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* 


AN INTERNATIONAL 


DAILY NEWSPAPER 


VOLUME 48 NO. 254 


RIGHT 1956 BY 
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING SOCIETY 


os 


BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


** ATLANTIC EDITION 


FIVE CENTS A COPY 


‘Suez Enters New Phase 


By Henry S. Hayward 


Chief of the London News Bureau of The Christian Science Monitor 


Lendon 


With the ending of the 18-power London conference on the Suez crisis several important 


points have been clarified. 


One is that the dispute is entering a new phase, a phase of further negotiation with Presi- 


dent Nasser—somehow. 


Another problem now is certain to be referred to the United Nations in the near future. 


A third factor is that there is something less than complete accord among 18 nations, par- 
ticularly among the French, for the new Suez Canal Users’ Association (now called SCUA) 
which the London parley declared its intent to establish before it adjourned Sept. 21. 


French Foreign Minister Christian Pineau in a surprise move said he could not adhere to 


the declaration at the outset, thereby at least temporarily sundering Western Big Three | 


unity on the SCUA. 


His complaint was that the document is not str 


fees to the association rather than to Egypt. 


French criticism is believed to be a last-ditch stand for the original strong British-Frenc 


viewpoint which now has 
been sharply modified by 
conference developments. 


Membership in Doubt 


Meanwhile, the first organi- 


zational meeting of the SCUA 


is scheduled to be held here 
Oct. 1, It may not be known 
until then how many of. the 


18 are willing to adhere to the | 


new agreement. 

United States Secretary 
State John Foster Dulies, how- 
ever, committed the United 
States to membership immedi- 


io ~ately..So.did- Selwyn. .Lioyd. for 


Britain. 


American, German, and Ital- | 


cL 


| 


. 
ict enough in forcing payment of canal | 


. , 
Stevenson Opens 


Farm Belt Foray 


By the Associated Press 


expected 
present a detailed outline of 
his farm program for this 
speech and he is also said te 
be prepared to hit hard at the 
agricultural policies of the 
Eisenhower administration in 
the struggle between Demo- 
crats and Republicans for the 


h' important farm belt vote. 


' 


| LOE 
¥ 
a 4 ~ 
‘ 
‘ 


of | 


ian ships still are paying canal | 
dues to Egypt—doubtless a fac-| 


tor in the French complaint — 
but Mr. Dulles indicated he 
would take steps to see that 
American shipping in the near 
future commences to pay dues to 
the SCUA. 

Following the conference the 
British spokesman stated, “In 
the view of the British Govern- 
ment the time 


a 


is rapidly ap- | 


proaching when recourse should | 


be had to the United Nations.” 
The 18 nations agreed in the 


final announcement that UN re- | 


Mayflower II Revives Past 


course should be sought “when- 
ever it seems that this would 
facilitate a. settlement.” 

Opinion here is that this step 
‘will be taken in October soon 
after the SCUA is established 
and operating. 


' 


In the long final session of | 
conference most delegations de- | 
clined to commit themselves to | 
the SCUA without consulting | 


their governments. 

[The French Cabinet has de- 
cided to go ahead and partici- 
pate in a Suez Canal Users’ As- 
sociation, the Associated Press 
reported from Paris. Sept. 22.j 


Two Documents 
The parley produced 


United Press 


Mayflower II Adheres to Authentic Tooling and Techniques 


By John Allan May 


Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 
backing, from private individu- “And I jolly well will.” He sent 


Brixham, England 
Mayflower II was launched at 


| eight o’clock this morning in the 
Devon fishing port of Brixham. 


The ship, replica of the May- 
flower that carried the Pilgrims 


| to America 336 years ago, was 


two 'ed one of Britain’s decorations 


launched by Reis L. Leming, 
former American airman award- 


documents. One accepted unani-/ for acts of gallantry, the George 


mously was a general 


state-'| Medal, for saving 22 persons in 


ment. It referred to the un-/ the Norfolk floods of 1953. 


successful Menzies mission to! 


The Mayflower, a gift from 


Cairo and regretted Egypt did) the people of Britain to the peo- 
not accept the 18-power pro-| ple of the United States, is not a 


posal 
_counterpro ls. 

It reiterated confidence 
the August proposal but termed 
the Egyptian proposal of Sept. 
10 “too imprecise to afford a 
useful basis for discussion.” It 
announced establishment of the 
SCUA and the likelihood of UN 
recourse. 

It added that the 18 nations 
will. continue to consult and 


geek. peaceful solution “in con-. 


formity with the principles of 
justice and international law” 
and the UN Charter. 

The second document, ac- 
cepted on the spot only by 
Britain and the United States, 
was the SCUA declaration. 

Its membership can include 
any of 18 powers; others who 
wish to adhere and whose ships 
use the canal to the extent of 
1,000,000 net tons a year or 
whose trade through the canal 
is 50 per cent of its total trade 
(a- restriction which rules out, 
for example, the Soviet Union), 
or others eligible when and if 
membership requirements are 
reduced later (an apparent 
escape clause by which the 
Soviet Union or other nations 
might be admitted). 


Role Outlined 


not mandatory. It will have 
power to receive dues and fees 
and hold disputed money in trust 
and pay Egypt a fair share. It 
will note “any significant devel- 
opments affecting use or nonuse 
of the canal.” 

It will assist in practical prob- 
lems if the canal fails to serve 
its purpose and will study means 


to reduce dependence on the | to the Maldive Islands southwest 
of Ceylon to sail in the great 


Suez waterway. 
And it will facilitate any pro- 
visional UN solution. 


council of members with an 
executive group and administra- 
tor, 
The Suez moves have become 
ae a Dulles show in two 
mdon emergency conferences 
and he has earned acclaim from 


he “British and several others 


for the “masterful manner in 
-which he has picked his way 
through the thicket of conflict- 
ing interests.” 
Jt is pointed out he had to bal- 
_ance strong Anglo-French opin- 
ions on the one side with the 
need to retain support from the 
Afro-Asian nations unwilling to 
bring direct military or economic 
' pressure on Egypt. 


Arab Big Three chiefs meet: 


~~ a 


Inside 
Reading: 

Crime Probing 
Not Pleasant Job 
Page 2 


% 
t 
a) 
is? 
ae 
parks ; 
, 
Fai Sy 
a 2 
a 
* 4 . . . 
? me » = A ® ; ’ 


of Aug. 23 or make) model, not an«a 


|maintain the lines and ways of 
To do all this it will form a/| Elizabethan time. He says that 


‘ = S i : 
el nck lSeeartpidah oan’ nema ts CNPP RURe REND Pa AN as SR Sth RITES 5 gray NN BIRR Ree LH ON La 


| landmark for all time. 


imation, 


sn | not a sham but the feal thing. 


She has been buijlt like the 
original, of similar great oaks, to 
a similar design, With similar 
tools and similar skill. Even the 
ropes are of soft l7th century 


| cordage. 


‘Radio Sole Modern Gear 


She is to be sailed by Britons 
to the United States next spring 
with no modern gear except the 
now compulsory radio—an ad- 
venture with only one exact 
parallel—a dramatic symbol of a 
common heritage and an unde- 


feated friendship. 

The Mayflower probably. will | 
arrive at Plymouth, Mass., on 
May 30 next year after a voy-| 
age lasting two months. Then, | 
having “shown the flag” in. vari- 
ous northern American ports, | 
including New York, the May- | 
flower is to be formally handed 
over to Plimoth Plantation, Inc.., 
in November and thereafter is to 
lie at Plymouth as a historic 


Captain on the voyage is to 
be Alan Villiers, Australian | 
mariner who has devoted his | 


He says, happily, that the | 


“grim.” He is a former Cape} 
Horn sailor, and he is the only 
person aboard who has any 
actual idea of how the ship will 
sail. For nobody else in the 
world has sailed such Eliza- 
bethan galleons. The West said 
good-by to them 300 years ago, 

Captain Villiers, however, has 
recently made a special voyage 


Maldive galleons. These. still 


at sea they are “grim.” 

From -the point of view of 
safety and even of comfort, how- 
ever, this trip in 1957 will be an 
improvement on that of 1620. 
This Mayflower is a sound, new | 
vessel. The first Mayflower prob-| 


‘ably had’ been ‘around for 60 | 


years before she was chartered | 
by the Pilgrims, and she was) 
broken up four years later, This 
Mayfiower’s crew will have the 
advantage .of a knowledge of 
Atlantic winds and currents that 
the first could not have. This 
Mayflower will carry probably 
but 40 people. The first carried 
some 102 Pilgrims, 


Gesture of Friendship 
But, although haps more 
comfortable, Mayflower II is in 
every other way authentic, 
It was this authenticity, de- 
manded by the o tor of the 
project, Warwick lIton, that 


made the whole thing seem so | farmer’ 


unlikely when he first proposed 

it in 1946, = 
Mr. Charlton, a professional 
who had 


. eee : : se _. 
Sly te Nr Mh pret oR 
— ry ~~ re , ** 
. set } 


any backing. When he got 


als like Randolph Churchill and 
Felix Fenton and from thou- 
sands of members of the public 
and from industrial firms, he was 
told he would never get a de- 
signer. Plimoth Plantation, Inc., 
offered him the plans and serv- 
ices of William A. Baker, of 
Hingham, Mass., who already 
was planning a reconstruction 
for them. 

Having obtained a designer, 
Mr. Chariton was told he never 
would get a builder. It was said 
that no one in this country (or 
indeed in any other) knew how 
to build an authentic Elizabethan 
galleon. When Mrs. Stuart Up- 
ham, wife of a Brixham ship- 
builder saw this statement in 
print in a magazine, she showed 
it to her husband and retired to 
wait for the explosion. 

“T can,so build it!” Mr. Upham 
said, or words to that effect. 


a telegram to Mr. Charlton say- 
ing that Brixham shipwrights 


certainly could build such a | 


vessel. 

Adzes, shipwright’s axes with 
curved shafts, have done most 
of the work on the great timbers. 
The tree for the main beam 
when felled was 116 cubic feet. 
When worked there were 60 
cubic feet left. The oak that 
made the keel is exactly as old 
as the firm of Uphams—130 
years. 

The masts 


have come from 


Canada, because no tall timbers|we have a _ candidate against 


now grow in Great Britain. The 
flax sails come from Scotland. 
The British rope industry has 
provided special soft cordage as 
a gift. Navigational instruments 
of the period have been supplied 
by Kelvin & Hughes, Ltd., one 
of the most ancient marine in- 
strument firms in the world. 


Eisenhower Campaign Lifted - 


Moines 

President Eisenhower’s mount- 
ing campaign for reelection 
suddenly soared to an impres- 
sive peak here as he concluded 
a barnstorming tour in the na- 
tion’s Farm Belt before a roar- 
ing, record crowd in Des Moines. 
The spectacular demonstra- 
tion for Mr, Eisenhower, ac- 
cording to veteran White 
House correspondents, probably 
matched in enthusiasm, if not 
in numbers of people, anything 
he has experienced since he be- 
came a presidential candidate 
in 1952, 

A comparison has yet to be 
made between Mr, Eisenhower's 
warm reception, unexampled 
for any person or event here 
as far as anyone remembers, 
and the welcome to be ac- 
corded Mr. Stevenson. It now 
is the Democratic candidate's 
turn, following Mr. Eisenhower 
to speak at the National Plow- 
ing Association contests at Col- 
fax, near Newton, east of here. 


By Max K. Gilstrap 
Chief of the Central News Bureau of The Christian Science Monitor 


The Eisenhower magic of ap- 
peal on an estimated 75,000 tra- 
ditionally reserved lowans put a 
noisy, optimistic climax to his 
farm visit that is expected to 
bolster his supporters across the 
nation as nothing else has in the 
present campaign. 

The President had already 
been reassured that Iowans who 
gave him a victory of landslide 
proportions in 1952 still “like 
Ike”—however they may vote in 
1956. An estimated 100,000 peo- 
ple had cheered him along the 
roads and in towns as he took 
Mrs. Eisenhower on a visit to 
Boone, where she was born. At 
the plowing contests at Colfax a 
crowd of 80,000 somewhat taci- 
tur farmers was on hand to 
hear him, in a rolling hill setting 
resembling a Grant Wood paint- 
ing. 

But as the President continued 
his trip and neared his final 


stop at Des Moines, he appeared 
to sense something unusual in 
the growing crowds. He became 
more animated as he stood in his 
specially built car. He waved 
more. He beckoned Mrs. Eisen- 
hower to stand with him as they 
reached the center of the city. 
Here shouting, waving lowans 
surged’ forward, leaving a hnar- 
row lane for the slow-moving 
motorcade, while confetti and 
streamers showered down. from 
windows above. It was Broad- 
way in miniature. 


Eisenhowers Buoyed 


At the airport, Mr, Eisenhow- 
er, flushed with pleasure, told 
assembled Republican leaders, 
precinct workers, and a special! 
group of weekly-newspaper edi- 
tors: “Mrs. Eisennower and I 
witnessed a turnout that we 
have certainly never scen in a 


Massachusetts is in the 
process of becoming the only 
state ever to return to Wash- 
ington a congressman who has 
served a jail term while in 
office. 

Oddly. it is not at all certain 
that even the voters of Repre- 
| sentative Thomas J, Lane’s dis- 
trict know exactly why and 
how this is being accomplished. 

If you were to ask the 25,812 
‘voters why they chose in the 
Democratic primary a man who 
had been released from prison 


| four-month term for evasion of 
| $38,542 in income taxes, most 
|of them probably would reply: 
'“Why, it is because we like 
Tommy.” 


Opposition Split 

| Jf you were to ask the 34,- 
010 (the majority of those who 
\voted) who split their votes 
among four other primary elec- 
ition - candidates, the average 
| probably would respond: “Lane 
‘was a sure thing from the start 
| because we did not unite on one 
opposition candidate.” 

| And almost any Republican 
‘would admit dejectedly; “Yes, 


Lane in the November election, 
but he is not strong and this 
district has been overwhelming- 
ly Democratic for decades. Lane 
will win despite the jail sen- 
tence.” . 

There is, of course, the remote 
possibility that Congress would 
refuse to seat Mr. Lane, but it 


13 days earlier after serving a} 


By Courtney R. Sheldon 


New England Editor of The Christian Science Monito 


SEE ae . — . 
otetut 

Tews / 
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iin] 
Source | ‘Paw hr 4 
. J 


, A 

at ' 
“2 . 

Sroesra.o/ ‘1 > | 

. waren TON . 

WE Ne a — 

\ ~~ 

Daavtas . 

; Sev raw, -_ 

; 


. 


ne a at, lt ¥  *. 
Russell H. Lenz, Chief Cartographer 


Gerrymandered Seventh 


Massachusetts Republicans 
had no idea in 1941 when they 
further concentrated Demo- 
cratic areas in the seventh 
congressional district that they 
were depriving themselves of 
an opportunity to gain a con- 
gressional seat in 1956. The 
strung-out shape of the dis- 
trict also makes it difficult 
for a newcomer challenger of 
either party te make himself 
known. 


is little discussed in New Eng- 
land and not taken seriously 
when it is. 

The story of the Lane en- 
trenchment is not wholly that of 


> 


By Nate White 


US. Displays Economic Sinews 


Business and Financial Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


Sinews of the United States’ economic strength 


are not in hiding. 


If ever a nation functioned in the full glare of 
the world spotlight it is the United States. Every 
economic fact about the country is quickly re- 
criticized. The man in the 
street is liable to mention the GNP, It’s now a 
television must for politicians to talk about the 
GNP (see footnote). The economic system 
subject to the fastest reporting, the most care- 
ful checking and evaluating ever devised. 

It simply is not possible for the United States 
to function economically ‘in the dark. 

This being the case, what are the economic 
career to sail. Captain Villiers | sinews? Why all this talk about rising prices, 


sees this Mayflower command credit restraint, inflation, and marginal eco- 
‘as the greatest achievement of | 


his career. 
The SCUA is voluntary and | 
will make services available but | 


ported, analyzed, 


nomic areas? 
The sinews are these: 


: An industrial system which is so strong that 
actual voyage is likely to be | it doesn’t know how to rein itself in. 

A demand for products so strong that the:in- 
dustrial system is forced to expand to provide 


them. 


A labor force so fully employed that additional 
workers must continually come into being to keep 


it supplied. 


A consumer willingness to spend, but to spend 
to save by the purchase of houses and capital 


goods on payment systems. 


An income which continues to rise. 
A confidence in itself and its way of doing 


things. 


These sinews are exercised daily by the United 
States atop a plateau far above the dead level 
of economic subsistence. It is a plateau of plenty. 

When discussions of econdmic problems occur 
they center on problems which occur on this 

lateau— at the highest economic . level the 
nited States has ever reached. On this high 
plateau, economic problems became problems of 
degree and not necessarily problems of basic 


Boston 
since then. 


lion dollars. 
is 


farmer and the 


United States. 


last December, a rise in June, and a subsidence 


Net farm income, however, is not as disturb- 
ing as the indices would say. Told in terms of 
1955 dollar prices, net farm income In 1939 was 
1.584 billion dollars. In 1950 it was 2.688 billion 
dollars. In 1953 it was 2.557 billions, last year 
2.336 billions, and for the first two quarters of 
this year it was averaging out above 2.3 bil- 


When politicians discuss the farm problem, and 
newspapermen write about farm unrest and dis- 
content the subject is very real, both to the 


commentator. It may have deep 


political meaning. But the Communist world .can 
take cold comfort in a farm economy operating 
ata plateau such as that which exists in the 


It’s a matter of degree. 
The stock market is another case in point. 


Those who watch the market from day to day 
get into a habit of worrying about what certain | 
stocks. did that day. But where are the Dow- 
Jones averages? They are up there on that pla- 


teau, hovering between the high 480’s and 500. 


stock prices 44 


Last year at this time they were hovering con- 
siderably lower. The SEC composite index put | 


points above a year ago for the 


week ending Sept. 14, 116.8 points above 1954, 
and 155.3 points above 1953. 


Economic Indicators 
This is a high market and changes in the mar- 


ket are at an altitude or plateau which is breath- 


dicates that the 


taking. Of course, it is only a plateau to those 
who started in the market several years ago. The 
new investor must bide his time. The record in- 


long-range trend is always up. 


The United States’ economic gain has beep on a 
path rolling gently upward and forward since 
1950. The Consumer’s disposable income has 
steadily but gently moved upward. So have his 
savings and his expenditures, : 

The GNP has moved in a similar direction, 


‘always gently upward and forward. 


Trend of the Economy 


to the Korean 


An unemployed person represents a problem 
of basic magnitude to himself. But in a nation 
of 66.8 million employed persons and unemploy- 
ment of 2.9 million the problem quickly becomes 


one of economic degree. 


Of course, a farmer could argue that he had not 
yet climbed up to the plateau, that he was still 
plowing furrows in a valley considerably below 
the peak. Nevertheless, even the farmer is on 


the economic plateau. 


The index of farmer's prices—the prices he re- 
ceives for his goods—usually starts with an even 
1910-1914. In the year 1939, the 
index was 95—below. the 1910-1914 
ia period 


moved up. 


of 


Corporate profits, dividend payments, a 
distributed profits—reflecting the changes due j tongel, is similar in some aspects | 


and un- 


war and changes in corporate 


tax rates—have made some abrupt shifts, but 
since 1953 the trend has been sharply upward. 
Expenditures for new plant and equipment have 
moved gently upward until a tiny valley was 
reached last year. Since then the ascent from 
this gentle dip has been sharp and bold. This is 
a key sinew in the economy of today. 
Hourly earnings, 


weekly earnings have 


The chart world is jagged in spots. Housing 
ha set a disturbing variation—but even this 
variation is at a plateau level, Total nonfarm 
houses begun in 1949 numbered 1.025 million. 
They jumped to 1.127 million in 1952 and 1.328 
million last year. The rate this year is about 
1.1 million. New credi 
this OB gnc upward in 

year. 


may change 


t 
1957 and the remainder 


These are the economic indicators of the United 


States. are the work of 
Bocacht it Weeithate’ hocinke 


’ 


Committee of 
indicators come from all of the 


the President's 
for 
Congress. 


States Government. 


up there on that plateau. 
the sum of all goods and 


ia as 


voter indifference to or rejection 
\of standards which. customarily 
| apply throughout most of the 
rest of the United States, It be- 
\gins back in 1942 when Mr. Lane 
_became heir to the seat held by 
ithe Connery brothers, William 
|and Lawrence, since 1923, 


Gerrymander Switch 

In the Connery era, the sev- 

enth district had been certain 
‘Democratic, but in 1941 the Re- 
\publicans who controlled the 
state government  redistricted 
.and made the district even more 
| Democratic than before,- They 
|took out four Republican towns, 
in the net, and added areas 
which normally voted Demo- 
| cratic, 
The GOP regarded the seventh 
‘district as too Democratic to 
reclaim. They felt they could use 
‘some of the Republican wotes 
| then in the seventh to better ad- 
|\vantage by shifting them to 
‘neighboring districts. In like 
| manner, nearby Democratic 
areas were shifted into the 
seventh. 

This standard political ma- 
neuver is better known as gerry- 
/mandering, having derived its 
name from Governor Gerry of 
Massachusetts whose Legislature 
carved out in 1812 the dragon- 
like contour of the sixth district, 
a-next door neighbor of the 
seventh. 
| The minority Republicans left 
in the seventh have long re- 


‘signed themselves to Democratic , 


city anywhere near this size be- 


2 | Lane Aided by Gerrymander 


= 
; 


for he represents a dis- 
trict whose mills and factories 
have not always enjoyed . the 
prosperity of adjoining areas. 

Gerrymandering and_ split- 
vote factors aside,:Mr. Lane’s 
triumph is directly attributable 
to the political climate of the 
seventh district. The suggestion 
that there was something in- 
discreet about mentioning Mr. 
Lane’s jail record took root 
firmly. 

Most of his opponents were 
afraid of the so-called “sym- 
pathy vote” for Mr;Lane; After 
all, it was argued, the man has 
served his sentence, why perse- 
cute him further? Who likes to 
pay taxes, anyway? 

In neighboring Boston, 
Boston Herald (R) raised 
voice trying to reverse 
pointedly raising the question 
of whether lawmakers should 
be recruited from among those 
who had broken the law. This 
editorial . was reprinted by 
some of the candidates. 

One of Mr. Lane’s opponents, 
Pasquale Caggiano, did hit him 
quite hard on the jail issue. By 
so doing, he tended to unite the 
many voters of Irish . back- 
ground behind Mr. Lane. There 
is hard political 
between the Italians and the 
Irish in the Lawrence area of 
the district, the most populous. 
The Irish vote is dominant, 


the 
its 


this, 


Decisive Factor 

The cohesiveness of Irish 
voters is still often a decisive 
political factor despite the dim- 
ming of memories of the days 
when the Irish first came to 
New England shores and turned 
to government and politics _for 
careers when they were coldly 
shut out of other avenues for 
advancement. The Irish feel they 
have good reason to be sympa- 
thetic wiih the underdog. 

The “sympathy vote” aspect 
and “vindication by the voters” 
have been common enough in 
Massachusetts politics to arouse 
both local and national comment 
from time to time. Former 
Mayor James Michael] Curley of 
Boston had two. convictions on 
his record, but seemed, in the 
over-all, to have suffered little 
loss of popularity as a direct re- 
sult. 

This contrasts directly with 
elsewhere in the United States 
where former Representative J. 
Parnell Thomas (R) of New Jer- 
sey, was defeated in a primary 
after beMfg jailed for payroll 
padding and accepting kick- 
backs; Representative Ernest K. 
Bramblett (R) of California 
avoided the issue by not at- 
tempting reelection after being 
convicted for accepting salary 
kickbacks; and former Repre- 
sentative Andrew J. May de- 
clined to seek reelection after 
being convicted of wartime 
fraud. 

Mr. Lane only found it nec- 
essary to give up his salary for 
the period he was in jail. His 


staff carried on his duties—and | 


his campaign—for him. 


competition | 


By Giant Des Moines Turnout 


fore in our lives. We are deepl¥ 
grateful.” 

The . effect of this kind of 
Eisenhower campaigning, in 
which his prestige as President, 
his personal popularity, and in- 
formal, off-the-cuff chats are 
substituted for the usual major 
campaign addresses has yet to 
be tested at the polls in Novem- 
ber. 

In spite of the rousing re- 
sponse in Des Moines, the effect 
was not all, by any means, on 
te credit side of the GOP can- 
didate’s political ledger. In a 
state which prides itself as the 

‘“Mation’s farm capital, many 
anxious farmers, caught in the 
cost-price squeeze, thought Mr. 
Eisenhower should have dealt 
with the farm -problem-in 4 
major address here rather than 
later at Peoria, I]., on Sept. 25. 
They said so emphatically. They 
said further that they would 
lend a sympathetic ear to what 
Mr. Stevenson would have to 
Say. 

T . > = 

“Nonpolitical’ Haymaking 

Other farmers thought the 
President was entirely proper in 

choosing to avoid politics. at his 
major appearance at the plowing 
contests, where the tone is cus- 
tomarily nonpolitical, 

. There can be no doubt that 
Mr. Eisenhower enlarged his 

audience of sympathetic listen- 
ers among members of both par- 
ties and among the independents 


\In his frank opening statement 


admission at Colfax that, though 


‘the farmers might find it diffi- 


cult to believe, he had not come 
to make a political speech, 

scarcely anyone present. how- 
ever, doubted that. despite Mr. 
Eisenhower’s intention. political 
advantage could accrue from his 
reverent mention of the plow 
as a symbolic instrument of 
‘peace and his reference to the 
Biblical passage in Micah: “And 
they shall beat their swords into 
| plowshares.” 


Need to Vote Stressed 


This political advantage could 
be won by his expressed interest 
in the need for soil conservation, 
impressed upon him by Dr. Mil- 
ton S. Eisenhower, his younger 
brother. It could be gained by 
his identification of himself with 
his audience with referénée fo 
his boyhood farm experience. 
However, some his listeners 
took friendly technical excep- 
tion to his including their Mid- 
west farm country part of 
the Great Plains region of Kan- 
Sas, where he was raised. 

Mr, Eisenhower, obviously, 
made most of whatever political 
hay he accomplished here by 
just being “Ike,” by ingratiating 
[himself every moment shaking 
i|hands with long lines of “preési- 
dential guests,” presenting 
‘awards to sun-bronzed plow 
champions: visiting exhibit 
booths in the tents of Conserva- 
tion City raised for the occasion, 
in complimenting the musical 
contribution of the bands, and in 
, thanking “Miss Furrow Queen” 
for the bouquet of red roses she 
presented to. Mrs. Eisenhower. 
At the airport Mr. Eisenhower, 
in the presence of Gov. Leo 
Hoegh (R) and Senator Bourke 
B. Hickenlooper (R) of Towa, 
said laughingly that he couldn’t 
stand being nonpolitical any 
more, 
lowa Poll Noted 

He then reviewed some of the 
things he had told the GOP 
party rally recently at his 
Gettysburg home, emphasizing 
the need for getting all Ameri- 
cans out io yote. 

No one will know until No- 
vember what Mr. Eisenhower’s 
tremendous reception here will 
mean in votes. A recent Iowa 
poll showed him well ahead of 
Mr. Stevenson in . popularity 
among all Iowans, but somewhat 
behind Mr. Stevenson in the - 
preference of the farmers. 

While pleasing many, Mr. Eis- 
enhower certainly didn’t answer 
the hopes of some, including the 
Des Moines Register, which said 
bluntly that agriculture is in 
trouble and that Iowa would 
welcome some new imaginative 
thinking by both Mr, Eisenhower 
and Mr, Stevenson on how to 
adjust farm production and to 
protect farm income. 

Eisenhower speech excerpts: 

Page 4. 


Ol 


asd 


Democrat has entered the Re- 
publican primaries (as Mr. Lane 
did in 1942 and 1954) and 
walked away with both nomina- 
tions, , | 


Likened to South 
|... This_ situation, as the. Bost: 
Herald pointed out in an edi- | 


to the Democratic - dominated | 
South. The primary is all im- | 
portant. 

But Massachusetts does not 
have a second primary election 
or runoff between the two high- 
est candidates in the first pri- 
mary. as is done throughout most 
of the South. 

If the seventh district had 
had a runoff primary, it is pos- 
sible that Mr. Lane would have 
succumbed to a united opposi- 
tion. 

The reason there would be no 
certainty even of this, once 
again dates back more than a 
decade. Once in Congress, Mr. 


gressmen in Washington. 
Mr, Lane is adamant in in- 

| i that he has “built up a 
of working assiduously 

on behalf of my constituents.” 


|\dominance, and occasionally a/| 


School Integration 


+ 


_ Blocked in Virginia 


The World's Day 


National: Assembly Passes Governor’s Plan 
The Virginia General Assembly has passed Gov. Thomas B. Stan- 


The triah ef persons alleged to 


viet plane equipped with 
vo. = 


ley’s entire package of legislation to block mixing of the races 
in any public schoo] of the state. 


Europe: Poznan Trial Slated to Begin Sept. 27 


have taken part in the Poznan 


“We want bread” riots on June 28 will begin Sept. 27. Number 
of accused has been reduced from 323 to 154. 


New England: Kennedy Set to Aid Stevenson 


Adlai E, Stevenson's campaign manager, James A. Finnegan, has 
announced the appointment of Robert F. Kennedy, chief coun- 
sel of the Senate Permanent Investigations Subcommittee, as 
a special assistant. Mr. Kennedy is a brother of Senator John 
F. Kennedy (D) of Massachusetts. 


Arctic: Soyiet Plane Rescues Five From Glacier 


Five natural scientists, lost almost a week on an Arctic glacier in 
the desolate Spitzbergen archipelago, were rescued by a So- 
skis, Th 


e men—two Swedes, one 


. 


Art, Music, Theater: Pages 10 


and 11, TV, Radio, FM 


= 


o - te Pat Se 


_THE CHRISTIAN ‘SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER: 2, 1956 


— Many Walls Block Probe" 


ae 


Crime Commission Hainnere! 


By Frederick W. Roevekamp 
Steg Writer of ney general. 

The Christian Science Monitor it failed. Twice the courts 

There is little doubt that the | threw out the grand jury in- 

Massachusetts Crime Commis- | dictments against seven leading 

sion has set itself one of the most | police officials, including the 

difficult, most unpleasant, and, | then Boston police commission- 
some say, most necessary tasks er and his superintendent. 
waiting to be tackled in this | Indictment Quashed 


state. In both cases, the indictments 


This task is to determine the | . 
_ | charging conspiracy to permit 
scope and entrenchment of or oming ware  queshed mr 


ong on oe gambling, the de: | sroutids other than the actual 
has failed to cope with it, and to merit of the charges. ‘The first 
explore the possible remedies. 

It may be the last opportunity 
in many years to break the grip 
organized crime is believed to 
have in many. areas on govern- 
ment and law enforcement. 

The last such chance was back | 
in 1943. It was a bold probe car- 


iried on by a reform-bent attor- 


Last of a Series on Crime 
Commission Probe 


‘batch of indictments was 
quashed because of the pres- 


son” in the grand jury room. 


When the grand jury re- 
indicted the seven, the indict- | 
ment against the police com- 
‘missioner was quashed on the 
ground that his official duty | 
iwas not to enforce the law. 
‘His duties, the court ruled, | 
iwere only those imposed on the 
‘Boston Board of Aldermen in 
1821. Thus, it was concluded, | 
he could not be tried for neg- 
lecting a duty which he never 
possessed. 

As a result of these rulings, | 
the attorney general withdrew 
the indictments against the 
other six officials. Sometime 
afterward he committed § sui-' 
cide, 


Mission 33235 


ence of an “unauthorized per- | 


Since then, no similar broad 
hte «a has been made. 
Massachusetts was not. visited 
by the Senator Estes Kefau- 
ver’s Senate Crime Committee 
in 1950 for reasons not fully 
explained. 

Meanwhile, crime experts es- 
timate that anywhere from 
10,000 to 50,000 persons — di- 
rectly profit from horse and 
dog betting operated by crimi- 
nal syndicates in this state. 
Total annual turnover of the 
gambling rackets has been con- 
servatively estimated at $150,- 
000,000 in the state. 

In the pursuit of its task to 


get to the bottom of the prob- |. 


lem. the crime commission 


makes few friends. 
Double Difficulty 
On the one hand, it faces the 


large part of the public which 
‘knows little about gambling 


land is little concerned because 


it does not see excessive vio- 
‘lence and gangland warfare. 
'That such violence is found 
primarily 


control of criminal syndicates 


in areas where the. 


is shifting rather than firmly | * Po 


established may not be gen- 


erally understood. 


On the other hand, there are | 
| the wide circles that 


| 


regularly and habitually in il- 
legal gambling at private fairs 
and clubs and, above § ail, 


through the thousands of book- 


Chandler s 


Tremont and West Streets, Boston 


* 


= -» 


mn” 


. 


New purchase and 


‘ > & 
, 


At V3 off their 
_usuel prices 


ne 


< 
Fh 


You may budget 
your purchase 


PRICE 
13.95 
22.95 
34.00 
59.00 

219.00 


2'x3’ 
2’x4’ 


mats usually 22.95 

Hemeadens usually 36.95 

3’x5’ Kerajeahs usually 54.95 

4’x7’ Hamadans usually 89.00 
91’x11'5” Heriz usually 339.00 

Many other Orientals at ‘3 off 


All sizes on Oriental Rugs ore approximate 


CHANDLER'S RUGS—EIGHTH FLOOR 


| 


i 


; 


| 


' 
| 
; 


| 


Mission's 


far between. 


-given the- Massachusetts 
for the current year and an ad- 
'ditional total of $27,000 during 
ithe preceding two years. 


/countants, 
| gators. 


poses. 


ies and emplovees of the 
number pool and race-betting 
| syndicates that crowd so many 
cities and towns. 

Among these latter persons, 


gambling, whether at the legal-_ 
| ized race tracks or at the corner 
| store 
‘considered a 


bookie and horseroom, is 
“harmiess” diver- 
'sion hampered only by 


| critical’ ’ laws. 
' 


Chilly Reception 
In addition to a public either 


unconcerned or hostile, the com- 
_mission is confronted by an atti- 
tude of considerable coolness 


among 
cies, This is because the oom- 
very existence 


purpose casts doubts on the effi- 


'ciency of these agencies in gen- 
eral. 


Nor is there any large, solid 
block of crime commission sup- 
| porters in the Legislature. Last 
‘year most legislators appeared 


ready to put the commission to a | 


quiet end after starving it out 
of funds for two years. 
Only a vigorous newspaper 


'campaign contrasting the extent 


of apparent organized crime 


| with indifference of the Legisla- 


It 
year 


ture saved the commission. 
was revived for another 
with a larger appropriation. 

Crime commissions set up by 
legislatures have been few and | 
In recent years, 
such commissions have func- | 


tioned with varying degrees of 
success in New York, California, 


and Illinois, in. addition to the 
federal crime probe under Sen- 
ator Kefauver. 

But there is considerable dif- 


ference in resources as well as 


specific task between the New 


-York State Crime Commission | 


and the Bay State commission, | 
for instance. 


New York Comparison 
The New York commission 


carried out a three-year investi- 
‘gation of the New York water 
‘front with a total of $969,367 in 


state appropriations. 


Personnel-wise, the contrasts 
are similar. The New York com- 
mission had a staff of 43 investi- 
gators, including lawyers, city 
detectives, state policemen, ac- 
and special investi- 


The Bay State commission has 
only 11 men for all these pur-. 
These include the chief 


A 


Harvey Berin does the blouson 


The long slender line of a sheath, broken just below the woist, 
softly bloused above a leather contour belt. Harvey Berin interprets this 
fashion news in imported striped wool, gives it great eclat with a black 
silk bow and braiding. Black-gray. 10 to 16. 89.95. From our new collection 
by this designer, fourth floor and Chestnut Hill. 


law-enforcement agen-| pac 


indulge | 


Lyman W. Fisher, Staff Photographer 


Wrecked Freighter Etrusco May Be Floated Any Day 


Depending on the height of 


possible that this Italian vessel——blown ashore 
on the rocks of Cedar Point, near the harbor 
entrance at Scituate, Mass., during a blizzard 
on March 16—may be floated during the extra 
high tides which will prevail during the next 


the tides, it is two weeks. Bulldozers have been working dur- 
ing lo wtides on both sides of the Etrusco clear- 
ing away rocks to allow space for the swing of 
the bow to sea. Using its own winches attached 
to anchors, the ship will pull itself out to sea, 


it is hoped. 


| counsel, Thomas J. McArdk, a 


' 


‘relatively 


full-time investigator, seven | 


“hypo- | State Police troopers, one part-/|sistently defeated. 


time investigator averaging 10 | 
hours a week, and one special | 
assistant. 

While the New York water- 
front probe’ centered on a 
smal! 
area, the Bay State commission 
to investigate the entire 


‘commonwealth. 


and | 


iwas able 


’ 


The Kefauver crime commit- 
tee, with its 150 investigators, 
to draw on material 
collected over many years by 
various local crime committees. 
The Massachusetts commission 
has had little such material 
to start with. The previous 
érime commission in this state 
operated in the early 1930's. 


No Radio-TV Publicity 


Through radio and television, 
the Kefauver committee pre- 
sented directly to the public the 
picture of organized crime anc 
corruption emerging from its 


public hearings. 


citizenry over the heads of those | 


A special legislative statute 
| prevents the Bay State commis- 
‘sion from admitting radio and 
television to its public hearings. 

Thus it is deprived of its 
strongest potential weapon — 
the direct appeal to the 


‘in the political arena who may 


have reason to keep the public | : 


uninformed. 
There are those who say that | 


the commission's recent hearings | 
‘into the crime and police situ- | 


ation in the town of Wnhthrop | 
would have had far greater 


effect if the tiny courtroom audi- | 


ence of 16 had been expanded 
into one of virtually millions 
by means of radio and television 


| coverage. 
This compares with $100,000 | 


body | 


Pressure has been consider- 


able on the commission to ex- 
pose the “big names” in organ- 
ized crime as well as among 
law-enforcement officials sus- 


pected of graft. Undoubtedly if 
the commission could do such 


' 


| 


| the principal need in combating | 


! 


a thing, the demand for reform 
would be almost irresistible. 
Appointed by Legislature 
One factor often overlooked is 
that the commission is a legis- 
latively appointed body designed 


to explore the need for new. 


| legislation. 


On the other hand, it is gen- | 


erally agreed by observers that) 


organized crime is not addition- | 
al legislation but firmer en-_ 


forcement of existing laws. 


Except for occasional raids, 
‘few bookies are arrested in 


| Massachusetts and fewer éver 


‘readily paid by their 


‘Sunday mostly 
chance of showers. Temperature | 


'go to prison. Nominal fines are | 
“employ- | 
ers” and shortly afterward the 
defendants are “back in busi- 
ness.’ 

However, the commission has 
recommended legislation in the | 
past. 


nee 


Weather Predictions 


By U. 8. Weather Bureau 


| Cloudy, Showers Sunday 


All New England—cCloudy and 
warmer with showers tonight. 
cloudy with 


about the same as today. 


High Tides, Commonwealth Pier 
Sept. 23, 1:38 a.m., ht. 9.6 f 

Sept.. 23. 1:52 p.m. ht, 10.4 ft 
Sun Rises Sun Sets Moon Rises | 
6:32 a.m. 6:39 p.m. 8:22 p.m. | 


Events Scheduled ,, 


In Greater Boston. 


Monday 


Free public lecture on ey ag Selence | 
by J. Hamilton Lewis. C.5.. mbe 


in lation ar Advertising 


the chureh edifice, Chestnut 


mS .m, The blic ye cor- 
Thats ist » pu 


y 

blie rere on Christian Science 

alter 8. Symond S.3B.. & mem- 
ber of The Christian 
Hit Gatien at" chia 

st ure 

in the church edifice, ‘Ne = 
Great “Pisin Avenue, at 8 p.m. 
public is cordially, inv vited. 


A bill providing manda- | 


tory jail sentences for socknd|feterm, the findings of the crime 
offense bookies has been con- | commission, whatever they may | 
| be, will have to be followed up | 
| Another proposal by the com- | ‘by investigations by the state | 
mission to establish a crime in- | prosecutor and grand juries. 

‘formation bureau within the Whether this will happen de- 
State Police for the purpose of | pends largely on the contents of | 
keeping track of movements in/the report the commission will | 


geographical | the organized underworld has | issue next March and how this grades and ways. Our study of 


been voted into law. 'report is received by the public | 
_ Thus, to result in any r kind of | and the Legislature. 


aid Pittsfield Weig hs 


‘Classroom Aids 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor 

Pittsfield, Mass, (|Chest has been a dn ater 

Pittsfield has plans — via ss a for a number 

r part in the cation of 

fhe south re we Yet the activities lack the 
The city’s residents, its indus- vital ingredient of coordination 
tries, businesses and organiza- | that would maximize their edu- 
tions, its geography and its his- meen cate pgs ’ Dr. Russell 
Rg ge il ee gy Ow is much duplication of effort, 


ni i 
the classrooms and textbooks, |8"d much that is good remains 
inaccessible to many, if not 


The program for “getting the . 
most out of the city and into | ™°st of our teachers.” 
the pupil” has been outlined by Cataloguing Proposed 
Dr. Edward J. Russell, superin-| Dr. Russell proposed a 
tendent of schools. igram involving the following 
Dr. Russell called it “the uti- | points: 
lization of the people and the; 1. A catalogue of the resi- 
socio-economic environment.../| dents of Pittsfield and nearby 
as educational resources for the | Berkshire County who can serve 
classroom teachers.” \effectively as resource people 
The superintendent has sug-| in the classroom. 
gested to principals and teachers | 9 Techniques for utilizing 
that “intensive work and major | resource people in the classroom. 
3. A catalogue of farms, face 


consideration” be given to the 
curriculum area involving live- ‘tories, and business establishe 


use of the city and its residents | ments suitable for field trips. 

to complement textbooks and | | 4 A catalogue of anvanan 

discussion. |mental institutions and agencies 
Coordination Seen Need he saa for field trips. 


5. A catalogue of voluntary 

Although much has been ac- jnstitutions and agencies suit- 
complished along that line in able for field trips. 
recent years, through a number| 6, Techniques for conducting 
of independent approaches, there | successful field trips at various 
has been no coordinated treat- | grade levels. 
ment, Dr. Russell said. 7. A geography of Pittsfield 
“Our teachers have utilized and Berkshire County perhaps 
field trips as an educational \written in alternate forms suite 
tool for decades in all grades,” |able for various grade levels. 
he said. “We have made fre- 8. A history of Pittsfield also 
quent use of resource people | | Perhaps written in alternate 
from the community, working | ee er various grade levels. 
them into the classes as instruc- | brochure on Pittsfield 
tional aides for a variety of pur- teniy wie special reference’ to 
poses: We are accumulating a governmental and socio-eco« 
‘file of color slides of the eco- nomic phases. This, too, should 
‘nomic life of our community. | probab y be prepared in altere 
| “We are devoting a good deal ‘nate forms for various grade 
‘of attention to the history and _ levels. 
|geography of the region. Our 10. Suggested grade place- 
_municipal government receives ment for activities and projects 
consideration in a number of relating to the utilization of the 
‘people and the socio-economic 
environment of Pittsfield as in- 
structional resources, 


voluntary community organi- 
/zations through the Community 


Kennedy Raps GOP on Foreign Policy 


~ —_ <a iti, ie i eel eta te 


Around New England 


re 


By the Associated Press 


Los Angeles 

Senator John F. Kennedy (D) of Massachusetts says the Re- 
publican administration’s assumption that United States foreign 
policy is concerned- merely with anticommunism has enabled 
the Soviets to exploit growing Asian-African nationalism. 

Senator Kennedy told a World Affairs Council luncheon yes- 
terday the East-West struggle is not “directly or indirectly in- 
volved” in the Suez, Cyprus, Israel, and French North Africa 
issues, where “the leadership of the West and the maintenance 
of peace are threatened most seriously.” 


In all but the case of Israel, he said, the conflict is an out- 
growth of the Asian-African revolution of nationalism—‘“the 
revolt against colonialism and the determination of people to 
control their national destinies.” 


“Tied too blindly and too closely to. the policies of England, 
France, and other colonial powers,” he said, “we have permit- 
ted the Soviets to falsely pose as the world’s anticolonialism 
leader, and we have appeared in the eyes of millions of key 
uncommitted people to have abandoned our proud traditions 
of self-determination and independence.” 

Senator Kennedy said .Democratic administrations since 
World War II also have been remiss in comprehending the 
nature of this revolution. ; 

“We cannot afford in 1956 to alter unwisely the conduct or 


course of our foreign policy for purposes of political campaign 
strategy,” he added, 


O'Keefe Resumes Brink Testimony 


By ac Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


Boston 

Joseph J. (“Specs”) O’Keefe resumed the stand in the Brink’s 
robbery trial today in an extraordinary Saturday session 
ordered by Superior Court Judge Felix Forte in an effort to 
speed the sessions, which already have consumed seven weeks. 

Cross-examination of O’Keefe was continued by Paul T. 
Smith, chief counsel for the eight men accused of the robbery. 
Yesterday’s cross-examination had not shaken O’Keefe’s story 
of at least 27 preliminary surveys which he and others made of 
the Brink’s establishment prior to the robbery. 

The witness said that members of the gang “ran into many 
men in various parts of the building, but not in the Brink's area.” 


—_— 


Kilpatrick Sees Stiff GOP Race 


By the Assoctated Press 
Providence, R.I. 

Gen. John Reed Kilpatrick, national chairman of the Citizens 
for Eisenhower-Nixon, says the path to election will be harder 
for President Eisenhower in 1956 than it was for Géneral 
Eisenhower in 1952. 

General Kilpatrick told an interviewer he is “deeply con- 
cerned about the (election) situation. We’re in a real fight. 
Neither the Republicans nor the Citizens can let up. We must 


= our efforts because the Democrats are working very 
ard.’ 


siaiaaciaal eee ee 
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GOP Relieved 


mi 
- 
Ameena on, 


By Richard L. Strout 

Staff Corre t of | 
The Christian Science Monitor 

. Washington 
The subject of living costs has 
become politically hot. With a 
sigh of relief Republican leaders 
learned that the cost of living 
<< for August had declined 
0.2 per cent. There is a general 
expectation that it will start up 
again in the fall and winter, but 
there are authorities in this field 
who think that in longep per- | 
spective the rising curve isflat- ally protected by trade unions) 


tening out, can buy more goods and services 


This is the first decline in | from his pay check than in any 
seven months. The price index | previous * August. 


now stands at 116.8, using the | ; 
1947-1949 prices as 100 per cent. | When President gg pte 
The July figure was 117. This |*°Ok office in January, 1068, the 
Jeaves the current figure the sec- | &g 


ond highest in history. ; 
The slight reduction was due | pore to buy what $1 bought 


to a seasonal decline in fresh ; s 
fruit and vegetable prices which | A oe in. Living costs 
comes every fall. The decline) bi go chile >, this ay. Se 
was somewhat greater than the |} 48 (CaP ae per cent oo 
long-term rise in most other | /flation still remains a threat 
"omy and services which has rm a of the slight August re- 
et uction. 

The advance in prices of fin.|, The Federal Reserve Board 
ished goods and services has has increased its interest-dis- 
been obscured by the decline in | Count rate six times in the past 


Living Costs 


Sag in August 
yy W4e7 


| 113.9. It now takes 2 or 3 cents) 


Ay 


runs counter to the Federal Re- 
serve Board’s antiinflation 
“hard money” policy. The Fed- 
eral Reserve System is an inde- 
pendent agency, outside politics. 
A home buyer with a $25,000 
mortgage whose interest rate is 
boosted from 4 to 5 per cent has 
to pay $3,240 more over the 20 
years. Compared to 1,330,000 
‘housing “starts” a month last 
year, the present figure is about 
/ 1,100,000, The building indus- 
‘try has become increasingly 
alarmed. 
| ‘Stable Dollar’ 
| The Eisenhower administra- 
| tion has made a talking point of 


‘the “stable dollar.” President 


farm prices. Stiffening farm 


; ‘age ; on help- | 
prices this year have been help harder to get. 


ing to send the whole index up. 
Political Implications 
Factory workers’ take-home 
pay rose to a new all-time high 


level during the month, ac- 
cording to Dr. Ewan Clague, 
Commissioner of Labor Statis- 
tics, who released the figures 
here. The average factory work- 
er with family of three had a 
weekly take-home pay check of 
$73.06 in August or six cents a 
week higher than the average 


the situation are two-fold. 
Higher cost of living is dis- | er’s pay check “has been eaten | were raided at the same time. 


others to borrow money; it in+|M. Butler (R) of 


17 months as a brake on spend- | ~" ¢ ; 
ing by making loans and credit | Eisenhower hailed “prosperity 
with general price stability.” 

The political implications of | At San Francisco, .the GOP 


iconvention declared the work- 


agreeable to consumers, away by rising taxes and soaring 
Second, the “hard money”! prices.” The sudden rise of liv- 

remedy adopted to combat in-|ing costs has been politically 

flation makes it harder for cattle | embarrassing. 

men, farmers, home owners, and| As an example, Senator John 

Maryland, 

creases bankruptcies of small’ running for reelection, recently 


business and also the cost of car-| omitted frém a prepared speech 


rying the national debt. The lat-| here a statement that the ad- 
ter item alone has risen between | ministration’s inflation policy 


By Leslie Warren 
Special Corresponden 
The Christian Science mn 


are foes of the present govern- 
ment, especially of Vice-Presi- 
dent Joao, (Jango) Goulart. Re- 
cently Tribuna charged Sen- 
hor Goulart with having re- 
ceived funds from the former 
Argentine dictator, Juan D. 
Perén, to help finance the Var- 
gas presidential campaign of 
1950, and the Lacerda .“mani- 
festo” called upon Brazilians to 
“put Jango in jail.” 

The furor stirred by the po- 
'lice raid on the Lacerda paper 
has not, except-from a few 
sources of the same political 


Monitor 
Rio de Janeiro 

The.issue of press freedom has 
developed into a major stir in 
Brazil and brought the goveftn- 
ment under heavy fire. 

Cause of the storm was recent 
police interference with one of 
Rio de Janeiro’s noisiest daily 
newspapers, Tribuna .da Im- 
prensa. Generally intemperate 
and at times an outright advo- 
cate of goverment overthrow, 
Tribuna was. invaded by ma- 
chine-gun-carrying special po-| stripe, been so much a defense 
lice who confiscated one day’s | of Senhor Lacerda as a criticism 
tdition and caused the paper to| of the methods used against 
skip the next. him. Even the progovernment 


Although top Justice Ministry | conservative Correio da Manha | 


officials were obviously caught) termed the police act an attack 
by surprise, Police Chief Gen.|on press freedom, citing the 
Augusto Magessi Pereira took) Constitution and press law 
full responsibility for the action.| which forbid government action 
(Federal District police are re- | directly or indirectly interfering 
sponsible directly to the Army) with free circulation of periodi- 
and War Ministry, headed by) cals or causing them financial 


Gen. Henrique Teixeira Lott.) 

General Magessi said he 
sued his orders on learning that 
the newspaper was running a 


rector, Carlos Lacerda, on the 


second anniversary of the sui-. 


cide of former President Vargas, 


is- | 


| prejudice. 
Constitution Cited 


After catching its breath, the 
“manifesto” from its absent di- | 


government produced an opin- 


lon by the Attorney General de- 
fending the Police Chief's right 


‘to act by virtue of Article 141 


calling for another “houseclean-| 4¢ «6 Constitution, which states 


ing.” General Magessi said he} , 
considered the manifesto clearly | ‘"* neither war propaganda 


law to regulate Brazil’s press 
unlikely, Even government leg- 
islative leaders have expressed 
disa val of the proposal. The 
adm tion had reportedly 
been working on a law intended 
to “make newspapers more re- 
sponsible,” 

The Tribuna episode high- 
lights. problems in Brazil and 
elsewhere in Latin America of 
maintai press freedom. The 
average orth American in- 
istinctively condemns any action 
which suggests press  inter- 
ference. But in Latin America, 
where revolutionaries use the 
press to achieve their ends, 


where much of the press is ir-| 


responsible, the issues are not so 
uncomplicated. 


Strong Language Used 
Take the case of Tribuna da 


Imprensa. Although the paper | 


‘and its director, Senhor Lacer- | “"* \ 
United States editor from using, | 


da, are holders of a United 
\States Maria Moors 
|'Award for Action on Behalf of 
Press Freedom in the Americas, 
they often use strange language 
for defenders of democratic 
‘ideals. Before last October’s 
‘presidential balloting, Tribunal 
called for suspension of elections 


}'on the grounds they would be 


influential Sao Paulo paper, | 


which also ran the manifesto, | °° will be tolerated. 


This explanation has not sat- 
isfied critics, who point to dis- 
Lacerda in Portugal crepancies in constitutional pro- 
Senhor Lacerda, whose attacks visions and to the apparent 


.on the Vargas regime were in-| freedom allowed police authori- 
| strumental in causing the former | ties to act as judge and prose- 
| dictator’s downfall and guicide,| cutor in matters of subversion. (Goulart, with arms traffic across 


: 


for July. 

This figure also has a political 
implication comforting to Re- 
publicans. It means that the | 
average factory worker (gener- | 

| The administration has now 


Is this ae soap from ‘stepped in to ease mortgage 
Belgium worth $] a cake? ‘credit terms. Various federal 


agencies lending to home buyers 

° |have all acted at once. 
We think it is. You'll think so too Political implications are in- 
after you read this I-minute story dicated in the fact that the news 
, announcement came from the 
eed Our sin | White House itself rather than 
drawn and dry? from the agencies, as is cus- 

| tomary. 

os sen in = In some respects the admin- 
your face only | istration’s easier credit policy 


$600,000,000 and $1,000,000,000 
because of higher interest rates, 
Building Money Eased 
High interest rates have 
alarmed the building industry. 


has “increased the purchasing 
power of the dollar for every 
man and-woman in Maryland.” 
His Democratic opponent is fea- 
turing the issue. 

Democratic candidate Adlai 
E. Stevenson has also attacked 
| current high level living costs. 

Republicans, in turn, recall 
\inflation under the Democrats. 

The dollar stability under 
| President Eisenhower in 1953 
and 1954 was due in part to 


farm price decreases which 
counterbalanced rising prices 
for finished products, services, 
| and the like. As farm prices 


(have tended to stabilize, the | 


is in Portugal after a six-month | Even. . conservative. ..organs 
stay in the United States, where | have criticized the recent police 
he went last* November after! seizure of an edition of a Com- 
War Minister Lott led a military; munist magazine devoted to a 
movement to forestall a reported! summary of the idol-breaking 
coup which Senhor Lacerda and _20th Congress of the Soviet 
others had been calling for. | Communist Party. 

Senhor Lacerda and his paper 


This concerted opposition has! 


rigged anyway, urged a mil- 
'tary-headed “regime of emer- 
gency.” 


| Two weeks before the voting, | 


it published copies of a letter 
|purportedly linking the vice- 
|presidential candidate, Senhor 


the Argentine. border,.An. Army | 
investigator named by the then | 
| President, Joéo Cafe Filho, to} 


whose regime Tribuna was sym- 


Cabot | 


Senhor Goulart and Juscelino 
Kubitschek, Senhor Lacerda and 
his paper egged on militaty 
leaders to call off the results, 
worked openly for a “golpe” or 
coup. When a small-scale Air 
Force mutiny broke out before 
the Kubitschek government was 
two weeks old, Tribuna ‘ ran 
eulogies of the rebels, interviews 


supporting them, The paper has 
applied words like “traitor” to 
eneral Lott, “thief” to Vice- 
President Goulart, and “drunk” 
to the owner of a conservative 
rival paper. 
Lively Tradition 

But Tribuna da Imprensa is 
far from being alone among 
Brazilian newspapers in employ- 
ing language and issuing charges 
which a sense of fair play, re- 
spect for individuals, or fear of 
libel laws would prevent a 


| 


with disgruntled military brass | 


t 
‘h 
’ 


fiercely individualistic, . resent 
any infringement on their right 
to disagree. Often journalism is 
mere pamphleteering. 

Many newspapers exist solely 
to express political views of 
their owners or special groups. 
Latin difficulty in reconciling 
differences of opinion is reflected 
‘In the multiplicity of news- 
|} papers. Rio, with 2,500,000, has 
|15 daily newspapers. 

Laws setting out press rights 
nd regulations are often faulty, 
astily written to suit a new 
constitution that comes with a. 
‘new government. Sometimes, as 
in the present case in Brazil, 
they are contradictory, some- 


|times absurd. 


In the face of badly written 


legislation, libel laws are often 
‘ignored. Court processes, 


fur- 
thermore, are painfully slow. 


ws ENJOY 
y are so many Latin- | 
American papers and journals | BOSTON'S 


irresponsible? The reasons are 


‘various, POPULAR 


Organ 


pathetic, found the letter false, | 


and two accused forgers are now 
(in jail, 
Following the election won by 


Free - wheeling, screaming | 
journalism has a jong and lively | 


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He recently took a 
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Captain Equils said he first | 


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THE CHRISTIAN. SCIENCE. MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1956. 


By Stafford Derby 


ian of the New York News Burecu of 
hé Cheistian Science Monitor 


New York 
With the presidential 
senatorial contests stealing the 


full rays of the political spot<) 


light, the Republicans are seek- 
ing to give 
elections their proper share of 
this quadrennial illumination. 

First step toward this end 
was taken by Leonard W. Hall, 
chairman of the Republican Na- 
tional Committee, in opening 
the second series of political 
forums conducted by the Na- 
tional Republican Club in this 
city. 

Speaking to a dinner-meeting 
of the NRC on Sept. 20, the 
GOP chairman knew that his 
audience needed no persuasion 


as to the necessity for President’ 


Eisenhower (if reelected) to be 
supported by a Congress with 
a Republican majority. 


Records of Congress Cited 

His words, however, were di- 
rected to the electorate as a 
whole. His argument was based 
on the accomplishments of the 


Republican-controlled 83d Con- 
gress and the failures of the 
84th Congress which came under 
Democratic control in 1954. 

Mr. Hall’s premise was that 
there is a “major difference be- 
tween the two parties today: the 
Democrats like to boast about 
the things they will do for the 
people... The Republicans ° get..it 
done. It’s a difference between 
political talk and concrete 
achievement.” 

Looking back to the 83d Con- 
gress which came into being in 
the Eisenhower landslide of 
1952, the GOP chairman cited 


-_-— 


and 


the congressional 


‘as achievements: removal 


‘ternal revenue code, stabiliza-|- 
tion of the cost of living, re- 
vision of atomic energy laws, 
approval of the St. Lawrence 
Seaway project, and “reduced 
spending” which “set the stage 
for a balanced federal budget.” 


Democratic orators have used 
when seeking support for their 
‘congressional candidates is that 
“President Eisenhower needs a 
Democratic Congress to put 
‘across his program.” 


School Bill Delay Hit 
Mr. Hall recognized this, 
ferred to it, and proceeded to 


of |& > 
iprice and wage controls, con- 3% aS. 
‘structive revision of the in-| ~~ 


One of the arguments whigh | 


tak state has 43 seats in the House 
* | Few trials are in what nae 
- jbe properly termed debatable 


| Associated Press 


rée- | 


Leonard W. Hall 


discuss the school construction and get others to register and | 
bill as an example of “Demo-' 


” 


crat obstructionist tactics. 


Roughly these tactics were to 
“delay the bill a full year” 
after the White House Confer- 
ence on Education had made 
‘the views of expert educators 
clear: omitting “entirely . the 
factors the President had rec- 
ommended for making the out- 
right grants: to the _ states”; 
voting 215-to-9 against 
amendment which would have 
made the bill conform to the 
President's program, and finally 
coming up with a “school bill” 
that “was unacceptable to both 
parties.” 

Other failures 
Congress which Mr. Hall would 
place at the door of the Demo- 
crats were “killing proposed 
changes” in the McCarran- 


of 


an 


the 84th. 


Walter Immigration Act. to_lib-. 


eralize policies and delay in the 
final. passage of. the. soil-bank 
farm program bill. 

Like most GOP orators, Mr. 
Hall expounded on the need to 


avoid apathy and forsake com-| 


' placency, to get out themsel ve: es 


school 


every 


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AUSTRALIA 


vote 
‘Tireless Work’ Urged 


“We will have to work tire-| 


to make the next Con-| 
gress a Republican Congress. | 
Let us not underestimate the 
opposing party. 
and tough and despite 
they claim, well financed.” 
The congressional background 


lessly 


against which this occasion and | 


these words may be projected. 
is one which shows the Senate 
with the Democrats leading 49 
to 47 and in the House of 
Representatives with 231 t® 201. 

In New York state the con- 
gressional contests are featured 
by the one for the Senate seat 
being vacated by Democratic 
Senator Herbert H. Lehman. The 
senator has named 


cessor and the Democratic Party 
happily persuaded Mr. Wagner 
to make the race. 


Eyes on Senate Race 

Republicans have nominated 
Attorney ~« General Jacob K. 
Javits, a hard-hitting and inde- 
fatigable campaigner as their 
choice for the Senate. Mr, Javits 
has started a fast and furious 
campaign which will range from 
the sidewalks of this city to the 
north country near the Canadian 
border. 

Mayor Wagner has yet to get 
under way but enjoys the sub- 
stantial backing of the Demo- 
cratic organization which con- 
trols the city (half the state’s 
population) and the endorse- 
ment of Democratic Gov, Averell 
Harriman. Thus this race is one 


.to watch and should be close. 


On the congressional front the 


ee —_ 


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congressional. battles will be 
forthcoming from other NRC 
forums/ Daniel J, Riesner, presi- 
dent of the club, who introduced 
| Mr. Hall, is one of the promoters 
of these events and believes they 


should be useful on a national 


basis. 

“This phase of our-.program,” 
‘according to Mr. Riesner, “will 
‘show. how much solid support 
is needed behind the future Eis- 
enhower program ... when ad- 
ministration measures will be 
projected which can well set the 


for a yet~undreamed prosperity 
for the people of this country.” 

These torum-dinners will be 
weekly affairs until November. 
On Sept. 26 Rep. Richard M. 
Simpson of Pennsylvania, chair- 


man of the Republican Congres- | 


sional. Committee will be the 
speaker to be followed on Oct. 2 
by Senator Prescott Bush of 
‘Connecticut, chairman of the 
National 
Committee, 


Republican Platform | 


- 
. 


| Court Restrains 
NAACP in Texas 


By the Associated Press 


- running from 60 to 100 per | 
F jcent (a district where the GOP 
©’ |had no candidate). 


| the National--Association for 
the Advancement of Colored 
People out of busiftess in 
| Texas, 7 | : 

District Judge Otis T.. 
Dunagan of Smith County 
ordered the NAACP to stop all 
operations in Texas, to file no 
more school integration suits, 
and to collect no more money 
until a hearing Sept. 28 in 
Tyler. 

“We allege that the NAACP 
has exceeded the bounds of 
propriety and law and have 
asked that they not be al- 
lowed te operate in this 
state.” Attorney General John 
Ben Shepperd said in a state- 
ment. 

“I know many Texans will 
be stunned by the import of 
our evidence. I urge a calm 
and patient attitude,” he said. 

Gov. Allan Shivers, whe 
ealled out the Texak Rangers 
te stop recent racial dis- 
turbances at Mansfield High 
School, had neo comment. 

Dr. H. Boyd Hall, state 
NAACP president, said the 
Attorney General's move 
showed that Negroes’ in 
Texas were entering an era of 
persecution. He said he had 
anticipated the ban. 


' 


President 


Salutes 


Plow as Symbo 


By the Associated Press 


Newton, Iowa 

Following are key sections of 
President Eisenhower's rernarks- 
at the national plowing matches 
here and later at the Des Moines | 
airport: 

I wanted to come back here 
because in this great plains re- 
gion was where I was raised. | 
am quite sure that the boy who 
was raised on the city streets 
sees nothing particularly beau- 


tiful in the black of fresh-turned | 
soil. But anyone who was raised 


in the Mississippi valley does. 
Moreover, such a boy raised in 
the city would probably find 
nothing particularly to admire in 
a long straight furrow stretching 
out across a quarter section. But 
if he had—as I have—followed a 
walking plow when I was so 


'small that I had to reach up to 


the handle instead of down, he 
would know what it means to 
plow a straight furrow. 

Vhat I am trying to say to 
When I 


you, my friends, is this. 


come back to this great central | 


granary of the United States, I 
‘feel at home. And I have ex- 
actly the same feelings of home- 
coming that anybody does when 
he comes back to the scenes of 


his boyhood, the places where he | 


Was reared. 
Plow Symbol of Peace 

Then I wanted to come back 
today because this National 
Field Day this year is dedicat- 
ed particularly to soil conser- 
vation. I have a young brother 
who has spent his life in the 
study of soil in the universities 
j—the state universities of two 
great states—and he long ago 
converted me to the need for 
having an eye for preserving 
our heritage of soil and water | 
resources for the future. 
| | believe in it..thoroughly 
-and when I heard there was 
| going to be both contour and) 
+ straight plowing, I had an add- | 
|ed-reason for coming. And your 
officers have taken me through | 
‘a tent where they are showing | 
exactly how much feed it takes | 


,to the plow. Ever since I had 
the invitation to this meeting, I 
have been trying to think in my 

mind of some instrument in- 
vented by man that has meant 
/more to him than the plow. I 
}ean think of none. In fact, the | 
atest has become the sy mbol of | 


= “the Bible it says, tn trying | 


to talk about that wonderful 
future time: when there shall be 
|no war and we shall beat our 
swords into plowshares. 
Different Methods Now 

So the plow is a symbol of 
peace, as the sword is of war. 
And I think, therefore, that no 
group of American citizens can 
feel closer to peace, feel closer 
tc the need for peace, than does 
the great agricultural commu- 
nity. 

Finally, I came to pay my re- 
spects to the men and women 
who produce the food and fibers 
of. this United States. You use 
different methods than we used 
in western Kansas 50 or 


years ago when I was a boy. 


Great tractors have taken the | 


places. of 
mules... 

At the Des Moines airport: 

Governor Hoegh, Senator | 
Hickenlooper, and my fellow 
Americans: For the last couple 
‘of days I have been very non- 
political and I can’t stand it any 
more, and I turn over a new leaf 
right now. 

I come just from a trip 
through your city where Mrs. 
‘Eisenhower and I witnessed a 
turnout that we have certainly 
never seen in a city pore dion 
| near this size before in our loves 
We are deeply grateful. 
|- I have urged people going out 
‘in this political campaign that 
jare detailed on the team of) 
speechmakers to remember one 
| thing: They have a great. story 
to tell, in the simple unadorned 
truth. 


our horses and 


‘Good of 168 Million 
Government does not try to. 


more | 


of President's Program Backed — 


CARE Food Crusade Outlined 


By Harry C. Kenney 


Staff Correspondent or 
The Christian Science Monitor 


New York 
The 1956-57 CARE food cru-| 
‘sade is designed to support | 


President Eisenhower's program | . 


to promote international people- | 

| to-people contacts. ) 
Tais formula ~ for national | 

and worldwide action was issued | 


by Richard W. Reuter, exetu-_ 
tive director of CARE, at a 


United Nations Building. 


Mr. Reuter had just returned 
from a White House “people- 
to-people” meeting .of more 
than 100 American business, 
civic, educational, and other 
}leaders, whom. the President 
| urged to help devise “thousands 
‘of methods by which people 
|can gradually learn a bit more 
of each other” in order to “help 
| build the road to an enduring 

ace.’ 

Under CARE’s unique delivery 
' system, 5,000,000 packages of 
| United States farm surplus will 
be distributed to needy people 
in 19 countries as personal 
gifts from Americans. The 
'“people-to-people” factor is | 
emphasized by the fact that ' 
every package will bear the | 
name and address of the Amer- | 
ican donor who contributes ' 
CARE’s $1l-per-package han- ' 
dling and delivery costs. 

Mr, Reuter _illustrated...the: 
vast possibilities of “personal 
communication” by pointing out 
that every year Americans send 
330,000,000 nonbusiness letters 
overseas. Every week,  195,-' 
| 000,000 people in other lands! 
‘see American movies. At any 
| given time, there are 2,000,000 
Americans abroad, including 
‘members of the armed forces, 
igovernment employees,  busi- 
,/nessmen and their families, and 
| tourists. 

“Not everybody can produce 
a movie, or have international 
| business connections, or take a 
‘trip abroad, in order to give 
other peoples the opportunity 
‘to know us better,” he _ said. 
“But every American can join 
the CARE food crusade.” 

Abram G. Becker, assistant 
| executive director of CARE, | 
‘has just returned from an ex-| 
tensive trip to the Far East 
where he surveyed CARE oper- 
ations in Korea, Hong Kong, 
Vietnam, Laos, and the Philip- 
pines. He said: 

“Despite the time that has 
elapsed since the end of hos-| 
tilities in Korea, on the Chinese 
mainland, and in Vietnam, the | 
refugee victims of those wars 
are still in urgent need of 
food.” 

CARE hopes to distribute 
throughout the fall and winter 
300,000 in Hong Kong, and /| 
200,000 food packages in Korea, | 
150,000 in Vietnam. 

In addition to planning food 
relief, Mr. Becker laid the 
groundwork for expanding | 
CARE’s village aid and self- | 
/help programs, which provide 


Digging Spree Nets 
144,500 Useless | 
Wells for Peking « 


By the Associated Press 
Hong Kong 
By official count, Communist | 
China’s bureaucrats have sunk | 
144,500 useless water wells in| 
Shantung Province. 
Many of the wells have been 
-~ “thes ain with dirt. 
eking People’s Daily, 
release Communist Party pa- 
per, said the wells were sunk 
over a six-month period when 
party planners let the project) 
get out of hand. | 
The Shantung 
‘committee formulated a 


1956 | 


to produce a thousand pounds | pe “big brother knows better | Plan for the sinking of one) 


of beef to put on the city work- 
ers’ table. I have learned a lot. 
‘If I could stay longer I would | 
| learn much more. 

| And finally, my friends, 


LADIES— 
COATS 
SUITS 
FROCKS 


te weer 
with delight 
all the 

year round 


MOFFAT'S 
of Richmend 
298 ridge Rood 


| than you do.” No matter what | 
his problem, whether it be in| 
the field of power or the field of 


| believe that the closer you keep | 
| gov ernment to home where the) 
people who pay the taxes can | 
watch that money being spent, 
|with their desire to see it spent 
|efficiently and effectively and 
economically, that is the best 
| kind of government. 

.. My friends, as you well know, 
I was scheduled merely to bring 
you greetings. This I do from 


| the bottom of my heart. I thank 
| you for the cordiality to your | 


| welcome. I. thank you for what 
| you are doing now in this-criti- 
‘cal period of the election year, | 
‘making certain that you are | 
registered and ready to vote, 
making certain that your neigh- | 
bors are ready to vote... ., 

50, go to it. God bless you 
for coming out and giving Us | 
this warm greeting. All our} 
‘friends from Boone and from 
‘Des Moines and all over this 
state of lowa thank you very 


38 2588 | much indeed on behalf of Mrs. 
ue VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA I 


Eisenhower and me. 


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‘DUNEDIN ~ WANGANUI 


 } 


' 
j ~ aoe te ' - 
a eA pe eee Senet ; 
ordishg HUTT. 
: 
' 
. : 


‘million new wells. 
“Because by the first part of) 


_ this year agricultural cooperat- | 


: ivization was in the main com- j 


I | finance, or any other field, we pleted, the well-sinking . quota | 
_come today to pay my respects | 


was increased to two million, | | 
then to three million, and 
finally to five million for the | 
| entire province,” the paper said. | 
| By April, sowing of crops | 
should have begun, but many | 
areas did not have the man-| 
power for it. When spring sow- | 
ing should have reached the | 
busy stage, the leadership of 
all party committees still was | 
concentrated on well digging. | 
“Wells were sunk in areas 
where river water is available 
for irrigation, and such useless 
wells had to be filled later,” 
| says the paper. ““The more than 
/ 140,000 useless wells sunk in 


news conference held in the 


CARE 7 . 
DRINK OF MILK for little ern ‘Akhtar (f¥eat’ Teft), whe 


, winter, and spring, : | 
now face the worst food situa- 


| East Germany and other 
' lites. Most people, he said, come 


provincial | . 


£ 
A 
.) 


lives with his friends and brothers in the village of Alirazabad, 
West Pakistan, near Lahore. The milk is distributed by the 
CARE organization as part of a school-feeding program which 
eventually will reach 1,600,000 children from 5 to 14 years of 


age in East and West Pakistan, 


farm and vocational tools, sew-! not. only 


ing machines, 
ment. 
Richard S. Jessup, assistant 
executive dire®tor of CARE, 
also has returned from a visit 
to Europe and the Middle East. 
He worked at coordinating 
plans for the food crusade in 
West Germany and Yugoslavia, 


and other equip- 


| and other aid projects in Malta, 


Egypt, and Libya, West Ger- 
many (including Berlin) and 
Yugoslavia will be the recipi- 
ents of 500,000 special food 
packages each. 


Mr. Jessup found Yugoslavia | 


especially in need of help be- 
cause, as the result of a series 
of floods and storms last fall, 
“the people 


tion since the drought of 1951.” 
Mr. Jessup pointed out that 
for West Germany and Berlin, 


‘there is the problem of the con- 


tinued influx of refugees from 


satel- 


to West Germany with no more 


than the clothes on their backs. | 
CARE food packages provide | 


"CARE’s Crusade 
In Terms of Meals 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor 
New York 

What the CARE food cru- 
sade means in terms of meals 
on many tables: 

To prepare 5,000,000 CARE 
food crusade packages will re- 
= approximately 110,000,- 

0 pounds of United States 
pi aac products. Broken 
down into contents, is 
what those foods will mean 
for the world’s hungry 
peoples: 

Enough milk powder to 
make 129,486,680 quarts of 
milk; | 

Enough flour to bake 13,- 
$01,522 large loaves of bread, 
each loaf providing 18 average 


Enough cheese‘to make 178,- 
400,000. sandwiches; 

Enough rice to fill 405,600,- 

bowls; 

Enough beans for 59,681,420 
servings; 

Enough corn meal to make 
35,715,260 servings of cooked 
cereal, 


—- BB 


initial aid for them, 
but also the hope and courage 
to face the future and the un- 
derstanding that they have not 
been forgotten by the rest of 
the world. 


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| one area occupied about 1,200 
acres. The total manpower for 
| digging these wells and refilling 

the useless ones amounted to 
| 860,000 work days.” 


Identity Card Photo 
Just Confuses Issue 


By the Associated Press 


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The-time- may” have come for | 
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As Deputy’ Gilliland was 
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self, 

She studied the picture close- 
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THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE z MONITOR, BOSTON. ‘SATURDAY, chptainds 29, 1956 


~ Antarctica Viewed as Abode y 


By Robert C. Cowen 


Netural Science Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Sheffield, England 


: 


tica include teams from Britain, 


the United States, and the Soviet ln’ 


setting | 
at, Sir 


Union, They are alread 
up elaborate bases 


Don’t write off the frozen Pore dag said, make the rude 


Antarctic.continent just yet. 
Sir Raymond Priestley, presi- 


dent of the British Agsociation | 


for the Advancement of Science 
and a veteran Antarctic ex- 
plorer, says that icebound land 
mass could become the seventh 
habitable continent of the world. 

Sir Raymond. has had a good 
deal of experience with that re- 


mote part of the worid. In the. 


early years of this century, he 
took part in expeditions with 
Scott and Shackleton and had | 
kept in touch with Antarctic ad- 
venturing ever since. 

Reviewing the history of this | 


exploration at the BAAS annual | 


meeting here, Sir 

warned that long-range aircraft | 
and atomic weapons and power | 
have given Antarctica a new | 
strategic importance. No longer, | 
he said, can that continent be 
left to the expeditions of private 
individuals and natural science 
societies. In time of war, con- | 
trol of Antarctic could be vital. 
This, by itself, will be enough 
to keep national governments’ 
interests alive, he said. 

Extensive Preparations 


The extent of these national 
{interests can already be seen in 
extensive preparations being 
made now for the forthcoming 
International Geophysica| Year. 
This will be an 18-month period 
from July 1, 1957, to Dec. 31, 
1958, when the whole earth and 
its atmosphere will be studied 
exhaustively by 
- scientific teams. 


ts of his Antarctic days look 


like play cabins in the woods. 


What kinds of resources are 


-these teams likely to find? What 


possible value, besides its mili- | 


tary importance, could this re- 
mote and frozen land have for | 
the rest of the world? 

Sir Raymond remarked that | 
these are questions on which | 
“we still have too little to go 
upon for speculatign to cut much 


| ice.”” But he let his imagination 


‘are definitely 


ride and outlined some of the 
things that may lie ahead for 
| Antarctia. 

Minerals Vital 


In the first place, he said that 
‘any continent of this size must) 
have great and valuable mineral | 
deposits, although very few of | 
them have been found yet. Pros- | 
pecting there will be so costly | 
and on so vast a scale that only | 
national governments can afford | 
it. But, since governments now 
interested in this 
frigid land, the kind of prospect- 
ing effort needed is beginning to 
be made. 

Already, Sir Raymond said, 
air-borne instruments and stere- | 


oscopic cameras are being used | 4/so be a source of useful power. | ——= 
“But,” Sir Raymond warned, The autonomous republic of Togoland has been inaugurated in 
the former French trust gear! 


to survey vast areas. 
future, these aerial surveys will 
be coordinated with helicopter- | 
borne ground teams equipped | 
for high-speed drilling and ore | 
sampling. By way of compari- 
son, Sir Raymond pointed out | 
that “in Canada, five geoiogisis | 


international | with two helicopters have pros- | 


In the} 


it wel > oy dot e444 
on the relatively few exposed 
| rook ou sagpennes where mining 
| would not hampered by icy 
movements. But once the ore is 
|located, the whole enterprise 
could be moved gradually under- 
ground, 

Once a tunnel or ether entry 
‘had been established, Sir Ray- 
mond said that underground en- 
gine rooms, hoisting gear, and 


le World News in Brief 


~. see 
Or the 7 nine re 


he one Loeanee Monitor, 


Moscow: Ballet Visit Still On? 


mineral dressing plants could go | 


| into operation. 


| “Once a footing had been ob- | 


tained, anything might happen | 
in these days of technological 
man,” Sir Raymond remarked. 

Another use for the Antarctic | 
might be as a gigantic deep 
freezer. As a food-supply depot, 
Sir Raymond said that it would | 
offer vermin-free storage for 
| food surpluses which could then 
| be preserved for the needs of 
'future generations. 


Bolshoi Theater Ballet visit to London has not been canceled 


officially, despite the dancers’ refusal to a 


Culture 


pear there, A Soviet 


inistry spokesman said, But Mi ‘hail Chulaki, direc- 


tor of the troupe, later said it would not/go to London without 
British Government guarantees of safety from incidents such 
as the shoplifting charge against woman athlete Nina Pono- 
mareva. Cancellation would be a $112,000 blow to the Covent 
Garden Opera House, where the ballet troupe would have ap- 


peared. 


Canada: Oppositio 


m Leader Resigns 


| 


|George Drew has resigned as leader of Canada’s Progressive 


Conservative Party. Mr. Drew 


had led his party, the chief po- 


litical opposition to the government, in two disastrous defeats 
in national elections in 1949 and 1953. 


(Pakistan: Anti-Indian Strike 


Still another possibility is the | Normal life in Karachi is at a standstill because of a general 
strike protesting the killing of Moslems in religious riots in 
India, A large procession marched through the city’s main 
streets shouting anti-Indian slogans, The Hindu-Moslem riots 


use of. atomic power to make 
living at permanent settlements 
|in the Antarctic as pleasant as 
in a London apartment. This | 
| is something in which the Japa- | 
nese have already expressed a 
lively interest. Sir Raymond | 
added that the harnessing of 
the violent Antarctic gales may 


i 


returning to present-day capa-— 


bilities, 
pend on the discovery of a 
_worth-while economic objective, 
| and this is not at the moment | 
in sight.” 

| "the chances are,” 
“that, for the remainder of this 


“everything will de- | 


in India arose out of Moslem 
an American book, “Religious 
to be insulting to Mohammed. 


agitation against publication of 
Leaders,” which Moslems claim 


Togoland: Republic Inaugurated 


lese flag has been hoisted for 


in West Africa and the Togo- 


the first time over the Legisla- 


tive Assembly building. Foreign affairs and defense will be 
handled by a French-appointed commissioner. 


’ 


he added," Keny a: Voting Begins 


ted in ane season some 67,000 | century, Antarctica will remain. Voting for a new Legislative Council began Sept. 20 as 83,000 


Those due to explore Antarc- foe wom miles.” 


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| the scene of investigations in | 
pure rather than applied science. 

| But man may yet find a way to | 
| overcome the latent heat of ice | 
‘and add a seventh habitable | 
| continent to the six 
| has in thrall.” 


he already ss 


white, Asian, and Arab voters went to the “polis” to decide 
whether to keep a multiracial. government or revert to the 


pre-1954 all-white system. Af 
000,000 people, will vote next 


ricans, the bulk of prado 6,- 
March, 


Significant Diseovery — 


ad John Hughes 
taf Correspondent of 
The Chetabion Sctence Monitor 
Nairobi, Kenya 
Africans are discovering trade | 
‘unionism. They are beginning to | 


realize the power of organized | 
labor in a eontinent where the | 
white man is dependent upon 
that labor. 
|. And events this week appear to 
‘indicate growing African aware- 
-ness and expansion of this idea. 
In Central Africa, troops and 
‘armored cars are patrolling the 
Rhodesian copperbelt in an of- 


ficial state of emergency climax- | 


ing a series of strikes by the. 
African Mineworkers Union, 

In West Africa, the Interna- 
‘tional Confederation of Free | 
Trade Unions, representing the 
AFL-CIO and the British Trades 
Union Congress, 
extend its trade-union campaign 
to Africa 
Trades Union Conference, 

And in East Africa, trades 
union organizations from Kenya, 
Tanganyika, and Uganda have 
| just concluded their first inter- 
‘territorial conference designed 
to coordinate their campaigns. 
| Throughout sub-Saharan Af- 
rica, trade unionism for non- | 
whites is in its infancy. Ignor- 
ance of its objects, unwillingness 
‘to pay dues, general 
communications, plus tribalism 
and interregional! jealousies 
have delayed its emergence. So, 
too, has government opposition. 

in some’ countries, notably 
French and Belgian Africa,.non- 
-white unions have .been encour- 
,aged. to. operate as branches of, 
white metropolitan unions in the | 
_European homelands. Thus iden- 
‘tified with European aims and 
objects, they have not func-| 
tioned as African unions, pro- 


Soviets Unlock Door on Criticism of Tito 


By Eric Bourne 


Special Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Belgrade 
Soviet criticism of the Yugo- 


‘road 


to socialism, why not 
we?” 


Therefore, the primary pur- 


| pose of the Soviet’s present be- 


'hind-the-curtain moves to “play | 


slav Communists is again being | 
secretly circulated among the) 
Communist Parties of Eastern | 


Europe, apparently as part of 


-of “free speech” induiged in 


ij some satellite capitals following 
ithe Soviet party congress of last | 


| February. 


down” President Tito aims to 


head off those who may be hope-. 


ful of following Yugoslavia in 


|its independence of Moscow con- 
an effort to halt the upsurge) 


i 


The Kremlin’s anxiety on this 


‘score has considerably 
|ereased since the Poznan riots 
‘in June. Top-ranking Soviet 
leaders have visited at least 
three Iron Curtain capitais 


in- | 


ers draw the line between per- | 
mitted protest against certain; 
aspects of the Communist re-| 


gimes as distinct from criticism 
of the Communist regime as 
such. 

Moscow appears equally con- 
cerned lest the example of 
Yugoslavia—the one country so 
far successfully to throw off 


| satellite 


| selves: “If Tito can have full 


Soviet domination—tempt other | 
leaders to ask them- 


trols. 
Warning Sounded 


Western diplomatic 


capitals now are confirming a 
tactic already reported to Bel- 


grade by Marshal Tito’s repre- 
sentatives and agents—that the 
Soviets are, in fact, warning the | 


‘since then to “help” local lead- | satellite leaders to be on their’ 


guard against the Yugoslavs and 
their possible influences. 
Soviet directives to the satel- 


lite parties have stressed par- | 
ties | 


ticularly Marshal Tito’s 
with the West and the view that 
he is still “pro-Western” despite 
the rapprochement with Moscow 
and the criticism of Western 
policies he has lately indulged 
in. 

According to 
placed Yugoslav 


some highly 
sources, the 


reports 
‘from several Eastern European | 


on ideological and theoretical 
questions where Yugoslav devel- 
opment of internal social and 
economic forms differs 


but also from current Soviet 
practice. 

Soviet disapproval of Yugo- 
slav agrarian policy, where a 
‘complete and apparently final 
break with collectivization has 
been made, is a case in point, 


that the Soviets lately 
tended to justify those Yugoslav 
Communists who, after the Bel- 
' grade-Moscow split of 1948, went 
over to the Cominform and 
thereafter until the end of: the 
‘Stalin era in 1953 took part in 
the violent propaganda activity 
‘directed from Moscow and other 
‘Soviet bloc capitals against the 
Titoists, 

Since Kremlin’s 


the peace 


| mission here last year, most of | 


these renegades—apart chiefly 
from a handful of bigger person- 
alities—have returned to Yugo- 
slavia. The more _ seriously 
‘viewed offenders have been 
tried and jailed, though accord- 


ing to an official Yugoslav re- | 


| sovereignty and use a private! Soviet campaign is concentrated port, only one in six of the re- 


By Gordon Walker 


Chief Far Eastern Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Tokyo 


| 


ence of former Japanese mili- 


tary leaders was injected con-| 
‘cerned choice. of councilor in. 
‘charge of defense planning on 


Japan’s nascent military ma- | the secretariat. 
chine, while primarily run by | 


civilians, 
fluenced by former generals and 


will be strongly in-| 
Cabinet ministers 


admirals of the now defunct 
‘nese Imperial Army planning 


Imperial Army and Navy. 
This may not be entirely ap- 


But it is clear from details 
of the backstage struggle for 
power which preluded formation 
of the council—Japan’s top de- 
fense planning organ—in early 
July. 

Plans to set up a National 
Defense Council were shelved 
last year when the. national 


created in Japan — largely 
among the left-wing parties— 
over announcement by Wash- | 
ington only a few days before | 
a 


se “Honest John” 
an to Japan. 
! Personnel Problem 

In June of this year, however, 
the National Defense Council 
bill became law, despite still 
sec opposition from parties 

to rearmament. 

The problem then facing the 
oem was one of person- 
nel. 

According to the Defense 
Agency Establishment Law, the 
defense chief must be a Cabinet 
minister. And according to the 
Constitution all. Cabinet min- 
‘isters must be civilians, ‘This | 
settled, at least for the time 
being, the question of who/icon 
would fill the top post. But it 
did not prevent appointment of 
former tary leaders as ad- 
visers to the council or as mem- 


MAKE MONEY WRITING 
. Short paragraphs! 


| coe Gent have te be a Ceaanes Gneees Se make 


bers of its secretariat. And in 
the pattern of Japan’s present- 
day bureaucracy, an adviser is 
often as influential if not more 
so than his chief. | 
The point wherein the influ- 


' 


MacArthur Aide 
Premier Hatoyama and other 
favored a 
former member of the Japa- 


staff, ex-Col. Takushiro Hattori. 


| Their choice was reportedly in- 
parent when the so-called Na- | 


| tional Defense Council holds its | ex-Col. 


‘inaugural meeting under Pre- blueprinted 
Zone. Stote....'mier Ichiro Hatoyama’s mean Co a 
|manship in late September. 


fluenced in no small degree by 
Masanobu Tsuji, 

the capture of 
and who barely es- 

aped British indictment as a 
on criminal. 

Colonel Hattori, after Japan’s 
surrender, became connected 
with Gen. Douglas MacArthur's 
staff, notably the _ intelligence 
section run by Maj. Gen. 
Charlies . A. Willoughby. He. 
played an important role in the | 
writing of General MacArthur’s | 


it is presumed, was the furor | lished. 


Appointment Blocked 


And when the occupation | 


‘ended, he continued military | 


Diet voting that it would) planning research with former 
rocket professional colleagues within | 
the framework of one of several. 
postwar military groups. Colonel | 


Hattori and his group evolved a 
plan of unified command which, 
if it were carried through, would | 


make Japan the first major 
country in the world with all | 


three armed services under a_ 


single commander. 
If Colonel Hattori had been 


p 
for a unified command in Ja 
might ey oe d ve 
And this, would ha 


increased te oseibility of Jac 


pan’s former military personnel 

trolling any future formal 
es establishment. 

Colonel Hattori’s appointment 


bering how the former 
dominated the} 


Imperial Army 


Poot : 


er ofr ue Dy 


J apan Cloaks Military Chiefs | 


| Navy, this group apparently sus- 
pected that Colonel Hattori was 


tionship and pave the way for 
future Army ascendancy. 


Taipei Jails Ex-Official 
For Aiding Red Agent 


By Reuters 
Taipei, 


Formosa 


A Chinese Nationalist military | 


tribunal has sentenced Jen 
missioner, to seven years in 
prison on charges of harboring 
a Communist agent, 


,cially announced Sept. 21. 


The announcement said Jen. 


obtained an entry permit to For- | 

mosa in 1950 for his uncle, Jen 

'Fang-hsu, a Communist agent. 

| The case was discovered by 

security authorities, who later 

er ospoargs the former. commis- 
oner, A verdict of guilty was 


senseved by the Ministry of Na- | 
Diet vetoed them in its 1955 | military history, many parts of | tional Defense, 
session. The reason for the veto,| Which have still not been pub- | ment said. 


the announce- | 


most | 
sharply not only from Stalinist | 


plotting to revive the old rela-| 


whe Hsien-chun, former finance com-. 


it was offi- | 


'turnees has been sentenced, and 
these have prospect of amnesty 
‘in due course, 


Borba Replies 
Recently, Il Lavoratore, the 
newspaper of the anti-Tito Tri- 
este Communist defended the 


Yugoslav Cominformists and (as | 
quoted 
called them the “champions of 
the 
The Yugoslavs have. also noted | 
have | 


by newspapers 


international Communist 
movement.” 

The two-column reply in Mar- 
shal Tito’s official newspaper 
Borba aimed higher than the 
Trieste sheet and was clearly 
intended to answer Pravda, 
which has reported some of Bel- 
grade’s recent: Cominformist 
trials in a similar sense. The 
Yugoslavs interpret this as an- 
other facet to the Soviets’ gen- 
eral effort to discount Yugo- 
Slavia’s example; to Eastern 
Europe. 

“It is more than amazing,” 
commented Borba, “that, at a 
time when Stalin’s attitude to- 
ward us and the international 
workers’ movement has been | 
finally condemned, anyone | 
should raise the question of the | 
former Cominformists and, 
moreover, 
'the correctness and justice of 
our attitude toward them.” 

Borba did not mention Pravda 
‘by name but challenged * ‘certain | 
|foreign newspapers” which it. 
said had manipulated reports of 
the trials and presented the de- 
fendants as innocent “political 
emigrants.” To justify or protect 
them, the paper said, was to 
support the old Stalinist concept 
of relations between socialist 
countries and was a revealing 
indication of how “somebody is 
really thinking” about coopera- 


ition and links between them. 


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: Llizabeth Pooler Rice 


Many Years’ Experience 


is planning to’ 


with a Pan-African | 


lack of | 


gency and 


here) | 


Africans Sample Unionism 


tecting essentially African rights. | paid mendierahtnn in the East 
The strongest African union, | African unfons total 40,000 Afri- 


however, is probably found on) 
the northern Rhodesian copper- | 
belt. Here thousands of African | 
mine laborers doing virtually | 
\identical work easily saw their 
‘identity ef interest, afd sub- 
merged their tribal differences. 
Their confidence in unionism 
stems from the fact that in time | 
|of strike they are not easily re-| 
pong rogy= in such large numbers 
as, for example, bus drivers or 
bootmakers. Also, they are keen- 
ly aware that productidh of | 
|high-selling copper for world | 
markets, which depends on their | 
_labor, is the economic mainstay | 
‘of. the whole Central African | 


Federation of the Rhodesias and | 


Nyasaland, 


Equal Work and Pay 
Their African Mineworkers 
'Union has proved itself a-con- 
siderable force since its incep- 
'tion after World War Il. It has 
constantly agitated for higher | 
| wages and equality of work and 
pay for African and white mine- 
| workers, and gained considera- | 
ble concessions from mining 
companies. 

Abolition 
color bar 


of the 
flercely 


economic | 
resisted, 


is 


however, by white mineworkers | 


unionists, many of whom are 
South African immigrants sup- 
porting the concept of racial 
segregation. 

| Added to the African Trade 
| Union dissatisfaction is the fact 
that Africans of Northern Rho- 
| desia. in which the copperbelt 
| lies, strongly opposed incorpora- | 
tion inte the Rhodesian. Federa-_ 
‘tion on the grounds that it 
| would subject them to white do- 
minion, They would prefer to 
run Northern Rhodesia as an 
independent African nation. like 
'the Gold Coast. 

The upshot of all this dissatis- 
faction has been 16 short strikes 
in the’ past three months and 
appointment of a government 
inquiry, 

Unrest has continued to such 
an extent that the government 


has declared a state of emer-. 

in troops to. 
demonstrators. | 
The government attributes the | 


called 


'deal with. the 


rioting to irresponsibility of 


it has detained about 30. 


duly emerge, 
has been compelled to recog- 


the copperbelt as a major force. | 


ICFTU Active 
Meanwhile the worldwide 
International Confederation of 


tending a trade union campaign 


in Africa. which it considers 


one of the world’s worst union- | 
| a Pan- | 
African Trades Union Confer- 


ized areas. It plans 


ence for early next year, pos- 
sibly in West Africa, where its | 


| African headquarters is situat- | 


Led, or in-Uganda.. The object | 
|would be to set up an ICFTU | 
regional organization for -Af-'| 
rica, and generally get the 


‘union functioning on a consid- | 


erable scale. 


In amore localized sphere. 
spread doubts about union organizations of Britain’s 


three East African territories are 
'mapping coordinating plans for 
mutual support, as a result of | 
‘the first conference. Although 


| England. 


'Mombasa 
78,000 man-days last year, which 


| being 


African union leaders, of whom | 

But whatever the rights or | 
wrongs of the case which will | 
the government | 


nize African trade unionism on | 


can members, the organizations 
are beginning to assume a cer~ 
tain importance in the eyes of 
local governments, particularly 
the 25,000-strong Kenya Fed- 
eration of Labor, to which are 
affiliated nine Kenya unions, 

It is headed by Tom Mboya, 
who achieved consid eravie pub- 
licity during his recent United 


States visit and his years. of 


scholarship at Ruskin College in 
Mr. Mboya is under- 
to have organized the 
deck strike, costing 


stood 


considerably jolted the Kenya 
Government. 

Some colonial governments 
/are antagonistic to the anticolo- 
nial ICFTU, but most unionists 
argue that organization of Afri- 
cans by this anti-Communist 
body is preferable to organiza. 
tion by the Communist World 
Federation of Trade Unions, 
which has already evinced in- 
terest in Africa. 


ee 


Soviets Start Restoration 
Of Ancient City of Pskov 


By Reuters 


London 

The ancient Russian city of 
Pskov, the foundation of which 
goes back some 1,800 years, is 
restored by Soviet archae- 
ologists and architects, the So- 
viet news agency Tass says. 

The city tortress. with its 39 
towers and walls measuring 
over five miles in circumference, 
has suffered from time and the 
Trav ages of war, 


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By the Associated Press 


a | Caire 

President Nasser has flown to 
Saudi Arabia to confer with his 
two most powerful Arab allies, 
Saudi Arabia’s 
Syria’s President Shukri Ku- 
watly. 


The Suez crisis headed the | Arab conference, 
agenda of the Arabian Big | King Saud’s capital. 


Three summit meeting. There 
was speculation in London and 


. Western diplomatic circles here | Cojonel 


Arab Big Three 


' 
' 


: 


} 
’ 


| 


mats thought he might agree to 
work With the less powerful 
agency agreed to by the major- 
ity of the 18-nation conference. 
There was no immediate official 


King. Saud and | Egyptian reaction to the London 


development. 


President Kuwatly of Syria 
for the | 
Riyadh, | 


Damascus 
at 


flew from 


Chiefs Meet 


It is the second Arab summit | 


meeting in six months. Informed 
Egyptian. sources interpreted 
Nasser’s decision to 


the other Arab leaders might | jeave the country at this time as 
an indication of his confidence of 


be putting pressure on Colonel 
Nasser to find a solution to his 
dispute with the West. 


a continued lull in Suez devel- 


opments here. 


Border tension between Israel] | 


and the neighboring Arab states 
may be discussed also. : 
It was Colonel 
trip outside Egypt since the cri- 
sis erupted from his nationaliza- 
tion of the old Suez Canal Com- 


pany July 26. He postponed a ' 
scheduled good-will trip to the | 


U.S.S.R. because of the crisis. 
The Arab meeting of Sept. 22 
second London Suez conference, 


| cal 
Nasser’s first | 


_ The Egyptian strong man was | 
/ accompanied by his close politi- | 


adviser, Wing Commander 
Ali Sabry, and Anwar E) Sadat, 


| secretary-general of the Islamic 


| was based on the possibility that | 
_Europe might replace part of its | 


Congress. 


SATURDAY, 


U.S. Plan Awaits Funds 


Canadians Sell _ 
Israel 24 Jets 


By the Associated Press 
Ottawa 
Prime Minister Louis 8. St. 
Laurent has announced gov- 
ernment approval of the sale 
of 24 Canadian Sabre jet fight- 
er planes to Israel. 


He said Sept. 21 that the 
planes will be shipped during 
the next six months, but that 
if “political circumstances” 
during this time should war- 
rant, the outstanding part of 
the order would be canceled 
or delivery postponed, 

f[Abudul Monem Rifa’l of 
Jordan said his government is 
considering all measures that 
may be taken. to put an end te 


By Richard Mowrer 
Special Correspondent of 
The Christian Sectence Monitor 
Madrid 
A United States Defense De- 
partment plan to build an addi- 
tional air base in Spain to sup- 
plement the four now under 
construction has been “indefi- 
nitely deferred,” American 
sources disclosed. 
Last year, 


for possible 
| Llanos, near Albacete in south- 
eastern Spain; and at Ecija, 
in the Cordoba region, This 
spring United States Air Force 


to a single additional base—at 

Reus, where the Spanish Air 

Force already has a field. 
Donald A. Quarles, Secretary 


| preference had narrowed down | 


| be completed late this fall. 


}them with 


|mile pipeline which will supply 

fuel. The first SA 
B-47’s are scheduled to appear 
-on the new runway at the Sara- 
gossa base some time in the next 
three months. These will be 
the vanguard of a rotational 
training scheme which wil] ex- 
pand as the Spanish bases near 
completion, 


The B-47’s will start training 


American engi-| exercises here on a very mod- 
neers had surveyed three sites | est scale, 


new bases—at/for perh 
Reus, near Tarragona; at Los! and then taking off again. But 


coming in at Saragossa 
s a two-hour stay, 


their appearance will mark the | 
beginning of the last-lap phase | 


struction program. 

At Torrejon the longest run- 
way in Europe (13,400 feet) will 
If 
at Thanksgiving time a B-47 


what he called the “aggres- 
sive policy of Israel.” 

[Mr. Rifa’l issued a state- 
ment after calling on United 
Nations Secretary - General 
Dag Hammarskjold for a dis- 


The- speculation that Colonel | 
Nasser’s Arab neighbors might | 
be pushing for a Suez solution | 


supply of Middle Eastern oil 


has to land at Torrején, it will 
‘be able to do so, but there will 
be no fuel or servicing facilities. 
‘By April, 1957, navigational 
/aids, a control tower, and a re- 


of the Air Force, was reported 
here to have asked the House 
Appropriations Committee for 
funds to develop Reus as a 
modern jet interceptor station. 


— 


down the initial earth-moving | 


phase of construction. 

A fourth base at San Pablo, 
Seville’s airport, will serve as 
SAC’s depot center. The exist- 
ing runway ‘as to be extended, 
a parking apron built, and 
warehousing set up. San Pablo 
will be able to take the USAF’s 
biggest transport plane, the 
C-124 Globemaster. 

Pipeline Under Way 

The pipeline extending from 

Rota, where a United States 


naval base is under construction. | 
to Saragossa is due to be finished | 


of the American air base con- | and ready for testing in Decem- 


ber. Fuel storage tanks are ex- 
pected to be ready at Torrejon, 
Saragossa and Moré6n in the first 
quarter of 1957. This will make 
the bases available for opera- 
tional use in case of emergency, 
for once fuel flows through the 
pipeline and once it can be 
stored at the bases, SAC’s bomb- 


ers will be able to take off from 


Spain as combat-ready units. In 


Plan for More Bases in Spain Deferred 


matter of minutes. The Rota; headquarters of SAC’s Iberian 
plane runway (11,700 feet) is|\Command. It will have a full 
expected to be available by Sep-| peacetime complement of planes 
tember. Rota eventually will be| and staff. Moron and Saragossa, 
headquarters of the American however, will have only skele- 
Sixth Fleet serving in the Medi-| ton caretaking detachments suf- 
terranean. \ficient to keep the installations 

The Torrején air base will be ready for instant use if required. 


Bonn and Belgium — 
To Adjust Frontier 


By J. Emlyn Williams 
Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 
Bonn served for so much nationalist 

Germany and Belgium are to | propaganda before and during 
— a ehh gee att segue the Nazi period. But the new 
will regula eir frontiers and | A F ie 3 
all major problems arising from | °° does show goodwill, says 

one newspaper, 


World War II. : | 
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, Holland also is reminded in 


Central European 


The site is regarded by Air 
Force officers. as ideal to cover 
Spain’s Mediterranean ap- 
| proaches against enemy air at- 
| tacks. 

The shelving of the Reus 
scheme is attributed by Ameri- 
(ean sources to lack of funds. 


fueling system will be available. | 4 single day’s flying operation,|@%d Foreign Minister Heinrich | this connection by the German 

By September, 1957, staffing!one wing of B-47’s consumes, VO" Brentano-and Belgian For-| press that it also took a large 
of the base will have started.|more fuel than all of Spain's) "8 Brussels for this purpose tract of land and 12.000 inhabi- 
Torrején will be fully opera-|tank cars and tank trucks can/| 5¢Pt. 24, when new agreement tants from this country at the 
tional by Easter, 1958, according | distribute to meet the country’s| Will be actually signed by Herr | same time as did Belgium. This 
to present @stimates. So will | needs for one week. . von Bretano and Belgian For- | js at Elten which lies on the road 
Saragossa. So will the base at| The naval base at Rota is not/ eign Minister Paul Henri Spaak. | from Emmerich to Arnheim and 
Moron, according to present | expected to be completed before This must later be ratified by the | persons travelling that way can 


followed by a day the end of the | 
which set up a watered-down | 
Suez Canal Users’ Association. | 
Colonel Nasser denounced the | 
Western Big Three’s— original | 
plan for a users’ association to | 
run its own shipping through | 
the canal. Some Western diplo- | 


cussion of conditions in Pales- 
tine and especially the ten- 
sion on the Jordanian-Israeli 
demarcation lines. | 


with American petroleum if its 
Middle East supply route 
through the canal were cut or 
reduced. Virtually all Saudi 
Arabia’s income is from oil. 
Colonel Nasser’s departure 
wound up a week of intensive | 
consultation in Cairo with V. K. 


WOLF'S 


; 


Nehru, 
| Nehru is going there Sept. 24-to 
'Tepay 


Krishna Menon, India’s trouble- 
shooting diplomat. Mr. Menon is 
going on to London to talk with 


, British leaders in an attempt to 
-smooth the Suez crisis. 


There is a chance Colonel 
Nasser will see Mr. Menon’s 
boss, Prime Minister Jawaharlal 
in ~Saudi Arabia. Mr. 


an official state visit of 
King Saud to India last Novem- 


| ber. 
An Indian informant gave the ' Indonesia. 


impression the Indian Govern- | The development of new weap- 


-ment did not Know whether the | ons and a consequent reshap- 


| spokesman at the first Suez con- 
iference called by 
| mid-August. Mr. Menon’s pro- 


| the...canal]-—-in....contrast 


paths of Colonel Nasser and Mr. | ing of operational thinking may 
Nehru would cross. India acted | have been a contributing factor. 
as Colonel Nasser’s unofficial | There is no question of Spain’s 
having opposed the acquisition 
of a new base, according to the 
American military mission in 
Madrid. 


Britain in 
posal for an international ad- 
visory board to help Eeypt oo Aided by Dry Summer 

majority demand for interna- | Meanwhile, dry summer 
tional operation —— was backed weather favored construction 
by the Soviet Union, Ceylon and | work on three Strategic Air 
‘Command bases and the 485- 


| 


‘calculations. Morén, in the Se- | the fall of 1958. Eventually two 
| ville region, got a slow start be-/|supercarriers will be able to 
‘cause abnormally wet weather | dockat.a pier simultaneously to 
‘last winter and spring bogged take on plane replacements in a 


Partnership Aided 


In British Africa 


By Eric Robins 


‘are only to be found on large 
scale. local..maps...of.. northern 


forest lands’in the same district. | 


Parliaments of the two countries | still see painted on wall propa- 
concerned, ganda for its return to Germany. 

Outstanding in the new ar-| Dutch-German discussions on 
rangement will be small altera-|this problem have not hitherto 
tions which involve the return | reached an agreement since Hol- 
to the federal republic of little ‘land wants some of its own de- 
villages (Bildchen, Losheim, |mands settled—particularly that 
Leykoul, and Hemmeres) which | West Germany (as the iegai suc- 
'cessor of the former Reich) ful- 
| fils conditions of the coal agree- 
\ment of 1920. Since the federal 
republic recently “agreed to a 
Railroad Rerouting Set | partial application of that agree- 
These small areas were taken | Ment it is hoped here that rec- 
over by Belgium's occupation | tification of the Dutch-German 


Eifel, as well as exchanges of 


forces in 1949 with Allied sup- 


frontier as it was before 1945 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor port for “administration pur- | also will take place soon. 


Little Folks 


917 Cheseville 2020 Sen Merce Bivd. 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 


N 


| Special to The Christian Science Monitor | from hydroelectric plants. 


; 
i 


| 


| 


‘since midsummer. What is caus- 


: 


'whereabouts is that there has 


; 
: 


By Anders Buraas ting a great many of them comes 
Oslo | The soil everywhere — in the 
, ay at ‘'moun‘ains, in the forests and in 
Where does the “— Bo: the fields—has drunk more than 
These early fall days the ques- jts share which again is due to 
tion is being asked over most of |-the fact that the summer of 1955 
Norway, and the answer points ee wee a _ ~ 
. t the 
up some facts, both pleasant and | °°" story and l¢ 
, round in a very thirsty state. 
unpleasarit, about climatic trends | . y shed 


and, also, some basic facts about _ Aakes SUR Lew 
economic life in this northern| ‘This year’s rain water failed 
corner of Europe. 

There has certainly béen no 
lack of precipitation in Norway 


|hillsides and mountain slopes, 

‘it has vanished straight into the 
; , ei d, to be sucked up by the 

been no corresponding rise in / Sroun i. 

the level of the rivers and lakes. | "00'S of trees and other vegeta- 


ing the anxiety as to the water’s 


is 


orway s ‘Dry’ Lakes Explained 


‘ 


’ 


} 


to follow its normal pattern, In-| coniferous trees, spruce 
Stead of forming brooks and | pine. 
merging into streams down the) 


: 
] 
; 
; 
| 
; 


Salisbury, 
Southern Rhodesia 
Hope for a fair share in their 
has risen considerably. If this country’s government has be- 
trend continues, there will not 
be any glaciers left in this 
country two centuries from 
now. 


some Africans, 


‘nership is to be implemented in 
the highest administrative serv- 
ice—the Federal Civil Service. 


Forests Changing 

Norway’s leading forestry ex- 
pert, Prof, Elias Mork, recently 
explained how, due to higher; In _ future, Lord Malvern, 
mean temperatures, trees were | Prime Minister of the Federa- 
now growing at a higher alti-|tion of Northern and Southern 
tude..The silver birch forms the | Rhodesia and Nyasaland, says 
advance guard, followed by the neither race, color, nor creed 
and | will bar a man from the civil 


These additional forest areas 
constitute, so to speak, a new 
consumer group. One § fully 
grown birch can drink 500 pints 
of water a day, a spruce more) 
than 300 pints. The warmer 


fully multiracial as laid down in 
the Constitution. 
The new Federal! Civil Service 


come more than a dream to’ 
For in British | 
Central Africa practical part- | 


-cruited directly 


mént of the federation,” says 
Mateyo Kakumbi, a Northern 
Rhodesian African MP in the 
federal Assembly, who, in the 
past, was one of the most per- 
sistent critics of Lord Malvern’s 
race policies. 

Though for the present the 
the 


to top 


branch of the civil service will 


service—a statement which in-| and 
dicates that the foundations of | teachers stand nearer ‘in line for 
the country are, in fact, to be! promotion to the top branch. 


be fully qualified doctors, other 
advanced and efficient African 
public servants can be pro- 
moted from the lower branch 
after sustained testing under 
working conditions. Highly 
qualified and experienced Asian 
colored (mixed race) 


Apartheid Avoided 
The government's courageous 
further 


; 
' 


‘only Africans who will be re-| 


' 


’ 


| justments planned by these two 


poses” and will now be the first 
German territory returned since 
1945. | 
Afterwards a number of ad- 


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neighbor states will straighten 
out the frontier in this area by 
rerouting a railroad line which 
now runs through both German 
and Belgium territory and by 
digging a new bed for a iocal 
stream. 

In addition, regulations for 
compensation for Germans who | 
fled to Belgium for political 
reasons, for double taxation, | 
social insurance, civil airlines | 
and care of Belgium war graves 
in West Germany are included | 
in the new treaty. Customs | 
duty formalities can now be 
much simplfiied on this part of 
the frontier. 

Thus, writes the German 


will allow a nonwhite to rise to, experiment—a move | 


the a ig ho post - @| away from the accepted apar- | 

ministry. He will, however, have| ,,_.. eae : 

to prove his worth in order to| theid policy of the neighboring 
Government— 


press, there is removed a prob-_| 
lem which could ‘disturb rela-/ 
tions between these neighbors. 
Belgium is highly praised for 


| this is bound to create a@/ "The thirst created by last| weather is also causing in- 


pag song Ageacnatan gpn an ‘year’s drought has been mate | anes eg —— 
: | | by ‘into. the air what previous 
.months of frost with daylight | “2 quenched” by “the amount | P 7 


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lasting from four to nil hours at | 


the lakes which have been 


‘all energy for running industry, 
' for lighting homes and for heat-_| 


76 per cent of their capacity. 

A recent headline in an Oslo 
newspaper, “It rains and rains— 
of no avail,” was indicative of 
how the city dweller of today 
is becoming as weather-con- 


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ee JACKSONVILLE, FLA, nd 


of rain this summer, and still 


’ 


dammed to ensure a continuous | these developments to be minor | 
‘supply of water to the hydro-| causes of the decreased flow of | 
electric plants, are only filled to| water, he far from discounts | 


+ 


\scious as the farmer has always | compete 


One explanation put forward |industrialization of the nation, 
for the low water level is the|the building of new power 
steady decline in the size of| Plants has been given top pri- 
glaciers.| ority in the investment pro- 
These glaciers have been won-| grams since the end of World 


But they have been shrinking | energy has increased by 250 per 
_year by year and their contri- | cent since 1945. At present one- 
bution to the water resources | third of Norway’s total invest- | 


| 


the past 50 years| There are now 70 new hydro) 
Norway’s average temperature | projects under construction. 


; 
’ 
: 
' 


; 


’ 
j 


| 
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’ 
' 
’ 


FRESH SEA FOOD 


On the Highway—U. S$. No. 1 South — 
One Mile South of St. Jobu's 


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me JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 


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PHONE EL 3-0973 


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went down the river. 

While Mr. Mork considers 
a post which would otherwise 
have been filled by a white man 
with the 
them. and must show that he can carry 

Norway's abundance of wa- 
terfalls, the source of its cheap. 
electric power, constitutes the | 
basis of its economic life. With- 
out it, its industry could not} 
internationally. To 


make possible the accelerated |... _ reaching 


pean, 
‘Race Partnership’ 


hazards and the 
implications of 


the political 


'the other hand, the plan gives 
the lie to the suggestion that the 
federal government is prepared 
‘to do no more than pay lip ser- 
‘vice to the policy of partnership, 
-and the plan has dramatically 
‘improved the prospects for ra- 
| cial harmony in the federation. 


“This is the first real achieve- 


ar Il 
The production of electric 


ment is for new power plants. | 


same qualifications, | 


-attain parity with a European|South African 
official. To do so he must occupy | may do much to lessen African 


' 
’ 


‘out his work as well as a Euro- | 


opposition to federation. It fol- 
lows an announcement that 
“better-class” Africans are to 
be admitted to dining cars on 
the Rhodesia Railways and that 
something solid is being done to 
meet African workers’ requests 


Lord Malvern’s “race partner- | for advancement in the railway 
ship” government knows both’ service. 


The general trend in the fed- 
eration is now toward coopera- 


ithe bold step it has taken. On | tion instead of racial clash, 


In Northern Rhodesia, for 
instance, tension has begun to 
ease mainly through the decision 
of Harry Nkumbula, president- 


'general of the African National 


Congress, to try to wean. his 
followers from extremism and to 
use constitutional methods for 
redressing Agrican grievances. 


Nonetheless, the dry summer 
of 1955 brought rationing of 
electricity to every factory and 
home during the winter. One 
firm alone, Norsk Hydro, pro- 
ducer of fertilizer, has. already 
this year reported a loss in ex- | 
ports revenue of $4,000,000, en- | 
tirely due to lack of power. 

As for the coming winter, ra- 
tioning of electricity was, for 
the most densely populated part 
of southeastern Norway, fixed 


A = ‘ as ear we ail geo 1.| strides toward the elimination of 
anks to a practically contin- | : SAGE Si EF : 
uous downpour in the past tew | racial discrimination, but in the 
weeks it has been put off until | field of housing the city’s treat- 
Sept. 16. And so Norwegians are | ment of its non-Caucasian citi- 
bracing themselves for another | zens is heavily criticized follow: 
season with rationing of their|ing a two-year housing surve} 
most precious commodity. just completed by the Urban 
League of Portland. 

Portland (population 400,000) 
has about 20,000 nonwhite resi- 
dents. About half this latter 
figure consists of Negroes, most 
of whom have moved here from 
the East and South in the past 
10 or 15 years. Others are pre- 
dominantly of Chinese or Japa- 
nese ancestry. The Urban 
League survey delved into the 
housing problems of all who 
might face barriers erected by 
racial prejudice. 


No Value Loss Found 


Althougl practically all of the 
60-odd census areas in the city 
have some nonwhite residents, 
the survey found, a full half of 
the Negro population lives under 
substandard conditions in Port- 
land’s near east side. Non-white 
homeseekers, says the league, 
invariably meet with’ discrimi« 
nation because of their race 
whether they seek to rent or to 


buy. 

“The discriminatory action,” 
the Urban League report says 
“may take any one of sever 
forms—the claim by the real es- 

| tate agent or rent manager that 
the owner will not sell or rent to 
nonwhites, evasive statements or 
perative or in- 


Portland, Ore. 
Portland has made_ great 


QUALITY FOODS 


COLONIAL STORES 
ea ee 


| decline if other ucasians 
| were permitted to enter a neigh- 
} borhood. 


white farnt- 


in 


| 


Racial Housing 


Sifted in Portland 


By Malcolm Bauer 
Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


were valued on the 1954 market 
from $8,000 to $50,000. There 


was no appreciable difference in | 


value fluctuations as between 

the areas in which nonwhites 

lived and the control areas. 
Attitudes Tested 


The report concluded: “The 
contention that the introduction 


preciation of property values, 


or that it necessarily endangers 
property values, is found to be 
unsupported by fact and with- 
eut foundation.” 

The survey teams also sam- 
pled individual attitudes among 
residents in the various areas. 
Detailed interviews were com- 
pleted with occupants of 451 
homes, 226 in the test areas, and 
225 in the control areas. Of 
these, 46 cent opined that 
nonwhite families should live in 
segregated neighborhoods; 50 
per cent thought there should 
be no such discrimination; 4 per 
cent had no comment. 


’ 


from ITALY, 


new sport shirt 


‘the territory which the Allies | 


'Mayor of Frankfurt and one of | 


'imprisoned in a Nazi concen- 


this action, and especially M. 
Spaak. It also was pointed out 
that Belgium even in 1949 re- | 
fused to accept a greater part of | 


SEARS 


ROEBUCK AND CO 


than offered. 
Goodwill Saluted 


This area now returned nei- 
ther in size nor importance is 
comparable with Eupen-Mal-| 
medy which Belgium took over | 
after World War I and which 


Dr. Walter Kolb 


By Reuters 
Frankfurt 
Dr. Walter Kolb, who passed | 
on here Sept. 19, was Lord 


Downtown—1531 2nd Ave. N, 
Ensley—19th St. at Ave. D. 
East Loke—7733 Ist Ave. N. 


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the war, Dr. Kolb was univer- | 
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Frankfurt back from ruins to 
prosperity. 

One of his first actions after 
being. elected ..Lord .Mayor. in 
1946 ‘was to go out with pick 
and shovel and help clearing | 
up the rubble left from the 
war. ! 


) 
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~ 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ‘MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, | SEPTEMBER 22, 2, Yo 


Sunday Programs 


A special telecast on Christian 
Science will be featured Sunday 
morning at 9 o’clock on Chan- 
nel 4's “Our Believing World.” 
“Can Religion Be Practical in 
School Life?” will be discussed 
by H. Phelps Gates, circulation 
manager of The Christian Sci- 
ence Publishing Society, and 
Miss Julia Willis, graduate stu- 


dent of the Fletcher School of 


Channel 4.to Feature Christian Science Talk ~ 


Law and Diplomacy, with ‘Dr.| 
Richard V. McCann, coordinator 
and narrator of the series, The 
half hour telecast will include 
a program from the television 
series on “How Christian Science 
Heals,” and a filmed discussion 
on the application of religion to 
school life between Dr, Carl 
Willenbrock of Harvard Univer- 
sity, Glenn Linden of the Uni- 
versity of Washington and Miss 
Willis. Inman H, Douglass will 
be moderator. 


John J. Selover, an associate 
editor of the Christian Science 


at 9:30 o'clock. His subbact 
be “Wilt an Be — eo | eee 
Scenes from a coed American 
opera, “Susannah,” by Carlisle 
Floyd, which makes its New 
York debut at City Center Sept. 
27, will be presented on C 
s “Camera Three” Sunday at 


11:30 a.m. on Channel 12. Phyl- 
lis Curtin, John Crain, and Nor- 


eo fmarring sie, 7 


“World World Music Festivals” Sunday 
at 2:05 p.m. Both performances 
were produced under ee 


of the 
Wolfgang wand Wie Solan Wann Winaee 
at the Bayreuth Festival in Ger- 


many. 


ADIO-TV 


Radio Tonight 


“ERWIN D. CANHAM 
The Mositer 


9:30-—Call to Ch 
:00—Di 


WEEI-590ke-CBS 


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00 News; On @ Sat- 
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eer Listening 


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4:45 Saturday Aftern'n 


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Dialer’s Guide Sunday 


9:00 a.m.—Our Believing World—Christian Science 


2:00—Red Sox-N. Y. Yankees—Ch, 4, 10; WHDH. 

4:00—College Press Conference: Brownell—Ch. 9, 

5:00—Face the Nation: Dr. Omer Carmichael—Ch. 
12; WEEI, 10:05 p.m. 

5:30—Pleasure Playhouse: Film, Heidi—Ch. 4. 

6:00—Meet the Press: Sec, John Foster Dulles—Ch. 


p.m.; Ch. 4, 11 p.m. 


6:00—Telephone Time: I Am Not Alone, starring 
Victor Jory—Ch, 12; Ch. 9, 10:30. 


Island Rescue—Ch. 9. 


7:30—Cireus Boy—Ch. 7, 12. 
9:00—Gregory Ratoff in Maestro—Ch. 4, 10. 


Molly Malloy—Ch. 7, 12. 


9:30—Q, 'n’ A.: Teaching Reading—WEEI. 
10:30—Sounding Board: Good Teachers—WNAC. 
11:15—Reviewing Stand: American Novel—WNAC. 


Secret Under Stars.. | 
Secret Under Stars. 


Box: W'ther 


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Listening: — seeds 
Jack Wyrtsen ....«s.. 
Jack wyrtzen we 


News: Sports: Peatures 
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News: Record Shop. 
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. Howard Show. 
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Easy fone 

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1:00 7 12—The La Show 
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12—Let’s Fn Pgs Park 
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Easy 
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WGpecial Peatere = 


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10—Lau ardy 

12—Hopalong Cassidy 
30 10—Big Game Hunt 


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he WEE! News: Jerry 
10:15 Howard Show .. 
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News; Sports; NBC 
Feature Programs .. 
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45 10—Industry on Parade 

00 1~Treasure Hunt 
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2 
Sherm Feller Show . 
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700 CBS News R'ndup 
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Dr. Donald Barnhouse 
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This I Know 

N.E. FParm Letter . 


News: ‘The Chosen 
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6:15 10—-Meet the Champion 


The Lone Ranger 


3:15 10—Kentucky-Georgia Tech 


4:00 12—Championship Bowling 
4:30 4—Kentucky-Georgia Tech 


| TV Saturday 


6:30 Saturday Hoo 


Industry on Parade 


6:45 
7:00 


7, 12—The Buccaneers 
9—Ozark Jubilee 
Como Show 
je Gleason 
7 12—8tage Show 
4. 5 weg E Hou 
7, 12--Sam Leceneen Show 
9— Coakame Welk Show 
7. 12—Jeannie Carson 
4 10—Encore Theater 
7. «.2+—Gunsmoke 
9— Wrestling 
4.10—Your Hit Parade 
7—Jim Bowie Adventures 
12- Rieh Finance 
° 9. 10—News 
—Film—Paver Orchids 
1d eeerioct Holmes 
9—-Stace 9 
4—Hollywood's Bect 
10—Ted Me: k 
12—Bif Ber 7 A. 
10—Mi"’ 


Sunday Sings . 
Sunday Sings 


10:00 News: E. Power 
10:15 Biggs, organist. 

10:30 Invitation te 
10:45 Learning ....... 


Radio Bible Class ... 
Radio Bible Class ... 
Proph 


Voice 
Voice of Prophecy 


National Radio Pulpit 
National Radio Pulpit 
“Kiddie Hit Parade”. 
Park Street Church... 


News; Israel's ee 
Message of Israel 
News; L... Gay Sings., | 9:25 4—News 


11:00 News; Washington 
11:15 World Affairs Rept 
11:30 Salt Lake Taber- 
11: 45 nacle Choir: organ 


Service from Cathedral 
Church of St. Paul. 
Service from Cathedral 
Church of St. Paul.. 


Park Street Church... 
Park Street Church... 
Park Street Church..,; 
Here's to _Veterans 


12: 00 WEE] News: Talk 
12:15 Sunday Music Hall 
12:30 News: Music 

12:45 Through the Years 


R.C. Religious Pam.. 
Prank and Ernest . 
Melody 
Melody 


Time 
Time 


8:30 «¢—Industry on Parad 
7—How Christian Sci 
@uls 


8:40 10—Reiigious Messace 


Sunday Sings 


NBC and NE News 
Better Gardens “ee 
The Eternal Light 
The Eternal Light 


1:00 The Best in Mu- 
* host, Donald 

Percy 

1:45 Faith, ‘con: gests. 


aoe on ecapte 
Listen 
easueen 
Listening 


News: 
Easy 


Easy 


8:45 4—Mah to Man 


Sunday Sings 7~This Is the Life 


Sunday Sings 
Sunday Sings 
Sunday Sings 


12.-Farm Facts 


News ‘Reports: Sports 
Berkshire Festival 
Boston Symphony Or. 


Berkshire Festival 


Herald of se 
Herald of Tru ; 
News: Sunday ‘sings, 


Sunday Sings 10—Frontiers of Faith 


2: World Music Fes- 
2:15 tivals: Bayreuth 
2: e Festival in Ger- 
2:45 many: excerpts 


Listening 
Listening 
Listening 
y Listening 


News Spts WBZ music 
"BZ Holiday—music _. 
WBZ Holiday 
WBZ Holiday 


i2—-Faith. for Today 
9:15 7=—R. C TV Center 
9:30 4—Frontiers of Faith 

10—This Its the Life 


Sunday — = 
Sunday 


Wings of Healing 


3:00 from Wagner; s0- 
3:15 loists; orch. 
3:30 Music on a Sunt- 
3:45 day Afternoon 


Listening 
Listening 
Listening 
Listening 


News: "BZ Holiday ... 
"BZ Holiday: Tunes.. 
"BZ Holiday—music .. 
"BZ Holiday—music .. 


12— The Christophers 
10:00 4—The Christophers 
7, 12—Lamp Unto My 
Man to an 


News: Sunday Sings 


Sunday Ange y 
The Decision: 10— 
Billy” “Graham 2 | 10:15 10—Roman Catholic Pe 


4:00 News: On a Sun- 

> 15 day Afternoon 
te Sunday Afternoon 
45 Sunday Afternoon 


Listening : 
Listening ..... 


News: Hi-Fi Festival: 
with Martin Bookspan 
Hi-Fi Festival. with 
Martin Bookspan.... 


htioned ore , 10:30 4—American Forum 
hioned Reviva!) 7. 12— Look Uo and Li 
hioned Reviva! | )— News and Weather 
Old-Pashioned Reviva) Sunday Funnies 


. 8:00 News: Indictment 
5:15 Indictment: drama 
6:30 Fort Laramie 
5:45 Fort Laramie 


News; Easy Listening 
Easy Listening 
Easy Listening 
Listening; Spts News. 


News: NBC: Songs .. 
NBC Peature na 
NBC; At Polis: NBC.. 


Pem.: Sports .. 


}-— Dirhensions 
Challenge of the Hour i—The om Picture 
religious pam.: News }—Safari—film 
Sunday Sings ... 
‘Sunday Sings 


on’ iow We 


6:00 News: FBI 

6:15 Peace and War 
6:30 Gunsmoke: Wm 
6:45 Conrad: Weather 


in 


Walter Winchell ; 
Pront Page: Headlines 
Bill Hillman. news .. 
Sports: YN News..... 


News; NBC Feature _. 
Bob Considine 

Music: — the Press 
Sec. John F. Dulles 


12——Eye rk 
11:30 7—Wiid Bill Hickok 
19— 


Monday Headlines 

Paul Harvey. news .. 
Secret Under Stars .. 
Secret Under Stars . 


7:00 News; Mitch Mil- 
gsts 
Sh 
7:45 Herbert: Weather 


By the People ..... mn 
By the People 
Lutheran Hour . 
Lutheran Hour 


News: NBC Feature .. 
NBC Specta) Feature 

Music: Bob-Ray: NBC 
NBC Special Feature.. 


News: Bryson Rash 

Overseas Assignment 
Hour of the Crucified 
Hour of the Crucified 


Wea 
30 4 —Local Amateur 
7~-You Are There 


8:00 News: Meet Cor- 
8:15 iss Archer: sk. 
8:30 Gam Levenson: 3 
“g:45 for the Money . 


Bill Cunningham 
Yankee Network News 
Heartbeat Theater ... 
Heartbeat Theater 


News: NBC Feature 
NBC Special Feature.. 
NBC Specia) Feature... 


‘NBC Special Feature. 


10—Best of Films 
12—Wild Bill Hickok 
1:00 was ig the 


7—Politica!] 


News: Bond Show Pe 
Bond Show: music ... 
Show: music .. 


Bond annam 
Bond Show: music . 


9:00 News: Romance 


"30 n : Chas. 
“45«CAshiey; News 


.\ Easy Listening 


Christian Science Pgm 
John T. Fiynn 
Keep Healthy 


News: Special Peature 
NBC Specia) Feature.. 
Feature: Bob and Ray 
NBC Special Denture 


News: All-Star Coun- 
try Show Program 

Spts.: All-Star Coun- 
try Show Program 


1:15 7—Film 


7—Beven Day Set 
12—Great Gildersieeve 


News: Face the 
: Nation: guest 

130 Church of the Alr 
45 Church of the Air 


Wings of Healing... 
Wings of Healing... 
Sounding Board .... 
Sounding Board ... 


Roman Catholic Hour 
Roman Catholie Hour 
The Mennonite Hotr.. 
The Mennonite Hour.. 


Erwin D name eee 


1:45 7—Channel 7 Theater 
2:00 4. 10—Red Sox-Yanke 
2:30 


7—Top Plars of 1956 


100 News: Al LaRosee 
‘15 Natural Science 

"30 UN on the Record 
'45 USAF Dance Band 


YN News: News 
NWU Reviewing Stand 
NWU Reviewing Stand 
Easy Listening 


Verne Williams, news 
Better Gardens . 
Hour of Decision, with 
Billy Graham : 


oo | — a 


a Christian Science 


9:00 4—Our Believing World— 
Christian Science Pro- 
gram—live and filmed 


sient 


Editors— | 


12—Stump the Preachers 


1:30 4—Weather Porecasting 


12—Professiona! Football 


3:00 %7~—Warner Bros. Presents 
9—This Is the Life 
12—Solialist Workers Partwv 
9—Times Sauare Playhouse 
7—Heart of the City 
§—College Press Conf. 
7-—-Mvy Friend Flicka 
9—Story Theater 
10—Dateline Europe 
12—News 
7—Annie Oakley 
9—How Christian f&cience 


ence 


Heals 
10—Overseas Adventure 
12—Face the Nation 
Q ing Places 
4—Pleasure Playhouse 
7—Seatch for Adventure 
10—You Asked for It 
12—Bandwagon ‘56 
7—Channe!] 7 Theater 


Feet 
12—Telephone Time: drama 

7~Adv of Rin Tin Tin 
9—The Evening Show . 
19%—Disneviand 
12—You Are There 
4—Jungie Jim film 

7— Waterfront 
y ger 

. 10—Circus Boy 


ve 


7 12—Ed Sullivan Show 
4. 10—Plavhouse—Maestro 


4 10—Loretta Young Show 
7, 12—$64.000 Challenge 
9— Focus 

4—Liberare 

7—Map Behind the Badge 

9—Telephone Time— dr 

10—Badge 714—Jack Webb 
12—Whoet's My Line? 

4— Meet the Press 

sree yalcon 

12--News 
ry oat Movie 


| 11:00 


; 12:18 
11:30 
11:45 


| 

4— Night Ow!) Theater 
7~—8ong of Mv Heart 
12—-Newstime Previews 


es 


News: peeemenen ie 
Imaginat 
ee ee re 


5 


Imagination: News : 


Monday’s Programs 


6:45 Weather. 6:35 


WEEI-590kce-CBS 


WNAC-680kc-MBS 


WBZ-1030ke-NBC 


WVDA-1260-ABC 


7:00 WEEI News; Tom 
7:15 Russell Show 
7:30 WEEI News 

7:45 T. Russell: w’ ther 


W'ther; Easy Listening 
News: ‘Easy Listening 
Weather: Easy Listen- 
ing: News: Weather 


News; Carl deSuze ... 
Carl deSuse Show 
Verne Williams, news 
Carl deSuze Show . 


4, 10—Today: 
7. 12—Wil Rove: . 
7~—Les Paul, 
7, 12—Capt. Karearoe 
4—Morning Playhouse 


Boston Heartbeat 
Boston Heartbeat ... 
Boston Heartbeat ... 
Boston Heartbeat 


8:00 CBS World News. 
8:15 News Spts W'ther 
8:30 Tom Russell Show 
8:45 Tom Russel] Show 


Yankee Network News 
Easy Listening 

City Desk; Easy 
tening: recordings 


News: Carl deSuze.., 
Cari deSuze Show...., 
News: Carl deSuze .. 

Cari deSuze Show ... 


7—Morning Star Time 
10— 
12—Romper Room 


10—New Starr of ‘56 


Martin Agronsky. news 
Boston Heartbeat ... 
Boston Heartbeat 

Boston Heartbeat .. 


9:00 WEE! News: Tom 
9:15 Russell Bhow 

9:30 Tom Russel) Show 
6:45 T. Russell: News 


Yankee Network News 
Guy Lombardo : 
YN News: Louise Mor- 
gan Show: guests.. 


News. Carl deSuze .... 
Carl deSuze: News ... 
Marjorie Mills ..... be 
Marjorie Mills 


12—News and Weather 
Breakfast Club ...... ' : 
Breakfast Club ‘ nnanees ane -Taethet 
Breakfast Club 


Breakfast Club 


10:00 Arthur Godfrey. 
10:15 Arthur Godfrey . 
0:30 Arthur Godfrey .. 
0:45 Arthur Godfrey . 


News: Weather: Easy 
Fasy Listening 

News: Easy Listening 
Easy ‘Listeni ng . 


News: Alan Dary .... 
‘Alan Dary Show 
Alan Dary Show . 
Alan Dary Show. 


Drama Seria! 

Drama Serial sslea 
When a Girl Marries | 
Whispering Streets 


7. 12—Arthur Godfrey 
10—Operer*ion Schoolho 
4 10—Hom* cueste 
7 12 Strike It Rich 


11:00 Arthur Godfrey . 
1t:35 Arthur Godfrey .. 
11:30 Wally O'Hare ... 
11:45 Howard Miller ... 


News: Bandstand . 

Bandstand . Tyr) 
Queen for a ‘Day $066 
Queen for @ Day .... 


News: Alan Dary .... 
Alan Dary Show .... 
Alan Dary Show .... 
Alan Dary Show .. 


Grand Central Station | 4—News: We- 
ho 7. 12—Vaiiant Lady 


i0—Roman Catholic Chepel 


Jim Pansullo Show. 4—Big Brother 


12:00 Wendy Warren ... 
12:15 WEEI News ..... 
12:30 Helen Trent . 
12:45 Our oe Sunday __ 


News; Gabriel Heatter 
Easy Listening 


News; Easy Listening 
Easy Listen 


News: Rod MacLeish 
Alan Dary Show ..... 
Alan Dary Show .... 

Alan Dary Show 


News, “Mildred Albert. 7. 12—Love of Life 


Jim Pansullo Show. 
Jim Pansw Show. 
Jim Pansullo Show. 


7. 
10—It Could Be Y 


4:00 This Is Nora Drake 
1:15 Aunt Jen eer neee 
1:30 Young ‘Dr. Malone 


; A 45 Gashetage Wife 


YN-Local — oe 
Duncan MacDonald & 
guest: Cedric Fos 
ter: Weather ‘....... 


News; Leo heat aa 
About Music 
Leo Sean—-all About 
Music-——records . 


12:48 7% 13~— ne Lis ht 
Paul Harvey, news 12:55 
Jim Pansullo Show ... 
Jim Pansullo Show . 
Jim Pansullo Show 


l 


News: a: 
id Mrs urton. 
Strike "te Rich 

Pat Buttram Show 
-— 


SEslé 


83 99039 09 
ts 


- 
uo 


News Comments . 
Hilltop House 
Pepper Young's Pamily 
Woman in My House. 


News: Leo Egan—aAll 
About Mu 

Leo Egan—All About 
Music—records ae 


12—Susic-Ann Sothern 
Joe Smith Show ... 7 
oe Smith Show .. 
a Smith Show .... 
Joe Smith Show ..... 


12—News and Weather 
12?—Pamily Plavhouse 


House Party—Art 


* +e ee 
SSa8 
aw 


Pive Star Matinee... 
Pive Star Matinee... 
News: Basy --apantent 


Norm Prescott 
Prescott Show 
Prescott Show 
ae Show. 


News: Joe Smith .. 
ie mec.” 
Joe Sniith Show 
Smith Show 


4, 10—Tenne 
7 12—~Art L'nkletter 


Joe 


»*, 
ase 


Carl Moore, m.c. 


Easy Listening .. 
News: ay Listening 
Easy Lis tening 

News: Easy Listening 
Easy Listening: News 


: Norm Prescott 
ea Show 
Prescott Show 

Prescott Show 


News; Joe Sm 


re Smith wt 
a oe sa 


Bob and Ray ........ 
and Ray 


Bob and Ray p 
News. Sports: News ‘ 


. Prescott 
; Norm Prescott 
ares Soe 


Norm Prescott 
Show 


News: Joe Smith Show 
Joe Smith Show 

Sherm Feller: Judy 
Valentine: live ogm. 


a. $2—Briahter av 


1.13 
“wy Little Margie 
The Edee of Night 


- 


2 Je 2 
S\os53 
o 


Sports: Weather. 
Moore Show 
ee Thomas _ 


a aeaa FFat neee weet 
3 ess 


: 


oatng 
a 


3u8 


YN News: News 

Songs; Spts; Weather 
News: Eddie Fis aa 
Three Star Extra. 


Pulton iy aes seed 
Sports and News 


All pty 
Norm gut agers t Show... 
Norm Prescott Show.. 


toston Movietime 
Pol'tical Broadeast 


BE Bo Mc dern Romances 
UnderStars; Digest 


9——Certace TY me 
me? yg B House 
10—My Little Margie 


News: WBZ ® spore 


; ae 
eee 


News: 
simulcast. 
10—Religious Farm Report | 
N.E. Today | 
Jr “Pow 
Mary Ford 


The Star and the Story | 


4, 10—Ding Dong Schoo) 
7, 12—Garry Moore Show | 
4—Bandstand—guest band | 


10—Tic Tac Doueh--quiz | 
12—Search mt, semerres ) 


Dineen, Brink Tria] 
1:00 4—Holly mens ‘Playhouse 


12—As the World Turns 
7—New Erigliand Matinee 


ssee Ernie 


Day 
ob Cummings Show 
30b Cummings Show 
4. 10— Queen for a Day 


The Secret Storm 


c 
Mouse Club 
t le 
rtoon Show 


Monday 


Jueen of the Jungle 
Superman 
= RES Shack 

Let's Have A Story 
News; Guest House 
2—Louis M. Lyons. news 
4—Victor wank. news 
7- Big Tow 

9—Sports, Soe: 
12—News, sports 
10—Loonevy Tunes 
10—Les Paul, Mary Ford 
2—Backgrounds: Bulletins 
4—Wryatt Earp 
10—News, weather, sports 
12-— Douglas Edwards. news 
7—~—News and Weather 
9—Kukla, Fran and Oliie 
10—Summer Originals 
12—-Stac¢e 7 

2—A Look at Britain 
4—Arch Macdonald 
7—Patti Page Show 
9—.John Daly. news. 
2—French Through TV 
4—Jung¢le Drum« 

/. 12-—-Robin Hood 

§— Bold Journey 
10—-Frankie Carle Show 

4. 10—J. C. Swavze 


weather 
weather 


use 


2—Shakespeare to Auden 
4, 10—Fir Lanclot series 
7, 12—Burns and Allen 
§~Circle M Ranchboys 
?2—#ilm—English Justice 


ks 
. 4. 9. 10. 12—News 
i~—Dan us Assignment 
= Saunders, svorts 
Joe Dineen, Brink Trial 
10-—- Weather 
12—-Racket Savad 
Fs aarnae Party 


10—Les Paul: Mary Ford 
10—Crime Hunters 

7—Les Paul: Mare Ford 
7—Stars in the —— 
12—News: Previe 
4—Tonigh t 


ee oe ast 
n —: news. 
lor 


saabehen the Editors. : 
Starring the Editors. . 


Star FE 
ohn Bassetti 
Bassett 
lassett 


see 


ca rahe = 


Sherm Feller ......... 
Sherm Feller .. 


“In God We 


5) 


“The Oil ot Joy” 


heard in-New England this 
Television 


Christian Science 
:| Programs on TV -Radio 


mK, owing Bi programs in the series “How Chris- 


” will ~ Poy among those’ seen or 
Sunday: - 


Daily Bread” 
8:30 a.m., WNAC-TY, Ch 7, Boston, Mass. 
: 8:45 a.m., WIAR-TV. Ch. 10, Providence, RI. 


— a ee 


Paul Maithen, ‘internationally | 
known -baritone of 
bridge, Mass., will be host on a 
special radio series of famous 
ed ras to be broadcast 
over W -AM-FM, beginning 
Sunday; Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. As 
host of the series, Mr. Matthen ,, 
will present interesting insights 
to the music, roles, and casts. | 
The fitst broadcast will be a| 
complete 9 a te phe yyp om of Bee- | 
thoven’s ‘Fidelio” conducted by 
Willem Furtwaengler. 
Pad cot | 
“Circus Boy,” a new filmed 
series about the adventures of a 
boy who was adopted by a cir- 
cus troupe at the turn of the. 
century, will bave its premiére | 
on Channels 4 and 10 Sunday at 
7:30 p.m, Twelve-year-old Mick- 
ey Braddock will play the title 
role. Other leading roles will be 
played by Noah Beery, Jr., and 
Robert Lowery. 
ee Ne 


A complete recorded perform- | 
ance of Shakespeare’s “Antony 
and Cleopatra” will be presented | 
on the “BBC World Theater” | 
Sunday at 9 p.m., on. WGBH- 
FM, with Michael Redgrave and 
Peggy Ashcroft playing the title 


BEE at 


Gregory Ratoff will be starred 
in “Maestro,” an original tele-| 
piey by John Viahos,on NBC- 

TV's “Goodyear Playhouse” 
Sunday at 9 p.m. on Channels 
4 and 10. The story is about a 
European orchestra conductor 


| roles. 


| . . 

‘Radiocast Program 

On Christian Science” 
“Wilt Thou Be Made “‘Whole?”"’ 


is the title of the half-hour | 
Christian Science program to be 
broadcast Sunday morning, Sept. 
23 at 9:30 o’clock in WEEI’s lo- 


| 


| periodicals, 


| 10:00—Late news, sports w> 


| 411;00—Organ 


' 


| 


| 3:00—Mozart: 


i 
} 


| 


cal “Call to Church” series. 

The speaker will be John J. 
Selover, an associate editor of 
the Christian Science religious 
Frederick Jagel, J. 
Alden Edkins, and a quartet will 
supply the music. 


a ee eee 


Glorious 


ey E. Theater” on Channels 


‘WBZ and WBZA will 


'public affairs, and special pro- nication, 


‘clude programs featuring Saville! 


Elliot Norton, dramatic critic of 
ithe Boston Post, and other well 


~ lAchievement Awards 


who helps a small Téxan town. 
form an Ren of local talent. 


, Greer ge al ites eee | 
n a new com entitied “The Five more Greater Boston| 
Gift of Molly Malloy”! men wil receive 1956 Achieve- 
Jameson Brewer Sunday | ‘ment. Awards at the first annual | 
ight at 9 o'clock on CBS-TV’s award dinner sponsored by the 
and 12. ‘and Couutry Clubs. it was an- 
‘nounced today by Richard 
Preston, chairman of the ex- 
ecutive committee. 
These awards—in the fields 
of natural science, education, 


ee 


“What's All This We Hear 
'About Reading?” will be the 
subject. of Charles Ashley's. 
“Question and Answer” program , ne 

press, business, and civic serv- 


on WEE! Sunday night at 9:30. | ice—complete the 10 categories 


ven | 10r the 1956 awards, Mr. Pres- 
Monday Previews ton explained. Awards in the 


Re fields of public service, medi- 
Effective Monday, radio sta-!cine, sports, culture and arts, 


tion WNAC will become a tri- and entertainment were an- 

network station—NBC, MBS, nounced recently. The following 

and Yankee Networks, Many of “ve men complete the list of 
: recipients of awards: 

the familiar NBC programs, for-| In the field of 

merly broadcast on WBZ, will ‘Charles F. Adams, 

be found now on a 


business, 

Jr., presi- 

oo of Raytheon Manufactur- 
A+ + g Company, Inc. 

Sept. 24 will rian the begin-| » * the. field of edutation, Dr. 

ning of WBZ-WBZA’s new all- Nathan Pusey, president 
New England 24-hour -a~-day| Harvard University. 


scheduling, which began par-| * In the field of natural science, | 


tially July 16, when both sta-| Bradford Washburn, of the 
tions discontinued broadcasting Museum of Science. 
during the day the NBC Net-| In the field of civic service, 
work programs. From now on| Walter Brown, president of 
feature Boston Garden. 
In the field of public commu- 
Erwin D. Canham, 
editor of The Christian Science 
Monitor. 

Elections to determine the 
awardees were made by ballot 


Club Week 


known authorities. Channel 4’s henihan 


pular Sunday feature; “Star-) american” “Association “or ~ University 
Women. Boston Branch: Board meet- 


original programing of news, | 


grams of a cultural nature. 
The night broadcasts will in-| 


Davis, American news editor of| 
The Christian Science Monitor, 


ring the Editors,” with Erwin D.| 
‘ ine of the Boston University Faculty 
Canham, editor ‘of ‘The Christian} Club, $°p.m 
Science Monitor, and other Bos-| . a Thursday Pay 
. _— elmstone ub Reecuiar ar 
ton newspaper editors, will be| eting. 541 Gambridge Street. All- 
repeated on WBZ Monday nights | ston, 16:36 o.m. Luncheon 12:38 p.m. 
.' Florence Crittenton League. Brookline 
at 9:30. Other new feature pro Circle: Meeting at 9 Prescott Street, 
grams will include “Governors' | Brookline, 2 p.m. Miss Margaret A. 
” Fish will be hostess. 
Report, which will present the Massachusetts Widows World War _ I. 
six New England Governors on inc. Chapter I. Boston, Mass.: Meet- 
an alternating basis, discussing 
local affairs. Many other out- 
standing program features will 


| tne Hotel Lenox. Boylston and Ar- 
| lineton Streets. Boston. 7:45 p.m. Nom- 
be presented daily. 


ination and election of officers for the 
nt gine year. Chairman Teresa Rosen 

iil make her annual report on mem- 
bership. 


FM 


Saturday 


WGBH-FM 893.7mc 


5:00—-The Campaign Issues. Louis M 

Lyons and quests 
5:30—-A Jazz Antholo 
6:.30-—News. Weather: * What's 

In Boston? 
6:45—Window On the World 

_ Vemur Captain Harold Auten. 
-Voices of France in Choru 
es Wohl-Temperierte 
‘Bach}. 


Going On 


For 


Mavier 

A comparison of book 
one and two, featuring perform- 
ances by Wanda Landowska 
harpsichordist. 

8:25—Les Fleurs Du Mal. Charles Bau- 
delaire. Read in French by Eva 
Le Gallienne and Louis Jourdan. 
(new series) (To be repeated Sun- | 

day at 7:25 p.m.) 

8:30— Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Berkshire stival Concert 
Charlies Munch, conductor, 


WBUR-FM, 90.9me 
5.00—Vocal and orchestral music. 
6:00—News, Sports) Weather 
6:15—String Serenade — Tchaikovsky: 

Violin Concerto in D, Op, 35. 
7:00—Saturday at the Pops. 
7:30—WBUR Opera House. E 

ather. 


WXHR-FM, 96.9mec 
2:00—Verdi’'s La Traviata—-complete re- 
cording (new series). 
§:00—Mahler: Symphony No. 9 in D 
minor (Israel Symphony Orches- 
tra; Kiletzki). 
6:30—Songs of Stephen Foster 
Wagner Chorale}. 
7:00—Beethoven: Leonore Overture No 
1; Elgar: Violin Concerto Opus 61 
in B minor 
8:00—Galuppi: Overture No. 2; Gior- 
dani: Piano Concerto. 
9:00—Stravinsky: The Rake's oc reeress. 
Recital . of and | 
Mendelssohn by Albert Bcamediner. 


WCRB-AM, 1330kc: FM, 102.5mec 

2:00—Paisiello: Harpsichord Concerto in 
C; Kalinnikov: Symphony No 

186; 


Divertimento No. 4, K. 
Berlioz: Harold in Italy. 
4:00—Hindemith: The Four Tempera- | 
me Schumann: Violin Con- | 


(Roger 


certo 

5 o—Tewe weavers Presentation. 

6:00-—New 

6: 10—Candielight Serenade — Invitation 
to the Ballet—-Newman, 

7:00—Musiec of All Churches. 

7:30—Music and High Fidelity. 

8:00—News — Evening at Symphony — | 
Borowski: The Mirror: Dohnanv!: | 
Ruralia Hungarica; Frederick the | 
Great: Flute Concerto No, 3 in C. | 

9:00-—-Beethoven: Prometheus Ballet: 
Mozart. Violin Concerto No 2. 


00—N-ws. Connoisseirs”  Concert— 
Bach: Eight Flute Sonatas. 


Sunday 


WGBH-FM, 89.7mc 


—BBC Bandstand. Band of 
ajes (BBC) 
| j . The Outsider 
by Colin Wilson. 
|. 6.30—Backgrounds. 
7:00—Das Hohi-Temperierte Klavier | 
‘Bech). A comparison of books | 
one and two. featuring perform- | 
ances by Wanda Landowska. 
harpsichordist. 
| 7:25—Les Fleurs du Mal Cherles Baude- 
' laire, Read in French by Eva Le 
Gailienne and Louis Jourdan. 
7:30—Chorus Pro Musica. Alfred Nash 
Patterson conductor. 
9: putt «A World Theatre. Sadana s 
ny and Cleopat 
| About io inn -Night Music. 


Ce 


—— a -——— ee 


TT 


WBUR-FM, 90.9me 
Summer Concert—Shostakovitch 
Symphony No. 1 in F Major. Op 
10; Strauss: Ein Heldenleben: 
Rimsky-Korsakov: Le ‘Coq d'or! 
Suite; Janacek: Suite for String 
Orchestra. 
7:00—Great Moments from the Opera— 4 
Puccini: Tosca (highlights). 
8:00—Toscanini Conducts Herold 
Overture to Zampa; Saint-Saens 
Ae ated No. 3, in C minor, 


Housing Association of Metropoli- 
tan Boston; Kane Simonian, 
Chief, Urban Renewai. Boston 
and panel of community guest 

‘Boston College Citizen Seminars) 
i(Rebroadcast from WGBH-TV) 

-~Urban Frontier. Week-end. Docu- 
mentary dramas the 


10:00 


an urban setting. 
10:30—Louis M. Lyons. 
10:45—A Basic Record Library. 


WBUR-FM, 90.9mc 
5:00—Vocal & Orchestral Music. 
‘00—News, Sports, Weather. 
i5—Coast Guard Presents. 
‘30—Vocal Artists 
45—Patterns of Thought 
90—Piano Workshop 
30— Let's Talk ‘About M 
00—Boston Univer Cc 
00—Orchestras of the World 
00—News, Sports. Weather 


WXHR-FM, 96.9mec 
7:00—Breakfast Concert. 
8:00—Marcello: Aria in A Minor for 

Strings; Cirri: Concerto in A for 

Cello, Piute and Stritigs: Albi- 

noni: Concerto in D for Violin 

and Strings: Pergolesi: Concerto 

No. 5 in Fiat 
i) wale racee Overture in G; Bruck- 

er: Psalms 112-150; Debussy 

Epi raphes Antiques 
10:00—E. ower Biggs in Organ Music 

of Pachelbel. Bach, Sweelinck 
11:00—Chausson: Trio Opus 3; Beetho 

ven: Quartet Vo. 16, Opus 14 

‘Ha 


r 
12.00—Re 


78 
9:00— BBC Concert Hall—Haydn: Sym- | 
phony No 60 ? 
Concerto in 
Pianos and Orchestra; 
Symphonic Poem from Bohe- 
mie’'s Woods and ficlés 
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WAHR-FM, 96.9inc 
5 :.00—"“‘Review for Yourself.’ 
6:00—Backhaus: Carnegie Hall Recital. 
March, 1953 
7:00—Bizet: Patrie Overture: Walton 
Concerto for Viola and Orchestra: 
Borodin: Symphony No. in A 
miner ‘Unfinished.’ 
8:00—*‘‘Building Your Record Library.” 
9:00—-Barber: Concert for Cello and 
Orchestra; Prokofiev: The Prodi- 
al Son Ballet (complete) (New 
ork City Ballet Orchestra). 
10:00—Haydn: The Creation (Dermota 
tenor: Felbermeyer, soprano 
Chorus and Orchestra of the 
Vienna State Opera; Woldike). 


WCRB-AM, 1330kce; FM, 102.5mc 
8:00—News — Morning Musicale — En- 
cores—Milstein and Fiedler. 
Immanvel Baptist Church. 
30—Classical Capers—Cherwubini: 
creon: Overture: Coates: 
Three Elizabeths: Fielder: 
Gounod: 


1c 


ymicert 


OD -~1-IDMAA®WH 


—" 
os 
— 


Pp 

vest and Network Hours. 

2:00—Waiton: Troilus and Cressida 

3:00—-Sibelius: Karelia Suite. Onus 
Sibelius: Symphony No. 5 
Fiat, Opus 82 

4:00—Suk: Serenade for 
6: Bartek: Suite No. 2. Opus 4 

5:00—Edric Connor in Songs of da- 
maica: Jean Ritchie in Songs of 


Kentucky. 
Recital by 


6:00—Brahms 
emp 

7:00—Griffes: The White Peacock: Mac- 
Dowell: Indian Suye Opus 48. 

8:00—Franck: Psyche (‘cemplete score) 
(Netherlands Chorus, Choir: 
Hacue Philharmonic; 
terloo:. 

9 :00—Fiear: 
40: 


6°30 1 
9 Ana- | , 
The in 
Lust- 


Panst Sirings. Onus 

10:00 ~ikaiete 0 
—Delibes 
Grofe 
Ippolitov 
Sketches 

12:00—News and 

l een ; 
Sym 

2:00-— Attesneon at Sy mphony—Debussy: 
Prelude to the Afternoon of a 
Faun: Strauss’ Also  Sprach 
Zerathustra: Block: Sacred Serv- 


ice. 
4:00—Mozart: Quartet in G. EK. 2387: 
Tehaikovsky: Serenade for Strings 
5: te ge oh Choruses of New England 
é: 10—Candielicht Serenade — Fiddie- 
sticks-Camarata 
7:00—Record Review—_Richard L. Kaye. 
8:00—News. Evening at Symohony 
Beethoven: Fidelio: Mozart 
Serenade for 13 Winds. 
| 11:00—Schmidt: Symphony No. 4. 
12:00—News—Starlight Serenade. 


Monday 


the Boston Symphony 

Coppelia’ Excerpts: | 
rarad Cenyon Suite: 
Ivanov: Caucasian 


Middsyv .eature 
tdii—Rentamin: 


Cockaigne Overture. 
Brahms: Vialin 


Opus 77 
10:00——-Torelli: 
No.. 8: ee 
Night, Opus 
11:00—A Liszt ‘Recital by Alexander 
Brailows 


WCRB-AM, 1330ke: FM, 102.5me 

7:30—News—Commuters’ 
Sullivan: 
valdi: A 


Op. 9. 
8: m— eo . -#. %.. "heews. 
8:10—Commuters’ 
Williams-Jacob: English Folk Song 


Transfigured 


Ballo Vi- 


Overture di 


No. 


3 


_ Porter- “Benr nett: _ Biss 


Me, 


7;|membership of the Boston Town | 


To Go to Five More 


among representatives of the 
Greater Boston press, television, 
_and radio from nominations by 
the entire group. 

The committee includes, in ad- 
dition to Mr. Preston as chair- 
man, Rufus F. Hale, William J. 
Bird, and Ben White, director of 
the Boston Club and Common- 


wealth Club. 


' 


| 


‘sports; 


of | 


’ 


ortraying 
life activities neanle carry on in | 


The awards will be made Sept. 
25 at the newly reconditioned 
Commonwealth Country Club. 

Previously announced awards 
were to Dr. Paul Dudley White 
in the field of medicine; Miss 
Tenley Albright in the field of 
Arthur Fiedler in the 
field of entertainment: Edwin 
O'Connor in the fie'd of culture 
and arts; and to Governor Herter 
in the field of public service, 


—_——-— 


Grand Jury Gets 
Post Salary Case 


John Fox, former publisher of 
the Boston Post, was ordered 
held for the grand jury yester- 
day on 800 complaints alledging 
nonpayment of wages to Post 


‘ employees. 


Mr. Fox appeared . before 
Judge Jacob Lewiton in Boston 
Municipal Court on a continu- 
ance with his new counsel, for- 
mer Assistant United States At- 
torney Edward D. Hassan. Judge 
Lewiston declined jurisdiction 
and referred the case to the 
grand jury. Mr. Fox was allowed 
to go on his personal 
nizance, 

Meanwhile in federal court, 
two additional . appeals. were 
filed from an order of Federal 
Judge George C. Sweeney in 
permitting the three court-ap- 
pointed trustees of the Boston: 
Post to borrow $500, 000. 


cere ere 


——— 


Powerful Mushroom 
A mushroom growing under a 
driveway in Kitchener, Ontario, 
exploded through a 3-inch layer 
of asp halt. 


—e 


Fate:. Suite. Mendelssohn: Spring 
Song. Gombau: Dance of Destiny. 
News Headlines—Curtain Time~— 
Crcoham: New Faces of 1952 
Clescical Capers—-Su 
Dame: Overture. arr. Kostelanetz: 
Roumanian Fantasy. Delibes: Le 
Roi L'a Pit: Overture. Romberg: 
My Maryland: Medley. Strauss: 
Fiedermaus Quadrille. Tchaikove 
sky: March Miniature. 


9:00 


9:30 pe Pique 


10:30—Morning Nelodies 


| 


Wilhem | 


yan Ot- | 


Opus | 
Concerto, ) 


Concerto Grosso, Opus 8. ; 


Concert—II— | 


Certa, Violin Concerto, | 
1. 


Concert-ITI-Vaughn | 
Suite. Dvorak: Slavonic Rhapsody | 


; 


11:00—News — Morning Concert—Grieg: 
Old Norwegian Romance with Vae« 
riations. Vieuxtemps: Violin Cone 
certo No. 5 in A minor. Khat 
turian: Masquerade Ballet. 
News & Midday Features 
—News—Afternoon at Symphony~— 
Gordon: The Rake's Progress. 
Corelli-Pinelli: Suite. Mozart: The 
Imopresar 
2:00—Charpentier: Impressions d'Itale; 
Stravinsky: Violin Concerto in D. 
3:00—Chopin: Variations on La Ci 
arem ta | Dvorak: Sym- 
phony “New. World.” 
4:00— fiosart “Haffner” Serenade in D. 
: 00—News—Commuters’ Concert—IV — 
Smetana: Ma Viast: Sarka: Pure 
cell: Chaconne in G minor: Liszt: 
Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4; Cimae 
rosa: Ii Matrimonio Segreto: 
Overture: Boyce: Symphony No. 1, 
6:00—News Commentary—Dr. Lawrence 
uchs 
6:10—-Candieclicht Serenade—Tchaikove 
sxv Melodies—-Kostelanetz. 
Recital Hall—Robert Owen. Organ. 
Music and Hieh Fidelity. 
News Evening at Symphony — 
Weber: Abu Hassan: Overture: 
R} ms! v-Korsatov: Symphony No 
2 ‘Antar’: Donovan: Suite for 
Oboe and Strings. 
Bruch: Scottish Fantasy: 
Sinfonia Concertante, K 
10:00—News ——- Music History Concert — 
Reeh: Excerpts from the “Clavier- 


Mozart: 
4 


11:09 


vebung.”’ 
-Connoisseur'’s Concert. 


ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE 


OF BOSTON 


Heedaquorter:, 51 Corver Street 
Shelter 366 Albany Street 


A charitable organization, with 
over FIFTY YEARS of service 
for the protection of and pre 
vention of cruelty to animals. 


Contributions in any amount 
greatly appreciated 


Cariton E. Buttrick. Pres 
Philip W. Trumbull. Treas. 
James Jackson Jr.. Sec 


WGBH-FM, 89.7me 


a 


5:30—A Basic Record Library: Orches- 
tral Music. Program: Bartok: Pi- 
ano Concerto No. 3: Faila, The 
Three Cornered Hat 

6:30—Louis M. Lyons, News. 

6:45— Backgrounds. 

7:056—-U.S. Weather Bureau Report, 
What's Going On In Boston 

7 15—Review of the Canadian Press ; 

7:30—Great. Women of France. Yvette 
Guilbert 
Highet 
x 


Li 


Program: | 


8:15—The First Men in the Moon. A 
dramatized serial by Lance Sieve- 
king, based on the novel by H. G. 
Wells. (BBC) (new series). 

8:30-——Music of Our Time: The Sound 

Ideal of Our Time. Allen D. Sapp, | 

Jr., Assistant Professor of Music. 
Harvard Univ ersity. \Rebroadcast 

{ Series 

9: 30-—The Challenge to Greater Boston. 
New Life for Old Neighborhoods. 
Donald J. White, Associate Dean. 
College of Bus’ness Administra- | 
tion, Boston College: Clarence G. |& 
McDavitt, President. Somerville | 
Natione! Bank: Norman Sherry, | 


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* a 


THE CHRISTIAN-SCIENCE MONITOR — 


Seascape With 
Figures 


Atonc the shore the evening light 
robbed objects of their identity. Built by 
my great-grandfather in the 1850's, the 
terraced houses with their Italianate 
balustrades and verandas were trans- 
formed into -Venetian palaces and sea 
caverns. Human beings, boats, and cliffs 
ran together, The sea wall was no longer 
spaced into bars by the breakwaters, the 
leaping figures of the tennis players no 
longer moved rhythmically against the 
frieze of the tamarisks that bordered the 
little park. The sea became indistinguish- 
able from the sky, and patterns of colored 
lanterns broke out round the bay—half- 
moons, butterflies, pagodas. 

In different parts of the town, children 
were being put to bed. Now there was a 
hush, a pause. The couples dwindled 
among the shadows, the waves rustled 
over the beach. In the seaside villas the 
d&y’s events were being discussed. 

Later, when I was supposed to be 
asleep, the fireworks threw golden foun- 
tains into the night. Falling bouquets of 
rockets were reflected in the looking glass. 
I would getup and lean out of the win- 
dow in my pajamas, lean out as far as I 
dared, for down there, far below in the 
garden, my parents sat after dinner. I 
heard their murmured conversation as 
they, too, watched the Bengal lights and 
Catherine-wheeis flare against the dark 
wall of sea. Then would come a final case 
cade. of .splendor,.as.if all the flower .pet-. 
als—metallic reds and pinks, blues and 


vetlows—were falling cut of the sky into” 


the sea, or blossoming for an instant 
among the branches of the pine trees, 
turning their dark heads in a shower of 
golden rain or flashing like fireflies over 
the garden, then falling, falling into noth- 
ingness. 

| ee eee 

Next morning nobody would speak of 
the fireworks. It was as if those water- 
falls, those floating and dancing blossoms 
had never been, or were part of the night 
that one had forgotten. This was the hour 
consecrated to the morning walk along 
the shore, a walk which, for a small child, 
seemed part of the ritual of an English 
seaside. 

We stepped out through the garden 
doorway. Below the promenade wall the 
sea unfurled its dazzling banner. Stalks 
of smoke smudged the horizon where 
ships were passing far out in the English 
Channel. The terraced houses no longer 
resembled sea caverns, but looked as if 
they were cut out of white rock, hard and 
shining and rather prim. We pursued the 
crescents of boardinghouses and hotels, 
the shop windows, the junk stalls. Lace 
curtains and balconies gave place to 
kiosks and pavilions, to photographs of 
family groups, threaded on a single string 
of laughter; to stalls where you could buy 
the humbler sea foods—shrimps and 
winkles, mussels and jellied eels. Here, 
too, were trays of bangles and brooches 
designed as true lovers’ knots or bulging 
with pearls as big as pewits’ eggs. 

Farther on stood the fruit vendors, the 
women who sold carnations and violets 
(“Fresh vi-lets sixpence a bunch, ducky! 
Ever so fresh!’"’}: the boys who. wore 
nautical caps over one eye and offered 


The step 50 


Long needed 


Pointing out plainly that Jesus’ 
works proved the truth of his words, 
the Christian Science textbook, Sci- 
ence and Health with Key to the 
Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy, then 
takes the step so long needed. 


It shows the 
seeker plainly 
how to walk in 
the way shown 
by the Way- 
shower, Christ 


ing problems of | 
daily life. 

This is the merciful mission of 
Christian Science: to meet humanity's 
great need for a religion of works, 
rather than words alone. 


Study of Science and Health brings - 
the promised Comforter. It makes 
plain the natural, ceaseless availabil- 
ity bere and now of the Christ- 
power, whatever our human need 


Science and Health 
may be bought, bor- 
rowed, or read at 
Christian Science 
Reading Rooms. 
throughout the 


the arterial road that 


CP SRS 


€ 


“MARINE: ORAGE”: 


Qua 


nN By Courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Institute, Williamstown, Mass, 
An Oil Painting by the French Artist, Claude Monet 


great bunches of colored balloons; the 
men who bawled, “Trip to the lighthouse, 
who’s for the Skylark? Trip to the light- 
house. ... Come on, now!” 

Presently we reached the topmost of 
the three terraced walks. Statues upheld 
baskets of geraniums along the seaward 
side, and we would peer down between 
the spikes of municipal greenery at the 
crowd, scattered round the bandstand. 
The scariet-coated bandsmen played to 
an audience that forever sauntered, glided, 
and strutted in front of the waves. They 
clashed out Tchaikovsky and Offenbach 
and Sullivan, harmonies that seemed 
composed of brass and glass broken now 
and then by the derisive laughter of the 
gulls as they wheeled and swooped high 
above the shore, or settled like plaster 
birds upon the waves. 

Then we would leave the promenade 
where the town suddenly dwindled, and 
climb towards the ledge of the cliff. At 
the summit you could trace the thread of 
ran across the 
marshes beyond the town, the ruined 
castle, the pink smudges of the bungalows 
round the edge of the bay—disputed scene 
of the Normans’ landing. 

Ignoring the smudges, my father would 
prod the distance with his stick. The 
whole of that plain, he would say, was 
once an inlet of the sea and ships sailed 
over what were now fields and villages. 

Above the cliff a track ran first to the 
clover, then to the mustard field, bright 
gold in the sun. You climbed till you 
could feel the bony structure of the earth 
stretched out under your feet, and again 
you climbed as if to meet the sky. The 
track stopped in a tangle of gorse bushes. 
You had come to the emptiness of the 
natural stronghold, to the landscape of 
the hills and giant. 

ety eee, 

Outlined in chalk against the distant 

slope, the giant belonged to the dolmen 


and the stone circle, to a world of imagery - 


and myth. His origin was too remote for 
an imaginable past. His kind was to be on 
other hillsides of southern England, chalk 
silhouettes cut deeply in the soil, symbols 
that had lost all meaning, all power, that 
had become as the stones and the ancient 
earthworks and the ruined castles in a 
land that was perpetually renewing itself, 
building itself afresh. 

And around this figure that seemed to 
stride the hills, the countryside showed 
its colored oblongs and squares spaced by 
hedgerows in monotonous regularity, and 
falling steadily towards the sea. 


The summer faded and veils of mist 
wreathed the clear blue skies of autumn, 
In the town the trees drenched the side- 
walks and gardens in flame; the winds 
rattled the glass doors along the sea- 
echoing balconies, where the deck chairs 
had been stacked, along with the chil- 
dren’s pails and spades. 


At night you heard the wind nosing 
round the shutters and cannonading along 
the promenade, tearing at the gaps be- 
tween the houses. Now we walked for 
the last time that year along an empty 
shore, picked our way beside the muffled 
gray waves. There were no more fire- 
work displays; the rowboats had been 
hauled to the top of the sea wall and lay 
like so’ many fish along a slab. 


It was our last walk, but we would 
come back next year. 

“Next year!” said the grown-ups, but 
for me that seemed a lifetime away. As 
we drove to the station to catch the Lon< 
don train, the cliffs crowded against the 
skyline as if determined to withstand the 
onslaught of the winter seas. 


TERENCE DENNIS 


BY STAGES, a small handsome art mu- 
seum is opening galleries with exhibitions 
of paintings, silver, and ceramics, The 
Sterling and Francine Clark Institute, 
Williamstown, Massachusetts, is a white 
marble structure of classical design. The 
truly rustic surroundings of dense green 
foliage with hilly slopes in the far dis- 
tance are unique as a setting. Generally 


we expect to come upon museums in an 
urban context, often very close to the 
activity and excitement of city life. Delib- 
erately Mr. and Mrs, Clark have chosen 
this restful environment as an appropriate 
setting to house and exhibit the many 
treasures they have gathered over the 
years. 

There are four canvases by Claude 
Monet currently on view at the Clark In- 
stitute. The picture above is particularly 
atmospheric, with squalily sea, dark green 
water, light green foam, and a dark, 
gray sky. A warm accent is introduced in 
the jacket of one of the two sailors. It 
is red, 

Dorotuy ADLOWw 


Viewing a Pageant of the Flowers 


THERE were no class distinctions among 
the flowers I knew. There were no rich 
garden flowers, children of high degree, 
and poor wild flowers, common like village 
children. They all grew together in a 
world where wildings invaded the garden 
and garden spread over the wold, and 
the flowers dwelt in bright profusion of 
friendly harmony. Silently they 
talked, and nodded their gentle heads, and 
stared with unblinking eyes, or they hid 
behind their leaves as shy as the child 
who stooped low over them, kneeling in 
the grass of damp woods and rocky pas- 
tures, listening for a word, looking for a 
sign, waiting to share a hidden secret 
which they held. All night they were out 
under the stars with. eyes shut, and silky 
eyelids drawn across, but they surely 
knew things out there. . . . From January 
to December the pageant of flowers moved 
on, and I was a joyful witness. I ran to 
welcome them, I hunted in their hiding- 
places for the low green buds and the 
growing stalks. I picked here and there, 
leaving some for company, and I took 
them home to adorn kitchen window sill 
or parlour table, speaking softly to them, 


hoping they would enjoy the goings-on at 
the farm and the friendship of the family. 

The year began with the snowdrops, 
which pierced the snow in the orchard and 
shook their green and white petticoats in 
the icy blasts which swept up the hill. On 
the banks of a wind-swept field grew 
early short-stalked primroses, but as the 
sun grew stronger the larger, more beau- 
tiful primroses came out of hiding. They 
clustered in pale yellow beauty under the 
hedges, peeping from the dead oak and 
beech leaves which littered the banks, 
opening wide eyes by the water troughs, 
pushing their deeply veined leaves, whose 
scent is as sweet as the flowers themselves, 
from among the black lichened rocks and 
rusty fronds of old bracken. ... The wind 
swept with bitter force up the field where 
these first flowers grew. Like a knife it 
lashed us, and we crouched on the hill, 
crawling on hands and knees, to pick the 
little brave flowers. They battled with 
that fierce wind, they. too crouched on the 
hill, they were wrapped in green shawls, 
close to the earth—From “Country 


Hoard,” by ALison Uttiey. 1945, Faber . 


and Faber Ltd., London. 


Unexpected Treasures © 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


Wuewn Columbus discovered America, 
he was looking for a new route to India. 


‘He had no idea that another continent 


existed; thus the progress which was 
to unfold from his discovery, he could 
not have imagined. Inventors often find 


that unexpected results are of more 


value than the original aims. 

Unexpected treasures unfold also in 
the study of Christian Science, for al- 
most everyone turns to. this religion to 
receive something, probably more often 
than not, a physical healing. Although 
some individuals experience instanta- 
neous healings, many others need to 
gain a deeper understanding of Chris- 
tian Science in order to see the solution 
of their difficulties. 

In the process of gaining this under- 
standing, one finds that sin, which 
never before seemed evident, suddenly 
appears ugly and is destroyed. Fears 
too are seen to have no foundation and 
are overcome. New vistas are opened, 
and undreamed of opportunities come 
into view. The loss of material pleas- 
ures and beliefs, the student of this 
Science finds, is actually gain which 
increases happiness immeasurably. 
Often the revelations unfolding are so 
much greater than the healing which 


was originally sought. that one who is 
healed often says, “I don’t. remember 
exactly when the healing took place, 


but it has been permanent,” 
ee, NED 


The study of Christian Science, 
which is based upon the Bible, is the 
greatest adventure of our times, and its 
understanding, the greatest treasure. 
During the writer’s early experience in 
this religion, which began when she 
was a young child, she found that 
proofs of its power seemed to come 
slowly. She received much comfort 
from the reading of the Bible and the 
textbook, “Science and Health with 
Key to the Scriptures” by Mary Baker 
Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder of 
Christian Scierice. However, she did 
not experience as many demonstrations 
of its power as did other members of 
her family. 

Because the writer did not see suffi- 
cient results, there came a time when 
she began to try to mix various mate- 
rial philosophies with her understand- 
ing of Christian Science. But the at- 
tempt brought stagnation. instead of 
progress. At a particularly discourag- 
ing period, she was taking a course in 
mathematics, studying diligently but 
apparently accomplishing little. Her 
father said, “If you would study Chris- 
tian Science half as hard as you study 
mathematics, you would see a solution 
to your personal problems.” 

She then began to really study and 
to apply what she learned. She under- 


stood what Jesus meant when he said 
(Matthew 6:33), “Seek ye first the 
kingdom of God, and his righteousness; 
and all these things shall be added 
unto you.” Her outlook, her talents, 
her health, her opportunities, every 


phase of her life, improved beyond 


anything she had ever thought possi- 
ble. For the first time, she had a sense 
of calmness, dominion, and direction. 


} Me ER! 


Mrs. Eddy writes in “The First 
Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscel- 
lany” (p. 158), “We live in an age of 
Love’s divine adventure to be All-in- 
all.” This adventure of the student of 
Christian Science brings him unex- 
pected treasures, for one of the first 
lessons is that God is Love, and, there- 
fore, man as God’s child reflects Love, 
More is required of the student than 
his memorizing of this simple fact. He 
must see that it becomes true in his 
own experience, that he puts it into 
practice by expressing love in every 
way he can, and thus proves for him- 
self the all-powerfulness of Love. 

A student of this religion must strive 
to understand what Love really means, 
for Love is not a human emotion that 
can_change. suddenly..to. hate. Love is .. 
universal-- Mind, -expressed by -such © 
qualities: as» kindness; beauty; and sin= 
cerity. In the proportion that one une 
derstands that Love is All-in-all, he 
experiences the joys of the divine 
adventure. 

Whether one turns to Christian Sci- 
ence for healing of human difficulties 
or to satisfy a deep yearning for the 
truth of God and man, he finds both; 
for the unexpected treasures and the 
original goal blend in achievement. 


In other columns on this page will be found trans- 

ations of this article into French and German. The 

next French and German translations will appear 
September 29.) 


End-of- Summer Walk 


With what is left of summer 
Let me fill your hands: 
Acorns borrowed from her, 
Four assorted brands, 
Rubbery gooseberries, 
Blue and good to eat, 
Spray of black chokecherries 
And orange bittersweet. 
You’ll: know what to do with 
Round disks from hollyhock, 
Shells the snails are through with, 
And giant mullein stalk. 
You can find some uses 
For silky milkweed seeds. 
Summer still produces 
Way beyond her needs, 
Scattering and. spilling 
In heedless overflow— 
Hold out your hands for filling 
As we go. 


Betty BRIDGMAN 


Des Trésors inattendus 


[This is a French translation of “Unexpected Treasures,” appearing on this page] 


Traduction de l'article anglais de Science Chrétienne paraissant sur cette méme page 
{Lea prochaine traduction francaise paraitra le 29 septembre.) 


Lorseue Christophe Colomb découvrit 
l’Amérique, il cherchait une nouvelle 
route pour les Indes. Il ignorait l’exis- 
tence d’un autre continent; il n’aurait 
donc pu imaginer les progrés que sa 
découverte allait rendre possibles. Sou- 


vent, les inventeurs constatent que des 
résultats inattendus surpassent en valeur 
le but original. | | 
L’étude de la Science Chrétienne nous 
apporte aussi des trésors inattendus, car 
presque toujours on se tourne vers cette 
religion pour recevoir quelque chose — 


dans bien des cas la guérison d’un mal 


physique. Quoique certaines personnes 
soient guéries instantanément, beaucoup 
d’autres doivent approfondir la Science 
Chrétienne afin que leurs problémes se 
résolvent. 

A mesure qu’il obtient la compréhen- 
sion nécessaire, le disciple constate que 
tel péché dont il ne s’était jamais rendu 
compte apparait soudain dans toute sa 
laideur et se détruit. En outre il s’apercoit 
que les craintes n’ont aucun fondement, 
et peut les surmonter. I] voit s’ouvrir des 
horizons nouveaux, des perspectives in- 


préhension de la Science constitue le plus 
grand trésor, Dés son enfance, ]’auteur du 
présent article apprit a connaltre cette 
religion, mais les preuves' de son pouvoir 
lui semblaient lentes a venir. Elle trouvait 
un grand réconfort dans la lecture de la 
Bible et du livre de texte, Science et 
Santé avec la Clef des Ecritures, par 
Mary Baker, Eddy, Découvreuse et Fon- 
datrice de la Science Chrétienne. Cepen- 
dant les autres membres de sa famille 
démontraient plus souvent qu’elle-méme 
le pouvoir de la Vérité. 

Par la suite, ne voyant pas se produire 
les résultats désirés, l’auteur eut recours 
a diverses philosophies matérielles qu’elle 
voulut mélanger avec sa compréhension 
de la Science Chrétienne. Cette tentative 
produisit le marasme et non les progrés; 
A une époque ow elle se sentait trés dé- 
couragée, elle suivait un cours de mathé- 
matiques; quoiqu’elle étudiat beaucoup, 
les résultats semblaient maigres. Son 

; : “Tu trouverais la solution 
de tes problémes personnels si tu étudiais 
la Science Chrétienne avec autant de zéle 


Alors elle se mit vraiment & l’ceuvre; 
elle étudia la Science et fit l’application 


Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany, Mrs. 
Eddy déclare: “Nous vivons dans une ére 
d’aventure divine, ot l’Amour est Tout- 
en-tout.” Cette aventure dans laquelle se 
lance le Scientiste Chrétien lui apporte 
des trésors inattendus, car une des pre- 
miéres lecons qu'il apprend c’est que Dieu 
est Amour; donc "homme, enfant de Dieu, 
refléte l’Amour divin. Mais il ne suffit 
pas d’apprendre par cceur cette simple 
vérité. Le disciple doit la comprendre et 
en faire vraiment Il’application; il faut 
qu’il la mette en pratique en exprimant 
l'amour dans tous les détails dé la vie, 
et prouve ainsi lui-méme la toute-puis- 
sance de |’Amour. 


Ceux qui étudient cette religion doivent 
s’efforcer de comprendre ce que signifie 
vraiment *l’Amour: ce n’est point une 
émotion humaine capable de se changer 
soudain en aversion. L’Amour, c’est l"En- 
tendement universel qui s’exprime par 
des qualités telles que la bienveillance, 
la beauté, la sincérité. Dans la mesure ou 
Yon réalise que l’Amour est Tott-en- 
tout, l’on fait sienmes les joies de ‘J’a- 
venture divine. 

Qu’on se tourne vers la Science Chré- 
tienne soit pour guérir les maux physi- 
ques, soit pour satisfaire un profond désir 
de connaitre la vérité concernant Dieu et 
homme, on trouve la réponse cherchée; 
car les trésors inattendus et le but original 

accomplissement, 
clentiste Chrétien 
des Ecritures,”’ 


——— 


Unerwartete Schitze 


[This is a German translation of “Unexpected Treasures,” appearing on this page) — 


Ubersetsung des auf dieser Seite erscheinenden christiich-wissenschaftlichen Aufsatzes 
[Die n&chste deutsche Ubersetsung erscheint am 29. September) 


Ats Kolumbus Amerika entdeckte, 
suchte er einen neuen Seeweg nach In- 
dien. Er hatte keine Ahnung davon, daS 
ein anderer Kontinent existierte; daher 
war der Fortschritt, der sich spater aus 
dieser Entdeckung entwickelte, etwas, das 
er sich nicht hatte vorstellen kénnen. Er- 
finder merken gar oft, da8S unerwartete 
Resultate ihrer Erfindungen von groéSe- 
rem Wert sind als die urspriinglichen 
Ziele. ! 

Unerwartete Schatze entfalten sich auch 
aus dem Studium der Christlichen Wis- 
senschaft, denn, obwohl fast jeder, der 
sich dieser Religion zuwendet, etwas zu 
empfangen sucht, erwarten wohl die mei- 
sten eine kérperliche Heilung. Wenn auch 
manche Menschen augenblickliche Hei- 
lungen erleben, miissen andere ein tie- 
feres Verstandnis der Christlichen Wis- 
senschaft erlangen, um die Lésung ihrer 
Schwierigkeiten zu finden. 

Bei dem Vorgang, dieses Verstandnis zu 
erlangen, entdeckt man, da8 Siinden, die 
vormals nie beachtet wurden, plétzlich 
haBlich erscheinen und tberwunden wer- 


‘den. Auch Furchtgedanken werden als 


grundios erfunden und verscheucht. Neue 
Ausblicke tun sich vor uns auf, und un- 
geahnte Gelegenheiten’ werden wahrge- 
nommen. Der Verlust materielier Freuden 
und Annahmen wird von dem Anhanger 
dieser Wissenschaft als Gewinn erachtet, 
durch den sich seine Zufriedenheit un- 
endlich vertieft. Sehr oft sind die Offen- 
barungen, die sich entfalten, so viel 
gréGer als die Heilung, die urspriinglich 
gesucht wurde, da8 der Geheilte haufig 
sagt: ,2Ich kann mich nicht daran erin- 
nern, wann die Heilung kam, aber sie 
war von Dauer.“ 


<r bo $ 


Das Studium der Christlichen Wissen- 
schaft, die sich auf die Bibel griindet, ist 
das gréBte Abenteuer unserer Zeit, und 
das Verstindnis derselben, der gréSte 
Schatz. Wiahrend der friihen Erfahrungen 
und Erlebnisse, die die Verfasserin in 
dieser Religion hatte, ais sie noch ganz 
jung war, schienen sich die Beweise von 
deren Heilkraft ihr nur langsam zu ent- 
falten. Sie fand viel Trost im Lesen der 
Bibel und des Lehrbuchs ,,Wissenschatft 
und Gesundheit mit Schltissel zur Heili- 


it iran ta parton ee 


Christliche Wissenschaft halb so eifrig 
studieren wiirdest wie die Mathematik, 
so kénntest du die Lésungen deiner per- 
sdénlichen Probleme finden.“ 

Daraufhin fing sie an, wirklich zu stu- 
dieren und das anzuwenden, was sie 
lernte. Sie verstand, was Jesus meinte, als 
er sagte (Matthaus 6:33): ,,Trachtet am 
ersten nach dem Reich Gottes und nach’ 
seiner Gerechtigkeit; so wird euch solches 
alles zufallen.* Ihre Weltanschauung, 
ihre Gaben, ihre Gesundheit, ihre Még- 
lichkeiten, alle Phasen ihres Lebens bes- 
serten sich mehr, als sie es je fiir méglich 
gehalten hatte. Zum ersten Mal hatte sie 
ein Gefiihl der Ruhe, der Herrschaft und 
des ZielbewuStseins. 


Pe A 


Mrs. Eddy schreibt in ihrem Werk ,,The 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, and 
Miscellany“ (Die Erste Kirche Christi, 
Wissenschafter, und Verschiedenes, S. 
158): ,,Wir leben in einem Zeitalter des 
Abenteuers der géttlichen Liebe, Alles-in- 
allem zu sein.“ Dies Abenteuer des An- 
hangers der Christlichen Wissenschaft 
bringt ihm unerwartete Schitze; denn 
¢ine ihrer ersten Lektionen ist, daB Gott 
die Liebe ist, und daS der Mensch als 
Gottes Kind die Liebe widerspiegelt. Doch 
wird mehr von dem Wissenschafter ge- 
fordert als nur das Verstehen und Im- 
Sinn-Behalten dieser einfachen Wahr- 
heit. Er mu8 darauf bedacht sein, daS 
sie in seiner eigenen Erfahrung bewahr- 
heitet wird, da8 er sie betitigt, indem 
er in jeder médglichen Weise Liebe zum 
Aysdruck bringt und so sich selbst die 
Allmacht der géttlichen Liebe beweist. 

Ein Anhdnger dieser Religion muS 


.. @anach streben zu verstehen, was Liebe 


wirklich bedeutet; denn die gittliche 
Liebe ist nicht eine menschliche Empfin- 
dung, die sich plétzlich in ihr Gegenteil, 
den HaS, umwandeln kann, Die Liebe ist 


das allumfassende Gemiit, das in Eigen- 


schaften wie Giite, Schéinheit und Auf- 
richtigkeit Ausdruck findet. In dem MaSe, 
wie wir verstehen lernen, da8 die Liebe 
Alles-in-allem ist, erleben wir die Freu- 
den des ,gdttlichen Abenteuers“. 
Gleichviel ob wir uns der Christlichen 
Wissenschaft zuwenden, um Heilung fir 


Sea 2 i Bit it 


btn § re a Sy See mir % ra yee 
a ee ras 4 
ne 


Re Bs, - = 2 ° < < ; 
Union Pacific Railroad (Morning Mists at Mt. ‘Bt. _ Helens) 


All Across the State of 


VE ve rgree n 


Bunyan Handwriting in Washington State 


© Harris & Ewing 


Senator Magnuson 


Wide World (Dorsal Fins for Sembers at Boeing's) 


By Bertram B. Johansson 
Staff Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Seattle 
AUL BUNYAN and his loggers and sawyers 
at one of the Northwest's largest timber 
: firms in the State of Washington had 
scrawled a new kind of political handwrit- 
ing on the wall. It was as pungent and tangy as 
the resinous odors of sap from newly cut Douglas 
fir, hemlock, and cedar 
In tall, white chalk letters on the side of a small 
black shed inside the droning sawmill, a saw crew 
laborer had printed: 
: HAIRCUTS 
Democrats 
Republicans 
There was no lumberman’s footnote about how 
much a haircut would have cost Paul Bunyan, or 
whether singing Swedish steel bandsaws would 
have sufficed to cut his 5 o’clock shadow, but the 
sign had a special relevance in the State of Wash- 
ington, especially after the Sept. 11 primaries. 


Maine, at one end of the country, had gone for 
a Democratic governor a second time on Sept. 
10, and had added another Democrat to the 
United States House of Representatives. 

In Washington state, Maine’s opposite _geo- 
graphical number on the West Goast, three-time 
Republican Gov. Arthur B. Langlie, who will 
run in November for the United States Senate 
seat, was soundly trounced in a primary popu- 
larity contest by incumbent Senator Warren G., 
Magnuson, the Democrat who will be Gover- 
nor Langlie’s opponent. 

Neither man had any primary opposition, but 
the popularity contest, which was more than a 
write-in affair since both candidates’ names were 
printed on the primary ballot, was taken ex- 
tremely seriously within the state, though na- 
tional notice has not beén widespread. 

Senator Magnuson’s margin over Governor 
Langlieé, whom you'll remember as the Republi- 
can convention keynote speaker, amounted to 
more than 150,000 votes in the popularity con- 
test. 

The size of the Magnuson margin is par- 
ticularly significant in view of a private statement 
made by one of Governor Langlie’s aides the day 
before the primary. It was that if Senator Mag- 
nuson won the popularity contest by 20,000 votes, 
Governor Langlie could easily make it up in 
November. If the Magnuson margin were 50,000 
votes, this aide had said, the Governor would be- 
gin to worry about November. If it topped 100,- 
000, he would run very scared. 

Governor Langlie’s comment, the day after the 
primary, was realistic. He said, “A lot of people 
will have to change their votes in the next two 
months.” 

High Republican officials in neighboring 
Oregon, on hearing of the Langlie performance, 
commented, “He’s done for. He should have 
stayed in for a fourth term as Governor.” 

The valley may not be quite that low for 

Republicans. The popularity contest result has 
had a chastening effect. 
.Now, more apparently than ever, the Wash- 
ington contest, like the McKay-Morse senatorial 
struggle in Oregon, will provide an acid test of 
President Eisenhower's coattail influence in 
November. The President is expected to speak 
in Washington before the campaign ends, and 
other GOP big gun campaigners will soon be 
moved into position. 

Not that Governor Langlie is hanging avidly to 
the President’s coattails, or depending on them. 

He is a strong and effective campaigner in his 
own right. In the 1952 gubernatorial campaign, 


Governor Langlie polled 567,822 votes, defeating 
Hugh..Mitchell, who. received. 510,675. : 

By comparison, Senator Magnuson, in his most 
recent election showing in 1950, a nonpresidential 
election year, it should be noted, polled 383,378 
votes to the 328,550 of his opponent, Walter 
Williams. 

Governor Langlie entered the Senate race re- 
luctantly, afte* much persuasion from the Eisen- 
hower administration, and primarily to provide 
a booster rocket to the President’s campaign in 
the state. 

Downstate Washington editors believe that 
Governor Langlie’s stand on the Hells Canyon 
dam issue alienated a host of Grange, rural, and 
labor votes. Governor Langlie opposes federal 
financing of the high dam in Idaho, which could 
affect power costs in his state, and has been 
a spokesman for the administration’s “partner- 
ship” program for power development. 


Senator Magnuson, senior senator from Wash- 
ington who has served eight years in the House 
and 12 in the Senate, is an ardent public power 
advocate. He favored the high federal dam at 
Hells Canyon in Idaho. 


Governor Langlie’s popularity contest perform- 
ance in the town of Montesano, (Pop. 2,500) in 
southwest Washington was typical. Chapin Col- 
lins, nationally known conservationist and editor 
of the Montesano Vidette, a weekly newspaper, 
said the primaries had shown the strongest 
Democratic trend in 25 years in his predomi- 
nantly Republican town and county. 

Montesano, where local Democrats have been 
in the habit of filing their candidacies for office 
simply as a matter of course and without much 


hope of election, went heavily for Senator Mag- 


nuson...with...647.. votes..to..the..365.. cast. for..the. 


Governor. | 

The town, like many cities and towns of 
Washington, is experiencing an influx of indus- 
trial population, and Democratic voters—as the 
state, with its three main industries of fishing, 
farming, and lumbering, becomes more indus- 
trially diversified. 


“I expected Magnuson to lead Langlie around 
here,” said the Montesano editor, “but I was 
surprised at the weakness of the Langlie vote. He 
has been a good vote getter in this area during 
his 12 years as Governor. He has spoken here 
several times. People have seen him and talked 
with him. 

“I don’t know exactly why the trend was so 
against Langlie,” Mr. Collins said. “I think the 
secret is that there is no outcry against Senator 
Magnuson, I think Magnuson has done a com- 
petent job that has been generally considered 
as acceptable. He’s done a lot of errands for 
his constituents, both Republicans and Democrats, 
many of them businessmen. 


“Most of the people in the state are doing well, 
except for the dairy people, so what have they 

ot to vote against? Now, if Langlie had run for 

overnor, he would surely have carried the 
state.” 

This is not to say that Governor Langlie’s 
chances for winning the Senate seat from Wash- 
ington are entirely washed up. It definitely will 
be. an uphill fight for the popular Governor, 
against a Senator who “has always responded 
practically and quickly in serving his home con- 
stituency,” as Mr. Collins said, 


Se ee 


(Peavey Men Loosening Logs) 


2 
; — 
« @ 
Px 
¥ 


Republicans Heed Tocsins 


Harold M. Lambert (Mt. Rainier—14,408 Feet High) 


Washington, City-Dwelling Fishermen, Aeronautical Workers, Loggers, Peavey Men, Sawyers, Clubwomen, Dairymen, Are Thinking Twice About the November Elections 


Ss tate Hustings 


Governor Langlie 


By Alice Myers Winther 


Special Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Seattle 
EPUBLICANS in the Evergreen State are 
doffing kid gloves and rolling up sleeves. 
Washington’s Sept. 11 primary was a 
shock to the GOP, A salutary shock, party 
leaders hope. 

From senatorial to county commissioner races 
Democratic gains were strong. The Democrats 
polled approximately 55 per cent of the total 
vote. Geperally in this state Republicans turn 
out in greater numbers: than Democrats at the 
primaries. Political observers interpret the count 
as showing a significant trend of independent 
voters returning to the Democratic Party. 

Viewing the returns as “both good and bad,” 
GOP State Chairman George Kinnear called for 
a “coats off, fighting campaign” to win the gen- 
eral election. 

“The bad element,” he said, “is in the huge- 


ness of the task we face. We have a tremendous 


job to do because, frankly, they got out the vote 
and we didn’t get out ours. 


Republicans Roused_ 


“The favorable element is that apathy and 
complacency are now dispelled. Any Republican 
who thought we could coast to an easy victory 
now knows we face a tough battle. 

“The Republican Party has a grand slate of 
candidates from President Eisenhower down. 
They deserve to be elected. 


hington 

Everything that has happened boa far sug- 
gests that we are in the opening stage of what 
can be an exceedingly close, uncertain elec- 
tion. which. eould go either way—or both 
ways. (The Democrats could win Congress, the 
Republicans the presidency.) 

Numerous benefits come from the prospect 
of a close election. It makes the campaign it- 
self more meaningful. It encourages more peo- 
ple to vote. It increases the influence of the 
thoughtful independent voter who, in any 
reasonably close campaign, holds the decisive 
balance of power. This is an incentive to both 
candidates to make their appeals candid and 
constructive rather than to pitch them to the 
lowest common denominator of partisanship. 

The two most visible facts in the campaign 
at this point are. these: 

The continuously mounting strength of the 
Democratic Party throughout the country as 
demonstrated in nearly every election since 
1952 and as evidenced at two salient — 
during the past two weeks. 

The undiminished popularity of President 
Eisenhower who in virtually every test of 
public opinion finds that the great majority 
of the voters like him and consider that he is 
doing a good job. 

These are conflicting indices. 

The strength of the Democratic Party does 
not guarantee that the Democratic nominee 
will be elected, because many Americans may 
vote for the Democratic congressional candi- 
dates and against Adlai E. Stevenson as they 
did in 1952. 


The popularity of Mr. Eisenhower does not 


Close Election Shapes Up 


guarantee that the President will be re- 
elected, because it remains to be seen whether 
liking a President is the same thing as intend- 
ing to vote for him. 

There is no doubt that Democratic morale is 
high today. There are several developments 
which are contributing to that high morale. 


The Democrats are not overlooking the fact 
that the Gallup poll shows Mr. Eisenhower 
running as well, if not a little better, than 
he was at the same stage in the campaign four 
years ago. But they are more impressed by 
another “poll” than by Gallup’s, more im- 
pressed by how the voters actually voted 
than how it is forecast they will vote. That 
“poll” is the ‘Maine election in which the vot- 
ers reelected a Democratic Governor, elected 
one Democratic congressman and may have 
elected another, 


What makes the Maine election particularly 
significant is that it comes on top of an almost 
uninterrupted series of Democratic congres- 
sional, gubernatorial, and mayoralty victor- 
ies since 1952 and shows that Democratic 
voting strength has not been arrested but 
continues right into the present campaign. 


There is a second major factor which gives 
the Democrats new confidence. They presently 
are outstripping the Republicans in one of the 
most crucial phases of the campaign—register- 
ing the voters. In many important states—in 
Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Washington, , and 
elsewhere—the Democratic. registration gains 
are formidable. What happened in Pennsyl- 
vania is a vivid example. In 1952 there were 
approximately 1,000,000 more registered Re- 


qn has been cut now by at least 600,000. 


tration. Thus far the Democrats simply are 


four years ago because 14,000,000 men and 
women who never voted before went to the 


impressive campaigner who may be able single- 


By Roscoe Drummond 


Written Especially for 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Philadelphia alone the last registration was 
two-to-one Republican; the Democrats now 
have drawn even. 

This is an achievement of efficient organi- 
zation. On this score the Democrats are helped 
greatly by their labor union allies who are 
particularly alert to the importance of regis- 


doing a better job of getting voters, including 
new voters, registered. A Republican National 
Committee analysis of the 1952 election shows 
that General Eisenhower won his great victory 


polls and 11,000,000 of them cast Republican 
ballots. If the Republicans don’t catch up in 
getting Republicans registered, their cause will 
be in serious jeopardy. 

It should not be overlooked that President 
Eisenhower has, it might be said, “just begun 
to fight.” He has delivered only one nationwide 
speech, and it showed him, it seemed to me, an 


handedly to lift the Republican Party to 
victory. 

But the basic uncertainty of this election 
remains: Can Mr. Stevenson ride to victory on 
the coattails of the Democratic Party? Can the 
Republican Party ride to victory on the coat- 
tails of Mr. Eisenhower? 

Or it could be put another way: What is 
going to happen Nov. 6 when the apparently 
irresistible force of Democratic Party strength 
collides with the apparently immovable ob- 
ject of President Eisenhower's personal popu- 
larity? 


“After seeing the primary returns we're fight- 
ing mad. 

Gov. Arthur B. Langlie ran unexpectedly far 
behind Democratic Senator Warren G. Magnuson 
in what was essentially a popularity contest, since 
both were unopposed. :Senator Magnuson rolled 
up an impressive lead of more than 150,000. 

The Langlie-for-Senator Committee here in 
Seattle reports it is now “being deluged with 
people who have lost their complacency.” Said 
Frank Pritchard, Jr., committee chairman: “Peo- 
ple are suddenly aware of the fact that it would 
be a terrible thing if this state turned its back 
on two men of the caliber of President Eisen- 
hower and Governor Langlie.” 


Warned of Overconfidence 

The committee is not discouraged, but 
realizes it will require unrelenting neighbor-to- 
neighbor persuasion to give Mr. Eisenhower the 
needed assistance of Governer Langlie in the 
Senate. : 

Republicans derive comfort from the fact that 
the Governor was a 2-to-l1 underdog in the 
1940 primary and still won the general election 
that November. 

Meanwhile Democratic leaders are cautioning 
their workers against overconfidence. Henry P. 
Carstensen, Democratic state chairman, issued 
this statement: 

“In the Sept. 11 primary the voters expressed 
confidence in our party and its candidates, but 
we must remember that many Republican candi- 
dates—particularly the six incumbent district 
congressmen—are still holding on by narrow 
margins. 

“While the victories we scored showed clearly 
that not only Democrats, independents, and many 
Republicans are tired of the present administra- 
tion and its policies, the primary eertainly was 
not a Democratic landslide. 

Statewide interest now centers on the guber- 
nmatorial contest between Republican Emmett 
Anderson of Tacoma and Democrat Albert D. 
Rosellini of Seattle. These primary victors each 
won by approximately 2-to-1 margins. There 
were four Democratic and six Republican con- 
tenders. The outlook for this November race is 
that either could win, and the running is ex- 
pected to be rough and close. 

The Democratic trend was broken only by five 
of the state’s six Republigan representatives: Tom 
Pelly, Seattle; Jack Westland, Everett: Russell 
Mack, Hoquiam; Wait Horan, Wenatchee; Thor 
Tollefson, Tacoma. Each polled more than the 
combined totals of his Democratic opponents. 
Representative Hal Holmes (R), Ellensburg, 
polled slightly less than the total of his Demo- 
cratic opponents. 

The Democratic swing continued in the cone 
test for congressman-at-large. Incumbent Don 
Magnuson, the state’s sole Democrat in the House, 
held slightly better than a 3-to-2 lead over the 
combined vote of the GOP candidates. Philip 
Evans, former secretary of the Seattle World 
Affairs Council and a vigorous young newcomer 
on the political scene, won the Republican nomi- 
nation. 

One of the hardest fought and most contro- 
versial races was that for the nonpartisan post 
of State Superintendent..of Public Instruction, 
The incumbent, Mrs. Pearl A. Wanamaker, who 
is seeking reelection for the fifth time, made her 
poorest primary showing. It was practically an 
even race with the other finalist, State Senator 
Lloyd Andrews. Henry W. Turner, who was 
eliminated, polled more than 100,000 votes. Feel- 
ing runs high in this race, and the next few 


publicans than registered Democrats. This boomers will have to give. 


see | 2 


saying “no passports” to them. In the case of United 
States newspapermen wanting to go to Communist 
China, though, the State Department not only 
The difference is this, say department officials: 
Communist China still holds 10 Americans prisoner 
and won't let them go despite promises; Communist 
China also is most anxious to have American reporters 
visit and do stories on Communist “progress”; there 
is very little nonmilitary leverage the United States 
can put on Peking to free these Americans < but one 
persuader is to refuse to let other Americans visit 
China until present prisoners are freed. 
The United States does not have any such case 
of mistreatment or abuse to justify its refusal of 
passports to pilots wanting to work for Cairo. 


weeks are bound to see spirited campaigning. 


es 


be more generous to it this coming year if the 
State Department were currently less generous to 
the UN specialized agencies, 


WASHINGTON LETTER 


COST OF BOYCOTT ON EGYPT ANALYZED 
It is very unlikely, now, that the Suez crisis 


will erupt ina shooting war. It has boiled down to 
a sharp economic battle. 


The West is beginning to apply an economic 
boycott against Egypt. Egypt is girding to endure 
that boycott. The ultimate matter of “who wins” 
likely will be decided by the answer to this simple 
question: Who can best endure this kind of econom- 
ic warfare: Egypt, or Britain and France? 

If the West sends its ships around Africa 
instead of through the Suez Canal, this will cost 
Britain, France, and Italy a half billion extra dol- 
lars a year. An applied boycott on Egypt and on 
use of the canal will deprive Britain, West Germany, 
and other nations of much of their Middle East 

trade, The economic squeeze can hurt Western 
Europe seriously. 

On the other hand, Egypt would lose 80-90 per 
cent of its canal traffic. Its sterling assets have 
been frozen in London. Its cotton crop already is 
mortgaged to the Communists to pay for arms pur- 
chases. Egypt can try to tighten its belt and trade 
more with the Communist bloc. 


to stand more aus<- 


To the Readers of The Christian Science Monitor: 


The next two weeks may be critical in the 
presidential election. Up to now Democrats have 
been coming up from behind. They got their cam- 
paign under way more quickly than Republicans. 
This is also substantially 
what happened in 1952, 

Republicans are tradi-«- 
tionally slow starters, 

But in 1952 the 
Stevenson-Sparkman 
ticket paused at about 
this point and found 
difficulty in ever climb- 
ing above the 45 per 
cént point in the national 
polls which it reached 
early. The question is 
whether the Democratic 
upward trend will falter 
now as it did in 1952 or 


whether it will continue 


1293 National Press Building 
DEMOCRATS TO PUSH *MICHIGAN TECHNIQUE’ 
Watch for the Democrats to use their “Michi- 
gan ae which worked well in Maine, in other 
states dur this political cam _Essentiall 
the technique is simply a teamup. between Demo- 


cratic workers and labor unionists - in r 
doorbells and ge out the vote. 


Stor benls and gerne cot Se vere. 

The concentration is on precincts which are 
strongly Democratic. The (aes is to amass a 
heavy vote in preponderantly working-class area 

h can outweigt contrary vote in less 
favorably Democrati 
- This strategy firet saw success in Michigan, 
where the CIO’s Automobile Workers helped pro- 
duce a Democratic tide in 1952, Now other states 
where organized labor has strength are earmarked 
for the same treatment. ; 

Despite such techniques the Republicans are 
counting on retaining some portion of the labor 
_vote which went surprisingly strongly for Mr.. Eisen- 


hower in 1952. But the Republicans still have to 
its advance this year, srove they can se oe re rout out 


Up to this po e Democrats have had the he pro-Republican voters in heavy quantity. Witt 
psychological jump on the Republicans. The GOP President Eisent Fr energetically commanding ute more than one-third of the UN's total. But in 
made mistakes at its convention, and the Demo- his troops the Republicans put on a good kickoff the end Mr. Dulles got the $15,000,000 plus just a 
crats quickly exploited them - as, for example, rally at Gettysburg. But those “rallied” were only __ warning | 
the “Joe Smith” incident, But the Republican cam- the topmost party leaders in each state, not the pre- cn 

_ paign finally is launched. Vice-President Nixon is — cinct workers. Can the enthusiasm be passed down : ing less than $15,000,0 00 the State 
in the field, President Eisenhower has made his the line sucsesetully? That is the GOP's shout rtment is wondering whether it would t 
first massive TV appeal for support, and the ge question. : Tyamarter to refra a from spend ng all Ce 


... weight of radio and television time for the Republi- ete Oh ier arate «as fait RS ys ae -srawalle le ie me 
cans will begin slowly to have effect. Party pro- _ FROWNS DIFFER ON CAIRO AND PEKING 


of re again before for more monies; aa 
aa fessionals shink they-sill: na a much better answer pags Was ah AR ee | Sethe aan , ess would 


UN SHADES DULLES AGENCY'S FUND OUTLOOK 
Congress told State Department officials the 
could spenc J00,000 this year on UN special- 

ized UNESCO, FAO, WHO activities, but it did not: 


like the idea of the United States contribution being 
about half the total - as it had a habit of being. 
The United States share should be nearer a third, 


Congress said, and would the administration please 
keep that in mind? 
Some legislators were for 


‘He is absolutely right!’ 


was available, the United States should a detlartios 


ww Ss vs r fritnh OF Shy 228i. 21CUR 


Tt an eeionne every 


YY rr. 


on - rnp ge thee engage = sopeas 


ii 


-. 1 )104%* ~— Art<Musie—Theater THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 Art—Music—Theater 


- 


| Venice Biennale After Long Absence—San Francisco Opera 


— 


& 


Season Opens 


“a4 


Impressions of Traveler 


At Vast Display of Art 


By Charles Fabens Kelley 


Venice 

It was nearly 30 years ago 
when I saw my first Biennale, 
just as the project was getting 
under way, and Lorado Taft, 
who was there, too, felt that it 
boded.-little good for art. A few 
of the works he found of inter- 
est, but for the most part the 
exhibits seemed to be exploding 
and flying apart with no feeling 
for dignity, nor desire for noble 
expression. 

After long absence, I have 
seen this year’s show, a stagger- 
ing array from many countries, 
beautifully staged, for the most 

art, in Venice’s lovely park. 

his now has permanent pavil- 
ions for more than a score of na- 
tions and a very large multi-gal- 
leried building for Italy itself. 

It is a formidable task to visit 
an exhibition of such 
sions; and still more to assess it. 
What progress has art made 
among the different nations, and 
what national characteristics 
q@merge as significant expression 
of the fgelings and aspirations 
of a people? What significant 
changes have become. estab- 
lished, comparable to impres- 
sionism? Wherein will art al- 
ways be different from what it 
was 25 years ago? 


Pictures From Russia 

Curiously enough, Russia 
shows less desire to be different 
than do other nations. Ndthing 
in the large Russian exhibition is 
unlike what could have been 
seen in any conservative exhibi- 
tion in England, America, or 
France 25 years ago. There is a 
great deal of portrait sculpture 
mostly in bronze, large scale 
genre’ painting, etchings, wood 
blocks, drawings—all technically 
proficient and disarmingly free 
from propaganda. Perhaps Ni- 
kita Khrushchev was on the 
jury. It was pleasant enough, 
but I cannot remember a picture 
I would care to see again. 


Then there was Japan, de-| 


terminedly fauve, according to 
the best European traditions. 
Japan has proved that its people 
can do anything anyone else can 
do, but the Japanese flavor re- 


dimen- | 


for fairy tales of ¢he Hans Chris- 
tian Andersen type. There was 
little variety and less creation, 
and the execution stayed within 
very narrow limits. 

Italy, the host, naturally had 
the most gallery space of all, 
and the exhibition accordingly 
suffered from too inclusive an 
offering. The first galleries held 
high promise, and the level de- 
teriorated rapid! thereafter, 
with exceptions of course. 

A very large gallery was 
to de Chirico with a pr 


ven 
omi- 


canvases, with very few of the 
surrealist subjects that have 
made him so famous in America. 
They seemed far in advance of 
his other works. 


Blow-Torch Work 


| Then, too, there was a Manzu 
‘gallery with some very fine 


'blow-torch work, but the exam- | 


‘ples shown were not of his high- 


lest creation. Doubtless these 
|could not be secured from their 
owners. 


The United States had a dif- 
ferent type of show, so it cannot 
easily be compared with the 
[other countries where a handful 
\of one-man shows was supposed 
ito represent the work of a na- 
|tion. The Museum of. Modern 
|Art, which was.responsible for 
‘the American exhibit, invited 
\the Art Instiute of Chicago to 
assume responsibility forthe 


show, and this was delegated to | siderable number of imaginative | 
| ine | painters, working in a variety of 
,ern painting and sculpture. She | techniques. 


|'Katharine Kuh, curator of mod- 


chose as a theme “The American 


'Painters and the City.” 


Such painters as she consid- 


nance of portraits and decorative 


4 


|ogues 
|This naturally produced a very 
\ered able exponents of contem- | favorable impression. 


* 
@ Peter Rossiter 


Siobhan McKenna as Joan and Earle Hyman as Dunois in 
Shaw’s “Saint Joan,” at the Phoenix Theater in New York. 


Manon Lescaut’ Presented | 
To Launch 34th Series 


San Francisco 
It was a moot question—at 
the opening of the 34th annual 
San Francisco Opera season— 


whether the dramatics took 
place mainly in the audience 
or on the stage. The opera was 
Puccini’s ~ “Manon aut,” 
given in a production that on 
any other occasion would have 
rivaled the best. But the audi- 
ence was so compelling in its 
opulent array that it could 
hardly help a certain preoccu- 
pation with itself. 
Experienced observers are of 
the opinion that no other 
American city can excel San 
Francisco in its manifestation 
of high style at the opening 
of the opera. This provides a 
fine show for those who go to 


who must compete with the 
couturier. Dorothy Kirsten, for 
instance, is one of the most 
stunning prima donnas on the 
American stage, and in the title 


porary techniques were invited 
to exhibit one picture each, for 
the most part, though one 
painter has three, one four, and 
several two, making a total of 46 
canvases. With as diverse a 


the central theme offered a uni- 
fying factor which has produced 
a handsome show. It proves at 
any rate that America has a con- 


Beautifully 
were 


illustrated cata- 
available’ gratis. 


Visitors From U.S. in Vienna 


By Rudolf Klein 


Vienna 
The concert season in Vienna 


‘opened with an evening per- | 
‘formance by the Boston Sym- 


phony . Orchestra. After 


sions. 
the | 


this music is almost unknown to 
us, but also because it was per- 
formed with a precision and an 
exactness of fabulous dimen- 
The virtuosity of the 
woodwinds and the brasses, in 


mains as -a noldover—not as a} Philadelphia Orchestra and the | my opinion, has no equal in the 
constructive factor. A half a|New York Philharmonic-Sym- | world. That in this immensely 
dozen of the prominent artists | phony, this was the third Ameri- | difficult work not a note was 
are each trying to be ferocious | can orchestra of the postwar pe- | missed, and none was blurred to 


and untrammeled. A room full 
of bold black-and-white prints 


‘riod to visit Vienna. 


| the ear, was a surpassing accom- 


The orchestra came from Mos- | plishment. 


- the - committee 


is devoid of the characteristics | COW via Prague to the Austrian | 
that have put Japanese wood- | capital, The train on which the 
block printing at the forefront. | instruments of the musicians had 
This can, however, be blamed on | been sent was late, and the audi- | 
for selection: | 


Concept of Music 


The same precision was evi- 
dent in Ravel's Suite from 


}group.of artists.as can be found, }. 


' 


By Harold Rogers 


role she gave, with the excep- 
tion of one badly pinched hi 
note, a superb account of the 
wayward heroine. | 
ussi Bjoerling, too, has 
never been heard in better 
voice as he poured his heart 
out in the role of Des Grieux; 
in fact, this is one Puccini opera 
in which the tenor truly has his 
day—even more so than the 
soprano. Louis uilico from 


see and to be seen, but it is| 
not so fortunate for the singers | 


Canada made his San Francisco 
debut as Lescaut and covered 
himself with glory for the 
handsome quality of his bari- 
tone. 


It was therefore regrettable, 
considering the excellence of 
the singing, that the audience 
was divided in its attention and 
cool in its response. Oliviero de 
Fabritiis, making his American 


conducting debut, took a share 
of the blame from local critics | <= 


| for his flaccid tempos, and there |; eS 
| were those in the audience who | 


|& poor choice as the opening 
| item. 


Too Many Shows 


But the answer probably lies 
in the fact that two shows at 
the opera are one too many. All 
the splendor should be on stage, 
as happened to be the case with 


fering. Renata Tebaldi, the noted 


operatic world at her feet, gave 
a noble and impassioned por- 
trayal in’ the titlerole;-and--at 
the conclusion of her “Vissi 
d’arte” aria the show stopped 


had Glauco Curiel, the conduc- 
tor, not insisted, with a per- 
sistent baton on starting it again. 

She sang the aria, and indeed 
the entire role, with nuances of 
emotional and vocal coloring sel- 
dom matched by less artful sing- 
ers. When she discovered that 
Cavaradossi has actually been 
executed, she evoked a display 
of dramatic horror that chilled 
the blood. 


Mme Tebaldi had a vis-a-vis 
in Richard Martell who was con- 
vincingly handsome and whose 
tenor had a stirring ring that fell 
excitingly on the ear. This was 
his San Francisco debut, and one 
hopes his career will progress as 
auspiciously as it was set forth 
here. 

Mme Tebaldi was also fortu- 
nate having to deal with a Scar- 
pia sung by Leonard Warren, 


| known for its musical and emo- 


Puccini's “Tosca,” the second of- 


and would have stayed stopped | 


whose powerful baritone is well | 


| Set that “Manon Lescaut” was | en 


® The Scotsman, Edinburgh 
Kumudini and Ram Gopal as 


‘PA ROGER YS OF 


4 
, 
= 
a 
¢ 


Princess and Emperor in a new 


ballet, “The Legend of the Taj Mahal.” 


‘slight, ungrateful rasp in her 
‘tone, though toward the end she 
‘Sang. so vividly and well that 
one was willing to forgive and 
forget the disappointments. 

Mr. Bjoerling as Manrico did 
not equal his superb perform- 
ance as Des Grieux, but his sing- 
|ing was nevertheless eminently 
| pleasing. The surprise of this 
|performance was the dramatic 
| mezzo-soprano of Oralia Domin- 
'quez from Mexico, who was 
/making her American opera 
(debut in the role of Azucena. 
| She brought the part out of the 
shadows of the background, 
| where it is usually found, and 
set it on a plane that often 
equalled, and at times surpassed, 
| the singing offered by Miss Far- 
‘rell and Mr. Bijoerling. Mr. de 
|Fabritiis, evidently compensa- 
ting for his slack tempos in 
“Manon,” kept the orchestra 


| tense and pulsating. Sometimes | 
‘he was even anticipating his. 


singers, 


‘Flying Dutchman’ 
William Steinberg took the 


' 
Italian diva who has most of the| ‘ere was nearly always a 


Ram Gopal 


With Ballet 


From India 


By E. N. Adam 


Edinburgh 
Pursuing their aim of bringing 
the art of other countries to the 
Festival, the Edinburgh Inter- 
national Festival Society this 
year invited Ram Gopal and his 
Indian Ballet to demonstrate 
Indian dancing to the cosmopoli- 
tan audiences gathered in the 
Scottish capital. Of prime inter- 
est was the new ballet, “The 
Legend of the Taj Mahal,” which 

had its world premiere here. 
Expectations were high, and 
insofar as they included gor- 
geous color spectacle and per- 
fection of mime nobody was dis- 
appointed. There was some re- 
igret that Ram Gopal himself, 


'superb exponent of his art, was 
not really seen at his best in this 


ence had to wait more than an | “Daphnis and Chloé.” The work “we 


Much better contemporary Japa-| hour before the concert could/ and the magic of its sound 


| tional qualities. Mr, Warren and ‘baton for an incisive, vigorous, 
nese woodblock printing can be | 


Friedman-Abeles Mme Tebaldi pointed up their yet not-too-interesting perform- 


begin. But the delay was taken 


seen in the United States today. 


Choice of Exhibits 


One has the uneasy feeling 


represents the art of a country, 


but rather that determined pres- | 


sure groups (there are altogether 
too many of them for the good of 
art) have pushed their own 
favorites. This, I think, can be 
said of Great Britain, where 
vast quantities of blow-torch 


blow-torch 
common. 
Blow-torch sculpture is ap- 
parently the great new force in 
creative art. Nothing like this 
existed, or at least was exhibi- 
ted, 25 years ago. The other 
British exhibits did not seem 
up to the standards of similar 
work in current London shows. 
France is definitely no longer 
the standard-bearer of creative 
art. The general impression was 


sculpture has in 


| good-humoredly, and the recep- 
| tion given the orchestra and its 
|conductor, Charles Munch, was 
‘in no way less warm, The en- 


that none of the exhibits really | 


thusiasm of the audience grew 
with each piece, and finally 
burst all bounds. When at last 
ithe people let them go, it was 
\only because the strain of the 
‘long tour was plainly written in 
the musicians’ faces. 


Remarkable Quality 


sculpture prove how much all | 


This strain, however, had not 
the slightest effect on the quality 
of the performance. Even the 
first work presented, the “Elegy” 
_by Howard Hanson, made clear 
| the outstanding qualities of the 
| string section. In fact, the quality 
of the orchestral group seems 
| to be in all ways remarkable, In 
| particular the cellists and basses 


‘played magnificently, and the 


‘song of the violins compared 
with that of the Vienna Phil- 
harmonic. 


of slight work, amateurish, and, 
as a show, rather messy. Czecho- 
slovakia’s offering seemed to 
consist mainiy of illustrations 
encine 


| The-rendition of the “Liturgi- 
cal Symphony” by Arthur 
Honegger, was the high point of 
.the evening, not only because 


men ee 


| profited greatly from the circum- 


| stance that the woodwinds of the 
orchestra in part have French 


| instruments, which are specially 
| suited to this music. The situa- 
|tion was less favorable in the 
| Brahms Second Symphony, for 
| the individuality of the wood- 
| winds did not lend itself to the 
| blending of a homogeneous 
whole, and those parts of the 
'composition which are based 
'on the completeness of such fu- 
‘sion did not attain the proper 
‘unity. Also the trumpets stood 
/out a little too sharply. 


difference in the concept of 
music between the Boston or- 
chestra, or any American or- 
ichestra, and a Viennese orches- 
'tra, is a question of rhythm, To 
the Viennese musician, the 
measures are more or less elastic 
indications, which, according to 
the demands of the melody. are 
contracted or expanded so that 
there is no metronomic exact- 
ness. American orchestras, by 
contrast, seem to focus on strict, 
inflexible rhythm, which in turn 
has the advantage of the utmost 
precision. The Viennese audi- 
ence would be Willing to do with 


Aline McMahon tn the dramatic readings from Sean O’Casey’s 
“Pictures in the Hallway.” which are being presented at the 
Playhouse in New York on Sundays, Sept. 23 and Oct. 7, and 


In general. it seems that the’ directing massed forces — his 


Saturday, Sept. 29. 


Music at Edinburgh F estival 


By Felix Aprahamian 
Edinburgh (the oboe quartet. Mozart was 
This year’s Edinburgh Festival | certainly in no danger of being 
‘began with a great musical | forgotten here. 
isplash: Sir Thomas Beecham; The Schumann centenary, too, 


oyal Philharmonic Orchestra, | ing recital devoted to the Fan- 
‘the Edinburgh Royal Choral|tasie in C, “Waldscenen,” and 


(Union, and a quartet of eminent |Etudes Symphoniques, Robert 


choice for |Casadesus showed that Cortot 
iis not the only Frenchman to 
| have penetrated to the heart-.of 


| Singers. His original 
| the first concert was Beethoven's 
| Missa Solemnis, but Her Majesty 
|the Queen was to attend, and | the : 
some considered it undesirable|No_ Festival seems complete 
‘that the head of the Anglican! without Casadesus these days, 
'Church should hear the words of | and Edinburgh, in spite of more 
‘the Latin Mass sung on a Sun-/|than 20 other soloists, would 
|day, so the Ninth Symphony was/|have been noticeably poorer 
| substituted. podewe ger bear voy peerless ae 
| The second concert brought | COUMt of Franck s Variations an 
i the first novelty, a new Overture, | Ravel's Left-Hand | Concerto 
“Edinburgh,” by Sir Arthur | (with Monteux and the Boston 
‘Bliss, Master of the Queen’s|>’™Phony Orchestra) added 


| The orchestra under Mr. Cu-/| this champion of music drama | 


'was not overlooked. In a morn- | 


most romantic of Germans. | 


|dramatic sparring in the second ance of Wagner’s “The Flying 


| was witnessing one of the great Wagner’s and not Mr. Stein- 


|moments in opera. berg’s. Even at 28, Wagner was 


pn: ._ ° showing the seeds of long- 
Eileen Farrell in Verdi | windedness. One wonders why 


-riel’s direction became a thing so often poured his drama into) 
‘alive as it mirrored the stage his scores and left it off the} 
‘action; and indeed, in this lis- | stage. 

'tener’s estimation there is no/| So it is with the “Dutchman,” | 
‘other Puccini opera that is so'a refreshingly diatonic score 
beautifully constructed as an or- | filled with intriguing ideas. But 
ganic whole from the first notes; with a few exceptions—at the 
to the final chord. ‘opening of the second act, for 
| In Verdi’s. “Il ‘Trovatore” | instance, when the stage is alive 
| Eileen Farrell, long noted as a|With spinning wheels-—we are 
leading concert soprano, made | Bane endless monologue and 
twee paige ee ame “some The major compensation was 
| ee ee Y | singing of great beauty in the 
\the overwhelming ovation she | Germanic style. Hans Hotter was | 
| Marg” sd pos | he — ong ‘an imposing Dutchman, majestic | 
one would have to say that hers porn yg j tena Neauine heat 


was a triumph of the first order. | ; ae dalek © dade 
But only at times did one hear | Amer = oF ’ 


| Rysanek of Vienna won the 


that limpid, lyrical, and effort- 
| less soprano that has marked her 


| 


major portion of the plaudits 
with her impressive performance 


'concert singing. Perhaps she felt! as: Senta. She gave us impas- 
'that for opera she should make | sioned singing in epic style for 


it bigger, or then again she may 
have felt somewhat ill-at-ease in 


| 


the ballad, and she was an apt 
dramatic and vocal partner to 


ballet for which he and Yogen 


lact until , inced he | . Desai were the choreographers. 
)act until one was convinced he| Dutchman,” but the fault was| He was the personification of 


regal dignity as the young Prince 
who became the Emperor, and 
Kumudini as his consort danced 
with a tender grace and fluid 
hand and arm movements. The 
most striking dancing came from 
Satyavan in the role of her pet 
peacock, investing it with an un- 
canny birdlike character. His 
manipulation of a gorgeous tail 
was highly effective. 


Liberties Taken 
Some liberties were taken 
with tradition. Moslem women 


exquisitely garbed in startling — 


colors that never jarred pere- 
formed Indian dances, one with 
silken scarves bought from a 
passing vendor being particu- 
larly delightful. 

The Princess’s maidens were 
welcoming spring in the Shali- 
mar Gardens, the highly modern 
décor designed by Frieda Harris. 
For the most part, however, a 
simple backdrop was employed, 
so that there was little to dis- 
tract attention from the dancing. 


this new field. Whatever. it was, | Herr Hotter. 


Richardson at Old Vic 


less of this precision and get in | Musick; but this added nothing | — = ne ne — 
exchange more freedom in the/to his reputation and little to | + oe ti 3 e . ra Pp hy o 
melodic structure. It is not so|the fund of human joy. Nor did Fevot 3 saat sane ere ent 
set, however, as to fail to ap- | “Landscapes and Figures,” a new | no navy to oer ot y Arages ta 
preciate the merits of the Bos- | work commissioned by Beecham thi epee ~Sipeeabed in the duller 
ton Symphony. from Richard Arnell, create a | ae Weer, 


The musicians with their . 
‘drums, gongs, cymbals, flutes, 
‘and that ancient stringed in- . 
'strument, the veena, kept up a 
‘continuous rhythmical accom- ~ 
/paniment, reflecting with its rise 


Orchestras and Conductors 


The Berlin Philharmonic Or- 


{ series of concerts at Town Hall, 
chestra.under the direction of 


|New York, sponsored by the 


Herbert von Karajan, will open 
a- second. American tour, Sun- 
day, Oct. 7, in Washington, 
D.C. Two performances are 
scheduled for New York, 
Wednesday and Friday, Oct. 10 


_Jazz and Classical Music So- 
ciety, a non-profit organization 


|designed to give greater hear- | 
_ing to musicians, contemporary | 


|composers, and _ infrequently 
performed classical composers. 


‘New York Ballet 


The autumn season was ush- 
ered in wholly by American art, 
‘for the Staatsoper was also 


furore. ; 
By general opinion, the musi- Myra Hess 


cal high light of this first week | 
|was a magically sensitive per- | usual success in another Mozart 
‘formance by Sir Thomas Of} concerto and in a Beethoven 


Dame Myra Hess scored her | 


By Harold Hobson 


London 


The Old Vic has opened its 
season this year in a rather un- 


| speaks Timon’s curses as though 
'they were gentle lamentations. 
|His Timon is not a young Lear, 
| but a Richard II musically utter- 


and fall the emotions of the per- 


‘formers, a strident horn marking 


an occasional crisis. The music 
by Comolata Dutt struck West- 
ern ears as slightly more melodi- 


usual way. It is-its custom at 
this period to put on a play in 
which the stars who are to shine 
till next spring make their bow 


| Delius’s “In a Summer Garden.” | ous than was anticipated, and 
recital, while Isaac Stern won 


and 12. At the first of these the! Participants besides Mr. Mi- bore mbiag ee ope ‘It seems to have melted even | 
German violinist, Wolfgang /tropoulos will include Miles let filled the aret pact “ aa 'the stoniest hearts; I cannot;fresh laurels for the warmth 
po gna will make his | tata tabs — J. - John- | period by giving daily, and remember greater unanimity and nobility of his Beethoven |} ; Ag Reger “2g 
ew York debut. — | son, Connie ay, an ohn | sometimes twice daily,’ pro- among the critical fraternity on Violin Concerto (with Munch | >efore the i Vie public. In| But the sound is so glorious that | 
The orchestra will visit 34 | Lewis from the jazz field and a | grams, If technically the pres- any previous occasion, ‘and the Boston Symphony Or-/| their presentation of “Timon of | sickens incined ef cath! If it seems a little ungracious 
cities in 44 days, concluding the | classical orchestra of 18 brass. | . '. Beecham and the R.P.O. were | chestra) and for his irresistible | Athens” they have a star of the | one rejcic when such rich fare was offered 


: ’ , i j ; " ) ini i = | . 
aa, 4 be pons Barbara, Calif. They will present classical peerage ies Petia ory Sadie w followed, in the second week, by | virtuosity in Prokofiev's First | first magnitude, none other than plaining. I rank this perform~| +, cavil at this, the dancer and 


‘ing notes of quiet and beautiful | this was but one example of a 
| sadness. ‘certain blending of the East and 


| The sound of his performance | west that rather detracted from 
is at direct odds with its sense. | the general effect. 


ae dee 


- Jazz and Classical 


Dimitri Mitropoulos will con- 
duct on Oct. 19 the first of a 


EXHIBITION OF PAINTINGS 


by 
| EI R. 
“90TH ANNIVERSARY ROUNDUP” 


SEPTEMBER 25-OCTOBER 12 


GRAND CENTRAL ART GALLERIES, 
15 VANDERBILT AVENUE 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


the contemporary Gunther 
Schuller, and....by- jazz com- 
posers Jimmy Giuffre, J. 
Johnson, and John Lewis. 


Wager Say dere 


‘Manager for Philharmonic 
By the Associated Press 


New York 
| Bruno Zirato, co-manager of 
‘the Philharmonic - Symphony 
| Society of New York since 1947, 
has been appointed managing 
|director, of the society for the 
coming year. The title of man- 


laging director is new. 


Mr. Zirato had been co- 
manager of the orchestra with 
Arthur Judson, who retired 
after 34 years with the orches- 
tra. Mr. Zirato, who has been 
associated with the society since 
1929, will dssume all mana- 
gerial functions effective Oct. 1. 


works by Gabrielli, music by | 


Authentic, Rare and Beoutiful 
Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Persian 


wore, ANTIQUITIES 2.0. 
Including waraggere og Glass, Bronzes, 
Potteries T | 
Many will make unique Christmas Gifts 
from the collection of a famous Haifa Archaeologist at 


bis 
cx; 
¥, . 
F : 
a 
q 
en ee : wrathe: acm wat 0 
: < mr 
a 
i 


Bui, sS 
aS 


erra-Cottas 


ichards 


|have expected of a ballet, they 
| surpassed artistically, too, every- 
rthing one had seen in this field. 


*}| Vienna art circles were unani- 


mous in saying that a ballet of 
such quality had never before 
been seen in Vienna, Its success 
was sensational, Day after day 
the house was sold out. 


What one principally admired 
in the company was the legiti- 
macy of its dance art, which 
could be traced .particularly to 
the choreography of George 
'Balanchine. There is no striv- 
‘ing for symbol or association; 
there is only the beauty and 
pure aesthetics of movement. 

How well the movements, 
which stem from what to us 
seems incredible technical abil- 
ity, fit the music, and how well 
they translate it, one could 
perhaps best appreciate in the 
dance interpretation of the 
Symphony by Bizet, which was 
the high point of the four pro- 
grams offered. While the ballet 
of the Vienna Staatsoper de- 
pends mainly on the’ perform- 
ances of a few soloists, one can 
see here and admire the beauty 
of a genuine ensemble, which 
takes for granted a _ perfect 


Munch and Monteux conducting | Violin Sonata (with Alexander 
| the Boston Symphony Orchestra; | Zakin), 
‘but in the final -week, shared 


_between the London Mozart) her appearances, .demonstrated 


|Players under Harry Blech and | the possibility of producing fine, | 


the Vienna Hofmusikkapelle | full vocal tone from the start, 
‘under Rudolf Moralt, life and| without making an opening 
sparkle were dependent on emi- | group sound like a series of 
nent soloists rather than on con- voice-warming exercises. Her 


ductors. Singing was as blithe and sure 
. as always. 
Choral Musie Opera this year was supplied 
The London group gave con- {not by Glyndebourne, But by 
scientious performances in good |Hamburg. The quasi-novelties 
style of Haydn, Mozart, and 


were Stravinsky’s “Oedipus 
Schubert, but their one incursion | Rex” and “Marra,” in a double 
into modern music — Bartok’s 


bill, and Cornelius’s “Der 
Divertimento for Strings Barbier von Bagdad.” The two 
showed up a deficiency in direc- 


other works were more familiar 
-tion.. This was also evident in|'— Mozart’s “Die Zauberfiléte” 
the work of the Viennese visi- 


and Strauss’s “Salome.” 
tors, for choral and orchestralen-| It was the last of these that 
semble in Mozart’s Requiem and 
“Coronation” Mass was ragged; 
and despite a vaunted tradition 
of nearly 500 years, the singing 
of the Hofmusikkapelle gave less 
pleasure than the singing of the 
Edinburgh University Singers 
under Herrick Bunney, The 
latter, on a morning of unre- 
lieved dampness, warmed and 
consoled us with some Byrd at 
the start of an hour's am 
of a cappella music, impeccably 
chosen and most sensitively sung. | Prin 
These T concerts at the nception. 
She was peel by a clear, 


In the title role, we were intro- 
duced to a histrionically ideal 
Salome in the person o 
Pilarczyk. There have been 
Salomes with larger voices. This 
one was submerged only at those 
moments when the orchestra in- 
variably eats up every Salome, 
and her vocal line was admirably 


| Irmgard Seefried, at each of) 


made ‘tthe greatest impression. era 


Helga |. 


bi 
i 


Sir Ralph Richardson. 


But at Christmas, Richardson 
is to leave the company in order 
‘to appear in Jean Anouilh’s 
“The Waltz of the Toreadors” 
on Broadway. Nor will he ap- 
pear in any of the other produc- 
tions of the Old Vic this autumn. 
Keith Michell is to be’ Benedick 
in “Much Ado About Nothing,” 
and Robert Helpmann, Shylock 
in “The Merchant of Venice.” 
Richardson will act in “Timon 
of Athens” and nothing else. 


_Onee we have accustomed 
ourselves to this unpalatable 
fact, we are bound to admit that 
to have Richardson at all at the 
Old Vic is a cause for profound 


Sound vs. Sense 
“Timon of Athens” is one of 


Best | Shakespeare’s bitter plays, Its 


is 
go8ss 
Feszet 


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. 

4 

4 
Lad 
’ 


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ie 


ance very high indeed. The rest 
‘of the Old Vic company is good 
on this first showing, without 
‘apparently having anyone who 
can challenge Richardson's pre- 
| eminence, 


The night before the opening 


‘performance of “Timon of 
| Athens,” Agatha Christie’s 
“Towards Zero” came to the St. 
_James’s Theater. Mrs. Christie 
is far and away the most popular 
_of English detective play writers. 
Her skill in plot-making is a. 
/nomenal, though she has little 


originality in the creation of | 


‘character, and there is no dis- 
tinction in her dialogue. 


Christie Plot 
In this play she sets her scene 


does | in a house in Cornwall, where a 


party is being held. The hand- 
some and manly Nevile Strange 
has the singular idea of bringing 
his former and his t wives 
together at this party, so that 
they can get to know each other 
better. The plan produces a cer- 
tain tension in the atmosphere, 
and this tension is not relieved 
when the hostess is discovered 
murdered. 

From this point on the author 
matches her wits against the au- 
dience; she gives fair clues, and 

bservers can 


however, for Mrs. Christie is ex- 
tremely . 


ingenious. 


very 
— (a serious fault in the play), 
the detective. The rest of the 
wrt 


his company are responsible for 
having raised hopes so high with 
| their first festival program, Ram 
Gopal exceeded even one’s 
earlier memory of him as “Ga- 
ruda the Golden Eagle,” flashin 
onto the stage in glittering gol 
‘against a fiery red sky, appear- 
‘ing at times to soar through the 
aiy/ flapping great wings, poising 
as if to take flight with darting 
'motions of head and eyes, It was 
‘a wonderful performance, 


Folk Dances 


A number of bracing folk 
dances were included, and the 
delicate art of Satyavati com- 
gassed the difficult part of Sita, 
first conveying by mime her en< 
|joyment of a beautiful garden 
and then her evasion of the ad- 
vances of the Demon King Ra- 
'vana whose prisoner she is. Ce- 
rise, peacock blue, and a rich 
golden yellow were combined in 
her costume. Shevanti, another 
eenoenplished member of the 
co : whir 
brillant red and her long 
dark hair falling to. her knees, 
was a lovely “Parvati,” weaving 
intricate patterns her 
hands in a solo dance, 

Eloquence of hand movements 
is, of course, the hall mark of 
the Indian dancer 


ine 
dancer, 


Pa 


The more robust male parts in a — 
number of dances taken by 


skirts of - 


. os 


* 


, 
ere es 


Ari—Masic—Theater THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, ‘1956 ‘Art—Masic— 


‘Symphony Returning Next Week — New Play Opening Monday Night 


Friedman-Abeles 


Robert Alda, Pat Harrington, Linda Darnell, 


ton in “Harbor Lights,” 


> 


Preview of ‘Candide’ 

A special preview performance 
of the musical version of 
dide” is scheduled for Saturday 
night, Oct. 27, at the Colonial 
Theater for the benefit of the In- 
stitute of Contemporary Art. 
formal world premiére is sched- 
uled for the following Monday 
evening. 

Mail orders for the preview 
are being received at the Insti- 
tute which is now located at 230 
the Fenway. 


Concert Calendar 


23 
Gardner Mu- 


Sunday, Sept. 
Jeaneane Dowis, pianist, 
seum, 3. Free 

Tuesday, Sept. 75 
Chester Fanning Smith, piani Anne 
Rothgeb. sopranc. Gardner Tie im 
2:45. Free. 

Thursday, 
Patricia Gibson, pianist 
bass-baritone, Gardner 


Free 
Friday, 
Carmen Prii 
Baltic Concert Ser 
bh Be viens 
Freeman rolinis 
set Gardner Mu seum 


Sept. 77 
John Hornor 
Museum, 2:45 


Sept. 7 


FPiorence 
Preeman, pian 
Free. 


2-45. 


Fi irst Group 
Of Men Due 
On Friday 


Members of the Boston Sym- 
phony, returning from the or- 
'chestra’s European tour, will be- 
‘gin to arrive in Boston late 
next week. The first contingent 
will be flown in from London 
Friday by Royal Dutch Airlines. 
‘A second group will arrive 
Tuesday, Oct. 2. 
|. The opening concerts of the 
(76th symphony season will be 
‘given Friday afternoon . and 
‘Saturday evening, Oct. 5 and 6, 
‘| with Wolfgang Schneiderhan of 
i Vienna making his American 
debut as soloist in Beethoven's 


which will have its delayed Boston 
opening Monday night at the Wilbur, 


“Can-. 


The, 


| Violin Concerto. The rest of the 


= program will include Weber's 
Overture. to “Euryanthe” 
the “Eroica” Symphony. 
The Symphony 

tour in England 
cert in Leeds 
Sunday night, 

>. .teux on the podium, and two 
: |concerts in Royal Festival Hall 
\in-London Monday and Tuesday 
& |evenings, with Charles Munch 
and Mr. Monteux conducting. 


with a con-' 
Town Hall this 


and ) 


winds up its’ 


with Pierre Mon- | 


For the rest .of the week. 
they fly back, orchestra 
bers will be free for 
| seeing. 


meme | 
sight- 


Es ae Se 
Baltic Concert Series 

The Baltic American Society 
of New England will sponsor a 
recital Friday evening ‘in Jor- 
idan Hall-by Carmen Prii, an 
Estonian violinist. 

The society, organized 15 years 
ago, will present two other re- 
citats"tn’ Jordan Hall Tater in the * 
season Vaclovas Verikaitis, 
Lithuanian bass-baritone, will 
give a concert Feb. 8, and Ingus 
Naruns, Latvian ‘cellist, will per- 
form April 5. 

Tickets for the three events 
are now on. sale at the Baltic 
American Society, 190 Beacon 
Nf ' Roston 

bce a 


Cecilia Society Audittons 


Auditions for the tenor and 
bass sections of the chorus of 
the Cecilia Society of Boston 


and Paul Lang- 


— — eee ee — a 


Old Vic for Boston 


Shakespeare's ‘Romeo 
Juliet’ -ancd“Macbeth’ are dett+ 
nitely scheduled for the Boston 
engagement of the Old Vic the 
week of Jan. 14 the Boston 
Opera House. Two performances 
of “Richard II” are also being 
considered by Aaron Richmond. 
The opening performance wili be 
of “Romeo and Juliet” with 
Claire Bloom as Juliet, John 
Nevile as Romeo, and Paul 
Rogers as Mercutio. The produc- 
tion has been staged by Robert 
Helpmann. 


and 


, 
a i 


_ — ee <a | 2 eee 


*‘_Lreat Musie’ Series 


until 


Will Rapport 


Barry Sullivan, starring as the police lieutenant in “Too Late 


the Phalarope” at the Colonial. 


= 


Two Productions Scheduled to Continue | 


“Harbor Lights,” a new play 
by Norman Vane starring Linda 
Darnell and Robert Alda, will 
make its delayed debut at the 
Wilbur Monday evening after a 
postponement of a week due to 
ian injury to Mr. Alda’ at the 
ifinal performance in Ne Ww 
Haven. At the Colonial, “Too 
Late the~ Phalarope” begins 
Monday on its first full week in 
‘a pre-Broadway engagement. At 
the Plymouth “Sixth Finger in 
‘a Five Finger Glove” is about 
‘to start on the second half of 
a fortnight’s visit. 

“Harbor Lights,” will bring 
‘Miss Darnell and Mr. Alda to 
‘town for their first Boston stage 
| appearances. In their-supporting 
‘cast are Paul Langton, Pat Har- 
'rington, and Peter Votrian. Set- 
itings are by Perry Watkins and 
‘lighting by Lee Watson. The 
'production has been directed by 
|'Thomajan and is presented by 
|Anthony Parella. 

Among the productions on the 
‘horizon for Boston are the fol- 
lowing: 


The Apple Cart — At 
Plymouth, beginning Monday, 
Oct. 1. Maurice Evans and 
Signe Hasso starring in a re- 
vival of comedy by Bernard |} 
Shaw, which was first pre- 


the 


tured players include the Eng- 


continuing, 
may....be...arranged 
Mrs, Dorothy W. 

FAirview 3-6306. 

singers are invited 
Monday evening 

which - begin. at 
Huntington Ave., 
phony Hall. 

The Society, under its new 
music director, Theodore Ma- 
rier, is preparing for its part in 
a concert to be held Oct, 8 at 
MIT’s Kresge Auditorium. 


are 
by: ..calling 
Howard al 
Interested 
to attend 
rehearsals, 
7:30 at 
opposite Sym- 


Tickets for ‘Lil Abner’ 

Box office sale of tickets for 
“Li'l Abner” has been postponed 
from Monday to Tuesday, Sept. 
25, at the Shubert because of the 
heavy volume of mail orders. 


Appointments 


254: 


lish actor, Charles Carson. 
Claudia Morgan, Mercer Mac- 


Lexington Chorus Leod, and Katharine Hynes. 


Vivaldi’s . Gloria Mass, as 
tape recorded by the Lexington 
Choral Society at Cary Hall last 
May..20,. Alien C,.Lannom..con- 
ducting, with Adele Babcock 
and Ruth Ellison as soloists, will 
be broadcast over WAHR-FM 
Monday evening at 8. 

The broadcast is a.feature of 
the organization’s membership 
drive, opening its 17th season. 

Bach’s Magnificat in D and 
Beethoven's Missa Solemnis 
have been announced as the 
major works to be performed 
this year. Choral applicants are 
invited to attend rehearsals 
Tuesday evenings at 8 in the 
Harrington school, Lexington. 


Charles Adams 
Neebe. This is 
Broadway 
weeks, 


Li'l Abner — At the Shubert 
beginning Tuesday, Oct, 2. New 
musical comedy based on the 
comic-strip characters created 
by Al Capp. Peter Palmer, a 
newcomer to the stage, will have 
the title role. Norman Panama, 
Melvin Frank, and Michael 
Kidd are the producers. The 
Messrs. Panama and Frank 
have written. the _ libretto; 
Johnny Mercer and Gene Paul 
have produced the lyrics and 
music. Mr. Kidd is directing the 
‘production and _ staging 


and- Joseph 
another pre- 
engagement. Two 


The next meeting in the Bos- 
ton University “Great Music 
series will take place on 


AMUSEMENTS 


AMUSEMENTS 


Wednesday at 7:15 in Room 12, 
College of Liberal Arts, 725 
Commonwealth Avenue. Klaus 


BOSTON (MOVIES) 


(STAGE) 


' 


| cludes 
sented in Boston in 1930. Fea- | Sally 
‘and Myra Carter. 


| Laughton; 
George Schaefer -is directing for | 


the 


Te 


dances, William and Jean Eck- | recting the play and sieihiaioas | it 
art are designing the settings. with Leigh Connell and Theo- 


Separate Tables—At the Co- 
lonial, beginning Monday. 
8. Two plays by Terence Raiti- | 
gan, involving characters in the 
dining room of a middle-class 
English boarding house. . Eric 


Portman and Margaret Leighton | 


of the English company will be 
seen here. Others of the English 
company will be Phyllis Neil- 
son-Terry, Beryl Measor, Jane 
Eccles, and Mary -Hallatt. Mem- 
bers of the cast from this coun- 
try will be Donald Harron, 
Georgia Harvey, Ann Hillary, 
and Helena Carroll, The pro- 
duction has‘ been directed by 
Peter Glenville. Settings have 
been designed by Michael 


Oct. | 


dore Mann: Donald Haves is de- 
signing the setting in a New 
‘England summer home in 1912. 
Costumes will be by Motley and 
lighting will be planned by 
Theron~ Musser: Two weeks. ; 


The Best House in Naples— 
At the Plymouth, ‘beginning 
Monday, Oct. 15. New play by 
F. Hugh Herbert. The play will 
be directed by Claude Dauphin, 
Katy Jurado will be starred. 
Featured players are Rino Negri 
and Esther and Silvio Minciotti. 
Settings have been designed by 
Ralph Alswang, and costumes 
by Jerry Boxhorn. The produc- 
tion is presented by Nick Mayo. 
Two weeks, 


Weight. The production is being 
presented by Producers Theater 
in association with Hecht-Lan- 
caster by arrangement with 
Stephen Mitchell. Two weeks. 


Major Barbara—At 
ton Opera. House,_beginning 
Wednesday, Oct. 10. Revival of 
comedy by Bernard Shaw, star- 
ring Charles Laughton, Burgess 
Meredith, Glynis Johns, Eli 
Wallach, and Cornelia -Otis 
Skinner in a cast which in- 
Colin Keith-Johnston, 
|Nancy Malone, Virginia Kaye, 
Gracie, Walter Burke. 
Richard Lupino, Mark Herron. 
The produc- 
being directed by Mr. 
scenery has been de- 
signed ..by...Donald.-Qenslager, 
and costumes by Dorothy Jea- 
kins. The production is pre- | 
sented by Robert L. Joseph and 
Roger. L. Stevens; Ten days. 


Bells 


Shubert, 


Are Ringing — At 

beginning Monday, 
Oct. 22. New‘ musical comedy 
starring Judy Holliday with 
book and lyrics by Betty Com- 
den and Adolph Green, and mu-« 
sic. by Jule-Styne, Fhe-produc- 
tion will be staged by Jerome 
Robbins assisted by Bob Fosse 
and will have sets and costumes 
designed by Raoul Péne du Bois. 
It will be presented by the 
Theater Guild. 


Candide— At the Colonial, be- 
ginning Monday, Oct. 29. Musi- 
ical version of Voltaire work with 
‘libretto by Lillian Hellman, 
‘music by Leonard Bernstein, and 
lyrics by Richard Wilbur, the 
late John Latouche, and Doro- 
thy Parker: Tyrone Guthrie ‘is 
directing. Three weeks. 


the 


the Bos- 


tion 


iS 


A Very Special Baby—At the 
Plymouth... beginning: Mondav, 
Oct. 29. New play by Robert 
Allen Arthur, with Sylvia Sid- 
ney and Larther Adler heading 
the cast. Two weeks. 


Long Day's Journey Into Night 
—At the Wilbur, beginning Mon- 
day, Oct... 15. Eugene O'Neill’s 
autobiographical drama making | 
its American debut in a pre- 
Broadway engagement. Fredric 
March and Florence Eldridge 
will star in roles based on the 
playwright’s parents. Bradford 
Dillon will portray a character 
modeled on the playwright and 
Jason Robards, Jr., will be seen 
as an older brother. Katherine 
Ross will have the part of the 
family maid. José Quintero is di- 


Happy Hunting—At the Shu- 
bert, beginning Tuesday, Nov, 
13. New musical comedy starring 
Ethel Merman, with libretto by 
Howard Lindsay and Russel 
Crouse, and music and lyrics by 
Matt Dubey and Harold Karr, 
Three weeks, 

Entertainment Timetable on 
Page 12. 


AMUSEMENTS 


BOSTON (STAGE) 


G. Roy will give an illustrated | 
lecture on the symphonies of | 


Schubert, Schumann, and Men- | 
delssohn. The public is invited. 


a ainaneneneetemnmnnemneeen een 


L 


AMUSEMENTS 


BOSTON (CONCERTS) 


OF WONDERS! 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY CELEBRITY SERIES 
AARON RICHMOND, Managing 


REMAINING SUBSERIPTIONS NOW: 143 NEWBURY SI. 
SYMPHONY HALL - JORDAN HALL 
Choice Seats af Substantial Savings for 7, 9, or 12 Events 


Vienna Philharmonic Orch.—Dyer-Bennet—Renota 
dapest Quartet—Michoei 
Gerald Moore—Schwerzkopf—Destine end Heaitien Dencers—lLeon Fleisher— 
Singers of London—Bach Aria Group with Eileen Ferrell, 
Sinfoniette, end Chorus. 


Quertette italiano—Bu 


Gelden Ac. 
Peerce, Zimbler 


Detziled Announcement Upon 


2. ot to $18.50 @ LAST WEEKS OF SERIES SALE 


You reach places you 


Director couldn’t see for 


neor Dertmouth 
Tel. KE 6-6037 


Tebeldi—<Adele Addison-—— 
Reabin—Solomon—Firkusny— 


Jon 


Request 


OPERA 
HOUSE 


OCT. 3 


5 Performances Only 


BOSTON 16, MASS. 
$5, $4, $3, $2.50, 


Aaron Richmond “presents 


yal ee Danish 
Ballet 


MAIL ORDERS: 143 NEWBURY ST. 


$2, $1.50 
Enclose self-addressed, stamped env. 


OPERA HOUSE BOX-OFFICE OPENS THURS. 10 A.M. | 
——=> MAIL ORDERS NOW fo SYMPHONY HALL <—=—— sae 


Enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope. $6, $5, $4, $3 for each event 


BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHES 


Herbert Von Karajan, Conductor 


VIENNA PHILHARMONIC REST 


Carl Schuricht, Conductor 


the greaiesi wonder... 


{ TODAY & TOM’W. at 2:30, 5:30, 8:40 P.M. 


TWO FULL HOURS 


tens of thousands of dollars! 


The New The ZAD Cinerama presentation 
the LOWELL THOMAS production 


SEVEN WONDERS 


COLOR BY 
TECHNICOLOR 


RESERVED SEATS 

NOW ON SALE! — 
Box Office Open Deily 
from 10 @a..4. te 9 p.m. 
Sundeys...1 te 9 p.m. 


BOSTON 


Tax Inc! 
Mats. 
Extra Show 


PRICES AND dues ag yo 
EVERY NIGHT 


Mats. Sat, Sun., Wolidays.... 


ty “ar ?. i. $2.65-81.7 15 
at 2:30 P.M. $1.75-$1.20 
at 2:30 P.M. $2.40-$1.75 
at 5:30 P.M. $2.65-$1.75 


Sat., Sua. 


e 


THEATRE WASHINGTON AND ESSEX STS. 
ES AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT 


ond Give Alternate Choice of perf. 


HU cas | 


RKO KEITHS Mermoria/ 


Sun. Aft 
Oct. 14 


Sun. Eve 
Dec. 2 


BEASSS - 


MANTOVANI 


AND HIS 
ORCHESTRA OF 45 


Only Boston Concert: Tue. Eve. Oct. 2 


SEATS WOW: SYMPHONY HALL 


. $1.65, $2.20 
$2.75, $3.30, $3.85 


me SYMPHONY HALL — CO 6-1492 
Fresh from European Triumphs 


76th SEASON OPENS 
FRIDAY, OCT. 5 at 2:15 
SATURDAY, OCT. 6 at 8:30 


Boston Symphony 


Orchestra 
CHARLES MUNCH, 


JAMES CAGNEY 
BARBARA STANWYCK 


"Twese WILDER 
YEARS” 


ww thew 


“DANCE LITTLE LADY“cole* 


Music Director 


Guest conductors: 
Soloists: 


Tickets are available for 6 Sunday Concerts at 3 
Nov. 4—Dee, 2—Jan. 20-—-March 10—March 31—A pril 14 
Pierre Monteux, Jean Martinon 


Clara Haskil, Irmgard Secfried 
Apply to Season Ticket Office 


ri M, 


CHORUS PRO MUSICA 
REHEARSALS 


at 
Trinity Church 
Copley Squere 
Every Monday, 7:30 P. M. 
_.\ Nese. members.invited.to atiend. 
SURVEY OF MAGNIFICATS 
CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL 


B MINOR MASS 
NINTH SYMPHONY 


Show 


_in The Christian Science — 


f 


™TODD-AO wogsra case 
3 SHOWS TODAY 


2:00, 5:30, 8:40 p.m. 


SAXON 160¢ 


4600 
TREM: NT ar 


STUART 
Bor Office 10 


AAO iy’ 


— 
_——— 


PARAMOUNT FENWAY 


“A or IN THE segs di 
us David Way 
OTHE: NAKED HILLS” 


BOSTON 
3 WEEKS 


SHUBERT ?x OCT. 2 


MATINEES ist Week Wed. & Sat. 


2nd Week Fri. (Oct. 12) & Sat. 
3rd Week Wed. & Sat. 


BOX OFFICE OPENS TUES. 


az 


WORMAN PANAMA, MELVIN FRANK & MICHAEL KIDD present 


“Lab. ABNER" 


An Original Musical Comedy 
Gen »y NORMAN PANAMA & MELVIN FRANK 

Based On The Characters Created by AL CAPP 

Direction and Choreography by MICHAEL KIDD 
tyrics ty JOHNNY MERCER 
music by GENE de PAUL 

ww EDITH ADAMS PETER PALMER 
HOWARD ST. JOHN STUBBY KAYE CHARLOTTE RAE 


TIWA LOUISE JOE £ MARKS GERM HOFFMAN §Al NESOR 
TED THURSTOW JULIE WEWMAR WILLIAM LANTEAU «= ALBERT LINVILLE 


PRICES: Opening Night, Fri. & Sat. Evgs, Orch. $6.25; ist 4 
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& 3rd Weeks, Wed. & Sat.—2nd Week, Fri. (Oct. 12) & Sat. 
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order. 


PLYMOUTH 2 


METROPOLITAN] 


ELEP CINEMA 
ROME 


Churchill; Advence in the Air; 
Jungle Search; Music; 
Two Certoons; ws 


BOSTON (Kenmore Sq.) 


After 
the 


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aang ta 


vite FINLAY CURRIE 


Directed by 35 


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First Subscription Attraction, The Theetre CGuild-&mericen Theatre Society, 
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ran CHARLES ADAMS and JOSEPH NEEBE 


BERNARD SHAW’'S COMEDY 


“the APPIE CART 


Co-Sterring 


SIGNE HASSO 


with 


CHARLES CARSON « CLAUDIA MORGAN ¢ MERCER McLEOD 


KATHERINE HYNES e RAYMOND BRAMLEY 


Production staged by GEORGE SCHAEFER 


Settings ond Lighting by 
ROBERT O’HEARN 
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EVES, AT 8:30 — MATS. WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 2:30 
7 ee  Dabort 


= >a 


DARNELL. ‘AUDA 
pnBon ) wGHTS 


A New Drama by NORMAN VANE 


Directed by THOMAJAN 
with 


PAUL LANGTON 


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| BOSTON Hite CHILDREN’S THEATRE 
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. 20, 27 and Nov. 


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aN GRact FRAME 
CROSBY - KELLY - SINATRA 


ta Viste Vision and Coter 


ual 


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ond SPECTACULAR STAGE PRESENTATION 


NEW YORK (STAGE) _ 
A CREEPY 


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vecare SUSAN 


_ SCHILDKRAUT —_STRASBERG 
THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK 


with GUST! RUBER 
Nee, 


Bi, 


2. 
nae Pa Ps 
were tc OL EAME Pm FAD: me FF 


oo : sa a pe te ath a are MY eae 
aor ROS 2k. ae ~ Che sce ae 
— a rad om tia ¢ ee Ss we ee iy, a 
i. a a " . BRAT She iy 


Pf “Be STasen ne A 3 ao Sedat we ee 
: he 


0 St. E. of Wy. Eve. 0:40. Mat, Wed. B Set, 


- Sports 


; 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


Sports 


- Braves Whittle Brooklyn’s National League Lead to Two Percentage Points 


| Redlegs Refuse to Quit, 
Winning Third Straight 


Major League Roundup 


By the Assootated Press 


Is Milwaukee finally going to 
make the breaks pay off? Is 
Pittsburgh about to knock | 
Brooklyn out of the race, just | 
as in 1954? Can Cincinnati still | 
make it? 

That’s today’s baseball quiz, 

with the Braves within two per- 
centage points af first-place 
Brooklyn again and the Redlegs | 
only three lengths back in the | 
National League's battle for | 
survival. 
‘ The Braves, who have blown 
breaks like everyone else in a 
race marked by missed oppor- 
tunities, grabbed the brass ring | 
and made Chicago errors pay 
off with a 6-4 victory over the | 
last-place Cubs last night, Sept. 
21. 

Pittsburgh, the 


club.‘ that | 


sprung a September trap to the Brooks, had beaten Maglie | 


catch Brooklyn and open the | 
pennant door to New York's | 
Giants in.'’43, was at it again, | 
meanwhile, tripping the Dodg- 
ers, 2-1, and roughing up Sal 
Maglie to boot. 

And the Redlegs, refusing to 
quit, made it three in a row 
with a 9-1 breeze over St. Louis, 
Jeaving the race like this: 


Brookiyn .... ae $8 ' 
Milwaukee .. 89: 59 oor 
Cincinnati 86 62 561 3 

In the other NL game, the | 
New York Giants, with Johnny 
Antonelli winning his 18th, de- 
feated Philadelphia 7-3, scoring 
seven in the fifth against Dick | 
Farrell in his major league 
debut. Willie Mays stole his 
37th and 38th bases, tops in the | 
NL since Kiki Cuyler stole 43 
in 1929. 

New Record 

In the American, Mickey 
Mantle’s .5ist..home run_.gave | 
New York a league record with 
183 for the season, but the pen- 
nant-winning Yankees also set 
a major league record by leav- 
ing 20 men on base to lose to 
Boston, 13-7. 

Cleveland took a two-game 
hold on second place over Chi- 
cago, defeating Detroit, 5-1, 
while the White Sox lost to 
Kansas City, 3-2, in a 10-inning 
nightcap after winning the twi- 
night opener, 4-2. Baltimore, 
with Gus Triandos hitting his 


= 


Friday Stars 


By the Associated Press 
Pitching—Joe Nuxhall, Red- | 
legs—Allowed only five hits and | 


struck out four in a 9-1 victory | 


over the Cardinals that kept | 
Redleg pennant hopes alive. 
Hitting — Mickey Mantle, 
Yankees — Gained ground on 
Ted Williams, .356 to .352, with 


three hits in five trips, one his ‘in his second run _ with an | eyeling). 


5ist home run that gave the | 
Yankees a league record of 183 | 
for the season, in a 13- . defeat 
by the Red Sox. 


20th and 2ist home 
whacked Washington, 7-3. 
| The Braves, outhit 11 to 8, 
made the most of three Chicago 
errors, scoring. the clinchers in 
ia three-run sixth on a passed 
|ball and a two-run misplay by 
shortstop Ernie Banks. That 
| provided a 6-0 lead, but it 
just enough as the Cubs 
ot to Warren Spahn for Monte 
frvin’s 15th home run in the 
‘seventh and chased the. veteran 
lefty with three in the eighth. 
|Gene Conley relieved to nail 
'Spahn’s 19th Victory. 
| A two-run, seventh-inning 
‘home run by Frank Thomas, his 
234, got the job done for the 
Pirates, who had jolted. the 
| Braves by a similar 2-1 score 
\Sept. 20. Pittsburgh, with six 
‘more games remaining against 


runs, 


proved 


‘only four times previously in 
25 decisions and the 39-year- 
old righthander had a personal 
six-game winning streak on the 
fire. Ron Kline, 0-3 against 
Brooklyn for the season and 
2-9 lifetime, scattered eight hits 
and struck out six to win his 
14th, ovine up a double and 
| Junior Gilliam’s single for a 
‘run in the seventh. 
Seven. Shy 

Wally Post, thumping five 
‘home runs in five games socked 
‘his 33d and 34th for four Red- 
ileg runs while Joe Nuxhall held 
| the Cardinals to five hits. Post 
homered and Nuxhall hit a 
‘two-run triple in a three-run 
‘first inning against Vinegar 
Bend Mizell. The Redlegs, with 
six games to go, are seven shy 
of the record 221 homers hit 
by the 1947 Giants. 


The Yankees cracked the 182 
|AL record hung u by the 1936 
| Bombers as Mantle’s near-500- 
foot wallop helped build a 4-0 
lead. But the Red Sox then 


it with three in the fourth and 
three in the fifth. Bob Turley 
lost it, with reliefer George 
Susce the winner. Yankee cat- 
cher Yogi Berra, playing the 
outfield for the first time since 
1948, ran his hitting streak to 
18 games. 

Mantle was 3-for-5, for a 352 
season average in his battle 
with Ted Williams for the lea- 
gue bat title. Williams, 2-for-4, 
is 356, needing 24 at bats in 
the seven remaining games for 
the necessary 400, 


Early Wynn won his 19th as 
‘the Tribe ended Detroit's win- 
for. streak at five on home 

ns by Al Rosen (15th) and 
Vic Wertz (32d). 
| Walt Dropo’s three-run 
homer won the opener for the 
|\White Sox, but after Sherm 
Lollar, who had four hits, drove 


'eighth-inning triple that tied i 
the A’s came back with Jim 
| Pisoni’s single and Joe Demaes- 
tri’s triple to win it. 


scored six in the third and iced | 


L RESTAURANTS 


LAGUNA BEACH, CALIF. 


LAGUNA BAY” 


CLOSED MONDAYS 
HOURS 12 NOON TO 12 


“IN A QUAINT OLD GARDEN OVERLOOKING BEAUTIFUL 


Ris Victor uso 


MR. ene MRS. MARCEL LANGLOIS 


MIDNIGHT—HYate 4-3541 


361 CLIFF DRIVE—LAGUNA BEACH, CALIF. 


"Radio Transmitter 
Fails Grid Coach 


it in view of their 24-14 vic- 
tory over the Chicago Bears 
in a National Football League 
exhibition. 

Brown used the system ifn 
the first few minutes of the 
game for sending in plays te 
his quarterback but the ma- 
chine broke down and the 
Cleveland coach went back to 
sending in a man after every 
play with instructions. 

The radio relay features 
small transmitters in the hel- 
met of the quarterback by 
which he can receive instruc- 
tions from the Coach. Brown 
has a four-watt transmitter 
placed near the Cleveland 
bench and he merely talks inte 
a micrephone sending the 
breast an instructions. 


—s 
Celts Sign Bradley 


University Cager, 


Dick Estergaard 


The Boston Celtics of the Na- 
tional Basketball Association 
have announced the signing of 
Dick Estergaard, a drait choice 
from Bradley University three 
years ago, for the 1956-57 sea- 
son 


Estergaard, a 6-4 forward who 
scored 462 points in 32 games 
during his senior year at 
ley, Was 
from the service. 

Estergaard will report with 
‘seven other rookies for the Cel- 
tics’ first workouts Sunday. 

Other first year men are: Vic 
Molodette, North Carolina State: 
Tom Heinsohn, Holy Cross; John 
Silk, Boston College; Bob Mc- 
Keen, University of California: 
Buzzie Wilkinson, West Virginia: 
and Dan Swartz, 
loape State Teachers. 


Luxembourg Star 
Olympic Returnee 


By the Associated Press 
Luxembourg 

Josy Barthel, who shed tears 
of joy and pride after winning 
an Olympic gold medal for tiny 
Luxembourg in 1952, will run 
again in the 1,500 meters at this 
year's Melbourne Olympics. 

He and nine other athletes | 
were named for Luxembourg’s | 
Australia-bound squad. 

Other members of the team 
are: Gerard Requin (800 me- 
ters), Fred Hammer 
jump), Roger Thersen, Dr. Emile 
Grotsch and Fernand Leischen 
(fencing), Josy Stoffel and An- 
nette Krier (gymnastics), Rene 


os (200 meters breast stroke) 


and Gaston Dumont (road 


J Sports in Brief 


By the Associated Press 


Golf 


Oklahoma City 
Billy Maxwell of Odessa, 


lahoma City Open to lead after 
36 holes with a 138 total. 


Indianapolis 
Joanne Gunderson of Kirk- 
land, Wash., defeated Mrs. Anne 
Casey Johnstone of Mason City, 
Iowa, 1 up and Marlene Stéew- 
art, Canada, defeated Anne 
Quast of Everett, Wash., 4 and 3 


Women’s Amateur Champion- 
ships. 


Tennis 


Los Angeles 
Herb Flam of Beverly Hills, 
Calif., defeated Alejandro Ol- 
medo of Peru, 8—6, 9-7, 2—6, 


4—-6, 64, in the quarterfinals 


BOSTON, MASS. 


COHASSET HBR., MASS. 


DELICIOUS MEALS... 


“RED APPLE 
SPECIALS” -. 


(a wide variety, 
changed every day) 


90 


NO MORE! 


MIAMI, FLA. 


of the Pacific Southwest Tennis 
Tournament. 


Baseball 


Fort Dix, N.J. 


Ft. Devens, Mass. scored 


j lay in the third inning to beat 


Lee, Va., 2-1 and enter the 
All-Army Baseball finals. 


Major League Standings 
American League 


Ww 
93 


New York .. 
Cleveland .. 


— — - 


Holleman 's Restaurant 


The Best of Food 
With Friendly Service 
MODERATE PRICES 
M. W. 79th Street et 7th Avenue 


HA 6-9836- 


"Next te Colonia) Theatre 


Gon Geen trons Revtetee 05. Uebues 


MIAMI, PLA. 


Teday's Sthedule 
New York at Sosten Larsen (9-5) vs. 
Minarcin  . 
t Chicage—Duser (1-0) 


sas 

vale ison (1 a1). it—ficore (18-9 
eveland a ro te (18-9) vs 

FPostack (14-13). 


w at Baltimore (N)—Her- 
a gatington vs "Moore (12-7). 
"s 
New York at 


Wochingves at Baltimore 
Kansas. Ci 


| Rok Sona 


geatas Calas 


Out In Port of Thir Education 


Cleveland e re 
* ichedule 


New York @ timore (N). 
' National League 


Ww 
88 
89 


Brooklyn .. 
Milwaukee . 
Cincinnati 


{8-16 


—— 


rad- | 
discharged recently | 


Moorehead, | 


| son, Lefty Grove and a very few | 


(broad | particularly the slider, that they 


| fault, He gets the idea the curve | 


Texas, posted a 4-under-par 68 | 
in the second round of the Ok- | 


to gain the finals of the USGA 


— , td oo * | 
bog 
10) ¥ w (8-15) si 
vive. bar, fda ” New | 


; ~= ners “> 
‘ : 6: ae - oe ra) Pe xX. a : sae es . 
Eset lll aS ip OO OE ate RE 


Birdie Tebbetts, Cincinnati Redlegs manager, who made a 
‘grand fight of the National League pennant race with Brooklyn 
and Milwaukee, refuses to give up the chase until mathemati- 


‘Chess 


| Frederick rj Chevalier 


Prepared for The Christian Science Monitor 


September 22, 1956 
Problem No. 3927 


y 


“he ip a. 
_ ‘ 
10 Pisces 


e 
e to play and ma’ e in two 
prize. vachista TPolsk 

nk is one of San Francisco's 
trenment players.) 


Problem 
By M. 


No. 3928 


Havel 
8 Pieces 


| 7 
= 


cally out, His club is in third place with the Dodgers leading. 


[ee Pees | 


Fast Ball Best | 


| 
Red Ruffing, the one-time |delphia Athletics. He was the | 
Yankee and Red Sox mound ace, leading right-hand power hitter) 
thinks today’s pitcher hurts his;in an era that had some great’ 
chances by placing too much/ ones. He could hit them as far 
emphasis on the breaking ball. ee, any hitter who ever lived. 


“The fast Ball is still the best! 
pitch in the book, still the clutch | 
pitch,” said big Red, who now | 
works for the Cleveland club. 
“I’m not saying you can get by | 
with it alone, like Walter John- | 


World Series and the A’s were 
playing the Cardinals. I’ve for-| 
gotten who the St. Louis pitcher) ~~ 
'was, but Jimmy went to the 
plate with two on and two out}, 
in the ninth 
others could. But I’m convinced |'U" ball game, The count got ; 
‘that it’s importance is too often| dwn to two strikes and no 
minimized. iballs, Foxx was ready. So was) 


“In fact, I've known a 
pitchers to spend so much time} 
working with breaking stuff, | 


up and the pitch—and Foxx 
| took the softest looking fast ball, | 
‘right through the heart of the! 
plate. It was the sort of pitch 
that he would have hit out of 
'sight, 99 times out of 100. But 
la big it was, the final pitch of) 
- a big game. 

ms Seving Armes | “It was a while after that,| 
Perhaps it’s unfair to blame | maybe even the next year, that!” 
the pitcher,” Ruffing went on. | Foxx was telling us about it.’ 
“I think the catcher is often at | ‘He really struck me out in the 
first innin ” Jimmy said. ‘He 

|is the big pitch and calls for it | got me cee academe” balls.| 


jover the fast ball, And most | A he did was show me the! 
|pitchers, especially young ones | fast ball, but not for a strike. 
will go along with the catcher. | In that ninth, I was sure he'd 


“There is a tendency among} make me hit his curve with two 
today’s pitchers to save the arm. | strikes, It was known to be his 
They try to use change-ups and | best pitch. When he threw that 
breaking stuff because they | fast one right down the middle, 
don’t have to throw so hard. But|/he had me flat footed—and, | 
did you ever hear of a real good | guess, flat headed.’ ” 
fast ball pitcher having trouble| Ruffing is amazed, sometimes. 
with his arm? It’s the screwballs|at the absence of competent 
and sliders that shorten careers. | coaching in both the majors and 

“I won't mention his name, minors. 
but we had a pitcher on the; “Most any manager or any 
Yankees who had one of the! coach can tell a hitter he’s toa, 
best fast balls in the American|far out in front of a pitch or 
League,” Red recalled. “But how | that he does other things wrong 
he loved to throw his curve. | up at the plate,” Red said. “They 
When he wanted you to hit his| can tell pitchers what is wrong 
pitch, you always got the curve. 
The only trouble was, every hit- 
ter in the league knew it. So the 
pitcher didn’t last long. It was 
a pity. He should have been a 
big man in New York and had 
good contracts. But nobody could 
tell him.” 

Foxx Fanned 

Ruffing talked about other 
pitchers and pitches. Then he 
said: “I remember Jimmy Foxx 


lost their fast ball. 
pen. Too much 
curving can 
trouble. 


It can hap- 
twisting and 
bring on -arm 


agers and coaches can tell play- 
ers what to do about these 
thing? That’s the catch. Know- 
ing what’s wrong does you no 
good unless you can correct it. 

“It may be that too much is 
taken for granted. You simply 
cannot assume that every player 
reaching the majors is schooled 
in all the fundamentals. More of 


with them. But how many-man-! 


' Yy 
As 


White 
White te play and mate in three 
(First prize. Three overs. Prague. 


1954, Tourneys sponsored by the State | 
Committee for Sport and Physica] Cul- | 


ture. It is fitting that the great Bo- 
hemian composer should win this sec- 


| tion.) 


Solutions te Problems 


Wo. 3925. Kt-K6 
| No, 3626. 1 R-Kt5, @-Kt2ch: 
xKtch: 


End-Game No. 1248. 


2 Kt-K?2 
2 KxP 


End-Game No. 1249 


Black 3 Pieces 


| 18 when he celebrated his 25th | 
inning of a one- ’ 


‘| law, 


the pitcher. There was the wind-'» 


a 


te 


Z. thie. 

. * iy 
oe 
' ie: ws 
“a 


(4 *Z 


vg Wish you good health and good 
’ 4 | luck in life.” 


“, ' 


‘ 


hi 


os 


White 3 Pieces 
White to pier and win 
(Composed by Slesniev.) 


The Official Blue Book and 
Encyclopedia of Chess 


Kenneth Harkness. business manager 
of the United States Chess Federation 


book whieh has just been published for 


pany 

The chapter heads indicate its scone: 
The Laws o ess axplained: USCF 
Tournament Rules: Chess Notation: The 
: The Chess 
Directories : Rates 
Chess Players: and finally the officia! 
American transiation of the FIDE Laws 

of Chess. 
Three hundred and seventy-seven 
pages full of valuable information for 
chess functions! Plus 


list 
The list price is $7.50. 


Ostend Scene of Many 


Tournaments 


The Belgian resort of Ostend was the 
seene of strong ernie mer ag tourna- 
ments in 1905-1906 and 1907. Recently 
one of the leading players in the 1906 
event plaved in an Ostend tournament 
in 1956. His name is Dr. Ossip Bern- 
stein, and this year, although he did not 
win. his last-round victory over Donner 
relegated m to second piace behind 
the Belgian champion O'Kelly. 

Below is one of O’Kelly’s wins, 
victim being Hans Grob, Swiss master. 
who shared honors in the 1937 Ostend 
Tournament, which Kerss and - 
also played. 


an effort should be made to 
teach and correct. There is a' 
great waste of talent.” 


Ski Meets Announced 


By the Associated Press 
Aspen, Colo, N.J.; and Charles 
The National Ski Association | Greenfield, Mass. 
has announced sites and dates of Other Events 
12 meets, including national Other 1956-57 sanctioned 


championships it has sanctioned | the “asenclation’s agin “tone of 
for the 1956-57 winter season. 


meeting here were: 

The National Alpine Cham-| Nordic—Feb. 10, classics com- 
pionships—downhill, slalom and/| bined, Walla Walla, Wash.; Feb. 
combined—went to Aspen, Colo. 16-17, international cross coun- 
They will be held March 2-3,| try and classics combined, Ish- 
1957. peming, Mich.; Feb. 24, interna- 

The National Jumping Cham- | tional umping championships, 
pionships will be held March 3,|!ton Mountain, Mich.; March 
1957 at Berlin and the 


9-10, North American jumping, 
National Te-bllcenaver Cross 


cross country and combined 
Country Championships at Lyn- ae en 
donville, Vt., March 3, 1957. Alpine— 

The Association elected Robert} Veterans’ Giant 
Johnstone of Denver president.| Pionships, Winfield, Vt.; March 
He succeeds Albert E. Siegal of | 9-19, North American. Alpine 
Atherton, Calif. Named treasur- Championships, Squaw Valley, 
er was Wesley Hadden of Pasa- Calif; March 15-17, Interna- 
dena, Calif. 


tional Alpine Championships, 
Representatives 


Stowe, Vt.; March 22-24, Jun- 
Johnstone will represent the 


ref Tour-Event ‘ “ 
0 slalom, cross coun 
Southern Rocky Mountain Divi-| and jumping), Reno, Nowr 
sion, as well as being association| March 29-31, Roche Trophy | tee 
president, and Hadden will rep-| Race, Aspen, Colo. 
resent the Far West Division. 

Other division representatives! @ 
are William Downs, Helena, 
Mont., Northern Rocky Moun- 


in a World Series when he was 
at his peak with the old Phila- 


Warren, 


Major League 
Homerun Records 


By the Associated Press 


es OLN Sin PB PA OD 


~ Ruthie Jessen, 19, of Seattle, 
| Ween. 


Sicilian 
oO’ "Bleek 


teh 
41 K-Q3 and Bleck 


21 @-B P- mates in 


Major League Leaders 


(Gemes ef Sept. 21) 
By the Associated Press 


American League 
Batting ened on 350 at bats)—Wil- 
ams, Boston 56: Mantle, New York, 
352; Maxwell, | Settoit. 331: 
troit, 328: Power, 
— 

Chica Chicag : 
ae Leonk: Bauer, New York and Yost, 


eg Ax ied Ir ins Ken: 


8i oe n 
SS Or. 3 5a hat + Seg Cleveland, ari 
Mantle, on inew 


184: Kaline 


end Kuenn, Detroit, is: Bre Chicago, 
. Boston, 1 


and " wennesla.  Washing- 
wHeme Runs—Mantle. New pork, BI: 


York 
cut Waseee Washingion. 29 29: *Kaline, De Be. 


iy |S” eee. 
ie 


16; Prancens, 


ae Chicago. 18: 
= Aparicio. Chicago, 
Baltimore and Jensen 


Results 
By the Associated Press 


Mrinal, (vest-of-7) 


~4,, Toronto... 14. Rachester..1....(Tarenta. : 


American 


Association 
,025 1 (best-of-7) 
eater 6 Denver $ \ndianano. 
ee ae 


ia ahaa oat ; 


sphere ih tg NT aE ath 
Sf ie aes gd 
owe ite 4 


as pera 
Rone ie thts OM 
SUT Be 


yy, of last night’s 13-7 Red Sox vic- 
tory over the Yankees at Fen- 


ee 


Berra a Defensive Star 
In Outfield at F enway 


| By Ed Rumill 
| Sports Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


That was quite a defensive 
show Yogi Berra put on in left 
field through the early innings 


| Mickey Mantle’s towering home 
run off Frank Sullivan in the 
second inning. The ball, in a tre- 
mendously igh arc, struck 
about a foot from the top of the 
way Park. wall behind the center field 

Casey Stengel used Elston | bleachers, in a direct line from 
Howard behind the plate and | home plate. Press box critics es- 


.| handed a fielder’s glove to Berra, | timated it travelled 480 feet, but 


the league’s leading catcher. Was it could have been closer to 500, 


vvug times, he looked like one of the | 

"vest picket liners we have seen | 
*.| at the Fens all year. 

PT" Stengel ever’ did ‘decide’ he 


|, Beet BxKt: 2 PxB, White loses after | 
“Well, as I said, this was 4 ‘ 


, | by the National Sporting Club. 


¢ | cer 


has filled a long felt need ‘n the biue | 
the federation by David McKay Com- | 


ame ) bucid: 


| Subspia—-Reme: 


nee EES 


there any significance to the| Only two other balls have 
|move—was Stengel looking to | ever gone farther in that direce 
'1957, when he might install the | tion. Jimmy Foxx and Hank 
‘| capable owed: as the Yankee Greenberg, in the same season, 
catcher and play Yogi in the out- \hit over the wall behind the 
| field? | bleachers, to the right of the 

“Not at all,” was the Yankee | | flagpole. Greenberg’s, like Man- 


By Reuters 
London 
Tributes from sportsmen all | 
Lover the world, including the 
| Soviet Union, were paid to 
‘Stanley Matthews, 41-year-old 
_British soccer player here Sept. 


| year in the game. 


Diplomats, men of letters and | 
musicans and actors, as | 
well as a host of sporting per- | 
sonalities, were among the 500 
guests at a dinne: given to him | 


The Soviets International Soc- | 
team sent this message: 
| “Congratulations on the occasion 
'of your brilliant jubilee. We 


a 


|- Professional Football 
Results Sept. 21 

| By the Associated Press 

| 


Cleveland Browns 24, Chicago Bears 14 
New York Giants 42, Chicago Cards 7 


Music 


Temorr 
emis -- Teaiiane Dowis, | 
. 


Theaters 


Colonial—““Too Late the Phalarope,” 
Barry Sullivan, 8:30. Wed., Sat. Mat 
Plymouth — “Sixth Finger in a Five | 
Ae Ba Jimmy Komack. 8:30. 


Gardner 
pianist. 


‘Seskes Orchestra 


Totem Pole, wt Park, Newton-— 
Dancing tonight 


Films in Boston 


tor—"' Eddy poche Story," Tyron 
over, 9:30, 11:30, 1:30. 


of Happi- 
ness,’ ike Gund- 
—_ at 8 1: Ll; “4, 1:46, 3:48, 5:50, 9:54. 


Besten—- poet + Se of the World” 
Cinerama, 2:30, 6:30, 8:40. 

r Ba} vd Rapphrey, Bo- 
245, 6:06, 5 ey Tor 

Alan Ledd, S46. 

ns Peake ib, 3: ‘30. 


2:65. 4. 
ag David Wayne. 


“A Cry in the 
Natelie 


ountain, a 
7:20. 
8: 


manager’s prompt reply. “Yogi | | tle’s, was a towering fly. Foxx’s 
for 1,000 in his career. So I put | Season at the Fens and his 51st 
Yogi, who takes his outfielding | Ted picked up four times at ba 
RBI, putting him at or over the | ™ore games to play. 
|romped around in left field, | night, hardly the sort of 
| good showing in the approach- 
iby leaving 20 men on base. But 
'now knows he can do it wenout | lregulars. Names like Carroll, 
| improve it. . 5 | nent in the World Series. 
evening, of course, was|through the three hour and 23 
placing so much emphasis on 
Soccer Player Is. 
on the bench might be benee 
| plunging into the classic agairist 
But, on second thought, you 
iwill snap out the orders that 
doing and is using these few 
, ee ae 
| morrow’ s series final with the 
‘the Boston season. with afters 
' best RBI game of the year, with 
Hungary, once rated the finest ‘ing and cleaned them with hie 
|your oustanding skill. You are | ‘his RBI tota i a fine 84 
say their World. Series ticket 
‘available ... Bill Skowron had 
Brivegn: “Autumn Leaves.” “Miami 
Ai 
"Tot Rod Girl” 2:37, 8: 15. 
Flanne!) Suit.’ 
i, 
9: 
EVERETT—Park: 
FRAMINGHAM—Cinema: “Bus Stop.” 
abe’ PAK Fairmont: 
“The “S 
Hold Back so remortow dl 
07,4: 33, 
Strand: 
tumn Leaves,”’ 
ftigh Society.” 
2:30 
Exeter—' ‘Private’s Progress,” 
5, 7:30 + “Man With the 
Golden Arm.” Kid.” 
» | MELROSE —Metrose: | Hulot’s Holle 


went into the game needing one | | was a line drive. 
him in the outfield gave my boy | overall. 
‘is less chance of Berra being in- | the Red Sox star in front, .356 
as seriously as he does his hit- leaving him 24 short of the ree 
‘century mark for the fourth ee Se 
1% 4 
|making the right throw several saSt 
ing World Series. They estab-« 
| wanted the bats ol Berra and | ' remember that it will be dif- 
|hurting the team’s defense. D | Coates, Wilson, Hunter and Sies 
However, a fellow could not 
The big thrill of 
minute game if the Yankeeg 
'personal records, when a game 
Accorded Tribute tr epee ep mean important 
the champions of the National 
can be sure that Stengel is 
‘are best for the team. The “Old 
remaining games to get ready 
Briefs » «e 1om Brewer tries 
| Yankees ... Monday is open . 
inoon dates Tuesday and Wed- 
five ...dJim Piersall found the 
| player in the game, cabled: “We | |39th double, high for the 
| the ideal player of the world.” jisecond only to Jensen’s 95 on 
|Sale was the largest in history, 
five hits for the Yankees. rT 
Expos 
| POSTERS TER — Ages: “Hot Red Girl.” 
Prison 
“Autumn Leaves.” “Poste 
Strand; Mes Back the Night,” 
9, 7: ' 2:32, 5:81, 
“Outside the Lew.’ 
Gorman: “Hold . Back the Night.” 
Girl. ss ean ‘Girls in Prison.” 
Ww mp.” 
“Men in Gray: 
“High Soc 
7:45. “Aut 
| MATTAPAN—Oriental: 
“The Bad Seed,” 
MEDFORD—Felisway: 
“Billy. the 
“Litt'e Werd of Don Camille,” 


RBI for 100 this season and three; It was Mickey's first of the 
|Howard a chance. With the| The batting duel between 
jured in the outfield.” to .352 at the end of the Myo 
‘ting and catching, got his 100th quired 400. There were seven 
straight year. And the way he | The Yankees looked sloppy 
team that figures to make a 
lished. a..major.. league record. 
_ Howard in the same line-up, he | ferent when Stengel plays his 
lfact Yogi in the outfield might |bern are not apt to be promis 
the long, |help wondering as he sat 
chilly 
| F ee were using good judgment in 
Outstanding British 
or two—even a few innings~ 
and -much needed rest before 
League, whoever they may be, 
watching his men closely and 
|'Professor” knows what he is 
for the big games in the classic, 
again for his 20th victory in to- 
The Washington Senators close 
inesday ... Billy Klaus had his 
Ferenc Puskas, captain of | pases loaded in the third inne 
'hope you will continue to show | American League . .. It brought 
the Red Sox . The Yankeeg 
| with only standing room now 
Entertai t Timetabl 
‘Girls in Prison.” 1, 
nger. 
Franklin: “Picnic. ”" “Main in the Grog. 
High Society,’ 
“Awey All “Boats” 
“Thunder Over Arizona.’ G s re 
we ung 
N — Lexington: 
1:05, 5:02, 8: 
2. 
“Miami! Exposé, " 1a, i 
MAYNABD—Fine Arts: 
“Marty,” “Rese 
Tattoo.’ 
Mea Drive-in 
Medford: “Moby Dick.” “Congo. Cross 
FEDMAM~ Paramount: ‘Scarlet Hour.’ 


Jeff Chandler, 
12:40, 3:45. : “ 
Before,” Jock , Wi 11:10, 2:16, 
Kenmore—’ ‘Ma dame Butterfiy.” 
Yachigusa, Michizo Tangka. Nicola 
FPiliacuridi. 1; 07 3:08. 5:19, 7:34, 9:49. 
Mayflower —~ ‘1984. Bdmond O'Brien. 
9:30. 1, 4:30, 8. “Autumn eaves,” Joan 
Crawford, 11:06, 2:35, 6:05, 9:30. 
tan-—"’ azon Trader,” eo 
Button. 10:15, 13:50, 3:36. 6. 8:3 
“Burnin Hills, by WA "00. 8: Natali 
F j " James 
. Barbara Stanwyck, 2: 30, 12: 
9: ence Li e Laas.” 
Sat Zetterling. B) 105 8:25. 
Paramount—‘‘Nak d His: ' ‘David Wayne, 
9:30, 12:10, B88 5-3 8:20. “A Cry 
i ‘ "Edmond "O’Brien. Natalie | 
Bea "18. 7, 9:40. 
ohn Bromfie!d, 
3s. “H 


ae Par rdne 

. PONSET-——Drive-In: “High Society.” 
“Hold Back the N ht.” - 
i, Simones “High Society.” | 
roy { READING—Drive-In: “High Sew. 
Strand: intrigue.”’ ye 
“High Society.” = 
m tea Society.”* 


: “Bigger “Thaw” 
“Poreign Intrigue.” 


| yey esten: “Somebody Up 
Me." “Storm Over the 


“Tle 

1 Sq. ra, “Parde 
# “ome 
‘The Mins 


Keoru 


"Mohawk." 


ot: 


“ the 


Mons Freeman. | “*Maseac 
| WAKEFIELD — Wakefield: 


rer 


Mon 
10: Tons. at :30, < 15, Se vias 
Gloria Gude. 4 6:30, 8: 30. 
State—“These Wilder Years,’ James 
gt OF Barbera Stanwyck. 11:46. 3./} 
50. “Dance Little Lady.’ Mai. 

. 1:30, 4:55, 8:20. 

m in the Streets,” Bol | 
k Out on 101,’ intial 


cegeenss: Advanee m |" 
Car- 


reh: Music 
"30 a.m. to midnight 


seen, "" ae 
38, h:8t. Kelty ) 
U ptew n— umn ee od 
ford "yl: ‘io . 7. 6. 


-abteee Fas | 
Life,’ James ey 1, 
Films in Suburbs 
High Society.” 
“are ; 


aan in Prison inn mot Rod Giri.” 
“The King, and 1” “Helen 
Refier in aes t “Santiago.” 

“Kiss Be ore | 
. k the "Wight. Ad 7.” 


my Tonge “Miami 


“Star 


Beciety.” 


the Air: du 
toons: news. 
Trans-Lux—**Maverick 
Stanwyck, 9:30, 12:59. 
iety,”” mi Eresey, 
14:12, ye 6:10, 9:38. 


ihe ibe Certain 
ae r nemgy 
wanes! “Storm 


: “Away All 
rner.’ 

ore Ine 
d¢v.”’ 


Rod 


aE an 


PEMWAW FAE 5 


“Hot 


popatveras.< 1:30 4:47. 8:09. 
. 0:40. 


+ - 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MON ITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER a 1956 


Education 


Courses by Mail Can Meet Special 


In a World-Wide Elementary ‘School’ 


Written for The Christien Science Monitor) cording to Dr. Edward Brown, 
One of the most unusual cor= | Headmaster. 


respondence-study programs in | 
the world is handled by the Cal- | 


The questionnaires retirned 
by the American firms surveyed, 
ireflect the experience of com- 


vert School of Baltimore, Mary~- | panies with a total of more than’ 
land. Calvert is an independent | 10,000 employees abroad, operat- 


diementary day school, enrolling 


some 375 boys and girls of from 
four-and-a-half to 14 who live 
in that region. But paralleling 
the day~school curriculum is a 
correspondence « study depart- 
ment whose pupils are boys and 
girls in far corners of the earth. 

This home study department 


enrolls some 8,000 children, of | 
whom 75 per cent live in other | 


countries: Children study with) 
Calvert in Alaska and Canada, 
in every country of Central | 
America and the Caribbean, in| 
all South American countries 
except French Guiana, in 
countries of Europe, 19 in Africa, 
seven in the Middle East, 19 in 
Asia and Indonesia, and in 11 
areas of the Pacific. 
Who They Are 


Many of these children have 
rents working for American 
usiness firms, but there are also 
children of government workers, 
missionaries, diplomatic and 
service personnel, and others. 
There are also many children 
living inside the United States 
who study by means of the Cal- 
vert Home Instruction Courses— 
children who for some reason. 
cannot attend regular school— 
shut-ins, those who live too far 
from a-school, children of thea- 
ter or show people, and of par- 


/seas stations.. 


ing on all five continents and 
in the Pacific Ocean area. These 
employees have more than 6,000 
children with them at their over- 
Calvert learned 
this from the survey: 

1. Americans working abroad 
tend to take their families with 
them. 

2. About one third of these 
Americans remain abroad more 
than six years: about two fifths! 


| remain abroad less than three 


nies 
6 | abroad 


| years. 


3. 
with Americans a 
expect the number ofl 
their employees to increase in 
the next five to 10 years; less 
than 10 per cent of the tompa- 
nies expect that number to de- 
crease. 

4. About of the 


a quarter 


\letter or brochure containing 


About half .of the compa- | 


‘naire conduct operations in Latin 


companies have established their | 


own elementary schools for chil- 
dren of their employees. These 
usually include grades l 
through 8. About half of these 
schools are supported by the 
company alone, and the remain- 
der by the company and parents 


| Cooperating financially, 


ents who travel for business or | 


pleasure, 
These courses are accredited 
by the Maryland Department of 
Education and are accepted by 
the regular schools whenever a 
child transfers to one. Many of 


the children study alone, with a) 


parent or other person as home 
instructor, following the teach- 
ing guide. In many other cases, 
several children study together) 
as a little class, and in some! 
cases whole private schools 
abroad are using the Calvert les- 


sons for their regular curricu-| 


lum. 


Calvert cooperates in the 


5. About two-thirds of the 
companies do not operate schools 


-_——_— ~— — 


American 


' the 


because either they have too few 
children or there are other edu- 
ee facilities available. 

Personnel of almost a third 
en ‘the companies teach their 
children by means of home- 
study programs, For their 
younger children, grades 1 to 9, 
they use the Calvert Home In- 
struction Courses, 


Highly Important 


7. Most employees consider 
the educational problem highly 
important, The companies usual- 
ly inform their employees of the 
local educational situation at the 
employment interview, or by a 


general information about the 
place to which the employee is 
| being sent, 

8. More than half the com- 
_ panies replying to the.question- 


America. Europe is the scene 
of operations for about a third, 
A fifth to a quarter of the com- 
panies operate in the other 
areas. (Most companies operate 
in more than one area.) 

Records of the Calvert School 
indicate that many of the com- 
pany schools noted on the ques- 
ti¢nnaires are operating with the 
Calvert System. In addition, al- 
most 1,000 children whose par- 
ents are employed overseas by 
companies are en- 
rolled as individual pupils in 
Calvert Home Study 
Courses. 


College Courses by Mail 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


If you are interested in tak-| Most of the courses in age 
courses| languages also use records. | 


ing college extension 


from liberal arts and land-grant) 


universities, 
76 institutions 


colleges and 


have some to 


organization they 


you | 


If you would like to take 
courses from a particular uni-| 
versity, with the idea of build-| 


ing up credits to apply at that! 
choose from. These belong to an' 


themselves) 


formed, called the National Uni-' 


iversity Extension Association. 


' . . . 
; | why not write to the university 
|All 76 are engaged in extension 


activities of great variety, among" 


which are evening classes. con- 
‘ferences and institutes, .audio- 


3 ta materials, radio and tele- 


formation of these group schools’ 


whenever it is possible to get 
10 or more students together. 
A number of Calvert’s group 
schools are maintained by Amer-| 
ican firms at their foreign in-) 
\ stallations. 


All Lessons Tested 


The courses are, 
built around the three R’s but 
in addition to the fundamental 
elementary school subjects, Cal- 
vert includes astronomy, art 
history, mythology, and other 
subjects not always taught in 


; 
’ 
; 


of course,) versity 


the early grades. All the lessons 


have been tested 
more day-school classrooms. 


working 
several 


personnel 


countries interesting 


facts were turned up by the Cal-) 
ac-| 


vert School of Baltimore, 


in the Balti-| 
'Extension Association, 

In a recent survey of Ameri-| 
ean firms that have American' 
in foreign | 


vision, package library, lectures, 
and various community services. 

Of the 76, 
offer correspondence courses. 
Many of these courses may be 


| study 


university toward a degree—one | 
you see your way to attending 
personally at some later date— 


itself and ask for their cata-' 
logue of correspondence or home 
courses. If they have a 


‘home study or extension depart-' 


there are 53 who, 
| Start. 
ment will gladly give you advice. 


taken for credit; and when sup-' 


plemented by a certain amount 
of designated residential work 
(usually a full year) at a uni- 
accepting these credits, 


| 


may be applied toward a degree.) 


A “Guide to Correspondence’ 


Study,” listing the courses avail-' to write. But many a would-be 


ment, you can then choose 
courses that would be acceptable | 
at that institution and follow) 
through with them from the 
Someone in the depart-' 


oe 


NE Ne Nome 


Needs, 


ut. 


Through an Editor's Window 


-_! 
ne | 


Be Wise Investment of Time 
=| Back to School on a Postage Stamp 


By Millicent Taylor 


Education Editor of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


It’s back to school for mil- 
lions of children: and back to 


‘isehool for plenty of adults as 
-|the. school buildings and the 


colleges open their doors for 
evening study. It’s also back to 
school for some 700,000 people 
who do their studying right in 
their own homes in margins of 
time. 

In this do-it-yourself era, 
what is better self-help than to 


take a course by mail? Cor- 


respondence study has for some | 
people important advantages 
over courses that must be taken 
at certain hours and away from 
home. 

If you are employed some- 
where all day, you may hesitate 
to enroll in a course that keeps 

ou out two or three nights a 
reek, away from your family. 
If you” you are a _ wife and mother, 


during the day or being able 


| 


you cannot always be sure of | course by mail and may enjoy it 
getting away at specific times! no end. 


I know a man who brushed 


to provide a baby-sitter for the | Up on branches of art in order 
children, and you may not want/ to improve the handling of a 
‘to be away in the evening when | job he had landed. He needed 


your husband is homie. 


At Your Own Time and Rate 


If you are in the armed forces 
you have spare time that can 
be much more interesting if used | 
on a correspondence course. No 
matter what your circumstances 
courses by mail can be taken at | 
your own rate, depending on the | 
time you can give—and such 
time may vary from day to day | 
quite appreciably. 
of 


Among disadvantages, 
course, 
| spondence courses are taken 
_ lation and 


and a teacher, 


| 


»|'a field allied to his 


| 
| 


| school, 


' 


to learn more about picture lay- 
| outs and cartooning. There are, 
'a few schools offering these and 
other branches of art by mail. 
Another young man I know 
has been taking electrical engi- 
neering in order to work into 
present one, 
‘A woman who called on me 
recently told me she had mar- 
ried before’ finishing high 
When her children 


' reached their teens and she had 


is the fact that corre- | 


more time to herself, 
rolled in a 


she en- 
correspondence 


| School that offers a regular high 
solo. You don’t have the stimu-| 


fun of classmates | 
the give-and- | 


take of discussion and exchange | 


of ideas. But if the advantages 


‘outweigh these disadvantages or | 


'if you live where there are no 
‘adult education classes given 
| locally, you can enroll in a 


UCLA Undergraduates Take 


—_ 


U.S. to Colleges i in India 


By Nora E. Taylor 
Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 
The grass-roots method is usu- | group found answers and they 
ally considered the best way of | were solid, thoughtful ones. 


getting acquainted with anyone. 
Expanding this to nations, stu- 
dents of the University of Cali- | 


= (fornia at Los Angeles ‘conceived 
"=| the idea of taking teams of col- 


Evenings at home with the family can also be used for taking 
a correspondence course that helps one toward a job promotion 
or enriches one’s enjoyment of life. 


By 


orrespond 


London 
British young people should 
know more about the govern- 
'ment of the United States is the 
view of 


cn 


From Writing to Landscape 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


The way to become a writer is 


able and what colleges and uni-| writer using margins of time at 
versities offer each, may be pur-| home yearns for help from some- | 


chased for 25 cents at the head-| one who knows the ropes. Work- 


quarters of the 


Address the National University; for years making the same mis- 


ington, Indiana. 


Bloom-; takes as to unsalable subjects 
|and approach, 
Some of the member institu-| 


where a little | 
guidance could change futile ef- | 


tions also offer high school and) fort into successful achievement. 


even grade scheo! courses; and} A correspondence course in writ- | | fe 
in braille! ing for publication has for many 
and on records for the blind.! made all the difference. It helps 


a few offer coursés 


EDUCATION | 


Fine and Applied Arts 


Coeducational 


; one to work systematically. 


| volved), 


i speech — are taught by 
| of records and often with a tape 
recorder. You 


gives 
one skilled, impersonal criticism 
(one’s own family and friends 
| are likely to be emotionally in- 


+ 

Is it possible to learn a foreign 
| language by mail? It always has 
| been, and many have done it. 
| However, today it is especially 
asibte, for most courses in for- 
| eign languages—or any kind of 
means 


not become 
alone with a 
phonograph records, 


may 
fluent working 
book and 


| but if you can find a way to con- 


| verse, using what you are learn- 


MUSEUM SCHOOL 


a Pabst cary OF THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 
Professiona/ training with dipiema course in Braw- 
ing. Graphic Arts, Painting, Sculpture, Jewelry, 
Silversmithing, Commercial Art, Ceramics. 16 Trav- 
eling ve Catalog. 8.F.A. and 8.8. in Ed. 
Gegrees granted by Tufts University. 
SCHOOL OPENS SEPT. 24 


EVENING SCHOOL 
a Sept. 27. School Opens Oct. : 
te course in Graphic Arts, Sculpture, 
yamics, Painting. Special courses in Calligraphy, 
ing. interior, TY and Plastic Design. 
Russell T. Smith, Head of Scheel 
The Fenway, Sesten 15, Mass. KE 6-5066 


TRAPHAGEN SCHOOL 
OF FASHION For Results 


Training Were Pays Lifetime Bividends 


ART DESIGN CLOTHING CONS“RUCTION real DECOR 


Bur, Send for Cir. 7, Ph. C6 5-207 
Teephagen, 1680 Bway (52d ‘SN. YL19 


_ Business and Secretarial | 


ENTER TOMORROW all DAY programs. 
EVENING SCHOOL, TOMORROW Acct.. 


THURSDAY Income Tax, 69 Brimmer St. | 
TUESDAY Secretarial, Greag Shorthand, | 
on) 


Typewriting, 160 Beacon. ENROLL 
entrance. New class SPEEDWRITING 
SHORTHAND Sept. 24. Offices open 9 a.m. 
to 8:30 p.m. 

160 Beecon $t., Boston 16 COpley 7-7435 


For Information 
About Good School 


‘consult the advertisements . 
i on the Saturday 


| 


' 


te. FOR GIRLS 
jOn the shores of Lake Michigan, 


' 


' 


Trade Methods in Minimum Time—Coeé | 


THE LEELANAU |§ 


SCHOOLS 


PINEBROOK LEELANAU | 
FOR BOYS, 
Ac: | 
\credited, coeducational college prepara- 
ition. Small classes guided by a staff 
selected for its technical competence and 
pration to young people. Grades 6-12; 
raduates in leading colleges. Pleasant, 
melike. Music, art, shop. Ski school. 
Riding. Work ram, scholarships. All | 
‘attend Christian Science services. Booklets. | 
Charies W. Shinn, Headmaster 
Glen Arber, Mich. 


. ¢ 
Form 

Schools 
BOYS GIRLS 
Preparing youth to 
meet today’s prob- 
lems with quiet 


strength and a joy Litchfield, Conn. 


in the vast opportunities that are 
theirs. 


Grades 6-12. Accredited 
Foll Curriculum 
for College Entrance 
Attention to Character Training 
Mr. and Mrs. John N. Forman 
Directors 


din 


Prepare for College at 


Daycroit 


in New England 


where faculty and students 
ere from Christian Science 
homes. Coeducetion, Board- 
ing @nd Day. Balanced 
scholastic, athletic, cultural 
and social program. Con- 
structive effort stimulated, 


Director of Admissions 


Blachiey Road Stamford, Conn, 


“Prog ress at 
PRINCIPIA" 


tf An roe 
ho! which ~ sh 


he 
PRINCIPIA 


__$AINT LOUIS 12, MISSOURI 
Founded 1898 


Junior College 


Upper School 
Lower School e 


| & 


" 


| 


| ing, fluency can be won. You 
| can nearly always find someone 
| to converse with, ancavill enjoy 
ithe widened horizons that come 


' with the practice, 


. 
4:9 PT S Py 


| 


Berkel Hall | 
ehh 


46th Year | 
Starts Sept. 18 
CO-EDUCATIONAL 
DAY SCHOOL 
‘Nursery Through 9th Grede 


BR 2-1237 
CR 5-0197 


| States is felt by the few 


| greenhouses, 


300 NORTH SWALL DRIVE 
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA 


You Will Become 
a Fine Dancer 


grammatical 


Ce 


A new movement in the United 
home 
study schools that teach land- 
scape and gardening by corre- 
‘spondence. Many an amateur 


| gardener is finding it profitable | 


and good fun to take a course in 
‘landscape design. New home 
owners are enrolling with an 
eye to designing their own home 


‘grounds and doing their own! 


planting. with real know-how 
and enjoyment. But these schools 
are. reaching more than the or- 
dinary home owner and amateur 
gardener. Employees of nurs- 
eries, city park departments, 
and garden shops 
are taking courses, while others 
with an interest 


For example, many an indus- 
trial plant and city school sys- 


zens want trained garden con- 
sultants. 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 
The Berlitz ag Handbook of wo | 
New | / 
drawing power. It contains a col- | | | 
lection of questions by which a| | 


tive E the Staf® of 
Berlitz Languages. 
York, Grosset & Duniap. $4.95. 


This book has an immediate | 


the 


reader can test his own knowl- 
edge of words, spellings, and 
points. Having 


} turned to the back of the book 


Sine be todo than eeustens fenton | 
et ne obligation whetscever ) 


7020 Hollywood Bivd. 
Los Angeles, Calif. HO 4-8255 


or eny of 21 VGY schools on the 
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"A Rich Experience for 
Enlarging Interests” 


Mesonic T 
2875 — A 
Ruth Heard Filer, Dir Director hie. 6-1232 


rand done this, or some of it at 


least, a reader looking*at the | 
results of his test would prob- | 


ably feel impelled to begin at |} 


the beginning and brush up on 
word knowledge. 


Berlitz Schools staffs have 
wide know-how not only of lan- 
guages, but of proved ways of 
teaching them, ~In the light of 
this, the Volume is organized to 
be an effective self-help, with 
humorous black and white illus- 
trations to brighten the path. It 


} covers every aspect of stringing 


words together from usage to 
rules, to sentence construction, 
to effective speaking and writing. 
It also takes into account the 
fact that English (or maybe we 
should say veg we is a living 
language, . and therefore con- 
stantly chafiging. It helps the 
reader decide when to accept 
into his vocabulary a new idiom 
or form and when to avoid it, 
While this. _book would not 


Substitute for school teachi 


| would be a mp fens handbook fo 
| who n ‘out 


‘along tk 
way in their language assimila~ | 
tion, and is 


the Hansard Society | 
‘for Parliamentary Government | 
| Hitchner of the University 
| Washington, 
' Society's London staff in Sep- 


and enables one to meet | 
Association.| ing alone, it is possible to go on | the needs of the writers’ market 


+ here. 


| Honorary 


British Teachers to Study U.S. 


Melita Knowles 


tofThe Christia 


mn Se 


The Society -has -decided 
to do something about it. 

It has set up an American 
section within 
to offer its services to teachers 
in the United Kingdom. 


I i ole SSVI 


lence Monitor 


Ameri ican D. 


of | 
Seattle, joined th 


tember 
Dr. 
young 
entist, 
tive 


as Head of the Section. 
Hitchner is a distinguished 
American political sci- 
a specialist in compara- 
government who since 1937 


has had varied teaching experi- | 


ence in American universities. 
In its initial stages the Ameri- 
can section will concentrate on 
making its services available to 
the educational field in the 
United Kingdom, It is concerned 
to find out more of what is being 
done in teaching about Ameri- | 
can parliamentary government 
and to help teachers and others. 
At Conferences 


In outlining possible ways in 
which the Section may achieve 
its aims Sir Stephen King-Hall, 
Director of 
ciety, suggests this may be done 
through addresses to conferences 
and other gatherings of teachers. 
If and when headmasters or 


headmistresses and teachers of | 
(history come together -for any | 
the services | 


purpose, he says, 
of Dr, Hitchner would be avail- 
able to address them. The same 
would apply to gatherings of 
young people from 14 to 17 years 
old. It might be that several 


gether their senior pupils in one 
school to hear a talk or to ques- 
tion Dr. Hitchner. It is hoped 
films and film strips will be 
available. 

In the meantime British teach- 
ers are invited to send in ideas, 
suggestions and requests in re- 
gard to services which the 
American Section can render. 
Letters should be addressed to 


|The Secretary, The Hansard So- 


in entering | 
these fields are studying and | 
landing new jobs because of it. | 


| 


tem wants trained superintend- | 
ents of grounds these days, and | 
garden clubs and private citi-| 


ciety for 
ernment, 
S.W.1, 


Parliamentary Gov- 


}and improve 
ithe United States 
| thought. 


' from 


its own Society |® 


‘the title 


finding, 
At each stop at school or college, | 
gave | 
talks about life back home in| 


| found it. 


| tossed at every 


the  So- | 


‘four 


39 Millbank, London, 


i\lege students to India to meet 


‘similar groups of students there, 


talk with them, get acquainted, 
understanding of 
in Indian 


Probably the example set by 
/UCLA will have repercussions 
‘in other “colleges “ and” “more 


‘groups of young people will go 
‘abroad to get into -close touch 


with their opposite numbers. 


/ This movement could have far- 


‘flung results. 


Even within its 


|present limits it is contributing 
ito a deeper understanding of the 


Money came in for the project | 


Winthrop 


the traveling students furnished 
part of the cost themselves, 
Fourth Expedition 
In the summer of 1955 the 
fourth expedition set out. 


group of _12-students 
adult leaders took along with 


| them a writer and a photog- 


'rapher from Look magazine, 
+Thomas Bruce Morgan and Bob 


e | Learner, respectively. What they 


saw and photographed and lis- 
'tened to was later recorded in 


| book form by the former under | 
and Fellow | 


“Friends 
Students” (Thomas Y. Crowell 
Company, 432 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 16, N.Y. $5). 

This was a hard-hitting, fact- 
fact-giving expedition. 


the individual members 
the United States as they had 
A Negro and a Japa- | 
nese girl found themselves con- 
'stantly answering race queries. 
Politics and foreign policy were 
meeting—*W hy 
| don't you recognize Red China?’ 

“Why are you .experimenting 
with the H- bomb: ”™ “Does Amer- | 
ica want war’ 


Such questions indicated now | 
Stue | 
It | 
disturbing 
how much Communist | 
into | 


“Where the Cambus Meets the Suri!” 
' 


alert the educated Indian 
dents are to world problems. 
also indicated in 
measure 
propaganda is 
fallow thought. 
Book Sums Up 

Mr. Morgan’s factual 
readable book shows what these | 
groups are accomplishing. After | 
years of groups, 

finds a ready welcome at 


poured 


India” 


/journey’s end. The young peo- 
schools would decide to bring to- | 


ple work hard, and soon find they 


to their own. attitudes, too. In 


a country oriented so differently, 


attitudes and mores taken for 


|'granted back home have. to be 


justified and explained, The 


thought through, 


The girls and boys of the = 


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Rockefeller | 


and the Ford Foundation, and |“. ; ‘ple 
ceived notions of other countries | qaower arrangement 
tossed into a kaleidoscope with | : 


United States abroad. Recipro- 
cally, the students concerned in 
it are finding their own precon- 


the end pattern sometimes ap- 
pearing very different from the 


first. 


This | 
and two}! 


The more 
grow, the more understanding 
and likelihood there is of agree- 


ment at international gatherings | 


such as the United Nations. As | 
time goes on, more and- more: 


such movements 


school course with diploma. She 
graduated with honors and is 
now taking college courses by 
mail, 

Got Her College Degree 

A young woman who was con- 


'fined at home because of an el- 


'derly 


‘finished, by 


| relative and who lived in 
a village in the Kentucky hills, 
mail, not only her 


| high sehool course but also the 
(equivalent of a four-year college 
| course, and later, when possible, 


’ 


attended the college in person 
long enough to add the required 
number of resident courses to 


| win her degree. 


Hundreds of people take 


courses by mail just for fun, too, 


| terests 
you would like to play the piano 
better or study some other musi- 


‘work or 


offered 


_barriers 


or for the joy 


of improving 
themselves, 


widening their in- 
and _horizons. Perhaps 


cal instrument or take music ap- 
preciation. Perhaps languages 
intrigue you, or courses in writ- 
ing short stories, plays; or fea- 
ture articles. Perhaps for your 
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study public speaking. Almost 
any of the college subjects are 
somewhere by mail. 
There is a school that specializes 
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landscape 
gardening, business manage- 
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Age, location, and circume- 
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to further study. For 
those who cannot or prefer not 
to attend actual classes in a 
nearby school or college, there 
are good courses, well taught, in 


delegates will have been reached.| abundance, and in every possible 
by chasmi-bridging groups of this | field of interest—which may be 


type—and the results 


and 


“Project 


‘have to question themselves as 


unhappy side of United States 
‘activities — predominantly, | 
course, the racial question and | 
the unrest it arouses—has to be} 
and reasons | 
‘found for why the situation is | 
‘not as black as Communist say- | 
- would indicate. 


of | 


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9 


_THE CHRISTIAN, SCIENCE MoNTTOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


Investment Company Aims: 


At Regularity 1 in 1 Program 


In his final article on the 
Commonwealth Investment 
Company of San Francisco, 
S. Waldo Coleman, president, 
discusses what he means by a 
complete investment program, 
This series of three articles 
was prepared by Mr. Coleman 
at the request of The Chris- 
tian Science Monitor. 


By 8. Waldo Coleman 


President, 
the Commenwealth Investment Company 
Written for The Christian Sctence Monitor 


San Francisco 
“In the management of Com- 
monwealth Investment Com- 
pany, our purpose has at all | 
times been to provide a complete §&@ 
investment program for the in- 
vestor. There are two phases of 
that purpose which deserve def- 
inition and comment. 

When we refer to a —— 
investment program, we mea 
the type of investing that would a 
be done by a prudent investor | 
if he had the time, training and | 
experience to handle his own | Moulin Studios 


: | effectively if they reecive a reg- 


ss ular amount each month. 
, This is especially true of sala- | 


ried people who retire, and we | 
feel that this service is a logical 
sequel to our plan for system- 
atically accumulating an in- 
vestment program. 

Trustees, guardians, and other 
fiduciaries are using mutual 
fund shares more and more, One 
of the reasons, of course, is that 


>i mutual funds "provide diversifi- 


cation and management, regard- 
less of the size of the trust and 
the investment experience and 
facilities of the trustee. 

Many persons are finding that 


Bit is possible to establish ny 
t 


trusts to “earmark” funds or 


wee | make outright gifts for special 

‘=. | purposes. 
and | For example, one may wish to 
: fiestablish an educational fund 
| for a child, provide for a church 


‘or favorite charity, or even ar- 
| range for the support of an el- 
'derly dependent. To assist share- 
holders and their attorneys, as 
well as investment dealers, we 
have prepared illustrative ma- 


Investors Cautioned — 


Against Red Hot Tips’ 


By Nate White 


Business and Financial Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


Boston 

Trend charting in the stock 
-market is big and expensive 
business in the United States. 
Practically everyone is inter- 
ested in the stock market. Hard- 
ly a brokerage house exists 
which does not have an informa- 
tion specialist who provides 
clients and prospective clients 
with highly particularized views 
of the market, concluding, as a 
general thing, with recommend- 
ations on certain stocks. 

Some houses get sizable fees 
for their services, Others are 
more modest. Some are free. 

It is almost as important for 
an investor to know his market 
trendist as for him to know the 
companies in which he wishes to 
Frckisors What makes a trendist 
function? Is he an economist? 
A businessman? A seer? Or a 
financier? A kind of religionist, 
perhaps? 

The New York Stock Ex- 
change, through the vigorous 
leadership of Keith Funston, its 


The investor, however, must 
retain control of his case. He 
must learn to study the financial 
statements of a company. Read- 
ers of this newspaper learned in 
the four-article series recently 
by J. Sinclair Armstrong, chair- 
man of the United States Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission, 
that they have rights and that 
the SEC exists to protect these 
rights, but that it cannot prevent 
the gullible from being gullible. 

Some trend letters are bullish. 
Some say the stock market has 
no limit. One trendist poses a 
future Dow-Jones average of 
1,000, but with a question mark. 


J. Sinclair Armstrong, 


(The industrial average reached 


the bearish nature of the Suez | 
news and tight credit, also a dis- 
counting of the election results| 
in the United States. 


‘Extreme Selectivity’ 

Many trendists are urging “ex- | 
treme selectivity” at this time. | 
Some are fearful. Others recom- 
mend dollar averaging—a device 


521 in April.) Another speaks of | 


article series on 
which recently appeared in 


‘now passing the information to 
its lists. as indicative.of future | 
market behavior. “In the past,” 
it notes, “when Vesuvius has 
gone up, our stock market has 
gone down.” 

Extensive unproven theories 


casts two years ahead of time 
on. elections, 


Courtesy, United States Securities and Exchange Commission 


SEC Charged by Congress With Regulatory Powers Over Stock Sales 
chairman of the 
United States Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission( center), is the author of a four- 
the -commission’s activitres 
The Christian 


Science Monitor. Members of the commission, 
left to right, are Earl F. Hastings, Andrew 
Downey Orrick, Chairman Armstrong, Harold 
C. Patterson, and James C. Sargent. Mr. Arms 
strong cautions investors to know their brokers, 


tral zero line of human be- 


formation (without requesti 
havior,” and thus makes fore- 


it), but has not acknowledg 


receipt of it, 
the stock market | 


; The Humor Route 
and other subjects of interest. | Still another business house 
His current set of “mass psy-| 


takes the humor route to pere 
chology timetables,” for in- P 


aa suade the investor to buy stocks,’ 
investments, and sufficient re-| Douglas R, Johnston terials showing how arrange- president, has moved in many for regular purchases, regardless |of dubious statistical documen- | stance, highlight certain “criti- 


sources to give him flexibility 


and diversification in the man-— 


agement of his funds. 


Then we must define an.“in-. 


vestor.” An investor used to be | 
thought of as someone whose | 
primary activity consisted of 
clipping coupons afd collecting 
dividend checks. 

In America today, this is far) 
from the case. It is estimated 
that there are more than eight- | 
and-one-half million individual | 
owners of the shares of publicly | 
owned companies. 

Although there are 
wealthy persons among 
number, the vast majority are 
persons of moderate circum- 
stances. _Even. this _ number 
doesn’t include the uncounted 


persons who are indirect invest- | 


ors through their interest in| 
pension plans, profit-sharing | 
plans, and insurance. 


Thus, an investor in our coun- | 


try is any person who has taken. 
care of his rainy day needs and 
has funds to put to work for fu- 
ture use. . 

Investment Growth 


For many years, we have 
been impressed with the grow- 
ing number of investors—both 
potential and actual — in this 
country resulting from our in- 
creased wealth.. 

This has resulted in large part 
from the technological advances 
we have made during the twen- 
tieth century. Accompanying 
this increase in our national 
wealth have been 
changes in its distribution. 

These, in turn, have led to a 
growing interest and ability to 
invest. The remarkable growth 
of investment companies is 
based in part upon the fact that 
they provide a practical way of 


investing—a way to satisfy the 


natural desire of all of us to 
share in the ownership of our 
industries. 

In this way,.we feel that in- 
vestment companies are cdntrib- 
uting to the development of a 
people’s capitalism. 

l-recall..the..personal...experi- 
ence of a young woman who was 
able to’ fulfill her widowed 


many | 
this 


important | 


| Vice-president, North Amer- 


ican Securities Corporation 
and Commonwealth. Invest- 
ment Company of San Fran- 
cisco. 


’ 


plan. Introduced 
flexible and involves no special 
charges. ' 

A person may open a sys- 
‘tematic investing account with 


| whatever amount he wishes, and | 


he may add to it either regularly | 
or at irregular intervals. 

As the name “systematic” im- 
plies, the plan is intended to 
provide a simple and practical 
way to accumulate an invest- 
ment for the future. 


‘Check-a-Month’ 


Our systematic investing plan | 
| was the first plan of its kind to | 
‘be made available by an invest- | 


shares through independent in- 
vestment dealers. Ten years 
have now passed since we start- 
ed this plan, and most other in- 
vestment companies have sub- 
sequently adopted similar “Sige 
Today, many thousands 
Americans are sacemtedading | 
‘shares of Commonwealth In-| 
vestment Company and other 
mutual funds through systematic 
investing plans. 


This has an important social | 


significance, for many of these | 


in 1946, this 
plan is entirely voluntary and/|are not like an individual ith | Substantial gains have been 


ment..company. distributing — its | 


ments of this kind can be made. 

We feel that this greater em- 
phasis upon the estate planning 
aspect of investments” in Corh- 
'monwealth reflects the growing 
‘recognition that the shares of a 
mutual fund like Commonwealth 


icurity, but provide instead a/| 
way of investing. 


Unusual Company 


We, at Commonwealth, look | 
upon investment companies as | 
existing for the purpose of ful- | 
‘filling needs, It was that think- | 
ing which was responsible for 
the formation of the first com- 
pany in our group. It continues 
to be a primary motivating | 
force, 
| As additional needs have be- | 
come evident, we have endeav- | 
ored to provide means of ful- 
filling them. We recognize that 
an investment company is an 
unusual type of company in that 
its “product” isn’t something 
tangible like an automobile or a 
refrigerator, but is strictly in- 
tangit le—something we like to 
‘call “service.” 
| This extends from the man- 
agement of Investments to the 
providing of facilities for in- 
creasing the usefulness of Com- 
monwealth to an _ increasing 
‘number of investors. 

We look forward to the con- 
tinued growth of investment 


‘people have become investors— | companies as a way of invest- 


/and thus owners of the Ameri- 
can economy—through their sys- | 
‘tematic investing in mutual fund 
shares. 
More recently, we have devel- 


oped another plan which we feel | 


‘fulfills a need—a “check-a- 
month” plan. This is based upon 
the recognition that most people 
can budget more easily and more 


ing, because as our country con- 
'tinues to progress, there will in- 
evitably be a continuing increase 
‘in the number of investors, 

This ever-broadening owner- 
ship of American business and 
‘industry is one of our strongest 
bulwarks against the forces 
‘which threaten our American 
way of life. 


Whither Cricket? 


British Look On 


| earnest 


ways in the past four years to 
discourage bizarre investment 
oe Oger the “hot tip” or.rumor 
route, 
ici and hysterical prop- 
oo unfounded on any s¢m- 
blance to economic fact. 


marked by Mr. Funston and his 
associates and by Edward T. 
McCormick, president of the 
American Stock Exchange, in 
their work to offset the destruc- 
| tive misconception that the na- 
tional auction markets in stocks 
are (1) gambling institutions, 
(2) dominated by tycoons, 


zarre sophisticate could succeed, 
if at all. 


| Instrument of the People 


Exchange studies show the 
market as an instrument of 
people’s capitalism where mil- 
tions of investors can buy and 
sell property, assured that the 
exchange’s communications are 
the best ever devised and that 
safeguards to protect investors 
are built into the system. 

Obviously the exchange and 


its members are highly disinter- | 


ested in any kind of off-beat 
service which might have an 
adverse effect on investor con- 
fidence, 
“economic stability. 

| Trendists peddling fear or 
exuding ungrounded zeal have 
been, and still are, a problem to 
the authorities, That is why 
officials of the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, and both 
the New York and American 
Stock Exchanges reiterate that 
no person or system can pos- 
| sibly predict the market and that 


an investment based on rumors | 


or tips is a dangerous risk. 

Buying stock is like buying | 
‘any other kind of property. It. 
requires. common sense and 
business acumen. 
_ Nevertheless, the trendist ex- 
ists. Probably the safest trendist 
is the old hand in Wall Street 
who said: “You can be absolutely 
sure about the stock market. It 
will either 7 up.or.down.,” 

But trend-charting is serious, 
business. People earn 


horse-race..sort. of. 


or | 
(3) a place where only the bi- | 


the market itself, or 


of the market, on the theory that | 
prices average out at a profit. 

Some trendists offer mathe- 
matical formulas on which they 
project the market future. Some | 
quote passages from the Scrip- | 
tures. 

One important house has 
made a- careful study of the | 
earthquake record of the world | 


Vesuvius, having 
ments since 1949 indicating its 
concern over the effect of the 
eruptions on the stock market. 
Having determined the earth- 
quake “cycle” of the Northern 
Hemisphere is well as the Ve- 
suvius projected eruption peri- 
baw this investment house is 
a e 
SEC Fights Sales 
By ‘Boiler Rooms’ 
By the Associated Press 
Washington 
Government officials have 
appealed to the public to help 
thwart “scheming operators” 
who have made millions by 
high-pressure telephone sales 
of stock, much of it worthless. 
J. Sinclair Armstrong, 
chairman of the Securities 
and Exchange Commission 
told a news conference here 
that “operations of unscrupu- 
lous salesmen selling stock by 
telephone from so-called 
*bucket shops’ or ‘boiler 


rooms’ in New York” are 
running on a big scale, 


| curve of growth in our civiliza- 


and the eruption record of Mt.| from trignometry, 
made state- | duces to an equation stock mar- 


_growth, some of the large east- 


| prospering. 


_ing..on 
| has prepared “cycles” of market 
_activity in the future which it 
_sends to its clients in advance. 


cal periods,” as based on moon 
time, The investor is urged to 
“go with the tide,” and advised | 
not to resist it. 


‘Magnetic Force’ 


Human behavior is keyed to 
the occult by the founder of 
this service, who argues that 
“there is a magnetic field of 
force which imposes its design 
on all living and nonliving mat- | 
ter” and that “this field of force | 
,controls mass thinking—which 


tation exist which relate the ac- 
| tion of the stock market to sun- | 
spots. 

Andther tnvestment Howse fs" 
committed by its information | | 
specialist to the “exponential S- | 


tion,” although it carries a dis- | 
claimer for the views in the 
newsletter. This is a term taken 
which re- 


ket and other business activity 

based on population growth. 
‘Cycles’ of Activity 

| This theory has more of an 

economic foundation than some 

other theories. Even so, if popu- 

lation. were the sole factor. of | 


cision of a fine watch.” 

This service does not label! 
itself astrology, although it is 
keyed to moon movements, but 
its .founder.does .admit it. is) 
fatalism, 
ern lands with millions of un-| This 


trendist is currently | 
employed citizens ought to be 


writing businessmen, large 
firms, and prospective clients 
| indicating great concern about 
| thestock .market,...He also —is 
telling news media that the 
| Democrats will win The White 
| House Nov, 6, and the Republi- 
cans the Congress, the “axiom” 
‘being that on a descending! 
moon chart the party out of 
power wins, 

In a letter on White House) 
stationary dated Dec, 22, 1954, 


A Massachusetts house, rely- 


“cyclical” procedures, 


Still another “investment 
consultant,” who describes him- | 
self quite forthrightly as “a stu- 
dent of the occult and eastern 
philosophies,” has keyed his 
two-year projections to the 
United States Naval Observa-_ 
tory’s almanac of lunar time. 
He has diligently fed statistical 
information from Dow-Jones | 
averages and the records of| pense. We would like very 
four key stocks into.2,500, 000 | much to see your 1956 predic- 
punch cards, each of which is| tions, provided, of course, they 
keyed to the moon’s timetable.' are available, Thank you for 

With this information pro- | writing.” 
vided repetitiously by. the} Adlai E. Stevenson, the Dem- 
punch-card machines, he draws) ocratic nominee for President, 
lines above and below a “neue! has also been supplied the in- 


tary to President Eisenhower, 
writes, “You 


It indicates that after 50 yearg 
of “sitting tight,” the investe 
ment path leads to a dead end, 
It then recommends regular in« 
vestments based on dollar ave 
eraging. 

A popular memo-writer, who 
persistently charges the Fede 


\eral Reserve System with ine : 


; 


| can be measured with the pre-| 


| 


James C. Hagerty, press ’ secre- | 


competency and bad judgment, 
takes a dim view of the market, 
A Swiss investment specialist 
'writes this newspaper offering 
‘his services as follows: 

“After many years of ree 
searches and observations, I 
have. succeeded in discovering 
those cosmic laws and ruleg 
(quite unknown until now), 
‘which really have decisive ine 
uences on the changes of trend 
at the New York Stock Exe 
change (and other exchanges).” 

Investment houses which key 
their research to facts of what 


has happened, leaving the reade 


er to make his own judgment, 
are providing the most practi- 
cal assistance. In a ‘society of 
individualistic thinkers and in- 
vestors, there are no behavior 
patterns, either in elections or 
finances. Voter preferences are 
noted for their deviation from 
the expected or predicted. 

The investor’s best tools are 
the official SEC market trends, 


do a wonderful | the Dow-Jones averages, Stande 
job of keeping people in sus-| ard & Poor's index of 90 stocks, 


various news-service indices, 
such as the Associated Press, 
the New York Times, the New 
York Herald Tribune, and Bar- 
ron’s. 

In the long run, his own best 
judgment is probably the best 
for him. 


— 


New York Stock Exchange Quotations 


Stks/Divds Sales Net 


Transactions Yesterday Selected and Compiled by Associated Press 


| Stks/Divds Sales Pst eet le ohare) Saies 
(Dollars) (100s) (Dollars) (100s: 
Joy Mig 1.60 
ee ee Bee Kaiser Al .90 
anCSou 3a 
fennecott 6a 
-erncla 2a 
.errMcG 60 


High Low Close 


3 + a7 


~~) 
— D> 


— 


—=S 
ee - 
- 
se 


= 
a 


fr 


——— 


Net ,|Stks/Divds Sales 
Chge |(Doliars) (100s) 
= i% | Revere C 1.10h 
‘e | 


Low 
7 
69 
38 
4 


< 
So 
5 
S. 
* 


z 
3 
3 
+|+ 
Senet 


Rchfid Oil 3a 

tidgeway 2a 

tob Fulton 1% 9 23% 

tonr Airc 1.40 ° 6 28%" 
rison 


Oo 17 15 
OtaryElSitee 4 41% 


r+ 


mother’s lifelong ambition to re- 
turn to England for a visit. 

In spite of the young woman’s 
limited income, she was able to 
do this because for a good many 
years she had faithfully fol- 


| their livings telling other people 
which way the wind is supposed | 4) 
to blow in the marketplace. In a Ch 3b 
(1949, trendists existed by the |“! 
dozens, and many an unwary |Alc 


\yil Dut 2.16¢ a 10845 
afewayS 2.40 64 
it Jos Lead 3 


By John Allan May 


Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 
London ,round. Friday’s average now 


In every business it is valu- | is tae 
‘able to stand aside every now | very year the public for 


la i 


~ @ 
eo - 
ra 


Yerterrr 
Bora saad 
SFTFETET EE 


= 
= 


oe 
) 
oe 
—) 
¥ 
oe 
ro 
ed 


~~ 
Fad 
~ 


lowed a plan of investing, I be- | 
lieve, $10 each month. 


j and again and take a look at 


Sometimes this was not easy, | one’s traditions. 


but she kept at it, and in the; Are they adding to or sub-| 
end she was able to fulfill her |tracting from the value of the | 
mother’s wish. ‘business? Should you polish | 

This impressed me with the | them, put them in a glass case, 
fact that small amounts of} or throw them away? 
money can be accumulated ‘and| The classic example of what 
used for important things. happens to a business when | 

Some years later, in Common- | tradition is allowed to take the) 
wealth Investment Company, we chair, and the managers sit in 
developed a systematic investing the glass case, is the English | 
cricket industry. 

For the first time this” in-" 
dustry has been subjected to 
searching scrutiny by a re-| 


in | 
Current Div. Available : 


nomic Planning; an independent 
British unit, has. just published 
its report on cricket. 


Millions Watch on TV 


It is a well-known fact that. 
nobody has yet understood | 
cricket as a game. That is why | 


\meaanaanean ae 
Please send FREE BOOKLET on 
FEDERAL INSURED SAVINGS 


ee C. > MORTON & Co. 


doing .on the field. We are look- 
ing for something. 

It is not_so well. known that 
the game is a business. Or that 
the business, as a game, is in 
|| very serious financial trouble. 

Some people claim that 7“ 
major cause of this is that, 
PEP so rightly points cart. | 
“Cricket can be played only 
under. weather conditions that 
are not typical of the average 
British summer.” But there is 
very much more to it than that, 
as PEP also shows. 

In spite of it all, cricket stars 
are national heroes. Three mil- 
lion spectators will watch a 
major game on TV (or part of 
a game. A whole big game is 
never televised. It usually lasts 
21 hours. If it is a very big one 
it can last 70 hours). Eight or 
nine million. pay to watch 
cricket during the season. Tick- 
ets for international games in 
the summer are sold out, fre- 
quently in February 


ALG: Sheltes $q. 
st. Perens hy et Pe agg 


Tonk me 21 $0. Beare st York 8-195 | 
HOUSTON: ries Professional Bldg. JA 2-813 | 
ALBARY, : $9 State St. 4-5191 
MEMPHIS, Teak: 2717 Union Ave. Ext. 
Memphis 


; RAME 
3 og 


~ In the Mutual Saving Banks 
of M Diceathusntte 


Dperated under strict Massachusetts 
oe wes are no stock- 


tors. vee ggg AF begins on Mantes listed. 
If more convenient you 
BANK BY MAIL 


BOSTON, MASS. 


you mey- 


part of the business of public 
13! entertainment. _— players 
° are professionals. 


ay eee * 


8 search team. Political ‘and Eco- | 


we play it. That is what we are | 


first-class cricket thus dimin- 
ishes, The production of cricket 
bats (in 1954 worth nearly | 
$800,000) also declines. Exports 
are falling away. 

County clubs cannot pay their 
way, except by running whist 

rives, dances, and raffles, and 
' sharing the proceeds of the in- 
ternational games which Eng- 
land plays in turn against Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, South 
Africa, India, Pakistan, and the 
| West Indies. 

Professional cricket, in fact, 
does not pay. The only kind of 
cricket that does pay is amateur 
cricket. 

This is part of the mystery, 

The MCC, which, rules the 
game, is not, as some ‘have sup- 
ey the Mystery Cricket Club 

ut the Marylebone. It has its 
headquarters at Lord’s in Lon- 
don, It does not recognize the 
kind of cricket that pays. 


Membership Limited 


The MCC’s attitude is that the 
game should not be commercial- 
ized, although there is no obvi- 


played six s a week unless 
it be tenn Bos al, The MCC pays 
| its own way on its membe 
fees, It is extremely exclusive, 
its membership list being lim- 
ited to 8,000, ve mem- 
bers today must wait 40 years 
after applying for membership 
before they can actually join. 

If it wanted to, by doubling 
its membership the MCC could 
increase its revenue by £100,- 
000 ($280,000), It could have a 
surplus of maybe £50,000 a 
year. It does not want to. 

England’s national team plays |, 
under the name of the ey ae It 
is chosen only exclusively from 
the players in the now almost 
bankrupt first-class counties, 


*Who Is Logic?’ 


The question that remains is 
whether the MCC must jettison 
its traditional outlook on the 
game along with its entire pres- 
ent organization if it is to save 
first-class ae in England |§ 


mae a, yes. seals says: 
Scrap. the 


ous reason ie a game that is | Pt 


investor lost his shirt because of 


‘/them, basing his investments on | am 


trendists rather than on eco- 
“nomic or business reasons. 


. Procedures Improved 
| Out of that learning period, 


investment procedures. Require- | 4 
ments for higher. margins of 
cash in stock purchases were set 
up. Numerous investigative pro- | 
cedures were rovided. The 
Securities and 
mission was formed. ee 

Provisions for preventing sud- 
den chaos in the market, by 
means of the use of skilled spe- 
cialists with adequate resources, 
were made. Educational pro- 
grams for long-range investment 
programs were conducted. 

The stock market is not an 
economic barometer. It is true 
that when business is strong, 
the market is strong; and, con- 
versely, if business is weak, the 
market is weak. But crisis news 
can make the market weak when 
there ‘is no economic reason for 
it. And buying zeal can make 
ene dangerously over- 


The market is a barometer of 
the investment judgment, 
fears, and the speculative en- 


element exists which is in and 
out of the market on every bit 

of scare or confidence news. 
a the other hand, 
sible, experienced large - 

e institutional investors ( 
ete ase pang banks, invest- 
ment trusts, 


orce. 
e frothy element in the 
market is a fit target for fear, 
hope, rumor, tips, superstition, 
occultism, mathematical slide- 
rulism, fatalism, astrology. It is 
important that the investor un- 
derstand that these elements ex- 


Sources of Information 
Superstitution is a key ele- 
ment in many _§ investor's 
ts, just as superstitution is 
element in horse rac 


the United States improved its 7 & 


xchange Com- | amstiFd2.40b 1 


the | Bigelows 1 
thusiasm of a people. A fringe | 


strong, |' 


pen sion funds, in- : 
he cog mee clubs) exert a stabiliz- |: 


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‘The Business Day - 


The stock market this areal followed the pattern of the previous 
week, and that of the week ended Sept. 1, winding up with a 
rally after four days of decline. On average it was lower and 
made the sixth week out of seven to record a loss. The Suez 
Canal issue continued as a dominant factor, but the suspension 
of tension in that area tended to bolster confidence. This was 
further strengthened by more builish news on the economic 
and business front. Reduction in auto inventories, prospects 
for higher car prices, rebounds in industrial production, pros- 
pects of higher year-end dividends, easing in certain credit reg- 
ulations on housing, and a rise in the short position onthe New 
York Stock Exchange all had a cumulative effect in giving the 
market an end. of the week spurt. The five most active stocks 
on the Big Board were: U.S. Steel, off 15% at 6754 on 160,700 
shares; Standard Oil a Jersey), off % at 54%: General 
Motors, unchanged at 47% - Chrysier, up 4 at 74%; and Royal 
Dutch, off 5 at 1074s. 


On the American Stock Exchange the five most active stocks 
were: Pancoastal Petroleum, off % at 5% on 135,000 shares; 
Scurry-Rainbow Oil, off 1/16 at 313/ /16; Pan-Israel Oi], un- 
changed at 144; Webb & Knapp, up ‘s at 2%; and National 
Telefilm, up %%4 ‘at 63%, 


The question of whether to restore federal tax benefits to spur 
plant expansion in the steel and other industries will be put 
up to President Eisenhower's Cabinet, the Office of Defense 
Mobilization announced. It was stated that no final decision 
would be made by the Defense Mobilization Board, an ODM 
advisory unit, “until the matter had been discussed at the 
Cabinet level. ” Around $1,300,000,090 of proposed new steel 
plant construction projects by a doz@n companies and a large 
number of expansion plans in other industries are involved. 


The cost to industry of fringe benefits, including such items as 

~pensions,.vacations and insurance protection, averaged $891 
per worker in 1955, an increase of $99 over 1953, a survey of 
the Chamber of Commerce of the United States disclosed, The 
cost for the 1.000 companies surveyed ranged from less than 
5 per cent to more than 50 per cent of payrolis and averaged 
20.3 per cent, or 39.2 cents per payroll hour, 


A 20-year $8,500,000 loan has been granted to the Kyushu Elec- 
tric Power Company of Japan by the Export- Import Bank of 
Washington to increase power generating facilities in southern 
Japan, one of the nation’s major basic industrial areas, The 
loan will help pay for a 156,250-kilowatt generating unit to be 
built at its East Pittsburgh plant. 


. 


Boston Stock Exchange — 


Weekly Volume and Price Range 


Week Ended Sept. 21, 1956 
Shares High Security Shares High 


Shares = + Loekheed Air Corp 
25 $ oew's Inc 
60 Lone Star Cement 
Long Island Licht 
Mack Trucks Inc 
Maine Centrai 5 
Martin (GlennL) 
Middle St Util 
MinnMining& Mig 
Minute Maid 
| Monsanto Chem 
Montana Pwr Co 
Montgomery Ward 267 
Nat'l! Bihcuit Co 69 
| Nat'l Cash Register 167 
Nat'l Deiry Prod 50 
/ Nat'"| Gypsum Co 
Nat'l Lead Co 
| Nat'l Serv Co 
Nat'l Steel Corn 
Nat} Theatres Inc 
NE Elec Sys 
NE Tel&Tei Co 
~~. | NE Telé&tTel rts 
< * | NY NH&Hartford 
| NY Central RR Co 
| NY Chic&StLouis 
| Niagara Mohk Pr 
Norbute Corp 
Norfolk&Western 
North Am Aviatio 
Northern Pac Ry 
Ohio Edison Co 
Ohio O1!} Co 
OlinMath Ch 
Otis Elevator Co 
Pacific Gas & Elect 
Pacific Mills 
PanAmWorldAwrs 
Parmount Pictures 
Penn Railroad Co 
Penn-Texas Corp 
Penney (JC) Co 
PennsylivaniaPr&Lt 37 
Pennroad Corp 39 
Phelps Dodge Corp et 
PhilaElectricCo 15 
Phila ReadingCorp 
Phiico Corp 
hillips Petroleum 
Potomac ElectPwr 
Procter&Gamble 
PubServiceofind 
PubServiceEl&aG 
Pullman, Inc 
Pure Oil Company 
Radio Corp of Am 
Ravyonier Inc 
Raytheon Mfe Co 
RepublicSteeiCorp 
Reynolds Metals 
Ri se gg Oil Corp 


Security Last | 
Security 
Adams Express Co 
Admiral Corp 

Air Reduction 'Co 
Alleghany Ludlum 
A! Chem & Dye 


lis-Chalmers 
luminum Ltd 

lum Co of Amer 
\merada Petroleum 
Lmerican Airlines 
m B'ctg-Par Thea 
American Can Co 
American Cyanamd 
m Gas & Elect Co 
Am Mach&Found 
American Motors 
Am Naturai Gas Co 
Amer Optica! Co 
Am Rad&B8tan San 
Am Smelt & Ref 
Amer Steel Found 
Amer Tel&Tel Co 
im T&T ris‘wi' 47268 
faldwin-Lim-Ham 
altimore & Ohio 
Baltimore Gas&El 

} tell Aircraft 

Bendix Aviation 
Bethlehem Steel 

best Foods Inc 

toeing Airplane Co 
Borden Company 


378 
383 
214 

1 


655 
457 
644 1 
48 
9 
100 
368 
479 


‘Se Be, Se ae Se Oe 


2 
0 

7 
1203 
59 


‘RS Se, See Se ee 
> - 


ee 
ie ae 


169 


Boston& Maine RR 
Braniff Airways 
Boston Pers Prop 
Burlington Industs 
Burroughs Corp 
CIT Financ! Cor 
Campbell Soup 
Canadian Pac Ry 
Carrier ve 

Cc 


ase ( 28 
Gaterciiler “Tractor 0 
Celanese Cor 3 
Central&So West 
Certain-teed Prod 
Chnce Vought Acft 
yg ogg ake & Ohio 
Chic RI & Pac RR 
Chrysler Corp 
Cincinnati Gas& El 
Cities Service Co 
Cleveland Moly Co 
Colo + ys & frou 
Col B 

Col ed ae Inc 


-! 


Go 03 C8 I OD OT 
a Or 05 Ho 3 


ae 
© «3 +) 


Safex ay Stores Inc 

St Louis-San Fran 

St Regis Paper Co 

Scott Paper Co 

Seaboard Air-Line 804 
Sears Roebuck&Co 472 
Shawmut Assoc 

Shell Ol! Company 

Sheraton Corp 

Sinclair Oil Corp 

Socony Mobi! Co 

So Carolina E& G 

So Calif Edison Co 

Southern Company 

Southern Pacifie Co 

SouthernRailwayCo 

Sperry Rand Corp 

8 O Co of Cal (Del) 


Commvw ith ee 
Consol Bowen Os 
Consol Natural Gas 


Cornin 
Crane 
Crucible Steel ° 
Curtis Pub Co 
Curtiss-Wright 
Deere&Company 
Delaware&Hudson 
DenveraéRio Gr. 
Detroit Edison Co 
Douglas Acft Co Inc 
Dow Chemica! Co 
Dresser Industries 50 
juPontdeNemours 1056 
Du Se one! Light Co 10 
East Gas&Puel 634 
ows Airlines 35 
 -y tman Kodak Co 325 
aso Natural Gas 75 
ectric Auto-Lite 26 


50 
30 
59 
75 
454 
SO Co :Ohio) 

_Staniey WarnerCorp 85 
Stone&Webster Inc 141 
Stop & Shop 145 
Studebaker-Pack'd 233 
Sunray Mid ContoOil 144 
Swift & Company 155 
Sylvania Electric 415 
Texas Company 1595 
Texas Gulf Produc 160 
Texas Gulf Sulphur oH 
Texas PaciicC &O 
Texas Utilities 

' Textron Ine 
Tidewater Oil Co 
Timken Roller Bear 
Toledo Edison 
Torrington Co 
Transamerica 
Tri Continental! 
Twentieth Cent Fox 180 
Union Carbide&Ca 1146 
Union Elect Co 157 
Union Oil Co of Cal 120 
Union Pacific RR 1496 
Union Twist Drill 

+ + United Fruit Co 
United Shoe Mach 
United Acft Corp 
United Airlines 
United Corp 
United Gas Corp 1 
United Mer & Mfrs 50 
US Pine & Found 50 
US Smelt Ref & Mng 75 
US Steel Corp 14 = 
Vanadium Corp 
Vermont aa RR 8 
Va Elect & 
Waldorf mee, 148 
Walworth Company 
Warner Brox Pict 
Wash Water Pr 

| West Penn Elect Co 

| Western Union Tel 
Westinghouse Air 
Westinghouse Elect 

, Wisconsin Blect Pr 


Foremost Dairies 
Pruehauf Trailer 


amics 12 
amics WI 77 
ere 2283 

orp 17 


Gen Mot 

Gen’! Pub Utilities 
General Telephone 
oe re ny 


Pt bed FiredR 
Grace (WR)&Co 
Great Northern Ry 
Green ( + Co 
Greyhound Corp 


Hathaway Bakeries 


nt'l MineralsChem 
nt'l Nickel Co 

nt’l Packers Ltd 
nt’l Pe Co 


ntl T el Corp 
« cere pl al 
ones&La 


Kel siser AlumaChem 


tnt ie ed oe Oe ed 


Worthington Corp 
Youngstown Sheet 


Kroger Co 40 80 
Libbey-Owens-Ford 127 157 


Dividends Declared | 


Company Div. On Rec. Pay 
nere 
Gustin Bacon Mis . » 10- 9 


Past Sta Cpo-pf eary 1f- 1 
East Sta Cp pf B 1.50 ll- 1 
Webb & Knapp pf 1.50 10- 1 | Amer Molasses .17'3 Q 
| Argus Cameras .25 
10-25 | Bank of Nova Scotia 45 Q 
Bay State Corp .254, 
| Bralorne Mines 10 
, Cannon Shoe 10 
11-16 | Gannon Shoe A. 10 
Cen Aguirre Sug 35 
10- 9. Chess Corp Va. 30 
10-27 ons Royalty Oi! .168 
10-27 | 


| Agnew § > eae 10 Q 
. urp ae rs. 
Alum Co Am. 
Alum Co Am ot 93°, Q 
Am Maize Prods .50 
Am Maize Prods pf 1.75 Q 


pralative 


ear 
Dividend Shares .03 


i 
oul Ghares iz) 20 Cons Nat Gas .42'4 Q 


Davidson Bros .10 Q 
Elastic Stop Nut .25 


Bu @ Fed 


- Dow-Jones Averages 


By the Associated press 


whnea 


tee 
What Stocks Did 


1149 
1 


per Mold see 


ee 
7% 


ue Rouners Si Car 28 
a diet sa, 


9- 
l- 1 


*' Kindly 


* YOUR OWN BUSINESS! Your own hours! 


. W. TORREY LITTLE, inc 


3 » 325-322 Newbury 6&t., Gesten 15. Mass 
| Telephone CO 7-2963 
. LIQUIDATION OF ESTATE APPRAISALS | 


98 ioe in merchandise or 


} | Hours to suit, high 


Mee te 
sgt te 


in cash or stock at ahare- | : 


HELP WANTED—MEN 


HELP WANTED—MEN 


. USED CARS 


ew ~ 


— 


Immediate Openings in Boston for . 


ENGINEERS 


Civil - Electrical - Structural 


METCALF & EDDY 


1300 Statler Building, Boston 
Please call Mr. Ingalls, HAncock 6-8188 


a ee eee 


YOUNG MAN WANTED ||. HELE WANTED—WOMEN 


for Interesting and Varied Work 
MAIL CLERK-MESSENGER 


with 


Christian Science Nurses 
Aid in Healing Work 


1 pply 
NURSES TRAINING COURSE 


Board, Room, Uniforms and Cash Allowance 
Mature As Well As Young Workers 
May Apply 
Apply: Personne! Department 


107 Falmouth Street, Seston 15, Massachusetts 
COmmonwealth 6-4330, Ext. 313 


The New York Advertising Staff 
The Christian Science Monilor 


Opportunity to gain experience in the 
advertising and business world and to 
make valuable contacts, Excellent op- 
portunity for one who wants practical 
experience in a pleasant atmosphere 
with opportunity for advancement. 


Apply Advertising Office 


The Christien Science Monitor 
588 Fifth Ave... New VYeork 36, N. Y¥. 


SELLING POSITION 
Intelligent woman capable of assuming 
responsibility. Opportunity for advance- 


yee — ~ ment. Ex ienced , 
WHOLESALE FLORIST business in Bos-"°"'. Experienced preferred. 
ton with opportuhity for advaticement: LAMP & GIFT SHOPPE 


waiting on trade, shipping and deliver- New Canaan, Conn. WO 6-1991—6- 


ing. Must have driver's license, good 
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN NURSING 


character, g00d personality, willingness 
( and 2% yr. course—-NO AGE LIMIT- 


to work. Give tel. number in reply. Box 
E-13, One Norwa ; St : Boston 15. Mass on-the-job iraining under Christian &ci- 
ence nurses, og oF hg Al 


“SENIOR AND SEMI-SENIOR oy See ny ~~ Bh om 
ACCOUNTANTS |__ TENACRE FOUNDATION, PRINCETON, Wd 


Desired by Certified Public Accountant 
Firm. Very little traveling. Write to Box “CHRISTIA AN SCIENCE Nt RSE 
D-55, One Norway &t.. Boston 15, Raney Graduate B.A.. for permanent position 
44-hour week. Nurses’ cottage on @rounds. 
‘MAN WANTED AS CUSTODIAN FoR PEACE HAVEN—YOrktown 5-3853 
c agen eh en -time basis. + se i by Route 12, Box 148, Kirkwood 22, 
etter giving experience «an 
ences to First Church of Christ, Scien. PLI ASANT. SE RIOL S GIRL 
tist, 70 Floral Parkway, Floral Park.) Who ‘peaks French fuently, 
: care of 2 children, in very 


=e. =e a. - © 
. French speaking home in Boston 
bustion “equipment such as Ep ee way Street. Boston 15. Mass. 

naces and incinerators wou e he 
ful. Good future with old established): WORKING HOUSEKEEPER to live in at 
area Box A-365, 3-212) Mall institution at Brookline Village. 
quired. Write for 

One Norway St. 


firm in Detroit 
_ General Motors Bidg.. Detroit | 2. Mich Good wages. Modern kitchen, 
MOTHER'S 
| live in; for 2 school age boys. 


SALES SME 
GOOD SALARY — SY PERIENCE IN 

room. Smal!) salary. References 
changed. 537 Majorca Avenue, 


RECRUITING. OTHERS... SEE MR 
NEW YORK CITY. 
Gables. Plorida. 


SMALL. 7 WEST 125th STREET, 
HELP WANTED-MEN, WOMEN | Plot 


or 
to 


r appointment, Box F-1, 
Boston 15, Mass. 


2 =800 


fies year plus 


Mo. } 


“WOMAN 
take 
agreeable 
Other 
One Nor- 


every 
other week-e! id off. Goqi references re- 


HELPER—Reliable woman to 
Private 

ex- 
Cora] 


with a low-cost 


auto loan through 


The FIRST Plan 


ihe FIRST NATIONAL BANK ¢/ BOSTON 


LOOK AT THESE ADVANTAGES 


You arrange your loan before you 
buy and have the bargaining ad- 
vantage of a cash buyer. Your life 
is insured for the unmatured balance 
of the loan at no extra cost. For 
more information, contact any office 
of this bank . .. or consult your 
insurance representative. 


| 


Examples showing low cost of automobile 
financing and monthly payments under The FIRST Plan 


When Financed for 74 Months 


When Financed for 30 Months 


Total 
Monthly 
Payment 


Total 
Monthly 
Payment 

$22.91 

45.83 


Finance 
Charge* 


$49.84 
99.92 


Finance 
Charge* 
$62.50 
125.00 
150.00 68.75 187.50 56.25 
199.84 91.66 250.00 75.00 


* Computed at the rate of $5.00 per $100 per year on the original amount financed, 
with minor adjustments whenever necessary to provide for equal monthly paymenta 


$18.75 
37.50 


HOUSES FOR SALE 


COTTAGES TO LET 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


IPSWICH, MASS. $15,000 J !NDIAN,_ ROCKS BEacn. 
Delightful small house with 3 acres 
and a view of the bay. Landscaped 


| s0n. GEN 
fruit trees and shrubs. Custom- 


Gulf Boulevard. 


Housekeeping cottages on 
Gulf of Mexico. Week. month or sea-| 
EVA COTTAGES, 1912 


——~ 


were 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PROPOSALS 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Department of Public Works 
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 
Sealed proposals for projects as listed below will be received at Room 427, 100 


FLORIDA - _ 


North 


with 22 foot living reom, pic- 
ture window and panelled fireplace 
wall: screened porch: dinin room 
with fireplace; electric kitchen: 2 


WANTED TO 


Nashua Street, Boston, Mass., 2: ~ P M. (DST) on the dates mentioned 
and at that place and time ned and read, Charge for plans and 
specifications (amount returnable only mh idders) and proposal inerenty as shown. 


BUY 


bedrooms, 2 full baths: pine-paneled 
hall: insulated with fiber glass: new 
forced hot air heating system. Low 
taxes. For sale by owner. Call Andover 
2260, or write Box M-65, One Nor- 
way St.. Boston 15, Mass., for ap- 
pointment 


Offered by 2 young chi 


Write 
247, 
fieid 


Dianne or 
Sterling, Mass., or 
2 ~6531, 


Sate TE 4c HER for Labradgor jun 
a dren, Immediately, Comf. living, 
able town, travel paid. Sonmie successful 
teach. exper. nec, Apply Box F-3, One 
Norway St.. Bostoh 15, Mas 
LNENCUMBERED middle-aged 
permanent companion and light 
seeper: sieep in 


Opening for 
Advertising 
Representative 
for 


Bay Shore, N. Y. 


house- 
Answer by ae giv- 
ing full — and refs Box E-15, 583 
Fi th Ave ue, New York ; I 


WOMAN | TO | LIVE IN. 
liidren 5, 3, 


Help care for 

l vr. Own rm. and bath. 
$30 wk. Starting wage Country life 
Close to Boston. Tel. Andover 2813. 
(Massachusetts. } 

HOUSEKEEPER COMPANION in well 
anized adult family of 4. 
opsiield. Day help kept 
One Norway St.. Boston 


15 
it NIOR ACC OUNT ‘ANT - Small CPA office 
No exp, nec., except knowledge of book- 
keeping. Write Box D-42, One Norway) 
St.. Boston 15. Mass 
NU RSE—C ompani on wanted “Mon. 
Some care nights. Co mpanionship prime 
consideration. Hours $ P M. to 
A.M. Call BE 2-7867 (except mornings) 


WORKING 
for lady. in 3-rm. apt.. 
Mass. Box M-66, One Norway St., 
ton 15, Mass. 

SECRETARY-STENO. Di. 
versified exp. only. Box G-23, 588 Sth 
Ave.. New York 36, N. ¥Y 

pap Sea HELPE R—Siecep 

100! «chi oa A Queens, 
Fi lds ton e 7- +59 


Oor- 


“to Fri 
Applications are invited from 


persons who can qualify for ap- 
pointment as advertising repre- 
sentative for The Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor in Bay Shore, New 
York. This opening presents an 
exceptional opportunity for a 
qualified woman or man, who 
is free to give a good portion 
of each week to calling on re- 
tail stores, 


Bos- 
— Art Gallery. | 
in. 2 small 
New York 
TEACHERS “or TUTORS | 
should be mem- “ 
bers of the Christian Science 
Church in Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Remuneration is on a straight 
commission basis, 


Applicants 


ART c LASSES 
Fundamenteis thru Advanced Act 
ays—evenings—all mediums 
Adults—Teens “ iidren 
Queens- Nassau N Y. Vie ae 3 9730 


PRIVATE PIANO LESSONS, also classes 
in READ MUSIC. Folde: 
upon request. IDALIA WRIGHT. Sher- 
man Square Studios, 160 W. 73rd St 
N.Y¥.C. LY 5-7802,. TR 71-6700 


SITU ATIONS Ww ANTED-MEN 


_ YOUNG "MARINE 
naval aviator. 
active duty. 
ment or 
any 


If interested, please write for 
application form to Mr. Stephen 
Curtis, Monoger of Advertising 
Representatives, The Christian 
Science Monitor, One Norway 
Street, Boston 15, Massachusetts. 


recentiy released from 
desires executive. 
personnel type position 


BINDERY HELP WANTED 


Light manufacturing. 
Tel. CHarlestown 2-5250 (Mass.) 


counting 
aviation 


personnel management 


anywhere! Write Occupant, 7407 Vernon 
Rad., Richmond, Va. for résumé of exp 


REGISTRATIONS invited for September LATIN: “AMERICAN TRADE — i5 
placement, Register by mail or inter-| CO™mercial import, export sales, 
views Monday, Tuesday, Friday. Doro-| Sneaks fluent Portuguese, 
thy Marder Teachers’ Agency, 342) rived Canada, age 4), 
_ Madison Ave.. New York 17, New York U.S.A, or Canada. Lioyd. care Foster. 

Se ag Nene 708 Terminal Bldg... Toronto, .-Canada 


~ TEACHER OF GERMAN | =“ nen 


SALESMAN, executive, », former road man. 
Part time, for school in Braintree, Mass represent you, New York area: commis 
forward résumé to Box M-64 


sion basis; consider investment legit 
One Norway St... Boston 15, Mass 


mate enterprise. o _ 588 Fift 
AGENTS WANTED 7 


: Ave., New York 36 
EXPERIENCED DRIVER, 
SALES PEOPLE AND MANAGERS to sel! 
made-to-measure jersey dresses. They 
fit—they repeat—you profit. Write de-' 
talls of your experience and proposi-' 
tion you seek OWERS, Sweetwater |... 


years 
Brazil 
recentiy ar- 


handy man 


_ Box D-5 


_ O1 re Norway St. Ma: s 


SITU ATIONS W ANTED 
MEN, WOMEN 


Boston, 


nior-high chil- 
Size- 


woman as 


3 


0 WESTWOOD. MASS.—Custom 3-bedrm 


HOUSEKEEPER-COMPANION | 
Springfield, | 


c ORPS CAPT AIN, 


manage-| 
with’! 
_ progressive firm. Sound educational 
background, wWorkifig Knowledge of ac- 
and) 
Family of 5. Willing to work! 


Bes position | 


i me available for immediate eccupancys. 


Best ‘ye Boston preferred. Write 2. LAU DERDALE. FLA. 


WESTFIELD WN. J, 
This attractive Cape Cod wants a refined 
couple to occupy it and enjoy its lovely 


| 


"GOOD HOME FOR THE RIGHT PONY” 


of room in country with lovin 
David Hall, 


WANTED TO RENT 


s& Proposal 
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956 Guaranty 
| j\—CLINTON: Ch Hwy. 
‘TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1956 
2— ESSE Reconstr. 


. 121—County 
LEICESTER: Fiocod Proj. Steel , ° 
4—SOUTHWICK: Flood Pro R. C. Box Bridge Extension 5. 225. 
5—WILLIAMSTOWN: F-39 (6): State Hwy. & Bridge Wk 15 1,000, 

Minimum wage and dump- truck rates have been established. Complete informa- 

‘tien at said office. Plans on display at District offices. Right reserved to waive 


Constr. (Drainage Work) 
ldren. Plenty 

care. 
Box 


on vonn. Ww ‘we Ave. 
R o 
phone GAr- 


20.000, 
String. Bridge 


10. 
> 2,800 


decorations, its attractive surroundings, 
and its ideal neighborhood. And profit by 
its low cost gas hot water heat and low 
taxes. Living room, dining room, two bed- 
rooms, tile bath and kitchen a Tappan 
range. Attached gaiage. $17,.%& 


WANTED TO RENT Oct. 
within 100 mi, Boston 
women. Firepl. 
ocean or woods. Desire 
Moderate. Box D-60, O 
Boston 15, Mass, 


or stove, exc 


any informality in or reject any or all proposals. An award will not be made to @ 
Contractor — = not equipped to undertake and complete the work. 
JOHN A. VOLPE, Commissioner of Public Works. 
_Beptember me 1056. 


MOVING AND STORAGE 


15 for 1 wk.— 
Cottage for 2 
view. nr. 
to cook meals 
ne Norway st.. 


— ~~ 
— 


ORGANS FOR SALE 


HAROLD E. YOU NG. co. 
267 East Broad St, WE stfield 2-1105 
Evenings—E. L, Turnbsugh WE | +-3416-M 


PAYING GUESTS 


BACK BAY. “WURLITZER ORGANS | 


Sunday: 1:30-5:30 
NEWTONVILLE, MASS, | 
End of lane. § min = 


Adorable Cape. 
schools, trans, stores, churches. Liv.-rm., To study, to work, for 
din.-rm., den, lav ; 2 bedrms., bath (2nd Pranklin Square House, a 
f.) Garage. Charming garden. Privacy. dence hotel, offers young 
$18.500 Call owner BI 4-6683. plus cOmpanionship, own 
wOooDatock Tv A meais, roof garden, 
ing restored Colonial: home facing the %°°: 

hills. Attracti ve grounds. 
land. Eight rooms, iarge living room 


ARE A—An interest- 


East East Newton St.. Boston, 


| COMING TO BOSTON? 


library. Bus Stops at 
Residence rate from $13.50 weekly. 
one acre of Phone KE 6-8300, or write Registrar, 


ror your’ ehurech or your home; 

rgan tone. $1,345 to $5,000. Rent or buy. 
Terms if desired, Free delivery, installa- 
tion and course of lessons. 


YANKEE DOODLE PIANO & ORGAN SHOP 
364 Washington St., Holliston, Mass, 
Tel. Hollisten 2426 


Local and Long Distance 
WE SHIP ANYWHERE 


E. A. SPRY and CO. 


Packing, Shipping, Office Moving 
Agents for Fireproof Storage 
60 Westland Ave., Boston, Mass. KE 6-7282 Open daily 10 to Sue + 1 te = 


Moving From Door to Door Since 1874 png CLEANING & REPAIRING 


a visit? The 
non-profit resi- 
women privacy 
room, deliciour 


41 
Mass. 


with fireplace, hot water heat. 1° 
baths. artesian well. $18,000. Box L-38. | 


One Norway St. Boston 15. WEST RINDGE 


licious food, attractive 


home, wooded 
_. eeren, 
~] 007-1 M ; 
BEAUTIFUL MODERN HOME — 1 acre 
gdn.: priv. estate: 3 bedrms., 3 baths 
$55,000. Ph. Dobbs Ferry, N.Y... 3-0347 


tile bath, oil 
$16,300. NO 


% acre: 

many extras modate 12. Rates 
Fall coloring at its 
from Boston. Trans. 
Science Church, Mr 
L. Dyer, Sr. Rindge 15- 


THE ELEAZER BLAKE oo 
A cheerful homelike ~ FA? de- 
ate and semi-private baths. 
$6.50 - 
best. 


and Mrs. 


Local and Distance Movers 
Andre W. Delanjian 


Storage Werehouses 
Direct importer of Oriental Rugs 


L. CURTH & SONS 
Complete Rug Service Rug Specialists 


on Agent Nerth Americen Von Lines y 
4/246 Marion St., gS 33, N. Y. ALL WORK DONE 8Y HAND 
Tet. AS 7-7268 


Tel. Glenmore 2- 
1428 Beecon St., Brookline, Mess. 


rooms, priv- 
Accom- 
$9.50 daily. 
65 miles 
to Christian 
Orrin 


ll. 


35 MI. W. OF PHILADELPHIA—2 bdrm 
ranch. wooded acre, super view 


$17.000. Walter Russell. Glenmoore. Pa 


3 BEDROOMS, living room; dining room, 
modern kitchen, 2 aths. . Excellent 
1; 


JAMAICA, B.W.1. (Green 
gill Ave., Halfway 


to $8 


-Tree, Jamaica, B.W.1.) vonitor in which I have been a consistent | 
—A smail private hotel with Ist class ac-| advertiser for over a quarter of @ century 
commodations for 24 quests, at only $6) BL 

per day Open all year. Apply t 
Manageress at above address. 


Gables, 6 Car. 


| DEEM IT & PRIVILEGE wo offer my | 
UPHOLSTERERS oe 


Personalized ai and Long Ditetance | 
RE-UPHOLSTERING... RESTYLING 


Moving and Fireproof Storage Service 
the readers of Christian Science 

‘Guaranteed workmanship. Budget terms, 
Free estimates—Better fabrics! 


atti 


. STEVES, Ine. 


4 Sharp St.. Boston 24. Mass. TA 6-240 


condition Phone Hyannis ! SS. 2. 375 i5 
HOUSES TO LET 
LUNENBURG, MASS. 


New 5-room house, garage under, on 


Overlookin 
Camden 
rants, bathing beach. 
Nov. Mrs _J FP 


eller, 


KELLER’'S GUEST HOME 
LINCOLNVILLE BEACH, MAINE 
Penobscot Bay. 
ear golf courses. good restau- 
theatres. 0 


CERTIFIED UPHOLSTERY CO. 


Tel. LOngweoeod 6-3853, Brighton, Mass. 


ARTS AND CRAFTS 


HAVE YOU ANY NEEDLEPOINT YOU, 
WOULD LIKE TO HAVE DONE? 
Excellent work and references 


6 miles from 


May 


Camden 8411 British Isles—Africa 


lakefront and hard road. Fine oppor- 
tunities for a store and boat rent- 
ing business. 39 miles from Boston. 
A. N. JONES 
Fiat Hill and Jenes Street 
Lunenburg 2-9929 


and cottages. Excellent 
can plan. Open until 


THOMPSON HOUSE 
NEW HARBOR, MAINE—RHtd. 


Oct 
DAN and EDITH THOMPSON 


Tel. WOburn 2-1512 or write, 
Box D-61, One Norway St.. Boston. 


ues. Continental Europe 
AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE | Australia—New Zealand 
1954 CHEVROLET 


raoms 
"ya Ameri- 


| 


convertible. power 


ro ‘LET—Bermuda bungalow, 3 bedrooms 1s 
2 baths, French Provincial decor. walk. 
ing dist ance to ocean. Worth Ave.. 
Evergiades Club: heating, air condition- 
in etitia Brandon, 315 Chilean Ave. 


Guest home for winter. 
of Tryon, N. C. 
Mrs. W.. Gibson, 
_ Tel. Landrum, 


GIBSON FARM 


Comf, rms.: 
Campobelio, S. 
Ss. C. GLendale 7-5462. 


lide. radio, heater, 25,000 miles. 
e seen in driveway. 508 Main 
Hingham. Mass. Tel. HI 6-3308. 


CORSETIERES 


AGENCIES WANTED 


J, A. GITTLESON (Pty.) UTD., (‘manu- 
facturer’s representative), P. O, Box 
410, Durban, So Africa, seeks aaency 


May 
St... | 


9 miles south 
ood food. 
co. 


| | 


Pa ayy Beach 


PHILADELPHIA. PA.—3-story Townhouse 
Central location. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. | 
$125 mo, Also for sale. Box 8-355.! residence. 

at. 3-212 Gen. Motors Bldg.. Detroit, Mich for pamphiet 


Ti 1ON—Our M M 


PRINCETON, N. Tsk TENACRE FOUNDA- 
N HOUSE is now avail- 
able for rest cea study or permanent) 
Hostess in attendance. Write) 


for inexpensive cotton, rayon, and nylon 
piece goods;spangled voiles, sui able 
for Indian saris; cotton and rayon up- 
holstering materials. Interested in direct 


Individually Designed Foundations 
SPENCER CORSET SHOP 
462 Boylsten Street. Boston 
mer: Mrs wan 
Room 310 KE 6-776! 


| 


BEAUTIFUL MODERN HOME — Private EDGERILL INN 
estate, 3 bedrms., 3 baths. Rental $375 Homelike 
mo. Phone Dobbs Ferry. N Yoo : 3-0347. in good food, 


APARTMENTS TO LET 


HOTEL BRAEMORE 


466 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston 


Rest, — recreation, 
exc. bea 


year ar be W. _ Ring. Enfield, 


'. TAMWORTH, N. i. 
accommodations. 
tastefully served 
ATHLEEN D. _BROWNLEE 


PEACEFUL ACRES 
home atmosph. 
utiful neld, NH owe al) 


ROOMS AND BOARD 


representation of milis only. 
CHILDRENS’ HOME 


VILLARS s/OLLON ‘Switzerland. 4000 feet. 
Open ail year. Well situated near dag 
Miss Gavillet. 


HOMES TO SHARE 


DY, to 
— 15 
Nottingham. 


Specializing 


FOR RENT 


RIDGEFIELD, CONN. 
One or two comfortable rooms 
chen privileges, Beautiful | 
ings. Garage. Call 
wood | 8-6312. 


| FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS | 


Kit. school. 


surround- 
collect IDie- 


another's i 
Road, 


share 
Bedale 


pleasant 
erwood, 


?- and 3-reom suites, 
Please call Mr. Stuart, KEnmere 6- 


Exquisite TAR- 


with fall service. . 
4600. BROOKLINE. MAS 


atid 


LOngwood 6-9895. 


Coolidge Cor.—At 
tractive residence ond firm. All meais. 


a Pgs mg STEEL ENGRAVINGS. 
walnut bookcase. Tel evenings 
7 9202, Newton Highlands, Mass. 


MORE-on-the-Beach. Hotel rms 
1 bedrm. apts.; low summer rates 
Write for winter rates begin, Nov. E. B 


ROOMS FOR TOURISTS 


‘Smal! Hotels an nsio 
FURNITURE FOR SALE . alcle and Se <3 


in Europe 
‘BROOKLINE, MASS.—Mirrored fireplace: 


Willey, Owner, 3115 Terramar St... 


_Tennessee. COUPLE 


Florida. 
Parsons 


seeks motel management 
Business experience. O 
Box 86, Spirit Lake. tovs. 
SITUATIONS WANTED 
WOMEN 


in 


Seiiing nationally known cushion shoes 
is @asy, 135 styles for entire family 
Earn $30.00 day comm. Experience un- 
nec. FREE catalog. Write TANNERS. 
1013F, Brockton Tass 


AUCTIONEERS 


REFINED WOMAN will assist older wo-' 


man in home, suburbs Boston preferred 
Highest refs. Drivers license. Box M-67. 
One Norway Bt... .. Boston 5. Mass. 


REAL ESTATE 


JOHN F. KIRCHMAIER, Realtor | 


110 ee rs | BLDG. ACademy 2-337? 
SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


Consultant on soles of your furniture 
ond furnishings 


Ww 


NEWLY DECORATED efficiencies and 1- 
bedroom apartments. Excellent, quiet 
location. Lake block. $60 to $75 per 
month. See manager, 233 Wenonah 


ful Lake Eola 
able. 304 EB. Central Ay 


ORLANDO. FLORID 4—Make your winter 
home at HOTEL DWELLERE on beauti- | 
lean, quiet and reason: | 


peting: 2 white night tables, 1 ig.| 
table With marble tops; lamps: framed 
mirror; drapes: sfagnavox radic-record: 
player. Call mornings LOngwood 6-5405. | 


FRANCE 


enue 


Place, West Palm Beach, Florida. 


ROCKPORT, MASS.—Lovely apt.. 


looking harbor. Beautiful view, 


over- 
2 rms.,. 


ROOMS TO 


LET 


FURNITURE WANTED HOTEL BUMINY. 


‘WE BUY al kinds of furniture, dishes 


|. 


pilus kitchen and bath. Mod 
kitchen. Heated. Town center 
Pieasant. Phone 731. 


CA NTERBURY HOTEL 


ROOMS WITH KITCHENETTE 
FULL SERVIC 


electric 
5° Mt ness girls or women 
apartment, 
shopping, Cal 
write Box D- 23, 
Boston 15, Ma 


' ee 


| 


BOSTON, “MASS. —Nice Living for 2 busi-| 


elevator bidg., 
7-4642 eveni 


china and bric-a-brac. Breslau's. 183, 
Warren 8t.. Roxbury. Mass. Hl 00 


HOME IMPROVEMENT 


HOME REMODELING 
Alterations Free Estimates 


Rooms with and without bat h 
oderate terms—Bed and Breakfast 


SWITZERLAND 
CE PENSION SCHATZ 


2- 


use of ent ire 
near transp., 


ngs. oF 


Norway 


_— 


ae 


SUITES with E 
14 Chariesgate West. Boston KE 6-3700 | 
‘od = LAUDERDALE, FLA.—l bedrm.. 1 
ath, upstairs apt., seasonal from Nov. 
ie N. Andrews Ave. Ext. at Oakland Park! 
Blvd. Write (3021 N, Andrews Ave. xt. | 


OSTON, 
wes resident. opp. The 
of Christ. Scientist. 


MASS,—For tourist or 


Mrs, 
_ Huntington Ave. KE 6-4966 after 5. 


Larry Ritter Tel. ORlando 3-9473 | 
INVISIBLE MENDING 


rma- 
hureb | 
224 


allein terms. Federie 
GENEVA — HOTEL EDEN. 185 Bee de 


AVOS- 

An Elysium for Holidays. M 
Mother Manager. 
Gabe 


“oe Bus. 
emgrenete. = C-3, 
BO 


\ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.—2 room apt m 
—_— for 2 ae seas. rate $650. h | 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


MAIL ORDER 
OPPORTUNITY 


EXCITING home business or office side 
line, Mail order executive will show you 
how to net large profits with no invest-| 
advertising re-' 
Experience not necessary. Proven 

moves afk fully explained in FREE | 
— letter. Write: IMPACT! 
1 edacaease Dept. D76-32, Cleveland” ie 


CAPE COD, MASS. 


CHATHAM—Lovely year round home, 
nestied in 18,000 sq. ft. of naturad 
pine studded iand. Beautifully situ- 
ated with excellent location to private 
colony beach, golf course, fresh and 
sait water fishing and swimming. 
Living room 17x17 ft., Colonial fire- 
place, dinette. modern kitchen, 2 
Spacious bedrooms, hot water» heat, 
hardwood floors, cellar, expansion 
attic, breezeway afd garage. Sacrific 
only $17,900. 


PINE ACRES REALTY 
W. T, Ohman; Realtor 
Daily 9-5 Sunday 1-5 P.M, 
Closed Wednesday 
552 Main Street, Chathem, Moss. 
‘Chethem 1186 


; 
; 
i 


a: 


EMPLOTMENT AGENCIES 


ae Samed 
veestionss poe B for Omics ee ; 
pr ye | 


Florida 


“lcs 
| 


MFRS,’ REPRESENTATIVES 


Ground floor " snarteneeh sanel for prac- BOSTON, MASS. 
fi titioner, Front end rea ive-in 


Cc. (Cencourse, Vic.)—Large. cheerfu 
woman-gentieman. 


Lausanne, Near UNO and 10 s end jake. jake. 
Restaurant. Up te date. Mi 
— 


GENEVA — HOTEL BALMORAL, 
cooking. Moderate terms. 


~— | INVISIBLE MENDING - SERVICE—Moth 
Holes, Tears, etc.. Rewoven. Little 
Building, Rm. 26, Boston. LI 23-7806. 


Refined 
588 Fifth Sry 


P 
wner merville, Mass.. or 
write 224 9th Ave, N. E. after Oct. N 

pecoee. Convenient | 


MIAMI, FLA gry y apart., private! 
two bus lines, $21 55th Street. 


. Tare ——- 
large rm., kiteh. priv., 
My 3-1300 Sun, after 4 


_M. 


oe os -e 


MATTRESSES 
_ MATTRESSES MADE OVE 


River)—Sunny, 
cony, transp. 
"and Wed. alter 


comfort. Good 
Terrace. 

MONTREUX — HOTEL PENSION Ls 
IRIS. CHERNEX. Ideaj for ss 
holiday. Splendid view, 


|\WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
with 
area. 
_ available. DE 2 


-_ eee 


| @ntrance. Suitable | 
| APARTMENTS TO SUBLET 
BOSTON, MASS.—5 rm. 


furn. (warmly) 


Comfortable rm 
rivate bath. Choice residential | 
usiness wo preferred. Garage| 


T ESS COMPANY ~ LI-SITE. Garden 
| 202-204 Blue ai 4 Avenue: Roxbury, Mass MSiong Lane. ‘Running water. 


| MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 


htd.} apt. Elev. bldg. Nr. trans. 
shopping. Call co 91-4672 before 
_ and | after 6 Dp 


and 
"| room, double 
Good location. 
Keeler, 21 


bed, 


WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. — Desirable 
connectin 
$12.50 per wee 
218 Lakeland Drive. 


Nar ta gg eed eg REGIS CLARENS. 
gg t home _Lake....Go0oed..cooke-. 


GHUNIRTT GUNTEN — PENSION 


LINDE—Spiendid situation above Labe 


SPINET “PIANOS AND ORGANS | 
Great savings at our private piano 
studio in Lexington, . VOlunteer 


es. 


‘APARTMENT S UNFURNISHED 
| BOSTON, MASS., Beacon St- 


BOSTON, 3} MASS., 1 
2ud floor—Newly 
“Tm. . hé&e water 


redec., 
co 


195 Huntington Ave., 


2-4067 (mornings). 


PRINTING 


Thun. - eoaeaeun Good cooking. Rest! 
holiday 


dbie 
Dwyer. 


sunby, 
6-4641, 


) ped | 
Combination Scien: room, bed- 


Marlborough Street—A 


Bievator. 1: rena 


~ OFFSET P RINTING FINDS i 


oom, kitchenette, bath and shower. In-' 

dividual heat control, private parking. 

space. Waterside. $125 ‘month. Tel. week-. 
&—CAp 


BROOKLINE, 
Front 


room, second Pwo ™ 
oe homelike atmosphere. LO 6- 


| 


! Graphic House Associates 
Liberty 2-1466 Boston, Mass, 


SATISFACTORY 


day ea -0450. Sundays and holi-) 


days, CO 6-4944. CASSVILLE, MO. 


ere eee 


| 
‘MANUFACTURERS’ REPRESENTATIVE, 

E. £ ree, 20 years’ experience in| 

New Engiand cal) On gas and elec-. 
tric wtilities’ eng architects, 
contractors, lumber and plumbing. 
heating supply houses. desires new line.. 
B B. pinney, 234 Fount 
New Haven, Conn 


SALESPEOPLE WANTED 


DO YOUR SHARE 


1S-ACRE ORANGE GROVE AND HOME 


2 bedrooms; 2-car garage with apart- 
ment above. Lake front: landsca 
and irrigated yard; deep well; electric; 
telephone: paved road: palms and 
oaks 23-acre total, Estimated 6000 
boxes fruit on trees included if sold 
before Terms—29°, down, 
balance to sult. Price $55,000. Exclu- 
sive lis "Sitlcen 

£. R. VINCENT with H. T. DYKES, 
REALTOR, BOX 287, MT. DORA, FLA. 


Ros 


BROOKLINE, MASS. 


(307 East sya 


home. C/O 
ANGE. 


DESIRABLE FIREPROOF BUILDING 
Modern jJ-rm. kit.: tiled bath suite, 
elevator, doorman service _ mo*: 
og poe suite $150 m 


‘DORCHESTER, 
| privileges Garage. GE GE 


MASS.—2 nice rms. 
private home. Suitable for couple. “ay 
teves 


ms. in 
6-7393 


: § and 
6 rm, suites $200-$250 mo. The Stone- 
holm, erty Beacon Street. 


| HOLL EWooS. CA ALIF. — a 
loyed. 
lang, 


ima. 


. or couple. Share home. 
HO 5-6973. 


Suite for em- A Monitor advertiser living in Pitts- 


burgh, Pa., writes: 


iBOSTON, MASS., 408 Maribore Si.—Ne 


at 
tile bath | Share 


1 and 2 Sot | quatro MASS.—2 connectin 
lady. Tel. PRospect 6-0618. 


g rms. 


kit. wi one “We have moved some six 


shower, elect, kit. Tel, LA-3-2302- (eves. 
r 


BROO atmos. Conv. transp. 


Contribute to the family finances repre.) 
senting TV advertised AVON Gonunetios. BEDFORD, MASS.—2-year 
commission. r Ca 


HU 7-7742 
Hackensack, N. J, 


World Bank Bonds 


after 
KLINE, MASS.—Desirable 1 AE Cent. No 


SUNNYSIDE, N. ¥.—Comf. rm., con 
cooking. 


gen. 
in. from 
4-7151. 


results, in movi 


rms., » as bath. $75-$100 mo. 
capa 1470 Beacon Street. 


A gr agp hia. are ag 
“SE mo. haelee ae tee 


CIAIB. A 
UISIA 


PIE IF 


AiLis 
Lic A 
IF /EICIT 
RIE|AITIAI 


5 


‘\Crossword Quiz Answers 


ing to Pitts- 
oo oe supposed 


I BLOIMIA 
SIE IMIOIN 


AIVIAI: iT 
EIRIS|E 


Please send me o copy of the 
booklet, “Cossitied Advertising Brings 


Results.’ 


dee 


a Rl De De Be Ree Bee ne 


Pe scype svete = eter te es 


cage Ae ate 


ee A ee 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONTTOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


"46 er 
‘ALABAMA. 


FLORIDA | 


af 


_FLORIDA FLORIDA 


| FLORIDA 


FLORIDA GEORGIA | 


GOP Coanell = BIRMINGHAM 


FORT LAU DERDALE 


(Continued) 


a 


(Continued) 


HOLLYWOOD 


PENSACOLA 


WEST PALM BEACH 


(Continued) 


ATLANTA 


(Continued) 


Expected To Alva ie wie & Sons 
Stay in Maine 


CONTRACTORS 
By the Associated Press 


Specializing in 
additions, 
Augusta, Maine 

Despite their gains in the state | 
election, Maine Democrats ap- | 
parently haven't a chance to} 
break the Republican strangle- | 
hold on the Governor’s Council. 

Democratic Gov. Edmund, 
Muskie had an all-GOP council | 
in his first term and is expected 
to have another in his second. 
«The council passes on many of 
the Governor’s appointments Residleos ond 
and other decisions. : x 
"The mechanics of councilor Silversmiths Since 1879 


remodeling a 

Fstimates furnished. 
All work guaranteed 
4915 FIFTH AVENUE SOUTH 

Phene LYriec 2-5483 


MOBILE 


Juuus GOLDSTEIN & SON | 


THREE SOUTH ROYAL STREET 


LONG & FIELD 


Since 1939 
1503 E. LAS OLAS BLVD. 
APPAREL and 
| ACCESSORIES 


tor Women, Misses * 
| | Juniors and Halt Sizes 
| [be Howse of Stvte, Quaitty and Soreise 


OPEN ALE YEAR 


| ae 


HN. 


IN MIAMI IT’S: 
Cecil Holland's 


ALL- MIAMI FORD 
FOR 


HOLLYWOOD FORD, INC. 


Complete Sales and Service 


| 
1200 W. Federal Hwy, Ph, (2-672 


LAKELAND 


Lakeland Knows 


Benford Stationery Co. 


Stationery—Greeting Cards 


‘vervone in 


3 LOCATIONS 
1550 N. Miami Avenue 
1050 N. W. 36th Street 
3441 S. W. 8th Street 


picking are all against the Dem- |-———————————-———"—"—"— 


ocrats, 
Normally, _ FLORIDA Se 
‘CLEARWATER 


here’s the way it! 
works: B 

Well in advance of the legis- 
lative session, Republican legis- 
lators-elect caucus in each of |” 
the seven councilor districts to 
pick a nominee. 

The names of seven GOP 
nominees are presented at 
joint session of the Senate and 
House shortly after_the Legisla- 
ture convenes. 

The Democrats, toa, present 
seven names. But, because the 
Legislature has been controlled |~ 
by the Republicans in every SeS- | 


| ‘CLEARWATER 
sion but one since the turn of/~ 
the century, it is just.a gesture Dew- Hendry Furniture Co. 


on the part of the minotity, 

The law does not require the} 
Legislature to accept the nomi- 
nees of the Republican district 
caucuses—but it usually does. 

Now, even if the Democrats 714.C) d 
had won a majority of the legis- ‘ eigiees oe 
lative seatsin any councilor dis+'Clerriw ater, Florida 
trict, the Legislature still wauld|~” 
not be bound to accept their 
nominee. 

All that is required for elec- 
tion is a simple majority of the 
joint convention. 

Next winter, the Democrats | 
still will be far short of that. ' 
They will have 8 of 33 seats—a | 
gain of 2. And in the House they |—..-—_—— oem 
number 53 in a total member- Th 5 d R \ 4) 
ship of 15i1—a gain of 19. € an y 00 ore 

There is another factor that 322 S. Osceola 
works against the Democrats. gta’ 

One Block West of Court House 
Ph. 3-6129 


' Retail Meats and Groceries, 


1620 Gulf-te-Bay Bivd. 


Clearwater, Florida 
= 


Rugs and Furniture 


| ONE-STOP 
Building Supply Service 
for Contract Builder and 


Home Owner 


Each county, in a district em- 
bracing more than one, is en- 
titled to council representation | 
for a certain period. But by cus- 
tom, the nominees are chosen by 
the district's ltegistators-elect— as; 
a whole, rather than just those |}. 
of the county inv olved. . 


Books—Cards—Stationery 


The Finest in Beauty Care for 
the Discriminating Woman 
Prone’ sT-3701 
Harsch to Speak. Finke gagere 
BEAUTY SALON) 


At Ad Club Dinner Mrs. Evelyn Mendel 


Joseph C, Harsch, special cor- 351 Main Street. Dunedin. Florida 


respondent of The Christian Sci- F RED BOLTON 


ence Monitor, will speak at the! 
Sales — Service 


opening-of-the-season dinner of | 
the Advertising Club of | 


at the Hotel Statler, Sept. 25 
Newspaper Day is to be the} 
theme. Members of the club wil! | 
study 15 major news stories of | 
the year and select the six they | 
consider tops. Mr. Harsch will |_ 


lect his choice for th Ps 
selec is cnoice r the top six. Women's and Children's Wear 


Television — Radio 


ws PARK ST. PH. 3-2161 


ALABAMA 
_ BIRMINGHAM 
SERVING BREAKFAST 


LUNCHEON AND DINNER 
DAILY AND SUNDAY 


point and Clearwater Beach | 


CORAL GABLES 


IT'S Ea 


Coral Gables 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


100 MIRACLE MILE 


Plenty of 
Free Parking 


“31 Years in 
Birmingham” 


, TO BANK AT 


TOOO 
DELICIOUS FOOD 


f aleterta 


cone 
mRS MINNIE 


MRS. TODD’ s 


110 Beh Ar 
FREE PARKING + DRIVE-IN TELLERS 


a tork S hop P € | CENTRAL LOCATION+ COMPLETE SERVICES 


Maternity and Infant Apparel | Member F.0.1.C. 


es 


Sis 


oe. 


HIDE AND 
SEEK SHOP 


For the Finest in 


404 North 20th Street Tel. 4.2028 
Birmingham, Alaboma > ee 


WESTERN 
SUPER MARKETS 


Five Points West Shopping Center 
$229 Velley Rood—Fairtield 
2230 Highland Avenue 
Plaze Shopping Center 


1-Day Service 


UTOPIA- 


Cleaners and Dyers 
Alpine 1-4215 
fer City-Wide Delivery 
_ Convenient Neighborhood Branches _ 


Oldest Shop 


1) Biks West of Coral Gables Church 
506 1 Biltmore Way Phone HI 8- 5929 


DOWLING’S 


The Best in Competitive Prices 


PRIME MEATS 


S.S. Pierce 


; 
' 
i 
’ 


Fine Foods 


i237 Miracle Mile 
feo Delivery 


OPALESCENT 


Ph. HI 4 greed 
Hi : 


All Branches of Beauty Culture 
at Moderate Prices 


FREE PARKING OR TAKE BLS & 
Phone 83-3773 
_3812 W. &th Street (Trail) 


EXTERMINATING 


CHAS. T. PIERCE 


| Phone FR 1.2275 


Ladies’ Handbags and Luggage S. 
‘ Authorized Dealer tor 


HARTMANN LUGGAGE 
ee ind Ave. N.—Monuntain Brook 


SAVAGES | 


BAKERY and EPICURE SHOP 
Delicious Breads and Pastries 


Representing S&S. &. Pierce Co. faney 
fenpested and Demestic Foods 
Open Sunday—Clesed Monday 


3016 Se. 18th St.. Homeweod, Ala, 
Phene ie R. 1-4901 


ESTABLISHED 1888 


A.A. ADAMS & COMPANY 
REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 
Collection of Rents 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
Alpine 1-7165 2120 First Ave. Ne. 


5—Day or Night 
Florida State License * 257 


FORT LAUDERDALE 


Complete Service 
Gulf Gas and Oil : Tires : Butteries 
DE SOTO AND PLYMOUTH 


461 &. Andrews Avenue Ph. JA 2-065) 


Town & Country Market 


Ph: + 1344! 


Largest Variety of Beeks in Clearwater . 


OFFICE SUPPLY CENTER | 


| CCA alls ddet end lagu bork 


| 


Freshest Vegetables in Town| 


44 ' 


‘Points : Varnishes : 


SAWYER MOTORS ~ 


Competent 
Insurédnce Counsel 
and. Service 


Daniel Insurance Agency: — 


220 8S. W. First Avenue 


— ggg gegogasos gogoogeoo | 
‘TIMES SQUARE SALON OF BEAUTY 


“Hair Styles of Distinction. 
| TIMES SQUARE CIRCLI 
| LO 4-8788 
| Se a me mn oC a Go 


AIR-O-LITE 
VENETIAN BLIND CO, 


MATCHSTICK 
BAMBOO DRAPES 


S17N. Andrews Ave. 


eae ee LLL 


Bailey's Jewelers 
Watches, Silverware 
Repairing 
TELEVISION BLDG. 
229.S.-E. 4ST AVENUE 


FORT MYERS 


| 


| 


ALL LINES OF INSURANCE) 


PY. jJA2-477 | 


ee ee a 


Blackstone 
Flower Shops 
in Florida 


‘Miemi: 8871 Biscayne Bivd. 


Miemi Beech: 414 |6th St. 
and Rodney Plaza 
Hotel, 2301 
Collins Ave. 


Hollywood: Hollywood Beach Hotel 
Boce Raton: 


For 24 Hour Service 
| __ PHONE JEfferson 8-1598 


Gifts of All Kinds 
Office Equipment—China and Glass 


__ 5 SOUTH KENTUCKY AVENUE 


CARPETS DRAPERIES 


~—Phone 2-2101— 


Cook Furniture Co. 


210 Se. Floride Ave. 
J. R. HEATH @ A, K, WOLFE 
DECORATORS 


MENSW E. AR 
Hart Schaffner & Marx Suits 
Arrow Shirts 
Knox and Lee Hats 
Walk-Over Shoes 


Myrick's Men's Store 


12 SOUTH KENTUCKY AVE. 


ee 


| 


| ena 


Boco Raton Hotel 
ond Club 


MIAM} BEACR 


FOOD TOWN 


Formerly Dulaney’s 


MIAMI 


YOUR BEST BUY 
1S 


CHEVROLET 


Fancy and Imported 
Groceries 


Fresh Fruits and \ egeiabice. | 
Daily 


Top Prime Meats 
and Poultry 


‘Reliable Charge Accounts Accepted 
| PROMPT FREE DELIVERY 
411 4ist Street Phone JE 8-055) | 


BERNARD LEVY 


Insurance Agency 


All Forms of Insurance 
Insurance at a Savings 
Phone JE 8-2323 


See ART NORDINE 
N. Miami Ave. at 21st St. 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


OTHER STORES 


New York City Pittsburgh, Pe. 
_ Albeny, N. Y. Buffelo, “' Y. 


/ 


MENU PLANNERS . SHOr AT 


Hitgh Lo Nathurst 
Exclusive Distributor 


Products Shaw-Walker 

Company, Domore Chair Co. Sales 

and Service Pi pig gente ® S eaetine 
Machines. Cash Regis 


1531 HENDRY STREET oe SA10T 


GAINESVILLE 


Underwood 


# 


General Electric Appliances 


FULL LINE 
Soles and Service Since 1939 
-‘cC- 


PROGRESS STORES 


| CHACE AND KITCHENS—APPLIANCES | 


6-7207' 


'T18 S$. EB ist Ave, 


HORNE—APPLIANCES 


| 503 S W. land Ave. 


Die! FR 


| FAGAN’S BOOTERY 


Women’s and Children’s 
FINE FOOTWEAR 


9 West University Avenue 


Chester R. Yates, C.L.U. 


Special Agent 


guy NEW YOR LIFE INSURANCE Co. Foremos! Dairy Products'~ 


Life—Annuities 
and Group Insurance 


| 226 S. Main St.. 
' 


Children’s Wear at Coral Gables’ | 


112 S. W.Ist Ave. 


Florida 


Gainesville, 


STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS 
ATLAS TIRES AND TUBES 
FUEL OIL AND KEROSENE 
QUICK DELIVERY 
736 WN. Main St. Diel FR 2-1139 


; 


; 
' 


BEAUTY SHOP L. $. DANIELS Conan ROBERT younc| 22 N. W. 7th Ave. Ph. FR 9-1761 | 


nee ee ~~ 


‘The Harper Paint Co. 


Dutch Boy Points 


10 S. W. 7th Street 
Gainesville, Floride 


Diel FR 2-2151'-——— 


Gainesville, Fla. | 


DANIELS Service Station 


° 
ere 


TANNER’S 


— AND 


B - THRIFTY 


FOOD STORES 


3050 N. W. 7th St. 
1263 West Flagler St. 
1753 N. E, 2nd Ave. 
1906 Ponce de Leon Blvd. 
5795 Bird Road 
6190 S. W. Sth St. 
@ 13020, N. E. Sth Ave. 


1344 Washington Avenue 


—_—_— 


MIAMI—Hialeah 
FLAMINGO 


SALON 


91 HIALEAH DRIVE 
Phone TU 8-2353 


| 


NORMA WILEY 
Owner ond Operetor 


— j NORTH MIAMI 


Tienes, TT 


Complete iecieer 

AWNING & TENT CO., IN for the Home 

‘More on coer og Dollar 

gtr Eg pen Evenings 

| CANVAS Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 

' AWNINGS and CANOPIES '3130W. Dixie Highway, ‘PL 8-057) 
dmoco Gasoline Goodyear Tires 
Repairs—T owing 


LEANDER’S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
11835 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY 
TELEPHONE PL 9-02 

Specializing in 
Preventive Maintenance 


WE RENT AND SELD 
CHAIRS—TABLES—TENTS 
UMBRELLAS 


| 


CALL FR 4-1731 


EXPERT 
UPHOLSTERING 


Slipeovers and Drapes 
Reasonable 
Curnick Furniture and Decorating 
~ 71979 N. W. 2nd Avenue | 
A Pry 
P hone I L 4-34 74 TAILORING 
Distributors of 855 N.E. 125th St. Phone Ploze 8-4639 


IVES CERTIFIED MILK . ORLANDO 


L. A. JOHNSON 
FUEL OILS 


Woods Fuel Oi| Compeny 
tor 


CLEANERS 


eee were Vy oe 


PERSONALIZED SERVICE 


Ceres 


Fresh @ Pure @ Wholesome 
Telephone NE 5-4421 


JERSEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 
ICE CREAM 


Home and Business 
Hotels — Apartments 
Industrial Plants 


1035 Ww. Kh nannamnsvanll Ave. 


ntl 9887 


2ND AVE. | 
Miami, PL 4-4521, Heliy- 
1, Ft. Landerdale JAck- 
West Palm Beach _ 5624 


EXTERMINATORS | 


Regular Home Service 


Colonie State Bank 


AST COLONIAL DRIVE 
yusT EAST OF MILLS STREET 


Offers 
Complete Banking Services 


Telephones: 
weed 7-406] 
son 4-2501, 


Member federal Deposit insurance Corp 
a = 


SS i ea 
a 


Vermin and Termite Control 


TRULY NOLEN. Inc, A! YOUR SERVICE 


@ Bookkeeping 


| © Record Protection 


@ Business Engineering 


VMAGIATIST RUG CLEANERS 
Complete Rug Service 


CARPET LAYING—REPAIRING 
® FURNITURE SHAMPOOED— 
RUGS DYED 
@ MOTHPROOFING 


(20% Discount for ? Cash and Carry 


NATION. WIDE 


a AL. saan J SERVICE 
. Colonial Dr 


Roofing Moterieis—Paint 
Concrete Block—Doors 
Clay Products—Windows 
Lumber and Mill Work 


| “The Helzel Co. 


‘Heating and Air Conditioning 
Roofing and 
Sheet Metal Work 


802 S. E. 4th Street 


 Furniture—Lamps 
Gifts—Accessories — 


BUSINESS EQUIPMENT CO. 


Office Furniture and Supplies 
NEW LOCATION 


209 E. Las Olas Blvd. Ph. JA 2-0615 
4 SEESE REALTY, 


~-Realtors 


RERZERERE SEER ESSERE EE 


iGo | 


.W. 8TH AVENUE and 4TH STREET @. 
’ 


Um imby 


KELVINATOR 
: Sales and Service 


Sargent’s Pure Oil tation 


Mein ond Weshington Streets 
Complete Cer Service in o 
Convenient Downtown Locetion 


Ww. b 
NE 4-1541--Phenee NE 4-8941 


fi ine furniture Since 


@ INTERIORS 
RICHARD PLUMER 


- SS NE. PHONE 
* 40TH $T. PL 9-5714 


THE JEEP PLACE 


Phone FR 9-3636 
NW. 11th St. ot N.W. Ist Ave. 


PARTS + SALES + SERVICE 


Orlendo 
Fioride 


Phone 
5.9145 


Watches 


HOMESTEAD 


Rea] Estate and Insurance 
“PHONE JA $-7378—-0—O 


ALTMAYER PONTIAC CO. 


Hallmark Cards 
Watch and Jewelry Repairing 
LELAND CHUBB 


110 N. Orange Ave. ORLANDO. FLA 
+ occ ORLANDO— Colonialtown 
“We Invite Comparison” 


For the Best Insurance 


7 See 7 
Stembler-Adams-Frazier 
INSURANCE reps bs > Ine. 
118 N, E. Ist Ave. 


_ Save Shopping Sins 

al The Christian Science Monitor 
and you will find many helpful 

hints 10 save shopping steps. 


1202 East Colonic! Drive 
Orlando, Floride 


| 


Elgin, Bulova, Wadsworth 


Pahite & White *, 


“BETTER CLOTHES” 


SUE BALKCOM 
Gifts - 


Accessories for the Home 


is Palafox and Garden a | 


GIFTS—GREETING CARDS 
GIFT WRAPPINGS 


DIAL TE 3-4523 3172 Peachtree Road CH $012 


: 
: 


JS PASTRY SHOP 


Where Variety and 
| Quality Excell 
'2014.N, 12th Ave. 


_____ SARASOTA 
CITIZENS BANK IN SARASOTA 


SARASOTA. FLORIDA 


Drive-in Window 
Open 9 A.M. te 
8PM 


Free Parkine 
fer Customers 


Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corn 
Deposits insured dap to 510.000 


od 


Mutual Insurance Agency 


Savings on Your 
| Fire and Casualty Insurance 


SARASOTA, FLORIDA 


‘Successor to |. Markweiter? 


ST. PETERSBURG 
Tamiami Hotel | 
240. First Avenue North 
Telephone 5-4259 
Right in the 


Cood Restaurants 
’ 


; 


Heart of Town 
Nearby 


' 


| 


Open All Year 


‘ 
’ 


| 


MILLINERY 
CUSTOM-MADE HATS 
Designed by 


Madame Frivda 


Bridal Veils @ Bridesmaid? 


H. E 2.4180 


FIRST FEDERAL 


' Produced and Distributed 


Hiats tor All Occasions 


314 W. Lafayette St, Tel, 81-0662 
Opposite University of Tampa 


-LYNM- DIARE TRAILER COURT 


For Retired People and Tourists 
Fishing and Boating Nearby 


2310 Se. 50th $f. 
on Hiwey 41 


V. Cestongday, 
Mer. 


CHESTER’S 66 SERVICE 


| Ge 


Bey to Bay end Menhetten Tampe, fie. 


Babes Renae 


The House ot Quality” 
410 Franklin $1. 


Cors Called for 
and Delivered 


Phone 64-7841 ' 


@ Jewelers 


_ Feeds—F ertilizer— 


WEST PALM BEACH | 


ae we ~~ 


bor ‘the Palm Beaches es 


THE FABRIC CENTER, Inc, 


MAE JONES 


Telephone TE 2-1969 
213 Clematis Street 
West Palm Beach, Florida 


“LOGAN MOORE SHIRK 
LUMBER COMPANY 


One Square South of Belwedere Rd. 
and F. E. C, Ry. 


— LUMBER and v= 4 
* BLDG. MATERIAL | E 2-816! 
FLORIDA 


WEST PALM BEACH, 


George Sanner’ $ 
Beauty Salon 


Hair Styling—Experienced Operators 
lair Dressing 
Experts in Machine 
and Cold Permanent Having 
| Phene TE 53-4592 3605 Seuth Dixie 


| 


Printing — Engraving 
RUBBER STAMPS 
~ PALM BEACH PRESS» 


28 Fagan Arcede Ph. TE 2-7420 
JFRSEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 


Telephones: Miami 84-4521, Holly- 
it 4061, Ft. Lauderdale 2-1935 
V est Palm Beach TE 2-5624 


“BOY'S ROOFING and 
SHEET METAL WORKS 


1517 North Poinsettia Avenue 
PHONE TE 2-6187 
West Palm Beach, Floride 


- 


» “Everything for the Office” 


- Home and Car Radio Repairs 


MRS. HOWARD PATTILLO Z A. RICE 
werevarreresnets reve HOWARD PATTILLO 
“Insurance Agency 
Since 1866 Insurance Only 


FIRE—AUTOMOBILE 
BURGLARY, CASUALTY, BONDS 


WAlnut 2345 217 Healey Bldg. 


| Chery fehaae cx: 


Agents for 


p= 


13 Ivy St. N. E. MUrray 8-6660 
DECATUR 


_ WES) PALM REACH. FLORIDA FLORIDA 


Save by mail at 


SAVINGS end LOAN ASSOCIATION 
215 South Olive Avenue 
West Palm Beach, Florida 


CURRENT 3% RATE 


a ee 5 a ee eee 


WEST PALM BEACH Three Sisters Beauty Salon 
Lake Worth , 


Complete in 
| Beauty Service 


‘'DEarborn 7843 
427 CHURCH STREET 
w 


OPP 


Golden Guernsey te the 
Palm Beach’s 
Leading Premium 


MILK 


Exclusively by 


VIEw 
AUR FLOWER SHOP 
e wu wa” @ 


Phone DEarborn 3309 
301. Church. Street 


Phone JU 2-5656 


_NORTH CAROLINA _ 
ASHEVILLE 


WEST PALM BEACH 
Palm Beach 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
tha 

sf a 

PY Riku 


=~ PALM BEACH 


SHOE HOSPITAL 


Dial 3-3684 
667 


74 College Street 
Haywood Road 


WSKY 


1230 KC 


i 
: 


WINTER HAVEN Your station for 
~ TRIANGLE SERVICE STATION MUSICeNEWS+SPORTS 


FASER and DEAS, Owners 
Phone 77663 Read Service 
GAS—OIL—TIRES 
BATTERIES 
GREASING—POLISHING 


CHARLOTTE 
SMART FALL HATS — 


Fa 


MAGNOLIA and AVE. “A” 
WINTER HAVEN, FLA. 
Dine in Beautifully Appointed 


SIRLOIN ROOM 


Home of the 
Broiled Prime 
Dinner 


C 


finest Charceal 
Steaks. Lebster 
and Luncheons 


Sundown Restaurant 
AIR CONDITIONED 


Fellew U.S. 17 Seuth, Near 
Cc ypress Gardens 


TCHELL-BOLAND > 
FEED STORE 


yy * MEANT TO HARMONIZE 
HN with the beoutiful, slim 
+ —_ tines of Fall Fashion. 


Remodeling by Ann Lattimore 
115 S$. Tryon St. Phone ED 4-7961 


| The Carol Ann 
HAT SHOP 

LI BRE Bm 

HOME FEDERAL 

| Savings & Loan Associction 
“Charlotte’s 

Savings Corner” 
4th and Tryon 

Dividend 


i BM te 


SAVINGS INSURED SAFE 
Up to $10,000 


Mi 


Seeds 


Winter Florida 


203 Sth 


Haven, 


Nt. 5. W. 


3 


P hone -3641 


ee — 


i RORIDA OFFICE SUPPLY 


INC. ' 


171 WEST CENTRAL AVE, 


3 Current 
WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA 


WINTER PARK 


State Auto Body Works 


Specialists in— 


Wheel Balancing 
Convertible Tops 
Upholstering 

Seat Covering 

Body and Fender Repair 
Frame and Wheel Alignment 


Auto Insurance 
A better i 
plan for careful 
drivers! Ask— 
rane =o. Bonn A. Gilbert 
Agency 


320 Wilder Bide. 


Distributors for— 


General Tires 

Valvoline Oils 

Wix Filters 
(220 ORANGE AVE. PHONE ¢-1241 


Phone ED 3-4306 


HARRIS 
SUPER MARKETS 


Fine Foods 
‘5118 Park Rd. 


and 
1704 Central Ave. ° 
2707 South Boulevard 3 
(1924 Rozzells Ferry Rd. 


Hampton Y. Carter 
INSURANCE AGENCY 
416 Providence Road 


General Insurance and Binds 


GEORGIA 
ATLANTA 


CLOUDT’S — 
FOOD SHOP 


Our Merchandise 
Speaks for Itself 


1933 Peachtree N. E. _TR 6-7523 


WEINSTOCK’S 
FLOWER SHOPS 
8 Peachtree Street Arcade 
4090 Roswelt Road, NW. — EXchange 9261 


ee 


RADIO HOSPITAL 


“Service That Satishes” 
Specialists in 


OVER 3 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE 


TECCCCCCCCCCUCCECCECCES 
The BLOSSOM SHOP 


Flowers 


| FRED SLAGHT 
1160 W. Peachtree TRinity 4-1013| 


Gentry Brothers 
Paint and Glass 
439 Fern St.—Ph. TE 3-5711 
West Palm Beach, Floride 


Leke Worth, 2011 Ne. Dixie, JUstin 2-8550 
gee 1935 Broedwey vi. rnd dP 


- Each Account ‘Insured 


for All Occasions 
EDison 2-6146 2242 Avondale Ave. 


Harry Sommers, Inc. DOUGLAS VILL AGE 


CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH | Furriers—Dry Cleaners: 
446 W. Spring St. N.W.  JAckson 3-461! | Self-Service ‘Laundry | 


j Dress Shop 
Molly a. cies 15 Etesbeth. Ave. ED 3-516" 
T Beat. Salon. 


‘3110 Peachtree Road 


J. L. MILLER 


SALES REPRESENTATIVE 


ec. 


| Exchange 8655 ira 


Seb pa eda Mata 


| | : suse : 
fe : r j ; m 


‘ae 


~ 


BOSTON, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


_Family Features 


Youth Section © ==st2=s0000: 


‘material from contributers teen age te 36 
» nines —_ - a ’ 7 er Ss i Fi PASS NS... Bia da state RNs, ee TS ER oh 
PR eI RRR RI eR ERR, COE te RE een 


Photographer's Album A Day at The 
EE Tee | Sehe Fair 


By Brian C. Pearson 
Beaconsfield, Bucks. 
England 
England has had its first | 
spaghetti-eating contest: the) 
occasion was Soho Fair, held in| 
the second week of July. This. 
historic fair was only revived | 
in 1955, and its success then 
warranted the continuation of 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, 


: Camera Shots—Here and Abroad _ 
Today 4 Suotation ss eet a. 


Love and you shall be loved: The good man has 
absolute good, which, like fire, turns everything to 
its own nature, so that you cannot do him any harm, 

—EMERSON 


3 
:.. 
a s : 
Baek 8 


The English 
Cornquerors 


By Bryan G. P. Pope 


R. Duniway, Edwards, Calif. 


“AN aah 


Along the Corkserew Road 


In 1923 San Francisco engineers built the Corkscrew Road to 
overcome the steep grade on Lombard Street, between Leaven- 
worth and Hyde. By constructing seven hairpin turns they 
reduced the grade from 26.2 per cent to 18 pes cent, which is 


safer for cars. 


Pedestrians use the steps. The street is paved with bricks, 


which become slippery when 
converted to a one-way street 
only frem the top. 


wet. To improve safety it was 
in 1945. Now it may be entered 


The people who live on this street have garages and park 
their cars by their houses just like householders everywhere. 

Vermont Street, in San Francisco, has a similar roadway. San 
Francisco has built other streets, straight, with grades up to 


31 per cent. 


Cultural Ambassadors 
From Teheran 


By Bruce Muirden 


Cairns, N.Q., Australia 
* With their sights set on a ten- 
year tour of the globe, young 
Persian students Issa and Abdul- 


lah Omidvar called in recently crafts and collecting items for a'| 


at North Queensland centers in 
the second year of their mara- 
thon journey. They left Teheran 
on August 20, 1954, after six 
years of intensive preparation. 
Since then they have been to 
Afghanistan, India, Malaya, 
Ceylon, Borneo, Indonesia, and 
Australia. 

Issa, 26, and Abdullah, 23, 
have financial backing from the 
Persian Government, which has 
thus made their ambitious ven- 
ture possible. They travel by 
motorcycles for which they re- 
ceive free petrol and oil as a 


Our Mail Bag 


O al hee ce 
gS 


Milan, Michigan 

I-am 14 years old and I would 
like to correspond with girls 
near my age from any country. 
I am interested in learning a 
language that is foreign to me, 
also in reading and sewing.— 
Suzanne B 

| ee te 


Floral Park, New York 

I am a boy, 13 years old, and 
would like a pen pal in either 
‘Japan, India or Siam. My chief 
interests are piano playing and 
chemistry. I also like stamp 
collecting, and collecting photos 
of movie stars. —Bill P, 

BS Beek 


Bremen, Germany 
I am a girl of 15, and would 
like to write to a girl my age.— 


ion K. 


Darwin, N.T., Australia 
I am a 17-year-old Senior 
Scout from Australia... I would 
‘like boy pen friends, 16 to 18 
s, in the U.S.A., Canada, 
(someone who knows a 
little English) and Great Britain. 
I would like them to be Boy 
Scouts, and to be keenly inter- 
ested in cars and car racing. I 
am also a keen cyclist. I have 
seen most of Australia, so I can 
tell you = a lot about this 
country.— obert B, 


Let’s Write! 
Mall me. which is published fre- 
in section rs - 


readers from 13 


lresult of an oil-company con- 
/ cession, 

During their tour they are 
displaying Persian arts and 


world-art display in their own 
country on their return. The lat- 


iter they send back regularly by 


| freight. 

|. In effect, they are cultural 
ambassadors for Iran. They-can 
speak and write Persian, Ara- 
'bic, and English, and have some 
acquaintance with Hindu and 
Urdu. 

After some difficult times in 
_Afghanistan, where they once 
incurred severe displeasure by 
‘trying to film a bridal proces- 
sion, and in other eastern lands, 
ithey have found Australia a 
i\“very quiet country where 
everyone seems happy.” 

So far 
30,000 miles in ten countries, In 
India they scaled the 20,000-foot 
Norsing peak in the Himalayas 
burying a record book under 
cairn at their final camp. 


amit aan 


| In each country they try and 
isee the president and prime 


: 


a 


graphs of these dignitaries, Each 
signatory is presented with an 


exquisitely illustrated volume of 
the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. 

Lacking a tight schedule, the 
adventurous pair can include 
places unthought of in their 
original plans. Waiting 
Townsville, North Queensland, 
for a ship to take them north 
to the Philippines, they found 
themselves with an extra week 
and journeyed north to Cairns, 
where they 
welcome. With full support of 


fine work. They had a tape re- 
cording of Persian music but did 
| not play it. Issa is a violinist and 
Abdullah plays the drum (they 
had three years at a music col- 
lege before they left Persia), 
and have given recitals in east- 
ern lands, 


| a” koe 


Little was left to chance when 


they left Persia in 1954, In | 
their years of preparation they | 


+ had Jearned to. strip and repair 
their all-important 500 c.c. mo- 
torcycles, had experimented 
with various types of photog- 
4raphy, and climbed steep peaks 

in Persian mountains. This 
‘climbing practice was later to 
prove invaluable when they 
reached the Himalayas. To dis- 
cover some of the snags they 
might encounter they rode right 
around Persia on bicycles. Their 
music course; they thought, 
would fit them better for their 
task ahead which they en- 
visaged primarily as a cultural 
expedition. 

Now approaching their third 
year from home, they are yearn- 
ing to return. They would give 
much to be able to visit, even 
briefly, their father at his Téhe- 


minister and collect the auto- 


in | 


received a warm | 


the city council they staged a | 
display of Persian ornaments, | 
carpets, inlays, cloths, and other | 


the event this summer. 

Soho is a small area in Lon- 
don sandwiched between Oxford 
Street and Leicester Square, and 
bounded by Charing-Cross Road 
to the east. This section consists 
of narrow streets, tiny foreign 
cafés, and food shops; once a 


nationalities, and the place for 


tertainment. 


eet ae 

During the week of Soho Fair 
the streets were decorated with 
flags, banners, and streamers, 
and many people from different 
countries donned their national 
dress. Councillor Patrick Stir- 
ling, Mayor of Westminster, 


+ who. inaugurated last year’s fair, 


opened the event this year and 
described it as far bigger and 
far better. 

The week's festivities started 
with the waiters’ race, run from 
Soho Square. The entrants, 
dressed in full waiters’ attire— 
black tails and bow ties—must 
run with a full tray. Dropping 
it means disqualification. 


ing and competitions, and, 0 
course, plenty of good food, 
with a special emphasis on many 
varied national menus and cus- 
toms. Spanish girls danced in 
the streets to the accompaniment 
of guitars and castanets; march- 
ing jazz groups recalled the 
street bands of New Orleans. 
The little café in Greek Street 


'five Soviet citizens, and 
| delegates from the State Trade 
‘and Catering Workers’ Union 
lenjoyed an international ten- 
'course dinner. 


a 


A novelty introduced at this 
year’s fair was the spaghetti- 
eating contest, held at the cafe 


—three Italians and two Eng- 
lishmen—had to eat 142 pounds 
of spaghetti, using a fork only. 
| With onlookers and cameramen 
‘cramming the small café, and 
more crowds squeezing noses 
against the outside of the win- 
dow, the winner—an Italian— 
consumed his spaghetti in 1 
minute 33 seconds. The pro- 


|prietor admitted that this must 


be “nearly a world record.” 
Miss Finland, 1955 Beauty 
Queen, presented the Italian 
‘champion with First Prize of 
| The last day of the Soho Fair— 
July 14—was really the French- 
|man’s day, for this was the 
famous French fete dav cele- 
brating the fall of the Bastille 
'in Paris in 1789. 

| The enthusiasm and cama- 
‘raderie of this year’s fair 


showed that the event has come 


> 


they have covered | to stay. It is a colorful and un- 


usual celebration in London’s 


rich calendar of festivities, and | 


‘an opportunity to watch na- 


’| tionals from all over the world 


_having fun together. 
| te 


; 


An Invitation 


' 

| We're looking for those 
| snapshots and maniscripts 
| you’ve been intending to sub- 
| mit to the Youth Section for 
| consideration, Articles from 
| 500 to 600 words are prefer- 
_ able. Sharp, clear, glossy 
prints and original sketches 
in black and white. Address 
them to the Youth Section, 
The Christian Science Moni- 
tor, One Norway St., Boston, 
Mass, 


fashionable part of London it is | 
now the haunt of people of all | 


exotic food, and fascinating en- | 


The fair continued with danc- | 
¢ | happened 


proves a sumptuous meal for | 
these | 


in Swiss Street, in the middle of | 
the week. The five competitors | 


' 


Parents 


summer 


‘sought and found a 


a small boat on a lake. 
4 4 5 


Just as one gets the opportu- 
nity to gleefully tuck the lawn- 
mower away for 
season the Garden Editor runs 
ithe comment, “Never let a lawn 
go into the winter unclipped and 
| Tagged.” 

| ee Oe 


Wisps of commuter conversa- 
tion that keep haunting us, “He’s 
always..got.the. horse. before .the 
'cart?” And then this one, “I 
| voted for him because he has 
| such a nice-looking family.” And 

this one on courtesy, “They’re 
such perfect hosts—they always 
|lower the sound volume on the 


TV set whenever the conversa- | 


| 


pose, every seed. grew. 


\tion gets interesting.” 
ee ee 


Whippersnappers: What ever 
to that expression 
'“bright as a whip” when ap- 
plied to bright young children? 
et oak 


The hat manufacturers say a 
man looks more successful with 
a hat on his head. From now on 
‘many a man is going to be 


of a quite normal|that sound simple? 
group of teen-agers have just|sound as if that was all there 
returned from the most pleasant | was to it? Don’t be misled. Let 
vacation ever — they | me tell you that I am full of 
retreat | admiration for the corn kernels 
where “rock and roll” meant | we planted; theirs was no easy 
nothing more than the motion of | path to eventual participation in 


distinguishable f 
the winter | ode, aeaats rom winter over 


: 


_good,” and so saying seized me 


\seed. That, I decided, was the 


i|to give away. We were on our 


corn. (Amendment of the chap- 
|ters on planting in the garden- 
| ing books seems indicated, chuck 


line. ) 


Exeter, Devon 
Folks! We have cornquered. 
We did it. We grew corn. Does 
Does that 


our first corn feast. Hiawatha 
would have been proud of them. 

Listen to their story. Way 
back in the spring (mostly in- 


autumn is almost 
upon you) I bought, for the seed 
I had, some very special potting 
compost. With this, in a box, 
under glass, I planted some 
eighty seeds, Only five grew. 
Nothing daunted, I replanted, 
and again only about five grew. 


Now somewhat discouraged, said } "0 


I to myself, “This seed is no 


a hoe, drew a lengthy furrow 
and sadly buried the rest of the 


end of the experiment. 
Sete ae 

Just to make amends, I sup-| 

I had; 

enough for six rows and plenty 


way, and so, we felt, was the 


in and forget ’em isthe: 


(per instructions | 
perhaps remember) we) 


Tenderly 
you'll 


judged impolite when he’s just | watched over the corn patch, | 


striving to make like a tycoon. 
Tee” eee 


watering copiously against the} 


drought at one time severe in| 


Movie houses have repeat per- | these parts (no sun, just clouds 


formances and so does 


Ty.|with no rain—very 


English). 


However, the latter spaces it | When passing we murmured in 


|out by months and years. 

| 2:8 

| At this time of year the 
warmest welcome you can re- 
ceive is from the automobile 


dealer loaded with 1956 models. 


H. &. TI. 


4 Record only 
| He Ournny flours” 


REG US PAT OFF 


‘ 
Local 397 Aids 


Bowmanville, Ontario 
| A group of thirty understand- 
ing carpenters have just finished 
| working on a new dormitory for 
“Mom” Whyte’s 62 
children. 

As for Mom, all she can say is, 
‘“I’m so happy, it’s just a 


miracle. These wonderful car- | 


‘penters have surely helped us 
out.” 


‘dered Mom Whyte to provide 


'more space for her 62 children. | 


| That's when the carpenters, all | 


pcorgery of the United Brother- 


’ 


‘and Bowmanville, 


to 


lose 


Cherrebeth Gordon 


ACROSS 


. Taxi 

. Poetic 
name for 
England: 
abbr. 

. Large 
serpent 
Country tn 
America 

. African 
worm 

114, Evil spirit 

15. Ideal 

17. Stop: naut. 

18. Lariat 

20. Gaelic 

21. Wind 

indicator 

24. Horizontal 


. Goup 

. Umbrella 
part 

. Feminine 
ending 

. Wealth 


; oepean. 
blackbird 

. Blotch 

. Omitin 
sea 


ng 
. Falks 
wildly 


Se 


MY, 
Md, 
* St Oh td a 


et 
“a 


; nr 4 
: we 


re 


Crossword Pussie 


Par Time 18 Minutes 


ee 

t 35 Was £7; 

weet AR ae eee 

‘ ery 

r | ft 4 ff 44 Molten 
ae rock 
a Ee 45. Above 

adi Wm 47. Task 


. Praising 

. Ward off 

. Busy insect 

) rm 

. Tales of 
adventure 


6. Pancake 

mixture 

Feminine 

name 

8. Slope 

. Grandson 
of Esau 

. Lichen 
Before 
Lately 
picked 

. Greedy 

Change 

Ancient 

Asiatic 

region 

23. Notch 

25. Black 


27, Wriggling 
29. Roof edge 
30. Asterisk 


de 


. Drinking 
vessel 
. Peer Gynt’s 


. Opposite of 22. 
aweather 
Train mak- 
ing all 
stops 


M 


“A 
Sd ; 


Afb p fp 
) th, 
, 
danas 
of 


reer rrers 
VW pps 
thf, VAS, 


(hh dhdb hd Ch 
caf 


We 
41. Moon 


Cow's 


49. Streets: 
nani De, silat ata 
51. Tavern —- | 


oS 38 gS . 


accents we fondly hoped would | 


i make the tender shoots feel more | 
'at home. We had to murmur, the | 


neighbors might not have un-| 
derstood. 
| ee ee 


Came July the fifth and three) 
wandering Americans. We con-— 
fided in them, Said they, “Knee 
high by the fourth of July is 
the criterion.” Tim (eight) said 
he thought it was corn we were 
growing, but was enlightened 
when by dint of using his knee 
our corn qualified. 

We were most encouraged. So 
was the corn, for we watered 
and cosseted and murmured the 
more, Then came the gale! Pau- 
Puk-Keewis did us dirt—ninety 
miles per hour, the worst in July 
for sixty years, just when we 
were thinking summer 


* 


U.S. Army Photograph 


These are the two units that 
make up the helmet radio, the 
tiniest two-way combat radio. 
The top case holds earphone, 
switches, and batteries. To- 
gether they weigh less than a 
pound and snap into a special 
plastic helmet. 


this every year.) From the ver- 
tical our corn became horizontal 


_—just as the flowers were ap- 


pearing, 
holiday. 


We disappeared 
Returning, we 


on 
were 


/amaized (sorry) to see that the 
‘corn had reverted to the verti- 


cal. In the act of raising our hats 


! really | in salute we saw most-plants had | 
‘must arrive soon, (We fall for} at least two ears in the making.! manently cornverted. 


: ae 
United Press 

A former teacher, mother of 
a 5-year-old son, Mrs. Marga- : 
reta Hurtig is Sweden's first 
radio policewoman. 


-_ 


Acoso 


Some, we decided, were ready | 
for the pot. | 
Accumulated lore on cooking 
times from readers’ kind letters | 
Was soon added up and aver-| 
aged. The salt water boiled mer- | 
rily. Instructions were -issued as | 
to the exact meaning of the verb | 
“to slather” with a cautionary | 
note from Margaret based on the 
price of butter, Methods of han-) 
dling we left.to impatience to 
find the handiest way. It did! 
This time never a grain did the | 
neighbors’ chickens get. 


We wish we had a bigger gar- | 
den. We have been completely, | 
delightfully, deliciously and per- 


United Press 


Little Arthur Nickols of 
Calgary, Canada, guards the 
family luggage in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, He and 19 members 
of his family are enjoying a 
European vacation, traveling 
in a chartered plane. Arthur's 
grandfather, an oil king, is 
footing the bill of about 
$80,000, 


United Press 


Europe’s largest illuminated 
clock, 28 feet in diameter, is 
at Langendorf, Switzerland, 
An executive of the Lanco- 
Watch Company is silhouetted 
behind the neon-lit dial. 


A Verse 
for Today... 


Ye are the light of the 
world. ... Let your light 
so shine before men, 
that they may see your 
good works, and glorify 
your Father which is in 
heaven.—Math. 5:14, 
16. 


— 


—* 


foster | 


The local health unit had or- | 


hood of Carpenters and Joiners | 
of America, Local 397 of Oshawa | 
decided to. 
|enter into the picture and con-_| 
_struct the dormitory. | 
| Mr. E. R, Elliot, the union’s | 
business agent, urged carpenters | 
all across Canada to contribute | 
the Whyte fund. He ex-/| 
plained the group couldn’t sit | 
back and see these 62 youngsters | 
the only home they’ve | 


a tome for lack of a dormitory. 


| 
| 
lol 


j 


Tubby 


ee | By! *// 
I) 
WY [lp i ft 


j 


Hetto BOY... 


L'Lt TAKE TWO 
CUPS OF 


ith Wits 


, 
; 


Ne 


PL 


By Guernsey LePelley 


THE RAIN 


Ou STANLEY ~~ 
THERE’S A Poor 
LITTLE FELLOW 
TRYING TO SBLL 
LEMONADE IN 


* 


ALSO 


, 
~. 


THE MAN SAID ——~ 
THERE'S NO SENSE 


l Noo HEARD WHAT eal 


TRYING TO SELL 
LEMONADE IN 
THE RAIN 


MORE LEMONADE 


TODAY THAN I 
HAVE ALL SEASON 


re ae ; Fie aad F fe 4g 4 
i ¢ fi Ae aN ben? 2 4 a ae ee 
fy CN -e fn, Sey Eos hL nia beens de ee a 
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ers ea Sis ee oe ie Le: 

So Dk A ST i ee) fk 


"a 
PCO, oY gee er, tee 
al IRE S Ay ee 
tan Bo 
asst ¢ Pak-eg: 


Ther WERE 
VERY GOOU 


Tit. Have 
TWO MORE @:- 


my WE 
2 
[es 
f ft 
+ 


ler’s STOP AND 
HELP HIM OUT 


; * . , 
“ff ant 
— iP 


Sure. 
SOMEONE 
OUGHT TO 
EXPLAIN THE 
FACTS OF 
MERCHANDISING 


- 


— We 


’ 
, 
| 


TY'o uke To 


oIVE XO. SOME 
GOOD ADVICE... 


; 


ea, 


‘Tus isn'T THe q 


Yoo NEED A HOT, 


KIND OF DAY TO 
SELL LEMONADE JF | 


SUNNY DAY TO 
SELL LEMONADE 


I’ve HAO 


FORTY-THREE 


PECPLE STOP AND Give 


ME THAT SAME PUNK 


Sor yk 2 wv AS ee fer: 
See ee 
; ” x ‘ , est er a P 4 


wa 


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= alia MR Sis 


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ts ads ae 


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cell 

is, 
[iff 


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bate ait Fon a aca atl a CA, oe aR Rk 
PR sha Loe EPL ee ee pon Senay EN ARS 7 aa em 2 


Boston, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


“First the blade, then the ear, PRE Sthen the full grain in 


Pe ee yp eter 
tage cate s. ie Ge Hass 
Boa ‘sata go Boonen 
r . 
x i Piss . 


i pat 
: nA aS 3. Ee a ee ‘i cei w 
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. , a ne 
a : ve y watt 
~ 7 \ 


Features 


PUBLISHED BY 
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING SOCIETY 


Strains in the Satellites 


It is little more than a year since 
President Tito of Yugoslavia and 
Party Secretary Khrushchev of the 
Soviet Union issued a pronouncement 
that “difference in social systems and 
in forms of socialist development are 
solely the concern of the individual 
countries.” This was paraphrased as 
recognition that there are “different 
Yoads to socialism”—which to Com- 
munists means communism. 

That acknowledgment, once made 
as to Yugoslavia, was bound to have 
repercussions on the relations be- 
tweensMoscow and other capitals be- 
sides Belgrade, particularly in the 
Soviet satellite orbit. 

Now Mr. Khrushchev again has 
gone to Yugoslavia on a quickly 
arranged “private visit” to Marshal 
Tito, with elaborate official trappings 
and an evidently intensive but secret 
agenda. There is some reason to be- 
lieve it has to do with an effort at 
tightening the reins which were 
leosened by the communiqué of 
June 2, 1955. 

Goaded by necessities in the Soviet 
Union, the Khrushchev collective 
dictatorship had to proceed with the 
deglorification of former Premier 
Stalin; but ever since then it has 
been engaged in what Harrison E. 
Salisbury, a former Moscow corre- 
spondent, describes as taking two 
steps forward and one step backward 
in permitting a minute but percep- 
tible “democratization” of govern- 
ments in the satellite countries. 

The nation in which this loosening 
of controls has been allowed to go 
furthest is Poland. The situation 
there and in East Germany, Czecho- 
slovakia, and Hungary, so far as-it 
can be appraised through the Iron 
Curtain, has been reviewed in this 


newspaper in a series of articles, just 
concluded, by Paul Wohl. 


The resignations of Party Secre- | 
tary Matyas Rakosi in Hungary and 


of Deputy Premiers Jakob Berman in 
Poland and Dumitru Petrescu in 
Romania are manifestations of the 
de-Stalinization trend, as are the re- 
habilitation of former Party Secre- 
tary Wladyslaw Gomulka in Poland 
and more recently former Vice- 
Premier Trajcho Kostov in Bulgaria. 

Yet there is some speculation that 
President Tito is displeased with 
efforts of Moscow to defend former 
Yugoslav Stalinists who have come 
back (or been sent back) to take 
their punishment at his _ hands. 
Whether this or something else is 
the real subject of the intent talks 
at Brioni, the Moscow leadership has 
a difficult task on its hands in trying 
to maintain at least the appearance 
of greater latitude for its puppet 
governments without letting them 
get actually out of hand. 

The West should not entertain any 
too sanguine expectations on this 
score, because the Soviet Communist 
hierarchy, with..the backing of. the 


Red Army, undoubtedly has the ca- | 


pacity to suppress any revolts, like 
the East German riots of 1953 or 
those in Poznan this year, which 
would represent a serious threat to 
its authority. 

But every instance in which force 
has to be invoked constitutes a black 
mark on the record of Soviet colo- 
nialism and an evidence of the pain- 
ful conditions under its rule. For that 
reason the masters in Moscow must 
continue to try to let go without let- 
ting go, and the peoples of the satel- 
lite countries will profit from their 
every embarrassment. 


Dollars for 


Democracy isn’t just a matter of 
votes or of getting out the vote. It’s 
a matter of dollars too—and getting 
out the dollars necessary to get out 
the vote. A rough estimate indicates 
that the “going rate” of this expense 
in the United States this year will be 
about $2 a vote. 

We are not talking about buying 
votes in the sense of bribery. We are 
talking about what it will cost to per- 
suade 60 per cent of the eligible 
voters to use their franchise in local 
and national elections. But without 
direct bribery the buying of influ- 
ence may be involved. For if a politi- 
cal party must have money to get 
out its votes and must depend for 
such funds chiefly on large givers, its 
ears are likely to be especially tuned 
to the views of those givers. 

In another column on this page 
appears a summary of nonpartisan 
studies which show how this system 
operates in both parties. The best 


Democracy 


answer of the citizen who decries 
this situation is not denunciation of 
the big givers—although more pub- 
licity on such gifts would help. The 
best answer is to arouse potential 
little givers to furnish the bulk of 
campaign funds and so end the de- 
pendence of the parties on the big 
givers. 

This is a favorite project of re- 
formers, The trouble is that it is 
costly in time and money to collect 
campaign funds in small bits. But 
the Gallup Poll recently reported 
that 17,000,000 American families 
would give $5 each to party cam- 
paign chests. This $85,000,000 might 
be more readily collected than has 
been thought. Much might be offered 
voluntarily if it were better under- 


stood that every dollar so provided 


cuts down the power of the influ- 
ence buyers and renders government 
more responsive to the individual 
citizen’s vote—more truly demo- 
cratic. 


Almost Free Wheeling 


The way a car depreciates in value 
almost as soon as you buy it, it’s a 
wonder there are even as many of 
them on the road as there are. 

Take the Hawkins’ family auto— 
all shiny and just the same shape as 
the day it was bought. Mr. Hawkins 
paid nearly $1,500 for it, but the 
other day he-sold it for a mere $150. 
Even so, he did better than some car 
owners we know who have sold cars 
costing that much for as little as 
$25, used. . 

But $150 isn’t much; it hardly re- 
imburses one for the sentimental 
wrench involved. To be sure, it 
wasn’t this year’s model, or even last 
year’s. But for economy with gaso- 
line it could outdo the most up-to- 
date streamliner on the road. And 


repairs? Well, it isn’t likely to need 
any more in the next 40 years than 
it has in the last. 

The Long Island Automotive Mu- 
seum got a bargain when it bought 
Mr. Hawkins’ Milburn Light Elec- 
tric, that is all we can say. And not 
counting the memories. What a cut- 
up a light electric could be on Main 
Street between 1910 and 1920! Catch- 
ing everybody’s eye. And scaring the 
horses—for a snappy job like that 
was rare then; not like now when a 
horse would be more likely to scare 
a car. | 

Well, we hope when the Hawkins’ 
brougham drives up to the museum 
there will be a band playing—maybe 
some tune like “In My Merry Mil- 


burn Light Electric.” 


Washington Is 


Replying to a telegram from the 


“NAACP” charging a “scurrilous~at-~ 


tack” on Washington Negroes and 
desegregation, President Eisenhower 
has disassociated the administration 
from the current congressional in- 
quiry into the District of Columbia 
school situation. 
Tt may be true that the members 

of the House subcommittee now 
holding hearings are all opponents of 
desegregation. And witnesses thus 
far have given a very dark side of 
the story. But it is true, also, that 

- Washington needs to be understood 

as a special case. 

~ Washington is not just a border 
_ city. Its population make-up is what 
it is largely because it is the seat of 
national governsnant and ng: site og 


@ t bu pe the time it i deepest ts 


a Special Case 
nearer te to 46. It is even higher now. 


worldinas of integration within the 
federal bureaus, racial friction in the 
community outside has long been a 
problem. 

The administration felt, quite un- 
derstandably, that the nation’s capi- 
tal could hardly lag in implementing 


Every Small Contribution Is a ‘Vote’ Against Him 


CAMPAIGN | 
HEADQUARTERS fom. 


Britain’s Pittsburgh 


By Mary Cowen 


SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

“You’re going to Sheffield? Whatever 
for? Not much in Sheffield. Mind you, 
I’ve not been there, but an industrial 
town—you know.” 

It happened that the British Association 
for the Advancement of Science had 
picked Sheffield for its annual meeting 
this year, in spite of misgivings holiday- 
minded Englishmen might have, and be- 
cause it was the centenary anniversary 
of Bessemer’s announcement of his 
revolutionary steelmaking process—Shef- 
field being the leading steel center of 
Britain. 

One can certainly see why Sheffield 
would be a good place for the BAAS to 
meet. Get yourself up on top of one of 
the many hills of the town and look into 
the east end, or industrial valley, of 
Sheffield, and you know what its business 
is. You are standing in a lovely park, but 
you are looking into a sea of rolling mills, 
chimneys, railroad tracks, and billows of 
smog-generating smoke, 

It is a solid panorama reminiscent of 
Pittsburgh. It didn’t all begin with Besse- 
mer, but he gave steel its big shove out 
of the cutlery stage into big business. 

In Sheffield one can feel the pulse 
of present-day Britain. Here are some 
of the contemporary problems facing an 
industrial city: housing, schools, busi- 
ness-government-labor relations, the 
squeeze of high prices and taxes, and 
prosperity all jumbled together. 

Here, however, a worker’s living is a 
cut above that in the usual industrial 
center. Sheffield has managed to move 
its laboring force:odut of the slum areas 
around the mills up onto the hillsides 
above them. Now a man can potter in 
his garden in the evening and his chil- 
dren can play on the moors instead of 
in the city streets. What is more, Shef- 
field citizens can commute between 
home and work or play in a matter of 
minutes~ via a remarkable municipal 
transport system. 

New “estates,” the British equivalent 
of our development housing, cover the 
surrounding hilltops, engulfing what used 
to be independent villages. TV antennas 
ornament the rooftops; new schools and 
playing grounds punctuate the landscape; 
gardens flourish in even the tiniest yards, 
not to mention “allotment gardens” begun 
during the war and still cultivated in 
the open spaces. There is far more of the 
natural beauty of the place to enjoy than 
one would find within the same radius 
(three miles) in an American steel 
center. | 

On the other hand, it is difficult to 
tell the difference between the old and 
new housing except for the location and 
the exterior color of the brick—the one 
thick with soot, the other fresh and clean. 
The new houses, some of them, have only 
two bedrooms, and stimulate specula- 
tion about the second removal of the 


* |-tenants within a few years as families 


grow, 
Then there is the rising cost of liv- 


ing. The 20 per cent rise in prices the 


The British Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science is making a strong 
plea at this year’s meeting for better 
communications between the - natural 


scientists and the lay public, with the 
hope of drawing more young people into 
the fold. But one is strongly tempted to 
wonder what practical considerations will 
draw these young people elsewhere. 
Overseas the same amount of daily effort 
will pay off in substantially better living, 
they hear. 

As in America, the salary is not the 
sole consideration of a young man seek- 
ing a job these days, but future improve- 
ment of a living standard is a considera- 
tion. The amount of working cash left 
after very heavy taxation is another. 
Education and betterment of the lot of 
a man’s children loom large among 
responsibilities. These are all practical 
matters that cannot be ignored. 

Balanced against this, to some degree, 
is the somewhat altruistic satisfaction of 
doing one’s bit to improve the situation 
of the whole cbuntry by participating in 
its contest for international survival— 
this depending more than one. might 
think upon the ability of natural sci- 
entists to. keep their technology going. 

And yet, people of all types in Sheffield 
take pride in their city’s achievements. 
The Master Cutler, -for instance, occupies 
a position equal in rank to that of the 
Lord Mayor, and represents the trade 
of Sheffield as the Lord Mayor repre- 
sents the town. Cutlers’ Hall plays an 
important part in the life of the town, as 
does the Company of Cutlers.. which 


occupies it. The Company of Cutlers is - 


the only provincial body outside London 
authorized to issue trade-marks for 
metal manufactures. 

In fact, cutlery has had an important 
role in Sheffield since the town began, 
and is still a main industry to be proud 
of, along with other steel works. And 
all of Sheffield is out to prove it with 
every steelmaker and cutler putting his 
best products forward for the Bessemer 
centennial and the BAAS. Financial 
squeeze or no, they have set up an im- 
pressive array of tours and industrial 
displays, all designed to show their guests 
“same proper Sheffield metal.” 


ocrats. But 


wih 


‘Money and Politics’ 


An Intimate M essage from Washington 


Registered ia U. 6. Patent Office 


By Richard L. Strout 


Some $147 million were spent: in local 
and national campaigns for nomination 
and election in 1952. The cost in 1956 it 
is estimated will be around $156 million. 


Campaign funds of this size come, in the 


nature of things, very largely from those 
able to give. 

“The net consequence,” says a dispas- 
sionate study just completed at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina by a group 
headed by Prof. Alexander Heard (pub- 
lished in a New Public Affairs pamphlet) 
“is vastly larger representation of vested 
financial interests than contemplated by 
equalitarian democratic theory.” 

Or in different language, money talks 
in an election—and keeps on talking after 
the election is over. What big contribu- 
tors get is not as tangible as the public 
often supposes, says the study; mostly 
what they “buy” is “access.” One lobby- 
ist called it “entree” and another called it 
a “basis for talking.” The main result of 
“access” is to “speed things up.” 

The current study began with an alpha- 
betical file of all known contributions of 
$500 or over, followed by an analysis of 
the donors by occupational groups. Most 
of the money in a presidential campaign 
year comes in amounts of $500 or over, 
it is found, 


Some results’ are Interesting. “Of 27" 


noncareer appointees as Chiefs of United 
States Diplomatic Missions on July 1, 
1952, at least 13 were filled by contribu- 
tors of $500 or more—and all were Dem- 
on Oct. 1, 1953, out of 30 
others at least 12 had contributed a sim- 
ilar sum—but now all but one were Re- 
publicans. 

The value of “access” is increasingly 
recognized by lobbyists. Campaign con- 
tributions are now standard equipment. 
The analysts found no individual dona- 
tions by trustees or directors of farm, 
veteran, or labor lobby outfits, but listed 
many from the board members of busi- 
ness associations. An example: In 1952 
the roster of officials of the American 
Petroleum Institute showed many indi- 
vidual contributors, the report states, 


when “the disposition of offshore oil rights 


was a principal issue in the campaign.” 
Contributions of lobbyists know no 
party lines. Lobbyists are more interested 
in policies than in parties. Some contrib- 
ute -to both parties. Politically connected 


lawyers, especially, use contributions. to 
keep in touch with the party in power, 
One individual was found who had alter- 
nated four times between the two na- 
tional committees in a space of seven 
years. 

Another big factor, says the report, is 
“corporate political participation through 
the contributions of officers and directors.” 
An instance: “The four American firms 
most closely involved in the controversy 
over an import levy on Swiss watches all 
had officials who made contributions.” 

One odd fact is that following each 
presidential election “the winning party 
receives an enormous spurt of large cone 
tributions, and the losing party gets vir- 
tually none.” These donors wait to see 
who wins. After the 1952 victory the Re- 
publican committees got 257 donations of 
$500 or more (compared to 1,152 before); 
the Democrats only 35 (compared to 970 
before). After the 1948 surprise Truman 
victory, the winning Democrats got 272 
such gifts (as against 426 before); the 
GOP only 29 as against 1,115 before. The 
“access-buyers” quickly signed up. 

Republicans generally get more money 
than the Democrats, the report says, 
though the difference is less than free 
quently supposed. Expenditures by pare 
tisan committees in 1952, including labor, 


showed the’ Repubticans”’ spending’ $5:50""" 


for every $4.50 for the Democrats. The 
ratio varied widely. Tentative figures ine 
dicated a ratio of 61 to 39 in Connecticut, 
and 69 to 31 in Pennsylvania. 

The result of this financing system is 
the growth within either party of what is 
described as “a crucially important group 
of people”— solicitors who can be de- 
pended to brihg in large collections in 
time of need. 

This group, the investigators concluded, 
is often more important than the formal 
officials of the party. They command ace 
cess “in the grand fashion.” 

One man “with White House experie 
ence” is quoted as declaring: “The chare 
acter of an administration is set by the 
network of people who raise the party’s 
funds. Locate the chief fund-raisers and 
you locate political power.” 

What a curious contrast this discloses 
between certain philosophical assumptions 
held by most voters about their parties 
and the inherent financial realities of the 
American electoral system. 


Desegregation From Two Standpoints 


The Cost of Discrimination 
To Tue CurisTIAN Scrence Monitor: 

Last_ spring one of your editorials on 
desegregation expressed a thought that I 
have not been able to forget and which, 
by expansion, strikes me as. containing 
one of the seeds to a solution of our na- 
tional problem of minority group rela- 
tions. 

Your editorial noted the sacrifices that 
southern whites would have to make in 
desegregation for the near future. Cer- 
tainly sacrifices are required, but all of 
us are making sacrifices as long as dis- 
crimination operates in any part of our 
country. Constant publicity about such 
sacrifices and losses must be one of the 
constructive approaches to changing at- 
titudes so that the letter of the law will 
someday be supported in spirit, 

The first sacrifice is that made by those 
discriminated against. Think of the 
anguish and frustration in the hearts of 
those who learn by bitter experience that 
neither they nor their children have the 
same rights and opportunities as their 
fellow Americans. It is indeed surprising 
that such frustration does not produce 
even more social aberration and hence 
cost to our society than it does. 

The second sacrifice is the cost to our 
country in not educating: properly and 
giving vocational opportunities to those 
who do have the ability and interest. All 
parts of our society desperately need more 
and better educated technicians, planners, 
administrators, teachers, etc., as our needs 
and developments grow in complexity. If 
discrimination in schools and jobs keeps 
only 250,000 young people per year from 
making their potential contribution, our 


‘whole nation suffers from the stillborn 


Bipartisan Collaboration 


Mirror of World Opinion 


The. second year of budget balance 


under the Eisenhower administration is. 


shaping up into a prime campaign issue. 
The Republicans will point to it with the 
pride of accomplishment. The Democrats 
will attempt to belittle it and attribute it 
to a neglect of the public welfare and the 
national defense. 

But the fact remains that, weaheaie 
the circumstances, the budget is in bal- 


__-ahee and a modest surplus has been cre~_ 
“ated, It represents the reversal of a trend 


toward deficit financing which had 
brought great disquietude to conservative 
observers and had raised the national 
debt to a staggering $275 billion. 

In part the Eisenhower achievement is 
due to a high state of business tn 
which has kept employment and earning 
high and the taxes rolling in. But it is 


also true, as Treasury Secretary Hum- 


Take, for example, the natural scientist 

or engineer, whose work is so vital to 
Siddha Gidkisdelan. 80 Sk te kei eneseen success- 
ful, he may have a small house and car. 
But he will have to dig and 


phrey has pointed out, that even with 
higher tax receipts from a prosperous 
economy the favorable budget position 
would not have been possible without the 
substantial reduction in governmental ex- 


spend more than it 


education of young children. not a fair 
break for farmers, not the growing men- 
ace of communism in the world, not 
America’s waning influence, but a bal- 
anced budget.” ; 

It is possible to wish that keeping to 
a sound fiscal program were not so much 
a matter of contention between the two 
parties, for it is a basic economic fact that 
no government can forever manage to 


without ruining and bankrupting its peo- 
ple. When the budget should be brought 
into balance may be debatable, but 
whether it should be balanced is not. The 
temptation to operate at a deficit, by 
increasing the national debt and the in- 
terest charge on it, to provide services a 
lot of the population may want is un- 
questionably strong, but it is dangerous. 

Mr. Stevenson is not saying that he 
prefers deficit financing as a way of gov- 
ernmental life; but neither is he suggest- 


BgEts 
if 


ves in révenue 


energy and genius. Not every minority 
group child is, of course, a potential Car- 
ver, Anderson, Einstein, or Ford, but at 
least some of those not getting a_ fair 
chance represent precious, God-given tale 
ent that will never flower. 

For our national welfare this is the 
real meaning of the effort to get federal 
aid for the schools. 

The third sacrifice is the price we are 
paying in our own conscience for not be- 
ing willing to live up to an ideal that we 
profess to ourselves and to others. We 
compromise our political and religious 
heritage with devious explanations and 
excuses, but actually we fool no one. Our 
weakness — part of the “American dileme- 
ma’”’—mocks our efforts to achieve the 
fullest inner growth as individuals. 

We are suffering other losses: regional 
economic stagnation, local tensions, rela- 
tions abroad, and the like, but these are 
not as basic to me as the first three noted 
above. I believe that the school integra- 
tion issue has indeed brought hardship to 
individuals in the South, and I fear thgt 
more will come. But it should also awaken 
ali of us to the ugly facts of discriminae 
tion throughout our country. By learning 
of the losses that all of us, everywhere, 
are suffering we will come the sooner to 
throw off our ugly burden of weakness 
and unfairness. THEODORE HERMAN 

Hamilton, N.Y. 


Problems Know No Race ° 
To Tue CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: 

Has the right to progress been denied 
the Negro race? What do they want? 
Equal opportunities with the whites? In 
the Pentagon I saw Negro supervisors in 
some of the offices with whites working 
under their supervision. | 

Better wages in the South? I worked in 
a dairy store in the South—Florida. True 
the Negro dishwasher received only $1.18 
an hour, but I received only 22 cents am 
hour and had to launder my own unie 
forms and pay half-price for everything 
I ate. 

Better housing? Many times I drove 
through the Negro residential section of 
St. Petersburg; there were well-kept 
homes and badly-kept homes, the same ag 
in many white districts. Some had shrub- 
bery and flowers, painted houses; some 
showed lack of ambition, the same as ip 
many white districts. 7 

_Some very brilliant. Negro. people ew 
come out of segregated schools to win the 
respect and admiration of the white race, 

I am white but I have not had the edue 


Not all white people are well housed, 
Not all white people are well educated; — 
not all White people’s incomes are in the 
top bracket but are in the low-income 


ween any fe aeeecies hg et 


* jae ae