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~'THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 


— | 


BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


** ATLANTIC EDITION 


seroup Mn FIVE CENTS 


Lyman W. Fisher, Staff Photographer 


Going, Going 


One final glint of gold, which once rose only to | 
the glare of footlights, now twinkles faintly in the 
light of day as Boston's beloved Opera House bows 
to the swinging ball of demolition, 


. « » Boston’s Once Glorious ‘Lyric Temple’ Yields Ignominiously to Wrecker’s Hammer 


Sold suddenly 


last September to a construction company 


by the —— 


Shubert interests, the hall will be superseded by-a 
campus. building of Northeastern 
heartless rubble of torn ticket stubs, crushed marble. 
and trampled crimson carpet gives opera levers a 
for 


twinge. Boxes and balconies, 


ee ee eee 


Bay State W ithholding Levy? 


Tax Plan Hinged to Senate 


By Edgar M. Mills 


New England Political Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


The withholding tax contro- 
versy is far from settled. 

Although the general feeling 
on’ Beacon Hill indicates passage 
this year, it will be attained 
only if Governor Furcolo exerts 
fullest gubernatorial pressure in 
the Senate. 

The Republican-controlled up- 
per branch is the key. A. with- 
hoiding system for coilection of 
the state personal income tax 
lost in the Senate last year by 
three votes after easy House 
passage. Actually the true mar- 
gin was only one vote because 
Senator John E. Powers (D) of 
Boston, Senate minority leader, 
had two more votes in his 
pocket to use, if he could have 
swung the third. 

With the Governor 
to put behind the 


now ready 
w withholding — 


tax the full steam of the gov- 
ernor’s office, unlike his luke- 
warm . approach last year, the 
Senate may be swung into line 
The opposition is strongly vocal. 
however, although budget. fac- 
tors may finally produce the 
votes needed. 

Much depends on the budget 
itself. If the House Committee 


Beacon Hill Views 


on Ways and Means can slash 
it heavily to eliminate the need 
for new revenue in the next fis- 
cal year, or reduce the revenue 
need substantialivy, the with- 
holding tax. could be side- 
tracked. 

If the budget is not cut heav- 
ilv and new revenue is required 


Manned Satellite 
Seen Realistic Goal 


By Robert C. Cowen 


Natural Science Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


New York 

How close is-the United States 
to manned space flight? 

No one at the meeting here 
of the American Astronautical! 
Association is ready to give a 
timetable for this achievement. 
But the consensus is that enough 
already is known to start a fast- 
paced manned satellite project 
today. 

Remaining problems would 
in all likelihood be solved in 
timely” fashion as the project 
moved toward the goal of 
launching a recoverable manned 
“space ship” a few years hence. 

This estimate sums up the 
status of American space flight 
re-earch today. 

Rocket motors and launching 
techniques, equipment for keep- 
ing a man alive in space for at 
least a few hours and solutions 
to the complicated problems of 
. bringing the vehicle safely back 
have reached a stage where a 
manned satellite project could 
now be organized and begun. 
More research is needed. But 
this could be done while the 
project is under way 

At a press--conference, Dr. 
Fred Riddell of Avco Research 
Laboratories remarked that such 
a project would be the next big 
step forward in space flight 
technology. 


The ‘Great Adventure’ 


Launching of more elaborate 
unmanned satellites and of un- 
manned moon rockets wil] be 
useful auxiliary projects. But 
these are essentially follow-ups 
of the earlier sputniks. They are 
not the direct line of advance 
to the great adventure that wil! 
carry men to the moon and 
eventually to the planets 

Significant progress in this di- 
rection is waiting on the suc- 
cesstul reentry into the €arth’s 
atmosphere of a manned satel- 
lite. 

This must be a vehicle‘ that 
wont be destroyed by at- 
mospheric friction and that can 
be landed within a reasonably 
sized target area, say within a 
few hundred miles of a chosen 
spot. 

Asked when this could be ac- 
complished, Dr. Riddell refused 
to speculate on a timetable. But 
he said that “most of the basic 
information for manned reentry 
is available. A start could be 
mace on the project right now.” 

Dr. Riddell outlined four 
areas where more information is 
necded. These are the effects of 
a space environment on suitably 
protected humans: effects of 
meteors on space ships: effects 
of weightlessness, and the ex- 


act composition and density of 
the very high atmosphere. 

The Soviet sputniks are fur- 
nishing us with new data on 
meteors and the upper air. As 
more unmanned satellites are 
launched, Dr. Riddell said that 
the information needed in these 
two areas should be quickly 
gathered. He expects other 
needed data wil!) obtained. 

How would a manned satellite 
be recovered? One way might 
be through use of wings or some 
other sort of lifting surface. 
Once the ship had slowed down 
enough to enter the denser air, 
these would enable it to operate 
like a glider. 


Different Principles 
A second and quite different, 


would be to use the drag | | : 
| tax bill arrives annually. 


way 


of the air the main 


itself as 


controlling. force on the satellite. | 
In this system, drag or friction | 
forces, perhaps controlled some- | 


what by the pilot, would be the 


in factor determining where | 
— & | number of such returns totaled 


the ship would land. 


The essential difference be- | 1956. Mr. 


tween the two systems is the 
difference between using aero- 
dynamic forces like those that 
provide lift for ordinary air- 
planes and sole reliance on the 
retarding effects of the air. 

A parachute is a simple ex- 
ample of a drag type system. 
However, 
of controlled reentry of a sat@- 
lite cannot be directly compared 
to the gentle fall of a body 
supported by a parachute. 

But regardless of what type of 
system is used, the essential fac- 
tor in control will be to start re- 
entry at the right point along 
the satellite’s flight path. A 
badly timed reentry could mean 
an unintentional landing at the 
North Pole. 

As mentioned préviously, these 
and other needed data are being 
gathered at an increasing rate. 
[It should be pointed out, how- 
ever, that the progress in space 
research reported here is not a 
purposeful coordinated program. 

The know-how needed to or- 
ganize a manned satellite proj- 


ect is currently scattered around | 


the country in a variety of lab- 


oratories and projects supported | 


by different government agen- 
cies or industrial companies. 

It would take a top-level gov- 
ernment decision to organize 
these resources into a coherent 
program. But if that decision 
should, be taken and any ham- 
pering, interagency rivalries 
overcome, the necessary experts 
are eager and waiting. 


One of a series. 


+ Corporations and 


| make it possible to balance 
| State 


the complex problem | 


MacDonald Raps Plan 


| show 


aiance it 
probabls 
ion veal 


in large amounts to b 
the withholding 
will be voted as an elect 
stopgap by legislators preferring 
that approach to one invoiving 
new taxes 

The withholding ti: 
provide 17 million doliai 
windfall revenue for the 
budget because of overlapping 
payments between Jan. 1, 1959. 
and April 15, 1959, and a sub- 
stantially higher windfall for cit- 
ies and towns in connection 
with their share of income tax 
receipts. 

The Jan. 30 public hearing be- 
fore the Legislative Commit- 
tee on Taxation on the with- 
holding plan somewhat weak- 
ened the proponents’ drive. Op- 
ponents were quick to seize on 
the admission by Joseph P 
Healey, State Commissioner o 
Taxation, that 
the increased revenue expected 
above the windfall would -be 
only about 1 to 2 million dol- 
lars a year, with a good part of 
that to be overset by depart- 
ment collection costs and pro- 
posed rebates to employers to 
cover expenses involved. 

Mr. ‘Healey, however, insisted 
that regardless of the size of the 
revenue increase: the withhold- 
ing system is highly important 
as a means of assuring each tax- 
payer that his next-door neigh- 
bor is paying his state income 
taxes due. 


> 4 
La A 


7x 


Advantages Cited 


tne 
with- 


But primarily, as of now. 
chief state advantage 
system 
windfall 


of a 


holding to be 


that its 


appears 
feature would 
the 
next -fiscal 
amount ol 


budget in the 
year without a major 
new taxation. 

The other major advantags 
would be to the taxpayer who 
now finds it difficult to produce 
the lump sum needed April 15 to 
pay his income tax in full, By 
having weekly deductions taken 
from his envelope, the taxpayer 
would be current with his tax 
liabilities, generally, when the 


To the state another chief 
advantage would be elimination 
of the growing problem caused 


for the amount due. In 1957 the 
103,000 compared with .64,000 in 
Healey reported the 
billing costs as substantial. 

On the other hand, business 
and industry, as well the 
Massachusetts Federation of 
Taxpayers Associations are stil] 
lined up against the plan as 
financially unprodu@ive and 
costly to industry. 


as 


William J. Malloy, 
counsel for the Greater 
Chamber of Commerce, told the 
committee that until the 
department exhausts all! the 
tentials its 
aimed at better 
and stricter enforcement, 
tion of the withholding 
sion would be a mistake.” 

Jarvis Hunt, general counsel! 
of the Associated Industries of 
Massachusetts, said his organiza- 


legislative 
Boston 


tax 
po- 
in current program 
administration 
“adop- 
provi- 


| tion remains opposed to the plan 


until figures are produced to 


the yield 


try are convinced that they 
would be fully compensated for 
their expenses. 

The biggest opposition Sat 


was laid down by Norman Mac- : 


Donald, executive director of the 
Massachusetts Federation of 
Taxpayers Associations. While 
Mr. Healey insisted the with- 
holding system. would ensnare 
the floating worker who works 
for a time in Massachusetts and 
then leaves the state without fil- 
ing or paying an income-tax, Mr. 
MacDonald ‘sharply disagreed. 


University... A 


sed’ | here 
by thousands of taxpayers filing | 
returns and waiting to be billed | 


would warrant | 
| the cost and business and indus- 


48 vears | pany 


| filled with the voices of grand opera's greats. 
look straight out upon a living street scene—a _ Bos- 
ton which as yet has made no provision for replac- 
ing its storied opera house. The Metropolitan Com- 
will be housed in a movie theater this spring. 


now 


Strauss Backs Atom Bill 


By the Associated Press 


Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Lewis L. 
President Eisenhower has no 
stockpiles of nuclear weapons 


atomic bars. 


Washington 

Strauss says 
intention of swelling foreign 
by lowering United States 


A Senate-House atomic energy subcommittee has made avail- 
able portions of Mr. Strauss’ testimony at secret meetings. In 


that testimony 


Mr. Strauss supported administration proposals 


for freer exchange of weapons information and for providing 


allies with atomic raw 


weapons. 


materials and nonnuclear portions of 


While the administration is asking removal of present legal 
bans on giving other nations nuclear materials for weapons pro- 


duction, Mr. Strauss said, 


“It is not intended under this au- 


thority-te promote the entry of additional nations into the ficid 
of nuclear weapons production, nor to promote the build-up of 
larger atomic stockpiles in the hands of other nations.” 

He said when an ally is building up to a previously set goal, 
and when it is stretching its resources to produce nuclear mate- 


rials, 


“the United States might foreclose such waste effort by 


furnishing materials under suitable arrangements.” 


less 1930's. 


Washington is taking a long, 


President Eisenhowe! 
,campaign on 

Harlow H. ¢ 
‘should begin 
‘the economy. 
| Washington is weighing 
'watches the business indices 


Curtice., 


cons idet ing an 


The economic situation will be a big congressional! 
' 2 = > . - 
improve promptly,—it 


| Mr. Eisenhower's 
to Republicans, 


“The economy,” 


’ 
; 
' 
; 
' 


“five years of prosperity” 
president of Genera! 


ine 


the President said, 


By Richard L. Strout 


Motors. 
across-the-board tax cut 


Eisenhower-Curtice 


rs felt here. 
encouraging words 
his State of the Union Message, budget message, and economic report. 
‘is catching its breath for a new advance after the 


are similar to those 


British Trade Lags 
Ships Creak in Port 


By John Allan May 
Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


London 
If you go down any of the 
great estuaries of Britain these 


| days—the Clyde, London River, 
the Severn, Falmouth—you will 


filled with 
Their lines 
fade even- 
in the rain 


moorings 
idle ships. 
stretch away and 
tuallvy_as shadows 
and mist 

Right now there are more 
tramp ships and tankers laid up 
in the ports of this island of 
ships than ever since the job- 


see the 
silent, 


Moorings, indeed, are so hard 
to get for unemployed ships 
that the government has had to 
step in and make available 
some Ministry of ‘Transport 
moorings. The Admiralty may 
be asked to open up Navy 
berths to commercial ship own- 


ers. 


Two Factors Blamed 


Falling treight 
of trade are blamed 
state of affairs, which 
Britons fo underline 
important lesson 

That the first need for 
Western world is prosperity. 

Here is the way the situation 
appears in Britain: 

The West cannot 
less than prosperity. 


and lack 
for this 
seems. to 
one very 


rates 


the 


settle for 
Here is a 


State of the Nations 


Summit. Arms. and 


Kconomics 


By JOSEPH C. 


The total number of per- 
sons who planned, put to- 
gether, and for some two years 
have been operating ZETA— 
Britain's device for -using 
hydrogen as the fuel of the 
future—is .50 

ZETA’s successor, which 
should be the second from 
last step to actual production 
of power from sea water, 
estimated at less than 30 mil- 
lion dollars. The actual power- 


is 


‘producing installation at the 


end of the road may cost much 
more, but still be in small fig- 
ures in terms of the energy 
which should be obtained. 


ee See 


Figures such as these give 
some idea of what the econo- 
mies. of modern countries will 
probably be built around in 
a future which may not be so 
very far away, ZETA’s suc- 
cessors should produce elec- 
tric energy from the almost 
limitless supplies of natural 
water for very much less than 
the present cost of getting 
power from coal or oil 

Of course, there will still 
be uses for coal and oil, But 
is a new factor which 
must be fitted into the theories 
about economics, It is one of 
many emerging new factors 
which make it increasingly 
difficult to forecast the future 
in terms of the experience of 
the past. 

Another one is the economic 
effect of arms for defense or 
war. Wars down through the 
Korean conflict were fought 
largely with infantry wearing 
uniforms and using weapons 
which consumed vast quan- 
tities of raw materials, pro- 
vided employment for mil- 
lons, and developed new in- 
dustries in the process, 

Britains industrial revolu- 
tion of the 19th century was 
spurred by the war eflort of 
the Napoleonic period. The 
modern United States indus- 
trial complex was also given 
strong impetus during the 
Civil War and came into its 


present scope and stature out 


of World Wars I and II. Many 
an economist attributes the 
long duration of’ the post- 


‘World War II economic boom 


throughout the Western world 
to the expansion of industry 


‘during the Kdévrean war. 


There. are optimists who 
think that the summit confer- 
ence now almost certain to 
take place this year will make 
some headway in the-area of 
arms control and limitation, 
Perhaps they are right, One 
can always hope. But whether 


‘or not the prospective sum- 


mit conference of 1958 brings 


January 31, 1958 


some measure of disarmament, 
we can be sure that progress 
or no progress will make rela- 
tively little difference to the 
economies of Western coun- 
tries, 

Defense in the Atomic Age 
increasingly means fewer men 
wearing uniforms and han- 
dling rifles, machine guns, 
and conventional artillery, On 
the contrary, it means rela- 
tively few men, as at the 
atomic energy research center 


‘You—Whiz, Click— 
May Go Home? 


at Harwell, England, making — 


highly complex and highly | 
destructive weapons 
use relatively little steel or 


the other classic ingredients | 


of weapons. 

50 we must downgrade 
drastically the importance of 
defense projects, whether 
large or small, to the state of 
an economy. In times past, a 
big defense budget could be 
an antidote to softness in the 
economy. We are moving into 
an era in which this factor de- 
clines sharply. 

We have been living eve: 
since World War II in an eco- 
nomic environment dominated 
by the concept of full em- 
ployment. We have had infla- 
tion with full employment 
Whether the two are sep- 
arable is a matter much de- 
bated by economists. Perhaps 
they can be separated, but no 
country has yet been able to 
prove it by an experience 
record, 

The British Goyernment, 
which pioneered for the West 
in attempted full employment, 
now is trying very hard to 
separate it from inflation. It’s 
a fascinating experiment. One 
hopes it can work. But along 
with the check to inflation has 
come a leveling off in eco- 
nomic growth, And-~ econo- 
mists are not sure whether 
the two trends are related or 
only coincidental. 

Are the economies of the 


HARSCH, Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


whole Western world leveling 
off because production ca- 
pacity has outstripped con- 
suming capacity or because 
governments have become 
cautious and have. practiced 
disinflationary devices? There 
is wide disagreement. 


ee oe 


Call it a pause for regroup- 
ing, or a healthy adjustment 
or a breathing spell, or what 
vou will. The blush is off the 
boom and the boom probably 
will not be revived by de- 
fense programs even if this 


year’s summit conference 
produces no disarmament. 

We shall find out what hap- 
pens. to..Western economies 
under -such conditions, and 
there are no precedents to fit 
these precise conditions 

This reporter—no econo- 
mist he—will merely quote a 
leading expert as saying that 
the best thing that could hap- 
pen would be a 10 per cent 
decline lasting about 18 
months during which time the 
rising needs or rising popula- 
tions would take up the slack 
in demand for what modern 
Western industry can produce. 


dramatic illustration of the point 
that the West simply cannot 
overcome its problems with 
“hard tack and sputniks.” 

Economics beats space travel! 
continuing importance. And 

major economic problem 
that the West has yet to over- 
come that of combining a 
steady price level with expand- 
ing trade. Inflation is no answer. 
Slump is obviously no answer. 
But static trade, the mere main- 
tenance of standards of living, 
is no answer either. 


Production Holds Up 


While the cold ships ride high 
and gray at their moorings in 
the shallows, it is good to know, 
from figures issued by the Cen- 
tral Statistical Office, that Brit- 
ish industrial production is 
maintaining its highest ever 
level of activity. 

This high level has been 
maintained for three years. It 
has not been expanded. Appar- 
entiv there is the rub 

Britain, in fact,-is-finding-theat 
it could have a very high level 
of production and “distressed 
areas” at one and the same time. 
The car industry is set for new 
records, But ships are idle. 
Workers are being laid off in 
Lancashire. 

It could have very high wages 
and yet simultaneously face the 
possibility of unemployment. 

What Britain needs now—like 
any other industrial or trading 
nation—is customers. 

But it particularly needs 
more prosperous customers. 

These days one can't stay rich 
when others are poor; one’s 
wealth depends upon his neigh- 
bor becoming increasingly well 
off 

Thus three things in particu- 
lar are important-to the West: 

l. That the United — States 
enjoy prosperity. 

2. That Europe share it 

3. That the underdeveloped 
countries, too, now be cut in 
on it. 


in 
the 


is 


U.S. Role Stressed 


Clearly, the Western world 
needs an America that is in a 
buying mood. It wants to sell 
the United States its copper, its 
zinc, its rubber, its cocoa, its 
cars, airplanes, its fabrics, 
its fashions, its mountains, its 
beaches, its charm, everything. 

An austere America dedicated 
to plain living and to outer 
space would certainly ruin it. 

But eqrratiy the Western world 
needs now to see a beginning to 
the solution of the problem 
of underdeveloped countries. 
While industrial expansion 
red new _wWealth into one 
part of the West, it failed 
to share it adequately with 
farmlands and forestlands be- 
low. the equator. Now falling 
prices for food and raw n 
terials, reficcted here in falling 
freight rates as well as lower 
import prices, could actually 
threatén to impoverish the un- 
derdeveloped or nonindustrial 
lands. 


iis 


DOU 


a- 


statements 


election 


which | 


Snowfall Recor 


et 


In Burlington, Vt. 


The World's 


Day 


New England: January Total Tops 33 Inches 


A record for total snow in January was set in Burlington, Vt.. 
75-year-old record made in 


33 inches, beating a 


is still snowing. Burlington has had almost 


month as it did all last 
$34,133,200 contract for 
destrovers —believed to be 
was awarded to the 
information the 
Robert Hale (R) 


year. 


United 
of Maine 


The First Naval District has announced that Rea: 

A. Snackenberg, USN, commandant 
chief 
Group to the Netherlands in 


and a halt. will become 


Advisory 


construction 
in this class of 
Bath Lron 
States 


at 
and it 
this 


1954 ——— 
as much snow 


guided missile 
vessel so armed 

Maine, according to 
gave Representative 


of two 
Works of 
Navy 


Admiral John 
three years 
Assistant 


the last 
Military 


April. 


[o1 


oO} tne 


National: N.Y. Police Post Men at Schools 


The New York Police Department is posting-patrolmen at 41 
schools to cope with upswing in teen-age violence. 


Europe: Partial Home Rule for Algeria Voted 


The French national Assembly 


passed a modified bill giving 


Algeria partia] home rule. Algerian rebel leaders have rejected 


it in advance. 


Washington: President Flies to Georgia 


‘President Eisenhower flies to ‘Georgia today 


for “a little rest 


and some sun, in addition to what work there will be to do.” 
He will return to W ashington Feb. 2. 


Weather Predictions: C older Tonight (Page 2) 
Art, Music, Theater; Page 5. Radio, FM, TV: Page 10 


9,800,000 for 
_ prospect for 1958 is substantially 


Curtice Tax-Cut Plea 
Ignites Fiscal Debate 


Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Washington 


new look at the business situation. 
told the Republican National Committee 
this fall in spite of the current recession. 

told a Senate committee that- Congress 
“to stimulate business confidence” 


here that the GOP can 


in 


against each other as it 


issue this fall unless things 


of his Jan, 20 Chicago speech 


fast expansion of recent 
vears.”’ and he reiterated that 
the tide will turn in midsum- 
mer and denounced what he 
termed “prophets of gloom 
and doom.” 


Congress Jolted 

Mr. Curtice’s tax recommen- 
dation, coming’from the source 
it did, caused a deep stir here. 
It is bound to have protracted 
echoes. 


To ask Congress to cut taxes 
at this precise political-economic 
juncture_is..like dropping a 
match into a barrel of excelsior, 

Mr. Curtice speaks with the 
weight of the head of America’s 
biggest industrial corporation 
and from the citadel! of free en- 
terprise—the Detroit automobile 
industry. 

He said Congress should con- 
sider lowering taxes “this ses- 
sion” in order “to stimulate con- 
fidence” in the nation’s economy. 
This should be done, he said, be- 
cause “people today are some- 
what cautious” in buying. 

People have money to spend if 
they will spend it, Mr, Curtice 
said. “It isn’t the shortage of dis- 
posable income.” He cited the 
tax cut of 1954 and said that in 
spite of it the budget was bal- 
anced “with a surplus.” 


Confidence Reasserted 

Administrative economists 
have heretofore opposed anti- 
recessionary tax cuts .on the 
ground that the situation did 
not require them. 


“The forces of growth may 
be expected to reassert them- 
selves later in the year,” Mr. 
Eisenhower said. “because the 
American economy remains 
basically strong and the Amer- 
ican people remain basically 
confident.” 

Mr. Curtice did not contradict 
this, But he did propose a rem- 
edy which, in academic circles 
at least, would be offered only 
in a serious situation. 

Despite Mr. Curtice’s allusion 
to the balanced budget in 1954 
after a tax cut, the situation in 
1958 is not considered parallel. 


Burns Plan Outlined 


An across-the-board tax cut 
now, it is felt here, would al- 
most certainly result in a deficit. 
because the budget is already in 
precarious balance. 

Dr. Arthur E. Burns, former 
chief economic adviser of Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, put down a 
tax cut as a second line of de- 
fense against a business reces- 
$10Nn. 

In a new 
Without 
Savs, 

“The emphasis at the start of 
a recession should ordinarily be 
on the easing of credit condi- 
tions, later on tax reductions for 
both individuals and business. 
still later on rescheduling of 
federal expenditure—and—onlv 
as a last resort—on large pub- 
lic-works programs,” 

Dr.. Burns solemniv warns 
against temporrzing with a re- 
cession once public anxiety be- 
gins to spread. 

The administration has fu]- 
filled the first part of the Burns 
formula by moving out to com- 
bat the current business read- 
justment by relaxation of credit, 
but it has avoided tax reduc- 
tions. 

Defense orders are also being 
prepared, which might be listed 


book, 
Inflation,” 


“Prosperity 
Dr. Burns 


'as No. 3 of the Burns formula. 


But to propose tax reductions 
now would evidently be inter- 
preted as meaning a graver 
view of the business situation 
than any official connected with 
the administration is prepared 
to take. 


Big-Auto Sales Sag 

The administration cur- 
rently taking a drubbing from 
\spokesmen of managément, ag- 
riculture, and labor testifying 
before the congressional commit - 
tees, These spokesmen follow, 
in turn, representative econo- 
mists, Their consensus on the 
business situation seems to. be 
considerably less hopeful than 
that of the administration 

Passenger-car sales in Detroit 
have cx approximately as fol- 
lows: 7,200,000 in 1955, 6,000,- 
000 in “1956, and an estimated 
1957. The present 


is 


under 1957, judging by the com- 


| parative figures at the introduc- 


uuon of new models. 

Mr. Curtice rejected the idea 
that a cut in car Prices would 
eliminate What he called con- 
sumer “caution” in buyin 

Some observers have a 
ent interpretation, 

They see,.a “buyer strike” 
against big, high-priced cars 
They ask if Detroit has missed 
the market, Small-car imports 
are sw elling and American Mo- 
a is increasing sales of its 

. ; ; Sera 

The big- -car index of sales is 
presently going down. The 
small-car index is going up. 


fler- 


2ee . 


, 


THE CHRISTIAN 


. 


SCIENCE MON 


fe 


 —- 


- se 


- Russian Researeh Center Hailed — 


Scholars Celebrate in Hub 


By Earl W. Feell 
Sta? Writer oj . 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Cambridge, Mass. 

To an insignificant, unlabeled 
former dormitory on .Cam- 
bridge’s narrow Dunster Street 
there streamed this week hun- 
dreds of the United States’ most 
noted scholars on the Soviet 
Union. 

They came to celebrate the 
10th anniverscary of the world’s 
foremost center for scholarly 
study of the Soviet Union—the 
Russian Research Center at 
Harvard University. 

The festivities and speeches 
took place at nearby Littauer 
Auditorium and at the Harvard 


| \@ How.-bureaucrats .are re-. phasis has also.been placed on 
‘cruited, trained, and advanced |collecting referente material. 
in their careers. |The library of the center is not 
| € Exactly how the Soviet pric- | complete. It doesn't have to be, 
ing system works. 
© How recent Khrushchev or-/| scarcely a block away and the 
ders decentralizing industry and | largest university library in the 
reorganizing agricultural super- | world, shelves a Slavic section 
vision effect the national. econ-|Of some 65,000 titles, including 
omy. such noted collections as the 
€ Precisely how life is or-| Trotsky Archive of private pa- 
ganized for the one out of every | pers and the Kilgour collection 
two Soviet citizens who lives on | Of Russian literature. 
a collective farm. But the Dunster Street library 
© Where the line is drawn does have a comprehensive as- 
hetween decisions made at the sortment of basic Soviet refer- 
top and those made by regional | ence books and a representative 
and local officials—whether any | Selection of Soviet magazines 
“states rights” climate is’ build- | @Md newspapers. 
ing up. | In its short life the center has 
become the chief cornerstone of 


Harvard's Widener Library,| 


SE 


eek 


| 
; 
| 


ITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


Se % 


I REE EMP 


‘School Unit Favors 


Around New England x 


B, a Stag Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 
v 


= 


| Boston — 

A proposed single-salary schedule for the 3,400 teachers in 
Boston schools was endorsed last night by the salary adjust- 
ment board of the Boston School Department. 

Philip J. Bond, one of the six assistant superintendents of 
schools comprising the salary board, outlined the schedule at 
a meeting of the School Committee. The committee adjourned 
without taking action, but will consider the schedule at another 
meeting tonight. Under the law, the committee must approve 
a preliminary budget before submission to Mayor Hynes before 
the last Monday in February. 


Church Group Pushes Crime Curbs 


By a Staff’ Writer of The Caristian Science Monttor 


; 


Single-Salary Scale 


the dark retreat at 16 Dunster 
Street that the center and its 
Buests really marked the 10th 
anniversary. For it was there 
that the painstaking work of 
mapping the U.S.8.R. had taken 
place in some two-score spare- 
ly furnished offices 

In a turbuient-decade--when 
the Slavic world has twice sur- 
prised the Western nations with 
its growing capacity, the Rus- 
sian Research Center has had to 
grow fast. 

On Feb. 1, 1948, when it first 
opened its doors, the Soviet 
Union was a modern terra in- 
cognita to most Americans. This 
week in a commemorative ad- 
dress the center’s associate di- 
rector, Marshall D. Shuiman, 
was able to say with con- 
gsiderablé~ dssurance that the 
Churchillian description of the 
Soviet Union as an enigma in- 
side a riddle wrapped in a mys- 
tery is “out of date.” 

Far From Finished 

This is not to savy that the 
center’s dedicated, highly in- 
dividualistic eompany of scholars 
have finished unwrapping from 
their chosen subject all the 
Pravdas and assorted Sovetskaya 
newspapers that enshroud it. 
The directors of the center admit 
there are many gaps in the in- 
tricately detailed picture their 
long-distance scholarship has 
drawn of the Soviet Union. 

They say, for instance, that 
accurate knowledge is lacking 
on: 


ern academic interest in Soviet 
affairs. Columbia University’s 
Russian Institute, a year older 


Most of these gaps are a di- 
rect result of the lack of direct 
scholarly exchange between East 
and West. Although the center’s 
researchists have been able to 
make 30-day visits behind the 
Iron Curtain in the past two 
Summers, and although the flow | 
of magazines and books has been 
freer in the post-Stalin era, 
there are vast areas of scholar- | 
ship which have remained ab- 
stract and lifeless because of this 
lack of on-the-spot experience. ' 

But what can be done the 
center has done. Besides being a 
home for its staff of top re- 
searchers and graduate students, 
it has acted as a kind of hostel 
for yisiting scholars from all 
over the world. 

Almost every recognized au- 
thority on the Communist world 
has carried on a project, lec- 
tured, or merely visited and 
rubbed elbows with his fellows 
at the center. 

' Harvard’s Middle Eastern and | 

Far Eastern research centers 
have been either spawned by or 
patterned after the Russian Re- 
search Center. 


30 Books Published 


During its 10-year growth, 
the center’s scholars have pub- 
lished 30 books via the Har-| 
vard University Press. Four 
more are at the press. Some 
350 magazine articles and chap- 
ters in survey books swell the 
listed output. 

During this decade much em- | 

j 


eminent in the field of teaching, 
complementing Harvard's em- 
phasis on research. 

Universities in Britain, France, 
and Germany, where Russian 
| studies declined during the post- 
war years, now have their schol- 
arship on the Communist world 
on the mend. 


Other Centers in U.S. 


In the United States. other is- 
lands of academic study on So- 
viet affairs are lIbcated at the 
universities of Indiana, Wash- 
ington, and California, with fur- 
ther islets at the universities of 
Michigan, Fordham, Syracuse 
‘and Notre Dame. Alumni of the 
Russian Research Center itself 
|are scattered among 42, Ameri- 
can colleges. 

In some fields the Harvard 
center surpasses even the re- 


Union itself, These are mainly 
political science and sociological 
' subjects, in which few Soviet 
scholars risk study because the 
final word has already been said 
by party theorists. "9 
Moseow has its rough aca- 
demic counterpart of the center 
in its Institute for the Study of 
Contemporary World Capitalism 
‘and its Academy of Sciences. 
Members of these institutions 
publicly find the work of Har- 


=== 


Zi€ filene's 


. BOSTON 


“butterfly 


yy 


soft-dress in 


wild-textured 


vard and Columbia “colored by 
ideology,” and researchers at the 
Harvard center return the com- 
plaint, 


East-West Contacts Grow 


But ¢n recent years the con- 
tacts between these scholars of 
opposite backgrounds have be- 
+come wafmer. Recently, one of 
| the center's men finished ad- 
dressing the Soviet Academy of 
-Sciences and was astonished to 
hear a young girl ask him a 
question referring to a paper 
he had writteh 20 years ago. 


ities on Soviet affairs in Wash- 
ington are reported to be friend- 


| Department experts often visit 


But the center does not tell 
Washington how to answer 
Marshal Bulganin’s letters. 
When it started in 
was the belief of the Carnegié 
Corporation, which supplied the 


——— 


’ 


Courteous— 


Taxicab Service 


' 
' 


Boston 
Cab 


6-5010 | 


than the Harvard Center, is pre- | 


| search institutions of the Soviet. 


Relations with official author- | 
ly, close, cooperative, but cor- | 


head | 
om uae rest pe srs ae pw dng BO weeks to account for the 


| meanwhile, 
1948 it, 


; man, 


Dependable— | 


| 
| 
. 

aes re 


By a Staff Photographer 


Translations From the Russian at Harvard 


‘Taras Butoff (left), a speciali 


| for researchist-author Richard 


'funds, and Harvard, which sup- 
‘plied the initial staff of two 
full-time research associates, six 
faculty members on fart time, 
five graduate student fellows, 
‘and a director, that the research 
| work would be mainly directed 
| toward the social sciences. 

| Work started on that basis 
| under the center's first director, 
Clyde Kluck- 
hohn, who had directed teams 
'of social scientists in research 
on the Japanese character dur- 
ing World War II. 


Shift in Emphasis 


Over the vears there has been 
some shifting of emphasis to- 
ward the traditional studies of 
history and politics—and an in- 
evitable trend toward 
matic, strategic, 
ment policy analysis. 

Under its present director, the 
noted historian William  L. 
Langer, the center has contin- 
ued a policy of promoting in- 
dividual. rather than team re- 
search. With the exception of a 


‘enthropologist 


‘refugees about life in the 

| U.S.S-R., which was carried out 

| from 1950 to 1954 by a team of 

| 20 schclars, work has habitually 
been on a single basis. 

The researchists are far from 
isolated, however, rubbing el- 
bows in the center’s lunch room 
and library, often talking in the 
corridors, or meeting in one an- 
others’ homes for intense, dedi- 
cated sessions. 


Example Cited 


Mr. Shulman gives an exam- 
_ple..Joseph. Berliner, he recalls, 
was working on a paper about 
Soviet factory managers. At 
lunch Merle Fainsod, sitting on 
one side of him, kept after him 


role of the party in a manager's 
life. . Sociologist Alex Inkeles, 
persistently cate- 
chized Dr. Berliner on the posi- 
tion of these factorv men in So- 
viet society. Out of the lunch- 


provincial press at Harvard’s Russian Research 
Center, checks some modern Russian syntax in 
the sputnik-bedecked Soviet magazine Ogoniok 


diplo- | 
and govern- | 


st on the Soviet two scholars 


E. Pipes, The 


-who can’t run a factory. After 
‘all they are just an explicable 
human phenomenon.” 

2. Its source material and on- 
'the-spot travel opportunities are 
‘still curtailed by Soviet secre- 
| tiveness. 
| On the first point, the center's 
officials note a marked improve- 


are using the magazine- and 


Pravda-stacked room of the research center's 
reference library, where many of the Western 
world’s leading authorities on the Communist 
world have met, talked, and read together. 


ment since the waning of the 
McCarthyism fright. 

On the second point they are 
cautiously hopeful that the 
scholarship-exchange agreement 
signed by Soviet and American 
representatives Jan. 27 will be- 


gin a new thaw in the scholas- | 


tic cold war. 


Fiscal Legerdemain 


Gets House Scrutiny 


State Hous: Roundup 


The Massachusetts House be- 
gins considering on Monday a 


'Governor Furcolo-proposed feat | 
de- | 
his | 


'of financial legerdemain 
|signed to help balance 
jrecommended 418-million-dollar 
|state budget. 


ioff three million dollars in vet- 
erans’ bonds maturing in this 
'fiscal year, and six million dol- 
‘lars in bonds maturing in the 
/next fiscal year, by issuance of 
nine million dollars in new 20- 
year bonds. Thus, the state 
| would be relieved of finding cash 
'to retire the bonds, thereby add- 
ing to the current tax problem. 


Approval of the plan has been 
voted by the House Committee 
on Ways and Means, with three 
Republican member$ dissenting. 

The refinancing idea did not 


The Finance Advisory Board 
earlier had recommended re- 
financing of 63.5 million dollars 
‘in bonds between now and 1965 
| to level out amortization pay- 
i'ments in general fund bonds at 
jabout 20 million dollars a year. 
| Governor Furcolo added three 
‘million dollars to the plan by 
| proposing a three-million-dollar 
‘refinancing in the current fiscal 
_year in addition. 


time exchanges, says Mr. Shul-j| 


came a_i well-rounded 
work, but one which had the 
unity which comes from a single 
_author. 


center as it enters its second 10 
years, 
1. 
ularized to have much effect on 


American public opinion. A Vis- | 


iting French professor remarked 
recently that it is a “paradox 
that American scholarship on 
Soviet affairs is so highly ad- 
vanced while public discussion 
is so primitive. Too many Amer- 


sians as either a race of super- | 
men or as a bunch of barbarians! 


Two great problems face the 


Its work is too slowly pop- | 


Committee Announced 
For Scholarship Dinner 


Governor Fureolo has named 
the committee to run the $1,000- 
_a-plate dinner by which he 
‘seeks to raise one million dollars 
for scholarships to aid worthy 
students with grants and loans. 
| The dinner will be he'd at the 

Sheraton Plaza Hotel on Feb. 16. 
Governor Furcolo originated the 
|plan some time ago and. as a 
result, a foundation was estab- 
lished with Judge Stanley 

Qua, retired Chief Justice of the 


K Enmore icans tend to look at the Rus-/ Massachusetts Supreme Judicial | 


Court, as its president. 
Arthur D. Cronin, of West 


Se ee a | .2ne proposal involves paying | 
project of interviewing Soviet 


originate with Governor Furcolo. | 


Be re 
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| rectly free of influence. State 


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|e ay ° the secret.is the lightest Permanent Wave 
S possible, to be found only in the Flizabeth 
Arden Salon, where Permanent Waving is a 
special skill. The loveliest coiffures grow from the 
creative fingers of the stylists at Elizabeth Arden’s. These 


little cap of 
lightly dancing 


pretty, pretty look. 


| Newton, prominent — insurance 
| official, heads the dinner com- 
mittee. Other committee 
bers are: 

Richard Bereson, president of 
Revere Airways: W. Chester 
| Browne, president of W. Chester 
Browne and Associates, Inc.: 


‘Paul F. Clark, chairman of the | 
|board, John Hancock Insurance | 


mem-| Numerous methods of presenting students with such prob- . 


in the Bay State. 


not been set for the hearings. 


Network Employ 


By a Stay Writer of The Caristian Sctence Monitor 


Boston 


The Massachusetts Council of Churches today urged passage 
of 11 bills before the Legislature to control gambling and crime 


The council’s board of directors, is seekfng support from 
both churchmen and laymen in its drive to win: passage of the 
bl] measures offered by the now-defunct Massachusetts Crime 
Commission. The Rev. Dr. Myron W. Fowell said “passage of 
these bills is of greatest importance if organized gambling and 
crime are to be brought under control.” : 

The various bills will be brought before legislative commit- 
tees on judiciary, legal affairs and taxation, but dates have 
‘ 


ees Set to Strike . 


Boston 


After unproductive negotiations this morning, representatives 


of the National Association of 


Broadcast Employees and Tech- 


nicians and two major networks resumed talks this afternoon. 


The union has agreed to negotiate past tonight's midnight” 


deadline if the networks will 
the same time instructed its 
eventuality.” 


jurisdiction, especially the in 


a union statement said. 


| Schools must better acquain 


“get down to business,” but at 
members to prepare for “any 


This morning’s session was devoted to the problem of work 


troduction of video tape. “No 


substantive progress was made regarding the handling of this 
new process, which is expected to replace film in telecasting,” 


Schools Keyed to Regional Plan 


By a Staff’ Writer of The Caristian Science Monitor 


Boston . 5 
t their students with the issues 


of metropolitan planning by way of preparing them for the 
solution of such problems, a group of more than 200 Greater 


Boston educators told 


yesterday. 


was 


at a Boston College seminar 


ee 
oe 


lems of metropolitan planning were outlined by a panel. of; 


speakers headed by the Rev. 


W. Seavey Joyce, S.J., dean of 


the College of Business Administration at Boston College. 


Senators Discuss 


‘Company; former Governor De- | 


ver; Judge J. John Fox of the 
Boston Municipal Court; Francis 
C. Gray, chairman of the board, 


Fiduciary Trust Company; Law- | 


/rence Harrington, president, De- 
|positors Trust Company; Ernest 
'Henderson, president, Sheraton 
‘Corporation; Joseph Kaplan, 
president, Colonial Tanning Co., 


Inc.; Michael T. Kelleher, Marsh | 


& McLennan, Inc.; Edward A. 


Larner, Sr., president, Employ- | 


ers Liability Insurance Com- 
pany; George A. McLaughlin, 


president, National Docks Com- |; 
pany; Thomas A. Pappas, pres- | 
ident, C. Pappas Company, Inc.; | 


Louis R. Perini, president, B. 
| Perini-& Sons, Inc.: Richard S. 
‘Robie, vice-president, Hertz 
Corporation; Nelson A. Smith, 
| vice-president, Atlantic Coal 
| Company; and Lewis H. Wein- 
stein, Boston attorney. 


‘Salisbury Authorized 
‘To Vote on Liquor Sales 


| Governor Furcolo signed an 
act authorizing the town of 
|Salisoury to vote at its March 
‘annual town meeting on a 
_liquor-sales referendum. 


banned all 


| liquor option questions. 
‘Retail Food-Price Index 
lor January Shown Up 

A 3 per cent hike in food-at- 
home costs was largely respon- 
sible for a 0.7 per cent increase 
in the - Massachusetts ‘ retail- 
price consumer index for Jan- 
uary compared with the Decem- 
ber, 1957, level, the State Divi- 


-sion—on—the-Necessaries—of: Life? 


reported. 

The combined index now is 4 
per cent higher than in January, 
1956, and 21.7 per cent over 
June, 1950. 


Weather Predictions 
By U.S. Weather Bureeuw 


Clou 


_ New England—Tonight fair 
and a little colder. Low tem- 
}-perature near 30 along the coast 
|of Massachusetts and 


day increasing cloudiness fol- 

lowed by snow or rain and not 

quite so mild. 

Eastport to Block Island— 
| Westerly winds around 10 miles 
an hour tonight. Fair with good 
visibility. 

High Tides, Commonwealth Pier 
Feb. 1, 8:26 a.m., ht. 9.9 ft. 
Feb. 1, 9:00 p.m., ht. 88 ft 

Sun Rises Sun Sets Moon Rises 

| 6:57a.m, 5:00p.m, 2:23 p.m. 


| Five-Day Forecast 


| The temperature in northern 
New England, 
‘and Rhode Island during the 
‘next five days Saturday through 
Wednesday will average near 
'the seasonal normal. Turning 
‘colder Sunday with no important 
‘temperature changes then likely 
through Wednesday. 
Precipitation during this pe- 
riod will on the average total 
between 3 to 6 tenths of an inch 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island 
and 1 to 3: tenths northern New 
England melted occurring. in 


The special referendum is the | 
‘result of a 1956 state election | 
vote by which the town’s voters | 
liquor sales in the'| 
town in voting on the biennial 


dy, Colder Saturday 


in the 
| lower 20’s in the interior. Satur- | 


Massachusetts, | 


Textile Problems 


By the Associated Press 


Washington 


New England senators met here yesterday to discuss prob- 


lems of the cotton and wool industries in the six-state region.: : 


Meeting in the office of Senator Theodore F. Green (D) of R.I., 


the group voted to request the 


Interdepartmental Trade Policy 


Committee to study effects of cotton and wool imports on the 


New England economy. 


They also moved to ask a continuation of quota tariff restric- 


tions on wool textile imports b 
Information. 


Electric Utility 


y the Committee on Reciprocity 


Faces Strike Threat 


By a Stag Writer of The Crristian Science Monitor 


most of Rhode Island, will go 


Boston 
A strike against the New England Electric System, serving 
about one-third of Massachusetts’ electric light customers and 


into effect at midnight tonight, 


unless union demands are met, a labor spokesman said this 


morning. 


W. Edward Meeker, chairman of the negotiating committee — 


for the Brotherhood of Utility 


Workers of New England, said 


the 3,600 men his union represents have extended negotiations 


' 


for one month after the contract expired Dec. 31. 
John J. Sullivan, a federal mediator 
issue, but declined further. details. 


, Said wages is a principal 


Workshop 


Some 400 to 500 beginning 
.elementary teachers from all 
parts of New England will get 


to carry on their work at a 
‘workshop conference held to- 


University College of Business 
Administration. 

The conference, sponsored 
annually by Pi Lambda Theta, 
national ' honor society for 
women educators, will be initi- 
ally divided into panels discuss- 
ing work in each grade level 
from kindergarten to sixth 
grade. Additional panel sessions 
| on remedial reading and the ex- 
ceptional child—both gifted and 
retarded—will complete the spe- 
| cial work. 
| Dr. D. Justin McCarthy, di- 
rector of state teachers colleges 
for the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Education, will address 


“a -plenary--session ofthe con~} will 


‘ference on the problems and 
progress of teaching today. 


Tue CHRISTIAN ScHENcE Monitor 9 ean of Portland Annex 


An International Daily Mowepepes 
FOUNDED 1908 BY MARY BAKER DY 


Second-class mail privileges authorized 
at Boston, Massachusetts 


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| Articles and illustrations for publice- 


ag eee 


some extra instruction in how | 


morrow morning at the Boston | 


Slated 


For N.E. Teachers 


By a Staff’ Writer of The Caristian Science Monttor — 


| The hundreds of teachers at- 
| tendin 
those new to teaching and those 


| been away from the classroom 
for several years. 
In addition to hearing discus- 


| cation, 
teachers 


the audience of new 
will view ae small 


| country -fair—of—new-equipment-~.- 
available to classrooms at the. 


- 


g the meeting are both- 


who have taught before but.’ 


sions by panel members of long‘ 
e@xperience in elementary edu-,, 


grade 1-to-6 level. This will in-': 


clude displays of seats, cabinet: 


and play units, worksheets for 


|teaching records, and 
modern furnishings. 
Mrs. Gerald J. Pine 


of the local 


other 


, president_ 
chapter of PI- 


_ Lambda Theta, is to be honors” 
ary chairman of the conference. 


Dr. Olive F. Eldridge, principal 
of Memorial’ School, Newton, 
be general chairman, . 


Maine U Names Alumnus 


By the Associated Press 
Orono, Maine 
The University of Maine has 
named Dr. William L. Irvine, 
associate professor of education 
at the University of Vermont, 
to be dean of its newly estabe 
lished annex in Portland. 
| A Maine graduate-of 1942, Dr. 


I. 
Ju 


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| Irvine will succeed Dean Luther™ 


rain or snow Massachusetts and 


urday. night and in snow flur- 


snow northern New England and | ten should be addressed to Editorial De-' 


Rhode Island Saturday and Sat- | Mass. 


artment, The Christian Science Mont- | 
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'“Are Parents Necessary?’ iecture by 

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Lowell Institute; Lecture Room Bos 
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Saturday 


Princesses.” “The Prin- 
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Boston 15, Mass. U.8.A, 

Publishers of Tus CHRISTIAN ScIENCE 
Journat, CHuRistiaw Science Sentinet, 
Tue Heraatp or CuatsTiaN Scrence (Gen-. 
| MAN, Paencn, Scanptnavian, Duren, Bran- 
ISH-PORTUGUESE-ITALIAN, AND BRalLie Eat | 
' TIONS), CRISTIAN CB Quaareay. 


| 
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| 
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| 
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' Connaught H 
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' 
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7 


Filene’s women’s fashion dresses, 


fifth floor 


_— — ee i A LL GE 


"The Dancing 
th 


seum, 
Jamaica Plain. 


. “« 


Street, 


. ‘ster the case 


* 


ars 


— 


Soviet Lead Reassessed 


= = 5 > : “4 
Two-Year ICBM Lag Seen casa 

; - derstanding thatthe firstone, 
| the earliest they could be opera- 


By Courtney Sheidon 


Staff Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Washington 
The Soviet margin of superi- 
ority in ballistic missiles is ap- 
parently greater than the “reck- 


and-neck” estimates of govern-. | >: | 
. ‘recommended that the “calcu-/| said the first capability I thought | 


risk” of beginning mass| the 
the ICBM, and it would be a/| 


ment officials 
ously. 

Army officials have now told 
Congress that the Soviets will 
have a 5,000-mile intercontinen- 
tal ballistic missile in limited 
Operation by next July. 

With the speedups now antici- 
patec, the American version of 
the same weapon is not expected 
to be ready until at least 1969. 

Though the Soviet missile 

program may not quite repre- 
sent the hare, and the United 
States effort ithe tortoise. the 
Soviets could hardly be expected 
to overlook the story's lesson. 
_ The Soviet head start con- 
tinues to be crucial for the late- 
Starting United States. When a 
track man‘ is behind in a race, 
he can’t expect to win unless he 
dashes forward at a rate faster 
than his competitors 


indicated previ- 


Grist for Democrats 


The Army evaluation wil! bol- 
of Democrats in 
Congress who have been arguing 
that more money and effort must 
be put into the United States 
missile program. 

One of the leaders in this 
drive, Senator Henry M. Jackson 
(D) of Washington, was terming 
the administration's missile 
budget “wholly inadequate” in 
the Senate about the same time 
the testimony of the Army offi- 
cials was released. 

He said it was not too late to 


| States. 


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WEDDINGS 
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CONVENTIONS all accessortes 
READ G&G WHITE 
11) SUMMER ST., BOSTON, MASS. 


tutawars 
BANQUETS blue sutts 
CRUISES (shoes, sherts, 
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full dress sustt¢ 
DINNERS summer formals 
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THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


ICBMs and IRBMs operational. | tional ..;” (several words then 


ducible items of technological 
lead time are 
us.” 

To somewhat offset these, he 


lated 
production be taken before 
‘every minute item”: was tested. 

Though the Army disclosures 
startled some in- Washington and 
raised questions as to whether 
the public estimates of Pentagon 
officials have been unwisely 
toned down, the basic situation 
is unchanged 


Role for IRBMs 

The United States now plans 
to have IRBMs of 1,500-mile 
range based in Europe by De- 
cember. So, even if the Soviets 
have a 5,000-mile weapon ca- 
pable of assaulting the United 
the Soviets presumably 
could be-ptaced under fire from 
European bases at about the 
Same time 

The latest estimate of Soviet 
strength was brought out during 
interrogation of 
Maj}. Gen. Dwight E. Beach, 
deputy Army chief of staff o 
military operations, by the 
House Armed Services Commit- 
tee 

The censored transcript read 
like this 

Representative William E. 
Hass (R) of Ohio: “When.do we 
anticipate that Russia will have 
its ICBMs operational?” 

General Beach: “It is my un- 


a closed-door 


working against | 
right.” 


‘However, he said “certain irre- | censored). 


Mr. Hess: “July of this year?” 
General Beach: “That is 


ater General Beach said: “I 


Russians could have with 


’ 


| 


very limited one, would be in, 


July of this year, 1958, and as 


General Lemnitzer has stated, 


that would be the first ones.” 


These answers are somewhat 


‘at variance with previous offi- 


cial estimates that the Soviets 
have tested only two or three 


ICBMs and there was reason to | 


| doubt the Soviets had solved the 


nosecone reentry problem. 

They are in line, however, 
with -published evaluations in 
aviation .trade magazines. In 
early fall, these magazines and 
some military observers report- 
ed that the Soviet ICBM had 


was in production, and in limit- 


| ed operational use. 


The common presumption 
that ICBM hardware was used 
to launch the sputniks tended 
to confirm the unofficial esti- 
mates. 


Countdown Reported 


There is some apprehension in | burg, Va., youngsters 


the capital that the Soviets will 
launch their third sputnik be- 
fore the United States blasts its 
first into the sky. 


It is reported here that the | tempting 
one  sateliite. 
The United States launching | 


at least 
advance of at- 


started 
in 


Soviets 
countdown 


~ 4 


Unionist’s 


For Limousines Told 


Penchant 


By the Associated Press 


Washington 


Staff aides told the Senaté 
rackets committee Jan. 31 that 


union boss William E, Maloney 
has three Cadillacs and an Im- 


perial automobile, bought for 
him by the International Union 
of Operating Engineers. 

They said union records also 
show that union funds provided 
Mr. Maloney with garages for 
the four cars. a chauffeur to 
drive them, an apartment in 
Washington, free maid and tele- 
phone service, air conditioners 


for his Washington and Chicago | 


area residences, and television 
sets for both. 

Investigators Jack Balaban 
and James Mundie said two of 
the Cadillacs were paid for by 
the union’s Chicago Local No. 
150, which Mr. Maloney and his 
heutenants have run for 29 
years without benefit of an elec- 
tion. Mr. Balaban said Mr. Ma- 
loney also pocketed $2,000 cash 
in connection with these pur- 
chases. 

Union Paid for Cars 

The other Cadillac and the 
Imperial—the latter bought from 
labor racketeer Joey Fay—were 
paid for by the international 
union, which also pays for the 
apartment, chauffeur, maid, and 
telephone service, 

The committee, headed by 
Senator John L. McClellan (D) 


of Arkansas, took the testimony” 


about the automobiles in round- 


LAND AVAILABLE 
for BUILDING on 
Boylston St., Boston 


A wonderful opportunity 
to acquire this prime prop- 
erty—strategically located 
right in the heart of Bos- 
ton. For information, call 
HAncock 6-0250. 


'the union’s Chicago locals 


| Maloney 


‘or 


“expense 


/ money 


; Up 


said union 
| Maloney collected thousands of 


ONCE A YEAR 


0) OFF 


DURING THE 
Menth of FEBRUARY 


* 


On our complete line of 
nationally famous corsets, 
corselettes,girdles, and 
brassieres. Strapless bras. 


Hosiery, lingerie 
‘Except Camp and Custom Garments 


SCORSET SHOPS 


59 TEMPLE PL., BLAKE BLDG. 
6th FLOOR = Liberty 2-1677 


415 Highlend Ave., Devis Saquere, 
Somerville. Open Fridey Evenings 
SOmerset 6-397! 


HI-LAND FARMS TOP QUALITY 


All-Stuffed ! 


ROASTING 


CHICKENS 


32 to 42 Ibs. 


OVEN- 
READY 


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10 Big Stars 


¢ Newtonville 
+ Somerville 

+ Chestnut Mill 
* Brookline 

+ Cambridge 


+ Watertown 
« Wellesicy 

+ Medford 

* Mt. Auburn 
* Stoneham 


YOUNG, TENDER 


DUCKLINGS 


5 to 52 Ibs. 


C Regularly 
h, 69c pound! 


'ing out a record of what re- 


wards Mr. Maloney has reaped 
as president of the operating en- 
gineers : 

There was testimony earlier 
that he has drawn hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in expense 
money as well as his $55,000 a 
year salary. 

The committee’s building of 
this record was preliminary. to 
an exploration of the bitter bat- 
tles attending Mr. Maloney’s 
rise to power in labor unionism, 

Chief counsel Robert F. Ken- 
nedy said the committee would 
explore bitter power fights in 
150 
and 399: - and whether -the~stit 
unsolved gun murder of Dennis 
Bruce Ziegler in 1933 
linked to these. 


Mr. Kennedy called as a wit- | 


ness Clarence Donath, a Chicago 


/'union member he described as a | 


friend of Mr. Ziegler and a foe 
of Mr. Maloney. 

Members Denied Vote 

The committee contends 

or his 


Mr. 


members have been denied the 


right to elect their own officers, OHIO: 


to have any voice in the 


locals’ financial affairs. 


Staff investigators testifying | Paid oft im 
Jan. 30 accused Mr. Maloney of car washes 


taking $171,110 of 
money 


illegitimate 
from 


in his income tax re- 
turns. In all, they said Mr. Ma- 


loney received $353,650 from the Was 4 set-up wit : 
union from 1950 through 1956. worthy of a desert storm. Well, a few 


minutes with KozaK worked a miracle 
right before my eyes!” 


NEW YORK: 
everything you claim and many people 
has subpoenaed, and the testi- ask me if my Chevrolet has its original 
paint job (car is 10 years old) — that's | 
how good it looks. We use one on furni- 
Michael H. Schwartz 


They described the remainder 
as “partly legitimate.” 

With Mr. Maloney too ill to 
testify, the committee has 
undertaken to bring out the 
story through union records it 


mony of witnesses. 
Investigators Jack. Balaban 
and Marshall T. Gould teamed 
in charging that Mr. 
seven years from 
ported income of $388,578 to 
the tax collectors while actually 


| drawing $742,228. 


records show M) 
dollars on expense accounts for 
attending meetings he didn’t at- 
tend. They and other witnesses 
said the union paid the $130,000 


for years for pleasure 
Mr. Maloney, his KK; 


union officials. 


Unions Tax..Exempt 
Chairman John McClellan 
(D) of Arkansas of the commit- 


tee said this is evidence that 'WASH.:" About 8 years ago I bought 
new laws are needed to “stop a KozaK and have used it continuously 
ever since, but it seems to be losing its 
leaning properties so you better send me 
E. H. Harbison 


up loopholes and prevent those 
who would be crooked and dis- 
honest 
pilfering union funds.” 

Unions are tax exempt now, 


and Internal Revenue officials | BROOKLYN: “I have found that in a 
say they have no authority to matter of minutes my car can be changed 
from a dirty, dusty car to a showroom 
‘finish using KozaK and Mak-ur-own. You 
huge sums, which never show have made a life customer of me as well 
up on their tax returns, and as a walking-talking advertisement.” 


audit union books. Senator Mc- 
Clellan said this makes it possi- 
ble for union officials to steal 


thus never are taxed. 

Senator McClellan referred to 
testimony that Mr. Maloney had 
collected “double and 


expenses from various union 
funds for many trips, charged 
the union nearly $9,000 for his 
membership in a. Florida golf 


club and in various race tracks; 


Was | 


’HAd' At least’ 10" successful tests; + 


By Neal Stanford 
Staff Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 

Wash 


The President faces a major 
legislative battle over his re- 
quest to extend the reciprocal 
trade program for five more 
years and permit him to reduce 
tariffs up to 5 per cent for each 
of these five years. | 

There is little doubt but that 
the President intends to fight for 


clear that a formidable opposi- 
‘tion intends to fight 


that the President will have to 


‘tension for only two or three 


; | years, and certain other impor- 
|| tant concessions to the protec- 


_tionist elements in the country. 
Pressure Greater? 
Opposition may well be more 


fj intense than in some previous 
f; years when the act came up for 


United Press 

Lacking skates, these Lees- 
make 
the most of what's available 
as they enjoy winter on a 
frozen pond. 


to orbit a third 


of the Vanguard had to be post- 


i mechanical 
Jupiter-C rocket has been held | 


of 
The 


week because 
deficiencies. 


poned last 


up because of weather con- 


ditions. 


|extension because of increasing 
unemployment and the growth 
of protectionist sentiment in the 
‘once free-trade South, 

There are the traditional sup- 
porters of a protectionist tariff, 
men like Representative Daniel 
A. Reed (R) of New York 
|and Representative Richard M. 
Simpson (R) of Pennsylvania, 
and Representative Thomas A. 
Jenkins (R) of Ohio. These three 
top-ranking Republicans on the 


House Ways and Means Com-, ' 
vie 


mittee all refused to introduce 


the administration’s bill, hear-. 
ings 
They come from industrial states | 


on which begin Feb. 


and though members of the 


President's party are violently | os. ’ ; 
| political basis that if one asks 
for twice what one wants one is | 
Said Mr. Reed, the President | 
is asking fer “moré of the same | request. Rather, as he pointed” 
has been a/ out 


opposed to the proposed legisla- 
tion. 


trade policy that 


‘this program with all the forces | 


,at his command; but it is also} orycial 

| , 43. | HOuse, not the Senate. For sena- 

< it with | 

'om |equal vigor and tenacity. | 
| The consensus here now is | 


_ settle for less than what he has. 
& | termed essential — possibly ex- | 


of Ohio, 


/ could 


17. | 


demonstrable failure for 25 


years. 


year extension. is needed be- 


cause of the intricacies that are 


| 


; 
: 


Said Mr. Simpson: The Presi-| going to arise in tariff negotia- | 


dustry, agriculture, and labor on 


the sacrificial altar of interna- | 


tional diplomatic expediencce.” 
House Action Crucial 


Initial reaction from the Sen- 
ate was more favorable, but it 
is recognized that the Senate 


almost always reacts more fa- 


vorably than the House to re- 
ciprocal trade proposals. The 
battles occur in the 
whole _ states 


tors represent 


‘rather than particular districts 


which may be completely in- 


dustrialized. 


Nonetheless nearly a half a 


quickly an- 
support of the 
program: Senator 


dozen senators 
nounced their 
President's 


|'Prescott Bush (R) of Connecti- 


cut, Senator Jacob K. Javits (R) 


‘of New York, Senator Thruston * 


B. Morton (R) of . Kentucky, 
Senator Frank J. Lausche (D) 
and Senator Wayne 
Morse (D) of Oregon. 

The President's 
Congress on reciprocal trade was 


a strongly worded document. He 


called passage of the proposed 
bill essential to “our national 
economic interest, to our secur- 
ity, and to our foreign relations.” 
And he tied the trade program 
right 
war by asserting that only by 
stepping up its trade program 
the United States meet 
“the growing capacity of the So- 
Union in 
field.” 

Strategy Explained 


The President asked for a 


five-year extension, not on the 


satisfied to get half of one’s 


in his message, 


| States 


|ardize American jobs.’ 
message” to” A ! 


dent would “place American in-/| tions with the European eco- 


nomic community. 


' 


7 Tariff-Cut Battle Confronts Eisenhower 


And he warned that the Soe 
viet Union is engaged in “an in- 
tensive. effort, through .come- 
bined programs of trade and aid 
to divide the countries of t 


Six European countries will | free world, to detach them one 


between 1960 and 1962: and the 
President does not want United 
negotiations with that 
new trade area endangered or 
frustrated by uncertainty over 
the continuity of the reciprocal 
trade program. As the President 
said: “This period must be de- 
voted to negotiations with the 
new economic community and 
these negotiations must be pre- 
ceded by painstaking prepara- 

The President again stressed 
that if the United States is to 
export it must import, that trade 
is a two-way proposition. “We 
can either receive the benefits of 
the reciprocal lowering of trade 
barriers,” he said, “or suffer the 
inevitable alternative of increas- 
ingly high barriers against our 
own commerce which would 
weaken our economy and jeop- 


| move toward a common tariff 


by one and swing them into the 
orbit of Communist influenceé.” 


The Soviet capacity to export is 


matched by 


its capacity and 
willingness to import, the Presi- 
dent asserted. 


Sun-Ripened 
—— h ; a a 
= FLAVOR = 

a ~ 

SUNSWEET Prunes are sun-ripened till 

the full rich prune-plum flavor is at its 

peak. They're plump with 
natural food value. Packed 


by the growers them- 
selves. At your grocer’s. 


into the East-West cold) 


the economic. 


the five- iL 


33% 


Per Annum 
Computed Quarterly 


Over $24,000,000 Assets 


ON ALL SAVINGS, 
INVESTMENT AND 
SHARE ACCOUNTS 


Accounts May Be Opened By Mail 


UINGY 
CO-OPERATIVE 
vmey sevens BANK 


Quincy’ sevare 


Advertisement 


Advertisement 


’ 
' 
' 


’ 


; 


: 


: 


' 
; 
' 


handpicked tron with 
| lieutenants have run these locals than any product of 
for 29 years, during which the | ysed.” 


Ma- cure too.” 
'loney’s income tax returns for 


| the 1950 |MASS.: 


OHIO: “The purchase of one of your 
‘bill to buy and operate a yacht KozaKs was an excellent investment. 
trips for They really do a good job on our dark 


ests and blue Buick and the ,Mak-ur-own is per- 


, 


from looting and |* 


’ 


| 


triple” | 


: $17,472 for a Washington apart- | 
¥w ment, and $1,444 for personal | 


Mr. Kennedy said the tenta- 


have blamed each other for the 
violence. 


Australian Livestock Soars 


Australia today has more 
sheep and cattle than ever be- 
fore. Statistics reported at the 
end of 1957 said there were 149,- 
802,000 sheep and 17,257,000 cat- 
tle. There also were 1,325,000 


pigs and 737,000 horses. 


49 


=. | purchases not spelled out in the | 
: | testimony. 


tive plan is to start hearings 
*) soon after mid-February on vio- ’ 
lence in the still unsettled strike | 
dispute between Walter P. Reu- | 
ther’s United Automobile Work- | 
ers Union and the Kohler Com-. 
pany, of Wisconsin. The plumb- | 
ing fixtifes firm and the union | 


; 


’ 


i i i i ee i i i i i i i i i i ee 


Does YOUR Car Get Shameful Dirty”? 


EVERY TIME 


YOU WASH 


HOW YOU KEEP YOUR 
SO SHINY CLEAN ... 


WAY TO DO YOUR 
GIFT SHOPPING! 


NEIGHBORS WILL ASK YOU 


...AND WHAT AN EASY 


bs + A +» +» - » » » » » DD DD De he he Le he De i De ie ie 


CAR 


time 


i i kh he he i he i he he i he i i i i i 


PENNA.: “I think your 


is indeed wonderful, a perfect combina- 
KozaK, it has proven better 
its kind I've ever 

R. J. Crawford 


union IOWA: “I am weary of. exaggerated 
funds and failing to declare the ads and I just got your KozaK yesterday 
and set out to prove its worth. My car 
h a coat of dust on it 


“Your 


I use it. the better it works.” 


“I have used my KozaK for | 
nearly 4 years now and it has certainly | 
time saved and savings on 

J. H. Watkins 


Rev. Wm. Holub 
product does 


“I have been complimented so 
| through 1956 showed he had re- |much on the way my car looks that my 
friends think I spend all my time on it, 
bur that’s not so. I spend so little time 
Mr. Balaban and Mr. Gould on it they don't notice me do it. What 


D. W. Love 


fect for the off-white trim.” 


a new one.” 


@ 
® U.S. Pat. Off.. Canada 
® Kozak Auto DryWash Inc. 1957 


C. C. Welch 


full besides. 


ITH KozaK you can save 
\¢ 80° of your wet-washes, 
and have a clean car every 
| day the sun shines. Takes only 7 min- 
utes of your (or one of the boy’s) 
ata cost of less than 4c a 
DRYWASH. A $3 or $4 invest- 
_ ment in a regular or SUPER KozaK 
/DRYWASH CLOTH will return 
Mok-urown | Dalf itself every time it rains or 
aK-ur-OWNn | . 
_ snows — and keep on doing so for 
_months—saving you $50 to $100 
in former car washing expense. 


As One 
KozaK Fan Wrote: 


“There is no excuse whatever for a 
man to drive a dirty car if he knows 
there is such a thing as a KozaK 
DRY WASH process.” 


And, of course, that fan’s beautiful | 
| Cadillac Fleetwood is his pride and 
joy — and is never dirty — except 
during the very rain itself and the 
short time it takes for it to dry off. | . | 
| Then 7 minutes DRYWASH and, presto! $2 saved—clean car again—not a penny out of pocket— 

not a squeak from high pressure water washing—a real nice job you can be proud of. More fine cars 
_are DRYWASHED daily than less expensive cars. And 11,000,000 KozaKs have been bought by criti- 
cal people in the past 32 years—people who have saved thousands of dollars 
|—and, more important, have got themselves bigger trade-in allowances for 


you say kAbout KozaK is true. The more | ; : 
| turning in a nice, clean car. 


IT DOES 


IT°RAIN CATS AND DOGS? 


Here is 


the KozaK DRY washed Austin-Healey t 
of Tucson First Place in the sportscar division of Arizona's First Annual Auto- 
rama. Purchased in 1954 — original paint perfect after 21,000 miles of daily 
driving and KozaKing! 


bat won 


‘ Rss 


Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Basil 


Our Way of Doing Business 


Mail orders for KozaKs are remailed without fail the same day received and 
have always been. A simple request for refund in full is immediately answered 
by air mail with-our expression of appreciation. So far-as:-we-know-we have 
no dissatisfied customers anywhere, and have hundreds of thousands of enthu- 
Siastic users in every city, town, village, and most hamlets. You are never asked 
to return your purchase. If you don’t like it for any reason, you keep it or give 
it away to your firehouse or police patrolman and get your money refunded in 


What a KozaK* 
DRYWASH” Does: 


Removes dirt. 


Polishes as it cleans. 
Saves time and work. 


No hose needed—sum- 
mer or winter... no 
pressure moisture to 
rust springs and start 
squeaks. . 


It’s safe — over 11 mil- 
lion used. 


Protects the finish. 


TTT erTjereTj jr." = ™ 


TwTrVTvT,r,yTrTVTVereeeefeffwrwT"TTTT.- 


i i ee te ee i 


Safe and Tested But Hard to Believe Until Used 


O other cloth or cleaner on the market gives your car a better tested safe .. . DRY-W ASH action. 
| ~ KozaK is the ORIGINAL and ONLY Auto Drywash Cloth. There is no other way to have a 


M. Jerschauer | 


clean car for only 4c a Drywash. KozaK keeps the showroom finish on your new car — revital- 


‘11 = million KozaKs have 


the coupon now. 


55 °S.. Lyon St. 
BATAVIA, N. Y. 


How KozaK is 


nesinaiead 


UNCONDITIONALLY 
If the KozaK DRYwash Cloth has 


not saved its cost many times over 
after you have used it for thirty days 
- + « just write and the money that 
you paid for it will be refunded... 
you do not even have to return the 
KozaK. We are able to make this 
guarantee to you because in 32 years 


owners of cars millions of dollars 


in car washing. On this uncondi- 
tional guarantee tear out and mail 


KOZAK AUTO DRYWASH 


We heve lived in 
Betevie since 1825 

. +» thet’s 132 yeers. 
it's « 

good tewn 

industry. 


: 


saved 


KOZAK 


izes the clean bright shine of paint and chrome on your older car —— helps get you a bigger allowance 
when you trade-in, as reported by thousands of KozaK users. 


‘Made by people you can depend on to do the right thing” © 


SUPER KozaKs 


(Lost 4 Times Longer) 


[ 1 for $ 4 
O 2 for $7 
1) 5 for $15 - 


CO ii caine PI ihe Spee a TEN ee Zone... State 


STOP RUSTING! 


(1) 1# yeu de not need ao new Kozak ot this time. . 


OE ai a le ot ale eh 


a aR, eee EES Es He ROE SN, « SES CE er pe nen 


. - bb eb A DD De be D2 tt ft he fd tt tt td 


55 So. Lyon St., Batavia, N. Y. 


Fer remittence enclosed, pleese send postpaid et once, on your unconditione! guerentee: 


Regular KozaKs 
(Used by the Millions) 
[) 1 for $ 3 
[) 3 for $ 7 
[1 5 for $10 


You will seve TEN TIMES its cost by SILICONIZING your bumpers end bright mete! 
with the Mek-ur-own supplied with these KozeKs before seit rusts them beyond ell help. 


. or if you ere not even @« Kozek 


user, we would like to help you preserve your cer's nice looks by sending you 


O Check 
O Cash 


‘ 


enough Mek-ur-own for ell winter et no cost to you. 


| ‘SPECIAL 5.00 ORDER to introduce to you BOTH Super and Regular Kozaks, to help 
decide on your next order, which suits you best, 


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THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


orgenstiernes Adopt U.S. 


In Capital as Private Residents 


By Jessie Ash Arndt . 
Women's Editor of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Washington 

The beginning of 1958 marked 
a new and much more relaxed 
life for the former Norwegian 
Ambassador and Mrs. Wilhelm 
Munthe de Morgenstierne. The 
day after New Year's following 
a round of holiday parties, in- 
cluding that at which they en- 
tertained the new ambassador 
Paul Koht. and Mrs. Koht, they 
moved quietly—well, as quietly 
as one can move—to an apart- 
ment at 1911 R Street N.W. ~ 

Now they are enjoving 
dence in Washington, still among 
their many friends in official and 
diplomatic. circles, as private 
citizens. They no longer must 
represent the diplomatic corps at 
every function given for visit- 
ing heads of state, nor must Mr. 
Morgenstierne be at the airport 
to greet these dignitaries on 
their arrival in the nation's 
capital. ° 

For ten vears, as dean of the 
diplomatic corps, he discharged 
these obligations accompanied 
by Mrs. Morgenstierne whenever 
it was officially correct for he: 
to be present also. 


Too Many Dates 

Often these occasions were 
delightful, but added to the 
usual round of social - obliga- 
tions attendant on official and 
diplomatic life here, they some- 
times seemed to come too often. 
Still, they afforded to Mrs. 
Morgenstierne as well as the 
Ambassador such rare privi- 
leges* as being seated at the 
Queen’s table at the dinner 
given at the British Embassy 
honoring Queen Elizabeth IL 
and Prince Philip last autumn, 
and being included among the 
guests at the White House 


resi-, 


musicale, alsa given in honor 
of the royal visitors. 

When the Morgenstiernes came 
to Washington 24 years ago it 
was just nine years alter their 
marriage, which took place in 
her native city, Winnipeg, in 
1925. Although married to a 
Norwegian, Mrs. Morgenstierne 
has lived less than four vears 
in Norway except for the vaca- 
tions they have spent there. 

She and Mr. Morgenstierne 
met in June, 1925, when he 
went to Winnipeg to visit her 
sisters husband, his closest 
friend,. after having come to 
America to attend the centen- 
nial of the Norwegian-Amecri- 
can Society in Minneapolis. 
Just a month. later they were 
married and he _ returned to 
Norway with his Canadiag 
bride. 


Short Visit Here 

he was sent 
for six months 
Norwegian in- 
case— 
is still 
and his 
Wardman 
Park 


A year later. 
to Washington 
to represent 
terests in the Hannevig 
a shipping case which 
in it a omy — and he 
wife ved at the 
Park, now the Sheraton 
Hote! 

Thev then 
way where 


returned to Nor- 
Mr. Morgenstierne 
headed the Anglo-Saxon Divi- 
sion of the Foreign Office for 
two vears. In 1929, he came to 
the United States again as 
Norwegian consu] general in 
New York. and in 1934, he be- 
came the Norwegian envoy in 
Washington 

Social life was full of ‘in- 
terest to Mrs. Morgenstierne, 
who soon became one of the 
most popular of the diplomatic 
wives. 
At 
regular 


that time there was a 
schedule of “at homes.” 


Never loo Late tor Livy 


What's half a century in the 
life of a scholar! 

Not just 50 years — but 60 
years ago, Mrs. Katherine L. 
Bradley was working for her 
master’s degree at Cornel! Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N.Y., and had 
completed all the requirements 
except writing a thesis, when she 
“married a fellow student, Ly- 
man R. Bradley, who has since 
passed on. 

Today Mrs. Bradley has de- 
cided to finish the thesis that she 
side-stepped in 1897. 

Mrs. Bradley says: “T think it 
probably will deal with ‘pax’ 
(peace) in Livy, or perhaps 
with Tacitus.” Livy and Taci- 
tus were Roman historians. 

Mrs. Bradley taught Latin and 
Greek in a private school near 


FROM 
HAWAII: 


| nist. China's 


Ve 
ws 


littke queen's taste. On your 
grocer’s shelf or in his freezer. 


Pacific Hawaiian Products Co. 
Fullerton, Celiforma 


Philadelphia for a vear before 
entering Cornell in 1896 

The widow says her four chil- 
dren and some of her six grand- 
children studied the classics, but 
not the way she did at Smith and 
Cornel! 

“Now,” she says, “they dress 
up in togas and lie down to eat. 
They haven't the grounding and 
discipline we had.” 

Mrs. Bradley resides most of 
the’ year in Tallahassee, Fla. 
Her summer home is in Spencer, 
near Cornell's campus. 

Last vear she delivered a four- 
hour address on the 10 minor 
Hebrew prophets in the Bible 
before a church study group. 

Cornell has other ties in the 
Bradley family. Her daughter. 
K. Mary Stimson, was a member 
of the class of 1932; a son, Ben- 
jamin O. Bradley was in the 
class of 1934. Two _sons-in-law, 
Tuur® A. Pasto and Clinton R. 
Stimson, were in the classes of 
1934 and 1935, respectively. 


Wives. of members of the Su-. 


preme Court received on Mon- 
days from 4 to 6; the wives of 
members of Congress on Tues- 
days: Cabinet wives on Wednes- 
days: wives of senators on 
Thursdays, wives of diplomats 
on Fridays and the Washing- 
tonians used to have pleasant, 
informal parties on Saturdays 
and Sundays. Ong could go and 
meet one’s friends and enjoy the 
gatherings, Mrs. Morgensuerne 
recalled, but after World War 
Il with many more countries 
represented in Washington, there 
were just too many people to in- 
clude. So entertaining has con- 
siderably changed and the pleas- 
ant at homes are no lomger held 
as they used to be. 

When the Morgenstiernes had 
been 14 years in the capital, the 
Ambassador by virtué of the 
seniority of hi®@ service there be- 
came dean of the diplomatic 
corps, and its official representa- 
tive at all state functions and 
ceremonies. 

The Morgenstiernes have two 
daughters, Mrs. Marjorie Cole- 
man, who, with her little son, 
lives in Georgetown and is 
secretary to Ambassador Ben Ab 
Oud of Morocco, and Solveig, 
who lives at home. Solveig has 
recently been teaching Nor- 
wegian to American officers as- 
signed to the American Informa- 
tion Bureau in Oslo. 


Back to Norway 


The Norwegian pieces which 
furnished the library of the em- 
bassy during the Morgenstiernes’ 
period of residence they now are 
sending back to Norway where 
they have their summer home at 
Gola, high in the mountains. 
Semiformal French provincial 
pieces furnish their apartment 
here, 

Mrs 
fo give 


Morgenstierne, who used 
time to music as an ac- 
complished pianist, and to figure 
skating, now says her chief 
recreation is Walking. She and 
Mr. Morgenstierne enjoy walks 
on the Naval Observatory 
grounds, There has not been 
time for much other recreation 
during their busy years here. 

The chic little hats which sit 
becomingly on .Mrs. Morgen- 
stierne’s chestnut hair and her 
smiling gray eyes will still make 
a bright spot at official parties, 
but now she and Mr. Morgen- 
stierne will go just because they 
Want to. 

And guests at their R Street 
apartment will still enjoy meat 
balls, white fish soup, lobster 
meat and leg of lamb stuffed 
with parsley, the characteristic 
Norwegian dishes they always 
served at the embassy—and the 
delicious caramel pudding—but 
the parties will be less formal 
and the hosts can just enjoy 
the good friends they are enter- 
taining. 

Although thev will continue to 
reside here, they expect to 
spend their summers at their 
picturesque mountain home in 
Norway. 


a7 De 


ro 


Fritos Company 


ous ng es 8 


Teen-Ager Makes Valentine Tree 


Heart Motif Used in Food 


By Eleanor Richey Johnston 
Written for The Christian Science Monitor 

Valentine's Day with its col- 
ored hearts, lace, ribbons, and 
flowers invites entertaining, 
and Valentine table decorations 
are always easy. You can do 
wonders with hearts cut from 
red paper, with paper lace doi- 
lies pleated and frilled, and with 
artificial or real flowers and col- 
orful ribbon bows 

“I came to ask what you think 
of an idea I have for a center- 
piece for my Valentine party,” 


} 


a neighborhood teen-ager said 


to--me-afew days-ago, Shewas_one—of—our 


breathless from tearing across 
the street and her eyes were 
bright with her new idea. “It's 
so simple, I didn’t know whether 
it would do or not,” she added. 

We decided it would “do” very 
nicely, in fact that it would be 
lovely in the middle of the red 
crepe paper tablecloth she is 
planning to use, This is her idea, 
in her own words, 


Cookies Shaped Like Hearts for Valentine Parties 


| 


More than one person down 
South is going to start feeling 
sorry for the New Englander 
who mentions spring in Febru- 
ary. But aS anything, buds 
are swelling on shrubs in Bos- 
ton’s Public Gardens, even 
though tomorrow may bring 
them a feathery coat of white 

February in New England 
means unexpected thaws — and 
mud. And like as not, a snow 
shoveling stint before you can 
start off for work in the morn- 
ing. On such days, theres 
nothing like a hearty, warm 
breakfast, especially if there's 
someone around to get it for vou 
while you snap on overshbes and 
hunt for your muffler. , 

French - toasted 
wheat biscuits are the latest 
wrinkle — especially made to 
order tor Good Breakfast Month 
Which is vou've guessed it 
February. If this hearty a break- 
fast is the last thing you want 
there’« nothing to prevent vour 
using this good recipe for a sup- 
per dish 

Just split shredded wheat bis- 
cuits horizontally and place 
them an e¢gg-ini mixture: 4 


a 


sure 


, , 1] 
shredded 


lk 


a" 
sae 


beaten eggs to ‘2 cup milk and 
ls teaspoon of salt will do for 
six biscuits. When they have 
soaked about 5 minutes, frv them 
in heated shortening about |! 
inch deep until browned on both 
sides. You need turn them only 
once. There’s nothing else to do 
but serve them with maple syrup 
—there’s a new crop coming— 
and bacon or sausage 
You'll be surprised how the 
snow will fiv off the shove 
after that breakfast! 
4 4 4 


Betty Crocker, that good friend 
of cooks everywhere, has an 
unusual offer which mavy inter- 
est many, and be of special use 
to those who do not have normal 
vision. Tips and “talking recipes” 
have been put on three talking 
réecords—firtv tips on food 
preparation and serving, pilus 
twenty complete basic recipes 
for such items soup, bread, 
cake, and so on 

A vear ago a Similar of 
three records was offered to the 
public with spoken directions 
for all Betty Crocker cake, 
frosting. and cooky mixes. Man\ 
of the tips on this vears new 


as 


s@f 


records have been suggested by 
blind homemakers and students, 
and have been checked by such 
organizations the American 
Foundation the Blind. 

The set of three new records 
entitled “Tips and Talking 
Recipes” are available for just 
ten cents to cover malling and 
handling. Send requests to Betty 
Crocker, Dept. 920, General 
Mill lis, Inc., Minneapolis, Minne- 


as 


for 


a ¢ 
sot 


aes aa 
season brings the second 
largest crop of avocados in his- 
tory, we are told, which should 
mean attractive prices. 
4 4 4 

Carrots do not always have 
the following they deserve. 
Here's an interesting idea, and 
a’ -stmpte~one-~Sthice~ fresh~-car- 
rots as thin as a sharp knife will 
them and saute them in 
butter o! margarine until 
slightly tender but still crisp. 
Then spoon them into the bot- 
tom of soup cups, pour in hot 
consomme, and sprinkle chopped 
fresh chives over all for added 
color and flavor, It’s pretty and 
nourishing. 


This 


cut 


“Well, you see. at Christmas 
decorations. was a 
silver branch from a@ tree with 
lots and lots of little branches 
growing out of it. It wasn’t 
really silver, but we painted it 
silver. Now, my idea for Valen- 
tine’s Day is to set this branch 
in a flower pot of sand. making 
a ‘tree’ out of it. I can wrap 
sil¥er paper around the pot and 
tie it With a big red bow of satin 
ribbon. On the tree.limbs. I 
thought I would hang lots of 
little red hearts of different 
sizes—probably tie them on with 
narrow § silver ribbon—then | 
will call it my tree of hearts!” 
4 4 4 
The heart motif mav be car- 
ried out in refreshments in many 
different ways. The red. gelatin 
salad vou made into a star at 
Christmas may be molded into 
a heart for February 14. Cookies 
(shown in the picture) may be 
cut into heart shapes. Cakes, 
either big or little. may be heart 
shaped, iced with white icing 
and decorated with—_tiny candy 
hearts, or icing may be red 
' decorat ed with white hearts. 
Valentine Dainties 
6 tablespoons butter or marga- 
rine 
3 tablespoons sugar 
%4 cup flour 
'2 cup crushed corn. chips, 
measured after crushing 
1, cup semisweet chocolate 
pieces . 
f-ream sugar and butter to- 
gether; add flour, corn chips, 
and chocolate. Mix well. Pat on 
floured board and cut into 12 
hearts. Bake on cookie sheet at 
350° F. for 12 minutes. 
4 4 
Of course, any cookie dough 
may be cut in heart shape. Red 
coloring may be used in the 
icing. OF Fred sugar mav be used 
top these hearts. Here is a 
plain refrigerator cookie recipe, 
in case you want to make them 
the day before the party and 
serve them with red punch. 
Tea Cookies 
'» cups flour 
cup snortening 
cup sugar 
teaspoon sali 
eggs 
2 teaspoons vanilla 
‘Sift flour before measuring. 
Cream shortening with sugar 
and salt. Stir in eggs and va- 
nilla. Add flour in 4 portions, 
mixing well after each addition. 
Press into a rectangle and flat- 
ten; wrap in waxed paper: chill 
4-5 hours. Remove 15 of dough 
at a time from refrigerator and 
roll thin. Cut with heart cutter: 
bake on ungreased cookie sheet 
at 375° F. 8-10 minutes, until 
golden brown on edges. Remove 
from pan-to~cake~ rack: 11-12 
dozen cookies. 
a 
If you'd rather 
in your cookies, get heart- 
shaped gum drops and make 
these honey gum-drop bars. 
Honey Gum-Drop Bars 
1 cup honey 
3 eggs, well beaten 
1 teaspoon baking powder 


to 


] 
l 


4 
have hearts 


14 teaspoon salt ~ 
1!5 cups flour 
1 cup chopped nuts 
1 cup small red 
(heart shaped, if possible). 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Combine honey and cggs. Add 
dry ingredients which have been 
sifted together; add nuts, gum 
drops, and flavoring. Turn into 
pan which has been greased be- 
fore and after lining with waxed 
paper. Spread mixture to not 
more than 's inch thickness, 
Bake at 350° F. for 20 minutes 
or until lightly browned. Re- 
move from pan at once: remove 
paper. Cut in bars 14-inch wide 
and 3 inches long. May be rolled 
in powdered sugar, if you like. 

4 4 4 


Would you like to make an 
easy Valentine cake, white with 
a pink icing? Bake this in heart- 
shaped cake pans. 

Valentine Party Cake 
1 package white cake mix (plus 
ingredients called for) 
2 egg whites 
‘4 cup sugar 
1 cup jellied cranberry sauce 
‘4 cup slivered blanched al- 
monds 

Prepare cake mix as Ge 
rected on package and bake; 
cool. Then spread center, top, 
and sides with cranberry frost- 
ing to give the pink color you 
want for Valentine’s Day, 

Cranberry Frosting 

Beat egg whites until they 
barely hold their shape. Add 
Sugar gradually, continuing te 
beat until mixture is smooth 
and stands in soft peaks. Crush 
cranberry jelly with fork. Fold 
into egg white mixture. When 
cake is frosted, sprinkle almonds 
on top. 

| iy See 


If you're having a simple 
punch-and-cake party, try these 
cakes which you may want te 
bake in heart-shaped pans. This 
recipe makes 18. 

Valentine Cherry Cake 
2 cup shortening 
cup sugar 
teaspoon vanilla 
eggs 
244 cups sifted cake flour 
3 teaspoons baking powder 
‘> teaspoon salt 


1 
l 
l 
2 


34 cup milk 


‘2 cup maraschino’ cherries, 

chopped (about 20 cherries) 
2 squares semisweet chocolate, 

grated 

Cream together the shorten- 
ing, sugar, and vanilla until 
mixture is light and fluffy. Add 
eggs and beat thoroughly. Sift 
flour, baking powder and salt 
together. Add sifted ingredients 
alternately with milk, mixing 
well. Stir in cherries and chocoe 
late. Spoon batter into individe 
ual heart-shaped cupcake pans, 
Bake at 350° F. 20-25 minutes, 
or until done. Remove from pans 
and place on cooling rack. Frost 
top and sides with white frost- 
ing and garnish with chips of 
maraschino cherries. 

White Frosting 

Blend 2 tablespoons butter or 
margarine, 1] teaspoon vanilla, 
2 cups confectioners’ sugar and 
3 or 4 tablespoons milk to make 
a spreading consistency. 


. Agricultural Problems Lurk 


S Peking Set to Chart New Plan 


By Gordon Walker 
Chiet Far Eastern Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Hong Kong 
Ambitious plans for Commu- 
Second._Five-Year 
Plan will be the keynote of 
speechea made before the Na- 
tional People’s Congress sched- 
uled to open Feb. | in Peking. 

But behind all the oratory 
there will remain the sobering 
fact that the First Five-Year 
Plan suffered some serious set- 
backs, that targets were set a 
bit too high, and that agriculture 
—chief bulwark for industrv— 
just did not produce what was 
expected. 

[A pronouncement on results 
of the six-month “anti-rightist” 
campaign is expected to be one 
feature of the coming session 
Peking Radio reported Jan. 31 
that three cabinet ministers had 
heen dismissed bv Chief-of State 
Mao Tse-tung for “rightist” 
activities 

{The 


three ministers—Food 


_e 


For Steaks and Chops 
“KETTLE-FRESH” 


VACUUM-TINS - 


Pik- seeloed 


HOESTRING ~*~, 


CHOCOLATS ssa 
youll =a" 


NEVER 
FORGET 


BAUERS CHOCOLATS 


Capturing A: merica 


by the bite 


The USC of BAUR. 


$1.85 
LINCOLN, NEB. Pestpcid 


SPRING | 


eS) SILVER 


SPRING 


SILVER SPRING GARDENS 


EAU CLAIRE wis N SIN 


Minister Chang Nai-chi, Com- 
munications Minister Chang Po- 
chun, and Forestry Minister Lo 
Lung-chi—have been under con- 
Stant fire in recent months be- 


cause; during Peking's- brief ex- 


employment. 


periment in free speech last 
spring, they took too Aterally 
Mr, Mao’s admonition to let “A 
hundred flowers bloom together. 
a hundred schools of thought 
contend.” ] 
Heavy Industry Stressed 
Tweive hundred delegates 
from all over mainland China 
who attend the Congress will be 
told that in substance the Sec- 
ond Five-Year Plan remains as 
originally anticipated with major 
emphasis upon heavy industry. 
Where changes have _been 
Made is in néw émphasis placed 
upon industry being geared to 
give greater support to agricul- 
ture, notably in increased pro- 
duction of chemical fertilizers, 
There will also be less empha- 
sis upon mechanization of agri- 
culture as a result of general 
though belated recognition that 
Communist China's manpower 
may be its greatest asset and 
that introduction of farm ma- 
chines has created serious un- 


how far Peking leaders 
will go in admitting the eco- 
nomic failures which marked 
the closing phases of the First 
Five-Year Plan is an open ques- 
tion. 

Failures will be implicit, how- 
ever, in an expected new call 
for belt tightening and general 
austerity. 

This should not be taken as a 
sign that Communist China now 
is in the midst of an economic 
crisis, It does mean, however, 
that the last stages of the First 
Five-Year Plan and particular- 
ly the drought, floods, and ty- 
phoons of the past year dealt a 
heavy blow to economic plans 
and have forced some revisions. 

Collectives Fall Short 

The first Five-Year 
probably be most noted for the 
inability of the government to 
make farm collectives live up 
to expectations. 

Weather played a big part in 
the crop failures of 1957 


Just 


Plan will, 


refusal of farms to deliver all 
their grains plus the farmers’ 
higher rate of food consumption 
probably played an even greate! 
part. 

This tresutted~in-€omnrunist 
China having less to export and 
therefore in forced cutbacks in 
imports needed for industry. 

Another big problem which 
may come in for discussion dur- 
ing the latest Congress meeting 
is that of population 

Much attention has been 
focused upon the present scheme 
to send upward of five million 
intellectual cadres and malicon- 
tents to work in farm areas 
What has received less attention 
is the gigantic drain on state 
finances ‘incurred by the 
mounting—_influx_of_rural popu- 
lation into the cities 

Attracted bv better living 
conditions and dissatisfied with 
the collectives, large chunks of 
mainland China’s rural people 
have flocked to the cities in 
mass migrations which have 
raised the population in some 
cities like Shanghai by as much 
as 100 per cent. 

Drift From Farms Hit 

This has forced the govern- 


still- 


—prent to spend ast-stins-on new 


and 
mene 


housing, transportation, 
welfare facilities, not to 
tion the problem of meeting food 
needs. 


‘For a short-term solution the 


government sending large 
numbers back to farms and 
through registration and police 
blockades is attempting to stem 
the flow. 

For a longer-range solution 
the vernment hopes to de- 
ont. industry, thereby dis- 
persing the popylation. 

Finally, the Congress will be 
given an up-to-date account 
progress made in the. rectifica- 
tion Campaign 

Jt will be clear that while the 
rectification campaign now is 
scheduled to continue’ unti! 
May, the lids have been slammed 
down tight and “freedom ol 
expression” will be strictly con- 


is 


oO! 


but ' trolled. 


Bie or, 
mers See 


warheads 


World News in Brief 


Reports from corresnonderts of 7 
fhe Associal ted Ahoy ar 


eChrts ae Ce rere eMo” tor. 


d Reuters 


London: Fog Snarls Communications 


A pea-soup fog descended on 
blacking out 
traffic. In the Essex 
crash on a line with a 
automatic train control, 
ranged from about 

blackout fog crept over the 


shuee ' he 


Suiwui wo 


air communication 


supposedly 

killed 
20 vards to zero in southeast England and~™ 
industrial midlands. 


20 English counties late Jan. 30, 


and stalling Thames River 
London, a commuter train 
“fool-proof” system of 
passengers. Visibility 


of 


10 


Labor Party Spokesman Aneurin Bevin and three other widely 


Britons commented 
Jan. 31. LLaborite leade1 

Weekly Tribune, 
to disarmament 


known 


with 


on 
Bevan, 
linked what he called 
United States 


world disarmament problems 
wrring the left-wing 
American “resistances” 
conditions. He 


ail 


economic 


said he felt much opinion in the United States was committed 
to accepting a boost in defense spending as the most hopeful 


vay out ofl 
sae A mo Canon 
scientific write: 
clear disarmament” 
to stop the armaments race—if 


Cairo: Kuwatly 
Syrian President Kuwatly 
President Nasser of Egypt 
State’ of their two nations. 
he made Feb. 1 or Feb. 2. 


John 
Ritch 


a growing depression 
Collins 
ie Calder 
in an effort to persuade their countrymen 


* See 3 
and 


nu- 


Meanwhile, writer 

of St. Pauls Cathedral 
launched a “campaign for 
uniiatera!l action. 


necessary D) 


Arrives 
arrived 
in 
The 


here Jan. 31 to join with 
proclaiming a “United Arab 
proclamation is expected, to 


Paris: Standard Oil Seans Sahara 


Jan, 30 
venture 
of 

Top 


Reports circulated here 
minent on a joint oil 
Standard Oil Company 
Francaise des Petroles 
reported holding talks 
ernment in Paris now. 


New 
Jersev 
with the C, 


that an announcement is im- 
in the southern Sahara by the 
Jersey and the Compagnie 
Standard executives are 
F. P,. and the French Gov- 


Cairo: Algerian Appeal Aired 


The Algerian National Liberation front Jan. 30 asked the aid of 


four Baghdad Pact 

Cairo ambassadors of 
Western economic 
the Algerian problem 


members—Iran, 
Iraq—in Obtaining Algerian independence 
the four 
and financial aid to France be halted while 
remains 


Pakistan. Turkey, and 
Notes to the four 
Pact members suggested that 


unsettled. 
2 


British-U.S. Pact Held Near 


On Nuclear- Missile Bases 


By © Asso 


Ankara, Turkey 
United States and British rep- 
resentatives should ‘have an 
agreement for stationing Ameri- 
nuclear in Britain 
for signature within 10 
days, American informants said 


Jan. 30. 
Secretary’ of State John Foster 


Dulles and British Foreign Sec- 
retary Selwyn Lloyd discussed 
missile bases and other matters 


can missiles 


ready 


a few hours before Mr, Dulles 


left for home after the Baghdad 

conference ended Jan, 30. 
American sources said Mr 

Dulles proposed a solution for 


the lone remaining point of dis- 
‘agreement, 


The nature of the 
point was not disclosed, but it 
was described as minor. 

The plan is expected to call 
for four bases costing Britain 80 
to 90 million dollars. The weap- 
ons stationed there will be 1,500- 


‘mile intermediate range ballistic 


missiles. Custody of the nuclear 
will remain with 
American teams at the launch- 


| sites, 
' “ihe bases are F sass to be 


acted Presse 
in operation by the end of this 
VCal 

Jacques Chaban - Delmas, 
French Defense Minister, said 1n 
Paris Jan. 30 that France de- 
mands “atomic independence” in 
the Atlantic Alliance. His words 
implied that France intends: to 
have its own nuclear weapons 
with no-strings attached. 

M. Ghabaln-Delmas told news- 
papermen France has asked the 
United States for either nuclear 
bombs or enough information to 
make them so that’ Paris can use 
them independently if necessary. 
The French are reported well 
along on making a bomb of their 
own. % 

The United States has not 
asked, at least on a -high level, 
for the stationing of nuclear 
missiles in France. And there are 
no nuclear stockpiles for United 
States warplanes there. 

France is believed seeking 
United States nuclear secrets in 
return for granting permission 
for missile bases on French soil. 
The French have said proposed 
changes in United States law to 
make nuclear information avail- 
able to allies will benefit Britain 
and Canada but not France, 


‘Pierre Pflimlin 


‘Paris Hails News 


Of New 


By Joan 


Aid Loans 


Thiriet 


Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monttor 


Paris 
A vast sigh of relief has gone 
up in French official circles as 


‘the news that the United States 


Government, the Internationa! 
Monetary Fund, and the Organi- 
zation for European Economic 
Cooperation (through the Euro- 
pean Payments Union) have 
agreed to provide France with a 
total of $655,250,000. 

Premier Felix Gaillard told a 
crowded press conference at his 
official residence, the Hote! Ma- 
tignon, Jan. 31, that this “good 
news” was “a patch of blue sky” 
which has brought France out of 
“the past months’ nightmare.” 

This infusion of fresh cur- 
rency reserves means.the lifting 
of an enormous burden from the 
shoulders of Finance Minister 
who, over the 
has been hard put 
to settle for 


past months, 
to find currency 
essential French imports., M 
Pflimlin has been looking at a 
bare cupboard, which is now re- 
furnished with a good supply. 
enough for some 15 months. 


Gaillard Cheerful 


But amid the general! sigh of 
relief the French Premier made 
a point of stressing that this did 
not mean in any way that France 
could Jet up on its efforts to 
stabilize the franc and put Ls 
finances and economy on a 
sound footing before the Euro- 
pean Common Market begins its 
slow progression toward West- 
ern economic unity at the begin- 
ning of 1959. 

M. Gaillard, 
most unwontedly 
announced the news. 
a barrage -of— floodlights 
speaking ‘over the whir of the 
cameras, paid tribute to “the 
comprehension of the United 
States Government” and to the 
solidarity shown by France's al- 
lies’ whom he remarked had a!so 
shown themselves to be 
“friends.” 

He warned that “the worst 
of errors’ would be “to con- 
sider that this help enables us 
to relax our efforts in any way.” 
He told reporters that any such 
effect “‘would be catastrophic.” 

M. Gaillard explained that the 
expected foreign trade deficit for 
1958 should be in the neighbor- 
hood of $400,000,000, meaning 
that France will have enough re- 
serves in hand with the new 
loans to cover the year. easily 
and tide over into 1959. 


More Than Hoped For 


But he said “if we have not 
achieved a favorable balance by 
the end of this year, the threat 
will come in 1959. The position 
then would be almost insoluble, 


who looked al- 
-smiling as he 
sitting in 
and 


for the negotiations that have 


brought these loans cannot be 
renewed.” 

The negotiations are certainly 
a success from the French point , 


000 


‘$96,000,000 are obtained by 


more than was 
and the 


is rather 
generally hoped for, 


_terms_of repayment are in gen- 


eral excellent, since they give 
France ample time to put its 
affairs in order. 

There are no political condi- 
tions attached, as M. Gaillard 
was at pains to explain. There 
is also no specific obligation 
exacted by the OEEC regarding 
a speedy return to the police 
of liberalizing trade whic 
France was obliged to reverse 
in 1957 as its reserves dwindled 
to the danger point. This subject, 
quite apart from the EPU new 
loan, is due to come up in June. 

On the other hand, the tone 
of the communiqués put 6ut By 
the OEEC show that France has 
been put “on its honor,” in the 
sense that the loans are tied 
closely to a program of financial 
recovery outlined by the French 
Government. 


Reform Obligated 


France is therefore implicitly 
obligated to continue the policy 
laid down by M. Gaillard, to 
avoid any inflationary actions, 
and to carefully foster the hopes 
of financial stability opened by 
this new opportunity. 

The financial facilities ex- 
tended to France by the United 
States total $274,000,000 of which 
an 
agreement the next four 
semi-annual installments on 
previous Export-Import Bank 
loans, $90,000,000 by postpone- 
ment of three annual installe 
ments on prior’ lend-lease 
credits, $43,000,000 in shipments 
of cotton under Law 480, and a 
further $45,000,000 through the 
fale for francs of United States 
military supplies to French 
NATO forces. 

The European Payments Une 
ion will provide $250,000,000, 
either through the organization's 
funds or by means of funds 
loaned by various member coun- 
tries, which notably’ include 
$100,000,000 provided by Ger- 
many. Finally, the Internae 
tional Monetary Fund has ap- 
proved a drawing by France of 
$131,250,000. 


Ernst Heinkel 


By Reuters 


Stuttgart, Germany 
Dr. Ernst Heinkel, who passed 
on here Jan. 30, was one of the 
most famous names in German 
aviation. 
Dr. Heinkel, credited with dee 


on 


veloping the world’s first jet aire 


craft and first aircraft catapult, 
founded his firm after World 
War I and saw it grow in World 
War II into Hilter’s biggest pro- 
ducer of warplanes. 

Hitler gave him the title of 
work pioneer. In 1948 a denazi- 
fication court fined him but on 
appeal an Ansbach court in 1949 
cleared him of the designation 


of view, The total of $655,250,-| “Nazi follower.” 


gum drops 


ey 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ‘MONITOR, BOSTON, 


4 


SS NR ten a 


-FRIDAY, 


JANUARY 31, 1958 


Art—Music—Theater 


*5 


New Haven’s Alpert Mayan Treasures in Cambridge—Seven Hills of Rome’ 


Of ACes Proxy Fight Art of**Greeks of America’ 


By a Staff Writer of The Christian Sciénce Monitor 
A group claiming control 6f allow the list to be used: The} 
131,385 shares—or 28 per cent— | 


of the preferred stock of the New 


Railroad has called for the re- 
placement of George Alpert as 
president with an “operational! 
expert” to head the road’s man- 
agement. 


J. Douglas Casey, president of 
A. C. Allyn & Co., New York 
and Chicago investment firm, in 
@ statement charged that “the 
deterioration of the New Haven 
Railroad has reached the point 
where immediate action is man- 
datory.” The investment house 
leads a group of five investment 
banking firms which holds the 
131,385 preferred shares. 

Under the New Haven’s char- 
‘ter, preferred stockholders can 
elect two-thirds of the com- 
pany’s directors when preferred 
dividends are in arrears, 
are.in_the case of the road. 


Board Shake-Up Asked 
Immediate reorganization of 
the board of directors of the 


road to include representatives 
of what Mr. Casey termed “pres- 


ently unrepresented” preferred 


and common ‘stockholders, de- 
manded by the _ investment 
group, clearly indicated a proxy 
fight at the annual stockholders’ 
meeting in April. 

Mr. Alpert declined comment 
on the latest statement of the 
investment group. He had earlier 
asserted, however, that he and 
the present management of the 
‘railroad would resist any at- 
tempts by minority stockholders 
to gain control. 

The Allyn firm currently is 
seeking access to the road's list 
of preferred stockhoiders 
had entered suit in Connecticut 
Superior Court at New Haven to 
force the railroad secretary to 


Morrison Named 
Library Meeting’s 
Featured Speaker 


Theodore Morrison, author of 
“Stones of the House” and a lec- 
turer on English at Harvard Uni- 
versity, will be the featured 
speaker at the midwinter meet- 
ing of the Massachusetts Library 
Association Thursday, Feb. 13, 
Hotel Somerset, Boston. 

“How to Get, Train, and Keep 
Librarians,” a topic of urgency 
for all libraries today, will be 
discussed in the morning by the 
following. three-man_ panel: 

Keyes D. Metcalf, librarian 
of Harvard College, emeritus 
and library consultant: Kenneth 
R. Shaffer, director of Simmons 
College schoo! of library science: 
and Robert L. Peel, registrar 
and professor of human rela- 
tians, Boston University College 
of Business Administration. 

“Minimum standards for Mas- 
_ sachusetts public libraries, 1958” 


will be reported on by the as-., 


sociation’s planning committee. 
New spring books will be re- 
viewed by Helen L. Jones, chil- 
dren’s editor at Little, Brown & 
Co. and by Dr. Sidney Rosen 
The “Art of Book Reviewing” 
will be discussed by Lilly S. 
Abbott, reference librarian at 
Salem Public Library. : 


and 


‘investment firm’s 


York, NewHaven & Hartford some postponed to next Thurs- 


i 


as they | 


.all over the world. 


superior court: hearing on the | 
petition has 


day. 
Deficit in '57 Cited 

In its superior court petition, 
the Allyn firm said it sought the 
preferred stockholder list to pre- 
pare for the election of directors | 
at the railroad’s spring meeting. 
A railroad spokesman said ac- 
cess to the stockholders’ list was 
denied because the investment 


company gave no specific reason | 


for its request. 

For ihe first 11 months of 
1957, the New Haven had a defi- 
cit of $963,187 as compared 
with earnings of $214,089 in the 
same period of 1956. Recently, 
the road has cut train schedules, 
sought increased fares, and. has 
announced the impending lay- 
off of 800 employees or nearly 
six per cent of its working force 

Indications that the railroad 
may face further legislative in- 
vestigation was at hand when 
Senator -ohn E. Powers (D) of 
Boston, Senate Minority Leader, 
walked out of an informal meet- 
ing held yesterday between leg- 
islative leaders and Mr. Alpert. 
Senator Powers declared that he 
was declining to participate in 
closed sessions. He said that he 
will not be a party to testimony 
that is not given under oath. 


Now on Display at Harvard, 


By Dorothy Adlow 


.. Because Mrs. Alfred M. Toz- 
‘zer has donated means for 
‘proper display, invaluable art 
treasures of Middle American 
‘cultures, owned by Harvard 
| University for half a century, 
‘are now attractively exhibited. 
With the enhancements of good 
lighting and adequate back- 
grounds, a-selection of Mayan 
arts af various stages of that 
great culture is now on special 
exhibition. There are descrip- 
tive labels -for the material 
which is set up in chronologi- 
cal sequence. 

“Greeks of America” was the 
complimentary characterization 
of one scholar. Such esteem is 
high indeed for the accomplish- 
ments of these pre-Columbian 
Americans. But the aesthetic es- 
timate extends beyond the 
boundary of classical antiquity, 


for the experts discern-an-artis- 


ancient 
Chinese. 


tic Kinship with the 
Egyptians, the early 
and the finer expression of 
India. Thus, Maya is associated 
with the peaks of achievement 
in art history. 

Practical interests brought ex- 


plorers into the Maya country—._| 


the search for coffee. bananas, | 
and chicle. Fabulous discoveries 


Library of World Law 


Under Way 


Special to The Christ 


Cambridge , 

A new library is being built 
at the Harvard Law School to 
house old and new books which 
will further legal understanding 
between the “old” and “new” 
worlds. 

The International Legal 
Studies library will include col- 
lections of the laws of Britain 
and the British Commonwealth, 
of Europe, Asia, the Middle 
East, and Latin America, as well 
as those of the United States. 

Books which are now stored | 
in the basements of the schoo]’s | 
dormitories and in Langdell Hall 
will be made more easily acces- | 
sible, according to Erwin N. 
Griswold, dean of the law 
school. 

Not only will the faculty and 
students of Harvard be able to 
use them -he-- emphasized, -but 
they will be available to schol- 
ars and practicing lawyers from 
and by offi- 
cials from Washington and from 
the United Nations. 

This special branch of the 
law school, composed of 200 
Americans and 100 foreign 
students, is “mainly for grad- 
uates” with a law degree, ex- 
plained Dr. Griswold.- Some 
courses In the program; how- 
ever, may be taken while stu- 
dents are working toward their 
LL.D degrees. 

‘The new building will con- 
nect with Langdell Hall, the 
main library, by means of a 
two-story glass bridge,” said 


Hugh Shepley of Shepley, Bul- | 


_| 


RESTAURANTS 


WELLESLEY, MASS. oe 


CHIN’S VILLAGE 


981 Worcester Turnpike 
(Wellesley, Reute 9) 
CE 5-4481 — CE 5-9650 


Chinese and American Food 


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR PARTIES 


ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 


‘CHINA INN 


250 Herverd Street 
Brookline (Coolidge Corner) 
LO 6-9021 —LO 6-0395 


SN NS 8 SS eee 


ANDOVER, MASS. _ 


FIELDSTONES 
CLOSED 
WILL OPEN 
MARCH 22nd 


Route 28 


Howard Johnson's 
Reute 28 ef By-Pess 
BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON end DINNER 
Open Deily 8 A.M. to 12 P.M. 
' Privete room available for parties 


BOSTON, MASS. 


ALL ‘ROUND BOSTON 


—— ——— 


oy 4 


Ts eeaor's 
SINCE 1928 


SLADES ORIGINAL BARBEQUE 


en ot its 
LUN egg AND DINWERS 
te Take 
A.M. to 
*noxpuRy, Mass 
7-775 


Manag Restaurants advertised im The 
m4 Gee Monttor ectate your 
cuies sourself as « Monitor reader. 


. 


: 


ete seed and 


WELLESLEY 
570 Weshington Street 


Breakfast Luncheon 
Dinner 


CAMBRIDGE, MASS. | 
Petit Gourmet — 


19 Gosden Street, Cambridge 


ommander Hotel 
LUNCHEON AND DINNER 


| Real Home-Cooked Food—Sensibie Prices 


| 


Sunday Binner 17-4 P.M. 


EAST BRIDGEWATER, | 
MASS 


COPPA GLU secur, 


JUNCTION ROUTES 18-106 
EAST BRIDGEWATER 


(In Our 32nd Yeor) 


Open 11:30 to 7:30 
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays 


(Except Holidays) 
E. B. Drake #2211 


Tel. 


LEXINGTON, MASS, 


OPEN YEAR ROUND 


17753 HOUSE 


Luncheon—Dinner 
Between 12 Noon and 8:36 P.M 
(CLOSED MONDAYS) 
Route 2, Lexington, Mass. 
For Reservations Tel. VO 7-114 


aay * 


ROCKPORT, MASS. 


- OLEANA-BY-THE- SEA | 


ROCKPORT, MASS. 
Breakfast « Lunch e Dinner 
Delicious Homemade Pastries 


‘space in the new 


| classrooms, 
faculty 


| president 
| William F. Schnitzler, secretary- | 
| treasurer. 
Text of the telegram, to which | 
been no! 


_Jan,..28 by. Al Bradt. 
| porary chairman of the FRF. he 


| terpreted 


at Harvard 


ian Science Monitor 


finch, Richardson & Abbott, 
architects of the project 

“The gray limestone exterior 
will match the gray limestone of 
Langdell Hall,” he continued. 
“Large picture windows wil! 
face the northern: and eastern 
exposures. The sun from the 
west and south is hot and un- 
desirable.” 

According 
there will 


to 


be 


Mr. Shepley, 
enough stack 
building for 
250,000 books. Five levels high, 
the building also will have four | 
a reading room, 
offices, and a dining 
room for employees. 

Construction of the library on 
Massachusetts Avenue began on 
| Dec. 16 and is expected to be 
finished in one year—by De- 
cember, 1958. 


When, in January, 
law school received a_ grant 
from the Ford. Foundation. 
$500,000 of it was put toward a 
wing to Langdell Hall for this 


1955, the 


| rapidly expanding department. 


The remaining $500,000. which 
makes up the $1,000,000 estimat- 
ed cost of the building, is being 
raised through gifts from busi- 
ness organizations, foundations. 
and interested individuals. 


Staff Members 


Of AFL-CIO Asked 


To Take Pay Cut | 


By the Associated Press 


Providence, RI. | 
Staff members of the AFL” 


—~—| CIO have been asked to take a. 
cut to save the’ 


voluntary’ pay 
Jobs of 56 labor organizers whose 
dismissal notices become effec- 


=| tive this Saturday 


As an alternative, the Field 
Representatives Federation has 
| Suggested that all staff members 
| agree to work one or two weeks 
a year without pay “to help the | 


| cause.” 


The money-saving - proposals | 
were set forth in a telegram | 
‘from FRF leaders to AFL-CIO 
George Meany and 


there has _ reportedly 
response, was made public here 
As tem- 


Was one of its signers. The other 
signer was Robert W. Christof- 
_ferson of Charlotte, 
'Christofferson,. FRF temporary | 
secretary- treastirer. is one of the | 
organizers who has received a 


dismissal notice. 


AFL-CIO spokesmen have in-| 
dicated that the slash in the or- 


| ganizing staff was dictated for 


but Mr. Bradt 
Christofferson have in- 
it as an attempt to 
the FRF, which has 


economy reasons, 
and Mr. 


“destroy” 


been seeking recognition as bar- | 


gaining representative for the 
organizers. 
An FRF petition for a bar- 


gaining representative election 


is pending before the National 
| Labor Relations Board. 


‘Meanwhile, Mr. Bradt has 
been assigned to W estbrook, 
Maine,a.few miles west of Port- 
land, to carry on an organizing 
campaign at the S. D. Warren 
Paper Company. 

Mr. Bradt termed his 
assignment part of a “campaign 
of persecution” for his attempts 
to organize the office employees 
of the international union. 


new 


Sullivan cian 
29 Hub Policemen 


Police Commissioner Leo J. 
Sullivan today promoted six 
police lieutenants to the grade 
| of captain, eight sergeants to 
lieutenant, and 15 patrolmen to 
| sergeant. 

These promotiqns will take | 
effect next Wednesday and will | 
fill up the ranks with the excep- | 
tion of two captaincy vacancies. 

The Back Bay and South End | 
traffic and tagging officers wil! 


two of the new captains, James 
Sullivan and Francis X. 


Quinn, who have traffic experi- | 


ence, will divide the city in two 
sections and will be responsible 
for the enforcement of traffic 
re lations in their sections. 
Ig. Hinchey will be freed to do 
executive. wark with the traffic 
| force, 


a 


NC. Mr. | 


myreves rere 


be sent to the traffic division and | 


puty Superintendent James | 


lattracted explorers, archeolo- 
gists, historians and astrono- 
mers, for it was soon found that 


‘these native Indians had cre-| 
calendar | 


ated a remarkable 
based on mathematical calcula- 
tion and a knowledge of the 


movements ofthe sun, the moon, | 
A duodecimal! | 
system of bars and | 
dots was evolved by the Maya: | 


and the planets. 
numerical 


and they originated a method of 
writing with glyph. characters. 
Scholars at present are in the 


——————— 


b 
s 


process of deciphering their hi- | > 


eroglyphic system. 


The exhibition begins with a| 


display of the formative epoch 
reaching back to about 
B.C, The next phase is 
classic, 100 B.C. to 100 
Potteries and figures 
changes and progress in fabri- 
cation as well as design concept. 
In—-elassical...Mayan 
there are visualizations of gods 
and supernatural forces in a 


proto 
A.D, 


complex, ornate style with pro- | 


found expression. The classical 
Mayan art is described as “so- 
phisticated, natural, flowing, 
curvilinear.” ‘The relief carving 
is compact and concise and curi- 
ously involved as Andrée Mal- 
raux might say with “man’s 
destiny.” A superb example of 
sculpture in the round is a 


‘maize god from Copan, Hondu- 
ras. 


This head has been com- 
pared with the loftiest achieve- 
ments in Greek or Gothic 
sculpture. 

There are also shown indiv id- 
ually various carvings of glyphs, 
a grotesque head, and a serpent 
dragon. Those who . brought 
these treasures to light decades 
ago could not have guessed that 
these very objects would soon be 
regarded so highly as works of 
art. 

4 


4 4 


Gouaches by Trefonides 


Recent gouaches and draw- 
ings by the Bostonian, Steven 
Trefonides, will be on view at 
the Carl Siembab Gallery until 
Feb, 22. Mr. Trefonides works in 
the medium of photography as 
well as painting and graphic 
art, 

He paints subjects relating 
profoundly, passionately to birth 
and to death. His is a strong 
and forthright presentation. 

There is some influence of 
Hyman Bloom on this younger 
artists manner and even on his 
pictorial concepts. But topical- 
ly, Mr. Trefonides shows more 
range and greater venturesome- 
ness. The “‘life-force,” expressed 
vividly by romantic artists, is 
visualized by Mr. Trefonides 
in .a-mixture of realism -and 
symbolism. 

Added to these themes is a 
series of drawings which were 
inspired by John Malcolm Brin- 
nin’s book “Dylan Thomas in 
America.” Many young artists 
have focused on Dylan Thomas 
as a tragic, poetic figure. Mr. 
Trefonides’ depictions are night- 
marish and macabre. 
Aside from its topical 
terial, the exhibition holds in- 
terest for craftsmanship. Mr. 
Trefonides is one of a distin- 
guished clan of Boston artists 
who have developed skillful 
draftsmanship, studying the old 
masters profitably. They are pa- 
‘tient. deft. experimental. It is a 
pleasure to study the deviceful- 
ness and the effectiveness with 


ma- 


-which-they—put-the tools of their 


trade to work. 

Mr. Trefonides finds gouache 
appropriate for one kind of 
composition, white ink and a 
“washaway technique” for an- 


'other,. The pen and sponge have 


been used in combination. Some 
brush drawings of insects are 
handsomely executed, 


1500 | 


show | 


culture | 


Mario Lanza and Marisa All 
at the State and Orpheum. 


— es 


Camera Visit 
To Bermuda 


And Florida 


Thayer Soule presented “Ber- 
muda” last night at Symphony 
Hal in the Burton Holmes se- 
ries of Low-level 
shots of a march in the 
islands military tattoo were 
particularly successful in cap- 
turing the atmosphere of the 
occasion 

The picture 
moved to Na 
to Bermuda. 
vacationers 


travelogues 


slow 


tarted in Florida, 
sau, and then on 
It was primarily a 
survey, sticking 
closely to the beautiful, the nos- 
talgic, and what they cost in 
these sun-drenched playgrounds 

In Florida Mr. Soule touched 
on Miami, Miami Beach, and 
Key West, and proved that there 
is something to be sé€en in the 
area bésides millionaires. He in- 
cluded* the man-made islands 
linking the first two, the water- 
front homes—attractive but all 
too often lacking evidence of 
anyone enjoying them, since 
they are, Mr. Soule says, used 
for only a few days each vear— 
and the nearby displays of mon- 
keys, orchids, parrots, and othei 
jungle wonders. 

Moving on to Nassau. 
presented” a contrast 
with crowded, growing, striv- 
ing Miami. In thé ancient and 
quiet streets of the capital city 
of New Providence island, the 
native residents — black and 
white—promenade to watch the 
tourists buying tall hats and 
shell-strewn bags in the straw 
market. On more s¢rious. er- 
rands they rub elbows with the 
visitor at the harbor market, 
buying fruit and vegetables, 
some of it from the islands but 
much from the United States. 


After the intermission, Mr. 
Soule took his audience on to 
his chief venue of Bermuda, ar- 
riving there just in time for the 
searchlight tattoo produced by 
the man who makes the ar- 
rangements annually for the 
Edinburgh tattoo. The next Ber- 
muda one will be in 1959. 

The lecturer warned that no 
one is allowed to drive an auto- 
mobile on the island until he 
has been resident there for 30 
days. Perhaps this ruling is en- 
forced because it takes that 
length of time to slow down 
from 20th-century hustle to. the 
island's 20-mile speed limit. 

Anyone for Bermuda this 
year? Ms ax ae 


the film 
ir -pace 


; 


Music 
Temerrow 
Maseum—Lya 
2:45 


Gardner De Barberiis 


piano 


Theater 


Charles Street Piayhouse—‘‘The Grass 
Harp 8:30. 

| Colenial—*‘No Time for Sergeants.” 
James Holden. Myron McCormick. 8.30 

Poets’ Theater. Cambridge—'Mrs. Na- 


and “The Exiles, 
8:30. Sun. 


Shubert—' ‘The Entertainer.” Sir Lau- 
rence Olivier. George Relph pr enee 
de Banzie,. Joan Plowright 2 

Wilbur—"“Cat on a Hot T' bent. 
tor Jory. 8:30" Mats. Wed. Sat 


Dance Orchestra 
Totem Pele. Norumbega Park; Newton— 
Dancing tonight. 


Films in Boston 
Aster—"Wild Is the Wind,” 
Magnani Anthony Quinn 
Pranciosa 10:30, 12:35, 2:45. 


9:30. 
— will—Cartoons. 9:30, 11.10, 12°55 
6:10. 7:60, 9:40 P 


Vie. 
2:30. 


Anna 
Anthony 
$8, 7:35, 


Sesten—" Search for Paradise.” 
rama, 2: 8 40 
Capri rear ewe oe saa , 
inness, | 4 nvi- 
ate rit . Gene Kells 
yo 25. ; 
“Only the French Can Jean 
Marie Felix Francoise Arnoul 
il 25. 2-55. 6°20. 9:50. “Lady Chatter- 
* Danielle Darrieux, Leo 
} 4:25. 7:35 
Exseter—' admirable Crichton.” Kenneth 
More. 2:10, 4:35. 7 
Age That Is Waiting.” 
From Hell It 
Carver 
‘The Disembodied.” 
8 Paul Burke. Alison 


Gary— ‘Bridge on the River Kwai.’ 
liam Hiden. Alec Guinness. cl 

Hawkins or ‘Pevion Place.” Lara 

morial—' 

a By Lee Philips. 9.30. 12:24 3-18. 

6:12. 9:06 

Keamore~Marcel Marceau, 1. 3:12, 5:24 

7: 48. “Gervaise,*_ Maria Schell, 

1:16, 3:22. 6:34 3:46, 9:58 

Mayfiower—''Pal Joey.” Frank Sinatra 

Rita Hayworth, 9:50, 12:10, 2:50, 4°40 

7:05, 9:20 


i Metre itan Marlon 
rp ado. Miike Tike Se: 10 "42:85. 3: <0. 
9:10. 


| ont ee ‘Seven Hille of Rome. 
eanen, Marisa Allasio, Renato Rascel, 
|” 99:15, 2:50, 6:30, 10:10, “Happy Road, 
' Gene Kelly, 9:30, 1:05, 4:45, 8:25 
Paramount—'‘From Heil It Came,’ Tod 
Andrews. Tina Carver, 9:20, 11:46 
a 10, 4: 05. 9.35. “The Disembod- 
ied.” Paul Burke. Allison Hayes, 10:30. 
1, to 5:55. 8:20 
— Raber 
2:25 
» home 


Below.” 
9.20 
Road. 
11:05, 


> 
itehum Curt Jergens. 
3:25. 9°25. “Plunder 
lide Jeanne Cooper. 2.05 
5:10. 8:10. 
Saxen—“Aroind the World in “80 
Days,”’ David Niven, Cantinfias. Rober 
Rotten Shirley MacLane. 2:30, 
State—‘‘Seven Hills “of Rome.” aris 
Lange Marise Allasio Renato Rasce! 
11:25, 2:55, 6:30, of of Bs id Road. 
Gene Kelly. 1:10 . 
Teleptn~—Bistoric B.A narrated br 
ec Guinness; Ecuador; anada 
Washington” Irving s “Bleepy Hollow" ; 


40, 4:25, ‘Old | 
Yeller,” 9:45. 11:30. 1:15. 3 4:40, 6:25. | 
:10 


Cine- 


* Mario | 


Entertainment Timétable 


Robert Benchic 
Cartoons: News 


Cari Hoff and Band 
10:30 to midnight 
Trans-Lux The Respectful Prostitu 
9:30" 12°35. 3°40. 6°¢5—@ 60 
Boy." 10:55. 2. 5:05. 8:10 
U ptewn— ‘Razzia Jean Gabir 
5:55 25 Womal A 
Gown,” 12:55, 4:25 


- 


7:55 


Films in the Suburbs 
Al. LSTON—Capito! 
5: “Les 
ARLINGTON : 
‘Kiss 
BROOKLINE: — Cleveland Circle: 
Sac Bombers B-42 
Coolidge “Roman Holiday,” 
CAMBRIDGE—Brattie. 
the Park.” 5°30 
Central Sq.: Pal Jory.’ 
the Outlaw.’ 


v niversits: 
ir] in 


Story of Mankind.” 
ty 
Sack 


4 
Sad 


Them for Me.” “Zero 

“Sad 
“Tender 
z Happened in 
“Parson and 


2:45. 6. 9:15 
1.30 


Les Girls 
Biack Stockings.’ 
445.8 


DORCHESTER ~— Adams: “Sad Sack 
“Short Cut to Hell 
Cedman Sq.: ‘Baby Face Nelson. 2:36 
9:11; ‘Chicago Confidential 1:15 


i 45 
Derchester. ““Tin Star.” “Julie.” 
Franklin Park: “Sad Sack Devil s 


: “Eee m_ * 2:47. 8:17. “Story 
of Mankind } 
EVERETI—Park: ‘Sia ighter on Tenth 
venue.” “Wayward us 
FRAMINGHAM _ ners: 
Oss thie Bri 
HANCOCK “VILL AGE= Bencesk 
Is iid.’ “Operation Mad Bail 
JAMAIC A PLAIN—Jamaica: For Whom 
Bell Tolis"’ “The Long Hau! 
LENINGTON—Lexington: 
the August Moon 
MAL DEN — Auditerium: “Living Ido) 
45. ae Bride Is Much Too Beauti-. 
fa) 
Granada: 
’ 40 


Enemy Be 


‘Joke! 


Teahouse of 


“Tin on a 
Les Girl 
Port ane Expose : 
03 


* 


Dead Jocke 
$:33. 6:33. 9:23 
wh: iB. 3:43 


R 
MATTAPAN Oriental: ‘Les Girls 
The Long Haul 
MAYNARD—Fine Arts 
MEDE ORD Medford: 
Brothers Rico 
NEEDHAM—Paramount: 
arene Alley 
NE TON—Paramount 
" “The Long Hau! 
NORWOOD Norwood: 
“Ed e of the City 
‘¥—Strand: 


READING — Reading: 
Anxious * 2:10. 9:06, 


ee 


Olid Yelier.” 
Pail Joe, 
"Sad 


‘Baby Face Nel- 


Sack 


“Les Girls 


“Les Giris.* “Slim 


Eighteen and 
Girl in the 


Woods 42, 7:4 
SOMERVILLE—Ball Sq.: “Sad Sack,’ 

“Devil's Hairpin 

Capitol; “Sad Sack.’ “Devils Hair- 

in,”’ 

Semerville: “Time Limit’ “Dragoon 
Wells Massacre 
; ‘Hunchback of Notre 
“Pick-Up 
wa 
“Gold of Naples.’ 
“Les 


“Sad 


WALTHAM—Central: 
“Out of the Clouds 
Seepeenes oa Summer Night,’ 


9:2 
WELLESLEY siti. LS — Plavheuse: 
' “Bridges at Toko-Ri 
WEST ‘“NEWTO! i—Newton: “Les Girls 
“Action@of the Tiger 
WINCHES age “mamma “Pal Joev.” 
“Altack, 


oe OF Tria 
rad Winthrop: 


WOLLASTON— Wollaston: “Pal Joey.” 


e 
Py 


P 
aa, 


asio in “Seven Hills of Rome,” 


Mario Lanza, Marisa Allasio 


Head Cast in 


By Nora 

In “The Seven Hills of Rome” 
a tenuous thread of story con- 
nects a mélange of old favorites 
and new songs by Mario Lanza. 
He and his hearty tenor voice 
occupy the screen for most of 
the film at the State and Or- 
pheum. 

The man whose picture “The 
Great Caruso” still holds a box- 
office. record at Néw York's 
Radio City Music Hall, sings 
everything in his latest film 
from “Rigoletto” arias to take- 
offs of Perry Como, and Frankie 
Laine, eventually including the 
title song. His warbling begins ~ 
in a television studio in New 
York, but shifts swiftly to Rome 
as he goes in pursuit of his 
errant fiancee. 

+ 4 
leave logic 
when you 


Tf 
and 


is as well to 
reason at home 


see this movie and simply enjoy ~ 
~the-—-mrste; 


and-~the-—-superb 
travelogue of Rome. The un- 
likely happenstance of a popu- 
lar American television and re- 
cording star arriving.in Rome 
not only broke, but also with the 


——————— ee 


ee ee 


Wainis y Hi osmer at J iniliiin Hall 


By F. Burns 


Hitch Hosmer, mezzo- 
in Jordan Hall last eve- 
a récital of quality 
throughout, both as to interpre- 
tation and choice of program. 
The main portion was made up 
of German and French songs. 
with two short conclud’ng works, 
“Wild Swans” and “Viennese 
Waltz’ by John Duke in English 

In the opening work by J. 5S 
Bach, Cantata fur Alt, James 
Pappout flute. and Loui: 
Speyer, d'amore, assisted 
This selection, consisting 
three movements, was well done, 
although the balance was a little 
heavy on the side of the instru- 
ments. The solo voice blended a 
bit too lightly with the wood- 
winds and plano accompani- 
ment, 


Nancy 
soprano, 
ning, gave 


sakis. 
oboe 


Ol 


ee aes 


Mrs. Hosmer does not possess 
a strong voice and it is rather 
restricted in range. But the songs 
she sang were not too demand- 
ing.in this respect. Occasionally 
the tone in the lower register 
became obscured, and there 
were very brief moments when 
a certain lack of assertien tend- 
ed to cloud the free flow of the 
melodic line, These minor flaws 
of technique, however. were 
miniscule compared with her in- 
telligent phrasing and over-all 
interpretative ability. 

In one respect the selections 
lacked a sense of variety. Yet it 
was all there in the five songs bs 
Hugo Wolf, or in the five poems 
of Baudelaire by Debussy. The 
emotional range from the drama 
of “in “Im Fruhling” gave way to 


Langworthy 


the childlike berceuse, “Ach, des 
Knaben Augen” in three-quarter 
time. The impassioned appeal in 
“Le balcon”—a demanding work 
—contrasted distinctly with the 
easily flowing “Le jet d'eau.” 

In the closing.part of the re- 
cital, Mrs. Hosmer became more 
relaxed. as was evidenced in her 
effortless singing of “‘Le papillon 
et la fleur’ by Faure, and. Pou- 
lenc’s “C’est ainsi que tu es,” a 
work of beauty. mostly in the 
minor mode but shifting key. 

The pianist. Ludwig Berg- 
mann, was excellent, especially 
in the Liede1 and art songs. 


— ———— ——_ 


Testimonial for Wolfes 


A testimonial concert for Felix 
Wolfes will be given Sunday 
evening at 8:30 in the Recital 
Hall of the New England Con- 
servatory. 


dovsky and John Moriarty. Vo- 
cal artists on the program will 
include John Horner, 
James Joyce, Robert Gay, Ar- 
thur Schoep and Nancy Wil- 
liams. all members of the New 
England Opera Theater. Miss 
Williams will end the program 
with a group of songs written 
by Mr. Wolfes. who is a member 
of the Conservatory’ faculty, 


Organist at MIT 


Lois Pardue, a member of the 
faculty of the Longy School of 
Music and a former student of 
André Marchal, will give a free 
organ recital at the M.LT. 
Chapel Sunday, Feb.. 9 at #4 
o'clock. 


equally 


The program will in-' 
clude piano solos by Boris Gol-| 


Jean Kraft, | 


Color Musical 


E. Taylor 


| penniless—and charme- 
ing — Raffaella Marini (Marisa 
Allasio) in tow is equaled only 
by subsequent events of the nare 
rative. 

Marc Revere played by Mr. 
Lanza, has a cousin in Rome, 
Pepe Bonelli (Renato Rascel) 
also financially embarrassed, 
who lives in the most pictur- 
esque Italian tenement one is 
likely to see, with a connois- 
seur’s collection‘of antiques. But 
why quarrel with settings which, 
after all, provide a suitable 
background for gaily attired 
Italian parties full of arpeggios, 
chords, and “real cool” music? 

By the time the first party 
celebrating the arrival of Mare 
and thé waif he has acquired 
winds up at dawn, it seems quite 
natura! that an uninvited guest 
should take his hosts on an early 
morning helicopter flight over 
Rome: Swooping low over the 
Colosseum, the Appian Way, the 
Forum, the churches, and statues 
of the Italian capital, the pilot 
comments that Paris may be the 
most beautiful city in the world 
—consciously—but Rome is the 
most beautiful—unconsciously. 
Movie-goers might be inclined 
to agree, after this proxy trip 
in Technirama. 


| ee ae 


Marc continues his melodious 
but temperamenta) path through 
Rome night clubs with a freee 
for-al] in one which almost ends 
his career. There is a mild see 
quence, too, of Raffaella’s steale 
ing-by-finding a diamond brace- 
let, which she offers to Marc to 
pay for the night-club damage, 
It is in the tenor of this unbe- 
lievable but amiable story that 
Marc should then win Raffaella 
for his own—perhaps to prevent 
her from taking to a life of 
crime. 

As Raffaella, Miss Allasio em- 


_ploys the direct look of extreme 


youth to great effect. This mod- 
estly charming Italian younge 
ster is avrefreshing arrival from 
a land of sulphurous beauties. 
Her portrayal of the girl in love 
with the singer but with little 
hope of capturing him, gives 
promise of a film future for her 
in which acting as well as looks 
could play a considerable part. 

Renato Rascel as Pepe, in love 
with Raffaella, and fond of his 
unpredictable cousin, gives a 
touching performance. All this, 
however, is subservient to the 
fact that the film is Lanza, 
Lanza, Lanza, all the way. He 
is in good voice throughout, 


Michael Power Recital 


Michael Power, pianist and 
faculty member of Winchester 
High School, will give a recital 
in the school auditorium, Mon- 
day evening. Proceeds will aid 
the Parent-Faculty Association's 
projects for scholarship and 


'sehool improvement. 


AMUSEMENTS 


———$ 


_ BOSTON (MOVIES) 


BOSTON (STAGE) 


— 

lane Turner + Hope Lenge 
Lloyd Nolen’ Arthur Kennedy 

Russ Tamblyn -Terry Moore 


00 


ALEC 
GUINNESS 
“ALL AT SEA" 


“Taio 10 THE real 


1N TECHNICOLOR 


Marion Brando in 
“SAYONARA” 
PARAMOUNT - FENWAY 

“FROM HELL IT CAME" 


“THE He ISENBODED 


ae —_. ee 


BOSTON (Kenmore Sq.) 


—_. 


"A MASTERPIECE HUGHES, 


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svammnGcMARIA SCHELL 
Added" MARCEL BAM rat” 


MANAGERS OF THEATERS 
advertised in The Christian Science 


Monitor appreciate your identify. 
jing yourself as a Monitor reader. 


i 


GENE KELLY 
‘the HAPPY ROAD" 


2 SHOWS 
TODAY 


~ PARADISE: 


WAL! DISNEY 
Presents DOROTHY MCGUIRE @ FESS PARKER 


OLD 
YELLER 


Now e BEACON HILL 
opp. The Perker House 


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CR PORES womens t caw race mrs WILLIAM ROLDEN 
ALEC GUINNESS JACK HAWKINS 


“THE 
BSRIDGE ON 


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luthor of RIFIFL' 


DANCING 


TOTEM POLE 


PAR K 
EVERY 


SAT 


NORUMBEGA 
Dancing <p 
$2.20 ¢ ¢ 
BOB BACHELDER oncw 
Coming Feb. 21-1 Night 


RAY ANTHONY 


and his orchestra 


pie FR 


COLONIAL TONIGHT, 8:30 
| Matinee Saturday, 2:30 | 


“AS FUNNY AS EVER .. . RARE COMEDY 
FIRST RATE CAST.” 


Eves. 8:30 — Mets. Wed. 2:18 — Set. 2:98. 
Men. thre Thurs, Eves. $4.46 te 1.66. Fri. & 
Sat. Eves. $4.96 te 1.66. Mets. Wed. A Set. 
$3.86 te 1.10. 


MAT. TOMW © 23, 
LAURENCE OLIVIER 
THE 
ENTERTAINER 
SHUBERT sart'ste. shit 


2 sHOWwSs a 2: —— se. 
(Senday 3 


pond a oni 


Eee, 30 days on Sale 
at the Box Office 


pennies saan sAXOT 


EVERY SAT. 


CAMBRIDGE (MOVIES) 


a The New Yorker says: ee 


‘A SHEER 
he toh eel 


Virterie BE SICA * Gerard 


IT Hay MEG 


IN THE 731 


4 


GENE KELLY—MITZI GAYNOR 
“LES GIRLS” 


acusrent "The Girl in Black Stockings” 


| See 


_NEW YORK (MOVIES) 


RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL 
Rockefeller Center + Ci 6.4600 


MARIO LANZA . 
“SEVEN HILLS OF ROME” 


altos 


. ee 


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12 AEFI RRC 


Sports” 


a 


§** 


_ ‘Watch Delany in Mile’ 
Warn Track Officials 


By Ed Rumill 


Sports Writer of Tre Cnuristian Science Monitor 


Glamorized by the appear- 
ance of half a dozen Olympians, 
plus seven athletes who hold a 
grand total of 13 IC4A cham- 
pionships, plus seven National 
AAU titleholders, the 69th Bos- 
ton Athletic Association track 


and field meet will be run off) 


tomorrow night before what un- 
doubtedly will be a jammed 
Boston Garden. 

Starting at 7:30 and running 
past 11:00, the attractive pro- 
gram: features eight invitation 
events, plus the usual hand- 
picked college relay races which 
are sandwiched in between the 
specials. 

Will Cloney, chairman of the 
BAA “Games, has done such a 
solid job of linifig up his pro- 
gram, it is a fact that only one 
of indoor track’s top names will 
be missing at the Garden — 
sprinter Dave Sime of Duke, 
forced by a leg injury to refuse 
Cloney’s invitation. 


Mile Field 


But all of the others will be 
there—Ron Delany, Ira Murchi- 
son, Charley Jenkins, Elias Gil- 
bert, Deacon Jones, Don Bragg, 
the great Occidental College re- 
lay quartet and many others. 

The glamour event of the eve- 
ning, of course, figures to be 
the Hunter Mile, as it generally 
is these nights with Delany 
running. 

Talk of a possible new indoor 
mile record, and perhaps even a 
four-minute effort, has been 
crowding the local sports pages 
all week and there can be no 
doubt that at his present, fine, 
conditional edge, Delany, the 
Irish Olympian, is capable of 
world marks. 

If Ron does it, it will probably 


' Princeton freshman star: 


field, but there to battle him will 
be Pfc Joe Gaffney, K of C win- 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


ner two weeks ago: Josh Cul-, 


breath, an Olympian; Rudy 
Smith of Bates, Maine's 440 
champ, and possibly Bob Mc- 
Murray of Morgan State. 

Tom Carroll, winner of the re- 
cent K of C special, heads the 
Lapham 
has: Harry Bright, N.Y, Pio- 
neers: Dave” Scurlock, North 
Carolina: Bruce Lockerbie, New 
York Athletic Club, and Zbig- 
niew Orywal of Poland. Ty Had- 
ley of Occidental, NAIA mile 
titleholder, could be a late 
starter. 

the 
Murchinson, 


shorter 
the 


races, 


1,000 field, which also. 


Ira 
defending | 


champion, leads the Briggs 60- | 
yard field. Among his rivals will | 


be George Sydnor, 
winner of this event in 
Ed Collymore, Villanova’s IC4A 


Villanova, | 
1956; | 


100-yard champ; Dick Edmunds, | 


Dave | 


Del any 


V/LLANOVA'S /AILER 


Kan, 


FROM DOUBELIN 


WILL SEEK A/S TARO 


CONWVSECUTTIVE » 
HMUNTEkKE VICTORV 
OUVREING 7HE GAA 

MEET ON 
SATOCCOAY AT THE A 

EOSTON GALEN 


Hammie of Morgan ‘State, Ken | 


Kave, and others. 


Gilbert, the AAU low hurdles | 


champion, spearheads the Hill- 


man Hurdles event on the BAA | 


card, with Dave Settele of Bos- 
ton University and Santee Ruffin 
of Philadelphia pushing him, 
among others. 
Bragg Vaulting 

The pole vault, always a 
crowd pleaser, has Don Bragg, 
the IC4A champ from Phila- 


delphia, who has done T5ft. din. 


There, also, will be the Ohio 
Track Club's Gerry Welbourn, 
who has done 15ft.; Mel Schwarz 
of Baltimore: George Lynn, New 
York A.C., and Maurice Carter 


Fresh Batch of Powder  \atiana Beck 


of the University of New Hamp-. 


shire. 
Phil 


Reavis of Villanova is 


back for the high jump. He js 


be because he was pushed by | 


Phil. Coleman, 
Club and Burr Grim, the Mary- 
land IC4A champion. 

However, it often turns out 
that with the spotlight on one 
race, another steals the show. 

There will be the Billings 
Two-Mile, which actually has an 
re ater an flavor. The entry 
ist includes Deacon Jones, the 
University of lowa NCAA cham- 
pion: Velisa Mugosa, Yugoslavia: 
Gordon McKenzie, New York 
Pioneers; Ike Matza, also of the 
Pioneers; Arthur Reider of Har- 
« vard; Peter Close, St. John’s, and 
Dick Donohue, Holy Cross. 


Jenkins Back 


Chicago Track | 


the defending champ and also 
the AAU and IC4A titleholder. 
Others entered include George 
Dennis of Philadelphia, the re- 


cent K of C winner; Azigniew 


Lewandowski of Poland; Charley 
Stead, Villanova, IC4A 


‘champion; Rindge Tech's scho- 


Bob’ Barksdale, 


' legians, 


lastic champ, John Thomas, and 
Philadelphia 
Pioneers. 

In two cup races confined ex- 
clusively to New England col- 
Bill. Merritt of Holy 
Cross will be after his third 


‘Straight win in the Ryder 440 


and Yale’s John Slowik is rated 
ho man. to beat in the Bingham 
0. 


The relay program lists 15 


The popular and swift Char- races, eight of them invitation 
ley Jenkins heads the Prout 600' events. 


Warriors Beat Celtics 


By the Associated Press 
The Boston Celtics inay win} Arizin each scored 19 points to 
the Eastern Division title in the: lead the Warriors while Boston's 


National Basketball Association 
but no one can say the Phila- 
delphia Warriors have smoothed 
their path. 


' 


at an official, the second toss- 


: 


Bill Sharman had 17. 
Syracuse Coach Paul Seymour 
was chased for throwing a ball 


out this week, as Walt Dukes 


Rather the Warriors are doing} helped bring the Pistons from 


their utmost to put a crimp in| an 


Boston’s title aspirations. They 
won their fourth game in eight 
starts. against the Celts 


night, Jan. 30 116-96, in the 


early deficit to a fourth quar- 
ter lead. A seven point splurge 
late in the fourth quarter 


last| wrapped it up. 


Dukes led Detroit’ with 


21 


nightcap of a Convention Hall) points, while Dolph Schayes had 


twinbill in Philly. 

The Detroit Pistons also sur- 
prised the Syracuse Nats in the 
opener 87-83, while the Min- 
neapolis Lakers turned on Cin- 
cinnati, 105-104 in the other 
NBA action. 

Led By Seven 


The last place Warriors made | Cincinnati 


| 


' 


’ 


| 


; 
' 


23 for the Nats. 
‘omeback Victory | 


Cc 
Vern Mikkelsen tossed in a 


CO- | 


( 


( 


5 | 


(HE 
a2 ~ YEAR-OLD 


Assures Weekend Skier _ 


By the Associated Press | 


February is usually New Eng- 
land’s best month for skiing and 
with another fresh batch of 
powder this week, it could be a 
record month for all northern 
slopes and inns. 

Places like Cannon Mountain 
at Franconia, N.H., and Sugar- 
loaf at Kingfield, Maine, caught 
up to 23 inches of new powder 
in the last couple of days. Mt. 
Snow at West Dover, Vt., is 
really living up to its name by 
picking up 30 inches of powder 
to shove its total maximum 
depth way above five feet. 

The Dartmouth College 48th 
annual--winter~ earnival,. which 
usually has to go begging for 


snow terrain for its two day ski | 
“too much” | 


meet, has almost 
snow, a carnival spokesman said, 
as the big Indian squad played 
host to eight top college ski 
teams starting today. 

The ski picture from 40 re- 
porting stations was generally 
good to excellent with most 
spots leaning to the best skiing 
of the season. 

4 4 


Ski stuff: The Dartmouth meet 
starts this morning with a 


|}downhill tomorrow morning and 


the cup. 


|... Picked to represent the East- 
‘ern Association are Renie Cox, 


In Gibson Race 


The 19th annual Gibson 
rophy race will be run Sun- 
day afternoon, at Cranmore 
Mountain, in North Conway, 
New Hampshire. 

Edi Mall, who holds two 
legs on the trophy, is. out to 
retire it this weekend. But he 
figures to get stiff opposition 
from a large field, including 
1956 Olympian Bill Beck. 

The race is run over the 
popular Arlberg Trail and will 
be forerun by Toni Matt, for- 
mer world champion. now 
working at the Carroll Reed 
Shop in North Conway. 


Norwich, Vt.. and 
Fletcher, Rutland, Vt. 
oa: a 


The American FIS' Nordic 
team will be in action Saturday 
and Sunday at Stowe, Vt. .°.. 
The six-man squad will have a 
cross country and jumping work- 
out prior to leaving for the FIS 
World Championships at Lahti, 
Finland ... The 9!» mile Ver- 
mont State cross-country cham- 
pionships will be held tomor- 
row afternoon at 1, Starting 
at the Mt. Mansfield toll house 
.. . Exhibition jumping Sunday 
at the same time takes place on 


slalom race ... cross country | 
will be held this afternoon, 


jumping at the 40-meter vale 
of Temple Hill Saturday after- 
noon . .-. On Sunday the 19th 
annual Harvey D. Gibson Me- 
morial trophy race will be held 
at Cranmore Mountain in North 
Conway. The open A and B race 
will be run on the Arlberg Trail 
If conditions permit the slalom 
will be run from the summit 
Edi Mall, who holds two legs on 
the trophy, will try to retire 
He will gét stiff 
competition from Bill Beck, 1956 
Olympic team. captain. 
| ee 


s 
Marsha 


Three seniors and five juniors 
will represent the USEASA in 
the Ladies International Ski 
Races in Canada, Feb. 8 and 9 


Port Leyden, N.Y.: Deborah 
Davis, Middlebury, Vt., and Sue 
Goodwin, Montpelier, Vt., from 
the senior ranks ... Junior rac- 
ers will be Jill Flint, Farming- 
ton, Maine: Louise Gulic, South 
Casco, Maine. Nancv’’’Sise, 
Wellesley,.Mass., Lisa Yeomans, 


? 


pair of free throws in the final | 


seven seconds to give the Lakers 


a comeback victory. Mikkelsen 


and Larry Foust got hot in the 
last period to cut down a 93-79 
lead and give the 


it seem as if they were in first! Lakers a 96-95 lead. 


place by six and a half games 


; 


Clyde Lovellete’s three point 


Sports Front Briefs 


By the Associated Press 


Golf 
Phoenix. Ariz. 
Dow Finsterwald and Stan 
Mosel — stroked - five-under-par 
66s to share the first-round lead 
in the $15,000 Phoenix Open. 
Kingston, Jamaica 


Herman Barron of Miami 


| Beach, Fla., and Ted Rhodes of 
| Chicago each shot a four-under- 
‘par 68 to tie for the first-round 


lead 


over the Nats instead of Boston | play in the final 2 minutes gave | 
as they ran away from the Cel-| 


tics. They led by seven at the 
quarter, 15 at the half and 24 
at the three-quarter mark be- 
fore 11,214, the largest NBA 
crowd of the season at Conven- 
tion Hall. 

Woody Sauldsberry and Paul 


Cincinnati a 104-102 lead, but) 


Art Spoelstra’s free throw fol- 
lowed by Mikkelsen’s’ two 
wrapped it up for the Lakers. 

Mikkelsen and Foust led the 
scorers with 33 and 29 points re- 
spectively. Jack Twyman had 25 
for’ Cincinnati. ~ 


New England Ski Reports 


By the Associated Press 


Forecast: Mostly cloudy today , , Kingneld 


with occasional light snow or 
flurries over mountains, Tem- 
peratures near or just below 
freezing except above freezing 
eastern Massachusetts. Partly 


cloudy and colder. tonight. with | 
freez- |‘? 


temperatures well below 
ing. Saturday mostly cloudy and 
colder with flurries over north- 


sible in the Berkshires, Tem- 
peratures below freezing all day 


' 


' 


; 


' powder, partly cloudy, excellent 
ern areas and light snow pos- | 


‘Sugarioaf) 42 to 83. 8 


cloudy, skiing 


Vermont 

Barre (‘Skiline Ski Center) 
packed powder surface. cloudy, 

Brattleboro ‘Hogback) 16 to ‘ 
packed powder, partiy cloudr, excetient. 

Heartwellvilie ‘Dutch Hilli 22 to 36. 
5 packed powder. cloudy. good. 
Jeffersonville (Smugglers Notch) 38 
50. 2 powder surface, light snow. 
excellent, 

Ludlow (‘Okemo Mt.) 21 to 48. 2 packed 


fur- 
powder 


16 to 25 
excellent 
30. 6 


Lyndonville «Burke 
4 new surface powder. 


Mt.: 26 
snowing 


to 
excel- 


| lent. 


, above in east- | 
except somewhat powder, light 
Pe yor College Snow Bow! 18 to 


ern Massachusetts. 

: New Hampshire 
ranconia ‘Cannon Mt.' 10 to 76. 

inhnan powder, with 1 new light snow. 

Good to excellent upper. excellent lower 
Franconia ‘Mittersill) 41 o 0. 

packed powder. light snow. excellent 
Intervale Pe to oe peeked powder. 
udy. good to excelient. 

map OF (Biack Mt.) 41 to 60. packed 


4) 


der. 
6 | So 


nowder surface. cloudy, good to excel-| 


lent 


16 to 36. 3 


anon 
Levan good to excel- 


paenee powder. 
a 
"Teme Center ‘Dartmouth Skiway) 12 


cloudy. 


'2 surface powder. 


L 
to 30. packed powder. oney excellent. , 


Mt. Sunapee 12 to surface 


3 
owder. clear. exceilent. 
new London 18 to . 18 packed 
powder. partiy cloudy. excellent. 

North Conway ‘Cranmore: 22 to 45. 
wacked powder surface. cloudy. good to 
excellent. 

Peterborough ‘ 
10 vowder. clear. excellent 
_ excellent. 


. in ‘Wildeat: 84 to 75, 


Pink 


Temple Mt.) 28 totaf. | 
(White Tows) 26 total. | 


cloudy, excellent. | 
hittier: 16 to 40. . 


packed powder 
excellent. 
Maine 
Bridgton ‘(Pleasant Mt.) 15 to 40. 12 
packed powder, partly cloudy, good to 
excellent. 


Manchester (Big Bromiley) 16 to 40. 
10 surface powaer, light snow, excellent 
Manchester ‘Snow Valley) 2 4 
snow. excellent. 


. 6 powder, light snow. excellent. 
North Tfroy iJay Peax: 41 to 54. 7 
packed powder, cloudy, excellent 


in the 72-hole Jamaica 
Open Golf Tournament. 


Baseball 
New York 
Baseball Commisrioner Ford 
Frick announced that the 1958 
All-Star teams would be decided 


by—a—_poll_of players, managers, 


50 


6 to 0, 


Rutland ‘Pico Peak) 15 to 40. 6 pow-. 


cloudy, excellent. 
uth Vernon ‘Pine Top) 8 to 18. 5 
granular, nartiy cloudy, good to ex- 
eellent, upper, excellent lower. 

Stowe ‘(Mt Mansfield -and Spruce 
Peak! 36 to 50, 2 surface powder. light 
snow. excellent. 

Waitsfield (Mad River Glen) 41 to 590. 

liaht snow excellent. 
(Mt Snow: 34 to 6§,. 30 
total powder. cloudy, excellent. 

Windsor iMt Ascutney) 12 o (3. 
packed pvowder, partly cloudy, excellent 

Woodstock +Suicide Six: @ to . more 
than 8 surfece powder, partiy cloudy. 
good to excellent 

Massachusetts 

Amesbiiry iLockes Slove) 

granular snow. 


clear, good 
Blandford 


West Dover 


we 


inches 


§ 
‘Springfield Ski Club) 
to: 15, 1 grawuler. clear. good. 
Charlemont ‘(Chickley Alp! 16 to 20. 4 
granular. clear, good to excellent 
Greenfield «Mohawk Trail Skiway'!: 2 
to 10 granular with 3 settled powder, 


4 


good. a 
Hancock (‘Jiminy Peak'!: 7 to 20, 7° Boston 


wder, partly Coney. pose. 

Littleton ‘Hartwell Hill): 4 to 12, 3 
granular, clear, good. 

North Andover ‘(Boston Hill}: 1 to 6 
granular 3 where packed, clear 


St 
Otis Ridge: 2 to 15, 2 powder, clear, | Cincinnati 
‘Detroit 4. 
7 | Minneapolis 


excellent upper, fair to good lower. 
Pittsfield ‘(Bousquets!: 8 to WH, 


and coaches instead of the fans. 


Football 
Salt Lake City 
Ray Nagel, assistant at UCLA, 
was named head coach at Utah. 
Edmonton, Alberta 
Ted Youngling, assistant foot- 
ball coach at the University of 
Oklahoma for the past three 
years, signed as an_ assistant 
coach with the Edmonton Eski- 
mos of the Western Football 
Conference. 


General 
Acapulco, Mexico 
Eight yachts swept into port 
in the fourth annual San Diego- 
Acapulco yacht race, bringing to 
14 the number of the 35 entries 
which have arrived at the finish 
line, 
Rangoon 
The visiting Czech Red Star 
soccer team defeated a Burmese 
All-Star team 3-0. 
Nuremberg, Germany 
A Belgian Army soccer team 
defeated a U.S. Army team 3-0 
on an icy, snow-covered field. 
Kitchener, Ontario 
The Kitchene'r - Waterloo 
Dutchmen, wrapped up a 9-0 
victory on the United States na- 
tional hockey team with a five- 
goal splurge in the last period, 


| $22,400 Round Robin Profes- 
' sional Tennis Tournament 


| Tony Trabert of Cincinnati, who 


NBA Pro Basketball 
By the Associated Press 
Eastern Division 

Won Lost Pct 
4 
Syracuse 
New York os 
Philadeiphia -. 
Western Division 
. 30 18 
. 23 
20 
i 


Louis 


“1 tions on whose courts the troupe | 


the new take off at Harlow Hill, 
south of the toll house... It 
will mark the official opening of 
the jump. at Stowe... St. 
Michael's College new ski jump 
gets its first competition tomor- 
row, too, at the winter carnival 
meet. 


Chicago 
A Nova Scotia rink skipped by 


| 


B’s May Use 
Billy O’Ree 
At Montreal 


The Bruins may add Billy 


O’Ree to their forward squad | | 
The Celtics, losers by 20 points 
‘in Philadelphia, 
‘theory at the Garden tonight. 


tomorrow when they play the 
Montreal Canadiens in Montreal. 
The game with the Canadiens 


will conclude a two-game road 


| 


| 


i 
' 


trip for the Bruins, who will 
play the New York Rangers 
at Boston Garden on Sunday at 
7:30 o'clock. 

The Bruins have been cam- 
paigning since last 
without Bronco Horvath, their 
high-scoring center, who has 
been recuperating from a knee 
injury. Buddy Boone has been 
moved into Horvath’s position 
between Johnny Bucyk and Vic 
Stasiuk, but. Bucyk has been 
operating with an assortment of 
brutses: 

As a 


result, Coach Milt 


| Schmidt revealed yesterday that 
_he might call for O’Ree, the ag- 
gressive left wing who plays for 


the Quebec Aces, with whom the 
Bruins played an_ exhibition 
game in Sherbrooke, 
last night. 

Schmidt Impressed 


O’Ree played two games with | 


the Bruins the weekend before 


pression on Schmidt: with his 
speed and hustle. 

“We may call him up as in- 
surance for this Montreal game,” 


‘said Schmidt. “We haven't defi- 


nitely decided yet and whether 
or not we do depends upon the 
condition of Bucyk. Johnny 


| made out all right in New York 


the other night but he was a 


little below his top speed.” 


The team faced the possible 
loss of a third key skater for 


weekend action with defenseman | 
Russell, Bob Cousy, Bill Shar- 


Leo Boivin undergoing tests for 
a stomach disorder. 


On Sidelines 
The almost unprecedented in- 


‘'cidence of hockey injuries with 


which the Bruins are well ac- 
quainted has hit at both Mont- 


real and New York. The league- | 


leading Canadiens have been 
without Maurice “Rocket” Rich- 
ard since early November and 


| this week they lost Boom Boom 


Geoftfrion for an extended 


' period. 


New York. presently holding 
second place by a margin of 
two points over the Bruins, is 
playing without Dean Prentice, 
the speedy left wing. 

On the other hand the Ran- 
gers have been. strengthened, at 


least as far as the Bruins are | 


concerned, by the return of 


~ Olympians Color BAA Games Program—NBA Double-Header at Garden A 


‘similar overtures vs. 
‘Saturday in an Ivy League con- 
i'test to be played at Cambridge. 
_A near sellout crowd is expected. 
weekend | 


| Pistons 
'Knickerbockers. Boston also has 
‘a l17-game home winning streak 


| breaking 


‘last and made a favorable im- | Coach Red 


the one he 
_ St. Leuis), Boston. will be in an 


‘it was considerably 


after a crushing defeat is often | 


the hallmark of a good ball club. 
acid test this 


Harvard, beaten 65-60 last 
night by Boston College, makes 
Yale on 


Tonight the Celtics have a 
9:15 p.m. date with the Phila- 
delphia Warriors in the second 
game of an NBA double-header, 
which also features the Detroit 
and the New York 


to protect against the likes of 


Neil Johnston,.Paul Arizin,.Tom. 


Gola, and rookie Woody Saulds- 
berry. 
Five in Five 
Currently the Celtics are 
the process of playing five games 


in as many nights, two of which 
Quebec, | 

‘under the heading of a back- 
schedule, even for a | 


are road games. This comes 


world champions. It 
also explains 


Auerbach used his 


team of 
probably 


' 


in | 


| 


why | 


regulars so sparingly in Phila- | 


cals with considerable ease. 

If Auerbach can grab three of 
these five games (he already has 
wanted most vs. 


‘extremely enviable position. In 
addition this would enhance the 


'delphia, which handled the lo- | 


Celtics Host Warriors; 
Pistons Engage Knicks 


By Phil Elderkin 


Sports Writer of The Crristian Science Monitor 


The ability to bounce back | the second half when the Eagles 


broke the game open on key 


baskets by Barry McGrath and 


John Magee. 

Boston College has now won 
11 of 12. Harvard has a 9-5 
record. Jack Harrington led the 
Eagles with 25 points. Neil 
Muncaster, with 17, was high 
man for the. losers. 

At Storrs, Conn., Coach Hugh 
Greer’s Huskies coasted to their 
fifth straight Yankee Confer- 
ence win with an 84-62 triumph 
over the University of Maine. A 
tight man-to-man defense gave 
Maine little room in which to 
shoot and Connecticut outree- 
bounded the visitors, 75-45. 

Across the state line, Rhode 
Island lost to Rutgers, 86-68. The 
visitors were’ never in’ trouble 
as they took an early lead and 
added to it. The Rams have now 
dropped nine of 11 starts, while 
showing only slight improve- 
ment. 


Thirty Penalties 
As Habs Shut Out 
Red Wings, 7-0 


NHL Roundup 


By the Associated Press 
The Montreal Canadiens won 
the game. There was no question 
about that since the score was 


7-0. But the National Hockey 


Celtics’ chances of playing .700° 
' ball and assure them home court | 


advantage in the 
playoffs. 


The number of minutes 


postseason 
Bill 


‘man, Frank Ramsey, and Tom- 
my Heinsohn played vs. Phila- 
delphia are not available, but 
under the 
time they usually spend on the 
floor. 

Regulars Rested 


Arnie Risen, Jack Nichols, 


Lou Tsioropoulos, Andy Phillip 


and Sam Jones carried the brunt 


|tics lost, it gave Auerbach an 
opportunity to rest his regu-. 
jars while getting a long look 


at Sam Jones. Sam's usual ap- 
| pearances are confined to about 
| four or five minutes at a stretch, 
'making it 
judge his. improvement. 
With Boston so heavily popu- 
lated with top backcourt per- 


Lorne “Gump” Worsley to their | formers and with Bill Russell’s 
goal. In two games since return- | old playmaker, K. C. Jones, due 


ing from Providence little Gump 
has given the Bruins three goals. 


Hockey at a Glance 
Results Jan. 30 


By the Associated Press 


National League 
Montreal 7. Detroit 0. 

Internatoinal League 
Cincinneti 2. Fort Wayne 2 fovertime 
tie? 

Eastern League 
Charlotte 6, Clinton 4 
Washington 3. Now Haven 8. 

Western League 
Winnipeg 5. Calgary 2 


Stan Niewierowski and Mark 
Reiner, North 
freshman. basketball 


'are from Brooklyn, N.Y. 


to join the Celtics sometime next 


League leaders got no. better 
than a standoff in the money ase 
sessed by the referee in the Jan. 
30 braw! on the Montreal ice. 
The Canadiens, playing withe 
out the hospitalized Bernie 
Geoffrion and the convalescing 
Maurice Richard, increased their 


‘advantage over the New York 


' 
; 
; 


| 


| 


| of the Boston attack last night. | 
| However, even though the Cel- 


Rangers to 22 points in the cir- 
cuit’s only game as_ goalie 
Jacques Plante posted his eighth 
shutout of the season. 
Money-wise the game cost 
players of each team $75 with 
referee Red Storey calling a 
total of 30 penalties. They in- 
cluded two majors, one game 


/misconduct, two 10-minute mis- 


rather. difficult to | 19 


| 
i 


' 


; 


year, Jones's status has become | 


a puzzler. 

Sam could probably stick as 
a cornerman if he were only two 
inches taller, 


because Russell | 


says that K.C. Jones could make | 


'the backcourt of any pro team 


in the country. Fortunately the 
Celtics have almost a year in 


| which to find a solution. 


Harvard vs. Yale 
Meanwhile, Harvard plays 


T. H. Jones was among 13 first- 
round, first-event survivors in 
the opening session of the ninth 
annual International Men's Bon- 
spiel. 

Bratislava, Czechoslovakia 

Karel Divin, a Czech Army 
private, took a narrow lead over 
defending champion Alain Gi- 
letti of France at the completion 
of the compulsory part of the 
European Figure-Skating Cham- 
nionships. Vera Suchanka and 
Zdenek Dolez#® of _Czechoslo- 
vakia retained their title in the 
pair skating event, The Russian 
pair of Nina and Stanislav Zhuk 
was second, while—the English | 
pair-of- Joyce-Pamela Coates-andParty before the war, ae 
Anthony Holles placed third, [he third, Dr. Milan Zujovic, 


| a law professor at Belgrade Uni- 

Lew Hoad Takes tea tthers form an “naticonsts 
Top Prize Money | 
In Kramer Tour 


tutichal” organization. 
By the Associated Press 


Diilas Trial Recalled 
Melbourne 


A fourth defendant, Dr. 

Dragosla\ Stranjakovic, Was 
Hoad com- 
the 


By Keuters 
Belgrade 

Three men have gone on trial 
here charged with conspiring to 
overthrow the Communist re- 
gime of President Tito. 

Two _of the men, Bogdan 
Krekic and Aleksandar Pavlovic, 
were leading members of Yugo- 
slavia’s small Marwxist-Socialist 


ordered held for a separate trial 
after he said he was suffering 
from an acute ailment and 


Australia’s Lew 


| would be unable to defend him- | 


' Yugoslavia.” 


self. 


It was the first group political | 
‘trial in Yugoslavia for several | 


years. It follows by four months 
the trial of former Yugoslav 
Vice-President 
on charges of writing “hostile 
propaganda” apout the state. 
Mr. Dijilas, author of “The New 
Class” Which described com- 
munism as a new = despotism, 


was” imprisoned~for—a--total--6f 
nine years. Earlier he was given | 


a three-year sentence for “anti- 
state propaganda. 
Messrs Krekic, 


Milovan Diilas | 


; 


: re 
Stranjakovic, 


Belgrade Treason Trial Opens 


action but had only set down 
theoretical ideas in the form of 
a letter sent to Slobodan Jovan- 
ovic, premier of the wartime 
royal Yugoslav government in 
exile in London. 


Defends Socialist Aim 


| “The regime cannot be de- 


; 


| Yale at Cambridge tomorrow | ’ 
_after dropping a close 65-60 de- | 
Carolina State | cision last night to once-beaten | 
players, | Boston College. 
| were leading 56-54 midway in 


The_ Crimson. : 


conducts and 25 minors. 

The 30 penalties were six 
short of the league record. A 
total of 36 were called against 
— and Toronto, Dec, 9, 


As for the scoring, . Dickie 
Moore got two of Montreal's 
goals. The others were tallied by 
Doug es Dollard St. Laue 
rent, Beliveau, Marcel Bonin, 
and Don Marshall. ; 


College Basketball 
(Results Jan. 30) 


By the Associated Press 
East 
Pitt 86. St. Johns ‘Bkn.) 73 
Boston College 65. Harvard -60, 
St. Peters (N.J.) 70. Hartford Univ. 5€ 
Pairfield 109. Merrimack 53. 
Rutgers 86, Rhode Island 68. 
Connecticut 84. Maine 62. 
Fairleigh Dickinson 73, Newark Rute 
gers 67 
Youngstown 79. Westminster (Pa.) 58, 
oo est Va. State 78, Alderson-Broaddus 


Geneva 88 Baldwin Wallace 81. 
Pairmont (W.Va.) 103, Beckley 96. 
Newark Engineering 73. Pace 59. 
Monmouth iNJ.) 15,.Newark Tehrs 68. 


Motels 
California 


had not devised a program for | 


stroyed by words on paper,” he 
told the court. “The regime has | 


never been endangered from 
outside. It can only be en- 
d 
t 


ry 


and Pavlovic admitted they | 
worked out a program aimed at) 
the “destruction of the anti- 
national Communist regime in| 


But Mr. Krekic, the first to'| 
testify, told the court Jan. 31 he | 


pleted a clean sweep on 
Jan. 
30 when he beat Frank Sedg- 
'man 6—3, 5—7, 6—3. | 
The victory gave Hoad first | 
prize of $5,600. Sedgman, Hoad’s | 
fifth singles victim, took $3,360 | 
as runnerup in the tournament. 
In the second match, Pancho | 
Gonzales of Los Angeles gained 
an 8—10, 6—3, 6—3 victory over | 


London 
The Soviet Communist Party 
newspaper Pravda said Jan. 31 
the Baghdad Pact session dis- 
closed “acute contradictions be- 
tween the United States and 


played some of the night's best 
tennis in spots. 

As the touring professionals 
wound up their visit to Austra- 
lia. it was announced that Pro- 
moter Jack Kramer and the 
Lawn Tennis Association “of 
Australia had arranged for an- 
other tour next year. 

A joint statement by Kramer 
and LTAA president Don Fer- 
guson said they had agreed in 
principle to such a tour but defi- 
nite dates could not be set un- 
til the schedule for the Aus- 
tralian Championships, State 
Championships and the Davis 
Cup had been drawn up. 

The statement also said an 
agreement would be reached on 
a uniform scale of free tickets 
‘for members of state associa- 


Asian members of the pact on 
the other.” 

The Soviet news agency Tass 
quoted the Moscow 
as saying editorially that United 


Foster Dulles advertised Ameri- 
can economic aid in an attempt 
to iron out the “contradictions.” 


number of Eastern 
“cannot but realize 
‘aid’ results in the seizure of all 
natural resources in the country 


of national independence.” 
In another comment, 


Britain on the one hand and the 


newspaper 


States Secretary of State John 


Pravda said the peoples of a 
countries 
that such | 


by foreign monopolies, involves 
‘that country in aggressive mili- | 
tary blocs, and leads to the loss | 


Reds See ‘Contraditions’ 
In Baghdad Pact Ties 


By Reuters 


\the Baghdad Pact session | 
Some printed | 


The | 
Times, of London, said the dis- | 


' 


had 


achieved little. 


biting comment on the general | 


effectiveness of the pact. 
The conservative Le 


ran an Ankara dispatch from its | 


_special correspondent, saying: 


“The Ankara *conference has 
confirmed the pessimists in their 


judge and public prosecytor, 
said: “For 50 years I have been 
attracted toward 
and socialism. This is something 
freedom-loving and human. I 
Was a socialist before, and |] 
remain one today.” 

He admitted that in his pro- 


gram he described the Tito re- | 


gime as “totalitarian,” 
popular,” and “despotic.” 


“anti- 


angered from inside the coun- | 


The tall, graying prisoner, | 
arguing frequently with both the | 


democracy | 


} 


While in Ventura Stay in 
La Barranca Motel 


A new 20 unit motel with full tile, 
glass door showers 
vented heat. 


1220 Thompson Bivd. +U.$. 101) 
MI 3-2127 - 2128 


Hotels—Resorts 
California 


SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 


HOTEL CHURCHILL 


Sth end C Streets 
Ne Liquer Seld 


Centraliy located, nice surroundings. 
_ anc reading room overlooking 
arbor No sm in San Diego. 
RATES WiTH BATH $3.90 uP 
RATES WITHOUT BATH $3.00 UP 


Neo Tips 


| 


The judge read extracts from | 
Mr. Krekic’s writings in which | 
the ex-socialist leader—like Mr. | 
Diilas—said that “a new aris-/| 
tocracy” existed in Yugoslavia | 


and that Communist power was 
“maintained by bayonets.” 


The defendants face sentences | 


ranging from five years at hard 


| lab ,, 
Figaro | labor to the capital penalty 


Two observers from the United 
States embassy are attending the 


‘trial at which two Yugoslav em- 


opinion on the small efficacy of | 


the Baghdad Pact. 

“It is clear that several mem- 
ber countries hesitate between 
West and East and are seeking 
pretexts to keep their distance. 


| This is the case with Iraq over. 


the Israel affair.” 

The left-wing 
Combat said in a headline: “The 
Baghdad Pact conference has 
ended without having obtained 


ITALY” 
Coming to Rome? 
Make yourself at home 


VICTORIA HOTEL 


appreciable results.” 
: 
i 


independent | 


ployees of the embassy are ¢ex- 
pected to give evidence. 


Hotels—Resorts 
Italy 


; 


' 


' 


ce 
hestec s*imming pool, delicious food. 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Twins $5 
REE PARKING 


——iAittts 


were Wild Horse Ranch 


Opens isth season. For the best vacation vou 
will eve: have! Rates from $72 to $130 weekly 
.or evervthing. No extras. riding, 


J tte bert. Write for Ulustrated folder. 


Mrs. 


Mr. end Howerd W. Miller, Jr. 
P.O. Box 5505 Tucson, Ariz. 


ROME 


rgd BR sco 
MASSIMO 


D‘AZEGLIO 


First Closs | 


Louisiana 


eae ~' “@e 
+ & . . 


om AIG-CONDITION 
ROOSEVELT 
New Orleans’ Finest 
SEYMOUR WEISS 
Presrdent 
A.C. BELLANOE 
Moneger 


. *? >. ‘ 
a 


THE 


| played. 
Kramer had complained of 
‘having to hand out $33,600. 
worth of tickets to ‘Victorian . 
Association members’ during | 
matches here. 


packed powder, partly cloudy, good 
South Lee ‘Oak ‘n’ Spruce': 4 % 10. | 
4 vacked powder, partiy cloudy, eo 
West Cummingtom ‘Snow Basin': 7) 
to 15, 3 powder, cloudy, good to | 
lent. . 


leut 
mn = 


cussions in Ankara, Turkey, by | 
the .Baghdad Pact * Council 
showed “the process of consoli- | 
dation against attack has been 
_ going ahead as fast as could rea- 


A Romen Tradition Chicago, Hl. 


NEW LAWRENCE HOTRL 


) IN CHICAGO o- @ 
400 kitchenette apart- .\ 


jet and Comfertabie 
oon ite aghese Gardens 
+ Near Via Venete 
Full pension rate including service 


taxes $6. 
Mer. Prep.: Mr. BH. A. WIRTH (Swiss) 


Results Jan. 30 
Philadelphia 116, Boston 96. 
Detroit 87. Syracuse 83. 
Minneapolis 105. Cincinnati 104. 

Friday's Schedule 

* Detroit vs. New York at Boston. 
Philadelphia. at Boston. 
St. 


) 


Connect 
Cornwall ‘Mohawk Mt.): 


PHILADELPHIA—Tonight 9 P.M. 


Louis at Cincinnati. 


NM. Y.-DETROIT—7:15 P. M. 


Family Day Sunday 
CELTICS vs. DETROIT—2:30 P.M. 
2 Sue Pat 
Thc Each in Adjoining Seats, 


| powder, clear, good 


National Hockey League 
(Games of Jan. 39) 
By the Associated Press 


Montreal 


Saturday's Schedule 
Philadelphia vs. Detroit at New York 
Boston at New York. 

Cincinnati at 8t. Louis. 
Syracuse at Minneapolis (afternoon— 
TV}. . 


™ 


Orvis Sigler, a 1948 South | 


West Missouri State graduate, is 
in his fourth season as coach of 
Army’s basketball team. 


' -sonably be expected.” 
Leswick Rejoins Wings 


ger to the pact” is that local 
By the Assoctated Press 


troubles, like the Cyprus, Kash- 

. Edmonton _ mir, and Israel problems, “might 

Tony Leswick, scrappy little completely’ overshadow the 

left winger who spent four years inspiration which | originally 

with the Detroit Red Wings, will| brought the member states to- 
rejoin his former mates for a/¢gether.” | 

Saturday night game in Toronto.|. French mewspapers asserted 


The Times said the “real dan- | 


" ROME 


em 


Moderate terms 


e Hotel Savoy | 


ments, suites, rooms. 
‘Air conditioning op- 
1. im. pool, 
‘restaurant and fine 
ishops. Completely 
‘fireproof. $3.75 r 


MEDITERRANEO — SAN GIORGIO 
ATLANTICO — NORD 


Travel—Resorts | 


\ 


\ 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


Travel—Resorts 


<. . 


Cruises Swing Door Open to Summer and Shipboard Adventure En Route 


Vacationists Sail Seas 


For Change of Pace 


By Mary Kelly 
Spectal Correspondent of The Christian Science Monttor 


New York 


A short cut to summer 
what anyone of the. 


It’s not alone a colorful desti- 
js | Nation that most of them seek, 
winter | they say. It’s the getting there 


cruises sailing from New York | | they look forward to. 


these days provide winter weary | 


northerners. 


Major cruise Or minor cruise 
six—the 
trip can be designed to suit di- 
Business folks tak- 


—lasting 60 days or 


verse needs. 


ing advantage of that extra 


week off provided they take it 
college students 
using their spring vacation for 


in the winter. 


Shipboard Adventure 
It’s 


Portugal, 


not just for a breath- 
skipping glimpse of a wonder 
' waterfall in Africa, 
venture of ship life and service 
on a South Atlantic cruise. It’s 
not just the music of spring in 
it’s the sports, evening 


it’s the ad- 


: Px 
_parties, and relaxation en route. | gaa 


Similarly, 


on the short trips, | 


apolis. 
\sleeping cars 
i pool. 


N.Y. Central Maps Economy Moves 


Looking toward economy of 
operation, the New York Cén- 
tral announced this month that 
beginning July 1, it will take 
over from the Pullman Com- 
pany the servicing of all sleep- 
ing cars on its lines. This will 
involve maintenance, interior | 
cleaning, porter, conductor and) 
club car commissary services. 
It will also supply the bedding 
and linen. The road plans to do. 
the maintenance work at its) 
Beech Grove shops near Indian- | 
The Central has 370 
in-the Pullman 
The Pullman Company 
which is owned by the rail-| 


‘roads has more than 4,000 cars, 
_which it operates for the carfiers 


Among the Railroads 


distance trains in the country, 


Northern Pacific’s North Coast 
Limited has just been equipped 


with six new stainless steel din- | 


additional 
They were 


ing cars and two 
|Vista-Dome _ cars. 


| built by the Budd Company at 


a cost of $2,210,000. The cars 
| which the new diners replaced 
|are being. put on the Main- 


| streeter, a secondary train. The 


new cars are decorated in shades 
of Norway blue, rose and yellow. 
They have wall-to-wall carpet- 
ing and seat 32:in a center sec- 
tion and 16 in two “banquette”’ 
sections. 


, tenance cost had become’ pro- 


hibitive. However, it was said 


‘the principle of using coal as a 


fuel in such an engine had been 
proven. Of 4,500 horsepower, it 
weighed 586 tons when fully 
loaded. 

a ae 


The Canadian Pacific last year 
acquired 12 Rail-Diesel cars to 
bring its fleet to 43, the second 
largest number of any railroad. 
The Boston and Maine with 
more than 100 leads the field. 
These self-propelled cars, @& 
product of the Budd Company 
have proven popular because of 
their economy of operation, 
speed and easy riding. 


| as needed, 

In another ecpnomy move, the 
‘Central on Feb. 16 will down-| 
grade its crack Empire State) 
Express to the status of a local 
| train. This will be done by com- | 
bining the Dewitt Clinton, ‘a 
-much- slower train. with it. and 
_ making the stops of both trains. 
Between New York and Buffalo, 
the Empire will make 18 stops 
and take nearly an hour longer 
than formerly. A high spot in 
its 66 years of service occurred |~~ 


in 1893 near Batavia, N.Y., when 
* 
InWashington, D.C. 


‘it set a speed record of 112% 
STAY AT THE 


miles an hour under engineer | 
Marriott 


et ee Travel 
“Jawn Henry,” the huge ex- 
perimental coal-fired steam tur- 


| bine electric drive locomotive 
uncer test by the Norfolk and 


FOR YOUR NEXT TRIP 
| Western for the last three years, | Coli LERIOS TRAVEL 
has..been..permanently retired. 


The reason given was that main- | ° 
AIR — STEAMSHIPS — HOTELS 
RESORTS — CRUISES 


MO SERVICE CHARGE 
ANDREW WwW. 


LERIOS, inc., TRAVEL 


548 Mkt., $.F.—YU 2-7105—133 Mtgmry, 
T. & Ctry. Vill., Pele Alte — DA 6-0516 
St. Cleire HMetel, Sen Jose —CY 77-1700 


» ££. _ A A hh i i LD i 


it’s not just winter golf and | j 
swimming at Bermuda or pic- | 
turesque shore excursions in the 
| West Indies, it’s that choice of 
| rest or glamour-living on your 
cruise ship that counts. 
“Live«Aboard” cruises of six | 
oF séven days’ duration are of- | 
fered by Furness, for example. 
Their Triangle cruises which go | 
to both Bermuda and Nassau are 
|of eight days’ duration. | 
“You'll find a new life aboard | 
'ship,” says the folder describing | 


travel, retired persons eager to 
swap winter for a tropical gar- 
den atmosphere, and others are 
getting aboard. 


i ee i a le ti, nt, 


Hotels—Resorts 
New York City 


HOTEL DAUPHIN 


67th St. end Broedwey, WN. Y. C. 
KITCHENETTE APARTMENTS 


Bach completely furnished with bath 
and shower. Large AIRY. comfort- 
able rooms. Low weekly, monthiy rates 
Single from $4 Double from $6 
2-Room Suites from $8 Dally 


8. R. BENOW, Mer. TR 72-2200 


Deck Tennis Aboard Cunard Liner Caronia 


leaves Feb. 5 to be gene 14 days,| ward Caribbean carnival time, 
then again on Feb. 21 for 13 | lists various sailings from 
'days. These are followed by a. | Miami, as well as dates when 
nine-day trip to Jamaica, Pan-/| to board the Arosa Sky in New 


Atlantic No. 2 Spot ama, Haiti, and Cuba leaving | York. The latter schedule reads | 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor | March 10. | Feb. 11, Feb. 27, March 15, and 

|the Queen of Bermuda and the New York | As in other recent years, the; April 5. 

| Ocean Monarch, “a life designed | ee aoa eg +t. S | ' | 

lf hy Th ‘ ble th With more than 100,000 pas- Cunard Line 1S offering its Dune | The Arosa Star makes trips i 

or Nappiness. e Trouvies, ce | gengers carried across the At- | shine Cruises to the West Indies twice weekly from Miami to Charles Hogan at the throttle of | 

hurry, the care and annoyances | jantice, eastbound and west- |and South America. The com-| Nassau, through April 4. Those | No. 999. In 1941, the train re- 

‘of everyday are left behind a8/ young on its New York-Med- |Pletely air-conditioned Maure-| who want a longer cruise, ex-| ceived all new stainless steel | 

your vessel glides smoothly out | iterranean service, the Italian | tania is making four voyages. It | tending from 16 to 19 dave may equipment. Declining traffic was 

to sea. The ocean*you sail, the Line maintained ‘in 1957 its | Will leave Feb. 11 for 18 days;! choose the luxury’ cruise ship| given as the reason for the 

far places -you visit, and the) position of second place among 'March 5 for 15 days; March 22! arosa Sun, leaving Miami Feb. | latest economy move. 

beautiful ship itself charmingly | North Atlantic carriers in the | [°F 15 days, and April 8 for 12/14 Mareh 6, or March 24. ' One of the outstanding long- | 

alter the routine of living and number of persons transported. | days. AR ART ST TRIBE A" Bo ROE 

poate ide you with an excellent | | according to Exzio Bonfanti, | The last-mentioned ss the MOTOR HOTEL 

' change.” general manager of the line in | shortest but “how sweet are WORLD'S LARGEST” 

Trip to Africa | the United States and Canada. _ these 12 day 5,” the traveler iS Only 5 Minvtes From Downtown 

Time is now short before | The line’s second place | reminded, Its timing may inter- Washington, Do. C. © All Historic 

Sailing on the South Atlantic-| among North Atlantic carriers—}°S' the post-Easter contingent, Shrines Within o Few Minutes Drive 

| Africa cruise which Norwegian! has been held for three con- | "ce the sailing is Tuesday fol- 370 deluxe, soundproofed rooms 

America Line sponsors in coop- | secutive years. since 1955. lowing Easter Monday and the with free TY ond Hi-Fi ¢ Hot 
Shoppes Restavrant (No Alcoholic 
Beverages) * Borber & Beauty 
Shops *¢ Glamorous outdoor ice 
Skating Rink (Skote Rentals Avail- 
able) * Baby Sitters On Call « Sight- 
Seeing Service * Singles From $8 

FOR RESERVATIONS 

PHONE eeronee 8-4200 


Hotels—Resorts 


7 
Italian Line Keeps 
: Washington, D.C. 


New Yorks Cnweniont 


HOTEL 


46th to 47th Sts. Just west of B’way. |) 


1,000 Rooms 


“Let an 
Experienced 
Traveler 
Plan 
Your 
Trip” 


Representing all Transportation 
ond Tour Componies for 


EUROPE e CRUISES 
ESCORTED CRUISES 
WEST INDIES 
SOUTH SEAS 


Hotels—Resorts 
_ Virginia 


FF IOP PPP PLFA A Or © 


CEXLAENELELELELELS- 


Welcome to , 


Historic 
VIRGINIA 


Plan now to visit restored Williamsburg—where Washing- 
ton, Jefferson and Patrick Henry championed our freedom. 


leration with Thos. Cook &| w 05.259 * | getting-back day is a week 
Son, With Amazon and the Con- bn ob Rect aemaa from the. following ‘Sunday, 
|go as headlined attractions, the | » s April 20, 

Oslofjord sails on Feb. 6 and Ship With Reputation 
follows the northeast coast of | One of the reasons the Maure- 
‘South America crossing the At- tania is known as a “happy” | 
|lantic at Recife, Brazil, to Cape ship is the reputation of its 
cuisine and the skill of its | 
officers trained according to} 


Dining Room 
Scientifically 
Air Conditioned 


'Town by way of St. Helena. It 
travels north to the Canary 
Islands and Madeira to the lure | 
of springtime reaching southern | 
Spain, according to the experi- | 


“Rooms Air-Conditioned 


* * 4é 
. . « lelevision Travel 


Excellent Banquet Facilities 


enced at “the finest season of the 
year.” 
In Africa, there will be oppor- 


| Britain’s high standards of sea- 


manship. 
Another romantic path to the’ 


You'll enjoy the leisurely tours of famous buildings and 
gardens—trips to Jamestown, Yorktown and nearby planta- 


MOTOR 
HOTL. 


ROUND WORLD 


Twin Bridges. On U.S.1 2 Va. 350 
Washington 1 DO C 


New 12 and 20 Day 
| FREIGHTER CRUISES 


i\Prom $290 with bath. No tax. Leave N.Y. | pe 
. Incl. sights. Write for 
H COMPLETE | 
Madison Ave., 
6-4721. 


WYDLER TRAVEL 
SERVICES 


328 EAST MAIN STREET 
ROCHESTER, WN. Y. 


tunity to travel far inland. The | West Indies and South America | 
fe ‘ bs is provided by Canadian Pacific. 


great wildlife sanctuaries, moun- | : 

tains, lakes, handicrafts of cad Fe ey ee ~ ——— will 
people are of outstanding inter- | 54! *©9. <1 for i9 Gays Of sunny 
P - 6 " ‘charm; and on March 14 for 14 


est on this trip. , 
This same line features an. 22¥YS Of variety on board and on 
: land. 


Easter cruise. On this, the Ber- 
_gensfjord sails April 1, continu- The Empress has five passen- 
ing for 13 days with stops at | 8°" decks, Its starlit terrace, 
Bermuda, Puerto Rico, St. | — — ae eee ae | 
eC | photography shop, inviting li- 
Thomas, Jamaica, and Haiti. | brary and clubroom offer color’ 
Holiday Cruises = quiet according to mood. 
February is a good month for | “Gracious as a royal yacht” it’ 
cruising partly because of the | has been called. There will be | 
two important holidays it em-/| time for stops at quaint, yet | 
braces. Holland-America is fea- | magnificent, Martinque; at the | 
| turing a Lincoln’s Birthday and; home of South America’s great | 
a Washington’s Birthday cruise | liberator—Gen. Simon Boliv ar— | 


= ee. Yan E Buses |to the West Indies and South | in Venezuela; at Jamaica where | 
|America on the 


"w. steamships | shopping sights and the Hope | 
L 41 WwW. 86th St. met SC 4-6900 Nieuw Amsterdam and Maas-| Gardens are to be enjoyed; at! 
— ean ~|dam. The former will sail Feb. 


| Havana, Cuba, and other places | 
3 for 15 days and again Feb. | of modern or historical interest. 

ROSOFF “wrer | 20 for 16 days. The Maasdam 

SMALL COMFORTABLE HOTEL IN ii 


The Arosa Line, oriented to- 
THE HEART OF TIMES... SQUARE ey 
All rooms with beth 
Singles $3 up 
TRANSIENT @© PERMANENT 


MILTON J. KRAMER, Pres. 
Ownership Management 


tions. Golf, tennis and other sports in season. Fine-lodgings 
in modern hotels, colonial guest houses and restored taverns. 


Williamsburg Inn & Cottages 
Lodee & Taverns * The Motor House 
Double rooms with bath from $8.00 


rite direct, 


T , , 
(44th &t.) N.Y. MU 


For information: a Ce travel ageat, 
or Wiliamsbere Reservation Office, 30 Rocke 


teller Plaza, New York. Te. Clrde 6-6800. 


Hotels—Resorts 
New York. City 


‘H ¢ CAMERON 


New York's Family Hotei 
1-2 ROOM KITCHENETTE APTS. 
by DAY — WEEK or MONTH 
Air Conditioring Availabdie 
‘E meng ay Cariotion Science Churches, 


NOW! See the historic 
old-world landmarks... 


* VISIT NEARBY JAMESTOWN FESTIVAL PARK * ee inseam niin 


Travel 


” 


SAM CAMPBELL ALASKA CRUISE 1958 


Leaving Chicago via SPECIAL TRAIN 
june 16, 1958 


Itinerary includes Jasper Noationo!l Pork (4 
days), Vancouver, 2200-mile cruise of famed 
inside Passage on SS Prince George with stops 
at Prince Rupert, Ketchikon, Juneau, Skagway 
(with thrilling journey on norrow gauge rail- 
road to Corcross in the Yukon), Wrangell, 
Ocean Falls—-RETURNING VIA LAKE LOUISE 
AND BANFF. 

Three weeks ef tuxurious, exciting trovel 
through superlative scenic ond historic lends. 
All expense cost from $795 wp 
For information write Rey L. Dickson, Mer. 


SAM CAMPBELL TOURS 
44 E. 37th St., Indionepolis 5, Indiene 


‘January Thaw’ Not as Welcome as It Used to Be 
By Leavitt F. Morris 


Travel Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 
Spring Brook Farm, Dover, Mass. 

There was a real “January thaw” the early part of this week 
—temperatures in the 40’s, salty fog layers eating away at the 
snowbanks, and heavy rains. 

A “January thaw” isn’t quite as welcome in these parts as it 
used to be. The tremendous impact the winter sports business 
has on New England’s economy has made the “January thaw” 
a most unpopular event among not only the resort operators 
but many farmers as well. 

An over-all “thaw” can practically wipe out those “good-to- 
excellent” skiing conditions over a weekend, and ski lodges and 
inns suddenly find themselves with empty rooms and quiet 
lobbies. Many of todav’s farmers have put a spare room or two 
aside for the skier: The cash earned from the renting of this 
room is known by the farmer’s wife as “sugar bowl” money, 
which goes a long way toward buying a new spring coal, an 
electric refrigerator, or redecorating the parlor. 

But let’s face it. The “January thaw” is as old as time itself. 
When the snow lies deep and heavy in late December; when it 
has been piled high on both ‘sides of the walks and roadsides; 
when the barnyard is much too full for man or beast to walk— 
then nature takes over and makes adjustments. 


Grassy Islands Spring Up in South Pasture 


Mild days press down upon the fields of white, shrinking the 
huge glossy sheet to half its size. Hundreds of tiny rivulets 
scurry off to join the swelling brooks and streams. Grassy islands 
spring up in the south pasture, ridges of frozen earth appear 
in the barnyard, and the rusty edge of a “lost” ax sticks out of 
the snow. 

The farmer during the “thaw” harnessed his team to a huge 
sled and hauled cut wood from his wood. lot. The mild spell 
also gave him a chance to turn the cows into the barnyard 
to straighten out kinks. 

The few “warm” days unloosened the ice from the edges of 
the roof and sent icicles crashing against the house. These 
“warm” days gave the farmer time to restock the woodshed with 
stove-length chunks from the woodpile, now protruding through 
its canvas of snow. 

The annual “January thaw” was a happy day for the farmer's 
wife, too. When the sun was extra warm and the air almost 
mellow, woolen blankets were stripped from beds and thrown 
across the sHls of open windows. Cotton sheets were washed 
and hung outdoors. 

But the lot of the farmer’s wife is an easy one today. An 
automatic washing machine and a drier enable her to go about 
her weekly wash unconcerned about the weather. 
~ Among the first to herald the “January thaw” are the crows. 
anny They swoop out of the woodland, “cawing” excitedly over the 
New York Reservation Office: 30 Rocke- coaharenne of bare ground in last year’s corn field. Here they 
feller Plaza, Telephone Circle 5-80668. | =| make graceful landings, hoping to find a kernel or two which 
% ‘4 they overlooked last autumn. 


Chickadees Lead a Steady Parade to Feeder 


The activity of our bird population at Spring Brook Farm 
increases during these “thaw” days. They come into the feeding 
station from every quarter, apparently storing up food for the 
days ahead—days which can bring mountains of snow and sub- 
zero temperatures. Chickadees lead tHe steady parade of nut- 
hatches, downy woodpeckers, goldfinches, purple finches, gros- 
beaks, juncos, sparrows, and the pesky but always brilliant and 
wary ‘blue jays. 

Wildlife, we have learned, is not fooled, like some people, 
over the coming of the “January thaw.” Winter is not over, but 
just beginning. The “thaw” is not a harbinger of spring. Instead 
it serves notice to the seasoned New Englander to be prepared 
for the worst of winter. 

For February, though it be the smallest month, packs the big- 
gest wallop. During those 28 days some of New England's wildest 
storms have descended—snows and cold spells of record pro- 
portions. 

So it is quite clear why nature has scheduled an annual 
“January thaw.” It is not actually for the convenience of man 

or beast, as man might be so vain to think. No indeed! 

Nature just wants to make room for more of the same—snow, . 
' snow, and more snow! 


s 


EXCLUSIVELY for WOMEN 


Retes $2.75 end up 


New Kitchenette 
Now Aveilab 


ast 30% St 
Madison Ave 
Write Re dent 


“No Parcdes:: 
* outside your window 


at the Hotel Tudor, but a peace- 
ful, residential neighborhood 
that makes your New York visit 
enjoyable. Private park, restau- 
rant, pleasant lounge. Two 
blocks from Grand Central Ter- 
minal and three from the East 
Side Airlines Terminal. Adja- 
cent to United Nations Head- 
quarters, neat churches, depart- 
ment stores, theatres. 
600 outside rooms with bath. 
Doubles from $10 Singles from $ g@ OO 


Write for folder N5-1 


Sa Do Pr 


and MEET THE PEOPLE too! 


COOK’S “Human Interest” 
TOURS OF EUROPE! 


Here is an exciting new idea from Cook’s, creators of 
new ways in travel since 1841. On Cook's “Human 
Interest” Tours, not only will you visit the cathedrals 
and other historic landmarks, but you'll also get a vivid 
insight into the Europe of today. 


Get to know the British better as you exchange ideas 
with people at a local village inn. Gain a deeper under- 
standing of the Italians as a visitor in a Roman home. 
Paris will come alive as you~ call- on a young French 
painter in his studio. 


Experience all this, and more, on these new and dif- 
ferent 42-day, 7 country escorted “Human Interest” 
Tours. They begin April 9 and run throughout the sea- 
son. Crossings on Cunard “Queens” or by air. Fares 
are from $1581. (Brusseis’ World's Fair included in all tours.) 


OTHER EUROPEAN TOURS 
POPULAR OLD WORLD TOURS. 40-43 days. 7 countries. Crossings 
on Cunard liners from Montreal. From $898. 
POPULAR VACATION TOURS. 40-44 days, 7 countries. Holland- 
American liners. From $978. 
HEART OF EUROPE TOURS. 35 days, 
“Queens.” From $1118. 
7-COUNTRY TOURS. 35 days. 25 departures. April-Oct. Cross- 
ings on Cunard “Queens.” From $1282. 
NORTHERN SCENIC TOURS. 48-51 days, 9 countries. 6 
May-July. Via French Line “Liberte.” From $1395. 
PICTURESQUE TOURS. 55-60 days, 8 countries. <vesiigs on 
“America” one way, American Export Lines one way. Fares 
from $1596. 
COLLEGE VACATION TOURS. 49 days, 7 countries. For younger 
people (18-25). Via Cunard “Queens.” From $1673. 
CLASSIC TOURS. 53-56 days, 7 countries,.Crossings on the super- 
liner “United States.” From $1792. 
GRAND TOURS. 56 days, 8 countries. Cunard liners. From $2190. 


(Crossings by air, if desired, 
and Brussels’ Worid's Fair included in all abowe tours.) 


PILGRIMAGE TOURS to Lourdes, Rome and all Europe... im 
conjunction with the Catholic Travel League. 


still cost only 75¢ per $100.00 
M Check fer folders... and cell on f 


THOS. COOK & SON 


INCORPORATED 


Offices in: Atlonta, Baltimore; Beverly Hills, Boston, Buffelo, Chicoge, 
Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Memphis, Milwoukee, New Orleons, New 
York, Pasodeno, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Richmend, St, Lovis, Sen Fren- 
cisco, Seattle, Washington, Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Toronto, Ven- 
couver, Winnipeg. 


New York 
MU 33-1900 
Manaper 


at KENMORE $9., soston 

located for trans. 
portation te all points. | 
hit conditioned dining rooms. 


MAND Excellent cuisine. 
‘ececeecees WILLIAM t. siGLER, Sen. Mg 


otel | 
emenway 
At the Gateway to the Fens | 

A short walk from The| 
Christian Science Mother’! 
Church: No liquor is sold 


or served. 


Hemenwey St. ot Westland Ave. | 
Make it Your Boston Address | 


RENT 
or BUY 


As low as $30 per week 
Widest Selection of 
New European Cars 
For free estimate and “Eu- 
rope by Car Guide,” send 
departure date and length 
of sta¥. Dept. CS-4 
37 West S7th St., N.Y., N.Y. 
INC. PL 5-4739 


Alt Plas 


COMPLETELY 218-COMDITIONED 


SPRING CRUISE-VOYAGE 
TO EUROPE 


Sailing from New Orleans, May 20, 1958 
24 Days (terminating im Leebrugge, Seigivm, june 12) 
FOR THE BRUSSELS WORLD'S FAIR 


@ Evrope-bound next spring? For a leisurely 
and relaxing voyage, soil the sunny south- 
ern route in a ship renowned for her inti- 
mote. yacht-like charm. Among o select 
compony of 165 congenial guests, . visit 
Havana, St Thomas, Madeira ond Lisbon. 
Interesting shore progroms ore planned 
Make reservations now. Rates from $550 
CRUISES TO THE WEST INDIES 
from New Orleans 


Feb. 17 (23 days). Merch 13, April 1, April 18 
{16 days), May 5 (14 deys). Retes frem $2795 


$ SUMMER. CRUISES IN SCANDINAVIA end 
MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE 


304 East 42nd Street, New York 
MUrray Hill 9-3200,° Guy P. Seeley, Manager 


West Virginia | 


Oe Oe 


WHERE THE VACATION SEASON NEVER ENDS | 


SpectaL COMBINATION RATES 
December 1 to February 28. 
Rates include room with bath, all meals, 
greens fees, swimming and basic tips. 
$21 daily per person (2 in a room) 
$23 daily per person (/ in a room) 


For information and reservations contact 


7 countries. Via Cunard 


rahe ié va we 


wie 


= 4 


4 


3, * 
vii i bos 
wn Th aw : 


spf " _ 
PSS ES BESO tee 
CE a ey or. 
SS SR err 
2 


et Ae 


Cook's Travelers Cheques... 


i RS BS 
A 


SEL ERECT E GINS SMEs 


en Be, 


WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS + WEST VIRGINIA 


’ 


~ 


The Home Foru 


ee 
° 


, Registered in U. 8. Patent Office 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


‘“ 


Cats Around 


Now in midwinter the land has decided 
that it is spring, and all the pastures are 
green banquet tables, and daffodils are 
blooming in the dooryard, Already’ some 
fruit trees have blossomed, and that made 
us feel hurried about pruning the vine- 
yard, a task upon which we have all been 
working since before Christmas. 

When we started, we thought we had 
plenty of time, the vines would stay dor- 
mant until March, but now we snip hur- 
riedly, trying to race ahead of spring. The 
vineyard grows vaster every time we walk 
into it- and by some kind of magic three 
or four unpruned vines spring into being 
for every one we prune. None of us has 
ever seen anything expand the way that 
vineyard did 

Actuatty it is a pleasant job, for the days 
are so very beautiful, and neither too hot 
nor too cold. And there is something fasci- 
nating about the business, so that after 
one has pruned for quite a long while and 
it is time to go do something else, there is 
always the urge to snip away at just one 
more vine before you stop. _ , 

I had scarcely really looked at a vine- 
yard before and I didn’t know how to 
prune until various experienced pruners 
kept laughing at what I thought were my 
well pruned vines, and saying they looked 
like porcupines, as I had left so many 
small twigs sticking up. You have to be 
ruthless and whack away until you feel 
you are being much too destructive and 
that the poor shorn vine will never bea! 
again. It took me a long time to get this 
through my head, but now I’m being rash 
and ruthless, and I whack away in a 
carefree; professional manner. 

| ey ee: 

But, even so, there are hazards, for I 
very nearly prune the cats and kittens. 
They delight in our activity and as soon 
as I pick up the pruning shears a large 
number .of cats gather around. It is diffi- 
cult to be ruthless with the vines 
avoid pruning ears and tails of cats, but 
so far there have been no casualties. 

When I moved here I brought my nine 
nice cats, and when my niece moved here 
she brought her seven nice cats, and when 
the former owner moved away he left all 
his cats and kittens. I raised an objection 
to being the owner of so many cats, but 
he remarked cheerfully that no ranch can 
have too many cats, and hurried away 
before I could tell him he was wrong, 
that already this ranch had too many. I 
won't even mention thé exact number 
we have because I’m not quite sure my- 
self. Anyway, there are plenty. They are 
all ages, all sizes, all colors 

Various neighbors who have lived in 
ihis vicinity for a iong time began asking, 
“Has Bobby showed up yet?” 

And when we asked more about this 
mysterious Bobby, we didn’t learn so very 
much, only that. he was.wild, unfriendly, 
self-sufficient and wise, and if he did 
deign to come around we should feel flat- 
tered. By then the thought of one more 
cat liking us didn’t flatter us at all. We 
didn’t care if we never saw this snooty 
Bobby, and if he did come we wouldn't 
be polite. At the same time, we were curi- 
ous, Bobby evidently was something of an 
institution around here and had been fa- 
mous for years. So, though we said we 
didn’t want Bobby to come, we all wanted 
to see who he was. 

But: we had to live here for some 
months and no doubt all our activities 
had been carefully observed and thought 
about before Bobby made a personal. ap- 
pearance. He chose an evening after sup- 
per, just as I was washing dishes. I heard 
a voice by the breakfast-nook window, a 
voice that sounded both complaining and 
demanding, a different sound from the 
meows We ordinarily hear, round yellow 
eyes stared in at me, a big yellow. face 
pressed against the glass. The whole head, 
with its cauliflower ears and heavy jowls, 
looked too large to belong to a domestic 
cat, and I remember thinking, “Oh, I do 
hope he likes us!” Instinctively one wanted 
to be on Bobby’s side. 


a 


ana 


I opened the window and invited him in. 


» 0 


aor eT pe SR. ce a 2 ms 


ate “y 
CEPR 


By Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts 


“Rep Horses”: A Painting by the German Artist Franz Marc (1880-1916) 


He leaped to the floor and immediately 
the dogs bristled and gathered around, fo! 
this surely was an intruder that should be 
ousted. Bobby didn't. grow! 

hair 0 it all the igs, ana 


a the 


na bei ne e 
Hie merely looked ; 
dogs backed av 
Bobb 

had conquered wild Cat 


Ss, and pe 


to ovpserve 


rhaps €ven mountain lo: 
dog, or a pack of them, was 
nothing to concern hin 

I gave him milk and dog food and cat 
food and table scraps. He ate and ate and 
lapped and lapped until his dishes were all 
smoothed off. Then he sat down and 
washed his face with paws that seemed as 
big as a baby lion’s. Like his wild cousins 
he had no tail, and we realized that was 
people called him Bobby. Evidently 
there had been a Manx cat in his an- 


c¢ 


and a mere 


A ny 


He regarded me with so Kind an ex- 
pression that I picked him up, and he felt 
as heavy and solid as a big dog. I sat down 
and held him on my lap and stroked him, 
and he liked it and roared, only actually 
he was purring. All-his—paws expanded 
and he kneaded gently, as a kitten does, 
keeping claws well sheathed. I loved him 
for being so big and so tough and so 
gentle and so sentimental. He seemed al- 
most embarrassed, like an overgrown 
schoolboy, but he was enjoying the affec- 
tion we gave him 
4 4 4 

When I put him down he continued to 
purr. He sat on the floor and then he did 
the oddest thing we'd ever seen a cat do. 
As he sat humming happily away to him- 
self, he began to rock forward and back, 
exactly as if he were in a rocking chai! 
He sat purring and rocking all the rest 
of the evening, so that we felt reluctant to 
put him out at bedtime. We knew, thoughy 
that he was one to feel at home in the 
night. 

The next morning he watched all the 
other cats eat breakfast, but ate none 
When I started for the barn with the milk 
pail he trotted after.me. He knew about. 
cows and the deliciousness of warm fresh 
milk for breakfast and that was what he 
was going to have. In a few mornings the 
other cats learned from him, and a dozen 
of them went to sit around and yow! as I 
milked. so before I could get much in the 
pail I had to pour some out into a pan for 


. old 


eats. lf I didn't hurry. certain ones threat- 
ened to attempt to climb up the cow § tal 
And ever since then I got 


mMitkime with a 


from mm‘ 


av a . | zc 

The dogs like running with the norse, ana 
> ' : : hn _ 
Bobby, ear. is, ‘i 3 i; ine Lime ol] 


So aoes \ 
cows. Just 


day when we go alte to go fo! 
pleasure doesn’t interest him, but the idea 
of going to find the source of a warm drink 
of milk meets with his approval. 

While the dogs go following the scents of 


exabbits and squirrels, Bobby trots solemnly 


atthe horse’s heels. circles with us as we 
bunch.up the cows and 


ion back.to the 


. " ‘ 
barn : 
’ ‘ . “> o% "> fy 7 | 
ST) cil aya’ a ete: &' 


kitten, Jasper, 


Jasper is a dapper little kitten, black 
with a white shirt front, and frem the time 
he-was-very™ smatt he-was proportioned 
like a grown cat, so he looked like a nmunia- 
ture adult rather than like a kitten. He 
was the first of his batch to learn to 
scramble out of the nest, and to play and 
to go with us to the barn. 

Bobby, so very big, walks gently beside 
him and Jasper looks as if he admires the 
and would like to be as valiant 
Cow hoofs and horse hoofs are so 
that at first | 


cat 
as he. 
big compared with Jasper 
was alarmed to have him. go with us, 
but he takes care of himself very well, 
though he does look extra tiny when he 
walks beside a cow. Obviously he doesn't 
fee! tiny. 

We were so pleased with 
us that we felt 
when he wasn’t here. “Oh, 
back,” the neighbors told us 
still has to be a wild cat sometimes, 
know.” We didn’t see him for a month, 
Then one day when I was driving the car 
lL -saw--him--in-a field--about-—a-mie-from 
home. I slowed, leaned out of the window 
and called, “Bobby, you come home!” He 
did. He came trotting after the car, right 
down the middle of the road, and by milk 
ing time he-was ready and waiting and 
acting as if he’d never left at all 
JupY VAN DER VEER 


Bobby's 
hurt one 
he'll come 

“But he 


Vou 


ae 


proval of da\ 


Russia's Architecture Derives rom 


Its Forests 


Russia had .. . another building tradi- 
tion; one of immemorial antiquity, whose 
origins can only be conjectured and whose 
relation to the imported systems of con- 
struction still remains enigmatic. This wa 
the method of building in wood, the ma- 
terial originally found in abundances 
throughout central and northern Russia 
north of the steppe country. ... If the 
Russia of Kiev certainly, and even of 
Novgorod partially, still preserved for the 


riodern eye something of the serenity and 
geometrical clarity we tend to associate 
with concepts of the claSsical age and the 
masonry architecture of the antique South, 
the later Russia of the fourteenth and 
fifteenth centuries, growing up in_ the 
depths of the forests, is indelibly marked 
with the forms of wooden construction. 
To the static geometry of the cube of 
brick or worked stone, succeeded the or- 
ganic growth of the fir tree. Thie successive 


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stages in the history of wooden architec- 
ture present difficult, often insuperable ob- 


stacles -to the thistorian who wisne to 


prove a neat and chronologically consecu-. 


incontestable that 
Russian 


wood 


tive development. It is 
who inhabited the 
from times had—used 
form or other and, as we 
seen, the men of Novgorod upon almost 
their first appearance in history were 
derided by the Kievans as carpenters. , 

When the Varangians arrived they must 
have found a thriving culture of wooden 
construction “to which “they ~~ probably 
added certain details of their own which 
are now indiscoverable. Since there are, 
however, numerous wooden buildings, 
principaliy churches, still standing from 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 
and since from the chronicles and from 
the locations of these structures we can 
deduce that a profoundly conservative at- 
titude underlay their construction, it 1: 
not improbable that even the. latest 
often essentially older structures rebuilt. . 

The use of wood implies, then, not only 
possibilities for experiment and invention 
due to the flexible nature of the materia! 
but also, from the circumstances unde: 
which it was used, a certain traditionalisn 
in the familiar forms. ... 

this interaction of tradi- 
110n upor’ invention we may add the fur- 
ty relative simplicity of 
structural systems in wood, again leading 
to the contrast the elementary 
methods of construction and the elaborate, 
even sophisticated forms. evolved. 

The’ basic clement common to all Rus- 
sian wooden building is the frame of logs 
laid horizontally on a rectangular o1 
polygonal plan secured at the corners by 
interlocking beams, either through semi- 
circular or square cuts. By successively 
reducing the length of the logs at the ends 
of a rectangular frame a gable was 
achieved. The roof was made of flat planks 
and laid directly on beams running length- 
wise between the gables. This is the sys- 
tem used in the simplest form of peasant 
house, the izba, and from it in combina- 
tion with polygonal plans and applied 
carved decoration were created the most 
complex forms. — From “The Art and 
Architecture of Russia,” by Grorcre HEARD 
HAMILTON, 1954. Penguin Books, Inc., Bal- 
timore. 


the peoples 


land ancient 


ha f 


im} Some 


are 


repetition of 
paradoxical 


er factor af the 


petween 


+. 


‘ 


THE NAME OF Franz Marc is associated 
Wilh the painting of 
paratively short career, he evolved a stvle 
of painting with vivid intensitie: 
with rounded 


© XDTESSI\ 


animals. In a com- 
of color 


a ‘ 


forms, that are strong—and 


Franz Marc was the on ot a pDalnte in 
Munich. He was trained in an academic 
vay. When he 

tudied the 
onists: He responded. to the skillful 
ign of Japanese 
ceptible to new ideas, 
as were sO many young painters of hi: 
generation. There was a liberation from 
accustomed rule and practice: for example, 
Franz Mare used color not merely to 
match the various hues seen in nature, but 
for its stirring, emotional connotation. H« 
and some of his fellow 


traveled to Frat n 1907. 
works of the lt pre 
ae- 
Marc was su 


to a fre 


woodcul 


ch viewpoint 


painters went so 


far as to use color >5 
“Red Horst ~ pa 

iT) ana i) } 
Marc’ oil paint 


horse dif- 


mbolically. 
— 
nied Ll? 19] ] 


*, | 
ete ODUidl 


Franz 


7? 
liis manner of po 


Indeed, 
€atiest of 
riraving the 
fers from that of other artists who 
7e@ on the equine subject. The form is 
solia-but-supple;the-voltimes substantiatty 
qualified without loss of. gracefulness. In 
this fine painting, the horsés move toward 
and away ftom each other, the contours 
oftheir bodies creating grand arabesques 
over the landscape 

Marc also painted bulls, cows, and deer. 
There is.sontething joyous and positive in 
his expression; ‘he used a highly keved 
palette to intensify. this mood. “Red 
Horses’ was seen recently in an extensive 
exhibition, “European Maste: of Qu! 
Time,” shown in Boston at the Museum 
of Fine Arts. It was lent for exhibition by: 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Geier of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 


peciai- 


Dorotuy ADLOW 


Love Meets Every Human Need 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


One may ask, as did the Israelites 
of old (Ps. 78:19), “Can God furnish 
a table in the wilderness?” The right 
understanding of God as Love shows 
one how to prove that He does meet 
all our needs. 

On page 238 of “The First Church 
of Ghrist, Scientist, and Miscellany,” 
Mary Baker Eddy, the Discoverer and 
Founder of Christian Science, writes, 
“God is understandable, knowable, and 
applicable to every human need.”’ This 
Science teaches that God is infinite 
Mind, Love. expressing Himself 
through His ideas, the highest of which 
is man. It is natural for divine Love 
to furnish its ideas with perfection. 
Being omnipresent, omnipotent; and 
omniscient,. Love provides all good in- 
stantly, completely, and forever. 


4 la 4, 


Love does not afflict, restrict. or dis- 
criminate, but embraces all with con- 
stant, tender care. One learns in Chris- 
tian Science, which is in accord with 
the Bible, that sickness, poverty, fail- 
ure, and discord are never God-sent or 
(;,0d-permitted. These evils: are but the 
products of the belief that 
man is a mortal separated from a far- 
off Deity. The realization that man is 
a spiritual idea forever at one with 
ever-present Love dispels this false be- 
lief and its effects and opens the wav 
to the supplying of the human need: 
health, abundance. 
mony. 

The -Psatmist arnig (Ps. 36:7. 8) 
“How excellent thy 
() God: therefore the 
put the trust 
thy wings. They 


~~ 


erroneous 


success, or har- 


lovingkindness, 
children of men 
under the shadow of 
shall be abundantl\ 
satisfied with the fatness of thy house: 
halt make them drink of the 
thy pleasures.” Unshakable 
conviction that Love knows and meets 
every human need wipes out all anx- 
lety as to how and when one’s human 
need will be met. Childlike trust in 
God replaces willful, personal outlin- 
ing. Then one is ready to receive the 
unceasing blessings of infinite Love. 
Christian Science, which receives its 
| Scriptures, 


and thou 


river of 


authorit? rom the teaches 

God to suppl 
one knows that 
his needs are primarily spiritual ones 
and are eternally present. Nor does.one 
pray for more good, since infinite Love 
can do no more than bestow unlimited 
good. One prays for a clearer discern- 
ment of the lhmitless good which is his 
as the reflection of God. 


; ' i ‘ i. 
iflal ON aoe MOL aSA 


his human needs. for 


eae fee 


understood God as the 

good, and therefore not 
own needs, but the needs of 
ail those who sought his help were 
fully met because of this understand- 
ing. Through spiritual means only, the 
Master healed the sick, fed the hungry, 
and reformed the sinful. Mrs. Eddy 


Chi Ist Je: Us 
(;iver 


oniv 


JIFOBOBb Y AOBAETBOPAET KAMAYW 
YEJOBEYECKYW HY KAY 


'Thts is a Russian trai 


slation of “Love Meets Every Human 


Nes a << 


appearing on this page} 


lle pe por f 


A hy IVMMChKO oh nowemenHor NA aia ¢ pan 


o hpwueruan Caherc 


wine CraThn 


. [Cuerayomun PYCCKUH Hepeswol ROABHTCA i-ro Mapral 


hro HHOVIb MoaeT CHpOCHTbh, Kak BeTa- 
P4MHY cupauimBain Il3spananrane (Ileaaom 
64:19), “Moaer an bor npnrerosurs tpa 
nesy B uycThine! [I papnabnoe nonuMaHHe 
bora kak .lwOBH HOKAshIBAeT GeAOBEKY Kak 
MOKHO AOKAZATh, YTO bor yAopaeTBROpAeT 
BCe Hall HY AIM 

Ha 208-0n- erpanittie concn “The First 
Church: of Christ, Scientist. Miscel- 
Mapa bekep dum. oerkpapiiaa -# 
ocHoBabliad hpuevuan Casene (\preritad 
Havka). unuier: “bora wmowHe ne 
HATb, sHaTb H TIpPUMe@HAThL Bo BCEX 
WeCKHX HYAIAX . Ora Haywa var" 
bor eer beckoHEUADIH Pas\ M. .WOOBb H 
470 OH BbIpamaeT Ceoa TocpercTBOM CBOHX 
H1eM, HAaMBbICHIeH H3 KOHX ABAAETCH Yelo- 
Bek, lid GomecTReHHon .lwbBn ecTecTBeHHO 
OAPATH CBOM Wien conepuleneTBOM. by ivan 
BCeCVHEH, BCeMOryIeH A BeeBerymeH, .lW- 
cHAOMACT BCCM XOPOLIHM MOMCH- 
HOJHOCTDY H HABCeL 1a, 

oe ee 

LmdoBL He OrepqaeT, He OrpaHnanBaey ¥ 
He OTHOCHTCH TO PasHOMN, Hy ORpP\ aael 
BeEeX HOCTOAHHON, HERO sadeTeH. 4Le.ao- 
Bek tlosnaer TiyTem hipuernan Caitenc, ko- 
Popad HAXOAMTCA B Cordacnn ¢ bréanen, vo 
HO10SHH, Oe THOCTh, HEVIAGH HW pasta. HH 
hOria He Mochi dawn a bores MH He paspeiia 
wien boro, ATH sa0ecuaeThA ABAMIOTCA 
HpOIVATOM OUMOOUHOTO Be POBAHH A, "TO. e- 
10Beh eCTh EMePTHOe CVINECTBO, 01 le JOH HOE 
oT iasexore bomectBa. Ocosnanne Tore, 4Te 
eCTh JVXORHAN Wied, BOREKH 
Had CO BEEP LA-CVIeH LooRbIO, paccenBpac’ 


and 


lany” 


(Chad 
Te .10be- 


iT 
i?) 


DOBb 
bi.tbHu 


We doses eill 
re 0. Hoe Be pPoRBaHire H ele pes\ tb rar bl it 
OTKPLIBAeT UVTb K VIOBIOTHOPOHHO GTB 
WOCHKHA HJOOHINA, SCUPAd 
WH PapMonun 

Icaamonesen nea (Ileaaom Bord, 9): 
“hak iparonenna MusoctTs TRoa, boxe | Chi 
Hh YeJsoneyeckHe B T¢CHH Kpbid TBOUX No- 
KoliHbl: HachiMawTes.oT TYKa Joma Troero, 
u w3 novoka caalocrell Taonx Th Hanosetib 
ux”. Henoxoseéumoe y6ex1eune, 470 .1W- 
Hob 3BHACT BH YAOBACTBOPACT KAMRIyW GW.A0- 
BeUeCKYW HYAKAY, YHHITOKAeT HecHoKONCTBO 
OTHOCHTeAbHO TOPO, Kak A Korda kKagas 
an6o HyaIa GyleT yloBserBopena. lleKper- 
Hee jJobepHe k bor) JAMCHHET €BOeCBOAb- 
Hoe, JnuHve Haagnpowanne, Il Tol ja 4Ye.10- 
Bek roray Horydarh becupephipnble baaro- 
caoneHna beekonesHon .Lwonn 

lipueruan Caitenc, Hayka, apropnrer Ko- 
Topol nponetekaeT or Ilncanua, yunt, 470 
yelonek He Hpocut bora 06 yionszerRopenun 
CBOHX HYAA, UOTOMY ITO OH SHACT, ITO ero 


H\ mi. a LOPOBb a, 


HYAIL HepBUYHO AYXOBHAE WH BOBEKH CVE 
ll He MOJHTCH “eAOBeK © JapoBaHHH eMY 
ee Oo1buIMX O4ar, HOO beckoneuHaa JH- 
O0Bb He MoweT lath doable Hexean becko- 
HewHoe 1oopo, Yeaonek MOJHTCA O AapoBa- 
HHH OMY OOJeP ACHOTO PaCHO3HaABAHHA TOTO 
HecipeleIbHore Aoopa, KoTopoe MpHhalse 
AMT @MY Kak OTPamennw bora. 
ee ee 

\pueroe neve nonumaa bora Kak apu 
reid BETO JOOpa H ThosTomMy He ToaBKo efo 
COOCTBCHHMIC HV ALbI, HO MH HVA BCX TeX. 
KOTOphe OOPAlladiCh K HEMY_3a TOMOEHH, 
HOIHOCTDM ViOBIeTBOPAANCh Kak Cale lceTBHe 
aTord NOHAMaHHA, J4unTeab Heneana boab- 
HbIX, Hacblilat POJOIHKIX HH HCIpaBaAa 
PpemHHKOB  HCKAWUNTCIBHO AYXOBHBIME 
epeicTBamu. Mapu baxep 3aan anmer 8 
“Science and Health with Key to 
seriptures” (erp. 494): “bowecrsennan 
-O0Bb BCera ViOBAeTBOPAAAa A BCerIa 
OVieT ViobseTROeparh Raa Ye 10 Bede CR VE 
HY#wIY, Hexopome aymarp, “ro Ineye BHI- 
AKIN OORCCTROHHVH CHAY WOICHHA TOAbKO 
ioiew WAN HA O] piai- 
BpeMeHH, HOO BCeMY 4e- 
ROAKHM Gac OomecTBeHHAA 
LWOOBL lueT Bee XOpoiiee 

boane Ipopmienne NposBiserca B ARHSHH 
“eioneha B TOM Mepe, B Raho Ye10Beh oco- 
sHaeT, GTO bor cHadmaer Bee Crom Hien 
cHoH [Via BW AHaHeECHOCcOOnOCTLW AHSHE; 
Hachiatae’ HX XJedOM HeveCHHIM, 
llérunol, WH OleRaeT HX O1EMHHEM CBATOCTH, 
KpacerolWw Svan bowl Wien, PapMOHHTHO 
CoC UHCHHbBIG JPY € APYTOM \saMn lwdsn, 
HAXOIATCH Hot VupaBslentem e1nHOre boxme- 
cruenHoro = [lpunuuna W Npedbipawr B 
HpPUCYTCTBHH AWOBH, BLIpadad CoraacoBaH- 
HyMm JeatedbHocTh Pasyma, [papuannoe 
NOHMMAaHHe YTHX IVXOBHAIX MaKTOB- VAOBJe- 
TRopAeT YAOBEUeECKYH HYAIY B 3lOpoRbe, 
Mile, OLA IC, KpOBe HW CYACTAMBAIX COOTHO- 
HICHHAX, H BEET YeAOReKA K HOJee NOAHOMY 
ocosHaHil) beckonedHocTsH wbBH. 


LJ Huopannere Ueda 
HUYOHHR He pHes 
JOBeYeCTBY HBO 


“To On 


“Havaspuas Bemecrsennas Haysa” a “Her 
nu Ja”, » eoxnom tome, w “Perpecnexnas a 
Hutpecnecguua”,—tpyau Mopn Bexep Sagan, ua 
aHrAUHCKOM M PYCCKOM S3NKAX MOmHe “pH- 
obperaTh sp YnTaabHax Kpnernan Cadence nan 
y Horace J. Carver, Publishers’ Agent, 
One Norway Street, Boston 15, Mas- 
sachusetts, U.S.A. 

Bee cpexenna © npovel aurepatype ne Kpr- 
eTuan Canene H& PyCCROM agwke MomHe neay- 
vaTh oOpaTHBmuch HuchMeHRO B Haxareancnee 
Odmectse Kpnernan Caienc (The Christian 
Science Publishing Society, One Nor- 
wa Street, Boston 15, Massachusetts, 


writes in “Science and Health with 
Key to the Scriptures” (p. 494): “Di- 
vine Love always has met and always 
will meet.every human need. It is not 
well to imagine that Jesus demon- 
strated the divine power to heal only 
for a select number or for a limited 
period of time, since to all mankind 
and in every-hour, divine Love sup- 
plies all good.” 

The divine Providence is made mani- 
fest in one’s human experience in the 
measure that one realizes that God 
supplies all His idea with the strength 
of Spirit and the vitality of Life: that 
He feeds them with the bread of 
heaven, Truth, and clothes them with 
the garment of holiness, the beauty of 
Soul. Harmoniously linked through the 
bonds of Love, .God’s ideas are under 
the government of one divine Principle 
and dwell in the presence of Love, ex- 
pressing the concordant activity of 
Mind. A right understanding of these 
spiritual facts meets the human need 
for .health, food, clothés, shelter, or 
happy relationships and leads one on 
to a fuller reafization of the infinitude 
of Love. 

here on the page will be found a transie'iog 
article in Russian. The next Russian trane- 


lation will appear March 17./ 


Homecoming 


And one went back in thought to the little 
town 

Where he was born, 
streets again 

With the eyes of a child—walked often up 
and down 

The happy streets, and loved them now as 

then, 

thought he talked with those he 

knew, and smiled 

At the people who lived in the wonderful 
world of a child. 


and walked the 


And 


Another went himself to the same small 
town, 

Where once he too had lived. He saw it 
now 

As a wretched place, fit only for pulling 
down— 

Thanked fate 
anyhow! 

Nothing could now be worse than to live 
exiled 

In this place he had foolishly cared for ag 
a child. 


that he was out of it, 


They met, and this one said: “Don’t ever 
go back!”— 

“But I do go back. It’s always a home for 
my thought.”— 

“It hurts to see your home was just @ 
shack.”— 

“Memory sees 

taught.”— 

hold to 

will!”"— 

“You've lost the town, but I have kept it 
still.” 


essentials, I've been 


“Well, your illusions, wf you 


ROLAND ENGLISH HARTLEY 


_— 


the . 


Healing Power of 


Christian Science 


To those who live and look fon 
something better, this message 
offers help, regardless of present 
circumstances. 


It has been put to the test by 
countless others in all manner of 
human need and has not failed 
them. Through sincere study of 


SCIENCE AND HEALTH 
with Key to the Scriptures 
by Mary Baker Eddy 


that remarkable book containing 
the full statement of Christian Sci- 
ence, they have learned bow to 
avail themselves of help and heal- 
ing 

As a result, a new day has 
dawned for them, a new way of 
living — free and fearless. This 
light of understanding can be yours 
in the same way, through thought- 
ful study of Science and Health. 


Science and Health may be boughe, 
borrowed, or read at Christian Science 
Reading Rooms throughout the world. 


Horace J. Carver, Publishers’ Agent 
One, Norway Street, Boston 15, Mass., U.S.A, 


[} Enclosed is $3. Please send postpaid a 
copy of “Science and Health with Key to the 
Scriptures” by Mary Baker Eddy in the blue 
cloth Library Edition. 


; 


Non nda ce seecbdtemedadicnnmade 


RRB iinnonccdbdthidinedeeis oe 
vat 


HE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 


. Friday, janasty 31, 1958 


P 


~ x 


ce => 
- 


mi whi MII 
ue 


hs 
fA “\) 4 
in NM 


The House-Cleaning Brigade Departs 


fascism raises war clouds. 
Neutrality to the Atomic Age. 
ends, and the world moves into a new 
era, 1948-1958: From Sppremacy to Sputnik. 
American sole possession of atomic weapons 


comes, 


These two cartoons by Dwight Sturges ap- 
pearing on the editorial page of The-Christian 
Science Monitor in February, 1922, both com- 
ment on the arms-limitation treaties just signed 
in Washington. 

This page is the second in five surveying the 


ae treatment of the news in the past 50 


. The next three: 1928-1938: From De- 


turns into the nuclear stalemate. 

Other special pages will run each month 
throughout the anniversary year highlighting 
the events and significance of the half century. 


pression to Reform. The United States experi- 
ments with big government and big labor as 
1938-1948: From 
World War Il 


Uncle Sam: 


‘This will be a mighty sight, more use on land than it was on 


Pageant of Five Decades—2_ 


‘Las CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR’S second 


decade bridged many crises. 


There was, first of all, the winning of World War I and 


the disillusioning peacemaking. Came then the temporary 
withdrawal: of the United States from active participation 
its return with vigor at the Washington 


in world affairs. 


Arms Limitation Conference, and its increasing activity in 


world economic relations. 


The decade felt the impact of. four remarkably different 
men in Washington: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding. 
Calvin Coolidge;-and-Herbert Hoover. Each represented a 
facet of American thinking and character, with strength 


and weakness alike. 


The American and world economies rose through post- 
inflationary 
strengths and weaknesses, Seeds were sown in the 1920's 
which have been growing into wheat — and tares — ever 
since. For the Monitor itself, and for The Mother Church. 
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, the decade began with a severe struggle over control 
of The Christian Science Publishing Seciety which ended in 
late 1921 when the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachu- 
setts affirmed the legal rule of the church which Mary 
Baker Eddy had established in the Manual of The Mother 


war reconstruction to 


Church. 


During the decade the Soviet revolution deepened, but 


Disillu- 
Postwar with- 


IT. 1918-1928: trom 
sionment to Boom. 
drawal by the United States is sue- 


ceeded by thé “jazz age.” 


Making the Peace 

HE END OF WORLD WAR IT and the 

start of the Monitor’s second decade 

almost coincided. At once, as the 
patriotic cement of the war period began to 
disintegrate, the Monitor appealed for na- 
tional unity and support of President W il. 
son in the peac emaking. In the very first 
editorial of its second decade—Vol, XI. 
No, 1—it wrote: 

The President 

“It is not a very wholesome symptorr that, 
almost before the ink with which Germany 
has signed away her hope of becoming a domi- 
nating world power is dry, marking as the 
act does the greatest triumph of democracy in 
a century, if not in all history, certain trrec- 
oncilables in the United States Senats 
should be afforded opportunity of misrepre- 
senting and attempting to belittle a man 
whom the whole world cheerfully recognize 
as one of the most important factors in the 
achievement of the victory. ... 

“Common sense, common prudence, and 
ordinary judgment should, one would think, 
impell those intrusted with public responsi- 
bility to take a broader than partisan view 
of the work that lies before the President at 
this juncture. He is responding to a- world in- 
vitation in consenting to attend the peace 
conference. His presence at the board |: 
sought because his counsel is everywhere 
esteemed. The nation he will represent should 
feel proud of th€&\honor conferred upon him, 
It has stood behind him in the making of war: 
it should stand behind him in the making of 
peace.” 

The Monitor's didvice was not adequately 
followed, Partisan warfare broke out. But 
the appeal to the electorate made by the 
successful Republicans included more of 
a commitment to world cooperation than 
ensued at the very first. But by late 1921, 
Undersecretary of State *Charles Evans 
Hughesat the Washington Arms Limitation 
Conference again lifted the hapes of man- 
kind. The .paper grected this effort with a 
brilliant series of sketches of the world 
leaders. Here are brief glimpses of the cast 
o of characters: 


President Harding 


Mr, Harding does not possess thé volcanic 
; rer of Roosevelt nor the calm doctfinair- 


7 


By ERWIN D. CANHAM 


Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


with litthe hint of the portentous force the Soviet Union 
later was to become. Germany passed through inflation and 
experienced economic growth, both elements helping to 
contribute to the disease of naziism which afflicted its people 


in the following decade. 


boom, again with 


geney. 


ism of Mr. Wilson. but he has brought off the 
Limitation Congress after all, and, to the d 
gust of the Bernt iardis and the armor baron 
he-is going to make a success of it.” 


Secretary of State Hughes 
“As you sit in the great chair by his dé 
in the State Department, and’ listen to him 
discoursing on affairs. from China tq Peru 
you cannot fail to be struck by his nats o! 
his facts, and the certainty of his judgment 


Arthur James Balfour. 

Britain’s Foreign Secretary 
“One day in Downing Street ... [Prime 
Minister Lloyd George said to the Monito 
writer]: ‘If ever vou want an Ambassado: 

to the Amalekites, choose Mr. Balfour 
There never was anyone in the world. less 
akin to the “jolly bankholiday everyday, 
young man.” Life to Mr. Balfour is a meta- 
physical problem, a glorified X forever de- 
manding solution, the opportunity to know.’.’ 


Elihu Root, : 
former U.S. Secretary of State 
“The real key to Mr. Root’s publie life. i: 
that, like all great thinkers, he is an indi- 
Vidualist ...a gentleman of altogether ex- 
ceptional ability, gifted with an inability to 
ee other than as he see A Llovd George 
jumps from Opinion to opinion like a grass- 
hopper animated by intuitions. An Elihu Root 
is something of a great rock in a thirsty land.” 


Aristide Briand, France’s Premier 

“Time after time he has pulled his country 
out of difficulties and anyone who has fol- 
lowed his recent career must have been 
struck with the way in which for the first 
time since the Armistice France is becoming 
practical and practicing a policy of concilia- 
tion. . .. It is perhaps his studied ‘silence, 
which more than the eloquent diatribes of 
other men.has brought him back time afte 
time to power. He is one of the most remark- 
able orators in France, with the voice of a 
violoncello. but if he can, as the French say, 
charm Parliament, if he can lull suspicions 
and antagonisms to sleep, if his speech is 
silver, his silence is often gold.” 


Economic Consequences 
Of the Peace 


The Monitor was vigorously alert to the 
need for ecor@mic peacemaking and the 
extension of normal world trade, On Feb, 
9, 1922, just after a new editor was in 
office, the paper forthrightly affirmed: 

“The economic considerations which so 
greatly affect the question of German repara- 
tions affect equaHy the question of interna- 
tional debts. If France, suffering as she did 
from devastation, cannot accept payment in 
goods lest her markets be ‘flooded and her 
factories. closed—if, England must raise 


In many ways il Was 
662. y ae 
jazz age. 


lems of the 1950’s. 


its second decade. 


House of Representatives. 


The plan was widely acclaimed by national leaders 
and organizations and got so far as to be enacted by the 
Though it never became a con- 


‘mergency tariff barriers to keep out the flood 
f{ German goods offered in paymert of her 
part of the reparations, how can the United 
States hope to receive early. payment of the 
Vast sums involved in debts owed by foreign 
nations without serious consequences to 
American industry? The question is not a 
popular one with American statesmen. Theil: 
attitude toward it is one of fearsome pro- 
crastination. Yet it presses for an answer. No 
great question, whether moral or economic, 
has ever_been permanently shelved. Against 
such, the conspiracy of sience-avats- nothing 
This one, like its predecessor, must be threshed 
out in generat debate, and the public men who 
today think they serve their own ends best by 
evading it will not improbably find out in the 
end that they have sacrificed themselves to 
fear,” 
The Rise of Hither 

The Monitor discovered Adolf Hitler on 
Oct. 3, 1923. On Nov, 9, 1923, it ran his 
picture on its front page, recording his 
unsuccessful effert to seize power, The 
dispatches recorded the brutal character 
of his political ideas. The Oct. 3 story said: 


“An ante room of his office was filled with 
men of military age who show unmistakable 
signs of service during the world war. His 
headquarters resembled a hive of swarming 
bees. .. . Herr Hitler has a potential armed 
trength which is not to be regarded lightly.” 


Churchill on Wells 

On Nov. 9,.1923, the Right Honorable 
Winston Churchill delightfully criticized 
the views of H, G. Wells in the realms of 
economics and statecraft, After an admir- 
able analysis of socialist thinking, Mr. 
Churchill wrote: 

“We may profit by experience, we may 
broaden into new knowledge, we need not 
shrink from that ceaseless change and evolu- 
tion which is the condition of life. But we 
should make each step good as we go, and 
frequently look back upon the past to learn 
the wisdom of our ancestors, and to preserve 
unbroken the threads of tradition and ancient 
customs which are the priceless inhéritance 
of the British race.” 


The Monitor’s Own Peace Plan 
On Nov, 15, 1923, the Menitor’s new 
editor put forward a‘peace plan based on 
the conscription of wealth, The paper pro- 
posed the following constitutional amend- 
ment: 


“In the event of a declaration of war, the 
property, equally with the persons, lives, and 
liberties of all eitizens shall be subject .to 
conscription for the defense of the nation, 
and it shall be the duty of the President. to 
propose and of Congress to enact the legisla- 
tion necessary to give effect to this amend- 


_ment.” 


heedless and immature decade, 
with more than a few problems unsolved and inadequately 
discerned, Historians have called it.a frenzied decade, the 
lts importance today, particularly for the United 
States, lies in the lessons we can derive for solving the prob- 
Mere exuberant confidence in material 
prosperity, heedless excitement and indulgence, blind dis- 
missal of problems, are plainly revealed as dangers and 
delusions. We should be better able to cope with them today. 

Many of these elements were apparent to the Monitor in 
The paper saw the necessity of active 
American participation in the solution of world problems. 
lt evolved its own peace plan, a proposed constitutional 
amenament to “take the profits out of war” 
ing capital as well as labor in the event of a national emer- 


by conscript- 


stitutional amendment, when war actually came, its intent 
was carried out through the excess profits taxes, graduated 
income taxes, and extensive economic controls. 

The Monitor also clearly perceived the unsound basis of 


mere stock-market inflation and warned of the ‘possibility 
of collapse—and the need of preventing it—long before 
the debacle came. The paper also foresaw the dangers re- 
sulting from inadequate farm income and too heavy debt 


burdens. It favored lower tariff barriers, greatly reduced 


Kellogg-Briand Pact, 
limitations. 


The plan received wide acclaim from 
political leadership, business and labor 
leaders, humanitarians and thinkers. It 
was criticized by some. To a banker whose 
views in opposition were fully publicized by 
the paper, the Monitor replied: 


“Primarily it is the purpose of this paper 
to make the very idea of war so hateful, so 
repugnant, so terrifying to the very class that 
heretofore has looked with the utmost com- 
placency upon it, that it will take the lead in 
opposing it... we believe that if the end of 
profits be decreed before war shall be de- 
clared, the end of war will be brought before 
its beginning.” 


The Monitor welcomed the kellogg- 
Briand Pact for the outlawing of war but 
conveved to its readers a warning that more 
than outlawry was necessary. It said: 


“War occurs because there is a dispute in 
which opinion on both sides is so set that it 
will_not_yield.to.ordinary diplomatic. methods. 
If war is to be prevented, it will clearly be 
because both sides allow the intervention of 
some impartial element into the discussion, 
whose duty it shall be to sift the facts, and 
make proposals for settlement which are suf- 
ficiently fair and just for the reasonable ele- 
ments on each side to accept them rather than 
go to war. 

“What all thinking Europe is asking, there- 
fore, is whether Mr. Kellogg’s note implies 
that the United States is willing to include in 
his proposed treaties practical methods of ‘con- 
ciliation and arbitration, as the members of 
the League have done. Unless it is willing to 
do so, a mere abstract declaration outlawing 
war as an instrument of national policy is not, 
in its opinion, likely to have much practical 
effect in preventing war.” 


The Shadow of Teapot Dome 


On July 16, 1923, 18 months before 
Senator Thomas J. Walsh of Montana be.- 
gan hearings on the Teapot Dome scandals, 
a traveling Monitor correspondent wrote: 


“The Wyomingites would like very much 
to have heard from President Harding on the 
Teapot Dome oil affair. A few heart to heart 
remarks .on this subject would have come 
straight home to them. . .,, Unless present in- 
dications are deceptive, the Teapot Dome af- 
fair is going to cause the Republican Party 
trouble in 1924.” 


Political Insights 


The Monitor was on very good terms 
with its neighbor, Calvin Coolidge. On one 
occasion, its reporter, at Mr. Coolidge’s 
request, talked for 45 minutes steadily be. 
fore the then Governor of Massachusetts 
would more than a dozen words, As 
early as Feb. 6, 1924, the Monitor foresaw 


reparations settlements with Germany, reduction and fund- 
ing of the war debts. It urged peaceful revision of the more 
onerous clauses of the Versailles Treaty. It supported the 
but with realistic estimates of its 


In short, the Monitor’s voice was frequently and vigor- 
ously raised from 1918 to 1928 on the side of warning, 
of constructive reform. of reason. Dedicated as it is to the 
solution of problems, it did not predict the inevitability of 
doom if its analyses were not followed. But its optimism 
was not blind, It was premonitory and admonitory. 

In its second decade, the paper grew far more mature 
and effective in its journalistic mission, 
proved and seasoned. Its techniques were modernized and 
brightened. It progressed notably in circulation and adver- 
tising. Many of the people who were to play large roles in 
its development came on the staff in these years. It was a 
growth period of great importance in the paper’s history. 


Its staff was im- 


the nomination of Mr. Coolidge by the Re- 
publicans, of John W. Davis by the Demo- 
crats, and of Senator Robert M. La Folletie 
by the Progressives. Of the Republican 
convention at Cleveland in 1924, the paper 
wrote; 


“The elimination of the Senate oligarchy 
which. prevailed at Chicago four years ago is 
the overwhelming, outstanding feature of this 
convention.” It added, referring to Teapot 
Dome: “One of the chief needs of this cam- 
paign would-be to-make-the-people-forget.” 

When the Democrats met for their 103 bal- 
lots at Madison Square Garden, the paper 
said: 

“Two weeks ago in Cleveland, it did not 
seem to practical political observers that the 
ticket there nominated would have any 
chance of success,” but as the Democratic 
convention opened it could now be seen 
“whether that blunder is not about to be com- 
mitted.” So it proved to be. The Democrats 
split in the McAdoo-Smith battle. 


The Bull Market 


Discerning the fatal weakness of the bull 
market, the Monitor front-paged on May 
14, 1928, an exclusive interview with Prof. 
Gustav Cassel of the University of Stock- 
holm, a world renowned authority, saying: 

“Speculation has gone beyond the limits of 
reason. Securities as a whole are out of line 
with their true values and a few securities 
are greatly everpriced. This the people should 
know. They should be told that the chances of 
losing on a stock exchange are far greater 
than those of winning, and it is the province 
of the newspaper to tell them... . The thought 
of the people must be changed.” 

Bankers and economists, interviewed by 
the Monitor, mainly agreed with Professor 
Cassel. At this date, 18 months before the 
stock market crash, one said: 

“When the public takes the bit in its teeth 
you cannot. stop the runaway until something 
disastrous happens.’ Another said: “Not just 
speculators would be wiped out but that,col- 
lapse of the security market might lead to 
general recession of business with' a sacrifice 
of prosperity in all lines from agriculture to 
retail selling.” On May 18,-1928, a Monitor 
editorial titled “Lambs Beware” drove home 
the warning. 


The Speeding Times 

On July 1, 1925, the Massachusetts 
Registrar of Motor Vehicles declared that 
a speed limit of 35 miles an hour would be 
impossibly high: 

“It would never work in Massachusetts. In 
fact, it is my opinion that it will never work 
anywhere. There are many automobiles which, 
while perfectly safe at a normal, sane rate 
of speed, become a positive menace at 35 
miles an hour!” 


me 


i?* 


ied : 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


Teachers Freed for Teaching 


Newton Weckles School Problems | 


teachers felt, aa be delegated help that would enrich the cur- | Newton, parents who work at 


Newton, Mass. 
Education is everybody's busi- 
ness in Newton. 
The secretary who sits behind 


to someone e 
“IT am not 
schoolkeeping, but rather in 
schoolteaching,” one teacher 
commented, Who would be able 


interested 


the typewriter in the principal's to take over some of the “school- 
office may well be the mother of | keeping” aspects of a teacher's 


‘children in another school near- | 
by. 

The young mother 
standing in line at the check- 
out stand at the supermarket 
may be ing home to work 
over a high school senior’s com- | 


who is 


| duties? was the next question 
tackled by Dr. Anderson's com- 
mittee. 

These problems are far from 
unique, and so the committee 
queried 21 communities from 
Texas to Maryland and from 


position, which she is correcting Oregon to New York, to see how 
on contract for the English de-| they had dealt with them. Evan- 


partment. 
- Fathers, too, 
their professional 


into classrooms where 


| ston, Il.; 
are bringing other school systems which have 
experience earned 
they were included in the list. 


either agree to speak or act as 


advisers to students with special 
projects, 

All this activity is the result 
of a Teacher Utilization Study | 
just completed by Newton citi- 
zens and public school person- 
nel and formally accepted by the | 
Newton. School Committee..last-) 
week. 

Work Load Measured 

The Newton Public Schools 
sponsored the study in response 
to a growing national shortage 
of classroom teachers, Newton 
itself, however, has been able 
to attract and keep enough 
teachers to staff all classrooms. 

The study was headed by Dr. 
Lawrence H. Anderson, a former 
high school faculty member who 
this fail became an assistant 

rofessor at Michigan State 

niversity. The committee 
cluded representatives of the 
School Department, the Parent- 
Teachers Association groups, the 
Taxpayers Association, 
League of Women Voters. the 
Newton Federation of Women’s 
Civbs, and teachers. 

The purpose of the study 1 was 
threefold. First, the committee 
waated to find out how heavy a 
teacher's work load actually is, 
and what the teachers thought 
could -or should be done about 
it. Second, they wanted to find 
out what had been done about 
the same problems in forward 
looking school systems across 
the country. Finally, they want- 


in- | 
‘four major classifications: 


| Sch hool 


Bay City, Mich., and 


national reputations 
Help-Wanted Appeal 
Then a help-wanted question- 
naire was sent to some 12.000 
Newion homes—about 40 per 


| cent of the population—as part 


‘of Newton School Age, the 
Department’s official 
ublication, which is brought 
ome by every school child in 


| the city four times a year. 


these questi 


the | 


ed to learn what the community | 
i 


had to offer the schools. 
Activities Itemized 


Written questionnaires as well 


interviews with 
junior high, and 
elementary schoolteachers dis- 
closed that Newton teachers 
work hard, Most of them spend 
about 50 hours a week on their 
jobs, and some of thém work 
more than 60. Most of them feel 


as prolonged 
high school, 


that a “reasonable” work week | 


would be something like 42 
hours. 

Extracurriculer activities, 
routine money collections, mim- | 
eographing, filing, checking at | 


English at 
They not only correct papers 
_at home, but also come to school | the day, beginning at 5:05 a.m.| Washingtor. by a panel of news- | 
men, immediately after the close | 
of the first meeting of the year | 


In the first three weeks after 
naires were dis- 
tributed, the School Department 
received 150 telephone calls 
from people offering help. 

“Not only was the response | 
itself far in excess of expecta- 
tion, but also the quality of, 
assistance offered seemed un- 
usually high and most coopera- 
tive,” the report said. 

The 201 written replies that 
came in were broken down into 
61 
persons trained and qualified to | 
teach; 15 persons not fully | 
trained to teach but having spe- | 
cialized skills or training that | 
could be useful to the schools; 
96 offering clerical 
and 29 who said they would “try 
anything.” 

Seminars Polish Skills 


Some of these people have 
been put to work already. Thir- 


ty-four persons, many of whom | 


are former teachers, are attend- 
ing seminars and polishing up 
their teaching skills under the 


supervision of the Division of | 


Instruction. Twelve of these 


have become regular day-to-day | 


substitutes and more are to be 
trained in a special course that 
starts in February. 

One of the most unusual fea- 
tures of the program is the use 
of parents and other nonschool 
persons to help correct English 
compositions, Twenty women, 
college majors in English, were 
trained in the correction of 
written comvositions last sum- 
mer. Six of them were selected 
to work. with six teachers..of 
the high school. 


for conferences with pupils on | 


tendance, and even chaperoning | their papers. 
The School Age questionnaire, | invited some of his agricultural | of the Advisory Council of the 


are among the host of nonaca- 
demic activities which 


much of the teachers’ time.| everyday teaching problems; it; they will speak from time to| CBS-WEEI 
the | was also a search for volunteer time. A message from Governor | | interview Sunday night at 9:30. 


Some of these activities, 


in | 


assistance, | 


riculum, 


Several elementary schools 


had for many years asked world | 
travelers, businessmen, and oth- | 


ers to come to school and talk to 
the children, At the Spaulding 
School in Newton Center, for 


instance, a father, who is a 


member of the Boston Sympho- | 


ny Orchestra, has performed on 
several successive years. Last 
year he gave an illustrated talk 
on the ofchestra’s trip to the So- 
viet Union. : 
Experiences Shared 

A faculty member from Tufts 
University told 4th, 5th, and 6th 
graders about the problems of 
space travel. Each year, when 


| the 3d grades stu study the City of " 


| different trades in the city come 
and talk about their work. 

The questionnaire has located 
many more such parents in the 
city whom school officialr hope 
will-be appearing in classr»oms 
from now on, 

Others, some parents 
ous responsibilities in Newton 
schools. Some of the jobs are 
volunteer, but others are paid, 

Several secretaries have been 
hired. The School Department 


has also hired two special assist- | 


ants in physical education, The 
high school has also received 
volunteer help—largely from 
mothers, who tabulate tests, run 
clubs, and work 1 in the library. 


en 
sae 


‘Met’ to Give Opera pes Debut 


Saturday 


The werld radie- premiere of 
Samuel Barber's new opera, 
“Vanessa,” will be broadcast 
live, in its entirety, from 


House Saturday at 2 p.m., over 
'the ABC network. W XHR- FM 
'and WCRB- AM- FM will broad- 
cast “Vanessa” at that hour. 

| €leanor Steber will sing the 
title ..role: Rosalind Elias, the 
role of Erika, and Nicolai Gedda 
will sing the role of Anatol. 


Other leading roles will be sung | 
by Regina Resnik and Giorgio | 


| Tozzi. 

| During the first intermission 
the composer, Mr. Barpoer, and 
librettist Gian-Carlo Menotti, 
'will discuss “Vanessa” with 
John Gutman. assistant manager 


of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 


pany. 
a ee 

Portions of two musical works, 
which were given their world 
premiere veriormances by the 
New York Philharmonic, wil! 
'be included in the program 
which will illustrate Leonard 
Bernstein’s discussion on “What 
Is American Music?” on 
New York Philharmonic Young 
People’s Concert series, on CBS- 
TV Saturday at noon on Chan- 
nels 5 and 12. They are Dvorak’s 
Symphony No. 5 (From the New 
World) and Gershwin’s 
American in Paris.” 

This program will be the sec- 
ond in a series for young people. 
Aaron Copland will make his 
television debut as a conductor, 
when he shares the podium with 
Mr. Bernstein, plaving the finale 
of his own Third Symphony. 

on ee 

Observance of National Farm 
- Broadcasting Day; whichis be- 
ing celebrated Saturday, Feb. 1, 
will occur on WEEI throughout | 


A. Webster, editor of | 
“Country Journal,” has | 


' Louis 
| WEEI’s 


claim | however; did not limit itself to/| associates to be his gues!s, and | Democratic National Committee. 
the | 


the | 
| stage of the Metropolitan Opera | 


the | 


“An. 
| tion to which three members of | 


Furcolo will be included in the 
| broadcasts, together with a mes- 
sage from the newly appointed 
Massachusetts Commissioner of 
Agriculture, Charles A. McNa- 
mara. 

Se ee 

“The Face of Crime” in the 
United States, what a criminal 
is, and what can be done about 
our criminal population, will be 
the subject of an hour-long tele- 
east on CBS-TV's “The Twenti- 
eth Century” series Saturda® at 
|5 p.m, on Channel 7. 

ee ae 

Channel will telecast three 
live performances of “The 
| Scarecrow” by Percy MacKaye 
when it is staged on Saturday, 
i'Feb. 1, from 8 p.m, until] 10 
o'clock, Sunday, Feb, 2, from 
3:30 to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday 
night from 7:30 until 9:30. 

The play will be. presented 
by the Boston University Schoo! 
of Fine and Applied Arts under 
the direction of David Pressman, 
visiting professor of acting and 
directing. 

oe 


Sunday 


An evaluation of Bostan’s 
progress, compared with that of 
other major cities in the United 
States, will 
Channel] 2’s “Search for Truth” 
Sunday at 12:30 p.m, “Trouble 
at the Hub’” will be the ques- 
Boston Economic 


the Greater 


Study Committee will give their | 


Henry 
host 


authoritative answers. 

Morgenthau is the regular 

and moderator of this series. 
er Re 


Democratic National Chair- 
man Paul M. Butler will be in- 
terviewed on CBS-TV's 
+ the Nation” 
‘Channels 5 and 12. Mr. Butler 
will be interviewed “live” 


will broadcast 


——--—- | 


Music and Education 


Tonight 


WERS-FM, 88.9mc. 
wisg 4" Today. 


New 
World of Entertainment, 
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6:00—Dinner Music. 
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otheien to Learning: 
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8:30—Concert of rly Chamber Music 
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rts Roundup 
a Se in Pastels 
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9:00—Music. Mind. and Men 
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Ko : @earte t No 
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6.00--Prelude to Evening. 

7:00--8ports Parade. 

7:16—Jazz Steemboat with Marty Gross 

7'40--On the Record Sam Smith 

8:00—Composers Concert Tue ‘ite and 
musie of Gustav 

9:00—News:. Evening 

11.30. News of Harvard, 
sports. 


11:45——Music in Miniature. 


Saturday 
WERS-FM, 89.9mc 


ews Almanac. 
jaturday Showcase’ News 
laturday Showcase; News. 
laturday Showcase: News. 
= ~~ aoe Tradition 


Pwiltah ht Serenade. © 
The World Todey 
Collectors’ Corner. 


>—News 

| Boy Sports Parade. 
a ": You Like ft ote 
Saturday Session. 
News; Bened:ction 


WGBH-FM, 89.7me 
4:30-.The Governor's Conference 
Higher Ecucation. Possible Nex 
Education:! Facilities. Speaker: 
Malian, Executive. Secretary, 
Commission on Audit of State. 
Nerds. M 

C. Stone. Osterville. Panel: 

\ Alice Pederson. State Board 
Educ hy Bell, Pres 
dent, Bradford phos f. College: 

Handy, The Christian Sci- 


the 2 orid and 


lib 


ued 


Ff T 


Hate 


— 
— 
™ 
~ 


oT er rer 


—_— 
h* +2 oe 48 
oN 


Concerto Grosse 


w'th Marty Gross and Mike 
Daie Harris. 


| 
Con- 


on | 


oderator: Senator Edwerd | 
Mfs. 


|e 


ence Monitor: George Frost. 
rector. Holroke Junior College. 
(Recorded November. 1957, at 
Sanders Theater, Harvard Uni- 

versity:. (New Series). 
:30- —Jasr Ant hology. 
: Weather 


Window ‘on the World. 
7 0—Tnis Week's Symphony 
Sidelights Anec- 
reminiscences of 
. Guest Professor 
Drama. the University of Texes. 
and former Direc Shakespeare 
Memorial Theater, Stratford-cn- 


Avon 
8:15 a) ‘Australian Looks at New Eng- 
land. Jean ‘limot Bemis. Vice 
President of the English Speaking 
. Union. 
$:25— Boston ~_~ Orchestra 
Cheties : Munch on Director. Di- 
ect from Symphony Hall. Program: 
avel: “Ma Mere L'Oye” (Mother 
Goose) Children's Pieces: Ibert 


Chamber Concertine for Saxophone | 
i, Ballade for | 


and Orchestra: Tomasi, 
Saxophone and Orchestra 
performance at these 
Mendelssohn. 
major (Italian Op. 90) 


WBUR-FM, 90.9mc 


5:00—Light orchestral music 
6:00—Late news and weather 
6:15—-Sports goer 
Music tn Pasieis. 
ee 7 come Forum 
WBUR Opera House — Puccini: 
Madama Butterfiy with Canali: de 
Los Angeles; di Stefano. 
10: 00—News, sports. weather. 


WXHR-FM, 96.9me.-. 


7:00-——-News and Weather. Bach: Prel- 
udes and Fugues Nos. 1 and 2. 
7:36—News anid Weather 
Concerto for Five Flute 
News and Weather. 
Minuet. 


(first 


Baismortier: 
2 
Ireland: 


Weather Lis7t: Me- 
A~ Concert 
Ataulfo Argenta — Turina’ Toree 
Darices Fantestiques: Rodrigo: Con- 
certo for Guitar and Orchestra: 

Moskowsk!i: Spanish Dances 
dnt eae and Weather. Rorem: Son- 
a No. 3: Pubbra: Quartet No. 2 

11:00 y hind Theme. Variations and 
— — Op. 13: Rubenstein: Piano 

oncerto. 

hy 06 News and Weather. Requests 

2:00—News and Weather The Metro- 

litean Opera broadcast of Samuel! 
arbers “Vanessa” «(World radio 
premiere). ’ 

§:00—A Piano w. - bd Lovie Kent- 
ner—Liszt: Pau Waltz: n- 
netto de! tM... No. ties ge 
Tmpremptu No. 1: Nocturne, Op. 

No ?: Fantasie Improm 


and 


Headlines 


ptu 
6: af News and Weather. Janet Baker-— 


rr 

7:00 ax: Coronation March 1953: 
Bartok: Violin Concerto 

$:00-—News and Weather. W ilde: The 

Importence of Being Farnest ‘John 

Gieleud. Dame Edith Evans and 


others) 
11: 00. Marcel Gran aSeny Harp Recita!- 
Debussy: Are ke: Debuser: 
. de oon, Danse de Ila 
(Pevel. Couperin, and 


WCRB-AM, 1330kc; FM, 102.5me 


7:00--Music of Irving Berlin—Koste- | 


anetz 
7:30—-Simpson: Ricercar: HMardn: 
nede ‘from Quartet in F)- 
Symphony No. 4 in PF: 
Perpetual Motion. 

3:00 —Weber: Jubilee Overture: Cha- 
drier: Ode la Musiaue: Verdi: 
Rigoletto: Overture: Soutulle' y» 
Vert: Legend of the Kiss: Inter- 
mezzo: Busoni Tanzwailzer: Lincke: 
Beautiful Spring: 1 oblgal Gondo- 
liers: With Duca! Pom 

om tet Theater of Benuttful Mu- 

Cinderella (Rodger 


9: -. ‘Dette’ en: Turkish bd Wac- 
ner: Lohengrin: en to t 


orex. nd. 
: Willtam Tell: 
Falla: Rr 


Sere- 
Borce: 
Strauss: 


"enken a 
Entr’acte; Goldman: 


- orninge Sengers-Boek 
Brandenbure Concerto Ne. 


trauss: “wine 


Rose Mousse, 


av 
iano. Orchestral Se'ect 
1:00. New Afternoon ~~ | on 
Mendelssohn: au 
2:00.-The Metropo itan ies, Samue!} 
Barber's “Vaness".” Live bread- 
cast direct from th¢ 
Metropolitan Onera’ 


; Candie! ams 


House, New 


Berenade— 


Srenneses : 
.< rt and Sullivan High- 


ive broedeast--BESten | 
tre 


orehes’ 
onnoisseurs’ Concert-~ | 
Pi and 


puartet for ano 
Quar 


; r ‘ 


Di- | 


concerts): | 
Symphony No. 4 in A | 


1 | 12:00-—News an 


Jane- | 
rings: Delfus: The’ 


stage of the 


tet. 8:30--Thea 
phon 


WBZ-FM, 106.7me 
~Musie fer You—-Brahms: Tragic 
Overture, Op. 81: Lalo: Norwegian 
Rhapsody: Pastorale for 


6:05 


What's Going on 


—~Beethoven 
Ov. 13 
Piano: 


Classics 
Senata No 8 in C minor 
Smetana: Czech Dance for 


Furiant 
8:30—-Folk Music—Poland. 
9: Ballet Theater — spestene ae: 


Sh 

10:05—Woodwinds and Strings—Green- 
sleeves; Vaughan Williams Six 
Studies in English Folk-Song: 
Purcell: Four-Part Fantasia No.. 3 


> Pocket Size Sonata for™ 
Ln 


eton: 
Clarinet and Piano No 
10:30-—-Masterworks from Fra 
11:05--A Little Night Secke.<tiitentaals 
Marriage bv Lanterns: Overture: 
es Concerto No. 3 in G minor 
Oboe an Strings 
5 iubeatioder Waltzes, Ov. 5 
gart: Concerto No 7 in F 
for Three Pianos and Orchestra. 


WHRB-FM, 107.1mc 


3:00—-Accent on Jazz. 

6:00—News: Sportlite 

6:10—Jam With Sam-—Sam Smith 

7:30—Two on the Aisle—-Peter Town:- 
end presents music from Hollywood 
and the Broadway stage. 

8:00--Pre Game Music 

§:25—Basketball. Harvard vs Yale. 

11:00—News. 

11:05—The Duane Wadsworth Show— 
Pop Music and Jazz. 


Sunday 


WERS-FM, 88.9mc 
~News Almana 
—La' in Americar Limelight 
~Music For Sunda 
—Week in Review: 
—Music of America 
30— -Rev Duncan Howlett. 
55— News. 


"News. 


Fon & 8909 09 
S3SS%8 


00 } Senaikovek: 
Sleeping Beauty Suite. 
7:55—News 
8:00—-The Opera: 
—— Schatten. 
xham as host. 
10: me Benediction. 
WGBH-FM, 89.7me 


3:40—Chorus Pro Musiea. Alfred Nash 
Patterson, Conductor. Program 


Die Frau 


Strauss: 
Richard 


With 


Johann Sebastian Bach: Mass in B 
soprano: | 


minor. Phyllis Curtin, 
Richard Gilley. tenor: 
Kopleff. alto; Peter Trump, 
Orchestra comprising members of 
the Boston Sy maging. Death in 
at 


Florence 


6:30 Backarounds 

7:00—-The Public Arts 
(WNYC) 

7:25—-News Bulletins 

7:30—Portrait of Virginia Woolf. com- 
lled and narrated by George Ry- 
ands, Professor of English, Cam- 
aad e University. (BBC) 

C World Theatre. The Waves 

Virginia Woolf. Excerpts from 


Gilbert 


8.00 - 
ey 
the novel, 

Louls MacNeice 


by 
16:00 rd ee + in Bound, A program | 
h 


h fidelity stereophonic tape 
recordings broadcast simultaneously 
by station WBUR-FM and WGBH- 


FM. 
11:00—Night Music. 


WBUR-FM, 90.9me 
5:00.. The World of Music-—Jules Wolf- 
fers and guest composers and their 


- sports and weather 
6:15 —— and Literature—-Dr. Wiilis 
7:00. ‘Chapel Service (rebroadcast). 
8:15—Sacred Interlude. 
8:30—Inner Chamber — Bach: English 
Buite No 
9:00-——-Hi-fi Ti itiine ste naam tape 
: concerts of familiar classics pro- 
duced by Robert L Smith 
10 :00— Dimensions _* Sound—WBUR and 
| wa mbine te present hi- 
fidelity stereophente music 


WXHR-FM, 96.9mce. 
Weather: Requests. 
2:00-—-News a Weather: Tchaikovs 
The cracker Suite 
9:36-—-Blusival Instruments of the Or- 
estra. 2: hat's Goinr ‘ ” 
2:55 — . Boston Symphony Orchestra 
broadcast live from Sym y Hall. 
thoven: Variations on a Waltz 
of Diabelli, Op. 120. 
:: = ews, Weather: 


Beethoven: 
St. Saens: Syvm- 


Cariolan Dvoriure: 
Op. 78 with 


hony No, 3 i i Om 


Te*Deum. Op. 22. 
me eotte a—- eo 
e 
11:00—Brahms: Piano Siuaie. Or. fis. ' 


_WCRB-AM, 1330ke; FM, 1 02.5me 
$:00—Immanuel Baptist hare 
ter of bop af Mute wn 


Dass. | 
in the | 


BSeldes. 


arranged and produced | 


9:30-—Rodgers: Guadalcanal 
Polonais se in A fiat 
: In the Popular 
1: Kreislier: Tam 
Von “Te ™ Joliv 
Oklahoma Suite 
Gould, Monterde 
Macarena: Rachmani noft 
No. 3 O 3: Guion: Tur 
Straw Sersebe Monte 
Habanera: Strauss: Par 
Polka 
11:00—News. BBC Concert Hal! 
, Features 


ledier Show. 

2:00-—Afternoon at Symphony—Wald- 
teufei: Estudianttina ‘Waltz: Tchai- 
kKOVSKY Marche Slave: Smetana 

iw Horn Con- 


3:00 Foch: ‘Symphony mes oi 
, Symphonic Dances 
4:00—-Stravinsky: Firebird Suite: 
tok: Concerto for Orchestra 
§:00—-News. Choruses of New England 
, Candlelight Serenade 
Strauss—Sorkin 


Arthur 


Grieg: 
Bar- 


Sym- 


Record Review of the Alr 
L. Kay 
yt at 
Escales: Schubert 
phony Ne 8 “Unfinished” 
Notturno No @2 for the 
Naples 
Featureti Artist- 
Elie 
Sy 
Gayne Ballet: 
Connoisseurs’ Concert 
French Suite No. 1 in D 
Chausson: Trio in G minor, 
3 
WBZ-FM, 106.7me 
Masterworks of Sacred 
Organ Recital: Pachelbel 
in G minor: Franck: Chora] 
in E Major Boe!imann Suite 
Gothique: Chorale. Menuet, Prieré 
Toccata Bach’ Passacagiia and 
Pugue in C-minor 
6:00-—-Music For You—Handei 
for Orchestra in D minor 
5: Rogers: Soliloquy for F 
String: Glazounov: Concerto 
minor Op. 82 for Orchestra: Keller 
Serenade for Clarinet and Strings 
mens The Perfect Foo] Ballet 


te. Op. 39 
7: ia C ‘hamber Music—Rossini: Sonata 
No I String: 


in G Major for 

Veracini: Sonata in A Major p 
7; Ravel..Piece inthe. Form 
Habenera: Schumann: Quar- 

1 E-flat Major for Piano and 


. Op. 
8:05.Your Opera Box — Strauss: Die 
The Gypss 


teat Strauss 


1}: 05. A “Little Night Music 
The Crown lamonds: Overture 
Prokofiev Violin Coneerto in D 
Major. Op. 19: Grieg: Two Melo- 
dies-—-Norsk, Op. 53; Mozart: Sym- 
* phony No. 35 in D Major. K. 385 


WHRB-FM, 107.1mc 


2? 30-—Folkwayvs 
3:30—Musiec I Review 
5 00.--Music for Sunda‘ 
7 :00— On File 
7.10—Re visi ous Music 
£:00— Ne 
bandas Night on WHRB -Kopit 
he Questioning of Nick ‘Leverett 
House Drama Society.) Verdi: I 
Trovatere. . 


Record Gas Taxes 
Paid by Bay Staters 
Massachusetts motorists will 

have paid an estimated record 

$9,759,000 in gasoline taxes dur- 
ing the first 33 days of 1958 end- 
ing next Sunday—as much as 
was paid by the state’s operators 
in the whole year following 

enactment of the gas tax in 1929 

—Howard B, Driscoll, executive 

secretary of the ~Massachusetts 

Petroleum Industries Committee, 

_| has stated. 

| He estimated that during 1958 

Bay State motorists will pay 

$70,200,000 in gasoline taxes to 

the state; and approximately 
$38,300, 000 int federal gasoline 
taxes in the same period. 

Mr. Driscoll pointed out that 
this 11-fold increase in annua! 
gas-tax revenues can be partly 
explained by the fact that there 
are now 11.9 times as many au- 
‘tomobiles in -Massachusetts as 
there were in 1929, The present 
combined tax rate, moreover, is 
four and one half times as high, 
he pointed out. 


Symph me 
Svr 

' Hay an: 

King o! 


Gienn Gould— 


mphony No. ?: Khat- 
Excerpts. 


9°00 
Rudo iph 
10 00 8S! bell Us 
chaturian 


Music 
Fantasia 
No. 1 


5:05 


Auber 


—- 


ee 


and | 
some not, have taken over vari- | 


be the subject of | 


“Face | 
Sunday at 4 p.m: on’ 


in | 


March: | 


Fiedier's 


Tonight | 


“Prwin D. Canham 
Editor of | 
The Christian Science Monitor 


and The News” 


_— ~~ NETWORK 


Radio News, Weather, Sports 


WEEI —News: 7 a.m., 7:30, 8, 8:15, 12. 


9, 9:05, 9:25, 10, 11 


12:15, 5:30, 6, 6:10, 8:30, 


Weather: 6:55 a.m., 7:55, 8:25, 6:25. 
Sports: 8:25, 5:55, 6:15, 7, 11:10. 


WHDH—News on half hour and 7 
7:05, 7:35, 8:05, 8:35, 12 


Weather: 
Sports: 7:40 a.m., 5:55, 


a.m., 8, noon, 6, 11:15. 
°55, 6:25, 11:20., 
6:10, 6:35, 11:25. 


WNAC—News: On hour, half hour, and 7:10. 1:10, 6:10, 11:10. 


Weather: 6:55, 7:30, 
Sports: 6:25, 9:30. 


7:55, 5:55, 6°25, 9:25. 


WBZ —News: On the hour and half hour. 


Weather: 6:55 a.m. 
Sports: 6:05, 11:10. 


eames ie on the hour, and 7:30, 8:5, 1:55, 


7:55. 10:30, 11:55. 
easton 7:15 


2:55, 6:30, 6:40, 


a 
WEEI, 590kc; CBS; FM, 103.3mc 


35—Beantown Matinee 
30—Lawrence Welk Show 
45—Lowell Thomas 
05—Cart Moore Show 
20—Amos ‘nn’ Andy 
45—Edward R. Murrow 
00—Robert @ Lewis 
15—News: Invitation 
05— World — 
10O—-Dance Mus 
05—WEEI M’‘ ne Ty 
lb—Jerry Howard 


WHDH, 850kc: 


15—Bing Crosby 
45—Boston Ballroom 
00—Two-Eight Date 
158 —Celtics-Philadelphia 
11:25 Sports Final 
11-35—Cfoud C! 
WNAC, sees MBS-NBC; 
FM, 98.5mec 


Dinah Shore Show 


Theater 


~ == 
OO OC W@W @-3+31-7 Dw 


FM, 94.5me 


15— 


t Kine Cole 

ree Star Extra 
Fulton Lewis. Jr 
-One Man's Famil¢ 
10—News Of the World 
45---Global News Features 
05—Exploringe Tomorros 
15—Showtime 
’ Feature Program 
; Listening 
00—Cavalcade of Sports 
15—-Easy Listening 


WBZ, 1030kc; FM, 


iil Mariowe Show 
~Program PM 
5—John Bassett Show 
~Music "Til Dawn 
WEZE, 1260kc: ABC 
hn Daly: Paul Harvey 
man Catholic Program 
Edward P. Morgan 
Mery Griffin Snow 
Hank Rizzo Show 
John W. Vandercook 
10:05—Sherm Feller Show 


~~ 2S CO OS W OO «3 ~3 «3 +3 D 


~ 


106.7me 


Saturday 


WEEI, 590kc: 


05—Tom Russell Show 
00—CBS News Roundup 
30—Tom Russell Show 
05—Galen Drake Show 
05—Robert @ Lewis 
05—Housewives Protective 
30—Gunsmoke 

55—Jack FE. Leonard Show 
05—C it Hosp 
30—Reserved for You 
45—Treasury Salute 

05—On a Saturday Afternoon 
W—Rosemary Clooney, 
05—Saturday Afternoon 
30—Amos Andy 

55—Bing Crosby 
05—Cleveland Orchestra 
05—Saturday Night Country 
35—Stuart Foster 

05—World Tonight 
30—Entertainment USA 
05—Sammvy Dale's Orchestra 
30—Guy Lombardo 

15—Jerry Howard 


WHDH, 850kc: 
10—Ray Dore: 
30— Breakf ast Extre 

De rey 

al of Music 

Kins Cole 
i5—Pat Boone 
00—One-Two }! 
00—Two-Eieht 
0H—Rocton Bal 
15—Bing Crosby 
45—Jo Stafford 
00—Top Shelf 
18—-Brrins-Montrealt 
30—Celtics-New York 
45—Juke Box 


Leacwe 


— et et 


, 
Itai 


Style 


- 9 2 VewUewm I AAW S12 ee ee et 8 ON = OO OO -? 


~~ 


FM, 94.5me 


rt ee 
“© D-7AA & to bd bo O +3 -3 «3 


oe 


CBS: FM, 103.3mce | 


WNAC, 680kc: MBS-NBC;: 
FM, 98.5mc 

15—FEasy Listening 

05 NBC Feature Program 


Jmaat> & «3 


ture Program 
Horse Races 
NBC Feature Program 
i5—Dinah Shore 
Fasy Listening 
15—Talk on Alcoholism 
0—Jack Wryrtzen 
00—NBC Feature Program 
15—Easy Listening 
00—Eternal Light 
30—Easy Listening 
15—Jack Wyrtzen 
45—Easy Listening 


WBZ, 1030kc; FM, 106.7mc 


05—Carl deSuze Show 
05—Alan Dary Show 
05—Bill Marlowe Show 
05—Norm Prescott Show 
15—Bill Marlowe Show 
05—Program PM 
05—John Bassett Show 
30—Musie "Til Dawn 


W E ZE, 1260ke: ABC 
s 


-_ 


> © OO «3 «ID H 


~o  ee 
~~ © 


Far! Gynan She 
Waish Show 
ri Gynen Show 
$45—Rom an. .Catholic. Program 
~Hank Rizzo Show 
10 a Sherm Feller Show 


Sunday 


FM, 103.3mec 
6:55; 


WEEI, 590kc: CBS; 


News: 8:25. 10 to 6 on hour: 


8:15—Great Moments of Music 
30—Eileen Kneeland: Bookshelf 
00.-CBS World News 

15—Great Moments of Music 
30—WEEI's Cail to Church 
05—E. Power Biggs: organ 
30—Invitation to Learning 
05—Music Hall 

15—Howard K Smith 

30—Salt Lake Tabernacle Choir 
15— Music Hall 
Rosemary 
Best in Music 
For You—Dick 
Western Drama 
Bing Crosby 
-~N.Y. Philharmonic 
~Rosemary Clooney 
35—Suspense: drame 

Jonnuny Dellar 

30 FBI in Peace-War 
55—Bing Crosby 
05—Indictment 

30—Gunsmoke 

00—Jack Benny Show 

30—Sez Who: Henry Morgan 
05—Mitch Miller: guests 
05—Country Music Show 
30—Face the Nation 
05—Question ‘n’ Answer 
30—Federa) Wasteline 

45—You and Your Income Tax 
10—Safety Talk 

15—Churech of the Air 
45—Man Around the House 


WHDH, 850kc; FM, 94.5mc 


: On the half hour. noon. 2:25 


ee ee ee 


UY Oona ty getobetperergntotttrent 4 get ctr 
>) eT " . ; 


Cloone 
Robert Alda 
Haymes host 


host 


“OOO Vo 


* “s+ 


12:55. 6:25, 11°05 
7 15—How Christian — lence Heals 
7°35— Park Street Chu 
8:05—Children's Plavho' ise 
9:00——Music in the Air 
2:05—Hollywood Bow! Symphony 
DOmmMusic by Mantovant 
35—-Boston -Pops Orchestra 
00—Cavaicade of Song 
10-—Ce)tics-Detroit 
i5—Boston Ballroom 
30—Bruins-New Yor) 
35—Sunday Serenade 
35—Frank Chacksfield 
~The Mucie We. Love 
-Glenn Miller 
WNAC, 680kc: MBS-NBC: 
FM. 98.5me 
: 2. 2:30 to §:30 on half hour 
1 half hour: 11 
ival Ho 
8 :30— Providence Bible Instit 


8 to | 


: 45—Churchmen Weigh News 
‘00—Wings of Healing 
; 30—Back to God Hour 
' 10:00—Radio Bible Class 
10:30—Voice of Prophecy 
11:00—Episcopal Cathedra! 
12:00—Roman Catholic Program 
15—PFPrank and Ernest 
30—Faith in Action 
45—Fasy Listening 
00—Bible Study Hour 


see 


é 2 
re SO CO CO @ @ «3 «3 ~1 DH WW 89 = 89 RED 


’ Feature Program 

é Listening 

90— Bill Cunningham 
15—Bob Considine 
35—NBC Feature Program 
00——Singspiration 

15—How Christian Science 
45—Family Theater 
00—Hour of Decision 
30—Easy Listening 
-15—John T.-Fiynn 
20—Easy Listening 


WBZ, 1030kce: FM, 106.7me 


News: On the hour and 5:30. 6:30. 
&8:-05—Farm Review Dairy Chat 
9:°05—Alan Dary Show 
12:05—Bill Marlowe Show 
2)}05—Norm Prescott Show 
6:05—BilI Marlowe Show 
8:05—Prezgram PM 
8:30—Growing Pains: pane! 
9:00—Roman Catholic Program 
9:30—This I Know 
10:05—-John Bassett Show 
10:30—Ligeht of Life 
1:15—John Bassett Show 
WEZE, 1260kce: ABC 
News: 10. 3. @. 6:38. 6:38. 7. 143 
8:00—Radio Bible Class 
8:50—Wings of Healing 
9:00—Chosert People 
9'15—Tremont Temple 
1005— Message of I rae! 
10:30—Pete Walsh 
10:45—Park Street Church 
}4.45.-Paople's. Gospel Hour 
12:15—Bud Markle Show 
; Challenge of the Hour 
Old Pashioned Revira 
Monday Morning Head! 
6 15—Paul Harve: 
; Quincy Hows 
5‘—Roman Catholic Pr: 


Heals 


~~ a 


Hour 


hes 


: Canham 
10:15—-Far] Gynan 
10: 30-— Revival Time 
111:05—Earl Gynan 


I II 


” Dialer’ s Guide: Tonight 


6:00—Dateline Boston—World Affairs Council—Ch. 5 


6:50-—Backgrounds—10 years 


of ADA—Ch, 2; WGBH-FM 


8:30—Robert R. Brunn, “American News Editor, The Christian 
Science Monitor, discusses Great Decisions in 1958—-WBZ 
9:15—Celtics—Philadelphia at Boston—WHDH 


10:30—Person to Person—C yril 
10:30—Address by 


Ritchard, Anita Colby—Ch. 5, 12 


Adiai E. Stevenson—Ch. 


Saturday 
1:00—N. Y. Philharmonic Young People’s Concert with Leon- 


d Bernstein—Ch. 5, 


9 


~ 


1? 


:00—Samuel Barber's -Vanessa—WAHR, WCRB-AM-FM 


?:00—Rasketball—Nationals-Lakers—Ch. 4, 10 


9 


2? :00—Hockey—Black Hawks-Rangers—Ch. 7, 1? 


5:00—20th Century—The Face of Crime—Ch. 7 
7:05—Cleveland Orchestra: George Sell, conductor—WEEI 
8:00-—Shakespearean Sidelights—WGBH-FM 

8:00—BU Theater—The Scarecrow—Ch, 2 
8:15—Bruins—Montreal at Montreal—_WHDH 

&:25—Boston Svymphony——-WGBH-FM: WCRB-AM-FM 


8:25—Basketball: 


Harvard-Yale—WHRB-FM. 


9:30—Celtics—New York at New York—WHDH 
10:00—Mike Wallace—Fulton Lewis, Jr.—Ch., 5, 9 


Christian Science 
Programs on TV -Radio 


The following programs in the series “How Christian Sciénce 
Heals” will be among those seen or heard in New England this 


Sunday: 


Television 


“Prayer Can Heal Serious Cases” gd 
Channel 5, Boston. 


10 a.m., WHDH-PV, 


| 
; 


“A Place for Religion in Young People’s Lives” 
5 p.m:, WMUR-TY, Channel 9, Manchester, N.H. 


Radio 


“Making a Fresh Start” 
7:15 a.m., 
9:15 p.m., WNAC, 680kce, 

“Don't Pass It By!” 

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ot 


opra 


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oe 


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5, 12—News 


Father 


od > 
° 


’ THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31. 1958 


‘|New Tuskegee Curbs Weighed | 


Spectal to The Christian Sctence Monitor 


Tuskegee, Ala; 


sf 


ek 
91) 


- 
a 


Background... 
... And the News 


By Harry B. Ellis 


Assistant Overseas News Editor of’ 
Tre Christian Science Monitor 


by | Negroes to set up their 0 


itaken under advisement 
| Judge Walton who asked for) community government.: 
| “The struggle in the Deep) written briefs, from the state! But the situation is com lie 
‘South over Negro voting has within 30 days, from the Negro,cated still further by other 
been carried one step further attorneys within another 30 legislative action, an amendment 
with a case being heard before | aays. ‘to the state Constitution— 


By Josephine Ripley 


Stef#@ C dent or 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Washington 
Dr. Edward Teller, famed as’ 


Russians,” he told the commit- 
tee 


This has come about due to) 
American failure to honor its | 
scientists and to provide for’ 
science education in its schools, | 


already passed by the voters 


“father of the H-bomb,” had 
some fatherly advice for Con- 


gress on the subject of natural-' 


science education in the United 
States. 
It included some novel pro- 


| 
’ 
} 
| 


posals for the improvement of | 


science teaching, some scathing 
words for American 


failure ‘to! 


retain its early leadership in the | 


science field. 


Géod teachers should have 


“more honor and more money,” | 


he told the legislators. He pro- | 
posed an honor society for sci- | 


ence and mathematics teachers 
of the high- and elementary- 
school level, membership enti- 
tling each teacher to a “federal 
stipend” equal to his salary as 
teacher. 

There was this “catch” to his 
scheme. He would make mem- 
bership in such a society de- 
pendent on successful teaching 


as demonstrated in competition 


between students. . 


Draft Exemption Urged 
Teachers with the largest 
number of winners in such a 
competition “are the ones who 
should have the opportunity to 
belong to the society,” as Dr. 
Teller outlined the proposals 
And when a teacher “stops be- 
ing an honor teacher” under this 
system, his membership in the 
honor society and his “federal 
stipend” terminate. 
In this way, he says feachers 
Will be encouraged to work their 


United Press 
Dr. Edward Teller 


students hard ‘and produce the 
scientists” and “mathematicians 
needed in this national emer- 
gency 

He also proposed to the Senate 
Labor and Public welfare com- 
mittee before which he appeared 
that science and mathematics 


teachers or-scientists working in” 


industries important to defense 
be exempt from military service 

The Soviet Union provided 
such exemptions, he said, even 
during the war 

While this country was ahead 
in natural science for some time. 
there is “extremely good indi- 
cation that this leadership has 
slipped-from our hands and 
passed into the hands of the 


Radio Guides Readied 


By Reuters 


Washington 


An automatic electronic guide service will conduct many 
visitors through the National Gallery of Art in Washington in 


future. 


Beginning Feb. 5, the visitor will be lent—for 25 cents—a 
vest pocket size radio receiver with an earphone. 

As he walks through the exhibition areas he will pick up a 
series of radio lectures, audible only to those with receivers, 
dealing with the history and significance of the works of art on 
show. The broadcasts, lasting about 10 minutes each, have been 
installed in 10 of the galleries so far. 

The National Gallery's normal tours and lectures will con- 


a- 


i child 


' television 


‘should be encouraged 


| according to Dr. Teller. 


The, Soviets have pushed 
“very vigorous education pro- 


gram, because they give their 


children a very thorough edu- 


cation in science and drive them 


(on in a merciless manner, from 
| the lowest ¢rades on.” 
' 


Dr. Teller does not recom- 
mend that the United States try 


'to imitate the Soviets by using 


the whip in this fashion. “If we 
do, we are going to come out 
second best. The Russians have 
a bigger whip and more practice 
in using it.” 


In the United States, when a) 
extraordinary | 


shows an 
interest in a subject at an early 
age he is often “ridiculed,” says 
Dr. Teller, instead of being ad- 
mired. 

U-S: Urged to Take Steps 

Talent is greatest in children 
when they are rather young, he 
told the committee, naming 
some of the world’s greatest 


ahead, he said, because of their. 


natural scientists who have done | 


their best work before reaching 
the age of 20. “In our educa- 
tional system they would not 
know anything aboul these sub- 
jects at that age,” he said. 

Dr. Teller. a native of Hun- 
gary, now a professor at the 
University of California, says, 
“There is great need for us to 
be ashamed that the Russians 
ere ahead of us in appre-iation 


of science. There, they have a_ 


very high place in. the commu- 
nity.” 

He told the committee that 90 
per cent of the natura! scien- 
tists taught im the wortd: are 
taught in the Soviet Union. 
There, “scientific books have an 
enormous sale—much bigger 
than in the United States, or in 
all the rest of the world.” 

Dr. Teller urged that steps be 
taken to provide better teachers 


—teachers who not only know |) 


how to teach but know their 
subject matter better: that the 
National Science Foundation, o1 
some other society, encourage 
the production of more and bet- 
ter books for children—at an 
especially low price for them. 

He urged more educational 
on the subject, and 
suggested that successful men 
in business and industry go into 
the schools to talk to school chil- 
dren and stimulate their interest 
in various fields of accomplish- 
ment, 

Dr. Teller says that children 
in. the 
earliest grades to take an inter- 
est in natural science and math- 
ematics and that these subjects 


Within a few days the map- 
makers of the world will have 
a new task—=inscribing the 
name “United Arab State” on 
their maps where the words 
“Syria” and “Egypt” now lie. 

These two Arab states pro- 
pose to become a single new 
nation—with one President, 
one Parliament, and one Army. 

Why? Why shduld two coun- 
tries unite, when they lie sev- 
eral hundred miles apart—in- 
deed, when they are sepa- 
rated by Israel, which the 
Arabs call their enemy? 

Basic impulsion leading to 
this union is the old dream of 
Arab nationalism, which called 
for the formation of a single 
Arab nation stretching from 
Iraq on the east across North 
Africa’ tothe’ Attantic” Ocean. 
Almost all Arabs subscribe, 
at least in principle, to this 
dream. 

More modern reasons, how- 
ever, are the compelling fac- 
tors in this case. Svria and 
Egypt stand alone among im- 
portant Arab countries in ac- 
cepting massive Soviet aid 
and in eschewing completely 
formal commitments with the 
West. 

Iraq, in particular, fears 
that this policy of Egypt and 
Syria will lead to Communist 
penetration of the Middle East. 
Thus Iraq seeks to persuade 
Jordan, Saudi Arabia. and 
Lebanon to maintain a firmly 
pro-Western policy 

The Arab world, in other 
words, is split in two on the 
great issue of East-West ri- 
valryv. Leaders of the two sides 
are Iraq and Egypt. 

Concerned, apparently, that 
the influence of Iraq may be 
growing, President Nasser of 
Egypt has agreed on a auick 
Syria-Egypt. merger. Previ- 
ously the Egyptian leader had 
hung back until intricate fiscal, 
military, and economic prob- 
lems could be thrashed out. 

Colonel Nasser may have 
another reason for hasty ac- 
tion. Syria’s enthusiasm for 
the arms and economic aid it 
is receiving from Moscow has 
caused Damascus to slide un- 
der the control of pro-Soviet 
Syrian Army officers. 

President Nasser, despite his 


y * 
Caited A 


should be made exciting and | 


interesting to them. 


Californian Lowers Sights 


Economist Sees Poor ’58 


By Harlan Trott 
Staff Correspondent of 
The-Christian Science Monitor 
San Francisco 
Unemployment in California 
is the highest it has been in 


eight years. And at the West 
Coast conference of the Ameri- 
can Management Association, in 
the deep-carpeted Nob Hill 
Room, business bosses braced 
themselves in their gilded chairs 
while an economist forecast a 
gloomy 1958 outiook with no up- 
turn at the halfway mark as 
many expect. 

A year ago the opinion was 
widely held that business ac- 
tivity might be somewhat lower 
during the first six months but 
that business would be increased 
toward the end of the year. But 
Procter & Gamble’s Wilson 
Wright told the management 
men that the notion was “un- 
acceptable.” - 

Hopes for a second-half up- 
“Wing séem to stem from the 
premise that government spend- 
ing will be increased, home 


| building will recover its stride, 
inew wage boosts will 
| buying power, and taxes will be 


increase 


cut so that consumers can have 
more money to buy goods, but 
the P&G economist doesn’t think 
business will come out so snow- 


White inthis year’s wash. 


| 32 


“The trend of business in the 
last half of the present year still 
is to be determined by the action 
taken by consumers, business- 
men, and responsible persons in 
government in the months to 
come,” says Mr. Wright. He rea- 
sons from these factors: 

1. During 1956 and _= 1957, 
business investment in new plant 
and equipment increased 25 and 
per cent over the average 
level of the previous three years. 
But during 1956 and 1957, there 
was no important increase in 
profits, nor much of any sign of 
Increased productivity. He looks 
for a falling off in new plant 
and equipment that would tend 
to cut gross income by 9 billion 
dollars 

2. Last year, the book value 
of inventories held by factories, 


Bes 
* 


u< : ~ %y 53 
3, 
”~ 


Washington 
High Lights 


By the Associated Press 


Defense Money Bill 


The Senate Appropriations Committee has approved unani- 
mously a $1.410,000,000 emergency defense money bill. 
Only one major change was made in the measure as it passed 


the House last week. Senator Carl Hayden 


(D) of Arizona, 


chairman. said the Senate group knocked out all.reference to 
the advanced research project agency the Pentagon is about 


to set up. 
Senator 


Hayden said, however, 


that $10,000,000 would be 


made directly available to Secretary of Defense Neil H. Mc- 
Elroy for use in any such agency. 


Conflict of Interest Denied 


Norman Gelman has denied there is any conflict of interest 
in his work with a House subcommittee investigating regu- 
latory agencies, but announced he is quitting. 

He said he is stepping out because if he stayed on the group's 
staff it would not be good for the student fellowship program 
sponsored by the American Political Science Association. He 
got the assignment under that program. 

Representatives John Bell Williams (D) of Mississippi and 
John James Flint, Jr.. (D) of Georgia, committee members, 
had raised a question about Mr. Gelman, Identifying him as a 
reporter for the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times, they said the 
ewner of the newspaper is an applicant in a television channel 
case pending before the Federal Communications Commission. 
That is one of the agencies under study. 


Counterweapons Work Bared 


The United States has disclosed it is working on the develop- 
ment of nuclear counterweapons designed to destroy intercon- 
tinental and other aggressive missiles. : 

The disclosure came in the 23d semiannual report of the 
Atomic Energy Commission to Congress, 

The government previously has hinted at work on atomic 
rockets and antiaircraft shells designed to pulverise airplanes, 
and has announced development of atomic depth charges to 
knock out submarines. But this was the first official mention 


of eflorts to neutralize missiles, including the 


variety, with nuclear warheads. 

.Presumably, in forthcoming Eniwetok tests, the AEC would 
mount an A-bomb or an H-bomb as the warhead of an actual 
missile to test the effective scope of the blast at theoretically 


interceptive ranges. 


intercontinental 


| 


»-— 


‘stated that ( 
| States do not have to make Hit- 
between guns | 


iler’s old 
and butter. L. 2. Boulware. Gen- | 


‘plished by 
by 


present . 
part of the r cent waste | uy 
B esisth from Nentaieeaddiadce any city within 5,000 miles that 
‘too many people getting paid | Titan might be launched at —/| missiles will be shipped,.proba- 


‘for utterly useless time:.on the | ans within 30 minutes. 
, a 


wholesalers, and retailers in- 
creased by 4.5 billion dollars. 
Mr. Wright looks for a 4-billion- 


dollar drop in inventory values 
‘this year. 
| expects it would reduce gross in- | 
8.5 billion | 


If that happens, he 


come payments by 


i} dollars compared with last year. 


3. A problematical rise in 


| 


home building may be offset by | 


the probable drop in exports. 
Public Spending Mounts 


4. State and local 
ment spending is going up by 
about 2.5 billion dollars a year. 
Increased federal spending may 
approximate 2 billion dollars. 
Accelerated defense spending tc 
the tune of 2 billion dollars is 
likely, 

By calculating the net effect 


of all these factors, the Procter | 
a net) 


& Gamble economist say 
reduction in gross income pay- 
ments of about 10 billion dollars 
or more is a real prospect. His 
forecast also points to a drop in 


“consumer sales throughout this: 


year “rather than stability of an 
increase.” 

Despite 
drawn by 


picture 
it was 
United 


drab 
Wright, 
in the 


the 
Mr 


simp 
choice 


éral Electric vice-president, told 
the management men, “We can 
have both. We can have the sky 
full. of our sputniks and still 
live 20 per cent better.” 
Solutions Outlined 


Plowing some fertile new 


ground in “The Unworked Area, 


of Management,”’ Mr. Boulware 


' said there is a critical new need 
for 
‘nology. But most of the urgent 


still more advanced tech- 
new need now is for “social 
wisdom” to guide boih tech- 
nology and people in marshaling 
“our truly great talents’ and 
applying them to our resources 
in a way to “frustraie the ene- 
mies of freedom.” and stil} afford 
“a life here matertally and 
spiritually worth living.” 

He doubts Whether total gov- 
ernment spending would have to 
be increased now “if every un- 
needed security item could be 
cut back as new ones, like mis- 
siles. are added” and if expendi- 
tures for other, than delense 
“eould be eliminated or de- 
laved.” 

But if total government spend- 
ing goes up, Mr. Boulware added, 
the new government production 
can be accomplished o~ shifting 
some from civilian to govern- 
ment and thus lowering the level 
of living. Or it can be accom- 
the present work 
force working added hours, or 
more people entering -the 
work force “for the emergency.” 


He admits people don't like any 


of these three ways. 

“The best way to get any 
extra defense production and 
still live the same or better is 
to inereasé total production 
through higher output per work- 
er in present working hours. 
This is no ‘speed up’ proposal 
but is a means of taking up 
some of what many believe is as 
much as a 20 per cent waste in 


govern- | 


| 


i 


Russell H. Lenz, chief cartographer 


United Press 


President Nasser 


liking for Soviet aid, is anti- 
Communist, and does not want 
Communist influence to enter 
the Middle Edst through his 
own “ally, Syria:~ As” future 
President of the projected 
“United Arab State,’ Colonel! 
Nasser may feel he can curb 
pro-Communist officials § in 
Syria. 

Thus the union is expected 
to be announced _ shortly. 
President Nasser is scheduled 
to become first President of 
the “United Arab State.” A 
temporary constitution will 
govemm the new nation until 
Svrian and Egyptian plebi- 
scites ratify the union. Then a 
single Parliament will be set 
up. and permanent laws 
worked out and adopted. 


What may the West expect 
from all-this? First, a wave of 
popular approval among all 
Arab lands, whose peoples will 
see in the “United Arab State” 
the first step toward the old 
Arab dream of unity. 

This popular approval wil! 
put increased pressure on the 
governments of Jordan, Iraq, 
and Saudi Arabia in particu- 
lar to abandon pro-Western- 
ism and attach themselves to 
the skirts of Egypt. 

The “United Arab State,” 
meanwhile, will be undergoing 
grave stresses and strains, as 
two independent peoples—dif- 
ferent from each other in many 
ways—attempt to become one 
harmonious unit,~ divided in 
the middle by Israel. 

Thus whatever other results 
the “United Arab State” mav 
bring, peace and calm are not 
likely to be among them. 


“ab Siate 


' hundred 
; numrber-~ prominent at Tuskegee 


the 


a federal judge to determine 
whether an alleged Negro boy- 
'cott of Tuskegee white mer- 
chants should be jiurther en- 
joined. 

The Negro Tuskegee Civic As- 
sociation is under a temporary 
restraining order granted at re- 
‘quest of the state attorney 
general last vear. It was charged 
by the chief legal officer of 
Alabama, Attorney General John 
Patterson, that TCA last summer 
began a boycott against the 
community's white merchants. 
| Negroes were known to be pres- 
suring for voter registration. 
Macon County, in which Tus- 
kegee is located, has been, per- 
haps the most reluctant of 
Alabama counties register 
Negroes, who outnumber whites 
7 to l. 

Mr. Patterson thén won a 
temporary injunction. Later he 
placed on the stand . before 
Circuit Judge Will O. Walton 
witnesses who testified as to a 
| continued drop in ousiness. Two 
Negroes said thev had been 
threatened, by other Negroes if 
‘they did business with white 
merchants. 

TCA Protests 

The Negro organization, 
‘through its. attorneys, in turn 
‘sought to show that even if 
there had been threats the state 
could not show definitively that 
they had been made by mem- 
_bers of the Tuskegee Civic As- 
sociation. 


TCA 


to 


is 


made up of several 
Negroes, including a 


Institute, the famous Negro col- 
lege, and employees of a large 
veterans hospital located in the 
county. 

Testimony of both sides was 


Major Damage Possible 


The significance of the hearing 
is to be found in the question 
whether, if the state wins its 
case, it will have a suitable, and 
efficient, weapon to use against 
any Negro economic pressure on 
whites. The boycott, really be- 
gun in Montgomery with the 
widely publicized bus case, has 
not been tested thus in the 
courts up to now. An old Ala- 
bama law forbids organized 
boycotts. 

Negroes, who make up a large 
proportion of many Alabama 
counties, and in_ population 
dominate many especially in the 
Black Belt, under astute leader- 
ship which 1s now available, 
could effect considerable dam- 
age, especially if the effort were 
concentrated as it was in Tuske- 
gee, according to all evidence 
available to the public. That 
there was a boycott, attributable 
to TCA or not, is clear. Whether 
TCA can be identified precisely 
with the boycott is tke issue now 
before the court. 

The situation in Macon Coun- 
ty thus continues uncertain 
insofar as legal statuses are 
concerned. But the over-all 
situation continues to deteriorate 
as both sides show every inten- 
tion of fighting for what they 
consider to be right. 


Aim to Abolish County 


Already the Negro population. 


of Tuskegee, the community, has 
been gerrymandered by legisla- 
tive act outside the town limits. 
Not only that, another piece of 
legislation. which also. passed 
makes it exceedingly difficult to 
incorporate a new community 
adjacent to one already func- 
tioning. This would tend to fend 
off any effort on the ‘part of 


—which makes it possible for 
the Legislature by 1959 to 
abolish the county outright if it 
so elects. 

This movement, initiated’ by 
State Senator Sam Engelhardt, 
is aimed at carving up Macon 
County into five, possibly six, 
sections, and distributing these 
segments to adjacent counties 
which could absorb additional 
Negroes without raising the 
Negro population to a majority 
in the counties affected. 

State representatives and sen- 
ators from six counties definitely 
affected, and one other which 
may be, are to meet at regular 
intervals fog study of the pos- 
sibility of abolishing Macon 
County in that manner. 

There is some feeling among 
atleast some of the representa 
tives, however, that the same 
objective could be _ achieved 
simply by taking parts of Macon 
County. away, but leaving it 
much smaller. At ieast one lege 
islator has voiced anxiety about 
the welfare of some of the 
county officials and others de- 
pendent on the maintenance of 
a governmental unit in Tuse 
kegee. 

The entire action will not be 
decided soon. Neither the county 
dissection nor the boycott ine 
junction is expected to be sete 
tled within months. It will be 
at least two months before Judge 
Walton makes his decision as to 
any Tuskegee Civic Association 
complicity in a boycott. The 
legislators may not decide the 
Macon. carving matter for a year 
or more Negroes and whites, 
meanwhile, seem determined toe 
fight out all such issues down 
to the last technicality, using 
all conceivable maneuvers. 


Crucial Test 


for GoP 


N.J. Senate Race 


By Stafford Derby 
Chietofthe New York News Burecu of 
The Christian Science Monitor 

Trenton, N.J. 
Aspirants for the United 
States senatorial seat which New 
Jersey voters will fill by ballot 


on Nov. 4 are popping up with 


rare abandon in both parties. 

Republicans are united in one 
respect: They..do not..want a 
Democrat to step into the chair 
so ably filled for so many years 
by Senator H. Alexander Smith, 
respected conservative’ party 
leader. 

Democrats have a similar uni- 
ty of purpose: They want to 
have a Democrat in the Senate, 
where Senator Clifford P. Case, 
an Eisenhower’ Republican, 
safely seated until Jan. 1, 1961. 

And while each party is con- 
fronted with a surplus of will- 
ing candidates, the  circum- 
stances facing the political 
strategists who must prepare for 
the November showdown before 
April 15 primaries 
widely 

The Republicans, of course. 
are concerned over their failure 


is 


.to.elect a Governor. in either 


1953 or 1957. To’ add a sena- 
torial defeat in 1958 would be a 
serious blow. 

But to win they must present 
a united front—something which 
was not done in 1957 when the 


Titan Builder Says 


Moon Rocket ‘Easy Called Essential 


By Roscoe Fleming 


Special Correspondent or Tae Carristian 


Denver 
will be a 
iob when 


Reaching the moon 
comparatively simple 
the American people want to do 
it; a Martin Companv executive 
told the Denver Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Thus this community got the 
exciting news that the Martin 
Company's sprawling 7,000-acre 
installation southwest of the city 


|in the first folds of the Rockies 


| iS a key center not only in bal- 


; 
| 
; 


| hit a target “much smaller than 


; 


listic defense, but also in the 
conquest of space 

The executive H. W. 
rill, young Martin Company 
vice-president who heads the 
$37,000,000 local facility of the 
company. Here a labor force 
now approaching 5,000 is begin- 
ning to assemble the gigantic 
Titan, most ambitious of the na- 
tion’s guided missiles: and now 
it appears, a potential space- 
vehicle 

Mr. Merrill said the Titan 
could be made into such a vehi- 
cle without even a major change 
in design. The thrust ofits pow- 
erful rockets suffiGiset to 
boost “a somewhat lighter body” 
than the Titan warhead bevond 
the velocity necessary to escape 
the earth's gravitational field 
This would be on the order of a 
ton. 


Mer- 


i> 


Is 


Could Hit Easily 

And, he added, the existing 
Zuidance system for United 
States ballistic missiles is “at 
least 100 times as accurate as 
those needed to place a satellite 
in orbit around the earth.” 

Further, this same guidance 
system would enable Titan to 


the size of the moon even at 
that increased range.” 

This is a significant clue to the 
effciency of Titan as a weapon, 
as well as a space vehicle. A 
guidance system accurate 
enough to hit the moon could 
hit a circle 40 miles across at 
5,000 miles, the suggested range 
of Titan as a weapon. “Much 
smaller” could mean on the 


the use of present facilities and order of four or five miles. With 


personnel.”” He thinks 


‘ob. 


a hydrogen warhead, that would 
be sufficiently accurate to flatten 


Mr. Merrill also said that the 


Soterce My ; ‘nr 


Martin schedule calls for the 
first Titan test firing tn 1958. He 
said that in the interim there 
will be repeated separate firings 
of the propulsion system at the 
Denver facility, to be followed 
by captive firings of the com- 
pleted missile. 
Reentry Solved 

He said that the problem of 
reentry—bringing, a missile or 
satellite back through the at- 
mosphere without burning up, 
after its flight through space— 
has been solved. 

Mr. Merrill said the Soviets 
“undoubtedly” used the propul- 
sion system of an intercontinen- 
tal missile—their own “Titan”— 
lo put the two sputniks into 
orbit around the earth 

“We think they did our coun- 
try a great tavor,” he added 
“They proved to all what a few 
have known for vears, that an 
earth satellite ean be put into an 
orbit and that it a usetul 
thing to do.” He said he thought 
the Soviets ahead on  inter- 
mediate missiles. but “neck and 
neck” on in¥ercontinental ones. 


is 


Mars, Venus Next? 

He inferred that conquest of 
the moon would also be more 
than useful—it would be essen- 
tial—since a station on the moon 
would have all earth under its 
survey. “Who controls the moon 
controls the earth.” 

And he satd the first flights 
might not land on the moon, but 
go around Jt to see “what's on 
the other side-’ which mankind 
has never seen. Eventually, he 
said moon flights will be fol- 
lowed by “unmanned probes” to 
survey nearby planets, such as 
Mars and Venus. 


He told the Denverites that. 


the Titan program is one year 
behind the Atlas program. But 
he said the year means that the 
latter is of a more sophisticated 
and advanced design, This ap- 
plies largely to “staging.” 

A true long-distance rocket. 
he explained, is made up of 
several stages. As each exhausts 
its fuel and “flames out,” it is 
shaken off. With great. ranges, 
accurate staging becomes more 
necessary. 

The completed Titan will not 
be fired from here. Completed 


bly to Cape Canaveral, Fla., and 
fired over the South Atlantic, 


Neighbor Theme 
In Race Relations 


By the Associated Press 

New York 
The. National Council of 
Churches says its annual race 
relations message holds that 
“the commandment _to—love—our 
neighbor has been honored more 
in the breach than in the ful- 
fillment.” 

The announcement added that 
the message that in. the 
final analysis “a neighbor is any 
one of anv color, in need, wher- 
ever he may be.” 

“To love our neighbor and to 
show mercy today,’ the an- 
nouncement stated, “means to 
support those who seek free- 
dom and justice in 
discrimination, segregation, and 
neglect. . " 

The message, 
council Jan. 31, will be read 
from thousands of pulpits on 
Race Relations Sunday, Feb. 9. 
The 1,500*word message ad- 
dressed to the 38 million mem- 
bers of the 34 Protestant and 
Fastern Orthodox denomina- 
tions represented-by the council, 

The council. announcement 
said the message urges the 
members “to put the same gen- 
erositv and merev into their re- 
lations people close at 
hand that they have put into 
world missions programs.” 

The announcement continued: 

“They are urged to. share 
kindness and acceptance of 
their neighbors as thev have 
shared the gospel through such 
programs as hospitals, colleges, 
and agricultural education with 
people in far-away places 

“A series of pointed questions 
lays emphasis on the theme 
Who is my neighbor” 

“Could it be a tired woman 
in Montgomery, Ala., a citizen 
of the United States, who want- 
ed to remain in her seat after she 
had paid the same fare as other 
passengers but was required to 
give it.up and stand in the rear 
| of the bus? 

“Could it be the educated, 
cultured, financially independ- 
ent Negro citizen in Chio who 
tried to buy a home in a decent 
residential section but was pro- 
hibited because of his color? 

“Could it be the Indian 
Americans who are moving into 
towns and cities, or others who 
ae still trying to conserve their 
culture on reservations within 
our. borders? Could it be the 


Says 


issued bv the 


is 


1! ith 


thard-working 


differ | 


the face of. 


State Senator 
Malcolm S. Forbes was swamped 
by votes which went to Gov. 
Robert B. Meyner not only from 
his Democratic boosters. but 
from dissident Republicans. 

When Senator Smith an- 
nounced his decision not to seek 
reelection it was during the 
aftermath of the November de- 
feat..U nity was - emphasized ata 
subsequent GOP meeting in the 
Princeton Inn 

Since then three notable can- 
didates have announced their 
decision to seek the Republican 
nomination. In order of their 
official announcements, they are 
Berriard M. Shanley, former 
White House appointments sec- 
retary; Robert Morris, resigning 


chief counsel for the Senate in- | 


ternal security subcommittee, 
and—on Jan 30—Representative 
Robert W. Kean, veteran con- 
gressman. 
Others May Declare 
Furthermore, it is generally 
expected that State Senator 


Walter H. Jones 


: 


' 


County (an influential leader of | 


a-—populousarea)--and--Repre- 
sentative Peter Frelinghuysen, 
Jr.. of Morristown, will join the 
ranks of the hopeful. 

In addition. the state organi- 
zation has been tnreatened in- 
termittently with a change in 
leadership as opposition to Sam- 
uel L. Bodine. chairman, has 
waxed and waned, And, in back 
of all this there appears to be 
the remains of the bitter 1952 
Fisenhower-Taft feud which 
split the New Jersey Republi- 
cans. 

On the 


positive side, 


immers 


practical politicians welcome 
this preprimary battle. They fige 
ure that if the intraparty dise 
agreements can be put to the 
ballot test in April, the success- 
ful candidate can realistically 
expect and should receive full 
GOP support in November. 

When the Democfatic sena- 
torial picture is viewed, there 
is-one important difference, The 
Democrats have a single strong 
leader. Gov. Robert B. Meyner, 
who won a smashing victory 
last Nevember and—despite his 
avowal of the single ambition to 
be a good Governor and serve 
out his full term—is very much 
in the 1960 Democratic presie 
dential thinking. 

Democratic Rifts Possible 

And while George” Brunner, 
state committee chairman, ey 
not be —— 2S te his 
leadership, there aré 4i aaree- 
ments among some Daek-of: 
scenes strategists whith ¢ottld 
upset the pattern of success for 
the Democrats in stete and local 


of Bergen | Contests since 1953. 


Organizationwise, the Demo- 
crats must reform their bastion 


of strength in- Hudson County. 


John V. Kenny, strong man who 
broke Frank Hague’s grip there 


and more recently has lost con- 


{trol himsely, bowed out from 
Hudson County leadership on 
Jan. 22 leaving a void not yet 
filled harmoniously. 

And when it comes to aspir- 
ants, the Democrats have &@ 
roomful. On Jan. 29 the state 
committee undertook an official 
“screening.” The result was a 
list of 14 names according to 
Robert J. Burkhardt, executive 


some director for the state -ommittee. 


Troop-Support Balk 


— Jars NATO Frame 


By Voliney D. Hurd 


ChArefof?r 
Paris 


Bonn’'s rejection of both Brit- 
ish and French appeals for 
financial support of their troops 
stationed in West Germany has 
raised the serious question 
whether the European member 
nations of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization are suffi- 
ciently dedicated to the strategic 
concept of keeping strong forces 
in an advanced position. 

Since the answer appears to be 
“no.” the United States left 
as the only big power supporting 
this strategic foundation of 
Western defense 

Britain has withdrawn some 
13.000 troops earlier and now 
has received permission from its 
Western European partners to 
withdraw another 8.000 nex! 
April. France has withdrawn 
half its troops in Germany for 
service in Algeria. There already 
has been to when 
France would replace them, In 
of that long, apparently 
endiess. impasse. But with no 
mare support costs from West 
Germany it is doubtful if France 
will replace them at all. 

Reasoning Simple 

The situation is simple in its 
outlines. West Germany paid 
postwar occupation troop costs 
under a legal agreement until 
1956, when it entered NATO and 
changed from an occupied na- 
tion into an Allied power. Bonn 
had declared in December, 1955, 
that the occupation regime was 
over and West Germany no 
longer would pay on the same 
basis. However, lacking an army 
of its own it agreed +o. pay a 
contribution to NATO under 
treaty article three, on mutual 
aid, as its fair share of Western 
detense. 

This money, paid voluntarily 
as mutual aid under a treaty 


1s 


adoubpt as 


view 


signed in June, 1957, totaled 1,-| 
200,000,000 marks (about ,$285,- 


Puerto Ricans, the Orientals or ,710,000) for the budgetary vear 


‘the Mexicans in 
who are shunned as if they, too, 


Father?" | 


"sac 


this country. 
‘round 


,of 1957-58. Of this amount, in 
United 
were not children of the one| Kingdom received 588,000,000 

eae |marks, the United States 325,- 


numbers, the 


the Peris News Bureau of The Christian Sctence Mowitor 


,000,000 and France 225,000,000, 


question they themselves Kave’ 


The rest went to smaller nations, 
such as Belgium and the Nether- 
lands. While this was NATO 
“mutual aid,” it was in. fact 
agreed to on. a- bilateral  hasis. 
That is why Britain and France 
made individual appeals to Bonn 
to continue troop support Costs. 
Protest Launched 


NATO's budgetary vear ends 
next April, and West Germany, 
last vear, notified the different 
nations that in yiew of the num- 
ber of divisions which it was 
putting into service and the high 
cost of arming them—five divi- 
sions already in operation, with 
two more due in a few months 
—it no longer could pay support 
costs for foreign troops on its 
territory. It said it now was 
pulling its own share of the bur- 
den. 

Recognizing the problém of a 
nation, such as Britain, having 
to raise German marks needed 
to pay for its forces in Ger- 
many, the Bonn government 
stands ready under the NATO 
mutual aid article to help or- 
ganize a collective instead of- 
bilateral fund or pool, to which 
each nation would contribute 
on a fair basis: and which would 
aid in obtaining the needed for- 
eign exchange. 

West Germany bases its re- 
fusal of support costs for Allied 
troops on the fact that it has its 
own army. There is some logic 
in this attitude, but some NATO. 
officials feel that actually the 
whole Western shield-and-sword 
strategic concept is at stake for 
which, as two of the Western Big 
Three dominating NATO, Brit- 
ain and France were largely re. | 
sponsible, It is questioned here 
whether they can abandon that 
concept because they do not 
want to pay for troops in a for- 
eign area, which incidentally 
would give them the advantage . 
of having the first shock of 
battle hit them there rather than 
at home. That, in essence, is the 


raised, 


> 


: 


| Business—Research | 


ese 


’ 


— 


\ 
\ 


Industry—Finance | 


tereo Sound Rises From Si 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 - 


eee 


Precautions Guard F light 


| father of four children, flying in- | mated 714 hours for the 1,520- 
| struments is something special, | mile trip, gassed up, visited the 
/ even after 5,000 flying hours and| Air Force weather briefing of- 
25 transoceanic hops. | fice. picked up charts for the 
“You feel good after you.ve trip across, Major Powell took | 
completed an instrument flight,” | out a circular slide rule to plot | 
he said. “You've achieved what| the wind and to estimate his! 
you've trained for, A pilot Knows | arrival at various reporting | 
when he’s done a good instru-/ points, : 
ment job and when he’s done a; And now Major Powell! 
bad one.” 'showed me how to pump gas) 
Queried About Weather from the seven five-gallon tanks 
We flew over bleak, snow-/|!"to the big interior auxiliary | 
covered Canadian forests and| t@nk. And now we cut the ropes 
mountains, in and out of clouds, | °? the “Mae Wests” and the} 
|sometimes above them, some- life rafts. We discussed ditching 
times right through them, along Procedures. This was _ the 
our prescribed compass course | S€Tious part of the trip. We had 
weighing. fully loaded — gas, and altitude. At Mt. Joli, a re-| ©20ugh gas for almost 12 hours 
oil, luggage, its two-man_creW  pgrting point at the wide mouth | Of Might, 442 hours longer than | 
~—~-4.700 pounds (the new Boeing of the St. Lawrence River,*the | 0U" estimated time to Keflavik. 
707 jet liner grosses at about) ground radio operator asked us The Cessna had behaved beauti- | 
192,000 poundsy took off at_5:45 for a “pirep”—abbreviation for | [lly on the first leg and there | 
a.m. on a Saturday from Idle- “pilot's report.” was nothing to do except check } 
wild Airport for the first leg of “Say, Easy Charlie, do you the oil tank. It was still full, 
a proposed trans-Atlantic flight have anything interesting to re-| ,,.W@ ad arrived at Goose at 
to Brussels. Our flight plan port?” A soft voice tinged with 11:25 a.m. (All times are East- 
called for stops at Goose Bay, a Scottish burr, inquired. ern Standard Time without re- 
Labrador; Keflavik, Iceland:; “Cloud base is at 15,000 feet,” | 84m for time zones.) We left 


Prestwick, Scotland, and point! said Major Powell after a few|*>ree hours later at 2:25 p.m.,| 
of destination, 4,050 miles. moments assigned to an altitude of 11,000 


of looking around, ; 

It was still dark night as we | “forward visibility is restricted | fet and with the ground con-| 
sped down the runway into a to three miles with slight snow | ‘TO! tower wishing us, “Good 
slight southwest wind but by) showers, There are lower scat-|%4Y, g00d trip.” Five minutes | 
the time we had reached our , later we were headed into an | 


1a tered clouds over land masses to | Rn. ba 
prestribed cruising altitude at the right and left. The water | ¢@?ly midwinter sunset and over | 
9,000 feet over Connecticut, we 


area is clear of all clouds.” the Atlantic Ocean, 

could see the first faint glow ol This “pirep’” would be given | 
dawn across the horizon to the to pilots far distant from Mt. | 
East. Joli radioing for up-to-the-/| 

We settled in for our five-| minute weather information. In| 
hour-plus flight to Goose (in| addition, it would be used by 
airman parlance). Commercial | flight forecasters all along the! 
airlmers use Gander, Newfound- | coast in compiling their weather | 
land, as their first stop (unless, “trends” and forecasts. | 
of course, they’re going nonstop) And now we were on fhe last} 
because it means 300-400 fewer | leg of our flight to Goose as we | 
mileg on the Great Circle route. 


, crossed the St. Lawrence to our | 
However, Gander. being al- | next reporting point on the other | 
most on the Atlantic usually has 


side of the river, Seven Islands. 
far less reliable weather than; From there we flew over for- 
Goose, 160 miles inland. Besides, | ested land, scarred by dozens of 
there is a\good deal more traffic frozen lakes and rivers with 
at Gander which can mean de-_ nothing in sight anywhere, not 
lays in gassing and clearance. a cabin, not a wisp of smoke, not ; 
We flew on instruments over a sign of human habitation ex-| 
Boston, an hour and two min-| cept for one small building at| 
utes after leaving New York’ Lake Eon which houses a lonely | 
and 43 minutes later we were, human radio sentinel. The tower | 
still on instruments over Au-/ was practically invisible from 
gusta, Maine. 


the alr. 
Report ‘or Else’ Emergency Supplies 
Since We had filed a flight | 


It was obvious now why our | 
plan with the Civil Aeronautics | |uggage compartment was loaded | 
Administration office at Idlewild, 


down with 12 packages of de- 

wena hereby contracted t 1 hydrated soups, milk powder, s 

specified times on our flight—or |°2" Of butter, six packages of | 

else. “Or else” in this case means | Chocolate, six packages of bouil- 

that if at 7:30 a.m. the Augustailon cubes, raisins, .tea bags, 

radio tower hadn't heard our ens 

'| pancake mix, cans of meat, corn 

Shatlay tio OO-sEC — syrup, dehydrated foods and 
plane’s “license plate’), a hunt vegetables. 

In addition we carried two 


would be initiated all along the i 
way and in a-few hours search- | “Mae West” lifebelts, a “Gibson | 


and-rescue forces would be); Girl” radio, which when hand- 
alerted, — cranked puts out a homing sig- | 


Our flight plan had been tele- | nal on a distress frequency, a| 
typed by Idlewild to every re- life raft, sea-water desalting kit, | 


: 


Flight plans, instrument 
flight regulations, and sup- 
plies requisite for a trans- 
Atlantic hop in a small plane 
are described in the second 
article of this series by The 
Christian Science Monitor's 
special correspondent, Arnold 
Beichman, a licensed private 
pilot, whe served as copilot on 
this crassing to deliver train- 
ing aircraft to a Belgian air- 
line, . 


By Arnold Beichman 
Special to The Carristian Science Monitor 
Brussels 
The small twin-engine Cessna 


5 


_ 


Sabena Airlines 


Interior of Twin-Engine Cessna 
This shows the plane's instrument panel and pedestal, plus 


dual controls, 


e 


<< 


ngle Groove, but Tape Holds Edge 


~\ x ¥ 
25 2 “ | 
Ds ma 
* SS 


Installation of 100. Salton Auxiliary Tank in Cessna 310-B 


In the fourth and last arti- 
cle of this series on sound re- 
production, Charles Fowler, 
president of Audiocom, Inc., 
discusses the developments 
and outlook for stereo. This 
series was written at the re- 
quest of The Christian Science 
Monitor. 


By Charles Fowler 
President, Audiocom, Inc. 
Written for The Christian Science Monitor 

Great Barrington, Mass. 

A fact 
manufacturers of ear muffs is 
that human beings have two 
ears. Manufacturers of sound- 
reproducing equipment ac- 
knowledge that this is the case, 
‘and that the use of both ears 
‘for hearing may enhance the 
| enjoyment of the music. 


; 


|casting) and the two sound chan- 
long-recognized by | 


items 
| stereophonic 


|... But, until recently, there has | 


| been nothing practical that they 


could do about it. Sound, except 
| in its live form, has been largely 
for one-eared monsters. (For 
by one-eyed Cyclopians. With 
technique movies, all are. de- 
signed for viewing with one eye. 
Use of both eyes adds nothing.) 

Perspective, in sight and in 


our eyes, by focusing on it, by 


changing the angle formed by 
|our eyes. The process of locating 
‘an object by sound is similar, 


} | but it is less-well-understood by 


'physiologists. Essentially the 
'source of a sound is located by 
‘turning the head until the sound 
‘arrives simultaneously at both 
‘ears. We are very sensitive to 
| minute differences in time of ar- 
rival. The whole effort of aural 
‘breadth, of perspective’ in 
| sound, depends primarily on this 
lsensitivity. If we listen with 
‘only one ear, this perspective is 
| lost. 

| Yet listen with one ear is what 
'we have been obliged to do. Re- 
‘duced to its essence, the prin- 
‘ciple of recording (and of 
|'broadcasting) has been to use 
lone microphone and, at the 


| that matter, movies are best seen | 


the exception of certain special- | 


sound, is somewhat similar. We | 
locate a visual object by moving | 


'is its expense. A recording on 


‘other end (your end), one loud=_ 
| speaker. This is one-eared Lis-| 


tening. 
| Illusion Improved 

A good many dodges have 
been tried to improve the illu- 
sion of size. It is. net. necessary 
with solo instruments and small 
groups, but larger orchestral 


‘of a room. Adding a second 


loudspeaker (or speaker 
item) at a distance from the first 
|helps to spread the apparent 
| width of the orchestra and gives 
'a false sense of perspective. 
(Approximately the same aural- 
‘ly as the visual effect of wide- 
‘screen movies.) This may be 


porting point on our route shown Signal mirror, knife, oars, cord, | 
on the aerial map with an ETA | Compass, pistol and cartridges, | 
—estimated time of arrival, On! fishing kit and more—all of this 
long distance hops, particularly being ~survival-gear whichis: 
over specified roadways of the, ™andatory for over-water 
ait, an instrument flight plan, | fights. 
even in good visibility, is safety It was also obvious why we 
insurance in case of trouble. were flying this 1,100-mile leg 
Flying IFR (instrument flight, bY day because if we were 
regulations) has another safety forced down, the myria@ frozen 
factor—your airspace is reserved | lakes would make a _ safe 
for you by air traffic contro]. It Wheels-up landing field. The real 
is-an-area ahout 10 miles wide peril for this trip, paradoxically, 
from 25 to 75 miles long and/|is during spring and summer 
1,000: feet high. No other air-| When Labrador’s forests are 
craft is allowed ifito that space alive again, making it difficult 
until your plane has flown for search planes to see objects 
through it, thus precluding mid- | 0m the ground. With snow and 
air collision whether in daytime, | ice as the background, we would 
nighttime, or in clouds. But for) be easy to see in case of a) 
Major Powell, married, and forced landing. ; 
| As we neared Goose (a tail- 
Advertisement | wind gave us an average ground 


'speed of about 200 miles an 
TA xX R bE Li t b | hour) we called “Crowbar,” the 

| code name for the United States 
Opportunity for a Foundation of on) Air Force station. From then on 
Alumnus to acquire a foremost school| we were under radar control, 
of fashion with an unsurpassed Library which told us we would make a 
and Museum to present to an established ground control approach, a GCA, 
waren: +g ng A gg 0 g into the airport despite the fact 
200 ‘Mies Sieh tc, Hex wie. My! Na visibility was -plu- 


BROOKHAVEN FEDERAL nm Peres % Eviseuse 


“It’s good practice,” said 
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


| Stks/Divds Sales Net | 
'(Dollars! (100s) High -Low 1:300m Chee 
80 16s 3 1642+ 


— 


4 


see ee & 


d 
ACF Wrig .40b 
Acme 8t! ! 
Adams Ex 1.87¢ 
Admiral 
Aeroquip .40b 
Air Reduc.2'» 
Ala Gas 1,60 
Alaska Jun 
Aico Prod i 
Alleg Lud 2 
Allied Ch 3 


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AmBkNote 1.20 
Am Bosch 1.052 
AmBrkSh 2.40a 
AmBaPar 1 
Am Cyan 1 60a 
AmEncaus 60a 
Am Europ 3.90¢ 
Am Export 2 
|Am&F Pw 1 
|Am G&FEi 1. 60b 
Am Ho Pd 2.40 
Am Inv 1 

Am M&AFdy 1.60 
Am M&M 2.80a 
Am Motors 

Am N Gas 2.60 
_Am News 1.60 
_Am Optica! 2 


Nw " 
J ; 


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‘Am Ship Bd 3¢ 
Am Smelt ‘ee 
|Am 8t! Fd 2. 40a 
‘(Am Tel&Tei 9 
do Rt Wi* 
Am Viscose 2 
Am Zine 1 
Amphen E) 1.20 
Anaconda 3°74 
Argo Oi) Ib 
Armco 8tl 3 
Armour&Co 
Armst Ck 1.20a 
Arvin Ind 2 
| Ashi Oli 1b 
Assd Dry G 2 
Atchison 1.20a 
Atl Cst Line 2 
| At! Refin 2 
Atlas Cp .60 
Atias Pdr 2.40 
Autm Cnt 1.80b 
Avec oMig .10e 
Baid Lima .60 


& Oh 1 

Bath I W 2.60a 
Beech Airc 1.20 
Reech L Sav 1'. 
Bell Airc le 
Bendix Av 2.40 
Benguet 
Best Fds 2a 

* Beth St! 2.40 
Bigelow S 
Black&De 1.405 
Biw Knox 1.20b 
Bliss f 
Boeing Air lb 
Borden .60r 
Bore Warn 2 
Bran Airw 60¢ 
Brist My 2¢ 
Budd Co 1.40 
Bullard 
BurilInd &90 

| Burroughs | 
Butier Br 1 60a 

| Callahan Zinc 

, Calum&H .60 

/'Campb R LK ‘ce 

| CampbSoup 1'2 

| Cdn Pac l', 

| Capital Airl 

| Carbvorun 1.60 

| Carpen Sti 2a 

| Carrier Cp 2.40 2 

| Case JI 

| Celotex 2.40 

| Cen&Sw 1.70 

Cen ViSug 2.80e 

CerdePasi.60b 


Mayor Powell, “for the real 
thing in case you're really 
'socked in at an airport. I’ve 
| made a hundred GCA’s in my 
life but, it’s still good practice.” 
Five hours and 40 minutes 
after: leaving Idlewild we were 
at Goose. Its runways were icy, 
its ramps crowded with Scor- 
pion jets, heavy transports, heli- 
copters, and Air Force blue 
uniforms visible everywhere. 
We paid a $10 landing fee to 
“the Canadian Government, filed 
a filght pattern from Goose to 
| Keflavik, Iceland, with an esti- 


—s 
~ 


— 


Lo ~ 
IRI he @ 2} IN Ww Ww FOO Ow 


e+ 
ae nD OD ww ‘ 
aI POOLUV-ISAc'e 


ARCHITECT 


Opportunity for associate connection with an established, highly regarded 
Midwest firm. Should have strong edecational background, wide know!l- 


wu 
~~ 
_— 


4 
7. 2 


Li] 
c 


to Bt 


edge of modern construction methods, and broad experience in supervising 


- 3 
I~ DIS DS Jaw 


the production of working drawings and specifications for a compre- 


hensive variety in types of design and character of construction, Appli- 


—_ 


cations will be treated in strict confidence by third party. All replies 
}: will be acknowledged, Write, 
| f£equirements, to: 


i Box P-1, The Christian Science Monitor, 588 Sth Ave., N.Y. 36, N.Y. 


giving background details and salary 


-o5 


= eee ee eee . 
= 


oe 


we 
te deed hho fe Ee) 


-~] 


Every 
Account 
Insured 


hanceVetl 60 
hemway .20 


in Times per Year 


terest! 


SeeavSw a@aew 


Across the nation, thousands of alert investors have 
chosen Prudential Savings for higher interest. Every 
account insured up to $10,000! Interest paid 4 times a 
year on all accounts—both on full-paid certificates 
(available in $100 multiples) and k accounts. . 
Write for postage-free Save-hy-Mail envelopes! 

Send For Descriptive Booklet! 

‘Questions and Answers About Prudential 


Savings’: Shows how profitable, safe and 
easy it is to save this modern way! cons Pw2.40 . | 
“ontainer 7x ; 


PRUDENTIAL SAVINGS —1 | pont Sen 1.60 
H.N. BERGER, Pres. AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


524 W. Los Tunes Dr., Son Gobriel, Colifornio | 
IN THE HEART OF THE 4-COUNTY GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA! 


~~ -—- - =— «— 
*eF 2 2 & 


: 
—_— -—- 
* es * 


Cop Rng ', | 
| Copw 63 


| Guant Sug le 
| GuifMobaéO 2 


| Harris Int 2 


| Hertz 1. 20b 
| Heyden Npt 60 


| Houd Ind 1b 3 


' 3tks/Divds Sales 


Dollars) (100s) 


: 


-- 


LW OO Obs to Sw OOim.ato~ 


Curtiss Wr 3 
Cutler H 2a 
Dayton R 1.49 
Decca Rec 1 


— 


Diam Alk 1.80k 
Dia Gard 1.80 
Dia T Mot 1 


~ EP asonNG-}-30 
6 


Emer El 1 60 
Emer Rad 
Emp D Ei 1.20 
Ena John 2 


Ur > Ooo a6 . 


-~ 


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Firestone2.60b 
Flintkote2?.40b 
FPliaPAL1.40 


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ROM -16 NW Ke Dw ew 


Food M 2 
Fobte M.&80b 
Ford Mot? 40 
Forem D 1b 
Fost Wheel 
Frueh Tra 
Gabriel .60 
Gar Wood 
Gen A Indus 
GAm Inves2 
GenAmo} 
GenAmtTrn 3 
GenCable 2 
GenDynam 2 
GenElec 2 
GenFds1.952 
GenlInstru .152 
Gen Motors? 1 
GenPCem! 80a 
GenPrec2 40 
GenPubU! 2 
GenRCig 1a 
GenRetrac 2b 
On St! Cast 1.60 
Gen Time '«e 
Gen Tire..7 
Ga Pac Co lb 
Gerbr Prd 1.60a 


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Gilad McB !1 
Goodrich 2.20 
Goodvear 2.40b 
Grace&Co2.40 
Grah Paige 


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Grum Aire l*«ag 


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Gulf Gil 2%eb 
Hmd Ore 1.40a 
Harb Walk 1.80 


Havee Ind 
Haves $nd 1.20 


“IPO — Aor 


Househ Fin 1.20b 1 
HoustL&P 1.60 10 
Howard Str 60 4 
Howe Snd 15 
Hupp Cp 20 
Huss Fefr 1b ] 
Ideal Cem 2 3 

5 

l 

1 


Inland Sti te 


| Inspir Cp3'a¢ 


Interlak Ir 2¢ 
InBusMch?2.60 


| Int Harv 2 


4 

4 

5 

x 

Int Miner 1.60 I 
TInt Nick 2 60a i 
Int Pack ‘se 4 
Int Paper 3b 4 
Int T&T 1.80 8 
y | 

9 

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+ Jaeger Mch.1.12 


Johns Man 2 
Jones&L 2'eb 


i Joy Mig 2.404 


s6° 4 


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PaP&Lt 2.40 
Pa RR 


| Philco Sef 


| PhSvE4&G 1.80 


| Repub 8t! 3 
| RevereC'se 
| Revion 1.60 


| RobPulton 1'4 


‘(Dellars) (1008) 


Ww 


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I1CLA 2a 

I McCfee 80 
Kimb-Cik 1-80 
KLM Air! .79g 
Koppers 2', 


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Ie Dee AIS Utwe we Oe Oo 


LoneSCem!1.10 
Lone S Gas 1 80 


-- — 


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Mack Trk 1.80 
Magic Chf T%f 
Magma Cop 


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MartinCo 1.60b 
Maso! i ) 
McLean .60b 

Mead Cy 1 60b 
‘Mengei } 

Merck 1.20a 3: 
MerrCh&81.20b 86 


~ 


Mot.asco Ind 
Monsan Ch lb 
Mont D Ut 1 
Monter Oil .40¢ 
Mont Ward 2a 
Motorola I, 
Murphy 2a 

Nat Airlin 17st 


to~ 


be 
eo eek eee er ee ae 


NatCashR 1.20 
Nat Dairy 1.80 
Nat Fuel G 1.10 
Nat Gvyps 2b 
Nat Steel 4 
Nat Supply 2.40 
Nat Thea ', 4 
New Eng Fi 1 
Newmont 2 
NewptNShli 40a 
NY Air Brk 1.60 
NY Central , 
NY Ch&Sl, 2 

NY NH&Hart 

NY Shpb1.40 

Nia M Pw 1.80 
Norf&Ws't 360a 6 
No AmAV1 60a 42 
Nor N Gas 2.80 13 
No N Gas Rt 64% 
Nor Pac 2 15 
Nor Sta Pw .90 7 
Northrop 1.60 
Nwst Airlin &0 
Ohio Edis 2.64 
Ohio Oil 1.60 
Okla Ga E190 
OlinMath 2 
Oliver C .60 
Owens C 


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Penn Dix1.20 
Penn Tex 


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Nel VWs FRI D 


Pennroad 906 


a 
Pepsi Colal.20 18 
Pheips D 3 54 
Phila El 2 A 
10 
Phill Pet 1.70 78 
Pitns.Bow 1.40b 
Pit Metallu %.h 


| Pit Plat G 294¢ 


Pit Steel ib 
Pittstn Co 1.20b 
Plough .40 1 
Pivym O11 1.60b 2 
Polaroid 2 61 
Poor & Co 2 10 
Proct & G2 7 
12 
Pure O11 1.60 1” 
RCA la 268 
Ravonier .80 22? 
Ravtheon 22 
Repub A2 12 
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19 
18 
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1 
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Rohr A 1.40b 


|Roval D1.70g@ 831 


RovalDrt 1061 


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xs @n es; @f Bn fe & @& wk @& 
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‘| in stock durin 


~New York Steck Exchange. List. 


Transactions Today Selected and Compiled by Associated Press bo See oy 


Net 
fish Low 1:30pm Chge 


Royal McB1.40 3 
Safew St 1 6 
StJosLead2g 
StLSanF 1‘, 
StReg P.35e 
SeabALRR 2‘, 
Seab Fir ib 
Sears R la 
Seiber Rud 600 
Servei 
Shahmoon Ind 
Shell Oi) 2 
Shell Tran.52¢ 
Sherat Am .60b 
Siegler .80 
Signode 8 1b 
Sinclair 3 
Skelly Oil 1.80 
Socony 2a 
Solar Airc 1 
Sthern Co 1.20 
Sou N Gas 2 
Sou Pac 3 
Sou Ry 2.80 
Sperry Rd .80 
Spieel 1 
Square D 1b 
Std Coll Pd 
Std Oil Cal '2:e 
St Oil In 1.40b 
’ 5 


' 


' 
i 
' 


| 


Stauff Ch 1.80b 
Stew War 2b 


~~ =~ =~ «= FF & & 


, Stone & W 2a 
Storer Brad 1.80 
Stud Pack 
Sun Oil lb 
Sundstand Il 


os 


~ RL 


A CO WO tae — BD <tr me Pr BD ee wD 


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Texas Co 2a 
TexGProd 60b 
TexGSul l*«g 


Tex Util 1.60 
Textron ‘se 
Thermoid .60a 
TidewatOill 4%ef 
Tish Rea] 35a 
Trane Co. .90 
Tran W Alix 
Transamrl.40a 
rri Cont 9ie 
Twent Cen 1.60 
Oil 
Un Carbide 3.60 
Un Oj) Cal 2.40 
Un Pac 12.0a 
UnitAirLin'yb 
Unit Airc Jb 
United Co .358@ 
Unit Fruit 3 
Un Gas Cp 1‘, 
Unit M&M 1 
US Borax .60 
US For 8 22 
US Gypsum 2a 
US Indust 90d 
US Piywad 2 
US Rub 2b 
US Smelt 
Us Steel 3 
Van Norm 


eon 


on a ee 2 ee 
de hn ed en ne 


Vict Ch Wk 1.40 
Va Caro Ch 
Walgreen 1.60a 
Walker H wi 
WarnBPic 
Warn Lam2'*.sb 
WashWP1.88 
Wayne Pump] 
WPennE 1°, 
West Mary . 
WestUTel 30e 
WestgAB1.20 
Vesta E 2 
Wheel 8t!3.40 
| Wileox Ol! lb 
Wilson&Co 1 3 
Worthinet2‘eb 2 47% 
YnagstS&T ise 24 80% 
Zenith Rad3a 2 129 


aoe a . 
PF a 09 ee OS 9 89 DD  & 8 ws 8D w 


. 
‘ 
79% ‘ 
128% 129 


+i1%% 


2 are semen 
the last quarterly or semi-annual! dec- 
laration. Unless otherwise noted. 


—dis- 
%v— 


cld—Callied. sd—Ex dividend. £ 
| Ex distribution. xr—Ex rights. 


2| Without warrants. ww—With warrants. 


wd—When distributed. wi—When issued 
nd—Next day delivery. 
| @=—In bankruptcy or receivership or 
being reorganized under the Bankruptcy 
| Act. or securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 
a—Also extra or extras. B—Annua) 
rate plus stock dividend. d—Declared 
or paid in 1957 plus stock dividend 
e—Deciar or paid so far. {Payable 
/ in stock ring 1957. estimated cash 
value on ex-dividend or ex-distribution 
| date. g—Paid last year. h-—Declared 
| paid after stock dividend or split up. 
C~-Deciared or paid this year, an accu- 
mulative issue with dividends in arrears 
dividend omitted, 


| value on ex-di 


Rates of dividends in the foregoing 
a on 


) specia) 
or extra dividends are not a TS 


works suffer substantially when | 
reproduced over a single loud- | 
speaker plunked~into the corner. 


SYS- | 


'more space than is available at | 


| tape utilized 


| tape was recorded with one head, 
and the other half with a second 


| Staggered arrangement, 


_be edited, since matching sounds | 


ically a better and simpler ar- 


| corded tape manufacturers were 


/rangement, As of now, stacked 


3 | Bethlehem 


cs eaettsaes-nnsnneoee 
rset — 
a 


oF 


393, dend or ex-distribution . 
41-32 date. y—Liquidating dividend. 


Compatible Disk Equipment Looms 


stereo recorders now on the 
market will record monaurally 
(one track; for one ear) and 
play back either monaural or 
stereo tapes. (Of course—and 
some misleading advertising 
two independent and separate | notwithstanding — nothing can 
“channels.” If the same sepa-| play back a monaural tape’or 
rateness is preserved in record- | disk recording and make it come 
ing and reproducing, the effect is | out stereo.) 

rived sem on Sagan If two mi-| Two Systems Necéssary 
crophones are used for recording | A few paragraphs ago, I said 
(or for sound pickup in broad- i two Neti aaelte’ ayetens were 
i'needed for stereo reproduction. 
|For stereo, you need two of 
‘everything—two microphones at 
the recording end; two tracks on 
the tape recorder, two playback 
amplifiers, two loudspeakers .or 
| speaker systems. 

It is true that the second 
channel need not be of as high 
a fidelity as the first, so that if 

| you have a good hi-fi setup now, 

you can achieve much of the 
improved realism offered by 
stereo without spending as much 
as the first system may have 
‘cost, However, the more closely 
the two channels are matched in 
quality and sound characteris- 
tics, the better. 

There is a great dea] of argu- 
ment over this point. Let me 
give a simple example. Let’s as- 
sume a violin near the left-ear 
microphone. The vidlinist plays 
‘a C, then a G, back and forth, 
with equal loudness. The left ear 
loudspeaker reproduces these 
‘with equal loudness. But what 
happens if the right ear speaker 
has a peak at G? It reproduces 
the G louder than the left-ear 
speaker. Therefore, the apparent 
position of the violin will .be 
near the left-ear microphone for 
C, but will hop over to the right- 
ear microphone for G. 

This is not desirable, obvi- 
ously, It must be admitted, howe 
ever, that in the general cone 
fusion of an orchestral rendition, 
these minute differences will be 
'lost—provided they are minute, 
But a speaker with a nice broad 
presence peak, played against 
‘one without such a peak, will 
pull the sound over every time. 

And the future? Exciting! Bee 
cause in 1956, a Briton by the 
name of Sugden demonstrated to 
a seléct group a cartridge ca- 
pable of recording two channels 
of sound (required, remember, 
|for stereo) in one groove On a 
record. In April, 1957 he dem- 
| onstrated the same system to the 

on monaural (one-eared) long-} pyblic at the London Audio Fair, 
play records, and the tape-play- Jn October, 1957, London Rec- 
back equipment is much more | ords showed off a similar system 
expensive than, say, a record |to small groups in New York, 
changer with pickup. _ |and Westrex demonstrated yet 
cussion of stereo - playback o 
equipment would require much | Westrex System Praised 

It seems fairly definite at this 
time that the Westrex system 
will be adopted by the phoho- 
graph industry. It appears to be 
a good system, with a major ad- 
|vantage that will be compatible, 
That is, stereo disks can be 
played back on a monaural sys- 


beneficial when the orchestra 
in full is playing, but. is most 
disconcerting for a small group 
or solo instrument condition. A 
flute ten feet long—well! 

In hearing, our ears comprise 


nels are kept entirely separate 
and distinct, right through to 
two separate high fidelity sys- 
in the home, we have 
sound. By this 
method, the feeling of depth, of 
perspective, of location, of a 
spaciousness can be re-created 
with otherwise unobtainable 
realism. 

Steréo sound fs not’ new, In 
the 1930's, Bell demonstrated a 
multiple channel system, but it 
was strictly a laboratory propo- 
sition, In the early 1950’s hob- 
byists experimented with stereo: 
recordings were on tape. since. 
it was fairly simple to connect 
two tape heads and record two 
separate channels on one strip 
of tape. 

Tape Expensive 

Cook Laboratories offered 
stereophonic records in the mid- 
1950's. Left and right ear were 
recorded as two separate bands 
of grooves, and two cartridges, 
mounted side by side in tandem, 
were used for playback. 

As of the end of 1957, tape is 
the accepted medium. Many 
manufacturers are now produc- 
ing tape recorders capable of 
playing back prerecorded stereo 
tapes and practically all record 
manufacturers are releasing 
some of their catalogue in the 
form of stereo tapes. 

The one drawback about tape 


stereo tape may cost from three 
to five or six times as much as 


Indus try . 


Finance 


the moment, but a few com- 
ments may be helpful. 

Stacked versus staggered 
heads is a top question mark at 
present. First experiments with 
two recording- 
playback heads, One-half of the 


head, mounted an inch or so sound, and monaural disks can 
from the first. This was the|be played successfully on =a 
but it;stereo system. Actually, it does 
was not entirely satisfactory, not seem so important at 
Editing Barred | time which system is adopted’ 
long as all the record companies 

For one thing, tape could not | agree on one system. 

While some record companies 
gulp bravely and insist they I 
have commercial releases avag- 
able by midsummer or early fall 
of 1958, this may be a bit ambi- 
tious. It would be wiser to take 
it easy and to iron out some of 
the bugs. The demonstrations 
heard so far have been good but 
definitely open to improvement, 

Also, there is the problem of 
the crucial playback cartridge. 
As of mid-December, the main 
stereo products of leading pee 
up manufacturers were publicity 
releases. Experimental models 
were reported, but production 
| Was still to start. 

At the present time, tape is 
definitely an accomplished fact. 
It does not seem likely that disk 
will eateh up with tape for at- 
least a while, insofar as quality 
of sound and general availability 
is concerned. Which means: 
don’t stop buying monaural rece 
ords for fear of obsolescence, 
|And if you want stereo, go right 
ahead with tape. The main thing 
is to be aware that stereo is now 
here, on tape, and soon will be 
available on disks. It is also 
available now, in some areas, 
over FM-AM stations. Hence 
you should keep stereo sound in 
‘mind when planning new hi-fi 
installations, or modifications to 
existing ones. 

And after stereo? How about 
stereoscopic television? 


were spaced apart. For another, 
the slightest tape stretch, or 
movement by the heads, pro- 


duced horridle garbles of un- 
synchronized sound. 

Tape-head manufacturers de- 
veloped a head with two halves, 
and managed to reduce to ac- 
ceptable levels the “intercom- | 
munication” between the upper 
and lower halves. This was basi- 


rangement;tape could be edited 
easily; head misalignment was 
no longer a problem: stretch 
didn’t matter, and so forth, 
But the staggered-head ar-'| 
rangement had been in use in 
many home systems, and prere- 


obliged to release their tapes in 
both staggered and _ stacked 
(sometimes called in-line) ar- 
rangements. Two of the largest 
manufacturers of popular- 
priced tape recorders held onto 
the staggered arrangement until 
the fall ‘of 1957, when both 
moved over to the stacked ar- 


has won. 

In connection with tape re- 
corders, it should be mentioned 
that very few are available to- 
day which will record stereo- 
phonically, and those that do are 
in the professional class, and 
correspondingly expensive, Most 


The Business Day 


The stock market milled about today just slightly under the 
November highs with trading sluggish. By early afternoon, 
declines in key stocks were mainly fractional, but there were 
a'few small gains. Bethlehem Stee! edged forward after easing 
a bit in early trading. United States Steel and Youngstown 
Sheet, however, fell major fractions and Granite City Steel, 
which was off 3epoints Jan. 30, was. about unchanged. Motors, 
rubbers, chemicals, rails and airline shares drifted lower. Oils, 
aircrafts, and building materials were mixed, while coppers 
showed little change: Prices were mixed on the American 
Stock Exchange and trading was slow. Among gainers were 
Skiatron, Waltham precision, Guild Films, and Pancoastal 
Petroleum. Lower were Crowell-Collier, Mesabi Iron, Cenca, 
Pacific Petroleum and Campbell-Chibourgamau. 


Steel Corporation. reached new highs in profits, 
billings and production in 1957, according to Arthur B. Homer, 
president. He stated that he expects steelmaking activity 
throughout the United States to increase in March. Bethle- 
hem’s net income last year was $191,025,933, equal to $4.13 a 
common share, on the basis of the number of shares outstand+¢ 
ing after the four-for-one stock split jast January. This 
compared with 1956 profits of $161,411,625, or $3.47 a share 
on the same basis. Net billings last year were $2,603,713,277, 
compared with $2,326,704,414 for 1956. 


Estimated consolidated net earnings of Standard Oil Company 
(New Jersey) for 1957 totaled $800,000,000, or about $4.05 
each on the average number of shares outstanding during the 
year. This compared with $808,500,000, or $4.11 a share in 
1956. Gross revenues from sales and investments in 1957 weré 
estimated at $7,972,000,000, an increase of 9'2 per cent over 
the 1956 figure. of $6,900,000,000. 


An offering of $28,367,000 State of New Hampshire 2.60 per cent 
bonds due serially Feb. I, 1959-1986 has been made by an 
underwriting group managed jointly by the Chase Manhattan 
Bank and Halsey Stuart & Co., Inc. The group was awardéd 
the bonds on a bid of 100.633 per cent. Proceeds from the 
bonds will be used for turnpike, highway, capital and unis 
versity improvements, war service recognition, state armories, 
recreational facilities and revision of public laws purposes)” 


7i¢ 
. 


‘tem without “deterioration*:of <<» 


) 


7 


a 


= 


& 


By Philip W. Whitcomb 


Special Correspondent of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


Paris 

In spite of all temptations to 
join uromarket nations in 
some sensational rocket of the 
sputnik age, the guiding minds 
of the six-nation treaiy have 
held stubbornly to a 12- or 15- 
5 eg plan of old-fashioned build- 
ng. 

_ In fact, it would be nearer the 
truth to credit an age-old Euro- 
pean instinct, rather than the 
andividual negotiators, with this 
preference for solidity over 
Pyrotechnics. The plan which 
came into operation on the first 
day of 1956 appears to express 
the subconscious desires of the 
160 million people involved. An 
opinion poll couldn't have done 
it half so well. 

The steadiness in which Euro- 
market is to be constructed will 
be appreciated if a few of the 
steps involved are listed year by 
Vvear. 

1958: three 
nine- 


During the first 
months the Euromarket 
member... administrative. 
mission wil] organize its staff, 
and nominate a 101-member 
consultative economic and social 
committee, for approval by the 
8!X-nation council. On the eco- 
Romic-social committee there 
will be 24 French, 24 German, 
24 Italian, 12 Belgian, 12 Dutch, 
and 5 Luxembourg members. 
France Sets Up Agency 

Simultaneously, with March 
31 as a target date, the commis- 
sion must also organize its Euro- 
pean investment bank and 
propose a director-general for 
approval by the council. It must 
also establish an investment 
fund for the development of the 
overseas territories of the six 
nations: this fund will be under 
the commission’s own manage- 
ment. 

During this preliminary period 
the commission will organize an 
agricultural conference of which 
the purpose will be to coordinate 
the food policies of the six 
nations and to begin planning a 
joint agricultural policy to be 
adopted by all from the begin- 
ning of 1960. 

This part of the program is 
being taken very seriously by 
France, agriculturally the 
Strongest of the six nations. The 
‘government has appointed a 
high-level commission to pre- 
pare the French suggestions, and 
the United Chambers of Agri- 
tulture held a_ discussion in 
Paris in mid-January. 


At the end of “the vear’ the’ 


six governments must announce 
a flat reduction of 10 per cent 
in their tariffs as applied to 
each. other's goods. 

Price Revision Due 


1959: All bilateral quotas, 
limiting import and export of 
goods with any other member 
of Euromarket, must be _ re- 
placed by general quotas apply- 
ing to all. New lists of quota- 
‘free products must be submitted 
to the European commission. 
Discrepancies in transport rates 
—#throughout the six nations. are 
to be eliminated by the end af 


seo sthe. year..Erance cmust.offer.new 


regulations for trade with Al- 


COm=: 


‘a s 


: Stretchable Paper 


Success Claimed 


By the Assoctated Press 
New York 

An idea conceived by a 
famous 83-year-old inventor 
has become a reality. 

The idea was paper that 
stretches without ripping — a 
product that could be used in 
grocery bags and sacks and 
many other applications .of 

* wrapping and packaging. 

The unusual toughness of 
the paper may enable manu- 
facturers to use up to 25 per 
cent less paper and still turn 
out better products. It was 
termed “one of the most im- 
portant breakthroughs in the 
paper industry during this 
century” by David L. Luke, 
president of West Virginia 
Pulp & Paper Company. 

The product was placed on 
the market by a new company. 
( lupak, Inc., owned by West 
‘Virginia Pilp & Paper, paper: 
makers since 1888, and Cluett, 
Peabody & Co., manufacturers 
of men's shirts and other ap- 
parel. 

Sanford Cluett, inventive 
genius of Cluett, Peabody. 
proposed the new type paper 
to West Virginia Pulp three 
years ago. Mr. Cluett, of Troy, 
N.Y. has more than 200 in- 
-ventions to his credit, the most 
important being a preshrink- 
ing process for textiles. 

Mr. Luke said the stretch of 
up to 13 per cent in the new 
paper compares with the 2 
per cent of elasticity in a typi- 
cal sheet of conventional 
heavy paper. 

. 


geria, subject to revision before 
the end of 1962. 

1960: Import-export quotas 
must be generalized by equa! 
steps until all are abolished at 
the end of 1972. All member na- 
tions are»to revive their muini- 
mum prices during this year. A 
tentative plan for free competi- 
tion throughout Euromarket will 
be submitted. 

1961: A second reduction of 
10 per cent in reciprocal tariffs 
with others of the six nations 
must be made, and 31 per cent 
of each country’s autonomous 
darifis must be adjusted to Eu- 
romarket standards. 

1963: All controls must be 
removed from payments result- 
ing from movements of capital, 
“though capital-movements them- 
selves are not to be completely 
free until the end of 1972. 
Equality of salaries between 
men and women is to be estab- 
lished throughout Euromarket. 
A long-term agreement for the 
disposal of agricultural sur- 
pluses is to be, completed. 

By the end of the year the six 
nations must agree on tariffs fo! 
what is known as the “G” list 
of goods—70 debated items. 
During this year the customs 


regulations of the six nations are. 


be coordinated. 

1964: Beginning with this 
year.no..country..may allow spe- 
cial transport rates for the goods 


to 


Spaak to Push Bid 


By J. Emlyn Williams 


Centrai European Correspondent 
Bonn, Germany 

Paul-Henri Spaak, secretary- 
general of the permanent Coun- 
-cil of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, is to pay an official 
lightning visit here in the hope 
of persuading the (West) Ger- 
man Federal Republic to con- 
tribute at least a portion of the 
support costs of Allied troops 
on its soil. 

Such a recommendation was 
made by the NATO Council 
answering Britain's request at 
a meeting last Jan. 8. But for 
some time past and still now 
the viewpoint here is that the 
Federal Republic cannot simul- 
taneously pay stationing costs, 
build-up its own armed forces, 
and maintain a balanced budget. 

M. Spaak is scheduled to 
confer with Foreign Minister 
Heinrich von Brentano and De- 
fense Minister Franz Joseph 
Strauss. Chancellor Konrad Ade- 
‘nauer left Jan. 31 for a month’s 
Vacation in the south of France. 


Much Debated Subject 

Stationing costs has been a 
much debated subject for years 
past, In’ fact, each year since 
this country set out to establish 
the Bundeswehr (West German 
*rmed forces). there have been 
long - drawn - out deliberations 
Before agreement was reached. 


of The Christian Science Monitor 

Herr Etzel maintains that his 
new budget has been balanced 
only with difficulty and that is 
cannot accept new burdens, The 
budget for 1958-1959 totals 39,- 
200 million marks—an increase 
of nearly 2,000 million marks 
over its predecessor. The 
changes include tax exemptions 
for some three millien persons 
now paving income tax, reduc- 
ing the corporation tax on divi- 
dends from 30 to 11 per cent, and 
encouraging long-term saving by 
premiums, : : 

West Germans pay less per 
head for defense than the Dutch, 
Belgians, Norwegians, and less 
than 50 per cent of what the 
British pay. 

Case For Bonn Outlined 

While it generally is con- 
ceded here that Britain and 
France have their financial 
problems, it is argued simul- 
taneously that West Germany 
cannot be expected to pay both 
for foreign troops and build up 
its own Bundeswehr-~ simultane- 
ously, _ 

Other arguments freely voiced 
here are: 

1. Allied troops: have been 
placed here primarily not to de- 
fend the Federal Republic but 
to carry out that part of the 
NATO defense plans in which 


~and- returned home. 


For Bonn Troop Pay 


‘Recently the issue became 
more urgent as Britain request- 
éd payment of 508 million marks 
(140 million dollars) for the these plans would be seriously 
coming year. Otherwise its army affected. 
éf the Rhine would be consider- 2. How can there be talk ol 
ably reduced. withdrawing such troops and si- 

A NATO recommendation multaneously stressing fear ol 
supported this, and the United’ attack from the East? 

States and France also present- 3. Stationing costs would be 
ed claims for stationing costs. justified, according to one com- 

M. Spaak probably will find ment, only if they increased the 
the job of honest broker difi- defensive power of the Western 
cult. For official spokesmen, such ajjiance. Actually, however, they 
as Financé Minister Franz Etze!, have reduced that power. For 
budget experts of government the Allies have not added one 
parties as well as leading poli- sojdier to their forces here, and 
ticians, have -declared there IS on the contrafWTHe Bundeswehr 
little chance that tle British re- jas been deprived of finances 
quest will be granted either in necessary to build them up. 
the budget committee or the To Clarify Issue 

lenum of the Bundestag “Scie causa 

4. M. Spaak’s. forthcoming 


Qower house) eres visit to Bonn will mark the last 
Opposition Exp phase in the stationing costs 
Herr Strauss . 1s strongly Op- issue. according to anotner edi- 


this country is involved. Hence 
if British, French, and Ameri- 
can troops should be withdrawn, 


posed because, according to a 
memorandum submitted to the 
Chancellor recently, no funds 
from the defense budget are 
available. Also if they were to 
be diverted, the republic's com- 
mitments to NATO would be un- 
fulfillable, 

The next defense estimates 
will amount to 10,000 million 
marks. This is only 1,000 million 
more than for 1957-1958. But 
since last year’s total was not 


eompletely used, it is argued that 


actually the present defense 
budget is 30 per cent greater 
than actual expenditure of the 
gprevious year. 


torial, and should help “destroy 
the superstition that new sta- 
tioning costs are _ politically 
necessary.’ 

This whole issue it should be 
remembered, is up for solution 
at a moment when the economic 
“miracle” seems to be ending 
when a large section of public 
opinion is greatly perturbed over 
new atomic weapons for 
Federal Republic and feels 
the Bonn government is 
doing enougn to reach an 
with 


that 

not 
un- 
derstanding 


steps can be taken nobody yet 
has stated, 


the. 


the Soviet, 
/Union. Though what practical | 


of any of the six countries, in- 
cluding its own, 

965: Tariffs are to be re- 
duced again by a flat 10 per cent, 
to be repeated at the end of 1966 
and 1967: further reductions 
will then be decided on by a 
majority vote of the six-nation 
council. 

End of Quotas Slated 


1967: By the end of the vear 
a single tariff must be in effect 
on all railways for,.all goods 
originating m Euromarket. An- 
other 30 per cent of autonomous 
import-export tariffs will be ad- 
justed. 

1968: Minimum prices 
throughout the area may be re- 
vised by the council. A fina! 
decision will be reached on the 
“G” list. 

972: All quotas will be abol- 
ished, Capital movements will 
be freed, A permanent regime 
will be adopted for minimum 
prices under a common agricul- 
tural policv. with harmonization 
of prices in countries showing 
surplus or deficit. From the end 
of the year all tariffs will be 
exactiy-the--same -for-—-ati--the 
countries. A common agricul- 
tural policy will be established. 
A possible total coordination oj 
all transport will be examined, 

1973: A temporary increase of 
the joint export-import tariffs, 
limited to 20 per cent, will be 
allowed. 

Staff Organized 

At this point the six-nation 
council will decide whether fur- 
ther measures of adjustment are 
necessary. The expectation at 
the present is that by that time 
the Euromarket will be a solid 
structure serving the needs of 
170 million people. 

Euratom, needless to say, will 


Euromarket Slates Long-Term Building | 


arouse far fewer problems and 


will be more easily constructed, . 
entering, as it does, an entirely. 


new field. The European Eura- 
tom Commission already is or- 
ganizing its staff and will soon 
begin preparation of a plan for 
establishing nuclear industries 
in the common interest. The 


- Euratom commission will be ad- 


vised by a scientific and techni- 
cal committee of 20 members, 
chosen for their personal! abili- 
ties and not because of their 
nationality, each member serv- 
ing for five years. 

A word should be added re- 
garding the British suggestion 
that a larger free trade zone, of 
which the United Kingdom will 
be a member, should be added to 
Euromarket, Political leaders in 
the six nations have spoken po- 
litely of this suggestion, but the 
fact is that a considerable ma- 
jority of producers and traders 
are strongly opposed. 

The French Nationa! Associa- 
tion of Employers pointed out 
again, only this month, that 
whereas Euromarket is protect- 


“ed by standard tariffc all around | 


its frontiers, Britain’s proposed 
“free trade area” would have no 
such protection, Further, the 
association states, there would 
be no attempt to harmonize the 
policies of the free trade states, 
as is the case among the six 
nations. 

The association, and other crit- 
ics. assume that the purpose of 
the free trade area would be to 
allow the United Kingdom to 
trade both in Europe’ and 
throughout the Commonwealth 
on a preferential basis, without 
allowing other countries to trade 
on the same basis with Com- 
monwealth nations. 


1S 


Police Seize 


Leaders 


Spanish Discontent 


| 


| 


xploited by Reds 


By Richard Mowrer 
* . . . 
Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Madrid 

In one of the biggest police 
swoops of the Franco era, 43 
men and one woman have been 
arrested and charged with Com- 
munist activities, The operation 
extended over several weeks 
and —included .questioning .and 
temporary deténtion of possibly 
another 30 suspects. Arrests 
were made in Madrid, Valencia, 
Zaragoza, and Barcelona. 


High lights of the operation 


that 
last 


are: first, the disclosure 
some 90 Spanish students 


summer traveled to France on, 


valid passports and then went 
on to Moscow as guests of the 
Soviets to attend the Commu- 
nist- sponsored World Youth 
Festival: second, the fact that 
after vears of lying low in Spain, 
communism is’ breaking “surface 
here -as_it_goes into high gear to 
exploit for its own ends grow- 
ing.dliscontent with the Franco 
regime. sen = 

According to available infor- 
mation, some 90 young Span- 
iards resident in Spain, as dis- 
tinct from other youths whose 
parents went into exile after 
the Civil War, went to Moscow 
iIt--seems, 
however, that only those who 
showed active pro-Soviet in- 
clinations have been detained. 
Most of them are under 25 years 
of age. Some of the detainees 
are members of well-to-do and 
respected families. 


Arrests Publicized 


One, Javier Pradera (who did 
not go to Moscow, possibly be- 
cause he was then doing mili- 
tary service) is a grandson of 
Victor Pradera, a prominent Na- 
tionalist (pro-Franco) victim of 
the civil war, and a nephew of 
the Spanish Ambassador in Da- 
mascus. Another, Julian Marcos 
Martinez, the son of a well- 
known lawyer, had previously 
beén arrested in connection with 
the student riots of 1956. 

The Franco government does 
not always publicize political ar- 
rests carried out by its police. 
But in this case it has. The po- 
lice roundup is officially de- 
scribed as having brought to 
light and disrupted “an attempt 
to reconstitute the Communist 
Party in Spain.” It speaks of a 
plot to organize a “day of na- 
tional reconciliation” designed 
“to totally alter normalcy and 
public order”’—in other words, 
cause trouble. 

These charges are substanti- 


ated by Communist publications 
which have been circulating il- 
legally in Spain in_ recent 
months. Mundo Obrero, organ 
of the- central committee of the 
Spanish Communist Party, has 
been seeking to promote the or- 
ganization of a “day of national 


reconciliation” in allrance with= 


“all Spaniards of all parties, po- 
litical and social groups with- 
out distinction.” Such a “day,” 
according to  Miindo ~ Obrero, 
would be “a peaceful mobiliza- 
tion, somewhat like the civil ac- 
tion which in Colombia brought 
about the destitution of Dicta- 
tor Rojas Pinilla.” 


‘Nonviolence’ Stressed 
Adroitly Wliaving on the 
Spanish...people’s. determination 
to avoid any political action that 
would tend to Violence reviving 
the horrors of the civil war ol 


~ 7936-39, Mundo Oprero savs: 


“We, the Communist Party, 
do not consider the ‘day of na- 
tional reconciliation’ as a sub- 
versive movement, or a conspir- 
acy, or as a violent clash against 
the dictatorship. Nor do we con- 
Sider “it as the ultimate act 
against the dictatorship, al- 
though if it occurred this would 
accelerate its liquidation. 

“In view of the impossibility, 
under the dictatorship, of ex- 
pressing opinions through a free 
vote, we see the ‘day -of na- 
tional reconciliation’ as a unani- 
mous national plebiscite, as a 
solemn warning to those who 
persist in disregarding’ the 
troubled mood of the nation. We 
see the ‘day of national recon- 
ciliation® as an expression of the 
desire of the country for 
nonviolent, bloodless political 
change.” 


Hungary Recalled 


The. government __ has 
included Mundo Obrero: 
posals in its disclosures to the 
public. The cynicism of the 
Communist line of nonviolent 
reasonableness ‘s transparent to 
anyone who remembers what 
happened in Hungary a year 
ego. 

But the Communists evidently 
count on. discontent here to 
outweigh and black out remem- 
brance of Hungary's fa.e, and 
on the fact that the Spanish 
press, being government-con- 
trolled and heavily censored, 
|carries little weight with public 
opinion. 


pro- 


Strike in Bahamas Hits 


At ‘Arehaie’ 


Constitution 


By Reuterea 


London 

Colonial Secretarv Alan Len- 
nox-Boyd has hinted at possible 
constitutional changes for the 
Bahama Islands where a general 
strike moved to a close Jan. 30. 

House of Commons Labor 
members backed demands of the 
islands’ Progressive Liberal 
Party for a royal commission in- 
vestigatioft of conditions leading 
to the 18-day strike. 

The walkout began when taxi 
drivers, almost all of them 
Negro, struck over a _ dispute 
with travel companies over 
transportation from the airport 
to resort hotels. It soon spread 
to other fields. 

Leaders of the Negro com- 
munity, comprising 90 per cent 
of the islands’ population of 10,- 
000, complained_of unfair repre- 
sentation in the islands’ Legis- 
lature. 

Negroes are not represented 
on the colony’s Executive Coun- 
cil and have nine of 38 members 
in the Bahamas’ Parliament. 
Representation is restricted by 
income and property voting 
qualifications. | ‘ 

Laborite David Jones, in the 
House of Commons Jan. 30, de- 
scribed the present constitution 
'as “archaic.” He said that action 


would have to be taken to pre- 
serve peace and quiet in the is- 
lands. 

Mr. Lennox-Boyd " 
think that like many old con- 
stitutions it can do with changes 
here and there.” But he added 
that electoral legislation was a 
matter for the Bahamas’ Legis- 
lature and that proposed changes 
did not have majority support. 


said: 


. 
Market Indicators ° 


By the Associated Press 


Dow Jones Stock Averages 
Lew Clese Che. 
448.46 449.72 —1.44 
108.44 108.90 —@.6% 
f : 72.4 2.58 —@.23 
63 Stocks 154.96 13.535 —0.60 
Standard & Poor's Stock 


Chg. 
wy 
—, 12 


—.%0 


#25 Inds 


2.12 
What Stocks 


Advances 
Declines 
Unchanged 


otal issues 

ew 1957-38 highs 
New 1957-58 lows 1 

Steck Transactions 

Thursday's sales 2.3 
Today's sales to noon est.) 
1958 volume te date 
1957 volume te date 


not. 


Business—Research = THE. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


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Dancan, Broker, Louisa, Virginie. 


FARMS TO LET 


resentiy not 


SMALL DAIRY FARM, 
. stocked. In upper N 
and cooler. Good roads, 
F LL. Vaughn Grant Ave. 
Palis. New York 


MOVING AND STORAGE — 


“MOVING! C. BAIN, Inc.| 
Agent UNITED VAN LINES 


48 States and Canada 
Wkly Trips N. Eng., VN. ¥., Wash... D.C., Fis. 
Storage $3.60 per month ané up 
ce moving @ speciality 
PR 6-9750—MY 6-8888 
77? Broadway, Somervilic, Mass. 


| DEEM IT A PRIVILEGE to offer my 
Personalized Local and Long Distance 
sa i inesheiiati ; -- a. ae Moving and Fireproof Storage Service te 
WASHINGTON D. C., N. W.~—EMiciencs :ne reacers of The Christian Science 
apart. Feb. 15 to ri 15. AD 4-1713. \ronitor in which I have been a consistent 
Box 454. 1013 Naticnal Press Bailiding advertiser for over @ quarter of a century, 


We EFIRNISHE NOBLE R. STEVES, Ine. 
APARTMENTS FURNISHED — 04 teave Gn Gotan Ge, en 


ANTIQUES WANTED 


MARLBOROUGH ST. APARTMENT 


Between Dartmouth and Exeter Sts. 
We offer in one of our managed bDuild- 
ings an entire second floor consisting 
of large Paneled living room, 2 iarge 
bedrooms each with private tiled 
bath, kitchen with dining area. This 
apartment has southern exposure and 
will be completely redecorated to the 
tenant's taste. Rent $200, parking 
$15 a month. For further details eall 


30 Federal Street 81 Cherles Street 
Boston, Mess. Li 2-4436 


EE ——————_—_——_— 
APARTMENTS TO SUBLET 


PALM DESERT. CALIF., 12 miles E. Palm 
Springs—‘‘White Chimney Apartments 
Spacious and comfortably furn. Beau- —<-—~ - _ 
tiful view mountains. Quiet desert at- CASH PAID—Antique Purniture, Glass, 
mosphere. By week or month. 44-710 China. Bric-a-Brac, etc. H STAR. 68a 
San Rafael Ave. Tel. Fireside 7-6237 Market St., Brighton Mass. ST 2-7866. 


SUMMIT, N. J.—Three rooms, all ARTS AND CRAFTS 


im 
provements; with bath end- private hai... 
L, eager 


Near D. & W. and bus line. CR 
FOR PLEASURE AND PROFIT 


WALTHAM, MASS.—Most attractive liv.- ytare beautiful rhinestone jewelry. Satie 
cit‘nette, 1 iin, a ie Waitt SNC fection guaranteed. Send for catalogue, 
kit'nette. 1 min. from Ri. 126 Waltham- 1). piastime, 263 Broadway, Arfingtoa, 
Weston line. Tel. TWinbrook 3-2722 Mass oa 


WESTFORD, MASS. ‘raier incl. AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 


kitchenette. Heat waiter ete 
1956 PONTIAC 


8 miles from Aye! | Bedford 
, a4 
Ster Chief Cetaline Sedan 


W. A. Perrins. MYrtie 2-635 
APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 
Radio — Heeoter 
Hydra.—Fully Powered 


STAMFORD fy 
CONNECTICUT 3 White Welled—2-Tone 
Like New 


NEW GARDEN APARTMENTS 
$2195 


LINDEN (@ocrers 


HOUSE PONTIAC 
41 HOPE STREET VILLAGE 


Corner Gtonnroes Rood Open Eves. ‘til 10 P.M. 
A 
IDEALLY LOCATED LOngwood 6-5360 


Luxury Apartments 860 Commonwealth Ave. 
In Spacious, Park-like Setting AUTOMOBILES WANTED 


4-5-6 ROOMS LATE MODEL CAR (Olds. or Chrysler 


prefd)}. Must be exceptional value ang 
» end 2 Bathe Sane with Terraces condition. Flushing, N. Y. BA 5-1956, 


BEAUTY SHOPS 
SPECIALIZED and INDIVIDUALIZED | 
SERVICES 


_s 


-~Two 


ie 


FREE GAS AND PARKING 
CUSTOM BUILT KITCHENS 
FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGERATORS 
AIR-CONDITIONING OUTLETS 
HUGE ROOMS AND CLOSETS 
MASTER TV ANTENNA 
SCHOOLS BLOCK 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
Furnished Model Apt. 


OPEN FOR INSPECTION 


By Appointment 
ERIC BEAUTY SALON 
1623 Lexington Ave., N.¥.C. 


FIX-IT 
TYPEWRITERS Sctthe ‘Beisston 
Typewriter, Little Bidg., Boston. HU 2-35646 

FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS 


TWO ORIENTAL RUGS—Approx. 
ft. and ®x5. Also. hooked rug 8x10. Pine 
English arm chair. They do not Gt my 
new home. Will sacrifice. Tel. BEaconm 
2-5116 ‘Brookline, Mass.; 


BU &-9348 


Renting Agent on Premises Daily 19s 18 


FIRESIDE 8-8387 


DIRECTIONS: Merritt Parkway, nim sme — 
exit 34 toward center of town. _VENETURE WANTED 


On Estate in LEXINGTON. MASS. el BUY all kinds of furniture, d 


: china and bric-a-brac. Breslau’s, 1 
5-rm. apt. with utilities. Screened porch Warre , 
garden. Nr. Rts. 128 and 2. 2 to fren St.. Roxbury. Mass. HI 2-5800. 


20 min 
Harvard Sq. Adults pret. Box C-12, Ont) HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS 


Norway Street. Boston 15. Mass 
BOSTON. THE FENWAY SALE—Superb used furniture, furnishings, 
rm. apts. All electric. Elevator antiques. Bargain prices. Cash bu 
3 Lioyd’s, 116 East th Street, N. Y. 


$75-$90 month. KE 6-3942 
JEWELERS 


MILTON, MASS.—5S+rm. hid. ist fi. apt 
_ SPECIAL ORDER WORK AND REPAIRS: 


’ 


1 or 2 


and garage. Avail. Feb. 1. Rent $120 
Tel. BLue Hills 8-1640 
Kenneth KR: Park (Widme?'s) 
31 West Street. 5th Fleer, Boston, Mass. 


APARTMENTS WANTED 
’ ae an - * 
HAVE YOU a sep. 2-bedrm. apt. to Tent , “or eres 
in lg. house’ Two working women wish LAMPS AND SHADES 
Qi and Keresene Lamps 
€ NALBAND LAMP STUDIO 
EL °7°@ Washington &t.. Wellesiey Hills, 


4-5 quiet, modern rms.. in pleasant lo- 
MATTRESSES 


_ 


‘pid 


PPL LPL 


LAKELAND, FLA.—Deluxe 2 master bed- 
rooms: baths: Filia. room: brick firp! 
furnace heat: furn.. unfurn.: in util 
rm. half bath. shower: Ige lot: 14 oax 
trees; beaut. Indsepd.; school. church 
shop. center close by; reas. priced. Box 
A-4, $88 Pifth Ave.. New York 36, N. ¥ 


NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 


Near Christian Science Church. Well 
mainteined family home of 7 rooms, 
4 large bedrooms, porch, garage 
Asking $19.900. Mrs. Cleveland, LAsell 
7-2148 or LAsell 17-8180. 


READ THIS: In coastal 
Maine, Route 1, 
9 cabins all 
yielding good 
Roger Converse 


CONSULTANT SERVICES 
Assistance in provlems arising out of ne- 
go’. ation. administration or termination 
of United States Aim Force contracts 

; HERBERT P. POWELL 
PROCUREMENT CONSULTANT 
P. ©. Box 111, Fairborn, Ohie 
Phone (Dayton, Ohie) CHapei 4-2120 


EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES 


CLERK TRNEES-MANY $50-$80: 
BISHOP PERSONNEL BUREAU 


30 Church St... N.¥.C. (Rm. 805) Inty. 8-1 


~~ TIMELY PERSONNEL 


0; Sth Ave... N.¥.C. (42nd). MU 2-6755 


7 


home with 
furnished 
Write owner 


beautiful 
completely 
income. 


town, Camden, 


tatiak.. Abou Bpring...10-20.. min... BAle., 
Box On 
MATTRESSES 


trom Harvard. Write C-ll, 
Norway 8t.. Boston 15 Tel. 
4-7591. Cambridge. Mass. 
end BOX SPRINGS RENOVATED 
T. B. HAFFEY CO., 32 Centre Ave... Newton 
Bigelew 4-1061 Estab. 1896 


RICHMOND HILL. N. ¥.— Bus. woman 
desires 3-room apt... unfurnished; 
MATTRESSES MADE OVER 
l-day service, free estimate 


pri- 
vate nome pref. Tel. VI 7-1432 eves 
HOMES WITH ATTENTION 
THE BEACON MATTRESS COMPANY 
202-204 Blue Hill Avenue. Roxbury. Masa 
GA 7-906! 


NILES, CALIFORNIA 
One story beautiful grounds, viewing 
foothills, for healing, or eideriy de- 
siring home with care 
MARTHA M. BARKER, Owner 
975 Morrison Ave. Phone Niles 4488 


WANTED TO RENT MIMEOGRAPHING 


CAPE COD, MASS., or ocean walking dis- BENTLEY'S — Mimeographi and 8Stae 
tance. 3-4 bedrm. housekpg. cottage for tionery. Office and 6chool Supplies, 
family 2 weeks this summer. D. D.| South Sudbury, Mass. Hilitop 3-2042, 

——— 


Bean. Jr. Jaffrey, New Hampshire. ~ ~ 
PRINTING 


W. HEMPSTEAD, L. 1.. N. ¥.—Attractive 
2-fam.: 5 rm. and bath. enclosed porch 
ist floor: 3 rm. and bath. 2nd floor: lot 
0’ x 125’; trees; 2-car garage: nr. sta. 
and bus: oil. hot wat. heat. IV 1-2059 


HOUSES TO LET 


EDITOR, Biol./Chem./Phss. bdkgr.. kni. 
ref. bks.. MAN OR WOMAN. $5.500. 


SALESWOMEN WANTED 


Putt 


SALESWOMEN for many cities in United 
States. Our interesting work is con- 
ducted over sour home telephone. Com.- 
missions pvramid from vear to vear 
through renewais of subscriptions fo: 
ve big national megazines. Subscrip. 
tions are chareed on customer's depart- 
ment store accounts at our cooperatine 
department stores. We train vou at 
home—remuneration schedule on re- 
quest Write Clifton Krausz. McCall's 
230 Park Ave. New York 17 Y.. and 
give your telephone number 


SOLOISTS WANTED 

AUDITIONS. for Soloist invited Write 
Cierk. Second Church of Christ. Scien- 
tist, 13 New Dorp Lane, Steten Island 6 
New York. or call YU 7-0172. 


SITUATIONS WANTED-MEN 


TO THE NEW, in 
room apt. Living 
dutch oven pine 
Ceramic bath, garage 
44-3098. Mass. 
WINCHESTER, MASS. —Beau 
home. Large livy.-din. rm., 
baths. balcony. Kit.. gai 
den. WI 6-2033 
WINCHESTER, MASS.—Avai!l 
6 mos., completely furn. house. garage 
garden. Refs. req. WI 6-0849 or write 
Box C-6. One Norway S8t.. Boston 15 


COTTAGES TO LET 


FLORIDA 
PHOTOGRAPHER—Free-iance. widower 


49. will travel, have own camera and Attrac. 2-bdrm. cottages right on the Gulf 
projection equipment for 34 mm coloriof Mexico. where childfen are welcome 
film—interested in doing pictorial writ- The Hoadley Cottages Englewood, Fila 


this duplex 2 bed- 
room, fire place 
cabinet kitchen 


Call SUnset 


furn. studio 
Ss tarm.. 3 
lovely gar- 


Mar. 1 for 


LL 


PAYING GUESTS 
GRAHAM PRINTING CO. 


GARDEN SEAT INN | ws ornnt eee ll, N.Y, 
; “g . ei. - 
at Clearwater, Florida. A truly lovely spot = s.-is) Committee and Shevels 


on beautiful Clearwater Bay. Serving 
‘luncheon, dinner, and Special Parties RADIO-TV SERVICE 
RADIO AND TV 


Daily except Monday. Enjoy excellent 
REPAIRING 


meais in delightful surroundings Visit 
our Gift and Gown Shops 
1224 Druid Road Phone 32-0271 
' BAYWOOD EXPERT WORK, TUBES TESTED AT 
. STORE. GEORGE'S, I71A MASSA- 
CHUSETTS AVE... BOSTON. CO 
SLIP COVERS 


_ {at Daytona Beach. Florida) 
Spacious. river front rooms, centrally 

SLIPCOVERS EXPERTLY FITTED 
your own mater.; s@wing option.: 
mond 


juices served 
437 North Halifax CL 27-6814 
WHISPERING PALMS 
Venice, Fla... “on the Gulf.” Charming 
home for permanent guests. Unique plan 
for those retired. Near stores. church 
beach. Paula Fagan, Box 187. Venice, Fia 


CLEARVIEW FAR™M in. beautiful Buck: 
Co. for actrve elderly persons. Restfu) 

|} surroundings. Excellent food. Rich- 
boro, Pa. Phone ELmwood 17-7878. 


ROOM and BOARD for elderly people 
Flushing. N. Y. vice. Tray service op- 
tiona). Garden and T.¥V. pvigs. 
bet. 5 PM. and 9 P.M. FL 17-7304 


from 
best 
a . The 
57th, N.¥.C. CI 47-5420, 


heated, block YTréom “shoppifie “center” 
Quiet home, breakfast beverage. and 

refs.: prices reas. Claire Ed 
Osborne. 205 W 


British Isles—Africa 
Continental Europe 


Australia—New Zealand 


ing an subjects of factual.and-educa- » 
STORES TO LET 


_FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS 
TWO. CARAVANS for sale on small sue 


ROOMS AND BOARD 


trona! value pertaining to art, music 
archaeology. business, manufacturing 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.—Fxceptionalivy fine 
store in Harvard Square. Approximately 


and agriculture, etc. Use wire-recorder 
for in-the-fleld interviewing. Address 

800 sq. ft. floor space. Ideal for cloth- 
specialty lines, or offices. Owner 


replies to: Cyril E. CaMiere. 1535 Eas: 

98th Street, Seattie 16, Washington 
8381 install air-conditioning. Call ex- 
clusive agents: Ellis and Andrews, 4 


KE 
Brattle Street. Cambridge. KI 7-8586. 


ADMINISTRATOR 


Individual with broad civilian musica! 


perior camp. Bournemouth, Christe 
church area. Ideal family week-ends 
and holidays, or as residence for one 
or two persons. CSM K-839, 163,/4, 
Strand. Lendon, W.C 2. 


ORGANISTS WANTED 


WILD ACRE INN 
LEXINGTON, MASS. 
Rooms With meals by week. Pleasant 
country surroundings. Tel. VO 2-9624. 


ARLINGTON, MASS.—Exceptional, home- 
like. single rooms. Home-cooked meals 
Near 2 bus lines. MI 3-2973 


staff experience desires posi- 
tion, preferably with organrmation en- 
gaged in musical activity or operating 


ana army 
PUBLIC NOTICES 


~~ 


\profecsronal references 
iway 8t.. 


in support of the musical profession. Cul- 
tural background jncudes extended resi- 
dence abroad and world travel. Superior 
Box J-38, 1 Nor- 
Boston, Mass 


ATTENDANT. COMPANION, VALET, 
CHAUFFEUR Best of references 
Single. Write to BOX C-13, One Norway 
Street. Boston 15, Mass 


SITUATIONS WANTED 
WOMEN 


MANUSCRIPT TYPING 
Anyone in Boston area writing «a 
Retired secretary, Magazine writer, 
es manuscript typing to do at home 
Write Beth Roberts, 183 Beacon 8St.. Bos 
ton 16. Mass., or ph. ‘chancy) CI 77-9467 


COMPANION, Mother's Helper or Prac. 
Nurse— Will'e to give lov. serv. in home 
by day or week. Phila. area, Box F-5 
2618 Lewis Tower. 


NURSE AVAILABLE—Well trained. cap- 
able. Call after 4 P.M. T 
New York City 


PART TIME genera! office menos 
edge shorthand. Midtown. N.Y 
B-1, 588 5th Ave.. New York 36. N. Y. 


Fine selling exp. Ref. furn. 


Box L-8, 
2618 Lewis Tower, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 


iwill be received at 
of 
i\Tenth Floo: 
iMassachusett 
Standard 


Philadelphia 2, Pa. 
igeneral bids 


E 8-357 ‘ry Bub-bidse for work listed 


~know!- | 
Cc. Box: 


RECEPTIONIST—Knhowledge office work. '™ 


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF 
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 
Sealed proposals for Mass. State Project 
No. H-706. Fireproofing, Rutland State 
Sanatorium Rutiand, Massachusetts 
the office of Division 
Construction. Room 1002 
38 Chauncy Street. Boston 
until 2:00 P.M., Fastern 
Time ‘Note: Eastern. Davlight 
Time while officially in force in the Com- 
monwealth:. Februers 27, 1958. and the 
in seid office publicly opened and read 

aloud. 

The bidding documents may be ex- 
imined at the oMice of the Division am 
copies obtained by depositing a certified 
check in the sum of $10.00, payable to 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Re- 
fund will be made to those returning the 
Jocuiments in satisfactory condition 
within forty-five days after opening of 
otherwise the deposit shal) 
of the Commonwealth. 
in Item 2 of 
the proposal form shall be filed with this 
Divisién before twelve @eloek noon, 
Eastern Standard Time. ‘Note: Eastern) 
Yaylight Time while officially in force! 
the Commonweelth:, February | 21,/ 
1958, and then publicly opened 


Building 


be the properts 


certified 


anl read 


General bids must be accompanied by 
h 


aunt 1005 or a check on, or a 


TEMPORARY TYPING, statist. Compltg.. treasurer's or cashier's check issued 


research, ete. Educ es mature. by, a respomsible bank or trust company! 
Box B-2. 588 Sth Ave.. N. Y. 36, N. ¥. chusetts, in the amount of $3,800.00 


WOMAN—Cook, general housework. City 9U>-bids must be accompanied by similar 


~ form of security in the amount stipu-' 
or country or will locate out-of New) , 
York City. UN 4-4839 (N.Y.C.). lated in Section 1. Supplementary Gen-. 


jeral Conditions. No other form of bid 
security Will be accepted. — 

All bids for this project are subject to 
ithe provisions of Genrral Laws ‘Ter.| 
Ed.' Chapter 149. Sections 44A to 44L, 
inclusive, as amended or inserted by, 
\Shapter. 678. Acts of 1956. Attention is. 
jcalled to the minimum wage rates to 
jpaid on the work as determined by the! 
‘Commissioner of Labor and Industries 
‘under the provisions of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws,- Chapter 148, Sec- 
‘tions 26 to 27D inclusive. 

The right is reserved to waive any in- 


West Berlin Reports 
East Germans’ Flight 
: by Reuters 
Berlin 


West Berlin city officials have 
announced that 10,513 youths, 


‘including 1,227 under 14, fled formalities in or to reject any or ail bids 


to West Berlin from Communist | DIVISION OF 


East Germany in 1957, | HALL NICHOLS, Director 


? 


ed BV CONSTRUCTION 
y 


ORGANIST REQUIRED-—Small Church, 
Mason and Hamlin organ. Write: T 
Music Committee, Pirst Church 
Christ, Scientist, Walton and Weye 

idge, 70, Oatlands Drive, Weybridge, 
rrey 


ROOMS WANTED 


WIDOW REQUIRES UNFURN. ROOM, 
with kitchenette or cooking facilities 
and use of bathroom, etc., at reason. 
able rent. in Southend-on-Sea. , 
clift, Leigh-on-Sea, Hadleigh or Raye 
leigh, or in that area, near Christiag 
Science Church ‘CSM K-835, 4 
Strand. London, W.C.2 


BROOKLINE, MASS.—Comfortable living 
active retired, single or double. Excel- 
lent food. LO 6-9895. 


BROOKLINE. MASS.—Pleas.. warm room. 
ist floor. Good meals and homey at- 
mosphere for elderly lady. LO 6-9608 


ROOMS TO LET 


CAMBRIDGE, MASS.—Beau' 
in priv. apt. Retired 
business man or 
transportation. Tel 


N.¥.C., 106 St.—Large rm., studio type 
view of Hudson River. priv. home. $45 
Business hours call CH 4-7841. N.Y.C. 
Early A.M., late P.M.. MO 2-5299. 


BOSTON, MASS. 
warm room for study. 
Telephone Cl 7-8351. 


BROOKLINE, MAS8.—Altractive. newly 
painted room. Modern furn.. privat 
home: nr. trans. Off Beacon. BE 2-7278 


CAMBRIDGE, MASS... 1679 Mass. Ave. 
S. 3.—Well furn. rms. for business o1 
college men. Conv. loc. TR 6-1935. 


BOOKS 


FREE: Complete unbound volumes and| 
single copies of. old Sentinels and 
Journals. Mrs; Gorden Smith,---Ledy, 
Lake, Florida. 


furn. rm 
gentieman  o1 
woman Near all 
UNiversity 4-5265 


Quiet 


Crossword Quiz Answers 
N80 8000 Oo0a8 


B000 GOOs cog 
Q00G gi0a gaa 
HGG8 8ea@o aao 


— 


14** 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY; JANUARY 31, 1958 


Real Estate—Building— 


Showdown With Peasants? 


Farm Socialization Tests 


By Paul Wohl 


Written for The Christian Science Monttor| 


Once again Soviet agriculture 
rather than industry may hold 
the key to the stability of the 


regime. 

Soviet industry is well on its 
way toward a more even devel- 
opment, Its technological feats 
are breathtaking, its costs de- 
Cc ; Mdgnhagement may be 
im 

S. Khrushchev’'s 
décentralization scheme. Plenty 
of bottlenecks remain, but there 
seem to be no basie questions 
in industry with which the re- 
gime cannot cope. 

It is different in agriculture. 
Here Communist-oriented state 
socialism is up against deep- 
seated obstacles. 

‘Fortresses of Socialism’ 


These obstacles have 
origin in three factors: 


1. The peasants’ reluctance 
to state-socialism. 


2:-Ctimate~-- and soil - 
still defy control. 


3. The bureaucracy’s 
of juggling statistics. 

Last year these obstacles as- 
sumed dramatic proportions. | 
This year the drama seems to, 
be approaching a climax. 


The first act of the drama was 
Mr. Khrushchev’s Jan. 22 speech 
in Minsk, envisaging collective | 
farms which themselves have | 
become “fortresses of socialism 
in the countryside” and -no 
longer need to function in the 
shadow of party and govern- 
ment-operated MTS (Machine | 
and Tractor Stations). The par- 
ty’s and government's appeal of | 


their 


which 


habit 


Jan. 21 to increase agricultural! | 
production in 1958 was part of | 


the build-up. 
Assault on Capitalism 
The issue at stake may not be 


as a result of Party | 


peasants. Under a convinced 
Communist regime such a policy 
could not last. Heartened by 
successes on the industrial front, 
the party under Mr. Khrushchev 
now has sought to overcome the 
peasants’ reluctance to socialism 
by assault. 

Socialization Stepped Up 

Last year the assault against 
capitalism in the countryside 
went into high gear. The party 
started to hollow out the peas- 
ants’ private homestead econo- 
mies, This last capitalist enclave 
in the Soviet Union’s state-so- 
cialist production system has 
| two assets: (1) the peasants’ ! 
to 1‘g-acre private plot, 


collective-farm peasants, 
|} counting for between one-third 
herd, 

| Thanks to the policy of com- 
| mercial incitement of the first 
years after Stalin’s passing, the 
peasants went al] out to increase 
their livestock. In four years 
their..large.cattle.increased..by 
about 25 per cent; their horses 


ants, and not the collectives, who 
| deserved most of the credit for | 


the greatly improved supply of | 


animal products. 


The livestock owned by 


' 


period. 


(and one-half of the totai Soviet | 


| mainly 
(2) the | far, 

privately owned livestock of the | tp; 
ac- | 


almost doubled. It was the peas- | 


collectives show a substantial 
increase. ) 

Last year this trend was re- 
versed. In the Russian Repub- 
lic alone the large horned cattle 
owned by collective and state 
farms suddenly increased by 14 
per cent between Oct. 1, 1956, 


“oe” 


--*- 


rushchev_ 


Dmitri N. Ivantsov of the eed 
versity of Moscow, in No. 3 of 
last year’s Journal of the Insti- 
tute for the Study of the U.S.S.R. | 
Professor Ivantsov, who has| 
made an extensive survey of | 
provincial publications, 
that-in the past two years at 


and 1957. What had happened | vate plots have been reduced in 
was that part of the privately | size by 20 to 30 per cent. 


owned cattle had been trans- | 
ferred to socialist ow nership. 
The socialization of privately | 
owned cattle is to be stepped up 
this year. 
appeal of Jan. 21 stated clearly: 


“The further expansion of live- | 


stock breeding must take place 
on collective and state 
farms, as practice has shown 
large-scale stock farming 
yields the best results in rapidly 
increasing 
(Actually the Soviet 


livestock statistics of 1957 shows 


that in the past four years live- | 


stock breeding progressed much 
faster in the peasants’ 
homestead economies 
the sociahst sector. 
Size Whittled 


Transfer of privately owned 


than in 


livestock to socialist ownership | 


is but one of several ways of 


| forcing the peasant on the road 


the | 
collective farms remained sta- | 


fem y or declined during this | 


to socialism. 


The party and state | 
| work 


marketable output.” | 
govern- | 
ment’s own 618-page digest of | 


private | 


| for the 


i 
! 
' which has succeeded in industry | 
as Com-| 
munists believe, must spell eco- | 


|} and 


The average size of his private | 


plot also is being whittled down 


Another means of drawing the 
| Peasants away from their pri- 
|vate homestead economies is 
‘the policy of economic induce- 
ments for more and better 
on the collective 


of commercial incitements of the 
Malenkovy era 
No one can know to-what ex- 


tent party and government may | 


be able to turn the thinking of 
the collective-farm peasant 
from private profit to whole- 
hearted recognition of 
leged advantages of working for 
a cooperative enterprise or for 
the state. 

Most Western obsery ers 
lieve that communism’s 
heart and’ mind” of the 
| peasant masses must fail. 
Mr. Khrushchev and his associ- 
ates do not see it that way. They 
earnestly hope to break down 
peasant resistance to a system 
which, 


as they 


nomic, technical, and ultimately 


moral progress. 


believes | | 


:  gecetes to The Christian Sctence Monitor 


farm | 
which has succeeded the policy | 


i financing 


'has compiled a 
the al-' P 


| corporated 
i make. 
be- | 


s struggle | 
But | 


Dutch Theater Still 


i 


| By H. G. Franks 


Special to The Christian Sctence Monttor | 


Amsterdam 


of real culture, generally 
_ fer the stage to the screen, 
'is shown by the fact that 


pre- 


in 


The Duteh people, as lovers | 


as 


(Only for hogs did the| This was brought out by Prof. 


Progress? 


1 how 
i when the war 


| gagement schedules covering pe- | 


riods of seven nights. 
Sponsored Showings 


In the larger towns 


an economic one, whatever the | the past 10 years the theatrical | are available in the usual way. 


Communists say. It rather 
pears to be a struggle for the | 


thinking of the collective-farm ' 
peasant, for his way of life, for | 


his table of values. 

Stalin started this struggle 30 | 
years ago. After his passing it 
entered into a new phase. 

Faced with a severe food | 


shortage in a stationary or ret | 


rograde agricultural economy, 
Stalin’s successors appealed to. 
the private self-interest of the 


IF IT CONCERNS 
MORTGAGES 


Phone, Write or Wire 


RICHTER & KAISER 


INCORPORATED 


164 Remsen Street (Bere Hail) 
Phone: MAin 5-2264 


BROOKLYN I, WN. Y. 


ap- | 


“first nights.” Of these, 68 plays | 
were by Dutch authors. 

Of all -Dutch playwrights, 
| Herman Heyermans is the most 
|, popular. His plays, most 
| which have a definite purpose 
/and were written in the early 
days of socialism, show what 
the experts call “a genuine sense 
of drama, honor, and sentiment, 
,coupled with a flawless tech- 
nique and attuned to the typical 
Dutch spirit of realism.” 

Such plays as “The Good 
Hope,” “Ghetto,” and “The Ris- 


| season in Holland has seen 457 | which means that box office tak- 


in the | 


ings are uncertain. But 


‘provincial towns the system is 


of | 


| 


/ing Sun,” which have been pro- | 
duced by such masters as Stani- | 


_Slavsky, Antoine, and Brahm 
and been performed in countries | 
| as far apart as the United States 


|, ambassadors for Dutch drama. 
The big companies, 


| 


usually employed by which! 
various associations, large busi- | 


ness-houses, art circles and even | depend, as before, only on com- | 
to a | parativ ely small municipal sub- | 

erally requires payments over a 
well-estab- | 
or 
, special 


high schools contribute 
total fee for a fixed number of 
subscription performances. 

This plan, in fact, has proved | 
so successful that in the past two | 
vears it has been introduced 
into some of the larger cities, 
such as Utrecht and Amsterdam. 
although the weekends are still | 
kept free for public perform- | 


LL ANCES. 


Such a system, of course, has | 


| its” defects. Not the least danger- | 
_and Japan, have been eloquent | ous of these is that the com- | 
panies have to give the customer } 


consisting |what he thinks he wants and | 


of a cast of anything up to 40,! not what they think he ought to 
|are the regular performers at / have. 


‘the theaters in their towns of | 
residence. For financial reasons 
| they often divide the company | 
bee two or more groups, each 


| 


During the war, a number of | 
actors and actresses who had 


Popular 


improve its 
was over. 
‘Arts Council’ Recommended 
The outcome of those studies 


to position 


| Was a clandestinely printed re- 


port 
tickets | 


'groep Puck, 


(in 
‘very small villages and others | 
180 open-atr’| 
the | 


cut themselves off from the stage | 


of which performs a different | 
| play in a different town on the | 


isame....night,..usually 


with....en-.| 


by their refusal 
with the Germans turned their 


attention to a study of the foun- | flying 24,325 miles nonstop in 45 | 
dations of the Dutch.theater and hours, 


to cooperate | 


which «suggested, 
other measures, 
companies would —have 
united in a_ national 
tion, all working with the assist- 
ance of an “arts council.” 

This plan has in many respects 
been put into operation, added 
| by a large state subsidy rathe: 
‘than the companies having to 


among 


to —be 


sidies. 

There are now 
‘lished theatrical companies all 
'over Holland, one of the most 
interesting being the Toneel- 
equivalent to 
Young Vic in England, in which 
only young actors and actresses 
participate. 

In addition there are about 
4000 amateur dramatic societies 
Holland, some of them in 


keep... going the 
(theaters dotted 
country. 


all over 


SAC Set World-Flight Record 
The United States Air Com- 
mand established the fastest 


round-the-world flight on rec- | 


ord in 1957 with three B-5?2 


19 minutes. 


secect WINTER REAL ESTATE vatues 


Read, Call and See 


BULLETIN for NEW ENGLAND 


Buy, Sell or Rent 


'a lender 
ia 


| designed 


that the various . 
organiza- | 


|comes to obtaining home loans 


the | 


| under 


-dication as to how: he will repay 


| Jender 


Careful Check 


On Home Loan 


Chicago 

Is your family one of the 
more than 2,000,000 in the, 
United States that will be seek- 
ing a home loan in 1958? 

If so, it cauld be helpful to, 
know what the typical home| 
institution believes) 
constitutes good loan.” 

Norman Strunk, executive 
vice-president of the United | 
States Savings & Loan League 
list of qualities 

Savings ahd loan! 

like to see in-! 
in the loans they | 


se 


that typical 
associations 


Your chances are two out of! 
five-thet-if-you-get-a@ toatl’ during | 
the next 12 months, you'll re- 
ceive it from a savings and loan 
association, since this type of in-_ 
stitution is furnishing about 40 
per cent of all home loans made |} 
today, 

Good Neighborhood Accented 

Here Mr. Strunk’s list of 


is 


| some of the things a lender con- | 
'siders in determining whether a’ 
‘loan is good or not 


Desirability of the property— | 
likes to have a loan on) 
reasonably new house in a} 
stable or appreciating neighbor- | 
hood, For a house to have a good 
resale value. it must be u ell- 
and attractive on both 
inside and the outside, and 
good access to transporta- 
schools, shopping, churches 
parks. and recreationa! facilities 
Job stability of borrowe: wall coverings, 
Persons with -good- employment Outside elements. 
records, especially in stable in- .-- 
dustries, rate high when it 


~~ 


the 
offe: 


10n, 


braced (2) horizontally and 
greater ‘strength from thick 
Insulation comes next (5), 
outdoors in winter and 


generally should 
than one-fourth—and pref 


Lenders enerally investigate TOT. , 
- 5° erably not more than one-fiith 
income for 


the background of persons with e 4] 
| } Lie] 
unstable employment _ records |‘ hei fo 
more thoroughly ;payments, taxes, and Insurance 
i : ‘a. ; ia rr . . 2 . 7 : nts ’ : Ow by at 
Financial responsibility of I he ' i see hag m ‘y “ye tM 
_ ‘ar . 5 tne DOTTrOWeT IS NOt loo IVOL\ 
borrower—as a home loan gen- “ saith Wie, P he , : 
in install nent aepot 


Equity of the borrower—As a 
general rule, lenders know that 
the larger the equity a borrowe! 
has in his home, 
loan is. This 1: 
courage as large 
ments as possible, 
prepayments ahea 
on the mortgage. The seine a 
jpore..expensive. a-home..is, 
more the borrower will be 
quired to have as a down 


rYy s rig . 
bi) i | apt 


ed 


long period of time—20 years 
more—the lender must take 
effort to make -certain 
the borrower has the ability and 
desire to repay. The record of a 
prospective borrower in repay- 
ing previously acquired debt: 
installment or charge 
count plans provides a good in- 


ac- 


a home mortgage. Thus his 
credit record is thoroughly ex- 
amined. : a a 
; i ba sf 

Debts Spotlighted | ans is a tough one,” said Mr 

Other debts of borrower—The Strunk. “Some loans which look 
likes to know that the -goed-at the outset turn-out bad, 
borrower is not stretching hi: while others that question- 
self or his budget too much to able initially prove be per- 
buy the -house or make the fectly good.” 
monthly payments. Families From the 


of making sound 


are 
to 
of 


point of view a 


What does a well-constructed wail look like? What are the 
necessary ingredients? The picture above is intended to show 
what it takes to keep out rain, snow, 
provide a hiding place for electric wires and insulation. The 
2-by-4 studs (1) are of well-seasoned lumber. Studs are sturdily 
(3) diagonally, 
(at least 
blocking the passage of heat to the 
into the 
such as brick -(6), 


or 


he : 


| 


| 
| 


at 
' 


> | 


Boston to View Push-Button K itchen 
Banker Cites 


New Devices 


To Eliminate 
Most Chores 


Ru the Real Eetate Editor of 
The Christian Science Monitor 


For the first time in New 


| England, the housewife’s idea of 


a push-button kitchen will be 
seen at the 1958 New England 
Home Show in Mechanics Build- 
ing, Boston, Feb. 14-19. 

This is an actual preview of 
the kitchen of the future which 
eliminates kitchen chores and 
places all tasks on a push-but- 
ton control basis. 

Following its showing at the 
1958 Home Show, the kitchen, 
created by development engi- 
neers of the Radio Corporation 
of America, will be flown direct 


“| to the. International-Trade~ Fair 


_ United States exhibit. 
| temporary 
| standing 


l'contrasting colors 


_a hand, 


dirt, and vermin, and to 


get even 
(4). 


and they 
4,-inch) sheathing 


indoors in summer. Exterior 
protect the walls from the 


institution a 


eventu- 


wee loan 
good joan is one that is 
ally paid off, and a bad loan one 
which has to be foreclosed. Some 
loans” which pose —cotiection 
prob but eventually work 
| belong in the “in between” 


category, 


len 


out, 


Chemical Melts Snow. 


Spares Grass, Shrubs 
By t ated Press 

Highland Park, 

Ice on drivev 


elted witl 


ne Assoc 
Hl. 
side- 
anew 
ical product called Ice-Foe. 
It does not harm grass, shrubs, 
other plant life, says its de- 
loper in Highland Park. 
The firm vs Ice-Foe has 
up to 30 tin greater thawing 
ability than a 
stroyer, and dissolves com- 
pletely without leaving any 
messy residue to be tracked in- 
side the house. 


ays and 


waiks can be} 


cher 


ve 
oa 
es 
on 14 
wait, 
+ 
at 


| foods 


plant de-., 


in Milan, Italy, as part of the 
glance, this kitchen 
attractive con- 
room, The _ § freee 
cabinets are of rose- 
with panels in 


first 
like any 


At 
looks 


wood, sparked 


The floor is kept 
mobile floor 


functions auto- 


kitchen 
spotless by 
cleaner which 
matically. 
Cabinets open with a wave of 
pots and pans are auto- 
matically cleaned and _ stored, 
are cooked electronically, 
recipes are projected in color on 
the wall, and a seif-cleaning and 
mixing unit drops from a wall 
cabinet for mixing, blending, 
grinding, and shredding foods. 
With a jerk of a finger, a re- 
frigerator._moves—down from a. 
wall cabinet to a convenient 
level 
Other operations which take 
place automatically include food 
storage shelves that are lowered 
from wall cabinets to a level 
just a few inches above the 
countertop, a utensil storage 
drawer that glides open, a drop- 
down storage rack for glasses, 
and a wide range of self-clean- 
ing, automatic cooking facilities. 
A menu selection control at 


the planning center will! activate 


a completely automatic meal 
maker which moves selected 
prepared foods from cold storage 
to special compartments for 
cooling, warming, or cooking. 

Most of the innovations that 
will be demonstrated daily dur- 
ing the Home Show re still 
some years away from produc- 
tion, but all are within the range 
of laboratory research. Whether 
these appliances will be mass- 
produced will depend consider- 
ably on the reactions of house- 
wives who see the kitchen. 

in--addition to this unusual 
kitchen, every type of home ma- 
terial, equipment, appliances, 
and ideas will be shown at the 
show. 


emote mee 


-A-COAST TO COAST REAL ESTATE DIRECTORY 


‘California 


(Continued) 


i inti 


‘Atabama 


; 
| WAAR AFAAMN AAA we wren nn” ee ee ee 


BIRMINGHAM—506 N. 21st Street 
BUTLER REAL ESTATE & INSUR. CO. 
Rentals Sales Insurance 
Bir mugen 901 Brown Mare Bidg. 

ED &. MOORE, In 
NOTHING BUT INSUR ANCE 


| CORONADO—Across Bay from San Diego 
STRAND REALTY COMPANY 
1114 Orange Ave. Louis Millen, Pres. 


| T.-M. Holcombe; Realtor 


223 N. Hartz Ave.. Danville. Calf 


+ Becton | 
LOCATION | eam tee | 


DESCRIPTION 


| PRICE | 


FOR INSPECTION CALL 


; 


| yr.-old 


tillable, 


ture th 


| And 100 acres. 
| lawn shaded by a beautiful ma 


bath, furnace. 3 fireplaces. elec.: 
24x40 with cement floor and elec.: 2-deck henhouse 12x20; part 
to Village. 20 mins. 
at $6.700. some furni- 
Bargain Booklet Mailed Free. 


city advantages and industries. A * 


MODERNIZED CAPE CODDER | | 


home, renovated and m 


timber: 2 mi 


‘steal’ 


lots of growin 


rown in; part down. 


trout brook: glorious view of nearby mt 
le; outdoor fireplace; 
ernized, has 6 rms. and shower 

comb. woodshed and garage 


ran 
the i 


e 
$6,700 


to 


STROUT REALTY 
Centeecook. New Hampshire 


A. G. SYMONDS 


Phone: 15-24 


WAYLAND 


NEW 1-STORY — a 

simple and compact 
home. Excellent workmanship and 
good planning enhance its value. 
7 rooms, 2 baths, 2-car garage, 
on level acre with trees. Still pos- 
“~ible—vour- choice of decorations. 
Mid 20's. Call Mrs. Stella Meach- 
en, TW inbrook 4-1300 or Hilltop 


3-2426. 
WAYLAND: OFFICE 


WINCHESTER 


SPACIOUS 5-YEAR OLD GAR- 
RISON—flawless condition, Sit- 


FURNISHED HOUSE 


OWNER GOING TO EUROPE —fIor 6 
months. beginning April ist, will sub- 
let for $2256 per month their charm- 
ing chocolate brown authentic Cape 
Cod home nestied on a wooded hil)- 
side in @ quiet location. ret very con- 
venient. in Wellesley Hills. Mass. 6 
spacious rooms with many quality 
features Adults only xctusive 
Broker. 909 Great Plain Ave... Need- 
ham. HIlicrest -4-0505. 


ROOK, 


uated on a large, level, well- 


landscaped lot, this 7-room home 
has charm for the executive s fam- 
ily. The large fireplaced living 
room opens onto a secluded, 
screened porch; there is a family 
sized dining room, all-electric 
kitchen, mahogany - paneled den 
and powder room. Upstairs there 
are 3 twin bedrooms with ample 
closets and 2 colored-tile baths. A 
fireplaced playroom and 2-car 
garage complete the description of 
this home offered at $38,000. 
Please call WI 6-0172, WI 6-2845. 


WINCHESTER OFFICE 
WAYLAND, MASS ton Past 


WELLESLEY EXCLUSIVE 


e Ranch. 3 years old, custom 
bullt—iarge family kitehen includes 
modern appointments—3 bed- 
a 1's baths—unusual playroom 
with fireplace—oversized 2-car garage 
—step to inviting patio and garden 
from combination glassed and 
screened porch. 


Mrs. Olive F. Thornton 


REALTOR 


547 Washington &t.. Wellesley, Mass. 
CE 5-3812 TWinbrook 4-4885 


COUNTRY FLAVOR 


ON 16 ACRES 


et within commuting distance of 
oston. Weathered-shingle Cape fits 
naturally into this lovely setting. 6 
rooms, more unfinished. Excellent 
condition, and such extras as work- 
shop. sheep house. wood and too! shed, 
and. fenced garden. Price-~$21t:500:-~ 


2.2 
a%, 


REALTOR ~—C 


Routes 3A end 139, Mershtield, Mess. 
TEmple 4-6061 Scituete 397 


WELLESLEY—Dozens of excel. homes 
in the wanted $20-30,000 price range 
avail. Some new, some older. Mostiy 
Colonial, a few ranches. Now is the 
time for a really GOOD BUY. Call any- 
time for courteous, efficient service, 


WILLCOX REALTY 
3 Forest Street 
Wellesiey, Mass. 


CE 5-6886—Eves. CE 54-4763 


—~Reate 70. Bes 
Ad. (Opp. Red Coach Grill) TWinbreek 4-1300 
WABAN, MASS.—1631 Beacon Street 
Bigelow 4-8020 : 
WINCHESTER, MASS.—26 Church St. 


Winchester 6-4226. Eves.: W! 6-1033-8 
Wi 6-0202, Mi 68-4165 


James T. Trefvey 


REALTOR 


SCITUATE 


Pirst time offered. a delightful mod- 
ernised New England cottage. FHA 
By oll, 30 ft. fireplaced living room, 
fireplaced family kitchen, dining 
room, 5 bedrooms; combination storm 
and screens throughout. 2-car garage. 
Separate shop for the person who 
likes to “do it himself.” 2 acres of 
landscaped grounds, walk to schools, 
all for $22,900. 


Prouty Real Estate 


Q” Front S¢., Scituete, Mees. 


. $Cltwete 887 


FINE 
REAL ESTATE 
OFFERINGS 


Aczinitma 


~ 


| HINGHAM 


Brick End Cape —3 bedrooms 
2 fireplaces, 1's baths. Large 
combination breezeway ana 
2-car garage All in immaculate: 
condition Fine neighborhood 
$19,500. Call Dal MacGregor. 
HI 6-1893, Sunday and evenings 
COhasset 4-08603. 


OVERLOOKING A COUNTRY 
HILL TOP—ryet minutes to town, 
an especially well constructed 
and beautifully detailed new 
Ranch home. This well planned 
house has center-entrance hal! 
long fireplaced living room. ultra 
modern brick-walled kitchen 
dining room, 2 spacious bed- 
rooms, l', baths and garage 
Priced at $18 500 An unusually 
good value in the charming 
Bouth Shore town of Hingham 
Jalil D. G. Currier. HI 6-1893. 
Sunday and eves. HI 6-2103-M 


MEREDITH & GREW, inc. 


wien ‘McCRACKEN REALTY, 


1 Ress mc, etapa. coal 


NEW 
STROUT 
SPRING CATALOG 


JUST OUT! Mailed FREE! 
Farms, Homes, Businesses; Coast- 
to-Coast, 34 States, over 3,100 
properties described, bargains 
galore, many pictures: livestock, 
equipmt., crops, furnishings often 
included: many with low down 
payments, easy terms. 58 vears’ 
service. WORLD'S LARGEST! 
BUY, SAVE through STROUT 
REALTY, 810-HD Old South 
Bidg., Boston 8, Mass. 


| PHOTOGUIDES 


SEE 1000 HOMES IN 1 HOUR 


OPEN DAILY 9-5 


If you are interested in buy- 
ing, selling or renting a 
home or seeking specialized | 


Multiple Listing Service 
MARSH and RICE, Realtor 
14 CHURCH 8T , 
se est of 
+ DEdham 3-2300 


Real Estate services, 


Town & Country Homes 
COpley 7-1000 
hag 


Real Estete and Insurance 


CROW 3 Offices to Serve You 


Matin Office 


Arizona | 
Kampmeier- Loudermilk 


REALTORS 
10820 N. Swan TUCSON, ARIZ 


WOMES —-RARCHES—-1NCOME— INSURANCE 


Ssduev F. Cornelin 
MUKSE & CUKNELILS, MLAL 1UKS 
1314 N. Central Ave., Phoenix AL 8-1638 | 


Inc. 


FULLERTON 
Chapman Avenve Realtor 
14? Ww. Chapman—152? W. 


GLENDALE 


ROMES—INCOME—BUSINESS 
PROPERTY—INSURANCE 


D. T. KINGSBURY 


REALTOR 
$15 8. Verduge Bead 
x9 N. Bran 
1127 N. Pacifie — 


GLENDALE + REALTOR 
SAMPLE REALTY 


Commonwealth 


1629 East McDowell 
Phone ALpine 22-3451, Phoenix, Arzona 


MARIE A. GOODMON AM 56-3151 
68 E. Virginia, Phoenix 
Established 19487—Reliable 


MOVING and STORAGE—NATIONWIDE 
Lightning Meving & Warehouse Co. 
4lo East Jackson oenix 


DICK W. MARTIN, Realtor 
Preseett. Arirena 
information on homes, 
motels. businesses in beautiful ease n 
Arizona. Grand ali-year climate 
aust storms 


S186 
1168 


ci 2 
eS | 3- 
Cl 3.2196 


‘or ranches 


o Cl 2-4188 « CH 5-1437 


216 $. Glendele Ave. Eves Cl 4-1921 


RO} McK EF Clerus 4-3785 
134 N. Brand Bivd., Glendale 2. Calif. 


Ratt H. SELLERS, Realtor, Ins. 
Established 1911 in Giendora, Calif 
137 N. Michigan Ave. EDgewood 5-2153 


in Laegune Beach 


REAL 
ESTATE it's the BAILEY’S 
MART 3 6115. Coast Blvd. 4-6594 


m JOLLA, CALIFORNIA, CLASSIC 


} Beauty and dignity distinguish 
this Colonial home on 
our most admired ayenues 
Completely level and embrac- 
ing an enclosed patio of aun 
shine, flowers, Te 
charm. 3 bedrooms 
bathroom. Gracious 
and dining room 
dowed walls to patio. Artistic landscaping 
includes many fine and unusual pi 
specimens A rare opportunity to secure 
outstanding home. Price $49,500 


‘Hilda (. Barringer, Inc. 


R64 Prospect Street r. ©. Box 478 
La Jolla. California 


ED POST REALTY 
SETTER RESIDENCE PROPERTIES 
4457 Paims Circle. Scottsdale, Ariz. 


NELSON-RILEY | 
“REALTORS 


605 N. Alvernon, Tucson, Ariz. 


GREER NELSON 


California 


AGNEW REALTY CO 
REALTORS and INSURANCE 
Alameda, Calif. 1432 Park Street 
MAE M. OURY. Associate of 
BILL WILLIAMS, Realter 
S. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia 
-2144—E ves. Hillerest 7-9e90 
MARY HARRIS WATSON 
Realtor Insurer Est. Calif. 1918 
one TOrrey 7-2: 
9135 East Artesia Boulevard 
Belifiower, Calif. 


BERKELEY, CALIF. 
LOUIS B. SANDS, Reeltor 
American Trust Bidg. TH 3-055? 
SERKELEY, CALIF. 2916 Demingo 
TOBEY ROBERTSON 
With J. T. WARD, Realtor 
Hliome: LA 4-5875 Office: TH 5-602! 
ERRELEY, CALIF. 

LAURA SIZER with 


NORMA 1. STARR, Realtor 
TH &-5476 zone College Are. 


’ 
one oOo} 


Filllerest 7 


Come Live in Le Jolle 


TED JOYNER 


Realtor ond Insurance Broker 
1242 Prospect GL 4-0387 La Jolla 


RERKELEY 
CLAREMONT RE4: TY COMPANY 
Finer Homes 

4082 Claremont Ave. 


j 


OL t-s116 LA JOLL 4 


( 
Q 
ROBERT ‘aaa ? S. M. SIMMON DS 
267 ARLINGTON AVE. LA 6-5145 ; 2 atnnn ( 
BEVERLY HILLS 5 906 Prospect Gl. 4.6192 a 
LELAND P. REEDER CO. A 


"BEVERLY HILLS’ OLDEST REALTO 
9416 Santa Monica Bivd. CR 6- aan 


BEVERLY HILLS : 
WALLACE MOIR CO., 13@ EL CAMINO 
Real Estate—Luebsen—CR 1-521 


-Burlingame—San Mateo—Hillsborough 
H. Kent Atwater, Realtor 


i. Sat ey Ave., Burlingame, Calif. 
M , Broker Phene DI 38-3656 


) 
) 
j 
, 
, 


EDDY D. FIELD, Realtor 
REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 
29 Years Saine Location Specializing 
SALES. EXCHANGES, PROPERTY MGT 
Homes. Ranches, Income and Bus. Prop 
940 8, La Brea Ave., Los Angeles WE 6-515 


WESTCHESTER HOUSING CO. 


“One Good Investment ts equal to a life- 


just 


consult these pages. The 
advertisers welcome your 


TO BUY OR SELL fine homes 


inquiries. 


CAMBRIDGE and SL MONT PEARL MARVEL MARTIN, 


Che Ericksons 
The Friendly Realtors 


Citys, Town and Countr 
Westford. Mass. MYrtie 


flomes —_ ee fishing. 
— ok folder ith street map and prices. sa9q Ge. Western Ave. 


time of labor.’ 6808 La Tijera’ Boulevard. 
OR 868-5549, Los Angeles 4 California 


CAMBRIA-PINES-BY-THE-SEA 


Nine 
Castie at San Simeon. Half way betwe 
Los Angeles and San Francisco. Delight- 
ful climate. UmmsGrpassed scenic beauty 
“ean view iots 
nes. Send for 


“Service First” 
11229 Ventee Boulevard EX 7-07% 
s Angeies M4, Calif. 


KR. H. MARSDEN, RRALIUOK 


mes emoung the p 


os Angeles 43, > loteeeie 


MALIBU 


Realtor | | 


Box (7%, Cambria, VUaltt. RENTALS . | 
SALES 


Catifornia 


(Continued) 


‘California 


(Continued) 


| 
REALTY C0. ESC ae ye 


GATEWAY TO 
MERCED yosemite VaLiey 


MARY BRYANT, REALTOR 


3975 Yosemite Parkway 


esa) RAY SMITH CO., OAKLAND 


RA %-7458 


Real Estate—Insorance-Loans 
LY THLE V. SMITH, Realtor 
Author, Sole Distributor 
“Brass Tacks of Reali Estate Selling” 
6161 Moraga Ave. OLympie &-2471 


Fabulous Feother River 


ROBERT L. O'BRIEN 
REALTOR 


Ranches—Homes 
2345 Mitchell Avenue 


Oroville, California 


| 


WILDER REALTY 
HOMES—INCOME PROPERTIES 
Ti15's State Street Phene 2-1! 


Santa Barbara. Calif. 
EARL H. BIXBY 


238 E: Canon Perdido, Santa Barbara 
“X Marks the Spot Realter” 
Property Pictures Available Ph. 72-9508 


CENTRAL CALIFORNIA COAST 
wenn VALLEY tore gh 
TE M. HALL 


Cc. HA 80 
' 1545 PACIFIC AVE... SANTA crtz. CALIF, 
a eee atria aati Ath. Micron 


SEBASTOPOL 


Homes and Ranch Property 
50 Miles North ef San Francisce 
M. WOGMAN, ge 
152 Santa Resa Ave. . VA 8-21 


PALM DESERT—PALM SPRINGS 


HAL KAPP . TED SMITH 


Desert 
Firesiae ¢. 6113 — coe &-3600 


For Town and Country Properties 


W. H. VOORHIES 


3170 El Camino Real, Pale Alte 
DA 3-3134 


“~ friend of the Family” | 


PALOS VERDES ESTATES 
SMITH REALTY CO.—REALTORS 
412 Via Corta FRontier 5-294 


RANCHO SANTA FE, CALIF. 
QUIET HOME COMMUNITY 
Golf Course—Large Sites 
Louis BENN. P.O. Box 66 


REDLANDS, CAI “hated 
FOW 
REAL ESTATE "INST RANCE 


ee 
WILLIAM WILSON 


“Since 1487" 


@ REAL ESTATE 
@® LOANS 
@ INSURANCE 


40 North Garfield Ave. 


SY 3-8111 RY 1-696! 


PASADENA 


ant vie 


DESERT REAL ESTATE 


APARTMENTS FOR SALE. By RENT 
unfurn. Luxurious appointed 
ree desert living Bea autiful ernds 

Quiet atmos; Inspiring 


yhere 
Privacy: Located bet 


Ui 


trv Club are 

TED SMITH. 

7i-jll Mighway ttl, Rancho Mirage, 
Tel. Fairview 8-600 


Realtor—Exclusive Agent 
Calif 


Arthur Manuel 66 


“It is our belief that people wish 
te be served, rather than sold.” 
STete 4-8255 15472 Venture Bivd. 
Shermen Ocks, Californie 
SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 
OMES — LOTS 
' Residential | no Inceme” 


GOLDEN GATE REALTY CoO. 
108 BE. San Anselmo, Stockton GR 17-0203 


WM. H. McKAY, Realtor 
San Fernande Valier Preperties 
- Personalized Service 
with sincere effert 
13715 Berbank Bivd., Van Neva, Calif 
STate 2-9250 STaniey 3-2464 
IDEAL RETIREMENT 
New 2-bedroom home on view, ', acre 
Hardwood floors, fireplace, built-in range 
and oven. Fine district. $12,500, terms. 
JERRY SAMUELS 
S. Santa Fe, Vista, Calif. 
VISTA, CALIFORNIA 
Phenomenal Climate! Ha pier 
“VISTA ST 


n _ oe M. 
VISTA REALTY co 67 S&S. Santa Fe. 
Ranches—Homes—Grores 
ROYER'S 5 Offices to oerve VS a 
VISTA REALTY —*¢! Bust wa 
JOE LAIB SEZ: 
See Me for Vista Real Estat 
432 Ss. S. Santa Fe oe Satewes 
BAANEVe REALTOR 


TE 4-764! 
GILBER “By 8 


1410 Main Street, Walnut Creek, Caiif. 


CLARA KNAPP REAL ESTATE 
154 Elkhorn Rd. Ph. PArkway 23-1286 
Watsonville. California 


742 


: Sire. Gladys S&S. Wilsen 


NAPA VALLEY 


HOMES—FARMS—INCOME 


St. Helena 


Since 1875 
PERCY H,.. GOODWIN CO, 
Suite 300, First National Building 
San Diego's Oldest and Largest 
Real Estate and Insurance Service 


SAN FRANCISCO 


BLADE REALTY CO. | 


REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 
699 Portola Drive 
Sfabright 1-402) Dewey W. Blade 


486 Huntington Dr., 


SAN MARINO—ARCADIA 
THOMAS CO., REAL ESTATE 
San Marine, Calif 
AT 17-9687 Day er Night 

One of the Oldest 


SAN MARINO—ARCADIA 
HITCHCOCK REALTY CO, 
AT 9-784 HI 6-4656 


RICHARD A. COLLINS 


Real Estate Buildin caren 
1151 West Ith S¢.. 
Kimberley 2- see 


Properties, Large or Small 
But Always Distinctive 
Sears -HRealty Co. 


miles south of famous Mearet ROBERT WALTERS, REALTOR Studio F, El Paso, 817 Anacapa St, 
Tel. 


3181 Santa Barbara, Calif. 


K 
Lymeuth 6-1435. 107R State Street 


JOHN H. MARWEDE 
EALTOR 


Phone WO 77-0879 
Santa Barbara, Calif. 


KREBAUM & KREBALM | 


al Estate and Insurance 


715 Hunt Ave. | 


Colorado 


Call Maxine Mechem of 
MONTE CARROLL & CO. 
Dependable Real Estate Service 
FL 5-163! 261 Filmore, Denver. Cole, 


Choice Rentals—Properties fer Sale 
CHARLOTTE 8. BROOMAL =" peers 


2266 Se. Grant, Denver, Colo. P i-186e 


Connecticut 
DUNLAP & BULKLEY, Inc. - 


ealtoer — Insurors 

rhoroughliy covering the saan line from 
New. Haven,.Conn. to the Conn. River 
and adjoining inland villages. Unusual 
Mferings of waterfront homes, village. 
homes, farms and estates. Prices range 
from $10,000 to $125,000. Descriptive bree 
chures on request. j 

DUN LAP & BULKLEY, Inc. 


Clinten, Connecticut 


3 Clara M. Earl Assoc. 


—— REALTORS — 
= FREDERICK MILES 
DOUGLAS ASCHE 
1070 _ Reed, Darien, Conn, 
OLiver 5.9786 


THE ORIGINAL 


WHEELER 


REAL ESTATE EST. 1927 
1066 Post Road Opp. Darien Theatre 
DARIEN, CONN. OLIVER 5-1418 


hone 5-5178 Post Road, 


REED G. HAVILAND. REALTOR. 
ED G. HAVILAND, oREALTOR © 
Dar 5-1448 


Buy Savings Bonds 


A Geed Investment. 


Re 
112? Santa Barbara St. 


i a ssoci 
Bert Elser and Associates SANTA BARBARA, CALIF. 


23829 Malibu Road GLobe 6-2034. | 


ARE 
0p DUDLEY & BORLAND 


$2440 ESTABLISHED OVER 30° YEARS. 


Sa 


Rees i 


Real Estate—Bullding 


* ~ 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MON ITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1908 


Real Estate—Building 


** 


~ Iwo Builders Invest in Urban Future by Renewing Vast Slum Areas 


Newly elected president of 


Association of Home Builders Nels G. Severin 
(left) and retiring president George S. Good- | 


the National year (right) 


New World of Homes 


Spotlighted in Chicago 


By a Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Chicago 


wonderful 
built and 


It was a 
world of homes 
equipped to save labor, provide | 
comfort, delight the eye, and 
promote safety that were shown 
in the 781 exhibits at the Na- 
tional Association of Home 
Builders Exposition. | 

The displays overflowed the 
exhibit space of two conven- 
tion hotels and spilled into 
the Coliseum some _ distance 
away. 

Many of these new products 
were built-ins—ovens, cabinets 
and snack bars. Others were 
part of structural features, such 
as sliding glass doors, alumi- 
num window frames that per- 
mit windows to be washed from | 
the indoors, and colorful ce- 
ramic hardware. Some were mo- 
bile units. There was one kitch- | 
€n designed to be picked up as 
a package and taken along 
when the owner moves to a new 
home. 

There was’ also a_ portable 
kitchen cabinet that slides from 
kitchen to patio for use in pre-| 
paring outdoor meals. 

For the kitchen (most favored 
room) there were improvements 
like these: a drawer-type sur- 
face cooking unit which re- 
tracts when not in use; a split- 
level oven, with a flat oven for 
pastries under the roasting 
oven; a push-button — electric 
can opener (no hands); and a’ 
range ventilating hood- with} 
built-in radio. | 


| dinner. 


ito 


' walls. 


, with perforated border to diffuse | 
new/slight 


from fiuorescent tubes 
surrounding the glass; 
drier to keep wet nylons and 


other nightly washings out of 


| sight until they are ready to put 
‘away: 


and a wall-hung resi- 
dential toilet that does not touch 


| the floor, permitting easy clean- | 


ing at the base. 

Other exhibits were 
savers. “Intercom” Systems 
permit. mother (upstairs) 


labor 
to 
to 


speak to whoever rings the door- | 


bell to call the family to 
One “intercom” system 
has a master control tucked into 
the ventilating hood of the 
range. 

One company showed a master 
control switch that turns out 
any light in the house or ali at 
once. Another offered automatic 
switches to allow for turning 
lights and appliances on or off 
at various preselected times. 


or 


Most important were the ex-' 
‘hibits 


portraying economies or 
improvements in construction. 
Some of these were: 
A small extension platform 
support kitchen’ cabinets 
while they are being affixed to 
(Eliminates need for 
helper on the job.) 

New types of forms to speed 
the work of laying concrete. One 
type was a fiber form that is 
shipped flat and opened for use. 
Another was a horizontal form 


iwhich allows footing and foun- 


dation to be poured at one time. 
Giant-sized shingles to reduce 


a clothes | 


take time out at Chicago con- 
vention to welcome “Mrs. America” of 1958— 
Linwood Findley of Arlington, Va. 


= 
Florida House Lot 
- Setas Show Prize 


Spectal to The Christian Science Monitor 
Boston 


Some New Englander is go- 
ing to become a property 
owner in Florida by visiting 
the coming New England 
Home Show in Mechanics 
Building, Boston, Feb. 14. A 
$1,500 house lot at Vero Trop- 
ical Gardens in Vero Beach, 
Flia., will be given to some 
prize winner. 

Vero Beach is on the east 
coast of Florida, located 120 
miles north of-Miami and 227 
miles south of Jacksonville. 
It is the county seat for In- 
dian River County which is 
famed for its orange and 
grapefruit groves. The lot will 
be one of many prizes. to be 
awarded during the 1958 show, 
including a $16,500 Hodgson 
, house. 


S | able—this 
' cities.” 


Chicago Convention 


Told of Opportunity 


By Dorothea Kahn Jaffe 
Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Turning their backs on the suburbs, 


Chicago 
some top American 


builders are finding exciting opportunities for private hous- 
ing ventures right in the deteriorating centers of big cities. 
They are replanning and rebuilding vast slum areas, 

Two of these builders reported their experiences to the | 
National Association of Home Builders in Chicago, Some 
30,000 builders were told that in the last-year or so-changes 


in FHA mortgage rules and liberalized lending for 


urban 


renewal (Section 220) have made it possible for builders to 


make over 


city areas on a sound business basis, 


In short. 


there Is money as well as opportunity for civic service in 
|}such enterprises. 
“It is marvelously stimulating and I hope in the end profit- 


making over 
said Herbert S. Green- 


_wald of Chicago. who has car- 


| projects 
| Detroit. and Newark, N.J. He‘ a 


poke of urban renewal as a| Said he expects Section = to 
Mun |} 


‘ried: out large-scale renewal | 
in New York City, 


Ss 


'great adventure. 


‘urban renewal, 


Kits Supplied 


five years you 
he urged. 


“In the next 
should all get into it,” 
George N. Seltzer, 
of the NAHB 
added that there 


| was opportunity here for small 
as well as big operators. 


i 
} 
| 


|ties in this new field. When all| conditioned apartments and in- 
late-comefrs | clude 


as Mr. Greenwald and 
H. Kitchen of Kansas 
City, Mo., 
cussed the tremendous possibilli- 


seats were taken, 


'sat on the floor. All were sup- 
plied with kits full of practical ' 
‘information and concrete ex-' 


' amples 


with fitting frames, to eliminate | 


the work of trimming to get a 
good fit. 
| A new insulation board, pre- 
scored and marked to facilitate 
in-place measurement. 

Two manufacturers showed 
radically different types of 
house construction, both using 
the sphere instead of the rec- 
tangle as the basis of construc- 
tion. 

One house was of wood and 
panel material while the other 
was of aluminum and a vinyl 
and nylon fabric. The former 
was developed and licensed by 
Buckminster Fuller. The latter 


the United States Marine Corps, 
which regards it, because of its 


as useful for emer- 


Was developed with the aid of | 


of how 
renewal financing. 

“There is challenge and ex- 
citement in this Kind of build- 
ing,” said Mr, Greenwald. “You 


of & 


i 
| 


try. 
| 1950 
, however. 
chairman | 


] 
| 
' 


committee on) 


j 


| Kitchen 


along with housing | 


'officials from Washington, dis- | 


'dreds of millions of dollars 


i pied 
' The audience gave close at- | P 
' 

' tention 
| Lewis 


people to the idea that tall 
buildings had their advantages. 

Mr: Kitchen, who redévéloped 
Quality Hill in Kansas City, Mo., 
$6,300,000 renewal project, 
invite the investment of 
in 
urban renewal across the coun- 
He financed Quality Hill in 

without this provision, 


Because of its 
cation, a short walking distance 
from the business district, the 
hill has been 98 per cent occu- 
since 1951 and was 100 
per cent filled last year. Mr. 
is enthusiastic about 
possibilities in this field. He told 
of liis plans for another rede- 
velopment project in Kansas 
City which will feature air- 


homes for 1,000 persons 
and a $1,500,000 motel. 
Reports to the convention 


confirmed the optimism of these 


to get urban | 


| completed 
| with 15,000 more under way. 


take large tracts laid out when | 
people were driving horses and | 


you 
for today but for 50 years in the 
future. After all, 


ing sacred about the ancient 


make them over not only! 


there is noth-'| 


gridiron pattern, You are going | 


to have to give up acres of 


streets for acres of parks if you | 


intend to return people to the 
cities.” 


Missouri Project Cited 

his 
for tall buildings so that plenty 
of space is 
grass. 


in Detroit, whic’ 


| president, 
kind of planning calls) 
the home-building vear 
left for trees and’ 
Mr. Greenwald said that); industrial plant expansion. This | 
1 Is not accus-| 


builders regarding renewal proj- 
ects. Already 5,000 rental units 
and 1,500 sales units have been 
under Section 220, 
An 


excellent lo- | 


additional 30,000 units have been | 


certified. 


Actually, all information 


brought to the session pointed to | 
a bright future for this kind of | 


building. In the general busi- 
ness field, enthusiasm was more 
restrained. Tightness in the 
mortgage market dvring the last 
year has caused considerable 
concern. 

George S. Goodyear, retiring 
said he thought there 
would be some improvement in 
ahead 


due to he current slowdown in| 


would result, he thought, in 


_tomed to high apartment build- | fall-off in demand for loans from 


> ; 


This prefabricated 1958 Harnischfeger home 
was displayed at Chicago convention of the 
National Association of Home Builders. It was | 


| 


assembled and fully landscaped on the Conrad- 
Hilton Hotel’s automobile parking lot in a few 
days instead of the usual weeks. 


Builders Jogged on Homes for Aged 


By the Associated Press 


Chicago 

A government housing official 
told the nation’s home builders 
here that they- are faced with a 
relatively untapped market in 
providing suitable homes for the 
elderly. 

Jack Ashley, 
tistical reports 


director of sta- 
and development 


branch, Housing and 
Finance Agency, Washington, 
said older persons are in a 


special position regarding their 


Home ! 


abdtity’to- make the down pay- 


ment and monthly payments. 
By 1978 the number of elderly 
persons will swell to nearly 
million, or roughly one of every 
10 in the population, he said. 


Kitchen—showplace of the 


modern house—has 


Although their incomes are 
small from pensions and parte 
time work and other sources, 
their average net worth of 


_ $8,400 is more than double the 


average of families of all ages. 


22 | 


In 1950, statistics showed that 
68 per cent of households headed 
by a person 65 or older owned 
their own homes. However, 
nearly 40 per cent of them still 
lived in homes of six or more 
rooms, despite the fact their 


| children had moved away. 


rangements,” 


“It is quite clear that many 
of the elderly are dissatisfied 
with their present living are 
Mr. Ashley said; 


ik | ‘They would like to make a 


'sized homes. 


change. Some do nothing be- 
cause they can find nothing that 
meets their needs. Others re- 
main where they are because 


they don’t know where to look.” 


By disposing of. their. over- 
he said, many of 


the elderly could realize enough 


to make substantial down pay- 
.ments on a suitable new home 


‘and trim their monthly pay- 


ments to a level in keeping with 


their reduced income. He added: 
“What you have is a group of 


| people with modest incomes, but 


well-designed (homes 


generally with some _ equity 
money, who are in need of small, 
in the 
moderately priced class. In gen- 


eral, you will find that they are 
looking for a house on one floor, 


f}not more than two bedrooms, 


and ample storage space. They 
want a home located not far 


* from stores and other commu- 


a buiit- in 


oven, built-in rotisserie, chrome-finished interior, lift-off door, 
and fully automatic eontrols, There is no bending and few steps 


nity services, and in an area in 
which residents are not all of 


their own age group.” 


ff} substantial number” 


He said, however, that “a very 
of elderly 
) persons are physically or -eco< 
nomically unable to cope with 
‘the problems of home owner- 
| Ship. They need self-sustained 


| lightness, 
gency housing. 


For the bathroom: a bathtub | time required to side a house. 
with nonskid surface; a selitnet | Ready-hung doors, equipped 


‘ings, it took some selling to win | industry. to reach various shelves, stove, and built-in food freezer. ‘rental housing, he added, 


ST 


A COAST TO COAST REAL ESTATE DIRECTORY 
Michigan 


(Continued) 


Washingt 


(Continued) 


‘MILDRED ENGEL 


i 
-|= 4682, F1.1100 6632 50th 


GEO. P. BAKER REALTY 


A311 .W...MeGraw,.Seatile 90... -GA..1608 .. 


BUYING, SELLING, TRADING or TENTING 


See ERNIE SWANSON —.. 
Alvin J. Welff Ce., Ine. 
11305 E. Sprague SPOKANE 63, an WAeR. 
WA 6-9521 Eve. WA 6-75796 


West Virginia 


Complete Real Estate Service 
BELLE CALDWELL, Realter 
218 4th St.. Parkersburg HU 5-444 


Oregon 


(Continued) 


SIDNEY L. THOMPSON, 
Business and oe 
Fire and Aute. Insur. 

Irving, Portland 13, 4 “CA on 8188 


_.. | WELSON and NELSON, ‘Realiors 


10 Bank Street, Summit 
Real Estate — Insurance — Rentals 
All Multiple and Builders’ sicierta | 1590 S. Commercial St. Salem. Ore. 
BUTLER AGENCY, REALTORS 
Phone CRestview-3-9700 Anytime AL ISAAK & CO... Realter 
7 De Forest, Summit. (Premise Parking) “We Trade Anywhere” 


WESTFIELD. N. J. 322 Nerth Church. Salem, Oregon 


s ; ; NS . 

Would you like an illustrated bro- ee CORDOVA STEPHENSON with 
aa vill . ant ca Ted Morrison, Real Estate 

chure covering Westfield, Fanwood, °60 N. High Salem GQeasen 

Mountainside and Scotch Plains? “ ~etete & - : x 


Just send a post card to | 
MANCY_F._ SEY NOLES | Pennsylvania _ e 

R. ROSS COLLINS 4 

J HAVERFO § 


202 East Broad Street Westfield, N. J. 
ORD, PA. | 2- 
SUBURBAN PHILA. (MAIN (ime 


Phone: ADams 27-6300 
Westfield Multiple Listing System 

|MAIN LINE Suburban| 

Philadeiphia| 


New Jersey 


(Continued) 


HUGH K. NICOLLS. REALTOR | ‘ A. S ANDERSON 
ase es Estate Service—Property Me REALTORS—INSURANCE 
W: Kelamacoe Fi 3-1607, £-3472 443 Springfield Ave., Summit “CR 3-8400 | 


LEE L. OMER- & CO., REALTORS | THE STAFFORD AGENCY | 


Owesse, Michigan Phene SA 56-8198. REALTORS ~« ~ “wer yg a 


Kansas 


(Continued) 


Realtor 


DON DAVIS, Reeltor 
ona 


; 
Able to serve you well. 
346 Coronado Pi, Wichita & ; 480 


Louisiana © | 
LET US SERVE YOU 


BATT & MILLER 
REALTORS 
942 No. Rampart New Orleans 


~- 


yh op 
SEALTY 
50th .N_E.., 


Minnesota | 
'MINNEAPOLIS’ LARGEST HOME SELLERS 


4 Offices-;70 Selesmen 

5 ‘Hundreds of carefully appraised homes 
and other ‘ype eS -. real estate available 

lin all areas. and VA Home Loans 


THE SPRING CO., Realtors | 


43rd and Upten Ave., Se. WA 46-2761 | 
3Ra een Ave. Ne. JA 9-9204 

5309 Chicago Ave. TA 737-3733 | 
4789 Sheridan Ave. Se. WA 7-860! 


THE RECOGNIZED SPECIALISTS 


iin ‘better’? homes in all the better Min 


MRS, GERTRUDE GARDNER, Inc., Realter 
7934 Maple St., New Orleans Walnut 680 
Real Fstate nsurance 


Wisconsin 
THE PAUL E. STARK CO. _ 


EALTO 
Soles @ City and Farm e@ Rentals 
| Property Management @ Insurance 
‘Bank of Madison Bidg. . W. Main Street 
‘Madison, Wisconsin Tele. 6-013 


Sundays by Appointment 


Homes 


REAL ESTATE MERION, PA. 
irene oer PA. and 


Australia 
Vietoria 


VAL D. STEWART Pty. Ltd. RES 
All Real Estate — Insure 
76 Clayten Read, Clayten __0 161 


KENNETH HUME, U 
AUSTRALIA offers ey  « MEE 
[sites 23 Warrigal Rd., Oakleigh, Victoria. 


Canada 


British Columbia 
MRtheoberto Ltd, — 


330 Burrard St., Vancouver, —" ma 6431 
Leading Realtors Since 


industrial——Comm AE can 
OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 


New Zealand 


S. GEORGE NATHAN & CO., LTD. | 
Real Estate Agents 
4 Willis Street, Wellington 


| Chicega:: 
Realtor.. receives 


Excellent Results from 
Monitor Advertising 


NOYES 
INSURANCE 
Swarthmere, Pa. 


Nevada 


Nev. 


| 
' 


New Hampshire 
SHADES OF OUR ANCESTORS 


Texas 
STEW ART & STEWART 


-ALTORS 
ano N. ON Corpus Christi, 


WI N N G Associates | 


JA 6-1691 
Real Estate—Insurance 

301 Westheimer, Houston 
Multiple Listing Service 

| BUDDY HUGHES REALTORS 


27233 34th Street SH 4-2373 
LUBBOCK, TEX AS 


ALAMO HEIGHTS REALTY, Realter 
North Side Properti¢es 
8946 Broadway San Antonio 


—_~ 


. Indiana 


Speciolists in Sales, Management, 
Appraisals ond General Insurance 


WELLER Uk ERAN we 


208 N. Delaware, Indianapolis 


r e. €. minney 


FL 7-8339 Indianapolis FL 7-3247 
HAYNES REALTY SERVICE 


There Is a Difference in Service 
2020 E. 46th St., Indianapolis 5 CL 1-2223 
GARNETT RAY 
‘Assoc. with A. H. M. Graves; Inc. AT 3-7303 
5948 Me ek ‘avenue Indianapolis, Ind. 


Texas 


% 
Connecticut Florida 
(Continued) (Continued) 
™M 1 THE - 
CENTRAL FLORIDA, With our kng = BOISE REALTOR Dial any time 2-4930) 
perience in handling Florida rey! e 
tate, we are the avenue through which | 
Tilinois 
tell you about “Our Town” | and Margaret Morse, Reg. Broker, 1216! aia a 
| South Bay St., Eustis. Phone EL 7-4443. WM. Cc GROEBE R itor | 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET | FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA . , KEG | 
it, bu 
| you are interested in a Floride home with MAIN OFFICE:2057 W. 95th St. | | 
nx of the exclusive features found only , E ly 8-8100. 
expensive island homes, yan Chicago 43, Iilinois BEverly 
‘ \truly amazed ty Management 
1472 Post Rd., Darien OLiver 5- 2546 | scan Ganiniy ane aiae | 534 East ghat ‘st. Chicage BU 8.2200 
NOUR SPECIALTY” | Spacious one- or two-bedroom apart-|. TRACY W. CHAMPION & CO., Inc. | Maine 
‘and Cliff Lake. Swimming pool and large H. A, GIVEN, REALTOR 
irecreationa] area — convenient southeast ce N. GORHAM and SON, Inc. | 
PE nn. Breceg | eee, Sane ‘location. Prices begin at $9,800 with only, REALTORS and BUILDERS 
ee - o ~ 407 North Main Street, Decatur SO. HARPSWELL TErrace 3-2317 neapolis suburban and Lake Minneton ~ WESTFIELD 
CHOICE HOMES areas. Your needs will receive preferred M A MERCNER 
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. | _ A. 
tunities, bigg. sites. both city and shore. four own Real Estate Service: including REALTORS | Maryland | REES - THOMSON - SCROGGINS, Realtors 512 Dudley Ct.. 
ALLIED ASSOC! ATES TO SOLVE YOUR HOME PROBLEM | ~ iL 3-5681 5000 Wayzata Bivd., Mpls. 16 
488 Farmington Ave., Hartford, JA 3-0503 $11.875 up. Write G. 1364 Sherman Ave., Evanston, Ul. | SIGLER & MEGARY, Inc. : m 
cant Land Investment Department., P.C | New Yorks L 
|Price & Co., 2575 E. Sunrise Bivda., | a3 Vie. — Phila's finest suburban area. 
- . BAYSIDE, N.Y., and all points Lone 
Realtors—Insurors—Builders W. H. OAKLEY & COMPANY 
WOsTeee Tikes | CORAL RIDGE WATERFRONT, | “Gienview-Northbrock Northfield, | paston, Hon "4 BMStes a-s20a_| Brady Stevens Co. AL ae 
I e | : > ° —_ 
Member of New Canaan Real Estate Board with ‘ane view of busy ‘inter ta me Ray tn pag My —r—E—Errrrorrvrvei BUFFALO OR ITS SUBURBS? tt 
rch....Modern.built-in kitchen with land Phe TAlbeot 2.3456! 
island type range. Near shops and beach.) -—H: Ry RATHBEN, Realtor Easton Marvian Consult. JEANETTE ROBINSON, Réaltor 
; Select Residential Properties | R. 2 GARBRICK. Building Cc ontractor 
Established 1928 Additions to homes and comm. bidg. 
£3 Cherry St., New Canaan, Coon. WO 6-166, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA- peuepee seating Forvice BARRINGTON 
CECIL B. SEAY SAMUEL | N. ¥. REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 
~ THE MOGABGAB CO. 2606 Oakland Park Blvd. McNAB CAMPBELL Siitinen Ge themenam | 
| REALTORS—INSURANCE MORTGAGES REALTY APA® 
oi North Shore and West North Shore Area Massachusetts i - ce : Fan nc | 
| OT EES SOMES — INCOME 3 Shopping Center CH 5-3600 | 
. . 8. 
2329 Collins Avenue PARK RIDGE—A fine suburban town in Lewis E, Schauman __proer 
a Ron . 7 Bang ae es ithe Chicago area. Listi ing a complete -" a T aa — Suburb é Waterfront Propertie 
ur 23r ear in s Lecation §. Ss | & SUTE co., Ine. uburban an aterfren roperties 
Real Estate @ fasarance eleeen of geod homes CHerry 5-8015 | 
Stamford : T. H. MAENNER CO. 
Next to Roger Smith Hotel DA 4-6791 (12? Main Street Park Ridge, Til. | Real Estate Sales, Property Management - Ck ——-r ,¢ 
DA 2-1688 SELECT PROPERTIES (TAlcott 3-4144 NEwcastie 1-9788 Mortgage Loans snd Insurance + MAY WE SERVE YOU? SALISBURY AGENCY 
SF, 2 J . ' 
WENDELL L. aes? AGENCY, Inc, | 9566 Harding Ave. Phone: UN 6-975 ADVANCE REALTY CO. HARRY P. RUPPERT, Realtor 
Real Estate—Insurance MOUNT DORA, FLORIDA 1697 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. STUART 1-6886 
1740 Summer Street, Stamford, Conn. s— 256 Beyiston Street, Boston 
410 Thrush Ave. PR 5-5380 Peoria, Ul. CAPE COD SALES | | 60 Years Service, Scarsdale and Vie. 
. bath, oak floors. insulated. ceilings, RENTALS : 4 om 
67 Broad St., Stamford DAvis 4-111 furred walls. two ear garage with utility PINE ACRES REALTY. Chatham, Mass. | Historical Colontal thoughtfully and com-| Popham Road SCarsdale 3-000 
City and Country Properties and extra tile bath, landscaped lot 100 «| “ |pletely rénovated with spacious 10 rooms, BUSER REALTY CORPORATION 
NUHN and NUHN ae as 
Tel 
CARL 7% # PETERSON 
CHELMSFORD—LOWELL and VICINITY 
43 Central Square, Chelmsford, Mass. 


Idaho 
DARIEN * A RIGHT PLACE FOR YOU 
tO purchase take front homes. sroves; 
| Mates frontage CO-OP From $¥, B00 Up Bt Hills, Palos Neen and 
ne “Ievnea to see a FIRST m co- re WILBUR M. SLAUGHTER & COMPANY 
Re os 
nts. lake frontage-water frontage with a Estate, Sales Management, Insurance 
Post Rd. and West Ave. 
Seashore and Urban Propert:e.s 
|$3,500 down. SUN REALTY. R. W. Jahn 
Immediate occupancy Hartford, W. Hart- nes Fe ee By #ttention from our Mrs. Jeanette Wright | 
REALTOR AND INSURANCE 
erative Waterfront Apartments at 
E. 
MABEL Cc LAMB SAvis §-so0 Winnetka 6-4760 | Residential REALTORS industrial | 
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Realtors ' Isiand Thomas Van Riper, Realtor 
Intercoastal 999 Waukegan Road GLenview 4-3000 TIDEWATER REALTY CO. 
MRS..-PAUL LUNDY 
$44.500. SEESE REALTY INC. “4924 Kensington Avenue, Snyder, N.Y. Rhode Island 
Multiple Listing Service complete with plans, etc. 
230 Park Avenue, N.Y.C. ¥U 6-7150 
REALTORS 
Elm Street. New ransee, Conn. CLARENCE Cc. HALL 115 
56 Shermer Ave., Northbrook, Il. . 
WOodw 135 Seuth Fourth Las Vegas, 
W I L L I A M P | T T Barrington 230 Country Road 
‘RED I. GIL LICK co. Rochester, 
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA | SEE 1000 HOMES IN 1 HOUR 
Merritt Pkway <* ee 34 “ 
O17 5-9718 Town 2 Country Homes | 808 Crt. Nat. Bank Bidg., Omaha AT 3362 1292 Post Rd. Warwick, Rt. 
REAL ESTATE SALES AND TRADES ; 
SYLVAN SHORE NEW C. B. HOME 
DAvis 4-5761 REALTOR BRowning 1-5430 
bedrooms, Youngstown kitchen, 
- : hor ' 
135 ered by Cecil Lundy with Ed.| | Saaee, ca i‘. bedrooms, 5 fireplaces, large, very mod- Searsdale, Hartsdale, White Plains, 142 
Waterbury, Conn. PL 4-7149 
Telephone Lowell, GLenview 2-758? 


al 


| Sturdy barn with 3-room dream apt. 120 — . 
acres, 1200’ on state road. Near Man- DOROTHY 8S. WILLIAMS 
Personalized Realty Service 


chester and Concord. Panoramic view— 
$36,000 Harwood Bidg., Scarsdale, N.Y. SC 5-1334 


Chifford Mlartel. Agency 


Reaitor—Muitipie Listing Service 
Dial HY 73-4307, Goffstown, N. H 


tOeee us aki wanes or, _MARDON F. TALBOT COMPANY — 
“TRANSFERRED? We'd: like to ~ 
and acreage. Harry E: Morse, Reaitor,| 
INCREDIBLE? one hy like hwest Suburban Properties 
REALTORS | tive living—so reasonably priced you'll Estate Investments 
OL 5-4412 idireet access to intracoasta!l waterway 955 E. Gist St., Chicage Plaza 2-4900 
“ASK MRS. FOSTER.” Realtor 
Compiete Real Estate Service 
| Exclusive Agents, 1746 E. Sunrise Bivd 
ford, and Suburbs, ~—. Business Oppor- SMART & GOLEE, INC. Call her at GR 4-8283 or write c/o 
Westfield. N.J. AD 72-4140 
McFarlane. Va- 
si WYATT & COONS | 2435 Maryland Av., Baltimore 18 BE 5-7777 | Missouri 
REAL ESTATE FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 323 Lafayette Ave.. Swarthmore, Pa. 
| NT Sacurere 219-02 No. Bivd. Phone BAyside 5-6700 
| Waterway, Large rms. plus 33 ft. sereened TA GRANGE ILL Waterfront Homes, Farms. Estates 
Py BEse . 
AND ASSOCIATES 
REALTORS "rice - 
| 300 East Las Olas Boulevard. Circle 3240 | a 
608 W. Burlington FL 2-4860 Takoma Park. Md. JU 5-5303 T 
ard 6-16 REALTOR SERVICE TO YOU FIRST 
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. Tel. CR 2-0433 
N ” 
INCORPORATED Nebraska FARNUM & HILL 
N.Y. 
(Call for Mr. Bourke) REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 
OPEN DAILY 9-5 
A. D. SMITH, REALTOR 
Darien— Theatre 
STATE-WIDE SERVICE 
CLARENCE E. HITCHCOCK COpiey 7-1000 | 
Large living room. Florida room, two ; one Z 
—_—_—_———— ~ arge nternational Trades Clu nterchange | STEPHEN L. ANGELL CO., Realt 
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‘Vincent Realtor, 1919 Sunset Drive, P. O. itor — Insuran ern paneied kitchen. Screened pore. Central Ay., Hartsdale, N.Y. WH 8-0500-01 


DAVID H. BATCHELDER =ieS2 


OUNT DORA, FLORIDA 
LAKE FRONT PROPERTY—HOMES— 
COUNTRY PROPERTIES 
Wilton, Conn. PO 2-3365 


FPARMS—GROVES — BUSINESS OPPOR- 
adquarters for Fine Homes’ 
WILTON—Ceomplete Real ey Service 
TILGH 


“He ' 
POMEROY ORGANIZATION, INC. 
327 Montgomery Street | 2 


1919 Sunset Drive. P. O. Box 287. Phone 


EV 2-6727. Syracuse, New York 


Phene HA 2-311! 


Betty Jacobson 


Realtor 


r. cM McCain, Reg. Broker 
Highway 19, New Pert Richey, Fla. 
omes—Groves—Ac reage—Industrial 


BRASS & HAYNIE, Reajtors 


i'TUNITIES. Edward R. Vincent. Realtor 
MAN & FROST 


Leila V. Vincent. Ceci] Lundy, Associates. | 
Post ones Square PO 2-3304 


New Jersey North Carolina 
G. KIMBALL COLEMAN “*ARE YOU RETIRING?’ a 
258 Main St.. Chatham MErcury 5-7600 seams to ene of America’s best gorunaces 


Write or see Skyland Realty Compan 
G. G. NUNN BRidge 6-81 10 126 4th W. Hendersonvi N 
REALTORS—INSURORS 


181 Nerth Ave., E, Cranford, N. J, Ohio 


We Service Eastern Tahion County 
~ ROSENI ELD COMPANY 


SHORT HILIS = 6. A. ALLSODD ROSENTELD COMPANY. 


“aoes Hemes,” 27 Main St., Millburn 65 W. State Street, Akron, Ohie 
Call Fred Watson—DRexel 6-2266 A. BAILEY, Realtor—Canten 


eR I ER _—e 
v” 7 ba eal Estate — Insurance 
iL nanan 


319 Peoples-Merchants Tr. Bldg : 

D. AVISE ~— North Canton and} 

PILGRIM 4-3460 (Montclair) |" Canton multi-listing realtors. Office 
ETHEL and ROY YOUNG 96 
HOMES—COUNTRY ESTATES—FARMS |. 
HAROLD 


| Homes, Orange Groves and Business 


DistrictofColumbia Opportunities in Centra! Florida 


43 E. Central Avenue, Orlando, Filia. 
SAI ES—RENTALS "] | Homes, yng t _—_ 3, 
MORTGAGE LO ANS 840 N. Mills Street Orlando, Florida 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

INSURANCE 


i WILBUR H. STRICKLAND, Realtor 
| 7011 E. Colonial Drive Orlando, Fla. 
RANDALL H. HAGNER & CO. 
1821 Connecticut Ave., Washington, D.C. 


|'Homes, Business Property, Farms, Groves 
Florida 


LAND the basic need for 
"KZALEA REALTY, INC. 


tomorrow's opportunity in 
'. NSLIO 14th St. W. 
: Bradenton, Fieride 


FLORIDA 
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA 
KIBBEE, 


Leading Specialists in 
FORREST L. REALTOR Florida’s Acreage, Industrial 
$14 S. Ft. Harrison Av., Dept. A Ph. 31-6921 Sites, Investments — 
CLEARWATER, | FLA.—DOROTHY PEF- 


TATE. TO Boke ay 
ae.ertheaidle: 


—Acreage—Businesses—Houses 
REALTORS 


Prospect Street. 
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA 

205 Worth Ave., Palm Beech, Florida 

Témple 2-0516 


Hilson Realty. Realtors 
He 
LOnIOA MOrELS AND TRAILER PARKS ~ 


ose Ponce de — Bivd. Ph. a —— 
DAYTONA BEACH = HOMES. 
JOHN A. STONE, Realtor 
st FEDERAL BLDG, ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 


Acreage-—Cottle haode—Oranee Greves 
Georgia 


ALLEN 
- DUNCAN REALTY CQ.. ATLANTA | 


an20 S. Atiantic Avenue 
METTA M. MAYBEE REAL ESTATE 
Friendly, Personal ‘Service 
Property Mgmt., Farms, Insurance 


Ocean Front omen, Riverfront Homes. 
TR 6-7119 


126 South Street HI 6-1288 


HINGHAM | 


C His letter reeds: 

“We deem it a privilege to ocknow!l- 
edge. the splendid _results we hove 
been receiving for meny years from 
our weekly advertising in The Chris- 
tien Science Monitor. 

“During 1955 we realized 30 times 
the cost of our ennuel advertising 
investment ond again in 1956 excel- 
lent returns were directly traceable 
to its reoders who apperently single 
out ond patronize consistent Monitor 
odvertisers. 

“Although we olso use other media, 
The Christian Science Monitor is one 
daily newspoper to which we can 
credit such direct results.” 


Ave. lle 


HINGHAM & VIC INITY 
Where Boston Meets 
the South Shore 
IONE R. LOWRANCE 
130 North $., Ghegpen. Mass. 


Virginia 


HARRISON & E 
REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 
30 W. Queen Street, Hampten, Va. 


WILLIAM W. MACKALL 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Vienna, Va. Route 5 JE 27-1968 


“A. CLINTON BROOKS & CO. 


909 Gt. Plain Ave., Needham Hi 4-0505 
Branches: Norwood, Medfield, Dover 
See Our Photo Library of Homes 


WELLESLEY — WESTON 


and COUNTRY PROPERTIES 
M. 


NaC EARENCE ME CORNWEIT, S| Nps. Olive 7, Thornton’ © 


737 MM t., t Des Moin CR 99-1111 | 
m S., eee ee eee _ 847 Washington St., Wellesley Square K~ 


S. A. DICKERSON | 


| CEdar 5-3812—Realtor—Eves. TW 4-4885 
REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 


Bex 321 Marshalitown, lowa Michigan 


wee REAL TORS —INSURANCE 

The F. A. SERGEANT COMPANY 

Ann Arbor Pseg nies. Ph, NO 2-3259 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 


266 


lowa 
Builder 


(. R> DOHRN and Developer 
1732 Grant St., Bettendorf, lewa 5-1621 
ART WAGNER ana arrnaiser 


526 First Federal Bidg., Davenport, lowa 


HUSTON—REALTORS 


525 6th Ave., DES MOINES CH 38-3118 


Washington 
LONGVIEW AGENCY, Ine 


REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 
pal Broadway, Longview Ph. HA 5-3700 


JACK BAKER 
— ee ones HOMES 


> 


9-3370, Res. HY 9-356 
, ’ 


RUTH ANDERSON REALTY 
89 Wash. Ave. Morristown, N.J. JE 8-2276 


| 3655 Medbrook Way North 
CHARLES B. CLARK, Realtor , 


Telephone AMherst ee 
| TOL EDO, OHIO—Teipel-Brown Co.. 
Real Estate — Insurance 
Seuth Avenue PLainfield 5- sical 


tors. 2201 Jefferson—CH 8- 4265 Cal 
Mrs. Warsesaae, JO 2440—4357 Bonnie-| 
ANDREW HAYE & SON, > Couatry Realtors 
ton 
Piainfield, NJ. 


_Mail: Mount Bet el Oklahoma 


CONSCIENTIOUS moving service. Choose 
Howard A. Day, Realtor 


HU 1 
10 Miles Nerth of Seattle 
the town you want to move to and cal! 
Specializing in Residential renerty | 


ALBERT BALCH 
:-4 — us. Estimate full i 
sisal Kings Van a Stornge,, CRAWFORD & CONOVER, Inc. 
General Insurance 
61 No Maple Ave., Ridgewood GI! 5- a1 


Ht N g het Oklahoma City, Okla. | SEATTLE’S OLDZIST REAL ESTATE FIRM. 
. Seettle 
MASON FERRIS 


B0SO 35th N. VE 5555. 
Srogen “(HENDERSON Really Co. 
Insurance — Realtor ~ BROOKINGS, ‘OREGON | 


245 E. Ridgewood Ave., Ridgewood, NJ. SELECT OCEAN SITES. HOMES, ete. REAL EST 
GI 4-5044 “Oregon's Best Clim 15th Ave. N.W. DE 1255 Seattle 7 


Cc. H. GRAYSHEL, kee 

a D. JOHNSON, Realter HAROLD E. BAGGO 

arms, Timber, Business, Homes REALTOR 
Malinhe Listing Service, BE 6-7740 Northwestern Mutual Fire Ass'n Agency 
3115 E. Burnside, Portland, Ore, 623. 58.W. I52nd, Seattle CH 7100 


ADVERTISERS 
COAST-TO-COAST 
GET GOOD RESULTS 


7 > : 


BOTHELL 


The Christien Science Monitor 

One Norwey Street, Boston 15, Mess. 
Please send me a free copy of the 
booklet. 'Clessified Advertising Brings 
Results.” 


Kansas 
| CEsan’ REALTY CO. REALIORS 


SINESS — INDUsTkKiAl 
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 
608 Washburn, Topeka CE 38-3658 


L. O. TRADER AGENCY 
REALTOR and INSUR 
1328 Kansas Avenue, —— en 


Buy Savings Bonds 


A Geod Investment 


HOLDEN REALTY as 
Specializing in Redford. Southfield, 
Livonia and Farmington Property 

Call JAMES B. EN 
22215 Fenkell Ave., Detroit 23, Michigan 
KEnwood 2-1313 
“FOR BETTER SERVICE” 
B. ARNOLDY, Realtor 


A. 
Detr Bi rosse se Pointe--Suburban 
17914 E. Warren, Detroit 24 TU 2-5355) 


pro Ore Seabreeze Biva., 
ite Saag 2 CL 2-0251 - 2-1025. 
OD FLORIDA 
“On “ Bay and the Gulf of Mexico 
A quis, friendly, uncommercialized com- 
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hools. For information write Homes, 
fxs Lasbary. Realtors, Box 355, | 509 Atlanta Federal Bidg. 


— 
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eneanalh 


SUMMIT-MURRAY HILL AREA 
40 Min. N.Y.C. Map-info by request 
Town-country homes and ai) 


multiple 
listings. McNAMARA, Rtr., 37 Maple &t 
CRestview 3-3880 


Stete....cse 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


Modern Penology: 
Inadequate Staffs, 
Ignorance Charged 


* By James Nelson Goodsell 


Staff Writer of The Christian Sctence Monitor 


In the eves of penolo- 
gists, the weiter 
Massachusetts penal 
ments—in legislative 
public pronouncements, 
private discussions—has 
a woeful ignorance of the 
terms. 

What is by 
penology,. as tern is used 
in the Bay State, o w pen- 
ology as it is used elsewhere” 
What § abor discipline Is a 
sound dis sciplin approach in 
line with the rehabilitative 
aims of the new penology’ 

These questions — and 
more like 
asked by ci 
islators in 
COURnTPY as ' 
The 
jation 
tense than that in 
but = this 
shared bv 


many 


arrange- 
hearings, 
and 
shown 
basic 


modern 


then 


assacnu- 
Bay State 


pro\ P more 


ceitits« 
sith ma 
othe! ctatec 
problem is 


otners 
Outlined 

In a recent specci piven to 
the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science 
meeting in Indianapolis, Dr 
Alfred C. Schnur, associate pro- 
fessor police administration 
and public ty aft 
State Universit, 
is generally meant by 
modern penology and 
to discuss the national 
scene at some length 

For Dr. Sch 
penology today is simply “to get 
men ready to go out and stay 
out by returning them to 
ety, as rapidiv and econom! 
as possible, as useful, law-abid- 
ing, self-supporting. self-suffi- 
cient, independent citizens who 
will not contribute to the com- 
mission of crime by others 
men who obey the law because 
they want to and not because 
they are afraid not to.” 

These rosy-hued words have 
a solid ring of conviction bebind 
them. More than half of the law 
violators who enter prison to- 
day will be back on the streets 
within. 22 months; fully 85 per 
cent those in prison will 


Goal 


of 
cate 
outirn 
went 
prison 


* , 
nur. the goal of 


SOC l= 


cally 


of all 
be out within a period of time 
“Something,” as Dr. Schnur 
States, has got to be done to step 
up and improve existing treat- 
nent programs. 
Many Ex-Convicts Return 
This- program is not adequate, 
Dr. Schnur argues. Out of 25.- 
938 persons “employed full time 
in state and federal prisons and 
reformatories,” only ae few, 
1,337, are there to get prisoners 
“ready to go out and stav out.” 
He adds rether discouragingly 
that “more people are employed 
to shuffle prpers than to imple- 
ment the new penology.” 
Put it another way: “Inn 
who consume more than 
hour and twenty minutes 
service from the whole c 
fication, training. and treatment 
staff in one month are taking 
4nore,than.their fair.share.”’ 
Penology'’s batting average is 
not too good, the Michigan pro- 


lates 
one 
of 


lassi- 


of debate over | 


' individually, 


necessarily 


fessor admits. The figures show 
“that the majority of the men 
leaving prison today are not re- 
fraining from crime.” Carefully 
made samplings indicate that at 
least 55 to 60 per cent—perhaps 
as much as 70 per cent—will re- 
turn to prison within five vears 
of the completion of their terms. 

But Dr. Schnur emphasizes 
that “it is manifestly clear that 
the new penology cannot be 
charged with responsibility for 
the recurrence of crime. among 
the graduates of our correction- 
ai institutions.” 

Ignorance Spotlighted 

Indeed, very few 
of..the new. penology ever get 
inside prison gates. “The new 
penology,” he comments, “h 
not vet really been drafted into 
the war agajnst crime : 

“Institutions where treatment 
personnel are concentrated 
serve beacon lights to those 
of us who feel the new penology 
should be tried,” Dr. Schnur 

“We take heart that this 
is son indication that some- 
dav diagnosis and therapy wil! 
supplant blame and punishment 
in the management of law vio- 
lators.” 

At the very root of the prob- 
lem, Dr. Schnur thinks, 
norance.” He credits this with 
“much of the blame for the 
floundering and ineffectivenes: 
in the field of corrections.’ 
There are too manv theories 
and not enough information, he 
argues 

Manv Bay St 
suggested 


’ practitioners 


as 


as 


says 


e 


is “lg- 


ate leaders have 
that this is the 
crux of the problem. It is felt 
by many critics of modern or 
new penologyv—including'§ the 
legislative probers—that this 
approach leaves “discipline” 
aside. But auite to the contrary. 
say. Dr.. Schnur, other penolo- 
gists, and Massachusetts prison 
officials. 
Discipline Explained 

Discipline, they say, en- 
forced through teaching inmates 
to respect authority, not through 
a system of punishments and 
harsh control, This discipiine 
brought -into inmates’ experi- 
ence as a thing to be learned 
not as something to 
be hammered into all prisoners 


also 


is 


1s 


through a harsh, dictatorial sys- 


tem. 

Hence, these exponents of 
modern or new penology suggest 
that true discipline —the type 
that will benefit the inmate and 
society once the inmate is free 
to walk the  streets—is only 
learned through gradual under- 
standing of the reason for it 

tile he is in prison 

As Mrs. Betty Cole Smith. 
currently considering an offer 
to become superintendent of the 
Massachusetts Correctional In- 
stitution for Women at Framing- 
ham, put_it recently: “It doesn't 
follow that 
lief in. modern penology implies 
a belief in no discipline.” 


Resin Compound 
Defies Elements 


By a Stef Wr 


Virtually unlimited possibili- 
fiEYs for a new-type chemical 
resin compound were outlined to 
some 100 industrial research 
personnel at the Somerset Hotel 
in Boston yesterday) 

The all-day seminar 
ducted by the chemical div 
of General Mills, was one 
series of such seminars 
held._in-_major___cities 
country. 

Versamids, 


‘Cone 
ision 
ofa 
being 
of the 
which is General 
Mills’ trademark for its polva- 
mide resin products, will have 
such diversified uses as bases for 
paints, inks, adhesives, plastic 
tools and dies, cement-patching 
and road-filling compounds, and 
many other items 

General Mills best known 
for its food products which are 
sold across the country 
brand mames such as 
Crocker. The Versamid 


is 


chemical division 
studies dating back to 1940 
Versamids have been sold. com- 
mercially since 1948, .but new 
developments in the same fam- 
ily are increasing their versa- 
tilits 
Possibilities Described 

Dr. Harold Wittcoff, director 
of the chemical division, de- 
scribed some of the possibilities 
which the compound has 
opened up 

Blended with another common 
tvpe resin known epoxy, a 
new type of thermoset polymer 
resuits, which, in the form of 
thin film, makes . possible a 
coating with unusual foughness, 
hardness, resiliency, and flexi- 
bility. 

Sticking to 
face, the film 
acts as an amazingly 
hesive, can be crumpled, 
mered, abraded, subjected 
‘acids, and otherwise 
without harm. As a casting it 
can be sawed, threaded, ma- 
chined on a lathe, or can 
Nails pounded into it. 

In addition to this. 
is a permanent rust and 
sion. inhibitor Painted 
already rusted areas, it will stop 
the rust from spreading. 

Salt Spray Resisted 

When used as a paint. 
Wittcoff said, the surface to be 
coated with the Versamid- ~CpOxy 
resin. does not need to be pre- 
pared nearly as carefully as do 
surfaces for other types of paint. 
The surface can even be moist 
and still take the coating, and 
one-year tests 
Spray, corrosive city 
heres, and chemical 
ave little effect on the coating. | 

Among other uses already | 
found for it, the film has been ' 


as 


almost any sur- 
ls easily applied, 
strong ad- 
ham- 


corro- 


iter of The Carist 


under | 
Betty | 
resin | 
was developed by the company’s | 
from research | 


a | 


to! 
maltreated | 
have 
! trucks. 


the film) 


over ; 


| has 


Dr. | 


indicate that salt | 
atmos- | 
plants | 


’ 
ian Sctence Monitor 


used to color old telephones, to 
coat aluminum siding for homes, 
and brass and copper, to water- 
proof masonry, and for a high 
grade, abrasion-resistant traffic 
paint 

“New floors out of paint cans,” 
is another possibility, Dr. Witt- 
coff said, in which the coating 
may be put over virtually any 
kindof old flooring, giving a 
new floor which is much strong- 
er than concrete, much lighter 
in weight, and adhering better 
to the old surface. 


"Y 
si 


financial 


a be-) 


|New 
| South 
| Fexas, 


provisions 


j}are 


* Illinois. 


A. ~ 


Phone Rate Rise Granted 


Massachusetts residential telephone customers are Starting 
to pay 13 to 88 cents a month more today under an $11,873.000 
rate boost granted by the State Public Utilities Commission in 


a unanimous decision. 


The commission approved a rate schedule about 7 million 
dollars less than the 18.6-million-dollar rise sought by the New 
England Telephone & Telegraph Company. In 1956 the company 
won a 10-million-dollar increase. 

Whether the telephone-company. will go to court to seek the 
remainder of its 18.6-million-dollar request will be determined 
after the company studies the decision. The concern won its 
previous increase through court action. 

Under the new schedule residential multi-party-line rates will 
be increased 13 to 44 cents a month, 
customers’ rates will be up 38 to 88 cents. 
rate on public telephones will 


The present 10-cent. basic 
remain. 


The Public Utilities Commission asserted that the company 
will realize $5,365,000 in net earnings from the $11,873,000 rate 
increase, This is due to the impact of Massachusetts and federal 
taxes on the gross ineome of the firm. The company had sought 
a net earnings increase of $8,370,000 out of a rate increase of 


18.6 million dollars. 
Company plans would have 


from 20 cents to $1.40 a month» 


Explaining its decision, the 


a wage increase of approximately 3.8 million dollars had de- 
pressed company earnings below a fair rate of return which the 
commission “finds to be 6.45 per cent.” 
Hugh W. MacDonald. manager of the telephone company, 
the decision “is very disappointing and gives us real concern. 
“We have been denied the revenues. we-really..need.for.the 


work we have to do. 
“After we have had a chance 


a better position to determine the extent to which this reduced 
amount will permit us to meet the needs of our customers for 


more and better service.” 


The rate increase was immediately protested by 
chairman of the Massachusetis chapter, 


G. Myerson, 
for Democratic Action. 


“We are shocked,” she 


est in the country. 


“The ADA report pointed out that the New England Tele- 
phone Company has 14.5 employees per | 000 phones, compared 


said, 
creased telephone rates for Massachusetts. 
of Massachusetts telephone rates in comparison to rates in the 
rest of the country disclosed that with only the most insignifi- 

cant of exceptions Massachusetts rates were already the high- 


MASSACHUSETTS | MASSACHUSETTS | 


MASSACHUSETTS 


MASSACHUSETTS _ 


ARLINGTON 


(Continued) 


FITCHBURG mf 


"9 


LYNN 


(Continued) 


QUINCY 


(Continued 


BON VOYAGE 
FLOWERS 


GOAndwOGaS EAS and 


Mestord Branch: 242 High St__MY_ 6.060» FLE CTR IC 
APPLIANCES 


. backed by 


dependable service 


FITCHBURG 
~ GAS and ELECTRIC 


655 Main Street Phone 3-6931 


while other residential 


and Service 


Sales 
Charles B. Perham, Inc. 


295 Broadwar MI &-2433) 


boosted customer rates ranging 


commission said it found that 


ot STATIONERS 


VALENTINES 


rh FRR 77 BY. 4-/ 845 
74> Centre St 44 Common Sf 
Newton Centre Beimont, Cush. Sq 


Reid-Hoffman, Inc. 


Floarirets 
NEXT TO FILENE’S 
BELMONT CENTER 

'V 4-5770 


Branch Store in Swampscott 


Boston 


said 


GLOUCESTER 


WILLIAM G BROWN 
[885 COMPANY ~1958 


The Depart ren? Ny re 
North 


GLOUCESTER, MASS, 
PES ERSUSVECTCSUCSVEC OSE ES EE SE 


to study the order, we will be in 


Nhore 
Mrs. Paul ‘ 
Americans 


announcement of in- 
The 1957 ADA study 


“at the 
GREENFIELD 


PLL LLLP PLLA Pe 


Delivery in the Greater Area 


PAPAS AO” PP PL 


Thursday, Friday, Saturday 


OLD FASHIONED 


BROCKTON 


AAA A AEA RAFAA RA ee ee 


to an average for all other Bell Telephone companies in the 


country of only 11.5 employees per 1,000 phones. This difference 
costs every phone user an unnecessary 


his phone bill.” 


nong only 
which 

pay- 
o! its 


Massachusetts is a! 
eight states in the nation 
provide pension 
ments for dependents 
judges. the Legisiative Research 
Council disclosed today. 

In a report of its Legislature- 
ordered study of the subject, the 
council said the other states not 
providing dependent payment 
in such cases are Alabama, 
Arkansas. Kentucky, Minnesota, 
North Carolina, Virginia, 
West Virginia. 

The. other 40 s 
assistance’ to 


ao not 
f 


ana 


tates grant 
such de- 
pendents. 

In Oklahoma i Utah judges 
their families are covered 
social security only. In Mis- 
and Wvyoming the judges 
members olf a re- 
but their 
only by 


and 
bv 
souri 
themselves are 
tirement system 
ilies are covered 
insurance 
social security. 
Provisions Differ 

In 13 states the dependents or 
estate of a deceased judge re- 
ceive the batance of the -amount 
contributed to a_ retirement 
fund... These..states-are-Arizona, 
Delaware. Georgia, Idaho, In- 
diana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska 
Mexico, North Dakota, 
Dakota, Tennessee, and 


iaine- 
SuUuT- 
‘ 
Ui 


vivors provisions 


have optional 
reby a etired 
judge may elect to receive a 
smatier atowanee during mis Lift 
with payments to continue in a 
lesser amount for his dependents 
after he passes on These states 
California, Colorado, Florida, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, 
Nev Hampshire, New York. 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island 
(district court judges only), 
Vermont, and Wisconsin 

The remaining 10 states 
pecial provis: for annuities 
to widows and denendents ol 
justices, Thev are Connecticut, 
Louisiana. Maine. Mary- 
landi Nevada (Supreme Court 
judges only), New Jersey, Ore- 
gan, South Carolina, and Wash- 
ington 

A 


council 


Thirteen states 


. . 
wn 


‘ 
make 
ms 


or 


+ ¢h 


the search 


the 


re 
that 


trme the 


out 


same 
pointed 


Military 


Sea Outfit 


Pioneers Service 


By Albert D. Hughes 


Stef Writer of The Christian Sctence Moanittor 


The Military Sea Transporta- 
tion Service, out of the mul- 
tiplicity of water-transportation 
jobs it performs for all the 
armed services, not only pro- 
motes new ship designs that are 
closely watched by commercial 
operators but also trains per- 
sonnel for these new vessels. 

On€ such prominent design 
example pointed out yesterday 
by Rear Admiral Roy A. Gano. 
USN, deputy commander of 
MSTS, ts even now on _ its 
maiden voyage across the t- 
lantic. This new vessel, isieds 
may revolutionize cargo-han- 
dling methods, is the “roll on- 
roll off” cargo vesse! USNS 
Comet which-is-on its way from 
Philadelphia to St. Nazaire. 
France, with a load of Army 
military vehicles, he said. 

The new ship, which was can- 
structed especially under Army 


sponsorship, is designed to per- 


mit all types of Army vehicles— 
tanks tractors, bulldozers. 
half-tracks, etc.—to em. 
bark and debark under their 
own power. 

This feature, when translated 
into terms of Army mobility, 
great combat emergency 
value, Admiral Gano pointed 
out. The vessel has a_ stern 
ramp and two wide loading ports 
on either side, He said that it 
took just 12 hours to roll 399 
Army vehicles onto the Comet, 
a task which generally takes 
three days undér usual loading 
methods. 

Admiral Gano, who was in 
Boston to address Naval Reserve 
officers, pointed out that these 
loading operations conducted on. 


come more ‘familiar with the 


vessel 
Some of 
stations, he 


the missile-tracking 
have no docks 
or facilities where large vesse! 
can tie up: hence ao oper- 
ations are conducted by smalle: 
vessels. 


MSTS 


said. 


the 
tne 


of 
if} 
tated. 


operates one 
largest fleets of ve: 
world, Admiral Gano s but 
emphasized that 70 per cent of 
the sea transport is conducted in 
commercial-ship bottoms. This 

fleet includes from 30 to 40 pas- 
senger transports’in worldwide 
service, 50 to 60 cargo ships, 
30 to 35 tankers, and the re- 
mainder are miscellaneous craft 
which perform the specialized 
operations of the MSTS for the 
armed services. 

He said that many ‘of the 
specialized vessels perform oper- 
ations which would not be com- 
mercially profitable for commer- 
cial shipping firms. 

Another specialized 
promoted by MSTS, Admiral 
Gano said, is a new series of 
smail ice-strengthened cargo 
ships designed for use in the 
MSTS Arctic-supply service for 
Dewline and other’ military 
operations in the far 
areas, 

These 
bottoms, 
and ice-breaker 
permit them to 
the ive and break 
weight in the same manner 
the ice-breaking Vessels. 

Admiral Gano referred 
further economy of 
operations in employing cargo. 


, 
SC iIS 


design 


vessels have double 
reinforced side plating, 
bows which 
move up onto 
it with their 
as 


to 


vessels which can perform their 


own ice-breaking ~ functions 


|@ new vessel could be greatly ‘without ice-breaker escorts’ as 
speeded up when personne] be-'in the 


past. 


ae 


] udges’ Dependents: 
10 Bay State Pension 


northern | 


shipping | 


‘¢ BARGAIN DAYS 


THROUGHOUT. 
THE STORE 


DSHS) 
¥ 


70 cents a month on 


VALENTINES 
for Friends. 
Sweethearts. Familv 


tem 


Need Heat 
BORE in a Hurry? 
particularly 


pensions of 6 TIMKEN 


at age 70 years, lent Automattic FORBES CAMERA SHOP — 
preety MEAT 74 NIAIN STREET 


pendency bene- 
in 3 to 6 hours! 


Mas 
tor 


sachusetts 
judges is 
erous., providing 
three-fourths 
service 
with no 


7 , ’ 
Veals> 


dé 


ave bee 
qaevnenet 
igh options 
ssacnusetts Judges 
inciusion ci the 
regular state con- 
pension 
cnusett judges n 
contributions 

(one plan 
Massachi 


: : “ - iA 
lg ge s,s WoUuiG 


pro- 
iency 


Several plans h 
posed to provide 
benefit either 
for retiring Ma 
or tirougn 
judges in the 


tributory 


thro. 


HOLYOKE 


And you can count on heat 
LEO J. 


pian. Massa- in a hurry every time with the 
ow make PO new ROTORAMIC HEAT of IT Vor? CA G! <> 
offered unomMcialls the exclusive Wall-Flame ~. ‘ 
isetts Superior Court Burner! Entirely blankets all coal EW H Mang oe 
provide for a 3 per heating surfaces with flame. 
‘ent contribution by the judge le ee 
and a 37'> per cent of salary | Call for Free Estimate 
an! for dependents of de- 
ceased judges 
Thus far, 
been little legislative support for 
any plan to provide dependency 
ts for Bay State judges 
council disclosed that 
while judicial salaries in Massa- 
chusetts are higher than in most 
_$iates, they are-moderate when 
compared with those of ctner 
_populeus and. industrial states. 
The council reported that 
while Massachusetts pavs its 
Supreme Court judges $22,000 a 
'vear ($23,000 for the chief jus- 
tice), New York pays $32,500; 
California, $23,000; Pennsvl- 
vania, $25,000: Illinois, $24,000 
New Jersey, $24,000; and Con- 
necticut, $19,000, 
Selection Spotlighted 
Comparative Superior 
salaries (including. trial 
of general jurisdiction) are | 
Massachusett $19,000 (chief | 
justice $20,000): New York, $25.- | 
000 to $29,000: California. $18.- 
1000: Pennsylvania, $18,000 to 
$22.500; Illinois, $15,000 to $22- 
2900; New Jersev, $20,000 
Connecticut, $18,500 


Northeastern 
President To. 


Retire in 1959. 


Dr. Carl S. Ell has announced 
that he will retire from the pres- | 
of Northeastern Univer- 
1959, after 49 vears 
with 


t 
sureour STREET 


DUNN'S PHARMACY 


COSMETICS 
TOILETRIES 


Diol: JE 2-6131 


rs 


ana 


multys 


however. there has 


BROCKTON OIL HEAT, Inc. 


27 Legion Parkway 


9 Maple Street 


HYANNIS 


MY INSURANCE MAN 


Any Kind—Any Time 
Anywhere 
TEL. HY 2680 
326 Main St, 


The Holmes Greenhouses 
ConpteteFiorat-Service 


119 North Lewden St. 
BROCKTON, MASS. 
ju 6-2000 


LZ 
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALES 


227-229 MAIN STREET 


Hvannis, Mass. 


IPSWICH 


~QUINT’S DRUG STORE 


Hleadquarters 
RUSSELL STOVER 
CANDIES 


Ipswich 540 


Court 
courts | 


for 


BROOKLINE 


fm im LL mm em i, iain. Peal. Se Mn fie se 


FLOW BERS 


for All Occasions 


ALICE B. MERRILL, Inc. 
FLORIST 


‘Harvard Street ASpinwall 
Member F.T. D. 


ee eel 
; 
} 
ana 


Market Saquere 


LAWRENCE 


ee ee ee a ee a ee ee 


ew 


SPRING FASHIONS 
CONCORD 


ee arriving 
Gifts 


} iT! ly j 


156 7-860 


lalentine 


idency for All the 
sity June 30, 
of 
growing Boston institution 

For the last 18 of those vears’ 
Dr, Ell has béen of 
Northeastern. He has been asso- 
clated with the formation 
most of the notable divisions of 
the university. and has been 
largely responsible for the active 
role that New England indus- 
tries play in backing the techni- 
cal schools 

When other 
moving to join 
leges growing up in the West, 
Carl Ell, who had been brought 
up in Indiana, came East to do 
graduate work at Massachusetts 
Institute of Technolog, 

He joined the Northeastern 
staff in 1910 as an instructor in 
civil engineering and later be- 
came chairman of the depart- 
ment, He rose successively to 
become dean of the College ot 
Engineering, -dean of the das 
colleges, vice-president of the 
university in 1925, and president 
in 1940, 

During the 


Norcross Valentine: 
: See them at 


CHERRY S$ 


DANVERS 
LOWELL 


FUEL OIL _ LOWELL 
OIL BURNERS SAVE ON 


Serving the North Shore Since 1927 


BURSAW OIL CORP. 


4.4200 ashions | 
NOW at 


service this rapidly 


NIARK SHOP 
\Mass. 


GAIL 


president of West Concord, 


Oo! 


PPP BAPE LPO PPP 


@€ducators were 


the young col- 


Quality | 


Ploneer 


EF rCHBURG 


a a ae 


ee 


STERLING 
ele: 


r 
GC hn ne | 


» 

Rice, IN¢ 
One of New Tugland's Finest 
and Oldest Jewelry Stores 


Fitchburg Federal 
Savings & Loan 
Association 


Will serve you well in your 
savings and in your home 
financing prohiems. 


fantastic savings 


at 


pollards 


pS LOWELL 


—— 
period of this 
progress for Dr. Ell, Northeast- 
ern expanded from being an 
almost unknown, small schoo! 
meeting in the YMCA to today’s | 
independent university ef some 
18,000 dav and evening students. 

Its cooperative plan of hay- 
ing students work half their | 
school year in their special ficid 
and study the other half is the 
largest of any institution in the 
country. In enrollment, it is the, 
second largest college in New 
England. | 

Physically, the university has) 


fabulous February Sales 


Wailing Accounts save time | 
Budget $1! Down 


298 Main Street. Fitchburg. Mass 
fel. Fitchburg 2-3712 


VALENTINE 


” NEWEST and FINEST FJ WRogers « 


LYNN, MASS. 


-_ -_" 
= 
a 


Full Selection of 
GIFTS 


veryone You Love 


for i 


225 
Union St. 


| 


' 


} 


Bobbie's Beauty Shoppe 
24 Cottage Avenue Quincy, Mess. 
Telephone GRanite 2-954] 

Men and Women — Hoir Stylists 
Harper Method 
OPEN THURSDAY EVENING 


READING - 


~~. 


Prentiss and Parker 


200 Haven Street, Reading 
All Kinds of 
INSURANCE 
Tel. Reading 0249 


SALEM 


MARLBORO 


PI OP 


LL LL LOL LOLOL! LP 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK | 


of Marlboro. Mass. 


See us FIRST about your 
ALTO LOANS 


With Life Insurance Coverage 


mA 


MEDFORD 


CRADOCK APOTHECARY 


44 High St. Free Deliwery 


Ladies’ and Men's 
Toiletries 


MY 6-1500 


MIDDLETON 


MIDDLETON HARDWARE 
COUNTRY STORE 


Carrving a 
Complete Line of 
Sapolin Paints 


ROUTES 114 and 62 SPRING 4-111? 


_ NEW BEDFORD 


GULF HILL DAIRY 


suth Dartmouth, Mass, 
Furnish Your 
MILK e .CREAM 
ICE-CREAM 
Ice Cream Service Room 


Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m... 
9 a.m. to 9 P.m.. ~ 


and 


weekdavs 
indavs 


GEORGE E. TRIPP gs 


PACKERS and MOVERS 
LOCAL and LONG DISTANCE 


Fan Distntected After Each Moeing 
Cinders 


sand and Gravel 
Second-Hand Lumber 
‘76 ELM STREET 


NEWBURYPORT 


“Final 


Clearance 
COATS—SsUITS—* 


Watches 


Jewelry 


CFD 
Baniel Lows 


231 Essex Street 


; 


DIAL 2-372) L 


> 


| 


DRESSES—SPORTSWEAR 


Vy to WY off 


and More 


Puritan 


INLAID—TILES—FELT BASE 


ART SQU ARES 


WA 
LINOLEUM DEPOT 


Our Pri ices Will 

Estimates 
Eapert Installation 

SIMMONS. 415 NleF 


Flear 


Free 


\W.F imac St 


NEWTON 


RAA4A 44444 RAW AAAAAEAAA 


MOYE FOR YOUR MONEY 


For Honest Treatment 
For Fair Dealing 
For Service That Counts 


You Get 


MOYE FO 


Moye Chevrolet Co., Inc. 


431 WASHINGTON STREET 


Newton, Mass. 


Bigelow 4-5620 


SOMERVILLE 


Services for 
Every Banking Need 


Middlesex County 
National Bank 


Oavis Square 
West Somerville 


338 Broodway 
V/irter Hill 
Somerville 


Members of Federal Deposit insur. Cor, 


Belden G Snow 


“2 ¥. 0." 
Underwear 

for Men 
“T’’ Shirts 
and Brevs 
9c 3 for $2.65 
Sanforized 
Shorts 

3 for $2.05 


Devis Squere, Somerville 
Aass. Ave., Arlington Center - 


SEVEN OAKS DAIRY (0. 


69 


Daily Delivery 
in Metropolitan 
Boston 
SO 6-0372 
SO 6-0373 


OTK 28 
WIAMEIRON- 


ELECTRONICS COMPANY 
Guaranteed Scientific Repairs 
Hi-Fidelity.. Radio-lelevision... 
Custom Installations 
138 College Ave. St) 6.9150 


SPRING: .. _D 


Haynes 


1502 Main St. @ Springfield 


@ Men's and Boys’ Wear 


e Women's Fashion Floor 


a J 


WAKEFIELD 


CLINTON W. SPEAR, Inc. 


Dairy Products 


37 Centra!) St.. Wakefield, Meee, 
Tel. CRystal 9-0610—9-0199-M 


—_— 
WALTHAM 


BUY YOUR NEW 
1958 


CHEVROLET 


@ decler who puts integrity first 


R YOUR MONEY né sives service thers 2nd'te’ none. 


Bill Mitchell's 
WEST END CHEVROLET 


866 Main St. Tw 4-9000 


WELLESLEY 


PITTS FIELD 


PPA MLL Me ll 


Lab-Tested 
MILK 


at no extra cost 


Pittsfield Milk Exchange 


120: Francis Avenue Tel. 2-156) 


ba Minter clear 


QUINCY 


LL Ll te il lm lt a ll fia 


Me Wool Shop 


VERY SPECIAI 

ance sale of quality dresses 
Kirts and blouses. In this group are 
jiks, wools and winte Juniors 
i*15 and misses’ sizes 


> SAVILLE 


, .* 


ST.. QUINCY, MASS, 


‘blue coal’ 
America’s Finest 
Anthracite 


LL Le lm, lle Sg Lan, eae ; 


4 


Wellesley 
For Men $3 Central Street 


FOR FRESH FLOWERS 
CE 5-3500 


330 WASHINGTON STREET 
Opposite Wellesiey Hills R. R. 


a 


WELLESLEY HILLS 


— 


CE 5-3300 


sreceriet Ou ALITY" Fresh and nr aga 


om Us Fill Your ‘Deep yaesor yg 


For Immediate Detwery WELLESLEY HILLS MARKET 


CALL PR $-0837 


RALPH FUEL CO. 


LYNN 


NEW OFFICE and PIL. ANT 
4 Printing Plants Combined 
to Better Serve You 


Jackson & Phillips, Inc. 


24-68 Mt. Vernen &t.. Lene 
iNext to Burdett Coliege: 
Same Phone: LYNN &-4054 


also grown under Dr. Ell. It-has 
already jumped from a one-, 
_ building, two-acre school to a 
Ysizable 19+building ‘establish- 
ment with 10 of these modern 
structures located on its 17-acre 
Huntington Avenue campus. A 
| graduate school is at the foot- 
ing-drill, stage and a new ad- 
ministrative building is under 


SXXSEKxxx <x<x== 


TOWN & COUNTRY 


Home of ee 
FINE FCODS 


Fitchburg-Lanenburg Route 24 


cla “re id phd 


29a beale street, wollaston 


February Clearance 


dresses @ sweaters @ skirts 
blouses ond occessories 


| 


wonuiicaie 


Quality Clothes 


for. Men e. for Boys 


WARE PRATT CO. 


Main St. at Pearl @ W 


discussion. 


Y’ outh 


From 


Photo by Michel Thomas, Orleans, France 


Movement of the Stars in a, Wintry 


Section — =SS== 


IE RE ie a an ates. ile 


the Photographer's Albu 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


Fam 


Re ah Ss ot Se SR 


a 


- 7 - 
. . " 


TE, Ee 


Three dally caumns of tively, interesting 


EM oe Fone, ey kee 

Feb. 5 to 10: An 
but not spectacular shower of 
“shooting stars” (meteors) Is 
due but the bright moon, (from 
full to last quarter) will inter- 
fere with early morning watch- 
ing, when meteors are usually 
best. However, they will be 
worth looking for from 9:00 to 
10:00 p.m. before the moon is 
high enough to spoil them. They 
will seem to radiate from near 
the brilliant Capella, in 
Auriga,’ almost directly over- 
head about 9:00 p.m 


Feb. 8: The waning 
brilliant Jupiter 
Spica make an attractive 
quite ciose together. A 
night, they are bo 
horizon between east and : 

‘east. They con 
higher and 
| about 4:30 a.m., thes 
highest point and ar 


Stal 


ati 


1ST a 
climb 


SW ing 


as SOU 


reach thei 
due south 


7) 
’ 


)By-the-time dawn comes about | 


| 6:00 a.m.. they will have moved 
to between south and southwest 


Feb. 11 and 12: Don’t try to 
‘ get correct time from sundial 
these days, Noon the real 
'sun will be 14 minutes 19 sec- 
j}onds after noon by accurat 
clock keeping local mean time. 


Feb. 25 to March 9: During 
this period, observers in 
mid-latitudes of _ the United 
States have the norning 
and evening twilights of the 
|year, It is an hour-and-a- 
i half from:beginning of.dawn to 
| Sunrise and from sunset to full 
darkness. The longest periods 
are about two hours and come 
between the first week of June 


and the first week of Jul: 


Feb. 27: Beginners w! 
yet know the great fig 
Orion can be introduced the 

100n at 7:00 p.m. The moon, 
just past first quarter, will be 
directly above Orion and will be 
bright enough to blot out all but 


a 


eh 


ae 


> is 
14it 
shortest 


Oniv 


10.a0. nol 
ure ol 


by 


Sky Over France 


_ 


— ee a - 


Robertson. Professional in Ability 


By Margery Miller Welles 

Oscar Robertson is a polite 
fellow, a little shy, and with re- 
porters tending to be noncom- 
mittal. But he looks almost 
startled if someone ‘asks how 
he happened to play basketball 
in the first place. He looks like 
no one so much a Canadian 
hockey player who is asked how 
he started to play hockey. 

“I come from Indianapolis,” 
Oscar remarks gently. “Around 
there, everybody plays basket- 
ball.” (In Canada 
. plays hockey.) 

The fabled loyalty of the state 
of Indiana to the sport of bas- 
ketball has produced, in the 19- 
year-old Robertson, one of the 
most accomplished athletes any 
of us has seen. His utter fa- 
miliarity with the game, a fa- 
Miliarity which has § existed 
since boyhood, apparent in 
every knowing gesture he 
makes on the court. 

Oscar grew. up_in.basketbail. 


as 


is 


“The part of Indianapolis wheres: 


T learned the game is called 
Lockfield, but the name every- 
body called it was the Dust 
Bowl. The youngsters there 
played a lot of games and they 
played.them hard and 
asked. But, of course, basketball 
was the big game. I got into 
more pick-up games there than 
you could imagine, just feeling 
my way along in the sport. 
“And then there was the 
YMCA. I played a lot of bas- 
ketball there, too. Everybody 
talks about how I did at Crispus 
Attucks High School, but I 
played more games ‘just pick-up 
and at the YMCA than I ever 
did there. Looking back, I guess 
you could say I was learning. 
But at the time I was having a 
good time and trying to win 
today’s game, that’s all.” 
Oscar’s style on the 
shows the experience of 


He is a forward for Cincinnati 


every body 


no favors | 


court | 
the | 
countless games he tried to win. | 


the brightest of the nearby stars 
that the two that mark the 
giant's shoulders, the three that 
form his sword belt and the two 
that mark his legs will stand out 
alone with brilliant Sirius lower 
than Orion and to the left. 


vil 
> 


SO 


cy 


courteous and willin 
the reporter best 
he is anxious to get bac 
game. 

Coact Smit 
most anybody else 
worried 
sophomore .Osca! 
at noring 
‘hool boy ; 
40 college 


In the 


| University now, possessing every 
‘conceivable kind of shot with 
‘either hand, When he dribbles 
he crouches over the ball, pro- 
tecting it with his body, and his 
hands seem to be magnetic. He’s 
a fine player too, a 
good rebounder and guard, and 
cat-quick in his reflexes. All of 
these characteristics, somewhat a high-s 
less marked when he was a§ f) 
high-school student, have con- 
spired since -his~-earty. -adoles- 
cence to make him the talk of 
the Middle West, 

| “When I started playing bas- 
Ketball at Attucks,” Oscar says, 
‘“all the boys from the Dust) 
'Bowl neighborhood were there. | 
'It wasn’t only the same game, it 
'was the same people. We had | 
learned the same way, from and | 
with each other. I guess I prac- 
ticed a lot more than some of 


he can 


} 


a 
rs 


as 


The Planets in February 
dex lares., 
I would ha’ 
ut, but eve | 


ul, 
aro. 


h 
in the sky 


th. it 18 circling 


Mercury wiil not bi 
icture this mo! 


ind on the f 


. ‘ . ‘ oo hae 
aetensive a iOt aD 


_ ‘re 2 7 _e ,* 
cli PALA ‘Ji caat lis 


as a 
eran ig 


Information Desk 


< < k { rT < page i caaatiaeniniaaiataiatan ee . : —_ 
almost constantly, but it never *“L’Envoi 
seemed to bother hifi -or-to et ee 
affect his play. To Oscar, what 
reporters say about him just 
isn’t that interesting. He figures 
they have their job to do and 
they do it. His job is playing 
basketball and he does it.” 
eee awe However, I just ran across a 
He certainly-does. When the Copy of Kipling’s powwne a 
former all-state from Cris] which one called “L’Envoi, 
) i aii-State i) ispus euitin lag 7 7 
and it has similarity to the 
the fellows, although I never Attucks takes the COU ? te above other rn the title. Could 
thought of it so much as prac- tures the crowa’s atte sim- you give me the author of the 


tine lube "7 ey i 
ett I liked to play. | ply bv the wav he handles him- quoted ines and the complete 
RS Sia 


“T= hada tot of energy “and 
basketball was a puzzle to me 
each game different, always 
changing, always a lot of sus- 
pense, So whenever I was out of 
the houte I was apt to be in a /| team Cincinnati opposed, Oscar 
basketball game.By the time I | showed, however;—-a-—-healthy 
|'was in high school I may have | knowledge of his own fallibility. 
been pretty young in terms of | Shortly before the game he con- 
years._but I-was_a-_sort of vet-/|fided to a friend, “It’s a time 
eran in basketball. And. of/| like this, when you sheuld do 
course, the coaching I got then everything even better than 
helped a lot, too.” usual, that sometimes you can't 

It was as a high-school star ’| seem to do it at all. I might’ 
that Oscar began to get the pub- | goof.” 
licity which now has reached Instead f goofing, 
nationwide proportions. Even = scored 56 points to lead his team 
then. in his area, it was high-' to a 118-54 rout of the 
powered and would have di- tion. He did not have to 
verted the attention of many from far out because he 
young fellows from their game accomplished at driving 
to themselves. But Oscar still! feinting his way to 
looks a little disappointed when shooting position. The 
he is called off the court by crowd roared its delight. 
George Smith, Cincinnati coach,| Joe Lapchick, formerly 
to be interviewed during a prac- Celtic and a coach of the New 
tice session. Tt was the same way )-York Kniekerbockers, had a co- 

gent comment or two. Lapchict 
is now coach of St. John’s, and 


om 


,. 
AaAvDOUT 


name Wa 


ee a 


Q. lIalways thought Rudyara 
Kipling wrote the “L’Envoi’ 
which begins 

“When earth's last picture is painted 


And the tubes are twisted and 
dried ; 1s 


is 
no 


tina 
iia 


Cap- 
ntion 
aia _ wmt «anh poem. 
_self,-Before. his recent.debut-in 

Madison Square Garden, where 


McMibiams. 
Ment 


Frances i... 
Cehacen. 


4 
tu quote is b) 
two poems 
“T,EnVOs.”. & 
beginnin “When earth 
picture painted —_1: 
“L/Envoi to the Seven Seas, 
being the last poem in the grou} 
of that title. In some volumes 
of Kipling it is listed under a 
title identical with the first line 
The other “L’Envoi” is “L’Envoi 
to Departmental Ditties,” being 
the last poem in that group; and 
begins “The smoke upon you! 
Altar dies ...” “L’Envoi to the 
Seven Seas” is no doubt the bet- 
ter known poem, Both 
in any complete volume of Kip- 
ling’s poems 


a ed 
144, 


he set a new scoring record and 
single - handedly scored more 
points than the entire Seton Hall 


A. nh ih vi 
ori. 
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undel 
one 
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and 
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Today "5 Buotation 


Success is the result of 


ccidies Press 


Snow, Snow, Beautiful Snow!’ 
These four Colby Junior College students show their delight 


with recent heavy snowfall at 


bury, N.H., as they pose against a background of snow-covered 
trees. The student skiers are. left to right, Jill Mathews, Birm- 
ingham, Mich.; Prudie Hand, Manchester, N.H.; Anita Reiner, 
Manchester, N.H., and Noni Manwaring, Boston, Mass. 


ee 


Wouldn't you like to have your article appear in the Youth 


Section? Your photographs and 
We're interested in stories up 


Want | to Contribute? 


- a ene 


when Ray Crowe was coaching 
him at Attucks High. Oscar is 

———————— — said he was happy his team had 
not had to face Robertson that 


night. 

“Frankly,. any 
coach I«can think 
grateful Robertson is 
league. I will th! 
the greatest sophomore |! 
“ever seen and in ability 
fessional already.” 


mental attitude, and the 
prof right mental attitude will 
ot 
not 


SSion 
Cant 

in his 
this 1 
have 
pro- 


bring success in every- 
thiny vou undertake. 
—Q, W. HoLMEs 


Say 


a 


Par Time 21 Min. 


Mountain 


crest 
Sut 


ACROSS 
Vestment 
Foodfish 
Unmask 
Tibetan 
gazelle 
Surface 
a street 
Dutch 
cheese 
Noctur1.al 
bird 
Herring 
sauce ; 
Departed 
Tear 
Charmed 
The Tal- 
mud 
Ore 
deposits 
In favo1 
June bu 
Lyrics 
Wrong- 
doing 
A few 
Perceiv« 
Animal 

docter 
Drink of 
honey and 
mulberrie: 
Reddish- 
brown 
color 
Salty 
Effort 
Attire 
Not warm 
Opening 
A name fui 
the sassa. 
fras, tree 


Polygon 

having 10 
Sices 
Cover 


i@w els 


Soap 
ingredient 
slind, as 

In hawkinz 
Coasting 
vehicle 
Affirma- 


live 


the 
Silape 

( nooses 
al 
COTM POSi-«- 
tion 
Provoke 
Posted 
Resist 
authority 
Rock 
Vex 
Vapor 
Year: 
one's 
Regret 
Affirma- 
tive vote 
Vegetable 
9 1/0 


with 


ViusSle 


Commo- 
tion 

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goacde z 
Scotch 
uncle 
Playing 
caras 
Thrice 
pretix 
Luster 
Roundup 
Reverent!: 
Style of 
type 
5 6 


DOWN 
Past 
Moo 
Writer 
‘ballads 
Places at 
intervals 
Pulled 2F. 
with force 22. 
Affirm . 
With con- >. 
fidence 


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life 


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Mt. Sunapee State Park, New- 


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sketches? Poems? 
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earth 
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Virgo, quite -near- the star Spica 
during the month will give 


and, 


a neat 


the 


astronomer 


calls a 


demonstration of 


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what 
retro- 


grade 


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Sky ¢ ‘hart for Sky Seanners=Month of February 


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again and the two objects, 


sky gazer to watch. 


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show that Jupi 
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at month’s end, will be in almost 
exactly the same positions-as-on 


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irenthesis, “me something.” 


FO i 3 I a KD 


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he Sunny flours” 


Paints School Free 
Washington, D.C. 

George T. Smith, a Washe 
ington painter, drove past the 
Harrison elementary schoo] in 
that city last October, saw it 
“A in need of a paint job and 
mace nental note to bid,on 
the job. But the school’s budget 
had no money to pay for 
painting this school and Mr. 


as 


«i 


_eumith decided to forget about 


> 


+ 


it. Bait he could not forget it. 
The picture of the shabby 
school remained with him day 
after day. He says he thought 
about - it y day until the 
middie of December and wore 
ried over it. To get it off his 
mind, he painted the outside 
of the building himself | for 
iree, even working on holidays. 

The assistant school superin- 
tendent in charge of buildings 
and grounds estimates that the 
0b would have cost between 
$1,000 and $1,200. 

Gladys Chiquoine 


4) Verse 

for Today... 
He doth not afflict 

‘willingly nor grieve the 


children of men.—Lam. 
3:33 


e% or au 
‘ a 


As the Small 


ee eee 


Fry See It 


My young son recently wrote 
his brother in Germany. In 
e\ he for some 
gift. Again this was dt 
pecifically. I insisted 
itting the petition 

Dut at the botton 
a neat little P'S. said, “Do you 
know what -‘P.S.’ means? It 
means.‘please send,'."" and.in-pa- 


to 
letter 


aSKSs 


er y 


me 


rewrite it on 
He did SO, 


I let that pass. 
Vera Baggott, Augusta, Ga 


mother 


walk or 
ve ¢ nm Wi 


Donnie, who is 
ride his.bicycle to school, piped 


up, 
or run.” 


Ten-year-old Lynne and her 
were discussing riding 


her bicycle to school one cold, 
"rainy morning, and Lynne said 


know if she would 


ride. 


didn't 


Her: eight-year-old brother, 
not allowed to 


“I don’t know if I'll walk 


Ann Schoppeiry, Vienna. Va. 


Panel Parade | 


By Guernsey LePelley 


Ne ITHER OID 
(tT HAPPENED 


1c 


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FAST 


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Cc 
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LAR MADUKE 


FLEW OFF 


MY 


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LOOK 


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AREN'T 


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* United Press 


CITIZENS’ 
NATIONAL + 
BANK 


Loan Department 


MA mom 


“Just how much overdue IS this library book?” 


SOP 


Little People’s Corner 


Serine ect << | 


SR Nn Se ne ota 


The Litthe New Look 


This very young lady seems delighted with one of the new 
“chemise” style dresses. It's made of White sharkskin with navy 


Prong “Pop, what's this ad mean: ‘Never underestimate the power 


‘trim. The middy tie, nautical buttons, and box pleats give it a 
of a woman’?” #: 


tion in these THREE columns from readers 13 to 35. 
i; summer-sports appearance. 


- Answer Biock Appears Among Advertisements 


Editorials 


_* Boston, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1958 


_* 


- 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR > 


“First the blade, then the ear, ES then the full grain im the 


ear” ** (K) 


‘tien 


THE CHRISTIAN PUBLISHING socreTe 


Communism’s ‘Status Quo’ 


“If the status quo is not recog- 
nized ... ,” says Mr. Khrushchev, 
“then it is absolutely impossible to 
come to terms.” In this sentence and 
its context from a speech at Minsk 
the Soviet autocrat tells the free 
world how much—and how infini- 
tesimally little—can be expected 
from a summit conference of heads 
of state without exhaustive diplo- 
matic preparation. 

The status quo which Party Secre- 
tary Khrushchev so adamantly de- 
fends is Moscow’s iron rule, backed 
by the Soviet Army, over the satellite 
states of Eastern Europe, a rule at- 
tained by defiance of the Yalta 
Agreement. He protests against vio- 
lating’ the “sovereign” rights” of So- 
cialist states or interfering in their 
“domestic affairs,” as if Russia had 
respected these rights. 

At the same time Moscow appar- 
ently supports the proposal of Polish 
Foreign Minister Rapacki to prohibit 
atomic arms in a zone to consist of 
East and West Germany, Poland, and 
Czechoslovakia. This proposal is 
filled with “fishhooks.” Mr. Khrush- 
chev says the Soviet will accept “the 
necessary controls” to put it into 
effect; but will these controls in- 
clude any effective inspection to pre- 
vent total disregard of the pledged 
word. on the Communist side, as: has 
occurred in Korea? 

If the Communists were in earnest 
about making a real buffer zone in 


Central Europe they would consent 
not merely to denuclearize such a 
zone, or a larger one. but to with- 
draw troops from it. This would be 
the acid test of whether they dared 
trust the continuance of Communist 
governments to free decision. 

The Soviet chief commissar says 
the question of a “Socialist”. (Com- 
munist) government is decided “by 
each nation as it sees fit”—but not by 
the peoples of these nations. The 
Yalta Declaration reaffirmed the At- 
lantic Charter as to “the right of all 
peoples to choose the form of gov- 
ernment under which they will live.” 

To withdraw troops fren West 
Germany would involve some risk 
for the North Attantic Atiiance: Hugh 
Gaitskell, Labor, Party leader in 
Britain, Has_prdposed that Hungary 
be added. to the zone and that it be 
cleared not only of nuclear weapons 
but of Soviet and Western armed 
forces. We should like to see the 
Western governments really press 
Moscow on this proposition. 

We believe it would show the hol- 
lowness of Communist propaganda 
pretensions. It would help either to 
pave the way for a useful summit 
conference or to show plainly the 
futility of one. If the Communists 
have any areas of resiliency which 
would. make a. summit—.conference 
worth while, they should be willing 
to indicate these to obtain a con- 
ference. 


Northeastern’s 


Nearly a half century ago, when 
many New England young men were 
still taking Horace Greeley’s advice 
and heading westward in pursuit of 
careers, Carl Stephens Ell did ex- 
actly the opposite. He came east to 
Boston from Indiana, and has been 
an important figure on the local edu- 
cational scene for more than four 
decades. 

In 1959 Dr. Ell will retire as presi- 
dent of Northeastern University, 
but his significant contributions in 
the field of education will continue 
to benefit tens of thousands of New 
England students for years to come. 

A graduate of DePauw University, 
Dr. Ell joined the Northeastern 
faculty in 1910 as an instructor of 
civil engineering. His career since has 
paralleled Northeastern’s expansion 
from a handful of part-time students 
to the second largest New England 
university in enrollment. 


Great President 


He became president in 1940, and 
under his leadership Northeastern 
has developed from a small, obscure 
school in the Boston YMCA into an 
independent university with a 17- 
acre campus, becoming the largest 
cooperative-plan institution of higher 
education in the country. Through 
this plan students after their fresh- 
man year alternate in 10-week pe- 
riods--between -the- classroom --and 
actual on-the-job training in their 
chosen field. 

Through Dr. Ell’s enthusiasm and 
foresight. nearly all of the univer- 
sity’s present modern educational 
plant has been completed, academic 
standards raised, and a college of 
education and a graduate school 
established. Few persons have—con- 
tributed morein recent decades to- 
ward building Boston as a center of 
learning. 


‘Man Without a Country’ 


Dictators in Latin America have a 
natural affinity for one another. 

This has been shown. once again 
in the case of the perambulating 
Juan Domingo Peron. The onetime 
dictator of Argentina was rudely 
“asked out” of Venezuela when his 
protector, dictator Marcos Perez 
Jiménez, was thrown out of office. 

And where did Sefior Peron—as 
well as Gen. Pérez Jimenez—end up? 
In the Dominican Republic, headed 
by the most totalitarian of the Latin- 
American dictators. 

The homeless wanderings of Gen- 
eral Peron prove that it is getting 
ever more difficult for a footloose 
dictator to put his-roots down. With 
the overthrow or disappearance in 
the past couple of years of several 
dictators (Odria of Peru, Rojas 
Pinilla of Colombia, Anastasio So- 
moza of Nicaragua, Julio Lozano of 
Honduras, and now Perez Jimenez of 
Venezuela); the climate in the Amer- 
icas for this type ‘of exile has become 
more hostile. 


General Peron was “invited” to 
leave Paraguay, Panama, and Vene- 
zuela before arriving in the Domini- 
can Republic. His widely ramified 
activities, aimed at overturning the 
prodemocratic regime in Argentina, 
have made him a difficult guest. 
Argentina broke off relations with 
Venezuela when the latter country 
refused to oust Peron. 

The Argentines have constantly 
campaigned to force the former ruler 
into exile in Europe, where remote- 
ness would limit the effectiveness of 
his operations against their. govern- 
ment. Apparently their desire will 
be realized. Mr. Peron said he would 
go to Europe after a brief stay in 
the Dominican Republic. 

At present the places of refuge in 
the hemisphere for a dictator are few. 
Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and 
Paraguay are the only traditional- 
style military dictaforships remain- 
ing.—Phis-very—fact-is—an—optimistic 
comment on the evolving Latin- 
American political pattern. 


Cyprus—Another 


Rioting by Turkish Cypriotes 
against the British authorities in 
Cyprus brings a new note of tragedy 
into the troubled story of that island. 
This is the signal that Turks both 
in Cyprus and Turkey. are now 


deeply committed to the idea of par-- 


titioning the island between the 
Greek and Turkish communities as 
against turning it over intact to 
Greek rule. 

The riots, with their fatalities, fol- 
lowed British statements which 
seemed to put Turkish aims in doubt. 
It is possible that had Britain re- 
frained from bringing up th® ques- 
tion. of the Turkish minority in the 
early stages of the..Cyprus~crisis 
Turks would not now be excited over 
the possibility of being ruled by 
Greeks in Cyprus. On the other hand, 
the depth. of feeling now displayed 
can b® cited as indicating that Brit- 
ain may not have been too far off the 
mark in recognizing that Enosis, or 
union with Greece for Cyprus, held 
real concern for Turks. 

Had Greek-Cypriote aims been re- 
stricted to self-government, and not 


Face of Tragedy 


put forward in such a way as almost 
to guarantee that any settlement 
would soon mean union with Greece, 
a way might have been found to ac- 
commodate both Turkish and Greek 
Cypriotes in one community. As it 
developed, however, Greeks made 
clear to Turkish elements in Cyprus 
and to Turks at home that Athens 
would soon be ruling Turks in 
Cyprus if self-determination were 
granted to the islanders. 

This possibility was unwelcome in 
a way which can be understood only 
in the light of historic Greek-Turkish 
relations sharpened by the Greek- 
Turkish wars in the early 1920's. 
It was unwelcome, too, because 
Turkish. Cypriotes,- holding perhaps 
45 per cent of the land and'operating 
some of the more successful enter- 
prises, did not want to be taxed from 
Athens: They referred to conditions 
in Greece itself as qne reason why. 

One key to the Turkish riots 
is the same sort of nationalism 


that is sweeping many regions. It is 


highly emotional. But it defies any- 
one to underrate its significance 
merely for that reason. 


The Wise Milkman 


* 


Come What May 


Fall Out 


By John Allan May 


LONDON 
year at about thi time 


Exchee 
experts to 


the 


Every 


Chancellor of the juer, whoever: 


he. maybe, cals~ his him. to 
discuss 
if we can think up a new twist.” 

We are indébted to 
borough of the Daily Te 
don, for discovering the most thought- 
provoking of this year’s new The 
Commissioners of Customs and Excise are 
putting a purchase tax of 60 per cent on 
key containers, holders for check, stamp 
and address books, and “similar 
ceptables.” With one exception: 

“Plain -folders having no 
ever of retaining the art 
are designed.to. hold.” 

This decision apparent! 
failure of s 
agree with the Commi 
proper definition of a 
book. It clears everything 

It would only confuse things again if 
I went on to explain that a pocketbook, 
or wallet, would be defined quite differ- 
ently in Britain than in the United States. 
It is not the particular but the general 
interest that. wish to--underhne.. tis 
the theory I am interested in. 

The theory is quite clear. If ypu design 
and manufacture a container to hold an 
article, and design it so that it does in 
fact hold it, your product is subject to this 


taxation. “Let us,” he says, “see 


Péter=- 
of Lon- 


columnist 


? - : 
i@frapn, 


twists. 


re- 


what- 
the 4 


a m4 
means 


icles which 


ine makel 


up. 


60 per cent purchase tax. If on the other 
hand you design and manufacture a con- 
tainer for holding some article so that, it 
has no means whatever of holding the 
article—in other words if make a 
container to hold an article that it will not 
hold—then no tax is payable. 
4 4 + 

Similarly, as I see it, if ign a 
holder which when the article is inserted 
allows the article to fall out, such a prod- 
uct is free of tax. 

This’ seems fair. But perhaps it is not 
generally realized that a new principle of 
taxation has thus been formulated with 
far-reaching possibilities. 

For instance, as everyone knows, there 
is a purchase tax of 60 per cent on motor- 
cars. I do not know whether 
possibility of having a failure to agree on 
the definition of a motorcar. It i: 
demonstrably a mechanically propeted 
conveyance having four wheels (where it 
does not have three), the intention of 
whichds to take people from place to place 
by means of public (and private, where 
applicable). highways. There is_ barely 
room for disagreement. The same tax prin- 
ciple nevertheless could well be applied, I 
feel. In this case the 60 per cent purchase 
tax would be applicable.to all automobiles 
with this exception: 

“Plain motorcars having no 
whatever of conveying the passengers 
are designed to convey.” 

Such cars would be tax-free. 

Now this system would have certain 
obvious advantages. It would ensure the 
maintenance of full employment in the 


Vou 


you des 


there is any 


means 
they 


ear industry. It, would enable cars to be 


sold so cheaply that everybody in Britain 


would obviate the 


roads. 


could afford one. It 
overcrowding of the 

[ would suggest, as a slight imptove- 
ment, and to provide the necessary in- 
centive, that purchasers of excepted auto- 
mobiles might after a certain stated time 
interval be allowed to add to their cars, 
again tax-free, those means of conveying 
drivers and passengers which they have 
hitherto foregone, whether these means 
be seats, or wheels, or motors, or what- 
ever. This time interval should be at least 
as @reat as that covering the payments on 
the excepted automobile. Purchasers of 
tax-free cars could. thus use them only 
when they had paid for them and the in- 
flationary aspects of the installment 
tem, or hire-purchase, would be avoided. 


bith vin 

This reminds me that in January some 
exceptional London dockers proved a new 
trades union rule of some significance in 
the. battle against inflation. Two Danish 
freighters laden with food came in. They 
lay at a wharf while two gangs of dockers 
argued as to which gang should unload 
them. No agreement having been reached 
by evening, one of the ships, being on a 
chedule, sailed away still laden. The dock- 
ers then.claimed “standby-money” for the 
time they were standing by (i.e. arguing), 
as well as the money they would have 
earned if they had unloaded the ship they 
did not unload. The management refused 
to pay. The dockers went on strike. 
Negotiations next day resulted in the 
ang being paid the £25 it had “lost.” 
he dockers sent the money to charity, 
saying, “It wasn’t the money so much as 
the principle of the thing.” 

Now we see what the Commissioners 
are up to. This is exactly the sort of money 
intended to be kept in an untaxed wallet 
or pocketbook having no means whatever 
of retaining the articles it is désigned fo 
hold. In this tax game you have to think 
of everything. 


SVSe 


al 

»« 
st 
‘ 


In Behalf of Mr. Benson | 


Mirror of World Opinion 


The Senate’s farm politicians are get- 
ting ready to go over Secretary Benson 
again in new committee hearings. Chair- 
man Ellender of the Senate Agriculture 
Committee expects that two days will be 
expended in roweling the Secretary of 
Agriculture. Senator Thye, a Republican, 
announces that he is going to “block” Mr. 
Benson's projected cutback in dairy sub- 
if he can. 

Mr. 


Sidles 


But still for reducing 
point where farm 


approximate the 


Benson is 
farm supports to the 
prices will once more 
free-market offerings. Only in this way, 
he says, can American agriculture get 
back on its economic feet and the tax- 
payer shake the monkey of farm sub- 
sidies off his back. Only in this way can 
American farm products hold their true 
place in the markets, both domestic and 
foreign. And there is rising evidence that 
many rank .iand file farmers share this 
view. 

Just 
Farm, Bureau 


other day the big American 
Federation was passing 
resolutions that smacked of this Benson 
doctrine. One ‘set. of facts fairly repre- 
sentative of the whole farm situation is 
well known to the cotton men in the 
Farm Bureau. World. mill consumption 
of American cotton was 13 million bales 
in 1946. The figure had ‘dropped to 12.6 
million bales in 1954. World mill con- 
sumption of foreign cotton growths was 
13.3 million bales in 1946. The figure for 
1954. was 22.8 million bales. 

Many causes explain the decline of 
American cotton and the rise of foreign 
cotton in these figures. A major cause 
was certainly the steady pricing-out-of- 
the-market of American cotton under the 
high-level support programs. This is the 
kind of fact, duplicated in~= most other 
supported farm lines, that works with 
hydraulic pressure in behalf of Mr. 
Benson.—Baltimore Sun 


the 


Tithe past T2 wont wien 


——— 


A Change of Mood in Canada 


An Intimate Message from w ashington 


Registered te 


Petens to@ 


By Richard L. Strout 


who make 
are normal! 


American ambassadors 
pointed speeches abroad 
widely reported at home. If One of ou 
envoys in a country in Europe, say, felt i 
necessary to declare that local criticism 
of the United States was a cause of con- 
cern, wires would start humming. Living 
ston T. Merchant, United States Ambas- 
sador to Canada, made such a speech to 
the Women’s Canadian Club of Ha 
Ont.. Jan. 22. and it caused hardly a ry 
ple at home. But it has been the ibiect of 
much discussion in Canada 

Mr. Merchant i 
mat and his sper 
in Washington. He said that he detected 
“signs of a change in the mood of Canada 
Tt Behave 
look at.” Canadian 


growing, 


‘7 iiton 


am experience a dip 


nh was evicdentiy cieared 


both our countries to 
criticism of the United Stat 
he said, and it is making 
two countries’ mutual pro! 
ficult. 

Mr. Merchant's pl 
friendly and diplomati 
speech brought a good reactin 
Editoriats caution that 
the United States have gone ‘ al 
are over-emotiona! Bat inhi OOO 
mean that the probiem has ended 
striking thing is that citizens in the U 
States are hardiv aware of it. They are 
subject of heated arguments but thei 
ears do not burn, The United States oft 
displays toward Canada 
affectionate absent-mindedne:s 
Canada for granted. Someti 
more irritating than 4 


lems 


ras¢s 


can | 


r¢ Ce 


‘ ¢¢.4 
at) a i ete 


“il acdian 
been talk! 


The new { 
istration has g 
1D par Com eS Sere | 
United States to Britain. Ti 
ernment has just sent.a@ strong pi 
Washington against the 10 per cen 
Canadian oil on the West Coast 
based on a “voluntary” redi 


4 “aT 
' : : 


which Washingt clair : necessary te 
national securi nited State quotas are 
leadt, 
firs 
restric - 
United 
The 


(‘anata 


being threaten. 
ary cot pve ; 


export market da 


er? Caraci > LifTx. 
ex mor! ¥ 


: a * 
aT) aae at) arr ©] 


Tryve iy cer Ty 
7] iT} and : vy i<* met t cae + Py] 


abroad. 


granted 
inw 
strongiy. 

with Canada 

preoicwm Hors not rary 
n of Canha- 
and refinir 4 
capital with 
nickel, 
automobiic, 
chemical industries. 
' Trias uner ¥ 
that 


smaller 


Tit w ° 


ened dominati« 
facturing 
‘nited States 
: ; c i. fas, 


a Py 
ts77 fii 4 


ae? miry 


‘7 ef 


Answers to Communism 


To Tue C “HRISTIAN SCTENCE MONITOR 
The sensational advertiseme 

communism in a recent i 

extremely interesti 
late date is still u 
of the Com 
of Dr. F. C. Schwarz quot 
should 


per Was 
at this 
workings unist 
testimony 
the advertisement 
him—though the 
would hardly be new to any careful reader 
of your paper. 

On the other hand, Dr 
mony could lead to dangerous and panicky 
oversimplifications if not. put in a context 
of further Moni- 
tor habitually supplies. 

He describes, in a rudimentary w: 
the Communist mentality. Of course Met 
is no such thing as a simon-pure Commu- 
nist any more than there is a sin 
Christian. Even the most dedicated Com- 
munist (or Christian) reflects to de- 
gree the national background, 
temperament, human inconsistencies, 
common..instinc}s..which. characterize all 
people. Even the men in the Kremlin are 
Russians as well as Communists, and tra- 
ditional Russian imperialism plays a part 
in their thinking as Wéell as Marxtst+ 
Leninist ‘theory—and sometimes a conp- 
flicting part. 
is a great mistake 
absolutely 
automaticaliv to 
there are 


certain! io 


information it contain: 


Schwarz's test 


se > by 
such as iiit 


information. 


on-pu4&re 


Some 
personal 
and 


to think of 
monolithic 


ts 


Thus it 
coramunism as an 
sysiem, responding 
unified top command, Obviously 
strains and cross-currents within the satei- 
lite system as well as within the Politburo 
and the men composing it. Yugosiavia has 
already achieved a position of independ- 
ence. though remaining Communist, and 
Poland enjoys certain precarious liberties. 
While presenting a united front to the 
world, the two giant power centers, Ajos- 
cow and Peking, have deep conflicts of 
interest which must almost certainly in- 
crease with the growth of Chinese power. 

It would be wishful to count too heavily 
on these differences, but it would be folly 
to assume that communism is a perfectly 
functioning international conspiracy mov- 
ing with scientific precision under the di- 
rection of a single master mind or master 
group. To be hypnotized by fear into be- 
lieving such a fallacy would be as disas- 
trous as to be blind to the magnitude of 
the Communist challenge. . 

Dr. Schwarz rightly pointed out that 
basically the challenge Is not Military. 
Communism: has more effective ways of 
expanding in neutral and doubtful areas 
than by armed conquest. Yet panic would 
make Americans pour billions into bigger 
bombs and better missiles while neglecting 
the very steps that Would win the world 
away from Moscow’s seductive promise: 

Dr. Schwarz's prescription for educa- 
tion against communism is not wholly sat- 
isfactory. It sounds a little too much iike 
indoctrination, without that built-in con- 
cern for independence of thought and for 
responsible self-criticism which is the real 
strength of deraocracy. Would such educa- 
tion produce a cijzenry who would under- 
stand. for instance. that racial segregation 
in the United States provides communism 
with one of its favorite weapons for at- 
tacking the American system” 

Again, if the hopes of the rest of the 
world for top-level negotiations with te, 
Russians seem rather soft-headed at pres- 
ent, is it hard-headed to throw down the 
very possibility of any kind of: negotia- 
tions, as Dr. Schwarz seems to do? 

“The patient negotiators who secured the 
withdrawal of Soviet forces from Austria 
after interminable conferences were as 
hard-headed as they come, They cleariy 
had no illusions about Soviet “promises” 
but they knew a good deal ‘about both 
Soviet: and Western interests and they 
found the point at which those interests 
could come to a mutually agreeable ac- 
commodation, And there are other exam- 
ples. Would anyone prefer that we should 
still be-fighting in Korea as an alternative 


This newspaper welcomes communications fr 
pect of publication. All ere subject to conden 


m readers vieter they ore ‘* thee 
. We esses Ro rc ll: as for ‘statements is leloe 


armie 


‘= 
would 
ani 16 $as. 


diplomatic. €@0me6 
iver—inciud.- 

and wherever 

; TLsAC i VES 

» TOO! Out Mike 

in t own thinke 
Is evil te be found 
Soviet negotiators 
of self-interest? 

as Mr. 
Go? In the history 

ca mass extermination 

t of its own Indians 

tten’ Do we believe that 

st hardened Communist there is 
spark of the divine, which tay 
SMHRevLme and us 
an AWaAreTrese of 


- eA epee 


s + - - 
iaTi Warrior. 


in the me 
not a 
S<+HTe 


th Git . 
tiie greet ya 


basically 
Unites Ali rye 


well abandor held te the 


ight as 
ommun tists. 
t. hold out 
ideal for which 
lave heen willing toe 

he West is to offer 

world «a 

surely it 

ll appear. 

ideology, 

the dynamic 

God. \ 

f men, in 

each indivi i} may rise to his 
ature. S&S | @ faith is best 
“deeds, not words”—to bor- 
an overworked phr: The degree to 
which American: practice 
Christian iidera- 
everywhere wil! 
-Cammunist 


who. Pe . _ ‘A rm iris fri 
lo th rid Mmopian 


which 
(God-given st 
canveveri by 
row 


ck Moc rac * eI 
fellow men 
t bage 
mati TMMIT ¢ 


{ ONCERNED 


tion tor then 


speak louder than all 


art 


CIMTriven 


Goldilocks and Sputnik 

To Tue Crristian Sctence Monrror: 
f-must trie -excertien te -dehban- Gauld'«.. 
dismissal of the wade by Dr, 


J. Allen tale 


about 


SULEBEStion 
> 


Hivnek concerning Muresers 


how 


ma the 
: re exciting, 
It all Gepends on whe telling the story, 
and who is listening. Personally, | fee! that 
Dr. Hynek’s approach is & good one and 
presents a real Goldilocks, of 
course, bul wh zero tan” 

New York Dimronp, Ph.D. 


root 


challenge 
rest 
Rove 


Humane Bills 


lo Tue Currsrian Scrence Monrror 
d legisiati to be 
worked and even fought fer. 
an exarmpie is the human aughter 
legista up before Congress. Seve 
eral times before, this hegisi ation Was Wave 
laid or shunted aside for various reasons, 
However, the need for passage is just as 
great or greater ram? ever, 

If, as a Christian nation, we pray to a 
just and loving Ge d for mercy, peace, and 
protection for ourselves from the horrers 
of an atomic war, it would seem tmnera- 
tive for us to be consistent by practicing 
toward our own defenseless farm animals 
the same merey we wish and pray for. 

The bills: are No. S 1487 iSenate bil) 
and H. R. 8308 (Mouse hill 

R. Beareice Waneen 

San Diego, Calif 


time rev my There 


lion THM 


The b Netter 


way he kindled into 3