch cold and your throat feels 
dry or clogged, the secretions from countless 
tiny glands in your throat and windpipe 
often turn into sticky, irritating phlegm. 
This makes you cough. 

Pertussin stimulates these glands{to again 
pour out their natural moisture so that the 
annoying phlegm is loosened and easily 

. Quickly your throat is soothed, your 
cough relieved! 

Bnd cough may be a warning signal from 

iratory system. Why neglect it? 
spline ~~ a ve done! Use Pertussin, a 
ra ges siaaamat’ herbal remedy for kare. 
ee see Many physicians have prescribed 
comin for over 30 years. It’s safe, acts 
quickly. Sold at all 


Cae ER ee eae & 
‘ pine ney r aT poy * 
tel tee a ‘3 =e Ds ed ait 


on * 23 2% 
Ves Go Cate = Fe 
Sos fe Oo ycietet ys " 
ne ee aa os i tee . 2 
ON 9 Ts Kaas Sr ee 


Gates 


“ane 


oO ALE ye 


Premier Declares. 


BUCHAREST, Feb. 2—(?)—Octa- 


; \vian Goga, 57 year old poet and pre- 


‘imier of Rumania, today said in a 


| written statement that anti-Semitism 
jand nationalism are enduring fea- 
itures of Rumanian policy. He as-j| 
jserted anti-Semitism would continue 
jeven if he were removed from the 
‘|premiership. . 


“Jews say of themselves they are 
said Goga. 
But when the 


The premier, who has a poet's 
fondness for figures of speech, ob- 
served that too many Jews is exactly 


jlike too much salt. 


Move Began Fifty Years Ago. 
“We are not the founders of the 


lanti-Semitic movement in Rumania,” 


Goga wrote. “Exactly fifty years ago 
Alexander Cuza, the first president 
of our National Christian party, first 


jicalled attention to the Jewish prob- 


lem here. 

“Throughout the years of my liter- 
ary and political activity I have been 
guided by the postulates of our na- 
tionalistic ideas. They are the formula 
for defense against Magyarization of 
our country, as attempted by former 
Hungarian rulers, and now find their 
expression in the slogan, ‘Rumania 


Jfor the Rumanians.’ 


“Anti-Semitism is simply a mea- 
sure of defense—which will vanish 
when its causes are eliminated.” 


Post War Immigrants. 

Goga emphasized that the state was 
taking measures to protect itself 
against immigrants, largely Jews, 
who came after the world war. 

“These immigrants have taken per- 
manent residence here without the 
legal right to do so,” he continued. 
“We do not know, because of their 
irregular methods of entry, what their 
number may be, but it is the common 
opinion that there are several hundred 
thousands. 

“At present we are not so much 
interested in expelling them as in 
establishing the legal fact that they 
have no right to Rumanian citizen- 
ship. 

“What will happen later? We 
have opened the question and the 
solution probably will be found after 
a thorough examination by an inter- 
national forum. 

“We know from history that this 
problem has been brought up before 
and met with severe measures. We 
recall the brutality with which Eng- 
land, Spain and, more recently, Ger- 
many and Russia freed themselves of 
a surplus of Semitic peoples.” 


FIRST U. S. LOAN 
TO BUY FARM IS 
TO FATHER OF 12 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—(4)— 
An Alabama cotton farmer, 58 years 
old and the father of twelve children, 
will receive the first government loan 
for the purchase of a farm under the 
Bankhead-Jones tenant aid act, the 
agriculture department announced to- 
day. 

He is Wiley J. Langley of Walker 
county—the home county of Senator 
John Bankhead [D., Ala.], co-author 
with Representative Marvin Jones 
[D., Tex.] of the legislation authoriz- 
ing government loans to deserving 
tenants and sharecroppers for pur- 
chase of homes. 


Girl, 4, Killed by Train 
as She Runs to Father 


From his filling station at Dunes 
highway and Gleason road in Gary, 
Rodney Willis saw his wife on her 
way to visit him last evening with 
their daughter, Donalee, 4 years old, 
and their son, Dudley, 2. Willis hur- 
ried over to help them across the 
South Shore electric line tracks. See- 
ing a train approaching, he told them 
to wait. But Donalee, who had not 
heard him, darted ahead into the path 
of the train and was killed. 


Result of collision 
this herse and a truck 
north of Peotone, - 


involving 
one mile 


{TRIBUNE Photos.] 


Pipes projecting from the rear 
of this truck wrecked the front of 
the herse on route 49. 


Two men were injured last evening 
when a herse collided with a truck 
two miles south of Monee in Will 
county. The injured, James Rogers, 
driver of the herse, and John Fay, 
his assistant, were taken to a hospital 
in Harvey. The herse is owned by 
the McCann undertakers, 103 Gale 
avenue, River Forest. The truck driv- 
er was William Jackson of Kankakee. 

Three persons were injured slightly 
early today in a collision between two 
automobiles at Sacramento and Ful- 
lerton avenues. The injured are Vito 
De Frenk, 48 years old; his wife, Rosa, 
40, and their granddaughter, Rose- 
mary De Frenk, 4, all of 2322 Elston 
avenue. Four other people in the De 
Frenk car were unhurt. The driver 
of the other car, John Karski, 24, of 
4930 Kentucky avenue, and his com- 
panion, Henry Hansen, 35, of 730 Mel- 
rose street, also were uninjured. 

The body of an unidentified man, 
about 60 years old, was found last 
night at Archer and Paulina avenues, 
apparently the victim of a hit and run 
driver. 

In the 24 hours that ended yester- 
day at 4 p. m. there were no automo- 
bile deaths reported in Chicago or 
Cook county. Up to 4 o’clock Tuesday 
103 persons had been killed by autos 
in the county since the first of the 
year. Of that number 83 had been 
killed in Chicago. Up to 4 p. m. yes- 
terday 1,540 had been injured in Chi- 
cago accidents. 

[See editorial page for massacre 
clock.] 


LEAPS TO DEATH 
AFTER HER LOVE 
AFFAIR IS ENDED 


(Picture on back page.) 

Distraught over the end of her love 
affair, a young woman leaped to her 
death last night from her apartment 
on the eleventh floor of the Cass 
hotel, 640 North Wabash avenue. The 
body struck a canopy in front of the 
hotel and fell through to the ground. 

The woman, who was 30 years old, 
gave the name of Mrs. Florence Arm- 
strong when she registered at the 
hotel a month ago. Her mother, Mrs. 
L. D. Tharp, 633 Deming place, to 
whom the young woman had written 
a farewell note, told police that she 
did not know her daughter was mar- 
ried. 

Mrs. Armstrong’s despondency over 
her terminated romance was learned 
from another note found in her room, 
which was addressed “My dearest” 
and closed with a “ Good-by, Daddy.” 

Mrs. Tharp and another daughter, 
Frances, 21 years old, said that Flor- 
ence ran away from home several 
years ago. 


® |Pays Off in Court, but Has 
|His Opinion of Lie Tests, 


In spite ofthe police, the judge, 
and .the Northwestern university. lie 
detector, Homer Stanley, the “only 
one: beer” man from Milwaukee, 
stuck to his story yesterday in Judge 
J. M. Braude’s Safety court. And he 
insisted that the beer was not drunk 


‘} as a chaser for sarin with more 
| zing in it. 


. Stanley listened silently while Judge 


| Braude reviewed the circumstances of 


his arrest while driving against trafic 
on a one-way thoroughfare, and 
Braude’s offer to keep the fine at $25 
and pay for the test himself if the 
lie detector showed Stanley was tell- 
ing the truth about tHe one beer. 
Then the judge said: = 

“What do you think of the test?” 

Has His Own Opinion. 

“T have my own opinion,” said 
Stanley, a staunch soul, .- still say I 
had only one beer.” 

The judge deprived: him:of his driv- 
ing privileges in Illinois: for three 
months, told him*to pay*‘up, and get 

out of town. Stanley handed the'$100 
and $8.50 costs to his <attorney- "and 
marched out of the ‘court. - 

Mrs. Patricia Rogers, .a red-haired 
night club singer, 24 years. old, was 
sentenced to ten days in the county 
jail by Judge Cecil Smith/‘in the Jury 
court yesterday and prohibited from 
driving an automobile ‘for one year 
for driving while intoxicated. 

She had demanded a jury trial when 
she was arraigned in Safety court on 
Jan. 4, at which time she was brought 
into-court on the arms of. two police- 
men and went to sleep again immedi- 
ately after her plea. Yesterday she 
waived the jury trial after all. 


Woman Driver Gets 30 Days. 


Mrs. Ruth Miller, 39 years old, of 
6141 Greenwood avenue, was sen- 
tenced to thirty days in jail and her 
driving privileges suspended for six 
months by Judge Braude, Her car on 
the morning of Nov. 28 struck Con- 
ductor Edward P. Wirges of 714 West 
Marquette road as he changed the 
trolley of his street car at the end of 
the 63d street line. Wirges was 
crushed between the car and the 
auto, and died. Mrs. Miller was exon- 
erated of manslaughter by the grand 
jury. 

Others sentenced yesterday by 
Judge Braude were: 

LOUIS NAGRABA, 28 years old, of 
3930 North Claremont avenue, reckless 
driving; $45 fine, driving privilege sus- 
pended for thirty days. 

SAMUEL J. MENDO, 41, of 1000 North 
Keystone avenue, reckless driving; $50 
and costs and sixty days’ suspension, 

CHARLES WILSON, 43, of 7829 South 
Peoria street, reckless driving; six 
months’ probation and three months’ sus- 
pension. 

LOUIS GARDNER, 29, of 711 North 
Latrobe avenue, reckless driving; five 
days in jail. 

JOHN VLADICK, 23, of 5655 South 
Ada street, reckless driving; six months’ 
probation and sixty days’ suspension. 

Arrested on speeding charges, twen- 
ty-eight youths visited the county 
morgue and the fracture wards of the 
county hospital yesterday on one of 
Judge John Gutknecht’s “object les- 
son” tours to impress on them the 
hazards of unsafe driving. The youths 
then contributed $150 to the fund for 
needy patients in lieu of fines in 
Trafic court. 

Eli Coplan, 32 years old, of 1240 
Central avenue, Wilmette, was fined 
$100 and costs and his driving privi- 
leges were suspended for six months 
for drunken driving yesterday in 
Evanston court by Judge Harry H. 
Porter. 


Good For Snifflee 


“2-Drop” Treatment 


Apply 2 drops Penetro Nose 
Drops—each nostril. Contains 
ephedrine—helps shrink swollen 
membranes—opens air fgg oo 
brings head cold relief—Demand 
Penetro Nose Drops—25e, . 50c, 
$1.00—at druggists everywhere. 


Nobody can put into | 
coffee what Nature 
left out. Royal Jewel 
Coffee is the finest 
grown. Until Nature invents a — 
mew coffee plant, there can: 


be none better, 


For its GOODNESS sake— 
start drinking Royal Jewel 


Coffee today! 


(TRIBUNE Photo.} 
Patricia Rogers, night club en- 
tertainer, in Jury court when she 
was sentenced as a drunk driver. 


JUDGE CHARGES 
‘REIGN OF TERROR’ 
IN KANSAS CITY 


Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 2—[Special.] 
—A reign of terror exists in Kansas 
City, Federal Judge Albert L. Reeves 
declared today as he meted out. sén- 
temces ranging up to four years’ in 
prison to seven of fifty persons: con- 
victed in the government purge -of 
1936 vote frauds. 

“Twenty or more business men 
have mentioned to me that in Kan- 
sas City they do not dare take an 
attitude against conditions,” the judge 
said. “They tell me there are secret 
influences that will militate against 
their businesses. They say there is a 
system of espionage and they dare 
not vote their sentiments. 

“The espionage of Kansas City is 
such, if it were known they voted 
wrong, there would be a secret boy- 
cott against their businesses, their 
tax assessments would be raised and 
their businesses would be driven out 
of the city. Who carries on such a 
reign of terror?” 


RULES THOMPSON 
MUST SURRENDER 
$72,794TO CHARITY 


The Illinois Appellate court ruled 
yesterday that W. H. Thompson, a 
former Republican mayor, must dis- 
gorge $72,794, the last money remain- 
ing in a charity fund,. to which he 
has clung for ten years. He must 
pay the money to the American Red 
Cross. 

Yesterday’s decision was on the 
suit brought by Attorney General 
Otto Kerner in connection with $139,- 
772 subscribed by Chicagoans for the 
benefit of victims of the 1927 Missis- 
sippi flood. Attempts to compel sur- 
render of the entire sum, except $35,- 
846, actually spent for flood relief, 
began in 1931. 


INVESTIGATE the Smyth Plan of’ 
convenient payments——it’s differ- 
We: have co- 
cagoans for 71 years in ‘arranging 


ent, it costs less! 
operated with 


Unification a ‘Long Way 
Off, ‘Says Committee. 


Faced by repeated charges of mem- 
bers of the city council local trans- 


is tired of the delay in transit unifi- 
cation, officials of the Chicago Sur- 
face Lines and Chicago Rapid Transit 
company admitted yesterday their 
negotiations are deadlocked and they 
are still far from an agreement on 
any plan. 

After meeting for two hours with 
the special committee selected last 
December in Federal Judge James H. 
Wilkerson’s court to study the city 
plan for traction consolidation, and 
report back to him next Monday, the 
aldermanic committee learned three 
things. The surface lines say the 
cause is not hopeless. The elevated 
lines blame the delay on the surface 
lines- and both sides declare unifica- 
tion ,would be closer if the council 
would ‘draft .a franchise for a pro- 
posed’ consolidated organization. 

Seek’ to Hear of Progress. 

“We've understood for years the 
consolidation program was not hope- 
less, but we’ve been deadlocked for 
more than eight years,” Ald. James 
R. Quinn [50th], chairman of the 
transportation committee, told the 
group. “We called this meeting 
‘today to learn if the special commit- 
tee is making any progress.” 

William J. Lynch, representing the 
elevated lines, told the aldermen: 
“We're willing to codperate in every 
way to carry out the city’s plans. The 
surface lines have been unwilling to 
consider plans suggested by us and 
have not submitted any alternatives.” 

Guy C. Richardson, president of 
the surface lines, told the committee 
that the elevated and surface lines 
may still agree. He suggested that a 
franchise ordinance be drafted so the 
companies would know what to ex- 
pect in the event of consolidation. 

Calls for Franchise Vote. 

Most of the meeting between the 
two committees was devoted to dec 
larations by the aldermen. 

Ald. James B. Bowler [25th] said: 
“The people of Chicago are sick and 
tired of the whole thing. If some 
progress isn’t made by Monday the 
council ought to reconsider its vote of 
last week extending the surface lines 
franchise another 90 days.” 

“It will take five years to reach an 
agreement if the companies are left 
to: themselves,” declared Ald. George 
Kells [28th]. “The council must step 
in and force the issue.” 


DEATH UNDER ICE CALLED ACCIDENT. 
The death by drowning of John Keller, 22 
years old, of 4443 Wentworth avenue, who 
fell through the ice while riding his bicycle 
on the Des Plaines river Saturday, was 
termed accidental by the coroner’s jury in- 


vestigating the case yesterday. 


n Af 


portation committee that the public 


SHOE SALON FOR WOMEN 


Southeast Corner WASHINGTON & WABASH (Pittsfield Bldg.) 


ADVERTISE IN THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE 


MANUFACT 


UT Grose arie 


RERS ~ RETAILERS ~IMPORTERS 


PROD OOG \ >> C» mo Ann? KX . 
AMI? OF SURO O SRE: fa se tate ele Wee ees ADNAN MAAINNN ARIA a's n'p's'e 


a 
ee 


Are you prospecting for Furniture Values? 


Are you Price Conscious and Quality Minded,. too? 


Then Inspect Our Newly Opened Budget Rooms 


with their color ful settings and moderately | priced furnishings 


Bring along your pad and pencil—make every penny count! Form 
your own candid opinion of the exact savings—we’re sure we will 
lower your budget-estimate. Shop and Compare before you buy. 


convenient monthly er to 


exactly fit their budgets. « 


‘Text Over Free from the in 


You'll be ahead dollars by visiting our newly furnished Budget 
Rooms and Apartments. Thousands of our customers are gi 


for the splendid quality they bought and the lew prices they paid. 
A guarantee of satisfaction is traditional with us since 1867 . 


+++». 60 seourity is to be expected when you buy at Smyth's 


c- 6 


_Yaene are: Welsems 


' 
a 
* 
- 
; 
a 
: 


The Chinese resisted at Mingkwang, 
Linhwaikwan and Pengpu, but were 
defeated by a flanking movement of 
the Japanese. A Japanese force 
moving northward captured Tingyuan 
and Fengyuan and then closed in on 
Pengpu from the west. 

The Japanese stormed Pengpu with 
heavy artillery fire and a bombard- 
ment from the air. 

. Chinese Destroy Bridge. 

The Chinese destroyed the bridge 
over the Hwai river as they retreated 
northward from Pengpu, and today 
were trying to fortify new positions 
on the north bank of the river. 

The battles were fought in bitterly 
co'd weather with snow falling fre- 
quently. Japanese admitted that 600 
of their troops were killed in a sin- 
gle engagement and Chinese casual- 
ties were believed to be high. 

The Chinese had regarded Pengpu 
as a major point in their defense of 
the corridor to the sea which sepa- 
rates Japanese occupied territory in 
central China from the occupied area 
of North China. 

Pengpu is ninety miles south of Su- 
chow, the junction point of the Tient- 
sin-Pukow railway and the Lunghai, 
the east to west “lifeline” railway. 
The Japanese northern column still is 
held up at Tsining and Tsowhsien, 
about eighty-five miles north of Su- 
chow. 

Miesionaries in Battle Zone. 

Japariese declared the Chinese de- 
fense south of the Hwai river has 
now collapsed and the Chinese were 
forced into a major retreat. The Chi- 
nese, however, declared fighting con- 
tinued around Pengpu. Thousands of 
fresh troeps were being sent south- 
ward from Suchow. 

Eight miles north of Pengpu is the 
town of Hwaiyuan, where some mis- 
sionaries of the northern Presbyter- 
ian church are stationed. Among 
them were believed to be Harriet 
Stroh of Wheaton, Ill.; Miriam Petch- 
ner, Bakersfield, Cal.; Miss H. E. 
Boughton, Plainfield, N. J.; Mabe) 
Hall, Philadelphia; Dr. R. J. McCand- 
liss, Santa Monica, Cal.; Elizabeth 
Turner, St. Albans, W. Va.; D. B. Van 
Dyck, Brooklyn, N. Y., and Miss H. R. 
MacCurdy, East Toronte, Canada. 

Admits “State of War” Exists. 

TOKIO, Feb. 2—()—Foreign Min- 
ister Koki Hirota told the Japanese 
diet [parliament] today: 

“There is no Chinese central gov- 
ernment recognized by Japan. A state 
of war exists between the two coun- 
tries.” 

[Thus far in the seven months of 
Chinese-Japanese hostilities, Japan 
has not declared war on China. On 
Jan. 16 the Japanese government an- 
nounced withdrawal of recognition 
from the Chinese government headed 
by Gen. Chiang EKai-shek.] 

Hirota’s statement was in answer 
to a question by Takejiro Nishioka, 
who declared that foreign powers, 
with Great Britain and Russia in the 
lead, had been supplying China with 
arms and military funds for which 
some sort of compensation or secur- 
ity must have been offered. 

Admiral Mitsumasa Yonai, naval 
minister, also was questioned by par- 
liament members. On naval policy he 
replied: 

“ Japanese naval policy is indepen- 
dent, designed to meet Japan’s own 


needs. Even if other naval powers) 


build ‘million ton warships’ it does 
not necessarily follow that Japan 
must do the same.” 


Infantile Paralysis Plague 
Strikes New South Wales 


SYDNEY, Australia, Feb. 2.—(#)— 
Officials today announced the spread 
of an infantile paralysis epidemic ip 
New South Wales. An overnight in- 
crease of 18 cases was reported. Yes- 
terday there were 134 known suffer- 
ers and one fatality. 


{Associated Press Photo. ] 
i\..- HEBER L. HICKS. 


Michigan City,-Ind., Feb. 2.—[Spe- 
cial.]—Heber ‘L. Hicks, 40 years old, 
head and hands slayer of Harry Mill- 
er, retired Cincinnati fire captain, 
will die in Indiana state prison elec- 
tric chair a few minutes after mid- 
night tomorrow. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Hicks, Cincinnati, his parents, visited 
him today and planned to see him to- 
morrow afternoon. 

Hicks’ three companions in the 
murder, Frank Gore Williams, Wil- 
liam Kuhlman and John Poholsky, 
were executed in the prison’s first 


triple execution last June 10. Hicks, 
originally scheduled to die June 25, 
got a last minute reprieve from the 
State Supreme court pending disposi- 
tion of an appeal. 


U.S. PLAYS LONE 
HAND WITH NAVY, 
CONGRESS TOLD 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2.—[Spe- 
cial.]—Admiral William D. Leahy, 
chief of naval operations, informed 
congress today that the United 
States has not entered into a pact 
with Great Britain or any other na- 
tion involving a combination of 
navies. 

The question was brought up by 
Representative Melvin J. Mass of 
Minnesota, ranking Republican mem- 
ber of the naval affairs committee 
before which Admiral Leahy has 
been testifying in support of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt’s 800 million dollar 
naval building program. 

“This proposed program ‘: designed 
to protect the United States from 
aggressive attack without aid from 
any other nation,” Leahy said. “I 
think this proposed increase will pro- 
mote peace—not war—because when 
this building is completed we will 
have again approached the 5-5-3 ratio 
[between Great Britain, the United 
States, and Japan] which was set up 
to prevent attack by any power.” 


BRIDES ADVISED 
TO CHANGE THEIR 
SECURITY CARDS 


Brides of 1937-38 who obtained so- 
cial security account cards before they 
were married were requested yester- 
day by the social security board to 
send in their new names to prevent 
confusion in keeping of their wage ac- 
counts for federal old-age insurance. 
Cards for this purpose are now avail- 
able at any one of the board’s field 
we tas 3 six of which are in Chicago. 

. McCarthy, regional director 
of the board, explained that wage ac- 
counts are kept in the names that the 
worker gives the employer, and in- 
dividuals who change their legal 
status should correct the records to 
insure accurate recording of their 
wages and ultimate determination of 
benefits. 

Social security account card hold- 
ers, he said, may use the new appli- 
cation to correct misstatements as 
to age, address, or any other inaccur- 
ate declarations that have been made. 


Nazis Bar Catholic Young 


Men’s Groups in 2 Dioceses 
[Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 

BERLIN, Feb. 2.—A decree forbid- 
ding Catholic Young Men’s associa- 
tions in the archdiocese of Cologne 
and the diocese of Aachen was issued 
today. It was based on an order 
signed by the late President Paul von 
Hindenburg in 1933 “for the protec- 
tion of the people’s state.” Mean 


while Germany’s Bible publishers re 
ported a great increase in sales ir 
1936, total gains amounting to 162, 


copies. 


Emeraude Encores 


.. like a jewelled thread. this emerald-rich 


Pin ty” ty 


fragrance joins many new charm accessories 


GOly 


Emeraude Perfume $9.75 io $) + "Air 
Face Powde: $1 » Toilet Water $1. 
Tax s¢ md $1.10 + Dusting Powder $1. 
Bath dalis $1 « Sachet $i * Soap 35¢. 


— Bpu. 


oe ? x sr See NS ay 
eB St ee : =e . PE Shel Si at Og 
Fe ee a es ing TREE tS Bae 
Mae td Teg eee oe gid tae Bue Be 4 y > 
ee SMa RT PORES ood A beh re 
eee 


ae, 
va 
ee: 


|Seeks Also to Halt Italy’s 


‘Activities in Spain. 


BY EDMOND TAYLOR. 

3 [Chicago Tribune Press Service.] 
PARIS, Feb. 2.—The French gov: 
ernment agrees in principle with the 
plan of Capt. Anthony Eden, British 
foreign secretary, for ending the new 
wave of piracy in the Mediterranean, 
THE: TRIBUNE learned tonight from 
a semi-official source. 

Furthermore, the French agree 
with the British that some way must 
be found not only to check sea at- 
tacks but also prevent, if possible, 
Italy from carrying out new plans 
for land activity in Spain. 

Paris has information it believes 
thoroughly reliable that Premier 
Mussolini plans to send 50,000 men 
to Spain and that the embarka- 
tion is to begin immediately to carry 
out Il Duce’s determination to win 
the war for Gen. Francisco Franco, 
Spanish rebel leader. 

Fear War Materials. 

The French, like the British, have 
not any great fear of the Italian sol- 
diers, but are gravely disturbed by 
the new war material in the hands 
of Italians in Spain and headed for 
Spain, which is reported to be large- 
ly German. This equipment, together 
with terrific new German bombs, is 
believed to be capable literally of 
destroying Spanish cities in an at- 
tempt to undermine the loyalist 
courage by terrorizing the civilian 
populations. 

The new bombs are understood 
here to be of extraordinary caliber 
and to be manufactured under a new 
method containing a hitherto un- 
heard of quantity of explosive in a 
thin shell. They are said to be 
capable of destroying whole blocks 
instead of single houses. 

The new bomb, it was said, will 
change the belief held heretofore 
that airplane grenades are incapable 
of destroying cities fast enough to 
be decisive instruments of warfare. 

Eden’s Plan Reported. 

Capt. Eden’s plan for stopping 
piracy on the Mediterranean was 
kept secret, but it was understood, 
via diplomatic channels, that it in- 
cludes reénforcement of the British 
patrols in the British zone and a 
warning that all Mediterranean pow- 
ers keep submarines in their own 
territorial waters to make easier the 
finding and punishing of guilty sub- 
mersibles. 

Capt. Eden also is said to be -con- 
sidering extending the zone of sur- 
veillance to the Spanish territorial 
waters, but this measure has not yet 
been: decided upon. 

U. S. Tanker to Be Released. 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2-—/)— 
The state department announced 
today that Francisco Franco, Spanish 
insurgent general, has agreed to re- 
lease the American tanker Nantucket 
Chief as a result of representations 
by the United States government. 

The announcement said this gov- 
ernment had been informed the ves- 
sel has left Palma, in the Baleric 
islands, where it had been detained 
by insurgent forces. It said that 
after the vessel discharges its cargo 
at a main land port it and its crew 
will be set at liberty. 

The tanker, carrying petroleum 
from a Black sea port to loyalist con- 
troled Barcelona, was seized Jan. 17 
by Franco’s forces. It was under 
charter to the Spanish petroleum 
monopoly. 

Spanish Forces Deadlocked. 

HENDAYE, France [at the Spanish 
frontier], Feb. 2.—(4"—Deadlocked on 
the Teruel front in eastern Spain and 
north of Cordoba in the south, Span- 
ish government and insurgent armies 
today searched for openings in their 
enemy’s lines. 

The government announced the 
capture of the summit of Cullado 
Espina on the Somosierra front, the 
scene of little activity since the be- 
ginning of the civil war. 

In the south, insurgent artillery- 
men attempted to open a hole in the 
government’s defense works hear the 
junction of Cordoba and Badajoz 
provinces. 


etal sag 
Se 
eerie 
+ ieeratetet ete 

ences tats 


extra value! 


Golden Wedding is not merely one, but several fine, 


stains tases Prien tervtce.) 
(Pictures on back page.) 

CAIRO, Egypt, Feb. 2.—The boy 
king of Egypt, Farouk I, today ap- 
peared for the third time within two 
months as an apprentice dictator 
when he dissolved his parliament and 
ordered new elections. _ 

The decree of dissolution, published 
at 2 p. m. at the chamber of deputies, 
forestalled a session which was to 
open at 5 o’clock after-a month’s sus- 
pension and rule by Farouk’s hand- 
picked palace cabinet headed by 
Premier Mohammed Mahmoud Pasha. 

The deputies dispersed without dis- 
order and began preparations for a 
new election, which will be held on or 
about April 2, the decree of dissolu- 
tion having convoked the new parlia- 
ment for April 12. 

Hoped for Wafd Support. 

Until this morning Premier Mah- 
moud hoped that enough members of 
former Premier Mustapha Nahas 
Pasha’s Wafd [Nationalist] party 
would come over to the government 
side to enable the cabinet to face the 
chamber and get a vote of confidence. 
When it appeared, however, that 
Nahas was keeping his followers well 
in line Mahmoud produced the royal 
decree which he had in his pocket. 
Farouk had signed it yesterday. 

Fearing a rigged vote of confidence 
while they were forcibly excluded 
from the chamber, Nahas and his fol- 
lowers instaled themselves in the 
building at noon, lunched there and 
left only after the decree was posted. 

They drew up a petition requesting 
Farouk to form at once a neutral 
cabinet to conduct the elections. 

Will Revise Districts. 

The cabinet announced that the con- 
stituencies will be modified in accord- 
ance with the results of the 1937 cen- 
sus, which will mean, for one thing, 
increasing the number of deputies 
from 232 to 265. 

The Wafdists see this as affording 
an excuse for gerrymandering the 
election districts so that Mahmoud’s 
henchmen will obtain a majority in 
the new parliament. 

The Wafd party, however, an- 
nounced tonight it intends to fight 
to keep democratic institutions alive 
in Egypt. Its spokesmen said the 
party is sure of obtaining a majority 
again. 


Powder Plant Blast Toll 


in Italy Announced as 37 
ROME, Feb, 2.—(#)—It was official- 
ly announced today that 37 persons 


died in the powder plant explosion at |. 


Segni, southeast of Rome, Jan. 29. 


Radical Policies. 


[Continued from first page. ] 


army, has the backing of all the of- 
ficers on the general staf and the 
bulk of officers of the high command. 


supervise personally the instalment 
of the new minister of economics, 
Walter Funk, has been too busy in 
the conferences with the Fuehrer to 
attend to the preparatory work of 
Funk’s assumption of power. 
is understood that Funk’s nomination 
is definite, while best informed Nazi 
circles denied the appointment of 
Himmler or Robert Ley, chief of the 
Labor Front, as 
cabinet. 


as minister of economics was an- 
nounced Nov. 26. Funk was named 
as his successor, but until Funk took 
Office it was arranged that Col. Gen. 
Goering would be acting economics 
minister. Goering, in addition to be- 
ing air minister, is chief of the Ger- 
man four year plan for economic self- 


sufficiency. ] 


Hitler becomes war minister it will 
mean only a temporary solution, and 
that the Fuehrer must continue to 


Col. Gen. Goering, who wanted to} 


But it 


ministers in the 


(Dr. Hjalmar Schacht’s resignation 


Secrecy Shrouds Crisis. 
Government circles realize that if 


Get some — this Gasoline today from 


your STANDARD OIL DEALER 


GENEVA, Feb. 2. 


4 ae ; 
i gn ot Pasa seat : 
¢ re us i 
; oo ‘ are oe i 
. . att oe > _- 3 
bn Sn Ni vs 4 
il : : ( 
€&. . ¥ y - 
. : ce : , . 
: ay a ‘ egy 


in-chief of the French army, «~~ ; 
one ® see in Col. Gen. : 


imate greater duties. 


the = pe pe te for the} 


LEAGUE COUNCIL 
TO AID CHINESE 
—(/)—The council 
of the league of nations closed its 
100th session today after adopting a 
resolution asking league powers to 
aid China, Two nations, Poland and 
Peru, abstained from the voting. 

Dr. Wellington Koo, the Chinese 
delegate, warned that violence in the 
orient jeopardized the peace of 
Europe. Appealing for aid, he insisted 
it was the league’s duty and “ oppor- 
tunity” to discourage Japanese ag- cies, 
gression in China. He declared mal- aa ee 
treatment of Americans and Euro- 
peans by Japanese soldiers in China 
had been an intentional step in a 
Japanese plan to drive occidentals 
out of the orient, 
Dr, Koo declared the resolution was 
inadequate and reserved the right for 
China to ask the league later “to 
adopt positive measures.” 


Q000 
O600000 
ROO 
LIP RIO 
fy Be 


Try this 
VITALIZING, 
HEALTHFUL, 
FOOD-DRINK 


—<at OUR RISK 


We don’t ask you to risk one cent on MALVAZ, 


Unless MALVAZ proves its value to you after drink- 
ing several bottles, you receive without question a 
full refund of all that you paid. 


We know that MALVAZ has been enjoyed and 


praised by thousands of people, that only two cartons 
of the many thousands sold have ever been returned 
for a refund! Thatis why we feel safe in making such 
an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction to you. 


MALVAZ is MORE than just another pleasant- 
tasting drink—it is a nour aa 
stimulating, vitalizing FOOD 
DRINK—enjoyed by men and ‘wom- 
en who are run-down, neurasthenic 
or convalescent. Taken urider doctor’s 
orders it has often helped to re-build 
normal strength, MALVAZ may be 
just what you need. Order a carton 
today. 


distinctive whiskies—-each expressly chosen for — w 
ite on charactoriate of Sfomyty, tarts, 2nd body | 


Yay 2B et eat TNE. Area 
sip. Steg Bae Ie EON Sot RD 


> ee * 24-bottle carton... ....$2.75 
(50c refunded for empties) 
12-hettle Marton. seene - $1.40 
/ df a5 ; (ahqeontes for empties) 
WIVES!—fly a “second.honeymoon Usa emeye 
al | Thssess uf Monarch Beer 
| coucrchs Bre 
with your husband ‘% M --ei a Compe ny 
« 
| LH#IY- AO W.. Chica dys Yi OOU 
Yes—it’s really true. We want 
you to be our guest, to accom- YW thief h e ' 
pany your husband free of “Vetipany | : ; 
charge—if he buys a one-way hi flr hsb fr _ CRO SS WORD PUZZLE | | 
or round trip Chicago-New | Naf 7 3 : | 
York ticket between now and March Ist. ; yA HORIZONTAL 
We're making this offer because we know tn Yo 1. Indian harvest 29. Delve 58. Shapeless cap 
that some wives object to their husbands “ WwW ) > —_ i we — pr ge 
ee a | . Deep lethargy 34, n : 
flying—and one trial flight will completely Hess of | 14. Spread out 36. Japanese receptacle 64. Land measure 
convert you to the luxurious comfort and Gite? | 15. Lake 38. Accommodation for 66, Disappear 
dependability of air travel. 7 Win Loy 16. Active quality spectators 70, Thorough 
4] €¢ tov *? ae Mes 17. Ratify 43. Set out 73. Unused 
ij Me 4 I fly high be rt - lo — | | 18. Unlikeness 45. By way of 74, Behaves in disorderly 
ssescratcont ai ta ae tegen cues 7 20, Stretch out 46.. High structure fashion 
has completed 40,000 trips. 22. Methed of communi- 47. Fighters 74. teas been e6e 
Make your plans for a glamorous second ye pins (abbr.) Pa hoe 76. Froth 
* oe ad 77. Suceinct 
honeymoon” now! 24. Appendage §2. Narration ae 
TO rte YORK: 6 round-trip i, 4 eg’ 26. Knock 54. ‘Taxaceous tree 78. Prop 
rz: in United's exclusive Skyl 28. Unite 55. Blackbird 79, Shade trees 
LIFOR IA-SEATTLE: 2 ovcctlahe: itbépee 
N IT E D I R I N E flights, and scenic daylight trip. VERTICAL 
TICKETS: 23 E. Monroe St., HEMlock 8800 
é 1. Got 31. The chick-pea 65. Eat sparingly 
THE “MAIN LINE” AIRWAY—A YEAR "ROUND ROUTE Ze _ oF. Object of adoration 
* = Mit sir 3. Stroke 35. Short jacket 68. Bang 
ihipeataiti * it ‘i pam 4. Ria 37, Round objects ; 69. Stitches 
, 5. Nuptials 39. Pertaining to birth 71. Advantage 
6. Silkworm 40, From a place 72. By way of 
7. Raise 41, Field of granular 
8. Postpone snow PFs PUZZLE 
9, Conveyance 42, Depicted SO: 
10. Old 44, Not slack 
‘11. Make fresh again 48, Result of sorrow 
12. Relative 49, Bondage 
13. Mount 53. Time 
19. African antelope 55. Watchful 
121, Horse of doubtful 56. Water sprite ; 
wotth 57. Ethereal fluid (classi- 
25. Early form of animal cal myth.) 
life ' §9. Bane of good house- 
27. Bothersome insect wives 
29. Round, flat plate 61. Stab 
30. Preposition 63. Takes in 
] ee 
4zo 22 ae 
ne | e 8 ee Tae 3 
ae ris * * Sige te ; 
| | ; a € re : ¥ ‘ = 5. z 4 a t es : . 
merged ee exquisite boar : These ree | a = 3 a a. i i. bis . . : 
| | | 2 iS a ae . @ pees i ee Pes ae re S E 
3 Be fi ee Ses RS ; a , 7 
ee on $e ne St Ee wee 2 
a re. oe ru ghs we 3 cm ie : 4 aoe oe eh i ae Ste ie bo. : - ne Ur ae sak re ee os oe 


Strong 

‘ful wool, Beka “ome 
sheep. Spun and 
carded in Scotland 
and smart as possi- 
ble for sweaters and 
dresses. We are now 
offering it for the first 
time at this excep- 
tionally low price. 


Kitten Soft 


ANGORA 


2-ply white— 
If "“O2Zee 48e 

Keeping the sheep 
company is this kit- 
ten soft French An- 
gora yarn for sweat- 
ers, scarfs, hats, in- 
fants’ wear, afghans. 
It makes the sort of 
knit things you envy 
in imports. Very spe- 
cially priced. 

Fancy Goods—Third 


_ Floor, South, State Z 


SSE ae OE EE EEE 


SS OE OE: 


on oe Soha atataidare ogee MATOS Ok eee PK 
RP COE HT IRE CPE OOF 


on His Knowledge of Tobacco... 


BY PARKE BROWN. 


A three man fight for: the Demo- : 
cratic nomination for United States I 


senator was made certain yes 
through authoritative — 


clare himself a candidate on Satur- 


The entry of Congressman Scott 
W. Lucas was assured twenty-four 
hours earlier when he was indorsed 
at a Horner meeting in Springfield 
and accepted that support. 

The complete lineup of the impor- 
tant contenders was established 
when Senator William H. Dieterich, 
in Chicago to make a speech, asserted 
that he is in the April primary battle 
to stay. 

Report Courtney-Jarecki Alliance. 

State’s Attorney Thomas J. Court- 
ney, who has been urged to run, has 
not given his final answer, but already 
is considered lined up behind County 
Judge Edmund K. Jarecki in an in- 
dependent fight against the organi- 
zation. 

The other remaining angle is that 
Newton Jenkins, four times a candi- 
date for similar honors under other 
party labels, now is seeking the 
Democratic senatorial berth while a 
law office associate, Robert M. 
Adams, is out for the Republican 
nomination for the same office. 

Judge Jarecki, who was shelved by 
the Kelly-Nash organization in favor 
of Judge John Prystalski, announced 
that he will be a candidate in the pri- 
mary. It was also learned, however, 
that his supporters have discussed 
favorably a plan for him to run as an 
independent candidate in the Novem- 
ber campaign if he fails to win the 
nomination from Judge Prystalski. 

“I’m not ready to discuss my plans 
or the nature of my campaign,” said 
Judge Jarecki, “ except to say that it 
will be a continuation of my battle 
for honest elections and that I shall 
carry it into every ward:‘in the city 
and into every suburb in the county. 
I’m busy now on organization plans.” 


Igoe Announcement Saturday. 


District Attorney Igoe will make 
his plans known on Saturday, as the 
downstate committee, which already 
has gathered 50,000 signatures in his 
behalf, files his nominating petition 
in Springfield. That petition must be 
accompanied by his signature to a 
statement that he is a candidate. 

Mr. Igoe’s position has been that he 
will not permit politics to interfere 
with his official duties beyond the un- 
avoidable minimum. If it were not 
for the statutory requirement that his 
declaration of candidacy accompany 
his petition, it is said, he would defer 
any public step concerning his candi- 


‘dacy until after the trial of the Ross 


kidnaping case. 
Under these circumstances it is ex- 


| pected that when Thomas P. Sinnett, 


chairman, and other members of the 
downstate committee supporting him, 
call at the United States courthouse 


Robert W. Barnes 
—lIndependent Buyer — 
one of many tobacco ex- 
perts who smoke Luckies 


“"¥ OFTEN invest $2500 a week 
in tobacco — $2500 of my 
own hard-earned cash,” says 
Mr. Barnes. ‘‘So you can see that 
the only way I’ve stayed in busi- 
ness 10 yeats is to know tobacco. 
“Now I know Lucky Striketo- 
bacco and it’s top-grade. That’s 


why I’ve 
eight years now. 


smoked Luckies for 


“Lots of other independent 


buyers, auctioneers, and ware- 
housemen I know smoke Luckies | 


“sudavanetitin 
[goe, United States | 
district attorney at Chicago, will de-| 


PS REISS ee SE TELE LE ONE 


jAppellate Court, Passes 


[TRIBUNE Photo.} . 

Elmer Hoffman, Du Page county 
deputy sherif who will seek Re- 
publican nomination for  sherif, 
giving one of two friends a cup of 
coffee in the courthouse, 


The name of Elmer J. Hoffman of 
Wheaton will appear at the top of 
the list of aspirants for the Republi- 
can nomination for sherif of Du Page 
county. Two of his friends are see- 
ing to this by keeping a continuous 
vigil at the courthouse door in 
Wheaton to present his petition to 
County Clerk Clarence V. Wageman 
precisely at 8 a. m. Saturday, 

Wilbur Wassbrock and Merritt 
Pratt, both of Wheaton began their 
political marathon last Monday night. 
Since Clerk Wageman won’t permit 
them to clutter up the corridor out- 
side his office door until tomorrow 
night, they have had to establish 
quarters in the wooden storm shelter 
outside the courthouse. door, 


this afternoon to show him the thou- 
sands of signatures of voters who 
want him to run, Igoe will take the 
subject under consideration. He in- 
tends to take time for a formal an- 
nouncement defining his reasons for 
running. 

Senator Dieterich boosted President 
Roosevelt’s national defense program 
before the Army and Navy club at 
the Congress hotel at noon, then 
talked with reporters on politics. 

He said he would not comment on 
the announcement that Congressman 
Lucas had been sponsored by the 
Horner faction, save to say that it 
would in no way affect his intention 
to run for renomination. 

After a telephone call from the 
senator saying he wanted to have a 
talk Mayor Kelly last night called 
on Dieterich at the Blackstone hotel. 
Later both said that no agreement 
of any sort resulted from their meet- 
ing. 

State’s Attorney Courtney, who is 
an ally of Gov. Horner and, therefore, 
did not participate in the delibera- 
tions of the county committee when 
it scratched Judge Jarecki, declined 
to talk about that; but he has said 
he is deeply aroused by the principle 
involved in the effort to unseat a 
judge who has been on the bench 
for four terms. 


ORIMINAL COURT. 
Lester Krieman, robbery, sentenced to 
1 to 20 years in the penitentiary by 
Judge John C. Lewe. 


The Illinois Appellate court yester- 
day upheld the conviction of nine 


jmen and five women who received 


prison sentences or fines for permit- 
ting fraud at the polls in the 20th 
ward during the April primary of 
1936. Four were poll watchers and 
the others officials. 

The political workers and a woman 
Democratic judge were convicted of 
conspiracy to make false election re- 
turns by a jury in the Criminal court 
May 11, 1937, and sentenced to one 
to five years in the penitentiary. 
Four other women officials, convicted 
on a lesser count, were fined $200 
each. All served in the 4th precinct. 


Five Sentenced by Jarecki. 


The other case involved the 3ist 
precinct. There five election officials 
were sentenced to one year in jail by 
Judge Edmund K, Jarecki, who found 
them guilty of contempt as officers 
of the County court, which has juris- 
diction over elections. 

Those sentenced to prison in the 
Criminal court trial are: Mrs. Doro- 
thy Berger, 38 years old, 1214 South 
Homan avenue, Democratic judge; 
Clement Amore, 34, of 1043 South 
Winchester avenue, Republican pre- 
cinct captain; Barney Siegal, 37, of 
1260 South Spaulding avenue, Demo- 
cratic precinct captain; John Zittello, 
27, of 1911 Taylor street, and Sanders 
Caravello, 29, of 1132 South Win- 
chester avenue, party workers. 


Four Women Fined. 


The women officials who were fined 
are: Mrs. Rose Amore, 29, wife of 
Clement Amore, a Republican judge; 
Mrs. Edna Sulli, 34, of 1219 South 
Damen avenue, Democratic judge; 
Mrs. Kate Paldo, 25, of 1913 Taylor 
street, Republican clerk, and Mrs. 
Nancy Del Monaco, 27, of 1038 South 
Winchester avenue, Demoératic clerk. 

In a contempt trial before Judge 
Jarecki, each of the judges was sen- 


cludes only a sprinkling of profes- 
sional politicians, | 

The committee created under the 
chairmanship of Dr. Glenn Frank to 
frame a program of constructive op- 
position to the Roosevelt régime, will 
establish headquarters in Chicago and 
hold its first meeting there, Feb. 28 
and March 1. 


tenced to one year in jail, and the 
clerks to six months each, Their ap- 
peal is still pending. 

The Appellate court opinion, writ- 
ten by Judge Ross C. Hall, cited the 
testimony in this case of two watch- 
ers for the Chicago Association of 
Commerce. They told of officials as- 
sisting voters to mark ballots, and 
of arbitrarily assigning votes to each 
candidate in the count. 


Sentenced from $list Precinct. 


Those sentenced in the County 
court in the 3lst precinct are: Fred 
Savaiano, 28, of 733 Taylor street, and 
Mike Corso, 29, of 771 De Koven 
street, Repblican judges; Carmen Ba- 
gnola, 35, of 763 De Koven street, 
Democratic judge; Alex J. Morelli, 28, 
of 737 De Koven street, Republican 
clerk, and John Cantore, 23, of 733 
Taylor street, Democratic clerk. 

Testimony of two impartial poll 
watchers in the 31st precinct was also 
cited in the Appellate court opinion, 
which pointed out that 150 voters 
were given assistance, that beer and 
whisky were served in a back room, 
and that numerous ballot markings 
were changed. 


| Piquett Makes Ist Report 


to U. §. Probation Officer 


Louis P. Piquett, former attorney 


\for John Dillinger and who spent a 


year and nine months in Leaven- 
worth penitentiary for harboring 
Homer Van Meter, Dillinger gang- 
ster, made his first appearance yes- 
'terday before Walter K. Ulrich, chief 


| probation officer for the federal Dis- 


trict court. Piquett got four months 
off his sentence for good behavior 
and must report once a month until 


the end of the period. 


sions, errs a and ene put in- 


Attorney General Otto Kerner 
asked the Illinois Supreme court yes- 
terday to take jurisdiction over Abra- 
ham Karatz, convicted of conspiracy 
to embezzle in Cook county, who was 
saved from the penitentiary by Cir- 
cuit Judge Edwin L. Wilson, sitting 
at Joliet. 

The attorney general filed a peti- 
tion with the high court for a writ of 
certiorari which would compel Judge 
Wilson to send his records in the 
case to Springfield and to surrender 
any jurisdiction he might have. Mr. 
Kerner acted at the request of State’s 
Attorney Courtney, who sent Assis- 
tant State’s Attorney Robert Wright 
to Springfield on the mission. 


Replies to Contempt Threats. 


Assistant State’s Attorney James 
Cunningham of Courtney’s staf and 
Deputy Sherif Edward Scholler re- 
arrested Karatz after Judge Wilson 
had released the convict on bail. In 
reply to threats of contempt made 
by Judge Wilson when he heard of 
the action, Prosecutor Cunningham 
said there was a question as to 
whether Judge Wilson was not in 
contempt of the Supreme court for 
releasing the convict on a writ of 
habeas corpus. 

No action was taken yesterday on 
Attorney General Kerner’s petition 
to the Supreme court, but it is ex- 
pected that the writ of certiorari will 
be granted today. If so, it is under- 
stood this will prevent Judge Wilson 
from proceeding tomorrow on the 
Karatz case. 


Held in Cook County Jail. 


The Cook county authorities had 
said they would defy Judge Wilson 
and would refuse to produce Karatz 
when the habeas corpus hearing is 
resumed in Joliet. Karatz has been 
held in the Cook county jail since 
last Friday, when he was seized in 
Joliet after Judge Wilson continued 
the hearing a week. 

The attorney general termed Judge 
Wilson’s writ illegal interference and 
said he would not permit any one 
to prevent the incarceration of a per- 
son. lawfully sentenced, a: Karatz 


was. 


MALING BROTHERS 


SPECIALISTS IN PERKING.UP.WINTER SPIRITS 


LBL TENS 


THE CORRECT SHOE FASHION INTERLUDE 
‘TWIXT WINTER AND SPRING 


They couldn't be lovelier if they were $10 


Maling’s IN-BETWEENS 
are a shoe‘tonic for you, 
they'll carry you straight 
through from now. till 
Spring with refreshed spir- 
its and renewed smartness. 
Black, Brown, Navy,Gray. 


: 


If you are worried about your 


hair and if you don’t want to be 
bald—you can avoid baldness by 
consulting a Thomas’ scalp spe- 


cialist at once. 


He will examine 


your hair and scalp and deter- 
mine the exact cause of your hair- 
loss. He will then direct the 18- 
year proved Thomas’ method to 


meet your specific needs. 


Your 


hair-fall will stop; dandruff dis- 
appear; and before long you will 
notice new hair growing on the 


thin and bald spots. 
Call at one of the Thomas’ 


offices for a free scalp examina-. 
tion. The Thomas’ specialist will 
not accept you for treatment un- 
less he is reasonably sure that 
you will obtain satisfactory re- 
sults. Come in today and learn the 
truth about your hair and scalp. rf 


7 


md 


“THOMAS’ 


World’s Leading Hair and Scalp Specialists—Over 45 Offices 
Loop—30 W. Washington St. (Separate Depts. for Men and Women) 


W est Side—4010 W. Madison 


North Side—4753 Broadway 


South Side—6306 S. Halsted St. and 841 East 63rd St. 


HOURS—10 A. M. to 8:30 P. M. 


Florida Bound 


LO Vdron says:- 


Im headi 


SATURDAY to 7 P. M, 


n south 


USE THIS COUPON 


tie, .LANIGAN, Passenger Trafic Manager 
501 Central Station, Chicago, Illinois 


Please send me complete information about your 


I am interested in Completely Arranged Florids 
Tours C)] Auto Shipping O 


(State region interested in) 


for the same reason.” 
Yes, sworn records show that, — 
among independent tobacco ex- 
perts like Mr. Barnes, Luckies 
have over twice as many exclu- 
sive smokers as have all the 


‘4 PRS PP Lee GE Tate Sey tn kay Bot 

23 ae: - © ee ral ade dees £5 ae. MAS 

aes ae big? Df Si pee Keg oS ad 24 ae 
. eet pa: , re ¥ . %. * 


Scapa: adnan 


- « 
" * aad bes) 
" eS Ne eal A te Uh ee 4 3 Sak: 
“* CR ee  . 0 
ey oR vis te ba 
* 


Pept s Deniers cite. a ae a &S 
od ag lie adi” on ee. 
es Ree hee ar Se rks F P Pe ae Rib ec, 

= er omer Te 2 


alee eel ameal 


= = +¥ Ay > 4s 
wie. Sj at rie age 
y 
a ae 


“> aad 
i¢ ie OMT ’ é it ‘ 
et e:6 t 6i¢ tie ereree eper eee beleis@ 
+E» - a 
’ ene e.e Na a/ ré Set 76 
7 


‘Vieali Be 8)s8> SSleeresiass t 


- bee ‘ eejetee-+. Si 


eke S 3 ~&eigieiesy’ Jk. ¢ 


: : O d 
*- 
Lis S . ° a . & 
el 
Lic , & Me 


on DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, Etc. 


Quickly Obtained -——- No Notes — 
No Signers—WNo Investigation. 


$1 to $10,000 — Lowest Rates 
A Refined Service 
ILLINOIS STATE PAWNERS 


140 N. DEARBORN ST. 
Cer. Rand. Private Rooms, 2nd Floor 


SILLS PP IPS 
St hg 


id eae, ee ae x” 
RR EL I 
ei sege Pie : ge PT Soi 


Ce 
Mf Sy oe 
tiie 
“i 


oe 


PARLIN 
Wren 
PO Add ds 


rs 
id fa 


- 
ce 
s 

ro , 


CA = © ” pet, ha eo - 
I EE, Fe 4 

GEE TB ae 

7 fxd - 


<? 


AQRAIS PM Po 
PRIN 


A Sere 


if 
¥ 


ye 


. 
ey 


SPS Lg Wit ee 
OO ene Ae 
ee ae COE 


is SLLIIIILLS 


Ee 


“— 


Pras . 
hh adda 
i ae 


ee 


eas Ue eS Laat? rane ees ae 
_ WEW PRICES OLD PRICES 


aes 


os . +2 es ae hey ey 7 
+S ee is PP as ol , 
wittanae RAS wt pile Enea e 


st yh ta tank, 


2 _ af ' , . = 
he Sag) ome Ge 
Sc,’ ee 
% 4 * ‘ ? 
«, ‘ 
~ H g te + . § ; ae 
; are : nie 5 ) ai: Te =18 . ’ ; se 
‘ rv 12. " a9 thhele'e P é a 
ne exer ' ,0OBT ‘ SC EEALTI: me 
I 1C g ‘ 3 3 ‘ata stere i 
- epg. 8 - OS L. aC € aie ; : 
¢ J ay t ‘ + et: 5 ; ; 
- * e3¢ é seer 8eyeeees* = —9 6 #)% ¢ 
~~ T CobGb a cle OTTie e PC RRLEDE i 3 
S10rF wv 1 € one me wc 1 us 
fd sege ete , ¢€ (ee . a J 
‘ t TOVeEC ‘ “ale ity ‘ AOC ST 
; ee epteiete 4 a 
Vis atk ~ » - \ ae gic? 18 »/ 
POTTS Own ‘ ‘ ¢ 
. ion . 46 iT Lr niOT 
4 4 #4 4 ‘ n 4 et “ i 
10 ° . - : TTanLed re ' epbee ‘6 . : 
‘ 5 ore onr = rt, BL - 
a 4 
‘ Y ~ ‘ < *)8) oT 
= | ¢ ' Dit ~ I g s JECT 
e : MA LiO§ = » : Sie ~ sie@)¢ t . eete eje j 
+ t ieee gf ' . ; opte 


P WC - ream be TeErogic aC Ain 


5 a ae ae 
om fe ° o ~ Bete 
© PW 2 5 Spe 
on’s OC ass 
sthe ¢ t =: Hic ne 
ace are 
5 . . 
. v : 3 5° =4 ~ . ’ PAC ge 
q - 4 & 
2 lado 1) ¥ ¥ 
. 78°. : +eze Sa 
‘ : vit = = ‘* Cite. 
ele ‘ ® ‘4 ws 
* : ete ’ & ‘§ ‘ a ¢ é : - ’ n *® wy gt 
" a6, = 
6 (Lit % . Bi, 


La 
: -ake e 
“ oper - J . s *,.6 ad . eere ~Jeehesle ‘ 
P 
| 
. AD) ° A nmousehoigd nemedy fi ‘) Years 
ade eje ‘ Writ) © eC) AeTOTre V ° ret at 3 ~7-98 ’ etete,',’ 
ac 
- _ - e)eecece =! yep ae ' ef: 
. 


: 
= 
** 


. 


or better wo g conditions o STATE, ADAMS AND DEARBORN STREETS 


Interested in Self Improvement? Here's 


magavs i ena te mamen tor “veces! © AN Liberal Education 


sted, tying | oat before the ahipe were scheaulee || §=EIGh School Self Taught 


esgenss IE he winter of 1936, Mrs, He : 20 Yolumes 


: arine dus was sub Ts ee a in One Book 

ais e}: A Se eae 
sreive i VILE aU pt: OTis p0ard Was Bex: Let aeons 
; ~ hae e a : 3 Sees 5 ; Ree 

4 2 - s . * AE . - S * n ny 

= oe . ‘ ; ‘ aie 

. ‘ 1ié ; 2A He ’ eC : 4 Room, % : eee eate a 
7 - x > Be : 2 R ’ ee ears 


- This extraordinary book en- 
ig a : me eee ables you to get the equiv- 
, Me a alent of a high school edu- 
. 2 and it petitioned the New Yc gc eS cation easily, quickly and 

ST ae  a— in your spare time. 
idihheinig A ony, and voting had been completeé 20 subjects are offered in this book—each carefully planned and organ- 
anit halinde aomnted o a ized by authorities trained in adult education. Complete with compre- 


eines PEE : 928 hensive study outline and examinations. Among the subjects to be 
studied are: 


; » labor|lots were cast and o ese 10,( Good English Psychology Ancient History 


ta. contracts | voted : ations : French, Spanish Biology Medieval Histery 


reneRE : ) ;  sfillate English Literature Physics, Chemistry Modern, U. $. History 


ate, and the ew cee Ghee ota yi Mall and Phone Orders Given Prompt and Careful Attention 


" 
ae sei denied charges made ‘THE FAIR—State, Adams, Dearborn, Chicago: : 
od me . RESER OTs 2 sup Please send me......,...Books, “High School Self Taught.” 

3 pame See eae ' Charge [] Cash Enclosed [] Amount [] 


7 $ AS D pe ; e 1 


NAME li tdi te en ne Ph Lhe LLL 


> S * 46 ? . s a ‘ é 
2 2 ors 2 r Bos 2 ADDRESS CCH SPC SEC CRO CHES SEHESESEHP SCC eHe REC ASCBeeeeseseeheeeseeeeeeeeeeeeseeeees 
. = 5 
. :F. ti ms fF ’ wi ’ tn ' b CITY CHOOSE EEE EHOHEHEHER ESOC EEE HHH EEEP HO SEHESEHEOH EEE HE HOSED EEOE EOS 
U . - Nsen nr ‘at. “Tals * reara oc : (eorgeé eTitTitiiititiitittrtittirttetLlLLFLLCLTLLLLCLLCLLLLLULCLCLLCLL, 
: : “s om : 3h wr 7 a ’ ion , os ag n st : THE FAIR—Main Floor Book Sectione-State Street Store, s 
6) oe = : : ei68 ' ; 4 4 . 4 “ “te ~ 2 “ . y ’ os ; : . a | é s 


Py ss eee 
a / 
: oer ee LORE Id Ogu pees PPP nin or e "7 
aero \ tl (PRET E, ; 
i ee en oe ead SIP ‘ 3 1 7, , on 
, is a 7 , x , 

he 


. 
*.* 


x 
SS 


Pls 
Peers ee 


TLIN 


sa 


ig FAMOD 


. sy Ina é 
- is / Pit o/. ‘ 
Bes ahy! he 
pies te ; 
- ee fe ’ -? 
Lee 
Ay ‘ rT) 
ea Sor 
ory 
ee : Py 
rare! ‘ » % Sor 
an, Rennie 
del APRS Ke 
eR 4 oe, Fa 
ia NR ‘ata 
a a as < “a 


petatity 
Se eee Sod 


AKI ROY 


Kies 
AIS A 
“vod 


ALLIED OO 


“/ 


- tA 5 
i Saar ; 
Mate it Mase 
LEED 


“ 
Pf, oe 
oe y 
uf 


e 


state? 
Pattee d 
ee 


o, OOO 
Rei 
a 


i's! 


OO 


CA 


PR 


pete 
phat 
Patahe 
oe 


| : we 
GER ELE 


aa ARE fe " 
: ARLE OOOO 


ete 
Me eee Grass YOLOO 


a 
5 DeSe 


Li 


7 Ot 


p THI 


Or fete ‘ 
MMII iain 
De eate aie LESS 4 


Ll POS 


OIE os Ne 
x Naat ire : , f : 
Op tet . “ane? eto » *f,*,* 
OPENSIM Md , rh iar etetat aah chg hee eesaeaaaasae 
‘ Ron, “- cali - - 
fs PRPS ; ; - rat, 
ne ew 
mie 
: Lhe: Oe. 


ws 


Stat 
PIA TA PO 
ISAO 


3% 
oe woe 
, ree stiats 


> Seattle 
<a 


apes 
Meet is 
siesta 


Ty re 
ie. ee 


ee PASO. oy | 
; Pi ora % 


< hit A 


- EBL SED 
a RR LIRR 
pee PEE anne ORE. 

AP 


— 
ATER 
Se Me . 
BER RRR g 


eo 


coe 
on 

ate, 
ed 


aK RAI es es : 


< 
aS ORT se Mpeihe 
LL ALESIS, ieee as ae LAS ta 
noe ey LAELI IP iS ee  lltt—“‘“‘“—:;iCs—stwC—iCS ee ee lel Gell le ee ee eae ae weetate 
*s LLL LL AG OP” AAR RAR 
gical SP 


“ / on 
<a NTs J 
SII ITO OLE 
ne A ee fet ash a 


> 


- 
ee - 
& At A 
a 
+ . 
ry 
he 
a4 
% 5 ~t 
ay 
> si 


EEP the system open. Restore its alkaline 
balance. These ate the sensible precautions 
against colds, Lemon-and-soda helps do doth. 


How to Fix It: 


Squeeze the juice of a Sunkist Lemon in- 
to a tall glass of cold or warm water. Into 
another glass, put a half teaspoonful of or- W y AT T () 

inary baking soda (bicarbonate). Pour back 
and forth, and drink when foaming subsides. JUICE 

Do this morning and evening when ex- [eee 
posed to colds. 

Make It A Rule! 

If your system is sluggish, make this the to ANwenc: 
first order of every day, and chances are you GLASS PUT !/2 
will never need a harsh laxative. This simple . rhe ‘ ope rere op 
drink quickly made with household ingre- (BICARBONATE) 
dients is all the corrective many people need. 
Actually, long-time users tell us, it increases 
in effectiveness when followed regularly, _ 

Try it. See how you benefit—right from 


tthe start. Copyright, 1988, California Fruit Growers Exchange 


California Sunkist Lemons 


TALL GLASS OF 


OS mending Rte 


2 

e) %e 4 

- ’ 

: ols * 

ec. 

. # 4h 

ie alfete's 

; vie ; eibtele ‘ ° 
’ ‘ 7 ; @Ceoe “ete le ’ j 
. scape 6,6) spetere ee rn , 

: n a ne eer : HOLBOT? rr ‘ a'4ase 
a J +). + + beee Ate ’ ‘ ’ Per ste 

‘ ree a) ' the epereehe 

‘ ’ ee ste ‘ vee 
eit? ’ ; MAD | ” S/, ‘é 


ME aA aye Your pharmacist will tell 
Vises oie ; A tubborn 


chances 


are your § 


»es * 


“ 4 " ; ’ ; ? 25 ~ 
i sis . - ® iie.e ; $i i¢ i 
3 * iy Wace A 
iz thy 


piling, “Paden weep : Sta ses 
syd: ape bets 


‘ ai ‘ ¥ f. sia : a7 we e . '’.¢ 
a. 4 ro wes 7 Thine & a Bi ay od —. 
’ 4 ~~ . a aa ae Ties, ‘ 
; ' A PA " ; N by ss ‘ * 7 = 
1 Maho tient Tepe ghost ee ABR - Be a a : - a a y igs 
- { ’ “ 5 - Leia § 13.8) & .% Th LAO 'i\.- 2 
POPPE oe kyr tgirls. g gy “Nae AG —_—- * : os i 
4 ; oy 4 a ei , x & ; ¢ Le : 
dt Pod» - SB — p ae ae B . is k : ” ‘i os ¥ 
‘2. 2 eat aot . 
° —e eee ad — oar ne id 5 » ¥ e)i 
Ba Mates sine hl BaD Pcspero to cape eich ents re Ww 7 
a | . 7 = me oo $. age a Moreen 
; ee aera oy aot oe eee: ei Y Hy #33 Sade aS 
; Pes alata hal tee Oo ar Wee OF Dy ost "ar oe Per ie » 
é& ‘ ‘ a 4 : t "2913 S77 > Sie i P ‘a3 
sa ; 4 het ner. ” buted, Aap coe - Sipe, er BIE trey bs ee oe 5 DB gaitire : oS 
2 5 ‘ e 4 ‘ & . i tm aX Lhe ERT es mi 
Dae fi : Dn your | * ? “5 e ; 72 - - % 
a y ? Vial be i ‘a.\2i8 te Pititie > .o8 48 ’ 
34 ot ey 4 or a by Bachem eg Nn 2 Pinte y eth 
#1 F ~~ ‘Le <3 A ~~ ar? call - Toe aa a, Baa aes 
© : ; iy ¥ y oe ps 
ot eS ele ee ee oe ei ei isin rF ope pF Ph i ees < .§ pis 
: MORES ASE oS TA yg Aa ag aR cee eck 5 
e “ee” args etry ey Se oa ee, ~ aan ae ~ Sa Bare 
Ot eater ee eee 
y ai ‘yee t R03 i , 
J ~ _ 
ie : 
b 
i. A ery Be Soe 
fiddle oes Lie ss Cites Pe ee, Pick TR ae HN a eae g eg: 43 ; ee 
cos?) ie Ce = ; oF a g eT Se SEES ST FRE Ne he ra rae ie ee, pat : oY oi Sa ase ay 
ae cat in . , plies ee gies ene a OS 5 see en ea 


eh eS Pain 2 Ag ican ED st. 


Sone 


ee 


-. 


ee 


eaceniatetrete ncaa 


een Ne 
eas”, ral 
Samet 


a ee 


real soon, there'll come again that 
year (Saint Valentine’s Day) 
“an sell her that you love her 
seada's say a word... just 
Mrs. Snyder’s . . . ‘a lovely 
rs. Snyder’s .. . and somehow 

will understand, 


OUT OF TOWN CUSTOMERS 5 
S TO MRS. SNYDER’S MAIN 
aot N WABASH AVE., pain HO ° 


—————— 


RED 
Box i 


_AND SILVER HEART 
of delicious hard and soft 
ate ig s, nut candies 
and ch sizes, at Wie $2.10, $1.65 and 


Cash fr 
Jpn age tee 


“OLD GOLD 

f/ELRY—WATCHES 

GOLD TEETH—SILVER 
PAWN TICKETS 


This institution is o ginny by Public 
We Al citizens to help: you obtain cash. 


eee Pay the Best Prices 


on Diamonds, Jewelry, 
Demerara, Furs, etc. 


South Wabash Ave. 


‘Corner Monroe Street, 3rd Fleer 
ESTABLISHED 1900 


Onl y I¢ For 
SORE THROAT RELIEF 


buy the large family 

size gyn t.\ Joseph Pees af 84% 
ages ie = the be eet er ta 

e tab- 

ing J , Song v de adh in warm 

water, then gargled, bring relief 

to sore throat:-due to cold. 
Also real economy in the 8-dozen 
size at 20c, the 1-dozen size at 10c. 


World’s Largest Seller at 10c 


St.Josepn 


GENUINE PURE ASPIRIN 


CUTICURA : 


ipa | 4 


ene Ss oe 
= Maan 


Men of Apiahieak 


for relief in Illinois alone by federal, 
state, and local governments during 
the six years from 1932 through 1987. 
State Treasurer John C. Martin, who 


jigs also chairman of the Illinols Emer- 


gency Relief commission, made 0 
statement yesterday at a Chicago As- 
sociation of Commerce luncheon in 
the Palmer house. 


Chicago Relief administration, Samuel 
A. Goldsmith, executive director of 
the Jewish charities, and Douglas 
Sutherland, executive secretary of 
the Civic Federation and bureau of 
public efficiency, joined Martin in 
giving the business men the facts 
about relief. Walter L. Gregory, 
chairman of Gov.-:Horner’s council on 
public assistance and employment, 
presided over the meeting. 


Vast Extent of Costs. 


“Few of us, who are not directly 
associated with the administration of 
relief, fully realize the vast extent of 
these costs,” Martin said. “ But, 
listen to this: 

“From 1932 to 1937, both inclusive, 
there has been expended in [Illinois 
from the combined purses of federal, 
state and local governments the ag- 
gregate sum of $870,000,000. This is 
an average annual outlay of 
$174,000,000. 

“Of this six year total $463,000,000 
went for direct relief alone, to which 
the federal government contributed 
$260,000,000, the state government 
$163,000,000, and the local government 
units $39,000,000.” 

As an example of the amount this 
takes from each man’s pocket Martin 
said that 4 cents of every dollar in 
Illinois’ 1937 income of $4,900,000,000 
went for relief purposes through 
some form of taxation. 


Public Assistance Programs. 


“ Over and above the allotments for 

direct relief,” Martin continued, “ Illi- 
nois’ participation in public assistance 
programs required $54,000,000, which 
came from state, local, and federal 
funds. This was divided $30,000,000 
for old age assistance, $13,000,000 for 
mothers’ pensions, and $11,000,000 for 
blind assistance. 
“The federal government in addi- 
tion spent $322,000,000 on its works 
program in Illinois, of which $264,- 
000,000 was used on WPA projects 
and $57,000,000 on CWA projects, and 
contributed another $22,000,000 in sur- 
plus commodities distribution.” 

Martin said the total expenditures 
by years were: $47,000,000 in 1932, 
$93,000,000 in 1933, $164,000,000 in 1934, 
$161,000,000 in 1935, $207,000,000 in 1936, 
and $195,000,000 in 1937. 

Need 3% Million this Month. 


Lyons said approximately $3,500,000 
will be needed to care for the 100,000 
cases expected on the rolls of the 
CRA during February. He reiterated 
his statement of Monday that the city 
will be short of relief money by April. 
“I don’t believe the citizens appre- 
ciate the splendid, faithful work of 
the CRA employés,” Lyons said. 
“Those people out on the front line 
have been holding disorders in check 
despite a shortage of funds.” 
Reliefers live under a peculiar kind 
of civilization, Goldsmith asserted. He 
said that a million people were on 
relief in Cook county during the 
years from 1934 to 1937. 
“There are only five cities in the 
country with a larger population than 
this relief group,” Goldsmith said. 
“In cities of comparable size we find 
that six, eight, or ten times as much 
is spent for normal living as is al- 
lowed to these people on relief. 


Effect on Future Citizens. 


“Relief now is at only 69 per cent 
of a good standard. Think what this 
is doing to the children, who are the 
citizens of tomorrow. What of Chi- 
cago in 1940 or 19457” 

Sutherland warned the business 
men that they are storming against 
federal taxes, but that the withdrawal 
of federal money for relief in Illinois 
would leave the state in an impossible 
situation as far as the financing of 
relief is concerned. He said $39,000,- 
000 of the $83,000,000 collected annu- 
ally by the state in sales taxes is now 
used for relief and that the balance 
of the tax would not covere relief 
costs. 


Nearly a billion dollars was spent | 


Commissioner Leo M. Lyons of the| * 


ry ar oe tit. x 
’ Z ¢! © &. ~zS A » 


Lt hod “3 Bis, 


This chart shows the amount of 
money expended for relief in Illinois 
between 1932 and 1937 and the way 
in which it was spent. The six year 
cost totals nearly a billion dollars. 
Work relief refers to WPA and 
CWA; public assistance includes vari- 
ous forms of pensions. 


COUNCIL TO ASK 
60 EXPERTS FOR 
HOUSING ADVICE 


Sixty Chicago business, civic, and 
political leaders who are experts on 
aspects of the housing problem are 
to be invited to act as advisers to the 
city council committee on housing. 
The committee is attempting to un- 
derstand the situation and formulate 
a broad plan for its solution. 

The council committee, headed by 
Ald. William A. Rowan [10th], yes- 
terday determined to call a confer- 
ence of these experts for a series of 
public ‘hearings beginning Feb. 14. 
This action was taken on the recom- 
mendation of Gael Sullivan, associate 
director of the Federal Housing ad- 
ministration. 

At the request of the committee, 
Sullivan yesterday presented a thirty- 
three page summary of his views on 
the city’s housing problem, with sug- 
gestions about approaching it. He 
asserted that any plan which includes 
government or public aid must also 
provide for attracting private capital 
housing projects. He also warned that 
the housing policy must be born of 
economic sanity. 


For Savings 


More than 300,000 people are savings 
depositors in this bank. This is strong 
endorsement of the safety and service 
offered at a most conyenient location 
to those who save. You are invited to 
pena savings account any business day. 


é 


‘|| Kelly invites ‘Mayors to 
Protest Meeting. 


Howard O. Hunter, regional direc: 
tor of the Works Progress adminis. 
tration, inforried Mayor Kelly yester- 
day that on March 1 20,000 men will 
be cut from the Chicago WPA rolls, 
Chicago’s quota is now 76,000. Hunter 
said further slashes will be made in 
April, May, and June, affecting the 
entire central western region of 13 
states, 

The reductions, Hunter said, will 
be necessary because WPA increased 
its rolls during January and Febru- 
ary to meet unemployment and must 
decrease them in order to stay within 
its appropriation. 


Mayor Calis Protest Meeting. 


Disturbed by the announcement, 
Mayor Kelly said: “Chicago needs an 
increase in WPA, not a cut.” He 
promptly asked mayors of eleven 
other major cities to meet with him 
in the Palmer House tomorrow to 
protest against the proposed reduc. 
tions. 

“Our own relief administration 
couldn’t stand an increase that large 
on its rolls, and if the WPA reduction 
in the whole region is in proportion 
none of the other cities will be able 
to carry the load either,” Mayor Kelly 
said. 

Hunter said the present quota for 
the region is 720,700 workers and 
that, while a reduction is contem- 
plated for March, no figure has been 
set. 

Mayors Coming to Chicago. 

The mayors who will attend tomor- 
row’s conference are Harold Burton 
of Cleveland; Walter C. Boetcher, In: 
dianapolis; B. F. Dickmann, S&t. 
Louis; R. W. Reading, Detroit; D. W. 
Howan, Milwaukee; M, H. Gehan, St. 
Paul; Daniel Butler, Omaha; John 
Edy, Toledo, and H. F. McElroy, Kan- 
sas } City city manager. 


FOR WOMEN WHO 


slaerle attend: 
Five of the 00 si 
as typical, rode pall ant 
liament in a bus with 
of the petition. 
working mother, a pensioned © post- 
office worker, a 71 year old widow, 
an unemployed ex-soldier, and a cos- 
termonger [street hawker of fruit 
and vegetables]. | 
The petition, prepared by the Lib- 
eral party, attacks the government’s 
policy of artificially restricting trade, 
thus increasing the costs of food and 
household necessities. It will go to 
the committee on petitions and pos- 
sibly cause a debate on living costs, 


WPA FIRES THREE 
AS RINGLEADERS 
IN BEATING BOSS 


H, K. Seltzer, Chicago director of 
the Works Progress administration, 
discharged three WPA: laborers yester- 
day after they were identified by An- 
drew Jombanis, their foreman, as lead- 
ers in the rioting early Tuesday on 
the lower level of Wacker drive. 
About. 30 other workers were put on 
probation. 

Jombanis, who lives at 829 South 
Marshfield avenue, was severely 
beaten when he tried to force loiter- 
ing laborers, employed to clean and 
whitewash the concrete pillars, to 
leave their bonfires and go to work, 
He charged the three men with as- 
sault. Their cases were set for hear- 
ing May 2. 


Survivors of Tuscania 
Sinking in 1918,to Meet 


Saturday is the twentieth anniver- 
sary of the sinking of the S. S. Tus- 
cania, the only American troop trans: 
port torpedoed and sunk by Germany 
during the world war. Two hundred 
eighty-five soldiers lost their lives, 
but 1,715 were rescued by British 
destroyers. The National Tuscania 
Survivors’ association will hold an- 
nual reunion and memorial services 
at the Hotel Sherman. 


APPRECIATE FINE CLOTHES 


Anne Madison* 


Costume 
Dresses 


IN SPRING 1938 VERSIONS 


$29.95 ,. $39.95 


$29.96 


PS, 
: iin TEER Pee 


A. White pique on a tuxedo 
jacket costume. Navy or 
. $35 


8. Pin stripes on a rayon 
sheer ery dress and 
. $29.95 


©. Group tucks give distinc- 
tion to this cape costume. 
Navy or black ...$39.95 


EXCLUSIVELY AT MANDEL'S 
“Anne Madisons” are 


: the idelighs: of women - 


who ¥ Ste eae 7 
Ree ed . > 
gh AAP Bt ager 
Sat? eS Kt 
~ 
_ 


SS laksa School, County} 


Heads Pledge Economy. 


Heads of three large taxing bodies 
which were warned by the Civic feder- 
ation and Bureau of Public Efficiency 
yesterday that they must practice se- 
vere economies during 1938 made calm 
rejoinders last night and repeated 
pledges of savings. 

Under the signatures of Bertram J, 
Cahn, president, and Douglas Suther- 
land, executive secretary, the federa- 
tion’s statement predicted that the 
taxpayers will have to fight a battle 
against tax increases in the legisla. 
ture and public employés may be 
under the shadow of more payless 
pay days early in 1939 unless the city, 
the county and the board of educa- 
tion save all they can in 1938. 

Point to Legal Obstacles. 

“The city’s corporate budget,” the 
release read, “shows a balance of 
barely $9,000 only by including on the 
asset side $1,000,000 in revenues from 
the pari-mutuel brokers’ license fees, 
which were under legal attack when 
the budget was passed, and over 
$2,500,000 as accounts receivable in a 
claim against Cook county, also in 
litigation, and which the county even 
under an adverse decision, probably 
would not pay this year, and might 
under the law pay in ten annual in- 
stalments.” 

Mayor Kelly made immediate an- 
swer. 

“TI have already stated that city ac- 
counts will be balanced this year and 


oe ply ry 


RES ae Te i> eee 7 Poe 7 Ee ie SUS Mok pias 5 Si Ds y 
< oe ae tie. Sa 5 he ee a ee be BE a BR aah cee. Be ei ee ay bye, 
vy 4 NY ae eye tig ete Se ber re aor. Sy og 
‘ 
§ 


deficit before 
of 1938. They also said it 
laa ub aeabemabia ebrecntimne 1938 | 


the use of nonrecurring items of 
revenue to give a substantial part of 
them effect in 1938. 

James B. McCahey, president of 
the board, replied: 

“Mr. Sutherland is worrying pre- 
maturely. Chicago’s teachers’ pay is 
based on the $45,000,000 pegged levy 
for the school board’s education fund. 
We expect to sustain the salary levels 
as long as the pegged levy continues 
at that amount. The board of educa- 
tion anticipated no deficit at the end 
of this year nor any necessity for cut- 
ting salaries next year.” 

Points to Shrinkage Dangers. 

Taking up the county budget, the 
federation’s statement pointed to the 
possibility that the abnormally large 
revenues from delinquent tax col- 
lections [about $8,000,000 annually] 
might soon return to the normal col- 
lection of about $500,000 annually and 
leave the county board with an in- 
come far below its present scale of 
expense, 

“T am confident,” said Clayton F. 
Smith, president of the county board, 
in reply, “that there will be a dras- 
tic reduction in the 1939 county 
budget because of a number of non- 
recurring items of expense which we 
are now bearing.” 


COLOSIMO'S 


haba: 


(AWA, stg VW 


y OIN i rR 


with Whol 
BABY LOBSTER 


= 


MANDELS 


Sensational Values in Our February Sale! 


Famous-Make Shoes! 


Our famous Salon shoes—drastically reduced during our 


great February sale! 


fine shoes at very low prices! 


eae 


This is your opportunity to have really 


Get here early] 


Shoes 


ORIGINALLY $10.75 TO $14.75 AT 
The lowest price we i 
know of for this “Ex- $6:7- 
quisite Footwear.” 


Shoes 


ORIGINALLY $10.75 TO $12.75 AT 
Comfort ... beauty 

. fit... ata new $6:75 
low pricel 


Shoes 


Shoes for Women J 


ORIGINALLY $8.75 TO $12.75 AT 


$4.95 36:75 


A superlatively low price for Chi- 
cago’s loveliest shoes. 


AND 


Shoes 


ORIGINALLY $6.75 AND $7.75 AT 


Buy “Vitality” shoes 
now ,.. and save $4.95 
on your spring ward- 


robel 


“Cix Appe als” 
ORIGINALLY $6.50 AT 


$3.95 


MANDEL’S WOMEN'S SHOES, FI 
STATE. 


MAND 


“Thrifties” 


Children’s 

“Billikens” 

ORIGINALLY 
$3.50 TO 
$4.50 AT 


ORIGINALLY 


FTH, STATE. CHILDREN'S, SIXTH, 


THRIFTY SHOES, FIRST, WABASH. ALL SALES FINAL 


EL'S 


FEBRUARY SALE FEATURE! 


Van Raalte Special! 
‘A-Tex" Lingerie 


OF BEMBERG RAYON 


79¢ 


2 FOR $1.50 


AND SILK TRICOT 


pay restorations into 1989 because of | 


NUDE 
NAVY 
STRAWBERRY 
SKIPPER BLUE 


Imagine! This stunning 3-piece 
ensemble for only $19.95! Shet- 
land wool quilted swagger can 
be worn over Spring dresses! 
The high-buttoning jacket is 
fastened with bone buttons. Both 
coats nicely lined with celanese 
rayon twill. Sizes 9 to 17. 


MANDEL'S JR. CHICAGOAN SHOP, FOURTH 


Does your mirror give 
you an awful scare ? 


Don't blame your face 
..» give @* the air: 


% CONSTIPATION—an ailment that 
often makes your eyes dull, your 
skin sallow, causes pimples, 
Give your natural good looks a 
chance — take Beecham’s Pills! 
Gentle, thorough. All druggists. 


Ty BEECHAMS 


LAXATIVE PILLS... Cost a quarter, 
make you feel like a@ million! 


‘to wearers of _ 
FALSE TEETH 
limited time only 


Thousands who wear dental plates 
know FASTEETH to be a pleasant aid 
for all day comfort and security of fit. 
Anyone w whe wears a plate or bridge is 
invited, at our expense, to try KLEEN- 
TRETH for cleaning plates or bridges. 
No daily brushing — no acid-—-no harm, 
KLEENTEETH easily and quickly re- 
moves sticky film — stains —- tarnish and 
food debris that causes “plate taste” 
and “denture breath."’ Simply soak plate 

in solution of KLEENTEETH. 

“a your package of 
FASTEETH today and a 
trial package of KLEEN- 

TEETH at at no added cost. 
All druggists. 


yj mame 
with each 


p wot om - 
3 ~ sei 
-_— » 
: ~~ ; by 
- _ : 
& * 


ey. e 
te ‘eo -_ ¥ - 
Beg eg ine 


8 csi ~ 
-_> ty 


ag 


> * 


a ee ee ee td ee ee a oe eee 
Myf Aa ts a 
” - . eee: ad ti Sig rom Ue Raia to Mae 


The Tvibune compa 
er responsibility for their safe custody or retum. 


ae 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY. 3 1938. 


THE TRIBUNE | OFFICES. 


NEW YORK-—220 EAST 42D STREET. 

DETROIT—5-265 GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING. 

WASHINGTON—815 ALBEE BUILDING. 

LOS ANGELES—SPRING AND FIRST STREET. 
SPECIAL REPRESENTATION. 

SAN FRANCISCO—820 KOHL BUILDING. 


| THE TRIBUNE’S PLATFORM 
FOR ILLINOIS AND CHICAGO 


. End the Parole Business. 

Build Deathproof Highways. 

Make Chicago the First Cityinthe W orld. 
Faster Suburban Service. 

Up to Date Local Transportation. 

A Lake Front Airport. 

A Motor Ferry to Michigan. 

Cut Taxes in Half. 


by Ny hs 


ND vw 


90 


: 


AMERICANS IN CHINA. 


The Japanese government has again apologized. 
This time it is for the Nanking incident in which 
John M. Allison, third secretary of the United 
States embassy, in charge there, and Charles 
Riggs of the Nanking university faculty were 
slapped by a sentry in the compound of Japa- 
nese troop quarters. Our state department has 
accepted the amende as satisfactory. Another 
delicate episode is closed as it should be. There 
is further assurance that the Japanese com- 
manding officer and twenty soldiers have been 
arrested and will be tried by court martial. 

A Chinese woman, an employé of the univer- 
sity, had been taken from the premises, which 
are American property and protected by agree- 
ment, to the barracks and raped. The crime 
was reported to the Japanese civil officials and 
two Japanese policemen were sent to investigate. 
Mr. Riggs and Mr. Allison accompanied the 
police and the woman to the barracks to seek 
the assailants and the two Americans made the 
mistake of entering a military compound. There 
they encountered the sentry. They were acting 
under the impulse of natural indignation, but 
they were indiscreet. A better disciplined sentry 
would have stopped them and called his com- 
manding officer. Again he might have shot them 
and made a good case that he was acting in the 
line of duty. Another incident is closed, but 
where there are such contacts more will arise. 

Reports from Nanking covering the weeks of 
Japanese occupation of Chiang Kai-shek’s former 
capital uniformly reflect upon the state of Japa- 
nese discipline in the city, and, if true, reveal 
a terror which has been truly Asiatic in its dis- 
regard of humanities and decencies. The truth 
about it isn’t to be known now. War produces 
atrocities and it also produces exaggerations of 
them. Asiatic wars always have been ferocious 
and ruthless and the Japanese contempt for the 
Chinese, plus the Chinese bent for irregular war- 
fare, may easily have made the capture of Nan- 
king and its subsequent occupation a very bloody 
page in the history of Asia. In that the only 
inconsistent thing would be the assumption that 
the Japanese have acquired occidental civiliza- 
tion} which in itself might not mean so much. 

Foreigners in the war zones and the devastated 
areas are in a most precarious position and the 
old China hands among them seem ‘to be the 
last to realize it. They have become so accus- 
tomed to the immunities and the superiority 
of the white race in Asia that they are an 
amazingly independent, carefree, and audacious 
breed. They expect to do with impunity things 
which would be suicide for a Chinese, and the 
way they expose themselves would indicate cour- 
age in an extraordinary degree if it were not 
so. close to foolhardiness, and if it didn’t con- 
stantly strain the relations of their country with 
the invader. 

In the occupied regions, where fighting has 
been going 1 about them, they have as long 
as possible clung to their homes and their offices. 
They have had their cocktail parties and their 
teas and their dinners with bombs dropping 
about them and Japanese soldiers beating at 
their doors. They sit in their gardens with 
Japanese intrenchments dug outside their gates. 
The old timers have been so accustomed to 
rumors and alarms that a major war can come 
down around their ears and find them reluctant 
to change the routine of their lives, even by 
obeying the commands of their own embassies. 

They still rely upon what has been regarded 
as the impregnable position of the white man. 
We can admire their fortitude and still regard 
it as indiscreet. It is true that the Japanese 
have not declared war, but the legal fictions 
fiowing from that fact are wholly unreliable. 
We do not police the stricken areas of Spain. 
We haven't tried to police India or Ethiopia. 
We do not even protect our citizens and their 


property in Mexico. We cannot expect to domi- 


nate the Japanese in China, police their soldiers, 
or do anything effective except diplomatically with 
the Japanese government in Tokio. Our military 
forces in China are merely hostages. We should 
reduce the tension by reducing the number of 


A _ SUBS ITUTE FOR 


They ‘ote soon die ot their own absurdity if 


| whoever used one was made to replace the word| W 


with a straightforward definition of what he 
was trying to say, 


A STRONG CANDIDATE. 

Congressman Scott W. Lucas has announced 
his candidacy for the Democratic nomination to 
the United States senate. In opposing Senator 
Dieterich, Mr. Lucas’ ae have the ae of 
Gov. Horner. 

Senator Dieterich’s cadkuans Is all too appar- 
ent. He comes before the voters with a record 
of having permitted the Illinois coal industry to 
be ruined. Tens of thousands of miners down- 
state are outraged at his failure to protect their 
jobs. The indignation of the miners is echoed 
throughout the state and particularly in manu- 
facturing cities like Chicago, Peoria and Rock- 
ford, where millions of householders and fac- 
tory owners find their coal bills needlessly in- 
creased. Mr. Dieterich cannot escape his large 
share of responsibility for depriving MWlinois 
miners of their natural market; and neither can 
he answer the accusations of consumers of coal 
throughout the state who find their natural ad- 
vantage of nearness to the great coal fields of 
Illinois has been taken from them. 

Gov. Horner’s move was a clever one. He 
avoids tying his fortunes to those of a notorious- 
ly weak candidate. In Mr. Lucas the voters have 
a man of much experience and proved capacity. 
Mr. Lucas would give Illinois the kind of rep- 
resentation in the senate which the state has 
not enjoyed since Senator Glenn retired from 


office. 


UNDESIRABLES AT 
THE BAR. 


After prolonged and thorough investigation by 
a committee of the Bar association a report has 
been filed in the Supreme court with recom- 
mendations for the disbarment of two lawyers, 
Charles A. Williams, not related to Judge Charles 
A. Williams of the Superior court, and Walter 
V. Fackler. Censure is recommended for Barratt 
O’Hara and Charles B. Haffenberg. 

The offenses held proven include unprofessional 
conduct, action denoting lack of moral character, 
and action tending to bring courts and the legal 
profession into disrepute and contempt. The 
investigation was the result of a hearing on the 
reorganization of the Northwest Building corpo- 
ration under the federal bankruptcy law by 
Judge Barnes, who requested the Bar association 
to inquire into the conduct of thirteen attorneys 
engaged in reorganization cases. The hearings 
were held at various times beginning Aug. 26, 1936, 
and were concluded by Aug. 3, 1937. Complaints 
against six attorneys were dismissed and against 
three others placed on file without recommenda- 
tion. 

Proceedings of this character are no doubt 
unpleasant and irksome for busy members of the 
bar, but they are of the first importance. Every 
reputable practitioner must have pride in his 
profession and must recognize an individual and 
collective responsibility for its good repute. It 
is recognized by the best elements of the legal 
calling that it has suffered disparagement in 
recent years through the misdoing of lawyers 
who aid criminals to escape justice and engage 
in activities to cheat and defraud. The discredit 
this small minority brings upon a profession 
which is rightly held by the public to be a guard- 
ian of the law is not confined to the guilty, but 
gives an evil repute to the profession as an 
institution and therefore cannot be altogether 
escaped by any member. It is obvious that this 
minority must be dealt with with more prompt- 
ness and vigor than has often been shown if the 
profession is to regain its former influence and 
the high public regard it ought to hold among 
citizens. 

We congratulate the Bar association and its 
committee upon its action in this instance and 
hope that it will be followed up by an alert and 
energetic weeding out of all undesirables in prac- 
tice in this jurisdiction. 


OPENINGS IN THE ARMY 
AIR SERVICE. 


Owing to the competition of the navy and 
marine corps air service, the army has 232 un- 
filled appointments in the aviation cadets, who 
receive their training in the field army air course 
at Randolph Field, Texas. The training is strict, 
about half the attendants are eliminated during 
the course, but it leads to a commission in the 
reserve and two years’ active service with a 
chance of two years more. With the army’s 
expanding air program it is probable that the 
chances of the flying school graduate’s winning 
a regular commission will improve. In any case, 
the training is excellent and, besides giving the 
graduate two or perhaps four years’ active serv- 
ice in the reserve, will give him a preferred 
status in case of mobilization or in civil aviation 
if he wishes to make flying his profession. 

The 232 vacancies seem to offer an opportunity 
not to be scorned by young men of the right 
quality. The defense services, regular or reserve, 
are growing in importance and the opportunity 
of distinction. 


z Editorial of the Day A 


LL.G., GOING STRONG. 
[Boston Herald.] 
David Lloyd George celebrated his 75th birthday 
by defeating his daughter Megan on the golf links 
| at Antibes. That was in the morning. In the after- 


seer and said in depart Sonia, “My wits | 
a year ago and I miss her awfully, Mr. Swam 
Could I speak to her for $25?” the mystic st oa 
his réle in his excitement. . 

“For $25 you can speak with her and I’ll ditnt 
a glass of water at the same time,” he said. 


RONG CHU, | is 

(From.-the Chinese of Kan Twin.) 
Contented Cow chews cud in jade-green Fields. 
Smiling, comfortable Cow. 
I walk contented into Field’s chewing cut-plug. 
Soon I am green shade, uncomfortable, without 

smile, 
Wrong Chew is Bull in china shop. 
, K. M. 8. 


HE’S GOT SOMETHING THERE. 

Please do something about Charles Burger. .; ; 
Ever since he read Henry Ford’s statement about 
automobile bodies being made out of cornstalks, 
skimmed milk, soy beans, etc., he has been hunt- 
ing for a combination machine to extract from 
his 1938 Ford all the things necessary for a bal- 
anced diet. | Se 


Last Week’s Murder Trial Queen. 

A young man was in Ada Szczytowski’s bakery 
the day after she was acquitted for shooting and 
killing her husband’s girl friend, who had been 
employed in the bakery. Mrs. Szczytowski pointed 
to two girls working in the bakery and said to 
him: “I’m not taking any chances now. One’s 
my sister—the other’s my cousin.” 


THE FRED SMITHS OF AMERICA. 

Members of the Benevolent and Protective and 
Completely Universal Order of Fred Smiths of 
America are meeting again this month. Some two 
score of the eighty Fred Smiths living in or near 
Chicago will meet at a dinner Feb. 16 at the Con- 
gress Casino. “The March of Fred Smith,” por- 
traying the rise of Fred Smiths since the dawn 
of civilization, will be broadcast from the Hotel 
New Yorker that evening. Main objectives of 
the organization: 


—Preservation of domestic tranquility by the 
elimination of mistaken identity. 


—Identification by the adoption of middle 
names classifying Fred Smiths by the sort of 
work they do (i. e., Fred “ Railroad” Smith), 
thus insuring proper delivery of Christmas 
packages, telegrams, and mail. 


—Concrete expressions of gratitude to the 
wives who have gallantly submerged their own 
identities in the name “ Mrs, Fred Smith.” 


Titled officers of the organization are Provost 
and Scrivener. There was a Beadle, but the posi- 
tion was discarded. None of the Fred Smiths 
knew what a Beadle’s duties were. 


OYSTERS SOUND YOUR HORN, reads a road 
sign the Hugo Picks observed near Corpus Christi, 
Tex. But it didn’t mean that the oysters, like 
those of the Lewis Carroll poem, were out for a 
walk. There is a shack near by where oysters are 
sold—with curb service if motorists toot for it. 


FOR AN OLD FRIEND. 
There is a time for everything, 
For winter's frost, for budding spring, 
And joy that summer’s hours will bring. 


There is a time for sudden tears, 
For laughter free from shadowing fears, 
Mingled in bittersweet of years. 


So share my fire and sip my tea, 
Youth’s days have passed for you and me, 
This is our time for memory, 

Helen J. Goede. 


QUERY OF A LITTLE LAD. 

Mrs. Basil T Church overheard her husband 
telling their 5 year old that when he was his age 
there were no such things as automobiles, radios, 
and airplanes. Tommy looked incredulous, then 
inquired: “Were there any trees when you were 
a boy?” 


GETTING FAINTLY WARM IN THE SEARCH. 
About that John Bunyan tankard. “I saw it 
here in Robinson (Ill) in 1893, the year of the 
Columbian exposition. ...I seem to remember 
that it was owned by a woman in Lawrenceville, 
the next county south of us. When I saw it it 
was in possession of my friend Miss Mary Calla- 
han, who was collecting articles for the exposition, 
she being a state officer. .. . I’m so sorry I can’t 
tell you more. Ellen M. Firebaugh.” 


Thought for Thursday. 
(As expressed by a woman about to celebrate 
her ninety-seventh birthday.) 
One does not grow old; one gets old when one 
stops growing. 


THE SCHUHPLATTLER AND THE 
CHAUFFEUR. 

Remember the Tyrolean restaurant on Clybourn 
avenue we wrote about one day? Well, on a partic- 
ularly gay evening there some one started the 
Schuhplattler—the German peasant dance, One 
fashionable lady who had ‘earned to do it on visits 
to the Tyrol got into the fun and insisted that one 
of the patrons sitting against the wall by himself 
get up and dance. She taught him how to do the 
peasant dance. A few evenings later a friend sent 
her car to bring her to a dinner party at her home. 
The face of the chauffeur seemed familiar, and she | 
kept puzzling over it all the way to the friend’s | 
house. Suddenly she remembered why. He was the 
fellow she had taught to do the Schuhplattler, 


> 
oe 
' 


phragm push air out of the lungs which 


eta: sas The Chicago ig n 


HOW | STAMMERING BEGINS. 


rats nated ae 


"late as the most complented bi 


Ges of the chest and the dlia- 
passes between the vocal cords. Its 
force and the approximation of the bands 
themselves influence the tone, which may 
be steady, tremulous, clear, and bell- 
like, or husky and ** breathy.’’ 

‘We may not realize that the voice 


strings are not under the control of the 


will, Let us assume that we desire to 
utter a sound or to sing. With a mental 
picture of the required tone, the vocal 
apparatus then adjusts itself without our 
aid so that the wanted vibration rate is 
produced. But the whole business is not 
determined by the larynx alone—with its 
muscles, nerves, and regulating devices. 
Much depends upon the shape, position, 
and activities of the tongue, the lips, and 
the jaws. 

Suppose there is a loss of balance be- 
tween breath supply, the vibrating 
strings, and the behavior of the tongue 
and the lips. The outcome will be 
muffled pronunciation or perhaps stam- 
mering. In the latter event there will be 
numerous movements of the facial mus- 
cles, especially of the mouth, for there 
is not enough wind pressure behind the 
effort. As has been said of stammering, 
‘*It is a habit in which there is a heap 
of pronouncing with a minimum of 
speaking.’’ 


-e-— 

As a rule the stammerer is more at 
ease in noisy surroundings where trafic 
is flowing with an incessant clatter and 
bang. Sometimes he can sing without 
the slightest impediment. The reason 
appears to be that whenever the victim 
tries to exhale a greater volume of air 
the very loudness of his voice encourages 
him and he continues to make an in- 
creasing effort to be heard. He is thus 
driving air past the larynx steadily and 
with great power. Again, in singing, 
the notes may be long. In consequence 
there is no sign of the difficulty because 
a full breath is taken and used to sus- 
tain the tone. In conversation, on the 
contrary, short words and sentences are 
employed and the struggle made is not 
sufficient to overcome the defect. 

Every time a youngster stumbles over 
a remark, we must not call it stuttering. 
We all did this as children and practical. 
ly every one surmounts the difficulty, al- 
though about 1 per cent will become ad- 
dicted to a type of hesitation which is 
quite foreign to their natures. 

Apprehension may be responsible for 
many instances and a small vercentage 
of children become affected because 


The mus- 


it required: much patience and Dpersever 
ance. 


proved that embarrassment, or what is 
basically fear, was the cause. Punishing 
youngsters for the fault only aggra- 
vates it. 


~~ 
The first step toward cure 1s to oblige} ~ 


the individual to say everything clearly 
and distinctly with the lungs well filled 
with air. If the patient is musical, re- 
sults will come quicker. Speech retrain- 
ing classes are to be found itn most com- 
munities. ‘ 

The handicap is so pronounced that no 
parent should ever say, * Well, the boy 
will outgrow it.”” Perhaps he will, but 
the chances are he won't. All of which 
means that some plan of supervised train- 
ing should be adopted early. 


ee 
SPASMODIC PARALYSIS. 


M. F. writes: What is spasmodic paral- 
ysis? 


REPLY. 

Involuntary twitching with loss of muscu- 
lar power. ‘The cause is some injury or 
disease of the nerve supply. 

i 
ASTHENIA. 
G. H. writes: Is asthenia hereditary? 


REPLY. 

Asthenia means weakness. It may be 
hereditary, owing to age of parents, or it 
may appear as an early stage of some disease 
such as tuberculosis. 

te 
CALCIUM. 

T. U. writes: For what diseases are 

calcium injections given? 


REPLY. 

Calcium is used for various diseases of the 
bones and teeth, in disorders of metabolism, 
in endocrine disturbances, in tuberculosis, in 
certain blood conditions, etc. 


-o— 
SUBSTITUTE PAPER. 

F. H. writes: If a person has a cold 
should his handkerchiefs be washed sep- 
arately? 

REPLY. 

By all means, and boiled in soap suds. 

But why not use paper handkerchiefs? 
—-—o— 


NOT CATCHING. 
Mrs. A. B. writes: Is chronic glau- 
coma catching? 
REPLY. 
Not at all. 


| FROM ACROSS THE SEA 


BY DAVID DARRAH. 
{Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 

LONDON—Dr, Laurence O’Shaugh- 
nessy, pioneer in this country of sur- 
gery of the heart, has completed suc- 
cessfully a series of experimental op- 
erations which offer new hope to suf- 
ferers from the dreaded angina pec- 
toris. 

Lord-Dawson of Penn and two heart 
specialists of the Cardiovascular clinic, 
Lambeth hospital, Dr. Daniel T. 
Davis and Dr. H. E. Mansell, have 
helped him. 

The Lancet, British medical journal, 
states: “We see the prospect of 
added months and years of active life 
and comfort for a group of people 
whose bodies usually have been age- 
ing faster than their minds. Such re- 
juvenation will be a great achieve- 
ment, 

“Familiarity with the marvels of 
surgery makes most of them seem 
commonplace, but even for the med- 
ical man operations on the beating 
heart still have dramatic quality. 

“This particular form of heart 
trouble arises from lack of oxygen in 
the heart muscles. From some causes 


not yet understood, the blood vessels 
of the heart become strangled by dis- 
ease, the steady beat weakens, eventu- 
ally ceases. 

“Why this should happen we have 
no idea; we often accept it philo- 
sophically as part of the process of 
growing old, and resignedly plan our 
lives, or our patients’ lives, accord- 
ingly. 

“But now,” the Lancet adds, “ tell 
the surgeon the heart lacks blood, and 
he offers to perform an operation for 
increasing its blood supply.” 

Dr. O’Shaughnessy takes muscles 
and fat from the wall of the chest, 
grafts them on to the living heart, 
and slowly the blood vessels in the 
new muscle begin to feed the heart 
with blood and life-giving oxygen, 
gradually taking over from the 
heart’s own strangled blood vessels. 

Five sufferers gave their lives while 
this new knowledge was being sought, 
while the technique was being per- 
fected. Ten others were alive ‘six 
months after the operation. 

Nine of those ten lost their angina. 
Seven of them were able to resume 
work. 


[ FRIEND OF THE PEOPLE 


vs 


Lettera to thie department must be signed with names and addresses of writers. 


ESTATE PROBATE. 

Chicago, Jan. 29.—[Legal Friend of 
the People.J—I am one of seven children 
whose parents have passed away. They 
left a little real estate. This property 
has been in probate over one year. 

1, What is the cost of handling this 
property for each additional year? 

2. Is it not proper to make out deeds 
which will show all heirs’ names? My 
brother has been appointed adminis- 
trator. There still are several debts to 
be paid. 

3. He has borrowed $50 from me and 
signed a judgment note for it. 

4. Must I file this note against estate 
so I can get my money back when prop- 
erty is sold to settle estate? 

5, Can my sister sign her share over 
to her husband when there are minor 
children? 

6. The administrator is liable for rent 
he does not collect, isn't he? 

7. Can I compel him to render a state- 
ment every six months showing moneys 
taken in and paid out? 

8. I think he ts not collecting rent 
regularly from tenants on account of ill- 
ness of long duration. The tenant is my 


| sister’s husband. He owes considerable 


debts. He tried to pass a note to his 
debtor which the debtor should apply 
st the estate to collect when the 


outstanding debts and took only my 
personal things with me [clothes, books, 
and music]. I left all else for her, val- 
ued at about $2,000. Our bills amounted 
to about $200 and I’m paying them, al- 
though one for $100 is on the furniture. 

1. Am I responsible and can I be sued 
for bills she may run up in store and 
the like, or [2] is there a notice I can 
post somewhere which would absolve 
me from all respons pility for her ac- 
tions and debts? 

3. How long must I wait until either 
she or I can file suit for divorce? 

4. Can she get alimony? We have no 
children and she is working and making 
more money than I am. 

5. She claims to have supported me. 

6. Can I demand a copy of my time 
record from these various places of 
business where I worked as far back 
as seven years? J. E. 

1. Divorce would be the only way of cut- 
ting off your common law responsibility for 
her necessaries, 

2. No. 

3. One year’s desertion is a ground, but 
the bill should be filed by the party who 
was not to blame for the separation. 

4. The alimony allowance is largely dia- 
cretionary to the divorce judge; 

5. The decision on such disputes of fact 
would depend upon which testimony is be- 
lieved in court. 

6. You can request it. After the divorce 
proceedings are pending you can bring in 
the records on subpena duces tecum. The 
attorney whom you employ will be ip a 
better position to advise. you than we are. 

TRIBUNE LAW DEPARTMENT. 
eo 


CORPORATION STOCK. 
Berwyn, Ill., Jan. 28.—[Legal Friend 
of the People,J—1. If I-buy no par stock 
in an [Illinois corporation how will I 
share, as among stockholders, in the 


f 
: 


Lh 
‘: 


Bie 
eo) Bf ‘ REY 
a 
ae . 5 
» te ere 


é 


hold forth as clearly as any one. This ey 


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE 


Writers should confine themselves to 200 or 300 words. Give full names 


and addresses. No manuscripts can 
People, The Tribune, 


ENGLISH. 

Chicago, Jan. 30.—Being interested In 
the discussion of dancing, grammar, etc., 
in the schools, I wish to applaud M. H. 
for daring to speak in. defense of English 


We give much time and attention to 
fine arts by which at school we learn the 
art of fitting a dress or painting a pic- 
ture, making a bookcase, dancing, fur- 
nishing a room, playing a cornet, or do- 
ing any other of a long list of interest- 
ing things, and I trust we acquire much 
skill. I have no derogatory word to utter 
concerning any of these activities. 

But there is another fine art—that of 
the ready use of correct English—which 
we need because our lives call for its 
application at any hour of any day as 
long as we live. I know of no other fine 
art which we need so constantly, so con- 
tinuously. And a young person whose 
goal is a job should know that in secur- 
ing a desirable job this art counts. I 
believe that dropping English grammar 
from our courses of study removes a 
foundation stone from our power to dis- 
tinguish between correct and incorrect 
forms of speech. 

Recently, while conversing with a high 
school girl of more than average mental- 
ity, I ventured a hint of my views, and 
the reply I received, spoken most kindly, 
was: ‘‘But you know, in modern Eng- 
lish, grammar is not needed.’’ 

A young woman, possessor of two uni- 
versity degrees, looked up from writing 
a letter concerning a position of high 
erder which she was hoping for. She 
asked a question about sentence construc- 
tion and was told the form she men- 
tioned was plural possessive, calling for 
an apostrophe after the s. She added, 
“I never can be sure about an apos- 
trophe,’’ but said it with embarrassment, 
which it was not fair for her to feel. 
She deserved better than she had re- 
ceived of the schools. Surely, a compe- 
tent teacher of English grammar in the 
upper elementary grades or in high 
school would have saved her from these 
later embarrassments. 

Within a few days these expressions 
have come to me by mail or have been 
uttered in my presence: From a univer- 
sity graduate, *‘ The A—— chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution 
invite you . .’’; from a teacher, who 
is a high school graduate, *‘ With love, 
from we three’’; from a college gradu- 
ate, ‘* Of all that family, none are left ’’; 
from a graduate of a fashionable girls’ 
school, ‘‘ Come with Frank and I.’’ These 
are violations of only the first rules of 
English grammar, and are readily seen 
by one who sees as a study of grammar 
leads him to see. 

I am not asking that young teachers be 
called upon to teach that which they 
never were given an opportunity to learn. 
That would not be fair, for several years 
now have passed since the subject be- 
came unfashionable; but I am advocat- 
ing light, provided by some means, for 
our boys and girls. 

The departments of English in other 
respects I wish to commend. But when 
grammar became a distasteful word to 
some of our people, we were promised 
that which is just as good as the old- 
fashioned study and less painful to take; 
but we are not getting it. H. H. 


A PLAGIARISM. 


Woodstock, Ill., Jan. 30.—The recent 
letter in this column, signed by Dick 
Conklin, was lifted in its entirety from 
an article entitled ‘‘ No Third Term for 
Roosevelt,’’ which appeared first in the 
American Mercury and was recently re- 
published in the Readers’ Digest. 

SPECTACLES. 


UNEDUCATED FEET. 


Chicago, Jan. 30.—From recent letters 

I learn that the object of teaching tap 
dancing in the schools is to make the 
pupils’ feet behave. This being so, there 
are very many ignorant, ill-bred or ill- 
mannered males ‘in this town who need 
this course of instruction, On the “ L,’’ 
the street cars and the buses they place 
their feet so that the rest of us have to 
wipe their dirty shoes on our clothes. 
T. 


THE REAL THING IN MONOPOLIES. 
Chicago, Jan. 28.—The government 
coal monopoly must be the real thing in 
monopolies for thousands of people are 
hollering and revealing exactly what it 
is doing to them, while only one or twe 
people are exercised about the vague, in- 
definite wrongs of some unnamed pri- 
vate monopolies. . Cc. 


be returned. Address Voice of the 


BASIO CAUSE OF DEPRESSION. 


Chicago, Jan, 30.—Your editorial of to- 
day on ‘“’ Basic Cause of Depression’’ is 
2a splendid account of what happens to a 
sick country when it calls in an old-fash- 
foned doctor and he bleeds the patient 
again and again instead of attacking the 
disease germs. But you could hardly 
say that caused the sickness. i 

For us ordinary folks, depression came 
on when people stopped buying what we 
had for sale—our goods or our labor. It 
will be over when they’ve gotten over 
being so cagy about buying and open 
up as they did before 1929. That was 
when it started. Doctor R. wasn’t called 
in till three years later. 

Besides, if depression were due to 
lack of saving and modern capital invest- 
ment, there could never have been anvy- 
thing but depression up to a hundred 
years ago. Ever hear of George Wa : 
ington putting his help on a four « © 
week for lack of buyers for his prod 
They worked fourteen hours in ti 
days—just what we'll have to do a: 
ultimately, if we keep on squande: 
our capital as you described. 

It won’t be a “ depression,’’ thoi 
because depressions come to an end w 
brisk buying begins. The germ ot + 
pression is the “** passion for liquidity ’ 
the fear of buying—which overcame us in 
1929. The doctors have bitterly dce- 
nounced the fear germ but done practi- 
cally nothing to dispel it and countless 
things to make it worse. 

Let’s have another good editorial on 
the real cause of depression. 

HARRIS K, RANDALL. 


SWEENEY ON WAR. 


Chicago, Feb. 1.—Somebody once made 
an offhand remark that war is hell 
and ever since, without even botherh 
to find out whether or not the statement 
was true, everybody has been trying to 
end wars. 

Personally I think war could be con- 
verted into a dignified international busi- 
ness deal if we would stop all the child- 
ish enthusiasm which makes it appear so 
foolish. 

When intelligent business men go to 
work in the morning there's no silly pa- 
rade,; no wild flag waving, no crowds 
cheering. So when intelligent men go 
off to war let them go quietly, one by 
one. Don’t waste money on flags; we'll 
need that cloth for bandages. For 
heaven’s sake, stop yelling like a lot of 
lunatics; you'll want that energy to pro- 
duce munitions. Don’t go down to the 
train or boat to see them off; they’re 
not children, they won’t get lost. When 
they return with victory don’t gre¢cit 
them cheering madly; they’ve had 
enough noise in battle. 

If war were conducted in this digni- 
fied manner, I’m sure everybody would 
appreciate its efficient depopulating sys- 
tem and its great boom to industry: so 
next time let’s just try it that way. 

JOE SWEENEY. 


RELIEF ADMINISTRATION. 


Chicago, Jan. 31.—You are to he « 
mended on your recent articles d: 
with the gross inefficiency and wa:.< 
money in the distribution of relict. 

The proposal to place trained of 
executives in charge of office work sho 
be adopted at once. I worked ina re!.: 
office in this city which was Heteain IBS 
with a very antiquated system of filing. 
or not filing, I should say: Instead of 
keeping the case folders in files they 
were stacked on chairs, radiators, win- » 
dow sills and desks, and clients calling 
at the office were obliged to wait as long 
as six hours because their ‘‘ case’’ could 
not be located. A staf of girls, hired ex- 
pressly for this purpose, spent all their 
time searching through the various 
stacks, day after day, sort of a perpetual 
merry-go-round, and they are still at it. 
All their other handlings are outmoded, 
too. A suggestion from an employé for 
the improvement of this condition would 
have been equivalent to handing in a 
resignation. H, 


WHAT DO YOU SUGGEST? 

Chicago, Jan. 31.—After reading of the 
‘unforgettable horror’’ in Barcelona, 
where 158 orphan children were killed by 
an air raid, one wonders what kind of 
men are they who stoop to such infamous 
deeds, suck cruel and cowardly murder. 

It is positively sickening, this sort of 
thing. Can’t something be done by 
great Christian nation to stop these ‘ae 
forgettable horrors ’’ ? 


aie aN 


“THE ALL-IN 


CROONERS 


ala 


{London 2 Daily "Worker.] 


. ee ts vial 


for trial wi Pome iaee today, at] 5 or dispo 1e remainder, | 
ihe examination on| in which attorneys: indicated their | 

In connection with|clients “were still interested, have} |) 

palth Mee Cum- [Siero eang 


Niemeyer is calling 


_EDUCATIONAL. 


BY WILLIAM BROMAGE, 
[Chicago Tribune Press Service} |. | 
Springfield, Ill, Feb. 2—[Special.]| @ en 
—Thousands of tons of Illinois coal, Pe 4 
ee: 5 Malate’ tare _Fout arrested in roundup of robbers who had been » 
pio oe ee s cab drivers in Rogers ee 


aed crn in| Seo, Wi Wein, ed Gores Pl 


fixing device of the federal govern: 


The minimum price code inaugu-| 
rated last Dec. 16 under the Guffey- |» 
Vinson coal act has resulted in aj 
disastrous discrimination against cen- 
‘tral Illinois coal producers who de- 


In arranging your program of evening study, consult the educational advisers in - 
Wieboldt Hall for the Schools of Commerce and Journalism — in Ward Memorial 
Building for the University College. The spring term offers you almost mea courses 
from which to select a program of study. 


“pend on a free market in the Chicago 
‘ industrial area, and benefited Indi- 
“ana mines, according to operators 
who rely on a competitive market 
for their shipments. 

Many mines in this part of. the 
-state, which ordinarily would be 
working near peak production at this 
time of the year, have been forced 
to curtail operations as much as 50 
per cent, because of the new code 
prices, Elsewhere in the state mines 
worked only three days in January. 


Reduce Output 35 Per Cent. 


Panther Creek Mines, Inc., one of 
the principal producers in Sangamon 
county, with two shipping mines at 
Springfield, has cut operations 35 per 
cent in the last six weeks because 
fixed prices enable Indiana producers 

sell cheaper in important indus- 
trial centers in the northern part of 
Illinois, George Solomon, an official, 
said today. 

Solomon said the company, which 
employed 1,100 men five days a week 
from September to Christmas, is pro- 
ducing only 65 per cent as much coal] 
as it did six weeks ago. Not only 
has production been cut, but the com- 
pany has 150 cars of coal loaded that 
it is unable to sell. The price as set 
in the northern consuming market, 


Solomon said, is about 20 cents a ton, 


lower for Indiana coal than for coal - 
from central! Illinois. 

Screenings here are fixed at $1.40 
a ton at the mine and the freight is 
$1.75, making the delivered price in 
Chicago $3.15 a ton. This is a 20 
cents a ton differential in favor of 
Indiana on a comparable quality of 
coal. Some Indiara coal is a little 
better. On the whole, the quality of 
Indiana coal is as high as that of 
central Illinois. 

Hope for Code Revision. 


Operators are hopeful that indigna- 
tion stirred by discrimination against 
Illinois, third largest coal producing 
state, will bring quick modification 
of code prices, If the situation does 
not change, they say, many mines will 
be closed. | 

A survey is being made at the direc- 
tion of Gov. Henry Horner to deter- 
mine the full effect of the coal code on 
mining in Illinois. 

The higher price fixed under the 
code has increased the state’s coal 
bill by $160,000 a year, according to 
James McSherry, director of the de- 
partment of mines and minerals. 

The price increase will average 40 
cents a ton on 400,000 tons of coal 
usec. by the state annually. “We 
could buy Kentucky coal under the 
new schedule for less than we buy 
Illinois coal,” McSherry said. Horner 
said the state will continue to use 
Illinois coal. 


CLE VELAND PLEA 
FOR COAL PRICE 
WRIT IS DENIED 


Washington, D. C., Feb. °.—[Spe- 
cial.J—The city of Cleveland today 
was denied a preliminary injunction 
' Jainst the minimum soft coal prices 
set for the city by the national bi- 
tuminous coal commission. Judge 
‘Oscar Ruhling of the federal district 
court held that the city had followed 
improper procedure in bringing its 
action before him, The coal act es- 
‘tablishes the United States Circuit 
‘Court of Appeals as the court of orig- 
‘nal jurisdiction. 

Attorneys for the city announced 
“they will bring the suit in the Court 
of Appeals here immediately. The 
city charges that delay in suspending 
the prices fixed by the commission 
is costing it $500 a day. The city is 
attacking the commission for failure 
to hold hearings before fixing prices. 
As Judge Ruhling denied the pe- 
tition Charles S. Rhyne, staf attorney 
for the Institute of Municipal Law 
Officers, waited in the court to seek 


permission to intervene in the case | 


in behalf of the city of Chicago, He 
will do so when the action is brought 
fn the Circuit Court of Appeals. The 
Appeals court deélayed action on a 
test of Illinois prices brought by the 
St. Louis and O’Fallon Coal company 


[TRIBUNE Photos.] 
Miss Jean Zubroski, 22 years old, who was arrested . police 
seized George Dell, who revealed names of accomplices in taxicab 


robberies. 


ORDER U. S.COAL 
PRICE FIXERS TO 
COURT MONDAY 


7 Illinois Companies 


Ask Injunction. 


The United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals yesterday ordered the na- 

onal bituminous coal commission to 
how cause next Monday why a tem- 
porary injunction should not be is- 
sued to prevent the enforcement in 
Illincis of the commission’s price fix- 
ing scale. 

Application for the order was made 
by Attorney George T. Evans, repre- 
sentative of seven coal companies 
owning Illinois mines, which have as- 
serted that the coal commission’s acts 
are dicriminatory. Judges Evan A. 
Evans, Will M. Spark, and J. Earl 
Major, who heard the attorney, indi- 
cated that they would not go at once 
into the whole question of the legal- 
ity of the acts of the government 
body, but would decide only on 
whether temporary relief was neces- 
sary. 

Speedy Action Is Sought. 


Attorney Evans explained that was 
what he wanted. The companies, he 
said, had appealed to the commission 
for a revision of the scale, but that 
the body had set a hearing on rail- 
road coal prices for Feb. 14. This 
hearing might take weeks, he added, 
and meanwhile his clients would 
suffer. 

“The price scales for Illinois mines 
were set without findings of fact and 
without public hearings,” he said, 
“and the evidence on which they 
were based has never been disclosed 
to any producer of coal.” 

The protesting companies are the 
Southwestern Illinois corporation, 
United Electric Coal company, Cen- 
tral States Collieries, Inc.; Patoka 
Coal company, Truax-Traer Coal com- 
pany, Illinois Pocahontas company, 
and Pyramid Coal corporation. 


Commission to Be Notified. 

Mr. Evans said he would serve no- 
tice of the hearing immediately on 
the coal commission. It is expected 
that the commission will be repre- 
sented by an attorney at the hearing 
on Monday. 

The city of Chicago, which is fight- 
ing the coal board’s order on the 


ground that it increases the munici- 


pal fuel bill $150,000 a year, forward- 
ed two legal petitions to an attorney 
in Washington with the request that 
they be filed in the federal court 
there. The attorney, Charles S. 
Rhyne, represents the Institute of 
Municipal Officers. 

In the petitions the city related 
that before and since the arbitrary 
prices were established, interested 
parties repeatedly had asked itor 
hentin gs aa as required by the Guffey- 


Four- Way 


| be given an inch! 
you ive a col, the | hep 


‘Singing School’ 


Policemen Thomas Curtin and 
Henry Bobene saw George Dell, 5042 
Winthrop avenue, take off a cab 
driver’s hat and put on. his own 
Tuesday night. They arrested him, 
and Dell confessed he had just re- 
turned from stealing a cab and leav- 
ing the driver in Lincolnwood. 

Dell started talking: 

The police arrested Miss Jean Zu- 
broski, 22 years old, of the same ad- 
dress, named by him as his accom- 
plice in twenty robberies of cab 
drivers. 

Miss Zubroski talked: 

Police arrested William Etheridge, 
17, 3644 McLean avenue, as another 
accomplice. 

Etheridge talked: 

Police yesterday arrested Chester 
Burklo, 2932 Belmont avenue, and 
Charles Fulmer, 3545 Carlton street. 
Etheridge said they accompanied him 
on two burglaries. 

They kept quiet. 


Vinson act, but that the commission 
had refused. Therefore, the city as- 
serted, the acts of the commission are 
null and void. 


Father and Daughter, 11, 
Found Dead in Trailer 


Frank Page, 40 years old, and his 
daughter, Babbett, 11 years old, were 
found dead in their blazing trailer 
early yesterday in a trailer camp at 
at Highland, Ind., five miles south 
of Hammond. Andrew Hoffman, 
deputy coroner, said they died when 
a gasoline stove exhausted the oxy- 
gen in the tightly closed trailer. The 
stove then exploded, he said, setting 
fire to the vehicle. 


When Poisons Clog 


KIDNEYS 
and Irritate Bladder 


Flush Them Out 
for 35 Cents 


Go to your druggist today and get thi 
safe, swift and harmless diuretic ond 


feprulent——-ask for Gold Medal Haarlem 
Capsules and start at once to flush 
kidneys of waste matter saturated with 
acids and poisons, 

That’s the way to bring about healthy 
kidney activity and stop that bladder ir- 
ritation which often causes scanty passage 
with smarting and burning as well as 


restless nights. 
the kidneys oit 
gislag ae bing 99 i as = tawels, wid = 


Yb ageege | ss are: Get- 
tip once or tw 4 n rete nap rer 

pufty eyes—cramps 

moist palms. 


leg— 
be sure and get GOLD MEDAL 
Haarlem Oil Capsules—the original and 
esr 9g Wg soe «yp on he Rend 
cents), t good 
results el f fidn your expectations 


——— 


~ + nmin iso 


dria Secs 
ro ee, * 
Setesties ears and 


© ea eae largest-selling cold tablet 


wa ae on tts Soar oe to assur 
y pility, thelt cy and depend. 


Re 
pie 
y 


6 8. Th 


- 
FALE, 
wale > 


COMMERCE and JOURNALISM 


Foreign Trade 
Foreign Sales Management 


Quantitative Market Analysis 
Salesmanship 
Sales Administration 


Psychology 
General 


r 
Psychology of Advertising 
Retalling 
Retail Buying 
Retail Personnel Management 
Retail Store Management 
Problems of Management 
Fashion Merchandising 
Public Finance, Taxation 
State and Local Problems 
Federal Finance — 
Seminar in Taxation 


Public Utilities 
Public Service Industries 
Traffic Law 
Public Utility Accounting 
Public Utility Regulation 
Rate Structures 

Speech 
Effective Public Speaking 


Journalism 
Contemporary Thought 
Modern Life and Letters 
Modern Opinion 
Advanced Writing Practice 
Advanced Story Writing 
Newspaper Reporting 
Advanced Reporting 
Radio Script Writing 
Problems of Publicity 
Special Articles 
Interpretative Writing 
News Make-up 


Advertising Problems 
Retail Advertising Procedure 
Typography 

Business Law 
General Elementary Law 
Contracts 


Agency | 
Sales of Personal Property 


Negotiable Paper 
Partnerships 


Corporations 

Real and Personal Property 
Insurance 

Law of Estates and Trusts 
C.P.A, Law Quiz 


Business Organization 


Advanced Writing Practice 
Business Letter Writing 
Sales Correspondence 


THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 


Polish 
Elementary 
Advanced 


Political Science 


Nationalities, Nationalism 


Psychology 
General 
Abnormal Psychology 
Advanced Child Psychology 


French Grammar 

Survey of French Literature 
French Literature, 19th Century 
Spanish Grammar 

Spanish Literature 

Literature, 18th & 19th Centuries 


English Literature 

American Composition 
English Drama 

Current European Fiction 
Milton 

Shakespeare 

Poe, Emerson, Whitman, etc. 


Geology & Geography 


Economic Geography of S. Am. 
Physiography and Geology 


German 
Grammar 
Intermediate 
Scientific 


Sociology & 
Anthropology 
Educational Sociology 


History Psychiatry for Social Work 

European History Aspects of Criminal Law 

VU. &. History Medicine for Social Workers 

American Diplomacy Social Hygiene 

World's Living Religions Problems of Therapy 

Social Behavior of Groups 

Home Furnishing Arts Social Security in Europe 

Art of Cabinet Making Group Procedures in Case Work 

Architectural Background Supervised Field Work 
Mathematics 


Analytical Geometr, — 
metry 
Plane Trigonometry Etfective Speaking 


Investments and Insurance Creative Dramatics, Children 


: Reading Aloud 
Integral Calculus 
Differential Equations Training of Speaking Voice 


Philosophy Zoology 


Contemporary Mind Animal Biology 
Western Thought Heredity and Eugenics 
Philosophy of Plato Vertebrate Embryology 


Educational Advisers on Th daily from 9 A.M. 


to 8:30 P.M.; Saturday to 5 


M.—to help you 


plan your program of evening study. Registration 


closes February 5. 


OR, s ‘ 183 
ve Biogas agi tear “eee toe yi “eee 
J a 7 Ww re 3 
2 - ie ; _ 


ia9@s:MICHIG 


MEN ..WOMEN 


CHICAGO «ESE. 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 


‘een more thar 80 


| years this college has been train- 


ing business leaders. 

In new Chicago, the city of 
today, business men and alert young 
people alike show their preference for 
BRYANT & STRATTON training:—by 
selecting graduates for positions of trust 
and responsibility;—by enrolling in larger 
numbers for the practical courses below. 


rg ie 


‘. - pee 
* ne Da a0 2 Ras 
) Fae . ae i 
‘ a eit . on ne 
i “ he a 4 pe es Ere Se a 
. 
oes rT or pe ‘gt mye ney "ee = ; 
9 Q : ! %. 
ues . ’ ‘ q 7 } + 
. : he 
4 ifs + ta z i} 
a oe 4S 
ent’ r Pa * a 
Se * ce _ = 
' 
é 


pin, 5 
aye 


COLLEGE ar aw Cost 


Enjoy the cultufal and economic ad- 
vantages of a college tion. Day 
or evening classes and low tuition 
rates at Central College make this 
BFE 4... —— four-year 
ae B. degree me 

Liberal pew an Music, B, S, de 
in Science, B,. B. A. degree in Se 
merce. Also pre-p sional, engineer- 
ing, and specialized ss courses, 
In the Loop, 2500 students enrolled. 


Spring Semester Opens February 14 
Evening Commerce—Feb, 8 and 10 


The John Marshall 
; L AW. an AcennorreD 


p)Schoo! Be a eae 


Gress, Munson, Pitman 
Beo ginners or review. C ote with typing and Only 2-year 
nglish, 5 eave week, $1 : ne oe Day or 
SPEEDWRITING ropedy (BC) 
oF ilinote 


a usi Not a dor ong oe, in, Amerie 
00 WORDS 4 B in 8-10 seams. aves Lowest fallen. fet 


WEEKS. Easy to or read. 
Free Demo. 11 7, m. dally; Tues,, Thurs., 6 p. m. accredited 


NORTHWES 


ietpaia & 
4 


WALTER D. HARRIS, 8, S., M 
i] 


«» President 
4122 


190 N. Sta 
) oT aad 


' te men and women. Mid-Year Term for Beginners 
. Opens February 7. 


~ BUSINESS COLLEGE ® 

PAUL MOSER, J.D..PHER > 

Only Four Year High School 
Graduates Enrolled 


Gregg, Pitman and Munson Sherthand—also Stene- 
typy. Day and Evening Courses. Evening Courses open 


Students . 
eny Monday. “Booklet sent free, without 

solipaties-—orlle or phone. Ne solicitors employed. « 

aoe: 

«Starts Jan. 1, April 1, July 1, Oct, 2 

' 116 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Randolph 4347 


; 
: a . oe Be eS . ° i moe ’ 4: ‘LL. cam ’ — i ” x ee i ee ne ee : FE iis bes {oo- xe St 
_ ‘ Bet Ne 3 ses Bes Aowet eee ey 3 ~~ Ee a : hy ae f° SL)  Lateeeaae ot te eS RE ea Ge 
.- a : hi de Se SEARS SN! ‘ ee et sae . 2 * on ee niet ALOE PET ep eS a EST RS eee 
Pe - , +2 > ™ ad St he ie ee ay : ° a | Mt rR : $3 7 wt ok! > st! ot a j FRCS EES ROE, ei . 
: ts o FG oe oe % * Bs sath ' 2 ee —=ai wv Hi Sh ®, ete a ey x : Sats “e* KI “ , 
3 , 4 a % : , - ¥ ee : : m 1 r ; kay ok 4g : ; z id : Jee ne ee ; ene vost : , Ad a i%% S. fi fe 4 bE PBs ‘ = = 
: Idea Is One That. May "A Sale ae Oe. eee 
: ps ae ie . ’ ad a ~S Be ; sh Sag eric . ‘*: : is a4 “ Breen 
, f : ee 2 i ey hak ; : 
<* tg ae os ; ee @ Franke Fred, "Henry 3 ‘J 
, 4 Pe : se ; ee | Gauvreau, Mra. Laure 
: — - Ce Seige ’ Christina Wintercorn 
j - 2 od . - ; ; eS \ 
thinks > is ‘ ong * ’ oa hs weg ke eer @ . os pe 71st and 
For the person who e = | - ¥ ; ' BF as . | St. Boniface. : 
too busy all week to listen or ju SS | Pe ; Bs. weg JACOBS~Mose H. Jacobs, beloved husband 
can’t get to a loudspeaker when his j ae 2 3°38 4 wee < geese a= 1 oe ' of Bertha, née Sideman, fond father of — 
¢ uf sak ter tae 57's ot SS xy pe f 
favorites are scheduled, WJJID has a . UB. of. rw Se _— ; a se Se ce a | JS, 2 Sidney, father-in-law of Sylvia, nee Keller? “ 
new plan which he may welcome. | Syndicate, Inc.  \ ee (Bey % Ets : Seed fide og eed aoe Peat S| Pe a at Se | 53 | SS hil . mn sii . . | : ee ee L - ssa , et | J = 
Station proposes to Incorporate into a = pee ee eMC : ) lias stani » and late Ida 
Ia. serve 
m., at al 


a new Sunday afternoon review high- 
Nights from various programs of the 


week which have been preserved in TODA Y’S RADIO BROADCAS TS 


recordings. A commentator will tie | lass . 


ices ps i 

chapel, 5206 deaatean ‘Interment Wald- 

heim. Please omit flowers. 
JOLIVETTE—George J. Jolivette, 
husband of Marian, fond father of 


“OBITUARIES | 


these snatches together with run- TRAL STANDARD 'TIMES.] 5:30—W-G-N—Charlie Chan. Arnold Elie H on. | Arthur, 
ning explanatory remarks. a cremaige OTHER STATIONS, en WENR—What's the News? Wade H. ud mio Mae Sinedt anda turday. 
For example, a typical broadcast BERLAN--b:15 -p. m—Hendesvous, ats Today’s Features ge olga Ip Masonic funeral services for Wade| Funeral services for Elie.Hudon, 56 | LEVY—Morris Levy, 1036. Gone, but not] 9:30 a. m., from late residence, 7334 8. 
or ple, Masked en. DID, 25.4 m. 11.77 | ‘s WOPLnMneine): Vonlaticn. H. Arnold, general freight agent for|years old, a retired employé of the| ‘"sotten. Bereaved wife and children. Titanate Mente” Ben ese 


might include highlights of an in- 5:45—W-G-N—Little Orphan Annie, the Missouri Pacific railroad, will be| Chicago public library, will be held ALLEN—Bert A. Allen, Jate address, 318 w.| ¢#l Yards 3713. 


limax | —* The Count of Monte 
prc beng on a ais, ae LONDON-$:29 "GSC, 91.3 m., 9.58 rie eee eset Wat tat Ginien held at 3:30 p. m. today in Graceland|tomorrow morning at Notre Dame| Washington street, beloved husband of the | JONES—Elizabeth Jones, nee Ingram, 5619 
a & ’ The University Broadcasting coun- WEF L~Barren’s orchestra. cemetery chapel. Mr. Arnold; who|church, 1335 West Harrison street.| Jate Sarah Allen, father of C. Wheaton a iy bgp Rats Gus ne er ay 


GSB, 31.5 m., 9.51 meg.; GSL, ¢ 
E—6: yeti Antonio Monti: “ Men 
:30 Dp. “a ntonio $ 
_— . talian Risorgimento—Fran- 


Alien. Funeral services at the Healy 


chapel, Aurora, Il. 
BAINBRIDGE—Agnes 


was 53 years old, died Tuesday at his 
apartment in the Evanshire hotel, 


Burial will be in All Saints’. ceme- 
tery. Mr. Hudon. died: Tuesday in 


ing of a reckless driver by Judge 


. Braude in Safety court, an inter- 6 OO Re ah ne etehestza. 


cil program, “ World Neighbors,” will 
WMAQ—Hal agp 


be heard at 8 [Bridie] Bainbridge, 


: ew with a prisoner in the coun of eT Lyi WIND—German program. ae 
we a Shavit Toman, ceneition ork: Or eRO, Sit sm 9.63" mes.; DP Mm, & peg WEEM =Jehn Harrington. , 3 saa byent Worden — i the his home at 4408 Jackson. boulevard Feb. 2, beloved wife of George W.. daugh- KENDALL — Alice ee: 70 se 
IRF, 30.5 m., 9.83 m hour, on W-G- R—Easy Aces road trom ° » when he was | after a long illness, He retired’from| ror 72s, oY Nellie Marshall, Michael| beloved wife of Harvey C. Kendall, sister 


of Elizabeth 8B., Albert E., and Kalph 
McKay of Medford, Ore., and William J. 
McKay of Orosi, Cal. Resting at funeral 
home, 810 N, Clark street, Chicago. Serv- 
ices at First Congregational church, Hin- 
man avenue, Evanston, Thursday, 2 p. m., 
Burial at Rosehill. 


KILBORN—George W. Kilborn, 5015 S. Ash- 
land avenue, suddenly, Jan. 31, 1938, be- 


promoted to commercial agent. In 
1932 he was appointed general agent 
and transferred to Minneapolis. He 
returned to Chicago in 1936 as gen- 
eral freight agent. 


Mrs. Emily D. Schultz. 


of awards for a prize winning con- 


6: 1b ee em Varieties. 
test, and so on. WCFL— 


Dinner concert. 
WBBM—Hollywood Screen Scoops. 
WENR—Mr. Keen—Lost Persons. 


Walsh, and the late Margaret Kuzel. Fu- 
neral Saturday, 9 a. m., from late residence, 
507 W. 43d place, to. St. Gabriel church. 
Interment St. Mary’s. 


BEERMAN—Nat W. Beerman of 2109 N. 
Mozart street, beloved husband of Anna, 
father of Abel and Pearl Broh and three 
grandchildren, brother of Jake, Max, and 


the library when 33 years old after 
twenty years’ service. He is survived 
by his mother, Mrs. Pomela: Hudon, 
and by a brother and sister. 


Mrs. Agnes Sheehan ‘Robbins. 


beginning to- 
night. The third 
of a series of 
half hour educa- 
tional dramas) 
titled “The Uni- 


—7: 45 p. m. tie ‘Reich Academy 
come. Sports — Athletics. DJD, 25.4 
. oP a —** Piccadilly,” GSD, 
DON D. ‘ 
“— 25.5 m., 11. 15 meg.: GSC, 31.3 m., 
9.58 meg.; GSB, 31.5 m., 9.651 meg.; 

GSL, 49.1 m., 6.11 meg. 


CHICAGO FREQUENCIES. 


ELE ERM 


-~o~ 

Sounds like a good idea, one that 
.we hope may spread to the major 
broadcasters. There are several mag- 
azines that have built an astonish- 


: WJJD—1130 fication of Italy” | ¢:45-W.G-N—Rube Applebe 

ing success on reprinting excerpts| W-G-N—720 WENR—870 sag Be pest aggre Mrs. Agnes Sheehan Robbins, widow| Barney. Funeral Thursday, Feb. 3, at 10| loved husb 
D—5 WAAF—920 WWAE—1200 will be presented. L. Panico's orches . es Shee ? oe P ay, ' usband of Victoria A. Kilborn, 
' from a variety of published matter. rsa ero WCFL—970 WSBC—1210 “H cs ees dod WORLThrough the —- Mrs. Emily D. Schultz of 4010 Du | of Richard J. Robbins, a partner in a| % ™- at chapel, 2235 W. Division street. psa of George W. Kilborn Jr., son of the 
Radio might wisely try something) wsaBM—770 WCBD—1080 WGES—1360 p WENR—Freddy Martin's music. Boise boulevard, Congress Park, 1ong| printing firm who died two years ago,| BEHREND—Fanny Behrend, boloved mother} j0, George W. and Genevieve Kilborn, 
WLS—870 WMBI—1080 WHIP—1480 Serenade,” anew/ 7 oe aan Moonlight] prominent in civic and:women’s club ‘| of Alex, Samuel, Ephraim, Manuel. Flor-| jt of Alyce and Grace Kilborn. Serv- 
similar. atte Mutual and coast | died yesterday at her home, 6343 Ellis} ence Kesner and Evelyn Schwartz. Funeral] jc? &* Chapel, 63d and Harvard, Friday, 
Radio’s chief handicap is its}, y as eonek. wie, WMAQ~ Rudy Vaile’ Varieties. affairs & in neo western suburbs, died | avenue, at the age of 80 years. She| Friday, 1 p. m., at chapel, 936 E. 47th Pp sorte Pass se graye sons, Sleepy Hollow. 

WCFL—Don Norman iy Be. strect, ; im. win sser, . 

yesterday after a short illness at the/ is survived by one daughter and three} _*eet. Private. Burial’ Waldheim 4841 Berenice avenue, beloved ton of be 


evanescent and fleeting quality. And/ g.45—w.G-N—Wake Up and Sins. 
: we aN Se at os age Hk ET epee BLETTNER—Fred W. Bilettner, husband of Eeaneee 


:00—W-G-N—C ine. f 66. Surviving are her husband 

unfortunately too many program; 7 W-G-N—California: Sunsh WLS—March of Time. age O . § are her nusbdangd, | sons The funeral will be held tomor- ward and Marie Funeral Frid 

WLS—Julian Bentley. bow on W-G-N at a . the late Tillie, brother of Mrs. Emma ay, 
b> egg ag Frederick, three sons, and one daugh-| row from 7705°Cottage Grove avenue| Vierheilig, Mrs. Annie Knipfel, Mrs.| 49° sioeuxey ent tmeral home, 3906-' 


WCFL—You Gotta Get Up. 
WHIP—Cowboys. 
WBBM—Musical Clock. 
WMAQ—Suburban hour. 
7:15—WLS—Evelyn and Hilltoppers. 
%:30—W-G-N—The Music Box. 
WJID—Christian Science program. 
WLS—Morning Devotions. 
 +45—-WLS—Jolly Joe’s Pet Pals. 
WJJD—Kinney's Hawaiians. 


7:15—WLS—De Zurik Sisters. 
1100--eeeale Bolognini’s orchestra 


}. 
WCFL—Streamline Melodies. 
WLS—Barry McKinley. 
7:45—W-G-N—Victor Arden orch. and guest. 
WCFL—Herr Louie and the Weasel. 
8:00—W-G-N—World Neighbors [MBS]. 
‘WBBM—Maj. Bowes’ Amateur hour. 


'men have held to the idea that 
something once aired is dead and 
done for—despite the fact that even 
|radio’s most popular programs sel- 
dom attract as many as one-third of 
all the listeners tuned in at the 
time. 


9 p. m. Elias 
Breeskin, famous 
violinist, a sev- 
Merriel Abbott. enty-five piece 
orchestra, composed of many noted 
Hollywood musicians, and the Frank 
Hubbell choir will be featured. 


Sophia Schutz, and the late George, Au- 
gust, and Tillie. Services Saturday, 2 p. 
m., at fumeral home, 2500 N. Cicero ave- 
hue. Interment Waldheim. Berkshire 8070. 


BRENNAN—James R. Brennan, beloved hus- 
band of Viola O'Grady Brennan, fond 
father of Viola, Patsy, and James Jr., 
brother of Mrs. Otto Vonesh, and Mrs. 
Lue. Galligan. Funeral Friday, 9:30 a. m., 


ter. Funeral services will be held to- 
morrow in St. John’s Lutheran church 
at La Grange at 2:30 p. m. 


Dr. Elbert E. Dewey. 
Dr. Elbert E, Dewey, 60 years old, 


Franklin lodge, No. 962, A. FP. & A. M. Cre-- 
mation Acacia Park cemetery. Kildare 4000. 


LEONAKD—Leon Leonard, Feb. 1, age 69, 
late of 3145 N. Oakley avenue, beloved 
husband of the late Alice, foud father of 
Billy Leonard, Chester E. Dye, and Mer-’ 
ton L. Dye, also five grandeltiildren. Fu- 
neral Friday, Feb. 4, at 2 p. m.. from iu- 
neral home, 2056- 58 Belmont avenue, to 


at 9 a.-m. to-Holy Cross church, 65th 
and Maryland avenue, with burial in 
Holy Sepulchre. 


Anna Louise Amendt. 
New York,: Feb. 2.—[Special.]—Miss 


~~ 

If some broadcaster could retrieve 
on a Saturday or Sunday evening 
highlights of a dozen or more of ra- 
dio’s favorite shows of the week— 


8:00—W-G-N—“ Everyday Words.” 
*  WLS—Lulu Belle and Scotty. 
WMAQ—Your Neighbor. 
WCFL—Breakfast club. 
8:05—W-G-N—Good Mornin 


program, 


8:15—WLS—Evelyn and Hilltoppers. 


The Concert Revue, under the di- 
rection of Joe Johnson, presenting 
the W-G-N orchestra and octet, with 
Kathryn Witwer, soprano, and Wil- 
liam Miller, tenor, as guest soloists, 


WCFL—School of Music. 
WMAQ—Good News of 1938. 
WLS—Don and Helen. 
8 :15—-WLS—Evelyn, “The Little Maid.” 
8:30—W-G-N-—Comedy Stars of Broadway. 
WIND—Night Court. 
WENR—Town Meeting. 


an oculist in Chicago since 1915, died 
yesterday at his home, 538 Central 
avenue, Lake Bluff, of heart disease. 
Dr, Dewey was a graduate of the Chi- 
cago Medical school and a member of 


Anna Louise Amendt’ died: yesterday 
at her home. At one time she .was 
called the highest. salaried woman 
in this country. For forty-seven years 
she was private secretary to George 


from residence, 1237 Columbia avenue, to 
St. Ignatius church. Interment Calvary. 
BRINK—Louisa Brink, 2422 Irving Park 
boulevard, Feb. 1, 1938, beloved wife of 
Bernard, loving mother of Elizabeth Grau- 
man, Marie Dosenbach, Edward, Bernice 


Irving Park Boulevard cemetery. 


MADIGAN—John Madigan, beloved husband 


of Mary [nee Lenihan], devoted father of 
John, Michael, James, and Mrs. Mary Barry. 
Funeral Saturday, at 9 a. m., from .resi- 
dence, 5618 S. Abcrdeen-st., to Visitation 


eco form—he could cer-| 8:30—W-G-N—Victor Lindlahr. :45—W-G-N— : 

: ad > cg miahty wadience. WBBM—Road of Life. will be aired from the main studio! $'So—W-G: None of went the staf of the West Side hospital. He| ©. Tarbell, then vice president of the Gniech- and John Mary’ Munson. Funeral | church. Burial Holy Sepulchre. Yards 0662. 
i: ites om the gent: week a bit~ wirken a whlather a at 9:30 p. m. The feature of the| 9:00—W-G-N—Hollywood Serenade [MBS]. | 15 Survived by his widow, a son and/| Equitable Life Assurance Society of Priday, Feb. 4. at 9 a.m. irom chapel. | MEGELIN—Frieda Megelin. Feb. 2, 1938, 
o reflec pas WMAQ—Music Hall: Bing Crosby. | two daughters. Funeral services will} the United States. dict church. beloved mother of Paul Megelin. Resting 


program will be a quarter hour of 
Franz Lehar melodies. 

Other features: 

6:45 a. m.—Wake Up and Sing. 

10:15—Bachelors’ Children: [MBS]. 

Noon—Bob Elson interviewing peo- 
ple visiting the Chicago International 
Air show. 

1:45 p. m.—Beatrice Fairfax [MBS]. 

2:30—Home Management, with June 
Baker interviewing Merrie] Abbott, 
famous dancing teacher. 


in chapel, 5149 N. Ashland boulevard, at 
Foster. Funeral services private. Inter- 
ment at Milwaukee. Please omit flowers. 

MIDDEL—John W. Middel, Feb. 2, beloved 
husband of Doris Middel [nee Eggers}, 
father of Lawrence J. and Mrs. Grace Be- 
noit, grandfather of Donald Benoit and 
Laurel Middel. Funeral at late residence, 
16 McIntosh avenue, Clarendon Hills, Ill., 
Saturday, Feb. 5, at 2:30 Pp. m. Inter- 
ment Clarendon Hills cemetery. 

MONAST—Irene Frances Monast [nee Bar- 
ber], wife of Eugene A., beloved mother 
of Eugene Jr., sister of Mrs. F. A. Weath- 
erly. Suddenly, Feb. 2, at Houston, Tex. 
Funeral notice later. 


MORAN—Daniel J. Moran, Feb. 2, 


8:45—WLS—Don and Helen. 
WBBM—Linda’s First Love. 
WMAQ=—Dan Harding’s Wife. 

waa 2 esac Crane and Helen 


doy 
WHEM_-Pretty ee Kelly. 
WCFL—Party Lin 
WJJD—Bosworth Dicattonat. 
WAAF—Rhythmic Age. . 
WMAQ—Mrs. Wiggs. 
WLS—Margot of Castlewood. 
9:15—-WBEM—Mprt and Marge. 
WAAF—King of the Kitchen. 
WMAQ—John’s Other Wife. 
WLS—Aunt Jemima. 
9:30—W-G-N—Get Thin to Music [MBS]. 
WLS—Attorney-at-Law. 


WIND—Paul Pendarvis’ orch. 
WBBM—On to Adventure. 
9:15—WCFL—Favorite Melodies. 
WIND—Walkathon. 
9:30—W-G-N—Concert Revue [MBS]. 
WIND—Carisen's orchestra. 
WBBM—American Legion Aux. 


WENR—Jamboree. 
OO en. Federation. 


BURKMAN—Frank J. Burkman, late of 
4209 N. Monticello avenue, husband of the 
late Jennie Burkman [nee Johnson], fond 
father of Horace F. [Fred], Mrs. Edward 
Mullins, and Roy W. Burkman, grandfather 
of Francis, Horace, John, and Patricia Mul- 
lins. At rest in the funeral church, 3834- 
36 Irving Park boulevard, where services 
will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. Interment 
Acacia Park. Member of Hesperia lodge, 
No. 411, A. FP. & A. M.; Engineers council, 
No. 1, Engineers union, local No. 399. 


BURNS—Denna Burns, fond wife of the late 
Edward, sister of John, Harry, Fred Trip- 
pen, and Mrs. Tillie Erickson. Funeral 
services Thursday, 2 p. m., at chapel, Fg 
em- 


we heard Fred Allen, missing Law- 
rence Tibbett, Deems Taylor, Kostel- 
anetz, and Ben Bernie’s show, which 
are on at the same time; caught Rudy 
Vallee, missed the March of Time, 
and Kate Smith; heard Toscanini and 
missed Richard Himber’s Hit Parade, 
lent an ear to Jeanette MacDonald 
thereby passing up Jack Benny; 
tuned in on Radio theater’s presenta- 
tion of “The Green Light” and 
.missed Fibber McGee and Hour of 


be held in Graceland cemetery chapel 
tomorrow at 2 p. m. 


Mrs. Abba Irwin. | 

Mrs. Abba Irwin, 80 years old,: died 
yesterday at her home, 514 Arlington 
place. She.had been for.many years 
a Christian Science practitioner. Her 
husband, Edward Irwin, who: died in 
1925, also was a practitioner. 


Alexandre Moret. 
PARIS, Feb. 


Sister Mary Dominica. 

Sioux City, Ia., Feb. 2.—[Special.J— 
Sister Mary Dominica Burke, 51 years 
old, former teacher at the Blessed 
Sacrament school, Chicago, died of 
pneumonia here today. For the last 
two years she has been Sister Superi- 
or at a school in Marcus, Ia. 


y. 
L—Don De Vodi'’s orchestra. 
WENR—Globe Trotter. 
WBBM—Poetic Melodies. 
10:15—W-G-N—Theater Digest [MBS]. 
WCFL—Elza Schallert Reviews. 
WENR—Panico’s orchestra. 


2.—(#/)—Alexandre 


1938, be- 


‘Charm; dialed in True or False and WBBM—Emily Post. 7:45~—Victor Arden’s orchestra and WBBM—Henderson’s orchestra. Moret, 69 years old, a noted Egypt-| £&. 79th-st. Interment Oak Wood 
° WIND—Eb and Zeb.. , WMA Fort P ° : ’ ‘ Ss . Ss. 
passed by the Contented hour; stayed WCFL—Viennese Ensemble. guest. 10:30—W 7 i Sk one Ae George J. Westrich. ologist, died today at his home here,| er Ladies’ auxiliary, B. of R. T., No. 191. pot bes er , bs Blea, wed Jun 
CANTWELL—Mrs. Arthur Cantwell, widow, |: William, Raymond, Nichi wee Haward 


Eau Claire, Wis., Feb. 2—{Special.] | He was a professor in the College 


Mrs. John Smith, Mrs. 
and the late Police Lieutenant Michael 
Moran, Mary Ellen Moran, and Mrs, 
Theresa Elliot. Funeral from _ residence, 
6136 S. Princeton avenue, Saturday, Feb. 


Milwaukee salesman, died at a hos- 
pital here early today. He suffered 
an attack of heart disease at the Elks 


with Public wet tes ee oe a a és eae enti. Bill. 8:30—Comedy Stars of Broadway. wank Pgh og orchestra. formerly of Maryborough, Ireland, passed 
tion and soe A WMAQ—The Woman in White. ON OTHER STATIONS. 10:45—-W-G-N—Sammy Watkins’ orchestra arte Vi petmien £0 years old, ide France. a ne Roe he ier, Mor newvill rest. ai Catherine, “Fire Liewienant Jona Moran, 
miss 2 Eva at ester nn. rest a George Herman, 


Concert revue. Attending Kay Ky- 
ser’s premiére Monday evening forced 
Kyser, to forego Horace Heidt, Al 


WBBM—Truman Bradley. 

WJJD—" Sentenced Men.” 

WLS—Julian Bentley. 
10:00—W-G-N—Don Pedro and Piano. 


3415 North Clark, Chi- 


funeral parlors, 
. Thursday until funeral 


cago, from 8 p. m 
Friday to Rosehill, 


a s]. 
WBBM—Melody Time. 
11:00—W-G-N—Bob Crosby’s orch. [MBS]. 
WIND—Pendarvis and Carlsen’'s orchs. 


6:30 p. m—-WBBM—We, the People, 


with Edward [Spike] Howard, strong Fairfax Harrison. 


Baltimore, Md., Feb. 2.—(#)—Fair- 


Pearce, Charlie Butterworth, Walter David Harum man. WEEM_. . lub ; : 
; O'Keefe and Co. WLS--Mary Marlin. 7—WMAQ—Vallee’s Varieties—Fay WMAQ—Nat antes: orchestra, a ee oe fax Harrison, 69 years old, former peg ee sinha ~ tle ed io” Biase 5 at Su ie. 00 Beemer cae we 
| _ 10:15<e ee Chia ups), | Dinter, Walter Abel, Tommy Riggs, | se ee eairable Music, president of the Southern railroad,| of Frederick H. Jr. Funeral Friday, 10:30| terment Mount Olivet. 
That’s the way it goes every week. WIND—Sons of the Pi one and Betty Lou. WOFL—Garwood Van's sieates Elmer E. Payne died of heart disease at a hospital 2 tga ag A —— repr Pony oT O’BRIEN—Dorothy O’Regan O’Brien, beloved 
7—WBBM—Kate Smith hour, with AQ—L. Armstrong's orchestra. od here tonight. gro cne,, duatigs-tadiies | satde’ ina Gee Eh ng 
8 ’ 


WCFL—Josh Higgins. 
WLS—Pepper Young's Family. 
WMAQ—Backstage Wife. 
WBBM—Magazine of the Air. 
10:30—W-G-N—Painted Dreams. 
WBBM—Big Sister. 
WIND—Speaking of Love. 
WMAQ—Homemakers’ Exchange. 
WJJD—Women’s Exchange program. 


CHIAPPA—Peter Chiappa, dearly © beloved 
husband of Jennie, nee Funai; fond father of Charles, Harold, Richard, and: Robert” 
of Rose, Frank, Viola,,;and the late Reno. O’Regan. Funeral. Friday, at 9 a. m.,' 
Funeral from late residence, 4722 W. Dem- | from late residence, 4111 Cermak-rd., to 
ing pone’. Besreee: Revsag’ > at 9 ‘ phe to Epiphany church. Burial Holy Sepulchre. 
St. Genevieve church. Interment St. Jos- | op7z oe = 
eph cemetery. For information call Spauld- oe pri pe ae prongs po ay onl pe 
ing 8931 or Brunswick 8220. Caroline, Member of Locomotive Engineers’ 


Some way ought to be found to con- 
serve the juiciest offerings of the 
week, so that they may be heard at 
least in part at some other time. 
There are plenty of answers why 
this can’t be done. There’s the ad- 


Miami, Fla., Feb. 2—(/)—Elmer E. 
Payne, 76 years old, a retired news- 
paperman and a former member of 
the interstate commerce commission, 
died today after a long illness. 


WMA 
11:45—WENR—Six Day Bike Race 
ee Sichman’s. " orchestra 


WBBM—Rhythm at Midnight. 
WMAQ—Panico’s orchestra. 
WIND—The Night Watch. 
WENR—Paul Christenson’s orchestra. 


Miriam Hopkins. 
7—WLS—March of Time. 
8—WBBM—Maj. Bowes. 
8—WMAQ—Good News — Meredith 
Willson, Robert Taylor, Billie Burke, 
Fannie Brice, Frank Morgan, Allan | A. ™. 


Dr. Joseph Ragsdale. 

Athens, Ala., Feb. 2.—(4)—Dr. Jos- 
eph Ragsdale, 69, dean emeritus of 
Athens college, died today of a heart 


vertising angle, for instance; the WAAF—Sweet and Slow 12:30~W-G-N—Red Nichols’ CHRI 

' ; -G-N— s’ orch. [MBS]. attack at his home here. _M istensen, Feb. 1,|} association. Funeral services Saturday, 

rights to artists and material. But WLS—Viec and Sade. Jones, Judy Garland, and Betty WMAQ—Irma Glen. organist, of 6956. Dorchester sant wite of the| 9:30 a. m., from chapel, 1734 W. 48th 
late Charley, mother of Chris Mathisen,| treet, to St. Joseph church. Interment 


WENR—Art Kassell’s orchestra. 


WCFL—Peekers in the Pantry. 
1:00—W-G-N—Ozzie Nelson’s orch. [MBS], 


Jaynes. 
10 :45—W-G-N—“ Stella Dallas.” te 


8:30—WENR—Town Meeting of the 


Resurrection. For information. Yards 3713. 


QUODDY POWER 


sometime a way around these and 


other hurdles will be found—and it Dagmar Clark, Harold, Elsie Gerard, and 


the late Walter and Anna Mayer. Funeral | O'MALLEY—See D. J. Moran notice. 


WMAQ—Rhythm in the Air. 4g ” 
may be done. WBBM—Aunt Jenny’s Stories. Air—“ What Does Democracy Mean? . m. hapel, 5203 Lake | ornprrr—c 
WAAF—Foolish Questions, 9—WMAQ—Bing Crosby’s Music PROJECT AUTHOR 2 ae gp ren: Cedar Park. gf oy 9 Sogn El tame - Gameamtiie 


street, wife of the late William. fond 
mother of William, the Rev. James H., 
chaplain U. S. army, the Rev. Emmet, 
chaplain U. S. navy. Kathryn. Mrs. James © 
M. {Margarette] Foley. and the late Mary. 
Funeral Saturday, 9:30 a. m.. to St. Leo 
church. Interment Mount Olivet. 
PAGE—Cleone Page, late of 8056 Harvard 
avenue, darling daughter of John and 
Esther, nee Lemberg. Private funeral Thurs- 
day, Feb. 3, 2:30 p. m. Burial Evergreen. 


WHIP—Musical Views. 

WLS—The Gospel Singer. 
11:00—W-G-N—Harold Turner, pianist. 

WJJD—Bureau of Missing Persons, 

WMAQ—Girl Alone. 

WBBM—Mary Margaret McBride. 

WAAF—Memory Lane. 

WLS—Don and Helen. 

WCFL—Happy Jack Turner. 


CHURCHILL—Arthur C. Churchill, passed on 
Feb. 1, 1938, husband of Maude, father of 
Arthur Churchill of Spokane, Wash., and 
Ralph. Churchill of Eau Claire, Wis., broth- 
er of M. E. Brice of Spokane, Wash. Serv- 
ices at chapel, 2701 N. Clark street, Thurs- 
day, 3 p. m., private. Please omit flowers. 

CLARK—Louis Austin Clark, beloved hus- 
band of Satie Harris Clark, father of Wen- 
dell Harris, Samuel Harris, and Gordon 
Sterling Clark. Services at 2 p..m. Thurs- 


SCHOOL BOARD 
GETS WINDFALL 
IN RENT RULING 


A windfall for the board of educa- 
tion was seen yesterday in decisions 
of the Appellate court that boosted 


Hall, with Bob. Burns, John Scott 
Trotter, Ethel Bartlett, and Rae Rob- 
ertson, Wayne Morris, and Spring 
Byington. 

9—W BBM—On to Adventure. 

9:30—WENR—NBC Jamboree, with 
Don McNeill, Irene Castle McLaugh- 
lin, Jackie Heller, Bennett and Wol- 


DIES IN BOSTON 


Boston, Mass., Feb. 2.—(4)—Dex- 
ter P. Cooper,. 57 years old, engi- 
neer who dreamed of harnessing .the 
mighty tides of the Bay of Fundy —_——— 5 Snape 
and who conceived the Passamaquod- r 10 R T 
dy tidal project, died today. 


For many years Cooper trled to in ye CHICAGOS: sq] 


-—e— 
Eddie Cantor is being released by 
his present gasoline sponsors so he 
ean head a new show for the cigaret 
concern that now has Jack Oakie and 
Benny Goodman on CBS Tuesday 
nights. New Cantor show will be 
aired at 6:30 Monday nights, gid P. M. 
ing March 28. Oakie show will p | eee Mail Box. 


O’ Neills, Harry 

off the air. aed ame eaten svaet, Som Sylvia Clark, and the 1925 valuations on three parcels t t th ts of the United day, First oe Episcopal — ~ PEBRY—Eadward at gg ay of non 
— ; ° eres e vernmen e Unite Evanston, mnman avenue an ure rove avenue, ar ove us- 

of the board’s loop property by more go . street. Private burial, Forest Home. band of Emma, nee Miller, father of Ed- 


Ray, and Christine. 


WLS—Chuck, 
WHIP—Melodic Meditations, and Mrs. 


Julia Viahos, 


States and Canada in developing ward N., Mrs, 


Marshall, Opera 
Everett ar » Vpe than $460,000. The lessees sought a DESREMAUX—Irene Desremaux, nee Watson,| f nces Bedingfield, brother of the late 


PREFERENCE 
two- chapels 


° . ° 11:30—W-G-N—Quin Ryan’s News Comment. tidal power from the Bay of Fundy. 
Baritone, Divorced in Texas wine aoe 2:15—W-G-N—Valiant Lady dc ye i I ey SN Me The United States arement a Sonk wellielo t Dona M. and Donald, daugn: | Rev. 3. N. Perry. Puneral Friday, Feb. 4, 
WMAQ—Farm and Home hour.  WMAQ—-Ma Perkins. praisals as having been too high, but & ter of Ann Watson, sister of Mrs, Walter| 3¢ 9 a. m. from chapel, 124 Madison 
“ cepted a compromise proposal to +. Oe dere) oe street, Oak Park, at Lombard avenue, to 


Turner and William Watson. Funeral Fri- 
day, 9:30 a. m., from the late home, 847 N. 
East avenue, Oak Park, to St. Giles church, 
Greenfield and Columbia avenues. Inter- 
ment All Saints’. 

DIENHART—Edith Virginia Dienhart [nee 
Ziegfeld}, loving mother of Walter Jr. and 


Fort Worth, Tex., Feb. 2.—[{Spe- 
cial.]—Everett Marshall, opera and 
radio baritone, was divorced today 
from Mrs. Carolina Segrera Marshall, 
former Cuban singer, who won a sep- 


WJJD—Safety court 
WMBI—Continued Story. 
WCFL—Jean Ellington. 
WLS—Ma Perkins. 
WAAF—Myrna Dee Sargent. 
WG e hour. 

11; ee oe Down East. 


Ascension church, East avenue and Van 
Buren street, Oak Park, where solemn high 
mass will be celebrated. Interment Calvary.- 
POCHRON—Bernice Pochron, nee Nowak, be- 
loved wife of Frank Pochron, fond mother 
ot Stanley, Mrs. Sophia Bieschke, Anna, . 
Helen, and Eugene. Funeral Saturday, at 


according to the court’s ruling they 
now owe the board $484,000 in back 
rent for the decade from 1925 to 1935. 

Annual rental on the property is 
6 per cent of the valuation with a 


WCFL—School of Music. 
WAAF—Music in the Air. 
WBBM—Meet the Missus. 
2 paises ecg Baker, home manage- 
ment, 
WMAQ—Vic and Sade. 
-WBBM—Missus Goes to Market. 


build tide power dams on Passa- 
maquoddy bay in American territory 
near tthe Me. 


aration and $300 monthly alimony BBM—Our Gal Sunday. 
fro mhim ; WCFL—Three Romeos. WHIP—German hour. new appraisal being made every ten Richard, fond daughter of Edith and the 
fro in New York last Decem WHIP—aAirlane Dance. WIND—Stars Over Hollywood. years. Objecting to the 1925 evalua- A late Carl Ziegteld, sister of Florence Bran- lin Ha roy a er — 6 ee : 


num. Funeral services at her late home, Si. 
1521 N. Austin boulevard, Friday, at 2 
p. m.. Interment Graceland. 


DYE—See Leonard notice. 


WLS—Musical Roundup. 
WAAF—Red Hot and Low Down. 
2:45—W-G-N—Good Health and Training: 

Ill. Soe. of Mental Hygiene [MBS]. 


Adalbert cemetery. 

ROBBINS—Agnes Sheehan Robbins, Feb. 2, 
6343 Ellis avenue, wife of the late Rich- 
ard J., mother of Mrs. W. 8S. Lawson, . 


ber. Today’s decree also added to 
Marshall’s obligations,- for the court 
ordered him to pay $60 a month 


WLS—Markets. 
Noon—W-G-N—Man on the Street. 
WMBI—Gospel ye 
WLS—Dinner Bell p 


tion, the lessees continued paying on 
the basis of that of 1915, which was 
considerably lower. Property in- 


phone call’ 


toward the support of their daughter, WCFL—Emerson Gill's « 8 steiantre. WBBM—Gossip club. 
WIND—Ben Kanter, volved is at 6 South State street, 16- PARNHAM-—Robert F. Farnham, ¥eb. 1.| Thomas J. Sheehan, Joseph ¥., William K. 
WHIP—Southtown Church hour. to ursen father of Robert K. and William P., brother he hese ge a of George Griffin, Long 


6 months old, who is with her mother. 


Hospitals Get Rules to Stop 
Maternity Ward Epidemics 


18 South State street, and 20-22 South 
State street. 


KILLED BY EXHAUST FUMES. 
Nathan Becker, 24 years old, of 1506 


WMAQ—The Guiding’ Light. 
3:00—W-G-N—Rhythm Ramblers. 
WBBM—Houseboat Hannah. 
WMAQ—Lorenzo Jones. 
WENR—Club Matinée. 
3:15—-W-G-N—Lady of Millions. 


Island City, N. Y. Funeral from chapel, . 
7705 Cottage Grove avenue, Friday, 9 a. m.,. 
to Holy Cross church, 65th and Maryland 
avenue. Burial H oly Sepulchre. 


ROSS—Henry J. Ross, Jan. 31, 1938, hus- 
band of Mrs. Lillian G. Ross, "1320 Wesléy *~ 


of Gene McCormack and Beatrice Steward. 
Services Thursday, at 3 p. m., at chapel, 
5203 Lake Park avenue. Interment _ pri- 
vate. Jamestown, N. Y., papers please copy. 


FAVIA—Philip Favia, husband of Archangle, 


WAAF—Symphonic hour. 
WMAQ—Farm and Home hour. 
12:15 WO hee 
- rold Turner, pianis 
WJJD—Boonday service.” s 


assures you of 
the finest, yet 


WBBM—Hymns of All Churches. 
WCFL—Escorts and Betty. WCFL—Pi ital. North Kedzie avenue, was found dead from der ee: eee ee Abollonia, father of 

Dr. Herman N. Bundesen, president | 12:39_w.g.N—Markets. WMAQ—Story of Mary Marlin. carbon monoxide last night in his car in a @ Twenty-five times nee Marino, 400 ot oh, Mrs. Jean Max-| svenne, Evanston; lil Remaine at chapel, 
of the board .of health, announced WMAQ—Words and Music. WBBM—Quarter Hour of Romance. | Private garage at 3240 Le Moyne street, | wald, Angelo, and Vito. Funeral Saturday,| 1610 Maple avenue, Evanston. 

yesterday that rules for the conduct WCFL—Young Widder Jones, 3:30—W-G-N—Lawrence Salerno and organ, | Police said he left suicide notes blaming as man calls as the -9 a. m., from 1125 W. Ohio street to} services 4 p. m., » at Rosehill 
d : ti f maternity wards weee— Arnold Grimm's Daughter. WEBM—The Goldbergs. bupeness worries. | : Sancta Maria Addolorata church. Inter-| cemetery chapel, Chicago. | 

ee ee ee ae 12:35—W-G-N—Midday Service: T. Z. Koo of WMAQ—Hughes Reel. average concer ~— 1S ment Mount Carmel. Armitage 7800. ROUBINEK—James W. Roubinek, 2119 War- 

have been distributed to all hospitals | cas aero states- ote Ta Graham: Book a : Chica 3 ‘gs r ‘tion FELDSCHER—Rebecca  Feldscher, late Pr ner avenue, Feb. 1, —_ beloved Phen omgen 
: ; 3 ars, be- f Jessie M., nee BR lov er .of'. 

: en sie daseh of ‘aa aces oe ey WORL—Volce of Exp rience, Wirt as FE. a | Have A ed ce reer of | loved wife of ihe late Leo B. ig By oem Myron, en onagy and Bernice Bartlett, 
naga els. . and pprecia 2 4 Saga on ather of seven grandchildren.’ 


as epidemic diarrhea, which killed a 
| chapel, 2114 Irving Park boulevard. Inter- 


number of babies two months ago. 
He said hospitals are also being in-| 
spected by the health department to 


Lain & Son Service—_ 
Quality —and low 
prices. @ Included 


L., and the late Oscar. Funeral Friday, 
10 a. m., at chapel, 3125 W. Roosevelt 


road. ‘Interment O. B. A. cemetery. 
FLOWERS—George W. Flowers, Feb. 2, be- 
loved husband of Elsa [nee Spielmann}, 


ment at Montrose cemetery. 


SCHMETTERER—Louis Schmetterer, late of | 
6346 N. Talman avenue, beloved husband 
of Sarah, dear father a Max, 


Ww bor 
4 00: Owen's sh rMBsi. 
WMAQ—Tea Time varieties. 


Ww Dan 
WJJD—Ben Kanter. 


10 Years in 5” | 


3 F Mie Homes: 


WHIP—M es. 
determine whether they are ees WAAF—H ene 
.: een 1:15—W Razr Palrpher WENR—Six Day Bike race. Se tetas says 7 and it’s al : with all services — brother of Mrs. Elisabeth Storis of Balti'| Jean, Colm vetcea. and Sarah Bosman 
wieaee O'Neills 4:15—WMAQ—Benno xabinoff. D cause Of 8s nggie dneys.” West: Ph. HA Ymarket 0100 bo coy — ap ye : Being << Baga eat | Funasal Paursday. 4p m., 66 Go eee 
British to View Movi Midday Roundup. WENR—Musle circle, | on’t grow old before your : es aie when desired—at both DOr nO Nea er yea net St. Peter | Roosevelt road. Burial Jewish oar 
ra | yas WHIP—Lora and Lad y iM 4:30—W-G-N—Afternoon Serenade. _ time. Drink the natural, health. 2346 W. | | pels— Episcopal church. Interment private. SCHOR—Jacob Schor, 1321 S. Kedzie a 
Showin Duke’s Weddi 1:30-—-W-G-N—Lucky Girl [ BSI. gz cs BM—Stepmother ‘restoring water that ‘doctors | cha at no extra cae Gallagher, dearly} nue, ed husband of Sarah, tenes 
one. Pike apaiead WMAQ—Fort, Pearson.” R—Johnnie Johnston. have prescribed for 75 years, || North: Ph, WELlington 1724 cost—is the famous =| “Stiovea ‘husband of ‘Isabelle [nco Welse-| of Abe. Harry, Morris. Cacey, ‘Sam, Brieda 
LONDON, Feb, 2A fifteen min- rain, mavkete tas wENE—Zitse Homeot "|| Stgphons MOMeee’” Son | sayin seating IMPERIAL Quartet. | 2.lovm te re “S ire| of ve brother of lrael Schot. ‘amains at 
: / ’ 1 45-—W-G-N—Beatriee WEPM-—Hilitop E House... Telephone MONroe | Wittiam R. Larkin, Mrs. Alexander Mc-| chapel, 3163 Ogden avenue. 


Fairfax [MBS]. 
WMAQ—Armchair gently — 
WCFL—Edward Davies 


South: Ph. CALumet 4030 
~ \ - 
820 S. M Avenue. 
ae rs RECS Sane ae 
BES Tow Be so ‘tip of eG ty Li ys ity 
Peet ere aie, argh ot yi ah Vs eee ‘ ae - ’ 


ute news reel of the wedding last 
June of leon duke of Windsor, former 


Conan see os ae 8 


WIND—Once U 
5:00—W-G-N—Freddie 1 mthell’s aiiesied. 
WBBM—Kitty Keene, Inc. 
WIND—Stamp Man. 
WENE—Junior Nurse corps. 


Dick. 
5:15-—W-G.N—Harold Turner [MBS]. 
Roland Hall Sharp. 


MOUNTAIN VALLEY || 


WAAF—Sylvia Stone ae HOT SPRINGS, AF ‘ Ae bee 


seteagiinn - Wright ‘and Len Salve 
WMAQ—Pepper Young’s Family. 
JID—Spo 


mel. 
of Columbus. 


GARDINER— William Lynn Gardiner, Feb. 1, 


: Wiseman tour WiiD-Bour ot the ek 1988, of 931 N. Lathrop avenue, River 4 
4 WBBM—Ray Block’s Var Forest, usband of Hattie Gardiner, nee | € 
‘< ~ LS oy aoe at funeral home, iz 
: 3 320 N. Central avenue, Austin. Funeral| La Grange, I ‘ 
4 [ADVERTISMENT] Priday, p. m. Interment Forest Home.| 4. Interment : 
4 ” beloved husband ‘of. Anna. Fond father of 1 other of Julia Puxelis. bert ee 

, % zi £ mes 1 | Fis 

cm rs , S , | i be 


-- . 4 =“ ‘ : Se it : 
4 % 9 a ah hi ws 
4 -, . 3 P 7 ie & 
 « 4 a ; 2 > a PASS: 
Sear wx rpc gute N—Elit ¥S he GEER: ey ag “3 
‘ ; _ ¢ ayy 
“3 2 - ‘ . te tt hae pe ee ees & 
fides ry, Pre srt eh ? x. Le chr aa bes yp eae et se 
of = ar " s } e ed Le  \es 
FI =. ts + Ris ve pony reine : ¥ ‘ 
tes pig ‘My Die oe ex Page” #3 " re 


wk oh A 


RE AB ei ai ER MRE EES aN Rey PCT cpr As OP ee 
Ce aye y te he ~ “ ‘ 


2 NGL ORE BRAT LR NR ROMPRES MOE Bt Rs A FETE IEA RRA RT ae ~~ 
. aa 4 " . 4 ~ - t a a ow v tt new * 


Te AT a 


Si Se ae nde 
geist ; 


Dens 


aie ike eg 


Seaipleus’ City - 


Makes Ski Fan | 
“Want to Travel] 


BY JUDITH CASS. 


KI enthusiasts, kept at home in 

a snowless Chicago, listen avidly 

to tales of whiter fields brought] 

back by fortunate week-end—or | 
longer—skiers such as Mr. and Mrs.| 
A. Watson Armour III. the Henry/ 
*Porters, the Robert S. Macdonalds, | 
Dustin Grannis, and Alfred Langlois, 
who spent last week-end in Phelps, 
Wis. 

Parents and friends of Dartmouth 
students, and especially the hun- 
dreds of young women who are in- 
vited to the Dartmouth Outing club’s 
annual carnival, will read with appre- 
ciation descriptions of plans the club 
is making for its twenty-eighth car- 
nival, to be held the wegk-end of 
Lincoln’s birthday. 

-From Sun valley, from the Lauren 
tians, even from far away Switzer- 
land, postal cards and letters bring 
news of happy people sliding over 
beautiful white slopes. But here in 
Chicago the newly organized Snow 
Chase club mourns the lack of snow 
at its skiing territory in La Crosse, 
Wis. Its members wistfully wax 
their skis and oil their boots, and 
prepare to: enjoy skiing thrills vicari-| 
ously with forty minutes of colored 
skiing movies at a lufcheon at the 
Palmer house tomorrow. 


Dartmouth Plans 


a Gay Carnival. 

The plans for the Dartmouth carni- 
val are colorful and gay, as usual. 
The carnival will open on Friday 
night, the 11th, with a dramatic pres- 
entation, “Frost Fire,” given by a 
group of skiers and skaters before 
a modernistic setting uf ice and snow. 
Aerial fireworks and a musical ex- 
travaganza will accompany the pro- 
gram. 

Every one there will make a point 
of watching the cross-country, down- 
hill and slalom races between a Ba- 
varian team of skiers and Dartmouth. 
Other sporting events will be a swim- 
ming and basketball meet with 
Princeton, a hocky game with Har- 
vard, and the New Hampshire open 
speed skating championships. 

Gilbert and Sullivan’s “ Gondoliers ” 
will be given Friday and Saturday 
nights, the glee club will give a per- 
formance on Saturday, and numerous 
fraternity dances, tea-dances, and 
dinners will complete the gay pro- 
gram. 

Of the hundreds of pretty young 
women who will go to Hanover, N. 
H., for the carnival, one will be 
crowned queen of the snows at the 
“Frost Fire” presentation. 

James Cooney of Chicago is in 
charge of all races and competitive 
sports on the program. Other Chi- 
cagoans on the carnival committee 
include Julian Armstrong Jr., Thomas 
G. Antrim, William Spinney, Donald 
Stillman, John Ingersoll, Howard A. 
Hogg Jr., John F. Mercer, and Wil- 
liam C, Chamberlin. 


Plan Sports Week-end 


at Phelps, Wisconsin. 


Long Lake lodge at Phelps will be 
crowded with skiers again this week- 
end. Mr. and Mrs. William S. War- 


The beauty experts are getting 
baby minded and babies’ mothers, 
awake now to the idea that being 


to it, should be delighted. We can 
imagine that the woman of the fu. 
ture will be one who’s never known 
a day of skin trouble since she was 
born. 
One beauty set for the baby, 
brought out just recently bya spe- 
cialist, will be the envy of all grown- 
up women. It’s so beautiful, for one 
thing. And the cream and powder in 
it are so fine, for another. It’s an 
ideal idea if there’s a baby shower 


beautiful is easy if a girl is groomedy 


[TRIBUNE Studio Photo.] 


on your calendar and if you've a 
chubby little charmer in your, own 
home you'll never be able to resist 
the temptation to buy it. 
a 

The set consists of a baby cream, a 
baby talcum and cotton, in perfectly 
beautiful, feather light plascon jars. 
The cream is particularly exciting. 
Very pure, of course, and very effi. 
cient in keeping the flower petal skin 
soothed and lubricated and beauti- 
fied. It’s a rich cream, but so blended 
that it disappears into the skin im- 


mediately, leaving no stickiness. The 3 


tale is fine and without perfume. 
Talc, cream, and snowy cotton are 


Sure. of Self. in 


Tale of Streets 


“BOY OF THE ¢TREETS. ” 


eee, Mb ae 0 oar - Cooper 

ees . Maureen O’Connor 
PTREVULOLELL TE soe nee Burke 
Doctor seeesee caseeeseneeesoe GORdOn Elliott 
Mary BremMam.....cccecees: Main 
Blackie......... sevccveccerecscscmmtty Fain 
cocseuees Gay Usher 
Rourke..........Robert Emmett O’Connor. 
Tony.,... -Don Latorre 
Spike. ...Paul White 


eoeneeneeee ee @ 


eeeeeeee se Genesee eettees 


By Mae Tinée. 

Good Morning! 

‘We've been having a good many in- 
quiries lately about Jackie Cooper. 
Where was he? How was he? When 
would he appear in another picture? 
Well, here he is on the Garrick 
screen—and doing very nicely, thank 


you! 


The fun begins when the bath is over. Then baby enjoys her own beauty set of 
cream, talcum and cotton each in handsome jars equipped with a mysterious 
squeaker that makes her forget that bit of soap in her eyes. 


sealed in their individual containers 
with cellophane; containers are either 
pink or blue, for either boys or girls. 

We confess to being absolutely 
crazy about these containers, Their 
lines: are perfect; so are the colors, 
and so is the composition of which 
they’re made. But what we love best 
is their toy touch; each has a little 
button in the back of the jar. Press 
it and out comes a series of silly bird- 
like chirps! Babies think this is great 
fun. So do we! 

ELEANOR NANGLE. 

[For information about this beauty 
set for babies telephone Hleanor Nan- 
gle, Superior 0100.) 


field of Winnetka, who have skied 


there on other occasions, left last 
night for the resort, accompanied by 
their five children and some other 
young people. Elmer F. Wieboldt, 
Elmer Jr., and about five of his school 
friends went north at the same time. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Kent Tenney, who 
live in Madison, Wis., will join to- 
morrow’s train at Milwaukee, bound 
for a week-end’s skiing at Phelps. 
Among the young people who left 
with the Warfields were Gordon Pirie, 
Barbara Ingersoll, and Louis Ware Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ware also traveled 
with the Warfields, whose children 
aré Bill Jr., Ware, Jim, Dick, and 
Hildegard. 

Mrs. Alf Engen, wife of the famous 
skier, will comment on the movies 
to be shown to the Snow Chase club 
tomorrow. The luncheon will start 
promptly at 12:30 o’clock, so that 
the men will not be away long from 
their business. The movies were taken 
at Sun valley and in other parts of 
the Rockies. Providing snow arrives, 
the club will arrange for a special 
week-end party at La Crosse later 
this month. 


Set Dates for Horse 


Show at Lake Forest. 

June 22, 23, 24, and 25; they’re a 
long time off, but mark them in your 
calendars, for the Lake Forest horse 
show is going to be held then. The 
dates were set at the annual meeting 
ofthe American Horse Show asso- 
ciation in New York. Albert B. Dick 
Jr. and John B, Morse attended as 


” [Continued on page 15, column 1.] 
—————— ees 


Low Death Rate 
Is Reported by 
Infant W eltare 


BY VIRGINIA GARDNER. 
The Infant Welfare society of Chi- 
cago reports that during 1937 almost 
all of the deaths among the society’s 
infant charges occurred in the group 
of artificially fed babies. 

In a report by Dr. Heyworth N. 
Sanford, medical director, at the so- 
ciety’s 27th annual meeting in the 
Stevens hotel yesterday, it was point- 
ed out that the death rate among 
Infant Welfare society babies again 
reached the low level of 1935, with 
only 6.4 babies per 1,000. The infant 
mortality rate for the city was 37.5 
per 1,000. 

‘ibn 


Pneumonia claimed more victims, as 
usual, than all the other causes of 
death. It is in the society's few ar- 
Se IEEE atone etait RENN Ae aR RETR RE IIT A ERITREA 


‘YOUR DOCTOR KNOWS 
YOUR MIRROR SHOWS 


* 
\ “BUBBLE” 


Doctors know how effective the 
| ling of active oxygen is for 
blackheads, surface-pimples, and 
similar blemishes. And DIOXOGEN 
CREAM is the onl 'y cleansing cream 
that contains active oxygen. When 
you put this fragrant white cream on 
oe face, its oxygen forms millions 
aehagterdepem ate 
¢ hat its in-w 
and blackheads coobeddea ‘ 
_and then force the loosened wats 
sea to es connie of the skin . 
caving ney exion clean,clear, a 
nd smoo Mehetees, Pilih can. oe g 


vier Dry Skin me 5 "Wrinkles 


One ‘Hour Treatment p SEE Tl 


plica of monaeit’s Penetrating 


T= > Se. 


WEDDINGS 


The wedding of Miss Leone Wad- 
dell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam S. Waddell, to George S. Jones 
Jr. took place on Jan. 19. Mr. Jones 
and his bride have gone on a Carib- 
bean cruise. They will be at home 
in Evansville, Ind., after March 1. 

The wedding of Miss Evelyn Ra- 
che] Murphy, daughter of Mrs. F. Els- 
ton Murphy, 7031 Merrill avenue, and 
C. B. Murphy of Charlotte, N. C., to 
Oliver Frederick Richardson of Des 
Moines, Ia., took place on Jan. 15. 


tificially fed babies that the fault in 
immunity is found. which leads to 
death, he said. He urged building 
up resistance and keeping babies 
away from adults with common colds. 


— 
Whooping cough caused 70 per cent 
of the deaths from contagious dis- 
ease. Arrangements are being made 
with the board of health to inocu- 
late this' disease. 
During 1937 the society’s 18 sta- 
tions cared for 1,299 expectant moth- 


ers, with 725 live births. Of this num- 
ber there was only one maternal mor- 
tality, whereas the maternal deaths 
per 1,000 live births in Chicago in 
1936 were 3.7. 


pi 

A total of 9,051 infants, ranging 
from a few weeks to 2 years old, were 
cared for during the year, and 3,274 
pre-school children. These children 
and babies consumed 22,306 pints of 
cod liver oil distributed by nutrition- 
ists of the society. 

In the absence of the president, 
Philip D. Armour, who was reélected 
with the other officers, Lucius Teter, 
chairman, gave his report. Mr. Ar- 
mour is in Passavant hospital follow- 
ing a knee operation. 

x 


Native Daughters. 

Dr. Albert K. Baxter, acting direc- 
tor of the state department of public 
health, will address the Native 
Daughters of Illinois at a meeting on 
Feb. 15 at 2 o’clock at the Stevens 
hotel. Dr. Baxter, an authority on 
President Lincoln, will take’:as his 
subject, “The Man Who Didn’t For- 
get His Friends: Abraham Lincoln.” 


_Neumode 


eHOSIERYe 


~ 
STROLLER 


famous |WALKAROUNDS, those popular practical chiffonsl — 


on ODE HOSIERY SHOPS : 
‘BICAGO AND SUBURBS — 


| 2048 Milwaukee Avenue, 


1027 Eat Gd Sn 
MA Went esrd's ese iasy 


ds a brand-new Spring — 
shade. See it today in our’ 


near Logan 


Oy) x 
. 
: a ARS: op . 


I can’t say much for the story 
Jackie drew, nor did I care for the 
work of all the featured adults in 
the cast nor the girl, Maureen O’Con- 
nor, whom the hero is crazy about. 
But Jackie and the male adolescents 
who play his pals and enemies are 
all to the good. 

Backgrounds are a city’s congested 
tenement districts, . . . Main object 
is to show how a kid whose ambition 
is to grow up to be a ward leader— 
or some big shot who doesn’t have to 
work—finds himself... . 


-~>~ 
Conditions in his home are sordid. 
The bickering of a slatternly and dis- 
couraged mother anda lazy but good- 
hearted father is no fireside lure. 
P . Chuck and his gang run the 
streets, fight with rival roughnecks 
and give all promise of growing up 
into undesirable citizens. 
But the efforts of a kind young dis- 
trict doctor and a Park avenue girl 
who goes in for settlement work 
prove not fruitless. Chuck joins the 
navy and the film ends with a nice, 
clean boy bidding a nice, clean girl— 
for “Miss Park Avenue” has put 
Chuck’s Nora in a private school— 
good-by... . 
Some of the episodes are sicken- 
ingly saccharine. Much of the acting 
is forced and a lot of it is poor. [A 
shining exception is the work of 
Robert Emmett O’Connor as Chuck’s 
patrolman pal.] BUT— 

Young Jackie Cooper, thinner, tall- 
er, and very sure of himself, is 
“'THERE ”—and make no mistake 
about that! 


See you soon. 


First U. S. Evchibit 
of Ryback Paintings 
to Be at Arts Club 


The first show in America of the 
work of Issachar Ryback, Russian 
born French painter who died in 
Paris two years ago, will be opened 
at the Arts club tomorrow with a 
pre-view tea from 4 to 6 o’clock. Shar- 
ing the show are Jean Helion and 
Pavel Tchelichew. Mme. Sonia Ry- 
back, widow of the painter, will be a 
guest at the tea. 

Ryback, who died at 38, painted in 
Paris fifteen years and his work 
hangs in such galleries as the Lux- 
embourg museum, the Museum of 
Sevres and the Albert and Victoria 
museum in London. In the present 
show are a few of his oils and a 
dozen water colors, many of which 
are of his favorite subjects, the bril- 
liant colored scenes in the harbors of 
Brittany and La Rochelle. 

The show will continue two weeks. 

x 


Women Lawyers. 
Judge Edmund K. Jarecki of the 
Cook County court and Judge Jessie 
Sumner of the Iroquois County court 
will be the speakers at a dinner 
meeting of the Women’s Bar associa- 
tion tonight in Fred Harvey’s restau- 


“Tl Jackio aren 


atreet, on & 
the lower § 


Take the Stand, 
Jim Cagney. 


Hollywood, Cal., Feb. 2, 
Q.—You hail from New York, don’t 


you, Jim? 


* A—Yes, I 
was born on Fe 


Avenue D ie 


and 8th, 


east side, 

but the fam- = 

ily moved age 
to Yorkville- 


wees aaa ® 


: ene 
-f ere a ees See ears wren ~ 
SEG nett eats 


considered | 
that as my && 
home sec- ; 


tion. Paul : 


Berlen bach @& 
came from 
there, as did 
Joe Judge, James . Cagney 
who used to talks of career. 

play a lot of first base for the Wash: 
ington Senators. 

Q.—How did you get into this busi: 
ness? 

A.—TI did a little bit of idieeitiane! 
Best acting I ever did was as a kid in 
Wall street. We had to signal from 
the street with our fingers to the 
brokers to give them prices. I 
worked there six months. But I 
actually started on the stage in 
vaudeville. 

Q.—A song and dance act? 

A.—My first job was in an act in 
which I had to dress like a girl. 
When it played Yorkville—Loew’s 
86th Street theater— I was afraid to 
walk out on the: stage. It’s funny 
the way things hook up—the pro. 
ducer of that vaudeville act was ‘Phil 
Dunning. 

Q.—What was funny about that? 

A.—Later he was to produce 
“ Broadway.” 

Q.—I didn’t know you were in that 
show, Jim. 

A.—Nobody did. You see, I was 
picked to play the lead in the Lon- 
don company. The night we were to 
sail for London I was notified that 
I’d been canceled out of the cast. By 
the terms of the Equity contract Dun- 
ning had to pay my salary for the 
run of the play, but to protect the pro- 
ducer there is a clause that in such 
an event the actor must do whatever 
job the producer assigns. As a re- 
sult, for six months, in New York, 
I reported at the Broadhurst and did 
a walk-on bit in one of the crowd 
scenes. 

Q.—But you appeared on Broad- 
way in some musical comedies, didn’t 
you? 

A.—I was a chorus boy in “Pitter 
Pat.” Allen Jenkins and I both were 
chorus boys in that one. After 
“Broadway” came “Penny Arcade” 
with Joan Blondell. That was the 
show which graduated both of us to 
Hollywood. Bill Grady signed us with 
Warner’s for three weeks at $500 a 
week. 

Q@.—That was big dough for you 
then? 

A.—TI’ll say it was. When I signed 
I thought to myself, “Even if you 
flop, this will be enough to live on 
for a year.” After the three weeks 
they signed me to another three 
weeker, and I was delighted. That 
meant I could live comfortably for 
TWO years. 

Q@.—Then along came “Public En- 
emy” and stardom? 

A.—If ever there was an accident 
that picture offered concrete evidence 
of it. Another actor was supposed to 
get the part I played, and I was 
slated for a secondary réle. In the 


Legion Auxiliary. 

The first rehabilitation conference 
of Area D of the American Legion 
auxiliary will be held today and to- 
morrow at the Hotel Sherman. Mrs. 
James Morris of Bismarck, N. D., na- 
tional rehabilitation chairman of the 


rant, 308 South Michigan avenue. 


auxiliary, will attend. 


WHY LOTION THAT GOES IN 


SEATS LP TORR POH PRETO 


Keeps HANDS adorable 


scramble 1 got the, good part and he 
got the weaker part. That's how 
Stars are born, Edward—it’s sort of 
a hit or miss proposition. It’s al- 
ways amusing to me to hear actors 
explain how they .became.. movie 
stars, because nine chances out 
ten it was nothing but ‘a lucky acci- 
dent. For the same reason I’ve never 
believed that movie companies: could 
claim credit for developing’:a. star, 
but all.of them do. | 

Q.—That. was a swell. picture. 


A.—This will hand you.a laugh. On. 


my last trip to New York I was asked 
to speak at one of those. film organi- 
zations, you know, the groups that 
show those old pictures.. They showed 
“Public Enemy,” and. I’ve. never 
squirmed:so much in all my. life.. We 
made that in 1931, only about seven 
years ago, but the movie technique 
since then has gained speed and. pace. 
As a result I sat there, my face burn: 
ing, and watched myself “ hamming.’ 
up stenes. The camera would pro- 
long’ each closeup by two or three 
seconds as it dollied up or dollied 
back. It was incredible in view of 
what is done today. I don’t often 
blush, but when the lights went up, 
I was as red as a beet. 

Q.—You’ve had a lot of thrills in 
this business? 

A.—The greatest I’ve ever had hap- 
pened outside the business. In New 
York, one night, I went up to Dorothy 
Parker’s apartment, near East 86th 
street. Here on the lots and water- 
front where all my gang had played 


Natural Eastern 
Mink 

Was 3250.00 

Now 1985.00 


vp 


Black caracul muft.. 
Black caracul muff... 


4 twin-effect silver fox scarfs. 


3 nutria lapin coats 


9 black dyed kid coats..... 
2 grey dyed kid coats 
Hudson seal (dyed muskrat) 
Wolverine 


Pahmi 


2-skin cross fox scarf 


V3 


Black fox chubby coat. 


2 grey squirrel coats 
1 black dyed Persian 


Black dyed caracul..... Bee 
Black dyed Persian... 
Jap mink : 
Black dyed caracul 


Mink coats 


BAI COGEs ic co ccccrces 


% 


Silver muskrat 


Jersey muskrat | 


2 grey s 
‘3 black’ sian’'..’.. 
Black Persian coat. 


2 grey 


1 -grey” oe! REE 
Gréy persian .... 


; Se AOR A ee EE Beg ge 
mi ie ae & teoad : > : : 
he FRE seh, pera 3 


of | 


—Chas. A. Stevens & Co.— 


Chicago's Largest Store for Women 
State near Washington 


ici sets dee BOO 


Black Persian muff........... 


Nutria lapm Coat............. 
2 beaverette coats (dyed éoney).. Maca cd 


Baronduki coat .............. 


Black dyed tropical seal...... 


2-skin Hudson Bay sable scarf 
2-skin baby Fisher scarf...... 


l summer ermine coat........ 


2 silvertone dyed. muskrat coats..... 
2 Hudson seal coats (dyed muskrat)... 245.00 


2 Hudson seal coats (dyed muskrat). + 2380 


Hudson seal (dyed muskrat).. 


Brown natural Persian....... 
EREOW TATUPEL FCTBIAN 4 cones ce ccc dees 


Mink cCoeticicséius Os ee Oe CEO OR 


eseeneenteeeeeweneewee#ee 


eeeeeseoeoee a oeeeeee 


‘Australian: oposstm sence eestesescesenec ele 
uirrel cpate:.. 4.3. 


TESS eee + 828 Oe ae oe 


} 
245 
5 


mer coats. eee eeee rece seeees 
3 grey ‘krimmer coats csvsec00 12500. Om 
Cocoa dyed ein cc aa 


& black Persian, .0--+.-<nereveesescsccess 
Black Persian one 0.00 nee acl ene deinele Giie's 


All sale tall Ni 0. exchanges, refunds man tit 


* 


as kids in Yorkville were these mag- 
nificent apartment houses. 1 don’t 
know anything that ever has stirred 
me so deeply as that, Ed. That’s a 
great city—New York. . 

Q.—You’re Irish, of course, with 
that name and face? 

A.—Faith and I am that. There 
are Sullivans in the family, on my 
mother’s side. One thing I want to 
do is to visit Ireland while I’m young — 
enough to enjoy it. That must be am» 
amazing place. Joel Sayre sent mea 
clipping from a Dublin paper. It was. 
a letter to the editor. One of the sub- 
scribers, tongue in cheek, wanted to 
know what sort of times were these 
when a law-abiding man couldn’t get 
to sleep, what with the “little peo- — 
ple” and the Leprechauns pounding 
on his doors and dancing on the win- 
dow’ sills. 

Q.—What did the Dublin editor 
answer? 

A.—He said that the subscriber : 
should know that the “little people” 
were asking only for a drop of 
whisky to warm themselves on chill 
nights. Any country, in this day and 
age, which has retained that imagina- 
tion and humor, must be a great 
place. 

Q.—Everything is okay now at War- 
ner’s, Jim? 

A.—Yes. The tension is out of the 
air for the first time, and we’re one 
big happy family, to coin a phrase. 
Today, at 38, I think that I’m finally 
going to do the things I’ve always 
} wanted to do. 


Open 9:45 to 5:45 


Wn Vs, Y! 


Stevens distinctive 


Fur Coats! 


Some muffs and scarfs included! 


Unquestiona bly these are 
low prices for coats of such 
superb pelts, such nice de- 
tails, such gorgeous linings. 
Stevens coats are renowned 
for their distinctive — style, 
their’ unusual beauty, their 
marked individuality. The 
more you know about furs 
and style the more you'll 
marvel at these coats at these 
prices; the quicker you'll 
choose and the happier you'll 
feel wearing a coat that you 
know is lovely, flattering and 
smart. So if you are inter- 
ested in the unusual and the 
elegant in a coat and want to 
save, come early for the best 
selections ! 


Convenient arrangements may be 
made so you can pay for your 
coat m installments until early 
Fall! 


off! 


Originally 


thd 


7.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 . 
44.50 
57.50 
62.50 
79.50 
79.50 
79.50 
99.00 
997.00 
99.00 

122.50 
147.50 
197.50 
397.50 


secubiias ante 
, 115.00 


*e#eeseeeaeesne eee 


off! 


een eee 6 6.8 


198.00 
225.00 


245.00 


veo 63)250,00 


off! 


| 05 fa i 


2 silvertone dyed muskrat coats. cue ons tLe 
Mink dyed muskrat ......... 124 hebhe guaeere 


00 
00 
00 
Rey 
.395.00 
00 
00° | 
00°: 
-445.00"-~ 


-475.00, ° 


a 


2 ; 

i] lad. $03 ae ait 
nf 

ec ee a 


ry = je 
al eldig sebag M20 We 


; eee BAY totes re 
na, ene, 2 oe iinet 
y ere Reet ing.“ BAD ee 
Treas ae eee ae 
PS a Wig we det 


x 
Pepa abe ep 
a «by ah aera a 


om ee nett ee r . 
ON aA I ee mes Xo RR, AIS NFO E TE Nhe pao rere 


= for yenticular skill, the best 


J % 
y Sef 
“ . 7 


NHAMMERED 
By. Luke Short 
[Copsright: 1086: By Frederick Dilley Glidden.) 
ee aie) Kent. heddes wpitien lope of euie: Fy 


aadere, who framed Poco and — an outlaw o 
ph peak. Two insur. 


r) ance agents sent to meet 
two different bands of pal Pay 
ta , Jake Finger, whose papers he cing 
we each other a 4 - and ais lov lovely ee a on 


way to Shayne mitle m 
t with the Ae ‘Cardowan cro 
On. thet PP ad ¥ down the —— ain go ith oe as 


mar ar hom murder two of them, ge oS ae refuge in an army " tort, wag A om as we 
Poco St. Vrain. Meanwhile Kate helps resctie Poco 
Sollee: cn tt pursued fF ee ame bis real identity. Poco insists he will recover the seid 


to save her father from blame. 
INSTALMENT XVL 
ON TRAIL OF HIS ENEMIES. 
It was light enough now so that Poco could pick up the tracks of the 


eavaicade that preceded him. He traveled fast. 

Noon found him at the second camp of Two-Way and Cardowan, and 
two fresh graves pointed to something he could not immediately understand. 
But investigation showed him that there had been turmoil here, and that 
every one did not leave at the same time. But, strangely enough, they all 


took the same route. 


By midafternoon he was atop the rise that looked down on the builld- | 


ings of the concessionaires, who were not allowed to raise their establish: 
ments on military ground. He knew the place, knew Joe Hannagan who ran 
the saloon. He could see some blue coated troopers down there, and re- 
membering his tangle with the commandant at Fort Benjamin decided it 
would be wise not to show himself too openly. 

The ridge swung around in a crescent, one end of which almost touched 
the cluster of buildings in back of the Hannigan’s frame saloon. Dropping 
back over the ridge, Poco rode the crescent to its end. When fnally it 
flattened out his horse was in a clump of screening cottonwoods. 
mounted and walked through the back lot. 

Joe Hannigan had two rooms built on the rear and one side of his 
saloon, and it was for there Poco headed. The door was unlocked. Stepping 
inside he almost bumped into a Mexican woman, who was cleaning up the 
bedroom. 

She looked at him suspiciously. 


“Get Joe,” he said. 
The woman was used to this kind of visit, and she went out, through the 


door that led to the small kitchen and through another that let on the rear 
of the saloon. 

In a moment a man stepped through the door to the bedroom. He was 
in shirtsleeves, fat, baldheaded, with wary small eyes. He was wiping his 
hands on a soiled apron, but when he looked around the room and his 
glance fell on Poco the movement of hig hands died. Poco observed his 
slack jaw, which stayed that way only a second. Then Joe turned around 
and locked the door. 

Peco said dryly, “It’s no stickup. Why the locked door?” 

at’s the matter, did they lock you out of the fort?” asked Joe, 

Poco scowled. “I don’t get it.” 

“You don’t know a bunch of troopers are combing the hills for you? ™ 

“Still?” Poco said. “ They’ve got a long memory.” 

“You expect to bring a bunch of hardcases up and try to take the fort 
in the middle of the night and have them forget it by morning?” 

Poco said, “Slow down and say that again.” 

Joe repeated himself, adding. “You oughta had more sense than that, 
Poco. Why did you have to chase those two jaspers that way?” 

“What two jaspers?” 

“Them prospectors with their gold. You might of known you'd lose it 
for good if they reached there. Why the hell did you have to shoot up the 
place? Them soldiers don’t forget.” 

Suddenly Poco understood. Two-Way and Cardowan had stolen the 
dust from their own men, run for the fort, and then threw the blame on 
Poco so that the troopers would drive the two gangs back into the hills. 
He had his mouth open to explain, but he saw it was unnecessary. Instead 
he said, “ Where are they now, these prospectors? ” 

Joe shook his head. “I oughtn’t to tell you. You never used to do 
things like that, Poco. Leave ’em be.” 

“You will tell me, though,” Poco said quietly. 

Joe nodded in resigned agreement. “Yeah. For five years I been tellin’ 
you things that could get me hung higher’n a kite.” 

“Where are they? ” 

Joe shrugged. “The captain sent a guard along with them to Rincon 
this morning.” 

“A guard?” Poco repeated slowly. If it had been any one else but Two- 
Way who had done this Poco would not have believed it, but this had the 
unmistakable mark of Two-Way’s brainwork—or Cardowan’s, 

Poco lounged erect. “Some day, Joe,” he said, smiling a little, “the 
army will buy you drinks to keep you from telling what suckers they are.” 

He left Hannigan standing there scowling, wondering, too. 

After a night and a half day in the saddle, hours which had taken him 
ever the San Jons, skirting the pass, using every shortcut he knew in high 
country, Poco dismounted by the trough at the livery stable in Rincon. 

The Maricopa saloon lay across the way, a big two-story affair that domi- 
nated the other buildings along the dusty street. Poco, scanning the single 
avenue, noted and remembered that the small shack on the cross street 
ahead was probably the sherif’s office, because a long doby building with 
barred windows abutted it. 

He swung under the tie rail, then paused to let a half dozen horsemen 
ride by him. Poco observed them carelessly, until his attention was yanked 
up by the figure of Abe McCandless, who was just now swinging into the tie 
rail in front of the Maricopa. 

For one brief moment he contemplated with a kind of sardonic relish 
what would happen when Two-Way and Cardowan drifted into this. He 
knew now that Kate Shayne had not reached McCandless, and that McCan- 
dless would have no idea of what had happened upon the mountain. In his 
incessant traveling from ranch to ranch, from one vast holding to another, 
McCandless would ride the legs off a horse in a week. And because he was 
always moving, and because Poco was lucky and Kate Shayne generous, this 
whole thing could come to a head here tonight—only it wouldn’t. The gold 
was to be returned to. Kate, not McCandless. 

Poco waited until McCandless was dismounted and on the walk, and 
then he called sharply: “Mac!” 

Big Abe turned ponderously as did most of his men. Poco started across 
the street saying clearly. “Don’t go in there. I’m going in, I don’t want 
te look at you.” 

“Is this it?” Mac asked quietly again. 

Poco stopped and confronted them. “Not yet, Mac,” Poco said gently. 
“I won't kill you now.” 

Mac nodded, much as he might have received any news of his business. 
Only his eyes betrayed him, his eyes and the sweat that was beading his 
forehead. 

Poco laughed softly, jeeringly at him. “You've caught me with only 
ene gun, Mac. You and your gunnies make your play, why don’t you?” 

McCandless only shook his head. 

Poco looked coolly at the lot of them, then shouldered through the bat- 
wing doors. 

McCandless watched the door long after he had entered. 

The men shifted uneasily, waiting for word from McCandless. 
McCandless turned, his eyes dreamy, his face utterly grim. 

“Wait for me at the other saloon,” he said curtly, 


[Continued tomorrow. ] 


Use Discretion About the 
Question of Hair Dyeing 


Slowly 


BY ANTOINETTE DONNELLY. 


Woprright: ites: By The Chicago Tribune-, of professional training. If one can- 
Hows Syndicate, ine.) ‘not afford the highest type of work 


He dis 


__CH) CAGO. 


ATT 


as 


BUT LARRY 
HORT AND IN THE 


HOSPITAL, 


GO To SEE HIM! 


ge <— 
7 er 
ae a 


4 FOOLISH. ELSIE 
WAS NO THE | 
SMASH, Too, AND 
w@—~\ OION'T GET oe 
(=~ )}} \ SHE CAN 
TWA AFTER MIN 


is. 


. 
ye 


| MUST 


aera. rT 
WOOLEN’ T 


. 
. 5 4 fe 
¢ hy Z : 4 
¢ 7 
x : rs, PS eS : $y 
t re 4 
‘ 1 a . as j 
” 
; = i, jr 4 ‘ ug 
, M ? 2 
” a 
. 7% 7 , / 
™ cy é. 
¢ ™ 4 
wm 
he pee 
2 oe _— 
~ 
(1 F a! ry ; 
vs v4 } 
‘ > 


pune 


u cou 
THAT 3 


Paulette Goddard Signs 


Contract with Selznick 
Hollywood, Cal., Feb. 2.—(4)—Paul- 
étte Goddard, variously reported as 
the fiancée or wife of Charles Chap- 
lin, signed a long term contract today 
with the David O. Zelznick studio. 
The salary was not disclosed and the 
studio said although several stories 
were being considered for her, none 
had been selected. Miss Goddard, un- 
der contract to Chaplin for two years, 
appeared in only one Chaplin film, 


‘MOTION PICTURES 
DOWNTOWN 


eS SS 


U. of C. Reports a Sharp 
Decline in Available Jobs 


The business recession has greatly 
reduced job opportunities of Univer- 
sity of Chicago students and gradu- 
ates, Robert Woellner, executive sec- 
retary of the board of vocational 
guidance, said yesterday. Only one- 
quarter of the usual number of jobs New Escapeades! 
are available for graduates and many| Fe 
alumni who were placed last duke — “a ’ ; DOUG, FAIRBANKS J 
are back on the waiting list. Part) § | | 
time jobs for students are off 30 


“Modern Times.” 


MOTION PICTURES 
DOWNTOWN 


per cent. 


MOTION PICTURES 
DOWNTOWN 


ee ie 
ee 
, eee 


Ma ,° % - 
«3 , . * 
~ oF *s a pet aalal _ 
‘ o Ae ae a > gael 
y + Cours Motes oS WS. fi 
: 7 ne, » eess 
re - ee 
me g gf 4 i. site LSE tates 
, + 
’ | . bos oi sos 4 
3 Re BE yet, 5B sd 4 
; bes? 
J 
. 5 ; 3B 
’ Patt m3 sf 
Cae ; : 
anes ; 
aK 
) » < 
5 , < yo 


tats . . sd “ “6 » \ ' | ‘Bes 
AY A. ‘ies "4 ofa “a4 
ote! his 

‘eo as 


MAN DOLPH 1 I LA SA 


It is nadaliiade to note how, with 
the common adoption of all the other 
tricks and lures in the attempt to de- 
feat father time, a great many worm- 
en approach the hair coloring ques- 
tion with the same old fears and 
prejudices of generations ago. This 
is not without a reason, I know, be- 
cause makeup, madame’s funny hats 
and many other things adopted in 
the cause of youth extension can be 
removed promptly if found unsatis- 
factory, whereas hair coloring re- 
mains for a while, at least. 


Scarcely a day goes by but the 
question of whether to dye or leave 
hair alone is put to us. Our feeling 
is that of one asked advice about 
choosing, a. husband. The respons- 
ibility must be sent right back on 
the questioner. There are good hair 
eoloring jobs, just as there is good 
husband material floating around, 
but how ean we know what wisdom 
the interviewer will bring to bear? | 

: coloring can be and is being 

with success, but it is work that 


{it necessarily calls for some outlay 
of expense, because the work well 
done requires time, care and train- 
ing] we feel that it is better to fore- 
go the temptation to dye and concen- 


trate on exquisite grooming of the’ 


hair “as is.” Once the hair is 
touched up or colored, it means re- 
peated intervals of treatment every 
six weeks or two months. 

However, as said, it is up to the 
individual herself to make the fatal 
decision. If she can afford the lux- 
ury, and it is a case of premature 
fading or of gray hairs becoming a 
business handicap, go ahead with the 
idea, but be as careful about whom 
you trust with the locks as you would 
be were it your appendix that was 
being committed to outsiders’ hands, 

There is this to gray hair today. 
It never before has been made into 
the clever, distinguished asset it 
now ig known to be, You can make 
it a gorgeous asset, but it is going 
to call for concentration and exquis- 
ite grooming always, clever coiffure 
arrangement and smart dress color 
schemes to highlight it. 


Moody Piscident Urges 
More Hell in Sermons 


‘More hell in sermons was advo-|; 


vated by Dr. Will E. Houghton, presi- 
@ent of Moody Bible institute, at the 


BALABAN a KATZ WONDER THEATERS 


. 
MacDONALD ‘FIREFLY 
Pius —~ ‘NAVY BLUE AND GOLD" 


grow — ‘2 NEw 
OF MCVICKERS ” bp 


ane STATE ° 


CAROLE LOMBARD 
Fred MacMURRAY 


A 4. 


f TRUE 
ONFESSION 


JOHN ' 
BARRYMOR: 


JEANETTE 


PAT O'BRIEN 
pape MORRIS 
EORGE BRENT 


SUBMARINE 
D-i 


DORIS 
WESTON 


ty, 
—W with AS 
wo OD Ss Randolph & Dearborn 


Ph ne om wavy” 
“SHE “MARRIED "AN "ARTIST” 


JOHN BOLES—LULI DESTE 
LA SALLE ger ec = AB 
wit, ‘WHAT PRICE nonous Nigh. 


= “ 
pores 


nohel ie 
Simone ‘aman 
“LOVE AND 
HISSES” 


GRANADA AVY site: sass DY IK 


Lombard and MacMurray, ‘‘True Confession’’ 
extra tral March of Time NAZI EXPOSE BI 


RIVIERA Bdwy.-Lawr.—Last Day 


“Daughter of ee BI 
Pius Jane Withers, “46 Fathers,”’ ist show's =2o 
Extra! March of Time 


LCE 


NAZI EXPOSE 

CENTURY -camost in Distrow’-nazi rim BIK 
NORSHORE «wii gtce wanna 
BELMONT ie Nicnt cub Scandal” Bix 

PANTHEON nance’. nigne club Soancai’ BIK 
NORTOWN wreiorviwe sacneo” ors 
LAKESIDE “hots inn eo bk 
COVENT ics aC 
BiK 


TR Ia CINE? coon 15¢ ‘sso 250 “Arren 


MORBRO fl 
¢ 


Qp. 1 :30-Joei Me- | Winohell-Bernie 
Grea, Frances Dee | Simone Simon 


‘Wells Fargo’ | ‘Love & Hisses’ 
PAR ADISE Crawford-Washington-Grace 


Moore, ‘I'll T Romanee’’ 


Lombard—“NOTHING SACRED’’—March 
MANO North Lew Ayres in 


aw “HOLD 'EM 


“SHE MARRIED “Second Honeymoon” Pius ‘Last Gangster’’ 
AN ARTIST” ma or aaa a 


SONOTONE 374°7A sunzn 


Cont, 11 A.M, to Midnite--26¢ to 1 P.M. --85¢ to 6:30 


TONIGHT 'Giock, 2nd Showing 10 p.m. 


“YOUNG PUSHKIN’ 


An Absorbing Episode in the Early 
Life of Russia’s Greatest Poet 
Alexander Pushkin 


mee “PETER I” “@1s0'0'X"" 
World PLAYHOUSE Miah. Are 
Midnight—860 to 6:30 P. M. 


Thanitelle Club de 
Darrieux Femmes 
_ Adulte oniy—Bogiish ttlee—GIRLS' CLUB_ 


410 8. 


|" SENATE sertatioal Wht Bondage” 


John Boles in ths 
|} Central Plater. 


Ayres, ‘‘Hold "Em, Navy’ 918 Belmont—Last 3 Days! 
s JULIAN ~— | aya ng Titles 
“Sara Lar Sig Folkvett’’ (Sara Learns Manners) 
4038 ene at the 

e SHERIDAN Ritz,’’ “I'll Take Romance”’ 
3810 Bdwy.—**Dark Journey’’ 
“HOLD ’EM, NAVY” 
my Ce ee Sin” 


oAM ERICAI CALs wedding 


©BDYSTRAND 0". tawa:|@ VOGUE 


Wm. Powall, Myrna Loy, “DOUBLE Wen eMODE 


ns By (Pete Dal Fran. Tone, e400 
19S. Craw..! e DEVO SS IDR SIN” 


e e BIOGRAPH “THIS WAY, PLEASE” 


Cloero- Mather Fo 
Norma 

4037 Lincoln FEATURES 

4 wines e ER ourney,”’ “White 

= | oN. GE NTER | oe boubie \ Wedding” 


‘B912 Sheri 
0. De Ha 


6746 Oh ee aati, 
Paul Muni, “Life of EMILE ZOLA” 


6225 B’dway—‘‘White Bondage’’ 
“BORROWING TROUBLE” 


MOTION PICTURES 
‘DOWNTOWN 


MOTION PICTURES 
NORTH 


" BALABAN & KATZ WONDER THEATERS | 


CHICAGO 


STATE NEAR RANDOLPH 
Open 10:30 Price Change | & 6:30 


A RECORD! 


Despite the severe 
png a ged past two 
weeks more 

have thrilled pot 


picture. than to sn 
other in our history! 


CECiL B. DE MILLE*S 
Paramount Triumph 


BUCCANEER 


FREDRIC MARCH, FRANCISKA GAAL 
AKIM TAMIROFF, Thousands More 
ON STAGE—A tacular 


Prologue to ‘BUCCANEER’ 
with rousing CAST OF 4! 


MYRUS the wonder 


miad-reader 


Extra~-Crvatal 
R a é to Ranm 


Spm aman tt 


UNITED ARTISTS 


Open 8:45 a.m. 
Last 2 Days! 


ps SAMUEL GOLDWYN 
cats 


a 
~~ 
~*~ 


Op. 10:15 am. 


+f 
Prch.1 a | LA: rT IMES TODAY 


PET TT 


mall! 
= 


HERBIE KAY 4 


O KAY RHYTHM 


— 


jam we a. ™., 
Price Change 6 


NORTHWEST 


3327 Fullerton—‘‘VICTORIA THE 


” AVON ° GREAT," “Women Men Marry’’ 
Pig irving—3 FEATURES 


e IRVIN G. Arliss, “DR. SIN,” “Living 


on Love’ & McGee & Molly, “This Way, Please’ 
@ EMBASSY sccee-motiy."thie Way, Please 
@ CROWN rrvcii's Loy. “Double Wedding” 
TIFFIN North Ave. at pent — oo 
“SHE MARRIED AN ARTIST” 
jonBs. “BORROWING TROUBLE” 


FAMILY 


PORT AGE,.2° 4050 guiiwaukse—-O>en . 30 
4 td 

JAMES poe Sv ING ON VE"’ 
Petitpoint Dinnerware Free to Ladies 


ADMIRAL 7°40, terreno Marines” 
ea —- 

Josephine Hutchinson—'‘WOMEN MEN MARRY 
Patricia Farr—‘‘ALL-AMERICAN 8 SWEETHEART” 
Kitchen Canister 1 Free to Ladies 


3548 Montrose—O 1:30 
DRAKE 3 Hits— SMART WAY” 
a. Page analy: CEN A GIRL’ 
s Dunmn—' ‘LIVING ON LOVE” 
Tnitialed Silverware Free to Ladies 


ALAMO 8689 Chicago Ave.—Mat. Daily 


ac page vd hen 
“BORROWING TROUBLE”’—The J 
John Boles—‘‘SHE MARRIED AN nerisT’ 


LIBERTY 3705 Fullerton—Mat. Daily 


Din’ware & Glassware Free to Ladies 
P, _Muni, ‘Life of Emile Zola’ & ‘Dangerously Yours’ 


BALABAN & KATZ WONDER THEATERS 
HARDING _ Maal fn ome S O' Brite, 
Lombard-“TRUE CONFESSION”- MacMurray 
CONGRESS ts: ievarein unesi> Po 
“VLL TAKE ROMANCE” 
GATEWAY Plue—“Night Club Scandal’’ BIK 
TERMINAL ‘ir. t fem iewpine BER 
CRYSTAL “ex; {2m soi, 'she, BAK 
BELPARK inoscrs. ‘this Way, Please 
WILL ROGERS 3 & Cettitio, “Barrier” 
ALBA crienta® “Camille” oP ivior 
‘4 1’ After’ 
LUNA  Piue—“Merry-Go-Round of 1938" 
BILTMORE re ae ‘Open 1130 
LOVE OR A KINGDOM’ 
(‘'Barbara Radriwillowna'’’ ) 
MONT CLARE “estar’stworee 
FRANCES FARMER—"“EBB TIDE” 
Jones Family—'‘'BORROWING TROUBLE” 


LOGAN Milwaukee = Bag 5-4 
George Arliss—‘‘D SYN” 


Brian Aherne, Olivia De Havilland, ‘Great gt 


MILFORD 3811 N. Pulaski Rd.—15c to 6:80 


Oa Caliente Ware to 
“It’s Love I’m Aftter’’ P 9s sinlltatRoemes the Cireat” 


s tu BUR B A N 


vo oe) | KARLO 


Bette Davis, “‘It’s Love I’m 
“Straight From the Shoulder” 
Claudette sotbert, Fa. _PaANTOM PRESIDED 


AVA LON . 


mT” aUnmA RINE a 
D.1’’.-Pat 0’ Brien Don’t Cry” 
“FIRST LADY” “Navy Blue a Gore 

Tomorrow: Mie re Tomorrow: 
a Sweetheart”’ “T on” 
omitting New High” | me oe 


STRATFORD op Ota: Halsted—c. Rains, 


“THEY WON'T FORGET” 
Cary Grant—“‘AWFUL TRUTH"’—irene — 


RHODES | Franses Fares 


CAPITOL 


rances Farmer 


%? 
In Nm gy | 
rée 
95th-Ashland Both Thea ers 
7ist-Jeffery—Free Parking, 


JEFFERY she starriea an artist” and 


Wm. Powell, ‘DOUBLE WEDDING, ’ Myrna Loy 


William Powell 
OGDEN a 


BEVERLY 


Se 


UB 
Jean Muir 
BONDAGE” 


76th-Cottage—“‘DR. SYN’ 
and “The GREAT GARRICK” 
2 Dishes to Ladies with 35c Ticket! 


Edw. Everett Horton 
Olivia De Havilland 
bi GREAT 
GARRICK” 
Geoepe Arliss { 
SYN” 


79th- Ashland 


BROVE 
FREE! 


COSMO 
LEXINGTON 


1162 EB. 63rd 
SHORE na Gangster’’ 


Rex Beach’s ‘The BARRIER’ 

FROLIC S5th-Ellis—‘DR. SYN" 
Buddy Regers, Mary Livingstone 

Fibber McGee & Molly, ‘“‘This Way, Ptease’’ 
0 A KL AND 3947 Drexel—Tyrone Power. 
“SECOND HONEYMOON”’ 

Fibber McGee & Molly, “This Way. Please’ 
FREE! White Range Jar and Cover to Ladies! 


HAMILTON ‘rn women mex mann’ 
BALABAN &_KATZ WONDER THEATERS 
TIVOLI 


DAY ut. 
Joe] McCrea Wiechalt menue F 
Bob Bu 


-— 
SS eS ll — 


¥ Se __ —_ 
Ei —— ———— aaa le ate A 


ris Simone Simon 
“WELLS “LOVE AND 
FARGO” HISSES” 


SOUTHTOWN 


FREE DA aK) alt PR 
Last Day—Doors Open at 1:15 
M Murray ‘TRUE 


CONFESSION’ ‘The Firefly’ 
—TOMORROW— 


Allee Faye—Ken Murray 
“YOWRE A SWEETHEART” 
& Smugglers of Human Cargo Exposed 


“DAUGHTER OF SHANGHAI” 
4é ’ SEL IN DISTRESS” 
TOWER ,‘DAMSEL In DistREss 


& “NIGHT CLUB SCANDAL” 
MARYLAND “Ebb Tide’ & Powell, S75 
PICCADILLY scxcxs 


Loy, “Double Wedding’? BAK 
Fredric a mel 


Carole Lom Melee. Ot Douglas 
ROTHING SACRED PLL TAKE ROMANCE 
2:00—4 :50—7 :50— 10 :50 3 :00—6 :00—9 :00 


NAZI GERMANY EXPOSED 
COMMERCIAL 250 Commercial. on. 11:20 


ADULTS ONLY! 
Unfolding new pitfalls to youth 


“MARIHUANA” 


and The Jones Family—‘BORROWING TROUBLE’ 


WOODLAWN 1326 B. 68d—3 FEATURES 
Late Batg. Pr. 15e After 9:80 
‘DINNER AT 8’’—Marie Vag mag Wallace Leery 
Lionel & = Barrymore, Madge Evans, Edm. Lowe 
“Special Investigator Dix, Marg. Callahan 
‘‘Babes in Toyland’’ —Laurel & Hardy. Char. Henry 


MIDWA we Mat i peme. F Be Aft. 9:30 
“Bride of Frankenstein” at vie Karloff 


“The a Misbehaves’’—-Maureen O'Sullivan 
‘““PURSUIT’’—Chester Morris, Sally Kilers 


2638 E. 75th—Late Barg. Pr. l5c After 9:30 
ea len, Guy Lombardo 
, “MANY HAPPY BETURNS” 


. “AGGIE APPLEBY’’ 
Stuart Zrwin, Una Merkel, 


RAMOVA 


85TH & HALSTED 
Luli Verte 

John Bolee—“SHE MARRIED AN ARTIST’ 
THE sg a FAMILY—‘BORROWING TROUBLE’ 

FREE TO LADIES—HAND-CUT GLASSWARE 

KENWOOD 47th & Woodlawna— Mischa Auer 
“MERRY-GO-ROUND 1nsu’ 

Vivian Osborne—“SHE ASKED FOR IT" 
New Sound System—Perfected Heating Installed | 


JACKSON PK. °7*'Steny., Ovens: 30) 


Olivia De Havilland) 
Brian Aherne, E. REAT GARRICK” | 
Mystery 7 


RIRIRIZRIREIRISIZIE 


IRIRIR 


= 
“« 


ISIS 


AND 
TONE 


Horton—*'G: 


MICHIGAN 110 E. "G@arfield——Bargain Mat. 


“ALCATRAZ ISLAND,” Loretta 


, Tyrone Power, “SECOND HONEYMOON” 


COLONY 59th & Kedzie—2 Features 


Leo Carrillo—‘‘BAR RRIER” 
Loretta Young, Tyrone Power, “‘Second Honeymoon” 


CHELTEN 79th and Exchange 


Cary Grant, ““Lest Outpost” 
Leslie Howard, Bette Davis—‘“‘It’s Lové I’m After’’ 


1 OF THE LONESOM Sidney 
“TRAIL OF f wot oe oer PINE” 
& Joan Bennett—“PURSU. 
Muni 


HYDE PARK «2% ia Bae 


ZOLA” 
Plus MARCH ¢ 


6240 Kimbark Ave.—Mat. 
15e to 6:30—Geo. Murphy, “Women } 
MAROUETTE,, © ‘Ali Baba Goes to Town’ | 


6 obna, Tast anger | 


THiS is wav. “PLEASE” | | 


AY ne Robinson, “"Last 
BUDDY ROGERS, “THIS WAY, 


: 
Jay) 


EVANSTON. 


- a 
rwwrwvwY 


n I: 
“FIREFLY,” . Jeanette 
M’Donald, ‘Navy & Gold’ & Nazi Film 


VALENCIA pecs, "na vonevuson 


ary 
° pid END oe : 
nk LEN a a e DAVIS a arilee, “DR. ares 


| @ BUCK'M owes tov, “Double Wedding” 
: ca eet Saat alee 
to 6:30; E 


1040 Argyle—Mischa Auer, 
ie ‘Lambert “LADY BY CHOICE” 
ianet “Small Town Giri’ 


N ORTH 
BRYN MAWR 62 eee 


Ray! eon | of i938” 


nes. 


| ROSEWOOD. att MEd bey 
ieee, Boul. 


LOVE 


ns Nestle an ate cans 
“VICTORIA THE cn ge Tn hi 


‘We 


“DANGEROUSLY YOURS” | 


‘RIDGE > 


win 1:30 P. rT 
at Crk Open 80 = i BUGC 
BUDDY ROGERS duns OY F WAT, 


co RONET tee One uOUND of 30 


NO MAN’S LAND 


“Nothing Sacred” 
All ip nico 
Carole 


Fredric 
At 9:05. 


4 5:45 to 6:80—8743 W. Chicago Ave. 


IRIS, 15, Saabs aa 


AUSTIN “Victoria wes he Great 


_MAYWOOD 


BERWYN 
NEW RITZ ©8,W,-asomra na 


“Great Garrick’’—“March of Time" , Floyd G@ ipbons 
Aaoeland i Ta 


aa of the take Forest siacetation: 


succeeding Donald B. Douglas, who ‘ 
resigned after many successful sea-| 
sons as president and has become aj 


director and 2 member of the execu- 
tive committee. John T. 
is the new vice president; Laurance: 
H. Armour is treasurer; 

McIlvaine Jr. is the secretary, 


‘are serving with Mr. Douglas on the 
: executive committee. 
The annual horse show always 9c- 
 easions much 
| Forest, so the last eepi-on’ in June 
is certain to be one of the gayest of 
the summer on the north shore. 


Recall Visit of 
Miss Peggy Sykes. 

The Lake tan eee friends of Miss 

Peggy Sykes of New York were in- 

terested to.learn of her engagement 

a Walter P. Chrysler Jr. Miss Sykes 

isited here two years ago. Her hos- 
a at that time, Mrs. William R. 
‘Behanna, who then was Mrs. Win- 
| _throp Smith, received a telegram Sun- 
‘day from Miss Sykes telling of the 

“engagement. 

: Mrs. Behanna also heard form Miss 
Sykes that she and Mr. Chrysler may 
visit Chicago in the spring. On Miss 

Sykes’ last visit she and her hostess 

“visited Dr. and Mrs. Theodore Prox- 

mire at their summer home in Des: 

‘barats. Miss Sykes and Mrs. Hugh 

|'M. Johnston [Deborah Butler] were 

classmates at the Ethel Walker school. 

’Miss Adele Proxmire is at Sarah 

'Lawrence college. 


'Narsing Council 
to Meet Monday. 

The Central Council for Nursing 
Education will give a luncheon af 
12:30 o’clock next Monday in the 
grand ballroom of the Palmer house. 
Robert E. Neff, administrator, State 
‘University of Iowa hospitals, and 


Pirie Jr.| 
William B.} = 


ng in Lake] | 


[Du Bois the Drake Photo.] 
MRS. JAMES L. SURPLESS. 


The home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 


Farwell Ferry in Winnetka was dec- 


orated in greens and white tulips 
for the marriage and reception last 


night of Mrs. Ferry’s daughter, Miss 


Mary Hill, to James L. Surpless of 


land alive. 


president of the American Hospital 
association, will speak on “ Nursing 
Responsibilities in a Community.” 


At the speaker’s table with Mr. 
Neff will be Mrs. A. C. Backmeyer, 
new chairman of the council; Mrs. 
Ernest E. Irons, the last chairman; 
Mrs. David Wilson Graham, the hon- 
orary chairman; Dr. Backmeyer, Miss 
Nellie Hawkinson, Dr. Herman Bun- 
desen, Dr. George Post, Mrs. Paul 
Walker, Mrs. John T. Mason, Charles 
S. Schweppe, Dr. Irwin Abel, and 
Mrs. Ernest Meyers, among others. 
It has become a tradition for mem- 
‘hers of the Service club to act as 
ushers at council luncheons. Miss 
Lucia Dixon, a niece of Mrs. Walker, 
is in charge of the six or eight young 
women who will usher on Monday. 


Vacation Parties 

for Eleanor McClurg. 

* When Miss Eleanor McClurg ar- 
Tives today from Smith college to 
spend four days with her mother, 
Mrs. Freeman Hinckley, she will find 
Several parties already entered in her 
‘@ngagement book. Tomorrow night 
Mrs. Hinckley will give a smaller din- 
ner for her at the family apartment on 
Lake Shore drive. Tomorrow noon 
Miss Margot Reid will entertain at a 
Juncheon for her at the Casino and 
Saturday Miss Anne Jay Bryant will 
Bive a luncheon, also at the Casino, 


Winnetka Lecture 
on Italian Gardens. 

Mrs. Gifford B. West will talk on 
“The Beauties of Italian Gardens” 
at the Winnetka Woman’s club on 
Feb. 15 at 11 o’clock. Mrs. West has 
Spent a great deal of time the last 8 
years in Italy. . Ernst C. von Am- 
mon will give a small luncheon in her 
home in Winnetka for Mrs. West 
after the lecture. 

The Chicago Historical society has 
cards out for a presentation of Italian 
war trophies to be made by Dr. 
Franco Fontana, Italian consul gen- 
eral, to the society for its world war 
room, at 8 o’clock next Tuesday night. 
Members of the Italy America so- 
ciety as well as Historical society 
members are invited. 

Charles S. Dewey is chairman of 
the meeting. Miss Clara Lake will 
show stills of the Augustan Exhibi- 
pon of Roman Civilization. Harold 

and Dr, Samuel Burrows 
will show motion pictures of Flor- 

nce and Rome as they are today. 
r 'Mrs. Carter H. Harrison and Mrs. 
Charles S. Dewey will be hostesses 
at tea at the Alliance Francaise cau- 
srie this afternoon following the pres- 
entation of “Paris,” a musical com- 
edy written by Mme. Emilie-Jeanne 
Ertan. Assisting will be Miss Cyn- 
Cleveland, Miss Narcissa Thorne, 

and Miss Babbs Burton. 


M . Whitehead, to Ray fatso 
son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Matson of 
vanston. Miss Whitehead attended 
nwestern university and the 


Wilmette. The bride wore her moth- 
er’s beautiful wedding dress of satin, 
and a rosepoint lace veil, and car- 
ried orchids and lilies of the valley. 

The matron of honor, Mrs. Harry 
K. Wells, sister of the bride, wore 


a period gowr. of gray and silver 
metallic cloth with a gray velvet hat 
and carried blue and white hyacinths. 


Mrs. Reed Whitney, a bridesmaid, 


wore a period gown of blue and sil- 


ver metallic cloth, a blue hat, and 
carried blue hyacinths. The second 


bridesmaid, Miss Kathryn Putnam, 


wore a similar dress in rose and 
silver, a rose hat, and carried rose 
hyacinths. 

The Rev. Samuel Harkness read 
the ceremony. Mr. Surpless and his 
bride will go to Bermuda on their 
wedding trip. They will live in Wil- 
mette. 


Three Thousand Register 


for Methodist Council 


Bishop Ernest Lynn Waldorf of the 
Methodist area of Chicago last night 
announced that more than 3,000 dele- 
gates have registered for the United 
Methodist council which opens today 
at the Stevens hotel. The council 
will represent all major Methodist 
bodies of North America. Alfred M. 
Landon, who is a prominent Method- 
ist layman in Kansas, is expected to 
arrive this morning for the council 
sessions. 


nmer-is a Rontte sea- 
son with him, ged ‘autumn runs 
it a close second, 

In the present show there is a par- 
ticularly lovely painting of summer, 
rather a large canvas with stunning 
trees and a friendly blue sky in 
which the soft feathering of white 
clouds scarcely breaks the blue, and 
an exquisite, rich painting of fall. 
The coral red of the trees in this 
last is like a flame, soft, warm, and 


impetuous. 
oe 


In the Katharine Kuh gallery, 
Diana Court building, there is at 
present an interesting exhibit of 
drawings by Archipenko, with a few 
pieces of sculpture. The drawings 
are running sketches for future sculp- 
ture groups. Many of them are sensi- 
tive in feeling; a few possess charm. 

The loveliest thing in the gallery 
is the slender, idealized figure of a 
woman, slim lines from feet to head- 
less throat, a beautifully modeled fig- 
ure. This was purchased almost as 
soon as it entered the show and will 
stand on a black base in a large re- 
ception hall, where it-should be a 
stunning note in the decor of the 
room. 


-e- 

In the Chicago Artists’ Group gal- 
lery, Michigan avenue at Erie street, 
there is now on view an exhibit of 
work by Frances Foy, Charles Biesel, 
and Gustaf Dalstrom, among others. 
The exhibitions vary here in kind and 
coloring, but the current show is 
“safe” and includes several paint- 
ings of distinct merit. 

Miss Mary Ward is the director of 
the gallery and is confident that 
those paintings hanging there now 
are of the popular variety. 

The Richard Bach collection of rugs 
and carpets that has recently been on 
exhibit in the Metropolitan museum 
in New York is being shown in the 
rug gallery at Marshall Field & Co. 
It will remain on view through Feb- 
ruary. 


Slender Silksiettec 
for Daytime Marks 


Chanel’s Spring Styles 


PARIS, Feb. 2.—(#)—Skirts reach- 
ing just to the calf of the leg and 
a daytime silhouette that was slen- 
der and fitted at the waist were fea- 
tured today by Chanel in a spring 
fashion cee 

A serfes of tailored suits with 
nipped in waists was presented. 

Long coats of wool and silk were 
shown with contrasting printed 
dresses and afterwoon ensembles 
with unlined, matching jackets, 

The evening mode was strongly 
Victorian, with fitted bone princess 
bodices and off-the-shoulders decol- 
letage. 

Skirts in the main were puffed out 
from the hips or knees. Some eve- 
ning gowns were slender with a soft 
front fullness. 

Daytime colors were black, navy, 
black and white, navy and white, 
brown, beige, wine, green, and or- 
ange. 

Evening colors were black, white, 
brown, jade, flesh, flame, gladiola, 
pink, bright red, light blue, lavender, 
and yellow. 


(cording CULBERTSON 


{Copyright: 1938: By Ely Culbertson.] 
Surprisingly enough, some of the 
worst errors seen at the bridge table 
occur when there are only three or 
four cards left in each hand. At 
this stage the defenders and the de- 
clarer should have a pretty good idea 
of suit distributions and, in many 
cases, the position of key cards. Yet 
time and again in the dummy’s seat 
(been getting ready to deliver 
glowigg compliments to my partner, 
the declarer, for his masterful tech- 
nique, only to have the speech frozen 
on my lips by some outlandish play 


at the tenth or eleventh trick. That 


was my experience on the following 
hand, which occurred in a recent du- 
plicate game. 
South, dealer. 
East-West vulnerable. 
NORTH 
&Q 9 2 
99643 
$73 
&®KQI5 


mebipy Academy of Fine Arts. Mr, i : 


_ Was graduated from North- th 


in 1923. The wedding is 
i for the spring. 


out involving me in further nici r 


My hand was not quite worth 
clubs, yet was too strong for | 


ns ‘trump, hence my in-between 


gle raise. s 
P West. for reasons best known | 
elf, opened the club ace, 
a aback at ‘dummy’s u 


queen. It held and the ace was 
cashed, East’s king falling. 

Now declarer was in a position to 
bring home his two spade contract 
[which would have given us a good 
match-point score], but his foot 
slipped. Obviously, on the hope that 
he would find the spade ten under- 
neath the queen-9, he led his remain- 
ing diamond and, when West covered, 
ruffed with dummy’s nine spot. It 
held, but this did us little good, since 
East still had to be given a trump 
for the setting trick. 

Since declarer’s play. was predicated 
on West’s holding the spade ten and 
since, obviously, the rest of the tricks 
could not be taken if East had four 
trumps at this stage, it should have 
been the simplest thing in the world 
for declarer to lay down the spade 
ace ahd then play a low spade to the 
queen. If it developed that declar- 
er’s hope regarding the ten spot was 
fulfilled the nine would draw East’s 
last trump and the club queen would 
account for the eighth and fulfilling 
trick. 


Tomorrow's Hand 


South, dealer. 
Both sides vulnerable. 


ae 
ts + 
te nd 


‘| Mystic cream s 


| white, 1H 
| Apply. Mystic. cream at se sie. e 
el ‘fetiring. Iti i absorbed alm | 


| So: a this’ var, of ides, written 
to help you find out why your child’s 
school work is poor, I want to put 
in a word right here on the subject 
of colds, and of the child who may 
not be chronically tired but seems to 
be having a “tired spell.” 

Yesterday was devoted to replan- 
ning the day of the school . child 
whose work is suffering because he 
is always fatigued. Today I want to 
suggest that during these next two 
or three months you guard against 
occasional fatigue. 


builds up resistance to colds, and, of 


course, Makes him more fit mentally, 
and more poised in behavior. 


— 

The other suggestion I want to 
offer is not only for health but for 
your child’s school efficiency, since 
&/ that is our point this week. 

Bend over backward in the matter 
ot colds. Never mind individual at- 
tendance records. Never mind class 
attendance records, which sometimes 
very wrongly cause pressure to be 
brought to bear on children. 

If your child gets up some morn- 
ing looking wan and listless; if he 
goes to bed at night with a sniffle 
and a scratch in his throat, keep him 
home and even in bed the next day. 
It may check a cold completely, or 
else make it lighter than it would 
otherwise be. 


Or suppose he comes down hard 
and suddenly with a cold. Don’t let 
him* go back to school until he is 
well over it. This prevents a relapse, 
or one of those long drawn out coughs 
or dragged down spells. After an il)- 
ness school work often suffers for 
weeks because a child in low physi- 
cal condition is allowed to go back 


too soon. 
Another cause of poor school work 
will be discussed tomorrow. 


A new booklet called “Talks to 
Teachers “ or“ The Child in School,” 
is in preparation. The postage for 
it is 6 cents with your large, self- 
addressed envelope. Address Mrs. 
Gladys Bevans, The Chicago Trib- 

» Chicago, Ill. 

Mrs. Bevans’ column also appears 

in the Sunday Tribune. 


“Crow's Foot’ Is | 
Early American 
Quilt Patiern 


Crow's Foot. 


Patterns of this design are 5 cents, 
stamps. or coin. Address Nancy 
Cabot, Chicago Tribune, or call at 
one of the Tribune Public Service 
offices, 1 South Dearborn street or 
Tribune Tower. 


BY NANCY CABOT. 

“Crow’s Foot” is one of the oldest 
of quaint early American quilt crea- 
tions, and still enjoys wide popularity. 
Gifted with vivid imaginations, the 
Clever colonial women could readily 
see footprints of a crow in this in- 
triguing pieced design. When it first 
was pieced the desigr offered a spe- 
cial appeal because each block could 
be done in a. different color, thereby 
utilizing all surplus pieces in the 


scrap bag, a pleasure to thrifty house- 
wives. This “Crow’s Foot” design is 
large, measuring 16 inches square. 
The entire coverlet is composed of 
pleced blocks, forming an all-over de- 
sign. Surrounded by a five inch bor- 
der and a one-half inch bias binding, 
the quilt has over-all dimensions of 
96 by 106 inches. 


f ADVERTISMENT] 


Red, Chapped 
Rough Hands 
Healed Overnight 


There is one sure way that has ee 
failed to heal rough red chapped 
hands. The way Doctors, Dentists and 
Nurses do—and every one knows how 
important it is. Pad them to to keep their 
hands in good cond 

Hands | 
when | 


"secon a ; eee or p el namely store. 
supe everything your. 
e it soft, 


skin needs to smooth and 


Or rather, that;} | 
when you notice your child showing} |. 
signs of more than normal end-of-the- r 

day tiredness you see that he or she| 
gets in a big whack of extra rest) 
and even some extra food. This) 


es 


~~“ 


WOMAN’S AND MISS’ FROCK. 


We are all a little weary of somber colors and trim, tailored lines. 


The 


mid-season finds us yerning for full skirts and puffed sleeves, coupled with 


bright prints. 


The dress offered in our pattern today prefers prints and is 


decidedly youthful, although it is designed for sizes up to 42. The bodice 
hugs the figure, while the skirt, which is shirred into the waist, is full and 


flowing. The sleeves may be either 
wide, and handsome. 


long or short, and are puffed high, 


You may put a collar on this dress or leave the neckline uncollared, to 


be trimmed with braid to match that 
sleeve bands, and around the hem. 


down the front of the bodice, on the 


If you’re going south, select a light background print in cotton, linen, 
or wash silk. For those of you who are snowbound we suggest a dark 


background with bright figures. 


Style No. 2741 is designed for sizes 14, 16, 18, and 20 years, and 32, 34, 


36, 38, 40, and 42 inches bust measurement. 


Size 36 requires 4% yards of 


39 inch material, with 12 yards of braid or binding. 


Order 
CHICAGO TRIRUNE, P. 0. BOX 537, 


Inelosed find..... e 


Write sine 


cents 


plainly,. giving 
in stamps or coin [eoin 


7 
Name *Peeeeeeeeeee Steer eeeteeeoeteeeeeeeretvaeaaeet 


Number and street. 


State ... 


ee#seeeee eeenene 


and eights. 


CLOTILDE PATTERNS ARE 10 CENTS EACH 


Grand Central 
Please send me the Clotilde Pattern listed below: 
Pattern No. 2741. 
af 


Pewee Peeeaeeeeeeeaeeereeeaeee 


Peeeeeeeaeeaeeeeeeeeeeeee 


Blank 


Station, NEW YORK CITY. 


De 6 ids checks " 


desired. tInelose 10 
wrap it carefully]. 


pattern 
preferred; 


ee eeeeeeaeeeeeeetseaeseaeweeeereeseeege 
Seweeveeeeoe ee ee eeeee eeeeoe ee ee eeeseeeeeeee 
een eeee 


CCR CCH Cee eee eeeeeeeeeeeeaeeeaeneeeeesanenee es 


Smart Designs 


TakelnchesOft 
the New Shoes 


BY RHEA SEEGER. 

The snappiest new footgear in 
town! Gleaming black patent lether, 
short vamped finds ready for rain, 
shine, or winter weather; smart 
Streamlines that slice inches from 
the foot even though you wear sevens 
High heels, low cut out- 
lines over the instep and the short 
toes or vamps make them beguilingly 
feminine and young. Perky bows, 
also of the shiny lether, make them 
even shorter. 


Perforated patent lether keeps 
them air conditioned and adds a bit 
to their smartness. Bags to match 
complete the ensemble idea Such 
patent lether loot is ideal for early 
spring and sloppy weather wear. You 
can keep immaculate with the least 
possible exertion with such easy to 
clean footnotes. 

Worn with the new, brightly col- 
ored hosiery and with new hats | 


a 


a 

Sem re Sass ad ith. ant sees 7 
ms Oe a ee ee es » 
: eR SS ee win > E 


re frente er ene Wa yet 
ae sions oS EE 4 = 
Sr OL ae, 
mya 


trimmed. with the same lether, the 
dullest suit or coat assumes a new 
and festive manner, a cure for a limp 


morale. 
-e- 


Also new and with the same 
amount of gayety and youth are the 
short vamped models in light weight 
suede, with dull black as spotlight 
fashion. These come with open toes, 
but the openings are. under control 
and exposure is limited. Straps are 
crossed and the straps are wider than 
before. Heels are high and the vamps 
are short and then trimmed with 
bows. 

Some of the new arrivals combine 
the dull suede with contrast of pat- 
ent lether or fabric. If you have a 
yen for short vamps this is the:time 
to go shopping. 


x 
Eli W. Smith, 99, Becomes 
Great-Great-Grandfather 


Howard Copeland Hill III., who was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Howard Cope- 
land Hill Il., 5419 Ellis avenue, on 
Jan. 29, has a living great-great-grand- 
father, Eli W. Smith, who celebrated 
his 99th birthday on Dec, 24. The in- 
fant is the grandson of Lester C. 
Smith, 6045 South University, avenue, 
and the great-grandson of‘Jerry E. 


me See x 
. . area : é x 3 
: . a : Shy 
4 3 $ 
onan sae” . oe 3 ‘s 
A ee SPAS Fe aes i oetgatiebdeiains P ; “ P es OY “%%e", : we A a 
bi Be wey ee ae tp Rae oe 7 ae i ARES Se ig RGAE EST R RS fon de 
Me ai PEN IIE PTS IGE I PA ARRAN on - RDERED REI, AEA RARE AER EAE LURES org 9k RRO URES RR RH : 
Fe LES Se RRS SO BORER RTS Hy AP Sih 5 aes. i Z 4 bs i) : rir : 
Bitips ate ae “ me 2 is . ; SOR % 
eer é 
sa te 
i. y: * 
¥ $ 


Coffee or Milk 
‘LUNCH 
Cream of Lima Bean Soup 
Peanut Butter Sandwiches 
Cabbage, Apple and Nut Salad 
Chocolate Pudding 4 
Milk or Tea 
DINNER 
Crabmeat and Potato Soufflé 
French Fried Cauliflower 
Tomato, Avocado, and Celery Salad 
Apricot Whip 
Coffee 


BY MARY MEADE. 
(Copyright: 1938: By The Chicago Tribune.] 
Well, here it is almost lunch time 
and you’ve been so busy washing the 
woodwork and putting up fresh cur-, 


tains that you’ve forgotten the hun-j 


gry ones soon to burst through yon, 


der doorway fairly howling for hot! 


food. 
This needn’t cause concern if you 


aré one who keeps canned vegetables! 


and soups at hand for just such for- 
getful hours. In a few minutes, with 
almost no effort at all, a steaming 
soup can be prepared. Combinations 
of canned soups are growing in popu- 
larity. Almost any two or ‘three 
canned soups 
ing possible dozens of varieties. of hot 
luncheon dishes. These are only a 
few suggestions of what may he done 
with canned vegetables and ' ; canned 
soups, plus milk, of course. 
Cream of Pea and Chicken Soup. 
{Serves Five.) ' 

1 No. 2 can peas 

1 chicken bouillon cube 

3% cups milk 

2 tablespoons butter 

% teaspoon salt 

% teaspoon sugar 3 

Heat peas in their liquid for five 

minutes. Drain, saving liquid. Dis- 
solve chicken bouillon cube in liquid 
and put peas through ricer or coarse 
strainer. Add purée and bouillon to 


asparagus 
per,. aaah little prea Pt 


} Canned. Soup Chowder. — 
[Serves Three.] 
1: can condensed végetable soup 
1 can condensed pea soup 
1 can milk 
Measure milk in one of the emptied 
soup cans. Combine the soups and 
milk and heat thoroughly. 
Cheese and Celery Soup. 
[Serves Three.] 
1 10% ounce can celery soup 
1 can milk [measure with soup can] 
4% cup sliced pimiento cheese 
1 tablespoon butter 
1 teaspoon grated onion [optional] 
Heat ingredients in the top of a 
double boiler until cheese is melted, — 
‘\stirring to blend. Serve hot. 
x * 


True Sisters. . 
Johanna No. 9, United Order of 
True Sisters, will hold its 64th an- 
nual Stiftungsfest at 12:30 o’clock to- 
day in the Red Lacquer room of the 
Palmer house. The Saidenberg trio 
will give a program. 


heated milk. Add butter, 
and heat thoroughly before 


sugar, 
serving. 


Crabmeat Bisque. 


salt, and 


VARIETY REVUE 
FASHIONS 


[Serves, Five.] 
1 10% ounce can tomato soup 
1 10% ounce can pea soup 
1% cups milk. and cream 
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 
1 cup flaked crabmeat 
Combine all ingredients and heat 
thoroughly. 


New Orleans Bisque. 
[Serves Six.] 
1 can condensed clam chowder 
1 can condensed chicken gumbo soup 
2 cans milk [measured in’ soup can] 
Heat the combination to the boiling 
point and serve, 
Cream of Asparagus Soup. 
(Serves Six.] 
tablespoons butter 
tablespoons flour 
quart milk 
cups aspatagua purée 
Salt, pepper, celery salt 
Melt butter and add flour. Add milk 
gradually and cook until thickened. 
Add puréed canned or fresh cooked 
a 


4AMUSEMENTS. __ 


GRAN OPERA 4 LAST LAST MAT. 
HOUSE 4 ins SATURDAY 
Engagement Positively Ends Saturday 

SAM H, HARRIS presents 


STAGE DOOR 


By GEO. S. KAUFMAN & EDNA FERBER 


“* JOAN BENNETT 


WEEKS SEATS 
2 ony | Beg. Mon., Feb. 7 Yow; 
The World-Famous 


ABBEY PLAYERS 
EAS OFF HILLS” — ‘Mon, Tues. 


Wednesday. Matinee and me 
GOSSOON” — 72u 


“NEW 
Saturday. Matinee and Even 
Eives., 55c¢ to $2.20: Wed.-Sat. Mats., 


Pri. 
one 4i. 65 


UTROATUDAAAAYSOOEOU GU AOORGATOUUOEU AAMAS AE 


7 NIGHTS 


AUDITORIUM SAT. MAT. 
Sun., Feb. 13, to Sat., Feb. 19 
THE WORLD FAMOUS 


SALZB une OPERA 


Original Pa —— ee. as 
Performed in Salzburg and Vienna 
SEATS NOW—55ic TO $3.30 


aL ARGS ee 


| n wenure Beats, 


HELEN NAYES 


in HAIRDRESS 


MARIO MORENDA’ 
Pierre Andre Salon 
f 


SATURDAY LUNCHEON 

LP MM. cinchoon °° 

NEVER A COVER 
OR MINIMUM 


Dinner From $2.00 


CONGRESS 


John Burke, Manager 
National Hote! 
Vianagement Co., Inc. 
Raiph Hitz, President 
J. E. Frawley 
Executive Vice President 


ELLA LOGAN 
FORNIA 


, & 
 w i 
o 7: 


UAL 


FLETCHER 
in NOEL COWARD’S 
t at 8: 30”. 


RRIS 
f ries FOR ALL 
saNbARth Alek, o Lined Engagement 


——oa 


A OTT ANNOUNCES 


= SUNDAY ti: 


Bis 


Sco eet 
d New Trazic-Co 
pend Sew Ue eae 


, SCHOOP 


ORGHESTRA HA CS pine soctnanenes 
Sonieae at&®'1h #$TOMORROW at 2:15 


:! ICAGO JOSEPH 
S} - rr HONY VITO 
ORC a: | / 


Harp Soloist 
5 LANGE aac a , 


MILTON DOUGLAS 
“America’s Best Seller’ of Songs” 


THE THREE NONCHALANTS 


ABBOTT DANCERS © 
AND OTHER STAR ATTRACTIONS 


LAY MBALL 


ee) 


Cz 


7a 


S 


= 
= 
UY 


Billings Memorial ‘Hospital, 
Chicage..__.. 


‘ 


&§ i ; 
q 
— 
— 
 &§ F 
—— 
— 
— 
- 
4 
e 
W 
. 
: 
‘Nk 
. ws 
, at 
; ms Ss) 
: ‘ 
\ 
\ 
« 
. 
q \ 
N 
\ 
| NY 
\ 
A 
\\ 
TTT TT lee ~~ J 
| New York City 
‘ 
> 
: ; 
| : | 
7 
{ 
a | 
7 = 
sesespseo ym 
: tat ng “te sm 5 me 
| 
7 | : 
_ , eA ss tN SI — 
7 WN SSS8 
4 ; apy WSs 5 
a . : ll SSNS 
7 
Edgewater Beach Hotel, 
Chicage 
| : 
H 
7 oe 
| c r 
| rr FFF eee = EEE 
, aa | r (rT Tr r 
rr r Tr r 
. *rr et Le e 
: “ Pay c rr iT r r 
F re rr tr r 
af cirire 
7 | primer er 
YATE ZAM || - Eee e 
Vip - r rer 
: , . a 7 g~ 7 r 
- HHA GMa te ee 
: /, bse pete 
fer 
. tee 
Ae oe oe ee Le A ww Ridddd ides 


«6; Hotels and Hospitals 


Pictured Here ... 


| «+. prefer mattresses construct- 
| ed over springs made by the 
manufacturer of the spring unit 

; in “The Bonnie Scot.” In 
the group you'll recognize 

hotels and hospitals famed. 

for the excellence of their 
equipment. The U. S. govern- 

‘ment, too, buys such mattresses 

_ for its Army Medical Corps, 

-" Metetans’ Administration, Pub- 

‘fic Health Service and U. S. 


‘an 


ticking, with a sturdy pre-built border, it is bound in rich 


rHURSDAY. FEBRUARY 3. 1938. 


OD RI we 


‘CHICAGO 


DAILY TRIBUNE: 


- 


- bY 


. 


, 


veg the Third Memb 


: ‘4 ‘ : ¥ 
‘ : 4 : - ‘ ’ : % pra Sahlon 
Fd 4 ? é ¥ q 5 ; : - hee we 


4 


Ae ee ae 


QF wee ee HR Re BS 


titiesiesest 
ke ESs ESL EE & 
i SM TS OS SAS 


+OB 8 B84 na 


Seem news tase Ma 
Faewamse ik ik Fs 


tek? 2 2 FRE SF OS 


* > | 

; ’ ; 
| 

{ 


Custom-Made by the ‘Cilinilite eather Co. 


Last April we introduced “tThe Royal Scot,” last 
August ‘“The Queen o’ Scots” —and both mat- 
tresses have been proved superior by use in thou- 
sands of homes. Now we round out our “royal 
family” with ‘‘The Bonnie Scot,’? made to our 


“The Bonnie Scot” carries a five year guarantee 
against any structural defects— such is our faith 
Bs: in its innerspring unit, which was made by a famous 
| spring manufacturer exclusively for ‘'The Bonnie 
Scot.” It is buoyant, easy to handle, securely 


very particular specifications by the Columbia _ : 


Feather Company, the same manufacturer who anchored to prevent noise or sagging and its 
gave you “The Royal Scot” and “The Queen 0” _ brown-and-beige striped ticking is of top-quality 
Scots.” We’ve watched this mattress being made. Belgian damask with a rayon figure. You may get 
It has been constructed to meet highest quality it in full or twin bed sizes and the box springs to 
and comfort standards and is a worthy additionto #22 «. match — but get yours now at its introductory 
our “soyalfemily” «=  —.s P| price of $16.95! 

Bedding, Ninth Floor, South, State. 


a . 
, 
+ ; 
¢ 
| 7 
| y | 
1 
$ / 
¥ 
‘ cs 
% 
. 2 
: 
4 ee 
| ’ 
: id # " é ‘ 
F 
, 
* 
; 
! - ‘ 
° 
t ,. 
4 ‘ 
} 
. 7 
, 
> - By | 
‘ 7 
” | : r 
¢ 
? . ‘ i 
’ Ra | > 
; - } ; 
| 7 
| 
} 
/ 
, / 
; 
6 | 
| 
| 
f ; 
| 
| 
/ 
: 
; 
: 
si ' + 
* 
t 


Cris 


‘Here Are the Two Other 
Members of the “Royal” Family 
“The Royal Scot,” $2950, 
Covered in a smart beige and ‘brown striped woven 


. 


“The Queen 0’ Scots,” $39.50 
Covered in rich beige and brown whipeord (one of 
; - the most durable fabrics made) with a pre-built border 
| | cording. It carries a tem year guarantee against of beown whipcord, it is bound in beige and brown cord. 


i | With a 15 year guarantee. sc 


er of Our Ro 


“ 
- * 
- - 
« * 
> 
+ > 24 - 
. - . 


F , « iy it *y 
a a : 
° ~ 
et» “ 
- ‘. > 
a 
=? 
a 
‘ . = 
. ; x e £ 
“ + ‘ - “ ? 
_ ' hs 
; k: ae 
= 7 
2 
— 
‘ 4 
- # 
< 
ef 
eae, ‘ 


for February Onl 


Oe OR OME ETE 

Poet oe fo 8 & FB: 

<  PR WE  T E 
Si etete tet Te 


me er we OF 


Mk mmae ture 


ioe at at 
ae BeoRy 


Tw Ae A Oe eR 
Rk ma Ae 


4 


vast 
f ; 


7 
- - 
=eceeceree + eo 
a * 
: . 


ms 


She 


ASS 
= 


— Sete ee ee Se 
~~ e es ese ee = = * o 


WS, 


~J 


i... 
SR 


Ss 


ede es 


——— 
rrr ey 


i eatlietiadlatiadtidadad 


. 
sath 1° 
Vit ‘ 
a 7 e 
7 . 
Tay i 
¢% 
} } : 
344 , $ 
+13 * ie 714 3 
NUH} “Al 
- brs 
: ~~ 


New York Hospital, 
New York City 


ae. 
% 


—— a ane oe 


LLL LL AM Lad 


TITTLE i 


Budget Plan Spaces ' 
Your Payments « « « 
«+ if you have a purchase of 
$40 or more you can space your 
one - payments conveniently wide by 
making use of our Budget Plan, 
which is adjusted to meet your 
individual needs. It includes an 
initial down payment, a small 
carrying charge and the balance 
in 3, 6 or 12 months. Let us 
discuss it with you in detail! 


7 
_ 
| 
_ 
‘ 
‘ 
g 

7 


et a Ee EE One a A ATR cr aT 
ind ae 


a a pt 


CAUSE OF BAN 


Dehner Is Reported 
Out on Grade. 


(Picture on page 18.) 
_ Champaign, Ill, Feb. 2.—LSpecial.] 
—The Western conference faculty 
committee today declared Louis Bou- 
dreau, captain of the University of 
Tllinois basketball team and third 
baseman on the baseball team, in- 
eligible for athletic competition. The 
action was taken because the Cleve- 
Jand Indian baseball team had been 
remitting money monthly to Bou- 
dreau’s mother in return for the ath- 
lete’s verbal agreement that he would 
join the club after graduation. 

The faculty committee’s ruling pro- 
vided that Boudreau might be rein- 
stated for competition during the next 
school year if he sever connections 
with professional athletics. 

In response to the promise of rein- 
statement next fall Boudreau direct- 
ed the Cleveland club to stop remit- 
tance to his mother, who lives in 
Harvey, Ill. Being a junior, he has 
another year of competition. 

Dehner Reported Out, Too. 

News of Boudreau’s ineligibility 
stunned the campus. The students 
@nd coaches were further perturbed 
by a report that Pick Dehner, Illini 
center, who is leading all conference 
basketball players in scoring, has been 
declared ineligible because of scho- 
Jastic difficulties. It was reported 
that he failed to pass one course in 
the semester which has just ended. 


Meeting with Coach Mills and his 
teammates this afternoon, Boudreau 
expressed regret that he had become 
involved with the professional club 
and offered to help the team in any 
way possible. It is probable that he 
will play with the freshmen against 
the varsity in scrimmages. 

Preparing the Illini to resume com- 
petition against Purdue at Lafayette 
next Monday, Coach Mills cast about 
2m find a substitute for Boudreau. 


A Star at Thornton. 


Boudreau tirst gained fame on the 
Thornton Township High school bas- 
‘ketball team at Harvey, Ill. Thornton 
iwas state champion in 1933 and run- 
ner-up in 1934 and 1935. 


As a sophomore forward Boudreau 
(was an efficient member of the Lili- 
imois team that tied Minnesota for 
‘the championship last year, winning 
iten and losing two Big Ten games. 

Boudreau ranked ninth in Big Ten 
scoring last year with 93 points. He 
is tied for ninth with 44 points this 
season. 

On the baseball diamond Boudreau 
made good as a third baseman and 
was a factor in the winning of the Big 
Ten championship. He was one of 
the leading batters and made only 
three errors in the conference season. 


[ GRIFFITH RAPS CLUBS | 


Maj. John L. Griffith, RE 

of pe Be in the Western confer- 

ce, yesterday said the major leagues 

no agreement with the colleges 

of America not to entice or sign pros- 

sctive stars before their graduation. 

National Professional Football 

£ does have such an agreement 
in regard to football stars. 

“I wish the major leaguers could 
their way clear to quit tamper- 
with college players until their 

follege careers are finished,” he said. 
“We have figured it out that it 

tosts the colleges of America a quar. 
of a million dollars to support 

=< baseball, which usually is a 

venture. Yet the major leagues 

trying to take our players away, 
sat doing other things that disqualify 
tthe boy to participate in his favorite 
athletics at college. It-is a very. bad: 
situation. 


No Signed Agreement. 
“The major league clubs do not 
aga into any signed agreement with: 
boys because they are under age, 
but usually deal with their parents, 
8 was the reported case of the Cleve- 
Zand club and Boudreau, the Illinois 
| asketball player.” 
__Kenesaw Mountain Landis, commis- 
ener of basebali, said he had no 
10w]l of the situation, because 
> contracts had pean filed with his 


__ William Harridge, president of the 
. rican league said: “I don’t know 
an; dre ng about it. Any comments 
| i need to come from the Cleve- 


pasie 
is 


sce tes: 


Li 


’ Fas ; 
bod a - 
z 5 Ye te 9 
- % lS 5 ¥ 
Pr: . ; ae aik> nsx, 
~t cas : ? ar’ ry. Ake ta 
ie F * er an. 4 
> rs z a vate > 
‘ < res ‘ } * 
wi ‘ y To 4 
* , 
2 ARE bi t 
é 
> . 7 ys * 
- “Tee 
4 Ys * 
$ r?. 
i . 
r 


THE GUMPS—END OF THE TRAIL 


\ 
4 


IF YOU GENTLEASEA WILL DO YOU 
PARDON THE APPEARANCE Rs el hs 
Live IN ye. 

PLA 


OF THE PLACE- 
HAVEN'T HAD A 
CHANCE TO TIOY 

IT UP TODAY—_, 


1 WOULD! T EXACTLY 


say’ 
‘Susy A BE: 
‘BUT J 


“LIVE”, MR. 


HERE'S A PHOTO OF THE BABY | 
WITH ME AND MY LAMENTED © 


ROW- 
(AY CHILO IS RICHARD ROW, Ja. J 


om LALSO HAVE HIS 


BIRTH CERTIFICATE— 


08. by ‘Chicego 
Y. News Syndicate, Inc. 


pias 


WALTHOUR AND 
CROSSLEY TAKE | 
6 DAY BIKE LEAD 


Steal Two Laps to Go in 
Front at Coliseum. 


Bike Standin 


3 A. M.—78TH HOUR. 
Miles, 
. 1402 


LaPs. 
Walthour and Crossley..... 8 
Kilian and Vopel 
Audy and Buhler 
Van Kempen and Yates 
Le Page and Wambst....... 

Rodak and Korsmelier....... 

Ottevaere and Huertgen 

Peden and Spencer..... cess 

Fielding and Zach......+.++. 

Camastro and Seatta. 

Gruber and Heaton. 
Leader—Walthour. 


BULLETIN. 

The American team of Walthour 
and Crossley stole two laps early 
this morning to take the lead in the 
six day bike race at the Coliseum. 
The German team of Kilian and 
Vopel was in second place a lap 
ahead of Audy and Buhler and 
Ottevaere and Huertgen, who were 
tied for third, 


BY CHARLES BARTLETT. 

Last night was German night in 
the six day bicycle race at the Coli- 
seum and, however amazing the co- 
incidence may seem, those two sterl- 
ing Teuton athletes, Gustave Kilian 
and Heinz Vopel came out of the fren- 
zied pre-midnight wheeling in first 
place. 

The burghers of Chicago’s Little 
Germany came out in such force to 
honor Gustave and Heinz that the 
largest crowd of the week—nearly 
7,500—stayed well into the morning 
hours. Mutter and vater and all the 
kinder were there from Clybourn 
avenue, from Lincoln avenue, and 
from North avenue. A picnic spirit 
prevailed and Kilian and Vopel 
showed their appreciation by their 
fanciest riding of the race. 

Pressure Is On. 

As it was, the pressure on Gus 
anc Heinz, who are out for their tenth 
successive victory and a world record, 
was such that they probably would 
have had to spin ‘xeir spokes just as 
rapidly if it had been Hindu night. 
They entered the evening’s riding 
two laps back of Cecil Yates of Chicago 
and Piet Van Kempen of Holland. 
Along about 9:30, by dint of extend- 
ing themselves, they created a five- 
way mileage tie with the Yates-Van 
Kempen, Walthour-Crossley, Audy- 
Buhler, and Ottevaere-Huertgen duets, 
but were still trailing Cecil and Piet 
in sprint points. 

Just before the 10:30 sprints local 
German officials presented the two 
German riders with a hamper of 
posies. These had such a tonic. ef- 
fect on the young men that they 
dashed out and arranged a two way 
tie for themselves with Van Kempen 
and Yates. Ten minutes later they 
were off in front all alone, a lap in 
front of the four teams with which 
they had been deadlocked an hour 
before. | 

And- Then the Climax. 

The climax of the evening was 
reached in the second of the 10:30 
sprints, when a case of beer imported 
from Dortmund, Germany, home town 
of Kilian and Vopel, was offered to 
the winner. From the early jockying | 
for position it seemed that Al Cross- 
ley or Henri Le Page would run off 
with the lager. Then Vopel came out} 


*eeeeee . 


BY ARCH WARD. 


NIVERSITY OF COLORADO has placed Whizzer White's football 
jersey, No. 24, in a glass trophy case, following the precedent set by 
Illinois with Red Grange’s. famous‘77. . 
never will learn to ski, . . 


. » Sonja Henie says she 
- Coach’ Lynn Waldorf of Northwestern 


plans to shift Jack Ryan, sophomore. full back last year, to left. half back 


next fall... 


because of a scarcity of material at 
that position last season. . Phy- 


sicians have ordered Harold Small- | 


wood, Southern California’s Olympic 


quarter miler, to forgo track compe- : 


tition because of a weak heart. . 

Eddie Shea, former lightweight 
boxer, has purchased an 
in a night club on the southwest side. 
; Luke Appling, 
shortstop, has been hit by a pitched 


ball only twice in his major league _ 


. Johnny Brown and Andy 
former Golden 


career... 
Scrivani, 


interest 


White Sox © 


: Gloves ™ 
: champions, are fighting professional- aa 
& ly on the Pacific coast under the ; 


. Ryan naturally is a half back, but was moved to full back 


direction of George Blake, who piloted is see 


Fidel La Barba to a world’s cham- 4% 


of nowhere and won so easily that he} 


jcould have disposed of two flagons/ » 
of the brew before the field caught | # 


Luke Appling. pionship. 


Max Euwe.... 


West Indies. . 


hine did mountain climbing, 
work, and fasting to get in condition for his recent chess match with Dr. 
Frank Hill, starting his 17th year as Northwestern track 
coach, was a teammate of the late Knute Rockne when both competed for | 
the Hamilton park track -team.im Chicago. 4 
Miss Margaret Donahue, secretary of the Cubs, is vacationing in the 
Walter Cox, veteran trotting horse driver and trainer, 
believes it is needless expense to ship horses south in the winter. . . 


Dr. Alexander Alek- 


road Whizzer White. 


. He 


trains his champions by hitching them to sleighs for workouts on the 


Goshen, N. Y., track. . 


club. 


Quickies. 


They're all° wrong, Arch. The 
shortest possible unit of time is that 
between this contribution’s contact 
with your eye and'its contact with 
your waste basket. 


Slick: Say, there’s a nifty across 
the street. Think I'll introduce my- 
self. 

Slicker: Nice get if you can work it. 


1 met a fellow yesterday who spoke 
the queerest English. He invariably 
said “Yes” instead of “ Yeah.” 

—Wallace Finke. 
x 
Things I Would Like to See. 


Some one break the ice... Some 
one on the spot . . . Some one up a 
creek .. . Some one bite the dust 
. » « A sweet tooth . . . A cold shoul- 
der ... Blood run cold ... This 
contrib in the Wake. —Ting-a-ling. 

*% 
We'll Never Know. 

If Terrible Terry should decide to 
be nice to the sports writers this sea- 
son, they will be like the Filipinos. 
They won’t like it after they get it. 
You wait and see. —L. A. S, 


* 
Depends 
Friends, 


The Wake 
Opon Its 

x * 
Do You Remember "Way Back When: 

The throttle and the spark levers 
were on the steering. wheel within 
easy thumbing distance and we had 
to pump the choke while father 
cranked the family car?—Ronnie. 

. We had water from the well run- 
ning around a gutter in the cellar 
in which we kept the milk and but- 
ter cool [1895] ?—Jay Pee Dee. 
% 
Help! Help! 

Several times my wife complained 
about getting an electric shock when 
She dipped her finger in the baby’s 
milk to test for warmth. Not know- 
ing the cause of the phenomenon a 
witty listener suggested that perhaps 
it was because the milk was charged. 

~—A Strap Hanger. 


sdowne Throws Mack 


‘* 26:08 for 3d Straight 


Patrick Landsdowne scored his 
third straight. Chicago 
jnight when he tossed 


ejin twenty-six mint 
jonds at the Raint 


break the no broadcasting pact with the Yankees and Giants... . 
Maggs is athletic director, director of intramural athletics and coaches the 
basketball, baseball, boxing, fencing, wrestling, soccer and gymnastic teams 
at Maryland State Teachers’ college... . Waite Hoyt, the perennial school- 
boy pitcher, is the son of Ad Hoyt, famous old minstrel man, . . 
Howell, Nebraska guard whose field goal beat Kansas State for the Big Six 
championship, never placed kicked until last season. . 
advises this department that he will continue as professional at the Evans- 
ton Golf club despite rumors that he will.take @ position at a Minneapolis 


. An offer of $75,000 is tempting the Dodgers to 


Ben 


. Lowell 


. Johnny Revolta 


Four Seasons. 
‘l'he autumn sports are grand, no doubt, 
With football featured all about. 
While winter has its devotees 
Of skating, sleighing, even skis. 
The spring begins the year’s advance, 
With track athletes in skimpy pants. 
Then summer comes, the time; of all, 
Hot days, hot dogs, and hot baseball. 
—R. D. de Irene Byron. 
x 
The Awakening. 

Many a pretty girl has found out 
what a smooth looking fellow really 
meant when he said she ought to be 
in pictures. He was planning to 
frame her. —Hilary Haw. 


x 
Too Much Is Enough. 


I said her chin was sweet, and she 
Seemed happy as the young June 
sun; 
But that she might still sweeter be 
She wp and raised another one. 
—T. E. B. 


x 
Crowding the Hero Bench. 


I did not say Sanctuary much 
when the mailman handed me the 
Trib. —Hawkeye M. D. 


* 

Some Are Always Making Trouble. 

A group of scientists were discuss- 
ing the experiment of one of their 
number. “Yes,” said the honored 
one, “In a few days I’ll announce to 
the world my discovery, a solvent 
that will dissolve any known sub- 
stance.” Then -.up spoke‘ a quiet, 
mild appearing man in the back of 
the room. “What,” he asked, “are 
you going to keep it in?’ 

—Gas Hank. 


e& 
Maybe You'll Meet One. 


And do you know where bad little 

girls go? 
Daughter: 

where, 


Yes, Mamma, every- 
Prabang the Loop. 


Bob Becker's Worry. 


If the recession keeps up, 1 under- 
stand the birds will not return in the 
spring, —H. M. Ss. 

* % 


En Americana. 
Pedestrian: A man who has a new 
car and a son or daughter over 16 
years old. Biveia saga Tessar. 


Ten Years Ago 
cwned by Wiliam Danlel of Chess 


; Roding —Juatics F., | 


|BLACKHAWKS, ON 
PLAYOFF TRAIL, 
MEET MAROONS 


Boston to Visit Stadium 
Again on Sunday. 


Tonight’s Games 


Montreal Canadiens at Toronto. 
Detroit at New York Americans. 
Chicago at Montreal Maroons. 


MIONTREAL, Que., Feb. 2.—iSpe- 
cial.]—Chicago’s Blackhawks and the 
Montreal Maroons wiil meet here to- 
morrow night in a National Hocky 
league game that will have impor- 
tant bearing on the Shances of both 
cluhs to qualify for the Stanley Cup 
playoffs. The Blackhawks, in third 
place, two and a half games ahead 
of the Detroit Red Wings in the 
American division, have held a slim 
advantage over the Wings for several] 
weeks. The Maroons, anchored since 
early season in fourth place in the 
Canadian division, have been winning 
recently and are becoming a menace 
to the New York Americans’ hold on 
third place. 

Since the Red Wings are meeting 
the Americans tomorrow nigkt, each 
of the four teams fighting for third 
place in the two divisions of the 
league will be in action against a 
rival for that spot in the Stanley 
Cup playoffs. 


Team in Good Shape. 


The Blackhawks came here in good 
physical condition after their 6 to 1 
defeat at the hands of the New York 
Rangers in Madison Square Garden 
last night. They have been a jinx to 
the Rangers all season, having lost 
only once in five starts to Lester 
Patrick’s great team until last night. 

Manager Bill Stewart will stick to 
his revamped lineup for tomorrow’s 
game, with Earl Seibert back at his 
old defense post and Bill McKenzie 
on the front line, where he played 
in his earliest major league compe- 
tition. 

There is hot rivalry on the Black- 
hawk team for the honor of being 
the leading goal scorer for the sea- 
son and up to now four men are 
almost tied. In the latest scoring 
figures Romnes, Thompson, and 
March are tied with nine goals and 
Gottselig has eight. 


Meet Bruins Sunday. 


Following thelr game here the 
Hawks will return home. Their next 
game will be at the Chicago Stadium 
on Sunday night when they meet 
the Boston Bruins, present pace set- 
ters in the American division, whom 
they surprised with a 3 to 2 upset 
on the same rink ten days ago. Line- 
up for tomorrow: 


BLACKHAWES, MAROONS. 


Beveridge 
Evans 


sesee Ward 
Northcott 


[ea College Basketball | 


Mother, scolding young daughter: | ~~ 


| YESTERDAY'S RESULTS. 
Army, 50; Georgetown, 30. 

Yale, 49; Columbia, 38. 

John Carroll, 32; Kent State, 27. 


Coach Lynn Waldorf of Northwestern meets Bill De Correvont for 
the first time at the Austin High school football banquet held last night 
at the Midwest Athletic club a few hours after De Correvont announced 


he would enroll at Northwestern next fall. 
[TRIBUNE Photo.] 


20 Heavyweights, Count ’Em, 
Survive Omaha Golden Gloves 


BY FRENCH LANE. 


The fighters come in outsizes out 
there on the Nebraska plains and in 
western lowa, where the Omaha 
World-Herald is picking its team for 
the Golden Gloves Tournament ot 
Champions, which opens in the Sta- 
dium on Feb. 28. 

Besides being big boys, there are 
more of them than ever have entered 
a sectional Golden Gloves competi- 
tion. Twenty are left in the scrap for 
the heavyweight title in the Omaha 
meet. Thirty-two light heavyweights 
also are striving for honors in their 
division. 

They approach the Omaha fina! on 
Feb. 17 much in the manner of a lot 
of lumbering Cinderellas. Which one’s 
dainty foot is going to fit into the 
number .12’s left empty by Paul. Hart- 
nek. and .Carl Vinciquerra of the 
Omaha team who have dominated the 
heavyweight and light heavyweight 
divisions of the Tournament of Cham- 
pions for’ the last three years? 

Winners Turn Pro. 
Both Hartnek and Vinciquerra have 


entered the professional ranks. Their |: 
‘departure fromthe amateurs stirred 


the other big fellows in the Omaha 
territory to renewed. activity. Just 
about every well muscled, ‘hefty fel- 
low in that part of the country hyerar 
into training. 

The 20 heavyweights and the 32 
light heavyweights remaining in the 
Omaha. fighting do not. by. any-means. 
represent all the Omaha starting field 
because elimination tournaments al- 
ready have been held in Norfolk, 
Freemont, Alliance, Kearney, Supe- 
rior, Lincoln, and Grand Island in 
Nebraska, and in Council Bluffs, I[a. 


Knockout No ‘Longer Is News. 


There have been knockouts of 
every savoir dia im these elimina- 


omen 


ie BERNICE WALL TO. 


MEET MRS. VARE 
|IN BELLEAIR FINAL 


Belleair, Fila., Feb, 2,—()—Glenna. 
Collett Vare of Philadelphia and Ber-| 
nice Wall of Oshkosh, Wis., advanced | 
to the finals of the annual Belleair 
: women’s” golf tournament today. 2 gs 


tion struggles: The hardest hitters 
among the heavyweights appear to 
be Leonard Arps of North Bend, 
Neb., Alex Fuchs of Stanton, Neb., 
Frank Gelecki of Omaha, and Francis 
Toline of Alliance. They have won 
more than 90 per cent of their 
preliminary bouts with knockout 
punches. 

Victims of these sleep producing 
wallops are convinced that neither 
Hartnek nor Vinciquerra could slug 
in the.manner, of these newcomers. 

If the big guns of their team can 
be properly manned, Omaha can -vis- 
ion: a team title in the Tournament 
of Champions.’. Four members of. last 
year’s team—Martin Helzer, bantam- 
weight;' Paul Gaughenbaugh, feather- 
weight; Victor Marker, welterweight, 
and Jack Taylor, 175 pounder, are 
leading contenders for places on the 
team again this year. 


Martin Looks Very Good. 


Helzer, who last year was a semi- 
finalist in the National A. A. U. meet 
in. Boston, has, in the early Omaha 
fighting, been one of the standouts 
in the big western tournament. 
More than 800 boxers started fight- 


Ing’ several weeks ago for the eight 


places on the Omaha team. The field 


already has been sliced down. to .336.. 


Always 
Something New 


A new month is here and that 
means the approach of real fight- 
ing by--new fighters in the ennual 
Golden Gloves Tournament of 
Champions:in Chicago Stadium on 
Feb. 28, March | and 2. 


Mail. orders are being accepted | 
NOW for tickets for this ring car- 


TEAMMATES TO 
HG 10 SCHOOL 


Decides to Continue 
Career at Home. 


Bill. De Correvont, the nation’s 
most widely publicized high school 
football player tast season, will en- 
rol] at Northwestern university. next 
fal. The Austin High school half 
back, whose 35 touchdowns in ten 
games brought the west side team 
the Public School league champion- 
Ship and the city title, made the an- 
nouncement yesterday. 

be Correvont,-who was graduated 
last Friday, said an ambition to play 
in the Westerr conference and the 
fact that severa! other members of 
the Austin squad will matriculate at 
Northwestern next September lied to 
his decision. He had written to more 
than 20 colleges in the United States 
regarding scholastic requirements. 


He Issues Statement. 


In a statement issued in his home 
on the west side De Correvont praised 
his teammates for their coéperation 
throughout the season. Jack Riley, 
former Northwestern football player, 
a cousin of De Correvont’s was pres- 
ent when the statement was issued. 
It read: 

“I have decided to enroll at North- 
western university next September. 
The newspapers in Chicago have been 
grend to me. My folks have always 
lived in Chicago and I wanted to go 
to school near home, I was very 
fortunate to play on a great high 
school team. Some of the boys on 
the team are going to Northwestern. 
I know I can get a good education 
at Northwestern and I always wanted 
to play in the Big Ten.” 

In addition to Riley, another cousin 
of De Correvont, George Wilson, 
psayed at Northwestern in 1934. Wil- 
son now plays end for the Chicago 
Bears. 

De Correvont’s teammates who will 
join him at Northwestern are Alfie 


Bauman, giant tackle; Donald John- 


son, 200 pound center; Chuck Feingar- 
ten, guard, and Sonny Skor, quarter 


back. Feingarten and Skor also were 
graduated last Friday. Bauman, John- 


: son, and five other regular members 


of the squad will be graduated next 
June, 


No Plans for Summer. 


De Correvont ended his high school 
career last December, against Jack- 
son, Tenn., in a charity game at Mem- 
phis. He scored a touchdown in the 
first quarter on a 37 yard run and 
shortly afterward he suffered a frac- 
tured collar bone. The game fol- 
lowed Austin’s 26 to 0 victory over 
Leo, Catholic league champion, at 
Soldiers’ field before 115,000. 

De Correvont said he had not made 
definite plans for the spring and sum- 
iner. He may decide to accept a posi- 
tion in a loop bank. The half back, 
who also starred on the Austin base- 
bal] squad for three seasons, will work 
out with the Mills semi-pro club, 
which has scheduled several college 
nines for spring contests. 


Visits Coast, Ohio State. 


De Correvont led many to believe 
he might be interested in a Pacitic 
coast school last December when he 
accepted an invitation to be the 
guest of Warner Brothers’ studio at 
the Rose Bowl game between Alz- 
bama and California. He also had 


nival, as well.as for the finals on 
March. I 1,-when Chicago's intercity 
team will be chosen. | 


Make check or money order pay 
able to the Chicago Tribune Char- 
ities, Inc, and mail to Golden 

. Gloves : Ticket eer: oe 


written the registrar’s office at the 
University of Southern California. 

The first report that he was inter- 
ested in a Big Ten school was. heard 
following an airplane trip to Colum- 
bus, O., last fall, where he watched 
the game between Northwestern and 
Chio State. He occupied a seat on 
the Ohio: State bench during © the 
game. 

De .Correvont and his teammates 
were honored last night at a panquet 
at the Midwest Athletic club. Lynn 
Waldorf, Northwestern football coach, 
was one of the speakers. Waldorf 
met De Correvont and other members 
of the team for the first time. 

Waldorf, wnen informed of De Cor- 
revont’s decision to enroll at North- 
western, said: 

“ Any - school ‘yould be very glad 
to have De Correvont enroll and we 
feel the same way about it.” 

Named Most Valuable. 


De Correvont was named the team’s 
most valuable player at the dinner. 
Casey Piefer, full back, the only jun- 
ior on the squad last season, was 
named captain for 1938. President 
Peter Grachini of the Austin Alumni 
association, presented a gold watch 
to William C. Heiland; Austin coach. 

More than two hundred attended 
the banquet. Mayor Edward J. Kelly, 
James B. McCahey, president of the 

school toard; Waldorf, De Correvont, 


| ~~ Two Holidays. 


’ Bight of the first eleven games 
which will engage the attention of 
the White Sox when American league 
pennant competition is inaugurated 
for 1938 will be with the Cleveland 
Indians and the Detroit Tigers, two 
clubs which helped the Sex make up 
the 1937 first division bracket after 
the thundering Yankees had staked 
out their customary claim on the pen- 
nant. 

On April 19, when the race really 
gets under way, although a pair of 
games will be played in the east the 
previous day, the Sox will trot out 
on the Comiskey park diamond for a 
duel with the Tigers, who took sec- 
ond honors last year after a long 
spell in which it looked as if Dykes’ 
team might land the berth. After 
three gamés with Mickey Cochrane's 
men, the Sox make the overnight hop 
to St. Louis for a similar series with 
the Browns. 

Open in East May 3. 

On April 25 they return to the 
south side for three games with the 
Indians, who, with a brand new man- 
ager in the person of Oscar Vitt and 
a new right arm for Bob Feller, feel 
they are the logical challengers to 
the Yankees’ supremacy. Games with 
the Tigers in Detroit on the 28th and 
29th follow, then the boys make a 
two day stand at Comiskey park 
against the Browns before starting 
their first extended train ride of. the 
new season. 

Allowing a day for travel, the Sox 
open in Philadelphia on May 3, with 
stops in Washington, New York, Bos- 
ton, and Cleveland. Their next. sub- 
sequent home engagement will be 
with Boston on May 17. 

Two of the season’s three holidays 
will be celebrated at Comiskey park. 
The Sox will meet the Browns on 
July 4 and the Indians on Sept. 5, 
Labor day, playing double-headers, of 
course, on both dates. 


REDS ARRANGE NIGHT GAMES. 


Cincinnati, O., Feb. 2.—[Special.]— 
The Cincinnati Reds today revised 
the newly released National league 
schedule to agree with their plans 
for seven night games at Crosley 
field. Two. of the after-dark engage- 
ments will be with the Cubs—on July 
1 and Aug. 10. The Giants are the 
only one of the seven rival teams 
which does not play a night date, 
Manager Bill Terry being opposed to 
such competition. 

The first of the seven games will 
be with the Cardinals on May 27. 
Others in addition to those with the 
Cubs are with the Phillies on June 
8; the Bees, July 30; the Dodgers, 
Aug. 31, and the Pirates, Sept. 8. 

Games scheduled on days succeed- 
ing the night dates have been reset 
as parts of double-headers. 


PIOTTER, NELSON 
WIN IN STATE 
HANDBALL MEET 


Two of the matches in the Central 
A. A, U. state singles handball meet 
went to three sets in the Madison 
A. C. last night. National Champion 
Joe Platak won by default from Fred 
Dillon, Illinois Athletic club repre- 
sentative. 

Bob Nelson of the I. A. C. was ex- 
tended to beat Eddie Piotter of the 
Oak Park Y. M. C. A., 21-12, 19-21, 
21-12, and Paddy Cannon of the Mad- 
ison A. C. defeated George Corsen of 
the Hyde Park Y. M. C. A., 21-9, 19-21, 
21-18. The summaries: 

FIRST ROUND—Steve Panke, Joliet Y. M. 
C. A., defeated John Stenson, Madison A. C., 
21-18, 21-10: Chuck Ravas, Post! H. C., 
—* Tony Alberti, Skyline A. C., 21-12, 

SECOND ROUND—Bob Nelson, I. A. C.. 
defeated Eddie Piotter, Oak Park Y. M. 
C. A., 21-12, 19-21, 21-12; Paddy Cannon, 
Madison A. C., defeated George Corson, Hyde 
Park Y. M. C. A., 21-9, 19-21, 21-18; Joe 
Plateak, Lake Shore A. C., won by default 
from Fred Dillon, 1. A. C.: Bill McCarthy, 
I. A. C., defeated Bob Kendlar, Lake Shore 
A.C., 21-18, 21-6. 


Stockins, Jawgiel Triumph: 


in Artillery Amateur Bouts. 


Stanley Stockins, lightweight mem- 
ber of the 124th Field Artillery box- 
ing team, and Joe Jawgiel, Northwest. 
gymnasium, triumphed in the two fea- 
ture amateur bouts at the 124th Field 
Artillery armory last night. Stockins 
won a five round decision over Wally 
Zale, Gary, Ind. while Jawgiel 
knocked out Vito Savoldi, Gary, ‘in 
the second round. 


Reg. U. S. Pat. Of: 


i Copyright. 1988, hy Chicago 


Tribune-N. Y. News ES, 


BRADLEY FIVE 
TESTS PURPLE 
SATURDAY NIGHT 


Northwestern’s basketball team will 
conclude a two weeks’ lay-off for ex- 
aminations by meeting the undefeat- 
ed Bradley Tech five at Patten gym- 
nasium Saturday night. 

The Peoria Braves, victorious in 
ten straight games this season and 
——— since the Wildcats beat 
them a year ago, will invade Evans- 
ton with strong hopes of victory. 
Bradley has whipped, among others, 
Indiana, Nebraska, Utah, and St. 
Louis university. 

A capacity crowd will witness the 
game. Included will be 2,000 Brad- 
ley fans many of whom will accom- 
pany the team from Peoria on a spe- 
cial train. Others will make the trip 
by bus and auto. The size of the 
delegation was limited by the number 
of seats available in Patten gymna- 
sium. A Peoria radio station will 
broadcast the game. 


Harvey Star Paces Bradley. 

Paced by Dar Hutehins, 6 foot 4 
inch center from Harvey, IIl., Brad- 
ley has turned loose an offense which 
rolled up a 50 to 39 victory over In- 
diana, overpowered Nebraska, 50 to 
30, and reached its peak last Satur- 
day by scoring a 68 to 46 victory over 
Knox. Hutchins, who was a member 
of Thornton township’s state high 
school championship team of three 
years ago is high scorer of the team. 

Whether the Wildcats will be able 
to pick up where they left off at the 
conclusion of the first half of their 
Big Ten schedule is a question. Their 
last appearance was two weeks ago 
when they defeated Michigan, 30 to 
29, for their fifth victory in six 
games. The lone defeat was at the 
hands of Purdue. 


Wildcats Have Tight Defense. 


The Wildcats owe their first place 
position in the Big Ten race to a 
steady floor game backed by one of 
the best defenses in the conference. 
Michigan is the only Big Ten team 
to top Northwestern’s defensive rec- 
ord. 

- Coach Dutch Lonborg will start the 

same lineup against Bradley that 
opened against Michigan. This con- 
sists of two senior forwards, Fred 
Trenkle and Jean Smith, Jake Na- 
gode, the team’s high scorer, at cen- 
ter, and Ad Vance and Bernard Da- 
vis, guards. Vance is the only sopho- 
more in the starting lineup. 


AUSTRALIA PICKS 
TEAM TO PLAY 
FOR DAVIS CUP 


[Chicago Tribune Press Service. } 

SYDNEY, Australia, Feb. 2,—The 
1938 Australian Davis cup tennis team 
was selected today. It will be made 
up of Jack Bromwich, Adrian Quist, 
L. A. Schwartz, and Harry C. Hoff- 
man. 

Bromwich and Quist were on last 
year’s Davis cup team which lost to 
the United States in the American 
zone final. 

The Australian Lawn Tennis asso- 
ciation also decided to send Nancy 
Wynne, Thelma Coyne, D. Stevenson, 
and Mrs. H. C. Hopmann to the Wim- 
bledon tournament. ‘They will sail 
on March 8. 


Indians Drop Lloyd Brown, 


Veteran Left Hand Pitcher 


Cleveland, O., Feb. 2.—()—The 
Cleveland Indians baseball club an- 
nounced tonight the outright release 
of Lloyd Brown, veteran left hand 
pitcher. Brown is a ten-year man 
and cannot be sold by the club but 
may make his own deals as free 
agent. 


‘DICK TRACY—Muddy Water 


7 


wo 
LA) 


' WELL, BOYS, WERE 
ALL. 


AND WHEN 


READY TO 604S 


SOON AS THEY GET 

OUR OIL. SUPPLY ABOARD! / 
THAT SHOULD 

BE SOMETIME THIS 

AFTERNOON. 


YOU SAID IT, 


FISHES 

RIVER UP HERE -—ITs SANE. 
ING BLIT MUD 
D WASTE. 


Hy 


Yh 


Ril / 

a LLL / 
pel LL 

iy 


f 2m 
/ j 
tf 
tj 
a Wk 
s 


SM ON ag” 
TT <_ 


Mf |: 
i Teele aot | 


1a. 


_ 


"SA, 


AU 


G. Washington 
Quintet Next 
for Loyola 


Loyola’s basketball team will open 
the second half of its season tomor- 
row night on its home floor against 
George Washington university of 
Washington, D. C. The Colonials are 
out for revenge on Loyola, which 
snapped their twenty-six game win 
ning streak last year. 

Coach Bill Reinhart brings a team 
that includes eight letter men. Capt. 
Tommy O’Brien has been among the 
leading scorers in the District of Co- 
lumbia for the last two seasons. 
Teaming with him at forward is 
Arnie Auerbach, a sophomore, who 
has wrested a starting post away 
from two veterans. Jack Butter- 
worth, 6 foot 4 inch center, is, a dead 
shot at close range. At the, guards 
will be Sid Silkowitz and’ George 
Garber. 

Against this team, which: has lost 
only one game this season, Coach 
Leonard Sachs is expected to send 
the customary starting lineup, con- 
sisting of George Hogan, Bill Lynch, 
Wibs Kautz, Mike Novak, and Bill 
O’Brien, although if his injured thumb 
permits Capt. Bob Brennan will play. 


MESNER, ASBELL, 
CUB ROOKIES, 
SIGN CONTRACTS 


Steve Mesner, former White Sox 
rookie third baseman, and James 
Asbell, outfielder with Memphis of 
the Southern association last year, 
have sent in their signed contracts 
for the 1938 season, it was announced 
yesterday by Charles A. [Boots] 
Weber, treasur:r and business man- 
ager of the Chicago Cubs. 

The Cubs purchased Asbell, who is 
a native of San Marcos, Tex., from 
Jersey City of the International 
league. He slugged his way to a .352 
average last year <o finish second to 
Coaker Triplett of Boone, N. C., 
another -Cub recruit, who hit .356 to 
lead the Southern league. 

Mesner batted 324 with Los Angeles 
of the Pacific coast league last year. 


Two Handball Teams Go 
to Y.M.C. A. Quarter Final 


Two teams advanced to’ the quar- 
ter-finals in the Chicago city Y. M. 
C. A. handball doubles championships 
at the ‘Lawson branch last night. 

Arnold Le Vine and Don Ritholz, 
Lawson, won from George Corson 
and Barney D’Amato, Englewood, 21- 
13 21-8, and Bill Abrahams and Har- 
old Kahn, Lawson, defeated Sid and 
Ben Neross, also of Lawson, 21-15, 
21-8. 


Louis- Boudreau, Illini basketball 
captain, who has been. declared in- 
eligible. 


Adolph Kiefer Ineligible 


at University of Texas 


Austin, Tex., Feb. 2.—[Special.]— 
Adolph Kiefer, holder of numerous 
world swim records, will not be elig- 
ible for competition this year, Coach 
Tex Robertson of the University of 
Texas team announced today. Kiefer 
will remain in school, however. Rob- 
ertson said the Chicago swimmer had 
failéd to make ;the required number 


Official American League Schedule for 1938 


of credits. 


AT 
CHICAGO 


AT 
ST. LOUIS 


oa ae 
CLEVELAND 


WASHINGTON : 


PHILADELPHIA 


AT 
NEW YORK 


ly 8.8, 
Aug. 16,17,18 
Sept. 10,11,12 


q May 18,14,15 
2 May 30,30 

Aug. 19,20,21 
i Sept. 27.28.29 


May 8,9,10 


ST, US i vcbbinedroacancel 


a. 
eae ae 


| May 13,14,15 


May 30, 
Aug. 19,20,21 


THE TRIBUNE 
' Sept. 27.28.29 


;| April 19,20,21 
July 8,9,10 


Aug. 16,17 
Sept. 


18 July 22, 
10,11 Aug. 28,24 


a * 
ie ae ae 4% 

ee ES eS 
Re ois Sis ot 


& 
as aon a 


nt 


April 25,26,27 
July Lea 
Aug. 12.13,14 
Sept. 5,6 


Apr. 80, May 1,2 
une 2829.30 


Dp os * 
Sept. 30, Oct. 1,2 


6,17 


Aug. 30,31, Sept.1| Aug: 


14 
Aug, 


: 


. - we, _ — A - i 
“ 


CLEVELAND... csencsecccsens 
t f4 Naps eat 2% > *e 


[eee tb a 


Aug. 26,26,27 


23 ee 
: seeewarenees 


an Hf 
July a4, - ome 
| April 22,28,24 Bk: 
July 1 


‘Aug. 9 
Sept. 4,2' 


pril 30, May J 
Ly May1 


Sept. b0dd 


. = 
* 


Pe 


16,17 


7 ee ' ; 4 ! 

"| May 25, 

: ‘Vier - eebeaee 
Sept 15,’ : 


April 28,29 
cee 


Sept. 2,3,24,25,26 


eas 

: 
ri 2. Pe . 

: xs : 
= 10 LR Se 
- Ni eee 
: i ae, ‘ . r 
: ro ne: 
_ wee hy 

erage 


“3 
; 


¥ a3 a eis 
S > <= - «< 
Seip a net ve : ‘ x m 
ty — >, 
Potash ae 
=f - ., bad — 
; +. ~ : “« 


; b 
Aare t] 8 
+ - 
Mis, ae 


Michigan Still 
Says Veenker 
Tale Is False 


Ann Arbor, Mich., Feb. 2.— ([Spe-' 


cial.J—Reports published today that 
George Veenker, director of athletics 
at Iowa State college and former bas- 
ketball coach here, had been selected 
as Michigan’s new football coach 
were denied in the office of Presi- 
dent Alexander G. Ruthven. It was 
said the reports had been investi- 
gated by the president and found 
“unbased in fact.” 


Aigler Out of Town. 


Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman 
of the Michigan athletic board, 
was reported returning from Chi- 
cago, where he had gone yesterday 
“on business not connected with the 
new coach,” according to associates. 

Men close to the athletic board 
were skeptical of the report and 
termed it “at least premature.” 


They Say Nothing’s Sure. 


It was said that, although the 
board has met and is working toward 
an appointment in order to have a 
recommendation ready for the meet- 
ing of the board of regents on Feb. 
11, no conclusions had been reached. 


COCHRAN HOLDS 
SLIM LEAD IN 18.2 
TITLE CUE MATCH 


Boston, Mass., Feb: 2.—(/)—Welker 
Cochran of San Francisco had a lead 
of seven points over Champion Jake 
Schaefer of Chicago tonight at the 
conclusion of the first half of their 
3,600 point 18.2 balkline billiards 
match. 

At the end of the sixth block Coch- 
ran had a total of 1,800 to the cham- 
pion’s 1,793, scoring 373 points to 
Schaefer’s 293. Schaefer had one run 
of 209 while Cochran had one of 107, 
but Cochran’s run of 296 during the 
afternoon block was still the longest 
of the match. 


COLLEGE HOCKY. 


St. Thomas, 2; Hamline, 0. 
Army, 3; Union College, 2. 
MacAlester. 1; Gustavus Adolphus, 0. 


GILBEY'S 


ba ¢ 
t on ‘ ; . 
; , = ; ‘ 
ne . . rere : 
iad =! - —_ * es e + . 7 < 
me . - Se eee : * « . . 


go ELAR S COL tne 


Primo Carnera Rests 


Well After Operation 
PADUA, Italy, Feb. 2.—(4)—Primo 
Carnera, former world’s heavyweight 
champion, was reported resting satis- 
factorily today after undergoing a 
major operation for relief of a kidney 
ailment. 


430 CASH 
PRIZES! 


Name of 
Movie Star Is 


THE PRIZES 


First Prizeia ii eevee eee. 
Second Prize........0se0085 
WO OE ioe kt oes vapees 
Next 2 Prizes—Si00 each. . 
Next 5 Prizes— 50 each. 
Next {0 Prizes— 25 each.. 
Next 100 Prizes— [0 each. 
, Next 310 Prizes— 5 each. 


TOTAL—430 Prizes..... 


. $1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Helene Madison Mclver 


Becomes Mother of Girl 

Seattle, Wash., Feb. 2.—(#)—A 
daughter was born today to Mrs. 
L. C, McIver, the former Helene Madi- 
son, holder of numerous swimming 
records. The child weighed six pounds 
nine ounces. 


; 5.0 , 


get SR RS SARK ES SSATP STS TSA SSCS CC esse 


visieleelnle Ron oso a Na aa a 
ican mn SO 


SS 


HE scrambled name of a movie star appears in this picture. 

Each week day another name will appear in the Tribune. 

series. $5,000.00 in cash will be paid to 430 prize winners. You have a chance 
to win as much as $1,000.00. Hold all names until you have the entire set. 


500,00 
250.00 
200.00 
260.00 
250,00 


eat better, 
sleep 
better 


and 


‘ 
4. 


HICAGO OFFICE: 333 No. yan AY 
Suite 528-—Tel.: Randolph 5575 


oe 


WHO CAN ENTER? This game 
ig open to everybody — men, 
women, boys, .and girls every- 
where — except employes of 
the Chicago Tribune and mem- 
bers of their families. 


WHAT TO DO? Every week 
day-a picture containing the 
scrambled name of a movie 
star will be published until 36 
have appeared. Unscramble 
the name. Use every letter in 


No. 29—Chicago Tribune—'Paging the Movie Stars" 


ene bt tee ee a Ee GG BAR RRR RRR SRR RRR SRA KS SSC eS SSCS ST SS SSS 


Unscramble it! 
Complete the 


NOTE: For scrambled names previously published get back copies of the Tribune. 


THE RULES 


Illinois. With your éntry send 
a letter, giving your name and 
address and telling in 50 words 
or less, who is your favorite 
movie star and why. Letters 
will be considered only in the 
event of tied in’ naming ihe 


‘Stars. Entries must be im the 
office of the Chicago Tribune 


by, midnight, 12. days” ef 


the picture. Write or print — 


or on any piece of paper,” 


until 


oe 
<2 4 “ 
Hold ; 


2 


the : 


Sectionals to Start Next 


Week on West Side. 


BY WILFRID SMITH. 

The final Golden Gloves examina- 
tion tomorrow night at Trafton’s 
gymnasium, 180 West Randolph street, 
fis the last chance to enter this year’s 
sectional tournament in Chicago. Al! 
boxers who have received letters to 
report tomorrow night and any other 
boys who previously have received 
parental consent cards from The Trib- 
une Charities, Inc., may appear for 
physical examinations. 

‘More than two thousand letters 
have been received this year from 
boxers. Only those who have re- 
ported for and passed their physical 
examinations will be eligible to fight 
in the sectional tournaments which 
start next week. 

Five Veterans at Leyola. 


Among. the Open division boxers 
seeking a championship and a place 
on this year’s intercity Golden Gloves 
squad which fights New York in 
Madison Square Garden March 21 is 
Earl Watson. This is Watson’s fifth 
tournament and while he is only 25 
years of age, he made his first ap- 
pearance in Golden Gloves in 1930 
when he reached the finals of the 
lightweight class and was defeated 
by Chauncey Crain. 

The Open division at the north sec- 
tional tournament which starts at 
Loyola university gymnasium Feb. 
21 promises to be one of the strong: 
est of the four in Chicago. Five vet- 
eran boxers of the Catholic Youth 
organization were assigned to that 
center at the examination Monday 
night. They are Savior Canadeo, wel- 
terweight; John Anderson, light- 
weight; Cornelius Young, middle- 
weight; Al Scarlata, featherweight, 
and Albert Urlich, light heavyweight. 


Fight in West Section Next Week. 


While the west side tournament 
starts Feb. 9 at the Madison Athletic 
club, this will be the only section in 
operation next week. The west side 
boxers will go through to the semi- 
finals on Wednesday and Thursday 
and the tournament will be con- 
cluded on Feb. 17 and 18 at the Park 
Casino. The south side tournament 
opens Feb. 15 at White City and on 
the following night the northwest 
tournament starts at the Marigold 
Gardens. 

General admission at all four of the 
sectional tournaments is 75 cents. 
There are no reserved seats. Tickets 
now may be ordered for the Tourna- 
ment of Champions, Feb. 28, March 
1 and 2, and for the championships, 
March 11. These bouts will be held 
at the Chicago Stadium. Address 
ticket applications to Golden Gloves 
Ticket Manager, Tribune Tower, Chi- 
cago. 


TOW AND BURMAN 
FIGHT DRAW IN 
TEN ROUND BOUT 


New York, Feb. 2.—(#)—Young Bob 
Tow of Washington, D. C., latest ad- 
dition to Joe Gould’s fistic stable, 
fought a ten round draw with Red 
Burman of Baltimore, protégé of Jack 
Dempsey, before 2,000 fans in the 
New York Hippodrome tonight. Tow 
weighed 206, Burman 185. 

It was a dull, uninteresting bout 
between two inexperienced young- 
sters who showed potentialities but 
still have plenty to learn. The only 
knockdown came in the fourth round, 
when Burman dropped Tow tc the 
floor with a crushing right to the 
head. Tow regained his feet before a 
count was started. 


MORTON JUNIOR 
DEFEATS JOLIET 
QUINTET, 47 TO 44 


The Morton Junior college basket- 
ball team of Cicero defeated Joliet, 
47 to 44, last night, for its eighth vic- 
tory in nine games in the Junior 
College conference. 

Serunillo, Morton guard, was high 
scorer with five field goals and five 
free throws. McGrath of the losers 
made six baskets for twelve points, 
Morton led at the half, 18 to 11. 
Liggups: 


SORTON [ 
elinek.t 


> 
a 
ee 


JOLIET [44]. 


Knowles,f 
Fornango.f 


McGrath.¢ 
Layfield,f 
wese. rd 
Huey 
Deacnock. x 


WILSON RALLIES 
TO BEAT LISLE 
QUINTET, 38 TO 28 


Trailing, 14 to 19, at half time, the 
Wilson Junior college basketball team 
rallied to win from Lisle in a Junior 
College conference game last night 
on the Wilson court, 38 to 28. Lineup: 

WILSON ‘BE LISLE [28]. 
Vinson,f y 
Kaplan, f 


COOH ODA ALY 
CHOOMONINO hy: 
Mrs Com Cormszsas*d 


ROOD aorHtety 
SCOOCSNS OM 
CrrwpokoHr'd 


osHoen 
weer. sed 


WO WWOw woby 
BRONRERHOO 
DOWEsH COWO CO 


2 


TERRY AND THE PIRATES—Worth 


Saving 


/ MOST HEARTLESS 
m WOMAN IN CHINA 


I CANT BELIEVE 
\ YOU WANT TO 

HELP US OUT OF 
vn THIS MESS ! 


om 


I'VE HEARD THAT \¥ DO NOT MISTAKE 
YOU WERE THE \ THE DRAGON 
LADYS ACTIONS 
FOR BENEVOLENCE! . 
THERE IS A 


I KNOW THIS 
KLANG = HE 16 
A BOASTFUL 
FOOL = 8UT 

CLEVER ! | 


~S, ° 


HOW CAN WE 
CROSS HIM UP? 
THE ODDS ARE 

AGAINST us! 


% POOR 


VAS 2a 


THINKING ME DEAD, © F) \/. 16 IT 16 DONE 
MANY OF MY FORMER | ; 
FOLLOWERS JOINED | 
KLANG'S ARMY! off 
e GOME OF THEM a 
ARE SURELY STILL 
ALIVE (eo. vs 


SUDDENLY, WE 

MAY. SUCCEED — 
THEREBY SAVING 

THE LUSH BEAUTY 

OF THE GOLDEN / | 
ONE FOR THE é 
ARMS OF PATRICK sil ~ 


RYAN ! ae 


aes 
f 


> 


= 


Burns to Try 
Comeback in 


Rainbo Show 


Charley Burns, Johnstown, Pa., 
junior welterweight, who suffered a 
three round knockout at the hands 
of Milt Aron in Marigold Gardens 
Monday, will have a chance to re- 
deem himself in a six round contest 
with George Van Der Hayden of 
South Bend, Ind., in Rainbo Fronton 
tomorrow. The show, which is topped 
by Johnny Barbara and Sammy 
Chivas, will be the first under the 
joint’ promotion of Harold Ryan, for- 
mer Illinois boxing commission gym- 
nasium inspector, and Sam Yarosz. 
. . Henry Schaft, Alex Kettles, and 
Tom Kenneally expect to appear in 
supporting matches to the eight 
round windup involving Harvey 
Woods and Sammy Angott in Mari- 
gold Gardens Monday... . Billy Cele- 
bron of Rockford, who is preparing 
to open a comeback in the middle- 
weight division, has placed himself 
under the management of Benny 
Ray. . . . Bronko Nagurski threw 
Paul Jones in Minneapolis Tuesday 
to continue preparations for his 
wrestling headliner with Fritz von 
Schacht in the Coliseum next Tues- 
GE: > a2 


-o— 
Harry Thomas, Illinois heavyweight 
boxing champion has a busy month 
ahead of him. His schedule includes 
an appearance as referee at the ama- 
teur show in Madison Athletic club 
tomorrow, a boxing exhibition with 
his brother, Hank Pontious, in Eagle 
Bend, Minn., Monday; a fight with 
Tony Galento in Madison Square 
Garden Feb. 18. He may appear in 
Kansas City, Mo., later in the month 
and in Des Moines, Ia., in March... . 
Al Manriquez, Sioux City, Ia., junior 
lightweight, is in line for a match 
with Henry Armstrong in Des Moines 
after his anticipated bout with Leo 
Rodak in Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 11. 
. . « Next week Art Winch, co-man- 
ager with Sam Pian of Barney Ross, 
will go to Hot Springs, Ark., to es- 
tablish training quarters there for 
Ross’ anticipated welterweight title 
defense against Ceferino Garcia in 
Los Angeles March 4... . Harry 
Mueller and George [Jabber] Young 
will be referees in the Golden Gloves 
‘sectional tournament sponsored by 
the State Register in Springfield, IIl., 
Feb. 8 and 9... . Henry Armstrong’s 
signed contract for a match with Va: 
rias Milling in Chicago Feb. 25 stipu- 
lates that Milling must weigh more 
than 132%4 pounds or less than 128 
pounds.... F. M, 


First National Deteats 
Harris Trust Five, 40-29 


First National’s basketball team 
scored its eighth victory in the Chi- 
cago Bankers’ league last night, de- 
feating Harris Trust, 40 to 29, at 
the Central Y. M. C. A. gymnasium. 
In other contests Chicago Title and 
Trust won from American National, 
20 to 15, and Hotel La Salle triumphed 
over Northern Trust, 37 to 23. 


RESORTS AND TRAVEL. 


lll 


Ocean Travel. 


wae" 2 NEW ZEALAND - AUSTRALIA 
Sarat pM ‘a ices nanias atthe every 

» few days from California for 

interesting South Pacific ports. 

30 NORTH AVE., CHICAGO, RANDOLPH 8344 
$.S.LURLINE - $.5. MARIPOSA: $.S. MONTEREY - $.5. MATSONIA 


17 DAYS—$285 up 
GRAGE LINE vniseean 
SOUTH AMERICA and NASSAU 


FLORIDA. 


FLORIDA EAST COAST—Glorious sunshine 
Nes eg _ cennrenen .- ., aie eee 


| iy! West" mous hots of the Flaie 


Twenty-Four 
Skaters Leave 


for U. S. Meet 


A trainload of Chicago skaters and 
officials will leave tonight for Petos- 
key; Mich., where the United States 
outdoor speed skating championships 
will be decided Saturday and Sunday. 

Twenty-four skaters are included 
in the party of 150 making the trip. 
Illinois Skating association’s officials 
include Earl W. Solem, president; 
Rudolph Notz, Herbert Knudten, Ed- 
ward Planert, and Julian T. Fitz- 
gerald, judges; Carmen Tortorelli, 
starter; Peter Miller and William 
Beck, coaches, and Harvey Johnson, 
statistician. 


sia 

Illinois leading representatives in 
the men’s class A division are Vic 
Ronchetti, Eddie Schroeder, Bernie 
Cannata, Bob Heckenbach, Tony Neb- 
erz, Bob Sherman, and Ray Doersam. 
A quartet of Chicago women are 
among the favorites to win the title. 
They are Elaine Bogda, Shirley Jame- 
son, Eleanor Theil Dyer, and Gene- 
vieve Swierkos. 

Five other classified skaters will be 
in the party.. Bunny Lawler, whose 
record this season establishes her as 
chief candidate for the junior girls 
championship, rounds out the wom- 
en’s contingent. Intermediate boys 
entered at Petoskey are Lowell Mil- 
ler, Bob Horn, Wally Baron, Marshall 
Klemundt, and Gerald Lehnhardt. 


— 
The midget class will be repre- 
sented by Buddy Solem, Walter Rust, 
and Robert Christenson. Jack Van- 
derpool. and Marvin Thompson are 
the junior boys, while the juvenile 
boys of the nation will find formid- 
able opposition in Chicago’s Eddie 
Planert and Bill Carnduff. 


RESORTS AND TRAVEL. 


Ocean Travel. 


Curope 


VIA THE SUNNY 
SOUTHERN ROUTE 


Cross In Lido sunshine, Lido 
splendor! Choose either of two 
ways—a direct, speedy, “super- 
liner” crossing—or a leisurely voy- 
age including many extra ports 
en route, with time for shore visits. 


Rk 


EXPRESS SAILINGS to Gibraltar, 
Noples, Nice (Villefranche), Genoa. 


Conte di 


SAVOIA 


FES. 5, MAR. 2, APR.2, APR. 30 


FEB. 26, MAR. 26, APR. 16 
2: Ri ® %, 


LEISURELY CROSSINGS to Gibraltar, 
Naples and the Adriatic with vary- 
ing Itineraries Including many extra 
ports. Ask Travel Agent for details, 


SATURNIA 


VULCAN IA 


FEB, 18, MAR. 19, MAY 7 
MAR. 12, APR, 22 
Appl AGENT 
$33 No. ich Avs., Chicago, 
Phone Randolph $257 


ie bo ates a ND 


NOTRE DAME’S 
EX-CAPTAIN TO 
MAKE TRIP WEST 


New Castle, Pa., Feb. 2.—(4)—Alec 
Shellogg, who made good as a foot- 
ball player at Notre Dame, only to 
be suspended a few days after being 
elected to the 1938 captaincy, re- 
turned home today declining to com- 
ment on the situation. 

Shellogg said he had been visiting 
friends in the midwest since he dis- 
appeared from the campus early this 
week, 

“My position does not permit me 
to comment,” Alec said. “It would 
be detrimental to both sides. , Both 
Fred and I plan to go to the west 
coast within the near future and 


aa , 
at ee — . a 
PoP ain SEP Sis PRE a hile EEE: was ion gee Pa ee ee eee eee 


¢ 


Prep Basketball 


GAMES TONIGHT. 
CITY LEAGUE, 
Juniors, 
Tuley at Wells. 
Foreman at Marshall. 
Crane at Washburne. 
Morgan Park at Parker. 
Seniors. 
Medill at Austin, 
Tuley at Welles. 
Foreman at Marshall. 
Crane at Washburne, 
Morgan Park at Parker. 


work until next fall, when we both 
hope to return to school. We worked 
out there last summer.” 

Shelloge referred to: his brother 


and teammate, Fred, who’ preceded 
the ex-captain home by several weeks. 


Martin’s 10 Year Old 
now costs no more than most 
8 Year Old (or younger) Scotches. 
Don’t cheat yourself on age. 


MARTIN'S DELUXE 
LIQUEUR blended 
Scotch Whisky 
15 YEARS OLD 


RIGGS ADV ANCES 
IN MIAMI MEET; 
DEFEATS TURNER 


Miami Beach, Fla., Feb. 2.—(A)— 
Bobby Riggs of Chicago moved 
through the third round of the Surf 
club tennis tournament today with 
an 8-6, 7-5 victory over Carroll 
Turner of Miami. Summaries: 


SECOND ROUND—Dick McKee, Miami 
Beach, defeated Harris Everett, Jacksonville, 
Fla., 7-5, 1-6, 6-0. Frank Kovacs, Oakland, 
Cal., defeated Leonard Clark, New York, 6-0. 
6-4. Campbell Gillespie, Miami, defeated 
Weston Painter, Minneapolis, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. 
Gardnar Mulloy. Miami, defeated Robert 
MeMillan, Neenah, Wis., 6-3, 6-8. 6-0. El- 
wood Cooke, Portland, Ore., defeated George 
Toley, Miami, 6-1, 6-1. 


THIRD ROUND—Charles Harris. West Palm 
Beach, Fla., defeated Dick McKee, Miami 
Beach. 6-2, 6-0. Wilmar Hines. Hollywood, 
Cal.. defeated Lewis Faquin, Miami, 6-2, 6-2. 


"Skies 


Ra RABI HAITI. » 
— pee ic where 
ger PEO. 


a 


ames ( 


7 A aN 5 “| 7 - ee" Ps ee > 
= : he aR Ae pbees 
a : ” = at 7 e* Ae Sans 
a | ~ + > © : a eek eH : 
° ‘ 7 ‘ eis 
. ; a i Ba 
; -~ ~~ _ toy * de" Bs: 
ms hs 
7 Rivas) ig 


Se earths stat ae 
| y 2%s, 1945... .108.11 103.8 + 
BO 46....108 97 105.88 105.23— 


pais ta 


__ 


he 
Orbe i OLOD 


“ng OT , 
§ . E me 4 LaSf, 
i a Ss hn ee oe , 
“ * e > re Yaa _ 5 


| 1088 high... 101.1 
| ae. s oa'-ati fe Wee ite 20 LOW YIELD BONDS. = 
y ea Ra Ve: : _ i og . GE 8.60-] Wednesday wees LOB SG Prev, @ay......-2 5 
MART 1] rie . | 5636-4 » — Standard Oil cottons geod evaccii Gh cone ane ond eile 
ee oo will meet the 124th Artillery 1-5. u id: ? "80 stra 6.00 place rn. be enees eer 

i; an extra aaee ot 1937 high. .....0+! 13,7 937 loW. ...-... 107.0 
trio at the 124th armory Saturday het era I ee? Owner, along with the ob 0 cents a har 1028 high....... los 932 LOW. ++ sees 86.8 bases 221 
night, has scored. victories over Soe Trainer, a: , bursement of 25 cents on M 15. Loan Se, 52°44, .1 Jods 1ar38 8 103.28 

arch DOMESTIC. UNITED Spatus TREASU URY NOTES, 


Princeton university and the Govern-| $700; second, $150; thirc | : ) A year ago the company paid an extra|<... Net [Quo & Co. 
or’s Horse Guard, and has lost only|_. Ho Re Rey at | | | of 5 cents. Extras totaled $1 in 1937, | tous. aw Low, Chess: chge. [Fractional parts of quotations Ph ry oye . 2 Aaa 
POaTERTI at q: with 20 cents paid in June and Sep-; 2 Adam nde 8 as 100% 100% 100%+ 14 |, Series and maturity Bid. As iced Yield. d. Asked. Yield. 


20, 1013 


te SS Aepey «ah whF i¢ > ; 
- « at masts 


4%s ’66A oa 

S wise Ge 38°1 ‘10be 10 ae lg 
5 Wils&Co 4s % eree 
3 do 8%s hy ee one 
10 tWisCen 4s 46°40, 13% 13% 19% +- % 
138 YestS&T 46 61. 98% 98 98 — % 


SSasaar 
cia ane 


7 
CAS 
Mido 
hat 
bet et et 
ot 
ore >. 7 _ _ . 


i 
i 
eae aR 


to the United States military none: | 5d 4% 
ie somber ees o 44s CBs, Mar. 15, '38..,,..101.2 101.4 —61-04 | Baus, June 10. °40.-s--101 
emy. wei wine’ **" sctedybanenee: 37 e , and 55 cents in December | agg 1 any 67% 67% ti B2%s, June 16, '38.....101.18 101.20—19-32 |C 1%s, Dec. 15, '40.....1 Tis Lets ct} 


: do 4% 93% 
pacers Bigelow-Sanford Carpet company 20 dp * ee cS Sich ~ 80% Bou Sou 1% D 2s, Sept, 3, *38,,,.101.28 101.30—27-64 | A1%s, Mar. 15, '41....101.18101.20 | $i Australia bs ‘65. -10 ye Fy 


65-1 
Sefots buing pect last Wadeetey be penne oa Bb’ : 33.55-1 | .6 tdo 31% 30% B lis 8 5° 0 
| omitted its common stock dividend) 12 WRutnens” abs. 103% 108% 10% * ladenes Hee Paget ae — is ime. = 100.80 1ido 4s '56 eer as 101% 101% 


oe i 3 mutuels paid: Roar, $16.60 straight, $6.20 place, $4.50 , 
West Point, 10 to 5, Yale had beaten ‘ ty, $6.00 $4.10 a, We: Be Shadov $6.10: show. wi Winner, b and Compressed Industrial Gases,| 20 Am&ForP 602030 51, 51 51 abe ‘Sune 1 fb eek 00.8 5 Austria 7s 'B7 .105 105 


Ww 
Princeton, 15 to 12, and the Gover- 0. 8. Bromley. ie Inc. reduced its March SP AmIGCh 548'49.104% 104 104K+ Al Die : 
ent to 95 95 + 2% » 39.4.1 . 42......108.10 103.12 1. 4 Belgium 7s '65.115% 116% 115% 
payment to} 1 Am int b4s, "40 956. 95 . Dec. 16, ° 139 62 | 048s, Dee. 1, 49..01080 102.11 % 107% 107%— 


, , TH RACE—One d up. Purse ‘$1, 500. Net one to 
or’s Horse ‘io to 6%. wr ; $1007 fourd J '43 118% 118% 113% 
nor’s Guard, "” 1,100: ae third, $100; fourth, $50. 25 cents, Storkline Furniture corpora-| 8 Am pie 3 "38. ee . on tou o0% 40... 4101.29 101 31 
01 


Yale Arrives Saturday. + : wi PF St Fs %, Str Fin “ Wn tion designated its 12% cent dividend 
A change in plans for their western} L aaa ES | Si, Oh BR, a regular quarterly disbursement, al- 
departure calls for the Yale players : STS saoseenennend D2 ay, 1 a thoubh 25 cents was paid last Novem: 
to leave New Haven, Conn., tomor- 1 P ber. 

gollas mutuels ae Go Home, eT oh grape, .40 im Payments Hinge on Earnings. 


ee ae Se ae 
row afternoon, The team will arrive 1:37 4-5. 

Orien place, 0 ghow; Fraidy C 
over the New York Central Lines at Rhy G cima Se, Inning. Owner, is some farm, by sae. 1g Phill wo ; Compressed Industrial Gases made 
7:35 a. m. Saturday. » Se ear Olds Oe Purse oF value ‘© | four 50 cent payments in 1937, three 

150: third. 100; fourth, “sbi ‘| 

a #700: 200m His ge : of them before a 25 per cent stock 


Yale will put a six goal team on 
‘the field Saturday night. Selected Pins de te dividend in October. H. B. Pearson, 
| president, said he hopes 1938 divid- 


_ for the starting lineup are Alan L. ae eo nenets 
Corey, Jr., three goals; Mott Woolley, MPEYS PILLAR end will total $2 but said quarterly 
payments will depend entirely on 


team captain, two goals, and Ken OvAL ABIL ti eR gr 
earnings. 
Sheaffer Pen company will pay $1 


Schiffer, one goal. oy Oars 
on Feb. 26, the same as last Oct. 15. 


2: ts 


- 1 
Faye 


+4 
es 
F. KKEK RS 


Net 
Hish. Low. Close. chge. High. Low. Close. chge. 
1 Ligg & M 7s '44,129% 129% 129% ..2. 5 Panh ELP 48'52 99% 99% 99% .... 
Glia Carb 4s ‘47,106 105%106 + %| 58 Pa P&L 4%4s '81. 99% 98% 98%— ‘h 
4 Loews 3% '46 98% 29 99 ee 3 Pa = en -1038% iy 103% ... 9 Breda,Ern 7s * 
1 Lorilld Co 7% °44.1298 128 128 + 1 "63 s.2+55. 95% 95 95% 1 Buen A 36 '84.. 
26 do 4%s4%s °77. 
: 9 10do 4%s4%s °75. 
a = “tis “8. ‘loan ie 102% "sont Pe, 2 TBulgaria 7s ‘67 
0 s de ’ 
LANSIIM ae 169 90 4 i Hae : 98% 97% 34 Cauada 4s 60 ..110 109% 108%+ 2 
SLG&E 3%s '66..102% 103% 102%— % eee om o7k+ A 
1¢Man R 4s '00, 28 : = : 
athe & Sai te Bs Sith ij eB Bee 
ar IB 89% 8D 8914+ 3% qT 
G MeO St 5s '51.100% 100% 100%+ % | 48 0"augs vad 00 a abe his 1% 
eet B dies Cs. 108% 108 a ee “| 80 Phila Co be 67, 00% 80% 89%~" “i 
% 


1 {Mil SQNW. de'4 Me ve. 
4MSPASEMO%e78 64° G4 G $2 Phil Blec 8%s'67.106% wth me 


: 
’ 


sf | 
> eat atatatattatatee 


oe 


a Fe ek ff af ft pa et 
a ry a re 
OCW] 209 > 
fh kk kp pt pt pp 
wrx 
Go Oc 
- & 


TILER oo.s0ss: nove Roberts 

Artillery Rates Ten Goals. aepey tee ‘Kurtsinger 
& . bination, pee hota rae 1°38 4-8, wes 4-5. Two Gone m spud: First Bling 2. 10 pionisht. $4.30 place, | An extra of 25 cents, as well as a $1 

Field Artillery will pit a team rated $4.50 ae. 8 eS cichore apts show; Blind $7.60 show. Winner, : 

at ten goals in indoor play, with| dk. b. or br. ¢. 6. by kai-Sang'io. Owier, ‘G. La *Seainer, J. H. Johnson: a ca February. The oe ea.” ane 
SIXTH RACE—One mil olds and _ up. Pan $1,200, Net value.to win- to was ae, BellTPa 5 ‘ane atet stat 119%+ 1 
— gontby y ncdligsg Aga oe yee ner, $850: second, $200; third, a, S06: fourth a Edward J. Cornish, chairman of the| 17 Beth, st 4448'00 102% 102% 1024— 
+ e sere 

goals Ho 1 3 a ¢ 2 jh FA. is-1 | National Lead company, told stock-| 3640 34s ‘2. 86% 86% se 


Lieut. Don Rice at three apiece. Yale ' . 4 P Rober _| Bldo 3 al 
accordingly will be awarded four SUN POWER ek aleve ‘| ’ holders that the company has main-| 47 Boston&Me 68°67 48 42 43 


5 
4 7 7 3 8.Youn 3 . ’ 4 
1 2do 4%s JJ '61.. 
points by handicap. Bogen : 1 844 Kurta tained its dividend rate continuously ° s 
. 4 


> ° 
pre ohte te Pe: 


16 A do 6s 
{$F ntity Ry 4s'37 23 14 ¢Col 6s ’61 Jan. 
CO&StL, bt ie'00. 1% ets a “Al 17 tdo 6s °61 Oct.. 13% 13% 13% — 

6+Mo Pac Bike 49 sj | 12 Purity Bak Gs'48 85 84% 86 +1 | OT oe os '42,105% 105% 105 
5A 23 Reading 4%48’97A 84% 84 3 , 55 04 103% 103 io 
19 RemRand4%s °56 91 90% 90%—- % 101% 101% 101%+ 3 

6 Rep Stl 644s '54.106 104% 104%— 1% eek 65. 65 
oosee 80% 79% 80 + % 


98 38 38 

10 BklyEdis 3%8'66.103% 103% 103%-+ 
34 y'Stout 10. for many years—12% cents quarterly| 15 siiymanT 44066 62 52 + 
i V.Thompson _4.95-1 | since a 10 for 1 split in 1936—and if| 14 BelyUnE 1st6s'50 77 76% 7e%e 
Lake Forest Academy Five| 5 $-6. ‘Two dollar, mutuels Daid: Sabert L.. $16.30 span! $7. 57 etanes directors should change it they would | 26 BkixUGas be ‘46. 780 ‘so ‘on 


Time, 
$5.00 chow: lex ne pis ace, $6.80 show; Sun Power, er | «ys l i hat is held d 81 
ford ¢ Tr violate everything that is he ear! 12do 5s 2 81% 51% gata 1% 
anbedy er Owner, Woolford farm. ainer, B Stdo gen 4s "76.. 1 RevC&B 4%s '66.100 100 100 1 Finland 68 ’45.. 


Defeats Morgan Park, 37-27 | x Hy RR 106% Bs 
* veaere RACE—Mile wry one-é hth. Four year olds and up. Sead SF 000. Net | to the president and the board. Tam); 3 Brown 48 + Pe ‘ka ony on 9 7 

third, $1 fourth, $50. 15 ButR&P 4%857.. 33 $8 +1 2tMob&O 4%s '77 12% 13 + 3 4 RochG&E5s 62E.110 110 110 + 5 +Frankf 6%s 63 20% 20% 20%+4 1° 

Lake Forest academy yesterday de- value to winner, $700: second, $1560; $ our $ sure nothing but the direst necessity 1B Te Bs’ 55 38% aaa 38% \, 12M WPPSaity 60. 102% 101% 101%— 2 SafewStrs 48 °47. 102% 102% 102% ee 1 French 7%s °41. 105% 109% et » Pes 
an Saree 4 | RE: 


feated the Morgan Park Military would cause them to reduce the! 4 canwatRy ‘50°70.118% 118% 118%4+ % ; 9114+ 38 P 44a 66.10 101 101 ldo 7s 
academy basketball team, 37 to 27, to earls chee ben baa cea. 2do 7s '49 unst.. 


.118%118%1138%— % '41.100% 100% 1004%+ 9 t§SLIMS 4sRG'33 59% 59% + ; 
take the lead in the Midwest Prep 5¢GerCAgB 7s °50 


dividend rate.” 1 
».118% 118% 1138%+ % s 565A 73 #73 $73 — %| -1+StLP&NW5s '48 16%4— : 

” ; 4 ¢ nsider Extra Distribution. 4 3 Mor&Ess 3%s2 ; oe 1?GerCAL 6%s’58 
conference with four victories and no | 484s 36% : 102 § , Williams os 1 Can Nor 6%s'46.124%4 124% 1244+ % ee ee ee eS . Oe te 192 1%) 34 ¢GerGvt 5%s "65 | 
defeats, Tony Graham and Capt./| LITTLE BANNER 7 7 ya eel bop ace 

’ WAR 5 6 A.Smith 


5 Can Pac 6s'44..,118% 118%1138%+ %] 61 Nat D 3%s '‘5lww 99% 99% 99%-—- % + tdo 5s B '50 ct. 
Fred Railsback, Lake Forest forwards, 
25 CaroC&O 6s ‘52. 101% 100% 101%— 1%| 16 NJ P&L, 4%s'60.107% 107% 107%— 4tdo 4s '50 A ct. 1 Helsingf 6%s ’60. pe 108% 108% 
$5. 0 show; jive Spirit, 8 13 
1 StPUnDep 5s '72.116% 116% 1164 144 


ti 
PO 
’ ; ’ s ' ’ ’ ’ 
Pad fff hf a pt pt tc 
a e 
Satta ata ees: 


B | Secsenessoes 


Sl Se aE eon 
mismiotiparHone 


Directors of Remington-Rand, Inc., 

: 7do 5s *64........101% 101% 101% ....| 12 Nat DP 4%. '45.108% 108% 1031 tdo 4%s °78.. 
LA at their meeting Feb. 18 will consider] ido 4%» '46......100% 100% 100% ...| 3 Nath Steel 49 '65,108% 108% 108544. 44 B }do4%4e°78 cif st % 9%— %| 9 GiCHIPJap 7s’ 

led the scoring, Graham making six 2 10 an extra dividend payable in pre-| 10do 4s perp. , 88% 88% 88%— %| 4N ET&T4%48'61B.121% 121% 1214+ 1 9 tdo 4s ’50 A.... ‘ 1 Haiti 66 

in the treasury in 

baskets and one free throw and Rails- eT 6 ae & ferred stock now 1 Celotex 4%s'47ww 73 73 78 = «.«...| &SNOPUbS Bs 52 A 91% 91 6 + §StLSW 5s ’52. 

back five baskets and three free 3-5.. Two dollar — Bao Play Chance, $11.10 $4.00 ah $6.60 pl order to cut down or avoid payment 5 CenIlB&G 58'51. 98 97% 97%— % 1 TfNOTX&M 5%s'54 ” 3 ss =T 1 fdo 2d 48 ’89... 28 Eee Pi Ng 

$8.10 ae 40 “bow: Flying Bigose. $4.60 6 ae Inner of the tax on undistributed profits.| 22 CenNYPw 3%s'62.102% weg oie 56 NYC rfg¢ 6s 2013 5 ¢StPKCSL4%—s °41 


‘ 
~ 


: nae 
Soe: SAKES 


throws. ance Play-Lise Maloney. ner, A, 49 Cen Pac 58’60... 65 
aoe nates ile and per ph. y oh: year olds and up. Purse $1,000. Net | The company has paid 85 cents cash 36 do i'st 48°49... Ki 1 SA&APass 48 '43 72 72 72 + 1% 
value to winner, $700: second, $1 third, $100: fourth, $50. since its fiscal year began last April 1 CenRRNJ 58’87.. 32 é , ‘bis 5 SDegoG&E 45 '65.108%4 108%4 108%— 


Horse-— + 4 Sir Fin | Jocky 1. Earnings were equal to $2.02 aj 9Certain-td 5%s'48 60 4s 62 7 35 +SeabAL cn6s 45. 9 3 +MedelM ’ 644s" a 
‘ WINGED ED VICTORY .......... a. 3 in J-Anderson 
: JOHN 11 7 ] '.P.Martin 
TOUCHE : 3 
13 
1 9: 7 


& 
2 
2. 
[o%) 
) 


POWDSS 
DAT 
PFRSOSAO 


2D hte 
+ 
a pak ek pt fd pt pe 


Ca 


5 C&Ohio cn 58'89.105% 105% 105% .... 6 tdo 6s '45 ct..... 8% 19 MilanCy 6%s ’ 65% 65% 
share in the nine months ended te 1do 3%s '96D..... 938% 93% 42 89: .sce| 11 48-APlaGe "BBA ct 4% 4% 9 Norway 4%’ 6B. "103% 103% 1U3%— 
31, and business has been reporte 3do rig 3%s'96E.. 94% 94 el 89 ..,.| 9ShellUn 3% '51. 98% 9do 4s '63....... 102% 102% 102%— 
holding up well so far this quarter. 2 Chi&Alton 8s'49. 238% 28% 23% .. 37 Simmons 4s '52. 83% 8: 3 OrientDevy 5%’ 68 51% 51 51 — 1 
; $2 CB&Q rig 58°71A.102% 102 102 —1 . 2 8 SocVOil 3%s °50.106% 106% 106%— 5 OsloCity 4%8'65.102% 102% 102% 
Dividends declared yesterday, t0-| 6 Go 4% '77...... 98% 98% 98% .... s ia 4 ‘::| 2 SBellP&T3%9 °62.102% 102% 102% ....| 1 OsloG&EW_ yp be: eagle 9 elgtt tk 
is — Purse « gether with rate, period, and pay-| 40do gen 4s ‘58..,.104%103%104 + reese 48 2) 3 SCalGas 4448 '61.107% 107% 107% .... {100.7 denotes 
year olds BAD or — Williams ment and record My follow: 16 do 3% Ill '49...102% 102 102 — 5 NY¥Conn she 53.105 1056 105 + 1 SColPow 68 '47. 93%, 93% % 20 Panama 65%48'63.103% 103% 106% | 
Horse. PP, Jock ‘ 2 tChi&Elll Gs "61. 1534 15% 3 NYEdis 3% '65.103% 103% 103%+ 5 SouKraft 4%s '46 90% 90% ....| 2 tdo 5s’63A st asd 36% 36 36 
> Pame@lob ........ 6 ) C. Rollins Aluminum Ltd pfd, $1.50 @. Mar. ' 95 ¢ChiGtWest 4s’'59 19% + ewan a a es yin eth soem %| 183 Pac 4%s '68., 56% | et nd ry x" a 
Chanceful ....... - s ee : 6 6 6 S A V4 i *>| 26do 4%s °81...... 3 ¢do 2d 6s — 9% 
ld ee F. Kelly 
P. Roberts 
K. McCombs 
V.Th’pson 30- 


7 84 11 ).Are ; 
22 32 2 ee “Schmid! 53. 
1:53. Two dollar mutuels paid: Winged Victory, $28.20 straight, $12.60 Alum Goods Mfg, gs qd. : . 3 7Chi I & L 6s’66 3 
Atl fd, 75e ' 1 tNYNH&H 45 '56 19% 19% 19% | 85 
w. Wi as Corp p 32 *tCMSP&Pac 58'75 11% = 5 do | ieninna te 66.. 60% 
63 

H. Dabson 20- 
L. Turner 10- 


~ 
we 
SCCOPheHHorm 
: 


FOsSss 


Or Sis CoP DOr 


: 
o 


ie 


~ | BObomM-~IO 29 


28 


PBROHS 
Sant Lad ae 


aahaks aR; akabakaaakS Sat: 


po at ak et et 


4, by Victoria 
Bristol-Myers, 60c 35 do B +Prussia 6s '52 2U% 
15- FAIR GROUNDS. 
Govisco Homestake Mng, 37%c m..Feb. 
2 t+NYW&Bos 4%4'46 5 “se 4 +Spok Int 5s "65 12% 12% 12%— 1% 


15.8 ] 10 show: Touche, $4.2( nner, ; eee 
7.50 show: Fictorie cm tete. Owner, C. W. Pershall. Trainer, ed Soci, Start’ good. | Bigelow-Sanford pf, 31. 50 aMar, 39 tdo aj 58 2000.. 4% = 160 cy Ge 48 ... 2° seus "Ys 120 do ¥.. “ t 4fdo 6s 40 
Buff N & E Pw ip.8i.86 q.May | 89... 3 2 82 + 1% ] 16%— 2%) 184 77. 6 7 +2 
il D bl « ‘ gr RACE—Purse $800. allow PI ag 40¢ ta. wi sess ie 9 : 8 tdo gen te Lee 83 #NYOLW . ‘a6 M ¥ 1 54 do ; ° 4 Queensid 7s'41l. teens rt 100% + 
IR. A Purse allowances, 4 cago TD D e @....Mar .2 1 tdo 3%s : 2 . r 8 46 Sou Ry 6%s ‘66. 54% 5 i) ° 
Daily Double year olds and up, 6 furlon 01 | Comtinental Casualty, 30¢ a. Mar. 3 teChiaw 01036 LNY&RGas Os'51A 83% 83% | 20 do gen 6s '56... 51% 49% S eas leuees ce ie s% Fs 
I. Anderson 20- Cristate 2205206 fiav’''108| Smero Derrick, Bbe a....... Feb. ioe sae Bei 4 7 {NYS&WTmbs'43 42° 41, 42 + ix| 1440 cm 58 '94..... 68% 67% 674+ %| 2 tRiog do S 8546 11 
ture ... --106| Fed L & T pid, $1.50 a... Mar. bh tat or hee ae 14 NYTel 4% 39 ..106% 106% 106%... sShiddinde Dissta sie’ . | fie 8 Bae “8 
SECOND BACE—Purse, St. 000, maidens, Irene’s Bob and Sun Henry....-- eenere $19.40 +Mrs. Haughton-J. R. Bower entry. Metal Textile pfa 81 Ke rs Mar . aS tdo 4%s bale ‘ 12 do 3%s 67 o* 105% +0R% et 2 SWGas&b 4s 60. 101 101 101 oeeeeee gi, Ea 
year olds, 7 furlongs: SECOND RACE—Purse $700. allowances. 3 / “Mar. 1 tdo 448 2037C.. 5S 
Blue Ice ...-es00 2 HIALEAH PARK, year old maidens and winners of one race. oberg Hgg iye aagy - “aa 9 tdo 48 '87....... po sondinat poo ttn 108% 1054+ ; 1 StaleyMfgds °46.104% 104% 106%+ % "7 SaoPaust 5. 10% 
U Gin Fritters and Ravenna 70] 1 mile and 70 yarde: aul ae a 2. een Soe 6 tdo 4s '87 at.... | 1 $#Norts 5s'61 ct 10% 10% 24 StdOUNJ 8861, .100% 100% 100%+ % 
urple Wrack ...114/Mr. Mickey .....110] Soci m g A Shits, 74ihe.Feb, 17 Feb.10| 21 fdo 8% '87 ... 2 3NAmCo 6s ‘61 ..101 101 101 + 1 sStudeb Os 46 cv 65% O54 Get 4 
Goldkin ...... ia seeseees ddA Spear ir ‘os Sik chav eb 4 : Skee i ‘68. 108% 103% 103% 1% 1 Swift&Co 3%s’50.105% 105%105% .. 
SANTA ANITA yg ee Kai ti511105|Prince Arco. 4 24 pfd, $1.87%.......Mar. 1 aM. 4 -s*| Ado Be BT A .....101 . oan tee, eg i FP 104% Losi 1% 7 ¢tSerbsCtS 88’62. 
FIRST RACE—Purse $ elaimin tMae RIQTHOR pcccccccvcseed Stand Oil Calif, 25¢ Q.++++ Mar, 15 28+do rfe4s’ 34° ct 7% 7% 1do 5s ’69 C ..... 95% oes 1 TexarkFS 5468’ 50 79 79 2  Sbilenair 79°58. 


it) 


Blazing Memory.. 1 
orte .. ld aidens, 3 furlongs on str t- Seorsta ? poreie .114 : “es 4 7%+ 
J: tD. J. Sullivan ‘iil. entry. encieas fee abes Gee Be | 1 ChUnSta, 4s "63D.108% 108% 108% + 57 NPac 6s 2047 ... 82% 23 TexCorp 3%6°61.108 104% 104%— %| SmaiwkIP 5%0'71, 
-119, Lady Mava 115 "er aaa! © dees. 106% 10 9 do 4%s 2047 .... 68 8 sec] oan 5877 8 78% 78% 78% aiwEIP 5%s 
a age: me gl G7 |: 9 Sg ote Silat: THIRD RACE—Purse $700, claiming, 4] Walk H G&W, $1 Mar. 15 ; - 107 % 106%— oe, 88% 87 16 a0 Rete 75 *_"" 1, | 10 TokyoC 5%s ‘61. 
High Grenade bases, 6 Be “So Setta .....119| Year, olds and up, 6 furlongs: Do pid, 25¢ .......s.+000.Mar, 15 : .. 102% 102% — 1do 5s’80D 9% 79% T9%4 2 2 do Be BY 
enecs «- ; Chiruption tt t715 | Mindalo. ..........108) * Luck: : 7Ch&W Ind 48°52. 89 88 88 ‘ % I 1, > Seniota cence 18% 70% 7 lagi . 8 TokyoEL 6s'53.. 54% 54 64% 
clean anata reaasee edb Vedette Post coed 8 Merges... iis p B, ese eee Dividend omitted: Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 3 CinnGé&E aiee"71 103% 103% 10 ae 27 Ohio Ba, 4s 5... 100 0% 223 TidWat 3% 82, 101 100 100% 5 Trondhj 5448'57. ,104 108% 108% 
: eS Sea Shell... -.. .115! Valeo! 15! Shady Girt...” eS Beteydatee The letter “q” in the table ref BIC + 202 AUT ACT 107% 32 Olle G&E Bi0'66 99% 9 f Ree can 40nes Snake 4 3 tUrusuay 80 46. 40% 40% 
vecdman +--+... 8 117 W.D.Wrt 5-2) seconp RACE—Purse $1,200, 3 year pi War Sai 113 Ladder” a 7 oe oe woe ps 2do 4s '46 100 100 %| §tricontin 6s'b3-106% 103% 103% ar | 49 
Low rotate € 3 ib bor #1 (6 furlongs: 10310 aii ial 117 | Eepid Balls :113/T MDOV oveeeve eed dB aetna oa quarterly dividends; “m’ 5 ClUn Ter Bie'7S. Bot as% s9% 3 Ore RR&N 48°46. 107% 107% 107%4+ 15 Un El Mo 38%’ 62. 105% 105% 105%+ i 
eeveoee ee - e rT eeee . eeeebe r * eee — 
106 K. McCombs 20-1 114|Corsican Blade’ ’..1U8| Wee Luckie 113|*Sun Imege,;..:-103 | "eters to regular monthly payments.| ¢ 4, 55°73 ....... 83 $3 + | 9h OR ee oe tae” tae ae Dds tee he BOG t0ee 10am ibs% 


1156 A.Schmidl 12-1 S222051117]|Counsellor Fal ...114| wourTH RACE—P : os 7do 4s '77C . 78 + ol Uy 
can it vende et T urse $800. allowances, Le rel A bagi 103% 101% 101% S | (2 Otis Stl 4%0 62. 72% 72% 72%+ 3%s'70 3 92% 93 + 13 tWestpUEP 63°53 22 


Pe 9 
,...109' Enchanted 171 3 year olds. 5% syiongs: 32 Pac G&E 3%s’66.101% 100% 101%+- 2 15 Yokohama 6s '61 57 


106 P. Roberts 20-1 _ G. 8. Howard sity. Sunny M 1iijArch  Fiend.. 2 $de 5870 65 * 19 do B%s "81 ......106 104% 106, + ah 
108% 108%+ 50 3=-B0 xin—Ex interest. ct—Certificates. fSelling 


09 ’ . 
Town Car ...... 3 113 J. Mattioli 10-1 THIRD RACE—Purse $1,200, 3 year olds ,easeee. 104| {Radio Charm .,.1 10 Solmba@ 5s’52May. 92% 92 92 64 108 
Findon ......+e«. 4 103 H. Keppler and up. 6 furlongs: 109) Dolly Val 106 ldo 6s ‘61 87 87 87 — 1% 5@ aS ’ os 4 Ths ’ a 
Sharp 100 Bonamye ...-+006 +++-104/ Bob C, SPE Pe | nves ors ul e 6 ComiCred 3%s'51. oo ‘an 97 — % af rec: SE 7g tag ot be gt #1 ie lVertientae | 48 “Om | 69 2 'Y re ns other than default, 
554.108 108 108 negOtiability impaired pe 


1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
“1 
1 
1 
1 


ata) wtae atatan “ak acatagatar ae 


at TAT» op 
ke 


= 


8-1 
Broad Vision ....10 106 V.Th'pson 6-1 Miss 
Weary Flower .. 6 113 E. Arcaro 8-1 Enoch Borland . af Lyn Billy . and 104|Barbara §. Office. 8do 2%s '42 ....100% 100%100% .... A ™% 72 1 7 
ey 117 fa Spice Box .......104 {Regiotere’ U. 8. Patem } $ Com] ints ya6L. 108% ae 103%— 5 do 344s '47 72% 72% 2% 19 VaE&Py 4.108 108 
4 


All ...ce--11 106 F. Schieh 3 Mickey O'Boyle lan ild 1 M + i 5 ROTATOR AO SI CR NS NN SRN IE ON IF 
g, 4| roam tt O01 eB. iMary Senate ...106) & 1 Cmwith Ed 6s'54.112% 112% 112%+ 


FOURTH RACE—Purse $1,000, claimin 
’ Sky Reform .....113/Ser . 10 Harnandez entry. 
year olds and up, ¢ furlongs: Pala Chiet 107/|Ribald toe Side Pos $700. aatmine “S Thursday, February 3, 1938. ido 4% ’56 ....112 112 112 .. 
Tie meee... R. Eccard FOURTH RACE—Purse $1,200, claiming, 4 ig and up. 1 mile and 70 yards: 4 (Copyright: 1938: By The Chicago Tribune.) | _1 40 448 ’57 ... art tn apie *, 


escseese % 115 S. Young ‘ 1 oeeeeh02)*Ch 
"10 *Sky Lad 3 Wayne Pump. ‘65 ...104%104 104 — 


, : oak a Sclveh *Calaveras 23 Oo Bai ¥, 5 5% 
Daly | Oo boy -1 | Vicar Investors’ e: 1 m Edis 3%s'46.1056% 105 105%+ 
109 Guide: Please send men) “(oo sus "56... 108 108% 102%. 


Brendar 
evoooe @ 118 KE. Arearo Kandahar eee 
om *R x. 104 botin ........+114|*Dutch Unele |...111| report on Wayne Pump.—J. B. 4ConGNY 4%4s’51 106% 106% 106%+ 


108 C. Bierman ock 
111 1. Anderson FIFTH RACE—Purse $1,200, claiming, 3  gitetet sitar ee +208 Answer: The Wayne Pump com-} 18 Com Oil 3% '51. 97% 97% 97%— 
ee? ss ae iirai’’:''109|*Gallant Pat’ »...:421| Dany is one of the leading manufac-| 1 ConsumP Fagg Ek FRR a 
Colonel Bad ...... 8 i111 L. Haas fannhauser ..... 113) Orderly ebosesnce A *Good Memory .111|*Story Time |” 158 4 : 29do Sis '65 . 103% 108% 103%4+- 
JIVE BACR—Puree $1,100, allowance, 3 | Jeconut »..-+-++-.109! NaKBSUn -+-r++++-J0¢| SIXTH RACE—Purse $800, claiming, 4| UretS Of Pumps used by gasoline fill-| 2da a%e '66 a 101 
"Sisichbook ee 4 112 G.Seabo Who's There..... .104, Peneee Serres vo 4 Mogg uD. 4 Sale and 70 yards: _ ing stations, garages, airports, and a3 tee Rh ob +02 be ee pig 
et Te - 4 Z ; ee oseeeeee , fiat Pe 
Birthday .....+-. 8 120 E. Arcaro Silver Narch ©... 107 *Paper Bud ’',.:..1U4| *Veeke “pol -f07 other enterprises dispensing petro-| 9 CubaNRy 5%4s'42. 40 39 40 + 
The Whale ......1 112 F., Schieh SIXTH BACE—Purse $ ,500, Sliiae 4 *Baby Sweep .... leum products. Between 30 and 40 11 CubaRR 7%e °46. 55% 5414 5544-+- 
ereecene . Sc Come to Taw.. <1 as Jed | SEVENTH CE—Purse a0". claiming, : 3 e rig 4s'4: 
ET ; ingspread wa A WD bssee year olds and up, 11-16 miles manufactured in the United States} 1DG & E 5s '51.107% 1074 107%4— 
13 


i edcsssncdog # i No_ Dic 113 feet te Highland Lane ..112)*A . Se 7 &RG 4s '36. 13 
Plying Lee ..... 2 112 C.K’tsinger 6-1 {Blue Moon stable-G. Feevene entry. *Raymeta esses, 108 t ‘ 71m said to be produced by this com- 1 {DRGW5« Be Asd. = te 6 
"SIXTH BA CE—Purse $1,200, allowance, 4 |, SEVENTH RACE—Purse $1,200, claiming, | $00m's Pal ... te ; sated Self-measuring gasoline pumps| 56 do 5s '78 8% 8% 
year olds ‘and up, 6 furlo 4 years olds and Up, 1 mile: Our Silesia’... einen, 7*°°°"°"* account for about 80 per cent of the| 22 Det Hd 4%: "61,113% 112% 113%+4 1% 
, Home ....5 i . K’tsinger 6-1 | “Tlleanna ase ohhh an 4 04 Sharp Girl .......109 Fhe regia **to8 lt i 2do 4s '65 .. 109% 109% 2008+ ws 
| Siolosist .... 2 ’ Happy Dinah ‘.....109|Dunlin Lady"... 08 Be CO ..+es+.-102/Tornadic .. 5 company’s sales. 3 do Bigs at as dt Dr aaa 
Stubbs .......... 9 Win eek £1106 Bunny Martin ..1 eee racy es Other products include accessories} 2Dow Chem 381.104 104 104 nave 
Kingsbury ...... ; ssee 106) *Parg -110 : 15 Do I, 3448'65.107 106%107  .... 
Lady Higloss.....,8 108 C. BIGHTH RACE—Fures Gi. malls: claiming, 4 for pumping devices, other gasoline} 8 Pittantel: 49°52.100% 100% 100%—" i 
DM cckcossae 7 E. D'C'm'lis 10-1 Ben Xe and up. 4 P—— 4 year olds pnd up. 1-16 miles: |and oil dispensing equipment, air} 3 ripasoNG 414851. 108% 108% saat 
ME Anicactscnne. 8 B. Eccard 30-1 / Heart pons age more Boy reeedt iid Ow, 6[Hi Vie Hrror ... -406 compressors, automobile hoists, auto-| 25 Hrie rfg 6s sad 
eee neoeeee e+ S S. Williams 10-1/| High Martin .... Night a wei": piry ’'....2021:111| mobile washers, automatic tire in-| 224° rs 5s '76.. ~— 
bo I. Anderson 6-1 ravine Danger, 111 ae Politian ...117 Ce make” Ton } . 5 _ * 
$1,000, claiming, | Bmir_......-...+:A11|$Brla ......... :25108 val Tee a Petring. .::.103 flators, gear flushers, and other auto- 2 Wood-Stock is a top-flight bourbon 
pita ge eters Wace telenteses—Peres #i.000, | <h a: a ne 0 PERRET beanie oy + 2 ar gmt : ig 
eeee wee ou eeene eis ° ° ° = 
eee Y ¥. Schich claiming, 4 year olc pup: 1% miles s Pal eet One of the important pumps devel- ji + 4 that rates mighty high in the opinion 


eseeeeeve ¥ Ez. Arcaro 15-1 ** . 106 ee ° 1 Society pemory 18 ; a eset ee oped by the company is a gasoline - ; A , 
eee e wae & | NINTH e ’ 2 1 - : « 
Mies Capers .... 9 J.Rosen 4-1 i 107|Poroban ? 5 ae gt és [eubetltute) — ae ss, f700. meter pump which computes and re-| 5 Zaithks Monds'o6 8 orig of men who really know good whis- 


ssectaccoodd E.Porter 6-1 . 0 120) Sweet Mystery ..106 | Natamemor 116 ¢) 2Oreole Beauty 103 ‘a fe AE 
- O. vere eeeees .* cords total gallonage and tot Fla BE Ost6s'74ct 3 : eee ay ° ° 
er Friend ‘:103 ee + ' dive R: + So fe key. But, high as it is in quality, it 


Pas 


Set attatet: 


Uerque ....12 6 K. McCombs 10-1 i 111| *Nappus ..........108 *Attauauechee ,,,10 
fudge auc. oe 3 H. Keppler 6-1} *Almac 408 Advancing pivvaued om eoen eek te of each purchase and keeps a cumu- Hadi 4 say ong 


eeenveeee 1 s . A nti 'b6 4 42 2 4 noe = 
Blue King ...... 3 : pene nen oe “Captain ditita’ * weg I18| lative record of total sales in anton 8 Gen Am invOe'b2.102 03 = ‘“ Shaft 3 is by no means high in price 
This ee ° 


Black Peter...... 5 ; SANTA ANITA RESULTS. Pm Boy , ee aauac »eseoeesetis; age and in dollars and cents. 
A si eee , . 
FIRST RACE—Purse e $1. _ claiming, mai-| «Wax ia ae othe ‘i11|pump was put on the market in 1933. do Bue 61. nbs 108% 102% 1054 


den 2 tae hee 
en year olds, Robe ser so Ni ak hah ao 80 isk ......108| The principal plant of the company} 5 GenStiCast 5%s'49 60 48% 48%+- 


16 Goodrich 4148'56 96% 96 96 — 


lis, 119 : 
122th [N ‘nj... 11.80) 6. nee cls is at Fort Wa T ° . . } 
gpich'n yne, Ind. A leased plant 93 a W ood- oc mbed ht up into th 
Tea, on_Bunker, a FAIR GROUNDS RESULTS. also is operated at Los Angeles, Cal., 17 Gaye “ren 5e'67.104 104" 104 104% Stock has cli rig Pp € 


Maysette, Red Cab, and) FIRST RACE — Purse $800, claiming, 4/and warehouses are maintained in| 1 Gt Nor 5s '73... 92 LU 
lds and u fur $ in 66 99 
cisiming, | Chancing, ‘Los "Tbriscoll igee20 8.00 8.e0|many American cities. Assembly| j3a9 ist ie B+. 83 89. 183, + i 4" |e stratosphere’’ of popular favor. Every day 


ongs: ing 7 , : 
t’'n}.9.60 5.00 3.8 a: plants and warehouses are maintained| 67do 4s '46 Gs 0» 97% 96% 96%— % LS : ‘ 
cer. 9.00 ib. i a 130 in Canada, England, and Brazil. Seer ey ass SS OTH BS ! {B more and more men show good judgment 
Berth ses a enitlo 80 eulator, Pharatime, aod Sir i In 1936 the company retired its en-| 3 Guitsivul ‘ea 100% 100% sont. . 
i] ’ ‘| —_ . 
Victorian SOOED EACH. tire issue of 5 per cent convertible ne 02% 108 + & Vr 74 by asking for Wood-Stock by name at the 


tar, 
er? rete, Lolschen, and Brilliant Light] Trene's Bob, 1 a7 to ikf0 2 28 sobiamargs issued in connection with : 
o ’ 2 ' a ; 


RACE—Purse $1,200, maiden 8] Brain Tous, #40 
ace fan's) 4.40 3.00 ig ftime. cn oA 144 2-5." ee i late in 1934, The retirement left the 
Rober oni sebiue, Tee ieh eke, Prince and Transen ran. | company a funded debt. Plans| “97 | 07% 108 [Ea 
Ss, Apollo, aan Phen bo RACE -- Pure $700, claiming, 3 coin tat at least temporarily, on 4 ey oceedlOU ait Hi] 
, |late in 1937, to replace working cap > 4% * | cna , | ss 
rare $200, mln fe a Oe Pog 18 [int pa out in civicencs by ncreas| $8 Wa '66...... 39 2% Hinod-S10 Smooth, mellow as the moonlight, Wood 
: hy authorized capitalization and ! iret 7 
ne seiocised capitalization wad 3 Stock Whiskey i is as fine a bourbon as ever | 
9 ity G0 "00. 40% 4 Nd UE came up from Old Kentucky. ..as pe and ee 
: és 2s Pasi Sgt ing mb girdeny -| delicious a bourbon as choice sun-tipened 
Bourbon grain and master distillers.can prodt 


- Se: 


= 
. 


H B - Purse, $700, The company earned $1,637,073, or 
Kayel, i iat cae ne a8 3.20 | $5.65 2 age eee in the ye 


Wakita, 11: i142 ‘olsen, eee 
Scr, ah ant 
RA 


_ ee np 
aSenaranh Sines 


4%s8 "ER: coin ce 


one ey 
oe Bron | 


Deo 20 M+ ote coro be co A 29h 


Blames Small Group 
Within Industry. 


The utility industry as a potential 
major force working for the recovery 
of the nation is stymied by a small 
‘group within the industry intent on 
preserving intangible interests re- 
gardless of the cost, William O. Doug- 
las, chairman of the Securities and 
Exchange commission, said yesterday 
at a luncheon meeting of the Com- 
monwealth club in the University 
club. 

Douglas explained that heads of 
utilities have asserted that the indus- 
try should spend millions of dollars 
,on improvements, but has held back 
for a number of reasons, including 
fear of what the government may do 
to them. 

Says Leadership Slumbers. 


“T do not want to chide or criti- 
cize,” Douglas said, “but there are 
grave disappointments. There are 
also tragic episodes. While the na- 
tion awaits restoration of its capital 
markets, financial leadership slum- 
bers. An industry which, its leaders 
tell me, could use millions of dollars 
in capital for the next few years, 
does not quicken to the possibilities 
which have been and are in store 
for it. 

“An industry which has the oppor- 
tunity to make a major contribution 
toward recovery is stymied by a 
small group who stand squarely in 
its path intent on preserving its own 
intangible interests regardless of the 
costs. In Washington we can supply, 
I believe, the action which is needed 
from government. We have long 
been prepared. But this is a co- 
operative undertaking.” 

Warns on Law Violation. 


Declaring that those companies 
whose methods and operations are 
above board have nothing to fear, 
Douglas warned those who attempt 
to operate outside the law will find 
the government a stern taskmaster. 
On the whole he described the fed- 
eral government as having a concilia- 
tory attitude on utility affairs. He 
said that the problems of the utility 
industry are not too difficult for the 
ingenuity of American business and 
finance. 

“These are not problems involving 
the transformation of our capitalistic 
system into a socialistic state, with 
government serving in the réle which, 
traditionally, private initiative and 
enterprise have played,” he said. 
“Only carriers of false hopes can find 
_guch philosophy in Washington. These 
are not problems which pertain to 
abolition of the profit motive. Wash- 
ington knows that the profit motive, 
as the thing which makes our system 
tick, must be zealously guarded. In 
other words, there is realism in the 
Washington workshop.” 

Tells SEC Policy. 


Douglas said the SEC is adminis- 
tering the utilities act for the benefit 
of about a third the utilities industry 
and that it is not attempting to en- 
force compliance on the balance of 
the industry pending decision as to 
the constitutionality of the act. He 
declared that congress in passing the 
act desired to preserve the real values 
in the utility systems as part of the 
capitalistic system for the common 
good of investors, consumers, and 
management, and not to destroy 
them. 

“Preservation means harmonious 
relationship between finance and busi- 
ness, between management and stock- 
holders, and between industry and 
government,” he explained. “ That is 
no formula for sweet sentimentality, 
nor is it the formula for inaction or 
drifting. 

“The nation calls for action, direct, 
forceful, and intelligent action in deal- 
ing with the utility system, not by 
government alone but by industry. 
Such action means constructive work 
of the highest order, with the indus- 
try given freedom and the opportu- 
nity to take the initiative, but with 
government pointing the way and tak- 
ing the lead if it falters or delays. A 
fusillade of words will not suffice.” 


STEEL BUYING 
IS CURTAILED BY 
PRICE SITUATION 


The recent proposal of President 
Roosevelt for reducing prices and 
keeping wages up have intensified 
caution among steel buyers to the 
extent that practically none is willing 
to add to his steel inventories until 
the question of prices and wages is 
determined, Iron Age said yesterday. 

Production is figured by the publi- 
cation at 31 per cent of capacity, a de- 
cline of 1% points from last week 
after a steady rise during January. 

The Iron Age composite scrap steel 


price, an average of Pittsburgh, Chi- | 


- eago, and Philadelphia, is unchanged 
at onan a ‘ton. e 
ee ne ene 


W. O. Douglas i 
as Evangelist 


BY PHILIP HAMPSON. 

William O. Douglas, chairman of 
the Securities and Exchange commis- 
sion, yesterday 
concluded three 
days of visiting 
with Chicagoans 
and departed for 
Washington, D.C. 
According to the 
opinions of many 
of the persons 
with whom he 
conversed, his 
visit was an at- 
tempt to culti- 
vate better feel- 
ing toward the 
Roosevelt admin- 
sad istration among 
<<} Chicago business 
ge and financial men. 
SS SNES i The tenor of 
williems ©. Douglas. most of his for- 
mal talks was that business should go 
along more willingly with the various 
activities of the Roosevelt administra- 
tion. But in a few words in each of 
his two principal addresses, Douglas 
left no misunderstanding—those who 

do not conform will be forced to it. 


Direct in Statements. 


Most of those who talked with this 
new administration pro-counsul said 
they found him to be of pleasing per- 
sonality and direct in his statements. 

Douglas did a great deal of talking 
in the two and a half days he spent 
in Chicago. Monday noon he lunched 
at the Attic club. Among those pres- 
ent were Gen. R. E. Wood, president 
of Sears, Roebuck & Co.; Sewell Av- 
ery, president of Montgomery Ward 
& Co.; Paul Shields of the New York 
investment house of Shields & Co.; 
Edward Eagle Brown, president of 
the First National Bank of Chicago; 
Solomon Smith, president of the 
Northern Trust company, and Charles 
Freeman, vice president of the Com- 
monwealth Edison company. 

Monday night, Douglas dined at the 
Racquet club, Wood and Avery were 
there; also Gen. Charles G. Dawes, 
chairman of the City National Bank 
and Trust company, and others. 


Addresses Many Others. 


Tuesday noon, Douglas met a group 
of members and officials of the Chi- 
cago Stock exchange at the Chicago 
club, and on Tuesday evening he ad- 
dressed the Economic Club of Chica- 
go, including many persons promi- 
nent in Chicago business and indus- 
try. His last talk was given before 
the Commonwealth club, composed 
largely of junior executives of large 
Chicago enterprises. 

According to many of those with 
whom he talked, Douglas’ réle ap- 
peared to be that of evangelist to sell 
Chicago business the idea that the 
Roosevelt administration is not nearly 
so badeas described. But in his con- 
versations Douglas declared that this 
was not true. 

“TIT am not out here trying to be 
an evangelist or trying to sell the 
New Deal to those who are absolutely 
against it,” he said. “I know that 
would be impossible. But I do want 
to try to convince business men that 
it will be better for the whole coun- 
try if they will try to get along with 
the Washington government. 

“Congress has put certain laws on 
the books and they have to be en- 
forced. I think we all should recog- 
nize realities and try to work to- 
gether.” 

Bounced Off Train. 


Douglas interested his listeners on 
several occasions with a story con- 
trasting his first arrival in Chicago 
with that on Monday. His first ar- 
rival was fifteen years ago when he 
was “bounced off a freight car in 
the Chicago yards.” At that time he 
was on his way from his home in 
Washington state to make his for- 
tune in New York City. 

The “bouncing” in the Chicago 
yards ended a freight train ride from 
the west which had consumed about 
13 days. He borrowed sufficient 
money from a brother to enable him 
to complete the trip to New York in 
a day coach, he said. 


Opening of New York Auto 


Show Is Changed to Nov. 11 


Detroit, Mich., Feb. 2.—(/)—The 
Automobile Manufacturers’ associa- 
tion announced tonight that the 
1938 New York auto show will open 
Nov. 11, as it did in 1936. It opened 
Oct. 27 last year. The association 
said the directors voted for the 
change back to November “after a 
careful review of the sales and labor 
factors involved.” The date was ad- 
vanced to the fall at the request of 
President Roosevelt, the association 
said. 


ing values . . 


thereof to the 


Ha 


| | Sept., 1929, 
108.7 


Be oe 
me Employment _ 


i 
Jan., 1922,| 


ocean Pay Rolls 


70.3 


! 


Lt 
Mar., 1933, | 


| 


37.9 
7 aide vance 


0 
1919 ‘20 ‘28 '22 '23 ‘24 


SOURCE OF DATA: U. $. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS 


‘25 -'26 "27 ‘28 ‘29 ‘30 '3t 


"32 


33 ‘34 ('35 36 


BOARD OF TRADE CUTS 
ALL PAY ABOVE $1,800 
IN ECONOMY DRIVE 


Directors of the Chicago Board of 
Trade have ordered a reduction of 
10 per cent in the salaries of all 
employés earning more than $1,800 
a year, it was learned yesterday, 
The salary of Fred H. Clutton, sec- 
retary, was said to have been cut 
from $15,000 to $13,500 annually. 

The wage reduction, which will 
save $25,000 a year, was recom- 
mended to directors by a _ special 
committee named to find ways to 
cut expenses. The mortgage on the 
Board of Trade building was re- 
funded late in 1937, effecting a sav- 
ing in interest. At the same time 
a special assessment of $150 a year 
for three years was levied on the 
members. 

Drastic economy measures have 
been adopted recently by La Salle 
street commission houses. Some 
firms have discontinued special wire 
service to New York, and others 
have combined wire facilities. Both 
commodity and security brokers have 
been forced to economize because of 
slack market activity. 


RETAILERS TOLD 
NEWSPAPERS ARE 
BEST SELLING AID 


New York, Feb. 2.—[Special.]— 
Newspaper advertising is the great- 
est single selling instrument at the 
disposal of the retail merchandising 
field, W. S. Townsend, of Townsend 
& Townsend, Inc., declared today in 
an address to the sales promotion 
group of the 27th annual convention 
of the National Retail Dry Goods as- 
sociation. 

Townsend criticized advertising 
methods, declaring advertisers fail to 
obtain the full benefit of the space 
they buy, due to faulty preparation 
of copy. 

“The trouble with much advertis- 
ing,” he said, “is that it is written 
on the assumption that the reader 
already wants the merchandise ad- 
vertised.” 

He described as “false economy” 
the curtailment of advertising in the 
face of a business slump. “When 
you cut off advertising you cut off 
sales,” he said. 


U.S. TO POUR OUT 
147 MILLIONS IN 
POWER PROGRAM 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—<(py— 
The government will start pouring 
out millions of dollars next week on 
its long delayed municipal power 
program. 

Administrator Ickes announced 
today the first $1,000,000 of PWA 
grants would go forward in a single 
voucher to Memphis, Tenn. on 
Wednesday as an initial federal con- 
tribution to the city’s big electrica] 
distribution system. 

Thereafter, in rapid succession, he 
said, PWA loans and grants on sixty- 
one public power projects in twenty- 
one states would put a total of $146, 


RICH MAN — 


All evidence of weakth—stocks, bonds, com- 
modities, business and money —is influenced by 
impelling economic forces . . . forces which are 
ever moving . . . constantly creating and destroy- 
. shifting the ownership of wealth 

. making rich men poor and poor men rich. 

Ruthless when ignored or defied, economic 
forces become friendly guides te sound buei- 
- and profits... when undersiced. 

Knowing them, interpreting their future 
movements and. making practical application 

ontrol of investments in securi- 
Hes and commodities, is our business. : 


Tae gage consult with oo 


917,808 to work producing one man- 
hour of labor for each dollar spent. 


7 


POOR MAN 


Mr. Albright 
Objects to Tax 
‘Out of Hide’ 


L. M. Albright, who runs a small 
typewriter supply house at 300 West 
Adams street, was not one of the 
“little business men” summoned to 
Washington to tell President Roose- 
velt what’s the matter-with things. 
But Mr. Albright had a load to get 
off his chest, so he took one of his 
typewriters in hand yesterday and 
told his grievances to the President 
in a letter. 

“All this talk about helping the 
‘little business man’ becomes most 
confusing to the little business man 
himself,” he wrote. “It seems to be 
the sort of help..you get when the 
sherif puts you out on the street and 
hangs a sign on your front door.” 


Here’s Albright’s Story. 


Here is Mr. Albright’s story as told 
by himself in the letter: 

“I am paying two state and two 
federal taxes today under the new 
Illinois unemployment compensation 
act. We have a couple of very small 
corporations that have no surpluses 
and only enough working capital to 
just get by. The tax we are paying, 
therefore is being paid with money 
that we needed and expected to use 
for pay roll purposes. 

“My two little corporations are so 
small that between them we never 
had more than ten or eleven people 
employed and much of the time we 
don’t have more than eight. Four of 
us, including myself as president, 
have had to derive part of our salary 
from one company and part from 
the other. Up until a month ago we 
did not believe that we came under 
the provisions of the unemployment 
compensation act. We have recently 
been informed, however, that we do 
on two separate and distinct counts. 


Unpaid Officers Are Employés. 


“In the first place, we are told that 
if the officers of the corporation are 
included, each company has eight 
persons. We have two officers in 
each company who are represented by 
signatures on the corporate forms 
only. They receive no pay of any 
kind from either corporation. These 
officers, we are told, are now consid- 
ered as employés. 

“Second, under the state law, we 
are told, if two or more small cor- 
porations fall under a single owner- 
ship the combined number of people 
in the two companies, if they add up 
to more than eight, throw each com- 
pany under the act. So, under the 
construction of the law, we are liable 
on each count, and yet in each case 
we feel as though we were being 
padded into a bracket.” 

Mr. Albright told the President 
that he had nursed one of his com- 
panies along for seven years hoping 
that some day it could be built into 
a modestly profitable enterprise. Dur- 
ing this time he carried his own sal- 
ary as president on the books at $50 
per week, but earnings in the last 
seven years have been so slim that 
the company actually owes him $8,200 
in unpaid salary—on which, by the 


KENNEDY URGES U. S. 
BUILD 500 MERCHANT 
SHIPS IN TEN YEARS 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—(4)— 
High administration officials favor 
the construction of 500 speedy mer- 
chant ships in the next ten years at 
a cost of $1,250,000,000. This became 
known tonight when the senate com- 
merce committee published testimony 
by Joseph P. Kennedy, chairman of 
the maritime commission, who re- 
cently was appointed ambassador to 
England. 

Kennedy, who has been trying to 
rebuild the merchant marine under 
a subsidy program, said these new 
ships would be needed as an auxiliary 
to the larger navy program already 
announced. In peace time they would 
be merchant vessels, but in an 
emergency they would become part 
of the navy. 

“It is ridiculous to have a big 
navy and not have the essential mer- 
chant ships to serve as auxiliaries,” 
Kennedy told the senate committee 
behind closed doors. He and. navy 
officials said most of the merchant 
marine vessels now are antiquated. 

Kennedy said the navy “has a 
pressing demand for sixty-five ships” 
at present and said the 500 needed in 
the next ten years probably “ would 
cost $1,250,000,000.” 


way, he has paid his full individual 
income tax. 

His average salary actually re- 
ceived, he said, has been $125 monthly. 
The company has paid no dividends 
or bonuses. 

“My protest,” he wrote, “is over 
the fact that this tax of $144.87 comes 
out of the hide and not out of profits. 
It seems to result in my having to 
decide whether I am willing to take 
still less or whether I am going to 
take it out of the salaries of my em- 
ployés. In cases like ours the very 
money that we would use for wages 
is being taken from us in taxes and 


‘| the innoculation causes the infection 


it is supposed to prevent. 

“There is something rotten when 
vicious circles like these begin de- 
youring their own tails.” 


U. S. DEFICIT 
FOR 7 MONTHS 
IS $877,720,529 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—@)— 
The treasury reported today its deficit 
in the first seven months of the fiscal 
vear totaled $877,720,529. President 
Roosevelt has estimated the excess 
of expenditures over income will 
reach $1,294,345,300 by June 30. The 
seven month deficit was about half 
the shortage in the similar period 
of the preceding year, which was $1,- 
740,758,978. 

It has been narrowed by larger 
tax receipts despite an increase in 
expenditures. In the seven months 
ended Jan. 31, expenditures totaled 
$4,388,643,312 compared with $4,187,- 
890,871 a year ago. Tax collections 
increased from $2,442,131,892 to $3,- 
510,922,783. 

About $470,000,000 of the gain in 
taxes was due to social security and 
railroad retirement levies. 


Protit Eniier 


| Accuses 24 Firms of 


Fixing Profits. 


Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—(p)— 
The justice department, successful in 
recent anti-trust prosecution of six- 


| teen major oil companies at Madison, 


Wis., announced today it would press 
charges next fall against 24 oil com- 
panies and 46 individuals. 

Attorney General Cummings said 
they would be brought to trial on an 
indictment returned by a federal 
grand jury at Madison in December, 
1936. The indictment charges the oil 
companies with fixing uniform mar- 
gins of profit for gasoline jobbers 
throughout the middle west. 

Those indicted, Cummings said, in- 
clude the 16 companies and 25 of 
the individuals convicted Jan. 22 at 
Madison on charges of conspiring to 
fix the wholesale price of gasoline. 

Call Arnott a Leader. 

One of the accusations is that rep- 
resentatives of the oil companies held 
conferences over a period of years, 
usually at a hotel in Chicago, at 
which they agreed upon uniform prac- 
tices in dealing with gasoline jobbers. 
The indictment said the meetings 
usually were presided over by 
Charles E. Arnott, vice president of 


Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc. 


Arnott was one of the 30 individu- 
als found guilty in January of price 
fixing. 

The indictment estimated that 
about 4,000 jobbers were engaged in 
the gasoline business in the affected 
area, 

At a press conference, Cummings 
sharply criticized recent published ut- 
tacks against the justice department’s 
handling of the Madison cases. He 
said critics had only repeated argu- 
ments used during the trial and had 
failed to produce any evidence not 
weighed by the Madison jury. 


Discusses Ickes’ Letter. 


Cummings referred to two letters 
written by Secretary of Interior Ickes 
in 1934 to Arnott. Defendants in the 
Madison trial had contended. the let- 
ters virtually sanctioned, under the 
National Recovery act, practices for 
which they later were indicted. The 
attorney general said some had 
charged the letters were suppressed 
at the trial. 

“The letters actually were admitted 
in evidence,” Cummings asserted. 
“They were introduced by the gov- 
ernment.” 


Plans Hearing in March. 


Madison, Wis., Feb. 2.—(/)—Federal 
Judge Patrick T. Stone will hear ar- 
guments here after March 15 on mo- 
tions to set aside a jury’s verdict Jan. 
22 convicting sixteen major oil com- 
panies and thirty individuals of vio- 
lating the Sherman anti-trust act by 
fixing gasoline prices. 

Judge Stone has withheld sentence 
until he rules on these motions as 
well as motions for a new trial. 

A second indictment against some 
of the same and additional - defend- 
ants, which Attorney General Cum- 
mings said in Washington today prob- 
ably would go to trial next fall, also 
will be tried before Judge Stone. 


CHICAGO CURB 
WILL VOTE TODAY 
ON DISSOLUTION 


A recommendation of directors of 
the Chicago Curb exchange to liqui- 
date the organization will be voted 
on at a special meeting of members 
today. The meeting will be held at 
3 p. m., in room 400, at 332 South La 
Salle street. 

If the proposal is ratified the ex- 
change will apply to the Securities 
and Exchange commission for with- 
drawal of its registration as a nation- 
al security exchange and the assets 
will be prorated among the members. 

The exchange’s business has 
dwindled steadily in recent years. 
Only 40,256 shares were traded on 
the exchange in December. 

T. E. Murchison, partner of Paul 
H, Davis & Co., has been president 
of the exchange for the last two 
years. 


C. J. KOLLER 
President 


(both formerly associated with E. H. Rollins & Sons, Inc.) 


PHILADELPHIA ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION 


Announce their Incorporation to conduct the 
business of buying and selling commercial paper, 
especially distillers’ notes and assignments, and 
of generally financing distillers’ requirements. 


CHAS. W. COLLOM 
Secretary & Treasurer 


CERES HSE WO: 


in Last Year 


The Republic Steel corporation, 
third largest American steel com- 


pany, yesterday 
reported a small 
decline in 1937 
net income. Com- © 
mercial Credit 
company, Na- 
tional Lead com- 
pany, United 
Gas Improve. 
ment company, 
and a number 
of others also 
issued earnings 
statements. 

Republic Steel 

had net income 
for the year end- 
ed Dec. 31, 1937, 
totaling $9,044,- 
147, equal after Tom M. Girdler. 
all charges and taxes to $1.14 a 
share on 5,832,028 common shares 
outstanding. Net income in 1936 was 
$9,586,922, equal to $1.74 a share on 
4,127,264 shares. 

“The strike which occurred in the 
middle of the year and the severe de- 
cline of business in the fourth quar- 
ter resulted in substantially decreased 
earnings,” Tom Girdler, chairman of 
the board, said. ‘“‘ Despite these facts, 
the year’s net profit was only slightly 
short of that of 1936.” 


Commercial Credit Gains. 


Commercial Credit company, in- 
stallment finance company, had 1937 
net income of $13,593,119, equal after 
preferred dividends to $7.09 a com- 
mon share, against $12,005,779, or 
$6.07 a common share, in 1936. Earn- 
ings in both years were after surtax 
on undistributed profits. 

A. E. Dunean, chairman of the 
board, said there had been some in- 
crease in repossessions, during the 
closing months of the year, of mer- 
chandise sold on payments, and that 
credit losses had risen somewhat. He 
said, however, that the increases 
were not serious so far and that the 
company did not expect it to become 
so. 

National Lead company reported a 
slump in 1937 profit to $4,886,951, or 
94 cents a common share, from 
$7,232,530, or $1.71 a share, in 1936. 
Edward J. Cornish, chairman, said 
that preliminary estimates of Janu- 
rary, 1938, business indicated no re- 
versal of the downward trend which 
developed in the latter half of 1937. 

Utility Reports Rise. 

The preliminary report of United 
Gas Improvement company, big util- 
ity company, for 1937 showed net in- 
come of $28,150,549, an increase of 
$196,794 over 1936 earnings. Surplus 
for 1937 amounted to $1,072,709 after 
payment of common and preferred 
dividends. 

Earnings statements issued yester- 
day were: 


DECEMBER. 
1937 


; 1936. 

Ohio Edison $ 491.2578 548,360 

QUARTER ENDED DEC. 31. 
Air Associates ..... 28,126 
Bl 71,141 200,077 
376,776 281,482 

QUARTER ENDED JAN. 1, 1938. 
Purity Bakeries .... 49,939 
YEAR ENDED DEC. 31. 

Automatic Washer.. 21,859 
Altorfer Bros 347,882 
American Woolen *1,854,901 
Bigelow-Sanford 
Bristol-Myers 
Colum Bdcasting 
Commercial Credit . 
Compres Ind Gases. 
Consumers Power.. 
Electrographic 
Flintkote Co. , 


16,912 


13,593,119 
537,316 
10,025,848 
282,997 


sere 


National Lead 
Ohio Edison 
Pennsylvania Salt 
Purity Bakeries ... 
Republic Steel .... 
Southern Col Power 
United Gas 
*Net loss. 


DOLLAR GATHERS 
MORE STRENGTH;|* 
POUND AT $5.00% 


The American dollar developed fur- 
ther strength yesterday in the foreign 
exchange market. It rose in value in 
relation to the chief foreign cur- 
rencies for the second consecutive 
day. 

The largest gains were recorded 
against the British pound and the 
Dutch guilder. The pound fell % 
cent in New York, closing at $5.00%. 
The guilder lost 0.06 cent, closing: at 
55.84 cents. The French franc de- 
clined 0.00875 cent to 3.37375 cents. 
PS A ae YN NEE AIS OP SEE RT oS CO 


8,150, 549 27,953,755 


WE WILL BUY 


Automatic Sprinkler Pref. Stk. 
Clearing Ind. Dist. Pref. & Com. 
Loyola Apts. Stock 
Marquette Cement Com. Stock 
Morton Grove, Ill. S/A Bonds 
Natl. Lumber & Creosoting Pref. 
Norwegian Amer. Line Stk. 
Resources Corp. Internat’! Stk. 
Rhinelander Paper Com. Stk. 
United States Sugar Pref. 
Wilmette Masonic Temple Ass’n Bonds 
Whitaker Battery Co. Units 


REAL ESTATE BONDS--STOCKS 
A special department, ably staffed, is at 
your service in the sale or purchase of 
Real Estate Bonds and Stocks. We quote, 


A f 

7 ge Soe 

SERGE Toe TSE tee a SN z 
8 6% ens rim + ere 


buy and sell all marketable issues, 


|Legislators, Labor 


Leaders Disagree. 


[Chicago Tribune Press Service. ] 

Washington, D. C., Feb. 2—[Spe 
cial.1—With the administration’s bill 
to insure mortgages on privately con- 
structed housing finally passed by 
congress and awaiting President 
Roosevelt’s signature, legislators and 
labor leaders stili-are. disputing the 
effect it will havé.om wage scales in 
the residential building industry. The 
dispute arises from the defeat of the 
Lodge prevailing wage amendment, 
which was opposed by the adminis- 
tration. 

The defeated amendment of Sena- 
tor Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. [R., 
Mass.], provided “that the rates of 
pay for persons employed upon the 
construction of property covered by 
a mortgage insured under this title 
Shall be not less than prevailing 
rates of pay for work of a similar 
nature in the same locality, as deter- 
mined by the department of labor 
with the approval of the President.” 


Often Means Union Scale. 


In communities where labor is or- 
ganized, the prevailing rate of pay 
ordinarily means the union scale. In 
communities where nonunion labor 
is preponderant, however, the pre- 
vailing wage would be the standard 
rate for work of a similar character, 
and might be lower than the union 
scale. Whether the Lodge amend- 
ment would have required payment 
of the union scale for carpenters, 
brick layers, lathers, plasterers, etc., 
would have depended upon the com- 
munity and the type of labor [union 
or nonunion] generally employed on 
residential construction work. 

The Davis-Bacon act, approved 
March 3, 1931, requires that in the 
construction or repair of all public 
buildings of the United States, the 
rate of wage “for all laborers and 
mechanics employed . ...° on the 
public buildings covered by the con- 
tract, shall not be less than the pre- 
vailing rate of wages for work of a 
similar nature in the city ... In 
which the public buildings are locat- 
ed.” 


Fight Goes Back to 1935. 


The Roosevelt administration had 
its first fight over the prevailing 
wage principle in 1935, when the sen- 
ate adopted the McCarran amend- 
ment to.the $4,880,000,000 work relief 
act. The amendment simply applied 
the provisions of the Davis-Bacon act 
to all construction proposed by the 
work relief appropriation. 

President Roosevelt said this 
amendment would wreck the entire 
work relief program and his leaders 
in the senate, after a prolonged bat- 
tle and reconsideration of the bill by 
the appropriations committee, finally 
succeeded in eliminating the provi- 
sion. 

Thereafter, however, Administrator 
Harry L. Hopkins decided that the 
fight was all in vain and that pre- 
vailing wages ought to be paid on 
relief projects. By executive order, 
he fixed the hourly pay of relief 
workers at the rates prevailing in 
the various communities—high in the 
north, where the union scale prevails, 


[Continued on page 23, column 3.] 
AMO A EE SA ARS EE, A 


It’s your money —and 
whether you’re exchang- 
ing it for a commodity 
or depositing it in a 
bank, it’s good business 
to get all you can for it. 


Merchandise Bank knows 
that what gives another. cus- 
tomer the most for his 
money, may not meet your 
requirements at all. That 
is why Merchandise Bank 
makes its services so com-_ 
plete, so flexible, so direct— 
why so many different cus~ 
tomers all get the most for 


Re Rs AY a Cas 
- Fx wa Siek 
‘e. ’ se ~ * 
SP =f Bh sion. as ea 


& , 
; ah. a _ . 
@ Sethe Hs, ae as 2 bis Paid 6 _— a 
me oon See Tu ? 
fe f =r 4 . 
“S- 5 | ae “ . Ss 
* Te . a DAS 5 Sgt oy 


raed a PREG SF che 
; : >, sey) 
AMG uh eee ry : 
"4 a “ake es ~ eo bar 
Seticceipa ; 
Trading 
eee SB Sb } aid 3 
Be nace several] 
a Gale ew . is 
P| 


nee of 
the rally Played 
weakness, 


continued support, 
. @ut and gave way to 
Steels, motors, and metals took 
leading réles in the late reaction. 
“The stee! STOUD Was on the heavy 
side throughout the session. United 
States Steei, Bethiehem, and Youngs. 
et and Tube, in the order 


Prices, brokers reported, 


-~> 

__dIn the motors, Chrysler showed the 
way in volume and price de. 
cline, The stock dropped 1% points 
and was the most actively traded 
issue of the day. General Motors lost 

while Yellow Truck kept ‘its loss 
to a minor fraction, 

Internationa! Nicke! and Anaconda 
lost 1% and 1 point, respectively, in 
the cop ’ 

Continuing under the Stimulation 
of the proposed housing drive, build. 
ing shares came in for good in 
with U. Ss. 
and American Ra 
estly higher, 

Public utility and railroad shares 
Save up fractions for most part, 


oS ee eee 
today 


So 2 Te See wg ON AES Se ‘ 
3 a & Sea ie a “Tie . Rie ‘i : 4 s 
Year Mo ee ci, oeeee 


“ tot 


the time, ) 


Sell.| (The figure in brackets after name of stock 1» : 


trai) , ‘ 
SE Re Ahi cain ts Nien ‘ ; 
re rok Ss % S " 
‘ oF : 


ab etinGin vais a) 


& Dye | 6a] 
- Allied Mills [2g], 
Allieg tores er see 
- De pid [5] ; 
9% Allis-Ch M 13.50g 
Amerada Corp 12 

Am Bk Note [.2 
ho LB.dUg | 
.251.1,1 

% im 614i 

Am Car& F | .25¢/ 


Am & For Pow..,., 
Do $6 pfd... 
Do 7 pfd,,, ree 
Am —_ & Leath, 


Am International., . 

Am motive ,, 
Do pftd 

An M& 

Am M & 


Am gee 
Do $6 pf 15.626¢) 
No $4 pfl4 

Am Rad&St 

Am Rol! Mi 


r [2] 
Am Seating {1].¥6g/ 4 
tAm Ship Bldg} 21.11.70 
Am Smelt&R|,7hel #g 
Stl Fdrs [2], 20 
Stores 


| eae 17 
Do pfd [6]...... 8 


4% Am Zine L & S... 5 
Anaconda [1.75¢].127 
AnchorHG] [.60a] 2 
Andes Copp 4508) 1 

2 Arm Ill [.7 wi535 8 
ArmstrongC [.25e] 
Arnold Cons [,25e] 1 
Artloom ¢ eS AR | 

6% Assd Dry Goods,, : 
Atch T& SF [2g] 10 

Do pid J 5 
AtlCstLine 


1 
] 


“ J in S = 
~ WOR Bi.$ 
a 2 > 
" q 
Ye | ‘ ; 
* ee W 


8, 
tN 


—e | 
SFr eS #&F: 


- eat: 


% Gen Out Adver.... 


Pp eeerreese 


pa 


Do $ 
’ age “Toay! 


Do 


RY 


Erie R pe 
Do 1st pf 


Evans: Products.,,. 
F 


tFairbanks Co.. 
TDo pfd.,, 
Fairbanks M 3 
Fajardo Sug {le}, 9 
Fed L&T [1g]... 1 
TDo pfd [6]....0, 
Fed M & 8 pfd [7] 
Bed Water Svc A.. 
Fed D nee [ .25e] 


0 
‘ 
1 


: 


1 
1 
+ 
8 
1 
2 


Do pid 16]......, 
mires Nat 8 [.675e] 
Flintkote [1] » £2 
et a Cor "4 90 

Do » Q, 
Pore Wrenn ee 


d [ 0.20 
A P pfd,0,10 
0 2d pfd..... .0.40 


G 


Gen Am Invest.,,., 
Do pid [6] 


: ] 
Q 8]....,0.6 
Gen Bonga. 0 00s0% 
Gen WRUNG ss ccnadgh 
Do AES Bae Pec 
Do pfd Tal iiss 
Gen Cigar L383; 6c. 
Do pfd OTT wees 
Gen Elec [2 
Gen F 
Gen G & 


cSoPdDKaS wo 


[a]. 2 
GenMotors [3.75¢].128 
Do pfd [5]... 


~ 


Fe 


2m 
FRE 


Bais 
ag 


coe 3 114% 


Do A [1.50g oes 
G Print Ink [.80g] 
Gen Ry sig [. 256] 
Gen Real & 
Gen Refract 
TGen Stl Cast 


[2g] 


6 
Util, 12 


se 
“oa 
& 
+} 


ae 
ae 
+ 


o 
a) 
ns 
4. 


I 
f lgar 
i 


SSSR x 


Cent RR. 


NH®& 
pf 


8% N “ae incite 26] 


ft! 


m 
bt 


Co [.80]. 
3 pf [4.75] 


mage: 


+ Aled 


60g], 


[a] 
Bs pid 6) 


; ies 


1 pfd [5.! I. 
d M&M [.40e] 3 
8% Owens-I]] G) [.25e] 27 


9% 
13 


3 
3% Pa 


PacAm 

Coast 
Peo Lighting (b3 
ac n 3 
ec Mille i 


P 
Fish [1.20] 
1 pfd..0. 
& Bl {2}, 


Packard M [ ‘25¢), 

Panhandle p & R.. 
tDo pid "Pere es Uy, 0 

Paraffine Co [4g] 


% Param 


Do pid 


Pictures, . oF 
{.60]... 


2% Park U © M 
Parke Davig 


Parker 


he 
Patino 


R-Pr 
Film , 


Mines [2g]. 


Peerless or [80g] 


O [dal.. 


On Coal & Coke. 


Penn-Dix 
Penn Gi 


C pid A. 
S ct [lg], 


Peoria & FE 
Pere Marqu 


Petrol 
Phe! 
P 


2 


» 


4 
1l 
% 
4 


2 
17 


1 


1 
20 
5 


2 
36 


aniniaat e 


Thermoid Co 
4% Thompgon J R 
Tho 


12 


13% Tide. 


81% 


10% T 
39% T 


4 Un Papbrd [gig]. 
& For Sec 


Undwd £1 
U 


U § Gypsum [2a], 

U Hoffman Mach 
8 Ind Aleo 

Us Leather 
Do A 


Sa 
FR 
De SoS 


T [.20g} 


ce 
AS SoS 
Fae 


~ 
Or fo 
YS 


Shion 
ss 
rift 


we fs 
MHNWMOMM | Sica hb 


[4.50¢}, 
[.125e] 
[.80e], 20 
(1.20; 4 

.50e)}, 


> er aye? 


Pound. Cocoa for deliv 
closed at 5.2€ cents. reid 

Hides were quoted for future de. 
livery 0.31 to 0.35 cent a pound under 
Tuesday’s prices, the March contract 
closing at 8.60 cents, It was repor ‘ 
that 10,000 to 15,000 Pacific coast 
were sold in the cash market late 
Tuesday at the equivalent of 8% cents 
& pound, Chicago basis, 

- 

Crude rubber futures slipped 0,03 to 
0,06 cent a pound in New York. Con- 
tracts calling for delivery in March 
Closed at 14,52 cents, 

Business transacted in the 
markets was small. Copper wag \n- 
changed at i0 cents a pound on the 
domestic market, Sales in the expoi't 
market were reported at 9.95 cents y 
pound, delivered at European ports, 
Lead futures closed 0.04 to 0,08 cent 
& pound lower, | 


FUTURES SUMMARY, 
=——Glopee— “Bapeon's panse. 
Wheat bu...6 aa ods $1 40% » r / 
_.... Bau Bo: 


aU 
° 18 
New York 


Covoa, 0987 0546 


ot 
és 


: 4 2 13 0864 
Ai fhe eee ont 
e ; ’ ’ . 

.0475 0403 pit 0 ‘bane 
*Since trading in the contract started. All 


prices are for Ma delivery except butter and 
eee, Which are for February, and hides io; 
e, 


on Refi 
es 
NEW YORK FUTURES. 
| Yesterday’y cloxing prices in cents per pound 
unless otherwise stated. | 
Cottonseed 


New York Bonds. 
New York, Feb. 2.—(?)—Another 
Spirited recovery in rail loans helped 


Atlas Pow 13.75c] 
Atlas Tack [ 50g] 
Auburn Auto rere’ 


—™ we 


SRS trary 


_ 
“ID 


Glidden [2] 


bring good Support to corporate 
Aust Nichols Pee | 
bonds today, A long list of carrier tDo pr A [5g].0.80 % Gobel Adolpn’’’*'’ 
Aviation Corp ,.,. 10 Goebe] Brew [.20a] February. 
Goodrich B F {lg} 4% 0 ' 7.55: May and 
June, 7.58: July and August, 7.62; Septem. 


7,65, 92 {fots. 
Sugar, 


[domestic] —~Closed yn- 


Sales, 
No. 


issues rose fractions to 4 points. 
B Do pfd 
ber, 


Trading Sentiment was stimulated Goodyr Té 1% United Stores 4 | 


a 
1Un Lt T pra [8].0.10 
V 


ht 29 
PROM Bhs ASE 00 A om 


G 
Contract 


by reports of broad investment inter. 
est in the $67,000,000 of bonds and de. : 91, fd 2 [ 50k} 88 1114 % 11% hanged 
3 o : ; ee ge changed. 1 2,24; + 2,26; y, 
bentures of Appalachian Electric 3 [ =] Fh sy sit 4 Stl [1.125¢] 4 % pid [6], 1 e 1s” vansce Sales tig] 2.27: ; ta peed rh 4 
Power Company, formally Offered to. ll Oi {1}, wt ™% Purity Bak foe] 15 #0 ~=Vick Chem [2aye ) | foe 
day. Some utility loans were pid } iding-Hem AA@ | Q ona Ve-Caro Chem ... : #4 fh % bent foo i hee ae 
r; : 2% D f 15 f ee 2 cen OwWer,. 4 
up sharply. g b 15% Quaker sta oy (1) 2 3% *Va tree B ; a Re y. 1.08%: 
R 115 Virg Ry pfd [6). 17: May, 
47 Vulean Det [6¢].0.40 
Rio—Closed -01 cent lower to .0g cent 


TDo p 
Green H 


Among the larger gainers were 

3 1 5 

5 9: 2§ Greyhoun 
g 1 1 

] 

8 

7 


M. K. & T. first ds, 2%; Pennsylvania 
4%s, 2%; Wabash first 5s, 4; Illinois 
Central 5s, 3%; Morris & Essex 3s, 
3; Detroit Edison 4%s, 1; American 
@nd Foreign Power 5s, 1. 

_ Trading was slow in United States 
governments, with final prices 5/32ds 
lower to 2/32ds higher. 


4.07: 


Rad Corp A [.20¢] +8 5% % My Me Ww gher, March 4.54; May, 4.27: Iniy. aod 


Do ev 
3% Rad-Kei teas 16 1% Wabash Mees September to December, 4.06. Sales, 
Rayo :<e 2% Wabash Be Ae... bags. 
74%, Waler pf wwi4.50) 4 Santos—Cloreq 08 to 18 
March, 6.88: May, 6.11: July. 


pI [2] 1 
Osiery,. 64 Walworth Co 5 
2% Ward B ae somber, 5.99; December, 5.90, Sales, 
ags. 


Guantan 
cent 


[.40gj 2 r. 
F 6.02; . 
+t ha sae 
peng Co aol pi 29 ee 
Borg-Warner [2a], 6 ) 
BowerRoliB [.50a] 1 : 3 : yllieee w me % W 
Bridgept Br [.75g] ] se 2 
245 W 
86% f 
117 


Wo 
Closed .02 to 04 July, 76.1; 


December, 75.7, 


1 
i 1 
| [2] 2 ri 25 Cocoa, 
Brie Mite 4p] 7 8 Eiseniohr 17 2 “ Closed .16 to .20 cent lower. March, 5.26; 
May, 5.27; July, 5,32; September, 5.30: 
1 October, 5.41; December, 5.50. Sales, 203 
lots, 
2 


Chicago Stocks. Do pid {6] 


Bkiyn Un Gas een 
After displa % Brngswk-Blke 1.200]... @7 Maryland 3 
throughout t oe pir a Houston Oi! 5% Richfield Oi] §:2581 18 est Union Tel.” : 
u Z Owe Sound [3a] 7 17% Kuberoid [60a]... 4 20% Westnghs A B [1}.11 . 14.08: 
West El ¢ M [le] 28 14,77; August, 
? October, 05; 


Wheelin 


TDo pid 
hite 


eee er eee 2 
% Budd Wheel [.20¢] 7 
15.05; 


Novem ber, : 
129 lots. 


Hudson & Man 1 2 2 2 ok S 


- yesterday. Hudson Mtr [ 25g] 5 


7S issues traded, 31 closed Bullard Co [2g] ., 
, ' » Upp Motor ,...., 4 23% 109% Safeway Strs 
lower, 17 ended with gains ana 27 Bortiee “an tas 2 100" “+D9 7 White 1939, 15.10, 
were unchnaged. Trading was 18,000 BurrAdMch [.20e] 6 ; des, 
, 0. Hilinois Central.,,. Do hes beecsise . Closed .31 to 35 cent lower. March, 8.60: 
shares, against 12,000 shares Tuesday, be aes rade iy _ - ttl Cent L L [4] /3.10 Willys-Overian June, 8.95- " dentomber, 9,26: Deontaber: 
HE UNE average of 20 stocks Do pfd 11.50],, 3 eee Ind Rayon [.25e) 10 Did , 3 3 @ Wilson & Co -»,| 2-56. Sales, 94 lots 
closed 0.09 lower at 9.44. Pea a § 4 ly oS i 22” payee A 1ibbg) asta | 41 Woolw Sy eras 26 ; + ~ 
Commonwealt! Edison, mostly ac. : or oan By ey 3 é 1 Interb Rap Trang. 4 4 i % % me 43t", Worthingtn p &M 3 15 $1.49; 
tive issues, declined % to 23%, and Byron Jack [.50e] 1 Interchem Corp.... 1 " ps . y » $1.47%4° June to 
Cities Service common, also actively Cc F init, O88 167 ...0, 20 Seaboard oil Pio" Yale & T [60a] me: 1.40%, 
Intercon Rubber. ; 8Doard . 8% y ip adh Metals, 
traded, eased % to 1%. Zenith Radio Cal Pack [1.50a} i) terlake Ir [. 54% Sears Roebuck/ 3a] 1 el Tr & Coach.’ 73 Copper—Ulosed 112 to -10 cent lower, Feb. 
as Hoty ei de ' I 13 Servel Ino fi}... a8 7% vt 17) 0.80 rua ‘83; March 8.85: April 8.89; 
Kis % 23% 234 % 87 TY, 8.83: Mareh : April, 
60% Sharon Sti pid [5] Spe ¢ a. 1 5 6.93; June, 8.97: Juty. 9.01; 
hme & T (3.25¢] 97 September, 9,08: October, 9. 


and Marsha!) 
at 8%. 


% Callahan Z-Lead ,, 
Cal & Hec (1.10g¢] 
Campb Wyant {1] 
Can Dry G Ale .., 


retreated % to 13% 
Field closed unchanged 
Canad Pacifie 


Bank Stocks. os 
Quotations on Continental Illinois . og ‘Co (oe) 
National Trust company . tDo vid ass 
are yesterday, aterp Trac [,50¢ 
MUSi-s.. 
Shares eased Pl to Coe. 
company shares 


and December, 9.10; Janu 
Sales, 12 lots. 

Lead—Closeq U4 
ary, 4.40); 


Sharp & Do es 
15% Shell Union 
Do pfd 


6% Silver K 12% Zenith Radio 12 
8% 


2% ZOnite Products..." 


f—Unit Of trading ten shares °—Ex dividen 
, gs. —Ex- 2nd, 
+ : b—~1-1() share 
8 § 4| this calendar ; BN 
§ P 2 Cash or Stock, k~—Acey 


wig =v year. 
ales to 11 & m., 180,000: 
920,000; to 2 pm 890,000.’ 
WASHINGTON. ns 
by customerg werg 141,848 


x?'—ExX-rights ’ 4.47; 

of $2 breference Stock. | 4.48; Jan ; - Sales 

Declared op Daid so far d .18 cent tower. February to 

OCK. g—Paid last year. in » NO gates. 

vidend Daid or declared this and Straits |—Closed 25 to 
41.10): 

to 12 noon, 


250,000; to : 
5 Opt (883.910 shares, tb. m, 
ren. tubretial. |]—Oda lot 
shares: Sales, 97,251 shares, oe Tanees 
ee 


inn 
ge ¥ Cent Am,.1.10 +A Oe | 
20% Sou Cal Ed [1.50a] 7 


Celotex [1.20gj.." 
er Chicago bank T 
nt Tel & 20 
IntDep St [2.752] “7 10° seine Ee i 


unt ARuir [3.386] 
stocks were unchanged from Tuesday. y 108 Gen H ing (4.50):0.40 4 4% ‘ht ae a 2 10% 4 
Siro de Busco Iie] § 6% q@™ 0% ORT | 70" of% WMDED St (2:75, 6 Gay 
CHICAGO. Cerro de Pasco [le] ao Island Crk ¢ {2}. "3 cia i A 
[Nominal Quotations. | 19 J 


1 
4 
1 
7 
4 
13 
3 
1 


December, January, 
Standard, no sales, Straits. Bales, 2 lots, 


CHICAGO FUTURES. 


Certain-teeg Prod . 


x nme Exchange, $5.01; 


Fraterday. ‘ TDo 6% ~ tbat ve Jews, the [4] 2 ’ | 
J ’ ’ * Ww a **ee 
SP eecesececé ? Ve ara. 
Continental aitinet.. seen 71 ois ah sacs 3 K co ig al ‘s eoitain [Prices Feb. 2, 1988, in dollars per bushel, } Per’ 100 nonnds | 
***eeners p ee Ps 8 ° : a ge. $@-s 47 8, 7 . 8, 7 8.47 
Mereantile Trust... -°****34,) ChiMSt P&P’: 5 4 ‘es if paices per bane, 1 are. close. Year ago. igh. "sos "an vy "aes 
Merchandise pitts ene Do td 9 “re Rennncet 35%— 1% WHEAT, Hees A ‘80%. “eort Liar tage 132% Bepteussed’ 233 ee hae 
Nat: iiderg?"177"" BO 1 20 ~=6Kimberly-c} [la) |. aint us Chicago, Kansas City. St. Lous, | Oe ‘S9%- 89% 1.14 "111% 91% gman iy Hes Bellies, 
. | Tru ***eeeeees DOU 54 530 540 1 15% Kresge 8 Ss [.80e] 6 7 — % ie ee oe 97%@1.00%, SOOO Ce eases 5Yy $11.00 $11.00 $11.00 $11.00 $11.20 
Loan,..,......,.140) 145 140 145 *s D oo 14% Kroger Groc [1.60] 7 6 ws & CPeeeresens abslimeak 50%. Son 1.07% -1.07% ‘81 -» 1150 11.50 411.50 11.50 11.79 
ational . 7 28 26 “i : L o reseeeneees a pf “ CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE. 
Chrysi Corp [10g¢].163 3 Pe eesesees 1.03% ‘62% Butte 
. 3 3% 2% i [Laclede ede ne 2 POPC ee eees, 42% ro : u T, ay 
id Asked am rt 5 et a ee a 96 @07 ee ee 2 e 4 : en 8 per poun : . 
1 ‘ 11 2 Prey. 
oer lon 4 14% r eee) : : Renee Winoipeg, 20% ‘ Stee stands— Onen Righ Bia Mose. elnse, 
6 D.,.1, eoruary 29 
8 2 N...1.114@18% 84 March 
4 g Dias 1,07%@16% . 72% 
i” 9 d...944%4@1.08% wD 92 9 69% 
20 oledo, tees 1.06 1,06% 1.05% U5% 
8 teeeseveres 1.00@1.01 Bic a , 1.05% 1.57% 1.0% Prev, 
4 3 Coe eesereee 97% @ou1, —— ORG 104% 1.04% 1.04% isou 1:06" Refr. stands— Onen. Hitch Low. Close. close. 
20 9 OR ce ~~~-meimne | OCtOher 21% 21% 21% 21% 
1 7 Os tag a 
Kansas City, St. Louis. F 17% 1 
; oe A Loew's Ine (7.504) © 4 lst * se eee GRAIN IN OTHER FRUITS AND VEGETABLES | 7 ot ae . oe : 
15 ; 2 . “Seer eervnns a swine eT 19% 19% 19 
- WHAT STOcKs pip 15 1g port Ino 3 3 55% 55% @57i; MARKETS pis 
< 534@54 2 Wholesale prices jpn | es ‘ 
an [ 3 £4 3% 2 4 O54% 52K@54 Chicag reported by the Kine(3? lots in H ICES 
(Wednesday, Feb, 2, 1086) Comvlth g scs0) 22 Bt Xe ; BbG@sE" Tiere Vebroary Wheat, mos, 7 Puree of ‘agri “nee 
AVERAGES, Do pfd [,75k],. 1 4 wh POMMNL.  wesas.., O ‘ Frey. +8 .60 to $1.25 Chicago. 
. 20% telesales coc t |e + 10g fn 1.08% 1.08% 1,10% | Bee 35 to 95 38 
Congol-Nairn [2},, “3 | & grd.. March Wh Cabb P © y'Z5| Butter, extra. 92 score..$ 33 
88 Cig [ig]. 1 1.12% 1.1 Lett 2.25 to 2.60 Cattle, tops, CWS icei 10.50 
7 Man Z 4 B.A. ..1.10% 3°3 ; Se ae Clear bellies, Ie or. 1 
20% Con 20 Magma Co | 3 50%@52 55, Se ie box, 80 to 4.65 Pla eres’ ae 
ee High. Low, 91% Do ptd [5]. 4 4 484.049% May Wheat. ; 
od. one year ago 140.43 138,73 139.46 % Consol Film 3 40], ls seep "123% 98% 92% poy Oranges 
| $0 ‘Years a£0.120.30 119,09 119.40 “FT MarketStR pr pt.0.50 l2 57%, Dul, *: "Qh 1.05% 1.05% 1:05% Parsley,’ 11); hcneade cs 
: x , bf 5% Marshal] Field s 8 2 oa 88 88 88% 88% Pea " rs ha Manne ee ea ee 
| | AVERA & 15 % Martin G L Co eee 15 : OATS. Wog. 1.26% 1.2 1.25% é 6 Pe 8, ’ Mexican, ;.°:’ *Oeeeee 
the: 80 ind. 15 rails 15 ut. 60 stks, fd 3 1% Martin-Par Sys. Cucage. Kansas City, tLvp] 1.12% 1.19% 1.12% 1.19% Radione, ON bids cia se. 
vot change... accnaad & — 5 —_ 4 Cons Pw pf [4.50] ee Math Alk [1.65¢]. 3 33%@ 5 ae Geet duly Wheat. Rhubarb ; llinois 5 
ednesda: we GLY Contain Cor 11:20} 1% May Dept 8t 4 +. 87 87 rity 86% Sweet Potatoes : 
ev. day...,. 62,3 % Cont Bak A % eCrory 8t [50g], > ‘1.02% 1.02% 1.01% 101% Turnips, bu, [lingig’***'*'***- 
aie ‘a£o.... eee 1% [1}, 3 i oe 8 88 .88 i eee © a eke Seeees 
10 wee. 99.9 si 73 Do pid i@]..””” a wre Pore [2]. 21 pukka #4 “118% 118% 148% Lisy 
wheat - 52, _ Po rt M% McKeesportTin [2] 1 303 -1.12% 1.194% 112 1.12 
= wae 68.2 21.6 y% McKesg & Rob [d], 12 CCRC COB Oe ee ; JA ' & B, A. ..1.85 
* eee 60.2 : ht Jos 1 Winnipeg, (97% 97% 97% 
o T ye e PROG eaees % ’ , ps 0 
a tow... one : ts Mead Corp [1.50¢) 2 Sere 100% Set 1.00 bee a 
193: low..... 17.6 16.9 56 PS ) 41% Melville Shoe {1 RYE AND FLAX, c 1+M@e 04 
929 high. 1, we awe © seit {Corn Exch [3].,0 60 $ Mengel Co PP einige! rae Flax, eae 80 ony Flaxseed, 
lene? ets [3] 2 yD? 5% Dt1 2 66}.0.0 34 @L0% oe oe Du: ads 204% Dose Bo! 2.04% 
“3 os ; J 22 Mesta f , , 1 ‘ortaree ip, 2 agi 76% Dul. ee 04 2.04 2.04 2:04 2.04 


: ve yell oO ; ' Corn, s np eee PP eee eee es aee + 
“|. Pield seeds, fel Prices at Chicago 

| follows: Timothy, $2.90@3 00 [choice 

—Bigher); alsike, $26.50@30.00; red 

clover, $10,00 


. adi 

Ck és (3 
9g : , . e 
sai pi we be ; 
Cuba Co 


3 ratte a aaa 


$9 29 Comet pe te 


- 


Ast syre- Pr ett te 
: 4 Mo Pacific '|""'**"" 


hd dl a 4 r ' 9 4 : re a4. “ Ti 4 td a 
, a 


LC igi 28 aaa ea 27% e 2 rai ‘ar my ee 
45% AB% i Ae bsp. if x 2 eae: 533 sh 43 aes 
41% 


@37,00; sweet 


BH e009 


VGN Sete ccerene 
’ fe 5 . 
eZ OP eth eene 


+ 48% 


 Sesitiad Fas. , x we, 
aaa A ae aia ee ce Migs ites 
RMes 


eS a be eke ee Y ss ‘ oy 
COME ADs ser trreern oneness 


es ee 
Ron Lin eg 

tails i 1 i. 
i cee 


ed 
” — 
Asttly & 


J | Weston B. Grimes, 
BEV) charge of market 
against the firm's subsidiary, Cargill | 
| Grain company of Illinois, and its of-] 


be avy. od 
; 2 = 
Nei ey 
> a 
Mi my 


es wie 


fn 
* Li ; ‘a ~ i a P 4 ¥ hs a 
+ ‘ + : 1d ‘ 4 L+ EA Seas 


. 
a 
> 

— 


a ee 
Looe 
orae 


a. 
[> -; & 
Co 


to Practice. 


BY THOMAS FURLONG. 
Disclogure that the Farmers’ Na- 
tional Grain corporation, government 
| financed cobperative, was the largest 
short seller in the corn market last 
| September stirred much interest yes-| 
terday in La Salle street. | 
The cotperative’s big short position 
in the market was brought to light 


+4 
BE 


“38333 


ne 
=8 


3 


— : 
HOI DMIOHSMH AH MOomaL 


oe petet-) 
= 
Pon 


a 


ce gh Sie 


DOMESTIO BOND 


eSos 


>. Iw 
FERS 
- 
C2 
rant 


ficers is an attempt by the Chicago|T 
the exchange of wilful manipulation | 
Washington, D. C., Feb, 2—(P)—A| “that a committee of our competitors , McDons 
The charge, he asserted, is typical) mont of justice inv 


‘ » Biy Fa _ | Board of Trade to bolster its prestige: 
eet ee es armers its officers were accused bbs gh 4 
of corn prices during the market|t 
“squeeze” last September. 
- genatehouse committee agreed late| should find our purchases of Septem-| charged, that “it fs impro 
: | cucmugam | per corn to be offensive,” | pect deliveries on future 
| lof the “closed social club style” in 
which the affairs of the exchange 


S = Paes ns a special investigating committee 
Bonus for Compliance. 
“It is not surprising,” Grimes said, 
have been administered for many 


re 
- 


it 8°49 
1Baletiw 44s°70, 
2 3°7 
Charges Restraint of Trade. shaw W Pall 47 M88 
¢ SEP&L 6520254 


years. 
Grimes said the exchange was un- 


wheat, corn, to- 


bacco, and rice in 

an effort to sta- 

bilize prices. 

-Conferees said 

general provi- 

sions for corn, 
wheat, rice, and 

tobacco were not 

altered during 

final sessions of 

the conference 

committee, which 

has been busy since Jan, 3 drafting 
a single bill from the separate meas- 
ures passed by house and senate. 
They said they expected the plan to be 
subject to some criticism when the 
measure goes back to senate and 
house for final approval. 


able to sustain earlier charges against 
the company and brought up the new 
accusation of manipulation to bolster 
its position. 

He referred to the previous citation 
against the company for its refusal 
to obey an order issued last Septem: 
ber by the exchange to liquidate 
nearly 2,000,000 bushels of its corn 
holdings. The company contended 
that compliance with the order would 
force it to sacrifice its holdings and 


“Restrictions on the bidding im- 
posed by the exchange,” he asserted, 
are “obviously in restraint of trade 
and have the effect of reducing the 
price which the farmer can obtain for 
his grain,” 

John H, MacMillan Jr., president of 
Cargill, Inc,, is in the West Indies on 
a vacation, Grimes disclosed, The 
Board of Trade’s charges, he said, 
were timed so that they were made 
public during MacMillan’s absence. 


CIGARET TAX POURS 
$487.903,000 INTO 
TREASURY IN YEAR 


DISPUTE EFFECT _ 
OF HOUSING BILL 
ON WAGE SCALES 


by the report of the special commit- 


tee of the Chicago Board of Trade ae T&L 


investigating the causes of the 
squeeze in the corn market last Sep- 
tember, 


ree 
On Sept, 18, the report showed, the | But¥ 


cobp was short 2,460,000 bushels of 
corn, against which it was carrying 
only 643,148 bushels of cash corn with 
which to make delivery against the 


future contracts. This meant that } 


the coSp had a net speculative short 
position in corn of 1,816,852 bushels. 
Big Loss Is Reported. 

It is reported that the corporation 
took a big loss on its short opera- 
tions. This is said to have been one 
of the contributing factors in the re- 
cent decision of directors and stock- 
holders to liquidate the organization. 


tOCentrif P .. 
Cities Service 
Do pia ie 
Giga tah Hn 
u i) - 
Claude Neon L 
?Colon Devel,. 
Do cv pfid.. 
Colum O & G 
Omwl&Se war. 


es: > 
-* FRR. K- Bar: 


> 


7 71 
106% 105%+ ¥% 
aoe 104 
1 106 
108 
100 
90% 90% 


++ 
SaRakatae: 


+++1 1] 


me 


Bey 
4 
244 
is 
1 


— 


cece 


‘ 1 
23 
65 6 yf 
wai, 
65 5 
ti 1057 
87% 87 
97 98 
0 90 
83% 84% 
36% 386 


+++ 
co 
REESE LKR 


m& 
Fe 
+l ttt 
~ 


4h 
3d 


’"50.. 26 26 

11 Tex E S 5s ‘60.. 94% 94 9+ 
9 TexP&L 5s '56..103% 103% 108 
2 ToledoHd 6a '62,,108% 108% 108 
12 TwinCRT6%s'52A 59 58 8 
8 7Ulen6s’50 4th st 45% 

21 UnitL&P 6%s'74 61 

6 do 6s "75 eereneee 60 5 

5do 5s '59 ,..... 95% 

5 UnitL&éR 5%e baad > is. 


5s '60 81 
Wald-Ast 5s ‘54 te 15% 15 
3 WashGaslL 5s'58.105% 105% 105 “ee 
3 WashWatP 5s’°60.105 104% 104%— 
1 WNewspUn 6a '44 88 38 88 ceed 


Ralph T. Crane— 
* What 
profit? ”* 


over such transactions. - 


The bankers argued that congress 
would be employing the wrong psy- 
chology if it gave the SEC a police- 
man’s club and told it to make sure 
that “voluntary” associations were 
formed, 


% 
1 WUnGE 5%48’55A.104% 104% 104%— % 
% 


1 YadkinRP 5s '41.104% 104% 104%—- 

FOREIGN BONDS. All, however, indorsed the portion 
of the Maloney bill which would per- 

5 FinRMBk 5s’61st.103 108 108  .... 

1 IsottaFras 7s 49 79 #79 79 mit the establishment of associations, 

1 MaranBraz 78'58 17% 17% under the supervision of the SEC. 

1 ParanaBraz 7858 9 9 The associations would be charged 

5 RiodeJan 6%48 ’59 9 9 

s SantiagoCh 1s 1 13 with promulgafing and enforcing 

0 7s ws 19% 13% 1: codes of ethics to protect the invest- 

4 UnitElSve 7s '56 58% 58% 5 ing public. 

: = dividend. ee rights, iMatared Joseph C. Hostetler, counsel for the 
ons; Hegotlability impeired pending investl-| investment bankers conference, de- 
tion. fOfficially list ’ 

fhe + Re ot Flea Ma Bln sagt oma | clared that the threat of drastic regu- 

waranis, xw--Without warants, war—War-| laflons by the commission might hara- 

per formation of the associations. 

“T think it is wrong to say to these 
dealers: ‘Now if you don’t do this, 
the bogey man’s going to get you.’ 
Speculative interest in the cott not | *t i8 sounder to let this business or- 
ig a a minieum, brokers. said pote nen m4 ganize itself,” the Cleveland, O., at- 
and price changes in the market are large- | torney testified. 
ly a reflection of hedging sales on one hand 
and trade buying on the other, with minor Profit Definition Difficult. 
oF Henan etn based on Gis anton!  Renates Adams [D., Colo.] said he 
one, trades A cotton futures a. the | was “surprised” that none of the wit- 

icago Board of Trade were unchanged to| nesses had objected specifically to a> 

02 t higher. Oth kets 

ware 6% ria 03 cent wg Bae ig Ming . portion of the regulatory section 
Demand for cotton goods was reported as | which would permit the SEC to “ pro- 


little change. 
Spot cotton closed unchanged with New/ profits or unreasonable rates of com- 


Indorse Part of Bill. 


Approves Bonus Plan. 
Chairman Smith [D,, 8, C,] of the Washington, D. C, Feb. 2—(/)— The cooperative, organized with 
government money for the ostensible 


senate agriculture committee, said the | phe cigaret continued as a rising ‘ 

Joint congressional group had ap-|source of federal revenue in 1937, Legislators and Labor purpose of bringing the farmers a 

proved his suggestion that bonus pay- bringing $487,903,000 into the federal Eg e aders Disagr ee. ~via return a peso Eas gas, os 
cupied a peculiar position in being 

hastened, Under this arrangementinal revenue bureau reported today. [Continued trom page 91, column 33 


“ 


2 fo.) 
“Fe 2 Rees 


Re. REE lat Daa 


9 Bs 48 = 

1 tComwl85%s'48A.108 108 1038 =. 
1Comm P&L 5s'57 60% 60% 60 
21 t0oGELB eet 104% 106 


ments on the 1987 cotton crop be treasury during the year, the inter- 
the biggest short seller in the mar- 


growers can turn over to the gov-/This was a $28,000,000 increase over ket. The short sales of professional 
ernment some 5,000,000 bales of cotton |1936 collections, which totaled $459,- market operators have long been 
on which loans are already made. | 520,000, and low in the south, where labor | criticized by farm organization as de- 
Congress already has voted $130,000,-| Tax collections on all forms of to-| generally is unorganized. pressing market values and cheating 
000 extra payments on the 1937 cot-|bacco jumped from $536,102,000 in| The relief application act of 1987| the farmer of the full value of his 
ton crop in addition to loans ranging /|1936 to $563,183,000 im 1937, a $27,-|contained a prevailing wage provi-| products. i igellrteed 
down from 9 cents a pound. Legis-/| 000,000 gain. Receipts from manufac-|sivn, and Senator Lodge used it as} The short sales of the cobperative | Duval Tex .... 
lators from corn and wheat sections /tured tobacco such as chewing, smok-| the model for his amendment to the| were in effect financed by funds from sete * meee. 
may protest the new provision. ing, and snuff tobacco dropped from/| housing bill. the federal treasury. The organiza- Since ico. 
The program establishes definite | $62,588,000 in 1936 to $60,816,000 last; The administration opposed the/ tion has operated since its inception aap a Sh, 
supply levels for the five crops and | year. “i Arne age on the ground that largely with federal funds, although | pi Pow As ., 
attempts to control production and| — t e a the housing program | in theory its capital was provided by | _D 
marketing through a system of bene- th 4 = viamanee an tae ae poreye regional codperative associations | moni Com 
fit payments, loans on stored sup-| PE SU ME TRUCK Raeretary of Labcw Percing yo noi the which were the nominal stockholders. | tEsquire Coron 
Rescued by Government, 


plies, and penalties for excess sales senate administration leaders r 
lied, 

when supplies are large. I N QU I R Y TOD AY said: _— Farmers’ National was rescued from fsa tg 
How Scheme Works. AT S P R 7 NG FI E L D “It would mean that a prevailing | bankruptcy two years ago when the | Fidelio Brew 

The secretary of agriculture will wage rate would have to be deter-| federal Farm Credit administration, | Zisk ge SN 
estimate the production of corn,| Springfield, Ill., Feb, 2.—[Special,] | mined in virtually every community, | forsaking hope of recovery on its|wora Mot Lid 
wheat, or other crops needed in any|—An Illinois legislative commission| mo matter how small, in the United | loans, wiped off $14,000,000 that it had | Gen Alloys... 
season, convert this figure to acre-| will meet here tomorrow and Friday | States. advanced over a period of years to Sel ade 


Fe 


1 fConGBalt 5s'89.106 
1 *ConGUtés'’43 st 61 
1 ContG&E 5s'SBA.. 69 
18 CudahyPk 3%s'55 94 
1 DelHiPw 5148'59.100 100 100 
5 DenverG&E 50'49.109 109 109 
1 DetCGas 68'47A..105 105 105 
10 do 65s '60B 102% 102% 102% . 
1 §DetIntBr 6%4s'52 4 4% 4%+ | antes, 
13 fHastG&y 48'56A 75% 75% 75% .... pene 
j Becban, ofS tam “ah Bane 
ec 8 f 68% 63 
4EmpDisE 6s’52.. oa 88 eal * COTTON 
9FEmpO&R 5842 75% % 
: O08 ; 


FESS: 2 


9 FlaPow 4s'66C .. 
18 Gatin P 5s ‘56... 

2do 6s ‘41B 101% 101% 101L%— 
1GenPubS 68'53 ..80 80 80 — 
16 GeoPow 5s '67 .. 

4 GlenAldCoa! 48'65 

2 tGobel 4%s °'41A 
25 GrandTrunk 48’50 

1?GrocStPr 6s'45. 

3 HallPr 68'47A st 

7 HouGulfG 6%48'43 
16 tHysrdFd 6s’49A 


age, and then split the acreage up 
among states, counties, and individ- 


to resume its inquiry into the intra- 
state operation of 250,000 trucks regis- 


“The administrative difficulties in- 
volved would be very great and the 


encourage the codperative enterprise. | Geors Pow pfd 64% «.+,,| 1 Pw &Lt gpn’58C. 
‘ys ‘67 


At that time it advanced new credits 


Glen Alden . 
Goldfield Con. 


Orleans 8.65c; New York, 8.50c, and Gal- mission.” 


veston and Houston at 8.40c a pound. Prices 
follow: 


Ralph T. Crane, vice president of 
Brown, Harriman & Wo., New York 


ual farms. Farmers who stay within | tered in this state. The commission| delay that would be incurred would | which permitted the codp to continue | ¢Grand Nat Fil 
these limits will receive benefit pay-| will report to the next session of the} be a deterrent to the active construc-| operations. Subsequent unprofitable | 9'y Tel P 8 


ments and loans on stored crops.|general assembly recommendations; tion so much needed in the near operations and the prospect that no ey sir Prod 
When supplies become excessive a/for the regulation of this highway/ future,” _ 


Chicago Board of Trade, 


Low. Close. 
8.57 8.58 
8.57 8.58 
8,65 8.65 
8.75 8.75 


New Orleans Cotton Exchange. 


Ms '54B .... 90% 90 a -+ 
3Ind&Mich 6s’66..107% 107% 107%+- 
4Ind El 6s '47 .,. 85% 838% 86%+ 
3do 5s '61C ...... 72% 72 12 — 
4Ind Svc 68 '60.. 58 BB 68 + 

14 IntP&L 5s’57A..105% 105% 105% 
SIntPSee 64s8'55C, 56 £56 56 — 
liInt Salt 5s °'61..107% 107% 107%+ 
4Inters Pow 6852 25% 

12 do 6s '57 42 
1 IntPSve Bs ‘66D. 67% 67% 67%— 1 
2do 4%s "58 ...., 61% , 


SitSupPw 68’68A. 41% 41 % 
2JacksnvG §s'42st 33 33 33 ree 2 
14 JerCP&L 56%s'61C.1038 102%103 + 1 
7do 4s '47B .....105 104% 104%— 
9 KasPow 68'47A..100 100 100 + bata 
3 KyUtil 6s ‘691... 73% 72% 72%+ 
14LehiPS 682026A.101 100% 100%+ 
2 Lex Util 5s '52.. 95% 95% 95% .... 
13 LibMcN&L 58°42.1038% 103 103%+ 
11 LongIisILt 68'45.. 98 9'7 98 + 
LLou P&L 6s8'57.,108% 108% 1038%— 
1 McCord R 68°48. 82 82 82 aad 
4 tMengelCo4%s'47 86 85% 85%— 2! 
2 Metro Ed 48'65G.105% 105 105 — 
1 Midland Val 5s8’'43 56% 56% 56%— 2 
8 MilwGLt 4%8'67. 92% 92 = 
8 Minn P&L 5s8'55. 98% 
1 Miss Pow 5s ‘55.. 66% 
26 Muns'nSS6%4s’37ct 5% 
8 NatP&L 6s2026A. 78 


City, said it would be difficult to de- 
fine a “reasonable” profit at tinies. 
Senator Maloney [D., Conn.) said 
the SEC already regulates over-the- 
counter dealers whose sales of stocks 
are made outside of the exchanges. 


WHEAT PRICES 
SAG ON RAINS 
IN CROP BELT 


CHICAGO GRAIN FUTURES 


Closing prices on the May delivery 
of principal grains on the Chicago 
Board of Trade yesterday were: 


Yesterday. Tuesday. Yr. ago. 
Liverpool Market. $1.31% 
LIVERPOOL, Feb, 2.-~P)—Cotton receipts, Bm ; 1,07% 
13,000 bales; no American. Spot, quiet; 50% 
8do 5s 2030B., oo 40 prices 3 points lower. Quotations in pence: 1.18 
1 NatPubS 58’78 ct. 44% 44% 44% ..., American, strict good middling, 5.69; good ° , ° as 
1 NebrPw6s42022.116 116 116 + 1%| middling, 5.89: strict middling. 6.14: mide Demme enor, LOH =H 
1 Neisner Bro 63’48 85 85 85 = 3 | dling, 4.89; strict low middling, 4.64; low eae 
or rot BO 5 SS sin” Pf ad middling, 4.14; strict good ordinary, 3.64;/ Reports of light rains at a fe - 
Seed tnd’ tox Futures closed un-! points in parts of eastern Kansas a; 


19 NEngGé&E 58’50. 60 49 + changed to 1 lower. March, 4.78; May, ; 
red July, 4.88; October, 4.95; January,| Nebraska and the weakness in 1°: 


stock marRet resulted in a lo\ 

range of prices for wheat futures « ; 
the Chicago Board of Trade yes 

CHICAGO CURB. day. Wheat closed at net losses of \ 
High, Low. Clos. Prey. | to % cent a bushel. Corn declined *: 
£9 85 639s 33} to 1: cent with May touching 5s. 
cents, a new low since December 38. 


: akpKakatata®! seaeetae 


vit hee . 
- FRE! FRE: Fe 


> aRakataatak: atatak: 


7 do 5s °47 51 50 50 + 1 
11 NEngPow 5448'54. 80% 79% 79%— 

20 do 6s '48 78 77% 73 — 

5 NOrl PS Ge'49A. 65% 64% 64%— 
LNY&WLt 482004,104% 104%104% ..., 
1 NYCenE] 5%4s’50. 99 99 99 ae 
18 NY P&L 4%48'67.106%106 106 — % 
1 NYSt E&G 4448'80 98 93 93 = % Sales, 
7 NoInd G&E 69'52.106%106 106%+ 1 |Camp Gold. 1,497 ; 
5 No Ind PS 5s "66C 97 97 97 — ¥% Dick Br Br 100 ‘ 76 .76 
6 NoStPow 8%48'67. 98% 98% 98%— %F FehrBrew 425 .35 35 85 


new federal subsidies Gulf O ., 
vote of two-thirds of the producers | freight transportation, McDonald’s Letter Cited granted led to the pelted tHazeltine .,, 
Louis J. “ ¢Hearn D Strs 
taking part in a referendum can eat ae ogy ome we hid A letter from A. Stewart McDonald, | Tctors late last year to dissolve the Tollinge sae 
ee ins reviewed testimony received to housing administrator, also relied|® year old organization. This recom-| Hom 4 Hard 
ener ud ps Fp ee até et in thirty-four hearings in twelve SPoe by senate administration lead- el" sv piggy ! Gipeaapat i Hamble oll 164 
tela auotas, would operate 8| ites. The record indicate that the|""E MS, 4 | [ams t ® mesting im Chicago last | Berth 
‘ f meat, eggs, butter, coal, oe ’ 
bacco, if approved by growers. ce beg te Bek vient ote are in.| “Uld impose upon the lending in- Properties Taken Over, odd x Wie 
‘ volved in the inquiry and that it is ro ay pry for failure on| Most of the physical properties of {inte Prod .. 
1937 Air Express Shi pments| more than a problem involving the a builder, contractor or | the codperative have been surrendered 
truck owners and operators, because yaconitactor to comply with the con- | to the federal government in partial 
Show Increase of 35 Pct. retail prices must include transporta- ee becad a heal In other! satisfaction of debts, The govern- , 
New York, Feb. 2,—{Special.]—Air | tion costs. the builder. . at the thay oof | ment is now trying to liquidate these | {rebs'ey, *” 
express shipments increased 35 per| The legislators, six from each cham- AP ie, © ume & Prop: | assets, It is estimated the proceeds |JO Pal. 6% p 70 70m 
cent in 1937 over 1936, the Railway | ber, have learned also that much of erty was built, would deprive the of the liquidation will cover only a |10n_.& Lau stl % 88% 83%+ 
Express agency disclosed today. Gross | the hauling on the roads'today is in oe ee — to col-! small fraction of 15 to 20 salilions {Koppers Go'p 28101 4017 aus” 
revenue for the year showed an in-| violation of the public utilities act of| 11. otter the ad iw tnd a that the government poured into the | [#*,Shr M.; #000 574 56% 56%— 
crease of 27 per cent. 1921. should default on the mort perty | venture, tLe Tourneau 
sal rigage, The findi tLeonard Oil . 
| ley [D., Ky.], said this fear of losing committee raised the question of how | tLockheed ‘Air 
Da RB D SIO th s the government mortgage insurance extensive had been the earlier short yond hac F sah 
U U a U ru O (4 iy te would result in a refusal on the part operations of the corporation. It has Do p fe 
: ran of banks and other lending institu. been one of the biggest operators in {ons Lae 
EXDeriMeN#Aal EGFMNS Rives | tons 20 taxe mortgases on nousing | the, Chicago grain market tor sev-| din Br 
. projects, eral years and was known at times | {Merrlt.0 & 8 
Senator Burton K. Wheeler [p, | 0 have been on the short side, Mich Sug .... * st et 
Mont.J and other supporters of the| he committee’s report, however, Peis ha Fg By 3} t,. ft + 


atetae aati tie: a 


dangerous when it drops on side-| Lodge amendment said it - was the first definite fi 100 14 «(14 
as needed © Hgures that | Miss R Pw pt 30105 105 105 — 
wt oot Raut somewhat vllos|cgtaieguas, bor trom 't'azive to Mave been brought to ght concern | Blaveeies: ofp Ey tn Tiny 
tad on 7 
_ he a bene P reduce wages, ing its speculative short sales, ‘Mt City Cop au 6 


Ginkgo Trees 


February 2, 1938. 
INKGO trees will be grown from 
seed in a test being started at 


~——~—ews | Mount Prod , 
Mt st T @T. 
tNat Contain. 


200 5% 56 544+ 
10 118% 118% 1184+ 
100 7% 7% 7%+ 


the Tribune’s Wheaton Experi- 
mental farm. The test will be 
made on a small] scale by the farm’s 
head gardener. 
in starting the experiment, about 
a quart of the ginkgo seed is being 
stratified. The seed is put in sand 
and buried outdoors, imitating natu- 
ral conditions as near as possible, so 
the coats will crack in freezing. In 
the spring the seeds will be allowed 
to sprout and the young seedlings 
will be set in nursery beds where 
they can be carefully protected while 
they are establishing a root system. 
There hag been a ginkgo tree on 
the farm for thirty years. Last year 
the upper part of the tree died. The 
gardener found it necessary to cut 
down the tree, leaving a stump from 
which a sprout developed last sum- 
mer. While the ginkgo is used chief- 


Some authorities recommend grow- C ARN E G/ E S Qf EEL 


ing only the male trees to avoid the 
objectionable odor of the fruit. 

If the trees can be raised success- 
fully from seed, they will be used 
at the farm for landscape purposes. 


Native of the Orient. 


Tree experts have found that the 
ginkgo is a native of China and 
Japan. It is believed by some au- 
thorities that the tree really is a 
native of China only, but was intro- 
duced from there to Japan long ago, 
It is claimed that the ginkgo tree’ 
is the only species and only genus 
left of a family that formerly was 
widely distributed and that went 
back to the carboniferous age. It 
is well represented in the fossil 
state. Until recently it was found 
only around Chinese temples, but 


DENIES PLAN TO 
ABANDON PLANTS 


The Carnegie-Illinois Stee] corpora- 
tion yesterday denied reports origi- 
nating in Pittsburgh that it planned 
permanently to abandon operations in 
five plants and transfer Operations to 
the new $60,000,000 Irvin Works at 
Clairton, Pa. 

The five plants are at New Castle, 
Farrell, and Monessen, Pa,; Elwood, 


Ind., and Cambridge, O. Operations - 


at all five were suspended several 
weeks ago, 

At the Chicago office of the corpora- 
tion it was said that Operations had 
been suspended at the plants be- 


cause of lack of orders and that the Y 


corporation expected to reopen them 


| PRODUCE MARKETS 


tthe, | 1%e lower. Receipts, 12,847 
cases, BU R-U 

Receipts, 8429 tubs. POULTRY — Live: 
Hens, unchanged to 2%4c lower: iryers, un- 
changed to %c lower. Receipts, 80 trucks. 
POTATOES — Dull. 


cent butter fat, price paid producer at farm, 
$2.25 per 100 Ibs. 


Wholesale Creamery Butter Prices. 
——Chicago—— Phil- 
Whole Cen- New adel- 

k, Boston. phia. 
3 *ree 844% 


90 score..31% 
89 score. .31% 31% 
88 score..80% 380% 


Wholesale Cheese Pric 
Fiate @netenveeesee + © eeeeeee 
Twins..15%-16 16%-17 eeeeeeete @ eee eter 
8, Dais.16%-16% 17 -17%17 -17%17 -17% 
-18 17% 


e* @©@ eee eee8 7 eee 


. Am oesees 
ighn -16%-16% Sb aeeoeee #8 17 “17% 


nchanged to %e lower. 


Receipts, 67 care; on 
team track, 358, MILK-—Grade A, 3.5 per 


es. 
Chicago. Boston. New York. Philadel. 
16%-18 ... P 


Nat P&L pfd. 
?Nat Un Rad. 
New Eng T&T 
NJ Zine ..., 
tNewmount M 
M Y Transit. 
fNiag H Pow 

TDo ist pid 
Wiles-Bem-P .. 


Pepperell .... 
*Phoenix Sec. 
Pitney-Bowes , 


1 Nor’w PS 5s '57. 90% 90% 


90%+ %Hdelbg Brew 100 43 43 48 43 


L CHICAGO STOCKS 


PS 

fe 

“3 
a: | hak: 


0 87 86% 86 
25144 144 1 
50 67 67 


~3 
l 
ray 


Wednesday, February 2, 1938, 


Shares sold RON itci's dicks sedis 18,000 


CPovencesoecceseces +: LO1,000 
Description, 


Total sales 1938 to date......,.. 625,000 
Total sales 1937 to date...... . - 2,504,000 
Net -~—-Ulosing— 


div. rate, $4—~ Sales. Open, High, Low. Close. chge. Bid. Asked. 
5 37 37 37 3 6 Wy 


Abbott Lab [1.60a].. 
Aetna B Bear[1.05¢] 
Am P Sve pfd [1.75] 


g eee 

[ 63 + 
[1] 

Borg-Warner 


Do pid [1.50] 
CenlIlPubSve 
Cen-Ill See pf 
Cen & 8S WU 


Oats, rye, and soy beans closed un- 
changed to a fraction of a cent lower. 

There was no evidence of an in 
crease in outside speculative interest 
and the uncertainty regarding the 
trend of general business was said 
to have checked professional opera- 
tions. 

No hope of a breaking of drouth 
conditions in the southwestern part 
of the winter wheat belt was held 
out by the official weather forecast, 
and reports of dust storms were re 
ceived from the driest areas in the 
Texas panhandle and in western Kan- 
sas, 

Weakness in the corn market was 
said to be due to liquidation by 
longs because of the failure of ex- 
port demand to develop. Yesterday's 
decline failed to stimulate foreign 
purchases. , 3 


+Pitts Forg... 
3 U. 8. Government Graded Eggs. 
U, §. extras Llargej, white loose, 27 cents. Teclerie se 
U. 8. extras [large], white, cartons, 28 cents, Powdrell & A 


Live Poultry. 
Capons ,.... 22@26c! Geese .........12@19¢ | Sremer Gold. 
Broilers— Leghorn hens.12@19¢ | 4pryg Invest. 
Do pf ; 


along streets and in city parks, it | S0me wild species have been discov- 
~i been found -oitnren deg at the| ered recently. when business improved. 


Horticulturists regard the ginkgo 
MONEY, GOLD, AND SILVER 
Colored een 26¢ Old roosters ee 15¢c ‘a, ‘ 3 
As 1 % . Do B 90 % % Affl FInc. 3.76 4.14|Nat Wi See 2.86 


farm, where its growth and habits 
can be compared with the native | #8 One of the most distinct of the 
trees, conifers. Unlike most conifers, its 

NEW YORK, Feb. 2.—(p)— 

“TONDOM. Fee mt : prabe Springs ....28@26%Kel Pavers... a1 Ose | F t 

’ ed, oney, %%, i p GE csees TYGTS «sees ce 200 see : 3 2 28 

ie 2 Cord Corp preted ) 
ingai r Cnghm D Sirs [1.50] : 5S u Ot 


attractive dull green foliage is de- 
8 month bills, A %. Hens .... 


Common in Washington, D.C. ciduous, assuming a clear yellow tone 
. The ginkgo is grown quite com-| before falling in the autumn. : 
along the streets in Washing-| Growers find it extremely erratic| 5 Id, 1398 9d, up 2d. (Equivalent sed Poultry, 
D. C. It produces a seed with|in its behavior, Sometimes it grows inte LS Bar silver, 204, unchanged. K hepa yg. a il reves BODS2C rie) tan P ange Ae 
resinous flavored kernel) well, but at other times makes prac-| ‘panis, Feb. ry (Prin foreign exch saa oe : : Bl Household ....... 
tically no growth. Where it hap-| transactions tare HiginNatWateh  {3¢] 


erv 
ColemanL&S [2.50¢] 
Comwith Edis [1:25] 


INVESTING COMPANIES | 


: Sakae: atakatt 


Bid. Ask. Bid. Ask. 
AdmFd2d1.11.23 11.95) Mutual Iny 9.98 4° 


BroadStin.21.71 23.22; NAmBT cef.52.25 
CentShTr..2U.84 22.41 | NAmTS'63 1.96 
Comw Inv, 8.05 3,2 = "65 


eee 
eeere 
eeeoe 


today United States dolls | Extra firsts, cars 18%0 | websmeee "py 
es , Seceeeeeeeveeeeeseeeever ' 

pens to thrive, it is disease resistant | “08d 30¢ 51c [3.278 cents to the sane LO56 {HON COPS sesssotersercesvtesveoees 18C| St Begis Pap 7 6 FitzSimmns&Co [.50] 
, compared with 3.282c to the franc in New Fresh firsts, CATH sccsneesscerececseseses G 

and withstands severe windstorms, | York overnight. Exchange on London,|  L0s8 than CALS v.scsccseccssescecsecseveh TBC 

It is known to thrive in a cold cli-| 25 JP wpe EDR pouree 3% rentes were | OUFTEDE FECCIDIB vorsreersrvoersrrnreereoed ue 

mate or a hot, moist climate. For| {07 gre, 1” 7 $08: Ate 1087, | Dittion oressesrrssseserereressspeersesenersh BAe |§ 

this reason it is grown in practically| MONTREAL, Feb. 2.—()—Silver futures Potatoes, 

all be ; of the country. ae Pry epg t pai ye omy ai Feb- pyc 5 oes babe dade badar bhesb aces REI OOE ee 

“ep 38 peaaaaeepa ey, ale ee ee eect ee 

Wisconsin OFFER TFODE HOO 09 O88 F282 0 1 


e 
° 
» 


orCo wm 
te 
_. 


Ss 

& 

~ 
= 


3 8 88 88 — 
107% +t ant 
58 232 2382. st + 
00. 8h on ot 
1 88 38 38 ee 
25 54+ 


25 


*e@eet’ 


: 
* ee 


iat 

are 
Om ~B 

ese 

<x 

ie 


eo ate 
oO 
eat: 


Eyes 


tee eeerereer | 


Hart 


et Bid 


z 
ae 
BER FER 


. 
o “¢ 
+ hy, 
et » oe ; 
a % ; 
at 
w oe : 
‘ mm 
% 4 
% : 
bf 
= 


eS a ae oe es ae a La :. >. ti > . an 
he Ge SPCR ee RNG AENO Sit 65. Pik SND DB | he 
7 Sat " i, areeaiwet 2p '« ¢ ne 
seis “ge t; $e Re gaBetowwoy + Tied  . PF ine é 
e RSENS * ; vo OLS 
; > ae s 
EO - ack, OP 


See ie : 
Ms, “its ein’ 

t Slee NY thay 

os Fs i 4 
, $ ope” GS pes es 
eo . . 
. St a . 
So Se “ . is 
Ps a i ..% P : 
* by 


53 Million for 1937. 


BY JOSEPH ATOR. 

The’ state tax commission’s 1937 
capital stock assessments in Cook 
county, delivered yesterday to Coun- 
ty Clerk Michael J. Flynn, showed a 
12.2 per cent increase over valuations 
for 1936. The 1937 total is $53,040,650, 
as against $47,286,083 in 1936. 

Assessments on the capital stock of 
Illinois corporations are made by both 
the tax commission and the county 
assessor, the latter’s valuations being 
merged with personal property as- 
sessments. Those of the tax commis- 
sion are principally on utility and 
service corporations. The assessor 
appraises stock of mercantile, manu- 
facturing, newspaper publishing and 
coal mining corporations and live 
stock improvement and building and 
loan associations. 


Cover Intangible Assets. 


Capital stock valuations apply to 
the intangible assets of a corporation, 
or its total value less real estate and 
tangible property already assessed for 
tax purposes. The appraisals are 
sometimes spoken of as representing 
the going value of a concern. 

Virtually all of the Cook county 
assessments are within the city of 
Chicago. The 1937 total in the coun- 
try towns was $1,062,119. 

Some of Larger Assessments. 


Some of the larger assessments on 
the tax commission’s list follow: 


1936. 1937. 

Agri Broadcasting Co.$ 133,157 $ 148,500 
Am League Baseball 

Club, Chicago.. 
ArlingtonPkJocky ‘club 
Cal. & 8S. Chicago Ry.. 
Cargill Grain Co of tl 
Central Cold Storage Co 
Chi Bears Football club 
ChiBusMen’sRac’gAssn 
Chicago Motor CoachCo 
Chi Nat Leag Ball club 
Chicago Rys Co 
Chi Title&Trust Co.... 
Chicago Towel Co ... 
Comwith Edison Co... 
ist State Pawners Soc 
Halsey, Stuart & Co.. 
Til Bell Telephone Co. 
Ill Dist Telegraph Co. 
ill Greyhound Lines... 
Lake Building Corp... 
La Salle Ext Univ.... 
Mather Human StkTr. 
Merchants LightrgeCo. 
No American Car Corp 
Peo Gas Lt & CokeCo. 
Pub Sve Co Nor Il... 
Pullman Co 
Rosehill Cemetery Co. 
South Street Ry Co... 


Wakem&McLaugh, Ine. 56, 72 : 
Washt’n Pk Jocky club 55,500 111,000 

The only capital stock assessment 
in the county outside of Chicago 
which exceeded $50,000 was that of 
the South Suburban Safeway Lines 
of Harvey, which was $54,003 for 1936 
and $81,005 for 1937. The assessments 
of the Commonwealth Edison com- 
pany, Peoples Gas Light and Coke 
company, and Public Service Company 
of Northern Illinois include those of 
their subsidiaries. 


HAY MARKET. 

U.S. grades— No. 1. No.2. No. 3. 
Timothy, rail ...$14@15 $13@14 %10@12 

Do truck ....... 12@13 11@12 §@11 
Alfalfa, rail ..... 20@24 14@19 12@14 

Oat and wheat straw, rail, $7.00@8.00: 
truck, $7.00G@8.00. Marsh hay, rail, $7.00@ 
9.00: truck, $7.00@9.00. Rye straw, raik 
$8.00 00: truck, $8.00@9.00. Receipts, 
3 cars timothy, 1 car alfalfa. 


Economics.” ue 
The Holding c ompany. 


“Kindly explain just what a hold- 
ing company is, and how it operates. 
I have heard a number of people ask 


‘this question, and Iam sure TRIBUNE 


readers would appreciate the an- 
swers.” We shall try to answer this 
postal card inquiry, typical of many 
questions to Everyday Economics, in 
this and subsequent articles on the 
setup, function, and history of i 
holding company. 

Broadly and briefly defined, a hold: 
ing company is any corporation which 
owns [holds] stock in another com- 
pany. Generally speaking, a corpora- 
tion is not thought of as a holding 
company unless it owns enough stock 
in another company or companies to 
have practical control of that com- 
pany or companies. 

Most corporations generally classi- 
fied as holding companies own sub- 
stantial amounts of the stock of one 
or more companies engaged in the 
same general type of business that 
they do. 

The “parent” or holding company 
usually formulates operating, sales, 
and financial policies for itself and 
its controlled companies. Inciden- 
tally, a holding company may have 
practical control of another through 
ownership of as little as 10 or 20 per 
cent of stock, but the controlled com- 
pany is not classed, technically, as a 
subsidiary unless the parent owns 
more than 50 per cent of its voting 
stock. 

Tomorrow: The Holding Company 
—How It Works. 


CHICAGO Live STOCK 


em 


A I I a 


[All prices are in dollars per 100 pounds.] 


Hog 

Receipts, 19,000: 
Good to choice, 140@180 40@ 
Good to choice, 190@210........ 8.40@ 
Good to choice, 220@250........ 7.95@ 
Good to choice, 
Good to choice, 350@400 
Light packing sows, 270@350.. 
Heavy packing sows, 350@550.. 
Pigs, common to best 


Cattle. 
8,500; 6 * ggmiae 2,000. 
~ -d9, 75@10. 50 
7.75@10.00 
5.75@10.50 
5.00@ 5.75 


a 1,500, 
$8. 


Receipts, 
Prime steers, 
Good to best, 
Poor to best. 700@1. 500 
Low grade steers 
Bulk of steers 
Cows, choice to prime 
Cows, good to choice 
Cows, fair to good 
Cows, common to fair 
Canners and cutters............. 
Hefers, yearlings, fair to best.. 
Hefers, common to fair ret 
Stockers and feeders 
Calves, poor to best 
Bulls, bologna, com. to choice.. 
Bulls, beef and butchers, fair 

to best 


4. 50@11. 50 
5.25@ 6.60 


p. 

Receipts, 8,000: shipments, 1,000. 
Native lambs, fair to best 7.00@ 
Native lambs, common to fair.. 

Native buck lambs. fair to best 6.000 
Native lambs, culls 5.0 
Fed west, lambs, good to choice 7. 50S 
Fed west. lambs, “pe to good.. 7.00@ 
Heavy lambs, 95@110 7.0 
Feeding’ and shear. lambs, 

Ewes, light, good to choice 

Ewes, light, fair to good 

Ewes, culls to fair 

Ewes, beavy, 150@250........... 3.00@ 
Yearlings, wethers 


Comparative Prices. 


HOGS—Bulk of sales yesterday. .$7.75@ 
One month ago . 7.55 
One year ago 10.15@10. 40 
Top yesterday, $8.75: average, $8.15. 


CATTLE—Bulk sales yesterday..$6.75@ 8.25 
One month ago 7.00@10.35 
One year ago 8.50@14.00 

Top yesterday, $9.90: average, $7.50. 

LAMBS—Bulk of sales yesterday.$7.25@ 7.60 
One month ago 8.50@ 9.00 
One year ago 10.25@10.50 

Top yesterday, $7.70, average, $7.40. 


| OFFICIAL WEATHER FORECAST 


The official forecast for today and tomorrow )eittsburen, cloudy 
ee 


and yesterday’s table of records follow: 
INDIANA: Cloudy Thursday preceded by 
rain, somewhat colder: generally fair Fri- 


day. 

©HIO: Occasional light rain Thursday; Fri- 
day partly vloudy and colder. 

LOWER MICHIGAN: Rain or snow, some- 
what colder in southwest Thursday: Fri- 
day considerable cloudiness, colder in east. 

WISCONSIN: Cloudy Thursday, preceded by 
snow in east and north, colder in west 
and south and by nicht in northeast; partly 
cloudy Friday. 

UPPER MICHIGAN: Snow Thursday: Fri- 
day mostly cloudy, probably local snows 
in east and north; colder Thursday night 
and Friday, and in west Thursday after- 
noon. 

MISSOURI: Becoming generally fair Thurs- 
day, preceded by rain in extreme south- 
east, somewhat colder; probably fair Fri- 


day. 

IOWA: Becoming generaily fair, colder 
Thursday: Friday increasing cloudiness, 
rising temperature in extreme west. 

MINNESOTA: Fair in southwest, mostly 
cloudy in east and north, snow in north- 
east Thursday, somewhat colder in east: 
increasing cloudiness Friday, with rising 
temperature in west and south. 

NOBTH DAKOTA: Oonsiderable cioudiness 
Thursday; Friday probably snow and not 


80 cold. 

SOUTH DAKOTA: Partly cloudy Thursday: 
Priday unsettled and somewhat warmer. 
WEBRASKA: Generally fair, somewhat 
colder in extreme southeast Thursday: Fri- 
May partly cloudy and somewhat warmer. 
KANSAS: Generally fair, colder in east and 


$3 
posi 


Place of observation. 


State of weather 
Feb. 2. 6:30 bv. m. 


ra 


****£ep0} 1s9qSTH 
*aIno 


‘mad 0¢:9 ‘du 
s.3yuU 48] 2OMO"T 


romwce 
2 02 Ge 


SaSamo 


GRE 


ete 


ae 7 
o 
iT ei 
i * 
' BNOW.......- . 
8 . g z 
y ‘ : . 


7 epeseeeeece . 


SRmRawWwoSmOMEEoS 


: eloud 
ger 4 eee2e 

Mu, eeeeene EE. 

Pha 55 


- Ss . 


Bee @ RhaSwSERSesansSSsnkadcss 


WET WOT}E? 


SkouboNEie aS 


..S.E. 
Raleigh, .E. 


Boise, cloudy ..... 
Cheyenne. clear 


oe 
Pueblo, clear 


N.W. 
Salt Lake City, Ban yume -¢ 4 
Santa Fe, clea 


clea 
Yellowstone Pk. . snow.s. E 
Pacific states— 


udy. N. 
Walla, cloudy. W. 


Yuma, clear ..... 


Canadian— 
Battleford. cloudy .. 
Cc loudy 


TERMS OF EMER TOR 
OF THE TRIBUNE. 


Order for mail subscription must be ac- 
panied er. 
ates cago). Indi- 


ar, eS 00; as 


sr on |" one year, $7.50: one waa 

“Rates of subscri tion in postal 
he ], outside ot ¢ ie 
and Wisconsin: 
eo Bes. Pe one year, $7.50: 
. one year, $7.50: one month, 
pres one year. $15.00: one 

~ 


tes ubscription in zones ms 
ye asured trom Chicago], Sines oo 


ily. githen Sunday, one year, cal 
day . one year, $7.50; one month, 
ry ee one year, $19.50: one 


on 
Lagi Sr ape per 


eieiuu 
Rer oe 


. sila. 
; i) LeRIB LC. ’ 
Se as 
, 
% 


omg awitching: soeeuyes 
Did Ge vs $ 


wvv ; 


Page. Col. 
pe eesenecens aD 
27 
27 


Arata Red To Rent. 
Auction Sales 


Automo 
Used: Automobiles—For Sale eee eer 
bo Sea ; eae 


eee eeeer 


eeente eee 8 @eeeeeeeeaeeevre eee ee 
years eeeeeeet ter 27 
Auto House Trailers " iueke caaeee 
Autos. Trucks oe TE ack se cass cae 
Barter and Exchange .........+.;. 24 
Bar and Store Fixtures .....cceccecees BO 
Bicycles and Motorcycles Hi vatesee tse 
Boats, Ya and - =. 
0a 


Opportunities— 
Businesses For Sale even 
A preeerenipe and tavestpenke’ 


Pistributo 
Locations = Leases. Ze 


ccnemini ane. 
Business Equipment 
Van 


Business Personals 
Business Directory 
Cemeteries 


Daneing Schoois oP 
Death Notices 
Dogs, Cats and Pets 


Employment peceiee GW onien 
Financial Service 
RS aie pie oune Pa i | 
Help Wanted—Men | ink bones 
Help Wanted—W 
Hotels and Apartment Hotels 
Home Furnishings and laa al 
Home ee Wanted 
Household Appl iances 
Houses—See Real Estate and To Rent 
Instruction 25 
Jewelry 
Loans 
Lost and Found.. 
Machinery and Equi ment 
Mortgages [See Real Estate Loans}. 
Motor Buses—For Sale 
Moving, Storage [See Bus. 
Motorcycles and Bicycles 

d teen f 


DODD WOU OVD BOSE BLS OOOO FOO GAGA ON CSO FOS Or 0990 FS 


Direc.].. 


l an 
Instruments ve 

furniture and Devices........ 

Personal 

Eanes [See Musical lnstruments].. 

Tuning {See Bus. Direc.1]....... "26 

ban ng Machinery & in gt 

Radios, Supplies, and Service.. 

Real Estate— 

Apartment Buildings . 

Business Property ..........++. éécuae 

Houses 


BE BOOP 5. ccccewecccdscces eeade 
Other Cities 

Resorts 

Farm Lan 


ES ee RN RE SE pn 24 
Sewing Machines 
Situations sented 
Sporting Good 


DOW SOS P WW AMON Cro Sth Pi Cotote «ODOC CoH Godd ~3 roto -~Tas ts 


Stoves [ See Houseboats jeiteeny ae 
To Rent— 
a ig ee ganea 25 
Houses [City and Suburban] 
Apartments 
Apartments and Rooms to Share, 25 
Furnished Apartments 25 
Furnished Apartments 
Stores 
Offices and Shops 
Industrial Property 
Travel 
Trade Schools—Men ........ ‘ceneeebnol 
Trade Schools—Women 
Typewriters and Supplies 
Vacuum Cleaners [See Held. 
Wanted—To Buy 
Wanted—To Rent— 
Rooms 
Offices. 


24-Hour Service 

Tribune Want Ad-Visers are on 
duty 24 hours a day. every day 
of the year, to receive Want Ads 
by telephone or at the Want Ad 
Store. 1 South Dearborn. The 
Want Ad Store in Tribune Tower 
is open daily until 10 p. m.. Sun- 
day until 5 p, m. 


Convenience 
A Want Ad-Viser is as near to you 
as your telephone. If you have a 
telephone, your ad will be charged 
to you. If not, or if you prefer. a 
Tribune tnan will call at your home 
or office. 


Ad Writing Assistance 
The [ribune maintains an expert 
ad writing department to help you 
word your Want Ad to secure the 
best results. There is no charge 
for this service. 


$100.00 Reward 


will be paid by The Tribune for 
information leading to the arrest 
and conviction of any one obtain- 
ing money fraudulently through 
Want Ads published in its columns. 


Call SUPerior 0100—Want Ad-Viser 
or Want Ad Offices 
Tribune Tower 1 Seuth Dearborn 
LOST AND FOUND. 


vo én 


TO FINDERS. 


ee*®eeeeenaeee we 


Appl.]. 56 
25 


Hot GSDWWSNDDWDHHHyDpDOOh 


not 
** Lost ain - 


and Found de 
PUBLIC SERVICE OFFIC 
1 8. DEARBORN-STREET. 


TO LOSERS. 


If you are listed in the telephone 
directory you can charge an adver- 
tisment of your lost article by tele- 
phoning Miss Miller of the 
ad taking department, pupertor C 
Your advertisment receives the | 

free listing in the Tribun 

Service office mentioned above 
for a period of two months. This 
service facilitates of recovery of 
__lost articles advertised 


BILLFOLD—LOST~SM. SILK, FEB. P. M. 
tween Republic bldg. and Van iene 
Reward. Dorchester 0 594. 


BILLFOLD—LOST—BROWN, FEB. 
booth, N. W. depot. Reward. Pal. shape 


Ted Gate waar cme 4 on ec ta 
4400 Wes war ohn Hancock 
Insurance Co., 4055 W. Madison. Ked, 5426. 


9 | chas ve 0. cdditiogal akeaalons, Yj 
: streamlined, air conditioned passen-| | 

ons «from : re wel-| ger coaches for $2,100,000 and 10 ad- 

Address “ Editor, Everyday 


i ‘Bookkeepers and Clerks. 


ACCOUNTANT — AUDITS — TAXES — PART 
time bkkpg. Hell: Hellman, Webster 4561. 


‘Domeation ana Cooke, 


HSWK.—LGT.: SEWING: ia PRI. ADULT 
home; exp. nurse. Address A 483, Tribune. 


experienced: exc, refs. Grace. _ 


GEN. OFF.—2 YRS. EXP.: 26: DES. 

with rel. firm: refs. Address A 400, Pate’ 
SECY.STENO.—2 YRS.’ COLLEGE; 5 YRS.’ 
exp.: age 26. Address A 502, Tribune. 


TY PIST—61 IN., 110 LBS.: PEP. PERSON- 
_ ality: 8 yrs.’ off. ex, Address A 298, Tribune 


Accountants anw Auditors. 

CF AMBITION. «, WOENS Ton eee oe 
opene osed; income : 

tox Be: creaee’, systems, audits. H. P. 6636. 


ACOTG. -BEKPG.—TAX RETURNS: EXPD. 
in handling consignmt.: commiss.' * accts,: 
reas. rates: pt. time. Leonard. Wab. 5237. 


ACCT’G-TYPIST-—33, GOOD BACKGROUND, 
reliable, __ Steady. Address A 480, Tribune. 


ACCT. —OFC. | MGR.: 15 YRS.’ PETRO., LUM. 
exp.: cap.; mod, sal. Address A 547. Tribune. 


ACCOUNTING, BKKPG. SERVICE _— PART 
time: stmts., ‘all taxes: low rates. Roc, 0110. 


ACCT., B’BEEPING—PART TIME. MONTH- 
ly statements. Rates reas. Orlian. Col.5508. 


ACCOUNTANT—BOOKS KEPT PART TIME; 
stmts.; all taxes. Low rates. Ardmore 1427 


Executives and Manugers. 
GOOD OFFICE MAN—UNIV. TRAINING IN 
accounting: exnd. in erdts.. collts., and of- 
fice routine. yrs.’ banking in cap. of 
auditor and assistant cashier. 
ADDRESS A 471. TRIBUNE. 


TRAFFIC MGR.—NOW EMP., YRS. OF R. BR 
and indust. exp.; quote rates, make tariffs, 
adjust claims. Address A 614, Tribune. 


LAUND., RTE. FOREMAN—15 YRS’. EXP.; 
driver, firman., pit. mer.: will handle | rte. 
to show worth. kddvens A 491, Tribun 


ag cae -TYPIST—GEN. OFFICE: YG. MAN. 


| HSWK 


—GEN. HUNGARIAN. MID. AGE. 
Good cook. Adults. $14. Kildare 8757. 


HSWK.—GEN.. PLAIN COOKING: NEAT 
young col. girl: ref; stay or go. Ken. 0472. 


HSWK.——EXPD, GIRL, GOOD REFS., RE- 
liable and capable: $13. Hum. 13065. 

MAID—HOTEL OR GEN. nde 
excl, refs.: no cooking i no §Sun.: 

wash; age 25. $8 to $10. 10. Vict. 


MAID—COL. GIRL WANTS ToB: “CAN 
furnish ref.: suburb, city. Ph. miles 
MAID—COOK, BAKE, SERVE, — 3 
4 days week: temp. or perm, Ph. Dre. 4773. 


MAID—NEAT, INTELL.: COL.: HSKPR.: 
cook; can sew! no laun.: gd. ref. Nor. 7906. 


MAID—EXP.: GOOD COOK: SERVE: MID- 
aged: ref.: adult fam.: $12. Diversey 6057. 


MAID— COL, REFINED: PART TIME: EX- 
eellent refs. __ Kenwood 526 
MOTHER'S HELPER—EXP. IE CHILDN.;: 
mid. aged: refs. Address A 467, Tribune. 
NURSE GIRL—RELIABLE: COL.: REFS 
_care of children eves. Went. 9191. Call 9- 3° 
Couples. 
CHAUF.-BUTLER—16 YRS.’ 
cook or maid; good _refs. Drexel 0857. 
CHAUF. -BUTLER—SOUTH: CPLE.: WIFE 
ck.-maid: 10 yrs.’ exp.: A-1 refs, Dre. 9076. 
COOK, HSEMAN. AND CHAUFF.—OOL, 
BExpd. Good references, Seeley 5108. 


COUPLE — GOOD COOK--BUTLER-CHAUF, 
Davis, 7607. Ask for Turners, 


Ciubs, Hotels, and Restaurants, 


COOK—EXPD. IN SMALL RESTAURANT, 
tearm. or hotel. Address A 292. Tribune. 


COL. : 
Bt Se small 


EXP.: WIFE 


Salesmen, 

SALESMAN—AMBITIOUS, HIGH SCHOOL 
grad., age 19, desires position with future, 
with advertising or sales organization. She. 

7567 or address A 293, Tribune. 
ae ee ont MAN. 26: POS. WITH 
house who can use the services of a ca- 
nabie salesman. Address A 460, Tribune. 


JR. SLSMN.—EXP, MFG.. 6 YR. DIR. RET. 
sis.: Purdue. Address Ps 468. Tribune. 


SALESMAN—EDUCTD.. 30. WANTS MEBRBI- 
torious line: comm. Address A 505. Tribune. 


Professions and Trades. 

ASSIST. FOREMAN. PROD., DIE SET OR 

gen. mach.. stampings. maint.. spot weld.: 
some univ, tec. train.; will roll up sleeves 
or superin.: gd. reas. ‘leaving last pos. 
ADDRESS OD 224, TRIBUNE. 
AUTO MECH.-CHAUFF.—BRAKE. IGNITN. 

expt.: fleet maint.; sales exp. Dor. 0006. 


COOK — ASSIST, OR SALAD AND SAN 
wich girl; exp.; ref.; neat. Col. Ken. 83064, 


=. COOK AND PASTRY—EXP. VALUE 
concern, Lincoln 6800. 


Tigex. DIRECTRESS OR HSKPR.— 


ai 
Middle aged. Club, hotel, Refs. She. 5340. 


Housekeepers and Caretakers, 
HSKPR.—REFINED, MID. AGE WOMAN 

des. pos. as hskpr. for 1 or 2 people. 
Good cook. - Address A 273, Tribune. 


The Tribune dees not knew- 
ingly accept Help Wanted 
advertisments which misrep- 
resent the nafure or terms of 
employment, or advertis- 
menis for Sales Help which 
de net indicate the type of 
product or service to be sold 
and the form of compensa- 
tion. Report any misrepre- 
sentalions or requests for a 
cash bond, deposit, or in- 
vesiment for samples not 
stated im the advertisment to 
the Tribune, Superior 9100, 
Leeel 328 (fer complaints 
only). 


p- | Candies. 


Stores and esp 


CREW MGR.—NO HAS BEEN: 
ary, overwrite. Address O E: $25, 


Professions and Trades, 


ARCHITECT OR 
Architectural Draftsman 


with engineering training. Must be expd. es- 
timator and designer on small homes as an 
assistant to chief engineer. <A large number 
of small homes. Give in writing complete 
record, training, and experience 

Address O E 250, Tribune. 


CANDY MAKER—EXPERIENCED MAN CA- 
pable of making a general line of cocoanut 

Address O F 178. Tribune. 

DEN. LAB. [CERAMIC]—EXP. MOD’S., DIES, 
matrices, wr. det. Address A 509, Tribune. 


DRAFTSMAN JR. TRACER-ERRAND BOY— 
N. 8S. pref. Address O J 237, Tribune. 


GARAGE MAN-—OVER 30, EXP DD. ALL 
around, for night work. Stead job. Give 
full det details. Address O @ 258, Tribune. 


LINOTYPE OPERATOR—FOR NEWSPAPER 
plant. Mu 
“.DDRESS O °5 26, TRIBUNE. 


LIB. SAL- 
Neng 


HSKPR.—CAPABLE, WELL BRED WOMAN. 
Excellent manager. cook. seamstress. Prefer 

full charge. Can drive. Dor. 8808. 

HSKPR.—CONSCIENTIOUS. epee agie “to WID. 


Exc. cook: widower’s home, adult fam 
bach., emp., or elderly cpl., rots. Line. 7484. 


HSKPR.—TASTY CKG.: GD. MNGR. RE- 
fined: adults, Al _ city” refs. Gra. 3319, 


HSKPR.—AMEER.., WITH CHILD, 9: NEAT, 
refined; take full chge. Ref. Jun. 2247. 


BRASS WK.—YNG., 24: PLING. MACH. 
shp. exp., mch.incl. Address A 465, Tribune. 


HSKPR.—EXP.,;: INTEL. ; aes AMN.. MID. 
age: gd. ck., serve.: N. 8. $16 wk. Lak: 1346. 


CHEM. ENGR.—AGE 27: EXP.: DESIRES 
perm, pos: exc. ref. Address A 402. Tribune. 


HSEPHR.. oe HSWK. NEAT, MID. 
age: German; ref. Seeley 2167. 


COMPOSITOR—FAST, ACC... ABLE TAKE 
ch. shop. Omens. 3942 Lake Pk. Atl. 5099. 


HSKPR.—BMP. CPL. OR MTHL. H.: COMPT. 
sm, chil. $12-$15. Address A 461, Tribune. 


DECORATOR — PRICES RIGHT: LARGE, 
small: apts, or hotel: compl. material at 
+ dara cg Save money. Also job work. 


DESIG. -BLDR. OF SPEC. PRODUCTION 
mach.; 15 yr. exp. Address A 469. Tribune 


DIEMAKER—15 YRS.’ EXP.: YOUNG; : BEST 
references. Address A 458, Tribune. 


DRAFTS. AND MECH.—INVENTIVE ABILI- 
ty: expertl. and develop. wk. Full or vart 

time. Address A 466, Tribune. 

DRAFTSMAN—MECH., STR. ENG.: 17 YRS.’ 
exp.: will lv. town, Address A 484, Tribune. 


ELECTRICIAN—ALL AROUND CONSTRUC- 
tion and maint. Address A 503, Tribune. 


HSKPR.—WILL KEEP HOUSE AND CARE 
for eld. ecple. Write 1121 Orleans-st. 


HOUSEKEEPER—WIDOWER’S HOME: COL. 
References. nglewood 2337. 


Narses and Governesses. 
GRAD. NURSE—WILL CARE FOR ELD- 
erly person in nurses home. Buck, 3034. 
INFANT’S NURSE—THORO EXP. SPECIAL- 
ist in infant diet. Good disposition. Refs. 
No other work. $15. Van 4864. 


NURSE—ANY CASE. 17 YRS.’ HOSP. AND 
pri.: $16 wk. Bit. 2020, Rm. 439. 9-3 p. m. 


NURSE—PRAC., TR.: FULL CHG. CONV.., 
inv. or infant: ref.: $15-$18 wk. Vic. 1403. 


EMBALMER—YG. MAN, EXPERIENCED 
steady position pref. Kedzie 5093. 
ENGINEER—12 YRS. POWER PLANTS. 
Elec., stm., maintenance. Buck. 17728. 
MAINT. MAN—Al, 15 Y. EXP., AGE 35; 
Elect., stm., plumb. »., carp. Ref. Vic. 7948. 
MAINT.—ABOVE AVERAGE. I DO EVERY- 
thing; 18 yrs.’ exp. Address A 504, Tribune 
MODEL MAKER—KNOWING MECHANICAL, 
electrical, art work; all materials. Faull 
or pt. time. V. Kendrick, 218 Jackson. 
ey PAPER, CALC.—1ST CLASS WORK. 
AS. REFS. BRIARGATE 8893. 
SMMTING AND PAPER HANG. —~ALL WE. 
guar.: name your price. Bruns. 5932. 
PAINTER AND PAPER HANGER, Al, FAST, 
go anywhere. Lake View 1760. 
PAINTING. CLEAN’G — STORES. RESTAU- 
rants, halls, taverns. Austin 5568. 
SHIPPING OR RECEIVING eae 25. EXPD. 
Hi-school grad. Rets. Van B. 2974. 
TOOL AND DIE DESIGNER—LONG EX- 
perience, wishes part time wk. Spa. 8940. 


Clubs, Hotels, and Restaurants, 
CHEF-STEWARD—Al: 20 S.° EXP. 

hotel, club, rest.: economical, jacuatriogs: 
leave city. Address A 442, Tribun 


NIGHT CLERK—SMALL HOTEL =y APT. 
swhd., pleasing personality. Plaza 1146. 


House Servants, 
COOK.-HSWK.—A-1: JAP.: FAM.: BACH.: 
long exp.: city refs. Hama, Midway 5462. 


HSMN., CHAUF., COOK, SERVE, YARD 
work: lt. col., mar.: good refs. Mid. 4186, 


Chanffeurs. 
CHAUFFEUR—YOUNG: CAN DO MOST 
anything. Good refs. Call Stewart 3123. 


CHAUFFEUR—24, EXP., SGL., EXC. eo 
rel., sober. Refs. Go ‘anywh. Arm, 2257. 


Stenographers, Typist«, Etc. 
age aye om Bel Sar YNG. MAN 23, 7 YRS. 
D.; salary optional.: A-1 refs. Ked, 6510. 
mar “SWED. RECEPT., TYPIST, BILLER, 
light teno.: 2 yrs. exp. Buck. 8995. 
STENO.-CLK.—YOUNG MAN, NEAT. ACCU- 
rate. Will start at small sal. Boul. 0968. 


TYPIST-CLK.—YG. MAN, 28. GD. EXP., 
knowl. sten. Ref. Reas. sal, Ph. Man. 4504: 


Miscellaneous. 
2 YOUNG MEN , 
tions in Australia or 
sentatives of 
gr ns re 


EENAVY—NOT ONG ~ONOMABEE 
oon ad Be pent — oot 2" ‘wis ac ge oto 
essive, '. us 

fail f 1 first? Address A 510, Tribune. 


SECY, —YNG, MAN; 21: EXTRA 
and accurate; Col, grad.; some e 
personalty, Want perm. pos. Ced. 2257, 


BRIEF ima rpg 2 mc CONT. LI- 
brary bks, bet. 60th-Drexel and 224-8. 
Park on Feb. 2. Reward. Hyde Pk, 2807. 


gg ge gp ena RL 6 
ale arn >. Vie, ° 
Louis 0d Pelkane tine Bonne nike 


DOG—FOUND—SAT. EVE.: HT. SP 
Hyde Park-blvd. at Woodiawee hide PITZ: 


hite No questions, Kil. 7391. 


DOG— LOST — DACHSHUND, BLACK. . 
male, Reward. Phone nenrood ee des 


DOG—LOST—LAST SAT. VIC 
yng. police: brown, tan e baat "Bue. 202 


WIRE-HAIRED TERRIE 
PO Soumen 4! Feb, 1, N. of Granville.She. SObL. 


DOG—LOST—WR. HRD. 
North-av.. Oak Pk.: Pe ge Me ge gg 


BARRING — LOST GO 
lar, hite stone: id ics and-ay. street ¢ 
stony. Soa sitet Reward Merrimae 7710, 


ENVELO TOPE LOST—O 
info wil of it 


iP. Walsh . 


+ GLASSES~T.OS T—CHIL WHT 


OO eee BEAGLE, BLK., TAN, 


MO G JAN. 28, 
eer act ea con ee 
he efin 


PURCH.. BEKPG., GEN. OFF. DET. ‘ 
expd.: ed. refs. Address A 4 ee tty 


PERS. YOUNG GEN MAN DE 
‘consider anything. Mr. Eager. tat ae 


Fans MARIS ok 2805, 


YG, gaye gg "36 roan | F ° 
Ars ge ®, TO SeeY: 


el, no sé 
ee “FA ¥Y. um Af HAND. 
: marr.: refs, Ste al 


soe yer 37 AUTO W 
type work: A-1 refs. Phone ANTS ¢. 
BUICK. ” 


YNG. MAN—30, COL.. WITH "37 
will drive sismn.: go anywhere. Nor. 3. 


= ye RRIED MAN DES. PO 
g. Address A 5O8. 


soon ORKER—25 
Roast -ratasmnces ag PY my 


ribune. 
WORK FOR 


WILL TAKE 


617, Tribune. ‘ 
Situations Wantea —— a Invelatnes. Ts 


NURSE — TRAINED; oe ANY 
case: $14 week. Ran. 700% 
NURSE—TRAINED, PRACT., INVALID OR 
conval., $15 wk. Ph. 9 to 4. Shel. 3960. 
PR. NURSE—MID. AGE, COMP. TO SEMI- 
inv., el. per., rel., ref. $15. L.V.8494, Apt.9. 
WOMAN OF REFINEMENT FOR POSITION 


of trust with elderly people. Invalid, gov- 
erness. Gre. 1226. 


Nurses’ Registries. 
NURSES FURNISHED ON ALL CASES— 
Acme Registry, 2845 N. Burling. Well.5586. 


NURSES — FURNISHED ANY TIME FOR 
all cases. Aetna Registry, Inc., Bit. 6972. 


Laundresses and Day Work, 
GIRL—COL. LAUNDRY OR CLEANING. 
$2.50, carfare. Thur. and Sat. Atl, 2456. 
HSWK.—COL. GIRL OK NURSEMAID, HALP 
or whole: steady: ref. Seeley 2799. 
LAUNDRESS—Al SHIRT IRONER, FAST 
worker; stay until rect also hotel 
bundles: ref.: col. Wen t. 5929. 
LAUNDRESS—GERMAN. TAKB LARGE 
bundles home. Good refs. Lak. 3578. 


LAUNDRESS—GOOD ON SHIRTS, CLEAN- 
ing: fast worker: $2 and earfare. At "Atl. 1255. 


PHOTO ENGRAVERS. COPPER ETCHER. 
also stripper: full time jobs. Immediate 
opening. Address A 521, Tribune. 


PRINTERS—SMALL JOB SHOP, 40C HR 
State age, exp. Address O B 82, Tribune. 


SHOE MAKER—1ST CLASS. APPLY PAL- 
ace Cleaners, 908 Chicago-av., Evanston. 


SHOE SHINER AND HAT CLEANER— 
2546 W. 59th-street. 


YOUNG MAN—HANDY WITH iTH TOOLS AND 
some knowledge of commercial] art. Good 
opporsaniy with growing concern. Sala 
k. to start. State see and experi- 
ence. Address 0 H 341, Tribune. 

The Tribune offers special low rates 
to persons who advertise for positions. 
For information and assistance in writ- 
ing an advertisment stop at the Want 
Ad office, Madison and Dearborn- 
sts., or in the lobby of Tribune Tower. 


A A NL TTR EA ET BER: Oe Ie Cre tN a tae eS 


_HELP WANTED—MEN. 


EP AO OS OE CLEC L CRETE CE LE OCC LOGE IL CL EI OGL AS 


HELP WANTED—MEN. 


al ~eeww al 


Salesmen, 


ROGERS PARK AND LAKE 
COUNTY MEN. 


An executive of our organization will be 
here Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock to 
interview reputable industrious men for per- 
manent positions. é will hire men from 
Rogers Park, North Shore or Lake count 

at once. Married men with cars preferred. 

No investment or deposit. Previous sales 
experience is not essential, as we insist upon 


men thoroughly alone those lines in handling 
our electrical unit. New men, during initial 
training period, must be satisfied with mod- 
erate earnings but can increase this sub- 
stantially with experience. Hard work and 
study required to qualify for the higher com- 
missions. See Mr. Johnson, Thursday, at 
Rogers Park Hotel. 6805 North Sheridan- 
road, Chicago. Come prepared to spend at 
least two hours. 


TO A 
BRIGHT YOUNG MAN 


ABOUT TO TAKE A WIFE. 
Establish yourself with one of the greatest 
CHEV RO- 


&@ new pe ; a Chevrolet sales- 
man, this will mean a substantial sustained 
commission income for you. Free training 
with daily expenses. Our 5 day training 
school conducted by factory trained instruc- 
tors. See Mr. McCullough between 10 to 12 
a. m. 4130 Irving Park- boulevard. 


RELIABLE MEN 
WHOSE QUALIFICATIONS ARE AS 
FOLLOWS: 


apiiione ~* you have B scan in the past a will- 
hard wo 
2nd—That you have iived your life clean and 
can give excellent character references. 
In event you are employed you must be 
willing to take two days training at our 
factory branch. From percentages you should 
be able to live on $25 per week for your 
first six weeks. Only men whose services 
are available at once wil] be considered. 
See Mr. Focht. 20 East Jackson. Room 604, 
Feb. 3rd, between 9:30 A. M. and 12 Noon. 


COMMONWEALTH EDISON 
COMPANY. 


There are several openings in our Appli- 
ance Sales Department for neat appearing. 
ambitious young men, over 20 years of age. 
willing to start at the bottom and earn pro- 
motion by honest and persistent effort. Ex- 
perience unnecessary. Thorough training and 
co-operation given. Compensation: Drawing 
accounts and liberal commission and bonus 
to men who qualify. Apply Room 1807. 72 
West Adams-street nt a. m. to 12:00 noon. 
and 2:00 to 4:00 p 


AT ONCE. 


We will employ several neat appearing 
men, to 45, of average ability, ee 
desire a permanent connection with 

national organization manufacturing chee 
trical units. Must be willing to work 8 
hours a day and start at our terms. 
This means ‘about 40 per week on per- 
centage to start. mployment Manager, 
Room 618, 203 North Wabash-avenue. 


Clubs, Hotels, and Restaurants. 


COOK—-TO TAKE OVER KITCHEN CON- 
cession in tavern. 5526 W. Harrison. 


HAMBURGER MAN—EXP., YNG., SINGLE. 
1946 Irving Park-blivd. 


Pharmacists. 


EXP. APRRENTICE OR ASST 
21-835 years: full time. 1438 


Boys. 
ERRAND BOY TO LEARN DRUG BUSINESS 
—High school grad. 3301 Bryn Mawr-av. 


Salesmen, 
AUTO SALESMEN—SELL NEW AND USED 
cars; leads Ae ge Comm. and bonus. 
ELLIOTT & DUKES, INC., auth. Ford dealers 
since 1923. ak ii " Howard-street. 


AUTO SALESMAN—USED CARS. MUST 
live on West Side; 25x35 yrs.: attractive 
comm, 245 Madison-st., Oak Park. 


BED SPREADS, CHENILLE AND RAYON, 
fa . table. scarfs, " geot. stores. 
. 


R. 


Py. . 
E. 67th-st. 


SVERAGE SALESMAN CALLING ON 
taverns and liquor stores in Chgo. and 
suburbs to introduce brand new \ ebnes 
that is proving sensation in Chgo. Will pay 
lib, comm. Must have regular estab. trade. 
Write fully, age, exp., terr. covered. 
ADDRESS O C 466. TRIBUNE. 


BOOK SALESMEN. 


High class. Greatest backing of outstanding 
jens of our country ever given a salesman 
h eredential letter. National organization 
34 years success. Liberal comm. Rm. 
, 844 Rush. Mr. Corbett. 10-12 a. m 


CLEANING—FOR SAT. ONLY. “SWEDISH: 
good worker. Call Bel. 2591. 


WASHING, IRONING, CLEANING, 
day: exp.: ref.: mid. age, Scandiy. Bel. 


Stenographers, Typists, Etc. 
BEGINNER—ABLE, CAPABLE. NEAT APP., 
willing 1 to start at $10 wk. — 0967. 
CAP. ” §ECY., STENO. —9 YRS.’ ; TEM 
or permanent: mod, sal. Well. Baas. R. 10. 
DICTAPHONE, —- sr gt 
Overator—Exp., efficient, alert, Lawn 


EXEC. SEC.-STEN a Se oe 
det.; pat., gen. law, ee =e Ave. 6168, 


2.65 
711, 


RECEP.-TYPIST-BEKPR.— ATTRAC 
Office mgmt. exp. Kedzie reas all week. 


SEEN ra ae ian: ais ape alt 
oexD.t OM e, aan logp wk, ie Birs 
F Raa ceraseniier eam. Vale: iar tee. ‘008t 
ime Se Aaa Ae ies. 


SEC.-STENO.—EXPD.., REATIVE; 


RAPID. C 
excellent corresp., office etait. Buc. 2811. 


—¥NG.. LEGAL. COLLE 
The ae oe furn. refs.; sm. sal. al ind, 21 2136, 


TENO.—EXP. 6 YEARS, FAPID. ‘NEAT: 
"| ieee Dictaphone, swhd.: sal. sec. Dea.3483 


Pr hh ath eta Rtirh ate ctr a So 
NOGRAPHER—YOUNG. EFFICIENT: 3 
gs, exp.: ofc. detail: reas. sal. Nor, 3915. 


TENO.— INR.: H. 8.. BUS. COL. GRAD.: 
arg Soak sommelier: reas. sal. Went. 2227. 


a pa Pye TE TT 
gn oer wage bein Par ogee Sy : GRD BS 
ane ar oe 2 YRS. 


exp: neat SWE 
ORGY. “Sy EARS EXP. UX. 
STENO.-SEC7 =o Ya 1584. 
een KNOWL, SWBD,, 
oer “FIGHL Pa New. 3102. 
NO.21 2 YEARS COLLEGE, LLi- 
’ GEN. "OFC, WK.—YNG.. 
SrENO, SWIRCHED-GEN., OFC. WH TYG, 
SpnNO—ABLE: . ae H. Bes 
yng pable; 


alert pease Arm 


— BOOK AND MAGAZINE SALESMEN — 
There is always room in our organization 

for men with or without selling experience. 

Come in today and we will were Pw you 

can average $50 and more weekly 

Mr. Sperling, Rm. 715, 188 W. Randolph-st. 


Ate: South aie aaleuy conden sar 
; ou 6: 8 n en 
and commission, * Aaaveae OG 128. “refund 


oe COKE. FUEL OIL SALESME 
Expd.; comm, Kane Fuel. 1815 N. Tentass. 


GROCERY SPECIALTY SALESMA AN—WELL 
known mfr. has terr. for capable man with 
car; comm. $25 to $35 wkly. 1418 Harrison. 


REAL ESTATE SALESMAN. 


Plenty of leads and co-oneretion, Comme. 
John T. Wheeler & Co., 1221 Devon 


STAINLESS STEEL (SALESMEN—MAN U- 


with cars for 
mialified leads. No 
nager will train you 
ions to you while 


ivision manager contracts in 
ply 11 to 1, 1449 Wichiand-avenue. 


SALESMEN TO CALL ON GROCERY TRADE 
with household necessity now in demand. 
Opportunity to establish good income on 
commission basis with a fast repeating item. 
Tell us about your selling experience. 
ddress O F 133, Tribune. 


Community Reading Club. 


At 40¢c per month is the fastest sellin 
proposition in the city: pays inexpe 

met eu $1 per aay plus 650¢ the order; highest 
p. men. Worth investi gating. 

aotiy Pa Ty O12. 500 North Dearborn, 
SALESMEN—NEW IMPROVED BREATH 
purifier: sells fast off color counter dis- 
play card. Drug stores, taverns, hotels, oe 

beral comumiss on arrangement. Call betw 


COMMONWEALTH EDISON 


Company has openings in Appliance Sales 
Department for four neat and ambitious 
young men, 23 to 40 years of age. Perma- 
nent work, advancement, excellent commis- 
sion and bonus to men selected. Men who 
qualify by earnin ee + ar pala, ante training. 
Apply. today, a. m. only. 
Ww. pp a gre ng © 500. 


SALESMEN—THEATER-MERCHANTS TIE- 

up advertising plan. Men for out of town 
only. Our present men are making big 
money. Need men who can qualify for man- 
agers. Must be able to finance themselves 
for one week. We don’t want any drawing 
account artists. Comm. A ply SUPERIOR 
SYSTEM, INU., 325 N. Well 


New, Red Hot Geaabntet 


$1.00 per yr. Live leads: quick easy sales. 
Openings for neat live wire men, to work 
with supervisors. Liberal a aE. eng 
er wk. Apply 10 a. m. or 2 p 

o other time. Rm. 2017. ng 3 fill, ‘1508 


Wells-street. 
SALESMEN. 


High class, for silk satin slips; $2- $3 re- 
tailers; short line; finest workmanship for 
Chicago. Wis.. and all nearby states: strictly 
comm. Give exp., references or no attention 
paid, foucane manufacturer. Address O A 
363, Tribune 


——— A FUTURE WITH BENDIX 
Aggressive men, over 25, with sales expe- 
rience, to qualify as salesmen, supervisors, 
and managers in Bendix Home Laundry deal- 
er outlets. We train and place you. Comm. 
pply 9 a. m. or 4:30 p. m. Thursday only, 
1728 S. Midticanavente: 

THE 2 MEN HIRED LAST WEEK EACH 
ad cash in their pockets by Sat. 
Want 2 more bet. 30 and 50 years, used to 
earning good money. For high class educ. 
Roe, ‘Prefer educational or piano salesmen. 
own car to call on good leads. Coum. 

4817 Sheridan-rd.. Suite 38. 


Agents. 


RAWLEIGH ROUTE NOW OPEN — REAL 
opportunity for man who wants permanent, 
profitable oe Sales way up this year. 
te op ely Write Rawleigh’s, Dept. 
reeport, fil. 
Rost 300.000 DIAL PHONE USERS, PROS- 
ts for brand new invention. First time 
ou 60c per dozen. You 
. Act quickly. 
RANDOLPH. RM. 825. 


Miscellaneous. 


MEN—MILITARY SERV. NAT. GD. 

Pay for 1 nite drill per week and 2 wks.’ 

Sp. Armory, 16th end Michigan, tonight, 
6-9 p. m.. See Sergeant Lawson, Co. A. 


If you have not found the kind of 
position you are looking for, read the 
Salesmen Wanted ads. Earnings of 
salesmen are unlimited and many con- 
cerns are looking for inexperienced 
people whom they can train. 


Employment Agencies. 
Prod. Mgr., Sp. Mchy., $6,000 
PLANT LAYOUT ENGHR., Coll. Grad.$2,500 

gt x TP] Years’ Exp...... eh 0 
7 é 5 §65-t 


Exp 
NG. Gen 31-23, ‘Train for Sales. 
BUSINESS MEN'S. CL. HSE., 209 S$ 


FINANCE MEN. 
or small loan experience......... ‘Ouse 


] TO ee Sree re 0 
Gen}. lede GuNcY. 3698: eta 


As ‘American i industries, 134 N. La Salle-st. 
EXP, ROAD SALESMAN 


with good car to travel, to, sell tires whole- 

commission’ fee Mr. L. Cole. _General Office, 

oa Floor 3 2439 Indiana-avenue 

HARD WORKING NEELLIGENT MEN 

make ae selli Pp 

| very, cea wife prospect, 
se 2 

sion. . 839, 140 S. Dearborn 


ARTE = Bg close 
roads; ee no assmts.; 
LOYD: By Want Was Bs Eetaa-strest. 
OUNG Ma ane ae NEAT APPE 


eure 
tra D rent 


fust be’ ree BUSC 


MOTION-DIRECT MAIL—$4 
* Gen. Lede. B Any gt 150, Sales M. W. “Terr. 3176 
oO 


$150 and 
HARRISON P! PER MESA 20 W. JACKSON. 


SN s. oe. sont ——— 


Big ay Pete Ts pr er OBC 


sare _ STE aS get TRO 


aise Steward 


= 


AUTO MA 


’ 
JL 


JSBUL 


enna aaee CLER! 
«4 MULL . 


using our own successful methods and train: 


FLOORMAN AND GREASER—NORTH.$18-20 | 
and G + 
bike. $10 . 


|e ates ingens 250 $73] 


‘Employment Aweudies. 
aap eae a $350. 


Degree: know 
aistiy. a pp 28:95, single. . Borel 
E. E., refrigeration exp... Sal. 
GRA D. E. E., des. automotive-elec. eqn. Oven 
SALES Mech., rubber gds.. Michigan.Sal. + 
2 SALESMEN, grocery trade...... Pe 7-1 oe : 
COLLEGE GRADU eas ah 


STENO.-BOOKKEEP $90 
HOTEL MGR., age 30-36. $150 and room 


Glader Corp., 110S. Dearb’n, 


. 3 INDUS. SALESMEN. RECENT 
" exp, contacting mfrs., car nec., age 28-38, 
Natl. org. Texas, Kansas, Ohio........$1 5 
Spec. food sales, must have exp. co 
ret. grocers, under 
Spec. drug sales, age 23. 27, sat SF 
selling drug, stationery trade......-..$150 
MULTIGRAPH OPER., LABEL WOR 
Casket trimmer ..$25-Cabinet mkr. 

-H-A-Y, 14 W. WASHINGTON. 


SALES » -ORRESPONDENT . $3,500 | 
OFFSET PRESSMAN * 1 $40- 50 © 
Vertical | 


UTO f 33 
fer Spay 94 rn BL. [Cablael Wak 
tr oy rm abinet ake 
UPHOLSTERER-Repair Sa L. 


CADILLAC, 14 E. JACKSON. 


SALES, OFFICE SUPPLIES........esee- 313 
COIN MACHINE Service. car... .ccceoces 
ody. f ae (Truck mechan. oe 

HOTEL MANAGER. AGE 35-40.. $150. ‘Rm. 


TRIANGLE, 25 E. JACKSON. 


SEMI-SR. ACCOUNTANT, OPEN 
Hotel manager. $150 and apt. 
All around sheet metal WG g 75e. 
WABASH 202 S STATE 


— MODERN BUREAU. 879 N. STATE -- 
Lic. engineers [2]. $160: fireman, $175 
Employment Service. 
SALARIED POSITIONS SEF OUR AD FH? 


colump Sup... Wed. KW. BIAee; INU 


em ee —— —_——-- - 


___TRADE SCHOOLS—MEN. 


” ALLIED “SHOPS 
Offer Thoroughly Practical Training 
MACHINIST TRADE. 


TOOL & DIE MAKING 


DESIGNING AND DRAFTING. 
Automatie Serew Machines 


Train in the most complete training shops in 
America, Get experience on actual machine 
work. Start now. Days, evenings. Low fee. 
Free emplo ment help. Write for free book: 
“Practical Machine Shop . ee 
VISIT ALLIED SHOPS 


Allied Serew Machine Co., 


[SCHOOL DIVISION.] 
609 W. Lake-street. Dept. T. Hay. 1138. 


W -E-L-D-I-N-G, 


sat intensive course. Come rn see 
ur welders at work oo. 4 n 
GREER COLLEGE. 2027  WASASH. 


ONE WEEK FREE TRIAL. 


LEARN THE PRACTICAL WAY 
TOOL AND DIE. MACHIN 
REFRIGERATION. AIR ONS poe 
AUTO MECHANICS. BODY AN ENDER, 
Investigate Our ae Plus vanes 
GREER COLLEGE. 027 S. WABASH, — 


FREIGHT TRAFFIC 
MANAGEMENT 


THE COLLEGE -.OF ADVANCED TRAFFIC. 
Chicago’s oldest resident traffie school. All 
phases of freight traffle taught by experts 
with a combined. experience of over 250 
years. Hundreds of successful! graduates. Lib- 
eral employment pam Enroll cdeiide Phone, 


write or visit. Da 
330 S. Wells-st. Devt. C5. y eee. 8649. 


AIR CONDITIONING 


should excite the live wire who really wants 
an opportunity for steady employment and=- 
good pay. Interesting and easy to learn un-~ 
der R-A-C-I. Industry supervised method. 
Come and inspect our taborato and shops - 
~—finest in America. Write or phone for ad- © 
mittance pass and “ Vital Facts.” Refrizera- 
tion and Air Conditioning Institute. 5153 
Lawrence-avenue. Phone Longbeach 6100” 


1938 Government Jobs 


Men, women. Start $105-$175 per month. 
Dependable. Prepare immediately for Chi- 
cago examinations. Short hours. Influence 
unnecessary. Common education usually euf- 
ficient. Full particulars and list positions ~ 
PREE. Write today. 25 coached free an- 
nually. Franklin Institute Dept. 1158 360 
North Michigan. 


FORMER— 


U.S. EXAMINER 


Will help prepare you for P. O clerk. R. R, 
mail clk.. and general clerk. inspector of 
meat. customs or liquor. laborer, guard. file 
clk., typist, steno... bookkeeper, etc... exam- 
inations; men, women; classes unnecessary. 

NO COST IF inp papier oan 
Write PATTERSON or cali 
77 W. Washington. Suite 715. Franklin 97 84, 


BE A TRAFFIC MANAGER. 


Fastest growing business profession. 


OPP LLL 


hal 


isTs, 


students. Visit 10 a. m. to 9 D. m. or write. 
Freight Traffic Institute, 
176 W. Adams-st.. Dept. T-22. State 2330. 


TOOL & DIE MAKING 
MACHINIST TRADE, 


PRACTICAL nage FRAT. 
EMPLOYMENT hel 
VISIT OUR § 
National School of Mechanical 
218 N. Jefferson. Monroe 


ADVERTISING ~~ 


AN ATTRACTIVE WELL PAID FIELD. 
Large advertising ar gem bape we 2 
known. Offers practical spare 
in this fascinatin ag potent Write or 


(OF Oa NEHIGAN-AV. AT 20TH-ST 

FORMER < S. GOVT. JO Sig 

ony get, Soman, ee 

Western Coaching, 37 W.Van heen ab.6b2e, 
"We stata bet ie e rg % Open. days 

end et even Call, write or phone f * 

177 North ina CEN, 6393. 
Carpenters, Builders, Ete, 

arn estimating. f oe ee Suilder 


CHICA GO TECH. School 
21B Tech oes EB. 26th-st. 


sum eppteeteetet at ge mage 
ics” & foie a <n mgt thay (Prckes — 


aie ual. 


Crhnad srs 


Ge 


« £0 Le ime. 


. TREES me GRAD cate . NOE 

é ran ORS—DRAP: ie AND 
‘ach and, 4142 
ee. 


| ;— HOR AD\ 
= : ha 16 jiat el follo ins i’ bhea r 
coc ‘OUSEKEE Bschool. 3 
=n andi. “sl shool ch ; re 
| @00K-HSWE = T ROROOL ~CHIED: 
, 5440 ‘caarean Cal. 4381. 
WK.—WHITER. gee Eat et T oe 


Picons 
* joeese 1 small child. 
orest 2752. 
ee QROUGHLY EXP.;: 
permanent pos. to 
ore pak meee 
EN. grb D OK: ASSIST 
(BE one eters) ) GO 
Dall Seuresiy oF renitge_30 So. a 8098. 


: - —:: 


ist T 


: Executi Type 
ass Serna Bt Sh ag 
SrENO. mb exD. 

: STENO.-R 


m= | K i 
"| TYPIST-A 


W. cease & 
EXPE- 


a athe 
apis oe EB voedrbdoce 
eeeeeeeeses 


mer.-cook...$20 
) eae a “EB. JACKSON. 


WADDELL iggae a 
mete. sane ic. sig 


€XD., 


nasa 


Sten t ove 459 wath tO 
3 dictaph. anon: eo oop and n, north. $80-$95 
Steno., university grad., 1-2 yrs. exp...$80 


1 N. La Salle, Suite 1148. 


2 STENO.-SEO'YS. 
Fis -$125 


bras 


STEN CTAPHO 
STENO. ‘SECRET ae : eg oot $20 
C-R-A-I-G : #.EL , 209 S. State. 


MOLENE eee 105 W. ADAMS. 
STENO.,. some ins. exp., prefer univ. ed. $110 


| ats SH, Sy BRE, “Ht 


Bh. dap 
dept, som “¥ ue ‘edu, . 


ie 
“CREDIT INVESTIGA, 
STENO.-CORRESP., _COLLEC.-SALES $53 
cEUBROUGHS BILER, Co Comnt.. mips st. 
MIL ¥ payer Mer 4 $35-960 a 
Glader Corp., 110 S. Dearb’n. 


. 5 DAYS: S50 
Se | HR B MACHINE BEARERS. pany 4° eB 


SHORT ORDER COO SALADS. 
CADILLAC, 14 E, JACKSON. 


ZINSER PERSONNEL SERVICE. 
Steno.—Must have travel bureau exp. 
Steno.-Secty.—Advertising agency exp. 
Stenogra vestmen perience 

140 South arborn-street. Room 1548. 

$25 — 


~— DRESS MODELS—SIZE 14, 
10 METIC LABELE! Si 
GIRLS. 


PW. F 
: Sanbe Rac nune re 
MONARCH. 166 W. WASHINGTON 


NC 


Own room, bath. 
sch. ahi nc own rm,. bath. ae a ios 


N. HSWE.— DRY.. COOKING. GO. 
req. 2 in y. Bue. 5404 aft. 2:30. 


—W HITE. @GooD 
cook. No ins idy, Own rm., pyst, BE Bit. 0077, 


—WHITE. PL. COOK. STAY. 


beg for right girl. Regent 5947. 


‘GEN. HSWE.—WH. PL. CK. LIKE CHII- 
_ dren. No ldry. Own r., bath, $8 Sag.7093. 


GEN. HSWK.—WHT.: OWN 
apt.; no Indry. Blonder, 


‘GEN. bets ay ND COOKING—WHITE. 
: no laun.: : North: go. Sun. 3566. 


‘GEN. HSWK. —WH.., GD. COOKE: 3 ADULTS: 
no — a pay; go nites. Dorch. 1822! 


—WH. IN COOK, LIGHT 
Sisun."6 > Ng $8. 9948 Ss. ee Bev. 8838. 


'GENL. HSWE.—WHITE EXPER. TORING : 
own room: $8-$10. Ee Lhe 9520 


‘GEN. got i dled 7 ge th 3 ADULTS: 


room and bath: $6. 3652 Pine Grove, 2d. 


GEN. HsWkK. —CAP.., wH¢t, ASSIST WITH 
_ children. Own rm. Dr.’ s ho home. Key. 3392. 


'GIRL—WHITE. LIGHT HSWE. 2 DAYS. 

Care some evenings. Must live 
near Lincoln Pk. Will p el or hour 
wasis. *Tribun 


Address O H 340 
GIRL—PLAIN COOK, LicHT LORY. NO 
- windows. Mother emp. Sun- 


2 children. 
‘day off. 4943 Sheridan, Apt. 181. Lon. 2000 


‘GIRL, WHITE, TAKE CARE OF CHILDREN. 
Assist with housework: stay nights. State 


galary. Address O H 246, Tribune. 


GIRL OR | OMAN—FOR, bey be HOUSE- 
work. Good hom Tiva oom. Mrs 
's born, 5404 N. Sawyer. hepetons 5905. 

GIRL—YOUNG, 


for general AB Sy PP k, “— 
ust coo 
socom. L. Berman, 5330 Kimbark. sees 


Grr WH. GEN. HSWK.: 2 CHILDREN: 
refs.: gd. home stay. Good w Apply 
ves. or Sun. A. ir. Dr. Davis, 69 8 Paxton. 


BIRL_We., EXP. WITH YOUNG CHILDREN 
Bab s" was Oo He coog., 
cleaning. $11. 503 “Melrose, Apt. “1. 


(PIRL—EXPERIENCED; NEAT; AGE 18 ~~ 


apply 7 to 9 a. 
546 irving x tp bekery: ap —~ 
omi—war. ea = “PLAIN COOK, 
d. Stay. $8. Key. 4365. 


gen hswk. 
» CARE OF CHILD. 
Lakeview 7349. 


Oe ag Ay ee 


like ar Stay. She. 6116. 


BXP. GEN. a NO COOK. 
Seek Sie $6. Elkins. Lake View 7628. 
OWN 


ieee te trem aee Vir 7038 
ene twig es 


TE repro —_— . 


WHITE. GOOD Se 
like children. Hollycourt 


anal «Algae 


STAY. 
7470. 


MUST LIKE 


aoa M., /eM., 18-25: LT LT. 
home; $ -» 1 smi. Bev.6859 
om TO COOK AND 

. weemaisinvalig: 3214 Diversey. 
pew 5 FOR PERSONAL ATTENTION 
P : asst. 


a Se 
6:50, Fair. 4 


i } : ae GE 
| hswk. Go nights. Lon. 7504. " 
| »t EXC. CK.: GAR’N PREF.: 

! ae ee, r., bth.: $12, Fair 6088 
18-25 CHILD 3% YS. 
Do icy hee bt, ton te ares 
MAN— GEN. HSWK.. ASSI 

8 children, 5. Gare. ¥ = 
10:30 a.m. mp fom. Go of wages” Apply 4 
UNE SPECIAL LOW 


Dersons for be Want 


ston at the = 
the lobby of . 


"Tower. 


oR ed hal cme 


ong MANAGER—EXPERIENCED. 
or maep he otel dining room: must be attractive. 


arance and have pleasing per- 
a Rh atk 
7 W. Madison, 9:30-11 : — 


IRL — NEAT, yvonne. 57 
Waitress work. Aft. 10 a. m. 13842 E. 534. 


OUSEKEEPER FOR WOODS COUN- 
try club May ist to Nov. ist. ary and 
per aa he Lo Wooden: 
lh untry Club, Woodstock. wl.’ 
Saleswomen. 


ATTENTION, WOMEN! 
Add to your weekly income selling friends 


hee dresses , ete., at less than 
prices; liberal commissi 
as oe 


on; no money 


TURE WO OMAN— Se T. PLEAS 
sonality: womans me wear, iu ‘lib. at naan 


BNuanre et ie 


aL n._ 86 a. BOK. Stale Dept Cl 


TE s@eneee eee dL b- rT: 
& iHowsemaids’” $10" 


16: gano: 1 
pis'Si6' seignd malde 


RM.: SMALL 
518 Addison-st. 


si 72a Prine Sk babe EDUC. .$85 
+04 BER 
MAJESTIC, 25 E, JACKSON, 


eeeenee 


TRADE SCHOOLS—WOMEN, 


Sutin. 


lal w _ ~ ww ~ heal ll tl 


North Siders! South Siders! 
Enroll in Beauty Culture 
or Body Culture Massage. 


WORLD'S LARGEST BEAUTY AND peur 
Culture Schools in your neighborhood 


SELAN’S 


WON 1ST PRIZE 
in National Hair Styling Contest. 


Selan’s enrol] more students from Chicago 
than any other beauty school. There must 
be a reason. Visit and see for vourself. 


SELAN’S BEAUTY SCHOOLS 


Free tools, Position assured our graduates. 
AY AnD EVENING CLASSES. 
Visit, yh. phone for 24 page booklet. 
RTH—2744 MILWAUKEE-AVENUE. 
"Spauld ing. paulding $6 gOr8. 
6404 S. HALSTED-S NOR. 2 


COMPTOMETRY. 


Best 8 and 12 wk. course, incl. TYPING. 
Individual instruction. Day or evening. Ac- 
tual experience: prompt placement. Catalog. 
Secretarial-Shorthand. 


unson, —— 3-6-10 mo. courses. 

Individtal instr. echool which includes 
Dictaphone and sont board in Stenographic 
Course. Placement Free, Catalog on request. 


yee Gee er 
Most conmilete reat tagge pot 


America. All live boards, 
included. Co ariooe avitel: 


Accounting. 


Beginners and advanced. Individ. trai 
Century College, 106 W. Madison. Fra. 8478. 


Wilfred Training 


FOR SUCCESS IN BEAUTY CULTURE 
Join Wilfred’s March of Progress d 
evening clndote now being formed. 

rates and terms. d 


Cor. 
SOUT 


ining 
Typing 


m galled or eves. 


happy. busy 
oper > aereen oO in 


“WILFRED 


ACADEMY, | OF y HATS Fetes CULTURE 
Corner State. State $861. 


Also New roo 
Newark, ” philadelphia Pittsburgh. 


COMPTOMETRY, $15 


Complete Course—D or Ev asses. 
Felt & Parrant—Baourbs Cc gy 
sina Tecourhenenstiemeant Instructors. 


FREE COURSE IN 
SWITCHBOARD 


[P.B.x, Liveboards} Included. 
Dictation Practice, 20c Hr.: 10 Hrs., $1.75. 
Personal Attention. iieiaeue’t Service. 


| Chicago Commercial College, 


180 W. Washington-St. Tel. FRA. 4803. 


ALLIED BEAUTICIANS 

INSTITUTE OF BEAUTY CULTURE. 
Complete Beauty Course. 
TERMS ARRANGED AS LOW AS 


$1.50 Per Wk. 


FOR FULL TIME DAY SCHOOL. 

5 N. WABASH. DEA, 6818. 
Open Mon., Wednes., and Friday evs. until 9. 
HEIM BEAUTY SCHOOLS. 


365 92 DOWN 


lete Course. 
MARCEL E Cos 


SN ETICS INCLUDED 
and Evening Classe 
OoOoL : LAKE-9T. 


OADWAY. 
‘ 215 W. WISCONSIN-AYV. 
Rates slightly higher in Gary and Milwaukee, 


ATTRACTIVE GIRLS. 


Excellent opportunity for those who can 
qualify for fashion papdeling. Size 14-18. 
Small tuition fee. Free acement service. 
SPECIAL CLASSES R CHILDREN. 
Apply at studio at once or mail coupon. 


NAME ...0000 SP oseeeeseeseccceseseserocce evccces 


ADDRESS ee ee ees 
ERA JANE STUDIO 
64 East Sate Wabash 9332. 


ae eee Cy 
ina sta 
— —PITMAN— BEKPG. 
in. 8-10 wks. ] 
board. Only 
1 4 incoming 
s—take comp- 
for the inven- 
demand. Ask about our 
# placing sery. Visit this 
Don't be confused, OUR 
Y SCHOOL. 190 N. State. Fra. 4122. 


CFARN feeb CULTURE. 
COMPLETE! CAL, THOROUGH! 


m CE 
GERTRUDE HALE SCHOOL 
162 N. State-street. Ount 


serge now; 
— 


or e€ ; 
formation.” A ag 


school, 

OLER § 
177 North State-street. oe 
INCREASE YOUR INCOME. 
Become a fashion model ; intiBios. demand. 


32 W. fy De Dea. 3106. 


Good Pay igi: Learning 


PRACTIC 
} Benoa), Hecutre 2 Pa ae + 


go ean 
GE 


. COIN C 
me in for details 
r week. Don 


eenreeee ‘ : 
eee eveee ev eee ag 


335 


wie ’ ; : ; 
ENTAL NURSE— EAR. MORI RE : 
a a Be Di 4 » , 
a 4 | pe La . , Oo. 239 
nT) i" ; 


Bier a 


TRADE SCHOOLS_WOMEN, 


; 
ALD 
ry ee 
Ali We 


PO ee nnn me — - 


ny RENT—ROOMS—NORTHWEST. 


_HOTELS AND APARTMENT HOTELS, — Pe 


T0 RENT—APARTM EnTs—souTH. 


| MARINELLO | 


The a Qunt Metonal ofeaey, Cal Culture 
ANNOUNCEMENT! 


Our enroliments scheduled 
for the February classes are 
e~ceptionally large. There- 
fore, due to the limitation of 
classes, may we ask your co- 
operation by registering your 
reservation immediately? 


NATIONAL SCHOOL OF COSMETICIANS, 
108 N. STATE, STATE 5087. 


AMERICAN SCHOOL 


OF BEAUTY CULTURE 
Offers a oan Saving to the lst 
25 Girls Enr They Before March ist 
for — Complete Course Inc. All Equipment. 
159 N, STATE-ST,. 8th fir. CENtral 5446. 


IRESSMAKING—MILLINERY SCHOOLS 


PROF. DRESS ‘DESIGNING DRESSMAKG.. 
pattern drafting, millinery or 


Best equi d sch oO Rst. mach. 
Day or eves. ~ uipped schoo ~ 
Free Booklet *“T.” M tate 


aster College, 400 8. 
DRESS DESIGN.. PATTERNS, DRESSMKEG., 
millinery. Forest Academy, 2U9 


. State-st. 
PROFESSIONAL FRENCH DRAPING — 
Drees j ‘ r t.T 


PERSONAL, 


Skee ee 30 WEST. 
telepnoge, ‘carpe 24 ort | ower residence. Radio, 


ph 
pecge. sere ie oe vine = ally wets? o or 


ne distance to foer. WHITEHALD, 6211. 
LAWSON Y. M. GC. A. 


Hotel Rooms. 
— — “WH DO THE IMPOSSIBLE" 
S7 WEEKLY. 


Sensationally “‘Different’’ rooms. 
Big closets, Puy vy. afb. shr.: 24 hr. 


LTON. 
1517 MM 1out -BLVD. 
LEEDS 


3 HOTELS. 


$5-NO HIGHER-$5 


LUXURIOUS HOTEL ROOMS FOR LESS. 
ee an Lanawer: “4 Bour ho service. 


MADISON-ST. 
TON BEDS ii HOTELS. 
$8 Up-Hotel Grant-$5 Up. 


Newly dec. rooms: running water: baths, 
phones. cane money. Live ong heart of loop. 


$1.25 daily. 


TO RENT—ROOMS—SOUTH. 


CHAPPEL, 7617—LARGE LIGHT ROOMS; 
priv. family; I. ©. trans.; man. Butt. 0709. 
CORNELL, a pa ee or WARM FRONT 
sipg. rm,, or, I, C., bus: fine environment. 
DREXEL 8342, 2D~LGE.,. PLEASANT RM. 
__in priv. home. Catholic woman. =n 3088. 


BLIZABETH S. 8124-—-NICE RM. BAL 
home elderly man; gd, trans. Win. 3990. 


EVANS, 6120—LARGE ROOM IN PRIVATE 
— home; nicely furnishéd. Hyde Park 35065. 

HYDE PARK BLVD... 56488—HOT — 
warm rms.. $5 week. shrs. I. C.. bus 


ROOM; ATTRAC. 
~ ‘bed, Rpsuteress 


LUELLA, Stan 
tively furnished. ep 


appointmen * 


HAVE LEASED KENARD APT. “HOTEL. 
5746 Kenmore, to Julius Burt.. Respons. 
for my own debts only. Frank L. Nathanson, 


SOLD BEAUTY SHOP, 9008 8. ASHLAND— 
Not responsible for debts contract. by any- 
one but myself. RBHOMA G. HANNION. 


ROY K--WE WANT Pt EVERYTHING 
. with John M. and home. Mother 


siete for you. Dad. 


BOUGHT RESTAURANT 2845 N. PULASEI- 
rd. Not respons, for debts contre. by any 
one but myself. E. WINSTON MORGAN, 


T RESPON. FOR ANY DEBTS BXCEPT 
ay contr. by myself after Jan. 28, 1938. 
Charles Cushing, 1 N. Lavergne. 


NORMAL-BLVD.. AS ENGLEWOOD 87UU. 
ORWOOD HOTEL. 
New double inador ¢ golemine baths. 
All trans.: cafe: $6 wee : also kit. apts. 


WENTWORTH, '7220— so PRIVATE: 
_ good furn.; porch, radio, refrig. $5 week. 


eee sere 6546—LG., ATTR. RM.: Sur. 
1-2: $4; sm., $3.60; gents: L.c., L. Ofc. be 
STONY ISLAND. 612 VER 

ee nice 208. aiid" 0800, 

L, 7: re 


warm rs. 1-2 
6217—1-2-3 RMS. 

new. dec., refric. opt.: % bike 
YALL, 6667—COZ1, CLEA N BM. ADJ. 

bath; quiet adult tam.; all tran; men only. 


65TH-PL.. z. Aes a aA FURN. DAY- 
light rms., . and dbl, All trans. $2-$3. 


VERNON, 


T RESP. FOR DEBTS EXCEPT THOSE 
yo tracted by myself. ROBERT BOLDS. 


NOT RESPON. FOR DEBTS CONTR. BY 
anyone but myself. HOWARD J J. STULL. 


BOUGHT PRATT-BLVD. D. FOOD SHOP—ONLY 
responsible for own debts. F. WEISS. 


NOT RESP. Ate DEBTS CONTR. OTHER 
than by myself WM. P. STRINGER. 


ARTHUR L.—EVERYTHING FORGIVEN; 


FREE MEALS 
LOS ANGELES, $27.50. 
New tory 12. be. Dallas, $12.50. 
st. Louis, $4 W BATES soris, S22 a petrol, $3. 


MERICA ie; 
614 §. Wabash, 174 N. State. 


Call Wabash 8300. 


ROUND TRIP zoUpe N a 
PHILADEL. .$18.25 N 519.4 
BALTIMORE. 17. Se reeene 1 


ge Pillows. 

Pastest ; Beres Seats. 
os ae TRAILWA Ys. 

20 £. RANDOLPH. 


RANDOLPH 9500. 


— B INFORMATION BUREAU 
~ 815 N. State. FRAnklin 0303. 


Automobiles. 
SOrm DBRS AND ADVERTISERS ARP 
cise cauti in arranging 
eutome * yg tranabortat on with other 
indi vided References should be ex- 
n A 


BUSINESS PERSONALS. 


Vitamin F Permanent “Wave, 


$1.00. 
A perb wave with the finest solution. 
Ideal ey the hair. Ineludes hair cut, sham- 
©, finger wave. hair style. and pecondition- 
ng. Dail except Saturday. Ope We 
Fri. eve. Lee. 30 W. Washington. "Cae: 8225 


CROQUIGNOLE PERMANENT SHAMPOO 
set, rinse, aranteed. $1: Snrer. mere 10c 
complete. Free marcel wave. Loop. 
6 E. Lake-street. Also South. 936° w. '63d-8t. 


$3 STEAM O PUSHUP PERMANENT .$1 
Free trim,set. Ruth's, 202 S, State.Web.4241. 


a ate re i SE eTe Wi F 8") 


PERM WAVE, $1. ELEC, SCALP TREAT- 
Nina Parker. 64 W. Randolph. 


ment, 50c. 
ety ENDS ol MAR. 
| RB. 908. De RS 


poas, CATS, BIRDS, PETS. 
DOGS. 


MIXED UBS, $1: SH Ere. 

- Wires , Scotties 
aieiales. ‘others. 2413 W. North-avenue., 
MUST BE SOLD—CHOWS, WIRE. BULLS, 
collies, sheph., police, fox ser. y Spitz, $1 
up. 6419 Cottage ¢ Grove. We b 


$3: FOX TER- 
‘Bostons, Cockers, 


47TH-PL., E. ree ky 
spr. matt. Maid ser. Transit, I. C., $3 3.60 wk. 


JACKSON PARK PLAZA, 
Homelike Rms. with Complete Hotel Service, 
$5 A WEEK UP. 


Near I. e, afer pet rface lines, and bus 
i540 ¥ (Atl JACKSON PARK. 


SOUTH on ge gp, ao end eo 
and I. C T bedroom ee ty 
cont bath. Suit. 1 or 2. Gent @ ladies ot 

couple empl. Breakfast optl. Se Fai.4 
Hotel Rooms, 
NEW MICHIGAN HOTEL. 
20 - clay ieaont ice ta 
icely :; fresh dec.: $5 wk.. 2 
up; rest. and sh tel; 
Cor. MICHIGAN ARD AND S2D-8T- 
~LIVE NEAR THE LOOP THIS WINTER— 
880 S. MICHIGAN HOTEL. 


Live in ist. dotioop mpdarn fren worgot b bldg. 
$1.50 PHR DAY. 
THE MATELOWER HOTEL, 


6125 Se ee ee oe 
Attractive mat all wi one shower. 
Moderate rentals oh Baa eo 


‘a LAKERIDGE HOTEL == 


—~ 4665 LAKH PARK — 
” Meatiy furnished rooms All with bath 1 and 
shower, Excel. transp. $6 pe week and up. 


-eee BOLEL STATELY eee 
. 6150 GREENWOOD-AV 


Nicély furn. and attract, priced. All roo 
with bath ow I on invited. 


TO RENT—ROOMS—NORTH. 


ADDISON. 26—BEAU. 
ft. . Mrs. Pierson [ priv. & Fy. Wee hen Rea. 


of | LAK 
$6. 


BM., INNER| ® 


MORRO EEYD. _ 
Le 1952 NICELY 


MONTIOBLLO. N, [4600 BLE.1—VERY LG. 


ST. LOUIS, N., 2441—D ‘RT. BM. LG. 
clos., empl. ople. ; seh at a <etnean, 
o » * + + 2 LIVE IN . * e e rs . . 
RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT. 
It is much re h like t 2 
asinutes of thin ico via C. eS. Wok R. 
modern building, 


cafete ete.; 
near churches, public cvaitng iiyim.. ete. 
bus and ee our ae tag 


ao Aa ¥ 
4261 ing pig bid, Pinsanoin 1070. 


~— CONVENIENT AND REASON — 
eh ye BY loop. Modern "7 Foome, $485 


ADVANTAGES OF THE “Y,” 
» ame rier soanee. a Pa 3 vé-aB ‘weekly 

Senin oahu ue ny. M, CK. A > 
820 S. Kedzie-av. NEVada 3800. 


i. RENT—HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS, 


South side, 


BLACKSTONE, 6104—SGL, RM. AND KIT.; 
lge. closet: clean, quiet place: $3. Ral 


ELLIS, 3800—NEWLY DEC. 1-2-3-4 RMS.: 
fur.. unfrn. rs.: $4 up: Frig.. free cas. ight. 


ms he 6117-192 CLEAN. 8 POH. BL, 
: refg.: 24 br, ph. serv.: 1. C., surt.. L. 


aan ya, ye 3 ROOM APT. 
Refr., new dec. Re 1 rm, kit., $4.50 up. 


PARK-AV.. 4 wrree RM, KITNTS 
0-$8. Furn. or unfurn. Well kept 


LAKE PA 4917-—CLEAN WARM 
apts., pri. bath, $5 up. : TG ‘ad 


LAKE yt a ON a a Joan ty 


parlor. priv 
up. ap. r..$2. 50. 


MICHIGAN, 2¢ 
everyth. furn.: $3.50 w 
SRNOMON 6208-1 2 

orbed’” $7-$10. Mor tB00 1800. 

BM.: PIANO. 


stove, elec, ref... 
sm. 2 reas. 


UNIVERSITY. — LGE. 
Prig.: kit, adj. bath: wo" 

DATE. 

Bath “pbamt. 

ab 


47TH, 1115 ar 9 

Prig. i frt. rm. sf ee ae 

clean, warm, mane “comfort ortable place. 

pa a, fs = E., * BM, i, HSEPG., $4. 2 
hekps., $ Real kitchens, stm. heat. 

North Side, 

ELLEVUE-PL., E.. 19—CORNER 2 

_ front s : 2 beds: all conv.; Frigid. 

BUENA. 7655. COR, CLARENDON—653 BUS; 


comp. 2 rm, apt., pr. bath, $7; kit.. $4 up. 
BYRON, 1319—2 BEAU, FR. RMS., INA- 
dor bed: gd. trans.: a dec.: adults: priv. 


DEMING-PL., 623—1 


are, Bp. Sleeping rm vn, 0 


Sve EST Ba PRR AT 

priv. walking distance loop. 

TENOR. wet es oo ee 
ciienaas . 35 


ORE Dae 2738—BIG 
room; own entrance; $6 


KENMORE, 4011 NEWLY DEO. 2 ROOM 


RM. 


LAKESIDE-PL, 323-3 RM. FUBN. APT., 
frig., 1 rm, It. hskp.. $3; ex. tr. Ard, 3431. 


LELAND, RMS.; PRIVA PORCH: 
$7; 1 rm., $9.75. Sunnyside sian. 
MAGNOLIA, 4706—NEWLY D 1-2 RM, 
kitnts. Also sleep. rms.; reas., + trans. 
ae, 4532—NEWLY way * 1 AND 2 
‘ Frig. $4 up. All tranap. 
igscon. 71721 . PULL. mae ’ A 
_3 rms., suit. 2.; g.: adits.: al : Bd 
iTV 4900, APT. < ; 
sacs: adj. bath; lg. clos.: 
pri. bt ae ty. R. eR 6 eel vat 
5 . s07—BASEMERT. 2 RM. 
apt. ; : pri bath. bs 
BATH: 


SHERID . 4726—2 RM. KiT.. 
+ Fm ak refr.:; maid 
WELLINGTO 15 — 
folnwas es ed. cian bling, a3 py 
RMS.: EVERY- 


WILSON 1 ¢ 2 
thing "erbishs Gat trans., $3 up 


SuCRIMe RAE 636—L4@.. FRT. BED- 
sit. rm.; new, furn.: Ven. blinds; remod.; 
pri.res.: 24 ; 24 hr.ht,; air con.; ‘sep.ent.Gra. 2.3904 


CEDAR-ST., E., 60—GIRLS’ DORM.: INDIV. 
beds, wardrobes. 3 or 4 in lige. rm.. $3.50. 


CLARK, 1016 N., AT OAK. WHI. 4290. 
5 MIN. TO LOOP, FREE RADIO EA. RM. 


HOTEL OLYMPIC 
$6 WK. UP-$1.80 DAY UP. 


INSPECT THE F ST ROOMS ON NEAR 
NORTH SIDE. 2 NEWLY DECORATED 
RMS., EACH ial TUB, SHOWER, RADIO. 

3460. 


CLARK, N. MOHAW] 
NE Lipo” S opr. LINCOLN PARK. 


"HOTEL CLAYTON, 
300 MOD. ROOMS. - BEAUTYREST BEDS. 
$5.00-PER WEEK~§$5.00. 
FREE RADIO. 10 MIN. TO LOOP. 


CLARK, 1501 N.—APT. 3: LOVELY, CLEAN, 
warm, sunny rms., $2.60 up. Mitchell. 
DEARBORN-ST.. N.. 1447—NEWLY FURN. 
outside rms,, private baths. Hotel service. 

N.jJ — 


JUNIOR-TERR.., 818 [4300 
warm rm.; suit. 1-2; exc. tran.; pri. re 


BOSTON PUPS—9 9 WK. BRAU. oar PE 
B. ears, screw tail. 1137 Addison, Buc. fan. 


— — 9120 N. WAUBEGAN-ROAD. — — 
Pups and er. dogs, breeds, % he 


Visit A tenon nae ae CLN. AND § 
tary. All b 


$2. 4701 N. Bor cba 

PEKINGESE—TOY P +4 gt Seong PED.;: LITTLE 

beauties: reas. 543 Dover. Sun. 3754. _ 

5 oberon ey PRI- 
3071. 


INSTRUCTION 


“NEW YORK INSTITUTE 
OF td Sock Yate 


Complete comprehensive one year 
course in Dietetics ose oak thorough in- 
struction in Nutriti 4 te emaiet » Insti- 
tution Mana para- 
tion and Coo gard for posi- 
tions in hote goo, pom —, 


restaurants, 


‘Heating and Plumbing Supplies. 


— — GUARANTEED USED BO il 
Boiler tes. Rp and 


fittings. C. ; 
1247 W. HB 3387-88. 


; 4 _ e hg 
; o3 2 ¥ & 
. Pn eager — 
‘ Ps: Ms ' etty . by 
x. Pe wy . * av ‘ + ‘ 
a5 ae 5 u + 
—] i i as &. oe - 
Wal ce rT 2 . . 
ei ok E 
odie Ua ’ e 
. ? y 
4 ~ « ad na 
$i Fett ro 
x 
. é 
A 
‘ 
« 


~~ 


ere vas o8t af 


' i ——_ oh, F eal ” & 
Fi a4 +) 5 ae es 


KENMORE-AV., 5742—WELL SURED 
large room, private house, me optional. 
Suit. 2 or more. Reasonable. = 
MAGNOLIA, 4520—ATTR. NEW f » PRT. 
rm,, Yr. ‘wat.: le. closet: $3.50: W bus, 


MELRO W.. =: 3M—FUD . * . 
rm. inador bed: fam, of a a £407: 

watnoaa 51—LGE. at GHT, NICELY 
furn. room. Bucki = ee 


SH RERIBLERD- 
priv. home: brifst. aN tr. 4 a6 


=! oop: new 


Fe 
hs 
ef Ton {OTEL 
some witt 


Nicely furnished: 
Com mplete ’ 
ity. 


ALL go WITH Say ASS BATE. 
WINDALE 1 9  Wintt 


‘HOTEL NOR’ 'F MERE. 

v OF combine “hove Bi ta 

a os ESHIRE 
Full Hotel service. 


918 FULLERTON—LARGBE 1 
$3 wk. up: sipg. rms.: L. Surf. 


Weat Side, 


re S., 824—2 LT. HSKP. RMS. Bus. 
bsmt., h. w. ht., gas, el.; ed. ir. $4.60 w 


_ BOARD AND LODGING. 
“North Side. 


a Oe, AAs DRLLEV TR Oa 


SHERIDAN. 6643-—HSD, T. DBL, FACING 
lake: ex. mis, pri. fam Sun. 9319. 


WAVELAN 1D, 780—BDS, "GIRLS: LOVELY 

hm,; pri, bath: board, 4-50-7386 Bit, 1878 
ROOM—PRL FAM.; OPT.; REF, M 
2 fae 8, tel. $6. Sun. 3 


KITCH 
Adults. 


Tt 


211 


E.Delaware-pl. 
1 ROOM 


Furnished Kitchenettes 
FROM 


$47.50 TO $75 


Rentals Include Gas, 
Light and Refrigeration. 
Free Maid Service. 


24 HOUR SWITCHBOARD SERVICE. 
Convenient to Loop and shopping centers. 
OVERLOOKING THE LAKE. 

WHITEHALL 4450, 


MORE FOR YOUR MONEY. 


Fort DEARBORN Hotel 


CORNER LA SALLE AND VAN BUREN-STS. 
rooms. 18 story. _modern re 
bldg.: newly ished: 


rat furn 
attractive outside noosa: 


ous 2: ose to your work 
SPROIAL. RATES, 


$7.50 Weekly. $1.50 Daily. 
OPPOSITE LA SALLE STREET STATION. 


WELLINGTON ARMS 
2970 oh geeks 


to 4 epoom kitchen 
-_danesia and the 


By "540 unfurn., 
turn. Dane ae $350 up. F 6 up. Bit. 4600: 


DEARBORN PLAZA 


KIT. APTS., $12.50 WK. UP. 
ROOMS, $9 PER WeEe: ogee $2.50. 


$6 


108% N. DEARBORN-ST. WHI. 64 
DEVONSHIRE HOTEL, 


hour h wee 
ib BAST OHIO.” BUPERIOR 4900. 
WIL-MAR HOTEL 
11 W. bt epee 
Attractively fu pts. 
ara ee eee ae 


PLAZA HOTEL, 
AND NORTH-AVENUVE. 


An 


Bo. take Vv. 10611. 
500 


6 
HOTEL VERSAILLES, 
DORCHESTER-AVENUE AT 53D-STREET. 
$6.00 PER WEEK $6.00 


Modern, smartly furnithed outside rooms. 
Complete’ hotel service. 10 minutes to loop. 


HOTEL ALCAZAR, 
3000 WASHINGTON-BLVD. 


Chateau Hotel, 7.50 Wk. 
3838 BROADWAY. DAILY, $1.50. UP. 


each with bath, shower: eri grill, Fatatees 
bus, suface lines at d or: sxill, elevator: 


SHELDRAKE HOTEL 


nt ae ty , BOSs. furs. Compl. boll service 
Bus us a door eiaies a. iow as he pag WO. | 3 


NORTH PARK HOTEL. 


CORNER OGDEN-AV. AT CLA 
Onpes* Lincoln park. ohawk 100. 
Beautifully furnished 1-2-3 rm. apts. Com- 
lete hotel service. All outside larce apts. 
0 min. downtown. New. dec. Reas. rates. 


4943 SHERIDAN-RD. LONGBEBACH 2000. 
Unusual oe $3 Per — 


Beautifully furnis newly decora 
rooms. Excellent Ganrbortetins. SINTON 
HOTEL, Corner of Argyle and Sheridan, Sheridan, 


$6—$6—$6—S6—$6 


aes rae - coe decor. * Priv 


— : {heme ehove. 


Gentile, 
Convalescent Homes. 


: cony Re F Align eee wf 
: me, nr. 
Edgew. Beh, hotel: best refs. Longb. 6342. 


Sa a eae PO eae 


Children, 
i 5. school: x ae _ 


A COMPLETE ROOM. AP" 
as Se oa 
eau a Bree. Ard, 6% éy36. 
0; [a ee Tar 


“Taker tote 
aa MOD. APT. CPL, 
. 77 thst. 


“or bus, fils s _UWER BOER: Roa 


" North: Side. 


gies Ut ater an Pa ae 


~  S 


“°THE CHATELAINE” | 


ype gg gyn Ae Side, 


aap 


Sees 5 a } *} ‘H-ST 
; ¢ “ : was SL 
y “Se ‘ 42.6 | 
; OF TD Bo Ke : 
ae wil] 
TAB | DR TA . 
> * 


$52.50; 


Four, Five, Six Rooms, and Larger. 


Seed 
PORE we He 


"One, ree, ana Three ‘Reems. 
1 RM. KITCH. APT.—$18 MO. STM. BT.: 
exe. t . 4743 NN. rd. 


Four, Five, Six Rooms, and Larger. 
.* MELROSE. ist FL.—6 RMS. Big 
edd Babtare 4 no Saga 
® dood trana, 2416 2. Baterst. tot 


* eae Saatbate. test 6 o. 


a. N. Hamlin. 
3520 N. HAMLIN-4 | RMS.; ao age 
sun porch: Frigidaire: steam heat; , 


SOUTH SHORE’S FINEST... 

6 rms. 2 baths: breakfast rm.: garage. 

7370 SOUTH SHORE-DR.. 
6919 CHAPPEL. 
OWNER, PLAZA 6754. 


6339 HARPER-AYV. 


41m, apt.: newly remodeled; frefrig.: brand 
new stove; excel. transp. Agent on premises. 


CHOICE 7 RM, APT., 2 BATHS, GAR., DE- 
lake sunny. Best part So. Shore. Nr. 


2ee3 WELLINGTON-AV.—5 RMS.: \ 
reirig.; heated. Ing. jan. or call Fra. 


3301 CUYLER—5 RMS.: COR. APT.; MO 
ern: $47.50, See jan. or call Ran. 34 


— 2 N. io oe phone Frankia 3 rag UP, 


One, ‘Twe, and Three Rooms. 


2% RMS FREE GAS AND REFRIG.; tg 
woodw.: imm. poss. 167 N. Cicero, apt. 


gf ete. Gentiles. 2618 #, W208 t. 
atte eA GeTONE, * AME: BSE Teak 
re &s m at. Dp 
at ng ga? 347 8, “hisceaines , 2d fi 
4420-28 DREXEL-HLYD 4 ROOM “eggreo 
apt.; free electric refrigeration: 
decorated: $45, Phone AKLAND 7197. 


837 E. 6STH-ST—4 RMS ELEC, REF. IM- 
mediate poss.; st. car, L trans. $37.50. 


6 RM.—G@D. TRAN.: VENETIAN BLINDS: 


__10 RENT—APARTMENTS—NORTH, 


baal od dnd ~~ 


General List. 


1400 
Lake Shore Drive 


GAS, ELECTRICITY AND REFRIGERATION 
INCLUDED IN RENTALS, 


2 rooms—Liv. rm., dinette, kitch.$60-$72.50 
3 rooms—Liv. rm., bedrm., kitch. ..$75-$92.50 
4 rms.—Liv. rm., bedrm. din., kit.$82.50-97.50 
5 rms.—Liy, r.. 2 bedrs., 2 baths.$130-$140 
6 rms.—Liv. rm., 3 bedrms., 2 baths.$170-$180 
Elmer A, Claar & Co., Agts. 
Whitehall 4180. 


3520 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


1 spacious 3% room apt overlooking drive. 
Bedroom and in-a-dor. Moderate rental. 


— 2001 LINCOLN PARK WEST 
a -4-6 Rooms, $55 to $ 
osite Lincoln ers 

LINCOLN 3633. 


teed 


Doorm 
PETER . * REYNOLDS. 


———«- «= « §2() SURF-ST. 
3 and & room apts.; tile bath; good trans. 
Reasonable rental. janitor on prem 


—ELEC. REFRIG.: ~ DECOR.: : 
4844 N. ROCKWELL-ST. 


« 
+4 § 8-$40. 


Four, Five, Six Rooms, and Larger. 
5033 MAYPOLE—5 RMS. TED 


porch. EL refri ar, $55. 
sow. Charles Bertch, oi N Chasse. Man. 8100. 


4 ROOMS — STEAM HEAT: ips GOoD 
TO RENT—APARTWENTS—SUBURBAR, 
WEST, 


Austin—14 minutes to loop. 


ATTRACTIVE 4-5 RM. APTS. NOW AVAIL 
able: Oak Park and Austin, $42.50-$85. 
LANG. WEISE & CELLA NDOLPH 2574. 


TO RENT—FURNISHED APARTMENTS, 


SOUTH. 
$5.00 PER WEEK $5.00 


Newly decorated, smartly furnished rooms. 
Tub or shower bath; complete hotel service. 


SOUTHLAKE HOTEL, 
4711 KENWOOD-AV. ATLANTIC 2610. 


THE ee 


4537 8S. DREXE ATL. 
2-3 rm. kit. amt, in beaut. 7 story ‘alae. 
Numerous large closets, priv. grounds, age! “¥ 
dec. and furn. 24 hr. hotel serv., $50 
LEEDS HOTELS. 


7010 CREGIER-AYV. 


APARTMENT HOTEL. 
Beautiful rooms; kitchenettes, with or 
without bedrooms. Some with modernistic 
furniture. Near I. C., shops, and schools. 


YALE MANOR, 
6 Yale-avenue. Fireproof bid mod- > 
crnly furnished: dlee. room, kitchenette dag 
ree eige. gas. Frig nen, 
masta sary te "bus, L, surf, Eng.7900. 
LUXURY “AT LOW COST. 


2 rooms in de luxe bidg.; cveraines living 
Bo rng 24 hour hotel serv.: free swmz. pool. 
6731 JEFFERY. FAIRFAX 4282. 


One, Two, and Three Rooms, 


2322 Commonwealth Apts. 


Spacious 3 room specimens. Carpeted. 
Rental inclu ec. refrigeration, 24 
hour desk and s La po yal service 
2322 COMMONWEALTH-AVENUR. 


933 FOSTER-AYV. 


Barg.; 2% rms.: Pullman kitnt.: exc. view: 
free ii light, oe refrig.; newly decor.: only 
lake, best trans. References. 


i APT. HOTEL, 
4655 LAKE PARE-AV 

Attrac PB an furnished gh 

kitchenette _ apartments, 


MIDWAY DREXEL A ers” 
Bronte om room “units nal Box WAT nae. 
omp. serv. ex. tr.: mod. 080. 


eration: A 
lake. Autornatte elevator. $50 mon 


734 ee ae 


3 room apartments: 2 beds: cas. 
See_agent on_premises ¢ or call Handoigh 6171. 


2507 WINNEMAC-AYV. 


Mod. 8% am pane. 3 closets, inador, 
shower, z. Mrs. Harz rz on premises. 


1400 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


3 ROOMS, liv. rm., bedrm., kitchenette. 
$75: gas, elec, refr. incl. Ast. Wh Wh “= 


6920 RIDGEH—2 RM. APT.. ELECTRIC. : 
refrig. included. Ex t trans. cee 
te echools an stores, zent on premises. 
yh ow 838. 
age aa00 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 
Living room, Pullman kitchen, inador bed, 
th, rm.. $52.50. Agents, Whi. 41 80. 


2 pg sg Ph agg ug pe $3.50 
ew bidg.: as, refr.: su 
369 Greenieat an Ball, Lon. 23655, till 6 p. m. 


3 hoe E, LIGHT, AIRY ROOMS—AMPLE 


closet space. Opposite lake. Bus at door. 
a ons. 7100 Sheridan-rd., $45. 
I ng 3 BRM. APTS al ae ge ‘ 
” Wh te woodwork, gas 
1st fi.; $35-$50. Just off pe 3550 N.}. 
3 Pe vino MODERN fg BATH: 
tory elev. bidg.: free re- 
trigeration. 1 1505 Morse-av. Sh nldran $820. 


si9% NORTH SHORE-AV.—APT. 3. 3D FL. 
rm. kit.. ee dec.. $30 Rand. 3081. 


2 gr ELECTRIC REFRIG.- DECO- 
rated, 930-959, 4864 N. ROCKWELL-ST. 


1218 Vi R-AV. [5800 N.J]—2 RMS.., 
inndiog Cees virtee $34. xe, “tranep. 


1061 oe = ~—2 ROOMS: $27.50: FREE 
gs trans. 


gas, re : modern: 
LGE. 1 —IMMED. POSS. Lar 4 
1140 4 BM a. Maia a Lincoln 5900 


IRVING APTS., $40 UP. 
ut. 2 rm. units: refrig.: elev.: 24 hr. 
phone serv.: ex. trans. 4300 Drexel. 

Pasa oldie aa 
p10 8, LAWRENGD-AV, =e OUTSIDE 
gi + pew. ba $40 including gas, light, 
a Beatson” ‘Realty Co.. Fairfax 3064... 
*'finen S.. COMP. Pp. FURN., DAILY eng 

— serv. Close to I. C.. 


sh 
e gas, It.. rm lt.. refr. Regent 0929 after a D. m. 


EXEL—2 ROOMS. $42.50: PRIVATE 

0417 DRE compl. furn.; ~~ Plaga 7484. 

ATTRACTIVE 3% RM. PUR. i. APT. VERY 
reasonably priced. Ina. 


3444 MICHIGAN-AV =a AN. 
, AiRY Fins’ ae . elee.: Bare, week. 


3 RMS., NICEL 35: FRIGID 
Good ‘transp. 7 ti Kimbark. iat 
STEAM HEA SAT. CLEAN - ELECT. 
° aoe priv. entrance.: adults. Enz, 5148. 
7015 EAST END-AY. ~~] RM, APT.: ELE- 
go maid service: lL U. Dorch.’ 8243. 
5317 KIMBARK-AV.—1-2-3-4 ROOM FURN. 
kitchenettes: modern bidg.: reasonable. — 
Y NICELY FURN. 2-4 RMS.— —LARGE. 
i L ¢C., bus, eS —— “2 69th-place- 


MODERN 3 REFRIG:: 
tile bath: RS ia Sas: reas, 7/90 ign g BOS Luella. 


2 RM. KITCH., PRIV. BATH, RIV. BATH. ELEC. RE- 
frig.. 3d, $8. Quiet. 5426 Dorcheste 


MPLETE SERVICE—QUIET: L. ae 
— I., bus. Cut rates. 6818 Normal. Nor. 6824 


EW. FURN.: FREE GAS, ELEG, 
* and ef aa." nr. park. $45. Oak. 3547. 


SOUTHWEST, is 


1 FURN 
Fm y ‘attractively 
als. 65419 Harpers 


ma alts. "B10 


Apt. 623. 
Four, Five, Six Rooms, and Larger. 


6339 8. CAMPBELL—FURNISHED 1.AND 2 
rm. kits.. $6 up. Elec. refrig.. cas, light. 


1400 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


5 ROOMS, LAKE EXPOSURE, LIV. 2 
B 2 BATHS. D KIT.: GAS, 
ELEC, REFRIG. INCLUDED IN RENTAL OF 
$135. AGENT, WHITEHALL 4180. 


720 WAVELAND-AVENUE. 


aecere, tes, eal Satae oes Saat 
re solarium: ra - 
verge A or phone “Franklin 8383. 


Ti SROMETOHOAVERGE 

Mod. a 2. hag . arched doorways, elec. 
— a th.;: nr. outer drive. 
SAP meh or 4 8 Franklin 8383. 

999 LAKE SHORE-DRIVE. 


Brig rm, im, Se a” 8 finest apt. loc.: 
| Spygate nag Seba 9 
z sae 


TH AND KIT ‘eena R 
oe Se A oo 
saa 


THS, THROUGH 


eae 


afehe. tier Aer hiv floor. 


Ronorable. Central BOBO. 


~ and 


et NisoN—a LA R —— 
anos As aaa 


ie Vw 
DOVE rR. 


Meeeccve a ee ee : 


NORTH. 


596 HAWTHO RNE-PLAGE. 


Att i 1 Pullman _ kits.; everything 
Pk ob y el. ees ; $37.50 up. Buc. 0147. 


service 
AL 
adults. Reas. 


Millsfield Apts., $40 Up. _ 
Beaut. my and ee tS ri. - ange, Comp. hotel 
sa inae "G BM.. 
abe "gigi. fun a iavely, cheat 
s a hg ES 
agar, SOEN ee 


seein 
Park WR ge i . 
$10 wk. up or m 


i a 


i. aE 


4 : 
- 4 e n - 
~ — ns ~ ee ‘ a . 
i 
* . - ‘ 4 * 
ir Tr Iv. 
* as eee} 
ot WK. i.” 
=, ot mY . Dw. 
a 4 » 
neo > 7 a a 
. 
Sy irr a oe rURR r ae ~~ 603, x a 
mcinct=5 vara »t hall ramped 1:2 ee Soe. ae ee ‘ - a 
y= ae * Bae qos . - ey ag 
Rs i ; .. . : 
~ os s, Pa) : 
‘ 


oppir 


ee 


€icor omer 


“LAKELAND Coe HOTEL, 
{SHERIDAN N-AV 
* . Brand 
Mod, 1-2 Fm = {tat is e3 i. service 
real vaiue, $40 up. inanee. invited. 
ee LAKE sangha 
bedrooms. % baths 
Peete mt ars re — 
veriou 
rt ie cle Mitentahed.- ed. Call Moran Whi 4180. 
RN. 1 OR 2 
286 © ORTNRO BEAD ECB 2 oto 
inetut 7a el aes N snenodl Sy iSinmtete |. 
ee maid serv.: | ree skly. ot monthiy rates. Del. 6804 
~ GLENWYN APTS. 
6040 WINTHROP-AV. 
earpeted, furnished, and — 
12. gil kit. mt hea. furn.: $42.50 up. 
8520 LAKE cating my oc er 
One 4 room furn. apt. overlooking Belmont 
H r. Large rooms in ideal arrangement. 
Ample closets. Reasonable rental. 
$37. 50 A MONTH UP. 
4735 Beacon-st.. 1 rm. kitnt. apie.;. batt, 


shwr aid, phone, elec 
blks.. W. of Uptown theater, natidian Ls sia. 


432 SURF-ST. (2850 N.). 


SURF-LANE APARTMENTS. 
Now avail., 2 and 4 rm. apts., large, beaut. 
furn. Daily maid serv. ty trans. Very reas. 


4737 MALDEN-STREET. 


2 room dinette apt.. $40: new building, 
nicely furnished: electric refrigeration; maid 
service. Ravenswood 9093. 


1617 MICE 
PAGIN & CO. 38 S._ “38 s. 


l STORY BLDG.—46.000 oe 3 oe CAR} 


Trg aeeTp 


switch; reasonable. Sup. 


2 STORY — 5,000 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE: 
drive-in doors;- $100 ‘month. Ban. 2311. 


HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES. 


P- . 


a 


Elect ote: Retriavra tore. 


18 CENTS A DAY BUYS 


Frigidaire samples. aij sizes Lowest prices; 
terms. Open evenings and Sundays 706-704 
S. Western, 


GIGANTIC REMODELING SALE! , 
1.000 Frigidaires, Kelvinators, Norge, G. E.. 
many others. Floor samples. repossessions, re- 
conditions. Prices start at $39.50. Cash, terms. 
EDISON’S WHSE. OUTLET. 766 W. Jackson. 


RECONDITIONED ELECTRIC REFRIGERA- 

tors of nat’ly known makes, $35. Huudreds 
to choose from. Like new. full af eae 
220 W. HURON-ST. UNDAY. 


NEW FLOOR SAMPLE SALE— 

Frigidaire. $59: Norge. $64:  Westinghee.. 
$69: Electrolux, $70: terms. Sunbeam. n 
eves. and Sunday. 62] West Jackson. 


FRIGIDAIRE. ALL PORCELAIN, LIKE 
new: 6 cu. ft.: $50: rec.: tmse. 621 Jackson. 


NEW G.E. REFRG.—COST $139: NOW $69.95. 
Open eves,. Sun. 601 W. Washington-blvd. 


Stoves. 
4 Gass COAL COMB. RNG. DEMO., ese BO. 
ightly chi ped TABLE ae ‘RAN 
sin. 95 EDISON'S WHSE.. 760 W nk abe 


JEWEL TABLE TOP GAS RANGE_NEW. 
$25: tms. Op. eves.-Sun. 621 W. Jackeon. 


NATL. KNOWN STOVE—ALL PORCELAIN; 
cost $69.95. Now $29.95. 601 Washington. 


SUBL. 4-6 MUS., 56 RM., % BATH APT.: ES. 

9 duisitely appointed and decor. ; will rent for 
me price as unfurn.: 43) ma 

jinena. light, gas. ¥41 ‘Carmen. oe. ais’ 


ASHLAND APTS. 


4 Ashland: 3% rms. dern furn 
gas, Bagg Ts gece ~ i ‘naid. Restricted. 


Under New ‘Management. 


5722 Winthrop—1%. 2% kit. apts. and ho- 
tel rms. Compl ete hotel By Reas. rentals. 


NORTHWEST. 


t36 se gg ek ges Ing EO 3% RM. FURN 
apt., incl. gas, elec. . Also ten- 
nis Pek. bill. Seo ten. ad Apt. 3 or J. P 
McCarthy, 8812" Pepe ly av. Pens. 1100. 
kK KIT. APIS.—PRIV. BATH, FRIG.; 
— serv.; $40. 4901 N. Christiana. 
LOGAN S8Q. —2746 KIMBALL. 2D: 5 LARGE 
light rms.: new. furn.: ref.: all tran. Reas. 


eee 


WEST, ve 
DE LUXE 2%-38% ROOMS. 


Smartly “ tile bath, shower, maid 
oo aay t $60-$75. 143 N. Parkside. 
—_ Cha rEAU “—_j- i = RM. FURN. AP is 
. hotel swhd.: n beds: best trans. 

PF ag " 330 N, "Atietity si Vil. 8500. Aus.8510) 

4 BEAU. RMS.—BEDRM.. SHWR+ FREE 
gas, light, refrig. Reas. "221 Cicero-av. 


eg a de WES’ KEND-AV.. 14% KOUUM 
kit. apts.: ref.;: maid, linen; all ‘tr: reas. 


nn no 
TO REN*_STORES, 
Sonth Side. 
1009 EAST 83D-STREET. 


Ideal drug store corner. Only piace in vi- 
ecinity not restr. against liquor sales. 


949 EAST 68SD-STREET. 


Excellent location for women’s appare! 

store. 30xll 

South Side Management Co. 
DORCHESTER 7900. 


Cor. Bldg., 68d-Ashland. 


331 w. Goa. ‘$35. wig i937 ag $30 
0 W : 
John F. ‘Curtis. 6319 S. Ashland. Prosp.2771. 


CHOICE LOC, SOUTH SIDE. 


For groc. t, veget., delic., bakery, beau. 
shop: ag . Orr Realty, 1315 E. 53d. 
= E. 71ST-ST. — — 
2 “desirable. high urade retail chain store 
locations. . Good business section. 
PHONE "STATE 0675. 
—N W. COR. 79TH-ST. AND RHODES 
Available for occupancy Feb. [deal Iocation 
for food mart, variety and dry coods store. 
DORCHESTER 7900. 
LG.. MODEKN STORE 7450 AKCHER. SUM 
mit: zd. for food mart, furn.. dollar store. 
mfz. or any bus. Prospect 2559. 


North Side. 
2296 CLYBOURN-AV.—SUIT. LIGHT MFG. 
or storage: cheap rental. Div. 9500. 


Northwest Side. 
-13 N. AUSTIN-BLYVD. — — — 


LMONT 
desirable fo} 
0675. 


any line. Call agent. State 
3007 LAWRENCE-AVENUE. 


Small heated store. Reasonable rent. imm 
diate occupancy. See janitor or ph. Fra. $383. 


Weat Side. 

3209 W. NORTH-AVENUE. — — — 

Desirable store: in good location. 
“PHONE STATE 0675. 


Suburban. 
9140 S OAK PARK-AV., BERWYN — 
* hasten bie store: zood business location. 
PHONE STATE 0675. 


ILMETTE — Speen ge PrORE. SUIT- 


"aie for PHONE § 
Srire OneTe, 
Sees + ee 
_T0 RENT—OFFICES AND ‘SHOPS, 


—— oe ee ee 


Oil Burners and Stokers, 


2 USED BOILERS te STOKERS — CA- 
pacity 2-4 flats. 1547 N. Western-av. 


Vacuum Cleanets, 
HOOVER, EUREKA, G. E.. APEX. REC. 
Fully guaranteed, $14.95. Open eves., Sun. 
Ediscn’s Whse. Outlet. 766 W. Jackson 


Washing Machines. 


NEW SPECIAL, 322.50 


NEW THOR. MAYTAG, A. B. O., WEST- 
INGHOUSE and many other nationally ad- 
vertised ae on sale. Terms or oe ——— 
eves. to m.* Sunday. 10 5 
Edison's Warehouse Outlet. 766 W. Vackoar 
RENT A NEW MAYTAG—25C PER WEEE. 


No obligation. Immediate delivery. 
Apply rent on purchase if desired. 


LINCOLN 6900. 


CREDIT REPOSSESSED WASHERS, 
Small cartage charge if returned. 


WHY RENT A WASHER? 

Buy one §50c per week. Bargains $15 and 
up. Maytag, Thor, Prima, etc. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Phone Seeley 5264. 


MAYTAG AND THOR: LIKE NEW: $22. 
Rec. Terms. Op. eves., Sun. 621! Jackson. 


THOR WASHER OR [RONER RENTED, 25C 
weck. Free cartage. Thor. Albany 0140. 


INQUIRE ABOUT RENTING A WASHER— 
250 WEEKLY. NEVADA 1360 — 


NEED ROOM —385 LATK STYLE THOR, 
_Maytag, etc.. $15 to $30. 2034 Lincoln-a av. 
NEW GEN. EL. WASHER—COST $79: Now 
$34.95. Op. eves... Sun. 601 W. ashington. 
79.99 G. B. WASRR.. NEW. FULLY GUAR. 
$27.50. 5 W. Jackson. Open eves.-Sun A 


$20. 


HOME FURNISHINGS WANTED. 
FAIRFAX 6180 


HIGHEST CASH PRICES for used furni- 
ture, hshid. goods rugs. Call day or night. 
See SHAMROCK FIRS'T' before vou sell. 
Entire city and suburbs solicited. 


CALL KEDZIE 13800. 


WE PAY CASH. 
BEST CASH PRICES for used furniture, 
rugs. sewing machines, and gratd pianos. 
Calls answered i» CITY OR SUBURBS. 
—- — — — LAWNDALE 0828 — — — 
Highest prices paid for furniture, rugs, 
grand pianos, etc. Cal! day-night anywhere. 
— — — PHONE ROCKWELL 6900 ~—~ — — 
Best cash prices for furniture. rues. sewing 
machines and grand pianos. 
PARTY NEEDS FURNITURE. RUGS. GRD. 
Plano, linens, paintings, dishes. Lon, 4110. 
SUNNYSIDE 6000. NEED USED FURN.. 
rugs, gr. pianos at once. Pay your price. 
WANT ORIENTAL RUGS, GR. Fag > FINE 
furniture, paintings, ete. Edg. 7580. 

—~ NEED A‘ ONCE FINE FURNITURE, — 
PIANO: RUGS. EDGEWATER 1307. 
NORTH SIDERS—BEST PRICES FOR FUR- 
_niture, rugs. CLARKE’S, Longbeach 4711. 
FURNISHING 12 RUOMS—NEED FURN., 
rugs, linens, hsehid. eds: cash. Eng. 0410. 


ROCKWELL 0901 PAY YOUR 


WILL 
price need furniture, rugs at once. 
JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, OLD GOLD, ETC. 


CASH FOR DIAMONDS 
OLD GOLD, JEWELRY 


PAWN TICKETS. GOLD TEETH, SILVER. 
MEMBER Chicago Assn, of Commerce. 


Chicago Gold Smelting Co., 
37 So. Wabash-av., 38d Floor. 


wee 8 KT. DIAMOND. BLUE WHITE 
r. Very brilliant. Handsomely 
vied in latest type yellow gold 
ring. Six Jorge blue white diamonds 
in setting. 's IALLY' PRI .$85.00 
Diamonds awn tere Bought for Cash. 


THE U.S, LOAN BANK, 
10 North Clark-st., 6th Floor. 


www ww ~~ 


Centrai. 

32 N. SYATE—S W. CORK. WASHINGTON. 
— roof bidg.: one floor, -also attractive 
pances ces: worth light: oaizht service: center 
oop: single room Vertisioe dg. $20: with re- 
cept. rm up: beautifu; desk space 
phone. steno. SWIGART & CO. Room 601. 
20 E. JACKSON BLDG. 


2 private pia and reception room. 
month and u up. 
Har. 7490. BAIRD & WARNER. Room 80U. 


TURRIEAED PK Peay A One nk VAILABLE. 


DESK 1 WELL VASLARLE 
a #9 Om, $10: BLDG. ST,, ROOM 420. 


MAIL PHONE SERVICE. LETTERS AND 
postcards a nominal charge. LET 
Us IND YOU SERVICE. 203 S. Dear- 
born Suite _ 1201B; Har. 6877. 
ORF ice STUDIO OK vIS ate i fis 
os gf nt, ED J. 
JR. Co. E: Erie-st. Whitehall rgd ong 


eta BK iota Ss. age ear Fone saa 


able n 
* gxcl, Agents. HAR 0472. 


FURN. PRIV. Ey is tee COK. RM. RM.. 
one serv. inci.: $17.50- 


sect. 

on . 208 8. jo any sae 693. 

oaEe woes ano BORN 
Exceptionally. gr ne 

ENSTE) CO. Gare TRAL 5763 
ie M At. ‘UPFICE AND. SECKEITARIAL 
pe » phone 
En ire th floor, 201 North W : 
10 8. LA SALLE. RM. 748—NI Y FURN 

off,: secretary service o i. 


priv. 
1208. LaSalle. Hn ‘6217. 


BEAUT. FURN. 
serv. Rm. — 

TELEPHON : RETARIA INC. 
Mail: otek nfs we gen ‘K. Michigan. 

31 MO 

SUBLSE 


as ae PSST 


LADY’S DIAMOND WRIST WATCH, ALL 
platinum, exquisite model, set with 
32 Blue Whi diamonds, 17 Jewel 

Geneva Movement. 


_ GUAR AND NE 
Diamonds Pawn Tickets Bought. 
LEVINSON’S LOAN B 
739 NORTH CLARK-STREET. 
DONALD’S — 34 . WEST WASHINGTON-ST. 
Licensed Diamond Brokers and Jewelers. 
sai g Appraisers on Diamonds 
ewelry. Ow C 
Diasiseeatie: Jewelry and Gems Bought. 
Highest Cash Prices Paid. 


Pawn Tickets, Diamonds, 


Jewelry. old gold, silver, etc., bought. 
ERS’ EXCHANGE. 
11TH FLOOR, 32 N. STATE. DEA. 8905. 


CASH IN DIAMONDS. OLD GOLD, PAWN 


ETC. OMACK 

7 W. MADISON. AT STATE. ROOM 

READY CASH FOR PAWN TICKETS. DIA- 
mon or. an es dental aie Severs etc. 

CHIC JEW 

= tide. 7 W. son DEA. A. 6843. 
ASH FOR OLD GOLD, SILVER, "FILLED 
dae. antiques, dental gold, and bric-a- 

brac, Chicago Silver House, 108 W. North-av. 


SELL YOUR OLD GOLD TO THE OLD 
RELIABLE UNITED SMELTING WORKS. 
39 8. State-street, corner Monroe. Room 404. 


NEED MONWY ? ws PAY CASH: SELL 
YOUR OLD GO i 4 1d and Diamonds. 
Quint & Co., 6th fi. Rta lers Bidg.. 5 S. Wabash. 


E—3 FLA NY., BL, REF 
ea, WBA A ae Waa, 4160. 


Southwest Side. 
6210 8. gone gael Re BRK. 2 APT., 2-5 
apts.; refrig. Estate wants offer. 
tents. D. Hit ch, 39 Oe ‘La Salle-street. 


1.000 DOWN—DE LUXE 2 T BRE.: 
. fem. 7900. 


nr, 55th-Kedzie: 2 car gar. 


North Side. 
3 APARTMENT BUY!! 
apts.. 2 baths, hile kit. and bath, 
painted walls. ete.: 8 car gar.: 
Terms like rent. 
LYN 


N. 
Rogers Park 7801. 
Irving 7120. 


YOU CAN'T MISS Ra ee 
* Very attractive East mogere ark corne 
18 apartment: rental $11,000; ine $55,00€ 
gaa ed trade. ALSO mod. 30 apartmen 
3s. 4s, 6s: tile baths: rental 16,00€ 
$55.000 4%% 10 year loan: price $80,000: 
consider trade. Rogers Park 8606. 
G APT BARGAIN — 


rm. apts.: income 
cash, balance long, 


BURKE & LYNN. 
Rogers 


6 rm. 
stone free! 
small down payments. 

BURKE & 
1544 Morse-av. 
4747 N. Kedzie 


er eee 


$4.360- 
easy 
. A rea 


1644 Morse-av. 
a N. Kedzie. 


Park 7801. 
Irving 7120. 


9 APT.—6 LIGHT RMS.: TILE 
hath. kit. cabinets, ivory woodwk. ; brk. 
ars.: exclu. neighborhood: sac. % orig. cost. 
alter T, Larson, 5157 N. Clark at Foster. 
2 FLAT BRICK—65-5 ae) 7 FT. BASEM'T. 

Ms 3f = . flat. gg 31 fb0: 12 yre ais: 
good con pr. only 
SCHANK DAHM, 3241 N. ASHL ae 
RABEE--DBL. STORE AND 2% 6 
pa on ee tenant. Ai cons. $5,000 
offer’ ape anklin & Co., Ww. Washington. 
Franklin 50384 Bet 
HIGH GRADE MOD. APT.: B.. Ww. yk 
roof insullated, tile hath, exc. cond. an 
loc. a $11. 000: owner, | Sun. 9740. 


BrrAnE HOPE SELL LAE. Gm, SE 
y ry} $e an ac oO 

MR. McHUGH, "SHEL, 8300. 

UPR PIs al OE a oh 
ng fo an be bought for less tha 

$35°000. Address O A 264, Tribune. 

—DEVON-WESTERN—2 FLAT, 6 ROOMS. 
Wide lot. 2 car garage. Paved alley. 
Enclos. i Monthly terms. Bri. 4000. 


MOD. ENG. COR.—4 APT. pan 2-4'8: ALSO 
basemt. apt., suit. for a ouple; gar.: stm. 
ht. Stoker, Mr. "Phillips. Briargate 3509. 


Nt 10% CASH—RENT PAYS BAL. 2% 
r 3 fl. brk.: or. L. Dirks, 1166 Diversey. 


oa OLIVE-AV.—QUALITY 2 FLAT, | 2-68: 
gizd. rear pch.: stm. heat. Kog. Pk. 8130. 


10 FLAT—6 4’S, 4 5’S COR. RTS. $4,500. 
Pr. $20,000. Can trade. 53382. 


Northwest Side. 


7 APARTMENTS RENTS $1,860 YEAR FOR 


$10. 500 B44 000 requ ired. 
-_ apa income, only 


$4, eat $1. S00" Pt eed L. Morris. 400 
Division and 3585 filwaukee-avenue. 


OWNER WILL SELL 12 APARTMENT 
building located 2128-30 vi Sawyer-av. 


Full particulars upon requ . B. Lotts- 
man, P. O. Box, 1151 quest. § Beach, Fla. 


TODAY'S BEST BARGAIN—6 FLAT BRICK, 
Superior-st.. near Western-av., $5,900. 
BROOMELL BROS... RANDOLPH 9121. 


SS eg 5 FLAT AND a eaeer ne 
refrig. Full price, $11,500; tms. 
tate ath W. North-av. or oo 5200 


MOD. 10 FLAT, 3-4 RMS. FOR QU DICK 
sale, $25,000. Acme Rity.. 4126 Milwaukee. 


West Side. 

6 APTS.. 3-5, 3-4: STEAM HEAT; RENT 
$2.040 a yr. Cannot be beat. $6.800. 
2 fiat bri $900 a year. 

$3, 760. 


IS, 
4006 Division. Spaulding 7410. 


6 APT.— §$-5,.3-4. STEAM HEAT, RENT 
$2.040 a year. Cannot be beat; $6,800. 
2 oy bric pin gy $900 a year. Bargain. 

eh: Pours MORRIS. 

4006 Division. Spaulding 7410. 


OWNEK SAC. FOR $1,000 CASH, BAL, 

$4,300 HOLC loan. Pay $38 gree 6-7 rms., 
br. bi g.. w. ht., tile bath: car ee ape 
$1.200 vr. "8055 Jackson- ‘iva. 


if al COR. BLDG.: RENTS, $5.640 a 
$17. 500, $6, 000 req. Inq. L. Morris 

2006 Shi vision st. or 3585 ‘Gliwatikes- “av. 

A LE LL LI A A OTS TS, 


—_ 


Bargain 


davthweat Side. 
$2,000 DOWN BUYS STORE 125 FEET 
deep. 6 room apt. above, 10 years old; 
steam heat: busy section. Only $6,900. 
ANOTHER GOOD BUY. 
Brick garage. 100 feet frontage, 4 en- 
trances: needs repairs. $8,500, $2,000 req. 
BUY NOW BEFORE PRICES RISE. 
UIS MORRIS, 


4006 Division. 3685 Milwaukee-av. 


REAL ESTATE—HOUSES. 


South Side. 

FOR SALE OR RENT—TO CLOSE ESTATE. 

3949 Lake Park-avenue: magnificent old 
residence of 26 rms.: overlooking lake; lot 
140x306: 12 car gar. and apts.;: now 
rented; suitable for club, A school 
or building pu - must seen to be 
appreciated. John M. ‘Thomson, ‘Trustee, 
1053 E. 48d-street. Dre. 1234 or Oak. 0415. 


DO YOU LIKE ELBOW ROOM? 
Then you'll like this modern 6 rm. brick 
. on 40x125 ft. lot, side drive to 2 
i garage. Hot water heat, tile 
bath. Specially ey at $6,750. Phone 
Radcliffe 7300 t 
DONALD F. MOORE. Vong S. ASHLAND. 


HAVE THE BEST 


Modern 6 room brick bungalow: h. w. 
heat. tile wall bath. 2 car gara e Bao 64th 
and Fairfield. Price $5.950. 

JOHN McCARTHY. 7408 W. 63d- 9 ‘hen. 5000 


15 ST. LAWRENCE-AV. . 
“ story brick residence: 8 light rooms: 
@arage; very easy a: Open for inspec- 
tion. Price $3,500.00. 

R. O'BRIEN & CO.. 
111 W. Washington-st Rand. 3062. 


No Reas. Offer Refused. 
8 rm. asbestos shingled hse,; 3 car gar.; 
exc. cond.; te gl ae extra toilet down- 
c 


stairs, sun h trans.: schis., 
churches. 5907 Parnell. Ona, 400. W.W.Parketf 


JACKSON PARK HEIGHTS. 


7 rooms: Euclid, near 69th. 


C. 
South sj Boor Office, Hyde ‘bark 2604. 


IF YOU HAVE A STEADY POSITION AND 
can raise $500 or more, allow us to show 
you our model bung. Pos. April petD Total 
aro} cost incl. taxes, $42. Glatt & 
026 Cottage Grove-ayv. Vin. 6920. 


— — PRICE $4,000 — — $750 CASH — — 
Will buy modern 5 rm. brick bung.. gar. *9 
. lot. Avalon, nr. 7Oth-Bt. Vine. 8000. 


5 RM — ORR st bao 2 


ft. lot: k. 1. surface. $1.0 
balance $3h arith. + gauge G6. 


6 RM. BRK. BUNG.: NAT. FIREPL.. CANYV. 
walls, refrig., slad, porch, gar.; nr. schi.; 
good. cond.: gar. 1742 E. Rbth-st. Sag. 2438" 
$4.400—6 RMS. ARAGE: GOOD 
cond.: near vbatatine tewart 3602. 

6 RM, BRICK BUNG. —ONLY ler 760; NR. 
R. I.. surf.: outstanding barg. . 1602. 


-CASH FOR DIAMONDS AND OLD GOLD— 


Jewelry, Pawn Tickets, Dental Gold. 
BARNETTS. ist floor, 57 EAST MARIBOR. 
STORE AND BAR FIXTURES, 


THREE 8 FT. PORCELAIN REFRIGERA- 

¥ specially low 
counters and 
{t, candy cases and 
Open Sunday 54( 


BAR FIXTURES COCRTAT 
elu f bar. 


LOUNGE, IN- 
ack bar, uphol- 
es. Used on co 3 me Chairs, | ae of ae 
Private party. ag, aay , he. B 10209. 


STURE FIXTURES, ‘TAVEKN FIXTORES. 
hamburger and iurich equipmicut: iarge 
stock. new aud used. The lowest s. 
Easy pay. Chae Bender Co,. 608 608-14 N. 
6 AND 8 FT. DOUBLE DUTY COUNTERS: 
also all porcelain, 15 and 30 eu. ft 
refrig: very cheap. 220 W. Huron. Op. sate 

menses, DAD ard BAS net lpe 
Pe 2 Ps, LIB So Efi Gare 

Mangels 8. TERS, 


oe Tlie tae nnn 5 
: | 


JK 
~ . 
sion De- 


on Jer 


Southwest Side. 
$46 Monthly, $700 Cash. 


5 lge. light rms., ene. porch par gee od 
sect. scnoole, churches, trans., 60t Fair eld. 


Brk. bun 
F. H, HALVORSEN CO., 
na Ww. 634d-street. Hemlock 4300. 


North Side. 
Boge ob oye BOOM BRICK BUN- 


galow: 2 car areas 
For Br iate ‘cane ne DB ade 


doorways. 
“a ems.: 90 ft MANOR co $7. a 


Walter EB. Carle. 2312 Devon. 
7 rms.: lot: garage: enclosed Tear 


rch: ransp.: perfect conditi 
RRTHUR I KRUGGEL L & CO. "LON. i. 56531. 


OTT gee GaN gee Baga yee 

as 

Steinbach & Co. 6170 Broadway. R. Pp oy37 

7 ans ~MODERN, 41 BATHS. EDGEWAT- 
: gas heat: $7. : terms, Dearb. 9862. 


7 RoOu + en ARAGES: EDGEW 
Price $3.80" t¢ "3002. 


terms, Shel, 
anes a 


large lot, Stake oiler Shaia, Bdge 


ae Northwest Side. 
MEDIATE Poss SION—6 R 
Pri 6500: gee = pet nat ea tet ht 
GREGOR. ele gs all 


ss 


‘ 4/403 @ 
- ae ma. a 
any ga - ane , 
, oy , GWA. 
nm, te ytin’ Be oo 
1O¢ THert ot & 
e274 SPV iTti 
Bs LOCK. SN se i Mowe Sit. 
" = 
, > a 
= 


esa awa comet ie 


Palisade 1461. 


EIN a NE Pr “EN BER = 


“33 "| it ins 


RELIABLE CO} 
on tee ae eat gery rear poms RNG 
, on 
PERR 
1625 E et es ee 7997 or N60, ING 


__REAL ESTATE—VACANT. . 


South Side. 
$49. TERMS $1 DOWN. 
GACH. 2339 W, 95TH-ST. 


Northwest Side. 


EDGEBROUK LOT—TREES: X160, $1.3 
For deed: all imp, Address O64 50, $1,.350 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—SOUTH, 


Beverly “Hilla—2o minutes te laos. 
3 RM. FRM. HSH... 1 CAR BRK. GAR.: 

well loc.: ar untes ft. lot; nr. R.4. Pr. for 
quick sale. $2,650. Ryan & Co. Bev. 5747. 


BEAUTIFUL 100 FT, ON. BELL NEAR 
Sutherland school. $70 per ft. Also 72 ft. 
corner. Phone Randolph 9210 


Gieneral., 
$75 CASH BUYS. VEGETABLE OR POUL- 
try farm: almost avre: street newly stane 
paved free: A te by be available; uear Cicero- 
av. neh, black iand; brig. mo. 
DRESS E H 489 TRIBUNE. 


GARDEN FAKMS—17 MILES LOOP — 
ee house: nearly Bore. 
Stree + $125 cash, 2m 


aved: electricit 
CICERO- AVE UE AND 140T STREET: 
$750 BUYS MODERN 7 KRM. FR. HOUSE-~- 
rge cr near gaheole, atores, i. C.. bus. 
Price $4,750. Address N S$ 63. 


$5.Ra small 


30 FOOT L 
FRANK DE 


Tribune. 
2% ACRES—BUILD SMALL HOME, I. 
rans. Homewood district, electric, 
$675, $50 down, $10 month, Hemlock’ 2188" 
REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—S. W. 


Palos Park—46 minutes to loan. 


CHOICE WOODLAND ACS. FOR HOMESITES. 
L. Ficklen & Co., 1956 W. 95th-st. Bev. 6800 


General, 
WILL SACRIFICE 


my 4 rm. home on 1 ac. of good spoil: iarge 
poultry hse. & garage on paved rd. Has full 
plumbing; ag stores and school: located on 
55 minutes to loop. Price 
$2,600: nea "$250 cash, balance terms. 
Address D T 693, Tribune. 


NEW 5 ROOM HOUSE, OIL HEAT. GAR.. 1 

acre, hard road, 3 blocks to bus and steam 
trans. 40 min. to loop. Small down payment. 
Balance $30 month. Bros, 1139. 


2 ACRES, 4 ROOM HOUSE, WATER. GAS, 

electric. light. large chicken house: 655 
minutes to loop on Rock Island Railroad. 
J. A. Sherman, 6211 8. Troy. Rep. 4'7()3. 


BARGAIN—CORNER ACRE NEAR 71ST 
and Harlem-ay. $650. LElectric. Hard 
roads. Terms. Address O D 544. Tribune. 


POULTAA FARN —2 ACRES, 3 RM. HOUSE, 
well, elec., 2 story poultry house. $2,150. 
$250 down.” $20. x B month. Hemlock, Rolo. 


a 


Pid 
lal 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—NORTH, 


Ce ALPS “7 


Evanston—15 minutes to loop. 


Hole BARGAINS—10% CASH. BALANCE 
$7.91 per $1,000 per mo., eo bg interest 
Phone or send f 


for 15 
ORE E-TOWNS RE SUEY CORP. 
1603 Chicago-ay.. Evanston. Gre. 


6 ROOM. 1% STORY BRICK RES.: AUTO. 
gas heat, Natural firepl., breakfast rm.. re- 
ception rm., tile roof, side drive, brick gar. 
Ideal schools and trans. Owner says take best 

offer. Rogers Park 0458 Greenleaf 0471. 
2730 LAWNDALE—ATTR. 6 ROOM BRICK 
bung. : fine res. sect.: fireplace, brkfst. rm.: 
gar.: $8. 500; terms. Insp. by appt. only. 
Winion Rity., 201 N. Wells-st. Fra. 2344. 
b banese ENGLISH—NORSERKY OK SEWING 
oil ht.. attch. garage. Good location 

$8. B00, $2.000 cash. ogere Vark 0271. 


ARCHITECT BUILT-—EARLY COL. WHITE 
brk. and shingle. 5 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 ear 
gar., exquisite detail. Greenleaf 7220. 


$6.500—TERMS—6 BEDRMS., 3 BATHS. 
ize. rms.: 4 car car. Roz. 2616. Univ. oratit 

ATTR. 5 R.:' LG. LIV. R., PRPL., BRKFST. 

nk.; Sons ‘Willard sch, Kenney, ‘Sup. 7749. 
Glenecoe—24 minutes to loop. 


ony, 000° BRICK COLONIAL. RAST LOr.: 
4 bedrm.. 2% baths, oil heat. Glencoe 305. 


Niles wee. Spe 5° toa toon. 


BARG.—MOD. 5-6 ES.; $6.500 OP. 
Jos. J. Hansen, a N. ostner. N. C. 382. 


Wilmette—22 minutes to toop. 


rs. 
2700. 


OWN THIS —~ —- — — — 
Sacrificing 811x172. beautifully wooded. 
surrounded by the very van gg a $ 


homes. Phone Rogers Park 860 


WILL SACRIFICE 2 APARTMENT IN FINE 
residential section of Wilmette.. Lot 6GUx 
180. Price $6,500. Hollycourt 6886. 


Winnetka—22 minates to loop. 


NORTH SHORE HOMES AND VACANT. 
Cusack Realty. Winn, 715. Rog. Pk. 2321. 


6 RM.—2 BTH.: IDEAL LOC.: PINE COND., 
Ige. beau. wooded lot: $8.500. Winnetka 253. 


General, 
RIGHT ON LAKE MICHIGAN SAND 
Pac ee eng ng rights, street pane’. 12.600 
ft, Lake Co... fil. C. N. W. R. tranep. 
Price now $1.250., $356 cash, RSE month. 
Address E O 429, Tribune. 


NEARLY NEW *% STY. pene i ese. 
corner near 


of Green Bay-rd 
school. Needs fixing. inside. ago. 0 Us $300 


cash. Address EB N 122, Tribune. 


SUBURBAN FARM, HIGHLAND PARK—WA- 
ter, gage. road. electriv: nor. school. > 
Block m1 depth: no asemts.: low t taxep, Price 
$550: $100 cash. Address # O 434 ribune. 
S850: 5100 cash. Address HO £94. tribune 


REAL ESTATE—SUBURBAN—R. W. 


PB PBPPPPP PPP PPP PPL PP 
" Des Pinines—23 minutes to loon. 
SMALL FARM, NEW COTTAGE. COM- 
plete plumbing. oil heat, electric, schoo). 
road, e Des Plaines. $2, 495. Some cash, 
$25 eetnt Address E M 6562. Tribune. 


Mount Prospect—26 min. to loop. 


—. 6 BOOM CAPE COD HOME WITH 4 
finished, complete plumbing, oil heat, 
100x380 ft. land — ~* “ae course: restrict- 
ed section. Price only 10% down. 
balance FHA on ey Tow monthly payments. 
of a ame Y MT. PROSPECT 

~ Smith & Dawson State 3861. 


Shore 


General. : 
COUNTY FAKM SUBURBAN ESTATE—NEW 
28 ft. cottage:*inside sealed: 4 acres rich 
potas street paved: 1 same. $1 ap ae 2 het 
; new school same side o wa 
Price $2. 250: $350 cash, $25 month. r : 
ress FE N 335, Tribune. 


HALF ACRE GARDEN SOIL, NR. DES 


Plaines. ap cash, + de mo.: hard road: 
electric; ed. Address BE J 344 Tribune, 


“REAL egg gin C 


Berwyn—1t7 minates to loop. 
— § ROOM BRICK BUNGALOW, nine 
Kohout Bros., 6200 We Cen: on “8800. 


OWNER—SELL 2 RES. LOTS, 380X125, 
cash or term, 4834 W. Adams-st., so 80. 


Downers Grove—37 minutes to loop. 
6 RM, FRAME, NEWLY DEC.; FURNACE; 
Sairue BOL 3* re ‘ ha soil; cock. 3 
gar.; } mtg.; pr. = 
cash: C. = a Sery. Dati +r j 
BITES ONL 
_ Fronting ‘main high highway, $26 
$5 monthly. ss O A A 262. 
. FLARE HUNG. Re ang 
, Or. .; sha 
owner sac, for $4. 500. Dunham, rece; 


5 ano, Buueasa sir § ae: 
STA 
sib at iss Mase atte ek Sane 
Oak Park—16 minutes to loop. 
w Hot water hi, Comer le . At San ey is pa. 4 
Pile blk, trom Leta. Only $5, 168 vi 6 5106 
2 BLDG.—5-5 ENCL, SLPG. ri 


APT, 
h. 2 : fine co 
cash, Tbstanes Stnonthly. 12s ‘é6u BLVD 


aera HA Leaner 


3. St e, 47 
miata to 


peated 
ites be beat 85 


ACLOR WILL DESIGN. 


| bec dng? 


may Hk "4 
35 


aa 


ite Betz | Ha 
Bros. 


| biitmite. 
THE ONE YOO. Lave WILL LOVE THIS 
lover's retreat away from the world. on a 
glorious. 13 12 mile heavily wooded sand bottom 
Sinte. tri. bo : ly 50 miles N il 
el, n By es ; 
take $10 month. aly PT) N 178, Tribune. 


SACRIFICE $1.200 LAKE COTTAGE FOR 
ME. Ld fed oo d pette th kes miles Chi 

sand bo . 
cago, Address O @ 378. Mibun 


SACRIFICE LAKE COTTAGE.. 8700 

rms. ? excenens condition: finest ‘natural 
lake 37. mi. W. Must have $50 eash, bal. 
terms. pel E L 3655, Tribune, 


AIN O’ LAKES—NEAR. ANTIOCH. ILL. 
s axe lot ihe) >! terms. $2 wk. 

bnilt hom $495. Terms $10 

Address Nn. «3 293. Tribune. 


BARGAIN—4 RM LAKE COTTAGE. $595: 
$25 down. $3 oer week: 1 br. N. W. of 
Chicago. Address E K 392. | 


MUST SELL COTT. ON PISTAKEE LAKE. 
$1.200: cost 2-vears uzo over $1.800. El.. 
toilet. Terehe. Address P Y 249. Tribune. 


monthly. 


Indiana, 
LARGE COTTAGE SITE IN THE DUNES 
Lake es beach, 120x133. Only $240, 
wien i cash. ier $5 a month. Owner. 
DDRESS O A 263, TRIBUNE. 


Wisconsin. 
-~- — — $650 BUYS $1,500 VALUE — — — 
Secluded 4+ room cottage on 60 ft. lot over- 
looking coy Ardiges rig. pane lake, sand 
beach, good fishing: 0.: restricted. 
Terms, no trade. Address < 7. *2 07. Tribune, 


LAKE COTTAGE AND Fey aah COM- 
plete: 59 miles N. W. of Chicago: terms. 
No trade. Atdresé Ps 362, Tribune. 


BY RECEIVER—LGE. IMPKVD [LAKE GE- 
neva lots, $250. Address N A 29f), Tribune. 


BEAUT. SUMMER HOME—YEAR ‘ROUND 
living: $950 Address P § 366. Tribune. 


BARGAINS IN RESORTS. ACREAGE. AND 
Cabins. Free circ. Wise Bros.. Hayward. Wis. 
SAC. NEW COT.. BOAT. $500—I1NS. TOIL: 


large Wis. lake. Address PS 345, Tribune. 
REAL ESTATE—FARM LANDS, 


Farm Land Classified advertisments 
will be found in the News Section 
adjacent to the daily teature ‘“‘ Day By 
Day Story of the Experimental Farms.” 


REAL ESTATE WANTED. 


Houses. 
HAVE BUYERS FOR HOMES IN HYDE 
Park. Seeberger, 1701 E. 55th. Hyd. 6171. 


neve het. 000 CASH. WANT HOME OR 2 
rN. W. Address E N 303, Tribune. 


Miscelluneuvas. 


CASH FOR PROPERTY ANYWHERE IF 
bargain. Address E N 176. Tribune. 


REAL ESTATE FOR EXCHANGE. 


Apartment Buildings. 
TRADE 2 FLAT, NORTH SIDE FOR 6 OR 
7 room residence in Edgewater or Rogers 
Park. Phone Rogers Park 8037. 


REAL ESTATE LOANS, MORTGAGES, | 


‘NT $6.000 FIRST MORTGAGE ON F 
wi 


WANT 
stores at 89th and Loomis-streets: 

pay commission and repay at $50 per month 

plus 6% interest for 5 years. 


. a. DYK. 
5443 S. Halsted. 


Yards 3360. 


3 epee GE LOANS .- 


LONG TER: 
BELL SAVINGS BLDG. ,AND LOAN ASSN. 
S$ W. Washington-street. Bra. 5445. 


reer FUNWS AVAILABLE—LUW EST 
rates residential and income properties. 
Sharon Mtge. Co.; 105 W. Madison. Kan. 5656. 


WE BUY GOOD OR DEFAULTED MTGES. 
at reasonable discoun 
Richard Mtg. Co., 120 8..La Salle. Fra. 6217. 


FOR SALE—LITTLE CO. OF MARY ‘HOSPI- 
tal bonds, 4% and 4%%: atur,. °40)-’40. 
W. E. Gould & Co., 39 S. LaSalle. Gen, 2522. 


WILL BUY DEFAULTED MORTGAGES 
and distressed properties quick action. 
ADDRESS O E 436, IBUNE. 
MILWAUKEE-WESTERN _MORTGAGE CO. 
lends up to 80% PHA. See our Sunday ads. 
1976 Milwaukee-avenue. Brunswick 6200. 


CASH er : aoe arte ty te 18ST MTGS. 


MAN & C 
135° 8. LA. SALLE-STREET. FRA, 0576. 
INU, 


— SWAN. LORISH & CASPERS. = 
Interest rates as low as 44%4%. Dor. 62UU. 


O’BRIEN PAIN. LOWEST RATES. 
111 W. WASHINGTON. FRANKLIN 2561. 


STOCKS AND BONDS. 


WE BUY REAL ESTATE ean MAS. 
ipal bonds, mortgages: STE rd 
3URG Cc 34. N ~ ‘cle se ] 


s'TP. a 


COAL AND woop. 


ILLINOIS EGG COAL. 

STOKER COAL AS 

TERMS IF 
MULCAHY AL CO., 

4028 WENTWORTH. BOUL, 4028. 


HIGH GRADE COAL. MINE RUN, $65.'5: 
nut. egg or tump. $6. Delivered anywhere. 
— - or night. Ardmore 6975. 
.. 85% CRSE., $6. CHESTNUT. $13.75 
Molle "8c. Credit. Hiawatha Co, Lawn, 1611. 
EGG. $6 [2 TON!|: 1 TON. $6.25. 2 CONS 
ig $16.50), fas pe San o. Yard sat 
ILL. EGG OR NUT. $5.75: GEN. POC, 
_ 65% ¢8., $7, 20: Poe. pea. $8.25. Oak. 5 ie 
ETROLEU COKE, COARSE, $8.50 IN 3 
gb 3 lots. i ‘Yoal on eredit. Pullman 6020. 
W, VIRGINIA M._R, 75% CRSE. | $7.50 
Electric Co. Cal. 7563. 7 a. m. to 9 pb. m. 


"BUSINESS 3S OPPORTUNITIES. 


Businesses for Sale. 
AUTOMOBILE TRUCK PAINT SHOP. OR 
will consicer responsible man to operate. 
Address O J 236, a aaa 
AUTO ACCESSORY STORE—GOOD LOC.: 
compl. stock. Address © J ‘234. Tribune. 
BAKERY AND 2 Cte 

Busy corner. 553 W. W. 103d-street. 
BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP—ALSO FIX- 
tures, new, used. Paidar, 1120 N. Wells. 


BEAUTY SHOP — FOR SALE — SUPPLIES. 
equipment: cash: easy terms; catalog free. 
GIBBS & CO. 21 8. WABASH-AVENUE. 
er gig SHOP—SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY 
for operators; reason iliness: cash. 
of NOwTH STATE, ROOM 1328. 
BEAUTY SHOP — See eee ~ VIC. 
Est. 5 yre.: excellent bus.: $800 buys acct. 
fliness. Gentile. Austin 8070 betw. 10 and 2. 
HOP, REDUCING et wg 
“location; estab. {ate low 
rent: terms. Seitrasert 
AUTY SHOP_ESTAB 18 YEARS: SAC.: 
oe t $27.50. 2206 Roscoe. Buck. 8768. 
saa aT SHOP—BEAUTIFULLY E eg 
modernistic: N. W. 8. Pal. 5179 8-1 
BEAUTY oe ig ee EQUIPPED: aa 
liv. qtrs. 6646 8. Troy. 0, 316: 163. 
SCHOOL, LIGHT GROCERIES. OP- OP- 


ing, quarters. bath. $500. 


Ratablished 35 yrs. N pectamenic. 
NEAR GH 


CANDY. CIG., BUSY A 
schi. Rt. $26. gi ht. $450. 4919 x” bog 


» a HL. UPPL 5 PR UNCHES—SMALL 
mae aha 4 6.1683. N. Maplewood. 


flat, Reas. rent, $375 
CLOTHING STOR DIT BUSINESS 
with o ‘wldhout accounts active North- 
shore sonen: Address O C 4 _ Bribune, 
CONFECTIONERY-SCHL. STORE — CIGARS. 


cat al is Ea. aad 


td 


me Re 
site school. Livi 


3 wat ton. P ovina NEAR BEAUT. : 
Pi 3 nee | 
7 Mi igan-ave.. Porte, Ind. 


GER $ 7 
el cog oma? 39 
selling” has ae ae 27 
MBUR AND SANDWICH SHOP — 
Well estabi 7009 North Clark. 


ip ng READY-To- SHOP—GALES- 
o se op gtenay hesnoremong a, age Tag sa 
M. pitinits ” Bondi ‘Bide. Galesburs. DL 
LUN cHROOM 


TRRPOM SOUTH IDE BallOSD 
pusiness. 2731 Archer, Calumet 6010, 
MEAT 


Weat AR KET—REAS. COMPLETE. 3056 


Eatin peg 
down p 
be improved | ft right man. Call Ber. 


ete eseseenntsnssnapevasnennsinssstesissonummaeiesennmum 

MEAT MARKET—GOOD LOCATION, WiLL 
be sold for balatice of mortgage: smal] 

down payment. 415 S. Cicero-avenue. 


Ltn settnennmeemmanan, 
MILLINERY ST.—EST. 8 YRS., N.S. BEAU. 
urn.; gd. reas. Address A 512. Tribune. 


P NT. WALL PAPER, DECORATING 
Store—Old established. Ideal for painting 

contractor. Sell complete or reduce stock to 

suit buyer. Investigate. Hyde Park 1306. 


Rebee Pee oc RICAN: GOOD BUSI- 
mS quipped: sac. at 
; hy? farthee details given. Ca 
tween 5 and 7 p. m. 4243 Maypole-avenue. 


RESTAURANT—LIVELY PLACE, DOING A 
thriving business: sell cheap; illness com- 
pels sale. Ma Sterling, 1911 S, Wabas 


RESTAURANT — WEST a FULLY 
equipped; good business: sacrifice; other 
interests, ‘Phone Maywood 5170. 


ali HOUSE—28 R.. 2 BASE. FLATS: 
of Woodlawn: income over $500 
mente: 1,000 handles. Hyde Pk. 7975. 


BOOMING HSE.—10 RMS., NICELY FURN.., 
. loe., new furnace. Sell acct. of illness. 
Sac” $225 cash. Pri .party. Can. 2396. 


RMG. HSE.—32 BEAU. FURN. ROOMS, 12 
baths; rt. $110: nets aay a $3 600 :tms. 
——— & Alexander, 160 a Salle. 


RMG. HSE.—4 ROOMS, Se WN, 13 
bths.; rt. $195. ine. $550 :pr. $3,000; tms. 
Don F. Capps Co., 61 W. Schi iar. Sup. 6160. 


om. HSE.—72 R.: RT. $225: LNC. $950: LS. 3 
: req. $3. 000. DeWoskin Co..105W. Medison. 


TAILO SHOP—ES B.: GOOD Z, 2 
loc. : Ralts equip; leav. cty. S10 e ‘ae wel 


Tavern and ne 


Very busy loop loca.: seats about 100, beaut. 
mod. equip., air-cond.: good reas. for selling. 
Requires $10. 000 cash. ICH 


179 W. WASHINGTON-ST. FRA. 7990. 
TAVERN-RESTAURANT—HIGH CLASS. 
Must Sell Immediately. 


Busy locality on East 63d-st., near Cottage 
Grove: will sacrifice for less than 10¢ on 
the $1 of actual worth. Calumet 6110. 


TAVERN-RESTAURANT-LIQUOR STORE — 

Beautifully decorated. complete equipment, 
all modernistic. Busy transfer corner. Must 
see to appreciate. 756-758 East 63d-street 
or call State 3488. 


TAVERN — WELL EQPD. 
priced: established business. 
lin. Lawndale 2658. 


TAVERN — REASONABLE. 
ment. See owner. 11-4, 2609 N. 


TAVERN AND RESTAURANT 
equipped. 4751 W. Madison. 


TRACTOR-TRAILER AND ROUTE WITH 
established cartage company. hauling be- 
tween Chgo. and Fete up to $6,000 
vearly. Address DG 29. Tribune. 


VACUUM CLEANER SHOP—ESTAB. 4 RMS. 
with bath incl.; furn.: reas. Bue. 6319. 


SMALL DRY CLEANING PLANT—SO. 
Side. Also branch str.. $14.000 yearly Loy 
Ideal for couple with sml. invest. Mid. 270 


If the kind of store or business you 
want is not offered for sale today, why 
not advertise in the Business Opportu- 
nity Wanted Column? Stop in today 
at the Tribune Want Ad office, Madi- 
son and Dearborn-streets, or call Su- 
perior 0100. Ask for an Ad Taker. 


Partnerships anc lIuvestments. 


FOR SALE—HALF INTEREST IN A WELL 
established restaurant in Wisconsin; hour 
nd half from Chicago: doing good business. 
35,000. Investment. I am in ill health and 

wish to sell. my share, $3,000 cash, balance 

of $3,000 on time. “Air conditioned.” Doing 
business with better class. Good lease and 
reason tae rent, Seating 165 people. Address 

DG 3 . Tribune. 


EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR A 
man to take over an established route of 
legal vending machines. Can handle on spare 
time. Should pay $50 weekly to start. Can 
increase. Must have car and $625 cash. For 
appt. phone Mr. Welton. Spaulding 2200. 


Distributors. 
—— DISTRIBUTORS AND SALESMEN —— 
Territory ope nfor live wire. distributors 
and salesmen. Exceptional franchise for dis- 
tributors. Liberal commission for salesmen. 
Fast moving item with heavy repeat busi- 
ness. To drug stores, restaurants, dairies, de- 
partment stores and homes. Airite Products, 

Room 1507. 10 S. La Salle. 


—-— — BEER JOBBERS WANTED — — — 
CALL ARMITAGE 2013. 


Concessions, Locations, and Leases. 

FOR RENT—DESIRABLE SITE FOR DIN- 

ing ear, next to new. complete service 

located on highly traveled street 

carr ing 3 state routes. Near center of city 

of 0.000 population. If interested, write 
P. O. Box 5568. Peoria, I 


FOR RENT—DE LUXE NEIGHBORHOOD 
motion picture theater in city of 70,000, 
near Chicago. Cash deposit required. 
Address D G 40. Tribune. 


KITCHEN CONCESSION IN TAVERN, MAN- 
ufacturing dist. Good noon and eve. trade. 
2600 8S. State, Victory 9249. 


RASSUNS ped 
~668 § 


BEST EQUIP- 
Halsted. 


FULLY 


Signature 
Only 


SIGN YOUR NAME 
NO ENDORSERS 
NO CHATTEL MORTGAGES 


LOCAL’S 
ture Salary 


prefer to borro 


Bipyshed 
thousands, salaried pe 


De. gy Signa- 
satisfies 

and women 
ithout depending 


upon friends or pa bse to sign their 


t signing a chattel 


's) 
on furniture. auto or other 


ranged while 


Re eae” asad 


a loan ar- 


you wai 


TERMS 1 TO 20 MONTHS. 
CHARGE MADE ONLY FOR ACTUAL 


TIME YOU 


HAVE -THE MONEY. 


LOCAL LOAN CO. 


UNDER STATE SUPERVISION, 


MADISON at State. 


RA Ndolph. 8400 
Z 900 


; wood 0 
; ‘ BRUnswiek 3100 


E at Cicero. AVEnue 1400 


EVANSTON PI 


N at Leland. LONgb. 216] 
NE GREENLEAF $060 


LOANS 


Without Endorsers 
NO WAGE ASSIGNMENTS. 


Whether yous borrow on your auto, 
furniture or on Just your plain note, 
you will never* be required to ask 
others to sign. No endorsers or wage 
assignments required on ANY loan. 


Reduced Rates 


3% monthly 


$100 or less; 
$100 to $200; 


$200, 


interest on balances of 
2% on balances above 
1% on balances above 


COMMONWEALTH 
LOAN CO. 


OVER 50 YEARS OF SERVICE. 
9—-OFFICES-9 


NORTH SIDE 


tI 
1791 HO 
SOUTH SIDE 


cor. Ashland at 
. BITtersweet 3360 
Western at 
a aneen 3456 


Cice 
Vino 0443 


ARD at Ciark. ‘Room 21 
.RO 


Gers Park 0754 


6306 COTTAGE GROVE, Rm. 


bb Ps 63d-street at Halsted, 


305 
HYDe Pore 0604 

00 
'ENGlewood 1711 


ibEz: 
i 3, Hoon a15.ors ees at Madi- 


ood. Room 
ays ARE: 


137 N. Marion-st. 
be Avatin eos. 


Chgo. Phone 
BERW Py. CICE 
one ngs 


OF SD) NDER 


VAN Buren 5040 


at 204. 
B iliacs 6886 


Sy er nr. Ridgeland. 
LAWnda 
STATE SUPERVISION. 


le 2882. .Berwyn 371 


What do YOU require 
when you borrow ? 


a peed things you insist upon: 


per 
Simplicity 


Plenty of Time to Repa age 


Controlled Cost 
Flexible 


Friendliness 
Businesslike 
No Special Security 


o Extra Fees 
No Hard Pes Fast Rules 


You will find that we meet FOUR 
requirements when you need CASH 


A COMPLETE 
LOANS up to 


SERVICE—ALL PLANS. 
$300. Come in TODAY. 


PERSONAL 


FINANCE CQ. 


UPTOWN PERSONAL. 


4760 Broadway, 2d floor. LONgbeach 4090 
NORTH PERSONAL. 
4770 Lincoln-av.. 2d fi. 


IRVING PARK PERSONAL 
3982 Milwaukee-av., 2d fi 


LONgbeach 1321 
PALisade a 


[Over Art Thompson's S. E At Store 


Whee PARK PERSONAL. 
1954 W 


North- 


AUBURN PARK 
757 W. 79th-st.. 


WOODLA wei > PERSONAL, 


841 E 3d-st. ? 


-av., gr. fi. ARMitage 0833 
PERSONAL. 
2d fi. RADcliffe 8228 


3d floor. HYDe Park 1472 


MARQUETTE PARK PERSONAL 


2403 W. 63d-st., 2d floor. 


GAKFIELD PARK PRASORAL, 
Boponr W. Madison-st., 2d fl 


K PARE PER 


RSONAL. 
04040 North- -blvd., 2d floor. 
BERWYN-CICERO PERSONAL 
6346 Cermak-rd.. 2d “9g 
EVANSTON PERSONA 
708 Church-st., 2d fear. 


REPublic 7229 
NEVada 2134 
VILlage 6840 
BERwyn 666 
GREenleaf 6081 


W. Madison, 14th floor. Franklin 
Howard-st.. 2d floor. Rogers Park 
4554 Broadway, 2d floor. Longbeach 4 
1951 Irving Park, 2d fir. Buckingham 1 
2800 Milwaukee-ayv.. 5th fir. Capitol 344 
4704 Irving Park, 2d floor. Pensacola ra 
6255 S. Ashland. 24 fir. ‘451 
2355 W. 63d-st.. 24 fir. 
6856 S. Halsted. 2d floor. Englewood 
841 E. 634-st., 4th floor. Plaza § 
9204 Commercial-av., 34 fl. S$. Chicago | 
11106 8S. Michigan. 24 fi. Commodore 8 
4010 W Madison, 4th floor. Kedzie O7¢ 
Cicero, 6012 Cermak-rd., 2d fi. Cicero 64 
Oak Park 1140 Lake, 3d fir. Euclid 


“Doctor of Family Finances.” 


HOUSEHOLD 
FINANCE ~ 


CORPORATION. 
Hear Edgar Guest Tuesday eves.. 7:30—W 


LOANS UP TO $3,000. 


1% A MONTH. NO EXTRA CHARGES. " 
ans from $1 to $5,000 on 
Jewelry, Watches, iamonds, 
Silverware. Prompt, courteous, 
safe and dignified. 


FIRST | 


State Pawners Society 


UNDER STATE 
42 S. Clark-st. Nr. eaene ms My pene 


Republic 447 


Business Loans, 


$300 to $50,000 


n fixtures and equipment of 
Factories, Laundries est 
Meat Markets, Hotels, ate 
Accounts Keceivable. 
OLDEST ESTAB. IN CHGO, 
NO ENDORSERS. TEKMS TO SUI'!. 


Prompt attention to inquiries trom Michf 
gan, Indiana or Illinois on loans of $2 00 up. 


F, BOLAND, 
9 W. WASHINGTON-SY. FRANKLIN i¥66. 


$250 TO $60,000 


To Factories, Printing Plants, Stores, 
L’ dries Rmg. Hses., Bakeries, Autos, 
Restaurants, Machine Shops. ‘Trucks, 


FOR LOWER KAT 

FOR MOST COURTEOUS TREATMENT, 
FOR FASTER SERVICE. 

Telephone Central 5582 


for a representative to call on you. 
National Acceptance Cs 


£2 FINANCIAL SERVICE. 


HEIRS — WE BUY OR LOAN ON YOUR 
ts. bate Finan N aa - 


Also on 


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 


Pianos ‘ane ‘Players. 

WAREHOUSE GRAND PIANO BARGAIN 
rend piano. Reduced to ' 
1.50 a week, mon 
Q days’ free tal Nothing af 
March. See this bargain pt Priva ireproc 
Piano Wareh — . 8. Shoe land sa "Sothet € 

Dp. m. 


— CHICAGO’S FINEST PIANO VALUES, = 
Reconditioned grands and uprights. 
W..W RIMBALE GOMDANS Rag 
2611 ‘3 California O , EAQTORY, » 


PIANO BARGAIN — BRAND N 
reduced to only ade Terms. 


rere 


: bash- 
avenue. Open until 9 p. m. seine 


USED GRANDS AND SPINETS. $15¢ 
$175, $225. $2 erms. 
wu THe oh a 76, ey See | ves 


$2 MONTHLY wa ss UPRIGHT 79 TC 


ere art; Jackson, cor. W 
HC BRANCH” Phone Harrison son 5864, 


SPINE CONSOLES—FLOOR SAMPLES AT A 
rices. Your choice $3 down, $1 w 
wie N’S, 604 Republic Big., 209 S. State: 


KRANICH & BACH LOUIS XV. ona 
perfect cannot be told from new......$36 4 
Moist Piano Co., 13th fi., 209 8, State. 


RECONDITIONED MAS 
Gran Sead’ $495, used ed 


Steinwa 
CABLE PIANO Go S09 Bowes 


WANTED TO BUY—USED GRAND z 
from private family for cash. Mer. ee 

SAC. SMALL CHICKERING & SUNS GRAS - 
piano; like new. 6242 W. Grand-av 


CLOSING OUT MIDGETS. SPIN ETS XB 
__Srands, all makes. $75 up. 5408 W Noa: 
WILL PAY CASH FUR USED GRAND a 
midget upr. Mrs. Paige. Van Buren 1248, 


EXCHANGED GRANDS AND UPRIGHTS— 
Lyon & Healy, 243 S. Wabash-avenue. 


seme gp PIANO, LIKE NEW. ALSO WAL 
nut midget. 3238 W. Harrisou-street 


PACE IN BEAUTY SHOP LESTAB.| FOR 
millinery: $15 mo., includ. gas, light, heat. 
West side. Mansfield 4387. 
RENT HALF OF STORE—1 DISPLAY 
window: 1 blk. Milwaukee-Irving Park- 
Cicero; busy location: $65 mo. Cen. 7489. 


SPACE FOR INTERIOR ECORATORS, 
also workrm. Suite 210. 620 N. {. Michigan. 


WANTED—TO LEASE—1 GAS STATION: S. 
Side preferred. Grovehill 4655. 


Business Equipment. 


in. § TTE 
filinois. 22 W. Monroe-street, porate 


LARGE EARNINGS—NEW 1C-bC PEANUT 
candy machine routes: $200 cash. Full. 
part time. 330 8. Wells. Suite 1202. 


Wante# 
GAS STATION OR GROUND SUITABLE 


for gas station, Private party. : * 
‘Ambien, 4948 S. Western-av. __ Hem. 01838. 


CASH FOR STORES AND MERCHANDISE. 
L. Goodman, 672 Roosevelt. Canal 8625. 


GAS STATION WANTED— FELDMAN PE- 
ee Co., 5 W. Roosevelt. Har. 3000. 


agg 6: Bibl 3 GAS be 


BRouth h Bide. 7, Tribun 


BUSINESS DIRECT ORY, 


In se a 
blication Biya Entire 
soures. 


1.25. 
a7 Kan. 9368. 


si ye ra & Upholstery. 
REUPHOLSTER AND REFINISH YOUR 
furniture to be sew mes oh rt leather 
work Estimates free. pholstering 

Studio. 34h W. Hubbard-st. Eek 7844. 
iW PRICES, 


N EVANS UPHOLSTERY— 
Bi Sal g work. 4626 Clifton. Ard. 3847. 


Moving and Storage. 
mo BP le RATES. 


SAVE nic : 
com — 


Friendly 


Personal Loans 
$30 to $300 


Use our simplified loan method 
to get cash when you need it. 


Signature Only Loans. 
Automobile Loans. 


Furn 


iture Loans. 


COMMEMORATING 50 YEARS 
OF CONTINUOUS SERVICE. 
1888 . 1938 


Phone 


C. 


7 $8. DEARBORN-ST. 


Central 4733. 


C. ERD 


ROOM 616. 


Let Us Solve 
Your Money Problems 


CLEAN THE 


SLATE WITH A LOAN. 


$25 to 5300 


ON YOUR 


SALARY 
FURNITURE 
AUTOMOBILE 


T. B. WARD, INC. 


8 S. Dearborn. 


Room 408. 


Phone Randolph 2060. 


CAR PAYMENTS 


RE 


DUCED 


BE gg oe car or other h 
re taking too much of 
We can 


+ ¢ _ oa 
ry. 3 = ; : 
. ’ 3 . 
1% . 2 ¥ 
~y + 
= 


rborr ral 
Moor 
ANS ON 


WTD.—USED GRAND PIANO FROM 
party: will pay spot « cash. Sheldrake 5797, 


Accordions. 
sh ACCOR PINS — BARGAINS IN USE 
rebuilt. and demonstrator instruments 
sizes to 120 bass. Terms. with free ! 
Chicago: Musical instrument Co. 09 “S South 
ba v 


rrison 
RADIOS, SUPPLIES AND SERVICE, 


tap GIGANTIC REMODELING SALE! — 
H pose ¥ KNOWN, floor 
om. 


re 4} 


Hundred mi 
EDISON’ S WHSY, OUTLET, 766 Ww. 
OPEN EVES TO 9: SUN. 10- 


LOSING OUT! BRAND NEW! — 
1938 Crosley, reg. $69.95: red. uow.F. 
79.95: red zg 

‘ 9.95: 

38 c. 7 ais eg. $160: red 
1938 Zenith, cae "$174: red, .549.95 
Zable models, $3-6-9: used panies -2-3. 
1268 MILWAUKEX. EVES., SUN 


GENERAL E ELECTRIC—12 ig TUBES. 6 5E ANDs 
Phileo auto ar 


tage aig, 9.06, oi Su 


. THe 


5 tube 
Sunday. 


SACR, 1938 PHIL — U MC 
Humboldt 7068, 2602 


— $89.50 GRUNOW a WAVE, 18.05 - 
Commonwealth, 775 W 
TopEt 


NEW 1938 PHILCO = ay 
sac.. $40. Ss Lincolii-av.. 3d floor. 


G. E. 10 TUB E. $39.50: 1938 ZENITH, $48, 
Others. TR438 Fullerton. 


Service, Kepair, Ete. 


— — $1.00—RADIO § ART PA 
Any place, any time. GUAR 


— EXPERT t SERVIGR AN A) 

No play—no pay tn pera 92. 
pe Rea SED # SER 
NA R. A DIO. s Ss SERVICE. ALE 4 N 3 


oT SELL AT. ONCE Coal => 
~ 200 a fur coats, $25. up. = 
50 used coats; $15 up. 


*Hes  puilt their re ha @ 
* tdi with MARKET | |. 
PRICED used cars that . C . [187 PL rH ‘run nice, _,conaition =| : bier 
give surplus value. ee tara BUICK 60 oo 1 Bie sa it 585 ge frank: heater, clock, de Inge gael 1 °S5 OlGS Coach...... S895 SSC 
_CADILLACS below © TUDEBAKER Sedan, like new... 580} packard 1035 120 tour, sedan, | S> LoFra. Tr. Sed. 880 24 
6-85 touring sedan .....-..81.608 | Th ing Cars | ‘srcavaurn sass Sie) eta GUM le’ dat Genes! | [98 Ford De L. Sed 895 20 
| VF ae ones ss bebe nes 1,645 
9 es reg waheesbeoes paeevee 59% | PRES ole ‘ ie re ke ee apes 3 rincagoes leinanl eeane oo mF tay whet aon is | Spe ae Pey why yee ce wer 
Se CHECK } LISTI Al ; ver" 4e6| and. tires. show exceedingly good | ’S2 “Coupe... 138 
1088 tows eaten tiie moun. 87 | [36 Bute Bc BOL ee tose 420m b cae cae | hai Chvy. fed. @w 170 
Reeth cryin LES. “| CHEVROLET '35 Coupe. i 088. 1 in. See this one., shee 445) nal nag Baie nae eek ween 1°84 Cad. Trk. Sed... 150 
és ARROW '88 Sedna... 90 | 20 PLYMOUTH Sedan: nerteet.......- $85] Wf seudiy ine mou exscting Puwet: | 180 Olds Sed., 6 w. 125 
1936 touring sedan .......+0+4: ‘08 e luxe Fordor & edan _ | ‘36 HUDSON 4 Door Trunk § “4 verses @261 Sais a “Guar:..8006 §=|'29 Grhm. 7 p. Sed 150 
1934 BD chee ssc earereseneeens ha od ae 435 nda im Convertl eeeeecsense OO and a 
pn vV-8 sedan eee beeteceeeeeee Sedar cece 61 ORL ‘Sedan wi wi | Drunk.....+.s0+05 SF : pare owe wat (eptiona. See Us First 
137 Dodge eas, Sedan..$565/ 1982 V-8 sedan .....,...sss00 BUICK '35 Victoria Coupes sss. omnes oe Kailer-Youngquist 
panes Wve Svetaca St | Fee Sogn hic to | Sea ot ce Bt Packard-HubbardWoods|, ,aller-Voungai 
87 -ontonge Caaab agaeelamaalaed P gdee ame Sead "| PACKARD ‘85. 4-dor. Sedai,....... yin, Sed.,.$260/'34 Chev, Sed... 286] Chicago Phone: enol I AWAY | ‘39 International, pan 
PLYMOUTH ‘87 SOGAD .15..0+.s404- est ford --* o0°| BRIARGATE 0050, 916 LINDEN-AV. 4 MONTHS! ev. cab, chass reese i one ‘SHOWROOMS. 


Heater, Radio, etc. the 
mee Olds aus: Sedan......$525 We Must Have FORD '87 De luxe Fordor Sedan... '33 Pontiac Sed. 17! | 
fr brand te Cars You Want Be- | PACKARD Sian cc... 625 | 88 Ford Get. 288/89 Ohraes Be 10—BARGAINS—t0 cy sn ae hts 201 EC OH 10 


dition. | ao poidecbics eons — ‘81 Chev. Road. 29 Ford Sedan.. 25 JAMES F "“O Block Rast of Michigan at 600 
: - . GOODWIN FINANCE CO. REPOSSESSIONS Teor pene 1 gt 600 Roh 


Trunk, Heater 
133 Plymouth ‘Sedan......$845 — ‘81 Chev. 4D. Sd *81 Graham Sed. Te = N ICHI ” HYDRAULI RY SAA EON 15 
ee ent ongé. °36, ‘83, "31 Specials. gg oii a nsaia . M100 OTHER BAMGALIS. Liberal Trade—Long Terms. mn pat Pa Ah ore aga 27 cine. ap alee. Bo “ota wai 0 OPEN sees BAND a vn 4750 Washington. 
HONEST VALUES ENERAL MOTORS SALES CO Ford Motor Sales Co 2229 Maz hi 5 sogammadeiend Auburn ‘4 door F custom “built” sed. 85 | Ba Hederal’ sleeper ead. 900x20....-". $200 | AT CICERO-AVENUS. COLUMBUS 9609, 
| g2585 wienlean-ay. CALE ° IC Iigan 1 Dodge 4 d. sed., 6 w. 98] '36 Chevrolet conv. coupe. radio........ 385 | 9@4,Nederal. sleeper cab. 900220... 
COMPARE OUR LOW FINANCE RATES. B. 7ist-st. PLAza 8000: nog PINCOLN RETAIL DIVISION. 81 Chev. 2 dr. sedan...... 98/36 olds irunke ood. = ante. oh eee ete. In storage ‘since 1936. $450 Se | ) 
2820 8. MICHIGAN AY:: CALUMET 7840.|,37 Buick 61 Sedan.........§880|’81 Buick 4dr. sed.,.@w. 95 ad Go a3 7 PHONH CANAL “88000477 nsational Sale 


Broadway. LONgbeach 
2508 S. Michigan | ; . | : 
; Br aware Shee 2 OUGH'S ANNUAL FEBRUARY SaLp— |, Hester radio, builtin trunk: exe. eed. |’S1 Hupp ‘6’ 4d. sed., 6w. sedan --s..+..+-:: 339/735 FORD % TON STAKE. |Pypniture Mart S sie 


Prairie 820 Madi Oak Pk. ‘3h Plym. 4 d. irk, aed.: ntr. $345.|°37 Dodge Sedan............. ; Lo t 
24th at aes ROG. 71 Brough Pe Soto-Plymouth, 7480 Stony isi. brett dati, Neste: exe. oid 30 Stude. 4 d. sed., 6 w. 3 Graham 4 uy) Saale 24 service” in this” UseD 0. _ At ly ACTUAL COST 


NASH SALES 4 EVENINGS. ‘37 ‘Gheveroiat Sedan.......8575/|’31i1 Essex 4 dr. sedan..... ‘Se IGN CONT, GOUUUR ici icici pisessicca & GEN S, 
Cro ne Inc. ay DODGES Heat adio, built-in trunk; lik ’°30 Whippet 2d . Chevrol yenias aoe 1 ae ee ; a 
9 : jas 9 Thea! dante rebuilt ti ae $776 Corner Lake Shore@rive fon the lake). 


v. Sed. 95 -in trunk, 1957s Rea Saree Cane: Maron, ? 100s Moré te "Baobes From, |.” GENERAL MOTORS 
porn Pager with xvi dn Texe calle, beater, clea as brand new. 4 door toning sedans . Variety of colore, | 5701 Broadway. Lon. 7700. ae ee ee es sncnae aoee ees acames abas. OPEN EVENINGS. 
very classy ertible. | ¥ bal, 2 years 90 day guar. LIBERAL DISCOUNT, 5719 BROADWAY 2000 S MICHIG AN Gas when. FE Sha F ragiteapala 98 2-Pc. Parlor Sets, Old Sofas, 
yr Open till 10 bv. m. 1 M.7D DRIV ay Also ° tires, $ 75 others $550. Modern, French, and many other styles. 
= CENTURY FINANCE CORPORATION. 1987 Fords 208 Fords , ne paige Southwest Chey, S20 8. "$98 10 8 Ced. 3500. $19 TO $1153 
NASH ’33 SED., $185 Phone Calumet 4880. NEW PICK UP TRUCK—NEVER USED, 


reliable make Sacrifice ridiculously low 3-4-7 Pe. Highest Quality Bedroom Sets, 


3535 N, ASHLAND 850) JACKSON=-BL. OFFICIAL RP CARS. BEFORE YOU BUY De luxe 4 door; dual equipment; $20 down. PLYM. °39 SED., $495 price. Terms. Address L X 217, Tribune. $22 TO $99. 


4 door touring sedans. Variety of colors E Michigan Ave, Chevrol e 
SEE g ‘ evrolet, STUDEBAKER—C. 0. EB. BOSS TRACTOR. 7-8-9 Pe. Dining Room Sets. 


BUICKS ’37s, ’36s CHEY. 1937, $495 weg tar guaranties. Priced "to sell” rom Big De LUXE touring sedan, built-in | , 2-3 ton; 8.25x20 tires. Virginia 0210. 
= a run ries, defr ' : 1716 W. Pershin 9. se 3 
1987s, $565 UP. ae trom Various colors.) $595 | awder Bros. 2345 MICHIGAN AV trunk, dual accessories, heater, defrosters, | AUTOCAR TRUCK g. $39.50 TO $195 


. Your car down, bal. 5 da ay guar. REO—1% TON °356 PANEL DELIV. EXC. 100 Bran Ww 
ears — sgh with ulitin trunk "Your choice at full| YOUR CAR DOWN. BALANCE 3 Re] AUTH. FORD DEALER. ESTAB. 1890 OLDS ’36 SEDAN, $465 OF GENTURY FINAKG# CORE ORATION. | 7202. S475. Shi SS te eae Modern. Pe ned “ sei amen 
1 OLO rice or $496. Your car dn. 12-24 m months. /'The Home of the Dodge Car. 100 | TROCKS—$00 AND, Ur: “Broadioom and twist fri 
r : drivin De luxe 6 cyl. sedan, built-in trunk comp. § () J ACKSON BI. aS _St2kes. panels, dumps. 3148 OGDEN-AV. a OB to’ 
A Goor some with RADIO. HEATER, ° kk yt ay ee ee CORP. MURPHY MOTOR SALES, FINES? yen bey oF Dual acces. = detro rosters; clean 5 Ba OAT ee > ae MPS. 350 UF. oe noe ee 1o'860. 
14618 Washington-blvd.| _svmsonizep poper pzauens. I ene ee, GPM Ro WOE Ay bf Stina ERE PHRVEOY uOPOHE, 1230 8 ASHLAND. | tte, wns, cotesion, of, OO, hal, Sento 
IN THE Cry. CENTURY FINANCE CORPORA P] outh ’33, $167 FORDS-CHEVS.—'378, wT Ag ‘338. | Springs Matiresses i nelued in in this tage gy 
ym 4 Stakes, panels. Cheap. Wright. 110i N.Clark ete daa 40 


2720 N. CICERO-AV. B&G. mesa reahwad Aad guaranteed. | QE) | ACKSON-BI.. A REAL P. D, 4 DOOR SEDAN. FORD—'3@ PANEL. LIKE NEW $398 | ia m “°TRRMS. "°° DEL. 5824. 


OAK P ed acuTO Pi nce COR 
9 198is to 1987s. Rune LIKE A CLOCK AND AUTH. FORD DLR. 3948 ROOSEVELT. 
Dodge ’37 Trk. Sed., $595 hi. wale WORTH $250. TODAY, REAL SS i TOR P ANEL Al 


1618 Washington - blvd. C-H-E-V-R-O-L-E-T-S 
BUICK °37 SEDAN, $695 1984-1985-1986-1937 ALL MODELS. 5026 
MASTER DE LUXE COUPES COACHES. Here is a beautiful Santon town model Dor. 2310. Ruby Chev., 7158 Stony ‘Island. 
KD A CAR FOR YOU AT THE OLDS 1937, $595 FELZ, 1182 DIVERSEY-BL. rr =n Pe ee |_ TRUCE: 13. 


four Car a. 


Special small 8 sedan. built-in trunk comp. TOWN SPORT SEDANS. 0. with built-in trunk, dual mount ment, built: 8: 
bal. 2 years. 9 PRICE YOU WANT TO PAY.| 5, wass. de luxe tour. sedan; built-in trunk body 6% x 11% ft.: best cond. Hum, 6831, | °Ves~ 10 b. rm 

10'P: M7 DAY DRIVING TRIAL | Southwest Chevrolet, Inc., tonthout seins dole ae eh ethan nate TUALLY piagiobest. secs 1985, $295. 4538 WASHINGTON-BLVD, 

a RSET TAT eo | 2200-2 AamtanD: CRD. 8500, | standing, value in Chicago at this low, nelee, All Other Makes balance 12-24" months. "90 day guarantee 5 ger sedan. Extreme low ¥ TRUCE TO DELIVER or : 

= Fe geal OAK PARK AUTO FINANCB CORP. mileage, beautiful biack finish, Manady work. 210 NORTH TALMAN-AY, | poor 2N,,TUPTS., eed -—— 


“STERNBERG-PONTIAC. YOUR ag 
850 JACKSON-BL. CHEV. 1937, $425 6083 COTTAGE GROVE. Lowest Prices Ever! (4618 Washington = blvd. Dodes Haxiee Seo M Cleere WID. TQ BUY—LGE. STAKE BODY. SUIT. ta and Am. riental cha! -#20-525 
9 Master de luxe. knee action, 5 nass. town : Also Linc.-Zephyr '86 and '87 4 door sedans. 9 : - en Furn. Co. 444 ; tistietest 
BUICK °37, $645 | tities ise gis ttt a8 DODGE 37, $550 | 6900 VINCENNES-AV. | OLDS 6 '36, 9445 | PLymourTHs 1687, $845. |, sopor smincyion oF SANIZERS_VAN EMER STOR 
4 outer, datveniec, weitiin | “aad Gase ieee TENGE Gua 44 Tu bodies. soe BEDR.. D IN. SETS, "920: RUgs. $15 


5 sedan. seh used. | % door sedan; 
Ajso 10 other 1937 models, 41° Ruby Chevrolet, Inc. 5 pass. trunk sedan with heater. 4 BLOCK WEST OF Beese SsREeT. 6 pase, © cyl. (rene eedan trunks, ete. Your choice’ of 2, so act quick! |B. & J. Trailermobile and Freuhoff. Easy tms. rms. Eves.. 1 
BEAUT. IMPORTRD ORIE 


Mual accese., radio, heater. ock, etc. Your car down payment, bal. $26 ver mo. 


&, 
. ; d with radios. — ee group used 4 months. @) n Sundays. Eves. to 10. in black with radio ond heater, New car warran 
ho dee Oo an 1 7188 Stony Isl. Dor. 2810. 1936 trunk sedan for $395. Pe y Your car down. Open til 3335. MONTROSE-AVENUB. 3838 N. WHSTERN-AVENUB. PARLOR SET. $25. 0 BROADWAY, 


oe Your car down. Open till 10 bp. m., eee 5 
3535 N. ASH LAND Chev. ’36 Sed., $365 | 3535 N. AGHLAND owe pee eg 3535 N. ASHLAND Plym. ’36 Sed., $295 20.7: pester. poost0.020000000000003458 | “Contra. 


. T 0 
Built-in trunk. heater, many other extras. OLDS. ’84 SEDAN Perfect cond.: like new: hasn't a blemish. PHONE CANAL ‘8300: “Lala 3 fea innit batileaie: 
) : Cam. Diack Anish... Tear Soe Sows. : 4 Also 200 unbeatable bar terms. Open SUN, | xrtID X XDUUU XUN UOtANg Oa ____e | i. ip. for stores. offices. an 
BUICK 37, DO9S — | Aladve! sey ena DODGE ’37 SED., $575 TUDOR $295 SGOK COUNTY Finaws. bdo W030. AUTOMOBILE LOANS. estimates. Sevnere, Vic. 2804. 
De Soto Dir., 83148 Lawrence. ; : 
Latest series DE LUXE 4 door, touring $19.90 PER MONTH, 5 deen tees Gan clean: si deamhenl PLYM. 36 SED., $345 ‘ Ceara. 80 YDS.: yore 850 ) De. 


sodel 41. oor with trunk. 
to © belle rom—All colors. sedan, built-in trunk. heater, defrosters. S0UTH SHORE B 
ep yen CHEV. ’36 DE L., $395 Gey EH 9 10'P, M. 7 RIVING TRIAL | I | SINGIE »S 7320 STONY ISLAND, __ MID, 6408. # door: black finish; fully equipped. ) South Side. 
APITOL FI 3) geass been Gabe. Seen, AG es. CENTURY FINANCE CORPORATION Eee Caring sehen Bulle 186 j DE LUXE 4 BURKE, 6733 S. WESTERN. IN 10 MINUTES FURN. MART SAMPLES. 
Two carloads of bedrm., dining age break- 


2235 MICHIGAN-AYV. Michigan Ave, Chevrolet, $50) JACKSON- Ry. 925 JACKSON-BLVD. a Bree. de. terme. Plym. ’88 De L. Sedan, $219. on. youP ante ontemek: fast rm. furniture: : 50 occasional ch airs, 25 
0 ; 


5 = as INC.— 
BUICK ’37 67, $765 2345 MICHIGAN-AY. OPEN SUNDAY AND EVENINGS TILL 10. | “99 a wey, RSV, | ennik Moca eee Seis: Another 20 MONTHS TO PAY. ax, 10 to § 
DODGE DLR., 1019 DAVIS-ST.. EVANSTON. STID 18 COTTAGE GRATE 


wheel base sedan. Radio. heater, Chev. ’86 2 Dr. Sed., $345. Dosage fe, o. FORD 34 VICTORIA OLDS ’37 TOUR. SED. EVANSTON CARS ARE BETTER CARS. 


waite wall tires. built-in luseage com- REAL 
’35 Tour. Sed., $325. Deal direct with owners. Rug and Linoleum Sale. 


A 
partment. Original! cost $1. Turret ton. trunk compartment. hod brakes, TENE SEDAN-—-A BEAUTY. m 
complete Chevrolet ea gh finish, upbolstery, THE FIRST BUYER TAKES IT $150 Radio, heater: fully equipped. $695. Plym. 
gee they soos 6xW's, $10 u 9x12’s, 


Michigan Ave. Chevrolet, mechanical cond. would pee for new. Always 
AT ONLY $438. B 
This is Ford bargain week at our store: 2247 S. MICHIGAN — on i See Private Consultation Rooms. | $18 up. Broad coms, friezettes. 27.50 wks 
1. 


ore for your _mon 
Michigan at 24th-st. CLARE MAPLE CHEV. 940 MILWAUKEE.| FELZ, 907 DIVERSEY-BL. alas aus "Sk tadesey tardoen. “OE de. tues nonat na cee ee aot a. 
tudor touring, ‘37. fordors; all lowest prices. IPE. @ CYL: LIKE N Large size rugs. 9x15 12x16 
OLDS—’35 Sag COUP Cc EVANSTON CARS ARE BETTER CARS. Klever Shampay Cleaners, 4638 Cottare 
36 WINTER-HIRSCH : 


? ? DODGE—1936 4 DOOR DE LUXE SEDAN: 
Buick 37 6] Sed., §945 CH EY. 36 SEDAN, §345 trunk. radio. beater: very clean: driven a La Salle-Erie Motors mew on ee 8 B. saDAN, a OYE. $365 PLYMOUTH—'36 4 DR. TOUR. SEDAN: Grove. Open Tues.. Thurs.. Sat. enings. 
EMIL DENEMARK, INC. Master de luxe 5 pass. sedan: radio. htr., ete. short time: absolutely perfect thruout: will AUTHORIZED OLDSMOBILE DEALER. Heater; very clean 15 trunk, heater: Phas sy green........ 8805 en 
BURKE, 6733 S. WESTERN. batenee $22 per month. = 661 N LA SALLE De Soto-Piymouth Dir. 3520 ARC ER. De eee Cnt = 7 — 2n years in same location 7090 COTTAGE GROVE. 
o oat % ‘ NK ae a -A- - >. z i Coe 71st-street and South Chiecago-a 
OLDS.—'386 6 CYL. 2 DR. SED. TRU NEW AND RECONDITIONED. BU. cage avenue. 


3860 OGUEN-AYV. 
Have a fine selection of 25 used Buicks CHEVROLETS PRUDENTIAL FINANCE, 
= alt models, styles and body typer: "30 Lae. eae stock of MODELS. 1827 N. CICERO. OPEN EVES.| Forg ’*87 De L. Tour. Fordor. bargain iis 5. “Frumbui “Roe 6708. 1987 BRAND NEw, $797. 1842 S. MICHIGAN. BR ow DIN. RM. ae 39 
y ay : SEDAN, 5 PASS.. ate 7 PT. 

$.—'37 8D. 18 "fala BTC at — 4653 W. MADISON. 2 YEARS TO K 4 ay 8180 


oR PARTI UE AR OH. icom aft loa 7p., AKES AND < ) 
ae Bil Mt 2 Athair <0 MB dbo ned Some low as $45; ? ipped with : PAY. OP 
BUICHh—1937 MODEL 81 4 DOOR TOURING| Warner Motor Sales, Iga “irving Park, Dodge *35 Sedan, 5365 a. Theater. spotiient “t bis Vogue ie tories Alas. -_ t—_ a P TIAC SEDAN, I TR a - 
“sedan: radio. heater. defroster. Goodyear OPEN SUNDAY. 4 door de luxe sedan: fuliy equipped. white wall tires OLDSMOBILE—1936 COUPE 36 PONTIAC CO! epee Anew ok eras SUPREVIBION. — 3 R an es 71.00 See WEEE — = 
ne socee. Very 1GW mileane: eee aay it CHEV. ’36 DE L.. $350 5001 S. WESTERN-BL. AP jor. corapletely DE SOTO DEALER. NTIAC SEDAN, TRUNK ...... PLENTY OF FREE PARKING SPACE. OO ee = Une ee , $99. 
: Pp . NTIA SEDA} H mancan S DO YOU OWE CHINESE RUGS: 8xll. $29 2 , 
GOODMAN’S. 6821 3. HALSTED STREET. 


left the factory. Priced to sell today. 
d.. trunk, dual equip, New | ie pe poe: to choose from. 
LAWDER BROS. 5 pass. town se FORDS-FORDS-FORDS 1 new. 1997 120: tour, sedan: dareain: 3 TIAC COUPE, RUMBLE 
: finish. Like new. Rare value at $960. Tme R R R GLENN E. HOLMES, INC., 5 1037 130 irunk sed ans, slightly sed. PATRICK PONTIAC DEALER, Any Finance or 
: Bae PARLOR. E BEDRM.. DINING RN. SETS. 


5900 VINCENNES 1 BLOCK W. OF STATE | MID-CITY CHEVROLET. 1147 W. ieioce. scale ty tineti ied ecben 3 ’ 
30 W. LAKE- DOLPH 7171. 1936 L MUST BE SGLD Al a Piece. 8. 7727 S. ASHLAND. Loan Co, Q Sow BR 


OPEN SUNDAY. EVES. TILL 10. |. cHEV.—’33 SEDAN: TRUNK $135} 1936 tudor: original paint like new.. ST. AN 
Hyde Park Chevrolet, 6935 Stony or 1936 deluxe coupe: radio, heater Re OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS. TOD 


Buick De L. Cpe., $184 Chrysler 1987 Royal, $645! 1986 deluxe fordor sedan Ford ’37 85 Coupe, $425 HILL MOTOR gg Cco., PONTIAC 1937, $595 on a ogee 6910 Cotinas” ‘Grove. Open eves. Sunday, 
GEN, ieee RUG. $19.76. USED CA 


most beautiful real 1931 of drive. dual 2247 S. MICHIGAN Largest Packard Dealer in Ilinois 
5 Seen ake in town. Actually De fuxe 4 dr, trunk sedan. overdrive. De |. model; radio, ne. white wall argos: £ r . 5 pass. de equip. tour. sedan: built-in trunk net. © ne. parlor set. new. $1 
worth R350. Today's price only gm putin radio ee ee FORD °36 COUPE $205 =~ full de I. Meee are, Oi, et gral 640 Madison-st. Oak Park. NEW. 8008 “Hour car Gow Pay Your Present Balance Grove Rug and Turnitecs Co., 6738 pat he 
$184. 9 dr.; radio, htr uly eqp $ mn. 4550 WASHINGTON-BOTILEVARD. oe , 80 da guarantee. rive You More Cash BARGS.—IMP.. DOMES. RUGS. 7 5-$20-$25, 
9: term 


“WE HAVE THE CARS WE ADVERTISE.” ; 
Orig. blue finish; will pass for new. Terms. Michigan Ave, Chevrolet, K PARK KOTO FINANCE CORP. ...Reduce Your Payments ae atlgr. bedroom. din. gets 329-83 ; it 
app-Storage an urn. Vo 7 enia 


FELZ, 1182 DIVERSEY-BL. 
BUICK ’385 SEDAN, CHRYSLER 1981, $145. a 9 : Michigan at 24th-st. PACKA D 3/, 95 4618 Washington = blvd. 
Michivcan at 2Ath=st 20 MOS. TO PAY AT LOWEST RATES. FEB STORAGE SATE ow GOING ON, ON, 
§ 475 4 door sedan. de luxe: completely g ° FORD 1985 De luxe 4 door sedan, built-in ak etc., ° 9 sel. of bedr. and ru 
refinished: tirés excellent. : and '36 AS, radio, heater, etc, Only oe Pontiac 6 36, $445 FRIENDLY, CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE SCHWARTS & STu.. soe STONY ISLAND. 
Model '35-61. trunk: looke and runs like} Buick Dir., 3807 Lawrence. Ford ’31 Sedan, $128 , Business coune—a_ Aiosolsiary. heer ste Your car down ; bal. 2 pests: BY aay fuer: INCE 1919, = wehnyrestinis we mai 
ee “SOUTH. SHORE BUICK CO. CHRYSLER—1936 IMP. AIRFLOW SEDAN, A SLANTING WINDSHIELD FoR. The best buy anywhere at this price, = «| CENTURY ‘PINARCE CORPORATION. with heater.” Looke i Sedans, Inland Investment Plan | 8,8. terminal. Direct shipments. 
6208 COTTAGE GROVE. MID. 6403. 5 pass.: trunk, overdrive, radio, btr..$595 DOR SEDAN. A _ NICE ONE. CHEVROLET I Your car down. Open till 10 p. m. Oak Park 525 W._76th-st. Daily and Sunday, 9-6. 
; New Car Dealer. Open Sun.. Eves. Tiil 10. POSITIVELY TODAY ONLY $128. 7158 Stony Isl. Dor. 2810. $50) JACKSON-BL. gpk ” Michigan. 747 Madison.|. . poor ROOMS COMPLETE. $99 
BUICK ’37-41 6201 SOUTH WESTERN. | FELZ, 907 DIVERSEY-BL. | | 3535 N. ASHLAND | Waves 2: Buclid 8844. | ~ .mcp Ue, ROOMS COMPLETE. $09 5 = 
, 9228 S. Chicago. Sag. 4890. ° "Representative 1 will _call_at your request. : oe A 
Ss | OFF ON ALL FURNITURE AND | RUGS. 


Joyce Bros. Warehouse. 6711 8 


Touring sedan: radio. heater. white wall GHRYSLER— 36 TOURING SEDAN 6 CYL: | FORD 'S7 TOUR. SED. $458 p : g 5 
— «- PONTIAC—19837 COUPE, $585 — — 
C. ZEPP ackard 36, D9 AUTOMOBILES WANTED. SAG, SH, BEAU. FURN., RUGS, ae aan, 


res. This car will satisfy the new car 
buyer. Sacrifice at a creat bargain. —. “ese heater, white wall tires: like Sertans bull Wa ney i iatinntie : _PONTIAG—1087 COD z 5585 
v You Model 120, 4 door trunk sedan $85 or your car down. $25 monthly. eg re gt Dealer. M mia B83 


ing car down, balance @ mon : w white wall tires, radio in three. 
STRTIET EN) fs | SEDANS — =| noagae Dealer, 2720 N. Cieero $345 ‘Different colors to choose from. GROSSINGER PONTIAC, CASH FOR YOUR CAR North Side. 
— — BUICK—1932 86. $145 Pre aa 1935s and 1936s. All in perfect condition. oag Your car down. Open 10 bp. m. 3011 LAWRENCE. KEYSTONE 6321 We pay off vour notes or mortgages: cive NEW-REPOSSESSED 
San ng Agendas age hema di td end Nah een FORD ’86 CONVERTIBLE Auth d ‘gare tinedla oe yt Dealer. 353 2658 LAWRENCE. LONGBEACH 7883.| sou cash or another car for your equity. : 
A CHRYSLER—'45 CUS AIRFLOW SED.AN: uthorized Zor vom) OREM ATT 5 N, ASHLAND ; Cc > SELL FOR BALANCE DUE. 
overdr.: Driv. 1 trade, 1929 8. 524-av.Cicero| 5 Pars. Club Cony. Coupe, Radio. Heater 2960_ LAWRENCE. OPEN SUNDAY. | Dad PONTIAC ’836 6 CYL. Col. 7180. 4647 Madison. | 135 parior, Bedroom, Din. Sets..,... 
z ont touring sedan; dual iP SEE US FIRST Sig le Hues 
S 


P4TH AND MICHIGAN. CALUMET 7413. - _— 
BIRD-SYKES CO 15 Ss, ichigan. fon. top prices. Don't lose EAS Y IERMS—2.¥ YEARS “TO ery 


assenger 120 soins PONTIAU—’'36 SED. 4 air. RADIO: PERF ar for balance due. 


4 door touring sedan; radio, heater: low GORD 1986 SepAN 5 p 
Mileage: guaranteed. Ford ’35 5 P. Sedan, $240. TLIDSON 36 $445 Bui It- in trunk: dual pee erORD Warehouse. 620 Schubert. Wel. 8300. 2247 3.” 
3956 GRAND. AT C HIGRKST scar PRICES aii6 FOR CARS | OPEN DAILY TO 10 P. M., SUN. TO 5. 


James Levy Buick. 2257 Michigan. WE UNDERSELL HEATER: LIKE NEW THROUGHOUT, 9 —pree yy" ae YS 
FORD ‘36 FORDOR TOURING SED.: trunk, cyl. 4 door trunk sedan Packard ’386 120 Sedan, $675. STUDE. 36, $495 B . oe e MICHIE goa “" | Furniture and Rugs wt Off. 
ry 


BUICK—1934 4 DOOR TRUNK ees ‘ i , m + g 
4 door custom an. iow mileage : € mew: | radio, heater: hardly driven 65 
o, heater: hardly $2 with radio, heater, beaut, color. és wile jrunk radio he heater. : 
H IEL AMERICAN FURN. MART § 


model 41: real buy 
Por. 2310. Ruby Chev. 7158 Stony Island. CHRYSLER DEALER. OPEN EVENINGS. De Soto-Plymouth Dir. 3520 ARCHER. Your car down. Oven ti 10 bp. m. dra. i bide gran . init PRESIDENT ¢ aoe ities eee : 
Trunk, OVERDRIVE, htr.. small license fee. Upen cves Sut Gal 4437. Parlor, Bedrm.. Dining Rm. Sets..3 yo poe 


’ 
— FORD—1937 wORDOF TRUNK SEDAN — me VERAL 
Cadillac 35 ped. 5595 3910 OGDEN=AV. Radio, heater. Only $545 3535 N, ASHLAND PACKARD—-1837 a SEVe By NODES Also 1937 Dictator touring sedan. $575. SLIGHTLY USED CAR FOR PERSONAL Room Sized Rugs.. 
Moéel 20 trunk sedan aas.; black New Car Dealer. Open “aun. Eves. Till 10, pane : ced pri. i ale ch Bel 280 Your car down. ans 22 90 day use: owner only: all cash; recent model.| 4 RRroom Quality Outhts $149 
finish. anges cost $3. ésf Very low 9 6 Al FLOW 6201 SOUTH WESTERN ia ll besten Bel. 2801: | OPEN TO 10 P 7D Y DRIVING TRIAL Must pass mech. insp. Franklin 7100. re 
DE SOTO 3 R : HUDSON 737 SEDAN PACKARD—’34 CLUB SED. 1100 SERIES. CENTURY FINANCE CORPORATIO ~ Basy Terms. Open every eve. and Sunday. 
W. M. FEYERBEND SOUTH SHORE 7021. 61380 BROADWAY. __ 


mileage. pass for new car. Z 
Michigan Ave, Chevrolet ; FORD—1936 TUDOR DE LUXE: LI 5 | Wright Motors, se - ge-av., Kvanston. 00 used 
i | Bact tae agli cnt rez ed Hear mnemnntcaly Gece A| dor, ane agheebar:, Maltat | PaCRARp a TH aon Fou | OOO JACKSON OBL, (cztsreieeng sane a a 

$49 wall tires, radio, heater: run equip. ra sed,.: trk., radio, htr, $085. er alsted. JUNK—CAKS AND ‘LRUCKS WANTED— rooms 


Michi an at 24th-st. $1,300 Our price only 495 beauty: 5 white o ice $625. 
g private party. $350 cash. Kenwood 4300. rs, Orig. cost $1,420. Our price $ PACRARD1Da7 BED, NEW. GMA MOD. ST Q3 Call Palisade 0873 or eves. Hum. 9306. ee ge gy Beletead 
os UDE. 1936, $445 sais 


Michigan Ave Chevrolet M. Baur. Thurs. between 9:30 a. m.-1 , 
66Q99 9 . ; M vrolet, 
vadiliac ‘8’ ’36 7 P. Sed. Longe Oe VEE Foe a via JUNK (CARS AND TRUCKS WANTED or $460, Will sell for balance dus. afte 
Hi Edgewater 2191, until 10 p. m. Terms. Wallen: gO a este 


. h-= FORD ’36 COUPE, $365. " : PACKARD—'3 ree cninieaiailine 
: t 24th- 7 SUPER SEDA A EXECU a 
Fleetwood: side mounts, radio. heater. Michigan : st. Radio, hir.: very clean: reduced to $365. Michigan at 24th-st. tive’s car; sacr, 620) ae ubert, Wel, 8300. 6 cyl. 4 door trunk sed GLEAN 84-35-86 LIGHT CARS WANTED! Clark-street. Bit 

with radio and heater, in gunmetal, for cash. 5665 West Lake-street. IN SCHAULER’S STORAGH—EASY ; 


hrome wheels, $1.175. : TO *35 SED 361 | 2.2: Wright Motor Co.. W. 55th-st. 
== TA SALLE—i0878. REAL BUYS — — be 
DE SO 9 D brand new cars, Pierce-Arrow 1933, 5395 Your ‘car dows. Open til 10 p.m. |#AVE BETWEEN $75 AND $100 FOR GOOD NOW ON pipituce and Fug aee9 Hin, 2 y 
9, 


2317 S. MICHIGAN Ford ’36 Tour. naar $368. 2 gorgeous virt, 
“Not a trick ad.” Heater, other extras: 4 Die: trunk sedan and convertible trunk 
| C ’ 6 MOD. q0) May Motors, * “Bouse of Bargains.” Olds D A REAI BEAUTY. $100 DOWN. pe rie 6.W heel. If you know auto tor th we ap. FA bs . ASH LAND used car, Priv. party. Van B. i044 N. N WESTERN. db, DAILY 
ADILLA 3 4417 S. HALSTED SLUMBRICK FORD SALES. 1711 W. SSTH. values vou'll Kona the tremen- buyer, or e 0 $4.000. CA orth ee SRG oe B tcc Hag > eg 140 PARLOR | SETS.. a 
6 chrome wheels: Fleetwood body: car FORD—'36 TUDOR, TRUNK COMP., PERF. OOELE ALWAYS KLLS. Pains ce ‘4 125 bedroom, din. ecte,........ 
looks like new: only $975 | pe SOTOS—1937°8 4 DOOR TOURING SE- PP iene uphol], finish, mech. yeoné. siutentent 1132. Aiea ree PNAS it STUDEBAKER—1996 PRESIDENT SEDAN. | PRIVATE PARTY WANTS LIGHT atea Nelson Bros. Open eves.. Sun. 631 
dan me have heaters. radios. All colors new. Real hateain Mh LI bite nn Be mde — . side m waere ham: Equipment includes overdrive. a swell Must be cheap: all cash. Avenue ‘ RUGS AND Fl ND FURN. FROM S 
2247 S. MICHIGAN Witte thor tent anon CLARK MAPLE CHEV. 1038 N. CLARK. La Salle ’34 Sedan, $395 rier, dual horns. dual, ae heater. beautifully toned radio ete. Chis Excellent values! Good 
Bernard & Lee. 102% Chicaro-ay.. Evanston | FORD—1036, RDOR. "Honey A BEAUTY. : ‘ airy taunene bank a” eae ite joe be 8 ee Soe AUTO CREDITS. 3531 N. CLARK-ST. 
’ back guar.| * door de |, Fleetwood. Radio. trunk, au heater. pe e of firm who fave excellen rn ut 3 
adillac ’36 V-12 7 Pass. 5 ance and appearance as pe care. "It is in such clean condition vou will .~ | PARTY SACRIFICING 6 RS. HIGH G 
DODGE 37 $625 5 takes it. rte & ‘Du een. (ne., 1777 Michigan Ave Chevrolet, when orizinal owner received Oftered today 38 CRED| S- -CHRYSLER ROYAL 200 furn. like new. Will separate 
Fleetwood sedan, 4 door, with trunk, radio, | . . Open Sunday. Auth. Ford Dealer, ‘ priced far below pfesent mar it e468 Studebaker Branch, 1836 a t for $ 4s “Clark-Belmont Motors. 3161 | ental rug, $35. Dealer. & agowater . 
$1,275. 4 door touring sedan: equipped with radio Ee MODEL 86 5 PASS. SEDAN: 2345 MICHIGAN-AV. value. Sre it at once and. = wi iGee-ey.. Evanston. Open eves. and Suv- | N. k-st. 25 Oldsmo ile for $25. Otto's = — STORAGE RUGS FURS NIT 
! sees” 8396. day. Rogers Park 121]. ‘Chevrol Kané Storage, 2034 Lineo 


heater. This car will pase for brand new. hardly driven , $446 eo . : ¢ ves., Sun 
2317 S. MICHIGAN 2247 S. MICHIGAN De_Soto-Fiymonth Dir. _620 ARCHER. |/86 LINCOLN-ZEPHYR 87. /1441 w 7oina’ Rh anita pear 18 772! Stude. '37 6 Cyl., 5565 a ats aet zie i oa. Bs Qo. m.| Furniture end russ, agg 2-2, 


| FORD—'37 DE L, FORDOR stig 6 = RADIO, 
: ’ ap eg CHOC M. ~ wn 
dillac Real 37, $1,075: ig 19386 Tour. 4 Door. at ae eee efiok., wake. ol. ait 4 door Mes i dio, spotlight. b autitul ae “hreanwnr ot Mliteraweet 2141, 4 door tour sedan. Many extras. Like new. 1938 C 998 CREDITS PI YMOU : WAGON & HAM ALIN GEG 
reen de vcauoe ae, ae ens FORD—1985 BLA CK. TUDOR SEDAN; ar. Only $ bs CHE uedan: tom PL aay A-T... 9408 8000 LAWRENCE-AV. ‘ Che og Sta Mem Good. | —crabes. antiques: priv. party. Sup. O& 
seit 80 oth | ek it Irv. ik, Nash 280 for . Dea. 2463. ee, Alo yore fine. 48. 


HE SR an | Sew ar“ 1 od eran ate id 
Harborized ° | D. are’ | 95 ther rm OPEN ai Nay | rich : 


apheater, ete 
teed, 8 INCOLN : s.. arbor Motor Co.., vats Cottage Grove. | Also '37 Linc.-% phyr coupe, | . eae in OD COND. att 
LAWDER BROS., eA ALES Pe Week oi STUDERAKER OLR. ioe GARFIELD-BL. * hotors 8 veer fe Broadway. for BRAUT. 1 EAVING BM. URNI- v1 


AnD, GA PARE” [FORD 07 CORY, SPDAN. BADGE. = pape Rese 
} 08s, $58 ; | i ' elu cony, ) a __1890 A Fs rs Ge ge 7OC st 0 er. a ns oa ae 
198 2 DOOR “DODGE 1984 ars Hat 2, Weieht, 1201 W. clark: LOCK he Witt to. oe agit 56 Sedan, $421 Terraplane 37, $595 me stein’ TM nae mattresses AL & , EE 
arren Mo in. _ Sun 


“AT cto on eet Bytes, a a aes Zephyr ‘87 4 Door eee steel, oOen: aa Juxe 4 door tour, sedan. Built-in trank. 
| YOUR BAL, er A SAN. co in | SDN reine beodit tha Eh Al; . Did) Daal, Cale are mn. | “xcs sn ane Sa Reereienes Side, 
usital ear be AGE ooqgaiary : a. HO Ss son a ae bal. 1 DAY D a BARN og JUS 
ESOB. | oF Rolly ria ek CRP a oe, 


OTH. DODGE DLR. 7216 S. JALSTE) Bo big aro | Bae : ==’ | Sedan. | 
~ ‘%, : 4 DF SED. eeree Dealer, 2720 N. : -oe3 é 3 | ele si 


: t ondit d : 7 | idin  coue f. ‘a - jm 
mouth Dir mm | cease e* Sou Slee Brae JACKSON BL. ea cieam sity. Ameke, Shar x, | ie mres ESET wifes, Ba SR 
3 fd ae SHU ass + oe nv m5 | m0 —'S4 P. za mf SE r oe 850 ie Fa gt mat “i So | _kinsie Da ae = rag i: TOR) as cutee aa ae 
¥ ae .N, Hira ; PA : - as if ANDO ‘ M, et ve | dead Mn uf * | ag a0 | - Soe : ‘3F ne DE LA is ij iC ; RES ugs. | Sash or tern Op “eves 

as Nas AND SUNDA TS | dag ab CUETO | Terrapl. Sed., °37, $498 Wit : | Suit, £2 act" SiSrages tbur Milwactee-e 

50C ha pineton, % LINCOLN ZE . 37, Psy | LYM oUTH—1935 4 DOOE . orit ° Lf iz. 5 pass.; ns al ineadée eoeip.: | dual equip. Bids Ai. “ANT a Lise 

4 si tatigt sedan, last 7 made. th =| dan: ear Ret eee me ao | pene ha Ave, Chevrolet, ease ” Wanted. 
RAILER—OVER 19 FT.: Gl 


; , . : 
heater in “| pe Soto? Biati 2 7 

: Dp . : if i 9 ane seer hae os s 

yf : ~T" ‘ : nh 
’ Sr ea 7 eee Sao ‘ai & | 2 ’ > ~ . : , 4 ; « t = 
. at =ay ) . —) ¢ “EC ° 7 f | 7 4 M | 3 : 4 - : Son's 4 * ra 
S <2 a a , A ; ‘ ane “ah . ‘ re "7  . +¥ mF a7 i . - . ~ . 
x - Bisa Ae, 2 j { . 3 ‘ . “ PRB 2y ive as freien HUNG y ‘ : 
- - 7 2 « 
a a 
b : 
ay ‘ 


As AES AN 


4 
‘py mx 


. 
‘ 4“ é oF; 
> -_ * 

ncend Ae Bort Loe -ave 


é voile aha , See eee Ore a = i “ eas son Barn cota aE = ———— ee Sb Soe 
Little Business Men Policies—Uproar Marks Conference in Washington 


A ae 


tm. 


susie 


etn er set 


Pre not fl 


a ee ey | rAssociated Press Wirephoto.}) * oe eee eed Rea 


oe Paul A. Wright, Los Angeles murder defendant, as he rested head on arm and sobbed. on witness: stand yesterday 
_ €ross-examination on shooting of wife and John Kimmel. He broke down completely and a recess was called. (Story! on page I.) 


> . 


a 


9 OE hc QO ay 


wa 
te i Pie P| te at tie 


a 


; {Associated Press Wirephoto.] 


Small business men say it with yells and hand waving at conference in Washington. This isa scene as several tried to 
gain recognition at the same time to make speeches condemning the Roosevelt administration. — (Story on page 1.) | 


mente gee OO ct 


ernst Ra Bites etek |, mt nn =~ 


ee ee ee ee ee 


Ak ms Oe ae IO Oe 


ee en ena 


ae ote 


- { 


' i. Hope Dare, showgirl arrested with Dixie Davis, fugitive Marshal Werner von Blomberg, German war minister who .. Policeman (right) trying to halt A. S. Shaffer of Philadel- A. P. Haake of Chicago, director of furniture group, try- — 
+ brains” of $50,000,000 New York policy racket. is reported to have quit, with bride, the former Erika Gruhn. phia in speech. The hall was almost empty when he finished. ing to shout his speech at Washington conference. 
a . {Murray Korman Photo: From Associated Press,] (Story on page 1.) lacotsume Press Wirephoto.) | (Story. on page 1.) ~ .[Associated Press Wirephoto.] (Story on page 1.) | {Associated Press Wirephoto.] (Story on page 1.) 
: | 4g floor of betta eon se Wai sre to nu King Farouk, Egyptian ruler who yesterday dissolved §=—s« Egyptian pipers and drummers who provided oriental music at the wedding of King Farouk and Fareda, daughter of 
Sy tery: om page 5.) . ee ee | “a Peat apie at marriage on Jan.20. Justice Zulfikar. They were playing in the gardens of the Koubbeh palace in Cairo, where the marriage took place, 
ae a aaee a eel | ee BE aang an iggmmmme LS penn, eee (Story on page 6.) 


Latest 


‘ rs , * s { ; _ 
* > - é “ ss : ” < 
4 . . t ~ 7 Z ; ; * s - ; : * ‘ 
- . % Fees - mA ; x Fé 4 " :f : , - 
: ~ ’ 4 
ah. . ; ’ - , : * * & 3 “ r ’ " tes, 6 . . Fy * 
Sg : M5 : ¥ an : 4; , ot : a e 
i. ie : = : ' , i ‘ . : “i ° Mi 3 
oh - i, , a ’ 


ee Yee