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VOLUME 51 NO. 191 


© 1969, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING SOCIETY 
Reserved 


All Rights 


BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11; 1959 


R 


** ATLANTIC EDITION 


‘Maximum Muddle’ Phase 


Seen in Communist China 


By Ronald Stead 


Southeast Asian Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Singapore 

Communist China is going 
through a period referred to as 
that of “maximum muddle” by 
people here with confidential 
sources of information on the 
Chinese mainland. 

The muddle is political and 
economical and it arises mostly 
because of what the Communist 
Chinese themselves call “con- 
tradictions” due to continuing 
discord between party leaders 
and “éxperts’” in various spe- 
cialized fields — including for- 
eign affairs. 

The “big leap forward” ini- 
tiated in 1958 has had a boom- 
erang effect. Peking has meas- 
urably lost prestige in Southeast 
Asia by trying to go too far in 
too many directions at once. 
One sequel has been a lessen- 
ing of funds sent back to rela- 
tives in mainland China . by 
overseas Chinese, of whom some 
13,000,000 live in various coun- 
tries in this region. 

Communist China’s conduct 
over Tibét and even more its 
denigration of India since the 
Dalai Lama found sanctuary 


Associated Press 


there have caused its greatest 
single loss of face. But there 
have been others—not the least 
being a mistimed trade drive into 
Southeast Asia designed to sabo- 
tage anticipated Western and 
Japanese attempts to exploit this 
market, 


‘Doctrinaire Optimism’ 
Peking leaders sometimes mis- 
calculate because of what might 
be termed “doctrinaire opti- 
mism” when making interna- 


tional assessments in advance, 
and they apparently did so when 
they welcomed the American re- 
cession early last vear as herald- 
ing the anticipated decline and 
fall of he capitalist world. Peking 
planners evidently thought this 
would force the West into a des- 
perate attempt to sell in the 
East. The Chinese Communists 
sought to defeat this by dumping 
and price cutting generally. 
The end result of overestimat- 
ing their capacity to maintain 
supplies overseas on this basis 
was a disclosure of domestic 
limitations—while Western trad- 


Life in China Is a Tough Pull 


ers carried on as usual, backed 
by reliable outputs in the United 
States, Britain, and elsewhere. 

At the same time the an- 
nouncement of overambitious 
targets and subsequent failure to 
reach them has put into reverse 
the overseas publicity aspect of 
the “big leap forward” as a 
whole, 

The “leap” was intended to 
secure a large simultaneous in- 
crease in industrial and agri- 
cultural production (11,000,000 
tons of steel, 375,000,000 tons of 
food grains), accompanied by a 
decisive advance toward abso- 
lute communism such as even 
Moscow no longer attempts to 
impose on its people. 


Asian Attitudes Harden 

The frustrated division of 
views that arose in Peking when 
these ambitions were not real- 
ized is reflected in an aggres- 
sive foreign policy that may be 
influencing people but is cer- 
tainly. not making friends. 

This hardening attitude my be 
seen in the Federation of Ma- 
laya, which produces about one- 
third of the world’s natural rub- 
ber and tin. It may be seen in 
the contiguous island of Singa- 
pore, since June 3 an internally 
autonomous state self-governed 
by an uncompromisingly social- 
ist administration that has set 
its face against communism. 

Malaya’s reasons for prohibit- 
ing the entry of certain classes 
of Chinese textiles, as well as a 
general ruling that had the 
specific effect of putting Pe- 
king’s Bank of China out of busi- 
ness in Malaya, were really 
protective reactions against an 
ill-judged Communist Chinese 


| | a ‘ 
Pair From Britain 


Lives ItUp on $1 


By the Associated Press 


Montreal 

Bernard and Edith Cow- 
deroy, a British couple who 
are; 73 and 71, respectively,. 
have just completed a 14,000- 
mile North American trip at a 
cost of $1 plus the price of 
gasoline. They brought their 
own food from Britain. 

They traveled in a caravan- 
type of vehicle built over a 
truck. It is equipped with a 
mobile double bed, a kitchen, 
and even a sink. They bought 
canned food supplies in Lon- 
don, and arrived in Montreal 
last May 2. 

The dollar they spent? That 
was for overnight parking one’ 
night. 


policy in a region where good 
will was required. 

Nor have Peking’s colonial op- 
erations in Tibet done anything 
to reassure Southeast Asian na- 
tions. [It is not overlooked that, 
according to the Dalai Lama, 
Peking has settled 5,000,000 Chi- 
nese in Tibet since this remote 
land was “liberated.” 


China Sparks Anxieties 
Apprehension of China, with 
its constant build-up of internal 
pressure from .an ever-growing 
population, has grown notice- 


ably in Indonesia in the past 12 | 


months. A recent clampdown on 
Chinese-Indonesians engaged in 
small commerce is construed by 
them as a forerunner of heavier 
restrictions, 

Thug communism is_ being 
“contained” in Southeast Asia 
and one of the developments 
largely responsible for this is 
increased military influence over 
civilian matters in Indonesia, 
Burma, Thailand, and Pakistan. 


One of a series 


Floods aggravate China food 
lag: Page 4. 


‘State of the Nations 


Peering Into the Future 


By WILLIAM 


HH. STRINGER 


Trend of 


EKeonomy 


No ‘Doldrums’ in 1959 


of The Christian 


New York 

It used to be customary to 
speak about the “summer 
doldrums” in-the stock mar- 
ket, as well as in business 
generally. 

No more, Last summer 
marked the beginning of a 
new phase of the bullish up- 


Chief, Washington Bureau, The Christian Science Moniter | trend in stock market prices. 


Washington 

One of the advantages, no 
doubt, of the two-party sys- 
tem of government is that 
while one party is grappling 
with the present, the other can 
begin to explore the future. 

This is not quite the present 
line-up in Washington, but 
various people, including im- 
portant columnists, are urging 
this thesis on Democratic Ma- 
jority Leader Lyndon B. John- 
son. 

At the moment the Repub- 
licans, controlling the White 
House, have come fairly close 
to halting inflation and achiev- 
ing price stability. The next 
budget will be more than 
balanced. Prosperity .is at 
hand, and we may soon te 
talking about “boom” condi- 
tions. The Cabinet Committee 
on Price Stability for Eco- 
nomic Growth, headed by 
Vice-President Richard M. 
Nixon, says happy days are 
here if only inflation will stay 
conquered. 


a ae 

Yet there are certain mis- 
givings — those well-known 
clouds no bigger than a man’s 
hand, floating around 
horizon. 

There are misgivings 
whether the nation’s economy 


is really growing fast enough 
to supply all the multiple de- 
mands which will be made on 
the United States in these lat- 
ter years of the 20th century. 
“There is” the ~~ question 
whether monetary. controls 
will be sufficient to fight infla- 
tion, or whether tax revision 
and government yardsticks 
shouldn’t figure in there some- 
where. 

There is the awareness that 
the nation’s basic facilities— 
schoolrooms, colleges, air- 
ports, city housing—are not 
keeping pace with the growth 
of population. ~~ 

There is the argument that 
while sharp fiscal brakes on 
inflation may stave off price 
rises, they may also stifle that 
faster rate of national eco- 
nomic expansion necessary to 
meet the Soviet challenge. 

How shall the public esti- 
mate these things? 

Those Americans deeply en- 
grossed in putting out a new, 
compact automobile at Gen- 
eral Motors or Ford or Chrys- 
ler may not personally be 
thinking ahead concerning the 
adequacy of the nation’s 
classrooms. The farmer pon- 


’ dering whether to plant wheat 


in the acreage beyond the 
woodlot may pay’ no immedi- 
ate attention to whether five 
years hence the United States 
will have kept pace with the 

? 


‘ 


the- 


Soviets in long-range missile 
production. 

But a dynamic.-economy is 
continually tossing up new is- 
sues and new situations, and 
some are not easily compre- 
hended. A well-known Wash- 
ington reporter complained 
recently, after a briefing ses- 
sion on the Treasury’s request 
for abolition of interest ceil- 
ings on government bonds, 
that he has been wallowing 
in uncharted. seas. 


Here is where the opposi-_ 


tion party comes in, or should 
come in, To be sure, it cannot 
exert ‘as much positive lead- 
ership from its congressional 
strongholds on Capitol Hill as 
the President can from the 
White House. And the Eisen- 


hower administration has the. 


whip hand in political debate 
these days because public 
opinion very much admires its 
stand in favor of a ‘‘sound dol- 
lar” and its fight against infla- 
tion. To criticize —to talk of 
future improvements that will 
cost money—is to sound slb- 
versively inflationary. 
ae 

Yet the country is ap- 
proaching the time when new 
paths must be broken. I per- 
sonally find it difficult to be- 
lieve Buckminster Fuller’s 
foretasts, quoted in News- 
week magazine, that by the 
end of the century the word 
“workers” will be obsolete 
and the majority of “‘mature 
civilization” will be engaged 


‘In research and development 


rather than in production and 
there will be no “have-nots” 
at all. But this, from an ebul- 
lient architect, does mildly 
suggest that changes are in 
store, 

So who. is to explore and 
inform? 

Some Democrats around the 
country are urging more lead- 
ership on Senate Majority 
Leader Johnson. This some- 
what misses the mark. Senator 
Johnson must today lead his 
troops into direct legislative 
battle, not into uncertain 
grapplings with tomorrow. If 
by chance he should become 
a presidential candidate, then 
he would—his close associates 
assure—be making idea-filled 
speeches about the necessities 
facing the United States. Un- 
doubtedly we would find 
Adlai E. Stevenson, Mr. 
Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, 
or other candidates doing like- 
wise during the campaign. 

Neither party has a monop- 
oly on the future. But the Re- 
publicans do have something 
of a vested interest in the 
present and its prosperity. 
This gives the Democrats an 
incentive to stake claims up 
ahead. These claims could be 
very productive as time goes 
on, 


This summer is continuing 


‘the trend. 


What does it mean? 

Since the stock market is 
not a mystical, undefinable 
entity, but simply people ex- 
pressing their investment be- 
liefs in the market, it means 


i'that many folks think things 
‘are just fine and that they are 
lgoing to continue to be. 
‘Should public sentiment 
'change, the stock market 


| will reflect the change. 


| 


In: general, businesses are 
doing well-this summer, This 
means increased earnings. 
Even if a steel] strike occurs, 
it will develop’. shortages 
which must be filled in the 
fall. So far as the stock 
market is concerned, it 
couldn't care less. 

The corrosive force in a steel 
| strike is that it cuts down the 
| productive power of the most 
vigorous nation in the anti- 
Communist world at a time of 
world crisis. 

But those who invest in the 
stock market know all of 
these things. They have ac- 
counted for them. The stock 
market in steels has already 
jumped over the strike threat 
'to.the productive period ex- 
pected to take place in the 
fall. 

But expectation of good 
earnings is not the sole reason 
for the stock market upsurge. 
A basic reason is the general 
expectation of continued cost- 
inflation, 


oe faa 

A good job of advertising 
inflation has been gone. The 
public _has-aeceepted it, and its 
behavior in the stock market 
confirms ‘it. So far this sum- 
mer, however, nothing has 
been accomplished to curb the 
ever-rising costs of labor 
which is the principal in- 
gredient of cost inflation, of 
materials, of taxation, of dis- 
tribution, and of marketing. 

Labor costs represent 70 per 
cent of the finished article. 
And labor costs have risen 
about four per cent in the past 
year. 

This can only mean that 
prices are going up. Just now 
the cost-of-living index de- 
ceives us, It inched up just a 
bit in May, It may inch up a 
little more. But it is kept 
“stable” or down by reduced 
costs in food just now. 

But the elements in the in- 
dex itself are never stable. 
They are always moving, and 
they are usually moving up. 
For instance, while the index 
has seemed to be “stable,” 
rent has raced ahead, Since 
1957 it has moved the index 
for rent from 135.2 to 139.3— 
4.1 points, quite a sizable 
hike. And very far front being 
“stable.” | 

Transportation (including 


costs of purchasing new cars) 


By NATE WHITE, Business and Financial Editor 


Science Monitor 


since 1957 has moved from 
136.0 to 145.3. That is an in- 
crease in the index of 9.3 
points! Medical care in 1957 
stood at. 138. Today its index 
stands at 149.6. Up 11.6 points! 
Personal care—toilet articles, 
barber and beauty shop serv- 


ices — have jumped 5.6 points | 


since 1957, from 124.4 to 130. 
4 s 4 
It even costs more to have 
fun. Recreation includes radio, 
television, toys, sporting 
goods, movies, and news- 
papers. 
reading index has jumped 
from 112.2 in 1957 to 117.7 to- 
day. Up 5.5 points! 
Food in 1957 stood at 115.4 


points. Today it’s.117.6. Cloth- | 


ing costs have moved upward 
the least. In 1957 they stood at 
106.9 in the index. Today 
its 107, an increase hardly 
worth noticing, and prob- 
ably merited. 

The finat item in the index 
is called the “other” item, It 
includes tobacco, alcoholic 
beverages, and other goods 
and services. It has moved 
from 125.5 in 1957 to 128.2 
today. Up 2.7 points. In the 
past year, however, 
“other” item has moved up 
nearly one whole index point. 

These indexes show clearly 
that in no sense has “‘stability” 


been achieved in the cost of | 
living, unless by stability one | 


means an ever-upward trend 
of prices. When the current 
food-price situation ends, the 
general index itself can 
expected to go up, because all 
other items have gone up. The 
United States definitely is 
moving into a higher-priced, 
higher-cost, tighter, more in- 
flexible economy. 

In the same period, cor- 
porate profits showed wide 
variations. This summer they 


are about back to where they | 


were at the end of 1956, be- 
fore they headed into their 
swift recession drop-off. By 
the end of this year they 
should be ahead of the 1956 
high and off to a new record, 

Outwardly this_ indicates 
excellent business. Inwardly 
it means that the tighter, the 
costlier the economy becomes, 
the harder it is to get at the 
problem of cost inflation, 

; aes ey 

Legislative tools to handle 
the problem are nonexist- 
ent. Efforts to establish them 
are usually lost. Organiza- 
tions of special interests do 
not want any hindrances im- 
posed on their freedom to take 
a bigger share of consumer 
fruits. 

Those on fixed incomes and 
pensions and annuities pay the 
increased costs of living 
silently, They seldom can 
afford to invest in the stock 
market. They shouldn’t any- 
how, It is not a market for 
those with little money. Their 
thoughts are not written on 
the ticker tape. But these 
folks have votes. The presi- 
dential candidate and those 
seeking seats in Congress in 
1960 who ignore this silent 
citizenry and the toll of cost- 
inflation may find that their 
sentiment will be expressed in 
the ballot box rather than on 
the ticker tape. 


July 11, 1959 


The recreation and | 


the | 


be | 


Dumaine 
Eyed For 


(covernor 


New Fnoland Politics! Editor of 

The Christian Science Monitor 
Close friends of Frederic C. 
|(Buck) Dumaine, Jr., highly 
| successful industrialist, are 
(pushing him to run for the Re- 
/publican nomination for Gover- 
‘nor at the 1960 Republican state 

/convention, so 
With the party leaders seek- 
ing a new tace, a new and at- 
‘tractive person to lead the 
party’s drive for a 1960 come- 
(back after the 1958 debacle, 
many Dumaine associates con- 

‘Sider him a natural choice. 
| Although not a politician, the 
former New York, New Haven 


| By Edgar M. Mills 
| 


& Hartford Railroad president is | 


'well known among. Massachu- 
|setts politicians of both parties. 
He is highly regarded by Sena- 
_tor John, E, Powers (D) of Bos- 
ton, President of the Senate. 
While that would not help him 
iin the Republican Party, 
ifriends believe it shows 
j}appeal could cut 
‘lines, a major requirement 


| setts. 


to running for Governor, 


Record Seen Asset 


| To do so he probably would 
have to face the task of battling 
‘for the convention endorsement 


‘are 
| run. 
| Many 


interested 
Dumaine 
New Haven Railroad ‘president 


would be a tremendous asset in 
@ Campaign because of the fact 


that solution of Greater Boston’s 


| Mass transportation problems is 
one of the key issues in the 
; State. 
| Up to the time that Mr. Du- 
|maine was ousted as president 
lof the New Haven, he had made 
numerous changes to improve 
|service for commuters 
| cthers. 

Furthermore, Mr. 
has publicly stated he has a glan 
'for operating the MTA without 
'a deficit. He has not disclosed 
details of that plan. Operation 
of the MTA without a deficit, 
‘now at the 16-million-doliar 
mark annually, would be a tre- 
mendous feat. 


Reputation Gained 

| Of course, as a candidate for 
'Governor, Mr. Dumaine would 
'be confronted by the fact that 
| generally he is not well known 
‘in the state at large. However, 
his associates contend this is not 


/a major handicap because of his 
/own drive and personality. They 
feel a proper campaign would 


‘make him a statewide figure. 
Regarded as a liberal busi- 
inessman, Mr. Dumaine 


tottering industries on their feet 
| financially. 


Among others reported inter- | 
ested in the GOP gubernatorial | 


nomination for 1960 are Repre- 
sentative Laurence Curtis 
of Massachusetts, who probably 
‘would not make a fight for the 
nomination: John A. Volpe, for- 
mer State Commissioner of Pub- 


lic-Works:, Representative Frank 
'S. Giles (R) of Methuen, House 


Minority Leader, and Senator 
Fred Lamson (R) of Malden, 
‘Senate Minority Leader. 


GOP Chiefs Cheered 

Prebably the GOP field would 
‘be full of candidates if Gover- 
nor Furcolo should decide to 
seek a third term rather than 
run against Senator Leverett 
Saltonstall (R) of Massachusetts 
for the latter’s Senate seat. 


with: increasing frequency that 


i'the Governor is toying with the 


third-term idea, 

Whether these reports have 
solid foundation or are designed 
to strengthen his position with 
‘the Legislature has not been de- 


termined as yet. As a Governor |! 


planning to run for United 
|\States Senator he would not 
‘have as much control over the 
Legislature as a chief executive 
‘aiming for a third term, with 
‘all the patronage powers at his 
| disposal. 
Republicans would be gleeful, 
'if he were to seek a third term. 
‘Even if Senator John F. Ken- 
inedy (D) of Massachusetts is 
‘on the national ticket as a can- 
‘didate for President or Vice- 
|'President, Republican leaders 
\feel the Furcolo record is such 
'as to brighten GOP prospects. 
The more the Governor fights 
iwith the Democratic-controlled 
|Legislature the better the GOP 
chieftains feel. However, they 
are mindful that he has shown 
a faculty for making convincing 
appearances on television and 
on the public platform. 


a 
Inside 
Reading 
Ford stages circus at Fra- 
mingham Shoppers World. 
Page 2 
Communist efforts to 
penetrate Latin America 
scanned in Uruguay and 
Berlin, Page 3 
The Soviet exhibition: 
What it does not show. 
Page 4 
United States marketing 
stressed in East-West bout. 
Page 12 
Jurges enthusiastic re- 
garding hitting of Williams. 
Page 14 
British aim for Wightman 
Cup victory, Page 14 
- = 


ve ie 


his | Be 
his | Associated Press Wirephoto 

CONFER ON SOVIETS: W. Averell Harri- 
man, right, who recently toured the Soviet 
Union, chatting with Vice-President Richard M. 
Nixon, who is to visit there later this month. 
former Ambassador to the 


across party | 
in | 
Democratic - tinged Massachu-} 


_ Mr, Dumaine is reported to be| 
|Interested but not yet committed | 


| 


‘Moon’ Watch Urged; 
Mr. K. to Visit U.S.? 


; 


| 
' 


because some other Republicans | 


in making the | 


. enthusiasts | 
‘feel his record when he was | 


and 


Dumaine 


has 
gained a reputation for putting | 


(R) | 


Mr. Harriman, 


By the Associated Press 
Geneva 

East-West atomic scientists 
have urged the United States, 
Britain, and the Soviet Union 
to provide in a nuclear test ban 
treaty for a network of satellites 
to detect violations hundreds of 
miles above the earth. 


Western delegates said the 
scientific report was a consider- 
able step forward in the three- 
‘nation talks for a test ban 
‘treaty. It implied Soviet agree- 
‘ment to participate in a joint 
|program to launch the control 
‘satellites, although the report is 
not binding on the three powers. 

For three weeks United States, 
| British, and Soviet scientists dis- 
jecussed how nuclear tests any- 
where above 30 miles aititude 
could be controlled. Their 3,000- 
|word report of July 10 called 
ifor a satellite detection network, 
supplemented by other devices 
operating from fixed control 
|posts on the ground. The satel- 
|lites would radio information to 
the control posts. 


’ 


Extremely Costly 

i The scientists said the best 
control system would be to fire 
‘five or six instrument-packed 
satellies into’ orbit tens of thou- 
sands of miles above the earth, 
Such satellies would be ex- 
tremely costly. They might re- 


certainly would outlast the ef- 
'fectiveness of the instruments 
they contained. 

As a cheaper alternative, the 
| scientists suggested a system of 
lower-level satellites,-orbiting at 
| altitudes below 420 miles. Such 
‘satellies might disintegrate after 
one year and would have to be 
‘replaced ‘by others. This would 
permit keeping the instruments 
abreast of technical develop- 
/ ments. 
| The disadvantage of the. low- 
‘level network, the = scientists 


— 


Reports have been circulating | said, would be blind spots in 


.certain areas.«The blind spots 
could be easily calculated by a 
‘would-be violator and would 
have to be checked by other de- 
tection devices. 
Scientists Praised 
Western sources were lavish 
.in their praise of the scientists. 
One ranking Western official said 
the Soviet Union and the West 
have never before achieved such 
a complicated agreement in such 
'a short period. 
| The scientists opened their 
'discussions June 22 and held 
many sessions lasting far into 
‘the night. Their report—which 
does not commit their govern- 
/ ments to acceptance of the rec- 
ommendations—will be studied 
at government level and is ex- 
pected to be written into the 
draft test ban treaty later, 
Twenty scientists took part in 
the discussions. They disagreed 
only on one point: The Ameri- 
‘can and British representatives 
| wanted a more closely knit de- 
‘tection system directed at alti- 
tudes below 100 miles. The So- 
viet Union’s Evgenyi Federov 
maintained that this area was 
adequately covered, 


New Consultation Called 

The scientists previously had 
agreed on technical methods of 
detecting tests underground and 
in the lower atmosphere up to 
19 miles. -Later, when \the 


exploded . nuclear weapons 


above the earth’s atmosphere— 
apparently undetected—the sci- 
entists were- called back into 
consultation. 

The nuclear test treaty still 
has a long way to go before it 
becomes reality. The East and 
West are seriously on an air- 
tight inspection system to pre- 
vent cheating. The Soviets ob-. 
ject to United States and Brit- 
ish proposals to install inter- 
nationally manned _ inspection 
teams, 

a 


Soviet Union and former Governor of New 
York, is in Washington to tell government offi- 
cials about his trip and a stormy meeting with 
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev, who may 
pay a visit to the United States soon. 


By Neal Stanford 
Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Washington 

It is increasingly being taken 
for granted here in the capital 
that the Soviet Premier Nikita 
S. Khrushchev, in the not dis- 
tant future, will visit the United 
States. 

Whether he should come to 
represent his government at a 
summit meeting or whether he 
should come on a strictly cere- 
monial, sight-seeing visit would 
depend on what comes out of 
the foreign ministers talks in 
Geneva that are entering their 
second stage now. 

Theoretically Mr. Khrushchev 
would come in a third capacity 
(the one he presumably would 
prefer) that of Soviet spokes- 
man in direct bilateral talks 
with President Eisenhower that 
would cover the water front. 

But this is one capacity in 
which Mr. Eisenhower ‘has made 
clear he has no intention of wel- 
coming Mr. Khrushchev. 


The reason is more or ‘less ob- 
vious. The free world anti- 
Communist front is a coalition, 
and Washington depends on its 
friends and allies to keep it in- 
tact and strong. 

For the United States to nego- 
tiate bilaterally with Mr. 
Khrushchev on any but strictly 
Soviet-American matters would 
undermine if pot destroy the 
grand alliance. 


| main in orbit for centuries, and Benefits Sighted 


So Mr. Khrushchev is wel- 
come to the United States if the 
foreign ministers in Geneva can 
reach an agreement, and he 
would be welcome as a sight- 
seeing guest if he wished to visit 
America on those terms. 

It is even possible that the 
two kinds of trips might be 
joined, with Mr. Khrushchev 
coming either to San Francisco 
or New York for a. summit 
meeting and then taking a sight- 
seeing swing around’ the coun- 


y. 

Whether this were to happen 
would depend to a degree on the 
results of a summit gathering. 
For if it broke up with no agree- 
ment or in open disagreement it 
could be thought unwise to allow 
the Soviet Premier to make the 
grand national tour. 

However, there are those in 
the government who feel that 
theoretically, at least, a grand 
tour of America is just what Mr. 
Khrushchev needs (and a dead- 
locked summit meeting would 
make it more than ever a neces- 
sity) to convince him of the 
United States’ strength, unity, 
and progress. 

Much of this new thought on 
a possible Khrushchev visit to 
the United States stems from the 
series of talks that W. Averell 
Harriman, former Governor of 


New York and former Ambas- 
sadof to the U.S.S.R., has been 
having here in Washington. 

After a tour»of the U.S.S.R. 
and a lengthy talk with Mr. 
Khrushchev, Mr. Harriman has 
concluded that a Khrushchev 
visit to the United States is prace- 
tically imperative. 

It is “a splendid idea,” he 
repeated time and again, in 
talking with Vice - President 
Richard M: Nixon, with Secre- 
tary of State Christian A. Herter, 
and with the Senate Foreign Re- 
lations Committee. “He could 
see the strength and vitality of 
this country. He thinks the work- 
ers here have no influence, and 
he would see differently.” 
Visit Favored 

The Soviet Premier might use 
such a visit for propaganda, but 
Mr. Harriman is convinced that 
Mr. Khrushchev would not 
change the views of any Amerie 
cans on basic differences, and he 
is hopeful that the trip would 
change some of Mr. Khrushe 
chev’s views about America. 

Following Mr. Harriman’s talk 
with the Senate Foreign Rela« 
tions Committee, Senator J. W,. 
Fulbright, (D) of Arkansas, 
committee chairman, agreed 
that a Khrushchev visit to the 
United States would be useful, 
and he added that most of the 
senators he had talked with 
about it felt the same way. 

Senator Theodore’ Francis 
Green (D) of Rhode Island, fore 
mer Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee chairman, is among 
those also favoring a Khrush- 
chev visit. Senator Homer Cape- 
hart (R) of Indiana, while not 
enthusiastic, let it be known he 
“would not oppose the idea.” 

If Mr, Khrushchev should 
come to the United States as 
Soviet spokesman at a summit, 
it would be for Big Four ne- 
gotiations. If he should come 
alone, the problem would be to 
keep his visit strictly ceremonial 
and sight-seeing, The danger is 
that he would try and turn it 
into a bilateral negotiating op- 
eration, which explains why its 
ceremonial character would 
have to be fully and openly 
agreed to before hand. 

It has been the Kremlin ame 
bition, in fact a Soviet fixation, 
to have Washington and Moscow 
decide global diplomatic matters 
between themselves and then 
present them as fait accomplis 
to the rest of the world—much 
as the Soviets do with their 
satellites on Communist. bloc 
matters, 

The United States has resisted 
this ever since and during World 
War IT. And it is just as opposed 
now to sucha way of doing 
diplomatic business as it was in 
the days of Soviet Premier . 
Stalin, 


The World’s Day 


National: Kozlov’s Tour of U.S. Nears End 


In Pittsburgh, Fro] R. Kozlov’s barnstorming tour of the United 
States comes to an end. [Page 5.] 


Europe: Foreign Ministers Gather in Geneva 


The foreign ministers are gathering in Geneva for the talks that 
reopen July 13. Soviet Andrei Gromyko and East German 

' Lothar Bolz have arrived. Christian A. Herter and West Ger- 
man Heinrich von Brentano start out today, 


United States disclosed it had™ 


Bay State: Construction Contracts Mount 


Contracts issued in May for future construction in the residential 
omcrengs, Fey sane f in Metropolitan Boston—an area comprising 


Essex, 


iddlesex, Norfolk, and Suffolk Counties—amounted to 


$21,797,000. This represented an increase of 36 per cent com- 
pared to May, 1958, according to the F. W. Dodge Corporation, 


marketing and construction news reporting firm 


Asia: Kerala Chief to Confer With Nehru 


Kerala's Communist Chief Minister E. M. S. Nam 


is on 


his way to a meeting with Indian Prime Minister. Jawaharlal 


Nehru, Some 45,000 picketers in the an 
were detained in the June 12-July 9 


overnment cam n 
+) mpaig 


Weather Predi edictions: 
Art, Music, Theater: 


7 


Cooler Sunday (Page 2) . 
Page 7. Radio, TV 


» FM: Page 1¢ : 


y elake 


4 


7 


- 


‘Circus’ Features 


Motori 


st Safety 


By W. Clifford Harvey 
Automobile Editor.of The Christian Science Monitor 


If someone had said “the 
circus is here,” anyone ap- 
proaching Shoppers World in 
Framingham, Mass., today might 
have believed it. 

The animals on_ display ,— 
family pets — are somewhat 
smaller than the circus variety 
— camels and elephants — but 
the ventriloquist dummies are 
in the physical proportions of 
circus clowns, and are fully as 
funny in their mechanized 
antics. 

A closer approach, however, 
discloses something more solidly 
significant than recreation in the 
Ford Motor Company’s “Amer- 
ican Road Show” appearing 
under the timely label: “Design 
for Suburban Living.” 

Research Experiment 

The traveling show is an 
experiment in’ marketing re- 
search, in which Ford goes to 
the customer to find out what 
is being said about the things 
the consumer buys, what he 
would like to buy and what 
industry is about to offer him 
in new items. 

The road show rolled into 
Shoppers World in a compact 
unit of four moving vans, five 
full-scale. cars, and a staff of 
nine company representatives. 
Set up in sections, the show 
features a family pet center, a 
collection of modern gardening 
implements, a children’s house 
in which the youngsters 
taught the rules of traffic safety, 


a collection of 175 modern in- | 


ventions and new products, an 
outdoor patio living exhibit, 
and a traveling theater which 
employs four projectors run- 
ning simultaneously to present 
a unique motion ‘picture in full 
color. 
Varied Attractions 

The traveling show is one of 
48 to be displayed on a 
scheduled tour of the large 
metropolitan. centers: in the 
United States. The one at 
Framingham will run 
July’ 17. Admission is free to 
the public. 


For the youngster who wants | 


to visit the circus or the adult 
who wants to see the latest 


conveniences in suburban living, | 


the Ford show has a variety of 
attractions. Basically, the pro- 


gram is designed to help educate | 


in 
safety. This 


the motorist 
highway 


exhibitions. 


The viewer might be looking | 
at the latest in wardrobe fash- | 
ions or watching a tribal dance | 


by five full-blooded Indians, 
but the spectator won't be) 
far from some _ invitation to 


play it safe onthe highways. 
A person can test his driving 
skills in a mechanized display in 
the next booth to a baton twirl- 


ing exhibition or a naval officer | 


showing how the Navy's Spar- 
row missile works. 
Cat-and-Dog Items 
There is a flying mouse for 
cats to chase. A carpeted post 
with a plywood base offers the 
family cat a chance to sharpen 
its claws on something resem- 
bling the parlor davenport. A 


ham-scented bone made 0of 
nylon will flake off when 
chewed — brushing the family 


through | 


the ways of | 
is done | 
by weaving the ‘safety thread | 
through the over-all pattern of | 


pet’s teeth whether it likes it or 
not. 

Horse-drawn stages and rope- 
swinging cowboys will stir up 
the dust several times a day. - 

For the back-yard suburban 
patio, there’s a barbecue that 
never needs charcoal. Shaped 
like an umbrella, it concentrates 
enough heat from the sun to do 
a steak or hamburger to a turn. 
The apparatus also opens up 
like an umbrella and stands on 
metal legs like any normal 
| barbecue. 


eis me 
Brown U Finds. — 
‘Gold in Back Yard’ 


By the Associated Press 
Providence, R.I. 

Dr. Elmer R. Smith, direc- 
tor of Brown University’s 
summer school for teachers, 
wanted Dr. E. Roland Dobbs 
of the University of London, 
England, as a lecturer. > 

He wrote to the London 
Science Foundation asking: if 
it could be arranged. 

Why not ask Dr. Dobbs him- 
self, came back the ahswer. 

The London professor was 
doing special research in 
Brown’s metals and research 
laboratory, unbeknownst to 
Dr. Smith. 
| Dr. Dobbs will lecture on 
low temperature physics 
Aug. 5. 


By Betty 


Love of the Bible, which mor 
tivated the founders of the Mas- 
|sachusetts . Bible Society 150 
years ago, has continued to in- 
|spire the distrigution of Scrip- 
,tures through the years. 
| In -1809, a group of distin- 
guished citizens petitioned the 
|General Court of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts to use 
‘the Representatives’ Chamber 
on July 6 to institute a society 
“for the purpose of multiplying 


Bible Circulated: 


Labor of Devotion! 


D. Mayo 


Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


}umes, and in 1958, some. 220,100 
| were distributed, including both 
| those issued as grants and those 
'sold, but not “for purpose of 
| profit.” 
| The society still was in its 
‘infancy when the War $f 1812 
| was beginning- to make tory. 
‘In 1813, the. society’s toric 
‘documents record, “ ‘an Ameri- 
‘can privateer captures a British 
‘vessel containing Bibles and 
Testaments intended for charit- 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


E> \Furcolo Blames GOP 


‘copies of the sacred writings, | able distribution (in the British | 


isons in need thereof... .” 
Massachusetts leaders 
not the first pioneers in making 
'this move, however. In~°1809 
|Bible societies were formed in 
‘Connecticut, Maine, and New 
co 

The previous year, the Phila- 
delphia (now Pennsylvania) 


In 1804, the British and Foreign 
‘Bible Society was organized. It 
is thought that the latter is the 
“first organization in the world 
for the general distribution of 
the Scriptures,” according to the 


'chusetts society put out on the 
occasion of its 100th anniver- 
Purpose Projected 
In “The Panoplist” 
tion of June, 
public press there appeared an 
article setting forth the need 
for an association to distribute 


‘the Christian Publick,” it read: 
object which promises 


on the support of Christians. The 
Book to be distributed is 


only pure source of religious 


truth, the only perfect rule of 


Faith and Practice. In distribut- 
ing it, we furnish men with the 


i 


|'Redeemer, of their duties and 
destination. 

“We furnish them with an un- 
'erring and authoritative guide of 
life, with the most powerful mo- 
tives to virtue and holiness, and 
with the only unfailing support 
and solace in affliction.” 

The first year of the founding 
of the Massachusetts Bible So- 
ciety, distribution of Scriptures 


did not begin until autumn. The- 
total circulation at the time of | 


the first report was 812 volumes. 
| Ty 1909, just 100 years later, 
the circulation was 81,851 vol- 


Bible Society came into being. | 


souvenir history of the Massa-_ 


publica- | 
1809, and_in the | 


the Bible. Entitled “Address to} 

“It is difficult to conceive an} 
greater | 
benefit or has a stronger claim | 


uni- | 


versally acknowledged to be the! 


‘most interesting knowledge, the | 
knowledge of their Creator and | 


All are welcome ... 


CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH SERVICES 


: The Mother Church 


The First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
in Boston, Massachusetts 


Falmouth and Norway Streets (Symphony Station) 


SUNDAY SERVICE 10:45 a.m. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:45 a.m. 


{nursery available) 


WEDNESDAY TESTIMONY MEETING 7:30 P.M. 


You ore 


in the 3 


See and 
Sunday. 


Greoter Boston oréo. 
qi: 


are | and’ diffusing the same to per-| provinces), and, in an unfeeling 


and un-Christian manner, refus- 


‘purpose aforesaid,’ our Society 
|immediately opened a subscrip- 
ition to refund their cost to the 
, London Society. 
| “Money flowed in until, in- 
i stead of the $640.39 needed, $907 
‘had been received, and it was 


'a hundred Bibles from the Mer- 
rimack Bible Society and cash 
contributions from Salem. The 
original cost of the consignment 
and insurance was sent in full 
,to London.” 

The following year, a British 
'ship with 1,200 Bibles and Testa- 
‘ments in English and Dutch 
‘bound for distribution, at the 
'Cape of Good Hope also was 
by the privateer 
‘America and sent into Bath. 
‘Immediate action was taken by 
the society and through public 
sympathy, the volumes event- 
ually made their way back to 
| England. 

These acts, in part, returned 
ithe kindness of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, for send- 
ing the Massachusetts Society a 
generous sum of money shortly 
after its founding. 

An annual report at this time 
,speaks of supplying Scriptures 
to jails and almshouses and of 
giving Bibles and Testaments 
liberally to seamen individually. 
'In 1815, schoolmasters of Boston 
|requested volumes for poor 
i school children. 


| National Group Organized 


By 1816, Scriptures were be- 
ing supplied by 132 independent 
local societies “in all parts of the 
land.” In this year was formed 
the American Bible Society, 
'with which the Massachusetts 
group has cooperated as the na- 
tional body. 

In 1855, agents of the-society 
‘in different counties reported: 
“Copies were found, old, torn, 
or out of binding, whole books 
gone, and, in some instances, the 
leaves shuffled together and tied 
with a string like a _ bundle. 
Their owners were, some in 
'middle life, some younger, but 
many 60 and 70 and 80 years 
old and upward. Those that 
were able and willing paid for 
their Bibles in whole or in part; 
to others they were given.” 

One colporteur reported in 
1881: “I have adopted the prac- 
tice of giving a copy of the New 
|Testament to such children as 
have it not, on two conditions: 
Ist, They shall promise me that 
they will, 
prevented, read daily 10 verses 
in course to théir mothers; 2d, 
That they will commit to mem- 
ory one verse of Scripture, be- 


| captured 


— 


| ginning with the Sermon on the 


Free Parking 


cordially invited to attend Sunday 


services and Wednesday testimony meetings 


3 Christian Science churches in the 


e . 
heer ‘‘How Christian Science Heals” 


8:30 o.m., WNAC-TV, Ch. 7 


10:00 e.m., WHDH-TV, Ch. 5 
9:15 p.m., WNAC, 680 ke. 


Mount, and _ recite it to their 
‘mother. I have learned that one 
of the young misses to whom I 
| gave a Testament on the above 
| conditions has hopefully experi- 
| enced its renewing power in her 

heart and life.” 
| At an annual meeting of the 

‘society in 1854, Governor Em- 
ory Washburn, said of the Bible: 
| “Without the moral police of 

that volume, there would not be 
police enough of any other kind 
| to insure order and government 


‘tute of the Bible, Massachusetts 
could not exist as a free state a 
single day.” 

The Massachusetts Bible So- 
ciety anticipates celebrating its 
150th anniversary in the fall, 
when the original Representa- 
tives’ Chamber will be available. 


Henry P. Fletcher 


By the Associated Press 


Newport, R.I. 

Henry P. Fletcher who passed 
on here July 10, was a noted 
American diplomat and former 
chairman of the Republican Na- 
tional Committee. 

Mr. Fletcher began. his long 
career with the State Depart- 
ment in 1902 after serving in 
Cuba during the Spanish Ameri- 
can War with Theodore Roose- 
velt’s famous “Rough Riders.” 

President Roosevelt sent him 
to Havana as second secretary 
‘to the United States legation and 
he served thereafter in Chile, as 
American charge de’affaires in 
las Un as ambassador to Mexico, 


as Undersecretary of State for 
Pan-American Affairs, and later 
as ambassador to Belgium and 
ambassador to Italy. 

| He had been chairman to the 
|}American delegation to the 5th 
jand 6th Pan-American Confer- 
ences, in Chile and Havana, and 
jchairman of the United States 
| Tariff Commission. He was Re- 
| ublican National Committee 
Chairman in 1934-36. Later he 
served as general counsel to the 
| Republican National Committee. 
| At the end of World War II, 
he was special adviser to the 
Secretary of State. oe 


> t= saat : : SR 


| 


were |ing to surrender them for the | 


necessary to decline the offer of | 


Me oe 


Lyman W. Fisher, Staff Photographer 


Dolls, Dolls, and More Dolls—and One of Them Real | 


Little Jean Mekertin is surrounded by a | find their way to Morgan Memorial workshops 
few of the thousands of dolls which annually | for repair, beautification, and redistribution. 


WIAR-TV Lauded in Latin 


By the Associated Press 


Parade Caps 
_ Celebration 
In Norwich 


By the Associated Press 
Norwich, Conn. 

| A parade was scheduled July 
'11 to complete Norwich’s week- 
‘long 300th birthday celebration, 
'which went on despite City Hall 
'labor troubles, | 

Some 2,000 persons will pa- | 
rade through the town with 
\floats and marching drummers. 
'Accompanying marchers will be 
| the bands of the First Army, the 


Providence, R.I. 

Words of praise—all in Latin—for what the arts of communi- 
cation are doing for modern civilization, came to Providence 
radio and television station WJAR last night from the president, 
fellows, trustees, and faculty of Brown University. 

WJAR-TV had observed the last day of its three-day 10th 
anniversary celebration. 

Fortunately for the art of communication as practiced in the 
United States, an English translation accompanied the Latin. 
This said, in part: 

“Among foreign men as well as among our own citizens the 
arts of communication have ever been held in highest regard. 
These educate the young in truth and manliness; these expedite | 
the commerce and professional activities of middle age; these | 
ease the burden and dispel the loneliness of old age. 

“News of the day, the arts and culture, athletic events, 
religious affairs, the weather—these are but a few of the 
ingredients by which modern man lives and which effect his 


being. Man universal thrives when the sound of this comes foe! para be and the First 
tp him, but when they are both heard and seen, his life takes |* - Pe rte ie er ere 
on a completely new dimension.” | Strike ee nu p 


Barnaby Keeney, president of Brown, then wrote: “Nos apud eae COs, eee eit the 
Universitanem Brunensem: WJAR-TV_ ggratias pro officiis |“?8°S ‘! and 
» +.  |seven-day celebration, But the 
numeribusque hos decem annos agimus.” (We of Brown Uni- | Sead’ wieebhane Of. tie! 
versity express our thanks to WJAR-TV for its services and |S™P!OYCSs, 


unless unavoidably | 


favors during these 10 years.) 


Another congratulatory message came from Admiral Arleigh 


| Burke, Chief of Naval Operations, United States Navy. 
} 


Hadley Prepares 


For Tercentenary 


By Carolyn F. Hummel 
Staff Writer of The Christian Science Moniior 


Hadley, Mass. 


1 by Dr. and Mrs. James L Hunt- 


‘United Mine Workers 


Local | 


14.164, called back picket lines | 


‘before they could interfere with 
tercentenary events. 

| A truce was reached, and the 
'pickets marched on City Hall 
‘instead. The municipal employ- 


lees’ chief complaint is that the | 


city is spending what they call 
large amounts of money on the 
‘celebration, but refuses to honor 
‘their wage increase requests. 
| With current wages ranging 
ifrom $1.31 to $2.25 an hour, 
strikers are asking a 15 per cent 
across the board wage increase. 
Norwich has been filled with 
visiting dignitaries. One of them 


Early American history books | ington, who live in part of it |is the Lord Mayor of Norwich, 


are getting a well-worn look | and leave the rest as a historical | England, Michael Bulman, and 
as residents of this old town on | attraction. The doctor, himself, | 


his wife. The couple was hon- 


the Connecticut__River prepare | guides-guests through the house red yesterday_at_a_city lunch- 


for tercentenary' celebrations 
which will last from Sunday, 
July 26, through Sunday, Aug. 2. 

From the books, local muse- 
ums, and historical houses, and 
from tales passed down through 
the years by word of mouth, 
ideas have been gained for many 
of the events scheduled. 

These sources have provided 
the pattern for the historical 
poster contest, the pageant, and 
the fashion show, as well 
for the historical drama, “The 
Town in the Midst of the River,” 
'to be presented July 30 and 31 
in the Old Hadley Town Hall, 
| ‘Angel of Hadley’ 


| Many of the residents, 


} 


re- 
counting the tale of the “Angel 
of Hadley,” for example, might 
wonder just where his own an- 


cestors were when the Indians 
unsuccessfully attacked the 
settlement. Most likely they 


were not among the English- 
men who were first thrown into 
confusion by the surprise at- 
tack, then neatly organized and 
commanded by a stranger “of a 
very venerable aspect.” 

It was this stranger who 
helped them save the town, and 
then vanished as suddenly as he 
came. Since those early inhabi- 


‘in a free commonwealth. Desti-? tants could not account for him, 


they assumed he was an angel 
sent of God upon that special 
occasion for their deliverance. 

Some years later it was 
learned that the “angel” must 
have been one of the judges who 
epposed Charles I, and who had 
taken asylum in New England 
when Charles II succeeded to 
the throne. One of these judges, 
Gen. Regicides Goffe, was sup- 
posed to have been in Hadley 
at that time. 

But, since nearly 85 per cent 
of Hadley’s residents today are 
Polish-American, it is unlikely 
the ancestors of most of the 
celebrators were among the 
early residents. | 

Old Families Remain 

Other residents are from very 
old Hadley families. One family 
has owned the same lands for 


nearly 300 years. The 1752 
house on these lands is open to 
visitors the year round, and is 
one of the features for out of 
towners to explore during the 
anniversary. week. 

Called the Porter-Phelps- 
Huntington House, it is on a 
tract of land which, since 1660, 
has been caHed Forty Acres. 


This land originally comprised 


more than 1,000 acres, com- 
monly owned by the household- 
ers in the northeast section of 
Hadley. 

The Porter family owned 
only -a part of the land then. 
But, by gradual purchase, it be- 
came entirely owned by the 
Porters in 1752, when Capt. 
| Moses Porter built the house. 

Currently the house is owned 


| and can explain the history of 
every itegn in it. 
From Past to Present 

Traveling between “tourist” 
sites—Forty Acres, the South 
Sea Island, Bicycle, and Farm 
Museums and the McQueston 
House, oldest house in Hadley 
—the new houses, put “up since 
World War II, and the fields of 
|asparagus, the visitor is re- 


aa | minded that this is the 20th cen- 


| tury. 


| Edwin M. Podolak, however, | 


‘as chairman of the tercentenary 
|committee is encouraging the 
return of former activities. 

The week of festivity 
start with the fireman’s muster, 
or who-can-shoot-water-farth- 
est contest, and end with a 
grand parade. 

In addition to the events men- 
tioned above, there will be open 
house at the Farm Museum and 
Forty Acres on Saturday, Aug. 
1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. From 3 
to 4 p.m. that day there will be 
a band concert, and from 9 p.m. 
to 1 am. a tercentenary ball, 


i 
i 
; 


‘Artists’ Homes Tour 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor 


Rockport, Mass. 

The 1959 tour of artists’ homes 
and galleries, an annual event 
here on Cape Ann, will 
place on Thursday, July 16. This 
year’s program will include, for 
the first. time, a visit to the stu- 
dios of two well-known Glou- 
cester artists. yo! 

Sponsored by the Rockport 
Art Association, the tour will 
begin at its headquarters on 
Main Street at 2 p.m., and will 
include a visit to Bass Rocks, 
in Gloucester, and the studio of 
George Aarons, prominent 
sculptor, and the _ studio of 
Joseph Margulies, famed Time 
magazine cover artist. 

At Rockpert the tour will in- 
clude the homes, gardens, and 
galleries of eight well-known 
Rockport artists. A visit to the 
home of architect George P. 
Young on Union Lane will be 
one of the firsts. 


Weather Predictions 


By U.S. Weather Bureau 


Fair, Cooler Sunday 


New England: Partly cloudy 
and cool tonight with lower 
temperatures in the lower 60’s. 
Fair and cooler Sunday in Bos- 
ton and vicinity. 


Eastport to Block Island: 
Northwest winds 15 to 25 miles 
an hour tonight. Visibility less 
than 1 mile in fog and rain will 
improve, becoming 6 miles or 
better late today. 


High Tides, Commonwealth Pier 
July 12, 4:14 a.m., ht. 9.9 ft. 


July 12, 4:44 p.m., ht. 10.0 ft, 
Sun Rises Sun Sets 


ts Moon Rises 
5:19am, 8:20p.m. 12:11 p.m. 
: v 


will | 


~ Takes In Gloucester — 


take | 


eon, 


is | 


) 


| Maine Courthouse 
Of 1764 Restored 


By the Associated Press 
Dresden, Maine 
The Pownalborough Court- 

house, which dates back toa 
1764, was rededicated. yester- 
day,’ signaling restoration of 
the structure by the Lincoln 
County Cultural and Historical 
Society. 

Chief Justice Raymond §S 
Wilkins of the Massachusetts 
Spreme Court and Chief Jus- 
tice Robert B. Williamson of 
the Maine Supreme Court 
were the speakers. Maine was 
still part of the Bay State 
when the courthouse was 
founded. ; 

Prior to the ceremony, a 
plaque was dedicated in the 
courtroom by a group, of Bal- 
kan descent, in honor of Maj. 
John Polerecsky. The Ameri- 
can Revolutionary War hero 
once served as Dresden’s town 
clerk and court clerk, 


I 
; 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 
| POUNDED 1808 BY MARY BAKER 
| enemies 


— ———————— 


| Massachusetts, U.S.A 


——— 


tions MARY BARER eppy |creased service to the needy, 
Second-class postage paid at Boston, | 


For Budget Delay 


Around New England 


By the Associated Press 


Boston 

Republicans have been blamed by Governor Furcolo for the 
delay by the Democratic-controlled Massachusetts Senate on 
the pending state budget. 

Governor Furcolo said in a statement yesterday the delay is 
a trap designed by Republican strategists to force the Democrats 
to enact drastically higher taxes or cut back state programs in 
the 1960 election year, 

Daniel E, McLean, chairman of the Republican State Commit- 
tee, countered with a denial of the charge, saying he doesn’t 
believe the Governor’s views stemmed from the hot weather. 
He said Governor Furcolo made _ statements which were 
“equally silly when the temperature was below the freezing 
point.” 

Mr. McLean said the Democrats have overwhelming majori- 
ties in both the House and Senate, adding, “A Governor who 
cannot get his program accepted by his own party is incom- 
petent and unfit to head the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.” 

Governor Furcolo’s latest statement resumed his “countdown” 
on the Democratic Senate which he began the night he signed 
the temporary one-month budget bill into law June 30. 


McCormack Warns on Sunday Laws 


By the Associated Press 
Boston 
Attorney General Edward J. McCormack, Jr., said yesterday 
that busy weekends on Cape Cod are no excuse for stores which 
wish to remain open in violation of the state Sunday laws. 
Mr. McCormack said he ‘has ruled that business establish- 


ments throughout the state must close on Sunday unless they . 


are exempted specifically in the law. 

He said the stores should observe the law voluntarily, but if 
they don’t it is a matter for enforcement of the law. 

He said reports that some Cape Cod stores are remaining 
open on Sundays led to today’s statement. 


NET&T and Union Sign Contract 


By the Associated Press 
, Providence, R.I. 
The New England Telephone & Telegraph Company and the 
International Brotherhood of Telephone Workers have signed 
a 15-month contract effective as of June 21, it was announced 
yesterday. -. 

New contracts with four other unions representing company 
employees have previously been signed bringing the total now 
under new contract in the six-state area to about 34,000. 

The contracts provide increases of from $1 to $5 a week and 
a fourth week of paid vacation for employees with 30 or more 
years of service, Current pay scales were not disclosed, 


Boston to Observe Bastille Day 


By a Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


Boston 

Bastille Day, French equivalent to the American Fourth of 
July, will be celebrated in Boston July 14 with appropriate 
ceremonials. 

Baron Charles de Pampelonne, Consul General of France in 
Boston, and Mayor Hynes will commence the festivities by 
placing wreaths on the Lafayette Monument on Tremont Street 
Mall at 10:30 atm, 

A reception to be given by the Baron at the French consulate 
on Beacon Street will follow at 11 a.m., at which decorations 
will be conferred on several New Englanders for services ren- 
dered to the French Republic. A 14th of July ball at the Hotel 
Fensgate at 8:30 p.m. will conclude the day’s celebrations. 


N.E. States Assured on Air Service 


By the Assoctated Press 
Washington 
Northeast Airlines has given assurance to northern New 
England senators that future service in New Hampshire, Maine, 
and Vermont will not be confined to communities with airports 
capable of handling larger planes. | 
The six senators from the three states met here July 9 with 
Northeast officials to discuss future policy for airline service in 
their states, particularly the more sparsely populated areas, 


_ Notte to Seek Top Post in R.I. 


By the Associated Press 
Providence, R.I. 
Lt. Gov. John A. Notte, Jr., yesterday announced his candie 
dacy for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 1960. 
Mr. Notte, in making his announcement, criticized Gov. 


Christopher del Sesto (R) for not holding more frequent press 
conferences, 


Concord Prisoner Asks New Trial 


By a Stag’ Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 
Boston 

Thomas P. Carlino, one of five prisoners recently given 
additional sentences for participating in the April 22 escape 
attempt from the Massachusetts Correctional Institution at 
Concord, is petitioning for a new trial. 

In appealing to the Supreme Court, Joseph Sax, attorney for 
Mr. Carlino, claims that conviction of his client on six indict- 
ments is contrary to both the law and the evidence. 


Connecticut Earmarks Road Funds 


By the Associated Press 
Hartford, Conn. 

Connecticut’s new highway commissioner yesterday said at 
least 100 million dollars is earmarked for road construction 
in this state through the end of 1960. 

Howard Ives, at his first official press conference, said 29 
million dollars’ worth of the over-all 484-million-dollar, four- 
year highway program would be under contract within the 
next six months. 

And, he said, “a minimum of 71 million dollars of construce 
tion” would be launched the following year. 


ithe move will allow greater 


Salvation Army to Revamp Setup 


By a Staff Writer of The Christian Scietice Monitor 


The Salvation Army will put,between the agencies and the 
,its New England operations on 'people served. Under the reor- 


-.|ganization plan, Colonel Miller 
a more decentralized state basis’! will be promoted to the post of 


beginning Oct. 1, and will elim- | 
inate the post of New England | 
Provincial Commander, it was 
announced recently. 

Col. Ralph T. Miller, current 
New England commander, said 


National Evangelist. 
Provincial headquarters 


the northern New 


efficiency and economy, in- 


and more intimate relationships | necticut and Rhode Island. 


in 
Boston will then become head- 
quarters for the new Massachu- 
setts Division. Portland, Maine, 
will become. headquarters for 
England 
states, and Hartford, Conn., will 
‘become headquarters for Con- 


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THE CHRISTIAN SCM SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON , SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


Reds F low Into Vacuums in in Latin America | 


Uruguay 


By Bertram B. Johansson 


Staff Correspondent 
O12 Latin-Aynerican Affairs tor 
The Christian Science Monitor 
Montevideo, Uruguay 
One of the high-priority Com- 
munist efforts to discredit the 
United States in the 20 Latin- 


American republics is exposing /[ 


itself with simple, striking clar- 


ity here in the little republic of | & 


Uruguay. 

In’ this fertile pampaland of 
beef, sheep, and _ wool-raising 
gauchos (cowboys), Communists 
have undertaken a vicious cam- 
paign against the United States 
through the bogey-man device 
of the International Monetary 
Fund. 

IMF is a United Nations lend- 
ing institution to which the 
United States makes the largest 
financial contribution. This sets 
up the United States as a target 
for charges (mainly Commu- 
nist) that it wields the most in- 
fluence in the organization, and 
that it imposes this influence. 

Exploitation Described 

Here is how the Communists 
exploited the issue in Uruguay: 

A five-man IMF mission ar- 
rived in Montevideo July 2 


Pan American World Airways 


proportion to the size of the 
country, where. numerous Com- 


or legations are staffed all out of | 


Uruguayan Pastoral 


market conditions and its lower- 


which now finds it difficult to | 


‘sell its wool because of world |: 
as 


Invasion by Agitation 


y Arnold Beichman 


Special to The Christian Science Monitor 


Berlin 

Despite the overthrow of 
Latin - American—dictatorships 
and the swelling democratic tide 
south of the Rio Grande, the 
danger of Communist or other 
dictatorships still exists, accord- 
ing to the International Confed- 
eration of Free Trade Unions, 

A sobering survey of the cur- 
rent political and economic sit- 
uation was presented to the 
ICFTU Executive Board, meet- 
ing here. The survey declared: 

“The Latin-American peoples 
tend to expect immediate solu- 
tions to all their political and 
economic problems when they 
pass from dictatorship to demo- 
cratically elected governments, 
and if no solutions are found 
are liable to withdraw support 
from the new government, thus 
creating opportunities for reac- 
tionary forces to exploit. 


Red Aim Declared 


“The Communists do not fail 
to take immediate advantage of 
such situations, making attacks 
against the new governments so 
to bring about conditions 


Vice-President of Brazil, Jodo 
Goulart, the ranking leader of 
the —_-Brazilian---Labor —- Party 
(PTB). Such a pact endangers 
democratic trade unions. 

In Uruguay, the Socialist 
Party is supporting a Commu- 
nist campaign for a “united” 
labor —_organization..__Leaders of 
the Confederacién Sindical del 
Uruguay are being or have al- 
ready been expelled from the 
Socialist Party because of their 
opposition to this “united front” 
program. 


Unions Dominated 


In Ecuador the Communists 
dominate the trade-union move- 
ment through the Ecuador Con- 
federation.of Labor, even though 
most of its. leaders are nominally 
Socialists. 

Even in Venezuela, which 
since the fall of the Pérez 
Jiménez dictatorship has been 
without a national labor con- 
federation, the “united front” 
trend has incorporated open 
Communists into  trade-union 
activity. A convention, to be 
held in November for the forma- 


Threat of Civil War Fades 


By the Associated Press 
- Buenos Aires 

Rebels who threatened civil 
war to supplant the constitu- 
tronal government of President 
Frondizi by a military dictator- 
ship have disbanded in apparent 
defeat. 

A dozen military officers, led 
by Gen. Arturo Ossorio Arana, 
battled President Frondizi 
throughout June with threats 
and counterthreats from their 
hide-out near the military bar- 
racks at Cordoba, 500 miles 
northwest of Buenos Aires. 

General Arana and three oth- 
ers are under military arrest in 
Buenos Ajres. Four others 
slipped across the River Plate to 
Uruguay. 

Four Reported Missing 

But four are still missing, 
among them Marine Vice Admi- 
ral Samuel Toranzo Calderon, 
who led the first unsuccessful 


revolution against 


ex-dictator 
Juan D, Peron in June, 1955. 
Admiral Calderon has been dis- 
missed from the service and de- 
clared in rebellion by presiden- 
tial decree. This could mean a 
possible death sentence if he is 
captured. 

General Arana has undergone 
questioning in a military bar- 
racks since his surrender July 7 
with Capt. Alberto Mingotti, 
Maj. Urbano de la Vega and Lt. 
Col. Rual Matteri. There are 
reports that General Arana will 
be allowed to return to his 
home, in a suburb of Buenos 
Aires, 

Those who fled to Montevideo 
were Gens. Emilio Bonnecarrere 
and Martin Cabanillas: Cols. 
Desiderio Fernandez and Hector 
Cabanillas. 

Little Danger Seen 

There seemed little’ danger 


| the missing rebels could stir up 


Mack-Whiteside Trial 


Anti-Frondizi Rebels Disband . 


any immediate trouble. Two 
days ago, the chief of the army 


barracks at Cordoba announced 


the garrison’s loyalty to the Ar- 
gentine Constitution. July 9, 


President Frondizi, smiled re- 
peatediy and chatted with the 
country’s military chiefs during | 
a review of an Argentinian In- 
dependence Day military pa- 
rade, 

Many feel the winner in the 
crisis was constitutional govern- 
ment, as President Frondizi had 
to give in on many points Made 
by the dissident officers who ac- 
cused him, among other things, 


of coddling Peronists and Come 


munists. 

But President Frondizi’s trou- 
bles are not over. His newly 
appointed Economics Minister, 
Alvaro Alsogaray, a champion 
of free enterprise, is trying to 
bolster the shaky economy by 
persuading labor to forgo mas- 
sive wage boosts until October 
or November, 


INVEST 


| which might culminate in new 
| dictatorships. They aim to make 
| situations thoroughly confused 
}in each country, so that they) 
'can eventually impose their own 


NOW 


Eech eccount . 
insured to 


munists have infiltrated the 
press corps, and where bilateral 
trade agreements with the So- 
viet bloc have made Uruguay 


grade wool, devotes 25 per cent 
of its total to trade with the 
U.S.S.R. and Soviet-bloc coun- | 
tries, trading its wool for Ro- 


to look into the possibilities of 
granting a loan to the govern- 
ment. It came at the invitation 
of the government. 


tion of a Venezuelan confedera- 
tion, will allow Communist rep- 
resentation. 

The ICFTU believes that if 


Ends With Hung Jury 


By the Associated Press 


Washington Judge Matthews 
The three months’ trial of the} 


decided é 


Ordinaril¥Y, there would have 
been hardly more than _a brief 
notice in the Uruguayan press 
about the visit of such a finan- 
cial mission. Its work is of a 
highly statistical nature, compli- 
cated, and not of interest to the 
general public. 


Under the political and eco- 
nomic circumstances now ex- 
tant in Latin America, the IMF 
visit provided a 
portunity for the Communists to 
pluck a propaganda plum. 

For weeks before the ‘IMF 
mission arrived, El Popular, the 
Communist Daily newspaper in 
Montevideo; has’ been harping 
about the expected visit of the 
“piratical” financial mission, the 
“international jackals of 
nance,” the “fiends of capital- 
ism,” the “international oli- 
garchy,” and other trite expres- 
sions from the arsenal of Com- 
munist clichés. 


Embassies Overstaffed 


El Popular has ‘a circulation 
of only 5,000 daily in Uruguay. 
As such, it should not have 
much influence, either on the 
Uruguayan public or the rest 
of the press. 

But throughout Latin America 
today, the influence of Commu- 
nists is all out of proportion to 
their numbers and far greater 


than some North Americans be- | 


lieve. The latter, it is suspected 


here, became overly immune to | 


talk of communism during the 
McCarthy era, and some are 
disinclined to become concerned 
about its effect in Latin Amer- 
ica. 

In the case of Uruguay, where 
Soviet and satellite embassies 


choice op-| 


beholden to these countries, it) 
has been quite easy for propa- 
gandists in influence the press | 
and opinion here. 

Red Sheet Echoed 

Several other newspapers took 
up the tune of El Popular. By 
the time the IMF mission ar- 
rived in Montevideo, its recep- 
tion was far from cordial. 

The newspaper Accion printed | 
a cartoon showing a fat, pros- 
perous IMF man arriving here 
with one bagful of dollars and 
and other containing-chains, 
while a poorly dressed Uruguay- 
an looked on in despair. 

The chains, of course, repre- 
sented the financial discipline 
IMF has been asking of virtually 
all countries which obtain loans 
through the IMF, and to some of 
which disciplines Brazil recently 


delight of Communists and na- 
tionalists in that country. 

Accion is the official news- 
paper of the powerful] opposition 
Colorado Party, which for 93 
years had ruled Uruguay until 
the National (Blanco) Party won 
elections in December, 1958. 


Concern Voiced 


groups in Uruguay have ex- 


might try to impose severe re- 
strictions upon Uruguay’s eco- 
nomic life. This, they fear—and 
the fear has been fomented pri- 
marily by the Communist 
press—might be a condition im- 
posed before IMF would open 
the way for up to 300 million 
dollars in loans from the United 
States. 


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Part of the context for Uru- 


| guay’s fears is that certain na- 
'tionalist and Communist groups 
‘in Latin America are charging 


‘that Argentina’s current diffi- 


| culties stem from financial dis- 


|ciplines asked of Aregntina by 
| IMF as a prerequisite for inter- 
| national loans. 

| It would be more accurate to 
state that Argentina was plan- 
‘ning to impose most, if not all, 
,of the disciplinés IMF urged 
| before the IMF request. 


: Officers Blamed 

| The present difficulties in Ar- 
'gentina’s political life can be 
'more eorrectly traced to dis- 
| satisfied military officers who 


‘believe there is too much 


'Peronist and.Communist influ- 
‘ence in the Frondizi’' govern- 
'ment or who feel they have not 
[been given proper credit, re- 
ward, or deference for their 
‘part in the revolution against 
‘dictator Juan Peron. 

| In the case of Uruguay, the 
' simple fact of the IMF situation 
‘is that the IMF mission is here 
on a routine mission, in response 
|to a letter from the Minister of 
|'Finance written in April asking 
|IMF to come look at the Uru- 
|guayan economy. 

| What Uruguay really wants is 
'to make peace with IMF. Uru- 
| guay is not a member in good 
standing. The fund has never 
‘agreed to take Uruguay’s con- 
tribution in dollars because 
there has been disagreement 
over the rate of exchange at 
which Uruguay would contrib- 
ute. 


Reason for Attack 
Meanwhile, it is in Soviet- 
bloc interests to continue fo- 
menting hostility to the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund—and 
‘indirectly to the United States. 
Soviet trade in Latin America 
‘is most often built on bilateral 
‘trade agreements. Uruguay, 


ALLEMANN 


SWITZERLAND 


has been objecting, much to the | 


Opposition parties and private | 


pressed concern that the IMF | 


| manian oil, Czech glass, ceram- 
cs, etc... * 


IMF, on the other hand, 
means of loans which stabilize | 
| national economies, tends to| 
‘favor multilateral trade agree- 
/ments. 


| Furthermore, the Soviets feel 
| that IMF countries get back to 
a’‘sound economic basis throu 


by | 


'form of dictatorship.” 


This pervasive Latin America 
| ps¥chology is regarded by 
\ICFTU experts as a major hin- 
drance to the formation of pow- 
erful, politically independent 


trade unions. 


Most Latin American unions 
| are dominated by political par- 


£h | ties, which frequently conclude 


IMF loans and would not, there- | “ynited front” pacts with the 


| fore, 

of trade with the East. There- | 
fore, the Communists attack | 
IMF unmercifully in 
|America. 

Recently, the Soviet Union is | 
‘alleged to have -made an offer 
of a $120,000,000 credit to Uru- 
guay to build up its railroads, 
ports, and road systems. The} 
‘Soviet Embassy neither con- 
firms nor denies this report. 


Latin | 


. : 
With the nationalist and Com- | 


munist press making the recep- | 


‘tion of IMF so unpleasant, along 

with the Communist deputies in 
Parliament, and with the Colo- 
rado Party taking advantage of 
the situation by exploitating the 
jingoism inherent in the situa- 
| aes, the government is now 
| taking only a half-hearted posi- 
| tion in its welcome to IMF. 


be dependent on thé lure | Communists and “thus facilitate 


| Communist infiltration into the 
trade union camp.” 

In Chile, Socialists and other 
political groups have joined the 
Communists in a united front | 


called FRAP, of which.the Chil- | 
'ean labor center is one of the | 


| supporters. 
Socialists Divided 
In Argentina, the Socialist | 
Party is divided into two fac- | 
tions. Although there does not | 
as yet exist any agreement with 
the Communists, in practice 


'labor and political leaders be- 


| longing to one of the factions | 


support ‘Communist maneuvers 
and combat democratic unions. 

In Brazil, the press has re- 
ported the signing of a pact with 
the Communist Party by the 


immediate steps were taken to 
solve the economic crises in 
which these countries find them- 
selves, the pro-Communist trend 
in Latin-American labor could | 
be diminished. 

“Investments in Latin Amer- 
ica,” said the ICFTU, “are badly | 
needed which’will promote eco- 
nomic and social progress. in| 
each country, not the sort aimed | 
at exploiting cheap labor or ob-| 
taining products at low costs. 

“The instability of interna- 
tional markets for primary com- 
| modities and_ restrictions on 
| their sale are also factors im- 
peding progress. 

“Today the Communists are 
presented with opportunities of 
which they take full advantage. 
If the incipient democracies of 
|Latin “America: cannot. solve 
itheir present economic 
| they will inevitably be swept by 
another wave of dictatorships.” 


U.S. Cooking Caught On 
Along with their traditional 
| Oriental dishes, Tokyo restau- 
| rants now feature southern fried | 


| chicken. They learned to like it | 


| from American troops stationed 
in Japan, 


crises, 


Richard A. Mack - Thurman! 
Whiteside conspiracy case wound | 


'up with a hung jury in an 11-1 | Burner which 


| division, 


There was no official report in | 


| the courtroom 
'viction or acquittal. 
‘of their names, 


| viction. One said the 11-1 dead- 
lock had existed since July 7. 

The question of whether 
Messrs. Mack and Whiteside will 
be brought to trial again cannot 
be decided until 


fendant. 


as to how the} Messrs. 
jJurors were divided as to con-| went to trial followed disclosure | 


But three! before the House subcommittee | 
| members, refusing to permit use | on 


told newsmen | year 
| July 10 that the 11 were for con-| given 


| cused of corruptly 


discharge them on receiving a | 


‘note from 
said 
| stood 11-1. 


The indictment 
Mack and 


on 
Whiteside 


legislative 
that Mr. 
financial favors to Mr. 
Mack while the Channel 
case was pending. 


oversight 


Mr. Whiteside was alleged to'| 
$14,000, | 
to Mr.) 
after Judge|Mack to influence his vote in 
Burnita S. Matthews rules on the| favor of public service. 

still pending motions for a judg- | 
ment of acquittal for each de- | count, 


about 
indirectly, 


have funneled 
directly or 


In addition to the conspiracy 
Mr. Whiteside was ac- 
influencing 


If the motions are denied, the! Mr. Mack’s vote and Mr. Mack 


the Justice Department. 
Judge Matthews | said 


before considering the motions | 
further, and proposed to rule! 
| without hearing any 
arguments. 
The jurors 


further | 


she | 
would take a few days of rest | 


| 


had deliberated | 


for more than 30 hours when. 
i 


discharged. 


matter of a retrial then will be; was accused of. voting corrupt- 
‘for the policy-making level of | ly in favor of public service. 


foreman Robert A. | 
the jury) 


which | 


last | 


Whiteside had Pans VENICE, FLORIDA 


10 | 


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BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11,1959 


Sixth Fleet Wields 
- Quieting Influence 


By Courtney Sheldon 
stap Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 
With the U.S. Sixth Fleet off | ty pe of policeman-on-the-beat 
Spain capability that could be a model 
The United States Sixth Fleet! for an international police unit. 
in the Mediterranean has the By itself it does not have the 
iain strength to wage sustained land, 
‘sea, and air conflict and domi- 
nate large areas. 

But it does have the mobility 
and power to be a quieting influ- 
'ence and to be decisive in most 
‘possible brush fire war situa- 
| tions. 
| The Sixth Flect today is in 

fact a policeman for the North 

gus: P Atlantic Treaty Organization. It 

ee ‘ ~ ‘remains under United States 

BAG Hi Vi, command in peacetime, but is 

‘earmarked for use by the NATO 

ARE military command in the event 

of an emergency 
NATO countries. 

Second Duty Assigned 

Its mission is not, however, 
solely to’spread good will and 
‘quell minor outbreaks of vio- 


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anon. NATO has given it assign- 
ments which supplement those of 
other forces whose responsibility 
it 
war of defense. 


mission—for both limited and 
all-out war—the Sixth Fleet’s| 
major carrier attack force could 
be cut from two to one carrier, 
senior officers of the fleet admit. | 


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carrier striking force, an am- 
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If it did not have this dual service force, is a floating sup- 
| ply base which enables the fleet 


At present the fleet has three) 


|through or over a country, 
armies and planes do. The seas. 


_combat-ready 


barked. 
is to retaliate in an all-out) 


World News in Brief 


h rist 
Revers rom oo tteettes Prete ond heaters nt Meme 
France: Nine Poles Ask Asylum 
When the Polish destroyers Grom and Wicher left Brest July 
10 after a five-day courtesy call, nine crew members, includ- 
ing an officer, stayed behind and asked for political asylum, 


Berlin: Reds Grant Asylum? 
An American, a French, and two British soldiers crossed into 
East Berlin and have been granted political asylum, according 


to East German sources July 


man in West Berlin said he knew of no 


10. An American Army spokes-~ 
5S. soldier missing 


from units in West Berlin. A British Army spokesman said 


British soldiers Allan Brooks 
missing since May 7 and were 


and Derek Alderson had been 
reported to be in East Germany. 


London: Rockets Report Questioned 
British authorities question Life magazine’s Washington report 
that Nikita S. Khrushchev told W. Averell Harriman Moscow 
has given Peking enough rockets to bombard Formosa and 


to destroy the United States 


Seventh Fleet. Britain believes 


there is less than full confidence between Moscow and Peking. 


Vienna: New Government Due 
After eight weeks of negotiations, Austria’s two main political 


parties have agreed on a new 
Parliament July 17. 


government to be presented to 


The People’s Party and the Socialists, 


who have governed Austria as a coalition since the end of the 


war, won 79 and 78 seats, respectively, 


in the last election. 


cruisers and 20 destrovers. The 


‘amphibious group has a squad- | 
lence, such as was done in Leb- | 


ron of amphibious shipping with 
a reinforced battalion of 1,800 
Marines em- 


Fleet Not Dependent 


The third major element, the 


to stay at sea for indefinite 
‘periods. It is a collection of tank- 
ers, repair ships, and supply and 
provision ships. 

Obviously the six fleet is not 
tied to the Mediterranean. It 
‘could be shifted almost any- 
where in the world. It does not 
ihave to ask for permission to 
base itself at ports of the area 


tack force normally has two! in which it operates. It does not 


‘have to ask for rights to pass 
as 


|are free to all. 


The possibilities of an inter- 
/national police force of this type 
‘are readily evident, though it 
may not be a political reality for 
years. 
Police Function Unclear 

One way to conceive of it is 
as a city police riot squad which 


|moves in quickly to stamp out 
| civil commotions, using perhaps 


'tear gas and threatening to use 


‘clubs, but not lethal weapons. 


| 


Just how the Sixth Fleet does 
this type of police duty would 
‘probably be clearer to the 
'American and world public if 


'the fleet were plainly labeled a 


limited war force. 
Navy officers make this diffi- 


cult by their continued emphasis 


on the carrier as a jack-of-all- 
trades, almost equally needed in 
limited and retaliatory war. Un- 
'doubtedly, it could: have some 


' missions of the latter category 
and perform them ably, 


|e 


Limited Use Ascribed 
ut a close look at the capa- | 
bilities of the Sixth Fleet shows 
that they are quite limited in 
this respect. It appears as if in 


‘an all-out conflict the carriers 


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would be quite busy defending 
themselves against attack — to 
say nothing: of taking the at- 
tack to the enemy in a substan- 
tial way. 

Deputy Defense 


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ATLANTA, GA. 


‘Gates, shortly before he re- 
signed as Secretary of the Navy, 
said, in effect, that it was time 
the Navy recognized that the 
carrier was almost an exclu- 


Sively limited war weapon, 


It is true that carrier planes | 


can pack an atomic punch and 
heavily attack enemy installa- 
tions, such as airports, in a way 
similar to the methods of Stra- 
tegic Air Command planes, It is 


also readily apparent that car- | 


riers have one major advantage 
over SAC. planes and missile 
bases. They cannot be zeroed 
in on by enemy missiles. They | 
'move around, making detection | 
difficult; 


| On the other hand, of the 135 


planes aboard the two carriers | 


here, the number that can carry 
sizable payloads up to (1,000 
miles is extremely limited in 
| comparison with the Air Force’s 
roster of planes in SAC as well | 
as in its shorter-range tactical 
force, 
| Soviet Force Estimated 
| Intelligence officers of the 
‘Sixth Fleet estimate that the | 
Black Sea naval force of the | 
Soviets has a liberal quantity. of | 
short and medium range bomb- 
'ers whose major mission could 
be to destroy the Sixth. Fleet. 
|The range of these planes ~’ould | 
allow them to cover almost the | 
whole Mediterranean. 

There is some speculation that 
‘these planes carry 50-mile air- 
to-surface missiles which could 


| be used on shipping, but not ex- 


clusively., 

Vice-Admiral Clarence  E. 
Ekstrom, commander of _ the 
fleet, said that in a limited war 
situation survival is not the 
problem that it would be in a 


retaliatory war. 


Sub Threat Exists 


Enemy bases which could 
‘launch strikes at the fleet would 
be given high priority by carrier 
planes in an all-out war. 

There would also be _ sub- 
marines to be concerned about. 
The four submarines’ which | 


sailed to Albania a year ago are 


presumed to be there still. 
The sub 
‘son why Admiral 
would like the services of a so- 
‘called hunter-killer group full 
time in the Mediterranean. 
The forces of other NATO 
countries are, meanwhile, 


ing subs. 
| The dispersion of the fleet re- 
quired in an atomic age does 


not necessarily mean to naval | 
strategists that subs will have | 


-an easier time sinking naval 
units. On the contrary, it is 
argued, the subs will no longer 
be able to find the fleet by tak- 


ing advantage of concentration | 


'of noise. It will be necessary for 
/a sub to identify what it hears, 
‘thus becoming vulnerable it- 


i} self. 


threat is one rea- | 
Ekstrom | 


be- | 
coming more proficient in hunt- | 


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By Paul Wohl 
Written for Thée Christian Science Monitor 


New York 


of acquainting Americans with 
the Soviet challenge than an in- 
dependently guided tour of the 
U.S.S.R's impressive “Exhibition 
of Science, Technology and Cul- 
ture” on display, in the New 
York Coliseum until Aug. 10. 


to electronic computers and 
model kindergartens, everything 
is there that the Soviets can be 
expected to show, everything the 
party sponsors and approves of. 
And, as Communists see it, 
erything that legitimately exists, 
because it is good and has a fu- 
ture, 

It-is not merely that the So- 
viets set their best foot forward. 
Others do the same thing. Few 
countries are eager to 
abroad city slums, backward un- 
sanitary industries, 
dirt farms. 


From sputniks and superjets| 


show | 


There could be no better way | He ed. 


{ 


primitive | 


| 


The peculiar thing about the| 


Soviet exhibition is the uncanny | ‘bingy? Seame: 
seen in Soviet streets are black. 


Less obvious is the picture of | 


combination of what exists with 
what 
the way in which everything re- 
jected by the regime or tempo- 
rarily tolerated has been left 


out. 

The idea behind it—and this 
in itself is a major challenge— | 
¥s that of a dynamic, future- | 
conscious, secularly dedicated 
'society. The Soviet society 
‘shown in this exhibition is a 
society with a program, not | 
with a faith—a disciplined, one- 
‘minded, unquesioningly opti- 
mistic society. 
| It has been said by some cri- 
tical visitors—and rightly so— 
that the exhibition to a large 
lextent shows projects, dreams. 
But these are programed | 


Communist Party and the So- | 
viet state behind them. And 
‘many of the earlier Soviet 


is supposed to exist and | 


dreams have come true, even 
though the outcome is different 
from what originally was plan- 


For those ‘familiar with 
Soviet and Russian history the 
exhibition is amazingly frank 
in its. display of weaknesses — 


perhaps because so many rather | 


spectacular technological and 
organizational achievements are 
shown. But perspective is re- 
quired to discern these weak- 
nesses, 
Premier's Hand Evident 
Apart from all its positive 


hon | traits, there are in this exhibi- 


tion. crude incongruencies 
typical of the degree of project 
thinking in which Communists 
can indulge. Thus Soviet cars on 
display, with the exception of 
the immense, austere and im- | 
pressive prototype of the future 
Zil, are all in the pleasant pastel | 
colors recommended last year 
by Premier Nikita S. Khrush-| 
chev. All recent visitors confirm, 
however, that virtually all cars 


the “Ukraina” collective farm— 


one of the most interesting and 


attractive exhibits. The setup 


_and working of this-farm are ex- 
| plained by a wealth of figures 


| 


} 


| 


supplemented by a_ telephone | 
i|lecture. The nice little houses 
shown on the model: may actu- 
ally exist. The American writer 
Maurice Hindus.. who recently 
‘visited the Soviet countryside, 


‘has seen many houses of this 


| type. But the very facts and fig- | 
;ures given out 


dreams with the power of the | 


| 


by the Soviets 
‘spell backwardness and ineffi- 
'clency. 

Thus 732 families are said to 
‘live on this 7,400 acre farm of 


which, one discovers, only 4,405 | 
the | 


acres are under cultivation, 
balance apparently consisting of 
|pastures and fallow lands. Of 
these 4,405 acres, 2,870 acres are 


Floods Intensify 


| 


China Food Lag 


By Frank Robertson 


Spécial Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


| Hong Kong 
‘have existed 
China since 
the year 
intensified by the serious floods 
reported to have inundated 
large areas of richly productive 
arable land in south and south- 
central China in recent weeks. 
It seems certain, too, that the 
flood waters—which in Kwang- 
tung were said to have posed the 


in Communist 
the beginning of 


The food shortage known to) 


can only have been | 


worst threat in a century—have | 


‘swamped Peking’s lofty hopes 


for a staggering 525,000,000 tons | 


of food this year. 


Granted perfect weather con- 1 ; 
ditions, most experts gave China Loe 


no chance of achieving the am- | 


_bitious goal set for 1959. This is 
proving a poor year for the 
mainland’s hard-pressed farm- 
.ers, for in addition to the dis- 
astrous floods, drought was re- 
ported earlier in parts of Man- 
'churia and north China, and a 
| scourge of pests and wheat rust 
'was said to have caused con- 


siderable damage in the north- | 


west. 

’58 Claims Doubted 
| The experts, in fact, 
| believe Peking’s food claims for 
| 1958 — 375,000,000 tons, double 
1957 production. They now are 
saying that the recent natural 
disasters will give Peking just 
‘the excuse it needs to rational- 


did not | 


|ize the almost certain failure of 


this vear’s food program. 

In fact, 
‘notice of their anxieties by 
warning that natural disasters 
imight be expected in 1959, be- 
fore any had occurred. 
agricultural production at pres- 
ent is still: very unstable,” the 
People’s Daily warned. “We may 
have a bumper crop this year 
but we may have a very 
crop. 


Minister Li Hsien-nien .tem- 
pered his report to the National 
People’s Congress by pointing 
out that food shortages had 
caused “some tension” in the 
cities in the preceding 
months. 


interim food protiuction figures; 
winter wheat returns, 


before this, have not been given. 
Accuracy Asked 
Reflecting 


however short of the target they | 
may be. And a number of prov- | 
inces already have lowered their | 
sights for 1959 — Shantung, | 
from 54,000,000 to 41,000,000 
tons, is but one of a number of 
examples. 

More significant is Peking’s | 
abandonment of the vaunted | 
close - planting system, credited 
to Party Chairman Mao Tse- 
tung, which was hailed as the 
perfect solution for the main- 
jand’s pressing food-production 
problems. “We cannot put this 
system into effect for another 10 
years, and even then not in most 
areas,” the People’s Daily now 
has stated, 

Meanwhile, peasants are being 
urged to plant crops on stream 
banks, footpaths, and in the 
yards ‘of their houses—hardly an 
efficient answer, it would seem, 
for an agricultural system that 


Chinese, but also bear most of 

the cost of the nation’s ambi- 

tious industrialization program, 
Floods Subside 


gions, fought by millions of 
peasants, now appear to be sub- 
siding, although more than 
1,000,000 acres of maize were 
still said to be under water in 
+Kwangtung, while in the neigh- 
boring province of Kiangsi some 
520 square miles of crop land 
still were inundated. 

It is quite possible that Pe- 
king’ s propagandists have been 
exaggerating flood damage in 
order to explain away the fail- 


the authorities gave 


“Our | 


poor 


And a as early as April, Finance | 


six es 
‘a 


Although the year already is @° 
well along, with some harvests @ 
in, Peking to date has withheld @ 
J 
for ex- @ 
ample, normally published long LL 


| 


the new note of g 
caution that contrasts so sharply ™ 
with the ebullient claims Peking g 
was making at the beginning of [| 
the year, rural cadres have been ig 
warned that they must be care- ig 
ful to return accurate figures, : 


F 


| 
i 


| 


must not only feed: 650,000,00Q . 


The floods in the southern re- 


gram that was well beyond their 
reach in the best of times. But 
there is no doubt that there was 
serious flooding; 
result, the railroad connecting 
Hong Kong and Canton has been 
out of action for two weeks. 

Unhappily there can be little 
doubt, either, that many of the 
grossly overworked simple peo- 
ple of China will go hungry in 
the months to come. 


as one known | 


sown to grain, a rather exten- | 
sive form of cultivation which | 
with the help of the powerful | 
machines on display require rel- 
atively little work. 


Waste of Manpower 


there are a little more than six | 
acres of cultivated land per | 
family. Each family, “in turn, | 
probably has one or two adult 


highly mechanized model farm 


“Ukraina” still requires about 
one worker for every three acres 
of which nearly two-thirds are 
sown to grain—by Western 
standards a sheer unimaginable 
waste of manpower. 

The legend says that the col- 
'lective has 1,000 head of cattle, 
| 1,600 pigs, and 2,500 fowl. But 
nothing is said about how many 
|animals are privately owned by 
| the collective farm families. In 
| 1956, the last year for which data 


/are available, 56.5 per cent of all | 


cows were in private property. 
The telephoned lecture re- 
i'mains silent about, these still 
tolerated but ultimately to be 
liquidated private cows. 
| Soviet factories are shown to 
be modern and exceptionally | 
large. Yet the chairman of the 
‘Russian Republic Gosplan, Vla- 
| dimir N. Novikov, presently in 
the United States in the company 
‘of First Deputy Premier Frol 
R. Kozlov, personally informed 
the plenum of the central com- 
mittee on June 27 that “nearly 
80 per cent of the industrial 
enterprises (of Russia ‘proper) 
‘are relatively small,” many | 
with only up to 100 workers 
and employees. 


Tax Figures Questioned 
Perhaps the most glaring dis- 
tortion is the statement on one 
of the numerous charts that 


“taxes levied on the population 


| 
} 
lin the Soviet Union amount to 
} 


no more than 7.8 per cent of the 
state budgetary resources. In 
ithe near future it is planned to 
|eliminate all taxes in the Soviet 
Union.” This is officially correct 
only because the Soviets claim 
that their turnover tax is not 
paid by the population (but by 
the producers! ). 

According to the 1958 budget 
estimate, this turnover tax was 
to bring in 300,500,000,000 rubles 
($75,125,000,000 at the official 
rate) of a total revenue of 569,- 
200,000,000 rubles, which is only 
55 per cent of the revenue. 

No prices are displayed. But 
this may be in the nature of the 
exhibition which is not supposed 
to be a trade fair. Yet there is 
a commercial department and 
some prices can be ascertained 


On the basis of these figures | 


Soviet Exhibition in N.Y. Bares Challenge 


from the Soviet guides. If placed 
‘in relation to the income even 
of better paid workers, most 
prices are relatively high. 
Although bread and quite a 
few other mass-consumer items 
have become plentiful and rela- 
tively inexpensive, the items-on 
display which give visitors an 
‘impression of abundance,. solid 
comfort, and even elegance are 
accessible only to the better- paid 
'groups of the population. 


workers. This means that the SO | 


N.Y. Reaction Hailed 


By Reuters 
Moscow 
The Soviet exhibition in New 
‘York is “shattering the false 
‘illusions that Americans have 
about the Soviet Union,” accord- 
ing to Moscow newspapers. 
| They carried column after 
column of highly favorable reace- 


tions from American newspapers 
and enthusiastic quotes from 
visitors to the show at the New 
| York Coliseum, 
Against this, 
papers. scornfully 
|had been some “pinpricks” by 
certain “reactionary”. American 
newsmen who sought to prove 
the exhibit was not typical of 
Soviet development everywhere, 
| In general, the Soviet press, 
July 2, acclaimed American 
press reaction as indicating a 
triumph for the Soviet exhibits. 
‘Several papers reprinted in 
|headlines such comments as 
'“colossal” and ‘‘majestic.”’ 


American newsmen who wrote 
the exhibit contained too much 
| propaganda or that it was not 
| typical were written off as “cold- 
| war warriors” out to deliberately 
soft-pedal Soviet achievement. 

The remark of an unidentified 
American woman who ex- 
claimed, “I never knew that 
they had it so good!” was taken 
up gleefully by several papers 
as' the average American reac- 
tion, 

Since 
Premier 
Moscow 


many news- 
noted there 


~* 


Soviet First Deputy 
Frol R. Kozlov left 
June 28 for the open- 
ing of the Soviet exhibit, the 
foreign pages of Soviet news- 
papers have been dominated by 
related events in New York and 
Washington — including full re- 
ports of speeches made by 
President Eisenhower and Vice- 
President Richard M. Nixon, 

The onslaught of publicity has 
been at least equa] to or slightly 
more than that given First 
Deputy Premier Anastas A. 
Mikoyan’s tour of the United 
States earlier this year. 

Meanwhile, only brief refer- 
ences have been made to the 
United States exhibition due to 
‘open here on July 25, 


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Double Problem |§ 
Roils Middle East; 


By Harry B. Ellis 


Mediterranean Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Beirut, Lebanon 
This week two major problems 
continued to crop up above the 
roiled sea of uneasiness which 
characterizes the 
scene. 


One problem was the still in- | 
struggle between | 


determinate 
the Communists and Arab na- 
tionalists in Iraq, a struggle 
whose outcome may decide 


whether that country will be| 


denied to the Soviet Union as a 
bridgehead of expansion into 
the Mideast and eventually on 
to Africa. 

The second problem—which 
manifested itself in two forms 
this week—was the deeply un- 
settled and unsettling relation- 
ship between the Arab world 
am Israel, 

So far as Iraq was concerned, 
the trend of events could be re- 
garded by the West with cau- 
tious optimism, chiefly because 
Premier Abdel Karim Kassem 
continued to rebuke the Com- 
munists for their persistent at- 
tempts to agitate the Iraqi peo- 
ple in the Communists’ favor. _ 

Most spectacular item in this 
respect was a report from Bagh- 
dad that Lt. Col. Selim Fakhri, 
an alleged Communist who has 
been Iraq’s director of broad- 
casting since the beginning of 
last year’s revolution, has been 
arrested. 


Broadcast Chief Arrested 


Reportediy Colonel’ Fakhri 
was arrested July 2 for broad- 
casting news of formation of 
the Communist-dominated Unit- 
ed National Front despite Pre- 
mier Kassem’s order that it not 
be mentioned. It was also said 
that in describing a speech by 
Mr. Kassem on June 16 Colonel 
Fakhri omitted all references by 
the Premier to “‘Arabism” and 
“God” and had cut out of the 
broadcast all applause for Mr. 
Kassem. 

This would appear to be the 
first visible instance of a top- 
ranking alleged Communist los- 
ing his job in Mr. 
growing campaign against Iraqi 
Communists. 

In other moves in the past 
three days, Mr. Kassem has de- 
nounced the Communists’ so- 
called United National Front as 
a “tattered front” falsely claim- 
ing to represent other political 
parties, and has told the Com- 
munist-led popular resistance 
force that it is now completely 
under the authority of the Iraqi 
Semy. 

In an earlier decree dated 
June 29, six Iraqi Army officers 
were dismiissed at Mr. Kassem’s 
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recommendation. To judge from 
‘the resultant outcry in the Iraqi 
Communist press, these six offi- 
‘cers at the very least must have 
been followers of the Communist 
line. 

Negative Factors Loom 
These are hopeful signs, but 
‘to balance them certain other 
things must be noted: 

1. In speaking of the transi- 
tional period before Iraqi politi- 
cal life could be restored, Pre- 
mier Kassem declared that “na- 
tional democrats, Communists, 
and Turkish democrats are my 
brethren.” He made no similar 
reference to Baathists or Istiqlal 
members, whose Pan-Arabist 
views caused them to be crushed 
by Mr. Kassem early in the Iraqi 
revolution. 

2. Whereas ‘Western delega- 
‘tions to Iraqi anniversary cele- 
brations begining July 14 will be 


headed by the ambassadors resi- | 


dent in Iraq, the Soviet Union’s 
delegation will be headed by the 


First Deputy Foreign Minister, | 


_that—of Communist--China_ by 
the Deputy Foreign Minister, 
and that of North Korea by the 
Deputy Premier. 

3... Most Western reporters 
find it difficult if not impossible 
| to visit Iraq to report directly on 
happenings. This writer, for ex- 
ample, so far has been unable to 
secure a visa to revisit republi- 
can Iraq. 

4. While American 
Four and _ information 
programs have been shut down 


Point 


by the Iraqi Government, Soviet | 
technicians continue to be wel- | 


|comed to Baghdad in fulfillment 
of the recent Iraqi-Soviet tech- 
nical aid agreement. On July 7, 


for example, Baghdad Radio re- | 
ported that five Soviet railroad | 
experts are expected in Baghdad | 
next month to work on a pro-| 
rail net-) 


posed 
work, 
Cautious Optimism 


internal Iraqi 


is as determined to crush the 


‘Communists as he was earlier to | 
destroy the power of pro-Nasser | 


'Pan-Arabists; and that his 


‘language toward the Commu-| 


service | 


It is possible that Mr. Kassem | 


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Voila! New 


By Reuters 


Paris 


France is to get its first “heavy” franc money shortly. 
The change is part of a plan announced at the beginning of 
the year whereby 100 of the present francs will become one 


“new” or “heavy” franc. 


currency. 


Its aim is to restore sagging postwar confidence in French 


New coins and bills are being prepared for the complete 


change-over to the new currency next Jan. 1. 


imposed. 


Meanwhile, the first of the new bills to be issued July 15 will 
merely be old-type notes with the “new franc” value super- 


During the next six months the new currency will gradually 
come into use. The new rate will be 4.93 francs to the United 


States dollar. 


ary, 1961. 


The first new coins and bills already have started to come 
from the French mint and engraving plants. ' 

But the whole job of replacing the old-style currency with 
the new models is not expected to be completed before Febru- 


Come July 15, though, Frenchmen will be able to go to their 


vivid red overprint announcing 


10’s, and 500’s as 5’s. 
o 


banks and get new—but old-style—10,000-franc bills with a 


them as being 100 “new francs.” 


There aiso will be 5,000-franc bills marked as 50’s, 1,000’s as 


nists is still somewhat gentle in | 
order to avoid any possible Com- | 


munist-led coup d’état. 


| So far, however, careful ob- 


servers are forced to stick to the 
factual record of actual events 
in Iraq, and that record at pres- 
ent would not seem to justify 
anything beyond cautious opti- 
| mism, 

| As for Arab-Israel relations, 
all members of the Arab League 
now have agreed on a high-level 
— probably foreign ministers — 
meeting to forge fresh united 
Arab policy toward Israel and 
the Palestine problem, Most 


likely venue of this meeting is | to animated discussion by others. | about which 


Beirut. 


Those hoping for a more mod- | 


erate Arab attitude on this ques- 
tion are likely to be disappointed 
by this. Arab leaders—jousting 
for position in the Arab world 
and eyeing each other for flaws 
in armor—are unlikely to agree 
on anything but a hard line to- 
ward Israel. 


Bey 


oe 


levision 


Sitting in on Seminars 
By Frederick H. Guidry 


One of the theories now be- 
|ing tested by television produc- 
|ers is that a viewer can_be in- 
duced to think by being exposed 


Thus, while there may be 
some entertainment value in 
programs like “The World of 
Ideas” and “The Open Mind,” 


the hope seems to be that the | 
|panel show or seminar will in- | 


'spire the easy-chair audience to 


|do more than watch impassively. | 


The theory is that a viewer 
'cannot behold two or more peo- 


} 
Mexico College Goes Coed ?!€ &984ging in intellectual spar- 
| 


By the Associated Press 

| Mexico City 

The National _Teachers—-Col- 
lege is going slightly coed. 
Mixed classes will be held only 
in certain professional subjects 
because of Mexico’s noncoed 
tradition. 


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ring without wanting to put on 
the gloves himself. Even if he is 
(not moved to an immediate 


argument over foreign policy, | 


say, with his wife, he may profit 
by the mental exercise of fol- 
lowing the televised debate, 

| This, in turn, may lead him 


|to..the library for more back- | 


'ground, or to local discussion 
groups for chances to speak out 
in person, or to the writing desk 


to pen a demand for more of, 


this challenging TV fare. From 


the point of view of an unspon- | 


sored educational 
program, any one of these 
courses of action would be 
equivalent to rushing out and 
buying a sponsor’s product—the 
highest possible reward. 

| ES ee 

| One of the latest excursions 


or cultural 


into the televised informal dis- | 


cussion field is “Max Lerner’s 
Seminar,” soon to be released to 
educational stations throughout 
ithe United States. Its 13 half- 
|hour sessions have already been 
tested on Greater Boston by the 
originating 
| Mr. Lerner’s 1,036-page book 
; ‘America as a Civilization” pro- 
‘vides not only the program’s 
‘blueprint but also much of its 
|struetural material, as the au- 
thor chats with students frém 
his classes at Brandeis Univer- 
| Sity. 

A brief introduction by Mr. 
Lerner states the general pur- 
pose (discussion of “the urgent 
‘issues in American life — the 
kinds of problems with which 
all of us have to grapple”) and 
specific questions that may be 
touched on during the following 


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Any one of these questions 
could be the starting point for 
an entire program, but Mr. Ler- 
ner rattles them off as though 
'they were mere hints of still 
|vaster areas of inquiry lying 
-ahead. “To what degree should 
.thefe be permissiveness or re- 
strictiveness in the crucial rela- 
‘tionship between parent. and 
| child? What is happening to the 
'American family? What happens 


to communication between the 


generations? What kind of per- 
sonality is it that we are helping 
to shape among our young peo- 
ple today?” 


— 


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Thanks to a combination of 
advance note-taking and youth- 
ful boldness, the students are 
rarely at a loss for an opinion, 
whether the subject is “The Or- 
deal of the American Woman” 
or Dicameing ty b hal Role.” ; 


Even after discounting for TV 
mike-fright and for the possibil- 
ity that the students may be 
somewhat self-conscious at pub- 
licly grappling with issues still 
largely beyond their personal 
experience, the average viewer 
may find himself wishing Mr. 
Lerner were lecturing instead of 
refereeing: 

By the time the ideas in his 
book make their reappearance 
via the students’ notes, they are 


station, WGBH-TV. | 


iwot only difficult to challenge 
but even harder to grasp. 

| In the third session, for ex- 
lample, the topic was “Growing 
| Up in America’ — something 
the upper-teen- 
agers could be expected to fur- 
| nish first-hand impressions. Yet 
ithe discussion was almost im- 
mediately clouded with socio- 
| logical jargon. 

“As far as I see it,” one girl 
said, “we have a child-centered, 
very permissive family situation 
in the United States today and 


this can have, well, two clearcut | 


‘possible repercussions. Either 
'.«. you can have a personality- 
less personality—in other words, 
the child who can’t do anything 


for himself any more because | 
it’s always been done for him— | 
or, as a reaction to this kind of” 
background, we might be devel- | 


'Oping the authoritarian person- 
' ality.” 

(Granted, it may be unfair to 
look too closely at so off-hand 
an expression of so complex an 
idea. Yet the sample is fairly 
representative. ) 
ee oe 
The articulate Mr. Lerner 
‘could have whipped up 13 lec- 


‘tures with ease. But he shunned 


‘the lecture method in the in- 
|terest of experimenting with the 
|seminar method as a TV teach- 
‘ing tool. 
| “T feel that much of the edu- 
|cational future in America lies 
with the TV medium. There is a 
danger that many of us will 
itake the easy road and use TV 
‘simply as a powerful new me- 
‘dium for conveying the old 
classroom lectures and black- 
board demonstration. 
| “Surely we have the chance 
‘as 
iteaching methods through pow- 
'erful new visual techniques for 
|audiences of unparelleled size. 
| “Most of all, I wanted to 
show that education is a great 
encounter between teacher and 
student in which both are mean- 
ingfully stretched.” 
Professional educators wil] 
have the final say on the effect- 
ivéness of “Max Lerner’s Sem- 
inar” as a teaching method. But 
booksellers stand to be the ‘ear- 
liest beneficiaries of the series 
and its regular reminder of Mr. 
Lerner’s book. a. , 


Gasoline Tax Hike 


By the Associated Press 
Washington 
Prospects are growing _ for 
‘some increase in the federal 
gasoline tax to keep the inter- 
state highway program going. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee decided after meet- 
ing with federal officials to hold 
public hearings July 22 on vari- 
ous plans for financing the de- 
pleted construction fund, 

A gas tax increase, in some 
amount, figures in most of these 
plans. 

Chairman Wilbur D. Mills (D) 
of Arkansas said after a closed- 
door meeting July 10 that “it 
was concluded we cannot reach 
a solution without public hear- 
ings.” He said the committee de- 
voted its attention today solely 
to factual matters. 

The hearings will deal with 
urgent short-term financing 
needs and longer-range prob- 
lems. growing. out of rising costs 
of the 41,000-mile interstate net- 
work during the Dg eg span 
of the program, ending in 1972, 


' “THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11,199 
wee pay | Elbows Fly, Cameras Click, Quotes Veiled 


By Robert C. Nelson 
Staff Correspondent rf 
The Christian Science Moniier 
Chicago 
For some distance along a cat- 
walk at the Inland Steel rolling 
mill, this reporter was jostled by 
a Soviet news agency correspon- 
dent who aggressively dogged 
every word of Frol R. Kozlov 


Ks and his translator Victor M. 


Sukhodrev, 

Such elbowing is not uncom- 
mon when a reporter’s assign- 
ment is to cover an official as 
important as First Deputy 
Premier Kozlov of the Soviet 
Union. But, the incident raised 
an unexpected question of po- 
tentially far-reaching  signifi- 
cance. 

Not only did the Tass man get 
Mr. Kozlov’s every Russian 
word 
English that this reporter heard) 


Soviet newsmen would benefit 
from remarks from the tour’s 
official linguist. 

These banterings in Russian 
seemed to guarantee a full and 
Soviet-oriented Tass report but 
left in doubt the fullness, and 
perhaps fairness, of the report 
this newspaper — and other 
American news media — would 
receive, 

U.S, Translator Lacking 

It was encumbering not to 
have an American State De- 
partment translator available to 
at least provide a check on the 
renderings of the Kozlov com- 
ments. 

Even this reporter’s modest 
facility with the Russian lan- 
|guage picked up some flaws in 


but he received extra side com- | mon 


ments, observations, and jibes| words ought to be in English. | 
from_ Mr. Sukhodrev in rapid-| This won a cool glance but no 
fire Russian. Frequently, other | end to the private chat. 


| 


ulterior mission of the visit. 


Mr. Kozlov’s Russian that were | @ 


subsequently polished away in | 


translation. 


Undoubtedly, 
translator would also have pol- 
ished words here and there and 
paraphrased in order to keep | 
pace with long and spontaneous | 
remarks, but at § least 
American translator would have 
been available to American 
newsmen to answer questions 
about the exact words of the 
high Soviet official, 

A United States Department 
of State escort with the Kozlov 
party told this reporter that 
no American linguist had been 
assigned to the tour. 


an American | 


that | 


Soviet Media Represented 

At one point, the comments 
between Mr. Sukhodrev and the 
Tass correspondent led this re- 


(Mr. Kozlov spoke no/| porter to remark to them in the 


firmest Russian he could sum- 


that Mr. Sukhodrev’s 


Chronicling with film and the 
spoken and printed word every 
twitch of the Kozlov tour 
seemed almost to emerge as an 
It 
was staffed by a large retinue 
of newsmen from Pravda, Iz- 
vestia, Komsomolskaya Pravda, 
Ogonyok, Tass, and Radio and 
Television Moscow. These names 
identify leading official news- 
paper, news agency, and radio 
and TV units in the U.S.S.R. 

This mission seemed to rival, 
and at times supersede, the 
jolly gladhanding goal 


which | 


i 


; 


| 


i 
| 
' 


; 


Mr. Kozlov appears to have set. 


for this tour. 


“Wowing ’em on the corn 


Soviet Tactics.on Kozlov Tour Aired 


| 
Pittsburgh Shrugs at Reds 


Spectal to The Christian Science Monitor 


Pittsburgh 


The visit here July 11 of Soviet First Deputy Premier Frol 
R. Kozlov attracted far less attention than the visit earlier’ this 
week of baseball’s all-stars. But for police sirens ushering the 


Soviet motorcade into the city, 
taken notice of the visitors. 


few. Pittsburghers would have 


An orderly group of perhaps less than 300 idly curious people 
watched the party’s arrival from Chicago at Greater Pitts- 
burgh Airport early in the afternoon. There was no demonstra- 
tion then nor throughout the day. 

Mr. Kozlov and his entourage of Soviet officials and news- 
men were welcomed by F. G. Weir, president of the Pittsburgh 
City Council, and by Allan Rankin, a vice-chancellor of the 
University of Pittsburgh. Mayor Thomas J. Gallagher was at the 


airport, awaiting a plane to Los 


Soviets. 


Angeles, but did not greet the 


porter, ancillary to wowing them 
on the steppes of Asia at some 
future moment, to serve some 
special purpose. | 

Prime subject of this intensive 
Soviet coverage, was, of course, 
the First Deputy Fremier. But it 
was obvious during the steel 
mill trip that bridges, power 
lines, panoramic motion picture 
shots of the heavy industry com- 
plex, representing not 
scenic but, quite possibly, stra- 


tegic subjects, rated high priority | 
in the assignments of the men) 


from the Soviet media. 


Handy With Elbows 
On the part of the Soviet pho- 
tographers, there was frequently 


almost frenzied action to record 
Mr. Kozlov’s every moment. 

B. A. Sokolov particularly 
caught this reporter’s eye. A’ 


'short, but sturdy, newsreel cam- 


belt,” as one Chicago newspaper | 


phrased it, seemed, to this re- 


New York 


clearance program—a “dead 
isn’t it? 

Robert Moses, the redoubtable 
chairman of the Mayor’s Slum- 


never before to explore new | 


Grows in Prospect, 


‘He charges the recent criticism 


‘of alleged improprieties in his 


'domain has scared off business- 
men who are needed to sponsor 
these projects. 

Mayor Robert F. Wagner, on 
the other hand, appears deter- 
mined to reorganize the commit- 


duck” in New York City, OT | tion 


‘ ° ° } 
Clearance Committee, says it is. 


tee by adding more members to. 


‘it. Critics have blamed short- 
‘comings of the group on 
|/one-man rule by Mr. Moses, who 
for many years has pioneered 
‘and headed many of the city’s 
major projects in various fields 
of construction, 


| Support Sighted 


'who reportedly do about one- 
‘half of the city’s construction 
‘volume, have assured him that 


Stennis Airs Doubt 
On Missile Defense 


By the Associated Press 
Washington 


| 


the | 


Robert Moses Hits Back 
At Foes in Title I Battle 


By Frederick W. Roevekamp 


Staff Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


their long-held hostility to Title 


Is Title I—the subsidized slum-|1 projects would indeed change 


into friendly backing provided 
the current Title I administra- 
is improved. They ex- 
pressed a particular interest in 


vision, and clad 


eraman from the Soviet State 
Committee on Radio and Tele- 
in a_lumber- 
jacket shirt that did not appear 
summer weight, Mr. 


proved himself every bit as ef-'| 
fective with his elbows as Chi-' 
photogra- 


cagos determined 


phers.: 


At times dripping with per-| 


spiration and not knowing just 
which way the tour party might 
swerve next, he constantly 
drove ahead of the group in or- 
der to keep Mr. Kozlov in front 


of his lens and the hundreds of | 
feet of film that sped past it. | 


This morning—a _ blue-sky, | 


‘hot-air July 10—the same pat- | 


establishing an atmosphere of | 


open competition for 
sponsorships. 
Although New York City runs 


project | 


tern of Soviet conviviality and | 
Soviet reporting again prevailed | 
as it had yesterday at James 


,Holderman’s corn farm in near- 


'by Grundy County and as 


the biggest single Title I pro-| 


gram (named after Title 1 of 
the National 
1949), the independent-minded 
Mr. Moses has administered it 
his own way, 
more efficient. 

Criticism Heard 


Housing *Act . of | 


He considers it 


His committee picks the pros-_ 


pective sponsor, arranges the 
deal, and then sells the property 
to him in a procedure that re- 
sembles competition 


| 


bidding | 


‘only in form. The sponsor then | 
‘takes charge of relocation and 
| Now the Mayor has received | 
what could prove to. be crucial | 
‘support. A group of builders, | 


demolition. 
While many projects 


were | 


successfully built in this way, | 


some were criticized for . mis- 


management. 


| Slum 


Recent disclosures of alleged- 


ly improper business deals by | 


Clearance Committee 
members and the presence of an 
underworld figure among Title 
I sponsors 


— under heavy attack. 


| Senator John Stennis (D) of | 


| Mississippi says there is serious 
doubt that an incoming enemy 


atomic bomb will be destroyed | 


even if the airplane carrying it 
| is hit directly by the nuclear 


| warhead of a United States 


missile. 
No That is why, Senator Stennis 


| said in an interview, that the | 
| Senate Armed Services and Ap- 


|propriations Committees 


have | 


‘cut back sharply the programs. 


‘for the rival Army and Air 
Force defensive missiles. 


“We probably 
gone even deeper if the pro- 


would have’! 


_grams had not been recommend-_. 


red by the President of 
United States, the Secretary of 
Defense, the Joint Chiefs of 
'Staff, and the continental air 
defense commander,” he added. 
Senator Stennis’s 
‘came after closed-door testi- 
‘mony given by Maurice 
‘Stans, Director of the Budget 
‘Bureau, before the watch 

‘Senate defense  preparedne 
| subcommittee and released after 
screening for military secrets. 


the 


| 


comments | 


H., | 


| 


| 


With the Soviet Union shifting. 


emphasis from: manned bombers 
to missiles, Mr. Stans testified 
that the budget experts ques- 
tioned the billions of dollars 
planned for the Army’s Nike 
Hercules and Air Force’s Bo- 
marc missiles. 


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the year 2000. 


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had the day before in the cruel 
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Chicago Fair Visited 

Mr. Kozlov toured the Chie 
cago International Trade Fair. 
He lingered longest at Poland’s 
industrial machinery exhibit; 
registered some slight, but 
noticeable, surprise at. the Yu- 
goslav export display: and re- 


served his warmest smiles and 
only | 


readiest conversation 
prettiest female faces. 

For those who had covered 
the January visit here of the 
other First Deputy Soviet Pre- 
mier, Anastas I Mikoyan, the 
contrast in tours and tourists 
was striking. 

As Mr. Kozlov’s party sped 
off for the airport and a flight to 
there was word 
among newsmen that his stay 
there was being cut short. 

‘He’s had it,” one veteran So- 


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Art—Music—Theater 


gate ° Art—Musice—Theater “ TIE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


"Memories of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes 


Homage 50 Years Afterward 


Reveals No Artistic Heirs @ 


By Emile Vuillermoz 


Paris 
They have just commemorated 
in Paris the fiftieth anniversary 


of the introduction in France of 
the “Ballets russes” by Serge de 
Diaghilev, It was certainly a 
praiseworthy project, 
incomparable animator was a 
great benefactor of the .con- 
temporary art of the theater. 
We owe him a great deal in 
the realm of music, décor, cos- 


for this | 


backdrop and creating an at- 
mosphere more or less evocative 
around the action, without being 
directly related to it. They 
danced before a curtain by 
Léger, by Braque or Picasso, 
without daring to ask these 
fashionable masters to sketch in 
the doors, windows, parks or 
palaces the spectator might need 
to comprehend the scenario. 


f 


This conception of the décor 


tume, and dance, for he brought \led to still graver abuses. They 


to it a host of new and fruitful | 


ideas. The alliances he worked | in theatrical decoration and cos- 


no longer turned to specialists |§ 


out among. greatly’ talented 
choreographers, painters, and 
composers hatched numerous 
masterpieces. 

But, alas, he has no artistic 
heirs! He left hehind his splen- 
did example and theories which 
he alone was able to apply with 
safety, for he had the gifts of a 
magician and the taste which 
made him irreplaceable even in 
his most disconcerting experi- 
ments. 

One of these startling theories 
consisted of tearing down the 
partitions which once separated 
ballet music—music composed to 
order to meet the needs of a 
choreographer—from that prop- 
erly-known as symphonic music. 
He not only gave the composers 
he commissioned’ the greatest 
possible liberty of expression, 
but did not hesitate to translate 
into choreographic language 
scores which their composers 
had never thought of for such 
use. 


Subject Imposed 


What is more, if he chose a 


symphonic poem intended sole- | 


ly for concert use, but written 
on a theme of particular in- 
spiration or characteristic anec- 
dote, he was not content just to 
turn it into a ballet. He imposed 
an entirely different subject on 
it. 

Thus he seized boldly upon 


“Shéhérazade,” the famous sym- | 


phonic poem by Rimsky-Korsa- 
kov which describes minutely 
the voyage and shipwreck of 
Sinbad the Sailor, and made it 
the melodic and rhythmic sup- 
port for a harem intrigue in 
which brazen sultanas betray 
their lord and master with 
young and lively Negroes, and 
‘pay for their misconduct with 
their lives. And this was the 
masterpiece of Bakst and Fokine 
which still dazzles us today. 
What dangers such precedents 
present to maladroit imitators 
can be imagined. We have had 
plenty of examples. Maitres de 
ballet have grabbed at any score 
at all, bearing a signature likely 
to be profitable, for use as a 
carpet under the feet of their 
dancers. They dance on sonatas, 
quartets, symphonies, orchestral 
suites, concertos, or piano pieces 
orchestrated for the purpose. 


Blunders and Follies 


Never mind the discordance 
which may be set up between 
the particular rhythms of these 
works and those demanded by 
the choreographed action, They 
are content to align themselves 
with the general movement. 


|tuming. They called in painters 
i 
i with collectors or snobs, 


| who were in favor with the pub- . 


larged to the dimensions of a| 4 


taking a chance on the drawing | =4 


_power of their signatures. 


'to bow before all the caprices of 
| these artists, For true painters 
“see” things from an absolutely 
personal viewpoint, which gives 
them a style from which they 
cannot depart without disavow- 


guage than the plastic vocabu- 


they are, 


Improbable Cartwheel 
Many of them make fun of 
'these contingencies and gather- 
‘ing up their colors “orchestrate” 
|them, according to their tem- 
|peraments, with absolute disre- 
'gard, We have seen a famous 
contemporary painter introduce 
in all his décors a cartwheel 
leaning negligently against the 
walls of a cottage or a princely 


it was a fetish, and he did not 
| want to part with it. 

| Another, less celebrated, had 
be passion for wooden trellises 


| about to fall apart. He put them | 3 


|in everywhere. And, in the last 
|act of “‘The Marriage of Figaro,” 
‘having to construct elegant 
| little pavilions where Count Al- 
|'maviva appointed a rendezvous 
in the middle of his park, he 
created, along with his damaged 
trellises, the striking picture of 
henhouses ravaged by fire. 

These days we have had pre- 
sented to us at the Opera Com- 
ique new décors for “Pelléas et 
Mélisande.” With perfect sin- 
cerity the designer, believing 
'that contemporary art is oriented 
‘to simplification and “strip- 
| ping,” has encumbered the stage 
with rigid and geometric masses 
and reinforced concrete cubes 
without considering that the 
work of Debussy and of Maeter- 
linck, on the contrary, calls for 
mystery, the sheen glimmering 
» through a haze, iridescent refiec- 
tions, and the troubling uncer- 
tainty of a dream. 

If the painter had been. a 
| cubist he would have introduced 
‘unhesitatingly the quart measure 
in sections and half a guitar, 
which are the creed of that 
school! And then, the irony of 
it, to honor the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the Ballets Russes 
and Diaghilev — who created 
that marvelous ballet, Ravel’s 
“Daphnis et Chloé” — they for- 
sook the splendid deécors. by 


ing theraselves. They cannot ex-| ® 
press themselves in other lan- 


lary which makes them what 


palace with complete improba- 
bility. The “motif” pleased him, |; 


| That being obtained, they had % 3 


Roland Sidawy 


Two Lebanese folk dancers perform at the 
temples of Baalbeck, site of the annual Baal- 


beck Internationa] Festival in 


Bakst and substituted four back- 
drops by Marc Chagall, one of 
the most gifted painters of his 
generation. 

These scenes, in which the 
play of colors is very interest- 


ing, have no relation to the| 
poetic, mythological eclogue. The | 
trees, extending horizontally, 
and an enormous whale sus- | 
pended between heaven and/| 
earth, fill the center of one of | 
these curtains, and, in the last | 
setting, one discovers a woman, | 
coifed like a prostitute and/| 
wearing a red scarf, who is'| 
blowing a cornet! 

No one saw the least objec-| 
tion. Picasso might have done | 
lots more, But I do not know | 
what the shades of 
Fokine, Bakst, 
would have thought of this | 
singular homage. 


Lebanon, Pro- | 


Moon’ Journey a Success 


After Waiting 182 Years 


By H, George Franks 
The Hague struck affair, is based on a com- 
When the American musicol- edy Py Goldonl. Meee 
. overs’ troubles are, of course, 
ogist H. C. Robbins Landen the features of the action, but a 
was searching for old manu- refreshing innovation is intro- 
scripts of Haydn’s music, and 


duced by the profession of the 
then comparing them, he little | principal suitor, who is a bogus 
dreamed he would enter into 


astronomer. 
the age of space travel through 


Imaginative Touches 
that medium, 


He solves his amorous prob- 


—_, 


a 


Haydn’s Space Travel Opera i 


Yet this discoverer of a num- 
ber of lost manuscripts of that 
great musician proved to be the 


lems by sending his prospective 
|father-in-law to the moon, 
|where a surprisingly well in- 


me\perts, gets as close as possible | 


first man since 1777 to assemble | formed Emperor ordains that the 
a score which proved a musical $ sot of true love shall be no 
sensation when it had its pre-|/Onger impeded. The intended 
miére at the Holland Festival |f@ther-in-law is put in his 
here in June. 
It is called “Il mondo della|%¢ returns to the earth with a 
luna” (The World of the Moon), |>U™p, the real lovers have ac- 
and was produced here in the ,complished their wishes. 
version which, according to ex- | ' 
story gives plenty of scope to de- 
signers and producer, and in this 
performance, to be repeated in 
Aix-en-Provence shortly, they 


to the composer’s original in- | 
tentions. | 
Several musicians of the 18th | 


f—\century wrote music for this | certainly made the most of their 


4 passed through many 


el libretto, but all of them failed |™@"Y Opportunities, all in har- 


when it was produced. Haydn mony with music that is alive 
then got to work on it, and it was | with many humorous and imagi- 


proper place, and by the time | 


Such an amusing space travel | 


tried out, 
successfully, at the Court 
Theater at Esterhazy in 1777. 


:|Several Versions 


Since then the has 


vicissi- 


score 


ll tudes, and only the most careful 


comparison by Mr. Landon 
|showed that in effect it exists 


~~ |in two, or perhaps three, ver- 


sions. 

For some curious reason, no 
complete autograph of the whole 
opera_in any one version has 


* | survived, and the only complete 
-| manuscript 


is a contemporary 
copy Of what™is called the sec- 


*|ond version. This_ one includes 
- | some of the cuts made by Haydn 
*\after the first unsuccessful per- 
*\|formance. Some of the Copies, 
*|such as that in Brussels and an- 


other 


in Vienna, lack the last 


=| act, which meant that when the 
es | Opera was performed some years 


grams this summer include concerts by the 
New York Philharmonic and I Musici of Rome, 
as well as drama and ballet. 


Amid Temples of Baalbeck 


By Samyr Souki 


Beirut 
One of the youngest interna- 
tional festivals in the world 


‘takes place annually in one of | Grumiaux, 


the oldest and most famous his- 
toric sites—the temples of Baal- 
beck. 6 

The Baalbeck International 
Festival started in 1955 as a 
modest experiment by a group 


'of Lebanese music and theater | 


lovers. The Hamburg Symphony 
Orchestra, conducted by Georg 
Jochum, and with Wilhelm 


Ravel, | Kempf as soloist, gave Baalbeck | 
and Diaghilev | its first of a series of successful | 


concerts. French 
drama groups acted various 
Shakespearean plays, other 


and British 


;Charles Munch came as. guest 
conductor. Soloists included the 
Belgian violinist Arthur 
| the Italian pianist 
| Benedetto Michelangeli, and the 
| British violinist Manoug Pari- 
kian, 

| In 1957, too, the Baalbeck 
| Festival presented a program of 
| Lebanese folklore, 
showed the songs and dances 
|of the mountains and plains of 
‘this small but historic land. 
|Lebanon’s great singer, Firouz, 
sang old songs and new. ones 
festival. 


| 
| 


To Celebrate Peace 


' 
} 


which | 


'ago by Radio Rome a good deal 
of it was missing. 

As this year is being celebrated 
all over Europe as Haydn’s Year, 
a happy suggestion made by the 
Holland Festival resulted in an 
arrangement being made by 
which this opera, which had not 
survived its first night nearly 
200 years ago, should be given a 
new and complete premiére by 
cooperation between the Holland 


‘ence Festival. 
Artistic Contributions 


Carlo Guilini took charge of 
the musical direction, Maurice 
Sarrazin was given the produc- 
tion, and Jean-Denis Malcles was 
invited to design the scenery and 
| costumes, the former being built 


'in Holland and the latter made 
|in Paris. 

The actual music was provided 
by the Netherlands Chamber Or- 
'chestra, and. the soloists were 
|'Marcello Cortis, Luigi ° Alva, 


land Biancamaria Casoni. 
The musical structure of the 
opera follows the pattern of the 


imagin 


Festival and the Aix-en-Prov-| 


for some reason un-| ative touches. 


| In fact, the whole opera con- 
|tains some of- Haydn's 


trumpets, timpani, strings,. and 
harpsichord. In some places it 
provides some of the composer’s 
‘loveliest woodwind writing, 
|often producing a bizzare and 
| delightful combination of sound. 


most | 
ative instrumentation, the | 
|score calling for double wood- | 
|winds (except clarinet), horns. 


Photo Pic 


Sylvia StahIman, American 
| soprano, recently sang the role 

of Cherubino in Mozart's 
| “Marriage of Figaro” with the 
| Frankfort Opera Company 
| at the Theatre des Nations in 
| Paris. 


| 


‘Roots’ by a Young Dramatist 


London 


| Arnold Wesker a young 


is 


dramatist discovered by the Bel- | 


grade Theater, 


Coventry. Last 


‘year during the summer a com-| 


|pany from the Belgrade played 
Mr. Wesker’s “Chicken Soup 
|With Barley” for a week as 
|guests at the.Royal Court. This 
| Was an episode piece about the 
| development of a working-class 
|family, and I saw little in it, 
| though several of my colleagues 
thought it promising, Now~a 
second play by Mr. Wesker, 
“Roots,” is being presented: at 
‘the Royal Court, and again most 
of the players are from the 
| Belgrade. 

“Roots” 
ploitation of the most extreme 
| naturalistic theater. 


and onions is being cooked. The 
smell of this pervades the entire 
| theater, 
|slowly and repeat themselves. So 
|everything is said two or three 
| times over, and in the most dila- 
| tory possible way. 

‘(Rural Characters 

| The truth is that Mr. Wesker, 
\who is a Cockney, seems: to 
‘have only a small opinion of 


created for her and for the; Mariella Adani, Bruna Rizzoli,| rural people. The earthy wisdom | 


\that romantic novelists ascribe 


to them he regards as mere stu-' 


'pidity, Yet though he despises 


begins with an ex-| 


In a farm) 
| laborer’s cottage a meal of liver | 


Country people speak | 


By Harold Hobson 


| greatly impréssed Beatie Bryant, 
a member of Mr. Wesker’s rural 
family, whilst she was working 
along with Ron in a London 
hotel, 

Mr, Wesker ntver lets us see 
Ron, but he implies that he has 
no real integrity. Yet his words 
_about poetry and music, not to 
Say politics, have fired Beatie 
| into seeing that there are other 
'gratifications in life than the 
| price of eggs. She does not un- 
| derstand what Ron says, but it 
lights an enthusiasm in her: and 
'hér efforts to pass on this enthu- 
siasm™to her bewildered family 
are the poignant essence of the 
| play. 

They reach their climax in an 
extraordinary scene in which 
Beatie tries to explain to her 
puzzled mother why elassical 
/music is good by dancing wildly 
and clumsily to a gramophone. 
Here the realism of the begin- 
ning of ‘‘Roots” is abandoned in 
favor of a rapturous poetry. What 
follows, when the whole family 
|is gathered together to meet the 
i|splendid Ron, who does not 
come, is more theatrically re- 
strained, but equally touching. 
In the end Beatie is left to light 
her own torch in life, and Mr. 
Wesker thinks that she does it, 
But the socialist speech by 
which he tries to crown his play 
is not convincing. Nevertheless 


The civil war in 1958 inter-|times, with arias, duets, and 
rupted the series. Fortunately |recitatives culminating at the 
the historic and well preserved |end of each act in an extended 
rulns were not damaged during / finale. As a leading Dutch critic 
|the fighting, although several | said: “The fastidiously contrived 
clashes took place-in-the Baal=|}accompaniments, the wealth of 


world classics, anid avant-garde | 
performances. | 
| By 1957 the - festival was'| 
‘Starting to gain international | 
|recognition. That year the pro- | 
‘gram included the London Old 


‘them intellectually, he is not 
‘really contemptuous. There are | 
‘many little touches: in his first | 
-act which show that he has re- 
gard for their character if not 
their intellect. 


They bob about during the 
allegro; calm down for the 
andante; are sportive during the 
scherzo, and the bout is over. 
Choreographers who are good 
musicians Know how to choose 


“Roots” is a moving and sincere 
play, 

It is superbly acted by Joan 
Plowright, who most touchingly 
presents a girl who bears a truth 
‘whose vale she _ recognizes 


Zurich’s Pergolesi Festival 


By Willi Reich 
Zurich 


wisely, Bizet’s Symphony fur- 
nished excellent support for the 
charming “Palais de Cristal.” 
But the legion of less informed 


Through the enterprise of the 
conductor and cembalist Margrit 


center fostering the music of 


Jaenike, Zurich has long been a} i, 


rates themes for Pergolesi in a} 
four-movement oboe concerto; | 


and in the refinement with) 
Igor Stravinsky deals| 


Vic, which --produced “The 
Merchant of Venice” and 
“Twelfth Night” in the beautiful 
Temple of Bacchus, This was 


|beck region, Hardly had peace/vocal melody, the ravishingly 
been restored than the Baalbeck | romantic love duet in Act III, 
|Festival Committee hurriedly | unprecedented for its period, and 
met and decided that it was es-| brilliant finales to the three acts, 
/Sential to organize a 1959 festi- 


| On the other hand, he appears 
to respect the intellect of towns- 
people more than their charac- 
ter. There is a young socialist 


|Without understanding it. The 
rest of the company is gnly up 
|to repertory standard, 


make this opera a 
musical experience. 
The libretto, a splendid moon- 


5 important 


, 


intellectual, Ron, whose talk| lwo Mystery Plays 


have afflicted us with their about Beethoven and have | On London Stages 
} 


blunders and follies. 

Another of Diaghilev’s in- 
novations was the replacement 
of the classic décor, constructed 
for the exigencies of the mise- 
en-scéne, by an easel-piece en- 


AVAILABLE AT LAST! 


On a 12” WP 33'4% Microgroove 


Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, that 
remarkable Italian composer of 
the early 18th century, who had 
but a brief career. 


with such themes in his “Pul- | followed by the Madeleine |.) to celebrate Lebanon's re- 
cinella” Suite. Renaud-Jean Louis  Barrault turn to normalcy. 

The most interesting, how- | troupe, which acted in both the This festival will start on July 
ever, of the works in this field; Te™ple of Bacchus (seating |25 with three concerts given at 
: was the cantata, “Di Giovanni; Capacity 800) and on the stairs |the Temple of Bacchus by the 
In the seven years of his crea- Battista Pergolesi,” for Tenor | Of the temple of Jupiter where noted chamber orchestra of 
tive activity Pergolesi gave to|Solo and Stringed Orchestra, | ™ore than 2000 persons watched | Rome, I Musici. During the third 
the world nearly a hundred|which the Festival committee | French classics, | concert the program will include 
works of which, to’ be sure | commissioned the Russian| The Santa Cecilia Symphony |a song recital given by Rosalind 
only two—the “Stabat Mater’ | Wladimir Vogel, now domiciled|Orchestra of Rome _ followed.| Elias of the New York Metro- 
for women’s voices and the little |in Switzerland, to compose, and| Under the baton of Fernando |politan Opera, whose parents 
comic opera “La serva padrona’|which had a very successful'Previtali the orchestra played |emigrated to the United States | 


tions against “the bomb” have 

Two new plays dealing with 
'crime have reached the London 
| stage. One of them, “‘Murder on 
| Arrival,” at the Westminster, is 
a straightforward thriller. It 


' _ {aims at Grand Guignol effects, 
his room by his mother, and in| with bodies falling out of chests 


American Conductors Abroad 


By Rudolf Klein 
Vienna 
The international misic fes- 


a fit of temper overturns every- 


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Sung by CALVIN HARRIS, SOLOIST 
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(The Servant Mistress)—live on. 
The rest slumber in the com- 
plete 25-volume edition com- 
piled lately with touching en- 
thusiasm by Duke Filippo Caf- 
farelli of Rome. 

A Pergolesi Festival in Zurich, 
comprising eight musical ar- 
rangements and an exhibition of 
manuscripts, has commemorated 
this compilation. 

In their efforts to exhibit the 
creativity of Pergolesi, the 
organizers of the Festival have 
gone, in our opinion, too far. An 
introductory lecture, two con- 
certs, and an operatic perform- 
ance would have.better shown 
the contributions of the com- 
poser — his initiation of the 
modern -comic opera and his 


‘astonishing anticipation of Mo- 


zart’s melodic and formative 
accomplishments—than the pres- 
entation of a lot of concert, re- 
ligious and dramatic works, of 
which only a few revealed any 
real touch of genius. 

As the principal artistic gain 


‘of the Festival, we count in the 


Pergolesi domain the introduc- 
tory lecture by A. E, Cherbuliez, 
the charming comic opera “Lo 
Frate’nnamorato” (The Enam- 
ored Friar, 1732), and the two 


|Concertos for Strings, No. 2 in 


G major and No. 6 in B major, 
works which are enough in 
themselves to establish Pergo- 
lesi’s singular significance. 

The organizers also endeav- 
ored foPtrace the influence of 
Pergolesi’s art on modern times. 
In this sense one enjoyed the 
somewhat primitive way in 
which John Barbirolli elabo- 


premiere. 


in the Temple or Jupiter. 


LA MERI 


will teach ethnic dance 
at 66 Berkeley Street 


HINDU, JAVANESE, 
SIAMESE 


and 
JAPANESE 


JULY 22, 23, 29, 30 
AUGUST 5, 6 


Sponsored by 


» DANCE CIRCLE OF BOSTON 


WaAtertown 4-4529 


Art Struggle ona State Line 


By Dorothy Grafly 


Boothwyn, Pa. 

A silent but determined art 
struggle is shaping up along the 
Pennsylvania - Delaware _ state 
line, with headquarters in the 
tasteful, new Lord Jim Galleries 
at . Boothwyn, * in Delaware 
County, Pa. 

For years Delaware itself 
served as bulwark of art con- 


servatism, but graduahHy its an- li 


nual exhibitions, sponsored by 
the ‘Wilmington Society of the 
Fine Arts, and hung in the Dela- 
ware Art Center, Wilmington, 
have capitulated to the abstract, 
nonobjective trends of the day. 
Recently, in fact, such infiltra- 
tion has even penetrated the list 
of prize awards. 

A year ago so many top-flight 
realists were rejected by the 
Delaware Annual’s jury that the 
old art guard was severely 
shaken, 

For two generations’ the 
Wyeth art family of Chadds 
Ford, Pa., has exerted formi- 
dable influence both in Penn- 
sylvania and over the border in 
Delaware, Like a geologic vein, 
its realism runs all the way 
from West Chester, Pa., to Wil- 
mington, and has attracted a 
considerable following. 

Andrew Wyeth, now head of 
the clan, is one of the best 
known and sought after artists 
in the country. Sisters Henriette 
and Carolyn, and in-laws Peter 
Hurd and John McCoy, like An- 
drew, are all stanch tradi- 
tionalists. What is needed to- 
day, they feel, is a dignified out- 
let for realism outside the reach 
of abstract-minded juries. 

When the Lord Jim galleries 
opened last fall in-an appropri- 
ately reconstructed old country 
store at the junction of Na- 

oulk Roads 


Since 


then, Carolyn has been active in | the 
interesting fine art 


craftsmen 


from New Hope to Wilmington 
to send their work to the gal- 
leries’ shows. 

The summer exhibition,- now 
on view there, should prove a 
meeting ground for art lovers 
who find modern trends hard 
to take, and for artist realists 
plagued by difficulty in bringing 
what they paint before the pub- 


Ec 

The over-all impression of 
this invited show is one of quiet 
reserve; no blatant colors, no 
slashing brush strokes, no puz- 
zle pictures. At a glance, subject 
matter is recognizable. Stress is 
rather on craftsmanship and 
drawing (especially of the hu- 
man figure and face). 

One exhibitor, Harry Leith- 
Ross of New Hope, even dares 
to paint cows in a meadow; 
while another from Wilmington, 
Marcia Silvette, harks back to 
the pre-Raphaelites in a portrait 
head, 

It is true, however, that the 
show lacks almost entirely the 
color snap of contemporary ab- 
stract and nonobjective paint- 
ing. Its key is low. What it of- 
fers, on the other hand, is not 
stathe. Motion -is foremost in 
acrobat figures by a new young 
painter, Robert Bliss, and in 
race horse and trapeze impres- 
sions by the veteran painter- 
teacher, Paul Froelich. 

Carolyn Wyeth, Henriette 
Wyeth Hurd and John McCoy all 
are represented, as are such 
other realists as Paul Wescott, 
Cyril Gardner, Harry Dunn, and 
Stanley Lewandowski. 

But it is the trend of the show 
as a whole, rather than the iden- 
tity of its exhibitors, that seems 
of particular significance. Able 
saalions: undoubtedly, will come 
as a relief to many people, but 
one wonders whether, in the fu- 
ture, American realists will be 
forced to depend for their place 
in the public eye entirely vo 

specialized gallery, or 
own studios, 


from Zahlé, a town near Baal- 
beck, 

On Aug. 8 and 9 the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra, 
conducted by Thomas Schippers, 
will give two performances in 
the Temple of Jupiter, which 
can seat 2,500 for each perform- 
ance, 


French Actors 


French drama follows on Aug. 
11 when the Compagnie du 
Théatre Montparnasse - Gaston 
Baty, which includes some 30 
actors, will give performances in 
the Court of the Temple of 
Jupiter and in the Temple of 
Bacchus. The Ballet Rambert of 
London will folow on Aug. 18 


Temple of Jupiter. 

On Aug. 28 the _ festival’s 
Lebanese Folklore willabe pre- 
sented with an entirely new 
program, There will be four 
performances, and the seating 
capacity in the Temple of Jupi- 
ter will be increased to 3,500 for 
each. 

The Festival Committee in- 
cludes a number of Lebanese 
men and women who organize 
the festival on a purely volun- 
tary, non-profit basis. Whenever 
the budget is in the red, the 
members donate considerable 
sums to balance it. The Lebanese 
Government provides an annual 
subsidy, and various foreign 
governments cover part of the 
expenses of any group coming 
from their countries. 

During the festival the temples 
are floodlit. All performances 
take place at night in the open 
air. The nights are cool at Baal- 
beck, which nestles in the corner 
of a plateau 4,000 feet above sea 
level between the two towering 
mountain ranges of Lebanon. 


Kassel Theater Plans 


A 12-tone opera, “Prome- 
theus,” composed by Rudolf 
Wagner-Regeny on commission 
from the Hesse State Theater, 
will be performed as the sea- 
son’s opener at the State Theater 
in Kassel, Germany, in Septem- 
ber, Opening drama of the sea- 
son at the same theater will be 
Schiller’s “Mary Stuart,” in 
|honor of the poet’s bicentenary. 


with four performances in the: 


| tival of the Vienna Concert Hall 


Society has begun. In Vienna 
there are two great concert or- 
ganizations which take turns in 
presenting a music festival. 
Since the Concert Hall Society, 
whose turn it is this year, has 
plotted its course in the direc- 
tion of modern music, we shall 
be hearing new and interesting 
works, though not exclusively, 
for the tradition-happy public 
must also be regaled with classi- 
cal scores, it being particularly 
necessary to remember. Joseph 
Haydn’s passing 150 years ago. 
And finally one owes it to the 
listener to present in advanta- 
geous settings the great per- 
sonalities of international music 
life. 

As it happened; these were all 
Americans in the first days of 
the festival, which certainly 
went to prove the growing cul- 
tural importance of overseas 
countries. In addition, the qual- 
ity of the offerings was out- 
standing. :; 

The opening concert was con- 
ducted by Lorin Maazel. This 
young conductor — still in his 
twenties—is certainly a coming 
man, and is even now an orches- 
tra leader who can compete in 
purely technical and musical 
abilities with a Karajan. 


A Grudging Affection 
Vienna has a sort of grudging 
affection for him. His interpre- 


tations of French or modern mu- 
sic would win him unqualified 
admiration, but his attempts to 
present the music of Viennese 
classics on their home grounds 
fall short as yet because of a too 
pronounced feeling for outward 
effect and theatricality. But he 
cannot seem to curb it yet. Thus 
he has had to take some stiff 
criticism for his interpretation 
of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis. 

But this was balanced out by 
the opening concert, He con- 
ducted—and without a score—a 
concert performance of Ravel’s 
one-act opera “L’enfant et les 
sortiléges.” This fairytale opera 
is from the purely acoustical 
point of view a real feast, espe- 
cially when condu so superb- 
ly. It tells the experience of a 
naughty. little fellow who be- 
cause of-his defiance is sent to 


thing in the room. 
| But wonder of wonders, the 
‘furniture comes alive, from the 
| torn 
\legendary characters, 


' 
; 


complain about his behavior. 
molested this way, and finally 
they all pounce upon him. 

Only because he binds up a 
wounded squirrel is the popular 
wrath stilled: now he is a good 
child, The high point of this 
charming imitative music is a cat 
duet-in-long-drawn miaows. It is 
delightfully amusing; one ‘is en- 
tranced with the charm..of—a 
music which need be_comple- 
mented only by pne’s imagina- 
tion,’ a 


Schippers’ Debut 

Another American conductor 
has been introduced for the first 
time: Thomas Schippers of the 


forte is the polished and modern, 
he favors the romantic. 
Tchaikovsky’s 
phony was very successful, as 
well as the interpretation of 
Shostakovitch’s First Symphony. 


works of the Soviet composer, 
have been little known here was 
justification for this perform- 
ance, but the small esteem in 
which they are held has not been 
changed. The fondness of Ameri- 
can audiences for .Shostakovitch 
seems inexplicable to us. Sorry 
to say, Schippers had another 
weak spot in the program with 
a piano concerto by Saint-Saéns, 
which even the outstanding 
French pianist Robert Casadesus 
could not gloss over. 
Two great violinists from the 
United States have made the 
opening of the Festival particu- 
larly brilliant. Nathan Milstein 
layed three solo sonatas by 
ch and drew an ¢nthusiastic 
audience, which filled the hall to 
overfiowing. His interpretation 
in every way reac the peak 
of technical and m 1 perfec- 
tion. Milstein is held by Vien- 
nese audiences today to be abso- 
|lutely the top in his field. 


fairytale books step the’ 
and the)! 
| figures of the torn wallpaper ap- | 
pear before the child. They all | 


Even the animals bewail being. 


Metropolitan Opera, This young | 
‘man proved to have unusual Ca- | 
|pabilities in rhythm technique. | 
|In contrast to Maazel, whose | 


Fourth Sym-| 


That this work, and all the other | 


| at the bottom of dark stairs, and 
| seemingly innocent characters 
laughing hollowly when they 
observe that they are alone. But 
'for a last act cluttered up with 
too many explanations and con- 
fessions, it would serve not too 
badly its purpose of frightening 
the audience agreeably. 

The other play at the Strand, 
“All in the Family,” by Marc- 
Gilbert Sauvajon and adapted 
by Vitcor Wolfson, is more am- 
bitious stuff. It begins with a 
cry in the night: an old man, a 
wicked and tyrannical old man, 
a pillar sof the French bour- 
geoisie, has been killed by his 
young sécretary. His family de- 
cide that the scandal must .be 
hushed up, and they fetch his 
scapegrace grandson, Frank Ma- 
rescaud, to take the blame. Why 
murder by a grandson should be 
more respectable than murder 
by a typist is never explained; 
one is left to assume that there is 
‘something in the French ethos 


‘which accounts for it. So long 
as a thing is kept entirely in the 
family, nothing much can go 
wrong. Anyway, Frank, with 
some misgiving, accepts the role 
_ accorded him, and the police are 
summoned. 


An Interesting Rroblem 


But when the policeman ar- 
rives, things go wrong. The In- 
spector will not believe Frank’s 
story. He is a jealous man, this 
Inspector. He has been wronged 
by the Marescauds, and he is 
not sorry that now he has got 
them into his power. 

But are they in his power? It 
is in its treatment of this ques- 
tion that the main interest of 
“All in the Family” lies. For the 
Inspector is only a minor official 
in a third-rate town: He is quite 
aware that if he were a first- 
class man he would have a bet- 
ter job; and can a man who is 
not first-class do anything 
against the Marescauds, who 
may be cruel and ruthless, but 
who have great abilities? 

This makes quite a succulent . 
problem, and for its sake the 

lay is worth Donald 

nden is forceful as the grand- 
son, and André Morell thought- 
ful, rough, and worthy as the 
policeman, : 


Art-M usic—Theater 


THE CHRISTIAN 


i SCIENCE MONITOR, _BOSTON, 


SATURDAY, J ULY 11, ‘1959 


——-< ————— 


- 


Art—Music—Theater 


Rado | 


_ Prospects on the Straw-Hat Rialto—Balladeer at John Hancock Hall 


es 


Two Musicals to Open Monday Night 


Two new musical productions 
are on the program for Greater 
Boston theatergoers next week. 


a the North Shore Music Thea- 

ter in Beverly, “Wish You Were 
Here” opens Monday night. Tri- 
cia Foley and Stanley Grover 
head the cast in this Joshua Lo- 
gan-Harold Rome musical. Also 
on Monday night, Sigmund 
Romberg’s “The Student Prince” 
will come to the South Shore 
Music Circus in Cohasset. Jim 
Hawthorne, who is directing the 
production, will sing the title 
role. 

“Alison’s House” by Susan 
Glaspell,. a play patterned on 
the family life of Emily Dick- 
inson, is being revived at the 
Tufts Arena Theater Tuesday 
through Saturday night. 

A listing for New England 
stages follows: 

Massachusetts 

Beverly, North Shore Music 
Theater, ‘Wish You Were Here.” 
Monday through Saturday. 

Cambridge Drama Festival, 


“Twelfth Night” with Siobhan| ‘ 
McKenna. Tuesday through Sun- 
day. 

Cohasset, South Shore Music 
Circus, “Student Prince.” Mon- 
day through Saturday. 


Dennis, Cape Playhouse, sec- 
ond week of “Once More With 
Feeling,’ with Betsy Palmer and 
Kurt Kaszner. Monday through 
Saturday. 

Edgartown Summer Theater, 
“Gigi.” Monday through Satur- 


day. 

Falmouth, Oberlin 
Gilbert & Sullivan Players. 
“Ruddigore.” Tuesday through 
Saturday eves., Thurs. mat. 

Falmouth Playhouse, “The 
Girls in 509.” Monday through 
Saturday. 

Framingham, Carousel Thea- 
ter, second week, “Finian’s Rain- 
bow,” with Red Buttons. Mon- 
day through Saturday. 

Holyoke, Mt. Park Casino, 
Valley Players, “The Third Best 
Sport.” Monday through Satur- 


College, 


day. 
Medford, Tufts Arena Theater, 


Debut tor Jacob’s Pillow 


The results of almost three | 
years’ planning and negotiations 
by Ted Shawn will come to 
fruition Tuesday night, July 14, 
at 9 o'clock when the curtain 


Entertainment 
Timetable 


Music 


Gardner Museum—Bira Fenster, 
and Alice Miller, piano, 2:45. 


violin, 


Theaters 
Brighton—Cambridge Dr rama 
presents ‘‘Twelfth Night,’’ 2:30, 
Wellesley — Theater - on - the - Green, 
“Streetcar Named Desire.”’ 


Dance Orchestra 
Tetem Pole—Norumbega Park, Newton— 
Dancing tonight. 


Festival 
8:30. 


Films in Boston 


Aster—'‘‘Don't ove ve the Ship.” Jerry 
Lewis, 10:25. 12:40, 3, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45. 
st 2 arth BR aft 7, Ss) * 15. 2:10, 
4:25 

Beacon tt ‘Love Is My Profession,’ 
Brigitte Bardot. 10:10, 12: 10. 2:05, 4: is. 
6:05, 0 agoo,”’ 30, 11:55, 1:55, 
3: 50, 9:40. 


Bosten—“South Seas Adventure.” 2:30, 
8:40. 
cape om rrr Story.” $:45, 12:10, 
we 
ter—‘ ate 3 ‘wee Frank Sinatra, 
“— '30, 5:30, 9:20. ‘‘Road to Bali,”’ 


Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, 11:45, 3:45, 


Exeter—“I was Monty's Double.”’ Clifton 
James, John Mills, Cecil Parker, 2:20, 
4:45, 9:20. News, shorts, 1:50, 4, 
6:20, 

Gary—“‘Anatomy of a Murder,” James 
Stewart. Lee mick Ben Gansara: 
9:30, 12:15, 3:10, 6:05, 9. 

Keith Memerial—‘‘Born to ann eve. 
Hugo Haas, Carol al 9:30, 
8. ° is Ear Min * Rock BD on 
Jean mgas rothy McGuire, 
Claude ain 10:55, *: 25, 5:55, 9:25. 

Kenmere—“Magoo Beats the Heat,” 1:10, 
3:13, 6:16, 7:19, 9:22. 00 

Top,” Simone Signore 

71538. 9 wages Sears, 1:16, 3:19, 58:22, 


Ma he ie 


6:30. 9:45. ‘“‘Lonely Hearts,’’ 
gomery Clift. 9:50, 1:10, 4:35, 7:55. 
or ‘Nun's Foenge Audrey 
urn, 9:88. 59:48. 3:36, 6:20, 9:10. 
Orpheum — “Horse Soldiers.” John 
ayne, William Holden. 9:35, 12, 2:25. 
4:50, 7: ng 9:40. 
Dann 


Paramount — “Five Pennies.” 
Kaye, "Barbar Bel Geddes, | 9:20, 11:40. 
2:05. . 6:50. 

Pilgrim Tae As Lost Women,” 9:50, 

1:10, 4:30, "50. “Hercules,” Steve 
Reeves, 11:15, 2:35. 5:55, 9:10. 

y Girl.” David Niven, 

‘ ‘sok _ 10. 


Jesse James,”’ 
a Fleming, 11:3 


aatrs. Bdward G. Rob inson, Eleanor 
1:50, 2:15. 4:40, 7:05, 9:30. 
“Rebel Without a Cause,’ 

; — Acros the oo. 

Telepix—' ‘gamural,’ . 11:30, 1:30, 3:30, 
5:30. 7:30. 9: 

Uptewn—‘‘Count Your Blessings,’”’ Debo- 

rah Kerr, peepee Brazz!i; PP ee ty 

phn 9:30. 


1 2: 
*“‘Compulsion,”’ Diane 
Welles. 12; 40, 4:10. 7:50. 


Films in the Suburbs 


ALLSTON—Capitol: “Compulsion,” 1, 
4:20, 7:45. “Green Mansions,’ 2:40 
8: 05. 9:40. 


ee ne — Capitel: “Hercules,” 
Dog. ‘es 
Regent: ‘Mating Game,” “Gun Run- 


nerfs.’ 
BROOKLINE—Cleveland Cirele: ‘‘Count 
Blessings,” “Seven Hills of 


Your 

ome.’ 

MBRIDGE—Brattie: *“Binging in the 

Central: “Shaggy Dog,” “Last Blitz- 
Trieg 

University: ‘“‘South Pacific,” 2:20, 5:25, 

8:30, Shorts 

RCHESTER—Adams: “Shaggy Dog,” 

 ahaesy Dog,” “Apache 

ount Your Blessings,” 1:30, 
“Compulsion,’’ 3:37, "72:38 
vRwWorld, Flee pooek: “sou ung 
" “Wor esh an vil.”’ 

TON—Lexingé on: “Some Like it 

Hot.” .: 45, 9. ak 1:30, “Heidi and 


EN — Gra ew “South Pacific,” 
145, 6:20, 8: 0. 


6:00 
‘varsi, Orson 


Tc a 
: “Don’t Go Near the 


Paramount: ‘ Sw mH " 
“WBZ Dise Jockeys, _ “Island o 
Women.”’ 
WTON — Bs pe “Compulsion,” 
sion 
D — Nerwoed: eens Your 


f 


ith P 5 
‘Hercules,’ 40, 
Lost Women,” 3:28, 


SOMERVILLE — oom “Hercules,” 
‘Island of Lost Wome ; 
Broadway: ‘ ‘Shaggy "Dos, * “Happy 
ee atiaas “Shaggy Dog,” “Happy | 


neon 

WAKEFIELD—Weakefield: te “moepuee. 
6:25, 9:10, “Forbidden Dese 

WALT’ mbas “Bouth Pacific.” 
: of Laughter,”’ 1:30, 


ESLEY—Piayhouse: **Houseboat,”’ 
N—Newten: eet, Your 


flem 
: “Hercules,” 
Lost Women,” “WBZ Disc 
r— yaa a 
“Monte: Carlo Story.’’ 
WOLLASTO ON—Wollaston: 
“Tokyo After Dark.”’ 


Drive-In Theaters 


BRAINTREE—Quin tree: “Alias Jesse 
James,” “Gun Fight at Dodge city.” 


CAMBRIDGE—Fresh Pond: “Tth Voy- 
age of Sinbad,” “Last Hurrah.” 


mA —Detham: “Alias Jesse James,” 
MED RD—Meadew Glen: Pharsieas? 


.” “Pace of a tive 
win: Well Screen: 


Cirele Sereen: “Alias J James,” 
“Lonely, Hear Hearts,” ig, dese vs. Pat- 


NA’ we Pugiive “Alias Jesse games," 
of Hea 


ae a 7” «+ 


“Hercules,” 
**Hercules,”’ 


1 na ee ite 


vs. Dodge et Beas one? ol fe ies 


“Some 
and 


Parkwa 
“Fight at wat Dodge City’ 


rises on the U.S. debut of Eng- 
land’s Ballet Rambert at Jacob’s 
Pillow. Coming directly from a 
May-June season at the Sadler’s 
Wells Theater, the company is | 
bringing full productions of | 
scenery and costumes. The en- 
gagement will be under the per- 
sonal supervision of Mme Marie 
Rambert. 

The schedule calls for eight 
performances, evenings at 9, 
Tuesday through Saturday, plus 
matinees at 4 on Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday. 

The openin program will 
feature a complete, two-act ver- 


sion of “Giselle.” Dancing op- 
posite Christopher Lyall’s Al- 
brecht (or John Bannerman, al- 
ternate), Beryl] Goldwyn will 
appear as Giselle. 

Others in the cast-are Gillian 
Martlew as Myrtha, Lucette 


nate) and John O’Brien for the 
Peasant Pas de Deux of Act I, 
Norman Morrice as Hillarion, 
and John Chesworth as the 
Prince. 

“‘Laiderette,” a contemporary 
work by Kenneth McMillan to 
a score by Frank Martin, will 
open the evening. The ballet 
deals with the “ugly duckling” 
theme, the story of a bewildered, 
lonely girl and her search for 
love. Lucette Aldous will dance 
ithe title role with John Ches- 
| worth, Gillian. Martlew, Christo- 
| pher I Lyall, and. the company in 
| support. 


| phy 


| 


Aldous (June Sandbrook, alter- | 


lison’s House.” 


Tuesday 
rough Saturday. 


Orleans-Arena Theater, “Waltz} 


of the Toreadors.” 
through Saturday. 
Provincetown 
“Summer of the 
Doll.” Tuesday 
day. 
Stockbridge, Berkshire Play- 
house, “Once More With Feel- 
ing.” Monday through Saturday. 
Wellesley, Theater. on the 


Tuesday 


Playhouse, 
Seventeenth 
through Sun- 


| Green, Group 20 Players, second 


week, “A Streetcar Named 
Desire,” with Cavada Humphrey 
and Robert Blackburn. Tuesday 
through Saturday. 

Williamstown Summer Thea- 
ter, “Look Back in Anger,” 
Tuesday through Saturday. 

Maine 

Harrison, Deertrees Theater, 
“Howie.” Tuesday through Sat- 
urday. 

Kennebunk Port Playhouse, 
“Hilary.” Monday through Sat- 
urday. 

Monmouth, Gilbert and Sulli- 
van Festival Theater, The 
American Savoyards, “The Mi- 
kado.” Monday through Satur- 


day 
Ogunquit Playhouse, “Biogra- 
* Monday through Satur- 
day. 
New Hampshire 

George Mills, Lake Sunapee 
|Playhouse, “The Millionairess.” 
' Monday through Saturday. 

North Conway, Eastern Slope 
Playhouse, “Auntie Mame,” 
Monday through Saturday. 

Peterborough, Stearns Farm, 
Peterborough Players, “The 
Diary of Anne Frank.” Wednes- 
day through Saturday. 

Tamworth, The Barnstormers, 
“Once More With Feeling.” 

Whitefield, Chase Barn Play- 
house, “Monique.” Tuesday 
through Saturday. 

Connecticut 

Storrs, University of Connecti- 
cut Theater. 

Stratford, American Shake- 
speare Festival Theater, “Merry 
Wives of Windsor,” Tues., Wed., 
Fri.,' Sat. eves. “Romeo and Ju- 
liet,” Thurs. eve., Wed., Sat., 
Sun. mats. 

Vermont 


Playhouse, 
Paradiso,” Thursday 
Sunday. 


Rhode Island 


Newport, Casino Theater, 
“Paris,” with Mimi Benzell. 
Monday through S: Saturday, 


Weston “Hotel 


through 


“Music is essential order from 
within. . It is a medium which | 


by its very structural require- | “Oberon” 


‘cated to him, 
'performance under his direction | 
in Boston during the past season. | 
The three movements are titled: |* 


The Hamden Trio—Robert Brink, 
Bruce Simonds, piano, and Karl Zeise, cello— 


violin; | 


will give a concert Monday night in Sanders 
Theater, Cambridge. 


Evenis at Tanglewood tor Next Week 


Next Friday and Saturday with Tchaikovsky's Violin Con-| | by D’Indy, with Nicole Henriot- 
Isaac Stern, | | Schweitzer as piano soloist, 
make the first of three 


evenings (July 


17-18) at 8:30, | certo. , The soloist, 
and Sunday afternoon (July 19) | will 


at 2:30 the Boston Symphony / Berkshire Festival appearances 
Orchestra will present the first! thjs season, He will also appear 


of four weekends of Berkshire|on Friday, July 24, and Sunday, | 


Festival concerts by the full or-} Aug. 2. 


chestra in 


certs will be 


teux, conductor emeritus. 


Friday, 
Berlioz’s 
“Parables” 
tinu, and 
Symphony. “Parables,” 
sioned by Dr. Munch and dedi- 
received its first 


Dr. Munch will present |‘ 
“Corsair” Overture, 
by Bohuslav Mar- 


the Parable of a Sculpture, 

Parable of a Garden, 

Parable of a Labyrinth, 
Bae eee 


the 
and the 


Dr. Munch will 
concert of Saturday evening, 
opening the program with the 
Overture by Weber. 


ments allows feelings to be ex-|Lukas Foss will then conduct a 


pressed always 
way.” 


in a rational | 


—Austin DeLauriers 


| performance of his Ow n work, 
“Symphony of-G@horales.” 


The program will conclude 


r a ae 


4:30, | 


_ AMUSEMENTS _ 


BOSTON (MOVIES) 


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a 


BOSTON (MOVIES) _ 


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ri SAMUEL GOLDWYN 


SIONEY POITIER * DOROTHY DANDRIDGE - SAMMY DAVIS, Jr. PEARL BAILEY 


Music by GEORGE GERSHWIN © Libretto by OuBOSE HEYWARD 
Lyrics by DvBOSE HEYWARD and IRA GERSHWIN (Founded on the play ‘Perpy’ by OvBOSE and DOROTHY WEYWARO) 
Originally produced for the stage by the Theatre Guild © Screenplay by N. RICHARD NASH 


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the Music Shed at! 
Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass. Con-|first guest appearance 
conducted by | Festival 
Charles Munch, music director of | His program will 
the orchestra, and Pierre Mon-| Introduction and Wedding March | | York will make its now annual 
by | visit to Tanglewood to appear | 
Debussy’s|in the Chamber Music Series on 
‘Afternoon of a Faun, ” the Sym-/| Wednesday evening, July 15, at 
| phony ona French Mountain Air | 8:30 in the Theater-Concert Hall, 


'from the opera “Coq d’Or,” 
At the opening concert on'| 'Rimsky - Korsakov, 


Tchaikovsky’s Sixth) 


Mr: 
at 


the| public for 
on Sunday afternoon. | Orchestra’ s Pension Fund. 


include the| The Beaux Arts Trio of New 


|Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony. 
ae 


The Orchestra's 


the benefit 


— 


and 


Saturday | ¢ 
|morning rehearsal at 10 o'clock | 
Monteux will make his'on July 18 will be open to the| 
of the | 


The first in a series of three 
summer Folk Festival concerts 
was a rather inauspicious affair 
last night at John Hancock Hall. 
Bob Gibson, accompanying him- 
self on a banjo and a 12-string 
guitar, presented a barren pro- 
gram to a 
flip humor might have been wel-' 


some, 


afraid to approach ‘other emo- 
tional offerings with any degree | 
of seriousness. Songs meant to’ 
convey hardship, bitterness, or) 
sorrow were tossed about with 
a cavalier attitude that was dis- 
tasteful. The ancient English bal- 
lad, ‘“‘Mattie Groves,” for ex- 
ample, can give one shivers when 
sung correctly, In Mr. Gibson's | 
hands, at most, it gave a sense | 
of embarrassment, 

The bits of commentary, more | 
correctly called patter, indicated | 
that this folk singer missed his! 


show master of ceremonies. 
was strikingly self-conscious, 
especially in his half-hearted 
attempts tof get the audience) 
singing with him, He might well | 
take a lesson from Pete Seeger, | 
who not only gets his audience 
singing but makes his listeners 
feel the meaning of the songs. 
Mr. Gibson also consistently 
refused to let any song com- 


‘and content. 


strength; he preferred to strive 
or an effect that was frequently 
far from the song's 
An example of 
this was “The Unreconstructed 
Rebel,” originally sung to con- 
vey the intense bitterness felt | 
Civil War. 


Here Mr. Gibson) 


fome occasionally, but last even-| 


ing’s steady diet was asi =: of the evening he took up 


He was most at home with | 
humorous songs, but he seemed | basically different from the six- 


string guitar merely because it 
| has 


calling by not becoming a quiz | 
He 


municate by means of its own' 


| Chapel, 
intention | 


by southerners shortly after the) 


Summer Folk Festival 


Opened by Bob Gibson 


By Robert Gustafson 


could learn a great deal by lis- 
tening to Frank Warner, the 
collector of this item. Mr. 
Warner’s version is simple, di- 
rect, and powerful, Mr. ibson’s 
is catchy, semi-humorous, with 


‘a double chorus line at the end 
a sparse audience, His|of each verse that is not only 


unnecessary but unwelcome. 
When well into the second 


a 12-string guitar. This instru- 
ment, contrary to belief, is not 


six more strings and is twice 
as difficult to tune. It has tre- 
'mendous potentialities, but Mr. 


| Gibson realized none of them, 


He played not one accompani- 
ment that could not have been 
done just as adequately on a 
six-stringer, 


| Concert Calendar 


Sunday, July 12 
Ludwig Olshansky, 
Gardner Museum, 3. Free. 
Monday, July 13 
The Hamden _ Trio. 
| Theater, 


piano. 


Sanders 
Cambridge, 8:30. 
Tuesday, July 14 
Mozart’s Requiem, MIT Choral 
| Society, Klaus Liepmann cone 
‘ducting. Kresge Auditorium, 


8:30. 


David Beyer, piano. Gardner 
Museum, 2:45. Free. 
Wednesday, July 15 
Choral music under the direce 
|tion of Daniel Pinkham. King’s 
9. Free. 
Thursday, July 16 
Margaret Kurkjian, 
and Clifford Crowther, tenor, 
Gardner Museum, 2:45. Free. 
Saturday, July 18 
Francis Hester, baritone, 
Gardner Museum, 2:45. Free. 


piano, 


L 


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commis-' 


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‘LENOX, MASS. 


Rtn 


MASS. 


conduct the | 


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t Wed. July 15 et 8:30 


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SAT. July 18 at 8:30—Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto (MUNCH/STERN) 

SUN. July 19 at 2:30—(NICOLE MENRIOT-SCHWEITZER, Piano) 
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THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 


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Registered tn U. 8. Patent Office 


SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


Among the Underwoods 


I Found happiness in the woods long be- 
fore I thought about them. I was years 
away from realizing that it is not only 


the tall trees that make a forest beautiful. 
After I had lived in the wilderness and 
partaken of its wisdom, 1 came to see 
that the moss and ferns and small firs and 
slender birches were the friendly part of a 
forest which a man loves. The towering 
trees added majesty, mystery, loneliness; 
but it was the small growths, with the 
gentleness of wisdom, that were accessible 
and added their familiar beauty to the 
scene. 

Above all, I entered into the quiet of 
their crowded presence. It was the back- 
ground of every sound, a benison, a nat- 
ural resource of the heart. Nature excels 
in understatement. That was the age 
before every road was a procession of 
noises and the airplane shattered the once 
inviolable skies, In that naive era peo- 
ple did not need to raise their voices to 
say “Good morning” or make a joke. 
Speech had not left the woods for the 
marketplace, nor had the wisecrack be- 
gun to crackle in one’s ear. * 

Even Mark Twain knew how to be 
quiet. When he wrote of a house cat re- 
laying gossip to the animals in the woods, 
he reported that the cat “was greatly ad- 
mired by them because he was so learned, 
and so refined and civilized, and so polite 
and high-bred, and could tell them so 
much which they didn’t know before, and 
were not certain about afterward.” 


"eee 


That was the sort of humor that tickled 
me to the marrow, a humor just barely 
_perceptible, Dickens, in an offhand mood, 
was a master at it. “Peggotty and I were 
sitting one night by the parlour fire, alone. 
I had been reading to Peggotty about 
crocodiles. I must have read very per- 
spicuously, or the poor soul must have 
been deeply interested, for I remember 
she had a cloudy impression, after I had 
done, that they were a sort of vegetable.” 

Leisure, which is the quiet of time, is 
one secret of such humor, and speed is its 
destroyer, Notice that “u” in Peggotty’s 
parlour, or in old-fashioned honour and 
humour. When that was dropped to save 
time, a little of that spaciousness which 
man learned of the forest and sea-horizons 
was lost. And when an entertainer im- 
agined that he had to whang one over the 
head with a bludgeon joke to make one 
laugh, a whole art disappeared. 

Henry James was a marvel at sub- 
merged humor, though, like the seal, it 
sometimes comes to the surface to breathe, 
as when he announces, “women have no 
faculty of imagination with regard to a 
man’s work beyond a vague idea that it 
doesn’t matter.” Actually, as the great 
novelist portrays on every page, it is 
women who care most about a man’s work 
and expedite it in practical ways. James 
probably offered that remark to a table 
companion, for it seems that he was al- 
ways dining, to see if she was deficient in 
humor, that is, ineapable-of admitting that 
there is just enough truth in it under cer- 
tain circumstances to make it obliquely 
funny. 

eee es 

In our age of universal testing, it is 
strange that the paternal governments do 
not seize people and subject them to an 
examination of their sense of humor. This 
is of practical importance. If, as Lorenzo 
stated, the man that hath no music in 
himself, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and 
spoils, what of the humorless man? He 
imperils the republic. He is either above 
seeing a joke “and thus too haughty to 
laugh at the common lot, which is also his 
own, or else he is so filléd with him- 
self as to have no room for other con- 
siderations. The meek do inherit the earth, 
but more readily if they can take humor to 
heart, since it is almost always a rebuke 
to non-meekness and so a reminder of the 
preferred station. 

The kings of old realized that undue 
pride was the route to a fall and hired 


jesters. These nimble-witted fellows sat 
at the royal elbow and were licensed to 
whisper derisive comments when his-ma~< 
jesty got too majestic. A risky job, and 
no doubt many a joker was silenced for 
overestimating his monarch’s ability to 
accept a joke. Some people can’t take help. 

Humor is best on tiptoe, stealing in, and 
alone, It won’t bear being collected. True 
humor stays young, like sunshine, while 
wit is lightning that issues from clouds, 
and irony, so popular nowadays, is a dry 
bone tossed to the intelligence. 

Just as true greatness is unconscious, 
so is true humor, the bearing-out of mag- 
nanimity. Its heart is always in the right 
place, even when one is being slapped 
on the back rather hard, The tone of 
voice tells the tale, There need be no 
voice. The born clown’s mute appearance 
on an empty stage can set the key for 
laughter and make _ thousands lighter- 
hearted without opening his mouth. And 
if he ridicules them, do they hold it 
against him? They are delighted, and wake 
up in the night to laugh again. As Max 


Eastman says, with an assist from Words- - : 


worth, humor_is emotional chaos remem- 
bered in jranquillity. 

Good honest humor thrives out-of-doors. 
As spring ends, Westtown School stages 
a Shakespeare play’ in the Greenwood, 
often to the accompaniment of thrushes 
from the surrounding twilight. Always 
there are a dozen or so of faculty children 
in the front row or even kneeling this 
side the footlights. They keep incredibly 
quiet, are lost in the play, which in this 
setting is really play. 

Their attention is hardly a tribute to 
the wondrous poetry of the Bard, although 
its incantation, the beauty of the living 
background, and the freshness of the 
young players do cast a spell. What the 
kids are waiting for with such patience 
is Launcelot Gobbo lurching out of the 
wings to duel with his conscience, or the 
slapstick in Twelfth Night, or the Lion in 
Midsummer Night's Dream. They roar 
and not like sucking doves, either. They 
consider Shakespeare the funniest man 
who ever lived, which is dramatic criti- 
clsm of rare rightness, though they don’t 
know why. Because he sounded all the 
notes.in humor’s scale, and many barely 
audible. 

4 bs 


I suppose that life could be borne with- 
out humor just as people do succeed in 
living without trees. Yet as long as I 
may choose my companions, I shall want 
around me those whose quiet humor pro- 


vides refreshment on the dustiest jour- 
ney: I don’t mean jocularity or smartness 
or even the comic. I mean the satisfaction 
of hearing something that isn’t so which 
reveals something that I had long known 
but had not the gift to express. Such 
humor is to high seriousness what the 
jack-in-the-pulpit and the flowering shad- 
bush and youthful balsam trees are to the 
great trees rising above them. It is the 
precious, familiar, endearing underwoods 
of speech. 

Perhaps I should give an example and 
have one at hand, some lines that ap- 
peared recently on this page, writter? by 


_ Mildred Lescarboura Greene and entitled 


Essence of the Cat. They run: 


We meet on equal terms, 
delight 

In mutual respect. Each in his own 

And ‘separate orbit tastes the dark and 
bright 

Of daily life—together yet alone. 

We walk the same earth, are together 
warmed 

By an impartial sun. Yet you enclose 

Yourself in dignified aloofness, formed 

To warn me not to trespass nor impose 

Upon your place as the aristocrat— 

For I am only human, you a cat! 


take swift 


That is indeed a poem of sly, generous 
humor. 


T. Morris LONGSTRETH 


From “‘Romanesqye Art in Italy” 


SCULPTURE FROM DvuoMoO SAN PANTELEONE, RAVELLO (SALERNO), ITALY 


THis carved bust ofa smiling young 
woman is located above the entrance to 
the pulpit steps of the Cathedral of San 
Panteleone. The mysterious smile of the 
luxuriantly adorned young woman has 
been referred to as that of a Romanesque 
Mona Lisa. The pulpit of this cHurch is 
famous for its elaborate ornamentation 
with marble and mosaic. This photograph 
is reproduced from the recently pub- 
lished volume, Romanesque Art in Italy, 
by Hans Decker (Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 
New York). Included are: a good-sized 
introduction, 263: photogravure plates, and 
a descriptive catalogue. 

DorotHy ADLOW 


Snap 


Since men no longer will build a road 
To the better mousetrap-maker’s abode, 
The manufacturer’s modern plan 
Is to catch the customer if he can 
Sitting in front of his home TV 
Where the cheese can be eaten comfort- 
ably. 
THOMAS JOHN CARLISLE 


Science, Not Superstition 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


__Berore—the laws-of-the natural sci-— 


ences were discovered, attempts by 
men to explain cause and effect gave 
rise to myths and superstitions. 

Christian Science is correcting the 
misconception that either cause or ef- 
fect can be in matter or in the so- 
called carnal mind and is replacing this 
false belief with the truth that all cau- 
sation is God, divine Mind, which acts 
only through spiritual law; that all 
effect, including man and the universe, 
is wholly spiritual, the infinite and per- 
fect manifestation of Mind. 

The Bible, which is the authority for 
the teachings of Christian Science, con- 
tains a record of the growing percep- 


~ tion of God as the divine Principle of 


all true being and of the spiritual na- 
ture of God’s creation, as seen and 
demonstrated by the greatest spiritual 
thinkers. 

$ > +t 


By his understanding of Truth, 
Christ Jesus walked on the waves, 
stilled the storm, fed the multitude, 
healed the sick, and raised the dead. 
The Master taught that the truth which 
he demonstrated was holy and spirit- 
ual. He named it the Holy. Ghost, or 
“Spirit of truth.” And he said (John 
16:13), “When he, the Spirit of truth, 
is come, he will guide you into all 
truth.” 

Mary Baker Eddy, the Discoverer 
and Founder of Christian Science, 
writes of truth, or divine Science 
(Unity of Good, p. 52): “This Science 
of God and man is the Holy Ghost, 
which reveals and sustains the un- 
broken and eternal harmony of both 
God and the universe. It is the king- 
dom of heaven, the ever-present reign 
of harmony, already with us.” 

The recognition through Christian 
Science that being is spiritual and per- 


La Science, non la superstition 


[This is a French translation of “Science, Not Superstition,” appearing on this page] 


Traduction de l'article sur la Science Chrétienne paraissant en anglais sur cette page 
{Tous les samedis une traduction francaise est publiee| 


AVANT que les lois des sciences natu- 
relles eussent été- decouvertes, les efforts 
des hommes pour expliquer la cause et 
leffet engendrérent des mythes et des 
superstitions. 

La Science Chrétienne corrige la con- 
ception erronée selon laquelle la cause ou 
Veffet peut étre dans la matiere ou dans 
le soi-disant entendement mortel, et elle 
remplace cette fausse croyance par la 
vérité que toute causation est Dieu, )’En- 
tendement divin, qui agit seulement par 
la loi spirituelle; que tout effet, y com- 
pris ’!homme et l’univers, est entierement 
spirituel, la manifestation infinie et par- 
faite de l’Entendement. 

La Bible, sur laquelle sont basés les 
enseignements de la Science. Chretienne, 


Importance of Creative Speech 


WE LIVE in an age in which creative 
speech is as important as creative writing, 
and, whether we like.it or not, our effec- 
tiveness as individuals largely depends on 
our ability to impress and persuade our 
fellow men. “Democracy is discussion,” 
said a world famous statesman, and if, 
without resorting to shouting, you and I 


Photograph by Frances Berri 
“PORTRAIT OF A LADY”: 
By Clara Billing 


\ 


are to be heard amid this Twentieth Cen- 
tury. babel, we shall havé to speak a lan- 
guage fresher and more penetrating than 
the one we acquire through studying the 
conventional textbook of English Compo- 
sition. We shall have to speak the lan- 


guage of imagination. By language of 


imagination I mean not only Figures of 
Speech, but ordinary language electrified 
by imagination... . 

What happens when thoroughgoing 
study of English is abandoned too early 
is illustrated by what is happening in the 
world of science. Not only from the uni- 
versities, but also from eminent scientists 
and technologists .themselves, comes all 
too often nowadays the complaint that 
students are embarking on advanced 
courses in pure and applied science with- 
out having first mastered their mother 
tongue. Such students are said to be un- 
able to give a clear account of the work 
they are doing; unable to explain why it 
needs doing; and unable, when the work 
is completed, to present their findings in 
intelligible English. Surely it is time that 
positive action be taken to remove any 
grounds there may be for so serious a 
complaint. ... 

More and more, Britain is going to need 
scientists who can explain to non-scientists 
the importance, needs, methods, findings, 
and implications of pure and applied sci- 
ence. Increasingly, technologists will be 
called upon to teach less highly trained 
men and women how to operate and 
maintain costly machines and how to carry 
out complicated industrial processes. How, 
if the scientists themselves are inarticulate, 
will they contrive to advise and in- 
struct? ... 

Let us now consider how essential the 
fully developed imagination becomes 
whenever the scientist is confronted by 
problems which cannot be solved merely 
by applying the standard equipment of 
technical knowledge and technical skills. 
The digression may prove as illuminating 
to the arts as to the science student, for 
neither will attain to his full stature until 
ee realizes that knowledge and skills yield 

t until fertilized by imagination.— 
From “Creative English,” by Gorpon 
Taytor, Copyright, 1958, by E. J, Arnold 
— Sons Ltd., Leeds, England,: 


Ss 


Wissenschaft—nicht Aberglaube 


{This is a German translation of “Science, Not Superstition,” 


appearing on this page] 


Ubersetzung des auf dieser Seite erscheinenden christlich-wissenschaftlichen Aufsatzes 
{Jeden Sonnabend erscheint eine deutsche Ubersetzung] 


EHE man die Gesetze der Naturwissen- 
schaften entdeckte, wurden Versuche, 
welche die Menschen unternahmen, um 
Ursache und Wirkung zu erklaren, zur 
Veranlassung fiir die Entstehung von 
Mythen und aberglaubischen Vorstellun- 
gen. : 

Die Christliche Wissenschaft berichtigt 
die falsche Auffassung, daB wahre Ur- 
sache oder Wirkung in der Materie oder 
dem sogenannten sterblichen Gemit vor- 
handen sein kénne, und sie ersetzt diese 
falsche Annahme durch die Wahrheit, da8 


alle Ursadchlichkeit allein in Gott, dem 
géttlichen Gemiit, beruht, das nur durch 
das geistige Gesetz wirkt, und daB8 alle 
Wirkung — einschlieBlich des Menschen 
und des Weltalls—rein geistig ist; die 
unendliche und vollkommene Offenbar- 
werdung des gdttlichen Gemiits. 

Die Bibel—welche die Autoritat fir 
die Lehren der Christlichen Wissenschaft 
darstellt — enthalt einen Bericht Uber das 
wachsende Verstandnis von Gott als dem 
gottlichen Prinzip alles wahren Seins und 
von der geéistigen Natur der Gottes- 
Schépfung— wie dies von den grdften 
geistigen Denkern erkannt und demon- 
striert wurde. 

Kraft seines Versténdnisses von der 
Wahrheit wandelte Christus Jesus auf 
den Wogen, stillte er den Sturm, speiste 
er die Volksmenge, heilte er die Kranken 
und erweckte er die Toten. Der Meister 
lehrte, da& die Wahrheit,’die er demon- 
strierte, heilig und geistig ist. Er nannte 
sie den Heiligen Geist oder den ,,Geist 
der Wahrheit‘. Und er sagte (Joh. 16:13): 
» Wenn aber jener, der Geist der Wahr- 
heit, kommen wird, der wird euch in alle 
Wahrheit leiten.“ 

Mary Baker Eddy, die Entdeckerin und 
Griinderin der Christlichen Wissenschaft, 


schreibt iiber die Wahrheit —oder, gott-. 


liche Wissenschaft—in ihrem Werk 
, Unity of Good” (Die Einheit des Guten, 
S. 52): ,,Diese Wissenschaft von Gott und 
dem Menschen ist der Heilige Geist, der 
die ununterbrochene und ewige Harmonie 
Gottes sowie des Weltalls offenbart und 
erhalt. Sie stellt das Himmelreich, dar, 
die immergegenwartige Herrschaft der 
or die jetzt schon hier bei uns 

Ogg 

Wenn wir durch die Christliche Wis- 
senschaft das Sein als geistig und voll- 
kommen erkennen, énnen wir aus 
unserem menschlichen Dasein ungliick- 
liche sterbliche und materielle Illusionen 
ausschlieBen. Unser Leben wird dann ein 
wissenschaftlicher Beweis von dem gitt- 
lichen Prinzip der Vollkommenheit — Gott 
— und wir werden nicht mehr in Unwis- 
senheit umhertappen, um Ursache den 
Unwahrheiten und Schatten des Verlustes, 
der Bitterkeit, der Enttauschung, der 


Siinde, 
finden. 


In ,,Wissenschaft und Gesundheit mit 
Schliissel zur Heiligen Schrift’* schreibt 
Mrs. Eddy (S. 392): ,Steh Wache an der 
Tir des Gedankens. Wenn du nur solche 
Schliisse zugibst, wie du sie in k6érper- 
lichen Resultaten verwirklicht zu sehen 
wiinscht, dann wirst du dich harmonisch 
regieren. Ist die Bedingung vorhanden, 
die deiner Meinung nach Krankheit her- 
beifiihrt, sei es Luft, Anstrengung, Erb- 
lichkeit, Ansteckung oder Unfall, so warte 
deines Amtes als Wachter und schlieBe 
diese ungesunden Gedanken und Befirch- 
tungen aus. Halte dem sterblichen Gemiut 
schadenbringende Irrtimer fern; dann 
kann der Korper nicht unter ihnen 
leiden.“ 


Alle Erfahrungen, die wir im mensch- 
lichen Leben machen, sind nichts anderes 
als eine Vergegenstandlichung der Ge- 
danken, die wir hegen. Fur unsere 
Gesundheit und unser Gliick ist es von 
ausschlaggebender Bedeutung, ob wir gei- 
stige, wissenschaftliche Wahrheiten oder 
aber die aberglaubischen Annahmen des 
unwissenden sterblichen Gemits in unser 
Denken. einlassen,. Wir miissen aus dem 
menschlichen BewuBtsein die aberglaubi- 
schen, der Grundlage entbehrenden An- 
nahmen ausrotten, da8 der Mensch ein 
persénliches Gemiit habe, oder eine per- 
sOnliche Seele, die angeblich in einem 
materiellen Kérper wohnt, sowie die Auf- 
fassung, daB er des Bésen fahig und 
Schmerzen und Krankheit unterworfen, 
arm oder eingeengt sei. Dann werden sich 
derartige Annahmen nicht mehr in un- 
serer taglichen Lebenserfahrung zeigen. 


Und wir miissen uns dazu erziehen, uns 
selbst und andere als wirklich reine, hei- 
lige, geistige, giitige, immerdar von Gott 
geleitete Ideen zu sehen, die Gott mit dem 
unendlich Guten und mit unbegrenzter 
Fille .ausgestattet hat. Dann werden 
solche ‘Begriffe die einzig wirklichen fir 
uns werden, und wir werden Harmonie 
zum Ausdruck bringen. 


Wir dirfen mit Recht sagen, da8 wir, 
wenn wir lernen, richtig zu denken, auch 
lernen, richtig zu leben. Durch das Er- 


der Krankheit oder des Todes zu 


kennen der Wahrheit iiber Gott und Sein . 


Weltall werden wir die Macht erlangen, 
die abergldubische Annahme von irgend- 
einer Ursache auSer Gott, oder | irgend- 
einer Wirkung auSer dem wirklichen 
Menschen und dem wahren Weltall Seiner 
Schépfung, zu tberwinden. 


Das chriatlich-wissensehaftliche Lehrbuch ,, Wis- 
Gesundheit mit Sehit Baar cur 


contient des récits montrant la perception 
grandissante de Dieu en tant que Principe 
divin de.tout étre véritable, et de Ja na- 
ture spiritueUe de la création de Dieu, 
que les plus grands penseurs spirituels 
entrevirent et déemontrerent. 

Grace a sa compréhension de la Veérité, 
Christ Jésus marcha sur les flots, apaisa 
la tempéte, nourrit la multitude, guérit 
les malades, et ressuscita les morts. Le 
Maitre enseignait que la verité qu’il de- 
montrait etait sainte et spirituelle. Il 
l’appelait le Saint-Esprit, ou “Esprit de 
vérité”. Et il dit (Jean 16:13): “Quand 
l’Esprit de vérité sera venu, il vous con- 
duira dans toute la vérité.” 

Mary Baker Eddy, qui a découvert et 
fonde la Science Chrétienne, écrit en par- 
lant de la verité, ou Science divine 
(Unité du Bien, p. 52): “Cette Science de 
Dieu et de l’homme est le Saint-Esprit 
qui révele et soutient -l’harmonie ininter- 
rompue et éternelle de Dieu et de l’uni- 


vers. C’est le royaume des cieux, le regne 


toujours présent de Pharmonie dés main- 
tenant avec nous.” 

En reconnaissant, grace a la Science 
Chretienne, que |]’étre est spirituel et par- 
fait, nous pouvons chasser de notre exis- 
tence les tristes illusions mortelles et 
matérielles. Notre vie devient la démons- 
tration scientifique du Principe divin de 
la perfection — Dieu—au lieu d’etre un 
tatonnement aveugle pour trouver la 
cause parmi les mensonges et les ombres 
des pertes, de l'amertume, des déceptions, 
du péché, de la maladie et de la mort. 

Dans Science et Santé avec la Clef des 
Ecritures, Mrs. Eddy écrit (p. 392): “Gar- 
dez la porte de la pensée. N’admettez que 
les conclusions dont vous voudriez voir 
les effets se réaliser sur le corps, et vous 
vous gouvernerez harmonieusement. Lors- 
que se presente la condition qui, selon 
vous, occasionne la maladie, que ce soit 
l’air, l’exercice, ’hérédité, la contagion ou 
un accident, faites bien votre devoir de 
gardien, et fermez la porte contre ces 
pensées et ces craintes malsaines. Excluez 
de l’entendement mortel les erreurs nuisi- 
bles; alors le corps ne pourra en souf- 
iver.” 

Toutes nos expériences humaines ne 
sont que l’objectivation des pensées que 
nous entretenons. Ce que nous admettons 
dans notre pensée, les vérités spirituelles 
et scientifiques, ou bien les croyances 
superstitieuses de l’entendement mortel 
ignorant, est d’une importance vitale pour 
notre santé et notre bonheur. Il nous faut 
éliminer de notre conscience les concepts 
imaginaires -et superstitieux concernant 
Yhomme, selon lesquels il a un entende- 
ment personnel ou 4me qui demeure dans 
un corps charnel, selon lesquels il est 
capable de faire le mal, sujet a la dou- 
leur et A la maladie, pauvre ou limité. 
Alors nous ne verrons pas de telles 
croyances objectivées dans notre expé- 
rience journaliére. 

Nous devons apprendre a nous voir, 
ainsi que les autres, comme étant en 
réalité les idées de Dieu, gouvernées par 


“Lui, pures, saintes, spirituelles, douces, 


divinement douées de bien infini et 


d’abondance illimitée. De tels concepts 


deviendront alors pour nous les seuls 
concepts réels, et nous manifesterons 
l’harmonie. 

On peut dire en vérité que lorsque nous 
apprenons a penser juste, nous apprenons 
& vivre selon la justice. En connaissant 
la vérité concernant Dieu et Son univers, 
nous acquerrons la domination sur la 
croyance superstitieuse & une autre cause 
que Dieu ou a un effet autre que l’homme 
réel et le véritable univers qu’ll a créés. 


Le livre de apnte de ls Metenes Chrétienne 
ence A ec la Clef des Ecritures’’ par 


par Charles Henry 
One preowng Street, 
tts, U.S.A, Ka 


Pour tous ior Me entree . 
- ——s Sat beer tas coe 


15, 


& 
3 


fect allows.one-to expel-from his expe=— 
rience miserable. mortal and matérial+ 
illusions. One’s life becomes the scien- 
tific demonstration of the divine Prin- 
ciple of perfection—God—instead of an 
ignorant groping around to find cause 
among the lies and shadows of loss, 
bitterness, frustration, sin, disease, 
death, 


ee ae 


In “Science and Health with Key to 
the Scriptures,” Mrs. Eddy writes (p. 
392): “Stand porter at the door of 
thought. Admitting only such conclu- 
sions as you wish realized in bodily 
results, you will control yourself har- 
moniously. When the condition is pres- 
ent which you say induces disease, 
whether it be air, exercise, heredity, 
contagion, or accident, then perform 
your office as porter and shut out these 
unhealthy thoughts and fears. Exclude 
from mortal mind the offending errors: 
then the body cannot suffer from 
them-” 

All human experience is but the ob- 
jectification of the thoughts we enter- 
tain. Whether we admit into our think- 
ing spiritual, scientific truths or the 
superstitious beliefs of ignorant mortal 
mind is vitally important to our health 
and happiness. We need to weed out 
of human consciousness baseless, su- 
perstitious concepts of man as having 
a personal mind or soul as dwelling in 
a fleshly body, as being capable of evil, 
as béing subject to pain or disease, as 
being poor or limited. Then we shall 
not see such beliefs objectified in our 
daily experience. 

ad ae . 

And we need to educate ourselves to 
see ourselves and others as really pure, 
holy, spiritual, gentle, forever God- 
directed ideas, God-endowed with in- 
finite good and unlimited abundance. . 
Then such concepts will be the only 
real to us, and we shall manifest 
harmony. 

Truly it can be said that when we 
Jearn to think aright, we learn to live 
aright. By knowing the truth concern- 
ing God and His universe, we shall gain 
dominion over the superstitious belief 
in any cause other than God-or any 
effect other than the real man and the 
true universe of His creating. 


{French and German translations of the religioug 
article appear every Saturday. | 


So Might A Burd 


So might a bird released from his duress 

Fly high and swoop, exploring every 
bound 

That sky and earth impose him; so might 

he 

nis throat hoarse with long forgotten 

sound, 

Then in slow circles settle to the ground 

To lie exhausted, but with that full peace 

Which only comes from rediscovery. 


Sing } 


NORMA McLAIN STOOP 


ow can 
I learn 


to pray? 


THE TRUTH IN 
THIS GREAT 
BOOK CAN TEACH 
YOU TO PRAY 
EFFECTIVELY 


You can learn how to 
pray, how to commune with God, 
how to listen for His guidance, if 
you will read with an unprejudiced, 
receptive thought the truth contain- 
ed in this great book, Science and 
Health with Key to the Scriptures 
by Mary Baker Eddy. 


In -the first seventeen pages of the 
Christian Science textbook you. will 
find an inspiring explanation of 
prayer. Countless thousands, through 
the study of this chapter, have learned 
how to pray intelligently and are 
receiving the answer to their prayers, 

—as~evidenced in improved health, 
harmony, supply, and well-being. 


SCIENCE 
HEALTH 


Find this out for yourself! Read, 
buy,* or borrow a copy of this book 
at the Christian Science Reading 
Room nearest you. There you can 
read.this book, together with the 
King James Version of the Bible, in 
an atmosphere of quiet and rest, 
There, too, you can borrow Science 
and Health without charge and take 
it home to read at your leisure, 


Drcrcecnde . AND LEARN TO PRAY f 


*Science and Health can be 
purchased in red, green, or 
blue binding for $38 at 
Christian Science Reading 
Rooms throughout the * 
world, or it will be sent 
postpaid on receipt of check 
_ or money order by: i 


Cuances Henry Gasnizx, Publishers’ Agent, 
One Norway Street, Boston 15, Massachusetts 


wil 


HE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 
Kerala: Where the People Abdicated 


By Sharokh Sabavala ° 


Special Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor 


Second Section 


Trivandrum, India 

R THOSE who take good government and 

the stability that goes with it for granted, it 

would be useful at this time to visit the 

south Indian State of Kerala. In this state 
both the government and the people seem to have 
completely lost their moorings. The government 
is Communist, masquerading in democratic garb. 
The people are those who have deliberately put 
this regime in power out of pique and whose 
regrets are now expressed in tumult. 

The resulting head-on clash is ugly, unpro- 
ductive, and brutalizing. Against each wave of 
popular protest the government uses more and 
more repression. Against stepped-up repression 
the people. lash out in all directions, unmindful 
if they hurt themselves. 


During this correspondent’s visit to Kerala he 
has seen‘the results of bullets indiscriminately 
used, of wild police charges against men, 
women, and children, many of whom had inad- 
vertently found themselves at some particular 
trouble spot, of deliberate sabotage of law and 
order, of the gradual slowing down of the ad- 
ministration, of feelings of rising insecurity mak- 
ing it impossible to plan from hour to hour, of 
disruption of transport and communications, of 
heroism which ended only in more destruction. 

He has tasted of the terror of little children 
confronted ‘by howling mobs in their classrooms, 
of the anguish of their helpless mothers and 
teachers, many of whom have stood up with mag- 
nificent courage against most frightening mani- 
fe8tations of mob violence. 


Loss of Faith Noted 


He has seen what happens when a ruthless 
government faces a leaderless people,.when com- 
munism duly voted in endeavors to keep itself 
in power by those very constitutional means 
for which it has supreme contempt. 

Many people in Kerala have told me that it 
would have been better for them to have been 
unambiguously behind the Iron Curtain than to 
continue “suffering” a regime which quotes the 
Constitution even while it subverts it at every 
turn. They have also expressed loss of faith in 
democratic procedures to set right their now ad- 
mitted mistake. 


Government servants, schoolteachers, lawyers, 
planters, industrialists, even , socialist-oriented 
labor leaders have told me: Take our vote, our 
rights, our privileges, give us an Ayub Khan 
(Pakistani general who took over the presidency 
in a coup), give us an Indian Army so we may 
live in peace even under a dictatorship or mili- 
tary rule. 

This situation—it represents a major failure 


‘for the Indian Government and the people as 


The State of Kerala, made up of the former 
princely states of Travancore and Cochin, and the 
Malabar coast of Madras, covers 15,000 square 
miles of India’s most fertile land. Here are grown 
rubber, tea, coffee, cashew nuts, pepper, and 
bamboo. The state’s exquisite palm-fringed coast 
lines are strewn with thorium-yielding monazite 
sands, 


Discontent Rampant 

Kerala is India’s best foreign-exchange earner. 
Its -pegple also are the country’s most literate 
group, with an almost passionate devotion to 
their educational institutions, It was here, accord- 
ing to legend, that the Apostle Thomas first 
landed nearly two thousand years ago, and his 
works are reflected today in a strong, enlightened 
Christian community whose beautiful churches 
are India’s pride. 

But in this tropical paradise unemployment 
and discontent are rampant, for there are just too 
many people—more than 15,000,000—for the land 
to accommodate, Consequently the educated un- 
employed ‘take to politics. They try out various 
regimes and various forms of government, all 
of which keep the state in a condition of chronic 
instability. 

Their latest experiment, now 27 months old, 
is with communism. But even this was not pre- 
planned, for what the Kerala people did during 


the course of the general elections in 1957 was not 
to give the Communist Party an absolute ma- 
jority but to deny this to other political parties. 

As a result the Communists, with 35 per cent 
of the votes cast, became the state’s largest single 
party, They won the allegiance of five inde- 
pendents—made two of them ministers—and so 
were able to form a government with a legisla- 
tive majority of two. 


Surface Unity Achieved 

Even so they were ‘able to rule effectively if 
not well because. the democratic parties opposing 
them not only continued to be divided but also 
failed to do sufficient grass-roots W ork to restore 
the people’s confidence in them. 

The current anti-Communist upsurge which 
has brought about surface unity among Kerala 
opposition groups is mainly the result of an all- 
too-obvious Communist attempt to build a strong 


* _ 4 
4°¢2 
SMOKE 
Peas te 
sas tae. 


Associated Press Wirephoto 


Communist Chief Namboodiripad 


party base at the expense of development pro- 
grams, in violation of its promise to the electorate 
to permit all the individual rights and liberties 
which are written into the Indian Constitution. 

It does not mean that the Keralans are ready 
to support Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s 
Congress Party or the socialists or other purely 
communal groups. Necessarily, therefore, the out- 
come of the present popular revolt cannot be 
clear cut, 

It has shown that despite protestations to the 
contrary, the Communists are unable to work 
democratic institutions, much less understand 
them. 

This is tmportant, since even Mr. Nehru 
thought they could, that in the process they would 
become more democratic. With all this wishful 
thinking cleared out of the way, there now re- 
mains one course for President Prasad: to dismiss 
the Kerala ministry (he probably will be forced 
into this by the month’s end), and for him to 
appoint an able panel to administer the state on 
his behalf until such time as the serious damage 
to its moral and material fibers have been re- 
paired. 

Then the people can think of going to the polls 
in order to restore their democratic rights. Kerala 
is going to be a long-term problem. It will remain 
as a warning to politicians and people; and 
countless Indians hope that it will serve now to 
remind their rulers \“that coexistence with 
atheism and indecency is a most corrupting in- 
fluence.”’ 

Even in their present travail many. people in 
the state have expressed this hope. Many inno- 
cents already have suffered to bring it to the 
nation’s notice. | 


Second of a series on Kerala 


Associated Press 


‘ Anti-Communist Demonstrators Lie Down in Kerala Capital 


a whole—has been in the making for many yéars, 
during which successive regimes of :all com- 
plexions have shared one thing in common: ine 
ability to cope adequately with the people’s needs, 


Berlin: High-Level Test 


Washington 

We need to brace ourselves for another test 
ever the West Berlin crisis. 

The time may come when the Kiesilii will 
he convinced that the United States, Britain, 
and Franée are not going to turn the 2,000,000 
free West Berliners over to the Soviet-domi- 
mated East German Communist regime. Until 
then we must continue to expect Premier Ni- 
kita S. Khrushchey to try to maneuver the 
West to dilute their defense of West Berlin so 
that it can gradually be absorbed behind the 
Iron Curtain. 

There will probably be three. high-level 
opportunities to persuade Mr. Khrushchev that 
the West is not bluffing, that we do not intend 
to barter away the freedom of West Berlin— 
any more than the Communists intend to give 
up East Berlin—and that any attempt to deny 
our rights of access to the city by force will 
be met by force. These opportunities-are: 

1.. The reconvened meeting of the Big Four 
foreign ministers at Geneva on July 13—to 
remain in session as long as there is any chance 
of reaching agreement. 


. . 7 


2. Vice-President Richard M. Nixon’s July 
22 trip to Moscow to open the American exhi- 
bition, at which time Mr. Nixon will have 
talks with Mr. Khrushchev and other Soviet 
officials, 

3. A summit conference of the Big Four 
heads of government—Messrs. Eisenhower, 
Khrushchev, Macmillan, and de Gaulle—to deal 
with one or more of these four major matters: 
West Berlin;. ending nuclear tests: an all- 
European security arrangement; disarmament. 

There is nothing presently in sight to sug- 
gest that the next meeting of the foreign min- 


isters will accomplish what the earlier meet- 
ing failed to accomplish. 

In order to see what we are going to be up 
against during the next few months, we need 
to look at three aspects of the Bérlin dispute: 

The nature of the impasse: The Soviets want 
to get the Western powers out of West Berlin in 
order to snuff out this embarrassing show win- 
dow, behind the Iron Curtain, of what a free 
society is like. They are probably being pres- 
sured to some extent by the East German Com- 
munist officials who fear that they may not be 
able to keep their hold over the East German 
people if West Berlin is not’ removed from 
sight, 

4 . 4 


The Soviet Union does not admit it wanis to 
annex West Berlin to its East Zone puppet. It 
says only that it wants to reduce Western forces 
in West Berlin, add Soviet forces there to “pro- 
tect” Berlin, and to maintain it as a “free city.” 
The West is convinced—and, I think rightly~ 
that the end result would be to absorb West 
Berlin into the Communist zone. 


The United States holds that the West can- 
not withdraw from West Berlin until there is 
a united Germany and that if the Soviet Union 
allows the East German Communists to bar 
Westerm access to West Berlin, we will use 
force to maintain our rights. 


Mr. Khrushchev has declared that the Soviet 
“solution” to West Berlin “was not offered for 
bargaining,’ that is, is not negotiable, Mr. 
Eisenhower has said that “we will not yield 
an inch” in maintaining Western rights of ac- 
cess to West Berlin. 

This is the impasse. 

Why does Mr. K. want a summit meeting? It 
seems to me that there is one persuasive reason 


By Roscoe Drummond 


Written Especially for The Christian Science Monitor 


why the Soviet Premier holds out against any 
compromise at Geneva and why he wants to 
meet President Eisenhower face to face. He 
must be convinced that there is some prospect 
that the United States doesn’t mean it when it 
says “it will not yield” on West Berlin. Obvi- 
ously he sees no danger to the Soviets in keep- 
ing the. issue tense and uncertain. He must fig- 
ure that time is on his side and that, with the 
balance: of military power in missiles on the 
Kremlin’s side, he can either get the President 
to back down or drive a.sufficient wedge be- 
tween the Allies that America will be isolated 
in its firm position. In other words, Mr. 
Khrushchev sees nothing to lose in refusing an 
agreement at the level of the foreign ministers 
and in demanding that a summit conference be 
held, 
4 . 4 


‘Will the United States attend such a sum- 
mit? Mr. Eisenhower has_ said publicly that 
there must be some progress among the foreign 
ministers to justify a summit _meeting. But 
British Prime Minister Macmillan says he be- 
lieves that failure of the foreign ministers to 
find agreement on Berlin makes a summit con- 
ference more imperative. I cannot myself es- 
cape the conviction that if Moscow threatens 
to give East Germany its authority over the 
control points surrounding West Berlin, the 
President will be moved to go to the summit. 
His purpose will not be to yield West Berlin 
but to make it clear to Mr. Khrushchev (per- 
sonally that either Soviet or East German in- 
terference with Western rights of access will be 
deemed by the United States an act’of force 
to be met by force. 

The stakes could hardly be higher, 


— 


WASHINGTON LETTER 


Associated Press 


Angry Keralans Shout Anti-Communist 7 tata 


2 


cow had now armed Communist China with 
rockets to hit the Seventh Fleet and Formosa 


“— , ; Washington News Bureau 
To the Readers of The Christian Science Monitor: 1293 Notional Press Building 
A lot of people wonder how Democratic Na- 
tional Committee Chairman Paul M. Butler has the - 
nerve to attack Senate and House Democratic 
- leadership and how he can get away with it. 


The effort.to oust Mr, Butler has been going 
on a long time by those who don't like aggres- 
sive views — and has gotten nowhere. One rea- 
son is that he speaks for 
a different and more na- 
tional Democratic group 
than do Messrs. Lyndon 
B. Johnson and Sam 
Rayburn in Congress. 

The latter have to 
conciliate the one-party 
Democratic South which 
is powerfully entrenched 
in the Legislature while 
Mr. Butler is more the 
spokesman for the big 
Democratic cities and 
states which are needed 
to elect Presidents. 

The last presidential election the Democrats 
won was in 1948. There was a split in the 
party then when Truman forces adopted a | 
strong civil rights pr — at the nominating 
convention in Philadelphia. The party found 

‘ that it could win without the South, just as it 
could have won in the four election victories 
of Mr. Roosevelt even if the South had bolted. 


pe not mean that Mr. Butler doesn't 
w th in his camp. But as between that 


' 
ov 


and a civil rights bill and what he regards as a 
dynamic liberal program that will attract the city 
vote, he favors the latter. City leaders have 
backed Mr. Butler so far. His latest success in 
getting next year's Democratic convention located 
in Los Angeles — contrary to the wishes of 
congressional leaders—-was spectacular. 


SUMMIT PRESSURE IN WEST GROWS 


The pressure is building to get Mr. Eisenhower 
to agree to a summit meeting with Mr. Khrushchev 
without having nailed down the West's rights to 
stay in Berlin indefinitely. 

It is coming from Mr. Khrushchev ‘ who wants 
a summit but not at that price; from Prime Min- 
ister Macmillan who is convinced a summit is 
the only place one can do business with Mr. 
Khrushchev; from W. Averell Harriman, just 
back from his “tough talk’ interview with Mr. 
Khrushchev. 

Mr. Eisenhower is not budging from his po- 
sition that there can be no summit until Mr. 
Khrushchev admits America’s rights to be in 
Berlin indefinitely. 

But the pressure on him to give in is mounting. 


FAR EAST WARNINGS FLY 


There is trouble brewing, too, in the Far East. 

Washington would not put it past Peking to 
touch off a new Formosan crisis soon after the new 
Geneva German talks 

And United States officials were actually more 
concerned over Mr. Harriman’s report that 


Associated Press 
Paul M. Butler 


4 
va | 


bl 
;* 


than his account of Mr. Khrushchev's tough talk 
on Berlin. Washington neither confirms nor denies 
this rocket report. 

If the Soviets are going to try and bully Mr. 
Herter over Berlin, it would be normal for Peking 
to open up another crisis front in the Far East. 


KOZLOV TOUR VS. NIXON 


The Soviets have talked big about “reciprocity” 
in the parallel arrangements for the Frol R. Kozlov 
four of the United States and the Richard M. Nixon 


tour of the Soviet Union. But there is one area 
where they aren't likely to let “reciprocity” rule: 


When traveling around the Chicago area the 
Soviet photographers aceompanying Deputy Pre- 
mier Kozlov freely photographed key highw 
railroad yards, strategic bridges—items forbi den 
to cameras in the Soviet Union. The State Depart- 
ment security officials with the Kozlov party for 
some reason made no objection. 


Moscow will not grant any such free permission 


for photogra hing Soviet strategic communications 
during the ison tour, it is believed here. 
Another nonreciprocity item: the Vice-President 
is ready to face any and all questions from the 
Soviet press in Moscow. In the United States Mr. 
Kozlov refused to no in the sharp-ques- 
tioning “Meet the program, preferring in- 
stead a televised bless SE speech which ended 
with a few “selected” questions—Soviet-selected. 


STEEL WAGE COMPROMISE DRAFTED 


’ Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell reportedly 


believes that the steel industry can accept a wage _ 


increase of as much as nine cents an hour with- 


out having to boost steel prices. He also is reportes 


; 


. is safe and reliable 


to believe that the United Steelworkers will accept 
this kind of a modest wage increase this year. 


Here, then, is the formula for a noninflationary 
steel settlement. Vice-President Nixon, a friend of 
Secretary Mitchell who. frequently agrees with his 
labor views, has helped as an unofficial go-be- 
tween on this issue, making certain that the steel 
companies and unions: realize the opportunity for 
settlement. The central argument is t that if a strike 
is precipitated instead of a modest settlement, the 
unions will demand a bigger pay rise. 

So far, however, despite the Nixon-Mitchell in- 
fluence, bargaining is still stiff and unconciliatory. 


DEBATE BREWS OVER SMALL CARS 


You're going to hear public argument over 
which of those new ‘compact cars” being put out 
by the automotive “big three,” General Motors, 
Ford, and Chrysler, is best and safest. 

General Motor's Corvair has its engine mounted 
in the rear—lightweight, aluminum, and air-cooled. 
The Ford Falcon and Chrysler Valiant have their 
water-cooled engines mounted convent th . 
front. 

Ford and Chrysler have begun a sales pitch 
declaring that their engines are “mounted 
front where they belong’ — and that théy are 
safer at high speeds — less prone to wobble, 
swaying, and agp General Motors: is 
replying with other experts to show that its car 


e the Volkswagen), and 
requires no antifreeze in winter. 


 apln iy 


10** 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


' ~ 


TELEVISION 


WGBH 2, WBZ 4, WHDH 5, WNAC 7, WMUR 9, WJAR 10, WPRO 12 


Saturday 


6:45 4—News and Weather 


1:00 4—Hollywood Playhouse: 
The Sea Hornet 


5—Charlie Char. 


7<Test Pilot; Boomtown — 


9—Flash Gordon 
10—Return of Bad Men 
| of the Séa 
9—Joe ka—film 
12—Film Feature 

Red 


Escape 


4—The Great Carlini 
9—- Jones—film 
4—Detective’s Diary 
9—Duffy’s Tavern 
10—Big League Wrestling 
0 4, 9—Wrestling, Boston 
10—Top Pro Go 
12—Looney Tunes 
5—Sports Time 
4—Boston Movietime: 
Death Valley Gun- 
fighters 
5—William Tell 
‘omen Party» 
0—Bold Journey 
"siaeeine Command 
7, 12—The Lone Ranger 
10—Dick Clark Show 
5—Roy Rogers 
7—Sherwood Forest 
9—Double Film Feature 
10—The Early Show 
12—Cheyenne 
4—-Bishop Sheen 
5—Life of Riley 
7—Twentieth Century 


7:00 4—Jeff’s Collie | 
7—Mickey Spillane 


10—Rifleman—western 


12—Sea Hunt © 
7:30 
: 5—Dick Clark Show 


7, 12—Reckoning—The 


Edge of Truth 


4,10—Perry Presents 


5—Boston Ballroom 


7,12—Wanted Dead or 


Alive 
9—Counterpoint 
4, 10—Black Saddle 


5,9—Lawrence Welk 


7, 12—Brenner 
4, 10—Cimarron City 


7,12—-Have Gun Will 


Travel—western 
5—Pantomime Quiz 
7, 12—Gunsmoke 
9—Feature Film 


4—So Proudly We Hail; 


Ambush 

5—The D.A.’s Man 
7,12—U.S. Marshal 
9—Feature Film 
10—News 

10—King Kong 

4,5, 7, 12—News 
9—Feature Film 
4,5, 7, 12—Weather 
4—-Movie Continues 


5—Magnificent Matador 
7—The Big Knife; Ex- 


Champ 
12—John Loves Mary 


Sunday 


4—Industry on Parade 
4—Rex Trailer 
5—Clarence the Clown 
10—Roman Catholic Pgm 
10—How Christian Sci- 
ence Heals 
7—How Christian Sci- 
ence Heals 
10—This Js the Life 
7—This Is the Life 
12—Farm Facts 
4, 10—Frontiers of Faith 
7—Roman Catholic Pgm. 
12—Off to Adventure 
4—Dimensions; Freedoms 


ence Heals 
4:15 9—The Living Word 
4:30 
4—Flight 


9—Films from France 


12—The Big Picture 
4:55 5—Sports Time 


5:00 


5—Sgt. Preston 
9—New Horizons 
10—R.I. Farm Wives 


4,10—People Are Funny 


2—Gardener’s Almanac 


2, 12—Report on Russia 
—the Harriman Trip 

4—Starring the Editors, 
with Erwin D,. Canham 


“Erwin D. Canham 
Editer of j 
The Christian Science 
and the News" 
Sunday 6:15 p.m. 


WTAO and WXHR-FM 
aise 11:30 p.m, WEZE 


| D. 8. T. 
“i ABC NETWORK 


Saturday 


6; 6:10, 7:30; 9, 10,11: 
Weather: 6:55 a.m., 7:55, 8:25, 
Sports: 8:25 a.m., 6:15, 6: 355, 11:1 
WTAO—News: 7:25 a.m., 7:55, 8. 8: 25, 


6:55, 7:55. 
Sports: 7:40'a.m., 12:40 p.m., 5: 
WHDH—News on half hour and 7 a.m., 


WNAC—News: On hour, half hour, and 
11:10, 


Weather: 6:55 a.m., 7:10 p.m. 
WEZE —News: 7 a.m., 7:30, 8, 9, 10, 11, 


Radio News, Weather, Sports 
WEEI —News: 7 a.m., 7:30, 8, 8:15, 8:30, 10, 11, #, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 


oo p.m., 11:05. 
8; 55, 10:25, 10:55, 11:25, 


11:55, 12:25 pam. 12:55, 1:55, 2:55, 3:55, 4:55, 5:55, | 


40. 
8, noon, 6, ot 


Weather: 6:55 a.m., 7:30, 7:55, 5:55, 6:25 p 
Sports: 7:40 a.m., 3:55. 5:15, 5: ‘55, 6:10, 6: 35, "il: 10. 


7:10 a.m., 8:10, 1: 10, 6:10, 


Weather: 6:55 a.m., 7:30, 7:55, 5:55 p.m. 
WBZ —News: On the hour and 7:30 a.m., 8:30, 5:30 p.m. 


noon, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 


1:00—WNAC—YN and WNAC News 
WTAO—Ken Wayne 
WBZ—.News: 


6:55—W 
Alan Dary 
WEZE~—News: NBC Features 
1:06—-WEEI—n a pararsey Afternoon 
1:15—WNAC—Radiant Radio 
1:35—-WHDH—Curt Gowdy’ a Dugout 
1:50—WHDH—Warmup Tim 
1:55—WHDH—Red Sox- Sankece 
2:08—WBZ-—Norm Prescott 
:00-—WTAO—Trafiic; Ed Penney 
3:55—WHDH—€ports Extra 
4:00—WHDH--Boston Ballroom 
5:40+--WTAQ—Scoreboard: Ed Penney 
5:55—WTAO—Late News, Traffic 
WHDH—Scoreboard 


10:00-—W 


's, Traffic, Ed Penney | 
WHDH—World News ‘Roundu up 
6:05—WBZ—Phil Christie 
6:15—Fred Cusick: Weather 
WHDH—Curt Gowdy: Weather 
WNAC-—Radiant Radio 
6: set ga hart Music; News 
—News: Boston Ballroom 
6: 36-—WEEI_Senater Saltonstall 
6:45—WEZE—Roman Catholic Program 


7:00~—WEEI and WTAO—Roman Cath- 
Olic Program 
WEZE—Specia)] Featur : 
WHDH— Christian Endeavor 


5: 8—W 
6: 00 W 


uth 
a Christian Science 


eals 
WHAC Beautiful Hymns 
7: soem aa nll of the Bookshelf 


6: ated 


7:00—WTAO— 
WEEI—News. jJackson-Hottelet 
WHDH—-Hank Forbes 
WEZE—NBC Features 
7:10—WEEI-—-Wally O'Hara —Jazz 
7:15—WNAC—Talk on Alcoholism 
7:30- Oy 5 a ot dh 


9 :30— WEZE-— 
WEET— 


w 
11:056—-W 


WNAC—YN and Aa N 
WBZ— 


6: 1s—¥ WTAO—E 
WNAC 


6:50—WEEI—Lawrence Welk 


EEI—Phii Rizzuto. ~ i 


Ed Penney 8h 


Music: 
—Jack Wyrtzen 


NewWs 


8 :00—- weer —The World Tonight 
wae 


O—Ed Penney Show 
AC_Radisnt Radio 


VNA 
8:15— WTAO— Sian of 


EEI—-Saturday Nieps Review 

Recorded Muisic 

World Music Festty als 

HDH—John McLellan. Top Shelf 
E—NBC Features 


10:30—WEZE—Accent on Youth 
11:00—WEETI, 


WHDH—News, Weather, 
Spor 


ports 
NAC—YN and WNAC News 
EZE-—Recorded Music 


WEEI—Car!] Moore Remembers 


WNAC——Jack Wyrtzen 


11:30—WEEI—Music ‘til Dawn 


—Midnight Rider's Club- 


WB 
11:45—WNAC—Radiant Radio 


Sunday 


6:00—WEEI—Robert Trout. news 
wTAo— 


AO—Eleventh Hour News 
=) CBS Radio News Analysis 
HDH—Scoreboard 
EElI—Robert frout newe 
WTAO—Monday A.M. Headlines. 
ews 

News: Star Tim 
EEI—Have Gun wilt Trave) 
TAO—Twilight Time 
HDH—Boston Ballroom 
Twin D. Canham 
Radiant Radio 


Heals,” Will be 
Sunday: 


815 a.m., WJAR 
Destroying Fear Leads to 
8:30 a.m., WHDH 


10 a.m., 


7:15 
Recurring Disease Healed 
7:45 a.m, WCOP, 
9:15 p.m., WNAC, 


Christian Selence 
Programs on TV-Radio 


The following programs in the series, “How Christian Science 
be among those seen or heard in New England this 


Television 


The Healing Message of the Bible 
-TV, Channel 10, Providence, R.I. 


Healing 


-TV, Channel. 5, Boston. 
Healing the Effects of Accidents 
WHDH-TYV, Channel 5, Boston, 
Finding Freedom From Chronic Tilness 
4:00 p.m., WMUR-TV, Channel 9, Manchester, N.H. 


Radio 


The Light That Brings Healing 
a.m., WHDH, 850kc, Boston. 


Through Prayer 


1150kc, Boston, 
680kc, Boston, 


Sunday 
a 


A detailed report on W. Av- 
erell Harriman’s recent visit to 
the Soviet Union and his talks 
with Premier Nikita S. Khrush- 
chev will be telecast on. the 
CBS-TV-radio, network Sunday, | 
July 12, The program, entitled, | 
“Report on Russion: The Harri- | 
man Trip,” will be telecast live 
from New York, on Channels 2 | 
and 12, at 5 p.m., and on WEEI 
radio at 9:30 p.m. 

Mr. Harriman, former gover- 


viewed by a panel of CBS news 
correspondents, including Whit- 
man Bassow and Paul Niven. 
Charles Collingwood will mod- 
erate the interview. 
A 5 

“The Massachusetts 
Budget” will be the subject of 
Channel 5’s weekly “Scope” se- 
ries Sunday at 1 p.m. 

Participating in the discussion 
will be Charles Francis Ma- 
honey, Massachusetts State 
‘Commissioner of Administra- 
tion. and Senator Fred I. Lam-_| 
son (R) of Malden. Senator Lam- | 
son is opposed to the budget, 
but Mr. Mahoney considers that | 


nor of New York, will be inters | 


State | 


CBS to Air Harriman Trip 


The financial and economic 
policies of Fidel Castro’s revolu- 
toinary regime in Cuba will be 
examined on WHDH radio’s 
| Press Conference Sunday at 8 
'p.m. The half-hour program was 
recorded in Havana and will 
‘feature an interview with Dr. 
‘Rufo Lopez Fresquest, Minister 
‘of Finance. David Susskind will 
| be guest moderator of a panel of 
/prominent newsmen, whose 
| hames have not yet been re- 
| leased. 

EE ee SS 


Paul M. Butler, chairman -of 
the* Democratic National Com- | 
‘mittee, will be interviewed by | 
student panelists on ABC- TV's 
“College News Conference” 
Sunday at 1 p.m. on Channel 2. 

| ee nee 


Composer Morton Gould, vio- 


_ Forty-five New England col- 
lege undefiggraduates have ob- 
tained —paittsummer jobs —in 
Massachuse@ts welfare agencies 
under the Bay State’s three- 
year-old Social Work Careers 
Program. 

These students are undecided 
whether or not to take up social 
work as a career. If they did, it 
would entail going on to gradu- 
ate school. _ 

To help make the decision 
easier, this careers program, 
with headquarters in Boston, 
has lined up as many jobs as 
possible. It will give at least | 
some of the students an oppor-, 
tunity to try out the work be- 
fore committing themselves or 
rejecting the idea through igno- 
rance, Mrs, Leona Riskin, direc- 
tor, said. 

The need for social workers | 
is great, Mrs, Riskin, continued. 


nation. 
cies have at least one vacancy,’ 
she added. 


Beset by Shortages 


Massachusetts are beset by two)! 
problems. With the cuts made, 
in their budgets this year, there 


student. Moreover, a 


must be supervised by a profes- 
sional..social worker and the) 


linist Robert Rudie, and. pianist | jo b. 


‘Claude Frank will be guests on 
CBS-TV’s “Camera Three” 
‘Sunday at 11:30 a.m., on Chan- 
‘nels 2, 5, and 12, They will ex- 
amine, the role of the instru- 
|mental musician as a creative 
artist. 


| Monday Previews 


plications had been made for the 
Social Work Careers 


“In screening applicants, 


student and center on 


ior,’ Mrs. Riskin said. 


| In addition to the actual jobs, | 


But most of the agencies in | stay, * 


| 


is not sufficient money to pay a | 

student | Program was directed at these 
)n 
| try to interest them in returning 
staff shortages already existing | 3 
,do not leave people free for this |tnese women have been organ- 


Students Get Trial 4 
As Social Workers 


By Carolyn F. Hummel 
Stag Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 


also provided for’ the undere 
graduate. 

High -school students are ap-= 
proached to a lesser degree, Mrs. 
Riskin added, 

Trips Planned 

Planned “come and see” trips 
to local social agencies, and 
speakers sent to the schools, are 
the main points of this group. 

In both high school and cole 
lege programs, men as well as 
girls are approached. 

“There is a tremendous need 
for men in the field,” the direc- 
tor said. “They usually fill posi- 
tions in community organization 
‘and in planning for large groups 
of people. Or they work. with 
United Funds and children.” 
However, men advance very 
rapidly in the field and quickly 
go on to administrative jobs and 
into research.” 

Still another project of the 


Some 25,000 additional workers |careers program is directed at 
could be used throughout the| the married: woman who has a 
“Almost all of the agen-| graduate degree from an ac- 


credited school of social work. 
Married Women Welcome 


“Married women are here to 
Mrs. Riskin explained. 
“They provide the stability in an 
‘agency, since they aren’t as apt 
to move around as an unmarried 
| worker.” 
A recent survey by the careers 


nonpracticing social workers to 


work. 


Two refresher courses for 


|ized this summer at Boston Unie 


| 


summMeF | have 
program, only 45 could be taken. | Council on Social Work Educa- 


we 
'tion’s recent report which stated 
try to exclude the committed | ~ re P 


That-is why although 235 ap-| versity and Simmons College. 


These efforts by the program 
contributed toward the 


“enrollment for the aca- 


the | 'demic- year 1958-59 has reached 
borderline sophomore and jun-|4942—-the highest ever achieved 


iby the 
schools.” 


accredited graduate 


the budget is necessary and that | 
it must not be cut. 
$ -$ 


5:30 2, 12—Face the Nation 
4—-N.E, Talent Show 
5—Lone Ranger 
9—Capt. David Grief 

10—You Asked for It 

6:00 2, 10—Meet the Press 
4—Popeye and His Pals 
5—African Patrol 
9—Double Film Feature 

12—Conquest—repeats 

6:15 4—Casey Jones 

6:30 2—Chet Huntley 


E—Bob Considine 
junsmoke 
fenator Saltonstall 


Foundation Award 
5—This Is the Answer 
10—Roman Catholic Pgm. 
12—The Christophers 
4— Medical: Documentary 
5—How Christian Science 


Heals 
7, 12—Lamp Unto My 
Feet—Lyman Bryson 
10—Industry on Parade 
5—Roman Catholic Pgm. 
10—The Air Force Story 


Senator Leverett Saltonstall, five group 2 gies ad with talks, “There are plenty of people 
iscussion of experiences, field |jwho would like to work in an 

jermnes a a eee | | visits, and case presentations are | agency, but. who don’t have the 
Senator Stuart Symington (D) Forces Committee, will discuss |held ” throughout the summer. | required training,” Mrs. Riskin 
of Missouri, a member of the important governmental issues|The applicants who were not| pointed out. By 1962 when the 
Senate Armed Services Com-|in a special Quarterly Report on | accepted for the summer jobs| demonstration program expires, 
mittee and the Government Op-|Channel 4 Monday at 11:15. To | are invited to attend this series. | the effectiveness of its work will 
erations Committee, and one of i 4 lene = ed ba — bear Pe 4 Continuous Program ‘be better determined, she added. 
the leading critics of the ad- anne Ss  uewem i 
be Pg y iar hel policy, | MacDonald, Senator Saltonstall | iy an aaa of the | 
will be guest on CBS-TV’s “Face | Will discuss many important is- | “i BS boon ite 7S cals teh Or- | 
the Nation” Sunday at 5:30 p.m. |Sues, including the prospects of | wey panty ry y | 
. achinateths ganization Service. Set up as a 


W + 
Old-Fashioned Reviva) Hour 
WEZE—Ora! Roberts 
8:15— WEET—Man Around the House 
wean the fad s Call to cue: 
TAO—Len Libman Sho 
WNAGOProviienns ‘Bible Tastitute 
WEZE—Specia] Features 
8:40—WTAO—Scoreboard 
8:45—WTAO—Len Libman Show 
WNAC—Churchmen Weigh News 
9:00—WEEI—News:; oy. déusie Hall 
WTAO—Traffic R 


Don Giihe chew 
Vings of Healing 
The Chosen People 
Len Libman Sh 


Zz Roman Catholic Program 
7 amet My SITE Trout-Hottelet 
WEZE~—NBC Features 
WTAO—Speaking of Sports 
3Z—News: Stereo Review 
'TAO—White House Reports 
ER1—Mitch Miller Show 
"15—-WTAO—Overseas Assignment 
.J0—WTAO—News: Twilight Time 
wae Park Street Chufch 
NAC—The Lutheran Hour 
WHDH— New and Weather 
7:35—-WHDH—Music in the Air 


Scituate Plans “Tour 


ow 


4—-Our. Believing World 
S—Air Force Story 
7,12—Look Up and Live 
10—Farmer Alfalfa 
4—Tugboat Annie 
5—Eye on New York 
7—Modern Home Digest 
10—The Morning Show 
12—American Legend 
7—United Steelworkers 
5, 12—Camera Three 

4—The Sunday News 
7—Abbott and Costello 
2, 5, 12—Harry Reasoner 
4—Weather, B. Copeland 


5—Glencannon 
7—Sheriff of Cochise 
10—The Tracer 


12—Twentieth Century 
6:45 4—News and Weather 


7:00 4—Going My Way 
5—You Asked for It 
7, 12—Lassie 
10—26 Men—Western 
7:30 5—Maverick 


7—I Led Three Lives 


10—Suspicion—drama 
12——People’s Choice 


a 7, 12—Eq Sullivan 


irt of Living 


act 


7:55—W 
8:00— Ww 


ack dad Hour 
eer ‘club of Air 
io e Class 


c— T aR Tore 
10:30—WNAC— Voice of Prophecy 
pecia!l WEZE Features 
10:45— W EZE—Purk 6 Street Church 
il anti: 2 ~~ ween Cathedral) of 
11 30—WEEL. salt Lake Tabernacle 
11: 44 WEEe Po oo 
eople’s “Gospel Hour 
13:00—-WEEI—CBS and hedoenad News 
WTAO—Tr aMe Repor 
WNAC—Radiant Radio 


Z—New 

12 08—WTAO—The Sunday Show 

12: Sen Wa ee News Analysie with 
air C 


WBZ—Popularity Parade 
WEZE—NBC Features 


8:15—W 


V 
a 


Ww AC— Radtan 
WB N 
8:05—W 


Ww" 
8:30—WE 


8:35—W 
Ww 


EEI—CBS News Saees 
WEEI—‘*v New 
WHDH-— Radio Piztas Conference 


32 ‘ews: Seu 

EEI— The Y dy ™ eee Lime 
3Z—Spotlight on Schoo 
rAO—Sign OfF 

EI-~Medica) File 


VHDH—News and Weather 


BZ— Alcoholism 
WEZE—Trinity Church 
NAC—Familvy Theater 
DH—Music in the Air 


8: ee ee ae and WEE] News 


NAC— Walter ne 
NBC New 


WEZE— 
9:05—WEEI—Famous , Trials 
WBZ— 


Roman Catholic em 


WEZE—Challence of the H 
9:15—-WNAC—How Christian a 


Senator Symington will be in- | 
terviewed in Washington by a 
panel of newsmen, including 
William H. Lawrence of the New 
'York Times. Stuart Novins 
| moderator of this program, 

ee 


Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, who 
recently ended his 37-year mili- 


of his second term in office 
Army Chief of Staff, will 
guest on NBC-TV’s “Meet the 
Press” Sunday at 6 p.m. on 
Channels 2 and 10. 


aS 


on Channels 2 and 12. a summit conference, 


is 


tary career with the completion | 


be | 


foreign | 
aid, military appropriations, the | 
‘national debt, and current and | 
forthcoming congressional legis- | 
lation, < 

y 


ee 


‘manager of the 
| Transit Authority, will be guest 
on WBZ radio's “Newsmakers: 
(1959” broadcast Monday at 9:30 
p.m. 


Metropolitan 


Hk AA 


Channel 2 will telecast a spe- 
ciay 90-minute, one-man show 


| Edward Dana, retiring general | 


'three-year demonstration state- 

| wide program to establish a. 
‘method of recruiting social 
‘workers, it has just received 
|permission to continue for an- 
other three years. 

Its $15,000 budget is financed 
by trust funds, community 
funds, and contributions from 
agencies, professional organiza- | 
tions, and other interested in- | 
dividuals. 
| - Following a guide worked out 
‘by the National Council on So- 
cial Work Education, the organ- 


correspondent, 


Of Houses’ July 15 


ere to The Christian Science Monitor 
Scituate, Mass. 


One of the attractions in this 
year’s “tour of houses” in this 
South Shore town, July 15, will 
be the residence of famed aue- 
thor and World War I foreign 
Will Irwin, who 
|passed on in 1948. The house is 
located on Second Cliff, near 


Peggotty Beach, where the Men 


of Kent are supposed to have 
landed in 1626. 
In. addition, several restored 


2—They Speuk for 
Themselves 
4—The General Died at 
Dawn; Black Tuesday; 
Mississippi 
5—Jubilee U.S.A. 
7—Edison the Man: Mr. 
D Goes to Town; 
Tale hey Two Cities 
. eS) te and Mabel 
12:30 2;10—Johns Hopkins 
: 5—8 drof Freedom 
1:00 2-—C News Conf. 


5—Scope 

10—Movie = the Week 
1:30 2—Herita 

5—Senator a saltonstall . 

12—Sports Roundup 
1:45 5—Dugout Chatter 
2:00 2—Design Workshop 

5, 12—Red ‘Sox-Yankees 
2:30 2—Eastern Wisdom 
site eb , cng “peered Movie 

: —Open. Hearing 

§9—Oral Roberts ; 
3:30 2—Astronomy for You 
4:00 


| with the Canadian actor Barry 

General Taylor will be inter-| Morse Monday at 9 p.m. Mr. 
viewed by a panel which will in- | Morse, who is currently appear- 
clude Roscoe Drummond of the ing at the Theater on the Green | 
New York Herald Tribune, Rich-|in Wellesley, will present his 
ard Wilson of Cowles Publica-;solo program on the amusing 
tions, and Yates McDaniel of the ,; and sorr wful moments in “The 


lization focuses most of the pro- 
| gram on work in the colleges in 
| the Bay State. 


Cape Cod type houses will be 
‘included in the tour, the pro- 
‘ceeds from which will benefit 
Representatives are sent to the the Scituate League of Women 
colleges to interpret the oppor- | Voters. 
_tunities in social work to voca- Each of the houses will have 
tional counselors, faculty, and at least one distinguishing fea- 
Associated Press. | Actor’s Life.’ | deans, as well as personal inter- ture such as an. old-fashioned 
ee Part 2 of “The Actor’s Life” | views with students and group kitchen with fireplace and bay 
WEZE will broadcast this pro-| will be telecast by Channel 2 discussions with undergraduates. | window, the beehive oven and 
gram Monday night at 10:05. .i Monday, Aug. 3. ‘Supervised volunteer service is’ original hair plaster. 


Heals 
§:30—WEEI—Harriman Reports on Ruse 
wean Trip 
NAC—Donald i y Sarahouss 
WEZ E—NBC Featu 
WBZ—This 1 \ 
10:00—WEEI—World Tonight 
WNAC—FPrank 


12:30—-WEEI—Chas. Collingswood. news 
E—Specia] Features 

12:40—WEEI~—Accent on Musie 

WTAO—Sco 


res. New 
Recent on Musie 
WTAO—Sunday show 
WNAC— Yankee | News 
WEZE—NBC, WEZE Features 
3: 15— WNAG—Radiant Radio 


9:00 4, 10—Janet Blair & John 
Raitt—variety show 

5, 9—Colt .45 

7» 12—Deed of eeey 

5—Tombstone Territory 

7, 12—Alfred Hitchcock 

9—The Hunter 

4, 10—Loretta Young 

5—Citizen, Soldier 

7, 12—Richard Diamond 

9—Curtain Call 


Oe Wie 
BZ — 
LE 


2: Whe Red Sox-Yankees 0 
:05— QO—Sunday Show NA 
3:30—WTAO—Herald of Truth rE ye ee 
3:00—WEEI—CBS News and Analysis WNAC—YN and WNAC News 
WTAO—The Storv Princess HDH—News. Svorte Weather 
WNAC—Yankee News WEZE—Specia) Features 
4—Death Valle 3: mat ea oe on Musie 3Z—Kiplinger 
5, 9—Meet McGraw 3:30—WTAO—Hour of Decis! (tar le 
. on IiDH—Guest Star 
7, 12—What’s My Line 3 5S—WHDH—Sports Extra WNAC Radiant Radio 
10—News—Art Lake 


4:00—WHDH—Boston Ballroom 3Z -—Music for Meditation 
. WEEI—George Herman, CBS News [IZE—E 
10—Tovarich ~ H--News. - Weat 


ham 
06 nO Old-Fashioned Revival H—~ 
05— WEEI—Accent on Music ies aati Weather: 


‘: '30-WTAO—Radio Bible Class 11: 45—WEZE—NBC Peatures 


Monday 


7:00—WEEI—Ed Myers. news | 4: 


od Hour 


7:00—Music of the Baroque 

Eg A Festival of Folk Music, 
8:00-—Evening Concert. 
11:00—Weather: Scores and Encores, 


WBZ-FM, 106.7mc 


$:00—Masterworks of France, 
5:30—Saturdavy Promenade, 
6:05—Dinner Concert. 
7:00—-Concert Favorites. 
8:05—Keyboard Classics. 

9 :00— al —- 
10:05—-Jazz 

il: OO—Dtarlisht Serenade. 


Sunday 


WERS-FM, 88.9mc 
5:00—Matinee Musicale. 
6 00—Pop Concert. 
7:00—Night Music. 
10:30—Recital Halil 
WGBH-FM, 89.7mc 
6:00— Music Tanglewood—Isaac 
Stern, Alexander Zakin, 
piano 
6: 30— Backgrounds. 
7: :00—International Almanac. 
7: :25—News Bulleti 
7:30—Experiments 3 Music — Edgard 
Varese: Three Works. 
8:00—I've Been OSE, 
rial - Jury, 


Paul Nossi- 


10:00—News and Weather: Lecuona: 
k 


La Comparsa; 
ter’s Jazz Noteboo 


: Cortege of Bacchus; Lume 
Polka Concerto. 

I Handel: Ezio: Overture; 
White: La Bella Cubana: Chabrier: 
Fete Polonaise: Waldteufel: Skat- 
ers’ Waltz: Wolf-Ferrari: Minuet 
and Furiana: Tchaikovsky: Eugen . 
Onegin: Entr acte and Waltz; Wage 
ier: Lohengrin: Wedding Music. 

Curtain Time— Fine 


ow. 

9: 30- 99 A Aneayes _ Waltzes and Dances 

e090 e phony. eo. 7. i RE + agg Dancing; Victor Herbert 

aia ornere a uite No. | 
1; Br -t ong See. Concerto No. 2, 10: ae - wr gaan 7 

g tereo op 
i} Candlelight ‘Serenade. Dance Excerpts: Dvorak: 
8; Bec Concert, Hell. yo ea Anderson: 
: vening at Symphony, 

11:00—News: Connoisseurs’ Concert, 11:00—-News. Manfredini: 


1 for two violins: 
WBCN-FM, 188. Imc Fingal's Cave Overture; Britten: 
8:00—University Orga Matinees Musicales; Andre-Bloch; 
8:15—Concert in Miniature, Baliet’ Concerto. 
9:00—Morning Concert. 12:00—News. Luncheon Séeteties—-W = 
12:00—Weather; Sunday Pop near: Lohengrin: Act : Prelude 
1:00—Chamber Music: “a Chaminade: Autumn; ae All the 
2:00—Afternoon Concert. Things You Are; Puccini: Le Villl 
Tragenda: Weill: 3-Penny Opera: 
Finale: Mendelssohn: Midsummer: 
11:00—Weather: Scores and Encores. Nocturne; Templeton-Bodge: Mo- 
WBZ-FM. 106.7mc peed oem Surinach: Danze 
> uza. 
> sa Sl oot a 00— s; Afternoon at Symphony— 
8:05—The Symphony Overture; Halvorsen: 
Suite from Fossegrimen; Locatelli: 
Trauersymphonie. 
2:00—-Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade} 
Haydn: Harpsichord Concerto. 
3:00-—Stravinsky: Jeu de Cartes; 
Gershwin concerto. 
4:00-.Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in CG 
Violin Cone 


11:55—-News, Weather, Sign Off. | 
WCRB-AM, 1330kc; FM, 102.5mc 


7:55—News; Immanuel Baptist, 

8:05—Morning Melodies. 

9:00—News; Curtain Time, 
9:30—Showcase. 

10: $0 Heedlines — Entertainment 


12: we. Stee Luncheon Melodies. 
1:00—News; Afternoon at Symphony. 
3:00—Gershwin: Concerto: Sibelius: | 


! 
Music and Education | 
| 


FM—AM 


Glenn 


11:90 


and 
ane: 


Saturday 


WERS-FM, 88.9mc 
§:00—Matinee Beuatonie; 
6: 00—Pop Concert 

7:00—Saturday Showcase. 

WGBH- , 89.7mc 
§:00—Portraits of Cities. . 
5:25—News Bulletins. 
5:30—International Seminar. 
6:30—Cali From London. 
6:45—Window on the World. - 
7:00—Dimensions in Sound. 
$:00—Take Ten Provinces, 

Fisher. (CBC) 
8:15—-To Be Announced. 
8:25—Music From Tanglewood. 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. 


WBUR-FM, 90.9mc 


§:00—Summer Serenade. 
She ane bes peers Roundup. 
6:15—Orchestral dinner music. , 
Foe A in — Offenbach’ e a aa aot Galle an. 
gg cae” OUSE—VEENDACR 5 | eM Lenin ag of xan Orchestra. 
. ~?_ 11:00—Symposia on Creativity, 
Se eee 12:00—Night Music. 


WXHR.- FM, 96. 9me ° -WBUR-FM, 90.9me 


4:30—Grieg: Holberg Suite ose Ween aperts Rouaduy, 
5:00—News and Weather: 6: 15—Orchestral dinner music. 
7:00—Over the Back Fence, 
7:15—Patterns of Thought. 
7:30—Music by the Masters, | 
8:30—Our American Music. 
9:30—Recital—Isaac Stern, Violinist, 
10:00—-Late News Roundup 
10:05—Sign Off. 


WXHR-FM, 96.9mc 
4:15—Senator Saltonstall 
4:30—The Living Shakespe 
5:00—News and Weatlier: Peet the Folk 
ngers. 


: Bontte No. 18 in E 


Special 
11:10 4, 7—Weather 
11:15 4—Salty O’Rourke; Texas 
Rangers Ride Again 
7—China Seas; Life Be- 
gins with Love 
12—N.E. News, Weather 


© 
and 
00—WHDH—Boston Ballroom - — 
erz 
Classical 


Concerto No, 
Mendelssohn: 


WTAO— The —: Dale Show 


WEZ ack 
WNAC— Yankee WNAC News 
—Dorey and Cain 


9—This Is the Answer hil Christie for de Suze 


2—20th Century Revolu- 
tions 11:20 12—Four Wives 
Christian Scie ‘11:30 5—The Saxon Charm 


§—How | 
Monday 


4—Sign On Seminar §—Roman Catholic Pgm. 
4—Daily Almanac—Farm 9—Frankie Laine 
Report; News; Weather 5, 9—Day in Court 
10—Religious Program 7—For Better Or Worse 
4,10—Today: 5 minute 12—Amos ’n’ And 
news and weather break 4—News—Leo Egan 
at 7:25, 8:25 and 9:25. 12—Mark Stevens 
7—Laurel and Hardy 4,10—Court of Human 
12—-Cartoon Carnival Relations 
12—Storytime—B. Chollar 5, 9—Gale Storm 
12—Romper Room’ 7, 12—House Party 
5 5—Prayer 4—News—Leo Egan 
5—CBS News 4,10—Young Dr. Malone 
5—The Breakfast Show 5, 9—Beat the Clock 1:05—WEEI—Art Linkletter 
7,12—Captain Kangaroo 7, 12—The Big Payoff WEZE—NBC Radio Theater 
5—Mark Stevens ~ : 4,10—From These Roots af: 30—WEEI—Gelen Dr —" 
4—Betty Adams Show— 5,9—Comedy Quiz Show | 12:00—WEEI—George Richards news 
guests: Mrs. Samuel 7, 12—Verdict Is Yours Whe are einen erne 
Goldwyn and Herbert 4,10—Truth or -Conse- | 12:05— 


WEZE—It's Netoore Time 
Berghof, Director of quences: Bob Barker 12: eae ee About Town 
Twelfth Night 


5, 9—American- Bandst’nd } 12: 90—WEET= Romunce of Helen Trent 
5—Romper Room 7,12—The Brighter Day | 12: at ya . Far oe Ma 
7—Morning Star Time 4:15—7, 12—The Secret Storm 12: :45—WEEL—Couple Next news 

10—The Little Circus 4:30 4,10—County Fair 1:00—WTAO—K 

12—-Breakfast Playhouse 7—Topper 
4—Tic Tac Dough 12—The Edge of Night 

10—-Feature Film 5:00 4~—Boston Movie Time: 
5—For Women Only Raiders of the 7 Seas 
4—Dough Re Mi 7—Bad Little Angel 
5—Morning Headlines 10—The Early Show 
7—My Little Margie 12—Superman 
§9—Stop, Look, Listen 5:30 5,12—Mickey Mouse 
5—Mark Stevens Kartoon Karnival 
5—We Believe 6:00 5—Dateline Boston — 

12—-Dave Mohr, News Chamber of Commerce 

12—Mark Stevens 12—Salty Brine’s Shack 
4—-Treasure Hunt 6:15 2—A Number of Things 
5—Morning Playhouse 


10—News and Weather 
7, 12—Sam Levenson; gsts; 6:30 2—Louis M. Lyons, News 
4, 10—Price Is Right 


5—Life of Riley 
5—Beulah—comedy 7—Woody Woodpecker 
7,12—I Love Lucy 9, 12—News, Spts, Wther., 
4, 10——Concentration 10—The Real MeCoys 
5—Stu Erwin Show 


6:45 a 
7,12—Top Dollar—quiz acdonald, news 
4—News and Weather 9—Feature Film 
5, 9—~Across the Board 12—-Douglas Edwards 
7,12—Love of Life — 4—Don Kent, Weather 
10——-Tic Tac Dough 2—Capitol Hill Report 
12:15 4—Big Brother 4—Whirlybirds 
12:30 5—N.E. Farm-Food Pgm. 5—Huntley-Brinkley 
7,12—Search for Tom’w 7—Walter Winchell File 
9.—Liberace | 10—-Death Valley Days 
10—It Could Be You 12—Harbor Command 
12:45 7, 12—Guiding Light 15 2—High School Algebra 
12:55 5—Mark Stevens “~~ §—John Day: news, spts. 
1:00 4—Hollywood Play- 5—Weatherman 
w= Case of the 4—Buckskin 
y Legs 5—Walt Disney Presents 
0—Ozzie 


1 arriet 

7, 12—Name That Tune 
2—Hemo the = any oa 
‘, 10—Th un 


e Restless G 
7, 12—The Texan 

9—Star Performance 

4,10—Wells Fargo 


5:45—WTAO—Ed Penney Show 

5: re ee Today 

€:00—WEEI Raion’ poe WEE! N 

—Ralp orse, T Ww 

WTAO—News and Traff ons 

WNAC—YN and WNAC | News 

WHDH—John Davy. ne 

6:05—-WBZ—Dave oonen 
WTAO—Ed Penney Show 
WEZE—Music in the Air 

6: 1S WERE Fred Cusick: 


Rad 
7 :30—WEEI—Georne Richards. news 


with John 
WHDH—Breakfast Extra 


From 
violin, 


The Piano 


6:00—-Music from Other Lands. 
8:00—Evening Concert. 


H—Boston Ballroom 
6:40—WTAO—Arthur Van — 
6: ee et Thoma 


Roman Catholic Pem, 


Hour, 
9:30—Woodwind Ensemble. 
10:05—Podium ne agra 
10:30-—Organ Recita 
11:00—Starlight Berenade: 


Monday 


WERS-FM, 88.9mc 
5.00—Matinee Musicale, Serenade; 


‘to a Clique in B fi 
6 :00-— Pop weneer’. Saint-Saéns: Introduction 


Rondo Capriccioso; Auber: 
-avolo: Overture: Krenek: 
Marches; Grainger: 
Air: Goyescas: Intermezzo. 
6:00-——News:. Candlelight Serenade — 
Love Scene—Elmer Bernstein: Mule 
sic for Relaxation, Melachrino, 
7:00—News: Stereo Parade. 


The Breakfast Club 

WNAC—YN. WNAC News 
§:15—WNAC—Radiant Radio 

9:35—W HDH— 

10:00—Ww TAO— 
war 


Beethoven: 
Symphony No. 3 in E fiat. 
6:00—-News and Weather; ‘‘Panorama.”’ 
7:00—Scariatti: Sonatas for Harpsi- 
chord: Beethoven: Quartet No. 7, 


WXHR Opera 
ameron, nar- 
rator—Wagner: Tannhaeuser. 
11:00-—News Octet for 

Strings. 
11:55—News, Weather. Sign Off. 


WCRB-AM, 1330kc; FM, 102.5mc 


1:00—News: Afternoon at Symphony. 
5:00—-News; Oberiin College Players— 


minor; Mendelssohn: 
. 
BZ—News: Alan Dary Show 
10 08—WEFIC. Q. Lewis for Godfrey 
WEZE— fai 


Commuters" Concert 
b 


Op. 59 No. 1. 
if 00—WNAC—Yankee Network News 8:00—News and Weather; 
Presentation. John C 


EM, 89.7mc 

5:00 —New Recordings. 
6:15—The Once and FPuture King. 
6:45— Louis M. Lyons, News. 
7:00—Backgrounds 
7:15—Casals Festival, Program to tn- | 

clude works of Brahms, Beethoven, 8:00—News; Evening at Sympbony— 

and Mozart. Soloists: Pablo Casals, | Lisztc. Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4; 

cello; Mieczyslaw— Horszowski_and | Bach: Ch seonne; Albeniz,_Suri- 

Jesus aria Sanroma. piano: | nach: Iber 

Budapest String Quartet; Harry | 9:00—Mozart:. Adazio & Fugue in. @ 

Schumann, oboe; John ‘Barrows | minor; Brahms: Symphony No, i 

and James. Buffington, horns; Fes- | in C minor. 

tival Chamber Orchestra and Fes-  10:00-—Roussel: The Spider's 

tival ‘ Orchestra. Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake: 

Puerto Rico, 11:00-—-News;: 
10:30—Louis M. Lyons. Clair: Sonata for Violin, continuo; 
10:45—Backgrounds. Lalo: Violin Sonata; Rachmanine 
11:00—Music of Italy. Yerd!, Arias from off: Variations on a theme by 

La Traviata, Rigoletto, Ballo en Chopin. 

Maschera, Falstaff. and Otello. 
11:30—New England Notebook. 
11¢35—New Recordings. 

WBUR-FM, 90.9mc 

§:00—Summer Serenade. 


6:00—News: Sports Roundup. 
oe meagre dinner music. 
7 


Londonderry 
and Weather; 


WEZE— Morgan Beatty 
7:35—WEEI—Andy Griffith Show 


6: i 

6: 1? irwin. — a 
Christian Seenee 
at the ne 

6:30—'‘‘Panora 

7:00-—Bach: Be Acie Concerto No. 
5: Hovhaness:. The Mysterious 


Mountain. 
-News and Weather: R. Strauss: 
“Peuersnot’ '—love scene; Dvorak: 


WEEI New 
8: ‘05—WEEI— Accent on “iiasis 
Z—Dick Tucker 
WEED te. Rion 
8:15—-WBZ—Washington Report 
8:15--WTAO—Sign Off 
: WE E_NBC Features 
WBZ—PM Phone 
~The Fashion Whirl 
\C—Radiant Radio 
_—BoOb Nelson: Open Line 
Newsmakers. ‘59 
EEl—The World Tonight 
A aaah 


WBZ—N 

WEZE— Meet the Press 
VBZ—Dave Mavnard 

sh hal te She ) waren 


editor of The 
Monitor, looks 


: Keyboard Encores. 
8:20—News:. Boston igre Orch. 
Berkshire Festival Concer 
11:00-—-News: Connoisseurs’ Teneaet, 


WBCN-FM, 104.1mc 
1:00—-Chamber Music. 
2:00—The Opera, with John emtamaced 
Rossini, L'Italiana in Algeri 
5:00 “Chamber Cycle, 
6:00—Music of the Theater. 


Feast: 
Excerpts, 
Connoisseurs’ Concert——Lee 


9:30 


9:45 
10:00 


WNAC—YN and WNAC News 
+E 0G WERT Whispering Streets 


' (Recorded in 
WEEI—Ma Perkin 
WNAC— 


‘Romance for Violin 


and Orchestra No. 2: Delius: Paris 


ng of a City; Dvorak: Scherzo 
Cappriccioso. 


" Dialer’s Guide: Sunday 


9:30 a.m.—Dimension: Freedoms Foundation Award—Ch, 4. 
11:30—Camera 3: Role of Instrumental Musician—Ch., 2, 5, 12.. 
12:15—World News Analysis; Blair Clark, host—WEEL. 

1:00—Scope: Massachusetts State Budget—Ch, 5. 

1:00—College News Conference; Paul Butler—Ch. 2. 

1:30—Sen. Saltonstall—Ch. 5; WXHR-FM, 4:15: WTAO, 6:30. 

2:00—Red Sox-New York Yankees—Ch. 5, 12; WHDH, 1:55. 

5:00—Report on Russia: The Harriman Trip to Russia—Ch. 

12; WEEI, 9:30. 
5:00—Starring the Editors: Erwin D. Canham, editor, The 
Christian Science Monitor—Ch, 4, 

5:00—Rhode Island’s farm women; new series—Ch. 10. 

5:30—Face the Nation: Senator Symington—Ch. 2, 12. 

5:30—Suspense: Eye Witness, original drama by William N. 

Robson, starring John Lund—WEEI. 

6:00—Conquest: The Origin of Weather—Ch, 12. 

6:00—Meet the Press: Gen. M. D. Taylor—Ch. 2, 10. 

6:15—Erwin D. Canham—WXHR-FM; WTAO; WEZE, 11:30. 9:00. Che wleal Recordings. 

6:30—20th Century: Nuremberg Trials—Ch. 12. 8: pag Teeordla 3 Operiin Po 

TOO E Concert OOS Be ve ake WORB-AMTDE, | 120 tate gage ustieore 

n wor y ydn an . 
8:00—Radio Press Conference: Dr. Rufo Lopez Fresquet, Fidel ers A, Chopin 
Castro’s Minister of Finance—WHDH. Nouvelles; 
8:30—World Theater: Oberlin College Gilbert & Sullivan Play- 
ers present Trial by Jury—WGBH-FM 
5:00—GE PTheater Repeats: Deed Ronald 
Reagan, Carol Lynley, Agnes Moorehead—Ch. 7, 12. 
10:45—Dangers of Apathy Series; Maj. Edgar Bundy, General 
Chairman, National Laymen’s Council Church League of 
_ America, talks on Soviet Exhibition, New York—WNAC. | 


WBCN-FM, 104.1me 


‘00—Concert in Miniature: Part f. 
Weather: Concert in Miniature 
~-Weather; Concert in oo ila 
' Morning Con 
; Srenewense "Garintiin 
2: '00-—Request 


Srenvasi with Nirmal 
3 | Dan 


ae tenis Pops 

6:00-——Music of the eater 

j oo Comments. 
p.m, 


7:15—New Releases 

8:00— Boston Symphony Orchestra—Ré@e 
broadcast of Tanglewood Concert 

10:00—To Be Announced 

10:30--Piano Recital 

11:10—Weather 

11:15—Scores and Encores 


WBZ-FM, 106.7 me 


§:05—Hi-Fi Matinee — Gould: 
American Symphony; 
My Heart at Thy Voice: 
Debussy: Iberia: Mascagn!: L’ Amico 
Fritz: Intermezzo, Act Ill. 


6:05—Dinner rere 


WHDH—Red Sox- Yankees 
2: :05—~WEEI—Ri ht to Happin 
waz, a H pe ess 


10:10 
10:15 


10:25 
10:30 


am 
en ae Fortescue 
O—Ed Penney Show 
WNACYannen Network News 
3:05-—WEEI—Housewives Protective 


eague 
a: 10 WEec-Rediant Radio 
WEEI—Beantown Matines 
3: 1. WED eee Extra 


:00—Poetry and the American. 
:'30—Music by the Masters — Bach: 
Brandenburg. Concerto No. 4 in 

major: Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in 


E minor 
8: meg My World of Music with Jules 


Arias — H plests from 
A Masked Ball, with Zinka 


anne. d 
the Metropolitan Opera 
Grehestre. Dimitri Mitropoulos con- 


ducting 
10: 00—Late. News Roundup. 


10:06—8i 
HR- FM, 96.9me 
4:30—Ravel: Mother Goose Suite 
§:00—News and Weather: Weber: “Over- 
ture to Oberon: Ha ‘dn: Oboe Con- 
certo;: Smetana: om Bohemia's 
Meadows and Forests. 
6:00—News, Weather and Stock Sum- 
mary: ““Panorama’’—including a _re- 
vere = the news with John Daly 


AC—YN and WNAC N 
11: :1S—-WEET—Can Moore Remembers 


he _— 
dio 


WN Re- 
11: 1 


I—Musiec ‘ti 


11:00 —Midnight 


[Dawn "s Club 


5—Bold Journey 

7, 12—Father Knows Best 1 

9—The Name’s the Game 

2—An Actor’s Life 

4,10—Peter Gunn 

5—Secret Agent 7 

7, 12—Frontier Justice 

9—Sword of Freedom 

4,10—High Class Type 
of. Mongrel 

5—77 Sunset Stri 

7, 12—Jos. Cotten Bictas 


Winner’s Circle 


11:30 0—The Ghost Comes 


= 


12:00 


Home 
11:30 4—Footsteps in the Dark; 
Woman in the Wind 


55 


6: 
7:00 


Vermont National Guard 
To Hold State Muster 


Spectal to The Christian Science Monitor 
Burlington, Va. 

All 3,600 members of the Ver- 
mont National Guard, under 
Maj. Gen, Francis W. Billado, 
rae utant general for Vermont, 

gather here at the Univer- 
sity of Vermont for a parade, 
which will also include the 
Champlain 350th Anniversary 
Float, tomorrow, July 12, 

A color guard ‘made up of two 
Army and two Air National 
| Guardsmen, will be dressed like 
| the Green Mountain Boys who 

‘marched with Gen. Ethan fie. 


7:00-——-Showtim 
7:30—Coneert. Favorites — ~ Offenbach; 


4 
Market: 
Pp and Circumstance 


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Burana fi . Handel: Concerto ye = 


von ae Roe Seen: aoe 


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‘l ie hag , Elude-Caprices, Op. 
il “eae erlion: Royal 


10:00 
10:30 


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7’ 12-—-Desilu Playhouse 


2—News: Ro peu 
Bo mga 
‘ar —mystery 
0—P: "s Court 
4, 5, 7, 10, 12—News . 
ores 10, 12—Weather 
7, 10, eather 
‘fenates Saltonstall 
1The Nuisance Paar one 
_, = The 


= ape the News, 
Ye 


hi on 162.5me 


11:00 


11:10 
11:15 


WCRB-AM, ae 
71:00—News. Anderson: Fiddie-PFaddle; 


Geiger Beets 


Belles 
7:30—News. : Hungarian Dance 


4:30 5—Susie—Ann Sothern 
i. 12—As the World Turns 


8:30 


: | 


0 


Education 


THE CHRISTIAN 


SCIENCE MONITOR. BOSTON, 


SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


Education 


How Robert College Serves Turkey 


Quick English Opens Way 


By Louise 


K. Eberly 


Special to The Christian Sctence Monitor 


Istanbul 
Despite wars and_ revolution, 
the oldest American. college 
abroad has continued since 1863 
to educate the youth of Turkey. 


New ideas in education. caused 
Robert College to be founded. 
Today new ideas continue to 
guide the College as it seeks to 
give Turkish youth the educa- 
tion which will most benefit 
their aspiring country. 

This pioneering spirit is em- 
bodied in the College’s new 
language laboratory, one of the 
first in Turkey. Here students 
with earphones listen raptly to 
tape recordings and then reply 
into microphones at their desks. 
The use of mechanical equip- 
ment as an aid in foreign lan- 
guage study is part of the Col- 
lege’s new “linguistic method,” 
which has recently received a 
Ford Foundation grant. 
gram’'s_ director, Dr. Sheldon 
Wise, is a tall, energetic young 
American linguist. 

Dr. Wise explained in a recent 


interview that since most of the | 


courses at Robert College are 
taught in English, students must 
be fiuent in English. For this 
reason, many boys first attend 
the College’s own preparatory 
school, Robert Academy. Others 
prepare at Turkish high se¢hools 
or at private schools where 
much of the instruction is in 
English. 
For 80 Such Students 

But there are always young 
people who would do well at 
Robert College if only they 
could be taught English in a 
hurry. This past year 


guage Division for 80 such stu- 
dents. Their course will be the 
most concentrated ever held at 
Robert College and if they are 
successful they will go on tothe 
Engineering College, the College 
of Sciences and Modern Lan- 
guages, or the Business Admin- 
istration College. 

What are these students like 
who aspire to learn English in 
one vear of highly concentrated 
study? Why are they willing to 
work six days a week in the 
extra-long school year and to 


spend their summer writing and 

studying specialized material in 

the field they hope to study? 
On the average, they are older 


The pro- | 


the | 
College set up the English Lan- | 


| than a usual freshman college 
class, Dr, Wise said. Some are 
‘just out of high ‘school but 
others are Turkish Army offi- 
cers. Age may be one reason for 
the seriousness of these students, 
five of whom are women. A 
more compelling reason is prob- 
ably the fact that well over half 
of the students are on full, five- 
year scholarships. The Turkish 
Government, the Fulbright Com- 
mission, local banks, a cotton 
cooperative, the Chamber of In- 
dustries, and Robert College | 
itself are placing in these stu- 
dents their hopes for Turkey’s 


| 


future. Over half of the students | 


wish to become engineers. 


While most of the students are | 


‘Turkish, there are some Greeks 
and even a boy from Somali- 
land. Some have never studied 
English. Others have 
many as nine years, 
still far from, fluent. How well 
they do will depend not so much 


had as'| 


| 


| 
| 


| 


but are | 


on their previous English, as on | 


their intelligence, eagerness, and 
receptivity. 
Also Learn the Whys 

In order to master English 
rapidly, the students spend 21 
hours each week in the class- 
rooms and seven in the lab. In 
class the students use textbooks 
prepared by Dr. Wise and his 
colleagues and by the American 
Council of Learned Societies, 
|under a United States State De- 
partment project for writing 
spoken English »texts. Through 
explanations of grammar and 
discussion of their reading they 
learn the “whys” of English. 

Dr. Wise pointed out that the 
staff’s practice of speaking at a 
normal conversational pace be- 
gan with the very first day. 
Since passive understanding 
always outstrips more, active 
command of a language, the 
students understand most of 
‘what their teachers say. What 
they say themselves in class may 
not be as complicated, but they 
say it quickly and unhesitat- 
ingly. 

Once the students sit down 
in their individual soundproof 
booths in the lab, they have a 
full hour of concentrated listen- 
ing and speaking. Advanced 
students can be given enriched 
work and slower ones more drill 
and review. This is one of the 


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Turkish student in the lan- 
guage laboratory, Robert Col- 
lege, Istanbul, 


advantages of the language lab- 
oratory. No teacher could hope 
to supply this much individual 
attention in the ordinary class- 
room. 

Much of the lab work is 
grammar drill. The tape will ask 
the student to give, for instance, 
pronouns for all the nouns in a 
set of sentences. After each sen- 
tence there will be a pause in 
order that the student’s response 
can be recorded. Then the tape 
gives the correct answer. This 
immediate correction nips bad 
habits in the bud. Knowing he 
will be rewarded immediately 
with the correct 
hold the student’s attention. 


Another advantage of this 
machine that never gets tired 
is its willingness to repeat for 
hours, never losing patience and 
never varying its inflections. It 
will go over and over a certain 
point of grammar until nothing 
but the correct form sounds 
right. Thus the student goes 
quickly and easily from passive 
understanding to active 
application, , 

From the student’s point of 
view one of the advantages of 
the lab is that only he and the 
teacher hear his mistakes. The 
usual embarrassment which hin- 
ders much classroom learning 
disappears. 


Speaks Six 


It interesting to learn 


was 


that Dr. Wise’s first contact with 


a- foreign language was in his 


8th-grade French course, where 


undergraduate work 


! 
i 


| 


can’t.” 
' makes 


he discovered .that 


languages 

Now he 
speaks six. In the midst of his 
at Yale 


University, Dr. Wise went to 


work for the Signal Intelligence | 


Service breaking German’ code. 
In 1952 he coauthored for the 
U.S. State Department an Eng- 
lish textbook for Yugoslavia. 
After receiving his doctorate the 
following year, he taught for 


At Friendship Day Camp 


By Jill Beaumont 
Spectal to The Christian Science Monitor 
Los Angeles 
If you should happen on a 


‘omine parents of children rec- 
ommended. 


Those whose parents cannot 
group of children singing Yid- afford the tuition fee of $75 for 


dish folk songs in Los Angeles’ | each of the two four-week sum- 
Griffith Park this summer don’t| mer terms receive partial or full 
assume that the youngsters are | scholarships. This insures vari- 
all necessarily Jewish. ety of economic baéKgrounds, 
Seine ane ae. in| since the camp includes offspring 

a are you wou of wealthy and of world-famous 
ter these might be the bigys | DBTEH. 

e YS | S - . " 

and girls of Friendship Day| urveys show that 65 per cent 


C : ; ” | of the boys and girls have never 
amp, a unique private experi- | known others from a widely dif- 
ment in cultural pluralism which | ferent environment. 


opened its seventh season-here| a; first. fear of the unfamil- 
ve age send If . torlanna re iar, reflected as dislike, may 

xicans, Urientals, N€~ | chow in reluctance to touch, even 
groes, Jews, Caucasians. And 0n | casually in games, hands be- 
other occasions they might be | longing to those of another race. 
learning a Chinese dance from! But somehow the games and 
Mamie Chung, listening t0| crafts and other camp activities 


answer helps | 


oral | 


eR legends by Senora Con-| <-heduled seem to require such 
suelo Castillo de Bonzo, or sing- physical contact, and before long 
pt a.Negro folk song with Ni-| 4 youngster discovers that his 
|gerian movie actor Ukonu or repugnance has vanished. 


with Harry Belafonte, ‘ +. 
Superiority’ Vanishes 
| Realization that even desegre= | 
One morning a group got to 


| gated schools do not automati-| .. 
cally offer children opportunity discussing skin color. Some 
to know others of different ori- 
gins and background troubled 
some Los Angeles community 
leaders a few years ago. They 
saw that school boundaries, be- | 
ing geographical, usually en-/| 
| compass areas fairly similar eco- 
nomically, socially, and eth- 
nically. To provide intercultural 
experience Friendship Day 
Camp was founded, in 1953. 
Balance Sought 
Applicants are screened by 
trained case workers,’ selected | 
with an eye to cultural balance 
of the 150 campers each term. 
If .it becomes apparent that an 
insufficient number of, say, Jap- | 
fanese children have _ enrolled 
then Ezra Weintraub, adminis- 
trative officer, goes down to 
“Little Tokyo,” confers with 
leaders in that area, _and inter- 


had, or used to have, 


'found a sheet of paper and held 
it up. 

“This paper is white,” he said. 
“Let’s match our skins against 
eg 

“Why,” one of them exclaimed, 
“we are all colored!” 

A young Jewish boy felt su- 


But a slight aécident on a hike 
proved that man’s extremity is 
God’s opportunity. The boy had 
to be carried back to camp. Dur- 
ing this trip he learned to know, 
and thus to appreciate, the two 
who formed a seat for him with 
their &4rms. One happened to be 
Mexican, the other Negro. 
Then there was the little girl 
who had shown great dislike for 
a Chinese child new in ‘her 


- Intercultural Experience 


of | 
the children confessed that they | 
prejudice | 
about.this. The young counselor | 


Fred Wm. Carter 


Groups at Friendship Day Camp are kept ! 
small so that skills may more easily be taught | 


neighborhood. Her 
rolled her so that 
Day Camp would change her. at- 


mother en- 


' titude. 


perior to other minority groups. | 


The solution? 
Attitude Changed 
She was assigned to a group 
that had a Chinese counselor. 
In just two weeks daily contact 


Friendship / 


two Japancse-Americans, two 
Mexican-Americans, and one 
Anglo-Saxon. Each, assisted by 
a junior counselor, is in charge 


of a small mixed group number- 
| ing from seven to 10 in the same 


with this fine person reversed | 


the child’ e~attitude. 


this summer, most 
teachers or social 
clude four Negroes, 


of them 
workers, in- 
four Jews, 


Person-to-Person Talk Is Stressed 


By Millicent Taylor More 


‘educational developments. 
progressive teachers, however, 
have used informal language 
laboratory methods increasingly 
in recent years. The tape re- 
corder is in ‘constant use in 
many a school that has not a 
formal language laboratory. 
Phonograph records have been 
aiding in authentic pronuncia- 
tion for quite some time. Even 
years ago separate rooms for 
listening to language records 
were supplied in many institu- 
tions, 


Education Editor of 
The Christian Science Monitor 
The heartening increase in| 
the number of language labora- 
tories in American schools and 
colleges is one more indication 
‘of the progress being made in 
teaching foreign languages to 
students at all levels. For one 


Through an Editor's Window 


thing, it shows the emphasis on 
“communication” in language 
teaching. Students today want 
to -converse with others. They 
learn to read and write the 
language, yes, but they most of 
all wish to communicate person- 
to-person. : 


Language laboratories, 
their equipment of individual 
booths, tape recordings, ear- 


On the Increase 


But today the full-fledged 
language laboratory is definitely 
a part of much modern language 
teaching in American _ schools 
and is on the up-grade. It in- 
cludes individual booths, equip- 
ped for hearing and~for making 
discs and tapes, for viewing 
Slides and films; a control room 
phones, and other means for;from which language material 
hearing and practicing a modern|can be broadcast to an entire 
language, are comparatively newiclass or into classrooms else- 


with 


two years in Indonesia for the | 


Ford Foundation. 

While it clear that 
Wise is 
guage laboratory, 


is 


he is quick 


. Dr. 
excited with his lan-| 


to explain that the lab is only | 


part of the English Language 
Division. “I know Americans 


love gadgets and like to believe | 


that almost anything 
done with them, but 


can be! 
we don’t | 


believe a machine alone can) 


student can 


'teach a language. Of course, the | | 


|exceptional teach | 


himself a language with just a) 


| book, but the average student 


the 
fruitful 


teacher’s e efforts 


more and 


A language lab, he felt, | 


language | 


learning more efficient and in-|§ 


teresting. 
Although it 


draw statistical conclusions, it 


is too early to 


is clear in talking to the stu-| 


dents that they 


understand a, 


great deal. They do not stammer | 
out their English*ds though re- | 
membering and applying a rule. | 
The oral approach to learning | 
a new language is:an active ex- | 


‘ 


iday there are between 15,000 | 
and 18,000 working in communi-| 


| 


| 


Box S$, Carisbad, Celifornie 


MILITARY 


MT. LOWE wiutitary 


perience for them and almost 


as much fun as a baby finds it. | ee 
With English rapidly replac- | 
ing French as the second lan-| : 
it is good to |: 
know that Robert College is still |{ 


guage of Turkey, 


pioneering in its efforts to bene- 
fit the people of Turkey. 


Citizen-Support: Grows 


Only 17 citizens’ 
provement committees 
in the United States in 1949. To- 


ties across the land to improve 
their schools. 


school im-'| 
existed | 


Rollie McKenna, from Vassar College 


Section of the language laboratories at Vassar College in the 
new Chicago Hall, which houses the departments of French, 
German, Italian, Spanish, and Russian, each with its language 
center of library, classrooms, and conversation lounge. The 
| laboratories serve all the language departments, both for class- 


| 


that survey, 
| laboratories 


where in the building; a faculty 
recording cubicle suite. 
According to a U.S. Office of 
Education survey, foreign lan- 
guage laboratories are in 240 
colleges and universities in 41 
states, the District of Columbia 
Hawail, 
64 secondary schools. 
secondary schools, 46 are public 
high schools, 15 are _ private 
schools, and three are university 
demonstration schools. Since 
1957-58, additional 
have been com- 


‘pleted and are in operation at 


' 
i 


, the 
| served 
each 

| Kikongo, Mano, Tiv, 
‘ish. In 21 laboratories English as 


both levels. 


These laboratories are used 


age-bracket. Campers 
from seven to 12 years, 
separate camp for 
between 12 and 15. 


range 
with a 
teen-agers 

Campers 


| may attend either or both terms. 

For the counselor ‘staff itself | 
offers adult examples of success- | 
ful integration. Senior counselors | 


iage. They 


| 


and Puerto Rico, and in. 
Of the! 


Guest Performers 

Appreciation of other cultures 
is further stimulated by guest 
performers. of various races. 
These don’t make any speeches 
about their rich cultural herit- 
don’t. have to. When 
the program is over they have 
accomplished two missions, By 
their songs, dances or whatever 
makes up their performance 
they have € demonstrated at least 


season worn openly, 


and so that children of various cultures may 
become better acquainted, 


one aspect of their native cule 
ture. 

And at the end, 
entire camp into the _ singing, 
dancing, or story telling, they 
have afforded each child partici- 
pation in that culture and thus 
personal identification with it. 

Another result of these care- 
fully planned entertainments is 
the gratification a camper de- 
rives from seeing others learn 
appreciation of his own back- 
ground. When lovely Senora 
Castillo de Bonzo, fer instance, 
appeared and spoke in Spanish, 
she asked one of the Mexican 
boys to translate. No longer feel- 
ing like a second-class citizen he 
beamed with pride in his an- 
cestry. And, counselors say, 
many a Star of David, hidden 
under a shirt at the beginning 
of camp, is at the end of the 
proudly. 


drawing the 


EDUCATION 


Coeducational 


ONTRESOR 


Leesburg, Virginia 


most widely for French, Spanish, | 


German, Russian, and Italian. 
However, the survey brings out 
that during the school year 1957- 
58 a total of 40 different lan- 
guages was being served by 
laboratories. 

French leads the list in 219 
laboratories, and Spanish is sec- 
ond in 211. Russian at that time 


| was being taught in 60 but is in 


many more this year. Some of 
languages and_ dialects 
in only one laboratory 
are: Hakka, Icelandic, 
and Turk- 
language is 


a foreign being 


taught to non- -English-speaking | 


students. 
You Can Get the Booklet 
“Foreign Language 


‘tories in Schools and Colleges,” 


is the re-| 


illustrated with photo- | 
diagrams, and maps, 
a complete — list. of) 


‘laboratories, their locations and 
‘the languages served by them, 
-and also valuable data on organ- | 
izing, building, and administrat-| 
‘ing a foreign language labora-| 
tory in a school or college. 


A bibliography of 


Labora- | 


‘by. Marjorie C. Johnston and | 
|Catharine C. Seerley, 
|port of the survey. This 86-page 
‘booklet, 
| graphs, 
| contains 


further | 


'references, a discussion of tech- | 


‘costs, plans, and a 


cation, 


fee | Education, 


niques, evaluation of. methods, 


to future uses complete this 


*\stimulating and useful booklet. 
-™\ It is Bulletin 1959, No. 3, of the) 

U.S. Department of Health, Edu- | 
Office of. 
and may be pur-| 
'chased from the Superintendent. 


and Welfare, 


“look-ahead” | 


.of Documents, U.S. Government. 
| Printing Office, Washington 25, 


|Dc. 


| 
| 


for 35 cents. 


_ Finish High School First | 


Industry needs one engineer | 
and five highly trained techni- 


cians for every 40 workers—| 


who must be well-trained them- 
“selves. Engineers, technicians, 
and trained workers all need a/ 


Child’ s 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 
This is his garden—never mind, if rows 
May tend to waver slightly here and there— 
This is the plot that has his loving care, 
His is the pride that every farmer knows. 


Of faith and patience he has had no lack 
Since thoughtfully he planted every seed— 
And if, exuberant to route each weed, 

He pulled a seedling up, he thrust it back. 


And now, fruition! With a look of bliss, 


Garden 


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Sea Pines 


DEPENDABLE INFORMATION 
 —s oon SCHOOLS 
will be found in advertisements on 

the Seturdey Educetion Page. 


GRADES 1-9 
Preparation for best ‘secondary schools. 
y tome lite. Year-round care =, 
Tuition $1500. 


Ali 
| - Address: Feith Bickford 
Box M, East Brewster, Mess. 


Attend Christian Science Pars Schoo! 


LEE AVERY 


Architecture Student Builders 


As part of their training, sec- 
ond-year students in architec- 
ture at Melbourne University 


are taking a “compulsory” 
building course, said to be the 
first of its kind in any school of 
architecture, . 

On a 40-aere uncleared site at 
a coastal holiday resort, the stu- 
dent architects are building a 
housing settlement with their 
own hands. Atcording to Pro- 
fessor Brian’ Lewis, who initi- 
ated the scheme, students need a 


“working knowledge of trades 


methods” to be able to recognize 
good craftsmanship in different 
building trades. 

Each year’s class will build 
one house and, as the project has 


. 
° ; 
’ 


5 


cf Architecture will probably let 
the houses when they are fin- 
ished. 

Among the first group of stu- 
dents who started work clearing 
the site recently were three 
young women, who will work 
along side the men on all the 
various jobs involved. Women 
need a knowledge of carpentry, 
painting, masonry, and other 
building trades just as much as 
‘men, Professor Lewis claims. In 
this respect the course fulfills a 
special need, since male students 
can get jobs. as builders’ laborers 
in the vacations to acquire prac- 
tical knowledge, while this is 


impossible for women. 
) (UNESCO) 


to be self-supporting, the School | 


"The Conditions for Scientific Creativity in Contemporary Society” 


Chairman: 


PROFESSOR WILLIAM Y. ELLIOTT, Director, Harvard Summer School 
Keynote Add 


DR. 


. 


Chairman: 


ress: 


Panel Members: 


DR. JAMES A. pera Seater National Institutes of Health, Deseriment of Health, 


Education 


, and Welf 


J. BRONOWSKI, Director, Coal Research Establishment, National Coal Board, England 
Tuesday, July 21 
"Creativity in Various Settings” 


DR. NORMAN RAMSEY, Professor of Physics, Harvard University 


3 EMMANUEL R. PIORE, Director of Research, International Business Machines Corp. 
H. B. G. CASIMIR, Director, Philips Research Laboratories, The Netherlands 


8:30 P. M. 


Sanders Theatre, Memorial Hall 
| Open to the public 


CUSHING 


Unusual a rey |S Fete mang 
in this fine old New England 

tional academy. 84th year. ~~ MY emul. 
ment. Expert adult guidance, Coitmtry 
yo ggrmen 60 miles northwest of Seston, 
AS 


Box 30, 


et sh day 
> , . on fetietienls 


Ashburnhem, Mess. 


Australia 
Coeducational 


Litchfield, Co Conn. 


FORNACHON, HALL 


BOARDING AND oo Atige te gees 


: 5 days a week 
a rs Ne 12. 


eu . 
York Cli asin pear hour ‘pus trip from New 
or y 
Loul Core, Fab 8, B.S. Pd.8., Principal 


el. OLiver 2-1 


bth 


A 


So Busiacse—Nesoarch 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, 


SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959: 


Industry—Finance ] 


is i S. Firm’s Engineers Provide Nucleus for Ove rseas Projects 
Marketing Called Key in East-West Tilt jae a 


By Everett M. Smith 
Assistant City Editor of The Christian Science Monitor 


Boston 

The United States, today, 
must quadruple its marketing 
efforts and skills if it is to sur- 
vive in the rapidly growing eco- | 
nomic war with the Soviet Un- 
ion, according to Emerson Foote | 
of New York City, senior vice- 


president .of the worldwide ad- | 


vertising firm of McCann-Erick- | 
son Company, 

Addressing a six-day seminar | 
on top management prob- 
lems of marketing, sponsored 


by the Advertising Federaiton | 


of America at the -Harvard 
Graduate school of Business 
Administration, Mr. Foote 
placed particular emphasis on 
the importance of marketing to 
national economic survival, 


The seminar—attended by 54 
top executives of advertising 
firms, agencies, and media from 
various parts of the country— 
is dedicated to permitting these 
management executives to place 
themselves in the roles of senior 
marketing officials, and to study 
the various problems at that 
level. rather than from. their 
own viewpoints. 

Soviet Show Appraised 


Pinpointing what he described | 
as “the grim and inescapable 
fact that, for a nation nearly 
one-fifth larger if population | 
than ours,. industrial output in 
the Soviet Union is roughly one- 
third as great as in this coun- 
try,’ Mr. Foote said that there | 


| seems to be every urge to com- | 


'placency when one even thinks _ 
| about an economic war between | 
the two countries. 

| This view is aptly stated, he 
continued, by Max Frankel, cor- 
respondent of. the New ‘York 
Times, who described the cur- 
‘rent Soviet exhibition at the | 
‘New York Coliseum as “the| 
stuff of Soviet. wishful dreams.” 


that Mr. Frankel had regarded | 
the exhibition as projecting “a 
glistening Soviet future,” but | 
that it also “strains some facts 
of Soviet reality, The exposition 


clearly seeks to project an im- 


age of the Soviet Union as a 
modern industrial society on the 
eve of wholesale automation,” 
Mr. Frankel had added. 


(intercontinental ballistic mis- 
siles),”’ Mr. Foote asserted. “but 
they are so far behind us in 


providing consumer goods that. 


/any present comparison is awk- 
ward and pointless.” 
Rate Considered 
He then went on to point out 


to the.seminar attendants that | 


there is, after all, another side 
to the matter. It is not alto- 
gether where we are,” he said, 
“but where we will be in the | 
'future—and at what rate we 
will grow.” 


This reference to the “rate of | 
growth” set the theme for the 
greater part of Mr. Foote's re- 
marks, and he quoted liberally 
from the 149-page study made 
two years ago by the Subcom- 
mittee on Foreign Economic 
Policy of the Joint Economic 
| Committee, entitled “Soviet Eco- 
nomic Growth: a Comparison 


| With the United States.” 
Mr. Foote went on to state) 


Summarizing this report, Mr 


Foote said, the Joint Economic | 


Committee had pointed out that 

“Soviet growth rates may con- 
tinue enough higher than those 
of the United States that in time 
the gap between the levels of 
output in the two _ countries 
could begin to close.” 


While the figures of growth 
irate noted in the report need 

“The Soviets may have sput-_ 
niks’ and H-bombs, and ICBMs |“ 


frighten no one, Mr. Foote said, 

they may, represent to some 

degree the shape of things- to 
come—one of these days. 
‘Sustained Contest’ 

“Our goal must be to stay far, 

far in front of the Soviets ih all 


| Significant areas of production— 
'never to let the gap close,” he |! 


warned 


“we cannot decisively win a sus- | 
| tained economic contest of any 


'sort by production means alone, 


no matter how advanced or how | 


| proficient. We must actually ex- 


| hibit a skill in promoting con- | 


Stock Prices, Sales Soar 


By the Associated Press 


| 
The stock market soared to 


successive new highs during the 
week ended July 10 as volume 
swelled to the greatest total in 
two months. 

Ability of the market to climb 
to a record in the session before 
the long Fourth of July week- 
end seemed to flash a’ green 
light for further progress. 

The Dow Jones Industrial 
Average reached a record 663.8! 
before closing the week at 
663.56. 

Volume High 


In the new wave of confi- 
dence permeating Wall Street, 


s brokers said the Dow) 
ne ‘industrials, staging a technical 


could reach 700 by summer's 


reached 18,719,665 

highest weekly total 

since the week ended May.9 
when 18,993,800 shares . were 
traded. Last week's four-day 
trading period, reduced by the 


The Market Week 


Independence Day observance, 
was not comparable except on a 
daily average basis. On this ba- 
sis, an average of 3,743,933 
shares was traded in the week 
just past compared with 3,239,- 
305 in the previous week, 
Traders and investors heeded 


the “buy. signal” represented by | 
. z /on six days of uninterrupted | 


penetration of the May 29 
highs. Mutual funds, pension 


‘funds, andother institutional | 
| buyers rushed into the market. | 
‘Blue chips spearheaded the ad-| 


vance 


Rails “confirmed” the rise of | 
lower-priced, speculative stocks 
| were given a play as the public 
entered the market, anxious to' 


rally of their own on Tuesday 


‘and Wednesday and going to 


their highest level since 1956. 
The action of the rails heart- 
ened market analysts who were 


ting for this kind of move-, ore 
cine -averages from hitting another | | 


ment in advance of the event. 


Up the Ladder 


Rails had behind them a bril- 


liant improvement in earnings | 
‘and carloadings, but they did 
not start to move upward until | 


Wall Street advisories began to 
plug them as likely candidates 
for near term gains. 
Wednesday’s session brought 
the first 4,000,000-share day 


sumption which we have not up 
to now exhibited, 

“We must develop our 
marketing skills to a degree we 
have never before thought pos- 
sible. The Russian production 
machine always runs at full ca- 
pacity. Ours does not. 


Foote continued, “it will be 
somewhat difficult to continue 


the lead we want to have, and 
indeed must have, to demofi- | 
strate the superiority of our free 


steam—because we almost never 
have—unless we find a way to 
develop and put into practice 


better marketing skills than we | 


now have.” 
Improvement Stressed 


viets may catch up with the 


United States in automation— 


“In the years ahead,” Mr. | 


He added that while the So- | 


-|economly, if we are going to)! & 
operate it at less than full steam. | 
“We cannot operate at full | 


translating some of their sput-|§ 


nik ‘skills—‘‘they haven't the) 
| faintest idea of what marketing 


is all about. 


“To put it as simply as pos- | 
sible,” Mr. Foote said, “the heav- | 
iest burden in staying well out | 
‘in front of any other ‘system’. 
And he -went on to say that | 


rests squarely on marketing, and 


on nothing else. We must look to | 


improvement of marketing prac. | 


tices above all else. 


“Marketing is our weapon— | 


in a sense our secret weapon,” 


Mr. Foote said in conctusion, 


_because the Soviets cannot un-| 


derstand it. And he added that 


| While we may not quadruple | 
marketing efforts, either quan- 
| titativ ely and/or qualitativ ely | 


in the near-term future—‘we'’re 


since May 7. By this time the | 
market rise was running into. 


some heavy profit taking based 


advance, 


Profit taking continued we 


Thursday when the market was | 


Z 


definitely lower. 
The Friday session was mixed 
and turbulent. Many of the 


ride on what appeared to be a 
band wagon which had come to 


a rest temporarily. Only a spate | 


of late selling prevented the 


record peak. 
Active Issues Listed 


Aluminums, drugs, motors, ) 


steels, meat packers, and a wide | 


variety of selected issues en-| 


~~ 


going to have to step up: mar- | 
keting impact—quite soon—to| 
degrees which might scare us.” | 


OR 


Sao Paulo Steam Power Plant 


Stone & Webster built this steam power plant at Sao Paulo, 
Brazil, for Sao Paulo Light, S. A.—Services de Electricidade. 


P ‘ €; 
ptt] Ag fi 
r “were | 

ee 


ae 
) 
t 4 


x 


> | 
h Management Function 


Shared by Nationals 


In his sixth and final article on Stone & Webster Engineering 
Corporation, T. Cortlandt Williams, president, describes the 
worldwide operations of his firm, The series was written aft the 
invitation of The Christian Science Monitor, 


By T. Cortlandt Williams 
President, Stene & Webster Engineering Corporation 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 


| Boston to import large numbers of 
| Stone & Webster Engineering'skilled craftsmen to supplement 


4 Corporation has long been asso- the local construction forces, It 


ciated with work in foreign’ is a common occurrence to train 
L | lands. As early as 1901 our craftsmen at the construction 
‘engineers constructed an elec- site. 
tric street railway and a lighting Stone & Webster Engineering, 
/ plant in Ponce, Puerto Rico. Ltd., in London, is the major 
Over the years, overseas ac- affiliated company. This fully 
tivities gradually increased and integrated company is capable 
work included appraisals, en- of executing all functions for 


| gineering and business reports, design, procurement, and cone 


engineering designs, and con- struction of chemical, petroleum,” 
struction of varied industrial and industrial projects. 

facilities. By far the greater French and Netherlands affile 
portion of this work was done jates are not organized as fully 
for private interests. integrated companies, but make 

About 15 years ago, demands greater use of local engineering 
for assistance from other coun- organizations for assistance -in’ 
‘tries increased rapidly, and certain phases of the work. As 
'steps were then taken to provide required, offices are established 
specific organizational means for in other locations such as those 
ithe services requested. presently staffed in Milan and 
| Today we have active affili- Cologne. 
ated companies with Keadquart- | 
‘ers in Canada, tha United 
|Kingdom, and the Netherlands. 
‘Stone & Webster Construction 
Company, with headquarters in with the technological develope 
‘Boston, is organized to serve the ment of the particular country 
'Western Hemisphere, exclusive and the availability of trained 
\of Canada, and the United nationals at the time they are 
| States. needed. 
| Organizations Differ Function of the American in 
Although each of the foreign- foreign lands is to provide a 
| based organizations differs in professional level of competence 
| detail to meet the needs of local which will assure a modern 
Situations, they have some fun- plant completed at an economi- 
damental characteristics in cal cost at the time required by 
,; common. ; the owner. In_ fulfilling this 

Management function is gen- function, it is his responsibility 
erally provided by a combina-. to train local engineering, con- 
tion of national and American ‘struction, and operating people 
personnel, Technical direction to permit them to increase their 
comes from experienced Amer- skills for future work. This op- 
ican engineers, some of whom portunity to broaden the poten- 
spend several years with the tial of individuals provides one 
affiliated company, while others of the most satisfying aspects of 
are assigned for shorter periods work in foreign lands. 
to work on specific projects. Stone & Webster men have 

Working with these men are served in over 30 countries, 
engineers and designers of local making appraisals and reports 
origin-on the permanent staffs or designing and constructing 
of the foreign affiliates. In addi- facilities ranging from hospitals, 
tion to engineering and design office buildings, hydro-electric 
performed by the _ foreign developments, steam-powered 
affiliated companies, there is al- generation plants, electric trans- 
most invariably some phase of mission systems, petroleum and 
the engineering performed in chemical plants to food prepara- 
the Boston headquarters. tion, pulp and paper production 
Similar Arrangement Followed and ore extraction. 

A similar’arrangement is fol- Some of the principal work 
lowed on the’ construction now in progress, or recently 
phases of a project. Manage- completed, inc!udes expansion of 
ment and direct supervision of the Richard L. Hearn Station. of 
construction are usually provid- Ontario Hydro-Electric Power 
ed by American personnel, sup- |Commission, at Toronto, to a 


30 Countries Served 
In both engineering and con- 
struction, American personnel is 
kept at a minimum consistent 


ported to the degree necessary capability of 1,200,000 kw, mak- 
by American craft supervisors. ing it the largest thermal! station 

The labor force, itself, is re- in Canada and one of the largest 
cruited largely from available in the world. 


nationals in the area of the Plants Installed in Scotland 
|plant site. Under some circum-; ay, expansion in capacity of 


istances, 1t has been necessary jesser magnitude, but of equal 
significance to local industry 


week on the New York Stock, 3% fe Fue 
Exchange were: | Elwood M, Payne 


| . T . ° 
| Glen Alden, up 8%% at 2854 on | Petroleum Plant Built by Stone & Webster in Marseille, France 
or a or 548,500 shares; Aluminum. Ltd., 
up %4 at 36%; General Motors, 


up 4 at 57%; American Motors, 
By Jay L. Johnson up 1% at 4614; and New York 


|is under way at Sao Paulo. Brae 
New York Stock Exchange Quotations (3. ° 953" 
Writien for The Christian Science Monitor Central, up 138 at 30%. 


panding industrial areas in 

: ° 3tks/Divds Sales | Transa e i &tke/Divds Sales South America. Electrical trans- 
Melvi in E. Dawley was elected, senior vice-president, planning | BE Rie etl erg bp sae (Dollars) (1008) High Low Close Chee | ctions Yesterday Selected and Compiled by Associated Press 

president and chief executive| and organization and industrial | rican StOCK’ ABC Vend1 = 10 22% 22's 22% + 44 |Stks/Divds Sal 


ee — Hisb Low Close chee peerage gs teen — built by 
» , 1. 48 . Sill es Net Stks /Divds Sales Net outhn Co 1.30 "= tone Tebster wi soon ine 
officer of Lord & Taylor, suc- | relations, and Harry G. Beggs, | a eee wa 8% et tea aay ee ee pn a gaa Pa Low Close Chge ee ee Ram lap Giese Cast hy se: is crease the availability of power 
ceeding the late Miss Dorothy | vice-president, manufacturing, | | 8% on 224,800 shares: Canadian AirRedu ” seen ks Ay ater i ne | Sperry Ra to 203 to the users tn both ths Caan 
Shaver. Joseph M. Walter was| and facilities. | Javelin, up 3% at 1734; Guild 47194 Curtiss W 250-106 evey” fee, ‘ Square D1 240 , ! ican Republic and Turkey. 
hamed first vice-president and| Herbert J. Stiefel of the L. Films, up 1% at 2%: Kaiser In- Alleg Lud 2 Mack Trk 1.80 ge +9 Ou cele is 27a 52) . 2 | During the past 10 years, 
treasurer of Lord & Taylor and| H. Hartman Company, Inc. has | 'dustries, up 5@ at 185: and Allied ch 3 Macy 2 BA 43: ate rise sey fis sh? stutct as | Blants heave been inetalies am 
Van Buren Sims was named been appointed executive vice- Crowell-Coflier io % at 2014. Allied Stes 3 ; 
chairman. | president and chairman of the ’ g 

Beneficial Management Cor- executive committee. 


uefoeraae produce ethylene sa. pcGaginall 
. Mallory 1.40 a Re j é : ( 4 
| United States Government ry ge 380 Manh Sh , i s. ‘ 
bonds advanced a bit this week, Amerada2 xa36 
poration Nas realigned its top of-| Kelly "H. Gibson of Pacific | but corporate securities declined. 4™ Alriin 1 - 


Manh Shirt .70 Stevens JP 1" and to convert these to ethy! ale 
ficers. David-H. Finck was named’ Petroleums Ltd. has been named | Am Bosch 1.20 


Marin Mia l 
Marq Cem 1.60 Been wear 2b 56 *e-+ cohol and’ isopropyl - alcohol. 
. Marsh Fid 2a S WW Some of these plants were ex- 
a tee” Shemale | +3 wink ekeiant neo | New financing markets put in Am Bd Par 1 Disney 40b ‘Stud Pack panded and a acheraent alkylate 
chairman of the boar n 4 executive vice-p 'a good week. Brisk retail de- = — me Dome Min .70 | 
E. McMichael, president; and_ director. 'mand for the light schedule of Ame pper ff at “* | Doug Airc 2 


Martin 1.60 
Masonite 1.20b sagt yo 

Maytag $20 Sunbeam: ivébe 60';-- 3, Plant and propylene tetramer 

. owl Sunray: 1.32 . § slant added. Currently, cumene- 

Dewitt J. Paul, senior vice-presi-| In Phoenix, Charles H. Hallet | ,.y, offerings brought about the Am H Pd 3.60a Dow Chem 1.20 “9600 T and ealwetievions ane 
dent. ‘has been elected a director of Am M&Fdy 2 PRene: See PO ae 

‘We Lt d Gerald F.! Alli Bicel Manufacturing | Ore. Pyrease in four | As met Tenn Gas 1.40 are under construction, 
en awson an son 'months in the municipal market. Texaco 2.40 
Jones of Mack Trucks, Inc. have Company and appointed vice- | 


| joyed vigorous advances as mar-| § 
| ket interest rotated to them. me fe 
aw e ) a es eC The five most active issues this 


“. 


: 
— ee ew = & w& 
eeeew#ewetnt a * 


oe eer cer wn 


DinersClb 1.87f 


4 
- 


~ vw = 
ee nate 
wo 


won 


< 
Ex-Cell-O 14 MoutD wer 
Fairch E 2 ? r Montecat .92¢ 
Fansteel lb Monter Oil ivf 
Fed D Str 2 Mont Ward 2 }] 
Firestone 2.60b Moore Mc 1! 

, : : i 2 
First N Str 2a C + D+ r Morrell .30d 
80 : ‘ . : Motorola 1's 
Nat Airlin .12d 
Nat Bisc 2a 
Nat C R 1.20 
Nat Dairy 2 
Nat Gyps 2b 
Nat Lead 1.50¢ 
Nat Steel 3 
Nat Sug Ref 2a 
Nat Tea .80 
Nat Thea :., 
New Eng Ell 
Newmont 2 
NY Central 2: 
NY Ch & SL 2? 
NY NH & Hart 


nr 
O-312 O-+I—-PANOrKNUWOYK OYUN 


owe 2 


ue 


oo 


ee ee 


' 


Trane Co .90 xd 

Tran W Air 

Transamer 80 

Tri Cont 60g r ts 

oe challenge. Engineer ing work 

TXL Oil was done both in the United 
States and England. Materiais 

were purchased in the United 

States, England, and Australia, 


‘ + 
' 


-- 


Un Carb 3.60 


j 
tw 


eaeensanwneeaeneneeaneet nw 


Un Art! sts 1.60 
United Cp .10g 
»Unit Fruit 2 
Un Gas Cp 1% 
Unit M&M 1 
Cnit Shoe 2'2a 
US Borax 

US Gypsum 2a 
JS Hoff M 

US Pipe&F 1.20 
US Pivwad 2a 2 


oe 


COwWNrR woe 


Nrf&Wst 3.69a 
No Am Av 1.60 
No Am Car tI US Rub 2 
Nor Pac 2b f ¢ f Us Shoe 1.20a 
NorSta Pw 1.10 4 : US Sme.. 
Northrop 1.60 ‘ US Steel 3 
Van Norm 
Van Ail Stl 1.60 


McGrawH IT 40a 
Mer Ch&S 1.20 
Mesta Mch 2'2a 
. Mid 8 Ut 1.90 791 
: East Air L lb Mpls Hon 1.60a ) Aik In Japan, plants have been 
| Investment dealers were. able to “4m Mots 2.40 | 260 East Kod .74h 9 ‘e+ te MinnM&Mi 40 Tex G Prod 60 57 3412 ; 4 eek 6 
been ,appointed general mana-~/| president and general manage. | ot into inv entory for the sec- ae Shp ea 90° 30 bog Te se Minute M .50g TexPCcaol | $ ig Reelliey pet sega 
gers of the southern and comers William Feick, Jr., has been | onq successive week. | Am Smelt 50g 64 rie Mo Pac A240 aon re tS 208 henol.. Others under construc 
divisions respectively. ‘--—Teletted vice- -president in charge The Treasury sold $2,000, 000, - be joni . a potent ao ie Thiokol tion are for butadiene and eid 
i - 
eering Company, \corge ga-| pany. | age yield of 4.728 per cent. This - oar ae ) 
jeenian was elected president. | The California Packing Cor- | was the highest borrowing cost cay gp tae teak nchunee a ce 
S, Hornbaker has been poration named Ross B. Yerby, | for the government since it paid | 38%, : Setar halite presented a most interesting 
elected assistant treasurer of) Jr., vice-president in charge Of | an even 5 per cent on a six-'| 1 34 62 6294+ 48! Fiintkote 1.80 
Studebaker-Packard Corp. marketing. month certificate in 1921. Com-|4r ont 30. 11 
td cn eng Managerial [thelr rates vs percentage point  Armeacsate Force Dat 
‘8 . , 
The Spring Division of Borg- |__Russel Wetmore, cone: in line with the higher yields for | arvinind 50d Prept Sul 1.20 
Warner Corporation has an- | Mutual Life Insurance Com~ |»... ury-26=-and 13=week bills -AtiCstLinea Fruen Tra 
nounced S. J. Becker as vice- |pany, N.Y.; Charles W. Davies, Vii ion AtlRefin2 Gear Wood 
| assistant district manager, Amer- | W!th which they compete for | atiascp.15r ) 3 Garrett 2 
president and chief engineer. | ee viscose Corperation: Allen |2Vailable short-term investment | Atlasidr2.40 1 06 Gen Cable 2 | 
: . ‘ ; Gen Dynam 
Smith-Corona Marchant Inc. \ Krogel, plant manager, Glenn. funds, | Gen miec 2 ; 
announced Emerson E. Meads | Quigg, manufacturing superin- Brisk trading in the Treas- Gen Fds 2.60 26 
election to the post of executive | eo dent both of KVP, Houston:| UrY’s new one-year bills helped | oe rel 
vice-president and Gordon H.|/7... p ‘Bolas assistant man- the rest of the government bond dewey dp see 80 3: Gen Prec 
Smith to the office of senior | Philadelphia. Robert £E.| list. For_the week, the victory | peatrasi.so ; 53 ‘* | do rt 
aent. p aser. aceipnia, eine 244s of December 1972-67, ad- BeechAirei.60 
riceeeare ti National | mith, sales representative.| vanced 24/32 at 8328/32 bid, BellAirc.25e 
Recent promotions in National | Chicago, both of A. E. Staley f whet . | Bell&How.!4h 


(GG Tet&Ei 2 
Gen Time 1 
Gen Tire .70 
Gerbr Prod1.60a 

Getty O1L.25f 
Gillette 2a 
Gimbel 1.80 
Goodrich 2.20 
Goodyear 2.40b 
Grace&Co .80d 
Grand Un .60 


vfTr Kr = Bev = 
ie a ee ae a ee 


Airlines, Inc; include: Jean C. }; i ; (Up 8/32--were the 3%s of) BendixAv2.40 58 
Brawner, airline executive vice- See eet enaets at 874/32, the 3%s of oe ne aman = 
president; Walter Sternberg, | poth managers American Cy- 1990 at 88 28/32, the 3s of 1995 BlackaDec2 6 
senior vice-president, market | snamia Company Marietta, at 83 20/32, and the 4s of 1980 | Rawsecxt 400 39 
development; Rockwell Drake,| Onio. and Willow Island W.| 2! 97 8/32 bid. The 2%s of 1963 3 
treasurer; Charles Sharp, vice- Va.. respectively: Edgar J. Doo- | peeked up 3/32 at 92 12/32. 


president, traffic and sales. little, director of business plan- 308 Edis 2.80 


William T: Marx of Interna- | ning Boeing Airplane Company: — jran Airw .60 
tional Telephone and Telegraph Tg R. Berg, senna i rl ridg Brass .75g 1 


Corporation has been named tor of the New York Produce Ex- § INTERNATIONAL | rigesa8i 2 


Waldorf Svs 
Waukesha M 2? 
Welbilt Co .07e 


Otis Elev 2.40 
Outb Mar .80 
Owens Ill Gl 21, 


lot No Pap, .60 
Gt No Ry 3 
| Greyhound 1b 
|Grum Aire l'2 
Gulf Mob&Olg 
Gulf Oil 2'2b 
Hallibrton 2.40 
Hamil Wat .55¢ 
Hamer Pap.50g 
| HartS&M 2 


| Heinz 2.20 

| Hat Corp ‘af 
hercul Mot 
ss 50g 

| Hertz 1 

| Heyan Npt .30¢ 
Hilton Hot 1.20 

| Homestk1.60a 


ee OW we ee See 
eer neneenaee ee Benes 
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1 


WHE AND WHERE TO eral Telephone’ & Electronics sudd Co .50g 
Cor H. N. Horst, re- R's PRICES 


wipond@o 1.40 
Woolworth 2% 
Wortheton 2!, 
Yale & Tow 1%, 7 
Ynest ShAaT5 14 135 2%. 
Zenith Radi 19 39 — 


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banking laws. There are no stock- |; : Argentina, peso $ .0125 $+ .0007 
holders. All dividends go to deposi- |include: David D. Coffin, group | Austria, schilling 


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. Division of Raytheon Company; 
oY SENS CERNE Fo ee Edwin D. Ryer, a_ director, | e i 
BANK BY MAIL Merchants Co-operative Bank of Colombia 
Boston; Dr. Lawrence ould, | Cuba 
BOSTON, MASS. vice-president, Microwave As- 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank July 1s sociates, Inc.; Linwood C. Huff, 
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14 ‘ Sports THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


‘He May Hit .900 From Here In, Says Billy Jurges of Ted Williams 


League Batting Crown 
_ Not Beyond Big Fellow 


By Ed Rumill 
Sports Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 
man!” exclaimed ;other fine relief job. But as 
Billy Jurges. “What an exhibi- Brewer was leading 5-4 when he 
tion! Unbelievable! It’s worth left, he got credit for the game. 
the price of admission just to The Red Sox got help from a 


Youngster Takes 
Pentathlon Title 


By the Associnted Press 
El Monte, Calif. 
An 18-year-old high school 
boy captured the National | 
AAU Pehtathlon by scoring | 


_ Mas SUCCEEDED 
PINKEY AY/SS/NS 
AS MANAGE 
OF JHE BOSTON 
’ PED SOM 
AND ASSUMES 


ONE OF 7FHE MosT 
PUZZLING 


And Talking Of... 


Wightman Cup Comment 


“What a By Sydney Skilton 


Written for The Christian Science Monitor 
London . | Wightman Cup clash, 


3,196 points, July 10. 


Dixon Farmer of Orinda, 


and, in- 
Calif., defeated the favored C. 


watch him hit.” 


This was close to midnight 
last night, in the managerial 
niche of the Red Sox clubhouse, 
following Boston’s 8-5 victory 
ovér the New York Yankees. 

Jurges, the Red Sox manager, 
was talking about Ted Williams, 
who had two singles and a 
double, giving him a six-game 
streak of 10 hits ih 19 chances. 

Works Hard 


Had he thought, watching a 
Struggling Williams earlier in 
the year, that the big fellow 
would come back this strong? 

“Well, he got off to a slow 
start, as he had a year ago,” 
Jurges replied. “You have to 
work much harder when you're 
older and Ted really works. I 
know what he’s been going 
through because I was a player 
and I had to do it. It isn’t easy.” 

A six-game .520 pace had 
lifted the Williams average from 
.201 to .239. Soon, perhaps, he 
would once again be challenging 
for the batting lead in the 
American League. 

“Ted thinks he'd have to hit 
.900 from here in to finish with 
a respectadle average,’ Billy 
said, “But I say he may hit 
.900. He’s that great.” 

Another hot hitting subject 
was Sammy White, «who also 
had 10 for 19 through a five- 
game stretch, going from .219 
to .259. How did Jurges ex- 
plain this? 

lL] I can say is Sammy is 
swinging his bat,” Billy an- 
swered. “If you hit the ball 
somewhere, anything can 
happen.” 

Using Bench 


Jurges was making full use 
of his bencin. “That’s what it’s 
for,’ he said. In this latest tri- 
umph over the Yankees he used 
Busby and Keough in center 
field, Gernert, Wertz and Run- 
nels at first base, Plews as a 
pinch hitter and Brewer and 
Fornieles on the mound. 

Brewer started and, when he 
injured a finger slightly sliding 
into second base in Boston’s 
five-run fourth inning, Jurges 
took him out at the end of the 
sixth. Fornieles turned in an- 


| Don Buddin 


| glove, 


poor Yankee defense in that big 
fourth inning, The visitors had 
three chances to make double | 
plays and blew them all. Whitey | 
Ford, the losing pitcher, made | 
a throwing error, 
man Bobby Richardson ne- 
glected to tag the bag on a fonce 
play and left fielder Tony Kubek 
threw a ball yards over catcher 
Yogi Berra’s. head. In between 
there were hits by Avila, Wil- 
liams, Malzone and Brewer. 
Ted’s Double 

Ted’s really big hit, however, 
came in the seventh;:a two-run 
double into left-center. 

Avila, by the way, got two 
more hits, giving him five for 
nine in the first two games of 
this Fens series with New York. 

After the game Jurges also 
revealed that he is considering 
Gary Geiger as an infield candi- 
date. 

“That boy has good bounce, 
good hands, a good arm and 
the right disposition—in 


fact, he has everything going 


‘for him,” the manager said. “He 


second base- | 


has a world of natural ability. | 


I think he’d make a pretty good 
infielder. You can’t do much 
now in the middle of the season. 
I'd like to start working with 
him in the spring. But he hasn't 
too much to worry 
keeps on coming.” 
es ee 
Briefs. 
turned out last night, 
the Red Sox 
short of the half million mark 
at the Fens... 


hitting streak. .... Jurges is im- 
pressed with the 
pitching of Wills and Baumann. 
. This Yankee-Red Sox series 
continues with single games to- 
morrow and Monday afternoon. 
. « The only home run fast 
night was hit by Hank Bauer, 
the Yankee right fielder. . 


' There will be a home run hit- 


ting contest involving Hank 
Aaron, Eddie Mathews and Joe 
Adcock of the Braves, and Wil- 
liams, Jensen and Gernert of the 
Red Sox prior to the July 20 
Jimmy Fund game at the Fens. 


Sports Front Briets 


By the Associated Press 


Baseball 
Chicago 

The majors approved. the 
inter-league trading rule which 
permits teams from the two 
leagues to trade with each other 
from Nov. 21 to Dec. 15 without 
obtaining waivers and appointed 
a third-league committee, 


Golf 
Pittsburgh 
Arnold: Palmer of Ligonier, 
Pa., shot a 4-under-par 66 to 
take the 36-hole lead with a 133 
in the Western Open. 


Chicago 

Marge Lindsay of Decatur, IIl., 
eliminated Barbara Williams of | 
Richmond, Calif., 


| RESTAURANTS | 


BOSTON, MASS. 


CHINA HOUSE 


While Shopping in Town 
Stop at Our Most Pleasant 


AIR CONDITIONED 
RESTAURANT 


New Banquet Hall 
Just Refinished—2nd Floor 
Authentic Chinese Food 
As Well as American Dishes 


Food Put Up to Take Out 
146-148 BOYLSTON ST. 
HA 6-9836 
Next to Colonia) Theatre 
One Step from Boylston St. Subway 


I STEUBEN’ 


AIR CONDITIONED 


RESTAURANT 


Fine Feod at 
Modest Prices 


} 


Anne Gunderson of 
turned back Andy Cohen of 
Waterloo, Iowa, 3 and 2, 


ern Open, 


Dublin, Ireland 

Max = Faulkner, 

fessional, led the field at the end 

of the first rouund of the Irish 

Hospitals 72-hole golf tourna- 
ment with a record 67, 


Osaka, Japan 


Torakichi ‘(Pete) Nakamura, 


one-time winner of the Interna-. 


tional Trophy and Canada Cup 
Golf Championships, won the 
1959 Japan Open golf title from | 
Koichi Ono 5 and 4 in a 36-hole 


‘final. 


2 up,’ and Jo) 


| 


' 
} 
i 
| 


nis Tournament. 


Tennis 


San Remo, Italy 
Italy romped into a 2-0 lead 
‘over France in their European 


Zone Davis Cup tennis semi- | 


final, Orlando Sirola defeated 
Pierre Darmon 6—1, 6—1, 3—6, 
'8—6, after 
6—2, 6—1. 

Barcelona, Spain 


Britain defeated Spain in the | 
Euro- | 
Cup tennis | 


doubles match of their 
pean Zone Davis 
semifinal and took a 2-1 lead. 
Baastad, Sweden 
Top-seeded Beverly Baker 
Fleitz of Long Beach, Calif., re- 
quired only 28 minutes to de- 
feat Norway’s Tone Schrimer, 
6—1, 6—0, in the semifinals of 
the Baastad International Ten- 


Dublin, Ireland 
The final of the Irish Lawn | 


Tennis ChampionShips present- | 


HOLYOKE, MASS. 


Old Fashioned Food and. . 
a 


L Nueew Bey 
Holyoke, Mass. 


U.S. Routes 202 and 


MIAML, FLORIDA _ 


Telephone HI 6-2636 


La Casita Tea House 


DINNER @ LUNCHEON 
BOB ond GRACE OUSLEY 
“| 3540 Mein Hiway Coconut Grove, Fie, 


ATLANTA, GA. 


Open Daily MACout sume 
. for 
Luncheon. 

Dinner 


Pricate Dining Koom 
5 2882 Pegchtree Ra., N. B. CB 7-3079_ 


an 


~~, ‘ ‘“ 
- “* : 


Bob Hewitt, 
/ 6—0., 


} 
Sill 
he. 


‘world welterweight 


ed an All-American cast—Jack | 
Frost of Monterey, Calif, | 


Alto, Calif. The two Yanks de- | 
feated a pair of Australians. | 
Frost halted Frank Gorman, | 
3—6, 6—0, 3—6, 6—2, 6—4, 
while Douglas triumphed over 
7—9, 7—5, 6—2, 


Boxing 
Portland, Ore. 
retained 
title 
| outpointing challenger 
Moyer in 15 rounds. 


General 


Don Jordan 


by 
Denny 


Los Angeles 
World decathlon record holder 
Rafer Johnson of the United 


States track and field team dis- 


closed he will be unable to com- 


pete in the U.S.-Soviet games at 


| Philadelphia July 18-19. 


Los Altos, Calif. 
Indiana swimmers smashed a 


pair of national records in open- 


ing sessions of the AAU men’s 
championships as Bill Barton 
swam the 400-meter medley in 5 
minutes 14.6 séconds while his 
Indianapolis teammate, Alan 
Somers, won the 1,500-meter 


freestyle in 17:51.3. 


FENWAY PARK 


leaving | 
less than 40,000. 

. Jurges’ record 
managing was four and two....| 
had a five-game | 


leff-handed | 


Seattle | 


in the} 
semifinals of the Women’s West- | 


British pro-/ 


Nicola’ Pietrangeli | 
had bested Robert Haillet 6—4, 


about if he | 


. A crowd of 25,882 


PROBLENS 
(N THE MASOR 
LEAGUES . 


+" d 
444-6 .% 
Ae ate 


ATLEAST 
BSVERYON/E 
CAN AUSTILE 


ALWAYS AN 
ASSGRESS/VE 
PLAYER WHEN 

YE WAS W/7TH 
WHE CUBS aud 

SVAN7TS, S/LL 
SHOULD INS7T/LL 


K 
- 


SOWNE SPike/T /NTO 


THE SASSNVGS 


RED SOx 


AP Newsfeatures /60 


} 


e 
Major League Standings 


By the Associated Press 
American League 


Pct. 
577 
550 
524 
506 
.494 
.469 
.443 
.438 


Results July 10 
Cleveland 8, Chicago 4 inight). 
Detroit 5, Kansas City 2 tnight). 
Washington 7, Baltimore 6 ‘night). 
Boston 8, New York 5 inight’. 
Today's Games 
New York at Boston—Maas (6-5) vs. 
Casale (6-6). 
| Kansas City at Chicago—Garver (6-8) 
vs. Latman (2-2) 
Detroit at Cleveland (n)—Mossi (7-3) 
| VS. Garcia (1-5) 
Baltimore al Wasnington—Brown 
(5-4) vs. Fischer (6-3) 
Tomorrow's Schedule 
New York at Boston. 
Kansas City at Chicago (2). 
Detroit at Cleveland (2) 
Baltimore at Washington 
Monday's Schedule 
New York at Boston. 
Only game scheduled. 


Cleveland 
Chicago . 
Baltimore 
New York 
Detroit .. 
Washington . 
Kansas City 
Boston 


| National League 


| W L Pet. 

San Francisco 48 578 
Los Angeles 565 
Milwaukee 564 
| Pittsburgh 536 
Chicago .486 
'St. Louis .476 
Cincinnati. .. 27 
'Philadelphia 


37 ) 
Results July 10 
St. Louis 9, Philadelphia 7 (night). 
| Pittsburgh 7, Chicago 6 (1) .inns 
aan Francisco 8, Cincinnati 6 (11 inn, 
ht 


2 a Angeles at Milw aukee, rain. 
4. 


s Ga 
St. Louis at 
ke -4) vs. Cardwell (2-5). 
Chicago at Pittsburgh—Hillman (3-7) 
Kline (7-6) 


"nen Francisco at Cincinnati ~Anto- | 


nelli (12-4) vs. Brosnan 3-4). 

Los Angeles at Milwaukee—Koufax 
(5-2) vs. Pizarro (2-1) or Willey (4-2). 
Tomorrow's Schedule 
Chicago at Philadelphia ‘2). 

St. Louis at Pittsburgh (2). 
Los Angeles at Cincinnati 
San Francisco a. Milwaukee. 
Monday's Schedule 
| Los Angeles at Cincinnati (n). 
| San Francisco at Milwaukee (n). 
Only games scheduled, 


‘Champ Survives 


Early Rounds In 


By the Associated Press 


Providencey R.I. 


into the quarterfinal and semi- | 


G.B. 


told me, 


n). 


middle. 


|Ted might have done with it, 
"Philadelphia—Ricketts | 44 it might have been consid- 


| coaches, 


Rhode Island Golf 


Bobby Allen, Pawtucket, the | 
defending champion, led the way he’s started just four games in final round of the Massachusetts 


In the Dugout 


with Rumill = 


Casey Hesitated 


Critics, as usual, second 
guessed the losing manager in 
the recent All-Star Game. 

They thought that Casev 
Stengel -should have done two 
or three things differently in 
that 5-4 National League tri- 
umph over the -American at 
Pittsburgh. 

But today the manager of the 
Yankees second guessed himself. 

“As I look back now, there’s 
one thing I'd like to have 
changed,” the veteran skipper 
“That was in the eighth 
inning, with Ted Williams at 
bat. 

“ld sent Ted up to hit for 
Rocky Colavito because I want- 
ed a left-hand hitter in there 
against right - handed Face. 
There were men on first and 
second at the time. 

“Well, Face threw = three 
straight balls to Williams and 
the thought came to me to let 
the big fellow swing if the next 
pitch should be a strike. But I 
decided that Face had no idea 
of getting the ball over the plate 
and let the thought pass. 

“However,” Casey said, shak- 
ing his head, “The next one was 
a fast ball right through the 
I'll never know what 


erable.” 


Williams walked on the next! 


pitch. 
ae Se 

The Yankees think they have 
a future relief ace in Eli Grba 
(pronounced Gerber), a big 
right - hander recently recalled 
from Richmond. 

‘We had him in Florida in our 
rookie camp last spring,” said 
Ralph Houk, one of Stengel’s 
“and I 
‘termination. He worked ‘hard. 


| “He hed a good fast ball, good 


control and a fair curve, but 


'they tell me he has improved 


the curve some. I'd particularly 
liked the way he could reach 


| back and put a little extra on| John Tosca, Jr., 
| his fast ball. He was a good guy a pair of 


around camp.’ 


Said Stengel: “I understand | 


‘the minors and won two of! 


| final rounds of the Rhode Island |them. That’s pretty good. But 


_golf championship at Ledgemont | 


| Country Club. 


against Jon Douglas of Palo | Allen and three other former | 


champions survived the 
day, while three 
champions fell by the wayside. 


| Allen beat George Ashton, 


| Wanumetonomy 3 and 2, then 
eliminated Joe Sprague, Triggs, | 
2 up. Other former champions | 


| they think his best spot is the: 
bull pen.’ 
It was Grba’s second appear- | 


two /ance at a rookie school. He had | 
‘rounds of competition yester- ‘shown up in the one the Red vat Rollins 
more former |Sox held at Sarasota 


in the) 
spring of Jet. 


liked his de-| 


Signed me out of 
B choo! in Chicago 
in July of 52,” Eli said, 
started with Salisbury of the 
iarheel League in ’53, then went 
to Corning, San Jose and San 


“They 
| 


Francisco. I was in the Army in SY 


57 and ’58.” 
The Red Sox traded him to 


San Francisco with Gordon 
Windhorn for Bill Renna. 

“Ed Lopat taught me _ the 
slider,’ Eli said. “‘Ralph Houk 
talked with me and changed my 
grip on the ball. They both 
helped.” 

He has no idea why the Red 
Sox quit on him, 

an ee 

Commissioner Ford Frick re- 
ports that the second All-Star 
Game at Los Angeles Aug. 3 
will start at four o’clock local 
time. If rained out, it will be 
canceled. 

Each squad will consist of 28 
players, giving managers Stengel 
and Fred Haney a chance to 
make three additions. to 
teams which played 
burgh recently. 


The managers will also pick | 
their starting nines—and do not 77 
if “Stengel starts Uys 


be surprised 
Ted Williams in left field. Casey 
still has high regard for the vet- 


‘eran Boston slugger. 3 Gr 
“He has played well for me in 77/7 
YUH: 


All-Star Games,” Casey said. 


“He broke his arm once in Chi- | 


cago and made it a lot easier 
for me to win the pennant.” 

Stengel thinks it will 
different game in that ball park, 
the Coliseum. 


Dolan vs. Tosea 
In Massachusetts 


By the Associated Press 
Williamstown, Mass. 


Friday S tars 


advancing to today’s play were | Pitching—Jim Bunning, Tigers | 


| Angie Santilli, Potowomut; 


‘nie Quinn, West Warwick. 
Former champions, 


and Al “"Faenza. 
oe 


'Campadenelli, 

. 
Mrs. Ann Corby 

Wins in Archery 


By the Associated Press 
Springfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Ann Weber Corby, who 
will represent the United 
States in international compe- 
tition in Stockholm, Sweden, 
later this summer, wrapped up 
her 14th women’s target cham- 
pionship July 10 in the East- 
ern Archery Association com- 
petition, - 

Mrs. Corby, who § led 
throughout the first three days 
of the tourney, outdistanced 
her nearest threat, Jeanne 
Tomlinson, Rochelle Park, 
N.J., by 45 points, Mrs. Corby 
turned in a 3,385 score in the 
competition at Springfield Col- 
lege, followed by Miss Tom- 
linsen with 3,340. 

J. Richard Wear, Washing- 


ton, D.C., took the men’s tar-— 
get title with 3,146, while 


Natalie Lankford, Brooklands- 
ville, Md., won the ladies al- 
ternate competition with 3,067. 


2 —a 


Bob 
his | Kosten, Wannamolsett, and Ron- 


all from 
the Metacomet Country Club 
and all beaten in second round 
play, were Brad Oxnard, Fred 


—limited Athletics to seven hits, 
struck out eight and walked | 
only two as he pitched Detroit | 
‘to a 5-2 victory that ended a 
‘six-game losing streak. 
| Hitting—Dick Stuart, 
— slammed = an 
‘home run, his 17th of the sea- 
| son, with Bill Vardon and Hank 
Foiles on base to cap a four-run 
rally that gave Pittsburgh a 7-6 | 
victory over Chicago. 


Pirates 


_ Minor League Scores 


Results July 10 
By the Associated Press 


Pacific Coast League 
. Saeramante 


Salt Lake City. e in Diego 1, 
venoenyer 9. Portiand 

erican Tiesthien 
Omaha 3-2. Minneapolis. 2-3. 
Louisville 8, ; 


as 3. 
Indianapolis 3. Fort Worth 2. 
International League 
Miami 4, Havana 3 sth inn.), 
Montreal * Buffalo 
Toronto 9 
Richer 


Mobile 
+ sll Qries 


irming! 
touly games Mo 
Lenconter 


tle League 
Charleston 2-2. amevine 6-1, 
Knoxville 4, Char 
Gastonia 2. Jac sate ge FB . 
Macon 4, Bee ay 


a. Antonio 4 
Victoria at Amari, Bag ooo g 
Vera “Mexico 0 City L piers 0. 


Nuevo redo 8. 
Mexico City y Reds tm ¥., R 0. 


11th - inning 


Jay Dolan of Leicester and. 
of Thorny Lea, | 
young power hitters | 
'who have never won the title, | 
|teed off today in the 36- hole 


Amateur Golf Championship. 
They were scheduled for 18 
holes this morning and 18 more. 
| this afternoon on the 6,630-yard, | 
par 71 Taconic Golf Club course, 
Dolan, a 20-year- -old. junior | 
ollege in Florida, and | 
Tosca, a 26-year-old Brockton. 
_insurance broker, won their way | 
into the finals yesterday with | 
quarter and semifinal victories. 
Dolan, son of the Leicester | 
‘Country Club owner- -profession- 
(al, continued his par pace in| 
‘taking the veteran Walter Nawoj | 


of Ludlow 2 and 1 in the quar-| 
'ter-finals. Dolan then buried 17- | 


year-old Walter Sharis, Beverly, | 

with three birdies on the first. 

cision. 
Tosca, 


| 39 holes to whip a couple of | 
former champions. He got Ed- 
ward Martin, Winchester, 1 up 
on the 2ist_hole, and took Ed 
Connell, Thorny Lea, 1 up in 18, 

In the other quarter-finals, 
19-year-old Bob Kirouac, 
Sharon, lost to Connell 1 up, 
losing the last three holes, and 
Sharis beat Fordie Pitts, Scitu- 
ate, by the same margin. 


Norwich Ace Signs 
By the Associated Press 
Methuen, Mass. 
The Kansas City Athletics 
signed Larry Waite, an 18-year- 
old catcher, to a contract for an 
undisclosed bonus, Waite cur- 
ey is playing for Nashua, 
, in the semi-pro Northeast 
yb Waite, a 5-11, 


niversity freshmen this spring. 
International 
(Games of July 10) 
By the Associated Press 


Pct. 
.549 
.539 
.529 
506 
500 
4 
456 


State Golf Play 


Wij, 


‘the Yankee organization after, 


the | 
in Pitts- —— 


| 


| having a variety of | 
troubles, had to play a total of 


200 | } 
under, hit .375 for Norwich | 


T. Yang of Nationalist China, 
who had 3,187 points. Yang 
won the AAU Decathlon title 
at’ Kingburg, Calif., last 
month. 


Farmer tied Yang in the 
200 meter dash at 22.2 and 
won the 1,500 meter run in 
4:16.9. His broadjump was 
22ft. Vin., and his javelin 
throw 155ft. 5in. 


Chess 


Frederick 7 Chevalier 
Prepared for The Christian Science Monitor 
July 11, 1959 


Problem No. 4217 


By G. Martin 
6 Pieces 


Looking forward to the Anglo- 
American women’s Wightman 
Cup encounter on Aug. 15 and 16 
at Sewickley, Pittsburgh, is an- 
other way of looking back on 
women’s play at the recent 
Wimbledon championships. We 
are thus given an opportunity of 
commenting on a few items 
which eluded us at the time on 
account of lack of space. 

First and foremost, of course, 


we noted that the best woman 


player at Wimbledon did, not 
win the women’s singles. Even 
Brazil’s Maria Bueno would 
concede that had the American 
facing her over the net in the 
‘final been Althea Gibson instead 
of Darlene Hard the result 
would not have been 6—4, 6—3, 
in her favor. Instead of defend- 


_ing the title she had won the 


| 
| 


| past 


‘nament 
| newspaper. 


two years Miss Gibson 


‘elected to write about the tour- 


for a London evening 
This automatically 
barred her from participating. 


Vj, She probably found the transac- 


4y.tion highly 


profitable, but I 


‘\question whether she found it 
so enjoyable, That worried look 


she seemed to wear all the time, 


4s was it because she missed out on 


y. joining the company 


of those 


other great American racketeers, 


‘Helen 


Wills - Moody, Louise 


: Yj, Brough, and Maureen Connolly 


as three-times-in-a-row Wim- 


‘/ bledon winners? 


Y ty 


ST) Y len 
y was 
YY) 

4 “Ys Vy 


th 


White to play and mate in three. 
(La Marseillaise, 1945.) 


Problem No. 4218 


By W. Massmann 


After the United States cham- 


; 'pionships last year Miss Gibson 
7/7, announced that she would be 
4/7, resting from tennis for a year. 
|That year will soon be up. 

ee would not therefore surprise .me 


It 


to see her in the United States 
lineup at Sewickley resolved to 
wipe out .what she considers to 


| be a very dark spot on her play- 


ing career. When she lost to 


' Britain’s Christine Truman last 


year America lost the Wight- 
man Cup for the first time in 28 


Wh, years. A reverse result this year 


Z 
a) , 


Y; Uf 
WH 


We) . (bis 
ti; LAS, EG Z 
Yi} Y Le) 


tJ 
tii 


5 Pieces 
White to play and mate in four 
(First prize, Secwalbe. 1942.) 


Solutions to Problems 


No. 4215. R-K4 

No. 4216. 1 R-Kt, K-Kt2: 2Q-Kt7ch 

End-Game No. i391. White wins: ]j 
R-Kt3, BxR: 2 RxPch. K-R: 3 R-Kt8ch. 
KxR: 4 Q-Kt4ch. etc.. or 2 KxR: 
3 @-Kt4ch, K-R3: 4 B-Q2ch. and “mates. 


End-Game No. 1392 


By N. Rossolimo 
5 Pieces 


’ Mi) 
WY WV 
Wf!’ 


“WY fi “ 
4 . 
t7. Miss 
4 
7 


could restore the American- 
donated trophy to U.S.A. and 
with it-a blaze of, dare we say 
it, Old Glory to the New York 


~y4 Negress. 
i$, other ideas. 


(jj. sending over 
strongest team, 


Miss Hart to Coach 
The British, of course, have 
They are not only 
their best and 
and sending it 
well in advance, but they have 
engaged Doris Hart as coach. 
Hart, former American 
and Wimbledon champion, is 


now a_ professional hased in 


‘California. She is one of the real 


stroke artists of the game and 
every one of Britain’s quartet— 


'Christine Truman, Angela Mor- 
'timer, Ann Haydon and Shirley 
| Brasher—is sure to benefit from 


‘coaching by 


~| ness 
Hy, tennis armament. She can serve, 
V4. nit and volley as well as any of 
““\ ner sex but backhand control, 


her. I understand 
that the captain of the British 
team, Mrs. Bea Walter wife of a 
Fleet-street sportswriter, will 
ask the United States No. 1 of 
1955 to pay special attention of 


|Christine Truman’s backhand. 


Undoubtedly this is the weak- 
in 18-vear-old Christine's 


when the ball hovers at height, 


-is—something she has not yet 
®?\ been able . 
i hard courts where she won this 


to master. On the 


| year's Italian, Swiss and French 
‘championships she has time to. 


maneuver to cover this weak- 


‘C4 ness but it was heavily exploited 


4 on the very much faster Wim- 
'bledon grass greens by Britain’s 


O77 4 

5 7 
be a 7 

. 

7 4/ 


| Pat 


Ward and Mexico’s Yola 
/ Ramirez who vanquished her in 


by % the fourth round. 


White to play and win 


Two New Books 


Golombek. 


two books just published by Pitman 

The first is ‘‘Modern End-Game Studies 
| for the Chess Player.’’ which is a trans- 
lation, with a few additions. of Hans 
ouwmeeester's ‘“‘Schaakstukken spelen 


U voor.” It is @ most interesting 


H. games editor of the| ly wrong in their 
| British Chess Magazine. is the author of 


col- | 


lection of end-game studies, all of which. 


are  Reaerene which might arise in actual 
pia 


The author's comments about the 
various composers and discussion of the 
| winning maneuvers add to this delight- 
ful book. which lists for $3.50 

Golombek's other book is ‘‘Modern 
_ Opening Chess Strategy.’ which is de- 
' voted to openings generally met in mod- 
ern play. This is not a complete encylo- 
pedia of openings, but an attempt to 
explain in simple terms the whys and’ 
| wherefores of opening strategy. with il- 
lustrative games and suggestions as | 


na: 
merous diagrams. listing -at—$5.50. 


New Paperbound 


Fred Reinfeld’s ee Chess Sacrifies 
/and Combinations.’ h was pub- 


According to the seeding com- 


| mittee there should have been 
—. | an 


all Anglo-American semi- 
‘final as has always happened at 
| Wimbledon for longer than most 
lof us care to remember. But 
‘the seedsters were so complete- 
redictions and 
arlene Hard, 
surviving to 


had only one, 
their number four, 
that stage. 
No Real Surprise 
California’s Beverley Fleitz, 
who was seeded number three, 
was indeed most fortunate to 
survive the first round. There, 
but for being saved by a ball 
being called out to make her 


-deed, the United States chame- 


| 44 in the second set after los- | 


ing. the first to South Africa’s 
Renee Schuurman, she looked 
booked for her briefest-ever 
Wimbledon appearance. It was 
no real surprise 


’ 


subsequently | 


| when, after yielding sets to play-_ 


| ers who ordinarily would have 


‘been no match for the ‘greatest 
ambidextrous queen of the 


c 
lished by Sterling in 1955. has now bean -eourts, Mrs. Fleitz went out to 


reissued 
Noble at $ 


Paperbound by Barnes and) Germany’s:Edda Buding in the 


Reinfeld brings the reader through 20; fourth round. 


categories. pinning. 
queening combinations, surprise mo 
and the like. all to give the Be 


discovered 


| Player background to draw upon in his 
five holes and won a 5-and-4 de- | 


own games 


Santa Monica Tournament 


A Masters-Experts Tournament. 
during January and February at the 
pants Monica Bay Chess Club, in Cali- 


me in the last round to Irving Revise, 
California Open champion: Norman 
Lessing, like Revise an ex-New Yorker, 
and Revise each scored 
The players who finished next were 
Sven Almeren and George Palmer. and 
if either had won he would have tied 
for first. As it was. 10 hours and 140 
moves reached a drawn position. 
Below is the critical game. from the 
California Chess Reporter. which once 


again reveals the great chess interest all | 


over California. 


Sicilian 


Martin 
Black 


P-QB4 
Kt- 


Revise 
White 
14 Castles 


Rew lag Martin 


t | Indiana 


on KBE oe 


A Repeats in Milwaukee 


1 Benko, Hungarian eee, aue- 
pes... ©. efended the W tn Cham 
ee. 


M. Ot 
breaking. 


vine,’ whe vent 
into, %.. e © won this @ 


pene. | 


eld over the you in Mil- 
as 


Christine Truman, clearly not 
| relishing the burden of carry- 
| ing the No.'t-responsibility, dis- 
| appeared at the same _ stage, 
| which left only Angela Morti- | 


helg| Mer and Miss Hard to continue 


the predictions of the seedsters. | 
New favorite Mortimer lasted | 
just one more round, 


Miss Hard then bowed, 6—4, 


ballerina Bueno to give South 

America its first-ever duo-sin- 

— Wimbledon triumph. Alex 
Imedo, 

by the United Statés, 


surging part of the world. 
What will happen in 


American Association 
(Games of July 19) 
By the Associated Press 


Sianecapelis ‘ss 
8 
Louisville 

St. Paul 


Texas League 
(Games of July 10) 
By the Associated Press 


w. 

54 
me 
. 
44 


Victoria 
Austin seaeghen 
San Antonio . 
s Christi.. 
arillo 


leaving | 
only the United States No. 2. | 


| 


6—3, in 43 minutes to Brazil's | 


pionships, is anybody’s guess 
now. Form shown at Wimbledon 
can, and most likely. will, be 
completely reversed. So let us 
conclude on the very safe pre- 
diction that forthcoming tennis 
events in the United States, so 
far as women are concerned, 
will be even more open than 
they were here. 


HC Hoop Schedule 
To Include Dixie 
Trip to Raleigh 


By the Associated Press 
Worcester, Mass. 

Holy Cross College announced 
a 25-game basketball: schedule 
featured by the Crusaders’ sec- 
ond trip to the Dixie Classic at 
Raleigh, N.C., Dec, 28, 29 and 30. 

Holy Cross also will help 
Fairchild University dedicate a 
field house Dec. 5. 

The schedule: 

Dec. 5 Fairfield at Fairfield, 
Conn.; 9 St. Anselm’s; 12 Yale at 
New Haven: 16 at Amherst: 28, 
a 30 Dixie Classic at Raleigh, 

Jan. 2 Dartmouth: 6 Massa- 
chusetts; 9 Connecticut at Storrs; 
13. Rhode Island; 16 Assump- 
tion: 30 Niagara. 

Feb. 3 Villa Maddona: 6 Bos- 
ton College; 9 Dartmouth at 
Hanover, N.H.; 12 Seton Hall: 
16 at Boston University; 18 NYU 
at New York: 20 Connecticut: 23 
at Providence; 26 at Syracuse; 
27 Canisius at Buffalo. 

March 2 at Boston College; 5 
Colgate. 


NACC Reelects 
Three Officers 


By the Associated Press 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

The National Association of 
Collegiate Commissioners re- 
elected its three officers and 
voted to meet next April 19-22 
in Tucson, Ariz. 

The officers are Kenneth L. 
Wilson of Chicago, Western 
Conference commissioner, pres- 
ident; E. L. Romney of Salt 
Lake City, Mountain States 
Conference commissioner, vice 
president; Reaves E. Peters, Big’ 
Eight Conference secretary, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 

_ The association’s annual meete- 
ing, which began July 1, ade 
journed July 6. 


ALABAMA 
BIRMINGHAM 


MARY BEARD’S 


Estelle Patton, Owner 
Air-Conditioned 


Luncheon Dinner 
11:00-3:00 5:00-8:00 
400\¢ NORTH 20TH STREET 


[T PAYS TO SHOP AT 


E. E. FORBES & SONS 
PIANO CO. 


For Piano: Hammond and Estey 
Organs, Radios. Musica! Instru- 
ments. Pine Furniture and Gifts. 


Terms easy. Write for catalog. 
1914 4th Ave. North. Phone AL 1-4154 


Goodyear Shoe Hospital 


PHONE 


ALpine 
2-7346 


418 NORTH 
20TH STREET 


“Exclusive Home Delivery” 


621 SOUTH 27TH 


MARTHA L | G H T JOHN 


Soprano Tenor 


Teachers of Singing 


Also Class Lessons in 
Sight Singing—Stag2 Deportment 
Opera Workshop 


STUDIOS 
2100 7th Avenue North ALpine 2-1366 
Mail Address, 316 Redfern &t. 


FA 3-4421 


Ladies’ Handbags and Luggage 
Authorized Dealer tor 
? HARTMANN LUGGAGE 
1909 2nd Ave. N.—Also Mountain Brook 


1-Day Service 


UTopia- 


STA-NU 
Cleaners and Dyers 
tohbpine 1-4215 
City-Wide Delivery 
Suita Neighborhood Branches 


Alva L. Wilkey & Sons, Inc, 


the Peruvian entered | 
was the | 
first male winner from that up-| 


Specializing in All Types 
of Remodeling 
Including Tile Work 


the | Remodeling is not a side line but our line 


4757 \st Ave. N. LY 2.5463 


Pratt's Auto Radiator Repair Shop 


G.B. 919 20th ST., ENSLEY Gsteblished in 1920 


RADIATOR REPAIRING 
Cleaniig—Repoiring—Recoring 


Rebuilding 
Ose" asta” Sq AB abet Gre 
Rogers 


ey cr mi hdvertinad mn 
The Christian Science — 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


we 15 ee 


- 


ALABAMA 


FLORIDA 


FLORIDA > 


ee 


FLORIDA a FLORIDA > 


‘FLORIDA 


FLORIDA 


FLORIDA is 


MOBILE 


CORAL GABLES 


FORT LAUDERDALE 


(Continued) 


HALLANDALE 


(Continued) 


MIAMI SHORES 


ST. PETERSBURG 


WEST PALM BEACH | 


(Continued) 


Gayter's 
MOBILE’S FINEST 
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° 


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FLORIDA 
CLEARWATER | 


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Car Washing 


Service Is My Business | | 


GRUVER’S PURE OIL STATION. 
409 S. Ft. Harrison Ph. 32220 


Clearwater. Florida 


Ward's Upholstery Interiors 
Upholstering - Slip Covers Drapes | 
Carpeting « Traverse Rods 


Phone JU 4-5713 Night Phone 91-5271 | 
} mile $. of Harbor Bluffs 


Indian Rocks Rood Largo, Florida’ 


REED’S—Flortst 


© Say It Best 


421 Cleveland Phone 3-2597 | 


ROSE BOOTERY 


Shoes of Distinction for Women | 


RED CROSS HAYMAKER | 


and many other famous brands | 
Treasure Island Store | 
Treasure Island 


14 So. Ft. Harrison Ph. 3-3147 


CHRISTINE’S 
BEAUTY SHOP 


Specialists in all lines of 
BEAUTY CULTURE 
Geneva McIntyre, Prop. 
1199 N. E. Cleveland Ph. 37-745 | 
Phone 91-8261, 


PhillUP with Phillips 66 Flite Fuel | 
GULF CREST 66 SERVICE STATION. 


Jal Green Stamps | 
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Indian Rocks & Walsingham Rd. 
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THE SANDY BOOK STORE 


322 South Osceola Avenue 
One Block West of Courthouse 
BOOKS e GARDS 
STATIONERY 


Largest Variety of Books 
in Clearwater 


HOOD'’S MILK 


Reed's Flowers 


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WALSER’S GD servic 


(Continued) 


Featuring 


MONITOR—LANE—DREXEL ° 


BRAND NAMES. ARE OUR 
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Daniel Insurance Agency 
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PPB PP PPPPEPERPRPPPPD 


J & E CITIES SERVICE 


COMPLETE CAR SERVICE 
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WHEEL ALIGNMENT 


Les Oles Bivd. et 15th Ave. 
Phone SA 4-1801 — JA. 2-9552 


PAUL T. MOORE'S 
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The Friendly Station 
105 N. Federal Hwy. 
JA .2-9264 
A-1 Roofing & Siding Co, 
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Building Materials 
FREE ESTIMATES 


JA 2-0377 


Ba iley’s Yewelers 


Watches, Silverware 


TELEVISION BLDG. 
229 §. E. IST AVENUE 


BATTERIES @) ¢ Du Pont 


TIRES pray Glaze | 
501 No. Atlantic Ph. CL 2- 7327 


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a, 


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120 Orange Avenue 


CARPETS AND DRAPERIES 
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ys 772 


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Special Rates to Social Organizations 


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AL'S SHOE REPAIRING 


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| Delray Beach 
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CR 6-416] 


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The Complete Food Store 


FRED BORLAND — Owner 
521 N. W. 13th St., Gainesville, Fie. 


MANOR RESTAURANT 
Excellent Meals ° Moderate Prices 


Chercoal Broiled Stecks 
OPEN 6 A.M. -10 P. mM, 


2325 N.W. 13th St. Ph. FR 2-9207 


“| PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 


Plenty Parking Space—Air Conditioned | 


N. Miom! Ave. ot 21st St. 
Miami, Florida 
OTHER STORES 
New York City Pittsburgh, Pe. 
Albeny, N. Y. Buffalo, N. Y. 


Complete Sales and Service 


1200 N. Federal Hwy. Ph. 2-6721 | 


LAKELAND | 
Dobbins Service Station | 


L. G. (GUERRY) DOBBINS | 


mons US 
Highland Street and | 


S. Florida Avenue 


| MU 2-8751 


COOK'S 


FURNITURE SUPER-MART 


“Better Than Sale Prices... 


pe 


| 


| 


A SION OF SERVICE 


WINSTON -BERRY 
INSURANCE ASSOCIATES 


1200 S.W. lst STREET- 
MIAMI, FLORIDA 


_ Telephones FR 9-2538 - FR 9-2223 


| 


Complete 
Car Service 


-MIAMI SHORES 
TEXACO SERVICE 


BROWER PRESS 


Office Supplies—Stationery 
Mimeographing—Supplies 
Service is as near as your 

telephone 


12565 W. DIXIE HIWAY PL 4-2515 


Amoco —— Goodyear Tires 


Repairs — Towing 
LEANDER’ § AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 


11835 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY 


P. K; Smith 


STATIONERS 


326 Central Ave. 
Se RRAAALAAAAAAAAAA SSA DAAA 


TURE 
MING 


CENTRAL MARKET 


Purveyors of 


FINE FOODS ) 
803 S. Dixie West Palm Beach 
For Deliveries Phone TE 2-3669 


Prints 
SS 


212 2nd Ave. North 
Phone 7-5901 


Noldowithc’ 


THE STORE FOR MEN 
317 Clematis Street 
West Palm Beach ond Lake ae 


James M. Smith 


OFFICE OUTFITTERS 

PRINTERS 

e ROYAL TYPEWRITERS 
DRAFTSMAN and 
ARTISTS’ SUPPLIES 
GREETING CARDS 


Ph. 7-8121 


TELEPHONE PLaza 9-0263 


Specializing in 
Preventive Maintenance 


SARASOTA 


MIAMI SHORES 


FOOD PALACE 


Two Large Modern Stores 


' 


yar? a 


HOME-COOKED FOODS 
GROCERIES—MEATS—VEGETABLES 


MEL SWANSON, Owner 


700 4th Street N. Phone 7-8960 | 


| 


| 


MIAMI SPRINGS MIAMI! SHORES 
ON THE CIRCLE 9636 WE, 2nd Ave. 


ORLANDO 
Colonial Bank 


4H 6851 N.E. 


ve Rierivener 
and Everywear 
At Five Points 


_. SA8T COLONIAL DRIVE 
JUST EAST OF MILLS STREET 


Complete Banking Service 
3% Interest on Savings Accounts 
Member Federa) Deposit Insurance Corp 


Every Day” Auto Air-Conditioning Service 


210 So. Floride Ave. MU 2-2021 


ORLANDO’S 
FASHION AND 


Firestone Dealer 
Service Specialists 
‘8730 Biscayne Bivd. 


The Shoe Box 


SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN 


featuring 
POLL PARROT SHOES 
for Boys and Girls 
124 Eest Main Phone MU 5-5592 | 


PLaza &-9140 | 
| 


Ma paces 


_ Miami Printers 


1800 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE 
PHONE FR 4-8413 


FINE FURNITURE 
~ . 


Everyone in Lakeland Knows | 


- Benford Stationery Co. 


Stationery — Greeting Cards 
Gifts of All Kinds 
Office Equipment—China and Glass 
125 SOUTH KENTUCKY AVENUE 


Cadillac - Oldsmobile 
Free Pick Up — Free Delivery 
Phone MUtual 2-7173 


“Lakeland’s Automotive Show Place” 


M. P. TOMLINSON CO. 


922-938 East Main Street 


INTERIOR DECORATION 


RICHARD PLUMER 


155 NORTHEAST 40th STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA 


EXTERMINATORS 


Regular Home Service 
Vermin aad Termite Control 


TRULY NOLEN, Inc. 
600 N. W. 7th Ave. Ph. FR 9-1761 | 


MIAMI 


WHERE THE BEST COSTS LESS 


B-THRIFTY 


— AND — 


IGRAND UNION 


SUPERMARKETS 


General tnsurance 


@ AUTOMOBILE 
@ LIABILITY 


@ FIRE 
6 WINDSTORM 
‘(ngraham Bldg. Phone FR 9-3639 


| MIAMI—Little 


| 


LO 6-1561 | 


B-THRIFTY Supermarkets River 


5767 BIRD ROAD 


‘ “FLAGLER ST. 
3050 WN. W. Tth $T 
11301 $. DIXIE HIGHWAY 
2393 S. W. 67th AVE. 
+4 OPA LOCKA BLVD. 
753 WN. E. 2nd AVE. 
1906 PONCE DE LEON BLVD. 


GRAND en Supermarkets 


. 125th ST. 


Car “negie Shoe Salon 


“The Place to Go 
for the 
Names You Know” 
LADIES’ SHOES 
AT BUDGET PRICES 


5 PAN: -AM CHARGE PLAN. | ( 


8134 North East 2nd Avé. . PLaza &- 6302 


18000 N. W. 27th AVE. 


RIVIERA BEACH 
@ 3000 BROADWAY 


MIAMI BEACH 


Formerly Dulaney’s 


Fancy and Imported 
Groceries 


Fresh Fruits and “iar 
Daily 


Top Prime Meats 
and Poultry 


Reliable Charge Accounts Accepted 
PROMPT FREE DELIVERY 
411 41st Street Phone JE 8- 0551 | 


BERNARD LEVY, Realtor 
REAL ESTATE 
and INSURANCE 


Phone JE 8-2323 
1344 Washington Avenue 


“iN SIST on 


“HOME MILK” 


Serving South Florida for 28 Years 
HOME MILK 


MIAMI Phone FR 4-7696 
Ft. Lauderdale — JAckson 2%-2475 


YELL FOR PENNELL, INC. 


Plumbing @ Heating 
Septic Tanks 
736 N. W. 23rd Court 
Miemi 35, Floride 
PHONE NE 4-8589 


PHONE PL 8-4537 


. 
wvans SHORELINE CLEANERS 


Cleaners of Distinction World-Wide Moving 


CALL PLAZA 8-2525 
“wife Bite move 


12997 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY 
NORTH MIAMI, FLORIDA 


MARK’S QUALITY CLEANERS 
& LAUNDRY, INC. 


LAUNDRY—CLEANING 
STORAGE 
Cleaning at its best 


8020 N. E. 4th Avenue Cecil Evans 


Retail 
t534 North Miami Ave. Phone FR 4-262) 


FOREMOST DAIRIES, INC. 


8165 N.W. 17th Ave. Phone NE 6-442! 


thot: saw 


DEPARTMENT 


118 W. Pine 


Fred W. Diestelhorst 


FINE NAME BRAND SHOES 


FOOD TOWN) 


NORTH AMERICAN VAN LINES, Inc.| 


QUALITY | 
STORE | 
SINCE 1894 


GA 4-351! | 
LEE'S SIGN 
-eepune SERVICE | 


A COMPLETE SIGN SERVICE 


1 Orange Avenue 


Phone GA 3-7504 


“No job too large or too small” 


BRASS & HAYNIE, Realtors 


43 E. Central Avenue GA 4-8381 


: We are prepared to 

take care of your 

real estate needs in 
Florida. 


Elgin, Bulova, Wadsworth 
Watches 
Hallmark Cards 
Watch and Jewelry Repairing |, 
LELAND CHUB B 


110 WN. Orange Ave. ORLANDO. FLA | 


LAUNDROMAT 


- Rooke. Prop. 
GA 2- 0697" 1239 E. Colonial Drive | 
DO-IT-YOURSELF 
in new Westinghouse mechines 
or Let Us Do It for You 
Fluff Dry Dry Cleaning Leundr; | 


> oo) 
a 


HEART of FASHION 
in the 


Silverware 


Diamonds Watches 


for 


1480 MAIN STREET 
China 


1301 Ist STREET 


Jinith 


FURNITURE 


INC. 


a HEART of FLORIDA 
Ladies’ Ready to Wear | 


Ex So. MR pg bn 
WRAPS - SPORTSW ¢ UNDERWEAR 
MILLINERY ° SHOES ¢ COSMETICS 


131 North Orange Avenue | 


‘ASSOCIATED RADIO & TV, Inc. 


Westinghouse Appliances 
RCA-—Zenith—Philco—E merson 


| TV and HI-FI: Phonographs Chas: W.White Book Bindery Br 


149 N. Orange Avenue GA 5-156] 


‘ORLANDO-Colonial Plaza 


Belk’s Dept. Store 
Phone GA 4-2421 


Citizens Bank 
and Trust Company 


IN SARASOTA, FLORIDA 


Drive-In Windows Free Parking 
= 2. M, to Fer Custemers 


| 
ans 


“Service is not our sideline” 


GENERAL ELECTRIC | 


814 S. Dixie TE 2-4221 || 
West Palm Beach, Floride 


PALM BEACH | 
TYPEWRITER CO. 


“Complete Office Outfitters” | 
Florida 


FARMS 


PEAT, TOP SOIL, SOD | 
LAWN CONSTRUCTION | 


Telephone TE 3-7288—TE 38-7588 


West Palm Beach, Florida 
JERSEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 


West Palm Beach, 


2ND AVE. 
Telephones Miami 84-521, Holly- 
wood 4061, Ft Lauderdale 2-1935, 
' West Palm Beach, TF 2-5624 


edvertising 


? 


BEAUTY 
SALON 


312 Clematis, West Palm Beach, Fle. — 


BOY'S ROOFING and 


| SHEET METAL WORKS | 


1517 North Poinsettie Avenue | 


PHONE TE 2-6187 
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 


West Paim Beach, + 


Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 


WOODY JONES 


INSURANCE 
“IT PAYS” 


1440 FIRST STREET 


TAMPA 


“fit Banking Services | 
: 


SECURITY 


_ EXCHANGE BANK 
Belvidere Rd. and Dixie Highway 


Member Federal Deposit 
insurance Corporation 


Sp 
— 


WEST PALM BEACH 
Riviera Beach 


TOP QUALITY 


TANNER 
‘SUNMASTER | 


Mildew Resistant 
Outside White 
Finest for Florida's 
Rugged Climate 


Res. 6.68 4, Gal. 
TANNER PAINTCo’& 


402 W. Fortune St. Ph. 2- 6761 


4214 NEBRASKA AVE § 5126 FLORIDA AVE. 
PHONE 36.1791 PHONE 31-4251 


STERLING 
CLEANERS & LAUNDRY 


k-Up ond Delivery 


GENERAL BOOKBINDING 


1708 Cypress St. Phone 8-6532 
Tampa, Florida 


Balsth Roe 


The House of Quality’ 
410 Franklin St. 


© Jewelers 


ORLANDO—Edgewood 


CHRIS BROOKING 
BEAUTY SALON 


“Your personal beauty is 
ouf personal concern” 


PENSACOLA 


DELCHAMPS 
Food Stores 


101 West Garden 


Cervantes at 10th Avenue 
Warrington Navy Point 


' POMPANO BEACH 


4 


TELEPHONE WEBSTER 3-7858 


Waher Chaiser - 5 Ted a 


Hillsboro Shores on AIA 
. POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA 


3024 Corrine Drive Ph. GArden 4-0027. 


WEST PALM BEACH 


Robert E. & J. W. Shirk 


REALTORS 
Real Estate 
and Insurance 
2011 Se. Dixie Tel. TEmple 3-6235 


HALSEY and Griffith, Ine. 


Stationers 


‘The Camera Center, Books, | 
Greeting Cards 


Tel. 2-3883 W. Palm Beach, Fla 


fee 


Watches—Gifts 


Advertisers eppreciete it when you 


Mention 


| 
‘@Bumb 

ve oer 

West Palm goa 83-4408 


— 


MITCHELL'S 


1509 BROADWAY 
Phone VI 4-6930 
Riviera Beech, Fie. 


——— 


WINTER HAVEN 


; 
i 
id 


| Grantham 5 


| 
| FOOD STORE 
Top-Quality Food 
| U. S. Prime and U. S. Choice Beef 
| Finer Flavor from the Land of Corn 


320 Third St., N.W. Ph. CY 3-1566 


Town and Country Shop 


Exclusive Women's Wear 
QUALITYe DISTINCTION 


idal Salon by Appointment Only 
271 W. Central Phone CY 3-73214 


Insurance @ Homes @ Groves , 


H. E. ASBELL 
| 


Registered Broker 
“NEXT TO CITY -HALL” 
P.O. Box 1473, Winter Haven, Fla. 
Phone CY $-1973 

Lumberman’s Mutual Agents _ 


WINTER PARK 


 GULFWAY 
SERVICE 


| {111 So. Orlando Avenue = “Sue 
Gulf No Nox—Good Gulf Gasoling 
Batteries — Tires — Accessories 
Pickup and Delwery Service 
TEL. Midway 4-9037 


This wey te..: 
QUALITY 
FOODS 


THE MARKETESSEN 


323 Perk Ave. S. Mi 7-3119 


HARDWARE CO. 


KELVINATOR | 


Sales and Service 
(06 PARK AVE. 8. WINTER PARK 


Comiplete 
AUTO SERVICE 


Air Conditioning 


STATE AUTO BODY WORKS | 


: ) in 
Fresh @ Pure @ Wholesome| not moka'k's point t ee eet - 


. 
y : 


re te Avenue 


Plumbing & Heating 


eg. ma __THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


GEORGIA _ GERMANY _ SWITZERLAND _|__ SWITZERLAND _| Federation of Rhodesia| Union of South ‘Africa | NEW SOUTH WALES |__NEW ZEALAND .\— 
ATLANTA STUTTGART BERNE ZURICH and Nyasaland - TRANSVAAL SYDNEY—Paddington CHRISTCHURCH 


(Continued) (Continued) (Continued) ‘ (Continued) 
~ . SALISBURY | 


FRED A. YORK Garten | The Leading Store for |—e (Gentinaeds ee eemreiennt CW ORO FIT. UD. | coil 
PEST CONTRAL SERVICE | "rind pf wba | Ladies” Wear and SALISBURY'S =| GA YNORS | Enoincers— Welders G 


for . nan on Dress Material oie EUR ys eS ‘The Electricians’ (Pty.) Ltd. eecllibar bone Nese tes 
SPC age BOARS GARTENGESTALTER the motes. | PROGRESSIVE STORE t Mor iat. FARMER'S 


fe Showroom, Offices and Workshops Automatic Belt Tensioning 
IGEN PFISTER.  — Plorilége” 
Call TR 5-8378 El 


" Where Quality, Style and Service 42 PRITCHARD STREET 178 Oxford St., Paddington 
3 Stuttgart—Feuerbach, a Strasse 75 
766 State Street, N. W. Teléfon: 


e N Are Foremost PHONE: 33-6116 N. S. W. F. A. 1306 ; a ies 
(FL OWERS) B A L M A I Fashion Goods, Dress Fabrics Northern Branch, Tyrwhitt Avenue Christchurch’s Big Modern Store 
THE Puratanines.. a. ne and (Next to Parysia) Rosebank : 


, | ic arg oa | ee Pr. 0 PB on bag yo SOUTH AUSTRALIA It’s so easy——so convenient to 
\uno\g Jack ITA LY ? Y STORE. | S ENNY AAKER ECORI VICTORIA buy everything under one roof 
Teys @ Webbies @ Juvenile Furniture ROME CIOLINA & CO., A. G. rocution . . ‘ 


cods Con 1, Stranger of Galilee | | and on one charge account! | 
ad mates’ ons Doraville, Georris | Marktgasse 51, Berne x Hymns of 373 pre on and a MELBOURNE | | 
Phone 47-3893 


| , , io Barberini (at ) ae ae STANLEY AVENUR | 3. each | Tee sean 
RADIO HOSPITAL | Brioni _79 Veo tor ame rwlee: fee eee HANOVER DISTRIBUTING CO. | THE PRIMROSE POTTERY SHOP STORE” 


The Bpetaire Shop” 
stylist? of men’ ar ; Australi d | ted 9 
“Service That Satisfes” ~~ se his we 1959 aera: Se FINANCE AGENTS PRITCHARD. STRE! Sank ak Aan 


PRITCHARD STREET 
Specialists in Vertical Line in silk St Morite ‘ Insurance Consultants JONANNREBY RG PHONE: 34 3060 GIFTS and CARDS 
. . tie —- obe =! k “| ‘ : 
Home and Car Radio Repairs iam snot BOB SHACKLETON & CO, evr. 


Pottery, Silver, Glass, Prints f 
FRED SLAGHT He takes this opportunity to remind his Linquende House, Baker Avenue _hrupp & (Oo. (Pty.) Lid. | shanna cas neneetser mcgeersgae CHRISTCHURCH 


| oy | SALISBURY 367 LITTLE COLLINS STREET SY DENHAM-ASHBURTON-GREYMOUTH 
1160 W. Peechtree TRinity 4-1013 bout of the opening of his Lady's F. Niklaus 1 | P.O. Box 1562 Phone 28675 


Established 1892 
utique across from his men’s store. | 


Cherry TRANSFER, & (VIA BARBERINI 48) | Ihre seanbacacsctirsiae Bezugsquelle aed TROWLE-AYRES HOUSE OF QUALITY Alicante RESTAURANT & ; HASTINGS 


¢ FAMILY GROCERS COFFEE LOUNGE 
STORAGE C ~ 


& CQ. (PVT.) Ltd. Tl Pritchard Stréet and at 
Agent " Cefesa-rampone SINCE 1864 Gediegene 


D b d L wt 4 Tyrwhite Ave.. Rosebank. Johanneshare a Teas fA am ERS 

r rapers an adies v" " a A 

GREYVAN LINES, Inc | Big Choice in Luggage, Furs, Ladies Watches and Jewelry Damenwasche Outfitters Why | Am A Christian Scientist Parties Catered For HAWKES BAY FARMERS” 
DM nny Sang en CORSETS SALISBURY By THOMAS L. LEISHMAN “['” 305 conan serct, Meftourne | “ROBSere Aupociation Lad. 

13 ivy Se., N. &. MUrrey 8-6660 ather Goods, Distinctive Creations ‘ ’ 


 & 2 23/6d. | for the very best in 
Wie Tinccs fon 3eh 4 Ziie naELaaE SoS. ae Pant Qual ove Sica GAN) | BARES avcan PARPRSEES™ 
ia Iritone, el, 240 - ant Quality Flower 
DECATUR ‘Via gy 62 Tel. 68423) Bahnofstr. 44 und Munstereck Union of South Africa | RANDOM BOOKS (PTY.) LID. patil. 


; (Ecke Poststr.—Miinsterhof) 73 RISSIK ST, JOHANNESBURG For WINTER end 
Plant & Stevenson 


oe : ie « Reeth. Resteme. 6 | P.O. Box 6043 Tel: 835.4830 | SPRING FLOWERING ROTORUA 
6: Pima) PRIEDEN’S |_tonwnttisitioty 5 |_CAPE PROVINCE _ jepTgie-CEANES (TY) UD. GILL & SEARLE °7 


SF coltens, ce, Motel nasater WOOD - CARVING £ CAPE TOWN | We Call and Deliver | 73 ELIZABETH STMELBOURNES READ'S 


for all occasions 


hotel hassler’s hair dressers 


for ladies and gentlemen. CUCKOO CLOCKS 


| a" Phone 24-6151 22-6410 44-3435 MELBOURNE 
souvenirs de Rome souvenirs of Rome 
Rerrvencest —_ wletel' Maasier” MUSICAL BOXES FOSTEVES Se... Pe raenee Camberwell 
OR 7-3828 Piazza Trinita del monti, & Sefton Court, Joubert Plein Streets |. i 


. 6 . 4 . ; ; | S li st 
S adios. Awtikad Bijouterie Lederwaren, Reiseartikel, Schirme Famous Footwear FACTORY AND OFFICE Dress Fabric Specialists 
F ‘ »Zum Forum” Badenerstrasse 120 R 1; bl F bey 89 Derby Rd., Lorentzville,. Johannesbare BROOMHEAD A (0, | 
BAHNHOFPLATZ 7 Traveling Outfits — Leather Goods Cila c ootwear 


R. E. 8. 1. ‘Tel. 1123 Tutanekai Street 
(Schweizerhof Arcade), for the Whole Family PRETORIA 


j 


MACON NORWAY 


na ; E ; 1884 
Qualitats Schuhe state Agents since 


pray : | | 
Jos. N. Neel Co. OSLO | CONFISERIE ¢\ é f ) ee ey | | Properties Wanted and For Sale WELLINGTON ~ 
o * | 


One price to all GG +; TEA-ROOM oh al 82 ’ | 741 Burke Roed, Camberwell 
» 2... 
Correct Fashions tren 


PLEIN STREET, CAPE TOWN ; | LLoean| TOR SRTICE aa 
Schuhe fiir Jedermann—Footwear ; MELBOURNE 
For Men, Women and Boys KARL JOHANSGATE tk Wer oe 12 Badenerstr. 49) SAM NEWMAN Ltd. THROUGH FIVE REIGNS 


; Carnegie 
Mey we help you get the best In fur. | for a ee Apnllances Pretoria’s [Aost Progressive 


_- 9 
Ss 


niture, linens, ladies’ end men’s weor,, KRAMGASSE 173 TEL. 31864 | 


blenkets end rugs? | CX). \ Cofear PAINTS—TOOLS DEPARTMENT | MELBOURNE—CARNEGIE 
We con «clso refresh vour eiderdowns | | yo) pour Dames HARDWARE STORE C A RP E T C A RE | 
D | ’ renal ng a sem : F.Sommena | © ES 30 Burg St., Cape Town CHURCH STREET, CENTRAL | 

AVISON’S m0 


diets for cediy cotaian? y e ~ Sone: | BURNETT STREET. HATFIELD ee. clean them clean and — | y" l 7 ly s 
ALAS MAGASIN MARKUB) Matches, Jewelry | Too ESE, Mehter Carpets Pty. lt 

aiieas oe MARKTGASSE 51 TEL. 23 59 76 O S T E R S | WEST PARK 194 Glentuntly Rd. UL 7060, Carnegie oe ee es 
D @) e 4 | E R We have an efficient shee repair service | | = KRAMER ZWEIFEL ee Phone 2-7153 i 


expect more and get it. 
| “ ‘= Dinner and Tea Sets, Cutlery MELBOURNE 
Blectrie Construction Co. for your convenience | Betten-Vorhange Polstermobel Middle Brighton 


NKER Schwamendingerstrasse No, 24 | Silverplate, Cut Glass 
mMscirical Contractors |'Westkanttorvets @ i ae va 


| RING XB-1294 
48 Hout Street (Above Burg Street) 
3255 Houston Avenue 


Ziirich Oerlikon | CAPE TOWN | 
Millinery and Gowns Concord Presd KIRKCALDIE & STAINS LTD. 


P. 0. Box 589 Phone SH 6-5626 EWE STRAS 8 U pholsterer, Curtains, Beddi 
Blomsterforretning > oe © : ned Bnet ortarorcte Mestemrenesit _ LAMBTON QUAY, WELLINGTON, N.Z. 


| Always First with Fashion 


Macon, Ga. 24556 Lieferung ins Haus! | NATAL 82 First Floor City Centre | ENERAL PRINTERS | 
, 2734 Pretorius Stree 
Tidomennsgate 43, Toll, 551259. BUTCHER HAeauts Copffsra DURBAN RENT PARE CARACE eek ies | 
, ~, | | M. SEEGER-SCHMOHL , (Pty. Ltd.) 1157 New St., Middle Brighton, S. 5 
NORTH CAROLINA OLAF NORLI INTERLAKEN Thsfuersosic 273 Lynnwood Road | 
ASHEVILLE Universitets 1% . \ Bebubefur Phone 44468 Pretoria MELBOURNE 
i gt T KA ROO: | 31/Bireng. , OW cas __ SUBAGENTS FOR North Carlton 


SKODA and HILLMAN 


A NT NS eT 
a 


- : “Edward': (; ‘dA 9 Tel. 25 &1 30 Sales and Service ‘ 
Guild Calls BOOKS | | 2 ; Sealine Plgerere rtd. bE, CARS, TRUCKS and USED CARS, Choosing a Gift? 


Intimate, with unique rural garden 428 Smith Street, Durban A. A. Breakdown Service See our lovety : | For Fine Furniture 
STATIONERY and its attractive Tea Chalet. Albrecht - | 
930 Tunnel Roed 


collection of . 
| hlapfer F L ©) W E R S Chine, Crystal, Pottery, Providing home furnishings 
ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Ice-cream specialties, light luncheons. 


Zenith Wetches, 


a —— © ee Liniesctecolenn ANYWHERE — ANYTIME AUSTRALIA aptpetee ! Pela. ma 
fr ’ , ‘ ’ A RT j 
Southern Highland Hendicrait Guild SWEDEN BUCHHANDLUNG re ae S ‘ D. THOMAS . 


| * | Table Linen, Bed Linen, Blankets W orld-wide NEW SOUTH WA LES veh ices - seit teiiion 
ALLIED OlL & MOTOR C0. . STOCKHOLM | STATIONERS AND | Complete Trousseaux Flower Service 


Wellington—88-90 Lambton Quey 
BOOKSHOP 


C S WECA TEL. 25555/6 BURWOOD | MELBOURNE—Toorak Hastings at Heretaunga Street 
omplete Radiator Service | IG, 

Front End Alignment FOR G00D SWEDISH FRITZ BARTLOME & CO. a a Phone 21852 P. O. Box 1358 ‘SUTHERLAND’ S mee DECORATING Charles Hill-& Sons Ltd. 
Tune Up — Brake Service _ & [. N t N INTERLAKEN ~ ' EF M ] N G QO LD “Cood Shoes” | an 238 LAMBTON QUAY 


McDowell and Southside © AL 3-104 Theaterstr. 12 Bellevue edt Hiiaalin Dia ad Neline ' | H. Oliver & Son THE HATTERS of 
WELCOME TO _. LUCERNE _Flowershop Tel. 32 34 85 — a | WELLINGTON 


A ~~ . . 214 Burwood Road, Burwood 434 Toorak Rd. BJ 1100 
MAYFLOWER WAREHOUSE Gi  LEDERWAREN & REISEARTIKEL i) | "Pass Ul 349 By | Toorak | opposite the D.L.C, 
Moving « Storage yy ae fb. SCHIRME ‘AFRICA (Gilbert tote of Sydney) 


Packing « Shipping | Ladies’ Hair Specialist 


, s PARRAMATTA . | : , 
INGLE TRANSFER & STORAGE (0. Established 1900 in hester Ausfiihrung Federation of Rhodesia AYLWARD.. KENNEDY WESTERNAUSTRALIA Gilbert § 
_ 44 Valley St. AL 2-2731 | 58-64-66 Kungsgetan, Stockholm LEATHER GOODS and Nyasaland | | 3d 


| Pty., Ltd. | NEW ZEALAND 


BURTON Furniture | %° 2™7anee for delivery of | 4. ZURCHER-KAPPELI - BULAWAYO : reet | 10 WILLIS STREET 


we HARDWARE MERCHANTS | | Wellington, N. Z. 
A t ll rt f : a Specializing in AUCKLAND PHONE 70530 
CARPETS ¢ REUPHOLSTERING ee oe Hirechengraben_ 35 . : 


* REUPHO wthe world ERNEST CLARK | eter OSMAN Con. Viera Ra, and Charch St. vane BEAT SALON Charles Hill & Sons Ltd. 


Decorative Accessories Ahléns Florist’s Shop WALTER ROTACH saihes For DURBAN. FURNISHERS YY 2336 YY $336) Our staff of experts are there 
615 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, N.C Biblioteksgaten 5 LUCERNE ee China, Enamel, Glass "We nse oe ai oT h sa alibi 
-, Asheville, N.C. . apres | —— , : . ve on han or all ages, for all types of | 
ues ooo aoe apestres Aluminu d Tinw ‘Used Furniture of Solid Ook and Teck PARRAMATTA fo Brg is nah ar with ™ | THE HATTERS of 
able-cloths | ~ num @n INWaTEC. | phone us when contemplating disposing Flemington WE LLINGTON 
: CHARLOTTE sin tg ahi 6th Avenue, Fife Street, Bulawayo FURNITURE and HOUSEROLD EFFECTS Teenage Coldwave Perm 354° ° he D.C. 
SWITZERLAND Pfistergesse 25 ree Sw ; | We on valuing . O. R. For styles of today’ s trend | opposite the D.1. 
H ARRIS el (Ta.29202 esonabie pices | SALISBURY Tel.: 27884 SALEVARD'S SERVICE STATION Shampoo and Set 8/6 | STANOLINE SERVICE STATION 
| | MARGATE . tote arr = Pink velvet sha and lacque Lower Taranaki Street 
SUPER MARKETS RESTAURANT BASLERHOF THUN M El K L ES. ante Sateesvera Some. we, los RAYNOR service at”'5| Petrol, Olt, a i 
| eo ve . ene BOOP extra cost. Phone , | ’ > Ayres, : 
Fi F ' ny ; ae nt On dear toniaasanne McIVORS of MARGATE | Ft LEMINGTON NS.W x Ith Floor Colonial Mutual Bldgs. (Efficient Lubrication Service 
ine Ss Aeschenvorstadt 55, Basel Eisenhandlung Schweizer : re ct for 158 Queen Street, Auckland - , ; 
phe ant) renowned since pioneering HA tor — ee pen seven days a wee 
g118 Perk Rd. Up-to-date restaurant on the ie icles Wee se cs : BRANCHES “AT i if ~~ wesenries SYDNEY adiea: 
Sh ie ord, - ground floor. No alcohol. ik ek de ri ae Concession, Houghton Pork, ond Breesids| General Houstheld Feeduiadle | Nan TRAVEL and LEATH WELLINGTON 
v . ac escna ur ausnaitartike eee ’ 
2707 South Boulevard Tearoom, Kaffeehalle, din- ee und Feldgerite re tate Eeeeme — | Commercial Union Lower Butt cry 
<2 lglg See . ee esr CON Be oma MODERN BAGS Belmont Furnishi 
uchinson AVe. HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES Visit Bauranrce Company Wid, | t ~ 
Cotsweld Sho Ce ; PIETERMARITZBURG eimon urnis in 
ool os <2 9 Aagaamae H. A. Schaer-Rudolf, Manager WALKER’S FURNISHERS (Pvi.) Lid. : (incorporated in Kneland) |g AUCKLAND STORES and at HAMILTON 42.48-High Street iB 
Tel. 24 79 40 é (opp. Rhodes Cinema) Cc. J. Johnson, Branch Manager | LOWER HUTT 
EUROPE saLisDURY — Sew: E ’ G E l S E R ‘Insurance House,’ 109 Pitt Street, Sydney | CHRISTCHURCH “'C i ] te H a Furnishere 
Hans Schneider e MEN’S and BUYS’ e LIGHT P R j N T | N G THE HERBERT SHOE CO.. LID. i te see 
Drogerie zum Dreispitz en wee f Varpets at 27 die: Street, Wellinrtom 
ile ; e } : rpets a s , n : 
SERN ANY Dornacherstrasse 279 emimalne is wathd Georg e Smith POWER John Piercey & Son ore ; Come lo ACKROYD'S 
nt OND Tel. 34 32 61 HEIMATWERK Thun |, is LTD. All Electric Appliances | 343 sussex Street, Sydney | ... . Retailers of for all Bask 
Pelze Furs LAUITOR 87 no aot ee ee, ARMATURE WINDING MA 3509 High-Grade Footwear 
“Models (Groceries) Reiseandenken von o. SALISBURY * eae rn SALON CAPRI and Stationery 
| | Chenoa Temesneien. ° |. Reo gir Tak Te Brit Aiter Hone: 2-448 SYDNEY—Edgecliffe pene: oe a 
Wollen-Sacher AG ee Men’ d B WwW 289 Pietermaritz Street ; ~~ HAIR STYLISTS Lower Hutt. 
‘ ig ® Native Handweaving oh 3 86 oys car 


enna RAYMOND «¢ ALLAN For latest in owerseas hair styling 
| Eigane Modelle Freiestresse WW, Basel McCULLAGH & BOTHWELL PEACH ous HATTON Sydney's foremost hairdressers | also manicuring ’ UPPER avTT 


ZURI Members of the “Haute Coiffure ' =m 4 
mit ppreéalicher Note van 66 STANLEY AVE., SALISBURY _ 136, Church Street Francais” of Paris, Specialists in. a ee 


| (above Steward-Dawsons) 
: : Ph mAseh, P.O. Box 292 Suppliers of permanent waving. ye 
Dortmund Tel. 32040 Hense Strasse 38| @ Knitted Goods + . oe o = FURNITURE and FURNISHINGS aad Poe te Head Ra: FB13890.\W. U. BAKER G&G SONS Haz ly OO% is | 

STUTTGART oeecervins 4 oer to the Pietermaritzburg and Midlands mi ase ie Rd e CYCLES 


/ ne Pre-packed meats Public for the | | e REPAIRS | t , 

~ Haus und Kiichengeriite ace eS is ts te Wot room | sy pNEY—werstvitle | sAccessORIES | - ~Ppef Mutts 

wth re WALTER GARBANI BERN | ATERERS oa ¥ ) AE MIT 4lt Work Guarentesd Department Store 
Geschenkartikel aii “ Department Store : ; ARNOLD S ITH 219-221 Cashei Street 


: Norris . (opp. The Farmers’) | 
Staiger-Pfisterer Bek, (081) 6 6 19 i: A. &. NORRIS @ CO., (PTY) LTD. Watchmaker and Jeweller | _____(°f Pen for 66 Years 


MALEREI Agent f vertis preci w * 
(Household Requisites) : Mr ngitsme: | Ziirich-Basel-St. Gallen | SPEAK TO ADVERTISERS | Specialists in Fashion Footwear ROLEX WATCHES | ““*aencrrreciete B when vow | QUALITY © VALUE « SERVICE 
See eencanotees, | . Chur Ps A arau Advertisers olwoys oppreciate knowing 


/ . 
SIEBDREUCK thet: you saw their advertisement in Phone: 21153 165, Church Street) EXPERT REPAIR SERVICE | lent tOfn EVERY ISSUE OF TH HE MONITOR 
: moved Lie reas li ne Beet | not make it @ point to tell them? ”| —_P. ©. Box S62 Pietermaritzburg {177A Forest Rd.. Hurstville LU 2486| THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR ee ee 


~~ 


nena neneenenennEnn ent 


y 


q 
: 7 
. je 


> 


© 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, BOSTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1959 


RIS ASRS NPE Ree « 
- _- é . n>. — 
» ie ? 


Se J 
© 


PRE NI 


> See Se ae > PS ie? : ~ 

x * : OR, nn OS ES ne PS ee aes ake Se aE ae ae Se Sb ee CNA 
. SO SOORE SRR SSeS ee NS. Ns SEL ataees Sho ie etary aS 

5 i : Re Nee ee : ~ bite . : = ae 

ESR A es ‘ ~ Pee 


SSP nee ee 


— 
ate 


Cc 


tor 


a ES 


SSE SRR oe NR SRR ST: 
SSS St eines oa SS bia 


Have you ever tried to de- 
scribe cottage cheese to someone 
who has never seen it?. Or asked 


‘|for hamburger buns and been 


offered everything from a dinner 
roll to a ginger cooky? 
Shopping is a real experience 
in the little Scottish city where 
‘my husband and I are living 
while he is studying at the 
university. Armed with two 


‘ilarge shopping bags, and one 


husband to carry them, I ven- 
ture forth. I have learned about 
ithe shopping bags the hard way. 
|The first time I went sHopping 


'I came home with every pocket 


filled, a can of beans tucked in 


my jacket, and a loaf of bread 


| under each arm. No large bags 
are provided. No large boxes. 


eal | Just “bits. and pieces.” 


The Falconeers rehearse a dance number. The first player in the front row is the author 


Transition From Mareh to Dance Musie 


By William Ten Broeck Graham 'like old friends, rusty though;down a solid, driving base of 


Army duty, I found, 
pretty dull at times. As a musi- 
cian in a military band in Ger- 
many the routine of army 
ceremony at times resembled a 


, tune, 
‘thing to oring live dance music 
‘to our army area. Bob was un- 
‘officially appointed as head of 


gets | they were, and slightly out of |thythm., The reed section, with 
We resolved to do some- | saxophone 


} 


men from Florida, 
New Jersey, Connecticut, and 
Boston, blended into a _ single 
resonant sound. Trumpets from 


| For vegetables, I go to the 
market square—lovely, cobble- 
| stoned, and dotted with buck- 
ets of vivid chrysanthemums, 
/roses, and geraniums. I go here 
first, for everything is sold by 
| 10 o’clock. 

|bag with potatoes, carrots, and 
a huge head of cabbage, which 
seems to be Scotland’s favorite 


the fruit store. 
ee Pa 


Here I am really frustrated. 
I am not allowed to select my 
own, I must merely ask for a 
pound of apples, a pound of 
pears, or something of the sort, 
and they are chosen for me 


Having loaded my _ shopping | 


vegetable, I wend my way to. 


By Claire Jones 


after first recording them on my 
cereal box or any other con- 


venient space. I try to add along = 


with him, but am lost after the 
first 15 shillings and the first 10 
ha’pennies, 

By this time, the shopping 
bags are sagging, and so is my 
husband, but the end is not in 
sight. 

Next stop is the dairy store. I 
have long since given up and 
had the milk delivered, so here 
I need only buy butter and eggs. 
I always forget where the eggs 
are reposing in the shopping 
bag, and I usually put some- 
thing heavy on top of them with 
disastrous results, I try to de- 
scribe the cottage cheese, which 
seems to be nowhere in sight. 


“It’s white,” I say. “Sort of | 


lumpy—made from milk—in a 
carton.” 
4 


mel 


&, : 
. 
‘ ae ea aa see eg 
So ee eae sain RA nhc nt a a 


Still blank looks. As you can | 


see, 
cheese myself. My 


that here 
quantity. 


it 


I don’t know everything) 
about the nature of cottage | 
description | 
| fails completely, and I conclude 


is an unknown | 


On to the meat market. Here | 


I receive a nasty shock, 
among the ducks, chickens, and 


for | 


a huge beef suspended from the 
ceiling sits a cocker spaniel, not | eee 
so mournful now that he is in | Sse 


| close-proximity to a leg of beef. | 


The proprietor discovers Fido | 


‘and drives him out 


into the 


Street. He’ll be back, though. I'@ 


« **| Some working members of the 
_ ,.,.|family can remember way back 
* |\when most of the figures on a 
», .<|pay check meant ‘money due 
ge» | the worker—not .& long row of 
~ .\figures denoting ,deductions. 
| Py tee 


The quickest way to get into a 

rut these days is to leave the 

_|crowded superhighway for the 
. | picturesque byway. 
\ i ead 


| In a week or so a Los Angeles 
television station will launch a 
/most unusual weekly program— 
‘it will be a half-hour showing 
of commercials—nothing else. It 
-|could at best prove to be a 
|splendid opportunity for those 
‘TV fans who like to turn off 
»| commercials in one fell swoop. 
a | sb 
The best type of driver is the 
one who doesn’t think a new 
-. $50,000,000 highway is built 
solely for himself—he shares it. 


ee | 
| a ae 


| Don’t underestimate the teen- 
lagers. They are keener than 
.|parents sometimes stispect. As 
|for instance one young lady we 
know who aptly described her- 


self as, “An jndependent de- 
| pendent.” 
iP if 


One citizen who thinks new 


| without my having“6ne word to | can see it in his eyes. 

‘say in the matter. No pinching.| Now to the bakery. | 
From the friiiterer’s (that’s | Scots are masters here. The'|§ si 7 | 

what he’s really catted), I head | cookies and cakes sit unpro- | 3°) : pennies oe: dog . | 


tor the staple grocet’s} Here, the | tected in the screenless windows, | & TEs: fe school expansion has pushed his 
but they are so good that I over- se A elie 


Es | : local taxes-sky high, wants to 
look this. My main difficulty is | United Press International know what can be done to have 
that my names don’t jibe with 


. | Regatta Week at Kiel, Germany the schools occupied in summer. 
theirs. A cooky is a roll, a 


Almost 500 boats took part in thi t yachti inhm wa wn 
~ es 4 mos 0a ook part in s recent yachting event in (turn, “With What?” 
biscuit is a cooky, and a coffee! jie] Bay, Above, a sailboat of the Dragon class. . 
# = | bun is nothing but a big ginger - ee 
*.|cdoky. I’ve never ‘seen such a Picturesaue Pres Dep't: 
: variety of pastries, which by ‘jemeubting Waites ats wiles ok 
pap og alg wed pan don a. ‘Nature,’ narrowed her topic 
‘ers with better success than I | begin to see it “all” in four|down to astronomy, biology, 
| had with the cottage cheese. The; Vienna! days? | geology, heaventy badies, living 
- | cooperative woman doesn’t know Almost overwhelmed at our| Quickly we hailed a taxi and|things and earth formations’— 
'what they are, but she allows, frst sight of its beauty, my hus-| gave the address of our hotel. Mason Valley newspaper. “A 
ime to sample every “biscuit” band and I wanted to crowd all! Noticing the two-way radio,|cuStard pie makes a neat holder 
‘lin the various tins about the! We could into our short visit.!my husband complimented the|for a partly used piece of steel 
im | wall (a pleasant pastime) unti] But how could two strangers| driver on the ease with which |wool’—Wilmington hewspaper. 
Se one rings the bell. It is round | ‘he drove with one hand and/|“An eye witness was Winston 
mw jand delicious, quite graham-|~ ™) manipulated the |Dawson ‘who was not at the 
s | crackerish, and called a “di-| A V, microphone scene at the time ae 
| 2t%52 


| gestive biscuit.” with the other. newspaper, «=== 
por Today a 


broken record. playing over and|°Ut new enterprise, and I be- 
over with military precision, but | came the ‘administrative assist- 
with little variation, or free-|amt.” The evening ended on a 
dom of self-expression. note of enthusiasm. 
Several of us in the band had| | A ee 
been, in civilian life, part-time; Next afternoon Bob and I! 
dance-band musicians, For us, were on our way to special 
military music didn’t completely | service headquarters in search 
satisfy our musical aspirations.|of additional dance arrange-|™€Mts. : 
We missed the driving rhythms! ments, and triumpHantly re-|_, Before long we had a job 
of the dance band, the vital turned with about twenty-five |4t the Officers’ Club, Our re-| — 
passages of reeds and brass, the| pieces. That evening we called |earsals that week became} 
unique satisfaction of a solo|our first rehearsal. In an up- | onger and more intensive than 
well done. We talked often of|stairs room at the service club/|USUal. We were working toward 
the bands we had played in; the, we set up shop. We repeated 2 goal. Saturday afternoon we | 
arrangements we had used. We phrases, worked on reed ensem-|S¢t Up the bandstand, .arranged | 
spent hours listening to records,' bles. labored through brass | he lights and sound system. 3 
but missed the sheer enjoy- passages, experimented with |. That evening, the band made | ; 
ment of participation. ltempos. Three hours and ten|/tS first public appearance on); 
RE larrangements later we emerged | the Stand, complete with maroon 
One day, someone came into tired, disheveled and completely jackets and gray slacks, 
the barracks with a dance | eeee ‘ a ee ee 
rangement from the = service) rom then on we devote , 
stubs We decided to run through |every extra minute to the dance} PF ae rage aie  shateie — 
it. Out came our instruments.; band. Gradually we became Rl Je Th 39th Re me _t wae 
Someone beat off the time, “One,|well-integrated group, The) peter rn cajanenaaale pete gge be 
two, three, four,” and we hit|rhythm section, qa bass player |. heran anwe ie The 
the first chord, The familiar|and drummer from the idee df a ” thee name’ spread 
harmonies and rhythms were Coast, and our piano player laid | rapidly, and we got jobs 
- throughout the whole Nurnberg 
2 aaa raat cree eee SSeS | area. 
ne: 6 | )6©On a typical working night, 
i'merabers of The Falconeers 
‘dressed for the job immediately 
after supper. Soon, a bus, or 
'a truck would appear behind the 


Pennsylvania and Long Island, 
and trombones from New York 
City and East Boston, Mass., 
/made the brass section a sharp, 
‘confident unit. Our second 
‘trumpet player worked in well 
‘as a vocalist. Soon. we added a 
‘number of good vocal arrange- 


The 


Speedy Transportation to Hotel 


Toronto | 


iil} 


Teche: Maen 
Bide te ollbeas!! Hh eae PETTY 


/ Record ory 
he O@ pny flours” 
tom og tra’ ove 


a a As we pulled 


| up to the hotel 
:| Scotland is a beautiful coun- | and prepared to 

. ii try. Its people are among the | pay, we noticed 
am friendliest and most hospitable ‘with dismay 
in the world. Its customs and 


he ms that we had 
traditions are charming andj, Finally, brethren, what- ‘stepped into an 


Just a Challenge 


Most magazine editors are 
affable beings and are willing 
to accommodate their subscrib- 


rs . ‘ . . RR a 
A Sa Oe ~~ - er Se 
~~. s ‘ eS 


v 


SS 


Rose 


a TRL Li tttastuod MEA LAT, bat ib) 


Chats — 


By Guernsey LePelley 


THAT's NOT THE X THAT's 
A SPOT OF BACON GREASE 


CHESTER THIS MAP 15 
A MESS OCF SPLOTCHES.., 
HOW DO YOD EXPECT 

US TO FIND THE 
TREASURE 72/7 


EN( Yeowmre 


i 


On Vacation 


I see by the papers 

The neighbors are gone— 

That is, by the papers 

Piled up on their lawn. 
ELEANOR RYDBERG 


The Weekend Crossword Puzzle 


and accomplish- 
ment for a long time to come. 


pleasing beyond measure. | , Soe me . ‘unmetered ca : 
; | soever things are true, |U metered car. ers in any manner they can. But 
But when it comes to shop-| B . : _Apprehensively occasionally they're a bit baffled 
| ping, I’m completely in favor of | whatsoever things are | we asked the price. ‘by such letters as this one— 
ne mercan method. I cant) honest, whatsoever things | , “That's all right,” said the | entirely genuine—that turned up 
| a ate : bed wth WHlCn | i J driver in flawless English, “it|in the mail recently. “Dear sir: 
'barracks, and loading would | s “he ye e done in Amer-| are just, whatsoever |was my pleasure.” Before we|Last year you printed an article, 
start. By this time, our stock | 1ca, the _"s of tte “ea things are pure, whatso- pete thank him, he pulled | at least I think it was in your 
of arrangements numbered over josey A, wee eee lovely. |2™2¥: A glance at the license|magazine, that interested’ me 
100 selections, and weighed fifty lordly aon yee Bagg. i things are. lovety, | plate revealed the reason for;very much, but I’ve forgotten 
pounds. ae ; 2 whatsoever things are o his amusement—we had been) what it was. I lost my notes on 
In addition there were music housewife in America. The sav- | d io a of | riding in a police car! ithe subject and can’t find the 
| stands and lights for each musi- : oa Fig Phan and shoe leather is < Z00 report, if there be | Kathleen Shakotko | Magazine. Will you send me an- 
® cian, three cases of drum eat eee wll = essing too. | any virtue, and if there _| —-—- 'other copy of same, if it was in 
| equipment instruments for ten a ee eee ce So among the wonderful | . A . | Our readers are invited to contribute your magazine?” 
a ‘oi 3 RT es things that America has, I'll} be any praise think on | tems to this feature. Two dollars will | j 
musicians, plus a large array ta \1i 1 h oan . oof, lhmecaaions ‘ be paid for each original story pub-| Gems like this don’t arrive too 
spars escenacesameen censnnnanasnnnsnansenenesnesenecsnsneemmamenemammanamateacananieansctec sacesccounse of mut instrument racks The author in St. Andrew's | ist very close to the top Its h h oni ] 4:8 ‘lished, Unused items will not be re-| ‘ \ 
Ms ok utes, , | these things. ll. : | often but. when they do, they're 
ay Bes So eae ee Se eae, gen pO ae hs cate Fe ] : : market square ; supermarkets and grocery | turned or acknowledged unless the | , ’ - 
: RE eae ee ON aM ; electrical extensions, and other . prey peony lily. A 63 (tea aoe a ‘sender provides & slamaped.” colt. |Tewarding. a 
equipment. . § ores. LOng - ey continue: ee ” - addressed envelope. \ 
| Wa‘secruited a band mana er | clerk runs wildly all over the | 
The Mail Ba | 2 anager’ store looking for the strange | 
‘for additional help. This har-| j,i, | 
gs I ask for, There jis no| at Vv 
Lol pee ore gg Meo ee 'such thing as self-service. Since | e 
. , a h ee 3 ; 
 Settentiond Leer/Osttrietamy {and setting up equipment, an-| vidual items, I must ask him C C 
. nouncing special numbers and|... ge gg sg" ET DP CHESTER _. MoRNING 
interested in learn- |? am 15, and-studying to be- | over_and over, “How much _is aaa 
I am very in : , | dedications, adjusting the sound | ;¢pjgo» h is. HERE IT'S TIME Fo , 
ing more about Boston, so 1 come an interpreter. Jazz is my | nine ory taving the claves tnis: e is patient, owever, R US 
h to h f ome boy liv- |favorite kind of music. I am |cauipment, playing jand after 15-minutes or so, has TO TAKE A GOOD LOOK ar 
SPOe.t0 DST STUsn Sure Hy EY | , , ‘on Latin-American numbers, | ojlected hi J 
ing in (or near) this city. Pic- | VeTy interested in learning more | eo Alling ; oa it | 5° lect my things, while a 
ture post cards of Boston, and | about the United States. Would | #08, \%m & in on bass, 1" | string of equally patient people 
nearby cities. would be of spe- | Some girl, near my own age like | © rs ? wait in back of me. for their 
wget ; I 1 to write to me?—Maria F I could write a book about! turn to start him scurrying. He 
cial interest to me. In return I . the experiences of this unique|aqqs the figures in his head 
shall send my pen friend inter- ae group. Maybe someday I will. , 
—e ow — from — Tokyo, Japan To those in the service who 
Stef F on years Old.——| Tam a boy, 14, in my third! find themselves in our shoes, I’d 
efan f, soy year of junior high school, I |say, begin rehearsals as soon as 
should like to write to an Amer- | possible. Any ex-members of 
Osaka, Japan {ican boy who is about my age.|The Falconeers will agree it 
I should like to make friends; My hobbies are _ collecting |is certain to bring a feeling of 
in the United States. I do not) Photography.—Takashi I 
have any pen friends in a for-| 
eign country. I am a 16-year-; 
old high-school student, and will | 
acknowledge all replies in Eng-'| 
lish. My main interests include | 


rae 
t Gverp Grst, third and filth Seturde 


baseball, radio, tennis, and col- 
lecting stamps and picture post 
cards.—Hiroshi Y, 


| a oe 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 


I should like to write to a | 
15-year-old girl in Israel. I am | 
and > 


interested in music, 
dancing.—Gloria F. 


oe ee 


Nakasaki, Japan 
I am a 13-year-old Japanese 


art, 


boy who would like to write to | 
a boy in the United States. My | 


special hobby is 
stamps.—Megumi N. 
er Se 


Yeong Dong, Korea 
I am very interested in cor- 
responding with an American 
girl. I am 18 years old, and I 
shall be able to reply in either 
English, Korean, or Japanese.— 
Byoung sew 


collecting 


ee 


Kyoto, Japan 

I am a Japanese boy who 
would like to correspond with 
boys my age,. 14, from’ the 
United States. At present I have 
no pen friends in any foreign 
country. My knowledge of Eng- 
lish is limited but I hope to im- 
prove through exchanging let- 
ters with my new friends in 
America. My chief hobby is 
baseball.—Yoshihiro N. 


Let’s Write! 


The Mail Beg. which is published fr 
quently in this section, msors cor- 
on, og - sence between readers from 13 


te to someone whose 


ou cover the postage. 
l fe in another envélope to the 
he Mail The n 


to giris an 
do not give out names and addresses. 
include sufficient post- 


ane sad forward ‘your letter outside. the 


Correspondencé for those from 20 to 
rs in the Youth Round Table 
y. 


- 


ACROSS 

Bowman 

Titleholder 

\1 Steep slope 

} 18. African 

desert 

. Scandina- 
vian sea god 
Peace 
disturber 

. Drive 
onward 


65. 
68. 


69. 
71. 


Gala 
Incumbents 


Necklace 
Do this at 
Antoine’s 
a up,” 
disgusted 
. Uppity 
person 
5. Aromatic 
. Stopper 
78. Persian 
fairy 
. “— Miser- 


i. 
7. 
2. 
8. 


classic 
. City “not 
built ina 


.. Save from 
danger 

. No! 

. Ceil 
Chapman 
fashions 

. Noiseless 


. Business 
charts 

. Encum- 
brance 


ables,” Hugo 


DOWN 

. Adders 

. Lightly 
cooked 

. Food: slang 

. General 
‘“__” Arnold 

. Sets up 
Recover 
strength 

. Alkaloid 

. That 
woman’s 

. Culture 
medium 

. Clowns or 
jesters 

. Office of the 
chief 
executive 
Disputed 
Alarm 

. Dove “talk” 
English 
college 


87. “Golden 

State”: 

abbr. 

90. Right to 
buy or sell 


. Indian 
peasant 

. Moppet 

. Hostile 
feeling 

. Flame 
suddenly 
. Geological 
layers 

. Desert 
illusion 
Sun 

. Panacea 
. Frolicked 
. Immacu- 
late, as 
sheets 
Portray 


q 


2 is 


. Arizona 


16. Russian 
river 
. Playing 
card 
. Texas 
border city: 
2 words 


. Social 
stratum 


. arr 


. Sun Valley 
sport- 
equipment 
piece 

. Tiny —, 
in Dickens’ 
“A Christ- 
mas Carol” 
Plant 
Honolulu 
island 
College 
teacher 


. Moving 
stairway 
Gorgeous 

42. Capri, 
for instance 
. Utters 


by 49-Down 

. Christmas 
plant 

. French 
composer, 
Maurice — 

. Imperative 
Slack 

. Corpulent 
Dragged 

. Channel 
Temporary 
expedients 

. Strand, as 
of hair 

. Awife of 
Henry VIII 

. Dressy 


10 }12 


Indians 
| 37. 


clothes 


a8 : Air outlet 


Long- 
shouted fish 
39. 
40. 


44, 


45. 
47. 
48. 


any other 
name...” 
Embassy 
member 
Jasmin’s 
dad, 
— Khan 
“*_.. Bill,” 
William F. 
Cody 
Powder 
ingredient 
Rascals 
Roof edge 
Fibber 
McGee’s 
wife 
Four-legged 
animal 

62. Spendthrift. 


ié P] 
- . Irritable 
. Crawled 


| Coyly 


64, No longer 
here 


. Large 
Tennis 
stroke 

. Prohibit 
Become 
void, as a 
policy 
Take up 
residence 

. Cheek — 
cosmetic 
Wise 
lawgiver 
Measured 


. Composition 


WU 
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— 


THE RUINS OF THE 


WeLL THIS MaRK Is 


O10 MURKY MANSION 


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THINK WE OUGHT 
TO FOLLOW THEM 


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AcCcORDING TO THIS 
MAP IT’S A HALE MILE 
NORTH OF HERE. 


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CROSS THE STREAM 


OF COURSE... 
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Editorials 


BosTON, SATURDAY, JULY 11, 


1959 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 


“First the blade; then the ear, JETS then the full grain in the ear” 


xk 


Features — 


PUBLISHED B t : 


THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING SoctsTs 


Hand-to-Mouth Foreign Aid 


The so-called foreign aid bill, more 
accurately entitled the: mutual se- 
curity program, has gone through the 
two houses of Congress at a level of 
around 3.5 billion dollars as com- 
pared with 3.9 billion dollars re- 
quested by the administration. This, 
it should be remembered, is only an 
authorization, not an appropriation. 

If the full amount authorized 
should actually be appropriated, the 
cuts would not be unbearable but 
would leave a reasonably workable 
overseas program, except possibly for 
hurtful delay in arms modernization 
among allies. 

But the second stage of the fight 
over the adequacy of a mutual assist- 
ance or “foreign aid” program is 
sometimes the more serious one, 
though less publicized than the first. 
This is the stage in which the appro- 
priations committees of the House 
and Senate take a.crack at what has 
thus far been primarily the work of 
the foreign affairs committees. 

Unfortunately, certain events have 
taken place in the maneuvering of 
the bill through the Senate which 
may leave a reduced enthusiasm in 
some quarters for the tests that are 
yet to come. 

Aside from the actual amounts in- 
volved in the bill, an important ques- 
tion was whether a greater continu- 
ity of planning would be introduced 
into the aid program by authoriza- 
tions which would extend for as 
much as five years. 

Senator Fulbright, chairman of the 
Foreign Relations Committee, urged 
this particularly as to the Develop- 
ment Loan Fund in the economic 
side of the program. The Draper 


Commission ~marshaled_ important 
reasons why it should apply also to 
military programing. It is seriously 
needed in both fields. 

In his concern to protect economy 
in government President Eisenhower 
allowed the weight of the adminis- 
tration to be thrown against pro- 
visions he had earlier supported for a 
lending agency with authority to bor- 
row from the Treasury over a five- 
year period. However consistent this 
might be with a general antispending 
position, it destroyed some support 
for a purpose to which the adminis- 
tration is deeply committed. 

The activity, furthermore, is one 
which the country very much needs 
to strengthen its diplomacy at_a-cru- 
cial time. Much if not all of the mili- 
tary portion should really be figured 
as part of the defense budget of the 
nation. The good will accruing from 
cooperation in the development of as- 
piring new countries is an important 
factor in the contest against the Com- 
munist bloc. 

These are things the country can 
afford and should support, even at 
the cost of uncomfortable taxes and 
of economies in other areas. It is 
gratifying that the nearly 180 million 
dollars fequésted by the White House 
for technical cooperation or sharing 
of skills with other countries, one 
of the smaller items of the bill, was 
approved without change by both 
houses of Congress. We hope the 
House and Senate in coming weeks 
will decide to appropriate for mutual 
security the full amount permitted 
under the authorizations on which 
they very nearly agreed even before 
conference committees went to work. 


Crack of Light in Geneva Gloom 


The first press conference Mr. 
Herter has held since coming into the 
office of Secretary of State was spe- 
cially interesting for two reasons. 
Besides being a sort of curtain raiser 
for the reopening of the Geneva for- 
eign ministers meeting, it indicated 
that the Western foreign ministers 
may be entering the second round of 
sessions in position to seize an initia- 
tive in the discussions. 

This is all the more notable in view 
of the fact, as brought out by Mr. 
Herter, that there has been little dis- 
cussion among the Western foreign 
ministers since the Geneva adjourn- 
ment. Soviet Foreign Minister Gro- 
myko supplied this opportunity by 
his June 28 statement, which appears 
to have received further analysis by 
Washington since Mr. Herter’s re- 
turn. The Gromyko statement said 
Western rights in Berlin would not 
necessarily end even at the close of 
the 18-month period which he had 
offered for further discussion. 


The Soviet minister, as a conse- | 


quence, will on the one hand find 


himself under pressure to prove that | 
the offer of the so-called 18-month | 
“moratorium” was not just another | 


ultimatum with somewhat more com- 
fortable proportions than Premier 
Khrushchev’s original six-months- 


to-May-27. On the other hand he may | 
find it difficult to maintain a posture | 


of accommodation without admit- 


ting (1) that the West’s rights in | 
Berlin can have no time limit except | 
that which can be arrived at by an | 


appropriate bargaining procedure, 


and (2) that Soviet recognition of | 
this point is an essential part of any | 


preparations for a summit meeting. 
Past Soviet behavior should pre- 


pare the Western ministers for an | 


attempt by Mr. Gromyko to reopen 


Geneva on some other note. If he | 
does not try to, the present slightly | 


improved outlook for progress toward 
an interim Berlin solution will seem 
even brighter. 


Asking the Price 


It is hard to sell a “bill of goods” 
to a people that already has a bill of 
rights. Managers .of the Soviet fair 
in New York now have this warning 
to take back to Moscow in the guest 
books they have provided for visitors 
to the exhibition. 

The wholesomely skeptical Ameri- 
cans have accepted the Soviet invita- 
tion to make comments in the guest 
books, and one of the most pointed 
sort asks why the Soviets don’t state 
the prices of the good things they are 
showing at the fair. 

These questioners are only asking 
to be told the money price. Having 
heard that, they would, of course, 
still wonder about the price in terms 
of human dignity, individual rights, 
— liberty.” 7 **~ 


Perhaps in a state-controlled so- | 


ciety neither the economic nor moral 
cost of material gains need-be cal- 
culated realistically. But the ques- 
tioning attitude of visitors .to the 


Soviet fair may tell Soviet officials | 


something about American life that 
they could not learn except through 
firsthand experience with it. 

It is something that exists in all 


free societies and has always proved | 


perplexing to dictators. Even in 
Asian and African countries there is 
an increasing tendency to ask the 
price of the economic benefits the 
Soviet Union is offering through its 
trade or aid programs, Because on 
these things, too, the price tags are 
missing, and the recipients want to 
know: Who writes the ticket? 


A Hand From the President 


President Eisenhower has spoken 
unequivocally in the past of his duty 
to enforce federal laws and court 
orders. But until his July 8 press con- 
ference he had avoided any state- 
ment of personal convictions on the 
moral aspects of racial segregation. 
Then he did so in ahswer to a ques- 
tion. And the effect generally will be 
to encourage everyone working for 
solutions to this deepest of American 
social problems. Specifically, it 
should give timely impetus to effort 
in Congress to strengthen the 1947 
Civil Service Act. Several bills to this 
purpose are now before the House 
Judiciary Committee. 

The President carefully directed 
his answer to local laws requiring 
segregation in the enjoyment of 

“public facilities” (and not to free. 
dom of choice in personal associa- 
tions) “that interfere with the citi- 
zen’s equality of opportunity in both 


the economic and the political fields.” 


“I think to that extent,” he said, 
“that is morally wrong.” 

Mr. Eisenhower is backing one of 
the measures a McCulloch bill) 


— 


up for consideration before the 
House committee. It takes what 
might be roughly termed the middle 
approach between the two _ intro- 
duced into the Senate, one by Mé- 
jority Leader Lyndon Johnson, the 
other by Senator Paul Douglas. 
Senator Johnson piloted the 1957 
measure, the first civil rights legis- 
lation by Congress in 82 years, 
through the Senate to a: 60-to-15 


enactment. His bill would encounter 


less die-hard opposition from the 
Deep South, although it is by no 
means a meaningless gesture. 

The Douglas bill (sponsored by 
Representative Emmanuel Celler in 
the House) is a measure hard to 
quarrel with on grounds of the ethics 
of democracy. But it would encounter 
the stiffest opposition and might be 


the most difficult to actually adminis-_ 


ter and enforce. | 

Whatever the prospects of each of 
Eisenhower's 
long-awaited but nonetheless wel- 
come declaration will further the 
cause @f giving the words “civil 
rights” more tangible meanings. 


\ 


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‘The Old Dominion’ 


By L. G. Pine 
Editor, Burke's Peerage 


A short time ago my eye was caught by 
an item in the news which certainly 
seemed more than a little curious: In 1692 
the then British colony of Massachusetts 
was agitated by the Witches of Salem 
trials. After a frightful series.of ‘“‘smellings 
out” reminiscent more of a Rider Haggard 
novel than of a civilized community, sev- 
eral women, principally Ann Pudeator, 
were convicted as witches by Massachu- 
setts judges and hanged. 

The Massachusetts Legislature has now 
decided that these women were innocent! 
This, however, is not enough for one 
American. Mr. Colin Beresford Hatch, an 
author, has said that he has asked Her 
Majesty the Queen (through the Prime 
Minister, Mr. Macmillan) to reverse the 
verdict against the women. Mr. Hatch has 
explained that since Massachusetts was a 
British Colony at the time of the trial, 
Ann Pudeator can be cleared only by the 
British authority, hence the appeal to the 
British Crown. 

This is only one instance of the manner 
in which some English-descended Ameri- 
cans are more loyal than the King. The 
350-year anniversary of the foundation of 
Jamestown in Virginia provided another 
example in 1957, when the authorities of 
that state seemed to be deliberately step- 
ping back into a monarchical past. The 
Anglo-Saxon element in the makeup of the 
United States has very much lessened ab- 
solutely as against the elements front other 
parts of Europe, but this has, if anything, 
only intensified the feelings of the oldest 
American families, 


oe we 


Some years ago, in fact before the last 
war, I had the experience (my first with 


Americans) of working on many United ° 


States pedigrees in order to produce a book 
on the Burke style but dealing exclusively 
with American genealogies. In the upshot 
not less than 1,600 pedigrees appeared. 
Many of these were at least as old as any 
English family trees which were already 
in our pages, in cases where. the Ameri- 
cans had prided themselves on their Eng- 
lish connection and maintained their 
records. 

The book came out and it is a fact that 
for the past 20 years, even during the war, 
I have had many, many letters from Amer- 
icans who wished either to bring their 
pedigrees up to date, or to know why they 
were not included. 

I have had the opportunity of learning 
a great deal about the interest which 
American citizens of British descent take 
in their distant past. I have found that 
there are two classes of American in- 
quirers; those who frankly know next to 
nothing about their own ancestry and the 
problem of tracing it, and those who have 
studied the matter thoroughly and need 
only advice on Knotty points which their 
own studies have not been able to clear up. 

Of the former kind must have been the 
American businessman who contended that 
his ancestor was a certain Capt. John 
Smith (Smith is ubiquitous) who com- 
manded a company of lancers for King 
Harold in 1066 at the fatal field of Hastings. 
Vain was it for me to point out that there 
were no lancers on Harold’s side (one of 
the reasons why he lost the battle); no 
army ranks such as captain in 1066; no 
surnames as such; and that no Englishman 
at that time bore the Christian name of 
John, The American remained polite but 
firm; he was determined to have his Cap- 
at the beginning of his 
pedigree. 

| | a eee 


At last I thought of a way out of the 
dilemma,:I agreed to put in the gallant 
lancer captain, if my correspondent would 
give the date of his gazetting in the British 
Army. Back came the answer, “You've 
got me there. I always knew Burke’s was 
thorough, but not that thorough. I'll guess 
you'll have to leave him out.” 


At about the same time, I came across. 


another American who had a meticulously 
worked-out genealogy. He told me he had a 
team of genealogists working on it, in the 
United States, Britain, and France, His 
ancestors had been Huguenots, hence the 
French side of the work. The result of all 
this costly labor (he was a millionaire) 


was a pedigree of some 500 vears which 


for exactitude would have put many a | 


British peer’s in the shade. 

Consequently, I was not surprised to 
discover that in the United States there 
was (and is) a society which deals with 


hefaldic designs on the same lines as the | 
perhaps with | 
is the Committee on | 


English College of Arms, 
more rigor. This 
Heraldry of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society. From time to time 
this society issues Rolls of Arms, and one 
(the sixth since the war) has just come 
out in America. 

Now the interesting thing about these 
rolls of coats of arms is that they repre- 
sent an old medieval custom regarding the 
delineation of arms which has long died 
out in Europe and in England. I do not 
think there have been any rolls of arms 
produced in England for some 400 years. 
Yet the habit has survived in America, in 
a republic. 

The rolls which I have already seen are 
fine documents and show arms designed 
for various American gentlemen; not only 
are coats of arms registered for applicants 
but there are actual grants of arms. This 
means that many Americans are going to 
the New England Society instead of going 
to the College of Arms in London. It cer- 
tainly is more logical, for it is hard to see 
how a citizen of a republic can really peti- 
tion the heralds of another country’s sov- 
ereign for a favor. 

This interest in arms and genealogy 
manifests itself all over the States. When 
Mr. Gifford, the former American Am- 
bassador to London, landed in England, he 
announced that his ancestors had been at 
Hastings. Allowing for the slight change 
of Gifford from Giffard, which is quite 
natural over so many centuries, 
corre¢t, for the Giffards are one of the 
few really Norman families. But would a 
United States Ambassador have bothered 
to say this before the war? 

ee Mee 


Altogether, the balance of interest in 
matters of family and family pride is 
noticeably shifting. No longer are such 
matters the preserve of earls and dukes. 
For one thing few earls and dukes have 
the money to be interested any more. 
Conducted on the old lines, as in Queen 
Victoria’s days, it was on the grand scale, 
and few save the wealthy could afford it. 
It is as well that research has become more 
democratic, for when wealth directs re- 
search, what wealth wants is likely to be 
found. That can mean a lot of very funny 
pedigrees.-One researcher —of— Victorian 
times left diaries. In them he recorded 
how much he had earned, and that had 
the fee been _double he could have pro- 
duced a longer pedigree. 

Nowadays many people apply the 
principle of do-it-yourself to their 
genealogy, and work out their own pedi- 
grees, This interest is found among very 
many English folk whose names will never 
figure in costly reference works. It is 
widespread in America. It has become 
much more common in the British- 
descended communities overseas—Canada, 
Australia, New Zealand and, as far as the 
British element is concerned, South Africa. 

Before the war,-for one letter which I 
received from Canada, I would reckon to 
have four American, but now -there is a 
constant stream of inquiries from Canada 
by all sorts of people.- French Canadians 
are often likely to ask questions concern- 
ing matters of title if not of ancestry. 

But then it is natural that those who 
live in a Commonwealth country. should 
be interested in the Old Country. I still 
think it one of the most curious, yet ex- 
plicable and highly desirable, features of 
the modern scene that so many Americans 
should be proud of their forebears having 
been connected with England or Britain. 


From Yesterday for Today 


To consult with the wisest eatest men... 
To use bonkg righ 0 fae oF aah at 


Resources 


Our natural resources are so related 
that the use of one affects the use of all 
the others, This is especially true of our 
waterways, THEODORE ROOSEVELT 


-America’s Territorial Sea 


An Intimate Message from ci 


Registered ta 0. &. Patent OMes 


By Neal Stanford ’ 


Everybody (well, nearly everybody) 
knows that the United States territorial 
sea extends three miles (nautical miles, 
that is) from the coast. In this area United 
States sovereignty is complete—though 
ships of other nations normally are al- 
lowed to enter the three-mile limit under 
what is called “the right of innocent 
passage.” 

Figuring out America’s territorial sea, 
then, sounds like a very simple operation 
—just draw a three-mile limit around the 


» United States—and there you have it. 


The trouble is—there you don’t have it— 
as I quickly discovered from the State 
Department’s geographer, G, Etzel Pearcy, 
Figuring out this country’s territorial sea, 
I found can be as complicated as charting 
outer space or harnessing the atom. 

This question of just where our 
three-mile limit really is can be very im- 
portant—for an unfriendly ship operating 
only a few yards within United States 
territorial waters might well create an 
“incident.” Also certain countries (the 
U.S.S.R., the United Arab Republic, Pan- 
ama, among them) are trying to get in- 
ternational agreement to push territorial 
waters out to a six-mile limit. They failed 
some months ago to sell this proposition to 
a United Nations-sponsored conference— 
but they intend to renew their bid at an- 
other UN meeting in Geneva next spring. 

There are innumerable things that make 
charting this country’s three-mile limit 
(or a six-mile limit, if it should come to 
that) frightfully complicated. The reason 
is that in order to have the territorial sea 
charted exactly three miles from any point 
along the coast—a highly irregular coast— 
some very fine and precise measurements 
have to be taken. Immediately, the ques- 
tion arises as to what to do about bays, 
inlets, islands, river deltas; what about 
low tide and high tide; piers, breakwaters; 
buoys; bridges; reefs, shoals, or rocks ex- 
posed at low tide? 

First of all, I discovered, the low tide 
along ‘the coast is the normal baseline 
from which to measure. Next, arcs of cir- 
cles with radii of three miles are swung 
from every point along the low-tide line. 
The result is, theoretically, a three-mile 
limit that is neither more nor less than 
three miles from the closets coastal. point. 
But at this point the subject becomes com- 


| plated. 


Take big bays, little bays, and just 
coastal indentations. To distinguish a bay 
from a mere curvature of the coast line, 
the semicircle test is made. A line is drawn 


between the entrance points of the coastal 
indentation, Then a semicircle is drawn 
into the indentation with the line just 
mentioned as diameter. If the water thus 
closed off is larger than the semicircle, 
then it is a bay; if smaller, it is only a 
coastal indentation. In the case of a bay 
the three-mile limit is drawn from the 
baseline across the entrance to the bay; in 
the case of a coastal indentation, it must 
be charted three miles from all coastal 
points, 

However, there is an exception to this— 
under international agreement: if the en- 
trance to a bay exceeds 24 miles then a 
base line, of not more than 24 miles, must 
be drawn within the bay—drawing it to 
enclose the maximum water area possible, 

But what about bays that have several 
islands across their entrances?’In such 
cases a closing line is drawn from island 
to island to coast: lines. To be a bay, the 
area of water closed off“must be larger 
than that of a semicircle the diameter of 
which is the sum of the individual clos- 
ing lines. 

Next as for islands. Islands have their 
own territorial seas. Those within six 
miles of each other .have territorial séas 
which overlap, If these are within six 
miles of the mainland they coalesce with 
the territorial sea of the mainland. 

As for shoals, reefs, and rocks that are 
exposed at low tide but submerged at high, 
they do not have territorial seas of their 
own, However, if such a shoal, reef, or 
rock lies within a territorial sea of the 
mainland or an island, its low-water line 
may be used as a ‘baseline for measuring 
the three-mile limit. 

When it comes to piers, breakwaters, 
other man-made installations, these are 
accepted as part of a coast’s baseline, 
Bridges are not. 

It is obvious that off-shore islands tend 
to increase the area of the territorial sea, 
Were the three-mile limit extended to 
six, it is also apparent that while the 
coastline territorial sea would be twice as 
far out as at present, the six-mile limit 
would not just double an island’s terri- 
torial sea, but quadruple it. And this could 
mean the territorial sea of some islands 
would coalesce with that of the mainiand 
closing off channels now open to interna- 
tional sea traffic. 

Yes, it is all quite complicated figuring 
out just where America’s three-mile limit 
is—however easy it sounds. And figuring 
out a six-mile limit, thank goodness, need 
not be four, or even two, times as difficult. 


this was | 


Out of Experience 


To THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: 

On two separate occasions I have read 
interesting letters in this column regard- 
ing, the retention or abolition of capital 
punishment. 

In reading these letters I was struck by 
the opposite views of.the writers. One 
wished the ‘liquidation of all felons. The 
other expressed the conviction that: “all 
so-called criminals or felons are mentally 
ill and are most in need of care and heal- 
ing.” 

Since I subscribe to the second writer's 
conviction, I should like to offer a. few 
cases in point that may help other readers 
of this column to be a little more objective 
in their thinking on thiS delicate subject 
that is currently being debated in many of 
our nation’s state Legislatures. 

The ancient law of lex talionis (“a life 
for a life’) is considered by some people 
to be. the only deterrent to murder, and to 
others, it is a shade of barbarism that is 
carried over from the Dark Ages. 

Statistical abstracts on the history of 
Capital punishment tell us that primitive 
Savages used this penalty to eliminate 
their unfit, deformed, insane, crippled, 


| aged, and anyone who was a threat to the 


tribe’s very existence. 

As mankind progressed from savagery 
to the early stages of civilization, the ap- 
plication of capital punishment to the un- 
fit gradually declined, but the practice of 
killing the killer, regardless of whether 
the killing was accidental, in self-defense, 


| or premeditated, developed as a result of 


but a blind superstition which assumed 
that, the spirit of the victim could not 
leave his body until the murder was 
avenged, 

Today many proponents of capital pun- 
ishment attempt to justify the need for 
this penalty for the following reasons: 

1. Criminals fear it more than any 
other form of punishment. 

2. Capital punishment is efficacious as 
a social defense. 

3. Capital punishment is justifiable and 
desirable. 

On the other hand, those who advocate 
the abolition of capital punishment do 
so for any, or all, of thejfollowing reasons: 

1. The fat#bility of human judgment is 


pect of publica 


‘.capital punishment, 


so great that, lest innocent men and 
women be executed, most judges recom- 
mend life imprisonment as the.extreme 
penalty. 

2. The six-thousand-year history of 
capital punishment did not deter the com- 
mission of further crimes in the past, and 
it is daily proving itself to be an ineffective 
deterrent to crimes in, the. future. 

3. Murder as murder is a rarity these 
days, 

4. Capital punishment is revenge rather 
than punishment. 

5. Capital punishment is morally and 
spiritually wrong. It violates the sanctity, 
of human life. 

6. Capital punishment is inconsistent 
with the principles of enlightened pen- 
ology. 

7. Premeditated murder, 
usually the sole 


which is 
legal justification for 
is an elastic term. 

8. Capital. punishment is irrevocable 
in cases of wrong convictions. 

9. Capital punishment compels society 
to conceal its horrors from public view. 

10. The entire process of criminology 
and justice could be made more effective 
than it now is, and thus justify the ap- 
plication of life imprisonment in place of 
capital punishment. 

Lastly, it might help the writer of the 
first letter to reconsider his feelings for 
the liquidation of all felons by pondering 
these words from Lewis E. Lawes, the 
late warden of Sing Sing prison, as told to 
reporters following the execution of a 20- 
year old man for the crime of murder: 

“Let me tell you what this young man 
had to say. tonight just before he was 
ushered into the execution chamber. 

“‘l am not afraid to go. We all have 
to go sometime, and what difference does 
it make to me whether I go now, or years 
from now? 

“‘But there are two reasons why I am 
sorry to go now: One is on my mother’s | 
account, The other is this; I should have 
liked the chance to do enough good in the 
world to balance the harm I have done.’.” 

May I ask the reader of the first letter if 
this young man was worth saving? 

Norfolk, Mass. THOMAS VIGROLIO 

(A life-term prisoner.) 


on. All are subject to condensation. We assume no responsibility for statements in 


This noneptoe welcomes communications from readers. The briefer they cre, the better ts their proa- 
i in lettere. 


‘lieved with Justice Frankfurter, 


The Court Rises 


Mirror of World Opinion 


The Supreme Court term that ended 
last week impressed this newspaper’s re- 
porter, Anthony Lewis, as being “one of 
subsiding controversy without but sharp- 
ening conflict within.” The majority of 
the court yielded some ground in the field 
of civil liberties, upheld some Congres- 
sional powers that had been questioned 
and broadened a little the area of states’ 
rights. A minority of three or four, in- 
cluding Chief Justice Warren, frequently 
differed with their brethren. 

The basic issue seemed to be between 
those who held with Justice Black that 
the court’s highest duty was “‘that of main- 
taining unimpaired the rights and liberties 
guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment 
and the Bill of Rights” and those who be- 
as Mr. 
Lewis cites the position, “that the court 
must balance against the interests of the 
individual the needs of Government.” 

What we seem to have here is a. resump- 
tion of the old debate between liberty and 
order, between the individual and society. 


ee 


The question can never be permanently 
disposed of. We get more liberty in times 
of security and well-being. We feel the 
need of discipline when we are threatened 
by a misfortune or an enemy. 

Why the issue should come up at this 
time is obvious: we do feel ourselves 
threatened. Why the court should swing 
now this way, now that way, is harder 
to determine, except on the supposition 
that law is not a science and that judges 
are human. If law were a science the court 
would have only to apply the yardstick of 
the Constitution to the facts of a given 
case and the perfect answer would emerge. 
If judges were not human we would hav 
courts that were pitilessly indifferent to 
the strong tides of emotion that stasnor the 
world. 

It would be a brave man who ‘ail 
write a prescription for a perfect Supreme 
Court. It jis\good, on the whole, to think 
that the court we have is not an imper- 
sonal machine but a growing, changing — 


and sometimes—if we dare say so—an‘” 


irascible organism. —New York Times