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The Weather 


Today—Fair. high near 88. Saturday— 
Humid with afternoon thundershow- 
ers likely. Yesterday—High,. 87 at 
5:10 p.m.; low, 67 at 5:58 a.m. (De- 
tails on Page B-11.) 


Phone WA 4200 


De ~ 


The Washington Post 


FINAL 


Phone WA. 4200 


NO. Cepyright, 1949. 


26.671 


Entered as Second Class Matt 


er, 
By The Washingten Post Company Postoffice,. Washington. D. C. 


WASHINGTON: 


FRI 


DAY, JUNE 24, 


1949 


CARRILR 
PER MONTH 


DELIVER) - 


| Daily and Sunday $1 
Daily Onl 
| Sunday Only 15 3S 


City Zene 81.” Elsewhere sINGI 
on tee Sw 


’ 
ory 
PRICE 


Pails 
Stind¢ay 
Sunday, 


“~ 
ie 


rity ton 
tisewhere) .15 


S 


— 


Hiss Denie 


a 


St e-~-teeitteens 


Suit Filed in District Court 


Did Dog Attack or Fondle? 
That’s the $75,000 Question 


ane” 


Lawmakers 
Say Truman 
Wants Action 
On Job Drop 


(See picture on Page 2) 
By John W. Ball 


Post Reporter 


President Truman believes 
something should be done 
about rising unemployment, 
members of a congressional 
delegation that visited the 
White House yesterday re- 
ported. 


Senator James E. Murray (D., 
Mont.) headed a delegation of five 
‘ Democrats who sought support 
from Mr. Truman for an “economic | 
expansion” bill. 

Meantime, the following devel- 
opments in the country’s economic | 
situation were reported: 

1. President Truman signed a 
joint resolution authorizing the og 2 
monthly publication of “economic —— sf 
indicators” by the Governmertt. ES : se 
This monthly. economic analysis | & a | 
is to be prepared by the President's | ¥ 
Council of Economic Advisers. ~ | 
Letter to O'Mahoney ) 


After signing the measure. Mr. 
Truman made public the follow-* 
ing letter to Senator Joseph C. 
O'Mahoney ‘D., Wyo.), who spon- 
sored the bill: | 

“It is particularly important to 
our Government's efforts to pro- 
mote the objectives of maximum 
employment, production, and pur- 
chasing power, as set forth in the 
Employment Act of 1946, that 
there be broad public knowledge 
concerning economic facts and 
developments. 

“It will now be possible for 
people throughout the country to 
follow each month the compila- 
tion of economic charts. and 
ee prepared for the Joint ¢ Cre amb ec 

mmittee on the Economic Re-| ’ 
port by the Council of Economic 4 $75,000 damage suit in District eset! beg alg Pag be vege 
Advisers as this’ document will be Court yesterday. | eae llerangt Gendie elb bey o! 
available on a subscription basis| Duke is the pet of Mike Schek- Rosser’ Sea Food Grill, 4132 
‘from the Superintendent of Docu- terson, who lives at Soldiers’ ua ied | 

ments.” sae ‘Home. Plaintiff in the shit is| While be was there, Duke “at-) 

2. An extra allotment of 33 mil- Frank Bannow, 65, an interior; See SUIT, Page 14, Column 5. 
lion dollars to States for adminis- —-—— . : Fe 


gg A cl ag b-finding and jo>- Dresages Closest T-H Vote Yet 
Lucas Unites Pro-Labor Ranks 


’ 
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. FF at b> 
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By Jack Lartz—The Washington Pos 
DUKE’S A BIG FELLOW—Mike Schekterson of Soldiers’ Home 


shows how Duke playfully puts up his paws 


The size and weight of “Duke,” |decorator, who lives at 219 Far- 
brought about/r@gut st. nw. | 


-_ —_ ~ ee ~ —a a — 


: 
| 
’ 


commended by the House Appro- 
priations Committee. 
Unemployment Rise 
Increasing numbers of unem- ° . » - 
ployed and the “untoreseeabie With Anti-Injunction Move 
work load” makes the additional, ; 
award negessary, the committee By Robert C. Albright 
said. The extra funds were in- Post Reporter . 
cluded in the omnibus deficiency’ Senate Administration forces, united for the first time in a labor 
money dill to be sent to the House bill maneuver, yesterday aimed a surprise amendment at the emer- 
for action probably next week. 
3. The directors of the United 
States Chamber of Commerce 
urged Congress to trim Federal 
spending and balance the budget 
as a “stabilizing influence” on the 
Nation's economy. A_ resolution 
* See ECONOMIC, Page 25, Col. 7. 


Truman Names 
Flanagan for New 


Term On PUC 


President Tryman _ yesterday 
nominated James H. Flanagan for 
a new three-year-term as Chairman 
ef the District Public Utilities 
Commission, to start July 1. 

The nomination was forecast in 
The Washington Post Wednesday. 
it was sent to the Senate shortly 
after noon yesterday. 

Flanagan has strong backing at 
the Capitol, and Senate members 
privately predicted that the nom- 
ination would be quickly approved. 

It must be cleared by the Senate 


for Flanagan, Harold Boisvert, 
Washington attorney. 


gency injunction heart of the Taft-Hartley Act. 


Mavhew Set 
To Succeed 
Chief Murphy 


By John London’ 


Post Reporter 
Deputy Chief Joseph ‘Holy Joe) 


~ 


7 


The shift in strategy closed over- 


night a long-standing breach in the 
Senate's pro-labor ranks and pre- 
saged the closest vote yet on a 
Taft-Hartley issue, 


Senate Democratic Leader Scott 
W. Lucas (Ill.) sprung the surprise. 
He simply moved to strike out of 
a pending substitute by Senator 
‘Robert A. Taft (R., Ohio) all pro- 


vision for use of injunctions in, 


critical strikes. 
This would leave untouched for 


Mayhew, 62, has been chosen tothe time being Taft's companion 
succeed Fire Chief Clement Mur-|provision for seizure of a struck) 


phy, who expects to retire July 1 


for physical disability, Commis- 


sioner John Russell Young said 
yesterday. 
Mayhew, 


in an interview, re- 


‘plant in a National emergency. 
‘Lucas said his amendment con- 
isolidated splintering Administra- 
tion ranks by stripping the issue 
‘to this: | 

“Are you for or against use of 


vealed he plans to continue “gen-'the injunction to require®striking 


erally” the policies of the contro- 
versial retiring chief. 


However, Mayhew indicated that. 
unlike Murphy he does not believe 
integration of white and Negro 


| firemen would work. 


Interest in the Fire Department, 
proved by the Senate. Local Demo-| revealed, focused on candidates for 
crats had backed, as a replacement tne deputy chief post Mayhew will | 
vacate. Belief was strong that the 


employes to continue to work for a 
private employer?” 

Taft admitted he was caught off 
guard by the tactics change, but 
not for long. With Taft's support, 
‘Senator Spessard L. Holland (D., 
Fla.) countered with an amend- 
ment specifically providing for 60- 
day injunction powers in critical 


thority altogether. 


strikes, but omitting seizure au-/ After Mi 


Kver Being a 


By Drew Pearson 
Dr. Edward Condon, Direc- 
tor of the National Bureau of 
Standards, who with his wife 
was smeared in FBI reports 
made public in the Judith 


Coplon trial, has written a 


letter to FBI Director J. Ed- 
gar Hoover that may rank as 
one of the great human docu- 
ments of 1949. 


Dr. Condon, tortured by the ru- 


‘mors and innuendo spread first by 
‘the Un-American Activities Com- 
‘mittee about his wi 
sympathies for Russia, twice asked 


wife's alleged 


Hoover for an apology. Then he sat 


‘down and wrote Hoover a persona! 
letter in which he poured out some 
of his obviously deep convictions 
‘on FBI reports. However, the let- 
ter, so far unpublished, speaks for 


itself. Here it is: 


| Text of Condon Letter 


The téxt of Dr. Condon’s letter 


| follows: 


Dear Mr. Hoover: 
On Saturday and Sunday, 


| angered and hurt by the unjust 


and unfair allusions to my wife 
contained in an “unevaluated” 
FBI report which was made pub- 
lic in connection with a° court 
trial last week, I issued state- 
ments to the press in which I 
demanded an apology from you. 

IT would like to. assure you 
that these statements grew solely 
out of the spontaneous anger 
natural to any Man on seeing 
the name of his wife sullied in 
the press through official docu- 
ments implying improper con- 


| duet through their distortion of 
| an innocent and normal act, by 


cryptic and insidious phrase- 
ology and connotations, into 
something improper. I believe 
that you can appreciate and sym- 
pathize with my reactions. 

It is apparent, however, that 
you could not reply to my state- 
ménts because the injury is Ir- 


reparable by any apology. be- 


cause it would be impossible to 
remedy the sufferings that many 
have undergone, inaluding my- 
self, as a result of similar opera- 
tions, and because there is the 
possibility that any reply from — 


_ you might be pertinent to a court 


matter. In the light of these, I 


_ regret any inconvenience that I 


may have caused you. 

The fact that the present un- 
fortunate events did take place 
does emphasize, it seems to 
me, the need for care and cau- 
tion in connection with investi- 
gatory procedures. I have re- 
peatedly pointed out the im- 
portance of proper investigations 
and proper security measures 
and, for example, I have held 
again and again that the Presi- 
dent's loyalty program is a 
splendid and excellent thing. 

But the care and caution which 
I mention are crucial if we are 
to attain the ends which we 
seek and, indeed, if we are not 
to jeopardize that very thing— 
our free and democratic coun- 
try—which we value above all 
else. 

In this connection, I do not 
believe that the welfare of our 
Nation is served when slander- 
ous material about decent Amer- 
icans becomes a part of official 
documents. It does no good to 
say that these documents are 
“unevaluated” because they are, 
in fact, used as official reports, 
as they are in such matters as 
Federal employment and loyalty 
cases where they are used as 


See LETTER, Page 10, Column 3. 


— mae eee _— 


onage 


“because vou know 


By Bill Brinkley 
Post Reporter 
In a vital line of testimony, 
Judith Coplon yesterday 
would not admit that the FBI 
confidential documents found 
in her purse when she was ar- 
rested and charged with es- 
pionage were the property of 
the United States 
ment. : 
These crucial “data slips,” con- 
taining. among other things, in- 
formation on Russian espionage 
activities in this country, were “for 
my personal use—-they were my 
personal working papers,” she 
contended. 


“Can I gay that 
States Government owned them at 
my discretion?” the Barnard Col- 


Conslen Eases Judy Wont Remember Cecchi Galician sh ? 
His Demand Admit U. S. 
For Apology Owned Data 


Govern- | 


the United 


lege honor graduate asked Chief. 


Prosecutor John M. Kelley, jJr., 
as he repeatedly tried to pin her 
down on the question. 


Kelley Astonished 


“You can say thaf—is that what 
you're saying?” Kelley shouted 
back in astounded tones. 


“The sereaming and the know-’ 


ing look he’s constantly giving 
the jury!” Defense Attorney 
Archibald Palmer shrieked, tumb!- 
ing to his feet. 

“Are these documents the prop- 
erty of the United States Gov- 
ernment”’” Kelley's voice ham- 
mered through in District Court. 
“Who owned them?” 

The defendant 
don't know.” 


The high importance of the tes- 
timony lay in the defense effort to 
establish that in taking the now- 
famous FBI “data slips” on 
New York weekend, Miss Coplon 
was carrying around something 
that belonged to her personally or 
at least partly so. 

Miss Coplon, a Justice Depart- 
ment political analyst then, 
arrested March 4 in New 


answered: “!] 


York 


with Valentin Gubitchev, 32-vear-' 


old Soviet U,-N. engineer, after FBI 
agents had surveilled them for 
months. In addition to the espi- 
charge against her here. 
both face charges in New York of 
conspiracies to commit espionage. 


Says Two Took Papers 


Not only were the “data slips” 
in her purse then her “personal 
working papers,” Miss Coplon 
said. What was more, she said. 
two other political analysts took 
such slips with them when they 
left their jobs at the Department 
of Justice 

“How da you know?” Kelley 
sharply cross-examined her. 

“I have been told that—I have 


.no personal knowledge of it.” the 


defendant admitted. 

“It's a handy accusation,” 
ley snapped. 

“If you had resigned March 1,” 
he went on relentlessly, “you 
would have felt entitled to de- 
Stroy these! data slips or to take 


Kel- 


‘them with you?” 


ee 

“And the answer is no.” the 
prosecutor's voice clamped down, 
they belong 
to your Government!” 

Thus the prosecution worked 
away on Miss Coplon’s claim that 
she had the data slips in her 
purse when arrested in order to 
get ready for a civil service.exam, 


which required hér to outline | 


projects she had been working on. 

Nor would she admit the value 
the FBI documents. which she had 
when she was with Gubitchev, 


See COPLON, Page 8, Colum 


other Uses It 


ee 


was 


ae ee ee 


—— — - eee 


~~ ., 
é : 
; = 


ast 
7 


3 y 
- 
* 
. 


Communist 


* 


Never Gave 
U.S. Secrets 
To Outsiders, 


He Testifies 


_Not to Chambers 
Or Any Other 
Unauthorized 
Person, He Says 

By Murrev Marder 


ih: Siiiien 

New York, June 23.—Alger 
Hiss, with a distinguished 
Career at stake in a trial which 
may clear his name or send 


® him to prison branded as a 


betrayer of State Department 
Secrets, at 3:21 p. m. today 


=~ = took the witness stand in his 


is or ever 


Associated Press WIREPHOTOs 


BOTH ARE THE SAME BOY—Gerald Sullivan, pictured at left 
on March 14, when Boston police discovered he had been held 
captive in a small room for 10 years, appears as an entirely 


different person (right) entering court vesterday. 


is facing charges of neglecting 


‘Repugnant to Constitution’ 


to her. (Story on Page 15) 


His mother 


him. Gerald would not speak 


ee 


Prince Georges Court Rules 


Slot Machine Law Invalid 


the) 


| By William H. Smith 


Post Reporter 


‘ing weighed by 


perjury trial here. 

The lean, good-looking 44-year- 
old, his expression shifting from 
intense concentration to a boyish 
grin, denied unequivocally that he 
was a Communist or 


ever supplied documents to any 
unauthorized person. 3 
His appearance was the climactic 
moment to the months of worid- 
wide headlines which began last 
August when Whittaker Chambers 
first accused him of being a Com- 
munist, then added the charge that 
Hiss was a willing member of a 
Russian spy ring. 
Strides Calmly to Stand 


Hiss calmly strode to the stand 


jin the packed, stilled courtroom, 
‘where for 


17 trial days he has 
carefully watched his future be- 
| 10 men and 2 
women. 

. “Mr, Hiss.” asked chunky, white- 
haired Chief Defense Counsel 


| Lloyd Paul Stryker, placing the 


“question which congressional com- 


| The Prince Georges County slot machine law, voted at a referen-\mittees have so frequently phrased, 


‘ 


Charles C.-Marbury held that the 
ibill, legalizing cash-payoff 
i¢hines, was “invalid and repugnant 
to the Maryland constitution.” 

' He said its title failed to de- 
‘scribe adequately the full intent of 
‘the measure and did not provide 
‘for either repeal 6r modification 
of State antigambling laws, 

The jurist also termed the “in- 
nocuous” wording of the title mis- 
leading on the ground that the use 
of the term “amusement devices” 
did not clearly indicate that the 
type of machines to be legalized 
could be used for gambling. 

Judge Marbury said that he 
would issue a decree within a few 
days “consistent with the opinion.” 
The decree, he said, would enjoin 
county commissioners from issu- 
ing slot machine licenses and tak- 
ing other steps to put the law into 
effect. 

The ruling was issued in a de- 
claratory judgment suit filed by a 
Mantgomery County pinball ma- 
chine operator last week in an 
effort to invalidate a provision of 
the law restricting slot machine 
Jicenses to Prince Georges County 
residents. 

The operator, C. Walter Hen- 
drix. at no time made any attempt 
to challenge the validity of the 
entire act. When Judge Marbury, 
hearing the suit last week, indi- 
cated he had strong doubts as to 
the constitutionality of the whole 
Jaw, it obviously took both Hen- 
‘drix and the Prince Georges Coun- 
‘ty commissioners by surprise. 

The challenge of the residence 
‘requirement was at once subordi- 
nated and, as it turned out, Judge 
‘Marbury did not trouble to decide 
ithat issue in his ruling yesterday 


’ 
; 


= 3 inasmuch as he struck down the of it, 
___fentire bill. 


' 
, 


The bill providing for cash pay- 
‘off slot machines in Princé Georges 


ma- 


> 


dum June 2, yesterday was declared unconstitutional, 


| In an 11-page opinion, Prince Georges County Circuit Judge! been a member of the Communist 


- 


Tax Probe Airs’ 


front of a cream-colored summer 


Officials’ Ties 


By Robert Thompson 


Post Reporter 


Federal authorities are prepar-| 


“blow the lid off” 
a suspected tieup between officials 
and gamblers in Prince Georges 
County, a person familiar with 
the case told The Washington 
Post, 
basis for the inquiry. 

This 
ernment agents already have a con-' 


ing a case to 


Income tax violations are 


individual said that Gov- 


fession from one Prince Georges 
County official. believed connected 
with law enforcement, and are fol- 


lowing out a mass of evidence un-: 
covered in investigation of affairs’ 
of known gamblers and county offi-: 


cials, 

As soon as the Government men 
of. both the Justice Department 
and the Bureau of Internal Reve- 
nue correlate and corroborate es- 
sential facts already in their pos- 
session, the case will go to a Bal-: 
timore Federal grand jury with) 
request for indictments, the in-: 
formant said. j 

The income tax inquiry stemmed; 
from several sources. When George | 
Morris Fay, United States Attor-| 


ney in Washington, began his in-| 


quiry into gambling more than a 
vear ago, he launched one phase 


: 
tcomplexion, 
; 


To Gamblers | 


imunist sympathizer?” 


’ 


i“Are you now or have you ever 


|Party?” 
“I Am Not and Have Never Been” 
Hiss, his arms crossed over the 


)suit which contrasted with his dark 
answered softly: 

“ft am not and have never been.” 
Q. “Or a fellow traveler or Com- 


A. “No, Mr. 
have been.” 

Stryker then showed him four 
handwritten documents, among 
papers Chambers said he received 
from Hiss for the spy ring in 1938 
when Hiss was assistant to Assist- 
ant Secretary of State Francis B. 
Sayre. Hiss admitted they were 
in his writing 

Indicating 65.typewritten docu- 
‘ments, and 50-odd pages of micro- 
filmed papers Chambers said he 
also‘ got from Hiss, Stryker later 
asked 

“Did you in your lifetime ever 
furnish, transmit or deliver to 
Whittaker Chambers or any atu- 
thorized person, restricted secret 
or confidential documents of the 
State Department?” 

Denies He Lied to Grand Jury 

“I think you meant ‘unauthor- 
ized.” said Hiss with a smile. 
Stryker quickly corfected himself, 
and Hiss replied, “as amended, I 
did not.” 

With the same kind of crisp an- 
swers, he denied that he lied in the 
two perjury counts against him, 
when he told a Federal grand jury 
here 6n December. 15, 1948, that he 
had not seen Chambers after Janu- 


See HISS, Page 4, Column 1. 


U.S. Fired 83 


Stryker, I never 


> 


Metropolitan Police at that' 


time supplied him with a list of On Loyalty Counts 


138 “known gamblers” 
Greater Washington area. 


in thei 


In 20 Months 


new deputy chief might soon be 
chief. e effect of the Taft-Hollahd 

Basis for this speculation is that Counter was to give their plan to 
‘Mayhew is less than two years from Clinch injunctions into the law 


the mandatory retirement age of Voting priority over the Lucas 


‘County was passed at the last ses- He submitted this list, along! 
sion of the Maryland Legislature, with evidence he had accumulated.. The Civil. Service Commission 
‘reported last night that 83 Fed- 


See SLOT, Page 19, Column Ss NCE, ; 
ee PRINCE, Page 19, Column lL. Feral employes have been fired for 


———— | 


loyalty reasons since October 1, 


AAUW Unit Here 


Votes to Secede 


° 


we 


Death of Girl, 13 Months Old, 


the 


The District of Columbia branch 
of the American Association of 
University Women seceded last 


night from the national body be- for a candidate like Battalion Chie 
cause the convention voted to al- William H. Ronan, widely regarded |those two votes. 


low Negroes to become members 
of the national organization. Story 
on Page B-1. 


64. Though Commissioners Move. Actually both amendments 
could extend his tenure it was sus- Present the same basic injunction . 
‘pected Mayhew might serve an|/ssue. Thus the first clear-cut, A 13-month-old girl who had in- 
‘even shorter term, clearing the way tests in the still-inéonclusive la- haled carbon tetrachloride fumes 
¢bor bill wrangle will come onin her home last Saturday, died 


ital. 
The child was Margaret Eley. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milford 


as “cocky” but possessed of some, Offered by Senator Wayne Morse P 
strong backing. (R., Oreg.}, this would have re- 
Murphy said he plans to leave quired the President to submit Eley of 18 Todd pl. ne. 


‘14 Pest Readers 
Disappointed— 
One Gets Table 


Mrs. G. D. of Columbia Rd. 
N.W. had to disappoint 14 
Post readers, because she had 
only one dining room table to 
sell. Her Post want ad 
brought 15 calls in two days. 


Some of those 14 disap- 
pointed readers may still be 


looking for a table. Have you | 


one to sell? Call NA. 4200. 


See MAYHEW, Page 14, Col. 4. © See LABOR, Page 2, Column 4. __ Dr. Christopher J. Murphy. dep- 


ihe ‘uty coroner, said he was convineed 
| i the child died as a@ result of inhal- 

Convicted Man Says Lawyer 

‘Guaranteed’ His Freedom 


ing the fumes. However, he with- 
By Joseph Paull 
Post Reporter 


theld a death certificate pending a 
‘chemical analysis of vital organs. 
| According to Dr. Murphy, the 
fumes damaged the lung tissue 
‘and bronchial pneumonia followed. 
: | The cleaning fluid had spilled 
A convicted gunman testified trial without consulting them. De- over the head and face of the 
here yesterday that he was guar-'cision in the case was deferred. 
proves his freedom by Attorney) In refuting the defendants’ result from swallowing the fluid, 
‘Denny Hughes after the lawyer claims, Hughes declared that he 
was given $500 to have the case received $500 as his 1 fee and 
“taken care of.” nothing more in con ion ihe Coe Milford Eley 
The statement was made in Dis-the case. He testified he could 9, , 
(trict Court. In the case, two Balti- not remember who paid it, but The 
moreans who were found guilty knew he got it. Eley, 35, is a clerk in the surface 
jin 9th st. gunplay over the pro-| He acknowledged, however, that/division of the Bureau of Engrav- 
ceeds of a roving crap game are’, complaining witness in the/ing. 
fighting for a new trial. They are Bryuno-Skeens case had been paid) Mrs. Eley said the accident hap- 
John Joseph Bruno, 38, and James'¢400 to take care of medical ex-|pened ig their home at 5 p. m.) 
_T. (Skinner) Skeens, 28. ‘penses. He declared further: Saturday while she was cleaning 
__ Skeens received 16 months to... complaining witnesses gave a skirt with carbon tetrachloride. 
four years for assault with a dan- ... all the ‘help in the world they| 
Serous weapon and carrying @ 8UD- could, but a taxicab driver con- 
‘Bruno received a year for assault) sted beth these men.” 
and six months for packing ® gun. | Yesterday's 
| Both now claim that H | 


the case death probably yould 


which was resting on the edge of 
fe the dining room table. 


” 


<i 


‘waived away their right to a jury 


: 


4 


is a mechanic at Bolling Field. acai 
mother, Mrs. Leis Sexton) ae 


\See MOTION, Page 18, Columa 3.' Mrs. Eley made a rapid grab fer! 


Laid to Cleaning Fluid Fumes 


at 3 a.m. yesterday in Sibley Hos- 


= 


ié 


4 
, 


Hollywood, June 


Snake Pit?’ Wins Top Honors 


11947 


It said the loyalty of nearly two 


(?).—The film as the best drama of the year, Million Government workers had 


Screen Writers Guild named the Oscar Hammerstein 2d gave the 2C@ investigated in the first 20 


“Snake Pit” tonight as the screen 
|play which “dealt most ably with 


awards to screen writers Frank 


‘months of the program. 
After 


; “full field’. investigations 


iproblems of the American scene Partos and Millen Brand a. an in-\into the loyalty of Federal work- 


rin 1948.” 


dustry and national broadcast. 


‘ers by the FBI, it said, 274 em- 


Making its first honors to its|Navelist Mary Jane Ward shared|ployes were found “ineligible” for 
}members, the guild also named thejin both honors. 


| 
Of ‘Last: Days’ 


The 


: 
: 


current “enormous 


’ icrease” in crime, murder and law- 


child. Dr, Murphy said death could) 
but added that if this had been = 


Me ee eee: ® 
RGARET ELEY 
Tragic accident victim 


——— 


The child, who had been toddling the bottle and it toppled to the 
‘for three or four months, reached floor and splattered. She said the 
up for a pint béttle of the fluid child became unconscious almost at 


once as the fumes arose. 


child lapsed inte a coma 


- 


et A eA Ean emcees eget” 


Rushed Sibley Hospital, the. 
Monday 


lessness is part of direct fulfill- 
ment of the “last days” as prophe- 
sied by the Bible, Elder Howard 
J. Detwiler, president of the Po- 
tomae Conference, Seventh Day 
Adventists, said last night. 

He spoke to more than 2000 del- 


~, jegates and members from the Dis- 


trict of Columbia, Maryland and 
Virginia at the opening of the 10- 
day annual camp meeting at the 
‘Sligo SDA Church, Carroll and 


iFlower ave.. Takoma Park, Md. 


The Adventist leader cited the 
current armament race, the At- 
lantie Pact and the conflict be- 
tween capital and labor as the 
realization of other Bible predic- 


of the world. 


Adventist Elder Sees Signs 


in-' 


tions of events leading up to the| 
d coming of Christ and the 


of the World 


are crying for ‘peace. peace’ af 


meetings of leading statesmen and; 
at the United Nations they are at! 
Elder Detwiler: 
said, “racing to build up the de- 
fense of the country with fheir 
armaments program. This is 4 dis- 
tinct and clear fulfillment of the’ 


the same time.’ 


prophecies of the New Testament.” 
Warning his audience of 
critical situation today, 


allegiance to its principles, 

An estimated attendance of be- 
tween four and five thousand per 
sons f& expected at the weekend 
services, according to W. H. 
Jones, conference secretary-treas- 


| See ADVENT, Page M4, Col. 6. 


| 


“While the nations of the earth 


iGovernment employment 
Of the 274. 83 have been fired, 


150 successfully appealed and were 
\ restored 


to their jobs, and 141 
-eases still are pending. 

Nearly 700 Government - work- 
iers left their jobs before their 
loyalty cases had been processed 
ifully by the Federal Loyalty Re- 
iew Board. 


Vv 


Senate Unit Rejects 


Pay Hike Bill Delay 


The Senate Armed: Services 
Committee yesterday decided 


. | not te delay the service pay in- 
the: 
he de- 
clared that all Christians should: 
renew their acquaintance with the” 
facts in the Bible and renew their) 


crease bill for a study of retire- 
ment regulations. Stery on Page 
12. : 
Elsewhere inside the paper: 
Pages 
ae 
B8.11 


Federal Diary 
Financial 

Ob: tuaries 
Radio 

Sports 
Weather 
Women 


: Amusements 
, Classified 

‘ Columnists 24, 25 
| Comics (2. 9 
Crossword Puzzle 22 
District Line 3 
Editorials, Cartoon 24 


9 
-_ 


Friday, 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
June 24, 1949 


Struck Hawaii Firm 
Burns Rotting Food 


‘Master Stroke’ 


Lewis Seeks 
Wider Coal 
Talk Scope 


foodstuffs rotting 


( 


White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 
June 23 (*).—John L. Lewis and 
soft coal operators from the North 
and West moved today to make a 
national wage confernce of their 
contract talks here. , 

This was considered a master 
stroke by Lewis. It might enable 
him to isolate the Southern Coal 
Producers’ Association and United 
States Steel in his annual maneu- 
vers for more miner benefits. 

Lewis and the coal operators 
started bargaining for a new ete: 
tract here today by counting up 
the annual production tonnage 
represented at their conference 
table. 

The 
tons of soft coal. This was so much. 
of the country’s total that Lewis 


and the coal men joined in tele- 
grams asking other sections of the’ 
industry to join them in their 
contract negotiations. 

The appeal was addressed to 
steel companies that operate mines 
in the South and hav@ contracts © 
with the United Mine Workers, ' 
and to a score of Northern and 
Western companies not represent- 
ed at the talks here. 


me 
total reached 240 million. 


Honolulu, June 23 (#).—Hawaii's 


8-week-old dock strike was no) 
‘nearer settlement 


today, 
was forced to 
and burning 
on its strike- 


shipping company 
begin unloading 


bound freighters. 

Castle and Cook terminals re- 
ported that hundreds of sacks of 
spoiled onions had been removed 


from the idled freighter Hawaiian) 


‘|Farmer and burned in the munici- 
pal incinerator. The company said 
the onions would have contami- 
® nated other cargo. 

Five tons of badly-needed po- 
tatoes were also to be burned be- 
cause of spoilage, the company 
said. 

Both sides to the dispute which 


has blockaded shipping to Hawaii 
refused *o budge from their pre- 
viously stated positions on the 32 
per cent wage boost demanded by 
striking longshoremen. 

The International Longshore- 

en's and Warehousemen’s Union 
maintains that a 32 per cent in- 
crease in pay will bring Hawaii's 
dock workers to a more even wage 
— with West Coast longshore- 


The stevedoring companies in- 
sist that wages should be at a 
parity with those of workers in 
other Hawaiian industries rather 
than with mainland longshoremen. 
Although there are shortages in 
many food staples, the overall food 
situation is not considered serious 
yet. The longshoremen have of- 
fered to unload 4400 cases of 
canned milk from the strike- 
‘bound freighter Hawaiian Retailer, 
which sailed for Hawaii after the 
walkout began. 

A shortage of canned milk for 
‘babies is the most serious result 


if they came in, only two sec-|o¢ the strike so far as food is con- 
tions of the industry would be left | cerned. 


outside the negotiations. One is 
the Southern Coal Producers’ As- 


at Bluefield, W. Va. 


takes the lead in bargaining be-' 
tween Lewis and the steel com- 


panies operating their own coal 
mines. 


Falls Church 
Asks Status of 


School Division 


The new Falls Church School 
Board has petitioned the State 
Board of Education to make a 
school division out of the city. 


rious 


Reds Dominate Hawaii, 
sociation,: now holding talks with) 


another team of UMW negotiators 
The other is | 
United States Steel, which usually | 


Senator Butler Charges 
By The Associated Press 

Senator Butler (R.,, Nebr), 
charged yesterday that “interna- 
‘tional revolutionary communism 
‘at present has a firm grip on the 
economic, political and soc ial life 
of the Territory of Hawaii.’ 

He urgéd Congress to defer se- 
consideration of statehood 
for Hawaii “until the people of 
the islands demonstrate by posi- 
tive steps a determination to put 


\down the menace of lawless com- 
‘munism.’ 


Butler’s views were expressed 


in an official report to the Senate 
Committee on Interior and Insu- 


lar Affairs on his visit to Hawaii 


‘last November as a special one- 


In a June 2 Fairfax Circuit man subcommittee to study state-| 


Court decision, the city was held 
to be a seperate school district. 
Since 1942, Falls Church schools 
had been operated by Fairfax 
County. 


The School Board's request to 
make Falls Church a _ separate 


school division would entitle the 


city to its own division superin- 
tendent of schools. As a school 


hood legislation. At the time of 
his visit he was chairman of the 
full committee. 

In the report, Butler expressed 
high regard for the loyalty and 
achievements of “an overwhelm- 
ing majority” of Hawaii's people. 
But, he said: 

“Since VJ-Day, in September, 
1945, the Hawaiian' Islands have 
become one of the, central oper- 


and one. 


CONFER WITH PRESIDENT—Six Democratic legislators who 


are copsidering introducing what they call 


to combat rising unemployment 
D. TRomas (Utah): James E. 


Murray 


“economic expansion” 
are (from left) Senators Elbert 
(Mont John J. Spark- 


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Se Ee, ces al 
~~ “8.4%, "a — _ - 7 
SOLO LO OE . a es 
o- : ? ain 
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a Re << : 
cree en a ae Cie oleae 
= oS — . 


man (Ala.); 
Helen Gahagan Douglas 
(Wis.). 

White House conference. 


Builders Hold Union Offers to Arbitrate 
Firm Against In Transit Wage Dispute 


¥ 

Carpenters 
By Sam Stavisky 
Post Reporter 

The Master Builders Association 
yesterday met crumbling resistance 
among the independent builders 
with a new vow to continue to re- 
ject the pay demands of striking 
carpenters and laborers 

A spokesman for the association. 
made up of 44 general contractors. 
insisted yesterday that only two 
member firms had broken ranks 
since the 100-million-dollar con- 
struction industry walkout broke 
out June 1. 

“Our ‘membership standing 
fast, and.some of the nonaffiliated 
independents are standing firmly 
with us,” declared Francis J. Kelly, 
association attorney. 

Meanwhile, the building laborers 


1s 


‘were following up the recent suc-. 


cesses Of the carpenters’ union. 
Some of the independents who 
have signed up with the carpenters 
for 10 cents additional an hour 
have also agreed to a 15-cent raise 
for the building laborers. 

Under the new contratts. the 
carpenters will get $2.50 an hour: 
the building laborers $150 and 
hour. The laborer contracts carry 
a proviso that employers who 
sign up.for 15 cents will pay more 
or less, ifj and when the Master 
Builders Association comes to an 
agreement with the union. 

The building laborers yesterday 
won’ an agreement from Builder 
Morris Cafritz, who the day be- 
fore signed up with the carpenters. 
The laborers have similarly ob- 
tained new contracts with other 
firms which accepted the pay raise 
demands, of the carpenters. 

The carpenters added another 


independent to their list of em- « 


ployers against whom the strike 
has been called off. A new agree- 
ment was signed with Aubinoe 
Construction Co., which is erect- 
ing the Kaymount Office Building 
at Vermont ave. and K st. nw. 


AFL operators and maintenance 
men yesterday proposed 
tion of their dispute with 
Capital Transit Co. over a 
work contract. 
Division 689 of the, 
way 
pay 


the 
1949 


Street Rail- 
Empioyes has been asking a 
increase of 25 cents an hour 
for 4300 CTC workers, together 
with fringe benefits which the 
company asserts will .amount to 
9 cents more 

The union vesterday offered to 
arbitrate their demands. along 
with the company’s original pro- 
posal to continue the 1948 con- 
tract and make operational 
changes which CTC declares would 


amount to a saving of $500,000 a’ 


year. 

Negotiators for the transit com- 
pany took the union's arbitration 
offer under advisement, and prom- 
ised to have a reply ready at 

a.m. this morning, when the 
representatives of management 
and union meet again with Federal 
Mediator James Holden. 

Eli Oliver, attorney 


for the 


LABOR—From Page I 


arbitra- . 


union, yesterday flatly 
report that at one time in the né- 
gollations the union had receded 


irom its original demands and hail 
offered to settle for 10 cents an 
hour additional in pay. He empha- 
sized the union's arbitration offer 
submitted in writing yesterday. 
covered all the issues of the dis- 
pute in the original proposal of the 
union and counterproposal of the 
company. 

Three times disputes between 
the Capital Transit Co. and the 
union have been settled bv arbi. 
tration, im 1945, 1946. and 1947 
The procedure calls for union and 
company to select on arbitrator 
each, and for the two arbitrators 
then to select a neutral third ar- 
bitrator. 

The present contract between 
union and company—under which 
maintenance men get a maximum 
of $1.58 an hour. and operators. 
$1.48 an hour—expires July 1. 


—— 


Pro-Labor Ranks Unite 


critical strikes to Congress, along 
with recommendations for settle- 
ment. If he recommended seizure, 
the Government could take over a 
struck plant in 10 days unless both 
houses voted “No.” 

Morse had combined some fea- 
tures of two other compromise 
plans voted down Wednesda’. One, 
by Senators Paul H. Dougias ‘D. 
Ill.) and George D. Aiken .R., Vt.) 
would have confined emergency 
action to seizure. The other, by 
Senator Irving M. Ives (R., N. Y.), 
simply would have required the 
President to submit critical strikes 
to Congress. 

Douglas and Aiken had planned 
a second go-around on their seiz- 
ure amendment, submitting it as 
a complete substitute for Taft's 
injunction-seizure substitute. But 
after the vote on the Morse plan, 
Douglas suddenly withdrew his 
amendment and Lucas submitted 


* clear-cut 


D. Thomas (D., Utah) and 
Administration Democrats. who 
had previously split. away. from 
compromise proposals, lined up for 
the Lucas motion. Six or seven 
liberal Republicans were expected 
to join the pro-labor and com- 
promise forces in the close test. 

Holland's countermove for 
injunction powers, 
stripped of plant seizure au- 
thority, also brought reformation 
of lines on the Taft-Hartley side 
Taft forces still count on 16 or 
17 Democrats and a large major- 
ity of Republicans to stay put 
for injunction authority. 

Cosponsoring the  pro-injune- 
tion amendment with Holland 
were Senators John W. Brickér 
(R., Ohio), Andrew F. Schoeppe! 
‘D., Kans.) and Clyde R Hoey 
(D., N. Ci) 

Thomas asked for a vote vester- 


other 


Hubert J. Humphrey (Minn 
(Cahif 
They talked it over yesterday 


wae yrepenents =e a 1 Nese Program toe ‘Economic E x epension: 


Associated Press Prot 
, and Representatives 
Andrew J. Biemiller 

with Mr. Truman at a 


(See story on Page 1) 


and 


 Carusi 


Lueas P ledges 


DP Bill Action | 


denied al. 


This Session 


Senate Democratic Leader Scott | 


W. Lucas of Illinois yesterday 
promised the Senate will act on 


displaced persons legislation ‘be- 


. fore the end of the current session 


But Chairman Pat McCarran 
Nev.), angrily denounced 


LD) 
SULRES- 


tions that the House-approved bill | 


be forced out of his Judiciary Com- 
mittee, which has sat on it for sev- 
eral weeks 


' 
Lucas gave his pledge when Re- 
publican’ brought up the issue for ' 


unscheduled floor debate 

Senator ‘irving M. Ives (R 
Y.).' decried what he called 
Senate’s “deplorable lack 
tion.” Senator Homer 
(R., Mich.), termed the present 
D. P. law “only a gesture.” He 
said the United States has not as- 
sumed its full responsibility. 

The House-approved bill would 
admit 339,000 homeless Europeans 
refugees over a three-year period, 


N 

the 
of ac- 
Ferguson 


instead of the present 205,000 in | 


two years. In addition, it would 
remove restrictions in the present 
law, labeled discriminatory by 
President Truman, which bar en- 
trance of thousands of refugees 
from behind the Iron Curtain. 
McCarran, who has introduced a 
bill that would raise the D. P. num- 
ber 


to acting on the subject at all. 
Senator Robert A. Taft 
Ohio), suggested that 


mittee if the group fails to act in 
time for a Senate decision thts Ses- 
sion. 

Lucas arose and said he would 
assure the Senate there will be 
“some action—one way or another 
—at this session.” 

Senate J. Howard McGrath, 


Democratic national chairman, said | 


no pledge in the Democratic plat- 
form is ‘more ‘sacred than 
promise to liberalize the D. P. law 
But he pleaded for time for the 
committee to work out a bill. 


to 507,000 but retain restric- | 
tions of the present law, has hinted 
his committee may not get around ? 


(R., 3 


Democratic 
leaders seek to force it out of com- #& 


the <2 


Rangoon, Burma, June 23 (*/) — 
The government today announced 
Karen rebels have occupied the 
cigar-making center of 
but reported a 
sweep is recaptul 
of Moulmein 

Danubvu is 55 miles nor 
of Rangoon in the rice-growing and 
tobacco-processing Maubin district 

Thée objective of 


Danubvu 


arms 


Maladjustment Called 
eDespife strange 
language th 
must 


customs 


face in the United States 


S are surprising 
Dis- 
Commission said 


the maladjustment 
iV few, 


wo) « . 
placed 


the chairman of the 
Persons 
vesterday. 

Speaking 
National 


before the Wi mans 


Ciub, Uga 
said ‘maladjustment 
been a problem main) 
DP’s who have taken 
which they were unsuited 
Mr. Carusi told of a Washington 
case where a sponsor dad hired a 


Democratic 


among 
for 


ions 


7 
drive 
town 
nei? 


lages north had 


thwest | 


the reported t 


has ‘| 


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1« 


; 


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the 
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t? 


Burmese Lose Kev Town 


Karen 
7% . ™ 


svmi 


{ Minor Problem 


a and ‘ 
at a displaced -person fi: 


r domest a 


at 1 


WMOrkK OF 


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Travia.) 


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O07 Sen? Wn 


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1409 


{ 
ea | 


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» 


district, however, Falls Church /@tiins bases and a strategic clear- 
probably would have remained a aa house for on se owry ewe 
part of the Fairfax division, with P#4&" omg the Unite ates 
the Fairfax superintendent acting/°f America 


“By the well-known infiltration 
ao smn werner Besa tactics of world communism, a 


relative handful of Moscow ad- 
jherents in the islands, operating 
chiefly through the International 


; Longshoremen’ s and Warehouse- 
Quelled by Soldiers en's Union, has persistently 


Tehran, Iran, June 23 .P).—Se- sabotaged the economic life of the 
rious riots broke out in Azerbaijan territory.” 
and Maraghen tonight after two “Harry Bridges. president of the! 
laborers died of starvation. 'ILWU,” Butler continued, “is the 

A crowd of more than 500 gath- unseen Communist dictator of the 
ered otitside the Governor's office Territory of Hawaii. He operates 
shouting, “We are dying from hun- through John Wayne Hall, region- 
ger.’ al director of the ILWU in Hono- 

From there, the crowd surged lulu, who is an identified Com- 
through the streets, breaking the; ™U"!st.” 


le aeene 4s enon ich refused British Deny Asking 
U. S. Help at Hongkong Phone Man Gets Life 


It took three truckloads of 
armed soldiers to quiet the angry) jondon. June 23 UP).—A For- ‘For Slaying His Wife sary to keep the work going in 
eign Office spokesman today de-. Rock ‘er baoray Ill., June 23 “)— Government-seized plants. 


mob. 
nied reports that Britain had | 4 44-year-old telephone company| Later Lucas told newsmen: 
- oy Red gn om States a mre technician, Joseph Matusik, today; “Mr. Truman did not know a' 
n . * on ee a a | was convicted of murdering his|single thing about the move that 
asi 5 ° nese Vom "| wife whom he thought was un-/Wwas er a ag a ag og a 
: : faithful and tried to trap by wir- | 4Pprove or s in line w 
“en gr ag ca pyro ae ing their house for sound. He was his pw losophy on labor legislation. 
ridtaball nc tet in ‘Hong-| sentenced to life imprisonment. It was the only move we could 
Netewagrogpl “arveni nas ® bar The state charged Matusik in- make to unite all of our forces.” 
caiolders of the National Union Insurance| 1° we are responsible. We tentionaly shot his wife, Eva, 40, Lucas said the vote on his own 
directors and fer. such other lawful busl-|have not asked for American as- 0", March 7. Matusik, suspecting aoe the gems ee pes 
. be held at” lee Fare Ry $F -y the office of sistance in its defense and there ‘indiscretions, set up an elaborate |determine the course of the 
the company, Suite 761-03, 900 F st. nw. ; stion of the Americans Wire recording system in his home. - . It could determine whether 
en y, Jul epen 1S NO Questo ” in an effort to trap his wife. Allithe bill will be vetoed or even 


MARBUBY, Secretary. se ou Sh naeeeg Febanes to aepiet. the rooms as well as the telephone | ‘recommitted.” J 


day on the Lucas amendment, but 
Taft objected. The Ohioan said Monday but suggested an agree- 
Lucas sought to “kill” the Taft!ment might be worked out to vote 
amendment and he wanted to speak ‘either Saturday or Tuesday. Lucas 
in defense of his own injunction-|said he will try again to reach a 
seizure substitute, as well as for voting agreement today. 


his own. 

Lucas said he was proposing a 
“middie-of-the-road approach... 
taking something from labor, 
something from management” and 
giving the President a bill he can the Holland proposal. 
sign. Later Lucas sought unanimous 

Accepting Taft's own plant-seiz-'consent to vote on both the Lucas 
ure language, but omitting injunc- and Holland amendments on Mon- 
tions, Lucas said such a bill would|day. Taft objected to a vote on 
contain four other previously : 
adopted Taft-Hartley points. Guar- 
antee of free speech to employers, 
and requirements that both un- 
ions and employers sign non-Com-" 
munist, non-Fascist oaths, bargain 
in good faith and file financial 
statements. ) 

He said his plan would ban only 
use of-injunctions to make em- 
ployes stay at work for private em-| 
\ployers but wouldn't affect what 
he thinks is the President's implied 
| power to use injunctions if neces-| 


Union Quitting 
Grocery Trade, 


‘$4700 in Red’ 

‘Pittsburgh, June 23 (4).—The 
big United Electrical Workers’ 
Local 601 at East Pittsburgh is giv- 
ing up the grocery business after 
going $4700 in the red.” 

The local, representing 16,500 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. work- 
ers, opened the store a year ago to 
help members save on grocery bills 
through quantity buying. Philip 
Conahan, local president, said 
canned goods were being sold in 
small quantities only, adding, “it 
hasn't been a paying proposition.” 


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Can’t Relax Now. 
Acheson Declares 


: 


tae 


Pr, 


‘Totalitarianism’ | 
Lord Quits 
Laborites, 


Sees Danger 
| 


By Ferdinand Kuhn 


Post Reporter 
Picturing Russia as already on 
the defensive, Secretary of State 


for continuance of a firm and ac- 
tive American foreign policy. 

In the morning he told the 
House Foreign Affairs Committee 
that it would be “tragic” if Con-| 


London, June 23 (#).—Lord Mil-|ing both the North Atlantic treaty| 
verton quit the ruling-Labor Party and the military aid program for 
today with a charge it is heading western Europe. He also urged ap-| 
Britain for a fall into totalitarian proval of 150 million dollars of aid 
ways. for the new Republic of Korea.| 

Milverton, until 1947 Sir Arthur! saying that without it the people | 
Frederick Richards, joined the La- and government in  non-Soviet. 
bor Party after retiring in 1947 Korea “will have an almost in- 
from a long career as servant and superable task in maintaining free-| 
governor in the colonial empire. . dom and independence.” | 

The 64-year-old peer told the In the afternoon he told a press 
House of Lords many others in theconference that the greatly 
party shared his view that controls strengthened |position of the West 
have reached dangerous size. at Paris was due, in large part, to 

Many are uneasy, he said, over thé Berlin airlift and to programs 
the extent of the Laborite nation- adopted by the United States in 
alization program. ‘the past two years. | 

The specific issue prompting his'Can’t Stand Still 
resignation was a bill for national-- He said there could be no stand-' 
izing iron and steel industries. Heing still in what Re called the 
called it “this sinister journey.” (struggle for ‘the soul of Europe. 

“The road on which we are Either you move forward or you 
traveling leads to a precipice at the slip back, he said, and he pre- 
foot of which clearly emerges the dicted a continued improvement 
totalitarian state.” he said. in the relative power and influ- 


| 
’ 


Acheson appealed twice yesterday / 


gress adjourned without approv-\f 


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DOG oe OY ODOM ae tt. 5 
etn a 
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a" 
. 
ae a 


Milverton then walked calmly ence of the| West if the United jag 


across the floor to sit with the Lib- States took the necessary deci- 


pa a? sions without delay. 
| _ He compared a meeting of For-' 
| The Lords page hes ye prs Ministers to a steam gauge 
"ae toe - aren bill. A ma-0.2 boiler, an indicator of power 
on the iron and ste¢ ' and progress, He felt the western 
jority voted for it on second read- ve 

, ; position at Paris had ‘far more 

ing, oe ostensible approval in s@n, behind it than the Russians 
principle. | , “ae Lf 
“Quickly after Milverton’s sides... tyeSgon sp esterensiye he went 
meres we es ha en” as lax its hold in any way on eastern| 
Over Labor opposition it passed Germany or eastern Berlin; it did) 
two amendments: one would re- not dare to let the Germans regain: 
quire inclusion of at least three responsibility for their own affairs. | 
persons of wide experience on the|The West, on the other hand, was 
proposed national steel board; the ready to relax the grip of military 
other was designed to insure that control and give the Germans a 
the state steel body should include wide measure of self-government, 
a person with wide experience asS\pyt without giving up any of the 
a user of iron and steel for indus- },,<i, freedoms now possessed by 


trial purposes. | | | a 
Meanwhile, the Amalgamated the Germans-in the western zones. 


Engineering Union's national com- Wary on Paris Parley 
mittee, meeting at Scarborough, The Secretary was wary in. de- 


voted 42 to 10 for a resolution scribing the minor agreements on 
demanding nationalization of the Germany reached at Paris. He 
iron and steel industry without .2iq the final communique estab- 
———— hog 2 Lem lished clearly that the Berlin block- 
ly is wieder te Par. ade would not be reimposed. | But 

he said he was not so naive as to 


liament. believe that the blockade might not 


Hike in Greek Gon en 
a He felt the Paris conference had 

Aid Is Urged 

By Van Fleet 


at least provided a forum for the 
discussion of four-power adminis- 
trative and technical difficulties 
between the two halves of Ger- 

many, so that these matters would 

Lieut. Gen. James A. Van Fleet, 

chief of the American military About Austria he was cheerful. 
mission to Greece, said yesterday and confident that th oe 
e remaining 
that larger funds for Greek arMS\ technical, difficulties could be 
aid are necessary next year. | 
silk Aides thee, 160 maillion dollars) rate hard for a living, but at 
allowed during the past 12 months. | 
About the same quantities of arms’ 


not become great issues between 
‘governments. 
f Ww Jj 
He indicated to reporters that jevte® ut, He Predicted that the 
he is urging a higher appropria- 


independent. 


FASHIONABLE | COVERINGS—A rain 


Your Comment 


Invited ... 


Reds Tortured | 


Rail Strike 


Two Bishops, (Enters 34th 


Vatican Savs 


Vatican City, June 23 (*).—Two 
bishops of Romania's outlawed 
'Uniate Church have been tortured 
by Communist officials in an effort 


‘:to break their allegiance to Pope 


Associated Press WIREPHOTO>* 
coat (left), guaranteed 


not to blow up in the wind and a nightgown that would almost 
pass for an evening gown were shown yesterday at the Cali- 
fornia Apparel Creators fall fashion show. Janet Steele models 


the ‘rain coat, made of shiny 


Velon, with weighted hemline. 


Hat and bag match. Frances Leyden’s strapless nightgown is 


elasticized in back and around 


the top. The stole, with slits 


for the arms, ean be converted into a bed jacket 


| 


To High Living Archbishop 


In Morocco 


French residents! of Morocco are 
living in luxury far /beyond any- 
thing that could be afforded by 
the Americah taxpayers who make 
it possible, Congress was told yes- 
terday. : | 

Robert Emmet Rodes, president 
of the American Tfade Association 


of Morocco, testified before the 


Senate Appropriations Committee 
that ECA funds supplied to Moroc- 
co were being used to finance a 
boom rather than/to increase ex- 
ports, | 

He added: that American import- 
ers in that country were being 
squeezed out by French adminis- 
trators in violation of /existing 
treaties. 

To illustrate the! result of import 
restrictions, increased drastically 
in January of this year, Rodes cRed 
the record of imports of United 
States textiles into Morocco this 


least could be self-supporting and year. These imports, he said, were 
$600,000 


in January, $70,000 in 


| =z ° an : 
and supplies are needed next year. e Secretary dealt with other February and noné at all in Marci 


subjects as follows: 


Van Fleet said, but costs have) 4 pe issued a statement de- 


risen and some “capital goods” 
must be replaced. 

Some of the warships, planes 
and a military equipment pre- 
viously given the Greeks are , a ee 
ieting @ek, he oxblained,““and cencies of civilization, 
must be replaced or repaired. 

Van Fleet said that “lots of 
progress” had been made in 
Greece during the past 12 months, 
“militarily, politically and eco-| ‘2) He issued another statement 
nomically.” hinting that the present deadlock 

Communist guerilla activity wil] |in the Palestine Conciliation Com- 
be wiped out in central Greece|™!sSion might be broken’ if the 
at least by the end of next winter,|C°Mmission adjourned “for a brief 
he predicted. The Greek regular Period in order to permit the sev- 
army of 147,000 men, augmented era! delegations to consult their 
by 50,000 militiamen, is in good 0vernments and to give an oppor- 
shape, and has cut down the guer-|tunity for further informal dis- 
illa forces to about 18,000, Van cussion.” 

Fleet declared. (3) He said the State Depart- 

However, the border situation|ment was actively considering 
is “impossible” and peace can publication of an extensive record 
come in northern Greece only by of events in China during the 
an internationdl agreement, Ke past several years, including the 
added. |texts of documents not yet pub- 

“I don’t believe we can get out | lished. 
of Greece until we have such an| (4) He. reaffirmed the long- 
agreement stopping aid to the standing American position that 
Balkans,” said Van Fleet. ‘the Japanese peace treaty should 

Communist neighbors to the! be discussed by all eleven nations 


" and brand- 
jing it as part of an organized pat- 


rope. 
Statement on Palestine 


and April. 


The ECA, Rades told. the com- 


| houncing the Czechoslovak gov- mittee, was “helping foist . con- 
ernment’s attack on Archbishop trolled economy on French citizens 
Josef Beran as a violation of “the who would rather depend on work 
rights of conscience and the de- and initiative than political favors 


and intrigue for their livelihood.” 
He asked the committee to “pre- 


tern of persecution in eastern Eu- elude ECA aid to Morocco and 


withhold counterpart funds from 


all North Africa as long as Morocco 


is violating our treaties.” 

Counterpart funds under BCA, 
e said, were supplying half the 
annual budget of} Morocco, creat- 
ing boom conditions at the ex- 
pense of American taxpayers. 

Rodes said the association he 
heads is crmporesot 40 American 
importers, some 55 of whom first 
visited North Africa as World War 
II soldiers. | 


Prague Hears 


Is Isolated 


(From Press Dispatches) 

Prague, June 23.—Archbishop 
Josef Beran was said tonight to 
have been completely isolated by 
Communist~ security police and 
there were unconfirmed reports his 
most likely successor as Primate 
of Czechoslovakia had been ar- 
rested. 

Government-sponsored agencies, 
meanwhile, loosed new attacks on 
Beran and his bishops, warning 
them they were liable to prosecu- 
tion for “subversive” activities. 

Prague priests reported their 
last contacts with Beran have been 
broken. They said they doubted 
there was any chance he could 
smuggle out another defiant pas- 
toral letter like the one read Sun- 
day in Roman Catholic churches 
throughout the country. 


\ 
The 60-year-old Catholic leader 


who defied the state’s drive to gain 
control of the church has been 
under police surveillance more 
than a week. Vatican and other 
sources have predicted he might be 
placed under arrest at any moment. 

Official Prague sources would 
not comment on reports that Arch- 
bishop Josef Matocha of Olomouc, 
Moravia, had been arrested. 

However, further restrictions— 
if not actual arrest—appeared to 
have been imposed on Beran’s 
most likely successor. Two mem- 
bers of his staff were reported ar- 
‘rested and police made a two-day 
search of his residence. 

The labor union newspaper 
Prace charged today that Catholic 
Church leaders had used “open 
threats and pressure’ on priests 
who approved the government's 
new Catholic Action organization. 

“These are, of course, illegal, 
antistate, antipopular and punish- 
lable methods,” Prace said. 


Rakosi Says Hungary Reds 


Prague, Czechoslovakia, June 
23 (*).—Hungary’s strong man, 


‘Expelled’ 200,000 Comrades 


of Czech workers at Prague's In- 


dustrial Palace. 
He headed a delegation visiting 


north are continuing to provide|represenited on the Far Eastern Vice Premier Matyas Rakosi, said}... gor ratification of the Czech- 


“asylum, recruits and supplies” for; Commission rather than by the five tonight 200,000 persons—about 18 wungarian treaty of friendship. 


the guerillas, the general said. on the Council of Foreign Min- 
However, there has been Jess ac- isters. 
tivity over the Yugoslav border 
since Tito’s break with Moscow, 2 Red Divisions 
and there is no real evidence of 
supply columns moving across the 
line as with the case of Albania 
and Bulgaria, he added. 

What would happen if we pulled said today the First and Second 
out now? a reporter asked. ‘Communist Divisions were virtual- 


Reported Destroyed | 
Athens, June 23 (#).—A source 


per cent of the membership—had 
been expélled from the Hunga- 
rian Communist Party. 


| He added the party is still rid-| 


den with 
teurs.”’ 


“spies 
Against 


and provoca- 
these, Rakosi 


close to the Greek genera! staff Said, he is waging a “campaign of 


destruction with'an iron hand.” 
He referred apparently to the 


“We'd lose Greece,” was the|ly exterminated in three months of recent expulsion and arrest of 


reply. 


ECA Aide Fatally Shot 


fighting in western and central 
‘Greece. 
The divisions totaled between 


. ° ' 5000 and 6000 guerillas. Accord- 
In Paris Accident ing to the informant, “only a few 


Paris, June 23 (#.—John A. hundred remain” of the rebel! 
Brady, 23, a security officer at Eu- force which attacked Arta Jast 
ropean Cooperation Administration March 28, Greek independence day. 
headquarters here, was shot and Arta is 170 miles northwest of 


Laszlo Rajk, former -Hungarian 
Foreign Minister, and Communist 
Leader Tibor Secenyi on charges 
of spying and Trotzkyisfn. 
Rakosi, Hungary's Communist 
Party chairman, addressed a rally 


; 


Rakosi said a purge of Hungarian 
Communist ranks was féund neces- 
‘sary to “strengthen our party.” He 
said it was trimmed to about one 
million ntembers. | 

“It is natural that in our party 
remained paid agents, spies and 
provocateurs of the enemy,” he 
continued. “In the past few days 


we found out such an espionage or-| 


ganization, the destruction of which 


Pius XII, 
today. 

The Uniate Church, a Romanian 
branch of the Roman Catholic 
faith, was dissolved by Romania's 
Communist government last De- 
cember. 

The Vatican) informant said the 
Romanian regime is carrying out 
/a campaign of ‘wiping out the two 
‘branches of the Roman Catholic 
‘faith there, from the ground up 
and with the use of every means 
of terror, oppression and pressure. 

There are some 1,500,000 com- 
municants in @ach of the two allied 
Catholic rites in Romania—the 
Uniate and the Latin. The pro- 
Russian Orthodox Church, onls 
officially recognized religion in the 
country, has more than 12 million 
adherents. 

The Vatican source gave the fol- 
lowing account of the case of the 
two bishops: 

The Communists demanded that 
Uniate Church leaders return to 
the Orthodox faith. Six bishops 
refused. They were led by Msgr 
Ion Suciu, Papal represeritative of 
the metropolitan see of Fagaras 
_and Albia Julia : 

Bishop Sucju and the five other 
bishops were interned in gn Ortho- 
dox monastery. This was last Nob- 
vember 

Throughout the winter Orthodox 
prelates trie to persuade the 
Uniate leaders to sign statements 
saying they had abandoned their 
loyalty to the Pope and joined the 
Orthodox faith. 

This spring Suciu was taken to 
the Ministry of the Interior in the 
heart of Bucharest, where he van- 
‘ished into the iron and concrete 
torture chambers of the basement, 
the Vatican source said. 

It is known that Suciu was tor- 
tured, the source added, but it is 
not known whether he still is 
alive 

In May, the Vatican informant 
continued, Suciu’s auxiliary, Msgr 
Aftenie, was taken to the Interior 
Ministry and tortured. The other 
four bishops, all still held by the 
authorities, believe they merely 
are waiting their turn, the source 
said. | 


ep. Kee Enters 


Walter Reed 


a Vatican source said 


Representative John Kee (D..'8 


W. Va.), 75-year-old chairman of 
the House Foreign Affairs Com- 


mittee, is in Walter Reed Hospital # 
for what his office described, yes-| % 


terday as a “check-up.” 


ee was unable to preside at ; 


yesterday's committee meeting 


with Secretary of State Acheson.) & 


and his plate was taken by Rep- 
resentative James 
D., S. C.) as acting chairman. 
The death of Representative 
Sol Bloom moved Kee into the 
committee chairmanship last 
March. Kee is expected to be in 
the hospital for several weeks at 
least, with the result that Rich- 
ards will have to conduct commit- 
tee meetings for the rest of this 
congressional session. 
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Berlin, June; 23 U.?).—“Emer- 
gency crews’ of striking railway 
workers showed up for work to- 
day but the vital rail line from 
Berlin to western Germany re- 
mained idle 

The partial ‘blockade of Ber- 
lin, caused by the rail strike, en- 
tered its thirty-fourth day after 
the Soviet-controlled railway ad- 


ministration rejected the strikers 


offer to handle freight trains which 
have been held up between Ber- 
lin and Helmstedt since May 30 

The administration said the 
strikers’ propdsal was “an en 
croachment of the operation 
rights of the railway.” 

British military government of- 
ficlals described the strikers 
fer as “totally impractical,” 
the three western Berlin 
mandants were themselves _re- 
ported deadlocked on the question 
of how to end the strike 

Thev met bul 
were announced. Informed sources 
had widely diverg- 
ent views on means for ending the 
chippling walkout 

The Western commandants were 
scheduled to resume 
Friday or Saturday 

Despite the attitude of the So- 
viet Railway Administration to- 
ward the unidn’s offer. 80 strik- 
ing technicians reported for work 
today, and union leaders said addi- 
tional strikers! were ready to join 
the “emergency crews.’ 

Union officials hoped the raliway 
administration! would back down 
from its position and. at least al- 
low the strikers to unload 600 
freight cars brought in during the 
eariy days of the strike 

Union officials, in announcing 
the offer vesterday to bring in 
freight trains from the West. made 
it clear the strike on Berlin's ele- 
vated railway system would con- 
tinue. The strikers are holding 
out for written Soviet guarantees 
there would be no reprisals against 
them if they returned to work, 


Ol- 
and 
com- 


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Said the three 


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we undertook with an iron hand.” 

Rakosi said that, according to 
the official press report, the Com- 
munists’ trial and imprisonment of 
Joseph Cardinal Mindszefity had 
aided them in the recent elections. 


killed last night. Police said it was Athens. 
an accident. The guerillas were said to have 
Brady was struck by a bullet wandered several hundred miles 
from a pistol in the hands of Colin through the valleys and along the | 
H, Mechlin of Columbus, Ohio, | peaks in central Greece in an at- 
another security officer. Mechlin tempt to elude Greek army units. | 
and Brady were close -friends, offi- The general staff announced sev- 
cials at ECA headquarters said, and eral weeks ago that the two rebel 
both thought the gun was unloaded. divisions had “ceased to exist as 
Brady's home was in Omaha, effective combat units.” 


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THE WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


ra . 


+> 


tice 
said 
U.N. 


P| ee 


€ 
a. ™ 


Prague, Czechoslovakia, June 23 
*).—A United Nations official yordoch had 
arrived here from Geneva last srethibed since 
night to investigate local police 
attempts to arrest a Czechoslovak 
ciizen in U.N. employ) here. 

Olav Rytter, U.N. | information 
center director in Prague, could 
not be reached’ for tomment on 
a Story from U.N. heatiquarters at 
Lake Success about the emplove 
identified only as Mutdoch. nar 

The story said he 
given refuge in the 
security police who 
question him 


The Lake Success story 


not left tl 
Mav 

the Cze 

ma «tie 


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e 


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ernment at 
exchanging 


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casion police 

LN 
get Mur 
Rvyttet 
to 


® entered the tfices 


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was being an attempt to do 
center trom. gave when 
wanted |to thes 
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nh. but 
protested 
rient enter the 
All’ U.N offices are 
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lable by local police. 


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Hiss Denies Ever Being a Red, Says He Never Gave Out 


HISS—From Page I 


ary 1, 1937, and did not give Cham- 
bers State Department documents. 
in early 1938. | 
Just before Hiss took the stand, 
a surprise defense witness startled 
the Federal courtroom spectators 
with the statement that Chambers, 
in 1940, named Francis B. Sayre as 
“the head of a Communist appa- 
ratus in the State Department.” 
This declaration came from 
Malcolm Cowley, a Sherman, 
Conn., author and writer of maga- 
zine articles for the past 25 years. 
Cowley’s account of a conversa- 
tion he said he had with Chambers 
on December 13, 1940, and notes 
he said he made immediately 
afterward, went into the record 
over the bitter objection of Pros- 
ecutor Thomas F. Murphy. 
Cowley, a man with graying hair 
and a deep-throated voice, said 
Chambers called him in connection 
with an article Chambers intended 
to write for Time magazine. 
(Chambers, until recently, was a 
$30,000-a-year senior editor for 
Time. He joined the magazine in 
1939, after he said he renounced 
the Communist Party and aban- 
doned his work as spy-ring courier. 


Names in Conversation 


At that conversation, during 
luncheon at the Hotel New Win- 
ston here, said Cowley, Chambers 
“began to speak about Communists 
in the Government at Washington.” 

Chambers, in the talks, he said, 


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“a couple of names 
which I had never heard.” But) 
Cowley said he distinctly remem- 
bers mention of Sayre, and Nathan 
Witt, but has no _ recollection of 
“Alger Hiss” having ever been 
mentioned to him before. 


Cowley’s bombshell-like state- 


‘ment brought the immediate com- 


ment from Stryker that “I should 
like ... to state in the most 
emphatic way within my power 
that we completely repudiate the 
idea that the statement regard- 
ing Mr. Sayre is true that we 
strongly and sincerely understand 
and believe that Mr. Sayre .was 
a completely loyal member of the 
Government at all times. 

“We regret the use of his name 
here, and I do so only because it 
is a part of the conversation,” 
“Preposterous,”’ Says Sayre 

At Lake Success, where Sayre is 
attending sessions of the United 
Nations Trusteeship Council, ,to 
which he is United States delegate, 
reporters sent the testimony in to 
him for comment. 


He came out of the meeting 
and said of the alleged charge: 


“I give an absolute and unquali- 
fied denial. It’s too preposterous 
to merit any reply of any kind.” 

Assistant Secretary of State for 
Economic Affairs from 1933 to 
1939, Sayre also served as United 
States High Commissioner to the 
Philippines from 1939 to 1942 and 
has filled numerous other high 
Government posts. 

The testimony by Cowley was 
brought’ into the trial by the de- 
fense in an effort to support their 
contention that Chambers’ charges 
are wholly unfounded. 

Cowley, who said he was em- 


ployed on the editorial staff of the! 


magazine New Republic. for 12 
years and wrote several books, in- 


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THE HECHT Ca 


Wash ington 


Juniata” and “The Dry Season,” 
said he received a telephone call 
from Chambers a day or two be- 
fore December 13, 1940. 


Chambers’ secretary, he said, 
told him Chambers was writing a 
book “dealing with writers who 
had jumped off the Moscow ex- 
press.” 


“He wanted to include 
article,” said Cowley, 
Waldo Frank, Granville Hicks, 
Lewis Mumford and several oth- 


- 


ers.” i 
Voted for Communists 


in this 


Cowléy said he was never a Philippines?’” 


Communist, but prior to the Nazi- 
Soviet pact of 1939 had been a 
“Communist sympathizer,’ then 
“violently disagreed with them.” 


He conceded that he voted for 
Communist candidates in 1932 and 
1934 elections, and possibly 1936, 
but, said Cowley, he was never a 
Communist Party member. 


(Mumford said last night that he 
has attacked communism before 
1939 and since then, and “there 
has never been any moment at 
which I have been on “the Moscow 
express.”’) 

(Hicks, in a letter published in 
the New Republic in 1939, said he 
was leaving the Communist Party. 
because of the Nazi-Soviet pact, 
after four years’ party member- 
ship.) 

When he met Chambers at the 
New Weston Hotel, said Cowley, 
“Chambers looked as if he had 
slept on a park bench the night be- 
fore. His clothes were old, un- 
pressed and rather dirty. His linen 
was not clean. He would never 
look me in the eyes, but kept glanc- 
ing suspiciously around the restau- 
rant.” 

Cowley saifi Chambers “said 
something to |the effect that we 
were surrounded by spies, traitors 
and conspiracies. 


“You mean,’ 
room of the New Weston Hotel—— 
Murphy: “Suspiciously.”’ 
Stryker: “What?” 
Murphy: 
out.” | 
Stryker: “I don’t get it.” 
Murphy: “All right, skip it.” 


“myself, tone, 


' 


' asked Stryker, “he tion . . 
Said in looking around the dining, 


“Suspiciously, you left lea 


—aae 


cluding “Exile’s Return,” “Blue ties. Witt refused to discuss the at times with a half-smile of en- 


charge at that time, and could not couragement. 

be reached for comment tonight.) Hiss gave a now-familiar sum- 
“Then at this point,” said Cow- mary of his career, starting with 

ley, “he (Chambers) mentioned his birth in Baltimore in 1904 

another name which I shall not Among the interested spectators 

repeat here. was the) Rev. Duane Wevill, a re- 
“Well I shall ask you to repeat tired Episcopal minister who offi- 

it,” said Stryker, “... and ask you ciated at the Hiss christening. A 

to tell the whole conversation.” . partially bald little man more than 
Cowley then mentioned Sayre’s 80 years old, Mr. Wevill told re- 

name, and said tegay, in a shocked! porters he lives in Maplewood 
) s said to Chambers, notn. J 

Woodrow Wilson's son-in-law?” Under questioning by Stryker 


“And he said, ‘yes.’” Hiss noted that his 81-year-old 
“And I said to Chambers again, mother still lives in Baltimore 
‘The High Commissioner to the whese he was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and was graduated from 
“And he said, ‘not merely that, Johns Hopkins University in 1926 
but he’s the head of a Commu-} Just before he was graduated 
nist apparatus in the State Depart- from Harvard University Law 
ment. ” School in 1929, Hiss said: “I was 
‘Chambers, said Cowley, told told’ that I had been selected to 
him he had joined the Episcopal become’ secretary to Justice Oliver 
Church, and “I said to him that Wendell Holmes.” 
was a strange church for a former| Stryker asked if the term was 
Communist because the church not “law clerk” instead of “sec- 
had taken no active stand in po- retary,” and Hiss said the term 
litical matters.” was properly “law clerk,” but 

“Chambers said to me, ‘I: joined Holmes referred to his assistants 
the Episcopalians because it was— as secretaries. 
it is there that you will find the After the customary year with 
most powerful enemies of the Com- Justice Holmes, he went to Boston 
munist movement.’ ” for two years to study law, and 

(Chambers has testified here then served one year with the 
that he later left the Episcopal New York law firm of Cotton & 
Church to join the Society of Franklin. 

Friends, the Quakers.) On December 11, 1929, he said. 

Cowley said Chambers also told be married Mrs. Hiss ‘who had 
him, “I am glad that I joined the “€¢" married previously), “Is the 
Communist Party because | lady who sits there your wife” 
learned their methods and I’m go- asked Stryker. “Yes, sir.” said 
ing to use their methods against !8S with a bow and broad smile 
them.” to Mrs. Hiss. 

Stryker then read. over Mur. Entered AAA in 1933 
phy’s objections, notes which He entered the Agricultural Ad- 
Cowley said he ‘made in a large justment Administration in May. 
memorandum book the night of 1933, he continued, as an assist- 
the conversation with Chambers. tant general counsel. 

In these notes, Cowley wrote The following year, he said. he 
that Chambers “is fighting now was “loaned by the AAA as coun- 
for the Christian counter-revolu- sel to the Nye Committee (Senate 
. there is utter sincerity. Munitions Investigating Commit- 
in his hatred. ... tee) for ‘what was considered 

“Chambers boasts that he tried! at that time a work of great na- 
to disrupt every underground ac- tional importance.” 
tivity that he knew about after: In August, 1935, he entered the 
ving the party.” Department of Justice as an as- 
In the memorandum, Sayre was SiStant in the solicitor general's 
not referred to as head of a Com- Office. He said: “My work was 


'munist apparatus but as one “also Primarily working on briefs for 


Cowley said that when Chambers connected with the underground the Supreme Court.” 


mentioned “Nathan Witt of the movement,” 


Labor Board,’ 
that Witt “was ithe first Communist 


Chambers added notes quoting Chambers. 


He argued one case in the high 
court,. he said, in March. 1936 
to Cow- He was not arguing a case. he 


according to Cowley’s 


Chambers, according 


ever to be discharged for Commu- ley’s notes. was fearful at that said in answer to Stryker’s ques- 


nist affiliations from the United time that the Communists might “on, in March, 1935 


States government.” 


(Witt, now in private law prac- his testimony in Hiss’ trial, Cham- Court that day arguing a case when 


Mrs. 
said he 


Esther 


make an attempt on his life. (In Chambers had was in 


tice here, was) named as a Com- bers said he feared Hiss might She came to the Hiss home in 


munist by Chambers when Cham-|attempt to have him killed.) 


bers testified! before the House 
Committee on Un-American Activi- 


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Georgetown. 
Cowley’s notation ended with, In September, 
“He (Chambers) paid for the request 
luncheon, $4. It will cost me a tary 
lot more when the article comes he said, he entered the State 
out.” Department, and remained in the 
There is no indication that such department until January 15, 1947. 
an article appeared. His duties in Sayre’s office. 
Cowley testified under cross-'said Hiss, during 1936 and 1937 
examination that in 1948, after involved work to support the con- 
Chambers’ first charges against stitutionality of, and seek exten- 
Hiss, Cowley read his notes of his sion of, the 1934 Reciprocal Trade 


1936, at the 
of then Assistant Secre- 
of State Francis B. Sayre 


conversation with Chambers to A. Agreements Act 
J. Liebling, a writer for the mag- 


“In addition,” he said, 
azine, New Yorker who sought in-'duties were to advise Mr. Sayre 
formation about Chambers. on matters coming across his 


Later, said Cowley, he offered/desk,” and in this role he said 


“ms 


ithe information to Hiss’ defense he frequently drew up handwrit- 


' 


i 
| 
| 
' 


’ 


‘and a white off-the-face hat with 
green band, observed him closely, 


attorneys for presentation to the ten 


of 
Federal grand jury which indicted pa 
Hiss. 


summaries 
pers. 
Sayre, he gaid, “had been one 
“The Governmem rejected any of my professors at law school,’ 
assistance from you, is thatright?” and among the bonds. between 
Murphy asked him on cross-exam-|them was an interest in such ef- 
sory Ep on lg — alors forts as the League of Nations. 
talked to him. 


department 


Invited to Philippines 

Murphy pointed out that When 1939 became 
verbal account of the conversa- high commissioner to the. Philip- 
tion with Chambers was far more pines, said Hiss, he invited Hiss 
elaborate than his memorandum, t4 come with him but “I preferred 
particularly regarding Sayre. 

“Once I looked back on the 
memorandum,” Cowley countered. 
“I could remember more about 
the conversation.” 


Attended Harvard 


his Sayre, in 


to stay in Washington because |! 
felt that war was imminent and | 
felt that I could be more help- 
ful in Washington.” 
From 1939 to the spring ol 
1944. Hiss was in the office of 
Cowley said, in answer to a the Political Adviser on Far East- 
question from Murphy, that he érn Affairs. 
attended Harvard University, fin- Stryker, brought out in his ques- 
ishing there in 1919. tions, that all during this time 
Q. “You didn’t know Mr. Hiss fliss was handling highly con- 
at all?" fidential|' matters. In the fall of 
A. “Goodness, no.” 1944, Hiss served as executive 
Hiss, during his one-hour of tes- secrétary of the Dumbarton Oaks 
timony today, appeared at ease on ¢onference. 
the witness stand. “What was your relation to the 
Occasionally he glanced at the security system,” asked Stryker 
jury, as if to gauge their reaction |“; was it,” Hiss 
to him. Sometimes he produced seplied. 
aa as an in- ») yaita With Resenvelt &@ 
His voice was low when he start-. The following year, with Hiss 
éd his ‘testimony, and Stryker Stature jn the Government grow- 
asked him to speak louder. As he ing increasingly, he was among 
got under way, however, Hiss |those who accompanied President 
spoke clearly and methodically. Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Yalta 
emphasizing his remerks and ¢onference. 7 eG F 
sometimes turning his head from) “! Participated in a very small 
side to side. way,” he said. aie 
Across the courtroom, Hiss’ wife, | He commented, however, about 
Priscilla, in a dark green dress $0me of the political aspects in- 
volved there, and then, in greater! 
detail explained his functions as 
Secretary-General for the United 


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'Nations’ Charter Conference in 

San Francisco in 1945. 

There he was in charge of all 
physical arrangements for the con- 
ference, providing  transiators, 
housing, planning meeting sched- 
+ ules, making security provisions 
through'the FBI, etc. 

“You say the FBI was then 
collaborating with you?” asked 
Stryker, with obvious innuendo. 

“I'm having a hard time to get 
it out of you,” Stryker said at 


another point as Hiss reviewed 


his activities, “but you're modest.” 
| Hiss’ testimony was interrupted 


Auto Backs Into 
Tree; Knocks It 
Down on Car 


on the streets and highways, but 
one occurred yesterday at 7 p. m. 
on the Brentwood Playground at 
6th and Penn sts. ne. 

Police, said Walter Stevenson, 
| 40, of 1102 Half st. ct. nw. ‘stalled 
‘the truck he was driving going 


up an incline on the playground... 


He then let it roll back, they said, 
to get the motor started. The truck 
backed into a 35-foot high dead 
tree. 

| The tree toppled onto a parked 
‘car owned by Robert F. Coates of 
1303 Stephens rd. se. inflicting 
damage .estimated at about $200 
Police said Stevenson borrowed 
the truck without permission. They 
charged him with unauthorized use 
of a vehicle. 

; 


MP; 


\ 


Traffie accidents usually happen / 


Secrets | 


oo a a a — se come 


as the session ended for the day 
and he will resume the stand tp- 
day. 

As he finished testifying, Mrs 
Hiss greeted him, and they kissed 

Earlier in the day, Charles 
Fahy of Washington,former Solici- 
tor General of the United States 
added his testimonial to Hiss 
character, terming it “excellent.” 
Fahy said’ he had known Hiss 10 
to 12 years. 
today 

yes- 


In another development 
the prosecution challenged 


terday’s testimony that in 1935 the , 


Hiss family no longer had a Wood- 
stock typewriter which the prose- 


of the documents which Clhrambers 
has produced in the trial 

two brothers 
for odd JoDs 


Cross-examining 
formerly employed 
by the Hiss family, Murphy tried 
to show they did not receive a 
typewriter from the Hisses in 1936 
or 1937, as they state, but at 
later date—if at all. 


Further attempts 


a 


to discredit 


the brothers’ story are expected to + 


be made by the prosecution during 
rebuttal. 


One of the brothers, Raymond 
S, (Mike) Catlett, 27, of 2728 
P st. nw., Washington, charged 
today that an FBI awe while 
questioning him last May, offered 


$200 if Catlett would produce the . 


typewriter f FBI 
normally 

challenged 

Catlett 


or the 
Nurphy, 
furiously 


tion, but 


An FBI had previously 
testified that the typewritten docu- 
ments obdtained from Chambers 
were prepared on the Hisses’ ma- 
chine. 

The typewriter 
fully sought in an 
of Washington by 25 to 30 FBI 
agents, and defense attorneys have 
declared they found it after trac- 
ing it through various members of 
the Catlett family, their friends, 
and others. 

Raymond Catlett yesterday said 
he had beén given “about $40” by 
Donald Hiss, Alger’s younger 
brother, and had gone around of- 
fering $50 to anvone 
tind the typewriter 


soft-spoken 
this allega- 
held his. ground 
expert 


Was 


who could 


When he was being questioned 
the FBI about the typewriter 
Raymond, mildly. “the agent 
he would give me $200 or 
if I got the typewriter for 


by 
Said 
Said 
more 
him.” 

“What agent told you 
roared Murphy in surprise 
mond said he did not 


that?’ 
Ray- 


know. 


—_— 


uNSUCCESS-| 
intense search’! 


THE WASH 


' rida. 


INGTON POST 


bee 24, 1949 


. 


ne 


_ because repair parts were not avail- Hiss attorneys locate the machin® 


able. 
He 


tO as 


was a Washington att 
H 


orney, Charies 
; 


ui 


the shop he went 


but 


escribed ltiouston 
peing 


not suppis 


on the street level Hiouston. who 


described 
went from the Catiet 


, , 
ani 


a 


testified briefly. 
and McLean 
t family te dis- 
relatives who eventually re- 
ceived the typewriter, seeking to 
trace the machine on its myster!- 
as it passed from hand 
until it finally was located 
on 


ould 
- 
declared 


a name 
going to prove 
Murphy, “that! it 
Woodstock repair shop. 
1 1 you that 
pair shop at 


. how ne 


am to vo 
was 
Suppose 
Woodstock re- 
Connecticut and. A 
street did not come into existence 
until September, 1938. would that 
¢ause you to fik the time sfafter Nep- 
tember that you took it there.” 
Perry said lie had no jidea what 
month it was to alter 


Opped the 


old ine 
OUS COUTse 
to hand 


n Lockey s possess 


Why Mountain Valley Water 
is Recommended for 


ARTHRITIS - KIDNEY and 
BLADDER condition 


ocated) by Hiss’ phis natural mineral water from 
possession Of Ir got Springs, Arkansas, helps to— 
Kenilworth #1. Stimulate kidney functions. 
uck gperator who said he Soothe bladder irritation 
obtained i! in lieu of cash Neutralize uric acidity. 
4 moving job. Discharge wastes 

guard for Ask your doctor 
constructior said with Phone for a Case Today 


that he received only $15 MAQOUNTAIN VALLEY 
for the controvVersial machine 
MINERAL WATER 


Among thoge who helped .the 
ME. 1062 904 12th St. N.W, 


retused 


hy a 


anG 
Mur] 
le pr 
iy 


iS account 


subject for t esent 

it was hna 
tvpewriter was 
attorneys in the 
Lockey, of 723 


‘_-_— 
iormer ti 


ist osed that the 


< 
ave 
in 1945 


payment ior 


Locke y, no’ 


3 
4. 
a 


a 
grin } 


e 


a 


READ 


eVERY WEE 


Quick—the magazine sensa- 
tion of the year! Saves your 
time, keeps you well ine 
formed. Out today! 


ge « june 27, 1949 


| ONS 
PEOPLE| PICTURES » PREDNr 


“Did. he say it was his money or 


Government 
shouted. 
a 


money?” 


didn't ask him.” 


Murphy; 
.- 


“Who told you to say that $200 


Story?” demanded Murphy. 


mond said a “Mr. Jones” 
Objects te Screaming 

“If 
sociate 


Ray- 
said it 


your honor pleases,” As- 

Defense Counsel Edward 
C. McLean interceded with presid- 
ing Judge Samuel H. Kaufman. 
“lL object to him screaming at 
the witness.” 

At another point, Murphy, in 
seeking to discredit Raymond Cat- 
lett’s story that he and his brother, 
Perry, 28, received the typewriter 
in what Perry fixed as the year 
1937, said the facts would show 
that was impossible. 

While the Catletts 
lived at 2728 P at the time, 
Murphy said, he has. information 
that a real estate agents records 
show the house was rented to a 
man named “Roulhac” and that 
the Catletts lived there under the 
Roulhac lease. 

And Roulhac, said Murphy, did 
not rent the house until January 
17, 42938 

Asked if he would, 
change his account, Raymond in- 
sisted his family was there before 
that date 


said they 
st 


therefore,” 


i= 
Perry, his brother, who lives at 3 


733 Howard rd. se 
Ursula, supported his brother's 
story and said they received the 
typewriter about the time the 
Hisses moved from 1245 30th st. 
nw., to 3415 Volta pil. 

That move, previous testimony 
shows, was in December, 1937, but 
Perry said he could give no defi- 
nite date 


with his wife. j 


He said he remembered | 


that the typewriter was damaged : 


and he tried to get it fixed for his 
wife. then. attending Miner's 
Teachers College, and now 
eral Accounting Office employe. 

He could not fix the time but 
said that after the Catletts received 
the typewriter, probably “not more 
than three or four monihs” later 
he tried to get it repaired at a shop 
on K st.. near Connecticut ave 

It could not be fixed, he said 


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6 ‘ielmnne (U.S. Aide Threatened to Punch’ 


rs ., Detector Curbs Him in Nose,Reds’ Lawyer Says 


New York, June 23 U.P).—A de- much a punch in the nose as a 


e ‘fense lawyer in the Communist Straight jacket.’ 
' conspiracy trial charged today that 4 pier Judge Harold R. Me- 
e ~ QO) ranium |a Government attorney threatened poem ‘' : Wik ; 
'to punch him in the nose. : Bi ces ars Frequently hi ° to get 
By the United Press ; | Richard Gladstein said he had ©4¢ 0Mers goat, he sal 
| ony ¥ \been épproached during a mid- I'm frank to say that I do not 
Senate investigators disclosed yesterday that officials of the Oak; les the trial by As. UUDK he was employing some 
m cess in the y As- | . . 
Ridge, Tenn., atomic plant subject employes to lie detector tests and amauate oicied se ande pte Bevel subtie effort to get my goat,” Glad- 
take other extreme precautions to prevent loss or theft of uranium. ' Frank Gordon. Gladstein said Gor- oo ra SOB sg reas 
Congressional Atomic Energy® ~~ \don told him: . Chitin . Wh kde 0 ware cane) 
Committee records showed that at|of uranium adhering to the cloth; “Some day somebody is going his preference to substitute brute 
least twice in recent weeks lie can be recovered dle oe ha in the nose and it force for combat on what is sup- 
detector tests have uncovered; Senator Hickenlooper, (R., Iowa). ; hia posed to be an intellectual and 
! ; es That's his statement, bad Eng- legal plane. One look at him will 
cases in which Oak Ridge workers continued presentation of his mis- jjch and all,” Gladstein said, in i eaice: iin Chak <eieamn @ Ineenien 
removed valuable but non-explo- management charges against Atom- asking that the words be placed 


, | to brute foree he is one of the 
sive bits of normal uranium metal. 'j¢e Commission Chairman David E. | 0 record. 


, al 4 : most forceful looking brutes in 
They also disclosed that €M-\Tilienthal at a hearing yesterday) adstein said he retored to Gor- the court room. 
ployes in restricted areas wear! do 


: | ; Gordon, who is built like a full- 

special clothing which is later 9Y divulging that Dr. C. W. J. “Don't be surprised if I reply.” back, remained silent. 

burned so that any minute chips|'Wende, formerly a General Elec-| He said Gordon spoke to him’ Judge Medina, still smiling, or- 

trie «Co, geientist, resigned in| again during the noon recess and dered the jury to be brought in, 
———iMarch from an important “post at! Said, “what you need is not so and the session continued. 


the Hanford, Wash. plutonium 


” wih tue MURPHY Values! 


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works after protesting “unbusi-tector) examinations were given| 


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sacle ; “et + ee you ve e. fear them day or : 
Hickenlooper made opublicia bar of normal uranium in hisig’.,° ae | ma ' 
Wende’s letter of resignation in)locker, approximately one nar, oulded Missile | night. Bare shoulders—bare mid- } 
1 


f 
f 
f 
f 
f 
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‘ 
f 
f 


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which he complained that “no-jinch in diameter and one and one-! 7 B riffs. 
where” in the Atomic Energy Com-| half inches long.” Resea rch Fac ility 
mission “is there a hard knot of} He said it had been given to’ The Navy yesterday dedicated 
i practical business sense.” Naw by = fellow rn about|its newest facility for research and 
m Committee Chairman Brien Mc-|*W°O months previousty. development of propellants to 
BLENDED WHISKEY, Mahon (D., Conn.), said the Oak; Jesse Herndon, an assistant of power guided missiles, at Indian . © Tuffy Crepes 
Ridge inventory is still being Larson, said officials believe it Head. Md os . rf 
checked and that the committee Would do more harm than good! The facility, a unit of the Naval 
will follow it with “meticulous at-|to fire workers for violations which) Powder Factory there, was named MISSES’ 
tention.” Commission officials said;\Were mot intentional breaches ofthe Patterson Pilot Plant in honor ; 


; y 4 *s 
previously that “no a-bomb urani-/ "ational security. of the late George W. Patterson, MIDRIFFS W 0. IEN Ss 
lum is missing at Oak Ridge.” He said a worker who felt he naval powder expert who died in 


4 
: ‘ ) 
‘Was unjustly discharged could be 1942. Equipped with the latesi ) ; : 
Describes Precautions ;“very much of a potential danger safety devices to minimize fires \ - | . ‘ 
| The closed hearing transcript’ to this country.” land explosions, it occupies an 86- wy : | 


j 
! : : i | \ , ‘ 
eemce holed "cae nc a war PUtential Danger” acre tract of land. ? 
| due is & teckhesping orrer "They! “A man could take out of the Navy spokesmen said the plant ; ay o a e 
a dade than ein separate Plant in his mind figures, pictures, 18 the first complete facility for \ Uy 2 . 


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weighings and analyses are in-|%¢S!8M8, and so forth, with which research - ++ Aang pce of fuels | _ 
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+“ : ” of . new an e cou y 2.2 ~ 
Salis ia Gauh phase of tho won CRTyik out some material,” Lar-' British Craft Retyrned | 
processing operation. | $0 said. : Rosyth, Scotland, June 23 ?).— 
ieee Coeue om oficial He added that in all the inci-; Two destroyers lent by Britain to . 7 
’ th Cc bid & C b Ch 5. | cents described, he knows of only the Soviet Union during the war | . ored very smart- 
of the Carbide arbon “nem one case in which a worker might sailed back into home waters to- 


cals Corp., in charge of the uran-| he prosecuted but he thought th 
ium plant, and Fred Uffelman, Oak’ rey © mous ere day in the Firth of Forth. They 


would be “small chance” of con- are the Zhyvicuhy, formerly the 
Ridge accountability director, told) yiction. | Richmond 8 Dzerky formerly 
the committee there have been a | “i | 


| Harry A. Winne, vice president the Chelsea. 
few cases in which inventory er-| of General Electric Co., was called | Boxer type Hawiian prints with 
rors reflected actual losses or thefts'to answer Wende’s charges of or-| a 


supporting innerbelt. Trim all 
of uranium. | ganizational inefficiency. | | elastic fitting waistband 

ons In describing precautions taken, Winne said he considered Wende j 76 SEATS ; 
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’ On May 27, the FBI was notified athletes, including a woman, have, Vs Bw Oo. : : : : | 
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Miss Coplon Won't Admit Data in Her Purse Was U.S 


a —_- 


she te! Sehiy Gam bo. Show Yark 
with her to work on that weekend. 
This, she charges, was part of a 
“frameup” directed against her. 
Took Rata With Her 

The data slips: Not only did Miss 
Coplon take such material to her 
McLean Gardens apartment here 
to work on nights. She also took 
\the full FBI reports from which 
the data slips were extracted, she 
testified yesterday. She did such) © 
things, she said, because, her office | 
at the Department of Justice was 
short-handed and she wanted to 
catch up on the work. | 

The trial day got under way| 
warmly with a sharp question from 
Prosecutor Kelley to the brunette- 
haired defendant: 

“Did you not, in the spring of 
1948, visit the travel agency AAA’ 
and talk with Della Lee Riley, and, 
did yoy not ask her if it were not| 
possible for you to go to Russia?” 

Miss Coplon shifted in her wit- 
ness-stand chair. 

“Well, that needs a bit of an. 


COPLON—From Page I | 


- might have had to other persons if 
they had obtained them. 

“Do you concede,” Kelley asked, 
“that the material would be of 
great interest to Russian espionage 
agents in this country if it had 
fallen into their hands?” 

“I don't know what Russian es- 


pionage agents would be interested 
in,” Miss Coplon, who worked in 
the Foreign Agents Registration 
Section and on internal security 
matters at the Department of Jus- 
tice, said. 

Another document found in her 
purse was wrapped, sealed with 
Scotch tape, and on the wrapper 
was a pencilled arrow. This docu- 
ment consisted of Miss Coplon’s 
own handwritten notes on a “de- 
coy” shown to her at the Justice 
Department the morning of March 
4 before her arrest in New York 
that evening. : 

Prosecution has suggested that 
the arrow was to indicate to an- 
other person how the note was to 
be opened so as nai to tear it, explanation ... 
Explains Arrow The day before she hed testi-| ~ 

Miss Coplon was asked yester- fied “I never wanted-to go to 
day to explain the wrapper ane 
the arrow, and she said she did 
this so that if she should put some-| Foley Advised Route 
thing else in her purse, such as| But when she said that, she 

“a wad of gum,” there would be| went on to say, the implication to! 
no confusion as to which was| her in the question was the pos-| 
which. | Sibility of going to Russia to live 

“Did I hear you correctly?”| with 
Kelley asked. 
put the arrow on there so you!the romance she says was the rea-| 
wouldn't confuse the document/son, not to spy against her coun- 
with a wad of gum. Are you in|try, that she was seeing him at| 
the habit of wrapping up wads ofall. 
gum and putting them in your, She said yesterday that the’ 
purse?” |question of her making a trip to 

“If there's no other place to) Russia came up when a pictured) 
put it, yes,” Miss Coplon, her|Soviet folder arrived at her Jus-| *>ly be branded forever. 


es “wihaid Le sua to 
Valentin Gubitchev sbould|' = + 


4 r 


me —- ed 


F lameborne Tank ae 


“You mean you she marry him as a culmination of| | wo 38 
GOING UP!—An amateur photographer caught 
the initial burst of fame which shot this as 


| -phalt storage tank into the air at a waterfront 
plant of the California Refinery Co., 


Mr. |derstand a person wanting to go 'March 4 and go through the same 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
a. Pi tee _Fridgy, June 24, 1949 — 


—— oe 
~~ 


. Property, 


A GEA Sa ea _—\are ~ that question, btw | did’ 
ware op beating your wife?’” 
ore as fuent as her epeech, and Defense Attorney Palmer. who 
the FBI incinerator wes on ‘the in his own way, is also a master 
Soor above us. One day—it mustiof the English language, was on 
eave been a summer day, with the|his feet in frequent objections: 
wind blowing .along the ledge—a yesterday to give his client) sup-, 
' |plece of paper, singed on the|port in -her battle of -wits with) An 
? |edges, blew onto my windowsill. |Kelley. granted the Rosslyn 
| Ll picked it up—it dealt with) “Would you let her finish?” he se!) @ gas pipe line | 
» an FBI investigation of a lawyer | would bark in the prosecitor’s Gas Co. of Arlington 
in the Antitrust Division eof the ear “After all, she's still a lady."yesterday by the Virginia 
\Vepartment of Justice, in eonnec-| ‘He springs on her as if he's a Corporation Comm 
t ition with the loyalty program.|J#suar, he screamed at another) 
‘The| part that fell on the window-| poms. iwithout prejudice, the 
sill @id not give the lawyer's name| Paimer, over the prosecutor's) piained the Fede 
but for-all I know the other half Objections, had established himse! fi missior has under co 
containing the name fell down ‘in a chair slightly back of Kelley's!tion an applicat 
onto Constitution ave. I took the Tisht shoulder. Once yesterday a8 potomac Gas Co ‘ a cert 
part, that fell on my windowsil]|/*®e two prosecutors were confer ,¢ pup) convenience 
and| gave it to Foley ther chief),'T'mé on notes, W hearty turned and) purchase of the 
who gave it to Whearty (Raymond|45*ea: “Can you 
P. Whearty, of the department's! Mr. Palme 
Criminal Division and now one of; ‘Baby stuff!” Palmer spat out to the Virgi: 
her | prosecutors). Foley told me Seventy-five-year-old Judge Al-sii 4. pridge. If the sale 
Mr. Whearty took it up with the)bert L. Reeves leaned owe the’), approved 1 it would 
FBI jbench and said sharply: “If you),..... q, Co 
jgentlemen want to talk we can ad~|,_ 0 nn necyi 
Palmer Objects Again Journ and let you go outside and. " 
talk.” Stes 
Backbiting between opposing | heart. It has established th 
counsel is part of the war raging defendant spent nichts in o: 
in District Court, But the realitown hotels with H. P. Shay 


Gas Firm's Right 


order setting as 
Gas Co. 


St 
S10 
*. rescinding 
SUL 

ral Power Ci 
now 


ion rrom 


;pu 

see it all mnght, | 

The Ras ilne exilens mbout 

000 feet from Le« 

“more st la side 
give tfe 

a corti 


, | “These conversations with Mr.’ 
i i-\Foley,” Kelley observed dryly. 

y iwhen she had finished—she has 

- jrelated others with her former 
boss, who has appeared as a wit- 
‘ness against her, “are coming in 
\mighty handy, aren't they?” 

' | Again the articulate Miss Cop- 
lon, who has-referred once in tes- 
itimony to a “Walpurgain night,” 
ideclared: “After all, only I in my 

, ‘own defense can dissipate this 
“4 -« a dichotom: 
Pins Ge wei a ‘ae olen ems ' Yet again, she remarked in more 
, eo en Se i 
~ 7 | : wer @arthy language; Some of these 
Bc Bln. HK « ° “@ questions you ask me, Mr. Kellev 
Associated Presse WIREPHOTO 


Amboy, N. J. After this an explosion and 
fiash fire swept through adjacent tanks. Two 
volunteer firemen were trapped:and killed 


chology in fullest 
,protagonists, remained that be-in love with the 
tween the towering prosecutor and) Miss Coplon, admitting the nig 
the 5-foot, 100-pound defendant. 
Its climax is due today, with) piro 
Kelley hoping to finish his ¢cross- Today Kelley is expected to 
examination sault another defense claim 
Prosecution has made a siashing Miss Coplon, in 
attack on the central defense con- ment documents 
‘tention that Miss Coplon wag see- get | 
‘ing Gubitchev only as a sweet- 
s 


Your baking | GUARANTEED] 


Rp out 
nateria! tor 
f Me 


writing on the 


ER 
| 


in Perth 


eee ey eee eee ee ee —- 


ific at 


d. and F 
is uitime 


inti ty 
lle to Ke - Bridce. 


Virginia Rescind | 


To Sell rape Line 


Je authority 


to 


> the Potomac 
was approved 


ate 


its previous order 


ex- 
m- 


isidera- 


tne 
- 
the 


i8 

ill- 
af 
aL e- 
bry. 


> ~) 
kit 


at the 
{ -of- 


iro, 


battle, with every weapon of psy-| Justice Department attorney, about 
use by) both the time she says she was dee 


ply 


Russian citizen. 


nts, 


denies sexual intimacy with Sha- 


as- 


That 
taking Govern 
did so partly to 
a novel she was 
Washington scene. 


hands gesturing, said. “The wad tice Department office. 
of gum was just an example.” 

She had these wrapped-up notes’ plained, 
in her purse in the first place,| 
Miss Coplon has said, because 
William E. Foley, her boss in the 
Department of Justice, ordered 
her to make them from a “plant” 
document he showed her March 


“said he 


“Mr. Foley ther boss),” she ex-\to go from here, go to 


understood like Stockholm and try to get to ‘mittee would. They couldn't un-' 


Leningrad was a beautiful place. ‘Russia through the Russian Em- derstand that you were going not) 
I said to him, ‘Do you think I,|phacsy there.” 


with the nature of my work, could. 

get behind the Iron Curtain. 

asked what about the FBI?’ 
“Mr. Foley said I would prob-'sia. He said people couldn't un-/Kelley asked, 


in the obective sense. Maybe the hocus pocus... these same strange 
\FBI wouldn't misunderstand it, but; maneuvers . . . to hear again the} 
some place the Un-American Activities Com-! detectives were on your trail , . 


to get in a bus together while he 
whispered, ‘Don't sit by me’.. .” 


| Foley himself said to me, don't try) 


Bake everything 
fram delicious 
biscuits to tasty 
cakes with Wash- 
ington Flour, it’s 


‘because of a love for the country Lesathily the peenesutee — ) 
us but in an objective. sense.’ OS , 

aie, Pity Se eee “Did you not tell Esther Pauline| Mis# Coplon, who seemed at times 
Annis of the State Department,” from her vigor and fluency,to be 
“that you were go- conducting personally her own de-’ 


Also: 
Iipeople might misunderstand my 
motives in wanting to go to Rus- 


ing to call her to see about a visa fense, hammered back and forth 


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before it starts! 


are hand-selected three separa 


\to Russia?’ 


between them the question of how} 


| Miss Coplon said she had dis- important are the data slips found | 
‘cussed the possibility but never in Miss Coplon’s purse. 


said she was going to apply for a 


visa at the Russian Embassy here. 
“You never told her that?” 
‘Kelley said. 
“No,” the defendant said. 


Visited Travel Agency 


She did eventually take a trip 


“Miss Coplon crying: “The ea 


of a data slip being sacrosanct ad 
ridiculous. It’s a note.’ 

The Government contending, in 
_ the words of the indictment, that, 
| Miss Coplon “did willfully and un-) 


Ito Europe last year, though to such/!@wfully conceal and remove , . 
iplaces as France and Italy instead Certain extracts and summaries of| 


of Russia. She had visited the trav- 
she said, and there| Investigation known as data slips, 


lel agency, 


reports of the Federal Bureau of 


asked, “What were the possibilities containing intelligence reports re- 
‘of an American girl working in ating to espionage and counter- 


‘the Government going to Russia?” espionage activities in the 


United | 


But the next time she visited the, tates.” 


agency, 


at the agency said she was “glad.” 
The Government, 


she said, she told them) Relates Incident 
“just forget about it” and the lady 


And did this 


attacking, one after the other, the Jury of the United States and to 
myriad elements in the defense the advantage of a foreign nation.” 


case, 


sought yesterday to show 
that Miss Coplon used what:Kelley on FBI security, 


Miss Coplon, 
related an incl- 


has suggested is a standard Soviet dent she says happened one day 
spy technique in her meeting with when she was sitting at her desk 
Gubitchev February 18 in New in the Department of Justice. 


York. 


At this time they failed to get 
together at the hour they had 
agreed upon in what Miss Coplon —— 
She 


Says was a sweethearts’ date. 


“I was on the sixth floor,” she 
recounted, “her hands moving 


“with intent and | 
‘reason to believe that the infor-| 
methodically |mation was to be used to the in-! 


in a flank attack 


palms upward in the gestures that 


guaranteed to 
give you better 
satisfaction with 
every baking 
than any other 
flour you have 
ever used or 
MONEY BACK. 


walked around in the , vicinity of 


193d _ st. 
Denies Agreement 
“Isn't it a fact, 


| 


Kelley nee 


“that you had an understanding | 
with Gubitchev that if you did not! 
meet him at the appointed time,’ 
you would s¢atter, come back in| 


an hour?” 


It is this rendervous technique, | 
he had suggested earlier in the | 


trial, that 
Soviet agents. 


“No such agreement,” Miss Cop-, 
She didn't know about 
this technique and when she didn't: 
see Gubitchey, she walked around 
because she needed to go to a 


Ion said. 


is regularly used by 


ladies’ room and was trying to find | | 


one. 


She finally 
the street, 


or two detectives following me.” 


Their previous meeting January 


met Gubitchev on 
she explained, he said 
quickly to her: “I’m sorry, I can’t 
see you—I think my wife has one 


; 
' 


14 she had learned from him for 
the first time, after a unmber of 


dates, that he was married 


and 


the February 18 meeting was to get 


an explanation. 


| 


Hearing the news about the’ 
wife’s detectives, she walked on 


off. 

“After all. 
news to me,” 
cutor, 


| Same “Hecus Pocus” 


“You were not shocked so bad- 
badly,” Kelley flung back, 


this was shocking | € 
she told the prose- ¥ 


ie 
i = 


“but | 


what you were willing to come up) 


Makes Early — 
Morning Angels 


@ “Every day started off gray, but 


| it’s different now,” writes Mrs. R. 


Srrickland of Syracuse, N. Y.“A 
morning cup of the wonderful new 
Luase & Sanborn Coffee never fails 
to turn me into an early morning 
angel!” 

Of course, it's delicious! Selec 
ciones does it. The flavor coffees 
te 
times, You'll say it’s delicious, too, 


| Try it today! 


The NEW Chase t Sanbom 


BIG NEW ZH Y 


y 
> x 
_ => 
* ane. were Oe 7 
es See 
a ” 7 ‘ q 
Cs " ee 
eee : > 
2. , , nog 
Pi 
> és 
a . . 
> 


Lifebuoy with its Purifying Ingredient 


GETS SKIN CLEANER 


‘Stops"B.O.”as no other leading soap can! 


Doctors proved it in 820 tess! 
| The cleaner you get your skin, the 
| safer you are from “B.O.” (body 
| oer). ‘Doctors had people take 
| daily baths with different soaps, 
| and compared the afterbath pro- 
| tection each soap gave... proved 
| you are cleaner, safer from “'B.O,” 
when you take your daily bath 
Sich Lit Lifebuoy. It's more effective 
than any other leading wap against 


the “invisible dirt” that brings on 
ay 0. ”” 

Lifebuoy is milder, faster-lath- 
ering, too! Be popular... bathe 
with Lifebuoy every day! 


Save on Lifebvey Now! 
Go to your store today. Stock up 

luxurious bath size Lifebuoy 
at big cash savings! But act fast— 
while shipments last! 


| ANOTHER FINE PRODUCT OF LEVER BROTHERS COMPART 


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WHILE QUANTITIES LAST / 


( 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
| Friday, June 24, 1949 


ex Dima Bofere Weighing” 


BONE STEAK fhas shad ROAST *% LEGOLAMB * 4B LAMB CHOPS + SHONIER CAME ROAST 


There’s plenty 
of good reading 
in the big June 
ISSUE of the... 


The sketch above shows w hy you get more good-eating meat for your money when you buy Safeway’ 
trimmed-before-weighing meats. Note that you pay only for the portion that properly belongs on eac 
cut—not for excess bone, waste or fat.. We prepare other cuts in similar fashion—each according to it 
special requirements. W hen checking meat value, it pays to COMPARE TRIMMING as well as PRIC E. 
Safeway’s price is always on the trimmed cut, and every cut is guaranteed to please you or all your 
money back. 


amily scl 


BEEF LAMB VEAL PORK 


U. S. Good Grade 


SIRLOIN TIP ROAST ~~ 
RUMPROAST~- 


ALL STORES OPEN 
FRIDAYS «| 9 P.M. 


U.S. Good Grade 


LEG 0° LAMB 
RIB LAMB CHOPS 


U. S. Good Grade 


SHLDR. VEAL ROAST ~~ 
SHLDR. VEAL CHOPS 


Tender Fresh 


PORK CHOPS —~< 
PORK CHOPS ~<- 


ROUND STEAK. 
‘SIRLOINSTEAK : 
T-BONE STEAK. SHLDR. LAMB ROAST ~~ - 
PLATE BEEF ~~ BREAST OF LAMB ~~ 


ER. WEW CAKE TREAT AT SAF FEWay/ 


LOIN LAMB CHOPS 
SHLDR. LAMB CHOPS 


BACON 
BACON 


FRANKS 


RIB VEAL CHOPS 
LOIN VEAL CHOPS 
VEAL CUTLETS 
BREAST of VEAL ~~ 


BRIGGS Plump, = 49: 


Juicy, Skinless 


Webster, Sliced . /d. 47° 


Armour's Star, 


PORK ROAST =~ => 
PORK ROAST =~ ~~» 
SPARERIBS ~~ 
PORK ROAST ~~: - 


BSS SSS 


: ahs and SEAFOODS 


, eS wee ee” 


Half Loin 


af \ ” ( ®&\ . % 
| 


Ss | 
- “a 
rd 


/ S77 + 
427» APPLE SAUCE 
(BS) CAKE 


Here’s a new creation by the bakers of 
Mrs. Wright's famous breads. A 20-oz. 
Apple Sauce Cake, made from the 
finest ingredients available, that will 
lease even the most discriminating 
astes. You'll love its old-fashioned 
spicy flavor. Safeway'’s price of 49c 
eaner this new cake an especially fine 
buy ... get yours today at Safeway! 


Check These Values! 
Cranberry Sauce 2 ".%5 33c 
Corn: Toasties* "3°" 19¢ 
Shredded Ralston %* 17¢ 
Corn Meal “sr” 


Airway Coffee 


Mild & 2 Ib. 
Mellew bag 


8ic 


Salad Oil Mere &. 33¢ 
Wesson Oil ............ cE. soc 


Jell-O Dessert i=" 3 ve 22¢ 
Ice Cream Mix i.*."°.2* 35c 
Tomato Paste 242 21c 
Cheese rein. 

Cheese Food * = 4," 75c 
Red Salmon “%%. bono 7 oor ae 
Tine Fish... "2 4le 


Red Salmon Siew” a” 49e 


‘ ' 
, ‘ 
? ; 
‘ ? 
; | 
Sp 3 
qt. 2 

; y a Cc: ; 
? 


; ? 
3 In ve, at. i8e ; 
‘ , 


8 Mes, Wright's 
: Sliced White 


No ag yr No groping! No 
doors slide! Our new open 
cases make ‘selection of your fa- 
vorite frozen foods as easy as 
taking a can from the shelf! 


~ Melvern 


ICE CREAM 


Pre-Pac Bulk 


Red-Ripe 


WATERMELONS 


37 


Snow Crop Frozen Foods 
SWEET PEAS 2 \.;- 45° 


per] b 


12 es. 


Watermelons are now 
plentiful at your near- 
by Safeway. Note the 
low price. 


PREE “JIFFY” INSULATED 
BAGS FOR ICE CREAM 


Frozen foods and ice cream 
available in stores equipped with . 
frozen food cabinets. 


We'll make up any assortment of the cold 


cuts listed below in any amount you desire. 


Liverwurst, Ham Bologna, Veal 
Bologna, Pimento Bologna, Spiced 
Luncheon Meat, Pickle and Pi- 
mento Loaf, Luxury Loaf. 


SAFEWAY FRESH PRODUCE 


SAFEWAY 


oe SAFEWAY sells them “WASTE FREE” ea 
] PAN READY... Guaranteed to please! 


Jekyll Island 
“FANTAIL” 


FROZEN SHRIMP 


Breaded and Ready 
for the Pan! 


2 (2 


More Money Savers! 


SUGAR Granulated .. § (6 Ag° 
MILK onli ‘ 2 23° 
SALT Morton's 26, Qe 
SALT Sno-White ...°% + gc 
CLOROX" "2..." 33° 
BLEACH wis: 2°:.:° 29° 
F LOUR an ...7 4% OFS 


FLOUR 

SPAM 

PREM 

wamapee 


so. dM asin ective enti urda 
Miiashbingtes > < "MARYLAND: * Bethenda 
Rain . 


Frozen Fillets 


HADDOCK Wraped lb, 
FLOUNDER «... 
PERCH i... 


duc 
3/c 
b. ale 


Wrapped /). 
Wrapped 


49. 


Shortening 


Fluffo 


Luscious California 


\ CANTALOUPES 


Here’s an early summer treat! Luscious, 
full flavored cantaloupes from sunny Cali- 
fornia. Sweet, ripe, even textured melons 
at an attractive price. Keep several in the 
refrigerator. 


tall 


Cans 


FRESH CORN 


Tender 


CHERRIES 


Juicy, Bing ...... 


LEMONS 


California ... 


CUCUMBERS 


Fresh ... 


seats Ub. 1/< 
ce Wb. 25¢ 
», 2d¢ 
» be 


Pillsbury or =) /. 


Gold Medal .. bag 


. airfas alls enn 
‘ SALFS® TO DEALERS We ‘RES srRve re Ble mT ro 
IMITT GLANTITIES Ilteme marke 
an os Tax Peeduce orice. 


War 
ain ta ae lee quastne 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


SHOULDER 


LAMB ROAST 


Here's a tasty t 
2 low price you can’t afford to miss it § 


Se. tender! So flavorful! 


Cudehys 6 
“Edgemere’’ : ‘2 


SLICED 
BACON 


bro 39 


Pound 


SPICED 
LUNCH MEAT 


American Cheese 


pkg. 49° 


BREAST 
OF 


LAMB 


For braising or 
stewi 


~ 

” 
= | 
~w)° 

mS 


at for every one at such 
ARE CUT, NECK OFF. 


45: 


LUNCHEON COMBINATION 
PACKAGE CONTAINS 


iad BEE a 


though the contents were truly | 
factual and evaluated. Nor does | 
it remedy the dangers to our 


citizens: to say that the FBI is ‘ 


merely a fact-finding agency an 


pretation rests on other units 


of the Government because the | 


FBI knows how these are used 
in practice ‘as against any the- 
ories) and should therefore label 


the contents of these documents | 


as “gossip,” “slander,” “hear- 
say,’ ‘one side only,” etc.. and 
should cleary differentiate - be- 
tween information that is rele- 
vant and irrelevant, true and 
false, etc. 

In the present instance, I have 
gathered the impression from 
the press reports that the Gov- 
ernment seriously considered 
dropping the charges in court 
because the documents were too 


tunity? Certainly, the full facts 


,could have easily been obtained 
"and entered into the document: 


' and this would have presented 


the full facts in place of the few 
insidious-sounding ones which 


| turned up. 
that the responsibility of inter- | 


‘Procedures Fail Seriously’ 


It appears to me that the fart- 
finding procedures fail seriously 
in ignoring the information that 
cen be obtained from the person 
under investigation, even in 
those cases where (1) the situa- 
tion is one in which the person 
involved is already aware of the 
fact that he is being investigated 
or (2) the standing and character 
of that person is such that it is 
abundantly clear that he will not 
run away but would be happy to 


, Have a chance to cooperate fully 


witn the FBI. 
I will enlarge this point. 


' on Mrs. 


Are” 
|. you aware, with all the enormous 
| amount of effort that has been 
| spent on investigating Mrs. Con- 
don and myself as a result of | 
malicious and vindictively moti- | 
vated false alarms, that not once. 


Dr. Condon Writes to FBI Chief | 


janealatied ER—From Page I | here was a possible sales oppor- , 


has one of your agents come 
around to see either Mrs. Condon 
or myself, either to interrogate 
us or to get straightened out on 
some point or other? And this 
is so in spite of the fact that I 
have been absolutely straight 


| forward in all my dealings and 


have repeatedly offered to coop- 
erate fully with any fairly con- 
ducted investigation. I know. as 
a matter of fact, that your files 
Condon and myself are 
shot through with errors with re- 
gard to easily ascertainable facts. 
We would be glad to go over all 
of this material with your agents 
in order to get it straight, re- 
quiring only that a full transcript 
be made of the interview in 
which this is done for my files 

Having never met you. per- 
sonally, | look forward to meet- 
ing you, if you wish, and to dis- 
cussing these or other matters 
which may be of mutual or gen- 
eral interest. 


| “Writing in Friendly Way” 


I would like to assure you that 
I am writing you in a friendly 
and cooperative way, and I 


! 


| 


would like to confess that one of 
the reasons that I have addressed 
you so frankly and openly is the 
article entitled The Challenge 
which you wrote for the Sunday 
magazine , section called This 
Week. 

When I read this fine piece, 
beginning with the quotation 
from the Prophet Micah—“What 
doth the Lord require of thee. but 
to do justly, and to love mercy 
and to walk humbly with thy 
God”’’’—and ending with 
sentence—‘“These three simple 
phrases set up an indestructible 


~-- — 


a 


your | 


_ - 
> 


Ready easily, quickly. 12 
crisp and tender corn muf- 
fins by just adding an egg 
and milk to Flakorn. Per- 
fect result every time be- | 
cause ingredients are per- 
fectly mixed and blended. 


You'll be delighted. 


guidepost for human conduct. 
In clear and simple words they 


establish the essentials of de- 


cency. All are of the spirit— 
justice, mercy, humilitv”—when 
I réad these, moved by their pro- 
found truth and applicability in 
this troubled world, I felt that 


you would not mind a simple.’ 


frank, and friendly letter dis- 


cussing matters that weizch 
heavily on my heart. not mere 
in personal terms, though I am 
vulnerable enough like all man 
kind to feel anger and sorrow 
over unjustified aspersions. but 
im terms of that freedom and 
democracy which we cherish 
Sincerely vours. 
E. U. CONDON, Director 


a 


ONE G 7F on 


pS sporone nae 


This Breyers Gallow now brings you Breyers fomous Bulk ~— Cream et « price 


- 


‘ | a so low that your family can enjey it regularly. Your choice of popular flavors. 
| Important for the national se- va a 
| curity to release. If that is the : , 
case, then one must inévitably : 
concludé that their contents are 
| Teally important. If they are 
important, why is it that the con- 
tents are unevaluated—in the 
case of the perverse allusions to | 
my wife a period of some 19 
months having elapsed? If this 
information was known to be 
biased, incomplete, and slander- 
ous, why was it allowed the dig- 
nity of a formal place in an offi- 
cial document? And if it was 
felt that any information, irre- 
spective of truth or falsity, con- 
$Stitutes a “fact” in the “fact- 
finding” sense of the FBI, then 
why was it not clearly labeled 
as to whatvit was and evaluated 
in that period of 19 months as 
of no value? Moreover, if 
“facts” are gathered in this 
puzzling and broad sense, why 
were not additional facts sought 
before my wife’s good name was 
sullied by entering this material 
in official files? Why, for exam- 
ple, was she not questioned as 
to the material? Or, why was 
not a proper study made of the 
conference which led to her in- 
nocent meeting of one individual 
interested in purchasing print- 
ing-type materials and then indi- 
cating to an American business- 
man in the export business that 


-s Your Holiday Picnic Basket! 
SMALL ¢ BEAUTIFUL 


Buy one of these beautie$ this 
week-end! Have it on hand = 
tor your July Fourth Week-end' 
It's a truly delicious ham and = 
a real value! 


ul 
PG 


“e REEBAS-RRREE RUT nthe, ANAS TNE 


Borden's 
CHATEAU 
CHEESE 


» 69 


49° 


WILKINS 


TEA = 
anas i = Senate Delays 


iP : = Confirmation 
of = By the United Press | 
Red P C= The Senate last night was’ 
= blocked from acting on the nomi- 


=nation of W. Walton Butterworth 
59: = as Assistant Secretary of State in 

lb. = charge of Far Eastern Affairs. 
= Senator Robert A. Taft (R., 


= 

3 = Ohio), acting for Republican Floor | 
full ¢ = Leader Kenneth S. Wherry (Nebr.), | 
qt. = asked for a delay on Butterworth's 


= confirmation after the Senate had 
= = confirmed the appointments of four 
LOW PRICE other new Assistant Secretaries, — 


Rinso = Wherry has objected to Butter- 
= worth’s administration of United 
With Solium 


= States policy in China while head 
g ne Sunlight 
Ing t! 
lge. 


redien = of the State Department office of 
c= 
pkg. 25 


10 lb. 79° = ‘Far Eastern Affairs. 
bag | 
PPI OPPO 


Confirmed as Assistant Secre- 
taries were John D. Hickerson, Ed-| 
; ard G. Miller, jr., George C. Mc-' 
Honor Brand Frozen Green Peas 2 45e = 
Honor Brand Frozen Beans ,/°"" , 10 2. 27 
Hill's Frozen Horse Meat 16 2. 3Q¢ 


Ghee, and George W. Perkins. 
George F. Kennan of Wisconsin 
SUNSHINE HI-HO CRACKERS lb. pkg. 29€ 
FANCY CALIFORNIA . 


was confirmed as State Depart-' 


FRANK FURTERS 


"SURE TO BE Ib. 39°¢ 


TENDER” 


SMEDIUM 


RED SALMON 


TUXEDO 
GRATED 


. hag 


225 e 


PURE CREAMERY 


1 
own 
> 


G’S SWEET MIXED 


- © DUFF'S 


SHOT 
oie t | 


tall 


GRANULATED CANE 


A FINE BUY! 
10 Ib. 83° 
bag 


In ‘q-tb, 
prints 


“EXTRA 


PILLSBURY’S BEST 


(formerly 20¢) > 


ul 


Now you can enjoy the freshening ginger 


flayor of Canada Dry—at this new low price. 
It’s world-famous— because it’s the world’s 
finest. And Canada Dry is the world’s finest 
because it’s the only ginger ale with Pin- 


ment counselor and Adrian 5S. 
Fisher of Tennessee as legal ad-| 
viser. 

Senator Owen Brewster (R., | 
Me.) blocked action also on the| 
confirmation of, Ellis O. Briggs of | 
Maine as Ambassador to Czecho-| 
slovakia and Nathaniel P. Davis) 
of New York as Minister to Hun- 
| gary. 

Brewster earlier opposed ap- 
pointment of envoys to both coun- 
tries on grounds the two nations 
“deny the fundamental human 
freedoms.” 


Point Carbonation ... the only ginger ale 


made by the Liquid Ginger Process. For 


flavor, for sparkle, for pure, thirst-quench- 


ing goodness, nothing can compare with 
Canada Dry Ginger Ale. Buy it today—in 
the big, family-size bottle—and save. 


1 WHITE 


POTATOES 


NEW 
TEXAS 
ONIONS 


OR SPRING 


ONIONS 


3 + 10° 


SWEET GEORGIA 


e 


ag mn 


—e 


‘WitTERMELON : sm 
BEETS “ 9°|CaRRoTS “ 3° 


CRISP CALIFORNIA . “TENDER 


COOL - 
CUKES 


» §e 
CORN on the COB 
-Tender A ies - Be 


“Golden Bantam 


PLE LLU LLL 


that MAJESTIC 
nnaise is 


d fresh 
when it packed 
and As fresh 
Lill you OF the 
ein your /, Ga/ 


MAJESTIC 


THE ONLY MAYONNAISE 
THE FRESHNE 
FALED IN! 


a 


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— 


These favorite Canada Dry flavors 
Now only 2 for 25° in the big ‘5-glass’ bottle 


PLUS DEPOSIT AND TAX 


3 Veterans’ 
Groups Urge 


92-20 Pay Bill 


Three leading veterans organiza- | 
tions yesterday defended unem- 
ployed World War II veterans 
against charges that they banded 
into “52-$20 clubs” to live a year 
at the taxpayers expense. | 

Representatives of the Ameri- 
can Legion. Veterans of Foreign 
Wars and the American Veterans 
Committee testified before a Sen- 
ate Labor subcommittee in sup- 
port of legislation to extend for 
two years the provision in the GI 
Bill of Rights granting jobless ex- 
servicemen $20 a week, for 52 
weeks. The provision is sched-. 
uled to expire July 25. 

Spokesmen for the organizations 
' gaid persons who describe the un- 
employment benefits as “rocking 
chair” and “sit-down” money 
dont know what they are talking 
about. i 
Says Half*Didn't File | 

Senator Glen H. Taylor (D..’ 
Idaho), coauthor of the extension. 
said more than half of the World 
War II veterans have not filed for 
unemployment benefits because 
there has been full employment 
since the war. 

The bill also was defended by 
Senator Alexander Wiley ‘R., 
Wis.)}, who said that failure to pass 
it would be “discrimination and a 
slap inthe face for veterans.” 

-A similar bill is pending in the 
House Veterans Committee. but 
_ Chairman John E. Rankin (D.. 
Miss.), said the group probably 
would not send it to the floor. In- 
Stead, he said. the committee will 
consider a veierans’ bonus 

Omar B. Ketchum, VFW legisla- 
tive director. said his organiza- 
tion supports extension but be- 
lieves that a bonus based on length 
and type of service might be a 
better approach to the problem. 
Aute Bill Considered 

The American Legion was rep- 
resented by Ralph H. Lavers. as- 
sistant director of its economic 
commission, and the AVC‘ by its 
chairman, Gilbert A. Harrison. 


Quadruple Amputee 
Walks Into White House 


James Wilson, 23-year-old 
quadruple amputee, walked into 
the White House yesterday for a 
talk with President Truman. 

The Jacksonville, Fla.. war vet- 
eran walks with artificial legs. 
He also has artificial arms. A 
former Air Force radio operator, 
he lost his arms and legs in an 
air crash near Burlington, Vt., in 


* . > . pe a 
~ ~ b 4 


cs 


OT Sy MILLION KIDS OVERSEAS 
TTD MILLION KIDS OVER 

a NEED SOAP 
Mag Pe, “g 


T you CAN HELP! 
For every TWO Swan wrappers 


you send CARE, 
a cake of SWAN goes overseas! 


The need for soap 
is desperate! CARE 
guarantees deliv- 
ery. Allit costs you 
is the tiny chore 
of sending in your 
Swan wrappers! 

Bob Hope says, P 

“HELP THE KIDS GET 
THE SOAP THEY NEED” 


Visit the newly remodeled 


SANDY’S 
MARKET 


342 15th St. S.E. 
H. Rosenthal, Prop. 


HONOR BRAND 


Green 


]2-o0z. 
PEAS pkgs. 


World War II. 

Wilson asked President Truman 
to use his influence to get bills 
passed providing automobiles and 
preferential civil service: ratings 
for veteran amputees. He said the 
President promised to do what he 
could. 

The veteran drove his own car 
to the White House. 


‘Plumber’ Attacks, | 


Robs, Chokes es 


Woman In Home 


A man who impersonated a 
plumber to obtain entry slugged., 
choked and robbed Mrs. Eulalia 
Colwell, 54, in @er apartment at 


RROLEN > Ah. 


1416 R st. nw., yesterday after- | 


noon, she told police. . 
She was treated at Emergency ‘ 
Hospital for bruises, cuts and : 
shock. She said she had reported | 
a defect in bathroom plumbing | 
and the man appeared to “fix” it. 
Once inside, he beat her and 
choked her until she revealed 
where her purse was secreted. She 
told him and he obtained $6, she 
said. He slugged her again trving 
to obtain more money, then fled. 
Mrs. Colwell notified her hus- 


band, Wilmer L. Colwell, who lives i 


at 3930 Connecticut ave. nw., who 
called police. The intruder was de- 
scribed as a Negro, 30 years old, | 
slim, 5 feet 7 inches tall, wearing ) 
a red shirt and gray trousers. : 


Donaldson Appointed — 
To Pharmacy Board | 


John E. Donaldson, past presi- 
dent of the District Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association, yesterday was ap- | 
pointed to a five-year term on the 
District’ Board of Pharmacy begin- | 
ning June 30. 

The Commissioners named Don- 
aldson after Augustus C. Taylor,| | 
present member, declined rem) 
pointment. ) 


| Sealtest Cottage Cheese 
brings Health, Variety 
| and Color into Salad Serv- 
jings, and whep combined 
‘with fruits of vegetables 
you have a hunger-satis- 
| ‘fying protein food abun- 
dant in vitamins and min- 


BAS YOUR FAMILY) 


: 


‘7 


-aehe . +4 afatt i a 
FRESH COUNTY FAIR 


For greater enjoyment. 
Buy mm 


CHESTNUT FARMS 


COTTAGE CHEESE 
> Ue 
Hydrox Sunshine 


COOKIES :: 15° 
Anniversary Assorted — 


NABISCOS ~*= 59° 


To Locate Nearest 
D.G.S. Store 
Call RE. 6400 


7 
j 7 / 
ji 


TAFE Wexnixcrox rPoO<T 


Friday, June 24. 1949 


FRUITS and VEGETABLES 


DGS buyers scour the market to bring you the finest and freshest fruits and vegetables. 


Now——with home grown produce coming into the market, we urge you to visit your ntighborhood DGS 


store and inspect the pro@uce department. 


Economical! 


specials every day. 


BUTTER 


DGS \% lb. Prints Sweet Cream 


Ayershire $3 Score 
Cc 
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prints 


Rib or Loin End 


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| PKG. PARTY CAKE MIX 


(Regularly 35c) 


both 


for 


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Deodorizes 
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Free from Caustic 


03 


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LOCAL 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


Friday and Saturday Money Savers At All 


MCN A 


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jreceive 


The Senate Armed Services 


Committee yesterday disapprovec 
proposals that general retirement 
reforms be written into the pend- 
ing military pay bill. 

Their unanimous action removes 


one of the chief threats to passage 
of a service pay increase this vear 
Had the decision gone the othe: 
|way, differences of opinion and 
the complexities of the retirement 
System might. well have blocked 
final action on pay legislation. 
Gen. Omar N. Bradley. Arm, 
Chief of Staff. meanwhile, gave 
supporters of the measure new 
ammunition to win over members 
of the ax-wielding economy bloc 
Bradley told the committee that 
|the pay boost actually will cost 
ithe Government about 107 million , 
dollars instead of the apparent 
\302 million dollars. That's all the 
1,500,000 men and women in uni- 
form, plus large numbers of re- 
tired and reserve personne!, wil! 
in additional “take-home 


pay.” 
| This is because of the expiration 
of the wartime income tax exemp- 
Aion, he said. Without the pay in- 
crease, servicemen will pay 130 
imillion dollars more in Federal 
| taxes—in effect a pay cut. While 
‘if the bill is,passed, 


Move to Link Pay, 


Retirement Beaten 


By John (. Norris 


Post Re; 


oun a choice of duty to thei 


— 


Y* er 


ing officers and noncommissioned 
officers are torn in conflict be- 


to 
added. 


country and duty their 
dren,” Bradley “We 
reached a pathetic condition when 
men of superior capabilities are 
unable to astisfyv both 

“And nowhere is this more ap- 
parent than among colonels 
and commanders in 
prime of life and peak of efficiency 
find themselves 
tne pa) rates of 
the gaslight era.’ 


The Senate 


cnii 


our 
who the. 
compensated a 
their fathers in 
decision 


committee 


to defer any overhaul of the volun- 
tary and 
svslem 

Byrd (D 


iving 


involuntary retirement! 


was senatol 


Va 
ana 


Unanimous 
who had proposed 


pa retirement retorms 


into one Dill, Was not presen! 
yesterday, 

Unde itl origina! leg 
submitted b: Administration 
both questions were included. Ths 
tiouse Armed Services Committee 
split up the measure, recommend 
ing pay and physical disability re- 
iorms in the pending bil! 
terring the 
untary and involuntary 


problems until 


Lhe 


and de- 


retirement 
next session 


more complicated vol. ; 


have ; 


CAMILI 


‘Candidate Carries 
A Lot of Weight 


WIRE POLY 


HOUDE, 


‘ : Pry 


LEN 


Montreal's 270-pound mavor. is 


seeking 
nadian Pal i 


ning 


’ > 
if 


‘ 
<a i 


as 


a seat in the new Ca- 
ament. He is run- 
independent in the 


election Monday 


an 


icks on the “brass” 


during 


Hot Sf cgcepate 


“These 


on!) 
ne 


> 
Col i 


lot tne merits 


tend 
oOmeers and 


puted itie 


Comments whieh could 


to cause a rift 


men 


between 
and which 
to the evaluation 


of the legislation. | 


Medal for Vaughan Backed 


By Marshal! 


Poet RP, 
ibcommi itt 
did an about-face 
Harry H 


I} 


A House s 
uaV 
Mal. Gen 
President's 
ept a 
Previously the 
the House A 
mittee had 
a Dill wi 
United 
some 125 


ee vyester- 
io permit 
Vaughan, the 


medal f 


meq 

neid 

wou 
states om 
foreign 
Among them we 
the Pet gove 

lina besides 

avaraed 

subdcom! 

in favor ol 
oniy Repres 
 Oreg vot! 


“On 


Titative Norb 


Y ARAINSI 


Ploim 


| Andrews 
p 

full comn 
sentative 
app ove 7 
fo to Hone 


said Bradley, or lodized 


Pasco Concentrated Pure, Frozen 


Orange Juice 2 


Delicious U. S. Good Sirloin 


STEAKS 


U. S. Good Quality Beef 


Rib Roast 


Freshly Killed Killed Frying 


CHICKENS 


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Crab Meat 


Glenside or Rob-Ford Cal. 


PEACHES 2 


Lang's Sweet 


ix Pickles 


Farmdale Large, Tender 


PEAS 


Del Monte, Libby's Ideal or Asco 


PEARS 


Princess Enriched 


Margarine -: 


Supreme Enriched 


BREAD 


Spam, Prem, Tr Prem, Treet or 


TEM- 


Campbell's 


Tomato 


America’s Prize Winner 


Bradley also chided members of can assure 
Congress who‘‘villified the top po- 
sitions in our armed forces” in 


ou ne said. “were not 
the men and women 


the increased. revenue will total 
1195 million dollars 

The Army chief told the Sen- 
‘ators that congressional disap- — 
iproval of the pay boost would 
|have “tremendous_impact” on the 
i|morale of the men in uniform. | 

“At a time when industry is 
granting its second and third) 
‘rounds of pay increases,” Bradley 
ideciared, “men in the services are 
iwaiting patiently and uncomplain- 
‘ingly for the’ American people to 
‘correct their pay scales.” 

Terming present rates “an anti- 
quated pay schedule for the horse- 
‘trolley age.’ he said that it is be- 
lecoming “increasingly difficult for 


jus to get and keep quafity men for 
‘a quality security sy) stem.” SaSee. 
3 5 | “Too many of our most promis- gee4 
Cc | <a 


vell take! 


of the Army.” 


-_——ee | 


“It's always a pleasure to use 
Hudson Paper Napkins. 
They're re so white and soft.” " 


- NOTE YOUR GROCERY NEEDS 
ON THIS HANDY CHECK LIST 


teen es bet hh ee 


fe 


45° 


La enrindieteniin atin anata dieemnn ale 


Undereover War 


— 


Unitication 
Move Rends 
Pentagon 


By Robert S. Allen 
Defense Secretary Louis John- 
son's bare-fisted unification efforts | 
|have stirred up another raging | 


| NANETTE FABRAY., 
S on quar- ; 
| tempe t in inner Pentag q ae:  Sicles, anid 
ters. 
' 


‘Stor of “Love bite,” Musico! 
Because of the super-secret ;- Mi of 46th St. Theatre 
nature of the service involved, the & 
lembattled military have been un- 
‘able to vent their fury in public. . 
But what they have been. unable 


‘to do and say out loud, they have 
more than made up in undercover 
clawing. 

Feeling over the issue has hit 
atomic temperatures. 
The melee grew 
port by a crack regular Army) 
Inteligence officer. He recom- 
mended the consolidation of cer- 
tain high-level information-gather- 
ing agencies. The Army, Navy and 
Air Force each has one of these 
agencies, All are identical:in func- 
tion and personnel. All, also, are 
very expensive to maintain and 

operate. 

The Army and Navy have had 
their separate agencies for years. 
‘The Air Force, recently, began’ 
‘setting up its own in Texas. To 
make up for lost time, the AF has 
been making attractive offers to 
civilian experts formerly employed 
by the Army and Navy. 

The situation is a clear-cut case 
of costly and needless “duplication, 
waste and extravagance. On the 
part of the Air Force, it is also 
a clear-cut case of empire-build- 
ing. 
The regular Army colonel pro-| 
posed a simple solution. 

He recommended that the three 
overlapping agencies be consoli-| 
dated into one that would service) 
the military establishment as a 
whole. 
| In his report, the colonel sub- 
mitted evidence to prove that the 
merget would result in greater 
efficiency, better control, tighter 
security, and a great saving in 
costs. 

Apparently well aware that his 
plan might appear revoluiionary 
_\in certain Pentagon circles, the 
colonel! did not transmit it through | 
channels. Instead, he laid it di- 
rectly before Secretary Johnson. 
His reaction was immediate and 
forceful. 

Johnson enthusiastically 
proved the proposal. 

He directed the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to take steps to execute this 
unification. A committee, headed 
by an admiral, has been set up to 
'do that. | 

The Army Intelligence Sectton. 
i\which has the largest of the three 
agencies, is particularly frothy. 
Its first knowledge of the merger 
plan was when it reached the 
Joint Chiefs. Presumably, with 
Johnson demanding the . merger, 
‘it will go through. But Pentagon 
‘bureaucracy has a way of thwart- 


Grade B 
Large Eges 
tall ¢ 
cans 
ing even the best-intentional civil- 
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doz, 
| It still remains to be seen what 
¢€ happens on this project. | 
lb. can 5 a | 
Hope Wanes for Ships | 
U.S. Leng to Soviet | 


| The Maritime Commission 
/doesn't believe the United States 
‘ever will recover 86 ships lent to 
‘Russia during the war. 

| Testifying before the HouSe Ap- 
/propriations Committee on a defi-| 
_ciency money bill approved yester-| 
day, Gharies D. Marshall, the com- 
mission's general manager said: | 

“We hope to get them back, but 
we think it is nearly hopeless to 
hope we will ever get them.” 

(The State Department said last 
night that negotiation on return of 
|the ships is progressing better than 
on any other phase of Russia's 
11-billion-dollar lend-lease bill to 
this country.—Editor's note.) 


dairy products 


lfresh produce 


Ne. 2), 
cans 


Soap cleaners 


<A Ree BeA eee 


at, 
jar 


miscellaneous 


out of a re- 


No.2 
cans 


80 pure—they’ re safe frozen foods 


even for baby’s lips. 


oes: OG &. Sh te ae a Oe Se 


No. 242 
can 


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cello-wrapped 
loaf 


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Meats 


10 cans $1.00 


Soup 3-31 


(measured, wrapped quarters) 


68° 
3 63 


FINEST HAND PAINTED 
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AT HALF PRICE! 


When you enclose an empty 8 oz. 
spoon Reguier retell price—$3 50. 
$1.75 


MANN'S POTATO CHIP BAG! .. 


Here's the bargain of a lifetime! Magnificent, hand-decorated wooden bowls 
only half-price with one empty 8 oz. bag of Mann's Potato Chips. * 


Yes—one of the beautifully grained bowls pictured here, with fruit or vegetable 
design, a rich, lustrous finish and colorfully hand-decorated, can be YOURS. 


Gold Seal, Grade A Large 


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bow] you want. Enclose one empty 8 oz. Mann's Potato 

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YEAH, MANN! 


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1048 29th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 


Enclosed is empty 8 oz. bag of Mann's Potato Chips 
and cash............ check.......... for bowl 


IF YOU LIVE NEAR 
COLMAR MANOR 
VISIT THE 
MODERNIZED ACME 


223-25 
BALTIMORE BLVD. 
You'll Enjoy Shopping 
and Saving There 


June Family Circle Magazine at All Acme Markets—Only 5c 
Above Prices Effective Until Closing, 6:80 PF. M., Saturday, June 25th, 1949. Quantity Rights Reserved 


ee vA. 
Bivds.* 


Please send bow! to: 
NAME... 
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CITY. 


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WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


13 


ee eee 


BAKERY 


Yl, 


@ (fe 
Kes 


_ 
_—~ 


sae pry 


forces in the Senet 
‘have balked President Truman's 
plan to double the United States 
contribution to the Institute of 
Inter-American Affairs over the 
next five years. | 

The President asked last Febru- 
ary for a five-year extension of the 
institute's charter, but with a 
doubling of the present United) 
States contribution of five million 
dollars a year. The Senate For- 
eign Relations Committee has now 
approved the five-year extension. 
but has voted to keep the United 
States outlay at its present five- 
million-a-vear level. 
| The institute, a Government cor- 
poration, now. conducts 25 co- 
operative programs in 16 Latin- 
American countries in the fields of 
public health, agriculture and ele- 
mentary education. 

Because it is a cooperative effort. 
jointly staffed, paid for and con- 
trolled by Latin-American coun- 
tries and the United States, it has 
been regarded as a pattern “O 
technical assistance that might be O 
extended to Eastern Hemisphete 
countries under Point 4 of the 
President's inaugural message. 


YY Yin 
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Memphis Wednesday. Stewar 
ess Yvonne Hanavan, 22-year- 
old Memphis brunette, said pas- 
sengers pitched in to help im- 
mediately, opened the emer- 
gency hatch and cleared away 
__ torn seats for the injured 


47 Racetrack 
‘Job’ Pops Up 


» 


STORE LOCATIONS 
1—2806 SOUTH QUINCY ST. 


= re .~——- Center 
pen ‘til © reday and Friday 
2 LEESBURG & SEMINARY RD. 


Cc - eam te Se 


. one of America’s Best Hams... 


You ll enjoy one of these! 


enty of Fr 


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} open 8:30 a. m. te 6:30 p. m. dally 
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ay thru Saturday 4:30 a. m. te 8 ob. @ 


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permit to build the track on April 
— 21, 1947, after both the local and 
regional offices in Boston had also 
turned down permits. 

The agency's records also show, 
however, that on April 15—six 
davs before the final appeal was 
denied—the then general counse! 
of OHE, Adolph H. Swerner, sent 


In Hunt Case ‘Bowser a legal opinion setting 


NYHT News Service forth all the “exceptions” in the 
A Massachusetts racetrack built law under which the race track 
1947 h Waders) t might be constructed anyway. 
nlite, ween = ousing Tighe E. Woods, who is now 
laws supposediv barred the con- 


QYy, 
a, 
Uf 
wa housing expediter but did not oc- 
struction of such amusement facil- 


A 
Y/ cupy this post when the Foxboro 
4 /, itles—-popped up yesterday in the 


case was. decided in early 1947, 
‘case of James V. Hunt, whose ac- caid vesterday this procedure was 
jtivity as a “5S per center” is under 


“not unusual.” 
) congressional scrutiny. Woods said such legal opinions 
Court records in Boston show 


setting forth such exceptions were 
that Colonel Hunt signed a con- frequently supplied by the agency 
tract early in 1947 with the pro- 


during this period in answer to 
moters of the racetrack, the Fox- requests for information. 
boro Trotting Track, Foxboro, Frank R. Creedon, who was 
Mass. 


° 
housing expediter in early dl | 

The contract provided that Colo- when the Foxboro case was de- 
nel Hunt was to get a $15,000 fee cided, was an additional former @ ] 
for helping the promoters get per- high official whose name was 
mission to build the track despite brought into the “5 per center: 
the ban on such construction—a case by the race track incident. 
ban intended to channel scarce Creedon now holds a $30,000 a 
materials ahd labor into the build- year job with the General Electric 
ing of veterans’ housing. 


Co. as manager of design and con- 
The Boston court records pro- 


struction at the Hanford (Wash.) 
vide partial substantiation for a plutonium plant. 
claim made by Colonel Hunt on Grindle says Colonel Hunt on 
May 12 to Paul Grindle, the small May 12 identified Creedon as the 
" businessman whom Colonel Hunt 


official who advised him how the 
| was trying to impress with his Foxboro track could be built in 
“influence” in Washington. 


spite_of the housing restrictions. 
Grindle, a Framingham, Mass.. 
Just measure Nescafé* to suit your 


Creedon. reached by telephone 
furniture manufacturer. was so out- 
taste, add piping hot water and stir. 


BLACK & WHITE 


LAYER CAKE 55Sc 


For scheduled delivery 
CALL RA. 4424 


Special 
Price 


Crisp, golden 
slices for a 
hearty break- 
fast! 


in 


A Beat-the-Heat Special’ Just wonderful for salads 


shrimp cocktail, etc. ... and so very nourishing, too! 


INSIDE AT 
Shirley Stores Nos. 1 & 4 


AIR CONDITIONED 
FOR YOUR SHOPPING COMFORT 


. 
Shirley No. 1 Store (2806 S. Quincy St.) 
Now Open Thurs. & Fri. ‘til 9 P.M. 


NESCAFE IS THE INSTANT WAY TO 


—_— 


SWIFT'S BROOKFIELD 


SWIFT'S AMERICAN 


_. Savor that crisp, cool, red meat . 


Just the thing for a Sunday afternoon Abe 
ing laws so that the Foxboro trot- 
ting track could be built. 
The Boston court records con-| 
tain a deposition made by Colonel 
@ Hunt on Ortober 6, 1947, in which | 
he said he had received $5500 from | 
ithe racetrack promoters and was) 
‘still owed the remaining $9500 on 
his fee and $6000 more for * other! 
services.” | 
_ The chief promoter ak presi- 
dent of the track—and the man 
with whom Colonel Hunt signed 
the contract—was Paul Bowser. a 
fam former middleweight wrestling 
_. champion and promoter of many 


lb. 


| CANTALOUPE 


Mellow, juice-laden flavor . . um-m:m! 
Fill a half with your favorite ice cream 
for an extra tempting dessert! 


LUSCIOUS BEAUTIES 


FROM CALIFORNIA lb. 


WHITEST WHITE 


BLACK 


last night at Richland, Wash., cate- 
raged by Colonel Hunt's claims gorically denied that he had ever 
that he related thém to the New 
You get all the wonderful flavor and 
“lift” of pure freshly brewed coffee— 


siven Colonel Hunt any such ad- 
York Herald Tribune. vice relating to the Foxboro track 
Grindle says that Colonel Hunt 
without the fuss and muss of brewing! 
No waste—you make only what you 


or anything else. 
told him on May 12 that Colone! 
need. 


Hunt received $15,000 for finding 
“loopholes” in the Federal hous- § 

Hf you like good coffee, you'll love 
Nescafé, Order a jar—today. ~ * 


. 
, 1-t-> 


TH 


Xn pres! cz 
MITT a 


2 


That's why mote people drink NESCAFE 
than all- other instant coffees! 


NES. CAFAY) te the exchastve registered trade-mart of The Needs Company, 
tw soluble cofee prodact which ie composed of equa! parts of pure soluble cofies 
(dextrins, maltose and dextrose) added solely to protect the fisvor. 


ANOTHER INSTANT MIRACLE from the makers of Nescafe. You 
get perfect tea every time with Nestea, soluble'tea product. No 
leaves, no bags, no steeping. If your grocer doesn’t have il, send 
for free trial jar of Nestea to The Nestle Company, Inc., Dept. 
W-31, 155 E. 44th St., New York 17, N. Y. 


ee 


a 


sports events. 
Bowser told the New York Her- 
ald Tribune vesterday that he had 
paid Colonel Hunt the $5500 and 
‘owed him the $9500 more under 
the contract, but disclaimed Col- 
onel Hunt's bill for $6000 for 
“other sefvices.”’ 
A new Government 
brought into the 


agency 
“5 per cent” 


1,case through disclosure of the’ 


\Foxboro trotting track affair is 
the Office of Housing Expediter. 
Records made available by the 
‘agency yesterday show that it re- 
‘fused thrée times to grant a per- 
mit to build the Foxboro track, 
‘for which plans were submitted 


} calling for an outlay of $1,300,000. 
} The plans were submitted by Baqw- 


ser for the Bay State Harness 
Horseracing and Breeding Asso- 
ciation, promoters of the Track. 
The OHE records show that the 
agency denied a final appeal for a 


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Here’s a delig 


a 


The same finer, 
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packed a more 
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For Gistincuisbed news reporting, listen to Edward R. 
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14 


THE WASHINGTON 
Friday, June 24. 1949 


POST 


| 


Baltimore Synod 
Elects Dr. Taylor 


- Frederick, Md., June 23 ‘Spl.).— 

For the first time in its 95-year 

existence, the Baltimore Synod, 

Presbyterian ( Church, U. S. A. 
A elected as mod- 
erator a mem- 
ber of the Ne- 
gro race. 

Rev. Dr. Hal- 
ley B. Taylor, 
pastor of the 

* Fifteenth Street 
Presbyterian 
Church, Wash- 
ington, was 
nominated with- 
out opposition 

Dr. Taylor and unanimous- 

- ly elected as the 24th annual con- 

ference concluded its business 
sessions on the Hood College cam- 
pus here this afternoon. 


The electon highlighted the 
three-day conference embracing 
Presbyteries of Maryland, Dela- 
ware and the District of Columbia. 
Dr. Taylor's first official act 
upon taking office was to appoint 
as vice-moderator, the Rev. Rich- 
ard M. Mussen, pastor of the 
Sherwood Church, Washington. 


The Rev. Dr. A. Brown Cald- 
well, of Baltimore, as re-elected 
State clerk and treasurer for 
another three-year term. He was 
unopposed. 

Named to the synod's general 
council, and known as the class of 
1952. were: The Rev. William 
Kepler, 


Write 


J 
pastor of North Minster 


Church, Washington: the Rev. 
Brown, pastor of 
Church, Salisbury: 

Guenther, 
Baltimore; S. Gordon 
Church of the Covenant, Wilming- 
ton, Del., 
First Church, Arlington, Va. By 
virtue of their offices, the modera- 


ow, 
Wicomico 
Cariton A. 


‘tor and stated clerk are also mem- 
bers. | 


The : following were named to 
head the various synod commit- 
tees: Ministerial! relations, the 
Rev. Dr. John H. Gardner. jr.. 
First Presbyterian Church, Balti- 
more: national missions, the Rev. 
George J. Riester, 
Church, Baltimore: foreign mis- 
sions, the Rev. J. Edward Kidder, 
Berwyn, Md.: Christian education, 
the Rev. Dr. S. J. Venable, West 
Nottingham Church, Colora, Md.: 
pensions, the Rev. D. Hobart 
Evans, Hyattsville Church, Hyatts- 
ville, Md.;: memorials, the Rev. W. 
Keith Custis, Riverdale Church, 
Riverdale, Md.; social 
and action, the Rev. 
rie Speers, 
Church, Baltimore: New/ Life 
movement, the Rev. Dr. Paul C 
Warren, Second Presbyterian 
Church, Baltimore. 

Enrolled in this synod were two 
former moderators of the General 
Assembly, the Rev. Dr. Frederick 
W. Evans of Philadelphia and El- 
der Wilbur Laroe. ir.. of Washing- 
ton, one of the four laymen who 
have served as moderator in the 


Brown 


-SEASIDp 


> 


land 44 oe taGias BOOK io 


SEASIDE LIMAS 


UP IN NUTRITION...DOWN IN COST! 


Treat 6 Famil Toni 


ight 


» sioner to the 


Ridgely Street Church, | 
Mitchell, | 


and David S. Bender, 


Fire Chief... 


Waverly| 


education | 
Dr. T. Guth-| 
Memorial 


accommodations 


i ae 


MS 
So RD OS 


JOSEPH (HOLY 


SUIT—From Page I 


1 $75,000 Dog 
‘Suit Filed 


tacked” 
down, causing a fractured hip and @ttend the meetings 
other 


damages of Schekterson and Leo 
Rossiter, proprietor of the gril! on 

Rossiter 
while 
was not in the restaurant, 
Side on 
:+'Bannow had gone outside to pla 
with the anima! 

He said he was informed that 
the huge dog playfully 
- feet on 
the weight was too much 
Bannow down 


; 
? 


~ | es 
| a 


* Bannow’s suit charged that 
temperament.” 


Jet Request Re fused 


London, June 23 
has rejected a Yugoslav 
for 
British-patented jet fighter plane 
engines for its own use, authorita- 
tive sources said today. 


S: edi 
SRS acs 


By Cl erles Del Vecchio—The Washington Post 


JOE) MAYHEW 


Commissioners’ choice to head the District Fire Department 


———e 


history of the General Assembly. 
Two formef vice moderators of 
the General Assembly also have 
attended They were Elder 
Irving Pollitt and the Rev. (ea 
H. Gardner, jr., both of Baltimore 

Upon presenting the gavel of 
office to Dr, Tavlor, the retiring 
moderator, Dr. Venable paid his 
successor high tribute. This: was 
echoed by his fellow ministers. 

Acknowledging the congratula- 
tions from the assembled ministers 
and laymen, Dr. Taylor said: “Not 
I, but the synod is to be congratu- 
lated for this unquestionable man- 
ifestation of Christian brother- 
hood . .. The action here today 
will have repercussions here in our 
synod, but here and also elsewhere 
they will be significant to minis- 
ters, elders and also the lawmak- 
ers.” 

Dr. Taylor, who has been pastor 
of Fifteenth Street Presbyterian 
Church, 15th and R sts. nw.. since 
1925, held the office of moderator 
of the Presbytery of Washington 
City in 1939-40. At that time it 
was believed that he was the first 
man of his race to hold the post 
The Washington presbyterv in- 
cludes 39 white and, 3 Negro 
churches 

At a Similar meeting of synod 
at Hood in 1929, Dr. ‘Tavlor left 
the sessions after he was told that 
he could not eat with his fellow 
churchmen because the 
barred Negroes. Although 
synod suggested that 


the 
he obtain 
elsewhere, Dr. 
Taylor withdrew his registration 
and returned to Washington after 
‘the incident. 

Born in New Bern, S. C., Dr. 
,Taylor received A. B.,-M. A. and 
‘Dp. D. degrees from what is now 


M. AVYHEW—From Page I 


t Mayhew Gets 


M urph v Post 


within a month to live with rela- 
tives in St. Louis. There he will 
undergo an operation for a “deep 
cataract” which he said has blind- 
ed his right eye now the vision of 
his left eye is suffering. 

A farmer's son born in Prince 
Georges County, Mayhew has 
served 41 years on the force. His 
most valuable experience, he feels, 
was 11 years as captain of No. 1 
Rescue Squad. His greatest asset, 

says, is his thorough knowl-| 
edge of building construction. | 

As a youth, he worked as a 
union sheet metal worker on con-| 
struction in Annapolis and the| 
District. With the Amalgamated | 
Sheet Metal Workers, Local 202, 
he went on a sympathy strike in 
1907, when the plumbers struck. 
And that’s how he joined the fire 
department. 

“I drifted out to Laurel, work- 
ing in a tin shop while the strike 
was on,” he recalls. “Someone out 
there suggested I try the Fire 
Department—more money, $79 a 
month and security—and I did.” 

Mayhew served 16 years as pri- 
vate. Promoted to sergeant in 


college*1924, he was made lieutenant in 


in 1930, battalion 
deputy chief July 1, 


1928. captain 
chief in 1941, 
1946. 

His “Holy Joe” nickname, he 
says, derives.from his injunctions 
against drinking on duty and strict 
adherence to regulations. 

A widower, Mayhew, 204-pound- 
er, relaxes playing ping-pong and) 


Johnson C. Smith University in. swimming and lives with his moth- 


Charlotte, N. C. He held pastor- 

ates at Wilson, N. C., and Pater- 

son, N. J., before coming here. 
He was moderator of the Cape 


} Fear, North Carolina Presbytery 


in. 1910-11 and was elected mod-' 
erator of the Synod of Catawba 
, for the year 1914-1915. 

Dr. Taylor has been a commis- 
General Assembly 
of the Presbyterian Church, 
U. S. A. three times and in 1937 
led the delegation from Washing- 
ton. He also has served as a vice 
president of the Washington Fed- 


» eration of Churches and as a mem- 
- ber of its committee on race rela- 
. tions. 


‘Sunburn’ Meter Tells 
When to Seek Cover 


Swampscott, Mass., June 23 (UP 
A “sunburn” meter which 
basking bathers when to get into 
the shade was introduced today at 


the meeting of the American In- 


.,.|Stitute of Electrical Engineers.. 
| Hoyt Scott, General Electric Co. 


Al 


engineer, explained the 


7 | consisted of filters and light-sen- 


i ~|sitive cells which record on a dial examinations. 


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‘er-in-law, daughter and son-in- low) 
at 1811 Kearny st. ne. 
| He expressed views on sieht! 
versial department policies as fol- 
Ows: 
Present segregation of the 69 
Negro firemen, now organized in 
two companies, overmanned by 
about 40 men—‘“We're using the 
40 surplus men in neo tag work 
and it’s working out fine. I'll have 
to consult the Commissioners first 
as to policy but I suspect neither 
white nor Negro firemen would like 
integration. One Negro assigned 
to each company would be lonely. 
Two to a company would mean 
about half the men on duty would 
be Negro which might be too much 
integratior all at once.” 
Rotation—*“I believe in rotation 
to a certain extent, 
“To be a good officer a fireman 
should ‘be familiar with all types 


tells of work. Six transfers in a ca- 


reer should be enough.” 

Non - competitive promotions— 
“Promotions below the rank of 
captain generally should be by 
examination. But battalion chief 
and above should be personally’ 


meter selected, for leadership and habits) 


and qualities not demonstrated in 
We canvassed bat- 


the number of minutes of sunlight talion chiefs and only two favored 


necessary to produce a pink glow 
or a bad burn. 


examinations.” 
Firemen’s union—‘I believe in 
‘unions as a union man myself and 


USE 


CHEESE FOODS 


I'll always hear their views. But 
I don’t like their having taken up 
arms for one member against an- 
other—Captain Conroy against 
Chief Murphy.” 

He also indicated he favors out- 
side alarm boxes at schools rather 
than the inside boxes asked for 
by school officials; does not see the 


For Cooking ® Sandwiches ® Snacks need for an auxiliary fire force 


In the 
Familiar 
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er 


Six 

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Hickory- 
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Onion 
Garlie 
Port Wine 


AT YOUR GROCER 
Distributed by Wochineten Cheese Co. 


MAKE BETTER 


TETLEY TEA 


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world’s choice teas for over one hundred years! 


TRY IT! TASTE THE DIFFERENCE! 


unless war should become immi- 
nent: will work for congressional 
appropriations to reduce the 72- 
hour work week to 60 hours. 


U. N. Health Unit Asks. 


Soviets to Return | 


Rome. June 23 (‘*). — World 
Health Organization delegates ap- 
pealed today to the Soviet Union 
to return to the fold. Russia, White) 
Russia and the Ukraine, all parts 
of the Soviet Union, quit the 
group last February. 

The appeal, by resolution of the 
constitutional committee, «stressed) 
the need of the WHO, a special- 
ized agency of the United Nations, 
for participation of all countries, | 


ICED TEA! GET 


i 


ha 


| 
| 
| 
| 


. 


ADVENT—From Page I 


urer. All Adventist Churches 
the Washington area will be closed 


him and knocked hi Saturday to permit members 


m to 


in Takoma 
Park. 
The Colu Hall Auditori 


the campus of Washington Mis- 


injuries. He asked the 


mbDia in 
said vesterda) 
the accident occurred, | 
but out- 
and that pI 
y over loud speakers on the 
campus 
Sevent' 
eral large tents 
groups have dee 
campus The 
ington Sanitar 
pe open ioT wu 
Dy 


former 


(Nal sionars 
youth 


overfiow 


College will be used fo! 


meetings The 


expected 


the sidewalk will heat oceedings 


’ _ 
college 
tam 


and 


low ah | 


Lents seyV- 
his 
and 
knocking 
He said the dog 
pal of everyone around here 
Duke 


mischievous 


put 
shoulders 


tor age 
the 


W ash- 


las 


Bannow’'s n erected on 
and 


cafete! 


college 


umm 


’ 
;* 


Wi! 
se 
Benjamin 
p! 

Viissionar’ 

the firs! 

Other speakers 
Britain Elder Henry F 
request secretary the home 
manufacture department, General Conference 
headquarters; Elder Andrew J 


bbins, assoviate professor of re- 
mon, Washington Missionary Col- 


UY Campers 
Cy Wilkinson 
Ol Vv ash 


ollege Will 


< 


a “vicious and 


esident 
( 


session 


ington 
speak at 
6:30 a. m 
scheduled 


Brown. 


today at 


are 
ip 
ww 


associate 


ot 


missiona’ry 


permission to 


_——— — - oe 


lege, and Elder 1 A. Ochs, pres- 


ident of Columbia Union Confer- 


in ence 


Tonight's session at 8&8 e'clock 


VFW Session to Hear 

Cruzen, Symington 
Rear Adm. Richard H. Cru 

and Secretary of the Air Force W 


ill address 


>in 
° 
Stuart Svmington w tne 


opening session of the twenty¥- 


ninth annual Veterans of Foreign 
Wars convention 
Marvland. 


Departmet of 


in the 


toda - Pp. m 


Hotel. Baltimore 


Appr oximatel, 


at 
Emerson 


7450) delegates 


and members from the Montgom 


er County area will participate 


in the convention, which will « 
Admiral 
cb 
| prio 
Admiral 
Cruzen, who has returned from the 


ose 
Sunda 


f 


Symington and 


ruzen will head the parade wh 
will begin near the citv hal 


io the opening ‘ session 


Antarctic where he commanded an 
Navy Task Forte with Admiral! 
Byrd, arrived in Baltimore fer 
this convention aboard the USS 
Albany. 


‘UNITED 


Food Steres.\ 


SMILING SAM SAYS: 


HOT SUMMER DAYS, OUR FOOD DESIRES TURN TO COLD 


PLATES AND SALADS. 


EVERY UNITED FOOD STORE IS 


VIRTUALLY A DELICATESSEN IN ITSELF BECAUSE IT HAS 
SO MANY FOOD SUGGESTIONS IN FRUIT AND VEGE- 
TABLES, CHEESE, COLD CUTS, AND MANY OTHER ITEMS 
THAT WILL GIVE YOU COMPLETE TABLE- SATISFACTION. 


Prices effective June 24th and 25th. Call NA 6921 for store locations. 


DEL MONTE CRUSHED PINEAPPLE 2c. 31° 
DEL MONTE TOMATO JUICE 


aaev'S KREY’S FANCY MILD—CURED 


HAMS 
> 2 


HUNTER’S FANCY GRADE “A” 


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pkg 


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nadneiaiinitied 


Adventist Elder Sees Signs of ‘Las t Days’ 


will be ad dressed 
F Vandeman. denomi 
evange All sessii 
held in go Church 


DY } l¢ Lee 


= > 
: : 


ms are arene 


Cook Stabs Diner: 
Asked to Feed Dog 


second cook of 
Restaurant to his 
and asked him to prepare 
1) gaiou 
outraged, wh 


ipped 
tabbed the di 


a bowl 
oT 4) i) for lhe cin s 


d 


wcomen 


low 
t a knife 
t= 


Ta ; tn 
msiie'e ‘? 


a? 
ne 
Didiou was I 


A HOSPital 


and ine COOK Was aried 
llouse Group Approves 


REA Phone loan Bill 
1 ne lio 


vesterda\ 


Ru Comn 
house 

muiNhHoel 

ihcation Ad- 


moans ror 


ise 
approved = for 
ion iexis 
ing the Rural biect! 
ministration to nake 
rural telephone 
The loans would to wrival 
cempanies and cooperatives on the 
same basis now made tor rural 
electrification expansion 


al the 


service expansion 


go e 


as 


No ? 


(ans 


a':3 ar 


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PORK and BEANS 


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CURRANT JELLY vec: 
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28 ox. 
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nm 24e 


con 


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PHILLIPS 
DELICIOUS 


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For greater enjoyment 


-GLIM (Makes Dishes Sparkle) :~. ~. 29¢ 
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Dieu: 25° 


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HERES CASH w CHURCH, 
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Hox lop 


Sandy Spring Man 
Elected by Firemen 


Ocean City, Md... June 23 (P).—| 


Spencer Brown of Sandy Spring.' 


Md., was elected president of the’ 


Maryland State Volunteer Pire- 


Other officers named were: 
G. Mitchell Boulden of Elkton. 


first vice president: Cromwell 


men’s Association tonight at the|Zembower of Lavale, second vice 


final business session of 


Yention. 


>... 


Se --— 


Al In Favor 
Of Real 


Baked Beans 


Salim Heinz! 


ie Tender Heinz Beans 


* 


They're Really Oven-Baked 
_ Till Plump And Tempting — 
And Steeped In Racy Sauces! 


Fe ‘ 


ix 


5 


‘ 
“TF ly 


is WEINZ 
wt BEAN? 


Heinz Boston-style 
Beans, with pork 
and molasses sauce. 
Others yearn for the 
kind in “Aristocrat”- 


Are The Kind Folks Like Best! Sesudh ts Scheduled 


7 a : 


the president: Ted C. Gardner of Riv- 
groups fifty-seventh annual con- 


ierdale Heights, secretary: 
A. Wilson of Midland. 


William 
treasurer: 


| John O. Cockey of Glyndon! trus-’ 
itee. and the Rev 


James W. Minter 
of Hereford, chaplain. 


Earlier in the day a specialist 
on arson told the volunteer fire-| 
and twisted) 


fighters that liquor 
sexual appetites cause a lot of the 
country s most disastrous blazes. 

It takes only a few beers to set 
off an alcohoic pyromaniac, said 
Jeseph M. Giiiice, special agent 
for the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters. 

Gillice was the main speaker at 
one of today’s sessions of the Marvy- 
land State Volunteer Firemen’'s 


‘idled bee 


; POPULAR ~ 
‘DEMAND 


The outstanding 
feature of the year! 


THE 


DRESSED and DRAWN-READY- FOR- THE-PAN 
NO WASTE 


'Fifty-seventh Annual Convention. | B% 


The firemen quickly disposed of s 
one of the most controversial is-| E& 


/ 


sues before them by voting down | ite 


a proposal by Montgomery Coun-| 
‘ty’ s Firemen’s Association to lib- 


eralize benefits for members in- gm 


| jured in line of dut¥. 
The vote was 593 to 172. 


Opponents said they feared it 
would spread too thin the $20,000 
allotted by the State annually for 
relief of injured firemen. 


New arrivals today swelled the| 


ranks of firemen and their friends 


who have come to this Atlantic re-. 


sort for the volunteers’ top event 
of the vear. 
volunteer companies, 
/ 250,000 members. 
The crowd is expected to top 


with some 


ame 65000 for the big day Friday, which 
me: will include a parade. 


‘Hidden Boy’ 


; Turns Away 
¢F rom Mother 


(Picture on Page 1) 
Boston,’ June 23 (7. tag & 
‘trembling, smallboy “no,” Gerald 


@ Some folks prefer | Sullivan, 14, today turned away 


from the mother, Mrs. Anna Sul- 


livan, 45, who is accused of keep-. 
most of | 


ing him a “hidden boy” 
his life. 


Marviand has 243) 


» BRIGGS’ LIVERWURST or BOLOGNA MIDGETS . 


f 


Head, feet, e 
lungs and oil 


/ 


removed. PAN-READY. 


LEG 0’ LAMB 


ntrails, 
sacs 


3l/ 2 to 
© lbs. 
AVG. 
WCT. 
Cello 
Wrapt 


‘ 


. ' 
WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 : 


a 


FOOD FAIR’S BLUE RIBBON 


GENUINE SPRING 


Pan-Ready, Well 


Trimmed, Cello-Wrapt 


eee SKINLESS FRANKS 
ARMOUR’S x 


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PICK 


LE and 


8-oz. 
cello 
pkg. 


25: 


<< 


59: 


FRIDAYS 


"TIL 


P.M. 


ee 


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* 5010 New Hamp. Ave. N.W, 
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* 1919 Michigan Ave. N.E. 
* 3041 Naylor Rd. S.E. 
* 3528-E. Capitol St. 20: 


Sliced Bacon 


.» 49c 
.» 55¢ 
.» 65¢ 


Fresh Eggs! 


MEDIUM EXTRAS .........7. 
Food Fair LARGE 


tomato sauce — with 
or without pork. And ' 


* 4241 N. Pershing Drive 


Buckingham, Virginia 


* 4714 Columbia Pike 


Barcroft, Virginia 


They met outside a Closed court | 
; where she had come to plead with 
you'll agree Heinz 


bakes beans better! a judge to return her boy. : 
-| They have been apart since last 


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SWIFT’S PREMIUM .. 


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yy 


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Pavsaregieetty 


@ For real home flavor, it’s | 


‘March 14, when Gerald startled 
a world on his first day of real 
) freedom. 


In ragged dresses 


Gerald told police of his escape 
‘from a tenement room in which 
he said his mother kept him 
locked. 

| He said he knew nothing of the 
|world outside except what he could 
'see through a slit below a nailed 


. curtain. 


His mother—in a. weeping in- 
terview with newsmen said she 
t loved the boy and meant him no 
harm. Her only thought over all 
the years, she said, was to hide the 
secret of the boy's illegitimate 
birth. She said she wanted him 


‘back so they could go away and | 


\begin life anew together. 


. Today she saw her son in a neat 


‘blue tweed suit, his hair carefully 
‘combed. 

The boy did not speak. 
| Then his mother’s counsel, Dan- 
‘iel J, O'Connell, said: 

“Don't you want to speak to your 
mother, Gerald?” 

Set-faced, the boy turned away. 

O'Connell asked: 


and with’ 
black curls down to his shoulders, | 


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Del Monte 


Pineapple 
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ALL BACON WRAPPED IN CELLOPHANE PACKAGES 


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Widmer’s Pure 


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Swanson Boned 


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“04 


“Don't you want to say hello?” 
7: His voice shaking, Gerald blurt- 
> a ed—“No.” 
| He walked away. 

His mother stood wordless be- 
tween her two U. S. Marine Corps 
sons, James and John. 

The court will decide, probably 

viieesa:) 00 June 30, where Geral¢ will live, 


* Home- Grown 
STRINGLESS 


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cans 


2 = 23 


Bumble Bee 
Columbia River 


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325: 


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PEAS 


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Libby's 
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Baby Foods | Ane 


STRAINED 


3 jars 28- 


ptceeai 


Mayor John N. Torvestad of Col- 
‘mar Manor, last night was charged 
with passing a stop sign and caus- 
ing an accident by District police 
‘after a collision at 14th and Mon- 
Make Sammer roe sts. ne. 

Mayor Torvestad, 58, posted $10 
Salads Sing collateral for appearance in Traffic 
With Heinz (Court July 23. Police reported 
only minor property damage re- 

Fall- Bodied ngs 

Vinegars 


sulted from the accident. Torve- 
stad lives at 3612 39th ave. Colmar 
Manor, 

@ Crisp, cool summer salads 

just naturally taste better made 

with Heinz Vinegar! Heinz | 
Vinegar is clearer, more spar- 
kling—for it’s aged to uniform 
strength. Just a little does alot! — 


i: 


* Friends? Corner 


Such amusing figures, the 
Salt and Pepper twins, 
Squatting on the tablecloth— 
Fish with colored fins, 

_ Flowers, animals, or birds, 
Fanciful and clever; 
But the one I think has salt 
Hasn't ever. 


——Ferry Adams 


HEIN 


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So 3 
: 


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ICEBERG 


jumbo 
head 


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licinz Baby Foods | ‘, 


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Ib. 


You Can Count On | 


Tender, Pink- 
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of fine flavor 


| 
S| 
smart! Let Sealtest save the day! 
Anytime is Sealtest time! 
Remember, too, Old-Fashioned 


Cocoanut Ice Cream, the . 
Flavor-Of-The-Month for June. 


3 Little Kittens 


ARMOUR’ S* CAT FOOD 


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ee Ate 


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RITTER 


Pork & Beans 


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2 «27 


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— 


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eggs So OT ODareetsats etrersarenigiteateatcet 


- 


16 THE 


Friday, June 24, 1949 


WASHINGTON POST 


Mother Who Reared 4 as Catholics, 2 as J ews, 


Must Give Up 4 to Ex-Husband, 


New York, June 23 UP). — A/four as Catholics was ordered to- 
mother who reared two of her day to return the Catholics to he 
children in the Jewish faith and former husband. a Protestant Sun- 


ee 


a Protestant 


day School teacher. 

Judge Benjamin F. Schreiber 
interrupted Mrs. Marianne Lynch 
Teitelbaum’s experiment by of- 


' 


taal | selves 


dering her to return the four chil- 
dren to their father. Zoel Lynch, 
32. of Coalinga, Calif. 

The Manhattan Supreme Court 
justice also fined Mrs. Teitelbaum 


and her husband, Rubin, $250 each, <‘¢. 


for contempt of court because they 
failed to carry out two court or- 
ders giving Lynch custody of his 
children. . 


He said they could purge them- ™ 


of the contempt 
only by delivering the children to 
Lynch by noon Friday at the of- 
fices of his attorney, Louis Okin 
‘I Guess That’s That’ 


Teitelbaum said “I guess that’s # 


that.” indicating, as far as he was 


concerned, the children would be 


turned over. 
Earlier, Teitelbaum had said in 
an interview that he hoped the 


\judge would let him and his wife 


‘fd in 


CLARIDGE 


BROILED HAMBURGERS 


= 


~_ ———w 


Those famous 100% pure lean beef, already 
broiled hamburgers now come in 2 delicious 
souces—tomate sauce with mushrooms or brown 
gravy with mushrooms. 
Try the hamburgers in the tomato sauce with 
spaghetti... for a hamburger and potato meal 


keep the four children. 

“They're nice kids, all four of 
them,” he said. “We're getting 
along fine, eight of us, Catholics 
and Jews, in a six-room apart- 
ment and a shady backyard. We 
wish the world would leave us 
alone.” 

Teitelbaum, a paint dealer. said 
his wife's four oldest. children 
Nancy, 12, Thomas, 10, Mary Jo, 8 
and Judy, 6, were baptised and 
confirmed as Catholies soon after 
they arrived in New York las! 
Christmas, He said he gave them 
a confirmation party and that they 
were delighted. 

Two Children of Their Own 

Teitelbaum said that he and his 
wife have two children of their 
own, a boy, 2, and a girl, a year 
old 

The four, awarded to Lynch in 
a Reno divorce, were taken from 
their home by their maternal’ 
grandmother, Mrs. Kathleen King. 


/ostensibly to ga Christmas shop- 


‘ping. But she took them to their 


mother who whisked them to New 


. York by plane. 


2Dutch Airliner 
‘Carries 32 to 
7 Death in Dive 


BUTTER | 


. FLAVORED 3 


COOKIES |; 


- 

* 
* 
, 
. 


| chartered 


Bari, Italy, June 23 (U.P).—A four- 
engined Dutch Constellation air- 
liner crashed inthe rough seas 
of Bari Harhor today, probably 
killing 32 persons before the eyes 
of seafront strollers. 

Three harbor boats braved lash- 
ing waves to recover the bodies 


t of 24 victims—16 men, five women 


and three little girls. 
Port authorities believed other 
bodies might be trapped in the 


wreckage, resting on the sea bot- 


tom in 130 feet of water. 
was no sigh of survivors 
(In Amsterdam. officials of the 
Dutch KLM Airline—which had 
thé plane—said there 


There 


|were at least 21 passengers and 


> 
Se 


| How to Pick 
ONE DOG FOOD 
that's mode with 
CHOICE CUTS OF | 


11 crewmen aboard on an unsched- 
uled flight from the Netherlands 
East Indies to Amsterdam. The 
passenger list showed 16 Dutch 
‘and five Egyptians. The crew in- 
cluded 10 Dutchmen and a Briton.) 

Eyewitness reports indicated a 
fire in one engine started the 
trouble. 

Documents recovered from the 
sea showed the plane left the 
‘Indies Tuesday. It took off from 
Athens, Greece, today, probably 
en route to Rome. 


Midsummer Festival 


Scheduled Tonight 


A midsummer festival will be 
held in the garden of Augustana 
Lutheran Church, New Hampshire 
ave. and V st. nw., at 8 p. m. today. 

The Guild, Brotherhood and 
League of the church have ar- 
ranged the program. 


citation ; 


~*_ ee 


i“ 


Associated Press WIRCPHOTY 
IN MINED WATERS—Passen- | 
gers and crewmen (foreground) 
rescued frm the cross-chanhel 
vessel, Princess Astrid, look to- 
ward the ship as it sinks off the 
French coast Tuesday. She 
struck a wartime mine during 
a trip between Ostend and 
Dover. Small boats from nearby 

ports put out to the rescue 


Race Dispute 
Closes Pool 


In Ohio City 


Youngstown, O., June 23 \*).— 
A racial. dispute foreed the clos- 
ing of one of Youngstown’s six 
city-operated swimming pools late 
yesterday. 

Nathaniel C. Lee, member of 
the Community Relations Com- 
mittee of the National Association 
for Advancement of Colored Peo- 
ple, and his three chilgren entered 
the East Side Pool. A few minutes 
later most of a crowd of 1000 
lother swimmers milled around 
and threatened the father and his 
children. 

Police reported:Lee was warned 
to leave or “see your children 
drowned.” 

Bruce Hamm. manager of the 
pool, called police and, acting on 
orders of the Park Commission. 
closed the pool for the day. 


Smoking By Youth 
Deplored in Russia 
23 UP).—A Rus- 
sian doctor said today that Soviet 
youths are smoking too much and 
ought to stop “this evil practice.” 
Dr. A. Kuznetsov, in a letter to 
the Communist Youth League or- 
gan Kamsomolskaya Pravda, com- 
plained it was incongruous for 
happy Soviet youths, facing the 
brightest future with unlimited pos- 
sibilities, to resort to nicotine. 


Moscow, June 


The situation is different in capi-: 
said,| 


talist countries, Kuznetsov 
“where the entire pattern of life 
drives a man.to use narcotics,” and 
where hunger, need and despair 
compel youths to deaden their 
senses with tobacco. 


Mt. Vernon Unit to Hear 
Illustrated Talk Monday 


Cecil C. Wall, for 20 years 
superintendent of Mount Vernon, 
will give an illustrated talk at the 
‘quarterly meeting of the Mount 
Vernon. Citizens Association at-8 
p. m. Monday. 

The meeting will be held in St. 
Lukes Episcopal Chapel, Fort 
Hunt rd., Mount Vernon, and 
Wall's subject will be: “A Defini- 
tion of Our Neighborhood.” His 
talk will cover the period from 


the Colonial era to the ninteenth 
century, 


The Gallup Poll 


iF armers Not Only Happier 


‘happier. 


But Better Off, 


: By Geor 


Director, American 
of Public 


Princeton, N. J.. June 23.—Who 
is happier, the man living on a 
farm, or the man living in a city? 

Farmers think the farmer is 
City people think the 
farmer is happier too—and better 
‘off today than his city cousin. 

But don’t look for a rush of 
population back to the farm. City 
people may think the farm is fine, 
but only half of them have ever 
thought they themselves would like 
to live on a farm. 

Here’s the way people size up 
farm life in a national poll by the 
American Institute of Public 


m | Opinion. 


| “In general which do you think 
‘és happier today—the man who 
lives on the farm or the man who 
lives in the city?” 

| Manen Manin Don't 
Farm City Knew 


National 65% 21% 14% 


| 


City Folk Feel 


ge Gallup 
Institute 
Opinion 
‘Farmers 
Towns under 
10,000 
10,000-100,000 
100,000-500 000 
500,000 & over. 
With farm 
past few years hitting a new high, 


15 12 
18 
20 
18 
29 


14 
16 
12 


55 16 


and the Government propping up 


the price of many crops, the survey 
also asked voters: 

“In general, which do you think 
is BETTER OFF today—the man 
who lives on the farm or the man 
who lives in the city?” 

The vote follows: 


500,000 & over 


Jp 
’ - 


Ae | 


ae 


} 


Dt 


Is 


. 


a : y / 
Ger a cloth Ga 


income during the 


= ere 


, == Tex Thornton, Oil Field Expert, 


3 


GROCERS 
UNCON 3-033, fa 


Now 


Found Slain in 


Amarillo, Tex. June 23 i* 
W. A. (Tex) Thornton. 57. daring 
explosives expert of 
oilfields, was found 
in a tourist court 
Police were seeking a young 
man and voung woman who went 
to the motel with Thornton 
night. Officers said the 
diamond ring was missing 
found no mone’ 
effects 
Thornton's skull had been .frac- 
tured in two places and a shirt and 
towel were knotted about 
‘his throat 
Thornton president of the U 
Nitrogliveerin Co won fame as 
an oilfield trouble-shoote: Clad 
in an asbestos suit. he would ‘walk 
‘up to a wildly blazing well and 
snuff out the fire with explosives 
Thornton's home was Amarillo 
Besides his wife, Sarah, Thorn- 
ton is survived by a son, Col. Bates 
Thornton, an executive with 
Hughes Aircraft Co., Los Angeles. 
| A porter at the motel told offi- 
icers that when Thornton came to 
‘tthe tourist court last night; the 
‘young woman signed the register, 


the worlds 
siain toda’ 


las 
victim 
The 


, 
: 
» 
‘ 


in nis 


wigni 


S 


personal 


Tourist Cour 


} Det 


’ 
’ 


“TiLINg 


He said she and the man 
han 


, . 
‘i> 


iooKed in their ear 


U.S. Says Fields 


Owes $737.25. 


In 


Re 


20.) 


Back Taxes 
amin Ff Field« 


ted tw 
t ot Cong 
ernment $737 
Lax en notice 
Court stated vest 

The hen cove! incon 
for 1943, 1944 and 1945. The 
ord claims he failed to pay : 
230.43 in 1945. $488.512.38 in 1944 
and $173.512.79 in 1945, accorda- 
ing to the Baltimore oftice of the 
Bureau of Internal Revenue 

Fields served a 0-day jal! . 
tence beginning March, 1948 and 
paid a $250 fine for the contempt. 
He had failed to produce his rec- 
iords in connection with a sale of 
isurplus bronze wire screen when 
questioned by a Congressional 
icommittee. His address was givea 
as 1643 Connecticut ave. nw 
where he had offices. 


Len 


= 


*‘TaAYN 


s 


’ 
SCii 


—_ anne 


For a Cooling Delicious Summer Dish 
WE FEATURE 
LORD FAIRFAX YELLOW CLING 


ie: 


PEACHES 


Make wonderful shertcokes with these péoches and Reddi- 
Wip—er sttuff with cottage cheese for & swell saled's 


LIBBY’S 


TOMATO JUICE 


(aX YAY h(aXi @\l7@\(@\ 1 (@\1'e\h1@\1/@\4/6) 


~_ 


No. 3 


cans 


GRAPEFRUIT SECTIONS | 


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Healthful 
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SYRUP 


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MANN’S 
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bag 


fa\ ta. 


>) 
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can 


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l- 
F 
A 


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PETER PAN 
Smooth or 
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is Jha [he 


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97 nr vil i 


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Coffee 
Milk 


a ° 
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JERSEY ICEBERG 


Lettuce ~. 10° 
10 = 37° 
2 = 29° 

tb. 3° 


White Potatoes 


Green Beans 


New Green Cabbage 


New 
Caroline 
Tender 
Stringless - 


Firm, 


' 


’ 


| 


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Red, Ripe, Slicing 


ctn. 


of 4 


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GRAND ISLAND CUT No. 2 can 


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3 


THESE FINE FOOO VALUES 


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tall 


cars 


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Pe 
wy 


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rte 5 * 
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re . 
4 gee 
7 “J 
a. . » 
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billows of creamy richness 


twee Rills flies 
mesatitees Mery 
other Rying insects. 12 Fi. Ons. 


INSECT SPRAY 
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ROACH SPRAY 
Black Flag pt. 496 


~ WESSON OIL 
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mos s. 1Q9¢ 
NAT 


For 


|| Nearest 


ry 


Beech-Nut 
COFFEE 


You can't mistake the Flaver’ 


ALL 16-0z 
GRINDS can 


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‘ No whipping necesiary 
® Keeps fresh for days and days in your 


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@ Made with pure pasteurized whipping cream 
@ Sweetened and flavored to perfection 
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SERVING WASHINGTON! 


THOMPSON’S DAIRY 


ANS POR GENERATIONS 


FAB 
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CA 


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LL | 


Private Lead Urged(*= "= rahi Yaderldven: vee: 


| Mrs. Hankins 
In Security Search | Named to 


P 

| | Atlantic City, N. J., June 23 (>. | 
A-Coecoon Erie Johnston suggested today that P la y B oar d \ 
ee quassneeenel 


insurance companies take the lead 


. ‘ 
in a quest for private social -| | 
Radioactive - = eo “ ity plans. cee | Resignation of Mrs. Andrew Saul | 
| | ve Johnston, from the District Recreation | 
(Worms Put | | "™ one-time head Board, and appointment of Mrs. O. | 
| “™ of the United G. Hankins to succeed her, was 
“@ States Chamber 40nounced yes- 


Rays Lit Silk : s Pe ” of Commerce terday by the 


and now presi- Distrct Com- i | 
dent of the Mo- Missionefs. 4 a _—_— | 
} 
| 


New York, June 23 P).—Science, | > eee i tion Picture Mrs. Hankins, ¥ 
official journal of American scien- i, pommel Association of long prominent "jy 
tists, today announced creation of ‘ss aa America. saidin Patent- @ 
radioactive silkworms that make 4 said “insurance Teacher and 


a ilk is a fine, old other commu- 
radioactive silk. Jackson capitalistic con- nity activities, 


The purpose is to study cancer cept. will serve the 
and growth, rather than learn how’ Johnston told the closing session remaining two | 
to synthesize silk, which is one job °f the thirty-fourth annual con- years of Mrs. 
. vention of Kiwanis International Saul’s four-year ..Mrs. Hankins 
that has baffled chemistry. € th jthat the great issue of the day is term. 
A group in laboratories of the whether Americans want to accept’ Mrs. Saul of 3035 Chain Bridge 


Collis P. Huntington Memoria! Hos-'4 welfare state or devise security rd. nw. in her letter of resignation, 
pital and the chemical and biologi- | programs of their own. 


’ 


cal laboratories of Harvard Univer-| 
sity are trying to discover how to’ 


Dairy Foods 


Always 


Your Best Buy! 


. 2, like your eggs big ond fresh . . . your butter fine-flevered . . . your milk end rich | 

‘ anee Seene by Commleegee Sey 7 | their best? Like every dey low prices, too? Then make A&P's Deiry- Contte her x bos ing center ~ for “Seiry toed te eiaeuien 
Wherever we look around the! Mason, said: ot National Dairy Month its spotiess, refrigerated eases ere extro full of an dae Gn ee caeieeea as ae - 
synthesize a protein, because pro- world, people are tormented by a) “I have found that the time re- priced as low as possible oll week long.’ Stop in end feast your eyes Take home a lood ef buys! ’ sctetet 
teins are the biggest moleguies,|ee sense of insecurity. Man quired to attend the regular day 


; has always hunted for security, meetings, and the lengthy night s 
Sate aes inh ienpartoce "tor iite.|% course. But an acute and newly meetings and the special meetings a U er SUNNYFIELD I-lb. A IN Y%-LB 
Silk gives them a good chance, wae bones of insecurity bes\is much; more than! hed antici- = 2 | CREAMERY print | Cc PRINTS _ Ib Cc 


turned man’s quest for security pated, and more than I am physi- 
cause it is made of fibroin, one of . taj = " ay <a bel * 
the large protein molecules. into a lashing, driving force,” he cally capable of giving 


‘Ailews a) said. Harry S. Wender, chairman of * CRESTVIEW q 
Fo dies 9 nea Mage Belong Johnston said the term “welfare the Recreation Board, praised Mrs c LARGE GRADE B doz. | Cc SUNNYBROOK doz Cc 
P ; Bro} state” has alluring promise and is Saul's service on the board as “a' \ v J i.) LARGE GRADE A 


and gowth in turn is one of the |. more palatable than socialism.” He fine. contribution,” and, said the) 


basic researches in hunting the 


cide mie eutie ut bonnes | said the welfare state in theory board =. tage gga sorry” 7 Piva itresrs ‘ | | 
’ : es “vou itti r see her ve. He said the board) Pen Wea n | : 
“The Harvard group injectedimeas “you're sitting pretty from/see, her Heave. ie sit truceessor a . arp eese BENCH CURED b oa 
radioactive carbon atoms to light) 4° veifare state, Johnston said, Y@5 # woman of Mrs. Hankins’ Be eRe oe he / * 


up the innards of silkworms, so that Fado 0 big government and little high caliber and fine qualifica- 


the Hving process could be seen 3” people, but “wherever government | tions nine, weruen's Chatead | en. +« i 79¢ 


photographs. is small. the people are big: their|,, Mts. Hankins, active in Parent- 


The worms spun cocoons, and | private institutions are big.” ‘Teacher work for the past 25) Tasty Mild Cheese » 43c 


the cocoons were radioactive, If| The development of industry wel- years. finished her third term as) 
; } i ess | , 

na gabe geen — > beaieeal fare funds is healthy because “they yg wrens Ay ee i - May She : Muenster Ch eese te. 43c 

uct of great possibilities for the|ePTese™t self-reliance,” Johnston js gt present chairman of its leg-| “Bab Goud 

textile industry, because the know1-|5#!4. islation committee. j a y ou as cach 45c 

edge will assist chemists to sow Insurance companies, through | In the past she has taken an) re ; 

thesize real silk their experience in working out se- active part in Girl Scout work Because “‘Super-Right meats are Close-Trimmed to remove 
: ‘curity for millions against the death and participated as a member in excess waste before they re weighed, they always give you more 


aa 
é *_* of the family provider, may be able the District Girl Scout Council; good eating for your money. And every tender, juicy cut 's T 9 Th . N , 
Suicide-Proof’ Razor to develop plans of private social has served as second vice presi- marked with the lowest price consistent with its fine quality. ; ry 1s Cw Lo 


With Lock Developed regusd “4 - wae ggine needs of|dent and —_ se a cae a at ° 
the people, Jonnston said. iment of education in the District 
' Northampton, Mass. June 23) J Hugh Jackson of Palo Alto,| Federation of Women’s Clubs and TOP QUALITY, FRESHLY KILLED MAR Enriched 
U.P).—Two staff members at a Vet- Calif., dean of the graduate school represented it as a delegate to : H EAD 


s : ome: S 
erans Administration hospital here of a. eee rag teent pve Federation of Citizens’ Asso- — | KEEPS serte “ 
said today they had develo aq |was elec president 0 iwanis ciations; and has been president r k Nn j C n a ree R.. . Because is 
suicide-proof safety razor ai International yesterday. ‘of the Woodridge Book Club. to you,” * Mthed direct fram ovens 
; | A native of Chicago, Mrs. Han- é TASTES BETTER .7 

mf ciaier to a regular sqtety ° kins is a graduate of the Univer-| ONE PRICE— pant only highest qu “a, 1’-Ib 
razor, but a lock prevents removal | Lowl Turnti \sity of Illinois in home economics. | : a ASTS COTTER . . . Bec loaf 
of the blade without a special key. h sided in the District. NONE PRICED fended 0a Cc 
The inventors said the device ° \ coventalatels vd <0 Re . saree pound 
would save time for attendants in Yields Drug | She is the wife of Orville G.) HIGHER 


hospitals, jails and other institu- ' Hankins of 2704 Brentwood rd. Fresh D — 
tions who have to shave their | f PER.RIGHT _T on suc 
charges or watch them. Of Great Value ne., a research worker at the De-- SUPE GHT CLOSE-TRIMMED BEEF uls AR OR CINNAMON 


partment of Agriculture Research Sil sy 19c 
ye | 2 NONE PRICED ver | 
7a Doom FUE MawaTS Use |New York, June 23 cna Center ot penile, vet) Chuck Roast vic” Pound Cakes “ex 55 


: ingred 
vnifermly golden toas?. 


| scientific team tonight reported’ 


| ? the isolation and synthesis of s Ring coe + egy 5 ganas nes RIB END UP TO 4% LBS Layer Cakes Se ip 
valuable drug from the lowly " s / Jumbo Vienna R Ils + 59c 
| ; baga. 
“Tem regersnme Palsy Sufferer Pork Loin Roast 1 ~ 10¢ 
PIE CRUST MIX may be used inthe near tuture’ Asks U.S. Aid morris rive or GOETZE YELLOW LABEL 


beforehand every P hyroidism, a disease 
You know at | to treat hyperths ; 
— ‘in which the thyroid gland be- 


<7 Fy and golden, because |comes prcebtive. For Research Sliced Bacon 


The report of the new drug © @y The Associated Press 


k, | was made by Drs. E. B. Astwood,| A young West Virginia woman, ARMOUR’S STAR OR GOETZE | . For Thrifty 


‘Monte A. Greer and Martin, G.\crippled by cerebral palsy, yester- 


piped wor rolled ble, |Dugnaie oa, tute ear int mae esto nee SK INless Franks > Pantry Shelves. ** 


- J ity, ca | 
i School and Harvard University Fa PS 


— 


They pointed out in Science) "| 
Magazine, publication of the|mont, testified to a House Com 
ae" merce subcommittee for a bill to a Sr 
American Association for the Ad-| wide Government aid for re-| “— ce ae Le bee Na GOLDEN CORN 
vancement of Science, that sur-|search into causes of cerebral EF ek Se Lo 7 sages 2 
veys had shown presence of aM palsy and ways of combatting it.) r eS KAS > + ee oe & wee : 
ee factor in the yellow, payi A. ——— —— he . Bigs NIB ETS 2 12-oz 33 . 
turnip. ‘tthe American Federation of the : : 
Dr. Astwood and his associates Physically Hapaicenpes. we 20) 7 i cans c 
set out to find the factor, isolate ¢ure has been found for cerebral p 
jit and make it synthetically. /paisy. but that its victims can be roduce eee | | 
Thro ‘helped. 
| they =. ee Prneaneee peaenes, He filed statements supporting N ASPARAG NEW 1949 PACK Ne. 300 
Furthermore, they said the same - ag pending —" a, rg mn WISLET SPEARS een C 
‘ f r. inthrop i ps 0 aiti- 
re a Gadet terain Foon Nee and Dr. Herman Kabat of LARGE SIZE IMPERIAL VALLEY PINK MEAT PEAS a a | bee 
- Oakland, Calif. ? 37 
) | the oon ag — tur-- Two other doctors urged action C cone C 
\ |mip, cabbage, aie) 80 an rape on bills aimed at epilepsy. each Cc STANDARD Me? 
‘Sal plants. | Dr. William G. Lennox, of the an d ou es OMATOES 3 35 
Wy «Its antithyroid activity in man, /Harvard. Medical School faculty QUALITY eons 
the investigators said, approxi- and president of the International 7 | 
‘mately equals that of propyl-| League Against Epilepsy, said epi- | GREEN SE AN }ONA Ne. 2 
thiouracil, which is now being used '@sPy affects 500,000 people. If cur om LIC 
to treat thyroid disease. only a tenth were made self-sup- res arro by CALIFORNIA bchs. c 
porting, he said, Pony lifetime SALAD DRESSING oe pint 
money savings would be something . 
BRIGHTER | like three billion dollars.” om = 5c 
) ; ” . 
NO STREAKS + NO FILM 4 FFA Teams : | Dr. Arthur A. Morris of Wash- 24 ‘ mivaeecren Ib c we - 
,. ° ) ington, president of the Neuro- I t NORTHWE N ; K HOUSE EVAPORATED 4 45c 
NO Win In Vir pinta = Society of America, said | cons 
~ | Blackbufg, Va.. June 23 (%.—/€Pilepsy is “a curable affliction,” IONA SLICES 
A ee eke aN: Sor we Hee eet Green Beans visi, 2% 23c} PEACHES ca 2° Ae 
NEEDED a Mm Carrsvilie, Timberville and Nar-/@rror basis.” Basic research and VALENTINE cums 
rows walked off with top honors ®#refully controlled investigations 
today as the five-day State-wide are needed, he said. | a FRUIT COCKTAIL SULTANA ee. SN 
“4 rally and contests of the Virginia . eon 
7 Future Farmers of America came Budget Overhauling | Lima Beans FRESH 2 Ibs. 29- . 
THings soa to an end at Virginia Tech. U 3s M la d ; 12-0. 
o . More than 1000 delegates were rged in iarylan | or 39¢ 
While in convention, they award- land should overhaul its budget, ce ere e uC SIZE c LIBBY BARTLETT Ne. 2% 
va (ed 140 State farmer degrees, rec-|\system to avoid “unnecessary! ? . Wes 


ya ognized outstanding members of spending,” the Commission on : e 

aq the association and made plans for Governmental Efficiency and Econ-' T VEGETABL 

ma \their leaders and others to attend omy declared today. | res rocco i ender bch. Cc dex HORT . 
‘ithe national gathering in Kansas The commission said it has rec-: . we 


‘City next November. ommended the same thing before, 


, ‘but nothing h . | | 
— oe g has ever been done 24 b rries FRESH pint 29- TOMATO JUICE Liesy 
Career employes of the State’s| ue e CULTIVATED box | 
= fiscal organization are not to 
blame, the commission said. Faults DOG FOOD 
“are due to the law and long es- 


‘tablished policies” under which FROSTED FOODS FANCY SEAFOOD 


, an eg me : STOKELY’S . . FRESH CLAW HUDSON TISSUE ‘on 
| | . rt : “of. : 
You don’t have to shake SMO Lehman Far'Sentce || PEAS 2.-45c¢ | | CRABMEAT ™65c ||| SUPER SUDS 


...and shake...justa : : 
eae | | New York, June 23 (#).—New ve White Crab Mea Ib. ' : 
few sprinkles season ‘York State's Liberal Party, figuring) | 2tPawberries {y,", 39¢ rab Meat 75S¢ : — 

..food to perfection! IF. Woauak will resign come becamae| | COPMMBO Sulee 1 25= 4Sc Fresh Porgies » 17¢ FLAvor TesTeo Iced Tea 


- >dIZE lof illness, is backing f Gov. J | 
THE BEST SALT YOU CAN BUY! +a: fen teres lee Cut-Up Fryers sw » 65c Boston Mackerel", 25c | | FULL-BODIED: AND VIGOROUS 


lodized or Plain | Selection of the. Democratic for- OU rR OWN TEA 
mer Governor by the Liberal ! S: | | 


Party's policy committee was an- | 
_ nounced last night by State Chair- oO’ e/ 64 TEA BAGS 
man Adolf A. Berle, jr. ; ‘ ‘ = FOR ONLY 


Perfect for Iced Tea — escatst scturesuserse) X OS) nme rset 
o e Un ations - GE 
, ‘ e ec lief and Rehabilitation Administra- } : PACKGE OF 16 ahi hemes cea 
More Tea per Bag | 


tion 


‘Court Refuses to Bar 


Drive-In Near Airport 
54 _ Reed of the Washington Vir Cream Crest GRADE A FRESH Chestnut Farms’ VITAMIN ‘D’ FRESH | 

ginia Airport for an injunction to} , 

'prevent construction of a drive-in 


‘theater near the Bailey’s Cross-' . | : 

roads Airport was denied yester-| 

‘day in Fairfax Circuit Court, _ }-quart 3 1.qt. 

| The theater site is across Route 3 carton Cc ctns. Cc 
7 from the airport and near the. 


,end of a runway. The airport con- 
tended the theater's screen would | 

Po pte gy = = sora pede Eres Above Dairy Prices Effective in D. C. Super Markets Only’ 
| would endanger lives of its patrons. , die 


g THE WASHINGTON POST ,,, MOTION—From Page 1 
1é Friday, June 24, 1949 


a, 


Convicted Man Says Lawyer * A _ = | eae 
Hagerstown Youth ‘Guaranteed’ His Freedom te > GARDEN 


| : FOOD STORE 
: GALL 
| Chief Judge Bolitha J. Laws was... .I made reference to it because RE: 
ame 1e me mec by testimony of Hughes |! thought the jury would be preju-' | | . 2 


chi he went out to dinner with diced when the background of the SPECIAL 
. 
Take it easy 


JUNE 24 & 25 ONLY 
FLAKORN 
With GARDEN 
Easy-to-Prepare Meals! 


‘ 
College Park, Md., June 23 (®)—! Poultry judging—Winning team, Judge Henry A. Schweinhaut, the °45¢ is a gambling case .. . Any ‘ 
Max Rice of Hagerstown was Grantsville; individual winner, jyrjst who sent Bruno and Skeens Jury in the world would have con- 
elected president of the Maryland Charles Schaitman, Cordova. to jail. Also, he told the court victed hoth those men of assault ‘ 
Future Farmers of America today.|_ Swine judging—Winning team, 1+ Schweinhaut was among “six with a dangerous weapon,” Hughes ‘ 
Rice headed a new slate of of- Easton High; individual winner, ‘ adiaed we were wa eel. my 
fiers chosen by 500 youths at the |Philip Statelmeyer, Boonsboro. eed a : April G “How do you know that?’ tea 6- 
windup of their three-day conven-| Beef cattle judging — Winning SUeSts recently at an pril George- Laughlin asked gt 
tion. After a brief morning ses- team, Princess Anne. town University dinner. 1 | 
Don’t spend these hot afternoons over a stove 


sion and luncheon the FFA grovp Potato judging—Winning team, According to Skeens and Bruno, Taxi Driver Convicted Them a iA 4 er : ‘ong . on : 
elax .. . beat the heat! uy rden Food 


r 
) 
p 
] 
p 
? 
] 
? 
, 
] 
1 
1 
d 
} 
] 


all the help in‘ 


ce th i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 
pp Ee KAY 4 yh DDD Dee eee 


PORK AND BEANS rerio D 916% 19¢ 


BAKED WITH THAT SATISFYING FLAVOR _— 


PERLO TOMATO CATSUP | gancy = 4 


BUY PERLO... YOU’LL NEVER CHANGE AGAIN 


CANDIED CRISPY PIX arom ae 1 


A PICKLE TASTE TO ENJOY! 


GARDEN SPAGHETTI TT! DINNER compete Oe 


A COMPLETE MEAL FOR FOUR package” 


ASPARAGUS SPEARS fNEe phen! oe 


TENDER, ALL-GREEN @ THE FINEST NATURE PROVIDES  ““" 


adjourned for a sightseeing trip Clarksville; individual. winner, they employed Hughes shortly| “Because I have talked to both § JUNE 24 & 25 ONLY 
of Washington. James Swain, Hancock. after they were arrested February these defendants. I knew exactly > Stores Easy-to-Prepare Foods! They're delicious . 
Elected with Rice were the fo!. Dairy judging—Winning team, 15 in connection with the side- | that if these complaining witnesses @ they're nourishing . . . AND they keep you out 
lowing: Damascus; individual winner, Gor- walk shooting of Edward R. Ryan, testified against these defendants 9 - of the kitchen on hot days! en 
First - vice president: Donald 20 Turner, Princess Anne. 24, of 1013 8th st. nw., who got they were gone. The complaining § * i >'/ 
Rollins, La Plata: second vice » gg ane anol a slug in the leg, and the pistol | witnesses gave us ) Assorted pkgs. | 
president, Merle Duvall, Walkers- es . 5 whipping of Lonnie “Curly” Pol-| the world they could, but a taxicab ¢ Flavors ¢ Cc 
ville: secretary, John Miller. Woods, Sherwood. son, 34, 1706 67th ave., Cheverly, driver convicted them,” replied ‘ ) TURKEY TOMATO JUI E Bigg 
Cumberland: treasurer, Warren “ “ \Md. Hughes. ——————————— Cc 
Burr, Cordova: reporter, Charles Catholics to Build Witness Surprised by Waiver | Laughlin then asked, “The com- pw SPECIAL JUST CHILL AND SERVE a an ee } can 
Edward, Bel Air. Monaste in Chicago (| The nattily dressed Skeens told | P!alning witnesses were pal some | 
Named to the executive com-| Chicago, & tes 93 a. The Judge Laws that he was surprised Money, weren't they, sir? ‘ EVAPORATED 
mittee were Hardy Pickett Of peonciscan Fathers. Roman Cath-'° learn that his right to a jury! The complaining witness—$400 | 
Clarksville and Charles Mullinix 9);, order, announced today they trial had been signed away by'l believe was paid to the man that | 
of Damascus. will build a million-dollar monas- "!™- He said that Hughes had) was shot by Skeens,” said the wit-| 
Receiving their prizes for win-|tery and church in the heart of Siven him @ blank fot nd ee h h 
ning contests held Tuesday were: Chicago's Loop district. we had signed it at the lawy | ‘It was given to the man t at| 
Milk judging — Winning team, The building will be erected on  Reetatlaale United States Attor- was representing the complaining | 
Easton High; individual winner, the site of the LaSalle Theater, J. McLaueghli ked witness in my office. And | told | 
William Leber, Clarksville. which the order purchased from ey AT er on eae ve ‘com. the defendants at the time that if| 
Farm mechanics—Paul Butcher, Marshall Field for slightly more aitined shout. it if you hadn't they took care of this operation, 
Damascus. than $500,000. been sent to jail. would you? they would be better off even if 


page's 
de id hs done anythin they were convicted. They would 
to e — agi aed wife and ide be better off if they had treated | 


| é re ee had been freed, no sir, this man the way I thought he ‘ SPECIAL 
GULDENS Mustard I wouldn't,” Skeens said. ; should be treated. The man that JUNE 24 & 25 ONLY 


_ sped JL LS LA KA YY 4 4 4 4. dD dD Des 


In response to a question by his| was shot still had a bullet in him,’ 

new lawyer, James J. Laughlin,’ Hughes testified. GRANULATED 
Skeens said: 

tHe (Hughes) said, this case will | Court Record Introduced 3 
‘be dismissed. One time he asked| Hughes said at another: point 
for $500. He told me, ‘Now don't that Schweinhaut was “a good 


ti ae sai / ie a i ‘ask me where this money is going.’ friend of mine. And I thought he | 
Gray LF a. — Both 1h Tops |And another | time $300 and the) Would be very fair or that he was 


‘ : Perfect Ready-to-Serve Combination 

‘ ’ ce om sugar e@ ective hi 

i Flavor \rver is tine tr stood exuse| hem maint on sentence. too (B BerteME masons eae BN ~ | Sa PERLO::.; MAYONNAISE 

a) lili = bi ik we .* in ad and everything will be taken “| pe court record of a bench pw 1 HONEY WHEAT CEREAL wee ) Keep some on hand for emergencies — “Te’s eee ine 1°; 37°: ‘67° 
” | |  esamaager wagner a sy ER SN ference before Schweinhaut just RANGER JOE 2 pkgs. 21°: ll bis” Ge ee Firm! “ be 


before the trial. It stated: $ avicx COFFEE g os PERLO RtD- 


yellow mustard. But Bruno, a swarthy little man,; “Mr, Hughes: I spoke to the § NESCAFE 39° '. 12 ox. as F oz. can 16 os. cam 30 on. can 
1 jor 


_-2 », AE KEY 4 4 dL YD DDD Dee 


69° 
ns sm ana took the stand next. Asked how |defendants and also to the dis- po 16° 23° 39° cy ALASKA SALMON ve 
eyes Hughes prepared the case, Bruno trict attorney, and I think we pin BOUILLON se 2 LA LM 1% 
i: save some time if I can try it to, STEERO 9 ALASKA CHUM SA ON: deat 45° 


“The only preparation he made, |the court without a j . 21° FOR COOKING OR BAKING 
e co ury. _ ’ PP a . 
\he just asked for his lawyers fee| “The Court: You have a better | RITTER PREPARED MUSTARD | veme RANORSNEITED “4 16° ~ 21° = 


‘and he told me, he says, that if it chance with a jury than you have | CHILI SAUCE arts sre . 35° SALAD DRESSING | 
R 


goes before Judge.Casey or Judge with me.’ PERLO FLAVOR-FULL 


_—__—_——_—_—_—— 
ve pt. c 
aor ange. Ole chemen, 'S), Tae Demers) centencing . Braue ELISH a= CRACKERS 1, VOS|SANDWICH SPREAD ier 7 


got a chance to get you out.’” and Skeens, Schweinhaut had de- 


to jeep uprieeeed priors a taiek ier thor — ” ) SWANSON (Just heat and serve) College Inn Boned Chicken 60x con 826 
CHICKEN FRICASSEE College Inn Chicken ala King =". ior B8e 


~~ =_ =-_ a 
PPP PDP FPDP PPP iS- PPD PPPPRPRPEPRPRELIEG 


* a ‘i a of o> go ors toe. tried i Money “Geing Across Street” 
5 
Fruit Cocktail :: Menicipal Cont, Jusee Walt ir The next witness in yesterdays 
pet SUAS She is tall and buxom, ' 
on the bench of that court. Roaster 
WELCH’S at. © ff According to Bruno he tried to Ore, low-backed gown, and her (> ADEN Xeater CO FFEE BRU-O-LATOR CHINA TEA POT 
bet, eek ‘Sadiiee aff the | ends beelene onde hair was in pigtails tied | res 
GRAPE JUICE sentencing doy but Whe pink |"Ubons. § She quoted: We're still offering FREE a 9 oz. & (retell velve $3.50) 
poweeeeee other he wouldn't step aside.” ‘ Royal Ruby Glass with the purchase aN igen 
ASSORTED FLAVORS Ree t “I was told I wouldn't get a jail se 9 either get a fine or ee N for $1.25 
' sentence. He (Hughes) told me he ; , in the can or in the bag. and ONE COUPON 
JELL-O 3 pkgs. 23 had his own reasons, He said ‘I. Harry Joseph Russo, a plaster- | 11d. dag pani oieas - 
ms Prag : oi a longtime friend of the defend- | Royal Ruby Glass Royal Rudy Glass — Mc CORMICK TEA 
District. I have been practicing law : 
here for quite some time.’ I to ants testified Hughes wes given | 
my attorney, Denny Hughes, I had, $ at the least. COFFEE” 
McCORMICK TEA 
Hughes Answers Laughlin @ FOR REAL ECONOMY P.O. BOX 166 
going across the street. I am go- lb, 1 bb. ; 
INSECT KILLER BLaC As to the sentencing. Bruno ing to use this for taking care | ucky Dutchman Coffee | ‘lee c bag C NEW YORK, 8, N. Y. 
quoted Hughes as saying, “I have a of the trial.” Russo said. 
lot of friends. Most of these judges (Hugh ne ts Mlematt 
o just push the bution! Kills house- sitting on this bench, I am friendly Renee Ghee Sweety across , ee +. 
oprey.. pus $ 29 with them. He says, ‘I eat with 5th st. from the District Court . 
seeing ne ae ea fying them and play golf with them. |) building). | . ho 
insects in the house. 6 to 8 seconds of spraying | Z go to golf courses with them’.” | Pressed for amplification, Russo’ , 
is enough to kill insects in average sized room. 12 FI. On. Nel. He was followed to the stand by  S4id, “ - a rig la i: oe : cae , G DELIC 0 Ss 
me Hughes, who for the most part, across the street. ‘I am using this) | 
UNCLE BEN’S , WILKINS gave only “no sir”. as answers. |t© take care of the trial’.’ | ; : sO COOLIN see so I U 
. : "TT 1, Ib. pkg. 
angry with Laughlin. |0f someone across the street?’ he w* . Try Wilkins Tea iced... . with e bn pmé 
_ Laughlin asked him, “Now tell) Ws asked. a % , ee oy oS ae sandwich, a few slices of tomato, a 
us what you said about waiving a| “Yes sir,” was the reply. ‘He| fs “4 couple of olives! It’s the perfect 
trial by jury and what they said to| Said don’t ask any questions about i, x afternoon snack for these hot, sticky 
you?’ , it. It was going across the street.” , 
WITH VITAMINS 
that in my judgment, particularly | ® : | ) 
SEALED with the heat that was on in gam-| . WILKINS TEA IS FINE HOT! 
IN! | bling cases, and this shooting re- 2 . ’ 
sulted from a misunderstanding) ©UP CAKE MIX | | Try it in these ae ea bags: 
about a dice game that was held’ Jo easy to use: 
an at here. And then the men came| While they're adding - 
“Well, the shooting resulted from ty i = | | , 
this gambling activity and I told wi upiets, Pre- | ~.- “i | ’ OGA 
them as a result of the heat that cision-mixed for sure ee 2 MANN'S SARAT 
lot better off in my humble opin- i 5 POPP PEDPPPPPPPDI SSE LSS P IPL PI PSPS PIPL PPPS IP PDIP PPLLLLD. 
VANILLA jon, by taking a tral By the cour ee ARMOUR x BORDEN’S LIBBY’S 
EXTRACT ~ VIENNA i| Starlac CORNED 
| PEE | corton's | SAUSAGE ' | 
sons once onecceaseseaeaaeesensreRRR RO 10 os. 29¢ I 
sete a ene Codfish Cakes | . 
See : : = : eos Seneeete a 
. | | aD Di « of a a 90 
SWEET EART a Bi M pkg. makes 
| he henna Suse 5 quarts of 
Buy & cakes at res. price... cet & ' | 3 st age , ec 
ene more fer ic. 


Casey and Armond W. Scott are itecatees™ wae Srune § wits, Mary For a BETTER Breakfast—Serre GET THIS BEAUTIFUL 
‘somehow or Hughes as saying that “the boys | 
of each pound of Garden Coffee... 
know most of the judges in the ing contractor who said he was | 
GooD pkg. of 25 bags 
a lot of faith in him,” Bruno said. “Well, at the time the $500 was c Cc MAIL TO 
BLACK FLAG AEROSOL taken, the $500, and says, this is‘ 
CONVERTED LONG GRAIN But at times he became visibly, “Did he say he was taking care 
; “ee days! 
“I had advised the defendants, 4 
over from Baltimore up to Michael-| up the bridge s . .. w 
. | 0 , eee ASHI N 
son's poolroom and they apparently 3 Pen our a d ti Eee : ae nd 
had an argument or quarrel there. y g m | | ; . 
: f PAADDDDADRADARAARARARARLDAAD ALA GPP PPPS PS PPPP PL LP PLP POP LPL PL PD PLD PPD PLP PPP PLL PPA 
= | Nii | | | 8B oz, 
sA\ was on in gambling cases, they results. Just add egg en. : a and k 
wouldn't have a Chinaman’s chance and milk. pres ey ie ik 1 prs. Cc 
PURE before a jury, but they would be a ae eee ee ; 
con 2 Non-fat, d 
OLIVE ‘= 2° 5 SNACK STARS << >> S| ey Nonfat, dry 
OLIVE OIL sitet. | 


brings - Health, Variety 


m, DSc . 3 is | : ; and Color into Setad Saeve: ' TAMALES lb. VEAL LOAF 
| : | oz. 7 ox. 
| ane a : | i pongincoe read srrpontiee S * 21°| re LipBy’s =‘ ° 29¢ 
SWEETHEART ; 1s > } ying protein food abun: | GARDEN FOOD STORES WEEKLY CLEANING SPECIALS 
dé = fos , | 
i 


: | dant in vitamins and min- : ‘REALLY 
Ve “Yi ie LAVA SOAP —cs't8Zmw = Qe 
|. Bane cakes 40° | —- $3 , —— ee | ti 19 | FOR ll 39 
0 A\ (Ces oN e AMMONIA «=. Te | WINGTPX Way cuss ,'o. SBe 
WINNER OF | f 2 i> 8 rs 2 , 


BLU-WHITE =F P == =< is ‘f “America’s Favorite Bleach” 
EIGHTEEN HIGHEST AWARDS FLAKES IMs SENET } 


and GOLD MEDALS Pes ba sh cam bh 5's wt 


Bus & cakes at reg. price... get 
ene more fer ic, 


2-ox. e 
= 33° is 34 


| ; = - : ~ 4 > ; A 
| « F _ = = | ’ ’ 
: < i —= =. » | ee Z . . ? 
: —_ ~ = = : —— ‘ a 7 1 . -_ 
: ¥ —— ~ = = : | J 4 = . ; 
: . 7 7 ww ‘o > 
) HCRLAM! 
: : ‘ 4 , 
> = . ~~" : 
| | OCTAGON LAUNDRY SOAP. .3 “" 22c 
’ o 


a saaigert Di aaah Serhen Stance ej 8 
“America’s Favorite das ate eT 
x x PICNICS 


& Household Disinfectant’ 


| Bo deodorant 
66749 | t * * SNACKS 
eS a ae eo 7 454 A dial BATH AND TOILET SOAP 


Prolongs Life of Linens!” | secames - 
wk BEVERAGES = Cai Nameniasiag sc cares cold. seals rns et ya ae 


| ret the-clock freshness. 
“areal. jug | eS ily eer Product of Armour Toiletries 


CAPITOL FRITO COMPANY Inc. Prices in this ad effective thru close of business June 30 unless otherwise noted. Certain items gsubjeét te sales tax in 
, - 


4860 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, Md. 


PRINCE—From Page I 


'Tribesmen Vote 


‘Break’ Expected 


In County Probe 


to the Bureau of Internal Revenue 
for checking 

Soon afterward, the bitter series 
of divorce case hearings between 
Jobn B. (Blackjack) Kelleher and 
hi$ wife opened in. District Court 
he. Mrs. Kelleher alleged her 
husband had a lavish income from 
gambling operations. Testimony 
vas bandied back and forth about 
a safety deposit box containing 
$30.000 to $100,000 in cash An 
Internal Revenue Bureau agent 
began attending sessions. 


Meanwhile, May's investigators 


were piling up evidence which led 
to mass raids in March. Ajl in- 
formation in this inquiry pertinent 
to income taxes was turned over to 
the Internal Revenue men. 

The case has assumed such pro- 
portions, The Washington Post was 
told last night, that top men in 
the Department of Justice tax and 
criminal divisions are keeping in 
almost hourly touch with it. 

Up to now. most of-the investi- 
gation has centered in Washington. 
But now it has reached such pro- 
portions, The Post learned, that 
it will be transferred to Baltimore 
where Federal Court jurisdiction 


_———.- ——— —_ 


Bilton. Va. 


For White Queen 


lies in income tax cases in this vi- #°% 


cinity. 


George Hoflferberg, Internal te 


Revenue collector at Baltimore: J. 
Cc. Wilmer, revenue agent in 
charge: and Harry G. Herbstreig, 
Revenue Intelligence Unit agent 
in charge’at Baltimore, all were 
mum on the case last night. But 
from several sources here, it was 
confirmed that the case will move 
to Baltimore headquarters in the 
immediate future. 


“Break” Seen Near 


case is nearing a “break,” which 
in ordinary Federal Income Tax 
procedure means legal action on a 
civil or criminal basis or both. 

One high Federal official here 
said last night he cannot talk about 
the case for fear of “embarrassing” 
Bernard Quinn, United States at- 
torney at Baltimore, through whose 
office presentation to a Federal 
grand jury would come. 

Both Justice and Internal Rev- 
enue Bureau officials last night 
were closely guarding identity of 
the Prince Georges County official 
reported to have confessed. None 
denied that .a confession has been 
made. 


THE GABLES 
ELKTON, VIRGINIA 


For a perfect 4th of July weekend, 
in the heart of beautiful, historic 
. LValley of Virginia. Tennis, Bad- 


ing, Television and nearby Golf, 
Woted for excellent food. Write 
Richard Howell, Manager, Tele- 
opens 2381 Elkton or EXecutive 


minton, Archery, Horseback Rid- , 


A. Gwynn Bowie, stat s attor- 
‘ney of Prince Georges County. 
could not be reached for comment. 
He is in Providence Hospital here 
as result of a heart attack which 
he suffered on Mav 29. 

Dr. Andrew K. Bowie, his 
brotifer, said last night that his 
condition is “no more serious” than 
others having similar attacks, but 
that he is still not allowed any 


visitors and will not be able to be 


This lent corroboration that the, 


\:ecciated Press WIREPHOTY 
APPROVED—The former Ruth | 
Williams, a London typist, pic- 
tured with her husband, Sereste 

Khama 


South African 


Tribe Accepts 


White Queen |. 


Johannesburg, South Africa,' 
June 23 (#).—London typist Ruth’ 
Williams tonight was a queen-to-| 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Friday, June 24, 1949 


ses on 


— i 


45 OF AMERICA’S 


19 


—ANEST STORES—ALL TOGETHER 
IN 3 CITY BLOCKS! 


\be or not to be, as a noisy tribal 
fmeeting adjourned until Friday) . 


_ a moved for several weeks. 


NEWEST... FASTEST \SLOT—From Page I 


MARTIN 2-0-2 SERVICE Slot Machin i 
Law Voided 


subject to a referendum of county 
voters. The referendum was held 
June 2 and proponents of the ma- 
chines won, 6325 to 5409. 

In his ruling, Judge Marbury 
commented at length on the pur- 
pose of a constitutional require- 
ment that the titles to all bills 
enacted in the Legislature contain 
a full description of their intent. 

This requirement, he said, serves 
two purposes: first, to assure the 

ALASKA—15 TRIPS WEEKLY people that each act shall relate 

ORIENT—4 TRIPS WEEKLY to only one subject and to prevent 
SAVE 5%—suy rounp trips | the “engrafting upon an act mat- 

ters entirely unrelated thereto. 
Phone: STERLING 9000 and secondly to fairly advise’’\the 
a or your Trovel Agent Legislature and the people of the 

real nature of the proposal 

NORTHWEST | ‘Wissen rnc ou 

| “The wisdom of this require- 
Orient AIRLINES ‘ment becomes apparent,” he said, 
“when it i@realized that in legis- 
lative practice only the title of the 
act is read when the bill comes 
before it (the legislature) for con- 
‘sideration ... and that most acts 
‘get no mention in the press or 
otherwise except in reference to 


3 FLIGHTS fo 


PITTSBURGH 
- CLEVELAND 
- DETROIT 


2 FLIGHTS to 


SEATTLE 


HAWAII—3 Trips WEEKiy 


their respective titles. | 


_ “There is nothing contained in 

s the title of (this) act as passed by 
‘the legislature which by common 
\intendment gives the slightest no- 
‘tice or indication to the members 
of the legislature or the general 
public that the subject of this law 
‘has to do with any repeal or modi- 
‘fication of the general laws of this 
‘State with reference to gaming or 
‘that gambling devices, prohibited 
by law, would in any way be legal- 
ized.” 

The title of the Prince Georges 
act describes the bill merely as an 
‘act “relating to the licensing of 
coin-operated mechanical! or elec- 


Children’s 
Formal Wear 


. 
Full Dress Cut- 
aware. Braided 
ack Coats. 
chines in Prince Georges County.” 


| Judge Marbury'’s rulings gave 
‘two examples that would be fair 
‘descriptions of the act: 

1. “An act relating to the li- 
.censing of coin-operated mechan- 
ical or electrical amusemuent de- 
vices or machines ... and repeal- 
ing to the extent of their con- 


‘trical amusement devices or ma-' 


‘without deciding whether to ac-| 
lcept a white chieftainess. 

Several thousand Bamangwato, 
tribesmen. gathered at Serowe, | 
Bechuanalafid, defied their regent’s| 
orders and voted to accept the! 
white girl as their queen, She is, 
ithe wife of Chief-designate Seretse| 
Khama, who married her in Lon-’ 
‘don. | 

“If I don't give up my wife do, 
you want me for chief?” Seretse | 
asked the assembled tribesmen. | 

Forty minor chiefs turned! 


thumbs down. They wouldn't ac-! 
‘cept a white queen. 

| Then 6000 tribesmen acclaimed) 
Seretse, shouting their approval of| 
Ruth until the hills surrounding 


the meeting echoed with tribal! 


‘yells. a 


For 10 minutes Seretse was ap-' 
plauded, but decision was with-' 
held until the tribesmen gather | 
again Friday. 

Voting by a show of hands after} 
three days of ritualistic confer-| 
ences, only about a fifth of the 
9000 pow-wowing natives voted! 
against accepting Seretse and his| 
white wife as their leaders. Seretse') 
is 27 and his wife is 24. 

Earlier in the day the aged 
regent, Tshekedi Khame, told the 
gathering: “The white woman is 
unsuitable to Seretse and) the 
‘tribe. I will hand over the throne 
to him, but if he brings his white 
wife 1 will fight him to the end.” 


anical or electrical amusement de- 
vices in Prince Georges County. 
“Moreover,” Judge Marbury 
said, “the use of the generic term’ 
‘coin-operated mechanical or elec- 
trical amusement devices’ without 
more is misleading and does not 
connote the licensing of slot con- 
sole or other machines which 
might dispense an award to the) 
iplayer contrary to the gambling 
‘codes as they then stood. | 
_ “While some of the types of, 
machines sought to be legalized; 
‘by the act would undoubtedly be, 
‘characterized as gaming tables) 
(under the State law) and thus be! 
(prohibited, some of them would. 
not, . 
“But none of the machines men-' 
tioned in the title must neces- 
sarily be used for gambling pur-' 
poses and-all of them there de- 
scribed could be used without 


MEMES INGO sections of the State code, pro- “olting the law, so thet anyone 


/hibiting gambling. 
1714 L Street, N.W. | 2. “An act to repeal, to the 
L  Seraee a? Chin es ‘extent of their inconsistency here- 
rreet at Lonn. Ave with,” the same sections of the 
REpublic 7810 | State code “and to provide for the 
licensing of coin-operated mech- 


Prete © ee we 4 POC ABER CR ik Oe ORR 


the new Quick, out today. 
Fits your pocket. Fastest way 
io keep well informed. 


= 
a MEET 
; a 
= 
————— 
scene ee 


> a 


EVERY WEEM sunt 27, 1949 


. 
Be 


PEOPLE + PICTURES » PREDICTIONS 


reading the innocuous language of 
the title could not gather any | 
reasonable conception of the sub-| 
ject of the act or the true effect of 
the provisions contained in the) 
body of the act.” | 

He said that the “subject of this) 
law is not difficult to describe and,} 
if the proponents in preparing the) 


j title have deliberately used ‘wea-' 
‘sel words’ which are deceptive in! 
- character. when this situation is 


brought squarely to the attention 
of the court for decision they can- 


~ not complain because the court, 


in the exercise of its duties and 
responsibilities, is required to 


' strike down the act.” 


The fact that it went to a refer- 
endum did not cure the defects in 
the title, Judge Marbury said. 


Law Titles in 3 Counties 


Similar to One V oided : 
Titles of the slot machine li- 
cense laws by Calvert, St. Marys) 


-iand Charles Counties have word- 


ing similar to that which Judge 
Marbury found fatally defective 


in the Prince Georges law. 


Their titles all lack indication 


‘that the “mechanical or electrical 


amusement devices” include slot) 


‘machines. And they fail fo indi-| 


> State antigambling laws. 


»=' County acts do provide in the body 


cate repeal or modification of the) 
However, Calvert and Charles 


of the act for modification of the 
State gambling laws. 

The Anne Arundel act under 
which the commissioners licensed 
‘slot machines was a general law 
authorizing legalization of various 
types of gambling. The title 
specifically states that the gam- 
bling laws shall not apply in cer- 
tain instances. 
| |'The courts could not declare 
the slot machine laws in any of 
these counties illegal unless legal- 


- ity was raised in litigation. 


J Sed oe 7 > » : Se < < * " ° . 
ee SET CS Soa Pa RS Sete ee 
i : i. a —o Be Roag eg) et co. s Pk Sed Bas me Ss has! a : aes: ~ 


Mount Vernon (Brand) Whiskey—A Blend—86 Proof—724% Grain Nentral Spirits 
National Distillers Products Corporation, New York, N.Y. 


OMB anand. 
: re ee a ne 
PR, ee 
re ee ibe 


| = | oe 
12 Million to Harvard | eae 
Cambridge, Mass., June 23 U n—| mm 


Harvard University has received | 
gifts totaling $12,488,335 in the past | 


year, President James B. Conant} P 


today. ' 


There are NO parking problems in Shirlington! [f 
the frustrated shopper above was in Shirlington, 
she could leave her car in any of the three huge 
free parking lots. And after leaving her car, she 
would find all the 48 Shirlington stores close at 
hand on three city blocks. What ts she shopping 
for? A new evening gown or a postage stamp? A 
loaf of bread or a new Mercury? No matter what 
it is, she'll find Shirlington her shopping heaven. 
For variety, for value, shop for the entire family in 
Shirlington! And don't forget the convenience of 
night shopping on Thursdays and Fridays, or all 
day shopping on Saturdays during the hot sum- 


mer months! 


Open Nights—Thursday & Friday 
FREE AND EASY PARKING 
Three Large Parking Areas 


. ‘ , tt Se 
tp . eee oh 
¥ - ~ eo'4 
ox > xg > 
Se: ae 


-#. " 


“He a 
a So 


— a. . ao. i . 
ar aX - 


~* 


et ee od 
ne oe 


ACME MARKETS 


One af the lerger super markets 


i ARISTO CLEANERS 
€ut Rate Dry Cleaning for men 4&4 women 


ABC LIQUOR STORE 
Open Weekdays Until 6 P.M. 


ANN LEWIS 


Women’s Wear and Accessories 


ADELINE SHOP 
Women's Accessories 


A. & BRECK SHOES 
Pi7th Avenue Shoes for Women, Men 


RERGER HOSIERY 
Women's Hose and Accessories 


CLOTHES HORSE 


Women's Wear @nd Accessories 


TRICKERY INN. RESTAURANT 
Fried Chicken Delivered To The Home 


COHEN'S 
Picture Frames, Mirrors, Pictures 


CLIVES BEAUTY SHOP | 
Bevery Beauty Shop Service 


FANNY FARMER 


Nationally Famous Candies and Sweets 


E. A. FILENE CO-OP DEPARTMENT &TORE 
Co-Op Values for Every Member of the Family 


FIRESTONE STORES 
Automobdiie Tires. Accessories, ete. 


GULF STATIONS 
Muge Super-Service Station 


GIFT SHOP 
Gifta for the Home, Birthdays, ate 


GUDE’S FLORIST - 
Cut Flowers, Corsages, Plants, ete. 


HIGH'S ICE CREAM 
One of the Famous Hick Ica Cream Stores 


HOME STITCH SHOP 
Virginia’s Finest Fabric & Knitting Center 


HOT SHOPPE 
Huge Restaurant & Retail Food Store 


FRANK R. JELLEFPY 
Branch of Famous Women's Store 


JERRY'S KIDDIE CENTER 
Complete Outfiiters for Children 


JUVENILE BOOTERY 
Shoes for Babies to Trene 


TED LOUIS SHOP 
Nationally Advertised Men's Weer 


MILL END SHOP 


Drapery and Slincover Fabrics 


NUGENTS WOMEN’S WEAR 
Fine Dresses and Accessories 


rT. & POST OFFICE 
Big Enough to Service « City 


PITTLE’S BAKERY 
Cakes, Paatries. Cookies, Bread. ete 


JOHN SIMON 
Millinery, Dresses & Fine Soortewear 


SINGER SEWING CENTER 
Sewing Machines, Vecuum Cleaners. et¢ 


STAUFFERS 
Famous Body Streamiliners 


SHIRLINGTON RADIO SHOP 
Radio Television Sales & Service 


SHIRLINGTON PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Famous for Family Photographs 


SHIRLINGTON DRUG STORE 
One of the Largest tn the East 


SHIRLINGTON DELICATESSEN 
Fine Foods, Sandwiches, Meals 


SHIRLING TON THEATRE 
Modern, Air-Conditioned Theatre 


SHIRLINGTON JEWELERS 
Diamonds, Watches, Silverware 


SHIRLINGTON HARDWARE 
Everything for the Garden and Home 


‘SHIRLINGTON BEAUTY 
4 Complete Beauty Show for Milady 


SHIRLINGTON MOTOR CO 


Limneéin-Mercury Dealer, Sales, Service 


SHIRLING TON TRUST CO 
A. complete Banking Institution 


SHIRLINGTON CLEANERS 


4 Compiete Dry Cleaning Service 


SHIRLINGTON BARBERS 
Reppert Barbers for Men and Children 


SHIRLEY FOOD STORE 
One of the Largest Suver Markets 


WOODROW STORE® 
Nettonély Famous Men's Weer 


WOOLWORTH’'S 5 & 10 
One of the Lergest Woolworth Store: 


VARIETY SHOP 
Things and Stuff, Girts. ete. 


’ 
0, Viphhi 


BUSINESSCENTER 


The Shirlington Business Center is located on 
the Shirley Highway just 2\, miles from the 
Pentagon Bidg—adjacent to Fairlington and 
Parkjeirfax. 


— date. (~~ pes Bi,  eaeedalee Notables Honored at Harvard Commencement Midget Actors Resent ‘Monkey’ Tag, Strike 


Portsmouth, England. June 23 ° Mack said it was all a terrible 


! . oa | UP).—Thirty British midget actors mistake. 
*“ooseve t Yr. a | : . 4 : i hh, were on strike today because City “At last week's council meeting, 


Ceuncilor Robert Mack allegedly I said I thought the midget show 


o s os , |  Reggeae, ‘_ F sf 5 compared them to ‘“six-legged should be at the far end of the 
Backs acide Bill EH & | 7 eo fj + 3 ¢ monkeys.” thidway with all the other amuse- 


The midgets said they would not ments.” he explained. “I men- 
' Soo Lee : a Ysa . ek PSE < 3 eat ag! in the amusement park tioned six-legged monkeys and so 
Bees es . et ES ae | , Reais. , os. ee show for which they have been b as 
\ Be Gok “/ «4 3 eA oie ie: on, but was not referring to these 
pif cng LE <2 fim te ee. gs, Es e 3 a % ’ 3 booked until Mack apologizes people personally.” 
His resonant voice using words\age of the national housing bill. : 5 a te in A Bi , © ‘ 4 bE i | ma 
and phrases that brought back The House applauded as the) ™~ 
memories of his famous father, "¢W, 34-year-old lawmaker stepped 


to the microphone and opened 
Representative Franklin D. Roose- with an apology for his presump-| 
velt, jr., yesterday made his maiden tion in speaking so soon after |’ aie Be 


— in the House urging pass-) election. | : 
He emphasized that he had cru-|— 


saded for the housing bill in vet- ¢ 
a se" leet erans and civic organizations for (#7 
bale = past Sow years, and said that § = 
ine tes with new cushion the people o is district had ~ 
oe epplication fie ike new made it clear “that the uppermost |. 

iciaiest We Mantmaam, Money-bock Question in the minds of all is the 

‘ee. 598s tubesotdrugnists. disgraceful housing shortage 

which blights our land.” 
| “The slums of America,” Roose- 


| velt said, “are breeding spots of ' i i: 
MANY NEVER communism, and in passing this eas 
Hlegislation, -e will be striking a 


OCE : Associated Press WIREPHOTU | sie J HERE’S A FINE 
SUSPECT C AUSE blow against socialism and com-| ACADEMIC PROCESSION—Five of the 16 notables who received ton, president of Brown University (escorted by Dean Wilbur J. | sé 


munism and for our free enter-| honorary degrees yesterday at Harvard University’s 298th com- Bender of Harvard); Dr. Ralpn J. Bunche, United Nations medi- 
prise system and our American | 


‘howe mencement file past gowned seniors with their escorts. Degree ator for Palestine (escorted by Prof. William Y. Elliott), and | Sl Ae SUMMER SUIT VALUE! 
OF BACKACHES po clearly patterned | recipients include (row nearest camera, from left), Gen. Lucius: Robert P. Patterson, former Secretary of War (escorted by | RS. “as SRR 
| liver Franks, British Ambassador; Henry M. Wris- Prof. Erwin N. Griswold) 
This tment Often after those of his father, Roose. & D Clay, Sir 0 ’ ’ 
oe ete Relief velt told the House: | — 


| 
When disorder of kidney function permits | “In my limited experience, I Pan hae more than the un- Stanley Scherr, Maryland State 
us matter to remain in your blood. |ean remember that almost every healthy, the unhappy and the in- OUn unt y nRFOrwMNSs racing commissioner. One Mary- 
ee ee eae! piece of legislation in recent years hibited graduates of our slums.” land delegate, who declined to be 


pains ler pits, owelling, puffiness under the wich has sought to serve the in-| Roosevelt scoffed at claims that - ad P N d y ] identified, said the issue was 
eyes, beadaches and — Seen terests of the people instead of|public housing will make “politi- e ers arty eeas out l _ whether the senior members of 
scanty passares se ty peed it wrong interests of the few, has always|cal slaves” of those who live in it,| > tion Frid the party can dictate to the young 
with your kidneys or bladder.» been tagged by the same old gang|and attacking claims the bill is Salt Lake City, June 23 wa ine ion Friday was threatened on Republicans.” 
Den’ welt _- MEET euscesstully aS Socialistic.” “socialistic,” he pointed to Senator America’s Young Republicans/the issue. 


50 Doan's give | hio). one of pointedly informed party leaders}; Edward Trepinski of Toledo, 
atc ake the so es of In announcing he had granted Robert A. Taft (R., Ohio), one 
tubes 


h out, poisonous waste five minutes to Roosevelt, Chair-|its original sponsors, and said sr pone | wich needs sone annem se hg ag eg ag “nd + 40, 50, 602” 
ave ; “man Brent Spence (D.. Ky.) of the Taft soelathe” a Representative John Davis Lodge'|of seating the delegation of the ) 
j “T'll not ask how the next speak- Cheers Follow Speech (R., Conn.), the keynote speaker,) young Republican League of Mary- = Man, You re Crazy 
ler stands on this Bill. His illus-| A, he gnished the Democratic My ee pere so the Young Re-|land, headed by William C. Wid- yon rut aq! Tpownnds or penny 47 17 
ARROW 'trious father was for all measures|..,~ ¢ publican National Federation “the|man of Baltimore. Widman’s or- ,2egpins up with O solely to body's lack ef iron 
for humanity. It gives me great side of the aisle rang with ap-/Republican Party needs the in-| ganization was opposed by the in- Ostrex Touie Tablets tor raed Sea thie 

i y tend fi inut plause. creased participation of Young Re-|surgent Maryland Federation of very day. New “get acquainted” size only 50c 
VAN HEUSEN to the gentleman from New York.” a middle- income housing bill as) “In order to translate the needs’ ; : van 

ee Like his father, young Roose- 


= “jhis first to go into the House hop-|and aspirations of the American 
velt had a soft slur to his “R's” a8\ner. The measure would authorize people into effective political ac- Quick keeps busy people well 
McGREGOR [De Spoke, and like his father heiqirect Federal loans at low rates|tion,” he said, “the Republican informed. The magazine sen- 


read most of his speech, raising of interest for famili th an-\Party must become impregnated 
his head to look at the members er Saas We ae y preg sation of the year. Out today! 


; nual incomés frem $2500 to $4000. with young ideas.” 
for emphasis. Tall and stalwart,’ Roosevelt was followed by Rep-| On Friday, the delegates will 
he leaned slightly against thé)resentative Frederic R. Coudert hear representatives of the Ameri-| 


speaker's stand. Unlike his father|(R N. y.), who spoke words of can Federation of Labor and the — Se anne 
in most public appearances, the 


ees 
praise for the eloquence of his/Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
? young congressman needed a hair-\Central Park neighbor. jtions on the subject of the Repub- 
‘cut, and his collar was rumpled 


| EVERY WEEK ° re 1949 
But, said Coudert. the Adminis-/|lican Party's responsibility to labor. 

and soiled. tration bill “is a delusion and a|/The convention adjourns Saturday. | 

CHARGE | Men's Wear Stores | He referred to the visit by bi- sham and not a slum clearance Lodge asserted “true mission” of | 
accounts |/435 H ST. N.W. | partisan members of Congress| bill at all. the Republican Party is to main- 
701 HST. N.E. | Wednesday to New York and Phil- “I defy any member of this tain individual freedom. 4 

eee Open Evenings “til 9 adelphia and gaid: House to point to a single word) “We should burn into our brains 
‘Compares Slums in this bill which would clear a the incontrovertible truth that the 


ay slum,” Coudert added. ultimate, the essential welfare of 
my visits to refugee camps in the| The energetic Coudert told his|the American people depends upon 


INSLOW Middle East and Western Europe, colleagues he would offer a sub-|the continuation and increase of PEOPLE » > PICT URES - PREDICTIONS | 


Stitute today. ‘the vital opportunities inherent in 
Sane tte ae such cog The Coudert bill would provide our free society.” 
for yy NTS the «s] ithi ny en ao eee |& two-billion-dollar Federal fund The credentials committee voted 
Nation’ s Capitel.” miles of this) ror grants for slum clearance and against seating an “insurgent” del-| 
land. 
He referred to complaints by ‘rehousing over the next 10 years.|egation from Maryla 


Local communiti ] -. A fight on the floor of the con- 
Be Sure of the Quality of cee ote the on that it will mateh the Moderelighent ns i : 
Outside Paint ae | a a portion of 50 cents to a dollar.| 
Winslow's Outside | : When y _ talk of cost,” he told) ‘Coudert toldthe House the money Byrnes Mum on Report 
Paint is ene you can ; the House, “think for a moment of| would be apportioned to local 
be iside p ese gee — the legislation com-| 5 encies for the construction of He’ll Run for Governor 
ction pe with the ever-mounting €X-| new homes, | Spartanburg, S. C., June 23 (7. 
. pense to the American people of 
my. Por over & quar as peop The New Yorker emphasized f Sec- 
eS 8 cote: Seow: et Fa ‘maintaining our tuberculosis hos-| 153+ nic bill actuall ided ¢ —James F. Byrnes, former 
. pitats, our insane asylums, our re- +. eee OF | retary of State, isn’t saying wheth- 


slum clearance, and that it was 
r $4.50 » gallon rk — 2 ypc yy oe within the financial limits which|¢* he wants to be Governor of 


oa "around satisieetion thi ‘South Carolina. 
ne tn Paint Hardware Co. slums.” is country could stand. 


Sliver Spring Pa Faint & y Hardware Co, The children of the great Jacob Representative Jacob K. Javits) Newsweek magazine this week 


! 
Becker Paint & Glass x C2. Georsetown Riis is hnesing development in New|‘%. N. Y.), spoke before Roose-| saiq Byrnes is being urged to take 


Local Paint & Hardware Co., Hyattsville y City, Roosevelt said. “will velt, mrodidting that the Adminis- h ity the State’s di- 
be vs tration measure would get more|*?¢ Post to unify the State's 
_— = = ork Ave. peo 8610 serenethen the fibre of our great! nport on the Republican side of vided Democratic Party forces. 


the aisle than has been expected./ The State party was split last sum- 
Administration forces appeared 


to be picking up strength for the ™* during the States’ Rights 
bill, although a final vote on its presidential campaign of Governor 


hrs. 
passage is not expected until the|J. Strom Thurmond. Byrnes was 
, jiarile or end of next week. asked about the reports today. But 


Pla Studied |r sive ne comment to mike at| Moot Yen (Bnd) Whikey—A Bled Preof1208 Crain Nese! Sire 
70 SAN FRANCISCO ® For Control A] ris Se st aca 


THE ONLY AIRLINE WITH A COMPLETELY Police Still Seek 6 
P 


MODERN UP-TO-THE-MINUTE FLEET Of Schools Prison Bus Escapees t 


Adam A. Weschler & Son, Auctioneers 


Clarksburg, W. Va., June 23 (4°. 
Changes in the Prince William State police, sheriffs’ deputies and Attractive Sale of New High Grade 
County (Va.) form of government 


to txing isl an administrative off-|Pr ee CUM Guards continucd 
their search today for six of the) 
cer and allow the county board of igh “a 
supervisors to appoint the school| ©'® t men who escaped from 4/5 ioe, TRAIN AND CONSTRUCTION SETS—ACCESSORIES—MOTORS 
board are being discussed by the/PTison bus yesterday, MIXERS—VACUUM CLEANERS—CLOCKS—FLUORESCENT DESK LAMPS 


county supervisors Two were recaptured late last DRILL—MODELERS’ TOOLS — FLASHLIGHTS — TOASTERS — FIRE EX. 


TINGUISHERS—WINDOW FANS—WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC ROTARY 
sible changes briefly at a special) Charles E. Jones, 19, gave up with- BY AUCTION 


meeting yesterday. No action was|out a struggle and were returned tater 
. a taken, however, other than toto the prison camp at Gypsy. : 
,,\ e , }imake plans for another meeting; The men, assigned to work at a at WESCHLER’S 905 E St., N.W. 
> 
7 


eee is IN at which an official of the Virginia|quarry about 14 miles from the JUNE 25, 1946 SATURDAY 10:00 A. M. 


“ye? ape *HANDSOMELY TAILORED! 
SEASON OF League of Counties will be asked! prison camp, left the bus yester- Several new G.E., Emerson and other standard. brands A.C. electric 
And THE e ° to discuss the matter with the\qday after they had been taken’ fans, 20 Lionel train sets complete, Lionel accessories and con- 


° Deviled Crab , board. 2 miles from the quarry during |j struction sete complete with A.C., D.C, motors, fluorescent desk *WRINKLE-RESISTANT! 
FINEST OF Na , : 


“e lamps, various t from which to select, small electric traffic 
\ @ Crab Imperial : FT An official said the board is con-|a blasting operation. appliances consisting of GE. and Westinghouse automatic electric 


irons, hy trons, fire extinguishers, window ventilating fans, 


o—N Lum ” I sidering a change either to the| | 
gorse ~ _— r Salad F f tt ee (in effect in a modifed|Gael Sullivan Urges ome oye By Bg Ry th RS - 


deri i d hi bed lamps, and 
form in Fairfax) or the county! Aid for Israeli Children famous brands of pop-up toasters, Westinghouse electric Rotary 
manager form of county govern-| Gae] Sullivan, executive director A 


ment. Prince William now has noiof the Theater Owners of Amer- Brand new large adjustable pedestal fans, Westinghouse and other 
administrative officer to compare ica, spoke at a meeting yesterday standard makes, = gee a ray machine, leather carrying case, 


to the Arlington county manager| Doctor's professional m 
835 (7th. N W. oe ew County execu-\ioe ne the Pn Raye mening Appeal MODELERS’ SUPPLIES 


Any such proposed change must mer eee force at the Wil- SEVERAL HO LOCOMOTIVE KITS AND CARS 


) tions to aid children in Israel. 
BB ug: rset pharm wou tems activity of the appeal cam- 


point school board members. Talk P#/8" will be a victory rally and 
of change was precipitated, it was Gunner . ‘30 p. m., next og 
said, by the refusal three weeks Trai or the entire ce » e 
ago of County School Superintend-|/"“!#" Spring Country Clu | 1792 Columbia Road N.W 
ent R. Worth Peters to recommend olumola NOa WW. 


Ian H. Ross for reappointment as . Opposite Riggs National Bank at 18th 8 Col. Rd. N.W. heds ‘wri | bett than an 
principal of Manassas’ two schools. Pp f A N e? % Phone CO. 1500 or AD. 8200 | tet , ‘ eee mee si . y 


ft At the time, Ross’ supporters suit we know of. Tie a knot in a sleeve or trouser 
made much ofthe fact that ti TQ RENT. : : leg . . . untie it and there's not a crease! 
peopie or e 0 a ve no : 
control over the actions of the] WITH OPTION TO BUY Friday Only Specials! | ioe Ss 
school board, which appoints the ° : | Springweave looks no different than heavier 
Bottled in Bond—190 Proof weight suits because it comes in the same 
Kentucky cee good colors and patterns! | 
B O U rb O n Springweave is tailored as you'd expect any fine 
“Old ? 25 | suit to be, drapes beautifully, fits flawlessly! 
Blue . 
Springs” 
Imported 


ENCY CLOPEDIA 
BOOKCASES 


Mae ot hte pn wth pywed beth. Can be wed § 15 5 
for encyclopedia, law or medical books. Also ideal te 
plece under the window. Sanded, ready for painting. 
48” wide, 9%4" deep, 28” high. Reg. $9.76 


One cf the assortments of UNFINISHED puemeienn 
RECORD CABIN AND FURNITURE from which to select. Also, 


to order, IVERY DUNBAR’S LANSBURGH'S—Men’s Clothing—Street Floor 


Made and Sold by 
@ . Zauit- Wa Canadian 78 ENTIRE STORE 
€ 


ee Six ct ro ednesday “evropeetnnenenseennneny ) aoe 1 228 AIR COOLED 
ee in oak ram nt cen wee ems | JORDAN'S FOR YOUR COMFORT 


Limited Quantities . .. No C. ©. D. or Phone Orders | | | 


| Corner 13th and G Sts. N.W. 
MERE RRR pariee, - 


In brown, grey, tan or blue . . . reguler, short, 
long, stout... sizes 36 to 46. 


ST meen 


A 


fF soe ESE FASHINGTON Post 


Friday, June 24, 1949 


“ ~ . — J ‘a Sa . > 
. . ~< N > 4 \ Se 
* ¥ ~ as ~ 
» S » ‘ Ley » SSMW So ee . 
» 


ee ete 


ouple Seeks Cool mening | 


~ 


my ~ | SHOP AT aor SAVE 


ROEBUCK AND CO. 


oe eee nee ~~. * —— es -_ 
at te -~< - 


Cai the extra cash you save » through Sears 


Ce et me PASH we Hw 


Straight Line Distribution! Good-looking, crease-holding 


COOL FASHION TAILORED 


Associated Press WIREPHO re ¢ “ (< 
CAVE WEDDING PLANNED—Naomi K. Peiffer, a nurse of r 4 Oo - 2 Cc CG ; Ss Sale 
e 


ehem, Pa., and Robert G. Gilman arrange flowers on the 
Regular price $28.50 


altar in the “chapel room” of Lost River Cave, Hellertown, Pa., 
as they prepare for their wedding there June 25. They met 
there eight years ago and believe the 50-degree temperature |@ Cool wrinkle resistant rayon tropical fabric 


of the cave will assure one of the coolest weddin | ai 
ee current heat wave gs during the se] @ Large variety of summery patterns * $e, 


@ Tans, blues, grays, greens and others 


. ) 
‘One-Shot 2 Q F rom 12 % Breenxy goo! tropicals, smartly tellored for summer dress . . » prieed 
Cure Reported Lands Become jain worm wovrorone ween 
For Syphilis U. S, Citizens Cool Cotton Suits, Reg. $18.50...14.88 Rayon Suits, Reg. $31.00... 25.88 All-Wool Suits, Reg. $37.50. 29.88 


New York, June 23 ).—Col-| Twenty foreign-born applicants Men's Clothing Dept.. Sears Wisconsin and Bladensburg 
lier’s magazine today reported that were administered the oath of citi- 
a new - penicillin “one-shot cure zenship by Judge Charles C. Mar- 


At ‘bbspitels where lon rents’ yesterday in Prince Georges Coun- 


ment is being given, doctors told tY Circuit Court. 


the Associated Press that although! The new eitizens, many of them 
results Jook good it is too early War brides, represented 12 coun- 
it 


to be certain. ries. 
The new treatment is penicillin. The following with the country 
in a form that remains in the from which they came and their ad- 


body. In the usual treatment one dress, received citizenship papers: 
shot is given every two hours ust Hilleie. cupsteoees detente 
for a week because penicillin 614620 Se ae tien Teleteme. 
escapes so rapidly from the body. ®. ’ McNees. 1905 Powhatan rd. * Hyatte. 
Collier’s said cost of the penicil- Ridge — , hag anirey Lane. 19-0 
lin in the single-shot is 48 cents.| Scotland—Mre ‘Marion “Bien “ices: 
Authorities told the Associated Solomons, and Mrs. Alexandra Eligabe:h 
Barnhart, 7746 Decatur rd. Hyattsville 


ny ye ky ° es 
Press that nearly 100 cases have -Henry de Marne’ 4626 Knox 2 ES Lb at oe i ae ae R | ly 
been given the new treatment at... ; Mrs. Suzanne Louise Ge Se Bee es ae ES ie eee eg Ular 
, Kenilworth ave. Hyatts- , Ay —_ ny. eae oh 5 et % whet s , ; 5 


Resy Yorms 


the Staten Island Marine Hospital ke s. Anne Marie Rogers, 5-E 
and about half that number at the jtaly—-Mrs. Gonesttins de Gantis, 4891 
city’s Bellevue Hospital. At Mite hull bien tes Gere Ansa Marie 
Staten Island experiments began /ville: | Mrs. Assunta —  S- 
15 months ago, at Bellevue last, 4737 Homes Sy gS ae Smokier, 
uly. ye yusoslavia-” Miodrae Radoven Bilago- | Sie aa 
ay : Re ee eee gS ft 

In the Staten Island eroep three | Philippines Mrs. Belen Avals | Villa- rast eater: e ext ge Smartly tailored of cool rayon 
Fs é‘ tropicals, in an assortment of 


: omen. 6101 ay 4 rd., 
have come back for secon treat- |" land—Mrs. @ Frances Hornbeck 


ments. Whether they relapsed or | 14-M ‘Laurel Hilt rd Greenbelt. a a A 

were reinfected was not learnd. | $16 “ist st. Seat Mi Sanches. ae +: ag ey? — or fancy patterns. 

None of the others has relapsed. |eock. 5 ralia~Mrs. Ma ite Sk eae ip fly front, pleats, dropped belt 
At Bellevue, Dr.. Evan Thomas) itn ya. os Inered Bordelon, Be Cis ake loops. Sizes for most men! 

said the new treatment is given) ™ 7*" Mount Raine 

three ways. One is a single shot. a |, Men's Clothing Dept., Sears Wisconsin and 

Second is two shots, a week apart. te. C Bladensburg 

The third is four shots, each a) : 

week apart. ! 
“So far,” he said, “we have not. 

followed the cases for a sufficient- 

ly long: time to make any state- 

ment regarding effectiveness. The s 

results . . . are encouraging but f3 e * 

penicillin is not a panacea for {3 ‘3 say B Met ROG eT wane 

every case.’ at ' a 80 Sar 
The form used in the single- cok —— Ls ' Bors’ 

shot treatments is procaine pen- <3 a m 

icillin in oil and aluminum mono- 4 CLOTHING 

stearate. The procaine, oil and: 

aluminum.Xeep the penicillin in 

the body for days. 


10 Nearby Camps & B ‘A 
To Accommodate . A _ > . ; | | f; etR ae, eft 3 Trunks Boys’ Lastex Trunks 


“4 J . 
D.C. Girl Scouts y 1 Bees eg uss care / ig 
. oe ogy 95 ) Printed cotton twill, sanforized 


About half of the 500 Girl ‘ “a . 
i! es: oo Ss A A ae . (maximum shrinkage 1%) Cot- Cotton amd rayon vertical stripe 
front panel. Elastic waist, draw- 


Scouts who had planned to vaca- . ss 2 ¥ 
tion at Camp May Flather, Mount Brought te you Monday through i aS _ a  f ton knit support. 
Frida . OD ™~ Ba aie Y. Jr pla: 7. color trunks $] 19 Srring 


Solon, Va., this summer, will be y oy | wi ww 
able to enjoy a few weeks at other Fy} a ~ Sears Wi taconsin Bladensburg and 


camps in nearby States. 5 
Camp May Filather, established 


i i 


Sears Wisconsin Bladensburg and 
rliington 


in 1932, was badly damaged by the 
Potomac flood last weekend. It 


will cost more than $10,000 to ; . —— " 
D> Mothers! Sears 


make repairs, officials estimate. 
Ten ‘camps in nearby States 


have offered to take some of the ee 4 ° 
J ow Price plus easy 


Girl Scouts who made reservations 
for Camp May Flather. Parents of 


Tabanan | eh eZ | = washability will make you like | . Sf} 
Dr. Karl Compton | sy mart! " Ks oT . 
Wins Medal of | : Long-Wearing! J at - Boys’ Poplin Trunks = Jr. Swim Trunks 
earl EF all oyville Slacks *: nS 

Troy; N. Y., June 23 W?).—| Neat Boyville two-tone 


Chairman Karl T. Compton of the 


. :: V rints 
@ Glen plaids . . . solid colors jock tindieas ddek ian oF 


. ‘ 8 to 18 
@ Maximum fabric shrinkage 1% Sears Wisconsin, Bladgnthura and 
A 


national military establishment . 
Research and Development Board look inl the rlington 
tonight was awarded the Lamme : r o C a) s| _ Rayen slacks that you can wash . that iron 
Medal of the American Society fy ui hy ese toa! yay! 8 Zip fly, 4 pockets, pleated aR 
for Engineering Education. Ye | | OW Pages | , Bovs’ Clothing Dept.. sears Wisconsin, Bladensbure ” 
, n rlington 


tron poplin; solid color, royal, 
prick red, tan or gold color. Cot- 


ton Knit support 


Sears Wisconsin ~ ante ro end 


The society, holding its annual Shirt has fancy double yoke, contrasting deeper 
Boyville Jr. rayon slacks ... 3.39 


meeting here, selected Compton é 
for ialeiiecstional: administrative your Classified Telephone Directory | fone slacks: choice of blue er brown combina- 
tions. Sizes 8 to 18. 
Boys’ Clothing Dept., Sears Wisconsin and Bicdensburg 


and governmental services. fer GROCERS 
The society conferred its George | | Boys’ Clothing Dept., Sears Wisconsin, Bladensburg and Arlington 


Westinghouse award for excellence ICE CREAM 
in teaching and research upon Jo- POUL 
seph Marin, professor of engineer- 

ing mechanics at Pennsylvania) OR ALMOST ANYTHING ELSE | 
State College. : \ 2 | 


Wouldn't you rather 


. Boys’ Tee Shirt Boys’ S$ Roy R i Shirts Jr. , : | 
drink Four Roses? 69c irts oys port Shirts 69c rs oni te Shorts a Slack Suits a ; ae 


\Coot weg cotton knit crew Short sleeves, cotton broadcloth, Cool knit weave, 60% cotton, Of cotton twill, sanforized (maxi- Gay cotton shirt has dashing cow- 
ineck, short sleeves. Small, med- oxford cloth. Sanforized shrunk 40% rayon acetate. Blue, maize, mum shrinkage 1%) Self bel boy prints anit lashes tamthe Senforized (maximum shrinkac 
ium, lar (maximum sh Q,, white. 4 to | 2. t. - 0 « FONG Bor Coron . . | age 
Sears Wisconsin. Mastenche 4 on con sg ) 7 4to 12 slacks 1%) blue cotton jeans. Zip fly 
. , ’ 
og en Sears Wisconsin, Bledeasburs and Sears Wisconsin, | ~ amas end Sears Wisconsin. Bladensbure and Sears Wisconsin, Bledensbure and copper rivets, bartacks 3 to 10 


Arlington Arlington 
Artingt Ariineot . 
. gton érunctos Sears Wisconsin Bladens burg end 
Artington 


Sa $i! Biedensberg Ré. MLE. (2 
See oa aliifaciion gudsindetd Your Monty back” Weecaeta bod of Atanas (00) Ohaune- teen 
2800 Wilson bive. Arlington, Ya.. GHestnet 1722 


. a a 


a 


iE WASHINGTON POST 


Friday, June 24, 1949 


6 ** 
om 


An odd dish prepzred in south-! 
ern France is a salad made of gees 
Alpine thistles. Served with a YY 
pepper sauce, the hearts of this \\ 
plant are considered as tasty 

\ 


ACROSS 
44 VENOMOUS 
SERPENT 


Daily Crossword Puzzle me Tall, 


YESTERDAY'S ANSWER 


sy 


‘esale of Beer |: 
ysts Dealer 


46 GAELIC JOHN 

47 GRASSLAND 

49 YAWN 

51 Ay tS a 
EARTH 

54 F + Bae THE 


as 
artichokes 
PICTU 
16 SQUIRREL 
DELICACY 


Sir Hubert Wilkins, Arctic ex- 


‘s License 


Laurel, Md.. 


he was 


17 : ha -— POST 


merchant who 25 ANGLER’S 
H 
“boycotted” by a beer 26 SIMPLE 


ibutor because he undersold a. arate. 


competitors yesterday was or- ** heen 


d to surrender his license for ° hei 


cays for illegal trafficking in 39 INTRIC SPARS 


RALES 
he suspension was ordered by 43 pare PRESI- 


Prince Georges County Liquor} 
rd after the dealer, Hyman 
viger, admitted he bought beer 
1 another tavern owner for re- 
- in his own store after he was 
le to purchase popular brands 
1 wholesalers. 
s of Complaints 
‘anziger told the liquor board 
distributors began to “cut him 
' last January after other deal- 
in the neighborhood had com- 
“ned of his low prices. 
sanziger admitted also that he 
uuaded three soldiers to use 
‘'r automobiles to help him 
‘sport beer from a Berwyn tav- 
1. to his own place. 
mn announcing the board’s deci- 
1, Chairman William H. Brooke 
| the violation could not be over- 
xed because illegal transporta- 
) of beer is a violation of coun- 
State and Federal regulations. 
‘ce Licenses Issued 


The Liquor Board granted three 
' licenses yesterday, one to a 
or store owner whose place is 
vediately adjacent to Danziger’s. | 
* new licensee is Edward T.| 
er. 
jihers were granted to the new- 
established Prince Georges 
inty Elks Club in Bladensburg | 


: 


NTRICATE 


fig * 
2IN A 


NK 
3A KEEPER OFr 


| THIN ICE 


6 A KINGPIN 


7 BUILDER OF 
RIDGES 
8 PETTY THIEF : 
9GIVEN POINT 26 MIDDLE DOMED 
27 MOAN BUILDING 


er |? 


OF TIME 


56 DUTH UNCLE 
57 BLUE-MACAW 


RECITAL OF 
EVEN 

71A CIRCUIT OF 
JUDGES 29 TIME 

DOWN 

10 OLD FRENCH 
COIN 

11 VAGUE 

12 MORE DE- 
pitts 

13 LOOPS: ANAT 


19 ONE OF THE 
CORNERS OF A 


36 MOCK 


40 RAV INE 


31 FEELING 
34 SORATCH 


CONTEST 
37 fo ag. beet 
TIVE PRONOUN 
38 ote a al 


42 ALCOHOLIC 
INTERJECTION 
45 CIRCULAR 


28 MALAYAN 
OUTRIGGER 


50 hat yl AT — 
EXP 


Si MY 7 ADY 

52 COCKPIT 

53 ASSESSED 

95 ZODIACAL 
RAM 


58 BOOTY 

59 FIGURE 

60 DISRUPT 

1 BONDMANS 

63 HOUSE WING 

64 ITS IN A 
SHELL 


ti 2 3 


By Georganne 

Vy AUDEVILLE has come back 
at the Casino Royal. 
and Bane 
dance 


Bour- 
musical comedy 
team in the exaggerated 
stvie of several decades ago. 

A young, good-looking couple, 
they announce a “Dixie Jive” 
number as the same that Bour- 
bon'’s mother and father did on 
vaudeville 

Their steps are supple, pre- 
cise Bane’s costumes include 
the old high-buttoned shoes. a 
demure white evelet tunic, with 
rows of pink ruffles as the skirt 
The pantomime movements tell 
the boy-girl plot of their dances 

Another. hit act is Duke Alden 
and his Puvpet Portraits. One 
puppet is Mademoiselle Bonanza. 
a suliry South American. An- 
other is a pink and red swan 
from Disney's creations who tap 
dances. And there's Felix. a 
clown, who skates, twirls and 
turns. 


bon 


But the big puppet personal- 
ity is Lucigarde, “created in re- 
spect for’ Hildegarde. § Luci- 
garde sings, makes with the sub- 
tleties and innuendos in asides. 
brings Band Leader Schaffer 
into the act. and even smokes a 
cigarette. She's the best varia- 
tion of night club shows we've 
seen lately. 

Lou Fennard, a juggler, uti- 
lites balls, hats, and a cigarette 
and match trick. Bob Preble is 
the singing emcee. 

cos 
TASHINGTON is taking to 
the Cross Road's Negro sing- 
ing stars, Johnny and-George. 


Williamson 
“Bi Mier Bist gu Chein,.” which 
they originally introduced, had 
the guests begging for more. 
George. incidentally, did a bang 
up solo job on “Ole Man River.” 
Irvin Wolf, the new owner, 
has improved the food and stif- 
fened the drinks. He has start- 
ed redecorating the place and 
air-conditioning is being in- 
stalled. 
os 
‘| RERES a saucy little girl at 
the Shoreham. who does a 
dance act in the new show with 
a juggler and a dance team of 
three. Pixvish in a costume of 
sequined gray and pink, she gets 
much mileage out of her slinks 


and curves 

] AY McKINLEY will be at 
Chesapeake Beach tomorrow 

night. He is the third in a se- 

ries of Saturday night name 

bands. Next, on the 4th, will be 

Jimmy Dorsey. Chesapeake 


ces 


Beach people snag the big timers | 


for one night. stands while 
they're en route from: Virginia 
Beach to Atlantic City. 


GET ACQUAINTED 
DANCE TO THE MUSIC OF 


SAMMY FERRO 


& HIS AUGMENTED ORK. 


plorer, took the first 


pictures of 


actual fighting ever shown in mo- 


tion picture 
pre-World War | Balkan wars. 


Z2iIVER BEND 


On the Mt. Vernon Memoria! Hiahwoy 


theaters—during the 


ps . 
—~ 


DANCING 
Every Wed., Fri., and Sat. Nites 
George Stein 
and his Orchestra 
(Music in the STEINWAY) 


DINNERS 
6:00 P.M. te 10:00 P.M. 
Legal Beverages Served 
ALex. 3133 


Club avatiable fer private parties Soan- 
day. Menday. Tuesday and Ihersdas 


N ra summer night 
A cool delight 
Dine well ond donee 
Neath storry light To 


Sensational dance music of 


LARRY MURPHY 


Distinguished Cuisine—fine Bor 
No Cover Charge — Minimum. Weekdays 
$1.50; Fri., Sot, Hols, $2.50 — Moy be 

opplied to food or drinks. 


| Excellent pianist in Cafe Caprice 
during Cocktail Hour 


Additional 
Sten — 
@ TERRY BENNETT 
& HIS PAL “4 Lotte Gad” 


@® BUDDY SHANER, M4. 
Your Favorite Singer 


@ THE SINCLAIAS 
Eccentric Teg 
® DANCING—JACK CORRY'S 


Melodie Tunes 
645 P.M.—I1:15 A.M. 
NO COVER CHARGE 
LUNCH, 710e¢  OINNER, $1.58 


(Sat.-Sem. $1.65) 


OTUs 


4th & New York Ave N.W 


APPEARING 


at Washington's 
most unique 


AIR- ComDITIONED 


AN CHOR | 
ROOM 


HOTEL ANNAPOLIS 
12th on H St. N.W. ° 


| the Bowie Restaurant at Bow-| 
None will apply against re-| 
tly established “ceiling” on 
nee Georges County taverns 
e all three replaced permits! 
ch either had expired or been) 
9 

Bi : 


Tucker Pleads Innocent 1946-47 and continued last year. 
. = It now has the telephone num- 
urder Trial An Fraud Indictment 


De and locations for the various 
Roanoke, Va. June 23 “P)\—The| Chicago, June 23 (#).—Preston Maryland State police barracks. 
rder trial of Lee (Buddy) Scott; T. Tucker, his business suit match- 


carried a terrific wallop. And | 
also shows the new official 
‘signal for a right turn—the driv- 
, Scheduled to open in es ing the gray of his personal rear-|er’s arm extended out the left win-| 
urt Monday morning will be engine car, pleaded innocent to- 


dow and raised upward. This was 
‘osed to the public, Judge Dirk | adopted by the 1949 General As-| 7 
\ Kuyk said this afternoon. day to a Federal indictment charg-) sembly. 
“All persons whose presence at ing mail fraud, conspiracy and| 1s . 
2 trial is not necessary will SEC. violations. | 


» excluded,” Judge Kuyk said, 
ing thet “instructions to onl Six of his seven codefendants Ro dney Davis 
Master of the Keyboards 


‘act” have been given City Ser in a 3l-count indictment also. 
tae Ti +h dread pleaded innocent before —— 
Radio & Recording Star 
In the newly decorated 


George plays the piano, and 
‘sings in a deep bass. Johnny's 
_ range is practically everything 
| up to high tenor. The two make 
a hit with almost everything 
they try. j 
They're at their best in the 
| glow rhythmic, jive numbers. 
“. Their “Blues in the the Night” 


r 
or Ry 
Pam, 


s, Prom 45¢ 


SAM. ' Closing 


1336 CG. ST.NW. 
DI- 8235 
FROM 12 to 10 RM. 


(Air Conditioned 


ae 


nO COVER 
OR MINIMUM 


7S 


_ SS LS i A: eee — ee eS —s 
| For tops in early morning listening, hear Mark Evans, Claude 
Mahoney and Eddie Gallaher on WTOP, Washington Post station 


ADMISSION 


LADIES 40¢ 


GENTLEMEN 60c 
INCLUDING TAX 


; ublic Barred 


rom Roanoke 


‘FASIER BUG KILLER! 


Scott is charged with the slay-|Philip L. Sullivan. 


‘t of a 16-year-old Jefferson | The indictment, returned June| 
th School classmate, Dana Marie | 10, resulted from a grand jury’ 


saver, in the parish house of |, ticati ’ 
‘yrist Episcopal Church on the nvestigation of promot on of the 
“ht of May 8. Tucker automobile, involving an 


West Virginia University horti-| Maryland Highway Map 
ilturists advise grafting cuttings | 


om good commercial grades of For 1949 Published | 
‘ verry trees to native wild seed- Baltimore, June 23 (#).—The 
. ngs for good eating cherries. 1949 edition of Maryland’s official 


ae OH ‘highway map is out today. 


sam unrestricted in some of the much the same as the new ‘style 
tore remote sections of Arizona. |map adopted for publication in| 


Service with Charm 
MUSIC FROM 5 P.M. 
Ho Cover © No Minimam © Wo Tax 


SHERATON HOTEL 


i5th & L STREETS N.W. 


BOSS GS OS SSS BS OS BGG GP FS SSG BOS OOD OOD DDODODOPO®OEGSVE 


i ail 


THE MAN WHO CARES 
says: 
If you care how your 


friends will all rave... 
= \\s\ 


An ideal Dinner at 
Famous Village 
Restaurant 


Qs Since 1922 
1705 DeSales St. WN.W. 

| LUNCHEON DINNER SUPPER 
Try Our Pizza 


MIXED DRINKS 


Air Conditioned Second Floor 
and Cocktail Lounge 
Open-Air Roof Garden 


Music by Muzak 
Specializing in 
Italian Dinners 
ME, 1434 
Serving 
A.M.-1:30 A.M. 


SUPER- CHARGED 


INSECT KILLER 


or bk by % 
Good Housekeeping 
\ for 


8 WAYS BETTER! 


QUICKER! Amazing Airex Mist rids an average room 
of most a pests in 3 or 4 seconds! Much faster, 
easier th d-fashioned spray guns or bombs! 


prance Sang mero Ol lapel ven hard-to- 
kill crawling bugs, too! 


SIMPLER! So ! Just 
Mist. No Swat! No PumplN 


THRIF TIER! Sapercharged Alrex fills 8 room, covers 
walls and floors with finer particles, more particles of 
insect-killing chemicals. Clears most rooms of flies, 
mosquitoes for only 1'4¢! 


HANDIER! Beautiful aluminum Airez dispenser is 
streamlined to fit a woman's hand comfortably. 


The superior Airex for- CIVES 20% 
MORE MIST 


Youlll be coreful to serve 
each conclave : 


CARSTAIRS White Seal 


Blended Whiskey 


“Most Popular Place in Town” 
| Large Variety of 
Popular aT 


4Sc 


8 A.M. te 7 P.M. 


GILBEY’S 10-YEAR 
Old Scotch | 


The Man who Cares says :‘CARSTAIRS’ Bonded Bourbon 
Bonded Baltimore 


-CARSTATRS WhiteSeal 73 SS 


. COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


eee eee eee SSeS Seseseneoeqoeesaceceaeeacouccase” 
Maate "Til 1:00 A. M. 


Carstairs Bros. Distilling Co., Inc., Baltimore, Md. Tax—Cover—Minimum 
BLENDED WHISKEY, 86.8 Proof, 72% Grain Neutral Spirits Finest Drinks—Tastiest Food 


in Town — In the Beautiful 
Ambassador Room 
Luncheon, 75c 
Special Dinner, $1.25 


he MOTEL . Ath 


WASHINGTON'S NEWEST 

ROOM DOWNTOWN HOTEL i 
aes ys - CONDITIONED 
Ampie for Our Guests 
Gwimming | and | Heaitb — Club 


AIREX MIST rids a room of flies, 
mosquitoes for only Wg 
Just press the Handy red Wutton. Far- 
reaching Airex Mist shoots across the 
room, fills every corner, filters into cracks and crevices ... 
all in a few seconds! Yes, a mere 3 to 4 seconds of Airex 
mist rids a room of flies, gnats, mosquitoes. It’s the real 


answer to home insect-killing problems . . . the swifter, 
easier, inexpensive way to enjoy a bug-free home! 


Try AireX once, and you'll 
use it always. You'll say, “It’s 
the grandest bug killer ever!” 
The amazingly, powerful Airex 
formula gives quick knock- 
down, sure-kill! Gets them all 
— whether they fly or crawl! 


So clean! So handy} 


So quick! The stim, spark. 
ling Airex dispenser cradles in 
the palm of your hand. A Anger- 
touch on the push-button 
control ... that’s all you do! 


KNOCKS ’EM 
ALL DOWN! 


er Mist blasts flies, gnats, mos- 

uitoes, as they buzz about ... knocks 
as down fast! You actually see these 
household enemies drop to the floor 
and die! 


pep Setrn Ser Abe 


Super-charged Alrex Mist shoots 
out—does the rest! Swiftiy! 
Easily! There's no muss, no fuse 
with Airex! No mixing, pumping, 
squirting, or dusting to do! 


More for your money! 
Stronger, surer Airex is super- 
charged with Genetron*! Itsends 
finer particles, more particles of 
bug-killing chemicals into the 
air . . . reaches farther, lasts 
longer! And you get 20% more 
insect-killing mist, with ‘ian, 
than with ordinary bug bombs! 
*Reg. U.S. Pat. OF. 


mula gives quicker 
knock-down, surer kill of 
flying and crawling in- 
sects. Airex gets results! 


MORE EFFECTIVE! 
You get 20% more in- 
sect-killing mist for your 
money maith Airex— 
thanks to exclusive 
“Genetron” dispersant! 


MORE PLEASANT! 
Airex has a fresh, clean 
scent you'll like. No of- 
fensive odors with this 
insect killer. 


n/ 4 


‘ir. Bam Fisher 


requests the honour of your presence 
at the marriage of 


Ann Howse 


te 


| DANCING 
e Every Night Except Sunday 


PAUL KAIN 


And His Orchestra 


Washington's Most 
Popular Maestro 


He Gever er Minimum at 
Any Time 


HOTEL HAMILTON 


14th & K Sts. LW.©DI. 2580 
Alr Conditioned 


Mr. Jor Palooks 


Saturday, June 23 


The Washtngton Fast 


KNOCKS ’EM 
ALL DEAD! 


The hi ighly potent Airer Mist is sure- 
killing! Even gets big, tough roaches, 
hornets, spiders, etc. Here’s one in- 
secticide that works against all the 
common household pests! 


IREX ster ON SALE TODAY! 


AT LEADING HARDWARE, DRUG, GROCERY 
_ AND DEPARTMENT STORES! 


. June 24, 1949 


* 
By The Associated Press are peng 
a Seek By The Associated Press aan o0'migh Low | Close'Ch® 3 -W k High Total sales, $2,220,000; previous — ‘Belesin tne asan ao __}_ Bia ae ae “i me 
oes to cap Slag gee shares; 1 JOBLESS GROWTH ry . 9%) 19 one tee ce day, $2,732,000; week ago, $2,573,- 28 G ric ~ 4e 100% 100 8 i aM T : | Sa 
day, 550,000; week ago, 680,-|| Unemployment up in May, | 1500; year ago, $5,100,500. | igices 3 SS act) | sass WO Insurance 
Sie: year ao, 1.55050 two years, | Sint HS 6 44..}.| 70%) 10%) 70% 


| t - nl ° 
pigeon? VS Firms Reply to 


By S. Oliver Goodman 109,207, 929; year ago, 164,144,302; 
‘The Securities and Exchange tWe years ago, 124,050,276. 
Celler Charges 
New York, June 23 h.—Tee of 


jf Pao Narva will be asked to post- Cylinder G 
more, Closing quotations were! ‘the country's largest Life insurance 


~. | Dairy Pr.. 
. pone consideration of a shift in | | iNet Dairy Pr 
~ Capital Transit Co, stock contro!|Dow-Jones Stocks Nat Dept strs 
at or near the best of the session.| soie. iin thousands mies | Lew ilecs] sc uti tee ots aakels : jcompanies denied today charges 
Business picked up a bit from) worRLp BANK BONDS | (Dellars & 32nds) 25 NYN or | Sti, saul. 37 6 OY Representative Emanuel Celle 


— 
nam & 
for at least 30 days, it was learned, New Hork. June 28. fat Gypsum 
yesterday. me | 4 
15 In B R&D 2 00.1 13 100 13 100.1] 13 N rc , . 82 ; 7 : ‘ (iD... N. y ’ irr his re Cc nt criti jerry 
yesterday's semi-cothatose market, ; CORPORATION BONDS 5.N 12% en. 24 GING | -atel caaiaiin mines 
—one of the slowest in recent, A T 34— ‘73... .:105 % 10544 '105' id N t 4% °75.| | *\Jof privately negotiated insurance 


Linen Byc_ 
Meanwhile, new and powerful OO 43.42 42.94 43.26 40.36, 13 
local opposition has risen to North 6 stks. Bi 59.23 59.59 +0.35) 
. kA, 107! 14 Nor C f aC 1, - oF ’ ans wisinees ie iit 
. years—but was still disappointing- 2 m Té& 3 37 LO7 4 103: | : bose 2047 aR 973 97% ;Compan) loans Lo bu LLit SS a id in- 
ly small. Only 730,000 shares) EE 234 (S1- -- 101861101 tp 2013 Pate ost til leet eee ee 


American Co.’s plan to sell 109,458) today: | ie deere ials, 34.00 railroads, Eo 
shares of transit stock to a Florida|>"” writes, 33,000; total, 1 
group headed by Louis E. Wolfson. | RE | ce | Natomas Co. ; 
Latest foes are James F. O’Don- | Net | ———— ——— ph hanged (hands, ared with’ 
|____Ada\00 High | Low | ¢ se C SPFMAMIUIASO er |Newmont Min os ee | 
nell and his son, both substantial’ Ass | | : reCerTH Newport . .-- 550,000 Wednesday. t 
stockholders of Capital Transit Co. ACF-Bril Mot: ‘ “2% ae ae , ae ge -| Higher prices resulted mainly! 
New. 19%s' 19%) 19 Date: Bureau cl the Census Morris Katz 
The younger O'Donnell, a local at- Aaa Exp si | . i : from an absence of any serious’ 
| is.|selling pressure. Buying interest 
fe was never more than lukewarm) 
‘s\except in the case of a couple of 
s$| selected stocks. 


Aorney,.said yesterday he and his Affil Gas . 4 
father, a retired financier, will be 4‘7 Reduction . 
‘a,| The Associated Press average of| 
60 stocks advanced .5 of oné point’ 


Alask 
 Yepresented by counsel at the SEC |Aldens 3 Inc... 
, to 59.9, a top since the see 


edransit Shift (Quotations on N. Y- Stock ee Reach [New York Bond Prices te 7 


~~. &- 
aaee 


wr 


er 
Zouc ns Bi Oars 
e 


35 


"| New York, June 23 (®).—A gen-! Dow-Jones Bonds 

‘*\tle advance carried the stock, New York. Jene 22 
market to the highest average level| — Seyi 

in three weeks today. ie fist relies". aie’ 
Gains ranged from fractions to !® serond rails 


utilities 
around a point, and in a few caseS! ie industrials 


mo Mr wr LW Ore 


tee FU 


Close Net ch 


es oe 
a*-a rs @ 
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ACoe 


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Celler said insurance companies 
‘drew off large sums of the pub- 
. lic’s money into loans that were 
$3 regulated. In e and not sufficiently 
. ‘regulated In addition, he said, the 
‘companies concealed the details of 
‘the transactions 
Thomas I. Parkinson, president 
iof the Equitable Life Assurance 
| Society o! the United States, 
)',, termed Celler’s criticism both “in- 
-¢ $ | acc ‘urate and irresponsible 
‘| Details Are Released 


the | The Mutual Life Insurance Co, 
8 % ‘of New York ‘said in a statement 
iS Walerth 3% *76. 9 80 *} that it released details of all such 
tan au’ AT * ; loans to the press and made 

, ; j QQ 4, ; ‘ c come 

touched 60. 3 on June 3 on the way 100" »| plete details ava ble " 7. N 
down to a 44-year low hit June 13. oni i foil “Boe x a lian?) 428, Bly ~ ee eee 
le Ob-ctei: avetnas econ 14 i ree : | D3 3% | 36 | York State Insurance Department. 
i a . + iapeeeeasREE ——-———-— S ——_.....| Both companies participated in 
; points above the low but well be- 


*» low |the year’s high reached in Q YY. ( : | . eae ‘privately negotiated loans to busi 
> 8\ gandary 'N. Y. Curb Prices |D. C. Securities hes. 


iness that Celler cited specifically 

.6 The industrial group led the Py The Associated Press ‘ Yesterday's Guotatiens on Washington })” his statement ‘It is nonsense 

field, followed: by rails and utili- .)t@! sales, 220,000 shares; °*SS* Te. "i Wel. 20 lea| 398 to say that life insurance com- 

ties, the last bringing up the rear 7°#f 48° 449,705 shares. 01 re com. 30 13 ‘panies have ‘privately gobbled up’ 

‘es with no change at all. , —|, Pot “Elec "Pwr com.| 1! ‘at 133 ~— ‘loans which Congressman Celler 

| Two issues moved smartly up- Sale ' Net "Ah Tel & Tel. 7 at i381 ‘implies ought to be made by the 

,|ward in response to specific news) ——_____A¢¢ 00 B! ¥1 Close Ch gs| Sere es Oa Re jcommercial banks,” Parkinson 
‘developments. Am . 9: “141 30 


; .. Public Utility Bonds gs ; told a meeting of agents r oh 
‘ ! 43 i a C Aske gkenis ol Ls 
Reo Motors, one of the most Ark Nat Gas ‘ 3, .4 Am Tel&Tel conv deb 2% °57 } 104" 


‘ . ‘4 Am Teié&Tel conv deb 24 6) 101 ? ‘company 
. ; 7 Ark Nat G A Z - . +: . + > ; #* . " 
‘4 actively traded stocks, added % Acniuna Oak sap ‘Transit Goa deb tim ‘se 197' 4 if Mr. Celler knew anything 
at 9% following word that the Atlas Corp war 3 ‘8 |G town nae b . | 
reste . oe p Georgetown Gas Ist 5/61 Lis about such matters he would 
‘.|company had signed a 31-million- ; “t Bo Fiec Boe 37° 28 105 's ‘jrealize that loans made by lif 
Mn itt Pow ° i7 )! i : < P V e® ifte 
. I 46 | : dollar contract with the Army for sot Elec Pow 3 a, 102 ...k8urance companies are g ! 
114%! 15. ae | Rial! &: as "5000 of 21, 2-ton trucks and parts.'Brown Rub... .-|Pot Elec Pow 2% ‘84 .. 101 P Ss are generally 
17%) 17%!..... ils Elec... 5 | Site! 31 1. | Lhe company said the trucks will Cessna Aire... 
-|be powered with a new gasoline Sic Stk": 


7? 


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wm 


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| Net | 
a Aad vo" High | Low ' Close Ch'ge| + — 
* duPont 3%: pf. 993,' B9% NY NH&Hart. 


14% 


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‘+ *“hearing Tuesday. Rirees x: 
They will seek a delay in the Alice 

. hearing, Me added, in order to give Al Chen &e'D 
“both North American Co. and Cap- Allis-Ch Beg: ? 


aces ital Transit stockholders an Op-| Am — Leather . ; he 


“. .<wportunity to explore all angles of Am Ae ER 
He Proposed transaction. The) Am Airiines pt. 2 
*** senior O'Donnell is also a large 4™ 22 


A Br 81 
"phareholder in North American. |4m a a r 
C. L. McCrea, first to enter the|am Can .. | 


arena as a foe of the Wolfson! 4" ar & Pay. 
deal, said last night he was in full’ ‘Am ears sane 
sympathy with the O’Donnell plan am Cyanamia ; 
do seek a postponement of SEC) 4@ £yan Pt -- 
consideration. McCrea’ declared) 4m — L 
that more than 350 stockholders an & Fr P $7 pf 
so far have answered his personal 4™ © %%,°§ 2 
letter and offered to support his am-eeren OS 


@fforts to block the North Ameri- an Home Prod 
. ©an deal and substitute a plan 4™ {te -..:-- 
“~whereby the transit firm would Am 3 
¥ “Buy and retire the North American — 
“€o. block. Legal aid also has been a Phi, oe 
offered, he asserted. at Pp 
An unconfirmed report: in Gnesi Am Safety Raz 
cial quarters stated that the execy-|2@ Statine. 


te p mqer & R 
tive committee of Capital Transit 4 


uff 
» Co. met Wednesday and heard al Am ae on 


proposal that a special meeti 
of stockholders be called to sou 
ut opinion on the proposal to Am 
he y ga — the North American| ‘Am m Viscose... 
block of stock. The suggestion w at Wk o| 7%! 7% : rac 
rejected by the ser a said ah Wenn 25 ‘ oy haks ger Tne 
Re = controlled by North American, 26%| 26%. 26%) 


——— 


-. Tepresentatives. 


“** BIDS INVITED: The Washing- 
ton Suburban Sanitary Commis- 


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Packard Motor 


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i Washington C } : , . . 
‘s Miscellaneous Bonds ---»-jfor periods longer than commer 
Cons Gas Ut 
engine under development for the|Cons Mne & §& ‘ 


is Ter Re few Cp is 4°58. ...,,}¢lal Dank loans ought to be. There- 
Se |\*Amer Tel & Tern 139%,/40Fe, they distinctly are not the 
, %* past three years. binee Ry OS 
[Pillsbury Mills. ~1) 2615| 9612|.2615--"ig| American Hide & Leather scored|Creole Pet ..' 3 


a 
*C , t 1) 1 , ’ 
2 apital 20 i type of loan that banks should 
*) Pitt Coke & Ch Cuban Atl Sus , 471, Make. 
% tt 

Pitt Con Coal. .|8 new high for the year with 4\ Densison MI A 


: 4.7) Celler said he wanted | 
2320 Sé o know 
2|Pitt Forcings.. ; |rise of 158 to 45% after word that) Derby Ou 3 XA Elec & Pow com (ul20) ish _16%3/what intervenin 

*|Pitt Plate Gl :\the board had voted a year-end Dm Suacol 3 WashOL cum c ie o tenon copeg’ 
| Bitt Plate Gi. y NG\5) Bond & Sh 51 WashGL cum conv pia' -.«.. ately negotiated loans received 

*\Pitt Steel pi B " \dividend of 50 cents a share. This’ Paireniid Cam 46 Notional Bank Stocks compensat nu 
Pitt & West Vi - : i will be the first payment since Pairehild E&A 6 4! | ae: tal 21 “ pensation— how much and for 
: ‘/Plymouth Oil. an initial dividend of the same we ee Mel 8 lo) . te | eg 
Foods}... A200) 42 ¥4) 2|Poor & Co B “s amount was disbursed in July 1947, 
,'y |The company’s maces » year ends 
June 30. 


‘ 
arempent 31 11) 2| Potomac El Pw 
, 4 
34 , 
| Grains and “ites declined; | ona Star Ge 
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irtloom Carpet 
kissd Dry Gd. 
aseciates Inv. 
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“Speaking for Mutual.” that 


REF ot ees a ; 
3, Trost Company Stocks Companys statement said. 
' Amer Sec & » 
} 
| 


another $2,500,000 of 

~~, water and sewer bonds. og" 
“~ bonds, which will mature Jul y" 

1950-89, yD hae Caw In bt 


“the 


* 
IC Od OW We ee OP 
* . 


. «ese a & 2 i . : : ‘ 
*itNat! Sav yet answer is: ‘none whatever 
Prince Georges ‘ 1.20) | Pex 
’ ‘Union ‘Trust 7 _ 
i an oon & Tr ‘ia 
‘ avings Bank Stocks 
i 
; Bank of Bethesda (1.50) .. 
' *1Com & Savings (10) .... if Parkinson made a similar denial 
: vite inserance Stocks ‘a or Equitable and added that 
* *Firemen's (1.40) } A get 3° aft "| Celler had no “Tight to insinuate 
, *National Union (75e) ... : s bod ' 
* Title Insurance Stocks omebody is receiving im- 
4 be Columbia (30) frepees proper compensation for loans 
, Ai oe Bn Stocks | ae "***\|made by the Equitable.’ 
,* “Carpel Corp (1.00) 5 Desc 
. Meal aw rg com a 50) 5 16 escribing its investments and 
mart S*e% cu cy pfd(1.375) ( , " : 
siGart 414% cu ev pidili25) 17 Raa a its loans, Mutual said 
echt Co (1.60) 0 31 na | 
® Hecht 344% fd (3 75) nse in this vital way life insur- 


«In Six Months tLanston . 9 mee ance dollars work for the good of 


Avco Manufacturing Corp. re- | |Mergenthal ler 2 (a 50). 2, the Nation.” 
‘| ported consolidated net income = Chicago Grain neesiee Direc th.le 


i“ 
35%| Parkinson said that 
\*Security Storage (5) a 130 “ 1a ~commer- 
, | $2,566,640, equal to 35 cents & cnicago, June 23 uP.—All grains. sov-/Te?, Ref. & Wh Corp (3). 50 55 |Clal banks make their loans out of 
* | share, for the six months ended i and lard senk in a Senerely — “wawd par +e whit 103% 33 expansion of bank credit thereb 
0 t . 
: | May 31. This compared with $3.-\A little shaky at the start. the market Ex dividend. wi—When issued read creating new bank deposits, new 


* «2| 141,607, or 43 cents a share, for) cred, * ump from which itivear, (p) Paid 1948, (u) Unlisted.  |@dditions to the money supply and 
sithe first half of the 1948 fiscal An increase in hedging pressure had 


| never recovered. d 
irectly inflatin * 
| influence in send | —& our currency 
‘a |year. Net sales for the first half, Little interest was sending heat sr: |Baltimore Markets! Insurance company loans ie 
of 1949 totaled $71,054,898, against | met | mild profittaking after - yesterday | ti ' 
+. upturn. Large receipts and weakness ji Baltimore, June 23 « cuspa).——| @Dtl-inflationary loans ac’ com. 
_|$62,257,080 in the same period last, cash market depressed oats. a| Be } a 


TLE—Total salable, 1800: steady 
«| year. hey tee eans and lard were about the|25¢ hisher. advance én '1100-pound «saint $| pared with commercial bank 


commodities on the board. An-|!ed ofierings. few choice 896-pound C Leet loans,” he ac 
Electric Bond & Share Co., re- jother spil] by cottonseed oil’ in New York yearlings, 38.25; mosh medium ana added. 


tea a bearish atmosphe I 23,00426.50, common and iow ediu: 
:*|ported net income of $231,632 for fats and oils. prere pase tor and low mediumi, 


cis a mn a + oe, the late 1949 21. 00 23.28. few ey ane common | PUC Aut] . 

liveries of lard. which lost the most, |4tfaight grassers, 20. few scat ; 

if S| the quarter ended March 31, equal showed a belated reaction to yesterday's | tered eafly sales ali grades cows abou _ ize : 
to 4 cents a common share. The)>'€_crop repor' ommon snd’ medil », $6.00 18.00 “06, 


9.00 ea 
Wheat closed 1% to 1% } |common and mediu 00, eet | | k | 
he company’s net in the first quarter. was % to % lower oats ane ke "Ti ners and cutter, 13 BOG 9), ae ind! vidual rat ( oc 40an 


8 
= 
> 


. Pressed Stl Car 
' Lone Star Gas 


| Wheat at Chicago lost 1% to 1% Nat Bellas Hess 
9) Biel ao 9) ? sicents a bushel, corn %& to 34, and|N J Zinc ..... 
(Purity Bak ... 1! 2 26\2| 26%! 4 1% | oats $8 to-l1 cent. New York cot-/P.28 "ue Pow. 
RADIO CORP, 32 10% to 

Radio-K-Orph : . | n futures receded 10 cents to $1 a 

Raybestos-Mn p | Dale, 

| Rayonier 
| Rayonier 


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Insinuation Resented 


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Aust. Nichols. 
NEW DIRECTOR: Augustus E,|s¥2c8" <2 


arom Canteen 
-Giegengack, former Public Printer |Avce Mis... 24 
“Sof the United: States operating the) ois » 
go shige ot Office here. [Baie doco BT) 
a yes- ‘ io. 
terday to the anor yee 
directorate of pines se Ou. 
Lanston Mono- Fy Cigars. 
type Machine 
Co. Giegen- 
gack is now 
resident and 
“! We ard chair- 
Do an of the Na- 
‘tional Graphic 
. Arts © Exposi- : 
7 ons, Inc. Pe 
‘Other Lanston Giegengack 
rectors were reelected at the/7° 
‘gnnual meeting of stockholders in 
a, Va. At the reorgan-| por: 
n meeting held later at the’? 
tler here, the board reelected 
. oseph F. Costello as president 
cand David 5S. Hendrick as chair-|p° 
‘nan. Hendrick reported a satis-|B 
es three months for the peri-! 
“SeJed ended May 31, with shipments) 
., exceeding one million dollars but 
== £arnings slightly less due to rising | 
expenses. 


DIVIDENDS: The Hecht Co. 
declared regular quarterly div- 
_.idends of 40 cents a common. 
~) share and 9334 cents a prefer- 
Tred share, both payable July 30 
ge Wem OE reseed duty S «| 
‘s* American Seciftity & Trust Co, 
‘Si voted a quarterly dividend of 
, 2% per cent a share on capital 
=" stock, payable July 8 to stock of 
procera June 30. 


Cc 
- ‘WHO'S WHO TODAY: Ralph S. & = 
Damon, president of ‘eans World ee if 
Airline, has been awarded the In- 

ternational League of Aviators © tain-t 
“a Trophy in rec- cai, 

ognition of. his c 
31 years service —) 


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Pl Aden Reports fgolag Aire... 
St Pow& Lt... 


$2,566,640 Net sen 


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cent lower; rye was 1! to 2° cent lo is yearling beef bull, pF “60. no sausage 
of 1948 was $616,889, or 12 cents | soybeans were 2 to 3 cenis lower, and bulls sold; no early gales stock cattie District Public Utilities Commis. 
a share. lard was 23 to 35 cents « hundred pounds CALVES—300; slow. steady to weak: sion yesterd 
Oth | good and choice vealers and calves, 21.004 | yesterday authorized the Po. 
er corporate earnings re- Range p fellows: OO; . 24.00; common and medium, tomac Electric Pow 
Ported included: | Whea “odd culls, 14,00@17.0 er Co. to lend 
“Oo sh. Close, HOGS—700; few sales:. most bids 2/13 million dollars to the Braddock 
948 «= | Duly... 97 1.97% -% Higher; few lots good and choice trucked! | j ht & wwe 
Murray Corp., of Aueries. quarter ende@/| Sept, . 2.5 1.98% Me in _180-225-pound barrows and gilts, 22.00,| ~!8 Power Co. to complete a 
31: ‘Dec... 2.01% 2.0: 2.00% 200%-% |. SnBEP—100; slow, generally steady | 27-million-dallar construct 
$1,124,872 $43,058 |Mar... 1 | 1.961, "| Small lot medium to choice spring lambs, icon pro- 
ies 7 jn 820,388441 $24,181,084) | Carn— : 80; few medium, ry ra sinuahier ewes,| gram in Alexandria, Va 
ynol rin e | 2: ce quote | 
«| saat s Spring Oo., six months ended °° 1 32 20~% | Fruits and Veretables a 4 x | The commission ordered that 
‘ are LES— ut steady, Virginia bushel 
is Net profit vse $L124872, 943,058 Dec... 1-16 s-%e baskets early harvest. mo grade marks;| + ©PCO report each 90 days on the 
Hiram Walker-Gooderham & Worts., ; 


beens up, few, 4. aggregate amount of | 
ATOES—Slightly weaker Virginia,’ { loans it has 
ss/Lid.. and subsidiaries for the quarter quly 3 t "| 
lended May 31 (in Ganedian one ibe 59 4-60. about it steady ¢ others 160-pound sacks, U. §|| OUtStanding. 
Ss | Net profit $5,984.082 $4,370,213 Dec. 
t, 


593% is a 5. ls size A cobblers, unwashed | 
. A share vee $2.07 $1.51 


60%—-'% Eastern Shore Vit reinin, 2.5003. 
@2.85; dark, 2. a2 25 
Shore Virginie. 9 5502.78; dar kK, 
IR oO co A avers sma A: . 
e ets rmy New Jersey bushel hampers; U. & 1s, Jer« 
seys, 3.50 Geicens, 4.00, . 
«: Truck Order , Positry and Ege 
P *| POULTRY —Bhishtis weaker fowl. avout 
: St@acy o.ners eceipts iiberal. some fow 
Lansing, Mich., June 23 (4).— July,. 11. ‘carried; trading lisht; {ryers, 
Reo Motors, Inc., today announced |3¢°*: . 


3.3% nds, 23 ‘ 
| broilers Geghorn ; 2: MONEY 
s,| that the United States Army Ord-\Nor. ¥ | ae, Celored', 30G34; liehitweightd) 
a6 nance Department has contracted EGGS 


| Cash Pore 308 —abew t steady: receipts light: des ! 
man ow race arge. 7 ; raqceé 
va for purchase of 5000 Reo trucks) CBicago, June 23 (%).—WHEAT—None.| A, Mediums. 50@54; Grade: ge. Slée for Home Buvers 
3, and parts at a total cost of approxi- 039. > ge aa L and No. 2 yellow, 1.38%, |"), current receipts. ungraded, pounds: 
‘mately 31 million dollars. 10%; tampie grade 2a lee $ 032 Ceses. pe aa Bes , 
“oO ; . jR—Market steady; receipts, 7454) we are aiwa 
. Terms of the Army contract call. OATS No Poa, Oa S7se; No. 1 100-ib. sacks for export f d Bien T ph oo 
ie for deliveries of the 242-ton trucks a: No. 1 heavy white, 70@72: No. “Sth eae 1846.304. 6652; ship) oo eee Tere 6 ee ee 
; : pe oc 
rer “Nominal; none: stock, 3.1 120,977 


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4 40% 40% — 4); 
i l 31%! 31%! 31%4'— %& 

Int Tel & Tel... 27! BY ae : | 

“5 | T&T for ct 2' ek on 
Interst St 2 8 19% 19M\ i 

+ | JEWEL TEA. 1 | $2 i+ % ’ : d 

i |Senechaa ie 20 ) 34% 33%! 34 34¥\+ Me i ae 


34%) 33%) 34 ta nares stock, 1,892, 280 Our home-financing spe- 
| s —No. 2 red winter. garlicky, ali 

ae « 444 22% 2370) + rod - mes " a8 | spot, not quoted: No, 2. red winter. gar- cialists want to work for 
i 947 MIS...4... 34 Ya) 32%! 33%e!+ Mel 2| 8%) Bt, ag * ‘lochs, which will be shown to the| 

‘* KALAM ST&F 1) 9%! 9%! 9% \t Mel; 


Chi L licky, June, not quoted you—help you buy your 
i 19 , 
*s>|Kan City South \Syming-Gould, 2) | Biel Salt pubic for the first time in July. icago Livestock 


'N York C heme or refinance your 
‘| +3 AS CO $0'2! 50% Roig ee 23 @)_ (USDA).—SAL-|' ew ior otton | fe ui gl denen sc gay sare 
Bigha- eee i a| Dividend Actions diel wenersliy 23 seats higher both butSe: | oder weer tate’, 23,.#)—Cotton futures — in—tet’s talk it over! 
pnnecott Cop 19 t4\%, 43% 44 + 3] Tex Pac C New York, June 23 (.—Dividends de-|*** ‘and sows; trade uneven and instances | wn: aft Bh. mn ate oye Si = ugh 
imberly-Clark | 173%) 17% — 3 a|aearee L Trust clared: ag tae A smn Pinal prices were 10 cents to $1 a bald) 
. Rate riod ‘tora able |Bractical top 21.75: 0 


pecial , 19; most Selling of July increased sharply toward) 
‘Transamerica Corp...i8¢) 7-2" 4-30/2 gre: tae eeee age 20-2002 00; se as some traders decided tq H RT WESTERN 
Resumed ite ' - a . li holdings in advance of first’ 
| Am ‘Bide & Leather. .50c , ‘ 7-29 fo 400 . sverages, . at 


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George A.\Chi& NW bt 


Hatzes, general © Chi & NW pl, 
EF agent here for\chi Ri's po 
the Fidility ou ae © of 
Mutual Life In- Chrysler Corp, 
surance Co., has ie mY ie oe 
lified for the <i*¥, 4nvest .. 
1949 lod Soe the Clev El iilum’* 
: Dollar-R o u nd- £)°%, Staph B: 
, Deuba Table... Ger- Clinton ok ss 
ald E, Keene, assistant vice presi- Ginbty’ po 
dent of the Second National Bank & 59523,» ° 
in charge of personnel, this week Colonial Mills 
_completed 35 years of service to ben : Ba Ags. 
the institution . . . Philip Smith) 
* of Joseph Smith & Sons, Washing- 
~ ton, has been named general chair-| £9) 2s 5. 2 
. man of the annual convention —— } ad 10 
" which the Institute of Scrap Iron)comi Solvents. 
. & Steel, Inc., will hold here next Comwith Bai 


} {January 22 to 26. Ps ae 


* NEW ROLES: James Rotto— ons ons Pas bt “3 22! 
and Harold Melnicove, both of lSone RRCuvapl 


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good and choice 5s v5 notice day this Priday. Traders looked! 
0] "Waleoar Corp. aia: fe yw Sy Rw Fg Bra’ 16 2 for few tenders against July contracts, 
-| Irregular | 425-475 ibs. 15.00416.00: heavier DUt, there Was some opinion that a good. 
pines Brick wei ts = low as 13.00 for around 600-lb. cGeal of cotton may be delivered on July VINGS & 10 
rea 


eights: early clearance before trading in that contract expires)’ 
New Eng Gas & El. 22%c SALABLE CATTLE—Receipts 6000: saj-| The Spot cotton situation and export. 
‘Recular lable calves 500; steers and heifers steady | market sg omer | 1337 GS NW 
-|\Central Republic 6-30 | to $0 cents lower; cows : a . ov Low Net ch, treet saat: 


bulls about ice sieht . 22 33 et 32.93 32 00-33 02 —18- 24) 
Transamerica Corp. 'strone several loads choice “47 . 29 40 29.42 29.29 2 
Prod 


9.34 
g.} |medium weight steers 28.25@ tpo - 29.25 29.27 29.18 29.21-23 ew & ‘ RE. $262 
kx Wks. _: 7-30 |28. ) nee, thres loads "1536-lbs. ib Reignts: — = aS a 29 “ 29 ort 5 
o 2\ Johnston Mut Fund. ac. choice to prime - . ; u ay 28% 28.92 - 4 . 
, : Bwent C-Pox. c. 3) 10% | Me McLellan Strs Big \good and choice p steers 25.75@ 28.00; me-\Jly. 28.30 28.36 28.24 2928+ _ Branch: Takoma Park 
, s| Stern Bros toade iF oh Ib. selene 27.75 bulk | __*Nominal. ‘Bid 
/UDYLITE eae 4 9 i+ %| Chicago Corp | low-choice heifers 25.75427.25: —————— 
Underwood | 6 | 40%! 1 PPR ge nie ar 8: 27 rs 16,509 ee and nel 
ag ) ) unning 5. cows canners an 

Union Carbide a. *|D , * ’ ase 13.004@16.25:° medium and goed 
7-25 | 8ausi '19.50@21.50; medium to 

15 oe vealers 22.00@25.50; to | 
“BALABLE SHEEP—Receipts 500: slaueh TENTION | 
' eceipts slaugh- 
oe va | -~ steacy: top native spring lambs Al TEN 1 ION 
| 8.00: alk medium to good offerings | - "rT la by 
Cc b Ho. 4.0 arr 00: choice Noe. 1 skin lambs and) SVMALL IN\ KS] OR 
ros y; ope Find ings 23.00; ewes steady at 6.00@9.00 | + - 

: Y . ‘ . : . 

Dry Humor in Well Maryland Tobacco | apital invested in 


: 
Snyder, Tex., June 23 (#).—Bing! Baltimore, June 23 ().—~Averede prices 


Crosby and Bob Hope ate better | fo". \eredes offered in Deaviest volume ' MUTUAL FUNDS 
yn 


on the Southern Maryland tobacco 
icomedians than they are oil men. |suetion markets were steady to slightly 


ighe ith Wedn - 
Their first well, a wildcat test, Chas i NSH sean tants Gives you a regular annual return as high 
in central Seurry County, w ie United States Department of Aeri- 


bed ire and the Maryland State Depart- as $6 per $100 invested. The same in- 
ocr today as a “duster. | Of Merkets reported that the most a ae A le a 
Among other things, that means Dot¢eable difference in the market was vesiing principles that go 


the change in the quality offered. Ther ; 
not commercially profitable. were less good and fin A AP vanes ante companies safeguard your funds. 


Crosby and Hope were copart- and more medium ahd low qualities. 
Estimated receipts of the M a to-) 
hers with veterans oilman, W. A. “were reported as 6 Write or call today for free information 


cooperatives were reported as 

sg ag edi Ro. es amounted to 413, a pe Wednesday one epee nd Date % dee Rent jag 
. e oore. rf) i unds an average 

ications of oil ‘sue found after Stel tet oa. ort —— eet 

the well was drilled to 7978 feet|*"<"! dr | 

and preparations were made to representative United 

‘|plug' and abandon it. es crop: in red. $66: fair 


mM 
“fais fed GS Yow het ubleloes Uteen & TEDPA’ 


red. $45. 
Tips: Pair cherry-red. $55; fair red. $32 
Thin crop: Fine cherry-red. #72. 
cherry-red. $7C; a ne $67; fair cherry- 


cherry-red, 866: fair 729 15th Street N.W. 


; falr red, 845; low cherry- | NA. 4322 


Fair 
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ODD LOTS: Columbia Gas Sys- © 
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with the SEC to sell 972,624 addi- 
Mona} shares of common stock to/csns 


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Friday, June 24, 1949 


——— one 


Drama Festival 


A long and patient effort to bring legiti- 
mate theatrical productions back to Wash- 
ington is scheduled to bear fruit in Merid- 
ian Hill Park next Sunday evening. Under 
the auspices of a group styling itself Pro- 
ductions, Inc. and employing a site made 
available by the National Capital Parks 
Division of the Interior Department, Eliza- 
beth Bergner will open a summer season 
of professional productions with a new 
adaptation of Giraudoux’s Amphitryon 38. 
The producers have every reason to bill 
their plans for this and subsequent plays 
as a “Washington Theater Festival.” To 
drama lovers of the Capital, denied theatri- 
cal fare ever since the National Theater 
closed its doors because of an unwillingness 
to permit Negroes in its audience, this will 
seem a happy feast indeed. The sponsors, 
Miss Bergner and her supporting cast de- 
serve the thanks of Washingtonians. We 
anticipate that they will achieve the success 
we wish them. § — 


Royal Immigrant 


The marriage of Princess Cecilie Vikto- 
ria Anastasia Zita Thyra Adelheid of the 
House of Hohenzollern, granddaughter of 
Kaiser Wilhelm IL, to Mr. Clyde Harris, an 
interior decorator of Amarillo, Tex., is as 
good a sign as any that the institution of 
royalty has outlived its historical tenure. 
It js, of course, no disparagement of either 
bride or bridegroom to say that such a 
marriage would have been impossible if 
the Hohenzollerns had remained the ruling 
dynasty of Germany. 

The principle of monarchy hes a good 
deal to commend it; many wise and emi- 
nent men have considered it the most sat- 
isfactory method of government, at any 
_ fate when limited by constitutional re- 
_. straints. Some have approved it on the 
grounds of economy, observing that the ex- 
pense of courts and ceremonials is neg- 
ligible by comparison to the waste and cor- 
ruption so frequently found in republics and 
almost invariably in dictatorships. There 
is also the point that personal symbols like 
_ kings and emperors have often greater 
power over the imaginations and emotions 
of men than abstract symbols such as con- 
stitutions or flags or fatherlands. But the 
great strength of the monarchical principle 
has been the idea of legitimacy, whereby the 
harem intrigues and palace revolutions of 
the Orient, the civil wars and military 


usurpations of the Roman imperium, and . 


the noise, wind, tumult and extravagance 
of modern elections were avoided. © 

The whole life and education of royal 
personages was dominated by this idea of 
legitimacy. The interest of the dynasty had 
to take precedence over personal inclina- 
tions. Among the many sacrifices that had 
to be made to it was the right to love and 
te marry according to inclination. The 
marriages of royal princes and princesses 
were invariably arranged in the interest of 
state in much the same way that in certain 
peasant societies they are arranged in the 
interest of property. Perhaps it could be 
shown that such marriages have, by and 
large, been productive of as much happiness 
as marriages for reasons deemed valid in 
Hollywood. At any rate it was only in 
fairy tales that kings could marry beggar 
maids or princesses marry swineherds: Even 
the most powerful of absolute monarchs 
‘was nev erful enough to marry whom 
he pleased. 

The downfall of so many dynasties in the 
wars and political convulsions of the pres- 
ent century has plunged the European 
royalty into a situation with which they are 
ill prepared to cope. By education they are 
qualified for very little except to reign, or, 
lacking the opportunity for that, to lead a 
gracious but purely ornamental existence. 
As long as any hope for the restoration of 
their dynasties remained, they were unable 
-to change the traditional pattern of their 
lives. Society itself declined to accept them 
as purely private individuals; they found 
themselves cut off from all ordinary 
methods of livelihood not only by the 
nature of their training but also by the 
refusal of the world to take their efforts 
seriously. Thus they found themselves con- 
demned to lives of amiable idleness which 
many could no longer afford. Some of 
them solved the difficulty by marriages into 
wealthy families. | | 

The case of the Princess Cecilie, however, 
suggests that the recent generations of roy- 
alty may be growing dissatisfied with this 
ambiguous existence and determined te as- 


A 


« 


sert the rights and to enjoy the privileges 
that belong to ordinary men and women. 
By virtue of her marriage she has acquired 
American citizenship, which of course in- 
volves a renunciation of royal claims. She 
will enter into a wholly new sort of life at 
Amarillo; and while it is perhaps unlikely 
that her neighbors there will ever wholly 
forget or allow her to forget her former 
status, she will no doubt be able to find a 
full and satisfying life in the role of a Texas 
housewife, and her children at any rate will 
have a claim upon the future as well as 
upon the past. 


Foreign Policy 


There are no illusions in the minds of the 
American team who are now back in Wash- 
ington. They seem to be keeping their 
fingers crossed even in respect of the Mus- 
covite change of front on|Austria. Perhaps 
there will be a treaty, perhaps not. It was 
not justice for Austria that counted in Mos- 
cow in dropping Tito’s ¢laim to Austria's 
Carinthia. The concession was made be- 
cause Moscow wanted it as a weapon against 
Tito. A lesser war is on the hands of the 
Politburo in dealing with “national devia- 
tion,” and it is this diversion that has cre- 
ated a lessening in the tension with the 
West. | 

To be lulled by the seeming relaxation 
would be to throw away the time with which 
the West has been, endowed by the fortui- 
tous outbreak of intra-Communist feuding. 
This is probably what Secretary Acheson 
reported to the Senators.| He is seeking the 
quick ratification of the Atlantic Pact and 
the military arms program. This latter 
would be the kind of shield of western Eu- 
rope which would put upon the Soviet Union 
the necessity of mobilizing its army instead 
of dispatching its police in case of a decision 
to embark on overt action. As such it 
would develop the:'sense of confidence which 
was shown in the comradeship and like- 
mindedness with which the three powers 


dealt with Soviet diplomacy at the Palais 


Rose. . 

But this is not the only way to use the 
time which the West has been vouch- 
safed. A gigantic chess game is going on 
across a global canvas, this side as well as 
beyond the iron curtain, in Asia as well as 
in Europe; and only at|our peril will we 
refuse to play the game everywhere, and 
wait anywhere till the dust settles. 

Take, for instance, Tito. The wise thing 
is to press the advantage that is accruing 
to the West from this situation. Evidently 
thie Moscow fear is that Albania will join 
Tito in deviation. A sign of trouble was 
the execution of Rotchi Dzodze, the Al- 
banian Communist leader who has just been 
executed, and the occasion underlines the 
need for an American diplomatic mission 
to be returned to Tirana. 
breathing spell has been afforded. The fact 
that the Russians have lifted the overland 
blockade has not made this isolated West- 
ern outpost in Berlin any less of an exposed 
position. The only difference between now 
and preblockade is that a responsibility to- 
ward 2.5 million Berliners has been in- 
curred. It is a situation requiring not only 
constant vigilance but also fresh and press- 
ing thought on how to make it manageable. 
The handwriting was on the wall there as 
long ago as December, 1947, when the Coun- 
cil of Foreign Ministers broke up; yet the 
West waited in a state of near-paralysis till 
the Russians sprang their trap six months 
later. In Asia a similar portent is already 
visible at such exposed positions as For- 
mosa, and a Western unity and a military 
posture based on nonintervention, anti- 
colonialism, and antiaggression are urgent- 
ly demanded. These are some of the danger 
spots to Soviet Russia or the Western world 
that need attention before the next confer- 
ence is convened. | 

Over all the policy of pressing forward 
with the unity of the free world is the surest 
approach to strength and security. The 
Atlantic Pact is not enough, nor is MAP. 
This is the critical year of the Marshall 
Plan which must be devoted to laying the 
foundation for a continental integration. 
The economies of Europe are growing away 
from continentalization, not toward it. The 
stage has been set for currency union by 
the impetus to national production, yet any 
American whose voice is raised in behalf of 
such a unity is regarded in some European 
quarters as uncouth. He is supposed to be 
oblivious to what is fast becoming a perma- 
nent alibi, viz, the dollar shortage. Dollars, 
however, can be earned as well as lent and 
granted, and the people of Europe need to 
be reminded of this, as well as of the fact 
that internationalization and not nationaliza- 
tion is the true solvent of Europe’s ills. And 
by internationalization we mean a Europe, 
including Germany, for the historical ques- 
tion of the times is whether there is ta be a 
European Europe or a German Europe. 


In This Corner... | 


Although in some respects it got a bet- 
ter press than the 15-round go between 
Ezzard Charles and Jersey Joe Walcott 


at Comiskey Park, Chicago, the impromptu 


bout for the congressional heavyweight 
championship staged the same day at the 
Capitol Hill Stadium was badly handled 
from almost every point of view. Promo- 
tion and publicity were negligible: there 
was no advance build-up, not even a weigh- 
ing-in ceremony, the stahds were all but 
empty, and the affair, so far from having 
the blessing of the New York Athletic Com- 
mission, wasn't even recognized as carrying 
claim to the world’s heavyweight tifle by 
the National Boxing Association, which, 
judging from the match made under its 
auspices at Chicago, will recognize almost 
anything at all. ! 

» Besides, the thing was unorthodox in a 
lot of other ways. Young Sabath of Illinois 
who by all accounts scored a clean victory 
on points didn't so much as get a chance, 
when it was over, to say “Hello, Mom” over 
a microphone. The boy looked good; he has 


ney eee Satna at eS 


In Berlin only a 


it ever connects, is pretty murderous. But, 
then, almost anyone would look good against 
Goober Gene Cox, the Georgia fireball, who, 
at 69, just hasn’t got the speed or stamina 
any more to slug it out with the kids com- 
ing up in the game today. We aren't say- 
ing, of course, that Cox deliberately took a 
dive. He just never should have been in 
there earente a killer like Sabath in the first 
place. 

The Hill matchmakers have got a lot to 
learn if they’re going to stay in this busi- 
ness. The public isn’t going to stand for 
a succession of setups. It isn’t going to 
stand for having these things run off in the 
dark, so to speak. This is the era of tele- 
vision and the movie camera. When the 
Sabath boy defends his very dubious title, 
we hope it will be against a real challenger 
and under circumstances that will give the 
American people as a whole—not just the 
friends and relatives of the contestants— 
a chance to see a little blood and action. 
Otherwise, the sporting club up at the far 
end of Pennsylvania ave. might just as well 
go back to making speeches. 


Science Oaths 


The concern over the possible use of 
Federal funds to educate Communists is 


now reflected in the House bill for a National | 


Science Foundation. To this bill, the com- 
panion piece of a measure that already has 
passed the Senate, Representative Priest 
has added an amendment requiring that all 
persons benefiting by grants subscribe to 
an oath that they are not members of or- 
ganizations advocating the overthrow of the 
Government. : 

It is far better to have a-science founda- 
tion with this qualification than to have 
none-at all.. The country has dallied too 
long over replenishing its reservoir of pure 
science. The two bills in question, though 
administratively they leave a good deal to 
be desired, are essential instruments of 
national defense as a strong original science 
contributes to defense—and it is to be hoped 
that the House Rules Committee will dis- 
lodge the Priest bill promptly. The recent 
difficulties of the Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion with respect to its fellowship program 
emphasize the necessity for concentrating 
such grants in a science foundation. 

Given the furor that has been raised, the 
oath probably will have to be accepted as a 
political expedient in the hope that it will 
stall off more restrictive measures. The oath 
itself is innocuous enough, and there can be 
few Americans who would not subscribe 
to it willingly. But its significance as a 
weapon against communism may be ques- 
tioned. To be sure, it would be useful for 
perjury prosecutions if evasions later were 
discovered. A secret Communist, however, 
would have no hesitation in signing it if he 
were intent on infiltrating science—and the 
affiliations of the secret party members sel- 
dom come to light. 

The real objection to the loyalty oath as a 


‘condition of scientific grants is that it in- 


duces a political qualification into science. 
No security consideration is involved, for 
the great bulk of work under such grants 
is nonsecret, and persons with access to 
secret material are screened. But the 
deleterious effect on scientists could be con- 
siderable, for scientists as a group are jeal- 
ous of their right to nonconformity and 
some may see in this an effort to circum- 
scribe freedom of inquiry. Moreover, the 
oath sets a precedent for further Federal 
control of education, and, indeed, the inves- 
tigation of everyone receiving Federal funds. 
Such an unconscionable invasion is by no 
means beyond possibility once the political 
qualification for scientific. grants is ad- 
mitted. If the oath is adopted, defenders 
of a free science must be at pains to make 
sure that the move goes no further. 


Return Of The Natives 


Representative Preston of Georgia, chair- 
man and spokesman of the congressional 
committee which was flown at Government 
expense to Caux-sur-Montreaux in Switzer- 
land to attend the international congress on 
moral rearmament, has returned with an 
ingenious apology for this extraordinary 
junket. It was, he explained, a smart stra- 
tegic move in the cold war against com- 
munism, because the moral rearmament 
movement— 

has launched a vigorous campaign to 

answer communism in Europe. Com- 

munism in its naked, anti-God, material- 
istic form is the perfect opposite to 


Christian religion and is a malignant 
cancer in the realm of human relations, 


The delegates to the congress, Mr. Preston 


continued, seemed to be heartily encouraged 


by the presence of the congressional ob- 
servers. | 
All this is probably quite true, but alto- 
gether irrelevant to the point upon which 
criticisms of the junket have been raised. 
The Buchmanite is certainly not the only 
body of Christians which is seeking to offer 
a vigorous opposition to atheistic com- 


munism. The question, therefore, is why. 


they should have been singled out for what 
amounts to an official indorsement. Mr. 
Preston has not answered the question. 


—— 


—— 


NO LAMP OR STAR 
We climbed the cliffs above the sea. 
The village lay below. 
The waves beat out their threnody, 
And day began to go, 


And suddenly the black night dropped. 
So deep the shadows ran 
We could not tell where starlight stopped 
And village lights began. 


1 walk a darkened path tonight 
Because we are apart. 
No lamp or star can ever light 


The shadows in my beart. 
MILDRED GOFF. 


“In Two Words, Yes And No” 


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Letters To The Editor 


Oppenheimer Case 

I have just read Joseph Al- 
sop’s June 20 column on Dr. 
Frank Oppenheimer. | also re- 
call your June 17 editorial on 
the same subject. 

It amazes me to note that both 
articles seek to create the im- 
pression that Dr. Oppenheimer's 
present difficulties (including his 
teaching job) are due to the 
Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee. 

The plain, unvarnished fact is 
that all of his difficulties stem 
from his own actions; having 
joined the Communist Party; 
having denied it when ques- 
tioned and his present member- 
ship in the Wallace Party. 

Alsop speaks of.the Bill of 
Rights. Oppenheimer is not in 
jail; he exercised his rights; he 
is still free to do so. 

However, public opinion will 
not approve of Communist Party 
members, or former members, in 
places of responsibility. As a 
well-educated man, Dr. Oppen- 
heimer could not help but be 
aware of the implications of 
Communist Party membership, 
of its aim to overthrow our 
American system. His shift to 
the Wallace Party to most Amer- 
icans means only a change of 
labels. Right or wrong, public 
opinion has taken Dr. Oppen- 
heimer’s measure and it is futile 
to berate the Un-American Ac- 
tivities Committee for bringing 
the facts to public attention. — 

It is better that the man pay 
for the folly of his youth, than 
for the Nation to pay a greater 
cost. J. E. S. 

Washington. 


Tariff Inconsistency 


In the Congressional Record 

for June 16 Senator Arthur 
Vandenberg is quoted as fol- 
lows: 
. “I wish to call the Senator's 
attention to one phase of the let- 
ter from the Acting Secretary of 
State, because I think it under- 
scores the great weakness of the 
operation of the existing system. 
The Senator from Oregon will 
recall that he was assured that, 
in this instance, the cherry 
growers were given full oppor- 
tunity to present their case and 
to have it assessed by all the 
various departments of the Gov- 
ernment which might be inter- 
ested or which might have com- 
petent information on the sub- 
ject; and in the letter, large 
numbers of Government depart- 
ments are identified in that con- 
nection. However .. . the United 
States Tariff Commission is not 
so identified at all. Yet that is 
the institution which initially 
was set up for the purpose of 
just such a review. 

“If we get a little closer, not 
by way of control over net re- 
sults, but by way of competent 
consultation, to the Tariff Com- 
mission in these matters, I think 
we would be a little safer.” 

In the Congressional Record 
for June 14, 1948, appears Sena- 
tor Vandenberg'’s speech sup- 
porting H. R. 6556 (Public Law 
792) which specifically prohibits 
the Tariff Commission from par- 
ticipating in any decision or ne- 
gotiation of a reciprocal trade 
a ment. He later voted for 
the bill. 

Sealine Order No. 9832 was 


-{ssued on February 25, 1947. as 


one result of the so-called Van- 
denberg-Millikin-Clayton com- 
promise. That order specifically 
designates the Tariff Commis- 


sion as the sole agency to hold- 


hearings and make recommenda- 
tions regarding invocation of the 
escape clause in trade agree- 
ments which permits the United 
States to modify or withdraw a 
concession which results in 
even the threat of injury to 4a 
domestic industry. Executive 
Order No. 10004 of October 5, 
1948. not only repeats this desig- 
nation but requires the Tariff 
Commission to submit the di- 
gests of information regarding 
every item on which a tariff con- 
cession might be considered, and 
also the “peril a. report 
ealled for in H. R. 6556. 

In view of these facts Sena- 


A 


Communications must be 
addressed to the editor and 
must carry the complete name 
and street address oy the 
writer, though pen names will 
be permitted at the editor's 
discretion. Letters of less than 
200 words will be given pref- 
erence, and all letters are sub- 
ject to condensation. No com- 
munication can be returned. 


tor Vandenberg’s recent state- 
ment seems highly inconsistent. 
VERNON E. BUNDY. 
Washington. 
Gaza Strip 

I have read in the press about 
Israel's proposal to take the 
Gaza strip with its actual 230,000 
inhabitants (most of them dis- 
placed Arabs). Israeli spokes- 
men have emphasized this ges- 
ture as a generous offer to the 
Arabs. 

The implicatio& of this prop- 
osition is not clear to the public. 

The Gaza strip is a small part 
of the southern district of Pal- 
estine which was left Arab by 
the partition plan. Israelis have 
occupied all the other parts of 
the southern Arab Palestine, 
and have forced the inhabitants 
out of their homes and proper- 
ties. Most of these displaced 
Arabs are living now in the 
Gaza strip. 

Israel's offer seems to concede 
something to Arab demands 
when it only implies. new sacri- 
fices from the Arab—that is to 
say, Israel wants to occupy the 
last remaining Arab part in 
Southern Palestine free from 
Israel's control. 

To solve the fate of the one 
million Arabs displaced because 
of the creation of a Jewish 
State, Israel should not ask for 
more Arab lands, but restitute 
the Arab lands it has occupied 
contrary to the dispositions of 
the partition plan. 

ARTHUR DELANO. 

Washington. 


Pound Dogs 


I was somewhat amazed to 
read the June 14 letter by Judge 
Bennett Champ Clark in refer- 
ence to the ownership of dogs 
in the pound. His claim that the 
bill now being considered in 
committee by the Senate, which 
would permit the poundmaster 
to supply dogs to recognized 
laboratories, violates the person- 
al property rights of the owner 
is without any foundation in 
fact or law. 

The proposed bill does not 
change in any way the present 
law on the matter. Title 47, Sec- 
tion 2003 of the District Code 
as amended July 5, 1945, clearly 
states that any dog impounded 
because it does not carry a tax 
tag and is not redeemed by the 
owner within 48 hours upon pay- 
ment of $2 shall be sold or de- 
stroyed. Apparently the judge 
wrote without taking the trou- 
ble to determine just what the 
law is in the District, a some- 
what unjudicial attitude of mind. 

‘ALTER C. HESS, 

Georgetown University School 

of Medicine. 

Washington. 


Mall Parking 


If it is so necessary that the 
few parking places on the streets 
are to be taken away from the 
taxpayers of the city to accom- 
modate the tourists that come by 
the thousands into the District, 
why not turn over to the tour- 
ists the underground parking 
spaces in the Interior Building 
and other Government build- 
ings? The visitors from the 
States actually pay taxes to keep 
those buildings up and have 
more right to those parking 
spaces than the few that are on 
the streets, especially the Mall 
section. MARIE COOPER. 

Washington. 


Legalizing Basing Points 


The bill relating to basing- 
point systems of pricing (S. 
1008) raises questions of public 
importance calling for wider 
consideration and wunderstand- 
ing than they have thus far re- 
ceived. 

Under multpile basing-point 
systems, such as those in the 
steel, cement. and many other 
industries, the country becomes 
a mosaic of market areas each 
governed, as to prices, by a 
basing point. Every seller lo- 
cated either at the basing point, 
or as is often the case 1000 or 
more miles distant, who wants 
to get the business, quotes every 
prospective buyer the base 
price at the basing point plus 
the all-rail freight from the bas- 
ing point to customer's location. 


The fact of chief public im- 
portance, as to these basing 
point and allied delivered pric- 
ing systems, is that their pur- 
pose is to bring about complete 
identity of delivered prices, 
among all supposed competitors, 
at every customer's location in 
the country. And such has been 
their actual effect. 


These systems are the most 
exact antithesis of price compe- 
tition. Insofar as they are used 
there follows the destruction of 
the American system of prices 
arrived at through the interplay 
of competitive forces. 

The main tenet of the eco- 
nomic creed of this country has 
long been that price competi- 
tion must be preserved. For if 
it is relinquished, the public 
conviction is that the self-in- 
terest of industry will run prices 
so high that people, for their 
self-protection, will be con- 
strained to demand Government 
supervision of prices. 

Now the aims and results of 
the basing-point systems-and of 
the bill, as regards price com- 
petition, were hardly glanced at 
in the examination of industry 
men during the congressional 
committee hearings; there was a 
definite slant in favor of basing- 
point systems throughout the 
sessions. 


The bill, which has passed the 
Senate and seems practically 
sure of enactment, is intended 
to and would make it harder for 


the antitrust enforcement agen-. 


cies to bring back competition 
to several basic and many other 
industries which have used these 
pricing systems to destroy price 
competition among their mem- 
bers. 

The intent is to forestall the 
application of the salutary legal 
principle that men who make 
delivered prices knowing that 
the other members of their in- 
dustry will match their prices 
cent for cent have acted under 


a mutual understanding so to. 


do, contrary to the antitrust pol- 
icy and law. 

A further effect of these sys- 
tems, if hereafter they may be 
conducted with the aid and com- 
fort of the pending measure, 
would be to make it much harder: 
for Federal agencies to maintain 
the impartiality of their efforts 
in presecuting overt conspiracies 
in restraint of price competition. 
For it would constantly be evi- 
dent that the same monopolistic 
results precisely are being se- 
cured in other 
through basing-point systems. 

One of the lines employed by 
Moscow propaganda and with a 
substantial degree of success, 
able correspondents tell us, is 
that American advocacy of free 
enterprise and the competitive 
system is false and that this 
country is governed by and for 

“monopolists,” Another Soviet 
charge often flung at America 
is “fascism.” 

Precisely to the extent that 
these systems continue to elim- 
inate, price competition, and 
especially to the extent that the: 
Congress comes to their aid 
against the Federal agencies 
charged with enforcing antitrust 
laws, we shall have abandoned 
our price-competitive economy 
and shall merit the epithet, 


“mo , 
EUGENE W. BURR | 


industries 


Calling 
Washin gton 
By Marquis Childs 


Era On Trial 

NEW YORK.—At one point tn 
the respectful quiet of the court- 
room in which Alger Hiss is on 
trial, Judge Samuel H. Kaufman 
leaned forward to reprove the 
Government prosecutor. The de- 
fendant, Hiss, said Judge Kauf- 
man, is the only one on trial 
here. 

In the technical, legal sense 
that may be true. But there are 
many who regard Hiss as a sym- 
bol of the Roosevelt era. If he 
should be convicted, they will 
consider it as a verdict of guilty 
against the dead President and 
the men who made the New 
Deal. i 

That, of course, is where poli- 
tics comes in. So deep are the 
prejudices of many with this at- 
titude that they are not likely 
to accept at its full value an 
acquittal 

The Hiss defense has ranged 
back over those crowded years 
when Washington was an excit- 
ing place full of the ferment of 
new ideas and new hopes. The 
ghosts of those years seem to 
hover over Judge Kaufman's 
neat, efficient. air-conditioned 
courtroom. There are echoes 
from a past that today seems in- 
credibly far off. 

That was true, above all, when 
Supreme Court Justice Felix 
Frankfurter was on the witness 
stand. Here was the man ac- 
cused so often of being the head 
and front, the inspirer, the 
Machiavelli of the Roosevelt re- 
gime. This charge still is re- 
peated in various forms where 
venom continues to be distilled 
from Ahe past. 

Even in the ee period he 
was under examination the pat- 
tern came clear. With his brisk, 
precise articulation, so familiar 
to the drawing rooms of Cam- 
bridge and Washington, Frank- 
furter answered the questions of 
the defense and the prosecution. 
The great names rolled out, and 
even in this legalistic exchange 
the shape and texture of a by- 


- gone age were made visible. 


cow 


THE PRESIDING ghost was 
that of the late Justice Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. For most of 
his years at Harvard Law School 
Frankfurter had recommended 
to Holmes each year a brilliant 
young law graduate to be 
Holmes’ law clerk. 

So he had sent Alger Hiss to 
Holmes. Hiss, sitting just in- 
side the rail separating actors 
from audience in the court- 
room, looks today young enough 
to be that law clerk 18 years ago. 
It was the beginning of his 
career. 

Frankfurter sent so many 
young men to Washington. That 
is one of the crimes invariably 
raised against him. But, as his 
testimony developed, he also 
sent bright young men to the 
great law firms in New York, 
Chicago and Los Angeles. 

He was unequivocal in saying 
that he had never heard anyone 
question Hiss’ loyalty or verac- 
ity. Hiss’ reputation was ex- 
cellent. The same _ testimony 
came from another Supreme 
Court Justice, Stanley Reed. 
This in itself was an extraordi- 
nary thing—to have -two judges 
of the highest court of the 
land giving testimony in a trial 
judge's courtroom. 

ow 


IT IS a measure of the change 
in climate that has occurred in 
a few short years. From 1934, 
when he went into the New 
Deal, through Yalta and the 
early phase of the United Na- 
tions, the defendant was the 
confidante: and trusted adviser 
of the top men in Government. 

They worked with him from 
day to day. He and his wife 
were on @riendly terms with 
them and with their families. 
They admired him as one of the 
eager, willing, idealistic young 
men attracted to Government 
by the crisis of the depression. 

This is just where prejudice 
seems to me most harsh and un- 
just. Those who take Hiss as a 
symbol and who have already 
prejudged him in their minds 
prefer to forget that era of the 
30s when in the wake of 
collapse and bankruptcy the 
very foundation of our system 
seemed to have given way. 

A psychiatrist would find this 
desire to forget, coupled with a 
desire to find a culprit, extreme- 
ly interesting. Many of these 
same people were in despair in 
7932 and '33, uncertain whether 
they would ever regain their 
wealth and prestige. You can 
make a good case for saying that 
they were saved by the New Deal 
and that you never quite forgive 
your rescuer. 

This is not said to condone 
those who, like Henry Julian 
Wadleigh and. Whittaker Cham- 
bers, have confessed to willful 
treason in that era. That is the 
tragic enigma. How, even under 
the stresses and strains, the un- 
certainty and insecurity of that 
time, could young men sharing 
the advantages of the society in 
which they lived deliberately 
plot against it? 


Alabama Terrorism 


It is disturbing to read of the 
mounting terrorism by the 
hooded men of Alabama. I 
have made many trips through 
the South in the past 20 years, 
during which time, through my 
fraternal and other affiliations, I 
have found the every-day man 
and woman of the South to be 
persons of fine character and 
particularly very hospitable. 

Yet what is now happening in 
Alabama and other Southern 
States is a matter of simple 
arithmetic. Lynchings, floggings, 
tar and feathering and other un- 
lawful acts, plus official laxity, 
indifference and even con- 
nivance, equal terrorism. 

It is to be hoped that the ac- 
tion of the Alabama State Sen- 
ate in outlawing the hooded or- 
ganizations is not too late. 

ABE SHEFFERMAN. 


A Communication 


Revised Curriculum | 


In Secondary Schools | 


THE LIMELIGHT cast upon 
our educational system by the 
current hearings of the House 
Committee on Education and 
such recently published books 
as Dr. Bernard Iddings Bell's 
Crisis in Education and Dr. 
James Bryant Conant’s Educa- 
tion in a Divided World illumi- 
nates a calamitous situation. 

The birthright of every Amer- 
ican, the opportunity of educa- 
tion, offers little hope of survival 
if we are to ignore the increasing 
failures of education. Today's 
crisis is one of extreme urgency. 
It demands a searching scrutiny 
into the economic difficulties 
pushing our educational institu- 
tions uncomfortably close to 
bankruptcy. 

The immediacy is how to stay 
solvent when endowments and 
tuition fees no longer meet the 
increased costs of operation. This 
situation can only grow worse, 
not better. Enrollments will con- 
tinue to mount. Competent in- 
structors will continue to he 
tempted into more financially re- 
warding fields. Administrative 
directors will be more harried 
than ever with budgets that fail 
to meet existing costs of living. 


cos 


RATIONAL ' analysis of the 
problems besetting the public 
schools and universities is vitally 
important. It ‘helps to know 
where we are going if we know 
where we are, and how we stand. 
The more we can publicly expose 
and consider education per se, 
the more secure we are making 
our future. 

So far in this searchlight on 
education, the role of secondary 
schools and private preparatory 
institutions “has been  over- 
shadowed. This is nothing new. 
Secondary schools have long 
been side-tracked in favor of col- 
leges and universities. That they 
are the feeders to higher educa- 
tion and that their success is the 
key to success or failure later on 
is seemingly forgotten. 

Secondary schools, particular- 
ly, bear a practical perspective. 
Educators Nation-wide agree 


that the high school ¢urriculum . 


needg revision and a more thor- 
ough-going application of its 
basic subjects. The instructional 
formula needs the emphasis of 
repetition. Students need to be 
grouped in classes of like mental 
levels. 

Time of both students and in- 
structors is wasted on non- 


essentials. Interruptive holidays . 


take costly toll. The student, 
therefore, comes into college un- 
prepared to meet or keep pace 
with its requirements and with- 
out the disciplined talent of 
how to think, concentrate and 


ooo 


i ts a eS 


t- 


apply. The years that should 
have taught him how to best 
exercise his mind and fit him 
for higher education, and the 
thorough development of the 
mind, which is the sole purpose 
of education, have been wanton- 
ly thrown away. 
ow 


THE AMERICAN public is 


slow to accept abrupt changes » 


in its traditional customs. But 
certainly the necessity of 
streamlining this scholastic span 
is evident. It is an expediency 
to better educational progres- 
sion as well as better school 
management. 

By careful programming, the 
seventh and eighth grades can 
be combined into one year and 
the ninth to twelfth grades into 
two years, without sacrificing 
content or coverage. At this 
rate and with closer. attention 
to the basic subjects, a student 
would be able to complete his 
college education at 18 or 19 and 
begin that much earlier his pro- 
fessional career. 

Getting students into college 
two years sooner serves a dou- 
ble purpose. The young man 


lege training before the possi- 
bility of being called into mili- 
tary service, an academic back- 
log that will ease his return to 
studies. On the side of the;col- 
lege, it is spared the crippling 
effects that any national emer- 
gency brings with it. With the 
stabilized security of instruc- 
tors, students will receive a bet- 
ter dollar value in education. 
And the future of our academic 
standards ‘will be made safe 
against economic fluctuations. 
ow 


MUCH OF the waste in col- 
lege education is directly due 
to poor management and pres- 
entation in preparatory schools. 
Education is becoming more 
and more involved with mass as- 
sembly-line teaching. Academic 
failures naturally are high when 
classes sometime reach an at- 
tendance of a thousand students. 
The all-around waste of time 
and money is appalling. 

When colleges can come to 
have confidence in the prepara- 
tion of their incoming students, 
and when preparatory schools 
fulfill this promise, then we will 
have made the first step toward 
a sounder educational system. 

The weak line of secondary 
schools can only be strength- 
ened by saving time and rein- 
forcing the fundamentals. This 
is the answer to economic salva- 
tion of our schools. 

HOMER B. MILLARD, 

President, Millard School. 

Washington. 


—_—— 


By Wehty| 


_ 


GRIN AND BEAR IT 


— 


A CRUCIAL debate is now 
going on within the State De- 
partment. The issue can be 

| erudely stated as follows: Will 
the Far Eastern Division, having 
made its mess in China, at last 
adapt its views and actions to 
the foreign policy this country 
has been following in the rest 
of the world for the last four 
years’ The outcome, it may be 

» added, is still in doubt. 
A symptom, a passing sputter, 
'from this debate was the 
_ guarded statement issued by the 
department on Tuesday express- 
ing cool but. not unfriendly in- 
terest in the new government 

_ being established in Indo-China 
by the Emperor Bao Dai. This 
sort of thing must seem im- 
mensely remote and trivial to 
the average American. But the 
unfortunate truth is that this 
sort of thing may. later turn out 
to have all the importance of 
war or peace. 

In brief, as reports from the 
scene have indicated in this 
space, the Communist power in 
Asia has reached the uttermost 


¢-2¢ 


Geer POO? See ent Tie Ce 
F eo reserved 


“Is well to remember latest scientific discovery, Comrade 
doctors ... anyone not happy under our system is posi- 


| tively crazy... 
can acquire three years of col- | J y 


—_— 


—E 


limits of safety. If the Soviet 
Union can extend its sphere be- 
yond China, into Indo-China, a 
chain reaction will become high- 
_ly probable. All of southeast 


U, S. Economy Thorp Urges | 
Looks Serious, Cooperation in 


ADA Is Told) World Trade 


| The present economic situation 


serious to ignore,” the Washington 
Chapter, Americans for Democratic 
Action, was told last night. 
After- describing a decline 
purchasing power and an increase 
in unemployment, Dr. Dewey An- 


derson, executive director of the’ 


Public Affairs Institute here, and 
Stanley Ruttenberg, 


Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tiogs, said the United States should 
“do something big, now,” to halt a 
slide toward depression. 


(D., Ala.), also spoke at the pro- 
gram in the Hotel Willard. About 
109 persons were present. 


Ihanids't extension of veterans’ 
“52,20” unemployment compensa- 


ition; revival of the Civilian Con- ° 
iseryation Corps to absorb young | The State Department currently 
people leaving school and facingjis engaged in a bitter argument 
of'with the British over a five-year 
scholarships to technical schools trade 


"J nited 


unemployment; a program 


and institutions of higher learning. 
Also a revised tax structure 


Wellesley, Mass., June 23 (?).—- 
of the United States “is far too The postwar world trade honey- 
moan is over, Assistant Secretary 
of State Willard L. Thorp said to- 
in day. 

Competition for markets is be- 
coming more intense, he said, and 
the future will test the willingness 
director of |of all countries to cooperate with 
jedueation and research for the each other in the economic field, 

Thorp, who has charge of eco- 
nomie¢ relations in the State De- 
partment, spoke before the Sixth 

John E. Horne, executive assist- International Congregational Coun- 
ant to Senator John J. Sparkman ¢jj meeting at Wellesley College, 

“The fact is that rivalries and 
conflicts 

Among the suggestions offered emerge,” he said. 
iby Anderson and Ruttenberg were tendencies are taking on new force, 
a veterans’ program that “would and bilateral channeling of trade 
get. some money into veterans’ threatens to be not so much a 
method of getting trade started, as 
f preempting particular markets,’ | 


| Asia will be threatened. If 
southeast Asia goes, Japan and 
India will be immediately men- 
aced. And if this situation arises. 
the odds on war will be far bet- 
ter than even. It is tiresome to 
rehearse this series of grim prob- 
abilities, yet they must be daily 
borne in mind. 
cw 

INDO-CHINA is the key, for two 
reasons. First, it is the state in 
southeast Asia most accessible 
to China. And second, French 
folly has caused the Communist- 
nationalist movement of Ho Chi- 
Minh to gain great strength 
among the Indo-Chinese. The 
new regime of Bao Dai is the 
last chance to win over the Indo- 
Chinese people to an independ- 
ent, non-Communist govern- 
ment. On all sides it is acknow!l- 
edged that if Bao Dai fails, Ho 
Chi-Minh will succeed. 

Such are the bleak basic facts. 
The debate in the State Depart- 
ment concerns the extent of 
American support to be given to 
the new Bao Dai regime. As has 
also been reported from the 
scene in this space, Bao Dai is 
almost certain to fail if he is not 
actively supported by this coun- 
try ‘since exclusive French supe 
port actually discredits him in 
the eyes of his people). The Far 
‘Eastern Division of the State De- 
partment is extremely reluctant, 
however, to support Bao Dai 

The reason for this reluctance 
is certainly not fear of offending 


to 
“Nationalistic 


are now beginning 


agreement between the’ 
Kingdom and Argentina. 


Matter Of Fact 


By Joseph Alsop 


The Foot Draggers 


the French. The French gov- 
ernment has actually hinted that 
American aid for Bao Dai, whom 
they have fully recognized, will 
now be exceedingly welcome. 
Furthermore, the European Di- 
vision of the State Department, 
whose staff is a trifle more aware 
of the Soviet problem than the 
Far Eastern Division, has urged 
that the Bao Dai experiment be 
promoted and assisted in any 
Way possible 

Yet the statement that was 
just issued, which tould hardly 
be more cautious or gingerly, 
represents an elaborate water- 
ing down of a public avowal of 
sympathy for Bao Dai that was 
originally proposed Equally, 
those who see the appalling 
danger now confronting us in 
southeast Asia have been urging 
the expenditure of ECA funds in 
Indo-China. But the Far East- 
ern Division has succeeded in 
watering this project down also, 
to a decision to “consider” the 
matter, 

ow 

THE ARGUMENTS that are 
being made for this foot-drag- 
ging approach many be super- 
ficially convincing. It is true 
that Bao Dai is a risky invest- 
ment. But the fact remains that 
although supporting Bao Dai is 
by no means an ideal solution to 
the southeast Asia problem, it is 
the only solution available. The 
other approach is simply to drift 
with the tide, as we did in China. 
until we land on the rocks. And 
‘the rocks are now 10 times big- 
ger and 10 times more sure to 
destroy us 

Such is the rather unpleasing 
choice confronting Walton But- 
terworth, the new Assistant 
Secretary of State for Far 
Eastern Affairs, who is not a Far 
Eastern Division man. His sit- 
uation is further complicated by 
another grave fact. Although 
the members of the State De- 
partment Far Eastern Division 
have recovered from their senti- 
mental delusion that Far East- 
ern Communists are. mere re- 
forming agrarians they still have 
their record in China hanging 
round their necks like an alba- 
tross. Their main aim now 
seems to be to prove that the al- 
batross is not an albatross. after 
all, but-a peacock or possibly a 
bird of paradise. 

When officials have made one 
disastrous failure, their judg- 
ment should be suspect the sec- 
ond time round. This rule 
should now be followed. It must 
also be recognized that choos- 
ing the least bad alternative is 
preferable to drifting into the 
worst. Otherwise we shall have 
no policy at'all in the deeply dan- 


les 


—— ——— ~<a 


Montgomery 


: Urged to Hire 


. o 
Psychiatrist 

Hiring of a full-time Montgom- 
ery County school psychiatrist and 
five child psychologists to help 
fight juvenile delinquency was 
recommended yesterday by a Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars 
Bethesda. 

The recommendation grew out 
of a study of juvenile misbeha- 
vior in the Bethesda-Chevy C 
area launched last February 
VFW Post 2958 

Trial Magistrate James R. Mil- 
ler of Bethesda Police Court, a 
member of the study committee, 
said the study was spurred by the 
roundup of 40 youths, many from 
wealthy families, who had been 
stealing construction equipment 
Budget Being Studied 

The committee's recommenda- 
tions were delivered vesterday to 
the Council Council, now consid- 
ering budget ‘:ppropriations for 
the vear beginning July 1 

\ request for $8000 to chire a 
full-time psychologist and a part- 
time psychiatrist has been made 
by the Board of Education. County 
Manager |. G. McNavr has rec- 
ommended cutting School’ Board 
requests for health services, which 
include the two items by $7500 
“Teachers Gravely Perturbed” 

The recommendations were 
based on consultation and a round 
table discussion with teachers and 
parents and professional and busi- 
ness people of the community 
“Teachers,” the committer said 
“are gravely perturbed regarding 
their present inability to meet 
this problem.” 

Also requested was expansion 
of the county Mental Hygiene 
Clinic into “an adequate treatment! 
agency” to make the school pro- 
gram effective. 

There is no shortage of rec- 
reational facilities in Montgom- 
ery County, the committee said 


Post in 


hase 
b\ 


ECONOMIC——From Pg. I 


Truman Eyes 


Slump in Jobs 


pending in the Senate requiring 
President Truman to cut spend- 
ing by 5 to 10 per cent by exec- 
utive action next year was indorsed 
by the bo.rd 

The lawmakers who accompanied 
Senator Murray to the White 
House were Senators Elbert D 
Thomas (‘(D., Utah) and | Hubert 
Humphrey (D., Minn.) and Repre- 
sentatives Wright Patman (‘D., 
Tex.), Helen Gahagan Douglas (D., 
Calif.) and Andrew J. Bilemiller 
(D., Wisc.) 

They found Mr. Truman “already 
well informed and way ahead of 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Friday, June 24. 1949 


, 
-_ 
———— 


mew ne; = 


\- ° 

56 in Senate 
Sign Pact for 
Spending Cut 


senators clamoring for 
claimed yesterday 
half the 
signed up in 
President 


economy 
that well over 
Senate membership has 
iavor ot directing 

billions 
of dollars off next vear’s spending. 
the 96 
have signed such a petition, Sen- 
McClellan ‘(D Ark said: 
-1 Democrats and 35 Republicahs: 

“I expect to least 60 
mames when it is presented to the 
i@¢adership,” McClellan told a re- 
porter. “1 hope the leadership will 
be responsive to the the 
great majority and immediately 
Oring it out and reach a final 
vote.” 

Scott Lucas of 
Democratic 
strong 
which 


Truman. to cut 


Fifty-six of members 


ator 


have at 


will of 


Illinois. Senate 
has expressed 
Opposition to any system 
would shove the task of 
pruning appropriations on to the 
President rather than Congress 


leader 


McClellan, the chairman of that 
committee, and Senator Reed (R ; 
Kans.), another economy advocate. 
began circulating the Petition to 
Prove the backing behind their 
plan 

It Calls for the President 
Make cuts of not less than 5 or 
more than 10 per cent in al! appro- 
Priations for the \ear 
Which starts July 1. With a budget 
in the neighborhood of 40 billion 
dollars, this would mean a reduc- 
tion of two to four billion dollars 

Meanwhile. a Yankee Republican 
came out with a plan to balance the 
budget by a three-billion-dollar cut 
iM Military spending. 

Senator Flanders (R.. Vt.) said 
the United States is being asked to 
direct 35 per cent of its Federal ap- 
Ppropriations to the military. He 
contrasted this with the military 
dutlays of other great powers. 
Which he said were as follows 

Britain, less than 23 per cent. 

France, 18 per cent. 

Russia, “about 19 per cent.” 

“Outlays for military purposes, 
however necessary, are uneconomic 
and unproductive.” Flanders said 

The businessman-Senator apy 
peared as a witness before the Sen- 
ate Appropriations Committee, 
which is considering a House-ap- 
proved bill providing nearly 16 
billion dollars in cash and contract 
authority for military expenses in 
the next fiscal year. 


oO 


new fi scal 


Deposits Climb 


In Mutual Banks 


New York, June 23 (#).—Despite 
the decline in national income, de- 
posits in the 530 mutual savings 
banks are increasing more rapdle 
ly this year than last, the National 


gerous Asiatic situation. us as to the need for a program,” 


they said. The President promised 
to study the bill they propose, 
which provides for a National Eco- 
nomic Cooperation Board to rec- 
ommend policies to promote em- 
ployment, production and purchas- 
ing power. It also provides for. The mutual savings banks’ assets 
long-range public planning and reached the record total of 21 bil- 
promotion of private investment by lion dollars by the beginning of 
permitting more favorable treat- this month. This is an increase of 
‘ment, under tax laws, of certain|one billion dollars during the past 
‘new construction. '14 months. 


Association of Mutual Savings 
Banks reported today. 

Deposits climbed 403 million 
dollars in the five months ended 
May 31, as compared with 328 
million dollars in the like 1948 
period. 


—— __| that would benefit lower and me- Lhe United States has nt a= —---+- ——-- big 
diumincome brackets: an  ex-|Protested this pact, contending it " : 

’ , . "ea : . 5 

tended and increased public as-|Vi0lates Britain's promises in the The President s Calling List 


3 ) ‘Ds: istan r :. paisi international trade field and that) 
As: ‘Most Vigilant’ ‘Resurface Bid Asked Fort seta tostnyy llamar B pao it will freeze out American compe-| 


Bretton Woods, N. H., June 23 Baltimore, June 23 .(®). — The ment of housing legislation, and|“ton im Argentina. 


UP).—President Truman praised). coq for bids on resurfacing of| coma Rescribing. isla feel- 


ee 


Truman Lauds Rabbis (Silver Spring Street 


By The Associated Press 
| President Truman yesterday had (N. Y.). 
Thorp saild that until recently the following White House ap- 
all countries were confronted with ‘pointments: | r _— » ~ vanes 
the rabbis of the United States to-' several streets in the Silver! ing on the Hill” said “there jg, Shortages in many key products. -° 10 2 4 Jacksonville, Fla. 
day as “most vigilant in the advo-| Spring area. soaks Sear tint thie Geverament| fe But, a me, the general im- a a. m.—Budget Director Frank 12:45—Edmone 
cacy of the spiritual essence of| These include: ‘going to increase tax 4 alee ere Seepemie chairman, SEC. 
= nd Ave.—From Colesville| © }® a eee eed 10:30—Senators Murray (Mont.) }-90—Lunch. 


American democracy and stalwart gem ~ Reread north W _| that the Government may go idhgleun Sonidaee rowan pa 
defenders’ of American institu-|side, about a mile. | deficit spending. tion.” This situation. he  ex-|°"* 22°maes (Utah) et al. ni 
grasa Palais to esenburs v4. the to eve ay — — “i. |Pained, means the United States | 10:45—NLRB Chairman Pau! , 
The presidential commendation rd. northeast to Bladensburg rd.,| £0 ng to have to reduce expen lis “heading into a period of in- | Herzog. | 
| about a mile. . tures, increase taxes, or g0 intO| .reasing difficulty in our interna-| 11-00—Secretary of Navy Francis 
was contained in a letter to the) Blair Rd.—From Georgia ave. deficit spending.” tional economie relations.” | . yo here 
sixtieth annual convention of sean PEO EN the District line, about | | Thorp said American ‘ @dets to! Matthews, et al. 
Central Conference of American|* h#lf mile. One-Legged Man, 82, put japan and Germany on their| 1:15—Senator Johnston (S. C.). 
11:30—John J. McCloy, high 


| Bids on the Montgomery Coun- : ' 
Rabbis which opens tonight. , | | = wi economic feet are being resisted 
pe g ty projects will be opened July 5. Walks 15 Miles to Wed is aaiee cdiietes dkek tetken te ldememieaianar fon Garmete. | 


: = — ' Whitesburg, Ky., June 23 (#).— . 40-48 naledeintetive Devie| 
MTs CHELSEA CLOC : sgecsononcetene tang r prevent the return of those two 11:45 — Repres a yie) 
: KSie SS Eighty-two-year-old Jess Cook, Who .ountries to the foreign trade \(Calif.) and James Roberts. 
in 
Your Kind of Case 


jhas only one leg, walked here from. > : e tativ 
‘his home at Democrat, Ky., 15 miles field. 12 Noon—Representative 
Just what the traveling 


away, to be married for the fourth ease 
topgrain cowhide with 


time. 
Cook’s wife is the former Julia’ 
ere. In Congress 
| TODAY 
separating file . . . and . Bonnlasion a. m. open, Atomic Bnersy 
there's reom for pajamas 4 Sen 10 ‘Sides AD tt 
=. ngton one daho will testify, 
m 412. Senate Ollice pase.é Interstate 
mmeree, 10 & 
ubcmte.. 10 a. m.. open, 8-238. raiiroad 
munications, Capito] committee foom; | | 
ffice and Civil §& 


Wilson, 


Hanrahan, 


————— + — ~~ eee ————— * . 


FO a a aE Se VT 


; 


Celler| 


| 


\Patrick, 26, of Tina, Knott County. | 
wide, Includes an under- Senate 
* ; : a. I . 

and shirt ; ti 
@ Fortign . mr. open. 
stion heafing, Room 457, Senate Office 
; Jntersta 


It was her second marriage. 
ms briefease, a leather Srenmnitvecs: Joint Atemie Energy Com- 
ve or Authieliy 
te and Foreign Commerce 


Haspel *Refresha ble Suits 


The sun never frets or upsets active men wearing Haspel Refresh- 
able Clothes. Lightest of all hot weather suits, they're cool, crisp, 
easily cleaned. Be smartly groomed with the “cool look.” When 


it’s too hot for any suit . . . you'll be comfortable in a Haspel. 
Lewis & Thos. Saltz show them in a great variety. 


1141 Conn, 
Ave. 


. Capitol, Cenference on 
Office bill, 9 a. m.. ex 
. \; apes and Pubiie We 

a. . @kecutive, to consider reports 
fr subcoms . Room, Capito); 
Appropriatios 
tivé, to mari 
Room F-82, | 


AROUND THE WORLD 
IN SUNDAY’S POST 


FRANCE “If I eat, I cannot clothe myself,” says 


the French laborer today. , Post Correspondent 
Frank Gervasi, writing from Paris, paints a picture 
of high production, high profits and skyhigh prices 
in Western Europe's key country. « Section II. 


HONGKONG Will Britain have to defend her 


Far Eastern crown colony against the Communists? 
Hessel Tiltman’ describes the position of hectic 
Hongkong—now jammed with Nationalist refugees 
and busily trading with both sides—in another Sec- 
tion II report. | | 


Meets at noon. nom" 


ittees—Agriculture. 10 


f 1948 rela-| 
tive to service credit for retirement pur-| 
poses for mémbers of reserves. 313-A Old 

li £t' Bidg. Armed Services, 10 a. m., open. Kil- 
& e + day subcommittee on H.R. 524, providing 
at ge posyee of ail right, title. and in-| 

v7) 


% Haspel Seersuckers and Cords — the traditional 
summer cotton favorites, Easily washable, $20.50 


% «aspel Sir Preme—the genuine blend of durable 
cotton with rich Celanese* rayon. Lustrous corded 
stripes and sharkskin effects . $25.50 


te Haspel Sir Ultra — New. . shadow weaves and 
soft tones in an original and exclusive-with-Haspel 
blend of Celanese* rayon and cottan $32.50 


% Haspel Suit of Celanese* — ‘refrigerated’ fabric 
exclusive with Haspel, in frosty white, and rich solid 
shades in supplemental weaves $28.50 


a 2 subcommittee on national! 
ith bills, 1334 New Bids. Interstate 
| Fe ' Commerce, 10 a. m., open. | 
kworth shbcommittee on H.R. 378 re-| 
ring certain common oarriers by fail-' 
fh to install and maintain communica- 
10m systems. 

ter 
m, 


A worldly 

cotton... 

combining the 
green-and- 

10 a. m., 


Fis! 
pink irides- committee H.R. 1746, providing that! 
he; United States shall aid the States in’ 


fi | restofation and ana : | 
grated ory | and other bills. 219 ‘Ola Bide. Poste fies. 
y subcommitt 
shell pink 


Civil Setvice, 10 a. m., Exec. Williams | 
who 
Public 
organdy in col- 1324 New Bid 
lar, cuffs, is Entercom, 1324 New 
e s. rn . m ™ 
and round= =| H.R. 4286 to establish a Columbia’ Vatles 
| Administration. Governor of Idaho, Ore- 
about insets. | anc 
New Bide. Ways and Means, 10 2. m., 
| Exec. Social sen ah, Seaman. Com- 
pea Senat 
warm after- fet at noon. - te 
anon 3 a consideration of labor 
. biscussed DP legislation. 
$29. 75 R at 6:58. 


ope : 
dill arine and! 


Haspel Imported Irish Linen Suits, $33.50 
Haspel Celanese Evening Jackets, $28.50 
Haspel Cotton Cord Jackets, $15 


RUSSIA The Soviet government is reversing its 


stand again on that bourgeois institution, the family. 
How the Kremlin has gone back to encouraging the 
production of babies and discouraging divorce is 
told in Sunday’s Post by Edwin T. Gritz. 


GREECE On a tiny island off the tip of Attica, 


the Greek government is “reforming” Communist 
guerillas and throwing them back into battle 

' against their former comrades. Evon N, Clark, a 
Washington writer who visited the encampment, 
gives an absorbing account of what she saw—also 
Sunday in Section II. 


The Washington Post 


eR 
Call NA. 4200 for guaranteed home Asi EA lr ol elle 
delivery | | . 


. 


* Reg. U. S. Pat. OF 


Y 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz 


1409 G Street, N. W. 


EXecutive 4343 : 


open. Morris subcommit- 
f0n and Washington will be heard. 1302 
Precisely =e. ana 


legis- 


use 
Bilis. m. -: 
and sent to Senate compromise | 
por-Federal Security Appropriations bill. | 
Passed and sent to Senate bill contina-| 
import controls on fats and oils and 
p and rice products. 
eee consideration of housing bill. 
ived message from President Tru- 
in reiterating request for raise in salary 
top Government officials 
Received from committee deficiency ap- 
ppriations bill, recommending immediate 
nidation Of the WAA, 
Adjourned at 4:37. 


Nor conneceed with Salta Bros. 


lec. 


a 


— 


/ 


rn 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


Next to Keith’s Theatre 


615 15th Street, N.W. ST: 4044 


Another Tremendous Value From 
Our Large Stock of 


Sterling and Plated Silver 
Savings Up to 50%! 


Well & Tree Platter 
Was $9.00 
Heavy Silver Plate 
on Copper 


—WASHINGTON JEWELERS— 


Pe ng Ne ey a eee. Loe 
Tigi SS eearpmas 5 


“Where Sportsmen Meet” 


EIGHTH and D\STS. N.W. | REpublic 2545 


Reg. 3.50 Men’s & Boys’ 
McGregor “Gab Comber” 


Boxer Style 
\ Bathing Trunks 


a n> 


Re 


Pea. SOO ee NG “2 
a eS % 
* . - 
R Ne Cee oe , 

¥ ” } . oe toe bad 

a ee 
See 

. . 


Famous McGregor gabardine 
bathing trunks, boxer type, with 
full built-in supporter. Colors are 
maize, navy, tan and white. All 
waist sizes. 


NTER-—— 


+ og Re RAPES Poet a Mie ie ae —— weer © 


Your Harry Homeowner Stores 


NORTHEAST NORTHWEST ANACOSTIA VIRGINIA 


| 
IStth & H Ste. 5975 Ga. Ave. 1905 Nichols Ave. Falls Church. Lee Hy. 
at Bladensburg Rd. at Military Rd. at Good Hope Rd. at Hillwood Ave. 


REGULAR $9.95 VALUE, 5’ 


Garden Hose 


GUARANTEED FOR 15 YEARS 


SPECIAL 
~Fri., Sat. Only | 


Double Braid—Green Neoprene 
This isn't just ordinary garden hose that rots out in a year or 


so; it's worth far more, and actudlly guaranteed in writing for 
15 years. 


Other Garden Hose in Stock from $2.25 up 
COME, WRITE, PHONE ATlantic 1400 


—HECHINGER CO.— 


MANHATTAN 


AUTO & RADIO CO. 


i Established 35 Years 
Both Sides of 7th St. at R St. N.W. 


Store Hours: Week-Days. 8 a. =m te 6 dv. = fri. & Set & 
’ q ‘ 
Open Saunders and Helidars & a. m. t SA RARE 


elie. m 
FREE PARKING.WW~~~ ~ 


4th of JULY SALE 


Motorola Auto Radio 


$59.95 Model 508 


(Diseentinued 1948 Medel) 


@® Terms & Trade 


® IN FACTORY 
SEALED Cartons 


® GUARANTEED 
for 3 MONTHS 


| ee SPECIAL 
LOW PRICE 

Matching instrument panel 

control heads to fit most cars. 

Can be transferred from one $ 95 

car to another. Aerial and 


installation extra. Conven- 
lent credit terms. . * 


Manhattan Auto & Radio Coa. 
RECONDITIONED AUTO RADIOS $9.95 up 


LIMITED QUANTITY 


tke YOUNG MEN'S SHOP 


37th Year at 1319 F Street 


CLEARANCE! Broken Lots Men's 


Famous-Make Shirts 


$3.25 to $3.95 values 
$1.95 


Just 60! Handsomely 
tailored white and 
fancy patterned shirts 

» » » assorted collar styles 
... some with French cuffs. 
Broken sizes 14 to 164. 


Men's $3.95 to $5.00 Shirts 


Only 83! White and fancy patterned shirts .. . 
Famous-Makes! Assorted collar styles. 14 to 17 in $9.95 


group. 


Agents: A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
10th & ESts.N.W. "baring Plaza RE. 2545. 


Open Daily 9 to 6:15; Sat. to 7 P.M. 


its 


inated ash and fiber 
constructed nylon- 
strung racket; 3 ten- 
nis tennis racket 
press and cover. - 


—_—=-- -- - - 
Eee Crm 
= = - = = 

ee ~~ -”~ 


} 
} 
, 
, 
, 


FORD PHOTO SUPPLY, INC 


Sth & Penna. Ave. N.W.—RE. 5530 
Branch Store: 721 King St., Alex., Va.—OV. 1008 


$ ALLOWANCE ON ANY USED 
PHOTO-CELL METER 
In Trade 
for a new GE DW:S8 
Meter and Case 


17.15 


Lightweight ... sturdy... 
highly sensitive ... easy 
reading light scale... 
moistureproof meter 
movement. 


~PEERLESS 


MODERN HOUSE 
819 SEVENTH ST. N.W, 


9-Pc. Dinette Suite 


Hand rubbed solid birch finished 
“on champagne; 4 chairs with up- 
holstered seats. Table opens to 
32x54 inches. One 10-inch leaf 
included. 


No Phone or C.O.D. 
Orders 


= - 


i li i i i 
i id il ll i 


—BLACKISTONE, Inc— 


RING BLDG. 


FLORISTS 1407 HST.N.W. 


804 17th St. N.W. 
STerling 8058 


District 1308 


3171 WILSON BLVD. 
GL. 4248 OX. 1918 


RE. 7282 7331 WISCONSIN AVE. 
1200 18th St. N.W. Wisconsin 1300 


This Special for Five Stores 


Week-end Special Box! 
12 ROSES es 


12 LARKSPUR : i \ 
ae . 


6 GLADIOL! Wy 


? 


flowers to make a 
colorful floral ar- 
rangement. 


= == - 
ee le i i i el 


DELIVERED 


aaa eee 


=PLAZA SPORT SHOP- 


/ @ Men’s & Women’s Tennis Shorts 1.95 


THE ORIGINAL _ 


SURPLUS SALES CO 


“We Will Not Be Undersold” 
925 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. and 425 10th St. N.W. 


Open Daily 9 A.M. to 6:15 P.M. ® Fri. to 7 P.M. © Sat te 9 P.M. 
RE, 2545 


Army Surplus 


Double 


EEE ee 


Made to rigid Government specifications! Solid, sturdy 
bunk beds (easy to separate for twin-bed use). Each bed 


is equipped with strong springs for maximum comfort. 
° New Felt Mattresses to Fit 


OE BGM. Becks iis thc bvewbcncccetaaes] 1.49 
20-Minute Parking Meters in Front of Pa. Ave. Store 


—CLEAN-RITE STORES— 


“Washington's Vacuum Center” 


ME. 5600 925 F ST. N.W. 


Open Daily to 6 


Singer 
Rebuilt 


Electric 
Portable 
Sewing 
Machines 


‘37 a 


PRICE 


Easy Terms Arranged 
5- Year 
Service Guarantee 


LIBERAL ALLOWANCE ON YOUR OLD MACHINE 


] 
J 
FOR AT STAR 
FREE HOME } PARKING PLAZA 


: 
, ‘ 


MILSTONES 


RETAILERS—IMPORTERS 


af TORE HOURS 
927 Penn. Ave. N.W. panr FROM 10 AM. TO 6:30 P.M. 


[ “Original Home of Low Prices” } 


——_ = = 


IMPORTED SCOTCH 


“| Clanroy DeLuxe 


100% Scotch Whiskies! 
Produced and Bottled in Scotland 


8 PROOF 


ll lll 


(Oy ME OT 
om Bo 


scotenemsee J A 
aed REAL 
a 5 VALUE! 


ore tem 


$41.75 Case of 12 Bottles 
SOLD WITH MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 


| “Milstone Meets or Beats All Advertised Prices” | 


A 
7 


A&N Trading Co.— 
For 30 Years Headquarters jor Miligary Clothing and Accessories 


8th & D Sts. N.W. RE. 2545 Our Only Store 


$15.00 Value! 


Women’s & Misses’ 


2-Pc. Percale 


’ 


Fine quality percale made into 
snappy well-tailored dress suits. 
Neat, attractive pin stripes with 
zipper neckline, belted, two pock- 
ets. Cardigan type jacket. Long 
or short sleeves, Sizes 10 to 16. 


® Dress, without jacket, 2.95° | | | 


IRVING'S j 
10th and E Streets N.W. EXecutive 2626 


Open Fri. 9 to 6:15, Sat. 9 to 7 
FREE PARKING OPPOSITE STORE 


Greatest Luggage Value in Years! 


$29.95 Smooth Grain 
Men's 2-Suiter > 


popular cherry color! 
curved top 


© For Vacation, Travel or Gifts! 


—WALPOLE BROS— 


SPECIALISTS IN LINENS 
1529 Connecticut Ave. 
OUBLIN + 


LONDON 


NO. 2849 


Hot Weather Specials 


Beach Towels 
Bath Towels 
6-Pc. Towel Sets 
Luncheon Sets 


BOSTON a 


$3.75 to 5.50 
97c to 4.50 


Summer mats and rugs half price 


$2.95 to $21.50 


a 
Walpole percale sheets and cases 


72x108" sheets $3.25 
90x108" sheets $3.85 
Cases 95c 


JUNE STORE HOURS—Closed Saturday 1 PM. 


MORTON'S —— 


312-316 Seventh St. N.W. 


Boys’ and Girls’ 
eel) Polo Shirts & 
a * S Boxer Shorts 


POLO SHIRTS of = interlock, 
combed and carded yarns. Crew 
neck styles in solid colors, stripes 
and prints. Girls’ sizes 1 to 14, 
' Boys’ sizes 2to 16. 2 for $1 


BOXER SHORTS of Sanrforized 
twills in light or dark solid colors, 
stripes and. all-over prints. Girls’ 
sizes 3 to 8. Boys’ sizes 2 to 8. 


2 for $1 


MORTON'S—Girls’ Store & 
Babyland; & BOYSTOW N— 
427 Seventh St. NJ. 


by 


™ 


SECTION 


B 


Today 
on 
WTOP 


AM and FM 


$:00 P. M.—Helen Hayes recreates her role 
in “A Farewell To Arms” 


10:00 P.M.—A man who has nightmares 
finds they come true in “Into 
The Mist” 


LOCAL NEWS 
Classified Advertising 


FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1949 


hice 
Turns Down 
Money for 
D. C. Project 
Voted in °46 


Appropriations 
Committee Denies 
$2,180,000 for 


Marshall Heights 
By Edward F. Ryan 
Post Reporter 
The House Appropriations 
Committee yesterday again 
refused funds to launch Wash- 


Novelist Cited 
For Achievement 


University 
Women Quit 
National Unit 


Washington Body 
Objects to Vote 
Admitting Negroes 


To Membership 

Seattle, June 23 (U.P).—The 
‘Washington, D. C., branch of 
‘the American Association of 
‘University Women tonight se- 
ceded from the national body 
‘because the convention voted 
to allow Negroes to become 


ather for These Ducks... 


SRO 


House Committee 
Recommends WAA } — 
) | * W 

The House Appropriations Com- I r uman Asks F ure e 
mittee yesterday recommended the’ | 
sets Administration. It refused 
the President’s request to give 
WAA $26,500,000 to continue it val Q °* es 
another year, in the third defi- ff Is 

For Ottieial 

Instead, the committee proposed 
that Treasury be given $3,500,000 I ay I op Posts 
to pay terminal leave to WAA’s! 
four million dollars to care for 
+o agp ped agle a Congress Increases 

y , an at remaining ° 

aircraft be shifted to the Air Would Help Obtain 
Place on July 1. WAA has about 
$00 employes here. President Truman _ yester- 
was recommended for the National, 44Y repeated his request that 
$450,000, which may require a few ; 
lay-offs... WAR CLAIMS was Government officials. 
_- He urged the increase “prima- 


Elimination Now 
immediate liquidation of War As- Pay R ises 
_tiency bill. 
of which $2,500,000 be earmarked 
2500 employes, that RFC be given! His Message Tells 
real property to be transferred to) 
Force. The transfers would take! a 

High Type Men 

NLRB: A budget of $8,550,000 

Labor Relations Board, a cut of Congress raise salaries of top 
given $281,000 by the committee. | 


ow 


~ 


which would provide a 75-man 
staff. The President recommended 
$525,000 for it . . . FMCS: The 
committee approved a $2.700.000 


and Conciliation Service, or $40,-| had signed-a bill giving House 
/'members an additional $3000 each 


900 less than was_ requested. 
JOBS: Veterans’ Administra- 


tion is in the market for up to telephone and telegraph messages. 


300 additional card-punch opera-! 


be at least 16 and be able to type|become “increasingly worse” in. 


@ minimum of 25 words a minute. 
Starting 
$2724, depending on experience. 
Applicants should go to m| 
2057, Munitions Building, 20th st.' 
and Constitution ave. nw., for in- 
terviews ... AIR FORCE has 
openings for lithographic press-' 


rily as a matter of good business | 
point of the Gov-| 


from the stand 
ernment.” 


His request was contained in a 
budget for the Federal Mediation) message sent to Congress after he| 


for clerk hire and $500 a year for 


: 
' 


Mr. Truman said the salary po-' 
tors and trainees. Applicants must sition of Federal executives has) 


recent years so that now “the 


salary from $2284 to;Government has great difficulty’ 


in obtaining and keeping the best 
men.” 

“Even when they are prevailed 
upon as a matter of public duty 
to serve in the Government,” said 


' 
; 


# members of the national or- 


ganization. 


The four District of Coluinbia 
delegates walked out of the con- 
vention hall after Dr. Elizabeth 
W. Conrad, president of the Dis- 
trict branch, startled the final 
AAUW business meeting by an- 
nouncing the secession. 

Last night, the AAUW voted 
overwhelmingly to allow qualified 
members into the organization “re- 
gardless of race, color, creed or 
religion.” The Washington branch 
had advocated a revision of the 
by-laws to incorporate a “screen- 
ing” process, aimed especially 
against the admission of Negro 
women, 


‘ington’s congressionally - au- 
‘thorized postwar slum clear- 
ance program. 


It was the third time in as many 
years that the committee has 
turned down funds to carry out 
the 1946 District Redevelopment 
Act. 
| Denied this time was a request 
by the District Redevelopment 
Land Agency, created by the 1946 
law, for $2,180,000 to begin in the 
‘Marshall Heights section of east 
‘Washington, a slum clearance and 


ie 


y 
¢ & 
Sey 
DR. HELEN C. WHITE 
Wins $2500 
. . 
() Families 


Set on Walk in 


Mass Eviction 
redevelopment program. 


(Picture on Page B-2) The bill went to the House in 
Approximately 20 families and the midst of its debate on the 


men, $1.43 to $1.75 an hour; litho- the President's message, “too often) i 
graphic platemaker, $1.58 to $1.94 they find they can afford to serve 
an hour; film assembler, $1.22 to|for a limited time only. Thus men 
$1.50, and bindery operator, $1.10.!are lost to the Government just 
Sg agg 6700, Branch 73342,.when they have had the experience 
r details. ‘| which brings them to the peak of 
ELECTIONS: At the Labor De- their effectiveness.” | 
partment yesterday, George Her-| Mr. Truman pointed out that 
sey was reelected the employe there has been no increase in the 
ance ee rating) salaries of Cabinet officers since 
. ates are orris °| bers f im- 
Sacharoff and Linwood H. Per- — 1 cela pommegy ett . 
ites At Federal Power. Wil portant commissions whose sal 
liard W. Gatchell was elected the arses | were pi Syd $20,000 iow 
employe member and his alter-|¥@4Ts ago still get the same amount. |2 A 
nate is Edgar T. Hughes. | As an example, Pn — ier ° ° Eyes Small 
‘COMPENSATION: The House|*!0,000 salary paid members © District Bo 
Rules Committee yesterday cleared the Federal Trade Commission. 
‘This salary figure has remained nistrict traffic deaths this year. 32 


the Lesinski bill to liberalize the’ ff L Ww 
unchanged since 1914. ‘Traffic deaths this date last year 38 Ff oan aws 


benefits for Federal workers who 
are.injured on the job. The Admin-|.. ™ terms of real income, he said, po 44) traffic deaths last year... 67-———— 


. before taxes, is) 
istration-supported bill is slated to that amount, even A Red Cross bus carrying am-| 
come up for two hours of general less than half of what it was 35 \ 


“In spite of the fact that the their belongings were moved out hational housing bill, a measure 
conference improved its by-laws, on the sidewalk by United States which would, through special 


Dr. Conrad said, “the Washington : pec! 
branch feels it cannot do other- deputy marshals in a mass eviction amendments, hook up the District 


wise than withdraw, since nolof an apartment building at 621 With the national slum clearance 
screening process was instituted.”| Rhode Island ave. nw., yesterday. 89d public housing programs. 
Mrs. Barbara D. Evans, New! Most of the families, expressing | District Tie-In Attacked 

iene head of the by-laws revision complete surprise at the idea that! Representative John Phillips (R., 
|committee, said after the member- they had to move, started dazedly| Calif), who denounced the pro- 
'sHip voted 2168 to 68 to allow Ne- to separate their property, piling posal to tie the District into the 
‘gro women into the body: it into small heaps. A few,of them | pational: housing program as a 
|. “It is with great satisfaction made arrangements to move into! move to by-pass the . Appropria- 
\that we have crossed a new fron-' quarters of relatives. Most of them |tions Committee, said later a mo- 
jtier which will enable us t0\said flatly they had no place to|tion would be made in the House 
broaden our work for greater edu-|go and had no idea of what they/to strike the ‘District language 


Man, Named 
- . 
C « H | cational opportunities.” would do. from the national housing bill. 
| ivitan ecac Dean Althea K. Hottel of the} Officials of Leo's Enterprise; District Commissioners were sur- 


Civitan International, holding| University of Pennsylvania, re- Corp. Inc., owner of the two-story| prised by the Hill action and said 
its annual convention at the Shore-|elected president of the AAUW, building, which contains 39 apart-!they would have to consider what 
ham Hotel, yesterday named R./Was enthusiastic about the mem- ment units, contradicted the state-!steps to take next on slum clear- 
Kelvin Shivers, Washington in-|ership’s stand for admitting Ne-\ments of tenants that they werelance. Brig. Gen. Gordon R. Young, 
surance man, its president-elect; &ro women. ‘caught off guard. Engineer Commissioner, said the 
for the 1950 term. | “This will open a new era for) pamilies Told, He Says Corporation Counsel will be asked 


| tees to a baseball game struck) 
debate next week in the House.|’©2'S 48°. : ts | | , : Fores 
Approval is now indicated. So absurd is the present situa-|and instantly killed S-yearold} Bevoted { h thei Others voted in on the slate| Negro women,” she declared. “We Corporation Official Leo Wil-|to study the present “freeze” or- 
PAYDAYS: Hundreds of “re- 10", Said Mr. Truman, that many Ralph Hatton at 7:30 o'clock last ay . Gevote@ four Aours — teir'with Shivers were 1949 President | Will welcome them with Open liiams said the families were no-|der on issuance of building per- 
lease funds” wires went out yes-| Federal executives now have ar ht in the 400 block of Oakdale | on8est meeting on record this|)Eugene J. “Bryan, Chattanooga,|4rm™s. Kika ‘tified that the Landlord and Ten-|mits for work in the area to see 
terday after the President sig eq |sistants who receive higher sala-|"'& | year—in a vain attempt to take|Tenn., named president-elect at; The District of Columbia branch ant Court had ordered Solomon| whether it may now be lifted 
the second defici bill into la iries than they do. st. nw. final action on roposed small loan last year’s convention in Toronto) had opposed the admission of Ne-| \ecDowell who leased the roperty In sending the bill to the floor 
soy! | The President said he signed} ‘The boy was the son of William | P land installed in office last night;/8toes throughout the session, Two) | : 7 se tr ’ 
rented out the units, to restore the|/the Appropriations Committee 


| regulations. ‘years ago, the branch refused ad- 
who had missed paydays were the een ny. ig © ‘yrvomed 3 Hatton of 2038 4th st. nw. He} ‘They heard spokesmen for the first vice president, Marcus Rob-|- i wie Bg oon Mary. Fe oer Ne. . 
either paid late yesterday or they (members willingly but feit “con- . urged as an alternative that the 


ap OOH 


The Washington Post 
youngsters, accompanied by their parents, 
spent the day on a picnic there with Camp 

Fire Girls yesterday 


hivers: D. CG, 


HAND-OUT—Children of the Civitans, in con- 
vention at the Shoreham Hotel, feed the ducks 
on a visit to the Washington Zoo. Some 30 


eee | Takes No Acti 
Bus Carrying. 2 ee vane 


Amputees Kills| B.C. Board 


{ 


° 8 a 
By Sam Zagoria 
Post Reporter 
District Commissioners yester-| 


was pronounced dead at the scene | Washington Association of Finance! 


bins, New Haven, Conn.; second) ate 
will be paid tod A new wav ¢ Strained” to point out again the igro graduate of Oberlin (Ohio))|building.to the owners because of 
ciieas eagiiee cing be Aer next (need for raising the salaries of 
' ‘ 


Federal executives. 

+ so — eee hile: tal Mr. Truman declared he did not 
. rd regs approp oa believe the increases high enough, 
i, oneal tiall 

PAY HEARINGS: They will|petter the “present demoralizing 
start Tuesday before a subcommit- ” 
tee of the House Civil Service stuation. | 
i t 
C ittee. The group will study He pointed out that the cost of 


this legislation would be approx- 
all pay bills affecting all classes of imately $1,300,000 annually 
Government people. i 


as 
compared with $1,314,000 for the 
Meanwhile, the opposition of sev- 


clerk hire bill he signed yester- 
eral employe unions to the Senate |day. 
reclassification bill came with- 


y The legislation would raise the 
ins whisker of willing it. The|Salary scales for the heads and 
ng Subcommittee may meet 


assistant heads of executive de- 
again today on it. 


ees oa ae — of 
3 mmi xpected the executive branc ng com- 
ore aoe arene to pe a a the Pres- 
unsatisfactory efficiency ratings to “Important as it is for members 
a board within their agencies. The’ .+ sos Tiebewenn to have adequate’ 
present Civil Service appeals sys-|-jerica) assistance, it is at least of 
stem would be wiped out. Senators equal importance to have men of 
believe the system is time-consum- ability in the key executive posi- 
ing and complex. tions in the Government,” he said. 

LAY-OFF RULES: Changes in| “The best of laws can be ruined 
them will be announced soon by|by poor administration. The suc- 
the Civil Service Commission.\cess or failure of all the things 
They were discussed yesterday by|the United States Government un- 
John Overholt, of the.commission’s|4¢Ttakes to do age “aed — 
staff, with the Federal Personnel) ™C@S5UrTe Upon the wisco™ 

, : ability of these executives. 

Council. Briefly, it’s proposed: Striking an economy note, the 
A cece ye md ogee President reminded Congress that 
for reinstatement up to a year after the Commission on Reorganization 
their discharge. During that peried 
the commission would prevent any 


of the Executive Branch has urged 
agency from hiring a new employe 


morgue. 


,Oakmont ave., Bethesda, Md. 


bumper of the bus. 


dium. 


Electrician's Mate James 


st. and Massachusetts ave. nw. 


home at Winnsboro, S. C. 


631 East Capitol st. 


St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore 
with a fractured hip, 


bruises. 


‘on the Washington-Baltimore blvd 
His condition was reported serious 


by:an Emergency Hospital physi- 
cian. His body was taken to the 


Police said the bus is owned by 
the Montgomery County Chapter|firms into nearby Maryland and 
of the Red Cross and was driven) Virginia and lose revenue for the! 


The bus was carrying amputees 
fram Bethesda Naval Hospital to 
the baseball game at Griffith Sta- 


F. 
Lagen, 29, of the USS Des Moines, 
in Boston, was struck by a street- 
car, police said, at North Capitol’ 


At Casualty Hospital, he Was re- 
ported in critical condition from 
a fractured skull, cuts and bruises. 
He was on his way to visit his 


Driver of the streetcar, police 
said, was Howard Williford, 24, of 


Howard V. Russell, 53, of 421 
Elm ave., Takoma Park, was in 


, 


lided at the Patapsco River ered 


Companies and the Nolan Finance 
Co, reiterate that they believed 
additional legislation was the right 
way to handle regulation and that 
tight controls would drive loan 


by Eldridge K. Hayes, jr., of 5515 District government. 


| They heard Assistant Corpora- 


Hayes told police the child ran tion Counsel Chester H. Gray, 
from in front of a parked car and/ principal author of the regula- 
into the right. side of the front 


tions, and Martin F. O'Donoghue 
and Francis J. Buckley, jr., attor- 
neys representing the District Bar 
Association, reiterate charges that 
practices of loan firms are usurious 
and unfair to patrons. 

O'Donoghue cited the case of a 
park policeman who was encour- 
aged to borrow $300 because of 
the lower rates, although he orig-! 
‘inally asked for $100, and then! 
was charged $130 premiums on! 
life, accident and health insur- 
ance sold by the firm. The loan 
was already secured by a “com- 
pletely clear” auto. 

Gray told of a borrower who 
paid $14 a month in insurance 
fees on a loan secured by an auto. 


conscionable.”’ 


during repossession maneuvers. 
William R. Lichtenberg, attor- 


| 


Commissioner Guy Maso n ex-\night in the Shoreham, following) 
claimed at this one, “That's un-|business sessions which filled the 


Buckley said loan firms employ 
cuts and) thugs” on a fee basis to repossess) 
His auto and a bus col-/@rticles, such as cabs, offered as| 
security for loans. Gray charged 
borrowers have been “beaten up” 


| 


vice president, W. T. Stephenson, | College. Mrs. Terrell applied to nonpayment of rent. 
Shreveport, La.; treasurer, C. R-ithe national board for admission| Court records show that a writ 
Wolford, Birmingham, La. and was accepted. of destitution was issued June 15 
meena : | The District of Columbia branch| because McDowell owed the cor- 
‘then amended its by-laws to have! poration rent of $278.28 from May 
every applicant screened before! 4 to June 4 plus an electric bill of 
admission was granted. This drew ¢99 99 


* ss a é ‘ c.. sae *istiff fire from the national body.) Williams said he personally told 


| tee. ; re 4 |The case was taken to the courts most of the occupants of the build- 
| ing, called “The Howard,” that 


‘when the national group threat- 
they would have to move. He said 


ened to expel the Washington 

branch for failing to conform to ee 

national standards. the majority had refused for sev- 
Dr. Helen C. White, English eral months to pay rent to Mc- 

professor at the University of Wis-| Dowell, who lived Im one of the 

consin, was announced as the win- apartments. 

ner of the association's $2500 an-| A number of the tenants agreed 

nual achievement award. 'that they had not paid McDowell 
The award, first granted in 1943,'rent, but insisted it was because 

is In recognition of scholastic/he refused to give them receipts. 

achievement by women. Dr. White| several declared they had talked 

was cited for her professional and|t9 Williams as late as Wednesday 


literary accomplishments as an and had been assured they would 
author of historical novels and not have to move. 


, itical studies. 
ernor of the Chesapeake district = Lived There 17 Years 
of Civitan in 1946, and is now ts pe eee poo as Mrs. Daisy Byrd, who has three 
member of the board of the Wash-| ‘ eae ichildren and has lived there 17 


to the second conference of the 
ington Sales Executive Club. years, said she spoke to Williams 
Sie eiinben deme” tnetained United Nations Economic and So- 


at| , Sh 
eee ‘cial Council in Mexi jabout the matter Wednesday. She 
the Civitan’s annual banquet last | co City in 1947 ‘said she was preparing breakfast 


D. C. Board View 


Shivers Bryan 

Leaders of Civitans 
Shivers, owner of the Shivers 
Insurance Agency, lives at 3417 
Alabama ave., Alexandria. He 
was president of the Washington) 
Civitan Club in 1943, district gov-) 


yesterday morning when several 
‘men walked in and started to move 
her things out before she knew 
‘what was happening. By evening 
she as yet had no place for either 
her children or her furniture. 
Mrs. Connie Arnold said she was 
at work in a restaurant on 17th ‘st. 
nw., when she received a telephone 


morning and afternoon hours of 
the 750. conventioneers. 

At a luncheon meeting, Alexan- 
der M. Campbell, Assistant United 
States Attorney General in charge | 
of the Justice Department's crimi-| 
nal division, warned the group 


Auto License 
Revocations 


District Commissioners forget 
about clearing existing slum 
dwellings, and instead provide 
them with sewer, water, and street 
improvements. . 

In.a report made public. with 
the bill, the committee said it had 
been impressed with the diver- 
gence of opinion and conflicting 
information presented by those 
for and against the project. The 
Marshall Heights plan was pre- 
pared by the National Capital Park 
and Planning Commission, ap- 
proved by the District Commis- 
sioners, and certified to be car- 
ried out by the Redevelopment 
Land Agency. Chief opposition 
came from home owners in the 
area. 

Testimony Set Forth 

“Testimony was given to the 
committee,” the report said, “that 
90 per cent of the (Marshall 
Heights) property was, in the 
hands of individual homeowners 
and that these homes were largely 
paid for. Representatives of the 
Park and Planning Commission 
testified that many of the exist- 
‘ing homes are located on lots 25 
feet wide and about 100 feet deep, 
that .the assessed value was 3 
‘cents per square foot and would 
igenerally bring only two times as- 
| sessed valuation or about $150. 
| “It is obvious that this sum 
would not be sufficient for the 


more realistic salaries for Federal 
for a job a laid-off career employe 


ing greater economy and efficiency 


dispossessed home owner to make 


in governmental activities. 


call from another tenant that all of 
a down payment on a new home, 
He said, too, that the soundness 


executives as a means of achiev- 
was qualified to fill The agency, 


however, could fill the job by a 
promotion from within. 

The laid-off employe would be 
eligible for reinstatement to his or 
any other agency. He would re- 
tain his accumulated sick leave for 


' 


another session should be held by 
the Commissioners before final 
action is taken. The Commissioners 
adjourned without taking further. 
action. 


repeceaueendl’ 
CS 7 . 
, 


A joint congressional conference 
committee agreed yesterday to rec- 
ommend that both Houses approve 
the District appropriation bill with |, 
only “token” cuts below the Sen- 
ate-approved figure of 103 million 
dollars. 

Senator Lister Hill ‘D., Ala.) and 
Representative Joe B. Bates (D., 
Ky.) agreed to hold up publica 
tion of any details 

Other members of the group dis- 


| 


Removable-slat 
VENETIAN 
BLINDS 


retaining al! the ad- 

vantages of an 

ordinary blind! ... 

no premium prices. 
. 


Phone for demonstra- 
tion of the new “Key- 


: 
. 
. 


Bee the Advance Showing 
of Our 1950 Display 


Andirons 
Fire Sets 
Fire Screens 


~ 


XN 
\ 
\ 
N 


‘ 
SS ‘ 
a. 


Sa 


4 
~. 
. 
* 
. 
~ 
‘ 
* 
~~ 
\ 


~~ 


THE 


* 
| ’ America.” S l f y | 
Brooke Named tion of Finance Companies, said | hin Satie] Mikiecein wt | at $s actor her belongings had been put out on alte: tx Gas wate doveiedinant- es 
the actions charged do not reflect P >| the sidewalk. 
of this ‘gragee _ _— a ‘ . aliiieenl seiatiees of-téam tems ‘through the Federal Courts, is do-| elsewhere. It necessarily follows 
onstrated in American bus vv |) D t .| 
o UVistrict’s | 
, sh th fifth l a. et | peop 
porated \althongh, thousands el ltoied | __[wtiell the Board of Suspenatons| oe a aia het meth phere thqlwithost aay prospect of enruring 
ag io ne og Sales ‘Tax Post The seguiations have been in| 4 weg ear oo oar velo four-| ates Comtulontonae haa” Wamialh women and children could be|®* ome. 
. ' ay convention this morning Inter- nt | 
fixed accordingly. nes Payeme songgaa _ os lnationnl Civitas nwasés Sas ee ee : jthat the District Commissioners 
to laid-off careerists is left up te trict employe, yesterday was ap- y complaints oo sae - mer rest tng ¢]} Withdraw their previous approval 
the agencies. It could be paid in a TTUman, “has already recognized) | | A luncheon honoring the 1949.) Perens ae ne vote gee cee un LE f/ of the Marshall Heights project, 
© as pointed by the Commissioners as practices by loan firms. | ” din ° ° | leit 
lump sum after a 30-day notice, or the need for greater com pensa- mae ‘iP y s. A series 50 District governors of the group) ‘ict Day’ dinner of the Keystone _and instead set about furnishing 
7s for other owes * Federal edyminist ator of the sales and ggg ote glee pel hg ‘will be held at noon at the Shore.| tMn nage erin Fe gyn With oT ok en’ | See SLUMS, Page B-2, Col. 6. 
-|officers and employes, including)‘@*- >| ham. | | . | 
ernteks cive oe ae a the members “g Snape net F ararwee who has been assistant > A nae ended just as yes- |" [board's Ts SOS eee | RAG WAXY 
right to ignore its provisions under selves.” jadministrator of income and fran-|*erGay s . | C ts B k d \\ N= 
nertel ireume peatedly” favored changes in the ul ac e i» 
cases, the employe would have the/Members of Congress were in- trict 22. years. The promotion |sioners another conference should present setup. \ 
right of appeal to Civil Service. lereased from $7500 to $10,000 and/™¢ans a pay boost of from $5900 be held with all the interested The board has urged the Com-| 
| : the salaries. of Cabinet members|? Ye@F to $7102. Brooke is 53. attorneys from the loan firms, 
‘ ings be held before a driver's per- 
ms icorresponding general increase| Walter C. Thompson, 38, chief mit is suspended or revoked, Brett 
was made in the salaries of other vey = the Income ~ Fran- a m said. Presently, the Board of Sus- 
om executive officers.” chise Division, was named assist- B D D C C ad C 
ete | ug r Op Lit ° 7 et orps authority to suspend or revoke 
k imembers of Congress receive a rg ter an yo He has been with | ac a veg | he goss out. 
: | ivalent to $16,000 a year, (the c years. | ommissioner Young, following 
aaee ‘cm double ae dh did| Brooke’s successor will be Rob- oe a ee 
peed | “I’m responsible for the entire! “You can't expect a man who ‘©S¥lations which vdecome eltec- 
peeeee, Be one. pty renee Rave Fianehise Tax Division. Dunham) cadet corps in the schools here, has a job in a major field to do| ons. oo eee > pte» A 
been — ag ee judges and Su-|. 1) receive $4902. He has been a yet I can’t give any orders,” Lieut. objections of the Keystone Auto- 
preme . ces. : | 
| | ] ; id, .| 99-million-dollar total had been ap- 
Thomas W. Poland, 32, will re-|sor of military science and tactics, |S°™¢ f our instructors have been pe en — ee a yo eel croved. with all but the minotl ? 
tioned the salary increases given ahem ‘ d doing a very good job,” he ex- pensions and revoca- | 2 ; 
himself, the Vice President and place Du as supervising ex-|declared yesterday. | tions board to use its “discretion” | “token” cuts. | 
the oe nan of the House oe aminer at $4149 a year. He has} Colonel Barkman told _mem- plained. ' 
lat examiner in the income|a luncheon meeting of the many) said, the board must suspend a about the Commissioners’ eee 
He said he was “grateful” to the /#tely as an divisi . aaa 8 nied|i2 enrollment is the fact, that,/driver's permit, for instance, if a on the funds for an addition to the| 
‘Congress for the increase given 2714 apes we — on. osnegenecae rec pay Hops aye. sine since 1942, students no longer have|person is arrested for driving at 40 Bell Vocational Schoo! plant. 
‘him as President, but added: Others am 
| He said the enrollment has ing but must take five periods of\tionably will take care of their ob- dition, and school officials prompt+, 
ak of 2100 i ’ | " it be ved. The) 
‘branch ... would actually do more Tax Division at $4149. He original- dropped from a peak o MN physical education weekly, he said. jections, Commissioner Young ly urged that avere oo -: 
‘ito improve the President's per- ly entered District service in 1929,| 1942 to 690 as of June 1, 1949. | He called on club members tosaid. “We are satisfied with the Senate voted $225,000 for ad- 
a “For one of the greatest burdens, moted from examiner to chief ex-| instructors, Colonel Barkman said. many newspapers have uninten-\the Commissioners’ Traffic Ad- two buildings now weer by ~— 4 SHADE SHOP 
wees of the Presidency is in finding and|aminer in the Income Tax Division Instead, faculty members serve tionally harmed the corps by quot- visory Board, presided at the meet-| Members indica two on er! 830 13th St. N.W. 
% keeping good men for big jobs,|at $4149, replacing Thompson. He) as instructors. He not only cannot ing others in saying the training)ing, which was held at the home major school projects, Spingarn \ 


710 12th St. N.W. 


Just Above G 


ney for the Washington Associa-|that “We have a fifth column in 
The District Commissioners ar Salvation Army representatives 
where it is recognized that the He asserted few complaints are "8 everything in its power t0)«.atished” with the or bastier hastened to the scene but said they| ‘hat a ger thn — pr nesanirencn 
success or failure of an enterprise 
The committee recommended 
— r , ’ taken care of. : 
The payment of terminal leave “The Conaresf” said President Allan F. Brooke, veteran. Dis- Young said last night. 
| ess,’ sa | 
: received by the District of unfair presented. 
it could be paid in regular two- 
that the advisory group has “re- 
tances. In such| In 1925, he said, the salaries of/“hise tax, has been with the Dis-| Lichtenberg told the Commis- 
missioners that “show cause” hear- 
~\from $12,000 to $15,000, but “no/Thompson Appointed District and Bar Association and 
pensions and Revocations has 
Now, Mr. Truman continued,ant administrator of the sales tax 
Is Analyzed by Col. Barkman the dinner session, said that new 
prior to 1925. In the same 25-year /¢Tt J. Dunham, 43, now supefvis- 
| closed, however, that the ete 3 
his best in a minor field, although mobile Club ad ; ‘additions to the House-approved 
President Truman also men-|‘strict.employe 19 years. Col. William E. Barkman, profes- ‘mobile Club advisory board 
in making decisions. Presently, he| A question was raised, however, | 
this year been a District employe 13 years, bers of the Cosmopolitan Club at) Another cause for the decrease 
a choice of taking physical educa-|miles an hour or more. | Senator Hill had taken the lead | 
| “The proposed increases for, William P. Bogardus was ap- enrollment here. tion training or cadet corps train-| “The new regulations unques- in raising the question of the ad-, 
‘other officers in the executive pointed chief auditor of the Sales 
| | m.” jetion would 
8 @onal situation than the increase but left for other employment. Part of the cause may be that spread the word around that the present system. dition whose complet | 
in his own | (Marlin J. Kissinger, 33, was pro-|there are no longer full military cadet corps is worth while. Too| Arthur J. Sundlun, chairman of permit abandoning the older of the 
| RE. 6262 
and under present conditions that|has been with the District 11/give them orders, but he cannot/is archaic and no longer worth'of Mark Lansburgh, 3111 Idaho and Hine, had received .the backing} ~~ RN 
rate them either, he said. while, he said. ‘ave. nw. te the conference gfoup, - | 


is a most difficult task.” years. 


q 
% 


“ 


‘\ 


~ 


SB THE 


WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


‘ 


oe oe News in Brief 


Fuel Consumption 
Of Precincts Hit 


Police in some precincts made it entirely too hot for 
prisoners—and themselves—according to a report and order 
by Inspector Milton D. Smith, yesterday. It was literally hot, 
though. The officers made too much with the furnaces. | } 


> 


| Permit Denied 


American U., 


Apartment 
Plan Fails 
cam 


“A request by American Uni- 
versity for permission to erect a 
five-story apartment structure for 
use by students and faculty at 
Massachusetts ave., 
Wesley cle. nw., was denied yes- 
‘terday by the District Board of 
Zoning Adjustment. 

University officials asked the 
board to permit a variance from’ 
the use provisions of the “A” 
Restricted Area District in.which 
the site is located so the building 
could be erected. 

The American University Park 
Citizens Association strongly op- 
posed the proposal on the ground 
that the university pwned * ‘ample 
land on the south side of Massa- 
chusetts ave. which could be used 
for this purpose” and that it would 
create “an undue and undesirable 
traffic hazard.” 

_ The board will meet again to de- 
cide on other proposals presented| 
at Wednesday's all-day hearing, in-| 
cluding one by Providence Hos- 
pital and another by the Protest- 
ants and Other Americans United 
for Separation of Church and 
State. 

’ Yesterday it approved a request 
hy Mr. and Mrs. William Dawson 
toa permit conversion of a dwelling 
at 3317 Newark st. nw. into a two- 
family house. Dawson was the first 
United States Ambassador to the 
Pan American Union and earlier 
was Ambassador to Panama and 
Uruguay. 

The board refused an appeal by 


James S. Thomas to establish a VFW Backs 


temporary auto parking lot at the 
rear of 1922 3d st. nw., approved 


an appeal to establish one at the St. sw., 


rear of 2480 16th st. 
another at 1821-23 6th st. nw. 

The board approved a request by 
the Gelman Construction Co. to 
erect an apartment building at 
1930 Columbia rd. nw. 


; 


Tag Law Amended | 


eligible to purchase dealer li- 
cense tags henceforth, the Dis- 
trict Commissioners decided 
y rday. 

he city heads amended mo- 
tor vehicle regulations as a re- 
sult of a May 31 ruling by the | 
corporation counsel’s office that 
stich tags should be issued only 
to persons who could qualify for 
auto dealer licenses. 


Ward cle. to 


paid Bobby's 
expenses and sent Bob Darley of Washington lawyer, now serving lithium 


member 
‘Finance companies will not be M et ro politan 


Police Boys’ 


last year. 


Fuel requirements of all pre- 
cinct station houses have been fig-| 


ured out according to space and 


outside temperatures. Five pre- 


_cincts last winter used under their 
jcalculated requirements, burning 


from 68 per cent to 91 per cent. 


But 10 precincts went over, using 
from 113 to 290 per cent of re- 


; 5 
rs 
; 3s 


$3 o 


= 


é 


quirements. 


“Particular attention is direct-| & 
| ed,” Inspector Smith wrote, ; 
those precincts which show a per-| 
centage over 100. This is a very' 


“to | 


serious matter and it is a condition) 


that must be corrected. 


In this: 


category are Precincts 2, 6, 8, 10,| 
11, 12, 13, 14, and harbor precincts! F3. 


and House of Detention. 


“If several precincts can keep! | ee 
their consumption below 100 per et 


' 


‘cent, others can certainly bring ee ge 


theirs down,” Inspector 
said. “Commanding officers must 
give this matter their personal at-' 
tention. Fuel consumption must 
be reduced wherever possible.” 


Inspector Smith's order makes _ 


no mention of over-alls and sta- 
tionary engineer licenses for pre- 
cinct captains or commanding offi- 
cers. Presumably, they ll have to 
get their own. 


Safe and Sane Fourth 


District Commissioners yes- 
terday urged residents to join 
in the National Safety Council’s 
drive to make the Fourth of 
July “an accident-free holiday 
celebration for all of us.” 

The city fathers said: “Remem- 
ber that the Fourth of July 
commemorates the happiest day 
in our Nation's history. Let us 
honor the memory of those who 
died to bring about and main- 
tain America’s freedom by cele. 
brating the holiday safely.” 


Marble Champ 
Bobby Singleton, 12, of 492 L 
has been chosen by the 


a ‘ 
of 


Bobby, 
4 
Club No. 4, won 

the District 

championship 

The 

‘District V ¥ 'W 

Bobby 


-VFW to accompany him on the! 
plane trip. 


, Fourteenth Precinct for more 
. e aA year. 


Smith) § 


TURNED OUT—Residents stand among be 
longings after being evicted yesterday from 
their | residence, a two-story - building at 621 


Rhode Island 


——— ee - 


apartments. 


Mass Eviction on Rhode Island Avenue 


> ie 

The Washington Post 
ave. nw., containing about 39 
(Story on Page B-1) 


Pieket Line 
Protests ‘Bias’ 


= \At Engraving 


“The Citizens Committee to End 
Discrimination at the Bureau of 
Engraving.” several hundred 
strong, picketed the plant at 14th 
and C 
noon. 

Mrs. Therese L. Robinson, grand 
directress of civil liberties of the 
Elks and chairman of the commit- 
tee, said the picketing, from about 
3:30 to 4:30 p. m., was an expres- 
sion of protest, “not a strike.” 

A spokesman in the office of 
Secretary of the Treasury Snyder 
in reply repeated the Secretary's 
statement Wednesday that. there 
was “absolutely no foundation’ to 
charges of discrimination. 

Committee charges and com- 
ment by Alvin W. Hall, director 
of the bureau, follow: 


sts. sw. yesterday afte! 


ical or supervisory jobs. 
Hall: Of the number of posi- 
tions to which employes can be 


civil service examination, a large 
proportion are held by Negro em- 
ployes. 

2. There is not a single Negro 
printer, engraver or machinist at 
the bureau. 

Hall: All tradesmen are recruit- 
ed from the Civil Service. 
ter, and so far no Negro has been 
certified to the bureau. Until they 
are certified they cant be ap- 
pointed. 

3. Plans are now under wavy to 
dismiss many hundred Negro 


2d Police Car Salt Substitute Store Worker 
To Be Manned Named in Suits Held in Refund 


By Negroes 
Assignment of Negro police offi-| 
cers to a scout car covering a spe- 
cial two-precinct area was an- 
nounced yesterday by Maj. Robert 


Barrett, superintendent of police. 


The car, to be known as No. 
133, will patrol an area bounded 
by O, 15th, V sts. nw. and N. Cap- 
itol st., which Major Barrett said 
is a predominantly Negro residen- 
tial area. This bridges parts of 
Precincts 2 and 13. 

The system has been tried out 
in busy periods in recent weeks, 


Major Barrett said, and has 
worked out so well it will be made 
permanent. No scout car will be 


nw. and Veterans Of Foreign Wars to rep-Teplaced. Negro officers have been 
resent Washington at the National assigned 

Marble Cham- sti 

pionships at © 

Pittsburgh to- ¥ 

day. : 


to a scout car in the 
than 


Disbarment Action 


: > 7 Started in Jewel Case 


Disbarment proceedings were 
initiated in District Court yester- 
day against the Army colonel who 
was convicted in 1947 as one of 
a group responsible for the theft 
of the $1,500,000 Hess German 


‘crown jewels. 


He is Jack W. Durant, former 


14 years in the Atlanta Federal shelves and public sale in Feb- © 
Penitentiary. 


« Stores, 


For $100,000 


Sale of a substitute for table 
salt, later banned by the United 
States Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration, brought about two law- 
suits in District Court here yes- 
terday asking a total of $100,000 
in damages. 

Plaintiffs in the action were 
Herman Bronson, and his wife 
Mrs. Ethel Bronson, of 312 18th 
pl, ne. They sued Peoples Drug 
Inc., 
ages for her and $25,000 for him. 

The substance involved was 
marketed as ‘“Westsal,”’ produced 
by the .- Westwood Pharmacal! 
Corp. of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mrs. Bronson’s suit charged 
that last September she _ con- 
sulted a physician and underwent 
treatment for hypertension. He 
prescribed “Westsal,” the suit said, 
and she bought it at a Peoples’ 
store then and several times later. 
She became seriously ill from it, 
the complaint said. A table of 
symptoms was listed. 

Her husband asks $25,000 for 
loss of her services and for med- 
ical expenses. 

The Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration ordered, “Westsal” and 
other salt substitutes containing 
chloride off drugstore 


ruary, 1948. 


In Memoriam | 


; : NA. On Sunday. June 26, the 
ehunvetlin “ { the stone for LENA BRE- | 
ine take place at } m. at the 
ale Re 


| CONNERS, CHARLES. 


— 


Bied 


June 22, 1949. at his home. Traviliah, | 
Ma. CHARLES CONNERS, beloved hus-| 


On Wednesday, LINEBURG, 


Bied 


LISUT. Rg my 23 
denly, on Wednesday. 
34, "eee 


his ee 
HORA LINEBURG. Eoaacalt brother 


_|REIGER. FRANCES T. 


Bird 


Suddenly, 
049. at her resi- 

CES T. REIGER of 4819 
- Sooeensia Heights, Md.; 


asking $75,000 dam- 


Slip Forgeries 


A former employe of Sears, 
Roebuck & Co., yesterday was 


ordered held for grand jury action 


on a charge of forging company 
refunds for merchandise “he never 
purchased. 

He is Byron G. McCray, 
Baltimore, Md, 


24, of 
Municipal Court 


' Judge Ellen K.' Raedy set bond at 


$2000. z 

Police said McCray formerly 
worked in a Sears store in Clarks- 
burg; W. Va. They said he took 


itn thousands of dollars in refunds 


through the forged slips from 
Sears stores in Richmond, Balti- 
more, 
other places. 

Knowing where most stores 
kept their books of refund slips, 


he would head for that: spot in 
each store and take partially used 
books in order to copy the initials 
of the.supervisor from the car- 
bons of other slips issued, police 
said. 

He got a total of $193 in re- 
funds from the two stores in Wash- 
‘ington before he was spotted by 
a young clerk in the store at 4500 
Wisconsin ave. nw. and arrested 
Wednesday afternoon, they said. 

Police said McCray had just 


a drier when the clerk, June Her- 
tie recognized him as the man) 


store employes had been alerted 
‘to look out for. 


oniother employe and followed Mc-! Holds 


She signaled an- 


Cray out of the store, where he 


Arlington, Philadelphia and) 


women employed as printers’ as- 
isistants, many of them with six or 
seven years’ experience, and re- 
place them with others. 

Hall: That is correct, 
a White House executive order 
‘war service appointees are re- 
quired to take an examination to 
protect their positions. This was 
explained to the United Public 
Workers in January in a letter 
from the President of the Civil 
Service Commission. 

4. The bureau announced an 
examination for veterans to be- 
come apprentice printers: after 
about 30 Negroes qualified for the 
examination it was called off. 

Hall: The examination was 
called off because the bureau was 
able to secure improved labor- 
Saving printing presses, and 
wished to avoid an over-manned 
situation. It affected white work- 
ers as well as colored. 

5. Locker room and 
facilities are segregated. 

Hall: There are separate but 
identical facilities. Negroes are 
allowed to use toilet facilities 
throughout the bureau. however. 
and do use those in white locker 
rooms, 


SLUMS—From Page RB-1 


but under 


lavatory 


1. The bureau fails to promote 
Negroes to skilled, technical, cler- 


promoted without taking another. 


Slum Monev 
Turned Down 


the community with essential serv- 
ices. 

The Engineer Commissioner of 
the District testified that where a 
new subdivision is being developed 


quired to provide such facilities. 
The same recognition should be 
given to the Marshall Heights 
area. 

Improvement Not Practical 
The report did not refer to other 


.. Of Sol Levinson & Bros., 


Regis- , 


Mrs. Dulcan 
Rites Today 


In Baltimore 


Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah 
Esther Dulcan, mother of Charles 
B. Dulcan, and Samuel Dul- 
can of Washington, will be held at 

p. m. today at the funeral home 
1124 West 


ST ., 


Nomh ave., Baltimore 

Mrs. Dulcan, wife 
Harris Bulcan of 
at the home of 
ter, Mr George Blanken, 404 
Cummings lane Chevy Chase. Vd 

She is survived by two sons and 
two daughters, all residing in 
Charles 8. Dulcan, 
Samuel Dulcan, Miss. Frances 
Dulean and Mrs. Morris Abram- 
son; 10 grandchildren and 17 great- 
grandchildren, 

Burial will 


late 
died 
granddaugh- 


of the 
Baltimore 
her 


. 


Washington, 


— « 
~ 


take place in the 
Beth Jacob Congregation Ceme- 
tery. Rosedale, Md. The grand- 
children will act as pallbearers 
The family has requested that 
flowers be omitted. 


Dr. |. W. Grady 
Dies: Retired 
Pharmacist 


Dr. John Wilton Grady. 69. re» 
ired pharmacist, died Wednesday 
at his home. 1833 Hamlin st. ne. 
after a year's illness 

A representative here of 
standard Pharmaceutical Corp 
Ra'timore for 
last December 

Born in Greenville. 8S. C._ he re- 
ceived his degree in pharmacy from 
George Washington University. 
where he taught for several years 

He was a Spanish-American War 
veteran and served as a pharma- 
cist mate in World War l. He was 
a Mason. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs 
Clara Grady and a daughter, Mary 
Lou Liggett of the Hamlin st. ad- 
dress, and two sisters, Agnes and 
Lidie Grady of Greenville. 

Funeral services will be held 
Saturdsy at 2 p. m.. at the S. H 
Hines Co. funeral home, 2901 14th 


. nw. Burial will be in Cedar 
Hill Cemetery. 


School Sales 
Funds Backed 
For New Ones 


The Board of Education yester- 
day discussed sale of old school 
buildings with Engineer Commis- 
sioner Gordon R. Yoting and won 
his approval for having the pro- 
ceeds credited to new school con- 
struction. 

Nine schools the board plans to 
abandon are; Cranch, 12th and G 
sts. se.; Tyler, lith and G sts. se.; 


Wallach, 8th and D sts. se.: Denni- 
son, 13th and S sts. nw.: Walker. 
3d and K sts. nw.: 
sts. nw.; Logan, 3d and G sts. ne:.: 
Smallwood, 3d and I sts. sw., and 
Twining, 3d and N sts. nw. 

The board requested that Tyler, 


the 
of 
19 vears, he retired 


shed a refund slip for $14 for|the District is automatically re- wallach, Dennison and Twining be 


irazed to provide play areas or 
future school sites. The others 
would be turned over to the Com- 
missioners and if not used by 
them for District purposes put 


‘special 


Jones, Ist and L 


C. A. Bennett. 


Tax Attorney, 


Dies at 64. 


Chester A. Bennett 
Bureau of Internal 
torney and son of 
sentitive J RB 
Wednesday | at 
his home, 1401 
Barton §st., 
Arlington YVil- 
lage. Death was 
due to a heart 
condition. 

Mr Bennett, 
who was techni- 
cal adviser to 
the deputy com- 
mission of In- 
ternal Revenue 
heading the in- 
come tax unit, 


64. veteran 
Revenue a'- 
late Repre- 
nnett, died 


, he 


Be 


Ss 


Bennett 

was a native of 
Greenup, Ky. He was educated 
there and at Kentucky Normal 
Schao!l He held a Bachelor of 
Laws \degree from Georgetown 
University Law Schoo! 

After serving as a clerk here in 
the War Department from 1913-te 
1918, he was commissioned a first 


‘lieutenant in the Army in August, 


1918. and rose 
Active in 


to thevrank of major. 
American. Legion ac- 
tivities here, he was first.\vice com 
mander of the District Depart 
ment in 1946-47. He had also 
been commander of the Bureav of 
Internal Revenue Post No. 39, and 
was chairman of the District De- 
partments civic relations commil- 
tee. In 1948-49. he was chairman 
of the department Americanism 
committee 

Mr. Bennett entered the Bureau 
of Internal Revenue in 1921 as a 
attorney in the solicitors 
office. He resigned two vears later 
to enter private practice, and re 
turned to the bureau in 1937. He 
specialized in technical analysis 
of tax problems 

He is survived | 
Hope C. Bennet! 
BR. Bennett, New Rochelle, N. \¥.3 
his mother. Mrs. Annie L. Ben- 
nett, Pikeville, Ky.; two brothers, 
Charles B. Bennett, Greenup, Ky, 
and Joseph Bennett, Pelham, N. Y. 

Six sisters also survive. They 
are MPs. Frances Geyer. Rich- 
mond: Mrs. Kate Hill, Russell, 
Ky.: Mrs. Emabel Stephenson and 
Mrs. Sally Jacobs, Pikeville: and 
Mrs. Julia McWhorter and Mrs. 
Mary Shaw, Ashland, Ky 

American Legion memorial serv- 
ices will be held at Hines funeral 
home. 2901 14th st. nw. at 7:30 
p. m. Sunday 

Funeral services will be held at 
2 p. m. Monday from Hines funeral 
home. with burial at Arlington 
Cemetery. 


Charles F. Bailey 


Newport News, Va., June 23 (”. 
Charles F. Bailey, 86, of Hampton, 
retired engineering director of the 
Newport News Shipbuilding and 
Dry Dock Co. and internationally 
known marine engineer, died late 
today at a hospital here. 

Mr. Bailey, a native of Greens- 
boro. Va., had been in failing 
health for some time. 

He retired from the shipyard in 
1934. He was one of the early de- 
velopers of the shipyard’s appren- 
tice school. At reitrement, MF. 
Bailey was one of the shipyard's 
most widely known leaders. 


John Milton Boyd 


Orange, Va., June 23. — John 
Milton Boyd, 65, well-known Lou- 
isa County. farmer died at his 
home Wednesday. A_ graveside 
service will be held at Zion Meth- 
odist Church, Zion, Virginia, to- 


by his wife. Vir« 
aA Son Melville 


Cemetery. atives and 
ends are invited. 


Bird 

' 

AYLOR, JOHN PARKER. On Tuesday.) foiay. June 2 
al, y, June 24. at 2p. m. Interment} 

jue 3% 21, RY at er gee ont mast, Forest Oak Cemetery, Gaithersburg. Ma.) 
Capitol — ~ husband of sare. DAVIS, pocms ay ere On Wednes-' 
idso brother day, Ju 9, at her residence,' 
132 North Waketiela at... ye ington, Va...’ 

por NEUHARD DA fre of the 

late L. Davis, mother of George Rob- 
ert Davis of Arlington, Va.; Car] Martin 
a il of <_ Green tore, N. C.: Mrs. Earie 
ison of Wheeling, W. Va.; Eliza- 

beth Ima Davis and Mrs. Anna Mae 
ickinbotham of Arlington, Va. Also 
Surviving are five grandchildren. Re- 
mains resting at the Ives Puneral Home.: 
2647 Wilson bivd., Arlington. Va.. where’ 
emery’ services will be be held on Satur-: 


une 25. at . Interment 
National Memoria! Park. Lee | 
Church, Va. 


nd of Mary West Conners and father} 
of Mrs. Martha Cochran, Mrs. Thomas’ 
rown, Charies. Bruce. Upton. Walter. | 
am. Douglas and Minnie Conners. Re-| 


up for sale. Money from sale of . | 
school buildings now goes into is survived by his 
the general fund. wife, Mrs. Sidney Vaughan Boyd 

Young said the Commission- 294 @ daughter, Miss Kathleen 
ers would not transfer Wallach Boyd. Also SUS VEvInG are two sis- 
to the Public Buildings Admin- ees, See. H\- Semeere es svevenans 

oy 7 oe and Mrs. O. D. Jones, Springfield, 
istration for an office building. 1jinois and one brother. Charles 
Superintendent Hobart M. Corn- R Boyd, of Poughkeepsie, New 
ing said Wednesday he had heard York 

the Feder . } , . 

satidiens ral os wanted the Dr. Wulf Sachs 

Johannesburg, South Africa, 
June 23 U.P) —Dr. Wulf Sachs, 56, 
Russian-born South African au- 
thority on psychoanalysis, died 
here today. 

Dr. Sachs, a pupil and friend of 
the late Sigmund Freud, had but 
one more chapter to complete on 
his lifelong work. “The Paychelidy 
of Suffering.” 


Man Gets 90 Days 
In Theft of 9 — 


ia Washingben Streetcar Passes 


gowns ning James Rector, 30, yesterday was 
ioned from ele- Sentenced to 90 days in jail after 
gant imported'& Municipal Court jury found him 
fabrics. And guilty of the theft of nine streetcar 
now the ma- passes. 
terial has gone| Rector, who lived at 617 7th st. 
astray. 'Sw., was arrested May 31 after he 
Mrs. Brune Madame Lou-'\accidentally dropped a clothing 
ise Brune, who describes herself as| store credit card with his name on 


= international dress designer, it while alighting from a streetcar 
'reported to the FBI that the fab- on Maine ave. sw. Inside the 


sister'was arrested on the sidewalk by ¢. 
of fies or Linebure of New Market, Va.; 


Manson Linebure of Vienna, Va.; Mrs 
Hamel, Mrs. Irene Supinger. Mrs 
McDonald, ali of Washington, D 

Mrs. Mary Evans of California 
father-in-law of Elsie Fincham Lineburs 
and grandfather of Kathleen Marie 

Lineburg of Silver Spring, Md Friends 

May call at Hysong's Funeral Home 

1300 WN st. r. where services will be 

held om Monday. June 27. at W a. m 

Interment Arlington Nations! Cemetery. 

LINEBURG, HORACE W. A ecial com- 
munication of ryVashingten 
Centennial Lodge No. 14, | 
FAAM. =, soe for 9 a. m.'| 
on June 27, for the pur- 
es conducting the last 
son rights of our iate 
brother. HORACE W. LINE- 
All membera are urged to at- 


YD L. GALBRAITH, Master, 
AND W. WARNER, Sr 


. Luey Powell, Mrs. Lola Lau 
Anna Dries and Mrs.\Store detective John W. Gillespie. 


a at , &. o- 
eral 
i titerment Pinelawn Ceme-| Officials Report 
‘, Refinery Refuse 
Pollutes River 
survived by, two Srandehiléren, Services The United States attorney's 
on Monday, June a7. Office yesterday began an investi- 
gation of reports that industrial 
8 refuse of the nearby Worthington 
ART DA Vie ee o ndinvad ote Refinery is polluting the 
oh Ysrele emety and, sezrnt motes | River 
services will be held at her odabienee | Prosecutors Stafford R. Grady 
ment Congressfonal Gebeleet ioaed and Ross 0’ Donoghue were among | 
a group of officials who went to the | 


omit flow 
* |SHIRK, IDA Stal es ane) 33. scene on the Virginia side of the 


stimony by General Young, in 
which he sharply discounted as im- 
/practical the idea of spending to 
improve the present layout of the 
Marshall Heights area, even though 
the thought had at first made a 
istrong appeal to him. 

The committee, however, voiced 
this conclusion: 

“The committee urges that the 
}Commissioners lift a freeze order 
in effect for several years pro- " 
hibiting repairs and improvements Fabric 
Potomac This order has stifled and retarded 
development and should be lifted 
\immediately.”’ 


Pumphrey. Rockvile, 
d., where funeral services will be held! 


REIGER. HAROLD J. 
Wednesday June 22, 19 
dence. HAROLD J REIGER 
Clark st.. Boulevard Heights. Md~ 
of Mrs. Marie Marks, son of Mrs. Bessie 
Reiger. brother of Miss Helen Reiger 
ana Mrs. Piorence Tryon e is aiso 


yy 7 
his con 


P  anae 


Porids and Miss K 
ll Cariton and Bi st. nw.. 
eee tat the Wastler 
v4 


BURG, 
tend 


8. 
. 1949, at her = 


Intended 
For Court Gowns 


Marshall Heights residents. op- Reported Stolen 


posed the project at the hearings.| It shouldn't happen to a window 
‘They included Howard D. Wood- dummy, much less «a lady who's 


k Murphy Tiver above Key Bridge. They re- 
of 8. D. ‘son and Mrs. Patsy L. Allen,| been bidden to curtsy at the Court 
Friends | Ported seeing two drainpipes lead- | ‘treasurer of the Marshall Heights of St. James. 


¢, ing into the Potomac and Tin | Self-Help Cooperative. | 


Mrs. Allen said the official plan 
“encouraging home ownership’ 
gave residents “a bitter laugh.” 
She said the project actually would, 
‘convert home owners into tenants. 
or “debt-laden home buyers.” |@ 
| Woodson charged that faulty) 
grading in the-area was the result; 
of the failure by Digtrict officials). 
to follow their own grade sheets. 
Banks said the project would be 
“the greatest land steal ever made 


3 Culpeper 
and one. 1 papers w pleane COP. | 


. M. On wetness 
BAU TUL Me 


ay pean 


a Viola | 


re] 


Pelle hwy., near 


DULCAN, SARAH ESTHE 
aune 23, 1949, ARAN’ BS 


retary. 
Tues- 
os me, 


LONG, HOWARD Ff. Suddenly 

Thureday, day. June 21, 1949. at Naval 

DUL-| HOWARD P. LONG of 270 
oy Harris| 
formerly 
Morris 
Sam- 


D. C.. 


her’ of Mrs. 
Pra ances. Charies B. m 
uel Ralcan of Washington. D. C.- Fu-! 
neral from Saul vinson & Bros.’ Pu-' 
neral Home, 1134-36 W. North ave., Bai.| 
Atmore, Md., weseey, June 24. at | :30 Dp. 
. m. Interment Be | Arlingten National Cemetery. 


acob Coneres 
4 Ratetele. Baltimore. Ma) 

Pie Comets gp altim LUCKETT, HARRY Wed mre e504 | SMITH, sine ies pts JOSE On a 
ELEY, MA RGARET CLARISSA. Buddenty, SMITH 0 f 215 ‘on st. se. - o .. nd of 
x areser June 23. 1949. " eae | ree usta Matilda ba a and Se 
ots s Todd pl. ne. = daughter er of Milfo iltord | cos at Chambers # a - a! 87 

Lelia Eley Lith st, s@., on “Savurday. 3 gene 25, 


snd and 
1 ona Martin ‘ he i PY Fn m. Inte 
are invi rment Arlington Ne-| 8. i. ‘Hines be. Puneral Fagg Ht Cemetery. Please png 


Sonal Cemetery. | lath at * | STANSBURY, 
Wedn 


JANET. On bn a ll a 
BEAN. ornravoe at the home < S. BATES. 


23, 1949, — 23, 1948. at his home, ae & 
patter. 817 Viers wil ie a Gaithersbdurs. 
eateyoe JANET B 


rv to ® IDA 
home, 1 

y. june 24, at & D. 

Warren, Ohio. 


m. Inter- 


8 , CHARLES 
ET as ie 
a ” 
oe { ‘of Chaties 


n aes. f-Ry' 3: ™. 
ay . 
eo oe at the Church of the Na. 
vity of, R | * tne Relatives =a friends | 


You can’t 
meet royalty in 
sackcloth, you 
know, so sev- 
eral Washington 


at iT ® m. Interme 
nd. 


"\the area. 

They said they must first de-| 
termine whether their office has 
jurisdiction in the case before 
bringing legal action. 


Baudoin| 


so Payless Pay Days 


Walter 


denver Slated to End 
For Rent Office 


sister 
ughter 
a. 
Executives and staff of the of-| 
fice of the District Administrator 
esday,,0f Rent Control heaved a sigh of 
relief yesterday. 
President Truman signed the 


on Saturday. June 25. at 11 a. 
torment Cedar Hill Ceneneey 


| MARTIN J ite bag t i ge 
une a v n 
pial MARY ELIZABETH of 
10 Rhode Island ave. ne. da 
the late Mr. Patr 
sister or oy 
of st. 


ARET 
» St 
ULIA 


GA 
of 
o! 


. and Anna ee 
~ Charles Stansbury aidios 
turday,. name 25 Mrs, Julia 
rest Oak Ceme- 


nterment 


Mass. 
ave. ne.. where services will be held on 
Friday, June 24, at lO a. m. Interment 
Fort Linceln Cemetery. 

STORM, . "ee L. 
une 


ome of Robert 
Ma Notice of funeral later. 


McKENDRICK 


ARDINER, CATHERINE E. On Wednes- 
Gay. June 22, 1049, at Masonic 
Eas 6000 
ave. CA 
rand. aunt of George 8. Cartner. 

the Ss. H 


: . Solem 
requiem red ad “ote 
Martin's Chureh at 10 a. m. Relat 
and friends are invited. seteeneat 
Mount Olivet Cemetery. (Martinsburg, | 
“= Bn od ea — 
Wednesday, 


OM Oho HM famend Hf 


Massy, father of Raymond 
Massy. Notice of carviess 


77 Oa 
ne eareves vty ¢ - = 
r 
Rondrick Bell and daushter of 
cKendrick. 
nd James L. ne 
rt A. Pumphrey. 
a. Md., ee _ oeviees 
ld on turday u . 
i's. d held on 8 peorere. ew York 
papers please copy.) 


" Storm, father of Mrs. 
in Cemetery 


- GRADY, JOHN WILTON. DR. On Wednes-| 
day. June 22, } at his residence, 


Hamline st. ne, D 
TON GRADY. beloved 
atrice Grady. e 
Lou 


ett. brother of Miss 
Agnes Grady of Greenville. 8. o. 
ices Co. 


Y, 
June 2 io 
1-3. Los “1 
Mabel 
and lcs 
ater. 


MEISSNER, ALVIN R. On Thursday 
23. 1949. at pe residence. 


nes 

. nw. on Saturda 
ureday. ons m. Interment Cedar 
Hosp 
the residence of | 


1. and 
t. Fort | 


YON, . 


of 
sramitether 
Blaine L. emaing resting at, 
the 8S. H. Hines Co. Panerel Home, 2001) 
14th st. nw., from 4 BD. m. Priday until). 
ll «..m. Sa ay. June lease 
it flowers. (Detroit. Mich.. papers 
please copy.) 


¢| MICALIZZI, MARY. On Wednesday. 
22. reueence. 1316 


» MRS. 
day. june 22. 
Hospita), MRS. 
oved wife of the 
gar Jadwin « 2540 M 


EDG AR L 


"On Wednes- 
1949... at 
EDGA AR 


Wastier Funeral Hom i Bast Capitol 

st.. until 1 p. m. Fri . Funeral services 

will be held at Fort Myer Chapel Friday, 

June 24, at2p.m Interment Arlington 
National Cemetery 


LARKIN, le 7% susaN, On Wedn 
June 22. sUs 


a S| 
301 Bast Canis 
. June 27. 

neid at Sarat 


Kau fmaen. 
neral —_— 
a. m. Mo 


ctuary Coder 
Hill Cemetery. Relatives end friends TRA 
are invited. 


Ceme tery. 


JOSErE TLLER, CHARLES §£. Sudd 
AN, of Memphis, 
ey June 22 9. at rrkin of Oklahoma ci y. sey a7 » June S “Mt at he Her. 
ospital. mbers _— ae 
une 24. 


se.. on pans 
Interment Memphis, Tenn 


P., SECO 


ces at 
lth st. 
: BD. Mm. 


at the +, 


” Mrs. Phillips 
‘from their second floor bed- same meeting were Roger Robb infant Hurley, 45 min 


WHITE, SR., husband of 
a 9 a. Mm, . White, father r of Fr Prank ir. , 
. Interment) 4: the Bernard Dansansky ve = 
neral Home, 3501 14th at. 


& Son 
nY¥.. yn 
one at aK = Interment Benai 
e] Cemete 


t Grace 
E. 


eae husbaine 
Leena aa SH tes 
Beh marc 


Home, ath 8 
is 


LEWIS, szconn, LIEUT. JULIC 


t 
rien Our Lady of Cc 
avenue ne. v th 


Be oom, ¥ ere reauiem Mass will *& 
offered a. m. Interment Mount 
Olivet ae, 


FUNERAL DESIGNS 
>. 


1212: FP ST. NW. 


| GEO. C. 


Bxpreesive 
tm H. ond Mae bee RE Lz. 3.2200 
' 


at the Bernard Danzansky & 
Sen Funeral Home 3501 we st. nw., 
on Sunday. June 26 la. 


ae aires In- 


r Cc, 
Jehan Fenton 


ogy Someet Sr. 
Rane. 


Arnold Wester 


, | Eikins. 
| pean Weetastes 


under Federal sanction.” | 
Thief Gets Bride’s 
Rings, Escapes roe ae at ae e000 pad) credit card folder were eight 
second deficiency appropriation ee me passes fastened together in beok 
sree, Mi Rbogen. brother of Mrs. Bmiliel Oy” That will end for the rentid7t Bedroom Lea Ee stay sectere Sy~calny, y gant pe 
at B be 1 Sag: hoy - K controllers a payless period that| i on ruskng Gra. The streetcar operator turned 
will be held on Saturday. June 25. at\began early in May. A bride of|a few months lost Why it was fabulous materia): the folder and passes over to his 
id ; Enterment Cedar Hill Ceme-| The last regular pay checks in her engagement and wedding rings a er dificult to replace,” supervisor, who in turn called po- 
= po oo. ES » PbS rift: sate A ony 0 eonio’ 26. The} yosterday oO 0. SiGe CRS Foal Brune, who lives in the wee _When arrested, Rector had 
ve :3X8|week’s salary instead of two. Ever | prowler who took direct flight from Dupont Plaza Apartments, said the a a pass with him, 
ot exempiity the funeral aia, | Since—financial drought. apse — yas ee ee: — m¢ & W Watinn said the numbers of all 
et our late brother, GEORGE| The payroll for the office totals, the young cou- designing for her clientele, which, tched those of nine passes 
By order of FRANCIS B. ‘about $8000 a month. ple arrived at\she said, consists of the top 20 "ine mate or ote ae 
y ore r Deis | AS the dome one President | their apart-/ women in Washington taken from a bus sometime easly 
Attest: L. M. YOUNG, Secretary. T : ‘May 28. Rector insisted he found 
June THO DONALD Rk. On| truman asked Congress to appro-| ment. ea . Ma = 
| Wednesday, June 22. 1948. at Suburban | priate $50,000 for the work of the| Paul Phillips Criminal Justice the eight passes on Maine ave. 
SON. husband of Therese P. Thompson |Commission on Renovation of the and his wife. and bought the ninth from an = 
services “will be held ‘si| Executive Mansion. The commis-| Wikes  feuné i Group Elects identified man. Judge Thomas D. 
. ave. nwW.. meal was set up by Congress to | the door of H M. Quinn imposed the sentence. j 
on |SUPErvise White House remodeling | 4 their cone 
rest for which 5.4 million is slated to |. at 1320 Harvar ector Aring Deaths Repor ted : 
th | epent. AN st. nw. locked! Hector M. Aring, Johns-Man- The following deaths were re 
from the inside. ville executive, was elected presi- 
ported yesterday by the Burean 
In Memoriam As they went dent of the board of directors of of Vi 
ital Statistics of the District 
in through an- the Washington Criminal Justice Health Department. ‘Figure in 
other door, a Association yesterday. ‘ptrentinses date of death.) 
~ booklet ae 101 om man jumped) Other officers elected Thelma J. Sephr. 32. 488 Sth sow. (21), 
emoriam™ tributes suitab D, 
f public tion te vail ‘room window. Howard Baker, and Edward Kemp, vice presi- arthur T Pvccies 66. 1320 Pairmant et, 
or 2 now 4a - janitor in the apartment, gave dents: Wilmer Waller, treastrer, PAY Jagoe. 75. 3000 Conn. ave. hw, 
able without charge, Remem- chase but was outdistanced. He and Edward J. Flynn, secretary. oo a R. Donaldson, 63. 1108 Trenton pl. 
for all bers of (told police the man was a dark-| During the last war, Aring, a se (2! 
brances for mem Chasse 2 Miller 89. 44135 140) #@. aw 
ds skinned Negro whose arm may lieutenant colonel, performed spe- j 
the family and for frien have been broken in the jump. cial services between the Johns- ®ve ya, Wagner ry $00, Orecubeion Gre 
are included. The booklet fee. : ‘Manville Corp. and the Ordnance sul A. Pisher. 66. 420 Bmerson st. ow, 
may be obtained at the front Pennsy Diesel Derails Division of the Army. Sandra Wright, 3. Box 7 
; 4 os Danville. Ohio, June 23 U)—A_ Aring is also active in affairs, Head. Me. 
counter in the Post building, ‘Pennsylvania Railroad  diesel|of the Metropolitan Police Boys 
by telephoning your request, freight train derailed at a crossing|Clubs, Gyro International Club, Finiam J. Smith 
bw writing to the Wash- (here today, smashed a telegrapher’s|Arthritis Foundation and Touch- dumm tort. 
me Ras 5 , shack and scattered 17 cars along|down Club. He organized the first! Mey" A Wilson. 
ington Post Classified Ad- ‘the right-of-way. Bonnie Jean Lions Club in Baltimore and as- catherine B Gardiner. 87. 6008 WF. =. 
vertising Departgnent, Wash- italiano, 10, _Frederickstown, sisted in forming the Associated), sve.2™, (22), oom. pscotest. i 
_ 4,D.¢. daughter of the telegraph operator, Civie Clubs. He is also a prominent | aay > . me eM * 
7 : suffered minor lacerations. Mason. on he 


4a 4 48 49058 
Sq 4 44 49442_ 


Ee 


ak Fe. 


Che Washington Post Sports 
T his 


« 
Morning 
CHICAGO, June 23.—At 10:35 p. m., last night, Ezzard 


With Shirley Povich 
Charles became the new heavyweight champion of the 
world and, at the same moment, found himself reduced to 
a back number in the ring at Comiskey Park. No more- 
bewildered guy ever came into any kind of a crown. 
Charles found attention suddenly 
* switched to his manager, Jake Mintz. Off 
in a neutral corner of the ring, Mintz had 
- captured the new champ's audience by 
- swooning dead away. Well, not quite dead. 
But there he was, stretched out on the 
ring floor, and inert. 
That brought on more commotion than 
; there was at any time fluring the 15 rounds 
- Charles was in there with Pappy Walcott. 
. When Mintz hit the deck at the announce- 
; ment his fighter had won the decision, 
Charles’ handlers deserted the new champ | 
to rush to their stricken managers. Com- 
& mission officials and doctors clambered | 
over the ropes to reach the scene of the 
swoon, 
The ringside press gasped. Mon Dieu, what had Mintz done now? 
For a week he had railed against vague plots to do his man dirt 


and had promised “When this fight’s over, I'll give you a story 
that will blow the roof off.” 


bh ee 


POVICH 


MAYBE this was it. At least Jake's act provoked a double-take. 
Was this the story he had promised? The Tragedy of Jake Mintz. 
It was beginning to look pretty grim. Stretcher-bearers were 
climbing the steps to the ring now, and Jake wasn't responding to 
the ammonia and the smelling salts. But Ha! Now there was 
movement. 

With the best right. hand swipe of the night, Jake flung the 
ammonia pad from his face and leaped to his feet, scattering 
doctors and seconds. He waved the stretcher-bearers away, and 
rushed over to Charles’ sector of the ring just in time to get into 
the pictures. A half-minute more and the camera men might have 
been gone. 

It was doubtless pure joy that had overcome Mintz. Finally, he 
had brought his man to the title, and vice versa. But there were 
cynical characters who wondered what form of expression Jake 
would take if he heard a decision in favor of his man. “In the next 
fight,” they suggested, “they ought to lay odds on Charles winning 
and give us a price, too, on whether Mintz will swoon. Then a guy 
might be able to win a quiniela.” 


WITH THE ascension of the 181-pound Charles to the heavy- 
weight throne as recognized by all parts of-the known world except 
New York and the British Empire, a new flurry of activity in the 
division is anticipated. For the past 12 years, as long as the om- 

. niscient figure of Joe Louis was present, heavyweights had a habit 
of taking to the woods. | 

Charles inspires no such terror and a new wave of heavyweights 
ought to be coming out of hiding. He beat a tired old man in 
Pappy Walcott, and not by as wide a margin as some reports had it. 
If as New York and England claims, Charles’ victory was not sym- 
bolic of the world title, at least it was necessary to any solution of 
who is the rightful champion. 

Charles has a clearer claim to the title, at least, than do Lee 
Savold and Bruce Woodcock who are fighting in England in Sep- 
tember. Eventually, he will be matched with the winner of that 
bout, probably next June, 7 the title will no longer be clouded, 
except for the possibility of a come-back by Joe Louis. 


LUCKY it was that the Chicago commission adopted a point- 
scoring system to determine last night’s winner. If it had been 
on a round basis, there could have been no satisfactory decision be- 
cause some of the rounds were so dull they could not be awarded to 
either man and neither did they deserve being recorded as draws. 

Charles may not be a towering figure in the division that so 
lately was dominated by such as Louis, but he may nevertheless be 
a hard guy to lick. He can sting with his punches if not chill with 
them, and he hurt Walcott more than did Joe Louis in the first 25 
rounds of the two Louis-Walcott affairs. 

The 35-year-old Walcott today might have been the reigning 
figure among the heavyweights had he not run out of gas in the 
final rounds. As late.as the end of the thirteenth, Referee Dave 
Miller had Walcott only two points to the rear of Charles, and the 
judges’ tallies’ also gave him a chance to pull the fight out in the 
fourteenth and fifteenth. But those old legs said him nay. 


; Mr. 


- Savold or Woodcock * 


Gets Shot at “Champ” 


By Red Smith 

CHICAGO, June 23 (NYHT). 
The light heavyweight who is 
heavyweight champion of Saturn, 
Mars and Jupiter and Abe 
Greene, but 
not New 
York, came 
tardily to a 
_ reception in 
his honor in 
a private din- 
ing room in 
the Palmer 
House. Ez- 
zard Charles, 
for,it was he, : 

wore a tiny " 
patch of ad- Red Smith 


— ae ee ee 


Mintz, had just addressed the 
gathering as follows: 

“Gentlemen, I'm gonna make 
a statement and its gonna be 
positively official and backed up 
100 per cent by my three co- 
partners—Charley Dyer, 
Elkus and George Rhein—and 
there is not gonna‘ be no other 
statement. 


Lesneviches, we are not gonna 
fight no Maxims at the present 
timé. We are gonna accept a 
challenge from the Savold- 
Woodcock winner. We have the 
champion but we will be happy 
to accept the challenges with 
approval of the Joe Louis outfit 
and Harry Markson of New York 
who we are going along 100 per 
hesive at the corner of his left | cent. We are also going along 
eye, a large lump under the eye, -with Abe Greene, who helped 
a seersucker jacket, tan slacks, make this bout and he should be 
a sports shirt and a self-con- commented for being success- 
scious grin. . ful. 

He was there to receive a “Charles is gonna have a little 
“championship belt,” a massive Pleasure of himself personal to 
hardware girdle which several which he is entitled to.” 

; Mr. Mintz was asked whether 
strong.men had lugged in swad- | it was his custom to swoon as 
‘died in a Palmer House bath | he did last night in Comiskey 
‘towel and encased in a wooden | Field when his fighter was de- 
box the size of a coffin. The 
slightly articulate operator of | 
the new champion, Mr. Jake | 


Walcott, and Jake's cup of joy 
ranneth over. 
“I never swoomed in my life,” 


| Erautt 


/ Russell. lf 


‘Spahn.p... 


13), 


| (3). 
| Smalley. Crandall. 


| Adkins, 2 in 2: 
| Winner—Spahn 


‘Notgonna Fight No Lesneviches’ 


Mintz Speaks for Charles 


“WE ARE not gonna fight no | 


clared winner over Jersey Joe | 


Major League Standings 
AMERICAN LEAGUE . NATIONAL LEAGUE 


L. Pet. Pct. 
.639 os 607 


2) brink of obsolescence 


Yesterday's Results 


Cleveland, 4; WASHINGTON, 3 
"New York, 12; Detroit, 6 (night). 
Boston, 7; St. Louis, 6 (night). 

-Philadelphia, 11; Chicago, 4 


TODAY’S GAMES | 
Detroit at New York—Hutchin- | 
son (4-2) vs. Reynolds (7-1). (6-9) or Kennedy (5-5) vs. Hacker 
.St. Louis at Boston—Ostrowski (1-1). 
(2-2) vs. Stobbs (1-1) or Kinder, Brooklyn at Pittsburgh (night) 
(6-4). —Barney (3-4) vs. Bonham (2-2). 
Cleveland at WASHINGTON Boston at St. Louis (night—Bick- 
(night)}—Feller (3-6) ws. Haynes ford (9-3) vs. Brazle (6-3). 
(1-2), Philadelphia at Cincinnati, night 
Chicago at Philadelphia (night) —Heintzelman (7-3) 
—Gumpert (5-6) vs, Fowler (6-3).' (4-4). 


St. Louis, 10; New York, 6. 
Boston, 12; Chicago, 5. 
Philadelphia, 9; Pittsburgh, 3. 


TODAY’S GAMES 


New York at Chicage—Jansen 


vs. eae ot 


Nats’ Rally Fails, Tribe Wins, 4-3 


‘Buns Whip 
Reds, Keep 
League Lead 


Cincinnati, 23 (»).—Lefty 
Joe Hatten, who apparently can 
do no wrong when he takes. the 
mound against Cincinnati, whipped 
the Redlegs for the third time. of 
the season today—this time by a 
7-2 margin. 

The triumph enabled the Dodg- 
ers to stay a half game ahead of 
the second-place St. Louis Cardi- 
nals. 
| Hatten held the Reds to six hits, 
but, nevertheless, was behind by 
1-0 until the sixth, when Marv 
Rackley hit his first major league 


June 


| home run with Peewee Reese 


aboard. That put Burt Shotton’s 
crew in the van and they never 
were headed. 

The Dodgers managed to touch 
three Red hurlers for only seven 
hits, but they took advantage of 
eight walks 
Brooklyn AB H 
Reese. ss 


| 


C’cinnat! AB 
Walker.cf 
wrey lf. 

) Hatton. tbh 


a 


l Gumbert p 
aCorbitt 
Stalicup.ss 

1 L'whiler.rf 

1 Ki'wski.l® 

bHowe!l! 

Frautt.p 

F’ovich.p 

Adams,.2b 


2K VVeWHINnNDdO 


PAW ONIN WN 


SDB DONMKew a Dwworwd 


7n 


NNW DOW Wwe 


: 
i] 
’ 


= 
w' Ooo 90 94599-"W4r+99 


“2s 


~} 


-- 


Totals 
aWalked far Gumbert in 
__ DbSingied for Kluszewski | 
Brooklyn ~ 1 
Cincinnati ah 010 006 oor 


Runs—Reese (2). Rackley. Robinson. 
‘Purille, Cox. Campanella. Corbitt, Stall- 
Errors—Reese. Litwhiler. Runs 
in—Rackley (2). Brown. Campa- 

» Kiluszewski Two-base hit——Robin- 
Home 

] plays—Robinson 
to Reese to Hodges: Stalicup to Kluszew- 
aki Left on bases——-Brookiyn. 4: Cincin- 
Base on balls—Hatten, 5: Erautt. 

1 Strikeouts—Hatten, 2: 

l 


> Panovich, 2: Gumbert 
Hits- _Eraut t. 4 in 6%: Panovich, 2 in 12s: 
Gumbert. 1 in 1. Hit by pitched ball- 
(Snider). Wild pitch- ‘Fanovich. 
Passed balls—Cooper. Campanella Win 
ner—Hatten (6-3). Loser—Erautt (3-7 
| Umpires Stewart 


Conlan and Wairneke 
| Time—2:18. 


Attendance——7008 
Spahn Wins 9th, 
Braves Rout Cubs, 12-5 


Chicago, June 23 (*).—The Ros- 
ton Braves pounded five Chicago 
Cub hurlers for 15 hits here to- 
day for a 12-5 triumph that split 
the four-game series. 

Warren Spahn went the route 
for the Braves, allowing eight hits 
for his ninth win. One of the 
blows off him was Hank Sauer’s 
seventh homer with two mates 
aboard. 
Boston 


Holmes. rf 
F’tcher.16 
D 


> 
w 


+t ot BZ Oe hat > 


Chicago 
Verban.2h 
Reich. ib 
Gustine.3b 
H.Sauer lf 
Pafko rf 
Jeffcoat. cf 


ee | 
‘oF 


E.Sauer.cf 
Sisti.2b 
aRickert., 
Ryan.2b.. 
Crandall.¢ 


ot tes ll 


0 


AVOIWAWVA DAD 
A! woo 
et Sh 
-—OO°or90 4" 
RO Z: 


=} | 


Totals. .44 | 


A tile AE 
3992999)+-9U4n39U490 


Chipman» 0 
Totals ‘35 
aWent to bat for Sisti in eichth. 
bDoubled for Adkins in seventh. 
cRan | for Smalley in seventh 


' 
=! 9099+909+909)-Ww-Oz 


410 O11 O4{—j2 Base on balis—Riddile, 
100 003 100— 5 cewell, 


Runs—Piletcher (2). Dark (2). 
E. Sauer (2). Ryan Crandall. Spahn 
\Reich (2). Gustine. H. Sauer. 
| Errors—Gustine. Mauch (2). Verba 

‘liott.. Runs batted in—Elliott (3), ‘Oran - 
(dali (3) eet Dark. Gustine. H. Saue 
Smalley. Two-base hits— 
Gustine. Home r 

Sauer. Elliott, Pletcher. Double play— 
\Mauch to Verban to Reich. Base on aS Mee 
ase 


_ Leo : 
| Strikeouts—Kush. 2: Kakine ; 
|Hits—Leonard. 5 in 25: Kush. 
Lade. 0 in%s: Chipm 
Wild pitch—Spahn 
(9-5). Loser-—Leonard 
(2-9). Umpires—Robb Pinelli and Gore 
Time—2:36 Attendance—9144. 


in 1% 


Ezzard More Cautious 


Than He Should Be 


Mintz said. “After they an- 


Mr. 


nounced the first judge's score fee rf 
.M’ 


and then before the second it 
looked like an hour.” 


CHARLES, having arrived by 
this time, was not talking, this 
being Mr. Mintz’s department. 
They make a pretty good team. 
Mr. Mintz is a level little guy, 
| somewhat on the emotional side. 


Gene | 


Some months ago, for instance, ~ 


‘Sisler,1b., 


o Pittsburgh 


Elliott Sewell, B i 
(3-5) 


Novot uney. Ballanfant. 
E)- 2:28. 


1 pa 


_ when he was dead broke and the | 
_ Tournament of Champions of- | 


| fered $40,000 for his fighter’s 


| the firm of Octopus, Inc.—Jake 


he had made a promise to the 
Twentieth Century Sporting 
Club, but he wept as he kept his 
word. 


The fighting half of the team 
is a fairly able operative, with 
quick reflexes, a pretty good 
punch in both hands, no bent 
for the spectacular, and a sin- 
cere attitude toward the busi- 
ness which he adopted because 
_ of boyish admiration for a comic 

strip pug. 

He is probably the best big- 
gish man now fighting, and he 
is more cautious than a heavy- 
weight champion ought to be. 
His title fight was typical. He 
whipped Waleott *by a wider 
margin than the officials gave 
him, controlling the bout from 
the sixth round on, but when he 
had his turkey ready to serve, 
he laid the knife aside. 


He ran down the fleeing Jer- | 


- geyman and belted him. to the 
in the 
seventh round, then backed off 
and glowered at Joe throughout 

the entire eighth. “He's giving 

Joe a 4Minute rest,” said a 

man at ringside. 

The crowd summed it up even 
_more succinctly. “Boo!” said 
$246,546 worth of customers. 

On the other hand, his cau- 
tion was justifiable on tactical 
grounds. *He had the National 
Boxing Association title wrapped 
up and didn't choose to carry his 
bundle by the string. Asked why 
he didn't finish Walcott when he 


had him, he said he was taking skins of 


| 


no chances with the dangerous 
right hand of Camden's multiple 
sire. 


: 
' 


services—this was before all pro- | Ke; 
| motional rivals were welded into |% 
Nelson to Schoendienst: 


turned down the money because ($0 


' 


Golfers, Fans 
Find $15,000 


ITICA, N. Y., June 23 (®).—R 


but it didn’t help his golf game 
16th fairway, Lake found $200 i 


on the bonds. 


cents on the 18-hole round,” he 


Fans Help Golfer Make $ 


a check. 


senior, came up with a $9200 find on Valley View golf course, 


Lake was on the 14th fairway yesterday when he picked up 
$9000 worth of United States savings bends. In the middle of the 


Deciding that the same person probably lost the bonds and 
money, Lake called Ray Anton of New Hartford, whose name was 
Anton confirmed he had lost the money and bonds. 
and gave Lake a substantial reward. 

But, said Lake, finding the money “huined my rcolf came.” 

“I couldn't hit much afterwards and | wound up losing 15 


ORONTO, June 23 (*).—Spectators at the Canadian Open golf 
championship got an added thrill today. 

Three hundred fans were circling the eighteenth green when 
it was announced over the loud speaker that fully endorsed checks 
totaling $5800 had hJown out of galleryite’s coat pocket. Als were 
recovered. The unidentified spectator rewarded each finder of 


Hit Jackpot, 


on 2 Courses 


ohbert._W. Lake. jr.. Utiea College 


any. 


n $20 bills. 


complained. 


5800 Recovery on 18th 


It’s 9-3, Phils 


Restelli Hits 
6th Homer: 


Pirates Lose 


Pittsburgh, June 23 (#).—Pitts- 
burgh’s sensational young Dino 
Restilli clouted another homer, but 
the Phillies countered with two of 
their own, plus a triple play, and 
subdued the Pirates, 9-3, here to- 
day. 

Rookie Restelli’'s homer was his 
sixth in the 10 games since he was 
brought up from the Pacific Coast 
Léague. 

Second Baseman Eddie Miller, 
who started the three-ply killing in 
the third inning, hit his sixth 
homer of the year with two on in 
the sixth when: the Phillies scored 
five runs after two were out. Stan 
Lopata gave the visitors their 
other two runs in the big inning 
as he hit for the circuit with one 
aboard. 

The triple play came after Ralph 
Kiner had walked and reached sec- 
ond on Wally Westlake’s single. 
Ed Stevens then lined to Miller, 
who tossed to Shortstop Granny 
Mamner to catch Kiner off sec- 
ond. Hamner fired the ball to 
First Baseman Dick Sisler before 
Westlake could get back to the 
bag. 


Ph'elphia AB H 
Asho'rn.cf 


9 


0'9209°0°°90.4 57 


Pittsb rgh H 4 
Hammner.as n q 
Ennis.if., 
Lope ta.c 
'Hoilmig.rf 
Mayo.rf.. 
Jones.3d.. 
Miller.2b 
Simm ns.p 


n 
Stevens ib ? 
Baszall.2b 
Masi.c 
Riddle.p 
Sewell.p... 
Casey.p.... 0 


] 
a) 
n 
0 


ae ARs Orr O 


o 

5 4 
5 4 
5 3 
. 2 4 
3 3 
0 3 
3 4 
5 2 
. 0 


Totals. .42 1 


| «tre Owe er 


Totals..31 627 
000 005 238 
lil 000 000—3 

Ru uns— Ennis. Lopata (2). Hollmig Bay: 
iJones (2). Miller (2', Casiglione. li, 
Errors—Ashburn. Basga i oot 

Runs batted in—Riddle. Res- 

Miller (4). Ashburn, 

e¢ hit—Simmons, Home 
qacristes 


Philadelphia . 


Da: 
Lopata. Miller 
Double plays—Kiner 
_ Miller to Hamner to Sisier. 
play—Miller to Hamner to Sisler. Left - 
bases—Philadeiphia. 10: Pittsburgh. 
3: Simmons. 3: 
Strikeouts—Simmons, 4: Rid- 
Hits—Riddle. in 545: 
; , . O in %. 
Loser—Riddie (1-7) 
Barlick and Barr 
Attendance—10,233. 


Triple 


1 
Sewe!l) 


Time— 


Novoiney Cards Beat Giants 


On 7 Unearned Runs, 10-6 


St. Louis, June 23 (#).—The St. 
Louis Cardinals made the most of 


Balk— mt six hits and four Giant errors to- 


day to whip New York, 10-6. Seven 
of the Card runs were unearned. 
The victory. gave the Cards the 
series, three games to one, and 
kept them on the heels of the pace- 
setting Brooklyn Dodgers, who 
lead by half a game, 


beat Cincinnati, 7-2. 
del York 

Rigney.2b 
cD. Mu ler 


° 


c 
m 
> 
> | 
s~O,0 9O00ONW> 


> 
i) 
=x 
2) 


Th’'son,cf 
Gordon. |f Diering.ct 
Kezak.3b. 
OG riola.c 

Nelson. 1b 


NwnNoooIoNw 


Pellet.p 
Munger.p 


SV FWwNOFewwey 
>! @Boro200n0r90reZ 


nu :* 
~3 [2 OlrNNnreOOf wre 


“3 
a] 


OH 990N0N09090}-0N'>* 
— 
= 


~Or- mw ee ee hee 
SOOO oOWwVOrwNOWOW 


2900 9-+ we 


Totals .36 12 24 12 

aFlied out_for Behrman in seventh 

bPopped out for Webb in ninth 

cSafe on error for Rigney in_ ninth 

aqHit into double play for Lohrke 
ninth. 


in 


one 030— 6 
. 610 318 00x—10 


luns— Rigney. ‘Gordon. , Marshall, Lafata., 
err, Hartung, Schoendienst. Musial, 
tthey (2). Kazak (2). Nelson (2). Gara- 
ae Pollet. Errors—Rigney (2). 
pmson, Kiein. Runs batted in—Rigney. 
Thomson, Gordon (2), Lafata (2), Northey 
(2). Nelson (3), Slaughter. Pollet. Schoen- 
o-base hits— 
Home 
Lafata. 
 nouble plays— 
Kazak to Schoen- 
Rigney to Lafata;: 


Nelson: 


New Y 
Hartung. 7: 
out— Pollet. 
Behrman. 2 
12' in 7%: 

Pollet (8-4) 
pires——Jorda. 
2:15. 


0 : 
] Pits—Martune 
in %: Webb, 1 in 2: 
Munger. 0 ie 1% 
Loser—Hartung (6-7) 


Goetz and Dascol! 
Attendance—11,028 ‘paid). 


Paper Reports 
Angling to Pur 


Brooklyn > 4 


- eWeigel 


Lafata. 


~ (6-7). 


Polly Riley 
‘Upsets Babe 
In. Western 


Oklahoma City, June 23 (™ 
Amateur Polly Riley, Fort Worth. 
Tex., scored her second major vic- 
tory Mrs. Babe 


Zaharias, Ferndale. N. Y.. 
golf 


nver 
Western Open 
quarterfinals 
The sturdy 
stroked steadily 


here today. 
little Irish 
to close out 
Babe on the seventeenth hole, 3-1 
Miss’ Riley 
champion Patty Berg and 
other professionals, Betty Jameson, 


San Antonio, 
Carrolton, Ga., 
finals. 

The 


two 


semifinals match 


many previous links battles 
Miss Berg, 
Western title rallied on 
coming nine to defeat Beverly 
Hanson, Fargo, N. Dak., 3-2. 
Miss Jameson also spurted in 
the late stages to defeat Carol Dir- 
inger, Tiffin, Ohio, 4-2. Betty, 
winner of this event in 1942, gol 
two birdies on the last three holes 
The match was even through nine 
as Miss Diringer needed only 12 
putts, blasting out of traps three 


the in- 


> times for one putt each time. 


McGrath Makes 


Bow on Tonight's 


°Lanham Card 


Steve McGrath, 28-year-old Bos- 
ton Irishman who has been setting 
a terrific pace in Eastern competi- 
tion. makes his debut at the West 
Lanham Speedway tonight when 
midget automobile racing is re- 
sumed. 

McGrath. generally considered 
the hottest young pilot to come 
along sincé Ed “Dutch” Schaefer, 

be strongly challenged by 
such outstanding rival Offenhau- 
ser drivers as George Fonder, Len 
Duncan, Mike Joseph, Shorty Mc- 
Andrews, Walt Fair and Ernie 
McCoy. 

The New Englander has swept 
four successive 25-lap~* feature 
races at the Princess Anne Speed- 
way, Norfolk, Va., prior to being 
beaten to the finish line by 


can and Fonder last Tuesday 


Nats’ Box Score 


CLEVELAND HRbi O 
ir, me seatse 6 6b 
one te eee a 


7. AL 
eel 2 


2333-3~-33-"- 
>2s3--s-4 
s:32-333s-s~- 
ee oe ee 
ee oe Pr ee 


Pa pish, 


a. 
s- 


Tetals 
WASHINGTON 
Coan. VW. 
Lewis, rf. 


Robertson. 4b. 
aChristman 
*Simmons 
Stewart, ef. 
Robinson. 


sss 


Kozar. Th. 


Wente, 85. 


wo! OS — S68 —--— S- SF Sis- ZS 
s3s3ss-s323 


otals a 3 
singled for ‘Salvert in seventh. 
for Haefner in ninth. 


pped 
Singled fer Rebertson in ninth. 
Ran for Christman in ninth. 


CLEVELAND pee _, 200 O01 O10—4 
WASHINGTON . 00 100 o02—3 


“'TWO-BASE HITS—Robinsen, Kennedy. 
Dente, Coan. STOLEN BASES—Kennedy. 
SACRIFICES—Calvert. Boone. 
DOUBLE aeons te Dente 

. LEFT ON ASE ‘Ye 
Washington. 


¢ Calvert. 8 im 7. 

. lt ron. WIN- 

1 LOSER—Calvert 

UMPIRES—Honocchick. Summers. 

Stevens and Grieve. TIME—7?:48% £xAT- 
TENDANCE—1?I 694. 


Clevelanders 
chase Indians 


Cleveland June 23 (*\.—The Plain Dealer said tonight a group of 


businessmen are organizing a syndicate to buy the World Champion t 


Cleveland Indians for about two 


million dollars. 


The report was neither confirmed nor denied by Bill Veeck. pres- ‘ 


ident of the Tribe. Reached in Co 


lumbus, Ohio, he said he had heard : 


Eager Customer Raps 
Unwrapped Golf Balls 


Nashville, Tenn., June 23 (7. 
Luke Morris, whe works in the 
Belle Meade Club golf shop, was 
talking te himself today. 

Here’s why: 

“Gimme a dozen golf balls,” 
| a customer ordered. 

“Okay. Shall I wrap ‘em up: 
| Morris asked. 

“No,” was the reply, “just tee 
‘em up, and I'll drive’ em home.” 


°° 


rumors of an impending offer. 


Cobbledick's story said: 

“The would-be purchasers in the 
new group are understood to in- 
clude Ben J. Goetz, president, and 
Max Axelrod, vice president of the 


ors of the concession stands at the 
stadium. 

“Shortly after he came to Cleve- 
land, Veech engaged in a long and 
lunsuccessful legal battle to break 
ithe contract with the concession 
/company. 

“The Bernet brothers (falso of 
Cleveland), Maurice J., William G. 


Redskins Sign Top 
Field Goal Kicker 


Fort Collins. Colo., June 23 (4. 
Bob Hainlen, star quarterback at 
Colorado A. and M. College, has 
‘signed to play professional foot- 
ball. with 


the National Footbal! 


‘and Bernard F., also are reported 
to be members of the group headed 
by Creadon. So is W. O. Wash- 
burn, a wealthy Cincinnatian.” 

In his conversation with the 
newspaper from Columbus, Veeck 72° 
said he himself would under no 
circumstances remain genera! man- 
ager if the club is sold. He de- 


the Washington Red- clared he had not fixed a price. On’! 


that subject, the Plain Dealer re- 


League. Hainlen was the Nation's ported the prospective purchasing), 
collegiate field goal kicker in group had learned he wants §$2.- \ 
948. 500,000. 


Didrikson , 
in the owas 


joined defending ~ 


and Louise Suggs, ° 
in tomorrow's semi- + 


Ri 
Riley to. 
against Jameson and Suggs against ,, 
Berg, bringing on a renewal of | 


Dun- K 


Sievers.3b 2? 
Pawas . 


Lane.lf 
} Philley. rf 


Cleveland Goncession Co., operat- 


Byrne Stops 
Tio cers With 


| Hit, 12-0 


New York. June 22 (*)\.—The 
Yankees’ Tommy Byrne came 
within a foot of pitching a no- 
hitter tonight as New # £=York 
humbled the Detroit Tigers, 
. The lefthander hurled seven 
hitless innings before Shortstop 
Johnny’ Lipon laced out the lone 
Tiger safety—a single that fell 1 
foot fair inside the left-field foul 
line 

Lipon caught hold of the first 
ball pitched in the eighth inning 


4 for his spoiler. 


It was Byrne's fifth victory of 
the year against four defeats. A 
crowd of 55.591 was on hand for 
opening of the important first di- 
vision series. 

The Yankees’ big noise was fur- 
nished by Tommy Henrich, who 
drove in five runs, two of them 
with his 15th home run in the first 
inning. Larry (Yogi) Berri hit his 
seventh home run of the year in 


the seven-run eighth inning, with 


nobody on 


Detroit ARP 
{ poe 4 


xk AR HO: 
tb £ Bo 
Lake, Jt 7 


fn 
; 
. 


tournament «. 


Girl owuins 
the ~'" 


77 } 


aPoeped ty 
Detroit 
ew York 
Coleman 
ra. Brown 
Frrors 


in @lahtn 
000 000 000 0 
2108 000 2is—tI!12 
Rizzuto Henri 
Johnson, Keller. Map 
Kolloway (2). Sampbelil. 
Henrich (5). Keller, Lin- 
2). Berra ‘«2) Two- 
: Keller. Mapes. 
Byrne. Rizzuto 
Henrich. Berra Sacrifice 
Double plays—-Kolloway to Lipon 
Byrne to Rizzuto to Hen- 
to Campbell: Byrne to Cole- 
Left ba ses——De- 
on balis-— 


i‘) 


Brown 


its 


on 
Rase 
Overmire 


seeking her fourth °"% 


Rommel and 
Attendance 


Bosox Beat Browns. 


(0. Behind McDermott 


Boston, June 23 (4).—Rookie 
Lefthander Maurice McDermott 
pitched a three-hit shutout tonight 
in steering the Boston Red Sox to 
a 7-0 triumph over the St. Louis 
Browns 

McDermott faced only 28 hatters 
In winning his second major league 
victory. He walked two and gtruck 
out six. Four Boston double plays 
limited the Brownies to one left 
on base. 

Not a Brownie reached second 
against the slim lefthander, who 
will be 21 vears old August 29 

He retired the first six hatters 
before Jack Graham, lead-off bat- 
ter in the third, bounced a single 
through the middle of the dia- 
mond 

The Sox landed on Ned Garver 
for three runs in the opening in- 
ning, added two more in the third 
and picked up single counters in 
the fifth and sixth. 

Their fifth-inning run was Al 
(Zeke) Zarilla’s fifth homer of 
the season, a loft into the home 


bull pen in. right center 
St. Louis AB Boston 
Sullivan.ss 
Svence.cf. 
Piatt. if 


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Totals 
aSt 


3 24 
for Garver in 
oe aoe 000—F4 
302 O11 00x—7 
Pesky Williams 
Goodman. Zarilla Error 
Platt Runs batted Stephens 
Goodman, Batts (2) l I 
Two-base hits 
run Zarilla 
Stephens to Doerr to Gaodman 
Doerr to Goodman Doerr to Goodman 
to Stephens: Doerr to Stephens to Good- 
lal (unassisted) Left on 
a Boston, 10 
cDermott. 
MeDermott é 
-?) Loser —Garver 
Berry. Paparella. Hubbard. Time 
Attendance— 29.080 


DiMaggio. 
2) 


in 


" Kellner Wins 10th. 
» A’s Drub Chisox. 11-4 


Philadelphia, June 23 (#).—A 
14-hit batting attack, which in- 
cluded Sam Chapman's eighth 
homer of the year. carried Phila- 
delphia to an easy 11-4 decision 
over Chicago tonight. 

Rookie Southpaw Alex Kellner 
chalked up his tenth pitching tri- 
umph. 
ppicage 


AB oe A 


oos*. Ss 

Moses.rf 
Moses.ri 
Pain.jb 


“0 


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. haels,.2b 

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Rh’ n.3b.ss 
Tipton.c 
Judson.p. 


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aPouled out for Shoun 
Chie 


in ninth 

H18 108 161— 4 

Philadelphia O51 211 Olx—1! 
Runs—<Appling. Souchock. Tipton 

Joost 2}. Moses {2 

‘3). Guerra. Kellner 

Souchock (2), Guerra (2). . 

Chapman 4) Moses 

Two-base hits-—-Guerra 5 

Home runs—Souchock, Tipton 

Sacrifices Pox (2) Dou- 


Rhawn to Souchock. Fox 

ain: Majeski to Fox to Fain 
th ne to Souchock Left on 
Thicago. 5: Philadeiphia. 7 
~Judson. 3: Pieretti. | 
3%. Strikeouts——Keliner. 
Judson. 5 in . 
Shoun. 5 in 5 
Loser —Judson 
pires.-McGowan “MeKinley.. 
Hurley. Attendance—-6549 


Welsh, Lynch 
Win 2 Matches 


Barney Welsh and Hugh Lynch, 
second-seeded team, yesterday de- 
feated Ted Rodgers and Tim Coss, 
junior champions, 6—2, 6—2, i 
the second round of the Wood- 
mont Country Club Invitational | 
doubles tennis tournament. The) 
winning team went on to defeat 
Orme Wilson and Thomas Moor-| 
head, 6—1, 6—2, in the quarter- 
finals. 


ee round matches—Dr 
and Capt Robin Hippensteil de- 
feared Buddy Eig and Lew Mulits. 6-2 
|. Barney Welsh and Hugh Lynch de. 
foated Ted Rodeers and Tim Coss. 6 
‘2 Pred MeNair and Bill Clifford — 
feated McCarthy and Ed Kients. 6—! 


“oe. Um. 


Daves Jonhn- | 


"Gectesiine matches—Barner Weish 
an¢d Hush Lynch defeated Orme Wilsor 
ard Thomas Moorehead. 6— 6—-2 
Today's matches (quarterfinals) —Ra! ph 
dair and Allen vs. Fred McNea = ae 
ifferd at 5:30 p m Dorie Re and 

aries Channing vs Don Leavens anc) 
= Theckare et € © m., 


—— 


‘ile solidly 


ve. Gecision yesterday 


’ 


12 to 


oo, 


So's AN. 
es Ste ae >: sees 


ora Ag Su ak ae 
Associated Souue » 
FANCY PANTS—lIt was Gor- 
geous Gussie Moran when the 
California girl took the court 
this week at staid Wimbledon, 
England. Then she flashed her 
lace-trimmed panties. Here she 
shows how the new style 
panties fit 


Falkenburg 
Wins Despite 
Hostile Four 


By Robert Musel 

Wimbledon, England, June 
Lanky Bob Falkenburg of 
wood, the defending 
saved himself with a fifth set rally 
before an unfriendly crowd today 
and joined threé@ other ranking 
Americans on the list of survivors 
in the Wimbledon Tennis Cham- 
pionship 

Ted Schroeder of Lacrescenta. 
Calif.. Dick Gonzales and Frankie 
Parker of Los Angeles, seeded one- 
two-three at the top of the draw. 
preceded the erratic champion into 
the fourth round with straight set 
victories. 

Falkenburg, however, was forced 
to. the limit in downing stvlish 
Joseph Ashoth of Hungary. 6—4. 
7—5, 2—6, 6—4, after blowing an 
early lead. and the icrowds gave 
him no help. 


More than 7000 af 
crowd of 30.000 jammed around 
the court where Falkenburg and 
Asboth were playing and it was 
'Y against the clouting Cal- 
ifornian, presumably because of 
bitter remarks about ‘Wimbledon 
attributed to him after he won the 
title last vear and his sudden 
to withdraw 
from the mixed double vithout 


See TENNIS, Pace 5B. Column 2. 


9” 
60 


Holly- 


the reeord 


Sale! 


—e inson to hat. 


champion, 


Gordon Saves 
Game in 9th 
By Robbing 
Ed Robinson 


The Indians heat the 


last nik sht 


Nats. 
It was, you might Say. 
an act of Gordon 

Gordon, 
leaping skyward mace a one- 
handed stab of Eddie Robinsons 
ninth-inning line drive, and for the 
Indians it bordered on the provi- 
dential 

Farlier in the ninth, the Nats 
had stirred up two runs, driven 
Early Wynn from the box and dis- 
patched his successar, Sam Zoldak. 

Now they had the tving run on 
third base with two out, another 
runner on first, and Robinson was 
carrving Pitcher Frank Papich 
down to a 3-and-2 count 

Off Robinson's bat rocketed a 
fiery clout toward rightfield, “hit” 
written all over it. and then Gor- 
don got into the act 

His feet far off the ground, his 
glove stretched upw ard to the ut- 
most, the nimble Gordon found the 
hall in the webbing, and the Nats 
were a gone gang 
Wynn Master for & 

For the Nats and their 21.694 
customers, it was a cruel denial. 
Facing a 4-1 deficit going into that 
ninth, they reacted bravely Al 
Evans opened up with a single. 
'Pinch-Hitter Sam Mele struck out. 
but Coan banged a two-bagger to 
right and Wynn out of the ball 
game 

In moved Lefthander Sam Zol- 
dak and he got rid of Pinch-Hitter 
Ralph Weigel on a pop up. But 
Pinch-Hitter Mark Christman 
fetched two runs home with a 
single to left, and Ed Stewart 
moved the tying run to third with 
a single to right 

All of which served to bring 
Papish into the ball game and Rob- 
and set the scenery 
for Gordon's wonderfully larcenous 
contribution 

For eight innings Wynn was the 
master of his old pals, the Nat, 
and ultimately he was credited 
with his fourth straight win for 
the Indians Until the ninth he 
had yvielded only one run 

The Nats’ defeat was traceable 
in part to an episode back in the 
sixth inning when thev scored 
their lone run, and were euchered 
out of another one by Catcher 
Jim Hegan 

That first Washington run com- 
menced with Robinson's two-bag- 
ger off the right-field wall He 
moved to third when Kozar heat 
out an infield hit. and apparently 
was dnomed on his race for the 
plate when Dente tapped a ground- 
er at Wynn 

Wynn fired the ball to Hegan 
and Robinson, in an effort to de- 
lav the tag. started back for thiftd. 
On the baselines he encountered 
Wynn, who was standing idly by, 
and bumped him. Over the loud 
protests of the Indians’ manage- 
ment, Umpire Jim  Honochick 
ruled interference by Wynn. and 
permitted Robinson to score. 


Calvert's Start Shaky 


The Indians promptly got even. 
When Al Evans missed a bunt at- 
tempt, Catcher Jim Hegan picked 
Kozar off second base to take the 
innards out of the uprising. 

Paul Calvert started the game 
for the Nats, and yielded two runs 
in the opening inning. The ctis- 
tomers were beseeching Manager 
Kuhel to switch from Calvert..at 
that point 

It was a smart piece of business 
hy Dale Mitchell that helped the 
Indians to their first run. He 
opened the game with a single to 
right, and on Boone's bunt down 
the third-base line dashed all the 
way to third. Mickey Vernon 
drove him home with a single. and 


See NATS., Page 4-B, Column 6, 


Second Baseman Joe 


— —~s 


Broken Lots 
of Famous. Make 


MEN’S SUMMER SUITS 


Just 55! Men's $20.50 Was 
Summer Suits—-Regs. 3/37 

2/44, 3/46, 1/48; shorts 1/35 
2/39; longs 1/38, 1/39, 2/40 

2/39, 40. 1/42. 3/44, 4/46 

2/39, 3/44, 1/46 
soiled 


.? 


long 


Only 46! Men's $35 and $38.50 
37 to 46: shorts 
stouts 1/40, 1/41, 1/43 
1/42. Blues, grays 
and eggshell! 


Suits——Regs 
to 40. 


stouts 


Just 84! 


14/38, 5/39, 5/40, 2/42, 4/44. 
3/37, 3/38, 1/44, 3/46: longs 


5/40, 2/42, 3/44. 1/46: 
stouts 3/46 


stouts 


50—$40 to $50 All-Weol Tropical Worsted Suits. Regs 


shorts, 35 to 38: longs, 
stouts, 39, 42, 44, 46 


&—S$75 Stein Block All-Wool 
5/38. 1/39: shorts, 1/36: large 


SINCE 7911... 


37. 


stouts 


tans 


Men's $50 to $60 Famous-Make. 
Wool Tropical Worsted Summer Suits. 
ing India weave Gabardines.—Regs. 3/36, 6/37. 


39, 40. 46: stouts. 39 to 50: 


hable Seersucker 
2/38. 4/39, 2/40. § 
2/36. 1/37. 3/38 
1/42, 2/44 
short stouts 
od 


- 


13 


14 


stouts 
2/3 


Some 


Tropical Summer 
35 to 38: longs 37 
2/44. 1/46 


browns 


long 


v 
38 


white 


All- 


includ- 


2/46. shorts 5/36. 
1/36, 4/38, 7/39. 


1/39, 1/48; short 


36 to 468; 
sht. 
$32. 
Trepical Worsted Suits. Ress. 
1/39 $52 


FAMOUS FOR FAMOUS MAKES 


i Moueg Moves S top 


37th Year af 1319 F Street 


SS 


THE WASHINGTON POST| 


wv" 110,000 Expected for Laurel’s Harness Opener Tonight 


Farmer Boy 


NATS-——F rom Page B-3 to third on Booge's bunt im tp this season when he starts fer 
Race Chart. for Dela ware Pa ” first inning camp as a surprise the Indians tonight... He will 


. 

Hi ay M aking Short Races 
- 
a not onlv -to the Nats. hut the he facing Joe Haynes who. in @ 
7 : | | : 

¢ «0 Gordon’ = Cate ] Indians as we To tnerr reco'!- sense '< s former teammate 

a es LC e ‘ ‘Copyright. 1949, Trianble Publications, Inc., Daily Racing Form! FLBOW ROOM. $11.30. 64.90. 84.20: GAY PATTY, %4 Ladtion @ wae the Seat Male be Sint neds Se winnahies ata 

e \ 1 \ e on FIRST RACE—Pive and one-nalf furlongs. Purse, For $4.40; CY DART, 86.50. tj as th | | | ) seonatie @ . 

2-year-olds; claiming. Went to post at 2 Off st 2 FIFTH RACE—Two miles. The Georgetown Steeplechase 


aa We | \ r had ever pulled the play Indians for two months last win 
B p H f } ; y Start good. Won Griving place same Siaser, Mrs. M ' handicap wre 10. ie n°" wr ane >. se ony Stops .. at Rally Roh Feller ; r. ‘ 
_ 7 fatch ® post at 4:07 i tari g£oo0 Won nang. ; 
4 u Cc wuUsOoOn ; reine intage|—War Bob by —. Wa e Trained by J ‘0 
a 


| 


. will make his maicen er, but never donned their uni- 


a r ee ee es ee hy place driving. "Winner, K. Miller's b. ¢. (11) by Mate--Best bs R *  anpnearance at Griffith Stadiun 
—_— —-— — —-- —- Test by Black Toney. Trained by K., Miller Value to winner. Joe Gordons infield out scored PI G Lt Sta#aqium 
nl ia a wa _ rses ~ Joekeys Wat Post St. St in. Straight $8300. Time. 3:48 4s. 
Ma: 112 4 } } } - ia 


) —— —————_— . le. u 
Err fall Te ae oe ee s§ Horses Jockeys Wat.Post 8t. 5 10. Str. Pin. St A double-play grounder 
By Walter Haight ew ...1 41 , RlS : : 3214 se Elkridge. ‘Smithwick) 152 5 5 ? | 
> sray ; : , a, Genancoke ge 
Post Reporter By Jack Walsh Co en Pn 4h # +, Me a. | Sun aoe 1) ae Re ee te eet lin th th the | sot 
1IOE IUDGE former Nats’ . Post Reporter \ - : ‘ K + ~ ; ~ : . 16 0% tin Isle } 2 : - 4 i 9 n e Six ' Ve ndians mt) t a 
Pe a of The h . ’ one sbiftelanicee.” usile) 2): BE ge oom th RT (Russell ae. A Fn “\eheap but important-run off Ca! 
, star, had never used a claw | e harness racing scene Midnight | i$ k) 107 te ae ,| 108-70" ELERIDGE, $6.50, $2.90, $2.50; GENANOOKE, $2.60, $2.50) a. aonied hich off 
_ style first baseman’s glove until jio Laurel Raceway tonight where Rednaxeia (Sheridan 105.2 8 9% 9 10 } gan ae ss Seis tis ines 7. — ue ) 
” : ACE—Six furlongs e Newar urse < Bo it } 
, he played with the “Oldtimers lat 8:15 p. m., some 10,000 trotting _ WAGEL. £7.40, $4.40, $3.30; EMPIRE VALLEY, $11.40, $6.50; | 3-year-olds and up, allowances. Went to post at 4:37 OF ai the left-field wall with one out, but 
recently. j, sod te tak 7 ‘BIG SHREW, 43.80. 2%, Start peed, Won arvans pees nme. wennes as. Piay Calvert fanned Hegan Attempt- 
ii ‘ ; jGaener 2a’s r.c¢ ‘J? t aya ul y r 
“Perhaps I'd ans afe expecte | © take up where SECOND RAC B—-Six turlonss The Claymont Rurse, 7000. Trained by M a Dixon Value to winner, $2500. Time. 1:11%s ing to steal third on the strikeout 
i fillies, ent to post at 2:36. at |-——- -—— - — $$ 
get used to they left off at Rosecroft. 36%! Won easily: place driving ‘Winner. Green. |. Horses ockevs Wet Post St. ' Str raph 
one.” said | Refurbished Laurel, com Lete|t tree Stables ch. {. (3) by Questionnaire—Rhythmic by Royai | Whiffenpoof $1 20| pitch, Kennedy raced al! the way 
, : a , p Minstrel. Trained by G. T. Poole. Value to wWinned, $1850. 1183 home wi Evans threw the ball G 
Judge, “but |with a new clubhouse, opens a 20- Time, 1:12. 3°90 e ad a rew u et hiner quality... 
Ost | 3.60\far into left fie 
I got along jnight session that, with five rain panecine Lesson Wet) fa. 3.60\far into left fiel 


hiner tasting drinks 
5§ in 
OK with the Our ’ ki 1 Miss (H 112 , 5? he by t r ' {00, came © 
old stvle mitt dates, may run through July 23. ‘w® oo eure on 12 ) Gar Weokes” Sto 114 140.7 70 Their fourth = , . ww ith see 
~ . 1; — 
1} 


Givens) 
F y to tne ndians It was 


By Heart (Kirk! 1d) 

The claw is | Located on Route 1, midway be- Comeaiiye |. iSnyder) 
$3 Vy CERTIFIED. ‘lwrenched out of Mickey Haefner 
SEVENTH rye bmi furlongs. * The St. Georges Purse 


; i Chance . (Civitello) 
helpful in tween Washington and Baltimore, layaci . (Sheridan) | 
$3500. Por 3-year-olds; claiming. Went to post at 5:07. Off at) With the aid of one hit that didn’t 


stretching for Rose Sand .. (Lynch) | 
throws but Laurel will be starting its second eeiping .._ @eamen) 120 | : ———| 3:07. Start good Won handily: place Griving Winner Blue\+ pave] a dozen feet. Haefner walked ft tr = 
en. nek aime meeting with practically the same DANCING LESSON, $5, 80. $3.50. $2.70: OUR HOSTESS. $2.70, | tome Parm's It. bf. (3) by Vaidina Orphan—Disco by Display Holden 


| $2.30; PAMLICO ‘| Trained §y W. A. Croll. jr. Value to winner. $2200. Time, 1:10°%s.|\Gordon and when Keltner bunted 
Haight it is an asset | “rivers and horses who provided Gord and 


? o 
Lid ale 
THIRD RACE-—ix furlonss, Purse, $2500. Por d-vear-olds:| vane ela ... “itgech) 116 1 8 Pip. Sirs'sht i front of the plate, the Nats’ bat- ¥ 1d ith \ NY | es 
- UL \ ‘ | 


a 


tn | 
“2 


- Fin. Straight 
1' $1.90 


— 


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we 1a Me 


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Bigs 
Be VID”, 
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arn 


: ming. Went to post at 3:07. Off at 3:08. Star d.-Won | Vals Kic (Lynch) 
, for fielding. Too many of the |the pari- -mutuel sport at Oxon Hill. |¢aimins. went tos Lat 3:07, Off at 3:08. Start good. Won : Bi Scaeres F  ethek on: Abehenen ane 
. present day boys are slapping at Principa difference in Laurel's oe poor Rose Eternal by Eternal, Trained by D. W. Kerns ~ (Bircland) See ‘ is p 

‘¢.7910n the puny tap. Keltner beat it 


“balls we used to get.” ... Last jracing program is the revival of — oh, r 
. out. Haefner walked Hegan to load HAS HA 


Sorass Joc! ey eys W Po 
* vear, when Laurel Raceway was {Shorter races. Four of the events |raio Jockeys kt Pos 
bases and Wynn's fiy to left 
> produced the run 


YEAR 5 
Olecranon 

Pin Straight | Galaman (Hansman) 

iCivitello) 

‘Picou) 

(Downs) 

‘Basile! 

te. (Main) 

Pifth Whee) (Gilbert) 


wo PEERS FOR FIFTY 


+ 
ren BW ho 


" " Syimad ; Do « ) ) 
; Maryland's only harness track, on tonight's opening card _ be |Szmedy ..--| (oawas: 4 3 
; President Dick Hutchison had contested at dash distances, 442 to|Ow! oe ‘Bansman' 110 
shis choice of dates and picked we furlongs. Mi Scandal .. (Basile) 


: ; . bJust Love! f l di 
-the last week in June to open. The two top races offer $1000/B'% Whitt “pou, 


- 


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yr.-olds: claiming 
Solle Star 
*Inchcapella 
Strutawar 
*Tanneke 
*China Colleen 


MARK HIGH. $4.2 
Conspire (Segraves) 111 arry obv as ; JOSEPH 
“As a bo the f Ir ° |trotters go in the fifth race with Handy Man (Knapp) 118 EIGHTH RACE—One mile and one sixteenth. Purse, $2500.| when Larry Doby was given an EPH S. FINCH & CO. ALADDIN, PA, 
s a boy on the farm, I remem : Y ' 
: 1/8 ae Strike (‘R’on, ir.) 115 Por 4-year-Olds .an i : Went to post at 5:34. Of intentional pass with two out , 
bered that we used to make hay \Joe Mallalieu's Josedale Counse 
: vie race accorded the | yal Knave {Givens} 115 11 
‘ starting at that time and I be- jand ite ve =; crace ae . “aitrs. C. A. Gasiine- G& eckh , - : Or. Trained by F. Buriey. Value to winner, $1650. Time,| inning ... Rookie Ray Boone 
: ; . . ; , , : 0 eimer entry 1:462 
‘lieved it would enabie us to es- | g pore bA. W. Wi Hiams-S. C. Mikel! entry - : who ,is being groomed as the 
successor to Boudreau as the 
Bi H Winnie L. Wil Fou RTH RACE—Six fur! Pp $2500. F a 'Picon) Indians’ shortstop, is the more 
: : ’ : ‘ . Inn e he son anus irioneg: urse 250 4- =( « ; . ‘ icou) 3 = . 
‘ operating ‘a daily double. W hen sery anover ar up: claiming Went to post at 3:37 "Olt yl vA ae See ' .. (Meyer) ' 
> . . . 
New. York ovals discontinued 
p Christmas, Time, 1:12? . oo wy ' | 
Rosecroft, will send his Shamrock — ~ ~ nee : «Sree er... Playing the percentages | JOCKEY CLUB 
| Joe Kuhel had a solid array of 
‘metropolitan tracks finally dis- pacers in the seventh race. The Gay Patt; (Lynch) 112 | | ‘ot ¢ | : 
s covered they were losing busi- Hylan horse is expected to go post-'fj40 Way isheruine, in + : 5-90 | Mattie Girl (Sreman) © 
: : PRINCESS GALA, #240.’ handed pitchin Dale 
Miss Gossip, (Meyer) 1 ? , 5 $2.90: ROPLEY. $12.90 : : 
; ‘position should come from Tom bss , Mitchell's dash from first base 
' Many fans believe it was an aill- Walters’ Pan American and Joe > Tae ee —~ Ee: een en mE —_—-— 
les; ‘ 3000; claiming: for 4-year- Poston Pitches Shutout 
. Avery has two 5-2 choices going! aco © 
, d ever, spl = | <* " , 1-—*%.4: $3500; maiden 3-yr.-olds up; cl’ ST A | 6% furlongs: \Olds and up 
gs Eling ean ee ee for him in the daily double. He) :cnestnu: A uy FOR gegen ee Bob Poston yesterday pitched 
: , , , Ari ' *Wiiroy Lf ght: ips 12] 
drives Connie Hal in the first) 30'S’ ori’ a Sw and up. Binky B (no SDs. elena 
etee Dee (Gilbert) eeee 
bExtra (Smithwick Gov t Pp " Off 
| | am *Bindo Siitent” dian tan sovernmen rinting ffice in raed ’ 
his spine in sliding, causing 3 to 1. 2—5'2 {.: $3500; maiden 3-yr.-olds y) Punchestown (Givens) the Sherwood Softbalé League Post Time 2:00 P.M... E.D.T. 
Oaptain Kidd ino boy) ... Cock Feather (no boy) 
t. 4\,-furl a7 ag ey Daher ng —_— aBusy Moments ( Ansteatt) 
: , : - S - *Molly eR i. | Marcia ? fins } . ; , ’ , 
him great pain as well as back event, a urilong dash for pac Soothe fase Plumelette Bis Bones (Winslow +5 ibs. epprentice allowance claimed in the fifth inning CLUB HOUSE AIR CONDITION ED 
lameness. He is still taking week- ©*S- Senator M. and Fly Away) whisker So: ‘7 Ibs. apprentice allowance claimed 
cl Macanudo (no boy) Horses listed according to post position. , alia ‘ a 
ds oh 8 *+Wolfberry | Mrs. 8. B. M man- Mrs. ‘, 
I | Teittaa 35 bKipper. 42 |ton enth: Kae AT DELAWARE PARK, sc lack B. & O. trains leave Washington Union Station 
sarting Monday the clubhouse (Laurel Raceway = |istedarée BP RMRAB 0 188 EMRE ASRS Hen onure, (Mab re MRR OT gg sea rePaINTNG ff, 12:00 E.D.T.; Silver Spring, 12:15 E.D.T., 
j iti , ° all Guy ..» 137 Uranium I anad ' . : 
Will be air-conditioned, the work | piper pace—mile: trot: purse. $500: FGerameng SECOND RACE—Pive and oneshalf fur>| | 3—Reuch Ciond, Bright Player, ( and REPAINTING | 
) 1 tDandy Foot (no boy) | §&—Neble Impulse, Sun Bahram, Brick. 
Oy eS 4:1]. 4—S' {.; $3500: 2-yr.-olds tJayencee (no bOY) ....«s:- | &—Sendoff. Mark Up, Alairne McMahon Chevrolet race track ] ‘40 Pp M., E.D.T. 
PHILADELPHIA paper re- Pran Hanover (Myer) -1| Oitomacy 108) © Wily tidle Tale: (no boy) 7—PUT AND CALL. Pied Piper. King | (238-46 Upshur St. H.W. GE. 0100 j 
ports a fishing party on the Del- Hedgewood Song (Jones) ee i}. en ' 106 Po rent Olea V. (Hacker) eee 
Calumet Return (Walters) | ; $4000: 4-yr.-olds up Halgino (no boy) 
Wayn Trak (Metcalfe). Spats 108! * Assault aEntreat ‘no boy! 
ion ; sie thee . Also eligible: > AS 6—1%2: $5000 added: 3-yr.-olds UP Cc Early (Kirkland) 
ies and we have-plenty of | Scott Free (Vineyard), Fiaxey Hal!|aRespingo Flashco + say Hedda ‘(Lyneb) 
hem on our Chesapeake Bay ‘Garrow), Jalapa (Kelly), Phoebus (Wil-|aPrefect 116 Back Talk aMiss Burgoo (no boy) 
ry 
longs: pace: purse, $500, 2-year-old ; 4500; 3;yt.-olds Up: Blessette (Givens) 
won at Monmouth Park the up 24 conditioned. . > one i "1 MOSSY < Wedgewood (Knapp) . 
other day he was saddied by + Governor Bonington (Btakley) Red! Ranio ‘Grab Bag (no boy) 1 
ist 
aitees TY ee ig fed $2500; claiming; for 4-year-olds a re 
the great horse, Black Gold,. rid- Bright Majesty (Wingate) 
‘ ss . ee : : ito 
jng him on the ill-fated after Lady Leura Vineyard) Se” whe ‘Vibra 
— at New Orleans when the 10 Jean Chief (Avery) 


Wo-INWe wr 


Turned Trick (Hans man) $ 
Happy Pappy (Knapp) 


4 Q 192° ¥ 
mp Play (Carro!l) 138 33 1 14 14 3 1” at 5:37 place same. Winner. J. H 
scape some rain .. . Delaware | Competing with them will be IDIO, $10.20, $6.10, $4.10; SLYMADY, $4.00, $310; ARCH- Horses "Jockeys Wgt.Post 8 
‘and three others. —, on Geiviae: pines came Winker  f Gaminned’s bo remarkable rookie because until 
*the popular twin bet, Delaware PLS ens 
Thoughts against nine other crack p)°°% ceeress Was. Fest Ge 
five left-handed batters in his 
‘ness to New Jersey plants and ward as the favorite. Principal op- zauee Rumor (Downs! ROYAL FOOT, 38.60, & 
Romancer (Basile) 
di bh teal C eee Se Hokse site a two-hit game to lead the Scogna JUNE 27 to JULY 16 
ading base-steaier, Case Con- event, a mile trot. Billy Mvyer’s*Moon Voyage . 115! *Grandme G it : : 
Smart Eddie (Gilbert) ...... 
e vy : bBabadora ‘Ferra, 
. ery s « > race! 116| 'Eternal Pame 
the huilding of a calcium and Avery's Jean Chief is accorded;Traceiene al Pam tier Jack George paced the hitting for 
*Presh Breeze ino boy) . 106 
cOut of the Red tno boy) 
’ Fey . | 14 
130 3. old : : . Mes- 
having been done during the (2-year-olds and up: 27 conditioned M. Hirsh-J. Grabosky enry longs purse, $3000; al vane cher-K. O’Conner Entry 
| y willl et 
Miss Stuck Up (Wingate) ey Summerlight 114 Emerald Belle Anchor Belle (no boy) . icin Gite Wroct Between Georgia Ave. and 13th St 
aware River caught 279 porgies. 
Connie Hal (Avery) -2| Michi 113 Gay Sone Surita Hall (no boy) 
son) Ispahan 116! Fire Point Intercept 
‘Trainer Dave Emery. Twenty ay gS ay Frosted il! aH. B. MacCrowe-E. K. Bryson entry 
per Abbe (Walters) 
aLittie Shrew ‘Snel: ngs) 
<entucky Derby winner fell aD, eliethie: 


: 4 7 0 3 WO, 2 90 : 2 . . a i 3 , 
Asked how come. he replied \purses for trotters and pacers. The Grabro iCivitello) VALS KID, $32 oe $9 10. $6.1 THIN DIME, $3.70, $2.% loud boos from the customers BLENDED WHISKEY 84 PROOF + 70% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS 
Filiott's ch hb. (5S) by Charing Cross—Brown Queen 1] by Nic and a man on second in the fifth 
D 
Park is one of a few tracks not ‘Ruth's Guy, Bonnie Scotland, MERE Princess Gala (Mertin} 11 
sJoe Hylan, leading driver at S) by Appealing--Francine C., by Jean Lafitte. Trained by last June he was always a catch- 
-did_ likewise. However, the 
oom (M'ison) 12 
, 
line-up against Wynn's right- | Summer Meeting 
reinstated the “double” | 
a . 
‘ing shoulder that forced George EYler's Tom Dillard. A a D 8 tEndtown (Downs) . 104 15-1) 18 Days of Racing 
2 Case, former Nats’ ace, out of the In the morning rundown, Earl . gges uct etaware EIGHTH RACE—One and one-sixteenth | 
*Littl : r! ees 
ittie Topper purse. 83000, ciaiming for Mityme (McLean) nd ts 
; aMakorbreak ‘no boy) ..+. Tailors tae 9-0 victory over the 
ally bruised the lower end | *Tip-A-Toe *Ambitious ‘ 
nuall: r Fran Hanover is second pick at ie Wek thn cet 
. . ch [Pieldfare (Harr) 
: tar ; *C_over aree 
tissue area that finally brought an excellent chance in the second -" rj 
; g *3 lbs. apprentice allowance claimed Scogna with a grand slam homer 
Comique (Brown) 
Town reopens for three weeks 
BODY AND FENDER WORK Rockvill 
week lay-off No. Horse and Jockey s.| DM. A. Cushman-W. G. Jones entry maidens 1 —-Sailing On, The Biues, Senofun. e, 2. 25 E D. T. Arrive Charles Town 
Shanghai Belle (Robinson) ...... 3 bai Potent mere se Ce ie ney) neem eens tees a 
: This kind of fishermen are hog- Bertha Rosecroft (James) tSuper Mouse Griffith) 
: McLean ) 
; .. When the horse, Air Patrol, _ sECOND RACE—Four and one half fur-, #9 tMailcoach (Griffith) 
Ply Away ‘Huggins ) Conztressional THIRD RACE—Six furlongs: purse, 
wears ago Emery was astride | 
terling Boy (L'Heureux). Bonnie FH 


wo 


>) 


‘ (no driver), Topsy Scots (ne driver). Gen- '*S Ibs. apprentice allowance claimed 
with a shattered leg and had to layne (Rally). me ' 7 apprentice allowance claimed 


bes destroyed. Many fermer THIRD RACE—Six furiongs; trot: purse. , ; 


joc ‘$700; ¢ . * condit ed : s3500. claiming 4-vear-olds Up. 
cr he —s — successful ) oa Teaneck Dandy. 116 (Gorman) 
¢drainers including: Hugh Duf- a ES 


ford, Will Crump, Merritt Sob t : x nwa oh ead +" Merry King, 116 (McCreary) 8.00 5.60 
0 
Ze 


—— st) 9.90 
torn, Frankie Catrone, ‘nanaca, Unediialed. Aethe 


wow 3a a awoD 


Pine Vision 

‘Mary Ann 

Sandglass (no bos) 

*Sir Jinx ino boy 

Roush Cloud (Mattison). 


OI OF eWwWNK-OOBRBDYaewnr- 
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Avonwood (Hansman) 
Vamanos (Snellings! 
tMagna Charta (Wright) .. 


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auanvVewnre 


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6—1%: $3500: claiming: 4-vear-olds wo. olds and up , 
5-1 Hals Pal, i16 (Atkinson) 11.18 5,20 4.16 3 Pied Piper (cilocrt) 


Head Smar' 
Lietor (no 
Adonis (Snellings) handel 


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a . bal Mik Bir no Connie Dridas (Seaman) 
Hicks, John Leyland, Andy | j Columbus # bee tenn Getter snd 
_- j a DOSS AES Set 
: AS oo a ate y other Beer or Al 
know is Leon Garrett, cur- ood ee ae eimeess), Mise | La- ease 16.50 0.80] 5 Linene tugneh) 22 ee ae Loe gg. an ome e a 
mounts are tough to get, Leon |On#%j, Pace;, purse. $000; 3-year-olds and) Takeitoff, aWoc. Cals Jewel. Clyti¢. Lady) § Donna Bones (no BOY) ..++.- a ee mY in fown 
Third Vision (Basile) : eeneneeeennnnnn rn a MR Ms ca 
Biorning; makes sandwiches for spate SOUEES PAID, 285.7 PIPTH RACE—One and one sixteenth 
-} bShucks. 133 (Carter) . 4.40 2.30 
fluties of a jockey'’s valet in Greentree Jr. (Hylan) . . Time, 3:14%% 
b 
ownpour, Garrett appeared at | FIFTH RACE—One and one sixteenth Sis Briar, 116 (Bernhardt) Sis gt 
Biery Hanover (Garrow) Wevmark, 116 (Mehrtens) 6.30 SIXTH RACE—Six furlongs 
rain hat. Somebody remarked, 
uth’s Guy (Daggett) ; .| Blue Kay. 116 (Atkinson) 6.90 2,98 2.60 
enough jobs, now he's going in Winnie L. Wilson (Kelly) Marapahia. Mary L. Lovely Trial Ma aw Up in. 
l Lets Dance. 1°28 ( Jessep) &.70 A.20 Kingross (Civitello) 
the trot tracks concerns “How 1 “ “7 : 
8-2 eee ran. Time 
Perhaps those behind the show Hankie, 118 (Areare) 
ora Abbe. (Lewis), Winnie Direct’ Winged, Bold Leader, Goof 
enough on the actual racing. The Ednamie (Wingate) +h eee Li too 5.10 
Count Vonian (Bel)! Bluesweenp, 11% (McPhee) 
if the win, place and show mu- 
diction that the horses Arch / EIGHTH RACE—Six furlongs: . pace 1 - $3500; maiden 4-year-olds up. | & rather 
site il 
tain Castle (Rosencraats) ... ’ ' Win the Peate. 
eighth race on a half-mile track 


~~ Orr bD 
wu10e -1 


2 


and ae Jean Welaunie (Balzaretti) 
. 1 " id. FOURTH RACE—Six furlongs; 
The hardest working jockey I ligible: i] [ig : claiming; 2-year-olds. ids 
> Ascona 
rently at Charles Town. When | FOURTH RACE—Six and one half fur- Parchesi, 108 (Mehrtens) 5.30 4.30 
: Emillia. Camtrun, aAbbie Co also ran, 
| 1 Dr. Al 
looks for other jobs. At present Al Time, 1 :083% Situnnle (haartens) 
the jock ] I d at. 1%4: $3000: claiming; 3-yesr-olds UD. miles; purse, $4000; the Rehoboth; for 
le jockeys room lunch stan ) 
5-2 Stampede Hi, 140 (Nix) 10 
he afternoon. During a recent | Pesci Re. PryLiangollen Farm en 
jhe finish line wearing hip boots, ‘Up PU £2000: S-vear-olds and 71.00 29.00 13.10, | Rome Empune imeris) 
. 
l 
: Trace ‘Eyler) Pebridgée. Hyson, Resistant. Miss Ga)lbuc, the Oak Grove;:-for 4-year-olds 
“Look at Garrett in that fisher- | ; aE price owen Tb -8'%:| $3000. Sevearolds: maidens.” 
4 7 — 
o . 
: Josedale Counsel (Malistien) > Sailors Choice, 116 (Areare) . 240 2.10) ; Bleek Goods (Bnapp) 
a a line : Y “Six 
the salmon business!” '|Ghancelot. Roanalda, Luty Girl also ran SEVENTH RACE—One and one-sixteenth 
; - 8- .3 Brother Ed. 114 (MeCreary) 
much was bet?” and not, as it 
i 4-1 $3500: 3. “vr -olds aiming. 
dén’t realize that it is possible ‘Eva's Toy, 113 (Atkinsén) 
eggs by putting too much empha- (Browne) lot, Heleneius, Summer Sun and Major 
average fan doesn't care about Rita Direct, (Wingate) eh 4-1 Profane. 11 (Gilson) 
a ene : aight ° 
Pan American “Walters\ aia } Skeleton. Peanuts Girl, Army Marc Ou 
ypsy : ..« 3+1)\Preezout also ran. Time, 1:54%. y 
tuels and the action leading up to Shamrock ts (Hylan) 2 
g up 
‘ 
McDonald. Art Brown and purse, $600; 3-year-olds and up: 21 con- Light hed 124 Orphans Court. 
obubetse 


“3 0: C. Mescher-K. A. 0'Co! het entr Yes—they ou ell 
: ; a r+ i 
Schuttinger and others Dixon)... - aati - — 
$3000: claiming: for 3-year-o! 
McL 
Eyeful Star, 111 (Danisi) 5.60 eee nn theertin? 
he works. horses in the early (oe. Cpren Beles Rare Mineral (no boy) 
Firebet, 13° (Harris) 5.30 32.60 2.20 3. year-olds. 
before noon and rform : 
pe forms the Alda Hanover (Rosencrants) bJoalioy, Reno Olga, Uranium II Iso 
eaches Hanover (Puckett). -%: $3500: claiming: 4- ones olds up 
Rosten Babette, 106 (Danisi) 19.10 te. Rw Some Town (Gilbert) 
big raincoat and wide-brimmed 
Bonnie Scotland ino driver) .1 Shockoe, Iwo Jima, San Bernard. Jono 
| Silver Peg (Myer) ... i tes 5--5*2: $3500 vear-olds: maidens 
man's outfit! As if he didn't have n 
me. 1:09' miles: purse, $2500; claiming; for 4-year- 
THE BIGGEST STORY around 
5.an 
Rogue. Mr MeOreget. Flaming Lady 
should be. ““‘Who won the race?” 
Tedave Lady, 107 (Flutie) 7%? “ne 1a, 20 aha 
t& kill the goose laying the golden | Ron ole ann) ee “Eeider, Gol? 

: ? . SEVENTH RACE—Mile: pace se, May eld. ran. Time, 1:15% : 
sis on total wagering and not $1000; 3- year -olds and up; 17 conditioned || ‘Field. AV V/et bi lebel t 
Duke Harvester iMyer) Billy Perry, 118 (Atkinson). 

the total bet but he is interested 
. . ~] 
Pa : t|\M h Park 
them . . . Contrary to my pre- fom Dillard (Eyer)... » ot onmoul trar 
3 ditioned. *Wianno d 
‘Walter Haight would meet in the 
laos bbs Roses? OF THE FAMOUS NAME 


~ 


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Pome mi ; "? rk ¥ 17 Miss Rounders - 
ico diving» 5.3 109! Desert Gold 

the ailing gelding away to be 

: : Swim Gir) 115' Duke Bl ne 
used as a saddle horse. An op-  47°,° 90 ne ) Briat Bay is| "Beau's First. 

| Impish Peter ain tr peg a | 
. . e Mai yn's Mirac . 

poses, which is just as well, as it Von mouth Me OTK A. f 9; year-olds, vets _ Fine Contes Waly. See Poe Se pee Everybody’s talking about them! Everywhere 
is doubtful if .thus. named he ~ Pair Vielen .... 107 tlucks Joba.” neutral spirits. Frankfort Distillers Corp.,. N.Y. | 


ee oe 
258 


Volburn (Myer) : . 6 ba ‘whi ite’s Plag 
some day, the great clash will not Scotempkin, (Berdier) 5-1 /$Lark Boy... 117\ Miss Round 
materialize. John Manfuso, Chevy 
Ch ; » Chevy te : $2500; maiden 2-year-olds; 
ase owner of Art Brown, gave een, Some, awe 57; LWest Witch ... 110\ Pault Pinder 
Bardia Direct (Gray) oo oe Bandpane 1S ereans 
Anna Belle Mitchell (Alien). Dottie 
| : +, Prisky Queen (Snedeker). ** 53 
Aneroid useless for breeding pur- 
‘ : "9 Z °F (: 
; ‘ej Oy l—%s: $2500: 2-year-olds; claiming. Havey «s+ 1234) Jet Propelled .. . ¢; sa 
wauid have improved the breed wsrenan, 119 (Mera) sso 3-30 '3.00|Honey, Binet" 311 : ace RR TARR you go, you see and hear these two great | | mS ws I 
anyway. Garden Week, 116 (Gilbert).... 7.80 5.40) 3 o Me. “year-olds: claiming. ‘ md, 
absre Normal, 112 (Finnegan). ‘a! 6.40) Pic on 7 Sper 108 aCancellation .. — | d R r d “AM Leun 9 g@ 
; a eee arme, Protanto, Carry Round, Hed- ie-dee: Tn , ; | ; N 
Bullets (et Killick rolar, Gliding Girl, peace Theater, Com- {Fras Poandas -» 11) T WE PUT THE FINGER names.. . Valley Forge Beer an ams ec SCHEIDT B REW! 
jmitment aiso ran ime _ does 
’ _| 2%: $2500: 4-year-olds claiming. Shrewsbury ... . , : . . . 
_maltimore, June 23 (#).—Larry siapinthedart, 106 (Pw'er) 16.20 8.80 $.60| 507 nine tia Hidden FF ON ANY CAR TROUBLE Ale. They're the Popularity Twins! Enjoy tears wonni stow 7 yp) 
Killick captain of the Vermont Beld Dan. 111 (Bencivente)... 12.60 9.40) aFiahting Rebel 114) Hidden . y 
Universit, 1946 q intet bb d Plane Shadow, 106 (Stidham).... ee FE say e M. Crump and Ken lworth Par SS aL 12 FLOZS. sane AS 
Hiversity i: ‘quintet, Ras ae- id Your Highness. Warmoud, ' o ° 
: : a8 list $4000; 3-¥ -olds: all 
cided to play professional basket- 2" WoirPvSressor Lee also a urn ign’: | Me ‘ ios Wat Anthen st tia either of these great favorites... today ! 
“ . ' Puri ive 109 Razzmatazz .... 116 
ball with the Baltimore Bullets. 1.13% ue ap sisices—— | esxeprond 119 
DAILY DOUBLE PAID $101.60. —len ¥ saeee 3-vear-olds wp: aonetey, 
~1.4: 83000: 3-year-olds; claiming lunt Remark.. ee 
AP (Consensus {Tie (Dewitt). 13.40 6.60 4.60) Nava! Base .... ‘+ 2S 
Beld By 114 (Turnbull)..... , n a ose 
AT AQUEDUCT Ceurt Ruler, 114 (Buxten) 11} 
S bE: 


RANDMA G. Fighting Gipsy, Tip- Bleury Street... Bases Loaded, Cee Vee 
A-Toe. 


Shirley's Pride also ran. Time. 1:47 

2.-Whiskey Sour, Plumeletie, Tracelene. _ Ps: $2500; maiden 2-year-olds. 

ok a. Cushman-W. G. Jones Entry, ‘ 23.80 
y. 


onda. . “~ a ‘ ¥3 
t—Mendicant. ‘Othelle, Oi ‘Blazing, 113 (Bowest) 5.80 +> 308 aces OG : ee 
{esalant, Qxheie, Quomacs. Signin 118 Bement. RU TAlet c.g emer Dew =. 18 \. A COMPLETE LINE OF CONTAINERS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE... 
6—Fire Point. G. Ring Entry, Back Talk, Susen’s Care, die Memory also ran. Rosie Berri .... 1 rs) Pe 
zr—thosas Face, Tree Pilerim, Partition. aD teen nen alist (ciaiming ‘Deep Fen ..... 116' Lima A. .-... 07 Pee 8 | | bottl 
a ; ~My; >, 3-year-ol } CES eA 
rutaway, Incheapella, Tanneke. , ; 6.26 4.46 3.00 Mist Baron_ Gal . 107 | Im our Owner Managed Service De- = 12 ounce ond fu quart regu or bores. 
AT MOMOCTH S asey pare, bald iicuter tae EBD eau, 6b Soria am aia, aviaced” Foo Seeks ae oe | bottles and 12 
a ad, Mary arr, ss Ge ts). 20 ys tees is see son and © service ctent! ; 
Rounders. Pull Reward, Alibarre, Crew Cut, silver | Little Noble ... Riar Red ...... tas Al T Service fer An 12 ounce no-deposit ofties a ounce cons. 
&—Sandpaper, Lyns Miracle, Swim Girl.'ciad. Tuppence, Best Behavoir. Mr. Num-| Westminster ... 114 Killeybees noe 8: ae yous =e y 
+I AiR VISION,  Unapproachable, Ses One, Raw Cord also tan. Time, 1:12%,|Wanima ....- 108 soenteate 108 Make Car or Truck 
. 6—1,4; 84000; 4-year-olds up: all ances: pa w te , ah eee EN 
deen Shrewsbury, Hidden Fire. gound View, 1i2 (Mora). + 4.80 3.40 2.60 ME vc cuinds ‘allowance claimed. 
t Remark. Eddieow remid. rotewer, 1D A ay mm dig 4.90 Sao *Seven pounds allowance claimed ALL OVER PAINT JOB 
—Resie Berri. ed b mee a Tinea. Justice, Picture Card, Realior ‘aiso ran, *Three pounds aliowance claimed. Any Car—Any Cover. ¢ 
bg soll ea AT LAUREL RACEWAY ee 49" 


S HARNESS. mek Penner: Li (ender! 730 Bee" ds Program, selection ‘ See ae } VALLEY FORGE DISTRIBUTING CO., Washington 3, D. C. 


: 187 (Porser).. Cennie Hal, Free Hanover, Shanghai : ts ie Mu. , 
a is | ‘eMalien) Sie Pelie Chief. Senater M.. Fly Away. | Budret terms on 1940 and later models Listen te: Bob Welt in Sports Headlines — 6:15 P os | tli 
FR A ¢ E - Treada Boy aiso ran. Time, %. URester Hanever, Scariet Manever, SAFFORD-CHANDLER | Eddie Gollaher in "The Moon Dic! —WTOP—11:30 P ghtly 
2 ee eae ee an saps & een roland. wWeeshy j2né. av See and hear: The Bob Welfl Sports Review Telecast, WTTG (Chonne! $) 6:45 P.M. Mon. to Fri. 
; @-FT.- celal nsel, ". 
BWar Sword, 116 (Nowell). 9.00 5 3 20 3.20 Ruthie Ger. essences ee SALES Bagh SERVICE 


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also ren. Time, 1.554 i Farbes Wanover, Bardia Direct, Cap-\| 629 M St. N.E. AT. 4600 

bMrs. A. Cacoese and E. O. Eling entry. tein Castile, 


Buae. JV TT} P< 


irs. Bower's Rally Defeats Meckley on 20th Hole... 


’ 


Holy N lame, Marx TENNIS-—From P. B3 


Win Junior Tilts 


Holy name defeated Mount Cal- 
vary, 8-2, and Marx Jewelers 
trounced Caithness, 11-1, 
day in National City Junior 
League baseball games at Taft. 
Johnny Passas hit two homers and 
“Pete Cerrick fanned 15 to pace 
Holy Name, while Johnny Hogan 
blasted out a double and two sin- 
gles for Marx. 


Falkenberg, 


Schroeder Win 


consulting his 
Moran, current 
London. 

Rut with the count 4—4 in the 
final set, Falkenburg calmly pulled 
his game together, cracked As- 
both's service to lead 5—4, and 
3 then smashed over a service ace 
2 on match point that whizzed past 
and the beaten Hungarian before he 
could move a muscle. 

The post-match ovation went to 
Asboth and Falkenburg stalked off 
to the polite clapping of a few 
hands. 

Schroeder, the tournament fav- 
‘orite, polished off Rene Buser of 
‘Switzerland, 6—3, 6—2, 7—5; Gon- 
zales toyed with Marcel Coen of 
Egypt, 6—1, 6—-2, §—4 and Parker 
blasted Phil Hanna, New York 
singer appearing in a London 
musical comedy, 6—2, 6—0, 6—4 

Four other seeded players re- 
garded as the greatest stumbling 
block to an All-American 
final also advanced, with 
seeded Jaroslav Drobny of Crech- 
oslovakia knocking out Budge 
Patty of Los Angeles in a five-set 


yester- 


partner. Gussie 


glamour girl of 


- #1 000 001—2 7 
011 020 40x—8 11 
Grigsby: Cerick 


Mount Calvary .. 
Holy Name . 


and 

1m 000— 1 2 32 

. 232 201 10x—-11 15 4 

ee and Faulkner: Brightman 
and MeDousa!l. 


Randall Gets 12 Runs 
th Fifth, Wins, 16-5 


‘* Randall nteall 12 runs in a busy 
fifth inning and downed the Dons. 
16-5, yesterday in an Eastern Re- 
creation League baseball game on 
the East Ellipse. 


1606 0— 5K 12 3 

aa . 004 ©1209 Ox—16 12 2 

“S Benald, Meyer (5) and Tayler: Harvey. 
Pizza (3) and Colbert. 


Ray Riordan Stars 


Ray Riordan pitched and batted 
St..Ann’'s to a 3-0 victory over Holy 
Comforter yesterday in the semi- 
finals of the Catholic Youth Or- thriller. Patty tossed off the fourth 
ganization intermediate baseball] set to conserve his strength for a 
tournament. Ray yielded only four rally in the fifth but the chunky 
hits, and connected for a two-run Czech had plenty in reserve and 
single. jwon, 6—4, 6—8, 7—9, 6—0, 6—2 


sixth- 


a 


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Mrs. Stokes 
Shoots.33 to 
Reach Finals 


By Leila Edwards 

In one of the most exciting fin- 
ishes in District competition, Mrs. 
A.B. Bower, Manor, defeated Mrs. 
Betty Meckley. Kenwood, 1 up 
in 20 holes, yesterday in the semi- 
finals of the Women’s District Golf 
Association championships at the 
Columbia Country Club. 

Mrs. Bower, defending champion. 
caught Mrs, Meckley when 
was playing her best game. 
Mrs. Bower was three down in the 
first six holes, 

Three down and three holes to 
go at the sixteenth hole. Mrs 
Bower regained her game and 
tossed two birdies and a par at her 
opponent to tie up the match on 
the eighteenth green. They halved 
the nineteents and the match was 


closed out when Mrs. Meckley, ex- 
periencing both water hazard and 
semi- Sand trap trouble on the twentieth, 


conceded, 

The best golf of the tournament 
was played in the other semifinal 
match between Mrs. Walter Stokes. 
also of Manor, and Mrs. J. P. Trou- 
chaud, Kenwood. Mrs. Stokes. a 
favorite to go into the finals. found 
herself 2 down on the frent nine. 
but rallied on the home side to 
shoot a magnificent 33 for a 4-23 
win. 

Her score of 75 tied the course 
record for women's 
golf. 

Mrs. Bower and Mrs. Stokes will 
play at 10 a. m. today for the title. 


RESULTS IN THE FIRST FLIGHT 
Mrs. A. B. Bower. Manor. defeated Mrs 
Betty Meckley, Kenwood, 1 up. 20 holes: 
Mfs. Walter Stokes, Manor, setepted Mrs 
P poedhaud Ken wood 
FIRST FLIGHT CONSOL ATION 
Mrs Howard. Kenwood. defeated 
Miss Elinor Finckel, Columbia. 1 up: Mrs 
John Ives. Columbia eee ed Mrs. John 
Méencos, Belle Raven. -3 
SECOND Fi IGHT 
Mrs. John ——. Columbia. defeated 
. Charles Egenroad, Washington. 3-? 
. Calvert, Washington, defeated 
hahan, Prince Georges. ! up. 
SECOND FLIGHT CONCOLATION 
rs. George Jani, Congressiona), de- 
feated Mrs. Roderick Watson. Manor. 2 up: 
Mrs. George Bailey, ir.. Washington. de- 
feated -Mrs. H. L. Lacey. Manor. default 
THIRD FLIGHT 
. Sam Brown Woodmont. 
. Gillam, Melle Haven 
avies. Mano 
Babcock, 


Rex 


defeated 
y up 
de- 


H 
Frank}li Chery 


Roy Bris ter 

Milton Harris, 

Mrs. Arth 

defeated Mrs. 
2-1. 


Was hineton. defeated 
Woodmont. 1 up, 19 
ur Phelan. Chevy Chase. 
Paul Barefoot. Washington 


FOURTH FLIGHT 
Lockett. Kenwood. defedted 
ter Morrill. Kenwood. 2 up: /Mre 
> . Columbia, defeated Mrs./ Jac 
Howard, by default 
FOURTH FLIGHT CONSOLATION 
Mrs. H. M. Nelson, Washi ngton, deteated 
fells. Kenwood, 6- 
PAIRINGS TORBAY 
ower and Mrs 


i! Rex How- 
ard vs Mrs. John Ives at 10:05 

Second flight—Mrs. John Kerkam Co- 
lumbia. vs. Mrs. G Ww Calvert at 19 

Second flight consolation —Mrs Geares 
Jani and Mrs George Bailey, ir.. at 10:20 

Third + ere Sam Brown vs. Mrs 


4 

cronasolation— Mrs Ror 

| Arfhur Phelan at 9°45 

Mrs. & . Lockett 
9°30 


t consolation- 


Rrister va. 
Fourth h 
Mrs. Fred Trew at 


Brewers Win, 
Tie for Lead 


v* 


The /Heurich Brewers knocked | 


Sunnybrook Tavern out of undis- 
puted lead of The Washington 
Post-Industrial League by beating 
the Tavermen, 12-5, yesterday on 
the South Ellipse. The Brewers, 


‘Sunnybrook and Cameo are all 


tied for first place with 3-1 rec- 
ords. 
Heurich AB 
FP’ cis.cf.rf 
K'man,2b 

G’ rich. ef 


° 


Oo-woerHOooocwPr 


S’ybrook AB 
Cc Cm i,3b 


M’ Lael 2. 

Bladen.c.cf 
Quinn,.1b. 
Evans,if.. 
Loomis,ss. 

Walsh.2b. 
B’kford,rf 
Becraft.p. 
Z'linsky.p 
JI.C’omi.cf 
Greer.... 


Totals 


-- 


° tre Bm hr BD BOO 
Wh we We & Ww 
SOND OK WHOWWSO 


Aq’ lino. if 
Aud. rf. 


aS 
& | Ore CSHOWUWNNO 
~~ oe, 


2 ooOonnewoooco-copP 


Totals. 2 
31 


nN 
ros 
~~ 


oe 


Heurich . 
Sunnybrook. ' » 
Runs——-C. Ciomi. Moreland (2) 
(2). Geigereich, Castiglia (2), k 

(2). Barry. Zanelotti, Valenti 

lino, Quinn. Evans Runs batted 
Vaienti (2). Norris. Evans, Bickford. 
Blatien (2). Quinn. Geigereich (2). Zane- 
lott] (2). Prancis. Barry. Two-base hits 
Moreland. Castialia (2). Geigereich. Home 
run -~ Rarry. Three-base hit Quinn 


ou 
| 
- 


li @O OS906-cOonN-+WwWHNOR 


Quantico Beats Sailors 


Rusty Gates slammed out a 
homer and three singles § and 
drove in four runs as the Quantico 
Marines whipped Anacostia Naval 
Receiving Station, 17-8, yesterday 


411 830 O80-——17 21 6 
O24 100 O10— 8 11 5 


Brace (5). 


Quantico 

Anacostia 
Kohler, 

ringhaus: 


Pope (9) and Nied- 
Dean and Fex. 


Mrs, Kinsinger Wins 

Mrs. Walter Kinsinger’s 
22—-71 won low net honors at the 
ladies day golf tournament at In- 
dian Spring Country Club yester- 
day. Guest laurels went to Mrs. 
Margaret Murphy of Congressional! 
with 91—+17—-74 


£ 


. ae 
Be ASE SREY = Sys Se Ww ras oe = 
Arse » TE Saas 


The gin 
IMPORTED 


GIN | 


HIRAM 


ALKERS 


Distilled 
London Dry 


ae te with . 
BOTANI CALS f 


HIRAM 
PE roma! 


98 proof. Distilled from 100% Americon groin. Hirom Welker & Sons Inc., — us 


she | 
and Mill 


competitive : 


93— 


Bob Brownell, 


Bachman in 
Second Round 


Rachman Robby 
led the favorites into 
the second round of the Congres- 
sional Member-guest Invitational 
by defeating Frank McArdle and 
Ed Finnessy yesterday, 2 and 1. 
Finnessy shot a 68 but couldn't 
cope with Brownell's 66 and a team 
best ball of 63. 
Pirst Round Results 
0 goed and Bre awn eli 


r 
| 


Harrv and 


Brownell 


i Seana and Bri ees 
Bogart defeated Eng! sh ‘an 
Eoerts and Rutiey deteatec 
nd Cross, 3 and 2: Kavanaugh anc 
defeated Preuit and Gardner 3 
Neuland and Ault defeated Ga.- 
lagher and Overton 1 up: Nolan ana 
Edmondson defeated Jenkins and McCabe 
1 up: Frederick and Swearinger defeated 
Furiow and Morris. 1 up. 19 
Second Flight -Bouscaren and Cornwel) 
defeated Beck and Pitt. 6 and §:; 
and Fitzgerald defeated P. J. ! 
Bowers, 1 up 21; Bogert’ and Nordlinger 
defeated Gregg and iliis, ‘ 
and Heron defeated 
1 up: Dezendor{ and sactistent 
Schoenfeider and Jankowski, 2 up: Cornel 
defeated Mihi! ils and Gib- 
. Zandi. Harvey and Jenkins defeated 
Nee and Corby. 4 -and 3: Gabriel ana 
urnham defeated Given and DuFour 
up 
Toird Pliight—Whalen and Rhoades de- 
feated Moore and McAleer, 4 and 3 - 
Neil! and Baldwin defeated Brewer 
Fleming, 1 ip Radice and Thompson 
defeated Burgess and Holsberg, 1 up .20 
Warner and Barrett defeated Melsing and 
Palmer. 1 up: Peterson and McGeed dé 
feated Fiood and Rice, 6 ana 5 O'Connel] 
and FPerguson defeated Dezevalios and 
Murphy. 1 up 19: Currey and Herford. de- 
feated Scalessa and Daniels, 4 and 3 
Boclen and Bubb drew bye 
Today's Pairings First Flight—12:55 
Bachman and Brownell vs. Hunt and 
Puryear: 1:00. Wheeler and Hogart : 
Fbhert« and Rutley: 1:05 mavesnaen and 
Fuchs #. Neuland and Ault; 1:15 
ericks and Sweari nger vs 
Edmondson Consolation—1:20, } 
and Finnessy vs. Evans and Briggs 
Jobe vs Mills 
and Gardner 
1:40, Furiow 
Jenkins and McCabe 
Second Piight—1:45. Bouscaren 
Cornwell vs. Lennon and Fitzgerald: 1:55 
Hagerty and Nordlinger -vs. Briggs and 
Heron: 2:00. Dezendor{f and MecLister vs 
Cornell and Semmiler: 2:05,./ Harvey and 
Jenkins vs. Gabriel and Burnham. Con- 
solation—2:10. Beck and /Pitt vs. P. J 
Nee and Bowers: 2:15, Gregse and Will! 
vs. Kendall and Trew: 220, Schoenfelder 
and Jankowski vs. Mihills and Gibdso: 
2:30. Nee and Corby vs./Given and DuFour 
Third Plight—-12. Whalen and Rhoadce 
ve, MacNeil and Baldwin: 12:05, Radice 
and Thompson vs. /Warner and_ Barret' 
12:10. Peterson an@ McGee vs. O’Conne)) 
and Ferguson 2/20. Currey and Herfor< 
vs. Roeglen and Bubb. Consolation-—-12:25 
McAleer and Herman vs Rrewer and 
Fleming; 12:3 Burgess and Holsberg vs. 
Helsing and /Palmer: 12:35. Fileod and 
Rice vs. Ditelassis and Murphy; 12:45 
Scalilessa arid Daniels drew bye. 


FBI Wins, 12-3 


5 


and /Morris 


anc 


Federal Bureau of Investigation. 


routed Washington Gas Light Co.. 
12-3, yesterday in a Departmental 
V.eague baseball game on the West 
Ellipse. Rush Buckley, with three 
hits. drove in two FBI runs and 
scored two himself 

AB OA , 


f) 


—-OONnWrootr 


owe wwe YO 


> 
3~j3D3a32>-3ae29>F 


4 
4 
2 
4 
‘4 
4 
4 
> 
3 


Rr'dock.p 

Cullen.p.. 
Totals 13 27 10 
Washington Gas Ce..... 010 001 O00-— ° 
FBI 213 005 1ix—13 
Morris (2), Bahlow 
(2), Kovaluks 


_s 


Pa) 
~) 
~ 


To'ais 


Runs—-McBabe (3), 
(2) Murmin Buckley 
Ritchie Biaszek, Cullen. Frrors—-Brad- 
dock. Deannsberger (2). Kovaluks. Me- 
Cahbe. Kine Runs batted in-—Blaszek 
(2). Buckley (2). Cullen, Ritchie. Collins 
|MeCabe (2) Bahlow (2). Two-base hits- 
| McCabe Riaszek Bahlow Buckley 
iFrolen bases Collins, Kinesbury. Strike- 
outs— Braddoc 5: Cullen, 6 Walks 
Rr addock. _6; Cullen, 1 


BASEBALL TONIGHT 


WASHINGTON 


vs. 


CLEVELAND 
GRIFFITH STADIUM 


*.* —. 


8:30 P.M. 


Take Up fo 
12 Months to 
Pay for Major 
Repairs. 
Rebuilt Motors 
$15 Down 
6TH & NEW YORK AVE., N. W. 
SRD & H STREETS N. E. 


Truck Center, 2001 W. Va. Ave. N.E. 


GE Coaches-All-Stars Lockman’s Ankle OK 


Cincinnati, June 23 (* 
Shotton, manager of 
lvn Dodgers, toda, 
his appointment a 
League all-star coach bys 


Billy Southworth of 
Braves, 


— Rurt 
Brook- 


was notified of 


St 


today 
Whitey 


Louis, June 23 (4).—<X-rav 


disclosed no fractures 
Lockman's right ankle and 
the New York Giant outfielder is 
expected return to the lineup 
in a few days. Lockman was in- 
ured the first inning of last 
night's game, 


the in 


as National 
. 


Manager 


the Roston } 
who will pilot the team 


in 


RONNEY CASH MEMORIAL 


AUTO RACES 


TOMORROW 2:30 P. M. 


Practice and Time Trials 1:30 P. M. 


7 BIG EVENTS 7 


yuasy RING AN OUTSTANDING 
OF RACING STARS AND 


Prices (inc. tax): Infield, $1.00; Bleachers, $1.50; Reserved Seats, $2.00 


FREE PARKING AT THE TRACK 


For an afternoon of thrills eqme to the new and convenient 


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june 24, )949 


POST ’ 
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Rare Regal Sal 


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Regal hardly ever hos @ shoe sale! Hurry for costly imported 
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Lace ee oe oe oe 


Sale Only at 14th and F Sts., N.W. Open Thurs. Eves. 
and 915-917 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. 


Orher Regal Stores in Boltimere, Nerfokk end Richmond 
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Rent that spare room through a Post 


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ay 


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These fine beers and ales 
new available in Washing- 
ton in quarts or 12 oz. One- 
Way glass bottles. 


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remember—iF [1S REALLY FIRST CLASS: 


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ae 


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I) A Lh - A Milan Mpa 


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5 
" 
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‘,% 


» 5 
| 
; ’ 
7 . ; ded ; j ; jt / gi oe 
ee” sea j fy j ; j i, J 4 ts es bets eeiv-w , "OP teee 
HABA ELUATE EEE LIE, | 
¢ 


eer 
*? ss 
Ae # ‘« 
‘ * 


nee OOCC OLA 4 
wi .\ 


a 


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AAR WENN LENOLO IU LLOEGR 


PIU i 


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SS . *. : 
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4/77 “s 
* 


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WUiL. Ws \ i @ 


; : fy) tk 1, 
Ait ' nine M i . 
* hae Peeebe he ees ; 
j "2 es ae 


= 


TE 


—_ 


dSlashes Wages 


A 15 per cent wage reductioe 
for ail employes of the gr 
liu Faper Co. Lid.., bone 
efiect immediately, Was —— = 
Thursday by Staniey S. Taylor.@ 
president. 

Taylor sa) 


v. Presiden 
f : 

ad a reduction of busi- 

ness brought about by ‘ne ae 

shore strike was the reason » 

the wage siash and if the “g . 
Bis prolonged it may result in tur 
mther cuts. 

He also annou 
working hours for 
;** 


’ 7 
: | Shy 
ti 

’ 

|3 
‘i? 


need a change 15 
employes C0! 
Instead of bei 


aim 26o|close, July rye was ¢ 


from od Said 

onday throug 

rill now open 2 
on 


t 8 a.m. aud close# for 


e 
Monday, Tuesd 


fir 
Satifactory 


fem 
=3 
Sd : 
e* TAYLOR'S announcement | 
thn part:  t. Cut back 
“If the strike continues Maes in tn, 
mean iurther and. more pick 
reductions. These rt gre cided . 
not be elimninater’ until Staff furtp 
. ‘ns to normaicy. 

re The end of the strike 
ignal the return to NOM for th. 
he damage done to the eco%cle, Ho oe 
Hawaii takes months, aBthe strip. 
strike termination, to rece 

a ee eee 


udd 


USin fof emplo 


s. 
me S€4sonaily 


CUL bacis’ 
er. " Our regular 


vee 


¥chen) 
Sharp. 
$s: ° 
X Scars 
Seiberli 
Simmo 
Snriece} 
S:andar¢ 
Stewart- 


e 
May Sales a 


As 


Adee he 


> —— 
- 


’ 

: ' 
; 
: 
a | 
; 

: 

: 

é 

s 
_ 


“ ". _ « 
a e 
> 


jet 


by Frank Chow, near-blind poultryman 
Twenty-four younger chickens 
eat the substitute food. 


Feed Shortage Hits 
Poultryman’s Flock 


It was Frank Chow's 33rd bicthdey Je Thipreday, but wet 
‘tua very happy occgsion for the near-blind young poultryman o 
iS Waiestnalo. Ue had just buried 24 six-weeks-old chickens, dead 
ro starvation, from a flock that he has counted on to support 
his wife and family of three children. 


pnically enough, Frank Chow, 
is a former Honolulu stevedore,;, | 
and @ former executive officer gt — | 
the very union which hag sh f 
the feed that he so dés 

eeds to save his flock 

In a final effort to 

ank has been t 


| 


200 


‘oe 101—STeI-NSNpUt OT 


"tee da 


t of Lew. 


) fex-duty. 


ri] did ks ny 
: Noth. : 
We dem |The domesti® ~... 


se 


It was announced Thursday by the Honolul 


total of 1,942 workers will have lost their jobs. 


Commerce that 348 business firms, in answer to a questionnaire 
sent by the chamber, report that 906 emploves have heen laid off 
since the strike began May L, and that if it lasts until June 15, a 


sé% Wews ~@« whee 
uests making 
round-the-islar 


Sed. Radway has . he 


' 


Crewmen 
| Lurlin 


{)pen 1 


u Chamber of | 


- fram . 
vertieer : Overwh » 


. > + 
THESE. FIGURES do not in-.since May 1 of 
clude those on strike and repre-|more, 61 a 25 per 
.sent only partial returns 


tionnaires were sent to a list of| 
both large and small business' June 15, 38 firms 
firms. of 10 per cent or 

Twenty-seven small business-/ of 25 per cent, 58 
men said that if the strike con-| per cent or more. 


| If the strike 
uncnan2ggd 
sales of 

The w 
» ished 3 ' 
higher, Sqeee?™? 
The spot ’ 
‘sugar hel 
world at 4, 
Cuba and 
cents ~a po 


. 


have to close up, liquidate thei 
assets and dismiss their employes. men said 
Two-hundred thirty eight firma, 


sharply since May 1. 
range from 1 per cent, lowest re- manager, 
ported, to 100 per cent on the part 

of nine businesses, 
Ay, One-hundred thirty 
 taareported a decline 


one 
Cook, one second 
lwasher, 


| Open inte ‘wc 
lures Was an 

jlracts at thet two firms 
in business! 


-— 


The 50 per cent decline, and 
-ichamber reported that 1,650 ques-icline of 75 per cent 


@tinues beyond June 15, they will/of 75 per cent or more 
HERE I8 WHAT the busimess- 


The owner of a small hotel re- 
reported that business has dropped| ported that on June 


Decreases lay off'12 employ es. il 


nhouseman, 


two waiters, 
,maids, one yardman, and one util- F"" 
(Continued On Page 5, Col. 8) ‘ 


Another 
Follows! 
Barrage 


embers af the Lurt 


May sist, Mr Sehmidt 6 


19 per cent o 
cent drop, 26 a 
22 a de- 


so 


rew ™ 
. z hes ship Saturday, hat - 
inds of the awe oat 
P estion that ® tr 
. hallot takes 


' 

houl th hie. | 

“shou he snip, 
we are willing iti 


superv* 


continues until 
expect a decline 
more, 89 a drop 
a deciine of 50 
and J9 a decline 


By Radiovphe 
HAWI, Kel 
10—The IL 
rebuff ia 
voles among 
ions tonight 
Nohala plag 
the strike by 


heir ewn 
giadly 


earry 
bi 
ich they. Be dou 
; (he picket lines. which 
oss 
pager 7g” jpeumstances. 
«a GROL PO 


\ MEMBERS. 
do wader whe * 


se we fear eB 
evealed 


LURLINE UNIO 
atures pecat 


win 
ars no Si’ \dentity be | 


be 
etter nould our \de 


ow B.—This te" 
x from the Union » 


} 
‘ 


he had to 
ang the mal 
cniel 
COOK, one Gdish-% 
three room 


pulsion 
’ “$i 


. 
Tue OVE 
> eee against 
ivi.0wed Suz 
gneewng at 
changé w 


: The snap bea hl be timin OD . . ’ 
ong presenting TPA, ABOUP A MON 


+? , he im , 
lhe VM ital tuKcens brought iti Vn Tal orpil 1} 


_ inte Natio ai snc mendat oi) 


aah 


onal connect 


: ; 3 r’ 
pDOoINnis (“om the 
~-* — 


_ An Appeal For Help From 


No Americans have ever received such unfair, un-American treat- 


ment as the people of Hawaii have been suffering since May 1, 1949. 
WITH NO RELIEF IN SIGHT. 


Hawaii's life line of ships has been cut by a Union of only 2,000 
members, only 500 of whom are even American citizens. No ships can 


come in—none can go out (except relief food shipments by “courtesy” 
of the Union). 


Even ships loaded with food in our harbors won't be worked— 


and food is spoiling because, with their vital cargoes, they sailed after 
the Union started the strike. So—they are “hot.” 


No monopoly ever prosecuted under the Sherman-Clayton Anti- 
Trust Act, has ever. been as vicious or as complete as we in Hawaii 


face—And the government does nothing. 


This monopoly control of the destinies of over half a million peo- 
ple is being run and directed by Harry Bridges and his lieutenants 


Louis Goldblatt, Henry Schmidt and Jack Hall—heads of the ILWU in 
San Francisco. 


These men, with lesoht leaders, have decided that the business 
people of Hawaii are either going to run their businesses according to 
ILWU orders, or be starved out and ruined. 


Because the business men of Hawaii have learned after 15 years 
of experience that under this ILWU union and its leadership there 
can NEVER be labor peace, and that there is no sincere desire on the 
part of the Union for labor peace, they have as one man, big and 
small, ‘through utter necessity, agreed to stand together and resist 
further demands, if it takes every dollar they have. 


To submit to further compromise would lead to the same result. 
We have no choice. 


an 


Thus, legally, a handful of men are starving out and bankrupt- 


ing an entire American Community, fully backed by American labor 
laws! 


At the start of the strike we had 9,000 jobless in all Hawaii. 


futher Am —" Tie —“Terraay. Tigers eenergny 


I Feed Shortage Cuts 
4Milk Production 1 


Oahu’s fresh milk production already has been cut abou 
per cent by the strike-induced feed shortage, Bes the ss 


me more and more rapid f until ship-& 
dain tebumedt cetheiiis b erly > ae now until ship- 


nless definite relief is in sight this week, there will be a 
sharp ourtaRnent in production,” 
rge 


0% , trangling ILW 
st » 


’ 
’ 


a 
P Ngee 
y 


Today we have 18,800 and the numbers are pyramiding each 


week as firm after firm runs out of merchandise, and cannot contiave 
te carry on. 


No one can buy food without money—and that is running out. 


The firms that can bring in merchandise by air mail or by parcel 
post (by Army or Navy transports), find that the people who have 


money are afraid to buy anything but sheer necessities for they know 
not what the future holds. 


The Army and Navy can bring in its cargoes, which are unloaded 
by this same Union at going pre-strike rates. 


Why? Because if the Union refused, the services would unload 


their own ships. \ 


But it is illegal for civilians to unload—or load any of their car- 
goes. If they do, another branch of the same Union will refuse to sail 


the ships; if the ships do sail—the same Union in San Francisco will 
declare the ships and their. cargoes “hot.” 


If stevedores in San Francisco did unload, the warehousemen 
(same union) would refuse to handle it. 


Hawaii has appealed to the President. He will do nothing but 
send Labor Conciliators. Arbitration is not the answer to a wage 
dispute. 


Our governor apparently can legally do nothing. 


In the meantime a pestilence, Union-made, spreads over all 
Hawaii. 


This advertisement is pa 


scriptions of thousands of 
losing everything--jobs, I 
forthcoming promptly. ~ 


scheduled air service io 507 4040 Wit wero uiauager, salt 
ory on Sunday. reservations are coming in rap 
© has-issued 'Y from all over thegerritory 
~ ——@ everywhere, Many o 


* the ran 


ursday totaled 906 


the reck] 


“8 result of the 


£ 
Islands than at 


any time in # 
last If sears. Olnerwise w ie 50 


oo eia Twenty eas 


USiness off ee 


: t’ at 7 


"0 y S\N ee 
+. See ceReeceemees UUM ite ae Tete ar! Tat | | . 1 | 
ti ttt Wise x Pe TTR a : SHG WASHINGTON POE? 


sa eam a 
\ Ay mar me 04 aA a sh) vo ggn oprett ttt, 8) copes pe eees 
>... 5 ys ait iim edlaareliaal lalate Jews 2, 190 


‘ : ; 
soaps fb oo 
fiver eges ? 
i Pies etze ise ~ 
CH fh 


Aad ¥\\ ' AY ' My A 

, -. + : TAAL ' Av 

° taste e+ ce A Wa \ a,” ; 

se Se Ee oD Ei We 

. 7 +. . ae . xs 

_ 

. +) : : ' t 

‘ 7. mee oer: A, a Mm . 
/ ’ *4 Pe ite é sas 

s ie x > 2 Z 


S 


“ST OPN SVPPE=  TeTeS ERT PErTT ETT Teer” rreet reer reree ef iferciereert 


—s 


" 


ee - 


a a” oe — 


are 
Ls eget solicite ' ; f: “| ' “a «© , SER Cy ae 
« be “ ted, , | | bd tional | “You don't get those sitting in/>#2 ®t 
3 | 0 announced that . ar , . | tenn: . mdt—not there,” snorted) “22 
rday. The clubs i U R f tee¥ 
gional playof | \ hion e uses ok” ) ? 
Kaulukukui ' . all players think they 


k 
inst pome wes. . ¢ . ToUn] d d but they don't know gy * 
| . ~' \ .? Oa o0° is te realy work. De Z, 
, re es | F) 5 k a ball player gets ou 
ce exams ar@ p ; «er 4 x m 2 Sh o golfer and hits base 
1éu was emcee ‘ v ° a* a : | | 0 Ips hours on end until Je, “+, 
: onoly); e no , V's Ws ' : 7a The ILWU Strike poles m in his sleep” Ana * my 
‘al we : mittee Thy etre dl ' Com-Bhk they play in rai 
| ‘No’ To i 4 Seem of f ¢ ¥. th n , Pig OY BO 8 rh , Re \unloadin aT ruled against) we de?” 
. sh ' & ‘ . dstuf 
Ps has » : , 0m freighter by fs from the Mat- ie ae 
aWalian 


a ' 4 : PY a ' ¥ 's JGTTR : 
Tieup 4Y Mornin < yl ge St \ Added}. Thursday. Citizenfiton contends 


LL w + > ¢ *. CS , But | 
ht- Wing Oo P< cee ut the work of unl as a baseball 
oe —e y Po Ae» Nn ¢ van freighters in Honolulu and soe at game like 


J rt Was = > ¥ \4 : ° , & ™m ase after other j 
i | Spec@lPute ove, ida) ; « pe eee &< * XS om others are ’ Said. sland Ports continued, ' sao 
oF . . » x . remembe 

Advertiser _ wie’ ot eg of Castle @ oie ae ie ot oe vata . bands , » becau: COMPANY OFFICIALS gh-soun 

+ umn i : . AT al : : ‘1Ke 5 : m ‘ ; -_ zs 
red its first Boinerea bye nd ; EP LM PE hy , nO REALLY |, ard | Hawaiian Mer. vite . fe 
: m . . , . . 5S : wo os i ) 
gar strike & Sunday _ : 4. sd J Other members ; ae ,. Vs. 2 % Y My » Decay: | 1 of a be com to n>. 
waii planta. Br column 44 been plan food. No @.; |Pionship team are o> DP Pe Dp ‘gt i “i ‘Ke 4 STEWS Would start st app anda But 
Unit 13 at a tishe , MEF for tog ‘sikane, Ah Toon Soon. . , Isthmian on thee 


Ued seBueyo 
A100} Ja 581,08 
aauav~ 


eid ou 


jeay 
petuei! 
4 @ 8349) O¢i¢ 


9M SB Buiseg tad c. masaccme nn 


vl 
d 


{1} @801) aul 

Ww uo}I0y 

e490 Oj 
sureuz 

aol 


39 


loading edit, 
Shr, i 


ine 


iseFTiQa a 
SOMO 5? 
“@>2 Z uey; 


know 
hen, 


‘Spunod paipun 


aus 
Sz 2z$ 


[ 


‘ 


ay Bind |* | ee] ory. et chitdren go hie a PP. (reighter Steel Fives 
>t .ine k Kaaihue, Stanley Hoohu 3 | The fet ov “unery,” ~oie @t Pier 24 yer 
oe. See ym Honok of un | Qex ; : 
. ‘MOCheCOn , af /Cituzen to be a 
Mo 
. “ Tite; r fiday an ' | : , ' > » a >, : . ¥ : 
NG deci- lan. Bu lay “pled f q the girls’ ‘softball leagi a > 2 Cviouonoluly |? is 10 do ©, Ala, its las iF Cs 4 : p prrespondcaP 
Ge | rid , ona,, Yellow Jackets, 16 to 6. Lillian > : . Pupil ; : Ca 
° ot j * ida : se gee eg Middlewies Cafeter, seas , ‘ oo nned 8000s, Castle & 
H. ‘a & $. Co. fo Halt 


$3 , che} : 
Margin. day ev | bt 7 Si Hawaii mi) oS fk “Ne 7 - 
Yeu rr ; J EI 4 fds “4, . ‘ ? le / " ; 
mn W Cunesday. since it left Mob i lip “te Me “ | “ é “ salen tio 
OF @ day de dog, ' t,. 4 6G fp ees a 
gar strike everal t ureo,| Noble FPilialoha’s Rockets wort’. 7 KAII L began KN 
sug “itu n id ; fay 1. Aboard the ship are® — Bein bp OM League op 
mnasium ‘ r 
ty pnuet te $0 fond bas a of Tal eak- Glover was the winning pitcher] tives Rute wauriey | fagies) 


| vara Kalama | o> t | YOO & © ho i ty Se) =r Weer. a The union ruled the 
. Loe ~ Napes us : , .* , ie ; et< . 
with Son n aee last 2 GIKLS LEAGUE & e % 6 “. Lia’ unload | Uurn t vu: ts irike Ship 
Main! 
< : | ‘Mand port, afte the strike ‘Ur, % % “Hy, Ae, Yn,“ |: oy play in the 2 
: ‘ . . : an i ; 
Public mass week. s ' ee mailitheir third game by crushing the! es! " @azue. ul x 1 an the Te; i $22 tons of feed and 56 sit 
y tons of 
Canka ys 
members a a -——~m - 4 ab thea “a OC fri e ompe 
WAILUKU, Maui, June 9 (By Radiophone)—Ha» aitian Com- 


mercial & Sugar Co., largest cane producing plantation in the 
United States, stopped all harvesting operations this afternoon 
The same Union promises a sugar strike in the near future— throttle an ENTIRE community. at both the Puunene and Paia sections. 
In announcing the shutdown, Asa Baldwin, manager, told 
employes that boiling house oper-}| 


but without boats our warehouses are already full and the industry That is what is happening in Hawaii. RIGHT NOW. ations at the Paia mill will con-| $950 000 Suit 
| 9 


tinue until 10 p.m. Saturday, and 


is already slowing down. Soon it will stop for lack of storage space nog Peel A gegenygy ab 


We do not believe that any laws of the United States were ever as all cane on hand at the mulls| : 
a strike, so workers (same Union) can receive Unemployment after the shutdown will be grou 


calculated to protect 2,000 union members, against the best interests “WHEN WE SHUT DOWN,” 
benefits. Said, “there will be storage sp 
, 000 for a week or 10 days ol pr 
of 540, . tion. This space is being 
vacant so that when we start 


Witho in. The peak | 
Berea On for care, cur prnnmpere lncustry faces ruin. The pes THAT is what is happening right now in Hawaii! ‘vesting after the shipping 
of the crop will be ripe by July and will have to rot in the fields. Their lends, 60 he Sees 
: | We do not believe Veterans of World War | or Il, who have ' “after the shipping strike is 


employees (same union) will also be out of work and of course en- Be Pig rete ape 
‘ship from the Mainiand to 


| mee | started businesses of their own, should be legally crucified by an . | . 
titled to Unemployment benefit payments. | . werne in: Soe | Rabulul. Is the seontiog 
Union— , ‘take out 6,000 tons. Howey 
‘tween the time this ship 


Our tourist business has cancelled out, though prospects had in- , ‘pnd tha MONE One arvives it 


probable we wil! find it n 


dicated the largest summer travel in history. THAT is what iS happening right now in io store more sugar.” 
{ BALDWIN SAID emp! 
needed in the mills will be 


This legal boycott and monopoly is a situation which is without Hawaii! rea tage” ag he valine 


;work will last about 10 


stwo weeks. Then, for 


flag. 

parallel under the American flag | | on ofthe steike its 
al | jreduce the wérk week, 

es . . on employes doing necess 
Official Washington says in effect “It's Your Baby. You Handle | toe apy Bannerman 

It “ irrigation, and dairy. 

.. : ' bo ee : mS “It is hoped,” Ba'dwin 

Like most American citizens we are NOT in a position to prove th's plan to reduce the 


jor every one will 


that this strike is Communist directed. But we do know that every pees baa 


| . . a 
justice that is being —_ move in this whole picture for 15 years tallies exactly with the Com- ; ,Donald Smith, gene 


: of the Pacific Chemica 
. ee . . ee . . . 2C . H lul , 
Won't YOU who know Hawaii, or who do business with Hawaii, munist manuals and teachings—without any exceptions. We do know ‘taat. tee aaaely OC 6 
. . . . ° . plied by his company 
or who as just plain honest Americans believe in a fair American that every Communist list as issued by the Un-American Activities epee eines 
cused up, their supp’ 


We pray that the American people will recognize the grave in- 


Joves and Laugnun 
Lu'.ens Stec! odes 


if 
deal, and are against unfair legal practices, give this American terri- Committee of the House of Representatives, contains as listed Com- 


- Satine help? | -munists the names of the men who are crucifying Hawaii. eee aiatpennat Strike Blamed 


‘As3 More TH 


Liggett & Myers , ob ° ‘ 
York, for Harry Bridges in San Francisco, and for the ILWU leaders in Fen Tesessa and worth Fin ms Cut P av 
Am. & For. ‘nd. Pe tem, Three more of Hawaii's leading 


’ . 
Hawaii, i$ the same man—Richard Gladstein. Amer. Pow. & i. ri preset. bY jfirms Or Organizations announced, 
. of 


~ 


Nothing short of SPEEDY action by Congress can help. We know that the principal attorney for the Communists in New «Amer. Tebacce “S" 


—_— = a + 


We do not believe that the makers of labor liens ever envisioned 
vilding up the power of a single union so as to enable it to legally 


reductions in salarie t 
‘columbia Gas & E : & vesterdavi 
Commonwealth ‘ _ Fp, cause of the effects of the 47. ¢ 
| u Commonwealth, Es t 7 om, 24¥-Old waterfront strike which e 
: x Cons. Edison of N. is blockadin H j ‘ 
| Elec. Pow. & Lt... ... n Dir they o- g Hawaii, t 
General Public Utuits y Ore:i: . 
imeois Pow .... # American Factors. 
National Pow. & Lt.. Le C, Brewer & Co 
North Amer , 


Co... ae lawaiian Sugar anters-—Acen. 

oY by the voluntary sub- We know that the people of the 48 states DO NOT KNOW what Brite Tel. & Fel. oe we [ % : we isthe 
| os i | FACTORS AND HSPA are mak- 
DEE of Hawaii ao who face the people of Hawaii are up against—and we can’t seem to find any- mencwiehts ; | strsight1© per cent cut while 
>¢ savings we if help is not : one in America that gives a damn. 13,000 Chi ck 3 jen the first $500 and 10 per 
99 


« 
a 
+ = ’ 


e cut by American Factors 


isn’t there someone in the Congress of the United States or in high H atchin g E g gs pate Ma tnaay while tha 
effective Ju! r 
official position who. will help? PROMPTLY? Are Dest roved. @ July 1. 


A total of 13,000 chick 
’ $ and 
. : : stroyed on Oahu because poultry§ 
gfeed is not available due to th 
me o~wre + OE © or *- , ae + : “ * . oS es a Sie me | relay ILWU Waterfront stri 
BERN S Lassie Narwack Yawn) when it was) TWO WEEKS VISIT—Mr and Mrs. Kelly McBean and their son, | 27M rerritoral reek; President osg 
® mMc¥ace ovdes Esta Cc | wer of a 
Aes. and forestry, has reported. 


ng ther Fp Over Supplies of Feed y jineer a : Qi Cah pealiemen q f a, ‘ 


WAILUKU, M in as-fut ° 8 
@ per cent of the 82000 pool MMM 10 be killed. If the siete Toone taut Fisheri se MEANWHILE, 
nt out that only two poultry fi Meleving hens will be killed) Boate smumne Jmen's -Associotns 
sin ae or three | e nd put -° the are bouts ' of | j or te birrer sem. ¢! 
try man said, uf 3 | , out Iwill be senna 
mediate rel 
Producti 
miiry will 
that 


ti de 


1 AY 


> SU 


- 


pue ‘suonejedxe 


irectors in cute) 
Sth dividend te 
50 per cent—(rom - 


yon Page 12. Col. 4) 


MICE prapey 


Sy © 
oY J 
fm dn "og Co 
~ = . a ; - : : 
7 °» | : ‘Are, w Dy. a 5, * *? 4 ° such @ deal veter 
f *, homes with very 
payments and easy mont 
me|. “T* Teducing i“, “goents. The property moe 
Pipand-imported. 24%, Giltly and all were sid bys 
hacive their chicken?, ni. m. last Saturday a 
f 


bur 


P®Pe02uU-Qonu e@ se 


dirsult that hens are nots ..- : - 
te 4 BP en, ol str/sual number of eggs, More than $8.4 million was 
at 80 many textiles” aié- ey lop /ppese figures@pre ih af ° i the chairman of stanasru vi <:.- ssciee hy 115 wt ster ‘Ss 

uuwacturadmuce 4.6501 £ he passengers Cying to and vom reiuse Co! rge—— 


VOTFEN(AAS.D sey st 
S29LieR® reuwrre - 


SMedxke Ysnug 


THr WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 | 


8B 


Talks Open Today 
Aimed at ‘Selling’ 
UNESCO to Public 


The United States delegation to 
the United Nations Educational, 
Scfeftific and Cultural Organiza-. 
. tion will open a two-day meeting | 
here today on a program it hopes 
will “sell”. UNESCO's work to the 
public. | 

Milton S. Eisenhower, president 
of Kansas State College of Agri- 
culture and Applied Science, and 
chairman of the sesison, said the 
commitee will take up six points 
to “help get public support during 
the next fiscal year. 

(1+ An educational campaign for 
understanding responsibilities of 
thre Universal Declaration of Hu- 
man Righ’s; (2) an interchange of 
“delegates” for beter understand- 


ing among nations: (3) reconstruc- - 


tion of educational and cultural 
facilities in war-devastated coun- 
tries; (4) a information program on 
the relationship between food sup- 
ply, population presure and war; 
(5) improvement of textbooks, and 
(6) an educational program on U.N. 
and its agencies. 

Willard L. Thorpe, assistant Sec- 
retary of State for Economic Af- 
fairs, will outline a proposed 
United States program for the 
technical development of backward 
areas. 


Bridges Refused 
Trip to France; 


Bail Hike Urged 


San Francisco, June 23 (®.— 
Harry Bridges was refused per-, 
mission today to leave the coun- 
try and, at the same time, learned. 
that the Government wants to 
increase his bail to $100,000.° | 

The longshore union leader) 
asked permission to attend a world 


conference of maritime unions at 
Marseilles, France, July 13-14. 
Bridges wanted to leave the United 
States July 10 and return July 29. 

Bridges faces an indictment 
charging perjury and conspiracy 
in obtaining United States citizen- 
ship. Two other union leaders, 
Henry Schmidt and J. R. Robert- 
son’ were indicted for conspiracy. 
Alt. are at liberty “unger $5000 
bond, 

Fedreal District Judge Michael, 
J. Roche ruled that Bridges could. 
not leave the jurisdiction of the 
court. 

The maritime union conference 
is sponsored by the World Federa- 
tion of Trade Unions—an organ- 
ization from which the CIO with- 
drew because of a belief that it 
was Communist dominated. 


Man Admits 
Mutilation-Killing 
Of Young Mother 


Morrison, Iowa, June 23 (#).—A 
pretty young mother was found 
slain and fiendishly mutilated to- 
day and tonight authorities ar- 
rested a man they said had ad- 
mitted the crime. 

‘The body of Mrs. Irma Jean 
Stahihut, 22, was found inside a 
big. walk-in refrigerator in the 
tavern she and her husband 

ated here. The killer had cut 

her breasts, slit her throat 
fram ear to ear, stabbed her twice 
in. the heart And cut her open 
“down the middle.” 
-Tonight Edward J. 


(Buddy) 


Beckwith, 27, of Morrison, was). 


arrested by a posse of four men. 
Sheriff John A. Meyer said Beck- 
with told his mother, Mrs. E. M. 
Beckwith, he committed the slay- 
ing. 

Afterward, the sheriff said, 
Beckwith, a wartime soldier left 
her home after telling her: “I'm 
taking off and you'll never see me 
again.” 


Here’s a Pleasant 
Note-It’s Cold- 


In Australia 


Sydney, June 23 (®).—A big slice 
of eastern Australia is having its 
coldest June since 1935—and a ban 
on heating to conserve coal is stil! 
iri effect. 

Coal, gas, coke and electricity 
are sharply rationed because of a 
threatened coal mine strike Mon- 
day. The miners want more pay 
and shorter hours. 

Winter is now in full swing 
“down under.” Five towns in the 
mountains near Canberra were 
snowbound today after one of the 

worst blizzards on record. 

Fuel and power rationing has 
forced many plants in New South 
Wales to shut down and transport 
is affected. 

Approximately 300,000 men and 
women are out of work in Sydney 
and other New South Wales cities. 

Hospitals are admitting only 
pregnant women and emergency 
cases. 


Italian Strike Ends 
After Six Are Killed 


Rome, June 23 (4).—The strike 
of Italian farm hands ended to- 
night after lasting 36 days, dur- 
ing which six persons were killed. 


. 

relocated roadways 

south of the 
Brid 


Yate. WNo 


BIDS AND PROPOSALS 4 


VERNMEST OF THE DISTRICT 
of Columbia, director of construc- 
tion, D. C.., rme 24, — _ led 
will be received 

. District Building. 14th 7 
Pennsylvania ave. nw.. 


4. D. 
ing time. June 30, 1949. and then 
publicly opened and read for elec- 
trical rearrangements at the Biair 
School, 6th and Eye sts. ne.. Wash- 
ington, D. C. Proposa! forms. pians 
and er go may be obtained 
. District Building. (Tel. 
2378.) 
TICE TO CONTRACTORS. AR- 
lington County School Board, Ar- 
lington, Va.—Se 


i th 
Arlington County School Board at the 
board office, 2732 Wilson Boulevard. 
Arlington, Va.. until 5 Dp. m., East- 
ern ayli¢ht Saving Time, THURS- 
DAY, JULY 14, 1949. for the con- 
struction of an elementary school 
at Lee Boulevard and Carlyn Springs 
Road. Drawings and specifications. 
bond and insurance requirements 
and form of proposal, etc.. may be 
obtained commencing Tuesday, June 
21. 1949. from Ronald 8. Senseman. 
architect. with offices at 327 Car- 
roll Avenue. N.W.. Washington, 
D Genera! contractors propos- 
secure the loan of 
Ss and specifications upon de- 
positing Fifteen ($15: Dollars 
set. All plans, specifications 
addenda must be returned in good 
condition Big -> — days after the 
The hh obtain refund. 
The full Sirens 813) Dollars deposit 
will be refunded only to contractors 
submitting a bid and only on one 
set. On all additional! mete obtained 
by contractors or others. 
of only Five ($5) 
made. ‘The Board of a re- 
serves the right to waive, any in- 
formalities in or reject anv or all 
bids. Each bidder must deposit with 
his bid, security in an amount of 
not less than five (5%). per centum 
of his bid in the form required by 
the information for bidders. All 
general and subcontractors must be 
registered and holding a certificate 
registration from the Virginia State 
Registration Board before they may 
bid or undertake a contract in the 
State of Virgina. By order of the 
ARLINGTON COUNT HOOL 
BOARD, Arlington. Va. 
JOY. Chairman; WALTER 
MAN, Clerk June24.25,27 


WASH ag SUBURBA 
SANITARY Nae MARYLAND 


GUARANTE BOND” : TGOM 
; MON ERY 
AND PRINCE GEORGES COUNTIES. 
o*aied proposals will be received 
until 3 oe m.. Eastern Day- 
light Saving Time. on Wednesday, 
JULY 6, 1949 
by the Washington Suburban Sani- 
tary Commission at its office, 4017 
Hamilton Street, Hyattsville. Md. 
er the following bonds of the Wash- 
nston Suburban Sanitary District, 
daied guly l. 1949, and maturing on 
Ju 1 im the years hereinafter 
stated, Without option of prior pay- 


-_ 

)- 600.000 Series “YYY" Bonds, 
maturing annually, $50,000 1950 to 
lvé9, inclusive, to be issued under 
the authority of Chapter 122 of the 
1918 Acts of the General Assembly 
of Maryland. as amended, for water 
main and sewer construction 

000 Storm Water Drainage 
Bonds Series “ZZZ", maturing an- 
option of 

to l 


e. to be 
a the authority of Tihdnbes 


constructing 
storm ane drainage Systeme. 
Denomination $1,000; principal and 
semiannual interest (J and J 1) pay- 
adie at ince Georges Bank 
Trust Company, Hyattsville, 


Trust Company. New 
New York, at’ holder's 
option; genera! obligations; unlimited 
tax: coupon bonds registerable as to 
Principal alone; exempt from taxa- 
tion by the State of Maryland and 
by the counties and municipalities 
in said State; unconditionally guar- 
anteed as to both principal and in- 
terest by Montgomery and Prince 
Georges counties by indorsement on 
each bond. There wil] be no auc- 
tion. Bonds will be delivered about 
July 28, 1949, at place of purchaser's 
choice, 
* Bidders are requested to name the 
interest rate or rates for the Series 

“YYY" Bonds, not exceeding 4% 
Per annum, in multiples of “% or 
1/10 of 1%. and each bidder must 
specify in his bid the amount and 
the maturities of the bonds of each 
bid may name more than 
three interest rates for the bonds of 
this issne, and the bonds maturing 
on the same date must bear interest 
at the same rate. 

Bidders are requested to name the 
interest rate for the Storm Water 
Drainage Bonds Series “ZZZ". not 

per annum. in a mul- 
P< and no 


tained. will be awarded 
to the bidder offering to purchase 
the bonds at the lowest interest cost 
to the ted such interest to be 
determined - educting the total 
amount of — premium bid from the 
ageregate amount of interest upon 
all of the bonds until] their respec- 


tiv ~ tee 
Bach 1 muat be iInclosed fn 
~~. F gore ty ashes “Proposal 


for Bopds. " and be accompanied by 

. c upon an incor- 
porated bank or trust company, pay- 
able unconditionally to the order of 
the gton Suburban Sanitary 
Commission, for $25.000. The right 
to reject any or all bids is reserved. 


chasers without cost. 
Circular on request and proposals 
information 
HIN pen ba 
N. DARBY BOWMAN. 
Secretary-Treasurer. 23.24 


The Washington Post 


ADVERTISING 
LOCAL RATES 


Por Washington and Points Within 50 
les of the District of Columbia 
The following rates are for consecutive 
insertions: 


When cancelling an ad, it is im- 
portant that you request and make 
a note of cancellation number to 
insure proper credit. 

Claims for errors must be made in 
time for correction before the second 
insertion. 


Phone NAtional 4200 


DAILY. 8 A. M. TO 7 M. 
SATURDAY. & A. M. TO 3: “30 P. M. 
SUNDAY, 11 A. M. TO 7 P. M. 


Ask for an Ad Writer 


FOR BEST 
SERVICE 
PLACE 
YOUR 
ADS EARLY 


The steadily @rewing vel- 
ume of classified eds in The 
Pest, combined with the 
practice of many acvertisers 
who phone late in the day. 
is making ft difficult to de 
vote the time and assistance 
to these late callers which 
is needed to prepare the 
most elfective possible copy. 


To assure receiving this help 
from your ad writer, please 
try to call during the morn- 
ing or early afternoon. 


DIAL 
NA. 4200 


og SERVICE . 


ins at and roof So reat rosk  ta shes rose wand 
ADDING MAC MACHINE ~~ 


quick se ( rices), 
=e. og = AL. 2. 12 
ey ay 


es ha 


BUSINESS SERVICE =~ 
AAA FENCE SPECIAL 
LAST ITS 


SOLID 
PICKET FENCE 


100 {t.. 874.50 delivered to you 
NSISTING OF: 
4x4 solid long-lasting oak posts 72 
inches high 
2x4 solid oak top and bottom rail. 
1x3 soild O€k pickets, 42 to 45 inches 
Nails, Sete bi hinges. gate latch. 
AAA SPECIALS— 
Instruct! oe for easy installation. 
or we will install for you 
before ist payment This 
economical. long-lasting fence you've 
been waiting for Also Nutype 
chain link now available. 


MILL-TO-YOU CO, 


FORESTVILLE, MD. 
HI. 2919 alter 6 DP. ™., or _ HT. 7590. 


ALL-STATES WATERPROOFING oo 
Residential work a oy. 
1222 Conn. Ave. RE 38 


CAMERA REPAIRING 
CALL FULLER & DALBERT. INO. 
____815 10TH 8T. ia 


CARPENTRY—Récr. rm. specialty; 
reas. rates; small repairs. WA. 4191. 


CEMENT WORK OF ANY KIND. 12 
year, experience. CH. 3355 


CEMENTING and retaining © walls; 
waterproof,: all work guar. NO. 1936. 


CLOGGED DRAIN PIPES electrically 
Razor-Kleened or no charee. 
Rooter. RA. 8888. day or night. 
CONCRETE, cement work, footings. 
porches, steps. driveways, retaining 
walls, basement floors. old and new 
work C. Galea, AT. 2864. 


FENCES 


Chain length fences: all galvanized 
macerial; all posts set in concrete: no 
down payment. 36 months to pay. 
Immediate service. Ca!] ae estimate. 

OYCE FEN NCE CO.—M Mi. 1882 
FIRST-CLASS | upholstery ch “ee “Te- 
Pairing. furn. refinishing. Reason- 
able. Townes Upholstery, EX. 1327. 


FURNITURE. UPHOLSTERING 
AND AIRING 


in the home or 2-4 the shop: experi- 
enced mechanic: all rk guaranteed. 
We buy. sell and — : surplus fur- 
miture as part 
Db. € BARGAIN. HOUSE 

A. 8. Tyle 3905 
PAPERING a "paniteaen A-1 
work; est. free. Mr. Beckett. DU. 4053. 
PAPERING ane painting. Reasonable 
rates. Terms. Mr. Seymour, DU. 7033. 
PAINTING, exterior. yy vd — 
hanging. CH. 1145, 8 « 10 Dd. 


PAINTING, nebapering ae Diastering, 
Reas. RE. . DE. 6591 


PAINTING ee Ome thy 
date service. Reasonable. NO. 
PAINTING inside nd out: PS se ones 
ing. Smith Bros. it 3 
PAPERING and Satie aie and 
exterior. All work guUar., reas. prices. 
RA. 8674, bef. 9 or 5 to 10 bp. m. 
PAPERING—S_ E. WALLPAPER co. 
Special 12x12 room papered, labor 
and material, $14.95: ist class me- 
chanic. 487 Orange st. se. LU. 3-7493. 
PIANO “tuning “and repairs: all work 
guar.: free est. WA. 5755 HY 0085, 


PICKET FENCE SPECIAL 


AT LAST IT’S AVAILABLE 
. DAYS ONLY—ORDER NOW 
Solid rustic oak picket fence 
100 {t., Rat. delivered to vou 
ONSISTING O 
Gee teeta oak posts. 72 
is high. 
2x4 solid oak top and bottom rail 
1x3 solid Oak pickets, 42 to 45 inches. 
Nails, gate hinges, gate latch. 
— R AAA SPECIALS— 
Instructions for easy installation. 
Or we will install for you: 60 days 
before ist payment. This is the 
economical long-lasting ‘fence you've 
been waiting for. Also Nutype chain 
link now available. 


MILL-TO-YOU CO. 


PORESTVILLE. MD 
HI. 2919 after 6 p. m. or HI. 7590 
ROOFING, SHEET METAL work, 
guttering. tinning, all types we san 
Free est O'CONNOR BROS. 9041 
ROOFING, waterproofg.. i " plas- 
ler, cement work. Nevins. LU. 3-2444, 
STORM WINDOWS—Practical storm 
windows for casements: aluminum 
combination windows. SOLID COM- 
PORT CO., TA. 6666. sata 
UPHOLSTERY, slip covers, draperies, 
springs retied., oo renovated; 
high grade work. FA. RE AS 
UPHOLSTERING and Repairing done 
in your home. ROSS, DI. 4987 
ee 
LOST 10 
CAT, young, yellow. female. named 
Ammersseen; lost. GL. 3958. 


and topaz. In front 8&t. 
Jonn ra Church 16th st., Friday. HO. 


Guiseea = er. ~ dark rimmed bifoc- 
als, on F st., vic. of a tends OR. 
2843 or EX. "3620, Ext. 6. 

LADY’ s diamond wrist “Sau piati- 
mum case. black silk cord. vic.. Are 
landria, Va.: reward. OV. 2877. 
MAN’S smooth black “calfskin secre- 
tary-type wallet. Arlington Court- 
house aréa. Call] McGrath, CH. 7500, 
Ext. 700, evenings. __ 

ONYX ring, near Lmeoln Park car 
barns, Wed. a. m.; sentimental value: 
reward. _WA. 3609. 

POODLE, small white femal female: hair 
Shaved; name Buttons: vicinity of 
Georgia 4 ave., Kennedy st. TA ‘Froo. 


—- 


SHOES—Men’ s brown. Wednesday at 
Annandale Quarry. GL. 0170. 
WATCH—Lady’s Bulova, black band, 
cracked crystal; _June 14. AT. 


PERSONALS % “Hh 


GRADUATE NURSE has vacancy in 
private home for elderly person: list 
floor; tray service. SLigo 8363. 


I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE for 
debts made. others than by myself. 
HAROLD R. HUFFMAN, 4016 N. 20th 
st.. Arlington, Va. 


PICNIC lunches prepared: homemade 
Pies to order: chicken and a 
boxes to go. Golden Glow, 
SECRETARIAL amet 
Complete: available days. evening 
end weekends. ST. 24086 or RA. 9164 


SUMMER CAMP for children. age 5- 
12: Uimited group: homelike: salt 
water bathing: reasonable rates. 
Southern Maine. WI. 9873. 


THINK OF NEXT FALI—yYou in « 
fashionable ine jacket. remodeled at 
Baskin Purs from your outmoded fur 
coat! Take advantage of season 
rates—as low as $25. Call now—for 
restyling. repeirs. storage. cleaning. 


BASKIN 


NA. 5522. Corner 8th and G. NA. $518 


VARI-TYPING — Forms. dena tt ste 
tistical tabulations, text. 


TYPING, manuscript work | done a - 
home; jetters addressed. etc. GE. 2985. 
WITH THIS CLIPPING to introduce 
our shoe repairing department. Men's 
half soles and best quality rubber 
heels, $1.49: best quality rubber 
heels. 39 cents: lady's half soles and 
rubber heels. 99 cents: rubber heels. 
35 cents. Best quality material and 
weemmnaene. NEW JPRSEY CLEAN- 
ERS N. J. ave. nw. 1211 First 


oe — 


imme- 
623. 


] 
207-9- it New York ave. pw. 
‘st. nw. Phone ST. 1213. 


YOUR PROBLEMS — 


ARE OUR BUSINESS 
Confidential investigaitons domestic 
cases, uncoyering important evidence, 
locating missing Roe Ww a complete, 
confidential service, WO. 7144. 
UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE AND 
CARPETING beautifully shampooed 
in your home. For quick. efficient 
servied. call NA. 3339. AETNA R 
& UPHOLSTERING _ CLEANING co. 
MOTOR TRAVEL TIA 


GIRL would like ride to Los Angeles, 
Calif.. around July 29; will share ex- 
penses: references exchanged. No. 
0634, RE. 5600, Ext. 5880. 


a - 


INSTRUCTIONS —'12 
TUTORING 


Lensfellow School, B . : 4, ensda: 
trades | 1 through 6. OL. 


HELP, MEN 15 
“ACCOUNTANT, $75 WK. 


Expr. Master's Degree...875 wk. up 
Budget auditor, store expr. » open 
Check auditor. wy experience. 

(NA. 2338 


Miss 
BOYD'S, 700 ‘12th, Cor. G 
Automobile Salesmen (2) 
‘oan 


r 
(the Golden Anniversary Packard . 
One of metropolitan in 


We prefer men with 
cessful automobile background. a 
= opportunity te get in on the 
groun 


i311 Wilson Bivd.. Arlington. Ve. 
(3 blocks south _Key Bridge) 


ee 


pass soloist and choristers, one serr- 
ce. OR. 1563. 


$65 guar. and comm. 1315 
Rhode Island Ave. N.E. 


at once; good shop; scood 
Nichols ave. se. WA. 9577. 
(white) —G =-Guarantesd $65 
wk. Call 8 sis N. - Capito 
BARBER—Job { or. $65 3 5-day 
wk. None other ‘than first class need 
apply. 8 miles from Wash... D. C. out 
— pike. Annandale Barber- 


ace — Pri. — Bat. ‘$25 guaran- 

Is. 32 Nichols are. 

: joned barber 

‘st. 4471 or apply 628 E 


for Saturday; steady. 2111 
Rhode island ave. ne, 


BARBER wanied meres, 469 far reliable. 
BARBER WANTED —Sieady. first 


pay. 31 


vee , corner G st, 


Roio- - 


ee 
HELP, MEN 15 
BOOTBLACK—Exper barber shop 
only; good boy, 21 2615 14th st. nv 
BRICKLAY FERS. part time; 82.586 
hour. 7 TU. 


CARPENTER 


With truck, to’ contract for erec- 
tion of wood fences. Can make good 
money. Reliable, Sondrinber. Call HI 
2919 before 6 a. m. or after 9 p. m. 


Carpenters Wanted 


Good men wanted for a housing 
job. Must be good mechanics. Come 
to North Capitol and Sheridan ats 
(Out New Hampshire ave., past Bast- 
ern Star Home to Eastern ave.). 
MORRIS POLLIN & SONS, GE. 0707 


CARPENTER 


Capable, reliable, experienced (nbt 
® helper); merried man preferred. by 
builder specializing in high class 
work; open shop; references required. 
John _H. Collins. 1832 18th at. nw 


COLLECTOR 


The Washington Post reauires the 
services of a man with an auto- 
mobile to collect accounts Salary and 
car allowance. Experienced aD- 
plicants, as well as those showin 
aptitudes for collection work. wi 
be given consideration. 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
1345 E _ Street, N.W. 
DISHWASHER (colored) for large 
Ruest house; no Sunday work: split 
Shift; meals end salary. Apply 1426 

2ist st. nw 


DRIVERS WANTED 


for Diamond cabs. New and used 
tars avail. Reas. rental rates. Must 
have identification card. apply Dia- 
mond iot, .101 M st. ne., see MELVIN 
HERRIMAN : 


ENGR. SALES, $50 
Saies of., equip., car, y'ng. $225 mo. 
MUTUAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
1710 G 8ST. ae NA. 0954 
FARMER to do general farm work 
on 10-acre farm in Frederick 
County. Apply 1021 7th st. nw. 


HARDWARE CLERK, 25 or over. ex- 
Perienced pref., but not necessary: 
permanent position; good starting 
salary. Apply in person only. Arling- 
ton Hardware, 291420 Columbia 
Pike. Arlington, ‘Va. 


INSTALLER. EXPERIENCED 
ROCK WOOL INSULATION 
Must be able to drive truck. Ac- 
curate Co., 4209 Sth at. nw. TA, 6719S. 


JEWELRY SALESMAN 


Experienced only, aggressive, alert, 
willing and pleasant personality: 
knowledge of credits, display: oppor- 
tunity and permanent 


THE JEWELRY SHOP 


veatezen Bidg., call RE. 6700, Ext, 
216 for appointment 


MAINTENANCE MAN © 


Por apartment house: must be ex- 
perienced and-have Sth class engi- 
neer's license. Apply 2730 Wiscon- 
sin ave. nw. 

MULTILITH OPERATOR 

Capable of operating Model 1250, 
also experience in setting up forms, 
Box M- 168, Washington Post 


“ORGANIST” 


Experienced for Electronic Orzan. 
Must be available part time for spe- 
cial store and church demonstrations, 
Opportunity to work in on sales pro- 
motion. State briefly experience and 
affiliations. Interview arranged. Box 
372, Washington | Post. 


PORTER-DRIVER 


Por liauor store: must. have. and 
will check, last 5 years’ previous em- 
loyment record: good salary; long 


ours: 
BOULEVARD LIQUOR STORE 
_ 2106 E ST. N.W. 


PRESSER 


To work a few hours in the evre- 
ning. after 5:30. Must be fast and 
good. Call DU. 1415. Mr. George 


PRESSERS [ 


Must be experienced. Straight time 
or plece work. ae art-time pressers 
ior evenings ew York ave. nw. 


REAL ESTATE SALESMEN 


2 men with experience. Special 
compensation for acceptable parties, 
dealing with high class clientele 
offering salable D. C. and Virginia 
ts org ‘small staff. Call between 


FRED J. GEORGE, GL. 6777 
~ | ROUTEMEN (2) 


Permanent position, no experience 
required. interesting work. excellent 
opportunity with an established com- 
merocial concern. We require serious. 
intelligent and eambitious men with 
at least high schoo) education and 
de ble references Apply office, 
mornings. $9 and 10:30: afternoona, 
a-3. AMPRICAN LINEN SERVICE 
co 2241 Sth st. N.W 


ROUTEMAN 


For an established route. Experi- 
ence desired. but will consider inex- 
erienced. Must have best references. 
Apply between 10 and 12 &. m. : 


1 Wnshingien Laundry 
| 2627 K ST. NW. 


SALESMAN 


for part time. to solicit household 
movings on commission basis: give 
experience. Write Boyer Transporta- 
tion Co., Knoxville, Md. 
SALESMAN, $50 wk.; car furnished: 
under 30; salesman free to travel: 
salesman to sell a ag 

and comm.. under 30, : 
Mr. Ford, at "BOYD'S, 700 Toth et. 
corner G st. NA. 


SALESM AN 


Por grocery epecialty. Must be ac- 
quainted with Washington. nearby 
Marvriand and Virginia trade. Write 
Box M-176, Washineton Post. 


‘SALESMAN (CAR) 


Im new and used cars. Excel- 
lent working cond. salary and 
vacation with 

Cc anf 


ON AUTO 8 
2712 DUKE ST.. ALEX. 


SALESMEN 
Immediate opening with medical 
equipment cOmPany for salesmen to 
cover oe Marviand and D. C. 
territories; salary, commission and 
expenses. ae 3-9300. 


| SALES MANAGER 


Old line life insurance company, 
selling ordinary and industrial insur- 
ance. is looking for a man 
capable of establishing and o 
a new branch office in Washing 
Must be able to sell and manag e 
salesmen. Write giving full details 
of experience, earnings, etic. We also 

want several men te canvass and 
build their own Some on salary and 


commission basi 
INDEPENDENT LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 
100 E. Centre Street 
Baltimore 2. Mé. 


SHOP FOREMAN 


Excellent working conditions, good 
aca te w ay 
one ERON SALES AND 


___| 2712 DUKE ST. ALEX. VA. _ 


TAILORS & 
OPERATORS 


—FOR— 
MEN'S ALTERATIONS 


>DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK 


APPLY 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
9TH FLOOR 
9:30 TO 6 DAILY 


WOODWARD & 
LOTHROP 


Risawman: aes oo ban a 


‘TRUC 
Seely Moat Th ay Bo | at. Ly 


- WOOL 7 ¥ ones (2) 

> able to do alterations; excellent 

aad for capable man. Call 
OX. 1359 : 

YOUNG MAN, 18-25: must be neat: 

single, ambitious and tree to travel 

A. Permanent Trans. 

turn. “by car. Average és ve Fa hg 


Hotel 16 2. 
Cairo 10 a.  m tol Dm. 


tu 
Washing salesm 
ing experience in cartons or 
wholesale bape paper lines in W 
imeten ar 

tion vith a future. Write 


ex 
le 
Ri 


for genera) office work, must be ex- 
ediient typist Seria Reve car for transe- 
ettan. Wehmyer, UN. 


Eee Bek san tae 


ae 


HELP, MEN m 
WOOL PRESSER 


Brperienced: steady work: 
hour; holidays with per i3 
Master Cleaners. 1501 Oth st nw 


WANT TO GET 
AHEAD? 


" TIE-UP WITH A 
Growing Organization 
Call Carl — several qpenines for 


mbitious me 
BERVICF- er tae "MANAGERS 
CALL 


DI. 2775 a gh: nA 


a 15 


NIGHT SERVICE MANAGER 
TIRE & BATTERY REPAIRMAN 
SEE MR. NEWCITY 

H St. NW 


BRODY & FENDER MEN 
SEE MR. JONES 


MR. JOH 
1815 L St. NW 
NIGHT BANS 
SEER MR NEY 
5949 Ry a NW. 


RILLING CLERK 
SEE +. pUABEOAR 
14 t. NW 


A Cal) Carl job is a job with a future 
Watch Us Grow 


AUTO SERVICE 
SALESMAN 


We have an opening for a reliable 

aq experienced automobile service 
salesman. Must be able to diagnose 
trouble. make estimates and write re- 
Pair orders and capable of meeting 
the public ns gg epettien. Good 
Salary and bonus 


BARRY-PATE MOTOR 
CO., INC. 


Washington's Oldest Chevrolet Dea! er 
1130 Connecticut Ave. NW 


MAN 
30 to 45 years of age to manace 
Conn ave custom dry cleaning 
Branch office with delivery service. 
Must be experienced High caliber 
Excellent opportunity Box M-!72, 
Washington Post ' 


HELP, WOMEN _ a 
A-] SECRETARIES $60 


Assoc. real estate. insur 
wk Est 33 yrs. Welcome 


BOYD'S, 700 12th, Cor. G. 
BOORREEPER— 


General office work: S-day week: 
age between 25 and 35. 

Wholesale Flectrical 
949 New York Ave. N.W. 


BKPR.., 82.800 
Bookkeeper, legal ofc. 4&5 
ATLAS AGCY.. 1420 N. y. VE NW 


BKPR. “SEC LC $60 


. law we 
travel a agcy 
Typists. vario $3 4 rk. 
MUTUAL EMPL OYMENT | SERVICE 
1710 G ST. N.W 


Bonikesaiinee 
Machine Operator 


Cc. R. No. 3000, with commer- 
office and some credit experi- 
Permanent. with chance for 
advancement in established concern 
References. 
BOX M-158 
Washington Post 


CLERK 


Young. white. willing to ‘earn: 
must be good typist: good salary to 
Btart: chance for advancement. 
Apply personnel offic 


MANHATTAN CO. 


1328 PLORIDA AVE. N.W 


FOUNDATION GARMENT 
SALESLADY 


Must be experienced: prefer some- 
one capable of assisting with the 
buving. Good salary. plus commission. 
5-day 40-hour week. age 26 to 40 

APPLY FRANK OFFICE 


L. FRANK CO. 


1°TH AND PF STS. NW 


HAIR COLORIST 


To represent nationally advertised 
distributor for sales and demonstra- 
tion work Must be licensed beau- 
tician, 25 to 40. free to travel. Sal- 
ary. bonus and expense arrangement. 
Excellent opportunity for advance- 
ment. . HO 0151 

JR stenogs., $175 to = 

» Se te $5 
N PERSONNEL SVC. 
710 14th St. N.W., Rm. 408 RE 728¢. 
LEGAL SECRETARY. 860 wk. Travel 
Agency Secy., $50 wk. Typist. $50 wk.. 
expert. Miss Bond, CAPITOL AGCY.. 
cor, 13th and Eye. N.W RE. 2828. 


MEDICAL SEC’Y., $200 
ATLAS AGCY., 1420 N. Y. AVE. N.W 


MEDICAL SECRETARY. doctor's of- 
fice. experienced preferred. Call HO. 
3200 between 9 and 5; HO. 6924 Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 


POSTING OPR.:, $50 


—_. on Burroughs machine. 

R. pookeepias ark $55. 
ATLAS AGCY., 1420 N . AVE. 
RECENT university et who is 
interested in medical special work 
training: if you like people. wish to 
establish yourself in a profession and 
do not have family responsibilities, 
we have a splendid opportunity. 


lol , 
OUPDpY 
NA. 9280. 


— 


Alexandria Hospital, AL. 6600 


SALAD GIRL, $45-a-week job: vYaca- 
tion after 6 mos. 

lonian Cafeteria, 

NW. See Mr. Paifar between 10 and 
12 or 2 and 4 


SECRETARY 


Experience. age 22 to 40: secre- 
tarial duties: patent law office: at- 
tractive environment: 35-hour week. 
Ring Bids... RE. 0502. =e 
SECRETARIES, Typicsts, Bookkeepers. 
at TOP salaries needed 
SELECT positions. We 
BETTER openings. Est. 32 yrs. Cour- 
teous service BOYD'S. 700 12th, 
cor G. NA. 2340. 


SECRETARIAL receptionist. position 
in hospita! laboratory: interesting, 
good hours: salary open. Alexandria 
Hospital. AL. 6600. 
SECRETARY 
28 to 35. experienced: 5-day: know!- 
edge of pookeeping preferred; %3.400. 


WALTER H. KESSLER 


Personnel Services, 612 Wash. Bide. 
iSth and N. ¥. Ave. N.W. 8ST. 9442 


SECRETARY, $300 MO. 


Knowledge bkpe.. under 35. Ajr- 
eondition gitases. See Miss Youngs 
at ance. 

_PERSONNEL SERVICE. 1311 G 8T 


SECYS.-TYPISTS-CLERKS 


Secy., pud. rel... 5 days, $2800. 
Secy.. adv. mar.. 5 days. $2400. 
Credh mar, corresp., $2.50. 
Clerk-typist, $180. 
Comptometer opr. $45 
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
1706 


~ SECY., chee. ai tiie ~ a4 steno.. 
$250 up start. 
Secy.-stenog., § days; 3 wks. Yac.; 


$50 start 
' ADAMS AGENCY 
204 COLORADO BLDG. 14TH & G. 


STENOGRAPHER 


ee anent. for circulation dept. of 
ly news macazine: 

seathend speed of 80 to 100 

pleasant working conditions. 

modern office bidg.: weekly pay day. 

liberal vacation and sick leave. free 

pee life. accident. surgical « 

hospitalization insurance: other em- 

loye benefits. Phone DI. 2900. ext. 
“30 to 5. Mon. through Pridays. 


STENOG., >DAY. $60 


Stenos.. H. 8. 34 4. 3 
ATLAS AGCY.. N.Y. AVE NW. 


i STENOGRAPHER 


Attractive opening for personable 
young lady. to assist sales promotion 
manager. small industrial organize- 
tion, hi achoo! graduates shorthand 
essential. permanent position, 5-day 
1080. start $185 mentaly. Call 


SURVEY W WORKERS (white); good 
salary pian. Apply to Mrs. Holthous- 
er, 412: Sth st nes oom 5 506. 
TEACHERS © © 

Agency, Colorade_ ae 14th we 
TEACHER—Vacation in country; 
pleasant. healthful work: 8360 for 
60 days. Box M-178. | 


Post. eG RES * 
' TYPIST, $190 


> Fysure ig 5-day week. 
B -typist -de 
ATLAS A AGCY.. 1420 N. Y. AVE. NW. 


TYPISTS TO $45 WK. 


Assoc. real estate. insur... dr. astions, 
recep. typist. $40. See Miss mvans at 
once—First (NA. 2338). Welcom 


BOYD'S, 700 12th, Cor. G 
~ WAITRESSES 


S ge for on exclusive downtown 
i A Fes 
rms urn. 
and 3 p m. 1135 16th st. nw. DI. 
8118. 
WOMEN, | are you interested in mak- 
ing money in « pleasant manner? 
i or part time. Avon Cosmetics, 
ns. 


a cult ured. ambitious, to learn 
business: $2,400: advancement. 
a mite. *Washingto mn Post. a 
COLLEGE eS a tn 
pleasant, healthful work: 
$360 for 60 days. Box M-l177. Wash- 
ington, Pe Post. = 


HELP, MEN & WOMEN _—i17 
ADVERTISING SALESMAN 


Thoroughly experienced. Also lay- 
u tf woman. Apply Evening 
Capital. 


T order cook and | ‘waltteas: | new 
restaurant seuage "Chureh and wife. 
experten Va 


Ig A Nes 


HELP, MEN & WOMEN ~ 17 


BOOKKEEPER 


Double Entry, good ren. 
man, must be acquainted 
with machine bhockkeep 

operations and pro- 


Good salary for 
aving proner 
itications. Permanent 
“nance for advance 


Rei ° -~ _ 
erences, s OF 


HELP, , DOMESTIC se 


Se — net 


HOU SEKEEPER. — Middle-aged whit . 
lady to do pore and light house- 
keeping. Gl. 


MAID, With emplored ‘husband 
ve n uUsdDand to give some 
Experienced. Refs. SH. 6799 


COLORED— Ist-class couple: $250 mo 
Ladies Exchanger 1109 K st nw. 
2d floor ST. 1737 


SITUATIONS, MEN 19 


HARVARD LAW , Raton seeks snm- 
mer employment; any type of work 
TE. 5348. , 
GEORGETOWN WU. student desires 
perm, Part-time day or night work: 
Lyping and auciting exp.: will con- 
Sider full-time ni shts Call Mi. 9802 


SITUATIONS, WOMEN ver 


LADIES’ alterations: not hing too 
hard: yourf home if desired. TA. 2769 


PRACTICAL NURSES avail. tra’ ned 
Sracs.; Gay or night du y; reas. rates. 
DI. 4383 weekdays only. 


YOUNG Scand. coll. student wants 
'® take Care of child during summer 
vacation. Only daytime. CO 682 6 


SITUATIONS, DOMESTIC 21 


BOOK KEEPER- TY PIST desires Dosi- 
iON, €xp.; mod. sa! Box 591. Post 
CATHOLIC U. student desires em- 
pDiOy., any type of work. partic. com- 
Panionship Call DU. 9271 after 10 
FOR EXPERIENCED domestic wo 
full time, part time, day workers Call 
Home _ Service Agency. NO. _ 3659 
GIR. COLORED, desires job as 
mother’s helper: no Sun. ME. 4897 
GIRL, colored, desires work by dar. 
in Arlington. LU 964 

COLORED GIRL desires job as moth- 
er's _hel per; no Sundays. _| _ST . 4359 


MONEY TO LOAN —~_—«a23 


ON DIAMONDS, watches. jewelry. 
silverware and m18¢ articles. LOUIS 


ABRAHAMS, 3225 R. |. ave. ne 


BUSINESS “OPPORTUNITIES 29 29 


BARBER SHOP—3-chair: post ex- 
change concession; doing good busi- 
ness. Call CH. 9227 after 6 p. m 
REAUTY SHOP—We!l equipped. 
operators. lease t 
above Price only 

buy Owens Realty. ME 


LUNCH ROOM doinz s00od business 

Virginia; excellent oppor- 
for quick sale; con- 

venient terms to right party 


MANY OTHER BARGAINS 
C. PRINTZ 
Herndon, Va.. Herndon 40 
LIQUOR LICENSE 
Small fresh stock of liquors: rea- 
fonabdly priced 
LOUIS DINOWITZ. Broker. NA. 6717. 
SMALL DELICATESSEN business near 
Clarendon. for immediate sale. Rea- 
sonabie price: good lease: attractive 
terms r details and appointment 
ys JUDSON REAMY & SON. CH. 


Modern Motor Court 


No. 1 hwy... south of Shir! 
bedroom, 2-bath brick house 
t All nicely furn 
over 


service 


for a 1iek Si 
Southland Realty 


OV 132 Evenings, AL. $723 


ROOMS, FURNISHED 34 

ALLEGHANY AVE., 6603—Rm. for }- 

2: television: exp. bus. SLigo 5804 

ALEXANDRIA—Comfortable room in 

Private home suitable for couple or 

eeecemen: conv. to everything. OV. 
35 


ALEXANDRIA—2 rooms single and 
double; semipriv. bath. AL. 2082. | 
ARLINGTON—Sz)e furn. room: gen- 
Uleman only; $7 wk CH. 3450 
ARL.. Va.—Twin, bedrm.. ‘Ige. closet: 
priv. liv. rm. ph.; 1 bik. bus. GL 2207 
ee ores Ls rm. for man, semi- 
ft. windows: unlim 
Lig biks. bus; pvt. home. CH. 


ARLINGTON (close-in Clarendon)—- 
Sale., dble. rms.; meals opt. GL. 2106. 
ARLINGTON—PFurn rm.. semipvt. 
bath: lh.k. priv. if desired: ] bik. 
bus; for employed adults. OT. 7296. 
B ST. N.E.. 134—Master bedrm.. im- 
mediate; front doubie, bath, twin 
beds: gsentiemen best location in 
Washington, opposite Supreme Court 
Bide.: one $50: two, $70. LI. 3-1955 
C ST. NE. 128, Apt. 9—Studio sin- 
gle. very attractive: near Capitol. 
Call after 6 weekdays, Seterces and 
Sunday all day. LJ. 3-7613. 
CATHEDRAL AVE., nr. Conn. Over- 
jooks Rk. Cr. Pk.: lige. front rm., $40. 
Also bed-sitting rm.. §35: priv. gen- 
tile home: gentlemen. CO. 8943. 
CHEVY CHASE—-Lee. cor. rm., bath, 
1 bik. Conn. ave. bus, for quiet, set- 
tled man: adult home. WI. 5209 i 
CHEVY CHASE, D. C. (% bik. Conn. 
. for 2 empl. 
ladies: ; , . bath: ga- 
rage _ breakfast priv. Call EM. 274@ 
CHEVY CHASE. MD.—Attrac. master 
bedrm., private bath: priv. home; 
gentieman: $50 x WI. 6466 after 5. — 
CHEVY CHASE—Larsge, newly decor. 
twin bedrm.. lovely home for 1-2 gen- 
tlemen: excellent transp. OR. 0869. 
COLUMBIA RD. NW... 1834—-Men: 
single. $6 wk.: clean, comfortable 
bed _showérs, baths. c.h.w. AD 4330. 
COLUMBIA RD. NW., 1736, Apt. 108-— 
Single room for employed lady. , 
COLLEGE PARK—-Larege “front twin 
bedroom: unlim. phone, laun. privs.; 
conv. trans.: $25 mo. each. UN 6). 
CONN. AVE., 12724. APT, 41-— Double 
bedroom: young ladies; walk. dist. 
Govt. _depts DI. 8642. Rent reas. ' 
CONN. AVE., 2126, Apt. 76—Hand- 
somely furn. bedrm . next bath, show- 
er: roof garden: GENTLEMAN: $45. 
CRITTENDEN ST. NW., 1505—Nicely 
furn.; twin beds: master bedrm.. pvt. 
bath: Jewish home; $50. RA. 4. 
DOWNTOWN—Ceci! Apts.: 1 lee. rm. 
for gentleman. new bed and rus: 
papered and painted: plenty 
elev. serv. 
m. all day 
Sat. and Sun. RE. 3960. : ; 
DUPONT CIR.—Lee. front rm., adi. 
bath: girls: 1 or 2, $50. DU. 6313. 
DUPONT CIRCLE AREA, 1757 Que st. 
nw.—Newly decorated, nicely furn. 
saie. rm.. $10 wkily., for geentlieman: 
pvt. home, no children use of iv. 
rm.. radio-phono., refrigerator. etc. _ 
EUCLID ST. NW., 1368, Apt. 20 
Large room, 1 or 2 _ — beds; 
$40 dbl... $30 sel. DU. . 
EYE 8ST. NW. i shawie a sin- 
bie or double room; private bath 
G ST. NW., 1825, Hotel Howarde. vic. 
White House—Sale.. $2 day. $10 wk.: 
dble. $4 day. $14 wk.: running Water 
and phone in rooms. RE. 5322 
GEORGIA AVE. NW. path: kitchen 
bedrm.. 3 windows. adj. be ite 
pri suit. 1 or 2 empl. GE. 6043. 
GIRARD ST. nw. 1450—Dbdie. ng 
rm.. $10 wk.: sale. sleep. rm., $16 m 
L ST. NW... 1343-—Doubie t. 5. rooms; 
$7.50-$8 wk — fi 
NIER PL. ~~ NW... "'1748—Beautiful. 
ye room. next bath. shower; 
3 boys; $4 wk each. e852 
mM 8T. _ * 1410— Apt 202: sgie. 
frt. rm.. next bath; $10 wk. DI. 0537. 
ARTHUR BLVD. NW.. 4817—Nice 
at rm.. ge closet. next bath; me. 
tocation: \ bik. bus; $25. EM. 3160 
MASS. AVE. NW... 2201—Binsle rm. 
c. Wu ghone in rm.) $9.5 wk. 
sT. NW... isi9—Master sine 
near bath: refined, —_. 
home: near bus. 
MONROE ST. NW. 1422—Laree San 
db).. also sel. rm.; maple furn.: ¢ 
clean. laun., Dh. priv.; excel. tranap. 
MT. PLEASANT, 3220 “Walbridee Pi. 
wW.—Beaut. furn. front rm.. for 2; 
twin closets; next bath; excellent 
transp MI. 3688. 
N HK. AVE. “NW. 1308—Comfortablie 
single room, running water; $25 mo. 
S = AVE. NW.. 1535—Beeutiful 
single rooms, $10-$15 week. 
NE. SECTION—Conv. transp.. 1 or 2 
girls, next bath, kitchen priv. RE. 
Si | before 5:30. 


—_— j beérm. mm. and 1 sitting rm. 
Lave 4 . TA _Ts4l. 


frt 
ladies | pret. _ $2: 
RHODE - ISLAND , AVE. nw. 
Desirable. cool rooms: Holl 
beds; conv. | location; reas. _ rent. 
s st NW...  9604—Sgie. rm.: bus et 
door; man “only: $35 mo. OR. 0918. 
SILVER SPRING—Nice rm. for girl; 
no other roomers. SLigo 6288. 
WISCONSIN AVE.—Georgetown ares. 
2-room suite: private entrance, Sre- 
piace maid service. OR. 4233, 
Di. 2740. * 
aTu ST. NW., 5235—Singie Tm™.: un- 
limited phone: £20 per mo. TA . 6883. 
. NW... 11394—RIGHT DOWN- 
coo! double rooms, 
reasonabie 


1226 17TH ST. N.W. | 


Laree tripie rm. suit. fer 3 young 
ladies or 3 youn sentiemen er couple. 
mo. Cocl clean. next bath: alse 
dbie. rm. 840 mo. transP. at door. 


ROOMS, FURNISHED ~~ 34 


14TH ST. NW.. §215—Lee. cool fr 
rm.. mext bath: Rew twin beds 
tached home: car at door: 
rants near: television. GE. 

Nicely furn. sacle rm 
phone anc iattn priv 


pl gi 
GE. 34] 
ISTH ST. NW... 4817 
anc conn. sitep.) porch 
iady nonsmoker pfd 
1193 fer appoin men 
16TH ST. N.W., $105—Lge. cool rm. 
semipriv. bath. gentleman. CO. 1219 
16TH ST CLUBHOUSE—Vacancie< 
for girl a} amc iounge privileges: 
reas rates AD. 1672 or DE. 4407. 
16TH ST. NW... 1400— A rathber homer 
Piace to live while in Washington: «a 
nice co pee Or singie gentleman 
1s Always nice excnangre 
ences. Please cal] before coming o 
4D #6455 . 
16TH ST. NW. 1314 nr Scott Cire 
cie—Dbdie ¢t. b. noms. $13.75 wk 
16TH ST. VIC. 
wood st. nw [ 
Tm... priv Hus af door 
16TH ST. NW. VIC.—Large twin bed- 
rm Mext Dath: phone and laundry 
Privs.; good transp RA. 2347 
ISTH ST. NW., 17°8—Sinele or dbie. 
room: home privileges HO. 7187 
1T?28 ISTH ST NW .—Double sieeping 
room EX. 349 


ee ee 
ri rel 

Newly furn. and decorated 
with running wWater 
Datos: air-cooled fans 
arc elevator service $10.50. to 
Wkly. 1440 Rhode Island ave 
LARGE DOUBLE front room 
Conn. ave. and GoW laundry 
phone priv: pref. girls. RE. 5a29 
HOTEL HAWTHORNE (2134 G 
nw.)}—Single. dauble rms all 
running water Dienty baths 
showers: reasonable rates 
NEAR WALTER REED. 2? sale rms 
for refined ladies: phone ond laundry 

riy $25. $35 mo. TA. #6! 
RITZ HOTEL (920 F st =a“ Deable 
rooms. $20 wk.: downtown. center ot 
bus., shop. dist.: complete hotel! serv 


Phon e 


7S 

5 AM 
COLORED, BLL, SRD 

Npi) Man 
CO 27% 

COLORED—Com! rm. nest bath for 
1 OF 2 men: pvt.home: refs. TU. 5092 
a ~Large bamit. rm. for non- 
drinking man: $8 week. CO, 7R89 
COLORED. Kenyon 8t. NW. 533 

Girl to ehare twin bedrm some 
priv RA. 93546. 
COLORED. 1033 Lamont st. ns 
Large double rogm for desirable emp! 
person. single or share. DU. 06% 


ROOMS 


COLORED—Lee_ rm kitehen privi- 
leges: empl. couple: $40 HU. 812 


HOUSEKEEPING SUITES 37 


RL ADENSBU a RD NE... 1800 Lee 
hk. rm pv! home iree 
Parking near “‘teaeual PR. 4431 
FUCLID ST. NW., 1761—‘% bik. lath 
and Columbia rd. Large front hk 
room. suit young empl. cple.. service 
or ex-service pref.; $45. AD. 9446 
F ST. NW., 21473—Studio rm., share 
eles. refrig $10-$15 EX. 0653 
SILVER SPRING—? bedrms.. comb. 
liv. rm rd kit: refri¢.: phone: near 
bus SLico 3348. moraine? and after 
6. SLigo 5525. } to p 

L. h. K. ROOM, redecorated: down- 
town vicinity ideal for employed 
coupe: $45 per mo NA 5771. 9-5 
COLORED, N.W. Sec.—Furn. or un- 
furn., LAK. rms¢.: married Govt. empl. 
couple: must be sober AD. 860 


ROOMS WITH BOARD 39 


BANCROFT HALL, 1810 Conn —-1 
saie,. 2 dbles.; to share; men and 


women: exce food NO 


CHEVY —, accommodations for 
or 2 gentlemen or couple in hand- 
some home independence and 
Privacy assured; conv. trans WI 
1237 
MASS. AVE NW... 1776—Large front 
rm.; also attrac. share twin vbedrm 
for boy. excellent meals DU. 9557 
MT. PLEASANT—Szile. room for 1! 
boy in beautiful newly decorated and 
furnished house: nice section. close 
to transportation: exc. foad: unlim- 
ited phone: iatindry privs MI. 349 
QUE ST. NW. 1704—Clean rooms; 
friendly atmosphere: sood food: 845. 
$50. $52.50 manth. NO _ 4095 
S ST. NW.. 2107—Szale. and 
rms Hollywood beds: gpod 
television: summer rates. HU 
THE JOHN KILPEN HOTEL (2310 
Ashmead pl. nw.). Dble. & sgle. rms., 
some with prt, bath: American plan; 
exe. meals: hame atmos. HO. 3564 
NR. PENT. ang Colonia! Village: spa- 
cious lawns and porches: club lounge. 
Excel. meals. §16- iw wk. Also furn 
ept. Mrs. Fay, OW. 6253. 


WESLEY, HALL 


Spacious double rms. in remodeled. 
rececorated bigs.: runnifie water in 
every room: large closets: dances and 
free moviet: récreation room: Bendix 
washer: selective menu: $48 to $58 50. 
1426 2ist st. nw. NO. $804. Office 
open Sunday 32 i & ¢ SeSniiaeis 


ROOM, BOARD WANTED 40 


TWO months room and board for 
mother and child. age 7 months. and 
care of chil through day. Box 
567. Washington Post. 


CHILDREN BOARDED | Gay 


GIRLS FROM 8-10 to board In pri- 
vate home at exclusive beach. Super- 
vised by Annapolis Health Dept. $15 
week. West River 3947 


APTS., FURN, er UNFURN. 45 


NW. SECTION—2 Ige rms... kitchen. 
semiprt. dath: Suitable for 2. y. 
7948 or HO. 6924. 


APARTMENTS, FURNISHED 46 


CONN. AVE. (nr. Shoreliam Hote!) 
Apt. studio rm.; kitchen priv.; 1 or 2 
HQ. 4900. Ext 105, after 6 p 


DUPONT CIR. New!ly Sdecr for 2 
or a adults + liv. rm.. porch over 
pa’ din rea huge bedrm., 
he ba’ ht kiteh.. firepiace. built- 
in bookcases | maid service. private 
entrance; $1460-5170. 1733 19th at. 
ne. CO. 5932; 


DOWNTOWN—1-room studio apt., 
place to cook for 2: share bath: com- 
pletely furn.:; $50-855. EX. 4544 


a PONT CIRCLE AREA~-Beaut. furr. 
iv. rm... bedrm.. kit. and bath: daily 
“wt d service optional. NO. 6629 


LINC. PK. vic,—1 rm., kit). pvt. bath: 
Jewish hm.: sgl. wom $50. LI. 3-4602 


MASS. AVE. NW... T2?01——Lovely fur- 
nished apt.: a] conveniences: run- 
ning Water and phone _ip room 

N. H. AVE. WW., 1535—"'The Pana- 
manian,.”” lovely apt all conve- 
riences: dowgjtown locat) on. 


PARKLAND. pe. —2-rm, apt., shar- 
ing kit. and beth: owner-couple: 
child welcome; pvt. entr.; 1 bik bus 
to Andrews Field: $15 wk. HI. 5308. 
PETWORTH SEC.—-1-bedrm furn. 
ept.. from July 1-Sept. 15: close to 
buses and shopping. TA, 2533. 


R BT NE 158 
_ 1 and 2-ropm apts. DU. 7247 : 
Sp ST. NE.. 1822—2-room apt. pvt. 
bath; $27.50 ea. mo. HO. 5888 
ISTH NE... 149 —4-rm “apt. for 4 work- 
ing adults: $30 mo. ea.: no drinking. 


4 RMS. AND BATH, avail. at once: 
$90. GRAHAM & OGDEN, AL. 13, 
TE. 1300 803 King st. Alex. Va 


AVAILABLE JUNE 30 


Suites—-1 bedroom, bath. living 
room. dining’ room, fit,. 300 on 
yearly lease: | bedroom, foyer. living 
room and kit¢hen, '275 me. on yearly 
lease: 3 bedraomea, 2 —_— foyer, liv- 
ing room. dining room, library. en- 
Closed porch, pantry and kitchen. 
$500 mo. on Pearly lease. Call Chas. 
T Hutchinapn. senefal manager, 
Hote! 2400 CO 7200 
NEARBY VIRGINIA—Purn. garden 
ep'.. 2 bedrms.: 5 Ti tS mea 
July 1: $101 month 
ITH «6ST. OUNLW. Stli— 2. ‘end 
porch apt. all utitities. ‘©. “a 

7TH ST. NW Wns. ty tm. 
Frigidaire. porch: Sii wk. RA. 0925, 


HOTEL 1440 


Newly furd. l-rm.. kitehenette and 
bath: air cobled fan: 24-hr sesetes 
and phone service: $234.50 to 831.456 
wkiy. 1440 Rhode Leland ave. ht une 


NOW. AVAILABLE 


Suites Deuble bedroom.  ‘tivin 
room. bath. $200 te £250 month: 


FRANCIS igort OTT KEY APT. L 
1 room. kitchen and bath completely 
furnished apt.. $4. $4.50. 5.50 
per day for 1 ‘or 2: twill hotel serv- 
ice: no time limit. 600 20th st. nw. 
BA. 433. 0 PEA 
APT. tor entplorved mother or couple 
with 2 childre~: day care for ehii- 
dren. BLigo.:: 


TWO-BEDEOOM furnished apartm ment 
vail from June 25-J Lacs' 
Parkfairfax Alex. Va 
39265 NEW HAMPSHIRE A Ne 
Liv. rm.. —: * — refined 
couple; $85 feo. t GE. 2975, after 5:30. 
JULY 1— Pot month, nicely furnished 
2-bedroom - very reasonabie. Sil- 
ver HiL M Capt. C. O. Willems 
Hi. 3100. ext. 5216 or Hj. 2704 
WiLL RENT ‘til Sept. i, 2- room 
furnished apt. Maid service. laundr 
privilege oese — S76 mo. 181 
at nw. : 


l- ROOM APARTMENT | 


1 ed@ult :oniy: sink Prigicaire: 
stove. share bath: Ay drinking. $12.50 
aren 4° K at vs + 


2-BEDRM. ar with ratte Fa 
bath. puite nie jour 


ris. each mo.) ' 
Se Pleasant car tormionl. 347 <= 
bourne pl. ne after 5.30 9 


bi sist &¥. XW — Nicely turn. 
? hr ichen. 


ers All ‘wtil tweet. 
between 3 and 6 BP. m. 


"Bhown only 


| UNFURNISHED 36 


APARTMENTS, FURNISHED 44 
IMMEDIATE “TID AKIO 


Off Mawaii A 
new @upiex 


ALBAN TOWERS 


rr 7, + Try 
AD HOTT 
+ »* >» * 


»- * ee 


COLORED—APARTMENT FOR RENT. 
TW. 1502 


APTS., HQUSES to sans 46A 
enn "ely 
* rp aL ty Chie ef al 
CONN AVE.—Y 

m ' $50 
ties HO. 6565 
Tp : weekdays al 
GIRL to sire mod. Ar! 
other har € expenses 
APT... bed rm lit 
Tur ed pt 


congenial 
i. and dallA 


» SECTION. One or two girls to 
re Dt with " ot ers TR 1444 
L ; + 
ONE GIRI to share apt with 3 other 

ris N VW han | n 5 5 mo DU 
S713 al 
wae. SHARE Apt with 

Om al ara for 2 

Wo consider 
W ss) ine FS . 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 
Pi. AYG ROL ND age child 
ndri rents was 


New!y remode! ed apdartmen' 
room. bdath sm der pening 
- aeees rh. Tis g hat ning room 
ION WitLn lovely Areplace end 
~. : ppea x it< — Rent 


" TENC HER c ° IN« 
AT) 2844 
a on 7 ie as ell 
UM HEIGE a4 .) 
as RTM! 
immeaqaiate Orc 


ff roa = 
Chi ldre n We i 
feoicn 
othe 
t on + 
Queens Chapel 
rds.; good closet 
tian Diinds. laun- 
uilies and storege 
Resident manager 
Veteran's pref- 
reach: Drive east 
‘Riggs rd 
turn right te 
Michigan ave. 
extended Queens A 
to Chillum 1: 
Drolect or 
meadows bus to C } 
turn right to project 
Hw. ¢ SMITHY CO 
—821 18h St. 5.W " 3300 
_ I2eoce ? 7 wats 
LAS N« ‘ [ Iw HEIGH i 
1 and Asin om aepariment uniis 
0 ly 1 occupancy rand new 
de elopmen: ioot of 8. Capitol at. 
a Distric 
GLAS ~ 
LO -R100 
»~ SE. 32207 Dupi 7 apr et 
> be drm chen and 
month Fn not me 
clude u ti! itles aduits preferred: avail. 


immediately GEORGE 1 BORGER, 
643 Indiana ave. nw 


QUEE NSTOWN “APTS. 


Queens Chapel rd. and Chillum rd. 
Mt. Rainier. Md New conatruction 
immediate occupancy 2 bedrooms, 
living room. kitchen dinette 
ba! h. $89 50 to $91.50 per month in- 
cluding utilities: some bave garbage 
cisposa! units in Kitchen: Venetian 
binds, good closet space. laundrs and 
storage rooms fenced<in play areas 
for children: shopping center being 
completed project Located next 
to public high school and convenient 
to other schools. To reach: Prive 
out Michigan ave. extended to Queens 
Chapel rd.. or dy bus, 
artisvile pus. 
representati' 

Queens 
CO.. 811 15th st. nw. OT 


NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE—Modern 
attr. unfurn. apt. 2 bedrooms. com- 
piete elec. kit. and bath. fireplace 
ample closets: parking space: suit 3 

adults $110 DE. 5019 
CHOICEST iocation. Dupont-Mar- 
flower area—2 new apts.. completion 
by July lst or sooner; both are Colo- 
nia Gesignecd with wuwiltra modern 
equipment. all-electric kitchens with 
Garbage-disposal units, flectrie’ ven- 
til ators in kitchens and baths; pien- 
ful closet apace. firenlaces. etc. 
Front apt Large living rm.. bedrm., 
ndows. floor area 970 «a. 


~~. A A NOR ’ 
¥\. ik 


49, Washineton "Bost. 

Donna Lee Apartments 
A limited number of 1 and 2 bed- 
room unfurnished apte. available far 
occupancy eariy in Juls Other sece 
tions if Auguatl. and Beprember 
Canvenientiy. located off af Cotum- 
nile past Baileys Cross 


7 hede 

ies tncinded. An- 

n cet d Priday, Sature 

y and Sunday at 2228 Wiieon bivd. 
Arlington OW. 6660 

, . 

a 


POMPONIO nA Lae 


WITHIN —? err 7 


SHIPLEY PARK APTS. 
Southeast Washington 


OPEN POR INSPECTION daily and 
Sunday: new 1 and 2 b 
S20 to $95 mo. inci. util 
rms. picture windows 
blinds and equipped kitchens. 

To reach: If driving. take Good 
Hope rd. or Penn. ave. to Alabama. 
se. right on Alabama tea 23rd at. se. 
By streetcar: Take Navy Yard street- 
car to Navy Yard at Navy Yard 
take €W bus to 23rd st. and Alabama 
ave. se 

Applications being taken eat 316 
Ring Building. 1200 18th st. new. RE. 
2388. RE. 3851 3 
Jonathan Woodner Co. 


TH 
WINDSOR PARK H( 
2300 CONN. AVE. 


An address of distinction. 
everiooking Rock Creek Park 
at fashionable Kalorama Cir- 
cle: Washington's newest de 
luxe apartment hote). with 
an in-town iocation afford- 
ing easy access central 

suburban business areas 
fireproef and soundproof; 
offering elevator switche- 
board. package room. iaun- 
dry window washing and 
garage facilities. rentals on 
these roomy picture-win- 
dowed aparjments — include 
all utilities plus reacing 
reom and roof garden priv- 
lleges. dining reom seon 

a 

} | end 

unfurnished ' 
for eccupancy. ! . 
8150 Call at 


a riyrrs 
SMITH A 


MANAGEMENT 


KENT V TLLAGE 


rere 's 
New Se bam Apa ’ nenis 
e of the most des 
ful developments 


and Country Club in Land- 


“et PEATURING 
Large Picture Windows 


A few select one-bedroom 
apartments avallable in see- 
ranging from 


o-bed sote. from 
$600 to $95.25. Our exquisite 
Guplez apartments are ‘ea- 
tured at 31065 per month. 


GAS AND ELECTRICITY INCLUDED 


SAPE PLAYGROUND FOR 
CHILDREN 


Siecesions -_— Prom 
. then tern right on 
202 


for 1% miles te 
ent Village. 


EUGENE B. ROBERTS 


KFWT VILLAGE. LANDOVER. MD. 
APoieton O68 


° 
APTS., UNFURNISHED 47) 
i etic eel 


Continuea From Preceding Page 
COLLEGE PARK— 


— 


'2 blecks from Uniy. 0 «- $91. 
mo., incl. ytil. 8H 8062, SLigo 7515. 


. 
— 9, 


ONG BRANCH APTS, |i 


New fireproof, Sarden-type; 2 bed. a ry ae 


rooms, living room. dinette, kitchen tended 
- Tr m util.-: WAVERL AYLOR 
bY-passing closet __1028 Conn. ave Nw RE. il 
SMARTLY F URNISHED 
_ AVAILABLE 


year's lease or 
and 4 


doors, kitchen exhaust fanc laundr 
b mond storage space. Contact resident 


TEMPLETON MANOR Fay 
re 
You Still Have An rtunity | ™* 
To Locafe In This Exceptiona! 


Garden-Type Apt. Development 


AUG. 
The entire project will be 
completed sometime in July, rms 
but we still have » numbe ¥ 
4 excellent apartmenis avai. 
abie. 


876.50—3) TOOM apartment 


On 
a 
consist{ of ilivi room, grounds. 
bedroom? dinet thee s, 2 
al a 

a r. 
886.504 roo . living room RAVENWOOD REALTY co 
dining room bedroom: Ener —PA. 2975 


HOU 


te, en 
and bath. 


en and bath. s 

$92.50——2-bedroom ¢ t IN. ARE 

With dinette or ora oo 2. i 

Unit with gull ining Toom. bige ; 
able- 

896.50 —2-bedroom ent 

Fith full dining mam 


ALL PRICES IN. 


All apartments equipped 
With venetian bij s 6 ft. 
electric refrigerator and full 
size 4-burner gas range. 

ea! Play facilities for 
®mail children, nursery school 
Tun by the tenants in space 
furnished free by us. 

You must look these apart- 
ments over te fully appre- 
Ciate them. 


Directions: Out Biladens- 
burg =F Peace Cross, and 


Fe] ee 
mile to Madison St. or Capi- 
tal Transit bus. Trolley to 

t. Rainier and transfer to 

ast Riverdale bus, Route 
B-4 to Subdivision. Resi- 
deat ager ®t 5433 55th — 


Di, apt. 10 1427 

OFPICE MONDAY 
THROUGH FRIDAY ONLY ANE 
Colonia! Investment Co. | Juiy 
RE. 6650 


SS =——— | AIR FORC 
£0-OP. APTS., SALE STA Ras Gee 
NAYLOR GARDENS | anpe 


furn. 


VETERANS ONLY pref, & 


COUPLE, 

2-Bedroom Co-op Apis. / four = 

Immediate occupancy owner leav- | Hyatts vill 
is 


sios''| GEORGETOW 
TILDEN GARDENS ~~ town, faust And 


1 %-tile-path Someth 
nee foyer. 


img OWN, will sacrifice 
$1200. Phone V] 


ds 2 room, 
Spartmenig with entra 


oy ' 

eizable living room, library. dining | Viding the dwel! 

room and kitchen. Tastefully dec- | [or co 

Grated and in beautify! condition. | diplo 

Priced reasonably with low mainte- | nishings desired. 
Coats. 


mance 


4420 Conn. Ave. 
EM. 1800 til 9 p. m. 


APARTMENTS WANTED a8 sire Seb eT CIAL 
Stas antes, nH 
72112 


BUILDERS Oo ERS, MANAGERS 
Apartments needed for deserving 


' Veterans. Please phone AD. 7050,|NW. OR 
American Legion Housing Committee. | Tm. kitch 


esires apart- M-174, W 


EMPLOY d 
ment. Lt, 34a5e after 6 weekdays. 


4196 ‘until 12 noon 


ENNDLORDS ie oeesc— ses — oom, aes 
ferting OB APITAL or PANS eet for large cl : 


to 


nt 
Pt Y who ne amily housing.| Max. § A. 4 
ty 3 603 weekdays, 8-30 COLORED—Lis; your 
and say “I want to list some | apts. Roys Re 
——_ i —_____ | COLORED—S 
MARINE Major and wife desire apt.' NW. sect 
ser summer months. as pear main | Box 6652 
avy &. as ‘sible. Ca uantice | ———___— 
9pm. OFFICES, D 


Just phone MI 
to 


cents Dem. ie 


PERM. lady Gov i employe needs 
efficiency or 1-bdrm. apt. CO. 6798 


YOUNG nondrinking couple 


: e 1. | Northwest locatio 
o'd baby, urgently need 1 or 2-bedrm. b _ AD. 2363. a. 
Attractive office. ex- 


unfurn. apt. TA. 4794 after 11 a. m. | 10 


tig 


YOUNG COUPLE. io be married in be fl SPACE— 


July, need apartment: maximum $50: 
no “poking or drink 
Box }as Washington 


ee cal ee 


furn.. apt.: 2 ladies, Walter 


3-RM. lo 
employes: vic. hospital; $75 —just 
mo Sun. and after cious 


Days, GE. 1000 
Or Mrs. Williams. 


ing, 
-—_ oe eee ne Wie. eee tery Gene EE ' : 
COLO ED—Couple n child; 1 or | suit 

- “ Rw : 8988, | Service. 24 
Sun. | Rished; 3 
Pply resident manager, 1 
st. nw. 


CHURCH | 


2 rms., kit. and , » 
after 5 weekdays, all day Gat., 


MOVING & STORAGE 49 
LIGHT HAULING. weekends; reason- 
A®. 2077. 


edie rates. aq. Ample 


eee 


CALL ANY Tim por insured. careful profe 
see Cle. 8137. * | fully 


—__ 


LIDO TRANS 


moving; Teas. wr. 
ee inet — 


ulin ht and heavy. Days, | * 
nights Bun. 4. 4911." 2D st 
ATLANTIC GOAS MOVERS—Tocal_ , Rs 


gong distance. TR. 7800, WI. 3010 | foo 


BEVENEY TRANSFER—pDU. 8817. | light 
Local, long-distance movers: small! McC 
up. 


local pickup: $3 


ee ae 


. 
a 


ate 


MARINE 

Hight loads. 24-hr. service. ‘A 
HOUSES, FURNISHED 50 
_—_——— SL Le restates 


snees locations, all with 3 bedr 


baths. Price ranges from $185 per spac 
nth to $200. Leases from 2 months | Bished; 


l year. - 


HICKS REALTY Co, _ | gouinoute’ 


REALTORS —— 
“SEE Us FOR YOUR SHARE OF | 
AL, 1600, eves. OV. 6843-oT. 9161 


a ae . |8as station. nd 
NGTON—6-rm. furnished home: | for apartment. sale 
10 minutes from “nem: 1 Canby. Mills B 
vailable imm late or rt o —e a 
fone “term levee 3140 month. CH. STORES, RENT 
. eee 

2 SB. to 6 ——e————____ | 7723 Wisconsin ave., 


— —~— ee 


ARL.—6-toom house for summer 


rental; large yard: Bendix. conv. Excellen: 

offices or 
BETHESDA. MD.—Aiirac. new home, | theater entrance. 
THOMAS F. HAMPTON 


BRIGHT WOOD—July rental: wel) 8015 Wisconsin Ave 


trans.; $100 mo., ‘inci. util CH, 
5314 or ST. 8617 


— 


3 bedrms., i*%2 baths; nr. schools and 
trans.; yt S. lease; $165 mo. OL. 5244. 
furn.; gpand Piano; 2 rooms. 
Yard porch; Teasonable. TA. 1193 
or DI. 7612 : 


through September 
8845. 


room and bath in basement. We!l- 


shaded yard. Suitable for entertain. | REAL ESTATE LOANS 
1ST, 2D. 3 


¥ MD., VA. 
1622 Wise. Ave. eae 2644. | MENTS LOW 
GEORGETOWN, new 2 Sedrms., | CO. 905 _N. y. 


ing Available now. l-year lease, | 
$225 mo. 
THE J R. TENCHER co., INC 


deep garden. $175 mo. Co 


GEORGETOWN |, Ne 


Unusually attractive 6 rooms in- | NAT 


Cluding 3 bedrooms, 2 baths in 


t 
menihe ge yest. “8. Tee 
NEAR CATHEDRAL—< bedrms.,, 1. 


@ir-cond_.;: baths. rden; July ji 
to Oct. I: 3160 monthiy. AD. 0990, 
Ext. 9. ar OR. 7112 B 


_9. at OR. 7112. Bante 
NORTHWEST SECTION |¥4ee secon J 


IRABLE RENTALS 
env EN GS Po Te ae 


A.D. CRUMBAUGH | MONEY For 


#908 Wis. Ave Realtor, WO. 1-3-6-4 aah calls. 


Se eee 


R TERRACE, 333 36th ne v. fen7 
RIVE rn... bedrm ~ 


atten 


rm.. din, . Kit. and ba 
Partly furn, gas heat: owner retain- — 
ins ] rm.: fer couple: $55 mo. DI. 
6700. ext. 2380, Mr. Siege! 


Nicely furnished 3-bedroom, 2%- 


bath home in fine residentia! —. AMERICAN UNIV, PA 


vear'y lease: iD. per month. 


HOLMEA 


and completely furn. ho 
z™ms., 2 baths. basement. seefeetion | othe. ie 2d 
Tm., Im restricted residential com. ~ 


munity. Outskirtg of Annapolis: 
cool. wooded area, on Severn River: 
$190 per _% oucluding sardner. 


Phone Annapo , 
ELECTRICALL ¥ air-cooled 3 bedrma.| 2 BLOCKS FROM CONN. AVE 


2 b eICALL 

aths, ige. liv. rm. . Tm... pow. 
der rm. enclosed pore July 1 thru 
Oct. 1. CO. 1739. 


$150 per mo. Restored country 
house on farm close to Rockville. 
4 bedrooms. baths. screened porch: 
eautites ews Cel ee commut. | 
ng Stance. a mtal Dept. 
WO. 1966 . : 


‘ : ss : f 
MARSTELLER-McCABE & CO.. Inc. | 


— hom ‘ ; 
GEYTLEMAN'S MARYLAND ESTATE a , 
Mouser io 30 minutes from White aewaer rm.. modern 


; m _™ ' 
Perch « lankets now): garden. flow. bedr 
re: 15 acres: Magnificent hilltop exce}! 


view: «4 rb Tees. 


Bas 


upe Wood. holly: 
ell oon an gnces of the Ly, ~~. ie maid 
errees -ooler: Maid available: ' Me 
WA 1406 Tage. 


eee es eee pe ne oe a | $29 
fome ifr ney ne ts; rene reel 
n 2. f 
Des. : ‘ 
é ietgie Der. $178 mo. OF wsbe 


’ 
; 


—— on 

bedrooms, living | Clyde C 

room, dinette, kitchen, and bath; jo- NEAR BRI 
aie Dew buildings: convenient to | br; k, 
shopping center an Ot tation: ing Orient 
l 


$15.000 | Ger $30, 
lin ve 
2b 


¥ 31, 1950, possib Investment Co 


~_OR, 2100. Open ¢ Ti); %.i- 
; BARNABY WOO 
Gilliat & Co. EN DAILY POR IN@P 
__ 2827 Dumbarton Ave. 


a@ttracti 
tain, 


3 b 
and silver 


Charming E 


terrific 
ing ft 


2-car garage. com-| 
: 00 


CHEVY CHAS 
SILVER SPRI 


‘a-bath brick home, | 
5 mo 


E. M.. FRY, INC. 


brick 


3-bedroom 
long lease. west of 


ALLIED REALTY CORP. wi 
H'SES, FURN. or UNFU 
Immediate Poss 


6 daily or by! #4rage 
R ORDO 


Shockey & Moorehead 
' REALTORS 


AER at. aes oth 
- 2' are row brick ~and in perfec; condi-| delightfy! rooms, 11 baths; ful) 
ton tia CHEVY CHASE, D. C. baths ye. aide porch | tion. Cail) Mrs cme te MI. 3022,| basement, attached garage. Side Porch, | 
._ , U re 
brick of finest. 

x ; ’ bath. fire.| “- B. WRI 

EWS FIELD PERSO 9 
ed | 


—~d ooee = vlN tile bath ge full bem. 
vith Outside entr.; Anchor ned. yd.. | ——_—_™._ | - ——~ | televs 
D- | Ven blinds, storm Windows. vers NR. WALTER REED eltvision, Bendix washer, and many $20. 5anering Oaks. Priced righ: 


| With 


Chevy Chase Realty Co. | JAMES L. DIXON 


& Moorehead — 
menos 
CHEVY CHASE, D. c. 

off Conn.—New 3-bed room 
bat room, 
kitchen. 
noms. Nice 


Furnished or Un 


ESK SPACE RENT $5 0% Povintlice ape 
| CHEVY CHASE Doc 


ving room Shackleford. 


; references, #Dd secy. 
Bost .| BLigo 4608 


Available “Immediat 


ell j 
west rentals we've rea | 
r 


6, - 9810. io 
. Ext. 634, Mrs. Spein | lavator 


b 
>| BURR & YOUNG, Realtors 
4444 


a tee F Quick sale at $22,000. Owner will 
Y - | finance. Approx $5 own. 


400 CONN. AVE. w 


YEFERAN—Inereee. trunks NR. MAY. —— 
CHEVY CHASE 


. © large 
—<—<—<————__— | High Ceilings. 


__No. 2 Dupont Circie. 


ALEXANDRIA BUSINESS PR¢ 
We have 3 furnished houses in FAIRFAX, VA hi 
eo : OR. | Rutley & Bair Wi ase sh” ase 


th EDGAR L. W 
. 6242. 


I 
N- t tchen; fleor fin- : 
‘o ished off in aan > ae. porches, | ents. DE. 1160 — | description call 8H. goi0 ‘14 9,.m.\,2 efseom., and bath bungalow. 
Ch: full | built-in gar: large, ishrady, lan -| | 
only | en ped lot. Bemg sold t settle estate Near Rhode Island ave. ne. 2-story ance 
Call SH. a0 9 Dp 


BUSINESS PROPERTY, 


MINIATURE sh 
on Colesville 
der one roof: 4 $17 
floor adaptable | 


ARKER. WO 7840 | 


location for druq store. | 
retail business, N 


| Bellevue 

Ce | basement: 

BURLEITH Tor nate 

6 rooms, bath and ‘%, erage | cont to 
‘ uly 1/ 

and fenced yard Available EM. | 2D ST. NW, 

(in first-class 


et — storage room 25 
Chevy Chase, D.C. for. it 


Georgetown Office. 
t. HU. 7266. 


tion. Garden. Very close transports. | 1312 New : DI. _ 
vdeveat eon FOREST HILLS 
ELLIOOTT 8ST. N.w.— 


e, tes. 
Befor all Colonia! Invest- 
St. N.W. RE. 6650. 


DO? ¥. : 
N.W. Dl. $230. Brokers bedroom, 2-bath home) close to ele- 1015 15; &t NW 


2D TRUST NOTES PURC 
WASHINGTON HOUS 


SILVER SPRING, MD. sal, B.C HOLS 


w 


FT, STEVENS p 


hom 
bedrms. and 2 baths. 


REALTOR | IST oO 
SH. 6200. Eves. Mr. Bair. SLigo 1974. center-hall 
"a a ; St flee 
JULY AND tely turn, Modern, finely den, dining + 


recreatio 


Leo M. Bernstein & Co. 


Realtors 
and bath on 1415 K St. N.W. ME. 5400 
be . 
ment; 
very £00 
Priced righ: 


eaten nee tee 


GEORGETOWN 


FIRST OFFERING 
1. Spacious drawing room 


Laura Harlan & Co. 


ay a oe. uu’ 


j 


; 


; 
4 


| | ‘ a 
S4/SALL B.€ MoUSES | ga) cate D.C. HOUSES 64/SALE SUBURB, HOUSES gy SALE SUBURB, Houses 
me omens Meath cee d , , , 67 
PARK GEORGETOWN F- EMERSON ‘ST. dia pean. | _MARYLAND . MAR¥la  —— 


, te Getached, l0-rm house, 31, 
Attractively Femodeled  2-story | Center hall; large porch ~ ae come ties onic 


’ ; well-built | . i gy 
brick. 6.cpedrooms, ‘SrS@ garden: un-!) home. with  RMicely ‘landscaped ETHESDA BARGAIN Potomac, mp. -S-rm.. 3-vear-nid- 
grounds, double tee reasonably | ree oom brick, 3 years old: Koonte Gari, Sere: $14.980. cy 


| Ver 1 : ring’ .. , - ' ~ 
‘ room: view of 7 et ving; ON fe a Owner, 137 OF | almost new house fondition: hand wie 
Good sma}! commercial in » of 2 eae a Se | *® DUS and schoo): eneed back yard vr RING 
ation +3 excellent shops i eee lovely trees. Good financing. 4% in. SIL VER SPRING 
Cal RE. MI. 2908 Stevens Realiors, 3245 Pp! 2022: eves yy patie paceniin. a Selling out 2 brick Colonials 3 
ae nei = a oe; Oves., tec reduce nice bedrooms 7 bath; stor ttic; 
| KINGMAN PARK ARFA | Pay As You Go | EUGENE B. GINGELL, Real tne: sngrlent consiruetion.” “castt, tte: 
|, It's cheaper to buy the best. This | ve OD beautiful high | 7542 Georgetown ». Bethe: renter ementary POO. recreation 
~~ | 18 Peally » dream My ‘ siaakons | tiny wintenn®, of Kent : Y BETH ‘ RA.. Be meede oa $14,950. g); 000 4', Ist 
rooms, hardwood f} rs | throughout. | opeanterized cottage |: ce | 'y 
UNIV, PK. pine-paneled recreation, peo me | Pedrooms) unti! you fan ] ESDA—$10,500 —/OSEPH M. Lyons SH. 9493. 
Kk ernistic kitchen fenced Yard. Idea! | build your DREAM HOUSE Bungalow With expandab'e attic. ; OTe ere — 
n for summer Priced under $14,000 on the same site. Make an | GI “nancing can be obtained. lst SILVER SPRING 
rd and Ca}! Mrs. Voigt. i os "gg ll Call Mrs. Dawson, ow Ne a = tchen  ,TOpm. ~~ ae Close-in section neW detached 
57 it i-g atenen, utility ‘r rial : we 
COX & COMPANY W lk & Dun) I bedrooms and bath eatiires include erick Sedroom and bath ist floor 
ae ee aD. soe. Walker ¢ UTLOp, inc, (expandable attic wit Plumbing ana men, coms and bath 24 ee penne 
: Senne Sen coe - a Realtors. Georgetown Office. neating roughed in: aTee lot After 4 — , sarese oe8 ny om: tae - cs ‘ 
aloe 7 0 8t. HU. 7266 CR Keay ME: Harper. wi jose) * en. sit osn it aranediate sale: $13, 
i " : SAMUEL B LEY rare 000 first iTust aVallable 
DS | Mass AVE. HEIGHTS ation” SygPOGLEY, INC. Bit FR B. KEY REALTY Co)’ Vj 
, “° — — os .. - —— === / Realtors 7004 Wisconsin Ave ~ oe 14 
CONVENT Dut )% FUBW. APTS. 3 baths toc brick. WI. 5500-WI. 1209 ——_SLiso 3010 Tins Py 
TH SPACIOUS atin | ‘a, block Off 16th e: pp, clit basement - aa aed 
‘ | SUSstantial ineome "ace $20,000 | rT TAI. 
MANSION | gid fan ter-hall Colonia! | ROW -BRICK, 6 jovely rooms, hard- | BETHESDA ~ SILVER SPRING 
oa aoa ~~ Situated ae, family (| | Nod floors, gas heat: excellent cond.; | $14.950 ARE YOU INTERES TED IN 
ag tion's | Sroup of fine residences * Prog UBsement, screens and ae nee | Modern S-room detached brick MAKING 4 REAL pry: 
6 rms IST FI R contains 22. Beer re tte ya easy terms. Im- home ipcated on well-landscaped Then here is Just the thing 
I ious ° | Mediate Session wooded lot. Purchaser Can assume  & 6-room, 1 ts-bath detached 
30- | ily dining Toone igus fam- | OWENS REALTY _ME. 0486. maete’ GI an at 4%. $73 Ber aame home a a fine Silver 
kit : month, in¢luding iMsurance and Pring location Priced 
© hae large den end full NR. LAFAYE7 TE SCHOOL baxes. Alter 6 p. m. Cali Mr. Mark- unusual leo i of 311 280 - 
2ND FLOOR has fujl- | Excellent prewar Getached brick;|™an. EM. 1175 Cal Mr. Payne, Mi 4260, Ext 6 
Screened etn - — | ist floor. living room with fireplace, | Samuel] a Bogley, Inc. | N.G. Frederick 6 Son, DI. 3740 
—— storage attic. | Pore. dining se =peere Kitchen. recep- Realtors 7004 Wisconsin Ave. | 
B EMENT has Q+ear ga- Jon Hall; 24 Sor, 3 bedrooms, 2 WI. 1320. WI. & 1 Sr arias —_ 
Tage, oi] h.-w. h * Paths; finished, | heated sce ———pe | SILVER SPRING 
Bitusted on a’ wile leve! basemennneled | tecreation rooms in| BETHESDA 
lot and priced well below to- basement; gas hot-water heat; det. | aan” NEW BRICK COLONIAL 
day's cost Exceptionally Weta Fe "JOHNSON ALTY $17,500—Will Go FHA Large 4) 1 bie ys 
Sood financing for | respon. - Nw, PEALTY CO./ 4. attractive brick home consisting eine ee on an Dowder 
Sible purchaser 3402 Conn. Ave. N.W. OR. 7100 of living room dining + kitchen | [90@. finisheg recreation room With 
Call WO 2300 anytime un- gers NEAR © Th powder "> ym, Kitchen. | tirenia- . + twin-size bedrooms 
til 9 tor appointment i. | VACANT—NEAR ce bedrooms, I bath’? 7 meee 3 | full baths. gas a-c hea: large jot. 
spect. | 1347 Newton st. ne Detached 2- home, ail Dasemen saree’ |slate roof: 3 lock to bus: excellent 
Oo shopping, schools and transporta- ~ i 
/Story. 6 lovely rooms. large jot. 3 | tion Well financed After 6 p.m. call y)7. Call DI. 101s a © “4 
P12 Osc ee BS, 2, apts.; | f° Harper, WI. 1575 Wm. H. Saunders ., Ine, 


| full baths: can , 
EDW. H. JONES & CO., INC, ‘2 en egRED, Eaeaice® SPP "| Sh yee BOGLEY, INC. | srcvaa sraate—ecees beh. tamns 


igh ere 90 Sith ST. NW. Realtors 7004 Wisconsin ave. | bler only $16,250. Features ese. | 
sil. | Massachusetts Avenue Park /§7 Palen Wee | ——Wi_ 1320. Wi S500 | sionally ige. liv. rm., 115 bara, S2CeP* 
rch | ae ELO KET "| fast rm. Bendix washer Brand. 
dining | Nr, Cathedral] & John Eaton | rw “MSs bath, semidet. bri. s00d | BETHESDA—$} 250 Rew. Choose your own decorative 
rs! pacetem Yoet,, Schools | alance' or Go. Na Baga! Bid. |, 6:r00m Trwblace aime age bath | Spey Clon hoe. Wet no vans. 
= i . i a.t . N . . es. ' . ; -* = , 
a |seunge cone Spas! bie Cae heet, ae awe Br eta iaaneted Watt ees 28 O° Moock neaty es 
7 oe ~ha) i, tition S han 2 wears old: } ~; , 
G-/ room. dining room kit¢hen, library QUICK SALF »- lot: In very desirable Parkwood area. Silver Spring—Bungalow 
maid's ane pavatory: oe “ r > a ee lst offering. Brict semidetached goons °,.vaval and Public Health | NLY $13,950 
: 2-car aths and enclosed porc oor: =~ FF ra _| Medical Centers. r sale by owne Ih Own 
to 2 bedrooms and bath Laundry, | 7 rooms, built-in Garage; ist floor leaving Washinstor * OL e517" : WITH $2500 DOWN 


; 1 . Us Nl : Brick, new OM Nice size in: Ra! 
'Maid's room and bath. jaree storage | screened porch through center hal] ; ; a uce size jot al- 
room, 2-car garage. attractive brick | Dian: bargain at $14,750. BETHESDA. | Ance @asy terms Conv: auto heat: 


e ’ . fler 5 D. mm. : ' b ’ 7 + . 
AGO 25 ‘| terrace’ The hou © 181 in excellent | JOSEPH M LYONS SH. 8493. Detached J-bedroom 2-bath brick | basemen: , wee today RE. 3316. 
Ligo 2578 or WO. , camel | condition throughout For appoint. | —— woos “| home on a lovely Street, in an ex- CHAPMAN REALTY co 
HASP D Cc ment to inspect cal! Mr. Ralls, eves. | Cetlent eine de yd ay) liv- SUMNER 
. . Sat. aud Sun, NO 9414 Other ‘ ‘ae TOOm wi replace, ning kK 
brick, bain, | ives RANDAL, Bt gah “Coe 2 TINY HOUSES builtin geraecrvenem, dcreen Derek | 1 NEW-HOUSE ConDrTion 
, . Ciusive agents, 2 onan, - eel ten ditto ono it~ ; i rooms take : : 
shove ave. nw. DE. 3600 CLOSE IN TOWN Wee nr excelient value at $18 950 2 at aiding gute of Brick, ek 
a ; r “ j CONLains 
Priced ASS. AVE. HEIGHTS |, Suitable for beopie who want e;”™: ; _- Senter hail. jarge “iD room open. 
®. Call! wis “Teen faire cenier-hali| home with real or Ay aoe and | _____ 3400 CONN. AVE, api Ce RS 1Re onto screened Porch. dining room 
* ‘| brick colonial residence is priced far/ charm, yet a | Ye “with | B HESDA ; Sith oriel window. a. Ist-floor 
below reproduction costs ands an | hanes ao Ritehee = aa Non ng BR ; | Bvatory, well-equipped Kitchen and 
excellent buy. First fidor has wide | firep wi founi i c my house} NEAR PUBLIC HI ALTH CENTER | Weil-proportioned bedrooms and » 
full center hall, 28-f¢. living room | rooms ‘ dou e. 1 sing ; ~ GI ; , | Baths, excellent storage room. large 
with fireplace, ‘large ‘dining room | 1s in Georgetown. $15,250: the ot ery Daenewy, this house with $1800 | closets 2-CAr garage, gas hea- 
nice kitchen. ’ pane) den ahd fyli| near Dupont Circle, $19,500. down bayment. Home contains 6 nice Ww C & A N MILLER 
° 4 ivi ’ 


aths, 2-car garage. large side el DEVELO 
100-ft. frontage. Stairs to large attic.| till 7 p m., or HU. and ti ar te nook. Priced at $18... Builders and Deveioper< of 


7266. 
; . tae dD ~ 000. After 6 p. m Call Mr. Kermit w : fall 
’ : t. y ? ‘ . » esi te . : 1} 
Por appoin 17 inspec call Waker & unlop, Inc |Mever at WI. O340 ey Hts cum & Spring Va ey 


EM. 5600 | Mass | OR 4 
: 3400 CONN. AVE +e 5207 ort anda ae Samuel FE. Bogley, Inc. | Ee Telephone wt, m9") 
MICHIGAN PARK ‘ , REALTOR | 7004 Wisconsin poe ——_ “iSt Your House With Us.) 
pene wn cig lly a ise ————| ———B1._1320,_w1. 3500." °°. WOODSIDE PARK 
: / ‘WSti O1./N.0, ; | , ; ’ 
Mod. brk meme Just off Sargent BUNGALOW . CHEVERLY | peste nee te — content| 


in excel. loc.: “has everything; | $1,000 down. 875 per mo Good | 


m 
Going tates rr will sel my home | bedroom. den and {yl} bath on first | 
c 


i rd. 
Bie 'Ige. jiv. rm, Picture window, ige | \ eciion. 5 rms., bath. finished | for $15.500, 2150 h - FF 
CHASE, D, C. id very fine kit. with ‘tabie Be 3 bed ms, Jorge ws? yk homes and 2 pult baths 


2d floor. full basement, new fas fur- Pua loan; ms. large living | or second floor; huge concrete side 


6. | Pace. & cu. ft. de luxe G E. refrig | Mace, hardwood floors. immed. poss. room, dinin room. kitchen and bath. porch, attached ganee, full boos 
y 3 6 Pp.) Screened side porch. large fenced in: ment, gas heat fines: ePpointments 


| full basement. Price Includes RCA Landscaped lot &4x205 With plenty 


' other « 
clean throughout: quick poss. | “Atras. Ideal for fhildren. One 


| mod.; block to a ’ | 
‘| or 7 | y ent ® brick home srace school. Call UN 7901. ' 
; | only 5 4200. with $16 50 ist trust) Lovely center-entranc corner lot. Conv. to Andrews and Bolling Pieid WoodConley Co.., Realtors 


inel.| located on. a beautiful 


4% »p mo. id. | M 
; do t - m., | Reception hall. large living reom. 8710 Ga: Ave SLiso 5700 ti gop 
james pt a oon in 9 p.m side porch. dining room. dining al- | CHEVY CHASE, MD. | Ww 5 ui 9 p.m. 
WOODSIDE REALTY CO cove, den and kitchen, 3 large bed- | REDD 85,000 i. SIDE 
ee aecientees illest s LI ————ee | FOOMS and 2 tile baths; oi] a8.) 1 bik. off Conn aye P00 ah pda epee a wél tunan a TAPS F 
heat; built-in garage. excel. cond., OF OOF. lot 105x130 ¢1.- | with bedrm. and bath on Ist floor. 
N W. CLOSE IN Chevy Chase Realty Co. | ist ‘» ge. liy, *,with firep).,| This home i. detached brick: fea. 
WEST OF 16TH AND NEAR PARK 4420 Conn. Ave modern ire ton, aaa. din ™. =e. os ee iv. rm. with fireplace, 
Detached brick, 4 bedrooms, EM. 1800 till 9 p. m. fast nook, den powder mt = f- & pened toy he nen tail | 


built-i sarage. oi] h -w h, Re- Me . : screened side . | ' 
Br heptaa make afin | TOWN HOUSE ones" ata Seda: 2 bait. “ie | Samant Ronson ut, fl 
ss ] DMAN ST. a: c! Sets: r - Storage SDace: ail . 
hi Mr. Payne, MI. 4280, ext. A dren Cae, of the 3 level rage, ARLIE ‘[° JOHNSON REALTY, MET CLER, REALTORS 
nc Prog ick & So DI, 3470 type, i a i3 gg CcO., INC. OR. 7100 tii] 9 DP. m. | pr 8600. 1106 Vermont Ave N.W. 
’ - Frederic n ‘ 5‘. baths. 3 ireplaces. rance Soar . ' 
level (oy oy Hg gm CHEVY CHASE, MD. WOODSIDE PARK 
Paes Seger enee . | room. be room an u acy. @ of the most attractive homes Lovely new brick of modern design | 
EST ORELAND HILLS level hes spacious dr wing room, it has been our pleasure to show: - | 80d excellent Construction. Cont 
M and music room for Sracious enter- tains 26-ft. living room with fire. | den room and batt ut ae 


2 ot, from Mass. ave., bear ing. with absolute freedom from | 
schools, trans. and Spring ’ Valiey ee penetrating the upper jeout | lace, “Hiren enter hall large dining floor and 4 bedrooms and 2 baths on 


+ | TOOm. . m. | +, large well eg Pped 
s ng ce bed chambers. Ample servants rear screen r v -| finest section of Silver Sprin Price 
ideally arranged for entertaining, in- puarters and 2-car garage. Located race. 4 ~~} fart, stud’ ter | Feduced for immediate ale’ 


pede brary and full bath. 2 foe | in an area of fine homes contiguous | (8°; _ 
replace, and 2 baths ‘on 2d floor. KE 
i. toon 81 with | be sold promptly. Open tO ANY rea- | car sarage, ful] basement, and ‘tc | WOODHAVEN BETHESDA 
LEATH AND ASHLEY NA. 3096 | S0nable offer heat is G vapo Priced to | ’ 
: _& — . ca : 


. EB. oil 
——— | Che Chase Realty ( 0. se!] at a Eves |, Beautiful! Prewar detached brick 
WOODRIDGE I ge py Mt WI. 1875, a  iteteen Snot. 2 Bathe. spe tfitt 
2 i) 9 Po; SAMUEL F. BOG aLEY, INC kitchen. recreation room and maid's 
—; one maculate Sctached nome on | ~————EM._1800 Till’ 9 } __ Se : Realtor | puarters with bath in basement 
St. ne. in excellent conditien ' ; : { » 
and priced for immediate sale 1st | ennsylvania Farmhouse 7004 Wis. Ave WI. 1320, WI. 5500 | inva’, for Mey vaate sale at —- 
oor has large Wing room with LOO N AND LAVATORY | - PRO i *| Zt 
| fireplace, dining room. modern kitch- TAD Bute EN AND, La of early | Chevy Chase Close In. call Mr. Holstrom. CO. A573 Leo M. Berr Biain 
détached brick! en and den; 2nd floor has 3 bed. American desien. built of stone and | Immaculate 3-bedroam 2\5-bath | VIET, ZLER, REALTORS . 
ar construction, | rooms, modern bath and sleeping brick in an excellent residential sec. brick me. on a well-plantea eorner | 'ite Vermont Ave DI. naan 
w et Tandeement:: oii Pin one tion. About ~¢ years old—in ane ba lot. with recreation room and ¢a- | a. yy ee ye 
' nice CA a! laity materials inely in : AN 
NA. ean Evenings, | ¢’tion. ion in random width 4 | T28* oe Sent ry thing you expect. | ETER S ONL | 


Only $24. Eves.. call Mr. Smith cain * 

large bedrooms. 2 baths on second | wr 7733 N re 

BOSS & PHELPS, INC, fina patos pat, hah eas ent’: | ALIED REALTY ©O | wy eegs | Metre BECK eS 
tw , aoe ee sea | : a 10080 dene,” th inely 

| pe I7 K 8T. Nw p= | par Sarage. Very reasonably priced CHEVY CHASE, MD, tax and insuranee pemott Deftens 

HOM If you are Prepared to #0 Out a way | Highway Past Bladensbure Peace 


E WITH INCOME hiiens i; 1a 3 YOUNG for a large lot end an exc USiVe neigh - 
bo 


4-unit apt house Téwar built 


f Northwest location. Consisting ee. | orhood, call jer Ro ha Cente p| pUrE right to Taylor “seq ‘eft to! brary: 
of liv. rm. dinette, bedran mod. Pt pm bedronetrwold white bric ome; S| 2 = 7 Aad, 
eet Eee ters Mie te|« (Olored—Vacant N.W iano fey, nis "alt igae ot HARRY A. BOSWEIL & CO 
: . ea at: 
Income $23 yearly uced fdr 6 lovely rooms, gas Newly |r s Call Jean Wetzel] 700. | clusive Agen 


eo : » OR. 5700,. Fx 

Dorch; nr 14th & Spring Ra with Edgar 1. Webstse Eves... OL. 3718 Rhode Island Ave. ite. Rainier 
42. —4F_ 3311. 

eS Eee 


7 05 Seed $2 mcereeitthitiediinns oaks 2 Nie BYO3._ all WA: 1923-" 
COLORED why AMILY ST. 0451-0436 Eves. GE. 5030 CHEVY CHASE). | - PRE-WAR COI. NIAT 
e x 


Brick an4 frame home on land. 


Ocated in Trinidad arta NE This | sections of the city. Priced right. Rath large 7-room, 2 th: 

Hon, $515. old. weatesPel sey Spade COLORED <$ oe rN | Snails teaatd? asd cathe, | Satestard gine, ros sents 
on, yrs. © Cauliful oa - Cautifuly gre an ca ‘ | ~ i. re 
ing and natural trim, full tile tec; COLORED—$1]250 DO with charming view ' $3000" cash: | 34/0vely b fal ea ahd tiled bath on 
and large kitchen om each floor, 16TH AND F sTs —Lovely, mod-/ one trust Davable $125 ‘mo. New. | fenced See vera ett oll hea 


. NE..-Lo 
ern. 10-yr-old brick homes, 5 large 
rms. and tile bath. full bsmt.. h -w-. 
h.. coal; front and 2 rear porches: 


concrete-covered fron porch, at. 
a price and terms. Immediate 
O. 7660, 


pA : 
CHEVY CHASE, MD, _ | mo¢d-Conley sas, Realto > 


ein On. Cal) Mr. jen, N —— sitete ane’: TESE  onins 
rae aERAD ie; ‘ ert net hesita * 3 . An older type home in ¢ very de- 
4 BEDRMS., 2 BATHS Buy (Call tl 9 p.m. weekdays, yenital area. "atee ie room with ee BEST-BUILT 
$8 / 2 os € room w uilt- Vern gn® down payment ¢ i, 
$325 DOWN ' 7 MO, Wm. Calomiris Inv. Corp, china pabinsts. large den. modern fied vels and $50 mo. (tax ana eet 
ered on heeccornee Gh Ue (t2-| _ 1012 in ar. ww. be oe ar ul babes meaty steam | gt tt, 2 or eta are a 
proved on lige corner jot: Se liv. rm., | ———*¢. —— a : “ ‘ . 
" ' COLORED—-CUSTOM BUILT b 


ath: beautiful trees and shry ry./FMs. and bath. 2d fir: re | 
ULTRA MODERN, WITH ; Priced under $20,000. es Beat 30 days Rock ihe area of 
Walnut paneled living end a Chevy Chase Realty Co. ‘ Cc. WI 363 


rooms. gas afr conditioning. cy s 
= "| mith chapel living room, selling jes! 4420 Conn. Ave. EM. 1800 tii] o9r.u.j NEAR NAVAL HOSPITAL 
OFF UPPER 16TH N.W. on ede trom Renueeet | GRERN. ACRES Cue Chase— This eae acre, | 6-10, m modern home, | 
' ‘ e€ v ‘ r Y " 
Beautiful prewar brick home, 3] ate. ne. 2 blocks ito house Open | pea utit A. ~~ i siek _—e is meres Ing acre avalienn $14. 950 (*tdomn 
enone. 2 taeie) SG net Se Ay | Saily and Sunday, 2:30 to 8:30 | condition Senetines yards ae NEAR NAVAL HOSPIT 
, - , , . , i s 
Gining room 2x15), dinette (9x8 | THOMAS W. PARKS co., exclusive | by flowers and shrubs. For detailed | AL 


Ist floor; 2 bedrms.. bath, 2a floor. 
Immed. settlement. Act Quickly! 


d-) COLORED.-BROOKLAND ~ | ontgomery Investment «& Insur- on bus line | basement. oil heat. 
0. 


9950 


s . 
10 until 9 DP, m. | detached frame; 2 large apartments: | Or In Topps GAITHERSBURG 
OMERY | 5 rooms down, 6 room nice hot-water INDIAN SPRING TERRACE rm. modern home on nice! 
abt } 0 heat. 82 9n9 own. For inner. Beautiful 3-bedroom 2-story bric ‘corner = jot: Close to everything 
INVESTMENT & INSURANCE CO! tion 92 Mrs. Elliott, pe 1160. | Colonia} Powder room on ist floor; | 313.950 Make offer 
ee v DE. 7058. center hall plan: side screened Porch.| WANT TO GO IN BUSINESS 


| 


AMAZING sie COLORED ~~ | Assume $12,500 ist trust at 44%. Bi 
' & store re nd 5. 
R THE PRICE | BUILT FOR 2 FAMILIES | | foie Rome ist year ‘cia: “Call bit aPhing” ite acres: suitable for eecer? | 
P & Ps. peotion:, cra sapatl | Well-constructed brick about 10 , MONTGOMERY | have vous surant shenees or what | 
; , r St- ' . ° ; ‘ n i ’ q 
| en oversized: iv. tm ad years old; “Rockville $14,950 terms” uhoes ial 


den. | om. Sm. | oars ent; 3 meme “Pally “enaienee ? | ~ 
lge. kit. 4 bedr S.,/2% baths: bit.-in apartments: modern fully equip NVESTMENT & INSURANCE CO | HOWARD R. SCHAFER 


| kitchens, gas h-w. h- Tee eOn EM. | el MR 
Davment.” 425.000" {Wilt ell muskt | Riga” BBA Dek Bt eed TERT | pe UNG OF grt 0050, tambier-| OWARD wi. seat 
'— Exclusive ith ug— Owner must sell—priced right. =! 6 brick of 5 rms.; tony. to elem. | U. 8. Postoffice is Opposite us. 
RUTLEY & BA H_T. RANDOLPH, RE. 2137, TR 7265 school, dé ine “eames? mit? | , 

. 4834 COLORED, Brookland, 3313 Sth st. | ) : ‘ | Vaio ate ges 
WI. 483 wag h ’ cone EM. 4450, eves., LO. Vets—Before You Buy 


H. 4589 
haa PRAWNP Tt on — —Det : ms, 3, 
634 FRANKLIN! ST. N. ‘ ‘complete apestn came sas heat full | 5-313. 
Suitable 2-family home: colonial | oom ne Gah aee: Binet ee ie | ) 
MALBROOK 


Inspect this excellent Value in 
Queens Chape Manor. Larse ana! 
new: 2-story 3-bedroom houses a:. 

» $1000 cash includes Settlement 
expenses; $56 50 month pays in. 


row brick. 7 rms., 2; baths: storm | down I 
windows. awnings, ‘ojl| burner h.-w. | DE. 7058 


| Rie a per 
eackty ee —. » fae 7 COLORED—N.W. | AND |. terest, principal, estimated taxes and 
L.T.GRAVATTE 1358 Parkwood Place HOLMES RUN PARK day and Banible house open Sain’ 
REALTOR SUNDA oo°,® FALLS CHURCH, VA. Drive ont a the Gas Co. display 
NR. CONN, & DAVE nas edhe amen he aS: Lenton DP ciagianee’ gn the sine | seen ane emg, Skane? goer 
Bi | You cao vn; S DAVENPORT | siesta 6 Macks fort Riese now avait fu, |ReRS tower. call. Bedi bg 
this home for $5000! rear Porches, gas heat, garage Va- * now available: : va 
zi com. Sa" under $300 a Beautiful /cant and in beautiful condition. Minj- bedrooms; $21,950 to $45,000. BARGAIN FoR QVick SALE. $8,950. 
house in perfect cond, in most de- | mum cash payment, $1500 A‘so large lots, panned to 3-bedroom white Cape Cod. one year 
bath on | sirable and conv. location. Will con- | CALL MR. SCANDLAND accommodate ranch - style d. on wooded lot, near Naval Ord. | Conn 
; -| sider trade for Smali¢r house Call’ ME. 386 EVES. RA. 7619 out sree wg pe Bo... 20. bus “serniee gine lle pit Route 
; i ; ME Aa ky r Me e m » 0 one c is 
1 ~ a Wataqn. we. 1 ie Seenave | COLORED N.W. flor an &aPDointment at any heat electric hot-water sombination. | 
. ATH_AND: ASHLEY | ___ NA. 7008 | We Rave 2 beautiful homes in the time ronnm, wcreen windows. Owner, Ash. 
. . i- ° i 
_ $14,950—DET] BRICK BR inepeetton nent hye” tawrence,| MALICE & BROOKS SPEN SUNDAY 12 to § p.m. Cras 
HOME IN Ww IDRIDGE TU 2100. TET OMEVEL LL DERS AND pt. West en sat preautify 
home. 6 rooms an th. t 
. ick sof 6 entet-entrance Dian Shockey & Moorehead PA. 4503, } ou heat; -. larg es wil "be sold 
rick o rms. an , it rt 
| 9m fine 180-ft. deep ‘lor "ath: REALTORS | see Mr? pmaking best 6 OF ag ell or | 


flowers and vegetable garden. c a. ——— | . coe” on . 
full bsmt. with outsifie entrance. HOUSES WANTED te 6 na - RAINI Home and business or Ford. £ pe d ae 4910 
&.-c. heat and / elec refer. Consult Us Before Buying or Selling. | income py owner; 6-rm. home with 8950 powNn— “year-old cuuresque 
y.} Square from t#ansp. Phone ROBERT L. McKEE co. |Btocery store and Spt. attached; 4-bedroom shingle Dungal v7 on 
Mr. Black wood N - Shoreham Building. A. 4750. | hearby apt. project: te ms. WA. 2177 acre: 10 tee from Silver Spring 


to BUY és see Mr. Morningstar, WA 8 with 
M 


, NO. 4597 7 
ry m Building eS SS | cent tehen, full basement. 
| SHANNON 6 LUCHS CO. DOMEDIAre OO MD. Wee YOUR | MT. RAINIER—9-bedrons: bungalow | attached “tener. ‘ae nee ire. 

H 8t. N.w | ~ a hools 


HO} N Ww j-| With expandable attic. mear se »i gl 

atom 1 a eT 2345. _ ored 'OaE CO. RE ies 40 SO. rts and transp._ 811.500. oS ns 4 - ~ _ 
As so S. an ers a , me adie daw . ta. eee 
OWNER LEAVING TOWN FOR REAL BERY NAY FIP REL YOUR | $1 down Wan sas4) mrose Realty, BRICK CAPE COD, locaied in Mons. 
Low priced for quick sale. this 4- PAUL Pp STONE Resite . age Es Peewee wr aoe —. | Somery Hillis Silver Spring. 2 blocks 
— New Hampshire Ave., | from transportation and shopping 


|Mentary school. has center an, 28- _ «1G pee’. Ss eaten I ‘ riced for immediate sale Call SH 
Khighen powder room’ patTiok jim: SAUL FAY chsw fo Mwhieet co) Highlands reacetl! % Bm.” Montsomery fn 
t " on irs 4 c t " t - a. , vestme t . 

newly decorated margushout, with ored. Ray Morse ai 8300. DU. a5sa_| AT nefehbeee pre, Lape Cod in = acatln f J mye pod 

| Setatis ne PRAND : PIRES bee 1 WILL PAY ali “cash for hoses, | with beautify! fireplace ana eae With porch; beau. view. spacious Cor- 

| ome. ohh tN WEBSTER. hite or eeeree. Be oaition °F in bookshelves. iwe 24-ft. bedrooms, | ner lot. 40\ min ta downtown Wash 

‘Eves OL 6242 roca Lion. venings., fe 88 | tiled bath, Knotty Dine recreation $7500 down OL 2304 Ba’ 
MAY WE SPLL y UR HOUSE? room ™ slate roof. copper downspout« and nights cal! Rockville 3152 


A ie: ae ‘s) lert sale partment has Pr; ec ; : 
|p DETACHED GORNER been ehalking ‘up matustonactatht®| Price _ Fe msiabes Veteran BURCH REALTY op 


Practically new homie in Michigan | °° les for 4 S and sell. | ith $50¢ 
| oat area. Near all conveniences. | era. We ‘Beed more houses to sell. Lai | Burebane * fown. Call Wa 3 BEDRMS. 3 YEARS OLD 


This excellently cons cted 6-room | «.. next deal be yours m. | ) bg vooe 
rita cin ohteate| origi ap nous pase VSS, CO. 8k Rate ie et 
Porch, completely equipped kitchen: 308 No. Capitol. Realtor NA. 6730 RIVER ROAD NEAR W 2 | Brick tile basement 


bath on 1a ANE BRICK AT 4% 


a. t E YEARS’ service to “local | ..2, bedroome. orn 
and ‘the lovely” corey fot nr ance. Probert eas’ service to local | Toit Sttractive house with large 600 
landscaped warty anne. Co. Ine Dt | living room, din room breakfast | 4". $12, Aluminy 
R. t. GE. 9012. | Wm. H. Saun =ts_Co.. Ine., Di. | full pettey. expandable 24 fiooe | aon Met wie 
—SA MR._DOWNER, _ = | PUROHASER ene Cash desires brick | full beerne Oll heer Bumens | dows worth $483. Near Marylang U. 
VICINIT1 Y OF 2 pearenens and bat ho gl fleet: | house. low Pa ty Dayment. $700 DOWN 
i lier 2 rooms an a ° ; } ARD, REALTOR 200 
SHOREHAM |HOTEL da. Cheeg toot: close-in “Bethes:| on AES DI._2740. | tor ‘nontert? 3 tears, geen: he 
er anxious to sell 6-room row! da, Chevy Chase or NW. Washing- | --"— RS wo a on, very low cost 2 more bed me nd | 
Prick, detached ga ® jaree con- a A Ae “S soone._WI. 2122. ; PoTditae HUNT AREA bath on 24 floor College Park Ma. 
porches. "'p, Poreh, ‘Venetian | SALE, SUBURB. HOUSES —67| _ Owner this, moderne er sre] BRICK BUILT IN 1940. | 
° . :. ti I. 10! ramet ~ ee * “ . # 
i's pene awnings. (Call D 15 MARYLAND 2-bath home, on more n cre | 6 eT ho et 125, With lst trust 


ig | ms with 


then « 
t of ground. With »« beautiful view, 


seen ees 1 ea i attrac white farm. 
New Detached Homes | 7-room l%e-bath brick Colonial | house. — 9-BEDROOM BRICK 
| With garage. first-floor den and lay- | INEZ CUSHARD. REALTOR Near Cheveri Tiintene. @ 
Tn seyradle Michigan Park area. story: gas heat: lovely jot with trees. | OR. 4230 DI. 2740. | ora: olds! 7 4 or: 7 years 
+ 3 bedrs . spacious sina ee ngi8.d30"* Bs Bees ROCKVILLE MD ~ $16.50). 9% PONE. lovely grounds 
; x, ms.. § *. arcain 6. re Wiin ' i - = 
large screened porches large living Gardiner Rui” Call Mr. Rohiand, | 7 ; TOURISTS OR STUDENT 


; ; Very attractive home located in| 
rm with fireplace, full basement wi 6696 evenings. WI 1494 ——— | West Montgomery section Consisting | Renta! Lovely brick an¢ frame 


| Sas air-conditioned iy sodded lots BETHESDA : | of large living room. dining room. | home with 100-f: frontage by 300- 


| ew siianaees : roo 
Wm. H. Saunders Co., Inc. BETHESDA debe. 2-car scaped, CiOh, house, | sbece for 2 more.” Garage’ 2,0? 


. fully : ; : 
| unusual values at $1 950 rooms and ft. depth. on No 1 hithway 3 
100 onble Purnished House tremide entrance to deep ior stodents On! ne m ¢cam- 
‘ Queens Chapel | Terrace NE. 2-story detached brick home built | transferred must sell; $3750 r~~4 Dus $17,959. * Decks from ea 


1 to 9 Sat | and Sun, ‘in 1942-9 » rqems. 2 of twin size (and 885 per month r . 
‘large back porch * &.-¢. heat | eves, WT : 7 Mr. Harper BURCH REALTY CO. 


7 te 9 BROS : : ge S75. 
“ STEUART Er Ss. INC. ‘Slate roof: fenced back rard. Call | SAMUEL E BOGLEY, INC 


1015 till @ rom 


ul? STH ST. N.W. DL. 2434] Won. Ht" Satntlers Go Inc.| BF ang 7908 Wioznin ae 


re 


ASHINGTON POs 


ridav, June 24, 1040 
SALE, SUBURB. 


ist Floor Bedro 


BBARD REALTY C 


Me located im ene 


VOM), brick bUNBalw 


\ 
ANNANDALP 


under th Gi pian aunders Co., Inc 


TON FOREST 


400 4% Trust 


he buy of the Ow “ino. 


‘UM & ASSOCIATES 


rpom home. dione | 


Investment Co. 
F.E. WESTENBF 


Wilson bivd. er eati 


ARLINGTON | ” 
TRY CLUB AREA _ 


Cross to 724 aye in Landover Hills | 


asement consists of 
n 


that this isiplete wit 


+e ‘ Immaculate con-/@nd bat 


q 
lish-type brick | 22 


- Graham & Co. 


* Office Open Til) 9 p, yy | 


| 2173 Glebe Rd. GL. 6777, 
Arlington—L 


ge bedraoms | With 


GEORGE, Realtor 


GL. 6777. Ox. 0141... 
iJ. H. BENOIT 


a! ALTOR 
KE) 3-6677 of KF. _3-6299 . 


ear Rockville—$2 750 


CONVENIENCE 


ae, ee 


ure to fill these 9 - 


WLC A&A N) MILLER 
LO 
ous home in a fin 


co 
Telephone TE. 3sas 


rick Bungalow 


PER MORNINGSIDE 
1 bik. ta! bus. shopp) 
TH ILLI 


: mi 
5203) SARATOGA AVE. | 8 
| BETH 4 | 


| PRICE REDUCED 


Hy-Degna Co 
$1,000 DOWN) 


ngtruction Co, 
state Service, Ine. 


ARLINGTON COLONTAT 


>» baths 
screened concrete po 
f hed - 


Wilcher Realtor 


Chas 

» $1500 down. 2 years. with 
storm it 

Exclusively, ox 243. | 


ALEXANDRIA 


© reach: Out Wash- 


rE 
il » Hi TAY 
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he ‘ celle a af . bea ould saetn Ri ner, ai 750- nd oor ne 9 h RB ALE. 
ie oats TE. 2160 m id natant “ion ga ae orn A | 
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I APpoinime lot dition. -bedroo 5750 “Di under old for #.. the | ° FLO 00 ent on shinee —~Vikaih H on m~\ | from Ney! y 
BNnae Wnee ‘only ‘ 2 __ Open | close} Ph. on fi inted 'f 0 st, ss - 
‘G UM — ly an oom | alo 1s O n E $2 jus 30. in ro ner ~ first d ‘for IR T pA stead 
I 5 b ac ww, da Ww EALTY t 000 7 0 ID 2300 ; ‘ GIN SE way, le ff 
: rz. ler ce ein re: rn mm yw bei . off A- es N Ss . i. i | 
Vv : AP} h a ut 00 | a all dy a co. in cacooe ho ers writen, Op 1A — -S lA y w be 
you “gu PRO SOC t Om “Bandale stil, mode roo a os | reales py 2 BOUN ilson Ac EN ie Steen - v? wa | = yers’ 5 heo 
ae buatite f Vv IAT . Ann pcre m- V mma ee x. i Porch y ced co Nor « LO a FA noe BES & \ 9 ; te er ring 
4 tine Dunga $250 ED ES Sire IN |e Section | as pty & S A Waitin | AS RA} Ae ARMS, | OP) VY L fea - = 
“ ett sho alo p do ¢ le 10 gy t K nn ni se, § s of 0 vite sty ine f her” : ix’ sis ', s ‘dio J d ~ ‘ as 
sion i = ~f Durehase 10 0 50 500 s nt h b FITE a h : hed mt. 110x110 room Foe A. 250 LERS , LAN en ; ' ~~~ . 
, det CUI ear tr Day 200 | pen 9 ] paced at CH. 352 H yon conven : 12.950. or kitche thr "he qo bs ‘Dow © sey » eal I 1 ip ~ . SE 
: CAPOT ea > ne ethadg vee Reilly om. 3827 ren Vi ate ha faite re dame' “4 =<. Recsene PLY | @ i PG ays 
teens PU Nice m ns. atts if wo” impe M. H ST. + a per OWN _ ££ BRUM Call heat thten . aroueng Oul been 4 ure RGIWN LE ae | 1Y ; Vue sizleslof ING i 
r 8 D S04 e ar < n a's eV A t - i on ted i] TT ‘s AD t11 [on t > a. ¢ =| ee hey LAC} 
FA FA. 2 LA! oad brides better ¢y . Da | imm ol semidat nly ely. 2 i 9. a 0 bee aa view ie e 10 £90 FARM 70 De > if i we OF be for \CHIN 
» 19 e d ow ra rk e d: j es oe & 4 oR av ie ne b athe > a ivy at ) J \ = ~J \ . : oe = 
b 4-hed S Y « X- | ny € TB 4 y Tr. ed) de s $7 : ] 0 Re u near le . ne ; - r fa | D hed | i Pp rir ac all i SS 
om ed 22 nn r s. rs } pe s at ] ta ey 50 H eS Os r €a . ify) ame oe ad - gro ir nam f 7 37 0G: “ an >% - \ | ee. 4y : oh li > ES 
qi) e room. & n te a ce! “ ith to oO ee e! n ch ery “at ev Wi - ul =... d ¢ TON as re <a tp . ¥ \ k shin m S 
in) .§ H r 0. ili fi sp in ne y. Hun yt a 587 8 bevel adh ever d ae e 7 c OM S| 3 . TAY \ G e o 
bedres baci UR i firepia repla n pr shr Bea ho ay | BED} 8 uNtin ‘thing own, 23 /—— 100 ge aghin Wooded trea os ) 2 ha om a. R we Pp <1 —— : i Y ae ip | a. 80: aE, = 
fl ro r 10 3- a 14! wie? livi aoe ¢ ofu rub uti me i Thi Lj n 1@s ‘ wi ington ed - par ition ~ CK ER ET \ \ eee. . “ bb iT C} ‘ E s Ww 
00 ey us Wa H, 5 th < j ho Ss 8 ful n s O Zo gt & $8 : ’ L ry I j ‘ ? r &’ — S q Ary ; { r nd 
en r, m. li th ki e: ng us ion: ] a ol 2 on; th 6 — est irn n bi eo land« . w ’ 8 to - w PU > e vert ) . NE -, 480 ar II 
geet inmen imine roo VA. Ese te te ae alee }OOMS, 1 han one Sete? sin det ae rate, "out nasties tone savin oe wera a een = eee assy fu Pilte rar Pa 
en we me 5 ip ick mtn wade d or sti m m ] On e aila ne 2. idea ° tr OAD th o bh Nt pr Nard nad k ay Use=b i ey, a é : ae . oy 7, hn an 640 thy ay 
ts 4 ol! Fr nee ath Ded m 4 co ter ee R20) inin bet ene a make on bun ] ble rooms, IMK JE an C. Le 5 Dastur aro — de c ER e ntok ~ tay eae “Se it A \ < Ss i a A ; ise he T. a Ree or ALL 
— n m Cees ki en rn ® 5 ant oe ap w y ; ga 1@a is 7, v wi U Pe st ne : ‘BS oc SP ker nt i SI a you a Aet a oan 
. evar 2-ca room etchant | ar edro0 fac i with Ch motel h in ae SOR Pric Pr. bric ENSr wr one PA. moreno Eine , KER ANTEL<.; ~ a 7 = JL | anes | IDEN Rag & annot), Cc el Sasa 
McG Duilt, ‘e-~~ s, ower gi on path i ae ra fast sieoreen H Rte reni ap} ny Rr aie nand, anus “> ea 3 VAIN ‘A AEA! "$38 — lent client SP Dur Eden cash d 6 r adhe oy | G — tg a a not High 4 » “ea — 
L. McG s call re A h 2d | spy oom a. ad on aa = Ox a close: ae. Sas ——- 8 mile MIN— Mos: Gay 539.000 pe tr ental 7 cee Sohn ALE ) = ] Tei pi OAR Da phon, ve We SI CAST tas 
EF a Us “ atio lb ath wi s hy ~ a sem aiti floo a ok BR R ae Ox n 1 ady me. § A oy ° . ing lars fr d or PA _ p 1A WT. Ls y ‘17 r - Seo EN 22> no. 7 e co —- | STLERE! ean 
EE KI a “ge |. 2 th ho “er rig r idth eS. IC} = Obie oo nl 2h cle, ree fom Cr des ge GI v batt a MIs > . ISTO. sé inte: J LO ee Y > : Say oF 
- | PAIRPA; N y room exalt lg a nt of aoe n A K _ 0. ” ~ 0994- , a-] lear hi str nee r neu) RE shet 106 T “2 om hon Cc Ser 124 ON in ime — te ' } ke te By FY SERRY, 
A at ™m a h e a a f n d n a pe M R r A a 4 4 oy; _ - - on E RO > ~ ) 
LD IRP his hom 7-000 m *Pla roo a” or me be B EA ym er vou od 4913. cade ge rge ae - ‘ng —— oe e ~) I T a er q “ I ’ e M LLAI ar) ec <ET ws s] r a D - “ R 
Cc * AX. cti el © Ber sc < ay 2-¢ ce Ri apg Ca qui tre UN LTY ei . uc ern RA 13 am lot ; ric Co bal oan" i@s : .y Ca : ‘DA ; A “Tr _ dist w a ji — AN f - 4 t > ” 7 od , T tien ris ¢ ~ Yo 
3 Jn harm "COLONIAL , CH. St me Clarend sa may es 2 | maid's GI wold a tile GALO co * | weemee uld Ame MBLFE Co... ga. tract saveniee es are W D msn 2 oe lable nos shia ~ . 4827. oe ion “ ugp b lror Fe. A; ih os ria : peeeten TRC 
heey ] Cc 5 | n ection y be | u ara s | ? im e sid b a he bo. . ri ER — n- Dord pe on in im Ole - gt teal C 4 ar fax mn AK rn A exe od sar OP | Bett ar ~ ae gr: Your ar ‘ 4 
u nz A RE f) s eh ns > ta r aa M Saad Wain \ til) sk c order ut ou mmir ; ¥ te | Ol T oe % N g th RN . | eata , IS : n : or R 
an S. rés a L 8 | t . ly oa T Du r genase ? J } nec a en the Ay rm ' silt din: - fe an ‘ 5<00 rir u re te 2nd « . lor Vv oT. { R . a ~ ~ eC * : — a ie ac rie '~ 4 >t . £ ka . 
nd n fea que tor TR ES STA at righ ‘ Cir urn irth hased > Pee ot ie ltra ns fy) a 4 soe ne atine Fae --— + ear” - Atom a m er 13 ho : ° P —s " E  . 80 ac ‘ My re> j ro +h . “~ ere ard - 78 aa = “9. » TA -}? 9 —— le te ke ttra 
me din ~ i set ed Y Cc AT ; N, t 4 mi cle aed di- 12 19 rca 30. Pp 1} by ne r .foom comet im a ble ~ vai but le a n ito nab | sow a ate e} ART > - hr ‘ VA D ~ a aa 41 zs k Pode a of & “A y. Xu non _ 29 22. . O4 ~ ) . and 
andom n nel tin Co LU E - | rahe ile 0 ri “ ri, Ww! bes P pP ‘ he last room! ai ed A lab] Gi cre stre: we ft h D cre pp Ir Pion auz d. st mas ae UR _ i + wha . he ak % lors “_ . \/ } | th 
rm rec b EB lon B t In to n ght ‘ 89 : . e 4" ur r -- LR] _— . rar uistandi a! ye a)o) e ng rea (5- er 1g . “ad S ped £i32) afer SI “ta aN wv "Ase 5° Se, Org . ai $ Ri, WOT A : q er 
, cee . deautit la) 24 INO} to glewo Rad 3 B n B Smith F lo “dye ARLING q rrangeme tin } that dering ~~ n i ablend terms Tats HET ma ter Ss0CK Dup n20R D . a wa sad De Bee ='8 J "pleas - Qn a = wa © . 0 
Dp th . hee ifu ta h | 24 OT br ood shi _— FE va iif) ee er wath T nomplete Kit ‘ _ bed h coe dia ou e) Tre LA ia he Net ° yo 1011 : Ll Ay ’ ce staan B M . r 
rough k } be f l ul om w USTve ale in P D i _ wri} 7 ae jement, li d. hou c un th cabin. ule tr his fa iy N s er re ex FI gp de : . tide s wr re’ < 
es ed . ; awd. ivf eg | Brad bys -s IVELY to wood Chan®? Cy RN. Rea) of leon NJ ge hen ng sary "oat oe ons, Oppo Pacts | cars ig » oh gis 4? harp So URN Fg. it ta patelse a ; Vw Prone .A- Bit - 
ri ne d be Pn h fie amore | n RI LOFT} 15th | embod on AP R w ity RB!) y IRE ¥ moder and term anicet ames tract aloes ie ETL tow Fs ee yg nadie peheriges va ae bed Bm tony All “ ES. ’ ‘ 
ced st r. ed r -® : fir vin Lo Iv F 8&0 d a rom } Dp A 72 y oo ce ne A a. De feorn on. mon - : etr ne of x Sonata , ire AN n. 4 pup $10 wk i@ ay , . frat NA ‘ : 4 » by | neal , = clean _S — 
see stable. eRe : me ~~ fin & LIN = iment of" - £11.50" ART TE P An d8i nN a4 Ty 1 to ment. - sci ty on eek e icity ae Sed. col ~~ Sram — PA ta FI Nes ‘a e¢ IRA ar ® lUve . » her _— Yr 4 : IcCK T m) ALE 
son 1). ch re r D ern } | Cas e h 4 re VED an ° rt . oS ae A auilding in acr ne $ . she att ' A. 37 . % R ™ vens , ; ’ xy : : ‘iy ‘ — 3 ‘ : 
na wi iekes pe vn Eh, a RAK ide G ~ _g = . ri f + son + RC aad xce} DO ’ LR SR + gs nstall —" 0 30. ep ar Dur 378 ne wo Saeed sare Ext. wit eh : Ar ; 10 on 
+ gEAPt Eek pice’ cree Lanta as no =. om TY CO. ug iy Phebe i be y HORSES, L ae oe ron ve ec tah Socks SICAL thers it int ha ae 
° UT 0 fu oes v ath: f uip) r rg IN <omm: ’ & pe or ay - unu $16, 75 ow cr riin 3-4 a 1300 Va INC erndor okt dee Sy IN nna 2 "Dips ner bed. N lanl L. 4 te 1a °K, - cae trp — mies = © oh Pa ye and bh 
=e I RE. = wner poids. cor cdute, liv 1A re. OW the balan inusual 750 C 00 tom G OTS > alanc ssa. -| § rears ol ORS. health =" bo Mah i $00 .4-p rting ew? SUM ; “im 40 8 tc doo | 
PA. E y > i : r tile dinin FO se FAR need al ‘oom a z.] Fr H Bod), ‘ R T ha — F ks « Baagey eS Tes Pw tite fone . Ee iA. door , 
Z if t 5 n Kk in n 0 an l¢ Z in he t : lac bh ss '@) ‘ err 22 ar L 0 0, « Oo A, vo n \ c ~ Dd! cin x! ae ae a et - a ’ . a- he oe - 
ao. TI REALTY ¢ rane: | min eae ORES } eu eet! Somes | am ka pelt FOR $A Deak ace eds fine, ant we ea $80. coe MA grote Se a gener wa 
=r oe 4, r F a t; ° +; ro m r we A r ai uy 0 $) an r 2 f e anc n h ‘ aN . U nts fine, «rt Liman . Ft sofa . | ’ om ‘ a Tad . : 1 By Tr , = * . h ; . 2 : . T - 
fa rang “bri ae TING? vA coil men oil “bedr crith | leo UTIPUL zs aie CH ts eas fence block ea hee ~se Fairfax acco MISC ve spi 76 Saal r TURE Dei a, Suni _PR. 8298 MAY ae | frocula UMENTS |p net: black In “excel S177 
an ic | e pure sec f it in ’ a a N A} la ng , aoe an rt ast c n r ‘ « RI —_—— l-spil ast ft \ sE or ur raft 8292 ie , = Sore | i Wei, . e Or . sed 
ais set eam aS Be ‘se ween 3s coast IL FINANC ka nla 0h te ‘on pene Satie weap cELLANEOL Se Be f Hales, edie Wes os .X ZWEI gate Lee aa <0 
+S 00 Pull x | mm nt. bal n lat * te d d: a lan ES lasee UR ves ING ' SH. opt Fee wr F "MBIA 7 al rE St E TF v isiaab ; sete con bed lamp. | WF vA Meh, . ‘a R ny a ne 
ante 3 edi em oo E ae las MER Pye reord! * large _Substa > , apne 0 Ti = new Str — . 8 RN idaire. $13 cond .P aT VE] ras | walls ne; ' 
ace” ia HT id 17-G1 A ry z J PUL 5 ining ees ING id ee Ei] CI RO. Re aR a A. “en 590° adi Us 3 me a3. °° re 6 p m ( >, W ale = ave BY ad ies er 
. pri te 5 et -G Ra LT ne with CH aan at > ill r fa ary ate f) ‘@- a ° an L()' 3 P QO r p o ] at om Wes ON eft var and U 9 ae 6 ‘400 ode! rt p : A\. : ta RE ety , sie 
Dy JE Alexa Vie, as ach L. eli + bees LE minute a ; arate et tig 45 N82 Ne ay Kh. bons Westing DI i and RE. Vy 7 a Bs —— UTRo A ada C ~ trot jhe e », was le; a 
Some’ e FFERSON 2 re LAR Manish ee Go ‘i Be ita * hee REIN re VERS aN Acs eae" one, cf Stadt . 130°bam 4 ‘Tov Sipe beets reas oan ——— ONS: : Euan 5 
Orch: sone ON tT ad G 8 Tis P 1. Open it $20. Located | 22 IC “gh room, , Just VERY dea! for oaveat der ping b eye a ONERS Dane FUR? CO Our Bil on ha t lamp, 105 “ABI ’ SER {E NS | s Sp : Bh 
sarees ° om ia Se FE _9 lvd u M Key th d ce 04 a $11,950 we Flin . oy a ¢ ~ 17] Pe nlage ae eu anit a ont 4 RNIT ' es Dab : » .. N MOT Vv ‘91 \ : cis , — 
be il 5 | P, A e = | va Th I] ¥ e nN ~~ Ww «TON 5p. ced ‘ net fro oe a re ew at mi - . 4s , we. 7 gid ina ns . & « ivi ne . a yr ‘ #1 ’ . 7 oat o ic R 3 ‘ ‘ ‘ 
Si haa anrek ARK * | S AM 35 M | yatue c $13. ° tie son for of a me a " ae ~ UTIF TA. 75) ¥ AIR. co Co ate laire 2 AU sy. H PUR Fis, W pt 359 i Ist ve a E + LICK . di | 
‘850 oe e baths 19 — lome oe 4 trust B RE i, on Che: ale ere ' IFUL 513 Cc B30 | with m typ ¢ bed. vs ne ee lari ‘Be -R ie 3 tare . 0! H . * - 
BR . . a n —it d iV Cc y 0 ust : . iV Al" m acd he ce hom hy ff? he ~ — }00 a7 ost i. Ion Ph pe : Sake ae . * T 4 >a aoe | *y)} ert ms \ ‘- } a; = 4 ‘3 re p 
AD lot. Re aony d fra Gl. 500 BLE situll ae cated 750 mae xX or a bed ae d. Ty a evy ~ mm oe ; _ B UR DIT A? 2 mino Bee r ~*~ i : IN — 2 URE a samt 12 Pen: : wir 2 6 ‘. ‘ g ; j : 
8-roo D sement.. m ns ioe are. sie 2 Fae large din 5 oO a , yi A — er KE in Shan - abin. 19> sp siete , 1032 B me e: 199 $518 i ' 
r n ee . 7 sD F fa e la e bt e d ' ee te om Wi | . ; ” wr PY 16 We \ ar es ts ' th : e , ‘ A rT) 9 a) . < = 3 ig MQ : \ 7 
j t pe MM n 1s a W a cate ” c F r. Be ma noe gay 4 ‘ ' . . 
h m br & 4 ce re — i ~ 9 Ith ctic A nancing, » dsca &to line = ane Large | ing Cole i000 9% mal preg — er . oa s O ERS, — Dia rings , ' ’ 19.50 LM} —. Dp ne G r La onl € iCODS Bt ts : \ ‘a *. ] . 
pm = will rick HE] duced | blers. wi “sae Wh peecaoed ho Mm a £0 ianeperta foe - : 20 Con te 2 willing __ At p IRC “ON, fa FANS, no st. tyr $145; sol , te, re D ust fainted rarer’ scent “cond lack aDsas A ee: 
$10 pl loca 0 | tn s wi! 3. : Lr Is f ll DO ome rg od ve N tat eq } a an bity Hing sasa re ( )} . 8400 R ype n : Mm-n 4... : ly. ont “ 7 26 ane a r ry, s , 
n eas ti me G j z to th 3-h Hol! se a E} rch: de n e 4 nn arr 4 ion Por uip wi wa . _ MA 1 Ave y | . . 7, eseas . ~_ f as a) Ons nes — nade r + —_ lis oes CR eXe Png os ' , ‘ ‘- * ~ - 
oil the + aia ee a iiisteér CH\ fx totes GI ones “ane ~ ‘pe Ded “kit ran Pa ke se SPS 90 D ae n " ©. a oat a &TION “ ET to a K ea re , : . on | j . f RI ; ~ UISER con 1e yaw! A. : o> ro ’ ra je , Ls . . 
le ra mo n . re ba 5. be f t ; a we ‘ ]« ‘ * . Cait - os oi) iteh m. — C fires ry D un ; e « u red ae uet 4 Fa \ roe x ware : TY P om . ISI D> Drag . : ‘ t ead \s i ¥ ~* . . oh 
Fr pas insterred, \elghbor- pois. Shs - La VIRG . ARRAN 10) at 28 VAS on. Hh apteat +: ‘cs nec tep lot OV xT : _ if F aa ion tion, n n ee GA al 9 a ee hub q om ot vp ‘ " — few c : Ne keel: = Ay “ % - tala oO . . 
ri ° eq Ss ys, a ze te rlir - a , en rz 40 RE e E ne : itil pga ‘ VN ome 108 M co nd 0 ka at Ss sili] i rot ng , Sane FY Papp ar e ' tor Neon ey , I ! we AD Deny é 
cu n mi u to . ou ] Mbp be 4 th ree | 0 R § 250 xe! rm exc caait ce if tow t°? ‘ ’ . ine r q n ge an FI " . he . he r ne ‘ ” ‘ CK y ‘ On + : , 
-f, d Ts Sto Y Pos- in ipped rec ~Ayy lington ‘ ~ co N] Ww r =e = ust A s cel. 3-1108 is G ard 5 —— » ae 249° ally | nn RN 7 ry} | : ~ 9a oat be wr? B ft w. 8! tag. NA Dular - 
Peas, ri Minty HI S- quet f d k cone” che re oan 2 screened rne IA F 1877 bsmt., ri $6? ve) ly L Ty fan AT a 05 i acre. co Rom m A a de @lilat . 5 le , " nal ies ‘ sc k la ~ : ~ ™ 540 s — ~ ‘ er . ey 2 br f > 2m ; 4 — l4 = oe. . a4 w) 4 ei a] 
00 led r vin ilt i t om It ti se! 00 ‘hee m ne e r . Oo ‘ ta : 5 9 j h C « a « u Ta) \ ~ po on ne ie a . " P = - 7 ‘ o ar n ns wn ‘ c 4 — 
bath: 2 Bathe Som ta S alee . tomalic entra: m ja little q ‘Additional REST Penta y home, MO., ER hed an ~f poutn A He SINC Si tf oa ao “oh ‘ ‘> Ox Ver CE. Bre Ww Or 3 a ai s¢ A hy . - Bl Tt Ma KEN . Ne ‘2 a a | 
Ba aid win rie Pron ws, sme tac ~ ie, St 10, FHA. TION, Bt ren aeroves ace ine satis ita F ca ain a ce ert. tie eee x 
| . i a c . tes f roke a s Sk 3 Realty >| ON 5 ur rice . Ken: ‘BID. mei, ¢ See NM ff ona. sum: lL Pa r . lane 0 
tor ached b screen picture nia 0 ~ + ck ex 40% 1AR om patton ~ ae. edr00 in peent ry FO Q RU] > es kw ES RE. NSO re ine . NG oe oe ade ted rT. a2 umn sine Ls} oO n GOOS 
n ~ A “bear ed a ire I a  —,- ad-an ebnste t- R will tte c constr ae" h s, “hs oded AC 1A In R Is L | a” B ss eoreTs)  B DON od ES Ah. ct ¢ x 4 R Roat are mer K ‘4 and bh ro ~om”” 
ao ara 00 on, nt tti a drai mstrn.. L] tod: Ss truetic + gl A plea fa _ red word we “2 , ~ hn rs Yong ~ myeek, J Me ie, setinn” Perens r. & UN Oat ¥ ga i ae : , Ra 
st. t —s ms Po r in s c te) le al r ie N da a etton are ir. lak as enke ee lon ate fon H Al LDE AQ ae CC) ew so on of Dut: or [ ’ ARO} rd, oda! er . ? vx 
m e r come. | e Ww $ iv s n co uCc- i » y an na tio e e , 6 h) nial “ry E ia coc Uv an ™ | ig a Ow ” S71 es . n of + T m oO er : , oy ft ota ‘ as . 
kK Red. uch shanty - you them torag hing oat | sou NGTON "RE Ang the’ pre | te sew 18 in fll _RA. 7: gor ATC BY TS ER. ARI emitas ck (glass pi FA cone reg. st 5028 von n for BOUT rd. end rial 19 eae anette. 
ing KANF A $c t 2d r Oo m Die e. 0 le uts ' PINE: ils N 2 WwW e h us kit wa his Aa CH Rg ven me | le mis Ow > ; _Tr ee ~ . D . ,AS 719 de ea < g e : 1 RD = t4 wi , 4< ’ , . bes: 
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: : pe ton r d i} Nn fi re . r . K R S $7 Cc a] te o » © n J . ; iG CK 9 N ; ) ge ry ‘7 4 re dy ‘ ) 
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fs wee — bee | BRICK ¢ lvd. ALTY at fond Co iin — SALE = VAS A overlooks WATERFRON cash, BEOX. ' a eae ee pe a P ots in ‘315 43 AR W/ $19 seta “Md. 4 Por , f, tain $ a VE RT 
— a nee, larse resid ia ° | ef. © ates i > New | SALE, OUT.£ ILSO A low do e. COLON RO ut ie? act use CME cond.; er = 1 ING ‘elk 199.5 i M me hee ra 11 oneor 1695 ster . 
; — al we Cole Cr w C IK _ andale en v | ] a L dowr ep 1A N beh a os nd ona . 9 til $ stor a , { f) 19 — we wi aan + Prats bea * R 
mae, | t il ] en o} th O - O.!1 ¢ FE al te te. | UT oO N 4 wn $40. ing T, d \ an tr . om ‘ $37 e ne. T 4 ry - AR 4 ni r 4 } mr ne e« £ 
kite y- - e t ti on ree LO 300 . Fell S - *. rm -0 x. ua i P R se Ma pr d ae d aa 50 ar i 4 , N A} > 4 R} N 7 A. ae ru : “ . 
CH. ge ise” ick: | ve nal ial N es H _ & FR LV ol ac: BE EN Pirin, A a ark Ph we. R17 w IRN NTE r ’ a, wort - igho > i, 
s . liv think u ne 2- I , reat see A - FPA E .T 278 D. ri . W l AC Be SS C Aaa ro _ or eae . 4 TER’ IT ! O Orth ethene OF | . 
SLoDERN 6568. hea} dining | |2aink the neighbo: ets place se? Siig DE a see ow : aes | bo Wi. A H ein Fenner, 93: sa office: "ex ee OS ITU! ANTEE JM OR LOG : excel 
RADI S._ +L a hen: bath 1 ‘ioe Sheree s berhes ry, 1 fee | rooms and flow T Ra & r I ¥ — ood sy 00 AD. —M foe - 933 P e t off = | aieted aan UR “Ps ha | p 1— — CK xy excelle 
On I KE. an. - th 4 e basement. ; 2- | Foom 9 ch. ow fo R — oeak rh Cc LA ——~ Da pn K D. od D fu RA. 33 aui nd} yp ny : 4 FR N 6 RE : My ys ee ” le: he 
n od n bedroo 5 bed ] fers. EES > on B N _ y; wi b OU 95 er ‘758 pod: Vo Pa eu D.; m er. vette n NW ~ , TRU CH i} '30-da. a 
v Mi AN 3- orice aati 5. e a m on . iv if | o ac with Y/ DOUNTY. =— boats ay, T= eened m4 is bd: V DO ar.; bes te a cr A ' Br N Prac: ge ' 
e do 3-BD .3 5444 ce » A ae con seen m |i a an one ing te nas oe — Psp ‘OWN = - VAC ats { in i c 3 apt CHA ine poral vi : Be eye = bes! qd chai tens Se ' 4 tT) OK J) VRe - : eg Prams 
, ao +, ~ i pee i ak you~ en pt Be one nick tle ~~ 10 Ree ome. an 368." CHIN, Tus holder RE" rms SAFE and slient’ dental F Du rF cH ised | A ie ner 
L Sane i umbe RO vie wn WE! pped rous aes Pa vepericed f. line ho D. EVERLE N P : fish and he ss ety $25 lub, oy oy 5x - 2444 labels a6 EX ombleve M 748 lal tar COG Eve Va. 36 D 
| 38 = tc bee $82 mbia Phe om inspec Pfh ear et sin FARMS, aH mi oe r TowNi BS N PLACES spine. on fe en bast fe eae cae cond Mosie ee Ge co] beaten ela "36 Master 
n’ d bed 5 i) e. . CH tra - en tn ink FARMS, L perks ny t. roc li cate L ° E font ‘ De C et g! D iffed wo x5 SAX tion xt 3s 8 n rec an ; [Yo T RO} cle by | wtp san 
ie fast k ow livin r te Cc , men - fae | S, te] a est fr — tore EY— 224 w "227, I EP pets. g siaew U. O trie AP aaa. I a condi. a To a c “. — an 920 ~-—aae ; , 
$3 nati gar in eentere n, $7 5100 — OW erating SAND a ol a en ae | rom eer moos —— _75C DEEP REFZER and mail con after ah —, Te = an = M Ne mart £ — ‘ROLET rice car eo OT 
00 Ox. bag y bungalow ee 3007. x Be A » SA e. M ean urn REN ne . 4 1om D. m DE old FR , whit ern a | SEWING } D ae enor + afl) An MORnis s— — oe 
ed wn se ool an e ST f 18 ~ AN n 2° s ed B} a er Ca 2 er‘ EK. n + 0 1% e ies. ce 4 fs n = - nEV Ga las RE 2 
ter. CO. Cour , . r ir J ~~ me su 2 c l " D ut cl FR ec nab) rq zen, lec ? c $2 art ew C R HD . oa 
Pi 3- —$45 | r J ond e 4 ep Cc R — fF 8 le 7 c if DI : E cte G e. yD ehi trif po ne HT 00 in o ( nd Im Sae « 
Pipes rou Ww un h Us hg ©) Be F nas 2 i owe tee ING B atio mm evens ve ‘Ri P on illy la AM ft EZ | Ly = RE ne y rt Ww NE! N 7 yo Ls iH ‘ m 7] 
. 5 ay ty ish ; cou nth| $) a R __Milh . ni _70 lue B > aes oe — ney, ON — m= % ais SE C ite m S > aa Wien r ES, lors, 
ws tough ia = re due es Presi USSELL Bua oa, MD | extras we” net a ear fos BE Drones ali SEWING She eet mene | ronlOK a ae aia 
dis n . la mil n ut i rao n 8, T | Ay Build A - i] age e 0 n oom ed mi te ' st ct lad d y ~, - iM 10 N * ig ays n i ~ — on ivi f . $1 co GE las an 
f € ree ea es e h tra A in : son es co Su ins $6 s ro , rad 75 ne ? s a Fr 932 . J S neg A 4 _ $3 us — han Ee i ‘ Ves 7 f ach ale Me 
or Fumaie 2 ets mina | Sie tractive Ba RD, Baw. Ide. vin " “heat 2%4'b soni ‘Thre SP see mit oe. at Pa D ia te ‘so. ped : * Bi ouscupers oie ae Sa: I. 1663 NEV RO . till 9. 195: ine’ dae 
ng a wi e 5 sch trict ea h- che roo re ] e ths H a] GI ANB ew ath RE e y vo ek de 125 i] r dDath NI i St ent pr: , y's ‘2 ° er scr 4 = Ty s ing We 42 n nt ) oa ; ke Le Sor / RT) ¢ ck a 
send ome lac oo! tom e | ‘ +8 m pl] la T r ot N RE —, ° H cr oe v rn G n NG ‘pted ie $700 , Sor 2485 ee in -Al th n ale EX M a A on n 19 ' oF sed T , fin bh 
- 4 _ ace r e va) -w a, ar . 0 o e a f) ar or. ® es ; ; 5 a Dn Alu: 2 . ret ‘ 42 ne . z - ~ ‘ 
JOHN EEE | screen rooms \ large ge living | Price te er ey 3732 ™ ee ‘North sleep "sto ~ baal DIN. c. table pa aia eaae: cr dos 1 31xS8 eee el - $i DY or de _ Re . Me 77 Baek sh. 
r n ea . ed. ] on eq -si ’ AN & A. ee < e S . m R I E id ae | ed d in M i@ fu ta ate a . o< ‘ H 5 " x35 ‘ = C n e b , ™ 17 * = ; a fr m aut r : I t 
who. a, he wer . ful nd ] ul ed ' y 8.5 a t H _— Jul r ent mo EA ast af to 4 cC ine r « pad st 44 vO m 3} n - ! « oO xX- iL 738 + . ley ¥ 6 if) r izo a 
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WR on . u- 2? A an ul) th f A; ped _ He i ree om Mii? range oder CH ha res © Mo ia sive te m. «a ITE $a: el) ~~ & gs % — 79 5 in x4 ;. rena e w S$ w L3¢ ile« - . : r c ze z rer eon 
— ; lo ] i ba To th oor . fn ‘ rx e or tile n m, whee ok S. _ set lit wa 5S — Co res = A D); ion = int 0 5 ar @ ar h st _ Cw ae id e7 eau ip ma 
RIGHT, i. from Pe t eect | PO PRI stream. RrHOR a ocean” new Mass. i, aah tes, mahog 350, ow cond. 4 teh Gaudi 1 heavy iy (oor HELP Koes aessees ta ied 
INC Tanase oat ye hachh 8 ‘SMAI Pancarvs: Sorat ls Beles me *. DISPL at 8 anes cae Te A sg: s form. | ae e pos ois” dana ces > . ~- “ye sin A A oie iy ith 
: ohinae he OW AINS 0 ee c oon od RORC ~B. a te R Mies” — K e aon 158 —— CI 5 ve oT iv 
| \ lat mt. sch w~ weod: re lig Ss” a ‘Sept R r oo 4 Dp AY 6 tn hit 9 5 t as P 4° { . ) er. a n f sie 9 Sa % ; e 
. ‘ 7 Fr J efr m x! or 9 ‘ ii ‘ | ‘9 4 g - m r .F © ge iy ior 45 : . _* a ? . n 
“See R , 2 minutes | Bick $10 ALL F Her rooms by" My AC , *vailad ex ft “e mm fetes ~ is able $275 . a +, ULI Oe Sta aho all. C cents 311 HIL lay > eee at T — < . ‘Do Oo O. 
oman) » te za : né A nd ] n Z et en Ho H la e nd " - t e; > b es : a m  - ves 4 Te H r oO 4 Do le % n 4 is t12 r I, r) 
1 - prAL =e oF al same no ind RMS 89 = W ed Se ne umes extra wan : ; ce rill eee all reiki iam 12x! — frame; 8026 gplseat “For & T int: mast 49 a, eh. me a ' sedan Ce 
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600 or y TO 1} re jen. fruit Gari aoe = R wf rashi y a ~ ay a Ji _ 6- ae nw Ca w sla . sf sh 9 " th 0 LE -0057 a. ™ NA ex our MU Po mt IR mm y $30 drea ; aie 4 A n 
gend RS O a re . at y ! d ~ ¢ “ Ing f j r I n 0 nt 9 st VIN at c rr : s rd A ed 7 s00d4 
Eves. oo sh . | dow ney your 7a sted INK ton week £01 ty ern dest HO hg ime | v on i nm. a AION er once erpre 6635 modeis Aa HAV Deal N ITS iate mf " fv In Dr wal 4 nD 
: Oo rth ar | conve Ss to ftrad m t la $2 k ipa; INIPES net ecole | ween Cc 44 een ba: tray ] ken. Le unten * flashine eee , ye me Cc me rE er Ww ) / dir y per : es 
, pee BP ore age or kitchen Rew shore. In Pt Also St FLEC “903 RANGE sat alte ae Na se 8 seta fa Cy NA. ta eS Re y eats © te 
, ns : : ‘ ; = . a . Ing @ . : 9 n ’ eel mn} a TT ne i¢ «R r r . 0 9% ‘. nO ve y 4 ra) . 
OV ° wee os “2 — wea lekens $76 * ee Bem vam, E \ R e 5 T 9 a me 5 oe ay ean? ale a5 Or DY t nd 
he o ° ein en } x. we Rag —— Fr A Piet as Hot Cc x E ~ ee 0 ‘ k- ane ‘il DT ediate cle 0 LN t rat and « 
. 68 fron Rington. sg BEOD hoy til here Harbor. includes “e m. logs, YN wy FLEC wel NGE, x onditic Pn alvert T ‘208 qu he Ts- fe ine Wi ail, DI o iatelj ‘als | 7809 ‘ M “s 
43 fronting ha veaneee ny sob Ake r - san ca frepi, “ a 7 i TRIC on he =" as t hee gd 9 ant nde Dp a ft a el _ WILT Pork). ne t sutte if Ae ai * oO MERC ACT TO! 
. fish t On ve Th u ent h yo EF “ _N Se dy Ss on’ lac n A » gOod °c oO ¥. 2 —* m Ww Is ivy on rec 6 ‘i ’ ae , . - 3 sere r 49 wf ' ~ R 
da in lots ake ~ wit ° ur © TH H n ty bea, He ee est | 2 N r IR fel VI ¢ od TI co 10 te R tf “te-9 _FP Pe! or 7 oo ie VR of ¥ RS 
ck } .. B th $5 to to h $25 its AN pe a ang nie tw nch EX un ONE otpo 97 Me 6 RE ndit Ns rm CA re ™ AY Ye DI ae for H JRO L. 4 n 
AE tie ull er 90 C oars pean ay Y ho st ch e. nee > FA T HA nin ER JE int 7 Ow > iW m 5. ion ET. ‘ or m f are i ~ J _ D+) a najor bs as , p) : "400 At EA 
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dtin, un. Ff ® hou ay | abi , EA Mely: erivace. Sn a ee 88 larg Tire Bs ay e138” H 7 MA . i st ne - Fd EI R 
con your al, ase). Seton 2 DE elvi - Cente B60 19-i rac %. G = ore Co ay 7 ref . x 30 Ts 6640. *.' : MA be a . » ‘ "@ te (“TR 7 , ' y ‘nish! 4 7 4 ” 
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ts m > at re AT y j ac t aiaih ijaz fa WA ine ar ab! il ly de} r? R ’ 9 : _~ ‘ Se he oy ta ~~ pay H - D LY 4 . 
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mB. your i PILANE rreened ra ‘Purni ee CAPID: ERS, se pu 701 e. "ape Ga 8 ae i if ae li} af N of Ow Rs RW CH oe E AND - . VV 
$990 * 3; oat Ic ES range ii ish Sg Tee |) 18 “ 1 > — - ae $3 it 18 MOTC aye ale EV 240 a 95 This 
90 ea. E h; 3, a - ai r fr ed F AL ue are ust 2. AS sth per Re n All o2 49 1 Sth : ner- in IDE ~ RO | -P ITO tt : 8 
ea |! N al -< um ch. sh 0 R > n ci al = apt H a es ~ nt a £ A o5 ° R per DFT Ne L . R RN 
in JO l ut Y, es, ow m m oe M RE rst n L000 - ~ . on 9 a R, er 5 ' N ate 7, aie K e') . nn i . In 
f i yo i “apts : Avail machine Sie ERZER ard SLiz WAS G Mac prea ae hyn Ta a Mn es d om at reiien "OF poe e 
; Lado va the s " an ay ? ford. FU ost oo ST urpose c ° we aa HER xe CHIN rchane r _"0 +n Y pT RC Hf POC) a” ie): rs A dc ee cond! m : Aang N w iy —" 
ederda) atts oa ve. Ba si RC ss .- AR 0 Anvie came ; — se. moe . e. H AS >Pr | . iis oe r * Aga 
rd id c ae _~ ze o ill ry- D te m. S13 ‘te 947 - ws 4n € fa) m . qa A — fr ' ae Fi be 
ale. n in City 3- N. FU 12. AT. saprifi > fh 3015 zer + ER. $50 K aay 0 ntr . tse odel & ve - an c He - Qe e rleetm 
ep bri y TH Aa, ~i4. Pe ‘fice ic M i, eas a ee Wh - be cies A + AGE ) {2 vR ni Ste ast 
: svate 53555 ch —B) new rsian e “Ow + "e M ce 5 hag — 790 PA iridr € ame, \ -GOO NT ‘e gh ROLE ne VY 5 . 
the ho : $15.4 oe Cs lam Ww us rea Isc ete nes ; 799 . 114 AM: see nt nD ‘ ee ner TI rl, . e fA 
Ve me F _Cc otheun, sof b. ed = AM EL ss 20: xkce) 0 s¥i ’ me high AR. ne m 194 4‘ ser ee av 
nice 4y 7 H. Loman ae oes Bink t B war = LAN el , Suse lent BOu D aT NIN amhest _ ‘ ste a: 6 a aS 
rt. 7 ae tesa ity ii coi rreaesyee hi ita 4 i [how ep of ea ER w: price wi 
end new ” bab od Cc 326 DORA’ pont ipa WA 68 : wan rs ig the E SHR “or Di RO ves CHEV Ww 1O5€ $125 Stig 7. 
on Chi . 15° ond. 5 ees ot id " ‘ N ' bg? mu use nr Ny . a RO an yt 7 . - ven da 
rs or ] ca 6 AN 2 ROG . 7¢ n TE 4 . uch 10d Ri a rt 5 Ww - 2 e LF as a e ni. 
a hippe rri asy sate Be h wel: Du ED. + b ° —, VD 403 ’ —— T tc fir n.y 
resser nda: ase. monds. sea th ying 79 apa Peak. eve bus Pr Apt | ‘ond f—~194 “as: ye 
rs, > le sid c sh S , 7 . 9) boric , siive fisin Ww ve i Cars ine x — 2 . 2 a ps - a > . ° : 
$3 O ) sot 3-54 lebial MILE a~ A ver- Ak es e som - \ e }> ae 5900 >a at rT 
8 $68": a CR I La, L sro: bra 7 ¥ fo & +i et rs. Mebbe tay LF Ca ¢ ay b c 7 » 4 a) 
ong 40 E LE ays cts. c I r of ad mes . ‘ EN ¢ ad a! gor A Le 
$7 5 D i TE Ra’, et N LL “l . r . zt © R s A , 
18 IA aft aune 5. id. 7 ° zE Chr R A a S the be De ‘4 OL Ma ' »¢ ry Vv 
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AUTOMOBILES, SALE | 97 ; AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, , SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 
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AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 
Page FORD—i037 sedan. Low-cost trais-| FORD— 4] sia. wagon. excel. cond.: | OLDSMOBILE— ‘46, pur¢hased Jan..| packaRp—104 yp ere Mn mg - ———— +e THE WASHINGTON POS 
LET—1949 2-dr. de duze; | DoTtation. 178 as is. prt. owner. $596. Best offer. OR. 7979. "a7 rs tudor sedan ea tse re- | SACEARI — 1945 ¢¢_ luxe 4-door se-| PLYMOUTH—1940: seeg ety. Bricee STUDEBAKER— 49 Regal de —4 Friday, Jung 24, 1949 32 LLIB 
. Owner; best offer. OW. 6837. H 'S, INC. | oan , o_o = es ¢ h.; $430 down, - BH mons. tires. 1 lowner, Best | Good tires. original finish. $1450. wonderful buy for someone a . a A... Fs. ony fully -_—_—— Coton ctor Eh. nite “es 
oe } : / i . . r Sy 
_ HUDSON. Sa ceden: fo m2 verr| eB BS. NA. 1900 Washinst on Mite les Cee | OLDSMOBILE—98 Patufamie — ant HAL bie ne | looking for good economical. trans-| few thousand mies ge 2 4} AUTOMOBILES, SAL SALE 97 ah SALE 97 
ciean, two A-1 condition. with '49 ‘ . each ible i 949; low milpage exce! AL) O, INU. , strator: n tit] : varantee, a seid: 
Washingion Mtr. Sales Corp. |5° ©" inpectign oieer gies.“ 1807 ia:h et. x.w. ab. sods. | Eup. Owner iavine opniry. hone 2000 M St. N.w. ' “xa. 1000] saoe WintetaS Ate NM CORT aio”). LEE D. BUTLER, IN a ay ae aS a 
KAISER—-1947, dark green, 1. | —— at se ; — pit: Pr ge Se ® re sories: | 7.00 i > ne-~o . car 
4518 Arkansas / Ave. N.W. GE. 7454. | 1430 Pha. ave. NE. AT. 6633 cond. $1350 or best ‘offer. £50. 39556. | —_ PACKARD- Po om. coupe. Orig-| PLYMOUTH—1940 coupé. This is a ! Ist St. } _ 7,000 miles, $2150. * ~~ ; wer ¢ art Dri én carefully . 
2 a +. n : aad is e-own er car. v ‘ ; — 4 . : 
HUDSON— 40” convertible; ~s h. FORD ‘46 TUDOR cA GALLE i659 sedan ac canes “OLDS ‘47 T CDNV b ack fir m: retake heater; | on r, has ery low mileage. Di. 0110 Bonded joal gray. Butler 
Drivemas verdri Maroon Orinizal black finish, new tires and "00 ommeere : ri : riced fe ‘ais Mes, ug and are ula od bus iro ueho any! —— eee ee Seu DEBAKER— 39 “Champion — 4- Dr ~ ¥ ry RY UTI LER. 
SBE Gin hey esiadiar aay | 1 te, est of condition, atte "| Ik perfacr conaition theauehout ais:| “9” SERIES HYDRAMATIC | PFT. i oer i 1 | Mabie one Togs ©! STCDERARER 41 commender ae WuiMc Sie" musty fegyeeen. and | LEE D. BUTLER, INC. 
~ car is equippe an as . Y s ; iT) = 7% ’ or oe Mo = an equ! Pp wit h ac- *4 _ . > “ JI Je : 112) 2100 St N Ww. 
JEEP—'46 with station wagon body; + ae sidewalls. Specially priced — ie LEY 5, ~~ $1795 11 25 151 ne RE 0303 if N.W. OR. 0100 met thes _ ~ ne overdrive Thi : ja , r 9110 
; & t. N.W, NA. 1 “19 eon verti radin r neec oar has bee she Abs B BS cost, iste -- Ste. 
2394. cond., $785 or best offer. aL. $1145 5 oie | Se __ Excellent condition: fine black top PAC Ane —"<3 c lipper sed.. 6 lis PONTIAC 4 plas — one rad: , © only $595 for qui ck sale! cee - 245) Shi:  WILLYs S STATION WAGONS ™ 
“ye LINCOLN-ZEPHYR—'4) 4- door sed.; Sats and windows adjust electrically. der. recently overhaul-| 9000 mites annot be t if toes new FE FP RITTIER ING Di. O13 é Lidepel trade and imm. del. om '49's 
ag TE, 5. pero. M40.” eae Bee GRADY MOTORS Sood condition; $545 ah agg Be ney ae wall § tires; Spar- ed: exce! tires orig owner } $1945, mane : — 00 1. DU ee STU DEBAS R 1948, dom ‘Te. UNTER ~ bes rn 
" v) 1} f~ ng chrome. radio and h r. 30-' mi var. A wo ful bu 5 . , , 1121 2ist “. ommandcer fe- 90. Pri 
rubber: Bris. Army. good con “ie mee er (LINCOLN-MERCURY DEALERS) Washir i gton Mtr. Oaies OID. day _——— rated gu ake 7 eh NO or 60 ea ron pb. A day . RON PC NTITAC cs . . ~ . — ~s ea. ce ne sod } ove r rive e radio 


or best reas. cash offer. Ov. "4350 | 1809 OL 7400, Ave. 1507 14th St. NW. | AD. 1004 Med wedi es ea! ind seat "covers 


: PACKARD—; 48 ur io 2 4830 Hampden Lane Bétheade. . ~ ' n im ate condition 
after r © D. - ORD— 46 ~“Buper deix. “8” S-dr. fF. LINCOLN—1949 Cosmopolitan coupe ‘TOGAN (FORD) w 9 | 5 ~~ eee a SS ae AP 8 DEBAKER—1941 secan, radio be told ar + = , con toy 
CHEVRO onditien; seaee rar ae: | rt b., bik., perf. cond. soso. CH 93 a5” rempeny ——- rat ter, Beautiful 1111 18th St. NW cal 995 >. $695 down PONTIAC—’'48 conv. blue. black top. condit Baers ~: 1.89: 
very good Gition; $650 st 0 §! sonded with extras; very | — s6tn & ] ry *] ivedramati ~— a a 04m a>. - , a.50 ITry’¢c 

pPORD—1947, Super ‘de luxe Tudor a } The car ‘ your dre . 3 ‘ i - | | e Viv) | ate CAN typo ae . a cess Bes : offer FPA "“" ) : a : : sAVOCR I } HALF y > 
CHRYSLE 1941 Ro + a - ° am PACKARD— 1949 30 , 639 n Capitol 

yal oor s a this is the kind you look : lon ak T a y 13 luxe, PAT te 4 al 5:30 nl 
dan. 95. ‘ und t you io na Price you Can afford 4-door, r. and h.. (Pack ‘. ARD DEALER *, , At dior “ Packatd 
KENYON MOTORS for nae ‘seldom find; 2 agcod solid $5.095, S-day trial exchange priv-| been driven oniv ° :, , +> Kennedy St. N.W PONTIAC 40 4-cr. de luxe sedan; 1. hg aces pli 2020 M Bt. N.W 
1430 Fla. Ave. N.E. AT. 6633 | “*F: MONROE “3? B "CO. gy iw M 1 leautiful Packard bie finish, | TU, 3200—9 til 8 and Sun ony Dee ay |i el trom “O¢ STUDEBAKER—1947 
CHRYSLER—1942 Windsor 4-door se- E FO D mMaylower Motors, inc. | IOV AT. 3 PACKARD—-cyl, "39 4-dr. sedan; Call OW. 6579 STUDEBAKER— 49 Resal de juxe Sisck finen. w 
dan; rt. h.,| good tires; excellent con- Open eves. til! 1237 East-West 1125 15th st. NW RE. 0302 Ri LAL : = e..ent condait wher PONTIAC 7 St lack onvertible cou fect * ay = om ummBar u 
we. 4 rE. eee ns he of Se ei —_ ; Streamli 8. Bly a Os oupe, periect cond by 1595 

dition; reasonable. Wo. 8528. Hwy.. Silver Spri aa Mad. SLigo 7800 LINCOLN— 48 12-cy! 5-pass coupe: (PACK. ARD DEALER) oad . th . ‘UV ; i otner extras .000 n > § persona Jemonstration carefully ; ) JA FROE ORD _ 
CHRYSLER—1948 Windsor sedan. FORD ‘AT 4 DR rand h., overdrive, whitewall tires’ 15 Kennedy N.W PAC KARD—1 °h per 2-dr. sedan. s00d ndition, $1,450. UN. 08 criven 2000 mil hany extr {ON FO CO. 48 ford Tuder 
Radio an ; " ; other extras; beautiful condition; ex- TU. 3200.. -9 bil 9 & Sun. . 1-0 ar that carries PONTIAC } a4] sed: ynette, fully cer ot ng suarant a Open ill § Bast- West $1295 
SED. ‘V-8;" 1 OWNER. VERY CLEAN °®/@nt buy. AP. 1943 _. PACKARD—1942 Clippe? seaan. R 0 ~ hy + ‘fini ie y o> equipped $8 _ | eatin x: wy. Siive: a te SLigo 7800 ‘48 Chev. CIC Grey 

MERCURY -~1949 club coupe. Gleam. 254_h., 1 owner: orig. fimish is very «rune rtles at . ~~ - KENYON. ‘MOT ‘ORS 2 aa 1495 
~ ing black finish and loaded with ex- good. . good tires and if runs per- ~° Ty RY Ose ra? 1430 Pla. Ave. NE _ AT. 6633 es ee ‘47 Chev. C ha 
Gears rey Ly — Ma. tras. This popular and hard-to-find ‘ec¥8y; $895. : MALO. © 7 PONTIAC—'41 conv. coupe; good ° wait sgt 495 


beauty is prited for only §2.195- ry’c we one ogy ceidittam: Of DI 0110 
barons cr Pa | Nonan (Ford) sa almadiasli y spaelagas sa me 1900._ | Taye “HI0" convert wean Sales Corp: PN “a = . - 1395 
Se Se Gi a | eam Batt BeFork™| Mayflower Motors, Inc. | PACeMicimtrs tt | Rasen Ui rica sit Amn ae xew_oe ve BUY. YOUR CAR 4 fa coe, a Q 
ogg hy Bn fnins: findio beet: | FoneD i946 Buper de luxe sedan... _ MERCURY, 1949. $1095 hauled oy. 7 dpwnt! | "ROY ‘AL MOTORS s 2 pg PR ABR ee WHOLESALE 7 <shaapeiiamrand cen ie 635 
inety” buy, $1795. Radio and heater, seat covers. Per- | » 144 me ree a iia “ROYAL MOTORS | (PACK ARD DEALER) L AND MULONR 


> Kennedy St. N.W 5033 Wis. Ave. N.W OR 6 OW E oe da teare 595 
| - f . : + .¥ v R 6600 
Maryland Motors, Inc. HALEY’S. INC. MERC UR Y—1940 convertible. A (PACKARD DEALER) TU, 3200—9 til 9 and Sun PONTIAC 47 Sire r U6HB 4- - H] HW [T S. N R-RATED ' 
Rockville, _ Md. OL. 6500 ' sharp-looking car, in A-+1 condition 3 “hl &. , ere oo 1946 super ¢! doo B a ae a Be M R 
———- | 2020 M St. N.W. NA. 1900 Radio, heater and countless ot her ex- o> sedan; es rfect , — —— oS EDMONDS MOTORS. nC 
DE BOTO-- 1945 4-door sedan. A-1 FORD—i942 Tudor. A-1 condition,| tras. Today's best buy at only $695 ty gy Radio” —~ gt tion; dip avi i sell $1,500. ae N) ROP FOR 4 49 CHEV FINE CARS : ‘ 
‘$1275. ern n dio ja ate : me Wilh Sei) $1,051 ist ; ; : LIN i 
YON MOTORS $695. K ON MOTORS M aytior Wer Motors. Inc. Good tires. $775 '- DE. 83 00 ext U or EM. 7188 lO! WE FORD CO. green fin %. mee ~~ Wilson Bivd. & Wash. Bivd.. 
1430 Fla. Ave. NE.  __-—_—_- AT. 6633 4430 Pla. ave. NE AT. 6633) __1125 15th St. NW RE. 0303 HA] , INC. ch Tac ay KE, , , Silver Spring. Md. SLiso yeoo, | ‘T**: Only 15, miles. Arlington, Va. 
=" /Vi® Bs ia u recen' painted Waa werk mu. SLI ) a - . 
DE SOTO 194] SEDAN ag oo oS rte [eee convertible: 1 49 MERCUR’ J 2020 M st. N.W | Ni exce! tire Ss motor overhauled my ITIAC '4 ~, “7? , hey ne $1595 L@CAN (Your Friendly Ferd Dealer) 
int, low mileage, 1 owner : . : BUICK—1941 Special, 4-door. ap covers. ful price $f Lua oF obit han se "47 Ford Clubd Cor 
. service and miles left in FORD—1936 Cpe., 5 new tires; excel. | “OUPT r. and b. new paint Inew peal son 193 mpleteiy led HYDRA-MATIC & CY! , ‘muiah Santer iene tes DLA. 86 
! adio, heater, over-| cond.; $194 cash. GL. 6900, Ext. 147. | illy ea edly has r. and h., | overs, good tires bp ve 7 ty _lnspection. $2 wr be tH k T dan... Hitt 


a 


i » “7. i uu ; a : (8th St. LW 
: | ORD CONV. ‘46 ! di has|r. and, | “covers. (goed Uires. sbpve aver | Sfter for either ene TE ab44 az Dalek Ruder ‘seden. <. 996 DI 
ALL CARL MOTORS | =. FORD CONV. ‘46 mall TE. 6400," 9 ** § | $235 down | RACK ARD '20 CON’ tL Olds. Tudor sedan... $795 . 5803 
; : Pully e uipped this car i« a ; a ae t - i ai Ly } | * 4&4 eee 24 Ld ; V« P " . ; “ees : 

5949 Georgia Ave. GE. 3716! béauty oa wheels and runs per- | 49 MERCURY CLUB < oP gg gk vent 7 . , ellent interior. b top 14) Chee: as 00 Oe 

OPEN EVES. AND SUNDAY | fectly. | lage al” gy Seg (PACKARD DEALER) cae ee nL ONE erfect. Finest mechanient coniiion | +2, Gnevrolet Tudor .......87 : 
DE SOTO—1949 Cust. Club Coupe. | ONLY $1205 ieien” ins |. everything maa _ 15 Kenn edy. St E Ww | | palust the can for th ms Vogue premium white w xt Sree ian a0 inured 6. en cas $73 BROMIDES 
Available Squmediately. Company of- | TORS uld want or need in a 200.—{ l ¢ Sur Bnish: «jiu: Tawaterrtallt ti Me and bh Toemee tate 
equipped. (LINCOLN-MERCURY DEALER) fection. $19 Radio and heater, 


ira 7~re a TYT ea a To - — ae: a CORRES Can Solve Your 
, st > > ' ~) 
nde esX ; tA aE ANT ) Sa {i Ss v¥ = . . - Land on CIALS! 7 . 
~~ ~ other extras: sold and serviced by us - - en. ms OGA ( OC) Transportation Headache 
Maryland Motors, Inc. 7809 Wyepemsin Avenue sRADY MOTORS since new: we invite ee eal anit IRC EF MOTOR INC. "uC Bove NF RD)" ae Ward att see $128 — : x 
peckville. pd. __° OL. Cee FORD—Exceptiona! opportunity: ‘41 meee pana URY DEALERS) ma ineoorisens tet Nic 101 Penn. Ave N W. bing SARIN Ary = 34 Pontiac : $175 . THE INCESSANT DRIP 
POBOE— 1990, _2-door, new rub- Ford coach: 35,000 les; original VOL” Oe a aaa HALE v, INC. PACK ARD—) 37 120" sedan n PONTIAC 194] Ost Qf tn full 
eT S50. ’ ; i 


m 
r. motor in A-1. , fonditi om, owner: best offer. UN. 7838 “7400 2020 M St. NW. \NA. 1900. owne! Cle wn ' 
ready-to-go. $395. down! | 9 of == MERCU RY — 1949 converiibie _Bis- Clean, 1 owner, trade 


r HALEY’S, INC eat at covers, low mil h ata AN in 
ROYAL MOTORS FORD—1948 Conv.; mi. 16,000: pert. | cayne blue, black top: fully equipped PACKARD 1641 4-door Weedan, $445 Poaeny — Ps eteete Seek euvers, few mines btiees ‘donaiti 
| Cone.; w.w. res, F. bh. ws. washer “ready to roll for that vacation 1439 Pig N.E 2020 M St. N.W. wa. 1900 UA ARL MOTORS | , 


(PACKARD DEALSS) extras; owner, best offer. AT. 3736 AL.a@ price yo Car afford $2.395 : Ave. | , AT 4833 PLYMOUTH 4 : “14 | 
: . 1942 r. — 48 4-dr ged t +. 5949 Georgia Ave GE 16 

00 8 til 9 gy SA | FORD+"46 2-door sed.; like new: 5-day trial ees privilege he a a Clipper, | ers, r. and h.; one owner. TU. 0936 OPEN EVES. AND su UND AY 

, $1095 v — ivi Ay! Co Wer Lotors iy. tires, above averagce insi de and | ood ‘con hry — "38 9.dr | ecessori PONTIAC ™ 1999 coach , ack You have nothing te lose bat rear 

Washington Mtr. Sales Corp. 125 15th St. NW RE. 0303 out. Tip-top mec hanhc 4 con- | 00 tion: best offer. CH. 8287. Owner car; $400 o1 Dest. chains! We'll take the 


} i 4 543 . , 
1507 14th st. N.W AD. 1004. NASIT- 46 “600” 51 upe 4-doc ees VAI $365 dow | PLYMOt TH 40 conv. coupe and along wit your old car coil we'll 
Washinyton Mtr. Sales Corp. Saabs NA r 4-door, f ROYAL MOT ORS g \ ae ao CODY. Col . 


- OS ge erg me ge - d h.. foam rubber cushions: exce! 5 ipho! ‘rf. cond STU a COMMANDE R—'48 re- sive you a Ps Estape” guaran. ‘47 Merce 
4518 Arkansas Ave. N.W. GE. 7454. ee gl te black fin i and | cond., $1045. SLico 6479 eves. (PACKARD DRALER) $6: oo pe &. IN 62 gal de .. A beautiful tee on en of these BOUR- 4 _ 
ie) ae ae, Conon: ee PLYMOU TH—1946 4 ne | se8 green finish orown jeather up- GEOISIE BARGAINS! door .. $1,395 
DODGE— 1940 200. DU. 831 .—— low mileage: guar. 30 da 6, | SASS—'40. Three official cars at Li nedy St N.W pane oa ie perfect sedan. ¢ ne holstery, radio, spotlight. acclimatizer 
cally & é ; pe etore » greatly reduced prices Low mileage: can : —9 ‘th 9 & Sun. wl ha This a 8} : ; 
oe MONROE FORD Co: 1075. 


; ast is sure to go quickly at "42 BUI 
7 00) s Open eves. till 9. 1237 East-West anthers ae neal 4 ndee es gga eg + a lux¢ 4-door nd HA! | I( -_— Pr UT Nic” ALL You W \ fully Lesiaeaa $895 La Ladd sum 
popGE—ik 39 4-door sedan: $29! re nd feature. 975 io an eater. id and LALO, » 4 4s LF | OME : 

sh. 4 anekiene & Bro., 12th Hwy.. Silver Spring, Md. SLigo 78600 ALEXANDRIA NASH CORP serviced by Us from new) and Carries 2999 M st. N.W. i D Bi \ ER, I Ns 


once 41 sedan; new mdtor; 


m , ‘ ‘49 PLYMOUTH 5§ Dd! 
" , Montgomery at No. 8 f ; = 1121 2ist.S8t me: - 
and Brentwood rd. ne. | pown——09 Seem Tudor green: 5. Alexandria. Va—AL. 2330 > | On AL FY'S, INC. PLYMOUTH—i948 sedan” Heater be St. 2 ab HATERS see Dene Sed.; edie; 12 mi, $1995 
= ay pee rol nee mi; inspection, tighten, ' Open Evenings Until 9. ane oh 9 $1595 a ee Bee eT ‘49 FORD | Custom 2-deor 
imivon MOTORS | 1; $1695 or best offer. OW. 9137.| NASH, 1946. 4-dr. Ambassador se. 2020_M_ St. N.W. NS, 1900 | ee a ROP ~~ AWAY FROM THESE: R.&H{ 5000 miles $1795 
9430 Fla. Ave. NE. AT FORD—1948 Wordor V8 de sa heater: good cond.; $850. ov. PAC ‘*KARD— 1947 Super sedan. Radio MONROE FORD CO ‘49 MERCURY Cl 
DODGE—'40 conv. coupe, tT. h.; new  Secessories; $1395. CH. 1766. | —° — og - Open eves. till 9. 1237 east-Weet NEARLY NEW R.&H 3000 an eyew $2245 
Peter: ST a cat ace - ee f aks a tras ee ] ‘finish. yo owner. Life Gu tubes! : Hwy.. Silver Spring, Md SLico 7800. | . a ei 
cel. cond.: burgundy finish perfect; ' - 00C has only 15. 000 careful | s on it PLYMOUTH— 1941 Convert. de luxe: | OC any ' MERCURY Convt.; 

Washington Mtr. Sales Corp. w.w. tires: low mileage: very fine . vy! gt se and cannot be told from! new. $1775.| dark blue, red leather seats: top LATE M DELS aT Chev, 5-pass. coupe... . $1475 Gray; Ovr'dr., an. $2495 ‘47 Chevrol 
1507 14th St. N.W. AD. 1004. black costal’ wera” inehe ract leally ALEY’S, 1 Guaranteed cond.; $850. CH. 5111, mornings | tudebaker "48 Commander ‘47 Packard 4-Dr Clipper. $1485 MERCURY 4-Dr. — 
cok Ae. toa 4 ; : a TT , ame Fi Stu ? = 

DODGE--1947 custom 4-door, | STG” grech-air hin; $2245, terms, 2020 M st N.W. _NA. 1900 HALEY’S, INC. | “PLYMOUTH 194) | Convertible coupe, $2.19 “41 &F Manhat Sed.; $1295 2-door oo $1,425 

has been well nent and ehows it. 0m Pr gge r tee . hydr.. 814 . h.. St. N.W. NA. 1900| 9-door, new seat covers. 1 owner door “sedan, $2,125 ‘4 Buick sedanett $8 T 

$1395. $465 down. 7 me Fr. clean. 1 owner. 1475. OV. 7117 PAC ‘KARD—1947 de luxe Clipper, car, A-l mechanic al condition. Good Studebaker “48 Commander 2- , Ds seeeees 65 Many More te Choose From WE JAGGED EDGE 

ROYAL MOTORS stn OLDSMOBILE. 1 1948 é-door, nr adie end mop ‘er very ti ree Alt : door sedan, $1,995 41 Packard Coupe | -éeecen Proletariat invited 
‘ n inside and o m A Studebaker ae | : 
(PA KARD DEALER) Series 76, sedan coupe, beautiful chanical con rh tion. tg is | ALL . CARL " [OTORS vert ‘ Saaeme 4 * nee ste 39 Chevrolet tudor Vore ees $395, ly 

ennedy St. NW S PASS. CLUB CPF. ‘two-tone blue over gray finish Only $1495. $500 down $949 Georgia Ave ante * 
a n. 


; A GE. 37 Studebaker 3a Champion 3- ‘al Plymouth ee Look And Feel Like 4 
cs TU. _3200- -9 2 ) "This most popular body style: Bey } = ag u) mine Y ROY Y AL } LN AOTORS OPEN EVES AND SUNDAY passenger coupe $1. 498 38 Plymouth tudor coat 

. Seclient mechanical” condi ar R buyt — a heater and ot her accessories Pull | (PACKARD DEALER) ! Aart gy tha pedeor. Blac - 4 13005." 7 oe Com Mest Cars Equipped With Radic and Capitalist Dog 7 eo 6 Join 
tion: attractive green finish: ver WD TERMS D-day "Soak toed Our pees al price. 15 Kennedy St. \N.W “* * S popular) ~*) Heater 


C ; " a car ts ? , ‘ oI acat! 1. all 
mine V4 soter, Friced at oniy §: $395. CIRCLE. MOTOR cx). Ih NC. ; 895 ‘OA Lop a PON’ mn 4 } TU 32 oO 44 "t Q Ae oun “7 395. 5-day cd ghee Te ented mpare nese beautiful one- the Mass N\ 
$336 Wisconsin Ave. NW. OR 0100 | 2401 Penn. Ave. N.W PLO imiin AC 


Pac KARD—1940 &-c yli inde r coupe ihege owner low ‘mileage Stude- The Are WISH 
| — | 401 Worlds ave. we. | at “ee real bi, transportation. A Mayflower Motors. Inc. bakers with any cars offéred A y 8 TO ‘Ab Ponti 
FORD ‘AO. DEL. ~~ TRORD ‘34 2- DR. OLDS—1942 “98;" blacks new white HALEY’ S, INC. 1125 15th st. NW RE. 0307 | anywhére. Most of these mour-Rated — 


care : 
K. “ F Y : PAINT. Goo MECHANT- sidewon tires, Plastic covers, air- 5 4 PLYMOUTH — 1947 4-door : | re load rit ce ar ? Convertible . $i 395 
2-DR. whe 3 a RECENTL hex gt wt ts cond. hea er, be appraciscee: must | I ae TAR Ta 7 aaa fully equipped, like new $4 e gina | are loa pacar sries, & | Come eat tor tn Pass 
| 145 PR 4415 after 6p | ve NE AT. 0623 ' at eur Aw viary 
"$495 | $ oubswontt F—'38 2-4 nedan cod] 4 CLUB COUPE PLYMOUTH 190 34a57" goed a) Lee D. Butler, Inc. Glamorized MOTOR CO . OLD DOMINION 
: } r “ rour 
NORMAN (Ford) | NORMAN (Ford) ‘ffsrce it ine AS) meta cai meyers | shaadi te we Moe | 1121 Dist St. N.W. |B OUR STAFF OF exter MPANY 


T C. ) ming +o A $75 P ‘ - ; ° ° ° 2611 Lee Hwy. Ow. 7166, 
nae Op — a ae i. N _ oe on Pe Mad. st etn | LEE D. BUTL i a CIRCLE ns MO AND AD ke nem "8795 5 org pageants DI 0] 10 CENTRAL MOTOR CO. *Mather Russian for MOTORS 
7 » 9 or ; ollece i m i i > . 5 
é “a Uv. of M. on Blvd.) | | of U. of M. on Bivd.) DI. 0119 TOR O, IN Washington Mtr. Sales Corp. 3200 Lee Highway CH. 7000 . , 833 HN. Pitt Street OW, 2088 


2401 Penn. A ser 94! a h ' *COMR ADE” 
a | | ve. |W, 1507 14th st. N.W. AD. 1004. (Kaiser-Frazer Dealer) nee. SS. eh ee Se 


——— 
a ‘ 


v — = 


What's the Verdict? — | | Today’ - Greater Was hington Radio Programs june 24, 1949 The Weather 


ATOBTOC | -_ Forecast, Washington Area 

on Abbott wrote Carr: “My Rsay oN ) Radio Hi chili : chts | |__WMAL  630)WRC 980/WOL 1260| WINX ra0TWEAM 1390|WWDC 1450|WTOP | 1500 civudiness ‘with fish “near #8 Beturdanes 

en ac s moving to your ~ & arm end more nami ecatleted 

\. Z | ' ee 6, 7, 7:45,|News, 6, 7, 7:30, | Art B N 6, 7, 8. Rill 7 enkin Mi) alterneon showers li 

town. His money is tied up in a \ \ WQQW—7 a. m. Bina sae onie Rhapsody. 8:30. Jim Gibbons,/8, 8:30. Bill Her-/Show, "6.3, except 7 nay fea Strong Noles. § 0 Boy aa et ane cae Evans. — Ms pa ly tee Raa Fe 
court case. Lend him $500 and I The London Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir |Thomas Town Clock, 6:05- | son, 8:05.9. for V. of Wash.. Show 6: 0509:00. |Fddie Armoald 7 7 "7:30 8:15 De — +. nev: | humid with scattered afterncce thundéer- 
will guarantee it.” Carr lent Black * Beechman conducting. 9. Weather, 8:30 7-30, nese PM he any 7:30. E. Gallaher showers. 
the $500, and as he was dictating a WMAL—11:30. Miss May Bradshaw discusses | ) * en SS Pee Mage 45. (|7:4S. News, 6 upriretnte: __ Tegar—wertiy cleaéy 9nd 
letter notifying Abbott of the fact, changes in education during her career as drincipal : Talking Parrot. © 1 46:00, °7,> &. lite t more 
he received a telegram from Ab- of Roosevelt High School, and future prospects. :00\Breakfast Club {Nows; Bill Herson| Art Brown Show |News; J. Strong | Bill Jenkins |Miltion Q. Ford | |News of America ¥ 
bott saying that Abbott had just Q: 


AP 
LLUZE. 
ie ee 


Zz 


ut mere 


saw 
AX 
Q\ 
3 
= 


, nimid og wit scattered afternoon th 
we 
WGAY 115 Don McNeillisii] H Art B Sh rs N Bill J Wind 
; —12:15 p. m. The work of the! Varie i Merson rt Srown. show jj. Strong; News / Bill Jenkins | and Parrot /Eddie Gallaher’ fn fii 
learned Black was bankrupt and he Club is discussed by members, with Mark duster! ty 30 Jack Owens/Nancy Osgood John Ball Show hate Varieties . |News; Music Milton Q. Ford Home Service + privie coa 


wouldn’t guaranteé any loan. Carr : “WS WASH- FM—?: :30. D. C. Medical Socidty Pro- ___ 45 Sam Cowling! Nancy Osgood John Ball Show | [WINX Varieties ‘To Your Health | Missing Persone | Nancy Dixon bas Sis hae 


Y 


You're the Too i eetpitation since 
that the Joan had been made, and SS, Health laboratory. a8 My True Story Fred Waring John Ball Show, [WINX Varieties (Morning Worship Willis Conover a os ae . 1949} a3 — 
upon Black's default, demanded S WMAL—8. Lead roles in the Fat Man are an 130/Betty Crocker (Road of Life Georgia Crackers |WINX Varieties (Muriel Fvans Turle Inn Arthur Godtrey | aro this rc, 
payment, Is he entitled to it? | attractive girl, Brad Runyun, and a missing corpse. :4S'This Rh'mic Age'Brighter Day Tom, Dick, Harry 'WINX Varieties (Muriel Evans | Willis Conovet! Arthur Godfrey Meen, Tide 

A. Abbott's letter to Carr was an = | C pone tua :30. Schumann, Sy mphony No. 2 in » = 00 Modern (Dr. Paul lohn Nesbijtt \News; WINX Var. | Meet ihe Tune Inn T Arthur Godfrey 
offer that could be accepted by the that he| may know he extent of © Major. Also Stravinsky's “Song of the Nightin- | 215 Romances |We Love & Learn) V. H, Lindlahr _ [WINX Varieties Band Willis Conover Arthur Godtrey omac River {and Geode Great 


performance of an act. Carr having pis liability. The notice must be gg » :30/Ruth Crane ‘Jack Berch | Against the Storm |WINX Varieties (Luncheon Tune Ina Grand Slam ‘Pails (United States Engineers). 
done the act (lending the money) given within a reasonable time, and _ ,, —3. Helen, Hayes recreates her role in | :45 Ruth Crane - ‘Lora Lawton ' Against the Storm /WINX Varieties Musicale Willis Conover Rosemary a. wa anes 
before. receiving notice of the with- Carr met this requirement by A Farewell to Arms.” i ; aT eauereue 


drawal of the guarantee, the con- giving notice promptly. Abbott is WTOP—11:15, Arch McDonald with sport 17: News; Crane ‘|News; Brinkley |Kate Smith News; Sinatra ' Luncheon Tello-Test Wendy Warren Atis 


7 news, :18'Galen Drake Look to This Day|Les Highbie,.News |Frank Sinatra Musicale 'Lunch at 1450 Aunt Jeany Atlant tie Ci City 
ons is ee paroee o liable.—F. L. D. | :30 Welcome | Here's Archer |Back to the Bible Luncheon with Sports Derby Lunch at 1450 Helen Trent Bis narek 
Cases discussed illustrate general prin- ___ 43) Travelers! Here's Archer Back to the Bible | Jerry Strong Jack Ridge! Bing Crosby Sur Gal Sunday Boise .. 
contracts, to be enforceable, re- cipies. They should not be construed as Televi ision Hi hlights ' Aberrant di . ie % es ree 
quire notice to the guarantor so [¢¢0! s4nice Ot eto aaur lawyer. —_ ~ ~. :00/Baukhage Here's Archer John Ball Show |News; J. Strong | Sports Derby |All Sports Parade |Biq Sister Btownsville 
—_ WMAL—38. Think Fast re bre Dr. 1$i'Ted Malone Here's Archer John Ball Show [Jerry Strong Jack Ridge! Tony WakemaniMa Perkins 
fm Mason Gross, Dean of Liberal Arts of Rutgers ‘30'Round the Town) George Hicks John Ball Show | Band Stand | Sports Derby All Sports Parade) Young Dr, Malene|&? 
7 AR NT Roe University, David Broekman, Leon Janney, par #45'Dorothy Dix Easy Listenin’ John Ball Show | Band Stand tH lack Ridge’ Tony Wakeman Guiding Light 
FOR EVERY P E eee ae Eloise McElhone. :00'It's a Hit Double or Nothing|/Queen fora Day |News; Williams | Sports Derby x Sports Parede/2d Mrs. Burton 
’ Si WNBW—9:30. “An Only Son,” by Sarah Arne 2: s15 It's a Hit Double or Nothing) Queen for a Day (Band Stand Jack Ridge! Tony Wakeman|Perry Magon 
an important message. ae Jewett. :30\Bride and Groom | Today's Children /Say It With Band Stand Sports Derby All Sports Paradp|Nora Drake 
a=  WNBW—10. Greatest Fights of the Century | os John Nelson’ Light of the Werld Music 'Band Stand : ae a Ra Fh tn ss Rar 


For a moderate monthly rental, your child so film is of the Mills ys. Lesnevich an , f ani . - 
se Gemeecek let ies of oben 4 vich vs. Basi fights. d the Lesne cet Talk Your Way |Life Can be Beaut./Charles Keaton {News; Band Stand | s Derby All Sports Parade|David Harum 


15) Out of It Ma Perkins at the Organ powet Willams Re lack Ridge' Tony Wakemag)Hilltop Hause | Harrisoure 
piano. Give your boy or girl the added seep :30 House Party Pepper Young District Matinee’ |Rand Stand Sports Derby All Sports Parede'/Mark Evans Indianapolis 
social grace, the emotional outlet, the fy WNBW—Channei 4 WitASacChennet i | :45| (Linkletter)| Right to Hap’ness.| Music Band Stand | lack Ridqe| Tony Wakeman! Mark Evans Jackson 
wider horizons which only music can ie WTTG—Channe!l 5 WOlIC—Channel ¢ | 4s Kay Kyser's Backstage Wile News News; Williams (Sports Derby All Sporte Parade |News; Beat Clock 


bring! Read the details below! 215) College |Stella Dallas Sports Band Stand | lack Ridge} Tony Wakeman/Beat the Clock 
- 12:00 man :30/Ethe! & Albert |Lorenzo Jones News Band Stand Sports Derby ‘All Sports Parade/ Winner vat - 
OIC—Ted Steele Show. ton Downey. 45E & A Roosevelt! Widow Brown Musie Band Stand Jack Ridge Tony Wakemap | You re the T 


| ° Se WNBW—Mor Mi!w ' 
| . So 12:30 WMAL— “Blind Date’ = ? ees 
Campbell's New Piano i WOIO—Vanity Fair. woICc—Ty News, a 5 :60 Green Hornet {A Girl Marri Superman News; Music Hal} |S Sports Derby |Band of Day ‘Top Spot | Nasheile 


WMAL—Reviews, Music, Spts,| WOIC—TV Bopper. = a Hornet soy Superman |Music Hall | ae “jock Law cw ‘tieler 
| oo 00 a 80\Johnny Luijack (Just in Bill The Wonder Morse Musie Hall Sports Derby | Sports 8 
Student Rental Plan =| waat—weil- Sports Parade, | WRER— orsleng comity, 44S\Johnny Lujack (Front Page Farrell Tom Mix Music Hall | lack Ridge Lowe:_Wakeman |3ob Elson, Show 


5:00 Wolff. eae 
WNBW—Western Balladeer. WMAL—Think Fast. 00 News; Massey | News; Eid Philipps, Sports| |News; Music Hali|Sports Hi-Way Melody Lane |News, Sevareid 
ies pe = + parece. WOIC—Aaventures in Jase. fj iSiesser: Sports |Easy Rhythm News; Bob Wolff, Sports| Dinner Music Melody Lae Re 
WNBW— Howdy Doody. cure Seen Wash, vs 30'Ear!] Godwin B’gholtzer, B’m'n/Congress Today j|Musie Hall Places to Go Wakeman: Derget 
a 


RENTAL PAYMENTS Concert Bail. 8:30 |  45\Sammy Kaye /3 Star Extre 'L. Welk’s Orch! !Muste. Hall and Know Supper Club Lowell Thomas 
WMAL—Tresaure Quest. 4 cseencnanctcta een A 


se 6:00 | | 
ASLOW AS | Bt WERE Tppet op WOHO—Theater, of Visicn, | ] isi Head. Ed. |Supper Club [Fulton Lewis, ft. |News; Music Hall|Lily and Curley |!450 Club | [Beulah 
. Ww 


rontier Theater, ateke ye Rubin's The-| :15/Elmer Davis World News Tohnson Family {Music Hall Lily and Curley 1450 Club Jack Smith 


ee R a b 1S 
s Be 3s WMA Break ithe ae :30\Lone Ranger Fiddle and Bow | Gabriel Heatter |Music Hall Hillbilly Music |Deems py we | es 


SLL SSE CLIENTS sigsatesseasse3 


PER ae eS Ean Brane. WNBW—Your naw Time #2 Lone Ranger !H. V. Kaltenborn | Inside of Sport !Music Hall Hillbilly Music i ow 
MONTH oe Compton, News, WOlt—Bessbat ne A Q Sis Fat Man |Band of Plantation That Sand Man [Dance Time Ray Morgan | feck Categn Wealthy Ruler 
oo 10:00 


i WOue—Lucky Pup Puppets. :18\The Fat Man America Jubilee |News; Les Sand [Dance Time Dugout Chatter | [lack Catepn 
plus cartage Be WNBW—Wesiher add New WAAE—Distries (uewboist :90'This Is Your FBI|Jimmy Durante (Carman Cavallaro | That Sand Man Let's Travel | Baseball Game | My Favorite | =) Ko nap peh Ty 
he Bob 


wt G— iff. 8 . 45 ; c | , Cc} ieve! lana at Husband 
WOIC—Sketch 2 Quiz. ports. ws! * pail nites ¢45/This Is Your FBilJimmy Durante | Orchestra ' That Sand Man Dance Time 


wnsaw— 
witnetedt Splines 25th’ Anniversary. :(00/Break the Bank (Eddie Cantor Sylvan Levin Les Sand |Cactus Matt Washington Cord Theater Is Crem ated 
WITG—Pil Shore s WMAL—Pilm Shotts. | :15Break the Bank (Eddie Cantor Opera Concert That Sand Man Cactus Matt Baseball Game | Ford Theeter 
, ee WMAL— ipacle Rider. ee RLS Sa S ee ‘My Good Wife [Enchanted Hour (That Sand Man  |Nightingale Club’ Baseball Game | (Ford Theater Bd Dethi, Indian. June 23 U.P, 
oe T:15 oO ) , heriff: ‘My G 7 4 | ; ~e memage 
For the boy or girl studying music—or as a Su wine wer age iit WNBW Newsreels, eri be Call 'My Good Wife Enchanted Hour ‘That Sand Man [Nightingale Club Cleveland a} Ford Theater wey Fosccneer — a ~~ 
thrilling graduation gift—a new piano From ine SI ame Room » Sand. WETG—Hews. | :00 Bernie Green {Dragnet ) Meet the Press News; Jackson (Cactus Matt ‘Washington Playhouse world’ ss + aand one o 
a thane tame maken: Stel Soh ae Woltoenude Mahoney. WNBW—Goll, D. ¢. Newsree! Mes. ohow Dragnet _ |Meet the Press Harold Jacksen——{Cactus Matt Basebal) Game Playhouse orid § wealthiest men, was Ge 
: us Lal eilnway, mer, a A : | 130'Treasury Band Sports Newsreel |Mutual Newsreel |House That |Cactus Matt Tenth Inning Dick Jurqens mated yesterday yesterday near his 
Kimball, Gulbransen., ble or Jesse French. 4 FM Radio bye el | 45 Treasury Band (Pro and Con Concert Notebook | Jack Built!Cactus Matt Lowe; 1450 Club _ Orchestra my 76 ld Mah 
Large variety of models to choose from. The + :00|News News; Sports |Voice of Wash. |News; Jackson |Sports Final |Lowe, 1450 Club News, Hottelet . \puiea oven a son poo” ee oe - 
small monthly rental payments will be applied 1] ~~ aller of Dreams World News Phillips, Sports {Harold Jackson (Blue Evening Lowe; 1450 Club |Arch McDonald some. be is Bembey of puede 
selects purchase price of the instrument you ee o. preams U. N. Is My Beat!Gramps Show [House That |Dancing Party. |News; 1450 Clubj |Eddie Gallahes nia St 
select. If you can’t come Jee mail coupon for 


#45: Hour of Dr Pastels in Rh 5 ; 5 monia Sunday. 
of Vreams Pastels in Rhythm 'Gramps Show | Jack Built |Dancing Party 3 illaher His funeral pyre was ted 2 
more information. vannel 266— ae b oper. 6:18 a. m. to 8: |  ottin.n.oemsu few hundred yards from his ornate 
- | “(Channel 278-103 5 me)—7 8. mi. pidn is WPIF (730) ope 4:15 5. Oo EO 105D) oper. 6:15 a. m. to 8:30 Dp, m.| . 6: 30D. a. copy of the Versailles Palace at 
% : oe i I Ons. S118 OM. to EID D By WECO (152p) coe. S115 0. we. ty 8:20 B | Kapyrthala. He had liked it better 
| | : | | . \ th 
| WISHING WELL | | | an any of the other 11 palaces 


1108 G St. N.W., Washington, D. C. | cl ssttered about his 70-square-mile 


. | i kingdom. , 
reer hn emp it your New Piano P ortrauts : sateen House Continues Curbs 
ental Plan. Please send me more information. By James J. Metcalfe SF, : On F ats, Oils, Rice : 
PE» 0b 0s pb Slenalad ee Mkesb sac cee : 


. i | The House yesterday unani- 
RS a8 tha BR | a Your Friendship ? ‘mously passed and sent to 
i CITY COs PSesseecesesese eee e Meese seassscsese 


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Along a path of flowers fair . .. I saw the rainbow’s end... | Senate a bill to continue for 


~ 
And all the world was wonderful .. . When you became my Bh Baer Fh ype git on, ye and 
friend ... My heart was young, my step was light... . As I - | 5 rice products. The present law 


went on my way... And everywhere my soul embraced . . . The expires June 30. 
beauty of the day . . . Because your friendship seemed to melt 


A BETTER 
NAME FOR 4 3 | 
MUSIC «cx oo | . +» My troubles and my cares... As though it were a miracle 
j : . +. In answer to my prayers .. . It gave me hope and courage 
@ : | new ... And faith that I had lost . . . And taught me that a 
J Count the letters in your first name. Subtract four if the num- 


, sacrifice . .. Is worth whatever cost . ,, And whether I succeed 
ber is six or more. Add three if the number is less than six. or fail... I know that in the end... I shall be grateful for “Use your key! Don't kick the the 


Then, you have the key number. Check each key number, left the day ... When you became my friend. door! _Be surg to take money 
te right. The letters under the checks form a message. : with you! Don't—” 


Z 


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THE WASHINGTON POST .,, 


Shop Today and Saturday I0to9 — nce Ferkivg / 


ic b 


Friday, June 24, 1949 


Se 


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’ Fe ae ’ votre v ‘ siete’ . ’ ~~ ' roe ees a Ne ee dievadie oe ai 


ROEBUCK AND CO. Pa 


, Pr 


ee A ee ee ee —_ = — 


nn 


ower price! Save 2 ways with SEARS 
—... AFTSMAN LAWN MOWER 
Ss Weed Killer i, Formerly $17.50 | 8s 
ey % 7 oT \\ Five Blades % 
-— 4 ce SAN ba 16-inch Cut 


Controls over 
50 Different 
Weeds 


Won't harm most 
grasses. Eliminates 
back-breaking work 
of pulling weeds. 
2-4-D formula. 


® Alloy steel blades stay sharper longer 
® Precision ball bearings make mowing easier 
® Heavy semi-pneumatic tires roll smoother 


sears 1 Stores 
Here’s a double savings for you! Expensive, precision fit parts insure longer tife, less 
repairing! And Sears low, low price means extra savings right “off the bat’’! Alloy steel 
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hardwood handle. It's the mower for you, at the price you want to pay. Get yours 


now .-. . and save, two ways! 


2-4-D Weed Killer. 
NE ES a 


i ee 7.45 
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en Gs o's Oew ds 19.45 
20% Copper 3-wey Control Gar- 
den Spray, 6 ozs. 55 
5% Copper 3-way Control Garden 
Spray, 1 tb. 

5% D.D.T. Insect Dust, 
as ee 1.25 


50% D.D.T. Insect Spray, 
1 lb 


Hardware Dept., Seare 4 Stores 
varanteed 5 Years..- 


UNLAP GARDEN HOSE 


25-ft. length 


2:22 


50-ft. length, reg. $4.75 .4.33 


~ . 


Grass, ‘iller 
Sears Cross Country 


One Quart eee Z GC 


Special chemical solution § kills 
grasses and weeds. 


Sears 4 Stores 


* 


Dust Containing 75% ps 


164% D.D.T. and 34% Copper 
Potato Spray, 6 ozs. 


Garden Shop, Sears 4 Stores 


Regularly $2.59 


Priced to Save 
Money Now! 


@ Withstands 450 Ibs. pressure ®@ Three vulcanized layers 


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he eo Rite Se py "S2 DOF, | | 
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Wall Trellis 
Of Seasoned Lumber 
8-ft. high Gee eeeee 1:4 


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Easy to clean and coil ®@ Tight-fitting brass couplings 
Here’s a grand “buy” in garden hose! Guaranteed quality at good sayings! Standard 
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25-in. high ....... D>? 
A ote la 2 Hardware Dept., Sears 4 Stores 

ttractive to lawn. Com- 
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Ww 
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“T" Fence Pos Barbed Wire 


« Dichet Fence Léwn Sprinkles 


Sturdy Hose Nozzle 
+ Popular Ring Type 


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100-ft. roll 


Won't Slip or break, 11]-gauge 
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s Arlington 


Galvanizéd Tank 
2x2x4-foot Size 


Sears Low Price 17°*° 


3x2x8-foot size 

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Sears Wisconsin and Bladensburg 


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mavid Bradley Hydraulic 


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Improved bucket takes 17-cu. ft. 
Fits H and M Farmall or John 


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42-in. 15.95 48-in. 17.50 
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wire. 
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Arlington 


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Garden Tractor 
Famous David Bradley 


Reg. $187.50. 467° 


Has improved Briggs and Stratton 
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Reg. 83c 69¢ 


6-ft., 78< 


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Arlington 


Sears Farm-Master 
1320 ft. Reg. $7.95 § 7° 


4 point type, has extra sharp 


| points. 12 Ye-gauge. 
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. fe gs et <a ees 4 Rt ae, nents ike, Sais 
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7 “* : ~*~ ‘. ro af. a. %e ~ a “ 3 
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Adjustable Type 


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Solid Brass Arms, Head 
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Side Delivery Rake 
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Reg. Price $339.50 


Tractor Hitch Included 


horse hitch. $32 Down, $17.50 Monthly. 


Usual Carrying Cheroe 


Front Tires and Tubes, $30.70 extra 


Farm Dept., Sears Wisconsin, Bladensburg and Arlington 


319-2. 


Uses interchangeable wheels for 6:00x16 used auto tires. 
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Lightweight Aluminum 
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a 


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-: ene 


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Tubular steel legs, frame and handle. Lightweight alumi- 
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shock, protects lawns. 


10x2.75. semi-pneumatic tire absorbs 


Hardware Dept., Sears Wisconsin, Bladensburg and Arlington 


4 


Saltiaction guananlied ov your money back SEARS 


* 


» 


Socket shank pattern. 


Reg. $1.19 ......QQ¢ 


8-in. diameter, covers 20-ft 
circle. Solid, non-rust brass. 


Sears Wisconsin, Bladensburg and 
Arlington 


Hedge Shears 
9-in. Carbon Steel Blades 
- 
Compound Action . 2.45 


Blades notched for trimming 
heavy branches. Wood handle. 


Sears 4 Stores 


Long Handle Shovel 


Round Point 


% 
i 
ei 


9x1 2-in. 
blade. 47-in. ash handle. 


Sears 4 Stores 


$11 Bladensburg Ad. HE. (2) 
Wisconsin Ave. at Albemarle (16) GRdway 1122 
2900 Wilson Bivd., Arlington, Va. GHestnet 1722 
5928 Georgia Ave. a.W. (11) 


10-in. Double Edge Blade 
Craftsman 
Cuts as you swing like golf club. 


36-in. steel shaft, rubber grip. 
Sears Wisconsin and Bladensburg 


Pee een a OF Que OPO we pen 


Grass Shears 
Self-Cleaning, Non-Jump 


Dunlap quality. 5-in. tool steel 
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Lawn Edger 


Built for Service 


1 35 


Heavy duty 9-in. steel blade, witht 
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Cuts Cleanly...:.. 


RAndoiph (122 


SECTION 


C 


SOCIETY 


Marriages—Engagements 


The Washington Post 


WASHINGTON: FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1949 


SECTION 


WOMEN’S NEWS 
Club Activities—Comics 


MAKE IT BUFFET STYLE if you’re dabetain- 
ing a group of friends at breakfast. Serve a 
mediey of different fruits arranged attractively 


ER CAKES AND SAUSAGE—That's. a 
wonderful breakfast combination! Get the day 
started right for your family by serving them 
some of these crisp little corn meal pancakes: 

BATTER CAKES 
1 cup corn meal 1 beaten egg 
% teaspoon soda 1% cups buttermilk 
% teaspoon salt pe gay | 


o~. Word to the Wives 


You Can Prepare ¢ 
_ Hearty Breakfast | 
Fy Ere Coffee Perks | 


By Lucia Brown 


O KEEP your husband healthy and happy, 
Mrs. June Bride of ’49, be sure to feed him a 
man-sized breakfast! 
That’s advice from none other than Mrs. 
Marjorie Child Husted, the original “Betty 
Crocker,” and it’s good advice whether you've 


= . been married two weeks er 20 years. 


on a plate as shown above. Here are peach 
halves, fresh strawberries and chopped pine- 
apple, all ready for topping the shredded wheat 


The bride who is not an accomplished cook 
should learn to prepare a delicious breakfast as 


‘her first step in culinary training, says Mrs. 


Husted,| one of the Nation’s best known home 
economists, a frequent Washington visitor, and 
a recent winner of a Women’s National Press 
Club Achievement Award. 

“Breakfast is the easiest meal of all to cook 
well,” Mrs. Husted points out, “and it’s just about 
the most important from the standpoint of health 
and effi¢iency. One fourth to one third of the 
day’s nutritional needs should be supplied at 
breakfast if you are going to be in high gear 
for the work of the day. And a good breakfast is 
every bit as important in summer as it is in 
winter, for you need good nutrition to battle 
hot weather.” 

An adequate breakfast for two can be prepared 


> in exactly 10 minutes with very little practice, 


Mrs. Husted points out. The definition of, an ade- 
quate or “basic” breakfast, as given by leading 
medical authorities, is as follows: Fruit, prefer- 
ably citrus; cereal with milk or cream; toast, 
butter and coffee. 

To get this on the table in less than a dozen 
minutes, Mrs. Husted suggests the following 
double-quick steps: Start ..the coffee first, then 


P= — squeeze orange juice or remove previously pre- 
= pared, canned, or frozen juice from the refrigera- 


Sift + osnaned i ingvedichts. Add beaten egg 
and buttermilk, beating until smooth. Pour 1 
tablespoon of batter for each cake onto a well- 
greased iron skillet. Bake until brown, turning 
only once. If batter gets too thick, add a little 
more buttermilk. Serve with honey or maple 


Set the table; putting on cereal, milk, bread, 
butter, and electric toaster. Now if the coffee's 
done, you're all ready to sit down and eat. As 
you can see, it’s only taken as long to get the 
entire breakfast as it does to perk coffee. 


Surprises for the Family 

Breakfast menus can easily get in a rut. Some 
people ido like ‘em that way, of course—may be 
it just saves thinking in the early morning. But 
you can lift breakfast out of a humdrum groove 
if you eook up a few surprises for the family, so 
that they'll look forward with eager curiosity to 
the morning meal. 

A few suggested menus and recipes follow: 


BLUEBERRIES AND CORN FLAKES 
FRENCH OMELET CINNAMON TOAST 
COFFEE MILK 


| FRENCH OMELET 
3 eggs Dash of pepper 
% teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon butter 
BEAT EGGS just enough to mix whites and 
yolks. |Add salt and pepper. Heat butter in 
omelet pan, pour a little of it into the beaten eggs, 


tor. 


* and reheat remainder. Turn eggs into pan and, 


as mixture cooks on the bottom and sides, prick it 
with a fork so that egg on top will penetrate the 
cooked! surface and run under sides. While the 
eggs ate still soft, but thickened, fold over, let 
stand 4 few minutes to brown and turn onto a 
hot dish. This recipe serves three. 


i 


STARTING THE DAY with a really good breakfast 
and Mrs. K. Wallace Husted of Minneapolis, Minn, 


down to grapefruit, cereal, bacon and eggs, 


a 


toast and 


Mr. 


sit She is Marjorie Child Husted, the original “Betty 


Crocker” and an adyocate of good breakfast 


coffee 


TOMATO JUICE COCKTAIL 
EGGS BAKED IN BACON RINGS 
BRAN FLAKE MUFFINS 
MILK OR COFFEE 


EGGS BAKED IN BACON RINGS 
6 strips bacon Salt 
6 eggs Paprika 


GREASE the bottom of muffin pans and line 
them with lightly broiled bacon. Into each cup 
break an egg. Sprinkle the eggs with salt and 
paprika. Bake in moderate oven 325 degrees for 
about 15 minutes or until eggs are set. Turn them 
out onto rounds of toast or slices of drained pine- 
apple. Garnish them with parsley. 


cos 


BRAN FLAKES MUFFIN MIX 
3 cups sifted flour 
3 tablespoons plus 1 
teaspoon  double- 
acting baking 
powder 


1 teaspoon salt 

% cup sugar 

% cup shortening 
6 cups bran flakes 


Cooking CUES cic 


———_—i 


Small-size fresh onion rings and pimento-stuffed olives make 
tractive toppings for miniature meat loaves that a family will enjoy. 
* - > 
For an easily made Sunday night supper dish serve canned green 
asparagus (drained) on toast with cheese sauce and Canadian bacon. 
Use the liquid from the can for a cream soup. 


ale 


georgetown 


Sift flour once, add baking powder, salt and } 


sugar and sift again. Cut in shortening with 
pastry blender or two knives until mixture re- 
sembles coarse meal. Add flakes and mix well. 
This recipe makes about 9 cups mix. 
Place in glass jars or crockery bowl. 


place. Keeps well for 3 weeks. 


TO MAKE MUFFINS: Measure 2 cups bran 1) 


flakes muffin mix into bowl. Add 1 well-beaten 
egg and 2/3 cup milk, then mix only until dry in- 
gredients are dampened. Fill greased muffin pans 
2/3 full. Bake in hot oven (425 degrees Fahren- 
heit) 15 minutes or until done. This makes 7 
large muffins. 


RAISIN BRAN MUFFINS: Fold in % cup | 


seedless raisins with each 2 cups bran flakes muf- 
fin mix. 


Cover ff 
lightly with cloth or plate to allow circulation of | 
air. Store in refrigerator or other very cool, dry |} 


Rqua Straghers Drurs 
Ditochale Por 


un Back anc WA 
$25°° 


Air-Conditioned 
Open daily 9:30-9:30 


sh ieee 


Please suggest an after-wed- 
ding buffet supper menu for 
about 12 people. I would also 
like to have a champagne punch 
or cocktail recipe. What type of 
stemware is used to serve the 


1 cup milk 


2 cups chopped cooked ham 
44 teaspoon onion juice 
1 teaspoon vinegar 


After-Wedding 
Buffet Menu 


% teaspoon dry mustard 
1 cup chicken bouillon 


Setaseentes ARE BACK as breakfasts } have just the right note are tart ieenins t to blend de- 
Bot "em, if the meal planner is wise. They have liciously ‘with cold cereals 


| en eee ae eee a 


Pan American Concert to Fete White House Spanish Class 


-A- Pan American concert in 


1 tablespoon chopped parsley 
% cup heavy cream, whipped 
Watercress 


Soften gelatin in cold water 5 
minutes. Combine egg yolks and 
seasonings in top part of double} 
boiler; add bouillon and milk and 
cook over hot water 5 to 6 minutes, 


i ~-_-_—— 


I am wondering if you can 
give me some information, or 
refer me to someone who can 
help me? By accident, while 
doing my dishes Sunday, I con- 
cocted a plain soap and water 
mixture that took all the tar- 
nish off my everyday silver- 
ware. I was simply amazed. See- 
ing how nice the few pieces 
looked, I mixed a second batch 
of the same soap and water mix- 
ture and cleaned the rest of the 
everyday silverware. This is 
what I want to know: Is there 
some place where I can have 
this solution tested to see if it 
hurts the silverware? Before I 
publish my finding, I want te be 
sure it won't hurt or harm sil- 
verware in any way, also if I 
could sell the idea to a soap 
firm and realize a very small 
revenue for it, I'd like that too. 
Of course, I realize I used com- 
mercial products. I did not try 
to do this, it just happened. 

M. B. O. 

«| Listed under “Chemists” in the 
yellow pages of the telephone 
= book are firms which will test the 

| # Solution for you. 


4 I'm afraid I can't hold out much 
i hope to you for finding a market 
P for this idea. As you suggest, the 
‘solution was made up of commer- 


champagne and when is it 
served? H. E. 
Here is a menu for a wedding 
supper buffet: 
Ham mousse 


ning in the garden of the Arts;Puerto Rico's “ambassador of good Tomato cups filled with vegetable 
honor of members of the White! Club, 2017 Eye st. at 8:30. will.” salad 


House Spanish Class of the Amer-| Guest artist of the evening will) Some of the countries to be Buttered green beans with 
icas will be given Tuesday eve-|be soprano Senorita Maria Comas,|honored on this program will be | mushrooms 
Argentina, Mexico, Uruguay and | Hot rolls 
Costa Rica, For Costa Rice, the| Wedding cake 


—— ; orchestra will play a new composi- | 
The Last Week of Our 4 tion, “Tropical Suite,” by one of the | HAM MOUSSE 
4) foremost composers of Costa Rica,| 1% tablespoons plain gelatin 
4 Julio Fonseca. | Mr. Fonseca is in| 2 tablespoons cold water 


4 2 egg yolks, slightly beaten 


| te ma and cayenne 

, CLO Sy} NG SALE - Sea oar SESE ones on eanernmemamanne cece | ee ; 8 
Sizes-10.1018 Al Sales Foal i Our last week-end before closing 
> EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD REGARDLESS OF COST 


Reopening Monday, August 2md fi Sensational Savings 


MASON WATERS DRESSES Were 
G&LORGLTOWN 6 (faded) .. sn» -caaas- -12.95 to 22.50 
"009 P STREET N.W. BE Sh nic bc SohoceBcewes tated me ane 
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15 crepes, satins, organdy ..7.95 to 8.95 

7 crepes and silk prints ,.. 10.95 


MISCELLANEOUS Were 
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6 Pins, ceramic gumtie-0:6 <7. 0/0 dee éiale 2.00 
3 Lipsticks ~.....0.++-cemaceceecedutse 1.00 
LANGIIEROD 60 ccc ccutegsicctinee O00 
1 Necklace ....ccscccccccsspons S00 
RAhacklores «.). csbdcwesevsbooe B00 
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1 Pr.-Earrings .... tet eeeet pees 6.50 
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*Open Evenings 
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_— SSS] 


Coffee 


KAMP TRAMP 
SANDAL in red, 
white, brown, 
natural, 


Sizes $ to 12, §-00 
Sizes 12% to 3, @-08 


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1512 KING STREET 


ALEXANDRIA 


It’s Time for FUN. { 


Everybody’ s planning vacations .. . and we've 
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Bathing Suits 
Beach Coats 
Play Suits 
Shorts and 
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2C 


Friday, 


THE WASHINGTON 
June 24, 1949 


POST 


Nicaraguan Ambassador Holds 
Reception for Capus Waynicks 


Latin American diplomats and top officials gathered at the Nic- 
araguan Embassy yesterday afternoon for the reception held by Am-* 


bassador and Senora de Sevilla-Sacasa in honor of the newly ap-| 
pointed United States Ambassador to Nicaragua, Capus Waynick, and/| 


Mrs. Waynick. 


Summer flowers decorated the embassy, and a buffet of hors 


d’oeuvres was served with cock-*~ 


tails in the dining room. Guests 
were greeted in the green recep- 
tion room by the host and hostess 
and Ambassador and Mrs. Way- 
nick. 


"Many of the guests were from 
North Carolina, home State of Am- 
bassador Waynick. In the gather- 
ing were Senator Clyde R. Hoey, 
Representative and: Mrs. Graham 
A. Barden, Representative and 
Mrs. Herbert C. Bonner, Repre- 
sentative and Mrs. Monroe M. Red- 
den, Representative and Mrs. John 
H. Kerr, and many other Tarheels. 

‘Diplomatic guests included the 
Ambassador of Cuba and Senora 
de Gans, Senora de Thomen, wife 
of the Dominican Ambassador, the 


' 
: 


| 
) 


| 


Ambassador of the Argentine, Jer- 9 
onimo Remorino, the Ambassador # : 


of Colombia and Senora de Res- 
trepo-Jaramillo, and all the ambas- 
sadors to the Council of the 
OAS. 


From the State Department came 
Undersecretary of State and Mrs. 


Dean Rusk, Assistant Secretary of . 


State and Mrs. William Thorp, As- 
sistant Secretary of State and Mrs. 
John E. Peurifoy, Mr. and Mrs. 


Paul Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Stan-' 
ley Woodward, Mr. and Mrs. Ray-' 


mond Muir, and the newly appoint- 
ed Assistant Secretary of State for 
Political Affairs, Edward G. Miller 
and Mrs. Miller. Over 400 guests 
in all attended. 


: 


OPEN ’TIL 9 P. M. TODAY ... TOMORROW 


SALE! NEW 


O hue 


E DRESSES 


; 
ei 


H 


Wy 


Re 88 


New dresses, one as lovely as 
the other, arriving daily and 
at a budget-controiling price. 
Choose from rayon. Bemberg 
(reg. U. S, Pat. Off.) dotted 
Swiss, voile, dimitie and organ- 
die. A grand assortment of 


,’ colorful prints, plain colors and 


- Hessler tr oy 


MRS. DEWITT HALL MONT- 
GOMERY, JR., the former Miss 
Martha Dorris Barber, became a 
bride June 18 at Grace Episco- 
pal Church in Silver Spring, 
Md. She is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. William F. Barber of 
Silver Spring and the bride- 
groom is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. DeWitt H. Montgomery of 
Springfield, Ill. 
will make their home in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., while Mr. Mont- 
gomery completes his studies at 
the University of Pennsylvania 
School of Medicine 


MRS, JOHN A. SHOEMAKER, 
whose marriage took place June 
18 at the Church of the Nativity, 
is the former Miss Mary Helen 
Gallagher, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence K. Gallagher of 
this city. Her husband is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson P., 
Shoemaker of Lansing; Mich. 
Following their wedding trip 
through southern Virginia, the 
newlyweds will reside in Sharon, 
Pa. 


The newlyweds ‘ 


ret 


MRS. “ALFRED LUBAUGH 
BERNJER DI ZEREGA 34, 
whose marriage took place June 
18 at Christ Church in North 
Conway, N. H., is the former 
Miss Mary Porter Evans. She is 
the daughter of Mrs. Alice Rob- 
inson Evans of The Birches, In- 


tervale, N. H., and the bride- 
groom is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. L. B. di Zerega of Rock 
Spring Farm, Leesburg, Va. The 
newlyweds will spend their 
honeymoon in Canada and then 
make their home in Leesburg 


a“ oe | 
:. > 
vo ~ 
* . 
7 ; . 
, J 
oa 


; ii. # 


¥ 


Schofield 
MRS. CHARLES WHITE 


STOCKELL was Miss’ Lee 
McNeilly before her marriage 
June 18 at the Westminster Pres- 
byterian Church in Nashville, 
Tenn, The bride is the daughter 
of Mrs. Marion McNeilly of 
Highland Park, Mich., and Mr. 
Stockell is the son of Henry 
Cooper Stockell of Washington. 
Both/ Mrs. Stockell and her hus- 
band; attended Vanderbilt Uni- 
| versity in Nashville 


‘Miss Price to Fete Brides-Elect and Fiances 


iss MARY-STUART MON-'of Miss Julia Ann Halloran and 
TAGUE PRICE wi 


at a cocktail 


a June 25, from 


oe — 


Beta Sigma Phi Bake Sale 


Alpha Beta Chapter ef Beta 
Sigma Ph: will sponsor a bake sale. 
Saturday 9:30 a.m. 
the District 


| entertain her fiance. 
party on Saturday 
5°30 to 8:20 


John Malone. and Miss 


Monica Gaillard! and her fiance 


Jone 


Coal 


> 
5 
és 


Co. 


at 
in honor Tavior Peck. 


— ae ee 


en ee 
— eee ee 


. Are 


Ee 


a pen % 


& 


MRS. JACK SAMUEL DANIELS 

was Miss Ellinor Alberta Mc- 
Kenney before her marriage 
June 18 at Temple Baptist 
Church in Alexandria, Va. She 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard A. McKenney and her 
husband is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harvey Daniels, all of Alex- 
andria. 


ee 


Following the reception 
the couple left for a wedding 
trip to Wildwood, N. J. The 
bridegroom is stationgd with the 
Army at Fort Monmouth, N. J. 


Hessler Studios ’ 
MRS. ROBERT FRANK LOW- 
ERY before her marriage June 
17 at the Chevy Chase Presby- 
terian Church was Miss Barbara 
Frances Limerick of Chevy 
Chase, Md. She is the daughter 
of Mrs. Frances McNeil Limer- 
ick of Chevy Chase, Md.. and 
the bridegroom's parents are 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman C. Marr 
of Kensington, Md. The newly- 
weds will make their home in 

Silver _ Spring, Md. 


WOODWARD & LOTHROp 


1Oeh, Tith F and G Streets Zene 13 
BRANCH STORES—Bethesds, Maryland 


Phene Districe 5300 
The Pentagen, Virginia 


Special Savings Add Importance 
to Cloths and Quilts You ‘’Make”’ 


Handy to be handy with a needle when such special June 
savings as these come along. Beautiful tablecloths . . . de- 
lightful nursery quilts ... are yours for the making and 
giving. 


Stamped linen luncheon cloths in two designs with cut 


work and embroidery. ‘4x72 inches. 


Special a... « 


- => SEER eke cere cee com, Se” eee a Mi agtea.- + 


$4.65 
$5.95 


we - 


‘"o_—e e’@# @ 6 «8 wer oereret ee . 


64x81 inches. Special 


Matching napkins, 18x18 inches, Each, special Oc 


Stamped linen ee sets in three pretty pat- $°) 15 
terns. 5 pieces, special . 


Crib quilts stamped for colorful applique on white cotton. 
Pink and blue patterns and borders. $°).25 


Special . a. 


W&L-—Art Needlework, Eighth Floor 


° 


‘Miss Eleanor Cushman oe 
'To Address Soroptimists ? 


The Grenfell Mission at New- 
/foundland will be discussed by 
Miss Eleanor Cushman, secretary 
of the mission, at the weekly 


‘lunchen meeting of the Soroptimist 
joining her when possible. The ‘Club of Washington Wednesday, | 
Matthews family-four married ie > | June 29, at the Willard Hotel. | 
daughters, one daughter who is a Yt oe ae (| The Wednesday meeting will be 
student, and one son, also married| J a | = "ie @ the last meeting of the’ Soroptimist 
—will join their parents at Ely at 4 Club until September. 
various times during the vacation 


At Mayflower ne | 
The Secretary of the Navy Fran-| 


cis P. Matthews has taken an apart- 
ment at the Mayflower, which he} 
will occupy during the summer. | 
Mrs. Matthews will spend the, 
summer at the Matthews summer 
home at Ely, Minn., the Secretary 


combinations. Some with ‘jack- 
Sizes for miss 


and junior miss in the lot. 9. 


ets or boleros. 


, ee 73% 
. “~Re ; : > 7 
~y _ . ’ 
: > \l aa ae ; 
; ~~ a“ a) $ + ° Bs oe 
a \t } : 3 ae 
ss <2 - ee | 
ie 
, - 
7 
6 
. ry 
he : : 


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Silver Spring 


o 


"SEARS AND SAVE 


Harris & Ewing | 

MRS. GEMIN JUSTIN ZISES 

| is spending her honéymoon in 

| Banff, Canada, before making 

_ her home in Los Angeles, Calif. 
| She is the former Miss Dorothy 
’ 


ROEBUCK AND CO 
_ Rae Littman, daughter of Mr. 
Be Con déleoredy and | Mrs. Morris Littmah of 
ee Aer | Rutherfordtown, N.C. The June 
Ae | wedding took place at the home 
-| of her grandparents, Mr. and | 
‘. Mrs. Adolph Kahn of this city, | 
with a reception following. The 
| bridegroom is a student at the 
| University of Southern Cali- | 
| fornia 


Miss Dickey 
Fiance, Feted 


A GARDEN cocktail party was 
given yesterday by Miss 
Nancy Thomas in honor of Miss 
Lelia Dickey and Charles Claude 
Crossfield 3d, who will be ma-r 
ried Monday, June 27, The party 
was a combined kitchen and bar 
shower, and it was attended by 
over 100 of the younger group. | 
In ithe gathering were Miss Ann 
Harrison and Miss Helen Har- 
rison, Miss Sophie Finkenstaedt 
and Miss Joan Gardner. Also, 
Miss! Margret Thors, Miss Louise 
Hamilton, Miss Marianne Evans 
and Miss Sherry Parker. 

Young marrieds included Mr. 
and | Mrs. Dean Lewis of New 
Haven, Conn., brother-in-law and. 
sister of the bride-elect: Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick Finkenstaedt, Mr. 
and (Mrs. Lewis MacCracken and 


Mr. and Mrs. C. Brewster Chap- 
‘man, 


General and Mrs. Clement 


Say Farewell at Party 


ENERAL and Mrs. William 
Clement gave a cocktail party 
at their house yesterday to say’) 
farewell to their friends. The) 
} general has been assigned a new 
‘Post as commanding general of 
ithe ‘Marine Recruit Depot at San 
Diego. After a vacation at Nan- 
tucket in July, General and Mrs. 
Clement will proceed to California. 


NOW! Fine Budget silverplate 
for picnics—summer cottages 


—or everyday use 


in two beautiful 
new patterns 


/ marathon 
and vision 


95 


26-pc. service 
for 6—chest extra 


REGULAR SIZE Rinso ONLY $¢ 


WHEN YOU BUY LARGE SIZE AT USUAL PRICE! 


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by R. Wallace & Sons! Same 
gleaming mirror-like’ finish— 
same 18% nickel silver base— 
that speaks of more expensive 
silverplate. Buy yours today! 


@ six dinner knives 
@ six dinner forks 
@ six teaspoons 

. six soup spoons 
@ ene suger spoon 
@ one butter knife 


Has 3 times 0 
| Whiter Washing action 
of any other soap! 


Yes, this greatest Rinso of all: ++ lacest winmaph of 
the world-famous Lever Laboratories ::: will do whet 
no other soap can do! It's the new 1950 Rinso with 
Solium that gives you 3 times the whiter washmng 
action of any other soap! This new washing acuon 
of 1990 Rinso makes clothes whiter then new 111 
washable colors brighter shen new...and KEEPS them 
whiter, brighter than any other soap! Even tates 
and grayed clothes become whiter and brighter . . 
even in hardest warer. Don't miss this chance to try 
seul Hiesn end nave desieg tile excising 5¢ Sulel 


Silverwore Dept., Sears Wisconsin and 
Biadensbdurg 


Just in time for the holiday! 
Orvin sportsman’s 
Among the guests at the cocktail 


watch, 4.95 | 
J 
party were the Chief of Naval 


af 
‘ . \ Operati qd M Louise E. 
- Orvin With Stainless Steel Band ......16.95 | Denfeld, the Commandant of the 


Orvin outdoor watch has chrome plated a Corps, Gen. Clifton B 
case. Antimagnetic movement: lumi- Sar ps and Mrs. Cates, Maj. Gen. 
nous hends and numerals. Serviceable Mrs. O. P. Smith, Brig. Gen 
gray strap. mer Mrs. John T. Selden, Admiral 
and| Mrs. Harold R. Stark. . Vice 
Admiral and Mrs. Robert B. 
Carney, oe and Mrs. Leslie Biffle. 

Mr. and rs. Felix de Weldon. 
sii Bladensburg Rd. WE. (2) FRanklin Led r| and Mrs, Edgar Morris. the 
Secretary to the President and 
iMrs. Matthew J. Connelly, and Mr. 
and Mrs. John W. Kenney. 


CHURRY TO YOUR STORE:.; 

OFFER GOOD ONLY WHILE 
__ PRESENT. SUPPLY. LASTS 
ee 


Wise. Ave. at Albomarie (16) ORdway 1/22 , 
7 


~- 


When Drama Returns to D. C. 


In Itself. 


T LONG last! A theatrical first night smack 
in the center of metropolitan Washington. 
‘There'll be a new angle, too, at the Washington 
‘Theater Festival opening Sunday. The powers 
that be in the theater’s direction have invited as 
special guests some 11 women of achievement. 
They'll he seated in a special section with their 
own guests. | 
- Like to know who they are? | 
_ KATHERINE LENROOT, now with the Federal 
Security Agency; 
" MRS. ESTES KEFAUVER, wife of the junior 
Tennessee Senator and recent first prize winner 
in the District art competition: 
- MARY BETHUNE, famous Negro educator; 
- MUNA LEE, poetess and author of “Sea 
Changes”: 
_ MRS. RAYMOND CLAPPER, Senininsliate 
. DR. CATHERINE WAY, atomic scientist, now 
with the Atomic and Physics division of the Bu- 
reau of Standards: 
NELLIE TALOE ROSS, Director of the 
‘United States Mint: 
' MRS. JULIA WEST HAMILTON, shire edu- 
cator and president of the Phyllis Wheatley 
YWCA; 
* LEE WALSH, director of advertising at Gar- 
finckel’s; 
- REPRESENTATIVE EDITH NOURSE ROG- 
ERS; | 
- MARGARET LANDON, author of “Anna and 
the King of Siam.” 
_ Oh, yes, the play is “Amphitryon 38,” starring 
Elizabeth Bergner. The place is at Meridian Hill 
where, in cooperation with the National: Park 
Service, the Washington Theater Festival has dug 
into a picturesque site. 
2 a) 
-URING this past (we hope) desperately torrid 
spell the pleasant thing to think about—in 
fact the only thing to think about—was ICE—tons 
and tons of crystal clear ice stretching to a dis- 
tant horizon; stacks and stacks of ice cubes tin- 
kling in tall glasses; bowls and bowls of crushed 
ice used to cradle seafood, melons—or in ice packs 
to smooth the ravaged brow! | 
_ Brooding thus deliciously, we thumbed through 
a booklet entitled “ABC About ICE” with an in- 
structivé subheading “and how it helps keep 


| The first Night Audience 
Will Be an Attraction 


By Mary Van Rensselaer Thayer 


Guest List Shows 


America the healthiest Nation in the world.” | 
Thus effortiessly equipped we ferreted the fol- | 


lowing ... the Egyptians first put ice to a prac- 
tical use by filling shallow, porous pans with 
water in the early evening, skimming off thin 


layers of ice in early morning (this comes as | 


considerable surprisé to anyone who's sweltered 
around Egypt!). 


Naturally, the smart. old Greeks weren't far 
behind—and they did it the easy way. Using the 
principle of rapid evaporation of water through 
porous vessels they ranged rows of jars on the 
reofteps and during the night kept slaves sprin- 
kling them! 

That inveterate tourist, Marco Polo, next 
stepped into the icy picture, bringing back from 
an Asian jaunt the secret of how to make both 
water and milk ices. This was back in the 
thirteenth century and for the next 500 years 
most people were happy enough to eat their meats 
very high indeed. 

Just: 99 years ago, Dr. John Gorrie of, believe 
it or not, Apalachicola, Florida, invented both 
the mechanical method of making ice—and air- 
cooling. The Doc, helping cure malaria and yel- 
low fever, discovered human temperatures went 
down with cool room temperature. He rigged 
up a funnel, placed blocks of ice in front of it, 
piped the cool air into sick rooms. Since he 
needed, dawn in toasty Florida, plenty of ice, he 
figured how to make it. He was backed by a 
Boston friend, the machine was patented May 
6, 1851. His one difficulty, however, was extract- 
ing the ice from the containers. Stumped, for 
the time, his pal withdrew all capital, and the 
poor doctor died believing himself a failure. : 


Later, as such things almost always go, a grate- 
ful public recognized his valuable contribution— 
raised a monument at Apalachicola and placed 
his statue, as one of two great Floridians, in the 
National Capitol! 


Right here in Washington there's a school for 
icemen—which, alas, is only open from October 
to summer. It's a two-weeks course, costs $125, 
and is approved by the GI education bill.. The 
course is run by the National Ice Marketing In- 
stitute and teaches everything from marketing 
to the more intimate facts about an ice cube! 


ings 


on yy lead 


ingers 


ME AND MRS. HENRY P May, to Richard L. Collins of Wash-| gagement of their daughter, Alper | 


of Washington announce the ington. 
engagement of Mrs. Field’s daugh- 


Claudia, to: Lieut. John Neil 


Miss Poehler attended schools;Munkres, USAF, s@n of Mr. and 


hmond Knowl- in Indiana and Washington. Mr.' Mrs. A. Neil Munkres of Weeping 
> ge meg ‘eden Set jr. Collins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Water, Nebr. 


The bride-elect is the daughter of L. Collins of Gulfport, Fla. at- 


Miss Vestal attended the Bish-. 


ton of Dominica tended the University of Maryland op’s School in La Jolla, Galif., and 
inte Britt West wath and she 2nd George Washington Univer-'was graduated from the National. 


isthe granddaughter of Mr. and Sity- 


‘Mrs.George W. Knowlton of Sal- Tha da—Thompson 


ters~ Point, South Dartmouth, 
‘Mass., and Paget, Bermuda, and of 


‘Cathedral School in Washington. 
She received her degree from) 
\Pembroke College at Brown Uni- 


Maj. and Mrs. Herbert W. Thada|versity. She is a direct descendant 
- Mis: Robb White of Thomasville, of Washington, announce the en- of Capt. Cornelius Ten Broeck, one} 


Ga. gagement of their daughter, Jane'of the original members of the) 
“Miss Knowlton went to the Girls Alice, to William C. Thompson, Order of the Cincinnati. 


1 in Chicago. the Pot- son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Thomp-, 
coer dma ho aie: and the son, also of Washington, formerly the University of Nebraska and is! 


Mr. ‘of Plainview, Tex. 


Garland School of Boston. 
Robb is the son of James Hampden 


Robb and the late Mrs. Robb of Samsel—Daniels 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Samsel Air 


_ Beverly, Mass. He was graduated 


Lieutenant Munkres 


. a graduate of the United States 
Military Academy, class of ’46. He 
is now stationed with the 315th 
Division 


from. Groton, he served in the of Bean Station, Tenn., announce !tazuki, Air Force Base. 
United States Army Air Force, and the engagement of their daughter, 


he is now at Harvard. 


Society. 


shortly at York Harbor, Me. 


Poehler—Collins 


Mrs. Esther M. Poehler of Mc-| Maj. 


Lean, Va., announces the engage- USA, and Mrs. 


His clubs Margaret, to Samuel D. Daniels of 
are the Hasty Pudding, the Procel- Washington, son of Mr. and Mrs.'{ 
lian, the Speakers and the Useless David Daniels of Chicago. 

‘ wedding will take place September [ 
The marriage will take place 17 in the New York Avenue Pres-'{ 
byterian Church. 


V estal—Munkres 
Van Rensselaer 


ACKERMAN'S 
FINER 
REWEAVING 


1730 Conn. Ave. N.W. 
NO. 2716 
Five Day Service 


Vestal ) 


Vestal, now inf 


ment of her daughter, Virginia Fukuka, Japan, announce the emit 


...with these 


te r @nrnant na 
‘ ° 7 ° 


Coty fracrances 


Dusting Powder $1.50 
Bath Saits 1.50 
Toilet Woter 

Sochet 

Talc 


All prices plus tox PERFUMED BATH me eUrattes 


Car re ded end CarPerr ehs- 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Friday. June 24, 1949 


attended! 


Headquarters in 


F Street 


Shirlington 


llef£' vee See 
e e s Retheaca 


Conn. Ave 


hate Fanilor 


introduces the new and wlerly different 
pe make-up pencil 


Go 


he only eye pencil 
with the perpetual point 


. for the most exquisite accenting of the 
leye .. . Elizabeth Arden introduces EYE- 
| STOPPER | . the perfect make-up pencil to make 
| eyes seem wider, brighter, lovelier, by the deli- 
| cate underlining of eyebrows and eyelashes. 


_EYE-STOPPER ... 
|EYE-STOPPER ... carries its own built-in 


| sharpener! Beautiful as a jeweler's piece . . 

| with its golden-banded case! 

| Start using EYE-STOPPER today for perfect eye 
| make-up. Crayons come in Black, Dark Brown, 


| Brown, Blue. EYE-STOPPER in case 


Now. 


maintains a pin-point tip! 


| 2 refills 75¢. Plus 20% tax 


| ]elleff’s—Our exclusive Elizabeth Arden Section has 
| everything you need in Summer toiletries from refresh- 
_ ing Flower, Mist to sum preparations, Capable Arden 
| salespeople to advise you! Street Floor and all Jelleff 
| Branch Stores! 


ellef£ 


Look, that | love-of-a-fabric 


Jersanese (Celanese Rayon) 


thal pet of -a style, 


The Peignoir 
Regularly $8.95 


now, 


v\ $ 5 95 


white 
maize 
aqua 

melon 


:; ihe orie- 
inal [AY ANN robe 
that sold earlier for 


dollars more! 


Floor-length and fully 
cut it may be either 
a peignoir or the sash 
may be tied all 
around... 


Not! Bet 1a s lik 


sank For araceful 


lines, for comfort. for 


packability. 
Sizes 10 to 20. 


letfs .Negligees—~ 
Fourth Floor— 
F Street. 


ray , , wa 
onirinctor OuVver 
c . - ’ " 
OprTing, petnesaa, 


4473 Conn. Ave. 


Marriage Announcements 


Mr. and Mrs. John E. Skilling Tiger Inn. He served in the Navy: 
He is the grand-. 
daughter, Nancy, to Bates Little- son of Mrs. Bates Warren and the; 
hales, son of Mr. and Mrs. Reber late Mr. Warren and of the late 
Littlehales, on November 27, 1948, Dt. and Mrs. George W. Little- 


announce the marriage of their during the war. 


in the Methodist Church in Bethes- nated. 


da, Md. 
Mrs. Littlehales is a graduate of: noun 


of the Junior League. 
hales was graduated from St. Al- Del. 


versity where he was a member of Camp Hill, Pa. 


—— ee ee 


a eee 
TTT? 
: QEEUOSUEOOUOUEOECUOUEDOUSUDOROUDUROOUEREOUGUOORUOUOROUOUONOOUOOORODODE: 
- 


ARLINGTON WOMEN 


A (tention! 
W ynn’s 


SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE 


DON’T WAIT! 


You can save NOW while selections 


= 
are complete. Two convenient loca- 
tions to serve you. 


WYNN’S 


Feminine Apparel Shops 


os 
Mr. and Mrs. Gould Shaw an-' 
the marriage of Mr. Shaw's 
Holton Arms School and attended daughter, Yolande Agassiz Shaw, 
Vassar College. She is a member to Harold Clark Whitcomb, jr., on 
Mr. Little- January 22, 1949, at Wilmington, 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitcomb are 
ban’s School and Princeton Uni- residing at 337 North 25th st., 


: 
: 
: 
) Has Just Begun ... 
| 


aces Se etme 


ULL 3 A 


3134 Nilson Bivd. Cor. Glebe Rd. & Lee Highway 


(Country Club dieanenes 


elleffs 


* Silver § hin * Shirlington * 4473 Conn. Ave. 
pring g 


Children’s Shops 


Little Miss 


Sunsuit Special! 


Regularly 4.95 


e240 


Fine quality cotton 
broadcloth 
shades of 


in sott 


Blue 
Orchid 


Green or 
Pink 


_ __——- Ruffled and 


~~ bowed in 


\ darker Pay: 


er Spring —447 3 Connecticut Ave. 


» 


Here’s where you 


elleff’ 


Save Money! 


Sc! Cait C e 


Spring shoés ...our best! Broken sizes but in the 
total collection sizes 4 to 9 and AAAA to B widths. 


Experienced salespeople to serve you in our 


C-O-O-L Shoe Salon, Fourth Floor. 


DARK 
LEATHER 


‘Mademoiselle 


Shoes by Carlisle 


(89 


Patent Leathers ’ 


Peacock 08 c 


Shoes 
0 85 


‘Were $14.95 to $18.95 
Leathers | 


Types 


Sandals 
Slings 
Pumps 
Closed toes 
Open toes 


Were $14.95 to $18.95 


M. Wolf 


Footwear 
Were 418.95 to $22.95 


Heels 


High 
Medium 
Flats 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


IT’S NEW The Household Scrapbook 
; 
| . . . A pair of tweezer wikl sen the stubborn 


Knot in the child's shoe- 


By Lucia Brown 


Flexible and easy to arrange in a dozen different ways is a modern peelin- 
floor screen made of lightweight wood slats. It looks a little like one... 
of those hanging bamboo porch screens, standing on it’s side—much 
heavier and swankier looking. though 

Suggested uses for this screen of many shapes: As a partition he- 
tween rooms in small homes, as a shield for a nursery crib, to stand in 
front of the door leading to the kitchen. to hide a space heater or 
radiator, to serve as a striking decorative note that will give anv room 
a “lift.” 


’ 
it i< 1 between vour tront teeth while 


to your eves 


er > mera 

all mie 

<P) LITTLE CALEDONIA 
a Se 


Let your mouth 
Slay Sligi 


j . . SIMS - 
Alwavs PAXamMmine ce a5 vou open the new hak nr nox 


im ne reriain trAere are | 7. Boxed raisins and currents 
should be watched carefu 


a 


Watching his wife struggle to 
shake out a dust mop properly in 
an apartment inspired an ingenious 
invention by a Washingtonian. 
John O. Barkl of 2221 42d st. nw. 
has patented and recently placed 
on the market a plastic bag on a 
plated-steel rim which may: be at- 
tached to any door knob. The mop 
can then be inserted through the 
overlapping opening at the front 
of the bag and thoroughly shaken 
and cleaned without raising dust 
in the room. 


one ' a 


, 


S Se . —". 
~ s — 3 ~ arr 
7 ~ <-> 
» x a 
A “We 
— , ~ « 
- Se ™~ 
‘~ 
cS ae 
: _) 
4 
s ” 


LE 
821 NINETEENTH N.W. ; 


Air Conditioned 


SALE 


WAT SOUND 0 oc os ela e b0 QMEERS 


No need to make a trip to the 
porch—if you live in a house—or 
to the window of your apartment. 
No chance of having the dust blow 
right back into the room you've 
just cleaned, or worse still, into 
your neighbor's apartment! The 
simple, sanitary gadget saves time, 
trouble and possible fines for vio- 
lating city laws. 


CANDY MINTS 


Wade Fresh Deil, 
lor every special acrasian’ 


Flat and rosebud mints in white, 


: . reen, . d ] : : 
Fresh upholstery is easy to in- . pink and yellow, 80¢ lb 


stall on a dining or kitchen chair 
if you have one of the new kits 
of plastic material. 


PERFECT FOR PARTITIONING off 4 room, shielding a door- 
way, or just adding decorative charm to your home is a new 
flexible screen of wood slats 


Wedding bell mints in white, 


80c ib. 


PRINTS ....... BEACH COATS 


DUIT Dc oo ceo 0 oh «5 DINGERIE 


ALL SALES FINAL 


Mail Orders Filled RE public 7021 Open 9:50 'td 6 


fashionsitOR JHE TIME OF YOUR. LIFE 


Today and Tomorrow 


$16.95 to $45 Values 


‘5 = 510 


MILLINERY. | 
First Floor 
Erlebacher 


W.2 shington, D.C 


——1210 F Street N.W. 


The Family | 
Scrapbook 


By Dr. Ernest G. Osborne 


Using Chjldren’s Records 

In the last few vears there has 
been a flood of good records for 
children put on the market. One 
of the most popular monthly 


“clubs” has distributed hundreds 


of thousands of records made es- 
pecially for youngsters. 

When you and I were children 
our parents relied largely on 
‘books, paper dolls, drawing, and 
a few other types of activity for 
the quiet times that all children 
should have. Today 
play their part. 

Though at first some parent 
supervision in using records may 
be wise, before long even young 
children can be ‘relied on to play 
their own.. Nor will they find 
their favorites only among the | 
records made especially for them. | 


Mature musical selections of great | 


: 
composers are often high on the' 


child's lists of best-liked records. | 

In some families selected rec-| 
ords are used at rest time with 
good effect. Children who resist} 
naps will lie quietly listening to| 
some of their favorite music. Rec-| 
iords are also useful on rainy days. 
+ One art feacher I know has used 
,certain musical selections to help 
children develop their art work. | 
She puts on a record and sug-| 
gests that the youngsters use their! 
crayons or paint brushes in 
rhythm with the music. Surpris-| 
‘ing results are obtained. 


(Copyright. 1949. byw United Feature 
Syndicate, Inc.) 


records can 


BRS ee NS TN CR RR OTT A! 


a 
BS 


PEEL TUB CHAIR © 


Feather Weight and Reinproof © 


$4159 
pe | ee, 
WEXIGAM SU@P 


| : 1216 Gennecticut Ave. ¥.W. 


= — Entrance Around ‘Corner on 


For distinguished news. reporting, listen to Edward R. 
Murrow at 7:45 p. m. on WTOP, The Post station 


a 


Jefferson Place 
DAILY $:30-6 
SAT 10-5 


a Re ER aaa 


= 


_ Pretty Pinafore 


It’s crisp and cool, and a charming 
combination of fine broadcloth 
and eyelet embroidery. It has 
that *Liliputian Bazaar touch 
and the careful sewing that is so 
important for summer washables. 
Bee it on her, you'll love it. 
Pink, blue or yellow. 
Allsizes3 to 6. . 5.00 


Mail ond phone orders Filled : 
Postege prepoid everywhere in the U. S. 


BEST & CO. 


Emerson 7700 
BUS STOP AT THE DOOR 


~ COMPLETELY AIR CQNDITIONED—COOL SHOPPING 


_ with; me 


Card Playing Is Incidental 


It’s Yakkity-Yak When 
The Bridge Club Meets 


HE dominating influence of 

community life is the Ladies’ 
Bridge Club. We have one in our 
community. The lady who lives 
is a member. Every 
time! it is her turn to entertain, 
I am asked what she should 
serve. I invariably say cake, ice 
cream and coffee. That's the 
only|thing I can think of except 
hamburgers. Then she tells me 
what she is going to serve, which 
is usually some concoction of 
Salad ana nut bread. 

Last time the bridge club met 
at ofr house I had a headache 
and gtayed home. I learned how 
these clubs operate. Card play- 
ing js incidental. 

The conversation started 
about someone being late. It 
was ‘the same person who was 
late ‘all the time. Her husband 
was the kind who would neither 
do the dishes or put the children 
to ted. He was the only un- 
trained male in the group and 
the ladies really waxed furious 
about him. : 

Imagine the lazy galoot, who 
sat with his feet on a desk all 


| day, | refusing to help around the 


house at night. What a snap he 
had icompared to cooking, clean- 
ing ‘house and changing pants 


all day long. Everyone agreed 
| that! something should be done 


| and ias a starter, all agreed that 
| they: would quit speaking to him. 


One lady happened to mention 


that} her husband had lost $3 


playing poker the week before. 
This brought the men’s poker 
club into full discussion. 
ladies wanted to put a stop to it 
immediately. It was finally 
agreed to let it continue, but 
only if they stopped playing 
promptly at midnight and the 


limit was cut to 5 cents. 


_ the | neighborhood. 


Baby sitters were taken up | 


next. 


local talent by persons outside 
Everyone 


Three , 


It seemed that there had | 
| been some “muscling in” on the 


ieee seal i Made-to-Order 


Colorful Cottons ‘i 


mints: 
Hand-decorated. $1.00 Ib. 


hoi 
—— Lily-of-the-Valley, $1.25 Ib. 


Mixed 
Nuts 


$].50 
l Ib. 


Colorful cottons—in deep new | 
“decorator” shades—are the kev 
to making every room in the 
home a place of color and beau- 
ty. The new trend in colors 
such as chartreuse, wine, gray, 


~-e 


ae 


agreed that these guilty persons 
“had their nerve.” The club 
chairman was delegated to tell 
these interlopers to “cease and 
desist” and the vice chairman 
was directed to ask the sitters 
not to accept jobs out of the 
neighborhood. Television § set 


deép green, reaches into every AY prom oam 
nook and crranny—from the 
table cloths in vour dining 
room, the towels in your bath- 
, room, to the sheets on your 
beds. These new shades bring pS 
life. to walls, accent rugs, add - ee oF 
| heauty to yeur table. te = ‘eg’ She 


er Bene Si 
ae a Pe eg See +. 


Silver Spring Bethesda 


Arlington 


(Lee Highway and N. Jefferson St.) 


engin — NE oe 


Store Hours: 10 A. M. te 6 P. M. 


SES Peet Sy RAL Sey “hy 

a. as $% § } 
te = 23 
> + 33 4 


oe, ; 

$ty,.* : : titan s 
ise 2 RS As tes See eeen ns 
BRE metae, 


+ 


*> 
Sis 
a8 


> th ll, Milne Rn teen lp Mert POLLY ty ee ee ow 


owners agreed not to use them | 


as added inducements. 


A uniform hourly rate was also 
agreed on. This rate lasted until 
the fellowing Saturday, when 
competition got keen, and two of 
the ladies cheated—not inten- 
tionally, ef ceurse. 

One of the “players” apparent- 
ly had a new hairdo. It was one 
of those new-fangled short hair- 
cuts. All the girls screamed and 
raved for 10 minutes about it. 
And everyone said they were go- 
ing to get one just like it right 
away. And the cost was only 


$15, which included washing and | 


setting. It was obvious that the 
husbands were about to be poor- 
er by $120.00. 

‘I also learned that some of the 
neighborhood children were get- 
ting out of hand. The word 
“brat” was used several times. 
It wasn't anyone’s children who 
was there, of course. It was the 
other people’s children. Some of 
them had no training at all. 

And so it went. Only one of 
these women liked the new man- 
ager of the Supermarket and five 
thought the new baby shop 
didn’t have a thing. The bakery 
was beginning to slip on the 
quality of its cakes and no one 
thought they’d like the new 


imports from Italy, our Rattia Straws 
are hand-crocheted ready to wear 


with all your summer fare and only 7,95 


Have either the cool ankle strap sandal shown or a vamp strap sandal, gaily 


embroidered for sizes 544 to 814 narrow, 4 to 9 medium. 
PARKING IS FREE AT YOUR NEW STORE - 4250 CONNECTICUT AVENUE « ORDWAY 6700 
quam Store Hours. Monday Through Saturday, 9:30 to 5 30 


Pk Hanis 2 Lo. 


JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS SINCE tere 
P AND ELEVENTH STREET. N. Ww. 


neighbors. “Did you see how she | 


had that bey dressed?” 
The party ended for me when 


some one asked if the lady down | 
the street merely needed a gir- | 


die or did anyone Know for sure | 


if we- were to have a new arrival 
in thee community. I slammed 
the door, took a sedative and 
went to sleep. 


I don’t think they ever did | 


play cards. Tom Cullen. 


LUNCHEON 
COCKTAILS 
DINNER & 
SUPPER 
DANCING 


PRESENTS 
Johnny Shaw 
and his orchestra 
A Sidney Presentation 


The Mayflower 


Diamonds and Gold 


Levely set of bracelet and earrings of fourteen 
karat gold centered with exquisite diamonds. 


Bracelet 675. 


(inel, tax) 


Exclusive Agents for Stief Silver in Washington 


2 


qummmmmmR. HARRIS & CO. © Jewslers and Silversmiths Since 1874 © F & |) THammmmmmmms 


————— —— 


© 5,’ ; 


Starching Collars and Cuffs 


When starching lace collars and cuffs, and lace doilies, here's a 
good rule to remember: First measure your piece carefully, sane 
an accurate tracing of it on a heavy white paper. Then in lukewar 
light suds, wash. Rinse three or four times. No matter how Soiled, 


if you use several light soapings, lace will come white under 


treatment. Starch to consistency desired and dry on the paper. 


you prefer a creamy color give a final rinse in weak tea and 
solution; or for a warmer color, u use weak coffee. 


——— > — 


‘It’s Easy, If You Know How: 


age 


es 


7 


9 (HOREHAM 


* 


Moonlight Dining, 
Starlight Dancing 


Starlit outdoor setting for din- 
ing and dancing. BARNEE 
conducts the Barnee-Lowe Or- 
chestra for dancing from 7:45 
p.m. to 12:30. Entertaining 
Floor Show at 10 p.m. DINING 
from 7 p.m. to 12:30. Dinner, 
$2.50—Steak Dinner, $3. Sup- 
per Cover, 50c——Saturday, $)). 


Reservations—AD. 0700. 


Service will be transferred to 
the aircooled Rlue Room in 
inclement weather. 


CONNECTICUT AT CALVERT 


CLEARANCE! 


ENTIRE SUMMER STOCK 


_of 


COATS AND SUITS 
25% OFF 


REGULAR PRICES 


ALL SALES FINAL 
NO C.0.D. 


‘ 


Ne 


INCORPORATED 


WINCHESTER 
VIRGINIA 


BETHESDA 


MARYLAND = 


‘the waitress. 


Then, turning to her companion, she said defiantly, 


take the pie—diet or no diet!” 


Youll Never Be Happy ona Diet 
Dwelling on Sweets of the Past 


By Ida Jean Kain 


“And for dessert I'll take strawberry cream pie.” 
mee = lcave this order firmly, 


A plump customer 


almost as if she expected an argument from 


“I'm going to 


The friend of course knew al! about the diet—how could she help 


it? She knew our overweight had 
been struggling to reduce for 
months—4doctor's orders. So trying 
to help her stay on the straight- 
and-pastryless path, she ventured: 
“Wouldn't it help you to forget 
desserts and to stop craving them 
if you didn’t eat them?” 


“No, it would not!” the dieter 
exploded. “That dietitian’s theory 
is all wrong,” she continued. “I 
crave them all the time... it must 
be something in my system. I nev- 
er forget them for a minute , 
we always had desserts at 
house, such wonderful 

’ At this point a dreamy look) 
came over her face, and she went 
on nostalgically ... 


| “Why I remember every Sunday 
we had homemade ice cream, some- 
ee reg fresh strawberry ice cream. 
Ae And mother used to bake the best 
BAe *|Dutch apple pies—we could have 
seconds. And | can see the candy 
dish on the mantel—it was always 
kept full, And the cookie jar in 
the kitchen—-filled with freshly 
baked cookies ... to this day I 
remember how good they smelled! 
| “Diet or no diet, 4'll never get 
over craving desserts and sweets,” 

she finished with a deep sigh. 
Well, in that frame of mind 
never will. Subconsciously she 
doesn't want to stop craving 
desserts. So our overweight will 
be tempted by‘ every cream pie. 
candy dish, cookie. jar and ri h 
dessert the rest. of her natural 
life. That's the way she wants it. 
What's more, she feels put upoa 


ss 


. she 


PE TUNI All 


WEN ce NEN Se ot oa AROS Soxien Sao x? aognooane. ee 


The hems of ancient 
Sheets are spiffy 

For making spice bags 
In a jiffy! 


: Right, Petunia—so save’ em! © 
: Cut off a short length of the 
4 hem, insert herbs or spices, 
> and knot both ends. 
~ cinch to remove 
* cooking's done. 


It's a ss 


Rishop-Bracken 


@ Also at Spring Valley 


with complete aplomb, Is just 
long enough 

to keep you warm when cool 
breezes blow, yet short 

enough for comfort en route. 
Of aa light-weight wool, 
Ours alone in Washington and 
so moderately priced, 

29.95. 

Greenbrier Sports Shop, 


Fourth Floor. 


QO ur Little Summer (Go-Coat 


Perfect traveller—this little topper goes over everything 


our) 
desserts 


© for it. 
S tuat they no lo ger have a desire 
= to overeat, and to their complete 
¢. amazement, 
© rich desserts, 


oe} 


when the | 


| meal. 


onion 


a eke 


or until 
stantly. 
until 


thickened, stirring con- 
Add to gelatin, and stir 
dissolved: then 
juice, 
chill. When slightly thickened, 
fold in cream. Turn into loaf mold: 
chill until firm. Unmold on serving 
platter, garnish with watercress 
and serve with mayonnaise. Serves 
six persons. 
Usually when 
. champagne 


served with 
is used as 


a 
it 


| comes from the bottle. It is poured 
' as soon as the first course is served 


| 


at being deprived of what she 
considers her just desserts. 

Her | psychology couldn't be 
worse. ‘Rut it is the attitude many 
overweijghts take. Under doctor's 
orders |they diet and reduce, but 
they are completely miserable 
about the whole thing. 

It need not be that way! 

If you have to lose weight, make 
up your mind right off that it will 
just be a different way ef eating. 
Then you can appreciate the 
science of nutrition that lets you 
have the best fare in the world 
and still turn excess pounds back 
into energy. 

Take the viewpoint that: a neat 
and tidy waist is much more to 
your liking than a piece of pie. 


“|Think along that line and desserts 
4 begin to lose their power over you. 


* You can break a food habit the 
‘same 4s you can break any other 


ie habit—if you really want to. 


You ‘don’t have to take my word 
Hundreds of reducers \-rite 


they no longer crave 


(Conyright, 1949, King Feature 
yndicate, inc.) 
Pineapple Ambrosia 
Pineapple Ambrosia is a quickly 
made and delectable dessert. Peel. 


core, and cube a fresh pineapple: 
~ sprinkle with sugar and mix well. 
- Just before serving place a layer 
» of the pineapple 
: sauce idishes or sherbet glasses, 
© then sprinkle with coconut and re- 


in individual 


% peat the layers once more. Garnish 
¢ with fresh or maraschino cherries. 


ie 


Champagne is best when served in 
very thin stem glasses. Thin glasses 
are best because they do not raise 
the temperature of the champagne 
as much as the thicker ones do 
Champagne glasses have a wider 
top than regular wine glasses. 
There are on the market glasses 
for champagne which have hoHow 
stems to set off the sparkling bev- 
erage to the very best advantage 


CHAMPAGNE PUNCH—Serves 30 
2 cups diced fresh pineapple 
Juice of 3 large oranges 

Juice of 1 lemon 

1 cup whole strawberries 

1 pint brandy 

] pint Curacao 

1 pint Tokay 

8 bottles carbonated water 


IN BETHES 


CEADIES\ JF | 
She 


| Q ( COTTON 
14) 


| 


7456 Wisconsin Avenue 


Opposite Sas 


Formerly 


Sizes 9 to 15—10 


2 FOR $4.19 
Nationally 


Black Only. 


Known 
Sizes 


Formerly $14.00 
WT hite 
Sizes 32 to 38 


——— Ample 


add ham, 
vinegar and parsley: 


$14.95-$12.95-$10.95 
4LL FAMOUS BRANDS 


Rayon Tailored 
Slips & Half Slips 


Formerly $4.50-$3.98 


BEACH JACKETS ¢ 


Terry Cloth 


Open Friday ‘Til 3 


Parking Space 


From Page I 


1 large piece of ice 
3 quarts champagne 


Place the first eight ingredients 
in a 3-gallon crock and let stand 
several hours. Add a large chunk 
of ice and the champagne just be- 
fore serving time. 


Can you tell me where I can 
obtain patterns for piece work 
quilts? WwW. M., 

The McCall Needlework Pat- 
tern Book has patterns for two 
guilts, the Dresden plate and fan 
quilt. Both - patterns contain 
transfers for the quilting designs 
also. 


o-_—- 


Can you tell me whether there 
is some way in which I can wash 
black cotton and not have it 
come out covered with lint? 


2. @ 

Tie the cotton securely in a 
much-washed and therefore lint- 
free pillow slip before placing it 
in the washer. Or wash it sepa- 
rately in fresh wash water. I sus- 
pect the lint comes Yrom washing 
the black fabric in water in which 
light fabrics have been first 
washed. 


DA... {TS 


DRESSES 


to IR 


Brands, 
32 to 42. 


White and 


She 


EACH 


OLiver 8373 
West Highway 


in Rear of 


tt LT 


Do moths attack shede? I 
have both a suede coat and a 
suede dress and am wondering 
whether I should store them or 
pack them away the same as 
other winter clothing. 

G. H. W. 

Moths do not attack leather, but 
it would be wise to place the arti- 
cles in cold storage, where they 
would not be subjected to intense 
summer heat. High temperatures 
could remove the oils from suede 
and cause it to be less soft and 
pliable. 


Inquiries and contributions to 
Ask Anne column must be itn 
written We regret that 
time does not permit handling 
them by telephone. Address 
questions to Anne, Room 408, 
The Washington Post, Washing- 
ton 4, D.C. 


form. 


ee i il i i i lll lll ~— 


eS 


THE 


WASHINGTON 
Friday, June 24, 1949 


pee 5C 


POST 


neocivccceed Neh Evenings, until 9 


Colortul 


“Why, of COURSE she'll speak 
to you... she knows you got 


7” 


your allowance today! 
y 


. Mondays until 6 P. M. 


Summer 


DRESSES 


COTTONS ® SHEERS 


RAYON CREPES 


Specially Priced 


prints, pastels, dark 


shades, dressy sheers, one and 


two-piece styles, sunbacks., 


Sizes for Juniors and Misses. 


A -good selection at decided savings. 


Alans. 


3403 Connecticut Ave. 


-" 
tli li tll tll 


SUSIE Q. SMITH: 


rere 


= _ i 
sz 4 ll i i 


il ll id —_——_—--- ™ 


_—_ __" _— lies 


i 


=" 


ad ll le il i i i 


Bai. suits . 


@ Also at Spring Valley 


. » Mardi-Gras gay. 


Left—the 


Center—the 


Princess stvle 


sizes 


12-42 


suit 


two piece 


So flattering to all sizes and sizes 10-16 


Right—the dressmaker style 

sizes 16-42 
All in Celanese Prospector 
rayon in wonderful holiday 
shades—sea coral, aqua, grey, 
blue, miaize, black, green and 


white. All at one price, 


10.95. 


figures, and exclusively ours 


in Washington. 


Greenbrier Sports Shop, 


Fourth Floor. 


“Res U. @. Pat. Office 


i 
f 


A 


Julius Garfinckel & Co. 


F Street at Fourteenth 


Julius Garfinckel & Co. 


F Street at Fourteenth 


— 


6C THE Wa ag lg T 0 3 POST Garden Party Set DAR Chapter 


% : . By Epiphany Church — To End Season 
On the Capital Club Front... he Bptany Church Home, 1221 Th Francis Walla Chapter 


Massachusetts ave. on Saturday. Daughters of the American Revo- 
June 25, from 3:30 to 6:30 p. m 


Mrs. William L. Katzenberger:!secretary: Miss Margaret F.@Hook. Mrs. Charles P. Ryland, historian. 
president of the Washingtonitreasurer: Mrs. Mae Kinney, regis- Mrs. Henry W. Zeh, librarian. 


Alumnae Chapter of Alpha Omi-trar: and Dr. E. Josephine Ben- Docc yt ype te a _ a Dine oy ee Pperange oman os et ee 
eron Pi, accompanied by Mrs. Wil- nett. historian. r ; n rs. swe ent jn the yard, also a gift table. at 2 p. m. at the home of Mrs. ( (il 
= 


lution, will hold its final meeting 


diam D. Fizer and Miss Marcelle Committee chairmen are Mrs. and Miss Lucille Twogood was | semes Albert Dowte, 3 Went Sem) 


O'Shaughnessy, will leave today william S. Sinnott. auditing: Miss Clected delegate. and cake for sale. A silver offer- roe ave. Alexandria. Guest 
for Swampscott, Mass., to attend Carolina Sudler | ing for the benefit of the home speaker will hé Mrs. Charles Car- 


by-laws and At Lenape Village will b 
; . 4 ill be taken. The public is in- 
the convention of Alpha Omicron staging rules; Mrs. Mae Kinney, Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Matthews vited | nou Hate, part Wessueer genera) 


' we he DAR. 
Pi International Sorority. colonial and genealogical records; are enjoying a stay at Lenape Vil- | agate 
Also attending the convention Mrs. William M. Carrigan. banquet lage. the lakeside resort on Fair- — ~ oe ——— -~ ——-- —— - — — ' 


from the University of Maryland and entertainment: Mrs. Elmer view Lake, Tafton, Pa. 


Se 


chapter will be Miss Carter Pres- Curry, finance: Mrs. N. Adams- 
cott, Miss Ann Boswell, Miss Do- Beede, flags and banner service: 


jores-Hancock. Miss Alic@~Bolden “TS: George E. McCann, flowers ‘ 3 0 | 
. d ; * . 5 ol > ‘ : 
and Miss Beverly Huddleston. ("6 Visiting: Mrs. Estelle Price,| ; > Se : D a ( r 
. t ° 3 ® 


_ hostesses: Mrs. Charles J. Painter. - 
The convention, which will be membership; Dr. 


: E. Josephine © 
in session from June 26 to July 2, Bennett, memorials and _ historic 


will be attended by delegates from SP0ts; Mrs. Roy Bowker, national °, ‘i LS r : 7 
the 49 active and 84 alumnae re gl ag patriotic education; LAINE ae LP: fe 
chapters of the sorority from the ao] ore ra lglg cay  wecnaggen : tebe | Lak éi8 
United States and Canada, |Grove, printing: Mrs. Robert M. _ : — Ss Cee | 
. : azo, program; Mrs. Lee Pen-| ©. >) oe > al : 
Hospital Guild / nington, radio; Mrs. David Cald-| ay ery 
Chairmen Named well, rehabilitation and hospitali-. > | § i : 
: zation; Mrs. Ralph S. Pend | Soe PGES | 
Mrs. William Bowie. president r —_—. | 


“of the Prince Georges General pj ae SCOP! we 3% CLASSIC STYLES! CASUAL STYLES! 
Hospital Guild, afinounced the fol- IeCall DAR Chapter _ * Pinking Shears! b DRESSMAKER STYLES! 


; th m4 to'Blares | THE ONLY SHEAR OF ITS KIND UNDER 7.50 , 

lewing chairmen of the guild to Elerts Mrs. D. F. Crimm lt planks ante qusel Mahsoatie-cot Saiched ALL DRESSES Pertnorty ae 1 og : $5, - oon : 3 

serve the coming year: The Colonel James McCall chap- ‘edge. Saving tedious hours of hand finish- mn DRESSES Formerly 10.94 & 1294 s'88. 2 * 17 00 
Mrs. L. C. Rosenkrans, me.nber- ter, D. C. Daughters of the Amer- %:,F or ® Snish that is more accura ALL DRESSES Formerly 10. 9 4, hl-44, 


| ' cofessional, and d i 99, :; 
ship; Mrs. George B. Merrick, '©#" Revolution, elected Mrs. D.| lightweig 18S graeeee | Gat SRESSES Formerly 14:96 to 17.96 0.79, 2 fer 09.08 


Frank Precision ground Alllmmetel, cold nickel 
finance: Mrs. George S. Langtord,| veding regent at a recent tere pls granny ae oe 
publicity; Mrs. Guy Latimer, li- Other officers are Mrs. James Prepaid Mail @rders Accepted “4 s oe bes ie TESS C () p 


— 


brary: Mrs. Fred N. Ohm, linen W. Butler, vice regent: Mrs. Rue. Add ite fer Postage 
and sewing; Mrs. Charles E. Kel- 5 a “age _ Edward | With two locations to serve you... 

. _ efley , recording. secre- . , 
wee, Gt ghop, One Mrs, MOrey iccry) Miss Marierie T; Cleaves | | 109 Sth Street $.E. 4115 Maribore Pike $.. 
Jull, special decorations. | 


corresponding secretary: Miss 725 Vith St. W.W., NA. 0959 Gucectp Sistas Batenche Ceral Hills Shegping Center 


ad HLllside 
Officers who will serve with Mrs. Sally M. Wells, treasurer: Mrs. te CRS AF ] BLE Cool Cool a Cool 
Bowie include Mrs. James M. Os- Franklin T. Garrett, registrar: Ap Conmnnes | Cool Coo . 4 


borne, first vice president: Mrs. ———— 
James H. Hamilton, second vice 
president; Mrs. George C. Cook, 
treasurer; Mrs. G. Carville Bown, 
recording secretary, and Mrs. 
George H. Martin, corresponding 
secretary. 


Mrs. Frad L. Volland 
Elected DAR Regent 


Mrs. Fred Louis Volland was 
elected regent of the Little John) 
Boyden chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, at a recent 
meeting. 

Other officers elected are Mrs. 
‘Nelson H. Budd, vice regent; Mrs. 
Jennie Conrad . Hurlburt, chap- 

_ jain; Mrs. William B. Tibbits, re- 
cording secretary; Mrs. Carlos 
Campbell, corresponding  secre- 
tary; Mrs. Clifford W. Hurley, 
treasurer: Mrs. Henry M. Steece. 
registrar: Mrs. Alfred H. Thiessen. 


historian: and Mrs. Eleanor E. 
Dyer, librarian. 


Chevy Chase Red Cross 
Branch Sets Meeting 


The annual meeting of the 
Chevy Chase branch of the Mont- 
gomery County chapter of the 
American Red Cross will be held 
at 2 p. m. Tuesday at the home 
of the acting chairman, Mrs. Ma- 
son B. Leming, at 9315 Montgom- 
ery ave., North Chevy Chase, Md.: 

At the meeting the annual ‘re- 
ports of the chairmen will be 
heard and the new slate of of- 
ficers will be presented. . 
* 


Mery Bartlett DAR | s : | Ape ave fl : Be 
preerer Som Plenc + ee a Ee NY oe @* ‘395 


Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, will hold a picnic July 31) 


. Pe ae ane 4 . os »> aN Py . ~~ ¥, ~ mas . . . 
— 2 ee ik ; 4 | See : 4 a ) Ee Se [) Se 2S a 
: Pi. > aries 5 Rs de = ; < See 5! se See oe 3 ae 
, ; 5 ee Ses Nee ae oS : os Se pe ON te a ae ‘ 5 ae 
at the summer home of Mrs. John ag Seaeegae a : 4 “3 Bae. Se Sees > fs & os te | 
: ae ay ma . . im 3 3 : ae ye - ee * : , 2 : 
SO A, 7 As . ' 7 oe ae’ - a Wows * ‘ : 5 . 
oe Be . “ie eee, : oe Se) ae 3 oS oe : ; a ee : ; : a 
ee b > oz 7 er ~ “4 ; me » cx ; , A : : > oe ‘ cxSon 
~ me . : : 2 ak 
* < . “ $ - ) 


' 


R. Grunwell in Maryland for the 
benefit of the DAR National Build- eo... z .— me o eee ae we ee ee Be 5 
Newly-elected officers of the Bee ae a oq dane AO. we See a ee es | CRS va @ Sia Be 4 
chapter are Miss Faustine Dennis, cs an Soh & Ue. Lee G . (ae BR AS : St Ser tn :s., ) ; 
regent: Mrs. John R. Hogan, vice | Besa: . a | Bs: e° Se ~~ - ; ¥ be pe q a . ae 33 b 3 eg e ¥F io net y, QO n © r S © 
regent; Mrs. William D. Marshall, ee - BOTs oo ae ae we ee BA ~a5 bx. eer 
chaplain; Mrs. Glen H. Deem, re- ie abe. ee.  & | ee 2 ) c 
cording secretary; Mrs. Thomas G, ae > ) So Ree Me | Ne nw ani ager 
Crouch, corresponding secretary; 


Miss Alice E. Marrs, treasurer; ’ \ | “et a “0 % ) : al | . ie 33 : Ps : 

, Miss Josephine Roberts, registrar; \. 828 | reg ay S P S REGULAR AND 
Mrs. Thomad E. Marshall 3d, his- . — : . ae | | | 
torian: Mrs, J. C. Buck, librarian, | Oe. } — | ® @ EXTRA SIZES 


and Miss Ann Marie Eastman, dele-| 
gate. : | 

The chapter regent has been: ) rs ee 7 
chosen to serve as president of the | eS . : 
Chapter Regents’ Club. ' = | 


D. C. Federation Sets  £ ABA For Misses, Juniors, Women! | S 
Final Meeting Monday — b: .\ 4g | 
The final meeting of the season’ pee GG ee * -) 


* 
of the District of Columbia Fed-| mere x Pig | 
eration of Women’s Clubs will be. : ff eS ay, 
held Monday at 11 a. m. in the’ ee ee = iB : 


Gold Room of the Hamilton Hotel. 
The advisory council will meet at 


10a. m. in the Blue Room. . | View | ew “Marilyn” styled Pastel Broadcloth 


Beautifully styled for smartness, comfort and long service, these lus- 
Mrs. Edward C. Magdeburger, 


ncdiiaes’ af Geena | cious Nylon Slips are lavishly trimmed with delicate nylon lace at 
pres nt or o e era- ee e : % ae a ; : i 
ne ween ee OF 41 28 Ee | top and hem. They fit with perfection, launder in a jiffy and don’t 


federation’ convention held re- . oe : a om | nd | 
a ee me. # = — | $ require ironing! Brought ® you at a very special low price... 
teed pasate v2 g as oe | | wonderful for gifts and trousseaux. Tearose and blossom white, 


Daughters of Colonists | sizes 32 to 46, 

- Dr. Ella Fales will serve as State 

regent of the District of Columbia’ me hee he _ me oe 

Daughters of the American Col-. ee ca @ Sun-up to sun-down dresses you 1] live in and love. | 

onists for the coming year. | i Fa il Beautiful cotton broadcloths with Velveray finish, 3 9 
Officers who will serve with Dr. | a Ss Schiff_i embroidery, floating skirts. All are San- | 

Fales include Mrs. goose yet ve | a: oe, Se : forized to prevent shrinking more than 1%. All 

Ralph ‘ge Fhe tines vice. Be Rhy. are colorfast and come in pink, aqua, powder blue Nylon Undi 

regent; Mrs. William M. Carrigan,f ang maize. | ¢ y : es 

third vice regent; Mrs. George E.’ | A. Rick-rack points up the rol! C. Clasic charmer handed treet loor 

McCann, chaplain; Mrs. Enoch G.' collar, wee sleeves, pearly but- with sparkling eyelet em- i | “The Avenue” 

Johnson. recording secretary; Mrs. | tors, swirling skirt. 9 to I5 broidery, buttoned from neck Tithe 8th end D Sis. NW. 

Rex T. Mitchell, corresponding | to'hent, 14 to 42. 3 


' 


—— a | 8. Frost white embrodery D. Dalety Schittt : . | 
Fil the kK, " . am ‘ embroidery ——_— ea 
. \ iy hr Hogs a a i ~—9 rows of it—troces the | , ¢ Mail and Phone Orders Filled Se 
-yYOouUR | | : froriter. 38 to 44. slash-neckline bodice. Note 
the deep coo! sleeves. | 4 to 20. 


5. KANN SONS CO., WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 


ARE SPOTLESS Daytime Dresses, Second Floor 
’ . Please send me the following slips at $4.99 each:? 


1 

: | 
| i 
4 ? 
| | | | | 
| | 7 
2 | | 
| 4 | 
; | 
| | | | Ries | 
: : tal 
| ces ! 
| 0. ©. | 
| The Avenue” | | | 
[| Tth, Bth end D Sis, N.W. | : | 
| Di 75.06 | { Add 2% tax for Marvlend delimeris. 


SAT sd Es eee OO 


a 


t the Warner 


eed Escape? ‘Try 


‘Bride of Vengeance 


6s RIDE OF VENGEANCE,” 


new Paramount “ell at 
the Warner, is simple, sheer, un- 
adorned escapist stuff. As a work 
of art, it makes no pretensions. 
It's a lavish spectacle of hokum and 
it offers you 2 hours of relaxation, 
demanding nothing. more of you 
than your time, and money. 

No attempt has been made at ac- 
curacy in the presentation of this 
historical romance which deals 
with the machinations of the in- 
famous Borgias to dominate Italy 
in the sixteenth century. Instead, 
the actual personages have been 
given the “Hollywood treatment,” 
Caesar Borgia is all evil; Lucretia, 
his sister, is a naive dope: the 
Duke of Ferrara is all goodness. 
If you know your history this is 
hardly the true picture. 


Accuracy Unimportant 


But in these “treatments” arc- 
curacy is unimportant. The his- 
torical setting is merely used for 
variety; the types remain the same. 
In this one, John Lund is playing 
the Duke of Ferrara, a _ noble- 
_hearted ruler of a domain which 
stands between the Borgia iands 
and the coveted Duchy of Venice. 
Macdonald Carey, as Caesar Borg- 
ia, must eliminate Ferrara before 
he can march on Venice. He has 
the husband of Lucretia (Paulette 
Goddard) murdered and makes it 
look as if the Duke of Ferrara did 
it. Intent on revenge, Lucretia 
marries Ferrara, planning to mur- 
der him and help Caesar take the 
hometown. Ferra is no dope, how- 
ever. He has Caesar pegged and 
is trying to cast a huge cannon 
which he can use against the 
Rorgian armies when they turn up 
at his city gates. 

‘Lueretia falls in love with Fer- 
rara, 
learns she was duped, returns to 
Ferrara to help defend’ it, finds her 


betrays him, poisons him, Cortt Pervert 


e poison didn't work, Is re-united 
with her husband, helps him blast 
Caesar's army, and lives happily 
ever after. See! Nothing tremen- 
dously original. Just a lot of fun. 
Lund Toys With Part 


Helping to make it seem light 
and unimportant is the perform- 
ance of John Lund. He doesn’t 
get carried away with the absurd- 
ity of the plot, he is playing with 
the part. Paulette Goddard has 
the chance to go on a costume jag, 
although some of the things she 
wears look downright hideous. She 
prances through her role, not get- 
ting in the way. Macdonald Carey. 
with the weitdest hair-do in years, 
is appropriately snarly and un- 
unctuously sinister. 


The supporting cast has a line- 
up of stalwarts such as Albert 
Dekker, Raymond Burr, John Sut- 
ton, and Fritz Leiber to fill out this 
romantic Renaissance tapestry 
which is ably directed by Mitchell 
Leisen. Leisen has used his music 
and his cameras extremely well: 


he has gotten much comedy into a * 


film which could easily have 
turned out to be a flop. 

Because he hasn't tried to do ‘ 
something great, he has given the 


public a satisfactory chunk of hot- * 


weather entertainment. 
JOHN M. COPPINGER. 


“BRIDE OF VENGEANCE’ Produced 
by Richard Maibaum, directed by Mitch- 
ell Leisen. screen play hy Cwuril Hume 
and Michael Hooan, story by Michael 
Hooan music score Hugo Friedhoter:’ 
dicertor of photography. Daniel L. Papp. 
i. a. Ge. oe oa Pan 

CAST 
Alfonso Rete. uk ke of Ferrara 
John Lund 

Pauletie Goddare 

Macdonald Carey 
4 Raymond Burr 

Donald .Randnioh 

Athert. Dekker 

Cherles ‘Dayton 
.. Anthony Caruso 
ick Foote 

John Sutton 
William Farnum 


Lucretia Rordia 
Caesar Rorgia 
Michelotta 
Tiziano 
Vanettt 
Bastino 
Captain of the Guard 
Neoligent Sentry 
Prince Risceolie 
Gemma, ma 
ate Drain 
7 Nicholas 
Fritz 


Lucretia's 
K 


Chamberlain 
Felinnea 


Lewson 
lay 
Leiher 


. 


q Cross Roads Has Fine Time W ith Herbert Play. 


GROUP of young, enthusiastic 


a 


F. Hugh Herbert's recent 
way comedy, “ 


Broad- 
For Love or Money,” 
out at the Bailey's Cross Roads 
Theater. They seem to be having 
fun doing it and you may have fun 
watching it, if you critical stand- 


f /ards are not tho rigid. 


ETHEL BRITTON plays 
“Leda” in “Amphitryon 38,” 
which opens Sunday evening at 
Meridian Hill Park and stars 
Elisabeth Bergner. Tickets at 
1317 E ‘st. nw. 


Show Time 


Olnev—Violsa 
“Night 


in Must Fall,” at 


STAGE 
Roache and. Leon Janney 
8:45. 
SCREEN 
Warner—‘Bride of Vengeance.” at 11:46, 
1:40, 3:40. 5:40, 7:40, 9:55. 
Capitel—‘‘Let's Live a Li " starring 
Hedy Lamarr and Robert ul immings, at 
if. 1:50, 4:35. 7°20 and 10 05 Sammy 
Kaye stage show at 12:55, 3:35, 6:20 and 


m 
.Palace—' Edward, My Son,’ 


study of 
mi. spl a ed parental love at + 2:15 


Hayward, 
Preston, Tech- 
12:40, 2:35, 4:25, 


Klahoma oilfields 


Robert. 
nieolor ed Same at ] 


0:50 

iG 9:55 Dp ry) 

“The Ba kieys of Broadway.’ 
} 


30 and 9 be 


Stra ton Siory.” the 
hite’'Sox player, at 

i 45 and 9:50 p. m 

Metropolitan— The Bie Cat 

0 aacyve c li 40, 
a q 45 p. n 

Pia yhouse— Qu t. four Somerset 
Mau sham Short stories oo tan eons bythe 
R . 7:30 
9 10 and | 50 D m 

Little Livy 
2 LO, 4 s. . 20 
] 4 6°35 


as 
‘National 
; 


Pp. Mm 
gan pee The 
: . "hh Cako V 
: MA 0 4s 
~ a Techni- 
( 1-40, 3 40, 5:40, 
+.40 ar 


Fianders.”’ 
"Q +4 “Ribens.”’ 
j and 9:10 
Siansdreme- -“Corridor of Mirrors,” 
2:05 5:55. 7:50 and 9:45 
‘Love Life of 
1:25 5:30 
Pix—’ *‘Congorilla.” 
“Borneo.”” at 10, 
Ambassador. 
10. 


“Bri de of Vengeance,’ “at 


The Lyons Den 


YORK—Arthur Schwartz, 

the producer and composer 

of “Inside USA,” was at a party 

- where he played a medley of his 
song hits, and then did the first 


By Leonard Lyons 
| Mother,” 


song he ever succeeded in get- | 


ting published—‘“Baltimore, Md., 


Is the Only Doctor For Me.” Al- | 
though it was written as a seri- | 
ous effort many years ago, it has 
now become a travesty replete | 
with cliches—and Schwartz sings 


_ it as a comic song . . . Reinald 
Werrenrath heard it, and told 
the composer: “Believe it or not, 
Arthur, I must have a copy im- - 
mediately. I want to do it at a 
recital next week. It's perfect” 

. “Recital? Perfect?” asked 

Schwartz. “You're joking” 

“No, I'm serious,” 

singer. 


said the 


l 20. 7:25 and 3:40 p. m 
Beltsville Drive-In ‘Bad Man of Tomb- 
stone,’ at 9:05 p.m. “Bad Boy.” at 10:35 


Whe Done It?” 
‘I Cover the War.” at 


: "m 
Airport Drive-te—* Sin Town” 


» Route i Drive-In—* at 


10:45 


at_9 


which goes on tour in 
September. This is their first 
real vacation in many years... 
Their marriage has been an ideal 
one, despite the hazards of the 
theatrical professions where the 
show, for some strange reason, 
always is supposed to be of 
prime importance ... The day 


after they were married, Miss 
Stickney received a wire to re- 
port to the touring company of 
“Chicago.” The actress joined 


| the show, and her groom honey- 


mooned alone ... In reviewing 
the past years Miss Stickney 
said yesterday: “I'm so perfect- 


ly happy that last night I saw a 


“The recital is in Bal- | 


timore, at a convention of doc- | 


tors.” 


Tuesday night “Pretty Penny,” 


the new revue by Jerome Cho- | 


dorov and Harold Rome, had its 


falling star—and could think of 
nothing to wish for.” 


-* 


LAST WEEKS! : 


INTELLIGENT PICTURE’ 


Richard | Coe—Washington Post | 


W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM 


personally 
brings his greatness 
to the screen! 


premiere at the Bucks County | 


Playhouse. 


On their way to the | 


Pennsylvania theater, Chodorov | 
and Rome stopped to buy several | 


religious amulets to carry in 
their pockets at the first-night. 
... "I didn’t know you were so 
religious” a friend tdélid them 
- « « Chodorov explained: “There 
are no atheists in fox holes or on 
opening nights.” 


Dorothy Stickney and Howard 
Lindsay are vacationing from 
their starring roles in “Life With 


AIR CONDITIONED 


mt PLAYHOUSE 


| Cone. fons lt Reale delle aoe thera 


1Sth AND WH STREETS 


A 3. ARTHUR RANK Presentation | 


00 
“State Department 
m. 


a 12:1 m 
-< 10:40 p 
ISTH 


Dp. Mm. an 

Pile No, 649.’ 

|RKO KEIT W 

| ATG 
OPEN 10:15 A.M—SUN. (2:30 P.M. 


THE SCREEN’S MIGHTY 
SHOW OF SHOWS! 


“CONMNGA 
1 ie aA 


| The play runs through Satur- 
day night and opens again next 
. Wednesday to run through Satur- 
day. 

Most of the people associated 
with the productions at Bailey's 
are amateurs: the theater is not 
their primary ‘source of livelihood 

But what they lack in experi- 
ence, amateurs make up for in en- 
ergy and gaiety. Often their fun 
is contagious. At least, so it 
seemetl to this reviewer when he 
saw the play the other night. The 
audience laughed often and loud 
although it must be admitted that 
it was more ‘often at the wit of - 
the playwright than the delivery 
of his lines. 

“Money” was a hit on Broadway 
primarily because of the presence 
| of a young lafly named June Lock- 
hart. That’s:what the New York 
critics all said. That's only half 
the story. It is regrettable to re- 
port that there is an outspoken 
coarseness and salaciousnes in 
the basic situation of the play 
which must ‘have been responsi- 
ble for a large part of the success 


wits NATIONAL 


oe 


AIR 
COOLEL 


—E AT 
13TH 


Starts SUNDAY —— Jennifer Jones: 
“WE WERE STRANGERS” 


DI. 
CARY GRANT 


9 HE 


LOST PATROL" 
«(Zi NICTOR McLAGLEN 


| WARNER ES 
PAULETTE GODDARD 
MACDONALD CAREY 
srooeree JOHN LUND 
|BRIDE o VENGEANCE 


ALSO NOW SHOWING AT AMBASSADOR 


WARNER BROS COOL F NEAR [Dt 


METROPOLITAN 
The BIG CAT 


Celer by TECHNICOLOR 
ROARING ADVENTURE 
RESTONFOSTER FORREST TUCKER 


LOM McCALLISTER PEGGY ANN GAREER 


actors and actresses are doing friends a young 


Broa 


girl and “hoe her 
mEVervone iS given 
misunderstand their 


of the piece: a What 
noxious 
people deli. 
observation 
mark 


makes the w 


is to 


ole 
near some ve 
home 
a chance to 
relations. 


his rind + hk | i 
an e ne a. OS 


smacks 


it down tn t 


thins 


voune 


..7 ee 8'.¥ ts 


Frieay, June 24. 194! 


COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR 
some comedies avai ENICOLOB 
need 


ecessful 


funny 


: 
oon ft 


very 
mie which .smMmu 


\¢ 


LESUE BANKS 


it NS " 


“\ ' Ce Want 


AWRENCE 
ERTRUDE LAWRE 
. ELSA LANCHESTER 


STARTS TOMORROW! 
LAST DAY “CORRIDOR 
OF MIRRORS" 


—e- avn vaso 


1 ta) ‘ 
“SIN TOWN 8 & T2:15 — 


One mile fram ttih st 
Open 10:45 A.M.—Air Conditioned 


Hey. Bridge inte Ari 
Pies eur Camoplete Neweree! Digest 


WASHINGTON 
PREMIERE 


(#¢ 
Thay 


on stage IN PERSON 7 ipa 


F cnccterea |. 

his 

Che the Soren. woh 
| “wey LAMARR ROBERT CUMMINGS | 


z A 


hnticinheianniannintinsdinneneieenbitinnatadindhessechese tec ee 


Broadway's No. 1 
Dramatic Stage Hit 
Now 
on the screen! 


IAN HUNTER + LEUEEN MacGRATH 
JAMES DONALD - MERVYN JOHNS 


WOW .. open 10:48 


aft ALSO “Fe Sn 5 


Alexandria Group 
Doing 3 One-Acts 


Three one-act plays will be pre- 
sented by the Disciple Players of 
Alexandria today and Saturday at 
8:30 p. m. in George Washington 
High School auditorium. The plays 
are “Ripe Watermelons” and 
“Guest of Honor,” comedies, and 
“Bracelet of Doom,” a mystery. 
Louise Brown is director, assisted 
by Eleanor Dannehl. 


Seat wit 


Enjoy the luxury 
“Sleepy 


IN PERSON 


Elisabeth aoa 
in “AMPHITRYON 38" 


: 83.60, $2.40, oro eae 
Opening yw ye 


3 — pext National 
17 EB St. N.W. ST. e27e 
Filled Promptly 

envelope 


for you. 
pet pew’ and 


at coach fare 
with Radio; * 
. Washingto" 


. Cincinnatl 


fer os © 


OLNEY yf 


W PLAY 
VIOLA ROACHE 
an 
LEON JANNEY 
in Emiye Williams’ 
“NIGHT MUST FALL” 
Next Week 
GUY MABISON (in person) 
“JOHN LOVES MARY” 


“BALTIMO 


You can reserve 


1) ” reclining 
ae it as ySiere’s wish, 


are! Extra ares smo 


tric power; 
Diesel- eece tewardess- 


ay ‘St. Levis itil 
Passengers fer Leviny 


, Sleepers with Sects Bedrooms: 


Phone « Sterling 


a Coach 
hout chargé to 


cINCINN All: poe LOUIS 


your own 
uxury of baving ©” waiting 


adjust — 
king lounges 


Coffee Shopp® 
urse service. 


» Silver Spring 


Hie mey ret 


ents, Drew!" 


Sections. Comporre servation Cer 


$106 or SHepherd 4343 


Ut MHUH@JJ™”s 


RE & OHIO RAILROAD 


NOW .. open 10:45 


VACATION 
AT HOME 


Your transit company has prepared 


a guide book of 10 three-hour tours of 


the Nation 


s Capital. It contains de- 


tailed information on 31 popular points 
of interest, and is designed to cover 9 
full dedys of sightseeing by street car 


| and bus. 


Know and enjoy the shrines and show 
places that make our city world- 
famous. For a free copy, phone 


- Michigan 6363, or write Department M. 


= 


tad Feanstty | 
Washington ” 7, D. 


Washington Bex Office: Jordan's 
lth # G Bis, NW RE. 1313 


| 


tren, agp! Men, Mate to. & See “OZARK 


SIE 


SUMMER RECREATION 
RIDES 
& ATTRACTIONS 
1 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT 
AT GAY 


‘REE ADMISSION 
LEN ECH() 
USEMENT PARK 

SWIMMING 


10 A.M. TO 10:30 P.M. 
DANCING 


OZARK’S N 
BER TODAY? 


| 8 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT | 


WHIF FED 
HIM 


TWICE 
ALREADY 


JUS: CAN‘T KEEP 
MAH BYE ON TH’ 
BAWL WHEN MAH 
HEART AIN'T 
IN: TH’ GAMES 


POPPED UPJ.,, AND (MOAN) 
HE AIN’T LIKELY TO GET 


OTHERWISE, 
HE’S MINES.., 
AND A 
PENNANT FOR 
MY SOX) 


ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 


Per information. Call 


E. M. Loew's Oven Air Drive. In STANTON 


~ , ers “mt 


SEABCE. 
\Bil’s Hildiibes in 


AT HIS WITTY, SARDONIC BEST, in 


“THE LOVE LIFE 
of NAPOLEON 


In French, with English Dialoque titles 


with JEAN-LOUIS BARRAULT 


ster of “CHILDREN OF PARADISE” . 


age i” our (OUNEE 
mi SPM Cel ?044 
we Perts trom 1 PM 


pont 
LAST $5 DAYS! 
PRIZE 


i332 dupont AVE 
: val WINNING 
La alt * 


Louis : R\ : 
Louis, VBENS 


AR! FILM Pose: snatrnag: ~Y | -—o 


WARNER BROS. THEATERS 


For Additional Information Phone Theater 
Direct or Call REpubdlic 0800 
THEATERS HAVING MATINEES 


AMBASSADOR oar Ss oe 
vliette Goddard. Jonn Lait ee 
PANCE.” 1. 3:08 , 1s * 25. 9 
Sth anp@ F Ste. N “ 

LI. 3-3200 
Temple wm ANDVEN 
7? eat 1:30 50) 


= 


HOWARD Air Cenditioned 
ween 1t Neer 
Pe 
| ete" ART OF RHY THM. AMOS 
MI LRN. BIG REVUE ; 
LINCOLN Air Conditioned 
Upens 12:3° P.M. 
, Payne Fi en Drew 
or VENGE THE QROOKED WAY" | es 
' . Air Conditioned 
Upens 12:30 P.M 
Aniah John Payne, 
EL PASO" 
Air Conditioned 
Opens 12:50 PF. M. 


A a Ww 
ga!» Ee fiven. Jane Wrmank 
KISS IN THE DARK" 
LANGSTON Air Conditioned 
firene 12:45 PM. 
Sabu Ga sell. Turhan 


Rae ‘OF INDIA” : 
| STATE faile © berch, Va. 
FA sa6 
“youU NGER BROTHERS: . 
Wayne Mo ee 


Chi Te ; “ME 
40 


DISTRICT THEATERS 


or tafermation. Cali NOrth 3000 


CENTRAL * oer 


“ROLL 


th St. A. Ww. : . 2841 Rey 
copes 


"BOY, WITH GREEN 
hil DER ROL! : a 


4th NW 


e Rae 


“fA 1556 
Pact Palle Chereh, Va. 
Air Conditioned | 
“FLAXY MARTIN 
“THE RANGER AND THE LADY” 
1720 Wileen Bivé. 
wre. “ON ox t4R8e 


“se FE YOUNGER BROTHERS” 
Paige 


316s Ww Seen Bava. 
ox. tt 


Seqaces “Nr 
RA 


“CAN — PACIFIC 
) q 
Pa Ave. at ith 8.E 
x oe 
, ‘MR 
“COLLEGE . a 


1555 


W eth “) 


Chi ey ‘T 
BELVEDERE ron ro 
. Q 

Ave 


SHERIDAN jc 


osby in ‘CONNECTICUT TANEEE, 


© 


vine Mort ‘ Janis 


&® Shertdar 
7400 


> 
w“ 


“PRONTIER as VENGE 
Lash LaRue. Fuzzy st. John 
Pike & 6. Fie 
mere St OX. 2999 
"ARLINGTON 
“MR re GOES TO COL- 
LEGE.” Cliften Webb. Shirley Tempie 


BUCKINGHAM pg ee = 


“MR. RELVEDERE GOES TO cont, 
LEGE.” Cliften Webb, Shirley Tempie 
Artineten Va OR 42366 
GLEBE sa N. Gleberd. 
Air Cenditioned 
“FLAMINGO ROAD” 
Joan Crawford. Zachary Scott 
194 Seoth Warne Gi. 
BYRD ‘*ferd 1733 
“RED CANYON” 
Ann Blythe, George Brent 
Lee Bivd. & 
Annandale Bd. 
“MR. BELVEDERE GOES TO COL- 
LEGE.” Clifton Webb. Shirley Temple 
"3507 Rhode ist. Ave. B.S. 
Phene Mich. 9227 
Healthfully air-Conditioned 
“RARKLEYS OF BROADWAY" 
Pred Astaire _Ginger _ Rogers 
i2th “& Newten LS a we 
Phene Mich. 
Air Conditioned 
“MR Bet yeaeae Gors TO COL 
EGE.” lifteon Webb. Bhirley Temple. 
ny 18th Nr @hede tsi. Ave. N.B. 
ES ‘ Phene DUpent 841 
Healthful, Air-Conditioned 
Double te gr, 
* Barba Be, Geddes 
ert Ryan. “SO THIS is ew vORne” 
Henry Morgan. Virginia Gr Bevin 2 
First ape BR t Ave. H.W. 
SYLVAN Phene Ntieth @689 
Healthfally Air-Conditioned 
Double Feature 
YOUR “wu SRAND." 


1139—-P 


Ca. 4ee & Colesville rise Cor 
< 
Humphrey Bogart. Jo 
ANY DOOR,” 1:20 
itth & Park Rd 


TIVOLI co 1800 


iften Webb. Shirley Temple in “MR 
BELVEDE - GOES TO COLLEGE.” a 
i 1:3 9:45 


" Derek. “KNOCK ON 
s 8-30 5 9:40 


nw 


.:35 40. 7:40 


PTOWN 


Fred Astairé 
BARRELS Ro 4 ‘RROADW AY, at. I 


fenn Ave & Newart 


= ~ eae 
_ 


—_ = 
* = 
— 


ARLINGTON, FALLS CHURCH, VA, 


sanfermatien Phone OX 


Performances Only 
a24 L, + nF 
200 


Ziphary cat In AFLAXY MARTIN.” 2! 


AVALO 


Gene aut ry in “as RIG SOMBRERO.” 
15, 9 


AVE. “CRAND ane Ave, , 8B! 


Randolph Scart in “THE WALKING 
HILLS.” at 6:30. 8 15. 9:50 


COLONY “an ae 


Hurypnrey 
rT On ue 


“Theaters Sang Eve. 


cas ‘418 Conn, Ave. WLW 
ana 


Bogart. Walter Hust on, “ 
SIERRA MADRE.” 6.45 
saa . 
Re 
- re in “J SU RRENDER DE AR. 
{ 


, 8:45. Badd ry Driscoll “S0 DEA 
To MY HEART.” at 7:20 9°55 


MacARTRUR er. 7 + ‘ew 


Riv? 
BARKLEYS. OF ‘BROADWAY: ‘sé 50 9°30 


1970 14th 44. NW 
SAVOY en “DON'T TRUST 
Johany Mack Brown -in IDOE DAN * 
GER”. at 5. 8:20. ;: 1000 =: ‘red MacMurray 
a744 ¢ 7 ave... 


Madeline Carroll: 
== rCAUG nT.” Bat bara Bel Getdes. Reb- 
SECO Silver Spring bas er 
=“ 27540 
aul Lada “WHISPERING 


Pree erty yh _— . 
9:40 Jimmy Lydon in TUS acon” ot 5 H 10 Z > ACADEMY 
to Healthfully Air- re. 
th & Betprent Se << Double Feature 


1 Spa Stw COMES Ur 
in “HOME IN SAN ANTONF.” . MacDona d 
Joan Crawford in “FLAMINGO 
7, 9:36 


CAUGHT.” 


535 , Ste Ce 
Li. 


icolor): Jeah- 
' Claude Jarman, Jr: 
“DYN AMITE."* Wiilem Gergen. Vir- 


ginia Welles a MSS 
VERNON ~ 9707 Mt Vernce are 
Alesandria Ve al 
Healthfully Air-Conditiened 
“RIG JACK" 
Wallece Beery. Richard Conte 


~ APEX $813 Mase Ave 8 WW. 


WOodley 4400 
fton Webb. Shiries Te emp e } 


RELVEDER! -, ro COLLEGE.’ 
. 40. 9 


at 
PA Ga Ave & Guedes Pi Ae 

eA. 44080 
Ted Donalece | in “RESTY LEADS THE 
War.” 6 $0 Dopcias Pairbanks iv..| 
THE STING O FLYNN.” 6:55. 9:45 


DRIVE- 4 On Balto. Pike 5 Min. 


Past U. of Ma TO. saoo 
Open 8: iS Pew r? 


*™E 
at 


« i¢ 


Revn 
MEN ‘OF TOMBSTONE: 
4 No! ar ss 


Sh iit 
HIPPODROME Omer an wr 
Air .. 1K 

n 


~ Mu ller 
"CORRIDOR. OF MIR- 


a +. 
— 
> 
77 
> 
a 
= | 


’ We WERE ‘ITRANGERS” 


nines «8 
ATientie «8700 


John Payne. Gail Russe ‘eL PASO” 
Pius: Robert. Ryan in “SET wr" 
RORS.’ 
“-eew Ber 
—_". 


QF TaESDA ~ We aves 4 | SENATOR “ res a ses a 


RL POI condi ong Today ic ifton Webb Shire, 

L PAMIL W y Ros-| RELVEDERE GOES 

lers in “NIGHTTH z is at ey R. at ae REL 49. 4:11. y 9°40 

eas aie 5 hh Base “oo “ ws au ané Ale ‘ve. 6.8 

edy show wit gs inny. okey 

|Mouse. Goofy, Merrie Melody + NAYLOR C3 Bes te Deer. he 4008 

Ph Rackvilic MA 2 Deors Open 2. s6-Cent, 1-1} 
Pree P n ” TUSCON nN” at i 4. 4 45, 

; 5! Al Stewart Granger im 
“Air Conditioned—Last Day lee . - a 
Bendix, James Gleason in “TH “mLANCHE FURY.” ‘n color, at 


OF RILEY” at 7:3, 9:25 Country Store Grand Award 9 P. M. 
, 


rap Ave 5 Grand Awards Free 
Chapt. No. & Bruce Gentry Serial. 


x ANACOSTIA''” “ lined it tee “Te 


red a Roger rs in 
THE RARKL. evs oF BROADWAY,’ n 
"Pechnico! or. at 1. 3:05. ao1D. 7:15. 9°20. 


ATL Awyrr rt 8 ‘ant =«¢ S&S & 


©. 3-508 
or ane 
Bel v gy oo} 


Mth 
eas 
; re- 


Cenditiened 


weal 
> 
a 


Comfertably 


Cnr 


o 


te 


Temple in “ME 
OLLEGE.” at 


“= a 
wwe #209 
r Con- 


Milland 
‘AL ias NICK 


Y S! Trmp! 

Tt RE IN RALTIMOR®: 

Lamour Br Dor levy 

LUCKY STIFF” Last Compile 

re 1 feprtet Metight« We 
H ‘ 


HYATTSVILLE S20": “me “ic Coburn. Pessy Cummins {s 


.° “GREEN GRASS OF WYOMING.” in 
Hyratts, 0552 na an Packing Teehai ol ; at 6:25 8:08 9:45 


MR RELVE’ © CONGRESS 7" Sorat © 


e riey Tem 
‘DERE GOES To COLLEGE” at 6:15. = +7908 
_ 9:55 Twe Techn! color 


aon § Hits faria Montes 
and Jon Hall in “AL BABA AND yy 
CHEVERLY 9 °vfsr...'h°"d" FORTY | THIEVES 30 
TN. 0100-—Pree Portiins Claude Ra! . in “PHANTOM oF The 
Air Cond! tioned + Tod On Ray S OPERA.’ at 55 a Cana 
M1] n in “ALIAS NICK BE AL’ 
ins 9-08 TOMOR.-SUN ALL o FAIRLAWN 
‘PAMILY SHOW RED STALLION IN @ Double PFeature- ae. Sy 
THE ROCKIES” nlu« 3 cartoons: Dor- & Sabu in be ACK wae ARC iss 's.” 
ahd 
“CAPTAIN BOYCOTT) - 


ald Duck. Pluto. Woody Woodpecker Technicolor 
z WIGHT. AWD 
Don! 


Shirley 
GOES 
f 


9 


SIONEY LUST ieee See 


« 
a 
a= 
— 


MARLRORO fener Merthers We Gr ranger in 


atast oe?* 
Cliften 3 
Wwe Temp - 
DT RE GOErs TO COLLEC 


‘ 7577 Pe Ave OF 
“ah aeLve- . rave 


a Aine a 
ae 


He» , _ 
Siercarde 5 
bhott and Lou Costello 
; “AFRIC. SCREAMS at 
CIMTA “it Verner Bled 
fire «F st #7%9 
arguer 


te Ch an. Walter Brennan 
“THE GREEN PROMISE” 


ann S19 Aine . 
Prene OV S826 
Joe! Crea. Alexis 8m 1th 
SOU" TH OF sT. LovuT” | 
(Pairttecten: PF mote 1600) 


“THE YOUNGER poeta” 
Wayne Morris, Janis. Paige 


: TOY Parkfairtes 


Ve a 
>" Wall gil 
nom rd ay 


a5: 


“CASABL ANCA a 
there Pike ot intet ret ‘tee, 
Hiths 
red Astaire an ger Rogers 
“THE ry thy nF BROADWAY.’ 
Technicolor, at 6:35 and 9:25 


7414 Wise. Ave 
. 08 
Air-Conditioned 


AL 
x 


- 


E 


nr 


yal 


C4 
RIDERS OF “wish ma “PINES” and 66 
} = -, min. of comedic oi 

Ci 


“ CIRCLE 
iS Ginger 


Roger Pre 
BARKLF! ys OF RROADW ay” 
- 


calor 


mor? re al 
OUR 2108 ee ave. BW. 
e184. 


“THE 
i Techai- 


ope WO-HOUR 
TOON “AND COMEDY SHOW 


GREFNBEI. t— 


Robert Tayior 
“THE BRIBE 


Detightfutty ‘ ooh 
Ave —_ 
Ste ue. 
3-5347 
sir Conditioned 
Jane Powe: THRit PARING DAUGH- 
. TERA Van He efiir sc T or VIOLENCE” 
itth & N. Careline 6.€. 
Li. 3-647) 
Healthfully Air-Conditioned 
“THE RED PONY” ‘col- 
“THE KANSAN™ 
fetrtas. 


Prene 
“THE YOUNGER ABOTHERA” 
Wayne, Morris. Janie Paige 


sh & C 
ui 
| os miles Se eof Alevandria te 
4 oO" ond Cast 
/ “WHO DONE T no Jot Way 
mn “¢ COVER — as ow Sa 
Last re fidnigs' re 
Adult > == CONNEC ict? 
TANEREE Pe 
Sir Conditioned 
Del Rav (‘Alex.? OF 
a) star ceat Uncie 
person Every Mondss 
igh},st 6—Come Early Por Seats 


sae 
“THE 


THE DISTRICT LINE by Bit Gola 48% TRAD 


Who'll Get the Decision | 


In This Scrap? 


Ezzard Charles and Joe Walcott 
¢tould learn a thing or two about 
fighting by watching Judy Coplon 
and Prosecutor Kelley in action. 

cw 


“SOUTH PACIFIC” BIG HIT 
ON STAGE, BUT NOT HERE 

“Does anybody put out a good 
snappy course in the art of con- 
Versation these days?” asks D. 
Geldner of 1831 2d st. ne 

“The reason that I ask.” she 
continues, “is that we had a 
Visitor ldst week. He was a 
Marine who served in the South 
Pacific with my husband. 
“Por three hours they fought 
‘ the war all over again. Final- 
- ly, just to Show the boys that 
. 1 was still awake, I asked our 
visitor how he liked our city. 
‘He said: ‘I am_ constantly 


my 


amazed by traffic here. The 
populace seems to be divided 
inte two parts—the quick and 
the dead.’ | 
“Then, having disposed of | 
me in the shortest possible time, | 


_ Liners Club will be 


| eligible to join 
been 
~ | overworked Secretary 
| Quible of 6004 Benalder 


—————— —~———_—— 


1.77 children and female college 
graduates 1.26 children.” 


District Liner Coleman's 
personal survey of the sub- 
ject indicates that the fe- 


males have 100 per cent of the 
children. 


ow 
CLUB NOTES 

Next meeting of the District 
held at 8 
o'clock tonight at the Petworth 
Library (‘Georgia ave. and Up- 
shur st. gw.), 

If two of your items have been 
printed in this column, you're 
If you haven't 
vet, it's because 
Rennie 
dr 


invited 


_hasn’t Wad a chance to contact 
you yet. 


r cam- 
paign in the South Pacific. 
“At this point, | think | am 
suffering from battle fatigue.” 
co 


FIGURES DON’T LIE 


(OR DO THEY?) 


If you're eligible for mem- 
bership and would like to join 
the fun and attend tonight's 
meeting, you don't have to wait 
for a formal invitation. Be at 
the Petworth Library at &. and 
tell Rennie to sign you up. 

cw 


| GIVE-AWAYS 


“Two of the mosf mischievous 
kittens ever: male and female.” 


‘SACRE / 
(T'S MARKS 


MARY WORTH 
| ‘T'M SORRY 1 LOST 


MY TEMPER,SIR! 


MR.PORSEEN wasn) 
‘QUITE HIMSELF! 


HELD HIM, DOC, 
PLEASE...HE’S 
BES’ FREN’ 
JOHNNY MALOTTE 


Z/ UF COURSE ,JUNIOR, A 
. HOST SHOULDN'T SLUG 
A GUEST- -AND PORSEEN 
iS OUR VICE-PRESIDENT 
** BUT YOU DID RIGHT, 
COMING TO THE DEFENSE 
OF--UH-- MODERN ART! 


THE VW 
Birv 


HE’S IN 


x tli OO 
MAY BEST 


-+I WISH I'D HI 
HIM! 


BAD SHAPE, 
JOHNNY, BUT 


T 4 DON'T MATCH 
KNOW SOMETHING YOURSELF 
“ OUTSIDE YOUR 
OWN GENERATION, 
DAD:--GOOD- 
NIGHT ! 


A TRAPPER HAS 
JUST COME IN... 


f 


ASH 


INGTON POS 


lume “4 


. 


FOR A PRIZE FIGHTAIR 
THERE EES ALWAYS A PRIZE 
NO? 


y- 


, 


(Chestnut 6641.) : 

“Affectionate 6-month-old fe- | 
male cat and three lovely 6-week- | 
old kittens.” (Owens 3936.) 

“Three male kittens. one fe- 
male, about 7 weeks old.”’ (Wood- 
ley 2407.) 

“Lovely, well trained black 

| kittens, 7 and 18 weeks old: will 
| deliver.” (Lockwood 5-1342.) 
“Two-year-old black male cat 
_ with a dual personality.” (Hud- 
son 5683.) 

“Two-year-old female dog, 
half fox terrier and half dachs- | 
hund, and her 3-month-old | 1:8 
daughter, whose father was a 
cocker.” (Falls Church 1334.) 

“Two cute black and white 
kittens: playful but well man- 
nered.” (Georgia 1917.) 

“Lovely, playful, gentle, black a «r , | Me . 
and white male kittens, 10 weeks ‘ta ow Va ? ; | 


old.” (Dupont 9228 between & Y 


M. ©. Coleman of 520 7th st. 
se. raises a dubious eyebrow at a 
statistical report which appeared 
recently in our morning con- 
temporary. 

It quoted the Population Ref- 
erence Bureau as stating that 
“male college graduates average 


[i= 


. es 
A? et (ie 


=. 


STEVE CANYON 
SSNS an 
— "BRANDYWINE, I DON'T 


—/ 


—— Si 


MEANWHILE —THE GUARD AROUND 
STEVES AIRPLANE 


YOU'RE SO RIGHT, STEVENSON, J 
MY LAD — I MERELY LEARNED 
FLOM THE COMMANDER WHERE 
KNOW WHAT YOU SAID To \THE REBEL AIR UNITS WERE 
THE COMMANDANT OF THIS \ DISPOSED IN CENTRAL CHINA! 
PEREL FIGHTER FIELD, BUT |THE CURRENT PRICES ON HEAD- 
IT WILL TAKE MORE THAN / BREAKING I DETERMINED 
, TALK TO GET US OUT OF A THROUGH OTHER ae 


so! you MUST 
TRY OUR HOSPITAL 


AH! THIS 
THE COMMANDANT \ OUTY HAS 
HAS ORDERED THE \COMPENSATIONS! 
GUARD SUPPLIED 

WITH HOT RICE! 


Y 


a.m. and 1 p. m.) | 

“Five-month-old female puppy, 
part Great Dane, part setter: 
wont get as big as a Great 
Dane.’ (Axminster 4612 after 
5) p. m.) 


Awad 4b 


CASUALS 


f IN BONBON COLORS 


Created Ry, 


sopry rig foe © 


oo 

PERSONAL NOTES I ay ome 

GWU: Your complaint that JOE PALOOKA 

Washington girls are unduly HONEY... I 
| Stand-offish won't find many sup- | CALLED TH’ 
| porters, [ll betcha. Have you | A|RPORT...HE|DION'T 

ever considered the possibility GIT IN ON TH 
| that the fault may be with you, TWO O'CLOCK 
| and not the girls? j PLANE. 

Y b 


Felser Scott's 


Perhaps you'll never have a tiny foot, but these 
beautiful casuals will give you a pretty foot! So 
sleek they look painted on! . 


sy 00 


A subway high 
wedge. sandal in 
delicate shades to 
blend with your. 
warm - weather 
colors. 


STYLED IN: 


OH, KNOBBY... 
OH, KNOBBY... 


WHAT'S TH’ MATTER... 
THERE'S A LOTTA NOISE 
OUTSIDE... HOPE 
NOBUDDY GOT HURT 
IN THAT JAM... 


PLEASE...FOLKS.. 

SOUNOS LIKE A HEADS UP.. LET 

P’LEECE SIREIN... 
C-COMON 


CROWD LESSEE... 


OUTSIDE 
WAIT 
NERVOUSLY 
| FOR JOE'S 
| ARRIVAL... 
THOSE 
INSIDE } 

ARE { 
MORE 
NERVOUS, 


on | 

THE DATE MUST HAVE | 

_ BEEN ABOUT MARCH 15 | 
Felton Thomas of 865 2ist st. 

| he. notes with amusement that 

_ his favorite newspaper recently 

reported: 

| “Collision of one of its buses 

| with a tax last vear cost the 
A. B. & W. Transit Co. $1500 

yesterday.” 

Thie is probably the only 
tax in history that Senator 
Byrd would find amusing. 

| cos 

_MEMO TO A COP 

|. J. B. H. would like to send a 

| Message to a policeman he 

doesn't know, so he’s doing it 
| through this column. The mes- 
sage goes like this: | 

“To the motorcycle patrol- 
man who hides in the bushes 
on Weaver pl., just of Chain- 

bridge rd.: Please be careful. 

_ The bushes are full of ticks 
this time of year, and you 
might get spotted fever. We 
wouldn't want that to happen 
—even te @ policeman who 

hides in the bushes.” 


~~» 


% OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 P. M. ves 
ALL RIGHT— 


HERE WE GO! 


| 
MICKEY FINN 


5. Pat. Office 
laught Syndicate, Inc 
WY 


CLOTHES - AND 
A COUPLE OF 


. NOTHIN’ DOWN U, 
PAIRS OF SHOES, / 


) a HERE, CHIEF! /* 
White @ Purple @ Brown @ Red @ Pink @ White \\ 
with Red @ White and Green @ White and Brown 


@ White and Black @ and Multi-colors. 


Widths, Narrow and Wide. Sizes to 9. 


Other Casuals from $3.00 


ay 


= 


Please add 15c¢ postage on all mail orders. 


* care 
\*Pess 
5858 


> 
* 
, 


7*o ot « 
iat 


NTA ay 


— 


’ 
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oe a 


*& Felser's 
St. 


| MOTHER IS AWAY, | HAVE TS 
| SCOOT HOME AND Cook FATHER’S 


ON ALL 


TELEVISION! 
SETS 


New 1948 Models 


WESTINGHOUSE 
RCA 
PHILCO 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 
EMERSON 
SENTINEL 


“HE THINKS IT'S 
SOMETHING ELSE - 


*& Scott's 
518 Kin St, 
- Alexandria 


& Seott's 
Silver Spring 
Shop. Cen. 


fe. 
2s 
, 


C444 


ee 


SNS a 


[ THAT'S RIGHT--I'VE GOT 4 
A STACK OF BRICKS THIS, 
i. HIGH, NOW! x | 
GOLLY-- 
WE'D BETTER 
START LOOKING 


I GUESS SO-- CRUSHERS) 
BRINGING ME A BAG OF 


CEMENT NEXT WEEK! 


YOUR BOY FRIEND 
‘CRUSHER’ STILL 
PLAN TO GET 


ME CANDY EVERY 
Wee ICI 7 
ME A ; 
Nee 


ELECTRIC 
FANS 


$9.98 
, turers for 


each ©=ONE YEAR 
for table or wall mount 
high polish blade and guard 
| powerful air-cooled motor 
super safety guard 
tip-proof base with feet 
} 8” fan blade size 
listed by “Underwriters” 


Guaranteed 


Take your pick... all new 
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under service guarantee 


policy! | 
SPECIAL OF THE WEEK| 


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hair dryer and fan 
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ON ALL CLASSICAL RECORDS 
AND ALBUMS 


Mums the Word Pe 
for Cs 


Sum mer 1. ps a | 630 Fifth Avenue, N.Y. 20.N.Y 

‘ 

| 7 | Name 

Xe . 

q [ Mm o at ees 
: , , e 


- D> be nian " 2 
penenntil CREA EDO |S Coa aren TST aoe 


Dont take chances — 
Get Mum today! 


Safer for Charm... , 
Safer for Skin... 92>. 
Safer for Clothes. o oma al 


aS 
a Y 


Kitchen, bedroom, study, office, living room, window, > 
trailer or cabin. . 3 
S00 fer yourself how surely today 5 Mum stops eaderaren | 


perspiration odor Mail coupon for generous sample En- 
close }¢ amp to Covet postagr Ofer expore Dae 31, 1949) 


8i0 7th ST. H.W. 
Open Thurs. til 7 P. M. 


Shop Murphy's Washington Stores, Thurs 9 A.M. till 8130 P.M, 


1414 14th St. N.W.} 
HObart 1414 


= --— on eamae-—---- 


THE WASHINGTON POST ) oP ae 
REX MORGAN, M. D. | Ee tag tril Spb ane Washington Merry-Go-Round 


tai x on . + 
NICE WORK, DOC! WE'LL ) NO’ I THNKT'D BETTER | JUNE, CALL OR. REYNOLDS / : | d Ao , - H - 
ce WOR, GOe, wes Yo" we Fo perree] [ 7 JUNE, ca Og RENO Wolcott Turned Against ousing 
SA FRIGHTENED ENOUGH / “7 ANEW PATIENT! By Drew Morse . issued his warning Navy dispose of p: 
: y Drew Pearson avy dis} 


yperty without 
rivately after rowing with Tydings 


any public report. Morse objected 
ey) | } eal, . y ™ 
uBlicly over whether the Navy on the ground that Congress 


cnecas an 


Representative Jesse Wolcot 
of Michigan, who leads the Hous jould report to Congress its dis- 
j. 
fight against .the public housin osal of surplus property This is mi Rut ymmittee 
| Dill, would like to forget all abou‘ sow required by law, but Tydings T 
iit, but he once... wants to repeal the law and Iet the speriokt. 1949 ote, Pee 
wey oh . 3 . ‘os , . 
Stronslyu = = a eat . 
espoused what ie - | 
he now op- SS , 
ve * , 3 . f For Lumber Call Our Number ATlantic 14100 
Back in Au-3 . 


| | | gust, 1937 Wol-# = ae . 
: / . ~ Beapy f j j cott was ani 3 — Pes ech ger C0 
oe a ‘ ~~ f A . : outsp o k- . 
Bh. 207" | ee x eee en champion of it (ia a RD, 
Y AND THE PIRATES _ soe eae the Wagner- iq 
| } 


should not 


bi Me a. Pr Z Zs ime. 


MASTER, ONE LARGE A BIG BA ox. pay 7. Stegall Ho ae Open 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. Including Sat. 

CHIN ACTING Lit ! ACTING } also provided Pearson - 

Facpenion of lout CHINESE. Shed 3 . for slum -clearance and low-cost IT’S TIME TO USE 
! AND T HAVE . /) public housing—the same pro- 


a 
gram which the Michigan Re- 
BUSINESS ip”, 4 publican now calls “socialistic.” rieLf= ag er 
ae oe nr h > Ma?” ep) : ' fh ~— | Lifting Little Iron Curtain 
ca NNN , . » BA ~—, + 
<Seee id ' : _ f Debated backstage during the WRINGS WATER FROM THE AIR 
4 , — “ ~. closing davs of the Paris confer- 
Ae oe » 
. ence was a point which may revo- 
lutionize U. S. policy toward Iron The : Proven Home De- 
Curtain countries. It was: Should humidifier for the Control 


the U. S. create a “Little Marshall of Mold, Mildew and Rust 
Plan” for the satellite countries” 


Two schools of thought exist 


among American diplomats. ewer CLOSET SIZE 


' aA! mer’, agree that Europe badly needs 


" | | — i —_ bLast-West trade and that the Ger- 
“THATS HOW WE KNOW,) IN LINCOLN YOU MUST BE READING} JUST A GUESS--WEVE | | L:KNOW THAT TOWN/--- GO ON,MR.ROPER/ man Ruhr must have markets inf 3 coeur size 
MR, BALUGHMAN/--THE | CITY, MR. ROPER? | ITHE ANSWERS IN THE /SUSPECTED FOR SOME | |COVERED A GANG WAR THERE) THIS 1S VERY A Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and no 


BACK OF THE BOOK/,“ TIME THAT LINCOLN __| |~BACK IN THE DAYS WHEN I gc Theo pethyynesince tg oP 
NLY HAVE BOUGHT THAT, — of CITY WAS PLAYING HOST] [WAS STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Fclece esihemsie td te uae trent. Dina 

RAZOR BLADE IN-- gm 3 f TO THE BUSIEST RING OF 1 |FORA NEWS SERVICE/ PI | : mn] BASEMENT SIZE .. 
—— ’ BOGUS MONEY BOYS IN | [>>— — . 

Y, . AMERICA ! 

‘ 


ad 


Curtain country. Such aid, it is 
argued, is only an indirect way of 
helping Russia 

The other school argues that aid 
to Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hun- 
gary, etc.. would win over the 
people of these countries—already 
resentful. of Soviet rule This 
group is prepared to take the cal- 
culated risk of helping Russia in 
9 el .order to persuade the satellites to 
Seer oe .— 2 a , fsa ET . lin SAUNDERS break away from Russia. 

abi 2 LAA 7 Sf a y Bi ate, ays ee. . 


t COGN However, it was economic un-}| CQOME—WRITE—PHONE ATilantic 1400 


2: , s : rest inside Yugoslavia that helped 
Lam — 4 > > ev rage Abad or up — “8 COMPLETE HOUSE REPAIR NEEDS 

seteneemen ' | Curtain, erefore the No 
P : 7 | : 1e \ ‘ay \}/ | school argues that our best policy OGSEAeS | RE ee seek ae ee, alin Cee tow 
1 THINK T REMEMBER | | PAP e— GOUT HOPE Y WE GHOTAT Yi [itor tine aatellites stew in their] (dvihadiadbethe, stitulahy Be. LUbcot ope ba. "at Silos tea 
TH’ DIRECTION To ) ‘A BACK WAY ) N GUN 4/ LOOKING p—A J} own economic juice until thes , 
% HIS CAMP ae HIS OLD TO 


yj AROUND / OH— really realize how tough life be-| — — 
, | SA) CLOTHES ON THAT . q OEA 
\ ia 


ere Oye 
ret. O@e 


= 
* 


— 
ok te 


BRAND-NEW “CLARKE” 


Floor Machines for Rent — 
SANDERS © EDGERS © POLISHERS 


1eee 


TM. Ree 


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sib bh be bh ee ee SS SS 
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— 


ek Oe BD BE MH HE 


A» se DDD DADA 


fe « er 
P aintais Ca 


= 


Ae, 


4) 


hind the Iron Curtain is 

P ‘_POACHER— Pipe . | (Note—Despite Foreign Minister 
i ) | 'Vishinsky’s smiles at Paris, Russia 
fh : _ still has 172 fully trained divisions 

| of the Red Army, plus 180 reserve 


| divisions which can be mobilized in RRM eetinse Highly 


—_ = 


| 60 days.) 


Perle’« Parties 


| Mrs. Perle Mesta. former Repub- } L | i), specialized 


lican oil heiress from Oklahoma. 


> < + ’ 
‘whose loyalty to Harry Truman * 4 Furriers 


; ry 
SR ee ee ee 
me # 


ae 
/ ——™~ 


2... 


| has made her Minister to Luxem- 
bourg.: threw a party for Defense 


Secretary Louis E. Johnson the oe t | ee Methods at 


other day. But the guest list looked 


: | | as if Mrs. Mesta was specializing ie ‘on . Reasonable 
tS GOING TO EY Ba | 


ion Pan American Airways. 


CIVE ME MY nt 


It included Sam Pryor, Repub- 


ALLOWANCE / : | ‘lican national committeeman from 


|| aS ASS: : Summer Rate 
' |Connecticut and vice president of ae Be 


|Pan American: Ben Sonnenberg. 
|astute public relations counsel for 
Pan Am, and Senator Brewster of 
Maine, considered Pan Am’s best 
|senatorial friend. Louis Johnson. 
‘himself, of course, used to be 
counsel for Pan American, which 
has received more favors from 
Uncle Sam than any other airline 
'in history. 

| Note: Mrs. Mesta is now reading 
books on the steel industry. for 
Luxembourg, her new post. is the 


center of the European steel car- 
tel, 


Merry-Go-Round 


Most of the Pennsylvania Demo- 
crats in Congress are planning to 
descend on Defense Secretary 
Johnson to demand the ousting of 
Paul Griffith, former commander 
of the American Legion: from the 
Defense Department. Those who 
know Griffith and his chair-warm- 
ing activities, agree with the Con- 
gressmen , . Some wives of the 
generals and admirals who make 
up the Joint Chiefs of Staff refer 
to their husbands as the “stiff 
joints.” . . . Rootin’-tootin’ Rep- 
resentative John Rankin of Mis- 
; | sissippi has really dug into the his- 
ss tory of books to sound the alarm 

about spies. Warning Congress 

att ae | ' ‘ ya ‘4, | about communism, Rankin recalled 


a | * that Benjamin Franklin's secre- 
dui = ie! wAHo | ——=._ | tary, a subversive named Ban- 
once iT'S 18 Tygeh gle ~ ! i “BY, MACK!I‘M |] | croft, had slipped Government se- 
HAUNTED WSN GHOSTS! Zar | . CONVINCED! 


_erets to the British during the Rev- 
~*~ ve sions 
ona a ee 


WTITTTITT Tree ee beatae 


atte Bn 


olutionary War... Jack McCloy. 
now United States governor of 
Germany, was picked up and vir- 
tually appointed by Secretary of 
State Acheson, They will work) 
well together : Gen. Harry} 
Vaughan, the President's military) 
aide, is now sniping at Defense) 
Secretary Johnson, 


He Who Laughs Last 


Oregon's wrathy Republican 
Wayne Morse has servéd notice 
that he will block every bill Chair- 
man Millard Tydings of Maryland) 
-——“itries to steamroller through the 
‘Senate Armed Services Committee. 


ee - — ee oe ——— ror 


City Tire & Seat Cover Co. 


pa 


~~ 


Only at Latt’s—Nowhere Else! 


| 2 % é ‘e 2 Sa | 

| “What are you so excited about? | TH 

: s 4 : . 
SS 


They're nothing but pearls!” | 


(AA 


' 


No two ties alike. Rare and DUVAL ORIGINALS 
beautiful colors hand paint- 


ed on pure silk cravats, all $5 


| bar tacked and silk lined. | 
GES BEAUTIFULLY | For 1931-1948 cars The most unusual value we 
Lely | — \4 CLEANED and As low as $5.95 hove ever offered. Originally $15.00 to $25.00 - 


ee CITY TIRE & 
|| Modern Rug Plant || SEAT COVER CO. 

Cer. (4th ts. . ; 

(urtis Brothers : lil: BAR 


| | moves 6 mn 910 14th Street N.W. 
a: eh. SO AMPLE FREE PARKING {. 


——_ * ¥ —_ a 

Beaks Res 

EMRE 
ry Soe 


ee 


oC THE WASHINGTON POST 
7 ] Friday, June 24, 1949 


THE HECHT CO. SILVER SPRING OPEN TODAY 12:36 TO 9:30 P. M.: WASHINGTON STORE HOURS, 9:30 A. M. TO 6 P. M. 


No matter what your height, you'll find perfect fit in 


fea mprufe oProportioned 


lacy slips... at a low, low price. 


3.95 


Less than four dollars for a slip that fits you as if custom-made! A slip that’s propor- 
tioned in three height sizes! Best of all—this is no plain looking, ordinary proportioned 
slip, this is a Seamprufe Slip and it’s lavished with lace, front, back, and at hemline! Tiny 
embroidered scallops outline the lace at the bodice—and you = what an expensive-look- 


ing detail that is! Cool, cool Bur-Mil* quality multifilament rayon crepe in summer white. 


Short sizes 31 to 43, average sizes 32 to 44, tall sizes 32 to 44—and only 3.95. 


"Res. U. S. Pat. Off. 


Lingerie, Third Floor, Washington; Second Floor, Silver Spring 


Tall Average Short 
sizes 32 sizes 32 sizes 3] 
to 44 to 44 


fale, 329 and +4 i, Cool! Cool! 5-yd. Skirt! 
Glamorous Strapless Bras... 


Perfect for your strapless sundresses! Ideal for your sheer dance dresses! Designed for your off-the-shoulder blouses! These Cool air-conditioning for humid Washington nights! Airy cotton batiste 
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Bras, Third Floor, Washington, Second Floor, Silver Spring Lingerie, Third Floor, Washington, Second Floor, Silver Spring 


. 


HE Hecnur Co. - OL.0¢ Cool... Cee. 
| WASHINGTON AND SILVER SPRING © 


| 


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