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Boston Boom at i : 


By Frederick Wf. Guidry - ~~ - 
Staff Writer of The Christian’Science Monitor 


Forecasts that 1956 wil! be one 
of the best years ever for 
Greater Boston business are be- 


ing coupled with observations 
that things could be even better, 
i ews 
The “ifs” suggested by promi- 
nent business leaders as possible 
barriers to maximum prosperity 
are mostly in the fields of tran- 
portation, housing, salesman- 
ship, and taxation. 

Both are glowing forecasts 
and the words of warning were 
sounded in connection with the 
first annual business forecast 
seminar.. sponsored by the 
Greater Boston Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Summing up # panel's con- 
si opinions, Dr. Alfred -C. 
Neal, a ‘vice-president of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Bos- 
ton. noted that “there is no dis- 
sent from the view that the level 
of business in the months ahead 
promises to be good.” 

But is business in Boston ond 
the surrounding communities 
as good as it should be? 


Boston’s Needs Outlined 

Dr, Neal said there is 
siderable feeling” among panel- 
ists of the serhihar that “while 
business good and 
promises to continue to be good 
in Boston, it might be better.... 

“Boston needs to better de- 
velop its port business and to 
work out its rail transportation 
problems, particularly as they 
apply to the Metropolitan Tran- 
sit Authority and commuter 
service. 

“Boston needs to attract more 
tourist business and to increase 
the facilities available here for 
tourists, particularly by build- 
ing an adequate convention 
hall. 

“Boston ‘néeds new cormprier- 
cial, industrial, and housing 
construction. Boston needs more 
industrial employment... . 

“Perhaps the key to meeting 
most of these needs,” Dr. Neal 
continued. “lies in Boston's 
fiscal problems. Boston needs 
less municipal expense and a 
new source of tax income.” 


“con- 


has been 


Participants Listed 


Participants in the seminar 
included: Ernest Henderson, 
president of the Sheraton Cor- 
poration of America; William D. 
Ireland, president of the Second 
Bank-State Street Trust Com- 
pany; Edward R. Mitton, presi- 
dentof Jordan Marsh Company; 
Thomas H. Carens, vice-presi- 
dent of Company; 
Joseph Kaplan, president of the 
Colonial Tanning Company: 
Gerald W. Blakeley Jr.. vice- 
president of Cabot; Cabot & 
Forbes: and Loyd J. Kiernan, 


Farm Polit 


Washington 
This administration is not pro- 
posing anything in the nature of 
the killing of little pigs, but in 


ithe “soil bank” idea it is advo- 


cating that farmers be paid for 
not producing 

It i§f proposing to spend an 
estimated $1.000.000.000 over a 
10-year period to encourage 
farmers to stop producing s0 
much wheat, cotton, and corn 

There is no doubt that the 
idea is completely abhorrent to 
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra 
Taft Benson. But it is equally 
obvious that he has little choice 
in the matter. His opponents 
may not have succeeded in 
freezing him out of the Presi- 
dent’s Cabinet, but they have 
enforced the “politics first” pol- 
icy as far as the farm program 
is concerned. 

What is proposed fn the soil 
bank is the retirement of land 
from production — the govern- 
ment paying the farmer to take 
s0 many acres out of the surplus 
crops. 


ro 


executive vice-president of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Donald J. Hurley 
president, said that t 
was factual evidence that | 
Greater Boston is looking for- | 
ward to “a sound, prosperous 
year of growth in 1956.” 

Several of the panelists limited 
théir boom forecasts to the first 
half of 1956, without expressly 
casting doubts on what might 
be expected to happen toward 
the end of the year. 


Big Railroad Year 


Mr. Kiernan said the rail- 
roads have just finished a good | 
year from the standpoint of | 
traffic volume, though it was not | 
quite up to 1953. He said 
traffic and revenues in the cur- | 
rent quarter are rurming ahead | 
of the same periods in 1953 and | 
1954 


: 
“This encourages us to ex: | 
pect continued favorable results | 
in 1956,” he said. 

Electric utilities in Greater | 
Boston will spend about 40 mil-| 
lion dollars in 1956 in expanding | 
their generating, transmission, | 
distribution, and supply serv-| 
ices, Mr. Carens said. This is| 
the largest capital program for | 
the electrical industry in any 
one year, he added. ) 

He said plans now on the 
drawing boards call for total 
expenditures by the area’s elec- | 
tric utilities of some 200 million 
dollars by 1960. ) 

Mr. Mitton, projecting the re- 
tailing business into the first six | 
months of 1956, foresaw “a/| 
period of good business and | 
good job opportunities.” How-/| 
ever, he said several notes of | 
caution should be sounded. 


New Auditorium Urged 
The year 1956 “should prove 
another: good year” for the shoe’ 
and leather business, Mr. Kap- 
lan said. “This will certainly 
beetrue for the first six months, | 
based on firm orders already 
booked.” 
He said 


production of foot- | 
wear “will at least equal and 
may even be slightly greater | 
than all-time peak figures.” 

Mr. Blakeley said pressure is 
mounting for new industrial | 
facilities and for office and com- 
mercial construction in Greater 
Boston. “The barrier to satisfy- 
ing this demand is well-known 
and has been talked about with 
great awe, but it is a man-made 
situation and as such can be! 
changed. 

“We must—and we have no | 
choice—completely revamp our | 
present state tax structure, in- 
cluding methods of distribution 
of collected revenue, and find 
a new source of revenue,” he 
said. 


—y 


| 


Top administration officials 


voted 


Informants said the big new 


program, partly 
in answer te the Seviet Union's tougher anti- 
policies, would We divided 


drafting a stepped-up foreign aid request te 
Congress of nearty $5,000,000,000 
jaant ceasion 


Sees “Ss Rillion Foreign Aid Looms 


By the Associated Press 


Washington Economic Aid: Some $1,900,000,000, about 


are reported 


for next year, 


Congress approved 
present fiscal year which began last July 1. 


than this year’s appropria- 


Gordon N. Converse, Staff Photographer 


Christmas Splendor Overspreads Needham Center Maple Tree 


By Josephine Ripley 


ics. Hedges Benson and ‘Soil Bank’ Plan. 


Staff’ Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Some of the money Will go 
toward the cost of conversion, 
Some of it will go in cash pay- 
ments — thus helping to boost 
farm income. The Farm Bureau 
federation has proposed that 
payment might be cut-rate grain 
from the government. In other 
words, the government would 
sell back to the farmer at a low 
price the grain it has purchased 
from him at the support price. 
Thus, it would pay him tWice 
for the commodity. : 

No one really knows at this 
moment how much it will cost 
the American taxpayer to foot 
such a bill. Estimates say it 
might cost $500,000,000 for the 
first 18 months, and then on into 
the billions as time goés on— 
depending on the length of the 
program. 

But as in the case of price 
support, once such a program 
has been initiated and cash be- 
gins flowing to the farmer, it is 


* 


hard to take it away—particu- 
larly for politicians, 

Not that the idea in itself is 
impractical, It obvious that 
farmers are putting into produc- 
tion land that should be turned 
to conservation. at least for a 
time. 


is 


But paying the farmer to do 
what he should 
will be hard to explain 
voters. Yet in any farm emer- 
gency. the economic welfare of 
the’ whole country is involved, 
so essential is food production 
to the nation and so closely 
linked is farm prosperity to all 
prosperity. 

The American 
Federation, 


ODVIOUSILYS cao 


. tte, 
i.) city 


Farm Bureau 
representing more 


than 1,500,000 farmers in its 
membership, and one of the 
most conservative of the three 
organizations, has just voted for 
the soil bank plan. 

In fact, it has been proposing 
just such a plan for a number 
of vears 

There 


adaministr 


doubt that the 
tion has been forced 
to adopt it because of election- 
year uncertainties due in large 
measure to the continued slump 
in farm income. It will stick to 
its guns on the practicability of 
flexible price supports, however, 
as compared to the Democratic- 
proposed return to a rigid 90 
per cent level. | 

The government algeady has 


is no 


Jerusalem 

The current transformation 
| in the political line-up of Middle 
n countries is being fol- 
|\lowed oy the Israelis with grow- 
ling apprehension. 

| Three recent developments in 
ithis area—all of them strength- 
| ening Israel's feeling of isolation 
—are subjects of close concern 
here. They are: 

1. The unexpected growth of 
the Baghdad pact in the wake of 
powerful Czechoslovak arms aid 
to Egypt. Started originally as a 
bilateral military arrangement 
between Turkey and Iraq, this 
alliance has developed -imto a 
fivé-power bloc extending to 
Iran, Pakistan, and Britain. 
|.’ 2. This week’s change of 
i\government, in the Hashemite 
|Kingdom of Jordan, encourag- 
i\ing elements in favor of that 
|country’s adhesion to the Bagh- 
\dad pact. 

The dismissal of the Arab Le- 
gion’s pro-Egyptian deputy com- 
mander, Maj.-Gen. Ahmed 
Sidki el Jundi, was followed by 
the resignation of Premier Said 
el Mufti and the dropping of 
four Palestinian Arab ministers 
ggg Jordan’s participation 
in the Baghdad treaty, 

The way has thus been cleared 
for the new Premier, Haza el 
Majali, to yield to British advice 
and try to make Jordan the 
sixth member of the Baghdad 


| Eastern 


‘| alliance. 


Asswan Project Decried 
3. The United States Govern- 
ment’s apparent willingness to 
help Egypt build the Asswan 
Dam—an economic project of 
unprecedented scale in this area. 
The Israelis believe that unless 
this is made conditional on real 


,arms 


more than $7,.000,000,000 tied up 
in price-support operations—not 
all money down the drain, to be 
sure, since,some of these com- 
modities will be resold. 
losses in the conduct of the 
program run higher and higher. 

Yet despite tiis tremendous 
output to keep farm prices and 


farm income up, they are still | 


on the skids. Republican poli- 
ticilans are clamoring for a s0- 
lution. 

The soil-bank plan is seen as 
a quick way of pulling land out 
of production and giving farm- 
ers a hunk of cash to bolster in- 
come at the same time. It is 
considered a relatively short- 
term operation, they theory be- 
ing that as production is cut 
back surpluses will be liqui- 


Israel Sees Mideast. Web 


By Francis Ofner 


peace with Israel, this project 
will complement rather than 
counteract the substantial arms 
shipments which Egypt is con- 
tinuing to receive from the So- 
viet bloc. 

Although 
trend of events 
States would seem to mark a 
strengthening of the West's 
standing in the area, the Israelis 
insist that their country is the 
sole party harmed by it. The So- 
viet Union's position, they stress, 
remains unaffected. 

Officials here emphasize that 
the purpose to be served by 
aid to Arab countries 
should be judged not by Wash- 
ington and London spokesmen 
but by statements of Arab lead- 
ers, who repeatedly have gone 
on record as intending to wipe 
israel off the map. 


of it the 
the Arab 


face 
in 


on 


Background Stressed 

It is against this wider back- 
ground that the Israelis defend 
the recent local action against 
Syrian gun positions which they 
say had been harrassing Israeli 
fishermen on the Sea of Galilee. 
Although partly critical of the 
heavy scale of the Dec. 12 raid, 
public opinion here largely sup- 
ports Premier David Ben Gu- 
rion’s policy of returning with 
a heavy hand and blows hurled 
at Israel from across its 
frontiers. 

The problem of border rela- 
tions with Syria goes far be- 
yond clashes over fishing boats. 
In the past, Syria repeatedly has 
challenged Israeli sovereignty 
over a narrow strip east of the 

of the Jor- 
dan River above it —* a strip 


ber 17, 1955 


dated. \ 
\_ 
\ 
. 


Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


which until 1948 formed part of 
the Palesiine mandate. 
A bitter politica] conflict, rag- 


ing Since 1953 over Israel's right | 


to draw on Jordan River waters 
for its power and irrigation 
projects, has also contributed to 


the strain on relations between 


the two countries. 


Prisoner Swap Sought 
Apart from reports of fre- 
quent shooting at Ysraeli border 


farmers, other landmarks along | 


this troubled road include the 
arrest of five Israeli soldiers on 
Syrian territory. One of these, 
the Israelis say, committed sui- 


cide after torture. The rest have | 


been held in Damascus .more 
than a year despite a United 


Nations ruling calling for their 


repatriation. 


In am attempt to effect re- | 


lease of these men, five Syrian 
soldiers were recently abducted 
from their border positions by 
an Israeliunit, and these have 
since been joiried*~ by another 
30 Syrians captured in the raid 
of Dec, 12. Negotiations for ex- 
change of prisoners now have 
started through the United Na- 
tions truce supervision organ- 
ization. , 

While armed action around 
Sea of Galilee has for the mo- 
ment pinpointed attention to 
the long-standing conflict with 
Syria in the north, it is from 
the Egyptian border and the 
Baghdad pact developments that 
the Israelis say they expect the 
main t. 


Syria asks sanctions 
against Israel: Page 5. 


But 


tries. 


Asia UN 
U.S..Grip Seen 


Ek ee ee 


Status 


» By William R. Frye 


United Nations Correspondent of The Christian Science 


(Grows; 
eriled _ 


Monitor 
United Nations, N.Y. 


An important increase in Asian influence and other fundamental changes: in the United 
Nations are expected to result from the increase in UN membership from 60 to 76 coun- 


These changes will not become fully apparent until the- UN General Assembly recon- 


venes for its llth session next year. 


e current Assembly is in its final stages. 


The world organization, however, failed to adjourn as scheduled late Bec, 16. It became 
bogged down in an unprecedented effort to settle a key election—the one to the Security 
Council—by drawing lots. Delegates rejected this*desperation solution to a three-month 
deadlock and recessed to try again by more normal means Dec. 18. 


Rightly or wrongly, the United States is blamed by many for this 


deadlock. The United 


States has sought to elect the Philippines to a Council seat which others feel belongs right- 


fully to Europe. 
Neither side has been able 


to muster 


—_ ee 


Soviets Ride ‘Fide 


That Buffets U.S. 


By Joseph C, Harsch 
Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Washington 

This week, more clearly than 
before, one could see the rip 
tide of old and new movements 
'in the world. 
|. And so far, Moscow's di- 
| plomacy appeared to be steer- 
‘ing more expertly than Wash- 
ington’s through the troubled 
| waters. 

One tide carried 16 new 
members into the United Na- 
tions. Of these, four were 5So- 
viet satellites, Jour were far 
West in the world political 
spectrum, and the other eight 
| occupy varying points of middle 
| position. 
| Clearly, the overwhelming 
majority of countries in the 
world Wélcomed this “package 
| deal.” which presumes the po- 
| tential coexistence of all kinds 
of countries in the world: 
| which recognizes no moral dis- 
i tinction between Albania and 
| Spain, or Romania and Italy: 
'which assumes that the shape 
of the world is more or less 
fixed in its present patterns; 
|and which expects, and very 
soon, to bring Communist China 
also into the family of nations. 


Nationalist China Resists 


The tide also carried the un- 
‘compromising figure. of Na- 
| tionalist China, denouncing all 
| that was happening, doing its 
| utmost to prevent it from hap- 
| pening, demanding, in effect, 
ithe nations continue active re- 
sistance to the Communist di- 
plomacy. 

Moscow was riding the tide. 
| It manipulated the “package 
deal” in the UN. 

It played the host, expertly if 
| hypocritically, to Spain and the 
‘Irish Republic, Portugal and 
Italy. 
cn 
| States 
struct 
wanted. . , 

Its two much-traveled top 
leaders, Premier Nikolai A. 
Bulganin and Nikita S. Khrush- 
chév, First Secretary of the So- 
viet Communist Party, headed 
triumphantly for home from 
South Asia. They had a joint 
Indian-Soviet communiqué in 
their pocket which made it 
sound as though Moscow, not 
the West, was the true friend 
of India. 

Washington was not riding 
any tide. It was not willing to 
ride with Nationalist China. 
Nor was it willing to cut loose 
and ride the tide in competition 
with Moscow. 


U.S. Zigs and Zags 

It had “zigged and zagged” 
(to borrow a phrase from United 
| States Secretary of State John 
|Foster Dulles and a different 
context) through the UN debate 
until the New York Herald 
Tribune wrote editorially that 
“the United States has been out- 
maneuvered, outplayed, and left 
in a most unhappy position.” 

At the end, Japan, the country 
Washington most wantéd to get 
into the UN, was left outside, 
and many of its citizens fairly 
or unfairly were blaming Wash- 
ington, not Moscow, for the 
Moscow veto which had kept 
it out. 

Others felt the 
Times, of London, 
| pro-American, said: 

“There is no denying that 
Japan would be a member of 
the United Nations today had 


maneuvered the 
into appearing 
what the 


United 
to ob- 
majority 


same. The 
sedate and 


Washington been able to control 
its most fractious ally.” 

The Manchester Guardian 
added: 

“The United States has suf- 
fered an unmitigated diplomatic 
defeat in its unwavering support 
of Chiang Kai-shek.” 


Status Quo Supported 

Behind it all lies the follow- 
ing: 

l. For better or for worse, 
wisely or unwisely, there exists 
in the world today a profound 
desire to see the existing shape 
of the world accepted. 

2. Not all countries which 
feel this desire are satisfied 
with the way things are, but 
they prefer to accept the world 


Pattern 
Of Diplomacy 


as it is rather than experience 
the strains and danger and costs 
of further efforts to change 
them. They prefer the status 
quo to a resumption of the “cold 
war.” 

3. Moscow 
enormous 


the 
this 


recognizes 
ularity of 


point of view"and has associated | 


its diplomacy with it. The pose 
may be false, and massively ’*de- 
ceitful, but it is also popular. 

4. Nationalist China’s inter- 
ests are bound up with a re- 
sumption of the “cold war,” not 
with an acceptance of the status 
quo, 

5. The United States cannot 
join the popular side without 
either cutting loose from Na- 
tionalist China or inducing “its 
most fractious ally” to accept 

“the trend of the times and be 
quiet. 

6.. Washington has not yet 
been able to choose between the 
popular side in the world and 
Nationalist China. 


Indecision Criticized 
It was the indecision of Wash- 
ington which paved the way for 


week and gave to Moscow the 
opportunity to pose as leader of 
the popular cause. 

* Events were rapidly forcing 
Washington toward @ decision 
which Mr. Dulles had profound- 
ly hoped would lie dormant 
until after the 1956 elections. 
The UN had agreed last year to 
a moratorium on the question of 
admission of Communist China 
until the fall of 1956. 

The moratorium was jeopar- 
dized by the final willingness of 
Nationalist China to block the 
“package deal,” and even more 
by the inability of Washington 
to keep Nationalist China from 
trying to thwart the will of the 
UN majority. 

The inclination was growing 
in the UN to be done with the 
business, to put Nationalist 
China off the Security Council, 
and to bring Communist China 
into membership. 

This is what the UN majority 
believes must be done before 
the acceptance of the status quo 
is complete. All those who. want 
the 
want Communist. China accept- 
ed as a recognized and partici- 


pating member of the family of | 


nations. This includes the closest 
and most loyal friends 
United States has in the world 
—Canada and Britain. 


Should the United States ac- | 


cept, or resist, the tide? This 
week it was not doing either. 


The World’s Day 


Americas: Argentine Police Report Plot Foiled 


Police said today they had foiled 


'Washington: Aid Offer on Nilé Dam Expected 


a conspiracy against the govern- 


ment of Gen. Pedro Aramburu with the arrest of 500 alleged 
plotters. The arrests were made on a ceuntry estate near La 
Plata, capital of Buenos Aires Province, the police said. 


The State Department was expected to announce today a joint 


» American-British pro 
River dam which the U.S.S.R. 


Europe: Ex-Chief of 


for his part in the murder of 


deducted from his sentence. 


terday, 


al to help Egypt finance the Nile 


has offered to help build. 


Nazi Camp Sentenced 


Former Nazi concentration camp commander Paul Werner Hoppe 
was sentenced to five years and three months at hard labor 


several hundred camp inmates, 


mostly European Jews. Time spent in pretrial detention will be 


Asia: Peking Says Guns Bag 2 Nationalist Planes 


Peking Radio claimed that Communist antiaircraft fire brought 
down two National Chinese planes 


north of Matsu Island yes- 


 Wantnan redebetones: ©: 


artly Cloudy Sanday (Pg. 2) 


Art, Music, Theater: Pages 6, 7, Radio, TV, FM: Page 15 


status quo accepted now | 


the | 


the necessary two-thirds majority, and neither side 


has been willing to give in, 
‘No fewer then 35 ballots 
have been cast. . 

The note on which the As- 
sembly is closing is in some 
ways typical) of the. session. 
There has beep a distinct trend 
this year away from American 
leadership. 

To call the session a “revolt” 
against the United States would 
be overdramatizing what hap- 
| pened; but on nearly every ma- 
‘jor issue the desires of the 
American delegation have car- 
ried less weight, and have had 
to be modified more drastically 
than before. 

There are many indications 
that this trend will continue and 
|\intensify in 1956 in the new 
| 76-nation Assembly. The 1956 
|Assembly may well begin the 
eclipse of both Europe and 
North America and the rise of 
Asia, Africa, and the Middle 
East—perhaps allied with part 
or all of Latin America—in & 
,;movement of underdeveloped 
‘peoples determined to establish 
their place in the sun, 


Firm Leadership Vital 

Those who believe they see 
the first. signs..of such a movee 
| ment are convificed that the 
United States can regain its 
‘position of preeminence in the 
UN only by coming forward 
more clearly and consistently as 
a practical champion of the 
poverty-ridden, assistance-hun- 
gry, anticolonial nations. 

Such a step seems highly ane 
likely in view of the need to 
preserve the United States’ alli+- 
ances with ‘colony-owning pow- 
(ers and the reluctance of the 


|_American Congress to vote any 
increase in economic aid, least 
of all any increase in economic 
aid through the UN, 

A second major trend in the 
UN, given impetus by the ad- 
mission of new countries 
leads toward universality 
away from selectivity. 


Focus on China Issue 
».. The.“package deal” by which 
the 16 were admitted was, in ef- 
fect, a repeal of Aritcle 4 of the 
Charter, the article which has 
been the basis of the selectivity 
idea. This Charter passage pro<- 
vides that UN members must 
be “peace-loving.” : 
Technically, this fact has no 


: relevance to Chinese representas 
the Soviet coup in the UN this| 


tion. But in practice, it is likely 
to increase sentiment for a 
“realistic” settlement of that 
' problem also. If the UN is to be 
_universal—that is, if it is to re- 
flect the world as it is—main- 
land China would have to be 
seated. 

Mainland’ China, 
governing Africa, 
many, Korea, Vietnam, and 
Switzerland are virtually the 
only political entities of signifi- 
cance not directly represented 
in the UN. Together, however, 
they comprise nearly 40 per cent 
of the world’s population. Switze 
\erland does not wish repre- 
sentation, 


New Voting Blocs Loom 
One of the principal] tasks of 
the new Assembly will be to exe 
pand the Security Council from 
its present 11 members to 13 
or 15. The number 11 was se- 
lected on the basis of a 55- 
nation UN. Of the additional 
Ceuncil.members,-at-least-.one 
and probably two are expected 
to be from Asia. Indeed, India 
would like a permanent seat. 
Of the 16 countries admitted 
Dec. 14, four are Communist 
| satellites. The Soviet bloc thus 
| becomes nine in number. Alone, 
| this bloc is of no particular sig- 


non-selfe- 
Japan, Ger- 


| nificance in a 76-nation Ass®m- 
bly. 

The Arab-Asian bloc, howe 
ever, which now numbers 23, 
would control more than one- 
third of the votes if joined by 
the Soviet bloc. Important de- 


cisions must be taken by-two- 
thirds majorities. 

The temptation for the Arab- 
Asians to seek the cooperation 
of Moscow—which could be had 
(for the asking—would be great, 
and might be irresistible if the 
'apparent trend toward estrange- 
ment from the United States 
continues. Indeed, Moscow’s co- 
operation may be thrust upon 
the Arab-Asians, | 


Test of U.S. Methods 
The United States, together 
‘with 20 Latin-American re- 
| publics, previously controlled 
one-third of the Assembly. In 
order to continue this control, 
it will be necessary to hold the 
loyalty of all members of this 


bloc and find five more 
a task 


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US Lead 


~ At World 


"ay « Shap Wruer of Phe Christin Betonee Montior 


Soviets and the satellite nations 


head-on, winning hands down,” 

in the opinion of Roy F. Wil- 

, director of the Office of 

frfternational Trade Fairs of the 

~~ --tnited-States~ Department. of 
Commerce. , 

However, in one instance in 
the fair at New Dethi, India— 
the Soviets eclipsed the United 
States in the design, architec- 
ture, lighting, and showmanship 
they displayed—“Ddut never in 
the quality or variety of their 
goods. We outdid the Soviet and 
the nations in its orbit by 14 to 1 


in crowd participation.” 
Mr. 


sociated Industries of Massachu- 


the effectiveness of the Ameri- | 


can International Trade Fair 
Program. 
ur exhibits, which featured 

live television programs, with 
some in color. and with acti- 
vated 
held the interest of the millions 
of people who visited them for 
much lenger periods than the 
exhPbits shown in other national 
pavilions,” Mr. Williams said. 
‘Atoms for Peace’ 
Williams’ two-month visit 
international fairs took 
Italy, Egypt, Ethiopia, 

India, Thailand, Cam- 
bodia, Japan,. and to the first 
fair in which the United States 
participated in Colombia. 

“In Addis Ababa, interest in 
the American exhibit the 
trade fair was so intense that 
on several occasions it was 
necessary to ask the police to 
clear the place—a far different 
experience from many exhibits 
where it is frequently a prob- 
lem to stir up interest,” 
Williams said 

Among the more popular in- 
dustrial items displayed by the 
Americans were the “atoms for 
peace” 


Mr. 
at the 
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Pakistan, 


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ohn Ne Peace 


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from Duluth, Minn., the 


the Soviets and satellite nations, 


ihe said. 


Ranch House Shown 


Williams, who is also ex- | 
ecutive vice-president of the As- | 


apd..animated displays, | 


Mr. | 


/United States, 
| hand, 


éxhibits, the aviation and | 


showed great interest, too, 


Exhibits .... 


free in some of the warmer 
countries, were a pleasant at- 


| 
| 


Women visitors to the fairs | 
in | 


American styles shown by a 
setts, has just returned from a/“Maid of Cotton” model spon- | 


27,000-mile global tour, the Ob-| .oreq by the Cotton Council of 
jective of which was to gauge | america. 


It was found that the Amer- | 


ican home—a typical ranch- 


i; « 


house type of dwelling in the | 
$12,000 to $15,000 class—drew | 


greater attention than some of 
the more elaborate, yet utterly 


nontypical, hornes shown by the ; 


Soviets. 
“At one place, we had 70,000 
loaves of bread, baked outside 


the fair; distributed to the vis- | 


,itors who quickly noticed the 


white 
Mr. 


higher quality of our 
wheat—it was a sensation,” 
Williams said, adding: 

“The Russians, 
had nothing either new or un- 
usual. They showed many over- 
sized machine tools, conveyor 
belts which made little impres- 
sion, and mockups of agricul- 
tural machinery, which while 
impressive by their size, were 
obviously not intended for ac- 
tual use. Such displays failed to 
attract any great attention.” 

“On the whole,” he said, “the > 
Russians, extending their prop- 
aganda arm, showed things | 
which emphasized the false 
prosperity of the country. The 
on 
triés to be typical, and 
takes care not to overstress its 
luxuries. 


"True American Story’ 


by contrast, | 


the other Pp 


— i. 
young 4-H “American Dairy | 
— Miss Ruth Peterson 
ice. 
cream proved more popular | 
than any of the silks, shoes, 
and wines and liquors shown by | 


involving offenses committed by one American 
against another and those arising out of acts 


i 
‘ 


Denying reports of widespread injustices, 
Mr. Sprague said one of the concerns of United 
States commanders in foreign countries has 
been that “the sentences tmposed abroad in 
some cases have been too light.” 


Mr. Sprague addressed the graduating class 
the N 


i 


t 


i 


: 


release through a habeas corpus action in civil 
court. | 
Three turncoat prisoners of war who first 


stay with the Reds, had been given dishonor- 
able discharges. 

Mr. Sprague said a recent decision in Dist- 
trict of Columbia District Court is more seri- 
ous than the one on ex-servicemen. The Wash- 
ington court held unconstitutional a provision 
of the Uniform Code of Military Justice giving 
military courts jurisdiction over dependents of 
servicemen overseas. 

Mr. Sprague said if this ruling is upheld it 
will thdermine the historical authority of the 
military over civilian employees accompany- 
ing military forces abroad. He said the De- 
fense Department “will make every effort” to 
get the decision overturned. 


Savings on 


: 
a te 


Bond Issue 


Flood Fund Held Adequate 


By Edgar M. Mills 
New England Political Corr-soondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 

Prospects are good that Mas- 
sachusetts will not have to 
spend all that $55,000,000 voted 
to finance flood damage repairs 
and local tax aid necessitated by 
1955 floods. 

A highly respected state fiscal 
xpert disclosed this situation 
after a study of costs already | 
incurred under the bond-issue 


'program and those anticipated. 


' 
: 


How extensive the savings 


“Our object was to catch the | Will be cannot be accurately de- 


rt 
merican story. 

“People would stand in long 
queues, waiting for hours, to 
see some of our exhibits. And 
then thhey would come around 
-— mn and again. They seemed 

show the most interest in 
exhibits which were either ani- 
mated or lighted in such a way 


¥ as to express action.” 


One great lesson that was 
learned, he said, was the ap- 
pointment of young men and 
women in India, dressed in red, 
oo and blue to serve as 
guides Speaking the language 
of the people, they were able to | 
fen onstrate things where some 

the other nations failed be- 
cause it was not possible to ex- 

in the displays in the native 
comand 


——- 


Christmas Tree 


Set for Hub Birds 


it’s. tree-trimming 
the birds again. 
On Wednesday, Dec. 21, Camp 


=p for nose of determining how best 


$3,000,000 will not have 


' 


Fire Girls and members of the | 


Massachusetts Audubon So- 
ciety’s teaching staff will trim 
4 tree in Boston Common for 
birds stopping over for.the holi- 
days. 

The birds’ Christmas tree will | 
| be hung with strings of popcorn 
and cranberries. Pine cones and | 
orange halves will be filled with 
peanut butter and suet. 

The public is invited to attend 
the ceremonies at 3 p.m. near 
the large lighted tree located at 
the corner of Boylston and Tre- 


mont Streets. 


= P=(y 


= nae \ 


< 


you \ cee \ ue | coe coe \ mae aos 
‘° 


--h-T 


. or ee | eee eee oe 
a —— ae 


~ \= r\« as le te »\s > \s 


OPEN MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY 
OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY 


“it 8:30 FP. M, 


BUDGET 


with liberal terms 


TOO OOOO OOOO OO ————— — eeeerl leer 


12,000 $@; YARDS OF ALL WOOL, AMERICAN MADE 
RUG OR WALL TO WALL SIZES 


AMERICAN ORIENTAL 9 x 12’, 


BROADLOOM 


BROADLOOM CONTRACTS SOLICITED 
Brooks, Gill’s Special Hartford Saxony Sereband 
With \4 century Guarantee 


‘amortization costs will 


- oe 


992 w 


AT ALL 
TIMES 


Ist FLOOR—ALL PERSIAN ORIENTALS 
2nd FLOOR—ALL WOOL BROADLOOMS by LEADING MILLS 
3rd FLOOR—ALL ANTIQUE AND SEMI-ANTIQUE RUGS 


4 


46 + or 4 ite fe te 
) ft eeiee S iinet ft YS pa 


illions..and. tel). them. the. true | termined 


| Means said 
| does not mean the state’s bonds 


' was sold in the open market, he 
| said, is evidence of the extreme- 


as yet. However, this 
same expert. points out that of 
the $12,000,000 bend 
thorized to finance 1954 hurri- | 
cane damage repairs, at least | 
to be 
issued. If the same percentage 
were to hold on the $55,000,000 
bond issues authorized for flood 
damage repairs, about $14,000,- 


to be issued. The interest sav- 
ings alone to the commonwealth | 
would be substantia! 

With the direct state debt | 
now at a record $532.686.045 
level and $333.205.377 
bonds authorized but not 
issued. the condition of 
state debt and its pact on 
future finances of the state is 
under close scrutiny at 
levels. 

Situation Examined 

Governor Herter’s unofficial 
debt management committee, 
composed of experts outside the 
government, is deep in a study 
of the whole debt for the pur- 


bes 


to handle it. 

House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee experts are examining 
the situation minutely in prep- 


aration for the 1956 legisiative 


S@€8310Nn. 
Annual cost of debt amortiza- 
tion is mounting spectacularly 


TY he Text fiscal” year, starting” 
i July 1, 


1956. General fund debt 
retirement costs, those financed 
by general taxes, will be up $6,- 
600,000 to a total of more than 
$26,000,000, 

Highway fund debt amortiza- 
tion will skyrocket $9,000,000 
in the same period, to near!) 
$28.000.,000. However, this cost 
is covered by earmarked gaso- 
line taxes 

Highway fund bonds, issued 
and authorized but unissued, 
account for $512,326,422 out of 
the over-all $856,891,422 total. 

For the next fiscal year debt 


to $54,000,000, a record high 
But the annual costs are due to 
go substantially higher until 
they level off avout 1960, under 
the present program. 


Bond Rating Drops 


Size of the state debt has al- 
ready resulted in the state's loss 
of its Triple A rating on its 
bonds, It has dropped to Double 
A, with only nine states still in 
the Triple A class 

However, a staff expert on the 
House Committee on Ways and 
loss of the rating 


are not excellent. The speed 
with which the latest state bond 


: [retirement costs. 


| mated that 


; 
meue BU- ; 


| line tax to provide revenue for 


/ now 
| Some persons 


000 of the bonds would not have | in additional! 


more | 
yet | 
the | 
the : 


several | 


amount? 


bond payments under the ac- 
celerated road program, the 
gasoline tax has already been 


| However, the interest rate of | 
2.3 per cent being paid on the 
bonds—relatively high compared : 
to previous bond issues in re- | increased 2 cents a gallon, with 
cent years—has caused some re- | the revenue earmarked for bond 
Lassessing of the future effect | amortization. ; 

of bond payments. Among the| However, the size of a new 
$159,000,000 joint issue was $83,- | highway bond issue which could 
| 000,000 in highway bonds. be. floated without new tax rev- 
| Interest Ri enue will be governed by several 
| mteres ses ‘factors. One major factor is 
The higher interest rate, of | how much federal highway aid 
| course, ups the annual debt-| wil) be available in immediate 
Thus, whereas | future years, beginning with the 
Governor Herter and his fiscal 1957 fiscal year opening July 1, 
experts earlier this year esti- | 1957. 
$125,000,000 addi- 
tional in° Trew highway bonds | 
could be authorized for continu- | 
_ation of the road program with- | 
‘out need of increasing the gaso- 


‘tion: a policy has been adopted 
whereby the amount ef federal 
aid received is used to reduce 
the amount of borrowing to be 


‘future’ dedt payments, the tota! 
would be lower. 

now estimate 
than $75,000,000 | 
bonds could be; 


issue. Thus, 
issue of $150,000,000 was 
thorized by the 1954 Legislature 
less than $100.000.000 of the to- 
tal will actually be issued be- 


ithat no more 


Under the Herter administra-| . 


| prove his point, 


nade under an authorized bond | 
while a road bond | 
au- | 


authorized without requiring aj cause of the application of fed-| 


gasoline tax boost. To finance (eral aid payments. 


re 
. 


lk retechmat HitsCas Boost 


= OE SEY OR BA Bee roreca aa TR ie Oe Cae —————— 


2 ROEM ARAB, 


~~ dhe Rwerett M. BA 100: 929: 


Ste? Wrater of The Christian Science Monitor 


The Massachusetts gasoline price-fixing law 
which went into effect this week “is a scheme 
under which thousands of Bay State motorists 
are being made the goats to guarantee profits 
for a few small dealers.” 

“The law fails in its purpose. It was passed 
in an effort to end gasoline price wars. It Gots 


* dust the opposite; it invites price wars.” 


“Such flagrant abuse of, and discrimination 
against, thousands of motorists in favor of a 
féw dealers must be stopped!” 


These strongly worded statements, issued to 
the press this week by Robert S. 
manager..of the Massachusetts Division. 
American Automobile Association, are typical 
of the intense, hard-hitting campaign which he 
is currently conducting against the new law. 
And Mr. Kreischmar’s statements, of coursé, 
have not gone unchallenged by those gasoline 
dealers who believe the law to be valid and 
necessary. 


‘Profit Padding’ Law 


The vigor with which Mr. Kretschmar has 
pursued his objective has made the gasoline 
price boost a major issue in Massachusetts this 
week. ° 

However, this is not the only recent incident 
in which Mr. Kretschmar has tried to aid the 
motorist. Obviously, as head of the Triple-A, 
that is his business. And where he .is able to 
that naturally Dine more 
business to his organization. 

“Bob” Kretschmar, is now demanding repeal 
of what he calls a “profit padding” law. The 
Triple-A, he says, “will underwrite legal 
charges and carry a test case to the Supreme 
Court, if necessary, to determine the constitu- 
tionality of the gasoline price-fixing law as 
now on the hooks.” 


He points out that provisions of the law 
permit dealers to include “gifts or premiums or 
other valuable considerations passing from the 


Gordon N. Converse, Staff Photographer 


Robert S. Kretschmar 


a dealer might circumvent the law mere 


a rebate, which would price to 
that charged before the price 

“There are several unanswered | 
about this law which make ‘the’ mic . 
more for his gasoline than many of the dea 
themselves think is necessary,” he added. 
he intends to find the answers. 

Born in Pennsylvania, but spending most of 
his years in Boston, Bob Kretschmar attended 

graduated from 

ewton High School in 1928. He took a fling at 

advertising .nd was associated with the l 

Oil Journal for several years in various ad- 
vertising capacities. 

Along came the depression, and Bob went 
to work as a general reporter on the Boston 
American for the then princely sum of $15 a 
week. His duties included covering. society 
events and some art work. During that time, he 
began to pick up public relations accounts. 

radually, he worked out of the 
field and into public relations work exebealveny. 
The was but one of several accounts. 


Won Legion of Merit 


Pe Kretschmar — vies United 2 
rmy as a reserve secon utenant. in. 1941 
and was discharged in 1946 at his service rank 
of lieutenant colonel. During the war he was 
in charge of personne! and labor relations for 
the Army, Navy, and War Shipping Adminis- 
tration in Boston. For this, he received the 
Legion of Merit. 


In February, 1947, he became manager of the 
Boston Auto Club, which had 6,000. members. 
This Organization is now the Massachusetts 
Division, AAA . 


The organization's growth is attributed 
largely to Mr. Kretschmar’s direct mail ade 
vertising. The Massachusetts. Division is the 
only Triple-A club of any size which uses 
direct mail as its only membership drive. 

Mr. Kretschmar has received three “Best of 
Industry” awards and one “Award of Merit” in 
the national contests conducted by the Direct 
Mail Advertising Association. 


Married to the former Elizabeth Layton, a 
newspaper coworker, Bob Kretschmar resides 
in West Newton, where he is a director of the 
Newton Civic Association and vice-president of 
the West Newton Neighborhood Club. 


An ardent golfer, he also frequently joins 
Mrs. Kretschmar in bowling with other Newton 
couples. They have one son, Robert &., Jr. 
age 10. 

Mr. Kretschmar’s interest for the Bay State 
motorists extends to better highways, and he 
served as secretary of the Massachusetts Good 
Roads Committee, . which successfully put 
across a statewide campaign for a referendum 
directing gasoline taxes and registration fees 
for automobiles to be used only for highway 
building and maintenance. 

This referendum, passed in 1950 by the 
largest majority — 5 to l — received in any 
state by this type of amendment, made Massa- 
chusetts the 27th state with this kind of law. 


One in a series of weekly articles on New 
Englanders in the news. 


Kefauver Name Heads for N.H. Primary | 


Around New England 


By the Associated Press 
Keene, N.i. 

Unless Senator Estes Kefauver (D) of Tennessee says “No,” 
his name will be entered in New Hampshire’s presidential pref- 
erence primary March 13—the first in the nation. 

Francis A. Dostilio, Keene real éstaté and inslirance broker. 
who went to the 1952 Democratic National Convention as a 
delegate pledged to the Tennessean, said yesterday: 

“I plan to enter his name unless I receive instructions to the 
contrery.” 

Senator Kefauver announced his candidacy yesterday, 

did not disclose his intentions regarding New Hampshire 
he said was 

“I have heard some of my political associates there are get- 
ting their snowshoes out because they know how much I! like 
New Hampshire.” 


~ 
Boston Gas Asks Rate Increase 
By a Stef Writer of The Caristian Science Monitor 

The Boston Gas Company, which serves some 300.000 cus- 
tomers tn eastern Massachusetts, has asked the Massachusetts 
Public Utilities Department to permit it to increase its basic 
rate 25 cents a month. The increase, affecting residential and 
commercial rates, would become effective Jan. 2 

The company said a new wage contract, which became op- 
erative on Oct. 16, had increased its cost by $650,000. 


but 
All 


Act 


Boston 

The soundness of the stand taken by Judge William G. Lynch 
that traffic first offenders should be acquitted because the penal- 
ties under a new highway law are “too tough,” has been ques- 
tioned by a number of fellow judges. 

During the past two days, Judge Lynch acquitted 35 first 
offenders who were brought into Dorchester District Court. Re- 
peat offenders were convicted. 


Fellow Judges Question Lynch's 


a 
By « Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


Lane Says Arsenal Loses Contracts 
By the Associated Press 
Washington 

Government gun and guided missile contracts are being di- 
verted from the Watertown, Mass., Arsenal to private indus- 
tries In the West and Midwest, according to Representative 
Thomas J. Lane (D) of Massachusetts. 

He said in a letter yesterday to Secretary of Defense Charles 
E. Wilson that “the deliberate ‘slow death’ policy by the De- 
fense Department to gradually close down the Watertown Ar- 
senal, and for keeps, is no longer a military secret. 


issue — totalling $153,000,000 — 


due for “moth bail” 


ily high reputation Massachu- 
| setts state bonds maintain. 

Of the total, all but about 
$20,000,000 was taken up within 
24 hours, with only those bands 
with the shortest term—10 years 
—being unsold in that time 


Mr. Lane said 1,100 men had been discharged from Water- 
town during the past year and that the government plant is 
retirement by next June. 


Burke Announces for Lausche 


By a Stes Writer of The Crristian Sctence Monitor 


William H. Burke, Jr., who is disputing the chairmanship of 
the Massachusetts State Democratic Committee, has announced 


All are invited... 


Christian Science 


CHURCH SERVICES 


Sunday Services 10:45 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday School 10:45 
Wednesday testimony meetings 7:30 p.m. 


Free Parking 


‘Colleges Benefit in Will 


By the Associated Press 
Baltimore 
Martin, pioneer | 


Gienn L. 


‘flier and airplane builder has 


‘left charitable gifts totaling! 


/$3,635,000, his will probated in 


Orpkans Court has disclosed. 


The largest gift, two million |. 
.|dollars, went to the Board 


of 
Regents of the University of 
Maryland -to be added to the 


ANCH 
Minta Martin Aeronautics . Re- | "*w Yorn ae I 


search Foundation at the school. | 


Fifteen other charitable gifts Gunesee (1) a 


in his will totaled $1,625,000, 
Other bequests 
Brown University, . $100,000; 
Case School of Applied Sciences, 
$100,000; Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, $100,000, 


,_—Cloudy with occasional 


_ THECHRISTIANSCIENCEMONITOR 


Of Plane Manufacturer 


himself as favoring Ohios Gov. 
party's presidential nomination. 


At an interview at his home in Hatfield yesterday, Mr. Burke 
said he prefers Governor Lausche over Adlai E. Stevenson, the 


1952 nominee. 


He forecast that if Mr. Stevenson wére nominated again next 
year, he would get fewer votes in Massachusetts than he re- 
. when President Eisenhower carried the state. 

. Burke has sought to wrest the state chairmanship from 
John C. Carr of Medford. In a decision handed down Thursday, 
the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled that Mr. Carr and Ed- 
secretary of the state committee, 
elected illegally and are not entitled to office. 


ceived in 1952 


ward P. Gilgun of Woburn, 
had been 


Frank J. Leusche for the 


Adawes 


+ 
(yn otf 


GETS RUGS 
CLEAN * WHISTLE 


Cell Highlends 2-7000 


Ser nett: Sesser me oi , 


a 


: reasit 
hour this afternoon. 


and 
cloudy and not so cold tonight. 
Sunday partly cloudy and little 
' change in temperature.” 


cold 


Weather Predictions 


By U.S. Weather Burees 


Partly Clondy Sunday 


Boston and Vicinity —Increas~ | cloudy and 
diness “and not? 

his afternoon with 

res in the middle | 

ly cloudy and not s0o| 
t with low tempera- 
upper 20's. Partly | 
little change in 
Sunday. Winds in- 
20 to 30 miles an 


nape atur 
Zz 


Connecticut, 
Island — Mostly 


Massachusetts. 
Rhode 


| sr Dec. 17, 


New Hampshire and Vermont 
light 


little 
temperature with a few snow % 
flurries over the north and east |) 
portions in the morning. 
Eastport te Bleck Island — 
Small-craft warnings are dis- ' 
played. Winds increasing from |} 
the southwest again this after- R 
noon probably reaching 25 to 30); 
miles an hour by evening. 
'and good visibility. ' 


High Tides at Commonwealth 


12-56 p.m., ht 9.7 ft. i 
| Sun. Dec. 18, 1:30 a.m., ht 8.6 ft. 4® - 


' Sun Sets Sun Rises Moon Rises 
4:13 p.m. 7:08 am. 9:43 a.m. 


H. YATSUHASHI} 


Formerly with YAMANAKA 


> 


— 
— 2 


ORIENTAL ART 
for Unusual Gifts 


Chinese Jade Ornaments * Lamps 
Porcelain Vases * lvery Cervings 
Netsukes * Prints * Teakwood 
Tables * Screens * Silk Brocedes 
Cultured Pearl Necklaces 


420 BOYLSTON ST., 
BOSTON 
Third Floor KE 6-8822 


change in 


. 
y 
: 
b 
4 
\ 
X 
f) 
.. 
: 
bY 
K 
KN 
. 
_ 
. 
. 


Fair | t 


snow and not so cold tonight. | 


Sunday partly cloudy and little 
change in temperature. | 


Maine—Cloudy with occa-| 


sional light snow and not so 


tonight. Sunday partly 


FOUNDED 1908 BY MARY 


An International Daily Itty ae 
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING 
SOCIETY 


Entered as second class matter at the 
Post Of Office at Boston. Massachusetts. 


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- 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE oN BOSTON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER Mf, 1955 


“LETS HEAR YA!" Christine Middleton, 3, gives out with a 
“tet's hear ya” gesture in her role as cheerleader for the Boyne 
City (Mich.) Ramblers, a high-school basketball squad. What 
Christine doesn’t realize is that sometimes it’s her professional 


shouting style that wins more 


the Ramblers do. Giving her something 


applause from spectators than 
to shout about is the 


team’s record, which had earned it a first-place tie, even as she 
was leading this conference-game yell. 


Midcity Challenge 


To Churches Seen 


By Mary Kelly 


Seectal Correspondent of The Christian Science M onttor 


New York 

Protestantism has two major 
concerns today. It sees “serous 
diminishment of Protestantism 
in the heart areas of our cities.” 
It recognizes a paramount com- 
pulsion to assist racial integra- 
tion. 

How Protestant churches must 
move into difficult and depressed 
situations in order to better 
serve human needs was dis- | 
cussed at a four-day conference | 
held Dec. 11 to 14 at Buck Hill 
Falls. Pa. This was the annua! 
assembly of the National Council! | 
of Churches’ Division of Home 
Missions. About 250 leaders and 
home mission workers from all 
over the country participated. 

Treatment of minority groups 
“with genuine 


was a recurring theme. 


‘Sweeping Challenge’ 

The American Indian mig 
ing from reservation to seck a 
job in some industrial center; 
children of migrant workers, 
robbed of home school and com- 
munity life: language and other 
problems of Spanish-speaking 
eonstituents...assisiance 
nese Christians: Christian 
sponsibility to Jews in the com- 


grat- 


munity—all of these today mean | 


added church activity. 


Urban planning and popula- | 


tion shifts present a 
challenge to the church, 
ers said 

“Contemporary Protestantism 
is not effectively at work in the 
heart areas of our 
cities,” said a report by 
Edith E. Lowry 
Nace, released at the conference. 
“American cities have matured. 


sweeping 


Protestant churches have disap- | 


peared from these inner areas at 
an alarming rate.” 


Construction of housing, hizh- | 


ways, parking spaces and mov- 
ing to suburbs tended to de- 


vitalize missions or place them | 


under threat of extinction, the 


report continues. Urban churches | 
find themselves unrelated to the | 
present scene. Modern housing | 


often makes no provision for | 
ministry. 


City Planning Role. 


The Rev 
head of the council’s Department 


of the Urban Church, called on | 
to see that the | 


church leaders 
city does not become a forgotten 
area. Churches must participate 
in city planning, he urged. 
Through working on a comity 
basis the various denominations 
can minister adequately to city 
neighborhoods. The church 
should be the heart and center 
of the community, various 
speakers said. 

On Dec. 14, the assembly 
adopte? a-—resolution recording 
racia] segregation as a para- 
mount issue facing churches and 
society 

“We ‘deplore official and un- 
official efforts and movements 
to circumvent the clear intent 


of the decisions of the highest 
' 


court and to penalize persons of 


all races who are endeavoring to 


move towards a racially inclu- 
sive church and society,” the 
resolution stated. 

The Supreme Court decision 
expresses in legal form the ethi- 
cal principles set forth by na- 
tional and international church 
bodies, the statement says. 

Strong denunciation of the 
‘pro-segregation movement in 
the South came from the Rev. 
Harold Fey, executive editor of 
the Christian Century magazine. 
He condemned the “intimidation 
and violence” in Mississippi 
which he compared to the march 
of naziism in Germany. 


By Norman Ingrey 
Hes Carbone Die ieee” 


OM Phe) en 


Buenos Aires 
Commuting via subway and | 
|} suburban railway between of | 
ifice and home, and between 


| “Futbol” and Li 


| Argentines Reflect o on n Political Shifts 


| straphanging and maneuvering | 


ifor a seat, I listen these days 
ite the voices of post-Peron 
| Argentina. 
| SFutbol,” which is soccer 
there, still is to the fore of all” 
i topics, but I also hear plenty 
jabout national politics and 
domestic economy long before I 
| reach my destination. 
t..impresses. me first is | 


! 
' 


revolution, with one “wise 

woman” them—are sol- 
emnily inquiring into the same 
issue. It already is apparent that 


the solution will have to be pro- | 


vided by the reorganized Su- 


) 


| that my fellow-passengers are | 


-much less excited in their dis- 
i} cussion of new governing con- 


‘bells ringing, 


| .ditions-and problems than over | 


| that about the latest style of 
i\forward play by the San 


Lorenzo team or the question- | 
able penalty given by the Brit- | 


ish referee in the Boca Juniors 
match against Tigre. 


/Brisk Debate 


The keen contest for the soc- 


‘and second class. 


_preme Court. Even the clerk and 


| the meatpacker finally agreed on 


, this before their journey’s end. 
Headed toward work, the elec- 
tric train whizzes: around the 
bends of the river shore, stops | 
at each tree-shaded station, bi- | 


sects the presidential “quinta” | 


residence, thunders across a. 
score of level crossings with | 
almost saunters 
through teeming suburban cen- 
ters with terraced, flowery em- 


bankments and expansive park- | 


lands before the main “Retiro” 


(ex-Perén) terminus is reached, | 


with transfer to the subway. 
Everyday economics are ven- 
tilated the whole way, in first 
“Che,” the in- 
timate form of friendly address, 


‘punctuates the disquisitions of 


‘cer championship has had not | 


rr little to do with taking the 
| proletariat's mind off revolu- 
‘tionary changes, and. now that 
| summer is here in the River 
Plate, vacation-planning may 
| provide some additional relief 
| for the government of Maj. Gen. 
| Pedro Aramburu. Nonetheless 


ithe calm debate of Argentine 
changes by Argentines them- 
selves might be a. good indica- 
tor. Serenity in political re- 
flection is much needed here 

There are two classes of 
travel on the suburban railway 
I take—first and second. I often 
go second after paying for first, 
which, usually is crowded. On 
the wooden seats the other day 
I found myself listening to a 
brisk exchange on the desira- 
| bility of returning to the old 
Constitution. 


Latins here, as elsewhere, still 
‘cling to the idea’ that a con- 
stitution is a cure-all for almost 
(every political worry. In this 
case a passenger who looked like 
a clerk insisted that the coun- 
try had to get back to the 1853 
Constitution ..which. .had_.held 
good until Juan Perén came and 
wrote another in ‘accordance 
with “justicialismo,” his partic- 
ular brand of social justice. 

An obvious meat-packing 
employee was equaily insistent, 
though suavely so, that con- 
stitutions had to be adapted to 
changing conditions. Discreetly, 
perhaps out of consideration 
for an unmistakable “gringo” 
passenger sandwiched in the 
row, he did not mention the 
ex-dictator by name. 


Matter for Court? 


Their exchange was little 
more than an echo of the debate 
now proceeding among the re- 
vived political parties and in the 
rejuvenated newspapers. Most 
party opinion veers toward 


i\shunting aside the imposed con-' 


| merchant and mechanic. 


“Say, che, what do you think 
of the Prebisch report?” asks 
one passenger. Dr. Raul Prebisch 


(is an Argentine financial expert 


, sion 


who has been loaned from the’ 


United Nations to advise the 
revolutionary regime on salvag- 
ing the country. 
tion of his name invariably come 
audible moans about the decline 
in the quotation of the peso. 
“The dollar will go to 40.” 
Says one pessimist, who bewails 
that the pound already has 
“touched 100." There is a gen- 
eral murmur that things have to 
get worse before an improve- 


| ment can set in. 


Concern on Cests 

As a whole these people, for 
years accustomed to a peso 
holding its own with a dollar 
for stability of value, are taking 
devaluation with great calm. 
But a serious vein of concern 
about the rising cost of living 
runs through all the train con- 
versation. It claims more at- 
tention than the suburban 
shortage of water, affected by 
the lack of rain and the drop 
im the Plate’ River’ level this 
season. 

“Everything's going up,” 
clares a young bank clerk. 
he 
lariy informs me, 
stranger, that that act does not 
necessarily indicate he is a 
“descamisado” — the name by 
which Juan Perdén’s “shirtless” 
supporters were known. 

The agents left behind by the 
dictator are sedulously, and ma- 
liciously, spreading the impres- 
that the. Prebisch-recom- 
mended devaluation of the peso 


de- 
as 


a complete 


\is making the rich richer and 
the poor poorer. The provisional | 


government is finding it hard 
going to prove their point that 
better prices will bring abun- 
dance of production which will 
make living ultimately cheaper. 

As the train journeys through 


With the men- | 


takes off his coat and jocu- | 


fr Ae ener o> we eee tere re 


* with: “the end of 
Ba ~~ fone Ee eters, ret Me 


| 
i 


i 
i 


running- | 

ceived similar treatment, so the (terse and tart comment. It was 
talk and debate rises and fades | there the other morning I heard 
in political tone. the Radicals’ prospects summed | 
Comment Terse eee - a way 

The passengers rise from their | | tien make gad but ane a | 
seats as the trains begin to con- | jose it because “cannot 
'verge on Retiro and the out- unite.” The newspapers lately 
lines of the power station and | 5@ve required columns to say 
the immigrant hotels appear by just tris. 
the city riverside, but the ex- > 
changes continue peripatetically t} 
down the corridors and along) 
the platform: 


| 


| 


in retoring democ- 


| “Perén will never return.” BOSTON 3 

| “The Army means business || 

this time HOTEL 

“The Navy and Air Force will | 

see to that!” 

going to stand no nonsense about \ H f R iH y 

the cost of living.” ) ‘ 

let. us down under Perdén.” 

“How the Nort Americanos 

and the Ingleses must be doing | 

pounds changed into our pesos!” FOR THE ULTIMATE 18 BleiEG 

“Whit till we get that Amer-*~ ¢* *# Comrimental manage 

ican loan.” visit owr 

And always the final, confi- 

dent nationalist note. “We'll DINING ROOM 

sh ™ . " 

ow them when we get our UNEXCELLED SERVICE 

No farmers travel-on subur- QUALITY @ BEAUTY 

ban trains, but if one were there | 

when I heard that last remark 

massachusetts avenue 

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“Il hear the young officers are 

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grain and beef moving again!” 

One Minute from The Mother Church 

he assuredly would have struck 


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; it ans glen 
THE CHRISTIA®D 


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Ete wee! o* ae en ewe ee he eee TF . 
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Sa agen et ae ee ok — 


_ Gaitskell Hailed as New Labor Chief 
of rum ~~. which- 


‘ 
ARGO OR SOF Ts eRe NORA! 220 ge Le OE By. Petes Lyne OD) ERMAN tHe 


a Ow 


Parliamentary Correspondent of 
The Caristian Sctence Monitor 


ji nation. Sir W 
of the opposition 


long years after World War I! 


Lendon 
Britain’s House of Commons | When Britain's big socialist ex- 


is a generous body and from all | Periment was being put 
sides it gave Hugh | 
Gaiteskell a warmhearted recep- those days 


political 
_tion when he 
thé josition. 
Sir Winston Churchilt. made 
a special point of being in his 


' seat. Since his retirement April 
5 Sir Winston has been very 


this week the veteran politica! 
warhorse sniffed the scent of a 


big occasion and headed straight | doing s0- again. 


for Westminster. 


4 


| 


| Sir Winston was making po- 
rarely. seen in. the Commons. | litical . 
But down on his farm in Kent | Opposition leaders way back at | 


into 


A parliamentary reporter of 
remembers some 


for the | *™ary mer gS between Sir Win- 
first time y ston a 

wR 8 RE eo a 
'ston’s attitude to the Laborites 
moderated considerably, | 


-and-coming 
Sir Wine 


has 
though not his abhorrence of 
socialism. 

life wuneom e 
the beginning of the century. 
He would certainly like to be 
But «he has 
clearly decided that now that 


The way he scrutinized the | he has retiréd from office his 


new opposition leader was 


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qa best role is that of listener. So 


he kept silent this week and 
just peered at the new opposi- 
tion leader. 


oe ee 
There is good reason for 
thinking Sir Winston is thank- 
ful that Mr. Gaitskell was 
elected Labor leader. For the 


most part comment: about Mr. : 


Gaitskell is that he is a mod- 
erate, sensible, and agreeable 
man with quite possibly a streak 
of political genius in him. From 
Sir Winston’s point of view he 
has another asset. Anglo-Amer- 
ican cooperation has always 
been the basis of Sir Winston's 
political philosophy. And there 
is basis for saying that Mr. 
Gaitskell is. in a very over- 
simplified phrase, pro-United 


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Yee CHARLOTTE, N. C mxyervexd pacities. Though a socialist, Mr. 


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view of the United States and 
the American way of life. 

It would have been different 
if Aneurin Bevan had been first 
instead of second in the poll 
for the Labor Party’s new leader. 
Mr. Bevan is probably in fact 
less Of a “bogeyman”™ than he 
appears in American eyes. But 
nonetheless he would seem to 
be a most unpromising peg on 
which to try to hang the cloak 
of Anglo-American 

Neither Mr. Bevan nor Her- 
bert Morrison, the other. de- 
feated candidate in the poll for 


accara 


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si sk Mi cccniaaiai venqurenes 
pray fencer | Seven Farms in 10 


_ In U.S. Have Autos 


| By the Associated Press 


i. 2 . 


‘ amore. 

the Attlee retirement than was 
farma the Daily Mirror. 
counted, 3,390,707 farms had ee 
automobiles. | What finally made Mr. Attlee 
- The total number of autes (resign, it seems, ‘was Mrs. 
on these farms was 4,258,178. | attiee’s insistence that he should 


| Ov -1e By od ne chee | /quit while everyone still wanted 


| 447 cars reported in the last him to stay, and secondly that 
previous agricultural census he should not have to endure 
in 1950. 
._ |by train to Cherry Tree Cottage, 
Fens» sng my st wrk "tee Great Missenden, every time the 
proportion ef farms with autes Commons had a late sitting. 
has increased te about 71 per | ©o™ments Randolph Churchill, 
cent from 63 per rons Sn ton son of Sir Winston, in an article 
g@ Evening is ab- 


‘in Lord Beaverbrook’s 
B Standard, “It 
solutely in keeping -with— his 
the Laborite leadership, attend- character and life that his [ Mr. 
ed the Commons on the occasion Attlee’s| retirement should have 
when Mr. Gaitskell toak. his been dictated by the same sort 
bow. 
outgoing Labor Party leader, | tirement of the vast majority of 
has been wafted away from the his fellow men.” , 
Commons on the wings of an This parliamentary reporter 
earldom. So the Commons scene has just returned from a 
was quite difficult to recognize. banquet at London's historic 
But behind the scenes, there'| Mansion House where Sir 
is intense discussion about the | Winston received the Freedom 
future of the British Labor of the City of Belfast and the 
Party and considerable activity, |City of Londonderry. Mr. Attlee 
too. The Bevanites have just! was one of the guests and there 
announced they will publish ai was much discussion going on 
series of reports on how socialist |whether he was still Mr. Attlee 
policy should be rewritten. or had become Lord Attlee. 
These reports will rival the pol- Most people were calling him 
icy pronouncements of the offi- |Lord Attlee, though the head- 
cial Labor Party. quarters of the Labor Party 
The Bevanites are also or- says he is still plain mister be- 
ganizing regional conferences of | cause he is not gazetted yet. 
their own, ostensibly to boost For autograph hunters he ap- 
the sale of their weekly journal | peared to be signing just “Att- 
Tribune. But in effect they will | lee.” which is how a lord should 
try to make the Labor Party go sign himself. He had a broad 
more left. grin and looked remarkably 
Mr. Bevan himself is having youthful since’ shedding his 
a fierce quarrel with the mass political load 
circulation Daily Mirror, which The Attlees are obviously 
is, generally speaking, a stup-'going to have fun being Earl 
porter of the Labor Party. Mr. and Countess, and fie to those 
Bevan accuses‘the Mirror of who say socialism and titles 
having stirred up the agitation ,dont mix. 


a tye ee —— 


—— 
: 


Changes in British Cabinet 


Ry 
Ch the 


area 
Tae Car 


Henry 8S. Hayward 
ondon Ne: . Rut 
stian Science Mor 


London 
the 


So speculation persists that 
Chancellor of the Exchequer 
Butler desires to change from 
this stern post, 
come leader of 
Commons and 
Minister. 

Since Chancellorship is 
fhe No. post in the British 
Government, it then is pre- 
sumed that Harold Macmillan 
would have to leave the third- 
ranking Foreign Secretaryship 
to take the Exchequer. 

This, in turn,.would move up 
Defense Minister Selwyn Liovyd 
to the Foreign Office, in a vast 


ecu of 
7 


the House of 
Deputy Prime 


High-level. changes in 
Conservative government of 
Prime Minister Sir Anthony 
Eden loom, according to experi- 
enced British political observ- 
ers. 

A Cabinet shake-up 
would affect Sir 
closest’ lieutenants has bdeen 
forecast almost continuously 
since the Tory election victory 
last May 

Now, however, experts here 
recognize another factor pro- 
ducing pressure for a change in 
the strange lull that has been 
evident in British affairs in re- 
cent weeks. 

Butler Seeks Shift? 


This lull, as well as other 
things, has led to an undercur- 
rent.of criticisms against the 
Conservative regime in Decem- 
ber that had not appeared dur- 
ing the long summer political 
honeymoon that followed the| 
smashing Eden election triumph. 

The Tories also have the ex- 
ample of the Laborites reshuf- 
Tne thelr esadersnip. 


the 


*" 


that 
Anthony's 


And the question being raised 
is: Who is to gaim? Certainly 
not the ministries through 
which the new men would be 
| leapfrogging at close intervals. 
Mr. Macmillan has barely fa- 
,;miliarized himself with foreign 
problems—and the same is true 
of Selwyn Lloyd at Defense. 

But indications are that Mr. 
Butler has had his fill of the un- 
popular aspects of tax enforce- 
ment—and a general face- 
shifting probably would give 
Sir Anthony an appearance of 


time of stress. 
Noticeable Erosion 
It is not so much, one gath- 
ers, irom. various. written and 
spoken comments, what Sir An- 
thony has done, as what he and 
his Conservative colleagues 
have not done, that has com- 
})}menced a siow but noticeable 
1, erosion of Tory popularity. 
Not that Sir Anthony is in any 
danger yet. His government has 
more than four years to run be- 


= 


arfother winter commuting back | 


London | 


And Clement R. Attlee, of reasons that dictate. the re-. 


perhaps to be-° 


game of political musical chairs. | 


lactivily and. decisiveness..at..a. 


tish, French, and ish 
forcés and -it was here that for 


ore conve 
built by anbaen, 


New Houses Sparkle 
‘It is business that has built 


destroyed d. 

wegians are still. putting the 

finishing touches to their new 

}and very beautiful little town. 
Where the houses were totally 


sparkle in pale green, pink, and 


| Shining im silver and pale! pale blue.. All have been. de- 


| blue paint, the conveyer, to be 
i'finished this month, is 
| quarters of a mile jong and the 
\erane control rooms 
feet above the harbor. 
,.. The Narvik people live by the 
efforts of this conveyer and it 
overshadows everything in the 
little harbor town. Yet they do 
not like to talk about the 
_ builders. - 
‘This Is Business’ 

The Germans came from the 
firm of Demag in Duisburg, 30 
months ago, and there were at 
one time 150 of them living in 
a hutted camp. This Christmas 


there will only be about a dozen 


technicians left. The manage- 
' ment of the conveyer which was 
built for the Swedish concern, 
/LKAB, is entirely in Norwegian 
hands. 

In an interview, Schafig Pel- 


lersen, LKAB’s office chief, was 
philosophical about the nation- | 


ality of the builders. He looked 
out from his office onto the 
quiet 100 - foot -deép anchorage 
where four ships lay waiting 
their cargo. A golden Arctic 
twilight at 2 o'clock im the 


afternoon refiected the peace of 


the land in December, 1955. 
“There were 34 ships sunk in 
Narvik Fjord in one night in 
April, 1940. We are proud of the 
fact ‘that the Germans lost so 
many ships invading Norway 
that they had not sufficient 
small boats to invade Britain,” 
he said 
Then he 
veyer. 
“We took the Germans’ offer 
to build it because they could 
promise to finish it in time. The 


spoke of the con- 


three- | 


tower 100! 


signed by Norwegian architects. 

In the shops there is an al- 
| most Swedish standard in both 
quality and price whict’ is to 


‘be expected in a town that has of 
!more connections with Sweden | 


'than with Norway itself. 

While the rest of Norway suf- 
fers a transport crisis Narvik 
has been unaffected. There is no 
south connection by rail and the 

/main social contact for the town 


\is with Sweden via the rail- | 


vand--war; This is business;”he” 


Le 
HE tk 
5 


, Narvik will be 


Soviet Trips Oftere 


,way that brings iron ore from | 
the mining town of Kiruna, | 
Lapland. Fifty years ago there | 


/were only 25 people living in | 
thriving ¢ommu-*! 
| nity that was brought into ex- | 


Narvik’ The 
istence by the opening of the 
/ mines and the need to transport 


‘the ore to the world does not | 


show any signs of poverty or 
|distress today. 


Nationalization Looms 


clouds on the horizon. The ore 
output — through the wunder- 
ground crushers to the con- 
|veyer with its four i7-ton 
| grabs supplying an endless belt 
to the quayside—was only 600,- 


000 tons in November. The plant | 
|—-the Norwegians have no name | 


for it other 


than “anlege,” 
which means 


construction—is 


There are, however, a few 


The points of contact will limited te 11 cities 

tourists, he said, “but Soviet authorities would have no objec- 
tion if Russians living outside these areas met 

in the cities named.” 

“Soviet authorities have assured me neither the Russians 
their American relatives need have any fear of consequences in 
connection with these family reunions,” Mr. Reiner said. 

The cities on the list are Moscow, Leningrad, Minsk, Kharkov. 
Stalingrad, Kiev, Odessa, Yalta, Sochi, Tbilisi, and Sukhumi in 

the Caucasus. 

Mr. Reiner visited the Soviet Union last July and subsequent- 

ly negotiated an agreement with the Soviet agency In- 

_ tourist to represent it in the United States. He returned te Mos- 
cow Dec. 14 te smooth out kinks in the agreement. He «aid 

“prospects of American tourists in Russia really opened up with 
the removal of United States passport restrictions on travel toe 
Communist areas.” 


capable of 800,000 tons a month. |. 


It was held up last month be- | 
cause there was insufficient ton- | 


nage to take away the ore. 

| But output is a minor prob- 
lem comparéd to the social and 
national event which will take 


place next year. LKAB is at. 
present financed partly by Swe- | 


'den and partly by private in- 
vestors. Though the Norwegian 


Cee Ne is 
ert sr ¥ : 
= — : 


fore it is forced to seek a vote 
of confidence from the British 
people. His Labor Party oppo- 
nents have just jettisoned a vet- 
eran leader. Ear! Attlee, 
have not tested their machine 
with the new man, Hugh Gaits- 
kell. 

It can be argued. moreover, 
that Sir Anthony's recent pres- 
| tige setback is merely the nor- 
maj expectable decline that 


tends to follow any election vic-} 


tory, as enthusiasm wanes and 
old unsolved problems remain 
on hand when campaign prom- 
ises have faded. 
| Prosperity Enjoyed 
| The political honeymoon, in 
short, tis over—and the Prime 
Minister who succeeded Sir 
Winston Churchill now ts face 
to face with a certain number 
of grim facts about everyday 
British life 

While this country enjoys al- 


most unprecedented prosperity, | 


and while workers can take 
their choice of jobs in numerous 
labor-scarce industries, neither 
Sir Anthony nor the party he 
leads can be regarded as in 
jeopardy. 


claim since last summer 
notable contrast to the almost 
unbelievably successful 12 
months enjoyed by Sir Anthony 
from mid-1954 to mid-1955. 

In that brief span, he: 

l. Salvaged the Indochina 
armistice talks at Geneva—after 
United States Secretary of State 
John Foster Dulles had almost 
given up. 

2. Revived the Brussels 
Treaty Organization as a for- 
‘mula for including West Ger- 


is in 


and | 


Yet arc cooling -of public ee-> 


Slated? 


many in European defense plans 


o 
ore Cheice 
POCKET EDITIONS 
Lipmaay EsiTios 
BEWTYPE EDITH 
READER'S ERITH 


—after the French rejected the | 


,European Defense Community 
concept. 


Troop Pledge Offered 


3. Electrified the subsequent | 


London Nine-Power Conference [T~ . 


|on German problems with a his- 


itoric pledge to keep British 


| troops on the Continent. 

4. 
interests in Iran. 

5. 
| withdrawal 
|; moniously. 
| 6. Succeeded 
| Ministership in April. 

7. Saeotnanded the Tory 
‘election triumph. a month later. 
| 8. Made his opinions felt at 
the Big Four summit talks in 
| Geneva with an.“Eden plan” for 
/a German demilitarized zone— 
\later elaborated at the second 
| Geneva conference. 


Move te Save Popularity 
It was, very clearly, Sir An- 


from Suez har- 


to the Prime 


' 


thony’s big year. After that, al- | 
most anything was likely to seem | 


anticlimactic. And that is pre- 
cisely what the current quiet in- 
terval seems. 

No one here will blame him 


decline in his own popularity or 
that of his party and govern- 
ment. 

Particularly -in international 
affairs, the British regard Amer- 
ican leadership as operating, at 
the moment, under a handicap 
due 
problem. 


They are the ‘more anxious, | 


‘therefore, that British 
ship today be at its 


leader- 
strongest 


possible peak, rather than on the |; 


ebb. 


. 


r 


rT 
Nee 


istmas Greetings 


Cherlette, N, C. 


ae Oe ee 


pre 255 FER RSS IOS SG RS RA 
Srason's 


* 
Greetings 
TODD'S FLOWERS 


“Charlotte's Home of 
Fine Flowers” 


Special Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
By Frank Robertson 
Hong Kong 
The party purge 
munist China implicit in Chair- 
man Mao Tse  tung's 
famous speech on agriculture 
last July, in which he charged 
that - some --coHeagues “were 
“walking unsteadily like women 
with bound feet,” has begun.. 
Canton newspapers just ar- 
rived in this colony give some 
details of the disciplinary cam- 
paign within the party now 
being carried out in that prov- 
ince. Since this “party purifica- 
| tion” was ordered by the Chair- 


man of the People’s Republic 
from 


himself, it may safely be as- 
Daughtry Sheet & Metal Co. 


sumed that the same thing is 
Readers of 


The Christian Science Meniter 


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and yout patronage 


1504 Centrel Avenue 
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PRES PRES YS ESOS PO PS Fas Pees Pom '* 


¥ 
i 
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d 
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i 
i 
0 
i 
L 


| 


. een oy 


Merry 
China. 
Christmas At this stage, the campaign is 


being conducted at a fairly low 


ing agriculture ordered by Mr. 
Mao. 

| Punishment Demanded 

| Nonetheless, the Nanfang 
.Jihpao of Canton, which openly 
iealls the present campaign a 


now - | 


a 


happening throughout mainiand | 


level and is bound up directly | 
with the speedup in collectiviz-. 


Phone ED 2-2195 

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CHARLOTTE, W. C. a 

Rm Christmas 


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|party purge, states that ong 
| those expelled from the party 
with recommendation that “ap- 


propriate executive punishment” 


| provincial public security de- 
partment, a vice-director of the 
Kwangtung Post and Telecom- 
munications Bureau, and a 
/merniber of the provincial party 
committee. : 

| These officials had been sent 
into the countryside to assist in 
formation of new agricultural 
producers cooperatives. After 
several weeks, they left villages 
,and returned to Canton. “Their 
| bodies were in the villages for 
'a time but their minds were in 
the cities,” the Nanfang Jihpao 
stated. 


Flock Back to City 


The newspaper stated this was 
because they had been corrupted 
by city life, loving material com- 
fort and fearing hardship. 

But the same newspaper said 
Many cadres were flocking back 

to the city after they had been 
| sent into the country on specific 
| tasks in the cooperatives cam- 
| paign. 
| It therefore seems quite likely 
that the complexity of task they 
were asked to do baffled and 

them, 

them to throw up their hands 
_and walk off the job, 
_ Certainly there must be wide- 
spread confusion, if not turmoil, 
| in rural China today. Mr. Mao’s 
speedup order came at a time 
‘when party leaders, aware 


considerable peasant resistance 
ordered 


Mao Purges Farm Officials 


|signs of demoralization,” as 
|Nanfang Jihpao put it. As a 
result, the same newspaper said, 


ithe provincial party branch 


in Com-| be taken is the vice-Chief of the | “decided to carry out a purge of 


thought among all party mem- 
| bers and revolutionaries. ... 


Those who did not measure up | 


could expect expulsion and pos- 


bewe additional punishment, the | 


newspaper said. 


In another issue of the same | 
newspaper, an editorial stated | 
that the “party purge must go. 


hand in hand with the estab- 
lishment of the cooperatives,” 
which, of course, is what Mr. 
Mao intended when he set in 
motion the magsive coopera- 
tives campaign designed to get 
more grain for the state, bring 
China’s 500,000,000 peasants un- 
der tighter control, and at the 
same time strengthen party dis- 
| cipline. 

| In.doing so Mr. Mao delib- 
/erately ignored the passive 
‘peasant resistance and the 
| shortage of trained personnel. 
| Those carrying out his orders 
in the countryside cannot. 


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London 
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‘Nasser threat as 
outside the UN Charter and as 
an oe conspiracy against it.” 
onsideration Delayed 
jain nas ON Nasser’s note 
a “sinister and illicit communi- 
cation.” the Israeli Ambassador 
warned that it was “almost 
\identical” with one by the secre- 
‘tary-general of the Arab League 


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| Israel in 1948. 

The Security Council has 
(of the latest Arab complaint 
-against Israel until it gets a full | 
report from Maj. Gen. E. L. M. 


beet Palestine truce super- 


Brisbane Tel. Wrié 


soil on the northeast shores of 
the Sea of Galilee-on the night 
of Dec. 11-12. 

| Secretary General Dag Ham- 
marskjold informed the Council 
that such a report has been pre- 


headquarters by pouch the first | 
part of next week. Another Se- 
ieurity Council session on the 


complaint has been tentatively 
~~, ‘scheduled for Dec. 22. 

9 | In the meantime, the Security 
LASTING VALUE 'Council membership has” been 
'practically unanimous in ex- 
| pressing regret for the incident 
land sympathy for the families 

of the 41 persons killed. 
The general tenor ef the ini- 
tial statements indicated that 
the Council is ready to invoke 


TTTTLILILILL LLL LILLE 
more drastic measures to stop 
—_ of violence in the area, 


sarge staan 
here tension has risen sharply 


ETHEL ATKINS? since the announcenient of the 


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a 


of military actions 
initiated at Gaza, at Qibya, and 
at El Hamma, . 


fare of the Near East resis in’ 
largest measure on the should- 
ers of the leaders of the coun- 
tries in that part of the world, 
There must be restraint, regard- 
less of whatever the 
to fight may be. Should fighting 
break out again, the only vic- 
tors will be those who live and 
rule by misery and chaos.” 
Turkey, the United Kingdom, 
the Soviet Union, France, Iran 


‘postponed further consideration | 


Nationalist China, Peru, Bel- 


that heralded open Arab war on | gium, and New Zealand all ex- 


pressed regret over the latest | 
Yo tie border incident. 
Sir Pierson ‘Dixon of the 
United Kingdom 
| the Government of Syria for its 
| restraint in reacting to the in- 
cident, and Selim Sarper of Tur- 


visor, as to the exact events of key deplored retaliation as an 
| the “military “action” on Syrian’ ' 


JADE at | 
orwes i 


metrument of international pet 
icy, warning that it “ultimately 
defeats its own purpose.” 
Other Measures 
For the Soviet Union, Arkady 


| A. Sobolev calied on the Secur- 


| ity Council to take effective ac- 


pared and will arrive at UN | tion to forestall such incident 


| in the future 
Mr. Shukairy advised the Se- 


curity Council to look for a solu- 


' nations, 
. States... Article..4Al 


‘or partial 


tion to the economic lifeline 
that Israel maintains with other 
especially the United 
el... the..TIN J 
Charter states: “The Security 
Council may decide what meas- 
ures not involving the use of 
armed force are to be employe 


to give effect to its decisions, 


and it may call upon the mem-. 
‘bers of the United Nations to 
| apply such measures. 


“These may include complete 
interruption of eco- 
nomic relations and of rail, sea, 
air, postal, telegraphic, radio, | 


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=NATO Nations Brace ® 
=FKor New Arms Rise 


By the Associated Press 


Paris 


The Atlantic Pact 
concluding their first post- 
Geneva meeting in the chill of 
the renewed cold war, have 
braced themselves for dangerous 
months ahead. 
| The pact council, composed of 
representatives of 15 countries, 


| reported Dec. 16 in an unusually | 


blunt communiqué the general 
lines of its future defense plan- 
ning to meet an expanding 
threat from the East. The state- 
ment said all] members were de- 
termined to see the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization 
| forces equipped with the most 
aaa, weapons, with special 
emphasis on air defense and 
| warning in Europe. 
Cite New Soviet Jabs 


The council 
|gret” that the Soviet Union at 
ithe Geneva Big Four foreign 
| ministers meeting had repudi- 

for negotiating 


In 1955 


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ated proposals 
|German unification and opposed 
| any effective system for con- 
‘trolling armaments. It re- 
affirmed its determination to roll 
back the Soviets from German 
territory by peaceful means and” 
to reunify the country under the 
| West German Federal Republic. 


nations, 


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“noted with Te-. 


The council also cited “recent 
provocative moves and declara- 
tions by the Soviet Union re- 
garding the Middle East. and 
Asia” and said these tactics, 
coupled with the Kremlin's 
steadily growing military power, 
presented “a new challenge to. 
ithe free world.” 


The council is composed of the | | 


foreign, defense, and finance 
ministers of the member coun- 
tries. The communiqué 
drafted by representatives of a 
former enemy power and a Hittle 
coumtry once occupied by the 
Nazis—West Germany and Bel- 
gium — and approved promptly 
and unanimously* by the whole 
come! 

All the emphasis in the talks 
Was not on military defense. 
Canada’s Foreign Secretary, 
Lester B. Pearson, summed up 
the new approach when he said 
“NATO can no longer live’ by 
fear alone.” He meant the West- 
ern alliance has to fight on new 
fronts ——- economic, social, and 
cultural. 

United States 
State John Foster 
- headed 


of 
who 


Secretary 
Dulles. 


the American delegation, - 


spent the last day of his Paris 
visit talking with “the good Eu- 
ropeans.” He apparently hoped 
| to revitalize the united Europe 
\idea which some have felt is 
| fading. 

Mr. Dulles arranged to meet 
‘in turn with French Foreign 
Minister Antoine Pinay; Jean 
Monnet, architect of the six- 
nation European Coal and Steel 
Community; Belgian Foreign 
Minister Paul-Henrji Spaak: and 
West German Foreign Minister 
Heinrich von Brentano. 


with Dr. Mr. 


von Brentano. 
United, States air base at 
Evereux in Normandy and take 
off for Washington. The French 
air strike prevented his using a 
Paris field. 

M. Pinay received 
Foreign Minister, Moshe Sha- 
rett, who has been waiting to 
see him since Mr. Sharett. ar- 
rived from New York Dec. 
Later M. Pinay saw the ambas- 
_sadors of six Arab states 
| Lebanon, Syria, Hashemite 
| Kingdom of Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, 
and Saudi Arabia. He asked 
them all to renounce the use of 
;force in settling their differ- 
ences, 


Israel's 


peace atid future Wel-) ai 


commended | 


restine armistice 


was ' 


Immediately after the meeting 


Dulles planned to drive to the | 


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| John | 
{Gerhart Eisler, tormer lead- 


ition Office, 


A representative of Moslems. 
Mr. sete ood took note of the | 
Pp s 6f the Israeli. 

attack on a date close to the 
“birthday of the great Master in 
the land peace—the Holy 
Land which was made unholy 
by the terror and horror of Is- 
rael”—a reference that Mr. Eban 


| charged was an “appeal to re- 


ligious prejudices.” 

Defending Israel's foray, Mr. 
Eban pleaded continued harass- 
ment by the Syrians of its fish- 
ermen and other hard-working 
settlers in violation of the Pal- 


country had chosen retaliation 
above “passive endurance.” 


“and “said hie” 


World News in Brief! 
: : Sees 


ix nh ica - 


os * Oe 4 
OR A AES AL 


- 


J 


successful 
14 days after Frankfurt 
Me, Kate.” 


; 


Jas Ei) west 


: 


| delegate voted for the budget because it was felt the UN was 

really to reduce expenses. 

The Council voted, over Soviet objections, to review 

_ ‘the 10-year-old UN Charter “at an appropriate time.” The 
Soviets again served notice they would boycott a committee 
created to arrange such a charter-review session. 


Turkey 


Supporters of Premier Adnan Menderes beat down strong oppo- 
sition attacks in the Turkish Parliament Dec. 16 to win a 398 
vote of confidence on his new Cabinet and economic policies. 
The previous Menderes Cabinet had resigned two weeks be- 
fore over the nation’s economic situation. The new Cabinet 
will be the fourth led by the Premier in five years. . 


Compitied from dispatches eof the Asseoctated Press and Reeters 


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Paasikivi Faces New Term 


By Reuters - 
Heisink! 

Finnish President Paasikivi is 
faced with growing demands 
that he shoulder another six- 
year: term of office. 

He is likely to accept the in- 
vitation to run again if he is 


assured of the support of the! 
d | Social 


Democrats, strongest 
party in the Finnish Parliament. | 

Mr. Paasikivi speaks Russian 
‘fluently and is, perhaps, the 
‘European statesman with the 
longest experience of negotiat- . 
ing with the Soviet Union. 

In 1920, he helped draw up 
the Treaty of Tarty (alterna- 
oe known as Dorpat) con- 

ming Finland’s breakaway 
from the Soviet Union and 
emergence as an independent 
, Western state. , - . 

When the Soviets demanded 
certain east Finnish territory in 
1939, Mr. Paasikivi headed the 
mission that went to Moscow 
for negotiations. The negotia- 
tions failed, the Red Army in- 
vaded Finland, and the “winter 
war” (1939-1940) and the “con- 
tinuation war” (1941-1944) fol- 
owed 

An armistice ensued and again 
Mr. Paasikivi was sent to ne- 
gotiate, first in Stockholm and 
then in Moscow. 


Hard Bargaining 


Tn 1948, he was again in Mos- 
cow to negotiate a military as- 
sistance and friendship treaty. 
Stalin had asked Finland to 
make one identical with the 
Czech-Soviet pact. In six weeks 
of hard bargaining in the Krem- 
lin, Mr. Paasikivi secured modi- 
fications in the texts including. a 
theoretical right for Finiand to 
fix its own foreign policy. 

This year, Mr. Paasikivi again 
went to Mescow. He came home 
with a Soviet undertaking to 
evacuate the Porkkala naval 
base outside Helsinki. 

It had been his seventh offi- 
cial journey to Moscow 

“My seventh journey,” 


ee 


_ he 


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[told journalists, “was the hap- 
i piest I have ever made.” 
During these talks the Soviet 
leaders had told him they were 
ready to withdraW their troops 
, from. Porkkala because Finland 
had shown itself “a tough en- 
emy but honorable in all under- 
takings.” 
| When appointed Premier in 
+4944 of Finland’s first postwar 
government, he defined his pol- | 
icy as: “Abroad, good relations 
with Russia and everyone else. 
At home, parliamentary rule.” 

The President is a progressive 
conservative. 

Land Referm Pushed 

After graduating as a Doctor 
of Laws, he entered the Helsinki 
Diet when Finland was still part 
of Czarist Russia. He cam- 
paigned for a land reform and 
told the Diet in 1906: “Finland 
can only become a democracy 
through a socially just regime 
based on the will of the people.” 

In 1908, he resigned from the 
post of Minister of Finance to 
protest Czar Nicholas’ tighten- 
ing of Moscow's control over 
Finland and began a policy of 
Russiafication. Teh years later, 
when Finland’s first independent 
'government was formed, Mr. 
| Paasikivi was appointed its Pre- 
mier. 

Newspaper editorials and 
‘hints by politicians show there 
‘will be widespread support for 
Mr. Paasikivi shedld he decide 
to stand for a new presidential! 
term in the elections next 
January. 

Chief opposition has come 
from the Social Democrat Party, 
which would tike to see their 
own candidate, Karl-August 
Fagerhoim, elected. 

But the Social Democrats can 
be outvoted by the other parties, 
should these parties decide on 
all-out support for Mr. Paasi- 
kivi at the expense of their own 
candidates. 

Should 


another term he will add two | 
new points to his program: 

l. Closer relations with 
Scandinavia which become pos- 
sible. now... that .-Moscow. has 
dropped its objegtions to Fin- 
land joining the Nordic Council 
parliamentarians working for | 
closer inijer-Nordic relations. 


2. Discreet exploration of the 
possibilities of recovering some 
of the eastern territories Finland 
had to cede to Russia under the 
armistice and postwar settie- 
ments. 


“So ngs: 


4 
st it 


ype 
Exclusively for You FACE uy 


empty gift powder box by 


Mr. Paasikivi serve 


tole Sammened 
ea Bonn Parliament 


By the Associated Press 


Bonn, Germany 

The Bonn Parliament wants to 
hear Dr. Otto John’s personal 
explanation of his 
double flight between East and 
West Germany. 

The parliamentary committee 
which has been investigating the 
desertion Communist 
Germany of the former West 
German counterespionage chief 
announced Dec. 16 it will call 
Dr. John as a witness. 


Committee chairman Gerd 
Bucerius said the committee is 
prepared to sit between Christ- 
mas and New Year to hear Dr. 
John, if necessary. 

The committee has been col- 
lecting evidence about Dr. John’s 
eastward flight for months. It 
was about to complete its report 
when Dr. John made his dra- 
matic return to the West Dec. 12. 


to 


The committee was set up after , 
ithe government was hotly criti- 


cized 
house ) 


in the Bundestag (lower 
in connection with the 
“scandal.” 


ing Communist in the United 
States and ex-chief of the East 
German Government Informa- 


ers reported. 

(Dr. John had 
“generous help and hospitality” 
in East Germany and had been 
free ty» do as he wished, Herr 


| Eisler told a meeting of young. 
Communists Dec. 16, according | 
‘to the West 
‘agency DPA.} 

The blond, former spy hunter | 


German news 


now is being questioned by an 


| any cay for a charge of 


~ so Bucerius said his com- 


mittee heard a recording of a 
tapped telephone conversa- 
| tion between Dr. John and his. 


friend, Dr. 


shortly before Br. 


baffling | 


East | 


said in East Berlin | 
that the John affair was “noth- | 
. ing to get excited about,” Reut- 


been given | 


& Oe : the Rit 


The answer to Christmas shopping problems for the beauties on your 
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to-order face powder right before her eyes. $1 and $2 sizes, plus 
tax. Toiletries, street and Chestnut Hill, 


RH! 


140 Tremont Street in Boston (Telephone HUbbard 2-0260) 55 Boylston Street in Chestnut Hill 


ty filene’s 


from our budget sports shop, stréet floor 


, She apparently is the source of 
iunconfirmed reports that Dr. 
| John claims he was drugged by 
a doctor friend in West Berlin 
and found himself in the East 
when he came to. The reports 
say he had to wait months to lull 
the suspicions of the Commu- 
nists before making his escape. 

Herr Bucerius said his com- 
mittee would hold up its final 
report until it had heard Dr. 
John 


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Festival of Operas 


TD aR S . «4 
_.. Series. of Gala. Premieres... 


Received With 


> 


ee 


Acclaim 


By Rudolf Klein 


The opening night in the re- 
ed Opera House, when 


. construct 
“Fidelio” was, presented, may 


. tra, which 


not have come up to our expec- 
tations entirely, but the pre- 
miéres which followed reached 
heights which will not soon be 
forgotten. The enormous suc- 
cess of ' these evenings sprang 
from the rare homogeneity of 
the opera ensemble, from inte- 
grated group performances, and 
not least from the work of the 
Vienna Philharmonic Orches- 
is also the Vienna 
Opera House Orchestra. 

“Don Giovanni” —sung in 
German—was set for the second 


_ evening of the festival. Under 


_ tions of Mozart 


the conducting of Karl Béhm, 
an interpretation of ‘the first 
order was given. Perhaps for 
that reason it held no surprises 
for us, for excellent interpreta- 
in the postwar 
period, even in the interim thea- 
ter in which the State Opera 


played, have been the order al 


the day. 

Among the regular members 
of the company the American, 
George London, in the title role 
cut the best figure. Many for- 
eigners, who have known noth- 
ing of the Mozart style in post- 
war Vienna, might have been 
startled by the simplicity of the 
stage décor, which was adapted 
to each change of scene by a 
few accessories. Attention was 
concentrated on the portrayal 
by the artist; and this was to 
the advantage of all. 


From Richard Strauss 

An opera by Richard Strauss, 
rarely performed even in Eu- 
rope, the “Frau ohne Schatten” 
(Woman without a Shadow), 
was a special concern of Bohm, 
who was responsible for the 
original performance. It is a 
piece of curious content, with 
certain similarities to 
Magic Flute.” 


There are in it two pairs, who | 


different spheres 
intellectual, 


embody 


mankind—the set 


forth symbolically in the persons | 


of the Kaiser and the Kaiserin; 
and the sensual, expressed in 
the dyer and his wife. The crux 
of the problem is the “shadow™ 
of the wife, which serves as a 
symbol of fruitfulness 
The poet, Hugo 
mannsthal, spins from these 
gredients a compact and not al- 
ways comprehensible semimys- 
tical web of guilt and expia- 
tion, light and shade, enticement 
and testing, which 


Hof- 


iti- 


von 


i 


“f 


’ 


ever,, was proved several days 
after the premiere, at a con- 
cert, when he gave such «a 
brilliant reading of “Carmina 
Burana” by Car! Orff that en- 
thusiasm knew no bounds. 

A modern contribution to the 
festival was Alban Berg's 
“Wozzeck,” that drama of out- 
raged human nature. In the con- 
ducting of Béhm, the difficult, 
sensitive, eruptive music made 
a strong impression. Moreover, 
the scenery, created by Oskar 
Fritz Schuh, aptly underscored 
the sense and content of the 
work. In the role!oef the hu- 
miliated soldier, Wozzeck, 
abused by his superiors, aban- 
doned by his sweetheart, Wal- 
ter. Berry, a young singer, made 


e--e--e 5 


in Vienna—Guest Conductors Presented in 


’ 


| 


| 


his debut, and gave an outstand- 
ing performance. Marie, his 


sweetheart, was personified as | 
perfectly by Christl. Goltz. | 


: 


“Aida” | 


‘Aida’ Performance 
The performance of 


in the framéwork of the fes-' 


tival, was least satisfying: since | 
after all the Vienna Opera has| 
no ensemble specializing in Ital- | 
lan opera, and the rules of the! 
house preclude short-term en-'| 


| gagements. Leonie Rysanek was, 
'to be sure, an excellent inter- 
| preter of the title role, but other 


roles were inadequately cast. 
The American contralto, Jean 
Madeira, who some while ago— 
when the opera was still playing 
in its temporary quarters—had 
a sensational debut as Carmen, 
was effective as Amneris. Bat 
for all that, it was obvious that 
for her the role is too high in 


' Tange. 


| operas, 


“The | 


' 


of | 


’ 


demands | 


much of stage manager and au-| 


dience, since the 
ic sustained throughout, The 
work is crammed with close- 


magic theme | 


woven. melodious music, which | 


contains splendid passages, but 
which is urgently in need of 
pruning, if only to avoid ex- 
hausting the singers, who do not 
have to display such endurance 
in any other opera, 

In the role of the Kaiserin, 
Leonie Rysanek, really the great 


|“Three Plays,” 
| Manager, nor the theatrical pro- | 


discovery of the Festival, gave | 


a surpassing performance. She 


possesses one of the most beat- | 


trained voices 
generation 


best 
younge! 


tiful and 
among the 
of singers 
*‘Rosenkavalier’ 

A second opera by Richard 
Strauss. .the “Rosenkavalier,” 
naturally hadj-to be included 
because of its Viennese colora- 
tion. ‘This work too is part of 
the repertory of the Vienna 
Opera House and consequently 
had little new to offer. At the 
same time,.under.the baton of 
Hans Knappersbusch it far sur- 
passed previous performances 
In quality of rendition, indeed, 
it was the high point of the 
memorable events of the festi- 
val. Maria Reining, Sene Ju- 
rinac, Hilde Giiden and Kurt 
Béhme, as the protagonists were 
loudly applauded. 

A guest from Chicago, Fritz 
Reinér,»was chosen to lead Wag- 
ner’s *““Meistersinger.” With out- 
standing . soloists, principally 
Irmgard Seefried, Pay! Schdf- 
fier, and Erich Kunz (as Beck- 
messer ), 
rendition of the work, although 
one could see that Wagner is 


| of 


At a matinee, Bruno Walter 
stepped before the  Philhar- 
monic om the spot where he| 
formerly conducted many | 


to present Beethoven's ' 


© Gustav Schikola 


Scene from “Aida” at the restored Vienna | 
Opera House. In the foreground may be seen 
Leonie Rysanek as Aida, George London as 


Ninth Symphony 
ners Te Deum. The 
accorded him surpassed 
others of the festival. 
The opera ballet is scheduled 
to” close” the festival with “a 
first performance of the choreo- 
graphic drama, “Othello,” by 
Boris Blacher. Then the regular 
opera season will begin. If it 
maintains in some degree the 
level of performance at the 


ovations 
all 


1 64%  Art—Musle—Theater THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, 


and Bruck-| 


festival, a new and flourishing | 


period is 
Vienna Opera. 


Pirandello at the Phoenix 


By John 
New York 

It is not surprising that Luigi | 
Pirandello’s probing paradoxes | 
should retain their fascination 
There in his highly subjec- 
live realism, an originality of 
thought, a view of the human 
dilemma which continues to 
challenge the man out front. At 
the moment, the challenge is 
being offered at the Phoenix 
Theater, where “Six Characters 
in Search of an Author” has 
opened. 

Pirandello would have given | 
Descartes’ confident assertion 
an interrogative twist: “I think, 
therefore [I am-—what?” Not 


1S 
> 


sential question more disturb- 
ingly. 
Object of Irony 

“The object of Pirandello’s 
bitter irony,” writes Arthur Liv- 


ingston, in his prefatory note to 
“is not the stage 


the dramatic 
is the dramatist: it 


ducer, 
cTitic 


nor even 
it 


is 


the artist; it is, in the end; life 


itself.” 

The Pirandello theme—what 
Stark Young calis “that relation 
fiction and reality and the 
nature of truth that is the hero 
of most of his plays’—serves 


'“Six Characters in Search of an 


Author” in a particularly in- 


genious. way. Six. characters- who 


have been abandoned by their 
author interrupt a theatrical 
troupe preparing to rehearse a 
play, The play-within-a-play’s 


the thing with which Pirandetio 


catches the conscience of the 
spectator 

The HItalian’s object, as usual, 
is to prove that the real world 
of the imagination possesses 
more actuality than the imag- 
inary. world of the real. The 
imaginary father who speaks for 
the Six tells the director, that “if 


we have no other reality beyond | 


the illusion, you too must not 
count too much on your reality 


‘as you feel it today, since, like 


that of yesterday, it may prove | 


'an illusion for you tomorrow.” 


he gave a beautiful | 


Tyrone Guthrie has bestowed 
his customary buoyant and in- 
ventive theatricalism on 


not his special field of conduct~/| most brilliant Phoenix produc- 


is an orchestra 


ing. That he 


tion to date. Indeed, the puffs 


leader of the first rank, how-'of smoke in which Madame 


Art in Delaware 


ee 


By Dorothy Grafiy 


Wilmington, Del. 

one of the last 
strongholds of art conservatism, 
has capitulated to 
trends in its current 42d annual 
exhibition where the abstract 
and semiabstract have as dis- 
tinct an edge on the representa- 
tional as new contributors have 


Delaware, 


_on the old. 


To relative newcomers, in 
fact, go all the major awards. 
Held in Delaware Art Center, 
Wilmington, the annual allows 
each of its three jurors to give 
one of three equal $100 prizes, 
with the jurors as a panel 
awarding the $50 second prize. 

William Lee Freeland and 
Robert D. McKinney, two vigor- 
ous young West Chester paint- 


modern | 


Dish” Freeland uses still-life 
poldly for design effect. McKin- 
ney in “Blue Quarry” analyzes 
landscape down to dramatic 
color-pattern essentials. Ruth 
Egri Holden on the other hand 
relies for effect on flat color 
areas and on distortion of the 
human figure. 

What each juror chose as an 
individual, however, differs rad- 
ically from the jury choice as a 


, whole, the second prize going to 


of 


a representational canvas, “Sin- 
gle Figure No, 4,” by a young 
realist, Robert R. Bliss, who, no 
less than his honor-winning col- 
leagues, is experimenting with 
forms and color values in space. 
Working in a restrained palette 
blues, lavender-grays, and 


) | trast 
|} even Hamlet propounded the es- | eames 


Beaufort 

Pace vanishes and.the use of. the 
dummy to simulate the body of 
the boy commits suicide 
appear to be Guthrie innova- 
tions. No stage directions for 
such effects occur in the Dutton 
translation. They may — with 
justification—disturb Pirandello 
purists. The question as to 
whether the director has gone 
too far is certainly debatable. 


who 


in prospect for the) 


But it cannot be denied that | 


Mr. Guthrie gives the play a 


| positive clarity. The definition 


is furthered in the bold colors 
of Alvin Colt’s 1922 costumes 
for the rehearsing actors, con- 
with the mourning 
black of the Characters. 


It oce- | 


| 


' ‘ ; 
(curs in Kiaus Holm’s scenery | 


land lighting. A clump of mun- 


|dane stage ladders. for instance, | 


casts a network of 
shadows on the backstage wall 
| Stage movement and grouping 
further enhance the defined ef- 
| fect. 

actor who makes himself at 
\home in the empty, half-lit cav- 
ern of the stage creates imme- 
diately the contrast between the 
reaim of illusion (the stage it- 
self) and the individual human 
Deing (who is aiso an actor 
playing the part of an actor 
who will have a part to play). 
The layers of Pirandello enigma 
lare like the leaves of an arti» 
i\choke—as each falis away, 
there is more.meat inside. Like 
artichokes, Pirandello can be 
an acauired taste, even after a 
+ generation. 

It has been said 
Phoenix production that the 
mundanely real actors of the 
play are more persuasive than 
the six illusory Characters. This 
may be largely because the for+ 
mer are, on the whole, bette! 
acted. It may also be that Mr. 
Guthrie’s most natural habitat 
is the world of comic relief. A 
|Guthrie production 


of the 


Feininger | 


The early arrival of a ‘single | 


| Peking Opera. 
left critics of the arts; 
istand (1) for north, the planet 


‘to see the reactions of Composers | 
| water, and violet; 


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OPPO LL LIK MOTO wR ES PERE os. = SoS SE ad 


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apannte— « 


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Philharmonic Symphony. 
With Szell and Monteux 


ene yr we eee 


REP eR aie 


By Miles Kastendieck 


New York 


: 
: 


of the D’Indy pa bes oye A proved 


Guest conductors have taken the most memorab 


over the 


greasy | 


the Metropolitan + yg 
George Szell recently 


Philharmonic-S 


g his operatic ent 
a House. ome of the most inspiring inter- 
returned | pretations in years. 


; 


to be on the podium for a month. | 


Preceding him, Pierre Monteux 
came for a fortnight as a spe- 
cial guest in honor of his 80th 
. Both conductors have fol- 
wed the line of standard or- 
chestral fare. 
Mr. Monteux presented the 
Brahms Third Symphony and 


'“Pastoral” 


) Overture to 


ist and conductor responded so 
completely to their compatriot’s 
music. that the work ved 


Mr, Szell started out with an 
all-Beethoven program — the 
“Coriolanus”: the 
Fourth Piano Concerto, with Eu- 
gene Istomin as soloist; and the 
Symphony, Mr. 


| Szell’s meticulous direction cre- 
-ated strictly classic perform- 


ances, somewhat restrained in 


Debussy’s “La Mer” in the first | Spirit. Mr. Istomin caused ‘con- 


concert: with Mischa 
piaying the Bruch Violin Con- 
certo in G minor on one occa- 
sion, and the Mendelssohn 


| 


' 


Elman | siderable stir not only by beau- 


tiful piano playing but through 
a maturity of artistry most com- 


Con-/| Plimentary to his progress as 


certo on the other. A week later | Pianist. 


the concert consisted of an hour | 


of Berlioz, chiefly excerpts from 


| Casadesus was soloist 
Amonasro, Hans Hopf as Radames, and Jean 


Madeira as Amneris. The production was one 
of these marking reopening of the 


house. 


eww wr 


ander 


) 


| 


“Romeo and Juliet’: and Alex- 
Brailowsky playing 
Chopin’s F Minor Piano Con- 


certo. 


Casadesus Soloist 


For his final program, Robert 
in Mo- 
zart’s Concerto (K. 491), and 
D’Indy’s “Symphony on a 
French Mountain Song.” Of all 


| zertstiick,’ 
played William Schuman’s cho- ; 
|reographic poem, “Judith,” and 
Third | 
While the “Judith” remains a. 


’ 


log offered a peculiar. program 


which brought a great deal of | 
muerg he He dusted off Weber's 


irst Symphony, and the “Kon- 
for Mr. Casadesus, 


introduced Casadesus’s 
Piano Concerto. 


| granitic score, its intellectualism 


holds interest especially “when | 
| the performances this final one! Mr. 
Both conductor and soloist were | 
virtuosos in the music of Weber. | 
Mr. Casadesiis’s Concerto is a’ 
commanding re-| 
spect but little else. In a later | 


Mitropoulos conducts 


fluent score. 


program, Gaby, Robert, and 


~ |} dean Casadesus made a whole 


:2 > A a 
CMD MEMOS. - 


2 


Pe ee 


Detail from the production of “Die Meistersinger” at the Vienna Opera House 


Peking Opera in Retrospective View 


By W. H. Haddon Squire 
London 


as a curious consequence, the | gleaming 
12} 


sacred hymns are sung in 


| family of soloists. 
Sibelius Honored 


| In honor of Sibelius’s 90th an- 


'niversary, the Unisomi and the 


Finlandia Foundation presented | 


an all-Sibelius program with the 
Symphony of the Air. Jussi Ja- 
las, son-in-law of the composer, 
came from Finland to conduct. 
The concert was played in mem- 
ory of the late Olin Downes, 
who had a vital part in winning 
American audiences to an ap- 
preciation of Sibelius’s music. 
The program featured the 
Fourth and Seventh symphonies, 
the ‘performance of the former 
dedicated to Mr. Downes. It also 
included two relative] un- 


known works—‘“The ver,” 


“Luonndé- 


tar,” Op. 70, which Sylvia Aar- 


as the 


swordplay, 
stage was brilliantly meee. 


The sensational success of the? different keys during “the year, | What we had to Imagine was 


Theater of China 
at the. Paiace 


Classical 


Theater, 
with enough to ponder over for 
months. and it will be interesting 


of ballet, opera, choreographers, 
dancers, producers, designers of 


i\décors and costumes, in fact all 


invariably | 


possesses an immense relish for | 
‘problem of what really consti- 


the performer and the perform- 
ance. One player has defined the 
Guthrie technique as the act of 
“liberating” his actors. 


ithe human spirit in comedy 
i\than in the kind of tragedy 
|Pirandello uses for his play- 
within-a-play. The interior plot 
concerns the husband who drove 
his wife into his secretary's 
arms with far-reaching, tragic 
| results, 

Kurt Kasznar gives a robust- 
ly comic performance as the 
baffled director who manfully 
attempts to release the six 
wretched and unrealized Char- 
acters by giving ‘them life in a 
play. Natalie Schafer and Fran- 
cis Bethencourt set an ingratiat- 
ingly extravagant style for the 
‘professional make - believers. 
Aileen Poe and Fred Warriner 


If that is true, it is also true} 


the | that there is more liberation of | 


| with 
iment” 


| point 


also add to the pleasantry of the | 


evening. 


Details of Acting 

The actors portraying the six 
Characters fall somewhat short 
of the effect they should 


those artists for whom the thea- 


ter... provides...a..home..for..their. 


activities. For critics the Peking 
Opera provided a supreme ex- 
ample of the categorical convic- 
tion of their Eastern colleague, 


+ Venkatachaiam: 


“In art, tradition is the most 
revolutionary thing I know, and 
it is tradition that gives art 
vitality, its strength and beauty 
An art without tradition is like a 
tree without roots, a river with- 
out its bed. True art is both tra- 
dition and technique, not the 
whims and fancies of individ- 
uais.” 

As shown in a previous article, 
the Peking Opera has solved the 


: 
ILS 


tutes opera and ballet as art- 
forms by a synthesis consisting 
of song, dance, music, and acting. 
To repeat: “each dance move- 
ment and gesture, each word 
sung or recited, is synchronized 
the musical accompani- 
with the whole falling 
into a definite pattern as a theat- 


Tical spectacle. 


Traditional Backgraund 


The western world, even to- 
day, can offer no really ‘satisfy- 
ing definition of either “opera” 
or “ballet.” Pick up Paul Bek- 
ker’s “The Changing Opera” or 
Serge Wifar’s “Ballet, Traditiona! 
to Modern” and you will get 


some faint notion of the confu- |! 
(sion and bewilderment of those 


supposed to be expert critics of 
these forms. From the Eastern 
of view. their theories 
amount to little more . “the 
whims and fancies of divid- 


uals.” 


Before going on to the subject 


, matter treated by the Classical 


'achieve, Whitfield Connor makes | 


of the father but ends in being 
too sympathetic. Betty Lou 
Holland’s monotonous neuroti- 


Theater of China it is worth 
casting a glance at the tradi- 
tional background of Chinese 


rs yj . | music—the key art which links 
a consistently interesting figure | it, synthesis. It is illustrative in 


More senses than one for the 


Westerner. 


| for 
| white: (5) for south, Mars, fire, 


the influence of india on 


or | rising by a semitone from month 


to month. Again, 
five notes of the Chinese scale 


and the color 
east, Jupiter, 
(3) for center, 
earth, and yellow; (4) 
west, Venus, metal, and 


Mercury, wood, 
black: (2) for 


Saturn, 


and red.” 


Influence of India 

Here again, according to 
Sachs, is indubitable evidence of 
Chi- 
nese art—an influence which 
seems to have escaped the notice 
of any commentator on the Chi- 
nese Classical Theater one has 
far come across. Yet every 
student knows that in India the 
sound patterns of ragas are re- 
lated to colors, days of the week, 
elements, heavens, planets, sea- 
sons, signs of the zodiac, voices 
of birds, man’s ages, psychology, 
and so on 

Perhaps the closest parallel to 
the synthesis of the Peking 


So 


Opera that we have had: in the” 


West was the Gothic period of 
architecture. with its sculpture 
and stained giass, “those mount- 
ing prayers in stone and giass” 
and, not least, its Gothic music. 
The schoo] known as the Notre 


Dame de Paris was the greatest | 
| music center of the time and in 
‘Chartres Cathedral 
il2th 


there is a 
century -figure - of —music, 
complete with bell-chimes, viol, 
and psaltery. History enables us 
to trace the relation of “Notre 
Dame Melody,” “Chord Color” 
and 
tions to the human voice and the 
liturgical drama. 

At the Palace Theater we were 
“whisked in a jiff” right into 
the middle of a 
folk tale—“Where Three Roads 


Meet.” Two men were fighting | 


in the dark with flashing swords, 
but we were not expected to 
imagine the pyrotechny of 


as 


“almost bare 


“Rhythm” and their rela- ' 


14th century | 


\the darkness in which the fight | 
the normal, 


was going on and the miracu- | 
lous timing which enabled the} 
fighters to miss each other by | 
the fraction of a second or an/| 
inch. | 
We were fortunate in having 

introducer and compere| 
Miles Malleson, the well-known 
English playwright, producer, | 


,and character actor, who knows, 
the Chinese theater at first hand 5 4 ; 
and is obviously an enthusiast. | mend The Martina, written for | 


He recounts how he saw one | 
of their acrobatic 
Chinese acrobatism astonished 
even case-hardened London au- 
diences—representing a battle, 
with the stage crowded. “I felt,” 
he said, “that if one of the per- 
formers put a foot wrong, there 
would not only be chaos, but a| 
lot of defunct actors!” They | 
agreed, and replied: “We have | 
not been rehearsing these scenes 
a few weeks, but many cen-| 
turies.” | 


' 
Stage Almost Bare 


; 
Chinese drama is played on an | 
stage. Illusion 
created by the actors’ art and | 
the audience’s imagination. A | 
table is the most important stage | 


'“prop.” Now a banquet table, | 


now a magistrate’s desk; covered | 
by a cloth, surmounted by a/| 
chair it becomes a throne. The | 


_actor climbs over it as a moun- 


tain, hides under it and. so on, | 
opened with the “Masonic- Fu- 


as the play demands. Each has 
its symbolic meaning just as 
every gesture has a deeper 
meaning. 

Scenes which linger in the 
memory with “Where Three 
Roads Meet” are “The Favorite 
Bids Farewell,” “Trouble in 
Heaven,” and “The Tiger Hunt- | 
ers.” The dancers with their 
lovely gliding rhythm and gor- 
geous costumes, alive with color, 
must, alas, be left to the im- 
agination of those who had the 
misfortune to miss them. 


ballets—the | 


| 
: 


oe 
1S | 


\nio sang with distinction, and | 
“Finlandia.” Mr, Jalas made a 


most favorable impression as 
conductor. The music must have 
been very much a@ part of him. 
The performance of the Fourth 
Symphony was especially fine. 

The Symphony of the Air be- 
gan its first Carnegie Hall sea- 
son under the leadership of 
Leonard Bernstein, boldly offer- 
ing Copland’s “Canticle of Free- 
dom” and Mahler’s “Resurrec- 
tion” Symphony. The first hear- 
ing of the Copland music created 
interest more for its workman- 
ship than for its emotional ap- 
peal. Though a Bernstein spe- 
cialty, the Mahler Symphony 
did not quite .equal the stand- 
ard of his previous perform- 
ances of this work. 

In its two recent visits, the 
Philadelphia Orchestra has 
played superbly, as usual. Its 
most recent program brought 
the first New York performance 
of Martind’s Concerto for Violin. 
Piano, and Orchestra, included 
Hindemith’s “Symphonic Meta- 
morphosis,” balancing... 
with the Brahms Fourth Sym- 


nno and Sylvia Rabinof. and 
played by them, posed a prob- 
lem- notcompletely solved by 
the composer, though in his at- 
tempt to do so he revealed again 
his constant flow of musical 
ideas. 


Wagner Program 


The other, prpgram was de- 
voted entirely to Wagner, with 
Margaret Harshaw as soloist. 
The concert opened with the sel- 
dom heard “Faust” Overture 
and thereafter pursued a famil- 
iar course. 


On its first visit, the Boston 
Orchestra introduced Milhaud’s 
Sixth Symphony, a work which 
proved to be conventional for 
its composer, pleasantly mild, 
and undistinguished. The per- 
formance of Ravel's Introduc- 
tion and Allegro for Harp and 
Orchestra with Bernard Zighera 
as soloist was most enthusiasti- 
cally received. @ concert 


neral Music,” played in memory 
of Olin Downes, and closed with 
the Tchaikovsky Fourth Sym- 
phony. 


Just before finishing its first) 


American tour, the Philhar- 


tmonia of London again re- 


minded everyone what a phe- 
nomenal orchestra it is. The 


| program included Vaughan Wil- 
liams’s Fantasia on a Theme of 
Tallis, 

|‘ pagnole 


Ravel's Rhapsodie Es- 

and Tchaikovsky's 
Fourth Symphony. Herbert von 
Karajan conducted. 


BOSTON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1955 Art—Musle—Theater 


Sow en} 
e aor 
P ot Se 
¥ * 
‘ ‘ i eek 
Lae - a nat 
; ; 
— ne] 
. ee 
é a * Poe wey Nar ee so. 
é ' eae y 
Ma nhi ike nm 
“ ae 4 3 wi = 
' Pert 3 : 
Ma o 


Before leaving, Mr. Mitropou- | 


it. | 


= —_= 


PR | —— a ~ ee ee 


let “Soiree” Friday night in 
New York. 


Wallenstein 
At Start Of 


Final Season 


By C. Sharpless Hickman 
Los Angeles 
The 37th season of the Los 
Arigeles Philharmonic Orchestra 
is the 13th that Alfred Wallen- 


|Stein has been music director, 


Op. 14, for Strings and Drums. | 
‘and the Tone Poem. | 


' 


; 


' 
; 


’ 


. ‘ 


‘Tannhauser’ at Covent Garden 


By J. W. Lambert 
London 


Only Gounod’s “Faust,” I! 


ceedingly ill-received. | 
We-do not complain that. 


|1939, and it has been, alas, ex-| pressively; and Wilhelm Ernest, 


a heroic tenor whose idiosyn- 
crasy it was to produce every 


Though Mr. Wallenstein will re- 
turn for guest engagements next 
season, the present series marks 
the end of his regular contract. 

Thus far there is no word as 
to his successor, and it may be 
assumed that in 1956-57 there 
will be an interregnum of guest 
conductors while a definite se- 
lection is considered. Four such 
guests are to be heard this year 
-—- Georg Solti of Frankfurt, 
Eduard van Beinum of Amster~ 
dam, William Steinberg of Pit 
burgh, and John Barnett, t 
Philharmonic’s associate con- 
ductor. 

Mr. Walienstein’s first three 
pairs of concerts found the Phil- 
harmonic performing brilliantly. 
The conductor has somewhat 
altered his string arrangement, 
placing the viola section in the 
forestage at his right, with the 
cellos behind them, and contin- 
uing to mass the basses at his 
right and all the violins at his 
left. This seems to have im- 
proved balance and provided 
better projection for the violas. 
The string tone is more glowing 
this year, the winds less shrill, 
the brasses less harsh, There is 
a considerable improvement in 
homogeneity. 


Ingenious Planning 


The first two programs were 
ingeniously planned. The first 
offered three contrasting sym- 
phonies—Prokofiev’s “Classical,” 
Hindemith’s “Mathis der Maler® 
and Tchaikovsky’s Fourth. The 
second had three types of con- 
certi—the classical, represented 
by Bach's Second “Branden- 
burg,” the romantic, by Rach- 
maninov’s Third Piano Concerto 
(with Leonard Pennario as s0- 
loist); and the modern, by Bar- 
ték’s Concerto for Orchestra. 

The Tchatkovsky 
phony was more bombastic and 
less judiciously paced at the 
regular pair of concerts than it 
was when repeated two weeks 
later at Pasadena. The “Classi- 
cal” Symphony was an illustra- 
tion of strict discipline, but left 
something to be desired in 
warmth and grace. “Mathis der 
Mailer” received a reading which 
was meticulous and masterful 
as well. 

Tactics which somewhat 
marred the Tchaikovsky sym- 
phony also gave too gleaming 
a coating of chrome to the 
Rachmaninov Concerto, which 
Pennario played in an almost 
brutal style. He was in a better 
way expressive in the slow 
movement, as was the orchestra. 
The Second “Brandenburg” 
Concerto, done with reduced 
orchestra, was a treat, Bert 
Gassman’s oboe solos pro 
particularly effective. But the 
Barték Concerto for Orchestra 
was the high mark of this pro- 
gram. Never were its complexi- 
ties delineated with greater 
clarity and tasteful sense of 
proportion. 


Elman and Cortes 


Sharing honors at the third 
pair of concerts were 21-year- 
old Ramiro Cortes and the vete 
eran violinist, Mischa Elman. 


He kept the work in intimate 
form, making the Canzonetta 
movement truly that, and re- 


Pourth Sym- x ead wre 


note separately, as though each 
was a coin tumbling from a fruit 
machine, and Whose if 


Music, as an American his-| 
torian of much repute, Dr. Curt 
Sachs, tells us, is for the Chinese 


ers who are just beginning to} creams, he daringly places his 
cl attention, respectively figure far to the right of his 
won the prizes awarded by ju- 'composition, balancing its form 
rors Antonio P. Martino and | and weight at the left by means 


“Tannhduser” has a silly story; 
is a mark of many 
operas. We must regret that it 


cism as the stepdaughter, on 
the other hand, loses sympathy. 
Maud Scheerer brings a fine 


suppose, sO many easy- 
whistling, hummable tunes as 
“Tannhauser” — the’ Pilgrim’s | 


Doris Lee; while Wilmington 
painter Ruth Egri Holden, ac- 
corded two prizes in last year's 
annual, was selected for honor 


jury, Raphael Sabatini. 
Completely different 
the 


three winners con- | 
stitute a cross-section of mod- |™ore 


ern trends, In his award-win- 
ning “Death of a Fly in a Fruit 


' 


| 


; 


) 


-by the third member of the / spring 


: 


in art | Winning “I Believe” is as_emo- 


| 


: 


| coexist with equal effectiveness 


, MOLL: R 
Renowned tor Pipe Organs Since 1775 


of color intensity alone. 
Similarly, the quiet simplicity 
developed from realistic subject 
mattér (a book, a window sill. a 
landscape beyond) in 
Barclay Rubicam’s mention- 


tionally vibrant as any of the 
vivid semiabstractions. 
Thus, despite accent on the ab- 

ct, rea and its opposite 


in Delaware's annual, | 
Other mentions went to Albert 
B. Serwazi and M Bernadine 


buffo exuberance to the brief 
role of the despicable Madame 
Pace. Katherine Squire makes 
a miserable enough creature of 
the mother and Michael Wager 
is darkly effective as the legiti- 
mate son who despises both his 
mother- and her three . 


children 
born out of wedlock. Mr. Wa- 


ger, along with Mr. Guthrie, is 
credited with the new adapta- 
tion which is literate but col- 


not only connected with reli- 
gion but also with cosmology, 
“the meaningful interrelation of 
all the various aspects under 
which the universe presents it- 
self, be they cardinal points, 
seasons, colors, matters, or nat- 


Chorus, the Ceremonial March, 
Elizabeth's Greeting and Prayer, 
Tannhaduser’s own rude and 
tactless trolling; and above all, 
“© Star of Eve.” In spite of all 


these attractions it remains dull. ) 


Still, because it is by Wagner, 
it seems to be felt that it must 
be done from time to time—not 
that anybody does “Rienzi” on 

. When the 


because he 
| ducts Wagner with delicacy 


| has so much slow, droning, con- 
‘certina-chorded music; and 
when this music is matched by a 
\slow, droning -production, we 
cannot expect much aesthetic 
| satisfaction. 

Rudolf Kempe is a welcome 
‘visitor here; | con- 
and 
/restraint—one can hear 

| singers, in fact, at least half the 
time. 


too, was 


I must flee these cozy bowers, 
I leng to see the blogs’ ming 
flowers 


old-fashioned, was at least vig- 
His ex- 


; 
i 
. 
“tits : 
Hal 


4 

- 

, 

- 

- 
g 
; 

| 

§ 


e Boston n Stage Pros rospects- 
is scapes Mendes 


- Two Play 
Phough it's 


Seed.” which will be pre-_ 


% sented at the Plymouth Theater 


bythe Playwrights’ Company. 
“Two of the current produc- 
in town are eontinuing for 


” 


starring e 
starts the third week of a four- 
week engagement Monday. Sean 
OCasey'’s “Red Roses for Me,” 
at the Plymouth has one more 
week to go before it departs for 
Broadway. 
+ + s 


Nancy Kelly is starred In the 
“Bad Seed,” and Ann Shoe- 
maker, Arthur Jarrett, Roy 
Poole, and Kimetha Laurie are | 
featured. Miss Laurie has the | 
role of a little girl who murders | 
people, and Miss Kelly portrays | 
her mother. The play has been | 
adapted from a novel by William | 
March. 

In the cast beside those al- 
ready mentioned are  Lioyd | 
Gough, Elizabeth Council, James 
Field, Virginia Maddocks, Don- | 
ald Keyes, and Gordon Clarke. 
The production has been staged 
by Reginald Denham. Setting 
and lighting were designed by 
George Jenkins and costumes by 
Sal Anthony. The eng\gement 
here is included in the sub- 
scription series of the Theater 
Guild and American Theater 
Society. 

, 


, 4 


Plays and players in prospect | 


beyond next week include the 
following 


Gilbert and Sullivan—At the 
Shubert, for two weeks begin- 
ning Monday, Dec. 26. “The 
Mikado” will be given by the 
D’Oyly Carte Company from 
Monday through Wednesday of 
the first week, and “Iolanthe” 
from Thursday through Satur- 
day. “Trial by Jury” and “Pina- 
fore” are scheduled for Monday 
through Wednesday the second 
week, and “The Pirates of Pen- 
zance” will be given from Thurs- 
day throtigh Saturday. 


Dancing in the Cheaquered 
Shade—At the Wilbur beginning 


A 


s to Continue 


will direct and Boris Aronson 
will design the setting. Walter 
Starcke is the producer. Two 
weeks. 


Time Limit—At the Colonial, 


beginning on Monday, Jam. 
2. New play by Henry Denker 


| and Ralph Berkey about pris- 


oners in the Korean war, — 
sented by the Theater Guild in 

the subscription series. Arthur 
Kennedy, Richard Kiley, Harvey 
| Stephens, Allyn McLerie, Thomas 
i|Carlin; Frank Aletter, Arthur 
| Storch, Vergel Cook, John Con- 


nell, Robert Drew, Lione} Ames, | 


Kaie Deei, and Ch’ ao-Li. The | 
| production has been staged for 
ithe Theater Guild by Windsor 
| Lewis, and has been designed 
‘and lighted by Ralph Alswang. 
| Costumes..are by Noel Taylor. 
| The engagement will be in the 
Theater Guild-American Thea- 
ter Society subscription series. 
| Two weeks. 


| Fallen Angels—At the Plym- 
outh, beginning Monday; Jan. 2. | 
Revival of Noel Coward play of 
the 1920's with the setting) 
changed from London to New | 
'York. Margaret Phillips, Nancy 
Walker. William lL. Massena, 
and William. Windom will be in 
the cast. One week, 


The Hot Corner—<At the Wil- 
our beginning Jan. 9. Comedy 
by Allan Boretz and Ruby Sully, 


about the problems of a former 
major-league baseball manager | 


| trying to make his way to the 
| top again. Sam Levene and Vicki | 
Cummings will have the leading 
‘roles and Mr, Levene will direct. 
Eleanor Saidenberg is the 
producer. 


The Amazing Adele—At the 
Shubert beginning Tuesday, 
Jan. 10. New musical adaptation 
by Anita Loos of Barilet-Gredy 
play about a telepathic girl. Mu- 
sic and lyrics are by Albert Sel- 
iden. and the latter is the pro- 
iducer with Morton Gottlieb and 
Henry David Epstein. Reported 
for the cast are Tammy Grimes, 


Entertainment Timetable 


Music 
Srmpheny Hall—Boston Symnphone Or- 
ehestra. Arthur FPiediler 
Aléde Ciccolini. soloist 
Temerrow 


Gerdner Mueseum—Harvard Giee Club | 
and Radcliffe Chora! Society. 2 
Gympheny Hall—Boston Symphony 
chestre. Arthur Fiedler conducting 
ido B aft soloist 3 
Rreese 8 


tery. olanist 


Theater 


Celenial—""The Great Sebastiafis.”” A)- 
fred Lunt Lena Fontanne. 8:30. Mat 


Jo Ana 


, Eileen 
8:36. Wed 


Children’ s Theater 


New oe Muetual Ball—‘*The Snow 
Quee Boston Children's Theater. 


Kevin McCarthy 
Mat 


Dance Orchestra 


Tetem Pete. Nerumbeca Park. Newton— 
Dancing tonight 


Films in Boston 


Aster—"Guys and Dollis.” 
60. Jean Simmons, -" 9:16, 

735 7:30 

Beacon oS - ike African Lion.” 
3:02, 3:49. 4:36. 6:23. 8:10. 9:47 Peter 
and the Woit 11:01, 12:46, 3:35. 4:22 
6:09. 56. 9:43. Short 

~~ Cinerame Holiday.’ 2:30. 5:39, 


Marion Bran- 
11:40, 2:15 


9:35. 11:15 


&: 
oue"On the Loose.” Joan Andrews 

9:30. 12:35 3:06. 5:50. 8:30. “Out rage 

Ma‘s Powers. 10:55. 1:45. 4:30. 7:20. 10 
Exeter—Shorts. 2 4:15. 6:30. 8:45 Pan- 

4 ‘ 15 *The 
Pernandeil. 2 
* 31:38. 1:86 

House of Horrors 

0 


Tarantule.” Jo 
A 


{ 9.30. 
13:46. 3:05, 5:53. 8:41. 
1:15, 3°48. 6:21. 8:54, 
* Ernest pasperne, Betsy Biair. 
2:3. 4 ‘1. 7:35, 9:50 
Mayflower—"French Touch.” Pernandel. 
8:20. 12:20 © 6:30. 9:45. “Love Is 


congucting. 
w ; 


Or- | 


Cambridge—Er nest | 


he tee Ee “Te Hell and 
“Beminole Upri ane. 
MALDEN Auditoriom 


“Kise of 
Lady Godive 


. i] 3°21 34 
ee t ds ] 
‘ . “Man With the Gun.” 
32 
mAattAPAN 
Thousend Times.’’ 
MAYNARD — Fime Arte: “View From 
ompey’s Mead.’ 5:45, 8:15 
Dp — Felseway: 
The Detective 


~— @QOrtental “TI Died 


Lucy Gallant.”’ 


“To Caton « 


3 Stripes in the Sun 

: ite Feather 

MELEOSE—Metreoce: “Laat 
Paris.” “Kies Me Deadiy 


nes a Ye ee “Trial.” 


The Na 
NEPONSET—Drive. In: 
’ esert Sand 
_ WEON—Parameunt: 
Oun.”'*Lecy Gallant 
/Q@UINC ~~." eames ‘Big Knife.” 


| God 
REVERE — Drive-In 


“Desert Sand 
ROSLINDALE ialie: 
Yo Night of the Hun 
ROXBE RY—« lesten: “Bincerely Yours.” 


it of the Hunter 
soml "My 


Time 1 Saw 
“Fran- 


“Man with the 


“Man with the 
“Lady 
“Man with the 


Rs eet 


LVILLE — Ball Sq.-Capitel: 
8i — Blieen.” “9 Cities of Gold 
Sq. ne im 0 CRed 


Tee Velvet 
wach y oo 


“Bpecial De- 
“Rebel Without 

a Cause.” 7:65 
y Wat THAM—Contret: 

Rome.” Lure of the Sila . 

pe Lucy Gallant.” 


WATERTOWN — Coolidge: 


ea 
WELLESLEY. ee vee “Trial.” 
Heediine Hunters.’ 2:25 
WEST NEWTON—Weat Aa “? Cit- 
i¢s of Gold” ‘3 Stripes in the Sun.” 
weryes TH — Weymouth: “Blood Al- 
West of Zanzibar.” 
WINCHESTER _ iggy 0 “Rede! 
Without Cause.” Athe 
WINTHROR_Wiethres:, “Quentin Dur- 
° 


ward ron 
WOBURN—Strand: “My Sister Eileen.’ 
WOLLAS "ON— Wollaston: “Rebel With. 


‘Chicago Syndicate 
wut a Cause” “Fireman Gave My | 
Child.” 


Le | 


“Lady Go- 


“Ulysses.” 


- Many Bglendosed Thing,” Jennife 
Jénes, 10: 1:46. 4:50. 8: 
pelitan — “Naked Dawn.” 


row, eo Moore. Johan Agar. 
140. 4:35. 7:10. 9.55 
can ye een Bee. 
36. 12°40, 3:46. 6°50. 9°56 | on 
issippi,” Lex Barker, 11:25, 3:30. 


6 ‘35. , 
ameunt—"Black Cat." 8:30. 11:48, 
“House of Hor- 


35, 6, 8:30 


James Deah. | 


. , 

2:50. 7:40. “Battle 7, * Yao Hetf- 

. ie . Aigo Ray. 12:05. 4:55. 9:30. 
at "Duel on Mdississipol” Lex 
11:40 sO. 8:40. “6. “Queen 
Bee” dean Crawford, 12:56. 3:55. 6:54. 

Strand—‘Left Hand of God.” Hum 

Bogart. “Big House. U.S.A.” Br 


Ore hestra: 


hrey 
erick 


ion in qq 
ny: news. 16:30 om 


ight. 
ns-Lax—"Quentin Durwer 
Tay Fier, 9:30. 12:33. 
uf” John Br asia | 


* Jack Palance Ida 

9:40. “Lacy Gal- 

1.” Jane Wyman, Chariton Hes- 
12:50. 4:30. & 


Films in Suburbs 


gn oe “Quentin Durward.” 
‘Lucy Gallant 
ARLINGTON—Capitol: “Girt in Red 
Velvet Swing.” ‘Cobweb. 
“My Sister Eileen.” “Stranger 
crsebac 


intree: “Summertime.” 


EE—Brai 
ee oR of the Hunter.’ — 
NE—Cleveland Crete: “Love Is 


“Man 
“Lady 


Knife,” 3:53 


sites “a 
“4 te af Gold.” 


is in| 


’ Yours.” “Night of 
r + 9 


Arthur | 
3 


10:55. | 


* Joan Crawford 


Bar- 


BOSTON ( CONCERTS) | 


Pp" SYMPHONY HALL—CO 6-1492 


TONIGHT AT 8:30 
TOMORROW AT 3 


Boston Symphony 


ORCHESTRA 


CHARLES MUNCH—Music Director 
ARTHUR FIEDLER—Conductor 
ALOO CICCOLINI—Piene 


unser d > ingltiil * 


~ 
| 
: 
| 
Pire : 
3 80, | 
‘qhj1s 5:10 9:23. 


40 
3: 12. $2 


yay: gen EF 


—Parronchi Recital—Fiedler ‘Symphony Guest 


Big 

i 

| Leo Friedman . * 
Nancy Kelly, starring in 

“The Bad Seed.” which comes 

| to the Plymouth Monday. 


| Johnny Desmond, Joey Faye, 
Dagmar, and Enid Markey, Two 
weeks, . 
The Ponder 
|Shubert, beginning 
| Jan. 23. Dramatization 
| Jerome Chodorov 


Monday, 
by 
and Joseph 


|Fields of a novel by Eudora | his vitality in a commanding | 


Welty about an eccentric South- | 
erner 
| Una. Merkel and Serah Marshall | 
will be featured. Two weeks. 


Walting for Godot — At the 
Wilbur, beginning Monday, Jan 
23.: Play by Samuel Beckett, 
now running in London, with 
Bert Lahr and Tom Ewell to 
be seen as two philosophizing 
tramps in a cast of’five. Michael 
Myerberg is the producer. Two 
weeks, 

Someone Waiting—At the 
'Plymouth, beginning Monday, 
Jan. 30. Psychological. English 
|\melodrama by Emlyn Williams, 
with Leo G. Carroll, Jessie 
Royce Landis, and Howard 5t. 
John in a cast directed by Allan 
Davis. The setting has been de- 
signed by Ben Edwards. The 


Eddie Rich. Two weeks. 


™)\other of his ingratiating cello 
F lrecitals last night in Jordan 


ng wl wi 
| The 


: 


David Wayne will star. 


he nig Oe 


Hall, He spaces them about two 


apart and has won a fol-. 
Sowing of devowed Wstenere trom | 


egg Fim 


of Boston's dis- 
music eee For 
the 

a an 

spirit and his. 


He opened his program, how- ¢ 


ever, with” se ote yer Adagio af- 
fettuoso, pl as a moving | 
vith an opulent tone. 

ta in A 
ne Sg was ay ee for. the 


technical problems Mr. 'Parron-| dalusia 


chi so easily solved, but it left | 


an impression of being some- | 
i what slender as music. . 


Pe a 


‘without . 
| strings or striking them with the 


| sou of strumming gu 


e concluded with an enter-: 


ment a exp 

and rhythms of S$ 

_enthusiastic listeners he pla 

ithree encores—Cassadd’s 
ulebros,” Popper's “Chanson 
ee and Tyrina’s “An- 


A + 


He played the Turina piece 
pow, plucking the 


this time it was evident | | palm of his hand. It is a 


By 
that, the piafiist, Salvatore Sullo, | 
was insensitive to balance and | 
tempo. With a heavy hand he'| 
was Se to the 


‘Heart—At the tly j aiied hi 
He shone brightly in some of his ber of the Boston Symphony Or- 


solo portions, but the recital | 
| after all was Mr. Parronchi's. 
The. soloist further displayed 


traversal of Beethoven's Varia- 
tions on a Theme from Handel's 
“Judas .Maccabaeus.” With -a' 


| casual ease he solved the prob- 


lems one Dy one. 
After the intermission he de- 
voted his time to Spanish com- 


, ee 
‘Boy Friend’ to Return 


“The Boy Friend,” Sandy 
Wilson's amusing spoof on 
musical comedies of the 
1920's, winds up a fortnight’s 
engagement of sold-out per- 
formances at the Shubert this 
evening. But those who were 
unable to secure tickets will 
have another chance. It will 
return to the Shubert.on Feb. 
20 for an engagement of two 


pepe —~— - 


; = 


weeks, 
e 


as 


i technique, a flamenco style 
learned from gypsies when he | 
once lived in Barcelona. 

a audience wanted more 
Mr,._Parronchi, who had | 
is regular role as 4 fier‘ 


chestra earlier in the day, had 
‘had enough. 


|. Staffanson Appointed 


| Robert L, Staffanson of Bill- 
ings, Mont., has been appointed 
music director for the Spring- 


field (Mass.) Symphony to fill | 


the post left vacant last Febru- 
ary by the late Alexander Leslie, 
founder and director. 


Mr: Staffanson is directing the 


three sections»of the Orchestra 
Association's activities — the 
symphony, a chorus of 125 
voices, and a young people's 
symphony of more than 90 mu- 
sicians. 

Mr. Staffanson, a native of 
Montana, attended the Montana 
State University, and studied 
violin and conducting in San 
Francisco. In January, 1951, he 
founded the Billings Symphony 
and the Symphony Society 


‘chorus and youth orchestras. 


Sephie Desmarets appears 


| “Ma Pomme.” opening at the 
Brattle Theater in Cambridge 
Sunday. 


with Maurice Chevalier in 


Concert Calendar 


Tuesday, Dec. 20° 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Arthur Fiedler conducting, with 
| Aldo Ciccolini as piano soloist. 
i\Symphony Hall, 8:30. 
| Judith Anne Kelly, contralto, 
‘and John Moriarty, pianist. 
/Gardner Museum, 2:45. Free. 
) Wednesday, Dec. 21 

Wha Chung Han and William 
Han, duo-pianists. Old South 
Meeting House, 12:15. 

Thursday, Dee. 22 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Charles Munch conducting, with 
Richard Burgin as vielin solecist. 
Bach, Mozart, Sibelius. Sym- 
phony Hall, 8:30. 

Leonard Hokanson, 
|\Gardner Museum, 2:45. 
Friday, Dec. 23 


pianist. 
Free. 


gram as Thursday. 
Hall, 2:15. 


Saturday, Dec. 24 
Dolores Baldyga, soprano, and 


Symphony | 


| Museum, 2:45. Free. 


Boston Symphony. Same pro- | 


oat Po. a Spee 
~ oe > ee ae 


are paar Pe : 
eG ois 


~ In Rachmaninov Rapa 


By Harold Rogers 


- Arthur Fiedler became asso- | 


relaxed as they are during the 


ciated with the Boston Sym-/ Pops season) the concert yes-’ 


phony Orchestra 40 years ago 


a® a violinist. His father before 


‘him had been a “violinist in the’ Mr. Fiedler; but 


jorchestra for 25 years. 
Twenty-five years ago Mr. 
Fiedler became the conductor of | 
bo Boston Pops. Orchestra, a 
position that has brought: him. 


ducted the Esplanade Concerts 


pcentury, a_ series. he founded. | 
For his efforts to bring good 
music to thousands of people 
who might not otherwise attend 
a concert, the City of Boston 
has honored him by naming a 
handsome footbridge after h 
ia Dee 


He has made numerou® suc- | 
cessful recordings. He has. taken 
‘three transcontinental tours 
with the 
chestra, 


a group he assembled | 
purpose. = 

For these many valid reasons 
—and none too soon—Mr. Fied- 
‘ler has been invited to conduct 
‘the Boston Symphony for five 
'of its midseason concerts, the 
‘first of which took place yes- 
‘terday afternoon. These same 
/players, minus those of the first 
chairs, become the Boston Pops 
(at the end of the forma! season. 
Nearly everyone knows that this 
‘orchestra functions under two 
titles, but the point is made here 
'for interesting reasons. 


An orchestra is ofteh referred 


to as an instrument: and indeed 
It 35, 
As a piano responds to the mu- 
'sical personality at its keyboard, 
,\so does an orchestra refiect the 


'man-on the podium. 


One was curious to see, there- 
fore, if the orchestra yesterday 
would perform for Mr. Fiedler 
as the Boston Pops or the Bos- 
ton Symphony, and the result 
|was somewhere in between. 


which sponsors activities by a | Hazel Hallett, pianist. Gardner| Since the men were on their 


best behavior (not casual and 


j international fame. He has con- | more or 


for more thafi a quarter of a| well. 


| broughy 


Boston Pops Tour Or- | Ciccolini, 


like a piano or a violin.’ 


terday was certainly not just, 
another Pops concert. Never’ 
vhave they played sO well for 
less mb the style for. 
which he is, noted, 

Mr. Fiedler’s pr am, with 
the possible exception on of the 
Beethoven Eighth , is 
less in 
the type of music he knows so 
-;" will repeat this 
| gram in Symphony baw to t 
Sunday afternoon, and T 
evening, and in Sanders Thea- 
ter, Cambridge, the following 
Tuesday. 

He opened with Hans Kind- 


- ler’s transcription of a Toccata, 
| attributed to and 


ldi, 
it off with a sturdy, 
forthright beat. After a rather 
routine traversal of the Bee- 
'thoven Eighth, he accompanied 
_the young Italian pianist, Aldo 
in Rachmaninov’s 
| Rhapsody on a Theme of inet 


oe Bee 

Although this virtuoso piece 
is designed mainly for pyrotech- 
nical display, Signor Cieccolini 
brought a considerable amount 
of poetry to’it, especially in the 
little waltz portion. He is a sen- 
sitive player, as he demon- 
strated here five years ago when 
he played the Beethoven Piano 
Concerto No. 4. 

Yesterday he also proved that 
he could handle a flamboyant 
showpiece with clean articula- 
tion, incredible spéed, and &@ 
variety of tone colors. He was 
recalled to the stage several 


times by -clapping hands and 


stamping feet. 

Mr. Fiedler closed with 
Kodaly’s colorful Dances of 
Galanta. Here he brought out 
the rhapsodic Hungarian moods, 
the spinning rhythms and sud- 
den rubatos. The lilting rise and 
fall came forth in the conduc- 
tor’s best vein. 


bandas will be presented by 


| 


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SCIENCE MONITOR | 


._Prudence Views the Sky.» 


Peery Be 


eens anybody want to come up to the 
attic with me and see the sunset?” 
Pridence said. “When it shows pink over 
there on Ann’s house it’s at its best.” 

I looked up from my sock darning, Nell 
from her cross-stitched table cloth, and 


“Ann from her magazine to.see what Prue 


was talking about. We were sitting before 
her fireplace one late afternoon not many 
weeks ago. Julia was at the window, may- 
be figuring out the next day’s weather 
from the clouds, as we like to think she 
does. Beyond her, and over yellow Stein- 
way, who was bunched on the window- 
sill, we could see,"sure enough, that Ann's 
long white house looked stylishly pink- 
from the sunset. 

“Well.” said Nell, “this is something 
new. I haven't gone up to see the view 
since I was at that hotel in Key West 
where you take the elevator to the roof 
to see the wide expanse of ocean.” 

“I’ve been on top of the Empire State 
Building,” Ann said smugly, though as if 
she had been challenged. 

. Prue, from the west window in the din- 

ing room now, called in to us, “It’s gor- 
geous! But you can’t really see it down 
here. I've been going to the attic lately, 
when I can’t get outdoors, where I can 
actually see the sun set.” 

“I climb to the attic in my house only 
to get the children’s woolens out, or to 
store the magazines I never really finish 
reading,” Ann said. “I'm afraid sunsets 
come and go, and I just take a peek out 
the pantry window and say, “There must 
be a lovely sunset tonight!’ ” 


i ae 
“That's just it,” Prudence 
us. “We won't bother 


said, 
now. But i 


joining 
t's there 
and it’s beautiful and. we're missing it!” 
She sat down on a stool before the 
rubbing Splendid’s homely but 
black head as she talked. “We never see 
a sunset unless we are driving right to- 
ward one, or sitting on a hill at a picnic, 
or are at the ocean or in the mountains. It 
occurred to me last week, when | was in 
the garret in the late afternoon and 
looked out the window at one of those 
spectacular round fireball sunsets, that 
now that things are built up so here, we 
forget to look, and so every clear evening 
we skip seeing the most beautiful thing 
in the world. | get Henry up there once 
in a while now. He groans, as he leaves 
the paper, but he stays up there and 
looks and I'm right about it.” 

“We do cheat ourselves, I know,” Nell 
said. “I’ve thought the same thing many 
times and have occasionally gone out and 
driven down to the river to watch a spe- 
cially good one. I think each time I go 
that I'll do it often, but I don’t.” 

“It’s always time to get supper or tidy 
up before the family gets home or some- 
thing,” I said. “We are all the same.” 

“And what about the moon?” Prudence 
said. “Haven't you been actually sur- 
prised sometimes going out on a night 
when there is a moon and a heavenly sky- 


fire, 


lovable 


says 


Mountain Sunrise 


—- — -—--— ee 


They get their sun at eight o'clock 
And I get mine at nine, 

So I went down to their town 

To study their sunshine 

And to be there at eight o'clock, 
Or, better still, at seven, 

I started out at six o'clock. 

There was a blush on heaven 

That reddened in the east and then 
Each mountain on its rounded tip 
Took on a burnished golden crust 
"ANd Ih WHS "West The “Clouds, “slate gray, 
Emphasized the splendid thrust 

Of earth to meet the sun halfway. 

And so enthralled was I with all 

The spangled dawn on mountain skies 
That I must make another trip 
To see the eight o'clock sun rise. 


2 


ELIZABETH JAN 


ful of ‘stars? You forget they are there 
every night.” 

“Not every night this year,” said Julia: 
“Not every night this rainy year.” 

“Oh, I know,” Prue answered, “but it’s 
beautiful on lots of nights.” 

As is usual with Prudence 


‘fancies-and enthusiasms, she started us all-~ 


that late afternoon on thinking of the sun 
and its lowering and of the moon chang- 
ing from a thin sickle toa full-sized plate. 
We in our own homes began going up to 
third floors and sun decks (there are no 
ranch houses in our neighborheod) atid 
stepping out in the qreng to look at the 
sky. 


“] hope this won't go on forever,” Ann 
grumbled one cold night, at a neighbor- 
hood party, as we traipsed in from the 
yard to join our husbands, after a moon- 
and-star scenic tour in Nell’s back yard. 
“You know sometimes [I think you get 
more thrill from natural beauty when you 
come upon it accidentally and don’t go out 
looking for it.” 

The men were talking about us. “Din- 
ner’s late at my house every once in a 
while now,” John complained, “because 
my wife’s been out watching a sunset. 


The -first -time I- thought it must= be-an=™ 


eclipse.” 

“And Nell wants me to go out star- 
gazing with her in the evening. Romantic 
after all these years, isn’t it?” Nat added: 

Henry laughed. “I knew the girls were 
in for it. I haven’t seen so many sunsets 
and. moon-risings myself since I was at 
Boy Scout camp in the surhmers.” 

“There's one practical outcome,” Julia 
said, as she helped Nell pass cookies and 
ice cream. “My attic is getting cleaner 
and cleaner and neater and neater, be- 
cause every time I go up there I see 
something that needs to be done.” 

“There doesn't really have to be a-prac- 
tical reason for everything you do, does 
there?” Prue said, passing her hand over 
the smooth waves at the back of her head, 
a gesture we know well. It indicated she 
was really serious. 


B.i PcZ 

We were willit.g to take her question 
seriously, too. It’s the sort of thing one 
has a flash of thought about almost every 
day, and now we all were quiet in one of 
those communal moments. of.understand- 
ing. For my part I thought of a lot of 
silly hustling I'd been doing lately 
so-called practical purposes, useless 
polishing, shopping, making changes in 
the decoration of our house. 

Ann's thoughts jelled into, “Have you 
been reading Ann Morrow’s Gift from 
Sea by any chance, Prudence?” and Pete 
said, “Nothing véry practical about my 
watching TV nearly every evening.” 

Prudence brought us back from 
various roads of thought. “We saw 


for 


the 


our 


the 


Hatches this morning in town.” she said. - 


“They had just. got back from a motor 
trip. They said they got wp early in the 
mornings, because the driving was easier 
then, and that the sunrises—were simply 
wonderful.” 

The silence this time was charged with 
shock. Ann got words out first. “Oh.” she 
groaned. “I can’t do it. I just can’t do it. 
You know how I hate to get up in the 
morning!” “It’s going to be cloudy to- 
morrow, thank goodness,” Julia said. Nel? 
said, “Oh, Prue!” I groaned with Ann. and 
John, Nat and Pete roared with laughter 
I couldn't see just how Henry behind me 
was reacting, but I could guess. There 
must have been -that often-seen expression 
on his face, amusement slightly tinged 
with dismay. 

S ° 8:5 

So,-now;- Prudence “and “her Henten Dut 
insinuating influences are having their 
littie group of house- 
“Ann and Nell and Julia and I 


yawn our way over to Prudence’s 


way again with our 
wives. Yes, 
at teast 
once a week to ride out to 
ten-minute 


Temple Hill, a 
drive from our vicinity. There. 
late breakfast or no late breakfast. unde: 
a large pine near a jutting rock—azgainst 
which the sleepiest of us lean — we watch 
really thrilling, golden, but chilly, 
of the sun. 


risings 


CATHARINE REYNOLDS 


oo ey 


By Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum, 


Amsterdam, Holland 


“Anna Or AusTtrRIA”; An Oil Painting. by Peter Paul Rubens 


that 
such a pressing demand upon the talents 
Peter Paul Rubens. 
great painters 
of the 
European 


Ir ts understandable there was 
of the Flemish master, 
of the 


orative compos 


He was one of dec- 


itions. foremost 


great 


one 
portraitists of the tra- 
aition, 

Rubens was a man of the world: he was 
befriended by the great. An artist with 
huge capacities for pictorial invention and 
for vivid representation, he portrayed em- 
inent persons with the accessories of 
wealth and position. To those who seemed 


to have everything that social rank and 
wealth could provide, he imparted some- 
thing more—éciat. 

This portrait of Anna of ‘Austria was 
painted between 1620 and 1625. In 1622. 
Rubens went to Paris to confer with Marie 
de’ Medici. She was Queen Mother, and 
her son Louis XIII was the husband of 
Anna of Austria. Marie de’ Medici com- 
missioned the decorations of the walls of 
the Luxembourg Palace. The amazing 
mural, narrating the story of the Queen 
Mother, is now in the Louvre, Paris. 


Dorotuy ADLOW 


written for Phe Cartetian Setence Mentter 


Curtst Jesus said (John 8:32), “Ye 
shall know the truth, and the truth 
shall make you free.” The Master 
proved this statement in healing the 
sick, reforming the sinner, and raising 


“Pye dead. He made practical the words 


which he taught. 

Christian Science is based upon the 
life and works of Jesus. Since this re- 
ligion is a Science, it is feasible; it is 


demonstrable; and it is applicable to 


the moment's needs. Scholarly attain- 
ments are not necessary to the dem- 
onstration of this Science, but humility 
and receptivity make its truths avail- 
able to all. The simplicity of the Christ, 
expressed in purified consciousness, is 
requisite for those who would avail 
themselves of Truth’s healing power. 
Mary Baker Eddy, the Discoverer 
and Founder of Christian Science, says 
in “Science and Health with Key to 
the Scriptures” (p. 98), “Mystery does 
not enshroud Christ's teachings, and 


they are not theoretical and fragmen- 


tary, but practical and complete; and 
being practical and complete, they are 
not deprived of their essential vitality.” 
A consciousness free from sin and igno- 
rance is a clear transparency through 
which God's laws may operate. So to- 
day, as in Jesus’ time, the correct ap- 
plication of the truth to our specific 
problems can bring immediate and 
permanent healing. 
Pe: # 

One who is learning of Christian 
Science -for the first time may ask, 
“How can I make this religion prac- 
tical in my daily life?” The answer is 
that one must understand and practice 
Jesus’ teachings. Jesus was the human 
man, whereas Christ was the Godlike- 
ness, or good, which he expressed. 
Jesus saw the true nature of God, who 
is good, and of man, who is created in 
His image and likeness and who there- 
fore must also be good. He saw the 
unreality of all that belittled God's 
man, Christian Science--teaches tis ‘to 
apply these truths to whatever would 
limit us. 

If we are seeing our fellow workers 
as dishonest, aggressive, or unethical, 
we must reverse these suggestions and 
know that the real man, the man of 
God's creating, is truthful, sincere, and 
expresses only love. As* we become 
convinced of these truths regarding 
man, we shall have happier business 
relationships. 

Good appears because we are cor- 
rectly using the laws of God. They are 
feasible, ever-operative, and capable of 


La Vérité nous affranchit 


(This ts a French translation of “Truth Makes Us Free,” appearing on this page] 


Traduction de l'article anglais de Gcience Chrétienne paraissant sur cette méme page 


Curist a fait 
“VY ous 


| ous 


JESUS LI 
(Jean 8 
et la 
meme en 


les n 


cette promesse 
verite, 
’ Lali- 
guerit 
et res- 
mettait en 


connaitrez la 
rendra libres 
preuve car il 
réforma les pecheurs 
suscita les morts. Le Maitre 
pratique ce qu'il enseignait. 
La Science Chrétienne se 
Vie et les ceuvres de Jésus. 
cette religion est 
sable, elle pe' 
pond a tous 
de cette Science nex 


32) 
verite 
donna lia 


alades. 


fonde sur la 

Parce 
une Science, elle est 
it se ademontrer, elle re- 
nos besoins. La demonstration 
ige pas un profond 
avoir: ses veriteé sont ibles a tous 
ceux dont la pensee est hun ble, 
La s&s licite du Christ, 
une conscience p' 
chez ceux qui veuilent 
Vérité et & son pouvoir guérisseur. 

Mary Baker Eddy, Decouvreuse et Fon- 
datrice de la Science Chreétienne, déclare 
dans Science et Santé avec la Clef des 


que 


reail 


acces 
receptive. 
sexpril 

est 


nant par 


iritiee. necessaire 


avoir recours a lia 


Ecritures (p. 98): 
Christ ne sont 
ne sont ni 


“Les enseignements du 
voiles de mystére, et 
theoriques ni fragmentaires, 
mais pratiques et complets: et étant pra- 
tiques et complets, ils ne sont pas prives 
de leur vitalité essentielle.” Une con- 
science indemne de péché, de croyances 
ignorantes, laisse transparaitre les lois de 
Diet Gur peuvent alofs Vxercér leiir aé- 
tion. Aujourd’hui comme a l’époque de 
Jésus, les guérisons immédiates et perma- 
nentes sont possibles lorsque en face d'un 
probleme on applique correctement la 
vérité ‘ 


pas 


Ceux aqui pour tla premiere fois enten- 
dent parler de la Science Chrétienne de- 
manderont peut-étre: “Comment puis-je 
mettre en cuvre cette religion dans ma 
vie journaliere?” Le fait est qu'il faut 
comprendre ce qu’enseignait Jésus et s'y 
montrer obeissant. Jesus était homme 


humain, tandis que Christ était le bien 


Die Wahrheit macht uns fret 


a 


[This is a German.transiation of “Truth Makes Us Free,” appearing on this page] 
2 


Ubersetzung des auf dieser Seite erscheinenden christ! ich-wissenschaftlichen 


Autfsatzes 


Die nachste deutsche Ubersetzung erscheint am 24. Dezember! 


Curistus Jesus sagte (Johannes 8:32): 
,lhr werdet die Wahrheit erkennen, und 
die Wahrheit wird euch frei machen.“ 
Der Meister bewies diese Erklarung durch 
das Heilen der Kranken, das Umwandeln 
der Siinder und das Erwecken der Toten. 
Er brachte die Worte, die er lehrte, zur 
Anwendung. 

Die Christliche Wissenschaft beruht auf 
dem Leben und den Werken Jesu. Da 
diese Religion auch eine Wissenschaft ist, 
ist sie ausfiihrbar—beweisbar! Und sie 
kann bei den Problemen des taglichen 
Lebens nutzbar gemacht werden. Schul- 
weisheit ist nicht erforderlich fiir die An- 
wendung dieser Wissenschaft; doch De- 
mut und Aufgeschlossenheit machen ihre 
Wahrheiten einem jeden zuganglich. Die 
Einfachheit des Christus, die in einem 
gelduterten BewuSBtsein Ausdruck findet, 
ist notwendig fiir diejenigen, die sich die 
Heilkraft der Wahrheit zunutze machen 


~ wollen. 


Mary Baker Eddy, die Entdeckerin, und 
Griinderin der Christlichen Wissenschaft, 
sagt in ihrem Lehrbuch ,, Wissenschaft und 
Gesundheit mit Schiiissel zur Heiligen 
Schrift“ (S. 98): ,Kein Geheimnis ver- 
hiillt die Lehren Christi, sie sind nicht 
theoretisch und fragmentarisch, sondern 


‘praktisch und vollstandig, und weil prak- 


tisch und volistindig, sind sie ihrer we- 
sentlichen Lebenskraft nicht beraubt." 
Ein BewuStsein, das frei von Siinde ist 
und die Wahrheit erkannt hat, ist eine 
klare. Transparenz, durch die Gottes Ge- 
setze wirken kénnen. So kann heute— 
wie zu Zeiten Jesu—die richtige Anwen- 
dung der Wahrheit auf unsere besonderen 
Probleme sofortige und bleibende Heilung 


eins der Synonyme fiir Gott. 


machen?“ Die Antwort lautet, dai 
zu dem Zwecke die Lehren Jesu 
stehen und beti&tigen lernen muB. Jesus 
war das menschliche Wesen,. waihrend der 
Christus die Gott&dhnlichkeit oder das 
Gute war, das Jesus zum Awusdruck 
brachte. Jesus erkannte die wahre Natur 
Gottes, der das Gute ist, und des Men- 
schen, der zu Gottes Ebenbild und Gleich- 
nis geschaffen wurde, und der deshalb 


man 
ver- 


-auch gut sein mu§. Er erkannte die Un- 


wirklichkeit alles de&sen, das den Men- 
schen Gottes herabsetzt. Die Christliche 
Wissenschaft lehrt uns, diese Wahrheiten 
auf alles anzuwenden, was uns zu be- 
grenzen droht. 

Wenn wir unsere Mitarbeiter fur unehr- 
lich. aggressiv oder unzuverlassig halten, 
so’ milssen wir diese Suggestionen um- 
kehren, und uns vergegenwartigen, daS 
der 
Gott erschaffen hat, wahrhaftig und auft- 
richtig ist, und nur Liebe zum Ausdruck 
bringt. Wenn uns diese Wahrheiten in 
bezug auf den Menschen zur Uberzeugung 
geworden sind, werden wir gliicklichere 
Geschiaftsbeziehungen haben. 

Das Gute tritt in Erscheinung, wenn 
wir die Gesetze Gottes in der rechten 
Weise in Anwendung bringen. Sie -sind 
ausfihrbar, stets wirksam und kénnen 


* iiberall, zu jeder Zeit und unter allen 


Umstinden bewiesen werden. 
Christlichen Wissenschaft ist 


In der 
».rinzip* 


liche Prinzip ist immer gegenwirtig und 
weicht niemals von Gerechtigkeit, Ge- 


‘nauigkeit und Volistindigkeit ab. Um dies 


zu veranschaulichen — kénnte man sich 


wirkliche Mensch, der Mensch, den. 


Das gitt- 


standen oder angewandt worden sind. Das 
Gleiche ist der Fall bei den Gesetzen 
Gottes. Wenn jemand aus Unwissenheit, 
Furcht, Bitterkeit oder HaS die Gesetze 
Gottes, die Tatsachen des Guten, nicht.auf 
seine Probleme anwendet, so kénnen diese 
Gesetze nicht zu seinem Segen wirken. 
i oa 

Wir betatigen die Christliche Wissen- 
schaft, wenn wir krankhafte, entwiirdi- 
gende und begrenzende Gedanken aufge- 
ben, wenn wir uns weigern, sie als einen 
Teil unserer wahren Selbstheit anzuerken- 
nen, und sie gegen gesunde, aufbauende 
und gottahnliche Ideen austauschen. Gei- 
stige Ideen berichtigen materielle Begren- 
zungen. und in unserem gegenwartigen 
Entwicklungszustand bewirken sie eine 
bessere Art der Lebensfiihrung. 

Jesu Heilungen waren logisch, sie wa- 
ren das Ergebnis seines rechten Denkens. 
Die Christliche Wissenschaft ist bereit, 
Segen zu bringen, und kommt in der 
Erhabenheit heiligen Denkens, in dem wir 
die Wahrheiten, die Jesus lehrte uad uns 
anempfahl, verstehen und beweisen. Mrs. 
Eddy sagt in ,.Wissenschaft und Gesund- 
heit“ (S. 201): ,.Die beste Predigt, die je 
gehalten worden ist, ist die Wahrheit, 


welche durch die Zerstérung von Siinde,~ 


Krankheit und Tod betitigt und demon- 
striert wird.” Diese Wahrheit, welche die 
von den materiellen Sinnen auferlegten 
Begrenzungen tiberwindet, fihrt zur Har- 
monie, in der das Leben freudevoll und 
ewig frei ist. 


. Dek D4 oe tee _~ = Pe ba the 


eh 0 


. mia ae daeetete pose on es = ae ee a aihe aM 
é : Ss ae .t” % 
» 


[La prochaine traduction franchise parcitra le 24 décembre! 


exprimé par lui—la ressemblance de 
Dieu. Jésus percevait la vraie nature du 
Dieu qui est le bien, et de homme créé 
& Vimage divine, c’est-a-dire forcément 
bon lui aussi. Le Maitre voyait que tout 
ce qui amoindrit "homme de Dieu est 
irréel. La Science Chrétienne nous ap- 
prend & mettre en ceuvre ces veérites 
lorsque sé présentent des croyances Timi- 
tatives. 

Si nos collégues, nos compagnons de 
travail semblent malhonnétes, agressifs, 
ou n’observent pas les régles morales, il 
nous Tat renversér cés suggestions et 
savoir que l"homme réel creé par Dieu 
est véridique, sincére et n’exprime que la 
bienveillance. Quand nous serons con- 
vaincus de ces vérités au sujet de l‘homme, 
nos Papports avec autrui s*harmoniseront. 

Le bien s’accentue lorsqu’on emploie 
correctement les lois de Dieu. Elles sont 
réalisables, toujours opérantes et peuvent 
se prouver dans n’importe quel lieu, a 
toutes les époques, dans les circonstances 
les plus diverses. En Science Chrétienne 
le terme Principe est un des synonymes 
de Dieu. Toujours présent, le Principe 
divin ne s’écarte jamais de la justice, de 
l’exactitude, de l’intégralité. Dlustrons cela 
par un exemple: L’on ne saurait imaginer 
un endroit, un temps ou des circonstances 
qui rendraient impossible l’application du 
principe des mathématiques. Si le cher- 
cheur n’obtient pas la réponse correcte, 
c'est parce qu'il ignore les régles de cette 
science ou qu'il n'en a pas fait Papplica- 
tion correcte. Il en va de méme pour ce 
qui concerne les lois de Dieu. Si l’igno- 
rance, la crainte, la rancune, la haine que 
nous n’avons pas surmontées nous em- 
péchent d’appliquer a nos problemes les 
lois de Dieu,—les faits du bien,—ces 
lois restent pour nous inopérantes. 

Nous mettons en pratique la Science 
Chrétienne quand nous abandonnons les 
pensées maladives, avilissantes, restric- 
tives; quand nous refusons de croire 
qu’elles font partie de notre individualité 
véritable, et mettons a leur place--des 


idées divines, saines et constructives. Les 


idées spirituelles corrigent les limitations 
matérielles, et sur le plan o nous sommes 
elles améliorent notre maniéere de vivre. 
Les guérisons de Jésus étaient logiques, 
elles étaient dues & sa pensée correcte, 
La Science Chrétienne toujours préte a 
bénir se présente dans la sublimité des 
pensées saintes, permettant de comprendre 
d’une maniére démontrable les vérités que 


cette remarque: “Le 

qui ait jamais été préché est la Vérité 
mise en pratique et démontrée par la 
destruction du péché, de la maladie et de 
la mort.” Cette Vérité qui renverse les 
limites imposées par le sens matériel con- 
duit & lharmonie et nous assure une vie 
pleine de joie, éternellement libre, 


being proved anywhere, any time, and 
under any circumstances. In Christian 
Science one of the synonyms of God 
is Principle. Divine Principle is always 
present and never varies from justice, 


one cannot conceive of a place, time, or 
circumstance in which the principle of 
mathematics cannot be successfully 
used. If on occasion one does not get 
the correct answer, this is because he 
is ignorant of or has not correctly ap- 
plied the laws of mathematics. So it : i 
with the laws of God. If through igno- 
rance, fear, resentment, or hate one 
does not apply the laws of God, the 
facts of good, to his problems, then 
these laws do not operate in his behalf. 
ee 2m 

We practice Christian Science when 
we renotince sickly, degrading, and 
limiting thoughts, refuse to accept 
them as a part of our true selfhood, 
and substitute for them, healthy, con- 


striictive, Gnd Godlike ideas. Spiritual ~~ 


ideas correct material limitations, and 
in our present stage of unfoldment they 
bring about an improved way of life. 
Jesus’ healings were logical, the out- 
come of his correct thinking. Christian 
Science waits to bless: and comes ‘in 
the sublimity of holy thinking, wherein 
we understand and prove the truths 
which Jesus taught and commended to 
us. Mrs. Eddy says in Science and 
Health (p. 201), “The best sermon ever 
preached is Truth practised and dem- 
onstrated by the destruction. of sin, 
sickness, and death.” This Truth, as it 
breaks down the limitations imposed 
by material sense, leads to harmony, 
where life is joyful and eternally free. 
[In other columms on this 


lationg of this article into 
next Freneh 


will be found trans- 

— aa gee The 

an rman translations w appear 
December 24.) 


Boy and Star 


Nothing is so near or far 

As a small boy with a star. 

His short crooked path had crossed 
A meteor the heavens lost. 
Attentive eye had seen at once 
The rusty pock-marked difference - 
From any ledge or wall or stone 
On the farm he called his own. 

He pried it from its earthy sheath 
And in the crater underneath 
Found ants of a honey-colored race, 
fhat must have come from outer space, 
He lugged it home to where it kept 
A star’s watch while he slept, 

In dreams he pried it from deep sky 
And woke to touch it. By and by 
His chip-of-constellation treasure 
Showed him ways that he could measure 
Things which he had not divided, 
The star-flung reaches of the mind. 
Nothing is so near or far 

As a small boy and his star. 


Morcan BULKELEY 


WHAT 
CHRISTMAS 


MEANS TO ME 


And Other 
Christmas Messages 


By MARY BAKER EDDY. 


Now offered in a 


mew and beautiful Binding in 

supple red leather, paper-lined, 

with handsome gold lettering, 

printed on antique paper. 
Gathered together conveniently 

in this small book are ali of 

Mrs. Eddy’s prose 

writings on the 

true significance 

of Christmas. 


Horace }..Carver, Publishers oe 
One Norway Street, Boston 15, 5A 
Enciésed ts $....... for which 


mage ~.. 
mas Messages” by Mary 


ee 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1955 — : 


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Standard Oli Company (New Jersey): Raking dried potato vines with « hayrake 


expectantly, then everyone chuckled and 
applaudet-as if on cue. “This is something 

'" | tried to get through in my local Farm 
Bureau. and then in my state Farm Bureau, 
and they wouldn't have it,” he said. “Then |! 
asked my wife to present it here, and she 
wouldn't do it. Now I'm going to tell you about 

it_ myself.” 

“Members of the American Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration who had crowded into a parjor at the 
Sherman Hotel for an open session of the 
resolutions committee at this point laughed 
sympathetically and gave the speaker a hand 

He wanted, he went on to explain, to propose 
a resolution calling for legislation dealing with 
the veterinarian treatment of pets. His colleagues 
listened with the complete attention they had 
given to every man who had gone up to the 
platform to have his say. “I hope,” he concluded, 
“that I am not ot of order in speaking about 
this here.” 

This was not the morn.ent for delegate action 
upon such a resolution. It was merely the oc- 
casion for anyone who wished to get up and 
present, for consideration of the resolutions 
committee, any pet ideas which had somehow 
not gotten through to them earlier 

The warm splurge of handclapping—which 
followed the man to his seat was obviously less 
an endorsement of resolution than it was ap- 
proval of the man’s right to be heard. In it 
rang also commendation for his courage in 
presenting something he believed in, when every- 
one elise had turned it down. The committee 
members might net accept his thrice-spurned 
resolution but they would consider it, and that 
certainty satisfied everyone. 


N eve: LAUGHED until the man paused 


Members Present Views 


“That's exactly what this meeting is for,” said 
the chairman. “We hold this open meeting so 
that anyone Who Warts to say anything can 
bring it to the attention of the committee.” Most 
of the resolutions began to be formulated months 
ago in local and state Farm Buréa meetings 

For an hour or so, members had been rising 
to present their views on many subjects: how 
to turn the huge cotton surpluses held by the 
government from liabilities into assets: im- 
portance of timber as a national crop and the 
possibility of planting submarginal land in 
timber; the need for extending rural telephone 
service in some areas; the need of a better pro- 
gram for grain sorghum growers; the numerous 
other matters close to the hearts of those who 
spoke. . 

it was not comfortable in that overcrowded, 
overheated room. Many were standing at the 
back of the room and in corners, some burdened 


with heavy coats. Yet there was a surprising 
lack of restlessness, and a high degree of at- 
tentiveness. 


You soon realize, as you watch these farmers 
plow their way through five days of -a-jam- 
packed convention program, that they have more 
than one bond. Farming is not just a business, 
it is a way of life, and that way of IMe ad- 
mittedly constitutes a strong bond. But there is 
discernible an evéh deeper ahd more impressive 
tie. 

These farmers have joined together—1,623,222 
families in 48 states and Puerto Rico—primarily, 
it seems, because they like each other. They 


7 P 
t a - ». § f a. % ” hh 
i a ee Sp eee Se 


EE ENE CO Oe Aeereee teen eran. > a relies: 


Saturday, December 17, 1958 


the audience as the last contestant finished 
spe and returned to her seat on the plat- 
form. young people were required to 
speak on a topic given to them only a few 
moments ago. . morning you heard Roger 
Fleming (Farm Bureau secretary.and treasurer) 
and me go on for an hour and 40 minutes. We 
had three weeks to prepare our speeches, and 
I'll bet you won't any of you remember as much 
of what we said as you will what these young 
people said in a total elapsed time of 20 
minutes.” 

The four had spoken persuasively on a prob- 
lem that their elders have not yet solved; 


oe. RGPOM MTs Re en ee eae ee Tee. 


~ 


“If there is anything American farming needs 
today,” said Senator Anderson, “it is to have 
its program on a bipartisan basis.” 

Senator Aiken said he did not think any new 
farm legislation is needed but that what is 
already on the books needs to be reexamined 
and repaired and strengthened, a job he expected 
the Congress to tackle when it convenes in a 
couple of weeks. He expressed confidence that 


farming in the United States “has its best years 
just ahead of it.” 
These two senators who occupy seats on op- 


The Farm Bureau 


‘They Like Each Other’ 


By Helen Henley, 


Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


enjoy: each other’s company -and accomplish 
much more together than they ever could 
separately. 

Not even the perfunctoriness of a formal 
convention routine dims their evident pleasure in 
being together. They have some differences of 
opinion, it’s true, but they listen to each other 
with respect; and they succeed in establishing 
Farm Bureau policies which receive respectful 
hearings also in Washington. 

And they have fun along with their business. 

The four young people—two girls and two 
boys—who competed in the National Talk Meet 
finals on the Farm Bureau’s family night at the 
Civic Opera House won special praise from 
Charlies B. Shuman, president of the Farm 
Bureau, who relished poking a bit of fun at 
himself and a fellow officer. 


“Wasn't that amazing?” Mr. Shuman asked 


“Developing and Expanding Our Agricultural 
Markets.” 
The losers lost gallantly and seemed as happy 


as the winner when the award—a handsome 


cup—went to Jerry F. Ringo, Rothwell, Ky. 

Most of the farmers and the speakers par- 
ticipating in this 37th annual meeting of the 
Farm Bureau have kept harmomering away at 
the dangers inherent in political programs being 
presented as s lutions to farm problems. They 
keep insisting that the only practical approach 
is to base the agricultural program on economics, 
not politics. 

Thoroughly jn key with the convention theme, 
therefore, were the awards given Dec. 13 to 
Senator Clinton P.. Anderson (D) of New 
Mexico (former Secretary of Agriculture) and 
Senator George D. Aiken (R) of Vermont, 
honoring them for distinguished service to 
agriculture. 


posite sides of the political aisle in Washington 
but who have together championed many pieces 
of legislation supported by the Farm Bureau, 

id personal tribute to each other and to Farm 

ureau members for the cooperation each has 
given the other. 

The informal, spontaneous remarks of these 
distinguished legislators in accepting their 
awards flowed across the footlights in the folksy, 
friendly way one farmer talks with another. An 
additional aspect of service to agriculture was 
recognized when Mr. Shuman bestowed the 
Distinguished Service Award on a third notable, 
Dr. Harry J. Reed, dean and director of agri- 
culture at Purdue University, Indiana. 

The program at which all this occurred was 
almost three hours long. At most conventions, 
people would have grown fidgety or straggied 
out. But not here—possibly because the people 
who run these programs know how to keep 


bel -_ vee 
eo ee ck ae 
os ig 


Do-Plenty Congress Looms 


Washington 

The Republican Party today faces:an oppor- 
tunity in the coming session of Congress to 
ut itself in the best possible position for the 
956 elections 

On the basis of President Eisenhower's con- 
ference with the legislative leaders this week. 
it is evident that the administration will offer 
to Congress a wide-ranging program which 
will test the loyalty of the Republican con- 
gressmen to the President's leadership 

On the basis of a recent Texas speech by 
~~ Sebator LYnd6h “B. Jonnson” (Dy “or Texas. 
Senate “majority leader, it is evident that he 
will shortly be offering a counterlegislative 
program which the Democrats hope to pass 
and stamp with a Democratic Party label for 
use in the presidential canpaign 

If the Republicans hope to go into the 1956 
elections with a fair chance of winning, it } 
generally agreed that they will have to iden- 
tify themselves visibly and decisively with 
the President's humanitarian - conservative 
philosophy, with his program, and with his 
leadership—regardiess of whether Mr. Eisen- 
hower himself is the Republican candidate 

To fail to do that means under the best of 
circumstances—that is, if the President runs— 
risking defeat, and under the worst of cir- 
cumstances—that is, if the President with- 
draws—inviting calamity. : 

+ + , 
This is why the imminent session of Con- 


One. thing .is..sure. The..1956. Congress is 


not going to be a “do-nothing” Congress. It 
s going to be a “do-a-lot” Congress. The end 
result is going to be a budget of significant 


’ 


legisiation which will bear either a dominant 
Democratic label or a dominant Republican 
label 


The advantages are about even between the 


two parties. The Democrats have the advan- 
tages of a slim majority in both houses and 


pay-as-you-go 
which the Democrats favored. 

Federal Aid te School Building—At the 
White House education conference Mr. Eisen- 
hower advocated federal credit and money to 
build schools in states which do not have the 
resources to do it themselves. The issue wWill 


doubtedly the Democrats will be on the side 
of going further than the Republicans. 


By Roscoe Drummond 
Written Especially for The Christian Science Monitor 


special highway-use taxes, 


over the amount of federal aid. Un- 


will be far more in the direction of getting 
action than blocking actiori. Each side will 
want to get its version of the legislation into 
law, but neither side wili want to be put in 
the position of causing a stalemate, as hap- 
pened last year on the highway Dill. 


The Democrats succeeded in preventing Con- 
gress from passing the Republican measure, 


, 4 4, 


control of the legislative machinery. The Re- 
publicans have the advantages of the prestige 
or the White House and the teadership of the 
President. The outcome will hinge largely upon 
the discipline of the two parties in Congress 
and the degree of their. recognition of the 
value of presenting a united policy front be- 
hind whoever is their presidential nominee 

Despite substantial agreement on defense 
and economic aid spending, there will be plenty 
of controversy when Congress gets down to 
work. Each party will be fighting to shape 
the character of new legislation, and the prin- 
cipal areas of contest will be these: 

Farm Policy—-The Democrats will seek to 
restore 90 per cent rigid price supports, and 
the Republicans will seek to retain. flexible 
price supports, with some additional measures 
to try to arrest declining prices 

Highway Construction— Both parties are 
committed te a major construction program. 
The urgent need is not in question. Disagree- 
ment will come over how it should be financed 


Tax Reduction—The Republicans will go 
slow, will not want to move until they are 
sure the budget is Headed for’ the Diack before 
proposing some across-the-board cut. The 
Democrats will be intent upon acting early 
in order not to lose the initiative and will 
try to focus any reduction on the lower-income 
groups. 

Medical Program—Some aid to medical re- 
search and hospital construction. 


Secial Security—Extension of coverage to 
more self-employed groups and reduction of 
age limit for women. 

On both social security and medical aid 
the Democrats will undoubtedly favor out- 
spending the Republicans. 


Water Resources—The Democrats will want 
to put more funds into the development of 
public power, and the Republicans will want 
to put greater reliance upon the “partnership” 
development of water resources—partnership 
between private enterprise, the states, and the 


the Republicans succeeded in preventing Con- 
gress from passing pw Democratic measure— 
and the country ended up with no legislation 
for new highways. 

Both sides genuinely want to see a “do- 
something” Congress, and this suggests that a 
major legislative year is in the making. 

What the Republicans most need politically 
is to demonstrate that they are reliably and 
zestfully behind the President if they are to 
gain in their own right the popularity which 
has been Mr. Eisenhower's from the beginning. 

Vice-President Richard M. Nixon put this 
point candidly in a speech at Los Angeles a 
few months ago when he said that the Repub- 
lican Party is not strong enough to elect a 
President by itself but requires a strong presi- 
dential nominee to elect the Republican Party. 
The elections in 1953, 1954, and 1955 have 
added to Democratic strength. 

It .is. implicit .im.Mr..Nixon’s view .that. only. 
as the Republican Party decisively identifies 
itself with the President’s philosophy and pro- 


aa * } 
nee (Me 
oie f\ 


ee. i 
ot ae 


« 


everyone participating. The participation might 
be trivial, but it was effective. 

lf someone from lana was. announced ag 
winning an award, all the people in the audience 
who hailed from Indiana were asked to rise and 
stand while the winner moved to the front and 
center of the platform to receive the prize. 

And so it went. Farm Bureau activities give 
everyone a chance to take part, and to speak 
his piece even if his is a minority view. Some 
do not yield their viewpoints easily, as members 
of the resolutions committee would feelingly 
testify. These hard-working members had been 
forming, revising, and discussing, over and over, 
their all-important policy statements for almost 
too weeks before the resolution came up fof 
action on the meetings’ final day Dec. 15. 


‘Class Vote’ Discounted 


The strength and -solidity of some of these. 
viewpoints held by individual farmers make it 
difficult to forecast how they will vote in 1956, 
Mr. Shuman implied in answering some ques- 
tions put to him at a press conference. 


“I have an idea that strong Democratic farme 
ers will continue to vote Democratic and Re- 
ublicans, Republican,” he said. “I think an 
ncreasing number of farmers are independents, 
and many things may happen between now and 
November to cause votes to change one way 
another.” 


About the “so-called farm-belt vote,” Mr. 
Shuman said, “I don’t believe farmers have in 
the past or will in 1956 vote as a class any more 
than any other group in our economy votes as 
a class. I think we get more credit—or blame, 
according to your viewpoint—in the last cam- 
paign than we were entitled to. Some may vote 
on a monetary basis, it’s true, but I don’t agree 
with the commentator who said recently that 
people vote according to their pocketbooks.” 

Yet questions closely touching their pocket- 
books are uppermost in the thoughts of these 
farmers, for there are few even among the most 
prosperous ones, who have not had to note in 
their books a decline in income, while their 
operating expenses remain at a high level. 

Despite these problems, most Farm Bureau 
farmers (except for a minority located mostly 
in ‘the cotton and tobacco growing states) still 
pin their faith to their own ability to help 
themselves and to solve their own problems. 
They feel, as their policy statements spelled it 
out in specific measures, that self-help is the 
American way. And this American way, they 
are saying from their thousands of individual 
viewpoints, is good enough for them. 


2a 
. 


. ye 
Mn, >, 7 e 

' eos 
~eppaiees mis" a: ‘ 

ea aes aot rs a 

a a 


Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) 


a 


gress is a critical test of the leadership and whether by bonds outside the budget, which 


| i federal government. 
discipline of the Repuba.cans in Congress. the Republicans favored last session, or by 


The pressures on the new session of Congress 


gram cah it win back the votes it has lost 
during the past three years. 


At Home 


as - Ee f%. 
WASHINGTON LETTER aes 


To the Readers of The Christian Science Monitor: 


U. S. SEEKS WAY TO STIFFEN TIE WITH INDIA 

Officials are looking for some way to improve 
United States relations with India, bellwether of the 
neutral nations. Matters have been going from bad 
to worse ever since Mr. Nehru visited Washington 
in Trurman-Acheson days. It's no secret that he 
enjoyed his Moscow visit far more than his 
Washington one. 

Climax of this degeneration came with the joint 
India-Soviet communique at the end of the Bulganin- 
Khrushchev tour of India. It says just about every- 
thing Washington wishes hadn't been said, and many 
things which caused jubilation in Moscow. 

Those from both countries who yearn for a turn 
for the better had planned an Eisenhower visit to India. 
It was much discussed in spring and summer, but 
went out the window, with the President's illness. It's 
hard to think of any other “good-will” missionary from 
Washington who could expect a really happy reception 
in New Delhi. By common agreement Messrs. Nixon 
and Dulles are ruled out. ‘The Truman name has been 
put in the hat, but Republicans can't yet bring themselves 
to make use of him. _ : 


4 } bi ~ . eres: 


U.S. AGENCIES STRAIN LID ON SPENDING 

Present estimates are t in fiscal 1957 federal 
revenues will kite up by 2.5 billion to ion dollars, 
due to business prosperity. This would provide the 
surplus for a nice tax reduction - if government 
spending could be held within limits. 

But this hold-the-line ration won't be easy. 
Actually many government departments besides the 
Pentagon are proposing budget increases, The Ameri- 
can expanding economy requires more airports, 
national parks need improvement, Hood control 


demands are in, slum clearance is being proposed < 
all this in addition to the demands for new highway, 
education, farm relief, and defense spending, 

The Budget Bureau and the administration have 
a real struggle on their hands to keep additional —_ 
spending from using up the prospective surplus. 
OWictale Trem some of the departments concerned 
argue that the American constantly expanding economy 
is putting expanding demands on government. that it 
will be difficult to deny, . 


Washington News Bureau 
1293 National Press Building 


Adlai Stevenson's decision to enter primaries 
in California, Florida, Pennsylvania, and Llinois, 
in addition to Minnesota, gives a final battleground 
to the Stevenson-Kefauver contest. . 

The real test should DEMOCRAT HUDDLE 
be in California and 
Florida where Kefauver 
organizations were strong 
in 1952. The fighi in 
California has started 
already and should be a 
stiff one. 


Gov. Averell Harriman of New York can stay on 
the primary sidelines, ostensibly “not a candidate.” 
This saves him from the bruises of a preconyention 
battle but inevitably raises the taunt that he is “afraid” 
to risk his popularity. 


ECONOMISTS CURB HOPES FOR TAX CUT 

Post-Geneva disappointments have been written 
into the new budget in terms of more money (than 
intended) for foreign aid and guns. But there is still 
one more reason why Americans would be wise to 
restrain hopes Yor a tax cut. It’ 

What happened to Britain is remembered here. 
Last spring, to please voters, the Tory government 
passed out tax cuts in Christmas riband. The votes 
rotied in, but so did really serious inflation. 


The economists are warning the 
administration that tax cuts would put 
moré Cash in Consumer hatds> This” 
worked splendidly last year when the 
United States-was actually in a mild 
deflation. But now the United States 
economy is booming. To pile more 
money into consumer hdnds at present 
would invite serious danger of 
inflation, 


LABOR ‘HOLD’ IN POLITICS DEBATED 
How monolithic is the new 15,000,000 AFL-CIO 
labor group likely to be in politics? Some GOP right- 
wing leaders have launched an attack upon it as a 
power group that may capture the Democratic Party. 
The principals are Labor leaders here rather wistfully shy they wish 


trying to be polite, but -. they had all that political power but don't anticipate 
each side knows that these | re “5 it, 


contests are probably 
decisive so far as the 
Kefauver candidacy goes. 


In 1952 Mr. Kefauver split fs 
Fitepetricth in St. Levis Pest-Dispeud 


the Florida delegation 
with Senator Richera Russell (D) of Georgia. Unless 


he now can show strength in the South, the tall Tennes- 
seean is atone” California is just as important, 
or it is among biggest states in the nation. 

) r. 5 is in the better ition: he is 
apt to win sota, a y Senator Hubert 
Humphrey; in Illinois, his home state; and in Penn- 
sylvania, where the big Democratic city machines 

are for him, Thus he will have something to point 
to, in the unlikely chance that he loses out in Florida 
and California. | 


To begin with, the percentage of trade unionists 
who actually trouble to vote isn't much different from 
that of other Americans, where the percentage is 
about 50. That means only about 8,000,000 of the 
trade union group will go to the polls. It is next esti- 
mated that about one-third of the unionists are Repub- 
lican (they are strong in the so-called “craft,” rail, 
and similar organizations). Subtracting Republicans, 
the total on the Democratic side, likely towote, is 
something over 5,000,000. 

Finally, labor leaders say these members are 
much like other Americans; they don't like anybody 
to tell them how to vote, union or anyone else. 


Americans are free agents. ; 


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airlines be red 

they are to be fully effective. 

The Civil Aeronautics Board, 
of course, could clamp a ban on 
these liquor sales if it could be 
convinced that it should. 

But an interesting utterance 
From the CAB. on this subject is 
now availible, an expression 
which would indicate that the | 
rising crescendo of displeasure | 
over airlines liquor sales is miss- 
ing @ wey important mark—the 
ears CAB authorities,’ in 
echdaahen, DC. 

Writes Marian L. Newman, in- 
vestigator, office of compliance, 
CAB, to the American Business 
Men’s Research Foundation: 

“This office, which is respon- 
sible for processing service 
complaints, has received an ex- 
tremely small number of letters 
from persons who are opposed. 
to the serving of alcoholic bev- 
@rages on aircraft, on the 
grounds of safety, inconven- 
jence, and displeasure, or ob- 
jection to drinking in principle. 


oe i a) aera - 


If this is an accurate state- 
ment, and it must be presumed 
to be such, it becomes a dis- 
closure of headline importance. 

The. airlines have acknowl- | 
edged that they are receiving ani | 
exceptionally heavy flow of let- 
ters from those who are pro- 
esting “flying saloons.” 
| But with the wr fg 
tof -thispractice failing. to re- 
‘spond to the appeal, the protest 
ends right there. 

For it would appear from Mr. 
Newman's statement that. the 

is getting only a few 
liquor - connected  ¢omplaints, 


other passengers, 
be a volation of this section. . 
“I appreciate very much ich your 
| concern with air: safety. and 
may be assured that the edad 
will, within its statutory author- 
ity, take appropriate action 
should evidence be presented to 
it that such action is sagan: 
im the interest.” + 
If the reader has any ques- 


in the example 
| furnished by Rowland K. Quinn, 
either originals or carbon \Jr, president *of the Airline 
copies. | Stewards and Stewardesses As- 
n an earlier letter from Ross | sociation: 
Rizley, chairman of CAB, to | “The airline captain at one 
tative Thomas J. Lane | of our major eirports refused to 
(R) of Massachusetts, the num- | take off until 10 drunks had 
| bes of protests being received | been removed from the plane. 
by CAB is not indicated. “Later, because of more tip- 
Mr. Rizley merely speaks of | pling in the air, the samé plane 
the quality of the complaints,'|had to make an unscheduled 


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y, Stating, in effect, that the pro- | stop to put off eight other} ce 
‘tests are based mainly on/ drunks who were causing a dis- | 
|}grounds of morality, good taste, turbance and threatening the 
or religion, and that these rea- | safety of the plane.” 
sons are not enough of them-| If Mr: Newman’s statement | 7 
\selves for the CAB to step in. accurate, and CAB hasn’t even | 
He asserts that he is not get- | been receiving letters that ob- 
‘ting the kind of letters which | ject to the service of liquor on | 
impress most—those that would | planes on the grounds of ‘ ‘incon 
‘cite instances where the letter venience and displeasure,” then | 
writers actually observed in- | the type of experience that pas-_ 
‘stances of drinking which di- § senger L. T. Daniel has related) % 
rectly threatened the safety of to C. R. Smith, president of 
the flight. Writes Mr. Rizley: American Airlines, could well 
“With respect to the economic | be directed to the CAB, too. 
provisions of the Civil Aero- | N@ Stepping Off 
nautics Act, air carriers are re-| “pecently.” he writes. “I flew | 


from Los Angeles to Dallas with | 
SWAGGER SKIRT SHOP 


/ American. We left Los Angeles’ 
about noon. Those of us who/| 
did not drink had to wait for | 
|}our meal until all the cocktails | 
| were served and refills were 
offered. (Incidentally, I would 
| have gotten up and walked out 
| of any place in America where 
'that was going on, but I dared 
}not try it at 19,000 feet aiti- 
| tude.) 


| de 


The biggest obstacles current- 

in the way of developing 

1 atomic power in the 

United States can be summed 

up in three words—manpower, 
information, and patents. 

Sbortages. and. restrictions in |. 
these three areas are combihing | 
as the biggest single brake on 
the otherwise swiftly moving) 
United States atomic energy | 
programs today. 

Even at a "distance, this is} 
readily apparent in the reports 
‘coming from the week-long 
Nuclear Engineering and Sci- 
jence Congress that has been 
| total aspect, it all adds up toa 


lv 


L. 


|meeting in Cleveland. In its) 


oe | situation serious enough to draw 


sx. : 
Pure ‘ap - 
Ve Ea pe 
s Y wo: 
‘ A 


>| stern warnings from top figures 
in the atomic energy field. 

For example, it has long been 
known that the United States | 
is struggling with a shortage of} 
scientific and engineering man- 
‘power. But that shortage now 
has become so critical, especial- 
ly in regard to atomic energy | 
t. that Lewis L. 
Strauss, chairmat 6f thé Atomic 
Energy Commission, told the! 


endanger “all of our biessings, 
even our freedom.” 

“Science and engineering have 
combined to fift us to .. 
standard of living unrivaled 
anywhere else on earth,” Mr. 
Strauss commented. “But. can 
we keep it up?” 

He added that “our liberty 
and that of the free world might 
be jeopardized for want of men | 
possessing the skills to produce 
atom-powered ships and planes 
| or- to develop modern nuclear | 
weapons more quickly and more 
efficiently than other nations.” 

Senator Clintér P. Anderson 
(D) of New Mexico, chairman 
of the Joint Congressional Com- 
mittee on Atomic Energy, ap- 
parently felt only slightly less 
strongly on the need for loosen- 
ing the flow of technical in- 
formation in atomic energy 
fields. 

This kind of Information is 


Cleveland meeting that it could | 


By Robert C. Cowen 
Natural Science Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


told the meeting that there is 
much material being 
rag Be phe dmg by . 


heat. 


comprehensive 20° - 
_ ordinated information, 
with changes in the 
Atomic Energy Law to encour 
age the AEC, even more 
cally than it is now, to expedi 
aoe an increased informa 
| flow. Senator Anderson said that 
his committee ogek to 


| public eS on we 
| changes during the early part 
the next session of Congress. © 


Besides the ways and means 
of ‘freeing more informatiort, 
| these hearings will bably alse 
look into the Metnet eter of patent 
rights for private industry on 
developments in atomic energy 
fields. The -uncertainty about 
| such rights at the moment is the 
third stumbling block to an alle 
| Out private industry effort te 
develop the atom to its fullest 
extent. ) 

Return on Thivestments 

In this connection, Casper W, 

ms, a Chicago attorney, 
pointed out that it may be 15 
to 20 years before companies 
and individuals pioneering in 
atomic energy fields can expect 
any substantial return on. the 
| huge investments they are make 
jing. For many of them, he said; 
jthis eventual return will dee 
jpend almost completely on the 
patents on such inventions ag 
|they can contrive along the way, 
} At the moment, the extent te 
‘which private industry will “ 
jallowed to retain such paten 
‘rights. is at issue. There .aré 
tthose who feel that; since 
much public money and effort 
jhave gone into developing the 
'basic information that industry 
will use, private companies 
should riot be allowed to attain 
too much of a patent monopoly 
in the atomic fields. 

Mr. Ooms, in stating the 
opposite case, voiced what many 
industrial leaders have also been 


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Detroit’ s Projected Convention-Exhibition Hall 


NewBuildingsAdd 


Sparkle to Detroit 


By en K. Sparkman 


aff Correspondent of 


The ye tetren Science Mo 


Thr 


Detroit 


Centraryv to the-words of the: 
American | 


patriotic song, few 
cities are anything approactting 
alabaster. Generally, the large: 
they become, the deeper 
over-all shade of gray 
| Today, Detroit should be able 
, to make 2 strong bid for the rae 
las the nation’s “whitest” city, 
viewed from its front door, the 
Detroit River, or from Canada. 
| Within a few years, as its fast- 
'rising new Civic. Center contin- 
ues to- grow, that title should be 
practically unassailable—unless, 
| of course, Detroiters fail to keep | 
'its new buildings glistening, or 
some other community sets out 
(on a still more ambitious reno- 
| vation. 


For already, as seen from the 


iriver, from the decks of any one | 
4, 0f. the endilessly..shuttiing-imier- 


| national rail ferries or the close- 
|spaced Indian file of limestone 
|'and ore carriers, Detroit's down- 
| town eenter appears an alabaster: 
‘wall, rising sheer from new 
green gardens 

Soon, when an auditorium. 
industrial éxhibition 


an 
bullding, 
office 
are completed, the 
i view will be that of a river-front 
| plaza, surrounded architecturally 
with walls of stone and glass 
focused on a pool and appropri- 
ate memorials. 


‘Convention Hall Inked 
To date, a city-county build- 


ing (with leased offices for in- 
dividuals, and organizations 
serving former armed forces 
personnel), are completed, 


music hall—the Henry and Ed- 
sel Ford Auditorium—already 
presents to the viewer a con- 
| trasting facade of smooth white 
| Stone and 
jing. With 
| garage, 
| season. 

In a modest building a few 
blocks downriver from the Civic 
Center area, beyond the empty 
windows of half-century-old 
brick and stone stores and ware- 
houses awaiting demolition to 
make way for the project, archi- 
tects and engineers already have 
their drawing boards piled high 


its adjacent 700-car 
it is slated for use next 


their | 


4. 


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massive, convention-exhibition 
hall. 


These prints, 


E 


like the 
decorate the halls and walls, 
show the approved structure to | 
, be unique in appearance, unus- 
ual in layout. Planned to attract 
major political conventions with 
its 14,000-seat circular hall, it 
will at last permit the premier- 
s'ing here in the Motor City of 
‘major auto shows within its 
| 324, 000-square-foot exhibition 
space. 


‘More Hotel Rooms, Also 


| By straddling highway lanes | 


hall | the Geneva 


paralleling the river, the 
ican be sited close to the river 
| front, yet will not obstruct the | 
| flow of traffic leaving either the 
icity heart or the nearby termi- 
nus of one of the city’s express- 
ways now under construction. 
‘But--new-factitties often’: de« 
mand in turn still other facili- 
ties. If major conventions are | 
to be attracted to Detroit, addi- 
rooms will need to be 
added to the cit’s already- 
taxed hotels. Garage buildings, 
too. 
ment the roof-top. parking 
planned for the exhibition hall 
These structures, as well as 
a much-discussed federal office 
building and a 
archives hall, already are on the 
drawing boards of the city plan- 
ning commission. 
must await public approval or 


ithe influx of private capital. 


The city-county building was 
built with self-liquidating bonds. 


‘for erection at a pace matching 
icity income, supplemented with 
grants. Ford dealers across the 
nation contributed just over 
half the cost of the $4,700,000 
'Ford auditorium. Industry with- 
in the city is expected to chip 
irr almost a third of the cost of 
the $24,200,000. convention-ex- 
hibition hall. 
Public funds, 
piecemeal as it can. be absorbed 
on the construction site, is | 
raised from the city’s $3,000,000,- 
000 real estate valuation and on | 
‘its $1,500,000, 000 “personal prop- 
/erty” (business inventory, for 
the most part). 
total general fund tax rate of 


city-and-state | 


| waretiared 


ink | . 
sketches and water colors that ; 


| secret 


‘ 


; 


| 


might be needed to supple- | 


much more freely available to | 
industry than it was in the wake | 
of the Geneva “atoms for peace 
conférence last summer. But! 
Senator Anderson said this new 
availability is still not good 
enough. 
Speed Urged 
“Tt ts easier for a camel to 


| saying 


| 


/ 


| atomic energy 


| 


/ Sums 


pass through the eye of a needle | 
than it is for a businessman to | 
receive frank and Complete and | 


from the 
Commission.” 


answers 


omic Energy 


| Se . 
with blueprints of a mammoth, | ~°"**°r Anderson told the nu 


clear parley. 

He subsequently softened this | 
statement at a press conference, 
aying, as quoted by the Asso- 
ciated Press, that the AEC is 


recent months—< 
‘namely that industry wants 
some assurance of a reward for 
its efforts. There are many signs. 
jthat a clear statement in the 
law about the 
|patent rights of private indus- 
try could stimulate even more 
investment than the large dollar 
that are already being 
committed to atomic energy de- 
velopment from private sources, 

But, while the. information 


j;and patent situations are fairly 


| 


’ 


\effort right across 


“driving hard to remove certain | 
additional information from the | 


category. But “I think 


i lively issues, the most serious 
problem is the manpower shorte 
| age. This is a fundamental probe 
lem that is affecting the national 
the board, 
The, manpower pinch felt in 
atomic energy work is only one 
acute example of the larger sit- 
uation. 


they might move a little faster.” | 


Part of the slowness in re- 
leasing information lies in the 
fact that the AEC cannot release 
whole categories of data at a 
time. It can declassify only spe- 
cific documents. This means that 
someone has to write these d 
ments, and that someone is not 
always easy to find. 

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conference was that it provided| EIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS 


the stimulus for a good many 
technical people to put down a 
mass 


of useful information on | 


end Loan Association 


331 West fersyth Street 


paper and in a form:that en- | Member Paden Goss Sen Syne: 


abled..the..AEC..to.declassity- it, 
But, since then, interest in doing | 
this kind of thing seems to have | 
tapered off. 
Unceordinated Material 

Added to this is the fact that 
much of the information tha! 
has been released is in such an 


uncoordinated and unevaluated | 


| State that it is hard for industry 


/ experts 


: 
’ 
| 


Construction | 


appropriated | 


' 
’ 


The existing | 


$22 a $1,000 valuation already | 
has financed more than $13,000,- | 
000 for land-taking involving 72 | 
acres, as well as for the $5,000,- | 


000 veterans memorial. 
| Relenneae 
Peking Fnsiibes 

Pakistan’s Ali 


By the Associated Press 


Lendon 
Prime Minister Chaudry 
ohammed Ali of Pakistan 
accepted an invitation to 
visit Communist China in the 
ing Radice has an- 


'Tradi 
AU 


FARMERS 


Co. Ltd. . New Zealand's 
LAND Biggest Store 


Store built on 
Deperment ~~ 


public. The 


to find § their 

through its bewildering mass. 
Prof. Raymond L. Murray of 

North Carolina State College 


ee 


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Way | 


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MOTOR COMPARY IHC 


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DISCRIMINATING 
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Tel. 9-3816 Miemi, Fle. 


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Buy Your Christmas Dinner at 


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ewe a Ge ssiiiteaaidnde a hie tated 


THE ‘CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, “posto, ‘SATURDAY, ‘DECEMBER 17, 1955 


A Vocabula ry Building Program— Ti 


Maslo-to-Botter-Reading-— 


» = 


i 


By Paul Witty 
Prefesser of Education, Nerthwestern University 


Special to The Christian Sctence Monitor 


Evanston, Ill. 
We have indicated some steps 
for you to follow in an attempt 


to improve your reading speed 
and comprehension. Improve- 
ment will take place gradually 
as you follow a regular sched- 
ule. As you continue to im- 
prove, you will want to vary 
é. r plan. 

Ton wilt want also to extend 
your vocabulary by systematic 


practice, since improvement in| 


vocabulary will aid you to gain 
other skills more rapidly. 


Army Vocabulary Work 


This--fact has been demon- 
strated again and again-—per- 
haps most dramatically during 
World War II in the Army’s 
program for functionally illiter- 
ate men. This program was de- 
vised to hep the men improve 
their general vocabulary by the 
gradual introduction of new 
words in the textbook and in the 
workbook. Considerable atten- 


faster 


tion was given also to the im- 
provement of specialized vocab- 
ularies. In this endeavor,.lists of 
words were assembled in the 
various subject fields, such as 
“rifle markmanship” or “defense 
against chemical attack.” These 
vocabularies were presented on 
filmstrips. Each filmstrip con- 
sisted of a series of pictures with 
a descriptive word or labei 
printed on each picture 

After a filmstrip was shown. 
the meanings of the words were 
discussed and demonstrated 
Word analysis Was given and 
phonetic exercises were intro- 
duced as they were needed 
Sometimes longer films were 
also employed to give a richer 
background for understanding 
of the specialized terms in a 
subject field. When the men 
were studying “rifle rarksman- 
ship” on the drill field, attention 
was given to vocabulary devel- 


Keading 


opment by the use of portfolios | 


containing labeled pictures of | 
parts of the rifle. Thus, under- 
standing..of key works in each | 


field was assured W ‘tthout ques-! ls 


The 


cial 
|greatliy enlarged as you seek to 


'a dictionary, 


tion, the attention given vocabu- 
lary was one factor that con- 
tributed much to the remarkable 
success of the program. 

A good gener 
results in part varied 
firsthand experience. And wide 
reading helps you extend your 
vocabulary. Discussions in 
which you use recently acquired 


words also aid. Here are some 


additional suggestions for ex- 


tending and enriching your gen- |- 


eral and special vocabularies. 
1. Obtain a notebook and 


label one section of it My Gen- 
eral 
heading place the new words 
| you 

, word. 


Vocabulary. Under this 
encounter. Define each 
In “some cases you may 
wish to enter two or more defi- 
nitions. Choose as the first defi- 
nition that one which best fits 
the materials you are reading. 
In order to remember these 


vocabulary |. 


| words, practice using them, pro- 


nouncing each one correctly and | 
checking 
urately.in 
and writing. 

2. Label a second part of the 
notebook My Technical Vocab- 
ulary. 


words 
in either field, 
other new words 
tant key words In your techni- 
cal word list and define each 
word Practice using these 
words, too. 


Hobbies, Special Interests 


3. You may want to have @ 
third section of your notebook 
devoted to the vocabulary in the 
fieid of your special interest. 
heading ‘for-this section 
might be My Special 
Vocabulary. If you have a hobby 
or an interest such as stamp 
collecting, you will find a spe- 
vocabulary that can be 


you will 


find new words. Enter these 
words in your notebook, 
make an effort to use them. 

4. To find the pronunciation 
and meaning of new words, use | 
such as “Webster's 
Collegiate Dictionary” or. the | 
‘Thorndike- Barnhart Compre- | 


thether you have em- | 


In connection with your | 
work or in reading in a techni- | 
cal field, you will encounter new 
As you read more widely | 
meet | 
Enter impor- | 


various educational.and pro- 
fessional journals, he is author 
of several books and pam- 
phiets, including “Helping the 
Gifted Child,” “How te Be- 


come a Better Reader.” “Read. 
ing in Modern Education.” 
“Streamline Your Reading.” 
and “You Can Read Better.” 
also coauthor of others, includ- 


| ing “Your Child and Radio, TY, 


i hensive 
Interest | 


| many 


Comics, and the Movies.” 
i ee 


Dictionary.” 
using the dictionary ‘until you 
can find definitions quickly. Be 


sure to learn to pronounce each 


new word correctly. Then find 


|}occasions to use each word in/| 
‘speaking and 
| possible. 

and | 


in writing, if 

5. Study the many meanings 
|\of some words. Look over your | 
list of general and special terms. 
Choose a few words and see how 
different meanings you,; 
.can.find for each one. you 
know that some words like run 


L 


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Visit any day including 


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DATES — SPEED- 
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A Boarding School (year round, 
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Operated for Children from 
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A non-profit organization 
Pamphiet on request 
447 Post Road West, Darien. Conn. 


tory WUnriversity credit Lifetime 
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84) test Counep “wo 


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SELLS 20 ARTICLES AFTER 
ENROLLING FOR W. 1. A—AT 70! 


“ET am 70 years ef age 
and have had Fay B., 
years in the U. 

a ames te 4%, oil 


pted the 


Practice + 


This Berlin child smiles over 


ee ee 


a hing ss es ihe sil as 2 Spells ' 
~ey ree LT A OP I Te, 


Fe ae TNR, 


the food from a CARE package 


her family received for Christmas. Some 45,000 special food 


packages are being distributed 


in Berlin at this season, where 


thousands of refugees arrive every month. Food is from United 


States surplus stocks, sent te 


needy areas of the free world, 


contributions of $1 per package helping to pay cost of packing 


and distributing. 


The food is donated by the U.S. Government. 


. 


| 


or case may have dozens, even 
‘hundreds of meanings? Find as 


many different meanings as you | 


‘can for these words: 


engineer constitution 
id 


judge 
country 

Add other words to this list 
‘and find their different mean- 
| ings. 

6. 
ing prefixes and suffixes to fa- 
| miliar words. Try 
many new words as you can by 
— | adding to words you alreads 
know, prefixes such as ab, co, 
in, pro, pre, and suffixes such as 
able, ful, ing, ment. Note how 
the meaning of the words is 
changed by the addition of a 
iprefix or a suffix. 


Study the Roots 

7. Study the roots of some 
z,| interesting words. Look in the | 
iidictionary to see if you can | 
identify the roots for words such 
as manufacture, derived from 
Latin manus (meaning 
hand) and. factura (meaning .a | 
making). Look over your gener- | 


a N. ‘}al and technical lists. Find as 


What Makes 
WRITING ability GROW! 


For a number of vears, the) 
Newspaper Institute of America| 
has been giving FREE Writing) 
Aptitude Tests to men and women 
lwith literary ambitions. 

Sometimes it seems half the | 
people in America who are fired | 
with the desire to write have taken’ 
advantage of this offer to measure 
their ability. 


W hat the testis show 


U L te dale, ne one whe could = eames 
e “bern writer” has Alt 

Writing Aptitude Test. We have Set yet 
\@iscevered a single individual mirace- 
‘leusly endowed by natere with all the 


}qualities that ge te make Gp a suceets- 


-_ auther. 

me sspirant bas tnteresting ideas— 
lene a dull, eninteresting style. Another 
bas great creative imagination but is 
iweefully weak on structure and tech- 
nique. A third has « sateral writing 
knack—yet lacks Judgment and knew!l- 
edge of human behavier. In each case 
success can come only after the missing 
links have been for ~ in. 

ere, then, is t principal reasen 
why se many a. writers fail te 
ce ahead. Their talent ts ene-sided—in- 
it meeds reunding out 


Learn to write by writing 


EWSPAPER Inetitute training ts based on 
continuous wWriting—the sert of training 
that turns out more successful writers tha 
ny .uther . “ager ience Many of the pA men 
of tiday st «6setiers” are nhewspaeper- 
| trained ae = omen 
Ou e advantage of our New York Copy Desk 

hed is that it starts you writing and 
your own home on your 
jown time Week by week vou receive actual 
lassig@nments just as if you Were right at 

on a erest metropolitan daily 

All your writing is individually corrected 
and criticized by eteran writers with vears 
of experience “breaking in” new authors 
They will point out these faults of style 
structure or viewpoint that keep vou from 
the same time they will 


give you constructive suggestions for bullding 


} up and developine your natural aptitu 
Y Th th 


des 

Tact so stimulating a 
that student members often 
itheir work before they finish oe a a. 
do not mean to insinuate that A A oxy: 
irecket into the “bie money 
iPreminent overnight. Most sberinnines 3 ave 
made with earnings of $25 or more | 
for material that takes nue t a .* write— 

hobbies. sports 
elub and church 


FREE “sage Aptitude Test 
for Readers of The 
Christian Science Monitor 


If you really want te know the truth about 
I terest - 


leith ovt ge Ae Ful im and send “the 
nh. Newspape Lem a of America. One 
is N YY. (Pounde 


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Lice ond ws ae 0 7.) 


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—. your Writing -_ | 
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writifig for profit as The 
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Going to om 
Next: Fall? 


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ltt 


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totessencee 00... State... 
confidential No sales. 


‘Copyright 1945. Newspeper Institute of America 


| nounced alike, but 


or 


| oi i at 


many words as you can, 

meanings of which can be de- 

ten from study of their roots. 
-_ a list of these words. 

Pay attention to homo- 
words which are pro- 

which have 

different spellings and meanings 


inyms, 


How many such words can you | 


add to this list? 
a one 
won 
know 
no 


ce principle 


principal 
bear 
bare 

9. Listen to and list the un- 
‘familiar words used by news 
icommentators on TV and radio 
programs, and by your friends 


~s discussions. Pay attention to | 


different meanings’ of’ these 
‘aaah a 
ful or descriptive terms, 
ithese words to your lists. 
10. Remember to’ use. your 
‘newly acquired vocabulary in 
conversation and in writing. As 
you gain in vocabulary strength, 
you will be better able to read 
various kinds of materials rap- 
idly. You will not 
down by 
unfamiliar and partially under- 
stood terms. Your rate of read- 
~~ will naturally increase. And 
because you will understand the 
key words, you will be able to 
read the passages with greater 
understanding. 


Record Your Reading 


Add 


| 


of the books you read for sev- 
eral reasons. For one thing, you 


may find the information help- | 


ful in the future. You may want 
to refer either to a book, or to 
some of the facts in a book, for 
work in a class, or in connec- 
tion with a job, or to settle an 


Make new words by add-| 


to make as| 


the | 


be slowed | 
so large a number of | 


Tt is valuable to keep a record | 


largument with a friend. You 
may wish to keep a record of 


information available as you 
need it. Perhaps you will want 
to record on 3” x5” cards help- 
ful information about the books 
‘you read. These cards may be 
assembled and filed under cate- 
gories such as literature, biog- 
raphy, technical, 
laneous. 

On the card, you can place the | 
name of each book, 


your reading so as to have such ) 


and miscel- | 


How would you teach a course 
entitled “American Story” to 125 
sophomores studying English in 

a Siamese. Scenes ne od ana | House: 
this interesting challen 


Ba Thailand. 
ano 
mores study “English Story” 
with a British professor, and 
freshman students take a French 
civilization course, so the stu- 
dents get quite a good glimpse of 
Western ways.. 

Last year when the English 
department assigned courses to 
the “foreign” staff (English, 
American, and Australian teach- 
ers) I volunteered to teach 
“American Story.” The syllabus 
explained that the course should 
give a true picture of American 
life, customs, and institutions, 
using specific illustrations: 

I spent many hours in libraries 
and bookshops here, but found 
no single book including all the 


information T wanted to present 


to the students. It would be too 
expensive to order books from 
ithe United States. The only sat- | 
| isfactory solution was to engage 
in a long research project. com- | 
piling material to present in the 
| lectures. I decided to mimeo- 
graph them for the students to 
| | study outside of class. 
Topics Pientiful 

The project began with the 
| Question, “Just what is the Story 
|of America?” History, of course, 
and government, education, the 
arts, and family and community 
life—the hist of topics grew 
| quickly. 

The presentation of history of- 
fered a real opportunity to show 
‘that Americans have had to 


own country. The story of the 


the difficulties faced by all the 
early settlers. 


During | youth living in a lo 
=, hour the sopho-|of his honesty, he 
and President of the | 


Ang segregation in 


work tirelessly to develop their | 


The students enjoyed follow- 
ing Abraham Lincoln's . career 
from Kentucky to the White 


House. One sincere. young Thai |: 


wrote on her examination paper, 


lawyer 
| United States!” 


United States was, I felt, very 
important to discuss. In Asia 
there -is much” publicity, and 
often misunderstanding, on this 
subject. Lectures told the story 


‘of the early slave trading days, 


life on Southern plantations, the 
Civil War, and the present-day 
| position of the Negro. 


Toward Equal Rights 
We studied the great steps of 
progress made in the march 
toward truly equal rights—the 
Supreme Court decision regard- 


bet- 
ter job opportunities, case stud- 


ies of outstanding Negroes in| 


business, government, educa- 
tion and sports. We studied too 
the immense problems which are 
yet to be solved and stressed 


tion of the entire United States 
_population in the solution of 
| these problems. 


, the 
and especially the Bill of nigus 
Gerdiadie a8, cattinmibihe ga Ay -» its 

accompanyi , 


ng 
and-the need for the individua! 


eotsioned as a lecturer at) 

lalongkorn University in| “Abe Lincoln spent most of his| to take an active part in local 
In spite and national government affairs. 
came #8) 


School Life and Folk Songs 
We followed 


The racial problem ta ° the Student ~ from kindergarter 


through college, and saw him 
working part-time during hi. 
older school years. 


We listened to American foll: 
music and sang “My Old Ken- 
tucky Home” and “Red Rive: 
Valley.” The students watche:' 
a film showing the activities o' 
Tanglewood in the res, 
and we talked -about Inter- 
lochen, the Michigan music 
camp for young people. 

A week, after we had seen - 
short .movie on square dancin; 
some enthusiastic students aske 
me to teach them so they couk 
perform a square dance for th 
next university entertainmer) 


| program. Their spontaneity and 


grace helped them to master the 
dance easily, and the perform- 


ance was warmly received. 
the importance of the coopera- | 


The American Story course 
has been an expansive experi 


,ence both for the students and 


| The young people living in a'| 


country proud of its “Thai” an- 
cestry were tremendously inter- 


ested in learning that the only. 


“pure American” is the Indian. 
Again and again it was neces- 
sary to explain that the Indian 
is quite civilized now, and that 
there are no more Indian wars 
in America. Many students are 
quite convinced that the movies 
present a true picture of Ameri- 


| catio 
can life. and visions of cowboys ' Unit 


me. 


Partners in Prosperity 


A high standard of living anc 
an educated public go hand ir 
hand. America’s growth and de- 
velopment, from its earliest be- 
ginnings, has been paced by thre 
founding of centers of learning 
until today 1,857 institutions oi 
higher learning form a vast edu- 
1 network across the 
States. 


ee 


EDUCATION 


Coeducational 


; 
its author, | 


a summary statement of its con- | 


| tent, 


‘eating its value and uses. 


and a few sentences indi- | 


: 


After two or three months of | 


reading practice, test your read- | 
comprehension | 


ing rate and 
|again, Examine the cards you 
have filed under the different 
|headings. Then answer the fol- 
lowing questions: 

Have | improved my reading 
ability? 
| Have I increased my general 
/and my special vocabularies? 
| AmI reading widely? And am 
[ extending and enriching a 
special interest through reading? 
| Do I enjoy reading? 

Be Sure to Continue 

As you improve 
ability, 
skillful 


become a reader, 


idly, you will have time to read 
'more according to your inter- 
‘ests. If you have formed the 
i habit of reading critically, too, 
you will become increasingly | 
expert in extending your fund | 
of useful and accurate informa- 
tion. 

Through reading you can be 
helped to become a well-in- 
formed and generally interest- 


ring’ person. “But you must’ ten- tT" 
Note particularly color- | 


tinue to read if you are to keep 
and develop the skills you have 


cerning itself 
animals and plants, 


¢ 


and the entire college 


ORE AND MORE modern hiology is con- 
with the studies of living 


ranging from the larger 


animals and vegetative units to microscopic forms. 
The Principia College property on high bluffs 
overlooking the Mississippi River at Elsah, Illinois, 
rovides two thousand acres of fields and wooded 
ills and ravines rich in material for the biologist, 


in reading | 
you should apply your | 
new skills. Even after you have’ 
you | 
should continue to read. If you | 
have learned to read more rap- | 


roperty is maintained as a 
state wildlife refuge. Th 4 
cently established, qualified i 
Conservation, Fisheries, Forestry, Wildlife Man- 
agement, and Wood Technology may receive their 
bachelor’s degree from Principia and a second 
degree in one of the above specialties from the 
University of Michigan in five years. 


Write for further details and College Catalog. 


She PRINCIPIA 


| Founded 1898 
| SAINT LOUIS 12, MISSOURI 
: 


| 


acquired. Perhaps you will want | 


to set aside another 30-minute 
period each: day for 
Even a shorter period will help, 
as Louis Shores indicates in 
“The Wonderful World ol 
Books”: 


minute period each day (for reading 
It is better if it is regular... .. The only 
requirement is the Will to read. With 
it you can find the 15 minutes 
matter how busy the day te at 
means you will read half a book a/| 
week 
and 
| time It's 
| well read. 


an easy Way to become 


| *Equipped with greater skills, 
you will gain greater satisfac- 
tion in reading. If you have 
learned to enjoy reading you 
are indeed fortunate, 
will be increasingly rewarded. 


Last of a series of 17 weekly artictes. 
Teday’ s Skills 
" The & 


‘have been by Dr. Witty. 


two books @ month. 2 «a year, 
1000 or more in a reading life- | 


for you | 


and 
nal three 


; 


reading. | 


Each of us must find our own 15- 


no 


. = 


IN THE SAN JACINTO MOUNTAINS ABOVE PALM SPRINGS 
SUMMER CAMP 


Winter School: September fo June | 


school for boys ond girls 6th through |i 
ttn grodes. €xcellent ocademic stand- 
} ards and opportunity to develop initiative, | 
responsibility .and quolities of shup. 


: 
| 
' | 
| 


:| The Giver Along With the Gut) 


By Millicent Taylor 


Education Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


A busy young father once 
‘gave each of his boys for 
| Christmas one night a week for 
ithe coming year and kept that 
— “making up” the date 
on another evening if un- 
avoidable cancellations had to 


It was the grandest present 
the boys had and they knew it. 

ch boy on his special night 
ad his dad’s companionship to 
himself); and with Dad chose 
what they would do together. 
The boys were several years 


Through on Editor's Window 

apart, so the shop work, the 
movies, the session with- stamps 
and other hobbies, the impor- 
tant talks on walks or en route 
to skating or coasting were in- 
dividual and very. 

and Dad loved it, too. 


Family Nights 
These regular times of com- 


Dramatic Arts 


' tradition in that household. On | 


| Saturday night (uniess it sim- 
ply has to be postponed to an- 


other night) everybody dresses | 


as if for a party, and a member 
serves as host-or hostess, in 
rotation, having charge that 
night of preparation, entertain- 
ment, and refreshments, 


Disappear to Reappear 


The other members disappear 
out through the back door, and 


reappear to ring the front door- | 


bell and be admitted as guests. 
This family does music 
| gether, and part of the evening 
\is therefore taken with playing 
instrumental numbers, Singing 
follows—carols this time of 
year, and hymns and folksongs 
at all seasons. Poetry is usually 
read, maybe a story, too, games 
and jokes are worked in, art 
| work and dancing. All is over 
by 9 p.m. This has been going 
on for several years. 

“Why don’t we ever read 
aloud any more?” asked mem- 
bers of a little family after en- 
joying a Christmas reading in 
front of the fireplace one Christ- 
mas Eve. “Why don’t we?” was 
the reply. Thereupon a time was 
set am see each sre gt was just 


had a turn at doing 
and at the choosing, 


to- | 


Riding. Winter Sports; Hiking, -Pock Trips, 
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‘ST. JOHN'S 


| MILITARY ACADEMY 


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44 
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THE LEELANAU 
SCHOOLS 


, Arther 6. Heer, 
Pres. 


'| BOYS—GIRLS 
men today's to 


& prob 
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FOR GIRLS FOR BOYS 


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aracter Training 


On of Lake Michigan. Ac- 


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Charles W Shinn, Headmaster, len Arbor, Mich, 


CONSIDER 


Daycroit. 


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The famous 6t. John's Sye- 
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motivates study 

rapid ecademic p progress Pails 
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Director of Admissions, Bex 1611, 
DELAFIELD, WISCONSIN 


Educational Problems? 
CHOOSE THE WARREN WAY 

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Individual cae ey and acceleration. 

jal pros College prepara- 

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Washington D. C. 


MT. LOWE 


MILITARY 
ACADEMY 


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_.. By Mogens V. Rasmussen 
Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


Copenhagen | price-wage pressure lis 
As in most Western European | matic adjustment of w 
countries, advancing inflation is | reference to the retail 
today. | Baltimore 14 | |the dominant economic problem dex, which takes place 
such | com tin 


| to the cole 
— 1s readily admitted. But | of this mn agg where the Sotial | ployers and workers. In 
erences t, there came wide dif- | = today Democratic rty is in office ance with a clause con 
: < Sooees ae to Se 7. . in its third year as a'minority all collective agreements, the 
actual state of things and how it | 
is to be improved. 


| trated on 
* New ee eee Sey 7 Bord to check the unfavorable ef- crease of the price index. 
duced wi po “ 


unds, in the industry | = ~~“; feets of full émployment, which! - Good Work-Day Record 

iteelf But noveaniand cameras . 7. age to a ae and ie automatic ans 
seem ) onsta encouraged relatively leng 
this wins Se fee ‘ae all ce | With 1938 as the basic year, agreements and has given Den= 


; il ce index has risen 
public somewhat confused, es- the retail pri 
pecially when it simultaneously 
reads about a new German pro- 


copies, and ad- 
vertisements. But it is pointed 
out by the German 


mark one of the best records in 


from the beginning of 1955 to \the world for the smallest num- 
October, 1955, from 205 to 221. | ber of lost working days per ine 


uction i The latest published index for 
be paid on Wellywood stendarés. | hourly earnings in industry in 


Theaters ) through Wednesday : 1965 te at. Wages as well = 
Well Attended workin ou olidays, an 
The cinemas themselves are’ ular could have done this very | ‘other working. conditions are 
doing quite well. They are well | easily. Ex Market = | settled on an emg" — 
nded, and new modern pens = through nationwi collective 
erie theaters seem to be It is also said that more at-_ | agreements between the em- 
springing up all over the place. | j tention should be given to the | 
last year, and higher than the | export of German films, and | 


ployers’ and the workers’ or- 
It is rather the German film / | ? | zations without government 
“producer appears to be prewar annual figure, when -80 | parallels with the position in/ 
to 100 films of quality were | prewar days are drawn. 


Seevened: — ee 
permanently on the brink of col- | This system is criticized by 
Japse. But these must be made with the small but politically influen- 

9 atl parma - _~ ,tial Radical Party, yg feels 
lms produ never seem 0 ‘that a coordination of all eco- 
$n a Sreper market. This might 


-habitant as the result of*indus- 
‘trial conflicts. It is true that the ; 
| pressure on wages.as a result of 
ifull employment is a dom 
\feature in the individual 
panies, but the confidence in get+ 
ting compensation for price ifs 
creases is, ‘however, so prevaé- 
lent that the workers as a rule 
refrain from using force. - 
\ “For these reasongs “the” ets 
ployers have up to now 
ported the idea of automatic. 
wage regulation, but find, howe 
ever. that during inflation the 


on the large German language 
group in Baltimore. 


a ee 
—— 
_—_—— 


~~ 


Two Executives Join Staff of Vanity Fair Mills 


J. Neal Dow, teft,-has joined . Greeter, William Stophiect, richt.-will direct all 
advertising and promotion activities. He has 
been engaged in retail advertising and sales 
promotion for 18 years. 


——o 


of directots of Vanity Fair. As promotional 


inomic factors—as is the case in| 
suggest that West German films mertle. svteee 6 Js Sis sare 


place under the auspices of the 
government with cooperation 


are overrun by foreign films in 
their own market. 

Actually, this is not the case. 
Of the 500 films shown. annually 
in West Germany, 230 come 
from the United States, 120 from 
other countries, and the remain- 
in 150 from the studios of the 
Federal Republic itself. 


Box-Office Net 

Though only one-third of the 
al number of films shown are 
from West German studios, these 
fatter take about 50 per cent of 
the total box-office receipts. The 
idea that conditions could be 
improved simply by increasing 
the number of home-produced 
films is not correct. For the 
trouble is not in the quantity 
but in the quality of the postwar 
films produced here. 

During the present season 
some 159 German films are an- 


nounced. This is 40 more than. | 


— 
WHEN AND WHERE TO 
DEPOSIT YOUR SAVINGS 


In the Mutual Savings Banks 
of Massachusetts 


perated under strict Massachusetts 
prning Laws, There are no stockholders 
dividends go to depositors. Interest 


ins on dates listed 


lf more convenient tou may 


BANK BY MAIL 
BOSTON, MASS. 


Prankiin Sevings Bank 2 
Messachusetis vings Bank 
Bosten Penny Savings Bank 

Union Set Bank 

Warren Institution for Sevings 

Besten Five Oents Savings Bank . 


Chariestewn Gaving,. Bank 
Bast Boston Savings Bank 


Other Massachusetts 
Savings Banks 
Arlington Five Cents Savings 
Bank 
Gee eoenen Savings Bank 


r Avenue Savings Benk 
East Cambridge Savings Bank 


| ment, 


in strong protests from 
abroad about violations of inter- 
national film contracts, etc. 


It is net the quantity but the | 
quality of the present German | 


: 


films which must be improved. 
Many of them are far below 
prewar ‘standard, This is readily 
admitted, and 
the lack of capital within the 
film production industry itsel 
or to the lack of more aid from 
the government. 


Financial Problem 


Since the West German film | With political or military sub- | 


industry has tried to get back 
on its feet again the producers 


is attributed to | 


rope; and there not only the 


| German mentality but the Ger- | 


man language was understood 

Most of this area is today un- 
der Communist rule, and closed 
‘to West Germany. Exports 
therefore must go to Western 
countries. 


And here, too, new postwar 


‘ problems have arisen. For ex- 


+ porting fiims is not hike export- 

ing ordinary goods, It is a psy- 
| chological matter. Some of the 
| best postwar German films deal 
jects which require most care- 
| ful handling if they are to find 


have found few financial back- | '@™8¢ audiences both inside and 


ers. Most German banks are un- 


willing to grarit credits merely | 


on the basis of good will or a 


promising script. Yet this is all | 


most of the producers have had 
to offer hitherto. 

The impetus for West German 
film production has therefore 
had to come from firms engaged 
in lending-out films. These have 
built up a profitable organiza- 
tion through business in foreign 
and old German films. The 
banks have been less hesitant in 
granting them credits since a 
film-lending program with about 
a dozen ‘good films seemed a 
safer risk than a program car- 
rying two or three new films. 

More than 90 per cent of new 
, West German productions have 
| been financed by the film-lend- 
| ing firms. And this, say some of 
pine producers explains the poor 
quality of some of the new films. 
' For those who supply the money 
'ean decide upon the whole film. 
upon production, script, and so 
on. 

Sharp Criticisms 


Criticisms of West German 
film production aiso include the 
usual one that costs could be 
considerably cut, and that so 
many. producers show an ap- 
palling lack of business manage- 
If film producers would 
face up fairly and squarely to 


the present position, according to | 


one recent press comment, then 
it would be obvious that the best 
films are sound, but that to grant 
special financial aid for many 


Sound, Conservative 
Management 


In Our Banking Department 


The conservative policies which have 


char- 


acterized our Trust Department for more 
than eighty years prevail in our Banking 


Department. 


You can see that sound conservatism 
reflected in our Statement of Condition, 


which will be sent to anyone on request. 


Examine that report and you will see the 


high ratio of capital 


high percentage of assets in the form of cash 
and government securities. 


Our Banking Department safeguards the 
deposits of many individuals, fiduciaries, 
savings banks, insurance companies, munic- 
ipalities, churches, hospitals, charitable 


- 


institutions, firms and 


- we othe oo & & 


—— oe aw ee Ww © 


- BOSTON SAFE DEPOSIT. 


AND TRUST COMPANY 
_... 100 FRANKLIN STREET -_ 


to deposits, and the 


corporations. 


Oe a. Gas ee 


outside this country. 
German film exports 
nevertheless been on the in- 
crease during the past few 
years. In 1953, they totaled 7.- 
000,000 marks ($1,660,000), in 


have 


1954 11,200,000. marks, and for | 


1955 they are expected to reach 
15,000,000 marks. This advance 
is not as great as that of some 
other countries, in the foreign 
field. The United States received 
in 1954 for the showing of its 
films in this ¢ountry alone about 
60.000.000 marks 

But it is hoped that the Ger- 
man film will find a bigger 
market in the United States. As 
a start, some six to 12 German 
films are expected to be shown 
im some leading American 
cinemas during 1956. These films 
will be either synchronized or 
supplied with English titles. 


U.S. Market Sought 


Speciel to The Christian Srience Monitor 
New York 
A series of discussioris with 
German film industry leaders, 
aimed at intensification of efforts 
to widen the circulation of Ger- 
man pictures in the American 
| market, has been concluded by 
Munio Podhorzer, president of 
United German Film Enter- 
prises. 
|'dous vitality in the German film 
|industry of today and there is 
agreement all around that these 
new German pictures can stand 


comparison. with the best the 


rest of Europe has to offer to 
American audiences,” Mr. Pod- 
horzer declared. “The entire re- 
sources of UGFE are being 
thrown behind a renewed effort 
to bring this message to United 
States exhibitors and the public.” 


“I feel that there is tremen- | 


Business Horizons 


Logie Sparks French Industrial Shift 


By PHILIP W. WHITCOMEAR, Written 


Paris 

Obsolete and unprofitable 
French factories are being 
closed down or modernized 
with that blend of logic and 
obstinate individualism which 
is forever France. 
~ The logic had begun to ex- 
press itself in the Monnet 
Plan of the postwar years, 
_mixed with memories of the 
relentiess Nazi.industrial “ra- 
tionalization” in the thirties, 
and of occupation-time con- 
versions of French plants to 
German war production. 

Individtatism “ came” into 
play when great-grandsons 
refused to abandon family 
businesses even though the 
decks were awash, manager rs 
and workers shied away from 
those extraordinary Ameri- 
can ideas, and hatmakers 
stared in wonder when they 
were advised to convert cen- 
turies-old plants to the mak- 
ing of plastic sheets. 

> 4 + 

But in recent davs, when 
the first annual report card 
on industrial conversion ap- 
peared, it became clear that 
logic and individualism had 
cooperated. Sixty eight 
‘French factories out of 196 
‘which applied this year for 
ithe state’s new industrial as- 
'Sistance alread are being rig- 
orously modernized or con- 


verted to entirely new activi- | 
ties. The state expenditure for | 


the 68 operations will prob- 
ably be under 10 million dol- 
lars. 

Half of the 68 cases 
cepted by the new govern- 
mental office for industrial 
management called for a 
complete change to new prod- 


ac- 


ucts: The hat Tactory it Quil- 


lan, referred to above, will 
make plastic table tops. A 
beet sugar refinery is chang- 
‘Ing over to potato flour. A 
foundry whose activity had 
got close to zero will now do 


Taxpayer 


Urged 


To Help Himself 


Special to The Chrigtian Science Monitor 


Cc 
Now is the time for all good 
taxpayers to come to the aid of 
themselves, says a timely report 
by Commerce Clearing House, 
national reporting authority on 
tax and business law. 
| In “Pre-Return Tax Plan- 
‘ning,” CCH points out that de- 
_ferring- or accelerating income 
lor deductions may offer oppor- 
| tunities for tax savings depend- 
ing upon the taxpayer's situa- 
ition this year and next, as well 
as an estimate of the future 
course of income tax rates. 
An. automatic reduction in the 
corporate normal tax is $Sched- 


the law. The reduced rate- will 
| be 25 per cent, down from the 


present normal rate of 30 r 
\P have been approved by the In- 


cent. The corporate surtax rate 


taxable income over $25,000. 


able income over 
cent for 1956, compared with 
the present rate of 52 per cent. 

While there is no automatic 
rate reduction for individuals 
scheduled in the law, taxpayers 
will be considering the possibil- 
ity of lower taxes in 195@ as 
they make their year-end plans, 
CCH says. 


Deferring Saves Taxes 


As a general rule it is possible 
to save taxes by deferring your 


At 


tent oe _ 
. » « 
| Eres 
ne ee ta 
tS ee oh _ 


4. = : . O) te s- es i 


uled to become effe¢tive April | 
1, 1956, unless Congress changes | 


will remain at 22 per cent on | ; 
_longer inflexible, they permit a 
Thus the combined tax on tax- | 
$25,000 will | 
average out at about 48% per | 


~<pring all of the income, ft might 


be advisable to defer just a part, 
according to CCH. 

When you know that you are 
going to have a high income 
year, it is possible to save or at 
least equalize taxes by accelerat- 
ing your deductions or so much 
of them as will keep you out of 
the high tax brackets. Thus, in 
a situation where the tax rates 
are high in one year and can 


be expected to drop in the next. 


year, you can reduce the income 
subject to the high tax by speed- 
ing wp your deductions and 
bring about the same result as 
in deferring your income, 


Resurvey Urged 


For businessmen, CCH advises 
them to take a second look at 
new buildings and equipment. 
New depreciation rate schedules 
ternal Revenue Service. No 
higher rate of depreciation for 
1955 purchases. Rates for older 
property may aiso be adjusted 
|upward under certain condi- 


) tions, but decisions on using the 


new depreciation methods 
should be made before the year 
runs out. 

The new sum of the years- 
digits method of depreciation on 
'mew assets (1954 and 1955) is 
shown in the following example 
in the CCH pamphlet: 


preciation is figured thus: 
Sum of the Digits : 


a gene, TX > oe r 
fone BE. ee 
VOR? ees yr 
+ Dh ee ee Re, 
oa peas CRE Pee € 


ae * 


t 7 x a fe in 
pakaete te - Aistee ROR ee 
fax, Ape et 2 a, —s 


Neb seem 


a . q 4 
am aay 

Be pe ids 2 
ae 
se“ 


the 


‘government to go 
/business of lending money.) 


had already operated a simi- 
lar plan of its own, closing 


about 75 inefficient plants and” 


this month even transferring 
obsajete machinery to Al- 
giers. But, nevertheless, one 
spinner appears in the gov- 
ernment’s list, with conver- 
sion fo the making of sports- 
wear. 

The total of 196 applicants 
may not seem enormous for a 
country with 390,000 indus- 
trial and transport enterprises 
employing at least five per- 
‘sons. But it must“ be remem- 
bered that every one of the 
196 requests for a manage- 
ment study was entirely vol- 
untary. ‘ 

Complete freedom to with- 
draw from the study con- 
tinues until the new office has 
analyzed possibilities and 
purposes, plant and location, 
management and operation, 
merchandising methods and 
market demand. These anal- 
yses are of the same kind 
as those made in America 
by ‘management engineers. 
One of three conclusions is 
arrived at: no action: reor- 
ganization, usually with rigid 
specialization to replace the 
rambling ranges of product 
induiged in by most French 
producers; or conversion to 
another industry. 

+ +A 


Under this third possibility 
the enterprise might even be 
abandoned completely; and 
both management and work- 
ers retained and then distrib- 
uted among other industries, 
probably in other localities. 

After receiving his analysis 
owner’ must’ make up fis 
mind whether to accept or 
reject it. He has paid nothirg 
for the report; he can still re- 
fuse to go on. The emotional 
shock is often intense, par- 
ticularly so because nearly all 
French concerns, though us- 
ually incorporated, are family 
affairs interwoven with tradi- 
tion and sentiment. 


If a recommendation for 
modernization and specializa- 
tion is accepted, then the gov- 
ernment office from a special 
.fund established for the pur- 


4 


pose issues a guarantee which | 


enables the firm to obtain a 
bank loan at legal interest. 
(Needless to say, the French 
banks refused to allow the 
into the 


The manufacturer is now 
bound to follow precisely the 
scientific management plan 
laid down for him. Thirty- 
three of the cases approved 


tion. 

Similarly if the owner de- 
cides to accept a plant con- 
version of a closure and re- 


“this ne 


Minister, 


this year are for reorganiza-- 


fer The Christian Science Moeniter 
\tinning. The cotton ’ Maustry | 


training plan, he is bound by 
it. Government officials say 
that up to the present all 
have cooperated fully and 
have been perfectly satisfied: 
there is no evidence to the 
contrary. 

Some French business lead- 
ers believe that this Ameri- 
can-style readiness to try 


from. the. organizations and the | 


National Bank. 
Fiscal Devices 
As. the situation is today, the 
government's devices for creat- 
ing a sound 
are confined to influencing con- 
sumption through taxes and 


Lexeises and affecting economic 


something new because some- | 


thing old doesn’t work any 
more marks the beginning of 
a new era. Several govern- 
mental figures have been 
willing to accept credit for 


outsider it seems possible that 
the explanation is an altera- 
tion of the whole industrial 
atmosphere due to the en- 
forced changes of war and 
postwar years, and the drip- 
drip-drip of American man- 
agement ideas sprinkled on 
the French economy by vari- 
ous Marshall plan agencies. 
eth ee. 


The Monnet Plan had 
clearly stated the principles 
involved. The Nathan Com- 


activity through a discount and 
financial policy. 
The government's difficulties 
are intensified by the fact that 
the trade unions, which are to 
an overwhelming extent Social 
Democratic, are extremely polit- 
ically active. The leaders of 
the individual unions, who dur- 


‘ing collective bargaining try to 


‘their members, 


change, though to an ' 


mission had reported in 1953. 


that with 50 as a normal cost 
index French factories were 
operating at from 30 to 100. 
Jean-Marie Louvel, then 
Minister for Industry, basing 


his recommendations on the | 


Nathan report, specifically 
proposed the voluntary reor- 
ganization, reconversion, or 


create the best conditions for 
will often in 
their capacity of politicians have 
to follow . quite. .a different 
course. 

Practically all collective 
agreements runs for a period of 
two years and expire at the 
same time (next time March 1, 
1956.) and the opening maneu- 
vers of the negotiations con- 
erning new agreements are 
about to begin. While the gov- 
ernment urges restraint, the 
trade unions say they want im- 
provements, including wage in- 
creases and shortening of the 
48-hour week. 

Revaluation Weighed 

As a solution the economic 
balance . problem,. the .Trade 
Union Congress proposes an in- 
crease of the value of the Danish 
krone, which has a fixed ex- 
change rate of 6.92 for $1. But 
the opponents of an increase of 
the value of the krone (mainly 
the farmers who predominate 


‘in the export trade) stress that 


‘an inerease of the value of the 


abandonment of all factories | 


whose costs stood at 80 or 


over, where 50 was a reason- | 


able standard. It was such 
businesses, he said, that. were 
putting French prices so far 
above world levels. 

Edgar Faure, now Prime 
Minister and then Finance 
gave his Vigorous 
support to the plan and 
worked hard on it. The Coun- 
cil of Ministers approved it in 
February 1954, and it ‘was 
formally adopted in May. M. 
Mendes-France, always ready 
to sponsor any neatly con- 
structed and logically com- 
plete plan, also approved. 
First annual allocations were 
set at about 10 million dollars 
for the Keorganization’ and 
Conversion Fund, and 15 
million dollars for the Man- 
agement Methods Improve- 
ment Fund. The plan has 


| situation of the country. 


net debt in balance of payments 


TCOrning ai Increase or the rate" B 


economic climate | 


device may contribute to greater 

difficulties. —_ 
The employers’ organizations. 

now are of opinion that the rea 

sons for price increases 

to be considered in eath Case, 

before ‘any wage boost is 


granted. ’ 
There will undoubtedly 6é 
much discussion about 
problem during the forthcomin 
negotiations in connection with 
the new collective agre@mentie 
It is argued from most quar’ 
ters that an increase of wage® 
in real terms is impossible te 
force through, considering that 
the increase of productivity dufe_ 


‘ing the past two years has not 


; 


: 


been greater than the increasé 
of the wage level. 
High Standard of Living 
The standard of living in Déeti- 
mark is among the highest in. 
Europe (only exceeded by 
Switzerland and Sweden), which 
is due. to .extremely.. effiiciéng... 
agriculture and relatively. pro= 
duetive industry. Denmark's 
greatest concern is that it hag 
to import all raw materials: 
As a result of the high wages 
and the high living standard, 
productivity has to be increase 
to enable Denmark te compete 
in international markets will 
countries that have considera- 
bly lower wages and raw matte 
rials at their disposal. 4 
Denmark, with a home market 
of only 4,500,000 persons; hes 
the lowest tariffs in the world, 
and so imports much from coun< 
tries with lower wages. This ig 
particularly noticeable hh the 
textile industry, which flour= 
ished immediately after the war? 
but has great difficulties today, 
There are also difficulties for 
the shipbuilding, porcelain, a4 
other industries, for whom com<« 
petition, mainlyrfrom West Gere 
many, and to some extent front, 


. ' East Germany, is severe. 
krone, even if it is technically 


-——— eo 
Paid Dec. 31. 1908 


INSURED 


$10,000 


consistent with the interna- 
tional agreements, ‘will only 
tend to deteriorate the currency 


RS 


) 


As compared with a positive 
balance in 1954, the average 


to other countries in 1955 is 
346,000,000 kroner. The imme- 
diate effect of the rumors con- | Ask for Report CA-811 
of the krone is that Denmark's 
official currency balance has im- 
proved by approximately $1,- 
000,000..a—_day during. the past 


(weeks, as the Danish outstand- 


operated. since, January. 1955, | 


though inevitably on a partly 


experimental basis. 


It is safe to say that some 
marginal businesses are being 
salvaged and a few elimi- 
nated. But a more illuminat- 
ing comment has been made 
in terms of what is still 
France's. basic - food, bread. 


The new attitude toward or- | Dec. 14 by the American Tele- 
conversion, | phone & Telegraph Company. 


ganization and 
industrial leaders are saying, 


‘every three persons, had more 


; 


may prove to be the leaven | 


that had been lacking in 


French production, 


The Business Day 


After fluctuating all week the siock market headed higher at 
the close Dec. 16th. Obviously investofs-are extremely sensitive 
to any unusual news development which might shake down 
some of the high prices. When President Eisenhower's physi- 
cians said “go slow” there was a pronounced fall, but the 
market was never disorderly. Wall Street hopes that the 
end of the year will see the market higher and stronger. 
Trading to establish profits or losses for tax purposes is almost 
over. Traders hope these switches will not upset the price 
structure, The five most active issues this week on the New 


York Stock Exchange were 


Benguet Consolidated Mining 


unchanged at 1% on 367,700 shares: United States and foreign 
securities off 2% at 2954: General Motors off 1% at 46%; 
Sperry Rand up 2 at 26%; and Studebaker-Packard up % at. 
10%. The five most active issues this week on the American 
Stock Exchange were Kaiser Motors up 1% at 5% on 261,400 
shares; Cuban Venezuelan Oil up % at 24%; Sapphire Petroleum 
off % at 3; National Petroleum up 5/16 at 34%; and California 


Aviation up % at 4%. 
Lack of steel ‘s delaying many construction projects, despite the 


fact that steel mills are os 
‘manufacturers are on a a 


to-mouth basis in getting stee 
Construction has passed stage, according to the Associated 
Contractors of America, whose 


g at maximum capacity. Many 
stee!. 


spokesman reports that many 
held up because ofthe steel 


president of the American Institute 
ted steel 


—— . == ~ 5 ace me noe ‘ : . 
ih er can at Metra tink, Sek a 
yd wih. & — a wy a it heat ms ous By 


, r 
o* q ' . 
é a , 
a : 


in short supply every- 


03 


ee aie aaa 


or fal " eX 
Joe Sea ater ara ee, 
. Van he Maken Dees 


Pe ERS FET ee Pas 
» To Ne OR a Beet: eee, Se ‘ 
h oh he Od ae we PL ape Ly ie L at r oF 


survey showed. 


| place for the third straight year. 


) 


in its capital city, Reykjavik, as | 
‘is 40 per cent of its population. 


ing accounts in other countries 
are called home to a great 
extent. 

One of the most discussed 


problems in connection with | ee ee 
: ete EPS For the Coreful Investor 


U.S.Telephones | 3 ... 
Total Over Half | 


S48 SE, C 


Of World Supply § 


| Py the Arsocteted Press : 
New York 

The United States, with one 

telephone on the average for 


rao @F 
INSURED SAVINGS 
ASSOCIATIONS 


Ast for our Notion. Wide lish 
Complete wiormoton. 
than half the world’s 9442 mil-+- NO CHARGE FOR OUR SERVICE 
lion télephones on Jan. 1, 1955. 
More than 54 million telephones 
wefe added throughout the 
world last year. 


These facts 


© '%W Ademse Si © 
Finencial 6-211? Stetd 2-449% © 


were ~ disclosed 


' 
! 
' 
1 


1 ) be ANNUM Si 
3 /s (Current Rates) 
on Fecsenel Savings, Trust Fonds, | 
F* institutions! Funds, Corperste funds 4 


Chicege 3 MF 


; : 

s 
Iceland has superseded the Now Tor ee Inves 
United States as the second gab- 


biest nation in the world, the 


Canada, with 417 conversa- | 
tions per capita, holds first 


For Profi’ 
Since ! 
leas than 


3% im 


For Safety— 


: . 4 never 
Iceland with 394 nosed out this | 


country which had 393 for sec- 
ond place. More than half of 
Iceland's 25,000 telephones are | 


These statistics are for the | 
year 1954, since it takes almost 
a year to collect information | 
from more than 250 governments | 
and companies in all parts of 
the world, | 

The Netherlands installed its | 
millionth phone last year, bring- | 
ing to 12 the number of coun- 
tries with a million phones or | 
more. In addition to the United | 
States, are the United , 
Kingdom, nada, the German 
Federal! Republic, France, Japan, | 
Sweden, Italy, Australia, vine | 


Netherlands in that order. 


FSLIC, a 


Accounts ' 
where in 


this ad for full 


STANDARD 


SAVINGS & LOA 
4B Broad Street, H.W. 


+ » 
rie ae 


bk. 
+ 


t 


in Any Amount? 


a 


Each account f in: 
sured to $10, by: 


agency of Federal Gov't. : 


any- 


by mail 
t. Ss. Clip and. send, 


ASSETS OVER $23,500,000. 


‘ : 
FEDERAL. 
* a! , 

. 
*F 

: 


: 


Savings Deposits _ 
GENERAL BANKING — INCLUDING LOANS 
Each Deposit Insured up to $10,000.00 — 


“* : 
w 


o wv 


> 


— oe AM km 


-_e wz Een ee ee Oe, 


* af 
- enn k fatale am al 


7 
‘ - 


~ - a Oa ad 
+ ea OS. BS. es 
- 


Diet ogee 
Sa ee cea ie a 


nel set EL RE 


nizes the “feeble competition” 
which legal restraints 


proposed 
would do, briefly, is to fix fine 
_ jail penalties for parents of 
child who do 


fenders which elevates the so. 
lution beyond that of man-made 


“statement of 


belief” the c s’ group, which 


offer to 
the “familiar ethical effects of spent five months in the study, 


mental dictation and inter- 
ference. 


-beliefs of .its 


“The religious 
\citizens and their conviction 


‘concerning the sanctity of the 
‘individual and his obligations to 


any 
juvenile delinquency, 


is the 
recognition that all life comes | 


from God. 


Club Week 


Today 


—— Boston. 


550 Huntington Ave. 
Bostén, Mass. 


} mn yl Choice location. ° 
400 ~Alberta Drive. Pigture | 
available, 


Apply by letter stating 


BROOKLYN, 


N. ¥. (Platbesh)—* ; 8 


rms. 
bedrooms. bath, rage, ci). brick. 
Telephone HY —_ tien at said 


yf x 


qualifications to— 
Cc. M. Thomson 


ity on Or vajuet ony 


a Contractor wt 


December 17, 1085" 


HOUSES FURNISHED 


Minimum eaee ard dump-truek rates ay been em 
office. Plans on District. 


wag 2 is not wat equipped te t indertaxe am and ‘complete the she wor 


800 
10.00 4.300. 
informe- 
ee? 
oat wa =e made 


4. Foren Chub sp 10 the Once 


INVISIBLE SER VICE—Moth 
Holes. , 


Tears, etc. Rewoven. 
Building, Rm..26, Boston. Li 23-7806, 


PORTRAIT PAINTING 
{ Afforéabdie! From 
Gier, Wike for, titer eearien Tour 
PRINTING 


CHRISTMAS CARDS 
> Graphic House, 


Liberty “2-1466 Borton. 
RUG CLEANING & REPAIRING 


Andre W. Delanijian 


Direct importer of Orienta! Regs 
Complete Rug Service Rug Specialists 
ALL ws DONE BY BAND 
oe. AS 71-7268 
(+t BEACON. ‘ST., BROOKLINE, MASS. 
TEACKERS AND TUTORS 


vv." WOOD— Vocal cca) tnetrection. 
ates a | +. 


PL te pater anytime) | sO Lave was, 
TIRE RETREADING = 
~ CUSTOM SNO-TIRE TREADING — 


Eee. 1912 — Au Work Guaronteed 


6.00 x 16 $9.95 6.70 » 15 $10.95 


O. K. TIRE CO. 


380 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mesa, 
TEL. CO 6-5736 


VACATIONS 
winter haven of 


Write Perewars 
Arizone. 


———  —- 
Mest at Brigham’s._corner of Massa- COPY | 
chusetts Avenue at Boy iston rect, at 7 
2 pm; weak - 7. im time for | 
the 2:30 p.m 
Brookline 


éoncer 
ird cM. all-day trip 
Saiisdur 


ve 


Boston Stock Exchange _ 


Volume and Price Range for Week Ended Dec. 16, 1955 
Last: Security Shares High Low Last! Security 
230 | duPont deNemours | Paramount £ Peters 
=F uaneone Seas oy Co oy" ave + pie 
. t 
Bast Mass B sh ICI 
(Ches) & Co 
Corp 


— a 5% oo 

astern Steamship 
Dodge 
ila Electric Co 
ie Reading Coa) 


stern Airlines 
Ber, -_ ee ee Co 
06'.« ectric Auto-Lite 
si% |B Bond & Sh Phiieo Corp 
Proce am 
Pub borvies of na 
| Pub Service 


ee. 
24 
*. 
| Pullmen., Inc 
| Pure Oil Company 


yd y° -_. ida room. Priced oF | 


THE 
i x T-59,.One Norway ~_ SH ~ B, . with attractive terme. P heen overlooking p 
ewburyport -_— , bour, con n 
terneon trip to the Arnold \PERSONNEL MAN. Master’ 
Arboretum; meet at South Street gate | 
Arboretum at 1:30, 


Mendar 


Ria Vista, 


HOUSES TO LET 


. . open. pd. Resumé. commodations for 12 


Prescott Chapter, DAR, | __ HINGHAM, MASS. ORMOND BEACH, FLA. 
joint meeting with the Johanna As- | Beautifo erryveale. op the shore 
wall Chapter. Board, p.m. ree | pe Cod of the Melifas River A chermi 
or meeting, 2:30: epeaker;*Mrse J. J. odern_ kitehnen with) en@ comfortable guest home wit 
ego state regent. At the peme | Bendix ~ built-in oven Garage. Beach! « loving atmosphere and heme COOK - 
Margaret Fish. § Prescot. Street, Jignte, convenien Sepnepertasion.. Sort 


Brooktine ? pp. 
n BH. Barrows. 180 Commonwealth Ave. 
18% | Cambridge Club Christmas Pro Boston, Mass. KEnmore 6-7401. 


WELLESLEY, MASS.—6 rm. fu urn, Ca 
Suitable for couple. Nr. busiine. $115 
mo. Tel. Scituate 658-M. Box 261, 
Scituate, Mass. 

‘VERO BEACH, FLORIDA—Lovely 2-bed- 
room, beach house. Completely cura. | 

| Garage Reasonabie. Write C. t, 

} 1814— 25th Avenue. , : 


HELP WANTED=WOMEN | a 
| WOULD SLIKE—a wholesome, op ged _ APARTMENTS TO LET 


and refined woman about 45 to 65 HOTEL BRAEMORE 


to keep house and cere for girl age ei ' 
a. a from 3-4 mos 
406 Commonwealth Avenve. Bosten 
Mas avaliable fer tmmediat. secupe 
“it- and eultes, with fall servica, 


ginn arly Cleaning end eine 
Gry help kept ‘s en a wk. Woman ote, 

ret |Pieace call Mr. Stuart. KEnmore 6-4600. 
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 


sired w would consider position 
manentiy. Three other older chil 
are at colieg. 7 6 rm. split leve 
BEACH ARBA. | 
Snjoy gracious itving at £1 Terramar) 
where environment enhances beautiful 
apartments. Efficiencies 


house, near bus lines and shopping | 
center. Write —— wanted siso give’ 
ca 
Hotel Rooms 
Etta and Lester Deeley, 290] Terramar, 
8! 


+ Warren end 


‘DOROTHY MARDER TEACHERS aGcY.| 
--342 Madisen Are. ¥ork. 14, N.Y. 
Register now for the better Webruars| 
and September mg oy Interviews: 
Monday. _ Tu iia 


TEACHERS, | ae or Arts for Maine 
bors’ and girlie camp. Box R-71. . 
Norway St.. Boston 15. Mass. 


‘WANTED: CUSTODIANS (a couple) 
Pirst Church of Christ. Scientist, PO. 


504, Coral _Coral Gables, i, Fiorida. 


chureh nearby. 
or vear. Write 
458 Go Beach. 


Evans Products 

PairchildEng&Air 

First Nat'l Stores 

Pod Mach&éaChem 
Poremost Dairies 

' Pruehauf Trailer 

PruehaufTrailer WI 

8 4 Gair (Rebt) & Co 

39% |General Dynamics 7234 

22%  GeneralBlectricCo 2156 

<2 Genera! Pds Corp 131 


otor 4574 
Gen’! Pub Utilities 7 
Genera! Telephone 


Mrs. 
Ph. CL 23337 


THE GARDEN SEAT INN 
1224 Druid Rd.—On the Bay 
Clearwater. Florida 

For 33 vears serving delicious meals 
~ many luncheon end dinner guests 
nd making our house 
fortabie and happy. A 
tion on Clearwater Bay 


—e ae 


PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 
House. 


Congeriia) Guest plock 
from ocean. Single $15. Double $25 

r week ‘til Jan. Ist. Shadow-lawn, 
231 Australin Avenue, Palm Beach 
_ Phone 90. 


ta [A JOLLA. CALIF. Ser a Ai — Vacation = 
spacio us home sront: view un | 
enoetied: idea) tor quiet C- 5 GL 4¢-4832 | 
MOVING AND STORAGE 
BACK BAY 


Lecal and Leng Distence™ 


nee’ ; Devotion House, 

Brooxline 2 ” p.m 
aban Woman's Club. Program, Har- 

vard Glee Ciub and Radciife Chorai | 

Society G. Wallage Woodworth, con | 

ducting; Waban eighborhood Club- 

souse, 2 p.m. 
' PSO Siste peepee T with Marge- | 

ret Woite, 96 Gienpurn Roed, Arling- 


ion. 
Fieid Club 


——- 


= Ph. 


. 
% | Roval Dutch Pet 
bafeway Stcres Ine 


s7040 
son 


round-table | 


pm 
ane Forest 


et, i i i te, ee es ee, a, Se a, Se Se, Se is. 


r | 
lehw . 
proatiertneradiwy 5 ' Dj | Seare Roebuck. wi 71 24 se 3 “Chelonens Memories” 
Greyhound Corp , : Mutual Butiding. 
Grumman Acft En Shell Ou —w Clarendon Street. Boston 


f Mobile&Ohio Sjnclair Ol] Corp Tuesday 


Canadian Women’s Club Christmas | 
party Bring gifts for children. Mu- 
sical progran he Rewtones”: YWCOA 
140 Clarendon Street. Boston. § 
PEO Sisterficood.-Chapted D. wit 
|. Abella 331 Kenrick Street.. 


references and tion ' 
HARRY CARLSON 
271 Werman Ave : 
New Rochelie. SB ¥. 


HOU SEKEEPER—Pull char ge of 5 rm 
, . | apt. One adult. Phone AS 17-9439 for 
Republican Club. Dinner. 6°p.m.; DTO-| interview or write George Melhado, 42a 


8 pm; the James KR. Allen! 4g; Paul St. Brookline, Mass. 
in program of instrumental | io 


| music: Chipman Hall re- ‘RESORT SECRETARY —Meture To | 

Boston in Adm. and Ediphone. Write Box R-70, |— 
y Women's Council One Norway Street, Boston 15, Mass. | 
hour, 1 p.m: program. 2, spe- | —_ ev 


cia! “Christ mas p ‘rogram. Boston Uni | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ' 


versity President Harold C. Case ww! 
give ea Christmas message: Louisa Hol. gta ot Tt LAt DERDALE Pf 
‘LARC — CORP. ~—(r. $341,000 
in +7 est, 20 yrs: 75% equip. about; “088 and Motel 415 & & ith Ct sunshine and peace. 


f 
. yi. trucks with 2-way| _| Sleek to Christian Sciences Churen Ranch, Dos Cabezas, 
eS #610 ad FI. LALDERDALE, FLA.—Apis... Oicer.. L. CURTH & SONS ous rm a a 
wits REALE? SM 63 State rms. Quiet. walk. dist to town. Ex Agent North Americen Vo. Lines 
Rochester 14,.N _| chanted Place, 424 5.W 4th Ave 244/246 Merion &.. Gr n 33, 4.Y 
‘PAINT. wali Faree. GIFT SHOP—Ex-| NEWTONVILLE, MASS.—3 bedrm. « ___ Fal, Glenmore 2-2040 
cellent location. County seat nr. Kansas, miin. walk to Christian Science Chu i OEEM (tT 4& PRIVILEGE to offer my 
Wednesday City. Estab. 16 years. Owner retiring.| Adults preferred. LA 47-4414. |Personalizec Loca) and Lone Distance 


Mrs 


Tniand Sei Co New- 


usineses Meh 
t'l Harvester Co 
| Nickel Co 
Packers Lid 
| Paper Co 
Int 1 Tele@Tel C orp 
Isiand Creek Coa! 
Johns-Manville 
Jones & Laughiin 
Jov Manvcfact WI 
Kaiser Motors 
Kensas Pwr&l' 
KennecottCopper 
Koppers Co 
Kresge (SS) Co | 
Libbev-Owens-FPord 70 
Lockheed Acft Corp aan 
Loew's The 76 


ioetey Rand - he. 
Standard Brands 
SO of Cal (Del) 


We SHIP ANYWHERE 
MIAMI. FLA.—Maycourt Hote) Apts.. 1 
S.E Tth st Apartments anc hotel: 
rooms Private baths, newly decorated 


E. A. SPRY & CO. 
cellent clientele 4 blocks downtown 


Reading Room. Quiet. Weekly. monthly | Packing, Shipping, Office Moving 

= ro ae SOTRL | Agents'for Fireprouf Storage 
ROOMS WITH KITCHENETTS Leen, ee ee esl 
SUITES WITH FULL SERVICE 

4 _Charlesgate West, | Sesten KE 6-3 6-3700 


[RDA FLA. — SUN VIEW 


ton p.m 
The Business and Professional Women's | 


: 200 
StanieyWarner Corp 7 
Stewart Warner ‘ 
Stone & Webster Inc 
Stop & Shop 
Studebaker-Park 
SunrayMidContoil 
Swift ompany 

, Syivanta Electric 
Texas Company 
Texas Gulf Sulphur 

-* >Texes Pac CHO 

, TexPacLandtTr 
Texas Utilities 
Textron American 
Tide Water Assoc 
Timken Roller Bear 
Toledo Edise 127 
Torrington Co 
Trans America 
Tri Continental 

| Twentieth Cent Fox 
Union Carbide & C 
Union Biect of Mo 
Union Ol) Co of Cal 
Union Pac RR 

| Union Twist Drill 
United Fruit Co 
United Shoe Mach 
United Aircit Corp 

nited Airlines 

Un: ted Corp 
United Gas Cor 
i United Mer&Mfs 

| US Rubber Co 

> ig SmeltRef&Min 
Steel Co 


' Vanadium Corp 
| Va Blect&Pwr aé 
Waldorf System 55 
Waiworth Company 25 
| Warner ees 4 ct 50 
i | Wash Wa 37 
West Kentucky. Ciel 15 
West Pen lect Co 334 
iw est ern Onion Te) 
Westinghouse Air 
Westinghouse EB) 
Ww oolworth rw 


Universit 


soe (Moving From Door fo Door Since 1874 
Loco! and ong Distance Movers 


FARAWAY offers « 


man Fiske House 
Manuscript Club of 


program. 8 D.m.; 


Christmas | 
Hotel. Bos-*) 


Wom an's Clus. Reception. 
cheon program 
runé her on Statier, 


Boston 


Pioneer old, some 


est. contracts. 
RP. 


. - . ' 
s* 


e 
Lone Star Cement 
Long Isiand Light 
Mack Trucks Ine 
Maine Cent 5% 
Mart ‘Gienn L) 
Merck & Co Ine 
Middle So Utilities | 
Minn Mining & Mfg 
Minn Pr La 
| Miss River Puel 
| Mo Kan Tex RR 
Mohsante Chem 
Montgomery Ward 
Mullins Mfg Co 
eer Racing As 
tl Biscuit Co 
Nat’! Cash Register 
Nat i Dairy Prod 
Nat'l Gypsum Co 


ton 
Professiona! 
12:30 


748 
105 
183 


p.m 
Christmas Hote! 


Boston 


4 
a 


rysier Corp 
meinunat! Gas & Ei 
Service Co 
veland Bect ni 
Climax Moly Co 
Coca Cola 
Cole Fuel & Iron 
Bra aA 


be gt ~ 


Miaml!, 
HAMPTON PLACEMENT SERVICE 
bate “yreess. for Office enol 
bare 


> to) & 08 re «9% 
. a 


Piorida 


-- 
_ 
- 


-- 
1A OO bee BOOS 


2AOO &w' 
: 


Nevton Highlands 

program; Christ- 

» Newtones: speaker. 

Elsie Oakes Barber Heart of 

Congregational Church 

House ' 

Association of the Hebrew 
‘Teacher : College Speaker. Dr. Marvin 

Fox. philosophy dc partment of Ohio 

State University Are Our Jewish 

Thinkers Going Modern.” At the Co)l- 
— 48 Hawes Street, Brookline. ! 


7 


- 


- 


WI GESO AM 
, ee 


t 4 ngtord _Building 


~- 
eres Dart 
2 Ie 


MISC ELLANEOU S SERVICE 
No matter what “The Missing Link” 
im your business with France, we 
ean help you. Importers or dealers 
in French manufactured goods iet 
‘Ss announce your merchand) :. = 
¢- customers direct 
Prench enve) 


"THE MISSING LINK" 


73, Rue Cardina! Lemoine 


ieeke house on Garfield 
mo _ Mies inch 
7-9347 


. ep t . fine 
160 


Tel. Kirkland 
ARASOTA. FLA. 9 and 1 pedrm 
apts. Reasonable. sedsonal, wk or mo. 
Maid serv. Venetian Apartments cor- 
ner Golf and indian PI. 


=_—-—-—-— 


BOSTON, MASS.—Homey 2-rm_ apt. quiet | 
priv: home. Fenway view. Every conv. | 
bus. Woman. good loc. CO 6-4934 


a eee ee 


LAGUNA BEACH. CALIF.—New ce luxe CASH 
a Ore Se (Frenee) qrcen trom cingie ond Geubiee. Redess 

yee and reception. Hosts. officers | . , mn adults. }.. 1296 Ocean wa! at. 
and council at the headquarters, 35 | STTUATIONS WANTED MIAMI BEACH, Carey 531 Michigan Ave. 

Court Street Boston, 4-6 p.m | wo! -N Large, homey apts.. hotel rooms, reac 

Soturtng | ‘ ,; year, season. Zoiun'’s. 

Prank COMPANION © mature iady. couple. or 

Rreet, fer | children. Light (ee en ut APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED | 

a rwar “ 4 : ’ } oi 4 

Christmas | Box K-34 ‘sas Pitth Ave " Y NY 

MOTHER de in home, caring 

a Ci 5-756 


n 


- 
sete @ ee & & 


‘ith Edison 
ison Co 
Natura! Gas 


| 325-327 


“ 
he 


af A... st 


The "Seantanntty Bervice 
ton. Co 


? l pm 2 
Christmas program: fee ‘aera in | 
Newton, West Newton 
Thursday 
| Boston Bar Association Christmas oo] 


fiagare — awk P as 
orvpute 


Norfolk A& we estern 


Cordingiey. 
FLORISTS 


PARIS-CIT® MARUHS-ees-FLEURS 
MARIETTE SERVIEL Places 25-36 
Cer ore cou ptes 


| Livratsens dans ts tect ot Paris F Te ope heal 
SITUA<IONS WANTED-MEN | 


EFFICIENT SENIOR 148 
office manager, pay- 

shee employment 
lm. Box No ~1190, 
Waverton, NS.W 


Coatinental Europe 
PEO Sisterhood. Chapter G with Mrs. |__%¢.50. Box 2204 Kansas City, Mo. | Moving end Fireproof Storage Service to 
| . APARTMENTS FURNISHED - 
E L. Kemp, Baker Lane, Well- shine | ~~ |advertiser for over @ quarter of ® century 
auare of 
ail utilities, 10 minutes to town and) f the > Ah 
AUCTIONEERS aged 
18- inclusive unless 
applies onis te emo’orment 
and furnishings | British tish Isles 
LIQUIDATION OF ESTATE APPRAISALS ACH, Se. 
Newcastle 
Co. Lic. Box H-M, One Norway | 
6, Mass. ’ 


British teles—Africa 
Australia—-New Zealand 
cy. 1 R N ithe readers of Christian Science 
RS ta a ge ay wih | EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES 2 “Monito: in which | nave deen @ consistent 
OCALA, FLA.—Just built. Purnished 4)" NOBLE R. STEVES. inc. | |POST VACANT advertisement 
room apartment, wall heat, tile bath. | ,, Sharp St.. Boston 24, Mass TA 5- page Musrt 
Silver Springs. To May 1—$425.00 Write) Scheduied Eokement 
Bo te 1611 Ant! hony | Road — ww 8 man 
a —y- 
Ww. TORREY i} LE she of the employment is 
| 1 s tne. tress the orovision of the Not 
| Consultant on sales of your furniture | V8oancies Order 1953 This 
Newbury &t.. Gestem 6. Mass. | 
Taran My FLATS TO LET 
CURRUMBIN BE. 
: land—A 
ANTIQUES 
FOR > rag GUNS AND SWORDS. 
_ Boston 1 
AU TOMOBILES | FOR HIRE 
/ “WIMCAR” “ LONDON | 
BUOY _— Visit 10 BRA 


id. Meet 
sea ‘Berke! ey 
om. Welk 

ts ‘ew 


ieid and Forest 
and Marion's 
. 


at 
Stree 


Owens-Corn ing Pib 
Owens 111 Gla 

| PaciicG & Elect 

' Pacific Mi'!'s 

Pan Am Wor id . 


rr 


_JAMAICAWAY AREA 


iid Sotel “MM iat f..; deluxe.oew ‘ Puan OF 
be bine utifu ly - cor ted . nmiort GQ ) re! ; ye Ol , 4 | 
“West N y. c . “we —_— rat membership and ell the . 
oe si oli au : 4 | v are - . njoy- ’ 
SAI AD MAKER selecte 
drive car. Exe refs 
Clearwater. Florida 


ee eee 


30 
H 


Industries You ngst own Sheet 62 


New York Stock "Exchanee Quotations 


Transactions Yesterday Selected and Compiled by Associated Press 
Stxs Divas Sales Net 
Dollars) (100s Chee 
Koppere +1 
Kresge SS! 66 


10n 


res posit 


— ee ~ 


| eOROUGIEL® 
ee oe | Accountent, 
mast cashier 
in godine: Austra! 
o 6 Tunks 8: 


TEACHERS 


,PARIS—Mile WEHELY. es. Ree 4’ Alésia, 
ide, Lauréate Conservatoire Paris donne 
lecons solfege, vioion, preparation écoles 
prof, musique, conserv @t¢., ensembies. 


~*~ 


EXPER. 
also good manager, 


P.O. Box 894 JAMAICA PLAIN, MASS 
large rooms heated. Adwuit 
| Stks/Divds Ba. we REAL ESTATE sale Tei. JA 44-0024. 
Tiliars) : Mieh Low Close iN.Y.C. 118th St. Bway and Dr. —Mod. 
Ss: losLead 3 , ae _ xs - =a 3 rm. co-op. Hudson view. $4,500 furn., 
S:LS 1! 1 I ‘ie + “FE 


Lendon 
maint $59 Houghton Co. LE 23-9608. _Telephone: Fremantie 6401 /2/3 ' 
ON CAPE COD = ——— — — 
poe ~6 6h "guest rome APARTMENTS: WANTED~ 
d 


R. C. WIMBUSH, LTD. 


ne EAKLS COURT RED.. LONDON, 5.W. 5) 
Teiegrims: “Wimear 


Ne 
Chee 


Ju 8 
- 


- + 


ACF Ind 4 

Soregatp 000 

AirReduc i480 3) 
Prod | 


AE POMOBILES- FoR “Sate 


MIAMI, FLA.- ~Lady alone and employed FORD THU NDERBIRD — (Save $700 
want. quiet epartment = home for’ lack eves 


j eceupancy sext June ist. 1956 Yearly ont 
Ww 
ROGER W. WIGHT, Realtor 


_ lease 6250 N Miami Place. —| jesse tA < OTORS, “INC, 
4. a MES M | 
@ WANTED UNFURNISHED (0 > yose proms" beca mene 
ci Miles cree, —> De Mass. 

. rwie ; 
Lames . 


sve 


——- | Small Hotels and rs 
in kurope 


ENGLAND 


IDEAL HOME IN LONDON 
Cuisine Francaise. Beautifully furnished 
bed-sittingroom. H.& - gome central 
heating. Electric fires ali rooms, Single 
from £3.13.6d. Bed. breakfast, bath. Din- 
lll Sussex Gardens, W. 2@ 


ee ee eo 


DanRiver 22 22 ‘ 
DavytonRub ] 
DeccaRes 1 


Deere 1*s@ 


: 46 
Sheron Sti 24o¢ 8 
Bere ” . 


Sre 


Lon 3. Cer 


— 


ese @eeaeaeeer#w#s 


'Signode St 80a | 


— 


sees 2 +e 


(374 Washington Street, Weymout <s Ma 
STAMFORD. CONN.—Sma!l) unfurnished Phon es ED $-2219 — ED §-2220 
ee a Gk eS ee aaa ; ! 
ON CAPE COD 


apartment or house eep! s. eb : 
: S te Box EXCELLENT BUY — 1954 PLYMOUTH 
Several excellent oceanfront cottage and | 


desired by Woman teacher. H-35, 
588 Fifth Avenue. New York ¥. 4-dr. Sevoy 2-tone blue with htr.. ra- 
WE Ai oer er dio. Only 6500 miles, orig. owner. Mov-|2¢r_ optional, 
ROOMS FOR TOURISTS | ing west. Best offer. Call after 6 P.M.|PAD 0544 
mote] groups With essured gross summer — | BEacon 2-9446, Boston, Mass. 
incomes of from $10,000 to $50.000. Also| BROOKLINE. MASS. — Bea-Mar Tourist 


prottable ail-year garage and Billng ste-) tHouse 116 Marion, Cor Beacon Rest ANTIQUE CAR | 


ion vith net income of over ,411,000. ~ a ‘ 
- : . - Parki facilities LO 6-870] 1919 Model T Ford Coupe. 90% restored. | 
Please —_~ Tor appointment to discuss — - 2 Excelient running eondition. Good rubber. 
roof and interior New paint. Tel. Littie-/ 
ROOMS TO LET 
‘DAYTONA BEACH. 


ee be 


Swawe-weet @ @ie.3 @eG& > 
a > = » . 


36, N. 


~ 4 


== _—— —— 


FRANCE _ 


- PARIS, FRANCE 
HOTEL OXFORD & CAMBRIDOE lie 
13 Rue d'Alger corner Rue Honore 
~tiose to Tulleries Gardens. Low 
end Opere. First class femily tot 
with every comfeért Rooms ud- 


— 
> 


(& wo 


4&5 
Mesta Mh 2‘ea 
| Miami Cop 2a 
MiddleSU tis 
Miner&Ch 204 55 
Mission Cp 3f 


na then Mmspec 
“ROGER W. WIGHT, Realtor Le ___ 
26 Miles Street, Harwich Port. Mass. 
Tel Harwich 12790 
SAN DIEGO, CALIF. t 
beach Griswold Guest 
ine 


JOHN F. KIRCHMAIER, Reallor _Ssstun Yen" 


110 SPRECKELS BLDG. ACademy %-337t. ——— FLA.—Seuth Coconut Grove — 
~ —— ely room private bath, 
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


large 
nn A Couple or 2 ladies. $125 per | 
CAPE COD, MASS, 


month. Available Jan. ist. thru Apri!. “ 
4240 Ingraham Highway. Reader’ s Desks, Pew wse.. Poilding Chairs, 
CHATHAM: Hilitep house overlook- 
ing salt weter iniet with view of Nan- 


—————- ; ao | Tables—Low direct prices Catal free. Rooms with ‘and without oath 
‘NEWTON, MASS.—Beautiful oak pan- 
eled studio rm with firepl. in oriv. Redington Co.. Dept. R Scranton 3, Pa. 
tucket Sound. Right of way to water 
and safe smal) boat anchorage. Only 


| Moderate terms—Bed and 
home, Sep. entrance. Tel. kit. and | 
three years old, this year-round home 


parking. priv. Also, smaller rm. Gen- COLOR FILMS ‘SWITZERLAND 
has two bedrooms. nice 


VLA. BEAUTY SHOPS 


_MY HAIRDRESSER 
St.. Rm. 1018. N.Y. LO 6-301) | 
$7.50-$10.60 

$5.00 


ee ed 

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see ff 2° & 
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_ 
soecen @ © 


Room with 


555 


East. 
El Auto L 2a Home 


El & Mus = 


Cabies OXFOR TEL PARIS 


Paris. France 
HOTEL DUMINY 


3 rue du Mont-Thabor 


_ 
a. 


me ee 
se ee 2 ee @ 


__Pick-up Ware 
CHURCH FL RNITU RE 


see + = 


| Stev JP ice 


ern fr ee 


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Ey ans Pd 1 
Ex-Cell-O(2) 
PairtbMori sg 
Pairch E.55d 
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— — —— | GENEVA HOTEL BALMORAL Evers 
ON. 3 MIAMI Hevane. Sehamas Kodcechromes| - 
$2.50 per doz Pree cat Jatuson's Cam- | ‘comfort Good cooking Moderate terms. 


BOSTON. Mass. . Homelike. pleasant, 
single or double rms. (with elec. plate’, _ ore Store 60 W Piagier St Miam! Terrace 
GENEVA 


a 
; 
S2S8 oa SBBSS2E 


' 


across from the Mother Church of | 
Christ, Scientist. _COpley 7- 1391 ; 


~- 
eo. 


~ 


ae*3 
3.38 
+ +i+tt] 
s tFFFTFS 


ell tlk tell Gell i, ee, He, ee, “Se. Se. Se, See. Sed “Ses Se. Se. Se. Se. Se 
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*s #24 2s oe 2 ee « 


he ees 
rm Rt Wad ~“awwo-o 


= 


large jivineg 
room with fireplece and two picture 
windows, sefeened porch electric 
kitchen. full eéliar, hot water 
and located on about ome secre of 


\BOSTON, MASS. 


heat I! 


EXPORT AND IMPORT 
NEWSPRINT AVAILABLE 


newly furn Ist A panelled rm Pir 
place. large closet. kitchen fecilities. ; 
References required 


— HOTEL EDEN, 186 Ree de 
Lausanne. Nr. UNO and (LO and leka. 
Restavram. Us te date Moa terms. 


es 


| GRINDELWALD BERNESE OBERLAND — 


msion Villa 


-— 
> 


and. A very attractive home for 
either summer or witter living for 
$15.0 


just 


ote Rosen 
situation Good cooking W. ma 
_ BE 2-0606 MONTREAUX-HOTEL J0L1-SITE. Gar- 
den alone ‘ake Ruonting water Med- 
FOR SALE | @rate terms 
nner | MONTREUX EL PENSION 
BATH. | (RIS CHERNEX. Idea) for a restful 


| Textron lg 
Tide WA i*%ef 
| Trane Co 1 
| Tran W Air 
Transm 1.404 ° 
TriCont i‘ 
Tung Sol ila 
|TwentcC 1.60 115 
TAL Ol} "5 28% 
| Un Carbide 3J¢ 27 108, 


we 
“wee 


++i t+ 


European. For Shipment 1956. All sizes./ . 
(Snell Isie)— TARR PAPER COMPANY 
th and ent ?, o. Bex 88, Beston, Mass. 


ocr 


ST. PETERSBURG. FLA, 

| Lovely twin cm. priv 

| Golf course. wk. month, season. 132 
Ricardo War. Ph. 52-3731. 


| BELMONT, MASS.—Nice room with bath! .— 

in private home for business woman. ' HAND- ayer eee TABLECOVERS. 

Nr. trans. Tel. BEimont 5-3186. | ENG SUITS (14), corduroy jacket, (36). holiday. Splendid view 

‘BOSTON, MASS. (Maribere 81.)—Com- | shoes. (5°), Jeatherevte aprons. Every-| Von gRECX—@OTEL 
fortable rm,. quiet home, ist f.; near! si. ke. Y ney aes: 2 Mann, 29) W. Sisti' Goiet beme Gear 
trans.: kitchen priv.; reas. KE ee} ” 


BOSTON. MASS.— en comf. 
bus. person. A s* Uy. 27 Gainsbere - 
Suite 3. Tel. 7-3883. 


— 

_. - . 

ae 

a" 

* 

’ 

~~ 
e+e 2 6'4 @ & 


—S— 


“Buy With Surety, Buy ot P. A. R." 


PINE ACRES REALTY 
W. T. Ohman, Realtor 


: 
Daily 9-5 Sundev 1-5 P.M. f} 
Closed Wednesday | 


Chethem Office, Mein St., Chet. 1186 
5. Yermouth, «ft. 28 Hyennis 28 49-w 


: t- 


— 


- - 
* + 


2 2 


~ HOT Les 


- 
~ 
- 


27 


REGIS SO ED 
Lake Good eoek- 


ve 


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; Jag 
\STLS-MARIA near St. Morite — HOTEL 
| MA MARIA For quiet. comfortable einter 
holidays 
ays. ssoshtictilhiiigin 
HOTEL SCHIFF ST. GALLEN 
Quiet House Multergasse 
Good cooking. Tel. (071) 22 47 61 


re 


LS) 
ee oe 3 - 
sons eae = ¢ @ « 


—- 


4+i+i4 
ee S - ss 


QUES 
apestry-l8th ~ p 
__ figures ASpinwall 71-0900, (Mass 


FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS 
Buy U.S. Savings Bonds ‘ 
Regularly — 

FRUITS AND FOODS 
ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT. uncolored, un- 
sprayed: F.O.B groves. $3.50 bu.: trop- 

ica! food delica ‘ne tf 
Satis. guar Rioclemtor. ‘ 
FURNITURE FOR SALE 
DINING SUITE—11-~ . Wainut, Italian 
Renaissance $400. Box 
2204, as City, Mo. 
FURNITURE WANTED 


WE BUY all kinds of furniture, dishes, 
china end bric-a-brac. Breslau’s. 
Roxbury, Mass. HI 


“NTt 
| REAL BARGAIN 17 


Sill 


—_ 


LiL liae+bet e+ 


— " Beacen St.—2 ad}. | 
" and liv.-rm. Kit. priv.| ...— 


KLINE, MASS. Nr. Coolidge Cor. | 
Warm. rm. with kit, priv. Con’t. ht. wt. 
Bus. person pref. aS 17-0170. 


w 
Shed 


a 
+ 


,++++ ] 


++ )+ 


oe FoR —_ 


‘ YORK HARBOR, MAINE. 


Bullding-2 stores, 11 rooms. Excel- 
lent for apartments. 8 miles from 
Newington Air Bise Navy Yard 
with housing a problem. Helen 
gin Emery. Tel. aoe N. 

or 2553 N. . Central Ave., 


re 


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KLINE, | mass — — Pleas. 
pvt. bath. Hed. ar. eset 
tleman pref. BEacon a. gar ee Real 


. 


~~ 
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SasSaSoe 
~~ - » 


elieliaiedd 


Smelt 34g 20 
| USSteel!.15h 132 " 
Van Norm 1 & 


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is. ¥. © ¥. ©. (lieth St.-B'wey)—Attrac. rm. 


water, next ba . subway, 
“home. 


bath. 
tiful location. IN Seon 


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Contains 30 rooms. ot 
Via Piume, Gants Sante Margherita Ligure semi-priv. 
- ansp.. beau- 


aBer 

3 

23 
SET 


es 


Me ree Trade Unions 


__ Urged to Avoid Reds! C 
By the Assocteted Press 
New York 
The International Confedera- 
tion of Free Trade Unions has 
advised its members in 80 vom 


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Celtics Eye Second I 


Be he et, Be ee eek or ere es oo 


Need Victory 


Her ey Ror Ee PT IS RS ei 


OS aS RS Patio I ee 


Over Nats ~ 


On Garden Court Tonight 


Sports Here and There 


Tonight, 
this season, the world cham- 
pion Syractise Nationals, now | 
resting uticomfortably in the | 
Eastern Division cellar, will in- 
vade the Boston Garden to’ 
meet the surging Celtics. 

What is the reason behind this 
complete reversal of the Nats, 
one 6f basketball's finest ac-~ 
Oh agent 

ace to go this season,” said 
Red Auerbach. “They won it 
all last year. That always makes 
a difference. A team has to have 
incentive. Of course the over-all 
strength of the league is part of 
it. Philadelphia, New York, St. 
Louis, Rochester 
ar: all improyed. But the Nats 
have a good ball club. They'll be 
back up there before long. Don’t 


forget they still have” that» big - 


home court advantage.” 
Young Center 

Just when it looked like the 
Nats had finally jelled they hit 
the skids losing four of their 
last five games. The lone vic- 
tory was against the Celtics at 
Syracuse. The Auerbachmen 
have met the Nats three times 
this season, losing twice in 
Syracuse and winning on a neu- 
tral court. Over the years these 
two teams have put on an out- 
standing series of rugged games. 
Last year the Nats and Celtics 
split 12 regular season games. 
Syraciisé won five straight at 
home and lost five in a row in 
Boston with each team winning 
@ game on a neutral! court. 

In Johnny Kerr, one of the 
finest young centers in the 
league, Red Rocha and Dolph 
Schayes, the Nats have three 
front courtmen averaging 
points per game. The backcourt 
is second to none with play- 
makers Paul Seymour and 
George King both in double 
figures and Bill Kenville and 
Dick Fariey. both capable..re- 
serves. Rookie Ed Conlin, the 
only newcomer to the squad, 
averaging more than eight 
points a game. 

Final Game . 

Tonight's clash with the Nats 
I. the final game of 1955 for 
the Celtics in Boston. The club 
doesn’t return until New Year's 
Day when they meet the league- 
leading Philadelphia Warriors at 
the Arena. The Ice Capades take 
over the Garden on Dec. 26 
During that 15-day stretch the 
locals will be in New York to 
met the Knicks and Lakers be- 
fore heading West 

A victory tonight, coupled 
with a Fort Wayne win over 
New York this afternoon, would 
push the Celtics into second 
place and put a great deal more 
meaning into tomorrow nignts 
clash with the Knicks in New 
York. 


1s 


ee ee 

The.second and probably the 
best college attraction at the 
Garden this season is expected 
to draw a capacity crowd Mon- 
day night to see Alabama and 
Holy Cross in the feature game 
of a triple-header. Colby i] 
meet St. Anselm's the 
5:30 p.m., opener with Boston 
College facing Massachusetts in 
the 7:30 second game 

The..2..p.m., feature will 
All- America candidates Tommy 
Heinsohn of Holy Cross and 
Jerry Harper of "Bama. In their 
only meeting to date the Cru- 
saders edged the Crimsen Tide 


in 


“Syracuse has no | 


and Boston” 


15 | 


Pit. 


me «] r surface 
Ded. Basae Sg 


“for the first time | at’ Birmthgham; 70-68, on Rori=) 
“nie Perry's last-second shot. 


Sb . Ge af 

Before the weekend is over, 
the Bruins may feel the pinch. 
Fixtures such as "Sean | 
|Lorne Ferguson, 

and newcomer Nien bichon 
will be taking it easy in Boston 
while the rest of the team plays. 


_in Toronto tonight and Chicago 


tomorrow. 

Thursday, though, the Bostons_ 
played in this shorthanded con- | 
dition and beat the Black | 
Hawks for the first time in 10 


‘games with the Chicagoans, in-| 


cluding four games last year. 


a oe ee 


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“BOSTON SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1955 


eens 


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“ 


we; 


wee. Oe yg tet 


‘lace in “Eastern Disision n Before Tour of West t 


Frederick R. Chevalier 


Prepered for The Christian Science Monitor 


December 17, 1955 
Problem No. 3845 


H., 


as 4 


Eddie Panagabko (who started oo, “s 
the season with the Bruins and | 7 
went down to Hershey for a lit- #7 


tle more experience) was called 
up again yesterday. 

He mi ht be able to do some 
real good, too, At 
hustling little fella picked up 
two goals and an assist in two 
games. 

If the little AHL savvy he 
absorbed in Hershey can coordi- 
nate the drive that was his 
trade-mark in the amateurs 
with the nack of scoring in the 
majors, Toronto and Chicago 
may have their hands full. 


Hershey, the’ 


White 8 Pieces 
White to play and mate in two 
(Second price, Chess. 1954) 
Problem No. 3846 


By BR. C. O. Matthews 
13 Pieces 


Goalie Jacques Plante of the — 


Montreal! Canadiens will not be 
in his accustomed place tonight 
against the Chicago Black 
Hawks. A broken nose will 
keep him 
least two weeks. . 
4 i 4 

Boston College's hockey team 
remained undefeated last night, 
scoring a 5-3 victory over Har- 


vand’s defending Eastern cham- |'_. 


pions in the finale of a college 
hockey triple-header at the Bos- 
ton Garden. Third period goals 
by Don Fox ‘and Jim Tiernan 
were the difference. 

Bostori University knocked 
the Princeton Tigers out of the 
undefeated ranks, 5-3, in the 
second game of 
Sophomore Forbes Keith's sec- 
ond goal of the night broke a 2- 
all tie for the winners in the 
second period. In the opening 
clash of the long Garden show, 
Northeastern tallied twice with- 
in 17 seconds late in the first 
period to spark a 9-2 runaway 
over Hamilton College. 


Ski Conditions 
By the Associated Press 
Forecast for New Hampshire, 
Vermont and the Berkshires 
today: increasing high cloudi- 


ness and less windy with slowly’ 


rising temperatures in the after- 
noon. Chance of light snow Sun- 
day. 

New Hamopshire 
Mt.)—2 to 20. with 
nt ow. none uD 
slope ta 


~ to 4. 1 nowder 


Py anconi a (Canon 


4 
Belknanp)—4 to 6. 4 packed 
Sunaver—i to 6 I! 
None upper —s — lower 
North Conway ‘Cran — @t 
lese than 1 powder ay tats windy 
Pinkham Notch—7 to 
cloudy fair to poor 
Vermont 
4 to 15 
toe good 
ry College ‘Snew Bowl)—7 
. sowd jer. light snow 
at ~ 9 ow" 2 to 10. 7 ft 
| fa ood 


to 


"Mansfield 
—F1 to 30 3} powder 
tf ’ 
Waitsfield 


and Bor uce 
partiy cloudy 


now 
upper trails 


ton 
ms. ~ teed 
to excellent 


none 
ower 
Massachasetis 
Mancock Jiminy Peek 
packed powder part 
uoper. fatr iower 


Easy for you... 
a hit with him... 


A GIFT CERTIFICATE 


from 


COES & YOUNG 


What better gift can you give a 


man than a chance to pick out his 


the..evening.. 


powder. | 


3. 2 powder, | 


e-iormer United Staiss..enen 
¢ 


re, 


out of action for atiz 


Mid 
J ty 
i's GR 


White 1! Pieces 
White te play and mate in three 
(Pirst orice. Britieh Chess Magazine 

Three Movers. 1954 ' 


Solutions to Problems 


K-Kré 
1 Kt-B3 threat 
R«xP‘R3) 


No. 3843 
No. 3844 2 @-Bé mate 


. | Ameria. 


ae -eme Ee 
K-R. O-K7: 2 K 
4 K-Kt 
of 


mover 


End-Game No. 1216 


14 Pieces 


@-K6 and drews by repetition 


Biack 


me. 


Pres pee SER AOS PAPA PDE « Peri vrs. ad Ce oe en ; 


NOW PATH THE 
PRO 


PUTTS SUIS 


a_i 


AV GAT 
Benin 
xe SOE 

AUAY 


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Fit meg, Crit r 


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ay 
— # ae 
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” Ex-Northeastern Star 


Made Good With Pros 


By Harry Molter 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


Chicago 


Every year the National Foot- | 


ball League drafts the prize All- 
“name” 
ithe college ranks. Many of them 
go on to live up to their college 
reputations while others never 


quite make the grade in the pro 


ranks. 
| Just as regularly the NFL 
seems to come up with a hand- 


(‘ful of lesser-lights each season, 
i|i}many of whom are completely 


“y 
oe 


= 


& . gar 
5 OZ mp) 


oe coaching 


LE? 
ry 
2 Pieces 
© White te play and wi 
fAn iInstractive fiehting eesition from 
Reirfeld’s How to Pieht Back.” ituat 
published by Sterling 


Second Rosenwald Tournament 


The Manhattan and Marshal! Chess 
Clubs will be the scene of the second 
[fetter J. Rosenwald Trophy tournament 
Samuel Resheveky. who won thi« event 
last wear. will compete. along with Larry 
Evens-and Arthur Bieeuler. oresent and 
nest United States champions I 
Horowits. editor of the Chess Review. 

CRA 

ana #6 yvoune experts. Walter J. Shin- 
1954 New Jersev Pederation cham- 

pion. and William Lombardy, 18. former 
New York State champion 

Pies will Bevin Dee 18 
hatian Chess Chr 
se cen ._rounde« wi 
rounds will be evel at the Marshal! 
Cheste Chub 


Sist Hastings Tournament 


The helidave wil! again be celebrated 
with the weual chess coneress at Hast - 
ines. Pneland. scene of so many chess 
tournaments in the past. Thies vear's 
event begins Dec. 28 and finishes Jan. 7 

he voune German champion 71- 
vear-ol4 Kieus Dares. has been invited 
to Dlew im the Premier. alone with F 
Olateson. Iceland: B. Ivkov. Yugosiavia 
two Russians. MW aimanov and 
Korchnoy: R. Persits. Israel. and the 
British experts 


at the Man- 


Bieguier was invited 

© return for the Manhat- 

tan championship and the Rosenwald 
> last wear he distineuished 


Bisguier Finishes Sixth 


Arthur Bisculer. United States cham- 
pion. back tn New York after several 
months abroad. finished sixth in the 
International tournament at Zaereb. 
Yuroslavia 

The winner was V. Smvsiov. 
14%-4% Next came two 
Ivkov and Matanovic. each with 1214 
6%. The present Russian chamoion r 
Geller. could only tie for fourth end 
Sith with E. Gilleoric. Yugoslav. with 
12-7. Then came Biseuler with 11%- ™% 

Amone his victims was the Austrian. 
Duckstein. whose notition began to col- 
lapse with his 224d move 


English Opening 
Duckstein 
Blac 


with 
Yueosilavs. 


Bisruler Bisevier Duckste 
White te — 


“nickname “Century "Sit 


inflicting Reshevskv's only | 


unknown by the fans outside 
their own college areas. 

This season one of the real 
“sleepers” in the NFL was a 
t| boy named Sid Watson, a half- 
back on the Pittsburgh Steelers 
roster. Nobody, of course, knows 
for sure if the baby-faced Wat- 
son will blossom into real star- 
dom in the next few years. Nor 
was his start exactly spectacular 
this fall. Yet the Pittsburgh 
staff outspoken in 
for Watson's future 


is 
its hopes 
as a pro. 


Not Drafted 

Meanwhile Watson has made 
a real start as far as “obscurity” 
is. concerned. In the first place 
he wasn’t drafted. Nobody 
claimed him and the Steelers 
signed him as a free agent 

Nobody in the National Foot- 
Dall League had apparently ever 
heard of his college. 

Watson is well-known in New 
England where he played for 
|\Northeastern and earned the 
be= 
cause he used to gain 100 yards 
rushing in just about every 
game he played. Coach Joe 
Zabilski could tell you all about 
how Sid ran with the speed of 
a halfback and the drive of a 
fullback. What's more Sid 
played guard his first year at 
Northeastern and led the team 
in scoring. A versatile guy, at 
least in his own league. 

Little Different 


But it’s a little different in 
the NFL. Whenever the Steelers 
played away from home this 
season Watson usually found his 
alma mater misspelled in the 
home team’s program. 


“Sid seldom complains about 
anything. But he really squawks 
about that,” grinned publicity 
man Ed Kiely. “They usually 
spell it Northwestern instead of 
Northeastern.” 

Kiely recalls Watson's first 
appearance in the Steeler train- 
ing camp last fall: “He looked 
about 15 years old with that 
baby face of his. We signed him 
as a free agent on the recom- 
mendation of Nick Skorich, our 
line coach, who had seen Sid 
play for Northeastern against 
RPI.” 


. players. from 


The Steelers rate Watson a 
handy guy to have around. He 
can play any backfield spot ex- 


.cept.quarterback and is used on 


punt formation, field goals, and 
extra. points because of his 
blocking ability. He is also a 
deep man on returning punts 
and kickoffs because of his 
speed. “We like his competitive 
spirit,” says assistant coach Bob 
Snyder, who still has trouble 
remembering where Watson 
played his college ball. 
62-Yard Touchdown 


Sid has had his bad moments, 
like fumbling-a punt or two 
deep in his own territory. But 
he’s also had his bright spots 
like scoring against Washington 
on a 62-yard pass play from 
Jim Finks; returning a punt 
practically the length of the 
field one game, only to be 
tackled just short of the goa: 
and catching a iast-gasp pass, 
again just short of the goal 
line, as Pittsburgh was beaten 
17-14 by Detroit. Time ran out 
before the Steelers could start 
another play. 


“Watson plays behind Lynn 
Chadnois, the former Michigan 
State great, at right halfback,” 
says Kiely. “He's still young at 
this pro game and he makes 
mistakes. But the Pittsburgh 
coaching staff feels he’s going to 
improve. They think he has a 
chance to be one of the top 


“piever<-im tre ieague ina few 


years.” 

The National Football League 
had a bumper crop of out- 
standing rookies this year 

Battimore had Alan Ameche 
from Wisconsin, George Shaw ol! 
Oregon and L. G. Dupre of Bay- 
lor. San Francisco had Dick 
Moegie of Rice and Carroll 
Hardy of Colorado. New York 
picked up Rosy Grier of Penn 
State and Philadelphia had Dick 
Bielski of Maryland. Others in- 
cluded Bobby Watkins of Ohio 
State and Rick Casares of Flo- 
rida with- the Chicago Bears; 
Ron Waller, Maryland, and 
Larry Morris, Georgie Tech, at 
Los Angeles; Dave Mann. Ore- 
gon State, with the Cardinals: 
Ralph Guglielmi of Notre Dame 
anc Bert Zagers of Michigan 
State with Washington: Dave 
Middleton of Auburn with De- 
trot. 

It will be interesting to see 
how Pittsburgh's comparative 
“unknown,” Sid Watson, stacks 
up with 1955's “name” rookies 
during the next few-NFL sea- 
sons. 


* 
Rose Bowl Program 


Ready tor Mailing 


Official Michigan  State- 
UCLA Rese Bowl game pro- 
grams will be availabie to 
football fans throughout the 
country for the third-straight 
year. This unique service has 
made a big hit with television 
fans. 


Orders are now being ac- 


cepted and will be. fiilled and 
airmailed to purchasers when 
the beautiful 60-page program 
comes off the press about Dec. 
23. The nominal charge is 
$1.00 for this service. The pro- 
gtam selis for 50 cents at the 
game but the additional 
charge covers 42 cents postage 
plus handling and addressing. 

Te order, simply mail $1.00 
in currency, check or money 
order to the “Official Rose 
Bowl Program,” P.O. Box 829, 
Pasadena 1, Calif. 

The program not only con- 
tains all the regular game in- 
formation but alse includes 
many stories and pictures 
about this oldest of all bow! 
games. It makes a timely gift 
for a football friend whe will 
be viewing the Jan. 2 came 
over the nationwide NBC net- 


Rowe Will Scout 


By the Associated Press 
Detroit 
Schoolboy Rowe, who was 
dropped from the Detroit Tigers’ 
coaching staff at the end of last 
season, has been named as a 
scout for the Tigers. Rowe will! 
serve mm-the Southwest. 


Hockey at a Glance 
Results Dec. 16 


Ry the Associated Prees 


American League 
Hershey overtime tie 
Festern 'eeeue 
Philadelphia 1. Baltimore @ ‘overtime 


Tonight's Schedule 
Natienal League 
Chicago et Montreal 
Boston at Toerentc 


Sunday's Schedule 
Natiena!l League 
Montreal at Detroit 
Toronto at New York 
Boston at Chicago 


Cleveland i 


Cellege Hockey Results 
By the Assoctated Press 


Providence 5, Dartmouth 3 


American Hockey League 
(Games of Dee. 14) 
By the Associated Press 


L 
Providence 10 
Pittsburgh 7 
Buffalo 
Cleveland 
Springfield 7 
Hershey 6 is 


folds at Boston Garden, starting | 
Monday, Dec. 26 and proceeding 
“| ing an. 11. 


popular ice-travaganza is Donna 
| Atwood, in real life Mrs. John 
H. Harris, wife of the producer 
of Ice Capades. Miss Atwood 
after this nationwide 
linquishes her title of “Queen of | 
the Ice” and proposes to turn | 
her entire attention to the up-| 
| bringing of her twin. boys and 


| daughter. 


For her last circuit swing 
Donna essays the role of Peter 
Pan in the memorable play of 
Sir James Barries, about the 


Monna Atwood ii 
Ice Capades oe 


The Ice Capades of 1956 un- little boy who never grew 


seg en tng big cer Ame 
be 


cing her farewell ‘actually 
appearance as the star of Sats |dauoatved by 


tour re- | 


Hawks’ Overtime 
Milwaukee Score 


Stops Rochester 


By the Associated Press 
The St. Louis Hawks have 
stopped, at least temporarily, the 
Rochester Royals’ threat to pull 
‘away to a substantial lead in the 
Western Division of the National 
Basketball Association. 


The two teams met last night, 
Dec. 16, on the Hawks’ former 
home court at Milwaukee and 
St. Louis came through with a 
100-97 overtime victory to snap 
a four-game losing streak. The 
result left the Howks a half- 
game back of the Royals, who 
saw their five-game winning 
streak broken. 


The regulation game tied at 
91 as Rochester's Ed Fieming 
connected with a layup with 
five seconds to go. The score 
was tied at 95 in the overtime 
period before Jack Stephens 
i\dropped in four free throws to 
put the Hawks out in front to 
stay. 

Bob Pettit of St. Louis was 
the game's high scorer with 25 
points 


Sports in Brief 


By the Associated Press 


Baseball * 
Richmond, Va. 

Ed Lopat, crafty lefthander, 
who pitched on five world cham- 
pionship New York Yankee 
teams, was named manager of 
the Richmond Virginians of the 
International League. 


Football 
Evanston. Tl. 
Ara Parseghian of Miami 
(Ohio) was named head coach 
at Northwestern. 
Tokyo 
A bruising Army team shoved 
a lighter Marine squad around 
for a 20-6 victory in the annual 
Tori Bowl contest before 25,000 
servicemen. 


Basketball 


Chicago 
San Francisco defeated Mar- 
quette 65-58 for its 30th-straight 


victory. 
Golf 
Sanford, Fia. © 
Sammy Snead shot a par 70 
to retain a one-stroke lead with 
a 134 at the halfway mark of 
the $15,000 Sanford Open 
Golf, Tl. 
Jim O'Keefe, Chicago attorney, 
was.re-@lected president of the 
Western Golf Association. 


Tennis 
Los Angeles 

Tony__Trabert won. his first 

match against Pancho Gonzales 

in Jack Kramer's professional 

tour. Before a crowd of 4,183 

at Pan Pacific Auditorium, Tra- 

i bert scored a 2—6, 6—3, 6—4 

win. Gonzales now leads 2—1 in 

matches. Pancho Segura downed 

| Rex Hartwig, 8—2, in a full set 
| match. 


_are 


| pades. Among the diverting nov- 
‘elties are “County Fair” and 
\“Autorama.” Forgie and Larson 


provide fun with their badmin- 
| ton pyrotec 
Maxwells 


hnics. The amusing 
get about as fouled up 
as two fellows can and always 
manage to extricate’ themselves, 
There's a big French poodle, 


called Fifi that makes a big hit 


with the kids. Phil Romayne and 
Terry Brent offer adagio. The 
Old Smoothies, Orrin Markhus 
and Irma Thomas, are sure to be 
the usual show stoppers, with 
their rhythmic 
* Botty Maxson 
Henderson are cute and clever 
in their whirls and spins. Helen 
Davidson will present her ice 
acrobatics. 

There is plenty of comedy 
with Eric Waite back, and this 
time as the spoiled brat in the 
“Country Fair” number. Jack- 
son and Lynam are still Jackson 
and Lyman. Jerry Mayhall has 
arranged and conducts the mu- 
sical score. 


' Tickets for Ice Capades are 


now on sale at Boston Garden, 
and for the convenience of 
Christmas shoppers, also at Jor- 
dan'’s and Filene’s. 


Ford Frick Asks 
Separate Hurlers’ 
Award Each Year 


By the Associated Press 


blade work. 
and | 


~ 


New York ' 


Baseball Commissioner F 
Frick wants to see a separate 
_ classification for pitchers in the 


‘selection of the most Valuabie™ 


| players. 


Noting the comparatively low 
| Position of Robin Roberts in this 
year’s National League ballot- 
ing, Frick proposed that the 
Baseball Writers Association 
could set up a Cy Young Mem- 
orial Award for the pitcher-of- 
the-year 

“T have felt that a pitcher 
is to greatly handicapped under 
'the conditions of most valuable 
player balloting and that a sep- 
arate honor should be given. I 
believe we should pick out one 
top hurler for 
leagues,” Frick explained. 

Jim Konstanty, then with the 
Philadelphia Phillies, was the 
last National League pitcher to 
win the most valuable pleyer 
award, winning in 1950. The last 
American League hurier was 


| Bobby. Shantz of the Philadel- 


phia Athletics in 1952. 


Pitt In for — 


On Army Schedule 


By the Asoo lated Press 
West Point, N.Y. 


Pittsburgh returns to Army's 
football schedule next season, 
replacing Pennsylvania, an old- 
time Army rival which ended 


‘competition with the Cadets in 


order to play a full IVy League 
slate in 1956. Other newcomers 
on the nine-game schedule, an- 
nounced by Earl. (Red) Blaik, 
head coach and athietic director, 
Virginia Military Tnstitute 
and William and Mary. They re- 
place Furman and Yale. 
The schedule: 
t. 29. VMI: y~ & 6, Penn State: 1 
; og * 


4 10. William and Mary: 
17, Pittsburgh 4¢ Pittsburgh: 24. 
|manently open; Dec. 1, Navy at Phila- 
 delphia. 


RESTAURANTS _] 


LAGUNA BEACH, CALIF. 


LAGUNA BAY” 


“IN A QUAINT OLD GARDEN OVERLOOKING BEAUTIFUL 


The Victor Huso 
ifn 


both mejor - 


own neckties or socks — to choose 


Soviet Vigilantes Fight — 
Juvenile Crime Wave 


CLOSED MONDAYS MR. and MRS. MARCEL LANGLOIS 


HOURS 12 NOON TO 12 MIDNIGHT—LAGUNA BEACH 4-3541 
361 CLIFF DRIVE—LAGUNA BEACH, CALIF. 


and be carefully fitted to fine slip- College Basketball 


Results Dec. 16 
By the Associated Press 


pers or shoes~at Coes & Young's? 


He knows that he has his choice of 
the best there is when he comes in 
to use your thonghtful gift at this 
real men’s store. Certificates issued 
for $1.00 or more. 

Of course, if he’s ever bought 
shoes here, you can surprise him 
on Christmas with shoes that fit. 


We have a record of his size and last. 


Coes & Young 


PEXT TO THE PARKER HOUSE OW SCHOOL STREET 


The best place in town to buy men’s shoes 


; ae 
Philade!phia 
New York 


Kt-BS 
RxR 32 KLQich Resigns 


Individual Intercollegiates 
Col 


layed at John Jay 
University. New York. 
rough Dec 


h . 1. 

A seven-round Swiss is planned. This 
event is under the auspices of the 
United States Chess Federation — In- 
| tereolie@iate Chess League of America. | 
and Columbia University 

Entries shoulé be mailed {ne United | 

ration, Bedford | 
| Street. New York ye or x & te the | 
Dec. 26. 


entry 
bershio. 


Pp 
Columbia 
Dee 


on 
ce is $5. pine federation mem - 
Pifteen dius. dbrilliancy 


and boot-plaped-geme prizes ‘have been 
| arranged 


NBA Pro Basketball! 
By the Associated Press 
Eastern ena 


131 
579 | 


Tournament Play 
Depaul Teurney (First Reand) 
San Franciseo 66, Marquette 54 
Depaul 68, Duquesne 64. 
Biue-Gray hn 4 (First Reund) 
Texas 8&3. Aubu 776 
Mississippi 95. Seatenn Kentucky 92 
| Sampeen APB Teaerney (First Reand) 
| Hobart 81. Upsala 60 
| Hartwick 70 Wilkes (Pa.) 66 
> — voumeed (Semifinals) 
Tilinots Carthage (Ti.) © 


— (Ti.) — Milwaukee, Wis. Branch 


Other Games 
East 
Cornell 8&2. eg 63. 
Duke 96. Penn #0 
Conncetiont 71, St. Josephs (Pa.) 66. 
Vermont 86. New Hampshire 73 
\ New York AC 74, Goepesere (DC: 73 
Bt. Michasle ww $1 iphia 72 (twe 


50, Harvard 4. 


| Hofstra 
Bos 


82. Sridceport sa 
Lafayette 49. Swarthmore 45. 
Brandeis 83, Bowdoi 

| Princeton «4, Ru 


| Wevrasks: TI UCLA 

| Minnesota 83, Notre Dame 7% 
Oklahoma A&M om: 
‘t sauue { St. Louis) 79 


Seuth 
George Washington * Wash-Lee 70, 


Clemson 75. Mg 
estern 


‘are helping police in the 


| part. 


n 6. 
awe (Kan.) | 


By Reuters 


London 

Vigilante brigades 
Mos- 
cow area to fight a continuing 
wave of juvenile crime and 
hoodlum behavior, the Moscow 
| radio discloses. 

The radio hinted at tough, 
strong-arm methods when it 
mentioned that four members 


Teen-age 


‘of the youthful “raiding” squads 


had been awarded a military 


order, the Red Star. The award 


was made by a decree of the 
(presidium of the U.S.S.R. Su- 
preme Soviet. 

The citation said the youths 
“particularly distinguished 
themselves” but gave no details 
of the raid in which they took 


The radio said that seven 


_other members of the raiding 


meritorious military service” 


: 


The radio disclosed that “hun- 
dreds” of young persons have 
joined the Komsomol 
brigades” which aid the police. 

Moscow radio spoke of the 
struggle against “hooliganism, 
thieving, and profiteering,” and 
said that “the concerted on- 
slaught of Moscow Komsamol 
members against hooligans. 


thieves, and drunkards has al- 


aiding the 
HY Sergei Kruglov, the Soviet 
nister of Internal Affairs. 


ready yielded good results.” 
The radio reported that Dec. 
11 hundreds of*boys and girls 
from various parts of the Mos- 
cow region attended a confer- 
ence arranged by the Moscow 
Komsomol committee, in asso- 
ciation with the militia ad- 


ministration of the Moscow Fe | 


gion. 


The conference was a DELICIOWS MEALS AT 
uthful | __ aes LOW 


_by members h 
“raiding pee a 
taries of Komsomol 


‘committees. 


The radio reported that the 
Komsomol members honored for 


ice were greeted 


ee BOSTON, MASS. 


“raiding | 


CHRISTMAS 


SHOPPERS 


ARE TAKING 
ADVANTAGE 
OF OUR 


PRICES! 


Food Pui Up to Teke Out 


HA 6.9836 


Fhentre 
One sty trom Reriein At bebwer 


et 
Nth 4 


oss po girly imei yarns oe PRBS toes ae ee ah get i USN 


- President ---- 
_ Christmas message to the nation ae ee 
of the White 


bares, A ap te Tie a bevich sguhiriox ST eee oo 


telecast Sunday 
City Jessica They and Hume ©CBS-WNAC#TY. 
the Secaly Santas from 11: | | eas ag om “wt 2 “Chrisunes Til : story by Soon Street, entitled 
" between : CBS as ae t tt " |“ ” 
yt and $:30.' The ceremonies Benen dat care Closing” ont dl at 9 pm, on eames aes shea gre a! iy hg ene at 1550 Cleveland Ph. 31-9151 
will be seen live on this NBC-WBZ-TV's “The Goodyear | small boy's faith helps to keep |°" ‘¢ “GE Theater.” 


pro- | pad | Dae gen ONE DAY SERVICE — SHIRTS 
m. The President will be yertoeere ne for CARE ia as his family together, written for 


WNAC-TV’s “Studio One” | Orson Welles, Orson Bean Dew-Hendry Furniture Co. ; 
. oe ; 


| Street urchins, Christmas, and | by Kathleen and Robert Howard 
t= After a | | other “Omnibus” Barry Fitzgerald asa depart-| Lindsay. will be telecast Mon- RUGS, LINOLEUM, 
‘FURNITURE 


, , 

One of the high lights of | 
NBC-WBZ-TV's “Wide Wide | 
World” jaunday at 4 p.m., will | vesiihaien Department's 
be a live pickup originating ‘to release unlimited quantities 
— the summit of ore Wash- of surplus woe —_ - | | 
ngton, New Hampshire. The | beans to charitable agencies, - e- 
90-minute. program will visit | cluding CARE, is to mean any~ ’ | “ERWIN-D. CANHAM 
four countries, Mexico, Canada, | thing : torToR oF 
Cuba, and, of course, the United | Louis Webster, New | TMS CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 


Sunday at 8 p.m. 
WNAC-TY. 


ment store Santa Claus, with a Way night at 10 o’clock,. Natalie! 
714 Cleweland 
2:30—N.Y. Phitharmonic Sympbony: Israeli violinist, Ivry OF Ie . | 
Sibetius Violin C -WEEL A talk by Erwin D. Ceohem The Glades Restaurant 
Wide World: WYDA. 5:05: WEEI, 5:10: 1 bby | Monitor s : 
Looks at Distributior?.” wilt be Fine Food at Reasonable Prices 


Dialer’s Guide: unday | 
- “ S Clearwater, Florida Ph. 35-1355 
‘ FN ag oma oncerto— editor of 
Air-Conditionec 


|day night at 8 o'clock. Mr. Can- 


States, where preparations for 
Christmas will be very much in 
evidence. 
"Se? a 
Ivry Gitlis, the young Israeli 
violinist, who is making his first 
American concert tour, will be 


muest soloist with the New York | 


Philharmonic-Symphony, under 
the baton of George Szeil, Sun- 
day, Dec. 18. In honor of, the 90th 
birthrday of Jean Sibelius,...Mx. 
Gitlis will play the Finnish com- 
peser’s only violin concerto, the 
D minor. The entire concert will 


England 
agriculture chairman for CARE 
explained the situation today, | 
pointing out that contributions | 
to CARE pay only for processing, | 
shipping, and on-the-scene dis- | 


tribution to needy pedple by) 
mission chiefs in other nations. 


CARE’s Christmas food cru-' 
sade—now approaching its cli-| 


max — makes possible the 


shipment of 110 pounds of high- | 
protein surplus . powdered milk, | 


butter, and cheese to foreign | 
families for $5 or 22 pounds 


‘for $1. 


12:230—Complete News 


Tunes 
,~ 


—Life Regine at 80 
7—Star Tonight—-Nightmare 


Fameme im 

eak Bay i me Parks 
ence : etime 
oy ol -« 


Desie and Harriet 
Loo Parade—Mariin Perkins 
Rogers Show 


Religious Poem 


AND THE NEWS” 
Sunday 10:00 p.m. E.S.T. 


ADA—WJAR-TV and WBZ; WBZ-TY, 11 p.m. 
8:00—Town Meeting: Christmas Card From England—-WVDA.. 
9:00—J. Tandy, H,. Cronyn: Christmas Drama—WBZ-TV. 


9:00—Ronald Reagan in Let It Rain—WNAC-TYV, 
_.9:30-—Alfred Hitcheeck Presents—-WNAC-TYV, 

10:05—Face the Nation: Sen. Estes Kefauver—WEEI. 
11:15—-NWU Reviewing Stand: Political Significance of the 


Farmer—WWNAC. 
11:36—Handel's 


Messiah—WEET. 


Radio Tonight 


Ti 


. 
4—Carniva!l: i Perris, mec 
7—Disneyiand—David Crockett 
56—Western Star Theater 
4—It's a Great Life 


WNAC-480k0-MBS 


WBZ-1030he-NBC 


WVDA- 1280ke-ABC 


ay Serenade 


. Back Bay Matinee ... 


Back Bay Matinee 


News: Norm Prescott 


Norm Prescott Show 


Metropolitan Opere— 
Mogart’s Cosi Fan 


‘ence in Bostoe 


broadeast over WGBH-FM Mon- | 


ham spoke at a recent confer- 
on distribution. 
WGBH-FM rded these talks 
and is broadcasting high lights 
from time to time, Another | 

r....whese...taik. .will be | 
broadcast Monday night, during 
this broadcast, will be Gabriel 
Hauge, economic adviser to 
President Eisenhower. Mr. 
Hauge discusses “The Presi- 


PHONE 35-6930 


| dent’s Economics.” 


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It—Art Baker 


| reonene 


12:30—Boston Pops Concert—Sinigagiia 
Danza Piemontese in A; Masse- 
Le Cid: Ballet 
. Operetta Matinee—Lehar 
: Der Zarewitsch 


Sym phony—Borce 
Symphony Ne 8; LeCoqg: Milt 


Angot Suite: Mehul: Symphony 
Satur No. i in G minor 
3:00—Beetboven: Symphony No. 9 im 
Pgh mage heer OS. sane 
4 350-- Jazz Anthglog 


bhict “ 
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std 7 ieee with the Dorsers 
56—Fects Forum Panel 
loneymoouers--Jackie Oleason 
Wrestling Workouts 
4:06—Prokofief: Violin Concerto No. 1 4—People Are Funn ~ 4 [emotes 

in D: Haydn: Sfmphony No. 97 qn Money 
§ oTthicugh the Lookin Giless by in C: Mendelssohn: 2 Piano Con- 56— Wrestiin trom Reilrwood” 
Lewis Carroll BBC Drama certo tn BE: Moussorgrky ~* Revel 4—Jimmy rante Show 

us Pictures at an Exhibition 7—Ford Star Jubilee 

Weather: Whats Going on 6 66—Complete news 4—The George Gobel Show 

6. 10—Candlelight Serenade — Strauss | $6—Industry on Parade 
World.—The Waltzes and Polkas—Fiedler 56—Sign Off 
S ‘ Britain The 7 00—~Record Review of the Air 4— Your Hit Parade 

Right Honorable Hugh Gaitskell 8:00—Evening at Symphony — Gior- 


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> SEAVAGES* 


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Imported and Demestic Foods 
Open Sunday—Clesed Menday 
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Se. Federal Highway at Ninth Street 
Block Nerth Christian Science Charch 
PHONE JA 2- 2-9432 


New Location 


ABC Cleaners & Launderers 


Plant & Office, 725 Progresso Dr. 


Drive-in Service 
One-Day Serviee—Ne Extra Charge 
Pick-Up, 827 E. Las Olas Blvd. 

Phone JA 2-5652 


Visit our new locotion after Oct. 15th JOHN B. WHITE, Realtor 


CORNER OF GROVE AND DECATUR Ts Het. 1944 
hr. Stnd Street 
Ocean Mile” 


What's New 


mber Bride—comedy “1:00 Road Pr S ~6Paul Harvey. news 
itudio One: At Potters Farm . Pee me Food Show ; 
Confidential File—documentary 1:30 . Malone oes | 


Christ lence = : ee es Stumpus oes Norm Prescott Show Joe Smith Show ..-.- 
P r° ogr amis on TV Pep erous Assignment—drama : Mrs Burton News: - neers Two and Eight Dete News: Norm Prescott News: ‘Joe Smith ..... 
1 Pe 


Two and a Ry Ft pe Seana Show we oe eae 
News: ight . ay seons I 
The following programs in the filmed television series of The = = hy OR New : Two. Sy h gat = 4 == § seas | 


Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Bos- ~ a ™ T. . Bish Dat Mews: Mildred Carlson News: See Genith ....+ 
ton. Massachusetts, will be among those heard in the New Eng- ;: Meese Party: ? _. * Listentag were Two an and Eight De ; nidr “Oi Joe Smith Show ... 

; ' ; : Pasv Listening s: Two-Bi« 
Jand.area this Sunday: ate s : e Easy Listening | 


, Two end Eight Date aera ig House 
“Can Religion Be Scientific?” 8:30 a.m., WNAC-TV, Channel ‘How a 
+, Boston. 


Right to Happiness 
Christian Science 


Bet 

"HOMES —INCOME PROPERTY—LAND 
| On the Beaches and Waterways 
Ft. Lauderdale to Palm Beach 


ee me 


MIDDLETON’S. 


FLORIDA 
CLEARWATER 
Lorene’s Beauty Shop 


Lee and Lerene Lape 


onight 
Stars in the Night—?2 filme 


Ample Parking Space 
Quiet Surroundings 


“Prayer Can Help You in Time of Emergency.” 10 a.m., WKNB- 
TV. Channel 30, New Britain, Conn. 


“Getting Along With Our Neighbors,” 4:45 p.m., WMUR- TY, Heals’ 
Channel. 9, Manchester, NH. EDS 4, The following. programs in. 
= a’s's's oa" ete a"s ” errr . as a"e” By Be yg Poe gg Bs 


tist, in Boston, ne. 
will be heard locally. this 
Sunday?” 


We Specialize in Permanents 
for Unutaal Types 


Ph. 32-0082 


amore TOWN & Country Markel 
RETAIL MEATS 
and GROCERIES _ 
1620 Gulf-to-Bay Beuleverd 
Phone 34-8264 


NEW LOCATION 
201 East Las Olas Boulevard 


JACK ROSE 


Creator of Casual Smartness 
jor Men 


SPORTSWEAR 
31 5. E. Second Street Phone JA™R-0913 
a 


tate cre cn 


& cde Taxi Ne = eee eae oe Hood a9 2: | Florida Fashions for Men |PERSONAL SERVICE 


1 


os reas ~~ 


ah Great Discovery,” POSER 


. 

- < ag 7:45 a.m., WHODH, 
.s , 

". 


gisses 


4 


se 
r 
F 


f 


5 


| No. 1 nee ie aad beandup News. twe-Bignt Date Bend of America: Paul OGvees 
S eceeag oom RRR prc ™ ia mentee | (Rey 


=" 


: 


i. Ps + 

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A ty ee 
ED SF: a . ~ 


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FOE RA eT OL RO UE AR ERE pen re 9 Siti asi 


Es es A 416 A** 


ene A Mag PUM GRE PRM Bee. 


pris ee 


” 


“THE CHRISTIAN. SCIENCE 


-. 


Mt TO 


FLORIDA 


FLORIDA 


LAKELAND 
(Continued) 


> geen ied oe ee RO ee 


a 
to 
Visit 


FLAMINGO ORANGE GROVES 


end TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDENS 


* * 
° 


Where vou can see iL 
Citrus Proit and tra 

Tropical Trees 
orgeous live 


varieties of 

rece of Tare 
ana Shrubs See the 
lamingoe«< and Color- 
ul Peacocks. Secure road map from 
our Packing Howse 


3501 Sowth Federe! Highwey 
ORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 
ee ee, 


LONG & FIELD 


Since 1939 


FLORIDA 


__FLORIDA_ 


(Continued) 


as kom Os Pate eae ea ae oy . 
: 
) Revolution in 


| e881 crane ice Be Phone 89-0278 


_ PHOTOGRAPHY 


Painting and 
Since 1919 


~ FORT MYERS GIFT SHOP 


“D070 First Street Phone #459Y °° KODAK EKTACHROME ~ 
GIFT SHIPPERS | . 3 times as fast 
* 


hrome Film 
(ASA32)... 
process it yourse)f. 


KODAK TRI-X 


the new ultra-fast 
black and white 
film (ASA 200— 
but used success- 
fully at ASA 650) 


’ Florida's Finest Fruit 
“Herts Drive-ar-setf Servier” 


GAINESVILLE 
Long’ S 
Cafetetia, Inc. 


Let ws tell you more abeut 
these revolutionizing films! 


$13 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. 
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 


; 


‘Candies . 
ba 


Fee, ta a) =F i 3 ey 


ame and See 
Po Gifts 
Galore 
Gifts for the Home 
Personal Gifts 
Christmas Cards 


~’"’Genéral Tnstirance 
All coverage except life 
»>owm 
Hooper & NORTHROP 


363 8S. Washington Bivd. 
Ringling 3-0351—2-3561 


: 


Jellies F ruit Shipping 
OPEN 9 A. M, to 9 P. M. 


& 


and you can | 


NORTH MIAMI 
A Merry Christmas 
and 
A Joyous New Year 


| West Pelm Beech 
2623 Broadway 


~ lAlways the Best 
and the Best Buy 


Television — Radios 
Hotpoint Appliances —_ 


E. L. BEASLEY | 


at Five Points 


Clothes for Men 


Te All Our Patrens 


YOOGD FABRICS ' 


(e580 N. £. 1th &. 1836 Trier S44, 
Phone PLara §-3509 Phene *-8575 
Nerth Miami Holly wond 


ORLANDO 
RDARAARARASARARSARASABASSAAAAS 


; 


‘SMINUTE CAR WASH, $] 9 


Ph. 4-5291 


| ED K. BEASLEY _ 


Insurance Agency 
All forms of Insurance except Life 
\251 W. Central Ave, ». Phone- 2-325). 


CARROLL SMITH, INC. 
HARDWARE 
“The Friendly Quick Service Store” 


LHaarent 
Crtee (Sa tierisdivit 


LN SURANCE 4 MORTGAGE LOANS 


Phone 3-564! 1220 $. Olive 


“IN OUR NEW BUILDING” 
SINCE 1975 


Waxing and Polishing 
2192 Ringling Blvd. 


ences State Bank 


T COLONIAL DRIVE 
IU sT CAST OF MILLIS STREET 


WINTER HAVEN, FLA. 
S&S THIRD ST. N.W. 
|“? seu can't Gnd tt here. you doen't need | 


Deal with Downs 


DOWNS PAINT 


Bull et 42nd 


wer Vw YO RY TS om 
| GILSKIP’S ” 


Christnas Cards 
Candles—Centerpieces 
Party Supplies 
Sts. Ph. 3-9639 
H. Y. CURRY 
Dry Cleaner FURRIER Tailor 
Fur Repairing 


Harmon at 39th St. 1207 Bull Se 
Ph. 2-6373 Ph. 3-7822 


DESBOUILLONS, Ine. 
Jewelers 
126 Broughton Street East 
KIRK EXCLUSIVE 
mts for Gorham and Towle Silver 
MOYLE® S LUGGAGE 
Christmas Gift Suggestions 


Largest election of Luggage, 
Trunks, Small Leather Goods 


in Savannah 
~ (32 Broughton St.. West Ph. 2-4094 


SCHNEIDER & SON LINDSAY & MORGAN (0. 
JEWELERS | FURNITURE—RUGS 


WATCH and JEWELRY REPAIRING LINOLEUM—DRAPERIES 


ond SPECIAL ORDERS | a 
109 PEACHTREE ST., WN. a NTERIOR DECORATORS 
SAVANNAH, GA. 


ona “ANNETTE. DAIRY 


Pick wp and delivery service 
Peachiree Laundry & aa for the 


We Give Personalized Service 
2431 Habersham Street 


1861 Peechtree Rd. WE. 
Palm Beaches : 


417 Okeechobee Ra. . Ph. 2-3851 [ ZUD” 


BOY'S ROOFING and eres Hardware Co. "BARKLEY S FLORIST 
| SHEET METAL WORKS ozs reochtree na. NW. VE S526 Phone. 3-7878 


Lawn and Garden Supplies | 13 E. PARK AVENUE 


~ Kennickell Printing Co, 


DECATUR 
DeKalb Motor Company PRINTING 
Diy | and Office Supplies 
Chrysler-Plymouth | Jor Cueto: Vitek antiaaadl 


ales and Service | 
S S | Tel. 3-4533 111 W. York St. 
CR 3816-7 | — 


1503 E. LAS OLAS BLVD. 


APPAREL.—and 
- ACCESSORIES 


for Women. Misses 


Offers 


Seeae 8.7862 Complete Banking Services & GLASS CO, | 


223 &- Tenn. Ave. |Member Federal Depésit Insurance ouve.| DU .JNT PAINT PRODUCTS 


Seymour Nursery seats aes 


Your Fashion “GRAHAM DOOR SLES 
Lo ndeccplne 
838 Lake Hollingsworth Drive | 


(Formerly Clinger Soles) 
Phone 42-751 


rex DOORS—FOLDING DOORS 
-Moore’s Style Shop Elgin, 


MATCHSTICK. BAMBOO 
STYLE-SMART CLOTHES 


TRAVERSE RODS 
FLEXALUM BLINDS 
The Best Clothing Value 
in America Today! 


HALLANDALE GEORGIA 


ATLANTA 


MORSE CLEANERS 


Cee ene ol a en A a NAB hs 


DIAL 3-4523 


Juniors and Half Sizes 


MOTHPROOFING 
WATERPROOFING | 


314 E. Peces Ferry Rd., in Buckheed 
‘4001 Peechtree Rd., _ in Brookhaven 


nea Store | 
Since 1894 | 


a teeta tie, Une 


The House of Sivte. Quality ond Seedes 
OPEN ALL YEAR 


ee a ae ws o 


———— i 
,. 
ae ee ee of 


omtottable, Durabie 


FURNITURE FOR 
LAWN AND PATIO 


Jackaway’s 
GULFSTREAM PATIO SHOP 
216 South Federal Highwoy 


LTT a 


“FRIGIDAIRE 
APPLIANCES 


See the Complete Line 
REFRIGERATORS 


| 
RANGES HOLLYWOOD | 
WASHERS a peers AG OE eS "| 


H. F. DUTCHER ) 
mt Be Wadsworth 528 se. Pineappie ___ Phone 38381 


Watches | WARREN'S | 


Hallmark Cards 
Watch and Jewelry Repa.ring Exclusive Shoe Store 
«ae 


LELAND CHUBB 
te N. Orange’ Ave. _ ORL ANDO, _FLA. . 
1464 Main Street Phone 26101 | 
ORLANDO—Dikxie Village — 
WILLIAMS 


a 
for the Palm Beaches _ 
hone 2-2846 Parties a Specialty 


COONEY’S © 


House of Good Food and Hospitality | 


We appreciate your patronage 


310 LAKEVIEW AVENUE 
____ WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 


The Most Complete Retail and 
Wholesale Bakery in the 


207 East Mein Street 


Schiff 


Decorative Fabrics and 
Accessories for the Home 


168 WEST MAIN STREET 
Across from People's Bank 


“A Better Selection of Better 
Furniture at Better Prices” 


COOK'S 


716 6. Flerida Ave. 


Arthur K. Wolfe. Interior Advisor 
31 Years’ Dependable Service 
in Lakeland 
We Are Authorized Agents fer 
Phileo—RCA—Dumont—Zenith 
Television 
All Philce and Kelvinater Appliances _ — 

nd Electrical Supplies 


Gable Auto Electric & Applianc a 
= nandien scone 


Ph. 2-4721 208 Ne. Fioride Ave. Phone 4429) 
“Fine Furniture Since 1888” 
__ PHONE HEMLOCK 2-4193 
x ST. PETERSBURG | 


DRYERS - Te Your Order 
AIR CONDITIONERS Tastefully Decorated 


WsF ] : Cashmere | | 


Sweaters | 
312 E. bas Olas Blvd, 650 W. Andrew; Ave. ALL COLORS 
Phone JA 35-6594 Established 1939 


32 to 46 


fi Reasonably Priced) 
Ornamenial Tron Work” A Lillian 
ls Our Business 


Licker 
Call Hollywood 2-7526 


Town House, 
Young Circle 
for Free Estimates 
= 


HOLLYWOOD FORD, INC. 
K & L IRON WORKS 
18 So. Federal Highway 


Com plete Sales and Service 
DANIA, FLORIDA 


ase ee ee OO wes ee Oe 
SS SS SS 1200 Federal Hwy. 


personalize your home 
© draperies © carpeting 
® bed spreads © occessories 
® bamboo 


1111 Kwhi Avenue Whemesheant 


~~ Courtesy First ond: ‘Always _ 246 SOUTH PINEAPPLE AVENUE 
~—~| Ellie's Book & Shteany 
PUREAOOLA Te eee ant 
1350 Mein Street 
OFFICE MACHINES AND FURNITURE 
GREETING (6 CARDS—RENTAL 


oe 


1301 IST ST. 


AT 8035 


tl 


Sleesy Hollow 
Florist 


3416 Navy Bhd. HE 3-2800 
MEMBER F.T.D 


Phone 22-101 


1517 North Poinsettia Avenue 
PHONE 6187 


___West Paim Beach, Floride | 


JERSEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 
ice CRLaM 


7 


TELEPHONE 2- 1441 


a} 
6851 N. E. 2ND AVE. 


Telephones: Miami %4-4521, Holly- 
wood 4061, Ft. Lauderdale 2-1935 
Mita est Palm Beach $624 


FURNITURE 


Visit Ft. Lauderdale’s axt | 
Beautiful Women’s Appare! 
Shop and Beauty Salon 


Pence-de-Leon Place 
and Atiantic Ave. 


Rel bomtthe sa — 


JACKSONVILLE 2 
BERRIER’S 
ICE CREAM COMPANY 


MIAMI 


MENU PLANNERS . SHOr AT 


NORTH CAROLINA _ 
CHARLOTTE 


TALLAHASSEE 


EVERYMAN'S BOOKSHOP 


ALLEN. 


L PEDERICI 
SUNRISE SHOPPING CENTER 


Ph | > 4.5 


WARREN LAUNDRY 
v DRY CLEANERS, Inc. 
e an ~ a 
Serving Boynton B 

lo Hallandale 

For Service Pi 


DRAPERY ond DRESS | 
FABRICS ond LINENS 
Orns 


ae i ee ea 


e Collect 


» 


FORT LAUDERDALE FLORIC 


QUALITY CLOTHES FOR MEN 


A 


LEISURE WEAR 


403 Eost Los Oles Bivd. 
JACKSON’S 
WALK-OVER SHOES 
DR. LOCKE SHOES 
jor Men dnd 


_2-2062 


4 EK Las Olas Bivd. Phene JA 2-12 


~ PIANOS AND ORGANS 


a} 


Wurlitzer and erst son y a n 


RENTALS—TUNING 
37 Seuth Andrews Ave. Ph. JA $- B45 se 


WALTER’S JEWELRY. 
- Diamond Appraisers 
DOULTON FIGURINES 

Fine Gilt Wares 
21532 $ 
‘A 


- 


. E. ist Ave Opp. Post Office 
Phone TA 2-5041 


, FORT MYERS 
AT FRANKLIN’S 


Hardware, China and 
Glassware—Gifts 


FRANKLIN HARDWARE (0. 
First St. at Broadway Ph. 2-8181 


LESLIE E. BOOKOUT 


McCORMICK & CO. 
MEMBERS 


NEW YORK STOC meshes 
MIDWLST STOCK Exc 
AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE TASSOC.) 


P. ©. Box 604 


BRAND NAME Products 


Realtor 


EDison 2-8613) 


| TANNER’S 


AND 


B - THRIFTY 


FOOD STORES 
a 
West Flagler St. 
N. E. 2nd Ave. 
Ponce d« Leon Blvd. 
5 Bird Road 
6190 S. W. 8th St. 
BOZO N, E. Sth Ave. 


~McEMBER & MONTGOMERY — 
INSURANCE, INC. 


Insurance All Lines 


1120 Pence De Leon Boulevard 
Core! Gables, Floride 
Phone Hi 42587 


~~ Best for LAWN-LIFE 


, More plant food 
per dollor than 


ory other brond’ 


50 fhe. $2.25 
100 ibs. $3.95 


ALWAYS GOOD 
PHONE 5-3074 | 
1300 Hogan St 217 W Eighth St. 
PAINTING—BODY AND FENDER WORK 
W ashing—W axing 
Lubrication 


FORSYTH GARAGE 
Specialised Packard Service 
GAS AND OLL 


—— Bn 6521-22-73 573 Margaret St 
rks Jacksonville, Fla 


W. H. SLAPPEY, Mgr. 
General Insurance Agency 
321 
“Let us check 


Phone 4-7811 


’ 
poeeceee 


W. Forsythe Strect 

your rates” 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
JACKSONVILLE BEACH) 


Nee 


PART RA OG RA RE RS A RI 


JUNE WRIGHT 


325 Atlantic Boulevard 
| Atlantic Beach, Fla. 
YES YS SPOS ROS PROS SR YS POS YO YON YR YY 


| LAKELAND | 
“Hotpoint 


| Changes Your Viewpoint 
| AUTOMATICALLY” 


CALE ELECTRIC 


Hotpoint Appliances 


HECTOR SUPPLY CO. 
Miemi, Floride 


AA hen 8 


TRANSFER end WAREHOUSE CO. 


Americon Red Ball Trensit Co., 


115 N. BE. 19th Terrace. Miami, Fleridsa 
Phene 3-3346—2-4635 


lt -& Flerida Ave. Phene 4-413! 


LONG DISTANCE MOVING @ CRATING 


<= 


LAKELAND 
Boks 


FRENCH 
= 


deliver 

PHONE 

2-1871 
12 WwW. awe 


M tame’ s 
Largest Fiewer Shop 


‘DRY CLEANERS 


Biscayne Bivd. at Tist St. 
Phone 09-8484 


H. H.  ALLSOPP The Little Faun Markel 


W ‘ i \ als 

Gonuret Ne 
ancy Imported and Domestic 
114 E. Lemon 4M. Phone 2-0711 Groceries—Yacht Service 


8360 Biscayne Blvd. Ph 
Miami, Florida 


lowe rland Drive-In Window 


Plaza 7-1621 


MIAMI—Little River 


s 


Geo. L. Gaines, Jeweler 


It EAST MAIN STREET 


Benford ootory 


Smart Footwear 


LITTLE RIVER 
LAUNDRY 


345. Northeast 80th Street 
Ph. PL 17-1657 


Zoric Dry Cleaning 


for Men and Women 
(124 8. Kentucky Ave. Phone 3-1862' 


[EOP LLLP PPP 
CARLDETTMAN 
| Custom Designs 
Cabinets ¢ Furniture 

_ Reproductions from Pictures 
1311} E. Main St. Phone $-2401 


' 


CENTRAL FLORIDA’S LARGEST 
ond 
MOST COMPLETE 
DEPARTMENT STORE 


| 


TAMPA’+ST. PETERSEURE 


Brothers 


VINOY MARKET 
and BAKERY | 


432 First St. North 


' 


; 


SARASOTA 


EXCEL STUDIO - 


| Greeting Cards, Gifts 
Costume Jewelry 
Picture Frames and Framing 
24-hr. photo finishing service 
. Films — Cameras 
1435 MAIN STREET 
CITIZENS BANK IN SARASOTA 


SARASOTA. FLORIDA 


’ 


Free Parking 


Open © A.M. to fer Custemers 


8 PM. 


113 Wese College Avenue Tel. 2-2552 F R ST E f D F R A | 


‘Printing — Engraving 


Wide selection of Children’s 
books, Bibles and Reference 
books 


A pleasent ploce to browse 


THE STORE FOF MEN Insurance Agency, 


317 CLEMATIS STREET 
Inc. 


WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 
Fickling 
and Walker, 


Managers 


Serving All Ages | 
: 


Save by moi! ot 


TAMPA | 


TAMPA, FLORIDA 


| SAVINGS ond LOAN ASSOCIATION 
215 South Olive Avenue 
West Palm Beach, Florida 


CURRENT 3% RATE 


Ceminale, by COMPANY | 


Tampa's Greatest 
Furniture Store 


Rgtepette St. and 
de Park Ave. 


240 Second St. 
Macon, Ga. 


= * 
KERNAGHAN, INC, 
JEWELERS 


MACON, GEORGIA 
419 Cherry Street Dial 5-4717 
x 


CHAPMAN-HARRISON 
MOTOR COMPANY 


7 DeSoto 


, 
Plymouth 
SALES AND SERVICE 
Tel. 36721 455 Walnut St. 


ee 


Fay’s Flower & Giff Shop 


Q & Everything 

a 2 a in Flowers 

531 Third Street 
dea Die! 5-6524 

'NIGHTS ond SUNDAYS DIAL 3- 3354 


KARSTEN & DENSON C0.: 


Use Vertagreen fertilizer for plants, 
shrubs, lawns and trees. 


for Quality Dry Cleaning —_ 7 PAtm PEACH, FLORIDA _ 
Specializing in Evening Wear | Maliday Greetings 


sone gzepo, Ower | Sally's Fashion Frocks 


5. 5. IZZEDDIN, Owner 
2% ‘Smart apparel at budget tig 


WEST PALM BEACH | Dresses—Skirts—Blous 


Sportswear, Lingerie, Peter Pan Bras 


al First 54. Arcade (Fagaa) Ph 3-3511| 
RUBBER STAMPS 
PALM BEACH PRESS 


28 Fegen Arcede Phone 7420 | 


Weel and Cotten ‘Quality Carpeting 

Geedyear Rub fer Counters and 
Fieers. Inlaid Lineleum, Plastics = 
Kentile Asphalt, Tile Aluminum 
Plastic Wall Tiles. All work eon Ee —— 


Earn 3% Current Dividend 
Whitehead Floor re Each Account Insured 


Bill Frink, Prog. i $1 0, 
Now Accounts Cordially lnvited 


521 _Northwood Rd. Phone 9884 WEST DALM BEACH FEDERAL 
Modern Cleaners SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


223 Deture Street Phone 3-030! 
—LAUNDRY— | 


CLEMATIS A™ OLIVE 


We also carry all nationally-known 


Member Federa! Deposit Insurance Corp. 
___Deposits Insured up to $10,000 __ 


Roy's Paint 
‘land Mirror Store 


2090 MAIN STREET 


For Sportswear 
and Everywear 
ee Fine + 


MIDWAY GROVES. 


6 MILES NORTH 
ON U.S. HIGHWAY #301 


Grapefruit 


Telephone 8565 


| Heating @ Air Conditioning 


Hawthorne Roofing Co. 


———————— | 1501 80. DIXIE 


, George Tanner's Beauty Salon 


Quality Plus Service | 
522 So. Dixie | 
West Palm Beach, Fia. 


WEST PALM BEACH 
Lake Worth 


Golden Guernsey Is the 


insecticides and sprays. 


$53 Third St.. Macon, Ga. $-3306 


| Palm Beach's FRANK IRBY 


Johns- Manville Built-Up Roofs | Leading Premium | Plumbing and Heating Co. 


M | L K | REPAIRING o Specialty 


Produced and Distributed MR. HARDWICK, 
:. Exelusively by DIAL 8-4600 


PHONE 2-172 Manager 


Dial 3-6331 * 


400 SECOND STESES 


TURNER 8 BROS. AGENCY 


REAL ESTATE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
GENERAL INSURANCE 
122% E. 4th St. Charlotte, N.C 
FRanklin 5-5793 


Bridges 


<n Ss. Tryes Street Phene ED 83-3719 


RELIANCE ENGINEERING CO, 


Incer porated 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 
& CONTRACTORS 


Air Conditioning, Heating end Piping 
| Comutapelit gad talieietal Giateiiedete 
'P. ©. Box 1292 Ph, Edison 2-0533 


Aon Bhd. -- ES, 


DOUGLAS VILLAGE 


Furriers—Dry Cleaners 

Self-Service Laundry. 
Dress Shop 

1415 Elizabeth Ave. ED 3-5161 


JOSEPH C. HARSCH . 


ecial Correspondent of 
) Ti  Chetebion Scsence Monsor 
and NBC News Commentator 


FRIDAY NIGHTS, 7:15 - 7:30 


‘am 1240 WSOC em 103.5 


‘Cc R. WILLMANN CO. 


Plumbing Contractors 
Bathroom Fixtures 
eputation of Sixty Years 

for Dependability ~ 


Plaza Shopping Center 
EDison 2-8246 ‘1212 Gordon St. 


BUTLER SEAFOOD 


“Everything 
in Fresh Seafoods” 


919 South McDowell Street 
(Just Across from The Addison) 


‘Telephone FR 5-4409 Charlotte, N. C. 


' 
' 


It Costs Less 
at 
STERCHI’S 
CHERRY sand BROADWAY 
DIAL 5-168! 


Hair Styling—Experienced Operators 
Hair Dressing 
Experts in Machine 
and Cold Permanent Waving 
Tele's: Stes my meg 4 Bldg. 3-459% 


3605 Se. Dixie 
West Palm Beach, Flerids 


CATER 
FURNITURE 


We want your business 
+ 


E> ALR YY 
: Phone L. W. 5656 


Creators of Coral Sands | IN MACON 7 
Sportswear | Complete Banking Facilities 


333 Datura Street and 
STRENGTH STABILITY SERVICE 


West Palm Beach, Florida Buy Here—Factory To You 


WOMEN'S 
and CHILDREN’S WEAR 
and ACCESSORIES 


{14 Flamingo Drive Phone “ne 


and Save 


Slacks and Sportswear 
Main Plant Show Reem 


- 911 No. Dixie 

Lake Worth, Fis, | Ree ash. 
420 N.E. Srd St. F 

| Ez. Jacke 10918 


DEEP ROCK WATER 
| Its Purity 


Is Your Security GEN ERAL INSURANCE 


761 Poplar St. Dial 6-1353 


West Palm Beach, Florida 


ED. A. WILLS, Realtors: 
SALES - LOANS - RENTALS. 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


The First National Bank 
| Thru-Skill Shirt. Co... o-Seaitieneie te sie eke — 


South Carolina's 
schist eat caus cis. 


West End Jac Ma 


44 Bee Street So lh 2 ae 


; sip 
ts ae 
Peige e030) be st ren th: Saree yp ens 


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Richard Harrington 


N SCIENCE MONITOR. ‘BOSTON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17, 


“Outlined in lichts, the Parliament buildings sparkled against the gray sky of dusk” 


It Was Christmas Eve in Victoria 


By Jan Roberts 
Late shoppers hurried along 
the streets. Rain had turned to 
drizzle: the sharp air smelied 
clean. Outlined in lights, the 


| 


; 
| 


Empress Hotel and the Parlia- | 


ment buildings sparkled against 
the gray sky of dusk. It was 
Christrnas Eve in Victoria, Brit- 
‘eR Cotunrbie> The first Christ- 
mas my husband, John, and 
had been away from home 

We had telephoned to oul 
farilies in Southern California 
John had mumbled something 
about “two lone Americans in 
Canada Just now: though, we 
were concernea with getting 
the Wemblevs. Bill Wembly. a 
friend of a friend, had invited us 
to dinner—to his and Mary's 
two-roem cottage 

With Bill’s sketchily penciled 
map we ventured into the deep- 
ening dusk. The main road was 
easy enough to find, but there 
were turns and forks and cross- 
roads and big trees_and little 


. 
if) 


’ 


I | 


: 
’ 


: 
; 


lanes that Bill hadn't bothered to | 


mention. 
We had left the main road 
some distance back when John 
flashed his light again. He had 
memorized “first lane on left 
after right turn—two giant 
Douglas firs.” He checked with 
the scrap of paper. “This has 
be right,” he exclaimed 
Down the rutty drive 


to 


A young American girl living at the American 


Burtonwoods. Lancs., Eng.. 
highest aw 
‘Baave 


“ 


'riest 


| Henry VITl 


weithere was candlelight. 


Thick evergreens closed in about 
us, turning dusk to night. We 
could hardly see through the 
heavy drizzie. Not a light was in 
sight and not a sound except the 
sounds we were making. Wet 
branches s¢ratched and-siapped 
against the car. Slowly we 
rounded a slittle hill, John 
stopped short. 

“Look,” he half whispéred 

Between two low hills just 
ahead we could see the strait of 
Juan de Fuca, black, forbidding 
We could hear waves pounding 
the shore John opened the 
window. Quickl; + pulled oul 
coats close! 

+ ’ 4 


We had arrived. for at our 
left, tucked among the pines, 
was the little cottage. Through 
its window we could see a biaz- 
ing fire. Smoke billowed from 
the chimney with the fragrance 
of burning evergreen. On the 
path and coming toward us, a 
lantern bobbed up and down. 

“Welcome! And the very mer- 
Christmas'” Bill's voice 
rang clea! 

Inside was Mary’s warm wel- 
come and bustle aplenty. There 
was Hans Bresch, who lived ove! 
the hill, and George Wells, new- 
ly from..London. There was 
, the Cat, and Gen- 
the. Siamese. And 


eral Thai. 


we removeqc 


’ 
our wraps when Bill proudly 
pointed to the huge fir tree in 
the corner near the fire. 


the other side of our hill.” 
“What a lush beauty!” 
exclaimed 


‘3n 


It was, too. And it had gold 
and silver balls that twinkled 
the flickering light, and at 


' the bottom @ tiny white bel 


| Thai cuffed it playfully 
icrackled and fitfulls 
lonto the floor 


“That's for the General,” Bill 
explained 

In the corner opposite the tree 
stood a little organ. Tl! 
laid with white linen and fresh- 
ly polished silver, occupied the 
remainder of the room. In the 
center of the table was an elabo- 
rate silver candelabra, and 
shadows played 
under the lighted candles 

Presentiy, Mary brought in 
the shining goiden turkey, Bill 
carved, and everyone served— 
potatoes. gravy; little boiled 
onions, green peas; cranberry 
Sauce, cinnamon apple salad. 

To our enthusiastic 
Mary replied with a smile, 


ié table 


. 


“Only 


|@ wood stove can cook a turkey.’ 
AG finished with hot mince pie. 
© After 


were cleared 
tossed each of us a 
“Let's sit on the floor,” 


things 
away, Mary 
cushion 
she said. . 

On the hearth, Henry 
yawmed and stretched 
white bell tinkled as 


Vill 
The little 
General 
The fire 
Spit embers 


Pine sap oozed 


i\from the burning logs. 


Air 


Sixteen-vear-old Florence Reid, daughter of a schoolteacher at 
the high school on the base, was selected to be present at a civic 


shire in 1954. Florence already 
another high guiding honor: As 
the Fourth Bolton Eagley Gil 
her First-Class Guide rank i 
She received this latest 
activities .in the Guide 


and in a home for the aged 


Let's Exchange Ideas 


Youth Round Table 


awara 
movement 
has devoted all her spare time to Voluntary work in a day nursery | 


jon visits to the Middle East and | 
include | 


holds the International Trefoil. 


a First-Class Brownie. she joined 
| Geuide Troop in 1950, and attained 


fo! 
and 


‘rvice and 
young American 


Outstanding sé 
this girl 


ee 


Canada. My interests 


“I want to thank you for the/ art) orchid culture, and other 


Youth Round Table.” writes 


forms of 


one of our enthusiastic Round | Collies, and short-story writing. 


Tablers, L. R. B., of Nevada, “l! 
surely do enjoy thé correspond- 
ents I have gotten through it. 
One of them was from the letter 


who are 
corresponding 


Letters from 
interested 


persons 
in 


| would be appreciated. 


| 


: 
: 


of mine you published five years | 


ago, and the others are from 


those letters you have published | please put 


from time to time. I know that 


to get letters I have to write/yery much like pen friends in| 


(Mrs.) G. F., California 
’ ee ee 
Canada—W ould 


my letter in 
Youth Round Table? I would 


From 


them, and] find it much easier | the United States. or anywhere. 


to write letters than [ did 
fore.” 


And from California, Mrs. J./are letter writing, reading, and 


M. L. writes, “I've enclosed two | crocheting. 


I also collect post 


letters and it will be an inter-/|cards and old or foreign coins. 


esting experience to correspond 
with two new friends so far 
away. My interest has been re- 
kindled this year through read- 
ing the Youth Round Table. 
Years ago I submitted my name 
to the Mail Bag section and 
enjoyed the experience very 
much. However, through the 
years, as | became an adult and 
married, the correspondence 
dropped away. 

“Recently a pen friend I! 
hadn't heard from in _ years, 
wrote a lovely letter to an old 
address, after she had read my 
published article on cla 
ging, which appeared 
Youth. Section a 
months ago. She was not really 
sure that | was the same girl, 
but she remembered my married 
name, The threads of friendship 
were picked up again. Although 
I haven't time for extensive 
correspondence, the young 
adults that submit their names 
in the YRT from other countries 
avenue ,, for exchange of 


Today we're publishing invi- | 


' 


| 


(Mrs.) D. H., 
British Columbia 


ee 


From Germany—!I read about | 
the pen friend exchange in one/ 


of our newspapers, and would 
like to correspond 


age. I have attended a secondary 


school, and am, now engaged in | 


an office. I would like to hear 
from American girls. 
(Miss) I. M., Schwelm 


Rae Dae 


From Venezuela—I found the 17. 


‘Americans. I am 26, a citizen of 
Chile, and a former officer in the 
Chilean Rifles. I have been in 
the Republic of Venezuela six 
months,.and have no friends 
here. I would like very much to 
have friends from ted 
States, one of the true democra- 


“write it, al- 


tations to readers from several | 


correspondents. 
” MR SMS 


' 


Base at | 
has recently been presented with the 
‘ard given by the Girl Guides Association—-The Queen's | : 

5 : - et ueen s | vied in the Yule log and_his 


4 4 4 


As the flames leaped into gro- 
tesque shapes, George told how 
lee and his brothers always car- 


father lighted it with a splinter 


i from 


| Vear 
welcome accorded the Queen when she visited Bolton in Lanca-/*:** 


gardening, * raising | 


you | 
the | 


be-|I am a young mother with two} 
pre-school age boys. My hobbies: 


in English | 
- with girls aged 20 as 1 am that 


m dig- | address: of your newspaper at) 18. 
in the/the Venezuelan American Cen-' 

couple of ter in Caracas. I would like to 
get in touch with young North | 


h but do not, 


the log of the previous 
And Bill told how he and 
hi sister went through the 
+ house on Christmas morning— 
singing carols. And Hans told 
his mother spent 
imaking holiday cookies. and 
that their tree was always deco- 
rated on Christmas Eve, 
ihymn singing afterward 

| “Why don’t we sing’”’ Mars 
said, and began pumping the 
organ. It wheezed and gasped 
under Mary’s pumping. but we 
isang, “Deck the Halis.” and 
“Good King Wenceslaus.” 

| The candle on the organ 
| flickered and blinked. Mary kept 
insisting on “just one more.” We 
sang “Silent Night.” and “The 
| First Noel.” 
strangers — Canadian, German, 
American. We were people — 


< 


how 


and there was fellowship and | 


understanding. 


The last log had burned 
| we clasped hands and sang “Joy 
To The World.” Not one of us 
lever wanted to forget that 
Christmas Eve in Victoria. 


remarks. 


Today's half-billion dollar 
question: What popular make 
automobile will college faculties’ 
members now lean toward?, 

- "¢ 

Whe wants te appear in the 
red? Despite the popularity of 
the man in the red-flannel suit 
there’s never been any attempt 
to extend this clothing style to 


~ How We Spend 
| Bi ; 


By Margret E. Keatts 
“ Teulouse, France 

Because we were not settled 
in a home, our first Christmas in 
France was spent in a hotel on 
the Riviera or-the “Céte ¢@’Azur” 
which is the French name for 
this beautiful region. In Nice 
we found a room with a small 
balcony overlooking a _ lovely 
garden. Beyond the palm trees, 
bright flowers, and green foliage 
of the garden stretched the 
calm waters of the blue Medi- 
terranean—a scene far different 


from, our usual wintry Christ-} 


mas in Ohio. 

This first view of the Medi- 
terranean coast line quite took 
‘our .breath away. Photographs 
and pairitings do not do justice 
to this beautiful corner of 
France with its wealth of color 
you're ais@? considerate, you'lliiand old-world charm. The 
measure the recipient's home/ Alpes-Maritimes come down al- 
before you send the gift. imost to the very edge of the 

' ea uy azure sea. Tropical vegetation 

The latest in package deals: and brilliant flowers flourish in 

The cereal people are deter-| abundance. Pastel colored vilias 


other séasons of the year. 
ee Ty . 

If you're considering a gift 
for a prospective young zoolo- 
gist there's a life-sized stuffed 
elephant obtainable at a depart- 
ment store for $500. ‘And if 


mined that youngsters eat cereal; dot the mountainsides, while | 


and the movie people are justi ancient villages 
as determined that these same crown many 
youngsters go to the movies- ) ory Ser 

so what happens? One brand, | Christmas day was spent 


Quaker Oats, now includes, | ~~ 
courtesy M.G.M. free movie | ortving into the mountains Back 
ra ‘of Nice and Cannes. There we 
— or the peckage of break~| found the ancient hilltop vil- 
fast 1 " r , 4 lages which are so common in 
this region. Many of these have 
There are some whe can re- | been in existence since before 


or chéteaux 
a hilltop. 


jmember when you could DUY | the time of Jesus. At first view 


' 
: 


. 


; 


“Hans helped me cut it from | 


John | 


capriciously 


’ 


| 


your local paper for “one- 

hundred-millionth of a milion 

dollars.” Or was it two cents? 
, 4 , 

Then there's the chap who 
we think, has lost all sense of 
proportion and holiday senti- 
ment—he orders his seeds for 
spring planting BEFORE the 
Christmas holidays. H. E. T. 


they seem like something right 
out of a fairy tale. Spread out 
on rocky hilltops, the color of 
the stone buildings blends 
perfectly with the rugged coun- 


and as we wandered along the 
incredibiy narrow, winding 
streets we half expected to see 
robed figures of Bible times 
emerging from the low door- 
ways. However, we found that 
many modern-day artists now 
live in these ancient 


4 Record only 
Sunny flours” 


ized thé old houses, 
them quite comfortable. 
The terraced hills surround- 
ling these villages are planted to 
| fruit and olive trees, vineyards 
land millions of flowers. From 
this region come many of the 
‘flowers used in the. vast 
fume industry which is 
tered in Grasse. 
| ’ ae ee | 


The road ied into more 
rugged, mountainous country, 
climbing higher and higher un- 

Chicago til at the mountain-top village 

The following incident may} of Gourdon it started down, spi- 
serve as a refreshing and heart-jraling into Grasse. From there 
warming reminder that there are | we returned to Nice where we 
many who do observe the! ate our Christmas dinner near a 
Golden Rule in public relations.} giant grate-fire in the pretty 

During the past summer while} dining room of the hotel. 
motoring and vacationing in}; The second Christmas. day 
western United States, we were; was spent quite happily with 
halted in our travels by a smil-| some dear French friends where 


making 


Civil Service 


ling, affable, and courteous For- | five children helped to keep us 


i tional 


’ 


’ 


| 
| 
| 


' 


+ phone..by..a..gas-station..atiend-.. 


weeks | 


with : 


And we were not | 


to | 
embers: candles were low when | 


est Ranger near one of our Na-| 
Parks and informed that 


our homeland 
were astonished 


from missing 
festivities. We 


at a gas station, some 40 miles/ lent behavior of these children 
from. thal 
not, until informed about it, been 
aware that she did not fave it, 
and the gracious manner in 


who did not seem 
| excited by it all 


particularly 
It seemed quite 


}- 


SO | 


' 
' 


tryside that they appear to have | 
| been there since time began. We! 
twisited several of these villages,| 4 contrast to the noisy 


villages, | 
thaving renovated and modern-| 


| Clally 


per- | 
cen-.) 


‘On their way 
one of our party had left a purse/ at the quiet dignity and excel-| 


| 'May meet with beauty, face to | French 
destination. She had) who had put away most of their | 


land 


=) 


7 . ~~ 
ee 

4 > 

“' 


Street in Tourette-sur-Loup. a typical old-world French village | 


ment which 
prevail in an 
with five children present. 

It wash’t until our third year 
in France that we were intro- 


duced to the Christmas eve “re-| we wrapped ourselves in layers 
féte|of heavy clothing and donned 
which is such a joyous part of| heavy, warm shoes before we 
the French Noel. This is a sup-/set out for a church of their 


veillon.” that traditional 


per eaten after midnight, espe- 
after midnight church 


= 


a y 
eer y 
ee ae BS: 
. t* % 


service on Christmas Eve. It can | 
be a party in a restaurant, but is | 


more often a strictly family af- 
fair enjoyed in the 
were delighted to be asked by 
loving friends to share their 
family reéveillon. Each vear 


| returned 
home. We} 


beautifully arranged ind deco- 


since then we have been includ- | 


ed 
they repeatediy assure us 
that we now have a family in 
Vrance. 

It was. the 


first réveillon 


in their plans for this fete, | 


Christmas Trees for Sale 


From barren sidewalks, suddenly 

Sweet-smelling grows, 
tree on tree— 

Giving the look, however fleet, 

Of forests to a city street. 


Se that townsfolk, 
warning, 


with no 


te work some 


morning, 


face. 


| gifts by the time we arrived, and | And quietness in a noisy place. 


atas food had been consumed, 
we arose from the table at five 
— yg FE peo. well wee 

ppy a very 5 : ° 
knew our host Rag eh 
would be up again by seven- 
{ turty to start | : 

th the small children of the - 

family, so we said our good-byes 
and came home to fall into bed 
around five-thirty. 


ae Ee 
In general, the Christmas sea- 
son in France does not seem te 
be quite as festive as in the 
tus. Christmas trees are not 


used as generally or decorated as 
lavishly as ours, streets and 
homes are seldom decorated to 
any extent, and illumination of 
windows, decoration on deors 
and outside lighting are practi- 
eally unknown. It is impossible 
to buy a Christmas wreath in 
this part of France, and. very 
few Christmas cards are ex< 
changed. Gifts are lavished on 
the young children, but gift give 
ing among aduits is not as much 
Stressed as in our country... Ne 
Christmas music is heard in the 
streets or shops and no Christ- 
mas caroling is done. Father 
Christmas is a thin, rather sade 
looking man, not at all like hape 
py, jolly, fat Santa. However, 
these differences in customs do 
not change in the Jeast the sweet 
sense of love and generosity 
which permeates the atmosphere 
during this joyous season when 
all the world is touched by the 
spirit of the Christ-child. 

How wonderful it would be if 
one could spend Christmas each 
year in a different country, in a 
j; home, with a family, learning 


excite-| which seemed so different and| the traditional customs of each 


would ordinarily | so one which will live always in| country, sharing their Christmas 
American home| our 


memory. We went to the 
home of our friends around ten- 
thirty p.m. Since very few 
churches in France are heated. 


joys and dreams, thus being 
able to draw closer on that day 
of days to the real meaning of 
“peace on earth, good will to 
men.” 


Small Fry 


¥ 


Cynthia, four, had béen 
coached by her parents about 
| her name and address, and other 
_ information, so if she ever had 
ito identify herself she would 


know what to say. 
rated, the center piece being al One day they were testing her 
large “buche de Noél,” tradi- | 


see if she remembered. 
tional French Christmas cake| °©42d where does your Daddy 
made in the form of a Yule log 


work?” they asked. 
Gifts were piled at each place. “My Daddy works in the Hart- 
A large decorated Christmas 


ford Steam Boiler Insurance 
tree was standing in an adjoin- po ge ve be mag F mene then 
ing room with gifts arranged on impuisively—"and my 
and around it. These were for 


Mommy works in the kitchen!" 
the small children of the family 


who would have their festivities 
upon arising Christmas morn- 
ing. Of course by this time it 
WAS morning, being - around 
1:30 a.m. 

First the gifts were wun- 
wrapped and admired. Each 


sef&ction. 
4 4 4 | 


After the church service we 
to our friends’ villa 


where we found a iong table 


Ressell N. Case, 
‘@athedral City, Calif, 
ye oe 
It was a beautiful sutum 
afternoon and Jean, five, Was 
deeply interested in the way her 
elders were describing a particu-" 
larly beautiful beech tree whose | 
donor was warmly kissed on/golden coloring in the bright 
both cheeks by eath recipient, | sunligMt seemed beyond desérip- 
which included men _kissing/ tion. 
men, a custom still practiced in| After a long ~quizzical look 
families. Then we sat/| Jean said, “It’s like maramlade!” 
down to what we thought would|—a more apt description than 
be a light supper. the superlatives the others had 
After three hours of time had /| used. 


which she was advised. of it 
savea her many anxious mo- 
ments. 

This courteous Ranger had 
been watching for an hour for a 


|’ Tubby 


ELIZABETH-ELLEN LONG elapsed and eight courses of de-| srs. M. E. Stephens, Bristel, Engiend 


By Guernsey LePelley 


car of the make and mode! and 
bearing a license answering the 
description given him over the | 
ME PERFUME THIS 
CHRISTMAS — ITS 


Too E&xrVENSiVE 


| 


|ant. Yet both he and the attend- 

ant, as well as the honest and | 
| dutiful citizen who turned it in, | 
| were reluctant to accept any re- 

|} ward for their efforts in seeing} 
that it was returned to its right- | 
ful owner. It was 

day's work,” they said 


Lois E. Keding 


| 
UR ea alae ah caer (rey Raia 8 | 


Verse 


| 
' 


Now the God of hope 
full you with all joy and 


peace in believing, that 6633-12 17 


Wet ...-. 


Daruinc. DON'T BLY 


An 


— 


We'ut cue. You we 


VERY FOND OF 


Do vou KNOow wuHar 
NOUR MOTHER WANTS 
For CuURISTMAS TF 


tT + 


ar-casr | 
KNOw WHAT TO GET 
Mom FOR Cumistmas | 


i 


at 


ye may abound in hope, 
through the power of 
the Holy Ghost.—Rom. 
15:1& 


| hl ee ee 


DO YOU WANT 
TO HELP ME 
SELECT - = 


ACROSS 
Shed 
feathers 

Humming- 


. To wit 
" Leaf stalk 
Is 
5. . Czar’s wife 
30. Rodent 
; 98. - Scoft 
33. Male swan 
12. . Skull 
| 13, }. Glut 
14, 7. Springy 
Flectrically 
charged 
particle 
. Sayings 


el lie 
aon We 
SE ee 


1, 


Exchange 
premium 
Apart 
Think over 
Shake 


15. 


we wel ovo 


Ay 


indebted 


Par Time 23 Min. 


al S8 E . BS 
1ick A RBG ABE nal cook ond 


7. Kiin 

. Mountain 
State 

. Spoken 

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Seaweed 


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Separate 
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. Sandy 
. Pound 
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tree 
. Part of a. 
door 
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. Winglike 


. Present 
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DOWN 
l. Maximum 
2. German 
river 


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PERFUME ALWays 
EMBARRASSES ME 


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3. Easy gait notices 
. Grampus 
. Conflict 
Greek E 
. River in 
Ecuador 
Negative 
Mr. Lincoln 
Fodder pit 
32. Shades of 
meaning 
. Prickly 


g eee 


. Score 
. Artificial 


Irs A REAL NEAT 
SMELL ~~ SOMETHING 
Like A BARGER. 


3. 


HE Gave HER A BOTTLE 


THUS SMALL J 


I cor Her 
A QUART. 


You've Gor To 
HAND IT To "TuesY 
— HE CAN ‘SUzE 
SE A REAL MAN-OF.- 
THE -WORLD WHEN 
HE WANTS TO Be / 


Dio You GET irZd 


CERTAINLY ~ YOU 
CAN SMELL IT RIGHT 
THROUGH THE 
PACKAGE ~ 

*Oocve 
DE 
Litac” 


es 


4 


ff. 


vo 

Toiletries : 
Ay v 

yd LL 


AND SHES RIGHT ABOUT 
IT BEING EXPENSIVE —— 
1 HAD “To PAY 

NINETY GIGHT CENTS 


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‘Ss & - _ ss 
+ a > og : 


ER OU OF clos" 


“ 


\ What is it like to be thé major 
nation that is left out of the United 


as most of the world takes satis- 
in the fact that 16 nations 
become new members of UN 
if it couldn't be 17 or 18. 
the drama of the week shaped 


selves the question, “Whom will the 
Japanese: blame, the Soviet Union, 
Nationalist Chiria, or the United 
States?” Curiously enough, one of 
the first reactions in Tokyo was a 


in the Diet—to censure 

Japan's own foreign minister for 
poor handling of the application. 

This, to be sure, reflected some 

criticism of the United States and 

of Mr. Shigemitsu’s close coopera- 


‘tion with the United States; but a 


majority seem convinced that Mr. 
Lodge, the American chief delegate, 
did all that he could do to advance 
the Japanese candidacy. 

Reportedly a Japanese protest has 
gone to Nationalist China over the 
latter’s veto of Outer Mongolia, 
which resulted in the Soviet veto of 


dapan. It is conceivable that the re- 


gime of Generalissimo Chiang may 
not have many friends in Tokyo as a 
result of this intransigeance. 

But the fact that American and 
British proposals obliged the Soviet 
delegate to cast not one but three 
separate vetoes against Japanese 
membership is not likely to be 
missed by the Japanese press. Mr. 
Sobolev ended in the position of 


DPA MRS oR 


4g. the situation of Japan. to-.. 


Voted sap ANS) og em nee 0 


How Do the Japanese Feel? — 


- 


claiming to favor Japan's admission 
but refusing to promise support for 


it even next year unless Outer Mon- {| . 
golia be included. This bracketing | 
of nearly 90. million. people. with a | 


region containing only a million in- 
habitants is hardly complimentary. 
Wholesomely, however, many 


Japanese do not seem concerned pri-. 


marily with questions of blame but 
rather with, “How do we proceed 
from.where we are?” . 

Japan is concerned with conclud- 
ing: a long-delayed treaty of. peace 
with the Soviet Union. Negotiations 
on this may be renewed in London. 

The greatest long-run concern of 
Japan, of course, is to build up for- 
eign trade to support the population 
so closely packed on ifs islands. Any 
increase of exports to the United 


States soon runs into resistance. 


Southeast Asia offers some markets, 
but these will take time for develop- 
ment. Japan’s historic trade has been 
with the Chinese mainland, and al- 
though realistic Japanese do not ex- 
pect miracles from trade with Red 
China, they do consider such trade 
natural. : : 
Relaxing of restrictions on Sino- 
Japanese trade does not involve 
seating Communist China in the 
UN—an ostensible goal of Soviet 
diplomacy—but it probably would 
have effects tending in that direc- 
tion. Much Japanese opinion seems 
to accept communism in China as a 
de facto situation with which it and 
the West will have to deal; The 
events of the past week put Ameri- 
cans under some obligation to con- 
sider Japanese sentiment in Asian 
matters. : 


What TV Can and Can't Supply 


Said James Abram Garfield to the 
student body of his alma mater, Wil- 
liams College, over 80 years ago: 

Give me a log hut, with only a sim- 

ple bench, Mark Hopkins on one end 
and I on the other, and you may have 
all the buildings, apparatus, and li- 
braries without him. 


These words from a man later to 
become President have been para- 
phrased in prose and poetry through- 
out the ensuing years. Oversimplified 
as they may be, they wrap up in a 
wonderfully neat package one of the 
great facts of education—a package 
useful at the moment to give per- 
spective to the remarks by Robert 
R:; Mullen’ on educational television 
quoted on this page last week, 

Educational television, as Mr. Mul- 
len points out, can make a contribu- 
tion to the nation’s schools com- 
parable to that of the school bus: 


It can bring together pupils and 


teaching, teaching aids, and appara- 


tus not available to youngsters scat- 


ORD 


tered about in President Garfield's 
crossroads log huts. But will tele- 
vision, live from movie films, 
eventually replace the teacher per- 
sonally present in his classroom? 
Many a modest teacher has been 
tormented by doubts whether his in- 
struction was doing anything that a 
textbook, perhaps written by a noted 
authopity, could not do better. 
(There are teachers, unhappily, who 
never ask themselves that question.) 
The answer lies in what James 
Garfield must have really had in 
mind: discussion—the interplay of 
ideas, the questions and answers, 
the friendly clash of opinions; which 
can bring clarifying light into other- 


or 


. wise unsuspected dark corners and 


sculpture hitherto misty and un- 
formed thoughts. 

That is something no technological 
marvel yet over the horizon can 
supply—something no educational 
experience is complete without. 


What Makes a 


Dispatches from Washington re- 
port the finance subcommittee of the 
White House Conference on Educa- 
tion is now working on recommenda- 
tions as to what and how federal aid 
to the public schools should be made 
available — recommendations which 
will be further considered by the 
conference's full executive commit- 
tee a month hence. Also that within 
the administration: and at Cabinet 
level the same questions are being 
debated. 

The mills of discussion are still 
gtinding, therefore. And it may be 
@ good time to toss a few questions 
into the grist: | 

Must the assumption be accepted 
uncritically that all states must get 
some aid in order to make it polit- 
ically possible for needy states to 


Needy State ? 


get any? May not this issue be big 
enough to ride over some, at least, of 
this political folklore? 

What qualifies a state as “needy”? 
Simply the present inadequacy of its 
school facilities? Or should that be 
related to what it has to do with and 
to what it is doing or can do? 

Is a state's lack of resources a mat- 

ter of low per capita wealth and in- 
come, or of unwillingness to tax fur- 
ther, or of legal or other impedi- 
ments in the way of local financing? 
' One thing should be utterly self- 
evident: To whatever extent aid is 
allocated to states that are the 
“haves takes away from those which 
are the “have nots”; whatever is 
given to those which could do better 
takes away from those which have 
dug deep in slim purses. 


Shadow on the 


Since 1949 there has been one short 
stretch of almost 20 miles at which 
the Iron Curtain between the Com- 
munist and the free world becomes 
thin enough to be somewhat trans- 
parent. Like an open mesh, it even 
permits numbers of people to cross 
back and forth who could never cross 
the guarded western frontier of So- 
viet power at other points. 

This “window” is between. East 
and West Berlin, where a western 
island rises a hundred miles inside 


- the barrier from the Baltic Sea to 


the Austrian Alps. In the agreement 
w ended the attempted Berlin 
blockade of 1948 the Soviet..Union 
agreed with the United States, Brit- 


pin, and France that each should 


“have an obligation to take the 
measures necessary to insure the 
normal functioning and. utilization 
of rail, water, and road transport for 
movement of persons and goods” be- 


Berlin ‘Window’ 


German satellite government holds 
complete control over the eastern 
sector of Berlin as well as the east- 
ern zone of Germany, and has im- 
plied that it considers the occupa- 
tion of Berlin at an end. 

This would mean, if accepted, 
that the puppet regime of Vice- 
Premier Ulbricht could severely re- 
strict if not deny the right of Ameri- 
can, British, and French subjects to 
enter East Berlin. It could perhaps 
make.even more onerous or hazard- 
ous the conditions under which East 
Berliners thus far have gone back 
and forth to West Berlin. 

Such developments would be seri- 
ous in that they would begin to close 


the window..through which Western 


visitors get a glimpse of life in one 
section of a city under Soviet’ con- 
trol and through which the victims 
of that control get a small glimpse 
of the advantages which accrue from 
a connection with the free world. 
The West, at whatever probable 
cost, must not allow this window 


| Scottish 
| plied, “Well, we canna. They'll just hae to 


| others broke 
| Kyles are newcomers here and they've 
| done an unco bit already. We mustna be 


| thinned out. 


| pleasant 
| Jeremy Stair, the village “dominie,” got 
| the schélars enthused into making “bonny 
| things” for the tree. For the gifts, a col- 
| lection was taken and 


a 


, 


W r 


‘ Ww -™ 
»WSteel,” said my friend, that's 


| trol. 


Christmas Eve 


On a Scottish Island 


By Mabel Grey Gehring 


“I wish we could do something about 
it, Aggie Aird,” sighed Mrs. Munn of the 
island sweetie shop. Aggie re- 


face up to the disappointment.” 
The doorbell jangled and a young girl 


| entered whom they addressed with affec- 


tion as. “Annie.” She queried, laughingly, 
“Why so solemn?” 
“There's to be a Christmas tree over on 


| Kirma Vey. The bairns here have been 


hearing o’t and they want one too.” 

Annie became thoughtful. “! 
Aren't we having one shipped in?” 

he Town Council voted ‘no’—said it 

would cost owerly. Some o them say we 
oughtna cut doon a tree—that we havna 
too many in Scotland.” 

“Plenty in Drumwiddrie wood, but of 
course, they’re deciduous.” 

“Aye,..the.only. evergreens hereabouts 


know. 


' are on Craigielea estate.” 


“Craigielea! There’s a thought. I’m sure 
Lady Kyle would be glad to...” The 
in, hastily, “Oh no. The 


gruppy.” 

“Well, we could ask Euan Carr. He 
might know of a good substitute. Why, 
there he is now,” The Craigielea head gar- 
dener was striding along the water front 
so Annie dashed out and across to speak 
with him. She was back in a few minutes, 
gleeful. “He says only yesterday he was 
inspecting the firs and they'll have to be 
If Lady Kyle consents, the 
Guild can have one.” Then, with a mis- 
chievous grin, “Now we'll have. another 
chance at matchmaking. Ellen Hardie~is 
staying until after the hotidays.” 

News of the forthcoming event caused 
anticipation, especially when 


an order sent to 
Glasgow. 

The following weeks Were full of fine 
activity. There was the tree to haul down. 
There were presents to wrap, cakes and 


| biscuits to bake, paper sacks to fill with 
| fruit. and sweets—one for each child to 
_ take home. There was the Town Hall to 
| deck with holly. There were long tables 


to cover with white. All morning of the 


| day before Christmas the volunteers were 


coming. and going and happy greetings 
were exchanged. 

Four o'clock came and with it 
both children and grownups. 
expectancy was in the air. 


came 
A thrilled 
Annie and 


John Gowdie were known to have 
trimmed the tree, but for dramatic effect 
they had drawn the curtains in front of 
the platform on which it stood. At a cer- 
tain signal these would be pulled aside. 
in the meantime, there was carol singing 
and there were games. 


Then came the meal. That was over and 
the dishes were being cleared away when 
they first heard a sound with which 
they were all familiar—the prolonged 
note from the lighthouse on Ghillie Glas. 
Mrs. Munn whispered, “Maybe we'd bet- 
ter show the tree now—divert attention 
from the fog.” 

Annie whispered back, “But what about 
our plan?” (Dugal Shaw, the blacksmith, 
had been invited to reach packages from 
the high branches. These he was to give to 
Elien Hardie, who in turn would hand 
them to the guests. Working together in 
this way, it was hoped, would get them 


on a “chatty basis.” Miss Hardie was a .. ie 
| Eisenhower, stepped from a sailing vessel 


businesswoman, having an extended va- 
cation on the island and was well liked.) 
Mrs. Munn went on uneasily, “We canna 
wait for them. Can't you and John take 
over?” 

“Of course, 
acquainted.” 

She...wasmistaken,however. 
moment, the two of whom she spoke 
were already on a “chatty basis.” Both 
had seen through the kindly maneuver: 
both had been rather embarrassed about 
attending the party, and both therefore 
had been slow in getting started. As the 
‘smith walked past the jetty he was hailed 
by the boatman, Gavin Geddes. “Duggal, 
ye’re needed for a repair job. Trawler 
stuck on Taunby Swirls. Here are some 
of the crew.” 

Dugal addressed three shivering figures. 
“Come and get warm by the smiddy fire, 
lads.” Then to Ellen, who had just 
emerged from the mist, “Miss Hardie, will 
ye tell them yonder why I canna serve?” 
She replied, “I'm thinking I'd be better 
serving here nor there, myself. These 
men need something hot. Where could | 
make it for them?” 

Dugal answered promptly, “My place is 
right up the stair from the forge. The 
kitchen maybe needs a bit redding up, 


but—now they won't get 


At-Ahat 


but we have to get these strangers warmed | 


and fed.” 

They all tramped back to the smiddy. 
For two of them self-consciousness had 
vanished. Each was engrossed in giving 
assistance to others and in doing so each 
was agreeably aware of having found a 
congenial friend. 


ee ae Sk cer NE SE TO ee ot Se ee ee en fe ae 
Keep Your Eye on Steel. 


+, Se 


Registered ie 0. 6. Petent 


‘An Intimate Message from Washington, 


_ By Richard L. Strout 


ASHINGTON 


tleneck.” 

We were standing on the deep tufted 
Statler Hotel carpet, raising our voices 
against the deep throated murmur that a 


cians in five minutes than a month's read- 
ing of learned journals. Tables waited 
white and resplendent and the annual 
meeting of the National Planning Asso- 
ciation was about to start. Unconsciously 
we were shouting. 

My friend repeated “steel” and added— 
“This thing is serious.” He is one of the 
most trusted experts of an official eco- 
nomic agency in Washington and our ac~- 


-quaintance. is not of yesterday. 


So I began reading up on steel. This is 
what I have found: 

The United States is in the midst of 
prosperity such as no land ever knew 
before. It has teamed a span of horses, 
production and consumption, which are 
galloping in unison. The trick for the 


“anxious driver is to keep the horses even, 


Four times now the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem has applied the antiinflation brakes 
of higher discount rates to maintain con- 
The driver's job isn’t.made any 
easier by the passengers behind yelling 
“Faster, faster!” 


Americans have the money to buy goods 


and are going inte debt to buy more, 
prompted by skillful advertising. The in- 
debtedness is not serious in relation to the 
expansion of production, but if the ex- 
pansion should slow there could be unem- 
ployment, and who would pay Lafe 
Wyzler’s monthly installment then for the 
new Chevrolet with no yellow envelope 
on Fridays? Much depends on keeping 
production and consumption in balance. 
And so... there is steel and, to an 
almost equgl extent, copper, aluminum, 
and nickel. Flames on the Monongahela 
burn day and night. Domestic steel pro- 


| duction is running, and has run, at 99 per 


i 
pegEe eet 
r alah 


. 
i 


were not a “bureaucrat” dedicated to pu 
lie service—and prebably the thing 
straighten itself out all right. But it is 
job to watch. 

If consumption exceeds production, 


. frantic competitors bid prices up in ine 
rising, 


fiation. Steel prices are already 
Competitors are even now straining to 
accumulate inventories before prices 
higher and it is possible that before long 
some congressman may discover what is 
going on and will investigate. But in- 
vestigations don’t produce steel. 

Here are quotations from recent tech- 
nical journals. Business Week: “ ... We 
are crowding the economy's capacity. ... 
The system as a whole can’t expand any 
faster than the vital, basic industries, lke 
the metals. ...” 

Iron Age: “More production cutbacks 
due to steel shortages are on the way.... 
Backlogs (on machine tools) are well past 
the six months point... for the (fabri- 
cating) industry range from eight months 
to a full year. ... Mill production is sold 
out for the first six months of 1956. ... 
It’s only a matter of time before steel 
producers get the bad news on price 
boosts that will affect all major 
products.” | 

“Steel,” said my 


friend, “is the bot- 
tleneck.” . 


hower heritage .. 
| typically American as anything 1-knew, 


| @s 


The Reader Writes 


International Trade 
To THe CurisTiaAn Science Montrror: 

In view of your keen interest in our 
foreign ecommeree, 1 desire to bring you 
up te date regarding the progress of my 
bill, H. R. 5301. As you know, this legis- 


| lation calls for the establishment of an 
| “International 


Trade Commission” to 
promote the development in the United 
States of international trade centers, trade 
fairs and expositions to serve as bases for 
the rapid expansion of trade between the 
United States and friendly countries. 
One repeated suggestion was that the 
act should also include. the commission's 
supervision of governmental activities 
abroad, such as the proposed United States 
participation in the Universal and Inter- 
national Exposition at Brussels in 1958, 
and the President's present program for 


our government's showing in the various 
f ‘International trade fairs through- 


ore 
out the world. H. Res. 237 was intended 
to give this angle more extended study. 
This summer, I was abroad in the in- 
terests of the Appropriations Committee 
of the House of Representatives, and was 
afforded the opportunity of visiting the 
Turkish International Trade Fair at Izmir 
(Smyrna). I also spent an entire day with 


officials of the Overseas Fair Center 


(Mostra d’Oltremare) in Naples which is | 


as fine a permanent exposition as any in 
the world. The only other installation 


which may equal it is the Canadian Expo- | 


sition in Toronto. 

My trip further emphasized our great 
need for a governmental agency such as 
the “International Trade Commission” to 
effectively promote such international 
trade media, and to set such standards of 
accomplishment as will win us the respect 
of the world in this field. 


Washington Danrew J. Fioop, M. C, 


Bible as Literature 

To Tue Curistian Science Monitor: 
The recent reprint in your “Mirror of 
World Opinion,” regarding the King 


James Bible studied as literature in our |. 


public schools, was excellent. Our King 
James Bible contains the greatest litera- 
ture ever written. The most powerful, the 
most beautiful, the most inspiring literary 
devices ever used are found within the 
pages of this world’s best seller. Our 
schools no longer can afford to be with- 
out its literary treasures. Eni Nanver 
Portland, Ore. 


| security? 
' These are conventional, surface desires. 
| Satisfy them all and the universal yearn- 
| ing, the deeper dissatisfactions still exist, 


‘Everybody, Grown a Little Taller’ 


(Speech delivered by Dr. Robert L. 
Johnson, president of Temple University, 
on the occasion of the Dedication and Un- 
veiling Service of the Historical Marker 
at the Eisenhower Ancestral Home, Eliza- 


| bethville, Pennsylvania.) 


We are met on a site that marks an im- 
portant stage in the development of an 


| American heritage. It is a heritage not of 
| accumulated wealth, nor social position, 
| nor intellectual genius. What was planted 


in this beautiful valley of the Susquehanna 
long ago was the seed of a family line 


| which in its flowering perpetuated a name 
| to represent to 
times the best hopes of mankind. >: 


the world in troubled 


The first of the family line, Nicholas 


in the Port of Philadelphia one day in 
1741. He had a son Peter, who in turn had 
a son Frederick. Frederick was the father 
of Jacob F. Eisenhower who, with his 
wife, Rebecca Mather, was to establish the 
family-in this pleasant valley, build the 


| ancestral home where we are gathered, 


and become the grandfather of the 34th 


President of the United States. ... 


As I said in the beginning, the Eisen- 
. is not unique. It is as 


The only thing unusual about it is that it 
has been used so well by so many for the 
benefit of so many others. Yet that-heri- 
tage by itself does not explain all that we 
know about these brothers. 

What, for instance, is the ingredient, 
and where did it come from that produced 
a leader sO beloved at home and abroad 
Dwight D. Eisenhower? ... What is 
the -magical element in a man that can 
draw trustingly to him other men of many 
minds, contrary interests, varied fortunes, 
diverse backgrounds, and contrasting 


| temperaments? I asked myself that ques- 


tion just a month ago on that cheerless 


| Saturday that gave to the country the 
| news that the President was seriously ill. 


Never have I seen such genuine out- 
pouring of concern and good will for any 
public figure. It came from all levels of 
society—big people and little people, Dem- 
ocrats and Republicans, the poor and the 
prosperous, the cynical and the sentimen- 
tal, the godless and the devout. ... 

What is it that can do this to people? I 
asked. Is it the profundity of a man's 
knowledge? the sureness of his judgment? 
his organizational ability? the eloquence 
of his utterances? I have known men hav- 
ing all these qualities in varying combina- 
tions and degrees but without the slightest 
ability to command the respect and af- 
fection of people in the mass. 

I have been thinking it over for a long 
time. I think I have the answer. 

“What is it that everybody wants more 
than anything else? Is it money? health? 
No, he only thinks he does. 


What everybody wants fundamentally is 
to establish identity with what I may 
call, for lack of a better term, the spirit 
of man. 

What I mean isthis. We can be sur- 
rounded by family, friends, and neighbors 
and be as lonely as a hermit. ... A men 
may be known to hundreds, yet be known 
by none. The ego, the psyche, whatever it 
is that is the real person is held apart 
from that element in everybody else. It is 


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comes along with those rare personal gifts 
that enable him to penetrate the barri- 
cades. His présence melts the walls. He 
has an uncommon power of understanding 
and of making others feel they are un- 
derstood. Such a man is Dwight D, 
Eisenhower. 


Like every man who has ever had per-. 


sonal contact with the President, I have 
felt that power and seen it in action. The 
instances I am thinking of are little, un- 
important, everyday episodes, but they 
are examples of the power that Khrush- 
chev felt at Geneva, the power that 
prompted Bulganin to say: “Your Presi- 
dgnt we can talk to. We trust him.” That's 
one proposition, anyway, on which the 
Russians can get a majority vote from the 
American people any time. 

A man who is a world figure and an- 


+ other who is not known beyond the street 


where he lives have a common quality for 
Mr. Eisenhower. They are both people. To 
him, everybody is important. 

That quality was apparent so many 


times two years later in Chicago where 


Nie was nominated for the presidency. 
Early one morning he was walking briskly 
through the lobby of the Conrad Hilton 
Hotel with two or three aides. Not many 
people were about yet, but a young GI 
with a camera spotted him and tried to 
get a picture. Because the General was 
walking fast, the youth could not quite 
get the focus. As Mr. Eisenhower was 
about to pass, the boy reached out impul- 
sively and touched his sleeve. “Please, 
Sir,” he said, “could you wait just a 
second?” 

One man in the party tried to brush off 
the young soldier. 

“You have only ten minutes to make 
your appointment,” he said to Mr. Eisen- 
hower as the General paused. “That's all 
right.” the boss said. “This won't take 
long.” He reached for the GI's camera 
and looked at it. Passing it to another of 
his attendants, he said, “Do you know how 
to work this thing? Get over there and 
take a picture of both of us—this soldier 
and me together.” The picture taken, he 
said to the boy, “Thanks, son, and good 
luck,” and went his busy way. 

Somewhere in America there is a young 
man who will never forget that act of 
kindness, and the picture of himself 


gtanding alongside the General of the 


Army will always be his most prized 
possession. : 


Some of Mr. Eisenhower's political foes 


have spoken of such incidents as play- 
acting. Well, the old-timers in Abilene 
will tell you that whatever it is, it isn't 


was that of Ike Eisenhower. That's 
way it’s always been. 


Thinking of it that way, I guess that's 


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